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Given By 
Boston Fire Department 



ANNI'AL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



OITT OF h()ST()N 



\ 1)1 N(i DE< 'KM BEB 31. L930 







ANNUAL REPORT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

AND WIRE DIVISION 



CITY OF BOSTON 



TEAE ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1936 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1937 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreport1936boston 



OFFICIALS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 

William D. Slattery, 
Acting Executive Secretary of the Department. 

Samuel J. Pope, 
Chief of Department. 

George L. Fickett, 
Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division. 

Peter F. Dolan, 

Superintendent of Wire Division. 

Edward E. Williamson, 

Superintendent of Maintenance Division. 

Thomas H. Downey, 
Deputy Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Division. 

Martin H. Spellman, M. D. s 

Medical Examiner. 



[Document 12 — 1937.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

EIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1936. 



Boston, January 31, 1937. 

Hon. Feedeeick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Deae Sie, — I have the honor to submit herewith a 
report of the activities of the Boston Fire Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1936, as required by 
section 24, chapter 4, of the Revised Ordinances of 1925. 

Fiee Loss. 

The total fire loss for the City of Boston, estimated 
by the insurance companies, amounted to $2,952,958.42, 
of which $1,947,607.32 was on buildings and 
$1,005,351.10 was on contents. 

The fires showing the greatest loss during the year 
are as follows : 

November 27, 1936, 44 Charles River avenue, 

Boston Globe Publishing Company et at. . . $375,893 94 
April 8, 1936, Lake street, St. John's Seminary . 234,144 85 
December 8, 1936, 261-287 A street, Boston Plate 

Glass Company 164,594 35 

August 10, 1936, 2333-2337 Washington street, 

Wellworth Market et at 95,713 00 

August 30, 1936, 8 Winter street, Carpenter 

Estate etal . . 73,707 65 

July 27, 1936, 486-498 Albany street, Kimball 

Realty Company et at. 66,554 12 



2 



City Document No. 12. 



February 5, 1936, 463-469 Washington street, 

Hudson Apparel Company et al. . . . $60,427 04 

November 18, 1936, 900 East First street, White 

Fuel Corporation 58,713 40 

November 17, 1936, 84 and 86 Fulton street, 

G. Zuffante Company et al 37,862 54 

August 14, 1936, 34 and 36 South street, Acker- 
man & Patterson et al. 33,180 03 

Finances. 
Expenditures of the department decreased slightly 
over 1935. I submit below a table showing how expendi- 
tures of 1936 compared with those of previous years, 



Bmber 31, 1936 . 






$4,123,856 68 


31, 1935 . 






4,161,328 20 


31, 1934 . 






3,677,085 02 


31, 1933 . 






3,804,226 83 


31, 1932 . 






4,377,844 00 


31, 1931 . 






4,620,818 60 


31, 1930 . 






4,642,216 53 


31, 1929 . 






4,552,265 18 


31, 1928 . 






4,357,568 28 


31, 1927 . 






4,183,945 99 



Fiee Pkevention. 

The personnel of the Fire Prevention Division has 
been diligent in its duties during the year and continued 
vigilance has been practised to reduce the fire hazard. 

During the year all classes of buildings were inspected. 
Many one and two-family houses were inspected, with 
the permission of the occupants. 

Number of inspections 97,935 

Number of re-inspections 14,319 

Number of corrections 15,467 

Number of complaints 13,599 

Number of conditions found corrected on re-inspec- 
tions 12,593 

Number of personal inspections 2,476 

Oil burners inspected 1,672 

Reports of hazardous conditions were sent to other 
departments as follows: 

Reports sent to the Building Department . . . 1,136 

Reports sent to School Buildings Department . . 25 

Reports sent to Health Department .... 8 

Personal services by constable 451 



Fire Department. 



The following inspections were made by district 
officers and district privates: 



Buildings inspected by district officers 
Inspections by district privates 
Theatre inspections . 
Schoolhouse inspections . 
Public buildings inspections 
Carhouse inspections 
Deer Island monthly inspections 
Long Island monthly inspections 



20,311 

66,243 

4,123 

3,802 
849 

72 
12 
12 



A brief account of the activities of the Arson Unit, 
in accordance with the provisions of chapter 383 of the 
Acts of 1931, is as follows: 



Number of Police Inspectors assigned to the Fire Preven- 
tion Division from Police Headquarters . . . . 

Number of Fire Prevention Inspectors on Arson Squad 

Number of Investigations by Arson Squad .... 
(a) Reported as being suspicious .... 64 
(6) Reported as being unknown or undetermind, 128 
(c) Miscellaneous 72 

Number of persons interviewed at Fire Prevention Office, 

Number of hearings held at Fire Alarm Office (Fenway) . 

Number of hearings held, which, on account of in- 
sufficient evidence, were not presented to District 
Attorney 9 

Number of cases presented to District Attorney for 
consideration as to prosecution 7 

Number of cases arraigned in Municipal Court 

Cases held for Grand Jury 3 



4 

6 
264 



43 
14 



Fire Apparatus. 

