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Full text of "Annual report"

"^ 




EIGHTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1937 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1941 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTIN6 DEPARTMENT. 

8,13,41 1 ISOOfSO 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ELLERY SEDGWICK, President 

Terra expires April 30. 1938 

JOHN L. HALL 

Term expires April 30, 1941 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN FRANK W. BUXTON 

Term expires April 30. 1939 Term expires April 30, 1940 

ROBERT H. LORD 

Term expires April 30, 1942 



MILTON E. LORD 
Director, and Librarian 



FORM FOR GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

Gifts 

/ give to The Trustees of the Public Library) of the City of 

Boston the sum of 

to be used at the discretion of the Trustees (or for a purpose to 
be specified). 



Bequests for General Uses 

/ give and bequeath to The Trustees of the Public Librar}) 

of the Cit^ of Boston the sum of 

for the general uses of the Library. 



Bequests for Specified Uses 

/ give and bequeath to The Trustees of the Public Library 

of the Cit^ of Boston the sum of 

„ for the purchase of books (for the 

purchase of books on a specified subject if desired, or for some 
other purpose to be specified). 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Library is a unit of the municipal government of the City of Boston and as 
such is known as the Library Department of the City of Boston. It is governed by a 
Board of Trustees. 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston v/ere organized in 1852. 
They are incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 114 of the Acts of 1878, as 
amended. The Board for 1852 v^^as a preliminary organization; that for 1853 made 
the first annual report. 

The legal title is The Trustees of the Puhlic Library of the Cily of Boston. 

The Board of Trustees is made up of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor of the City of Boston for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each 
year. The following citizens at large have been members of the Board since its 
organization in 1852: 

Abbott. Gordon, A.B., 1926-1931. Haynes, Henry Williamson, A.M., 
Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, A.M., 1880-94. 

1879-95. Milliard, George Stillman, LL.D., 
Appleton, Thomas Gold, A.M., 1852-56. 1872-75; 1876-77. 

Benton, Josiah Henry, LL.D., 1894-1917. Kenney, William Francis, A.M., 
Bigelow, John Prescott. A.M., 1852-68. 1908-1921. 

Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, M.D., 1865-67. Kirstein, Louis Edward, A.M., 1919- 

Bowditch, Henry Pickering, MJ>., Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

1894-1902. Lewis, Winslow, m.d., 1867. 

Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. Lincoln, Solomon, A.M., 1897-1907. 

Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. Lord, Robert Howard, A.M., PH.D., 1936- 

Brett, John Andrew, LL.B., 1912-16. Mann, Alexander, DJ)., 1908-1923. 

Buxton, Frank W., A.B., 1928- Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Carr. Samuel, 1895-96. 1908-22. Murray Michael Joseph. LL.B., 1921-26. 

Chase, George Bigelow, A.M., 1876-85. O'Connell. William Cardinal. 1932-36. 

Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1879-88. Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. Prince, Frederick Octavlus, A.M.. 1888-99. 

Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. Putnam, George, D.D., 1868-77. 

Currier, Guy Wilbur. 1922-1930. Richards. William Reuben, A.M., 1 889-95. 

Curtis, Daniel Sargent, A.M., 1873-75. Sedgwick, Ellery, A.B., LITTJ)., 1930- 

De Normandie, James, D.D., 1895-1908. Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradstreet, LL.D., 
Dwight. Thomas. M.D., 1899-1908. 1852-68 

Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, B.S., 1927-28. Thomas, .Benjamin Franklin. LL.D., 
Everett, Edward, LL.D., 1852-64. 1877-78. 

Frothingham, Richard, LL.D., 1875-79. Ticknor. George, LL.D.. 1852-66. 

Gaston, William Alexander. LL.D., Walker, Francis Amasa, LL.D., 1896. 

1923-27. Whipple, Edwin Percy, A.M., 1868-70. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, M.D., 1868-78. Whitmore, William Henry, A.M.. 1885-88. 

Greenough. William Whitwell. 1856-88. Winsor. Justin, LL.D., 1867-68. 
Hall, John Loomer, A.B., LL.B., 1931- 



PRESIDENTS OF THE TRUSTEES 

Edward Everett. 1852-1864 
George Ticknor 1 865 
William W. Greenough 1866-88 
Henry \V. Haynes. May 7. 1888-May 12, 1888 
Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888-Aprll 30. 1895 
Frederick O. Prince, October 8, 1895-May 8. 1899 
Solomon Lincoln. May 12. 1899-October 15, 1907 
James De Normandie, January 31, I90&-May 8 1908 
Josiah H. Benton May 8, 1908-February 6, 1917 
William F. Kenney, February 13, 1917-May 7, 1920 
Alexander Mann. May 7, 1920-January 22. 1923 
Arthur T. Connolly. April 13. 1923-June 13. 1924 

May 2. 1927-June 22. 1928 
Louis E. Kirstein. June 13. 1924-June 19, 1925 

June 22, 1925-June 21 1929 

May 15. 1931 -May 20. 1932 

May 6. I93^May 7. 1937 
Michael J. Murray. June 19 1925-July 2. 1926 
Guy W. Currier. July 2. 1926-May 2. 1927 
Gordou Abbott. June 21, 1929-June 20 1930 
Frank W. Buxton, June 20, 1930-May 15. 1931 

May 6. 1935-May 6. 1936 
Ellery Sedgwick. May 20. 1932-May 5,1933 

May 7, 1937- 
John L. Hall. May 5, 1933-May 18, 1834 
William Cardinal O'Connell. May 18. 1934-May 6. 1935 



LIBRARIANS 

From 1852 to 1858 the chief officer of the Library bore the title of Librarian; 
from 1858 to 1877 Superinlendenl ; from 1877 to 1923 Librarian; from 1923 to 1934 
Director; since 1934 Director, and Librarian. 

Capen. Edward. Librarian, May 13, 1852-December 16 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superinlendenl, 1858-january 9. 1868. 

WiNSOR Justin. LL.D.. Superintendent, February 25. 1868-September 30. 1877. 

Green, Samuel A. M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1 877-September 30, 

1878. 
Chamberlain. Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October I, 1 878-September 30, 1890. 
DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892-April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian February 11,1 895-April 3, 1 899. 
Whitney, James L., a.m., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1 899-December 21, 1899; 

Librarian, December 22 1899-January 31, 1903. 
Wadlin. Horace G., LrrT.D., Librarian February 1, 1903-March 15, 1917; Acting 

Librarian, March 15. 1917-June 15, 1917. 
Belden, Charles F. D., a.m.. ll b.. litt.d.. Director March 15, 1917-October 24, 

1931. 
Lord, Milton E. A.B., Director and Librarian, since February I, 1932. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1937 



Departments 
^Central Library, Copley Square . 
*East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. 
§South Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
llFellowes Athenasum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
*CharIestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
♦Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
■fLower Mills Branch, 1110 Washington, cor. Richmond St. 
JSouth End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. 
■f Jamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St. 
IRoslindale Branch, 4210 V/ashington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
*North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponsel Ave. 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St. 
§AIlsfon Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
fCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 
$Mt. Pleasant Branch, 335 Dudley, cor Vine St. 
ITyler Street Branch, 130 Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
*Wesl End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUpham's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
JMemorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend St». 
§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles, cor. Tremont St. 

*Boylston Branch, 433 Centre St 

§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler Ave. 
JCity Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway , 
*Parker Hill Branch. 1497 Tremont St. . . . 

*Hyde Park Branch, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 

*Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St 

§Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 
'Jeffries Point Branch, 222 Webster St. . . . 

JBaker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business AdminisJ 
*KirsteIn Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 

Kirsfein Branch, third floor, 
§Phillip8 Brooks Branch, 12 Hamilton St., Readville . 



<IOpe 


NED 


May 2, 


1854 


. Jan. 28, 


1871 


May 1, 


1872 


. July 16, 


1873 


. Jan. 5, 


1874 


. Jan. 5, 


1874 


Jan. 25, 


1875 


June 7, 


1875 


Aug., 


1877 


June, 


1877 


. Dec. 3, 


1878 


Jan, 6, 


1880 


Dec. 27. 


1881 


. Oct., 


1882 


. Jan. 1, 


1883 


. Nov. 1, 


1886 


Mar. 11, 


1839 


Nov. 12, 


1890 


Nov. 12, 


1890 


Jan. 16, 


1896 


Feb. 1. 


1896 


Mar. 16, 


1896 


May 1. 


1896 


Jan. 18, 


1897 


Nov. 1, 


1897 


June 25, 


1901 


July 18, 


1906 


. July 15, 


1907 


Jan. 1, 


1912 


Mar. 4, 


1914 


Mar. 5. 


1914 


Oct. 15, 


1921 


ation Jan. 15, 


1927 


May 7, 


1930 


May 18. 


1931 



^In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. *In building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board, tli^ building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses. Jin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §Occupies 
rented rooms. i|The lessee of the Fellowes AihenKum, a private library association. 
• Under agreement with Harvard. 



CONTENTS 



Report of the Trustees . 
Financial Statement 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Director . 
Appendix 



I 

12 
18 
31 
54 



To The Honorable Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Ma^or of the City of Boston. 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31, 1937, being the eighty-sixth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 7, 
1937 with the election of Mr. Ellery Sedgwick as President, 
Mr. John L. Hall as Vice President, and Miss Elizabeth B. 
Brockunier as Clerk. 

The Reverend Robert H. Lord, whose term as Trustee ex- 
pired on April 30, was re-appointed for the term ending April 
30, 1942. 

BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted as of November 1 , 1 936 for the 
maintenance of the Library during the year 1937 were later 
amended and reduced. These estimates were as follows: 



Item 


Estimated 


Allowed 


A. — Personal Service 


$970,379.40 


$985,000.00 


B. — Service other than personal . 


109,121.33 


86,486.00 


C. — Equipment .... 


166,577.65 


85,048.00 


D. — Supplies 


38,392.00 


34,910.00 


E.— Materials 


22,336.00 


20,235.00 


H. — Emergency relief projects 


97,450.63 


78,750.00 


Total 


$1,404,257.01 


$1,290,429.00 



RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 



The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and the City Council, and the income from Trust 



[21 

Funds given to the institution and held and invested by the City 
Treasurer. During the year 1937 these receipts were: 



Annual appropriation ....... 

Income from trust funds 

Unexpended balajice of trust funds income of previous years 
Unexpended balance of special appropriations of previous years 
Unexpended balance of deposits in London of previous years 

Total 



$1,290,429.00 

59.839.65 

40,107.73 

23.408.32 

72.75 

$1,413,857.45 



Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the year were 
as follows: 

From fines $23,413.45 

From sales of waiste paper ......... II 938 

From sales of catalogs and other publications ...... 252,76 

From commission on telephone pay stations ...... 522.82 

From payments for lost books ........ 737.03 

Refunds, fees. etc. 8.80 

Total . . . $25,054.24 

EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 

The total amount expended during 1937 was $1 ,329,360.44. 
This was divided as follows : 

From city appropriations ......... $1,267,066.88 

From special appropriations ........ 11,131.75 

From the income of trust funds ........ 51,161.81 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 67,582, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part also 
by gift and exchange. 

Against the above-mentioned gain there was a total loss of 
60,236 volumes, arising chiefly out of volumes reported lost 
or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, thus making the 
net gain for the year 7,346. The total number of volumes in 
the Library at the close of the year was 1 ,700,681 . 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and the income from trust funds was $131 ,1 64.30. 



[3] 



USE OF THE LIBRARY 



The total number of books lent to borrowers during the year 
was 4,531,378. The use of books and other library materials 
within the Library's premises for reference and study is for the 
most part unrestricted, and it is therefore impracticable to re- 
cord it. 

In addition to the above-noted use of the Central Library and 
the thirty-three Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 
available to 281 agencies, including schools, institiitions, and 
engine houses. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICS FOR 1936 AND 1937 

A comparison of certain statistics for 1937 with those for 
1936 is given below: 



Total expenditures: city appropriation 

and trust funds income 
Elxpended for books and other library 

materials from city appropriation 

and trust funds income 
Number of volumes added . 
Number of volumes discarded 
Total number of volumes in the Library 
Number of volumes lent to borrowers 
Number of card holders 



1936 


1937 


$1,249,953.92 


$1 ,329.360.44 


1 1 1 .945.72 

54.620 

49.708 

1.693,335 

4,806,737 

176,982 


131,164.30 

67,582 

60,236 

1 ,700,681 

4,531.378 

178.097 



BOOKS 

The amounts appropriated by the City for the purchase of 
books during the last ten years are given below for comparative 
purposes : 



1928 












$125,000 


1929 












140.000 


1930 












160.000 


1931 












175.000 


1932 












160.000 


1933 












75.000 


1934 












100.000 


1935 












100.000 


1936 












55.000 


1937 












75.000 



[4] 

With appreciation it is noted that the amount appropriated in 
1937 represents an increase over that made available in 1936. 
It is hoped that in the years immediately to come further im- 
provement may be possible in this respect until the appropriation 
for books may be returned at least to the level which the ex- 
perience of many years has indicated to be the minimum amount 
with which the Library can function to advantage. 

SALARIES AND WAGES 

In 1936 it became increasingly clear that the Library was 
not receiving sufficient appropriations year by year for develop- 
ing an adequate scale of remuneration for the members of the 
librar}' staff. A special committee of the Trustees was thereupon 
appointed to study the problem. The committee continued its 
inquiry into 1937 and presented findings and recommendations 
in the matter in April. 

The Trustees wish to record here their appreciation of the 
action taken by the Mayor and the City Council in making avail- 
able to the Library a supplementary appropriation for 1937 in 
the amount of $32,000 for improvement in salaries and wages. 
This was made effective as of June 4th. 

On June 1 st there was announced the establishment of a new 
Classification of Personnel for the library staff. In addition to 
setting up uniform lines of classification for the library personnel 
provision was made for a series of Qualifying Examinations for 
probationary assistants who desire to qualify for appointment 
to the permanent service, and Promotional Examinations for 
assistants in the permanent service who desire to qualify for pro- 
motion and possibilities of increased remuneration. By these 
means it is expected that there can be achieved an improved 
classification of the Library's personnel, and also provision of 
definite "steps" with which a system of "step rate increases in 
pay" can be easily articulated. The new arrangements were an- 
nounced to become effective as of January 1 , 1 938. 



[51 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Early in the year an examination of the tower of the old West 
Church building, in which is housed the West End Branch Li- 
brary, revealed a structural weakness of sufficient extent to neces- 
sitate the closing of the entire front portion of the building. 
Shortly thereafter, follov/ing examination of the structural ele- 
ments of the rest of the old building, it appeared desirable to 
the Building Commissioner to order the entire building to be 
closed to public use. Temporary quarters almost directly across 
the street were promptly rented for the branch library and its 
activities until the old building could be made safe for occupancy 
once again. 

Emergency repairs were made upon the tov/er at once, at a 
cost of approximately $7000. Careful examination of the rest 
of the building indicated that the total cost of repairs would 
amount to approximately $55,000. For lack of an appropriation 
for the purpose no further work on the building has been possible 
since the completion of the emergency work in March. 

Each year over a period of years the Trustees have included 
in their annual budget estimates an item for the repair of this old 
building. Year by year the item has not been allowed, until finally 
an emergency situation came into being. The old church building 
is one of the significant historical and esthetic monuments of the 
city; it is also one of the only two remaining public edifices of 
its period in Boston. It is therefore important that provision be 
made for its renovation and repair at an early date. 

At the Central Library building there has long existed a 
troublesome situation in connection with the tile roofing. There 
is lacking an under roof with the result that, when the old tiles 
crack and disintegrate as they do soon or late in a northern cli- 
mate such as ours, there is nothing underneath to prevent the re- 
sulting leaks from dcimaging the Library's beautiful rooms and 
their invaluable contents. Year by year the annual cost of main- 
tenance and repair of the tile roofing has ranged from ten to 
twelve thousand dollars. With a view to ascertaining the steps 
which might be taken toward remedying the present unsatis- 
factory situation in which repairs are constantly needed, the 



[6] 

Trustees engaged Messrs J. R. Worcester and Company, long 
the Library's consulting engineers, to make a thorough study of 
the condition of the tile roofing and to make recommendations 
for a fundamental and permanent treatment of the problem.. 

The report of the Worcester Company, as rendered on Sep- 
tember 13, 1937, recommended a program which it is believed 
will lead to a reasonably permanent solution. The cost will be 
approximately $256,000. This is a large figure. Yet in 1937 
alone there had to be expended the sum of $13,221.01 for re- 
pairs upon the roof as it now stands. Apparently any treatment 
accorded to it will be costly. The present practice of annual 
patching and repairing will prove in the long run to be the more 
costly, however, since it provides for no more than keeping a- 
breast of existing difficulties as they occur in cycles year by year, 
and as they are likely to continue to do so more or less indefinite- 
ly into the future. The Trustees earnestly request therefore that 
careful consideration be accorded to the recommendation of 
their engineers looking toward a fundamental treatment of the 
problem which will be reasonably permanent in its results. 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF PROJECTS CARRIED ON 
UNDER THE SPONSORSHIP OF THE LIBRARY 

During the year the Library was responsible for carrying on 
three separate work relief projects under the auspices of the 
Works Progress Administration of the Federal Government. 
Two of these were in continuation of projects initiated in earlier 
years. One was entirely new. 

Work was continued upon the extensive preparatory stages 
for the project of reclassifying the scholarly book collections of 
the Central Library on a modern classification scheme such as 
that of the Library of Congress. These were substantially com- 
pleted by the month of November, with the result that in the 
remaining weeks of the year it was possible to begin the actual 
work of reclassification itself. 

On July 1 st an entirely new project was initiated along similar 
lines for the book collections of the branch libraries and other 



[7] 

units of the Circulation Division. Its purpose is to provide a uni- 
form cataloging and classification of books in place of the several 
existing varieties of procedure. For instance, there have been up 
to the present four different classification arrangements and six 
different sizes of catalog cards in use in the Circulation Division. 
In one branch library there has actually been no card catalog 
at all. This extensive new project will, through its establishment 
of a uniform basis of cataloging and classification procedure, ul- 
timately make possible a orocess of centralized cataloging for 
the branch libraries, with appreciable economies in operation ex- 
pected to follow from it. It will make use of a simplified foi-m of 
Library of Congress cataloging and a simplified and modified 
form of the decimal classification generally known as the Dewey 
Classification. 

