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TENTH 



ANNUAL KEPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



NOVEMBER, 1862. 




BOSTON: 
J. E. FARWELL AND COMPANY, PRINTERS TO THE CITY 



No. ;jr CoNtiKKSH SritKKT. 



18C2. 



City Document. — No, 85. 



(pa^^ (^w ©(©©"ffcDSJc 




TENTH 



ANNUAL HEPOUT 



TOUSTEES OF THR PUBLIC LIBRAM. 



18 6 2. 



In Board of Aldermen, November 17, 1862. 
Laid on the table, and SOO copies ordered to be printed. 

Attest : S. F. McCLEAKY. City Ckrk. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Public Libeary, 15 November., 1862. 

His Honor, Joseph M. Wightman, Mayor of the City of 

Boston : 

Sir : I have the honor to transmit to you, herewith, the 
Tenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public Library, 
prepared in obedience to the fourth section of the Ordinance 
of the 14th of October, 1852, providing for the establishment 
and regulation of the Public Library. 
Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

CHAELES C. JEWETT, 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



In obedience to the fourth section of the Ordinance of Octo- 
ber 14th, 1852, providing for the establishment and regulation 
of the Public Library, the Trustees ask leave to submit to the 
City Council their Tenth Annual 

REPORT. 

And first, as a part of their duty, under the ordinance above 
referred to, they duly appointed a committee of five citizens at 
large, with, a member of the Board of Trustees, as their chair- 
man, to examine the Library and make report of its condition. 
This committee, consisting of Daniel H. Whitney, Esq., as its 
chairman, and Charles P. Curtis, Esq., Moses L. Hale, Esq., 
Rev. Thomas B. Thayer, Edw^ard S. Tobey, Esq., and Hon. 
Samuel H. Walley, as its other members, having made the 
report solicited from them, and presented it, as required by the 
ordinance, to the Trustees, it is herewith annexed, marked A, 
together with the customary report of the Sujierintendent, which 
is marked B. 

To statements so ample, clear, and satisfactory as are con- 
tained in each of these reports, little can be added, either to 
explain the operations of the Library during the past year, or 
to set forth its present condition and prospects. But as the 
ordinance under which they act demands from the Trustees 



6 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 85. 

an annual exposition of the affairs it eonlides to them, they 
will now as briefly as possible, fulfil the duty thus imposed on 
them, premising, at the same time, that for all needful details, 
they would refer to the statistics furnished in the documents 
already mentioned, and which they ask leave to make a part 
of this present report. 

From these sources, then, it appears that seven thousand 
three hundred and ninety-one volumes have been added to the 
Library during the year, making the whole number on its 
shelves — excluding duplicates and broken sets — something 
over one hundred thousand. The number lent for use at home, 
— excluding, of course, those used in the Reading Rooms, by 
about two hundred and eighty persons, who resort there daily, 
on an average throughout the year, and excluding also a very 
large though not an equal number of books used for study, refer- 
ence, and consultation, daily, in the Upper Hall, — the number 
lent for home use alone has been one hundred and eighty thou- 
sand three hundred and two, or a daily average of six hundred 
and twenty-six, during the two hundred and eighty-eight days 
on which the Library was open ; — facts which the Trustees 
report with satisfaction ; because they show that the Library, 
during the last year, has extended its excellent influences much 
wider than ever before. Indeed if we could add to the num- 
bers given above, the number of persons who have visited the 
Library and consulted its books, without leaving any record 
behind them, the average daily aggregate would, no doubt, 
materially exceed a thousand persons. 

To the two hundred and thirty-four individuals and public 
bodies, whose names are set forth in the Superintendent's 
Report, as having given to the institution twelve hundred and 
seventy-four books, and nearly fifteen hundred pamphlets, the 
Trustees would make their grateful acknowledgments. Some 
of these contributions are of great value. All are welcome, 
and will readily find a suitable place in our collections. 

In this connection the Trustees feel bound particularly to 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7 

acknowledge the continued liberality of His Imperial IMajesty, 
the Emperor of the French, in the prompt transmission, as 
they issue from the press, of the volumes of the Correspond- 
ence of Napoleon the First, a work of rare interest and 
importance, — and also to renew their thanks to the Royal 
Commissioners of Patents, in England, who have not failed 
regularly to furnish the Library with the successive portions 
of their costly and invaluable publication. Nor would the 
other Trustees pass without especial notice, the thoughtful kind- 
ness of one of their number, (i\lr. Ticknor, to whom the insti- 
tution is in many respects under the highest obligation,) in the 
donation of the interesting and valuable collection of books, 
originally commenced by our lamented and beloved fellow-citi- 
zen, Mr. Prescott, and continued by Mr. Ticknor himself, per- 
taining; to the Life and AVorks of Moliere. A letter from Mr. 
Ticknor, accompanying this donation, with the acknowledg- 
ment of the Trustees, is appended to this Report, marked C. 

The thanks of the Trustees are also due to the Superinten- 
dent, and all associated with him, for their zeal and efficiency 
in the daily management of the Library during the year now 
closed, as well as in the years gone by ; — an acknowledgment 
in which we feel sure that those most familiar with the institu- 
tion, and who have oftenest witnessed and shared its benefits, 
will the most heartily concur. For ourselves, as Trustees, we 
can only say that we have not knowingly neglected our duties 
to the Library. Our meetings have been held regularly twice 
a month, and oftener when needed. We have done what we 
could, and all that it seemed desirable for us to do, to ])r()mote 
the welfare of the institution. 

It only remains for us, therefore, now to commend the Libra- 
ry and its interests, — as a part of the great system of public 
instruction in the city, — to its earnest friends and patrons ; to 
the municipal government which has so long and faithfully 
cherished it ; and to the community for whose benefit, as we 
believe, it has been no less faithfully administered ; sure that its 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

past extraordinary success, and its present beneficent working, 
obvious as it is to all, will claim for if, better than we can, any 
countenance and patronage which in the judgment of the City 
Council it may now or hereafter need or deserve. Leaving it 
therefore, as we doubt not it may safely be left, to speak for 
itself, we conclude our present report Avith a single further 
thought. 

The measure of a nation's elevation is marked by notliing so 
surely as by those great institutions, on which all true civihza- 
tion depends. Tlie measure of a city's honor and influence is 
no less surely marked by the contributions, which through the 
general education and nuiture of its people, it aflfords toward 
maintaining the welfare, dignity, and strength of the whole State 
of which it is a part, and in whose fortunes and condition its 
own fortunes and fate are inseparately involved. During periods 
of public trial and suffering, the duty that necessarily results 
from the claims of this general and true culture for ourselves 
and our children may, indeed, become onerous, but it is not on 
that account less imperative, nor are the results that will flow 
from its fulfilment less important and pressing. It is a great 
duty still. And the history and working of the Public Library 
during the last year not only show that this duty can be amply 
performed with the most satisfactory and consoling results, in a 
season of general doubt and agitation, but they show this — as 
far as a single institution can show it — in a manner not to be 
mistaken or overlooked. For many, very many, of the thou- 
sands, who, only a year or cighteeen months ago, trusted to 
the Public Library for instruction and improvement, ai'e now far 
away from its pleasant halls, defending whatever is dearest in 
our own rights and hopes as well as what is dearest in theirs. 
But the Library itself, though it misses so many familiar and 
kindly faces, was never before so much wanted, never so mucii 
resorted to, never so important to this whole community as it 
has been during the last year. Those who have remained at 
home have needed it for a relief to their oppressed thoughts, for 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

encouragement under anxiety, for instruction and help in the 
business and burdens of Hfe that have suddenly fallen upon them 
with a weight heretofore unknown. To such, and their num- 
ber is great, the Library more than any other of our municipal 
institutions has been a blessing, such as it never was in any pre- 
vious year of its existence. 

