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Full text of "Annual report"

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1966 

Annual 

Report 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



[Document 15 — 1967| 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

FOR THE Year Ending December 31, 1966 

July 19, 1967. 



Hon. John F. Collins, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear ^Ir. ^NIayor: 

I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the 
activities of the Boston Pubhc Library for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1966. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Lenahan O'Connell, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



LENAHAN O'CONNELL 

President 
Term expires April 30, 1971 

ERWIN D. CANHAM 

Vice President 
Term expires April 30, 1968 

EDWARD G. TVIURRAY 
Term expires April 30, 1967 

AUGUSTIN H. PARKER 
Term expires April 30, 1970 

SIDNEY R. RABB 
Term expires April 30, 1969 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



Boston Public Library 3 

Boston, July, 1967. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

As Director, and Librarian of the Library I have the 
honor to submit my first report covering the year January 
1, 1966, to December 31, 1966. 

It is significant that there has been considerable pro- 
gress in regional library services and the utilization of 
federal support in the year in which the members of the 
Pubhc Library Division of the American Library Asso- 
ciation adopted new Minimum Standards for Public 
Library Systems, 1966. The systems concept of library 
service permeates these new national standards and, as 
indicated in the preface: 

"The increasing interest of the federal government 
in libraries, beginning with the Library Services Act 
of 1956 and its subsequent extension and enlargement, 
and followed in 1965 by the Higher Education Act 
and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act — 
both having important titles related to library de- 
velopment — has had a powerful influence on library 
development." 

The enrichment of the Library's resources and services 
via federal government programs will be reported on 
in the section dealing with acquisitions. 

On October 26, 1966, in the office of Mayor John F. 
Collins, a contract was signed between the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts and the City of Boston estab- 
lishing the Eastern Regional Pubhc Library System. 
This contract was a landmark in hbrary history for both 
state and city. The formal establishment of this regional 
system completes a regional development program which 
began with the passage in 1960 of legislation granting 
state aid to public libraries and authorizing the creation 
of new patterns of cooperative library service. Under 
the provision of Sections 19C and 19D of Chapter 760 
of the Acts of 1960 of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, $950,000 will be available annually for the 
full implementation of regional hbrary service for the 
eastern part of the state. 



4 City Document No. 15 

The Boston Public Library will serve as the head- 
quarters for a cooperative service program for some 200 
Hbraries in 180 cities and towns in an area extending 
from the New Hampshire border on the north to Cape 
Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket on the south. 
Sub-regional reference centers are to be established in 
1967 in Andover, Lowell, Wellesley, Quincy, Taunton, 
New Bedford, and Falmouth to complete the regional 
framework which will provide 3,800,000 people equal 
access to a high level of reference and research service 
regardless of the size of the municipaUty in which they 
live. 

A second highhght of the year 1966 was the resumption 
of planning for the Central Library Addition. Phihp 
Johnson of New York City had been selected by the 
Trustees in 1963 to design the building, and active 
planning for the project was undertaken in May of 1964. 
Progress was suspended in 1965 due to revised cost 
estimates which far exceeded the original. Permission 
was granted in the spring of 1966 to undertake a thor- 
ough review of the program and to have the architect 
develop preliminary plans so that a realistic cost estimate 
could be prepared and appropriate funds requested in 
the 1967 capital outlay budget. 

In the area of branch hbrary buildings steps were 
taken to advance the Library's capital improvement 
program. The long-delayed West End Branch, designed 
by Maginnis and Walsh and Kenned}^ went out to bid 
in the summer. Unfortunately, excessively high bids 
were received and had to be rejected. After certain 
design changes by the architect, a second bidding re- 
sulted in a more favorable price. A contract was 
awarded to the low bidder, and construction should be 
completed by the end of 1967. 

Sites and architects were selected for five additional 
branch libraries, and funds for their construction are to 
be requested in the 1967 capital outlay budget. These 
new branches will replace inadequate and unsatisfactory 
library units. The Brighton Bianch Library, which will 
serve as Boston's first regional branch library, is being 



Boston Public Library 5 

designed by The Architects Collaborative Inc. The 
architects appointed to design the remaining units are: 
Eduardo Catalano for Charlestown; Kallmann and 
McKinnell for Dudley Street; Holmes and Edwards for 
Fields Corner; and Mitchell and Giurgola Associates for 
the South End. 

Community Services 

The Library staff has a duty to make the institution 
dynamic; it must use a variety of means to extend 
librar}^ services so that as many people as possible may 
benefit from the use of available cultural and educational 
resources. The Library has cooperated with community 
organizations and activities; organized book, film, and 
record programs within the hbrary units; and has 
participated in regional services, such as film loan, 
interlibrary loan, and telephone reference assistance. 

Hours of library service were extended in five branch 
libraries for the greater convenience of the citizens. 
Beginning on October 8, the Brighton, Codman Square, 
Egleston Square, Roslindale, and South Boston Branch 
Libraries remained open on Saturday afternoons. Re- 
sponse to these longer hours was most favorable. As 
a further convenience bookmobile service on Boston 
Common was restored after a hiatus of several years. 

In recognition of the contributions of the Opera 
Company of Boston, the Library arranged an exhibit, 
''Salute to the Opera Company of Boston: Boston 
Opera Then ;'ad Now," on the occasion of the staging 
of the first United States production of Arnold Schoen- 
berg's Moses and Aron. Other programs involving 
community cooperation were : " Mexico Week in Boston," 
a National Library Week program arranged in co- 
operation with the World Affairs Council; ''Freedom 
from Racial Myths and Stereotypes Through Negro 
History," in association with local Negro organizations; 
the annual Jewish Book Month program, cosponsored 
by the Boston Public Library and the Jewish Com- 
munity Council of Greater Boston; and the sixth annual 



6 City Document No. 15 

Children's Book Fair, sponsored by the Library, the 
Children's Book Council, Inc., the Massachusetts Bureau 
of Library Extension, and the Boston Herald-Traveler. 

