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Full text of "Annual report"

EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 

OF THE 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



1936 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1937 



LZO\'S 






THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRIHTIN8 DEPARTMENT. 
10,15.37: 2S00 



TRUSTEES OE THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN, President 

Term expires April 30, 1939 

ELLERY SEDGWICK 

Term expires April 30, 1938 

FRANK W. BUXTON 

Term expires April 30, 1940 

JOHN L. HALL ROBERT H. LORD 

Term expires April 30, 1941 Term expires April 30, 1937 



MILTON E. LORD 

Director, and Librarian 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

TTie Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, organized in 1852, are 
now incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 114 of the Acts of 1878, as 
amended. TTie Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; that for 1853 made 
the first annual report. The Board at present consists of five citizens at large, ap- 
pointed by the Mayor for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each year. 
The following citizens at large have been members of the Board since its organization 
in 1852: 

Abbott, Gordon, A.B., 1926-1931. Hall, John Loomer, A.B., LL.B., 1931- 

Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, A.M., Haynes, Henry Williamson, A.M., 

1879-95. 1880-94. 

Appleton, Thomas Gold, A.M., 1852-56. Hilliard, George Stillman, LL.D., 
Benton, Josiah Henry, LL.D., 1894-1917. 1872-75; 1876-77. 

Bigelow, John Prescott, A.M., 1852-68. Kenney, William Francis, A.M., 
Bowdifch, Henry Inger8oIl,M.D.. 1865-67. 1908-1921. 

Bowditch, Henry Pickering, MJ)., Kirstein, Louis Edward, A.M., 1919- 

1894-1902. Lewis. Weston. 1868-79. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. Lewis, Winslow, M.D., 1867. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight. 1869-72. Lincoln, Solomon, a.m., 1897-1907. 

Brett, John Andrew.^L.B., 1912-16. Mann. Alexander, DJ).. 1908-1923. 

Buxton. Frank W.. A.B.. 1928- Morton. Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Carr. Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. Murray Michael Joseph, LL.B., 1921-26. 

Chase, George Bigelow, A.M., 1876-85. O'Connell, William Cardinal, 1932-36. 

Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1879-88. Pierce, Phineas, 188&-94. 

Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. Prince, Frederick Octavius, A.M., 1888-99. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. Putnam, George, D.D., 1868-77. 

Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1922-1930. Richards, William Reuben, a.m., 1889-95. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, A.M., 1873-75. Sedgwick, Ellery, a.b., litt.d., 1930- 

De Normandie, James, D.D., 1895-1908. Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstrcet, LL.D., 
Dwight, Thomas. M.D., 1899-1908. 1852-68 

Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, B.S., 1927-28. Thomas, .Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., 
Everett, Edward, LL.D.. 1852-64. 1877-78. 

Frothingham, Richard. LL.D.. 1875-79. Ticknor, George, LL.D., 1852-66. 

Gaston. William Alexander, LL.B., Walker, Francis Amasa. LL.D., 1896. 

1923-27. Whipple, Edwin Percy, A.M., 1868-70. 

Green Samuel Abbott, M.D., 1868-78. Whitmore, William Henry, A.M., 1885-88. 
Greenough. WilUam Whitwell, 1856-88. Winsor. Justin, LL.D., 1867-63. 

The Hon. Edward Everett was President of the Board from 1852 to 1864; 
George Ticknor, in 1865; William W. Greenough, from 1866 to April, 1888; 
Prof Henry W. Haynes, from May 7, 1888 to May 12. 1888; Samuel A. B. Ab- 
bott. May 12, 1888 to April 30. 1895; Hon. F. O. Prince, October 8, 1895 to May 
8, 1899; Solomon Lincoln, May 12, 1899 to October 15, 1907; Rev. James De 
Normandie, January 31, 1908 to May 8, 1908; Josiah H. Benton, May 8, 1908 to 
February 6, 1917; William F. Kenney, February 13, 1917 to May 7. 1920; Rev. 
Alexander Mann, May 7, 1920 to January 22, 1923; Msgr. Arthur T. Connolly. 
April 13 1923 io June 13. 1924; Louis E. Kirstein. June 13, 1924 to June 19, 1925; 
Hon. Michael J. Murray. June 19, 1925 to July 2, 1926; Guy W. Currier. July 2. 
1926 to May 2, 1927; Msgr. Arthur T. Connolly, May 2, 1927 to June 22, 1928; 
Louis E. Kirstein, June 22, 1928 to June 21. 1929; Gordon Abbott. June 21, 1929 
to June 20, 1930; Frank W. Buxton, June 20. 1930 to May 15. 1931; Louis E. 
Kirstein May 15, 1931 to May 20, 1932; Ellery Sedgwick, May 20, 1932 to May 
5 1933- John L Hall, May 5, 1933 to May 18, 1934; William Cardinal O'Connell 
May. 18, 1934 to May 6, 1935; Frank W. Buxton, May 6. 1935 to May 6, 1936; 
Louis E. Kirstein since May 6, 1936. 



LIBRARIANS. 

(From I85S to 1877, the chief executive officer v/as called Superintendent; from 
!877 to 1923 Librarian; from 1923 to 1934 Director; since 1934 Director 
and Librarian.) 
Capen, Edv/ard, Librarian, May 13, 1 852-December 16, 1874. 
Jewett, Charles C, Superinlendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 

WlN'.SOR, Justin, LL.D., Superintendent, February 25, 1868-September 30, 1877. 
Green, .Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877-September 

30. 1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellcn, LL.D., Librarian, October I, 1 878-September 30, 1890. 
DwicHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892- April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 11, 1895-April 3, 1899. 
Whitney, J.\MES L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31 1899-December 21 1899; 

Librarian, December 22, 1899-January 31, 1903. 
Wadlin, Hor,\CE G., LiTT.D., Librarian, February 1, 1903-March 15, 1917; Acting 

Librarian, March 15, 1917-June 15, 1917. 
Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., LL.b., litt.D., Director, March 15, 1917-October 

24, 1931. 
Lord, Milton E., A.B., D'reclor and Librarian, since February 1, 1932. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1936 



Ik St. 



tfOPENED. 

May 2. 1854 
28. 1871 

1. 1872 
16. 1873 

5. 1874 

5. 1874 
25. 

7. 



Departments. 
''Central Libreury, Copley Square . 
*East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. 
§Soufh Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
llFeliowes Athenaum Bremch, 46 Millmont St. 
*Charlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
'Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road , 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adam* St. 
fLower Mills Branch, 1110 Washington, cor. Richmond St 
JSouth End Branch, 65 West Brookline St 
tjamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St 
IRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch. 1961 Centre St. 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
*North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
IjlCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Nor 
|Ml. Pleasant Branch, 335 Dudley, cor Vine St. 
:j:Tyler Street Branch, 130 Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
*West End Branch. 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Comer Branch. 500 Columbia Rd. 
^Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts. 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch. 208 Ruggles. cor Tremont St. 

*Boylston Branch, 433 Centre St 

§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler Ave. 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg.. Broadway . 
*Parker Hill Branch, 1497 Tremont St. . . . 

*Hyde Park Branch, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 

*Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St 

§ Andrew Square Branch. 394 Dorchester St. 

»Jeffrie« Point Branch. 222 Webster St. . . . 

• Baker Library. Heirvzwd Graduate School of Business Administration Jan. 
*Kirstein Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. . . May 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 
Kirstein Branch, third floor. 
§Phillips Broob Branch. 12 Hamilton St.. Readville . . . May 18. 1931 

^In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that nov/ occupied. *In building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board, fin building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses. Jin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §Occupie« 
rented rooms. ||The lessee of the Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 

• Under agreement with Harvard. 



Jan. 

May 

July 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

Aug.. 

June. 

Dec. 3 

Jan. 6 

Dec. 27 

Oct., 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

May 

Jan. 

Nov. 

June 

July 

July 

Jan. 

Mar 

Mar 

Oct. 



1875 
1875 
1877 
1876 
1878 
1880 
1881 
1862 
1883 
1886 
1889 
1890 
1890 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 



18 1897 



1897 
1901 
1906 
1907 
1912 
1914 
1914 
1921 
1927 
1930 



CONTENTS 



Report of the Trustees 

Balance Sheet .... 

Report of the EuXamining Committee 

Report of the Director 

Appendix ..... 



1 

8 
14 
23 
37 



To His Honor Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Ma^or of the Cii^ of Boston. 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the PubHc Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31,1 936, being the eighty-Rf th annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 6, 
1 936 with the election of Mr. Louis E. Kirstein as President, 
Mr. Ellery Sedgwick as Vice President, and Miss Elizabeth B. 
Brockunier as Clerk. 

Mr. John L. Hall, whose term as Trustee expired on April 
30, was re-appointed for the term ending April 30, 1941 . 

On May 15 His Eminence William Cardinal O'Connell re- 
signed as Trustee because of the pressure of other duties. The 
following minute upon his service as a Trustee of the Library 
was adopted by the Trustees and ordered spread upon their 
records. 

As a Trustee of this Board from November 8, 1 932 to May 15,1 936 
His Eminence William Cardinal O'Connell served his city unselfishly 
and well, dignified municipal administration, and set an example for 
other distinguished citizens. The Library and the community are per- 
manent beneficiaries of his efforts. He gave the most conscientious care 
to all the tasks of the office, and his decisions were invariably sound. 
Especially as President and Vice President for two years he exercised 
those qualties of mind and heart which have characterized his career as a 
Churchman. In those informal meetings which preceded and followed 
the formal sessions during his tenure, he was a delightful companion. 

The Board of Trustees and the individual members wish to express 
hereby, on the eve of his seventy-seventh birthday, their deep respect for 
him, their appreciation of his services, and their abiding affection. 

The Reverend Robert H. Lord was appointed to serve for 
the remainder of His Eminence's term as a Trustee, ending on 
April 30, 1937. 



2] 



BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted on November 1 , 1 935 for the main- 
tenance of the Library during the year 1 936 were later amended 
and reduced. These estimates were as follows: 



Item 
A. — Personal service 
B. — Service other than personal 
C. — Equipment . 
D. — Supplies 
E. — Materials 
F. — Special items 
H. — Emergency relief projects 
Total 



Estimated 

$940,039.28 

88,502.00 

177,456.00 

36,090.00 

27,135.00 

360.00 

269,156.42 

$1,538,738.70 



Allowed 

$921,000.00 

70.954.00 

62,883.00 

34,840.00 

19,285.00 

32.00 

88,872.00 

$1,197,866.00 



RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 



The receipts which ma}'^ be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and invested by the City Treasurer. 
During the year 1 936 these receipts were : 



Annual appropriation ....... 

Income from trust funds ....... 

Unexpended balance of trust funds income of previous years 
Unexpended balance of special appropriations of previous years 
Unexpended balance of deposits in London of previous years 

Total 



$1,197,866.00 

25,730.57 

72,637.58 

33,003.06 

. 67433 

$l,329,9n.54 



Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the year were 
as follows: 



From fines ..... 
From sales of waste paper . 
From sales of catalogs, etc. . 
From commission on telephone stations 
From payments for lost books . 
Refunds, fees, etc. .... 



Total 



$23,594.27 

73.60 

206.77 

494.68 

1,036.16 

189.17 

$25,594.65 



EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 



The total amount expended during 1936 was $1 ,249,953.92. 
This was divided as follows: 

From city appropriation ......... $1,181,497.37 



From deposits in London . 
From special appropriations 
From the income of trust funds 



601.09 
9,594.74 
58.260.72 



[3] 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 54,620, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part by 
gift and exchange. The total number of volumes in the Library 
at the close of the year was 1 ,693,335. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and from the trust funds income was $111 ,945.72. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The home use of books for the year was 4,806,737. The use 
of library material within the Library's premises for reference 
and study is for the most part unrestricted, and it is therefore im- 
practicable to record it. 