What the next year may liring forth to any of us, none may 
now be sagacious enough to foresee, or bold enough to predict. 
But one thing is certain. However much our material resour- 
ces may be diminished, — and somewhat diminished they must 
be, — nothing can compensate us for the loss we may sustain, 
— nothing can even in a moderate degree repair it, except an 
increase in those great, preponderating moral resources, which 
depend upon a wise and dutiful cultl^^ation of the faculties Avhich 
our Creator has bestowed upon all of us, and for the right use 
of which he will hold us responsible. 

EDWAED EVERETT, 
JOHN P. BIGELOW, 
NATHANIEL B. SHURTLEFF, 
WILLIAM W. GREENOUGH, 
E. T. WILSON, 
DANIEL H. WHITNEY. 
Public Library, 15 November, 1862. 

Note. — The name of Mr. Ticknor is omitted among the signatures of the 
Trustees, in consequence of the allusion made to liim in the Report. 



[A] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 



The Committe appointed in compliance witli tlie seventh sec- 
tion of the Ordinance in rchition to tlie Public Library, dated 
the 14th of October, 1852, "to examine the Library and make 
report of its condition to the Trustees," respectfully 

EEPORT, 

That they have attended to the duty assigned them, and have 
examined with as much detail as seemed needful and proper, 
into the organization, condition, and jjrogress of the Library. 
They have pursued the same method of inquiry as former com- 
mittees, and they now propose to present the results of their 
observations, as in preceding reports, under the heads of, first, 
The Books ; second, The Catalogues ; third. The Building ; 
fourth. The Administration. 

I. The Books. — The additions to the Library, since the 
last annual examination, are : 7,391 books; 1,493 pamphlets ; 
3 engravings; 11 maps; 2 manuscripts; 10 pieces of music, 
and 993 separate numbers of newspapers. 

Of these, 6,117 books, 9 maps, and 1 manuscript were ob- 
tained by purchase, and the remainder by donation from 234 
persons and institutions. 

The means for purchasing are dcri^'cd from the income of 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. H 

funds presented or bequeathed to the City for the purpose, and 
fi"oni the annual appropriations made by the City. 

The permanent funds are invested in city loans, drawing six 
per cent, interest. They are the following : — 

The Bates Fund, presented by Joshua Bates . . $ 50,000 

The Phillips Fund, f 10,000 presented, and $ 20,000 

bequeathed by Jonathan Phillips . . 30,000 

The Lawi-ence Fund, bequeathed by Abbot Lawrence, 10,000 

The Townsend Fund, presented by William Minot, 

and William Minot, Jr., in compliance with the 

will of Miss Mary Townsend .... 4,000 

The Bigelow Fund, presented by John P. Bigelow . 1,000 



95,000 



The income of these funds, now amounting to $ 5,700, is de- 
voted to the purchase of books of such character, and in such 
manner, as were required by the donors ; and the Committee 
have noticed with pleasure, the punctilious care with which these 
noble public benefactions have been administered. 

The Committee learned that the portion of the city appropri- 
ations devoted to the purchase of books, had been, year by year, 
expended entirely upon popular books for general reading, 
placed in the Lower Hall, and for the current periodicals, of 
wliich about 150, meeting the wants and pursuits of all classes 
of readers, are regularly received. 

The donations which have been shown to the Connnittoe, as 
tliose received since the last examination, furnish In their number, 
their value, and in the sources from which they were deri\ed, 
most gratifying evidence of the unabated interest with which the 
Library is regarded by our fellow-citizens, and by friends at a 
distance. The Committee would refer to the Report of the Su- 
perintendent for a particular description of several of these dona- 
tions, and to the list appended to his report for the names of the 
donors, and the number of volumes presented by each. 



12 CITY DOCU^rENT. — No. 85. 

With the accessions above enumerated, the Library contains 
105,034 books, counted as they stand upon the shelves, besides 
28,874 pamphlets, unbound. 

84,153 volumes of the most substantial character, are placed 
in the Upper Ilall, and are lent out to the public freely, but 
with such necessary safeguards as experience and good judgment 
have suggested. 20,881 volumes of a more popular kind, but 
comprising, still, the best standard Avorks for general use, are 
placed in the Lower Hall, where every facility has been pro- 
vided for their widest circulation. 

Every library to which books are presented, — oftentimes 
without a knowledge on the part of the donors of the former 
possessions of the institution, — Avill of necessity gather dupli- 
cates. The Committee found 4,794 duplicates and odd volumes 
in the Public Library. They were glad to know that proper 
lists had been made of these, and that they were held for ex- 
change and not for sale. The name of the donor of a book can 
be placed in the book which is procured in exchange for it, niul 
thus the record of every benefaction be preserved. 

The pamphlets were found to be fully and systematically 
arranged, and neatly kept, but it is understood to be the i)ur- 
pose of the Ti-ustees to have all of them, which are sufficiently 
important, separately bound, and treated in all respects like 
books, which indeed, in all but their binding, they are. The 
plans of the Superintendent as explained to the Committee will 
greatly promote this design, by introducing a style of binding, 
which seems every way satisfactory, while it is far cheaper than 
the ordinary mode. 

The Library has attained to this size in ten years. There is, 
the Committee Ijelieve, but one larger collection of books for 
public use in America, and that not many thousand volumes in 
advance. This is surely ground of j)rcscnt congratulation, and 
of good hope for the future. A noble beginning has been made. 
But it must be borne in mind that this Library is not yet, and 
cannot for many years become, all which the wants of an edu- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 13 

cated community require. The fostering care and the generous 
and enlightened liberality of the City Government, together 
with the continued benevolent regard of rich and cultivated citi- 
zens will, the Committee doubt not, carry forward the work 
with unflagging zeal and unbroken success. It is probable that 
more than three fourths of the possessions of the Library are 
private gifts. These possessions, as well stated by the Super- 
intendent, are not only of intellectual, but of pecuniary value, 
worth in the market no inconsiderable portion of the whole 
amount expended for the support of the Library. 

As to the character of the books, the Committee believe that 
they constitute as good a general library for reading and refer- 
ence as, with the same number of volumes, could well be made. 
The greater part by far, have been systematically selected, as 
the Trustees have stated at length in their reports. There are 
not indeed many book-rarities here ; but for every-day use, the 
first needed and the best books will generally be found. 

The condition of the books is in the main excellent. Nearly 
all are substantially and appropx-iately bound. In the Lower PI all 
many books show marks of frequent — not a few of too care- 
less — use. Books are actually worn out in the service — hon- 
estly worn out. To replace these, however, when no longer 
fit for use, costs comparatively little — two or three hundred 
dollars a year, perhaps. The books would last longer and be 
kept neater, if the hands in which they are placed were all of 
them accustomed to books ; but all men of liberal minds will 
regard Avith indulgence soiling and injury which are not the 
result of wantonness or malice. 

The Committee have recei\ed with great interest, and they 
may add surprise, the statements made to them respecting the 
use of the collections and the cii-cnilation of books. The ao-o-re- 
gate of loans of books for home use, during the year ending 
the 1st of November, is 180,302 besides 10,263 loans of books 
to be used in the building, and an untold number of references 
from shelf to shelf, and of readings of articles in the peri- 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

odicals. On an average of the 288 clays, during which the 
Library has been open, for the last year, 626 books a day have 
been lent out of the building. In one day 1,517 were delivered 
to borrowers. There were in tlie eourse of the year, 172,902 
loans from the Lower Hall. This extensive circulation is the 
more r:niarkable from the facts that, during this year of the 
largest circulation yet reached, so many have been absent from 
the city as soldiers in our army ; and that th(> minds of all 
the people have been so occu})ied with public troubles. The 
Library was most needed, it seems, at such a time. It has 
been frequented by those who were studying history and sta- 
tistics with reference to our present crisis, and by those who 
Avere interested in the arts of Avar by sea and by land, in mili- 
tary engineering, and military surgery ; and not only by those 
intent upon pursuits of public imi)ort, but also by those who 
sought relief from the weight of anxieties and cares, pressing 
heavily upon every class of the connnunity. 