There was also continued through the year the project for the 
cleaning of books throughout the entire library system. 

All of these projects provided work for several hundred indi- 
viduals. The cost of their wages was provided by the Federal 
Government. The incidental expenses were borne by the City 
of Boston as its contribution as sponsor of the projects. 

GIFTS 

As usual the Library received many important gifts of books 
and other library materials during the year. A list of the more 
important of these is to be found in the Appendix on pages 70-7 1 . 

TRUST FUNDS 

As a matter of interest to the citizens of Boston the Trustees 
have pleasure in listing the present trust funds of the Library, 
with explanatory notes, on pages 72—84 in the Appendix to the 
Report. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money and hope that 
generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare and other im- 
portant books which give value and prestige to a great educa- 
tional institution such as the Library. 



[8] 

ADMINISTRATION OF TRUST FUNDS ESTABLISHED 
UNDER THE WILL OF THE LATE JOSIAH H. BENTON 

Under the twelfth clause of the Will of the late Josiah H. 
Benton, and as subsequently modified by an Agreement of Com- 
promise dated January 15, 1935, the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary were designated as the residuary legatee of the Benton 
Estate. The Will provided that the residuary estate should be 
divided into two equal parts, to be designated as the Benton 
Book Fund and the Benton Building Fund respectively. The 
Trustees of the Public Library received also the Children's Fund, 
established separately under another provision of the Will. 

In 1936 the Trustees of the Public Library, having been 
found to be legally competent to hold the above-mentioned funds, 
received a first and a second payment of the cash and securities 
constituting the bulk of the Estate, and delivered them to the 
City Treasurer as the official custodian of all funds and securities 
to which the Trustees of the Public Library hold title. 

In 1937 the Trustees of the Public Library engaged the 
services of Messrs Stewart, Watts, and Bollong, Public Ac- 
countants and Auditors, to carry through an auditing and an 
accounting of the Estate, with a view to being able thereafter to 
set up the Benton Book Fund and the Benton Building Fund as 
required under the terms of the Will. 

Pending a final settlement of the Estate, and with the con- 
currence of the several interested parties, the Trustees of the 
PubHc Library distributed in 1937 to themselves as Trustees of 
the Public Library of the City of Boston and to the Rector of 
Trinity Church in the City of Boston one half of the total in- 
come received from such portion of the residuary estate as was 
then in the possession of the Trustees of the Public Library for 
the period extending from the date on which it had been delivered 
to the Trustees of the Public Library up to the time of taking 
the action, namely, from January 22, 1 936 to March 31,1 937, 
inclusive. The effect of this action was to make available for im- 
mediate use a substantial part of the current income from that 
portion of the residuary estate which would be set up as the 
Benton Book Fund when the necessary auditing and accounting 



[9] 

of the Estate should be completed. Under the terms of the Will, 
as subsequently modified by the Agreement of Compromise, six 
tenths of this income was paid to the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary and four tenths to the Rector of Trinity Church. The 
total payments amounted to $59,307.93. Of this total the sum 
of $35,584.76 was paid to the Trustees of the Public Library 
and the sum of $23,723.1 7 to the Rector of Trinity Church. 

That portion of the income from the Benton Book Fund 
which is payable to the Trustees of the Public Library is to be 
applied by them "for the purchase of books, maps and other 
library material of permanent value and benefit for said Library; 
meaning and intending hereby that such income shall be applied 
for books desirable for scholarly research and use." In accord- 
ance with this provision the Trustees of the Public Library ex- 
pended the sum of $ 1 4,826.02 for this purpose during the calen- 
dar year 1937. 

The Will requests that the Trustees of the Public Library 
pubhsh in their annual reports a detailed statement of the pay- 
ments of the income from the Benton Book Fund, and also "a 
certificate that said income is expended ... in accordance with 
the directions of said will, according to their best examination 
and judgment in the premises." 

In accordance with this request the Trustees of the Public 
Library have made above a detailed statement of the payments 
of the net irxome from that portion of the Benton Book Fund 
which was in their possession for the period of January 22, 1 936 
to March 31, 1 937 inclusive. 

In addition, as requested, the Trustees of the Public Library 
hereby certify that according to their best examination and judg- 
ment the expenditure of that portion of the income of the Benton 
Book Fund which is payable to the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit has been made in accordance 
with the directions of the Will, as modified by the Agreement 
of Compromise of January 15, 1935. 

In accordance with the terms of another provision of the Will 
the Trustees of the Public Library paid in 1937 to the Rector 



[10] 



of Trinity Church in the City of Boston the sum of $3,741 .22, 
representing the income from The Children's Fund for the year 
ending December 31, 1936, and the sum of $1,840.61, repre- 
senting the income for the period of January 1 to June 30, 1937, 
inclusive. The Children's Fund was given to the Trustees of the 
Public Library under the Will, with the provision that the an- 
nual income therefrom should be available to the Library in 
any year only if certain conditions should be met in that year. 
Inasmuch as these conditions could not be met for the year end- 
ing December 31,1 936, payment of the income for that year 
was therefore made to the Rector of Trinity Church as required 
by the Will. So likewise was payment made to the Rector of 
Trinity Church of the income for the period of January 1 to 
June 30, 1937, inclusive. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

The Trustees acknowledge gratefully the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of 1937. Its membership included 
the following individuals: 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott 
Mr. Walter B. Briggs 
Mr. Henry T. Glaus 
Mrs. William H. Dewart 
Mr. Garl Dreyfus 
Dr. Albert Ehren fried 
Mr. H. B. EUIston 
Miss Susan J. Ginn 
Mr. Arthur L. Gould 
Mr. Chester N. Greenough 
Mr. M. A. DeWolfe Howe 
Dr. Henry Jackson 
Rev. John S. Keating 
Mr. Carl T. Keller 
Mrs. Augustus P. Loring, Jr. 
Mr. George N. Northrop 
Rev. Charles E. Park 



Mrs. Charles B. Perkins 
Mrs. Edward M. Pickman 
Mr. Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Hon. Abraham E. Pinanski 
Rev. Richard J. Quinlan 
Mr. William K. Richardson 
Mr. B. M. Selekman 
Mr. Harlow Shapley 
Mrs. Arhur A. Shurcliif 
Mrs. Francis E. Slattery 
Mrs. Donald C. Starr 
Miss Ruth Tiffany 
Mrs. Joseph A. Tomasello 
Mr. John P. Vaccaro 
Dr. Henry R. Viets 
Mr. Robert J. Watt 
Mrs. Frederick Winslow 



The City of Boston is fortunate in having the generous and 
helpful assistance of citizens who give so freely of their time and 
interest in examining and reporting upon the Library and its ac- 



[11] 

tivities. Special attention is called to the interesting report of the 
Committee, which appears on pages 1 8-30 immediately follow- 
ing. 

CONCLUSION 

The report of the Director of the Library is to be found on 
pages 31-53 below. It gives detailed information concerning the 
significant developments within the Library during the course of 
the year. 

The Trustees have pleasure in expressing here their appre- 
ciation of the varied activities in which the library staff has en- 
deavored throughout the year to meet the needs of the citizens 
of Boston. 

Frank W. Buxton 
John L. Hall 
Louis E. Kirstein 
Robert H. Lord 
Ellery Sedgwick 



[12] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures for Personnel: 

Permanent and Probationary employees (ex- 
clusive of Printing r.nd Binding Department 



employees) 






. $800,836.13 




Sundays and Evenings, extra and 


other serv 
R Than F 


ice . . 102,413.11 


$903,249.24 


Expenditures for SER%acE Othe 


'ersonal: 




Printing and binding . 






30.50 




Advertising 






76.75 




Transportation of persons 






2,178.25 




Cartage and freight 






6,967.67 




Light, heat and power . 






19,593.53 




Rent, taxes and water 






20,146.08 




Bond and insurance premiums 






397.85 




Communication 






4,455.43 




Cleaning .... 






1,407.58 




Removal of ashes 






21.10 




Expert .... 






4,470.25 




Stenographic and copying 






1,226.81 




Fees .... 






26.70 




Photographic and blueprinting 






95.78 




General plant 






25,339.42 




Miscellaneous services 






142.90 


86,576.60 


Expenditures for Equipment: 






Machinery 






803.70 




Electrical 






865.30 




Motorless vehicles 






159.50 




Furniture and fittings . 






1 ,762.63 




Office 






5,070.85 




Books : 








City appropriation 


$72,516.85 






Trust funds 


28,721.75 






Josiah H. Benton Book 








Fund Income 


14,819.1; 


' 116,057.77 




Newspapers: 








City appropriation 


1,524.7! 


) 




Trust funds income 


1,651.5C 


) 3.176.25 




Music: 








City appropriation 


507.3! 


> 




Trust funds income 


1,441.1^ 


\ 1,948.49 




Lantern slides: 








City appropriation 


37.5( 


) 




Trust funds income 


69.0C 


) 106.50 




Periodicals: 








City appropriation 


6,864.6^ 


1 




Trust funds income 


1 ,909.5f 


\ 




Josiah H. Benton Book 








Fund Income 


6,8! 


) 8,781.07 




Photographs : 








City appropriation 


7I.4( 


) 




Trust funds income 


.2! 


) 71.65 




Manuscripts: 






Trust funds income 




1,022.57 




Tools and instruments 




1,225.63 




Wearing apparel 




11.50 




General plant 




350.70 


141,414.11 


Carried forward 


$1,131,239.95 



13] 



AND RECEIPTS. DECEMBER 31, 1937 



Receipts From: 

City Appropriation. 1937 $1,290,429.00 

income from Trust Funds 23,554.89 

Income from Josiah H. Benton Book Fund Income . 59,307.93 
Income from James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . 700.00 

Income from Children's Fund 3,711.22 



•$i,377,703.G4 



\ 



Carried forward 



$1,377,703.04 



[14] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Brought fonvard 
Expenditures for Supplies 
Office 

Food ... 

Fuel .... 
Medical 

Laundry, cleaning, toilet 
Educational and recreational 
Agricultural 

Chemical and disinfectants 
General plant 



Expenditures for Materials: 
Building .... 
Electrical 
General plant 



$1,131,239.95 



$8,090.06 

21.33 

17,703.58 

38.85 

1,660.52 

.20 

203.14 

213.94 

3,004.19 



3,705.41 
2,91 1 .41 
1,802.54 



W. P. A. Library Project 

Special Items: 

J. L. Whitney Bibliographic account .... 

Louis Kirstein Fund, Cataloguing .... 

A. L. Whitney Fund, Sick benefit .... 

Josiah H. Benton Book Fund Income, Trinity Church 

Children's Fund, Trinity Church .... 



Binding Department: 
Salaries 

Transportation of persons 
Gas .... 
Repairs 
Equipment 
Supplies 
Stock 



Printing Department: 

Salaries .... 

Gas ..... 

Photographic and blueprinting 

Repairs .... 

Equipment 

Supplies .... 

Electrical maierial 

Stock .... 

Outside work 



Special Appropriation Expenditures: 
Fireproofing, improvements, etc. . 
H. C. Bentley Gift . 



1,028.00 

100.00 

392.00 

23,723.17 

5,61 ! .83 



60.162.78 

.40 

72.78 

71.99 

5.70 

2.07 

6,817.02 



12,339.59 

48.52 

188.75 

259.38 

4.10 

2.10 

3.82 

4,020.41 

41.75 



11,131.75 
206.68 



30,935.81 



8,41936 
62,072.41 



30,855.00 



67.132.74 



16,903.42 



1 1 ,338.43 



Carried forTvard 



$1,358,902.12 



[151 
AND RECEIPTS, DECEMBER 31. 1937 

Brought forward $1,377,703.04 

Balances Brought Forward From 1936: 

Trust funds income. City Treasury .... $37,546.70 

Trust funds income on deposit in London . . . .30 

City appropriation on deposit in London . . . 72.75 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic account . . . 2,560.73 

Library Building, Fireproofing, Improvements, etc. . 23,408.32 

H. C. Bentley Gift 220.38 

Judaica Bookshelf . . . . . . . 159.17 

Children's Fund 3,741.22 67,709.57 



Carried forward 



$1,445,412.61 



[16] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Brought forrvard 
Amounts Paid Into City Treasury: 
Fines .... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins 
Commission on telephone stations 
Refunds, fees, etc. 
Sales of waste paper . 
Payments for lost books 



Balances, December 31, 1937: 

Trust Funds Income, City Treasury . 
Josiah H. Benton Book Fund Income 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 
H. C. Bentley Gift .... 
Judaica Bookshelf .... 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
Children's Fund ..... 



$1,358,902.12 



Balances Unexpended, December 31, 1937: 
General appropriation ..... 
Central Library Building, Fireproofing 



$23,413.45 
252.76 
522.82 
8.80 
119.38 
737.03 



25,794.10 

20,758.74 

2,232.73 

13.70 

159.17 

72.75 

1.840.61 



23362.12 
12,276.57 



25,054.24 



50.871.80 



35,638.69 



To Balance 



$1,470,466.85 



17] 



AND RECEIPTS. DECEMBER 31, 1937 



Broughl forward 
Receipts From: 

From Fines .... 
Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations 
Payments for lost books 
Refunds, fees, etc. 
Sales of waste paper . 



$1,445,412.61 



$23,413.45 
252.76 
522.82 
737.03 
8.80 
119.38 



25,054.24 



To Balance 



$1,470,466.85 



[18] 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: — 

The Examining Committee for the year 1937 respectfully 
submits its report. 

The Committee met for organization on June 7, 1937. Short- 
ly thereafter the usual sub-committees were appointed, and re- 
ports from them were submitted to the Vice Chairman early in 
November. These reports, with their detailed findings, observa- 
vations, and recommendations, have been filed with the Library 
for reference, examination, and study. 

The Report herewith submitted is intended to be a summary 
of the important and prominent features and outstanding sug- 
gestions contained in the sub-committee reports. Your Committee 
presents these findings and suggestions, conscious of the fact that 
the Trustees are aware of the conditions which need improvement 
and correction and of the defects which should be remedied. It 
is our hope that reference to them will serve as the impetus to 
further constructive action, and may impress the new municipal 
administration with the wisdom and necessity of making appropri- 
ations which will be adequate to permit the Boston Public 
Library (the oldest and the pioneer among the great public li- 
braries in the United States) to maintain its proper place as a 
leader in the performance of public duty. 

Let it again be recorded that we find that the service of the 
Director, his assistants, the heads of the various departments 
and branch libraries, and their respective staffs, has been loyal, 
admirable, competent, and efficient. The Excimining Committee 
is indebted to them for their hearty cooperation and takes this 
means of expressing its appreciation. 



[19] 
THE NEED OF BOOKS 

The 20th Century may answer the question whether our 
Democracy is capable of educating itself adequately to stave off 
disaster and survive. Meanwhile, the public library is one of our 
steadying influences. It is generally conceded that without knowl- 
edge democracy cannot live. Accurate knowledge can be ob- 
tained through intelligent library service. No library, public or 
private, can long endure, unless it provides new books as needed. 
The Public Library of the City of Boston is severely handi- 
capped in this respect. It requires and should have more books to 
meet the demands upon it. 

The Examining Committee of 1936 focused attention upon 
this subject; and, although it is a fact that the appropriation for 
this year has been increased over that for last year by approxi- 
mately $20,000, it is still $25,000 less than the appropriation 
in 1935 and $100,000 less than in 1931. 

The funds for the purchase of books come from two sources 
— ( 1 ) from appropriations made for that purpose by the Mayor 
and the City Council, the larger part of which is devoted to 
obtaining books which are distributed through the branch li- 
braries; and (2) the income from trust funds, which for the 
most part have been given and are used specifically for the 
purpose of purchasing books for the special collections in the 
central library. 

The Boston Public Library is maintained by its citizens pri- 
marily for the acquisition and provision of books for the use of 
the public. Ninety per cent of the total circulation of its books 
takes place in the 33 branch libraries, and consequently they 
carry the brunt of the burden of the public use. They supply 
chiefly books of popular and general interest, and books used by 
children in connection with school work. Education for children 
and adults has been expanding with an increasing emphasis on 
the part of teachers and class leaders upon outside reading. Of 
necessity, for the great majority this must mean reading public 
library books. Thus the branch libraries are finding themselves 
closer and closer to the school system with each succeeding year. 



[20] 

During the recent depression period the use of the branch 
libraries increased markedly. In 1 932 and 1 933 it increased by 
42% and 41 % respectively over 1929. Since 1933 it has gradu- 
ally diminished, but to a point which is still 2 1 % above 1 929. 
During this long period of over-use of library materials the wear 
and tear upon them has grown in ever increasing pyroportion, so 
that today there no longer holds good the normal estimate which 
had been in use up to 1929, that in any one year approxi- 
mately 60% of the funds available for the purchase of books 
would be necessary and sufficient for the replacement of the 
worn-out books. Coincidentally with this increased use the ap- 
propriations by the City for the purchase of books were cut sadly. 
The average of the annual appropriations for the five years from 
1928 to 1932 inclusive was $152,000, while the average for 
the five years from 1933 to 1937 inclusive has been only 
$81,000. This represents a cut of nearly 50%. 

The result of this combination of circumstances has been most 
unfortunate. The branch libraries in particular have been serious- 
ly affected. Not only have they been stan'ed for new material, 
so important to maintain the interest of readers; but in a period 
of abnormal use not even the normal replacement of worn-out 
material has been possible, and the general collections have 
become sadly depleted. The books most in demand — actually 
the best of the library materials — have become so badly worn 
that many have had to be discarded, and the books needed by 
school children for study and outside reading are deplorably 
dirty. Finally, with the enormous number of books which are 
being published in these times, a considerable proportion of 
which a proper library should have, it seems apparent that even 
if the whole of this year's appropriation of $75,000 were avail- 
able for new books alone (quite apart from replacements) it 
would not be adequate. 