In addition to the above noted use of the Central Library and 
the thirty-four Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 
available to 231 agencies, including engine houses, institutions, 
and schools. 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 1935 AND 1936 

A comparison of certain statistics for 1 936 with those for 1 935 

is noted below : 

1935 1936 

Total expenditures: city appropriation 

and trust funds income . . $1,189,553.34 . . . $1,249,953.92 
Expended for books and other library 

material from city appropriation 

and trust funds income . . 123.023.62 . . . 119.945.72 

Number of volumes added . . 74,623 . . . 54.620 

Total number of volumes in the Library 1 .682,848 ... 1 ,693.335 

Borrowed for home use . . . 4,947.701 . . . 4.806.737 

Number of card holders . . . 179,064 . . . 176,982 

BOOKS 

The effects of the economic depression have been more di- 
rectly noticeable in the appropriations for the purchase of books 
than in any other single item of the Library's budget. The 
amounts appropriated for this purpose during the last ten years 
are given below for comparative purposes: 

1927 $125,000 

1928 125,000 

1929 140.000 

1930 160.000 

1931 175,000 



[4] 

1932 160,000 

1933 75.000 

1934 100.000 

1935 100,000 

1936 55,000 

The trend of the last four years has been markedly accentu- 
ated in 1936 by the smallest appropriation over a long period of 
years considerably antedating the decade noted above. 

With minor exceptions the funds appropriated by the City for 
the purchase of books are not used for meeting the book needs 
of the Central Library ; the income from trust funds given for the 
purpose cares for these. Instead the city appropriation is de- 
voted almost exclusively to the purchase of books for the branch 
libraries, for the use of the citizens of Boston in their respective 
sections of the city. It is therefore upon the direct popular pub- 
lic service of the Library in its branch libraries that heavy re- 
ductions in book funds fall. 

So limited an appropriation as that of $55,000 for 1936 has 
meant that during the year the branch libraries have not been 
able to buy even enough books to replace those which were being 
worn out. In other words their book collections fell behind in 
this one year by a total of 9,091 volumes, just as in 1935 they 
fell behind by 5,335 volumes; whereas before the depression 
there was every year an average annual gain of some 20,000 
volumes. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

In the Central Library the end of the year 1936 found the 
crov/ding of the building appreciably greater than a year earlier. 
Shelving space had had to be found in the course of the year for 
a growth in the book collections of some 20,000 volumes, most 
of which were purchased from the income of trust funds. These 
volumes placed side by side required an additional half mile of 
shelving space. They represented only the ordinary annual 
growth of the book collections of the Central Library. 

It is increasingly clear that the Central Library building is be- 
coming filled to capacity, particularly in the book stack. Con- 
tinued study of the situation during the past year has revealed 



[5] 

that immediate relief is only to be obtained through a reallocation 
of departmental space. This cannot be effected, however, un- 
less some units now housed in the building are moved to quarters 
outside. In the budget estimates for 1937 there has therefore 
been included a sm.all item to provide for the rental of outside 
quarters for certain library activities whose nature is such that 
they can be carried on elsewhere without undue detriment to the 
service of the Library. 

Relief from overcrowding is a first requirement for the effect- 
ing of many needed improvements in the facilities of the public 
departments and in the working conditions and quarters of the 
library staff. Both are of prime importance to the services ren- 
dered by the Library to its readers. 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF PROJECTS CARRIED ON 
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE LIBRARY 

Under the auspices of the Federal Works Progress Adminis- 
tration there was continued during the year the long range pro- 
gram of activities preparatory to effecting a reclassification of the 
scholarly book collections of the Central Library on a modern 
classification scheme such as that of the Library of Congress. 
There was also continued the project for the cleaning of books 
throughout the entire library system. 

Several hundred individuals have been employed, their wages 
being provided by the Federal Government, and special provision 
for incidental expenses being made by the City. 

GIFTS 

The Library received many important gifts of books and 
other library material during the year. A list of the principal 
gifts is to be found in the Appendix on pages 45—47. 

TRUST FUNDS 

The following payments for the trust funds of the Library 
were received during the year: 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund — Bequest of Francis A. Morse, of 
West Roxbury, of $1000, of which the interest only is to be ex- 



[6] 

pended annually for the purchase of books for the West Roxbury 
Branch Library suitable for children of school age; 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund — Bequest of Heloise E. Hersey, of Bos- 
ton, in the amount of $3542, of which the interest is to be expended 
for the purchase of books, preferably those of recent issue that have 
real literary value; 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest under the will of Ella F. Wad- 
lin, in the amount of $1725.84, to be added to the Horace G. 
Wadlin Fund, and the income used for the purchase of books. 

In addition to the above there were received during the year 
first and second payments in part satisfaction of the interests of the 
Trustees of the Public Library under the v^ill of Josiah H. Ben- 
ton. It is expected that the final settlement of the estate can be 
made in the course of the coming year, and that thereafter there 
can be made available for use the income of the Benton Build- 
ing Fund and of the Benton Book Fund. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money and hope that gener- 
ous testators may remember the Library. It is from such sources 
only that they can make purchases of rare and other important 
books that give value and prestige to a great educational insti- 
tution such as the Library has become. 

As a matter of interest to the public the Board has pleasure in 
listing the present trust funds of the Library, with explanatory 
notes. The list will be found on pages 47-58. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE 
The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the assistance given by 

the Examining Committee for 1936. Its membership included 

the following individuals: 

Mr. Philip R. Allen Mr. Charles D. Maginnis 

Mr- George Bramwell Baker Mrs. Bertha Mahony Miller 

Mr. Walter B. Briggs Mr. George R. Nutter 

Mr. Patrick T. Campbell Mrs. Elizabeth W. Perkins 

Mrs. William H. Dewart Hon. John F. Perkins 

Mr. Carl Dreyfus Mrs. Edward M. Pickman 

Mr. George Harold Edgell Hon. Abraham E. Pinanski 

Dr. Albert Ehrenfried Mr. Philip H. Rhinelander 

Miss Susan J. Ginn Mr. Charles M. Rogerson 

Mr. Chester Noyes Greenough Mr. Harlow Shapley 

Mr. M. A. De Wolfe Howe Mrs. Arthur A. Shurcliff 

Dr. Henry Jackson Mrs. Francis E. Slattery 

Mr. Herbert F. Jenkins Mr. Charles H. Taylor 

Mr. Henry Lewis Johnson Dr. Henry R. Viets 

Mrs. Frederick Winslow 



[7] 

It is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens who render such service. Special attention is called to 
the constructive report of the Committee as it appears on pages 
14-22 immediately following. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the report of the Director of the Li- 
brary as found on pages 23-36 below. It presents the important 
needs and developments of the Library during the past year. 

The Trustees wish to express here their appreciation of the 
efforts of the library staff throughout the year to meet the needs 
of the public. 

Frank W. Buxton 
John L. Hall 
Louis E. Kirstein 
Robert H. Lord 
Ellery Sedgwick 



8] 



BALANCE SHEET, RECEIPTS AND 
Dr. 

Central Library and Br.\nches: 
To Expenditures For: 

Permanent and probationary employees (ex- 
clusive of Printing and Binding Department 

employees) $759,368.82 

Sunday and evening, extra and temporary em- 
ployees 96,831.73 



To Service Other Than Personal 
Printing and binding 
Advertising 

Transportation of persons 
Cartage and freight 
Light and power 
Rent, taxes and wafer 
Surety, bond and insurance 
Communication 
Cleaning 

Removal of ashes 
Medical 

Expert ..... 
Stenographic, copying and ind 
Fees ..... 

Photographic and blueprinting 
General plant 
Miscellaneous services 



$856,200.55 



25.80 

20.50 

1,823.38 

6,965.36 

18,482.58 

18,286.50 

377.73 

4,207.34 

1,334.24 

13.90 

29.00 

607.42 

945.83 

7.20 

167.05 

13,832.02 

46.80 



67,172.65 



To Expenditures for Equipment: 




-Machinery 




186.61 


Electrical 


. 


1,008.68 


Motoriess vehicles . 




85.00 


Furniture and fittings 




2,170.84 


Office .... 


• 


3,957,31 


Books: 






City appropriation 


$49,510.38 




Trust funds income 


45,791.16 


95,301.54 


Newspapers : 






City appropriation 


972.58 




7 rust funds income 


1,927.66 


2.900.24 


Music: 






City appropriation 


20.94 




Trust funds income 


1,691.34 


1. 71228 


Lantern slides: 






City appropriation 




13.50 


Periodicals: 






City appropriation 


4,518.36 




Trust funds income 


7,431.05 


11,949.41 


Photographs: 






Trust funds income 




68.75 


Tools and instruments 




1,024.32 


Wearing apparel 


• 


15.25 


General plant 




159.29 120.553.02 


Canted forward 


. 


$1,043.92622 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER, 31, 1936 

Cr. 

By City AppROPRiATiON 1936 . . . . $1,197,866.00 
By Income From Trust Funds .... 25,030.57 
By Income From James L. "Whitney Biblio- 
graphic Account 700.00 $1,223,596.57 



Carried forivarJ ...... $1,223,596.57 



[10] 
BALANCE SHEET. RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought foTioard . $1,043,926.22 

To Expenditures for Supplies: 

Office $8,600.87 

Food 20.68 

Fuel 19,584.20 

Forage and animal ....... 4.40 

Medical . 46.98 

Laundry, cleaning, toilet ...... 2,345.75 

Educational and recreational . . . . 5.60 

Agricultural ........ 212.25 

Chemicals and disinfectants ..... 72.05 

General plant 2,956.59 

33,849.37 

To Expenditures for Material: 

Building 3,964.36 

Electrical 2,917.10 

General plant 2,327.51 9.208.97 

To W. p. A. Library project .... 64,840.23 

To Special Items: 

Pension 32.00 

J. L. Whitney Bibliographic account . . . 688.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund, for cataloging . . . 586.07 

A. L. V/hitney Fund, for sick benefits . . . 642.00 1,948.07 

To Binding Department: 

Salaries 60,158.73 

Transportation of persons ..... .10 

Gas 75.96 

Repairs 217.14 

Equipment ........ 38.43 

Supplies ......... 6.50 

Machinery material ...... 3.62 

Electrical material ....... 1 .72 

Stock 6,921.62 

Outside work 7.60 67,431.42 

To Printing Department: 

Salaries 14,428.76 

Gas 50.64 

Communication ....... 1 .23 

Repairs 618.34 

Equipment ........ 526.53 

Supplies 39.34 

Stock 3,421.09 

Outside work ........ 13.25 

Miscellaneous services ...... 26.54 

Machinery material 29.18 19.154.90 

To Special Appropriation: 

Fiveprooflng, improvements, etc. .... 5,555.96 

Branch Libraries, establishment of . . . 1 ,597.40 
Central Library Building, foundation im- 
provements, etc. ...... 2,441.38 

Judaica Bookshelf 6.83 9,601.57 

Carried lor^ard $1,249,960.75 



[Ml 



EXPENSES, DECEMBER, 31. 1936 



Cr. 



Brought forward ^ . $1,223,596.57 

By Balances Brought Forward From 1935: 

Trust funds income, City Treasury .... $70,088.85 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . . . 565.61 

City appropriation on deposit m London ... 1 08.72 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . . . 2,548.73 

Central Library Building, Fireproofing, Im- 
provements, etc. . . . . . . 11 ,657.40 

Central Library Building, Foundations, Im- 
provements, etc. 19,747.96 

Branch Libraries, Establishment of . . . . 1,597.70 

H. C. Bentley Gift 220.38 

Judaica Bookshelf 166.00 106,701.35 

\ 



Carried forxoard 



$1,330,297.92 



2] 



BALANCE SHEET. RECEIPTS AND 



Dr. 



Brought forward 
To Amount Paid Into City Treasury: 

Fines ..... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins . 

Commission on telephone stations 

Payments for lost books 

Refunds, fees, etc. 

Sales of waste paper 
To Balance, December 31, 1936: 

Trust funds Income on deposit in London 

City appropriation on deposit in London 

Trust Funds Income, City Treasury 

James L. Whitney Biblioraphic account 

H. C. Bentley Gift 

Judaica Bookshelf ...... 

To Balance Unexpended, December 31, 1936: 

General appropriation ..... 

Central Library Building, Fireproofing . 



$23,594.27 

206.77 

494.68 

1,036.16 

189.17 

73.60 

.30 

72.94 

37,546.70 

2.560.73 

220.38 

159.17 

16,368.63 
23,408.32 



$1,249,960.75 

25,594.65 

40,560.22 
39,776.95 



$1,355,892.57 



[13] 
EXPENSES, DECEMBER, 31, 1936 



Cr. 



Brought forward 
By Receipts: 

Fines ..... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books 
Refunds, fees, etc. . 
Sales of waste paper 



$1,330,297.92 



^23,594.27 

206.77 

494.68 

1,036.16 

189.17 

73.60 



25,594.65 



1,355.892.57 



[14] 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: — 

The Examining Committee for the year 1936 respectfully 
submits this report 

The Committee met for organization in June. At that meet- 
ing the work of the Committee was planned and outlined and 
immediately thereafter the Sub-Committees were appointed. The 
reports of the Sub-Committees were submitted in November. As 
the complete reports of the various Sub-Committees are on file 
with the Library this report will be confined to the matters which 
we believe to be of the most importance. 