II. The Catalogues. — The system of catalogues adopted 
for the Library, and the ])rogress made from year to year in its 
application, have been fully and clearly described in the annual 
reports of the Trustees, of the Visiting Committees, and of 
the Superintendent. In these respects nothing is left for the 
present Committee. To them has been reser\ed the pleasant 
duty of noticing the perfected work, and of reporting that it 
proves in a far greater degree than was ever promised for it, 
practical and useful. The first execution of such a plan makes 
a heavy demand upon the patience of those who are waiting for 
its accomplishment, but it cannot be denied that in this case, 
whatever of patience was required from the public has been 
amply rewarded. The printed Indexes have been in use, — 
that of the Lower Hall five years, and that of the Upper Hall 
one year, — and the Committee think no better praise can be 
given to them than to say, as may with truth be said, that they 
have met the public demand, and have been received with 
universal ap])roval. 



PUBLIC LIBEARY. 25 

Four Supplements to the smaller Index have been issued, 
and the fifth is in press. During the printing of the larger 
Index, a great number of books, including the whole of Mr. 
Parker's Library, were received, and in the course of a few 
months from this time, a Supplement Avill be ready for the 
press containing nearly or quite 23,000 volumes. The Supple- 
ments to the Index of the Lower Hall will by that time require 
to be consolidated and reprinted. 

The Committee observed with peculiar pleasure that the man- 
uscript catalogue upon cards was completed to the very last 
books admitted to the Library ; and, that with the exception 
of the Parker Library, all the books have been located upon 
the shelves, and entered upon the shelf lists. The shelves for 
the Parker Library are now finished, and the books will soon 
be arranged upon them. 

It is satisfactory to know that the first steps uj)on such a 
system of catalogues, not only secure its perpetuation, but 
make its continuance a comparatively easy task. The great 
work is done, and if the Library should gradually increase to 
half a million volumes, or to a million, there Avill never be a 
time when the ' ' catalogue question " will be surrounded pro- 
portionately with so many embarrassments as it has already 
passed safely through. 

HI. The Building. — The Committee examined the edifice 
in every part, grateful to the liberality of the City Government 
for providing so spacious, substantial, and handsome a build- 
ing for such a purpose, and for providing so wisely for its 
preservation, and for its enlargement, when that may be 
necessary. 

They deem it also an act of simple justice to the person hav- 
ing charge of the building, that they should bear testimony to 
his fidelity and diligence, and to the perfect order and cleanli- 
ness, which appear in every part of the structure, from roof to 
cellar. The furniture of the Library, the alcoves, shelves, and 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

books, the niiinerous flights of stairs, the floors, and all the dark 
corners and places, least exposed, bear witness to the faithful 
■\vatch and care of Mr. Ford. 

And when it is remembered what numbers are continually 
passing in and out of the building, whatever the weather, what- 
ever the condition of our streets, it will be seen that this result, 
so pleasing to visitors, and so essential to the public exhibition 
nnd pemianent preservation of its literary treasures, can only 
be obtained by constant supervision and persevering labor. 

The allusion to " dark corners " in the preceding paragraph, 
leads to the mention of what impressed itself very forcibly on 
the minds of the Committee, viz : the necessity of more light in 
the alcoves and corners of the building. It seems to the Com- 
mittee a marked defect in the architecture of this noble edifice, 
that there should have been no special arrangement for lighting 
the interior of the alcoves. In a dark or cloudy day it is very 
difficult to read the titles and numbers of the books in the 
extreme angles of these compartments. 

The light from the roof and the windows does not penetrate 
into the recesses in sufficient volume to enable those seeking 
books to select them with rapidity and ease. And the same 
remarks apply to the corners of the front and rear, along which, 
the BoAvditch and Parker Libraries are, or are to be, disposed ; 
where the evil is very manifest. 

This partial and imperfect distribution of light is most unde- 
sirable in an institution of this character, and is often a serious 
hindrance to those employed in the work of the Library. 

The Committee are not prepared to suggest any method by 
wdiich this defect may be remedied ; but they have felt it their 
duty to call attention to the fact, not doubting but the practical 
wisdom of the Trustees would devise some way in which to 
remove the difficulty. 

IV. The Administration. — The care of the Library is 
confided to a Board of Trustees annually elected by the City 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 17 

Council, composed of five members from the citizens at large, 
one from the Board of Aldermen, and one from the Common 
Council. The public service Is devolved upon a Superintendent 
and Librarian, with such assistants and attendants as are re- 
quired from time to time. The present number of persons em- 
ployed in every capacity is seventeen. No one has been added 
to the number for three years, except for special service. The 
Committee only repeat the general verdict, when they say that 
the whole establishment has been from the beginning, admirably 
managed. They have discovered no important mistakes in the 
plans adopted, or the manner of their execution. They have 
'been led to read over with care the several annual reports which 
have been presented, and they have been deeply Impressed with 
the wisdom of the City Government In entrusting this rising and 
important interest to a Board of Managers so eminently fit for 
the duty, and keeping it from year to year in their hands, and 
the rare good fortune of the community in possessing citizens, 
and being able to secure their active services, so remarkably 
qualified in ability, culture, experience, and social position to 
lay the foundations of this establishment with such bi-eadth, 
forecast, and fidelity. 

And it should be observed that these gentlemen devote their 
time and talents, where, for themselves personally, they produce 
neither emolument nor honor, nor more assistance than to others 
in studies or in business. Sucli services can be commanded 
only for great public benefactions, and seldom for them. 

Nor has the City been less fortunate In the officers of the In- 
stitution. The duties required of the Superintendent, demand 
for their satisfactory discharge, a grade of ability, attainment, 
and experience, a\1uc1i are not often to be found, and Avhich 
enable their possessor to compete for the highest literary posi- 
tions. 1'he first years of his service have shaped the whole 
future of the Library, and have received from the Trustees, and 
from the learned public, recognition and praise, to which the 
Committee would gladly add the full tribute of their assent. 
3 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

The Ijibrarian has held his position from the first days of the 
institution, and has filled it with intelligence, fidelity, and zeal, 
for which no commendation is too high. The Committee have 
the best evidence that all the persons employed in the institution 
have been selected for their well-known competence, and have 
fully justified the choice. 

The Library when first started was regarded as an experi- 
ment. The boldest dared not hope for such results — so great 
and so speedy — as this Committee noAv see. The ordinance 
bv Avhich the Library Avas organized partook of the tentative 
character of the enterprise. It has been supplemented as occa- 
sion demanded. The Committee feel assured that the City 
Government will not fail to avail themselves of the experience 
of the Trustees who have conducted the institution so prosper- 
ously, in any modification or consolidation of the ordinances 
for the management of the Library which may be necessary. 
They therefore venture to suggest to the Trustees, (and they do 
it with some diffidence, as they have not conferred with any of 
them upon the subject,) the desirableness of such a change in 
the ordinance as would enable them to appoint the annual 
examination, and make their report, earlier in the year. It 
seems absolutely necessary to close the Library two or three 
weeks for this purpose. The proper custody of the books 
demands that they should be called in, counted, examined, and 
taken 6flfik;ial cognizance of singly, at least as often as once a 
year. Such work takes time. This necessity unites with 
another relative to the cleanliness of the building. The daily 
frequenters of the Library are so numerous that it is imprac- 
ticable to preserve the oi-dcr and neatness of Avhich the Com- 
mittee have already expressed their approval, without the 
exclusion of the public from the building a few weeks each 
vear. The closing of the Library being thus imperative, it 
.'•cems desirable that it should take place at a season of the year 
least inconvenient to the public. In the month of October the 
lengthening evenings invite to reading, the public schools 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 19 

resume tlieir sessions, and many citizens absent from the city 
during the summer months, are returning to their winter homes 
and haunts. In August, perhaps, this inconvenience would be 
less than in any other month, and the first of September might, 
perhaps, be the best time for the annual report.^ 

In concluding this report, the Committee would not fail to 
state that they have taken sincere pleasure in discharging the 
duties assigned to them, as they have thus been made more 
intimately acquainted with this admirable institution than they 
could otherwise have become ; and as they now have an oppor- 
tunity, by bearing testimony as citizens of Boston to its excel- 
lent condition and management, of doing something, as they 
would hope, to confix*m its strong hold upon the well-merited 
confidence of the community. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

DANIEL H. WHITNEY, 
CHARLES P. CURTIS, 
MOSES L. HALE, 
THOMAS B. THAYER, 
EDWARD S. TOBEY, 
SAMUEL H. WALLEY. 