During the year sixteen motor vehicles were 
chased, tested and placed in service as follows: 



pur- 



1 Mack, type 19, 1,000-gallon centrifugal pumping engine. 

1 Seagrave, V12, 1,000-gallon pumping engine. 

1 Ahrens-Fox, 1,000-gallon triple combination pumping engine. 

1 Seagrave, V12, 85-foot aerial ladder truck. 

2 Studebaker four-door sedans. 
6 Studebaker two-door sedans. 
1 Packard sedan. 

3 85 H. P. Ford trucks with pick-up bodies. 



4 City Document No. 12. 

Twelve small cars were traded in when the new ones 
were purchased. 

The motor equipment of the department, at the 
present time, consists of the following: 



Type 



In Reserve. 



Pumping engines 

Hose cars 

Aerial ladder trucks 

City service ladder trucks 

Water towers 

Mack wrecker 

Rescue cars 

Fuel cars 

School car 

Foamite wagons 

Lighting plants 

Chief officers' cars 

Ford coupes 

Emergency Ford cars 

Commercial trucks 



W. P. A. 

W. P. A. Project No. 7866 started May 25, 1936 
and was completed August 10, 1936. The work con- 
sisted of installing a reinforced concrete main floor in 
the quarters of Ladder Company 9, including changes 
in heating, plumbing, etc. 

Project No. 5069 was started in December, 1935, 
and was completed in November, 1936. The interiors 
of sixteen department buildings were painted during 
that time. 

Project No. 4843 consisted of painting interiors of 
eight department buildings. It was begun and com- 
pleted in 1936. 

Project No. 5578 begun in 1936, and consisting of 
painting interiors of fire stations, bricklaying, carpentry, 
roofing, plumbing, steamfitting, concrete work and 
general building repairs, was still going on December 
31, 1936. During this time work was done in thirty-four 
department buildings. 



Fire Department. 



High Pressure Service. 

The records of the two high pressure service stations 
for the year are as follows: 



Station No. 1. 



Station No. 2. 



Total alarms to which pump responded. 
Water discharged * 



243 

204,000 gallons 



209 
132,500 gallons 



* Owing to the construction of the Venturi meters they do not record flows under 600 
gallons per minute. 

Hydrants. 

The following is a list of the hydrants in service on 
December 31, 1936: 



Private. 



Ordinary post 

Boston post 

Lowry 

Boston Lowry 

Batchelder & Finneran post 

Boston 

High Pressure 

Chapman post 

Ludlow post 

Matthew post 

Coffin post 

Total 



129 

26 

33 

5 



384 



Fire College. 

The sessions of the Fire College were conducted 
during the year (except during the vacation period). 
Approximately one hundred and sixty (160) members 
of the department received instructions at the college 
during the year. 

Department Drills. 

Regular weekly drills were held by all companies in 
the department. In addition, each company in the 
department was given a thorough drill by the department 
drillmaster. 



City Document No. 12. 



Pump School. 



Three classes of the motor pump school were held 
during the year, at which fifteen (15) members of the 
department and three (3) members of outside depart- 
ments were instructed in the care and operation of 
motor fire pumps. 

Chauffeurs' School. 

Eight (8) members of the department received 
instructions in the chauffeurs' school during the year 
and were certified as operators of department motor 
vehicles. All members rated as chauffeurs were given 
instructions in the care and operation of motor vehicles. 

Mutual Aid. 

The department responded to fifty- seven (57) alarms 
of fire outside of the city limits, divided as follows: 



Milton 


31 


Brookline 


4 


Somerville 


19 


Chelsea 


1 


Newton 


2 



Radio Broadcasts. 

Talks were given from time to time over Radio 
Station WBZ in which the Fire Commissioner, Chief 
of Department, Deputy Chief in Charge of Fire Pre- 
vention, Superintendent of the Fire Alarm Division 
and the Superintendent of the Maintenance Division 
participated. The public was asked to cooperate with 
the Fire Department in its efforts to reduce the number 
of fires and the fire loss. The public was instructed 
in fire prevention and was informed concerning im 
portant department operations. 

Fire Alarm Service. 

During the year the Fire Alarm Service has been 
maintained at its usual high standard of efficiency. 
Fifteen (15) new public fire alarm boxes were installed 
and twenty- four (24) old boxes were replaced. 

Three (3) Collins radio transmitters, each of 50 watts 
capacity, were installed on the fireboats, replacing 
obsolete sets. 



Fire Department. 7 

Defective cables were replaced and necessary exten- 
sions of the underground system were made. 



Operating Records. 



First alarms 
Second alarms 
Third alarms 
Fourth alarms 
Fifth alarms 



5,239 
69 
19 

7 
3 

5,337 



Box Alarms Received but not Transmitted. 

Same box received two or more times for same fire . 
Adjacent boxes received for same fire .... 
Received from boxes but treated as stills 



422 

259 

6 

687 



Still Alarms Received and Transmitted. 

Received from citizens by telephone .... 

Received from Police Department by telephone . 