The Committee wishes to express its appreciation of the hearty 
co-operation of the Director and the staff of the Library, both 
the Central Library and all of the Branches. If our report seems 
largely suggestion and criticism it is not that we have overlooked 
the excellent work which is being quietly and effectively carried 
on but that our space is limited, 

BOOKS 

The acquisition and possession of books available for use by 
the public is the primary purpose for which the Library is main- 
tained. We are increasingly alarmed by the continued depletion 
of the books of the Library by small appropriations for the pur- 
chase of books and by the continued loss of books by theft. In 
addition to what has been said by the Examining Committees of 
the last few years we feel that it is imperative that we should point 
out the extent of the damage already done and the danger that 
yet more damage will be done unless prompt and effective sup- 
port be given by way of larger appropriations and the checking 
of the drain caused by theft. 

The total appropriation by the City for the Library for 
the year 1936 was $1,197,866, an increase of about $26,000 
over 1935, constituting the largest total since 1931 when the 



[15] 

Library- received $1,262,504. At the same time and notsvith- 
standing the increase in the total appropriation the appropriation 
for the purchase of books has been greatly and dangerously re- 
duced. The $55,000 allowed for that purpose this year is 
slightly more than one-half the $100,000 allowed last year and 
less than one-third of the $175,000 allowed in 1931. From 
1926—1931 the amount allowed for the purchase of books va- 
ried from 13% to 16.7% of the total appropriation. From 
1933-1935 it am.ounted to between 9% and 9.8% of the total. 
In 1936 it was slightly over 5%. 

During this depression there has been no cut in personnel and 
none of the branch libraries has been closed. If the Library's 
mission is to furnish books, and of course we believe it is, it Ccin- 
not be carried out by maintaining library buildings and staffs 
and neglecting to provide books. The money appropriated 
for the purchase of books is not used merely to expand the Li- 
brary. In normal times it is estimated that approximately 60% 
is used merely to replace books that have been worn out or other- 
wise rendered unavailable. The report of the Director for 
1935 points out that although 57,354 books had to be discarded 
from branch libraries it was possible to add only 52,019 to take 
their places, thus falling short 5,335 volumes. Many of the 
other cities, during good times, received very much larger appro- 
priations than did Boston and as a result entered the depression 
in better condition. The decreased appropriation for books 
in 1936 makes it impossible even to replace worn out or dis- 
carded books. This is particularly serious owing to the great 
increase in circulation and use of books during the first years of 
the depression, involving necessarily increased wear and tear 
on the books themselves. It takes no great effort of the imagin- 
ation to see into what a precarious condition ihe Library will 
rapidly fall unless the budget for books is at least doubled and 
so maintained. 

The num.ber of books borrowed for home use although 
greater than prior to the depression has steadily decreased dur- 
ing the last three years. It is generally agreed that one of the 
principal reasons is that the books the borrowers desire are no 



[16] 

longer available. Those books which have worn out through 
use and have not been replaced are the very books most in de- 
mand. The chief brunt of this decrease in books falls upon the 
branch libraries. The income of such trust funds as the Library 
possesses is, with some few exceptions, restricted to special 
types of books, such as scholarly or reference works, or works 
on special topics which are for the most part associated with the 
activities of the Central Library, leaving the branch libraries 
dependent almost wholly on city funds. The branch libraries, 
however, account for by far the greater part of the total circu- 
lation of books, supplying chiefly books of popular and general 
interest and books for use by children in connection with school 
work. It is the general public and the school children who suf- 
fer most from any reduction in the appropriation for books. 

In this connection it is interesting to note that only one branch 
appears to have escaped this great dearth of books, namely 
Charlestown, where three small trust funds for the purchase of 
books have supplied the needed and desired books. Would it 
not be wise to excite more local interest in the local branch li- 
braries? Such an interest working in co-operation with the Li- 
brary should ascertain quickly the local desires and needs, in- 
crease the usefulness and value of the library and perhaps lead 
some public spirited citizens to do for their local branches what 
has been done for Charlestown. 

LOST BOOKS 

It is impossible to separate the problem of lost books from the 
problem of more adequate purchase and replacement of books. 
Annually there are lost from the Library enough books to stock 
a new branch library. The rate of loss is such that for every four 
new books bought one good book is stolen. Through 1 935 this 
rate of loss was increasing. The average loss from the 33 branch 
libraries from 1926-1935 was 1 1,402 books a year. For 1935 
1 2,769 books were lost, 1 ,31 7 more than the average for the 1 
year period. During that period the average loss for the first 5 
years was 10,743 books a year and for the last 5 years 12,162 
books a year. This means that for each library day throughout 
the year for each of the 33 branches 1 1/^ books were lost. 



[17] 

We are glad to note that in 1 936 there have begun to become 
evident the results of the increased efforts on the part of the 
library authorities to curb this great loss. The annual checking 
of losses conducted during the summer of 1936 showed that the 
total figure of missing volumes for 1936 was 1 1 ,199 as compared 
with 12,769 in 1935. This 1936 figure while below the average 
of 1 1,402 for the preceding 10 year period 1926-1935 is yet 
substantially above the figure for the first 5 years of that period. 
We hope that the continuation of these efforts will bring about 
a continued decrease in the rate of loss. 

A high percentage of the books stolen each year were either 
known to be on school reading lists and disappeared when school 
and college pupils needed them, or were juvenile books not like- 
ly to attract adult thieves. This throws suspicion on children. 
Most of the thieves who have been caught were either under 20 
years of age or admitted that they began to steal library books 
before they left school. It is thus clear that the prevention of 
book thievery must begin Vv^ith school pupils. 

A plan has already been formulated for closer co-operation 
with the schools, and for the enlistment of the interest of both 
teachers and pupils in greater care in the circulation of books, 
thus putting the responsibility upon the children themselves. The 
basis of this plan is educational and character building. It should 
be successful. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The extent to v/hich the Library is used is indicated by the 
following figures: The total number of volumes in the Library 
collection is 1,682,000 of which 1,168,000 are in the central 
library and 497,300 are in the 33 branches. The circulation of 
books last year was but little short of 5,000,000, of v/hich 12% 
was circulation from the central library collection, and 88% 
from the collection in the branches. 

We are glad to note that the administrative headquarters 
recommended in previous reports has been set up in the Abbey 
Room, with experienced supervisors always present to advise 
and to deal with difficult reference questions, and to assist ma- 



[»»1 



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OVERCROVDINC OF CENTRAL UBRARY 



The wifcij, of the Ccatral libiaiy baUbg and ibe dtt- 

»ladi aiBc tfaenfraai hsve beat stated aad "■iJ'-*"^**^ 
bgr ne Deectar aad joic E^xaaBBg CoBMHltee is pvevioas 
jcais. Tbe aeed for irallnratioa of die jpace m die Ccatiai 



[191 

Library building in the near future has become imperative, if 
not acute. We invite attention to the valuable suggestions and 
recommendations of previous Committees and the Director, and 
particularly urge upon you the suggestion that space be found 
elsewhere for certain of the Library's activities. 

( 1 ) The Newspaper Room for the daily reading of current news- 
papers is now located on the ground floor immediately next to the 
main entrance. We believe that it could be removed from the Cen- 
tral Library building to some other central location without inter- 
ference or detriment to its own usefulness or the general work of 
the Library. Such a change would release substantial space that 
is urgently required by the Reference Division. 

(2) It is our considered judgment that the Central Department 
for Branch Libraries now located in the Central Library could be 
housed elsewhere without impairing the efficiency of its activities. 
"It is a unit that is for the most part self-sufficient, with its group of 
clearly related activities, and with its large reservoir of books for 
supplementing the collections of individual branch libraries." We, 
therefore, urge its removal from the Central Library building to 
some central location in the City. 

Even a casual examination revealed the particularly unde- 
sirable situation which has developed whereby large areas of 
"the book stack have had to be left open to all who come and 
go." Efficiency of administration dictates that such a situation 
must be corrected as early as possible. 

We can only repeat that which has been said on many prior 
occasions that the toilet facilities, locker space, rest rooms, lunch 
rooms, training course classrooms and the staff library are in- 
adequate and unsatisfactory for the health and comfort of the 
staff. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES 

The problem of the special libraries is tied up definitely with 
the problem of reallocation of space within the Central Library 
building. In comparison with the problem of reorganization sug- 
gested in this report and in the Annual Report of the Director 
for 1 935 the minor suggestions set forth below are of subordinate 
importance. 

(a) Rare Book Department. More space is needed. Special 
collections are crowded together and some have not even been cata- 



[20] 

loged. A number of important books need repair and attention to 
their fine bindings. Where certain items are wanting a list of those 
desired might be published in the Bulletin. Arrangements should 
be made for exhibition of interesting items in places other than the 
Treasure Room, such as in the recesses on either side of the main 
entrance hall, in the Sargent Hail, and possibly in the so-called 
Venetian Alcove on the second floor. This would tend to decrease 
the woeful lack of knowledge of the rarer books in the Library on 
the part of the general public, and might lead to increasing our 
collections. 

(b) Business Branch. This is still overcrowded and needs the 
use of the third floor now used by other departments. 

(c) Fine Arts Department. Unfortunately housed in an un- 
suitable part of the Library, this department has long suffered on 
account of its location. The valuable collection has never been 
adequately used nor can it be so used in its present state. It should 
be separately housed wdth its own exhibition rooms entirely under its 
own control. 

(d) Technology Department. It shares its space with Fine Arts, 
and, likewise, is unfortunately placed. It is very crowded. Its books 
are widely scattered. It should be more closely connected with 
the Patent Department. 

(e) Patent Department. It is too far away from the Technology 
Department, and poorly located. Certain of its books, seldom 
called for, could be redistributed, and Colonial newspapers might 
be sent to Rare Books Vv'here they rightfully belong. 

(/) Statistical Department. This is really a department of docu- 
ments and might be moved and expanded somewhat into a depart- 
ment of documents and social science. It has a very valuable col- 
lection of parliamentary reports, not as widely known as they 
might be. 

(g) Teachers Department. The Adams Collection, having no 
connection with this department, should be removed, and other books 
used by the readers substituted. 

(h) Music Department. Sound proof rooms in which the music 
and phonograph records of this very valuable collection could be 
used should ultimately be provided. 

CATALOGING 

The system of cataloging is eminently satisfactory, and is of 
the greatest assistance to the patrons. There are bound to be 
inevitable lacunae, even in the Utopian Library, but the courte- 



[21] 

ous and efficient help of the staff seems to rectify all that is 
necessary. 

The classification, however, is a very different matter. The 
consummation, devoutly wished for many years, is the Library 
of Congress Classification, (i.e. its system and its cards), and 
it seems to be well under way, very much aided by Federal 
Emergency Funds. These funds and the workers should be oi 
untold value under adequate supervision from the authorities of 
the Library. 



BRANCH LIBFLA.RIES 

This year, as heretofore, the branches suffer in some instances 
from inadequate lighting, worn-out or noisy floor coverings, poor 
ventilation, too few new books both fiction and non-fiction, and 
the problem of missing books. We can add little to what previous 
committees have already said. 

The v/ithdrav/al of uniformed policemen from library duty 
is most regrettable and raises the problem of adequate protection 
at many of the branches, particularly those in the congested 
areas, during the evening hours. We urge upon the Trustees the 
desirability of solving this problem as early as may be. 



CONCLUSION 

We are aware that much if not all we have said in this report 
is already known and appreciated by the Trustees and by the 
Director, and that they are giving thought and attention to the 
problems and development of the Library. We hope that by 
our discussion of these things we may contribute to a better under- 
standing of the needs of the Library and of the responsibilities 
which use of the Library by the public entails. 



[22] 



Adopted as the report of the Examining Committee, No- 
vember 23, 1936. 