[B] 
SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To THE Trustees of the Public Library of the City 
OF Boston. 

Gentlemen : In obedience to a requirement of the ' ' By- 
Laws relative to the Trustees and Officers of the Public 
Library," I ask leave to present to you the following 

REPORT, 

upon the condition and increase of the Library, during the year 
ending the 1st of November, 1862. 

A ijeriod so fraught Math public troubles and anxieties might 
have been supposed unfavorable to the progress of an institution 
of this kind ; but I am happy to say that the year has been one 
of undiminished prosperity to the Library, and one in which 
more than ever before. Its usefulness has been widely and 
beneficently felt, and gratefully acknowledged. 

The additions to the Library since the last report, are : By 
purchase from the proceeds of invested funds and from the city 
appropriation, 6,117 books, 9 maps, and 1 manuscript. By 
donation, 1,274 books, 1,493 pamphlets, 2 maps, 3 engravings, 
1 manuscript, 10 pieces of music, and 993 separate numbers of 
newspapers. 

The whole number of books added to the Library is there- 
fore 7,391, of which 1,226 are placed in the Lower Hall, and 
6,165 in the Upper Hall. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 21 

The whole number of books at present belonging to the 
Library, is : 

In the Upper Hall .... 84,153 

In the Lower Hall . . . . 20,881 



Total, 105,034 

This number includes only bound volumes, as they stand 
upon the shelves ; but it comprises 4,794 duplicates, and odd 
volumes. The duplicates, however, being held for exchange, 
will probably procure nearly or quite the same number of vol- 
umes as permanent possessions of the institution. 

Besides the books, there are In the Library, according to the 
enumeration continued from year to year, 28,874 unbound 
pamphlets, all of them assorted into classes, catalogued upon 
slips, and so ordered that they can be readily found for use. 

The donations reported are due to the liberality and pub- 
lic spirit of 234 persons and institutions. A list of them is 
appended to this report, and marked [A A] . 

While acknowledging all with gratitude, it may not be amiss 
to refer especially to the gift by the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign JNIissions, and of the American Baptist 
]\Iissionary Union, of their various important publications ; to 
the continued kindness of the Commissioners of Patents of 
Great Britain, and of the Trustees of the British Museum, in 
sending the valuable Avorks year by year Issued under their 
direction ; and to the repeated favors of his Majesty the Empe- 
ror of the French. 

William G. Cranch, Esq., of AYashington, has presented a 
nearly complete set of the Nutlonal IntdUgcnccr ; from the 
beginning down to 1844, in bound volumes, and from that 
period unbound and not complete to the date connecting it with 
the copy presented to the Library by Mr. Grccnough. Mr. 
Francis A. Brooks has recently given a considerable number of 
volumes, which will probably by exchanges aid us greatly in 



22 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

making the set absolutely perfect. The set presented by Mr. 
Cranch is least broken in the earliest volumes, which it is now 
almost impossible to procure. It is comparatively easy to sup- 
j)ly the deficiencies which are found to exist in the later portions 
of the series. From the great intrinsic value of this publica- 
tion, comprising as it does the best contemporary record of 
political affairs and opinions in America during the last sixty 
years, and from the great difficulty in procuring so complete a 
copy, this deserves to be mentioned as one of the most impor- 
tant of the donations to the Library. The donor is a son of 
the late Judge Cranch, and the value of the gift is enhanced by 
the fact that these are the very numbers which tlie honored 
magistrate received day by day for so long a course of years, 
and which he so carefully preserved. Mr. Cranch in his letter 
of presentation pays the following graceful tribute to this city 
and to the Public Library : "In the vicinity of Boston was the 
home of my parents, and I have therefore ever felt a deep 
interest in its prosperity, and in its literary institutions. With 
peculiar pleasure I have watched the growth of the Public 
Library, and observed the liberal public spirit which has laid 
the broad foundations of an institution whose healthful influ- 
ence extends through all classes of the community, to the 
humblest as well as the hi<>hest." 

It is also peculiarly gratifying to record the donation by 
AVilliam Picard, Esq., of Cadiz, of a copy of the magnificent 
work recently published by the Spanish Government upon the 
war in Africa. The work is of itself one of great value and 
interest, and one wliich, but for the generous thoughtfulness of 
]\rr. Picard, — whose benefactions to the Library while he was 
a i-esident in the city have been named in former reports, — we 
might never have been able to procure. 

I may be allowed also to refer to the new proof of interest in 
the Library shown by one of its earliest friends, M. Alexandre 
Vattemare, in a donation of 132 volumes ; among them the 
(ContLruiation of the publication of French patents, the earlier 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

volumes of which he had previously presented. This donation 
was made directly to the City Government, and by them appro- 
priately acknowledged. 

Mr. Ticknor has recently presented to the Library 143 vol- 
umes of books relative to the Life of Moliere, forming with 
those Avhich we already possessed quite a complete collection of 
works pertaining to this subject, and one especially interesting 
from the fact mentioned by Mr. Ticknor in his letter of presen- 
tation, that the collection was commenced in 1837 by the late 
Mr. Prescott, who then entertained the project of writing a life 
of jNIoliere, which he relinquished in consequence of the brilliant 
success of the Ferdinand and Isabella. He subsequently trans- 
ferred the pleasant task thus unfulfilled, with the books pertain- 
ing to the subject, gathered at his request, to Mr. Ticknor, 
who cherished the theme, and continued to enlarge the collection 
of books for many years, but now leaves both, — the theme to 
" some scholar in the dark future," the books to the Public 
Library. In the letter of presentation, Mr. Ticknor states : 

" The number of volumes embraced in it is above 130. Of 
these 20 once belonged to Mr. Prescott, and can be readily 
distinguished by his book-plate, — a circumstance I mention 
because I think that the proof it affords of their former owner- 
ship will add much to their value in the eyes of those who may 
come after us, as it has always added much to their value in 
mine. The remainder — many of them rarities — have been, 
from time to time, picked up' as I have happened to find them. 
Taken together, I believe they constitute a collection not without 
its bibliographical Aalue, and one which does not leave much 
to be desired by any studious person Avho may wish to examine 
critically the works of Moliere, or write his life." 

Some valuable works upon military matters have been pre- 
sented by Colonel Sylvanus Thayer. 

Mr. J. D. W. Williams of Koxbury has this year, as here- 
tofore, sent repeated and valuable gifts ; and we are indebted to 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

our faithful agent in London, Mr. Henry T. Parker, for various 
donations from himself and others. 

Another very acceptable and useful gift to the Library may 
be most appropriately noticed, by introducing the following 
letter of presentation : 

Boston, Jw7// 15, 1862. 
To THE Trustees of the Public Library : 

Gentlemen: On behalf of ]\Irs. S. A. Eliot, I have the 
honor to offer for your acceptance a clock made as a timepiece 
of peculiar accuracy, for the late ]\Ir. Eliot, by Messrs. Howard 
& Davis. 

I trust it may be accepted as a regulator of time in the 
Library, and that it may long serve to remind us and our suc- 
cessors of ]\[r. Eliot's important services and faithful attachment 
to the city where he was born, and of the respectful considerar- 
tion in which he was always held by his fellow-citizens. 

I remain, gentlemen, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed,) GEORGE TICKNOR. 

Notwithstanding the great number of persons absent from 
the city, in the service of their country, and notwithstanding 
the preoccupation of all minds by the troublous condition of 
pul)lic affairs, the use of the Librai-y has been more extensive 
than during any previous year. 4,32(5 new names have been 
added to the Register, making a total of 2(),9M(), who, since 
the occupation of this building, have subscribed the promise to 
obev the Rules and Regulations, and have thus secured for 
themselves the full enjoymejit of the privileges of the insti- 
tution. 

During the year the Library was open 288 days. The whole 
number of loans of books for home use was 180,302, making 
a daily average of 626 volumes. Li addition to these, there 
have been 10,263 loans of books to be used only in the build- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

ing. These numbers do not include the statistics of the use of 
the reviews and journals, the best in all languages, placed in 
the Reading Room, nor of the daily visits to consult the Speci- 
fications of English Patents, nor of the constant calls which are 
made for the verification of single facts, or names, or dates, 
suddenly brought into question, — it may be in a court of law, 
or by editors, clergymen, teachers, and authors, — a single 
inquiry often demanding hasty reference to ten, twenty, or even 
hundreds of volumes. It would be interesting to state, were it 
not from the nature of the case impossible to do so, except 
in the most general terms, the value of the Library for this 
unrecorded kind of use, and to report the thanks so frequently 
expressed for assistance thus rendered. In some days when 
the number has been counted, it has been ascertained that more 
than 2,000 persons have visited the Library, for literary pur- 
poses, besides those who came from mere curiosity. 

The issue of books from the Upper Hall has been quite as 
large as was expected, the books being for the most part such 
as are needed for reference and research rather than for mere 
reading. All books w^hich it was supposed would be frequently 
called for, have, from the beginning, been placed in the Lower 
Hall, where their free circulation has been facilitated by all 
proper means known to those who have the care of the Library. 
The circulation in the Lower Hall alone has, during the present 
year, reached the unprecedented number of 172,902, making a 
daily average of 600 and a fraction. 

It would be gratifying, were it possible, to state exactly the 
proportion of books called for in the various departments of 
knowledge. The rapid methods of the Lower Library preclude 
such inquiries. In the Upper Hall the investigation is pi*ac- 
ticablc but less important, inasmuch as all the books are of a 
substantial and standard character. It may not be without 
interest, hoAvever, to state the percentage of use of some of 
the principal classes of books in the L^pper Hall. 
4 



18 


pr. ct, 


m 




12 




8 




7 




H 




5i 




4 




H 




3 




^ 




n 





26 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

English history, local and general 
American history, and early literature 
Theology, and ethics .... 

Useful arts, and fine arts .... 

Medicine ...... 

French history and literature 
jNIathcniatical and physical science 
Oriental iiistory and litcratiu'e 
German history and literature . 
Jurisprudence ...... 

Greek and Latin classics .... 

Italian history, and literature .... 

The number of books missing from the shelves, and unac- 
counted for at this date, (not however including those reported in 
previous years as missing,) is 294. We may hope that more than 
half of them will be returned. The remainder are generally 
works of small pecuniary value, and were doubtless lost by such 
accidents as are to be expected, where books are freely placed in 
the hands of the young, and indeed of others who most need 
them. But I may safely, here say, that there is no evidence 
that a single volume has been taken this year from the Library, 
because of its pecuniary value. 

The number of volumes reported as worn out is 306. 

The places of books previously reported as missing or worn 
out, have, many of them, been filled by copies purchased anew, 
and at small cost. Some losses, and much wear must be ex- 
pected. But the real loss to the City is very small. The fines 
for the detention of books beyond the time allowed, (this year 
amounting to $133.63,) would generally replace the books 
hopelessly lost, and the annual expense of repurchasing books 
condemned has not exceeded $ 300, a comparatively small item 
of expenditure, and one which no person would desire to save 
by curtailing the privileges of those by whom the damage is for 
the most part undesignedly done. It is people of more preten- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 27 

sion and of better opportunities who most abuse the books, and 
disgrace themselves by occasional mutilations, and by marking 
and drawing in margins, and making comments upon particular 
passages, to the disgust of all future readers. Such ill-bred 
practices are deserving of strong reprehension, and should, 
when traced to their authors, be severely punished. I have 
referred to the matter in former reports, and I must add that 
in my opinion the Library has much more to fear from this 
source than from deliberate theft, or honest though sometimes 
too careless usage. 

During the year, the books which had accumulated while the 
larger Index was in press, amounting to upwards of 12,000 
voknnes, exclusive of the library of Mr. Parker, after having 
been fiilly catalogued, have been placed permanently upon the 
shelves for public use. The books of the Parker Library have 
also been fully catalogued, and more than half of the titles have 
passed their final revision. The shelves designed for their 
accommodation have been erected, the work of binding and 
repairing the books is in progress, and in the course of a few 
months a new Supplement to the Index, comprising the additions 
above named, in all more than 23,000 volumes, will be ready 
for the press. 

The experience of a year with the full Index, and the uniform 
expressions of those who have used it, show beyond cavil that 
provision as ample as is there oifered, was indispensable to 
meet the wants of the frequenters of the Library. 

This is the tenth year since the organization of the Library, 
the fifth since the dedication of the building, the fourth since 
the opening of the Lower Hall to the public, and the first since 
the commencement of the full activities of the institution, with 
catalogues, indexes, and other apparatus for research com- 
pleted. I have thouglit that it would be interesting to present 
at this time, in condensed form, for examination and com[)ar- 
ison, the prominent facts relative to the increase, the use, and 
the losses of the Library ; and to this end have compiled the 
three tables followino-. 



28 



CTTY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 



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(4 ee c^ 'a c« l-i 



PUBLIC LIBEAEY. 



29 



T -A. B Ij K II 



Year. 

1854... 
1855.., 
1856... 
1857.., 
1858.., 
1859.., 
I860... 
1861... 
1862... 



Signatures. 



6,590^ 
3,905 M 
2,361 ;>g 17,066 
2,236 
1,974 j 
13,329^ 

P 

4,809 g* 

>';i26,986 
4,522 

4,326 



CiRCCLATION. 



Whole No I 
Lent. I 



Daily 
Av'ge. 



35,389 

81,281 

82,661 

89,423 

75,570 

149,468 

151,020 

160,877 

180,302 



250 

284 

291 

310 

383 

588.5 

508.5 

587.1 

626 



Largest 
No. in 
one day 



535 

606 

647 

730 

693 

1,335 

1,052 

1,303 

1,517 



Date. 



Sep. 16 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 23 
Jan. 24 
Feb. 27 
Mar. 5 
Feb. 4 
Feb. 23 
Mar, 1 



Lent in 
Upper 
HaU 



7,400 



Used in 
Upper 
HaU. 



10,263 



T^BLE III 



1854..., 
1854-55, 
1855-56, 
1856-57, 
1857-58, 
1858-59. 
1859-60. 
1860-61. 
1861-62. 



BooIjs 
Missing, 



20 

98 

149 

217 

* 

130 
262 
340 
294 



Roolcs 
Regamed. 



42 
119 
107 



Books 
Worn out. 



134 
116 
261 
306 



Books 
Eeplaced. 



157 
206 



Amount 
of Fines. 



87 30 
200 27 
262 13 
130 85 

100 21 
143 02 

101 27 
81 00 

133 63 



* Tlie Library was removed to the new building during the summer of ISSS, and no 
account of missing books was taken until the following year. 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

These tables are not only interesting, but instructive and 
suggestive. The great rapidity of increase in the extent of the 
Library, and in its circulation, has been from year to year the 
topic of remark and congratulation. Upon tliis I need not now 
enlarge. 

There is one fact disclosed by these statistics, wliich perhaps 
"will strike some with surprise, namely, the great proportion of 
books presented. It should be remarked also, that more than 
two thirds of those reported as purchased were procured from 
the income of the several funds, and therefore should properly 
be called donations. Making this correction, it would appear 
that more than three quarters of the Library have been pre- 
sented to the City. 

A very important deduction from this fact is that a great 
amount of permanent property, (marketable property, if it 
were right or desirable to sell it,) has accrued to the city by 
the expenditures made for the Public Library. These appro- 
priations were made to promote the intellectual and moral 
interests of the people. It is this purpose alone which furnishes 
the motive, the justification, the necessity, we might almost 
say, for the maintenance of the institution. But it is, after all, 
satisfactory to know that the whole expenditure finds no small 
material and tangible justification as an investment of money. 
These books are actual property, which could at any time be 
sold, and (the depreciation by Avear and injury apart) they 
would in the asjo-i-eo-ate increase rather than diminish in value. 
It is difficult to estimate the market value of such a collection, 
but I believe it may be said that if sold now it would produce 
enough to refund all that the books have cost, and a consid- 
erable portion of all that has been expended for the care and 
circulation of them since the Library Avas established. Valu- 
able donations to the Library ^^\\\ doubtless increase, and this 
suggestion will be more and more forcible, and ere long the 
City, while procuring for itself the vast benefits of this wide 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 31 

use of valuable books, may find itself accumulating property 
thereby. " There is that scattereth, and yet inci-easeth." 

Another fact disclosed by the last of the tables is, that the 
loss and the wear of the books is after all a small matter when 
compared with the great extent and importance of the free cir- 
culation of them. It is a small annual percentage of renewal, 
and it vindicates the good judgment and the faith which gave 
this great boon to the people — the whole people of the city, 
without reserve. 

In concluding this report, I am happy to place on record my 
testimony to the diligence and fidelity of all the persons em- 
ployed in the Library in various capacities, and to their cheer- 
ful co-operation with each other and with myself in promoting 
the success of the institution. 

I append to this report a paper marked B B, containing the 
usual financial statement. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

CHAELES C. JEWETT, Superintendent. 

November 2, 1862. 



[AA] 
LIST OF DONORS. 



Bates, Joshua, London, interest of fund 
Bigelow, Hon. John P. " " 

Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, " " 

Phillips, Hon. Jonathan, " " 

Townsend, Mary P. " " 



Albany, Youno; Men's Association 

Alberi, Cav. Eugenio, Florence 

Alden, Ebenezer, M. D., Randolph 

Alger, Francis 

Alger, Rev. William R. 

American Unitarian Association 

Ames, J. W. .... 

Ann Arbor, University of, Michigan 

Anonymous .... 

Appleton, Hon. William . 

Aspinwall, AVilliam, Brookline 

Atherton, ]\Irs. A. . 

Aumale, The Duke D'. 

Babbitt, ]\Irs. Mary A. . 

Balfour, David M. 

Baltimore, Maryland Historical Society 

Bartlett, Hon. J. R., Providence, R. I. 

Bartol, Rev. George M. . . .2 ]Maps 

Bates, Samuel P., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Bell, W. H 

Bendelari, A. . 



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PUBLIC LIBIiAKY. 



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Bigelow, Erastus B. 

Bigelow, Jacob, M. D. 

Bocher, Ferdinand ...... 

Boston, City of . 

Boston. American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
Boston. American Baptist Missionary Union 
Boston. Amer. Board of Comm'rs for For. Mis'ns 
Boston Board of Trade .... 

Boston. Warren Street Chapel 
Boston Courier, Proprietors 
Boston Gas Light Company 
Botta, Prof. Vincenzo, New York 
Boyd, Susan E. . 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D 

Brewer, Thomas M., M. D. 

Brookline. Christ's Church, Longwood 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Mercantile Library Association 

Brooks, Francis A. 

Burgess, Rev. Ebenezer . ... 

Burnham, T. O. H. P 

Burroughs, Rev. Henry, jr. . 

Cambrido:e. Harvard .Colle2;e . 

Cambridge. Harvard College Observatory 

Cambridge. Harvard Magazine, Publishers 

Canada. Library of Parliament . 

Carter & Brothers . 

Chicago Board of Trade 

Chicago Historical Society 

Child, Prof. Francis J., Cambridge 

Christern, F. W., New York . 

Cincinnati, Young Men's Mercantile Lib. Asso'n 

Clai'k, Henry, Poultney, Vt. 

Cogswell, Joseph G., LL. D., New York 

Collins, G. L., Providence, R. I. 

Colton, John F. 

Comegys, C. L. 

Copeland, Elisha 

Cowley, Charles . . . 

Cranch, William G., Washington, D. C. 

Crowley, Lawrence T. . 

Cummings, A. L, M. D., Roxbury 



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84 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 



Curtis, D. Sarofent ..... 
Davis, A. J. & Co., New York . 
Dawson, Henry B., Morrisania, New York 
Dennett, William H. . 
De AVolf, John . . 

Dixwell, J. J. . 

I)udley, Dean ..... 

Diinphv, James W., 14 numbers of newspapers 

Dutton, E. P. & Co 

Edinburgh, Royal Society .... 
Eliot, Mrs. S. A., a valuable Clock and MSS. 
Eliot, Samuel, Pi-es. Trinity College, Hartford, 
Everett, Hon. Edward, 425 Nos. of newspapers, 
Fall River, Public Library 
Fish, Asa I., Philadelphia 

Flint & Hall 

Foley, William J. 

Forbes, R. B., Milton .... 
Fowle, George ..... 
Frotliingham, N. L., D. D. 

Fuller, Rev. A. B 

Gay, Mrs. George, 8 numbers of newspapers 

Great Britain. Commissioners of Patents 

Greenough, William W., 306 Nos. of newspapers, 

Greenwich, Royal Observatory 

Haines, E. M. 

Hale, Rev. E. E. . 

Hall, Charles B. 

Hall, Oliver, Dorchester . 

HaU, W. W.,M. D. . 

Hanaford, Mrs. J. H. 

Hanover, N. H 

Harris, ]Miss L. P. 

Han-ard Musical Association 

Hastings, H. L. 

Haynes, Henry W, 

Hey^vood, Ezra 

Hodges, R. M., M. D 

Hodsdon, John L., Adjutant-Gen., Augusta, Me 
Homer, George ...... 

Hood, Charles ..... 



Dartmouth College 



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PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



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Vols. 


ITrnots 


Hooper, Robert C. . . . . . 

Hooper, Hon. Samuel ..... 


1 

5 




Humphreys, E. K., LL. D. 




3 


Jackson, "Charles T., M. D 


1 




Jarvis, Edward, M. D., Dorchester 


1 


4 


Jonks, Hariiet N 




2 


Jenks, William, D. D 


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Ladreyt, Casimir ...... 


3 




Lamson, A.,D. D,, Dedham 


1 


8 


Lawrence, Abbott ...... 


91 


344 


Lawrence, James ..... 


fil 




Lawrence, T. Bigelow ..... 


2 


1 


Lenox, J., New York .... 


2 




Lieber, Francis, LL. D., New York 


1 




Lighthill, Dr. A. P 


2 




Littell, E 


1 




Liverpool, Literary and Philosophical Society . 

London, Eng. Corporation of . 

London. British Museum .... 


