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Full text of "Annual report"

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CIIICAGO-O'HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



CHICAGO MIDWAY AIRPORT 



MERRILL C. MEIGS FIELD 




annual report 1963 




Flags at Chicago's International Airport 



CHIC AGO-O'II ARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



CHICAGO MIDWAY AIRPORT 



MERRILL C. MEIGS FIELD 




annual report 1963 



RICHARD J. DALEY, MAYOR; JAMES C. MURRAY, PRESIDENT 
PRO TEM; JOHN C. MARCIN, CITY CLERK 

the Chicago city council 



Ward 


Aldermen 


1 


(Vacant) 


2 


William H. Harvey 


3 


Ralph H. Metcalfe 


4 


Claude W. B. Holman 


5 


Leon M. Despres 


6 


Robert H. Miller 


7 


Nicholas J. Bohling 


8 


James A. Condon 


9 


Dominic J. Lupo 


10 


John J. Buchanan 


11 


Stanley J. Nowakowski* 


12 


Arthur V. Zelezinski 


13 


David W. Healy 


14 


Joseph P. Burke 


15 


Joseph J. Krska 


16 


Paul M. Sheridan 


17 


Charles Chew, Jr. 


18 


James C. Murray 


19 


Thomas F. Fitzpatrick 


20 


Kenneth E. Campbell 


21 


Samuel Yaksis 


22 


Otto F. Janousek 


23 


George J. Tourek 


24 


Benjamin F. Lewis* 


25 


Vito Marzullo 


26 


Stanley M. Zydlo 


27 


Harry L. Sain 


28 


Alphonse R. Tomaso 


29 


Thomas F. Burke 


30 


Daniel J. Ronan 


31 


Thomas E. Keane 


32 


Robert J. Sulski 


33 


Robert Brandt 


34 


Rex Sande 


35 


Casimir C. Laskowski 


36 


Robert L. Massey 


37 


Paul T. Corcoran 


38 


William J. Cullerton 


39 


Philip A. Shapiro 


40 


Nathan J. Kaplan 


41 


Edward T. Scholl 


42 


Mayer Goldberg 


43 


Mathias Bauler 


44 


Thomas Rosenberg 


45 


Edwin P. Fifielski 


46 


Joseph R. Kerwin 


47 


John J. Hoellen 


48 


Robert J. O'Rourke 


49 


Paul T. Wigoda 


50 


Jack I. Sperling 


Robert 


J. Campbell, Record Clerk 


WlLLIAI 


A. F. Harrah, Sergeant- At- Arms 


*Decea 


sed 



CITY OF CHICAGO 




RICHARD J. DALEY 
Mayor 



WILLIAM E. DOWNES, JR. 
Commissioner 





DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION 

Room 1000, City Hall • Chicago 2, Illinois 



RICHARD J. DALEY 
Mayor 



WILLIAM E DOWNES, JR. 
Commissioner 



To His Honor the Mayor 

and Gentlemen of the City Council 



The Department of Aviation submits herewith its Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1963. 

Included are some of the highlights of the year at Chicago- 
O' Hare International Airport, the world's busiest airport, including 
the memorable dedication by President John F. Kennedy. 

Also presented are some of the factors which will ensure 
that Chicago Midway Airport will soon again become one of the nation's 
most active airports. 

The report points out the economic importance of Merrill C. 
Meigs Field, downtown airport on Chicago's lakefront, which is fre- 
quented by a Who's Who of American Business. 

The growing importance of helicopters and heliports to the 
City is also discussed. 

The Department gratefully acknowledges your cooperation 
and assistance in promoting aviation in Chicago. Such activity will in- 
evitably help the people of our City whose greatness is founded on trans- 
portation. 



Respectfully submitted 




William E. Downes, Jr. 
Commissioner of Aviation 



CHICAGO-O'HARE 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



CITY OF CHICAGO 

CHICttO-O'BARE IHTERNHIODAL AIBPOBT 



PASSENGERS 




1947 


217,412 


1956 


723,296 


1948 


238,314 


1957 


1,030,346 


1949 


259,408 


1958 


1,263,147 


1950 


176,902 


1959 


2,156,755 


1951 


146,278 


1960 


5,691,446 


1952 


127,796 


1961 


9,615,480 


1953 


201,968 


1962 


13,525,955 


1954 


311,530 


1963 


16,163,464 


1955 


471,170 




AIRCRAFT 


1947 


108,704 


1956 


156,043 


1948 


121,416 


1957 


207,498 


1949 


124,519 


1958 


231,412 


1950 


94,682 


1959 


231,636 


1951 


80,519 


1960 


252,799 


1952 


70,958 


1961 


322,054 


1953 


90,940 


1962 


416,991 


1954 


117,461 


1963 


426,098 


1955 


142,912 







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DEDICATION OF AIRPORT BY PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY 



In dedicating the $200,000,000 Chi- 
cago-O'Hare International Airport on 
March 23, 1963, President John F. 
Kennedy said, "There is no other air- 
port in the world which serves so 
many people and so many planes." He 
also said, "This is an extraordinary 
airport in an extraordinary city and in 
an extraordinary country." 

