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Full text of "Annual report"

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EIGHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

1939 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES 

1941 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON: PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 
4,10.41 I 2E00 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ROBERT H. LORD, President 

Term expires April 30, 1942 

FRANK W. BUXTON 

Term expires April 30. 1940 

JOHN L. HALL ELLERY SEDGWICK 

Term expires April 30, 1941 Tenn expires April 30, 1943 

LOUIS E. KIRSTEIN 

Term expires April 30, 1944 



MILTON E. LORD 

Director, and Librarian 



FORM FOR GIF TS AND BEQUESTS 

Gifts 

/ give to I he Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 

Boston the sum of „ 

to be used at the discretion of the Trustees (or for a purpose to 
be specified). 



Bequests for General Uses 

/ give and bequeath to The Trustees of the Public Librar]) 

of the Cit^ of Boston the sum of 

„ for the general uses of the Library. 



Bequests for Specified Uses 

/ give and bequeath to The Trustees of the Public Librar}) 

of the Ci/p of Boston the sum of 

for the purchase of books (for the 

purchase of books on a specified subject if desired, or for some 
other purpose to be specified). 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Library is a unit of the municipal government of the City of Boston and at 
such is known as the Library Department of the City of Boston. It is governed by a 
Board of Trustees. 

The Trustees of the PubHc Library of the City of Boston were organized in 1852. 
They are incorporated under the provisions of Chapter 114 of the Acts of 1878, as 
amended. The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; that for 1853 made 
the first annual report. 

The legal title is The Trustees of the Public Lihrar^ of ihe City of Boston. 

The Board of Trustees is made up of five citizens at large, appointed by the 
Mayor of the City of Boston for five-year terms, the term of one member expiring each 
year. The following citizens at large have been members of the Board since its 
organization in 1852: 



Abbott, Gordon. A.B.. 1926-1931. 
Abbott, Samuel Appleton Browne, A.M., 

1879-95. 
Appleton, Thomas Gold, A.M., 1852-56. 
Benton, Josiah Henry, LL.D., 1894-1917. 
Bigelow, John Prescott, A.M., 1852-68. 
Bowditch, Henry Ingersoll, M.D., 1865-67. 
Bowditch, Henry Pickering, MJ)., 

1894-1902. 
Boyle, Thomas Francis, 1902-12. 
Braman, Jarvis Dwight, 1869-72. 
Brett, John Andrew, LL.B., 1912-16. 
Buxton, Frank W., A.B.. 1928- 
Carr. Samuel, 1895-96, 190&-22. 
Chase, George Bigelow, A.M., 1876-85. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1879-88. 
Coakley. Daniel Henry. 1917-19. 
Connolly. Arthur Theodore, 1916-1932. 
Currier, Guy Wilbur. 1922-1930. 
Curtis. Daniel Sargent, A.M., 1873-75. 
De Normandic, James, D.D., 1895-1908. 
Dwight. Thomas. M.D.. 1899-1908. 
Dwinnell, Clifton Howard, B.S., 1927-28. 
Everett, Edward, LL.D., 1852-64. 
Frothinghara, Richard, LL.D., 1875-79. 
Gaston, William Alexander, LL.B., 

1923-27. 
Green, Samuel Abbott, M.D., 1868-78. 
Greenough. William Whitwell, 1856-88. 
Hall, John Loomer, A.B., LL.B.. 1931- 



Haynes, Henry Williamson, A.M., 

1880-94. 

Hilliard, George Stillman, LL.D., 

1872-75; 1876-77 

Kenney, William Francis, A.M., 

1908-1921. 

Kirsfein, Louis Edward, A.M., D.c.s., 

1919- 

Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 

Lewis, Winslow, M.D., 1867. 

Lincoln, Solomon, A.M., 1897-1907. 

Lord, Robert Howard, PH.D., 1936- 

Mann, Alexander, D.D.. 1908-1923. 

Morton, Ellis Wesley, 1870-73. 

Murray Michael Joseph, LL.B., 1921-26. 

O'Connell, William Cardinal, 1932-36. 

Pierce. Phincas. 1888-94. 

Prince, Frederick Octavius, A.M., 1888-99, 

Putnam, George, D.D., 1868-77. 

Richards, William Reuben, A.M., 1889-95. 

Sedgwick, Ellery. A.B., LITT.D., 1930- 

Shurtleff. Nathaniel Bradslreet. LL.D., 

1852-68 

Thomas. .Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., 

1877-78. 

Ticknor, George, LL.D.. 1852-66. 

Walker. Francis Amasa, LL.D., 1896. 

Whipple, Edwin Percy, A.M., 1868-70. 

Whitmore, William Henry, A.M., 1885-«8. 

Winsor, Justin. LL.D., 1867-68. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE TRUSTEES 

Edward Everett, 1852-1864 
George Ticknor 1865 
William W. Greenough 1866-88 
Henry W. Haynes, May 7, 1888-May 12, 1888 
Samuel A. B. Abbott, May 12, 1888-April 30, 1895 
Frederick O. Prince, October 8. 1895-May 8, 1899 
Solomon Lincoln, May 12. 1899-October 15, 1907 
James De Normandie, January 31, 1908-May 8 1908 
Josiah H. Benton May 8, 1 908-February 6, 1917 
William F. Kenney, February 13, 1917-May 7, 1920 
Alexander Mann, May 7. 1920-January 22, 1923 
Arthur T. Connolly, April 13, 1923-June 13, 1924 

May 2, 1927-June 22, 1928 
Louis E. Kirstein, June 13, 1924-June 19, 1925 

June 22, l92S-June 21 1929 

May 15. 1931 -May 20, 1932 

May 6, 1936-May 7, 1937 
Michael J. Murray, June 19 1925-July 2, 1926 
Guy W. Currier, July 2, 1926-May 2, 1927 
Gordon Abbott. June 21, 1929-June 20 1930 
Frank W. Buxton. June 20, 1930-Mav 15, 1931 

May 6, 1935-May6, 1936 
Ellery Sedgwick. May 20, 1932-May 5,1933 

May 7, 1937-May 6. 1938 
John L. Hall. May 5, 1933-May 18, 1834 

May 6, 1938^May 5, 1939 
William Cardinal O'Connell, May 18, 1934-May 6, 1935 
Robert H. Lord. May 5. 1939- 



LIBRARIANS 

From 1852 to 1858 the chief officer of the Library bore the title of Librarian; 
fiom 1858 to 1877 Supcrintendeni; from 1877 to 1923 Librarian; from 1923 to 1934 
Director; since 1934 Director, and Librarian. 

Capen, Edward, Librarian, May 13, 1 852-December 16 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, Superintendent, 1858-January 9, 1868. 

WiNSOR Justin, ll.D., Superintendent, February 25, 1868-Sepfember 30, 1877. 

Green, Samuel A. M.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October I, 1877-September 30. 

1878. 
Chamberlain, Mellen, ll.d.. Librarian, October 1, 1 878-September 30. 1890. 
DwicHT, Theodore F., Librarian, April 13, 1892-April 30, 1894. 
Putnam, Herbert, ll.d., Librarian February 11, 1895-April 3, 1899. 
Whitney, James L., a.m., Actiijg Librarian, March 31, 1 899-Decembcr 21. 1899; 

Librarian, December 22 1899-January 31. 1903. 
Wadlin, Horace G., LITT.D.. Librarian February 1. 1903-March 15. 1917; Acting 

Librarian, March 15. 1917-June 15, 1917. 
Belden, Charles F. D., a.m., ll b., litt.d.. Director March 15, 1917-Oclober 24, 

1931. 
Lord, Milton E. a.b.. Director and Librarian, since February 1, 1932, 



LIBRARY SYSTEM, JANUARY 1, 1939 



Departments. 
^Central Library, Copley Square . 
'East Boston Branch, 276-282 Meridian St. 
§South Boston Branch, 372 West Broadway . 
||FelIowc« Athenaeum Branch, 46 Millmont St. 
*CharIestown Branch, 43 Monument Square 
*Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Road . 
JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adami St. 
tLower Mills Branch, 1110 Washington, cor, Richmond St. 
JSoulh End Branch, 65 West Brookline St. 
t Jamaica Plain Branch, 12 Sedgwick, cor. South St. 
iRoslindale Branch, 4210 Washington St. 
*West Roxbury Branch, 1961 Centre St. 
*Mattapan Branch, 8-10 Hazleton St. . 
»North End Branch. 3a North Bennet St. 
§Neponset Branch, 362 Neponset Ave, 
§Mt. Bowdoin Branch, 275 Washington St. 
§Allston Branch. 161 Harvard Ave. . 
fCodman Square Branch. Washington, cor. Norfolk St 
JMt. Pleasant Branch. 335 Dudley, cor Vine St. 
♦West End Branch. 131 Cambridge St. 
$Upham's Corner Branch. 500 Columbia Rd. 
{Memorial Branch, cor. Warren and Townsend Sts. 
♦Boylston Branch. 433 Centre St, 
§Orient Heights Branch, 5 Butler Ave. 
$City Point Branch, Municipal Bldg., Broadway 
♦Parker Hill Branch. 1497 Trcmont St. . 
♦Hyde Park Branch. 35 Harvard Ave., cor. Winthrop St. 
♦Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St. 
§Andrew Square Branch, 394 Dorchester St. 
•Jeffries Point Branch. 222 Webster St. 
• Baker Library, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration Jan. 15. 1927 
♦Kirslein Memorial Library Building: 20 City Hall Ave. . . May 7, 1930 

Business Branch, first and second floors; 

Kirstein Branch, third floor. 
§PhiIlips Brook* Branch, 12 Hamilton St., Rcadville . . . May 18, 193i 
{School Department, 126 Tyler St July I. 1938 

^ In the case of the Central Library and some of the branches the opening was in a 
different location from that now occupied. *In building owned by City and 

controlled by Library Board, fin building owned by City, and exclusively devoted 
to library uses. Jin City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. §OccuDie» 
rented rooms. llThe lessee of the Fellowes Athenaeum, a private library association. 
JUnder agreement with Harvard. 



^Opened, 


May 


2. 


1854 


Jan. 


28. 


1871 


May 


1, 


1872 


July 


16, 


1873 


Jan. 


5, 


1874 


Jan. 


5. 


1874 


Jan. 


25. 


1875 


June 


7, 


1875 


Aug. 




1877 


June. 




1876 


Dec. 


3, 


1878 


Jan. 


6, 


1880 


Dec. 


27. 


1881 


Oct.. 




1882 


Jan. 


1, 


1883 


Nov. 


1. 


1886 


Mar. 


It. 


1889 


Nov. 


12. 


1890 


Nov. 


12. 


1890 


Feb. 


1. 


1896 


Mar. 


16, 


1896 


May 


1, 


1896 


Nov. 


1, 


1897 


June 


25, 


1901 


July 


18, 


1906 


July 


15. 


1907 


Jan. 


1. 


1912 


Mar 


4, 


1914 


Mar 


5. 


1914 


Oct. 


15, 


1921 



CONTENTS 



Report of the Trustees 1 

Financial Statement 16 

Report of the Examining Committee ... 22 

Report of the Director 35 

Appendices 

A — Summary of Expenditures of the Library, 1930-1939 79 

B — Appropriations and Expenditures for Personnel, 

1930-1939 81 

C — Appropriations and Expenditures for Books, 

1930-1939 87 

D — Personnel 90 

E — Book Stock 110 

F —Use of Books 144 

G — The Catalogs 1 49 

H — Printing and Binding . . . . . . 150 

I — Lectures, Concerts, Exhibitions . . . . 151 

J — Trust Funds . . . . . . . 1 60 

K — Officers of the Library as of December 31,1 939 . 1 76 



To The Honorable Maurice J. Tobin 
Mayor of the Cifp of Boston. 

Sir: 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
present the following report of its condition and affairs for the 
year ending December 31,1 939, being the eighty-eighth annual 
report. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

The Corporation organized at the annual meeting on May 5, 
1939 with the election of the Reverend Robert H. Lord as 
President, Mr. Frank W. Buxton as Vice President, and Miss 
Elizabeth B. Brockunier as Clerk. 

Mr. Louis E. Kirstein, whose term as Trustee expired on 
April 30, was reappointed for the term ending April 30, 1 944. 

BUDGET ESTIMATES 

The estimates submitted as of November 1, 1938 for the 
maintenance of the Library during the year 1939 were later 
amended and reduced. These estimates were as follows: 



Item 
A. — ■ Personal service 
B. — -Service otlier tiian personal 
C. — Equipment 
D. — • Supplies 
E. — Materials 
F. — ■ Special items 
H. — Emergency relief projects 
Total . 



Estimated 

$1,070,388.58 

129,149.50 

1 58,550.00 

24.795.00 

26.875.00 

1 .669.56 

79.000.00 

$1,490,427.64 



Allowed 

$1,039,859.34 

103,404.00 

61.300.00 

21.192.00 

19,600.00 

1.669.56 

41.786.20 

$1,288,811.10 



RECEIPTS OF THE LIBRARY 



The receipts which may be expended by the Trustees for the 
maintenance of the Library consist of the annual appropriation 
by the Mayor and the City Council, and the income from Trust 
Funds given to the institution and held and invested by the City 



[21 

Treasurer under the direction of the Trustees of the Library. 
During the year 1 939 these receipts were : 



Annual appropriation ........ 

Income from trust funds held by Trustees of Public Library 
Income from other trust funds held for benefit of Public Library 
LInexpended balance of trust funds income of previous years 
Unexpended balance of gifts for immediate use .... 

Total 



$1,288,811.10 

24.791.46 

32.864.95 

258.660.87 

172.87 

$1,605,301.25 



Receipts which were accounted for and paid into the City 
Treasury for general municipal purposes during the years were 
as follows: 

From fines $23,449.71 

From sales of waste paper ......... 78.96 

From sales of catalogs and other publications ..... 303.61 

From commission on telephone pay stations ...... 548.82 

From payments for lost books 655.08 

Refunds, fees, etc. 66731 

Total .... $25,703.49 

EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY 

The total amount expended during 1 939 was $ 1 ,39 1 , 1 69. 1 0. 
This was divided as follows : 

From city appropriation $1,271,195.27 

From the income of trust funds ........ 119.899.86 

From gifts for immediate use 73.97 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year 
was 7 1 ,820, obtained chiefly by purchase, but in some part also 
by gift and exchange. 

Against the above-mentioned gain there was a total loss of 
60,779 volumes, arising chiefly out of volumes reported lost 
or missing, condemned copies not yet replaced, thus making the 
net gain for the year 1 1 ,04 1 . The total number of volumes in 
the Library at the close of the year was 1 ,704,729. 

The total amount expended for books, periodicals, news- 
papers, photographs, and other library material from the city 
appropriation and the income of trust funds was $171,257.40. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The total number of books borrowed for home use during 
the year was 3,865,275. The use of books and other library 



[3] 

materials within the Library's premises for reference and study 
is for the most part unrestricted, and it is therefore impracticable 
to record it. 

In addition to the above noted use of the Central Library and 
the thirty-two Branch Libraries, deposits of books were made 
available to 946 agencies, including schools, institutions, and 
engine houses. 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS FOR 1938 AND 1939 

A comparison of certain statistics for 1939 with those for 
1 938 is given below : 

1938 1939 

Total expenditures: city appropriation, trust 

funds income, and gifts . . . $1,383,860.59 . . $1,391,169.10 

Expended for books and otiier library ma- 
terials from city appropriation and 
trust funds income . 

Number of volumes added 



Number of volumes discarded 
Total number of volumes in the Library 
Number of volumes lent to borrowers . 
Number of lard holders 



156,631.89 . . 171.257.40 
66,376 . , 71.820 



73,369 . . 60.779 

1,693.688 . . 1.704.729 

3.979.850 . . 3.865.275 

175.950 . . 175.800 



BOOKS 

A library exists in order to provide books. In our Central Li- 
brary this is being done reasonably well because the Library has 
a number of trust funds from which the income can be used for 
the most part for no other purpose than the purchase of books of 
a scholarly reference or research character. 

For the Branch Libraries there are very few trust funds for 

the purchase of books. Dependence has to be placed therefore 

almost entirely upon the appropriations made by the City for 

that express purpose. The amounts appropriated during the last 

ten years are given below for comparative purposes. 

1930 $160,000 

1931 175.000 

1932 160.000 

1933 75.000 

1934 100.000 

1935 100.000 

1936 55.000 

1937 ....... 75.000 

1938 73 875 

1939 55.000 



[4] 

The appropriations of recent years have been so restricted that 
for the last five years the Branch Libraries have not been able 
to add even enough books to replace those which were having 
to be removed from use. As a result there are at present in the 
Branch Libraries over 50,000 fewer volumes than five years ago. 
Year by year the number of volumes removed from use has ex- 
ceeded the number of volumes added by the following amounts : 

1935 4,257 

1936 9.091 

1937 3,930 

1938 20,841 

1939 11,890 

The result is that, whereas before the depression an average 
gain of from 10,000 to 12,000 volumes might be expected an- 
nually, there is now occurring each year an annual net loss in the 
book stock of the Branch Libraries in approximately the same 
amount. 

It is clear that the continuing heavy reduction in the book 
appropriations in recent years has fallen chiefly upon the direct 
popular public service of the Library in its Branch Libraries. 
The funds appropriated by the City for books are devoted al- 
most exclusively to the purchase of books for the Branch Li- 
braries. They are not used for meeting the book needs of the 
Central Library ; the income from trust funds given for that pur- 
pose only cares for those. Instead it has been directly upon the 
work of the Branch Libraries, for the citizens of Boston in their 
respective sections of the city, that the effects of the reduced 
book appropriations by the City have fallen heavily. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

For a period now extending for some five years back atten- 
tion has been called to the increasingly crowded condition of the 
Central Library building. Forty-five years have elapsed since 
it was first occupied in 1 895. An annex to it was erected twenty- 
two years ago in ] 9 1 7— 1 9 1 8. There has been no subsequent pro- 
vision of additional space. 

The ordinary annual growth in the book collections of a large 
library of reference and research such as our Central Library 



[5] 

is in itself a matter of direct concern in this respect. For every 
eight volumes added one foot of additional shelving space is re- 
quired. One hundred volumes require 12|/2 additional feet of 
shelving; one thousand volumes, 125 feet of shelf space. For 
ten thousand volumes there are needed 1 250 feet of shelving, or 
approximately one quarter of a mile of running shelf space. 

In 1939 alone there was a growth in the book collections in 
the Central Library Vv'^hich totaled some 29,830 volumes, most 
of which in recent 5'^ears were purchased from the income of trust 
funds. These volumes placed side by side required well over half 
a mile of additional shelving space. That this growth represented 
only the ordinary annual increase in the book collections of the 
Central Library is indicated by the comparable figures of growth 
of 25,944 volumes in 1936, 24,996 volumes in 1937, and 
25,447 volumes in 1938. Constant growth of this kind carries 
with it increasing difficulties not only in the housing of the book 
collections, but even more directly in the adminstration of the 
books for public use in the public departments. An individual 
volume in a large library which has a million volumes or more is 
of value in most instances only insofar as it can be used in relation 
to kindred volumes among the million or so other volumes in the 
library's collections. The difficulties of accomplishing this in our 
long since overcrowded Central Library building are becoming 
steadily greater year by year. 

So likewise has the space problem become acute in the matter 
of provision of adequate facilities and quarters for the library 
staff in the Central Library. The building was not constructed, 
even in the original instance, with adequate provision of space 
and facilities for the staff of a large library. From 1 895 to 1 939 
the number of regular full time workers in the Central Library 
building has increased from 1 72 to 347,, not to mention an addi- 
tional group of W.P.A. workers which has at times been as 
great as 125 in number. The staff quarters, originally inade- 
quate, have been steadily encroached upon in one way or an- 
other as the building has become increasingly crowded in all 
directions. There is now crying need for improvement and ex- 
pansion of toilet facilities, locker space, rest rooms, lunch rooms. 



[6] 

training course class rooms, staff library, and the various mis- 
cellaneous facilities and space necessary for a staff of several 
hundred individuals. This has been a matter of pressing impor- 
tance for a number of years. 

It is therefore gratifying to be able to report here that during 
1939 there was accomplished a first step toward relieving the 
space problem in the Central Library for the immediate future. 
On February 11,1 939 the heating and lighting plant operated 
by the Library itself since 1895 was discontinued in favor of 
purchasing steam and electricity from the Boston Edison Com- 
pany. This arrangement was effected in order to achieve economy 
in operating costs, economy in avoiding a capital replacement 
which would become necessary w^ith the three years immediately 
ahead in an important part of the generating plant if continued, 
and finally economy in space in the crowded Central Library 
building. By the end of the year all of the discontinued equip- 
ment had been removed, except one engine. With the expected 
removal of that in the early part of 1 940 a considerable amount 
of basement space will then be available in which to set up addi- 
tional book shelving and to arrange for improved locker and 
toilet space for the library staff. Thereafter the next step will be 
to effect re-allocation of departmental and other space to bring 
relief in many crowded quarters of the building. The importance 
of this for improving the Library's service to the public is great 
indeed. 

Another matter which is of urgency is that of effecting a 
permanent solution of the problem of the tile roofing of the Cen- 
tral Library building. In the original construction of the roof 
no permanent under-roofing was provided under the decorative 
tiles. Such an under-roof is highly necessary in a northern climate 
in which the cracking and breaking of tiles through frost and 
other action, plus the eventual loss of plasticity in the cement 
binding the individual tiles together, result soon or late in breaks 
and leaks in the tile roofing. With no under-roof to stop such 
leaks, damage is threatened constantly to our fine building and 
its invaluable contents. For a number of years the annual cost 
of maintenance and repair of the tile roofing has ranged from 



[7] 

ten to twelve thousand dollars a year. In 1937 the Library's 
engineers made an exhaustive study of this roofing problem. 
They recommended the construction of a permanent roof under 
the decorative tiles as the only way in which to end the constant 
annual expenditure for repairs and maintenance. Although the 
cost of such a fundamental, but permanent, solution appears to 
be great, it is nevertheless believed that as considerable as this 
cost would be it would prove in the long run to be actually less 
than that of following indefinitely the present uneconomical prac- 
tice of annual patching and repairing of the present single tile 
roof in cycles. 

It is pleasant to be able to record here that in the course of 
1 939 work was finally begun upon the repair and renovation of 
the Old West Church which the West End Branch Library had 
had to vacate in 1937 because of its unsafe condition. This work 
has been carried on as a project of the Work Projects Admin- 
istration of the Federal Government, under the sponsorship of 
the Public Buldings Department of the City of Boston, acting 
on behalf of the Library. It is expected that the v>^ork will be 
completed in the first half of 1940. 

Also it is pleasant to record that in 1 939 the Allston Branch 
Library was provided with enlarged and improved quarters in 
the same building in which it has occupied rented space since 
1 929. This change was effected without increase in rental cost. 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF PROJECTS CARRIED ON 
UNDER THE SPONSORSHIP OF IHE LIBRARY 

Under the auspices of the Work Projects Administration of 
the Federal Government there was continued during 1939 the 
long range program of activities designed to provide for the Bos- 
ton Public Library improved and modern methods for the class- 
ification and cataloging of its book collections. 

Two large projects initiated in earlier years were carried on 
to further points in 1 939. One of these had to do with effecting 
a reclassification of the scholarly book collections of the Central 
Library along the lines of the classification developed by the Li- 
brary of Congress. The other was concerned with providing a 



[B] 

uniform plan and process of cataloging for the book collections 
of the Branch Libraries, as well as a reclassification of these 
along uniform lines based on a simplified arrangement of the 
decimal classification devised by Melvil Dewey. 

Several hundred individuals were employed. Their wages 
were provided by the Federal Government. Special provision 
for incidental expenses was made by the City as the sponsor's 
contribution. 

These important activities were carried on as part of an ex- 
tensive long range program. With minor exceptions this program 
has functioned well over a number of years. Gradually there 
was brought into being among the W.P.A. workers the substan- 
tial body of reasonably well trained workers necessary for carry- 
ing on such highly technical projects as the two described above. 
Then in June 1939 the Emergency Relief Act of 1939 was 
passed by the Congress with a mandatory provision that relief 
workers who had been on W.P.A. projects for longer than 
eighteen months were to be dismissed. The effects of this manda- 
tory dismissal provision proved exceedingly disastrous for carry- 
ing on the W.P.A. projects sponsored by the Library. Chit of 
496 then employed on the two projects 443 (89%) had to be 
dismissed by September 1 st. It subsequently proved possible to 
have only relatively few of these trained workers of several years 
experience restored to the rolls. The result has been a heavy 
blow to the successful prosecution of the work. 

GIFTS 

The Library received many important gifts of books and other 
library materials during the year. A list of the m.ore important 
of these is to be found in the Appendix on pages 142—143, 

There should be singled out here a particularly satisfying 
evidence of continuing interest in the work of the Library. In 
May there was received a 1 4th, and again in November a 1 5th, 
anonymous gift of money for story telling in the public schools, 
particularly in those parts of Boston in which the Library's own 
branch library buildings are without adequate quarters for story 
telling in the libraries themselves. Each of this long series of 



[9] 

anonymous gifts — generally in the amount of fifty dollars, and 
frequently more — has come from a single individual who once 
had a direct share in the Library's work as a member of its staff. 
Wliat is particularly pleasant is that these splendid gifts reveal 
a continuing interest in the school children of Boston and the 
work which the Boston Public Library attempts to do for them. 
The donor is now no longer a resident of Boston and has indeed 
a far more direct association at the present time with a community 
other than Boston and a library other than the Boston Public 
Library. It is striking tribute to the excellent work which Boston's 
story tellers do so quietly and effectively in awakening an urge 
and developing a love for good reading in school children. 

It is the hope of the Trustees that from knowledge of an ex- 
ample of this sort there may come recognition on the part of 
citizens of Boston that the Library can put to good use gifts of 
money or books, whether they be small or large, and for almost 
any socially desirable purpose in which an individual donor may 
be interested. 

CARE AND INVESTMENT OF TRUST FUNDS 

From time to time as necessary during the year meetings were 
held by the Finance Committee of the Trustees for the purpose 
of directing the City Treasurer in the investment of the funds to 
which the Frustees hold title and of which the City 1 reasurer 
serves as custodian on behalf of the Trustees. 

Also the firm of Messrs. Stewart, Watts and Boliong, Cer- 
tified Public Accountants, was retained to list and check the 
holdings of both cash and securities belonging to the Trustees of 
the Public Library and to certify that these had been found to 
be actually in the custody of the City Treasurer. This listing and 
checking was subsequently verified by the Trustees themselves 
on June 6, 1939 by going personally to the vaults of the City 
Freasurer. 



[10] 

ADMINISTRATION Of TRUST FUNDS ESTABLISHED UNDER THE 
WILL OF THE LATE JOSIAH H. BENTON 

Under the twelfth clause of the Will of the late Josiah H. 
Benton, and as subsequentlj'- modified by an Agreement of 
Compromise dated January 15, 1935, the Trustees of the Pub- 
lic Library were designated as the residuary legatee of the Ben- 
ton Estate. The Will provided that the residuary estate should 
be divided into two equal parts and designated as the Benton 
Building Fund and the Benton Book Fund respectively. The 
Trustees of the Public Library received also the Children's 
Fund, established separately under another provision of the Will. 

BENTON BUILDING FUND 

January 22, 1938 - January 21. 1939 

As required by the terms of the Will the Benton Building 
Fund is held "as an accumulating fund, the income and interest 
to be added to the principal and reinvested as principal, until the 
total amount thereof shall be two million dollars ($2,000,000) 
. . . such total sum of two million dollars ($2,000,000) to be 
applied to the enlargement of the present central library building 
in Boston, or to the construction of another central library build- 
ing in such part of the City as may be then most desirable for 
the accommodation of the people of said City ..." 

As an accumulating fund the Benton Building Fund had on 
its anniversary date of January 22, 1 938 a principal amount of 
$1,644,118.57. During the year immediately following, from 
January 22, 1938 to January 21, 1939, inclusive, the income 
and other additions were reinvested and added to the principal, 
with the result that on January 22, 1 939 the principal amount 
had then become $1,733,103.77. 

The net income for the period of January 22, 1938 to Jan- 
uary 21, 1939, inclusive, was in the amount of $54,997.67, rep- 
resenting income from investments to the amount of $57,247.51 
and a liquidating dividend to the amount of $26.75, and losses 
from securities matured to the amount of $2,257.50 and admin- 
istrative expenses to the amount of $ 1 9.09. This net income was 
reinvested and added to the principal amount. Also there W£is 
added to the principal amount during this period the sum of 



[11] 

$33,987.53, received from the Surviving Trustee under the Will 
of the late Josiah H. Benton, as part of the principal and in- 
come of the Martha Ellen Fisher Trust, a life trust which had 
been set up under the Will, with the provision that on its ex- 
piration it was to become a part of the residuary estate and be 
divided equally between the Benton Building Fund and the 
Benton Book Fund. The total net additions to the principal 
amount of the Benton Building Fund during the period from 
January 22, 1 938 to January 21,1 939, inclusive, thus amounted 
to $88,985.20. 

BENTON BOOK FUND 
January 22. 1938 - January 21. 1939 

On its anniversary date of January 22, 1938 the Benton 
Book Fund had a principal amount of $1,136,480.25. During 
the year immediately following, from January 22, 1938 to Jan- 
uary 21, 1 939, inclusive, there occurred a net increase in the 
principal amount by the sum of $22,377.00, with the net re- 
sult that on January 22, 1939 the principal amount had then 
become $1,158,857.25. 

The net loss in the principal amount was $2,003.75, repre- 
senting losses from securities matured to the amount of $2,032.50, 
less a liquidating dividend to the amount of $26.75, This was 
offset by the addition to the principal amount during this period 
of the sum of $24,382.75, received from the Surviving Trustee 
under the Will of the late Josiah H. Benton, and representing 
one half of the principal of the Martha Ellen Fisher Trust, a 
life trust under the Will, which upon expiration was to become 
part of the residuary estate and be divided equally between the 
Benton Building Fund and the Benton Book Fund. The total 
net additions to the principal amount of the Benton Book Fund 
during the period from January 22, 1938 to January 21 , 1939, 
inclusive, thus amounted to $22,377.00. 

The net income from the Benton Book Fund for the period 
was in the amount of $44,003.48, representing income from in- 
vestments to the amount of $45,645.08, losses from income secur- 
ities disposed of to the amount of $165.00, and administrative 
expenses to the amount of $1 ,476.60. As provided by the Agree- 



[12] 

ment of Compromise of January 15, 1935, this net income was 
distributable in the proportions of 60 %and 40% to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston and the Rector 
of Trinity Church in the City of Boston respectively. It was 
distributed as follows: 

To the Trustees of the Public Library . . . $26,402.09 

To the Rector of Trinity Church .... 1 7.601 .39 



$44,003.48 
In addition to the income set forth above, there v/as also dis- 
tributed in 1939 the amount of $9,604.77, representing income 
from the Benton Book Fund (chiefly that part received from 
the Martha Ellen Fisher Trust) which had been delivered to 
the Trustees of the Public Library in Jime 1 938 by the Surviv- 
ing Trustee under the Will in connection with the third and final 
payment of the assets of the Benton Estate. This additional in- 
come was distributed in the proportion of 60% and 40% respec- 
tively as follows: 

To the Trustees of the PubUc Library . . . $5,762.86 
To the Rector of Trinity Church .... 3,841.91 



$9,604.77 
The total payments to the Trustees of the Public Library thus 
amounted to $32,164.95; to the Rector of Trinity Church, 
$21,443.30. 

USE OF INCOME FPxOM BENTON BOOK FUND 
BY TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

That portion of the income from the Benton Book Fund 
which is payable to the Trustees of the PubHc Library is to be 
applied by them "for the purchase of books, maps and other 
library material of permanent value and benefit for said Library ; 
meaning and intending hereby that such income shall be applied 
for books desirable for scholarly research and use." As of Jan- 
uary 1 , 1 939 the Trustees had available for this purpose a bal- 
ance of unexpended income in the amount of $234,038.14. As 
of January 22, 1 939 they received a payment of income accrued 
to that time in the amount of $32,164.95, thus making a total 
balance of unexoended income in the amount of $266,203.09. 



[13] 

Against this, during the calendar year 1 939, they expended for 
books and other library material in accordance with the above 
provision the sum of $96,156.20. As of December 31, 1939 
the balance of unexpended income was $170,046.89. 

USE OF INCOME FROM BENTON BUILDING FUND 
BY TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

As provided by the terms of the Will the Benton Building 
Fund is held '*as an accumulating fund, the income and interest 
to be added to the principal and reinvested as principal, until the 
total amount thereof shall be two million dollars ($2,000,000) 
. . ." As set forth with detailed figures above, the Benton Build- 
ing Fund has been held as such an accumulating fund, and the 
income therefrom has been reinvested and added to the prin- 
cipal amount. 

CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE 
WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THE WILL 

The Will requests that, in addition to publishing statements 
setting forth the payments of income from the Benton Book 
Fund and the investments in and accumulations of the Benton 
Building Fund, the Trustees publish "a certificate that said in- 
come is expended and said fund accumulated in accordance with 
the directions of said will, according to their best examination 
and judgment in the premises." 

In accordance with this request the Trustees of the Public 
Library hereby certify that according to their best examination 
and judgment ( 1 ) the income of the Benton Book Fund has 
been expended by them in accordance with the directions of the 
aforesaid Will, as modified by the Agreement of Compromise 
of January 15, 1935, and (2) the principal amount of and the 
income from the Benton Building Fund have been invested and 
accumulated in accordance with the directions of said Will. 

THE children's FUND 

In accordance with the terms of another provision of the Will 
the Trustees of the Public Library paid in 1 939 to the Rector 
of Trinity Church the sum of $3,632.61, representing the in- 



[141 

come from The Children's Fund for the period of January 1 to 
December 31, 1938. The Children's Fund was given to the 
Trustees of the PubHc Library under the Will, with the pro- 
vision that the annual income therefrom should be available to 
the Library in any 3'^ear only if certain conditions should be met 
in that year. Inasmuch as these conditions could not be met for 
the year ending December 31, 1 938, payment of the income 
for that year was therefore made to the Rector of Trinity Church 
as required by the Will. 

OTHER TRUST FUNDS 

The following payments were received during the course of 
the year and funded in accordance with the provisions under 
which they were made available to the Library : 

George W, Moore Fund — Bequest of George W. Moore, of Bos- 
ton, in the amount of $21 7.00, of which the income is to be used 
for the general purposes of the Library; 

Francis Jay Underbill Fund — The sum of $524.70, representing 
certain proceeds under the settlement of the last will and testament 
of Francis Jay Underbill, of Brooklyn, N. Y., from which the in- 
come is to be expended for the purchase of books; 

Boston Book Fair 1938 Fund — The sum of $1 72.70, received from 
the Board of Trade of Boston Book Merchants, representing the 
excess of receipts over expenditures by the Board in connection 
with the Boston Book Fair as held in the Boston Public Library in 
1938, from which the income is to be used for the benefit of the 
Library Staff, in recognition of the excellent services of the various 
members of the Staff to the Book Fair of 1 938. 

The Trustees welcome bequests of money or books and hope 
that generous testators may remember the Library. It is from such 
sources only that they can make purchases of rare and other im- 
portant books which give value and prestige to a great educational 
institution such as the Boston Public Library. 

As a matter of interest to the citizens of Boston the Board 
has pleasure in listing the present trust funds of the Library with 
explanatory notes. The list will be found on pages 163-1 lb. 



15] 



EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

The Trustees acknowledge gratefully the assistance given by 
the Examining Committee of 1939. Its membership included 
the following individuals: 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott 
Mr. Philip J. Bond 
Mr. Robert Cutler 
Dr. Albert Ehren fried 
Mr. Henry E. Foley 
Mr. Allan Forbes 
Miss Susan J. Ginn 
Mr. Arthur L. Gould 
Mr. Burnelle G. Hawkins 
Mr. Herman H. Henkle 
Rev. John S. Keating 
Rev. Arthur L. Kinsolving 
Mrs. Augustus P. Loring, Jr. 
Mr. A. Lawrence Lowell 
Mr. John L. Lowes 
Mr. John W. Lowes 
Mr. Keyes D. Metcalf 
Mr. George N. Northrop 



Rev. Phillips E. Osgood 
Rev. Charles E. Park 
Mrs. Charles B. Perkins 
Mrs. Edward M, Pickman 
Hon. Abraham E. Pinanski 
Rev. Richard J. Quinlan 
Mr. William K. Richardson 
Mr. B. M. Selekman 
M. Harlow Shapley 
Mrs. Arthur A. Shurchff 
Rev. Russell H. Stafford 
Mrs. Donald C. Starr 
Mrs. Joseph A. Tomasello 
Mr. John P. Vaccaro 
Dr. Henry Viets 
Mr. Laurence Winship 
Mrs. Frederick Winslow 
Mr. Charles E. Wyzanski 



Mrs. Roy A. Young 

It is gratifying to have the generous and helpful assistance of 
citizens who are willing to give freely of their time and interest 
in examining and reporting upon the Library and its activities. 
Special attention is called to the significant report of the Com- 
mittee, which appears on pages 22-34 immediately following. 

CONCLUSION 

Attention is called to the report of the Director of the Library 
as found on pages 35—78 below. It presents important informa- 
tion concerning a number of developments in the Library in the 
last ten years. 

The Trustees wish to express here their appreciation of the 
e^^orts of the library staff throughout the year to meet the needs 
of the citizens of Boston. 

Frank W. Buxton 
John L. Hall 
Louis E. Kirstein 
Robert H. Lord 
Lllery Sedgwick 



6] 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures for Personnel: 

Permanent and Probationary employee* (ex- 
clusive of Printing and Binding Department 
employees) ...... 

Sundays and Evenings, extra and other service 
Expenditures kor Service Other Than Person/ 

Printing and binding . 

Advertising 

Transportation of persons . 

Cartage and freight 

Light, heat and power . 

Rents, taxes and water 

Bond and insurance premiums 

Communication 

Cleaning .... 

Removal of ashes 

Expert .... 

Stenographic and copying 

Fees ..... 

Photographic and blueprinting 

General repairs 

Miscellaneous services . 
Expenditures for Equipment: 

Electrical .... 

Motorless vehicles 

.Furniture and fillings 

Office 

Books: 



City Appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Manuscripts: 

Trust funds income 

Periodicals: 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Newspapers : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Microfilms: 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Lantern slides: 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Photostats : 

City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Posters, prints and maps: 
City appropriation 
Trust funds income 

Phonograph records: 
Trust funds income 

Tools and instruments 

General plant 

Carried foru^ard 



$43,493.78 
93,316.04 



10,030.87 
1.844.87 

\, 367 39 
1.536.95 

.75 

7.871.08 

71.65 
667.00 

20.60 
.60 

14.93 
369.11 



$869,652.92 
89,938.53 $959,591.45 

172.71 

9.25 

2,174.94 

7,304.45 

35,621.34 

19,283.00 

1,894.90 

4.440.63 

1,250.50 

22.80 

1 ,048.00 

1 ,299.38 

141.85 

172.18 

20,609.47 

107.40 95.552.80 

137.42 

144.15 

869.48 

3.111.31 



136,809.82 
10,646.98 

11,875.74 

2.904.34 

7,871.83 

738.65 

21,20 

384.04 

4.80 
771.56 
236.33 176.527.65 



$1,231,671.90 



i7] 



AND RECEIPTS, DECEMBER 31, 1939 



Receipts From: 

City Appropriation 1939 
Income irom Trust Funds 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic 
Income from Children's Fund 



Account 



$1,288,811.10 
56.956.41 
700.00 
3.261.48 $1,349,728.99 



Carried iorward 



$1 ,349.728.99 



[18] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 



Brought forward 






$1,231,671.90 


Expenditures for Supplies: 






Office 


$7,749.65 




Fuel 






7.834.36 




Medical .... 






