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Full text of "Annual report"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06316 862 7 



[Document No. 11 — 1962.] 






t i> 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 

APR 101989 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1961. 



Boston, February 1, 1962. 

Hon. John F. Collins, 

Mai/ or of Boston. 

Dear Sir: 

I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the 
activities of the Boston Fire Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1961. 

During the period covered by this document Mr. 
Henry A. Scagnoli was Fire Commissioner from January 
1, 1961, to July 12, 1961. I was appointed to the office 
of Fire Commissioner on July 13, 1961. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Thomas J. Griffin, 

Fire Commissioner. 



H ISTOR Y 



FIRE COMMISSIONERS 

H874-1876. Alfred P. Rockwell. 
1877-1879. David Chamberlain. 
1879-1883. John E. Fitzgerald. 
1883-1885. Henry W. Longley. 
1885-1886. John E. Fitzgerald. 
1886-1895. Robert G. Fitch. 
1895-1905. Henry S. Russell. 
1905. Patrick J. Kennedy. 

(Acting February 17— March 20.) 
1905-1908. Benjamin W. Wells. 
1908-1910. Samuel D. Parker. 
1910. Francis M. Carroll. 

(Acting May 27 — September 16.) 
1910-1912. Charles C. Daly. 
1912-1914. Charles H. Cole. 
1914-1919. John Grady. 
1919-1921. John R. Murphy. 
1921-1922. Joseph P. Manning. 

(Acting Nov. 8, 1921— April 1, 1922.) 
1922. William J. Casey. 

(Acting April 1 — August 24.) 

1922-1925. Theodore A. Glynn. 
1926. Thomas F. Sullivan. 

(Acting January 26 — July 6.) 
1926-1930. Eugene C. Hultman. 
1930-1933. Edward F. McLaughlin. 
1933-1934 Eugene M. McSweeney. 

(October 16, 1933— January 5, 1934.) 
1934-1938. Edward F. McLaughlin. 
1938-1945. William Arthur Reilly. 
1945-1946. John I. Fitzgerald. 

(June 7, 1945— January 7, 1946.) 
1946-1950. Russell S. Codman, Jr. 
1950-1953. Michael T. Kelleher. 
1953-1954. John F. Cotter. 
1954-1959. Francis X. Cotter. 
1959. Timothy J. O'Connor. 

(March 2— December 31.) 
1960-1961 Henry A. Scagnoli. 
1961- Thomas J. Griffin 

(From July 13, 1961.) 



CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENT 

1826-1828. Samuel D. Harris. 

1829-1835. Thomas C. Amory. 

1836-1853. William Barnicoat. 

1854-1855. Elisha Smith, Jr. 

1856-1865. George W. Bird. 

1866-1874. John S. Damrell. 

1874-1884. William A. Green. 

1884-1901. Louis P. Webber. 

1901-1906. William T. Cheswell. 

1906-1914. John A. Mullen. 

1914. John Grady. (1 day.) 

1914-1919. Peter F. McDonough. 

1919-1922. Peter E. Walsh. 

1922-1924. John O. Taber. 

1925-1930. Daniel F. Sennott. 

1930-1936. Henry A. Fox. 

1936-1946. Samuel J. Pope. 

1946-1948. Napeen Boutilier. 

1948-1950. John F. McDonough. 

1950-1956. John V. Stapleton. 

1956. Edward N. Montgomery. 
(June 6 — September 5.) 

1956-1960. Leo C. Driscoll. 

1960- John A. Martin. 

(From February 1, 1960.) 



* Previous to 1874, the Boston Fire Department was in charge of the Chief Engineer. 



Fire Department 3 

SPECIAL COMMENTS 

/ . Fires 

During 1961 there were 1,994 fires in buildings. The 
foregoing is a decrease from the number of building 
fires which occurred in 1960. 

2. Fire Prevention 

During the year 1961 the department was awarded a 
plaque by the National Fire Protection Association for 
placing first in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
third among municipalities of over 500,000 in the 
United States, and fifth among all cities in the nation 
in a National Fire Prevention Contest held during the 
year 1960. This, of course, means that we are at the 
top among cities of the United States in fire prevention 
activities. 