Charles M. Rogerson, Vice Chairman 



Philip R. Allen 
George Bramwell Baker 
Walter B. Briggs 
Patrick T. Campbell 
Elizabeth H. Dewart 
Carl Dreyfus 
Albert Ehr en fried 
Susan J. Ginn 
Chester Noyes Greenough 
M. A. DeWolfe Howe 
Henry Jackson 
Herbert F. Jenkins 
Henry Lewis Johnson 

Mary 



W. Winslow 



Carl T. Keller 
Charles D. Maginnis 
Bertha Mahony Miller 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
John F. Perkins 
Hester Pickman 
Abraham E. Pinanski 
Philip H. Rhinelander 
Harlow Shapley 
Margaret H. Shurcliff 
Lillian C. Slattery 
Charles H. Taylor 
Henry R. Viets 



[23] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston : 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library 
for the year ending December 31,1 936. 

EFFECTS OF THE ECONOMIC DEPRESSION 

For the Library the year was in most respects still one more 
reflecting depressed economic conditions. Appropriations re- 
mained below the pre-depression level. In one instance — that 
for the purchase of books — the appropriation was reduced to 
the lowest figure in nearly twenty years. 

Books and facilities continued to be used in the notably in- 
creased fashion which had prevailed since the beginning of the 
depression in 1929, though not in 1936, as also in 1934 and 
1935, to the sam.e high degree as at the height of the depression. 
This retardation in use is probably attributable to a single factor 
more than to any one other, namely, the inability to buy books 
to replace those worn out through the heavy depression use. As 
a result in 1936 nearly 10,000 more books were worn out in 
the branch libraries than could be replaced by purchase. 

Continued heavy demands v/ere m.ade upon the Library in 
sponsoring and carrying out work projects for the relief of the 
unemployed, under the auspices of the Works Progress Admin- 
istration of the federal government. These were of a nature to 
be of lasting benefit to the Library. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE LIBRARY 

The City appropriated for the use of the Library during 1 936 
the sum of $1,197,866. This was $26,151 greater than the 
amount appropriated in 1935. 

The total appropriation included an amount of $88,872 for 
the necessary expenditures incidental to the unemployment re- 
lief projects which the Library sponsored on behalf of the City. 



[24] 



By excluding this amount for extraordinary expenditures the ap- 
propriation for the ordinary operating expenditures of the Li- 
brary v/as $1 ,108,994. This v/as $37,621 less than the amount 
appropriated for the ordinary operating expenditures in 1935. 

The appropriation for the purchase of books was $55,000, 
the lovvest figure since 1919. Its inadequacy is indicated by the 
following table, setting forth the heavily increased use of the 
Library during the decade preceding 1 936 : 











AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 






NO. OF BOOKS 


YEAR FOR THE 


LENT FOR 


PURCHASE OF EOOK.S 


HOME USE 


1926 .... $125,000 


3,499,137 


1927 








125,000 






3,705,657 


1928 








125,000 






3,899,286 


1929 








140,000 






3,930,068 


1930 








160,000 






4.133,459 


1931 








1 75.000 






4,702.932 


1932 








160,000 






5.567,681 


1933 








75,000 






5,548,283 


1934 








100,000 






5,194,351 


1935 








100,000 






4,949,701 


1936 








55,000 






4,806,737 


In later sections of this report the need of additional provision 


for the pure 


has« 


;of 


boo 


cs is presented in ( 


ieta 


il. 





USE OF THE LIBI^RY 

During 1936 there were borrowed for home reading 
4,806,737 volumes. This figure represents an increase of 
slightly m.ore than 22% over that for 1929, the last of the pre- 
depression years. 

The following table shows the increased use of the Library 
during seven years of economic depression, 1930—1936, in- 
clusive : 



1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 



NO. OF BOOKS LENT 
FOR HOME USE 

3,930.068 
4,133,459 
4,702,932 
5,567,681 
5,548,283 
5,194,351 
4,949,701 
4,806,737 



PERCENTAGE OF PERCENTAGE OF 
INCREASE OR DECREASE INCREASE 
OVER PRECEDING YEAR OVER 1929 



+ 5% 
+13% 
+18% 
-0.3% 
-6% 
- 5% 
-2.9% 



+ 5% 
+20% 
+42% 
+41% 
+32% 
+26% 
+22% 



[25] 

It is clear from these figures that a peak of increased use was 
reached in 1932 and in 1933, that since then there has occurred 
a retardation in use. 

It is of course entirely proper to ascribe such a change in trend 
to an improvement in economic conditions, hewer individuals 
are unemployed; consequently fewer have abundant time tor 
books and reading; therefore fewer books are borrowed from 
the public library. As encouraging an indication of economic 
improvement as all of this may be, there has been at the same 
time another factor which, in negative fashion, has contributed 
to the same result. That has been a lack of books. The Library 
has not had funds to replace those books worn out through heavy 
use in the preceding years of the depression. 

The specific effects upon library use following from diminish- 
ing unemployment cannot be easily demonstrated. Reliable 
figures are not available for the purpose. On the other hand, it 
seems possible, from the experience of the Library in 1 936, to 
indicate a correlation between a declining library use and a dim.- 
inishing supply of books. For instance, the number of books lent 
from the central library for home use in 1936 increased by 2.6% 
over the number lent in 1935, whereas the num.ber lent from the 
branch libraries in 1936 decreased by 3.9% from 1935. In 
1 936 it was possible to spend for the central library, chiefly from 
the current and accumulated income of trust funds, appreciably 
the same amount for the purchase of books as in 1935. For the 
branch libraries the amount which was available in 1936, be- 
cause of the greatly reduced appropriation by the City for the 
purpose, was approximately 36% less than in 1935. In other 
words, then, for the central library the same amount was spent 
for books in 1936 as in 1935, and the number of books lent in- 
creased; for the branch libraries the amount spent in 1936 was 
markedl}- less than in 1935, and the number of books lent de- 
creased. 

If the Library had had from the City in 1 936 an appropria- 
tion for the purchase of books equivalent even approximately to 
that in 1935 (the appropriation in 1935 was $100,000, in 1936 
$55,000), it might reasonably have expected to avoid a de- 
crease in the lending of books from the branch libraries. Indeed 
it might well have been able to bring about even an increase. 



[26] 



THE NEED OF BOOKS 



For several years now the book stock in the branch hbraries 
has been experiencing unusually heavy use arising out of the in- 
creased requirements of the depression period. The demands 
for books have surpassed the possibilities for supplying them. 
As a result they have been, and are being, worn out faster than 
they can be replaced, particularly since book funds have been 
greatly reduced. For example, in 1935 the branch libraries 
had to discard as worn out 5,335 volumes more than they could 
add, and again in 1936 they fell short by 9,091 volumes. In 
other words, in 1935 they discarded 57,354 books and added 
only 52,019; in 1936, they discarded 42,151 volumes as com- 
pared with only 33,060 added. 

It is precisely here that the crux of the situation lies. Prior 
to the depression and through 1932, up to 60% of the total 
amount appropriated each year for the purchase of books was 
used for the replacement of volumes worn out. Since 1932 
greatly reduced appropriations have limited the proportion 
available for replacements. For example, in 1936 only 19% 
could be made available. The results upon purchasing replace- 
ment copies are easily to be seen by the simple operation of 
comparing 60% of $160,000, the appropriation for books in 
1932, with 19% of $55,000, the appropriation in 1936. To- 
day there are literally thousands of volumes which have been 
worn out, or are fast becoming so, and are av/aiting replace- 
ment. For the most part they are the books which have been 
tried over the years, those continually needed by the general 
public and school children alike. Their very value is attested 
by the fact that they have been used heavily enough to wear out. 

Under such conditions there cannot be avoided a decrease in 
the use of books. The branch libraries suffer especially in this 
respect. For book funds they are dependent almost wholly 
upon the appropriation v.hich the City makes to the Library for 
the purchase of library books. Of this practically none is given 
over to buying books for the central library in Copley Square; 
for that there is used largely the income of trust funds which 



[27] 

have been given specifically for the purpose and are thus not 
available for any other use. When then the city appropriation 
is reduced drastically, as in 1936 to the lowest figure in nearly 
twenty years, it affects immediately the branch libraries, which 
serve the general public and the school children in their respective 
sections of the city. 

Here lies a particularly discouraging aspect of the situation. 
The economic depression brought to the public library individu- 
als who had been previously only potential readers and who 
now became active users of books. Their desire for reading once 
stirred they could in appreciable numbers be expected to con- 
tinue as readers, in any case so long as their appetites in this re- 
spect could be satisfied. Gradually, however, the books most 
desired by them became worn out through heavy use, or if cur- 
rent books they could not be made available because of lack of 
funds for purchasing them. Today, as a result, very many in- 
dividuals can no longer find in the public library books to satisfy 
their desires. From active readers they are being, or have been, 
forced back to become merely potential readers. 

Nearly a century ago the founders of the Boston Public Li- 
brary adopted a concept, entirely new at the time, which was to 
constitute a significant contribution to American library history. 
In addition to developing scholarly library collections for the 
relative few, in accordance with the prevailing library tradition 
of the time, they proposed to go further. They purposed to 
provide the books which people want to read, while they are 
nev/, and in as many copies as desired. Questionable as it may 
have seemed at the time, this concept has become one of the 
fundamental guiding principles in the development of the pub- 
lic library into the accepted American institution which it is 
today. Of all cities, therefore, the City of Boston has reason 
to bear in memory an enlightened past and to show itself as 
ready now as heretofore to make generous and adequate provision 
for the book needs of its citizens. It might well do so also, if 
for no other cause, for the simple reason that today as a result 
of economic and social conditions a group of readers both po- 
tential and actual, has come into being which is larger than ever 
before. It is a day when emphasis is being laid particularly upon 



[28] 

adult education. Yet, in 1 936, the Boston Public Library lent 
to adults nearly 140,000 fewer volumes than in 1935 (as com- 
pared with a decrease of approximately only 2,000 to children). 
Without an adequate supply of books neither adults nor children 
will, of course, persist indefinitely as readers. Books they must 
have, old and new, if the reading habit is to persist. 

It avails little to maintain library buildings and library staffs 
if there are not supplied also the very books to promote whose 
use these things are themselves provided. Certainly no rail- 
road would spend appreciably large sums for keeping locomotives 
and cars in running condition and providing train crews 
and personnel and then fail to provide the steam or other force 
necessary to make its trains go. 

In summary, the Library finished the year 1936 lending 22% 
more books than in 1929, the last of the pre-depression years. 
Its appropriation for the purchase of books, hov^^ever, was 61 % 
less in 1 936 than in 1 929. To catch up with these arrears — 
particularly in replacing worn out books, and then to proceed 
to build up the books collections to an adequate level — use 
could be made to advantage for several years to come of a mini- 
mum annual amount of at least $150,000. 



THE MISUSE OF BOOKS 

With the need of books becoming more and more acute, the 
Library has striven constantly throughout the year to exert every 
effort in its campaign against the m.isuse of books. This was 
described in detail in last year's report. As indicated there, 
the misuse of library materials and facilities occurs alike in the 
central library and the branch libraries. In the former the prob- 
lem is not easily controllable, because crowded physical facilities 
prevent adequate action for improvement, particularly in the 
book stack. In the branch libraries, on the other hand, the prob- 
lem is presented more directly and in terms somewhat simpler. 
It is there that the heaviest demand for books for home use oc- 
curs; also it is only in the branches that open shelves are to be 
found to an appreciable extent. 



[29] 

In approaching the problem, attention has been given first to 
the books which have to be reported each year as "unrecover- 
able" — that is, books which borrowers fail to return when due. 
It is known specifically which these are and to whom they are 
charged. For 1934 the branch libraries had had 2262 such 
"unrecoverable" volumes. By careful investigation of each in- 
dividual case as it came up during 1 935, the number of "un- 
recoverables" for that year was reduced to 1 399, a decrease of 
38% from the number in 1934. A continuation of these efforts 
brought the number for 1936 down to 953, a decrease of 32% 
from 1935. In other words, the efforts of the past two years 
have resulted in decreasing by 58% the number of books which 
the branch libraries have to report annually as "unrecoverable" 
from borrowers. 

In the case of books which disappear by theft from the open 
shelves, the approach cannot be so direct. Here there is gener- 
ally not available much in the way of definite evidence from 
which to start. Some aid is, of course, forthcoming from in- 
formation gained in the handling of cases of "unrecoverables '. 
For example, in 1 935 sixty-seven, and in 1 936 fifty-five, serious 
cases of stealing, forgery, or mutilation were solved from infor- 
m.ation obtained in large part in this fashion. From clues so 
gained, by independent investigations, by observation of suspect- 
ed delinquents while on library premises, by ever alert attention 
on the part of the library staff, it proved possible during 1936 to 
decrease the number of these books which disappear by theft. 
For 1935 the branch libraries reported 12,769 volumes as so 
missing. For 1936 the number was reduced to 11,012, a de- 
crease of 14% from the number which disappeared in 1935. 