48.07 




Laundry, cleaning, toilet 






1.385.32 




Educational and recreational 






19.50 




Agricultural 






133.60 




Chemicals and disinfectants . 






198.24 




Miscellaneous 






1.643.17 


19,011.91 


Expenditures for Materials: 










Building .... 






4,581.64 




Machinery .... 






82.0! 




Electrical .... 






1.982.07 




Miscellaneous 






1,774.58 


8.420.30 


Pensions and Annuities 






1 .298.55 




Workmen's compensation 






36.00 


1.334.55 


\V. P. A. Projects 








39.997.19 


Special Items: 






James L. Whitney Bibliographic account 


1,757.33 




A. L. Whitney Fund, sick benefits 


361.50 




Trust Funds Income, Salary 


1,500.00 




Louis E. Kirstein Fund, Fuel 


23.60 




Judaica Bookshelf — in honor of Miss Fanny Go 


dstein 73.97 




Children's Fund, Rector of Trinity Church , 


3,914.09 


7,630.49 


Binding Department: 






Salaries ....... 


60,065.58 




Transportation of persons . 






2.40 




Gas, light and heat 






807.82 




Communication 






78.30 




Repairs .... 






182.93 




Furniture and furnishings 






15.00 




Tools and instruments . 






27.65 




Supplies .... 






8.77 




Electrical material 






4.05 




Slock 






7,282.30 


68,474.80 


Printing Department: 










Salaries .... 






13,039.16 




Gas, light and heat 






784.10 




Rent 






7.50 




Communication 






77.86 




Photographic and blueprinting 






211.14 




Repairs .... 






15.50 




Electrical equipment 






36.00 




Supplies .... 






686.87 




Material .... 






7.86 




Stock 






3,657.81 




Outside work 






18.25 


18,542.05 


Carried forward 


.1395,083.19 



[19] 
AND RECEIPTS, DECEN/IBER 31, 1939 



BroughA formard .... 
Balances Brought Forward From 1938: 
I rust funds income. City 1 reasury 
James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account 
H. C. Benfley Gift .... 
Judaica Bookshelf .... 
Children's Fund ..... 



$1,349,728.99 



257,354.14 

1306.73 

13.70 

159.17 

3.632.61 



262.466.35 



Carried forward 



$1,612,195.34 



[20] 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 

Brought foTTvard $1,395,083.19 

Amounts Paid Into City Treasury: 

Fines $23,449.71 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins ..... 303.61 

Commission on telephone stations ..... 548.82 

Refunds, fees, etc. ....... 667.31 

Sales of waste paper ....... 78.96 

Payments for lost books 655.08 25,703.49 

Balance, December 31, 1939: 

Trust Funds Income, City Treasury .... 196,168.02 

James L. Whitney Bibliographic Account . . 249.40 

H. C. Bentley Gift 13.70 

Judaica Bookshelf 85.20 

Children's Fund 2,980.00 199,496.32 

Balance Unexpended, December 31, 1939: 

General Appropriation ...... 17,615.83 



To Balance 



$1,637,89(183 



[21] 
AND RECEIPTS. DECEMBER 31, 1939 

Brought forivard $1,612,195.34 

Receipts From: 

Fines 23.449.71 

Sales of catalogues, bulletins ..... 303.61 

Commission on telephone stations ..... 548.82 

Refunds, fees, etc 667.31 

Sales of waste paper ....... 78.96 

Payments for lost look. 655.08 25,703.49 



To Balance 



$1,637,898.83 



[22] 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE 

To The Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston. 

Gentlemen: — 

The Examining Committee for the year 1939 respectfully 
submits its report. 

The Committee met for organization in May. From the de- 
tailed reports submitted to the Vice-Chairman since November 
first, the members of the sub-committees have labored with even 
more than the usual zeal and have given full time and service to 
the vv^ork. Their reports have been filed with the Library for 
examination and reference. The detailed analysis made of these 
reports on file in the executive office and the care taken by the 
officers of the Library to follow up each recommendation until 
it is carried out demonstrates better than any general acknowl- 
edgement how thoroughly and in what spirit the Director and 
his assistants co-operate with the members of this Committee. 
Again and again in the reports mention is made of the competent 
and courteous help given to the individual members both in the 
main building and the branch libraries, 

FINANCE AND BOOKS 
As the circulation of books to the public is the lif eblood of the 
Library and the reason for its existence, this Committee renews 
with increased emphasis the recommendations made by former 
Committees that the situation as to the book stock of the branches 
should be seriously considered and action taken. It urges a 
larger percentage of the city funds for the purchase of books 
but, fully realizing the financial situation in which the city finds 
itself, it is not suggesting an increase in the total city appropri- 
ation but a possible return to the proportional distribution of 
funds that was found desirable in earlier years. During the 
seven years, 1926-32, eighty-five cents of each dollar of city 



[23] 

appropriations for salaries and books was spent for salaries, 
fifteen cents for books; during the six years, 1933-38, ninety- 
two cents for salaries, eight cents for books; during the current 
year, ninety-five cents for salaries, five cents for books. 

In presenting these dramatic figures no criticism is offered to 
the reduction of money appropriated for books in the first years 
of the shortage of funds as it may be necessary temporarily to 
save the book account in order to avoid losses from a valuable 
personnel but if the book collections decrease in quality and 
quantity, the use falls off and the balance of the total appropri- 
ation is impaired. Therefore, this Committee urges a careful 
study of the proper relationship between the size of the book and 
salary appropriations. 

City appropriations for the purchase of books have been ap- 
plied principally to the branch libraries. The collections in the 
central library are maintained chiefly from trust funds whose 
relative stability has kept accessions at a more normal level than 
has been possible in the branches. The Committee has in this 
connection three suggestions: 

(1) That such proportion of the available trust funds as would 
not prejudice the position of the central collections might be used 
to bring the purchase of types of material, books, and periodicals 
in the past acquired from city funds to a better level. 

(2) That w^ith increased funds for scholarly books, efforts be 
continued to avoid unnecessary duphcation between the Library 
and other research libraries in the Metropolitan area and that a 
division of fields of interest be adopted by the libraries concerned. 

(3) That w^ith the limited funds available for buying books a 
stricter supervision should be considered at the entrance to the 
central library. From the experience of similar Hbraries a turnstile 
and guard at the door reduces the loss of thousands of books. Also 
spring locks are recommended for the doors of the stack to reserve 
the use of the books to authorized members of the staff. 

In 1929 the total sum expended for books, periodicals, and 
newspapers was $141,829. In 1938 the comparable expendi- 
ture was only $73,400, a difference of nearly fifty per cent. 
Municipal economy is imperative but your Committee questions 
v.hether the upkeep of a library without an adequate stock of 



[241 

books is true economy and whether such economy, as far as the 
branch libraries are concerned, cannot be compared in some 
degree to economies in legitimate welfare. 

The situation is serious especially in the branches which serve 
the less prosperous sections of the city. The book stock is in a 
distressing condition. The total number of volumes is smaller 
than it was five years ago and many of the books are so worn and 
soiled as to discourage reading. This is especially true of chil- 
dren's books. Many standard works cannot be replaced or re- 
paired or new copies acquired. An effort is being made by a 
member of the Committee to collect children's books from 
friends. It is suggested that if a list of such needed books could 
be published in the newspapers many would be sent in as the fact 
that they were wanted for children would appeal to a large 
public. 

For a century the policy of the Boston Public Library has 
been to "provide books that the people want to read while they 
are new and as many copies as desired." Are we departing from 
that policy at a time when particularly in the branch libraries 
the printed v/ord is being brought to the unemployed, the un- 
educated and the foreign bom to whom this source of information 
must be made fully available if the American form of democratic 
government is to endure? The work done by the branches 
gives 2in efficient tool for adult education and is an indispensable 
adjunct to our public school system. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Here there is presented verbatim the report of the Sub-Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Equipment. 

"The province of this committee might easily extend far, but 
probably its greatest influence lies in discussing each year some 
one topic that happens to interest its members, and this year it 
may well be the arrangement and future development of the 
central building in Copley Square. 

"A..S originally planned and constructed the space in the build- 
ing was carefully divided between three distinct objects, which 
were kept completely separate. These were the use by the pub- 



[25] 

lie, by the staff, and for the storage of books. In general, though 
varying somewhat on different floors, the public was intended 
to use the north and east sides of the quadrangle and the staff 
the southeast corner, leaving for the stack the southwest part. 
In fact the stack began close behind the delivery desk, and ran 
unbroken around the comer until it ended in the middle of the 
western wall. This plan of keeping the three functions of the 
Library spacially separate is far from unimportant, but it has 
been not a little broken down by subsequent changes and en- 
largements. This is especially true of the stack, which in a h- 
brary that does not, and probably cannot, allow readers to work 
with some freedom among the shelves, should be kept apart, and 
should never become — as it inevitably is too much to-day — a 
thoroughfare between different parts of the building. 

"Since there is a general belief that when the city can afford 
it the central library will need enlargement the changes ought 
to be very carefully planned with a view to the best distribution 
of space and the possibility of still further growth in the stack. 
This requires all the more thought because the ornamental parts 
of the present structure — the outside facades and the public 
portions of the interior — must be scrupulously pre3ei*ved. The 
alterations and additions needed, even when not immediately 
probable, should be constantly in the thoughts of the Director 
and his staff, as in fact they are; and it would be well for 
them to make tentative plans from time to time. For that pur- 
pose, and for the other reasons, the committee would suggest 
that complete detailed sets of blue prints of the past and present 
internal arrangements of the building should at all times be avail- 
able at the Library where the Director and Trustees can consult 
them. 

"Meanwhile not a little can be done to improve the distri- 
bution of the space in the present building; but, of course, that 
means catering to the needs of some departments by curtailing 
the luxury of others, a proceeding that will inevitable cause com- 
plaint ; but no activity of the Library has a vested right to room 
that can be better used, and the Director should be encouraged 
to allocate the space afresh when improvement in its use can thus 



[26] 

be made. Perhaps some temporary relief might be obtained 
without additional expense to the city by using for the office of 
the Branch Libraries and for certain other activities some school- 
house abandoned by reason of the diminution in the number of 
children in the older parts of Boston. 

"From the point of view of good city finance we have another 
suggestion to make : Repairs, for example, on the fast deteriorat- 
ing tiled roof should not be allowed to become in arrears and 
thus force general renovation at large expense. Such cautions 
become insistent when, instead of trusting to indefinite future 
growth, the city — now suffering from a deficit — must look 
forward to a stationary population and perhaps diminishing 
revenues from taxation." 

STAFF FACILITIES 

When the city can afford the much needed enlargement of the 
central library careful plans should already have been developed 
for further growth in the stack and the relief of the grave state 
of staff facilities which have been crowded out by the enormous 
extension of stack space. Since 1895 the collection of books 
has increased over two and a half times and the personnel has 
been enlarged from 1 72 to the present roster of 406. The drink- 
ing water, eating quarters, lounges, locker rooms, rest rooms, 
medical supplies and toilets are far below standard requirements 
and inadequate, unattractive, and unsanitary. 

Until the new plans can be carried out several years must 
pass. We should not ask the personnel of the Library to suffer 
such conditions a day longer than necessary. 

Your Committee urges the following general recommenda- 
tions in order to raise the standard to that required by the Com- 
monwealth for Industrial Establishments and by the Boston 
Building Law where persons are employed. 

( 1 ) That certain departments be moved to other quarters to re- 
lieve pressure and allow for re-allocations such as branch head- 
quarters, binding, newspaper reading room. 

(2) That rest rooms and lounges be cleared of lockers and new 
locker space with adequate modern toilets be located near the point 
of entrance for the staff. 



[27] 

(3) That the whole problem of drinking water and the storing 
and eating of food be investigated and solved. 

These and other recommendations in detail arc on file for ex- 
amination. 

With full realization of the expense these changes would 
bring, we feel that the City has a responsibility to its employees 
as well to the public which they serve. We demand the highest 
level of interest and effort from these men and women and then 
compel them to use the outmoded equipment which our building 
provides. 

Similar recommendations have been made and changes urged 
with increasing emphasis for several years. This Committee 
can only add its testimony that such interior conditions in con- 
trast to the beauty and dignity of the outside of our building 
deny the Library's purpose which is to add to the mental and 
physical health of the people in the City of Boston. 

This Committee is fully conscious that the early steps neces- 
sary for the carrying out of these recommendations are being 
taken by the Trustees as rapidly as the conditions permit. 

CATALOGS 

The amount accomplished toward reclassifying of the book 
collections and re-organizing the card catalogs during several 
years was noted in this Committee's 1938 report. The loss of 
large numbers of workers trained for his specific work raises a 
serious problem. Should it be impossible to bring the relief 
workers back now lost to the projects, a long range program of 
re-organization should be planned within the regular budget of 
the Library. A step in this direction has been the decision to 
catalog and classify by the new codes, the major proportion of 
new accessions. There is also need for revision of the records 
of other currently useful books to avoid confusion and waste of 
time. 

The following suggestions given in detail in the report on file 
relate to the use of the Bates Hall catalog: 

( 1 ) The free distribution of small printed leaflets with brief 
instructions on the use of the catalog is advised. 



[28] 

(2) A guide card should be inserted in each catalog tray bearing 
notations about the catalog, especially in regard to the meaning of 
symbols and other guides. 

(3) The development is advised of an annotated card catalog 
of books on topics of current interest based on a "Selected List of 
Books" appearing in MoRE BoOKS. Attractive posters in the Hall 
should direct readers to proper sources of information and the staff 
members daily and at special times should observe the effect of 
these aids on the timid and confused, 

(4) The public school officials should be asked to check up on 
the instruction given to students in the use of library catalogs and 
extend such instruction. 

CHILDREN'S WORK AND WORK WITH SCHOOLS 

It is recommended by your Committee that a contact service 
be established between the schools and the branch libraries 
which serve them. Teachers could then give v/aming to the 
branch librarians of the assignments of reading so that the books 
might be collected in advance. Also the campaign by the 
teachers on the careful use of books could be pressed and fol- 
lowed up. In this way the loss and defacing of books could be 
further reduced. 

The curtailment of the delivery of books to the class room 
is only one example of the great need for more books in every 
branch of the library sytem. Books for small children are es- 
pecially needed as only a small proportion can be replaced or 
acquired. 

The Children's Room in the central library needs an over- 
hauling of the electric lights to make reading easier and save cur- 
rent. Complaints about the lighting in the older branches are 
frequent and the v/hole m.atter is of such importance in the chil- 
dren's case that it is suggested that an expert be employed to re- 
port on the question. Year after year your Committee finds 
many instances of inefficient lighting. It is as necessary to have 
light by which books may be read without injury to the reader 
as to make provision for the books themselves. 

The Cronan "Story Hour" continues to be successful and the 
librarians report great increase of attendance after each occasion. 
The number of Story Hours has been curtailed and it is sug- 
gested that they be restored as a wise investment. 



[29] 

Serious overcrowding in the children's rooms in rented quarters 
has been reported. In some cases a move has been made to 
larger quarters where the rent was no greater. Your Committee 
suggests that such changes should be considered in such other 
cases when possible. 

USE OF THE LIBRARY AND PUBLICITY 

The reports of many of the sub-committees begin and end 
with the absolute necessity of correcting the situation in regard 
to the funds for books for the branch libraries. In this respect 
careful consideration needs to be given to the increasing in- 
equalities in the proportions of the expenditures for books, re- 
pairs, and salaries. From whatever point of view the library 
system is regarded, it becomes evident that the reason for the 
existence of a public library is being denied if it can no longer 
fulfil its prime function — the purchase and distribution of books. 
The approximate purchase of books for the branch libraries is 
$20,000 less than for the last two years. The branches will be 
more than ever hampered in the replacement of worn out books 
and the purchase of new ones. The Committee hopes that the 
Trustees may be able to bring to the attention of the city officials 
the fact that if the Library fails to maintain its pre-eminent po- 
sition, the reputation of the city itself will suffer. 

The situation can be improved by full use of every means by 
which the needs and services of the Library are brought to the 
attention of the public. The Director and his staff are doing all 
in their power toward this end when the means at their disposal 
are considered. Your Committee hopes that it may be possible 
to give the many interesting activities and human happenings 
within the Library system more publicity in the newspapers. 
When a substantial sum can be set aside for the purpose, recom- 
mendations made by former sub-committees should be carried 
out, but even now measures can be taken to inform the public 
that the Library will welcome donations of money and books. 
The Committee was told that an ex-fireman had made a small 
bequest to the Library in his will. The whole story would make 
interesting reading and if the public knew of such bequests 



[30] 

others would be encouraged lo follow such an example. The 
Committee recommends that the Library have stamped on its 
publications a short dignified request for gifts of libraries, money, 
and books beginning with its insertion in More Books m order 
that the effect may be studied before proceeding to more ex- 
tensive action. 

Complaints have been made in the branch libraries of lack of 
police protection when disturbances arise. The Library as a 
public institution has every right to police protection and it is 
recommended that the matter be taken up with the Police Com- 
missioner himself. Another point the Committee wishes to make 
is the need for care in the placing of books on the open shelves. 
It is felt that a standard of good taste should be insisted upon as 
the shelves are open to minors, particularly those of high school 
age. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

The branch libraries serve a city population that is continual- 
ly shifting and by reason of these changes the regional distri- 
bution of our branches is not at present sound. The branches 
occupy our own buildings, municipal buildings and rented build- 
ings. It is suggested that where the building is rented changes 
could be made to cover the whole region more logically and bring 
better service to the people who need it most. 

Since the height of the depression their has been a steady fall- 
ing off in the borrowing of books from the branch libraries. A 
considerable volume of opinion links this falling off with the lack 
of books. 

Your Committee finds the greatest need among the branches 
as in other departments of the Library is for BOOKS. Children's 
books are urgently needed at 

Boylston Codman Square Fellowes Athenaeum 

Lower Mills Mt. Pleasant Neponset 

North End South Boston Uphams Corner 

Books of all kinds are particularly needed at 

Andrew Square Brighton Charlestown 

Dorchester East Boston Hyde Park 

Lower Mills Mattapan Memorial 

Phillips Brooks 



[311 

Hyde Park needs books on the useful arts, Uphams Comer 
asks for books on the mechanical trades, Mt. Bowdoin is in 
need of an additional encyclopedia. The North End Branch 
wants Italian books. In every case the NEED FOR MORE BOOKS 
cannot be too greatly stressed. 

In connection with this recommendation it is to be pointed out 
that the losses of books from the branch libraries have been re- 
duced in the last five years from 12,000 to 7,000. Owing to 
the excellent work in following up the persons who caused the 
loss of the books, the condition is being gradually corrected. 

The other two major needs in many branches is for better 
lighting and interior painting. The Memorial Branch has not 
been painted since 1926 as neither the Library nor the School 
Board are apparently able to assume the expense. Recommen- 
dation for better lighting and other matters in detail are on file 
in reports on the branches by members of your Commitee who 
wish to bear witness to the extraordinary understanding and 
sympathy with the needs of the people in their communities 
manifested by the branch library staffs. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

The findings of the Committee on Special Departments are 
on file for examination in detail. Your Committee quotes from 
their excellent report the recommendations in connection with 
the Fine Arts Department, the Teachers' Department, the Rare 
Book Department and the Music Department, also the Science 
and Technology Department and the Statistical Department. 

Fine Arts Department. The physical condition of these 
rooms is not satisfactory. The West Gallery is dirty and the 
paint on the walls of the out-of-town end of the Fine Arts Read- 
ing Room is peeling and dropping off. The West Gallery is 
crowded. It is much used by students and during the school 
year by groups of students from the private schools. The space 
at present in the Gallery has been reduced by the W. P. A. 
timekeepers and by the collecting and distributing agent of the 
bindery. When possible this space should be restored to the 
Fine Arts Department. There is no set place ft)r exhibits and 



[32] 

it is suggested that the Department work in concert with the Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts and Fogg Museum, so that the impact upon 
the public of a definite project be strengthened. 

Teachers' Department. The Teachers* Department designed 
for reference and research by teachers is well supplied with ma- 
terial and used effectively. The shelf room is insufficient, and 
as the valuable A.dams Collection of old books is at present tak- 
ing up nearly one-half of the available shelf space, this should 
be corrected if possible. The lighting and ventilation of this De- 
partment are not good. Readers have great difficulty in seeing 
the titles on the lower shelves. This condition is partly due to 
two fine canvasses on the ceiling which absorb and interfere with 
the reflecting of the lights. The ventilation is obtained only by 
opening windows with resultant drafts. The room is often too 
hot (sometimes 78° F) which is equally bad for readers and 
books. 

Rare Book Department. The present Reading Room for 
the Rare Book Department has to be used as in other cases 
throughout the building as a passage to the stacks. The present 
stacks for the valuable books are not adequate as they are 
of the open steel shelving made with no tops and backs and dust 
sifts down upon them from above. Such shelving might be kept 
covered by a dust curtain until better storage is provided, and 
some careful person chosen to keep these shelves and alcoves as 
free from dirt as possible. 

Music Department. The situation in the Music Department 
is at a standstill. Its location is against the use of the room for 
serious study, as it is the thoroughfare to the Rare Book De- 
partment, which makes it noisy and distracting. 

Science & Technology Department & Statistical Depart- 
ment. The physical facilities in the Science and Technology 
Department are impaired by the fact that the card catalog is 
kept in a different room from the reading room and the reading 
room is combined with that of the Fine Arts Department. A 
separate room for applied science is suggested where workers 
could get books and current literature which would improve their 
technical skills and make them better workmen. A substantial in- 



[33] 

crease is reported in the reading of books dealing with skilled 
labor. If this fact is an indication of a general trend it means 
that this Department serv^es a very useful purpose in furthering 
education among workers and supplementing the training af- 
forded by our public schools. 

It is noted in the Statistical Department that the books are 
kept on open shelves which is not the case in the Science and 
Technology Department. In pursuing research in a technical 
field or at an advanced level a reader is much aided by inspect- 
ing volumes the titles of which he may not know and others he 
may want to look over rapidly before making up his mind to take 
out the book. The open shelves on the second floor are not so 
convenient to handle because there are few reading desks and 
the light on this floor is poor. In all the important contemporary 
fields this Department fills a great need in an excellent manner 
but it could be richer in the orthodox and classical treatises of an 
older date and in foreign material. 

Business Branch. As in previous reports the congestion of 
the Business Branch is emphasized — a condition that interferes 
with the usefulness of this branch. It is recommended that either 
the Business Branch should have more space in the building or 
that some considerable proportion of the back files be moved 
into some other space to make room available to readers. 

CONCLUSION 

The minimum requisites for a public or any other library are 
books, a roof to shelter the books, and personnel to care for, 
handle and distribute books. The crying needs of our Boston 
Library may be taken in this logical order. 

We must have books or we deny the cause of the Library's 
existence, we must have an adequate roof and space in our build- 
ing and we must so manage our resources that the health and 
spirit of our staff are not impaired through impossible conditions 
of crov/ding and lack of ordinary standards of sanitation. 

The suggestions are reiterated by your Committee that even 
with the need for rigid economy we should have more books in 
the branch libraries, that some of the activities now functioning 



[34] 



in the main building should be housed elsewhere, and that the 
staff facilities should be improved. 

Adopted as the report of the Examining Committee, Novem- 
ber 20, 1939. 

Elizabeth W. Perkins, Vice Chairman 



Katherine Abbott 
Philip J. Bond 
Robert Cutler 
Albert Ehrenfried 
Henry E. Foley 
Allan Forbes 
Susan J. Ginn 
Arthur L. Gould 
Burnelle G. Hawkins 
Herman H. Henkle 
John S. Keating 
Arthur L. Kinsolving 
Rosamond B. Loring 
A. Lawrence Lowell 
John L. Lowes 
John W. Lowes 
Keyes D. Metcalf 
George N. Northrop 



Phillips E. Osgood 
Charles E, Park 
Hester Pickman 
Abraham E. Pinanski 
Richard J. Quinlan 
WilHam K. Richardson 
B. M. Selekman 
Harlow Shapley 
Margaret H. ShurcHff 
Russell H. Stafford 
Polly r. Starr 
Trances 1 omasello 
John P. Vaccaro 
Henry R. Viets 
Laurence Winship 
Mary W. Winslow 
Charles E, Wyzanski, Jr. 
Amy B, Young 



[35] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

To THE Trustees of the Public Library 
OF THE City of Boston: 

I submit herewith the report of the Director of the Library 
for the year ending December 31, 1 939. 

SCOPE of IHE REPORT 

In various quarters concern is being expressed over the mount- 
ing expenditures for personnel in the Library during the last 
ten years. A total expenditure for personnel which in 1 929 was 
approximately three quarters of a million dollars annually has 
increased in ten years time to be slightly over one million dollars 
in 1939. 

Such a sum is so large in itself and bulks so large (approxi- 
mately 84% in 1939) in the total annual expenditure of the 
Library for all purposes that a careful survey of what has been 
happening over the ten year period appears clearly necessary. 
This report will therefore be devoted entirely to such a survey. 

The presentation will be along the following lines: 

I. Introductory Statement. 

Increasing Expenditures for Salaries and Wages from 
1930 to 1939 Inclusive, (pp. 37-38) 

II. Increase in Personnel Cost Arising Out of Salary In- 
creases, (pp. 38—60) 

Salary Increases, (pp. 38-47) 

Up to June 4. 1937. (pp. 38-41) 

As of June 4. 1937. (pp. 41-44) 

As of June 3, 1938. (pp. 44^6) 

IntheYear 1939. (pp. 46-47) 
Status of Salaries in the Boston Public Library as of 

December 31. 1939. (pp. 48-51) 
Why Are There So Many Individuals in the Library 

To Receive Step Rate Increases in Pay? (pp.51- 

57) 



[36] 

How Long Will It Take to Stabilize the Level of 
Salaries and Wages in the Library? (pp. 57-59) 

Summary of the Salary Situation in the Library, 
(pp. 59-60) 

III. Increase in Personnel Cost Arising Out of Increased or 
Rearranged Activities, (pp. 60—72) 

Distribution of Personnel, (pp. 60-61) 
Distinction Between Regular Service and Extra Ser- 
vice, (pp. 61-62) 
Cost and Number of Personnel, (pp. 62-63) 
Total Personnel, 1930-1939. (p. 62) 
Full-Time Personnel, 1930-1939. (p. 63) 
Extra Service Personnel, 1930-1939. (p. 63) 
Summary of Changes in Number of Personnel, 1 930- 

1939. (p.64) 
Distribution of the Increase in Full-Time Personnel, 
1930-1939. (pp.64-68) 
Decrease in Full-Time Personnel of the Director's 

Office, (p. 65) 
Increase in Full-Time Personnel of the Division of 

Business Operations, (p. 66) 
Increase in Full-Time Personnel of the Circulation 

Division, (pp. 66-67) 
Increase in Full-Time Personnel of the Reference 
Division, (pp. 67—68) 
Flas the Executive Force Been Unduly Expanded? 

(pp. 68-69) 
Has There Been an Over-Staffing of the Library? 

(pp. 69-72) 
Summary of the Number of Personnel in the Library, 
(p. 72) 

IV. Conclusions, (pp. 73-74) 

V. Recommendations, (pp. 74-77) 



[37] 

I. 

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 

INCREASING EXPENDITURES FOR SALARIES AND WAGES 
FROM 1930 TO 1939 INCLUSIVE 

From 1930 to 1939 inclusive the Library's expenditures for 
salaries and wages have been as follows : 

For the year ending December 31. 1939 . . $1,032,696.19 

For the year ending December 31, 1929 . . 770.367.26 



Increase in annual expenditure . . . . $ 262,228.93 

This is an increase of 34%. It is attributable in the main to two 
factors : 

( 1 ) increases In individual salaries — salary increases as 
granted year by year during the period from 1930 to 1939 
inclusive amounted cumulatively by the end of 1939 to 
$219,323.88 per year in the gross; 

(2) increases and adjustments in the activities of the Library 
— increased or rearranged activities necessitated the employment 
by the Library of 105 more full-time workers in 1939 than 
in 1929; at the entering rate of $20.00 per week ($1040.00 
per year) the salary cost for these 1 05 full-time workers cumu- 
lated to $109,200.00 (105 X $1040.00) additional per year 
in the gross. 

Both of the above large amounts are gross figures. Together 
they total $332,155.99, as compared with the net figure of 
$262,228.93 given above. Obviously gross figures serve only 
in general illustration of what has been happening, as many fac- 
tors act to reduce them. For example, an Assistant who has 
reached the maximum of his grade at $37.00 per week may re- 
sign. If the vacancy is to be filled, it is by the appointment of a 
Probationary Assistant at the entering rate of $20.00 per week. 
Or a Children's Librarian receiving $39.00 per week may re- 
sign. The individual who is subsequently promoted to the posi- 
tion begins in it at the prevailing minimum, which at present is 
$32.00 pyer week. Likewise, for example, the addition of the 



[38] 

1 05 full-time workers mentioned above was offset by a decrease 
in the number of part-time workers to the equivalent of 20 full- 
time workers, so that the net additional cost was actually that 
for 85 full-time workers rather than 105. Even so, gross figures 
such as the above must be given in order to show from what the 
reduced net figures have com.e. For the actual net figures of in- 
crease in the expenditures for personnel year by year from 1 930 
to 1939, see Appendix D on pages 90-91 below. 

Both these gross figures and the net figure as given above 
indicate that it has been rather more because of increases in 
individual salaries than because of increase in the number of 
individuals employed that the increase in expenditure for per- 
sonnel has become by the end of 1939 annually $262,228.93 
greater than at the end of 1 929. 

Each of these elements entering into the increasing cost of 
personnel from 1930 to 1939 inclusive merits careful examin- 
ation. 

II. 

INCREASE OF PERSONNEL COST ARISING 
OUT OF SALARY INCREASES 

SALARY INCREASES UP TO JUNE 4. 1937 

Up to June 4, 1937 the level of salaries for library workers 
in the Boston Public Library was widely recognized as un- 
desirably low. In as many instances as not entering salaries were 
$11.00 and $12.00 per week for high school graduates and 
$15.00 per week for college graduates. A library school gradu- 
ate might under certain circumstances be fortunate enough to re- 
ceive $20.00 per week at entrance. More often his or her begin- 
ning rate was no more than $15.00 per week, the same as for 
college graduates with no library school training at all. Obviously 
few library school graduates were interested in beginning at 
$15.00 per week in the Boston Public Library. The average 
beginning rate in general for graduates of the School of Library 
Science in Simmons College was approximately $25.00 per 
week ($1 300.00 per year). That for the graduates of the School 



[39] 

of Library Service in Columbia University was frequently as 
much as $30.00 per week ($1565.00 per year). 

In the Boston Public Library the average of all salaries as 
of June 1, 1929 was the low figure of $1434.45 per year 
($27.49 per week) ; the determination of this average included 
every salary from the lowest to the highest. The following table 
(see also Appendix D on pages 1 00-1 03 below) shows the wide 
extent to which low salaries then existed in 1929 in the Boston 
Public Library, particularly for the library workers as compared 
with the mechanical and similar workers: 













% of Total No. 






% of Total No. of Mechanical 


Salary Range 


o 


Library Workers and Other Workers 


Under $15.00 per week . 




16.2% .... 0.8% 


Under $20.00 per week . 






27.8% 






25.07o 


Under $25.00 per week . 






49.0% 






36.5% 


Under $30.00 per week . 






73.3% 






40.6% 


Under $35.00 per week . 






83.2% 






54.6% 


Under $40.00 per week . 






89.3% 






62.1% 


Under $45.00 per week . 






94.8% 






87.1% 


Under $50.00 per week . 






96.7% 






95.2% 


From $10.00 to $14.99 per 


week 


16.2% 






0.8% 


From $15.00 lo $19.99 per 


week 


11.6% 






24.2% 


From $20.00 to $24.99 per 


week 


21.2% 






11.5% 


From $25.00 }o $29.99 per 


week 


24.3% 






4.1% 


From $30.00 to $34.99 per 


Week 


9.9% 






14.0% 


From $35.00 to $39.99 per 


week 


6.1% 






7.5% 


From $40.00 to $44.99 per 


week 


5.57« 






9.1% 


From $45.00 to $49.99 per 


wee 


'k . 


1.9% 






9.17o 



A clear conclusion is to be drawn from these figures that the 
workers in the mechanical and similar groups had already in 
1929 a preferred position as compared with the workers in the 
bibliolhecal group. 

For the mechanical workers in the Library wages had been 
stabilized at relatively high levels by 1929. The wage gains 
achieved during the preceding boom years by similar workers in 
private employ, frequently under conditions of organized labor, 
worked to the benefit of those in city employ as well. Binders, 
printers, engineers, firemen, watchmen, carpenters, painters, elec- 
tricians, elevator operators, janitors, laborers, cleaners in the 
service of the Library were all paid at the rates generally pre- 



[40] 

vailing in the community, and ever since have continued to be 
thus relatively well paid. 

For the library workers, on the other hand, the period from 
1 929 to 1 936 inclusive brought little improvement in their rela- 
tively disadvantageous status. In only four of the seven years were 
salary increases possible in appreciable amount, and then not to 
the widespread extent necessary for raising the average level (see 
Appendix D on pages 1 00-1 03 below) . Funds were never avail- 
able to an extent sufficient to permit an annual increment to all 
bibliothecal workers. In the central library particularly there 
was an appreciable number who had had no improvement in 
remuneration since 1927, and some not even since 1926 or 
1925. By the end of 1936 seventy-eight per cent (78%) of all 
the bibliothecal workers in the entire library system were still 
receiving less than $30.00 per week. And even as many as 3 1 % 
were receiving still under $20.00 per week. Janitors on the other 
hand were and had been receiving $33.00. Seven eighths of the 
33 branch librarians — who were in charge of whole buildings 
— were receiving no more than $41.00, while rank and file 
watchmen and firemen were being paid $41.50, carpenters and 
painters $42.00, binders $43.00, printers $44.00, engineers 
$48.00. For the mechanical workers these wage levels were en- 
tirely proper in terms of prevailing rates. For the library workers 
they were highly inadequate in terms of the nature of their work 
and the preparation necessary for it. Unfortunately there were 
for Hbrarians no higher levels existing elsewhere in the com- 
munity with which to point the desirability of salary improvement 
for those in the Boston Public Library. On the other hand, in 
other departments of the City of Boston service, higher levels 
of remuneration appeared to exist for work which appeared to 
be of an equivalent nature or which had requirements not dis- 
similar. And to reach these higher levels step by step there ap- 
peared to exist in these other city departments an adequate 
provision for annual increments in remuneration. 

It was against such a background as this that the budgetary 
allowance for the personal service account of the Library for 
1936 was found to be not sufficient to permit other than highly 



141] 

limited action in the matter of step rate increases in pay for that 
year. It became clear that special attention would have to be 
given to effecting improvement in the situation. The Trustees 
appointed a special committee from their own number to carry 
out a thorough study of the problem and present findings to the 
city administration. A group of the less well paid members of 
the bibliothecal staff organized themselves in support of more 
adequate remuneration. Conditions in general contributed to ac- 
tion looking toward improvement. The result was that the bud- 
getary allowance as established for 1937 was at a figure to per- 
mit improvement to an appreciable degree. 

SALARY INCREASES AS OF JUNE 4, 1937 

As of June 4, 1937 it was possible for the first time to take 
action on a widespread basis for the improvement of the general 
salary level in the Library. This was carried out along two lines : 

( I ) the establishment of an adequate minimum level of remuneration 
for the bibliothecal workers; 

(2) the uniform application of the principle of an annual increment 
toward certain maxima for all bibliothecal workers instead of 
for only a part of them as in preceding years. 

The result was that in the case of 1 1 5 individuals a minimum of 
$20.00 per week was established for Assistants or Probationary 
Assistants who had qualified by passing the required Entrance 
Examinations for the Graded Service of the Library, and that 
to 303 other individuals an increase of $2.00 per week was given 
toward the maxima of their grades. In addition there was given 
to certain individuals a further increase in basic pay to per- 
mit a discontinuance of ihcir extra work evenings, in substantial 
completion of the program initiated in 1933 for the establish- 
ment of the shift system in the central libraiy ; further, an increase 
from 25 cents to 30 cents per hour was established in the mini- 
mum rate of pay for part-time work. In all, 441 individual full- 
time workers received increases in remuneration in 1937. The 
extent to which this represented action on a widespread basis is 
shown by the following figures: 



[42] 



Year 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 



No. of Fuli-Time Workers 
Receiving Increases in Pay 

None 
None 

203 

173 

149 

441 



The increases granted in 1937 ranged from $1.00 to $5.00 per 
week. One individual received $1.00 per v^eek, 331 received 
$2.00 per vv^eek, 1 7 received $3.00 per week, 1 9 received $4.00 
per week, and 73 received $5.00 per week. The cost of the in- 
creases as paid on a 12 months basis in the following year was 
$63,905.12; for the remainder of 1937 only. $36,956.44. 

This action in 1937 was primarily for the benefit of the lower 
paid group of library workers. It provided first for lifting the 
remuneration of the lowest paid group substantially toward a 
more adequate minimum. It gave also to all of the library work- 
ers in the middle remuneration group a single step increase 
toward the maximum of their grades. It did not, however, make 
any provision for this middle group of workers by way of adjust- 
ment for the long period of preceding years when frequently not 
even single step increases had been available to large numbers of 
them toward long overdue improvement in their remuneration. 
Nor did it make any provision for the upper group of positions, 
since these were already reasonably well remunerated. So like- 
wise did it not make provision for the mechanical workers, since 
they had been relatively well paid from even before 1 929. 

The following table shows the distribution of the library 
workers by salary ranges before and after this widespread action 
of 1937 (see also Appendix D on pages 100-103 below) : 



Salary Range 

From $10.00 to $14.99 per week 
From $15.00 to $19.99 per week 
From $20.00 to $24.99 per week 
From $25.00 to $29.99 per week 
From $30.00 to $34.99 per week 

Under $15.00 per week 

Under $20.00 per week 

Under $25.00 per week 

Under $30.00 per week 

Under $35.00 per week 



% of Total No. % of Total No. 

of Library Workers of Library Workers 
as of December 3 1 . 1 936 as of June 4. 1937 



5.2% 
26.0% 
23.5% 
23.7% 

5.2% 

5.2% 
31.2% 
54.7% 
78.4% 
83.6% 



0.0% 

2.9% 
44.6% 
19.6% 
15.5% 

0.0% 

2.9% 
47.6% 
673% 
82.8% 



[43] 

The above figures substantiate clearly that the basic improve- 
ment accomplished in 1937 was for the lower paid group of 
library workers, particularly those (31.2% of the total num- 
ber) who had been paid less than $20.00 per week prior to 
1937. Even after this widespread action of June 4, 1937, how- 
ever, nearly one half (47.6%) of the total number of library 
workers still received under $25.00 per week. 

By this 1937 action the average of the salaries in the Library 
was increased from $1434.45 as of June 1, 1929 to $1530.15 
as of June 4, 1937. This was substantial improvement. Still, of 
the various City of Boston departments for which comparable 
figures were readily available for that date, the Library Depart- 
ment had even so the lowest average of salaries, as shown below 
(see also Appendix D on page 106 below) : 

AVERAGE OF SALARIES IN CITY OF BOSTON DEPARTMEN 1 S 

JUNE. 1937 



1 ransit Depailmcnt . 

Law Deparlment 

F" inance Commission . 
School Buildings Department 

Treasury Department . 

Election Department . 

Building Department . 

School Department . 



Street Laying-Out Department . 

Auditing Department . 

Weights and Measures Department 

Boston Traffic Commission 

Park Department, Cemetery Division 

Assessing Department 

City Clerk Department 

Soldiers' Relief Department 
Collecting Department 
Supply Department 
Park Department 
Library Department . 