Received from Fire Department stations 

Received from boxes but treated as stills 

Mutual aid alarms (adjacent cities and towns) treated 

as stills 

Emergency service treated as stills .... 



Still alarms received by telephone for which box alarms 
were afterwards received and transmitted 

Still alarms received by telephone from which box 
alarms, not received, were transmitted (11 p. m. 
to 7 a. m.) 



2,691 

327 

1,203 

6 

57 
312 

4,596 



221 

306 

527 



Automatic and A. D. T. Alarms. 

Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 170 

Box alarms received and transmitted after auto- 
matic alarms had been struck .... 2 

Box alarms not received but transmitted after 
automatic alarm had been struck (11 p. m. to 
7 a.m.) . 40 

Automatic alarms received at fire alam office but 

not transmitted 11 



8 City Document No. 12. 

American District Telegraph Company: 

Transmitted by company to this department . . 117 

Box alarms received and transmitted after A. D. T. 

alarms had been struck 4 

Box alarms not received but transmitted after 

A. D. T. alarms had been struck (11 p. m. to 

7 a. m.) 33 

A. D. T. alarms received at fire alarm office but not 

transmitted 12 



Summary of Alarms. 

Alarms received: 

Box alarms received and struck . 
Box alarms received but not struck 
Mutiple alarms .... 
Still alarms — all classes 
Boston automatic alarms 
A. D. T. alarms .... 



Box alarms not received but transmitted (11 p. m. 
to 7 a. m.) 



4,860 

687 

98 

4,596 
170 
117 

10,528 

379 

10,907 



Exclude following : 

Multiples 

Box alarms received but not transmitted . 

Still alarms for which other alarms were trans 

mitted 

Automatic alarms for which other alarms were 

transmitted 

Automatic alarms received but not transmitted 
A. D. T. alarms for which other alarms were trans 

mitted 

A. D. T. alarms received but not transmitted . 



98 
687 

527 

42 
11 

37 
12 

1,414 



Total alarms, with eliminations, to which apparatus 
responded: 

First alarms 5,239 

Still alarms 4,069 

Automatic alarms 117 

A. D. T. alarms 68 



9,493 



Fire Department. 



Multiple Alarm Fires 



With two alarms 
With three alarms 
With four alarms 
With five alarms 



54 

12 

4 

3 



Mutual Aid Response. 



To Milton . 
To Newton 
To Brookline 
To Somerville 
To Chelsea . 



31 
2 

4 
19 

1 

57 



Fire Alarm Box Records. 

Boxes from which no alarms were received . 
Box tests and inspections .... 



454 
12,428 



Note. — All street box doors are tested weekly. 



False Alarms. 

Box alarms received and struck 
Box alarms received but not struck 
Box alarms treated as stills 

* Telephone 

A. D. T 



Automatic 



1,328 

12 

4 

19 

4 

2 

1,369 



Alarm Service. 

Fire Alarms were received and transmitted with no 
delays or failures. Of the 4,860 box alarms received 
and transmitted to the department, 1,328 were false, 
about 27 per cent. This compares with 5,286 received 
in 1935 with 1,595 false, about 30 per cent. The Police 
Department made forty- one (41) arrests of persons 
sounding false alarms and thirty- six (36) convictions 
were obtained in court, as compared with one hundred 
and twenty (120) arrests in 1935 and eighty (80) 
convictions. 



* Five of these alarms were struck as box alarms. 



10 



City Document No. 12. 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Service. 



Total number 








1,698 


Owned by Fire Department . 


1,247 


Owned by School Buildings Department 


257 


Owned by Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 


46 


Privately owned 


148 


Total boxes on posts .... 




874 


Total boxes on poles .... 




470 


Total boxes on buildings .... 




176 


Total boxes in buildings .... 




178 


Fire Department Boxes. 


On box posts . . . . . . 797 


On poles 








427 


On buildings 








18 


In buildings 








5 


Equipped with keyless doors . 








497 


Equipped with quick-action doors . 








744 


Equipped with auxiliary attachments 








3 


Succession type 








1,025 


Designated by red lights . 








891 


Schoolhouse Boxes. 


On box posts . 74 


On poles 








27 


On buildings 








101 


In buildings 








55 


Equipped with keyless doors . 








164 


Equipped with quick-action doors . 








49 


Equipped with key doors 








44 


Equipped with auxiliary attachments 








253 


Succession type .... 








166 


Designated by red lights . 








64 


Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Boxes. 


On poles . 4 


On buildings 








15 


In buildings 








27 


Equipped with keyless doors . 








21 


Equipped with quick-action doors . 








5 


Equipped with key doors 








20 


Equipped with auxiliary attachments 








44 


Succession type 






10 


Private Boxes. 


On posts 3 


On poles 12 


On buildings 42 


In buildings 








91 



Fire Department. 