The intense campaign to educate the public in the 
use of space heaters has been continued. Only one 
death has been recorded from fires caused by space 
heaters during the year 1961. During 1959 twelve 
deaths were caused by defective space heaters, and in 
1960 two persons died from this cause. 

A microfilm photographic unit was installed in the 
Fire Prevention Division during the year, reducing the 
space required for the keeping of thousands of inspection 
reports and other records. 

3. Building Plans 

With the cooperation of the Building Commissioner, 
the Fire Department has been examining all plans for 
alterations in existing buildings and for new building 
construction in the city to insure compliance with all 
fire regulations prior to the issuance of a building permit 
by the Building Department. During the year 1961 
the Fire Prevention Division has examined and ap- 
proved, or disapproved, approximately 1,000 plans 
which were submitted by architects and engineers prior 
to the issuance of a building permit. As a result of the 
examination of building plans, it is felt that buildings 
being altered or erected in the City of Boston will be 
much safer from a fire prevention point of view than was 
previously the case. Many recommendations were 
made bearing on fire safety such as the installation of 
automatic sprinklers, heat detectors, local fire alarm 
systems in buildings of hazardous occupancy, dormi- 
tories, schools, nursing homes, and hospitals. 



4 City Document No. 11 

4 . Fire Stations A bandoned 

On July 1, 1961, the following fire stations were 
vacated by the Fire Department, and the companies 
quartered therein were relocated, with the exception 
of Engine Company 27, which was deactivated: 

Engine Squad 11, Ladder Company 21 — 761 Sara- 
toga Street, East Boston. 

Engine Company 27, Ladder Company 9 — 333 
Main Street, Charlestown. 

Engine Company 43, Ladder Company 20 — 5 Boston 
Street, South Boston. 

Engine Squad 11 was transferred to the quarters of 
Engine Company 5 at 360 Saratoga Street, while Ladder 
Company 21 was housed with Engine Company 56 at 
1 Ashley Street. 

Ladder Company 9 was relocated in the quarters of 
Engine Company 32 at 440 Bunker Hill Street, Charles- 
town, while Engine Company 43 and Ladder Company 
20 were relocated in the fire station at 900 Massachusetts 
Avenue. 

The foregoing relocations are in line with the con- 
solidation program of the department and will result 
in the saving of several thousand dollars annually. 
The relocation of fire fighters and apparatus has not 
impaired the operating efficiency of the department, 
and maximum protection is still afforded to the sections 
of the city in which the changes were made. 

•5. Training Activities 

During the year all officers and members of the Fire 
Department were given advanced training in fire- 
fighting operations at the Fire Academy on Moon Island. 
Over 2,700 members of the Boston Police Department 
also received instructions in fire prevention and the 
protection of life and property against the scourge of 
fire. Key personnel in hospitals, schools, United States 
Coast Guard, Boston Naval Shipyard, oil companies, 
industrial plants, and many others received instructions 
in basic fire safety and fire fighting at the academy. 

6. Fire Apparatus 

Contracts were awarded in November of 1961 for the 
furnishing of ten pumping engines, four 100-foot aerial 
ladder trucks, and two 85-foot aerial ladder trucks to 
replace old and obsolete equipment. This apparatus 
when placed in service will increase our operating 
efficiencv at fires and other emergencies. 



3x1 Jflemortam 

Deaths of Active Members During 1961 



January 20 

Arnold N. Reis 

Fire Fighter, Engine Company 3 

January 23 
Richard F. Concannon 
Fire Fighter, Ladder Company 15 

February 12 

Harry W. Murphy 

District Chief, District 4 

March 13 

John D. Casey 

Fire Fighter, Engine Company 40 

April 22 

Charles E. Doherty 

Storekeeper, Maintenance Division 

May 12 

Daniel A. Collins 

Fire Fighter, Fire Prevention Division 

June 6 

Henry M. Durand 

Fire Fighter, Engine Squad 18 

July 12 

Edward P. Conley 

Fire Fighter, Engine Company 53 

July 14 

Charles J. Hurley 

Fire Fighter, Engine Company 8 

August 15 

Hugh E. MacKinnon 

Fire Fighter, Ladder Company 18 

September 29 

William F. Burke 

Fire Fighter, Ladder Company 11 

October 30 

John P. Manning 

Senior Fire Alarm Operator, Fire Alarm Division 



6 City Document No. 11 

November 30 
Carl S. Bowers 
District Chief, Headquarters Division 

December 4 

Ralph L. Mullen 

Fire Fighter, Engine Company 54 

December 16 

William J. McMahon 

Fire Fighter, Second Engineer, Engine Company 47 

December 25 

Joseph P. Doyle 

Fire Fighter, Headquarters Division 



PERSONNEL 



City Document No. 11 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 
1961 

Fire Commissioner, Henry A. Scagnoli, to July 13, 
1961. 
Thomas J. Griffin, from July 13, 1961. 