$3,761.26 

2,962.53 
2,840.10 
2.729.90 
2,604.76 
2.597.62 
2.592.21 
2.537.80 

2.360.68 
2,313.94 
2.240.00 
2,124.70 
2,063.38 
2.020.17 
2,009.53 

1.925.65 
1,728.58 
1.718.60 
1 .690.43 
1.530.15 



In addition to the salary adjustments mentioned above a fur- 
ther action was taken in the Library Department in 1937 which 
was perhaps the most important of all for the Library for the 
future. This was the announcement of the establishment as of 



[44] 

Januar}' 1, 1938 of a new Classification of Personnel, with a 
wide program of Qualifying Examinations and Promotional Ex- 
aminations with which a system of pay increases was to be artic- 
ulated. The new examinations were to be obligatory for all in- 
dividuals entering the library service after Januaury 1 , 1 938 ; 
as a voluntary choice, however, for those in the library service 
prior to that date. 

Under the new arrangements the old system of automatic step 
rate increases in pay was to be abolished for all individuals en- 
tering the library service after January 1 , 1 938. In its stead 
there was to be established a new system of promotional increases 
(grade increases), to be granted only on an earned basis after 
measurement by specified examinations and upon recommenda- 
tion after executive evaluation. The old system of automatic step 
rate increases in pay would thus disappear entirely from Boston 
Public Library practice as soon as all of the individuals in the 
library service prior to January 1 , 1 938 had reached the max- 
ima of their grades. 

The implications of these new arrangements were far-reaching 
for the development of the library staff and its remuneration. 

SALARY INCREASES IN 1938 

In 1938 salary increases were granted on a uniform step rate 
basis of $2.00 per week for each individual worker who was not 
then receiving the maximum remuneration for his grade, with the 
exception of those individuals who were already being paid 
$40.00 per week ($2100.00 per year) or more. To this latter 
group of 36 individuals increases were not granted, in accordance 
with the practice adopted in general for City of Boston depart- 
ments for 1938. With this exception, however, the 1938 action 
in granting salary increases in the Library was for a second year 
on a widespread basis, just as had been the case in 1937. In- 
creases of $2.00 per week were given 391 individuals as of June 
3, 1938. The cost of these as paid on a 12 months basis in the 
following year was $41,290.24; for the remainder of 1938 
only, $24,118.76. 

During 1938 the same group of the lower paid members of 



[45] 

the bibliothecal staff who had organized themselves at the end 
of 1936 in support of more adequate remuneration requested 
that in addition to the regular step rate increases in pay granted 
in 1938 special action should be taken looking toward further 
improvement in the remuneration of the middle group of workers, 
as distinguished from the lowest paid individuals for whom spe- 
cial action had already been taken in 1 937. Its proposal was that 
this middle group be divided into three categories, to be deter- 
mined primarily in terms of increasing educational qualifications 
and length of service, and that to these three categories there then 
be given further increases of $1.00, $2.00, and $3.00 per week 
respectively, in addition to the regular automatic step rate in- 
creases to be granted in the amount of $2.00 each. Since an ap- 
preciable portion of the library workers concerned would be in- 
dividuals who had been in the library service for a considerable 
period, there would thus be brought about by special action a 
substantial step toward the improvement of their remuneration as 
an offset to the long period during which many, particularly in 
the central library, had had no improvement whatever in their 
relatively low remuneration. It v^^ould permit thus a partial ad- 
justment in their remuneration sooner than could be the case in 
having to proceed over a period of 6 to 8 years by annual incre- 
ments of $2.00 toward the maxima of their grades. The cost of 
such special action would be approximately $35,000.00 on a 
12 months basis. 

To have added this sum of $33,000.00 to the large sum of 
$41,000.00 necessary for the regular step rate increases of 
$2.00 per individual as mentioned above would have resulted 
in a total cost of $76,000.00 for salary increases for the year, 
as compared with the cost of the 1937 action at $63,905.12 on 
a 12 months basis. 

In view of the large cost ($41 ,000.00) of merely the regular 
step rate increases of $2.00 per individual, on the same basis as 
that prevailing in city departments in general, it was not found 
possible to take action in 1 938 except for the granting of these 
step rate increases. 1 he financial situation of the City, not to 
mention other considerations, put out of question an additional 



[46] 

expenditure of $35,000.00 for special action on a basis such as 
that which had been proposed. 

It was instead suggested that under the new arrangements for 
the classification of personnel which had gone into effect as of 
January 1 , 1 938 there existed already in the provision of Quali- 
fying Examinations and Promotional Examinations an oppor- 
tunity for those who were in the library service prior to January 
1 , 1 938 to demonstrate by voluntary action their eligibility for 
additional remuneration on a promotional basis. It was pointed 
out that the resulting advantages would be considerably beyond 
those which would follow a distribution of increased remuner- 
ation simply on the automatic basis which had been proposed. In 
that very year of 1938 there would be offered the first oppor- 
tunity for taking the new Qualifying Examinations and Promo- 
tional Examinations. 

SALARY INCREASES IN 1939 

In 1939 salary increases were given on both the old and the 
new bases. Step rate increases of $2.00 per week were granted 
to all individuals who had been in the service of the Library 
prior to January 1 , 1 938, on the same basis as that prevailing in 
city departments in general, up to the maxima for their positions. 
These were given to 425 individuals. The cost of these step 
rate increases for the following 12 months would amount to 
$43,171.20; for the remainder of 1939 only, $9,970.15. Pro- 
motional increases (grade increases) also were given in 1939 to 
1 30 individuals who had passed in 1 938 the required Qualify- 
ing Examinations and Promotional Examinations as a basis for 
receiving promotional recognition. The cost of these promotional 
increases (grade increases) for the following 12 months would 
amount to $16,247.10; for the remainder of 1939 only, 
$3,986.28. The total cost for all increases in pay in 1939 — 
both step rate increases and promotional increases — for the 
following 12 months would amount to $56,887.59; for the re- 
mainder of 1939 only, $13,956.43. 

Of the 1 30 individuals receiving promotional increases in pay 
in 1 939 only 5 had entered the service of the Library subsequent 



[471 

to January 1 , 1 938. Obviously there could be relatively few in- 
dividuals entering the library service after January 1 , 1 938 who 
would be ready for the 1938 Qualifying Examinations when 
given in the following May and June; in another year their 
number would supposedly be appreciably greater. 

The remaining 125 individuals who received promotional in- 
creases in 1939 had been members of the library staff prior to 
January 1 , 1 938 and had voluntarily presented themselves for 
Qualifying Examinations and Promotional Examinations in 
1938, in order to demonstrate their eligibility for additional re- 
muneration on a promotional basis. For the most part they were 
individuals who had been in the library service over a consider- 
able period and at lovv^er rates of remuneration than their edu- 
cational and professional qualifications merited. By their volun- 
tary efforts they had demonstrated their eligibility for increased 
remuneration on a promotional basis. To them therefore these 
promotional increases were granted in accordance with the pub- 
lic announcement made on June 1, 1937 on the occasion of the 
establishment of the new Classification of Personnel and Staff 
Examinations. The total cost on a 1 2 months basis for promo- 
tional increases for these 125 individuals was approximately 
$16,000. By contrast, if additional remuneration had been 
granted instead on a basis such as had been proposed in the pre- 
ceding year by the organization of certain members of the library 
staff mentioned above, the cost on a 1 2 months basis would have 
been approximately $35,000.00. Further, such action would 
have been on an arbitrary basis, as distinguished from the action 
which was actually taken in 1 939 in terms of individual accom- 
plishment on a promotional basis, by voluntary election on the 
part of the individual. The opportunity to proceed on this basis 
was open freely to all individuals who were members of the li- 
brary staff before January 1 , 1 938. Without discrimination each 
liad an opportunity to demonstrate in objective fashion and on 
equal terms with all others his possession of certain specific com- 
petences (or which he could be given increased recognition in 
the form of improved remuneration on a promotional basis. 



[48] 

STATUS OF SALARIES IN THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1939 

The action taken for the improvement of salaries in 1937, 
1938, and 1939 was in each year on the widespread basis 
necessar}' to raise the general salary level in the Library. The 
following table shows the number of full-time workers receiving 
increases in each of those three years as well as in the years im- 
mediately preceding: 

No. of Full-Time Workers 
Year Receiving Increases in Pay 

1932 None 

1933 None 

1934 203 

1935 173 

1936 149 

1937 441 

1938 391 

1939 425 

That the general salary level in the Library had been raised 
is shown by the following figures indicating the average of all 
salaries in the Library at significant dates: 

Date Average of All Salaries 

June 1. 1929 $1434.45 

June 4, 1937 . ... 1530.15 

December 31. 1939 '. ". . . . 1706.58 

Whereas at the end of 1936 thirty-one per cent (31 %) of all 
of the bibliothecal workers in the entire library system were being 
paid less than $20.00 per week, at the end of 1939 the pro- 
portion had decreased to 1.5%. Whereas at the end of 1936 
over one-half (55%) still received under $25.00 per week, at 
the end of 1939 the proportion was slightly over one-quarter 
(26%). Whereas at the end of 1936 nearly four-fifths (78%) 
were being paid less than $30.00, the proportion had become at 
the end of 1939 slightly less than one-half (49%). 

It will be recalled that by the end of 1 929 the mechanical and 
similar workers in the Library had already had their wages 
stabilized at relatively high levels, on the basis of the rates gen- 
erally prevailing in the community, and that they had therefore 



[49] 



already in 1 929 a preferred position as compared with the work- 
ers in the bibliothecal group. It is interesting to compare the rela- 
tive standing of the two groups at the end of 1929 and 1939, 
as set forth in the following table (see also Appendix D on pages 
100-103 below): 



Salary Range 



% of Total No. 
of Library Workers 



% of Total No. of 
Mechanical & Other Workers 



Unde 
Unde 
Unde 
Unde 
Unde 
Unde 
Unde 
Unde 



$15.00 per week 

$20.00 per week 

$25.00 per week 

$30.00 per week 

$35.00 per week 

$40.00 per week 

$45.00 per week 

$50.00 per week 



1929 

16.2% 
27.8% 
49.0% 
73.3% 
83.2% 
89.3%, 
94.89?, 
96.7% 



1939 
0.0% 

1.5% 
26.3%, 
49.4% 
68.8% 
83.9% 
89.4^^ 
95.1% 



1929 

0.8%, 

25.0% 

36.5% 
40.6% 
54.6% 
62.1% 
87.1% 
96.2%o 



1939 

0.0% 
19.3% 
33.9'/; 

37.3% 
63.3% 
66.7% 
87.7% 
95.3% 



Salary Range 

Fro.Ti $10.00 to 
From $15.00 to 
From $20.00 to 
From $25.00 to 
From $30.00 to 
From $35.00 to 
From $40.00 to 
From $45.00 to 



% of Total No. % of Total No. of 

of Library Workers Mechanical & Other Workers 



$14.99 
$19.99 
$24.99 
$29.99 
$34.99 
$39.99 
$44.99 
$49.99 



per Week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 
per week 



1929 
16.2% 
1 1 .6% 
21.2% 

24.3% 
9.9% 
6.1% 

5.5% 
1.9% 



1939 
0.0% 

1.5% 
24.8% 
23.1% 
19.4% 
15.1% 
5.5% 
6.3% 



1929 
0.8% 

24.2% 
11.5% 

4.1% 
14.0% 

7.5% 
25.0% 

9.1% 



1939 

0.0% 

19.3% 

14.67o 

3.4% 
26.0%, 

3.4% 
21.0% 

8.6% 



The conclusion is to be drawn that the mechanical and similar 
workers are at the end of 1939 still in a preferred position in 
the matter of remuneration as compared with the bibliothecal 
workers. For example, 49% of the bibliothecal workers still re- 
ceive less than $30.00 per week, as compared with 37% of the 
mechanical workers. Sixty-nine per cent (69%) of the bib- 
liothecal workers still receive less than $35.00 per week, as com- 
pared with 63% of the mechanical workers. Eighty-four (84%) 
of the bibliothecal workers still receive less than $40.00 per 
week, as compared with 67% of the mechanical workers. 

For the other City of Boston departments figures are not 
readily available to show the averages of salaries paid in the 
various departments as of December 31, 1939. It will be re- 
called, however, that in June 1937 — after the widespread sal- 
ary revision in the Library Department accomplished as of June 



[50] 

4, 1937 — the Library Department had the lowest average of 
salaries at $1 530. 1 5. As stated above, the average in the Library 
had by the end of 1939 become $1706.58. Substantial as this 
improvement was, it was however presumably not large enough 
to raise the relative position of the Library Department any more 
than from the bottom place in the list of city departments to a 
next to the bottom level. At $1706.58 the average for the Li- 
brary Department was far below the average for the School De- 
partment, which at $2537.80 in 1937 was apparently in the 
neighborhood of the median point of the average for all city de- 
partments. If there is reason to believe — and the signs point 
that way — that the American public library is primarily an edu- 
cational institution, it would seem not improper to compare the 
average of salaries paid in the Library Department of the City 
of Boston with that paid in the School Department of the City 
of Boston. 

Nor is the Boston PubHc Library average at $1706.58 con- 
siderably below that prevailing in City of Boston departments 
only. It may well be compared also with the latest available fig- 
ure ( 1 938) for the average of all municipal salaries in all United 
States cities of over 500,000 population. According to The 
Municipal Year Boof( for 1939 (page 225), this average of all 
municipal salaries in the large cities of the country was $1 950.00. 
It is reasonably safe to assume that the figure has changed rela- 
tively little in the meantime. 

It has long been a commonplace that librarians' salaries in 
general are everywhere low. The salaries paid in the Boston 
Public Library are relatively not high. In many instances they 
are below the average, as compared with the low standard for 
library salaries existing in general throughout the country. This 
may be seen from the following table of salary ranges in effect 
as of November 1 , 1 939 for the larger part of the positions in 
the public libraries of the leading cities of the United States 
(see the April 1940 issue of the Bulletin of the American Li- 
brary Association, vol. 34, p. 212) : 



[31] 



City 


First 


Assistants 


Baltimore .... 


$1080 


- 


$1560 


Boston .... 


1720 


- 


1980 


Buffalo 








Chicago .... 


1560 


- 


2340 


Cincinnati .... 








Cleveland .... 


1500 


- 


2600 


Detroit .... 


2280 


- 


2340 


Los Angeles . . . ^ 






2100 


Milwaukee .... 


1800 


- 


2220 


New York City 








New York Public Library . 


1980 


- 


2220 


Brooklyn Public Library . 


1620 


- 


2100 


Queens Borough Public Libi 


ary 1320 


- 


2160 


Philadelphia 






1350 


Pittsburgh .... 


1500 


- 


1740 


St. Louis .... 


1320 


- 


1770 


San Francisco 








City 


Children's Librarians 


Baltimore .... 






$1380 


Boston 


$1660 


- 


2040 


Buffalo .... 








Chicago .... 


900 


- 


2880 


Cincinnati .... 


1300 


- 


1650 


Cleveland .... 


1380 


- 


2300 


Detroit .... 








Los Angeles .... 


1380 


- 


1920 


Milwaukee .... 








New York City 








New York Public Library . 


1980 


- 


2220 


Brooklyn Public Library . 


1620 


- 


2100 


Queens Borough Public Library 1320 


- 


2160 


Philadelphia 


1200 


- 


1740 


Pittsburgh .... 


1458 


- 


1740 


St. Louis .... 


1320 


- 


1770 


San Francisco 


1560 


- 


1920 



Catalogers 


$1320 


_ 


$1740 


1875 


- 


2080 


1440 


_ 


2880 


1480 


_ 


1860 


1560 


- 


2800 


1500 


_ 


1920 


1920 


- 


2160 


1380 


_ 


2220 


1440 


_ 


2220 


1320 


_ 


2160 


1200 


_ 


1840 


1320 


_ 


1800 


1440 


- 


2160 


Other 




Professiona 


lA 


sistants 


$1140 


_ 


$2040 


1040 


_ 


2080 


1320 


_ 


2200 


1320 


_ 


2640 


1260 


_ 


1800 


1380 


- 


3000 


1560 


- 


3500 


1500 


_ 


2280 


1560 


- 


2220 


900 


_ 


2220 


1320 


- 


2100 


1320 


_ 


2820 


1050 


_ 


1300 


1320 


_ 


1800 


990 


_ 


1620 


1200 


- 


1920 



WHY ARE THERE SO MANY INDIVIDUALS IN THE LIBRARY 
TO RECEIVE STEP RATE INCREASES IN PAY? 

The question is frequently raised in municipal circles in Bos- 
ton as to why there are so many individuals to whom step rate 
increases in pay are given in the Library Department as com- 
pared with the other City of Boston departments. The following 
table shows the number of individuals who received step rate 
increases in pay in 1939 in the Library Department and in the 
various city departments for which figures can be obtained from 
the list of departmental changes published weekly in the Boston 
City Record : 



[52] 

Assessing Department ..... 3 

Auditing Department ...... 16 

Building Department ...... I 

Collecting Department ..... 29 

Election Department ...... 2 

Fire Department . . . . . . 116 

Health Department ...... 21 

I lospital Department ...... 86 

Institutions Department . . . . . 11 

Law Department ...... 5 

Library Department ...... 425 

Overseers of Public Welfare .... 345 

Park Department 4 

Penal Institutions Department .... 55 

Police Department ...... 233 

Printing Department ...... 7 

Public Buildings Department .... 2 

Public Works Department 54 

Registry Department ...... 6 

Retirement Board ...... 3 

Soldiers' Relief Department .... 9 

Street Laying Out Department .... 3 

Supply Department ...... 6 

In this compilation there is no figure for the School Department. 
It is not readily to be found in published form. The School De- 
partment figure surpasses that of all other city departments, how- 
ever. Not only is it the largest of the city departments, but also 
it has a relatively high proportion of its large total personnel on 
a sHding scale basis in the matter of remuneration. The depart- 
ments having the next largest numbers receiving step rate in- 
creases in 1939 were the Library Department with 425, the 
Welfare Department with 345, the Police Department with 
233, and the Fire Department with 1 1 6. On the other hand 
certain of the other large departments such as the Hospital De- 
partment and the Public Works Department had only 86 and 
54 respectively. 

Such differences as exist in the above respect are apparently 
attributable to the fact that some city departments have most 
or all of their workers on a step rate basis of remuneration extend- 
ing from a beginning minimum to an eventual maximum, while 
others have their workers for the most part at a fixed but higher 
rate of remuneration which is in effect from the very beginning of 
the appointment. In the Library Department only about one 
fifth (that is, the 120 or so mechanical and similar workers) out 



153] 

of the total of nearly 600 workers are appointed at a beginning 
rate which remains the established rate for the position without 
any later change, and which is therefore at a higher rate than 
would otherwise be the case. The remaining 460 or so biblio- 
ihecal workers in the Library Department are all paid on a 
sliding scale, step rate increase basis. The entering rate for them 
is at the low minimum figure of $20.00 per week. From that 
minimum their remuneration is increased by steps up to the maxi- 
ma of their positions, in accordance with the following scale : 



Probationary Assistants .... 


. $20.00 


- $25.00 


Assistants 


25.00 


- 37.00 


Second Assistants ..... 




41.00 


First Assistants ...... 




45.00 


Chiefs of Departments & Branch Librarians 


! 50.00 


- 60.00 



In the Library Department in 1939, outside of the relatively 
small group of mechanical and similar workers, not a single new 
appointment was made to the library service other than at the 
minimum beginning rate of $20.00 per week with but one ex- 
ception. In fact, during the entire eight years from 1 932 to 1 939 
inclusive, there have been only eleven out of the two hundred 
or so appointments which have been made to the library service 
which were not at the beginning rate of $20.00 or less. Of the 
35 appointments made to the library service in 1 939, thirty-four 
(34) were at this minimum beginning rate of $20.00 per week, 
and the single remaining appointment was made at the minimum 
beginning rate for chiefs of departments. Obviously, if all ap- 
pointments are made at the relatively low rate of $20.00 per 
week, an appreciable number of step rate increases are necessary 
to bring eventually to each of the workers appointed the maxi- 
mum rate of remuneration for his position. 

This practice holds in the Library Department for four fifths 
of the entire body of employees. In most of the city departments 
it does not apparently hold to a similarly wide extent. In com- 
parison with the new appointments made in 1 939 to the library 
service in the Library Department there should be placed the 
many appointments in other city departments which were made 
at rates in excess of the $20.00 rate used ordinarily for all posi- 
tions in the library service in the Library Department The fol- 



[54] 



lowing list of such appointments has been compiled from the 
weekly lists of departmental changes as published week by 
week during 1939 in the Boston Cit^ Record: 



1 — Associate physician (Hospital Dept.) . 

— Supervisor of poultry (Penal Institutions Dept.) 
— Resident physician (Institutions Dept.) 
— Pharmacist (Institutions Dept.) . 

— Second-class engineer (Hospital Depf.) 

— Engineer (Institutions Dept.) 

— Supervisor (Supply Dept.) 

— Assistant corporation counsel 

— Engineer (Penal Institutions Dept.) 

— Engineer, second-class (Penal Institutions Dept.) 

— Bookbinder (Printing Dept.) 
— Marine fireman (Public Works Dept.) 
2 — Firemen (Penal Institutions Dept.) 
3 — iFirst-cIass firemen (Hospital Dept.) 
2 — Second-class firemen (Hospital Depf.) 
3 — Firemen (Institutions Dept.) 
I — ^Fireman (Public Buildings Dept.) 
1 — Monotype keyboard operator (Printing Dept.) 

8 — Officers (Penal Institutions Dept.) 

I — Plumbing inspector (Buildings Dept.) 

4 — Cylinder press feeders (Printing Dept.) 

1— Tollman-guard (Public Works Dept.) 

1 — Senior assistant resident physician (Institutions Dept.) 

1 — Assistant resident physician (Institutions Dept.) 

I — Ambulance driver (Hospital Dept.) 

1 — Supervisor (Hospital Dept.) 

1 — Chief clerk (Law Dept.) .... 

I — Superintendent golf course (Park Dept.) 

2 — Assistant supervisors (Park Dept.) 

1 — Ambulance driver (Public Buildings Dept.) 

1 — Assistant supervisor (Supply Dept.) 

I — Visiting dental surgeon (Hospital Dept.) 

4 — Airport signal operators (Park Dept.) 

4 — Porters and furnace lenders (Public Buildings Dept.) 

1 — Lay inspector of animals (Health Dept.) 

3 — Deckhands (Institutions Dept.) . 

I — Deckhand and inland mate (Institutions Dept.) 

3 — Male nurses (Hospital Dept.) 

I — Resident physician on skin service (Hospital Dept.) 
I I — Junior assistant resident physicians (Institutions Dept.) 

2 — Assistant resident physicians (Institutions Dept.) 

1 — Stockkeeper (Public Works Depf.) 

I — Constable (Building Dept.) . 

I — Constable (Overseers of Public Welfare) 

8 — Junior law clerks (Law Dept.) . 
10 — Law clerks (Law Dept.) . 

2 — -Laborers (Printing Dept.) . 



$57.50 

53.09 
5L75 
50.11 

48.00 
48.00 
47.92 
47.92 
45.00 
45.00 

42.20 
41.50 
41.50 
41.50 
41.50 
41.50 
41.50 
41.40 

38.67 
38.33 
36.60 
36.50 
36.42 
36.42 
36.00 
35.79 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 

34.50 
34.50 
33.00 
32.58 
32.58 
32.58 
32.00 
31.00 
31.00 
31.00 
30.67 
30.67 
30.67 
30.19 
30.00 
30.00 



[55] 

—Janitor (Public Buildings Dept.) 30.00 

—Secretary (Public Buildings Dept.) 30.00 

— Assistant supervisor (Public Works Dept.) 30.00 

— Assistant pa)anaster (Overseers of Public Welfare) .... 28.75 

—Nurse (Hospital Dept.) 27.55 

—Pharmacist (Hospital Dept.) 27.00 

13 — Staff nurses (Institutions Dept.) 26.40 

Assistant cook (Hospital Dept.) 26.00 

Resident on neurosurgical service (Hospital Dept.) .... 25.17 

Assistant pharmacist (Hospital Dept.) ....... 25.00 

Technician (Hospital Dept.) ........ 25.00 

Caddy master (Park Dept.) 25.00 

1 — Stenographer (Law Dept.) 24.92 

-Laboratory assistant (Hospital Dept.) ....... 24.92 

I— Baker (Hospital Dept.) 24.50 

-Pastry cook (Institutions Dept.) ........ 23.33 

-Assistant in health education (Health Dept.) 23.00 

98 — Floor duty nurses (Hospital Dept.) 23.00 

12 — Floor nurses (Hospital Dept.) ........ 23.00 

3— Staff nurses (Hospital Dept.) 23.00 

3— Male nurses (Hospital Dept.) 23.00 

5 — Medical social workers (Hospital Dept.) 23.00 

I — Assistant dietitian (Hospital Dept.) 23.00 

1— Chaplain (Hospital Dept.) 23.00 

1 — Clerk-typist (Registry Dept.) 23.00 

1 — Junior accountant (Supply Dept.) ....... 22.50 

1 — Stenographer-Clerk (Boston Port Authority) 22.42 

2— Matrons (Health Dept.) 22.00 

1— Matron (Park Dept.) 22.00 

1— Secretary (Public Buildings Dept.) 22.00 

1 — Junior accountant (Supply Dept.) ....... 21.00 

The giving of such a list as the above is not intended to imply 
that the rates of pay for those various positions are too high or 
too low, or in fact anything other than what is entirely proper 
or just. They are given only to help in providing an answer to 
the question as to why there appear to be so many more in- 
dividuals to whom step rate increases in pay have to be given in 
the Library Department as compared with other City of Boston 
departments. Obviously more individuals have to be given step 
rate increases — and also more step rate increases as such have 
to be given — when the beginning rate is uniformly $20.00 per 
week than when as in other city departments the newly appointed 
individuals begin at rates which are generally more than $20.00, 
and frequently very appreciably more. A library assistant, for 
example, requires nine annual step rate increases of $100 per 
3'ear ($2.00 per week) to proceed from a minimum entering 



[56] 



rate of $1040 per year ($20.00 per week) to his maximum of 
$1930 per year ($37.00 per week), as compared with the six 
such step rate increases required for a clerical worker to go from 
his minimum of $1000 to his maximum of $1600 per year, or 
the live such step rate increases needed for a police patrolman 
or a fireman to go from his minimum of $1600 to his maximum 
of $2100. 

One further reason that more step rate increases — and also 
over a longer period — are having to be given in the Library 
Department is that the prevailing rates of remuneration in the 
Library Department are in the process of being raised from an 
unusually low level toward the average level for all city depart- 
ments, as set forth above. Until this average level has been ap- 
proximated there will perforce have to be given step rate increases 
to a larger number of individuals, and over a longer period, than 
would otherwise be the case, if the workers in the Library De- 
partment are to be given a treatment consistent with that accorded 
to other city workers. 

The basis on which stabilization of salaries on an improved 
level is being sought in the Library Department is the following 
salary schedule as established in 1937: 



Probationary Assistant, Beginning 

Probationary Assistant, 1st Step 

Probationary Assistant, 2nd Step 

Probationary Assistant, 3rd Step 

Probationary Assistant, 4th Step 

Probationary Assistant, 5th Step 

Assistant, Beginning 

Assistant, I st Step 

Assistant, 2nd Step 

Assistant, 3rd Step 

Second Assistant 

Children's Assistant 

Reference Assistant 

Cataloger 

Classifier 

Assistant, 4th Step 

First Assistant . 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian . 

Cataloger and Classifier 

Assistant, 5th Step . 

Chiefs of Departments 
Branch Librarians . 



$20.00 
2L00 
22.00 
23.00 
24.00 
25.00 
25.00 
29.00 
33.00 
37.00 
4K00 
4L00 
4L00 
4K00 
4L0O 
4L00 
45.00 
45.00 
45.00 
45.00 
45.00 
$2610-$3I30 
2610- 3130 



[57] 

Tliis salary schedule did not in reality set up new levels. Even 
as far back as 1929 there were individuals in nearly every one 
of these categories who eventually received as much as the rates 
set forth above. The difficulty existing then and up to 1937 was 
that year after year funds were not being appropriated in suffi- 
cient amount to permit a uniform application of these rates in 
the granting of step rate increases. That the above rates are not 
out of line with those existing elsewhere can easily be ascertained 
by comparing them with the rates paid in other city departments 
for work which is of a similar level or which requires not dis- 
similar qualifications- If any doubt exists as to whether or not 
these rates are adequate for what is expected of workers in the 
Library, it will be quickly dispelled by an examination of the 
qualifications set down for the various steps and grades of the 
Boston Public Library service in the separate publication en- 
titled Classification of Personnel and Staff Examinations issued 
by the Library on June 1, 1937; and perhaps even more by a 
perusal of the examination papers as actually set for the Li- 
brary's Qualifying Examinations and Promotional Examina- 
tions, as published by the Library each year after the annual 
examinations have been held. 

HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO STABILIZE 
THE LEVEL OF SALARIES AND WAGES IN THE LIBRARY? 

A study of the number of individuals who during the last 
three years have been proceeding by step rate increases in pay 
toward but have not yet reached the maxima of remuneration 
for their positions gives the following figures: 

1937 441 

1938 427 

1939 425 

For the remaining members of this group of individuals who 
were in the service of the Library before January 1 , 1 938 to 
reach the maxima of remuneration for their positions there will 
be necessary annual step rate increases in pay of $ 1 00 per year 
over seven more years. The number of individuals who will be 



[58] 



eligible on this basis for step rate increases year by year will be 
as followrs: 



1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 



388 
368 
338 
283 
231 
159 
77 
2 



Actually the number may be expected to be somewhat smaller 
year by year, by reason of resignation, death, or other change 
which cannot be foretold. 

The cost for each of the years will be as follows: 



1940 






$38,450. 


1941 






36,100. 


1942 






33.000. 


1943 






27.850. 


1944 






21.750. 


1945 






14300. 


1946 






3.950. 


1947 






100. 


Total cost 


$175,500. 



For these individuals who were in the library service prior 
to January 1, 1938 stabilization of salary levels will also be 
accelerated appreciably by their arriving with increasing rapid- 
ity at the maxima of their steps and grades through the working 
of the promotional system, with its promotional examinations 
and resulting promotional increases in remuneration. 

For those individuals who have entered the library service 
sinc€ January 1, 1938 there is no question of stabilization of 
salary levels. For them the old system of automatic step rate 
increases in pay is not in use. They are to move ahead to in- 
creased remuneration only on a promotional basis, through the 
meeting of Qualifying Examinations and Promotional Examin- 
ations, and upon subsequent recommendation following exec- 
utive evaluation. When this promotional system is fully in effect 
there are not Hkely to be in any one year more than 1 00 or so 
individuals eligible for promotional increases in pay. From the 
1938 examinations there were 130 individuals so ehgible; from 
the 1939 examinations, 93 individuals; from the examinations 



[59] 

in subsequent years, probably rather fewer. The resulting pro- 
motional increases are likely to average from $100 to $150 a 
year. There is reason to believe that the average is likely to be 
nearer the lower figure than the higher. On this basis the annual 
cost for such promotional increases will range from somewhere 
in the neighborhood of $10,000 up to a possible maximum of 
$1 5,000. This maximum figure is the equivalent of the difference 
between the beginning salary ($1040.00) and the present aver- 
age salary ($1706.58) for twenty individual full-time workers 
in the Library Department. Since there is annually a turnover 
in the personnel of the Library which is substantially greater 
than this, it seems clear that there will exist no necessity of addi- 
tional appropriation for the stabilization of salary levels for the 
individuals who have entered the library service since January 
I. 1938. 

The question of stabilization of salary levels exists therefore 
only for those individuals who entered the library service prior 
to January 1 , 1 938 and who are moving by automatic annual 
step rate increases to the maximum remuneration of their posi- 
tions. For them to reach their maxima an additional seven years 
will be needed, with an additional annual cost which will eventu- 
ally come to a total amount of approximately $175,500. 

SUMMARY OF THE SALARY SITUATION IN THE LIBRARY 

Of the total increase of $262,228.93 in the annual personnel 
expenditure of the Library over the period from 1 930 to 1 939 
inclusive, the sum of $219,323.88 per year represents the gross 
amount of the salary increases as granted year by year. 

These salary increases have raised the average of all salaries 
in the Library from $1434.45 in 1929 to $1530.15 in 1937 
and to $1 706.58 at the end of 1939. 

This average of all salaries for the Library Department was 
in 1929 by far the lowest for all City of Boston departments. 
It was still the lowest in 1937. It was apparently no higher than 
next to the lowest at the end of 1939. 

At the end of 1939 one half (49%) of the entire group of 
library workers was still after several years of service being paid 



[CO] 

under $30.00 per week. This is the figure which the American 
Library Association recommends as only the beginning rate 
for hbrary school graduates, even when without actual library 
experience. 

As compared with the mechanical and similar workers em- 
ployed by the Library the group of library workers was at the 
end of 1939 in a continuingly unfavorable position. Forty-nine 
per cent (49%) of the bibliothecal workers were still paid under 
$30.00 per week, as compared with 37% of the mechanical 
workers; 69% of the bibliothecal workers were paid under 
$35.00, as compared with 63% of the mechanical workers; 
84% of the bibliothecal workers were paid under $40.00, as 
compared with 67% of the mechanical workers. 

The wage ranges for the mechanical workers are already at 
an adequate level. To stabilize at an equally adequate level 
the salary ranges for the library workers who were in the library 
service prior to January 1 , 1 938, annual step rate increases in 
pay of $2.00 per week will be necessary in diminishing numbers 
year by year over a period of seven more years. The cost of 
such annual step rate increases over the seven year period will 
total approximately $175,500. 

in. 

INCREASE IN PERSONNEL COST ARISING OUT 
OF INCREASED OR REARRANGED ACTIVITIES 

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL 

The personnel of the library service is divided into two 
groups : 

(i) Full-Time Workers in the Regular Service 
(2) Parl-Time Workers in the Extra Service 

The full-time workers in the Regular Service are employed 
on either a weekly or an annual salary basis. They numbered 580 
as of December 31,1 939 and were distributed as follows : 

General Adminislralive Offices . . . . . 13 

Circulation Division (chiefly the Branch Libraries) . . . 257 

Reference Division (chiefly the Central Library) . . . 183 

Division of Business Operations . . . . • . 127 

580 



[611 

The part-time workers in the Extra Service are employed by 
the hour at rates of pay varying with the tasks performed. In 
terms of the equivalent of full-time personnel they numbered 1 07 
as of December 31, 1 939 and were distributed as follows : 

Extra Assistants in the Central Library . . . . 31 

Sunday and Evening Service in the Central Library . . 16 

Extra Assistants in the Branch Libraries .... 53 

Cleaners by the Hour in the Branch Libraries ... 7 

107 

The total number of workers in both the Regular Service and 
the Extra Service numbered 687 as of December 31,1 939 and 
were distributed as follows: 

Full-Time Workers in the Regular Service . 580 . 84% 

Part-Time Workers in the Extra Service . . 107 . 16% 

687 100% 

The total cost for all workers in both the Regular Service 
and the Extra Service was $1,032,696.19 in 1939, which was 
distributed as follows: 

Full-Time Workers in the Regular Service $945,123.21 . 92% 

Part-Time Workers in the Extra Service 87,572.98 . 8% 



$1,032,696.19 . 100% 

From these figures it is to be noted that the salaries and wages 
of the full-time workers in the Regular Service account for 92% 
of the total expenditure for personnel. In number these full-time 
workers in the Regular Service constitute, however, 84% of 
the total personnel of the Library. 

DISTINCTION BETWEEN REGULAR SERVICE AN EXTRA SERVICE 

The full-time workers in the Regular Service are a definitely 
known quantity at all times. Their regular work is by the week 
for six days each week. 

The part-time workers in the Extra Service vary constantly 
in number, chiefly on a seasonal basis. They are divided for the 
most part into two groups: 

( 1 ) extra workers (chiefly boys and girls in school and college) 
in addition to the Library's regular full-time workers; 



[62] 

(2) regular full-time workers employed in addition to their regu- 
lar weekly working period to cover certain activities on Sun- 
days and evenings on an extra basis with extra remuneration. 

Extra work by regular full-time workers was abandoned in the 
branch libraries a number of years ago, except for Sunday work ; 
but in the central library it persisted up to 1933 to a highly 
undesirable extent for covering the Library on both evenings 
and Sundays. In the years from 1 933 to 1 938 there was finally 
taken the long overdue step to establish gradually a shift or 
platoon system for all workers in the central library except the 
buildings force. At the present time regular full-time workers 
are no longer employed on an extra basis with extra remuneration 
except for the following: 

( 1 ) Sunday Service in the Central Library — for both the 
library and the buildings force; 

(2) Evening Service in the Central Library — for the buildings 
force only (with a half dozen exceptions from the library 
force not yet entirely on the shift system). 

COST AND NUMBER OF TOTAL PERSONNEL. 1930-1939 

The total cost of personnel has increased from 1 930 to 1 939 
inclusive as follows: 

% of Change 
Tolal Expenditures from 1929 

1929 . . . $770.367.26 

1939 . . . 1,032.696.19 . . . +33.9% 

The total number of personnel has increased from 1930 to 
1939 inclusive as follows: 

% of Change 
Tolal Personnel from 1929 

1929 ... . 602 

1939 .... 687 .. . +14.1% 

For detailed figures year by year see Appendix D on pages 
90-91. 

It is to be noted that while the total expenditure for salaries 
and wages for all personnel was increasing by 34% over the 
ten year period the total number of all personnel was increased 
by only 14%. 



[63] 

COST AND NUMBER OF FULL-TIME PERSONNEL, 1930-1939 

The total expenditure for salaries and wages for full-time 
personnel has increased from 1 930 to 1 939 as follows : 

% of Change 
Total Expenditures from 1929 

1929 . . . $663,747.98 

1939 . . . 945,123.21 . . . +42.5% 

The total number of full-time personnel as of December 3 1 st 

in each year has increased from 1930 to 1939 inclusive as 

follows : 

Total Full-Time % of Change 

Personnel from 1929 

1929 .... 475 

1939 .... 580 .. . +22.1% 

For detailed figures year by year see Appendix D on pages 
91-96. 

It is to be noted that while the total expenditure for full-time 
personnel was increasing by 43% over the ten year period the 
total number of full-time personnel was increased by only 22%. 

COST AND NUMBER OF EXTRA SERVICE PERSONNEL. 1930-1939 

The total expenditure for salaries and wages for Extra Ser- 
vice has decreased from 1 930 to 1 939 as follows : 

% of Change 
Total Expenditures from 1929 

1929 . . . $104,032.28 ..... 
1939 . . . 85 661.98 . . . —17.6% 

The total number of Extra Service personnel reduced to the 
equivalent of full-time personnel as of December 31st in each 
year has decreased from 1930 to 1939 inclusive as follows: 

Total Extra Service Personnel 

in Terms of Equivalent % of Change 

of Fuil-Time Personnel from 1929 

1929 .... 127 .... . 

1939 .... 107 .. . —15.7% 

For detailed figures year by year see Appendix D on page 
91. 

It is to be noted that the decrease of 1 6% in the total of Extra 
Service personnel was paralleled by a decrease of 17% in the 
total expenditure for Extra Service. 



[64] 
SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN NUMBER OF PERSONNEL, 1930-1939 

The net increase in all personnel during the period from 1 930 
to 1939 inclusive was 85, as follows: 

Increase in full-time personnel -f-105 

Deirease in extra service personnel .... ■ — 20 

The increase in full-time personnel was distributed through 
the period as follows: 

From 1930 to 1931 inclusive +60 

From 1932 to 1937 inclusive +57 

The decrease in full-time personnel occurred as follows: 

From 1938 to 1939 inclusive —12 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE INCREASE IN FULL-TIME PERSONNEL, 

1930-1939 

The increase (+8) in full-time personnel in the Division of 
Business Operations arose chiefly out of: 

( 1 ) the establishment of the Executive Staff (Comptroller's 
Office; 

(2) the fining of a number of vacancies not included in the count 
of full-time personnel on January 1 , 1 930, but filled sub- 
sequent thereto. 