11 



Equipped with keyless doors . 
Equipped with quick-action doors . 
Equipped with key doors 
Equipped with auxiliary attachments 
Succession type 



District 1 
District 2 
District 3 
District 4 
District 5 
District 6 
District 7 
District 8 



Fire Alarm Boxes in Districts 



103 


District 9 


72 


District 10 


46 


District 11 


87 


District 12 


75 


District 13 


102 


District 14 


104 


District 15 


136 





Division 1 . . . 383 

Division 2 . 499 

Division 3 . . 815 

Also one box in Chelsea. 



51 
52 

45 
23 

107 



116 
140 
157 
107 
174 
153 
125 



Summary of Work Done. 

Line wire used in new work (approximately) 
Line wire used for replacements (approximately) 
Aerial cable installed, new work 

Conductors in same 

Aerial cable replaced .... 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable installed, new work 

Conductors in same 

Underground cable replaced . 
Conductors in same . . . . » . 
Conduits laid underground 

Ducts in same 

Ducts abandoned. Owned by department 

Manholes built 

Handholes built 

Fire alarm boxes installed by Fire Department 
Fire alarm boxes installed by School Buildings 

partment 

Fire alarm boxes relocated 

Fire alarm boxes removed from service 

Box posts installed 

Box posts relocated 

Box posts reset or replaced by new 

Cable posts (small size) installed . 

Cable posts (large size) installed 

Underground cable boxes (attached to poles 

stalled 

Underground cable boxes removed from service 



De- 



m- 



Feet. 

7,100 

14,200 

1,325 

2,650 

1,620 

3,880 

15,108 

121,663 

15,251 

328,023 

2,659 

2,721 

311 

7 

5 

15 

1 
2 

5 

12 
1 

16 
3 

1 

2 
2 



12 City Document No. 12. 

WIRE DIVISION. 

Regular and periodical inspections have been made 
of all theatres, places of amusement and public halls, 
together with inspections of new installations and 
changes in electrical work throughout the city. 

Thorough investigations were made of all fires and 
accidents reported as due to electrical causes and reports 
of same are on file in the Wire Division 

Following is a table showing a summary of the work 
of the interior division of the Wire Division for 1936 : 

Notices of new work received 15,660 

Number of permits issued to turn on current . 11,935 

Number of incandescent lamps inspected . . 2,115,049 

Number of motors inspected 16,503 

Number of inspections made 31,330 

Number of inspections made of theatres, places of 

amusement and public halls .... 1,632 

The income received from permits to perform electrical 
work was $46,392.42. 

During the year there were ninety- three (93) fires 
in buildings, eleven (11) manhole troubles, twelve (12) 
fires on poles, nine (9) miscellaneous troubles and six 
(6) accidents, two (2) of which were fatal, investigated. 

Exteeior Division. 

The underground district for the year 1936, as pre- 
scribed under authority of chapter 101 of the Acts of 
1931, comprised the following streets: 

Brighton. — Washington street, from sixty-six (66) feet east of 
Market street to Tremont street at Oak square. 

Hyde Park. — Fairmount avenue, from River street to Water 
street. 

East Boston.- — Condor street, from Border street to East 
Eagle street; Brooks street, from Condor street to Bremen 
street; Orleans street, from Marginal street to Porter street. 

Jamaica Plain. — Pondrecl circle, formerly Pond circle, from 
231 Pond street to end of street at Pond street. 

South Boston. — West Third street, from one hundred (100) 
feet east of D street to Dorchester street; H street, from East 
First street to Columbia road; I street, from East Broadway 
to Columbia road. 

making a total distance of four (4) miles as prescribed 
by law. 



Fire Department. 13 

In these prescribed streets from which poles and 
overhead wires were to be removed there were standing 
on January 1, 1937, one hundred and seventy-four (174) 
poles and one million, three hundred and seventeen 
thousand, seven hundred and forty-two (1,317,742) 
linear feet of wire. 

During the past year the inspectors of this division 
have reported two hundred and nine (209) poles decayed 
at base and fifteen (15) poles leaning or a total of two 
hundred and twenty-four (224) poles, of which one 
hundred and fifty (150) have been replaced or reset by 
the various companies at the request of this department. 

The following table shows the overhead work for the 
year from January 1, 1936, to December 31, 1936, 
inclusive : 

Number of new poles set in new locations ... 7 

Number of poles reset, replaced or straightened . . 688 

Number of poles removed 171 

Number of poles now standing in public streets . . 17,320 

Number of defects reported 1,073 

Number of defects corrected 598 

(Other defects in process of correction.) 

Number of notices of overhead construction . . 3,576 

Number of overhead inspections 21,326 

Number of overhead reports 23,856 

Amount of overhead wires removed by owners, in feet, 325,068 

Underground Construction. 

The ducts used for the underground conduits of the 
drawing- in system are of the following types: 

1. Vitrified clay (laid in concrete). 

2. Fiber (laid in concrete). 

3. Creosote wood. 

4. Iron pipe. 

In side or residential streets special underground 
construction for electric light and power purposes 
(110 and 220 volts) of the type known as "Split Fiber 
Solid Main System ," has also been installed. 

The electrical approvals for underground electrical 
construction numbered 1,407. 