Chief of Department, John A. Martin, from February 1, 
1960. 

Executive Secretary, William D. Slattery. 

Medical Examiner, Edward H. Hommel, M.D. 

Assistant Fire Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Divi- 
sion, John E. Clougherty. 

Assistant Fire Chief-Chief of Staff, John F. Howard. 

Assistant Fire Chief in Charge of Fire-Fighting Force, 
Personnel, and Training, William A. Terrenzi. 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division, Albert L. 
O'Banion, to September 5, 1961. 
J. Edward Latjghlin, Temporary Superintendent, 
from September 13, 1961. 

Superintendent of Maintenance Division, Thomas F. 
Connors. 

Chaplains, Rt. Rev. Msgr. John J. McManmon 
(Catholic) ; Rev. John E. Barclay (Protestant) ; 
Rabbi Samuel I. Korff (Jewish). 



Fire Department 



MEDAL OF HONOR MEN 
BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT— 196! 

"John E. Fitzgerald Medal." 

Awarded to Fire Fighter James J. Loftus, Ladder 
Company 10. 

" Walter Scott Medal for Valor. " 
Awarded to Fire Fighter John G. Kenney, Ladder 
Company 26. 

"Patrick J. Kennedy Medal." 
Awarded to Fire Captain Thomas P. Maguire, Engine 
Company 12. 



ROLL OF MERIT — 1961 

Fire Fighter Leonard A. D'Amico, Engine Company 12. 

Fire Fighters Francis E. Callahan and Francis J. 
Troy, Ladder Company 24. 

Fire Fighter Robert F. Mackey, Engine Company 3. 

Fire Fighters Felix F. Cosgrove and Richard T. 
O'Donnell, Engine Company 2. 

Fire Fighter Joseph A. Desmond, Ladder Company 15. 

Fire Fighter Warren J. Cudmore, Ladder Company 18. 

Fire Fighter William J. O'Brien, Ladder Company 26. 



APPOINTMENTS — 1961 
(Fire=Fighting Division) 



Date 


Name 


Assignment 


Jan. 18 


Thomas P. Connolly 


Engine Company 5 


Jan. 18 


John F. McGrath 


Engine Company 5 


Jan. 18 


Russell J. Sullivan 


Engine Company 9 


Jan. 18 


Richard C. Fergus 


Engine Squad 11 


Jan. 18 


Gerard F. Lynch 


Engine Squad 11 


Jan. 18 


Robert J. Clougherty 


Engine Company 33 



10 



City Document No. 11 



Date Name 

Jan. 18 Ralph Larato 

Jan. 18 Edward J. Kavanagh 

Jan. 18 Edward J. Burke 

Jan. 18 Edward Monkewicz 

Jan. 18 Arthur L. Stewart 

Jan. 18 Robert E. Byrne 

Jan. 18 Leo W. Natale, Jr. 

Jan. 18 Robert P. Sullivan 

Jan. 18 James T. Barrett 

Jan. 18 Robert L. Mayhew 

Jan. 18 Daniel P. Murphy 

Jan. 18 Joseph A. Russell 

Jan. 18 William P. McDermott 

Jan. 18 George F. Cataldo 

Jan. 18 Richard A. Higgins 

Jan. 18 Coleman V. McDonough 

Jan. 18 Thomas F. McDonough 



Assignment 
Engine Company 33 
Engine Company 36 
Engine Company 40 
Engine Company 40 
Engine Company 40 
Engine Company 41 
Engine Company 41 
Engine Company 41 
Engine Company 50 
Engine Company 50 
Engine Company 50 
Engine Company 50 
Engine Company 52 
Ladder Company 14 
Ladder Company 14 
Ladder Company 15 
Rescue Company 



REINSTATEMENT — 1961 
(Fire=Fighting Division) 



Date Name 

Nov. 22 Dennis F. Leahy 



Assignment 
Engine Company 33 



STATISTICS 



11 



12 



City Document No. 11 



COMPARATIVE FIRE DEPARTMENT 
EXPENDITURES 



Personal Services 
Permanent employees 
Overtime 

Total Personal Services 

Contractual Services 

Communications .... 
Light, heat, and power 
Repairs and maintenance of build- 
ings and structures 
Repairs and servicing of equipment 
Transportation of persons 
Miscellaneous contractual services . 

Total Contractual Services . 

Supplies and Materials 

Automotive supplies and materials . 

Food supplies 

Heating supplies and materials 
Household supplies and materials . 
Medical, dental, and hospital sup- 
plies and materials 
Office supplies and materials . 
Miscellaneous supplies and materials 

Total Supplies and Materials 

Current Charges and Obligations 
Other current charges and obliga- 
tions 

Total Current Charges and Obliga 
tions 

Equipment 

Automotive equipment 

Office furniture and equipment 

Miscellaneous equipment 



1960 


1961 


$11,959,661 40 $11,740,807 32 
336,669 36 286,512 37 


$12,296,330 76 $12,027,319 69 


$37,679 86 
87,429 46 


$37,985 94 
86,454 59 


75,297 99 

67,429 58 

966 50 


143,525 85 

74,010 66 

1,319 41 


14,761 26 


24,865 49 


$283,564 65 


$368,161 94 


$93,667 55 
1 60 


$93,990 63 


71,792 11 


75,184 57 


14,481 01 


14,074 74 


1,465 26 

24,215 48 

i 186,527 95 


1,673 78 

23,280 14 

176,560 94 


$392,150 96 


$384,764 80 


$13,384 81 


$11,182 61 


L- 

$13,384 81 


$11,182 61 


$1,665 74 

4,665 21 

67,246 66 


$24,225 31 



Total Equipment 
Department Total 



$73,577 61 $24,225 31 
$13,059,008 79 $12,815,654 35 



Fire Department 13 



FIRE DEPARTMENT REVENUE— 1961 

Permits for storage of inflammable fluids, certificates of 

registration, etc $250,428 20 

Sale of badges . . 4 15 

Commissions from New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Company 3,411 83 

Damage to apparatus and motor vehicles . . . 4,774 98 

Damage to fire alarm boxes 4,222 45 

Miscellaneous 139 13 

Reimbursement from Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
for expenditures for fire alarm construction work on 

John F. Fitzgerald Expressway 854 11 

Rental of fire stations 1,201 00 

Total $265,035 85 



FIRE ALARM DIVISION 
1961 



15 



16 



City Document No. 11 



FIRE ALARM DIVISION 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF ALARMS 

TOTAL NUMBER OF ALARMS TRANSMITTED 
(To Which Apparatus Responded) 





1 959 


1960 


1961 




11,541 
7,517 


13,462 
8,377 


12,963 




8,191 








19,058 
116 


20,839 
137 


21,154 




140 








19,174 


20,976 


21,294 







TELEPHONE ALARMS 





1959 


I960 


1961 




6,395 
33.3 


6,842 
30.6 


6,746 




31.7 







FALSE ALARMS 





1959 


1960 


1961 




4,262 
22.2 


4,285 
20.4 


4,984 




23.4 







NOTE. — The first electric telegraph system for fire alarms in the world (in Boston) 
cost $16,000 and consisted of 40 miles of wire, 45 signal boxes or stations, and 16 alarm 
bells. 

The system was officially accepted by the City of Boston at noon, April 28, 1852, 
and the first alarm was received from Station 7, District 1 (now Box 1212), at 8.25 p.m., 
April 29, 1852. 

Total box alarms transmitted since April 28, 1852, through December 31, 1961, 473,827 



Fire Department 



17 



ANALYSIS OF STILL ALARMS 





1959 


1960 


1961 




6,395 

742 
1,305 

167 
2,647 

139 

279 
7 


6,842 

1,059 

1,545 

38 

2,555 

182 

198 

16 


6,746 
910 






1,525 




55 




2,539 




158 


Received from C. P. S.* 


253 
14 




11,681 

91 
4,073 


13,435 

111 
3,947 


12,200 


Deduct 
Still Alarms received for which Box Alarms were 
pulled after Still and Box Alarms were trans- 


84 


Still Alarms received for which Box Alarms were 


3,925 








7,517 
116 


8,377 
137 


8,191 
140 









* Does Not include alarms received after Still Alarm or after City Box Alarm, in 
which case no action was taken. 

NOTE.— NET TOTAL STILL ALARMS indicates number of alarms for which 
apparatus was dispatched by telephone without BOX ALARM, and alarms for which 
Private Company Box only was transmitted, without City Box alarm. 



18 City Document No. 11 

SUMMARY OF ALARMS — BY MONTHS— 1961 



Boxes 



Stills 



Totals 



January. . . . 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December. . 

Totals 



1,029 

873 

1,133 

1,158 

1,099 

1,007 

982 

1,071 

982 

1,204 

1,246 

1,179 



597 


1,626 


472 


1,345 


643 


1,776 


702 


1,860 


740 


1,839 


746 


1,753 


686 


1,668 


827 


1,898 


661 


1,643 


702 


1,906 


833 


2,079 


722 


1,899 



12,963 



8,331 



NOTE. — Alarms received from Boston Automatic, A. D. T., C. P. S. or where Private 
Company box only was transmitted, without City Box, have been included under Still 
Alarms. 

All alarms for Mutural Aid have been included under Still Alarms. 



ORIGIN OF ALARMS 





1959 


I960 


1961 




No. 


Per 
Cent 


No. 


Per 
Cent 


No. 


Per 
Cent 




7,544 
6,395 

91 

742 

1,305 

139 

279 

7 

116 

2,647 


39.34 
33.35 

0.47 
3.87 
6.81 
0.72 
1.46 
0.04 
0.60 
13.81 


8,442 
6,842 

111 
1,059 
1,545 

182 

198 
16 

137 
2,555 


40.26 
32.62 

0.52 
5.05 
7.37 
0.87 
0.94 
0.07 
0.65 
12.18 


9,009 
6,746 

84 

910 

1,525 

158 

253 

14 

140 

2,539 


42.31 




31.68 


Boxes received after telephone 


0.39 




4.27 




7.16 


C. P. S 


0.74 
1.19 
0.07 
0.66 




11.92 








19,174 


100% 


20,976 


100% 


21,294 


1007o 







Fire Department 



19 



SUMMARY OF ALARMS 
ACCORDING TO FIRE DISTRICTS 



1961 



No. 


Boxes 


Stills 


Totals 


1 East Boston 


696 


474 


1,170 


2 Charlestown 


523 


323 


846 


3 North and West Ends and Business 








District 


752 


532 


1,284 


4 Business District, South End and 








Back Bay 


1,357 


775 


2,132 


5 Back Bay and Roxbury 


2,102 


884 


2,986 


6 South Boston 


1,010 


635 


1,645 


7 Roxbury and Dorchester North 


2,110 


1,002 


3,112 


8 Dorchester 


1,149 


1,099 


2,248 


9 Jamaica Plain and Roxbury 


1,505 


809 


2,314 


10 Roslindale, West Roxburv, and 








Hyde Park 


849 


963 


1,812 


11 Brighton 


910 


695 


1,605 


Totals in Boston .... 


12,963 


8,191 


21,154 


Mutual Aid to adjacent cities and 








towns 


— 


140 


140 


Totals 


12,963 


8,331 


21,294 



MUTUAL AID ALARMS 





Response of BOSTON 

to Outside 

Cities and Towns 


Response of Adjacent 
Cities and Towns 
to BOSTON 




1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 






18 
8 

12 
9 
4 




1 


13 
11 

6 


32 






17 

10 

7 

6 

2 

1 

1 







5 

16 

3 



33 

1 




27 
5 
9 

14 
5 

1 

1 
1 
5 

15 
3 
1 

29 




36 
12 
16 
10 
3 





5 
22 
5 
1 
27 



1 

40 

10 

16 

7 

6 

1 



1 





11 

12 
1 


33 
1 




138 

9 

9 

52 
3 





3 

31 

18 
1 

42 
4 




125 

4 

2 

19 
1 





2 

16 

10 


42 
4 




111 

7 

3 

18 
2 





2 

18 

14 


37 
9 




135 

9 

5 
28 
2 






1 

27 
15 


51 

5 







127 




8 








23 




3 


Hull 












o 




o 




o 




1 




14 




9 









45 
10 








114 


102 


116 


137 


140 


310 


225 


221 


278 


242 







20 



City Document No. 11 



MULTIPLE ALARM FIRES 





19S7 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 




65 

26 
8 

2 


47 

23 

1 

2 


58 

14 

5 

2 


44 

21 

8 

1 


65 




13 




s 











Totals 


101 


73 


79 


74 


86 







SUMMARY OF MULTIPLE ALARM FIRES 
ACCORDING TO MONTHS OF THE YEAR— 1961 



Month 



Two 


Three 


Four 


Five 


Alarms 


Alarms 


Alarms 


Alarms 


10 











10 


2 








10 


2 


1 





4 


2 








4 


2 


1 





4 


2 


1 





5 





1 





5 


1 


1 





1 











9 











4 


1 


3 





6 


1 








65 


13 


8 






Total 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



Totals . 



S6 



SUMMARY OF FIRE ALARM BOXES 

Total number of fire alarm boxes in service as of December 31, 
1960 

Fire alarm boxes installed January 1, 1961, to December 31, 

1961 12 

Fire alarm boxes discontinued January 1, 1961, to December 

31, 1961 4 

Net Increase in number of fire alarm boxes. 



2,127 



Total number of fire alarm boxes in service as of December 

31, 1961 2,135 





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22 



City Document No. 11 



DISTRIBUTION OF FIRE ALARM BOXES 
DISTRICTS 



District 1 


126 


District 7 . 


181 


District 2 


131 


District 8 . 


241 


District 3 


161 


District 9 . 


187 


District 4 


156 


District 10 


363 


District 5 


. 202 


District 11 


191 


District 6 


196 







DIVISIONS 



Division 1 
Division 2 



770 
1,365 



FIRE ALARM BOXES INSTALLED IN 1961 



Date 


Box 


Dis- 

TEICT 


Location 


Jan. 10 


12-3763 


10 


Fairmoimt Nursing Home, 172 Fairmount Avenue. 




Jan. 24 


12-1275 


3 


U. S. Post Office and Court House, Post Office Square. 




Jan. 24 


12-4251 


2 


Navy Yard, Pier 5, Head of Pier, East Side. 




Jan. 24 


13-4251 


2 


Navy Yard, Pier 5, Midway on Pier, East Side. 




Apr. 25 


12-5293 


11 


Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company, 38 
Street, Guard Room, Rear. 


Life 


May 11 


13-531 


11 


Regent Nursing Home, 74 Corey Road. 




May 15 


13-2712 


9 


Sophia Snow House, 1215 Centre Street. 




Aug. 28 


12-5334 


11 


Rose Finkle Nursing Home, 149 Strathmore Road. 




Aug. 30 


12-3753 


10 


Most Precious Blood School, 1288 Hyde Park Avenue. 




Oct. 5 


12-2354 


5 


Riverway Manor, Wheelock College, 214 Riverway. 




Oct. 10 


3637 


8 


Ormond Street, opposite Outlook Road. 




Nov. 9 


12-7273 


6 


American Brush Company, 99 Atkinson Street. 





Fire Department 



23 



FIRE ALARM BOXES DISCONTINUED IN 1961 



Date 


Box 


Dis- 
trict 


Location 


Apr. 8 


12-3175 


7 


Miner House, 40 Mill Street. 


June 19 


12-3743 


10 


St. Raphael's Parochial School, Oak Street. 


Sept. 26 


12-6221 


1 


U. S. Naval Stores, McClellan Highway, opposite Addison 
Street. 


Dec. 28 


12-1673 


4 


Louisa M. Alcott School, West Concord Street. 



FIRE ALARM BOXES RELOCATED IN 1961 

Fire Alarm Box 3635 was relocated and designation 
changed, as given in General Order No. 43, dated 
October 26, 1961, viz.: 

3635, Hillsboro and Outlook Roads 



CHANGE IN DESIGNATION OF FIRE ALARM BOXES IN 1961 



General 




General 




Orders No. 


Box No. 


Orders No. 


Box No. 


1 


7435 


22 


1353 


1 


12-2165 


24 


13-3432 


2 


3663 


26 


1254 


2 


3242 


28 


15-1412 


3 


13-2184 


31 


3844 


20 . 


13-2136 


31 


3832 


20 


2145 


35 


4151 


22 


2649 


49 


12-369 



24 



City Document No. 11 



FIRE ALARM CONSTRUCTION FORCE 
UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION — 1961 



Number 


Type or Cable 


Installed 


Removed 


of Con- 
ductors 


Feet of 
Cable 


Feet of 
Conductors 


Feet of 
Cable 


Feet of 
Conductors 


4 
4 


Polyethylene P. V. C . 


3,920 

6,550 
9,963 

2,970 

5,925 
650 


15,680 

45,850 
99,630 

56,430 

219,225 
59,150 


280 
1,296 
5,883 

318 
1,050 

970 

1,742 

1,118 

60 

520 
2,017 

150 

1,666 
570 


1,120 
5,184 


6 




35,298 


7 

7 


Polyethylene P. V. C. . 


2,226 
7,350 


10 
10 


Polyethylene P. V. C. . 


9,700 
17,420 


15 




16,770 


19 
19 
19 


Polyethylene P. V. C. . 
Anhydrex Jacketed .... 


1,140 

9,880 

38,323 


20 




3,000 


37 
37 


Polyethylene P. V. C... 


61,642 


91 
91 


Polyethylene P. V. C... 


51,870 










Totals 


29,978 


495,965 


17,640 


260,923 









Fire Department 



25 



OVERHEAD CONSTRUCTION — 1961 





Installed 


Removed 




Feet 


Feet 


No. 10 Copper Weld T. B. W. P. "Duraline" 


2,020 




No. 9 T. B. W. P. Galvanized 




— ■ 


28,340 


No. 14 Twisted Pair — Weatherproof 






150 


1,095 


2 Cond. No. 14 Anhydrex Jacketed 






— 


225 


4 Cond. No. 14 Nonmetallic . 






— 


2,600 


4 Cond. No. 14 Polyethylene P. V. C. . 






6,545 


1,295 


6 Cond. No. 14 Nonmetallic . 






— 


1,760 


7 Cond. No. 14 Polyethylene P. V. C. . 






5,585 


— 


10 Cond. No. 14 Polyethylene P. V. C. 






25 


— ■ 


19 Cond. No. 14 Nonmetallic 






— 


1,200 


Totals 


14,325 


36,515 



Knockdowns Attended to . 
Multiple Alarms Responded to . 
Fire Alarm Boxes Installed 
Line Construction: Removals, 
Slack Hauled, etc. 



Installations, Transfers, 



148 
88- 
15 

299 Poles 



IRE PREVENTION DIVISION 
1961 



27 



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29 



SUMMARY OF INSPECTIONS AND 
INVESTIGATIONS — 196! 



Inspection Force 1961 — Fire Prevention Division 

Number of complaints received 

Number of inspections made 

Number of abatement orders issued .... 
Number of corrections and reinspections made 



Places of Assembly 

Places of assembly inspected 
Number of corrections made 
Number of abatement orders issued . 
Certificates of analysis approved 
Certificates of flameprooflng approved 



1,711 

44,517 
5,788 
5,753 

57,769 



4,781 

990 

86 

330 

271 

6,458 



Inspections by Fire Company Officers and Firefighters 

Building inspections 48,210 

Reinspections 2,800 

Theaters 12,410 

Schoolhouses 6,827 

Public buildings 6,510 

Oil farms 79 

Carhouses 69 

New installations — oil burner inspections .... 2,396 

Flammable fluids, storage facilities, etc 3,290 

Open-air fires 403 

Tank removals 65 

License renewals, inflammables, garages, etc 2,650 

Parking lots 398 

License petitions (location approvals) 160 

Blasting 103 

Boarding homes for children, day nurseries, boarding homes 
for aged, convalescent homes, etc., hospitals, institutions, 

etc 970 

87,340 

Total inspections and reinspections 151,567 

Conditions referred to other departments (written) 955 

Fire Drills 

Schools 2,801 

Theaters 361 

Hospitals, institutions, etc. 1,045 

Industrial and mercantile establishments .... 940 



School Program 

Number of school visits made . 
Number of pupils spoken to (all visits) 



539 
36,390 



30 



City Document No. 11 



ARSON SQUAD ACTIVITIES - 1961 



Undetermined fires 
Suspicious fires 
Causes given but investigated 
Multiple alarms . 