1 

1 
16 


1 


London. Institution of Civil Engineers 


1 




London. Royal Astronomical Society . 


2 


9 


London. Royal Geographical Society 
London. Royal Society .... 
Loring, F. W. ...... 


2 
1 


3 

85 


Loi'ing, J. Spear ..... 


12 


56 


Loring, Samuel, Hull ..... 


1 




Lowell, City of . 




1 


Lowell, City Library ..... 


1 




MacCarthy, Denis F., Dalkey, Ireland 


1 




McGuire, J. C, Washington, D. C, 1 MS. . 


1 




Marcou, Jules ...... 


6 




Massachusetts, State of . 


2 




Massachusetts Historical Society . 


2 


5 


Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 


1 1 




May, Rev. S. J 

Merriam, J. W., M. D., 53 Nos. of newspapers. 
Milwaukee, Young Men's Association 


1 
1 




Miner, Rev. A. A. 




1 


Monitor, The, Proprietors of . 2 papers. 
Moore, Charles W. 




11 


Morissey, J. 


1 





36 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 



Morton, Dr. W. T. G. . 

^Motley, Thomas .... 

]\Iussey, Eeuben D., M. D. 

Napoleon III., Emperor of the French 

New Bedford, Public Library . 

Newburvport, Public Library 

N. E. Historic (ienealo<rical Society . 

New York, Pe^ents of the University of 

New York Chamber of Commerce 

New York. Christian Inquirer 

New York. jNIercantile Libraiy Association 

Newman, Sylvanus C. 

Ohio, State Jjibrary .... 

Parker, Henry T., London . 

Penniman, B. F. . 

Pettes, John O 

Philadelphia. American Philosophical Society 
Philadelphia I^oard of Trade 
Philadelphia Library Company . 
Philadelphia, Mercantile Library . 
Philbrick, John I). 
Picard, William, Cadiz 

Pike, J. G. W., M. D 

Pittsburo-h, Younij; jNIen's iSIercantile Lib. Asso'n 

Pittsfield, Berkshire Medical Journal 

Polkinhorn, Henry, AVashington, D. C. 

Prior, A\'illiam M. . 

Providence, R. I., City of . 

Providence, 13utler Hospital for the Insane 

Providence, Grand Lodge of the State of R. I 

Punchard, George .... 

Quincy, Eliza Susan 

Rhode Island, State of . 

Rice, Hon. Alexander II. . 

Richardson, James B. . 

Rider, S. S. 

Rumble, Adrianna .... 

Salem, Essex Institute 

Sawyer, F. W. .... 

Scudder, Charles 

Sharswood, William 



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2 



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"Vols. 

Shaw, Benjamin 8., M. D. . 

Sherman, Henry, Hartford, Conn. ... 1 
Sibley, J. L., Cambridge .... 

Sinderby, William ...... 3 

Smith, C. C 

Smith Samuel, City Clerk, Worcester . . 1 

Snow, Edwin, M. D., Providence, R. I. 

South Dan vers, Peabody Institute 

Spooner, J. P. . . . . . . 1 

Spurr, Oliver H. ..... . 3 

Stark, Dr. James, Edinburgh ... 1 

Steele, G. M 7 

Storer, F. H 4 

Sumner, Hon. Charles ..... 12 

Thayer, Alexander W. .... 1 

Thayer, Col. Sylvanus, Braintree . . . 11 

Thayer, Rev. Thomas B. . . . . 3 

Thwing, Thomas ...... 

Ticknor, George . . . . . . 156 

Tolman, Henry & Co., 10 Nos. of newspapers. 

Treadvvell, Prof. Daniel, Cambridge . 

Trubner & Co., London .... 8 

Urbino S., 3 Engravings .... 

U. S. , Bureau of Topographi'l Eng'rs, S. H. Long, 1 

United States, Department of the Interior . . 39 
United States, Sanitary Commission 

Vattemare, Alexander, Paris .... 132 

Venice, Istituto Veneto di scienze, lettere ed arti, 3 

Vienna, K. k. geologische Reichsanstalt . . 1 

AValker, Wise, c& Co 1 

Wallcut, Robert F 1 

Ware, Rev. L. G 4 

Warren, J. Mason, M. D 3 

Washington. Smithsonian Institution . . 5 

Wells, Rev. E. M. P 

Whitney, Rev. F. A., Longwood ... 2 

Wigglesworth, Miss ..... 1 

Williams, Henry W., M. D. . . . 1 

Williams, J. D. W., Roxbury, 10 pieces Music, 50 
AVillis, Nathaniel, 175 numbers of newspapers, 
Wilson, Hon. Henry . . . . .36 



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CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 



' Vols. 



AVinsor, Philadelphia 

Winthrop, Hon. R. C. . 

Wisconsin, State of .... . 

Wisconsin, Institution for the Blind" . 
Worcester. American Antiquarian Society 
Worcester Pul)lio Library .... 

Worthington i!^ Flanders, Propi'rs of the Traveller, 
Wright, Elizur ...... 

Wright, Henry C. 



Tracts. 

4 

6 

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[BB] 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 

For one year, from November 1, 1861, to October 31, 1862, 
inclusive. 

Binding ..... $1,390 16 

Books, including remittances to Europe . 9,401 83 

Expense, including repairs, tools, water, etc. . 638 52 

Fuel ..... 770 25 

Furniture and fixtures .... 454 11 

Gas .... . 943 10 

Printing ..... 1,346 91 

Salaries ..... 12,031 71 

Stationery . . . . . 316 95 

Transportation, including insurance, postage, etc., 361 35 

$27,654 89 



Boston, October 6, 1862. 
To THE Trustees of the Public Library. 

Gentlemen : In the winter of 1837—38, my friend, the 
late INIr. Prescott, entei'tained the project of writing a Life of 
ISIoliere, involving, of course, an examination of his works. 
As I happened then to be in Paris, he addressed himself to me 
to procure for him a small collection of books, sufficient for 
such a purpose. By the assistance of ISIr. Jules Taschereau, 
who, some years before, had published the amplest Life of 
]\Ioliere yet extant, and who is now at the head of the Imperial 
Library in Paris, I easily fulfilled the little commission entrusted 
to me, so far as it was possible to do it at a very short notice. 
The books that could be found were soon and safely sent. But 
happily, the brilliant success of the Ferdinand and Isabella, 
which just then came from the press, induced its author to con- 
fine his labors for the rest of his life to subjects strictly con- 
nected with Spanish histoiy. He therefore never made any 
especial use of his collection of books concerning Moliere. 

But about a dozen years afterwards he gave me such of the 
books in this collection as I did not possess already, thinking 
that I might myself undertake the pleasant task which he had 
abandoned. Until lately, it has been my purpose to do so ; and 
therefore, as opportunities have offered, I have not failed to add 
to the books I had received from him and to those in my own 
library, any others which I thought would increase the value of 
the entire collection. But many cares and duties have, for 
some years, turned my thoughts away from Moliere, and now 
both my own age and the troubles that oppress the country 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 41 

leave me no right to hope that I shall be permitted to fulfil what 
had been my friend's wish as well as my own. 

I desire however, if possible, to make the collection which 
it has taken above tAventy years to bring together, useful to 
some scliolar in the dark future ; and, therefore, I now offer it 
to the acceptance of tlie Trustees of the Public Library, under 
whose care it can appropriately rest, until it sliall be again 
wanted. The number of volumes embraced in it is above an 
hundred and thirty. Of these, twenty once belonged to Mr. 
Prescott, and can be readily distinguished by his book-plate, — 
a circumstance I mention because I think that the proof it 
affords of their former ownership will add much to their value 
in the eyes of those who may come after us, as it has always 
added much to their value in mine. The remainder — many 
of them rarities — have been, from time to time, picked up as 
I have happened to find them. Taken together, I believe they 
constitute a collection not without its bibliographical value, and 
one which does not leave much to be desired by any studious 
person who may wish to examine critically the works of Moliere 
or to write his life. 

For all the common purposes of a general library — and, 
indeed, for any purposes except the two just mentioned — the 
resources of our own institution are, I suppose, so far as Mol- 
iere is concerned, already ample. I therefore wish to make it 
a condition of the present gift, that none of the volumes em- 
braced in it shall be penniiu I, at any time, to leave the proper 
rooms of the Library, except for binding and repairs ; but that 
all shall hereafter be constantly accessible for reference and use 
within the building itself, under such regulations as the Trustees 
or other persons having lawful authority in the premises may see 
fit to prescribe. 

So much providence for the future may, I hope, be regarded 
by the Trustees as no more than a becoming caution respecting 
a collection much of whose value consists in its being kept 



42 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

unbroken, and many of whose volumes can with difficuhy be 
replaced if lost, while others should, I think, be preserved 
with more than common care, because they are connected 
with the memory of one of whom our city will always be 
proud. 

I remain, gentlemen, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed,) GEORGE TICKNOR. 



APPENDIX. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Public Library, Boston, 6 August, 18G2. 
To His Honor Joseph M. Wightman, Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Sir : In compliance with instructions of the Trustees of the 
Public Library, I have the honor to send to you the accom- 
panying papers containing the petition of William D wight, and 
others, with the action of the Board thereon. 
I am, very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

C. C. JEWETT, 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



PETITION 



The undersigned, owners of real estate, and payers of rent in 
the city of Boston, but not voters, respectfully represent that 
we contribute directly and indirectly to the support of the Pub- 
lic Library, and therefore pray that we may be permitted to 
take books therefrom, under such provisions as the Trustees 
may deem proper for the safety of the Libi'ary. 

Boston, January, 1862. 

William Dwight, I. Amory Davis, 

R. Waldo Emerson, Leverett Saltonstall, 

George T. Curtis, (payer of Henry Lee, Jr., 

rent in Boston, not uii owner H. K. Horton, 

of real estate.) F. Skinner, 

George Minot, (as payrr of E. R. Mudge, 

rent.) James S. Amory, 

F. O. Prince, J. A. Burnham, 

Richard H. Dana, Jr., Stephen M. Weld, (for G. 

Francis Brooks, Weld.) 

John C. Lee, L. M. Sargent, 

F. M. Weld, Joseph Lyman, 

George Baty Blake, Sanmel Cabot. 
Isaac Livermore, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 47 

In Board of Trustees of the Public Library, 

August 5, 18G2. 

The Committee of the Trustees, to whom was referred the 
application of WilHam Dwight, and others, non-resident tax- 
payers, for permission to borrow books from the Pubhc Library, 
beg leave to Report : 

That this application is made by persons of the highest re- 
spectability, residing in the neighboring towns, and assessed, in 
the aggregate, to about 1,600,000 dollars worth of real prop- 
erty. The Committee are convinced that the gentlemen whose 
names are subscribed to the jNIemorial, are every one of them 
persons who would make a good use of the privilege applied 
for, and who in turn might be depended upon as valuable 
friends of the institution. Being aware, however, that the sub- 
ject of extending the privileges of resident citizens to non-resi- 
dent tax-payers, has, on several occasions, engaged the atten- 
tion of the Municipal Government ; the Committee are of opin- 
ion that the present application should be referred to the discre- 
tion of the City Council. They accordingly report a Resolution 
to give it that direction, expressing at the same time the hope 
that, if granted, it may be with due security for the proper 
responsibilities in the use and return of books. 
Respectfully submitted by 

EDWARD EVERETT, 
GEORGE TICKNOR, 
JOHN P. BIGELOW. 

Resolfed : That the application of William Dwight and 
others, non-resident tax-payers, to be allowed to borrow books 
from the Pul)lic Library, be referred to the City C^ouncil ; and 
if the Council should see fit to grant the prayer of the Memo- 
rial, it is respectfully recommended that the Trustees be author- 
ized to establish suitable regulations relative to the use and 
return of the books. 



48 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 



In Board of Trustees of the Public Library, 
Boston, August 5, 1862. 

iNIr. Everett, from the select committee, upon the petition of 
A\ illiam Dwio;ht, and others, presented a report in writing, 
which was accepted. 

A motion was made to adopt the Resolution appended to the 
report, and the yeas and nays were called for. The question 
being taken, Messrs. Everett, Ticknor, Bigelow, Greenough, 
and Wilson, being all of the Trustees present, voted in the 
affirmative. 

So the Resolution was unanimously adopted. 

A true copy, from the record. 

Attest: C. C. JEWETT, Secretary. 



In Board of Aldermen, August 18, 1862. 

Read and referred to the Committee on the Public Library. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

THOMAS P. RICH, Chairman. 

In Common Council, September 8, 1862. 
Concurred. 

JOSHUA D. BALL, President. 



CITY OF B O S T O X 



In Board of Aldermen, November 10, 1^62. 

The Committee on the Public Library, to whom was referred 
a communication from the Trustees of the Library, transmitting 
their vote upon the petition of William D wight and other non- 
resident tax-payers for permission to use the Public Library, 
beg leave to Report : 

That this matter has been brought to the attention of the 
Trustees on several occasions previous to the presentation of 
the petition of Messrs. D wight and others, and tlieir judgment 
has always been adverse to granting any application of tlie 
kind. It is true that many if not all the gentlemen wlio now 
ask the privilege of taking books from the Library are identified 
with the city in respect to its business interests and occupations, 
and they deem their residence elsewhere an insufficient obstacle 
in the way of their sharing with our citizens the privilege, of the 
Public Library. It is also true that it is in accordance with the 
intention of the originators of the institution and with its present 
management, to make the scope of its usefulness in disseminat- 
ing information and intelligence as wide as is consistent with 
sound principles of public policy. Those princi{)lcs however 
seem to us clearly to dictate that the Public Library, like the 
public schools, shall be carried on for the benefit solely of resi- 
dents of the city. The appeal made to us to extend the use of 
the Library to non-resident tax -payers, could be made with 
7 



50 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 85. 

equal propriety in behalf ut" the })articipati()ii by the chiklrcn of 
the same class of persons In the benefits of our public schools. 
It is obvious that any rule permitting either of these things 
must be subject to many limitations and restrictions, -which 
might still be ineffectual to prevent inecjuality and abuse in its 
practice. Tlie true policy is to maintain institutions of educa- 
tion for tlie advantage of our own citizens. These institutions 
are sustained at great expense, and they are powerful agents in 
shaping the character of the people and in supplying the intelli- 
gence and learning which build up our commerce, and which 
give the city its rank among citie.'^ and its reputation among 
men. To supply these advantages to non-residents simply be- 
cause they have a greater or less property interest in the city, 
would be unjustly to discriminate against our own citizens, not 
only as to the convenient and serviceable use of those advanta- 
ges, but by removing some of the strongest inducements for the 
residence in the city of men of means and taste. 

In respect to the Public Library, it may be added that its 
doors are not entirely closed to any person. Although the 
number of persons residing within our boundaries who use the 
Library is quite as great as is consistent with its efficient and 
satisfactory administration, still any respectable person may at 
anv time obtain ojiportunity to consult and read books in the 
Librarv JJuilding. Beyond this, it is the unanimous opinion of 
the Committee that non-residents should not be privileged. 

The Committee recommend, in oixler that the policy of the 
City Council may be settled and i)ut upon record, the i)assage 
of the accompanying Resolve. 

For the Committee, 

E. T. WILSON, Chahman. 



Re.'^OLVED : That in the opinion of the City Council, it is 
inexpedient and impolitic to extend the privilege of taking books 
from the l*ublic Library to non-residents. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 625 



B.P.L. bindery. 

NOV 23 1878