Number of inspections of underground electrical 

construction 2,191 

Number of reports of underground electrical con- 
struction 4,249 



14 City Document No. 12. 

Table Showing Underground Work for the Year 1936. 





^ 












3 
"0 


_^ 


a 






Company. 


d 
o 
O 


3 

Q 


CS 

O 
"3 


~ 2 
■2 § 


"Sfi 

I- o 

■2 b 








-*^» 


g»3 


g <S 




V 

o 
to 


to 


to 


3^ 


sec 



Boston Elevated Railway Corn- 


411 


2,400 


2,569.2 


2 




Boston Low Tension Wire Asso- 
ciation. 
Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 


290 
1,113 


1,160 
1,439 


12,913.8 


2 


22 


Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company. 
Boston Fire Department (Fire 

Alarm Branch). 
Boston Police Department (Police 

Signal Service). 
New England Telephone and 

Telegraph Company. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Company, 


32,970 


87,182 


510,781 


66 


580 


2,053 

345 

5,457 

50 


1,823 
345 

5,697 
200 


15,108 


8 


6 
37 














2,293 






pany. 












Totals 


42,689 


100,246 


543,665 


78 


645 







Note. — "Split Fibre Solid Mains System" of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
is included in the above figures, comprising 200 feet of conduit and 400 feet of duct. 



Table Showing the Amount and Distribution of Boston's Electrical Power. 



Company. 


o 


K % c 
■- pi] 

■gffl o 


Capacity of 
Incandescent 
Lamps in 
Kilowatts. 


S u ~ 

o 


m ° 
+5 O 

M 


T3 

w o 


S * 

3 CO 

•A 


Boston Elevated Railway Company. . 


24,360 
40,232 

None 
620 
400 


241,287 
265,416 

None 
400 
359 


3,879 

3,200 
125 
125 


15 
1,177,028 

300 

None 
None 


222,962 


49,630 


15 

76 


pany. 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company . . 
Quaker Building Company 


6,800 
106 

75 


2,000 
200 


2 
2 
1 






Totals 


65,612 


507,462 


7,329 


1,177,343 


229,943 


51,830 


96 







Recommendations. 

The principal objective of the Fire Department is the 
protection of life and property against fire, with the 
thought always in mind to bring about a substantial 
reduction in the fire loss. In order that these purposes 
may be accomplished this department must at all 
times be maintained in a very high state of efficiency. 



Fiee Department. 15 

Certain improvements are necessary during the coming 
year to maintain a high standard of efficiency in the 
department. 

Man Power. 

I strongly recommend that serious consideration be 
given to the filling of all vacancies in the fire-fighting 
force during the coming year. During the past few 
years the personnel of the department has been greatly 
reduced as no appointments have been made to the 
fire-fighting force since 1933. In order to maintain the 
department at an efficient operating strength new 
appointments should be made and all vacancies in the 
positions of company and superior officers should be 
filled. 

Fire Apparatus. 
A certain percentage of old major apparatus should 
be replaced each year in order to keep the rolling stock 
of the department in first-class condition. A sane 
program of replacements each year is absolutely impera- 
tive in order to maintain the apparatus at a proper 
standard; otherwise the time will come when it will be 
necessary to expend large sums of money during one 
year to replace old major apparatus. It is sounder 
economy to replace a few pieces each year than to 
wait until necessity forces the replacement of a large 
number at one particular time. 

New Fireboat. 

A new fireboat should be built and placed in service 
in the department to replace Fireboat Engine 31 which 
was built in 1895 and which is now forty-two (42) 
years old. Once each year the boats are taken out of 
service for annual inspection by the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. Such repairs as are required 
by the inspectors are made before the boats are placed 
back in service. As the boats grow older the annual 
repair bill becomes more and more extensive. The 
replacement of the fireboat " Angus J. McDonald," 
Engine 31, by a new boat more modern in type will 
result in a tremendous increase in the waterfront 
fire protection and greatly reduce the repair bill of the 
department. In the report of the National Board of 
Fire Underwriters, issued in December, 1936, recom- 
mendation was made that early consideration be 



16 City Document No. 12. 

given to the replacement of one of our fireboats which 
is old and in poor condition. I urgently recommend 
consideration of this proposition. 

Buildings. 

The subject of new building construction is one 
which is under consideration at all times. There are 
several old fire stations in use which were not built to 
house motor fire apparatus. They have been remodeled 
from time to time to serve the city temporarily. When 
the finances of the city permit the policy of gradual 
replacement of old and antiquated fire houses should 
again be put into effect to bring about improved housing 
and living conditions. Consideration should also be 
given to the consolidation of certain fire stations in 
order to increase the operating efficiency of the 
department. 

Yours very truly, 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 

Fire Commissioner. 



Fire Department. 17 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES, 1936. 

Fire Department - . . $4,123,856 68 

Wire Division 98,994 63 



t,222,851 31 



ANNUAL REPORT OF REVENUE, BOSTON FIRE 
DEPARTMENT, YEAR OF 1936. 