Deaths 

Injuries 

Arrests 

Grand Jury indictments 
Municipal Court cases 
Municipal Court convictions 
Superior Court cases . 
Gas odors investigated 
Fire prevention inspections 
Bomb scares .... 
Explosions .... 



221 

19 

116 

83 

21 

83 

14 

2 

25 

2 

11 

104 

508 

5 

2 



CASUALTY REPORT AND REASON 



Injuries Deaths 



Careless disposal of cigarette . 
Careless smoking 










14 
15 


2 


Children and matches 










4 


1 


Cleaning with gas 










1 




Explosion 










3 




Explosion, gas .... 
Explosion, tar kettle 










1 
1 




Flash back .... 










1 




Flooded oil burner . 












1 


Gas leak 










1 




Hot grease on kitchen stove . 










1 




Ignition of cement . 










3 




Ignition of flammable liquid . 
Inflammable fluid ignited by pilot 
Inflammable fluid spilled and ignit 
Rubbish 


light 
ed 








1 
1 
1 

2 




Short circuit .... 










2 




Suicide attempt 
Smoker's article 










1 

1 




Smoking in bed 










5 


5 


Undetermined .... 










24 


12 



83 



21 



Fire Department 31 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY 
Summary of Analyses and Tests — 1961 



Number of certificates of analysis issued 357 

Flash points 9 

Inspections 10 

Building Department tests 5 

Total fees collected $551 



PHOTOGRAPHIC LABORATORY 
Summary of Activities — 1961 



Arson ' . 246 

Accidents 93 

Department activities 109 

Public relations 18 

Fire prevention 175 

Multiple alarms 83 

I. D. photos 45 

Number of negatives 5,296 

Number of prints 8,279 



32 



City Document No. 11 



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Fire Department 



33 



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3. 







ANALYSIS OF FIRES 

IN BUILDINGS 

AND CAUSES OF FIRES 



36 



City Document No. 11 



ANALYSIS OF FIRES IN BUILDINGS 
FOR YEAR 1961 

Construction of Buildings 



Fire-resistive 
Second-class 
Third-class . 
Other type . 

Total . 



227 

962 

763 

42 



1,994 



Point of Origin 



First floor . 
Second floor 
Third floor . 
Above the third 
Roof .... 
Outside 










635 
357 
226 
137 
52 
220 


Total . 1,994 


Extent of Fire 


Confined to point of origi 
Confined to buildings 
Extended to other buildir 


n 

LgS . 








943 

983 

68 



Total 



1,994 



Causes of Fires in Buildings — 1961 



Defective chimney 








32 


Sparks from chimney on roof . 








4 


Defectively installed heater 








16 


Rubbish near heater 








2 


Hot ashes 








9 


Fuel oil burner .... 








98 


Starting fires — kerosene or gasoline 








3 


Careless smoking .... 








945 


Children and matches . . . 








105 


Other careless use of matches 








7 


Defective wiring .... 








116 



Fire Department 



37 



Electric appliances and motors 
Home dry cleaning 
Flammable liquids near flame 
Kerosene lamps, stoves . 
Grease, food on stove 
Clothes, furniture too near fire 
Spontaneous ignition 
Fireworks .... 
Thawing water pipes 
Sparks from machines 
City gas and appliances . 
Miscellaneous known causes 
Malicious mischief 
Incendiary or suspicious . 
Unknown .... 



95 

8 

7 

2 

27 

14 

19 

1 

9 

18 

21 

166 

52 

17 

201 



Total 



1,994 



Causes of Outdoor Fires — 1961 



Rubbish 
Dump . 
Brush or grass 
Other outdoor 
Marine 
Automobile 



3,041 

85 

2,202 

613 

8 

1,142 



Total 



7,091 



Rescue (emergency calls) 
Out-of-city calls 



4,978 
156 



City op Boston 

Administrative Services Department 

Printing a ;$8|ljSa» Section