These efforts will, of course, be continued. In the matter of 
books "unrecoverable" from borrowers, possibly as much has 
been done as can be by human care and attention alone. By 
the introduction of mechanical means of registering and identi- 
fying borrowers, and of charging and discharging books, through 
utilizing recording and charging machines, it is probable that 
the number of books "unrecoverable" each year can be reduced 
to perhaps one half of the present figure. There will always be. 



[30] 

however, an irreducible minimum of 300 to 400 volumes so lost, 
caused by the removal of borrowers from the city, the inability 
of citizens to pay for the replacement of books which they have 
lost, and similar naturally unavoidable circumstances. Yet the 
1936 rate of loss at 953 is not a bad record in itself. It is a 
loss of only one fortieth of 1 % of a total of over 4,000,000 
volumes lent in the course of the year. 

In the matter of reducing the number of books disappearing 
each year by theft, there has as yet been made only a begining. 
It is hoped that the 14% reduction in 1936 indicates a turning 
in the tide of such annual losses. Every effort is being exerted 
to reducing thieving, by detection and by prevention alike. As 
instances are detected, each case is carefully investigated and 
prepared, even though this may require several days, and a for- 
mal personal hearing is held. If necessary the case is taken into 
the courts. The solving of cases takes much time, of course, 
but it is believed to be worth while to carry each one through 
to a conclusion. Successful solution has generally the effect of 
preventing the individuals concerned from injuring the Library 
further. It frequently serves also to deter their friends and ac- 
quaintances from similarly offending, through making them 
aware of the penalties attached to such action. Much thought 
and attention is being given also to possibilities of prevention of 
thieving. In the latter months of the year a plan was worked 
out for close cooperation with the public schools. This aims 
at the enlistment of interest on the part of school children in in- 
creased care in the use of books. It is believed that responsibility 
in this respect can be instilled in the young people while they are 
still in their formative period. The plan will be put into effect 
only experimentally at first. Perhaps much may be expected 
from it and from similar approaches in the long run. In any 
case relief from book thieving is in the final instance probably 
to be obtained only by building up in the minds of the people of 
Boston a recognition that the resources of the Boston Public Li- 
brary are intended for the benefit and enjoyment of all, and not 
for abuse by the few. 



[31] 

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF PROJECTS 

The Library continued during 1936 to assume a share, 
together with other departments of the city government, in plan- 
ning, sponsoring, and carrying out work projects for the unem- 
ployed, under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration 
of the federal government. 

All of the projects which have been sponsored by the Libary 
have been planned as related steps in a long range program de- 
signed to bring about the eventual development along modern 
lines of certain of the Library's processes in which improvement 
has long been desired. Those carried on during 1936 were 
largely preparatory to initiating a reclassification of the scholarly 
book collections of the central library on a modern classification 
scheme such as that of the Library of Congress. 

Much preparation is, of course, necessary for so extensive an 
undertaking. This is particularly true as to the training of per- 
sonnel. Among the unemployed there are few individuals who 
have had library training or experience. There are, however, 
manj' among them who can be trained to the routine processes, 
many of which are clerical or mechanical in nature, with the dif- 
ficult and technical work of classification being left to trained 
library workers. The finding and training and organization of 
such a personnel, particularly in the upper levels, proved to be 
the main problem of the year. Difficulties of an administrative 
nature complicated the task for many m.onths. With the resol- 
ution of these in favor of the Library in the latter part of the 
year, it was finally possible to proceed with the selection and 
training of personnel along the necessary lines. In the mean- 
time a number of preparatory undertakings were carried on by 
the existing personnel. Notable among these was the arrang- 
ing and checking of a depository set of Library of Congress cata- 
log cards, transfered from the Massachusetts State Library to 
the Boston Public Library at the suggestion of the Librarian of 
Congress and through the cooperation of the State Library. 

There was also carried on during the year the project for the 
cleaning of books throughout the library system. 

These projects provided work for a number of individuals 
ranging from seven hundred to one thousand at various parts of 



[32] 

the year. The cost of personnel was borne by the federal gov- 
ernment as part of its program for the relief of the unemployed. 
The contribution on the part of the Library was that of directing 
the work, together with providing supplies and materials and 
renting space and equipment, for which purpose a special ap- 
propriation was made by the City. 

All of these activities are clearly to the interest of the Library. 
It should be pointed out, however, that their direction places a 
considerable responsibility and burden upon many members of 
the library staff, quite in addition to their regular established 
duties. At no time during the year has the number of relief 
workers been less than seven hundred, and most of the time it 
has been considerably larger, ranging up to one thousand and 
over. This constitutes a body of workers considerably greater 
than the regular staff of the Library, which itself numbers 
slightly under six hundred. The added responsibility for these 
individuals and their work has been carried on by the regular 
administrative staff of the Library, with but a single additional 
aide, namely, an expert adviser on the classification of the Li- 
brary of Congress. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

In last year's report the crowding of the Central Library 
building was described in detail. For 1936 there is little to re- 
port other than that the situation has in the meantime been made 
more acute by the growth of the book collections by nearly 
20,000 volumes in the last twelve months. 

Such an addition represents only the ordinary annual growth 
in the Central Library collections. Placed side by side on the 
shelves those volumes required an additional half mile of shelv- 
ing space. In this connection it is of interest to note that when 
the Central Library building was first occupied in 1 895 the vol- 
umes housed therein occupied eleven m.iles of shelf space; ia 
1 936 they stretched over the shelves for twenty-eight miles. This 
is the same as saying that today, if stood upon end and pi -iced 
side by side in one long line (averaging eight volumes to the 
foot) , that line would reach from Boston to Lowell. It requires 
little stretch of the imagination, then, to picture how acute the 



[33] 

situation is becoming when each year there is having to be found 
space to house an acHitional hall: mile of books in a building m 
which the shelves a/e already filled to capacity. 

Immediate relief from the overcrowding can apparently be 
obtained only through a reallocation of departmental space. 
This cannot be effected, however, unless some units now housed 
in the building are moved to quarters outside. It is urgently hoped, 
therefore, that provision can be made in the annual appropria- 
tions to the Library for the small amount necessary for the rental 
of outside quarters into which to m.ove a number of library ac- 
tivities whose nature is such that they can be carried on else- 
where quite as well as in the Central Library building. The re- 
lief thus obtained will m.ake possible the effecting of many need- 
ed improvements in the facilities of the public departments and 
in the working conditions and quarters of the library staff. Both 
are of prime importance to the service rendered by the Library 
to its readers. 

For the branch libraries it has been possible for several years 
to do nothing more than to attempt to m.aintain the buildings in 
as adequate fashion as limited appropriations have permitted. 
In one or two instances even important repairs have had to be 
postponed. They cannot be allowed to go without attention in- 
definitely without serious difficulties arising. It is to be hoped 
that appropriations may permit action in the very near future. 

TRAINING OF PERSONNEL 

The extensive and wide program of training courses v/hich 
was instituted in 1933 for all full-time members of the library 
staff continued into its third academic year in October 1935. 
During the academic year 1935-36 there w'ere 194 members 
of the staff enrolled in thirteen full courses (three terms of ten 
weeks each) and two one-term courses. These individuals took 
207 courses, of which 1 54 were com.pleted satisfactorily. This 
enrollment of 194 individuals taking a total of 207 courses is 
to be compared with 192 persons taking 260 courses in 1934— 
35, and 261 individuals taking 268 courses in 1933—34. Over 
the three years 405 different persons have enrolled. The per- 
centage of courses passed was 1A% in 1935-36, 83% in 1934- 
35. and 77% in 1933-34. 



[34] 

It was believed that the large enrollment in 1933-34 would 
not continue beyond that year. That it would sustain itself for 
a second and a third year at so high a level was hardly to be ex- 
pected. It would have been in many ways just as v/eli if it had 
not, for it is no small task for a library to engage in offering for- 
mal training to so large a number of individuals. That is really 
the province of the library schools and other training agencies, 
not of individual libraries. With the passing of time, hov/ever, it 
should not be necessary for the Boston Public Library to engage 
so extensively in the training field. Eventually it should be able 
to limit its formal training offerings to fields which are not cov- 
ered in the colleges and universities and library schools. More 
and more of its staff should be recruited from individuals who 
have had study and training in those formal educational institu- 
tions, particularly in the graduate and professional levels. 

In last year's report the hope was expressed that during 1 936 
there could be finally completed the plans for putting into effect 
the new program, of qualifying and promotional examinations 
for which the Library's training courses were originally conceived 
as affording aid and preparation. Provision would be made 
thereby for Entrance Examinations for individuals wishing to 
enter the library service. Qualifying Examinations for proba- 
tionary assistants who are candidates for appointment to the 
permanent ser/ice, and Promotional Examinations for assistants 
in the permanent service who wish to qualify for promotion and 
possibilities of increased remuneration. By these means there 
would be provided a basis upon which to achieve an improved 
classification of the Library's personnel; also definite "steps" 
with which a system of "step rate increases in pay" could be 
easily articulated. It became increasingly clear, however, as 
the Library's appropriations suffered reductions progressively 
throughout the first half of the year, that little could be done 
effectively in this respect until there should be forthcoming from 
the City the funds necessary for granting step rate increases in 
pay upon an adequate basis. The efforts of the year were there- 
fore concentrated largely upon presenting the need of increased 
remuneration for members of the library staff, to the end that 
improved appropriations might become available in 1937 and 
the new classification of personnel and the new examinations 
then be put into effect. 



[35] 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



The following appointments to titular positions were made 
during the year: Francis J. Hannigan, to be Supervisor of Gen- 
eral Reference Departments; Edward H. Redstone, to be Su- 
pervisor of Special Reference Departments; John H. Reardon, 
to be Deputy Supervisor of General Reference Departments, 
and Chief of the Information Department; Frank N. Jones, to 
be Deputy Supervisor of Special Reference Departments, and 
Chief of the Science and Technology Department; Mary A. C. 
Kavin, to be Branch Librarian, Tyler Street Branch Library; 
and James P. Mooers, to be Chief of the Binding Department. 

The following resignation from a titular position occurred: 
Louis F. Ranlett, Chief of the Book Selection Department, to 
become Librarian of the Bangor Public Library. 

Under the provisions of the Boston Retirement Act the fol- 
lowing individuals retired from the library service: Agnes C. 
Doyle, Assistant in Charge, Genealogy Department, after 52 
years service; Katherine F. Albert, Branch Librarian, Jamaica 
Plain Branch Library, after 44 years service; and Nils J. Her- 
land, First Assistant Engineer, after 4 1 years service. 

As of the date of her retirement the honorary title of Branch 
Librarian, Emeritus was bestowed upon Katherine F. Albert. 

By death the Library lost the services of Pierce E. Buckley, 
Supervisor of General Reference Departments, and Assistant 
Librarian. For over 45 years Mr. Buckley served the Library 
invaluably in many and varying capacities. 

CONCLUSION 

If this report seems to have been concerned largely with the 
need of increased appropriations for buying books, for improv- 
ing the remuneration of the library staff, for obtaining relief from 
the crowding of the Central Libraiy building, it is only because 
these are all directions in which action is urgently needed if the 
Library is to function effectively. At the same time it is not to 
be overlooked that a host of activities have been carried on which 
are in themselves of great interest and value. Some of these are 
indicated in the Appendix to this Report. Others do not ap- 
pear in the written record ; they are, however, known at first hand 



[361 

to countless users of the Library who have profited from them. 

To the members of the library staff the Director is deeply ap- 
preciative of constant aid and cooperation in carrying on the 
work of the Library. For them and for himself he extends to 
the Trustees grateful thanks for their ever friendly support and 
interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Milton E. Lord 

Director, and Librarian 



[37] 



APPENDIX 



COMPARATIVE CIRCULATION STATISTICS 





1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


Central Library 


728,656 


777,666 


793.121 


756.018 


737,396 


757,363 


Business Branch 


13,193 


16,604 


17,614 


18,410 


17,921 


17,822 


Branch Libraries: 














Allston 


137.709 


175,054 


192,331 


186.413 


182,203 


172,835 


Andrew Square 


128,337 


155.574 


145.801 


138.638 


130,777 


127,827 


Boyiston 


94,306 


147,862 


143,764 


138,595 


137,179 


138,532 


Brighton 


121,032 


139.276 


147.666 


134,388 


130,741 


121,152 


Charlestov/n 


119,637 


136,845 


144.676 


127,866 


117.525 


116.034 


City Point 


122,619 


1 55.492 


1 50,036 


144,762 


140,006 


129,289 


Codman Square 


186,386 


216.780 


199,786 


185,451 


168,412 


164,553 


Dorchester 


115,810 


137.018 


140.344 


132,104 


135,82! 


137.759 


East Boston 


180,859 


218.072 


214,769 


188,819 


161,227 


1 50,340 


Faneuil 


90,424 


120,007 


130,252 


138,234 


138,561 


133,787 


Fellowes Athea. 


93,970 


114.937 


109,077 


98,118 


89,857 


91,436 


Hyde Park 


127,888 


1 54,838 


149,875 


144,011 


141.763 


129.807 


Jamaica Plain 


118,561 


133,335 


131.903 


126.702 


119,760 


116,604 


Jeffries Point 


75,459 


100.736 


92,499 


80.460 


76,500 


73.593 


Kirstein 


43,196 


56,971 


65,149 


63,388 


64,045 


56,536 


Lower Mills 


59,692 


76,137 


81.017 


74,990 


70.928 


64.371 


Mattapan 


187,669 


220,675 


219,300 


205,498 


196,31 ! 


188.382 


Memorial 


213,320 


246,739 


246,757 


222,975 


211.971 


192.100 


Mt. Bowdoin 


151,456 


168.036 


1 58,667 


149,341 


143,823 


137.889 


Mt. Pleasant 


82,795 


100,361 


102,914 


94,640 


89,924 


84.102 


Nepoiiset 


60,936 


75.148 


78,579 


69.638 


64,409 


60.117 


North End 


1 58,333 


185,849 


163,735 


143.351 


123,174 


125.656 


Orient Heights 


60,512 


84,887 


84,233 


92,801 


81,189 


68.932 


Parker Hill 


112,308 


130,042 


125,524 


119.139 


112,165 


108.933 


Phillips Brooks 


25,713* 


50,383 


51,870 


46,258 


45,397 


44.859 


Roslindalc 


151,956 


1 70,287 


1 73.078 


167,562 


154,640 


151,971 


Roxbury Crossins 


y 69,034 


77.650 


76,023 


75,062 


72,839 


71,037 


South Boston 


161,244 


189,904 


163,326 


141,046 


128,979 


124,228 


South End 


122.870 


1 50.745 


155.575 


! 54,604 


153,478 


1 50,728 


Tyler Street 


59.163 


74,230 


72.334 


52,578 


47,979 


51,364 


L'phams Corner 


201,701 


225,285 


228.490 


211.399 


199,564 


188,437 


West End 


189,543 


219,413 


218,721 


208,003 


201,373 


200.444 


West Roxbury 


136.595 


164,843 


174.457 


163,089 


161.864 


157,918 



4,702,932 5,567.68! 5,548.283 5.194,35! 4.949,701 4,806,737 

''For eight months. May through December. 



[38] 



The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form: 



1 93 1 gain over preceding year 

1932 gain over preceding year 

1933 loss from preceding year 

1934 loss from preceding year 

1935 loss from preceding year 

1936 loss from preceding year 



VOLUMES 

569,473 
854,749 
19.398 
353.932 
244.650 
142,964 



USE OF BOOKS 
Circulation from Central Library by Months 



HOME USE 


HOME USE 
THROUGH 


SCHOOLS ANU 
INSTITUTIONS 




DIRECT 




THROUGH 






BRANCH DEPT. 


BRANCH DEPT. 


TOTALS 


January . . . 38.802 


7.175 


33,716 


79,693 


February 






36,530 


7.059 


35,468 


79.057 


March 






40,669 


7.412 


36,582 


84,663 


April 






37,887 


6,654 


36,534 


81.075 


May 






33,244 


5,800 


36,333 


75.377 


June 






25,181 


5,009 


14,439 


44.629 


July 






25,338 


4,880 


4,906 


35.124 


August 






24,959 


4,416 


4,692 


34.067 


September 






26,792 


5,217 


5,041 


37.050 


October 






35,601 


7.283 


16.520 


59.404 


November 






36,698 


6,912 


28.471 


72,081 


December 






33,547 


7,047 


34.549 


75,143 



Totals 



395,248 



74,864 



287,251 



757,363 



Distribution of Total Circulation 



Central Library 



a. Direct .... 

b. Through Branch Libraries 

1. Deposit Collection 

2. General Collections 

c. Schools and Institutions through 

.Branch Department . 

Business Branch 



Branch Libraries: 
Allslon 

Andrew Square 
Boylston 
Brighton 
Charlestown 
City Point 
Codman Square 



HOME 

use 
395,248 

48,005 
26,859 



schools and 
institutions 



287,25! 



total 



757,363 



17.822 



172.835 




172,835 


125.822 


2.005 


127.827 


138.532 




138,532 


118,070 


3,082 


121.152 


109,825 


6,209 


116,034 


129,289 




129.289 


154318 


10,235 


164.553 



[39] 



Dorchester 

East Boston 

Faneuil 

Fellowes Athenaeum 

Hyde Park 

Jamaica Plain 

Jelfries Point 

Kirstein 

Lower Mills 

Mattapan 

Memorial 

Mt. Bowdoin 

Mt. Pleasant 

Neponset 

North End 

Orient Heights 

Parker Hill 

Phillips Brooks 

Roslindale 

Roxbury Crossing 

South Boston 

South End 

Tyler Street 

Uphams Corner 

West End 

West Roxbury 



136,809 


950 


137,759 


145,119 


5.221 


150.340 


133.197 


590 


133.787 


78391 


13.045 


91.436 


128,097 


1.710 


129,807 


1 1 1 ,445 


5.159 


116,604 


73,593 


.... 


73,593 


56,536 


.... 


56,536 


64,371 




64,371 


187.637 


745 


188,382 


191,680 


420 


192,100 


137,889 


. • • • 


137.889 


84.102 


• • ■ • 


84.102 


60,117 




60.117 


125.344 


' '312 


125,656 


68.932 




68.932 


108,933 


• • . • 


108,933 


44,859 




44.859 


142,180 


*9>9l' 


151,971 


71,037 




71,037 


108,232 


l'5!996 


124,228 


145.025 


5,703 


150.728 


51.364 




51,364 


188,224 


■ 213 


188.437 


182,497 


17,947 


200,444 


144,723 


13,195 


157,918 



3,919,024 



112,528 



4,031.552 



These figures are condensed into the following : 

Books Lent for Home Use. Including Circulation Through 
Schools and Institutions 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 

the Branch Libraries 757.363 

From Business Branch .......... 17,822 

From Branch Libraries (excluding books received from Central Library) 4,031,552 

Total .... 4,806,737 

Comparative Statistics Showing Distribution of Circulation 



Central Library circulation (excluding 
schools and institutions) 
Direct home use 
Through Branch Libraries . 



391,123 
70.735 



Business Branch ....... 

Branch Libraries circulation (excluding schools 

and institutions) ...... 

Schools and institutions circulation (including books 

from Central through the branch library system 



1935 



461,858- 
17.921 

4,078,044 

391,878 



395,248 
74,864 



1936 



470,112 
17.822 

3.919,024 

399,779 



4,949,701 



4.806.737 



[40] 



Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 
shown for two successive years: 

1335 1936 

Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 
Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 



Applications refused: 

.From libraries in Massachusetts 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts 



1,933 
372 


1.592 
430 


2,305 


2,022 


860 
139 


693 
219 



999 



912 



The classified direct circulation of the branch libraries for 
two successive years was as foilov/s: 







1935 




1936 




VOLUMES 


PERCLNfAGE 


VOLUMES 


PERCLNTAGE 


Fiction for adults 


1,966,588 


4S.2 


1,815,704 


46.3 


Non-fiction for adults 


590,051 


14.5 


583,624 


15. 


Juvenile fiction 


1,046,534 


25.7 


1 ,045,093 


26.6 


Juvenile non-fiction . 


474,781 


n.6 


474,603 


12.1 



At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 

the following percentages: 

1935 1936 

Fiction 45.6 47.6 

Non-fiction 54.4 52.4 



BOOK ACCESSIONS 
BOOKS ACQUIRED BY PURCHASE 



For the Central Library: 

From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 

For Branch Libraries: 

From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 



1935 1936 
12,599 3,634 
4,699 9,842 
17.298 13,476 



45,702 30.260 
727 2.320 
46,429 32,580 



63.727 



46.056 



[411 

The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 



Accessions by purchase . 
Accessions by gift . 
Accessions by exchange . 
Accessions by periodicals bound 
Accessions by newspapers bound 
Accessions by serials bound 







TOTAL 


CENTRAL 


BRANCHES 


VOLUMES 


13,476 


32,580 


46,056 


3.300 


455 


3.755 


3 




3 


2,704 


25 


2.729 


156 




156 


1.921 


.... 


1.921 



Total 



21,560 



33.060 



54.620 



Cataloged (new) 

Central Library Catal 

Serials 

Branch Libraries 

Recataloged 

Totals 



THE CATALOGS 

1935 

VOLS. AND 
PARTS 



21 ,492 

8,528 
48,713 
10,988 



TITLES 

15,155 

45!796 
6,461 



1936 



VOLS. AND 
PARTS 

22.926 

10,696 

31.225 

6,719 



TITLES 

19,550 

29i875 
4,311 



89,721 67,406 71,566 53,736 



The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use is: 



Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 
General collection, new books (including continuations) 
Special collections, new books and transfers 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but now found, 
transfers from Branch Libraries, etc. .... 



19.484 
4,182 

2,278 

25,944 

Removed from Central Library shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, 

transfers, etc. .......... 7,849 

Net gain at Central Library 18,095 

Net loss at Branch Libraries . . . . . . . . . 9,091 

Placed in Business Branch ......... 1 ,483 

Net gain entire library system ......... 10,487 



[42] 

The total number of volumes available for public use at the 
end of each year since the formation of the Library is shown in 
the following statement: 



1852-53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

185^57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861 62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

186&-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-60 

1880-«1 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 



9.688 


1895 


16.221 


1896-97 


22,617 


1897-98 


28,080 


1898-99 


34.896 


1899-1900 


70,851 


1900-01 


78,043 


1901-02 


85,031 


1902-03 


97,386 


1903-04 


105.034 


1904-05 


110,563 


1905-06 


116,934 


1906-07 


123,016 


1907-08 


130,678 


1908-09 


136,080 


1909-10 


144,092 


1910-11 


1 52.796 


1911-12 


160,573 


1912-13 


1 79,250 


1913-14 


192,958 


1914-15 


209,456 


1915-16 


260,550 


1916-17 


276,918 


1917-18 


297.873 


1918-19 


321,010 


1919-20 


345.734 


1920-21 


360.963 


1921-22 


377,225 


1922-23 


390.982 


1923-24 


404,221 


1924-25 


422,116 


1925 


438.594 


1926 


453.947 


1927 


460,993 


1928 


479,421 


1929 


492,956 


1930 


505,872 


1931 


520,508 


1932 


536,027 


1933 


556,283 


1934 


576,237 


1935 


597.152 


1936 


610.375 





628,297 

663,763 

698,888 

716.050 

746,383 

781,377 

812,264 

835,904 

848,884 

871,050 

878,933 

903.349 

922,348 

941 ,024 

961,522 

987,268 

1,006.717 

1 ,C49,01 1 

1,067,103 

1 ,098,702 

1,121,747 

1,139,682 

1,157,326 

1,173,695 

1,197,498 

1,224,510 

1,258.21! 

1,284,094 

1 ,308,041 

1 .333,264 

1,363,515 

1 ,388,439 

1,418.489 

1,442,802 

1,475,743 

1 .526,951 

1 ,572,802 

1,631.422 

1,654,017 

1,673,609 

1,682,848 

1,693.335 



Volumes in the Central Library 1,186,598 

Volumes in the Business Branch 18,525 

Volumes in the Branch Libraries 488,212 

Volumes in entire library system 1,693,335 



[43] 

These volumes are located as follows ; 



Central Library 


. 




1.186.598 


Business Branch 


. 




18.525 


Branch Libraries: 








AUsfon 


13,57! 


Memorial 


17.220 


Andrew Square . 


11,670 


Mt. Bowdoin 


13,190 


Boylsfon 


10,484 


Mt. Pleasant 


8.418 


Brighton 


21,699 


Neponset 


6.902 


Charlestown 


18.197 


North End . 


1 1 .848 


City Point 


11,835 


Orient Heights . 


9,311 


Codman Square . 


16,741 


Parker Hill 


13.296 


Dorchester 


16,421 


Phillips Brooks . 


5,502 


East Boston 


18,301 


Roslindale . 


1 5.722 


.Faneuil 


13.737 


Roxbury Crossing 


5.981 


Fellowes Anthenaeum . 


41,291 


South Boston 


19.502 


Hyde Park . 


30,798 


South End . 


12,054 


Jamaica Plain 


16,480 


Tyler Street 


7,378 


Jeffries Point 


7,777 


Uphams Comer . 


17,440 


Kirstein 


7.542 


West End . 


22,474 


Lower Mills 


8.434 


West Roxbury 


20.500 


Mattapan 


16.496 







THE BINDING DEPARTMENT 



style 



Number of volume bound in various st 

Magazines stitched . 

Volumes repaired .... 

Volumes guarded .... 

Maps mounted .... 

Photographs and engravings mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

Requisitions received and filled ...... 

Card Catalog (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Card Catalog (Branches) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Signs .......... 

Blank Forms (numbered series) ..... 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside the numbered series) 
Catalogs, pamphlets, bibliographical programs . 



1935 


1936 


64,701 


66,014 


64 


69 


1,725 


1,900 


732 


644 


64 


77 


2,781 


2,521 


83.520 


130.504 


1935 


1936 


448 


220 


18,636 


23,861 


242.763 


140.640 


1,024 


1.010 


100.842 


86.731 


25 


60 


7.294,030 


4,210,220 


81,200 


43,275 


47,675 


40.615 



OUTSTANDING BOOK PURCHASES 

Augustinus, Aurellus, Saint. lo. Frobenius lectori S. D. En habes 
Aurelij Augustini opus absolutissimum de Ciuitate Dei . . . 
datum . . • per . . . loan. Basileae, 1 522. 



[44] 

Benet, Stephen Vincent. The ballad of William Sycamore, 1 790—1 880. 
(First edition, designed by Bruce Rogers.) New York, 1923. 

Boys, Thomas Shotter. Picturesque architecture in Paris, Ghent, Ant- 
werp, Rouen, etc. Drawn from nature on stone. Colored plates. 
London, 1839. 

Bible. Laiin. Biblia integra: summata: distincta: accuratius reemedata: 
. . . Colophon. M.CCCC.XCV. Black-letter. 

Cato, Marcus Porcius, the Censor. (Scriptores rei rusticae. Second 
edition). Colophon. M.CCCCLXXXII. 

Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. The first part (and second) of the his- 
tory of the valorous and wittie knight-errant Don Quixote of the 
Mancha. Translated out of the Spanish by Thomas Shelton, 
MDCXII (and MDCXX). Chelsea, 1927-28. 2 vols. 

Chaplin, James P. Journal of events on board Ship Newton, Capt. Eben 
Sears Master, Boston to Calcutta and return, November 20, 1 845 
to October 25, 1847. Manuscript. 

Cicero, Marcus Tullius. Epistolae. Venice, c. 1 494. 

Fridolin, Stefan, Father, of Nurenburg. Fol. (4)b . . . Da het hie an 
das buch. das der schrein o8 schatzbehalter der waren reichtumer 
des hails vn der ewige seligkeit. Colophon: Black-letter. 

Gregory I., the Great, Saint, Pope. Dit is die prologus, of die voersprake 
in sinte Gregorius omelie in duutschen. (Utrecht). M.cccclxxix. 
Colophon. 

Guiney, Louise Imogen. 52 letters and postccards, written to Charles 
Knowles Bolton, 1890—7, dated. Auburndale, Mass., London, 
etc. 

Heylin, Peter, D.D. Cyprianvs Anglicvs: or, the history of the life and 
death, of the most reverend and renowned prelate William . . . 
Lord Archbishop of Canterbury . . . London, MDCLXXI. 

Hunter, Dard. A. paper making pilgrimage to Japan, Korea and China. 
New York, 1936. 

Kongo, Iwao, compiler. (Old costumes of "No plays." 1 00 plates in 
color). (Kyoto, Heinndo Tanaka. 1932), The text is in Japan- 
ese. 

MacCarthy, Daniel. A historical pedigree of the Sliochd Feidhlimidh, 
the MacCarthys of Gleannacroim, from Carthach, twenty-fourth 
in descent from Oilioll Olum, to this day. Exeter. 1 849. 

Mace, Thomas. Musick's monument; or a remembrancer of the best 
practical musick, both divine, and civil . . . London, 1 676. 

Nakajima- i aiseikaku, publishers. (Famous flower and bird paintings in 
Japan. 60 plates, colored.) Kyoto, 1935. The text is Japanese. 

Poggio Bracciolini, Giovanni Francesco. Historia fiorentina. Venice, 
1476. 

Russell, George William. Deirdre. A drama in three acts. By A. E. 
(pseud.) Dublin, 1907. 

Suetonius TranquiTlus, Caius. Suetonius Tranquillus cum commentariis 
Beroaldi et Sabellici. Venice, 1 506. 



[45] 

Thomas a Kempis. Fol. (3) a: Incipit liber prim lohanis Gerson, cacel- 
larij parisiesis. De imitatione xpi de conteptu omniu vanitatu 
mundi. . . . Colophon. Mcccc.lxxxviij. Black-letter. 

Wadsworth, Joseph. Return of the officers, non-commissioned officers 
and men in Captain Joseph Wadsworth's Company, February I 4, 
1779. Manuscript. 

Whitman, Walt. Leaves of grass. (Poems. 1st edition. Anon.) 
Brooklyn, 1855. Bound vsath the original cloth covers. 

Worlidge, I. Vinetum Britannicum: or, A treatise of cider . . . Lon- 
don. 1 678. 

Yale College. The laws of Yale-College, in New-Haven, in Connecti- 
cut, enacted by the President and Fellows. New-Haven: Printed 
by Thomas and Samuel Green. 1 774. 

OUTSTANDING GIFTS 

Ames, Mrs. Oliver. A collection of ninety-two volumes and three hun- 
dred and seventy-nine pieces of music, including compositions of 
Schumann, Beethoven, Franck, Faure, Schubert and others. 

Bentley, Harry C. A collection of forty volumes on bookkeeping, for 
the Bentley Collection in the Boston Public Library, and a copy of 
Volume 2 of "A bibliography of v-zorks on accounting by American 
authors" by Harry C. Bentley and Ruth S. Leonard. 

Berenson, Mrs. Bernhard. Across the Mediterranean. By Mary Beren- 
son. Prato, Tipografia Giachetti, Figlio e C, 1935. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra. Boston Symphony Orchestra: charcoal 
drawings of its members, with biographical sketches. By Gerome 
Brush. Boston, Printed for the Orchestra, 1936. 

Bradford, Mrs. Gamaliel. Elizabethan women. By Gamaliel Brad- 
ford. Edited by Harold Ogden White. Cambridge, Houghton 
Mifflin, 1936. 

Bradlee, F. J., Jr. A collection of sixty-nine volumes, including both 
juvenile and adult fiction and non-fiction. 

Burr, Allston. Sir Walter Scott: an index, placing the short poems in 
his novels and in his long poems and dramas. Arranged by Allston 
Burr. Cambridge, Harvard University Press. 1936. 

Churchill, Mrs. Frank Spooner. A framed daguerreotype of Wendell 
Phillips, by Josiah J. Hawes. (To be hung in the Manuscript Al- 
cove) . 

Dole, Frederick H. Sketches of the history of Windham, Maine, 1 734— 
1 935 : the story of a typical New England town. By Frederick 
H. Dole. Westbrook, Cobb, 1935. 

Endicott, Samuel. Three volumes and three pieces of music, principally 
sonatas by various composers and several arrangements by Samuel 
Endicott. 

Filene, Edward A. A collection of forty-five volumes, including twenty- 
six Baedeker guides to various European cities and countries, and 
many city and state documents and articles of political interest. 



[461 

Gaxiola, Senor. Poinsett en Mexico (1822-1828). Notas de un libro 

inconcluso per Francsco Javier Gaxiola. Prologo de Jose Elguero. 

Mexico, Editorial "Cultura", 1936. 
Gest, Mr. and Mrs. Morris. The life of David Belasco, by William 

Winter. New York, Moffat, Yard and Company, 1 920. In two 

volumes, autographed by Reina Belasco Gest. 
Gilder, Rosamond. Theatre collections in libraries and museums: an in- 
ternational handbook, by Rosamond Gilder and George Freedley. 

New York, Theatre Arts, Inc., 1936. 
Graham, Mrs. Louis H. A collection of one hundred and live volumes, 

principally fiction, of which fifty-eight volumes were added to the 

Jamaica Plain Branch Library. 
Greene, Gladys. A collection of one hundred and twenty-eight volumes 

and one hundred and ninety-two numbers, principally works of or 

relating to music, philosophy and fiction. 
Great Britain Patent Office. Two hundred and fifty-six volumes of British 

patents received during the year 1 936, 
Hale, Mrs. Philip. A collection of one hundred and ten volumes and three 

hundred and sixty-five pamphlets, including music and works relating 

to music, musicians and the theatre. 
Harvard University. Harvard et la France. Recueil d'etudes public en 

I'honneur de I'Universite Harvard et offert a cette Universite par 

le Comite Francais pour la celebration du troisieme centenaire de 

Harvard. Paris, 1 936. 

Harvard University Tercentenary Gazette, Number 1—8. (Two 

copies of each issue). 

Two medals, silver and bronze, commemorating the Harvard 

Tercentenary. 
Hispanic Society of America. Arabic inscriptions in the collection of the 

Hispanic Society of America, by Werner Caskel. Translated 

from the German by Beatrice Gilman Proske. 

Daniel Urrabieta Vierge in the collection of the Hispanic So- 
ciety of America, by Elizabeth Du Gue Trapier. In two volumes. 
El obispado de Burgos y Castilla primitiva desde el siglo V al 

XIII, por Don Luciano Serrano, O.S.B. In three volumes. 
Jacchia, Mme. Ester Ferrabini. A collection of thirteen original composi- 
tions and arrangements by Agide Jacchia, and forty-eight letters 

written to him by various musicians. 
Jackson, Dr. Henry. Eight volumes of French fiction and non-fiction. 
Jordan, AJice M. A collection of thirty-two volumes of children's literature. 
Kelly, Nathan S. A collection of one hundred and eighty-two volumes 

of fiction and non-fiction, and forty-one photographs of Daniel 

Webster and several of his homes. 
Leadbetter, Florence. Twenty-one volumes, including several books in 

German, given to the Roslindale Branch Library. 
Littauer, Lucius N. Selected works of Hyman G. Enelow. With a 

memoir by Dr. Felix A. Levy. Volumes 1-4, Privately printed, 
1935, by the Kingsport Press, Inc. 



[47] 

Macrae Smith Company. Seventeen volumes of recent fiction published 
by Macrae Smith Company. 

Miyamori Asataro. Masterpieces of Japanese poetry ancient and mod- 
ern. Translated and annotated by Miyamori Asataro. Tokyo, 
Maruzen Company, Ltd., 1936. In two volumes. 

New England News Company. Twenty-one volumes of popular fiction 
published during the year 1936. 

Noyes, James B. Five copies of The Untold Story of Exploration, by 
Lowell Thomas ; twelve copies of We Who Are About to Die, by 
David Lamson; and, twelve copies of It Can't Happen Here, by 
Sinclair Lewis. 

Page, L. C. & Co. Nine volumes published by L. C. Page & Co., dur- 
ing the year 1936. 

Parsons, Mrs. Frederick. Fifteen volumes of fine editions of various 
books by Emerson, Service, Shakespeare, Stevenson, and others, to 
be added to the Artz, Barton, Galatea and "Q" collections in the 
Boston Public Library. 

Tinkham, Hon. George Holden. Two hundred and eighty-five volumes 
of the Congressional Record, to fill gaps and to replace worn volumes 
in the Library's file. 

Underbill, Francis Jay. Twelve volumes and fourteen pamphlets from 
the library of Francis Jay Underbill, and eight programs of sym- 
phony concerts. 

White, Alain C. A genius of the two-mover. A selection of problems 
by Comins Mansfield. By Alain C. White. Stroud, Office of the 
"Chess Amateur" Depot, 1936. The 32nd and final year of the 
Christmas Series. 