Permits for fires in open spaces; fireworks; blast- 
ing; transportation and storage of explo- 
sives; garage and gasoline storage; oil 

burners; etc $24,422 50 

Sale of old material (condemned hose) . . 228 11 

Sale of old material (junk) . . . . . 363 59 

Miscellaneous sales 21 32 

Sale of badges 391 50 

Property damage: 

Fire alarm boxes and posts .... 654 95 

Fire apparatus 748 16 

$26,830 13 



18 City Document No. 12. 



CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 
Samuel J. Pope. 
The chief is in charge of the fire protection of the 
city which is divided into three divisions, each com- 
manded by a deputy chief, which are subdivided into 
fifteen districts, each commanded by a district chief. 

Division 1. 

Deputy Chiefs, John J. Kenney and Louis C. 
Stickel. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 8, Fort Hill Square. 
This division comprises Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

District 1. 

District Chiefs, Napeen Boutilier and William F. 

Donovan. 

Headquarters, Engine House 5, Marion Street, 

East Boston. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 5, 9, 11, 

40, 47 (fireboat), Ladders 2, 21, 31. 

District 2. 
District Chiefs, Philip A. Tague and Michael J. 

Aylward. 
Headquarters, Engine House 50, Winthrop Street, 

Charlestown. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 27, 32, 36, 
50, Ladders 9, 22. 

District 3. 

District Chiefs, William A. Donovan and Charles D. 

Robertson. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 18, Pittsburgh Street. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 25, 38, 

39, 44 (fireboat), Ladders 8, 18, Water Towers 1 and 3. 

District 4- 
District Chiefs, James F. Sheehan and Franklin B. 

Sanborn. 
Headquarters, Engine House 4, Bowdoin Square. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — ■ Engines 4, 6, 8, 
31 (fireboat), Ladders 1, 24, Rescue 3. 



Fire Department. 19 

District 5. 

District Chiefs, John F. Watson and Daniel 

Crowley. 
Headquarters, Engine House 26-35, Broadway. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 7, 10, 26, 
35, Ladder 17, Rescue 1, Water Tower 2. 

Division 2. 

Deputy Chiefs, William F. Quigley and John F. 
McDonough. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 
This division comprises Districts 6, 7, 8, 11. 

District 6. 

District Chiefs, James J. Kane and Edward G. 
Chamberlain. 

Headquarters, Engine House 1, Dorchester Street, 

South Boston. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — -Engines 1, 2, 15, 
43, Ladders 5, 19, 20. 

District 7. 

District Chiefs, Michael F. Minehan and William J. 

Mahoney. 

Headquarters, Engine House 22, Warren Avenue. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 3, 22, 33, 
Ladders 3, 13, 15. 

District 8. 

District Chiefs, Daniel Martell and Charles H. 
McDonnell. 

Headquarters, Engine House 37, 560 Huntington 

Avenue. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 13, 14, 
37, Ladders 12, 26. 

District 11. 

District Chiefs, Thomas H. Andreoli and Joseph W. 

Shea. 

Headquarters, Engine House 41, Harvard Avenue, 

Brighton. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 29, 34, 
41, 51, Ladders 11, 14. 



20 City Document No. 12. 

Division 3. 
Deputy Chiefs, Frank A. Sweeney and Dennis J. 

COUGHLIN. 

Headquarters, Ladder House 23, Washington Street, 

Grove Hall. 
This division comprises Districts 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15. 

District 9. 

District Chiefs, William H. McCorkle and John J. 

O'Brien. 
Headquarters, Engine House 12, Dudley Street. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 12, 23, 24, 
Ladders 4, 23, Rescue 2. 

District 10. 

District Chiefs, Daniel J. Hurley and Edward N. 
Montgomery. 
Headquarters, Engine House 17, Parish Street, 
Meeting House Hill. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — ■ Engines 17, 18, 21, 
Ladder 7. 

District 12. 

District Chiefs, Timothy F. Donovan and Thomas F. 

Ward. 

Headquarters, Engine House 28, Centre Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 28, 42, 53, 
Ladders 10, 30. 

District 13. 

District Chiefs, Charles A. Donohoe and Edward F. 

McCarthy. 

Headquarters, Engine House 45, Corner Washington 

and Poplar Streets, Roslindale. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 30, 45, 
Ladders 16, 25. 

District 14- 

District Chiefs, James Mahoney and Walter C. Glynn. 

Headquarters, Engine House 46, Peabody Square, 

Dorchester. 

Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 16, 20, 

46, 52, Ladders 6, 27, 29. 



Fire Department. 



21 



District 15. 

District Chiefs, William Hart and Allen J. Jarvis. 

Headquarters, Engine House 48, Corner Harvard 

Avenue and Winthrop Street, Hyde Park. 
Apparatus Located in the District. — Engines 19, 48, 
49, Ladder 28. 

Alarms. 

3,637 

847 

340 

175 

116 

• 848 

731 

1,356 

245 

666 

451 

23 

73 



Building fires 

Automobile fires 

Rubbish, vacant lot 

Rubbish near building 

Dump . 