The Committee renews the reconmiendations of its predeces- 
sors that appropriations be increased to a level which will be 
sufficient to provide for normal demands as well as to replace 
worn-out and discarded books — a need arising out of the 
cumulative result of drastic cuts in the appropriations for the 



[21] 

last five years. The depleted book stocks in the branch Kbraries 
should be brought back to more nearly standard levels by the 
addition of the new items necessary to supply the demands of 
their readers, and the material which has been used up should be 
freshened, repaired, and replaced. The crying need of the 
Library is Books — More Books, Replaced BooJ?s, Nexv Books. 

OVERCROWDING OF THE CENTRAL LIBRARY BUILDING 

An early and radical change is imperative if the conditions 
resulting from the overcrowding of the Central Library building 
are to be relieved before they become so acute as to bring discredit 
upon the Library. We are aware that these difficulties, which 
have been stated and emphasized by the Director and your 
Examining Committees in several previous reports, give you 
grave concern, and that you have been helpless in the situation 
from lack of sufficient appropriations. Although we appreciate 
the importance of economy in municipal administration, in this 
situation as in the case of books the need is so fundamental that 
our new Mayor and City Council will certainly relieve the situ- 
ation if they are made aware of the facts. 

The facilities in the Central Library building at no time were 
adequate for the 350 persons regularly employed therein. With 
the addition of 150 W.P.A. relief workers conditions have 
become almost intolerable. The problem is not easy of solution, 
as the Director has said, "in a building of such architectural im- 
portance and stability." Much of the building partakes of the 
nature of a national monument and as such is quite properly 
inviolate. The available space in the building has been used to 
such advantage that few specific suggestions can be made. In- 
deed the suggestion of minor adaptations and improvements is 
almost an impertinence in view of the human factors and im- 
portant issues involved. Only a radical change will give the 
space necessary to adapt the library facilities to a decent standard 
of health and comfort for those who work within its walls. This 
is clearly indicated in the detailed and comprehensive report of 
our new Sub-Committee on Staff Facilities, which was formed 



[22] 

this year for the first time. Here we can only reiterate that the 
rest and recreation rooms crowded with lockers, the inadequate 
and unattractive lunch rooms, the lack of proper drinking water 
particularly in the summer months, and an impossible condition 
of overcrowding in the toilets must affect the comfort and the 
mental health and reduce the working time and power of the 
staff. For example, in one section of the building one small 
toilet room with facilities for only 3 persons at a time has to serve 
for approximately 1 1 5 women members of the staff, plus some 
100 additional women workers under the auspices of the W.P. 
A. Unless conditions in general are altered at an early date 
the future must show expensive deterioration in equipment and 
human living. If a few temporary alleviations or changes which 
have been suggested are carried out, we are fearful that these, 
desirable as they may be, may tend to obscure the imminent 
necessity of radical change to provide essential additional space. 
The reallocation of the space in the Central Library building 
is a vital first step in any determined effort to relieve the acute 
situation. The recommendations of previous Examining Com- 
mittees and of the Director that space be found outside of the 
central building for certain of the Library's activities and that 
they be housed in some central location are deemed important, 
are re-emphasized and again urged upon you. Two such activ- 
ities are the following: 

( 1 ) The Newspaper Room for the daily reading of current news- 
papers now occupies an especially valuable front corner of the 
ground floor. From its very nature, its location in so important a 
spot is not in keeping with either the cultural or educational atmos- 
phere of the building or its aesthetic importance. It could be re- 
moved to some convenient central location outside of the main li- 
brary, without impairing its usefulness, and at a moderate cost. The 
substantial space which would be thus released is urgently required 
for other departments which cannot be housed anywhere except in 
the main building. 

(2) The Central Department for Branch Libraries, with its group 
of clearly related activities, and large reservoir of books for supple- 
menting the collections of individual branch libraries, is for the 
most part self-sufficient. Its removal from the Central Library build- 
ing to a point in the center of the city, convenient for book ship- 
ments, would not impair its efficiency or the work of the Library. 



[23] 

Possibly one of the closed public school buildings could be obtained 
to house the 1 00,000 volumes and the 40 members of the depart- 
ment. 

If these two changes can be accomplished, then the readjust- 
ment or reallocation of such units as the Fine Arts Department, 
the Science and Technology Department, the Cataloging and 
Classification Department, the Music Department, and the en- 
largem.ent of the Rare Book Department might follow, at least 
in part. 

The economic and efficient catering to the public's needs de- 
pends largely upon the proper administration of the Library. 
Here again your Committee is impressed with the lack of proper 
quarters to enable the Director and the administrative staff to 
function adequately. Overcrowding is bound to interfere with 
efficiency of management, and no criticism of individual de- 
ficiencies in administration is fair until and unless the manage- 
ment has had the opportunity to house its departments properly. 
The problems of administration arise directly from the inade- 
quacy of quarters, and the fundamental requirement is more 
space. 

PUBLICITY 

To the end that there may be a larger public appreciation of 
the value of the Library and a better understanding of its needs 
and problems, the Committee recommends again the appointment 
of a skilled publicity director. Here is a forward step which we 
believe should not be longer postponed. Indeed, it is our judg- 
ment that, if the regular budget funds do not permit such expan- 
sion in staff, efforts should be made by the Trustees to secure the 
necessary funds through outside contributions. 

It has been the experience of large libraries that sound pub- 
licity is a wise investment. In many instances it has led to gener- 
ous subscriptions for special purposes. In others it has been re- 
sponsible for important bequests. In all it has helped to stimu- 
late public enthusiasm for the institutions and public support for 
their manifold activities. 

While we do not suggest anything in the nature of "bally- 



[24] 

hoo," it is obvious that the eye of a publicity director must be 
constantly on the human and dramatic side of a library's life. 
This is the field of which the people have scant knowledge. It 
is likewise the field which must be explored if the interest of the 
people is to be enlisted. 

By way of further suggestion, designed to attract favorable 
attention to the Library, it is recommended that some members 
of the staff be prepared to lecture entertainingly about the insti- 
tution before church bodies, fraternal organizations, labor unions, 
and other community groups. Perhaps, too, members of the 
Board of Trustees can be prevailed upon to grant occasional in- 
terviews relating to some special phase of the Library's work. 

Your Committee also urges again the enlargement and the 
further development of the admirable monthly bulletin and a 
wider circulation of it, particularly in the newspaper offices of 
the city and state. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

It is recommended that there be a return to the practice pre- 
vailing prior to the depression, whereby some of the branch libra- 
ries in the crowded sections of the city may be opened for two or 
three hours on Sunday afternoon. If the amount of use justifies 
the effort and additional expense, the Sunday afternoon service 
can later be extended to other branches. 

To meet the special need in those parts of the city where the use 
of foreign languages prevails, attention might be given even fur- 
ther than at present to the inclusion in branch library staffs of 
appropriately equipped personnel. Such specialization of staff 
should be particularly of value in the selection of suitable foreign 
language books. 

The problems arising from the excessive use of the Central Li- 
brary by students from nearby institutions of learning continue 
to give concern. Our reading rooms should not become study 
halls. The legitimate requirements of these student groups should 
be met, but not at a sacrifice of the needs of the general public. 
We consider it particularly appropriate for the library adminis- 



[25] 

tration to prosecute its efforts with the authorities of the various 
institutions involved, in order to bring about some equitable ad- 
justment of a situation which has resulted in the unnecessary 
crowding of general readers. 

We desire especially to endorse the present extensive activi- 
ties of the Library in following up and obtaining the return of 
books from delinquent borrowers, as well as the careful and 
thorough investigation of cases of theft and mutilation. Particu- 
larly do we wish to encourage the extension and even the further 
development of these activities, because of their value not only 
in books recovered but also in public education. 

CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 

The extensive work now in progress upon the reclassification, 
and in many instances also the recataloging, of the book col- 
lections in both the central library and the branch libraries has 
been examined with some care. A thorough-going revision of 
the catalog cards, involving both size and content, and a huge 
task of reclassification in accordance with the best modern 
methods, is going forward with the indispensable aid of relief 
workers employed under the auspices of the Federal Govern- 
ment. The nature and object of this complex undertaking has 
been described by the Trustees in their reports of previous years. 
To review its details in this place would be superfluous. 

Of all the relief undertakings of the Federal Government, 
this has been the largest single library project throughout the 
country. The em:ployment, primarily for relief purposes, of 
workers whose number has seldom been less than seven hundred 
and has ranged at times up to twelve hundred, over and above 
the regular library staff of some six hundred workers, has im- 
posed a large responsibility of direction upon the administrative 
staff of the Library. The temporary workers have required train- 
ing for their tasks, and the results of their work have called for 
close inspection and checking. The means to these ends appear 
to have been devised with much care and effectiveness. 

This work of vital importance would have remained beyond 
the range of accomplishment by the Library in normal times. 



[26] 

Apart from its central object of relief, the project has made an 
inestimable contribution to the immediate and future value of 
the Library as a workshop for scholarship, both elementary and 
advanced. 

WORK WITH CHILDREN AND WITH SCHOOLS 

The work with children is already being successfully and ad- 
mirably carried out by the several branch libraries. 

It is the opinion of your Committee, based upon the results of 
the conference which its sub-committee held with representatives 
of the public school system, the pcirochial schools, and the private 
schools, that close cooperation between the Library and the 
schools is of paramount importance. 

The branch libraries should be encouraged to cooperate di- 
rectly and continuously with the schools of their respective neigh- 
borhood for the double purpose of publicity for the Library and 
its services, and instruction in the proper care of books and the 
use of library privileges. Such activity should be invaluable in 
the attempt to minimize delinquencies, thefts, and mutilations. 
It is suggested also that, if each school would designate one of 
its teachers to serve as a liaison officer with the branch library in 
the locality, then truly constructive work might be accomplished 
in the prevention of mutilation of books, the education of children 
in the use of books, training in the use of reference material, and 
duty toward public property. Meetings between the branch li- 
brarians and groups of teachers to discuss these and related 
problems should be fostered and encouraged. A definite for- 
ward step in obtaining the help and enlisting the support of the 
public schools was taken when the Superintendent of Public 
Schools invited the Director of the Public Library to present 
the various aspects of the problem before a recent meeting of the 
principals of the public schools. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

In addition to that which has been said in connection with the 
overcrowding of the Central Library building, your Committee 



[27] 

suggests that some temporary improvement might be brought 
about by the use of the basement, at least in part, for extra staff 
rooms, toilets, rest rooms, and locker space, as well as an ade- 
quate lunch room. Possibly this space could be made available, 
as a makeshift at least, if arrangements could be effected whereby 
the library might purchase its light and heat from outside sources 
rather than engage in producing them itself in its own basement 
space as at present. 

Otherwise, outside of troublesome and recurring difficulties 
with the tile roofing, the general structure of the Central Library 
building seems to be in relatively good condition. No major dif- 
ficulties have occurred in the past year in the matter of the levels 
of the underground water; but it is recommended that there con- 
tinue to be given the regular daily examination of the water levels 
as heretofore, in order that the situation be kept constantly in 
hand. It is not recommended that the outside of the building be 
cleaned. The lighting of the Abbey mural paintings of the Holy 
Grail, and possibly also of the Sargent murals, should be serious- 
ly considered at an early date. 

Among the branch libraries the most pressing building problem 
seems to be that of the West End Branch Library. The old 
West Church building housing this branch library had to be 
temporarily abandoned this past spring because of emergency 
repairs upon its tower. It v/as subsequently found that the roof 
trusses were weak and the ceiling in the main room likely to fall, 
so that it proved not possible to return to use the building for the 
present. Rented quarters were obtained in the immediate neigh- 
borhood for temporary use until action could be achieved toward 
a final solution of a difficult building problem. It has been sug- 
gested that the building be put into adequate repair for continued 
use as a branch library, or that it be repaired for subsequent use 
as an historic monument and that other space be provided for a 
modem new library building. Whatever the solution may be, 
and we recognize that this will depend in large part upon the 
funds which the City can and will make available, we urge that 
every expedition possible be given to the problem, to the end that 
this crowded section of the city may have with as little delay as 



[281 

possible adequate provision of library facilities. Few sections 
of the city have so urgent and pressing a need in this respect as 
does the West End. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES AND SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Branch libraries are the chief agencies for bringing books close 
to the people. The thirty-three branch libraries of the Boston 
Public Library are located in residential areas. Your Committee 
is of the opinion that splendid service is being rendered by them 
and joins in the universal praise of their staffs and the educational, 
social, and cultural aspects of their excellent work. The exami- 
nation of these branches has been conducted by your Committee 
divided into eleven groups, and here we can only refer to their 
detailed reports of findings and reconmiendations, which are on 
file with the Library. We do wish to reiterate, however, that the 
branches which are housed in municipal buildings of various sorts 
or in leased quarters, as distinguished from those located in build- 
ings designed specifically for library uses, suffer from various 
physical handicaps such as lack of space, inadequate staff quar- 
ters and shelf room, poor ventilation and heating. Important re- 
pairs should be made as soon as appropriations permit, but the 
fundamental remedy is the resumption of the branch library 
building program of two new branch libraries a year which was 
in effect up to 1 932. 

The need of the special departments is more room, and the 
other needs are insignificant as compared with this one. We 
subscribe heartily to the statement of your Examining Commit- 
tee for 1 936 that "the problem of the special libraries is tied up 
definitely with the problem of reallocation of space within the 
Central Library building." We invite attention to the detailed 
suggestions contained in their statement and in the report of our 
sub-committee. 

At the Business Branch, in the Kirstein Memorial Library 
building, it is believed that there is need of the third in addition 
to the lower floors. There are probably controlling reasons why 
the top floor Ccinnot be vacated by the general Branch Library. 



[29] 

Its location where it is at present is desirable, but its necessity is 
not apparent. It is principally a convenience for people who 
prefer to go to a downtown general branch library rather than 
to the branches in their respective localities. Should this con- 
venience outweigh the proper housing of the Business Branch? 
The extensive use of the Business Branch is a tribute to the 
thought which originated it. The importance of the general 
Branch Library located on the top floor of the Kirstein building 
is not minimized. On the contrary, the public response to the 
recent display of books there is in several respects remarkable 
and is certainly heartening. A window display of a list of " 1 1 7 
books that make a college education" resulted in 450 people 
climbing the two flights in a period of three weeks and taking 
away a list of these classics. Incidentally, the discouraging as- 
pect of this experiment has been that the books themselves, 
which were displayed on the third floor and were taken out by 
the public, were in many instances very old, battered, in the 
smallest t>'pe, and unattractive in form. 

CONCLUSION 

The Public Library of the City of Boston is one of the most 
vital instruments by which our Democracy is expected to edu- 
cate itself and thus be kept alive. The importance of many of its 
needs are dwarfed by comparison with the esssentiai immediate 
requirements of more books in all departments and more space 
for certain developm.ents in the Central Libraiy building. The 
latter can be accomplished by the relatively small expense en- 
tailed in housing a number of activities outside of the main build- 
ing. Until and unless these needs are satisfied, the Public Library 
cannot perform its public duty in accordance with the standards 
which the citizens of Boston have a right to demand. 



[30] 

Adopted as the report of the Examining Committee, Novem- 
ber 27, 1937. 



Abraham E. 
Katharine Abbott 
Walter B. Briggs 
Henry T. Claus 
Elizabeth H. Dewarl 
Carl Dreyfus 
Albert Ehrenfrisi 
H. B. ElHston 
Susan J. Ginn 
Arthur L. Gould 
Chester N. Greenough 
M. A. DeWolfe Howe 
Henry Jackson 
John S. Keating 
Carl T. Keller 
Rosamond B. Loring 
George N. Northrop 



Pinanski, Vice Chairman 

Charles E. Park 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
Hester Pickman 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Richard J, Quinlan 
William K. Richardson 
B. M. Selekman 
Harlow Shapley 
Margaret H. Shurcliff 
Lillian C. Slattery 
Pauline Starr 
Ruth Tiffany 
Frances Tomasello 
John P. Vaccaro 
Henry R. Viets 
Mary W. Winslow 



[31] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF the City of Boston : 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library 
for the year ending December 31, 1937. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE LIBRARY 

The City appropriated for the use of the Library during 1937 
the sum of $1,290,429.00. This was $92,563.00 greater than 
ihe amount appropriated in 1936. 

The total appropriation included an amount of $48,750.00 
for the necessary expenditures incidental to the unemployment 
relief projects which the Library sponsored on behalf of the City. 
By excluding this amount for extraordinary expenditures the 
appropriation for the ordinary operating expenses of the Library 
was $1,211,679.00. This was $86,644.00 greater than the 
amount appropriated for the ordinary operating expenses for 
1936. 

The appropriation for the purchase of books was $75,000. 
This amount represented substantial improvement over the appro- 
priation of $55,000 in 1936. That it was still inadequate, how- 
ever, is to be seen from the following table, setting forth the 
heavily increased use of the Library during the preceding decade : 



YEAR 
1927 

1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 



AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 



PURCHASE OF BOOKS 



$125,000 

125,000 

140,000 

160,000 

175,000 

160,000 

75.000 

100,000 

100.000 

55.000 

75.000 



NO. OF BOOKS 

LENT TO 

DORROVVERS 

3,705.657 
3,899.286 
3,930,068 
4.133.459 
4.702,932 
5,567.681 
5,548.283 
5,194,351 
4,949,701 
4.806,737 
4,531.378 



[32] 

In later sections of this report there is more detailed presen- 
tation concerning need of additional provision for the purchase 
of books. 



USE OF THE LIBRARY 



During 1937 there were lent to borrowers 4,531,378 vol- 
umes. This figure represents an increase of 15% over that for 
1 929, the last of the pre-depression years. 