LECTURES — CONCERTS 

In the Central Library Lecture Hall the Library presented 1 04 pro- 
grams in its annual series of free concerts, lectures, and entertainments. 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1936 

Exhibitions arranged by the Library were on view in the Exhibition 
Room, the Treasure Room, and the Children's Room throughout the year. 

TRUST FUNDS 

Artz Fund — Donation from Miss Victoria Thomas Artz, of Chi- 
cago: the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of 
valuable, rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of 
American and foreign authors. These books are to be known as 
the"Longfellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1 896. 

$10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." $50,000.00 



[48] 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of CharLES H. L. N. Ber- 
nard. Received in 1930. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by JOHN P. BiGELOW in August, 
1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. $ 1 ,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of ROBERT CHARLES BlL- 
LINGS. 

"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $100,503.39 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. Received in 
1890. 

The v^hole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb David Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of Joseph H. Center, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. $39,807.58 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "The Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years v^'hen the city appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said city. In any year 
when the city does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston 
to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of the poor. 

$102,949.95 

Clement Fund — Bequest of the late Frank Clement, of Newton, to 
be known as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied 
to the purchase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854,41 



[49] 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of AbRAM E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his Hbrary of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901, 

$4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of SaRAH A. MaTCHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — A bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for the purchase 
of books for the young until otherwise ordered by the Board. Re- 
ceived in 1900. $6,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford 
to the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for general 
purposes. Received in 1935. $5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thom.as Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA Stewart 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 

1924. $5,000.00 
Morris Gest Fund — Donations made by Mr. Morris Gest in December 

1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in I 878 and 1 884. $2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE Harris, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her 



■301 



will: "I give to the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be 
invested on interest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase 
of books published before 1 850. I also give to said Public Library 
my own private library and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard 
Devens." Bequests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. 

$10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 
Received in 1884. $1,048.93 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of ALFRED HemenwAY. Re- 
ceived in 1928. $5,000.00 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund — Bequest of Heloise E. Hersey, of Boston ; 
the income to be expended for the purchase of books, preferably 
those of recent issue that have real literary value. Received in 1936. 

$3,542.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of FrankliN P. HydE of Boston, to be known 
as the "Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the 
purchase of books and other library material. Received in 1915. 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,271.58 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1,000 each made by Mr. 
Louis E. Kirstein, "to be used for any purpose of the Library 
that the Trustees see fit to put it to." 
October, 1925 $1,000.00 



October, 1926 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 
October. 1929 



1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 



$5,000.00 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of Katherine 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 

$10,002.50 

Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of HeLEN Lambert of Boston in 
memory of Frederic and Louise Lambert. Received in 1931 . The 
income of this fund to be expended for the purchase of books and 
other library material until otherwise ordered by the Board. 

$1,394.57 



[51] 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott Lawrence, of Boston. 
Received in 1860. The interest on this fund is to be exclusively 
appropriated for the purchase of books for the said library having 
permanent value. $9,812.52 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of EdwARD LaWRENCE, of Charles- 
town. Received in 1886. The following clause from his will 
explains its purpose: 

"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 

$500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be 
known as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "i give and bequeath to the 
Boston Public Library the sum off $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lev/is Library." Received in 1 903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of ChARLES MeAD, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library Received in 1 896. 

$2,530.51 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund — Bequest of Francis A. MoRSE, of 
West Roxbury; the income only to be expended annually for the 
purchase of books for the West Roxbury Branch Library suitable 
for children of school age. Received in 1936. $1,000.00 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of GARDNER O. NoRTH. Received 
in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of $1 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 
from the disposition of certain property held by the Trusttees, under 
an indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Arnor L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $1 1 ,781 .44 



John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PAPYRUS 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

$1,085.02 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, of Boston, 
in April. 1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books for said library. $ 1 0,000.00 

Also a bequest by the same gentleman in his will dated September 
20, 1849. 

The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance 
of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of the 
City, November 29, 1 873, and accepted by the City Council, De- 
cember 27, 1873. $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, late of Boston, 
under the 1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester 
Branch, $500.00. Received in January, 1922. Distribution of 
residue of estate in May, 1924, $964.30. $1 ,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial 

to Guilford S. Reed; the income to be applied to the purchase of 

books of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFIELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. $62,242.45 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of Richard Black Sewall: 
''Tenth. — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of lega- 
cy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income to be 
used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 



[53] 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 
judge lit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
^''Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of m.y son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1914. $51,059.97 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary Elizabeth Stew- 
art of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. 1 he 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Storrow 

and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to James Jackson 

Storrow, Senior; income to be used for the purchase of Italian books. 

$25,000.00 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest — Extract from will: "I give and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library the sum of five thou- 
sand dollars, the principal or income of said sum to be expended by 
them for the purchase of Catholic standard books, said books to be 
approved by the Archbishop of the diocese of Boston, Mass., or bv 
the President of the Trustees of Boston College, in Boston, Mass." 
Received in 1908. 

This bequest, together with Interest amounting to $339,61 , has been 
expended for books. 



[54] 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George Ticknor, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the city is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-nve 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the city, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the city, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequestss in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
received said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,106.71 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. ToDD, 
accepted by order of the City Council, approved October 30, I 897, 
the income to be at least two thousand dollars a year, to be expend- 
ed by the Library Trustees for newspapers of this and other countries. 

$49,984.94 

Townsend Fnd — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, of Boston, at 
whose disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such 
charitable and public institutions as they might think meritorious. 
Said executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City 
of Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1 879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 



[55] 

life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Pubhc 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 1 7, 1 872, said bequest 
was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized to 
receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as hey 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of Nathan A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 

$10,736.68 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1 897. $5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fnd — Bequest of HoRACE G. WadLIN, of 
Reading, former Librarian, who died November 5, 1 925, of $2,000 
to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston to be 
perm.anently funded and the income thereof used for the purchase 
of books. Received in 1 932. $2,030.51 

Also a bequest by Ella F. Wadlin; to be added to the Horace G. 
Wadlin Fund, and the income to be used for the purchase of books. 
Received in 1936. $1,725.84 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of George C. Wales : 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. $5,000.00 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. Wil- 
son, the income to be expended for the purchase of books for the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1913. $1,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James Lyman Whitney, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 



[56] 



name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discreton deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, ail amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. $27,786.82 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the beneEt of the Library. 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from: 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 

$150.00 
Donations — Besides the preceding, the following donations have been 
made to the Public Library, and the amounts have been appro- 
priated for the purpose of books, according to the intention of the 
donors, viz. : 
Samuel Appleton, late of Boston . . . $1,000.00 

H. C. Bentley 220.38 

J. Ingersoil Bowditch 6,800.00 

Nathaniel L Bowditch . . . . 200,00 

James Brown, late of Cambridge . . . 500.00 

Andrew Carnegie ..... 980.75 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . 335.13 

Sally Inman Kast Shepard .... 1 ,000.00 

James Nightingale 100.00 

$11,136.26 



[57] 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Artz Fund $ iO.OOO.OO 

Bates Fund 50,000.00 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund 1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 100,503.39 

Bowditch Fund 10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund 1.000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund 39,807.58 

Central Library Building Fund 150.00 

Children's Fund 102,949.95 

Clement Fund 2.000.00 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund ...... 2,o54.4! 

Cutter Fund 4.270.00 

Elizabeth Fund 25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 6,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund 5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund 1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund 2,652.50 

Green Fund 2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund 10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 1,048.93 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 5,000.00 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund 3,542.00 

Hyde Fund 3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund 10,271.58 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 5,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund 10,002.50 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund 1,000.00 

Helen Lambert Fund 1,394.57 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 9,812.52 

Edward Lawrence Fund ......... 500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund 5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund ...... 500.00 

Charles Mead Fund 2,530.51 

Gardner O. North Fund 2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 11,781.44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund 1,085.02 

Phillips Fund 30,000.00 

Pierce Fund 5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratl Fund 1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund 1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund ......... 3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund 62,242.45 

Sewall Fund 25,000.00 

Skinner Fund • - • _ 51.059.97 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund ...... 100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund ..... 25,000.00 

Ticknor Fund 4,106.71 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 49,694.94 

Townsend Fund 4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund 13,987.69 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 10.736.68 

Carried forward $396,428.81 



[58] 

Brought forward $396,428.81 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund 3,756.35 

Wales Fund 5,000.00 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund 27,786.82 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund 1 ,00 0.00 

Total $795,830.98 



[59] 

OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY 
Director's Office 
Director, and Librarian Milton E. Lord 

Clerk of the Trustees Elizabeth B. Brockunier 

Supervisor of Training Bertha V. Hartzell 

Editor of Publications Zoltan Haraszti 

Reference Division 

Chief Librarian of the Reference Division: Richard G. Hensley 
Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Frank C. Blaisdell 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Samuel A. Chevalier 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Otto Fleischner 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Lucien E. Taylor, Chief. 

General Reference Departments: Francis J. Hannigan, Supervisor. 

Bates Hall Centre Desk: William J. Mulloney, Assistant in Charge. 
Bates Hall Reference Department: Harry W. Mathews, Assistant 

in Charge. 
Information Department: John H. Reardon, Chief. 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief. 
Newspaper Department: Frederic Serex, Assistant in Charge. 
Periodical Department: Dorothy P. Shaw, In Charge. 
Registration Department: A Frances Rogers, Chief. 

Special Reference Departm.ents : Edward H. Redstone, Supervisor. 

Business Branch: Mary W. Dietrichson, Business Branch Librarian. 
Fine Arts Department: Priscilla S. MacFadden, In Charge. 
Music Department: Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge. 
Science and Technology Department: Frank N. Jones, Chief. 
Statistical Department: Elizabeth G. Barry, Assistant in Charge. 
Teachers' Department: Anna L. Manning, Assistant in Charge. 

Chief of the Special Libraries, Emeritus: George S, Maynard, 

Rare Books: Zoltan Haraszti, Keeper of Rare Books. 

Rare Book Departm.ent: Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge. 



[60] 

Circulation Division 

Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division: Orlando C. Davis. 
Children's Work: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor. 
Branch Libraries: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor. 

Branch Librarians: 

A-Iston, Katherine F. Muldoon. 

Andrew Square, Elizabeth H. McShane. 

Boylston, Margaret A. Calnan. 

Brighton, Katrina M. Sather. 

Charlestown, Katherine S. Rogan. 

City Point, Helen L. Morrisey. 

Codman Square, Elizabeth P. Ross. 

Dorchester, Marion C. Kingman. 

East Boston, Theodora B. Scoff. 

Fanueil, Gertrude L. Connell. 

Fellowes Athenaeum, Mary E. Ames. 

Hyde Park, Sara A. Lyon. 

Jamaica Plain, Rebecca E. Willis, Acting Branch Librarian. 

Jeffries Point, Mary U. Nichols. 

Kirstein, Grace B. Loughlin. 

Lower Mills, Isabel E. Wetherald. 

Mattapan, Ada Andelman. 

Memorial, Beatrice M. Flanagan. 

Mount Bowdoin, Pearl B. Smart. 

Mount Pleasant, Margaret H. Reid. 

Neponset, Margaret I. McGovern. 

North End, Mary F. Curley. 

Orient Heights, Catherine E. Flannery. 

Parker Hill, Mary M. Sullivan. 

Phillips Brooks, Edna G. Peck. 

Roslindale, Annie M. Donovan. 

Roxbury Crossing, Edtih R. Nickerson. 

South Boston, M. Florence Cufflin. 

South End, Clara L. Maxwell. 

Tyler Street, Mary A. C. Kavin. 

Uphams Corner, Beatrice C. Maguire. 

West End, Fanny Goldstein. 

West Roxbury, Geneva Watson. 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus, Katherine F. Albert. 
Branch Librarian, Emeritus, Carrie L. Morse, 
Branch Librarian, Emeritus, Margaret A. Sheridan. 



[61] 

Division of Business Operations 
Comptroller: James W. Kenney. 
Buildings Department: William F. Quinn, Superintendent. 

Auditor: Helen Schubarth. 

Book Purchasing Department: William. C. Maiers, Chief. 
Stock Purchasing Department: Timothy J Mackin. 
Binding Departm.ent: James P. Mooers, Chief. 
Printing Department: Francis W. Lee, Chief. 
Shipper: Robert F. Dixon. 



■^t'^l.