Brush or grass . 

Other outdoor fires 

False . 

Accidental 

Needless 

Rescue 

Marine 

Out of city calls 



Total alarms 



Fire resistive 
Second class 
Frame . 
Other types 

Total . 



Basement . 
First floor . 
Second floor 
Third floor . 
Above third floor 
Roof . 
Outside 

Total . . . 



Fires in Buildings. 
Construction of Buildings. 



Point of Origin. 



Extent of Fire. 
Confined to point of origin 
Confined to buildings 
Spread to other buildings 



9,508 



178 

1,912 

1,541 

6 

3,637 



1,140 
1,019 
426 
281 
181 
123 
467 

3,637 



2,994 

583 

60 



Total 



3,637 



22 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires in Buildings. 



Chimneys, soot burning . 










426 


Defective chimney . 










43 


Sparks from chimney 










61 


Defectively installed heater 










92 


Rubbish near heater 










67 


Hot ashes 










86 


Fuel oil burners .... 










264 


Starting fires, kerosene or gasoline 










7 


Careless smoking 










1,054 


Children and matches 










255 


Other careless use of matches . 










133 


Defective wiring 










79 


Electric appliances and motors 










217 


Home dry cleaning . 










3 


Flammable liquids near flame 










39 


Kerosene lamps, stoves . 










9 


Grease, food on stove 










96 


Clothes, furniture too near fire 










38 


Spontaneous ignition 










142 


Fireworks 










49 


Thawing water pipes 










24 


Sparks from machines 










19 


City gas and appliances . 










32 


Miscellaneous known causes . 










200 


Incendiary or suspicious . 










64 


Unknown . . 










138 


Total 


3,637 



Fire Department. 



23 



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26 



City Document No. 12. 



Causes of Fires and Alarms, From January 1, 1936, 
To January 1, 1937. 



Automobile 


847 


Other careless use of 




Rubbish, vacant lot 


340 


matches 


133 


Rubbish, near building 


175 


Defective wiring . 


79 


Dump 


116 


Electric appliances and 




Brush or grass 


848 


motors 


217 


Other outdoor fires 


731 


Home dry cleaning 


3 


False 


1,356 


Flammable liquids near 




Accidental 


245 


flame .... 


39 


Needless bell and still 


666 


Kerosene lamps, stoves, 


9 


Rescue 


451 


Grease, food on stove . 


96 


Marine 


23 


Clothes, furniture, too 




Out of city calls 


73 


near fire 


38 


Chimneys, soot burning 


426 


Spontaneous ignition . 


142 


Defective chimney 


43 


Fireworks 


49 


Sparks from chimney 


61 


Thawing water pipes . 


24 


Defectively install ec 


I 


Sparks from machines . 


19 


heater . 


92 


City gas and appliances, 


32 


Rubbish near heater 


67 


Miscellaneous known 




Hot ashes 


86 


causes .... 


200 


Fuel oil burners 


264 


Incendiary or suspicious, 


64 


Starting fires, kerosem 




Unknown 


138 


or gasoline 


7 








Careless smoking . 


1,054 


Total 


9,508 


Children and matches 


255 




— 





Fires Extinguished By. 


1936. 


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35 
29 
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28 
12 
29 
21 
24 


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134 
143 
134 
141 


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3 
3 
3 


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40 
47 
42 
47 


32 
30 
34 
25 
33 


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14 


May 


13 




17 


July 


20 




22 


26 


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5 


25 


38 


16 




34 


17 


103 


1 


19 


24 


13 




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45 


27 
24 


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186 


6 
10 


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65 


39 
46 


17 


November 


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47 


33 


162 


3 


40 


51 


21 






Totals .-... 


426 


282 


1,666 


56 


534 


466 


207 



Fire Department. 



27 



Alarms for the Past Ten Years. 



Yeah. 


Bell. 


Still 

and 

Automatic. 


Totals. 


1936 


5,232 
5,657 
5,952 
5,496 
5,587 
4,727 
4,601 
4,473 
3,867 
3,492 


4,276 
4,195 
4,023 
3,597 
3,808 
3,934 
3,808 
3,979 
3,829 
3,840 


9,508 


1935 


9,852 


1934 


9,975 


1933 


9,093 
9,395 
8,661 
8,409 
8,452 
7,696 
7,332 


1932 


1931 


1930 


1929 


1928 


1927 





Each fire is treated as having only one alarm. 



28 



City Document No. 12. 



Fires Where Losses Exceeded $15,000. 



Date. 



Location and Owner. 



Loss. 





1936. 






Jan. 


12 


780 Beacon street, Brighton Realty Company et al 


$20,811 25 


Jan. 


30 


184-190 Hanover street, The Lace Shop el al 


35,381 91 


Jan. 


31 


71-79 Kingston street, Allen Stationery Company 


36,977 30 


Jan. 


31 


531 and 533 Washington street, Harvard College et al 


15,767 73 


Feb. 


4 

5 




19,675 00 


Feb. 