The increase (+47) in full-time personnel in the Circulation 
Division arose chiefly out of : 

( 1 ) the establishment of the Executive Staff (the Chief Librarian 
of the Circulation Division and the two Supervisors) ; 

(2) the filling of a number of vacancies not included in the 
count of full-time personnel on January 1 , 1 930, but filled 
subsequent thereto; 

(3) the removal of 6 branch libraries into new buildings or other 
new quarters ; 

(4) adjustments for increase in work or other reasons; 

(5) the establishment of the Book Selection Department; 

(6) the development of the School Department. 

The opening of two new branch libraries (Kirstein and Phillips 
Brooks) was offset by the closing of two branch libraries (Rox- 
bury Crossing and Tyler Street). 



[65] 

The increase (+51) in full-time personnel in the Reference 
Division arose chiefly out of: 

(1 ) the establishment of the Executive Staff (the Chief Librarian 
of the Reference Division, the two Supervisors, and the 
WPA Sponsor's Representative) ; 

(2) the establishment of the Business Branch; 

(3) the establishment of the Book Selection Department; 

(4) the abolition of extra work evenings in the Central Library 
through the establishment of the shift system. 

Of all of the above-mentioned developments those of truly 
surpassing importance were: 

( 1 ) the establishment of the Business Branch ; 

(2) the provision of improved and adequate quarters in new 
buildings or otherwise for 6 branch libraries; 

(3) the establishment of executive staffs adequate to the eco- 
nomical operation of the three main divisions of the Library's 
activities ; 

(4) the abolition of the necessity for a great many members of the 
staff of the Central Library to work additional time evenings 
in order to make a living wage, this having been accomplished 
through improved basic salaries and the establishment of the 
shift or platoon system. 

To gain an adequate understanding of the effect of these 
various developments upon the number of personnel, it is neces- 
sary to examine in more or less detail the changes in net personnel 
which have occurred during the last ten years in each of the 
four divisions of the Library: 

( 1 ) the Director's Office ; 

(2) the Division of Business Operations; 

(3) the Circulation Division; 

(4) the Reference Division. 

DECREASE IN FULL-TIME PERSONNEL OF THE DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 

During the ten year period from 1 930 to 1 939 inclusive the 
full-time personnel of the Director*s Office was decreased by 
one ( 1 ) individual. 



[66] 

INCREASE IN FULL-TIME PERSONNEL 
OF THE DIVISION OF BUSINESS OPERATIONS 

During the ten year period from 1 930 to 1 939 inclusive the 
full-time personnel of the Division of Business Operations had a 
net increase of 8 individuals. 

This increase arose chiefly out of ( 1 ) the establishment of the 
Executive Staff (the Comptroller's Office) and (2) the filling 
of a number of vacancies not included in the count of full-time 
personnel on January 1, 1930, but filled subsequent thereto. 

It is interesting to note that simply the filling of these vacancies 
just mentioned accounted for an addition of 7 w^orkers. Inasmuch 
as the net increase in full-time personnel for the Division of 
Business Operations is set forth above as having been only 8, 
it is evident that the establishment of the Executive Staff men- 
tioned above must have been accomplished with offsetting de- 
creases in personnel elsewhere in the Division, as was in fact 
the case. 

INCREASE IN FULL-TIME PERSONNEL 
OF THE CIRCULATION DIVISION 

During the ten year period from 1930 to 1939 inclusive the 
full-time personnel of the Circulation Division had a net increase 
of 47 individuals. 

Here it is interesting to note that 24 out of the total increase 
of 47 were attributable to the increased activities and the in- 
creased coverage arising out of the removal of 6 branch Hbraries 
into larger new buildings or other new quarters. 

Ten ( 1 0) more of the additional workers were accounted 
for through the requirements of increasing work throughout the 
branch library system in general. During the ten year period 
following 1929 there occurred a marked increase in the use of 
public libraries everywhere. In 1 939 the Boston Public Library 
lent a 7% larger number of volumes than it did in 1929. At the 
height of the depression period in 1 932 it was lending as many 
as 42% more volumes than in 1929. Approximately 90% of 
this increase in circulation occurred in the branch libraries. 



[67] 

Seven (7) more of the additional workers were accounted 
for by the filling of vacancies existing on January 1 , 1 930 but 
not included In the count of full-time personnel made at that 
lime. 

These three groups just mentioned account for 41 out of the 
total increase of 47 in the Circulation Division. The remaining 
increase of 6 workers was attributable to ( 1 ) the establishment 
of the Executive Staff, (2) the establishment of the Book Selec- 
tion Department, and (3) the development of the School De- 
partment. Obviously the accomplishment of these developments 
required offsetting decreases elsewhere in the personnel of the 
Division. 

INCREASE IN FULL-TIME PERSONNEL 
OF mE REFERENCE DIVISION 

During the ten year period from 1 930 to 1 939 inclusive the 
full-time personnel of the Reference Division had a net increase 
of 51 individuals. 

Here the most extensive undertaking during the period was 
the long overdue step, taken finally from 1 933 to 1 938, to estab- 
lish a shift or platoon system for the library workers in the Cen- 
tral Library. The net addition to the staff for this purpose 
accounted for 33 out of the total increase of 5 1 , The carrying 
of this undertaking to completion was one of the most important 
single accomplishments in the Library over a long period. Its 
importance lay in that ( 1 ) there was thereby finally abolished 
the necessity for a great many members of the staff of the Cen- 
tral Library to work additional time evenings for extra compen- 
sation in order to make a living wage, and (2) there followed 
therefrom an improved library service to the citizens of Boston. 

The estabhshment of the Business Branch in 1930 accounted 
for 1 2 more of the additional workers. 

In these two directions alone 45 of the total increase of 51 
for the Reference Division are accounted for. The remaining 
increase of 6 workers was attributable to ( 1 ) the establishment 
of the Executive Staff, and (2) the establishment of the Book 
Selection Department. Here as in the other divisions the accomp- 



[68] 

lishment of these developments was accompanied by offsetting 
decreases elsewhere in the personnel of the Reference Division. 

HAS THE EXECUTIVE FORCE BEEN UNDULY EXPANDED? 

In the sections immediately preceding mention has been made 
of the establishment of executive staffs for the three main divisions 
of the Library. The purpose in developing these was to provide 
executive staffs adequate to the economical operation of the 
Library's activities. This appears to have been doubted in cer- 
tain quarters. The charge has been made that under the present 
administration of the Library there has occurred an unparalleled 
expansion of the executive force. No definition of "the executive 
force" is given, nor is the charge accompanied by supporting 
details. 

Since 1 93 1 , following the advent of a new administration 
early in 1932, the Library has been undergoing a reorganization. 
In the course of this there has occurred a number of changes in 
nomenclature of positions and in the allocation of duties among 
positions. It is therefore desirable to define "the executive force." 
A fair definition for purposes of comparison between 1 93 1 and 
1939 would seem to be to consider "the executive force" as 
including all of the officers of the Library at the end of 1931 
and at the end of 1 939. Such a definition would include depart- 
ment heads and branch librarians, plus all other officers. 

As to whether or not there has occurred an unparalleled ex- 
pansion of the executive force from 1931 to 1939 inclusive, 
the following statements of fact are pertinent. 

On December 31, 1 93 1 the executive force was made up of 
72 individuals, holding 76 different positions. On December 31, 
1939 the executive force was made up of 72 individuals, hold- 
ing 75 different positions. 

The only out-and-out new positions which have been created 
since 1 93 1 , and for which no counterparts of any sort existed 
prior to 1932, are the following: 

Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division 
Chief of Book Selection in the Circulation Division 
Chief of Book Selection in the Reference Division 
Chief of School Department 



[69] 

These are included in the 75 positions mentioned above as 
existing on December 31,1 939. 

As of December 31, 1 93 1 the annual salary expenditure for 
the executive force totaled $169,117, or 19.82% of the total 
annual expenditure by the Library for personnel. As of Decem- 
ber 31,1 939 the annual salary expenditure for the executive 
force totaled $203,495, or 19.70% of the total expenditure 
by the Library for personnel. 

From December 31, 1 93 1 to December 31,1 939 the annual 
salary expenditure for the executive force increased by $34,378, 
or 20.33%. For the same period the total annual expenditure 
by the Library for personnel increased by $179,709.02, or 
21.07%. 

HAS THERE BEEN AN OVER-STAFFING OF THE LIBRARY? 

There exists in some minds a v/onder as to w^hether there has 
not been an over-staffing of the Library in general, and parti- 
cularly so in the Central Library. This latter possibility is ex- 
pressed in the observation that the Branch Libraries seem to be 
more economically operated than is the Central Library. 

The effecting of an adequate comparison in this respect is 
difficult except upon the basis of thorough and authoritative 
study. The work of a branch library is carried on with a rela- 
tively limited number of titles — from 12,000 to 15,000 on the 
average. Increased turnover of this limited stock can result in 
an increased volum.e in use for which there may be necessary 
only a duplication of copies of these titles and without increase 
necessarily in their numbers. The central library, on the other 
hand, has to maintain a book collection totaling over a million 
volumes. Demand there is diversified. It is distributed among 
mcmy titles, not concentrated on a relatively limited number as 
in a branch library. The cost of maintenance of so much larger 
a collection of books increases in what is essentially a sort of 
geometric rather than a simple arithmetic progression. The larger 
a large library of scholarly research collections becomes the 
greater by far its cost of maintenance becomes, lo effect the 
selection, then the purchase, and then the cataloging of the out- 



[70] 

of-the-way book for a scholarly collection is obviously more 
expensive than to do the same for the current or standard book 
intended for a popular branch library collection. Also, to find 
the proper place for a single new volume in a collection of a 
million and more other volumes, in terms of the relationship of 
the subject matter of the new volume to that of the numerous 
other related volumes, is naturally more costly as a process than 
to place a single new volume in a small collection of only 1 5,000 
volumes. So likewise is the cost of distribution in the large central 
library naturally greater than in a branch library. The very 
bigness of the central library as a physical entity plays its part 
here just as it does in the cost of maintenance. It is of the nature 
of a large scholarly reference library that increasing costs follow 
from increasing volume of use rather than decreasing costs be- 
cause oi increasing volume of use. 

It is undoubtedly primarily in connection with the distribution 
of books that the query more often arises as to whether the 
Library may perhaps be over-staffed. The distribution and use 
of books is carried on directly before the eyes of the public, 
thus differing from the preliminary preparation of books for 
use, which is done behind the scenes or in units closed to the 
public. In a unit rendering direct service to the public on the 
other hand, the staff on duty is at all times in evidence, and 
generally concentrated at one or more points. The size of the 
staff necessary for duty at any one time has to be determined in 
terms of adequate coverage, not only to care for the ordinary 
volume of work but also to permit meeting as well as possible 
the peak demands when they come. The incidence of the latter 
is highly uncertain. Obviously, in order to meet them, there has 
to exist at all times a margin in staff coverage. 

The layman may unthinkingly assert that a unit appears to 
be over-staffed in noting that there are more staff members on 
duty than there are members of the public to be served at the 
particular moment. He may be overlooking, however, that in 
addition to the act of distributing books to readers or borrowers 
there is an appreciable amount of additional work which has to 
be carried on with these books as they are made ready for dis- 



7U 



tribution lime after time. He may be overlooking also the rush 
hour or hours v. hich may have occurred only a short while before 
or which are still to come later, when the size of the staff on duty 
would appear to him in an entirely different relationship to the 
number of customers. In a large store, by contrast, he observes 
a similar situation, where behind the counter there appear to be 
a number of unoccupied salespeople, and he is not inclined to 
assert in this case that there is over-staffing. He knows that the 
store cannot make a profit unless it has an adequate number of 
salespeople, neither too few nor too many, and that it is not 
likely to have more than are actually required. The store is only 
providing what it has found to be necessary for rendering the 
service which its customers require. So likewise is it in the case 
of the Library. What appears on the surface to be over-staffing 
may not necessarily be so. 

That the Library has not been interested in making expendi- 
tures for more personnel than it has believed to be necessary 
for honestly rendering the service which its customers require is 
to be seen from the following figures showing the unexpended 
balances year by year in its appropriations for personnel (see 
also Appendix B on page 81): 



Year 
1930 
1932 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



Unexpended Balance in 
Appropriation for Personnel 

$2,469.59 

5,915.83 

4,319.90 
11.396.63 

2,744.49 

2,660.74 

9,248.39 

1 5,949.59 

7.163.15 



Surely these figures are substantial enough to have permitted 
adding personnel fairly freely in most years if it had been de- 
sired to do just that. Instead they are themselves evidence that 
there has been an honest attempt at a careful administration of 
the funds entrusted to the Library. 

The problem in the Library is apparently not one of over- 
staffing as such. It appears instead to be one of finding the points 



[72J 

at which present procedures may be improved, with the result 
that a smaller personnel may be required for carrying them on. 

SUMMARY OF THE NUMBER OF PERSONNEL IN THE LIBRARY 

The gross increase in the number of full-time workers from 
1 930 to 1 939 inclusive was 1 1 7. Of this total increase of 1 1 7 
sixty (60) were added during the first two years of the period, 
namely, in 1 930 and 1 93 1 . The remaining 5 7 full-time workers 
were added during the six year period from 1932 to 1937 in- 
clusive. 

During 1938 and 1939 there occurred a decrease of 12 in 
the number of full-time workers. From 1929 to 1939 inclusive 
there occurred also a decrease of 20 in the number of part-time 
workers, in terms of their equivalent of full-time workers. 

The net increase in personnel was therefore as follows : 

Net increase in full-time workers .... -|-105 
Net decrease in part-time workers . . . . — 20 

Net increase . . . . . . -[-85 

The more important developments causing this increase were : 

(1) the establishment of the Business Branch; 

(2) the provision of improved and adequate quarters in new 
buildings or otherv^ise for 6 branch libraries; 

(3) the establishment of executive staffs adequate to the eco- 
nomical operation of the three main divisions of the Library's 
activities ; 

(4) the establishment of the shift or platoon system for the li- 
brary workers of the Central Library, with a consequent 
abolition of the necessity for a great many staff members to 
work additional time evenings for extra compensation in order 
to make a living wage. 

Such developments speak for themselves as to their desirability 
or necessity. They have not been accompanied by an over- 
staffing of the Library or by an unparalleled expansion of the 
executive force. 



173J 

IV. 

CONCLUSIONS 

NUMBER OF PERSONNEL 

From 1930 to 1939 inclusive there occurred a net increase 
of 85 in the total personnel of the Library. The period of in- 
crease extended from 1930 to the end of 1937. This increase 
was for entirely desirable ends. From 1938 on there set in a 
steadily continuing decrease. This decrease may be and can be 
continued to a still further point if the financial situation of the 
City requires such action. It can be carried to any point what- 
ever, provided that there is a vvillingness on the part of the public 
and all concerned to pay the price for it. The price will be a 
curtailment or even abandonment soon or late of present library 
activities at one or more points. 

IMPROVEMENT IN SALARIES 

From 1930 to 1939 inclusive there was achieved substantial 
improvement in the salary situation in the Library. Even with 
this improvement the personnel of the Library is in all too many 
instances not yet paid adequately. To pay it adequately will re- 
quire an eventual additional annual expenditure of approximately 
$175,500 above the expenditure for personnel on the pattern 
and at the rates in effect at the end of i 939. There appear to be 
several alternatives of action: 

(1) Allcmalive no. 1 • — increase in expenditure for salaries by 
whatever amount proves Anally necessary (approximately 
$1 75,500) for salary increases, both step rate increases and 
promotional increases — this luie of action will leave all li- 
brary activities in the present pattern, without curtailment or 
abandonment; 

(2) Ahernalivc no. 2 — stabilization of expenditure for salaries 
at the amount ($1,065,000) as necessary for 1940 follow- 
ing the 1 939 increases in pay, and giving no further salary 
increases except promotional increases — this line of action 
will be possible without change in the present pattern of 
library activities; 



174J 

(3) Allcrnativc no. 3 — stabilization of expenditure for salaries 
at the amount ($1,065,000) as necessary for 1940 follow- 
ing the 1939 increases in pay, and giving further salary 
increases on both the step rate basis and the promotional 
basis — this line of action will require a reduction in the 
present pattern of library activities, either through curtailment 
or abandonment at one or more points; 

(4) Alternative no. 4 — reduction in expenditure for salaries, and 
giving no further salary increases except promotional increases 
— this line of action also will require a reduction in the 
present pattern of library activities, either through curtail- 
ment or abandonment at one or more points. 

V. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. It is recommended that careful consideration be given 
to the possibility of carrying out an authoritative survey — pre- 
ferably by an outside agency or group — of the various ac- 
tivities of the Library, w^ith the purpose of determining the points 
at which present procedures may be improved, so that they may 
be carried on by a smaller personnel. Such a survey would con- 
cern itself with the question of whether or not there is in the Li- 
brary an overstaffing in general and also in the executive force. 

2. It is recommended that continuing action be taken for 
the improvement of the salary level of the library workers, par- 
ticularly for the middle group; that the salary level of the li- 
brary workers be made at least commensurate with that of the 
mechanical workers in the library service and that of workers 
of comparable standing elsewhere in the City of Boston service ; 
that this improvement in salary level be accomplished by taking 
action in accordance with some one of the alternative procedures 
listed above. These alternatives of action are recommended in 
the following order of desirability : 

(1) Alternative no. 3 as listed above — stabilization of expendi- 
ture for salaries at the amount ($1,065,000) as necesnary 
for 1940 following the 1939 increases in pay, and giving 
further increases on both the step rate basis and the promo- 
tional basis — this line of action requiring a reduction in the 



1 73 J. 

present pattern of library activities, either through curtail- 
ment or abandonment at one or more points; 

(2) Alternative no. 4 as listed above — reduction in expenditure 
for salaries, and giving no further salary increases except 
promotional increases — this line of action also requiring a 
reduction in the present pattern of library activities, either 
through curtailment or abandonment at one or more ponints; 

(3) Alternative no. 2 as listed above — stabilization of expendi- 
ture for salaries at the amount ($1,065,000) as necessary 
for 1940 foUowfing the 1939 increases in pay, and giving no 
further salary increases except promotional increases — this 
line of action being possible without change in the present 
pattern of library activities. 

The first hvo of these recommended alternative procedures 
will necessitate a reduction in the present pattern of hbrary ac- 
tivities. The third will not. 

The last two of the recommended alternative procedures pro- 
vide for the giving of only promotional increases in pay. For 
these in any one year the over-all appropriation for the personnel 
service account in the budget will be sufficient in amount without 
the necessity of appropriating an extra amount for the purpose. 

3. It is recommended that if only limited action can be 
taken in the matter of increases in pay preference be given to 
granting promotional increases on as full a basis as possible rather 
than step rate increases on only a limited basis. 

The granting of promotional increases only will be more easily 
possible and more easily justifiable than the giving of step rate 
increases if only limited action can be taken in the way of in- 
creases in pay. Promotional increases can be given within the 
amount of the annual appropriation for personnel in any one 
year; by contrast step rate increases will by their very extent 
require an additional appropriation in each following year above 
and beyond the amount of the personnel expenditure for the 
year in which they are granted. Promotional increases will cost 
in any one year from $10,000 to $15,000, depending upon the 
degree of success of members of the library staff in meeting pro- 
motional examinations and other requirements; by contrast step 
rate increases will cost $38,450 in 1940. $36,100 in 1941, 
$33,000 in 1 942, and so on in diminishing amounts year by year 



761 



through 1947 to a total additional annual expenditure of ap- 
proximately $175,500. Promotional increases are to be eventu- 
ally the only increases in pay to be given in the Library; step 
rate increases will no longer be given after those individuals who 
were in the library semce prior to January 1 , 1 938 have eventu- 
ally reached the maximum remuneration of their positions. Pro- 
motional increases are possible to all members of the library staff 
regardless of the date of entrance into the library service; by 
contrast step rate increases are not possible under the new ar- 
rangem.ents for the classification of personnel to those members 
of the library staff who have entered the service of the Library 
since January 1 , 1 938. Promotional increases are granted in 
terms of individual accomplishment on a promotional basis, by 
voluntary election of the individual; by contrast step rate in- 
creases are given annually on an automatic basis. 

4. It is recommended that, if in addition to promotional in- 
creases step rate increases are granted in continuing fashion up 
to the additional total cost of $1 75,500 over the necessary seven 
year period, and if this is to be done without any increase beyond 
the total amount of the personnel appropriation ($1,065,000) 
necessary for 1 940 Tollowing the increases of 1 939, the curtail- 
ment of library activities which will be necessary should be ac- 
complished in accordance with the following program of reduc- 
tion in the number of personnel : 





Amount of reduction 


Reduction in the 


Year 


in personnel expenditure 


number of personnel 


1st year (1940) . 


. $38,450 


22 


2ncl year (1941) . 


36,100 






21 


3rd year (1942) . 


33.000 






19 


4lh year (1943) . 


27 850 






16 


5th year (1944) . 


21 750 






12 


6th year (1945) . 


.' 14.300 






8 


7th year (1946) . 


3,900 






2 


8th year (1947) . 


100 










$175,500 



100 



Such a reduction in personnel would be achieved through rigid 
adherence to the policy of leaving vacancies unfilled as they 
occur. It is not desirable to accomplish it by the discharge of 
workers. 



[77J 

In all directions it will have to be clearly understood that the 
carrying through of any extensive program for the reduction of 
personnel will result soon or late in a curtailment and abandon- 
ment of library service. Branch libraries will have to be closed. 
Service to the pubhc schools will have to be given up. Numerous 
activities will have to be abandoned in the central library as well 
as in the branch libraries. 

All concerned — the library staff, the city administration, the 
citizens of Boston — must appreciate fully that the number and 
cost of personnel in the Library can at any time, as necessary or 
desirable, be reduced to any point whatever, provided that there 
is a xvillingness on the pari of all to pay the price for such re- 
duction through curtailed service. 



CONCLUSION 

Inasmuch as this report has been given over to a survey of 
the cost and number of personnel in the Library, there has had 
to be placed in the following pages of Appendix the usual pre- 
sentation concerning the significant happenings in the Library 
during 1 939. There in summarized form will be found statistical 
and other information of value and interest. 

It is hoped that the preoccupation here with salary costs and 
the like will be left after due consideration in the place which 
it should properly hold in the minds and interest of all concerned. 
The Library does not exist primarily for giving employment or 
for expendmg funds to provide employment. No one believes of 
course that it does. The widespread belief is instead that it is 
an educational institution, a cultural institution, a social insti- 
tution of ranking importance in the community, and that it does 
highly valuable work in these directions. The results of this work 
may be intangible in many instances. Certainly they are in gen- 
eral not easily susceptible of measurement in dollars and cents. 
They are none the less real in their value and influence, however. 

The Library carried on its usual wide variety of activities 
throughout 1939. Many of these had results which can be and 



176J 

are set forth in tangible form in the following pages of Appendix. 
Ihose which had results which cannot be set down in black and 
white will be remembered and cherished at their real value by 
the many who profited from them. 

To the members of the library staff who have carried the 
daily burden of these many activities I express warm appreciation 
of ever friendly cooperation. On their behalf, as well as on my 
own, I extend grateful thanks for the constant interest, aid, and 
support so generously extended by the Trustees of the Library, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milton E. Lord 

Director^ and Librarian 



[79] 



APPENDIX A 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES OF THE LIBRARY. 1930 - 1939 



Total Expenditures, 1930 - 1939 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



FROM ANNUAL FUOM SPECIAL 

CITY CITY 

APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIAIIONS 



!. 132,520.06 
1.239,257.45 
1.147.579.89 
1.000.431.87 
1.065.367.44 
1.I39.1 14.88 
1,116.657.14 
1.204,994.47 
1.231,278.52 
1.231,198.08 



$237,962.1 1 

309,794.65 

126,345.78 

1,027.43 

41.049.17 

36.295.49 

74,434.97 

73,204.16 

66,243.1 1 

39,997.19 



FROM 

INCOME OF 

TRUST FUNDS 

$22,796.21 
20.839.73 
22.801.04 
26,633.94 
19.083.82 
24,496.50 
58.826.03 
51.161.81 
86.338.96 

119.899.86 



FROM 
GIFTS FOR 

IMMEDIATE U£ 



6.83 

206.68 
73.97 



$1,393,278.38 
1. 569.89 1. 83 
1,296.726.71 
1,028.093.24 
1.125.500.43 
1.199,906.87 
1,249,924.97 
1,329.567.12 
1 .383,860,59 
1.391.169.10 



Distribution of ExPENoiTUKf.s From Annual City Appropriations. 1930-1939 





SALARIES 




ALL OTHER 




YEAR 


AND WAGES 


books 


accounts 


total 


1930 


$809,530.41 


$159,999.97 


$162,989.68 


$1,132,520.06 


1931 


852.987.17 


190,636.12 


195,634.16 


1,239.257.45 


1932 


. 853.680.10 


1 59,970.58 


133.929.21 


1,147,579.89 


1933 


788.603.37 


87.323.50 


124,505.00 


1,000,431.87 


1934 


821.974.51 


98.291.63 


145.101.30 


1,065,367.44 


1935 


912.339.26 


99.233.95 


127,541.67 


1,139.114.88 


1936 


930,788.04 


54.999.98 


130,869.12 


1.116,657.14 


1937 


975,751.61 


81,522.49 


147,720.37 


1 ,204.994.47 


1938 


1,023.225.41 


73,874.93 


134.178.18 


1,231,278.52 


1939 


1.032.696.19 


54,999.97 


143.501.92 


1.231.198.08 



[80] 

Distribution of Expenditures From Special City Appropriations. 1930-1939 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



CENTRAL LIBRARY 

FOUNDATIONS, 

FIRtPROOFING BRANCH LIBRARIES 
& IMPROVEMENTS NEW BUILDINGS 



$206 391 .46 

254.871.40 

13.125.06 



4,867.40 

7,997.34 

11,131.75 

12,251.72 



$31,570.65 

54,923.25 

113,220.72 

1 ,027.43 

6.80 

5,705.30 

1,597.40 



RF.LIEF PROJECTS 
(WPA, ETC.) 



$41,042.37 
25,722.79 
64.840.23 
62.072.41 
53,991.39 
39,997.19 



$237,962.11 

309,794.65 

126,345.78 

1.027.43 

41,049.17 

36.295.49 

74.434.97 

73,204.16 

66.243.1 1 

39,997.19 



Distribution of Expenditures From Income of Trust Funds, 1930-1939 





books AND other 








YEAR 


LIBRARY MATERIALS 


SALARIES 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


1930 


$22,466.21 


$ 180.00 


$1 50.00 


$22,796.21 


1931 


19.259.55 


1,480.18 


100.00 


20,839.73 


1932 


20,045.62 


2,755.42 




22,801.04 


1933 


23.873.19 


2,760.75 





26,633.94 


1934 


16.996.57 


2,087.25 




19,083.82 


1935 


22.264.83 


1 ,602.67 


629.00 


24,496.50 


1936 


56,909.96 


1.274.07 


642.00 


58,826.03 


1937 


49.641.81 


1,128.00 


392.00 


51,161.81 


1938 


82.756.96 


3,126.00 


456.00 


86,338.96 


1939 


116,257.43 


3.257.33 


385.10 


119,899.86 



Di-'iTRlBUTION OF ExHFNDlTURES FrOM GiFTS FOR IMMEDIATE UsE. 1930-1939 



YEAR 

1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



BOOKS AND OTHER 
LIBRARY MATERIALS 



$ 6.83 

206.68 
73.97 



[81] 

APPENDIX B 



APPROPRIATIONS y\ND EXPENDITURES FOR PERSONNEL 

1930 - 1939 

Total Appropriations and Expknditukes ior all Personnel, 1930-1939 



YEAR 
1930 

1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



amount 


AMOUNT 


UNEXPENDED 


APPROPRIATEO 


EXPENDED 


BALANCE 


$812,000.00 


$809,530.41 


$2,469.59 


858.903.00 


852,987.17 


5,915.83 


858,000.00 


853,680.10 


4,319.90 


800,000.00 


788,603.37 


11,396.63 


824,719.00 


821.974.51 


2.744.49 


915,000.00 


912,339.26 


2.660.74 


921,000.00 


930,788.04-* 






985.000.00 


975.751.61 


9,248.39 


1,039,175.00 


1.023.225.41 


1 5,949.59 


1,039,859.34 


i. 032,696. 19 


7,163.15 



* To take care of the commitments above the amount appropriated 
for 1936. the sum of $9,788.04 was transferred from unexpended 
balances in other accounts of the Library. 



Chances Year by Year in Total Expenditures for All Personnel, 1930-1939 





total expenditures 


%0F 


%0F 




FOR salaries & wages 


CHANCE FF.OM 


CHANGE 


YEAR 


for all personnel 


preceding YEAR 


FROM 1929 


1929 


$770,367.26 






1930 


809,530.41 


+5.1% 


+5.1% 


1931 


852,987.17 


+5.4% 


+10.7% 


1932 


853.680.10 


-fO.1% 


+ 10.8% 


1933 


768.603.37 


-7.7% 


+2.4% 


1934 


821.974.51 


+4.2% 


+6.7% 


1935 


912.339.26 


+ 11.0% 


+ 18.3% 


1936 


930,788.04 


+2.0% 


-1-20.8% 


1937 


975,751.61 


+4.8% 


4-26.6% 


1938 


1,023,225.41 


-1-4.8% 


H-32.7% 


1939 


1,032.696.19 


+0.9% 


-f33.9% 



[82] 

Changes Year By Year in Total Expenditures for Regular Serxhce 
(FuLL-TiME Personnel), 1930-1939 





total expenditures 


%OF 


%0F 




FOR salaries & WAGES 


CHANGE FROM 


CHANCE 


year 


FOR REGULAR SERVICE 


PRECEDING YEAR 


FROM 1929 


1929 


$663,747.98 






1930 


694.183.74 


+4.6% 


+4.6% 


1931 


734,150.50 


+5.8% 


+10.6% 


1932 


746,221.52 


+1.6% 


+12.4% 


1933 


683,618.01 


-6.4% 


+3.0% 


1934 


682.797.16 


-0.1% 


+2.9% 


1935 


799.271.34 


+17.1% 


+20.4% 


1936 


833.763.88 


+4.3% 


+25.8% 


1937 


875.957.34 


+5.1% 


+32.1% 


1938 


932.579.59 


+6.5% 


+40.7% 


1939 


945.123.21 


+ 1.3% 


-|42.5% 



Changes Year By Year in Total Expenditures for Extra Service 
(Part-Time Personnel. Etc.). 1930-1939 





total expenditures 


%0F 


%OF 




for salaries & WAGES 


CHANGE FROM 


CHANGE 


year 


FOR EXTRA SERVICE 


PRECEDING YEAR 


FROM 1929 


1929 


$104,032.28 






1930 


112,214.67 


+7.87o 


+7.8% 


1931 


1 1 5,888.67 


+3.3% 


+ 11.3% 


1932 


105.448.58 


-9.0% 


+1.4% 


1933 


102,982.11 


-2.3% 


-1.0% 


1934 


111.792.41 


+8.6% 


+7.4% 


1935 


96330.61 


-13.8% 


-7.4% 


1936 


92.411.73 


-4.1% 


-11.1% 


1937 


97.706.13 


+5.7% 


-6.0% 


1938 


88.305.46 


-9.6% 


-15.1% 


1939 


85,661.98 


-3.0% 


-17.8% 



[83] 

ANALYSIS AND DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES FOR 
PERSONNEL, 1939 

summary by divisions 

Director's Office 

Regular Service $ 26,940.82 

Extra Service 

Parl-time Service $ 493.65 493.65 



Total Expenditures for Director's Office $ 27.434.47 

Circulation Division 

Regular Service $403,833.21 

Extra Service 

Part-time Service $33,346.91 

Cleaning by the Hour 6,371.40 

Sunday Service 530.90 40.249.21 



Total Expenditures for Circulation Division 444,082.42 

RtixRENCE Division 

Regular Service $287,888.22 

Extra Service 

Part-time Service $18,482.73 

Evening Service 3,127.43 

Sunday Service 12,415.06 34,025.22 



Total Expenditures for Reference Division 321,913.44 

Division of Business Operations 

Regular Service $226,460.96 

Extra Service 

Part-time Service $ 

Evening Service 6,024.25 

Sunday Service 4,869.65 10,893.90 



Total Expenditures for Division of Business Operations 237,354.86 

Mi.scellaneous Service 

Story Telling 1,800.00 

Steriopticon Operation 111.00 



Total Expenditures for Miscellaneous Service 1,911.00 



Total Expenditure for all Personnel $1,032,696.19 



[84] 
EXPENDITURES FOR PERSONNEL IN DIRECTOR'S OFFICE, 1939 





REGULAR 


PART-TIME 




UNIT 


SERVICE 


SERVICE 


TOTAL 


Director's Office 


$26,940.82 


$493.65 


$27,434.47 



EXPENDITURES FOR PERSONNEL IN CIRCULATION DIVISION. 1939 



Unit 

Executive Staff 

Book Selection Department 

Young People's Room 

School Department 

Central Office — Branch Libraries 

Branch Libraries 
Total Expenditure for 

Circulation Division 
Branch Libraries 

Allston 

Andrew Square 
Boylston 
Brighton 
Charlestown 
City Point 
Codrnan Square 
Dorchester 
East Boston 
Faneuil 

Fellowes Athenaeum 
Hyde Park 
Jamaica Plain 
Jeffries Point 
Kirstein 
Lower Mills 
Mattapan 
Memorial 
Mount Bowdoin 
Mount Pleasant 
Neponset 
North End 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Phillips Brooks 
Roslindale 
South Boston 
South End 
Upharns Corner 
West End 
West Roxbury 
lotal Expenditure for 
Branch Libraries 



REGULAR 


PART-TIME CLEANING BY 


SUNDAY 


SERVICE 


SERVICE 


THE HOUR 


SERVICE TOTAL 


$22,895.25 


$ 


$ 


$ $22,895.25 


3.511.25 






3.511.25 


7.513.38 


960.30 





530.90 9.004.58 


1 1 ,739.04 


1.871.99 




13,611.03 


32,335.45 


2,912.43 




35.247.88 


325,838.84 


27.602.19 


6371.40 


359,812.43 


$403,833.21 


$33,346.91 


$6371.40 


$530.90 $444,082.42 


$12,559.70 


$729.00 


$474.80 


$13,763.50 


7.582.79 


1.731.23 


712.40 


10.026.42 


11,060.52 


1.097.05 




12.157.57 


10,952.70 


621.83 




11.574.53 


14,049.30 


837.30 




14,886.60 


6.54537 


1.866.00 




8.411.37 


12.454.33 


957.83 




13.412.16 


10.171.28 


1,036.49 




11.207.77 


16.286.64 


1.05 1. 32 


688.80 


18,026.76 


10,205.72 


797.10 




1 1 .002.82 


9.512.37 


639.45 


196.80 


10,348.62 


10,932.05 


663.00 




11,595.05 


9.186.67 


917.70 


610.00 


10,714.37 


8.187.43 


730.33 


126.40 


9,044.16 


5.541.00 


384.68 




5,925.68 


6.389.69 


542.00 




6,931.69 


14.859.22 


1,147.68 




16,006.90 


1 7,080.20 


1,584.84 


1 1 7.60 


18,782.64 


9,561.89 


634.92 


479.20 


10,676.01 


6,422.72 


762.60 




7.185.32 


4,749.68 


952.65 


527.20 


6,229.53 


1 5.290.04 


655.95 


624.00 


16,569.99 


5,993.60 


514.65 


91 5.20 


7,423.45 


12.378.04 


394.95 




12,772.99 


4,729.01 


451.81 


732.60 


5.913.42 


11,075.25 


647.55 


166.40 


11.889.20 


10,228.37 


863.19 





11.091.56 


9,847.20 


758.25 




10.605.45 


14,322.04 


1 .667.49 




15.989.53 


14,908.83 


1,392.75 





16.301.60 


12,775.17 


570.60 




13.345.77 


$325,838.84 


$27,602.19 


$6371.40 


$359,812.43 



[85] 
EXPENDITURES FOR PERSONNEL IN REFERENCE DIVISION. 1939 





REGULAR 


PART-TIME 


EVENING 


SUNDAY 




Unit 


SERVICE 


SERVICE 


SERVICE 


SERVICE 


TOTAL 


Executive Staff 


$31,822.51 






$276.00 


$32,098.51 


Bates Hall Centre Desk 


6,674.70 


$1,732.95 




821.05 


9.228.70 


Bates Hall 












Reference Department 


12,767.89 






1,335.35 


14,103.24 


Book Selection Department 


4.004.37 








4.004.37 


Business Branch 


18,679.54 


263.03 






18.942.57 


Cataloging and 












Classification Department 


51,991.41 









51,991.41 


Fine Arts Department 


14,364.93 


2,287.37 





1,231.65 


17,883.95 


Issue Department 


60,082.37 


6,302.10 




4,626.36 


71.OiO.83 


Music Department 


7,152.32 


1 ,257.00 




361.20 


8,770.52 


Open Shelf Department 


13,698.82 


1,766.10 




818.80 


16,283.72 


Periodical and 












Newspaper Department 


13,667.20 


1,717.84 




979.10 


16,364.14 


Rare Book Department 


11,632.16 


777.64 




601.65 


13,011.45 


Registration Department 


13,497.80 






356.00 


13.853.80 


Science and 












Technology Department 


1 5.984.55 


1,066.12 




402.70 


17.453.37 


Statistical Department 


7,443.33 


869.18 




433.20 


8.745.71 


Teachers Department 


4,424.32 


443.40 




172.00 


5.039.72 


"Unliquidated" Evening Service 






2,987.30 




2.987.30 


1939 Book Fair 






140.13 




140.13 


Total Expenditure for 
Reference Division 












$287,888.22 


$18,482.73 


$3,127.43 


$12,415.06 


$321,913.44 



[86] 

EXPENDITURES FOR PERSONNEL IN DIVISION OF BUSINESS 

OPERATIONS. 1939 

regular evening sunday 

Unit service service service total 

Executive Staff $14,287.98 $14,287.98 

Auditing Department 8.018.69 8,018.69 

Binding Department 59,931.13 $ 134.45 60,065.58 

Book Purchasing Department 28,053.68 28.053.68 

Buildings Department 79.008.87 5.889.80 $4,869.65 89.768.32 

Cleaning 15.381.50 15.381.50 

Printing Department 13.039.16 13,039.16 

Shipping Department 5.179.45 5.179.45 

Stock Purchasing Department 3,560.50 3.560.50 

Total Expenditure 

for Division of — 

Business Operations $226,460.96 $6,024.25 $4,869.65 $237,354.86 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES FOR ALL PERSONNEL, 1939 