Included in the picture of the dedi- 
cation shown below are: Senator Paul 
Douglas, Special Events Director Jack 
Riley, Governor Otto Kerner, Presi- 
dent John F. Kennedy, Mayor Rich- 
ard J. Daley, and two nephews of 
Butch O'Hare for whom the airport is 
named, Edward Palmer and Philip 



Tovrea. An airplane, the elevated en- 
trance roadway, and part of one of the 
terminal buildings can be seen in the 
background. 

The airport so dedicated is one of 
the wonders of the modern world. 
Operated under a break-even contract 
with the airlines at no cost to the Chi- 
cago taxpayer, O'Hare has a two and 
one-quarter mile runway and four 
others, two terminal buildings each 
longer than a City block, 500-acre 
hangar area, 94-acre man-made lake, 
its own telephone exchange and post 
office, the world's largest airport fuel 
system, and a host of other outstand- 
ing features. 



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OPENING OF BEAUTIFUL NEW RESTAURANT BUILDING 



The beautiful new Carson Pirie Scott & Co. restaurant 
building officially opened for business on March 25, 1963, 
with a dinner for 240 business and civic leaders in the Seven 
Continents, which has been called, "The finest gourmet 
restaurant possible." 

This beautiful glass and steel circular structure also con- 



tains four other restaurants of different price levels. There 
are no interior columns supporting the 190-foot span of 
ceiling with its hundreds of low-intensity lights; the roof 
is suspended from nearly a mile of heavy bridge cable. 

The restaurant building, which was not completely fin- 
ished during the year, cost $5,750,000 including furnishings. 



After inaugural ceremonies and an open house for the 
public on Columbus Day, October 12, 1963, the $2,750,000 
new international terminal building was opened to regular 
international operations the next day, Sunday, October 13. 

The international terminal connects with the domestic 
buildings and all are air-conditioned as well as heated. Inter- 
national Building visitors can look down from the second 



floor into a glassed-in lower-level Customs area and watch 
the baggage inspection operation. 

The nine airlines using the terminal initially included 
Air France, Alitalia, British Overseas Airways Corporation 
(BOAC), Lufthansa, Mexicana, Swissair, Pan American, 
American, and Trans World. Scandinavian is also expected 
to start in 1964. 






1963 was the first full year of simultaneous bad-weather approaches 
inaugurated December 15, 1962, when the Federal Aviation Agency 
lowered ceilings for simultaneous approaches toward the southeast 
from 3,000 to 900 feet. O'Hare is the only airport in the world with 
simultaneous bad-weather landings. It is possible because the two 
SE runways are 6,510 feet apart. It is necessary because high traffic 
volumes at O'Hare would otherwise result in greater air traffic con- 
gestion and delay. 




On July 31, 1963, O'Hare began using a new radar installation 
for control of airplane and vehicular traffic on the ground called 
ASDE ( Airport Surface Detection Equipment ) . This equipment will 
allow the Control Tower to "see," on a radar screen, ground traffic 
on runways and taxiways even when the cab of the tower is above 
a low cloud ceiling. The dome pictured on top of the tower protects 
a concave antenna, rotating at one revolution per second, from 
damage by wind. 



r 




The Chicago Association of Consulting Engineers in its annual 
honor awards program, April 4, 1963, honored C. F. Murphy Asso- 
ciates for the design of the complex of terminal, restaurant, and 
concourse buildings in the terminal area at Chicago-O'Hare Inter- 
national Airport. Among many unusual, attractive, and unique ele- 
ments of the terminal design, probably the most unique are the 
graceful "wishbone" supports for the elevated entrance roadway. 



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:e introduced 



After approval by the Chicago Plan Commission on September 26, 
1963, a zoning plan for a 220 square mile area around Chicago- 
O'Hare International Airport, extending in some directions up to 
10 miles out, was sent to the State of Illinois Department of Aero- 
nautics for review and adoption. The ordinance, which was prepared 
by the Department of City Planning, in coordination with the 
Departments of Aviation and Law, would restrict building heights 
and land use in aircraft approach areas. At year end, public hearings 
on this matter had not been concluded. 



O'HARE IMMUNIZATION STATION OPENED 

The nation's first immunization station operated by a City at an 
international airport was opened January 18, 1963, at O'Hare. It was 
manned in the International Terminal by a City Health Department 
doctor and nurse one half day each week on a staggered shift basis, 
to give approximately 500 noncompulsory smallpox vaccinations per 
month to airport personnel coming in contact with arriving inter- 
national passengers. Chicago was the first City to comply with a 
request from the U. S. Public Health Service to start such a program. 
It will be expanded if necessary to include shots against typhoid 
fever, paratyphoid, cholera, and yellow fever. 




YOUTH DAY 

Each year the Chicago Youth Week Federation sponsors a com- 
petition within all the various civic agencies dealing with youth 
in Chicago, such as Girl Scouts, Chicago Park District, etc., to pick 
a Junior Mayor and cabinet for Junior Officials' Day. Each year a 
different City department is host to these young people. On May 7, 
1963, with the help of department officials, Miss Barbara Shanahan, 
Junior Commissioner of Aviation, sponsoring agency Y.W.C.A., was 
hostess to a group of 35 Junior officials plus friends on a guided tour 
of buildings and airfield at O'Hare. This was particularly appropriate 
in 1963, because both Chicago-O'Hare International Airport and 
most of the boys and girls were 17 years old. 



START OF PAN-AM NOI 



iO 



Pan American World Airways, the leading international freight 
carrier at O'Hare, began a non-stop jet cargo service to Europe in 
mid-June of 1963. The plane which made this service possible was 
the largest pure-jet all-cargo plane on the market, the Boeing 707- 
321C. This seven-million-dollar plane, which can carry 40 tons of 
freight across the Atlantic in 6V2 hours, has helped in making O'Hare 
undisputed world leader in shipping air cargo. 



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n'cil of cwtcmio 





UNITED STARTS NEW CARGO BUILDING 

United Air Lines, the leading domestic freight carrier at O'Hare, 
began construction of the largest single-carrier air cargo terminal 
in the United States in 1963. The terminal will be teamed with the 
new DC-8F all-cargo jet aircraft which can carry 46 tons in domestic 
service, and be loaded or unloaded with special equipment in 25 
minutes. In addition to a 62,500 sq. ft. main floor, the building will 
have cargo offices on the 15,000 sq. ft. second floor, and the airline's 
main warehouse in a 36,000 sq. ft. basement. 




CHICAGO — O'H ARE 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 




CHICAGO'S THREE MUN1C 






CHICAGO MIDWAY AIRPORT 





CHICAGO-O'HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT — 

Chicago's Long-Range Airport — City-owned — Acquired war surplus March 22, 
1946 — Approximately 6600 acres — Longest runway (of 5) 11,600 feet — 
Mid-continent gateway to the great cities of the world, such as London, 
Paris, Rome, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, Tokyo, and so on — The busiest 
airport in the world. 

CHICAGO MIDWAY AIRPORT — 

Chicago's Medium-Range Airport — Leased from the Chicago Board of Edu- 
cation — Operations begun July 1, 1927 — Approximately 640 acres — Longest 
runway (of 6) approximately 6,300 feet — Businessman's commuter airport 
to cities of the United States, such as New York, Washington, Miami, New 
Orleans, Dallas, Denver, and so on — Will become again one of the busiest 
airports in the nation. 



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M 

Chicago's Short-Range Airport — Leased from the Chicago Park District — 
Operations begun December 10, 1948 — Approximately 70 acres on the site 
of the Chicago World's Fair of 1933-34 — Single-runway airport, runway 
being approximately 3,900 feet long — Close-in lake-front, Downtown airport, 
especially useful for general-aviation flights to close-in airports of other 
midwest cities, such as Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Kansas City, St. Louis, 
Minneapolis, and so on — The busiest single-runway airport in the world. 



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AIRPORTS 




MERRILL C. MEIGS FIELD 









-* CHICAGO HELICOPTER AIRWAYS 



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Each of the three largest cities in the United 
States, i.e., New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, 
has a scheduled helicopter airline operating in its 
local area to serve the central city and nearby com- 
munities. Chicago is very fortunate that Chicago 
Helicopter Airways started operating here Novem- 
ber 12, 1956. Over the years, it has operated sched- 
uled mail flights, scheduled passenger flights, and 
charter flights. 

In many ways CHA has turned in the best 
performance of all certificated helicopter airlines: 

1) it has carried over twice as many passengers 
in a single year as any other helicopter carrier; 

2) it was the first to carry 1,000,000 passengers; 

3 ) it has completed a larger percentage of scheduled 
flights; 4) it has provided more service with fewer 
employees; 5) it has enplaned more passengers per 
employee and more tons per employee; 6) it has 
operated at a lower cost per seat mile and a lower 
cost per ton mile; and 7) it has saved the military 
helicopter program ten times the total subsidy it 
has received and ten times as much as all other 
civilian operators together, by developing and mak- 
ing available specialized maintenance knowledge, 
according to Defense Department testimony. 



On October 2, 1963, the Civil Aeronautics Board 
renewed the operating certificate of CHA for two 
more years, after hearing testimony from the City 
of Chicago, such other cities as Gary, Waukegan, 
and Park Forest, the Chicago Association of Com- 
merce, the State of Illinois, the Departments of 
Post Office and Defense, and many others. 

Considerations for the certificate renewal included: 
1) the conviction that air-traffic delays at O'Hare 
and many other factors would soon lead to the 
reviving of scheduled airline traffic at Midway so 
that the Midway-O'Hare segment would again 
become the most heavily traveled helicopter route 
in the industry; and 2) the conviction that ground 
congestion on the Kennedy Expressway to O'Hare, 
already carrying expected 1980 traffic at 8% beyond 
designed daily normal capacity with low-speed rush- 
hour periods becoming longer and longer, would inevi- 
tably breed increasing helicopter traffic below the 
crowded airlanes and above the crowded highways. 

There can be little doubt that a scheduled heli- 
copter operation, as provided by Chicago Helicopter 
Airways, will play a vital role in the solution of the 
overall transportation problem for Chicago, a city 
founded on transportation. 



PASSENGERS 



AIRCRAFT 



1956 


876 


1956 


14,320 


1957 


55,310 


1957 


52,084 


1958 


108,911 


1958 


104,112 


1959 


204,389 


1959 


126,608 


1960 


309,107 


1960 


163,888 


1961 


245,462 


1961 


145,162 


1962 


92,976 


1962 


61,864 


1963 


50,173 


1963 


36,228 




CHA ROUTE MAP 



AND II 



Like scheduled helicopter operations, non-scheduled helicopter 
operations also have tremendous potential for helping Chicago find 
solutions to transportation problems. 

One of the ways that small non-scheduled helicopters have 
been of most use so far is in expressway traffic control. Both WGN 
(720 KC) and WBBM (780 KC) radio stations have helicopters 
in the air broadcasting information about traffic conditions on all 
the expressways approximately every 15 minutes during both 
morning and evening rush hours. Like the scheduled helicopters 
of Chicago Helicopter Airways, the traffic helicopters operate from 
Merrill C. Meigs Field, making that field one of the most important 
heliports in the nation. 

The non-scheduled type of helicopter has already been of 
substantial use to the Chicago city government, especially in the 
areas of fire fighting and air pollution control, in addition to traffic 
control. Other potential local government uses, which may prove 
important here in the future, are: search and rescue, following 
fugitives, waterfront patrol, aerial loud speakers for emergencies, 
aerial control of traffic lights, water pollution control, carrying 
medical teams to disaster areas and patients to hospitals, mosquito 
and other insect control, supervising public works construction, 
checking wide areas for building code violations, checking new 
construction for assessment purposes, enforcing heliport licensing 
and helicopter operation ordinances, transporting public officials 
in emergencies, and civil defense operations. In recognition of this 
kind of potential, Los Angeles completed a new heliport on its 
City Hall in 1962. 

In addition to governmental uses of non-scheduled helicopters, 
there is great potential for uses by business and industry, including: 
carrying executives, inspectors and expediters, carrying spare parts 
to prevent work stoppages, hoisting heavy weights to inaccessible 
places, power line patrol, news coverage, surveying natural re- 
sources, and many others. In 1963, almost 300 commercial firms 
in the United States were using about 900 helicopters for many 
of these purposes. 

For the full potential of the non-scheduled helicopter to be 
realized, of course, suitable landing places, or heliports, must be 
provided for them. The City Council passed a heliport licensing 
ordinance on July 13, 1962, and amended it on November 15, 1963. 
It now appears that the Fire Department of the City, on top of its 
Training School Building, and WGN Radio Station, on the ground 
at 2501 Bradley Place, will qualify for the first heliport licenses. 

The licensing procedure requires coordination by the Depart- 
ment of Aviation among the various agencies whose approval is 
required, including Federal Aviation Agency, State of Illinois De- 
partment of Aeronautics, and City of Chicago Building Depart- 
ment, Fire Department, Department of Aviation, and Zoning Board 
of Appeals. This procedure assists in development of heliports, both 
public and private, while at the same time providing fully for the 
safety and peace of mind of the public. 




WBBM HELICOPTER 




WGN HELICOPTER 




WGN HELIPORT 




i « 
FIRE DEPARTMENT HELIPORT 



11 



u 



CITY OF CHICAGO 

MIUIU C. NEWS FIEID 



PASSENGERS 



1948 


1,908 


1954 


127,341 


1960 


421,611 


1949 


45,355 


1955 


169,266 


1961 


356,231 


1950 


50,788 


1956 


209,630 


1962 


280,704 


1951 


55,460 


1957 


268,658 


1963 


286,911 


1952 


88,865 


1958 


309,268 




1953 


103,893 


1959 


332,225 


^^^^^^_ 



AIRCRAFT 



1948 


958 


1954 


46,573 


1960 


109,570 


1949 


23,589 


1955 


56,178 


1961 


97,598 


1950 


25,812 


1956 


65,252 


1962 


74,235 


1951 


26,394 


1957 


80,066 


1963 


75,860 


1952 


32,438 


1958 


93,585 




1953 


37,611 


1959 


97,656 






MEIGS AIRFIELD 





**** 



MEIGS TERMINAL 



IMPORTANCE OF MEIGS 

Merrill C. Meigs Field was opened for aircraft 
operation immediately after its dedication on 
December 10, 1948, by Mayor Martin H. Ken- 
nelly. This was the same year whose beginning 
witnessed the creation of the Bureau of Aviation, 
which later, i.e., in 1959, became the Depart- 
ment of Aviation. 

The area of Meigs is small, only about 70 
acres, and this restriction of area makes it impos- 
sible to offer a full range of services and develop 
a full spectrum of revenues from operation of 
hangars, cargo buildings, aircraft salesrooms, etc., 
as at most airports. It would require considerable 
expansion of area to provide for such services 
and revenues, and to give the airport the chance 
to break even in a narrow business-accounting 
sense. 

However, in a broader and more meaningful 
sense, the airport does far better than break even. 
The economic benefit which Meigs brings to 
Metropolitan Chicago is very large. It is regu- 
larly and frequently used by planes of companies 
constituting a Who's Who of American Business. 
It brings thousands of convention visitors here 
annually to the nearby McCormick Place Con- 
vention Hall. It provides downtown to downtown 
access from other mid-western cities. It is very 
convenient to a whole complex of close-by recrea- 
tional and educational facilities attractive to the 
air traveler. 

Merrill C. Meigs Field, in relation both to 
viewing its attractive new terminal building 
(opened October 19, 1961) lighted at night, and 
to reviewing the tremendous community benefit 
that its presence brings to Chicago, is a jewel 
on the Chicago lake front. Officials of other large 
cities have said that, if they had a field as useful 
and as attractive and as unique as Meigs, they 
would be delighted and very anxious to do all 
possible to develop it to its full potential. Even 
though aircraft parking area is too restricted to 
allow any planes to be based at the field, Meigs 
is the busiest single-runway airport in the world. 



12 



irnms — * 




ACTIVITIES CLOSE TO MEIGS 



The above pictures illustrate seven of the most 
important close-by recreational and educational facili- 
ties available to the air traveler near Meigs Field. The 
seven include: 1) McCormick Place, $40,000,000 con- 
vention hall, the nation's finest, with a main floor the 
size of six football fields; 2) Soldier Field, huge sta- 
dium seating 110,000 people, scene of great religious, 
sports, musical, and other events; 3) Chicago Natural 
History Museum, one of the most complete natural 
history museums in the world; 4) Shedd Aquarium, 



famous as the world's largest building devoted exclu- 
sively to acquarium purposes; 5) Adler Planetarium, 
a theatre where the stars and planets of any land and 
any age can be made to move across a man-made sky 
to illustrate fascinating lectures, and a museum with 
one of the world's finest collections of antique astro- 
nomical instruments; 6) 12th Street Beach, for those 
interested in swimming; 7) Yacht Harbor, for those 
interested in motor-boating or sailing. 



VISITING PLANES REPRESENT WHO'S WHO 
OF AMERICAN BUSINESS 

Most of the leading American corporations which 
own airplanes operate those planes regularly and fre- 
quently into Meigs Field. These operations undoubt- 
edly contribute very substantially to Metropolitan 
Chicago's annual $10.8 billion of retail sales, $24.6 
billion of wholesale sales, $24.9 billion of manufac- 
turers' sales, and $2.7 billion of service sales. Corporate 
names appearing frequently on planes at Meigs include: 
Continental Can, General Motors, Ford, Miles Labora- 
tories, Goodyear, Firestone, Brunswick, Schaeffer Pen, 
Kodak, IBM, Oscar Mayer, Minnesota Mining, Re- 
public Steel, Inland Steel, National Distilleries, St. 
Louis Post Dispatch, Johnson's Wax, and many hun- 
dreds of others. The convenience of Meigs for company 
aircraft must be considered at least partly responsible 
for the fact that 503 of the nation's 650 leading corpo- 
rations have operations in Chicago. 



ECONOMIC BENEFITS BROUGHT TO 
CHICAGO 

Chicago averages 1200 trade shows and conventions 
a year, compared with 750 for its closest rival among 
the 75 other North American cities which are in the 
convention business. The average convention and busi- 
ness visitor stays four days and spends $40 per day, 
or approximately $250,000,000 in total, each year. This 
money is indirectly but quickly spread around the City 
and suburbs. About $70,000,000 of it becomes increased 
annual payroll in Metropolitan Chicago which boosts 
purchasing power and the economy in practically every 
neighborhood. Meigs Field brings into the City every 
year a great many of these convention and business 
visitors. If the average incoming passenger spends at 
only half the rate determined by the Chicago Conven- 
tion Bureau, the airport would still bring in more 
than $9,000,000 to the community each year. This 
lovely airport is undoubtedly a bargain as well as a 
showplace for the City. 



AIRCRAFT PARKING AREA 



DESIGN ENGINEERING SHOW 



AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 




CITY OF CHICAGO 

> MIDWAY AIRPORT 




^k ^k ^k ^t 



AS OLD-TIME SMALL AIRPORT 



YESTERDAY AND TODAY 



The growth of Chicago into the nation's second largest 
metropolitan area has been due, in no small part, to 
the excellence of its transportation facilities. At the very 
outset of commercial air transportation, Chicago was one 
of the first communities in the United States to operate 
its own municipal airport. 

The construction of what is now Chicago Midway 
Airport started in the fall of 1926. Its first aircraft opera- 
tions began July 1, 1927. Its runways were made of 
cinders, and its area was only a quarter square mile. 
On December 12, 1927, Mayor William Hale Thompson 
dedicated the new field. On November 15, 1931, Mayor 
Anton J. Cermak dedicated a new terminal building 
now known as the South Terminal Building. 

The first non-stop Chicago to New York flight (4 hrs. 
5 mins. ) was flown by TWA on January 9, 1935, at a 
time when six other airlines were already operating out 
of the airport. In 1940, a railroad track was removed 
from the center of the present square mile, freeing the 
whole area for airport use. In 1946, the new terminal 
now known as the North Terminal Building was com- 
pleted during the administration of Mayor Edward J. 
Kelly. Building materials were so scarce during the 
construction of this terminal, because of World War II, 
that some of the structural members were adapted from 
war surplus artillery gun barrels. 



Safety measures originated at Midway which later 
became common at most airports, include: 1 ) Clearing 
for takeoff with flags at departure end of runway; 2) Con- 
trol tower (operated by City at first and later turned 
over to Federal Government) with radio communication 
to all aircraft; 3) Installation of an electronic runway 
localizer, forerunner of the present Instrument Landing 
System (ILS); 4) Marking ends of runways in tens of 
degrees Compass Heading, now standard regulation 
throughout the world; and 5) Filing of flight plans for 
aircraft flying between cities. 

Chicago Midway Airport was for many years the 
busiest airport in the whole world. Its all-time high 
came in 1959 with 10,040,353 passenger movements, and 
431,400 aircraft operations. 

After the last scheduled flight, one operated by United 
Air Lines, left Midway on July 9, 1962, all Chicago 
scheduled fixed-wing air traffic operated from O'Hare. 
Midway then settled down for an interim period, which 
included all of the year of 1963, to wait for the growing 
traffic congestion at O'Hare, and the factors listed on 
the following pages, to bring the southwest side airport 
inevitably back to prominence as one of the busiest 
airports in the nation (probably about 10th) with a 
substantial part of Chicago's airline passenger traffic 
(probably about 40%). 



AS WORLD'S BUSIEST AIRPORT 



AS 1963 AIRPORT 




AIRPORT 



AIRCRAFT 



PASSENGERS 



1928 


15,498 


1940 


704,846 


1952 5,945,438 


1929 


44,452 


1941 


804,461 


1953 7,151,474 


1930 


62,456 


1942 


720,746 


1954 7,935,879 


1931 


97,070 


1943 


802,490 


1955 9,134,483 


1932 


100,847 


1944 


1,089,553 


1956 9,174,930 


1933 


133,247 


1945 


1,496,634 


1957 9,709,633 


1934 


175,538 


1946 


2,598,418 


1958 9,667,696 


1935 


191,738 


1947 


2,645,674 


1959 10,040,353 


1936 


260,863 


1948 


2,564,103 


1960 6,981,667 


1937 


315,283 


1949 


3,246,693 


1961 3,565,561 


1938 


352,563 


1950 


3,820,165 


1962 659,549 


1939 


501,164 


1951 


4,953,160 


1963 417,544 



1927 


800 


1940 


88,201 


1953 


331,297 


1928 


41,660 


1941 


87,837 


1954 


348,909 


1929 


93,613 


1942 


88,349 


1955 


380,996 


1930 


58,688 


1943 


118,477 


1956 


368,580 


1931 


71,083 


1944 


120,783 


1957 


408,128 


1932 


60,947 


1945 


153,007 


1958 


420,193 


1933 


63,252 


1946 


190,338 


1959 


431,400 


1934 


80,492 


1947 


206,140 


1960 


376,168 


1935 


60,727 


1948 


221,552 


1961 


249,852 


1936 


73,345 


1949 


223,493 


1962 


107,768 


1937 


79,919 


1950 


234,331 


1963 


126,959 


1938 


69,604 


1951 


263,737 




1939 


79,350 


1952 


295,456 





TOMORROW 

Three of the factors which make the rebirth of Mid- 
way practically certain, aside from such obvious factors 
as the capacity operation at O'Hare and the complete 
inadequacy of airline service for three and one-half 
million people on the south side of Chicago, are the 
following: 

BOEING 727 THREE-ENGINE PLANE 

The Boeing 727, which was flight-tested from its base 
at Renton, Washington, from February through Decem- 
ber in 1963, is unquestionably the most important and 
outstanding and useful airplane in airline history after 
the Douglas DC-3. Carrying 90 seats one-class, or 70 
seats first class, or 94 seats mixed, or 119 seats coach 
only, it has the ability to bring jet smoothness and 
10-mile-per-minute speed to the ordinary airline airport 
and to the airline passenger from a small community. 
It has an exceptionally low noise level; taxiing or flying, 
it whispers to the people who are airport neighbors. 
It has come through all tests with flying colors, with 
drag 5% less and fuel consumption 4% less than origi- 
nally estimated. United, Eastern, TWA, American and 
other airlines have already bought this remarkable air- 



plane which is expected to begin airline service early in 
1964. Under ordinary circumstances, it is expected to 
be able to operate at Midway using only about half 
a runway length for either landing or takeoff. 

SOUTHWEST EXPRESSWAY TO MIDWAY 

The 18-mile, $194,000,000 Southwest Expressway will 
provide a quick 15-minute, 10-mile, expressway route 
between Midway Airport and Downtown Chicago, when 
put into operation in October of 1964. This expressway 
will connect McCormick Place, the nation's finest con- 
vention hall which is on the Chicago lake front, with 
famous Route 66 at the Cook-DuPage County Line just 
west of the Tri-State Tollway. The route of the South- 
west Expressway is historic. The road is being con- 
structed on the bed of the old Illinois and Michigan 
Canal which was dug in 1848 to connect the Great 
Lakes and Mississippi waterways by connecting the 
Chicago River to the DesPlaines and Illinois Rivers. 
It follows the portage trod by Marquette and Joliet in 
1673, and it runs right alongside the modern Great 
Lakes-Mississippi waterway connection, the Chicago 
Sanitary and Ship Canal, built in 1900 and improved 
from time to time thereafter. 



BOEING 727 



CONSTRUCTION OF SOUTHWEST EXPRESSWAY 




THREE CLOSE-IN BIG-CITY AIRPORTS 

Three of the most important cities in the United States have very much the same airport 
situations. They are: Washington, D.C., the nation's capital; New York, N.Y., the nation's largest 
city; and Chicago, 111., the second largest city. 





LA GUARDIA AIRPORT 



WASHINGTON NATIONAL AIRPORT 



All three cities have a long-range, large-size, far-out, 
newer airport which can handle the biggest planes leaving 
for the most distant cities. All three cities have a medium- 
range, moderate-size, close-in, older airport which can 
handle more quickly and conveniently the businessman's 
commuter type of air traffic to cities in a large part of 
continental United States. A table comparing the six 
airports at the three cities is provided below. In the pic- 
tures above, the World's Fair Unisphere can be seen 
in the background of LaGuardia, and the Pentagon in 
the background of Washington National. 

There can be little question that the three medium- 
range airports have just as much potential for future 
passenger and freight traffic generation as the three long- 
range airports. The Port of New York Authority which 



operates the New York airports, and which has very 
businesslike and good management, is building a $36,000,- 
000 terminal building, nearly seven times as big as the 
terminal it replaces, at LaGuardia, to be ready for 
World's Fair visitors by April, 1964. It is also extending 
LaGuardia 's two runways to 7,000 feet each at a cost 
of $42,000,000 to be completed in 1966, after the World's 
Fair. 

The traffic potential of these three medium-range air- 
ports even among themselves alone is very substantial. 
Their total potential, with other cities in addition, is 
tremendous. Each of these three airports is obviously a 
very valuable civic asset which should be carefullly devel- 
oped for the benefit of the community. 



SIX SCHEDULED AIRPORTS AT THREE IMPORTANT 


CITIES 






CHICAGO 


NEW YORK 


WASHINGTON 




Midway 


0'Hare 


LaGuardia 


Kennedy 


National 


Dulles 


Road Miles Downtown 


10 


17 


8 


20 


4 


27 


Road Minutes Downtown 


15" 


25" 


25 


45 


15 


45 


Feet Longest Runway 


6,300 


11,600 


7,000 b 


14,600 


6,870 


11,500 


No. of Runways 


6 


5 


2 


5 


3 


3 


Acres of Airport 


640 


6,600 


575 


4,900 


850 


10,000 


When Operations Began 


7/1/27 


3/22/46° 


12/2/39 


7/1/48 


6/16/41 


11/17/62 


Aircraft Operations, 1963 


126,959 


426,098 


71,288" 


312,363 


294,797 


90,674 


Passenger Movements, 1963 d 


417,544 


14,616,740 


2,928,961 e 


12,751,573 


5,464,010 


666,559 


Aircraft Operations, 1959 


431,400 


231,636 


172,213 


199,173 


309,340 


— — 


Passenger Movements, 1959 d 


9,439,629 


1,904,585 


5,290,875 


6,972,217 


5,005,746 


— — 



"Other than in rush hours (and after SW Expressway is completed in 1964). 
O'Hare time approaches 50 minutes in rush hours. 

''5,965 feet until extension is completed in 1966. 

'Civilian, under City of Chicago. 



''Enplaned plus deplaned passengers only, not including through passengers. 
New York and Washington do not have record of throughs. At Chicago, through: 
were: 1959— Midway 300,362 (est.), O'Hare 126,085 ;1963— Midway— 0— , 
O'Hare 773,362. 

■Considerable rerouting of traffic because of peak construction period. 





COMPARATIVE 


ACTIVITY 


' REPORT 


FOR THE 


CHICAGO 


AIRPORTS 








O'HARE 


MIDWAY 


MEIGS 


Passengers: 


1962 


1963 


% Inc. (Dec.) 


1962 


1963 


% Inc. (Dec.) 


1962 


1963 


% Inc. (Dec.) 


Scheduled 


13,298,710 


15,981,321 


20.2 


344,740 


32,275 


(90.6) 


30,892 


29,711 


(3.8) 


Non-Scheduled 


227,245 


182,143 


(19.8) 


314,809 


385,269 


22.4 


249,812 


257,200 


3.0 


Total 


13,525,955 


16,163,464 


19.5 


659,549 


417,544 


(36.7) 


280,704 


286,911 


2.2 


Aircraft: 




















Scheduled 


329,780 


357,461 


8.4 


37,240 


12,048 


(67.6) 


11,782 


11,560 


(1.9) 


Non-Scheduled 


87,211 


68,637 


(21.3) 


70,528 


114,911 


62.9 


62,453 


64,300 


3.0 


Total 


416,991 


426,098 


2.2 


107,768 


126,959 


17.8 


74,235 


75,860 


2.2 



DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION 
CITY OF CHICAGO 

WILLIAM E. DOWNES, JR., Commissioner 
J. P. DUNNE, 1st Deputy Commissioner 
FRANCIS E. CALLAHAN, Deputy Commissioner 

JOHN A. CASEY General Manager of Operations 

FRANK C. SAIN Administrative Engineer 

HERBERT H. HOWELL Chief of Planning 

JOHN F. O'CONNOR Chief of Finance 

JOHN H. GOSSAU Acting Chief of Contracts 

RAY C. BROWNELL Civil Engineer 

KENNETH W. COURSE Administrative Assistant 

RALPH K. HEINZE. Manager, Chicago-O'Hare International Airport 

MICHAEL J. BERRY Manager, Chicago Midway Airport 

WILLIAM J. O'BRIEN Manager, Merrill C. Meigs Field 



17 



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