The following table shows the use of the Library during the 
period from 1929 to 1937, inclusive: 





NO. OF BOOKS 




LENT TO 


YEAR 


BORROWERS 


1929 


3.930,068 


1930 


4,133.459 


I93I 


4,702,932 


1932 


5,567,681 


1933 


5,548,283 


1934 


3,194,351 


1935 


4,949,701 


1936 


4.806,737 


1937 


4.531,378 



PERCENTAGE OF 
INCREASE OR DECREASE 
OVER PRECEDING YEARS 



+5% 
+13% 
+18% 
-0.3% 

-6% 
-5% 
-3% 
-6% 



PERCENTAGE 

OF INCREASE 

OVER 1929 

+5% 
+20% 
+42% 
+41% 
+32% 
+26% 
+22% 
+15% 

From the above figures it appears clearly that a peak of increas- 
ing use was reached in 1932 and in 1933, that since then there 
has occurred a declining use. 

To those of us in the Library who are close to the situation 
it is clear that there is one dominating reason for this declining 
use. There are fewer and fewer books to use. In the branch li- 
braries — where 90% of the borrowing of books for home use 
takes place — books have been worn out from heavy use in the 
depression years faster than they have been replaced. For ex- 
ample, in the three years 1935, 1936, and 1937 there had to 
be discarded 143,851 books as compared with 125,495 added. 
In other words, at the end of 1937 there were 18,356 fewer 
volumes available for use in the branch libraries than at the end 
of 1934. Any member of the library staff in any one of the 
branch libraries can give eloquent testimony as to what this means 
both to school pupils and to adult readers in general. 



[33] 

There is in existence a demand for books which is not being 
met. The unfortunate feature is that a demand for books is the 
sort of thing that with careful nurturing turns into a growth of 
persisting vigor, without nurture quickly dies out. It is all too 
evident that too many of the Library's newly gained readers 
during the depression period from 1929 to 1933 have in the 
succeeding four years from 1934 to 1937 become lost to it be- 
cause the Library has had fewer and fewer books with which to 
meet their legitimate reading and study needs. 

THE NEED OF BOOKS 

It seems so self-evident that a library must have books that 
one v/onders what further can be said in support of such an axiom. 

Yet one frequently hears the query as to why more books are 
needed anyway. The Library has enough volumes in its system 
already. In the central library, for instance, there are 1,195,704 
volumes as compared with the 504,977 volumes in the branch 
libraries. Why should not some of those in the central library 
be turned over to the branch libraries? 

But who wants to choose his reading from the sermons of the 
Reverend Cotton Mather or the Bay Psalm Book or the First 
Folio of Shakespeare ? Who wants to read volume after volume 
of specifications of German patents or of the Sessional Papers 
of the House of Commons in the 19th century or of the Atti 
delV Accademia del Lincei of fifty years ago? Who wants to 
read Boston, Worcester and Springfield city directories for 1 875 
or the Boston Transcript for 1833 or Who's Who in America 
for 1903? Who wants to read Andreas Vesalius De Humani 
Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem (Basle, 1555) or Frangois Ap- 
pert's UArt de Conserver, Pendant Plusieurs Annees, Toutes 
les Substances Animales et Vegetates (Paris, 1810) or Fried- 
rich Engels' Die Lage der Arbeitenden Klasse in England 
(Leipzig, 1845)? 

It is of items of the above sort — in single copies only, for 
the most part — that the excellent book collections of the central 
library are made up. They do not contain, available for use in 



[34] 

multiple branch libraries, multiple copies of books of the sort 
which the average citizens of Boston frequenting the branch li- 
braries wish and need for their regular reading. What the central 
library has is the vast accumulation of materials which are needed 
by the students or the scholar engaged in serious research and 
investigation. And for the upkeep and further development of 
its collections of this sort it has special support in the form of 
trust funds which have been given for the purpose and for no 
other. 

On the other hand, it is on the branch libraries that there falls 
the brunt of the book demands of the citizens of Boston at large. 
Ninety percent (90%) of the books borrowed from the entire 
library system are asked for and obtained from the branch li- 
braries. Yet to meet this demand the branch libraries have book 
collections which total only 30% of the book holdings of the 
entire library system. A.nd the discouraging feature is that the 
number of volumes in the branch libraries is decreasing rather 
than increasing. In 1 935 the branch libraries had to discard as 
worn out 4,257 volumes more than they could add; in 1936 
they fell short by 9,091 volumes; in 1937, by 3,930 volumes. 
In other words, in 1 935 they discarded 53,996 books and added 
only 49,739; in 1936, they discarded 41,859 volumes and 
added only 32,768; in 1937, they discarded 44,346 books 
and added only 40,4 1 6. 

It is for that reason that more books are needed for the branch 
libraries. And, inasmuch as the branch libraries possess few 
trust funds for the purchase of books, that is why a return to the 
former higher level of book appropriations by the City is urgently 
needed. 

The amount appropriated by the City for the purchase of 
books in 1 937 was $75,000 as compared with $55,000 in 1 936. 
Such improvement was most welcome. It is nov/ to be hoped 
that in the years immediately to come continued improvement 
will follow. The appropriation for books needs sorely to be re- 
turned to at least the level which the experience of many years 
has indicated to be the minimum amount with which the Library 
can function to advantage — nzimely, $150,000 annually. 



[35] 



MISUSE OF BOOKS 



In 1937, as in the immediately preceding two years, constant 
effort was directed to making the most of the available book 
stock, particularly through preventing the misuse of books. 

In the matter of books unrecoverable from borrowers from 
the branch libraries continuing close attention to each individual 
delinquent case made it possible to hold the number of these 
volumes in 1 93 7 at the reduced level which came into being fol- 
lowing the special attention given to the problem in 1935 and 
1936. From 1930 to 1934 inclusive the average number of 
volumes unrecoverable from borrowers annually had been 2322. 
In 1 93 1 the number had been as high as 2598. In 1 934 it was 
2262, By persistent effort it was reduced to 1399 in 1935 and 
to 953 in 1936. In 1937 it was kept at the reduced level, with 
only 979 volumes unrecovered from borrowers. This figure for 
1937 represents a reduction of 58% from the average of 2322 
volumes annually unrecoverable from 1930 to 1934 inclusive. 
It is a loss of only one-fortieth of 1 % of the more than 3,500,000 
volumes lent from the branch libraries in the course of the year. 

Likewise in the matter of missing books in the branch libraries 
continuing close attention throughout 1937 resulted in substantial 
reduction of the number found to be missing at the time of the 
annual inventory. During the ten year period ending in 1934 
the average number of books so missing annually from the shelves 
of the branch libraries had been as high as 12,000. In 1935 it 
was 12,769. In 1936 it was reduced to 1 1,012. In 1937 it was 
reduced still further to 8,786. This figure for 1937 represents 
a reduction of 31 % from the figure of 1935. 

In recapitulation, the combined figures for these two sources 
of losses have been as follows : 





MISSING FROM 


UNRECOVERABLE 


TOTAL OF 


YEAR 


FROM SHELVES 


FROM BORROWERS 


COMBINED LOSSES 


1935 

1936 
1937 


12,769 

11,012 
8,786 


1,399 
953 
979 


14.168 
11.965 
9.765 



[36] 

At an average of $1 .50 per volume the value of these books so 
lost each year has been as follows : 



1935 


. $21,252.00 


1936 


17.947.50 


1937 


14.647.50 



The above figures of losses appear very considerable as 
figures. It must be remem.bered, however, that they are gross 
figures. The branch libraries are open approximately 300 days 
in the year. Thus the daily loss is seen to be only 32 volumes. 
And such a daily loss of 32 volumes is spread throughout a 
branch library system of 33 branch libraries. Certainly the loss 
of a single volume per day for each branch library on the average 
is not indicative of careless administration. 

A very substantial reduction in these losses has been achieved 
in the last two years. It is believed that still further reduction 
can be accomplished in the year ahead. 

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF PROJECTS 

The Library continued during 1937 the two work relief pro- 
jects which it had initiated in earlier years under the auspices of 
the Works Progress Administration of the Federal Government. 
In addition it initiated a third new project beginning on July 1 st. 

There was continued through the year the project for the 
cleaning of books throughout the entire library system. 

There was continued also the work upon the extensive pre- 
paratory stages for the project of reclassifying the scholarly book 
collections of the central library on a modem classification 
scheme such as that of the Library of Congress. Difficulties of 
an administrative nature had held back the carrying on of this 
complex and difficult task for many months in 1936. Only in 
the last weeks of 1936 had they been resolved in favor of the 
Library. During the early part of 1937 there therefore had to 
follow a considerable period of adjustment, as well as of selec- 
tion and further training of personnel. Thereafter the preparatory 
stages were completed promptly, and by November 1937 it was 
finally possible to begin the actual work of reclassification itself. 

On July 1 st an entirely new project was initiated along similar 



[37] 

lines for the book collections of the branch libraries and other 
units of the Circulation Division. Its purpose is to provide a uni- 
form cataloging and classification of books in place of the several 
varieties of procedure existing heretofore. For instance, there 
have been up to the present time four different classification 
arrangemxcnts and six different sizes of catalog cards in use in 
the Circulation Division. In one branch library there has ac- 
tually been no card catalog at all. This extensive new project 
will, through its establishment of a uniform basis of cataloging 
and classification procedure, ultimately make possible a process 
of centralized cataloging for the branch libraries, with appreci- 
able economies in operation. It will make use of a simplified form 
of Library of Congress cataloging and a simplified form of the 
classification commonly known as the Decimal Classification 
(the Dewey Classification). 

These three projects provided work for several hundred indi- 
viduals. The cost of their wages was provided by the Federal 
Government. The incidental expenses were borne by the City 
of Boston as its contribution as sponsor of the projects. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Early in the year there arose an emergency situation at the 
West End Branch Library. This has been housed in the old 
West Church building on Cambridge Street. When the old 
church was taken over in 1894 for the West End Branch Li- 
brary, it was put into good condition. Thereafter, however, little 
was done by v/ay of repairs. More recently, during the last half 
dozen years, an item for the repair of the old building has been 
included each year in the annual budget estimates of the Library. 
Year by year the item has not been allowed. Finally in the early 
part of 1937 an emergency situation came into being. 

In March an examination of the tower revealed a structural 
weakness of sufficient extent to necessitate the closing of the en- 
tire front portion of the building. Shortly thereafter, following 
examination of the structural elements of the rest of the building, 
it appeared desirable to the Building Commissioner of the City 
of Boston to order the entire building closed to public use. Tem- 



[38] 

porary quarters were promptly rented almost directly across the 
street until the old building could be made safe for occupancy 
once again. 

Emergency repairs were made upon the tower at once. These 
cost approximately $7000. Careful examination of the rest of 
the building indicated that the total cost for its repair would be 
likely to amount to as much as $55,000. For lack of an appro- 
priation in this amount no further work has been carried on 
since the emergency work W2ts completed in March. 

The old church building is one of the significant historical 
and esthetic monuments of the city. It is also one of the only 
two remaining public edifices of its period in Boston. It is there- 
fore important that provision be made for its renovation and re- 
pair at an early date. 

At the Central Library there has long existed a highly un- 
satisfactory situation in the need for constant repair of the tile 
roofing. Year by year for a substantial period the annual cost 
of maintenance and repair of the tiles has ranged from ten to 
tvv^elve thousand dollars. With a view to ascertaining the steps 
which might be taken toward remedying this unsatisfactory 
situation in v/hich repairs are constantly needed, Messrs J. R. 
Worcester and Company, long the Library's consulting engin- 
eers, were engaged during the year to make a thorough study of 
the condition of the tile roofing and to make recommendation for 
a fundamental and permanent treatment of the problem. 

The report of the Worcester Company was rendered on Sep- 
tember 13, 1937. It recommended a program which, it is be- 
lieved, will lead to a reasonably permanent solution. The cost 
will be approximately $256,000. This is a large figure. Yet in 
1937 alone there had to be expended the sum of $13,221.01 
for repairs upon the roof as it now stands. Clearly any treatment 
accorded to it will be costly. The present practice of annual 
patching and repairing will prove in the long run to be the more 
costly, however, since it provides for no more than keeping 
abreast of existing difficulties as they occur in cycles year by 
year, and as they are apparently likely to continue to occur more 
or less indefinitely into the future. 



[39] 

As to the central library in general the crowding of the build- 
ing became in 1937 even more acute than heretofore. The book 
collection housed there increased by nearly 25,000 volumes. 
For them there was necessary an additional half mile of shelving 
in a building in which the shelves have been filled to capacity 
for several years already. 

As to the branch libraries in general no action was possible 
in 1937 other than to attempt to maintain the buildings in as 
adequate fashion as the limited appropriations for the year per- 
mitted. Important repairs could not always be accomplished. 
These cannot be allowed to go without attention indefinitely 
without serious difficulties arising soon or late. 

THE SALARY SITUATION IN THE LIBRARY PRIOR TO 
JUNE 4. 1937 

In 1936 it became increasingly clear that the Libraiy was not 
receiving sufficient appropriations for personnel year by year 
for developing an adequate scale of remuneration for the mem- 
bers of the library staff. The preceding period of economic de- 
pression had contributed materially to make acute a situation 
which had already been highly unsatisfactory before the depres- 
sion had set in in 1 929. 

The salaries of the library workers in the Boston Public Li- 
brary had long been recognized as low. They were low as com- 
pared with library salaries elsewhere. They Vs^ere low as compared 
with the salaries paid elsewhere in the City of Boston service 
for work of a nature more or less similar. They were low as 
compared with the salaries and wages paid to the mechanical 
and similar workers even in the Boston Public Library service. 

The following tables are of interest as showing the distribution 
of the various employees of the Library by salary ranges as of 
December 31, 1936: 



[40] 



SALARY 

Under 
Under 
Under 
Under 
Under 
Under 
Under 
Under 



RANGE 
$15.00 

20.00 
25.00 
30.00 
35.00 
40.00 
45.00 
50.00 



per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per Week 
per week 
per week 
per week 



From 
From 
From 
From 
From 
From 
From 
From 



$10.00 
15.00 
20.00 
25.00 
30.00 
35.00 
40.00 
45.00 



to $14.99 

to 19.99 

to 24.99 

to 29.99 

to 34.99 

to 39.99 
to 44.99 

to 49.99 



per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 



%0F 
TOTAL NUMBER OF 
LIBRARY WORKERS 

5.2% 
31.2% 
54.7% 
78.4%, 
83.6% 
89.7% 
96.5% 
97.1% 

5.2% 
26.0% 
23.5% 
23.7% 

5.2% 

6.1% 

6.8% 

0.6% 



%0F 
TOTAL NUMBER OF 
MECHANICAL WORKERS 
1.6% 
16.9% 

32.2% 
37.9% 
58.8% 
61 .2% 
86.2% 
95.1 % 

1.6% 
153% 
15.3%, 

5.6% 
20.9% 

2.4% 
25.0% 

8.8% 



From the above tables it is to be seen that the library workers 
were at a disadvantage in remuneration as compared with the 
mechanical workers. Nearly one-third (31.2%) of the library 
v/orkers were receiving under $20.00 per week as compared with 
only one-sixth (16.9%) of the mechanical workers. Over one- 
half (54.7%) of the library workers were receiving under 
$25.00 per week as compared with only one-third (32.2%) of 
the mechanical workers. Nearly four-fifths (78.4%) of the li- 
brary workers were receiving under $30.00 per week as com- 
pared with only two-fifths (37.9%) of the mechanical workers. 
To name specific workers, seven-eighths (29) of the 33 branch 
librarians — who have the responsibility of being in charge of 
whole buildings — were receiving no more than $41.00 per 
week, while rank and file firemen and watchmen were receiving 
$41.50, carpenters and painters $42.00, bookbinders $43.50, 
printers $44.00, and engineers $48.00. For the mechanical 
workers these rates were entirely proper in terms of the rates pre- 
vailing for such work in the community. It is nevertheless to be 
noted that a preferred treatment in remuneration was thereby 
being accorded to the group of workers whose activity is actu- 
ally on the margin of the main work for which the Library exists. 
To the much larger group of library workers whose activity is 



[411 

in essence the real work of the Library the community was ac- 
cording not nearly as favorable treatment. 

As compared with library salaries elsewhere those paid in 
the Boston Public Library were low. The beginning rate for 
high school graduates had generally been as little as $1 1 .00 and 
$12.00 per week. For college graduates it had been in most 
cases no more than $15.00 per week, with occasional instances 
of as much as $20.00 per week. Sometimes a library school 
graduate might begin in the Boston Public Library at $20.00 
per week, but more commonly it would be at $15.00, the same 
rate as for college graduates in general who had not had the 
additional technical library training of a library school. Natu- 
rally not many library school graduates were interested in enter- 
ing the service of the Boston Public Library at rates such as 
these when better remuneration was to be had elsewhere. The 
average beginning rate for the graduates of the School of Li- 
brary Science in Simmons College was approximately $25.00 
per week ($1300 per year). And graduates of the School of 
Library Service in Columbia University were frequently ob- 
taining beginning positions at $30.00 per week ($1600 per 
year) . 

As compared with salaries paid in other City of Boston de- 
partments for work of not dissimilar kind the salaries paid to the 
library workers in the Library Department were notably low. 
And in these other city departments, in contrast with the Library 
Department, there appeared to be adequate provision available 
year by year for moving step by step from lower beginning rates 
to higher eventual rates. In the Library Department, on the other 
hand, it was becoming increasingly clear that from lack of suffi- 
cient appropriations it was not being possible to provide year by 
year regular step rate increases in pay to all to whom they were 
properly due. In fact, the tendency was in quite the opposite 
direction, as the following table shows : 

NO. OF INDIVIDUALS 
YEAR RECEIVING INCREASES IN PAY 

1934 203 

1935 173 

1936 149 



[42] 

In 1 932 and 1 933 there were given no increases in remuneration 
at all in the Library Department. And in the immediately pre- 
ceding years there had never been sufficient funds to permit ac- 
tion for the nearly 450 individuals in the Library Department 
who had not already reached adequate maxima in their remuner- 
ation. 

Many library workers in the central library had had no in- 
creases toward the maximum remuneration of their positions 
since 1 927, and some even since 1 926 and 1 925. Their remuner- 
ation had been low for a very long time. In order to increase 
their low basic salaries to a more nearly adequate living wage 
many had engaged in extra work evenings, in positions on the 
evening force which cared for the service of the central library 
from 6 to 1 P.M. The result was that there were numerous in- 
dividuals who were working regularly two or three or more 
evenings a week, in addition to their regular full day's work 
on those days. Such an arrangement was not for the best for 
either the Library or the individuals themselves. Nearly one 
hundred had been so employed. In 1 933 a beginning was made 
toward the abolition of this necessity for extra work evenings 
through action looking toward the eventual establishment of a 
shift or platoon system of personnel for the covering of the cen- 
tral library service evenings. Progress had been slow, however. 
Action could be taken only as individual members of the staff 
received increases in their basic remuneration and could thus be 
relieved of the necessity of extra work in the evening to a corres- 
ponding amount. Action had been possible, in fact, only in the 
cases of 30 out of the 88 individuals engaged in such work 
evenings. 

SALARY ADJUSTMENTS AS OF JUNE 4, 1937 

It was against such a background as this that it became clearly 
evident in 1936 that special action was needed for providing 
more adequate remuneration for the library workers in the Li- 
brary Department. The special committee which the Trustees 
had appointed in November 1936 to study the situation and 
present findings to the city administration made its presentation 



[43] 

in the following April. Shortly thereafter a special additional 
appropriation of $32,000 was made to the Library Department 
for the purpose of salary adjustment. 

As of June 4, 1937 increases in pay were given to the follow- 
ing categories of workers: 

Establishment of $15.00 per week as the rate of pay for all in- 
dividuals in the service of the Library who had not qualified by 
passing the required Entrance Examinations for the Graded 
Service, but had passed those for the Ungraded Service; 

Establishment of $20.00 per week as a minimum for all assistants 
who had qualified by passing the required Entrance Examina- 
tions for the Graded Service ; 

Increase of $2.00 per week for all other individuals in the Graded 

Service v/ho had not reached the maxima of their positions as 
follows. 

Assistants up to maximum of $37.00 

Second Assistants up to maximum of $4 1 .00 
First Assistants and 

Children's Librarians up to maximum of $45.00 
Branch Librarians and 

Chiefs of Departments up to $2500 per annum; 

Increase of $2.00 per week for individuals employed in depart- 
ments other than bibliothecal departments who had not reached 
the maxima generally prevailing for similar positions in City of 
Boston departments; 

Additional increase in basic pay to certain individuals in liquidation 
of extra work evenings, in continuation of the program for the 
establishment of the shift system in the central library; 

Increase in the minimum hourly rate of pay for part time work from 
25 cents to 30 cents per hour, as of June 7, 1937. 

This action of June 1937 made provision primarily for the 
lower paid groups of library workers. For 23 individuals em- 
ployed on a non-permanent basis and not fully qualified for en- 
trance into the Graded Service of the Library it provided a 
$15.00 per week rate of pay. For 1 13 individuals fully qualified 
for the Graded Service it established a minimum rate of $20.00 
per week. To 303 other individuals it provided an increase of 
$2.00 per week toward the maximum of their positions. It made 
no provision, however, for the higher paid group of library 



[44] 

workers. Nor did it make any provision for the mechanical and 
similar workers in general. Both of these groups were already 
reasonably well remunerated. Toward the abolition of the neces- 
sity of extra work evenings in the central library it permitted 
action to a substantial degree. Up to June 1937 it had been 
possible to abolish this extra work evenings for only 30 out of 
the 88 individuals concerned. By the action of June 4, 1937 it 
was abolished for 41 other individuals. There remained there- 
after only 1 7 individuals for whom further action v/ould have 
to be taken eventually. In effect the shift or platoon system of 
personnel had finally been established for taking care of the 
service of the central libraiy evenings. This was in itself one of 
the most substantial accomplishments in the Library in many 
years, and one which had been desired long and urgently. 

The average of all salaries in the Library — including the 
lowest and the highest — had been raised from a figure in the 
neighborhood of $1400 per annum to $1530 per annum. Even 
after action on so widespread a basis the average of salaries in the 
Library Department was still low as compared with the averages 
prevailing in other city of Boston departments, as the following 
table shows: 



AVERAGE SALARIES IN CITY OF BOSTON DEPARTMENTS 

(Compiled from data contained in Officials and Emplo\}ees 

of the Ci'/p of Boston. 1937) 



Transit Department . 

Law Department 
Finance Commission . 
School Buildings Department 
Treasury Department . 
Election Department . 
Building Department . 
School Department . 

Street Laying-Out Department 
Auditing Department . 
Weights and Measures Department 
Boston Traffic Commission 



3,761.26 

2,962.53 
2.840.10 
2,729.00 
2,604.76 
2,597.62 
2,592.2! 
2,537.80 

2,360.68 
2,313.94 
2,240.00 
2,124.70 



[45] 

Park Department, Cemetery Division 
Assessing Department 
City Clerk Department 



2.063.38 
2,020.17 
2,009.53 



Soldiers' Relief Department . . . 1,925.65 

Collecting Department .... 1,728.58 

Supply Departnnent 1,718.60 

Park Department (excluding day laborers) 1 ,690.43 

Library Department 1,530.15 

The above departments are for the most part the "white collar" 
departments. In the case of the remaining city departments the 
figures for the average salaries are not available for one reason 
or another. For the Health Department, the Hospital Depart- 
ment, and the Institutions Department figures comparable with 
those in other city departments are not easily obtainable, since 
many of the medical men are employed on only a part time 
basis, and many of the other workers are given food or quarters 
(or both) in addition to cash salaries. For the Fire Department 
and the Police Department the basic salaries paid are $2100 
per year, to which the firemen and policemen progress by annual 
increments of $100 per year from a beginning rate of $1600 
per year. An actual average figure for all employees of these 
two departments ^vas not attempted, in view of the several thou- 
sand employees in each department. In the Public Works De- 
partment most of the workers are laborers on a per diem basis, 
so that the figures for this department are not easily comparable 
with those for the other city departments. And the Public Wel- 
fare Department seems not to be organized on a permanent 
basis, so that its figures appear not entirely pertinent for com- 
parative purposes. 

As compared with the salaries paid to the mechanical and 
other workers in the Library Department itself those paid to the 
library workers in the Library Department are shown in the 
following comparative table presenting the figures after the action 
of June 4, 1937: 



[46] 









%0F 






% 


OF 






TOT.AL NUMBER OF TOTAL NUMBER OF 


SALARY RANGE 




LIBRARY WORKERS MECHANICAL WORKERS 


Under $15.00 per week 


, . 


0.0% .... 0.0% 


Under 20.00 per week 






2.9% 








16.5% 


Under 25.00 per week 






47.6% 








32.3% 


Under 30.00 per week 






67.3% 








37.9% 


Under 35.00 per week 






82.8% 








58.87o 


Under 40.00 per week 






87.4% 








61 .2% 


Undar 45.00 per week 






96.4% 








86.2% 


Under 50.00 per week 






97.0% 








95.1% 


From $10.00 to $14.99 per 


week 


0.0% 








0.0% 


From 15.00 fo 19.99 per 


week 


2.9% 








16.5% 


From 20.00 to 24.99 per 


week 


44.6% 








16.5% 


From 25.00 fo 29.99 per 


week 


19.6% 








5.6% 


From 30.00 to 34.99 per 


week 


15.5% 








20.9% 


From 35.00 to 39.99 per 


week 


4.5% 








2.4% 


From 40.00 to 44.99 per 


week 


9.0% 








. 25.0% 


From 45.00 to 49.99 per 


week 


0.6% 








8.8% 



From these tables it is clearly to be seen that the action of 
June 4, 1937 was primarily for the benefit of the lower paid li- 
brary v/orkers. Prior to June 4, 1937 one-third (31 .2%) of the 
library workers were being paid under $20.00 per week; there- 
after only 2.9%. Prior to that date slightly over one-half 
(54.7%) of the library workers were being paid under $25.00 
per week; thereafter slightly less than one-half (47.6%). Prior 
to then 78.4% of the library workers were being paid under 
$30.00 per week; thereafter 67.3%. 

On the other hand the library workers as a group were after 
June 4, 1937 still in an unfavorable position as compared with 
the mechanical workers. Whereas nearly one-half (47.6%) of 
the library workers were still receiving under $25.00 per week, 
only one-third (32.3%) of the mechanical workers were re- 
ceiving under that amount. Whereas tw^o-thirds (67.3%) of 
the library workers v/ere still receiving under $30.00 per week, 
only two-fifths (37.9%) of the mechanical workers were re- 
ceiving under that amount. 

The remaining need for salary improvement is for the middle 
paid group of library workers. Most of them are entirely inade- 
quately remunerated considering the nature of their work and 
the training necessary for it. And now, through the substantial 
raising of the beginning rate for library workers, the relative 



[47] 

progression of steps in remuneration has been thrown far out of 
balance. Many individuals who began at $12.00 or $15.00 per 
week and are finally receiving as much as $22.00 or so per week 
find that now after several years of experience in the Library 
their remuneration is only a dollar or two more per week than 
that of the newest member of the staff who has entered the library 
service at $20.00 per week. 

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL AND STAFF EXAMINATIONS 

Perhaps the m.ost substantial accomplishment for the Library 
and for the members of its staff for the long period ahead was 
the announcem_ent on June 1 , 1937 of new arrangements for the 
classification of personnel and for staff examinations, to go into 
effect as of January 1 , 1 938. These new arrangements were in- 
tended to provide a basis upon which to achieve a classification 
of personnel which would be uniform in its application through- 
out the entire library system. They v/ere to provide also for the 
further development of the incomplete examination system which 
had been previously in effect in the Library. 

The new arrangements are based on two fundamental assump- 
tions. The first of these is that individuals are not naturally equal 
in their respective capacities and accomplishments, that some 
can and wil! progress faster and farther than others, that there 
must therefore be provided a ladder with easily recognizable 
steps up which individuals may climb, thus achieving a classify- 
ing and grading of themselves largely through their own efforts. 
In other words, the belief is that in general the personal quali- 
fications of an individual are likely to afford a better basis for 
financial recognition than does the relative standing of a par- 
ticular position in which the individual happens to find himself 
and to which a particular rate of pay happens to be attached 
at the moment. 

The second fundamental assumption is that, beyond the pos- 
session of the common background which all librarians ought to 
have of the ordinary tools and techniques of their work, they 
ought also to be possessed of specific excellence in some particular 
direction or directions. The discovery of such competence or ex- 
cellence in the members of the library staff is of the highest im- 



[48] 

portance in the further development of a staff adequate to the 
needs and standing of the Boston Public Library. 

With these two fundamental assumptions as background there 
has been set up a framework with ten steps. The first five steps 
are those of the Probationary Service, the second five are those 
of the Permanent Service. With these steps the system of staff 
examinations has been articulated. Five Qualifying Examinations 
are provided for the five steps of the Probationary Service, by 
which Probationary Assistants will qualify for appointment to 
the Permanent Service. Five Promotional Examinations are 
provided for the five steps of the Permanent Sei"vice, by which 
Assistants in the Permanent Service will qualify for promotion 
and increased remuneration. With these steps and these exami- 
nations a system of promotional increases in pay is to be articu- 
lated. The promotional increases will take the place of the 
automatic step rate increases which have been heretofore in 
effect in the Library. 

The five Qualifying Examinations will test the Probationary 
Assistant's knowledge of the ordinary tools and techniques of 
library work at the elementary level. They will be offered in the 
three fields of General Book Selection, Cataloging and Classi- 
fication, and General Reference Work. In addition two others 
will be offered to test the Probationary Assistant's knowledge 
of the Boston Public Library system — one treating of the Cen- 
tral Library and the other of the Bramch Libraries. A limited 
period will be allowed for meeting the requirements of the five 
Qualifying Examinations. The Probationary Assistant will pro- 
gress in his remuneration step by step as rapidly as he meets 
successfully individual Qualifying Examinations. Upon success- 
ful completion of the requirements of all five of the Qualifying 
Examinations, and after successful meeting also of the additional 
requirement of favorable executive evaluation and recommenda- 
tion, the Probationary Assistant will be eligible for appoint- 
ment as an Assistant in the Permanent Service. 

Likewise in the Permanent Service there will be five Promo- 
tional Examinations. These will test the individual Assistant's 
possession of a competence or excellence in som.e specific direction 
or directions. They will progress ordinarily from the general 



[49] 

to the special. For the first step there will be a Promotional Ex- 
amination which will be comm.on to all departments of the Li- 
brary. This will attempt to assay the understanding which the 
individual Assistant possesses of the nature of the public library 
as an institution. For want of a better name its field will be desig- 
nated as The Public Library as an Institution. With the second 
and third steps the fields of the appropriate Promotional Exami- 
nations will begin to differ, varying as the individual Assistant 
may be employed (or may be interested in eventual employment) 
in the branch libraries and related units or in the special subject 
departments of the central library. For the branch libraries the 
Promotional Examination fields for the second and third steps 
will be the general fields of the Social Sciences and History and 
of Literature respectively. In the central library the Promotional 
Examination fields will be in most cases an advanced knowledge 
of the French and German languages for the second step and 
a general knowledge of a subject field (such as the Fine Arts, 
Music, Science and Technology, Social Sciences and History, 
Literature, etc., etc.) for the third step. For the fourth and fifth 
steps in all units of the library service the two Promotional Ex- 
aminations will have to do respectively on the one hand with 
the subject knowledge and the bibliographical knowledge of a 
special field to be selected from within the subject field chosen 
for the third step or on the other hand with similar aspects of a 
specialized library activity (such as Cataloging, Classification, 
Extension Work, Work with Schools, Children's Work, Library 
Administration, etc., etc.). The Assistant will progress in his 
remuneration through the first three steps as rapidly as he meets 
successfully the required Promotional Examinations. As he meets 
thereafter the Promotional Examination requirements for the 
fourth and fifth steps he will become eligible for promotion and 
for corresponding promotional increases in remuneration when 
and as there are vacancies to be filled in the group positions of 
the fourth and fifth step levels. 

The salary schedules with which these Qualifying Exami- 
nations and Promotional Examinations are to be articulated are 
as follows: 



[50] 

SALARY SCHEDULES FOR THE GRADED SERVICE 
(To be effective when and as financial conditions permit.) 

The Technical Library Service (Grades B & C) 

probationary service (crade c) 



Probationary Assistant, 


Beginning . 


. $20.00 


Probationary Assistant, 


1st Step 


21.00 


Probationary Assistant, 


2nd Step 


22.00 


Probationary Assistant, 


3rd Step . 


23.00 


Probationary Assistant, 


4th Step . 


24.00 


Probationary Assistant, 


5th Step . 


. 25.00 


NENT SERVICE (cRADE 


B) 




Assistant, Beginning 




. 25.00 


Assistant, 1st Step . 




29.00 


Assistant, 2nd Step . 




33.00 


Assistant, 3rd Step . 




37.00 


Second Assistant 




44.00 


First Assistant . 




45.00 



The Professional Library Service (Grade A) 

CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENTS AND BRANCH LIBRARIANS 

Basic rate . . $2610 per annum ($50.00 per week) 

Upper rate . . 3 1 30 per annum ($60.00 per week) 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Rate of remuneration to be determined for each case in- 
dividually. 

Complete dependence upon examinations is to be avoided by 
requiring at certain points executive evaluation and recommenda- 
tion in addition to examination accomplishment. These points 
will be as follows : ( 1 ) in the original instance of employment, 
after passing of the Entrance Examinations and before the in- 
dividual is taken into the library service; (2) after the passing 
of the Qualifying Examinations and before the individual be- 
comes eligible to be appointed to the Permanent Service; and 
(3) particularly before an individual becomes eligible to be 
appointed to the positions of Second Assistant, First Assistant, 
and all positions of equal or higher rank. For appointment to 
the positions of chiefs of departments, branch librarians, and all 
general officers, the examination system will not be used at all. 
For these a choice will be made primarily upon executive evalu- 
ation and recommendation, though generally the individual can- 



[51] 

didates will have undergone the competition of examinations in 
earher stages of their Hbrary careers. 

The new classification of personnel and the new examinations 
will be effective for all individuals entering the library service 
beginning January 1 , 1 938. Such individuals must meet the re- 
quired Qualifying Examinations and Promotional Examinations 
in the order and under the conditions specified, in order to qualify 
for appointment, promotions, and increases in remuneration. The 
proposed new arrangements will not affect individuals already 
in the library service prior to January 1 , 1938 unless they them- 
selves elect to take advantage of the new arrangements. For 
them the taking of the new examinations will be on a voluntary 
basis, except in the case of qualifying for promotion to positions 
of the fourth and fifth step levels. 

A detailed description of the new arrangements was published 
under the title Classification of Personnel and Staff Examinations 
on June I, 1937. 

Much faith is held for the successful working out of these 
new arrangements because of their being based on fundamental 
assumptions which recognize qualities inherent in human beings 
as such. The individual members of the library staff will in 
reality be achieving a classifying and a grading of themselves 
largely through their own efforts and in terms of their individual 
abilities. Further they will be having an opportunity to indicate 
their eligibility for promotional advancement through demon- 
strating their possession of specific excellence or competence in 
some particular direction or directions. 

TRAINING OF PERSONNEL 

Five years ago, in anticipation of the time when there could 
be put into effect a classification of personnel and a system of 
staff examinations on a wide basis such as that just described, 
there was a recasting along enlarged lines of the activities of 
the Library's Training Class which had existed since 1927. In 
the place of the single class affording instruction to a limited 
group of fifteen or so individuals throughout the year, there was 



[52] 

instituted an extensive and wide program of single courses, open 
to all full^ime members of the library staff. 

This extended program of training courses entered upon its 
fourth academic year in October 1936. During the academic 
year 1936-37 there were 151 members of the staff enrolled in 
thirteen full courses (three terms of ten weeks each) and two 
one-term courses. These individuals took 1 66 courses, of which 
133 were completed satisfactorily. This enrollment of 151 in- 
dividuals taking a total of 166 courses is to be compared with 
194 individuals taking 207 courses in 1935—36, 192 persons 
taking 260 courses in 1934-35, and 261 individuals taking 268 
courses in 1933—34. Over the four years 433 different persons 
have been enrolled. The percentage of courses passed was 80% 
in 1936-37, 74% in 1935-36, 83% in 1934-35, and 77% 
in 1933-34. 

Enrollment in the courses is voluntary. The individual has to 
undertake the work on his own, not in library time. Courses are 
offered in all five of the fields which are to be covered by the 
new Qualifying Examinations and also in certain of those to be 
covered by the new Promotional Examinations. 

It is a fact of no Httle importance to the Library and to the 
public at large that each year as many as from 1 50 to 200 mem- 
bers of the library staff are engaged in courses of study and 
training such as these. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

TTie following appointments to titular positions were made 
during the year: Rebecca E. Willis, to be Branch Librarian, 
Jamaica Plain Branch Library; Edith H. Bailey, to be Branch 
Librarian, Phillips Brooks Branch Library; M. Florence Cuf- 
flin, to be Branch Librarian, Allston Branch Library; Mary 
A. C. Kavin, to be Branch Librarian, South Boston Branch 
Library; Dorothy F. Nourse, to be Branch Librarian, Tyler 
Street Branch Library; William B. Gallagher, to be Chief of 
the Printing Department; Elizabeth L. Wright, to be Chief of 
the Periodical and Newspaper Department; Christine Hayes, 



[53] 

to be Chief of the Book Selection Department in the Reference 
Division ; and Edna G. Peck, to be Chief of the Book Selection 
Department in the Circulation Division. 

Under the provisions of the Boston Retirement Act the fol- 
lowing individuals retired from the library service: George H. 
Connor, Assistant, after 45 years service; Joseph A. Maier, 
Assistant, after 45 years service; Francis W. Lee, Chief of the 
Printing Department, after 43 years service; Frederic Serex, 
Assistant in Charge, Nev/spaper Department, after 42 years 
service; Katherine F. Muldoon, Branch Librarian, Allston 
Branch Library, after 41 years service. 

As of the date of retirement the honorary title of Chief of the 
Printing Department, Emeritus v/as bestow^ed upon Francis W. 
Lee and the honorary title of Branch Librarian, Emeritus upon 
Katherine F. Muldoon. 

By death the Library lost the services of William N. Gould, 
Carpenter, David G. F. Schromm, Elevator Attendant, and 
Ella M. Keenan, Unclassified Assistant. 

CONCLUSION 

The year 1937 was one of substantial accomplishment. Some 
of the more important developments are chronicled in the above 
reports. Others are set forth in statistical form in the Appendix 
which follows immediately after this Report. More have to be 
read between the lines since they are not of the sort which can 
be put into the written record. They are best known to the count- 
less users of the Library who have profited from them. 

To the members of the library staff the Director is deeply 
appreciative for constant aid and cooperation. For them and for 
himself he offers grateful thanks to the Trustees for continuing 
friendly support and interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milton E. Lord 

Director, and Librarian 



[54] 



APPENDIX 



USE OF BOOKS 
Comparative Circulation Statistics, 1933-1937 





1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


Central Library 


793,121 


756,018 


737,396 


757363 


748,21 1 


Business Branch 


17,614 


18,410 


17.921 


1 7.822 


18309 


Branch Libraries: 












AUston 


192331 


186.413 


182.203 


172,835 


160,973 


Andrew Square 


145,801 


138,638 


130.777 


127.827 


128,590 


Boylsfon 


143.764 


138.595 


137.179 


138.532 


124.069 


Brighton 


147,666 


134388 


130,741 


121,152 


113.169 


Charlestown 


144,676 


127.866 


117,525 


116,034 


110.377 


City Point 


150,036 


144.762 


140.006 


129,289 


124.505 


Codman Square 


199.786 


185.451 


168,412 


164.553 


157.174 


Dorchester 


140,344 


132.104 


135.821 


137,759 


130.130 


East Boston 


214.789 


188.819 


161.227 


150340 


130370 


Faneuil 


130.252 


138,234 


138,561 


133,787 


120,908 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


109.077 


98,118 


89,857 


91.436 


84.090 


Hyde Park 


149.875 


144,011 


141,763 


129,807 


126.043 


Jamaica Plain 


131,903 


126.702 


119.760 


116,604 


118,819 


Jeffries Point 


92,499 


80.460 


76.500 


73.593 


71.440 


Kirstein 


65,149 


63,388 


64,045 


56,536 


46,204 


Lower Mills 


81.017 


74,990 


70,928 


64371 


60,635 


Mattapan 


219,300 


205,498 


196311 


188,382 


177.013 


Memorial 


246,757 


222.975 


211.971 


192,100 


173,279 


Mt. Bowdoin 


158.667 


149341 


143,823 


137.889 


128,668 


Mt. Pleasant 


102.914 


94,640 


89.924 


84,102 


80,752 


Neponset 


78.579 


69,638 


64.409 


60.117 


59.535 


North End 


163.735 


143351 


123.174 


125,656 


121.927 


Orient Heights 


84.233 


92.801 


81.189 


68.932 


60.255 


Parker Hill 


125.524 


119.139 


112.165 


108.933 


102314 


Phillips Brooks 


51,870 


46.258 


45397 


44,859 


40387 


Roslindale 


173.078 


167.562 


154.640 


151.971 


146.992 


Roxbury Crossing 


76,023 


75,062 


72,839 


71.037 


44,576 


South Boston 


168326 


141,046 


128.979 


124.228 


117,161 


South End 


155.575 


154.604 


153,478 


150.728 


138.298 


Tyler Street 


72334 


52,578 


47.979 


51,364 


53.301 


Uphams Corner 


228.490 


211.399 


199.564 


188,437 


175,918 


West End 


218,721 


208.003 


201 373 


200,444 


181,642 


West Roxbury 


174,457 


163.089 


161,864 


157.918 


155,144 



5.548,283 5,194351 4,949,701 4,806.737 4.531378 



[55] 

The net gains and losses in circulation are presented, apart 
from the totals, in the following form: 

1933 loss from preceding year ........ 19,398 

1934 loss from preceding year ........ 353,932 

1935 loss from preceding year ........ 244,650 

1936 loss from preceding year ........ 142,964 

1937 loss from preceding year ........ 275,359 



Distribution of Total Circulation 



Central Library 

a. Direct , . , . 

b. Through Branch Libraries 

1 . Deposit Collection . 

2. General Collections . 

c. Schools and Institutions through 

Branch Department 
Business Branch 
Branch Libraries: 

Allston 

Andrew Square 

Boylston 

Brighton 

Charlestown 

City Point 

Codman Square 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Faneuil 

Fellowes Athenaeum 

Hyde Park 

Jamaica Plain 

Jeffries Point 

Kirstein 

Lower fvlills 

Mattapan 

Memorial 

Mt. Bowdoin 

Mt. Pleasant 

Neponset 

North End 

Orient Heights 

Parker Hill 

Phillips Brooks 

Roslindale 

Roxbury Crossing 

South Boston 

South End 

Tyler Street 

Uphams Corner 

West End 

West Roxbury 



HOME 
USE 

391,280 

49,340 
28,181 



schools and 
institutions 





279,410 


748,211 






18309 


160,973 




160,973 


125,149 


'3,*44l" 


128,590 


124,069 




124.069 


1 1 1 ,433 


1736 


113,169 


102.946 


7,431 


110,377 


124,505 




124.505 


146329 


l"o!845 


157,174 


129,547 


583 


130,130 


125,977 


4,593 


130,570 


120,908 




120,908 


70,560 


l'3!536 


84,090 


126,043 




126,043 


113,994 


*4;825 


118.819 


71,440 




71.440 


46,204 




46,204 


60,635 




60,635 


175,933 


'lioso 


177,013 


173,159 


120 


173.279 


128,668 




128,668 


80,752 




80,752 


59,535 




59,535 


121,517 


' VlO 


121.927 


60.255 




60,255 


102,314 




102314 


40,387 




40,387 


137,920 


'9;072 


146,992 


44.576 




44,576 


102,301 


1 41860 


117.161 


133,588 


4,710 


138,298 


53,301 




53301 


1 75,740 


' 178 


175.918 


163,702 


17,940 


181,642 


144,696 


10,448 


155,144 



3.659.056 



105,802 



3,764,858 



[56] 

These figures are condensed into the following: 

Books Lent for Home Use, Including Circulation Through 
Schools and Institutions 

From Central Library (including Central Library books issued through 

the Branch Libraries) 748,21 1 

From Business Branch . . . . . • • • • • 18,309 

From Branch Libraries (excluding books received from Central Library) 3,764,858 

4,531,378 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 

following use of books for the purpose of serious research is 

shown for two successive years: 

1936 1937 

Volumes lent from this library to other libraries in Massachusetts 1,592 1,436 

Lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts 430 342 

2,022 1,778 
Applications refused: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 693 843 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts . . . . . 219 205 

912 1,048 

The classified direct circulation of the branch libraries for 

two successive years was as follows: 

1936 1937 

VOLUMES PERCENTAGE VOLUMES PERCENTAGE 

Fiction for adults . . . 1,815,704 46.3 1,667,651 45.6 

Non-fiction for adults . . 583.624 15.0 552,208 15.1 

Juvenile fiction .... 1,045,093 26.6 1,000.823 27.3 

Juvenile non-fiction . . . 474,603 12.1 438.374 12.0 

At the Central Library the classified direct circulation shows 

the following percentages: 

1936 1937 

Fiction 47.6 413 

Non-fiction 52.4 58.7 

BOOK ACCESSIONS 
Books Acquired By Purchase 
For the Central Library: 
From City appropriation 
From trust funds income 

13.476 15.114 

For Branch Libraries: 

From City appropriation . . . 30,260 41,461 

From trust funds income . . . 2320 1,292 

32,580 42.753 



1936 


1937 


3,634 


5.681 


9,842 


9.433 



[57] 



The following statement includes the accessions by purchase 
combined with books received by gift or otherwise : 









TOTAL 




CEiNTRAL 


BRANCHES 


VOLUMES 


Accessions by purchase 
Accessions by gift .... 
Accessions by exchange . 
Accessions by continuations bound . 


15.114 

3.273 

5 

6.097 


42,753 
864 

21 


57.867 

4,137 

5 

6,118 


Accessions by newspapers bound 


28 


— 


28 




24,517 


43,638 


68,155 


THE 


CATALOGS 








1936 


1937 




VOLS. AND 


VOLS. AND 






PARTS TITLES 


PARTS 


TITLES 


Cataloged (new) 

Central Library Catalog 
Serials .... 
Branch Libraries ... 
Recataloged 


22,926 19,550 

10,696 — 

31,225 29,875 

6,719 4,311 


21,750 

11.185 

36,846 

8,215 


17,608 

34,869 
1.758 



Totals 



71,566 53.736 



77.996 54.235 



The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use is: 

Placed on the Central Library shelves during the year: 

General collection, new books (including continuations) . . . 20.815 

Special collections, new books and transfers ..... 2,484 
Books reported lost or missing in previous years but now found, 

transfers from Branch Libraries, etc. ...... L697 

24,996 
Removed from Central Library Shelves during the year: 

Books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, 

transfers, etc. 15,890 

Net gain at Central Library 9,106 

Net loss at Branch Libraries 3,930 

Placed in Business Branch ......... 2,170 

Net gain entire library system ......... 7,346 



[58] 



BOOK STOCK 



The total number of volumes in the library at the end of each 
year since its formation is shown in the following statement: 



1852-53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

186&-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 



9.688 


1895 


16.221 


1896-97 


22.617 


1897-98 


28.080 


1898-99 


34.8% 


1899-1900 


70.851 


1900-01 


78,043 


1901-02 


85.031 


1902-03 


97,386 


1903-04 


105,034 


1904-05 


110.563 


1905-08 


116.934 


1906-07 


123,016 


1907-08 


130.678 


1908*09 


136.080 


1909-10 


144.092 


1910-11 


152.796 


1911-12 


160,573 


1912-13 


179,250 


1913-14 


192,958 


1914-15 


209.456 


1915-16 


260.550 


1916-17 


276.918 


1917-18 


297,873 


1918-19 


321.010 


1919-20 


345,734 


1920-21 


360.963 


1921-22 


377,225 


1922-23 


390.982 


1923-24 


404.221 


1924-25 


422.116 


1925 


438,594 


1926 


453.947 


1927 


460.993 


1928 


479.421 


1929 


492,956 


1930 


505,872 


1931 


520.508 


1932 


536.027 


1933 


556,283 


1934 


576.237 


1935 


597.152 


1936 


610.375 


1937 



628,297 

663,763 

698,888 

716,050 

746383 

781,377 

812,264 

835.904 

848.884 

871,050 

878.933 

903.349 

922,348 

941.024 

961 .522 

987.268 

1.006.717 

1,049.011 

1.067,103 

1,098,702 

1,121.747 

1,139.682 

1.157326 

1.173.695 

1.197.498 

1.224.510 

1.258,211 

1.284,094 

1308.041 

1.333,264 

1,363.515 

1388,439 

1,418.489 

1.442.802 

1,475,743 

1,526.951 

1.572.802 

1.631.422 

1,654,017 

1,673,609 

1,682,848 

1.693335 

1,700.681 



Volumes in the Central Library 1.195.704 

Volumes in the Business Branch ........ 20.695 

Volumes in the Branch Libraries ........ 484,282 

Volumes in entire library system ........ 1,700.681 



[59] 
These volumes are located as follows: 



Central Library 




. 






1.195.704 


Business Branch 


, 


. 






20.695 


Branch Libraries: 












AUslon 


13.489 


Memorial 






16,571 


Andrew Square 


11.941 


Mt. Bowdoin . 






13,041 


Boylston 


10,808 


Mt. Pleasant . 






8,460 


Brighton 


20.755 


Neponset 






7,007 


Charlestown 


17.515 


North End . 






11,823 


City Point 


11.861 


Orient Heights 






9,607 


Codman Square 


16,805 


Parker Hill . 






13.101 


Dorchester 


16,292 


Phillips Brooks 






5,549 


East Boston 


17,947 


Roslindale 






1 5,806 


Faneuil 


14,334 


Roxbury Crossing 






7,038 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


41,563 


South Boston . 






1 7.780 


Hyde Park . 


30,569 


South End 






1 1 .796 


Jamaica Plain . 


15.435 


Tyler Street . 






7.919 


Jeffries Point . 


7.806 


Uphams Corner 






17,727 


Kirstein 


7.365 


West End . 






21,829 


Lower Mills 


8.682 


West Roxbury 






19,971 


Mattapan 


16.090 











THE BINDING DEPARTMENT 



Number of volumes bound in various style 

Magazines stitched .... 

Volumes repaired .... 

Volumes guarded .... 

Maps mounted .... 

Photographs and engravings mounted 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed 



1936 


1937 


66,014 


65,822 


69 


66 


1.900 


2,502 


644 


537 


77 


62 


2,521 


3,209 


130,504 


151.990 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1936 1937 

Requisitions received and filled 220 494 

Card Catalog (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Depariment count) 23.861 15.637 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") .... 140.640 124,609 
Card Catalog (Branch Libraries) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) 1,010 932 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") .... 66,731 81,240 

Signs 60 944 

Blank Forms (numbered series) . . . . . . 4,210,220 4,250,440 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside the numbered series) . 43.275 169,826 

Catalogs, pamphlets, bibliographical programs .... 40.615 162,799 



[60] 
NOTABLE PURCHASES. 1937 

Printed Books — Manuscripts — Reproductions 

ABC Lesetafel. Leipzig, V. Bapst. c. 1544. 
Accolti. 

Lo inganno de gl'occhi. Florenz, 1625. 
Albertus Magnus. 

De Natura Locorum. Vienna, Victor & Singrenius, 1514. 
Alexander de Villa Dei. 

Doctrinale puerorum. Nuremberg, Friedrich Creussner, 1487. 
S. Ambrosius. 

De officiis ministrorum (with other tracts) . Milan, Valdarfer, 1 474. 
The American Pioneer. 2 v. Cincinnati, 1 843—4. 
The American Revolution. 

Letters from a Midshipman in the Royal Navy. Plymouth, c. 1 800. 

Narratives, Memoirs, and Journals. 8 v. New York, 1 860-6. 

Andreae, Johannes. 

Arbor consanguinitatis. Nuremberg, Creussner, c. 1476. 
Angelus de Clavasio. 

Summa de casibus conscientiae. Chivasso, Jacobinus de Suigo, 1 486. 
Aristophanes. 

Comoediae novem. Venice, Aldus Manutius, 1 498. 
Aristoteles. 

Liber de moribus. Paris, Jean Higman, 1488. 

Politica. Rome, Eucharius Silber, 1492. 

Arnold, Matthew. 

Essays in Criticism. London, 1865—1888. 2 v, 
Aspinwall, William. 

A Premonition of Sundry Sad Calamities. London, 1655. 
Auctoritates Aristotelis. Senece, etc. Cologne, Johann Guldenschaff, 

1487. 
Aus America das ist auss der Newen Welt. Augsburg, I 620. 
Bacon, Sir Francis. 

History Natural! And Experimentall. London, 1 638. 
Of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning. Oxford. 

1640. 
Bandellus. 

De Conceptione. Milan, C. Valdarfer, 1475. 
Beaumont, Francis, & John Fletcher. 

The Wild-Goose Chase. London, 1 652. 
Benlowes, Edward. 

Theophila. London, 1652. 



[61] 

Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Berchorius. 

Liber Bibliae moralis. Ulm, Johann Zainer, 1474. 
S. Bernardus Claraevallensis. 

Epistolae. Strassburg, Eggestein, c. 1475. 

& Gilbertus de Hollandia. Sermones. Strassburg, Flach, 1497. 

S. Bernardus Senensis. 

Quadragesimale. Basle, Johann of Amerbach, not after 1 490. 
Bevier, The Rev. Johannes H. 

The Indians. Rondout, N. Y., 1846. 
Bircardus, Ariel. 

Quaestiones novae in libellum de sphaera. Frankfurt, Brubach, 

1549. 
Blondus. 

Romae instauratae, libri III. Verona, Boninus de Boninis, 1481. 
Boethius. 

De consolatione philosophiae. Lyon, Guillaume Le Roy, 1 486. 
Boswell, James. 

Life of Samuel Johnson. London, 1 79 1 . 2 v. 
Brathwaite, Richard. 

The Schollers Medley. London, 1614. 
Breazeale, J. W. M. 

Life as it is. Knoxville, 1 842. 
Breidenbach. 

Peregrinationes in Terram Sanctam. Mainz, E. Reuwich, 1 486. 
Bridges, Robert. 

Demeter. Oxford, 1905. 
Brome, Alexander. 

Songs and Other Poems. London, 1 66 1 . 
Brown, Samuel R. 

Views of the Campaigns of the Northwestern Army. Troy, 1814. 
Bulla Canonisationis Sancti Leopoldi. Vienna, Stephan KobHnger, c. 

1484. 
Bumaby, Andrew. 

Travels through the Middle Settlements in North America. London, 

1798. 
Bumaby, Charles. 

The Modish Husband. London, 1 702. 
Calchum. 

Zusamfassung etl. Geometr. Bremen, 1 629. 
Castiglioni, Luigi. 

Viaggio negli State Uniti dell' America. Milan, I 790. 



[62] 

Notable Purchases. 1937 (continued) 

Chapman, George. 

Andromeda Liberata. London, 1614. 
Chrysostomus. 

Homiliae XLIV. Urach, Conrad Fyner, c. 1 483. 
Cicero. 

De officiis. Venice, Philippus Pincius, 1 496. 
Orationes Philippicae. Venice, Joannes Tacuinis de Tridino, 

1494. 
Tusculanae disputationes. Venice, Antonius de Strata, de 

Crem.ona, 1 49 1 . 
Clare, John. 

The Converted Jew. Douay, Permissu Superiorum, 1 630. 
Cornelius Nepos. 

Vitae imperatorum. Brescia, Jacobus Britannicus, 1 498. 
Cornwallis, Lord. 

Examination before a Committee of the House of Commons. 

London, 1779. 
Cowley, Abraham. 

Anacreon. London, 1683. 
Crabbe, George. 

The Village. London, 1 783. 
Cumings, Samuel. 

The Western Pilot. Cincinnati, 1825. 
Davilla, Gil Gonzalez. 

Theatro Ecclesiastico. 2 v. Madrid, 1649—1655. 
Dictys et Dares. 

Historia Troiana. Venice, Christopher de Pensis, 1499. 
Directorium Breviarii Salisburgensis. Nuremberg, Georg Stuchs, c. 

1497. 
Doddridge, Dr. Joseph. 

Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of Virginia and Pennsyl- 
vania. Wellsburgh, Va., 1824. 
Donne, John. 

Biathanatos, London, 1 644. 
Drake, Sir Francis. 

Third Voyage. London, 1 626. 
Dunsany, Lord. 

Plays of Gods and Men. London, 1917. 

Unhappy Far-Of f Things. London, 1919. 2v. 

Eastburn, Robert. 

A Faithful Narrative of his Dangers and Sufferings during his 

Captivity among the Indians. Boston, 1 758. 



[63] 

iNoTABLE Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

England's Helicon. London, Richard More, 1614. 
S. Ephrem Syrus. 

Libri de compunctione cordis de judicio dei. Freiburg, Kilian Fi- 
scher, c. 1491. 
Epistola de miseria curatorum. Strassburg, Johann Priiss, c. 1 489. 
Epistola diversorum philosophorum oratorum Rhetorum sex et viginto. 

Venice, Aldus Manutius, 1499. 
Esquemeling, Alexander O. 

Histoire des Avantures. Paris, 1 686. 
Eyb, Albertus de. 

Margarita Poetica. Rome, Ulrich Han, 1475. 
Fielding, Henry. 

Amelia. Lxindon, 1 752. 

The Journal of a Voyage to Lisbon. London, 1755. 

Miscellanies. London, I 743. 

Fletcher, John. 

The Bloody Brother. London, I 639, 
Forbes, Alexander. 

California. London, 1 839. 
Fulgosus. 

Anteros. Milan, L. Pachel, 1496. 
Galilei-Sarsio. 

Libra astronomica. Perusia, 1619. 
Galvano-Hakluyt. 

The Discoveries of the World. London, 1601. 
Gellius, Aulus. 

Noctes Atticae. Venice, Andreas de Paltasichis, 1477. 
Gerstinger, Hans. 

Die Wiener Genesis. Filser Verlag, 1931. 2 v. 
Goldsmith, Oliver. 

Essays. London, 1765. 
Gregg, Josiah. 

Commerce of the Prairies. New York, 1845. 
S. Gregorius I. Magnus. 

Epistolae. Augsburg, Zainer, c. 1476. 
Guillermus Avernus. 

Rethorica divina. Freiburg, Kilian Fischer, c. 1491. 
Hall, John. 

Poems. Cambridge, 1 646. 
Hobbes, Thomas. 

Philosophicall Rudiments. London, 1 65 1 . 
Hudson, William H. 

The Land's End. London, 1 908. 



[64] 

Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Hues, Robert. 

Tractatus de Globis. London, 161 1. 
Hutchins, Thomas. 

A Topographical Description of Virginia. London, 1 778. 
Indian Anecdotes and Barbarities. Barre, Mass., 1837. 
Indian Treaty. A Conference Held at the Fort at St. George's. Boston. 

1742. 
Johnson, Mrs. Susannah. 

A Narrative of her Captivity. Glasgov^^, 1797. 
Killigrew, Mrs. Anne. 

Poems. London, 1 686. 
Landor, Walter S. 

The Hellenics. London, 1 847. 
Leigh, Richard. 

The Copie of a Letter to the Ambassador in France for the King 

of Spain, declaring the State of England. London, 1588. 
S. Leo I. 

Sermones. Basel, Michael Wenssler, c. 1474—5. 
Lesley, John. 

De Ttitulo et Jure Serenissimae Principis Mariae Scotorum Reginae ; 

and De Illustrium Foeminarum. Rheims, 1580. 
Lewis, Hannah. 

Narrative of her Captivity. Boston, 1818. 
Lochmaier. 

Sermones de Sanctis. Hagenau, Heinrich Gran, 1 500. 
Locke, John. 

An Essay concerning Humane Understanding. London, 1 690. 
Luther, Martin. 

Adversus Execrabilem Antichristi Bullam. Wittemberg, 1520. 

Confitendi Ratio. Augsburg, 1520. 

Ein Sermon iiber das Evangelion Johannis. Wittemberg, 1531. 

Summa des Christlichen lebens. Wittemberg, 1533. 

Mancinellus. 

Scribendi Orandique Modus. Venice, Bernardinus Benalius, c. 

1494. 

Versilogus. Leipzig, Wolfgang Stoeckel, 1 496. 

Manuscript letters to Mrs. James T. Fields from Sophia Hawthorne, 

Celia Thaxter, Louise Imogen Guiney, and others. 
Marvell, Andrew. 

Miscellaneous Poems. London, 1 68 1 . 
Massachusetts Views. Boston, Pendleton, 1 833. 



[65] 

Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Maurocenus. 

De aeterna et temporali generatione Christi in judaicae improba- 

tionem. Padova, Bartholomaeus de Valdezoccho, 1473. 
May, Thomas. 

The Victorious Reigne of King Edward the Third. London, 1 635. 
Mayne, Jaspar. 

The Citye Match. Oxford, 1 639. 
Medina. 

L'Arte del navegar. Venice, 1554. 
Mill, Humphrey. 

A Nights Search. London, 1640. 

— The Second Part of the Nights Search. London, 1 646. 

Milton, John. 

Of reformation. London, 1641. 
M'llvane, William. 

Sketches in California and Mexico. Philadelphia, 1850. 
Mizaldus. 

Harmonia coelestium corporum et humanorum. Paris, Kerver, 1555. 
The Muse of New-Market. London, 1 680. 

A New Voyage to Georgia. By a Young Gentleman. London, 1 737. 
Niavis. 

Latinum Ideoma pro parvulus editum. Nurnberg, Creussner, 1 494. 
Nider. 

Formicarius. Cologne, Ulrich Zell, c. 1475. 
Praeceptorium divinae legis s. expositio Decalogi. Reutlingen, 

Michael Greyff, c. 1479. 
Nonius Marcellus. 

De proprietate latini sermonis. Brescia, Boninus de Boninis, 1 483. 
Otway, Thomas. 

Windsor Castle. London, 1685. 
Paulding, James K. 

Chronicles of the City of Gotham. New York, 1 830. 
Pernambuco. 

Eygentlicher Abirs. 1530. 
Perottus, Nicolaus. 

De generibus Metrorum. Venice, Maximus de Butricis, 1491. 
Petrus Lombardus. 

Liber sententiarum. Basel, Nicolas Kessler, 1488. 
Peurbach. 

Elementa arithmetices. Wittenberg, 1534. 
Pike, Zebulon M. 

Explanatory Travels. London, 181 I. 



[66] 
Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Plautus. 

Comoediae. Venice, Simon Bevilaqua, 1499. 
Plenarium, Deutsch. Augsburg, Anton Sorg, 1 478. 
Plinius Secundus (Caius). 

Historia Naturalis. Parma, Andreas Portilia, 1481. 
Pontanus. 

De fortitudine bellica. De principe. Naples, Mathias Moravus, 

1490. 
Pope, Alexander. 

An Essay on Man. London, 1 732—4. 

Of the Knowledge and Characters of Men. London, 1 733. 

The Rape of the Lock. London, 1714. 

Privilegia et Litterae indulgentiarum Ordinis Fratrum Minorum. Leip- 
zig, Wolfgang Stockel, 1498. 
Proba, Anicia Faltonia. 

Cento Virgilianus. Poitiers, Jean Bouyer, [1500>] 
Psalterium Latino-Germanicum. Augsburg, Erhard Ratdolt, 1 499. 
Quarles, Francis. 

Hadassa. London, 1 62 1 . 

The Historic of Samson. London, 1 63 1 . 

Job MiHtant. London, 1 624. 

Observations concerning Princes and States. London, 1 642. 

The Shepheards Oracles. London, 1 646. 

Sions Elegies. London, 1 624. 

Quinlan, James E. 

Tom Quick, the Indian Slayer. Monticello, N. Y., 1851. 
Quintilianus. 

Declamationes. Venice, L. Dominici, 1482. 
Radcliffe, Ann. 

The Italian. London, 1 797. 
Raulin. 

Oratio. Basle, Johann Bergmann, 1498. 
Regiomontanus. 

Almanach ad annos XVIII accuratissime calculata. Augsburg, 

Erhard Ratdolt, 1488. 

Kalendarius. Augsburg, Hans Miller, 1518. 

Revere, Paul, 

Engraving of the Boston Massacre. 1 770. 
Rov/lands, Richard. 

A Restitution of Decayed Intelligence. Antwerp, Robert Bruney, 
1605. 



[67] 

Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Sabellicus. 

Rerum Venetarum decades. Venice, Andreas Torresanus, de Asula, 

1487. 
Sacrobusco. 

Sphaere textum. Paris, Jean Petit, 1515. 
Samuel, Rabbi 

Epistola contra Judaeorum errores. Metz, Caspar Hochfeder, 1 498. 
Sandeus. 

Lectura super titula de fide instrumentorum. Pavia, Michael de 

Geraldis, 1497. 
Scarron, Paul. 

Comical Romance. London, 1676. 
Scott, Thomas. 

A Tongue-Combat. London, 1623. 
Seneca. 

Opera philosophica et epistolae. Venice, Bernardinus de Choris, 

1492. 

Tragoediae. Venice, Lazarus de Soardis, de Saviliano, 1492. 

Settle, Elkanah. 

Ibrahim; The Female Prelate; The City-Ramble. London, 1677— 

1712. 
A Narrative; A Letter to Mr. Settle; An Heroick Poem on 

the Coronation. London, 1683—5. 
Seutter. 

Recens elaborata mappa. Ausburg, 1 730. 
Shelley, Percy Bysshe. 

Hellas. London, I 822. 
Sibylla, Bartholomaeus. 

Speculum peregrinarum. Strassburg, Johann Griininger, 1499. 
Smith, Mrs. Mary. 

An Affecting Narrative of her Captivity. Williamsburg, 1818. 
Smith, William, provost. 

An Historical Account of the Expedition against Ohio Indians. 

Philadelphia, I 765. 
Southerne, Thomas. 

The Fatal Marriage. London, 1 694. 
Speculum Exemplorum. Deventer, Richardus Pafraet, 1481. 
Stanley, Thomas. 

Poems. London, 1 65 I . 
Statius. 

Opera. Venice, Bartholomaeus de Zanis, 1 494. 



[68] 

Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Stephens, James. 

Typewritten manuscript of "Theme and Variations," with numerous 

autograph corrections, etc. in author's hand. With first edition of 

the work. N. Y., 1930. 
Swift, Jonathan. 

A Complete Key to the Tale of a Tub. London, 1710. 
The History of the Four Last Years of the Queen. London, 

1758. 

Memoirs of the G)urt of Lilliput. London, 1 727. 

Tate, Nahum. 

Elegies. London, 1 699. 

Poems. London, 1677. 

Taylor, John, "The Water-Poet." 

An humble Desired Union. London, 1 642. 

Mad Fashions. London, 1 642. 

Mercurius Aquaticus. N.p., 1643. 

Tennyson, Alfred. 

Poems. London, 1 830. 

Poems. London, 1857. 

Terrasse, Petrus. 

Oratio de divina profidentia. Rome, Stephan Plannck, 1483. 
Thackeray, William. 

The Adventures of Philip on his Way through the World. London, 

1862. 

The Book of Snobs. London, 1 848. 

Comic Tales and Sketches. London, 1 84 L 

An Essay on the Genius of George Cruikshank. London, 1 840. 

The History of Pendennis. London, 1 848—50. 

The House of Henry Esmond. London, 1852. 

A.n Interesting Event. London, 1 849. 

The Irish Sketch-Book. London. 1 843. 

"Our Street." London, 1848. 

The Newcomes. London, 1853—5. 

Mrs. Perkins's Ball. London, 1847. 

The Snob ; The Gownsman. Cambridge. 1 829—30. 

Vanity Fair. London. 1 848. 

The Virginians. London, 1858—9. 

Theramo, Jacobus de. 

Consolatio peccatorum. Cologne, Printer of Augustinus de Fide 

(Goiswin Gops?). c. 1473. 
Thesaurisatio in coelis. Nuremberg. Friedrich Creussner. 1488. 



[69] 

Notable Purchases, 1937 (continued) 

Thorius, Raphael. 

Hymnus Tabaci. London, 1 65 1 . 
Thucydides. 

De bello Peloponnesiaco. Treviso, Joannes Vercellensis, c. 1 483. 
Tortellius. 

Orthogiaphia dictionum. Venice, Hermann Lichtenstein, 1 484. 
Tritheim. 

De proprietate monachorum. Mainz, von Friedberg, 1495. 
Urbanus Bolzanius. 

Institutiones Graecae Grammatices. Venice, Aldus Manutius, 

1497. 
Vaughan, Henry. 

Olor Iscanus. London, 1 65 I . 
Villa-Senor y Sanchez, Joseph Antonio. 

Theatro Americana. 2 v. Mexico, 1 746—1 748. 
Walton, "William. 

A Narrative of the Captivity of Benjamin Gilbert. Philadelphia, 

1784. 
Whitman, Walt. 

Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, N. Y., 1855. 
Wimpheling. 

Oratio. Augsburg, Froschauer, c. 1 496. 
Woodcuts from Books of the 1 6th century. Portfolio, with an introduc- 
tion by Max Geisberg. 



[70] 

A SELECTION OF INTERESTING GIFTS OF BOOKS IN 1937 

Allen, Rosamond 

A collection of one hundred and nineteen volumes of fiction and non- 
fiction. 

American Association for Adult Education 

Seven volumes on adult education in America, published by the 
American Association for Adult Education. 1937. 

Baker Library 

One hundred and eighty-one volumes, including technical works and 
bound periodicals, several volumes of the American Almanac for 1831 
to 1861, and A Classification of Business Literature. 

Bang, Mrs. A. C. 

Seventy-six volumes of Danish books, including unbound volumes of 
the American Scandinavian Review for 1924-1929 and 1931, and 
"Denmark i skildringer og billeder . . . udgivet af M. Galschit, Koben- 
havn, Philipsens, 1 888." 

Bates, Van Ness 

A collection of sixty-two volumes, including t^venty volumes of Punch, 
1841-1860, several issues of the Boston Social Register and the 
Summer Social Register, and several volumes in the Badminton Library. 

Dran, Annie S., Estate of 

A collection of five hundred and twelve lantern slides of scenes and 
buildings in England, France, Wales and China, and of Chinese art 
subjects, about 400 of which are colored slides. 

Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. 

Behind the scenes of business. By Roy A. Foulke. 

Revised edition, 1937. New York, Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. Ten 

copies. 

Faxon, Frederick W., Estate of 

A collection of 853 latern slides, including views of historical places, 
buildings, monuments, parks, etc., in America, the British Isles and 
Europe. 

Gaines, Samuel R. 

Forty volumes of recent fiction and non-fiction, and two pieces of 
music arranged by Samuel Richards Gaines. 

Godoy, Armand 

Rome. By Armand Godoy. Paris, Grasset (1936). 
Le brasier mystique, by Armand Godoy. Paris, Grasset (1937). 
Trois poemes de Saint Jean de la Croix. Adaptes en frangais par Ar- 
mand Godoy. Paris, Grasset (1937). 

Goldstein, Fanny 

A collection of forty-five volumes, for the Judaica Collection. 

Lewis, Mrs. D. 

Fifty-six volumes and 222 numbers, mainly technical journals and 
periodicals, and several numbers of Punch and the National Geographic. 



[71] 

McKibbin, Miss E. W. 

A collection of thirty-four, principally unbound, volumes of French 
fiction. 

Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Massachusetts 

Sibley's Harvard Graduates, Volumes V, ! 701—1 712. Biographical 
sketches of those who attended Harvard College in the classes 1 701 - 
1712, with bibliographical and other notes. By Clifford K. Shipton. 
Boston, Massachusetts Flistorical Society, 1937. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Twenty-eight volumes of the Rural New Yorker, to help complete the 
file in the Boston Public Library. 

Morris, Mrs. Ira Nelson, New York, N. Y. 

Maria Theresa, the last conservative. By Constance Lily Morris. 
New York, Knopf, 1937. (Autographed, for the Galatea Collection.) 

Noyes, James B. 

A collection of forty-five volumes, many with fine bindings, including 
a ten-volum.e set of Carlyle's Works, a limited edition in two volumes 
of "Quo Vadis," a four-volume set of "The Memorial History of 
Boston," and other unusual and rare books. 

Rowlands, Walter 

A collection of forty-nine volumes, principally books on art. art cata- 
logs, several volumes of fiction and children's books. 

Stechert & Co., G. E. 

One hundred and thirty-eight volumes of French fiction. 

Underbill, Francis Jay 

Thirty-four volumes and twenty-eight pamphlets on various subjects 
from the library of Francis Jay Underbill. 

University of Pennsylvania 

Forty-nine theses presented to the University of Pennsylvania, and 
"The story of Edgar Fahs Smith Memorial Collection in the History 
of Chemistry." 

Viets, Dr. Henry R., Boston, Massachusetts 

A brief history of medicine in Massachusetts. By Henry R. Viets, 

M.D. Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1930. 

A Brief Rule to guide the Common-People of New-England how to 

order themselves and theirs in the Small Pocks, or Measels. By Thomas 

Thacher. Edited by Henry R. Viets, M.D. Johns Hopkins University. 

1937. 

LECTURES — CONCERTS 

In the Central Library Lecture Hall the Library presented 1 1 pro- 
grams in its annual series of free concerts, lectures, and entertainments. 

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1937 

Exhibitions arranged by the Library were on view in the Exhibition 
Room, the Treasure Room, and the Children's Room throughout the year. 



[72] 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1937 

The figures listed are for the par values of investments as of December 
31 , 1937 , except in the following cases in which the hook values are given 
instead as of var}^ing dates: the Children's Fund, book value as of De- 
cember 31, 1937 ; the Benton Book Fund, hook i^a/ue as of January 21 , 
1937 ; and the Benton Building Fund, book value as of January 21 , 1937 . 

Artz Fund — Donation from Victoria Thomas Artz, of Chicago: 
the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of valuable, 
rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of American 
and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the "I_ong- 
fellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." $50,000.00 

Benton Book Fund — Extract from the will of JosiAH H. BentoN: 

"Twelfth: All the rest and residue of my property and estate I give 
and devise ... to the TRUSTEES OF THE PuBLIC LIBRARY OF 
THE City of Boston . . . and I Direct that the same be held 
and used in the manner following . . . 

"First: — One-half of the net income of such residue and remainder 
to be applied by the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit for said Library; meaning and in- 
tending hereby that such income shall be applied for books desirable 
for scholarly research and use . . . 

". . . It is my desire that . . . the income given by the Twelfth Clause 
of my will for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit, shall be in addition to the sums 
appropriated by the City for the maintenance of the Boston Public 
Library, and that the same shall not be taken into account in any 
appropriation by the City for that purpose, 

"I, therefore, hereby provide that . . . such income as is given by 
the Twelfth Clause of my will for the purchase of books . . . shall be 
applied for those purposes only in years when the City appropriates 
for the maintenance of the Boston Public Library at least three per 
cent (3 per cent) of the amount available for department expenses 
from taxes and income in said City. 

"In any year when the City does not thus appropriate at least three 
per cent (3 per cent) of the amount available for department ex- 
penses from taxes and income in said City, the income given in said 
will for the purchase of books shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity 



[73] 

Church in the City of Boston to be by him disbursed in relieving the 
necessities of the poor." 

By an Agreement of Compromise entered in the Probate Court 
of Suffolk County on January 15, 1935, the Benton Book 
Fund was established" ... as a permanent fund, the income and 
interest thereon to be applied annually by the Library Trustees, 
without regard to the amounts appropriated by the City of Boston 
for the maintenance of the Boston Public Library in any year, as 
follows: — (a) Six-tenths (6/10) of such income is to be applied an- 
nually by the Library Trustees for the purchase of books, maps and 
other library material of perm.anent value and benefit for said li- 
brary; meaning and intending hereby that such income shall be 
applied for books desirable for scholarly research and use; (b) The 
remaining four-tenths (4/10) of such income is to be paid over an- 
nually to the Rector of Trinity Church to be by him disbursed, either 
directly, or in his discretion, through charitable organizations or 
agencies, whether incorporated or unincorporated, in relieving the 
necessities of the poor." Received in 1936. $1,138,539.00 

Benton Building Fund — Extract from the will of JosiAH H. Benton : 
''Twelfth: All the rest and residue of my property and estate I give 
and devise ... to the TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC Library of 
THE City of Boston . . . and I Direct that the same be held 
and used in the manner following . . . 

". . . Second: — To hold the other one-half of said residue and 
remainder as an accumulating fund, the income and interest to be 
added to the principal and reinvested as principal, until the total 
amount thereof shall be two million dollars ($2,000,000). And 
then I Direct such total sum of two million dollars ($2,000,000) 
to be applied to the enlargement of the present central library build- 
ing in Boston, or to the construction of another central library build- 
ing in such part of the City as may be then most desirable for the 
accommodation of the people of said City ; such new building to be 
constructed under the advice of the Librarian of the Library at that 
time in such manner as may be most desirable for efficient practical 
working of a library therein." Received in 1936. 

$1,594,006.38 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of Charles H. L. N. 
Bernard. Received in 1 930. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by the HoN. John P. BiGELOW in 
August, 1 850, when Mayor of the City. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of Robert Charles Bil- 
lings. 
"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 



[74] 

called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $100,689.26 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll BowditCH. Received in 
1 890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb David Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in I 897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of Joseph H. Center, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. $39,908.89 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from: 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 



$150.00 
Children's Fund — Bequest of JOSIAH H. BenTON of $100,000, to be 
held as "1 he Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the City appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said City. In any year 
when the City does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and incom.e in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
for the young shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the 
City of Boston to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of 
the poor. $100,000.00 

Clement Fund — Bequest of FRANK CLEMENT, of Newton, to be known 
as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 
Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854.41 



[75] 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of Abraham E. Cutter of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1901. 

$4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of Sarah A. Matchett, late of Brookline. 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-live thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for the purchase 
of books for the young until otherwise ordered by the Board. Re- 
ceived in 1900. $6,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp FoRD 
to the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for general 
purposes. Received in 1935. $5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA StewART 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang," Received in 1924. 

$5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by Morris Gest in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. $2,037.17 



[76] 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE Harris, the object 
of which is stated in the following extract from her will: "I give to 
the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be invested on interest, 
which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books published 
before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own private li- 
brary and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." Be- 
quests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of THOMAS B. HARRIS, of Charles- 
town, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. Received 
in 1884. $1,138.31 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of ALFRED HemENWAY. Received 
in 1928. $5,000.00 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund — Bequest of Heloise E. Hersey, the in- 
come to be expended for the purchase of books, preferably those of 
recent issue that have real literary value. Received in 1 936. 

$3,542.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of FrankLIN P. Hyde, to be knovm as the 
"Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the purchase 
of books and other library materiail. Received in 1915. $3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,271.58 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1 ,000 each made by LouiS E. 
Kirstein, "to be used for any purpose of the Library that the 
Trustees see fit to put it to." 
October, 1925 $1,000.00 



October, 1926 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 
October, 1929 



1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,000.00 



$5,000.00 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of Katherine 
Knapp: "To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be knovm 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 

$10,002.50 
Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of HeleN Lambert, in memory of 
Frederic and Louise Lambert. The income of this fund to be ex- 
pended for the purchase of books and other library material until 
otherwise ordered by the Trustees. Received in 1931. $1,394.57 



Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott Lawrence. The in- 
terest on this fund to be exclusively appropriated for the purchase of 
books having permanent value. Received in 1860. $9,950.53 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward LawreNCE, of Charles- 
town. The following clause from his will explains its purpose: 
"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Received in 1886. $500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH LeWIS, to be 
known as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the 
Boston Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of CHARLES Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896. 

$2,530.51 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund — Bequest of FraNCIS A. MoRSE, of 
West Roxbury; the income only to be expended annually for the 
purchase of books for the West Roxbury Branch Library suitable 
for children of school age. Received in 1936. $1,000.00 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of GARDNER O. NoRTH. Received 
in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of$l 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 
from the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under 
an indenture between Amor HoUingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L. Kollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund." the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $1 1,781.44 



[78] 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PapyrUS 
Club to estabhsh a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

$1,085.02 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, in April, 
1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by Mr. Phillips in his v^ill dated September 20, 
1 849. The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the main- 
tenance of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by the HoN. Henry L. Pierce, Mayor 
of the City, November 29, 1 873, and accepted by the City Council, 
December 27, 1 873. $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, under the 
1 4th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester Branch, 
$500.00. Received in 1922 and 1924. $1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of FIelen Leah Reed, as a m.emorial 
to Guilford S. Reed; the income to be applied to the purchase of 
books of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFiELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. $62,242.45 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD Black SewalL: 
*' Tenth: — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of 
legacy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income 
to be used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 



[79] 

judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the PubHc Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J, Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in i 9 1 4. $51 ,732. 1 4 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of MarY ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Stor- 
Row and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to 
James Jackson Storrow, Senior; income to be used for the purchase 
of Italian books. $25,000.00 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of GEORGE TiCKNOR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the City is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 



[80] 

expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the City, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the City might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life tlie books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the City, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
ceived said bequests on behalf of the City, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,106.71 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. TODD, 
of Atkins, N. H., accepted by order of the City Council, approved 
October 30, 1897, the income to be at least two thousand dollars 
a year, to be expended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of 
this and other countries. $50,000.00 

Townsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, at whose dis- 
posal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such chari- 
table and public institutions as they might think meritorious. Said 
executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City of 
Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May I 7, I 872, said be- 
quest was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized 
to receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 



[81] 

Tufts Fund — Bequest of Nathan A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
kno\A'n as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be appHed 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1906. 

$10,736.68 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. $5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest of HoRACE G. WadLIN, of 
Reading, former Librarian, to the Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston of $2,000 to be permanently funded and the 
income thereof used for the purchase of books. Received in 1932. 

$2,030.51 
Also a bequest by Ella F. Wadlin ; to be added to the Horace G. 
\Vadlin Fund, and the income to be used for the purchase of books. 
Received in 1936. $1,725.84 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of George C. Wales: 

"AJter the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. $5,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James LymAN Whitney, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund, I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 



[82] 

paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one shave for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one-half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. $29,294.09 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic w^ork for the benefit of the Library. 
Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. Wil- 
son, the income to be expended for the purchase of books. Received 
in 1913. $1,000.00 



GIFTS FOR THE PURCHASE OF BOOKS 



Besides the preceding, the following gifts have been made to the Public 
Library, and the amounts have been appropriated for the purchase 
of books, according to the intention of the donors, viz.: 



Samuel Appleton, late of Boston 

H. C. Bentley . 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch . 

Nathaniel 1. Bowditch . 

James Brown, late of Cambridge 

Andrew Carnegie 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library 
Sally Inman Kast Shepard 
James Nightingale .... 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest . 



$1,000.00 
220.38 
6.800.00 
200.00 
500.00 
980.75 

335.13 

1. 000.00 

100.00 

339.61 



$11,475.87 



[83] 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Artz Fund .... 

Bates Fund .... 

Benton Book Fund 

Benton Building Fund . 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 

Bigelow Fund 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 

Bowditch Fund 

Bradlee Fund 

Joseph H. Center Fund 

Central Library Building Fund 

Children's Fund . 

Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 

Cutler Fund 

Elizabeth Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund 

Franklin Club Fund 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 

Morris Gest Fund 

Green Fund 

Charlotte Harris Fund . 

Thomas 3. Harris Fund 

Alfred Heraenway Fund 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund 

Hyde Fund 

David P Kimball Fund 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund . 

Helen Lambert Fund 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 

Edward Lawrence Fund 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund . 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Ft 

Charles Mead Fund 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund 

Gardner O. North Fund 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund . 

Phillips Fund 

Pierce Fund 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund . 

Guifford Reed Fund . 

John Singer Sargent Fund . 

Scholfield Fund . 

Sewall Fund 

Skinner Fund 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 



$10,000.00 

50,000.00 

1,138,539.00 

1 ,594,006.38 

2,000.00 

l.OOO.OO 

100,689.26 

10,000.00 
1,000.00 

39,908.89 

150.00 

100,000.00 

2,000.00 

2.854.41 

4,270.00 

25.000.00 
6,000.00 
5.017.65 
1.000.00 
5.000.00 
2.652.50 
2,037.17 

10.000.00 
1.138.31 
5,000.00 
3.542.00 
3.632.40 

10,271.58 
5,000.00 

10,002.50 
1 ,394.57 
9,950.53 
500.00 
5.000.00 
500.00 
2,530.51 
l.OOO.OO 
2,000.00 

11,781.44 
1,085.02 

30.000.00 
5,000.00 
1.494.18 
1.000.00 
3,858.24 

62,242.45 

25.000.00 

51.732.14 

100.00 

3,500.00 



[84] 



James Jackson Sforrow (Harvard '57) Fund 

Ticknor Fund .... 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 

Townsend Fund .... 

Treadwell Fund .... 

Nathan A. Tufts Fund 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund 

Wales Fund .... 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 

James Lyman Whitney Fund 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund . 

Total .... 



25.000.00 
4,106.71 

50,000.00 
4.000.00 

13.987.69 

10,736.68 
5.000.00 
3,756.35 
5,000.00 
5.000.00 

29,294.09 
1,000.00 

, $3,528,262.65 



[85] 



OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1937 

Director's Office 

Director, and Librarian: Milton E. Lord 

Clerk of the Trustees: Elizabeth B. Brockunier 

Supervisor of Training: Bertha V. Hartzell 

Editor of Publications: Zoltan Haraszti 

Reference Division 

Chief Librarian of the Reference Division: Richard G. Hensley 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Frank C. Blaisdell 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Samuel A. Chevalier 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Otto Fleischner 

Book Selection Department: Christine Hayes, Chief 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Lucien E. Taylor, Chief 

General Reference Departments: Francis H. Hannigan, Supervisor 

John H. Reardon, Deputy Supervisor 
Bates Hall Centre Desk: William J. Mulloney, Assistant in Charge 
Bates Hall Reference Department: Harry W. Mathev^s, First 

Assistant 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief 
Open Shelf Department: John H. Reardon, Chief 
Periodical and Newspaper Department : Elizabeth L. Wright, Chief 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief 

Special Reference Departments: Edward H. Redstone, Supervisor 

Frank N. Jones, Deputy Supervisor 
Business Branch: Mary W. Dietrichson, Business Branch Librarian 
Fine Arts Department: Priscilla S. MacFadden, Assistant, In 

Charge 
History Reference: Laura R. Gibbs, Assistant 
Music Department: Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge 
Science and Technology Department: Frank N. Jones, Chief 
Statistical Department: Elizabeth G. Barry, Assistant in Charge 
Teachers Department: Anna L. Manning, Assistant in Charge 

Rare Books: Zoltan Haraszti, Keeper of Rare Books 

Rare Book Department: Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge 



[86] 

Circulation Division 

Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division : Orlando C. Davis 

Children's Work: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor 

Branch Libraries: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston: M. Florence Cufflin 

Andrew Square: Elizabeth H, McShane 

Boylston: Margaret A. Calnan 

Brighton: Katrina M. Sather 

Charlestown : Katherine S. Rogan 

City Point: Helen M. O'Leary 

Codman Square: Elizabeth P. Ross 

Dorchester: Marion C. Kingman 

East Boston: Theodora B. Scoff 

Faneuil: Gertrude L. Connell 

Fellowes Athenaeum: Mary E. Ames 

Hyde Park: Sara A. Lyon 

Jamaica Plain: Rebecca E. Willis 

Jeffries Point: Mary U. Nichols 

Kirstein: Grace C. Loughlin 

Lower Mills: Isabel E. Wetherald 

Mattapan: Ada A. Andelman 

Memorial: Beatrice M. Flanagan 

Mount Bowdoin: Pearl B. Smart 

Mount Pleasant: Margaret H. Reid 

Neponset: Margaret 1. McGovern 

North End: Mary F. Curley 

Orient Heights: Catherine E. Flannery 

Parker Hill: Mary M. Sullivan 

Phillips Brooks: Edith H. Bailey 

Roslindale: Annie M. Donovan 

Roxbury Crossing: Elizabeth B. Boudreau, First Assistant 

South Boston: Mary A. C. Kavin 

South End: Clara L. Maxwell 

Tyler Street: Dorothy F. Nourse 

Upham's Corner: Beatrice C. Maguire 

West End: Fanny Goldstein 

West Roxbury: Geneva Watson 

Book Selection Department: Edna G. Peck, Chief 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Ethel Hazlewood, Cataloger, 
In Charge 

Branch Bindery Section: Marion McCarthy, Assistant, In Charge 

Branch Issue Department: Alice V. Stevens, Chief 



[87] 



Young People's Room, Central Library: Mary C. Toy, Children's Li- 
brarian 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Katherine F. Albert 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Carrie L. Morse 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Katherine F. Muldoon 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Margaret A. Sheridan 

Division of Business Operations 

Comptroller: James W. Kenney 

Buildings Department: William F. Quinn, Superintendent 

Auditing Department: Helen Schubarth, Auditor 

Book Purchasing Department: William C. Maiers, Chief 

Stock Purchasing Department: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian 

Binding Department: James P. Mooers, Chief 

Printing Department: William B, Gallagher, Chief 

Francis W. Lee, Chief, Emeritus 
Shipping Department: Robert F. Dixon, Shipper 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

, ■Ifiillllll 

3 9999 06314 677