Regular Service 








Full-time Members of the 


Staff 




$945,123.21 


Extra Service 








Part-time Service 
Evening Service 
Sunday Service 
Cleaning by the Hour 


all Personnel 


$52,323.29 
9.151.68 
17.815.61 
6,371.40 


85,661,98 


Miscellaneous 




1,911.00 


Total Expenditure for 


$1,032,696.19 



(87] 
APPENDIX C 

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES FOR BOOKS, 1930 - 1939 

City Appropriations for the Purchase of Books and Other Library Materials 

1919-20 $50,000 

1920-21 60.000 

1921-22 100,000 

1922-23 100.000 

1923-24 90.000 

1924-25 100,000 

1925* 100,000* 

1926 125,000 

1927 125,000 

1928 125,000 

1929 140,000 

1930 160,000 

1931 175.000 

1932 160,000 

1933 75,000 

1934 100,000 

1935 100.000 

1936 55.000 

1937 75.000 

1938 73,875 

1939 55.000 

* February i - December 31, 1925 only. 
Total Expenditures for Books and Other Library Materials, 1930-1939 





from 


from income 




Yr^AR 


CITY FUNDS 


OF TRUST FUNDS 


TOTAL 


1930 


$159,999.97 


$22,466.21 


$182,466.18 


1931 


190,636.12 


19,259.55 


209.895.67 


1932 


1 59,970.58 


20,045.62 


180.016.20 


1933 


87,323.50 


23,873.19 


111,196.69 


1934 


98,291.63 


16,996.57 


1 1 5.288.20 


1935 


99.233.95 


22,264.83 


121.498.78 


1936 


54,999.98 


56,909.96 


111,909.94 


1937 


81,522.49 


49,641.81 


131.164.30 


1938 


73,874.93 


82,756.96 


156.631.89 


1939 


54.999.97 


116.257.43 


171,257.40 



188J 
Expenditures for Books and Other Library Materials by Divisions, 1935-1939 



YEAR 

1935 

From City Funds 
From Trust Funds 


CIRCULATION 
DIVISION 

$72,440.78 
1,335.89 


REFERENCE 
DIVISION 

$26,793.17 
20,928.94 


ENTIRE 
LIBRARY 
SYSTEM 

$ 99,233.95 
22,264.83 


Total 
1936 

From City Funds 
From Trust Funds 


$73,776.67 

$48,399.98 
3,983.70 


$47,722.1 1 

$ 6.600.00 
52,926.26 


$121,498.78 

$ 54.999.98 
56,909.96 


Total 
1937 

From City Funds 
From Trust Funds 


$52,383.68 

$61,141.87 
2,482.09 


$59,526.26 

$20,380.62 
47,159.72 


$111,909.94 

$ 81 ,522.49 
49,641.81 


Total 
1938 

From City Funds 
From Trust Funds 


$63,623.96 

$56,631.10 
2,482.71 


$67,540.34 

$17,243.83 
80,274.25 


$131,164.30 

$ 73,874.93 
82,756.96 


Total 
1939 

From City Funds 
From Trust Funds 


$59,113.81 

$42,667.54 
1 ,898.52 


$97,518.08 

$ 12,332.43 
114,358.91 


$156,631.89 

$ 54.999.97 
116,257.43 


Total 


$44,566.06 


$126,691.34 


$171,257.40 



Percentages of Annual Expenditures for Books and Other Library 
Materials in Relation to Total Annual EIxpenditures from City Funds 

1930 - 1939 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 





total expenditures 




total 


FOR books and other 


PERCENTAGES 


expenditures 


library materials 


OF EXPENDITURES 


from city funds 


from city funds 


FOR books 


$1,132,520.06 


$159,999.97 


14.12% 


1 .239,257.45 


190,636.12 


15.38% 


1,147,579.89 


1 59,970.58 


13.94% 


1,000,431.87 


87,323.50 


8.73% 


1 .065,367.44 


98.291.63 


9.23% 


1,139.114.88 


99.233.95 


8.11% 


1.116.657.14 


54.999.98 


4.93% 


1 .204.994.47 


81,522.49 


6.77% 


1,231,278.52 


73,874.93 


6.00% 


1,231,198.08 


54,999.97 


4.47% 



18<M 



Percentages of Annual Expenditurfs roi? Books and Other Library 

Materials in Relation to Total Annual Expenditures 

1930 - 1939 



year 

1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
FROM CITY FUNDS 
& TRUST FUNDS 

$1,155,316.27 
1,260,097.18 
1,170,380.93 
1.027.065.81 
1,084,451.26 
1,163,611.38 
1.175.483.17 
1,256,156.28 
1,317,617.48 
1,351,097.94 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 




FOR BOOKS AND OTHER 




LIBRARY MATERIALS 


PERCENTAGES 


FROM CITY FUNDS 


OF EXPENDITURES 


& TRUST FUNDS 


FOR BOOKS 


$182,466.18 


15.79% 


209,895.67 


16.65% 


180,016.20 


15.38% 


111,196.69 


10.82% 


1 1 5,288.20 


10.63% 


121.498.78 


10.44% 


111,909.94 


9.44% 


131,164.30 


10.44% 


156,631.89 


11.89% 


171,257.40 


12.67% 



Percentages of Annu.\l Expenditures for Salaries and Books and Other 

Library Materials in Relation to Each Other 

1930 - 1939 





total expenditure; 














FOR salaries 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 










& wages 




FOR BOOKS 








YEAR 


FROM CITY FUNDS 


% 


FROM CITY FUNDS 


% 


TOTAL 


% 


1930 


$809,530.41 


84% 


$159,999.97 


16% 


$969,530.38 


100% 


1931 


852,987.17 


827o 


190,636.12 


18% 


1,043,623.29 


100% 


1932 


853,680.10 


84% 


1 59,970.58 


16% 


1,013,650.68 


100% 


1933 


788,603.37 


90% 


87,323.50 


10% 


875,926.87 


100% 


1934 


821,974.51 


89% 


98,291.63 


11% 


920,266.14 


100% 


1935 


912,339.26 


90% 


99,233.95 


10% 


1,011,573.21 


100% 


1936 


930,788.04 


94% 


54,999.98 


6% 


985,788.02 


100% 


1937 


975,751.61 


92% 


81.522.49 


8% 


1.057.274.10 


100% 


1938 


1.023.225.41 


93% 


73,874.93 


7% 


1,097,100.34 


lOO'/o 


1939 


1,032,696.19 

rOTAL EXPENDITURE' 


95% 


54,999.97 


5% 


1,087,696.16 


100% 




FOR SALARIES 


TOTAL EXPENDITURE;- 










& WAGES 




FOR BOOKS 










FROM CITY FUNDS 




FROM CITY FUNDS 








YEAR 


& TRUST FUnOS 


7o 


& TRUST FUNDS 


% 


lOTAL 


% 


1930 


$809,710.41 


82% 


$182,466.18 


18% 


$992,176.59 


10070 


1931 


854,467.35 


80% 


209,895.67 


20% 


1,064,363.02 


100% 


1932 


856,435.52 


83% 


180,016.20 


17% 


1,036,451.72 


100% 


1933 


791,364.12 


88Sb 


111,196.69 


12% 


902,560.81 


100% 


1934 


824,061.76 


88% 


115,288.20 


12% 


939,349.96 


10070 


1935 


913,941.93 


88% 


121.498.78 


12% 


1,035,440.71 


100% 


1936 


932,062.11 


89% 


1 1 1 ,909.94 


11% 


1 ,043,972.05 


100% 


1937 


976,879.61 


88% 


131,164.30 


12% 


1,108,043.91 


100% 


1938 


1,026,351.41 


87% 


156,631.89 


13% 


1,182,983.30 


100% 


1939 


1,035,953.52 


86'; fc 


171,257.40 


\r/o 


1,207,210.92 


lOOVo 



I90J 

f^ERCENTAGES Ol AMOUNTS REQUESTED FROM ClTY FOR SALARIES AND FOR BoOKS 

AND Other Library Materials in Relation to Each Other 
1930-1939 









requested 










requested 




for books 










for salaries 




AND OTHER 








year 


& WAGES 


7o 


LIBRARY MATERIALS 


% 


TOTAL 


% 


1930 


$812,000.00 


84% 


$150,000.00 


16% 


$%2,000.00 


100% 


1931 


883.903.00 


82% 


200,000.00 


18% 


1,083,903.00 


100% 


1932 


866,124.00 


81% 


200,000.00 


19% 


1.066.124.00 


100% 


1933 


886,000.00 


84% 


163,000.00 


16% 


1.049,000.00 


l007o 


1934 


830,569.56 


85% 


1 50,000.00 


15% 


980,569.56 


100% 


1935 


937.187.75 


86% 


1 50,000.00 


14%, 


1,087,187.75 


100% 


1936 


940.039.28 


86% 


150.000.00 


14% 


1,090,039.29 


100% 


1937 


985.000.00 


87% 


1 50.000.00 


13% 


1,135,000.00 


100%, 


1938 


1,055,000.00 


887o 


150,000.00 


12% 


1.205,000.00 


100% 


1939 


1,070,388.58 


88% 


1 50.000.00 


12% 


1,220,388.58 


100% 



APPENDIX D 



PERSONNEL 



Cost and Number of Total Personnel. 1930-1939 



total expenditures 
for salaries & 
wages for all 
year personnel 

1929 $770,367.26 

1930 809.530.41 

1931 852.987.17 

1932 853.680.10 
1933* 788,603.37 
1934* 821.974.51 

1935 912339.26 

1936 930.788.04 

1937 975,751.61 

1938 1,023.225.41 

1939 -.032.696.19 



TOTAL PERSONNEL 

AS OF 

% OF CHANGE DECEMBER 3 1 ST % OF CHANGE 

FROM 1929 IN EACH YEAR FROM 1929 



+5.1% 
+ I0.7%o 
+ 10.8% 
+2A% 
+6.7%> 
+ 18.3% 
+20.8% 
+26.6%o 
+32.7% 
+33.9% 



602 
644 
657 
665 
695 
679 
687 
699 
705 
697 
687 



+7.0% 
+9.1% 
+ 10.5% 
+ 15.5% 
+ 12.8% 
+14.1% 
+ 16.1% 
+ 17.1% 
+ 15.7% 
+14.1% 



* Salary reductions were in effect from April 21. 1933 to December 31. 1934. 



91 



Cost and Number of Rr.cui,AK Service, 1930-1939 









TOTAL NUMBER OF 






TOTAL EXPENDITURES 




REGULAR SERVICE 






FOR SALARIES & 




AS OF 






WAGES FOR REGULAR 


'/t OF CHANGE 


DECEMBER 3 1st 


% OF CHANGE 


YEAR 


SERVICE 


FROM 1929 


IN EACH YEAR 


FROM 1929 


1929 


$663,747.98 




475 




1930 


694.183.74 


-H.6% 


512 


+7.8% 


1931 


734,150.50 


+10.6% 


535 


+12.6% 


1932 


746.221.52 


-i-12.4% 


537 


+I3.0%> 


1933* 


683.618.01 


+3.0% 


550 


+ 15.8% 


1934* 


682.797.16 


+2.9% 


563 


+ 18.5%, 


1935 


799.271.34 


+20.4% 


571 


+20.2% 


1936 . 


833,763.88 


-h25.8% 


578 


+21.7%, 


1937 


875,957.34 


+32.1% 


592 


+24.6%o 


1938 


932.579.59 


+40.7% 


590 


+24.2% 


1939 


945,123.21 


+42.5% 


580 


+22.1% 



Salary reductions were in effect from April 21, 1933 to December 31, 1934. 



Cost and Number of Extra Service (Part Time Personnel, etc.) 1930 1939 

TOTAL extra SERVICE 

personnel in terms 
of equivalent of 





TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


FULL-TIME PERSONNEL 




FOR SALARIES & 




AS OF 






WAGES FOR EXTRA 


'Jo OF CHANGE 


DECEMBER 3 1st 


% OF CHAN< 


YEAR 


SERMCE 


FROM 1929 


IN EACH YEAR 


FROM 1929 


1929 


$104,032.28 




127 




1930 


112.214.67 


+7.8% 


132 


+3.9% 


1931 


115,888.67 


+ 11.3% 


122 


-3.9% 


1932 


105,448.58 


+ 1.4% 


128 


[0.8% 


1933* 


102.982.11 


-1.0% 


145 


+ 14.1% 


1934* 


111.792.41 


+7.4% 


116 


-fl.6% 


1935 


96,330.61 


-7.4% 


116 


-8.6% 


1936 


92.411.73 


-11.1% 


121 


-4.7% 


1937 


97.706.13 


-6.0% 


113 


-11.07o 


1938 


88.305.46 


-15.1%. 


107 


-15.7% 


1939 


85,661 .98 


-17.6% 


107 


-15.7% 



* Salary reductions were in effect from April 21, 1933 to December 31. 1934. 



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[97] 

Distribution of Fui.l-Timf. Personnel by Categories, December 31, 1939 

library workers 

General Officers ............ 10 

Chiefs of Departments ........... 13 

Asisistants to the Director .......... 2 

Assistants-in-Charge ........... 10 

Branch Librarians ........... 31 

Children's Librarians ........... 20 

Reference Assistant ........... 1 

First Assistants ............ 25 

Second Assistants ............ 25 

Catalogers ............. 5 

Assistants 260 

Probationary Assistants .......... 50 

Unclassified Assistants ........... 7 

Total 459 



Mechanical and Other Workers 

Auditor 1 

Bookkeeper ........... 1 

Clerk 1 

Clerk & Typists .......... 2 



Shipper ........... 1 

Shipper's Assistants ......... 2 



Custodian of Stock ......... 1 

Assistant ........... 1 



Chief of Binding Department ....... I 

Finishers ........... 4 

Forwarders . . . . . . . . . . .12 

.'Apprentice ........... 1 

Working Forewoman of Bookbinders ...... I 

Bookbinders . . . . . . . . . .13 

Apprentice ........... I 

Clerk 1 34 



Chief of Printing Department ....... I 

Linotype Operators ......... ' 

Pressman, Cylinder ......... I 

Pressman, Job .......... I 



[98] 

Superintendent of Buildings ........ t 

Engineers ........... 3 

Steamfitter ........... t 

Working Foreman of Carpenters ....... 1 

Carpenters ........... 2 

Working Foreman of Painters ....... I 

Painters ........... 2 

Electricians ........... 2 

Electrician's Helper ......... t 

Mason 1 

Working Foiemen of Janitors ....... 2 

Janitors ........... 14 

Janitor-Laborers .......... 5 

Laborer ........... 1 

Macbinist's Helper ......... I 

Bookcleaner and Laborer ........ 1 

Watchmen ........... 2 

Elevator Attendants ......... 3 

Housekeeper .......... 1 

Cleaners . . . . . . . . . .21 

Telephone Operator ......... 1 

Stenographer .......... 1 

Bookcarrier .......... 1 

Coalroom Attendant 1 70 

Total 120 

Temporary Oiler .......... I t 

121 

Recapitulation of Full-Time Personnel, December 31, 1939 

Library workers ........... 459 

Mechanical and other workers ....... 121 

Total 580 



[99] 

SALARY SCHEDULES 
Salary Schedule for the Graded Library Service 

(The rates listed below are being used as a guiding framework 
to be approached when and as financial conditions permit. They 
are only partially in effect at the present time.) 



The Technical Library Service (Grades B & C) 



PROBATIONARY SERVICE (CRADE C) 

Probationary Assistant, Beginning 
Probationary Assistant, 1st Step 
Probationary Assistant, 2nd Step 
Probationary Assistant, 3rd Step 
Probationary Assistant, 4t!i Step 
Probationary Assistant, 5th Step 

PERMANENT SERVICE (GRADE E) 



Assistant, Beginning 
Assistant, 1 st Step 
Assistant, 2nd Step 
Assistant, 3rd Step 



Second Assistant . 
Children's Assistant 
Reference Assistant 
Cataloger 
Classifier 
Assistant, 4th Step 



First Assistant 
Children's Librarian 
Reference Librarian 
Cataloger and Classifier 
Assistant, 5th Step 



$20.00 
21.00 
22.00 
23.00 
24.00 
25.00 



25.00 
29.00 
33.00 
37.00 

41.00 
41.00 
41.00 
41.00 
41.00 
41.00 



45.00 
45.00 
45.00 
45.00 
45.00 



The Profession-sll Library Service (Grade A) 

CHIEFS OF DEP.ARTMENTS AND BRANCH LIBRARIANS 

Chiefs of Departments $2610-^3130 

Branch Librarians 2610-3130 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Rale of remuneration to be determined for each case individually. 



Salary Schedule for Mechamcau and Other Workers 

The rales of remuneration for mechanical workers are determined in accordance 
with the schedule in force for such workers in the City of Boston service in general. 

The rates of remuneration for clerical workers range from $1000 per year ($20.00 
per week) to $1600 per year ($30.0 per week) in accordance with the schedule in 
force for such workers in the City of Bo.ston service in general. 



100] 



SALARY RANGES 



- BY PERCENTAGES OF PERSONNEL 
IN EACH RANGE 



Library Workers 





% OF TOTAL NO. 


% OF TOTAL NO. 


% OF TOTAL NO. 


% OF TOTAL NO 


SALARY RANGE 


AS OF 


AS OF 


AS OF 


AS OF 




DECEMBER 31, 


DECEMBER 31, 


JUNE 4, 


DECEMBER 31, 




1929 


1936 


1937 


1939 


$10.00-14.99 


16.2% 


5.2% 


0.0% 


0.0% 


15.00-19.99 


11.6% 


26.0% 


2.9% 


1.5% 


20.00-24.99 


21.2% 


23.5% 


44.6% 


24.8% 


25.00-29.99 


243% 


23.7% 


19.6% 


23.1% 


30.00-34.99 


9.9% 


5.2% 


15.5% 


19.4% 


35.00-39.99 


6.1% 


6.1% 


4.5% 


15.1% 


40.00 - 44.99 


5.5% 


6.8% 


9.0% 


5.5% 


45.00-49.99 


1.9% 


0.6% 


0.6% 


63% 


50.00-54.99 


0.8% 


0.0% 


0.0% 


0.9% 


55.00-59.99 


0.8% 


0.9% 


0.8% 


0.2% 


60.00-64.99 


0.3% 


0.0% 


0.0% 


0.7% 


65.00-69.99 


0.3% 


0.4% 


0.4% 


0.2% 


70.00 and Over 


0.8% 


1.6% 


1.5% 


2.2% 


Under $15.00 


162% 


5.2% 


0.0% 


0.0% 


Under 20.00 


27.8% 


31.2% 


2.9% 


1.5% 


Under 25.00 


49.0% 


54.7% 


47.6% 


263% 


Under 30.00 


73.3% 


78.4% 


673% 


49.4% 


Under 35.00 


83.2% 


83.6% 


82.8% 


68.8% 


Under 40.00 


89.3% 


89.7% 


87.4% 


83.9% 


Under 45.00 


94.8% 


96.5% 


%.4% 


89.4% 


Under 50.00 


96.7% 


97.1% 


97.0% 


95.7% 


Under 55.00 


97.5% 


97.1% 


97.0% 


96.6% 


Under 60.00 


983% 


98.0% 


97.8% 


96.8% 


Under 65.00 


98.6% 


98.4% 


97.8% 


97.5% 


Under 70.00 


98.9% 


98.5% 


98.4% 


97.7% 



[101] 

SALARY RANGES — BY PERCENTAGES OF PERSONNEL 
IN EACH RANGE 

Mechanical and QrHF.R "Workers 





% OF TOTAL NO. 


% OF TOTAL NO. 


% OF TOTAL NO. 


% OF TOTAL NO 


SALARY RANGE 


AS OF 


AS OF 


AS OF 


AS OF 




DECEMBER 31, 


DECEMBER 31, 


JUNE 4, 


DECEMBER 31, 




1929 


1936 


1937 


1939 


$10.00-14.99 


0.8% 


1.6% 


0.0% 


0.0% 


15.00-19.99 


24.2% 


15.3% 


16.5% 


19.3% 


20.00-24.99 


11.5% 


15.3% 


16.5% 


14.6% 


25.00-29.99 


4.1% 


5.6% 


5.6% 


3.4% 


30.00-34.99 


14.0% 


20.9% 


20.9% 


26.0% 


35.00-39.99 


7.5% 


2.4% 


2.4% 


3.4% 


40.00-44.99 


25.0% 


25.0% 


25.0% 


21.0% 


45.00-49.99 


9.1% 


8.8% 


8.8% 


8.6% 


50.00-54.99 


0.8% 


0.9% 


0.9% 


2.5% 


55.00-59.99 


0.0% 


0.9% 


0.9% 


0.8% 


60.00-64.99 


0.0% 


0.9% 


0.9% 


0.0% 


65.00 - 69.99 


0.8% 


0.9%, 


0.9% 


0.0% 


70.00 and Over 


1.7% 


1.6% 


1.6% 


0.8% 


Under $15.00 


0.8% 


1.6% 


0.0% 


0.0% 


Under 20.00 


25.0% 


16.9% 


16.5% 


19.3% 


Under 25.00 


36.5% 


32.2% 


32.3% 


33.9% 


Under 30.00 


40.6% 


37.9% 


37.9% 


37.3% 


Under 35.00 


54.6% 


58.8% 


58.8% 


63.3% 


Under 40.00 


62.1% 


61.2% 


61.2% 


66.7% 


Under 45.00 


87.1% 


86.2% 


86.2% 


87.7% 


Under 50.00 


96.2% 


95.17^^ 


95.1% 


953% 


Under 55.00 


97.0% 


95.9% 


95.9% 


97.8% 


Under 60.00 


97.0% 


96.7% 


95.7% 


98.6% 


Under 65.00 


97.0% 


97.4% 


97.4% 


98.6% 


Under 70.00 


97.8% 


98.2% 


98.2% 


98.6% 



[102] 
SALARY RANGES — BY NUMBER OF PERSONNEL IN EACH RANGE 

Library Workers 







NUMBER AS OF 


NUMBER AS OF 


NUMBER AS OF NUMBER AS OJ 






DECEMBER 3 1 , 


U! CEMBER 3 1 , 


JUNE 4, 


DECEMBER 31 


SALARY RANGE 


1929 


1936 


1937 


1939 


$10.00 


^14.99 


59 


23 








15.00 


-19.99 


42 


115 


13 


7 


20.00- 


- 24.99 


77 


104 


198 


114 


25.00- 


-29.99 


88 


105 


87 


106 


30.00- 


-34.99 


36 


23 


69 


89 


35.00 


-39.99 


22 


27 


20 


69 


40.00 


-44.99 


20 


30 


40 


25 


45.00 


-49.99 


7 


3 


3 


29 


50.00 


-54.99 


3 








4 


55.00 


- 59.99 


3 


4 


4 


1 


60.00- 


-64.99 


I 








3 


65.00 


-69.99 


1 


2 


2 


1 


70.00 


and Over 


3 


7 


7 


10 


Under 


$15.00 


59 


23 





' 


Under 


20.00 


101 


138 


13 


7 


Under 


25.00 


178 


242 


211 


121 


Under 


30.00 


266 


347 


298 


227 


Under 


35.00 


302 


370 


367 


316 


Under 


40.00 


324 


397 


387 


385 


Under 


45.00 


344 


427 


427 


410 


Under 


50.00 


351 


430 


430 


439 


Under 


55.00 


354 


430 


430 


443 


Under 


60.00 


357 


434 


434 


444 


Under 


65.00 


358 


434 


434 


447 


Under 


70.00 


359 


436 


436 


448 



[1 03 J 

SALARY RANGES — BY NUMBER OF PERSONNEL IN EACH RANGE 

Mechanical and Other Workers 





NUMBER AS OF 


NUMBER AS OF 


NUMBER AS OI 


NUMBER A.S OF 




DECEMBER 31, 


DECEMBER 31, 


JUNE 4, 


DECEMBER 31. 


SALARY RANGE 


1929 


1936 


1937 


1939 


$10.00-14.99 


1 


2 








15.00-19.99 


29 


19 


20 


23 


20.00-24.99 


14 


19 


20 


17 


25.00-29.99 


5 


7 


7 


4 


30.00-34.99 


17 


26 


26 


31 


35.00-39.99 


9 


3 


3 


4 


40.00-44.99 


30 


31 


31 


26 


45.00 - 49.99 


11 


11 


11 


9 


50.00-54.99 


1 






3 


55.00 - 59.99 









1 


60.00-64.99 












65.00-69.99 


1 









70.00 and Over 


2 


2 


2 


1 


Under $15.00 


1 


2 








Under 20.00 


30 


21 


20 


23 


Under 25.00 


44 


40 


40 


40 


Under 30.00 


49 


47 


47 


44 


Under 35.00 


66 


73 


73 


75 


Under 40.00 


73 


76 


76 


79 


Under 45.00 


105 


107 


107 


105 


Under 50.00 


116 


118 


118 


114 


Under 55.00 


117 


119 


119 


117 


Under 60.00 


117 


120 


120 


118 


Under 65.00 


117 


121 


121 


118 


Under 70.00 


118 


122 


122 


118 



1U4] 



COST OF SALARY INCREASES, 1930-1939 



YEAR 
1930 

1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



Total 



AMOUNT 

$12,269.86 
14,094.34 
5,626.78 
309.84 
29,880.01 
15,891.29 
11,918.89 
47,137.52 
51,067.44 
31,127.91 

$219,323.88 



DISTRIBUTION OF COST OF SALARY INCREASES, 1930-1939 



1930 
Increases for 1930 effective at various dales .... 

1931 

Overlay from increases effective in 1930 at various dates for 
which provision had to be made in 1931 for payment over a 
full 12 months period ........ 

Increases for 1931 effective at various dates .... 



Total 



1932 



Overlay from increases effective in 1931 at various dates for 
which provision had to be made in 1932 for payment over 
a full 12 months period ....... 

Increases for 1932 ......... 



Total 



$12,269.86 



$ 8,713.34 
5381.00 

$14,094.34 



$ 5.626.78 
None 

$ 5.626.78 



1933 

Overlay from increases effective in 1932 . 
Increase for 1933 effective at various dates 



Total 



None 
$ 309.84 

$ 309.84 



1934 
Overlay from increases effective in 1933 . 
Increases for 1934 effective at various dates 



$ 501 .79 
29378.22 



Total 



$29,880.01 



[1 05 J 
1935 

Overlay from increases effective in 1934 at various dates for 
which provision had to be made in 1935 for payment over 
a ful! 12 months period $ 1,583.02 

Increases for 1935 effective at various dates ..... 14,308.27 

Total $15,891.29 

1936 

Overlay from incrca.scs effective in 1935 at various dates for 
which provision had lo be made in 1936 for payment over 
a full 12 months period $ 9.554.17 

Increases in 1936 effective October 30 -December 31, 1936 . . 2,364.72 

Total $11,918.89 

1937 
Overlay from increases effective in 1936 only for October 30- 
December 31, 1936 but for which provision had to be made 

in 1937 for payment over a full 12 months period . . . $10,181.08 

Increases in 1937 effective June 4, 1937 - December 31, 1937 . . 36,956.44 

Tolal $47,137.52 

1938 
Overlay from increases effective in 1937 only for June 4- 
December 31, 1937 but for which provision had to be made 

in 1938 for payment over a full 12 months period . . $26,948.68 

Increases in 1938 effective June 3 -December 31, 1938 . . . 24,118.76 

Total $51,067.44 

1939 
Overlay from increases effective in 1938 only for June 3— 
December 31, 1938 but for which provision had to be made 

in 1939 for payment over a full 12 months period . . . $17,171.48 

Increases in 1939 effective September 27 - December 31, 1939 . . 13,956.43 

Tolal $31,127.91 

1940 

Overlay from increases effective in 1939 at various dates for 
which provision had to be made in 1940 for payment over 
a full 12 months period $44,793.41 



06J 



AVERAGE SALARIES IN CITY OF BOSTON DEPARTMENTS 



Compiled from Data contained in 
Officials and Employees of the Cil}} of Boston — June I, 1937 

Transit Deparlment ......... $3,761.26 



Law Department 
Finance Commission 
School Buildings Department 
Treasury Department 
Election Department 
Building Department 
School Department . 

Street Laying-Out Department 
Auditing Deparlment 
Weights and Measures Departi 
Boston Traffic Commission 
Park Department, Cemetery D 
Assessing Department 
City Clerk Department 



2,962.53 

2,840.10 
2.729.90 
2,604.76 
2,597.62 
2,592.21 
2,537.60 

2360.68 
2,313.94 
2,240.00 
2,124.70 
2,063.38 
2.020.17 
2.009.53 

1 ,925.65 
1 ,728.68 
1.718.60 
1 ,690.43 
1,530.15 



Soldiers* Relief Department 

Collecting Deparlment 

Supply Department . 

Park Department (excluding manual workers paid by the day) 

Library Department . 

The above departments are for the most part ihe "white collar" departments. 
In case of the remaining departments as noted below, the compilation of figures for 
the average salaries was not attempted for one reason or another. 

Health Department, Hospital Department, Institutions Department 
In these departments figures comparable with those in other city deparlmenls arc 
not easily obtainable, since (1) many of the medical men are employed only on a 
part time basis, and (2) many of the other workers are given food or quarters (or 
both) in addition to cash salaries. 

Fire Department, Police Department 
The basic salaries for firemen and policemen are known to be $2100 per year. 
To obtain an actual average figure for all employees of the departments was too exten- 
sive an undertaking to be worth while, considering the several thousand employees in. 
each department. 

Public Works Department 
1 his department employees so many laborers, mostly on a per diem basis, that its 
figures are not easily comparable with those of other city departments. 

Public Welfare Department 
This department seems not to be organized on a permanent basis. Its figures are 
therefore not entirely pertinent for comparative purposes. 



[I()7J 

TRAINING COURSES. 1933-1939 
1933-34 1 934-35 1935-36 1936-37 1937-38 1938-39 



Number of full courses 

given 
Number of one-term 

courses given 
Number of individuals 

taking courses 
Total enrollment in 

all courses 
Number of individuals 

receiving passing 

grades 
Number of individuals 

failing courses 
Number of individuals 

withdrawing from 

courses 
Number of incompleted 

courses 
Percentage of courses 

passed 



12 


12 


13 


13 


n 


9 


9 


11 


2 


2 


5 


5 


261 


192 


194 


151 


173 


142 


268 


260 


207 


166 


197 


163 


202 


217 


154 


133 


169 


139 


15 


II 


8 


7 


10 


10 


43 


24 


42 


24 


14 


11 


8 


8 


2 


2 


4 


3 


7% 


83% 


74% 


80% 


79% 


77% 



ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS, 1939 



INDIVIDUALS 
WHO PASSED 



INDIVIDUALS 
WHO FAILED 



Ungraded Service 
General paper 

Graded Service 
General paper 

French paper 
German paper 
Italian paper 
Spanish paper 



131 (37.67c;) 217 (62.4%) 



TOTAL 

348 (100%) 



229 (65.8%) 119 (34.2'/;.) 348 (100%) 



116 (42.3%) 

45 (65.2'/;.) 

13 (46.4%) 

II (50%) 



158 (37.7%) 
24 (34.8%) 
15 (53.6%) 
II (50%) 



QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS. 1939 



examination 

General Book Selection (Q) 

Cataloging and Classification (Q) 

General Reference ^ork (Q) 

Boston Public Library — 
Central Library (Q) 

Boston Public Library — 
Branch Libraries (Q) 



individuals 

WHO passed 

15 (68%) 
II (73%) 
18 (82 Vr) 

15 (60%) 

10 (63%) 



individuals 
WHO fau,ed 

7 (32%) 

4 (27%) 

4 (18%) 

10 (40%) 

6 (37%) 



274 (100%) 
69 OOO'/o) 
28 (100%) 
22 (1007c) 



TOTAL 
22 (1007c;) 

15 (1007c) 

22 (1007o) 
25 (1007o) 

16 (I007o) 



11 08] 
PROMOTIONAL EXAMINATIONS, 1939 



EXAMINATION 

Adv2uiced Languages — French (II) 
Advanced Languages — German (II) 
Advanced Languages — Italian (II) 
Advanced Languages — Spanish (II) 
Boslon as a Community (IV) 
Boston Public Library — History (III) 
Business — General Field (III) 
Cataloging (IV or V) 
Children's Literature (IV) 
Children's Work (V) 
Classification (IV or V) 
Documents— General Field (III) 
Education — General Field (III) 
Extension Work (V) 
Fine Arts — General Field (III) 
Foreign Government Documents (V) 
History oF the Book (III) 
Library Records (IV) 
Library Administration (V) 
Literature — General Field (III) 
Music— General Field (III) 
National and Trade Bibliography (III) 
Newspapers — Special Field (IV) 
Periodicals and Newspapers — 

General Field (III) 
Periodcials — Special Field (V) 
Philosophy, Psychology, Religion — 

General Field (III) 
Public Library as an Institution (I) 
Science and Technology — 

General Field (III) 
Social Sciences and History — 

General Field (III) 
Special Fields — Subject Knowledge (IV) 
Special Fields^- 

Bibliographical Knowledge (V) 
United States Government Documents (IV) 
Work with Schools (V) 





1 (100%) 


2 (I007o) 


8 (57%) 


4 (80%) 


2 (100%) 




38 (61%) 


5 (83%) 









(0%) 


(0%) 




6 (43%) 


1 (20%) 


(0%) 




24 (39%) 
1 (17%) 







INDIVIDUALS 


INDIVIDUALS 




WHO PASSED 


WHO FAILED 


TOTAL 


24 (73%) 


9 (27%) 


33 (100%) 


6 (67%) 


3 (33%) 


9 (100%) 


I (33%) 


2 (67%) 


3 (100%) 


2 (50%) 


2 (50%) 
(0%) 


4 (100%) 


2 (100%) 


2 (1007o) 


(0%) 


1 (100%) 


1 (100%) 


3 (60%) 


2 (40%) 


5 (100%) 


4 (80%) 


1 (20%) 


5 (100%) 


(0%) 


1 (100%) 


1 (100%) 


1 (50%) 


1 (50%) 


2 (100%) 





1 (100%) 


2 (100%) 




14 (100%) 


5 (100%) 


2 (100%) 




62 (1007o) 


6 (1007o) 







2 (67%) 1 (33%) 3 (100%) 



ov 



APPOINTMENTS TO TITULAR POSITIONS. 1939 



William A. Roblyer 

Elizabeth B. Brockunier 
Gregory J. Edson 
Lucicn E. Taylor 



Chief of Cataloging and Classification Department, in 

the Reference Division 
Assistant to the Director 
Assistant to the Director 
Chief of Cataloging and Classificalion Dcparimcnt, 

Emcriliis 



RETIREMENTS FROM i HE LIBRARY, 1939 



Marion H. Shumway, Assistant 
Mary T. M. Boyle, Compositor 

Lucien E. Taylor, Chief of Cataloging and Classi- 
fication Department 
Garret P. Lacey, Engineer 
Elffie C. Merrill, First Assistant 
Ellen J. Offutt, Second Assistant 
Margaret M. Cusick, Cleaner 



After 44 years of service 

After 36 years of service 

After 35 years of service 

After 34 years of service 

After 33 years of service 

After 1 5 years of service 
After 9 years of service 



[110] 

APPENDIX E 



BOOK STOCK 

Total Number of Volumes in the Library as of December 31, 1939 
Reference Division 

Central Library 1,138,682 



Business Branch 



Total for Reference Division 
Circulation Division 

Young People's Room, Centra! Library 
School Department .... 
Branch Issue Department . 

Branch Libraries 



Square 



Allston 

Andrew 

Boylston 

Brighton 

Charlestown 

City Point . 

Codman Square 

Dorchester 

East Boston . 

Faneuil 

Fellowes Athenaeum 

Hyde Park . 

Jamaica Plain 

Jeffries Point . 

Kirstein 

Lower Mills 

Mattapan 

Memorial 

Mt. Bowdoin 

Mt. Pleasant 

Neponset 

North End . 

Orient Heights 

Parker Hill . 

Phillips Brooks 

Roslindale 

South Boston 

South End . 

Uphams Corner 

West End . 

West Roxbury 



Total for Branch Libraries 
Total for Circulation Division 
Total for Entire Library System 



13,791 

11.490 

12,102 

19,108 

15,898 

10,366 

15.468 

14,986 

16,703 

14.506 

41,744 

29,913 

15,277 

8,282 

7.979 

8.846 

16.529 

14,965 

11,543 

7,671 

6,645 

10.903 

9,565 

13,932 

5,555 

14,996 

10,307 

14,745 

17,504 

21,341 

18,891 

451,551 



24,686 
1,163,368 1,163,368 

9.914 
44,977 
34,919 



451.551 
541.361 



541.361 
1,704,729 



Ill] 



The total number of volumes in the Library at the end of each 
year since its formation is shown in the following statement: 



1852-53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-56 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1882-«3 

1883-84 

1884^5 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 



9.688 


1896-97 


16.221 


1897-98 


22.617 


1898-99 


28,080 


1899 1900 


34.896 


1900-01 


70.851 


1901-02 


78,043 


1902 03 


85.031 


1903-04 


97.386 


1904-05 


105.034 


1905-06 


110.563 


1906-07 


116.934 


1907-08 


123.016 


1908*09 


130.678 


1909-10 


136.080 


1910-11 


144,092 


1911-12 


1 52.796 


1912-13 


160.573 


1913-14 


179.250 


1914-15 


192.958 


1915-16 


209.456 


1916-17 


260.550 


1917-18 


276.918 


1918-19 


297,873 


1919-20 


321.010 


1920-2! 


345.734 


1921-22 


360.963 


1922-23 


377.225 


1923-24 


390.982 


1924-25 


404.221 


1925 


422.116 


1926 


438.594 


1927 


453.947 


1928 


460.993 


1929 


479.421 


1930 


492.956 


1931 


505.872 


1932 


520.508 


1933 


536.027 


1934 


556.283 


1935 


576.237 


1936 


597.152 


1937 


610,375 


1938 


628,297 


1939 



663.763 

698.888 

716.050 

746.383 

781.377 

812.264 

835.904 

848,884 

871.050 

878.933 

903,349 

922,348 

941 ,024 

961 .522 

987.268 

1,006.717 

1.049,011 

1.067,103 

1,098,702 

1.121,747 

1,139,682 

1.157,326 

1.173.695 

1.197.498 

1,224.510 

1,258.211 

1 .284,094 

1,308,041 

1,333,264 

1,363,515 

1.388,439 

1.418,489 

1 .442.802 

1 .475,743 

1.526,951 

1,572,802 

1,631,422 

1.654,017 

1.673.609 

1 .682,848 

1,693,335 

1,700.681 

1 .693,688 

1 ,704,729 



[112] 
ACCESSIONS, 1939 

The following statistics include materials received in 1939; 
they do not include materials received in earlier years, but pro- 
cessed only in 1 939. 

Classification of Accf.ssions, 1939 









NO. OF 


SOURCE 




VOLUMES 


By 


purchase . 




53.478 


By gift . 


. 


4,283 


By 


exchange . 




47 


By 


binding of 


newspapers 


66 


By 


binding of 


serials 


4.471 



Total 62.345 



Distribution of Expenditures for the Purchase of Books 
AND Other Library Materials, 1939 

Circulation Division 

From City Appropriation $42,667.54 

From Trust Fu.nds Income 1,898.52 $44,566.06 



Reference Division 

From City Appropriation $12,332.43 

From Trust Funds Income 114,358.91 126.691.34 



$171,257.40 



DisiRiBuriON OF Books Acquihi d by Purchask 

Circulation Division 

From City Appropriation 29,484 

From Trust Funds Income 1.405 30.889 



Reference Division 

From City Appropriation 2,265 

From Trust Funds Income 20,324 22.589 

53.478 



[113] 
Decrease in Book Stock of the Circulation Division, I935-I939 

TOTAL 
EXCESS OF NUMBER OF 

NUMBER OF NUMBER Of VOLUMES DISCARDED VOLUMES CIrCU. 

VOLUMES DISCARDED VOLUMES ADDED OVER VOLUMES ADDCD LATION DIVISION 



1935 


58,858 


55,567 


3.291 


603,892 


1936 


44,531 


36,502 


8.029 


595,863 


1937 


56,100* 


44.495 


11.605* 


584.258 


1938 


70,077** 


42,475 


27.602** 


556.656 


1939 


57,966 


42,671 


15,295 


541.361 



* An inventory loss of 4,069 in collection of Young People's Room included 
tn discards. 
** An inventory loss of 10,477 in Branch Issue Department collection included 
in discards. 



[114] 
NOTABLE PURCHASES, 1939 

Americana — Printed Books. Etc. 

Allardt. Hugo 

Novi Belgil Novaeque Angliae ... [1656.] Map. 
Bishop, George 

New England Judged. London, 1661. 
Chancy, Charles 

The Retraction of Mr. Charles Chancy. London, 1641. 
Drage, Theodore 

Account of a Voyage for Discovery of a North-West Passage. 2 

vols. London, 1 748. 
Esquemeling, John 

Bucaniers of America. 2 vols. London, 1684—5. 
Le Federaliste. 2 vols. Paris, 1 792. 
Glogoviensis, Johannes 

Introductorium Compendiosum. Cracow, 1506. 
Harbison, Massy 

A Narrative of the Sufferings of Massy Harbison. Pittsburgh, 1 828. 
Leonard, Daniel 

The Present Political State of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. 

New York, 1775. 
Linschoten, J. H. van 

Voyages into ye Easte & West Indies. London, 1 598. 
O'Callaghan, Rev. Jeremiah 

Atheism of Brownson's Review, etc. Burlington, Vermont, 1852. 
Piracies. Small Broadside. March 4, 1 783. 
Short narrative of the horrid massacre in Boston. London, W. Bing- 

ley. 1770. 
Sotzmann, Daniel Friedrich 

Massachusetts. Map. Hamburg, c. 1 798. 
Stamler, J. 

Dyalogus de diversarum gencium sectis et mundi religionibus. Augs- 
burg, 1508. Illustrated by Hans Burgkmair. 
Statutes of the State of Vermont. Bennington, Vermont, Anthony 

Haswell, 1791. 

Americana — Manuscript Books 

Penhaliow, Samuel 

Autograph manuscript. "History of the Wars of New England 
with the Eastern Indians." 1 726. 



[115] 

Americana — Manuscript Books (continued) 

Frevost, Lieut. Augustine 

Autograph manuscript journal, 1 764—8 ; and letters and documents, 
1750-1842. 

Americana — Manuscripts 

Adams, John 

D. S. March 10, 1767. 
Amory, John 

A. L. S. Zy.pp. Providence, 1 778. 
Barton, Confederate General Seth M. 

Autograph endorsement, 1 863. 
Blodgett, William 

Revolutionary correspondence. 
Boston Document, signed by Patch, Ellis, Cotting, and others. Ip. 

1 799. 
Boston Town Meeting 

Manuscript minutes. 1 768. 
Buchanan, James 

A. L. S. 3pp. June 1 9, 1 834. 

A. Ms. Address on the Cumberland Road Bill. 
Butler, General Benjamin h. 

Rough draft A. L. 2pp. April 26, 1 862. 
Chauncey, Isaac 

A. L. S. [y^pp. July 17, 1812. 
Cherokee Indians. D. S. 2pp. December 5, 1904. 
Civil War 

A. L. S. by Civil War Generals, Anderson, Sheridan, Sickles, 

I homas, Weitzel, Wise, and Wool. 
Clay, Henry 

8 A. L. S. to Epes Sargent. 
Confederate War Telegram. May 9, 1 864. 
Custer, George A. 

A. L. S. 2pp. March 1 6, 1 866. 
Davis, Jefferson 

A. L. S. 5!/2PP. 1876. 
Deane, Silas 

A. L. S. Ip. Paris. August 12. 1777. 
Debs, Eugene V. 

L. S. 2pp. Terre Haute, November 17, 1924. 
Emancipation document 
Ericsson. John 

A. L. S. 2pp. February 11. 1847. 



[116] 

Americana — Manuscripts (continued) 

Faneull Hall Document. May, 1 779. 
Florida Grant 

Manuscript signed. 1687. 
Fremont, General John C. 

2 A. L. S. September 20, 1850 and March 12. 1888. 
Gates, Horatio 

D. S. Revolutionary pay roll. 
Greene, Gen. Nathaniel 

A. L. S. 3pp. March 8, 1781. 
Hancock, John 

L. S. Ip. Boston, 1788. 
Hewett, S. P. 

A. L. S. to his mother. 1 860-62. 48pp. 
Hooker, Gen. Joseph 

L. S. November 7, 1861. 
Jackson, Andrew 

A. L. S. to Senator White. 4pp. March I 6. 1 826. 
Johnston, Lieut. Peyton 

A. L. S. Ip. April 7, 1865. 
Kearney, Gen. Philip 

A. L. S. Ip. March 5, 1862. 
Knox, Gen. Henry 

A. L. S. 5pp. July 12, 1801. 
McClellan, Gen. George B. 

A. D. S. 3pp. July 4, 1862. 
Madison, Dolly 

A. L. S. 1 p. January 10, 1844. 
Massachusetts Bay document on making bullion current. March 1 7, 

1 702. 
Mexico 

Nine manuscript documents signed by the first Viceroys of Mexico. 
1 6th century. 
Morse, Samuel F. B. 

A. L. S. 3pp. February 23, 1846. 
Motley, J. L, 

A. L. S. Nice. 1857. 
North, William 

A. L. S. 31/2PP. January 24, 1812. 
Pinckney, C. C. 

A. L. S. Ip. January 12, 1776. 
Porter, David 

4 A. L. S. 1826-1835. 



[117] 

Americana — Manuscripts (continued) 

Pownall, 1 homas 

A. L. S. September 7. 1 757. 31/2pp. 
Privateering documents 
Pynchon, John and son 

A. D. S. 1 664-69. 2pp. 
Randolph, John 

A. L. S. 2pp. Georgetown, March 31, 1816. 
Rosecrans, Gen. W. S. 

2 A. L. S., 1840 and 1863. 
Schurz, Carl 

A. L. S. 3pp. June 6. 1861. 
Scott, Gen. Winfield 

2 A. L. S., 1840 and 1864. 
Sewall, Samuel 

A. L. S. Ip. 1692. 
Sherman, Gen. William T. 

5 A. L. S. 
Shirley, William 

D. S. May 7, 1745. Ip. 
Slavery 

Document . . . signed Moses Cantine. January I, 1796. 
Strong, Caleb 

A. L. S. 1 p. and portrait. 1 793. 
Thomas, General George H. 

A. L. S. 1 p. Boston, February 21, 1851. 
1 homas, Isaiah 

A. L. S. to Hon. Dwight Thomas. January 30, 1 800. 
Tyler, John 

A. L. S. 3pp. May 30, 1 846. 
Upham, Samuel C. 

California manuscripts and A. L. S. 1 848—5 1 . 
Warren, James 

A. L. S. 3pp. March 3. 1 789. With other material of Colonial 

history. 
Wayne, General Anthony 

L. S. 3pp. hebruary I, 1782. 
Whaling Log 

Collection of ship's papers relating to the voyages of the whaling 

ship "Cadmus," 1831—41. 
Witchcraft documents. Salem, Massachusetts, 1692. 
Williams, Charles 

Journal of a voyage to San Francisco, I 849. With 5 A. L. S. 
Young, Brigham 

L. S. 2pp. Salt Lake City. January 9, 1865. 



[118] 

American Literature — Printed Books 

Barker. B. 

Mornilva. Boston, 1846. 
Cable, George W. 

Old Creole Days. New York, 1879. First Edition. 
Carey, David 

Life in Paris. 2 vols. New Orleans, 1837. First Edition. 
Gather. Willa 

My Antonia. Boston. 1918. First Edition. 
Dickinson, Emily 

Further Poems. Little. Brown. 1929. First Edition. 

Letters. 2 vols. Roberts Bros., 1894. First Edition. 

Poems for Youth. Little, Brown. 1934. 

The Single Hound. Little, Brown. 1914. First Edition. 
Duganne, Augustine J. H. 

Knights of the Seal. Philadelphia. 1848. First Edition. 
Handiboe. Edward J. 

Will Crittenden. Cincinnati, n.d. 
Heam, Lafcadio 

Some Chinese Ghosts. Boston. 1 887. First Edition. 
Howells, William Dean 

The Son of Royal Langbrith. New York, 1904. First Edition. 

A. L. S. to Mr. Munro [laid in]. Kittery Point. 1903. 
Jones, J. (Harry Hazel) 

Big Dick. Boston. 1 849. 
Larcom, Lucy 

A New England Girlhood. Boston, 1890. First Edition. 
Mann. George Flagg 

The Geranium Leaf. Boston. 1 840. First Edition. 
Ramon: the Rover of Cuba. Boston, 1829. 
The Soldier's Orphan. New York, 1812. 
Whitefield, George 

Three Letters. Philadelphia. B. Franklin. 1740. 

American Literature — Manuscript Books 

Bradford. Gamaliel 

Manuscript of "Darwin," October 11. 1926. 

American Literature — Manuscripts 

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey 

A. Ms. "Monody On the Death of Wendell Phillips." August 27, 
1898. 



[119] 

American Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

Allston, Washington 

A. L.S.June L 1819. 
Arthur, 1 imothy S. 

A. L. S. December 28, 1865. 
Bancroft, George 

50 letters, chiefly to publishers. 
Barlow, Joel 

A. L. S. I p. July 2, n.y. 

A. L. S. Paris, March 17, 1802. 
Bierce, Ambrose 

A. L. S. Ip. Washington, September 9, 1906. 
Bryant, William Cullen 

A. L. S. to Dr. G. W. Porter. Cummington, September 13, 1875. 
Bryce, James 

A. L. S. 3pp. May 1, 1907. 
Burroughs, John 

A. Ms. 14pp. N.p., n.d. 
Cable, G. W. 

A. Ms. N.p., n.d. 
Clemens, Samuel L. 

21 A. L. S. 1870-1910. 

Autograph postscript on a letter by his wife. February 22-3, 1886. 

Printed D. S. Ip. December 18, 1889. 
Colman, Benjamin and others 

A. D. S. Addressee unknown. Boston, April 22, 1 730. 
Cooper, James Fenimore 

A. L. S. Ip. May 9, 1840. 
Curtis, George William 

A. L. S., April 25. 1862. 

Collection of 40 pieces relating to Curtis. 
Dana, Richard H, 

3 A. L. S. 6pp. 
Dana, Richard H., Jr. 

5 A. L. S. to G. W. Curtis. 30pp. 
Dc La Mare, Walter 

A. L. S. 2pp. March 26, 1915. 
Emerson, Ralph Waldo 

A. L. S, Concord, Mass., 1855. 

A. L. S. 1865. 2 photographs. 
Everett, Edward 

A. L. S. 2i^pp. April 23, 1838. A. L. S. October 18, 1851. 
Fields, James i homas 

A. L. S. July 15, 1862. 



[120] 

American Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

French, Jonathan 

A. L. S. to Dr. Jedldiah Morse. Andover, 1 799. 
Gaine, Hugh 

A. L. S. to Peter v. Schaack. December 27, 1 787. 
George, Henry 

A. L. S. 4pp. May 27, n.y. 
Godwin, Parke 

7 A. L. S. to G. W. Curtis. 
Goodrich, S. G. 

A. L. S. New York, 1857. 
Harte, Bret 

6 A. L. S. 1880-1901. 
Holmes, Oliver Wendell 

28 A. L. S. 1 862-. 

Autograph manuscript of introduction to "The Autocrat of the 

Breakfast Table." N.d. 
Howells, William D. 

4 A. L. S. to G. W. Curtis. Autograph ms. signed, 7pp. A. L. S. 

to Swinton, Venice, October 22, 1 863. 
James, Henry 

A. L. S. 2pp. 1891. 
Key, Francis Scott 

A. L. S. 4pp. November 7. 1833. 
La r com, Lucy 

72 A. L. S. 325pp. Boston, 1879-92. 
London, Jack 

A. L. S. 4pp. August 23, 1906. A. L. S. and manuscript. Decem- 
ber 22. 1907. 
Longfellow, Henry W. 

A. L. S. to G. W. Curtis. June 14, 1859. 

Collection of letters and manuscripts. 25 pieces. 
Lowell, Amy 

10 typewritten L. S., 1915-19. 
Lowell, James Russell 

8 A. L. S. and a manuscript poem. 1 850—1 887. 
A. L. S. September 4, 1 880. 

Manuscript material by Hannah F. Gould, C. P. Cranch, Robert 

Farquhar, etc. 
Miller, Joaquin 

A. L. S. 3pp. January 8, 1 894. 
O'Connor, W. D. 

A. L. S. 3pp. January 6, 1 866. 
Page, Walter Hines 

A. L. S. Cambridge, Mass., February 17, 1896. 



[\2\\ 

American Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

Parker, Theodore 

A. L. S. West Roxbury. 1 848. 
Parton, James 

10 A. L. S. 1866-1877. 
Payne, John Howard 

A. L. S. Signed "JH.P." 4pp. June 21, 1822. 
Pierce, fcLduard L. 

20 Letters to G. W. Curtis. 
Riley, James Whitcomb 

A. L. S. to A. S. Hardy. October 12. 1894. 
Robinson, Ldwin Arlington 

A. L. S. to William Stanley Braithwaite. February 17, 1916. 
Roosevelt, I heodore 

A. L. S. to Pres. Benjamin Harrison. 4pp. 1 889. 
Sargent, Epes 

Correspondence, consisting of 200 letters from literary contem- 
poraries, c. 1850. 
Sargent, Winthrop 

4 A. L. S. 2 D. S. Mississippi, 1 797-9. 
1 abb, John Bannister 

A. L. S. Addressee unknown. February 1 6, 1 900. 
Taylor, Bayard 

12 A. L. S. toG. W. Curtis. 
Ticknor, George 

2 A. L. S. January, 1861, and March, 1862. 8pp. 
Warner, Charles Dudley 

6 letters to G. W. Curtis. 
Whipi^Ie, L. P. 

6 A. L. S. to G. W. Curtis. 
Whitman, Walt 

Manuscript poem "A Clear Midnight," and 15 other pieces re- 
lating to Whitman and "Leaves of Grass." c. 1899. 
Whittier, John Greenleaf 

A. L. S. 4pp. Centre Harbor, N. H., 1861. 

A. Ms. of "Hours of Labor." c. March, 1861. 

English Literature — Printed Books, Etc. 

Arnold, Matthew 

Empedocles on Etna. London, 1852. First Edition. 

The Strayed Reveller. London, 1849. First Edition. 
Bacon, brancis 

Sylva Sylvarum. London, 1627. First Edition. 



[122] 

English Literature — Printed Books, Etc. (continued) 

Barrie, Sir James 

Auld Licht Idylls. London, 1888. First Edition. 

The Little White Bird. London, 1902. First Edition. 

Margaret Ogilvy. London, 1 896. First Edition. 

My Lady Nicotine. London, 1890. First Edition. 
Barton, Bernard 

A New Year's Eve. London, 1 838. First Edition, 

Poetic Vigils. London, 1824. First Edition. 
Beaumont, Dr. Joseph 

Psyche. London, 1648. First Edition. 
Beerbohm, Max 

Zuleika Dobson. London, 191 I. First Edition. 
Blair, Hugh 

Observations upon a Pamphlet. Edinburgh, 1 735. 
The Booke of Common Praier. London, 1559. 
Borrow, George 

Lavengro. 3 vols. 1 85 1 . First Edition. 

Tales of the Wild and Wonderful. London, 1825. First Edition. 
Bulwer-Lytton, Edward 

The Last Days of Pompeii. 3 vols. London, 1 834. First Edition. 
Bunyan, John 

The Barren Fig-Tree. 1688. First Edition. 

The Water of Life. 1 688. First Edition. 
Burns, Robert 

The Inventory. Glasgow, [1796]. 

Letters addressed to Clarinda. Glasgow, 1802. First Edition. 
Butler, Samuel 

Evolution Old and New. London, 1 879. First Edition. 

The Way of All Flesh. London, 1903. 
Byron, Lord 

Works, 1 820. First Edition. 

Broadside. April 26. 1821. 

English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, 181 1, and The Vampyre, 

1819. 2 vols. 

Lara, a Fale. Jacqueline, a Tale. London, 1814. First Edition. 

Poems on Various Occasions. Newark, 1 807. 
Carroll, Lewis 

Ihrough the Looking Glass. First Edition. 
Caxton, William 

Chronicles of England and Description of England. Westminster?, 

Wynkyn de Worde, 1502. 
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor 

Aids to Reflection. London, 1825. First Edition. 

The V/atchman, No. 1 , March 1-May 1 3, 1 796. Bristol. Original 

issues. 



[123] 

English Literature — Printi.d Books, E.tc. (continued) 

Congreve, William 

The Old Batchelour. London, 1693. First Edition. 
Conrad, Joseph 

1 he Mirrour of the Sea. London, 1 906. First Edition. 
Cowper, William 

Poems. 2 vols. 1 792—3. First Edition. 
Daniel, Samuel 

Civile Wares. London, 1 609. 
Darwin, Charles 

On the Origin of Species. London, 1859. First Edition. 
Defoe, Daniel 

A Critical Essaj^ concerning Marriage. London, 1 724. First Edition. 

Dissectio Mentis Humanae: Or a Satiric Essay on Modern Critics. 

London, 1730. 
De Quincey, Thomas 

Confessions of an English Opium-Eatcr. London, 1 822. First Edi- 
tion. 
Dickens, Charles 

A Christmas Carol. London, i 843. h irst Edition. 

Master Humphrey's Clock. 88 parts. London, 1840-1. First Edi- 
tion. 

Oliver Twist. London, 1917. First Edition. 
Douglas, Norman 

South Wind. London, 1917. Mvst Edition. 
Elyot, Sir Thomas 

The Bankette of Sapience. London, 1545. 
FaithfuU, Emily 

Poems. London, 1 863. P irst Edition. 
Farquhar, George 

Fhe Constant Couple. London, 1700. Pirst Edition. 
Fielding, Henry 

Adventures of Joseph Andrews. London, 1832. Illus. by Cruik- 

shank. 

Don Quixote in England. London, I 734. First Edition. 

The Fathers. London, 1778. hirst Edition. 

1 he History of lorn Jones, a Foundling. 6 vols. London, 1749. 

hirst Edition, first issue. 

The History of Tom Jones. London, 1 749. Second Edition. 

Joseph Andrews. London, I 742. First Edition. 

Fasquin. London, 1 736. First Edition, 
hlccker, James EIroy 

The Golden Journey to Samarkand. London, 1913. hirst Edition. 
Galsworthy, John 

Fhe Forsyte Saga. London, 1922. hirst Edition. 



[124] 

English Literature — Printed Books, Etc. (continued) 

Gay, John 

Trivia. London, 1716. First Edition. 
Germ, The. Nos. 1-4. London, January to April, 1850. 
Gill, Alexander 

The new Starr of the North. London, 1632, First Edition. 
Goldsmith, Oliver 

Poems and Plays. Dublin, 1 777. First collected edition, second 

issue. 

Poems for Young Ladies. London, 1 767. First Edition. 

Selected Poems. London, 1775. 
Gosse, Edmund William 

Pather and Son. London, 1907. First Edition. 
Grahame, Kenneth 

The Wind in the Willows. London, 1908. First Edition. 
Hudson, W. H. 

Works. 24 vols. 1923. 

Green Mansions. London, 1904. First Edition. 

The Purple Land that England Lost. 2 vols. London, 1885. First 

Edition. 
Hume, David 

Essays Moral and Political. Edinburgh, 1741-2. 2 vols. First Edi- 
tion. 

Four Dissertations. London, 1757. First Edition. 
Humphrey, Lawrence 

The Nobles. London, 1563. First Edition. 
Hunt, James Henry Leigh 

Men, Women, and Books. 2 vols. 1847. First Edition. 

The Poetical Works. London, 1832. 
Johnson, Samuel 

Irene. London, 1 749. First Edition. 

Journey to the Western Islands. London, 1775. First Edition. 

1 he Prince of Abissinia. 2 vols. London, 1759. First Edition. 
Jonson, Ben 

Q. Horatius Flaccus, His Art of Poetry. London, 1640. First 

Edition. 
Joyce, James 

Ulysses. Paris, 1922. First Issue. 
Keats, John 

Endymion. London, 1818. First Edition. 

Lamia. London, 1 820. First Edition. 
Kingsley, Charles 

Alton Locke. London, 1850. First Edition. 

The Water Babies. London, 1 863. First Edition. 
Kipling, Kudyard 

American Notes. And the Bottle Imp by Robert Louis Stevenson. 



II25J 

English Literature — Printed Books, Etc. (continued) 

New York, [1891]. First Edition. 

The Light that Failed. London, 189L First English Edition. 

Plain Tales from the Hills. Calcutta, 1 888. First Edition. 

Soldiers Three. Allahabad, 1 888. First Edition. 
Lamb, Charles 

Essays of Elia, 1823—33. 2 vols. Wordsworth's copy of the fust 

edition. 

Essays of Elia. Philadeli)hia, 1 828. First American Edition. 

Essays of Elia. London, I 883. Ainger Edition. 

Mrs. Leicester's School. London, 1809. Dorothy Wordsworth's 

copy with her inscription and Wordsworth's initials. First Edition. 

1 he Pawnbroker's Daughter. London, 1830. First Edition. 

A Tale of Rosamund Gray and Old Blind Margaret. London, 

1 798. First Edition. 
Lamb, John 

Poetical Pieces on Several Occasions. London, [c. 1 765—70] . 

First Edition. 
Landor, Walter S. 

The Poems of Walter Savage Landor. London, 1 795. First Edition. 

Poetry by the Author of Gebir. London, 1 802. First Edition. 
Lang, Andrew 

Essays in Little, with autograph letter. London, 1 89 1 . First Edition. 
LawTence, D. H. 

The Prussian Officer. London, 1914. First Edition. 
Locke, John 

1 wo Treatises of Government. London, 1 764. First Edition. 
la)rd, Henry 

A Display of two forraigne sects. London, 1 630. First l-dition. 
Lucas, E. V. 

Bernard Barton and his Friends. London, 1893. First Edition. 
Macaulay, Thomas Babington 

Fhe History of England. London, 1849—60. First Edition. 
Mackenzie, Henry 

The Man of Feeling. London, 1771. First Edition. 
Malthus, Rev. T. R. 

Essay on the Principle of Population. London, 1 798. First Edition. 

Essay on the Principle of Population. London, 1803. Second Edi- 
tion. 

An inquny into the Nature and Progress of Rent. London, 1815. 

hirst Edition. 
Manby. G. W. 

An Essay on the Preservation of Ship-wrecked Persons. London, 

1812. First Edition. 
Mathews, Sir T. 

Collection of Letters. London, 1 660. First Edition. 



[126] 

English Literature — Printud Books, Etc. (continued) 

May, J. Lewis 

Charles Lamb. London, 1934. First Edition. 
Mill, John Stuart 

Autobiography. London, 1873. First Edition. 
Mirror for Magistrates. London, 157L 
Moore, George 

Memoirs. London, 1906. First Edition. 
Morris, William 

The Fables Turned. London, 1887. First Edition. 
Nedham, Marchamont 

The political tracts. London, (1650)-! 659. First Edition. 
Pope, Alexander 

First Epistle of the First Book of Horace Imitated. London, 1 737. 

First Edition. 

Universal Prayer. London, 1 738. First Edition. 
Proctor, Bryan Waller 

Charles Lamb, a Memoir. 1866. First Edition. With 19 lines of 

a letter from Lamb to Mrs. Westwood ; two A. L. S. from the 

author to Thomas Westwood, whom Lamb befriended; and the 

latter's bookplate. 
Quarles, Francis 

1 he Loyall Convert. Oxford, 1643. First Edition. 
Radclifle, Ann 

The Mysteries of Udolpho. London, 1 794. First Edition. 
Rossi, Mario M. and Joseph M. Hone 

Swift, or the Egotist. New York, 1934. First Edition. 
Sallust 

The Two Most Worthy and Notable Histories. Thomas Hey- 

wood, trans. London, 1 608—9. 
Sassoon, Siegfried 

War Poems. London, 1919. First Edition. 
Scott, Walter 

The Monastery. Edinburgh. 1820. First Edition. 

St. Ronan's Well. Edinburgh, 1 824. First Edition. 

Woodstock. 1826. First Edition. 
Shaw, George Bernard 

Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant. 2 vols. London, 1898. First Edi- 
tion. 

Widowers' Houses. London, 1893. First Edition. 
Shelley, Percy Bysshe 

The Cenci. London, 1819. First Edition. 

Queen Mab, London, 1813. First Edition. 
Ihe Revolt of Islam. London, 1818. First Edition. 

Rosalind and Helen. London, 1819. First Edition. 

Zastrozzi. London, 1810. First Edition. 



[127] 

English Literature — Printed Books, Etc. (continued) 

Sillar, David 

Poems. Kilmarnock, 1 789. First Edition. 
Soane, George 

The Innkeeper's Daughter. Prompter's copy. London, 1817. First 

Edition. 
Spenser, Edmund 

The Faerie Queene. London. 1596. First Edition. 
Sprat, T. and Waller, E. 

Three Poems. London, 1682. First Edition. 
Stevenson, Robert Louis 

The Black Arrow. New York, 1 888, First Edition. 

A Child's Garden of Verses. London, 1885. First Edition. 

Familiar Studies of Men and Books. London, 1 882. First Edition. 

A Footnote to History. London, 1 892. First Edition. 

An Inland Voyage. London, 1878. First Edition. 

Poems. Minneapolis, 1917. 

Virginibus Puerisque. 1881. First Edition, 
Stoker, Bram 

Dracula. London, 1897, First Edition, A, L. S. inserted. 
Swift, Jonathan 

Works. 4 vols. Dublin, 1735. 

First Ode to the Second Book of Horace Paraphrased. London, 

1714. First Edition. 

Gulliver's Travels. London, 1 726. hirst Edition. 

1 he Journal to Stella. London, 1901. 

A Modest Enquiry. London, 1714. First Edition. 

A Tale of a Bottomless Fub. London, 1 723. First Edition. 
Synge, John Millington 

The Shadow of the Glen and Riders to the Sea. London, 1905. 

First Edition. 
Talfourd. T. N. 

Letters of Charles Lamb. London, 1837. 2 vols. First Edition. 
Tusser, 1 homas 

Fiue hundreth pointes of good husbandrie. London, 1 599. 
Tye, Christopher 

The Acts of the Apostles. London, 1553. First Edition. 
Wells, H. G. 

The Flistory of Mr. Polly. London, 1910. First Edition. 
Wells, H. G. 

The Island of Dr. Moreau. London, 1 896. First Edition. 

Mr. Britling Sees it Through. London, 1916. b irst Edition. 

The 1 ime Machine. London, 1895. First Edition, 

When the Sleeper Wakes. New York, 1899. First Edition. 



[128] 

English Literature — Printed Books, Etc. (continued) 

White, John 

The Troubles of Jerusalems Restauration. London, 1 646. First 

Edition. 
Yeats, W. B. 

In the Seven Woods. Dundrum, 1 903. First Edition. 

English Literature — Manuscript Books 

Buchanan, Robert 

Literary notebook, 1868-1875, with 1 p. letter of Mary Buchanan. 
Collins, Wilkie 

A. Ms. "The Haunted Hotel." 
Conrad, Joseph 

Typescript. "The Secret Agent." 170pp. 

Typescript. "The Torrens. A Personal 1 ribute." 
Coppard, A. E. 

A. Ms. "Dumbledon Donkey." 8pp. 
Cruikshank, George 

A. Ms. "This is the House that Jack Built." 48pp. 
De Quincey, 1 homas 

A. Ms. Notes on French Drama and Literature. 
Morris, William 

A. Ms. "Independent Ireland." 

Manuscript. "The Pilgrims of Hope." 

Manuscript. "Useful Work versus Useless Toil." 
Shaw, George Bernard 

Article on "St. Joan." typescript. 
Swinburne, Algernon Charles 

A. Ms. "Victor Hugo: Toute la Lyre." 

English Literature — Manuscripts 

Arnold, Matthew 

3 A. L. S. April 25-May 11, 1857. 
Barham, Richard H. 

A. L. S. 4pp. September 8, 1 830. 

Autograph poem, initialled. January, 1831. 
Barrie, Sir James 

2 A. L. S. May 21, 1897 and June 26, [1897]. 

27 A. L. S. to the Duchess of Sutherland. 1906-1936. 

42 A. L. S. to Rosaline Masson. 1902-1936. 
Beerbohm, Max 

A. L. S. 2pp.. 3 A. L. S. June 1 5-28, 1909. 
Bennett, Arnold 

"American Literature," manuscript. 1928. 



[129] 

English Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

"Einstein," manuscript. 1927. 

"Private Libraries," manuscript. 1930. 

"T. S. Eliot," manuscript, N.d. 

"Rare Books," manuscript. 1929. 
Binyon, Laurence 

A. L. S. Ip. August 24, 1909. A. L. S. 1 ;/pp. Dec 20, n.y. 
Borrow, George 

"Songs relating to Marsk Stig and his Family." 23pp. 1829, re- 
vised 1854. 

A. Mss. "The Songs of Ranild," "Child Stig and Child Findal." 
Browning, Elizabeth B. 

A. L. S., and portions of 3 others. 1 7pp. 
Burke, Edmund 

A. L. S. 2pp. December 6, 1 790. 
Burney, Fanny 

A. L. S., October 14, 1813. 2pp. 2 A. L. December 31, 1799 

and May 5, 1816. 
Carlyle, Thomas 

A. L. S., December 19, 1854. 
Cobden, R. 

A. L. S. 4pp. 1862. 
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor 

A. L. S. to James Gillman, November 9, 1832. 
Conrad, Joseph 

A. L. S. 4pp. June 13, 1914. Bound with "The Lesson of the 

Collision," a printed article. 

A. L. S. "J. Conrad." 4pp. May, 1924. 

3 A. L. S. 1918 and 1924. 
Cruikshank, George 

A. L. S. 4pp. April 28. 1845. 

Leaf displaying two sketches. N.p., n.d. 

Pencil and pen-and-ink sketches. 

Signature. 
De Quincey, 1 homas 

A. L. S. 2pp. October I 8, n.y. 
Doughty, Charles 

A. L. S. N.d. 
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan 

A. L. S. I p., A. Ms. I p. Typewritten appreciation, corrections, 

10pp. 
Lliot, George 

A. L. S. to Chapman, 1853. 
iitzgerald, Edward 

A. L. S. August. 1 880. 

8 A. L. S. "E. F. G." and one A. L. 31pp. 1862-81. Bound. 



[130] 

English Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

Galsworthy, John 

A. L. S. 1927. L. S. Ip. 1915. 
Gaskell, Mrs. E. C. 

2 A. L. S. 6pp. 
Gibbon, Edward 

A. L. S. 3pp. July 25, 1 793. 
Gladstone, William E. 

A. L. S. 7pp. 1860. 
Hamerton, Philip G. 

2 A.L. S. 1876 and 1886; A. Ms., 1876, and 6 other letters. 
Hardy, Thomas 

2 A. L. S. 1872 and 1891. 4 typewritten letters. 1925. 
Hastings, Warren 

A. L. S. 2pp. 
Herschel, Sir J. F. W. 

3 A. L. S. 1821-1848. 
Hogg, James 

A. L. S. 3pp. April 1, 1813. 
Hudson. W. H. 

3 A. L. S. 
Lawrence, D. H. 

3 A. L. S., 1923. 
Martineau, H. 

A. L. S. 4pp. 
Meredith, George 

2 A. L. S. May 1 9. 1 884 and September 1 2, 1 887. 
Moore, George 

8 A. L. S. 1 L. S. 1885-1923. 
More, Hannah 

A. L. S. 4pp. 
Kossetti. D. G. 

6 letters; A. L. S. of W. M. Kossetti; manuscript list of Rossetti 

residences. 
Ruskin, John 

22 A. L. S. to Wm. H. Hooper, c. 1 883-86. 
Russell. George. "A. E." 

A. L. S. 1 K2PP. N.p., n.d. 

A. Ms. of poem "Loneliness," Ip. 
Scott, Sir Waller 

4 A. L. S. 1812 and 1828. 
Shaw, George Bernard 

2 A. L. S. October 21, 1887 and July 1 I, 1911. 
Southey. Robert 

A. L. S. 3pp. May 20. I 799. 



[131] 

English Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

Stanhope, Lady Hester 
A. L. S. 7pp. 1815. 
Stevenson, Robert Louis 

2 A. L. S. 
Tennyson, Lord 

3 A. L. S. April 15. 1870. December 27. 1871. n.d. A. L. S. 
1 866. Autograph postscript to a letter written by his wife. 

Tillotson, John 

A. L. S. 2pp. 1691. 
Wells, H. G. 

A. L. S. 1 p. 
Wilde, Oscar 

A. L. S. 4pp. 1888; A. L. S. 4pp. Worthing, n.d. 

Spanish Literature — Printed Books 

Al Rey Nuestro Senor . . . c. 1652, 

Chronica del muy esclarecide Principe y Rey don Alfonso el On- 

zeno . . , Valladolid: Sebastian Martinez. 1551. 
Mexia, Pedro 

Historia imperial y Cesarea. Seville, 1545. 

French Literature — Printed Books 

Cyrano de Bergerac 

Les oeuvres diverses. 2 vols. 1 66 1 . 
Daudet, Alphonse 

Lettres de mon moulin. Paris, n.d. 
l-^eletier, Jacques 

L'Art Poetique. Lyons, Jean de Tournes, 1555. 

French Literature — Manuscripts 

Beranger, Pierre Jean de 

A. L. S. Ip. September 19. 1850. 
Dumas. Alexandre 

A. L. S. Ip. N.p., n.d. 
Lamartine, Alphonse 

A. L. S. 2pp. November 10, I860. 



[132] 
French Literature — Manuscripts (continued) 

Rolland, Remain 

A. Ms. 2pp. 
Stael, Mme. de 

A. L. S. Ip. October 26, 1815. 
Sue, Eugene 

A. L. S. 2pp. N.p., n.d. 
Zola, Emile 

A. L. S. 2pp. 1 883. 

German Literature — Printed Books 

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von 

Farbenlehre. Tubingen, 1810. 3 vols. First Edition. 

Faust, Hundertjahrausgabe. Berlin. 1932. 

Die Leiden des jungen Werthers. I 774. First Edition. 

Propylaen. Tiibmgen, 1 798-1 800. First Edition. 

Versuch die Metamorphose der Pflanzen zu erklaren. Gotlia, 1 790. 

First Edition. 

Die Wahlverwandtschaften. Tiibingen, 1 809. First Edition. 

Winkelmann und sein Jahrhundert. Tubingen, 1805. First Edition. 
Heine, Heinrich 

Atta Troll. Hamburg, 1847. First Edition. 

Deutschland. Hamburg, 1844. First Edition. 

Neue Gedichte. Hamburg, 1844. First Edition. 

Die Nordsee. Hilversum, 1928. Heuvel Press. 

Die romantische Schule. Hamburg, 1 836. First Edition. 

Romanzero. Hamburg, 1851. First Edition. 
Hoelderlin, Johann Christian 

Gedichte. Stuttgart, 1 826. First Edition. 
Kant, Immanuel 

Critik der reinen Vernunft. Riga, 1 781. hirst Edition. 

Critik der Urtheilskraft. Berlin, 1 790. First Edition. 

Metaphysische Anfangsgriinde der Naturwissenschaft. Riga, 1 786. 

First Edition. 
Kleist, Heinrich von 

Das Kathchen von Heilbronn. Berlin, 181-. First Edition. 
Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim 

Fabeln. Berlin, I 775. First Edition. 

Laokoon. Berlin, 1 766. First Edition. 
Luther. Martin 

Das Tauft Buchlin. Wittenberg, 1523. First Edition. 



[133] 
German Literature — Printed Books (continued) 

[Robinson Crusoe. Imitations] 

Der Medicinische Robinson. Leipzig, 1 732. 

Nieder-Sachsischer Robinson. P rankfurt, 1 724. 

Der Brandenburgisclie Robinson. 1 744, 
Ryff. W. 

Reformierte Deutsche Apoteck. Strassburg, 1573. 
Schwarzenberg, Joliann von 

Beschwerung der alten Teufelischen Schlangen mit dem Gotlichen 

wort. Nuremberg, 1 525. First Edition. 

Mathematics & Science — Printed Books 

Blundeville, Thomas 

His Exercises. London, 1613. 
Evelyn, John 

Navigation and Commerce. London, 1674. First Edition. 
H alley, Edmund 

A Synopsis of the Astronomy. London, 1 705. 
Leurechon, Jean 

Recreations Mathematiques. Rouen, 1 629. 
Marius, Simon 

Mundus Jovialis. Nuremberg. 1614. 
Marriotte, Edme 

The Motion of Water, 1718. 
Ozanam, Jacques 

Recreations Mathematical. 1 708. 
Pascal, Blaise 

Traitez de I'equilibre des Liqueurs et de la Pesanteur de la Masse 

de I'Air. Paris, 1 663. First Edition. 
Sacro Busto, Johannes de 

Sphaera mundi. Venice, 1485. 
Seller, J. 

Practical Navigation. London, 1 739. 
Stoeffler, Johann 

Elucidatio astrolabii. Oppenheim, J Kobel, 1512—13. 
Taylor, John 

Thesaurarium Mathematicae. London, 1 707. 
Wilkins, J. 

Mathematical Magick. London, 1 680. 



[134] 

Mathematics & Science — Manuscripts 

Manuscripts and correspondence of Alexander G. Bell, Thomas Edi- 
son, Clarence John Blake, etc. 

Medieval Manuscripts 

Albumasar 

Liber de meditationibus. 1 4th century manuscript. 
Andreae, Johannes 

Commentaria ad S. Hieronymum. 1 5th century French manuscript. 
Aquinas, Thomas 

De fallaciis. 1 4th century manuscript. Bound with Aristotle. Or- 

ganon. 
Aristotle 

Organon. 14th century manuscript. Bound with Thomas Aquinas, 

De fallaciis. 
Ars Moriendi. 1 5th century manuscript. 
Canones tabularum (Johannes de Saxonia and Joannes de Lineriis). 

1 4th century manuscript. 
Caxton, William 

Volume containing nine fifteenth-century manuscripts, supposedly 

from the library of William Caxton and inscribed by him. 
Franciscan Breviary. Illuminated manuscript, about 1 340. 
Horae B. V. M. Rennes, c. 1 400. 
Horae B. V. M. ad usum Dolensem. Northern France, early 1 5th 

century. 
Horae B. V. M. Manuscript. Flanders, 1 5th century. 
Horae B. V. M. ad usum Romanum. Manuscript. Flanders, c. 1 500. 
St. Jerome 

Epistolae. 1 5th century Italian manuscript. 
Vita S. Augustini. 1 5th century German manuscript. 



Incunabula 

Abstemius 

Fabulae. Venice, 1 499. 
Albertus de Saxonia 

De proportionibus. Venice, 1 494. 
Angelus 

Astrolabiuiii. Venice, 1 494. 



[1351 

Incunabula (continued) 

Annius 

Auctores vetustissimi. Venice, 1 498. 
Anselm of Canterbur.v 

Cur deus homo. Strassburg, not after 1474, 
Appianus Alexandrinus 

Historia Romana. Reggio d'Emilia, 1494; and Scandiano, 1495. 
Bessarion, Johannes 

Adversus Platonis calumniatorem. Rome, before 1469. 
Breviarum Romanum. Venice, 1477. 
Cassinensis, Samuel 

Liber isagogicus. Milan, 1494. 
Cavaica 

Fructi della lingua. Florence, 1493. 
Corvinus 

Cosmographia dans manuductionem. Basel, c. 1493. 
Crescentius, P. de 

De Agricultura. Venice, 1495. 
Cyprian, St. 

De duodecim abusivis saeculi. Cologne, 1470. 
Eschenbach, Wolfram von 

Tyturel. Strassburg, 1477. 
[Gospel of Nicodemus.] Historia sive evangelium. Cologne, c. 1499- 

1500. 
Herbarius Patavie. Passau, 1485. 
Hieronymus de Vallibus 

Jesuida. Ingolstadt, ca. 1497. 
Horae. Paris, 1500. 
Horatius 

Opera. Strassburg, 1498. 
Isidorus Hispalensis (St. Isidore) 

Liber Soliloquiorum. Albi, c. 1478. 
St. Jerome 

Vita e Epistole. Ferrara, 1497. 
Lirer, f homan 

Chronica von alien Konigen und Kaisern. Ulm, 1 486. 
Macrobius 

In Somnium Scipionis. Venice, 1 500. 
Methodius 

Revelations. Basel, 1300. 
Negligentiae et dcfectus in missa. Erfurt, 1 494. 
Magni, Jacobus 

Sophologium. Strassburg, c. 1470. 

Sophologium. Lyons, J. de Vingle, 1495. 
Molitoris 

De Lamiis. M. Flach, 1 500. 



[136] 

Incunabula (continued) 

Matleolo da Perugia 

De memoria. M. Schott, 1498. 
Otto von Passau 

Die Vierundzwanzig Alten. Augsburg, Anton Sorg, 1480. 
Papal Dispensation 

Augsburg, Ratdolt, 1487. 
Precordiale sacerdotum devote celebrare cupientium. Basel, Johannes 

von Amerbach, June 1 6, 1 489. 
Ptolemaeus 

Liber quadripartiti. Venice, 1493, 
Raymundus 

Epislola Luciferi. Paris, ca. 1498, 
Regiomontanus 

Dialogus inter Viennensem et Cracoviensem. Nuremberg, Regio- 
montanus, c. 1475, 
Richenthal, Ulrich von 

Concilium zu G)nstanz. Augsburg, Anton Sorg, 1483. 
Rodericus Zamorensis (Sanchez de Arevalo) 

Speculum vitae humanae. Toulouse, J. Parix, ca. 1 480. 

Speculum vitae humanae. Besancon, P, Metlinger, 1 488. 
Rolevinck, Werner 

Fasciculus temporum. Cologne, 1474, 
Septem Sapientes, Cologne, c, 1472, 

Speculum humanae salvationis, Augsburg, Gunther Zainer, 1473. 
Suidas 

Lexicon. Milan, 1499, 
Turrecremata 

Expositio brevis, Mainz, Schoeffer, 1 476. 
Vegius 

Philalethes. Nuremberg, Regiomontanus, 1474. 
Von Wyle, Niclas 

Translationen. Esslingen, Conrad Fyner, 1478. 

Illustrated Books 

Anleitung zum Richtiger und Geschmackvollen blumen-Zeichnung. 

Nuremberg and Leipzig, 1 802. 
Bewick, Thomas 

A General History of Birds and Quadrupeds. Philadelphia, 1 824. 
de la Bretonne, Restif 

La Paysane Pervertie. La Haie, 1 784. 

La Prevention Nationale, La Haie, 1 784, 



[137] 

iLLUSTRAIFiD BoOKS (continued) 

Colonna, Francisco 

Hypnerotomachie ou Discours du songe de Poliphilc. Paris, 1 546. 
Corbeiile de Fleurs. Paris, 1 807. 

Les Exposicions des Epislres et Euangiles. Paris, for Verard, 1519. 
Hours, French. Paris, Simon Voslre, 1508. 
Horae Beatae Mariae Virginis. London, 1514. 
Hortulus Anime. Lyons, 1513. 

Icones historarum veteris testamenti. Lyons, 1547. Hans Holbein, illus. 
Imbert, Barthelemy 

Le Jugernent de Paris. Amsterdam, 1772. 
Philo Judaeus 

Les Oeuvres do Philon Juif. Paris, 1575, 
Junius, H. 

Emblemata. Antwerp, 1565. 
Justiniano, Leonardo 

Laude devotissime. Venice, 1517. 
Lamb, Charles 

Essays of Elia. London, 1900. 2 vols. (Brock illustrations.) 
Liliputian Dancing School, [c. 1780.] 
McCringer, Joel 

A Compendious Treatise on Modern Education. London, 1802. 
Malory, Sir Thomas 

Le Morte Darthur. London, 1 893-94. 
Mirabilia Romae, 1536. 
Royen, J. F. 

De illustratie van het boek. Amsterdam, 1930. 
Sambucus 

Emblemata. Anvers, 1564. 
Schopper, Hartman 

Panoplia omnium illiberalium mechanicarum. Frankfurt, 1568. 
Steinmeyer, V. 

Newe kiinstliche, wohlgerissene, unnd in Holtz geschnittene Figuren. 

Frankfurt am Main, 1619-20. (Weiditz, Burgkmair, Schaiif- 

felein, etc., illus.) 
Tooley, R. V. 

Some English books with coloured plates. London, 1935. 
Verini, Gian Batlista 

Luminario. Toscolano, c. 1526. 
Worringer, Wilhelm 

Die Altdeutsche Buchillustration. Munich, 1919. 
Young, Edward 

The Complaint, and the Consolation ; or, Night Thoughts. London, 

1797. Blake engravings. 



[138] 



Finp:ly Printed Books 



Chadourne, L. 

Terre de Chanaan. Paris, 1925. Illus. by Pierre Falke. 
Coppard, A. E. 

Adam and Eve and Pinch Me. Cockerel Press, 1 92 1 , 
Darmstaedter Pessach-Haggadah. 2 vols. Leipzig, 1927. 
Desportes, Ph. 

Les LX Pseaumes de David. Maastricht, 1926. 
St. Francis 

Laudes Creatorum. Doves Press, 1910. 
Frith, Wm. Powell 

John Leech, His Life and Work. 4 vols. London, 1 89 1 . Inlaid, 

extra-illus. 
Giraudoux, Jean 

Promenade avec Gabrielle. Paris, 1919—24. Illus. by J. E. La- 

boureur. 

Siegfried et le Limousin. Paris, 1928. Etchings by Edy Legrand. 
Gourmont, Remy de 

Couleurs, contes. Paris, 1 929. Illustrations by J. E. Laboureur. 
Haberly, Loyd 

Antiquary. Long Crendon, Bucks, 1933. 

Boy and Bird. Long Crendon, Bucks, 1932. 

The Crowning Year and other Poems. Corfe Mullen, Dorset, 1937. 

Poems. Seven Acres Press. 1930. 
Hall, Carroll D. 

Bierce and the Poe Hoax. Windsor Press. N.d. 
Johnson, Cecil and James 

A Printer's Garland. Windsor Press, N.d. 
Laboureur, J. E. 

Peau d'Ane. Paris? 1936. 
Lamb, Charles 

Dream-Children. New York, 1923. Bruce Rogers, 

New Year's Eve. New York, 1923. Bruce Rogers. 

Rosamund Gray. London, 1928. Golden Cockerel Press. 
Maeterlinck, Maurice 

L'Oiseau Bleu. Paris, 1 909. 

L'Oiseau Bleu, with set of illustrations. Paris, [1931]. 
Psalter, Der. Munchen, 1929. Bremer Press. 
Radiguet, Raymond 

Le Diable au Corps. Paris, 1 926. Illus. by Maurice Vlaminck. 
Rameau, P. 

Le Maitre a Danser. Paris, 1725. 
Roy en, J. F. van, en P. N. v. Eyck 

Over Boekkunst en de Zilverdister, 1916. 



[139] 
Finely Printed Books (continued) 

Spinoza 

Tractatus politicus. Hilversum, 1928. I Icuvcl Press. 
Sterne, Laurence 

Works. 7 vols. Shakespeare Head Press, 
Valery, Paul 

Le Jeune Parque. Paris, 1925. lUus. by Daragnes. 
Villon, Francois 

Oeuvres. Kunera Press, 1926. 

Oeuvres. Maastricht, 1 929. Halcyon Press. 



Fine Bindings 

Collins, William 

Poetical Works. London, 1797. Gosden binding. 
Saunders, James 

The Compleat Fisherman. London, 1 724. Gosden binding 



Music — Printed Books 

Dowland, John 

The first book of Songes . . . second book. 1597—1600. London. 
Eccles, John 

A collection of songs. London, 1710. 
Giovanelli, Pietro 

Thesauri Musici. 5 vols. Venice, 1568. 
Lavves, Henry 

Ayres and dialogues. London, 1653—55—58. 
Playford, John 

The whole book of Psalms. 1 699. 
Purcell, Henry 

A musical entertainment. London, 1 684. 
Ravenscroft, Thomas 

Harmonia perfecta. 1 730. 
Simpson, Christopher 

The Division viol. London, 1 667. 
Tritonius 

Melopiac. Augsburg, 1507. 



1140] 

Music — Manuscripts 

Musical manuscripts 

37 letters by composers (Wagner, Liszt, Meyerbeer, Gounod, 
Saint-Saens, etc); 6 autographed photographs; Mendelssohn's 
Quartet No. 1 1 (presentation copy). 



Miscellaneous — Printed Books 

Alexander VI, Pope 

Defense of Bull of Sixtus IV (against Sebastian Branl). Oppen- 

heim. J. Kobel, 1503. 
Amman 

Terentius, Mureto emendatus. Frankfurt am Main, 1574. 
Brunetto Latini 

Retorica. Rome, 1546. 
Carter, John 

Binding Variants in English Publishing, 1820-1900. London, 

1932. 
Grammaire Turque. Constantinople, 1 730. 
Juvenal & Persius 

Satires, trans, by Dryden. London, 1 693. 
Koops, Mat. 

Historical Account of the Substances ... to the Invention of Paper. 

London. 1800. 
des Masures, Louis 

L'Eneide de Virgile. Lyons, Jean de Tournes, 1560. 
McCoy, James C. 

Jesuit Relations. Paris, 1937. 
Maggi 

Delia Fortificatione. 1584. 
Mairet 

Notice sur la lithographic, ou L'art d'imprimer sur pierre. Dijon, 

1818. 
Millar, Eric George 

The Library of Chester A. Beatty. 4 vols. London, 1927-30. 
Monge, Gaspard 

Description de l'art de fabriquer les canons. 1 793. 
Plato 

Omnia Opera. Venice, 1513. Aldus. 
Plautus 

Comedies. London, 1 694. 



[141] 
Miscellaneous — Printed Books (coniinued) 

Plutarch 

Morals. London, 1603. 
Report from the Committee of Secrecy, appointed by the House of 

Commons to examine the late negotiations of Peace and Commerce 

with France. Lx>ndon, 1715. 
Seder Haggadah she! pesach. Amsterdam, 1712, 
Tunstall, Cuthbert 

In laudem matrimonii. Basel, 1519. 
Turner, William 
' Herbal. Cologne, 1568. 
Uberti, Fazio degli 

Ditta Mundi. Venice, 1501. 
Valturius 

De ReMilitari. 1532. 
Yiddish theatre collection. 
Collection of early children's books. 
Collection of Russian children's books. Modern. 

Miscellaneous — Manuscripts 

Abbey, Edwin A. 
2 A. L. S. 

Dramatic Group 

Copy of Cauldock testimonial, signatures of Joseph Jefferson, De- 
Wolf Hopper, etc. Presentation copy of "Great Acting in English" 
from Julia Marlowe to W. J. Rolfe. Letters of Julia Marlowe and 
Joseph Jefferson, etc. [12 pieces.] 

Metternich, Prince Clemens Von 
L. S., Ip. August 1, 1807. 

Pitcairn Island 

Ms. Account of Capt. Arthur, 1 822. 

Turgeniev, Ivan 

A. L. S., 5pp. 1875. 

Whistler, James McNeill 

A. L. S. August 21, [1890]. 2pp. A. L. S. Ip. [1890]. 



1142] 
A SELECTION OF INIERES TING GIF IS OF BOOKS IN 1939 

Bentley, Harry C. 

Twenty-five works on bookkeeping, for the Harry C. Bentley Collec- 
tion. 

Bradley, Mrs. J. D. Cameron 

A collection of 1620 volumes and 158 pamphlets, principally German 
and English classics, many of which are first and other rare editions. 

Byrd, Admiral Richard E. 

Twenty-six photographs of the second Antarctic Expedition of Ad- 
miral Richard E. Byrd. 

Columbia Broadcasting System 

Crisis: September, 1938. A complete and verbatim transcript of what 
America heard over the Columbia Broadcasting System during the 20 
days of the Czechoslovakian crisis. Prepared by the Columbia Broad- 
casting System, November, 1938. In 10 volumes. 

Crisis: a report from the Columbia Broadcasting System. New York, 
Columbia Broadcasting System, (1938). 

Serious music on the Columbia Broadcasting System. A survey of 
series, soloists and special performances from 1927 through 1938. 
Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc., New York. 

Crestin, Louis 

A collection of 48 volumes and 23 pamphlets, principally in French 
and German, on philosophy, psychology, religion, mathematics and the 
social sciences. 

Cummin, Dr. John W. 

A collection of 40 items, including 1 5 pieces of music, several volumes 
of college songs, operettas produced by the Hasty Pudding Club of 
Harvard College, poetry and miscellaneous non-fiction. 

Facsimile Text Society 

Defoe's Review. Reproduced from the original editions, with an intro- 
duction and bibliographical notes by Arthur Wellesley Secord. Fac- 
simile Books 1—22. Publi.-hed by the Columbia University Press for 
the Facsimile Text Society, New York, 1938. 

Pleischner, Otto, Estate of 

A collection of 35 books and 24 pam[)hlets from the library of Otto 
Fleischner, over 1 50 manuscript letters and notes concerning Ben- 
jamin Franklin, many of which were written to Mr. Fleischner by 
George Simpson Eddy, and other manuscript material concerning Eu- 
gene Field, Maude Howe Elliott, Julia Ward Hov.e, and others. 

Foster Hall Collection 

Eleven books, pamphlets and typescripts relating to the Foster 1 lall 
Collection; and 2 copies of a wood-cut portrait by Howard Simon 
of Stephen Collins Foster. 

Gaines, Dr. Samuel R. 

A total of 49 volumes, including music and current fiction and non- 
fiction, given at intervals throughout the year. 



[143] 

Goodwill Fund, Inc. 

A total of 89 volumes and 72 pamphlets, for the Business Branch and 
the Central Library. 

Hall, John L. 

A collection of 1 1 volumes, many beautifully bound, relating to the 
art and literature of France and Portugal. 

London, Library of the Corporation of the City of 

The Great Chronicle of London. Edited by A. H. Thomas and I. D. 
Thornley. London, printed by George W. Jones, at the Sign of the 
Dolphin, London and Aylesbury, 1938. 

New York Public Library 

A microfilm copy of Freedom's Journal, March, 1827— March, 1829. 

Perry, Margaret 

A collection of 25 letters from John Addington Symonds to Thomas 
S. Perry, written during the years 1883—1889. 

Phelan. Walter J. 

A collection of 1 48 lantern slides, 6 prints and 1 negative, and a note- 
book of lecture notes illustrating the story of revolutionary Boston and 
CharlestowTi. 

Phillips, A. V. 

The Saxons in England. A history of the English Commonwealth till 
the period of the Norman Conquest. By John Mitchell Kemble. Lon- 
don, Quaritch, 1876. In 2 volumes. 

Falaise Roll, recording prominent companions of William, Duke of 
Normandy at the conquest of England. By M. Jackson Crispin and 
Leonce Macary. Butler and Tanner, Ltd., Frome and London, 1938. 

L'art de verifier les dates des faits historiques, des chartes, des chro- 
niques, et autres anciens monumens, depuis la naissance de Notre- 
Seigneur . . . par un Religieux Benedictin de la Congregation de S. 
Maur. Paris, Alexandre Jombert jeune, 1 783. In 8 volumes. 

Ripley, Lloyd C. 

lypographical antiquities, or The history of printing in England, Scot- 
land and Ireland, containing memoirs of our ancient printers and a 
register of the books printed by them. By the Reverend Thomas Frog- 
nail Dibdin. London, Savage (1809). In 4 volumes. 

Smith, Harold V. 

Enjine! Enjine! A story of fire protection, by Kenneth Holcomb Dun- 
shee. Published by Harold Vincent Smith for the Home Insurance 
Company, New York, 1 939. 

Sons of Union Veterans, Camp 89 

Grand Army of the Republic, Dt-paitnienl of Massachusetts. Per- 
.sonal war sketches of the members of Francis Washburne Post No 92, 
of Brighton. (Philadelphia, 1890.) 
Framed rharti-r oi the Francis Washburne Post 92, G. A. R. 



[144] 
APPENDIX F 

USE OF BOOKS 
Comparative Circulation Statistics, 1935-1939 





1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


Central Library 


737,396 


757.363 


748,211 


376.837 


383.180 


Bu!siness Branch 


17.921 


17.822 


18309 


18.603 


18.454 


Young People's Room, 












Central Library 








56.042* 


50.943* 


School Department 








9.018* 


23338* 


Branch Issue Department 








48,392* 


48,207* 


Deposit Circulation 












(estimated) 








374.194* 


333.700* 


Branch Libraries: 












Allston 


182.203 


172.835 


160,973 


155.666 


142.082 


Andrew Square 


130,777 


127.827 


128.590 


119.587 


124.545 


Boylston 


137,179 


138.532 


124.069 


124,118 


126.518 


Brighton 


130,741 


121.152 


113.169 


109.720 


107,516 


Charlestown 


117.525 


116,034 


110.377 


102,532 


106.739 


City Point 


140.006 


129.289 


124.505 


119.279 


116.185 


Codman Square 


168.412 


164.553 


157.174 


142.898 


138.521 


Dorchester 


135,821 


137.759 


130.130 


124.554 


107.954 


East Boston 


161,227 


150.340 


130,570 


125,585 


123.723 


Faneuil 


138,561 


133.787 


120,908 


108.817 


117.945 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


89,857 


91.436 


84,090 


67.402 


67362 


Hyde Parle 


141.763 


129,807 


126.043 


117,678 


116.446 


Jamaica Plain 


119.760 


116,604 


118.819 


109,793 


107.667 


Jeffries Point 


76,500 


73,593 


71.440 


68,626 


64.566 


Kirstein 


64.045 


56,536 


46.204 


48.097 


48.771 


Lower Mills 


70.928 


64,371 


60,635 


57,098 


58.892 


Mallapan 


196.311 


188,382 


177.013 


174.567 


171.156 


Memorial 


211.971 


192,100 


173.279 


168,243 


163.684 


Mt. Bowdoin 


143.823 


137,889 


128.668 


119,133 


119.190 


Mt. Pleasant 


89.924 


84.102 


80.752 


77,635 


78.759 


Neponset 


64.409 


60.1 1 7 


59.535 


58215 


56,012 


North End 


123.174 


125.656 


121,927 


103,079 


100.195 


Orient Heights 


81.189 


68.932 


60.255 


55.529 


53.469 


Parker Hill 


112.165 


108.933 


102.314 


97.016 


92.149 


Phillips Brooks 


45.839 


44,859 


40.387 


39.168 


39371 


Roslindale 


154,640 


151.971 


146,992 


132.852 


121.158 


Roxbury Crossing 


72.839 


71,037 


44,576 


16.205** 




South Boston 


128.979 


124.228 


117.16! 


99.734 


94.694 


South End 


1 53,478 


1 50.728 


138.298 


124314 


121.998 


Tyler Street 


47.979 


51.364 


53301 


25.397** 




Upham's Corner 


199,564 


188.437 


175,918 


169.078 


159,616 


West End 


201373 


200.444 


181,642 


165,631 


1 54.786 


West Roxbuiy 


161.864 


157,918 


155.144 


143.712 


139.484 



4.949.701 4.806.737 4.531378 4354.044 4.198.975 



Prior to 1938 included under Central Library 
Branch Library closed July I. 1938 



145] 



GiMNs AND Losses in Circulation, 1930-1939 





NO. OF BOOKS 


INCREASE OR 




LENT TO 


DECREASE OVER 


YEAR 


BORROWERS 


PRECEDING YEAR 


1929 


3.930,068 






1930 


4,133.459 


+203,391 


1931 


4.702,932 


+569.473 


1932 


5.567,681 


+864.749 


1933 


5.548,283 


-19398 


1934 


5,194,351 


-353,932 


1935 


4,949.701 


-244.650 


1936 


4,806,737 


-142,964 


1937 


4,531.378 


-275359 


1938 


4,354.044 


-177,334 


1939 


4.198.975 


-155.069 



PERCENTAGE OF INCREASE PERCENTAGE 
OR DECREASE OF INCREASE 
OVER PRECEDING YEAR OVER 1929 



+5% 

+12% 

+16% 

-03% 

-7% 

-5% 

-3% 

-6% 

-4% 

-4% 



+5% 
+17% 
+42% 
+41% 
+32% 
+26% 
+227o 
+15% 
+11% 

+7% 



Distribution of Total Circulation in 1939 



FROM DEPOSITS IN 
SCHOOLS, INSTI 1 UTIONS 
HOMf. USE & ENGIN'I: HOUSES* TOTALS 



Central Library (Reference Division) 

Direct lending to borrowers 356,704 

Central Library volumes circulated through 

Branch Issue Dept. & Branch Libraries 26,476 



Business Branch 


18,454 


Young People's Room, Central Library 


50,943 


School Department 


23338 


Branch Issue Department 


48,207 


Branch Libraries: 




Allsfon 


142,082 


Andrew Square 


124,545 


Boylston 


126,518 


Brighton 


107.516 


Charlestown 


106.739 


City Point 


116.185 


Codman Square 


138.521 


Dorchester 


107,954 


East Boston 


123,723 


Fancuil 


1 1 7.945 


Fellowes Athenaeum 


67.362 


Hyde Park 


116.446 


Jamaica Plain 


107.667 


Jeffries Point 


64,566 


Kirstein 


48,771 


Lower Mills 


58.892 



268,291 
22,494 




245 



356,704 

26.476 
18,454 
50,943 
291,629 
70,701 

142,082 

124,545 

126,518 

108348 

112,273 

116.185 

140.986 

109.020 

124.218 

119.835 

74.907 

116.446 

107,912 

64.566 

48.771 

58,882 



[146] 



Maltapan 
Memorial 
Mt. Bowdoin 
Mt. Pleasant 
Neponsef 
North End 
Orient Heights 
Parker Hill 
Phillips Brooks 
Roslindale 
South Boston 
South End 
Upham's Corner 
West End 
West Roxbury 



* Estimated 



171.156 


225 


171,381 


163,684 


242 


163.926 


119,190 


95 


119,285 


78.759 
56,012 




78.759 
56,012 






100,195 


33 


100228 


53,469 




53,469 




92.149 





92,149 


39,371 


55 


39.426 


121.158 


3,225 


124383 


94,694 




94.694 




121,998 


1.523 


123.521 


159,616 


634 


160.250 


154,786 


12,567 


167353 


139,484 


4,244 


143,728 



3.865,275 



333,700 



4.198,975 



Summary of Circulation by Division in 1939 

books lent for home use 

Reference Division: 

Central Library (including Central Library books 

issued through the Branch Libraries) . . . 383,180 

Business Branch . 18,454 

Circulation Division : 

Young People's Room, Central Library . . . 50,943 

School Department ....... 23,338 

Branch Issue Department 48.207 

Branch Libraries 3341,153 



401,634 



3.463.641 
3.865.275 



Total Circulahon in 1939 



Books Lent for Home Use 
Reference Division 
Circulation Division 

Deposits of books (estimated) 



401.634 

3,463.641 

333,700 



4.198.975 



47" 



Inter-Library Loans, 1939 



Under the inter-library loan system with other libraries the 
following lending of books for the purpose of serious research 
is shown: 



Volumes lent to other libraiies in Massachusetts 
Volumes lent to libraries outside of Massachusetts 



2.114 
501 

2.615 



Classification of Circulation, 1939 

In the Circulation Division the classified direct circulation 
shows the following percentages: 

PERCENTAGE 



Fiction for adults 
Non-fiction for adults 
Juvenile fiction 
Juvenile non-fiction 



45.3% 
16.6% 
253% 
12.8% 

100.0% 



In the Reference Division the classified direct circulation 
shows the following percentages: 



Fiction 
Non-fiction 



percentage 

40.1% 
59.9% 



100.0% 



Missing Books from the Branch Libraries, 1935-1939 



year 

1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 





%0F 


%0F 


total 


DECREASE FROM 


DECREASE 


NUMBER 


PRECEDING YEAR 


FROM 1935 


12,769 

11.012 

8,786 

6,931 

5.299 


-14% 
-20^, 

-21% 
-24% 


-14% 

-31% 
-45% 
-59% 



[148] 

Books Unrecoverable from Borrowers from Branch Libraries, 1930-1939 



YEAR 

1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



NUMBER OF 


%0F 


%0F 


VOLUMES 


CHANGE FROM 


CHANCE 


UNRECOVERABLE 


PRECEDING YEAR 


FROM 1930 


2383 






2,598 


+9% 


+9% 


2,179 


-16% 


-8% 


2.191 


+0.6% 


-8% 


2,262 


+3% 


-5% 


1.399 


-38% 


-41% 


953 


-32% 


-60% 


979 


+1.7% 


-59% 


742 


-24% 


-69% 


642 


-13% 


-73% 



Books Unrecoverable from Borrowers from Branch Libraries, 1930-1939 



YEAR 
1930 

1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 







%0F 


TOTAL NUMBER 


TOTAL number 


VOLUMES BORROWED 


OF VOLUMES 


OF VOLUMES 


WHICH WERE 


UNRECOVERABLE 


BORROWED 


UNRECOVERABLE 


2.383 


3.218,102 


0.074% 


2,598 


3.775,021 


0.069% 


2.179 


4.602,790 


0.047% 


2,191 


4,589,393 


0.048% 


2,262 


4,291,443 


0.053% 


1,399 


4.078.044 


0.034% 


953 


3.919.024 


0.024% 


979 


3,659.056 


0.027% 


742 


3,470,958 


0.021% 


642 


3.341.153 


0.019% 



[149] 
APPENDIX G 

THE CATALOGS 





VOLS. AND 






PARTS 


TITLES 


Reference Division 






Cataloged 






Central Library 


18.165 


14.410 


Business Branch 


2.154 




Serials added 






Central Library 


4.296 






24.615 


14,410 


Circulation Division 






Cataloged 






Young People's Room, Central Library 


1.155 




School Department 


2,857 




Branch Issue Department 


1,560 




Branch Libraries 


30.319 




Miscellaneous 


26 





35,917 

The number of volumes shelved and thus made available for 
public use is: 

Reference Division 

Central Library (including continuations) 25,661 

Business Branch 2,154 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but 

now found, etc. 1.334 29.149 



Circulation Division 

Young People's Room. Central Library 

School Department Y 42 137 

Branch Issue Department ) 

Branch Libraries 

Books reported lost or missing in previous years but 

now found, etc. 534 42,671 

71.820 



[150] 

The number of volumes removed from collections during the 
year (books reported lost or missing, condemned copies not yet 
replaced, etc.) : 

Reference Division 

Central Library 2,727 

Business Branch 86 2,813 



Circulation Division 

Young People's Room, Central Library 

School Department \. 57,%6 

Branch Issue Department 

Branch Libraries 



60,779 



APPENDIX H 

PRINTING AND BINDING 

The Printing Department 

Requisitions received and filled 285 
Card Catalog (Central Library) : 

Titles 8.200 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 147,600 
Card Catalog (Branch Libraries) : 

Titles 944 

Cards finished (exclusive of "extras") 94,400 

Signs 1,906 

Blank forms (numbered series) 4,938,280 

Forms, circulars and sundries (outside the numbered series) 45,025 

Catalogs, pamphlets, bibliographical programs 140,731 

The Binding Department 

Number of volumes bound in vrsrious styles 61,094 

Magazines stitched 71 

Volumes repaired 977 

Volumes guarded 733 

Maps mounted 164 

Photographs and engravings mounted 4308 

Library publications folded, stilchc'cl and trimmed 157,325 



II3IJ 
APPENDIX I 

LECTURES. CONCERTS, EXHIBITIONS 
LECTURES 



DATE 

Jan. 5 
Jan. 8 



Jan. 12 

Jan. 15 
Jan. 16 

Jan. 19 

Jan. 22 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 26 



Feb. 2 
Feb. 5 

Feb. 9 



General Lecture Series in the Central Library 

TITLE lecturer 

Breaking the Barriers of Darkness Mr. Malcolm Watkins 

Shakespeare as a Dramatic Crafts- Professor M. R. Copithorne, 

man Dept. of English and History, 

(Boston Drama League Course) M. I. T. 

The Activities of the Metropolitan Hon. Eugene C. Hultman, 

District Commission Commissioner, Metroi)olitan 

(Field and Forest Club Course) District Commission 



The Builders of Boston 



Miss Abigail Covell Lazelle 



The Beauty Spots of Austria, Ba- Mr. John J. Ward 
varia and Budapest 

Glimpses of Kentucky Colonels, Mr. H. Harding Hale 
Trails, and Coffee Trees 



Poetic Readings by the Author 

Aerial Photographic Mapping 

Dances and Dance Music through 
the Centuries 



Jan. 29 Acting and the Moscow Theater 



New England Beautiful 

Modernism in Drama 

(Boston Drama League Course) 



Mr. George Pearson 
Lt.-Col. James W. Bagley 
Dr. Hans Nathan 



Mrs. Carlene Murphy Samoi- 
loff 

Dr. Wallace Nutting 

Professor Marston Balch, 
Dept. of English, Tufts Col- 
lege 



Beautiful and Historic Places in Mr. Laurence B. Fletcher, 
Massachusetts Secretary, Trustees of Public 

Reservations 



Feb. 1 2 The International Problem 



Mr. Frank H. Sprague 



1152] 



DATE TITLE 

Feb. 16 Home of General Custer. The 
Black Hills and Bad Lands. 

Feb. 23 The Architecture of Gothic America 



The United States and the Far 
Eastern Maelstrom 

Irish Mediaeval Craftsmanship, 
Manuscript and Metal 

The Good Plays of Boston's Spring 
and Fall Theatrical Season 
(Boston Drama League Course) 

The Fiscal Policy of the New Deal 



Tramping the Ridgepole of the 
White Mountains 

Horticultural Trends 

A Program of Imitations of Bird 

Songs 

(Brookline Bird Club Course) 

Trout and Salmon Fishing in North- 
ern Idaho 
(Field and Forest Club Course) 

The Unusual History and Develop- 
ment of the Great New England 
Fisheries 

California Estates of National Ce- 
lebrities 

The British Isles 

Friendship Through the Eyes of the 
Poet 

Through the Back Door of the Cir- 
cus. 



Feb. 


26 


Mar. 


2 


Mar. 


5 


Mar. 


6 


Mar. 


9 


Mar. 


12 


Mar. 


13 



Mar. 16 
Mar. 19 

Mar. 20 

Mar. 23 
Mar. 26 

Mar. 30 



LECTURER 

Mrs. C. W. P. Leiter 

Professor Warren S. Tryon, 
Dept. of History and Govern- 
ment, Simmons College 

Professor G. Nye Steiger 
Miss Ellen F. O'Connor 
Mr. Frank Chouteau Brown 



Harvard University Debating 
Council vs. Boston College 

Mr. Gardner E. Campbell 

Professor Arnold M. Davis 
Mr. Charles Crawford Gorst 

Mr. R. A. Kirkpatrick 

Mr. Edward H. Cooley 

Mr. Charles Gibbs Adams 

Mr. A. D. Nicholas 
Mrs. Emily Vance 

Mr. George Brinton Beal 



m 



DATE TITLE 

Apr. 2 An Hour of Poetry, Prose and 
Drama 

Apr. 5 Two synchronized colored motion 
picture films of the West 

Apr. 6 Byways and Waterways of the At- 
lantic Coast 

Apr. 9 Bonnets 

Apr. I 3 Daily Life in a Medici Palace 

Apr. 20 The Charm and Romance of Early 
New England Houses 

Apr. 23 Friendly Folk Along the Trails 

Apr. 27 Three One- Act Plays 
Lonesome-Like 
The Purple Door Knob 
The Portrait 



Miss Dorothy Sawyer Bates 

Mr. John H. Kenney and 
Mr. William S. Yale 

Mr. Vernon L. Small 

Mrs. Eleanor Coray Forman 
Miss Gertrude R. B. Richards 
Mrs. Emily Henry Bush 

Mr. Thornton W. Burgess 

The Theater Workshop 
Players 



Apr. 


30 


Mushrooms, Their Culture and 

Uses 


Dr. William H. Davis 


Oct. 


5 


Unusual Incidents and Characters 
of Boston Harbor, 1004[?]-1939 


Mr. Edward Rowe Snow 


Oct. 


8 


Value of a Vocation 


Mrs. Mary Winn Bullock 


Oct. 


15 


Robert Browning: The Mystery of 
"Paracelsus" 


Dr. E. Melville Quimby 


Oct. 


19 


Amazing America 


Lt. Robert E. McMillan 


Oct. 


22 


Mexico 


Mrs. Alice Howland Ma- 
comber 


Oct. 


23 


Art as the Handmaid of History 


Miss Gertrude R. B. Rich 
ards 


Oct. 


26 


The Economic Background of 
Shay's Rebellion 


Mr. Fred Miller 


Oct. 


29 


New England Gems 


Professor Charles Palache 


Oct. 


30 


The Far East Situation 


Harvard University Debating 



Council vs. McGill Univer- 
sity 



[154] 



DATE 

Nov. 2 
Nov. 5 



Nov. 9 

Nov. 23 
Nov. 26 
Dec. 3 

Dec. 4 

Dec. 7 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 14 



Dec 


17 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


31 



TITLE 

Goodyear's Discovery in Wobuin 

The Develop of Stage Decoration 

over 300 years 

(Boston Drama League Course) 

One Hundred Masterpieces in Ten 

National Park Galleries 

(Field and Forest Club Course) 

Exploring America from Mountain 
Peak to Valley Floor 

Two American Heroines: Clara 
Barton and Mary Murray 

Shakespeare and Sophocles; the 
Elizabethan and the Greek 

A Nature-Lover Goes Auto-Camp- 
ing Across the American Continent 
(Brookline Bird Club Course) 

Vanishing Americans 

Monologues 

Hunting Big Game in Tanganyika, 
British East Africa; and the Pyg- 
mies of Belgian Congo 
(Field and Forest Club Course) 

Dickens' Christmas Carol 

"The Star Gleams", a pantomime 
portrayal of the Nativity 

Painters of Germany 

Romance of Old Whaling Days 



LECTURER 

Mr. William D. Goddard 
Mr. Frank Chouteau Brown 



Mr. Charles W. Casson 

Miss Ruth M. E. Hennig 
Mme. Aino Saari 



Professor M. R. Copithorne, 
Dept. of English and History, 
M. L T. 

Mr. L. Raymond Talbot 



Mr. Fred W. Glasier 
Miss Olive Evelyn 
Mr. La Herbert Morse 



Mr. Edward F. Payne 
Back Bay Community Chorus 

Miss Patricia Marshall Tate 
Mrs. Margaret Louise Wood 



155] 



CONCERTS IN Tl IF. CEN1 RAL LIBRARY 



DATE TITLE 

Jan. 8 Concert 

Jan. 1 5 Program of Chamber Music 

Jan. 22 Concert 

Jan. 29 Costume Program 



Feb. 5 Song Recital 

Feb. 12 Lecture-Recital on Jewish Music 

Feb. 19 Song Recital 

Program of Songs and Arias 
Feb. 26 Violin Recital 

Mar. 5 Lecture-Recital: Thomas Moore, 
the Bard of Erin 

Mar. 1 2 Song Recital 

Mar. 19 Concert b}- L'Africaine Singers 

Mar. 26 Concert of Chamber Music 

Apr. 2 Song Recital 

Apr. 9 Vocal and Pianoforte Recital 



ARTISTS 

Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs Cho- 
ral Society; George Sawyer 
Dunham, conductor 

Paul Hastings Allen, com- 
poser and pianist 

Lincoln Symphony Orchestra, 
Edward Siegel, conductor 

Frances Perry, mezzo- 
soprano 
Helen Doane, reader and 

accompanist 

Sibyl Webb, soprano 

Professor S. G. Braslavsky 

Marion Fisher Robertson, 

mezzo-soprano 

Elaine Elkerton, contralto 

Alexander Romanesque, 

Roumanian violinist 

Benedict FitzGerald 
Thomas A. Quinn, tenor 

Camille Girouard, baritone 

Henry Gideon, director 

Einar Hansen, violinist 

Reynold J. Robillard, 

Evelyn M. Duncanson, 

soprano 
Helen Canterbury, pianist 



[156] 



DATE 

Apr. 16 



Apr. 23 
Ai.r. 30 

Oct. 2 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 15 
Oct. 22 
Nov. 5 
Nov. 26 



Dec. 10 
Dec. 17 



Jan. 10 
through 
Feb. 3 



Concert 

Recital 
Song Recital 
Concert 



Lecture-Recital: The Songs and 
Dances of Hawaii 

Concert 



The Albert Faucon Violin Recital 
Concert 
Song Recital 
Duet Recital 



Dec. 3 Song Recital 



Song Recital 

A Christmas Program 



Music Department of the Bur- 
roughs Newsboys Foundation, 
Stanley F. Clement, conductor 

Elsie Foss, Norwegian concert 
pianist 

Marjorie Alexandra Cook, 

contralto 

Boston Alumnae Chapter, 
Mu Phi Epsilon Sorority 
(Music Honor Society) 

Mrs. Mary Frances Barnes 



Mary Fitzsimmons, soprano 
Edmund L. Myhaver, pianist 

Albert Faucon, violinist 

The Rose Trio 

Sarah Thorn Couch, soprano 

Ruth Canavan, soprano 
William Rice, tenor 

Katharine Cunningham Gray, 
soprano 

Clotilde Sale, soprano 

Carolyn King Hunt, pianiste 



LOWELL LECTURES IN THE CENTRAL LIBRARY 
Under the Auspices of the Lowell Institute 



TITLE OF series 

The Evolution of the Military Art 
(A series of eight lectures) 



Colonel Oliver L. Spaulding, 
A.M., LL.D., United States 
Field Artillery, Army War 
College 



Feb. 6 
through 
Feb. 23 

Feb. 7 
through 
Feb. 24 

Feb. 28 
through 
Mar. 1 7 



Mar. 2 I 
through 
Apr. 7 

Apr. 3 

through 

Apr. 24 

Oct. 24 

throueh 

Nov. lO 

Nov. 21 
through 
Dec. 15 



I1^>7J 



Physical Problems of a Biologist 
(A series of six lectures) 

The Beginnings of Representative 
Government in England 
(A series of six lectures) 

The Conflict Betv^een Personal 
Liberty and the Efficient Adminis- 
tration of Criminal Justice 
(A series of six lectures) 

Restless Rocks in Our Changing 

World 

(A series of six illustrated lectures) 

Greek Politics 

(A series of seven lectures) 



Naval History and Modern Naval 

Prospects 

(A series of six lectures) 

The Rise of the Slavic Peoples 
(A series of eight lectures) 



LECTURER 



Jeffries Wyman, Jr., Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Zoolo- 
gy, Harvard University 

George Lee Haskins, A.B., 
Junior Fellow of Harvard 
University 

Sam Bass Warner, S. J. D., 
Professor of Penal Legisla- 
tion and Administration, Law 
School of Harvard University 

David T. Griggs, Junior Fel- 
low of Harvard University 

Frank Ezra Adcock, M.A., 
D.Litt., F.B.A., Professor of 
Ancient History in the Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, England 

George Fielding Eliot, For- 
merly Major, Military Intel- 
ligence Reserve, U. S. Army 

Samuel Hazzard Cross, 
Ph.D., Professor of Slavic 
Languages and Literatures, 
Harvard University 



BOSTON RUSKIN CLUB LECTURES IN THE CENTRAL LIBRARY 
Jan. 9 Michael Angelo and His Sonnets Miss Virginia Wainwright 



Jan. 23 Europe Has Everything 



Courtesy of the Cunard- White 
Star Line 



Feb. 1 3 John Ruskin's Birthday Observance Mrs. Agnes Knox Black 

Feb. 27 Around the Gypsy Camp Fires Madame Aino Saari 

Mar. 1 3 The Greek Drama Mr. Joseph C. Whipple 

Mar. 27 Magic Adventures in the Caribbean Courtesy of the Cunard-Whitc 

Star Line 



Ai)r .10 A Spring Festival of Music 



Madame Luisa Tosi 



1381 



Apr. 24 The Art of Living 

Oct. 9 Rabindranath Tagore 

Oct. 23 Notable Airs from the Operas 

Nov. 27 Hafiz the Persian 

Dec. 1 1 Pictures of Notable Madonnas 



Miss Anna Dunlap 
Gayatri Devi 
Madame Luisa Tosi 
Miss Virginia Wainwright 
Madame Luisa Tosi 



EXHIBITIONS IN THE CENTRAL LIBRARY 
Exhibition Room 



DATE 

January 1 5 — February 1 I 

February 1 2 — February 1 8 

February 1 9 — February 25 

March 1 2 - March 25 



March 


26- 


- April 


15 


April 


16- 


- April 


29 


April 


30- 


- June 


3 


June 


4- 


-July 


1 


July 


2- 


- August 


5 


August 


6^ 


- September 


2 



September 3 - September 30 
October 1 — November 4 
November 5 - November 1 1 
November 1 2 — November 1 8 
November 1 9 — December 2 
December 3 - January 30 



TITLE 

Japanese Prints, New and Old 
Lincolniana 
Washingtoniana , 

Philatelic exhibition of postmarks and pictures 

concerning the Navy and Merchant Marine 

Reproductions of Modern American Paintings 

Animal Posters 

Travel Posters 

Periodicals Our Ancestors Read 

New Cities for Old (City Planning) 

Vacationing in New England — Yesterday and 
Today 

America Goes to College 

Boston Harbor 

The Making of a Motion Picture 

Catholic Book Week 

The Making of a Motion Picture 

Bicycle Exhibit 



[159] 

Trf.asure Room 

date title 

January Joseph Blumenthal: The Spiral Press. (Loan exhibition) 

February Rare editions of Shakespeare's King Henry IV and King Henry V 

March Gilbert and Sullivan Operas. (Loan exhibition) 

April Chronicles of Spain, from the Ticknor Collection 

May Chronicles of Spain, from the Ticknor Collection 

June Fifty Best Books. (American Society of Graphic Arts loan ex- 

hibition) 

July "New Science from Old Books": recent acquisitions 

August "New Science from Old Books": recent acquisitions 

September "New Science from Old Books": recent acquisitions 

October Book of Common Prayer: I 50th Anniversary of the American 

Prayer Book 

November Books and miscellaneous pieces designed by Helen Gentry. (Loan 

exhibition) Catholic Book Week. 

December Fifty Best Text Books. (Loan exhibition) 



[160] 
APPENDIX J 

TRUST FUNDS 
Receipts and Expenditures from Trust Funds Income, 1930-1939 





BALANCE 




TOTAL AMOUNT 








UNEXPENDED 




AVAILABLE 








FROM 


RECEIPTS 


FOR USE 


EXPENDED 


BALANCE 


YEAR 


PRECEDING YEAR 


DURING YEAR 


DURING YEAR 


DURING YEAR 


UNEXPENDED 


1930 


$40,886.73 


$34,020.19 


$74,906.92 


$22,796.21 


$52,110.71 


1931 


52.110.71 


27,507.00 


79,617.71 


20,839.73 


58,777.98 


1932 


58.777.98 


27.713.68 


86.491.66 


22,801.04 


63,690.62 


1933 


63,690.62 


27,226.68 


90.917.30 


26,633.94 


64,283.36 


1934 


64,283.36 


27.006.01 


91.289.37 


19,083.82 


72,205.55 


1935 


72,205.55 


25.494.14 


97.699.69 


24,496.50 


73,203.19 


1936 


73,203.19 


25.730.57 


98,933.76 


58.826.03 


40,107.73 


1937 


40,107.73 


59.839.65 


99,947.38 


51,161.81 


48,785.57 


1938 


48.785.57 


296,214.26 


344,999.83 


86,338.96 


258.660.87 


1939 


258,660.87 


57.656.41 


316,31728 


119.899.86 


1%.4 17.42 



Receipts and ELxpenditures from Trust Funds Income, 1930-1939 





amount unexpended 








from previous 


, 




YEAR 


YEAR 


receipts 


expenditures 


1930 


$40,886.73 


$34,020.19 


$22,7%.21 


1931 


52.1 10.71 


27.507.00 


20,839.73 


1932 


58.777.98 


27.713.68 


22,801 .04 


1933 


63.690.62 


27.226.68 


26,633.94 


1934 


6433.36 


27,006.01 


19,083.82 


1935 


72.205.55 


25,494.14 


24,496.50 


1936 


73.203.19 


25,730.57 


58,826.03 


1937 


40,107.73 


59.839.65 


51.161.81 


1938 


48,785.57 


296,214.26 


86,338.% 


1939 


258,660.87 


57,656.41 


119.899.86 



Income from Trust Funds, 1930-1939 



year 

1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



without 


for purchase 


WITH 


TOTAL 


restriction 


OF UBRARY 


miscellaneous 


Income 


as to use 


materials 


RESTRICTIONS 


received 


$7,468.10 


$21,454.51 


$5,097.58 


$34,020.19 


6,147.28 


17,159.31 


4,200.41 


27,507.00 


6.148.64 


17,355.40 


4,209.64 


27.713.68 


6.060.57 


17.096.51 


4,069.60 


27.226.68 


6,034.35 


16,879.37 


4,092.29 


27.006.01 


5,950.53 


16,184.59 


3359.02 


25.494.14 


5,687.72 


16,370.97 


3.671.88 


25,730.57 


4,548.14 


51.767.20 


3.524.31 


59.839.65 


5.672.19 


286,912.72 


3,629.35 


296,214.26 


5,655.74 


48.341,89 


3.658.78 


57,656.41 



[161] 

INCOME FROM TRUST FUNDS, 1939 

General Summary 

Without restriction as to use of income $5,655.74 

For purchase of library materials 

Library materials whch may or may not be books $32,375.49 
Books only — • without restriction as to kind of books 5,944.69 
Books only — with restriction as to kind of books 10,021.71 $48,341.89 

With miscellaneous restrictions as to use of income 

For newspapers only 1,559.18 

For special purposes, not purchases of library materials 986.66 

For branch libraries 1,112.94 $3,658.78 $57,656.41 



INCOME FROM TRUST FUNDS, 1939 

By Individual Funds 

Funds Without Restriction as to Use of Income 

Bernard $60.00 

Bradlee 35.00 

Center 1.302.16 

Ford 240.00 

Ford Trust (1935) 162.84 

Hemenway 200.00 

Hyde 144.64 

Kii^tein 150.00 

Lambert 38.06 

Moore 

North 60.00 

Phillips 1.050.00 

Skinner 1,523.04 

Stewart 140.00 

Treadwell 550.00 $5,655.74 



62 



Funds Whose Income is Available for 
Purchase of Library Materials 

For the Purchase of Library Materials Which May or May Not Be Books 

(By terms of gift) 

Benton $32,164.95 

Gardner 137.50 

Gest 73.04 $32,375.49 



For the Purchase of Books Only — Without Restriction as to Kind of Books 



Ainsley 

Bigelow 

Billings 

Clement 

Cutter 

Kimball 



$5.62 

40.00 

3,441 .45 

80.00 

145.40 

423.60 



Knapp 

Sewall 

Underbill 

Wadlin 

Wales 

Wilson 



$370.00 
1 .062.50 

127.62 

212.50 

36.00 



$5,944.69 



For the Purchase of Books Only — With Restriction as to Kind of Bookte 



Artz 


$ 432.52 


O'Reilly 


$ 44.20 


Bates 


2,000.00 


Pierce 


170.00 


Bowditch 


425.00 


Reed 


30.00 


Codman 


97.08 


Scholfield 


2,384.96 


Elizabeth 


1,000.00 


Slorrow 


750.00 


Franklin Club 


42.50 


Ticknor 


162.12 


Green 


53.24 


Townsend 


160.00 


C. Harris 


425.00 


Twentieth Reg. 


212.50 


Hersey 


93.34 


J. L. Whitney-Bks. 


532.13 


A. Lawrence 


275.00 


J. L. Whitney-Manus 


532.12 


Lewis 


200.00 







$10,021.71 $48,341.89 



Funds With Miscellaneous Restrictions as to Use of Income 



For Newspapers Only 
Todd 



$1,559.18 



For Special Purposes, Not for Purchase of Library Materials 

Boston Book Fair 1938 Fund $ 

Central Library Building 3.00 

Sargent 107.16 

A. L. Whitney 176.50 

Whitney Bibliographic 700.00 



Branch Libraries 
T. B. 1 larris 
E. Lawrenie 
1 .oring 
Mead 
Morse 

Oakland I l.ill 
Pratt 

South Boston 
Tufts 



$41.38 
2().(X) 
10.00 
95.60 
30.00 

455.62 

41.86 

4.26 

414.22 



$986.66 



$1,112.94 $3,658.78 



$57,656.41 



[163] 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1939 

The figures listed are for the book values of investments as of De- 
cember 31, 1939, except in the cases of the Benton Book Fund and the 
Benton Building Fund, in which the figures given represent the book 
values as of January 21 , 1939, the anniversary) date of those funds. 

Ainsley Fund — Bequest of Emily L. Ainsley, under Article I 2 of 
her will for the purchase of books. Received in 1 938. $1 64, 1 42.96 

Artz Fund — Donation from Victoria Thomas Artz, of Chicago: 
the income of this sum to be employed in the purchase of valuable, 
rare editions of the writings, either in verse or prose of American 
and foreign authors. These books are to be known as the "Long- 
fellow Memorial CoUeclion." Received in 1896. $10,000.00 

Bates Fund — Donation made by JoSHUA Bates, of London, in March, 
1853. 

"1 he income only of ihis fund is lo be each and every year expended 
in the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as 
may be found most needful and most useful." $50,000.00 

Children's Fund — Bequest of JosiAH H. Benton of $100,000, to be 
held as "1 he Children's Fund," and the income applied to the pur- 
chase of books for the use of the young, to be applied for those pur- 
poses only in years when the City appropriates for the maintenance 
of the Library at least three per cent of the amount available for 
department expenses from taxes and income in said City. In any year 
when the City does not thus appropriate at least three per cent of the 
amount available for department expenses from taxes and income in 
said City, the income given in said will for the purchase of books 
for the young shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity Church in the 
City of Boston to be by him dispensed in relieving the necessities of 
the poor. $100,000.00 

Benton Building Fund — Extract from the will of JosiAH H. Benton : 
''Twelfth: All the rest and residue of my property and estate I give 
and devise ... to the TRUSTEES OF THE Public Library of 
THE City of Boston ... and I Direct that the same be held 
and used in the manner following . . . 

". . . Second: — To hold the other one-half of said residue and 
remainder as an accumulating fund, the income and interest to be 
added to the principal and reinvested as principal, until the total 
amount thereof shall be two million dollars ($2,000,000). And 
then I Direct such total sum of two million dollars ($2,000,000) 
to be applied to the enlargement of the present central library build- 
ing in Boston, or to the construction of another central library build- 
ing in such part of the City as may be then most desirable for the 
accommodation of the people of said City; such new building to be 



[164] 

constructed under the advice of the Librarian of the Library at that 
time in such manner as may be most desirable for efficient practical 
working of a library therein." Received in 1936. 

$1,733,103.77 
Benton Book Fund — Extract from the will of JosiAH H. Benton: 

"Tn>elfth: All the rest and residue of my property and estate I give 
and devise ... to the TRUSTEES OF THE Public Library of 
THE City of Boston . . . and I Direct that the same be held 
and used in the manner following . . . 

''First: — One-half of the net income of such residue and remainder 
to be applied by the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit for said Library ; meaning and in- 
tending hereby that such income shall be applied for books desirable 
for scholarly research and use . . . 

". . . It is my desire that . . . the income given by the Twelfth Clause 
of my will for the purchase of books, maps and other library material 
of permanent value and benefit, shall be in addition to the sums 
appropriated by the City for the maintenance of the Boston Public 
Library, and that the same shall not be taken into account in any 
appropriation by the City for that purpose. 

"I, therefore, hereby provide that . . . such income as is given by 
Twelfth Clause of my will for the purchase of books . . . shall be 
applied for those purposes only in years when the City appropriates 
for the maintenance of the Boston Public Library at least three per 
cent (3 per cent) of the amount available for department expenses 
from taxes and income in said City. 

"In any year when the City does not thus appropriate at least three 
per cent (3 per cent) of the amount available for department ex- 
penses from taxes and income in said City, the income given in said 
will for the purchase of books shall be paid to the Rector of Trinity 
Church in the City of Boston to be by him disbursed in relieving the 
necessities of the poor." 

By an Agreement of Compromise entered in the Probate Court 
of Suffolk County on January 15, 1935, the Benton Book 
Fund was established" ... as a permanent fund, the income and 
interest thereon to be applied annually by the Library Trustees, 
without regard to the amounts appropriated by the City of Boston 
for the maintenance of the Boston Public Library in any year, as 
follows: — (a) Six-tenths (6/10) of such income is to be applied an- 
nually by the Library Trustees for the purchase of books, maps and 
other library material of permanent value and benefit for said li- 
brary; meaning and intending hereby that such income shall be 
applied for books desirable for scholarly research and use; (b) The 



[1651 

remaining four-tenths (4/10) of such income is to be paid over an- 
nually to the Rector of Trinity Church to be by him disbursed, either 
directly, or in his discretion, through charitable organizations or 
agencies, whether incorporated or unincorporated, in relieving the 
necessities of the poor." Received in 1936. $1,158,857.25 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund — Bequest of ChARLES H. L. N. 

Bernard. Received in 1930. $2,000.00 

Bigelow Fund — Donation made by the HoN. John P. BiGELOW in 
August, 1850, when Mayor of the City. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated for the purchase of 
books for the increase of the library. $1,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund — Bequest of Robert Charles Bil- 
lings. 

"The sum. to constitute a permanent fund for said library, to be 
called the Robert Charles Billings Fund, the income only to be used 
for the purpose of the purchase of books for said library." Re- 
ceived in 1903. $100,000.00 

Boston Book Fair 1 938 Fund — Received from the Board OF Trade 
OF Boston Book Merchants as representing the excess of re- 
ceipts over expenditures by the Board in connection v/ith the Book 
Fair held at the Library in November 1 938. The income to be used 
for the benefit of the Library Staff. Received in 1939. $1 72.70 

Bowditch Fund — Bequest of J. Ingersoll BowDITCH. Received in 
1890. 

The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the 
purchase of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics 
and astronomy. $10,000.00 

Bradlee Fund — Bequest of the Rev. Caleb David Bradlee to the 
Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. $1,000.00 

Joseph H. Center Fund — Bequest of JosEPH H. Center, the income 
thereof to be at all times applied to the purchase of books and other 
additions to the library. Received in 1905. $39,520.39 

Central Library Building Fund — Donations in response to an appeal by 
the Trustees in April. 1925, setting forth the needs of the Library, 
from: 

Percy Lee Atherton $ 25.00 

William York Peters 25.00 

John T. Spaulding 100.00 



$150.00 
Clement Fund — Bequest of FRANK ClemeNT, of Newton, to be known 
as the "Frank Clement Fund," the income to be applied to the pur- 
chase of books. Received in 1915. $2,000.00 



[166] 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial Fund — This is a contribution from 
the friends of Henry Sargent Codman, to be used to perpetuate 
the memory of Mr. Codman by the purchase of books upon land- 
scape gardening. It is the desire of the subscribers that a special 
book plate shall be inserted in each of the volumes purchased, identi- 
fying it as part of their memorial collection. Received in 1 898. 

$2,854.41 

Cutter Fund — Bequest of ABRAHAM E. CUTTER of four thousand dol- 
lars and his library of books, the income of the fund to be expended 
for the purchase of books, and for binding. Received in 1 90 1 . 

$4,270.00 

Elizabeth Fund ■ — Bequest of Saram A. MaTCHETT, late of Brookline, 
who died October 6, 1910, the object of which is stated in the fol- 
lowing extract from her will: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Eliza- 
beth fund, to be received, held and securely invested, and only the 
net income therefrom expended every year in the purchase of such 
books of permanent value and authority as may be most useful in 
said Library." $25,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund — Bequest of Daniel Sharp Ford to the 
Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for the purchase 
of books for the young until otherwise ordered by the Board. Re- 
ceived in 1900. $6,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund — Bequest of Daniel Smarp Ford 
to the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be used for general 
purposes. Received in 1935. $5,017.65 

Franklin Club Fund — Donation made in June, 1 863, by a literary asso- 
ciation of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the asso- 
ciation, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French and 
J. Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such manner 
as to them should seem judicious. They elected to bestow them on 
the Public Library, attaching thereto only the following conditions: 
"In trust, that the income, but the income only, shall, year by year, be 
expended in the purchase of books of permanent value, for the use 
of the free Public Library of the city, and as far as practicable of 
such a character as to be of special interest to young men." The trus- 
tees expressed a preference for books relative to government and 
political economy. $ 1 ,000.00 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund — Bequest of ISABELLA Stewart 
Gardner. 

"To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library, for the Brown 
Musical Library, for a memorial to B. J. Lang." Received in 1924. 

$5,000.00 



Morris Gest Fund - — Donation made by MoRRIS Gesi in December. 
1925, the gross receipts from a benefit performance for the Library 
of "The Miracle", — $2,652.50, the income to be used in the in- 
terest of dramatic art. $2,652.50 

Green Fund — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of $2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for the purchase of books relating 
to American history. Received in 1878 and 1884. $2,000.00 

Charlotte Harris Fund — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, the object 
of which is stated in the following extract from her will: "I give to 
the Charlestown Public Library $ 1 0,000, to be invested on interest, 
which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books published 
before 1850. I also give to said Public Library my own private li- 
brary and the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." Be- 
quests accepted by City Council. July 31,1 877. $1 0,000.00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund — Bequest of Thomas B. HarRIS, of Charles- 
town, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. Received 
in 1884. $1,089.38 

Alfred Hemenway Fund — Bequest of ALFRED HeMENWAY. Received 
in 1928. $5,000.00 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund — Bequest of HeLOISE E. HerseY, the in- 
come to be expended for the purchase of books, preferably those of 
recent issue that have real literary value. Received in 1 936. 

$3,542.00 

Hyde Fund — Bequest of FrAxNKLIN P. Hyde, to be known as the 
"Franklin P. Hyde Fund," the income to be applied to the purchase 
of books and other library material. Received in 1915. $3,632.40 

David P. Kimball F'und — Bequest of David P. KiMBALL. 

"I give to the Public Library of the City of Boston, the income to 
be used for the purchase of books. $10,000." Received in 1924. 

$10,012.90 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund — Donations of $1 ,000 each made by LouiS L. 
KiRSTEiN, "to be used for any purpose of the Library that the 
r rustees see fit to put it to." 
October. 1925 $1,000.00 



October, 1926 
November, 1927 
October, 1928 
October, 1929 



1 ,000.00 
1,000.00 
1 ,000.00 
i ,000.00 



$5,000.00 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund — Extract from the will of KatherinE 

Knapp: "To the 1 rustees of the Public Library of the City of 

Boston, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), to be known 

as the Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, of which the income only shall 



[168] 

be used for the purchase of books for said hbrary. And I hereby 
request that such books be designated with an appropriate label or 
inscription, bearing the name of the Fund," Received in 1914. 

$10,000.00 

Helen Lambert Fund — Bequest of Helen Lambert, in memory of 
Frederic and Louise Lambert. The income of this fund to be ex- 
pended for the purchase of books and other library material until 
otherwise ordered by the Trustees. Received in 1931. $1,403.57 

Abbott Lawrence Fund — Bequest of Abbott Lawrence. The in- 
terest on this fund to be exclusively appropriated for the purchase of 
books having permanent value. Received in 1860. $10,000.00 

Edward Lawrence Fund — Bequest of EDWARD LAWRENCE, of Charles- 
town. The following clause from his will explains its purpose: 
'To hold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they 
may choose, to the purchase of special books of reference to be kept 
and used only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Received in 1886. $500.00 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund — Bequest of ELIZABETH LewIS, to be 
knowTi as the Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund: "I give and bequeath to the 
Boston Public Library the sum of $5,000 as a fund, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of such old and rare books as 
shall be fitly selected to augment the collection known as the John 
A. Lewis Library." Received in 1903. $5,000.00 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial Fund — Donation from the family of 
Charles Greely Loring, the income of which is to be expended 
for the purchase of books for the West End Branch. Received in 
1 896. $500.00 

Charles Mead Fund — Bequest of Charles Mead, to constitute the 
Charles Mead Public Library Trust Fund for the promotion of the 
objects of the Public Library in such manner as the government of 
said library shall deem best, and so far as the government shall 
deem consistent with the objects of the library to be used for the 
benefit of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 896, 

$2,500.00 

George W. Moore Fund — Bequest of George W. MooRE, for general 
purposes. Received in 1 939, $2 1 7,00 

Francis A. Morse Library Fund — Bequest of Francis A. MoRSE, of 
West Roxbury; the income only to be expended annually for tlie 
purchase of books for the West Roxbury Branch Library suitable 
for children of school age. Received in 1936. $1,000.00 

Gardner O, North Fund — Bequest of Gardner O. North. Received 
in 1928. $2,000,00 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund — By an interlocutory decree of the 
Probate Court for the County of Suffolk, the amount of$l 1 ,781 ,44 



1169] 

was received, llic same being one-half of the nel aniounl leccived 
from the disposition of certain property held by the 1 rustces, under 
an indenture between Amor HoUingsworth, Sumner A. Burt and 
Amor L. HoUingsworth, all of Milton. Mass., and John H. Mc- 
Kendry, of Boston, Mass., entered into the sixth day of August, 
1870. The above amount was accepted by the City, January 2, 
1924, and the Trustees of the Public Library voted to invest the 
same under the name of "The Oakland Hall Trust Fund," the 
income to be applied to the purchase of books and other library 
material for the Mattapan Branch. $1 1 ,781 .44 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund — Donation received from the PapyRUS 
Club to establish a fund in memory of John Boyle O'Reilly, late 
member of said club, the income of said fund to be devoted to the 
purchase of books for the Boston Public Library. Received in 1 897. 

,. ., . $1,000.00 

Phillips Fund — Donation made by Jonathan Phillips, in April. 
1853. 

The interest of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase 
of books $10,000.00 

Also a bequest by Mr. Phillips in his will dated September 20, 
1 849. The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the main- 
tenance of a free Public Library. $20,000.00 

Pierce Fund — Donation made by the HoN. Henry L. Pierce, Mayor 
of the City, November 29, I 873, and accepted by the City Council. 
December 27, 1873. $5,012.90 

Sarah E. Pratt Fund — Bequest from Sarah E. PrATT, under the 
14th clause of her will, for the benefit of the Dorchester Branch, 
$500.00. Received in 1922 and 1924. $1,494.18 

Guilford Reed Fund — Bequest of Helen Leah Reed, as a memorial 
to Guilford S. Reed; the income to be applied to the purchase of 
books of non-fiction. $1,000.00 

John Singer Sargent Fund — Balance remaining in hands of surviving 
trustees of fund originally raised to install in the Library decorations 
by John Singer Sargent; the income to be used for the care and 
preservation of the Sargent decorations, etc. $3,858.24 

Scholfield Fund — Bequest of ARTHUR ScHOLFiELD, who died in New 
York, January 1 7, 1 883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. 1 he last heir, Joseph Scholfield, died November 
1 8, 1 889, and by his will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum 
of $1 1,766.67. which represents the income of said fund received 
by him up to the time of his death, to which was added $33.33 
accrued interest on deposit up to the time of investment, to be added 
to the fund given by his brother, $61 ,800.00 



[170] 

Sewall Fund — Extract from the will of RiCHARD Black SewalL: 
*'Tenth: — I bequeath the following pecuniary legacies clear of 
legacy tax, namely. To the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston $25,000 to be added to their funds and the income 
to be used for the purchase of books." Received in 1918. 

$25,000.00 

Skinner Fund — Extract from the will of Francis Skinner: 

"Eleventh. — All my books and library I give and bequeath to my 
son, to be enjoyed by him during his life and after his death to be 
distributed as he shall appoint among such public libraries, as he shall 
judge fit, and in case he makes no such appointment then to the 
Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 
"Sixteenth. — All the rest and residue of my said property of what- 
ever kind, I give and bequeath to Augustus P. Loring and J. Lewis 
Stackpole in trust to pay the net income to my son Francis Skinner, 
Jr., during his life, or to apply the same to his maintenance and sup- 
port, or the maintenance and support of any issue of his, as they shall 
think best during his life ; and at his death to apply the income to the 
maintenance and support of his issue until his youngest child shall 
reach the age of 2 1 years and then to distribute said property among 
said issue, the issue of a deceased child to take the share a parent 
would have if living. 

"If there shall be no issue surviving at the time of my son's death, 
then to turn the said property into cash and to divide it equally 
among the following legatees: The Trustees of the Public Library 
of the City of Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Medical School 
of Harvard University, and the Free Hospital for Women, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts." Received in 1 9 14. $51 ,732. 1 4 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund — Donation of a citizen of 
South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit 
of the South Boston Branch Library. Received in 1 879. 

$100.00 

Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund — Bequest of Mary ELIZABETH STEW- 
ART of $3,500 to the Trustees of the Boston Public Library. The 
Trustees voted under date of June 29, 1923, that the income be 
applied to the purchase of books and other library material. 

$3,500.00 

James Jackson Storrow (Harvard '57) Fund — Gift of Helen Stor- 
Row and Elizabeth Randolph Storrow as a memorial to 
James Jackson Storrow, Senior; income to be used for the purchase 
of Italian books. $25,000.00 

Ticknor Bequest — By the will of George Ticknor, of Boston, he 
gave to the City of Boston, on the death of his wife, all his books 



1171] 

and manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about 
four thousand volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. 
After the receipt of said sums the City is required to spend not less 
than one thousand dollars in every five years during the twenty-five 
years next succeeding (i.e., the income of four thousand dollars, at 
the rate of five per cent per annum) in the purchase of books in the 
Spanish and Portuguese languages and literature. At the end of 
twenty-five years the income of said sum to be expended annually in 
the purchase of books of permanent value, either in the Spanish or 
Portuguese languages, or in such other languages as may be deemed 
expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for refer- 
ence or study, but arc not to be loaned for use outside of the library 
building. If these bequests are not accepted by the City, and the 
trusts and conditions faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts and 
money are to be given to the President and Pellows of Harvard 
College. In order that the City might receive the immediate benefit 
of this contribution, Anna 1 icknor, widow of the donor, relinquished 
her right to retain during her life the books and manuscripts, and 
placed them under the control of the City, the City Council having 
previously accepted the bequests in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said will, and the Trustees of the Public Library re- 
ceived said bequests on behalf of the City, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Received in 1871. $4,000.00 

William C. Todd Newspaper Fund — Donation by WlLLlAM C. TODD, 
of Atkins, N. H., accepted by order of the City Council, approved 
October 30, 1897, the income to be at least two thousand dollars 
a year, to be expended by the Library Trustees for newspapers of 
this and other countries. $50,026.44 

f ownsend Fund — Donation from William Minot and William Minot, 
Jr., executors of the will of Mary P. TownseND, at whose dis- 
posal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust for such chari- 
table and public institutions as they might think meritorious. Said 
executors accordingly selected the Public Library of the City of 
Boston as one of such institutions, and attached the following con- 
ditions to the legacy: " I he income only shall, in each and every 
year, be expended in the purchase of books for the use of the library ; 
each of which books shall have been published in some one edition 
at least five years at the time it may be so purchased." Received in 
1879. $4,000.00 

Treadwell Fund — By the will of the late Daniel Treadwell, of 
Cambridge, late Rumford Professor in Harvard College, who died 
February 27, 1872, he left the residue of his estate, after payment 



[172] 

of debts, legacies, etc., in Ivust lo his execulois, lo hold during ihc 
life of his wife for her benefit, and after her decease to divide the 
residue then remaining in the hands of the Trustees, as therein pro- 
vided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston. 

By order of the City Council, approved May 17, 1 872, said be- 
quest was accepted and the Trustees of the Public Library authorized 
to receive the same and invest it in the City of Boston Bonds, income 
of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such manner as they 
may deem for the best interests of the Library. $13,987.69 

Tufts Fimd — Bequest of Nathan A. TuFTS, of Charlestown, to be 
known as the "Nathan A. Tufts Fund," the income to be applied 
at all times to the purchase of books and other additions to the library 
to be placed in the Charlestown Branch. Received in 1906. 

$10,131.77 

Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund — Donation on account of the 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund, the income to be used 
for the purchase of books of a military and patriotic character, to be 
placed in the alcove appropriated as a memorial to the Twentieth 
Regiment. Received in 1897. $5,000.00 

Francis Jay Underbill Fund — Net proceeds under the Judicial Settle- 
ment of the Account of Arthur Lovell, as Executor of the Last Will 
and Testament of Francis Jay Underbill, late of Brooklyn, 
New York, the income to be expended for the purchase of books. 
Received in 1939. $524.70 

Horace G. Wadlin Fund — Bequest of Horace G. Wadlin, of 
Reading, former Librarian, of $2,000 to the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston to be permanently funded and the in- 
come thereof used for the purchase of books. Received in 1 932. 

$2,000.00 
Also a bequest by Ella F. Wadlin; to be added to the Horace G. 
Wadlin Fund, and the income to be used for the purchase of books. 
Received in 1936. $1,725.84 

Wales Fund — Extract from the will of George C. Wales: 

"A^fter the foregoing bequests I direct that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be paid to the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, the same to be held, managed and invested by them, so as 
to produce an income, and the said income to be apphed to the pur- 
chase of such books for said Librarv as they may deem best." Re- 
ceived in 1918. " $5,000.00 

Whitney Funds — Bequests of JameS LymAN WhiTNEY, who died Sep- 
tember 25, 1910. 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund — ■ The twelfth clause of his will di- 
rected that: One-tenth of said remaining income of the principal 



[173] 

fund, I direct to be i)aid to ihc 1 ruslecs of llie Public Libiaiy of the 
City of Boston, to be held and accumulated by said Trustees and 
permanently invested and re-invested. The first five thousand dollars 
of income so accumulated, including the income thereon arising 
during the period of accumulation, I request to be funded in the 
name of my sister, Alice Lincoln Whitney, and the income of said 
fund after its accumulation or so much of said income as may be re- 
quired, to be paid to such employees of the said Library, who are 
sick and in need of help, as the Trustees may in their discretion deem 
most worthy (there are often such cases). Any amount of income 
from said accumulated fund not needed for the purpose just men- 
tioned shall be used for the purchase of books and manuscripts. 

$5,000.00 

James Lyman Whitney Fund — The Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
having been established, all amounts of income of the principal fund 
paid to said Trustees, after the accumulation of said fund of five 
thousand dollars shall be held as the James Lyman Whitney Fund, 
and invested and re-invested and the income used in equal shares, 
one share for the purchase of rare and expensive books, and one share 
for the purchase and care of manuscripts; one half at least of the 
share devoted to manuscripts to be expended for their cataloguing 
and proper care, $31,293.38 

In addition to the above Mr. Whitney created a trust, directing that 
of the net income seven hundred dollars a year be paid to the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library of the City of Boston, to be expended on 
bibliographic work for the benefit of the Library. 

Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund — Bequest of Mehitable C. C. Wil- 
son, the income to be expended for the purchase of books. Received 
in 1913. $1,000.00 



GIFTS FOR THE PURCHASE OF BOOKS 

Besides the preceding, the following gifts have been made to the Public 
Library, and the amounts have been appropriated for the purchase 
of books, according to the intention of the donors, viz. : 
Samuel Appleton, late of Boston . . . $1,000.00 

H. C. Bentley 220.38 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch 6,800.00 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch 200.00 

James Brown, late of Cambridge . . . 500.00 

Andrew Carnegie ..... 980.75 

Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library, for the 

benefit of the Dorchester Branch Library . 335.13 



74] 



Sally Inman Kast Shepard 
James Nightingale 
Patrick F. Sullivan Bequest 



1 .000.00 
100.00 
339.61 

$11,475.87 



REC.'\PITULATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Ainsley Fund 

Ariz Fund . 

Bates Fund . 

Benton Book Fund 

Benton Building Fund 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard Fund 

Bigelow Fund 

Robert Charles Billinos Fund 

Boston Book Fair 1938 Fund 

Bowditch Fund 

Bradlee Fund 

Joseph H. Center Fund 

Central Library Building Fund 

Children's Fund . 

Clement Fund 

Henry Sargent Codman Memorial 

Cutter Fund 

Elizabeth Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Fund 

Daniel Sharp Ford Trust Fund 

Franklin Club Fund 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Fund 

Morris Gest Fund 

Green Fund 

Charlotte Harris Fund . 

Thomas B. Harris Fund 

Alfred Hemenway Fund 

Heloise E. Hersey Fund 

Hyde Fund 

David P. Kimball Fund . 

Louis E. Kirstein Fund 

Arthur Mason Knapp Fund . 

George W. Moore Fund 

Francis A. Morse Library Pund 

Helen Lambert Fund . 

Abbott Lawrence Fund 

Edward Lawrence Fund 

Mrs. John A. Lewis Fund . 

Charles Greely Loring Memorial 1 

Charles Mead Fund 

Gardner O. North Fund 

The Oakland Hall Trust Fund 

John Boyle O'Reilly Fund . 



Fund 



$164,142.96 

10,000.00 

50,000.00 

1.158,857.25 

1.733,103.77 

2.000.00 

1,000 .no 

100,000.00 

172.70 

10.000.00 

1. 000.00 

39,520.39 

150.00 

100.000.00 

2,000.00 

2,854.41 

4,270.00 

25,000.00 

6,000.00 

5,017.65 

1 ,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,652.50 

2.000.00 

10,000.00 

1 ,089.38 

5,000.00 

3.542.00 

3,632.40 

10,012.90 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

217.00 

1,000.00 

1,403.57 

10.000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

500.C0 

2,500.00 

2.000.00 

11.781.44 

1,000.00 



[175] 



Phillips Fund 
Pierce Fund 
Sarah E. Pratt Fund . 
Guilford Reed Fund 
John Singer Sargent Fund 
Scholfield Fund 
Sewall Fund 
Skinner Fund 
South Boston Branch Library Trust F' 
Mary Elizabeth Stewart Fund 
James Jackson Storrow (Ilarvard '57) P 
Ticknor Fund .... 
William C. Todd Newspaper Fund 
Townsend fund . 
Treadwell Fund . 
Nathan A. Tufts Fund 
Twentieth Regiment Memorial Fund 
Francis Jay Underbill Fund 
I lorace G. Wadlin Fund 
Wales Fund 

Alice Lincoln Whitney Fund 
James Lyman Whitney Fund 
Mehitable C. C. Wilson Fund 

Total 



30.000.00 

5.012.90 

1.494.18 

1. 000.00 

3.858.24 

61.800.00 

25,000.00 

51.732.14 

100.00 

3,500.00 

25,000.00 

4 000.00 

50,026.44 

4.000.00 

13.987.69 

10.131.77 

5,000.00 

524.70 

3,725.84 

5.000.00 

5.000.00 

31.293.38 

1.000.00 

$3,852,107.60 



[176] 
APPENDIX K 

OFFICERS OF THE LIBRARY AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1939 

Director's Office 
Director, and Librarian: Milton E. Lord 

Clerk of the Trustees, and 

Assistant to the Director: Elizabeth B. Brockunier 

Assistant to the Director: Gregory J. Edson 

Supervisor of Training: Bertha V. Hartzell 

Editor of Publications: Zoltan Haraszti 

Reference Division 

Chief Librarian of the Reference Division: Richard G. Hensley 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Frank C. Blaisdell 

Assistant Librarian, Emeritus Samuel A. Chevalier 

Book Selection Department : Christine Hayes, Chief 

Cataloging and Classification Department: William A. Roblyer, Chief 

Lucien E. Taylor, Chief, 

Emeritus 
General Reference Departments: Francis H. Hannigan, Supervisor 

John H. Reardon, Deputy Supervisor 
Bates Hall Centre Desk: William J. Mulloney, Assistant in Charge 
Bates Hall Reference Department: John M. Carroll, Assistant, In 

Charge 
Issue Department: Thomas F. Brennan, Chief 
Open Shelf Department: John H. Reardon, Chief 
Periodical and Newspaper Department : Elizabeth L, Wright, Chief 
Registration Department: A. Frances Rogers, Chief 

Special Reference Departments: Edward H. Redstone, Supervisor 

Frank N. Jones, Deputy Supervisor 
Business Branch: Mary W, Dietrichson. Business Branch Librarian 
Fine Arts Department: Priscilla S. MacFadden, Assistant, In 

Charge 
History Reference Department: Laura R. Gibbs, Assistant 
Music Department: Richard G. Appel, Assistant in Charge 
Science and Technology Department: Frank N. Jones, Chief 
Statistical Department: Elizabeth G. Barry, Assistant in Charge 
leachers Department: Anna L. Manning, Assistant in Charge 

Rare Books: Zoltan Haraszti, Keeper of Rare Books 

Rare Book I^eparlment: Harriet Swift, Assistant in Charge 



[177] 

Circulation Division 

Chief Librarian of the Circulation Division: Orlando C. Davis 

Children's Work: Alice M. Jordan, Supervisor 

Branch Libraries: Edith Guerrier, Supervisor 
Branch Librarians: 

Allston: M. Florence Cufflin 

Andrew Square: Elizabeth H. McShane 

Boylston: Margaret A. Calnan 

Brighton: Katrina M. Sather 

Charlestown : Katherine S. Rogan 

City Point: Helen M. O'Lcary 

Codman Square: Elizabeth P. Ross 

Dorchester: Marion C. Kingman 

East Boston: Theodora B. Scoff 

Faneuil: Gertrude L. Connell 

Fellowes Athenaeum: Mary E. Ames 

Hyde Park: Sara A. Lyon 

Jamaica Plain: Rebecca E. Willis 

Jeffries Point: Mary U. Nichols 

Kirstein: Dorothy F. Nourse 

Lower Mills: Muriel E. Cann 

Mattapan: Ada A. Andelman 

Memorial: Margaret I. McGovern 

Mount Bow^doin: Catherine P. Loughnian 

Mount Pleasant: Margaret H. Reid 

Neponset: Elizabeth B. Boudreau 

North End: Mary F. Curley 

Orient Heights: Catherine E. Flannery 

Parker Hill: Mary M. Sullivan 

Phillips Brooks: Edith H. Bailey 

Roslindale: Annie M. Donovan 

South Boston: Mary A. C. Kavin 

South End: Clara L. Maxwell 

Upham's Corner: Beatrice C. Maguire 

West End: Fanny Goldstein 

West Roxbury: Geneva Watson 

Book Selection Department: Edna G. Peck, Chief 

Cataloging and Classification Department: Ethel Hazlewood, Cataloger, 
In Charge 

Branch Bindery Section: Marion McCarthy. Assistant, In Charge 

Branch Issue Department: Grace C. Loughlin, Chief 

Alice V. Stevens, Chief, Etnerilns 



[178] 

School Department: Beatrice M. Flanagan, Chief 

Young People's Room, Central Library: Mary C. Toy, Children's Li- 
brarian 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Katherine F. Albert 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Carrie L. Morse 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Katherine F. Muldoon 

Branch Librarian, Emeritus: Margaret A. Sheridan 

Division of Business Operations 

Comptroller: James W. Kenney 

Buildings Department: William F. Quinn, Superintendent 

Auditing Department: Helen Schubarlh, Auditor 

Book Purchasing Department: William C. Maiers, Chief 

Stock Purchasing Department: Timothy J. Mackin, Custodian 

Binding Department: James P. Mooers, Chief 

Printing Department: William B. Gallagher, Chief 

Francis W. Lee, Chief, Emeritus 
Shipping Department: Robert F. Dixon, Shipper 



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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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