463—469 Washington street, Hudson Apparel Company 


60,427 04 


Feb. 


8 


749-759 Dudley street, Benjamin's Drug Company et al. 


17,238 80 


Feb. 


9 


669-677 Washington street, Shoe Manufacturers Outfit 


31,011 59 


Feb. 


10 

12 


196 and 198 State street, C. A. Faulds et al 


15,198 22 


Feb. 


364-372 Congress street, Noyes Ellis et al 


16,746 44 




11-19 Wormwood street, Proctor-Ellison Company et al. 


17,749 43 


April 


3 


213 and 215 State street, T. W. Emerson & Co. et al 


16,000 23 


April 


8 




234,144 85 


April 


28 


Kingston street, Sedlis Manufacturing Company et al. . 


29,437 55 


May 


9 


79 North Harvard street, Harvard University Athletic 


15,201 77 




30 

7 


28-32 North street, M. Blinder & Co. tt al 


21,611 48 


July 


27 and 29 Commercial street, A. E. Mills & Son et al 


20,704 44 


July 


27 


486-498 Albany street, Kimball Realty Company et al. . 


66,554 12 


Aug. 


10 


2333-2337 Washington street, Wellworth Market et al. . 


95,713 00 


Aug. 


14 


34 and 36 South street, Ackerman & Patterson et al 


33,180 03 


Aug. 
Sept. 


30 




73,707 65 


26 


45 West Canton street, Massachusetts Wine and Fruits 


20,891 24 


Nov. 


17 


84 and 86 Fulton street, G. Zuffante Company et al 


37,862 54 




18 . 




58,713 40 




22 




20,830 05 


Nov. 


27 


44 Charles River avenue, Boston Globe Publishing Com- 


375,893 94 


Dec. 


8 




164,594 35 


Dec. 


18 


37 and 37 1 Revere street, Sarah Rosen et al 


17,705 83 


Dec 


22 




21,210 16 


Dec 


23 




23,121 57 









Fire Department. 



29 



Statistics. 

Population, January 1, 1937 

Area, square miles 

Number of brick, etc., buildings 

Number of wooden buildings . 

Fires in brick, etc., buildings . 

Fires in wooden buildings 

Fires out of city 

Not in buildings, false and needless 





817,713 




47.81 




44,293 




93,768 


2,090 




1,547 




73 




5,798 


Qsns 



Fire Loss for the Year Ending December 31, 1936. 

Buildings, loss insured $1,947,607 32 

Contents, loss insured 1,005,351 10 



Total loss insured 








$2,952,958 42 


Marine loss 




$2,601 50 


Yearly Loss 


for the Last Fifteen Years. 


Year ending 


January 


1, 1923 . . . . $3,304,595 00 


a it 


a 


1 


1924 . 






6,286,299 00 


it it 


a 


1 


1925 . 






4,735,595 00 


a a 


a 


1 


1926 . 






5,407,070 00 


a a 


a 


1 


1927 . 






5,199,965 00 


a a 


a 


1 


1928 . 






3,694,642 00 


a it 


a 


1 


1929 . 






3,887,250 00 


a a 


a 


1 


1930 . 






4,129,926 00 


u a 


a 


1 


1931 . 






4,593,622 00 


u it 


a 


1 


1932 . 






4,113,419 00 


a a 


a 


1 


1933 . 






4,240,168 00 


u u 


u 


1 


1934 . 






2,359,806 00 


it it 


a 


1 


1935 . 






2,332,280 00 


u a 


u 


1 


1936 . 






2,033,107 00 


u a 


a 


1 


1937 . 






2,952,958 42 



30 



City Document No. 12. 



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Fire Department. 



31 



John E. Fitzgerald Medal. 

John J. Leary, for 1922. 
Daniel J. O'Brien, for 1923. 
Thomas F. Kilduff, for 1924. 
Dennis M. Condon, for 1927. 
Joseph P. Hanton, for 1929. 
Patrick J. Flaherty, for 1934. 
John J. Crehan, for 1936. 

Walter Scott Medal. 

Dennis M. Condon, for 1922. 
James H. Curran, for 1923. 
Edward J. Crowley, for 1924. 
Gilbert W. Jones, for 1927. 
John J. Boyle, for 1929. 



Roll of Merit. 



Carl V. Anderson. 
Carl S. Bowers. 
James J. Buchanan. 
William 0. Cheswell. 
Dennis M. Condon. 
Walter P. Corbett. 
Michael J. Dacy. 
James E. Downey. 
Thomas H. Downey. 
Dennis Driscoll. 
Joseph P. Hanton. 
Timothy J. HefTron. 
Gilbert W. Jones. 
Henry J. Kelly. 



Martin A. Kenealy. 
John J. Kennedy. 
Frederick F. Leary. 
John J. Martin. 
Edward McDonough. 
James F. McMahon. 
Thomas J. Muldoon. 
Edward J. Murphy. 
Arthur A. Ryan. 
John A. O'Connor. 
Michael J. Teehan. 
William C. Jeffers. 
James F. Sheehan. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT