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EIGHTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 



938 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1941 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTONt PRINTINC DEPARTMENT. 

9.e.4t : ?5OO+60 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



JOHN L. HALL, President 

Term expires April 30, 1941 

ROBERT H. LORD 

Term expires A.pril 30, 1942 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN FRANK W. BUXTON 

Term expires April 30, 1939 Term expires April 30, 1940 

ELLERY SEDGWICK 

Term expires April 30, 1943 



MILTON E. LORD 

Director, and Librarian 



FORM FOR GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

Gifts 

/ give to The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 

Boston the sum of _ 

to be used at the discretion of the Trustees (or for a purpose to 
be specified). 



Bequests for General Uses 

/ give and bequeath to The Trustees of the Public Library 

of the City of Boston the sum of 

for the general uses of the Library. 



Bequests for Specified Uses 

/ give and bequeath to The Trustees of the Public Library 

of the City of Boston the sum of 

for the purchase of books (for the 

purchase of books on a specified subject if desired, or for some 
other purpose to be specified). 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Library is a unit of the municipal government of the City of Boston and as 
such is known as the Library Department of the City of Boston. It is governed by a 
Board of Trustees. 

The Trustees of the PubHc Library of the City of Boston were organized in 1852. 
They are incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 114 of the Acts of 1878, as 
amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; thai for 1853 made 
the first annual report. 

The legal title is The Trustees of the Public Library of the Cit}) of Boston. 

The Board of Trustees is made up of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor of the City of Boston for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each 
year. The following citizens at large have been members of the Board since its 
organization in 1852: 



Abbott. Gordon, A.B., 1926-1931. 
Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, A.M., 

1879-95. 
Appleton, Thomas Gold, A.M., 1852-56. 
Benton. Josiah Henry, LL.D., 1894-1917. 
Bigelow, John Prescott, A.M., 1852-68. 
Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, M.D., 1865-67. 
Bowdilch, Henry Pickering, M.D., 

1894-1902. 
Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 
Braman, Jarvis Dwighf, 1869-72. 
Brett, John Andrew, LL.B., 1912-16. 
Buxton, Frank W., A.B., 192^- 
Carr. Samuel, 1895-96, 1908-22. 
Chase, George Bigelow, A.M., 1876-85. 
Clarke, James Freeman. D.D.. 1879-88. 
Coakley, Daniel Henry, 1917-19. 
Connolly, Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. 
Currier, Guy Wilbur, 1922-1930. 
Curtis, Daniel Sargent, A.M., 1873-75. 
De Normandie, James, D.D., 1895-1908. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1899-1908. 
Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, B.S.. 1927-28. 
Everett. Edward. LL.D., 1852-64. 
Frothingham, Richard, LL.D., 1875-79. 
Gaston, William Alexander, LL.B., 

1923-27. 
Green, Samuel Abbott, M.D., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William Whitwell, 1856-88. 
Hall, John Loomer, A.B., LL.B., 1931- 



Haynes, Henry Williamson, A.M., 

1880-94. 

Hilliard, George Stillman, LL.D., 

1872-75, 1876-77. 

Kenney, William Francis, A.M., 

1908-1921. 

Kirstein, Louis Edward, a.m., D.C.S., 1919- 

Lewis. Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, M.D., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon. A.M., 1897-1907. 

Lord, Robert Howard, A.M., PH.D., 1936- 

Mann, Alexander, DJ5., 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray, Michael Joseph, LL.B., 1921-26. 

O'Connell. William Cardinal. 1932-36. 

Pierce, Phineas, 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius. A.M., 1888-99. 

Putnam, George, D.D., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, A.M., 1889-95. 

Sedgwick, Ellery, A.B., LITTJ)., 1930- 

Shurtleff, Nathaniel Bradsfreet, LL.D., 

1852-^3 

Thomas, .Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., 

1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, LL.D., 1852-66. 

Walker, Francis Amasa, LL.D., 1896. 

Whipple. Edwin Percy, a.m., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, A.M.. 1885-88. 

Winsor, Justin, LL.D., 1867-68. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE TRUSTEES 



Edward Everett, 1852-1864 
George Ticknor, 1865 
William \V. Greenough, 1866-88 
Henry W. Haynes, May 7. 1888-May 12, 1888 
Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888-April 30, 1895 
Frederick O. Prince, October 8, 1895-May 8, 1899 
Solomon Lincoln. May 12, 1899-October 15. 1907 
James De Normandie, January 31, I90&-May 8. 1908 
Josiah H. Benton, May 8, 1 908-February 6, 1917 
William F. Kenney, February 13, 1917-May 7, 1920 
Alexander Mann. May 7, 1920-January 22, 1923 
Arthur T. Connolly. April 13, 1923-June 13, 1924 

May 2, 1927-June 22, 1928 
Louis E. Kirstein. June 13. 1924-June 19, 1925 
June 22, 1928-June 21, 1929 
May 15, 1931 -May 20, 1932 
May 6, 1936-May 7, 1937 
Michael J. Murray, June 19, 1925-July 2, 1926 
Guy W. Currier, July 2, 1926-May 2, 1927 
Gordon Abbott, June 21, 1929-June 20, 1930 
Frank W. Buxton, June 20, 1930-May 15, 1931 

May 6, 1935-May 6, 1936 
Ellery Sedgwick, May 20, 1932-May 5, 1933 
May 7, 1937-May 6, 1938 
John L. Hall, May 6, 1933-May 18, 1934 
William Cardinal O'Connell, May 18, 1934-May 6. 1935 



LIBRARIANS 

From 1852 to 1858 the chief officer of the Library bore the title of Librarian; 
from 1858 to 1877 Superinlendenl : from 1877 to 1923 Librarian; from 1923 to 1934 
Director; since 1934 Director, and Librarian. 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1832-December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Supsrinlendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 

WiNSOR, Justin. LL.D., Superintendent, February 25, 1 868-September 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 1877-Septembei- 30, 

1878. 
Chamberlain. Mellen, ll.d., Librarian, October 1, 1 878-September 30, 1890. 
DwiGHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13. 1892-April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, ll.d.. Librarian, February 11, 1895-April 3, 1899. 
Whitney, James L., a.m.. Acting Librarian, March 31, 1 899-December 21, 1899; 

Librarian, December 22, 1899-January 31, 1903. 
WaDLIN, Horace G., LITT.d., Librarian, February 1, 1903-March 15, 1917; Acting 

Librarian, March 15, 1917-June 15, 1917. 
Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll.b., litt.d., Director, March 15, 1917-October 24, 

1931. 
Lord, Milton E., a.B., Director and Librarian, since February I, 1932. 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1938 



Departments 
^Central Library, Copley Square . 
*East Boston Branch. Ilb-IBI Meridian St. 
§South Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
llFellowes Athenesum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
*Charlestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
'Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St. 
tLower Mills Branch, 1 110 Washington, cor. Richmond St 
JSouth End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. 
tJamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St 
j:Ros!indale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
*North End Branch, 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave. 
§Ml. Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch, 161 Harvard Ave. . 
JCodman Square Branch, Washington, cor. Norfolk St. 
JMt. Pleasant Branch, 335 Dudley, cor Vine St 
OJTyler Street Branch. 130 Tyler, cor. Oak St. 
*We»t End Branch, 131 Cambridge St. 
JUphjim's Corner Branch, 500 Columbia Rd. 
^Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sti. 
0§Roxbury Crossing Branch, 208 Ruggles, cor. Tremont St 

*Boylston Branch, 433 Centre St 

§Orient Heights Branch. 5 Butler Ave. 

^City Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadv/ay . 

*Parker Hill Branch. 1497 Tremont St. . 

*Hyde Park Branch, 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 

*Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St. ... . 

§ Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 

*Jeffrie8 Point Branch, 222 Webster St. . . . 

• Baker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration 

*Kir8tein Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 

Kirstein Branch, third floor. 
§PhiIIips Brooks Branch, 12 Hamilton St., Readville . 
^School Department, 126 Tyler St 

^In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. *In building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board, fin building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses. Jin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §Occupie$ 
rented rooms. ||The lessee of the Feilowes Athenaeum, a private library tt^sociation. 
lUnder agreement with Harvard. ^^Branch Library closed June 30. 1938. 



^Ope 


NED 


May 


2, 


1854 


Jan. 


28. 


1871 


May 


1, 


1872 


July 


16. 


1873 


Jan. 


5. 


1874 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


25. 


1875 


June 


7. 


1875 


Aug. 




1877 


June. 




1877 


Dec. 


3, 


1878 


Jan. 


6. 


1880 


Dec. 


27, 


1881 


Oct.. 




1882 


Jan. 


1. 


1883 


Nov. 


1, 


1886 


Mar. 


11. 


1889 


Nov. 


12, 


1890 


Nov. 


12, 


1890 


Jan. 


16. 


1896 


Feb. 


1. 


1896 


Mar. 


16. 


1896 


May 


1. 


1896 


Jan. 


18, 


1897 


Nov. 


1, 


1897 


June 


25, 


1901 


July 


18. 


1906 


July 


15, 


1907 


Jan. 


I. 


1912 


Mar. 


4, 


1914 


Mar. 


5. 


1914 


Oct. 


15. 


I92I 


Jan. 


15. 


1927 


May 


7, 


1930 


May 


18, 


1931 


July 


1, 


1938 



CONTENTS 



Report of the Trustees . 
Financial Statement 
Report of the Examining Committee 
Report of the Director . 
Appendix 



1 

18 
24 
36 
49 



To His Honor Maurice J. Tobin 

Mayor of the City of Boston 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the Pubhc Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31,1 938, being the eighty-seventh an- 
nual report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 6, 
1 938 with the election of Mr. John L. Hall as President, the 
Reverend Robert H. Lord as Vice President, and Miss Eliza- 
beth B. Brockunier as Clerk. 

Mr. Ellery Sedgwick, whose term as Trustee expired on 
April 30, was reappointed for the term ending April 30, 1943. 

BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted as of November 1, 1937 for the 
maintenance of the Library during the year 1 938 were later 
amended and reduced. These estimates were as follows: 

Item 
A. — Per'sonal service 
B. — Service other than personal 
C. — Equipment 
D. — Supplies 
E. — Materials 
H. — Emergency relief projects 

Total 

RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 

The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and the City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and held and invested by the City 



Estimate<l 


Allowed 


$1,105,207.03 


. $1,039,175.00 


122.553.50 


76,298.10 


168.937.30 


81 ,952.00 


42.505.00 


35.149.73 


20.685.00 


18,946.47 


124.250.56 


68.950.00 


$1,584,138.39 


. $1,320.47130 



[2] 

Treasurer under the direction of the Trustees of the Library. 
During the year 1 938 these receipts were : 



Annual appropriation ........ 

Income from trust funds ........ 

Unexpended balance of trust funds income of previous years 
Unexpended balance of special appropriations of previous years . 
Unexpended balance of deposits in London of previous years 



$1,320,471.30 

296,214.26 

48.785.57 

12.276.57 

72.73 



Total . . . $1,677,820.45 

Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the year were 
as follows: 

From fines $23,618.22 

From sales of waste paper ......... 75.74 

From sales of catalogs and other publications ...... 341.97 

From commission on telephone pay stations ...... 52134 

From payments for lost books ........ 657.95 

Refunds, fees, etc. 47.41 



Total . . . $25,262.63 

EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 

The total amount expended during 1938 was $1 ,383,860.59. 
This was divided as follows : 

From city appropriation ......... $1,285,269.91 

From special appropriations ........ 12,251.72 

From the income of trust funds ........ 86,338.96 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 66,423, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part 
also by gift and exchange. 

Against the above-mentioned gain there was a total loss of 
73,416 volumes, arising chiefly out of volumes reported lost or 
missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, thus making the net 
loss for the year 6,993. The total number of volumes in the 
Library at the close of the year was 1 ,693,688. 

The total amount for books, periodicals, newspapers, photo- 
graphs, and other library material from the city appropriation 
and the income of trust funds was $156,631 .89. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 
The total number of books borrowed for home use during the 



[3] 

year was 3,979,850. The use of books and other hbrary ma- 
terials within the Library's premises for reference and study is 
for the most part unrestricted, and it is therefore impracticable 
to record it. 

In addition to the above noted use of the Central Library and 
the thirty-two Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 
available to 1 ,356 agencies, including schools, institutions, and 
engine houses. 

. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS FOR 1937 AND 1938 

A comparison of certain statistics for 1938 with those for 
1937 is given below: 

1937 1938 

Total expenditures: city appropriation 

and trust funds income . . $1,329,567.12 . . $1,383,860.59 
Expended for books and other library 

materials from ciiy appropriation 

and trust funds income . . 131,164.30 , . 156,631.89 

Number of volumes added . . . 67,582 . . 66,423 

Number of volumes discarded . . 60,236 . . 73,416 

Total number of volumes in the Library 1,700,681 . . 1,693,688 

Number of volumes lent to borrowers . 4,531,378 . . 3,979,850 

Number of card holders . . . 178,097 . . 175,950 

BOOKS 

The appropriations made by the City for the purchase of 

books in the last ten years have been as follows : 

1929 $140,000 

1930 160.000 

1931 175.000 

1932 160,000 

1933 75,000 

1934 100,000 

1935 100,000 

1936 55,000 

1937 75,000 

1938 73,875 

It is to be noted that the amount of the appropriation for 1 938 
was intended to be $75,000, but that in the final steps of passing 
the budget it was reduced sHghtly by an arbitrary amount, as 
were all accounts in the budgets of all city departments. For 
comparative purposes, however, the amount of the appropriation 
may be said to have remained at substantially the same level as 
that for 1937. 



[4] 

It is of prime importance to the Library that the amount of 
the book appropriation continue to be maintained at the present 
level at the very least, and that as early as possible it be returned 
to the higher levels v^hich prevailed in the earlier years of the 
decade. They represent amounts which years of experience in- 
dicate to be those which are necessary if the Library is to work 
to the best advantage 

In 1938, however, the branch libraries discarded 58,314 vol- 
umes as worn out as compared with 37,473 volumes added. In 
other words, the branch libraries found themselves at the end 
of 1 938 with 20,84 1 fewer volumes than they had at the begin- 
ing of the year. Unfortunately 1 938 was not the first year in 
which such a backward movement had taken place. In the three 
preceding years of 1935, 1936, and 1937, the branch libraries 
fell behind by almost as many more volumes again. Specifically, 
on December 31, 1938 they had 38,1 19 fewer volumes than 
on January 1 , 1935. This is the equivalent of the total book col- 
lections of three entire branch libraries of the average size in the 
Boston Public Library system. 

From the above it would seem obvious that an adequate sup- 
ply of books, and an adequate provision of funds for their pur- 
chase, is necessary to the very existence of a library. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

For nearly two years the West End Branch Library has had 
to remain out of its quarters in the Old West Church building. 
As pointed out in last year's report the Trustees requested year 
by year the sum of $10,000 annually imtil the old building 
should be put into good repair, only to have the item disallowed 
each year. Finally in 1937 an emergency situation arose affect- 
ing the safety of the building. The Library's decision to close 
the building to public use was confirmed by a subsequent order 
from the Building Commissioner of the City of Boston. To date 
no provision has been made for the repair of the building. The 
cost is estimated at $55,000 - $50,000. Meanwhile inadequate 
substitute quarters are having to be rented across the street at a 
substantial annual cost. Provision should be made to meet the 



[5 1 

needs of this unsatisfactory situation. The old church building 
is an important esthetic and historical monument of the city. It 
is highly unfortunate that for nearly two years it has had to 
carry on its activities at increased cost in inadequate substitute 
rented quarters. 

Once again it has been necessary to make an expenditure of 
considerable amount for the annual repairs upon the tile roofing 
of the Central Library building. The cost of repairs during 1938 
amounted to $16,033.42. In the latter part of 1937 the Li- 
brary's consulting engineers, Messrs. J. R. Worcester and Com- 
pany, recommended a program contemplating the reconstruction 
of the roof as the only one likely to lead to a reasonably per- 
manent solution of this vexing problem. In the spring of 1938 
careful examination of the tile roofing was made also by a group 
of the City's experts, including the Building Conmiissioner of 
the City of Boston, the Superintendent of Public Buildings, the 
Public Works Commissioner, the Boston W.P.A. Administra- 
tor, the local W.P.A. Engineer, and others. This group also 
expressed the opinion that only through reconstruction of the 
roof could a solution of the problem be found. The Trustees 
earnestly request therefore that careful consideration be given to 
this possibility. It is highly desirable that action be taken to make 
unnecessary the present uneconomical procedure of costly an- 
nual patching and mending. 

Careful consideration was given constantly during the year 
to the water levels under the Central Library building during 
the period of the construction of the adjacent Huntington Ave- 
nue subway extension. Such regression of the water level as oc- 
curred proved to be only of temporary duration. At the end of 
the year they had returned to a point above the tops of the piles 
upon which rest the foundations of the building. 

During the year considerable study was given to the matter 
of heating and lighting for the Central Library building. Since 
1 895 the Library has made its own steam and generated its own 
electricity. A capital replacement in the generating equipment 
will be necessary in the three years immediately ahead. The 
heating and the lighting plant occupies a considerable amount 



[6] 

of basement space which would be useful for book storage and 
other library purposes. And estimates have been furnished which 
indicate that steam and electricity can both be purchased from 
the Boston Edison Company more economically than they can 
now be manufactured by the Library itself. Confirmation of this 
was obtained through independent engineering investigation. The 
Trustees therefore concluded to discontinue the Library's heat- 
ing and lighting plant in favor of purchasing steam and electri- 
city from the Boston Edison Company. It is hoped to effect this 
change as early as possible in 1 939. 

CLOSING OF TWO BRANCH LIBRARIES 
On July 1 there were discontinued the Roxbury Crossing and 
the Tyler Street Branch Libraries. In each case a decreasing 
population in the surrounding area had been accompanied by a 
decreasing use of the branch library facilities, until finally in the 
interests of economy it no longer seemed advisable to continue 
their existence as individual units. 

From their crowded location in the Central Library and into 
the quarters previously occupied by the Tyler Street Branch Li- 
brary there were moved the Library's activities in serving the 
school children in the schools, with a formal designation of them 
as the School Department of the Library. 

CURTAILMENT OF LIBRARY SERVICE 

As economy measures minor curtailment of the library service 
had to be effected in both the Central Library and the Branch 
Libraries. The Central Library was closed entirely on Sundays 
from June 15th to September 15th. The Branch Libraries were 
closed from April 15th on Friday evenings and on Saturday 
afternoons and evenings. 

The curtailments were effected only after a careful study 
and census of actual use had been made to determine the periods 
at which such curtailment of service would cause inconvenience 
to readers to the least degree. 

It is hoped that such curtailment of service may be necessary 
only for a limited period. 



[71 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF PROJECTS CARRIED ON 
UNDER THE SPONSORSHIP OF THE LIBRARY 

During 1 938 there were continued the three important work 
relief projects which the Library had sponsored in earlier years 
under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration of the 
Federal Government. 

The project for the reclassification of the scholarly book col- 
lections of the Central Library along the lines of the classification 
schedules of the Library of Congress progressed from the ex- 
tensive preparatory stages of the preceding years to substantial 
accomplishment in the actual reclassification of well over 42,000 
volumes and the typing of 432,309 catalog and other cards. 

The project for the recataloging and reclassification of the 
book collections of the Branch Libraries along the lines of sim- 
plified Library of Congress cataloging and a simplified and modi- 
fied form of the Dewey decimal classification proceeded likevsrise 
to substantial accomplishment with the actual cataloging of 
some 24,000 volumes and the typing of 1,387,182 catalog and 
other cards. 

To the regret of all concerned there was finally terminated on 
November 23rd the project for the cleaning of books. It had 
been in operation for five years lacking ten days. Successive re- 
newals had made possible its continued existence from the earliest 
days of work relief projects under the so-called Civil Works Ad- 
ministration beginning in early December 1933. An additional 
renewal was finally not permitted by the authorities of the Works 
Progress Administration on the ground that the work was really 
"current maintenance work" which the sponsor should perform 
itself. It is unfortunate that this had to be so. The Library has 
never been, nor is ever likely to be, in a position to find the funds 
for carrying on such a cleaning and refurbishing process. And 
the project itself was an excellent one for providing work for a 
type of individual for whom it is not easy to find suitable activity 
upon work relief projects. 

As in the past several hundred individuals were employed on 
these several projects. The Federal Government provided the 
salaries and wages. The City of Boston assumed responsibility 



[8] 

for the incidental expenses as its contribution as sponsor of the 
projects. 

GIFTS 

As usual the Library received many important gifts of books 
and other library materials during the year. A list of the more 
important of these is to be found in the Appendix on pages 
68-70. 

CARE AND INVESTMENT OF TRUST FUNDS 

From time to time as necessary during the year meetings were 
held by the Finance Committee of the Trustees for the purpose 
of directing the City Treasurer in the investment of the funds to 
which the Trustees hold title and of which the City Treasurer 
serves as custodian on behalf of the Trustees. 

Also a certificate was obtained from Messrs Lybrand, Ross 
Bros., and Montgomery, Certified Public Accountants, that in 
their examination of the books and of the cash and securities held 
by the City Treasurer as of the close of business on January 1 2, 
1938 they had found all cash and securities of the Library as 
listed on the City Treasurer's books to be actually in the City 
Treasurer's custody and likewise the funds of the Benton Estate 
although these had not yet been entered at that date on the books 
of the City Treasurer. 

ADMINISTRATION OF TRUST FUNDS ESTABLISHED 
UNDER THE WILL OF THE LATE JOSIAH H. BENTON 

Under the twelfth clause of the Will of the late Josiah H. 
Benton, and as subsequently modified by an Agreement of Com- 
promise dated January 15, 1935, the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary were designated as the residuary legatee of the Benton 
Estate. The Will provided that the residuary estate should be 
divided into two equal parts, to be designated as the Benton 
Book Fund and the Benton Building Fund respectively. The 
Trustees of the Public Library received also the Children's Fund, 
established separately under another provision of the Will. 

In 1936 the Trustees of the Public Library, having been 



[9] 

found to be legally competent to hold the above-mentioned funds, 
received a first and second payment of the cash and securities 
constituting the bulk of the Estate, and delivered them to the 
City Treasurer as the official custodian of all funds and securities 
to which the Trustees of the Public Library hold title. 

In 1937 the Trustees of the Public Library engaged the 
services of Messrs. Stewart, Watts and Bollong, Public Ac- 
countants and Auditors, to carry through an auditing and an ac- 
counting of the Estate, with a view to being able thereafter to 
set up the Benton Book Fund and the Benton Building Fund as 
required under the terms of the Will. 

In 1 938 the Trustees of the PubHc Library proceeded to the 
division of the residuary estate into the two equal parts provided 
for under the terms of the Will and set them up as the Benton 
Book Fund and the Benton Building Fund respectively. Messrs. 
Stewart, Watts and Bollong reported that, if the residuary es- 
tate had been divided as of December 27, 1927, the date at 
which it became divisible under the terms of the Will, the two 
equal parts would have been as follows: 

Benton Building Fund 

Principal Amount, as of December 27. 1927 . . . $1,156,839.75 

Benton Book Fund 

Principal Amount, as of December 27, 1927 . . . $1,156,839.75 

BENTON BUILDING FUND 

December 27, 1927 - January 21, 1936 

From December 27, 1927 to January 21, 1936, inclusive, 
that half of the residuary estate which was apportionable to the 
principal amount of the Benton Building Fund increased by the 
net amount of $384,304.76. The net income from the Ben- 
ton Building Fund for the period has been in the amount of 
$402,455.30, and had been added to the principal amount as 
required by the Will, which provides that the Benton Building 
Fund be kept as an accumulating fund until it reaches the sum of 
$2,000,000. During this same period, however, there had also 
to be deducted from the principal amount the sum of $1 8, 1 50.74, 
arising chiefly out of revaluation of securities, losses and gains 



[101 

on securities disposed of, and administrative expenses. When 
the Surviving Trustee under the Will delivered the bulk of the 
residuary estate to the Trustees of the Public Library on January 
22, 1936, the portion representing the principal amount of the 
Benton Building Fund had then become $1 ,541 ,144.51 . It was 
made up as f ollow^s : 

Benlon Building Fund 

Principal Amount, as of January 22, 1936 

Delivered to Trustees of the Public Library . . . $1,541,094.51 

Retained by Surviving Trustee under the Will . . 50.00 

$1,541,144.51 

BENTON BOOK FUND 
December 27, 1927 - January 21. 1936 

From December 27, 1927 to January 21, 1936, inclusive, 
that half of the residuary estate which was apportionable to the 
principal amount of the Benton Book Fund decreased by the net 
amount of $18,150.75, arising chiefly out of revaluation of se- 
curities, losses and gains on securities disposed of, and admin- 
istrative expenses. When the Surviving Trustee under the Will 
delivered the bulk of the residuary estate to the Trustees of the 
Public Library on January 22, 1936, the portion representing 
the principal amount of the Benton Book Fund had then become 
$1,138,689.00. It was made up as follows: 

Benton Book Fund 

Principal Amount, as of January 22, 1936 

Delivered to Trustees of the Public Library . . . $1,138,639.00 

Retained by Surviving Trustee under the Will . . 50.00 

$1,138,689.00 

For the period of December 27, 1927 to January 21 , 1936, 
inclusive, the net income from the Benton Book Fund had been 
in the amount of $402,455.50, and was available on January 
22, 1936 for eventual distribution, in accordance with the terms 
of the Will, as subsequently modified by the Agreement of Com- 
promise dated January 15, 1935, to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston and to the Rector of Trinity 
Church in the City of Boston in the proportion of 60% and 40% 
respectively. 



[H] 

BENTON BUILDING FUND 
January 22, 1936 - January 21, 1937 

In the principal amount of the Benton Building Fund there 
was a net gain in the amount of $52,861,87, representing in- 
come from investments to the amount of $53,445.62 and losses 
from securities matured to the amount of $583.75. As of January 
21, 1937 the principal amount of the Benton Building Fund 
was $1,594,006.38.* 

BENTON BOOK FUND 
January 22, 1936 - January 21, 1937 

In the principal amount of the Benton Book Fund there oc- 
curred a net loss in the amount of $150.00, representing losses 
from securities matured. As of January 21, 1937 the principal 
amount of the Benton Book Fund was $1,138,539.00. 

The net income from the Benton Book Fund for the period 
was in the amount of $53,01 1.88, representing income from in- 
vestments to the amount of $53,445.63 and losses from income 
securities matured to the amount of $433.75. 

BENTON BUILDING FUND 
January 22, 1937 - January 21, 1938 

In the principal amount of the Benton Building Fund there 
was a net gain in the amount of $50, 112.19, representing income 
from investments to the amount of $53,444.68 and losses from 
securities matured to the amount of $3,332.49. As of January 
21, 1 938 the principal amount of the Benton Building Fund 
was $1.644.1 18.57. 

BENTON BOOK FUND 
January 22, 1937 - January 21. 1938 

In the principal amount of the Benton Book Fund there oc- 
curred a net loss in the amount of $2,058.75, representing losses 
from securities matured. As of January 21,1 938 the principal 
amount of the Benton Book Fund was $1,136,480.25. 

The net income from the Benton Book Fund for the period 
was in the amount of $49,670.93, representing income from in- 



[12] 

vestments to the amount of $53,444.69, losses from income se- 
curities disposed of to the amount of $1 ,273.76, and an auditing 
and accounting charge to the amount of $2,500.00. 

THIRD AND FINAL PAYMENT 
OF ASSETS OF BENTON ESTATE 

On June 9 and 10, 1 938 a third and final payment of the as- 
sets of the Benton Estate was made to the Trustees of the Public 
Library by the Surviving Trustee under the Will. This was 
made up as follows: 

Benfon Building Fund, Principal Amount .... $24,382.76 

Benton Book Fund, Principal Amount ..... 24,382.75 

Benton Building Fund, Income 9,604.77 

Benton Book Fund, Income 9,604.77 

PAYMENT OF UNDISTRIBUTED INCOME 
OF BENTON BOOK FUND 

As of January 22, 1 938 the Trustees of the Public Library 
made a payment of all undistributed income from the Benton 
Book Fund up through the close of business on January 21, 
1938. This undistributed income was in the total amount of 
$451,157.99. It was made up of undistributed income as such 
in the amount of $445,830.38, plus the sum of $5,327.61 as 
profits on securities sold, said securities representing income which 
had been invested by the Surviving 1 rustee under the Will 
pending the eventual distribution of the Estate. In accordance 
with the terms of the Will, as subsequently modified by the 
Agreement of Compromise of January 15, 1935, this total sum 
of $451,157.99 was distributable in the proportions of 60% to 
the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston and 
40% to the Rector of Trinity Church in the City of Boston. It 
was distributed as follows: 

To the Trustees of the Public Library $270,694.79 

To the Rector of Trinity Church 180,463.20 

$451,157.99 

In 1 937 partial advance payments from the income of the Benton 
Book Fund for the period of January 22, 1936 to March 31, 
1937, inclusive, had already been made to the Trustees of the 



[13] 

Public Library in the amount of $35,584.76 and to the Rector 
of Trinity Church in the amount of $23,723.1 7. 

In recapitulation, the total distribution of income from the 
Benton Book Fund made to date to the Trustees of the Public 
Library and to the Rector of Trinity Church, covering the period 
from December 27, 1927 to January 21, 1938, inclusive, has 
been as follows: 

To the Trustees of the Public Library $306,279.55 

To the Rector of Trinity Church 204.186.37 



$510,465.92 



USE OF INCOME FROM BENTON BOOK FUND 
BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

That portion of the income from the Benton Book Fund 
which is payable to the Trustees of the Public Library is to be 
applied by them "for the purchase of books, maps and other li- 
brary material of permanent value and benefit for said Library ; 
meaning and intending hereby that such income shall be applied 
for books desirable for scholarly research and use." In accord- 
ance with this provision the Trustees of the Public Library ex- 
pended the sum of $57,41 5.39 for this purpose during the calen- 
dar year 1 938. 

USE OF INCOME FROM BENTON BUILDING FUND 
BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

As provided by the terms of the Will the Benton Building 
Fund is held "as an accumulating fund, the income and interest 
to be added to the principal and reinvested as principal, until the 
total amount thereof shall be two million dollars ($2,000,000) 
. . . such total sum of two million dollars ($2,000,000) to be 
applied to the enlargement of the present central library building 
in Boston, or to the construction of another central library build- 
ing in such part of the City as may be then most desirable for the 
accommodation of the people of said City . . ." As set forth with 
detailed figures above, the Benton Building Fund has been held 
as such an accumulating fund, and the income therefrom has 
been reinvested and added to the principal amount. 



[14] 

CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE 
WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THE WILL 

The Will requests that, in addition to publishing statements 
setting forth the payments of income from the Benton Book 
Fund and the investments in and accumulations of the Benton 
Building Fund, the Trustees publish "a certificate that said in- 
come is expended and said fund accumulated in accordance with 
the directions of said will, according to their best examination 
and judgment in the premises". 

In accordance with this request the Trustees of the Public 
Library hereby certify that according to their best examination 
and judgment ( 1 ) the income of the Benton Book Fund has 
been expended by them in accordance v/ith the directions of the 
aforesaid Will, as modified by the Agreement of Compromise of 
January 15, 1935, and (2) the principal amount of and the in- 
come from the Benton Building Fund have been invested and 
accumulated in accordance with the directions of said Will. 

THE children's FUND 

In accordance with the terms of another provision of the Will 
the Trustees of the Public Library paid in 1937 to the Rector 
of Trinity Church the sum of $1 870.61 , representing the income 
from the Children's Fund for the period of January 1 to June 

30, 1937, and in 1938 the sum of $1840.61, representing the 
income for the period of July 1 to December 31, 1937. The 
Children's Fund was given to the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary under the Will, with the provision that the annual income 
therefrom should be available to the Library in any year only 
if certain conditions should be met in that year. Inasmuch as 
these conditions could not be met for the year ending December 

31, 1937, payment of the income for that year was therefore 
made to the Rector of Trinity Church as required by the Will. 

OTHER TRUST FUNDS 

The following payments were received during the course of 
the year and funded in accordamce with the provisions under 



[15] 

which they were made available to the Library : 

Helen Lambert Fund in memory of Frederic and Louise Lambert — 
An additional payment in the amount of $9.00, under the Will of 
the late Helen Lambert, of which the income is to be expended for 
books and other library material ; 

Ainsley Fund — The sum of $84,000 as a first payment, the sum of 
$73,000 as a second payment, and the sum of $15,750 as a third 
payment, under the Will of the late Emily L. Ainsley, of which the 
income is to be expended for books. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money or books and hope 
that generous testators may remember the Library. It is from 
such sources only that they can make purchases of rare and other 
important books which give value and prestige to a great edu- 
cational institution such as the Boston Public Library. 

As a matter of interest to the citizens of Boston the Board has 
pleasure in Ksting the present trust funds of the Library, with ex- 
planatory notes. The list will be found on pages 71—83. 



[16] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE 



The Trustees acknowledge gratefully the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of 1938. Its members were the fol- 
lowing : 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott 
Mr. Clinton P. Biddle 
Mr. Philip J. Bond 
Mr. Henry T. Claus 
Mrs. William H. Dewart 
Dr. Albert Ehrenfried 
Mr. H. B. Elliston 
Mr. Henry E. Foley 
Mr. Allan Forbes 
Miss Susan J. Ginn 
Mr. Arthur L. Gould 
Mr. Burnelle G. Hawkins 
Mr. Herman H. Henkle 
Mr. M. A. DeWolfe Howe 
Dr. Henry Jackson 
Rev. John S. Keating 
Rev. Arthur L. Kinsolving 
Mrs. Augustus P. Loring, Jr. 
Mr. A. Lawrence Lowell 
Mr. John W, Lowes 
Mr. Keyes D. Metcalf 



Mr. George N. Northrop 
Rev. Phillips E. Osgood 
Rev. Charles E. Park 
Mrs. Charles B. Perkins 
Mrs. Edward M. Pickman 
Mr. Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Hon. Abraham E. Pinanski 
Rev. Richard J. Quinlan 
Mr. William K. Richardson 
Mr. B. M. Selekman 
Mrs. Arthur A. Shurcliff 
Mrs. Francis E, Slattery 
Rev. Russell H. Stafford 
Mrs. Donald C. Starr 
Miss Ruth Tiffany 
Mrs. Joseph A. Tomasello 
Mr. John P. Vaccaro 
Dr. Henry Viets 
Mr. Laurence Winship 
Mrs. Frederick Winslow 
Mr. Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr. 



It is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens who give so freely of their time and interest to the ac- 
tivities of the Library. Special attention is called to the interesting 
report of the Committee, which appears on pages 24-35 im- 
mediately following. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the report of the Director of the Library 

as found on pages 36-48 below. It presents the more important 

developments in the Library during the year. 

The Trustees have pleasure in expressing their appreciation 

of the efforts of the library staff throughout the year to meet the 

reading needs of the citizens of Boston. 

Frank W. Buxton 
John L. Hall 
Louis E. Kirstein 
Robert H. Lord 
Ellery Sedgwick 



BALANCE SHEET 



[18] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures for Personnel: 








Permanent and Probationary- 


employees 


(ex- 


elusive of Printing and Binding Department 


employees) 




. $857,940.53 


Sundays and Evenings, extra and 


other serv 
R Than 1 


ice . . 93,145.82 $951,086.35 


Expenditures for Service Othe 


'ersonal: 


Printing and binding . 




35.00 


Advertising 






25.75 


Transportation of persons 






1.999.51 


Cartage and freight 






7.837.56 


Light, heat and power . 






17.161.58 


Rent, taxes and water 






20.508.48 


Bond and insurance premiums 






1.584.33 


Communication 






4,696.49 


Cleaning 






1.863.44 


Removal of ashes 






24.60 


Expert .... 






1.516.95 


Stenographic and copying . 






. . . 1335.91 


Fees ■ . . . . 






147.70 


Photographic and blueprinting 






114.76 


General plant 






19.068.28 


Miscellaneous services . 






182.70 78,103.04 


Expenditures for Equipment: 




Machinery 






185.28 


Electrical .... 






580.20 


Motorless vehicles 






95.00 


Furniture and fittings . 






1,048.08 


Office .... 






3.298.60 


Books : 






City appropriation 


$59,698.49 




Trust funds income 


76,374.02 


136.072.51 


Newspapers: 






City appropriation 


4,590.81 




Trust funds income 


1,412.80 


6.003.61 


Music : 






City appropriation 


21.00 




Trust funds income 


2,548.08 


2.569.08 


Lantern slides: 






City appropriation 


36.90 




Trust fimds income 


107.00 


143.90 


Periodicals: 






City appropriation 


9,110.78 




Trust funds income 


820.50 


9.93128 


Photostats: 






City appropriation 


312.25 




Trust funds income 


368.50 


680.75 


Posters, prints and maps: 






City appropriation 


104.70 




Trust funds income 


2 


21.43 


326.13 



Phonograph records : 
Trust funds income 

Manuscripts : 

Trust funds income 

Tools and instruments 

Wearing apparel 

General plant 

Carried forward 



14.85 

889.78 
914.02 
2 50 
267!97 163.023.54 
$1,192,212.93 



[19] 
AND RECEIPTS, DECEMBER 31, 1938 



Receipts From : 

City Appropriation, 1938 $1,310,290.63 

Income from Trust Funds ...... 295,514.26 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . . . 700.00 

Income from Children's Fund ..... 3,636.22 



$1,610,141.11 



Carried forivarJ 



$1,610,141.11 



[20] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



fJro.-.'j;/!' forrvar-J 

ExPENDJrLRES KCU SupPLICi 
Office 
Fuel 

Forage and animal 
Medical . . _. 

: aundry, cleaning, loiict 
Educational and recreationa 
A.gricuit>!ral 
Chemicals and disinfectant: 



$1,192,212.93 



r„ 



plant 



ExPENDITLnKS FOP. MATERIAL 

Building 
Eleclrical 
General plant 

Pensions and Annuities 
W. P. A. Library Projects 
Special Items: 

J. L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . 

A. L. Whitney Fund, Sick beneht 

Trust Funds Income, Salary . 

Children's Fund, Trinity Church . 

EXPENDITLRFS FOR BlNDING DEPARTMENT: 

Salaries ...... 

Transportation of persons 

Gas ....... 

Repairs ...... 

Equipment ..... 

Supplies ...... 

Material 

Stock 



$9,319.98 

14,087.38 

7.10 

19.40 

1,631.18 

16.48 

235.00 

344.42 

2,942.24 



4.507.02 
2,473.60 
1.622.36 



1 ,626.00 

456.00 

1 ,500.00 

1,8^4.22 



59,594.35 

.40 

73.74 

154.27 

52.63 

5.14 

2.68 

6,900.14 



28,603.18 



8,602.98 

834.78 
53.991.39 



5,426.22 



66,783.35 



EXFENDITUFXS FOR PRINTING DEPARTMENT: 

Salaries ...... 

Gas ...... 

Photographic and blueprinting 

P.epairs ...... 

Supplies ...... 

Stock 

Outside work ..... 



Expenditures from Special Appropriation for FireprooSng, 
Improvements, etc. ....... 

Transfer to Hospital Department of the City of Boston 

Carried forvjard ...... 



12.544.71 

49.16 

184.55 

257.75 

.45 

3,912.76 

48.88 



16.998 26 



12.251.72 
24.85 



$1,385,729.66 



:2i] 



AND RECEIPTS, DECEMBER 31, 1938 



Brought foTTvard .... 
Balancls Bp.ouGttr Forward From 1937: 
Tru?{ funds income, City Treasur)' 
Josiaii H. Benton Book Fund Income . 
City appropriation on deposit in London 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Arcount . 
Library Building, FircprooBng, ImnrovemenfE, ct< 

H. C. Bentley Gift " 

Judaica Bookshelf ..... 
Children's Fund ...... 



$1,6!O.I41.1i 



$25,794.10 

20,758.74 

72.75 

2,232.73 

12,276.57 

13.70 

159.17 

1,340.61 



63,148.37 



Carried fci Kara 



$1,673,289.48 



[22] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Drought forward 
Amounts Paid Into City Treasury: 
Fines .... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins 
Commission on telephone stations 
Refunds, fees, etc. 
Sales of waste paper . 
Payments for lost books 



Balance, December 31, 1938: 

Trust Funds Income, City Treasury 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 
H. C. Bentley Gift . 
Judaica Bookshelf .... 
Children's Fund ..... 
City appropriation on deposit in London 



$1,385,729.66 



Balance Unexpended, December 31, 1938 
General appropriation .... 



$23,618.22 

341 .97 

521.34 

47.41 

75.74 

657.95 



257,354.14 

1 ,306.73 

13.70 

159.17 

3,632.61 

72.75 



25,262.63 



262,539.10 



25.020.72 



To Balance 



$1,698,552.11 



[23] 
AND RECEIPTS, DECEMBER 31, 1938 



Brought forrvard 
Receipts From: 

Fines ..... 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins and lists 
Commission on telephone stations . 
Payments for lost books 
Refunds, fees, etc. 
Sales of waste paper . 



$1 .673,289.48 



$23,618.22 

341.97 

521.34 

657.95 

47.4 i 

75.74 



25,262.63 



To Balance 



$1,698,552.1 



[24] 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen : — 

The Examining Committee for the year 1938 respectfully 
submits its report. 

The Committee met for organization on May 23, 1938. 
Shortl}"^ thereafter the following sub-committees v/ere appointed : 
A.dministration and Finance, Books, Buildings and Equipment, 
Catalogs, Children's Work and Work with Schools, Publicity, 
Staff and Staff Facilities, Use of the Library, Branch Libraries 
and Special Departments, and the General Committee. Re- 
ports from these sub-committees were submitted to the Vice 
Chairman early in November, These reports, with their de- 
tailed findings, observations and recommendations, have been 
filed with the Library for reference, examination, and study. 
The Report herewith submitted is intended to be a summary of 
the more important features in the reports of the sub-committees. 

The Committee is again indebted to the Director and the 
members of his staff for their helpful and generous cooperation, 
and takes this means of expressing its appreciation. We are 
aware of the wise and efficient direction under which the Library 
functions. We desire again to record that the sei'vice of the 
Director and his administrative associates, the heads of the 
various departments and branch libraries, and their respective 
staffs, has been loyal, admirable, competent, and efficient. 

The Committee renews the recommendations of its prede- 
cessors that the appropriations for books be brought back to a 
level which will be sufficient to provide for norm.al demands as 
well as to replace worn out and discarded books. No library, 
public or private, can long endure, unless it provides books as 
needed. The imperative need of the Library arises out of the 
cumulative results of drastic cuts in appropriations for books for 
the last five years. The depleted book stocks should be brought 
back to more nearly standard levels by the addition of new items 
necessary to supply the demands of readers and by the repairing 
or replacing of material which has been used up. 



[25] 



In spite of the acute necessity of economy your Comraittee is 
of the opinion that in considering the cutting down of expenses 
the municipal authorities and the Trustees should regarcl the 
purchase of books for the branch Hbraries as a matter of the 
greatest importance. 

Total expenditures of the Library Department from funds 
appropriated by the City aggregated $1,096,816.48, in 1928. 
Expenditures for 1938 presumably will approximate the appro- 
priations for the Library Department which this year aggregated 
$1,320,471.30. 

The following table reflects the allocation of these expendi- 
tures and appropriations: 



A. Pi 



Budget Items 

al Sen 



1928 (Expendilures) 

$744,990.87 

143,655.50 

144,655.01 

36,482.81 

26.168.79 

863.50 



938 (Approrsriaticns) 

$1,039,175.00 
76,298.10 
81.952.00 
35,149.73 
18,946.47 

68.950.00 



B. Contractual Ser 

C. Equipment 

D. Supplies . 

E. Materials 
r . Pensions 
H. W.P.A. Relief Projects 

It is clear from an examination of the above figures that sub- 
stantially increased appropriations have been made for personal 
service and substantially decreased appropriations for equip- 
ment. Except for contractual services and W.P.A. projects, the 
major variances occur in these items. 

We have not examined in detail the causes of the very large 
increase in the personal service item. We do know, however, 
that in part the increase represents salary adjustments to a jnore 
equitable base. This part seems warranted, under all the ciicum- 
stances, notwithstanding the present financial burdens of the Ciiy. 

V/e are concerned, however, over the decrease in the ap- 
propriation for equipment because in this item is incliided the 
appropriation for the purchase of books. Of the sum appropri- 
ated in 1928 for equipment, $125,000 was allocated io the 
purchase of books. Of the $31,952.00 appropriated in 1938 
for equipment, only $73,875.00 was allowed for book purchases. 
A relatively small allotment for book purchases was similarly 
made in 1933, and in 1936 and 1937. 



[26] 

Books must be purchased, not only to keep the hbrary cur- 
rent, but also to replace volumes worn out, lost or stolen. The 
wear on books is great, due to heavy use. That use is substan- 
tially greater now than it was in 1928, although the funds for 
replacement are substantially less. 

We suggest a possible survey by the Law Department of the 
City of Boston of the Library Trusts to determine whether or 
not they are being construed too restrictively, and whether or 
not greater latitude than is supposed may exist for the purchase 
of books. 

Now that the income of the Benton Book Fund is available 
for the purchase of scholarly works for the Central Library, 
may we suggest that consideration be given to the fields of 
knowledge which are to be cultivated with the new funds. If 
new fields are to be covered, this should be done only after the 
proper authorities have studied the matter carefully, keeping in 
mind the avoidance of undue duplication with other research 
institutions in the neighborhood of Boston. The Sub-Committee 
recommends, therefore, that a study be made of a possible divi- 
sion of field between the libraries in the region, and that ex- 
tensive purchases of books and serials which are available for 
use in other libraries be made only when it is felt that copies 
elsewhere will not supply the demand, and that additional ones 
are required in the Boston Public Library. 

It should be made clear that the above statement does not 
mean that the Sub-Committee opposes duplication .within the 
Boston area when it is necessary. Indeed it is felt that the pres- 
ent occasion should be used to consider the needs of duplication 
within the central building of the Library itself; and we hope 
that this problem can be studied. There must be many cases 
where in the past one copy of an important work was all that 
could be afforded. Now it might be well to have two, one for 
reference work within the building and one for circulation. 

It is difficult to make any new suggestions for the reason that 
reports have been made every year and the improvements that 
might be made are quite obvious. Your Committee is aware of 
the fact that the Trustees are familiar with the conditions which 
need improvement and correction and of the defects which 



[271 

should be remedied. It is, however, important that certain mat- 
ters be emphasized in the hope that reference to them will serve 
as the impetus to further constructive action. 

The Committee again reports in the main the same things in 
regard to the Central Library which previous committees have 
suggested. Those of us who come newly to the knowledge of 
our Library are staggered by the discrepancy between the noble, 
serene and spacious public appearance and the overcrowded, in- 
adequate, inflexible, and private aspect "behind the scenes". 
Your committee cannot but feel most keenly the human problem 
of employees under such conditions as our apparently spacious 
but really wedged-beyond-capacity Library has necessitated. 
Already overcrowded by departmental needs, growing book- 
stacks, and employees' facilities (if they can be so called) , the 
puzzle of adjustment has been intensified by the addition of 125 
W.P.A. workers to be quartered in the main building. 

Specifically, this sub-committee hopes that the main items of 
previous reports will be seriously reconsidered. We emphasize 
three of these. 

Although a number of things could be done to alleviate the 
crowded condition of the Central Library we realize that it 
may be possible to make only a few major changes during the 
next few years owing to the inability to procure the necessary 
funds. We feel that there is one improvement that must be made 
in the immediate future. 

( 1 ) The basement of the Library should receive first considera- 
tion. The Boston Edison Company, without cost to the Library 
for s\\"itching over Lo its service, vv^il) provide heat and light for the 
Library at a somewhat lower annual figure than is now involved in 
the Library's own contained plant. The deterioration of the Li- 
brary's own engines will bring within three years the necessity of 
drastic expenditures for replacement according to the engineers' 
prophesy. A new engine to replace the 1 895 engine will alone 
cost $25,000. If such arrangements are made, space will be made 
available for extra staff rooms, toilets, rest rooms and locker space, 
as well as a restaurant perhaps. It seems to us that the present 
facilities for the staff are, to say the least, distressing and these 
facilities have become even more noticeably inadequate since the 
staff of the Boston Public Library has been recently augmented by 



128] 

federal relief workers. This change should be made as soon as it 
is possible to provide employment for the six or more employees 
now serving in the engineering department. We believe the Trus- 
tees should use every effort at once to induce the City of Boston or 
the Boston Edison Company to take on these men. 

(2) If the above project can be perfected we believe the next 
important question is the Branch Library Departm.ent. Several 
yearly committees have recommended that this work be carried on 
outside the Main Building. The Branch Dep;irtment is for the 
most part unrelated to the work of the Central Library as such. It 
could be located at any central point in the city where the busy 
trucks could reach it. At present it takes up too much and too val- 
uable space at the Central Library. Almost any kind of buildmg 
of reasonable size could house it just as well or belter, — a store, 
an unused school, a good-sized house. Is it not possible, with so 
many properties takeji over by the City for unpaid taxes, with some 
school houses not u?ed, with the possibility of the gift of some house 
whose owners find it a burden to carry, that quarters could be found 
which, with a minimum of expenditure, except for light and heat, 
could be occupied by this Department? 

(3) If these changes and adju.'.tm.ents are made and m.ore space 
is still necessary for the different departments, we renew the recom- 
mendations made by several former commiltees, that the Newspaper 
Room might v/ell be removed to another building equally well 
located. Your committee doubts whether prior reports have suffi- 
ciently emphasized the fact that a proper situs for the newspaper 
room is not necessarily a proper situs for the Central Department 
for Branch Libraries. The Newspaper Room is a perennial prob- 
lem. It occupies disproportionate space in comparison with its im- 
portance in a central library. There is no lack of sympathy to be 
implied for the homeless or the forlorn who utilize the room along 
with those who are really making use of the newspapers for their 
intended purpose when we query whether the Newspaper Room 
should not be moved to some near-by building, or provided with 
its own entrance (as in many libraries). 

The special problem which will be created within the next 
months by an expected important gift to the Rare Book Depart- 
ment seems to us to deserve special mention for it shov, s clearly 
why more space is needed in the central building. 

At the present we can make no further recommendation as to 
open shelves. The steady diminution of the number of lost 
books is most satisfactory, and after all, one suspects the ma- 



129] 

jority of lost books is not from the open shelves bul from some 
of the stacks open to passers by. 

Parts of the building need painting very badly, especially the 
West Gallery, the Fine Arts Department, and the Science and 
Technolog}'^ Department on the top floor. 

As for the Branch Libraries the outstanding problem is the 
West End Branch, now housed in a rented store because ot the 
necessary removal from the old church which was its home. We 
hope that some day funds may be forthcoming with which to 
erect a new building. This church building is a public monu- 
ment, architecturally representative of an era of which the relics 
ought not to be destroyed. There has been an annual item of 
$10,000 in the Library budget toward the $50,000 it will take 
to put the old church into proper condition. Annualiy this 
item has been blue-pencilled and the church stands empty and 
unsafe. Meanwhile the store costs $3,000 per year, with its 
pinched space in a section where readers have been the most 
numerous of the whole city, pro rata. By any chance can the 
annual budget item be left in this year? 

The yearly repairs on the tiled roof in the central library 
building run into ver}'^ high figures but we presume nothing just 
at present can be done to obviate this expense. 

We express our admiring amazement at the ingenuity and 
morale of the Director and Staff under the stress of these and 
many other urgent problems and difficulties. We regret the situ- 
ation behind the scenes and urge as prompt action as possible to 
improve conditions. 

The tremendous work which has been in progress for the last 
few years, in revising our classification of books in the Central 
Library to conform with that of the Library of Congress, has 
made great headway this year. With the indispensable help of 
the Federal Government in the largest of the library projects, 
the employment of several hundred workers has been efficiently 
overseen by the members of our regular staff. The changing 
over of many of our old cards, by cutting them down to standard 
size, has been accomplished and the insertion of a nnrrov/ strip 
of wood along the side of each tray has made it possible to con- 
tinue the use of our present cases. It has been suggested that as 



[301 

there is great need of table space by those using the trays, that 
in the event of changing the present cabinets the extra space 
made available, by the reduction in the size of the cards, be used 
for these tables. 

Another recommendation is the possibility of printing in 
"More Books", or as a supplementary list, titles of books on 
various subjects to serve as "self starters" to present a subject 
not from the profound students', but from a general readers' 
point of view, which might help to open new fields for those 
readers who find themselves overwhelmed by the size of the 
catalog. 

In addition to the work being accomplished upon the classifi- 
cation of books in the Central Library, we are glad to note also 
the progress achieved in connection with another of the Library's 
large federal projects, namely, that of revising the catalogs and 
the classification of books in the branch libraries in accordance 
with the Dewey classification scheme. The results of this pro- 
ject are already becoming evident as of first importance for the 
administration of the branch libraries. 

It is hoped that the project for closer cooperation between the 
schools and the branch libraries will receive added stimulus this 
year by the appointment in certain junior high schools of teachers 
to act as liaison library officers to collect the advance information 
so important for the most effective use of the library in supply- 
ing needed materials at the appropriate times. 

Teachers can be of great service to the branch libraries if they 
will acquaint themselves with the material available in the li- 
braries and give the branch librarians preliminary outlines of 
the assignments they plan to make during the j'^ear. 

We are confident of the assistance of the Superintendent of 
Schools in bringing about closer cooperation between the Li- 
brary and the Public Schools. Publicity for the Library and its 
services, and instruction in the proper care of books and the use 
of library privileges, is in large measure necessarily tied up with 
the School Department. Such cooperation with the schools is 
invaluable in the attempt to minimize delinquencies, thefts, and 
mutilations. Constructive work with school children with a view 
to educating them in the care of books and in the use of reference 



[31] 

material will do much toward the prevention of such mutilations 
and thefts. It is suggested that an attractive pamphlet with an 
appeal to the practical sense and sentiments of youngsters might 
be effective in the campaign to reduce loss and mutilation of 
books. 

The Committee is genuinely alarmed by the fact that the total 
num.ber of volumes in the branch library system is diminishing 
yearly. Old books in spite of rebinding and frequent repairs 
eventually wear out. Last year 44,346 volumes were in so dis- 
reputable a condition that they had to be discarded while only 
40,41 6 could be purchased to offset the loss. Thus 3,930 fewer 
books were available at the end of the year than at the beginning. 

The thoroughly worn out books are generally the good stand- 
ard books and must be replaced. The budget for the purchase 
of books for the last three years has been so small that it was not 
practical to replace the discarded and missing books. 

During the last three years there has been a steady decrease 
in the total number of books borrowed from the libraries and we 
feel that the lack of books may be responsible for the reduced 
demand. We realize that under present conditions it may be 
difficult to increase the total library budget but we feel that a re- 
allocation of funds so as to allow a larger appropriation for re- 
placements and the purchase of new books might be practical. 
The Boston Public Library must not lower its standard of books 
available to the Public. 

The Committee regrets the necessity for the closing of branch 
libraries and hopes that they may be reopened. If branch li- 
braries must be closed we urge that those in the regions of the 
poorer population be kept open. 

The Committee of 1937 suggested that some of the branch 
libraries in the crowded sections of the City be opened for two 
or three hours Sunday afternoons. We favor their recommenda- 
tion but advise trying this first in the winter months. Then if the 
amount of use justifies the effort we suggest extending the service. 

We hope that soon the space in the Central Library may be 
re-allocated so that the Open Shelf Department may have bet- 
ter quarters, on the ground floor. At present the rooms of the 
Open Shelf Department are inadequate, with insufficient light- 
ing and almost no chairs. 



[321 

It is suggested that our books he made more available by 
having special shelves in which are grouped books devoted to 
such subjects as Parenthood, Occupational Information, Handi- 
craft Work, and related subjects. 

The Sub-Committee on Publicity has reviewed the many ac- 
tivities which are being used to attract the favorable attention 
of the public to the various services ar.d needs of the Library and 
recommends that the policies of the past year be continued with 
no change in emphasis. The continuance of nev/spaper publicity 
of the dignified type which has heretofore obtained, the further 
issuance of pamphlets, a greater number of radio talks, and the 
continuance of exhibits and lectures in the Library are earnestly 
urged. 

This sub-committee has done a thorough and painstaking job. 
Its complete findings are on file and can be consulted for the 
details of the observations and recommendations of the sub- 
committee and its individual members. We understand that the 
Trustees make a careful survey of the individual reports sub- 
mitted by the members of this sub-committee as a result of visits 
to branch libraries and special departments and that the recom- 
mendations contained therein are studied and carried out by the 
Hbrary authorities to the extent which conditions and appropria- 
tions peiTTiit. It is difficult, if not impossible, to summarize the 
detailed reports on each of the branch libraries, and therefore 
the reports of the mxembers of this sub-com.mittee are herewith 
incorporated by reference. The two branches which need most 
attention are Neponset and West End. The important repairs 
and changes which are suggested should be made as soon as 
appropriations permit. 

It should be reiterated that the problem of the special de- 
partments is tied up definitely with the problem of re-allocation 
of space within the Central Library building. The following 
suggestions although important are not as vital as this greater 
need. 

1 . Rare Book Deparlmeni. Although the physical equipment of 
this department is far from filling the needs of a section devoted 
entirely to rare books, nevertheless, the department is extremely 
well conducted and the books are kept in fairly good condition. 



[33] 

When compared, however, with a Rare Book Department such as 
is found in a more modern building, this department lacks a good 
many facilities. The care of older books, broadsides, manuscripts, 
letters, and books in vellum and leather bindings offers a particular 
problem that can only be solved by air conditioning, so far as the 
preservation of the material is concerned in its present form. Micro- 
photography, however, allov/s for the permanent recording of printed 
or written matter in a compact and usable form. It is being exten- 
sively used in many libraries and should find its chief use in the Rare 
Book Department of the Boston Public Library. The scholarly 
writings of the editor of "More Books" have served to make this 
department known throughout the world. Every encouragement 
should be given to his work. 

2. Fine Arts Department. As has been pointed out many times 
before, as long as this department is shared with the Science and 
Technology Department it is impossible to suggest any improvements. 
The rare art books might be used more for e?-chibition purposes, but 
they should be in a case that cannot be opened by the public. There 
is a lack of help in keeping up the picture files used by m.any stu- 
dents. An additional attendant is needed for this work. 

3. Music Department. The need for sound-proof rooms, where 
piano and instrumental music and victrola records could be played, 
is again emphasized in the present report. It is unfortunate that the 
department is so arranged that a good deal of dirt and smoke comes 
in from outside. The books are suffering definitely. It is worth 
noting that there is a general increase in the use of this department, 
particularly by young students from the Boston conservatories and 
from Harvard. 

4. Periodical and Newspaper Department. It is, perhaps, un- 
fortunate that the newspapers are housed in a part of the library 
where the lighting is at all times inadequate. News print is hardest 
of all to read, particularly if the paper has aged. Every effort should 
be made to give adequate lighting and special attention should be 
paid to this by lighting engineers. The readers in the newspaper 
room are a noisy group, but there seems to be no solution of this 
problem. The subscription list to newspapers is very large and it 
appears that the present endowment does not cover it. It is sug- 
gested that the subscription list be cut and that if some money v/ere 
saved in this manner, it could be well u?ed to enlarge the periodical 
subscription list. In general, it is felt that the periodical room is 
more important to the library than the newspaper room. 

The comprehensive and excellent report of this sub-committee 
is herewith incorporated by reference with the knowledge that 



[34] 

the library authorities will give its details the careful considera- 
tion which it deserves. We quote from the cover letter accom- 
panying the report of this sub-committee. 

"... the report is couched in much more restrained language than 
the members of the committee would like to express. We were as- 
tounded and, in some respects, even shocked to see the lack of 
elementary facilities for so large a staff as works in the central li- 
brary building. It is only our knowledge that the administration and 
trustees are conscious of all the problems and are doing their best 
to remedy them that led us to be as conservative as we are in describ- 
ing what we found and in making our recommendations. It is cer- 
tainly to be hoped that much more rapid progress may be made in 
the near future than has been made in the past in carrying out some 
of the improvements." 

Without going into the details which are covered by the re- 
port of this sub-committee it m.ust be said that the inadequate 
rest and recreation rooms crowded with workers, unattractive 
lunch rooms, lack of proper drinking water particularly in the 
summer months, and an impossible condition of overcrowding 
in the toilets must effect the comfort and mental health of the 
staff. 

In respect to possible changes which might be made to im- 
prove the present facilities available for use by the staff attention 
is called to the possibility of using the top floor of the annex for 
development of such facilities. These quarters are now occupied 
by the printing and binding departments, whose functional ac- 
tivities seem to the Committee not to require them to be kept in 
this space, especially if quarters could be provided outside the 
library building. Connections for necessary plumbing are al- 
ready available in this space in the lavatory and toilet facilities 
now being used by the printing and binding departments. It is 
recognized that the problem of approach to this part of the 
building is one which would represent some difficulty in making 
this change. 

The Committee is impressed with the commendable efforts 
which have been made in the direction of setting up standards 
of personnel and salary scales which offer definite opportunity 
for advancement within the permanent staff of the library. The 



[35] 

Committee recommends that the efforts of the Trustees and the 
Director toward putting this salary scale into effect be continued. 
The need of increased appropriations for buying books and 
the im.perative necessity of obtaining rehef from the overcrowd- 
ing of the Central Library building stand out more than ever and 
cannot be over-emphasized. With a relatively small expendi- 
ture, some of the activities now functioning in the main building 
can be housed elsewhere. If this is accomplished in the coming 
year, then a long step will have been taken toward the solution 
of the vexing and paramount problem of overcrowding, and its 
many consequences. Even with the necessit}'^ for rigid economy, 
some progress with respect to books and overcrowding ought to 
be possible. 

Adopted as the report of the Examining Committee, Novem- 
ber 2i. 1938. 



Abraham E. Pinanski, Vice Chairman 



Katharine Abbott 
Clinton P. Biddle 
Philip J. Bond 
Henry T. Glaus 
Elizabeth H. Dewart 
Albert Ehrenfried 
H. B. Elliston 
Henry E. Foley 
Allan Forbes 
Susan J. Ginn 
Arthur L. Gould 
Burnelle G. Hawkins 
Herman H. Henkle 
M. A. DeWoIfe Howe 
Henry Jackson 
John S. Keating 
Arthur L. Kinsolving 
Rosamond B. Loring 
A. Lawrence Lowell 
John W. Lowes 
Keyes D. Metcalf 



George N. Northrop 
Phillips E. Osgood 
Charles E. Park 
Elizabeth W. Perkins 
Hester Pickman 
Gabriel F. Piemonte 
Richard J. Quinlan 
William K. Richardson 
B. M. Selekman 
Margaret H. Shurcliff 
Lillian C. Slattery 
Russell H. Stafford 
Polly T. Starr 
Ruth Tiffany 
Frances Tomasello 
John P. Vaccaro 
Henry R. Viets 
Laurence Winship 
Mary W. Winslow 
Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr. 



[36] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 



To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF the City of Boston : 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library 
for the year ending December 31,1 938. 

appropriations for the support of the library 

The City appropriated for the use of the Library during 
1938 the sum of $1,320,471.30. This was $30,042.30 greater 
than the amount appropriated in 1937. 

The total appropriation included an amount of $68,950.00 
for the necessary expenditures incidental to the unemployment 
relief projects which the Library sponsored on behalf of the 
City. By excluding this amount for extraordinary expenditures 
the appropriation for the ordinary operating expenses of the 
Library was $1 ,25 1 ,521 .30. This was $39,842.30 greater than 
the amount appropriated for the ordinary operating expenses in 
1937. 

The appropriation for the purchase of books was $73,875. 
In the original instance the amount was intended to be $75,000. 
In the final steps of passing the appropriations for 1938 it was 
reduced slightly by an arbitrary percentage, as were the bud- 
get estimates for all accounts for all city departments. For com- 
parative purposes, however, the amount of the appropriation for 
books may be said to have remained at substantially the same 
level as that for 1937. 

The inadequacy of the amount appropriated for books for 
1 938 is to be seen from the following table showing the heavily 
increased use of the Library during the preceding decade : 



[371 











AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 






NO. OF BOOKS 


YEAR FOR THE LENT TO 


PURCHASE OF BOOKS BORROWERS 


1928 .... $125,000 . , . 3,899,286 


1929 








140,000 






3.930,068 


1930 








160,000 






4,133,459 


1931 








175.000 






4,702,932 


1932 








160,000 






5.567,681 


1933 








75,000 






5,548,283 


1934 








100.000 






5,194,351 


1935 








100.000 






4.949,701 


1936 








55.000 






4,806,737 


1937 








75.000 






4,531,378 


1938 








73,875 






4,354.044 



In other places in this report there will be found more de- 
tailed presentation setting forth the need of additional provision 
for the purchase of books. 



USE OF THE LIBRARY 



During 1 938 there were lent to borrowers 4,354,044 volumes. 
This figure represents an increase of 1 1 % over that for 1 929, 
the last of the pre-depression years. 

The following table shows the use of the Library during the 
period from 1929 to 1938, inclusive: 



1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 



NO. OF BOOKS 

LENT TO 
BORROWERS 

3,930,063 
4.133,459 
4,702,932 
5,567,681 
5,548,283 
5.194.351 
4,949,701 
4,806,737 
4,531,378 
4354,044 



PERCENTAGE OF PERCENTAGE OF 
INCREASE OR DECREASE INCREASE 
OVER PRECEDING YEAR OVER 1929 



+5% 
+ 13% 
+18% 
-0.3% 

-6% 
-5% 
-3% 
-6% 
-4% 



+5% 
+20% 
+42% 
+41% 
+32% 
+26% 
+22% 
+15% 
+ 11% 



The above figures show clearly that a peak of increasing use 
was reached in 1932 and in 1933, that since then there has 
followed a steadily declining use. 

Several factors have been contributing to this declining use. 
Unemployment obviously has not been as great in extent in 
1938 as in 1932 and 1933. There have been consequently 



[38] 

fewer and fewer individuals with time on their hands in which 
to turn to Hbraries to make use of books. On the other hand the 
number of unemployed in 1938 was even so sufficiently great 
that a satisfactory explanation of declining use is not to be 
found in that direction alone. 

A far greater contributing factor appears to have been the 
increasingly inadequate supply of books with which to meet 
the needs of readers. Experience shows that for most persons 
the habit of reading persists steadily only when books and other 
reading materials are readily and easily available. Unfortunately 
that is exactly what has been becoming less and less possible for 
the Library in recent years. Up through 1932 appropriations 
for the purchase of books were reasonably adequate, with 
amounts averaging approximately $150,000 a year. Since then 
the annual appropriations have been no more than $55,000 in 
1936, $73,875 in 1938, $75,000 in 1933 and 1937, and 
$100,000 in 1934 and 1935. Obviously with such reduced 
amounts substantial curtailment has had to take place in the 
purchasing of books. And while fewer and fewer books have 
been purchased because of inadequate funds, more and more 
books have had to be discarded because of becoming worn out 
from heavy use in preceding years. As a result there have been 
year after year for the last four years actually fewer and fewer 
books available for readers in the branch libraries, in which in- 
cidentally 90% of the borrowing of books for home use takes 
place. 

Without an adequate supply of books readily at hand it is 
not easy to keep the reading habit alive. Like all other habits it 
flourishes with use, declines with disuse. 

THE NEED OF BOOKS 

In 1938 the branch libraries discarded 66,180 volumes as 
compared with 45,339 volumes added. In other v/ords the 
branch libraries had at the end of 1938 20,841 fewer volumes 
than at the beginning of the year. 

Unfortunately 1 938 was not the first year in which such a 
backward movement had taken place. In 1935 the branch li- 



[39] 

braries had to discard as worn out 4,257 volumes more than 
they could add; in 1936 they fell short by 9,091 volumes; in 
1937, by 3,930 volumes. In other words, in 1935 they discarded 
53,996 books and added only 49,739; in 1936, they discarded 
41,859 volumes and added only 32,768; in 1937, they dis- 
carded 44,346 books and added only 40,416, 

Specifically, on December 31,1 938 the branch libraries had 
38,1 19 fewer volumes than on January 1, 1935. This number 
is equivalent to the total books collections of three entire branch 
libraries of the average size in the Boston Public Library system. 

In the central library the situation has been entirely the op- 
posite. Its book collections have been maintained and developed 
in entirely normal fashion. For this purpose there exist numerous 
trust funds. In 1 938 these were even increased, with the becom- 
ing available of a substantial portion of the Benton Book Fund 
after the many years required for the settlement of the Benton 
Estate. For the most part these funds must be used, in accordance 
with the tenns of their establishment, for the special collections 
belonging to the central library. They are not available for the 
purchase of books for the branch libraries. 

The branch libraries have to depend therefore almost en- 
tirely upon the city appropriations for the purchase of books. 
There have now occuiTed six lean years during which these ap- 
propriations have been in the aggregate $406, 1 25 less than they 
were in the preceding six years. The following tables show their 
amounts year by year: 



1927-1932 




1933-1938 


1927 


$125,000 


1933 . . . . $75,000 


1928 


125,000 


1934 . . . . 100,000 


1929 


140,000 


1935 . . . . 100.000 


1930 


160,000 


1936 .... 55,000 


1931 


175,000 


1937 . . . . 75,000 


1932 ... 


160.000 


1938 . . . . 73,875 


Total of city appro 


Jriations for books, 


1927-1932 . . $885,000 


Total of city appro 


priations for books. 


1933-1938 . . 478.875 


Average of anni 


jal city appropriations for books 


1927-1932 




$147,500 


1933-1938 




79.812 



[40] 

It is of prime importance that the amount of the annual city 
appropriation be returned to the higher levels which prevailed 
prior to 1933. They represent amounts which years of ex- 
perience indicate to be those which are necessarj'^ if the Library 
is to carry on its work to the advantage of the citizens of Boston. 

MISUSE OF BOOKS 

With inadequate funds for the purchase of books, particular- 
ly for the branch libraries, every effort was made during 1938 
to make the most of the existing book stock, especially through 
preventing the misuse of books. 

In the matter of books unrecoverable from borrowers from 
the branch libraries it proved to be possible to reduce by 24% 
even the very small number of 979 volumes so unrecoverable in 
1937. The number in 1938 was 742. It is interesting to compare 
this with the average of the number of volumes unrecoverable year 
by year from 1930 to 1934 inclusive. This was 2,322. In 1931 
the number had been as high as 2,598. The figure for 1938 
represents a reduction of 68% from the average of 2,322 vol- 
umes annually unrecoverable from 1930 to 1934 inclusive. It 
is a loss of only one-fiftieth of 1 % of the nearly 3,500,000 vol- 
umes lent from the branch libraries in the course of the year. 

The following table shows the results of unremitting efforts 
in this direction over the last four years, during which particular 
attention has been directed to the problem : 





NO. OF VOLUMES 


CHANGE 


% OF CHANGE 


YEAR 


UNRECOVERABLE 


FROM 1934 


FROM 1934 


1934 


. 2,262 






1935 


. 1,399 


'. -863 '. 


'. -38% 


1936 


. 953 


. -1309 


. -58% 


1937 


. 979 


. -1283 


. -57% 


1938 


. . 742 . 


. -1520 


. -67% 



Similarly, in the matter of missing books in the branch li- 
braries, continuing close attention throughout 1938 resulted in 
marked reduction of the number of volumes found missing at 
the time of the annual inventory. During the ten year period 
ending in 1 934 the average number of books so missing annually 



[41] 

from the shelves of the branch hbraries had been as high as 
12,000. In 1935 it was 12,769. In 1938 it was reduced to 
6,931. This figure for 1938 represents a reduction of 45% 
from the figure for 1935. 

The following table shows the results achieved in this direc- 
tion over the last four years, during which special attention has 
been given to the problem: 





NO. OF VOLUMES 


DECREASE 


DECREASE 


YEAR 


MISSING 


FROM 1935 


FROM 1935 


1935 


. 12,769 




, 


1936 


. 11,012 


.■ -1757 ; 


'. . -14% 


1937 


. 8,786 


. -3983 


. -31% 


1938 


. 6,931 


. -5838 


. -45% 



In recapitulation, the combined figures for these two sources 
of losses have been as follows: 



MISSING FROM 


UNRECOVERABLE 


TOTAL OF 


THE SHELVES 


FROM BORROWERS 


COMBINED LOSSES 


12,769 


1 ,399 


14,168 


11,012 


953 


11.965 


8,786 


979 


9,765 


6,931 


742 


7,673 



YEAR 
1935 

1936 
1937 
1938 

At an average of $1 .50 per volume the value of these books so 
lost each year has been as follows: 

1935 ... $21,252.00 

1936 ... 17,947.50 

1937 ... 14,647.50 

1938 ... 11,509.50 

It is to be pointed out that, considerable as these figures are 
for book losses in a year, they are the gross figures for the en- 
tire system of branch libraries. Each of the 31 branch libraries 
is open approximately 300 days in the course of a year. The 
daily loss in 1 938 was thus approximately only 25 volumes for 
the entire group of branch libraries. Such a loss of less than 
one volume per day for each branch library on the average does 
not indicate careless administration. 

The accomplishment of the last three years in reducing the 
loss of books has been substantial. During the year to come it 
is hoped to carry the reduction still further. 



[42] 

CLOSING OF TWO BRANCH LIBRARIES 

On July 1 , 1 938 there were discontinued the Roxbury Cross- 
ing and the Tyler Street Branch Libraries, In each instance a 
decreasing population in the surrounding area had set in in the 
preceding years. It has been accompanied by a decreasing use 
of the branch library facilities. Finally in the interests of econo- 
my it no longer seemed advisable to continue their existence as 
individual units. 

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF PROJECTS 

During 1938 there were continued the three work relief pro- 
jects which the Library had sponsored in earlier years under 
the auspices of the Works Progress Administration of the 
Federal Government. 

The project for the reclassification of the scholarly book col- 
lections of the Central Library along the lines of the classifica- 
tion schedules of the Library of Congress progressed substan- 
tially from the extensive preparatory stages of the preceding 
years. During the course of the year there was accomplished 
the actual reclassification of well over 42,000 volumes and the 
typing of 432,309 catalog cind other cards. 

The project for the recataloging and reclassification of the 
book collections of the Branch Libraries along the lines of 
simplified Library of Congress cataloging and a simplified and 
modified form of the Dewey decimal classification proceeded 
likewise to substantial accomplishment. During the year there 
were reclassified and recataloged some 24,000 volumes, and 
there were typed 1,387,182 catalog and other cards. 

To the regret of all concerned there was finally terminated 
on November 23rd the project for the cleaning of books. It had 
been in operation for five years lacking ten days. Successive re- 
newals had made possible its continued existence from the earli- 
est days of work relief projects under the Civil Works Admin- 
istration beginning in early December 1933. An additional re- 
newal was finally not permitted by the authorities of the Works 



[43] 

Progress Administration on the ground that the work was really 
"current maintenance work" which the sponsor should perform 
itself. It is unfortunate that this had to be so. The Library has 
never been, nor is ever likely to be, in a position to find the funds 
for carrying on such a cleaning and refurbishing process. And 
the project itself was an excellent one for providing work for a 
type of individual for whom it is not easy to find suitable ac- 
tivity upon work relief projects. 

These three projects provided employment for several hun- 
dred individuals. The Federal Government provided the sal- 
aries and wages. The City of Boston assumed responsibility for 
the incidental expenses as its contribution as sponsor of the 
projects. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Limited funds permitted no action during 1938 except for 
such minor repairs throughout the library system as were im- 
mediately pressing. For several years now a similar policy has 
been in effect. The result will be soon or late that major expen- 
ditures will become necessary because of inability year by year 
to keep buildings and equipment in constant repair. 

An example of the way in which this is likely to work out is 
to be seen in what has happened at the West End Branch Li- 
brary. The branch library is housed in the Old West Church. 
When it was taken over for library uses in 1896, it was put 
into good condition. Naturally over the intervening forty years 
there eventually came about a need for repairs. Year by year 
from 1930 onward the annual budget estimates of the Library 
included a sum in the amount of $10,000 annually until the 
old building should be put into good repair once again, only to 
have the item disallowed each year. Finally in 1937 an emer- 
gency situation arose affecting the safety of the building, and 
by order of the Building Commissioner of the City of Boston it 
was closed to public use. Now the necessary repairs will cost 
from $55,000 to $60,000. Such a situation need not have oc- 
curred if funds had been made available in relatively small 



[44] 

amounts year by year, particularly in recent years before the 
need for repairs had reached an emergency stage. 

It is highly desirable that there be resumed the practice of 
earlier years whereby each year a substantial appropriation was 
made for maintaining buildings and equipment in constant re- 
pair. 

There will be found above in the Report of the Trustees 
(pp. 4—6) a presentation of other important needs in the mat- 
ter of buildings and equipment. 

SALARY INCREASES 

In 1938 provision was made and action was taken, as in 
!937, for the granting of salary increases on a step rate basis 
to a sufficiently wide extent to take care of all individuals who 
had not reached the maximum of remuneration for their posi- 
tions, with the exception of those who were already receiving 
m.ore than $40.00 per week or $2100 per annum. To 391 in- 
dividuals there were granted increases of $2.00 per week or 
$100 per annum up to the maximum of their positions. 

That this action was once again, as for the first time in years 
in 1937, on a widespread basis is to be seen from the following 
table showing the number of individuals receiving step rate in- 
creases in pay in recent years: 

YEAR NO. OF INDIVIDUALS 

1932 None 

1933 None 

1934 203 

1935 173 

1936 149 

1937 441 

1938 391 

STAFF EXAMINATIONS 

As of January 1 , 1 938 there were put into effect the new 
arrangements for the classification of personnel and for the ex- 
tensive series of staff examinations announced on June 1, 1937. 
For individuals entering the library service beginning January 
1, 1938 these examinations became obligatory. For those al- 



[45] 

ready in the library ser\ace prior to that date, the taking of the 
new examinations was on a voluntary basis, except in the case 
of qualifying for promotion to positions in the upper levels of 
the graded service. 

The first of the new Qualifying Examinations and Promo- 
tional Examinations were given in May and June 1938, From 
among the individuals who had entered the library service since 
January 1 , 1 938 there were 1 8 registrations for Qualifying Ex- 
aminations. From among those who were already in the library 
service before January 1 , 1 938 there were 1 86 registrations for 
Qualifying Examinations and 197 registrations for Promotional 
Examinations. There were also 13 registrations for Qualifying 
Examinations by properly qualified individuals not in the li- 
brary service who wished to establish advanced standing as can- 
didates for appointment to the Probationary Service. 

The results obtained in the Qualifying Examinations and 
Promotional Examinations given in May and June 1938 were 
as follows: 

QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS 

INDIVIDUALS INDIVIDUALS 

TITLE OF EXAMINATION 
General Book Selection (Q) .... 
Cataloging and Classification (Q) 
General Reference Work (Q) 
Boston Public Library — Central Library (Q) . 
Boston Public Library — Branch Libraries (Q) 

PROMOTIONAL EXAMINATIONS 

INDIVIDUALS INDIVIDUALS 
WHO WHO 

TITLE OF EXAMINATION PASSED FAILED TOTAL 

Advanced Languages— French (II) . . 32(89%) 4(11%) 36(100%) 

Advanced Languages— German (II) . . 4(44%) 5(56%) 9(100%) 

Advanced Languages— Italian (II) . . . 5(50%) 5(50%) 10(100%) 
Advanced Languages— Spanish (II) . . 3 (60%) 2 (40%) 5 (100%) 

Boston as a Community (IV) .......... 

Boston Public Library— History (III) . . 4(44%) 5(56%) 9(100%) 

Business— General Field (III) . . . 4(80%) 1(20%) 5(100%) 

Cataloging (IV or V) ............ 

Children's Literature (IV) ........... 

Children's Work (V) 

Classification (IV or V) ........... 



WHO 


WHO 




PASSED 


FAILED 


TOTAL 


33 (79%) 
24 (83%) 

34 (76%) 
28 (76%) 
47 (73%) 


9(21%) 
5(17%) 

1 1 (24%) 
9 (24%) 

17(27%) 


42 (100%) 

29 (100%) 
45(100%) 
37 (100%) 
64 (1007c) 



[46] 

Documents— General Field (III) . . . 2(100%) (0%) 2(100%) 

Educalion— General Field (III) ... 1 (100%) (0%) I (lOO'/o) 

Extension Work (V) 

Fine Arts— General Field (III) . . . 2(100%) (0%) 2(100%) 

Foreign Government Documents (V) ......... 

History of the Book (III) .... 3(100%) (0%) 3(100%) 

Library Administration (V) ........... 

Library Records (IV) ..........#. 

Literature— General Field (III) . . . 14(58%) 10(42%) 24(100%) 

Music— General Field (III) .... 9(90%) 1(10%) 10(100%) 

National and Trade Bibliography (III) . . 3 (75%) 1 (25%) 4 (100%) 

Newspapers — Special Field (IV) .......... 

Periodicals — Special Field (V) .......... 

Periodicals and Newspaoers — General 

Field (III) . . . . .4 (100%) (0%) 4 (100%) 

Philosophy, Psychology, Religion — General 

Field (III) 1 (100%) (0%) 1 (100%) 

Public Library as an Institution (I) . .31 (52%) 29 (48%) 60 (100%) 

Science and Technology — General 

Field (III) 5(100%) (0%) 5(100%) 

Social Sciences and History — General 

Field (II or III) 4 (57%) 3 (43%) 7 (100%) 

United Slates Government Documents (IV) ........ 

Work with Schools (V) 

Special Field — Subject Knowledge (IV) ......... 

Special Field — Bibliographical Knowledge (V) . 

The individuals who passed the Qualifying Examinations 
and the Promotional Examinations appropriate to the particular 
fields of library activity in which they are employed will be 
eligible for promotional increases (grade increases) in remuner- 
ation in 1 939 up to the maximums for their positions insofar as 
funds are available for the purpose. 

The several papers set for the above examinations in 1938 
were issued in printed form by the Library in the latter part of 
the year under the titles of Qualif^^ing Examinations Offered in 
May end June 1938 and Promotional Examinations Offered 
in May and June 1938. 

TRAINING OF PERSONNEL 

The extended program of training courses instituted in 1 933 
entered upon its fifth year in October 1937. During the academic 
year 1937-38 there were 173 members of the library staff en- 
rolled in eleven full courses (three terms of ten weeks each) and 
five one-term courses. These individuals took 197 courses, of 
which 169 were completed satisfactorily. 



[47] 
Comparative figures for the five years follow: 



1933-34 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


Individuals taking courses 261 


192 


194 


151 


173 


Total enrollment in all courses 268 


260 


207 


166 


197 


Courses completed satisfactorily 202 


217 


154 


133 


169 


Percentage of courses completed 11% 


83% 


747o 


80% 


79% 



During the five years 485 different individuals have been en- 
rolled in these courses. It will be recalled that in 1933 there 
was effected a recasting along enlarged lines of the activities of 
the Library's Training Class which had existed since 1927. In 
place of the single class affording instruction to a limited group 
of fifteen or so individuals throughout the year, there was then 
instituted the present extensive and wide program of single 
courses open to all full-time members of the library staff. 

The courses are offered in all five of the fields which are 
covered by the new Qualifying Examinations and also in cer- 
tain of the fields covered by the new Promotional Examinations. 

To the Library there is much promise in the fact that 1 50 or 
more members of its staff are engaged each year in courses of 
study and training such as these. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The following appointments to titular positions were made 
during the year: Beatrice M. Flanagan, to be Chief of the 
School Department; Margaret I. McGovem, to be Branch Li- 
brarian, Memorial Branch Library; Elizabeth B. Boudreau, to 
be Branch Librarian, Neponset Branch Library; Grace B. 
Loughlin, to be Chief of the Branch Issue Department; Dorothy 
F. Nourse, to be Branch Librarian, Kirstein Branch Library; 
Catherine Loughman, to be Branch Librarian, Mt. Bowdoin 
Branch Library; and Muriel E. Cann, to be Branch Librarian, 
Lower Mills Branch Library. 

Under the provisions of the Boston Retirement Act the fol- 
lowing individuals retired from the library service: Harry W. 
Mathews, First Assistant, after 18 years service; Alice V. 
Stevens, Chief of the Branch Issue Department, after 39 years 



[48] 

service; and Isabel E. Wetherald, Branch Librarian, Lower 
Mills Branch Library, after 37 years service. 

As of the date of retirement the honorary title of Chief of 
the Branch Issue Department, Emeritus was bestowed upon 
Alice V. Stevens and the honorary title of Branch Librarian, 
Emeritus upon Isabel E. Wetherald. 

By death the Library lost the services of Jerome G. Sullivan, 
Janitor. 

CONCLUSION 

Many of the accompHshments of the year 1938 cannot be 
set forth here. They are however known and recognized by the 
countless users of the Library who have profited from them. 
Such of them as can be presented statistically are set forth in 
the Appendix which follows immediately after this Report. 

The Director is deeply conscious of the constant aid and co- 
operation received from the members of the library staff in 
carrying on the work of the Library. To them he offers warm 
thanks. And for them and for himself he expresses grateful ap- 
preciation to the Trustees for continuing friendly understanding 
and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milton E. Lord 

Director, and Librarian 



[491 
APPENDIX 

USE OF BOOKS 
Comparative Circulation Statistics. 1934-1938 





1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


Central Library 


756.018 


737396 


757,363 


748.211 


376,837 


Business Branch 


18.410 


17.921 


1 7,822 


18309 


18,603 


Young People's Room, 












Central Library 










56,042* 


School Department 










9.018* 


Branch Issue DepartmenI 


t 








48,392* 


Deposit Circulation 












(estimated) 






— 




374.194* 


Branch Libraries: 












Allston 


186,413 


182,203 


172,835 


160,973 


1 55,666 


Andrew Square 


138.638 


130,777 


127,827 


128,590 


119,587 


Boylston 


138.595 


137.179 


138.532 


124.069 


124,118 


Brighton 


134388 


130.741 


121,152 


113,169 


109.720 


Charlestown 


127,866 


117,525 


116,034 


110,377 


102.532 


City Point 


144,762 


140.006 


129,289 


124,505 


119.279 


Codman Square 


185.451 


168.412 


164.553 


157,174 


142.898 


Dorchester 


132,104 


135.821 


137.759 


130,130 


124,554 


East Boston 


188,819 


161,227 


1 50,340 


130,570 


125,585 


Faneuil 


138,234 


138,561 


133,787 


120,908 


108,817 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


98,118 


89,857 


91,436 


84,090 


67.402 


Hyde Park 


144,011 


141,763 


129,807 


126,043 


117,678 


Jamaica Plain 


126,702 


119.760 


116,604 


118,819 


109,793 


Jeffries Point 


80,460 


76,500 


73.593 


71,440 


68,626 


Kirstein 


63,388 


64,045 


56,536 


46,204 


48,097 


Lower Mills 


74,990 


70,928 


64371 


60,635 


57.098 


Mattapan 


205,498 


196311 


188382 


177,013 


174.567 


Memorial 


222,975 


211.971 


192.100 


173,279 


168.243 


Mt. Bowdoin 


149.341 


143.823 


137.889 


128,668 


119.133 


Mt. Pleasant 


94,640 


89.924 


84.102 


80,752 


77.635 


Neponset 


69,638 


64.409 


60,117 


59.535 


58.215 


North End 


143351 


123,174 


125.656 


121,927 


103.079 


Orient Heights 


92,801 


81.189 


68.932 


60,255 


55,529 


Parker Hill 


119,139 


112,165 


108,933 


102314 


97.016 


Phillips Brooks 


46,258 


45,397 


44,859 


40,387 


39.168 


Roslindale 


167.562 


1 54.640 


151.971 


146,992 


132,852 


Roxbury Crossing 


75.062 


72,839 


71.037 


44,576 


16,205** 


South Boston 


141,046 


128.979 


124.228 


117,161 


99,734 


South End 


154,604 


1 53,478 


1 50.728 


138,298 


124314 


Tyler Street 


52,578 


47,979 


51,364 


53,301 


25,397** 


Upham's Corner 


211.399 


199,564 


188,437 


175,918 


169,078 


West End 


208,003 


201373 


200,444 


181.642 


165,631 


West Roxbury 


163,089 


161,864 


157.918 


155.144 


143.712 



5,19435! 4,949,701 4,806,737 4,531378 4354.044 



* Prior to 1938 included under Central Library 
** Branch Library closed July 1. 1938 



[50] 



Gains and Losses 



The net gains and losses in total circulation over a five year 
period are as follow^s: 

VOLUMES 

353,932 



1934 loss from preceding year 

1935 loss from preceding year 

1936 loss from preceding year 

1937 loss from preceding year 

1938 loss from preceding year 



244.650 
142.964 
275.359 
177.334 



Distribution of Total Circulation in 1938 



from deposits in schools. 

institutions and 

home use engine houses* totals 



Central Library (Reference Division) 








Direct lending to borrowers 


351.756 





351.756 


Central Library volumes circulated through 








Branch Issue Dept. & Branch Libraries 
Business Brajich 


25,081 
18,603 




25,081 
18.603 






Young People's Room, Central Library 


56,042 




56.042 




School Department 


9.018 


90.656 


99,674 


Branch Issue Department 


48.392 


196,366 


244,758 


Branch Libraries: 








Allston 


155.666 




1 55,666 




Andrew Square 


119.587 


1,382 


120.969 


Boylston 


124,118 




124,118 




Brighton 


109,720 


927 


110.647 


Charlestown 


102.532 


9.536 


112.068 


City Point 


119.279 




119.279 


Codman Square 


142.898 


7,145 


150.043 


Dorchester 


124,554 


1.497 


126.051 


East Boston 


125,585 


2.491 


128.076 


Faneuil 


108,817 


315 


109.132 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


67.402 


14.672 


82,074 


Hyde Park 


1 1 7.678 


1,687 


119.365 


Jamaica Plain 


109,793 


2.354 


112,147 


Jeffries Point 


68,626 




68,626 




Kirstein 


48.097 




48.097 




Lower Mills 


57,098 




57.098 




Mattapan 


174,567 


50 


174.617 


Memorial 


168,243 


350 


168.593 


Mt. Bowdoin 


119.133 


116 


119.249 


Mt. Pleasant 


77.635 




77.635 




Neponset 


58.215 




58.215 


North End 


103.079 


1,331 


104.410 


Orient Heights 


55.529 




55.529 




Parker Hill 
Phillips Brooks 


97.016 
39,168 




97.016 
39.168 






Roslindale 


132,852 


6360 


139.212 



[511 



Roxbury Crossing 16,205* 

South Boston 99,734 

South End 124.314 

Tyler Street 25,397* 

Upham's Corner 169,078 

West End 165.631 

West Roxbury 143,712 

3.979.850 

* Estimated 

** Branch Library closed July I. 1938 



6.694 
3.335 

596 

19.205 

7.129 



16,205** 
106,428 
127.649 

25.397** 
169.674 
184.836 
150.841 



374.194 4.354.044 



Summary of Circulation by Division in 1938 



BOOKS LENT FOR HOME USE 

Reference Division: 

Central Library (including Central Library Books 

issued through the Branch Libraries) . . 376.837 

Business Branch ........ 18.603 

Circulation Division: 

Young People's Room, Central Library . . . 56.042 

School Department 9,018 

Branch Issue Department ...... 48,392 

Branch Libraries 3.470,958 



395,440 



3,584,410 
3.979,850 



Total Circulation in 1938 

Books Lent for Home Use: 

Reference Division 395,440 

Circulation Division 3,584,410 

Deposits of books (estimated) . 374,194 

4,354,044 

Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 

following lending of books for the puipose of serious research 

is shown for two successive years: 

1937 1938 

Volumes lent from this Library to other libraries in Massachusetts 1,436 1.721 

Volumes lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts .... 342 471 

1.778 2,192 
Applications not granted: 

From libraries in Massachusetts ...... 843 838 

From libraries outside of Massachusetts ..... 205 220 

1.048 1.058 



[52] 

In the Circulation Division the classified direct circulation 
shows the following percentages: 

PERCENTAGE 

Fiction for adults 46.4% 

Non-fiction for adults 16.0% 

Juvenile fiction ...... 25.97» 

Juvenile non-fiction . . . . . 1 • -7% 

In the Reference Division the classified direct circulation 
shows the following percentages: 

PERCENTAGE 

Fiction 40.77o 

Non-fiction 59.3% 



ACCESSIONS 

Books Acquired by Purchase 

1937 1938 

Reference Division: 

From City appropriation . . . 4,938 3,257 

From trust funds income . . . 9.026 13.964 15.254 18.511 

Circulation Division: 

From City appropriation . . . 42,204 38.475 

From trust funds income . . . 1.699 43.903 1.837 40.312 

57.867 58.823 

Volumes accessioned during the year were as follows: 

accessions volumes 

Purchase 58.823 

Gift 4.283 

Exchange ....... 1 

Newspapers bound ..... 87 

Serials bound ...... 5,088 



Expenditures for Books and Other Library Material 

1937 1938 
For Reference Division: 

From City appropriation $20,196.65 $17,558.67 

From trust funds income 47,075.43 $67^72.08 80,117.94 $97,676.61 



For Circulation Division: 

From City appropriation $61,325.84 $56,367.03 

From trust funds income 2,566.38 $63,892.22 2,588.25 $58,955.28 

$131,164.30 $156,631.89 



[531 

THE CATALOGS 



Reference Division: 

Cataloged 

Central Library 
Business Branch 

Serials added 

Central Library 


Central 
ent 


Library 


VOLS. AND 
PARTS 

23,706 
2,006 

7,258 


TITLES 

21,852 






Circulation Division: 
Cataloged 

Young People's Room, 
School Department 
Branch Issue Departm 
Branch Libraries 


32.970 

986 

L528 

2,422 

37.958 


21,852 



42.894 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available 
for public use is: 

Reference Division : 

Central Library (including continuations) 20,880 

Business Branch 2,006 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but 

now found, etc. 1,062 23.948 



Circulation Division: 

Young People's Room, Central Library -, 

School Department ( ai qjj 

Branch Issue Department j 

Branch Libraries 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but 

now found, etc. 598 42.475 



66.423 



The number of volumes removed from collections during the 
year (books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet 
replaced, etc.) : 

Reference Division: 

Central Library 3.256 

Business Branch 83 3.339 



Circulation Division: 

Young People's Room, Central Library , 

School Department ( yQ Qn-j jq fyjn 

Branch Issue Department f 

Branch Libraries 

73,416 



[54] 

BOOK STOCK 

The total number of volumes in the Hbrary at the end of each 
year since its formation is shown in the following statement: 



1852-53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 



9.688 


1896-97 


16.221 


1897-98 


22.617 


1898-99 


28,080 


1899-1900 


34.8% 


1900-01 


70.851 


1901-02 


78,043 


1902-03 


85,031 


1903-04 


97,386 


1904-05 


105,034 


1905-06 


110,563 


1906-07 


116,934 


1907-08 


123.016 


1908*09 


130,678 


1909-10 


136.080 


1910-11 


144.092 


1911-12 


152.796 


1912-13 


160.573 


1913-14 


179.250 


1914-15 


192.958 


1915-16 


209.456 


1916-17 


260,550 


1917-18 


276,918 


1918-19 


297,873 


1919-20 


321,010 


1920-21 


345,734 


1921-22 


360,963 


1922-23 


377,225 


1923-24 


390,982 


1924-25 


404,221 


1925 


422,116 


1926 


438,594 


1927 


453.947 


1928 


460.993 


1929 


479.421 


1930 


492,956 


1931 


505,872 


1932 


520.508 


1933 


536.027 


1934 


556,283 


1935 


576,237 


1936 


597.152 


1937 


610.375 


1938 


628.297 





663,763 

698,888 

716.050 

746,383 

781.377 

812,264 

835.904 

848.884 

871,050 

878,933 

903,349 

922,348 

941,024 

961,522 

987.268 

1,006,717 

1.049.011 

1.067.103 

1.098,702 

1,121.747 

1,139,682 

1.157326 

1.173,695 

1,197,498 

1,224,510 

1.258.211 

1.284.094 

1.308.041 

1,333,264 

1.363.515 

1.388.439 

1,418.489 

1.442,802 

1.475.743 

1.526.951 

1,572.802 

1,631.422 

1.654,017 

1.673.609 

1,682,848 

1,693,335 

1.700.681 

1 .693,688 



[55] 

The total book stock of the Library is distributed as follows ; 



Reference Division: 








Central Library . 


. , 


, , , . . 


1,114,414 


Business Branch . 


• 





22,618 


Circulation Division: 








Young People's Room, Central Library 


. 


9.727 


School Department 




. 


42,396 


Branch Issue Department . 






41.092 


Branch Libraries: 








Allston 


13.747 


Mattapan 


16,237 


Andrew Square 


12.016 


Memorial 


16.380 


Boylston 


12.110 


Ml. Bowdoin . 


12,191 


Brighton 


19.763 


Mt. Pleasant . 


8,836 


Charlesfown 


1 7.679 


Neponset 


6.906 


City Point 


11,652 


North End . 


11,380 


Codmein Square 


16.161 


Orient Heights 


9,439 


Dorchester 


16.132 


Parker Hill . 


13,721 


East Boston 


17,441 


Phillips Brooks 


5,851 


Faneuil 


14.840 


Roslindale 


15.247 


Fellowes Athenaeum . 


42,089 


South Boston . 


10,742 


Hyde Park . 


30.377 


South End 


12,769 


Jamaica Plain . 


15.392 


Uphams Corner 


18,308 


Jeffries Point 


8.202 


West End . 


21,761 


Kirstein 


7.754 


West Roxbury 


19.422 


Lower Mills 


8.8% 







THE BINDING DEPARTMENT 

1937 1938 

Number of volumes bound in various styles .... 65.822 63.554 

Magazines stitched ......... 66 75 

Volumes repaired 2,502 1 ,058 

Volumes guarded ......... 537 550 

Maps mounted 62 160 

Photographs and engravings mounted ..... 3,209 4,755 

Library publications folded, stitched and trimmed . . . 151.990 140,938 



THE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



Requisitions received and filled ..... 
Card Catalog (Central Library) : 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Card Catalog (Branch Libraries): 

Titles (Printing Department count) .... 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 
Signs .......... 

Blank Forms (numbered series) ..... 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside the numbered series) 
Catalogs, pamphlets, bibliographical programs . 



1937 
494 



1938 
596 



15,637 14,854 

124.609 222.810 

932 888 

81,240 88,972 

944 1,025 

4,250,440 9.902,555 

169,826 1.266,009 

162.799 194,025 



[56] 
NOTABLE PURCHASES, 1938 

Printed Books — Manuscripts — Reproductions 

Adams, John Quincy. 

Autograph letter signed. To James Barbour. August 17, 1825. 
Adams, Samuel. 

Letter, signed. To Elbridge Gerry. Boston, July 29, 1 789. 
Addington, Isaac. 

Autograph document signed. Deposition of Thomas Pound, pirate. 

October 19, 1689. 
[Adis, Henry]. 

A Spie sent out of the Tower-Chamber. London, 1 648. 
Albertus de Brudzewo. 

Commentum in theoricas planetarum Georgii Purbachii. Milan, 

1495. 
Aiken, Henry. 

Illustrations of Don Quixote. London, 1831—2. 

Illustrations to Popular Songs. London, 1825. 

Almanach Royal. Paris, 1 772. Heraldic binding. 
Ambrosius, St. 

Hexameron seu de principiis rerum. Augsburg, 1 472. 
American Revolutionary Orderly Book, 1 778. Manuscript account 

of Providence Campaign, June 6 — August 28, 1778, 
Annibal et Scipion ou Les Grands Capitaines. Le Haye, 1675. 

Thouvenin binding. 
Antidote against Melancholy. London, 1661. Pratt binding. 
Antiphonary. Illuminated manuscript, single leaf with miniature. 

Fifteenth century. 
Antolinus. 

Tesaurum artis pistoriae. Part I. Rome, 1635. Binding with the 

arms of Pope Urban VIII. 
An Apology for a late resignation. London, 1 748. 
Appianus 

Des guerres des Rommains. Lyon, 1 544. Binding of Thomas 

Wotton type. 
Arnold, Benedict. 

Autograoh letter, signed. To General Gates. Isle Mott, September 

9, 1776. 
L'art de juger du caractere des Hommes sur leur ecriture. Paris, 1816. 
Ausonius. 

Epigrammata. Venice, 1 494. 

Opera. [With other works.] Venice, 1488. 



[57] 

Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Balzac, Honore de. 

La Cousine Bette. Paris, 1885. Ruban binding. 

La maison du chat-qui-pelote. Paris, 1 899. Cuzin binding. 

Bandellus, Vincentius. 

Regulae. Milan, 1505. 
Barbaras. 

Castigationes Plinianae. Rome, 1492—3. 
Barclay, David, and others. 

Autograph letter signed by a group of English sympathizers with 

the American Revolutionists. To John Reynell and others. March 

8, 1782. 
[Barham, Richard Harris]. 

The Ingoldsby Legends. 3 vols. London, 1840—42—47. 
Bartol, Charles A. 

Three autograph letters, signed. To J. H. Benton. April 27, May 

13, and May 15, 1882. 
Basan, P. F. 

Collection de Cent-Vingt Estampes . . . Paris, 1 78 1 . Hardy- 

Mennil binding. 
Beauregard, Pierre G. T. 

Autograph document, signed, giving report of prisoners. September 

29, 1861. 
Autograph letter, signed. To Jefferson Davis. December 6, 

1864. 
Bede, The Venerable. 

Historiae ecclesiasticae. Cambridge, 1 643. Little Gidding bind- 
ing. 
Bellarmin, Robert, Cardinal. 

Traite de I'eternelle Felicite des Saints. Paris, 1656. Le Gascon 

binding (?). 
Benezet, Anthony. 

Autograph letter signed. To Samuel Huntington. November 26, 

1783. 
Benjamin, Judah P. 

Autograph letter signed. To President Franklin Pierce. January 

29, 1856. 
Bennett, Arnold. 

Clayhaneer; Hilda Lessways; These Tw^ain. 3 vols. London, 

1910-1916. 
Beranger, Pierre Jean de. 

Oeuvres completes. 3 vols. Paris, 1837. 
Bergomensis. 

De claris selectisque mulieribus. Ferrara, 1497. 



[58] 

Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Bernhardt, Sarah. 

Autograph letter, signed. To Mme. E. Furst. 1892. 
Berquin, Arnaud. 

Idylles. Paris, 1775. Chambolle-Duru binding. 
Bible in French. Old Testament. 

L'Histoire de la Bible en Francois. English manuscript written in 

Norman French, c. 1 430. 
Bible in German. New Testament. Strassburg, 1527. In dated bind- 
ing of 1571. 
Bible in Greek. New Testament. Basle, 1524. 
Bible in Greek. New Testament. Paris, E^tienne, 1 546. 
Bible in Latin. Antwerp, 1631. Le Gascon binding (?). 
Bloody Newes from Dover. [London?] 1647. 
Boccaccio. 

Die gantz Romisch histori. Augsburg, 1 542. 
Bonaventura, St. 

Instructio novitiorum. Montserrate, 1499. 
Book of Common Prayer [and] the Holy Bible. 2 vols, in 1. Cam- 
bridge, I 668-8. Samuel Mearne type binding. 
Book of Hours, Flemish. Paris, Widow of Thielman Kerver, 1534. 
Book of Hours, Latin. Paris, Regnauld and Claude Chaudiere, 

1549. Three of the woodcuts bear the mark of Geofroy Tory. 

Grolieresque binding. 
Book of Hours, Spanish. Lyon, Mathias Bonhomme for Guillaume 

Roville, 1551. Le Gascon binding (?). 
Bordone, Benedetto. 

Isolario. Venice, 1534. Grolieresque binding. 
Bornman, Z. 

Astra, bound with Astrolabium tetragonum. Breslau, 1 595-6. 
Borrell, Peter. 

A New Treatise, proving the Multiplicity of Worlds. London, 

1658. 
Boyle, Hon. Robert. 

Some considerations touching experimental natural philosophy. Ox- 
ford, 1663. 
Bradford, Thomas Lindsley. 

The Bibliographer's Manual of American History. 5 vols. 1907— 

1910. 
Brathwaite, Richard. 

Canterburies dreame. London, 1641. 
Bridges, Robert. 

Eros and Psyche. Gregynog Press, 1935. 



[59] 
Notable Purchases. 1938 (continued) 

Brown, Sir Thomas. 

Pseudodoxia. London, 1 646. 
Browning, Robert. 

Autograph letter, signed. To Phoebe G. Smalley. March 10, 

1885. 
Men and Women. 2 vols. Doves Press, 1908. Cobden- 

Sanderson binding. 
Burns, Robert. 

Poems, chiefly in the Scottish dialect. Edinburgh, 1 787. Stike- 

man binding. 
Burroughs, John. 

Three stories, in manuscript. 1912—1913. 
Byron, Lord. 

Autograph letter, signed. To Mr. Miller, London bookseller. 

Athens, July 19, 1810. 
Campbell, Archibald. 

A voyage around the world. Edinburgh, 1816. 
Caulaincourt, A. A., Duke of Vincenze. 

Autograph letter, signed. Addressee unknown. December 1 1 , 

1813. 
Cavendish, George. 

The negotiations of Thomas Woolsey. London, 1641. 
Caxton, William. 

Polycronicon. [Single leaf.] Westminster, 1482. 
[Chevigne, Comte Louis M. J. de] . 

Les Contes Remois. Paris, 1858. Ritter binding. 
Chinese map of the world. [19—?] 
Clemens, Samuel L. 

Autograph letter signed. To Edward House. February 14, 

[1881]. 
Colonna, Francesco. 

Le tableau de riches inventions. Paris, 1 600. Chambolle-Duru 

binding. 

Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Venice, Aldus, 1 499. 

[Combe, William.] 

The English Dance of Death [and] The Dance of Life. 3 vols. 

London, 1815—16—17. With Rowlandson aquatints. 
The History of Johnny Quae Genus. London, 1822. With 

Rowlandson aquatints. 
The Tour of Dr. Syntax through London, 1 820. Ramage 

binding. 
[Cotton, Charles.] 

Scarronides. London, 1 664. Bedford binding. 



[601 

Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Crane, Stephen. 

Autograph letter signed. Addressee unknown. January 30, 1 894. 

With photograph. 
Cultificis. 

Declaratio privilegiorum fratrum, ReutHngen, Otmar, 1 492. 
Darley, FeHx. 

Scenes in Indian Life. Philadelphia, 1 843. 
[Davenant, Sir William.] 

History of Sir Francis Drake. London, 1 659. 
Declaration of the Causes of War. Westminster, 1813. 
Declaration of Independence of the State of South Carolina. Broad- 
side. December 20, 1 860. 
De La Mare, Walter. 

Songs of Childhood, 1902. 
Delphinus, Federicus. 

De flexu et reflexu aquae maris. Venice, 1559. 
Demeny, Georges. 

Les origines du cinematographe. Paris, 1895. 
[Denton, William.] 

Jus regiminis: Being a justification . . . London, 1689. 
De Quincey, Thomas. 

Autograph letter signed. To Thomas Benson. April 5, 1833. 
[Dickinson, John.] 

A Declaration by his Representatives of the United Colonies of 

North America. . . . Philadelphia, 1775. Pratt binding. 
Digby, Everard. 

De arte natandi. London, 1587. 
Digges, Thomas. 

Nova corpora regularia. London, 1 634. 
Dobson, Henry Austin. 

Carmina votiva and occasional verses. London, 1 90 1 . Bradstreet 

binding. 
Doni, Antoine Francois. 

Les mondes celestes. . . . Lyon, 1580. Trautz-Bauzonnet binding. 
A Dreame, or News from Hell. Sicilia, 1641. 
Dryander, J. 

Annulorum trium diversi generis . . . Marburg, 1537. 
[Dryden, John.] 

The Hind and the Panther. London, 1687. Bradstreet binding. 
[Du Bellay, Joachim.] 

Recueil de Poesie . . . Paris, 1553. Trautz-Bauzonnet binding. 



[61] 
Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Dunsany, Edward, Lord. 

Autograph letter signed. To Mr. Markham. November 5, 1926. 

The book of wonder. London, 1912. 

Durel, John. 

Sanctae Ecclesiae Anglicanae Adversus Iniquas . . . London, 1 669. 

Heraldic binding. 
Edwards, Samuel E. 

The Ohio Hunter. Battle Creek, 1 866. 
Eliot, George. 

Daniel Deronda. 4 vols. London, 1 876. 
Eliot, Samuel. 

Autograph letter signed. To [Boston business associates^]. March 

17, 1770. 
Elucidarius. 

Ein newer M. Elucidarius. Strassburg, c. 1539. 
Emerson, Ralph Waldo. 

Autograph letter signed. To Mr. A. W. Smalley. May 8. 
Erasmus. 

Colloquia. Franckfurt am Mayn, 1561. German XVIth century 

binding. 
Fabyan, Robert. 

The Chronicle of Fabian. London, 1559. Charles Lewis binding. 
Fernel, J. 

Monalosphaerium. Paris, 1 526—7. 
Fine, O. 

Quadratura circuli. Paris, 1 544. 
Flaubert, Gustave. 

La tentation de Saint Antoine. Paris, 1907. Chevallier binding. 
Fox, George. 

Caesar's due. London, 1 679. 
Foyer, Archibald. 

Scotland's present duty. Edinburgh, 1 700. 
Free thoughts on the American War. London, 1 79 1 . 
Fuchs, Leonhard. 

New Kreiiterbuch. Basel, 1543. 
G., W. 

Memento to the World. London, 1 680. 
Garfield, James. 

Autograph letter signed. To O. Morgan. April 23, 1874. 
Gassarus. 

Grolieresque binding made for Thomas Maioli. 

Epitome Historiarum et Chronicorum Mundi. Lugduni, [1538]. 



[62] 
Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Goncourt, Edmond and Jules de. 

A Venise. . . Paris, 1913. Marius Michel binding. 
Graffigny, Mme. de. 

Lettres d'une Peruvienne. Paris, 1 797. Simier binding. 
Great Bastard, Protector of the Little One. London, 1 689. San- 

gorski and Sutcliffe binding. 
Haberly, Loyd. 

Daneway, a Fairy Play. Seven Acres Press, 1929. 
Hardy, Thomas. 

The Dynasts. 3 vols. London. 1904-1908. 

Jude the Obscure. London, 1 896. 

Wessex Poems. London, 1 898. 

The Woodlanders. 3 vols. London, 1 887. 

Hariot, Thomas. 

Artis analyticae praxis. London, 1 63 1 . 
Hayes, Margaret Howell (Jefferson Davis). 

Autograph letter signed. Addressee unknown. February 9, 1905. 
Hedin, Sven. 

Autograph letter signed. To Mr. Young. June 4, 1903. 
Hervieu, Paul. 

Flirt. Paris, 1890. M. Ritter binding. 
Hieron, Samuel. 

A Helpe unto Devotion. London, 1 630. 
Histoire du Vieux et du Nouveau Testament. . . 2 vols. Anvers, 1 700. 
Hobbes, Thomas. 

Decameron physiologicum. London, 1678. 
Holmes, Oliver Wendell. 

Autograph letter signed. To Bram Stoker. April 4, 1 886. 
Holmes, Richard R. 

Queen Victoria. London, 1897. Durvand binding. 
Homer. 

Opera omnia. [In Greek.] Florence, 1488. 
Horem, Nicolas. 

Tractatus de latitudinibus formarum. Padua, 1 486. 
Huxley, Aldous. 

Brave New World. London, 1932. 
Isolanus, Isidorus. 

De regum principumque omnium institutis. Milan, 1500—1508. 
Jackson, Andrew. 

Autograph letter signed. To Col. Robert Butler. September 4, 

1814. 
Jacob, Simon. 

Ein new und wolgegriindt rechenbuch. Frankfurt, 1612. 



[63] 

Notable Purchases. 1938 (continued) 

Jefferys, Thomas. 

A general typography of North America. London, I 768. 
Jerome, St. 

De viris illustribus. [With other works.] French manuscript, 

written in the 1 2th century. 
Index in tomos omnes operum divi Hieronymi. . . Basle, 

1538. Heraldic binding. 
Johnson, Samuel. 

Letters to and from the late Samuel Johnson. 2 vols. London, 1 788. 
Keleti, Arthur. 

Pax Vobiscum. Budapest, 1923. 
Keyes, Erasmus D. 

Autograph letter signed. To Brig. Gen. M. C. Meigs. July 2 1 , 

1862. 
Kipling, Rudyard. 

Soldier Tales. London, 1896. 
Kosma, Lajos. 

Balladak. Budapest, 1921. 
Lautreamont, Comte de. 

Les Chants de Maldoror. With illustrations by Dali. Paris, 1934. 
Lawrence, Samuel B. 

Autograph letter signed. To Benson Johnson Lossing. July 1 2, 

1866. 
Two autograph manuscripts, giving account of battle. July 

9, 1864. 
[Leslie, Charles.] 

A new and exact account of Jamaica. Edinburgh, 1 740. 
A Letter from Rhoan in France. London, 1641. 
Leybourn, William. 

The art of dialling. London, 1 669. 
London, George, and Henry Wise. 

The Retir'd Gardener. London, 1717. 
Machen, Arthur. 

The Three Impostors. London, 1 895. 
Maius. 

De priscorum proprietate verborum. Venice, 1490. 
Marsh, James B. 

Four Years in the Rockies. New Castle, Pa., 1884. 
Marvell, Andrew. 

Poems. London, 1 689. 
Mather, Cotton. Autograph letter signed. To John Cotton. October 

20. 1692. 



[64] 

Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Autograph letter signed. To Nathaniel Cotton. January 1 0, 

1721. 
Autograph manuscript sermon, delivered March 28 and May 

2, 1682. (Part I.) 
Autograph manuscript sermon, delivered March 28, 1 682. 

(Part II.) 
Mather, Increase. 

Autograph ecclesiastical manuscript, undated. 
Meerwein, Charles Frederick. 

L'art de voler. Basle, 1 784. Champs-Stroobants binding. 
Merchants, Slave Trade, and Adventure. 

82 autograph manuscripts and autograph letters signed, relating 

to English and American merchants, slavery, and adventure, c. 

1762-1845. 
Meserve, F. H. 

The Photographs of Lincoln. 1911. 
Mesmes, Jean Pierre de. 

Les institutions astronomiques. Paris, 1557. 
Mill-Pond, The. Broadside. Boston, 1805. 
Monardes, Nicolas. 

Libro que trata de la nieue. Seville, 1571. 
Moore, George. 

Autograph letter signed. To Mr. Smith. June 16, [1919]. 

The Brook Kerith. London, 1916. 

Morris, William. 

Story of the Glittering Plain. Hammersmith, 1 89 1 . 
Muller, G. F. 

Voyages from Asia to America. London, 1 764. 
Myers, Capt. John. 

Life, voyages, and travels. London, 1817. 
Nauclerus, Joannes. 

Memorabilium omnis aetatis. Tubingen, 1516. In contemporary 

binding, possibly for Jean Grolier. 
Newton, Isaac. 

Analysis per quantitatum series. London, 1711. 
Orrery, Roger Boyle, Lord. 

Poems. London, 1681. 
Ovid. 

Festivalls. Cambridge, 1 640. 

Metamorphoses. With etchings by Picasso. Lausanne, 1931. 

Paine, Thomas. 

Common Sense. Boston, 1 776. 



[65] 
Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Panormitanus. 

Disceptationes et allegationes. Venice, 1 490. 
Paulus de Middelburgo. 

De recta Paschae celebratione. Fossombrone, 1513. 
Peletier, J. 

De occulta parte numerorum. Paris, 1560. 
Peucer, Caspar. 

De circulis coelestibus et primo motu. Wittemberg, 1553. 
Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart (Ward). 

Autograph letter signed. To Mr. Gilder. 1889. 

Autograph manuscript of a story, signed, [1889.] 

Pike, Zebulon M. 

Autograph letter signed. To Capt. White Youngs. January 22, 

1813. 
Pinder, Ulrich. 

Speculum passionis domini nostri. Nuremberg, 1507. 
Platina. 

De honesta voluptate. Cividale, 1480. 
Pomet, Pierre. 

Histoire generale des drogues. Paris, 1 694. 
Regiomontanus. 

Natiirlicher kunst der astronomey. Frankfurt, c. 1560. 
Regola degli frati . . . del Terzo Ordine di Sancto Francesco. Italian 

manuscript, fifteenth century. 
Regola della Monache di S. Chiara. Italian manuscript, fifteenth 

century. 
Reiter, Laszlo. 

Konyokultura. Budapest, 1928. 
Relacion del espantable terremoto ... en las Yndias en una ciudad 

llamada Guatimala. [Madrid. 1542?] 
Repplier, Agnes. 

Essays in miniature. Boston, 1892. 
Richardson, Samuel. 

Complete works. Shakespeare Head Press. 
Ringmann. 

Passio domini nostri. Strassburg, 1508. 
Rumford, Count. 

Recherches sur la chaleur. Paris, 1813. 
Ruskin, John. 

Autograph letter signed. To Lady Af flick. November 10. 
Sacrobusco. 

Opusculum sphericum. Leipzig, c. 1498. 



[66] 

Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

Salerno, Bishop of Constance. 

Glossae. Augsburg, 1474. 
Santayana, George. 

Scepticism and animal faith. London, 1923. 

Soliloquies in England. London, 1 922. 

Sarsius, Lothar. 

Ratio ponderum librae et simbellae. Naples, 1627. 
Seager, Francis. 

Certayne psalmes. London, 1553. 
Seneca. 

Opera hispanice. Toledo, 1510. 
Shakespeare. 

The Tragedie of Anthony and Cleopatra. Doves Press, 1912. 

Cobden-Sanderson binding. 
Snellius, Willebrordus. 

Descriptio cometae. Leyden, 1619. 
Spinoza. 

Opera posthuma. Amsterdam, 1677. 

Tractatus theologico-politicus. Hamburg, 1 670. 

Steele, Zadock. 

The Indian Captive. Montpelier, 1818. 
Suevus, S. 

Arithmetica historica. Breslau, 1 629. 
Synge, J. M. 

In Wicklow, West Kerry, and Connem.ara. Dublin, 1911. 

The Tinker's Wedding. Dublin, 1907. 

Tacitus. 

De vita et moribus lulii Agricolae liber. Doves Press, 1 900. Cob- 
den Sanderson binding, 
Tennyson, Alfred, Lord. 

Seven Poems and Two Translations. Doves Press, 1902. Cobden- 
Sanderson binding. 
Terence. 

Le grant Therence. [Works, in French.] Paris, 1539. 
Thomas, Earl of Pembroke. 

Autograph letter signed. To Captain Smith. July 28, 1 709. 
Thomas, Isaiah. 

Autograph letter signed. Addressee unknov>Ti, August 22, 1 792, 
Tomhnson, H, M. 

Between the lines, Cambridge, 1930. 
Old June. London, 1918. 



[67] 

Notable Purchases, 1938 (continued) 

[Trenchard, John, and Walter Moyle.] 

An argument shewing that a standing army is inconsistent with 

a free government. London, 1697. 
Trollope, Anthony. 

Can you forgive her? 1864. 
Trumbull, John. 

Autograph letter signed. To David Trumbull. January 15, 

[1776]. 
Trutvetter. 

Summa in totam physicen. Erfurt, 1514. 
Vergil. 

Eclogues. With illustrations by Maillol. Weimar, 1926. 
Vergil, Polydore. 

English History. Basle, 1534. In Thomas Wotton binding. 
Waller, Edmund. 

Poems. London, 1 682. 
Walpole, Robert. 

Report from the Committee of Secrecy. London, 1715. 
Washington, George. 

Bios Georgei Ouasinktonos. (Biography, in Greek.) Athens, 

1856. 
Whitefield, George. 

Autograph letter signed. To Thomas Prince. Bermuda, March 25, 

1748. 
Wieland, Christopher Martin. 

Autograph letter signed. To Mr. Archenholz. August 1 0, I 787. 
Withers, Alexander. 

Chronicles of Border Warfare. Clarksburg, Va. 1831. 
Woolf, Virginia. 

Mrs. Dalloway. London, 1925. 
Bang, Mrs. A. C. 

A collection of eleven Danish books, to supplement the volumes given 
the Library in 1937. 
Bentley, Harry C. 

A collection of eighty-one books on bookkeeping, seventy-six of which 
are included in the Harry C. Bentley Collection. 
Binney, Mrs. Horace 

A collection of thirty-three volumes, five pictures and sixty-eight 
pamphlets and newspaper articles, mainly concerning the World War. 
Blashfield, Mrs. Grace Hall 

The works of Edwin Howland Blashfield, with an introduction by 
Royal Cortissoz. New York, Scribner, 1937. 



[681 
A SELECTION OF INTERESTING GIFTS OF BOOKS IN 1938 

Blumenthal, Miss L. 

A collection of forty-three volumes and three hundred and seven pieces 
of music, including classical and jazz music. 

Boston Athenaeum 

A catalogue of the books of John Quincy Adams deposited in the 
Boston Athenaeum, with notes on books, Adams seals and book- 
plates by Henry Adams. With an introduction by Worthington C. 
Ford. Boston, The Athenaeum, 1 938. 

Brewer, George E., Jr. 

Nine volumes of the works of William Kenrick, published in London 
between 1751 and 1778, and a typed volume "The Black Sheep 
of Grub Street: William Kenrick, L.L.D.," by George E. Brewer. 

British Museum, Trustees of 

Six volumes published by the Trustees of the British Museum during 
1938, including Volume 6 of the Catalogue of Political and Personal 
Satires; and Subject Index of Modern Works added to the Library 
in 1931—1935 (in two volumes). 

Coolidge, Mrs. Elizabeth S. 

Eight volumes of the Complete Works of J. B. Lully for the Music 
Room, the joint gift of Mrs. Coolidge and the late Miss Gertrude 
Watson. 

Corr, The Misses Mary and Maud 

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volumes 1 — 15, Supplement and Index. 
New York, Universal Knowledge Foundation, Inc., 1913—1922. 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Paul Revere Chapter. 

Four thousand and eighty-one copies of the D.A.R. Manual for 
Citizenship, issued by the National Society, Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. (Editions in seventeen languages, for use in the branch 
libraries.) 

d'Aulby, Countess Francesca 

Fifty autograph letters by Thomas William Parsons, 1848— 1880's. 

East, Mrs. Edward M. 

A collection of fifty-one volumes, including a set of "The Official 
Records of the LInion and Confederate Navies in the War of the 
Rebellion" in 31 volumes, and seven volumes of "The Army and 
Navy Chronicle, 1836-1842." 

Gaines, Samuel R. 

A collection of thirty-six volumes of fiction and non-fiction, principally 
works of contemporary authors. 

Goldstein, Fanny. 

Sixty-eight volumes, mainly works by Jewish authors on Judaism, for 
the Fanny Goldstein Judaica Book Shelf, and a portfolio of twenty 
photographs of scenes from "The Brothers Ashkenazi." 



[69] 

Hitchcock, Mrs. Ella A. 

David Blair's Grammar of Natural and Experimental Philosophw 

Hartford, 1824. 
Hollander, Dr. Jacob H. 

The economic library of Jacob H. Hollander, Ph.D. Compiled by 

Elsie A. G. Marsh. Privately printed, Baltimore, 1937. Number 

495 of 500 copies printed. 
Hoyt, Henry Sears and J. King Hoyt, Jr. 

The Crusoes of Pitcairn's Island: being an account of the wreck of 

the "Wild Wave" of Boston on Oeno Island in the Pacific and the 

subsequent adventures of her master and crew on Pitcairn's Island, 

as related in the diary of Captain Josiah Nickerson Knowles of 

Brewster. Number 42 of an edition of 1 00 copies privately printed 

for Henry Sears Hoyt and J. King Hoyt, Jr. 
The Jones Library, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

William Williams's Divine Warnings to be Received with Faith and 

Fear, 1728. (Incomplete copy.) 
Leadbetter, Florence 

A collection of sixteen volumes for the Roslindale Branch Library. 
McMurtrie, Douglas C. 

Nine pamphlets on various phases of typography and the history of 

printing in the United States. 
Quincy, Mrs. J. H. 

A collection of fifty-nine volumes, mainly of or relating to the works 

of William Shakespeare. Fifty-four volumes were used in the West 

Roxbury Branch Library, and five in the Central Library. 
Reed, Mrs. Caroline K. 

A collection of forty-one volumes and twenty-one numbers of musical 

works by various composers. 
Souther, Marguerite 

A collection of one hundred and twenty volumes, principally children's 

books and fiction. Ninety-five volumes were used in Jamaica Plain 

Branch Library. 
Thayer, Laurel. 

Autobiography of William Wilde Thayer. Typev^itten manuscript. 
Underbill, Francis J. 

Charles L. Slattery's sermons, 1910—1923. 
Van Wyck, Frederick 

Three volumes of the works of Frederick Van Wyck; a copy of 

"The Centennial History of the Harvard Law School, 181 7—191 7"; 

and thirteen issues of the New England Historical and Genealogical 

Register, 1936-1938. 
Vandelli, Signora Giuseppe 

In memoria de Giuseppe Vandelli, Societa Dantesca Italiana 1 865— 

1937. 



[70] 



LECTURES — CONCERTS 



In the Central Library Lecture Hall the Library presented 1 1 pro- 
grams in its annual series of free concerts, lectures, and entertainments. 



PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS OF 1938 

Exhibitions arranged by the Library were on view in the Exhibition 
Room, the Treasure Room, and the Children's Room throughout the year. 



[71] 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1938 

The figures listed are for the hook values of investments as of December 
31 , 1938, except in the cases of the Benton Book Fund and the Benton 
Building Fund, in which the figures given represent the book values as of 
January 21, 1938 the anniversary date of those funds. 

Ainsley Fund — Bequest of EmilY L. AinslEY, under Article 1 2 of 
her will for the purchase of books. Received in 1 938. $1 58,843. 1 

Ariz Fund — Donation from Victoria Thomas Artz, of Chicago: 
the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of valuable, 
rare editions of the v/ritings, either in verse or prose of American 
and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the "Long- 
fellow Memorial Collection." Received in 1896. $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by Joshua Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"The income only of this fund is to be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." $50,000.00 

Benton Book Fund — Extract from the will of JosiAH H. BentoN: 

"Twelfth: All the rest and residue of my property and estate I give 
and devise ... to the TRUSTEES OF THE Public Library of 
THE City of Boston . . . and I Direct that the same be held 
and used in the manner following . . . 

"First: — One-half of the net income of such residue and remainder 
to be applied by the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit for said Library; meaning and in- 
tending hereby that such income shall be applied for books desirable 
for scholarly research and use . . . 

". . . It is my desire that . . . the income given by the Twelfth Clause 
of my will for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit, shall be in addition to the sums 
appropriated by the City for the maintenance of the Boston Public 
Library, and that the same shall not be taken into account in any 
appropriation by the City for that purpose. 

"I, therefore, hereby provide that . . . such income as is given by 
the Twelfth Clause of my will for the purchase of books . . . shall be 
applied for those purposes only in years when the City appropriates 
for the maintenance of the Boston Public Library at least three per 
cent (3 per cent) of the amount available for department expenses 
from taxes and income in said City. 

"In any year when the City does not thus appropriate at least three 
per cent (3 per cent) of the amount available for department ex- 
penses from taxes and income in said City, the income given in said 
will for the purchase of books shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity 



[72] 

Church in the City of Boston to be by him disbursed in relieving the 
necessities of the poor." 

By an Agreement of Compromise entered in the Probate Court 
of Suffolk County on January 15, 1935. the Benton Book 
Fund was established" ... as a permanent fund, the income and 
interest thereon to be applied annually by the Library Trustees, 
without regard to the amounts appropriated by the City of Boston 
for the maintenance of the Boston Public Library in any year, as 
follov/s: — (a) Six-tenths (6/10) of such income is to be applied an- 
nually by the Library Trustees for the purchase of books, maps and 
other library material of permanent value and benefit for said li- 
brary; meaning and intending hereby that such income shall be 
applied for books desirable for scholarly research and use ; (b) The 
remaining four-tenths (4/10) of such income Is to be paid over an- 
nually to the Rector of Trinity Church to be by him disbursed, either 
directly, or in his discretion, through charitable organizations or 
agencies, whether incorporated or unincorporated, in relieving the 
necessities of the poor." Received in 1936. $1,136,480.25 

Benton Building Fund — Extract from the will of JosiAH H. Benton: 
"Twelfth: All the rest and residue of my property and estate I give 
and devise ... to the TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF 
THE City of Boston . . . and I Direct that the same be held 
and used in the manner following . . . 

". . . Second: — To hold the other one-half of said residue and 
remainder as an accumulating fund, the Income and interest to be 
added to the principal and reinvested as principal, until the total 
amount thereof shall be two million dollars ($2,000,000). And 
then I Direct such total sum of two million dollars ($2,000,000) 
to be applied to the enlargement of the present central library build- 
ing in Boston, or to the construction of another central library build- 
ing in such part of the City as may be then most desirable for the 
accommodation of the people of said City ; such new building to be 
constructed under the advice of the Librarian of the Library at that 
time in such manner as may be most desirable for efficient practical 
working of a library therein." Received In 1936. 

$1,644,118.57 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of Charles H. L. N. 
Bernard. Received in 1930. To be used for general purposes 
unless otherwise ordered by the Board. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by the HoN. John P. BiGELOV/ in 
August, 1850, when Mayor of the City. 

The Income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the Increase of the library. $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of RoBERT Charles Bil- 
LINGS. 
"The sum to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 



[73] 

called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $99,786.84 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll BowditCH. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb David Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JOSEPH H. CENTER. To be 
used for general purposes unless otherw^ise ordered by the Board. 
Received in 1905. $39,520.39 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April, 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from: 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 



$150.00 
Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "1 he Children's F"und," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the City appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said City. In any year 
when the City does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
for the young shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the 
City of Boston to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of 
the poor. $100,000.00 

Clement Fund — Bequest of FRANK CLEMENT, of Newton, to be known 
as the 'Trank Clement Fund," the income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 
Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854.41 



[741 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of ABRAHAM E. CuTTER of four thousand dol- 
lars and his liiarary of books, the Income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1 90 1 . 

$4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund — Bequest of Sarah A. MatCHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for general 
purposes unless otherwise ordered by the Board. Received in 1 900. 

$6,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford 
to the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for general 
purposes. Received in 1935. $5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $1,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA Stewart 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 1924. 

$5,000.00 

Morris Gest Fund — Donation made by MORRIS Gest in December 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. $2,000.00 



[75] 



Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of CHARLOTTE HARRIS, the object 
of which is stated in the following extract from her will: "I give to 
the Charlestown Public Library $10,000, to be invested on interest, 
which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books published 
before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own private li- 
brary and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." Be- 
quests accepted by City Council, July 31, 1877. $10,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of THOMAS B. Harris, of Charles- 
town, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. Received 
in 1884. $1,089.38 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of Alfred Hemenway. To be 
used for general purposes unless otherwise ordered by the Board. 
Received in 1928. $5,000.00 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund — Bequest of Heloise E. Hersey, the in- 
come to be expended for the purchase of books, preferably those of 
recent issue that have real literary value. Received in 1936. 

$3,542.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of Franklin P. Hyde. to be known as the 
"Franklin P. Hyde Fund." To be used for general purposes un- 
less otherwise ordered by the Board. Received in 1915. 

$3,632.40 

David P. Kimball Fund — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL, 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books, $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,000.00 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1 ,000 each made by Louis E. 
KiRSTEiN, "to be used for any purpose of the Library that the 
Trustees see fit to put it to." 
October, 1925 $1,000.00 



October, 1926 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 
October, 1929 



1 ,000.00 
1 .000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 



$5,000.00 
Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of Katherine 
Knapp: "io the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 
as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of v%'hich the income only shall 
be used for the purchase of books for said library. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund." Received in 1914. 

$10,000.00 
Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of Helen Lambert, in memory of 
Frederic and Louise Lambert. The income of this fund to be used 
for general purposes unless otherwise ordered by the Board. 

$1,403.57 



[76] 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott La WHENCE. The in- 
terest on this fund to be exclusively appropriated for the purchase of 
books having permanent value. Received in 1860. $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Edward Lawrence, of Charles- 
town. The following clause from his will explains its purpose: 
"To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestovm branch of said Public Library." 
Received in 1886. $500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH Lewis, to be 
known as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund : "I give and bequeath to the 
Boston Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of Charles Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896. 

$2,500.00 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund — Bequest of Francis A. Morse, of 
West Roxbury; the income only to be expended annually for the 
purchase of books for the West Roxbury Branch Library suitable 
for children of school age. Received in 1936. $1,000.00 

Gardner O. North Fund — Bequest of GARDNER O. NoRTH. To be 
used for general purposes unless otherwise ordered by the Board. 
Received in 1928. $2,000.00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of$l 1 ,781 .44 
was received, the same being one-half of the net amount received 
from the disposition of certain property held by the Trustees, under 
an indenture between Amor Hollingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L. Hollingsworth, all of Milton, Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1 870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund." the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $11, 78 1.44 



[77] 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the Papyrus 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

$1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by JONATHAN PHILLIPS, in April, 
1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by Mr. Phillips in his will dated September 20, 
1 849. The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the main- 
tenance of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by the Hon. Henry L. Pierce, Mayor 
of the City, November 29, 1 873, and accepted by the City Council, 
December 27, 1 873. $5,000.00 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. Pratt, under the 
14th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester Branch, 
$500.00. Received in 1922 and 1924. $1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial 
to Guilford S. Reed; the income to be applied to the purchase of 
books of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFiELD, who died in New 
York, January I 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, I 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67, which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother. $61,800.00 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD Black Sewall: 
"Tenth: — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of 
legacy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income 
to be used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 



[78] 

judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lev^s 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." To be used for general purposes unless other- 
wise ordered by the Board. Received in 1914. $51,732.14 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. To 
be used for general purposes unless otherwise ordered by the Board. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard *57) Fund — Gift of Helen Stor- 
Row and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to 
James Jackson Storrow, Senior ; income to be used for the purchase 
of Italian books. $25,000.00 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of GEORGE TiCKNOR, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 
and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the City is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 



[79] 

expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the City, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the City might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the City, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
ceived said bequests on behalf of the City, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WiLLIAM C. TODD, 
of Atkins, N. H., accepted by order of the City Council, approved 
October 30, 1897, the income to be at least two thousand dollars 
a year, to be expended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of 
this and other countries. $50,000.00 

1 ownsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. ToWNSEND, at whose dis- 
posal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such chari- 
table and public institutions as they might think meritorious. Said 
executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City of 
Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: "The income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 
of debts, legacies, etc., in trust to his executors, to hold during the 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1872, said be- 
quest was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized 
to receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 



[80] 

Tufts Fimcl — Bequest of Nathan A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be appHed 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1 906. 

$10,131.77 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. $5,000.00 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest of HoRACE G. Wadlin, of 
Reading, former Librarian, to the Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston of $2,000 to be permanently funded and the 
income thereof used for the purchase of books. Received in 1932. 

$2,000.00 
Also a bequest by Ella F. Wadlin ; to be added to the Horace G. 
Wadlin Fund, and the income to be used for the purchase of books. 
Received in 1936. $1,725.84 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of George C. Wales: 

"After the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Library as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. $5,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of James LymAN WhiTNEY, who died Sep- 
tember 25. 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 
fund. I direct to be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 



[81] 

paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one-half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care. $30,018.98 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 
Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of MehitABLE C. C. Wil- 
SON, the incom.e to be expended for the purchase of books. Received 
in 1913. $1,000.00 



GIFTS FOR THE PURCHASE OF BOOKS 



Besides the preceding, the following gifts have been made to the Public 
Library, and the am.ounts have been appropriated for the purchase 
of books, according to the intention of the donors, viz.: 



Samuel Appleton, late of Boston 

H. C. Bentley . 

J. IngersoU Bowditch . 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch . 

James Brown, late of Cambridge 

Andrew Carnegie 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library 
Sally Inman Kast Shepard 
James Nightingale .... 

Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest . 



the 



$1,000.00 
220.38 
6,800.00 
200.00 
500.00 
980.75 

335.13 

1 ,000.00 
100.00 
339.61 



$11,475.87 



[82] 



RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Ainsley Fund 

Ariz Fund .... 

Bates Fund .... 

Benton Book Fund 

Benton Building Fund . 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 

BIgelow Fund 

Robert Charles Billings Fund 

Bowditch Fund 

Bradlee Fund 

Joseph H. Center Fund 

Central Library Building Fund 

Children's Fund . 

Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund 

Cutter Fund 

Elizabeth Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund 

Franklin Club Fund 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 

Morris Gest Fund 

Green Fund 

Charlotte Harris Fund . 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund 

Hyde Fund 

David P. Kimball Fund . 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund . 

Helen Lambert Fund 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 

Edward Lawrence Fund 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund . 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund 

Charles Mead Fund 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund 

Gardner O. North Fund 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund . 

Phillips Fund 

Pierce Fund 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund . 

Guilford Reed Fund 

John Singer Sargent Fund . 

Scholfield Fund . 

Sewall Fund 

Skinner Fund 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 



$158,843.10 

10,000.00 

50.000.00 

1,136,480.25 

1.644,118.57 

2.000.00 

I.OOO.OO 

99.786.84 

10.000.00 

LOOO.OO 

39,520.39 

150.00 

100,000.00 

2,000.00 

2,854.41 

4.270.00 

25.000.00 

6.000.00 

5.017.65 

1.000.00 

5.000.00 

2.652.50 

2,000.00 

10,000.00 

1 ,08938 

5,000.00 

3.542.00 

3.632.40 

10,000.00 

5.000.00 

10,000.(X) 

1 .403.57 

10.000.00 

500.00 

5.000.00 

500.00 

2.500.00 

I.OOO.OO 

2,000.00 

11,781.44 

1,000.00 

30.000.00 

5.000.00 

1.494.18 

1,000.00 

3,858.24 

61 ,800.00 

25.000.00 

51,732.14 

100.00 

3.500.00 



[83] 



Brought forrvarJ 
James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund 
Ticknor Fund . . 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 
Townsend Fund .... 
Treadwell Fund .... 
Nathan A. Tufts Fund 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 
Horace G. Wadlin Fund 
Wales Fund .... 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
James Lyman Whitney Fund 
Mehilable C. C. Wilson Fund . 



$3,576,127.06 

25.000.00 

4.000.00 

50,000.00 

4.000.00 

13,987.69 

10,131.77 

5,000.00 

3,725.84 

5 000.00 

5,000.00 

30,018.98 

1,000.00 



Total 



$3,732,991.34 



[84] 

OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1938 

Director's Office 
Director, and Librarian: Milton E. Lord 

Clerk of the Trustees: Elizabeth B. Brockunier 

Supervisor of Training: Bertha V. Hartzell 

Editor of Publications: Zoltan Haraszti 

Reference Division 

Chief Librarian of the Reference Division: Richard G. Hensley 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Frank C. Blaisdell 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Samuel A. Chevalier 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Otto Fleischner 

Book Selection Department: Christine Hayes, Chief 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Lucien E. Taylor, Chief 

General Reference Departments: Francis H. Hannigan, Supervisor 

John H. Reardon, Deputy Supervisor 
Bates Hall Centre Desk: William J. Mulloney, Assistant in Charge 
Bates Hall Reference Department: John M. Carroll, Assistant, In 

Charge 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief 
Open Shelf Department: John H. Reardon, Chief 
Periodical and Newspaper Department : Elizabeth L. Wright, Chief 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief 

Special Reference Departments: Edward H. Redstone, Supervisor 

Frank N. Jones, Deputy Supervisor 
Business Branch: Mary W. Dietrichson, Business Branch Librarian 
Fine Alts Department: Priscilla S. MacFadden, Assistant, In 

Charge 
Music Department: Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge 
Science and Technology Department: Frank N. Jones, Chief 
Statistical Department: Elizabeth G. Barry, Assistant in Charge 
Teachers Department: Anna L. Manning, Assistant in Charge 

Rare Books: Zoltan Haraszti, Keeper of Rare Books 

Rare Book Department: Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge 



[85] 

Circulation Division 

Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division : Orlando C. Davis 

Children's Work: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor 

Branch Libraries: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston: M. Florence Cufflin 

Andrew Square: Elizabeth H. McShane 

Boylston: Margaret A. Calnan 

Brighton: Katrina M. Sather 

CharlestovvTi : Katherine S. Rogan 

City Point: Helen M. Morrisey 

Codman Square: Elizabeth P. Ross 

Dorchester: Marion C. Kingman 

East Boston: Theodora B, Scoff 

Faneuil: Gertrude L. Connell 

Fellowes Athenaeum: Mary E. Ames 

Hyde Park: Sara A. Lyon 

Jamaica Plain: Rebecca E. WilHs 

Jeffries Point: Mary U. Nichols 

Kirstein: Dorothy F. Nourse 

Lower Mills: Muriel E. Cann 

Mattapan: Ada A. Andelman 

Memorial: Margaret I. McGovern 

Mount Bowdoin: Catherine P. Loughman 

Mount Pleasant: Margaret H. Reid 

Neponset: Elizabeth B. Boudreau 

North End: Mary F. Curley 

Orient Heights: Catherine E. Flannery 

Parker Hill: Mary M. Sullivan 

Phillips Brooks: Edith H. Bailey 

Roslindale: Annie M. Donovan 

South Boston: Mary A. C. Kavin 

South End: Clara L, Maxwell 

Upham's Corner: Beatrice C. Maguire 

West End: Fanny Goldstein 

West Roxbury: Geneva Watson 

Book Selection Department: Edna G. Peck, Chief 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Ethel Hazlewood, Cataloger, 
In Charge 

Branch Bindery Section: Marion McCarthy, Assistant, In Charge 

Branch Issue Department: Grace C. Loughlin, Chief 

Alice V. Stevens, Chief, Emeritus 

School Department: Beatrice M. Flanagan, Chief 



[86] 



Young People's Room, Central Library: Mary C. Toy, Children's Li- 
brarian 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Katherine F. Albert 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Carrie L. Morse 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Katherine F. Muldoon 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Margaret A. Sheridan 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Isabel E. Wetherald 



Division of Business Operations 

Comptroller: James W. Kenney 

Buildings Department: William F. Quinn, Superintendent 

Auditing Department: Helen Schubarth, Auditor 

Book Purchasing Department: William C. Maiers, Chief 

Stock Purchasing Department: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian 

Binding Department: James P. Mooers, Chief 

Printing Department: William B. Gallagher, Chief 

Francis W. Lee, Chief, Emeritus 
Shipping Department: Robert F. Dbcon, Shipper 



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