Our Library programs have included a full range of 
story hours, preschool programs. Never Too Late Group 
meetings, listening and film programs, parents' discus- 
sion groups, book talks, exhibitions, and visits of 
classes, as well as local and foreign groups. 

Indicative of the wide-ranging impact of hbrary 
services is the fact that more than 291,000 people 
attended the 13,443 film showings this past year. Of 
these showings 1,092 took place in the Boston Public 
Library system. The home use circulation of 61,414 
recordings was supplemented by in-hbrary hstening 
programs ranging from jazz — old and new — to chamber 
music and symphonies. The elder citizens, the Never 
Too Late Group, were provided a wide variety of 
programs in the course of the year: illustrated lectures, 
tours of local museums, choral concerts, talks b}' au- 
thors, and reports on civic and urban reaewal develop- 
ments. 

The exhibits program serves to publicize the Library's 
treasures and to alert casual viewers to the joys of 
highly speciahzed interests. Among the treasures 
exhibited during the year were: a show of some fifty 
Daumier lithographs selected from the collection of 
some 3,000 original hthographs to give a fresh ghmpse 
of the artist's genius; books and manuscripts relating 
to ships and the sea in an exhibit, ''Ships and the Sea: 
A Tribute to Boston's Maritime Past"; a selection of 
materials from the Rare Book Department for a display 
entitled "Waiting for Spring: Books and Manuscripts 
for the Gardener." Special interest exhibits included 
books with fine bindings, the (rrandeur of Lace, Historic 
Copley Square, and one celebrating the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the Easter Rising and the Irish War of In- 
dependence. One of the most successful author ex- 
hibitions was "David McCord: A Portrait of the 
Author." It comprised literary manuscripts, proof 
sheets, books, a selection of his watercolors and drawings 
along with some examples of his collecting tastes. 



Boston Public Library 7 

Wiggin Gallery 

The celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of 
the Wiggin Collection of Prints and Drawings as a 
public collection within the Boston Public Library took 
place on May 6 with a symposium, ''Art and Education." 
A grant from the Albert H. and Jessie D. Wiggin 
Foundation helped make the symposium possible. 
The speakers were David McCord, essayist, poet, and 
watercolorist ; David B. Little, Secretary and Registrar 
of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston; and Sinclair H. 
Hitchings, Keeper of Prints at the Boston Public 
Library. 

The opening on May 5 of a gallery specially designed 
to house a series of eleven dioramas, "Printmakers at 
Work," added a new dimension to the Albert H. Wiggin 
Collection of Prints and Drawings. Commissioned by 
Mrs. Sherburne Prescott (Marjorie Wiggin Prescott), 
the eleven dioramas are based on experiences in the 
lives of great printmakers and were designed by Louise 
Stimson. 

Publications 

A revitalized publications program resulted in Francis 
A. Comstock's A Gothic Vision: F. L. Griggs and His 
Work, published jointly by the Boston Public Library 
and the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford; Art and Educa- 
tion, the talks given at the symposium mentioned above ; 
and English Literary Manuscripts in the Boston Public 
Library: A Checklist. Catalogs of the ''Ships and Sea" 
and "Waiting for Spring" exhibitions were prepared; 
and the publication by G. K. Hall & Co. of A Catalog 
of the Defoe Collection in the Boston Public Library will 
assist the work of Defoe scholars. 

Resources 

The demand for expanded resources is due to a 
number of factors: the population explosion, the publi- 
cation explosion, the higher education explosion, the 
rapidly diminishing world due to transportation and 
communication advances, and the ever-expanding gov- 
ernmental, business, and travel involvement in all parts 



8 City Document No. 15 

of the world. One need only reflect on the comment 
made by the President's Committee on Education 
Beyond the High School that we have become, without 
realizing it, "a society of students." In 1900, shortly 
after the Central Library Building was opened, only 
one out of every twenty-five young people of college 
age was in college; by 1960 the proportion was one out 
of three; and it is predicted that by 1983 one out of 
every two persons of college age will be in college. 
Expansion in the formal educational program is ac- 
companied by increased demands for information and 
knowledge to meet the spiraUng qualifications for 
advancement in business, industry, government, science, 
and the professions. An ever-increasing flow of materials 
— deahng with the histories and cultures of peoples in 
all parts of the world, with scientific advancement, with 
economic development, and with international and 
local, state, and national governmental activities — 
must be provided if the citizens are to make sound 
judgments in this rapidly moving world. 

Federal book credits, made available under the 
Library Services and Construction Act, have enabled 
the Library to expand its resources in a number of 
areas. Gaps have been filled in a number of important 
serial sets; other periodical sets, both English language 
and foreign, have been acquired; important reference 
sets have been added and microprint editions of re- 
search materials, e.g., the complete file of United 
Nations Documents, are now available. Arrangements 
have been made to acquire over a two-year period the 
complete output of the Readex Microprint Corporation. 
This program includes approximately 1,000,000 titles 
and is largely concentrated in the field of American 
research materials. The Boston Pubhc Library is 
assisting the Early American Newspapers project which 
is being carried out in association with the American 
Antiquarian Society. When this project is completed 
all obtainable issues of nearly 2,000 newspapers will be 
available. 

This federal support also allowed the Boston Public 
Library to join some thirty-three university Ubraries, 
the National Library of Australia, the New York PubUc 



Boston Public Library 9 

Library, and our own national libraries — the Library of 
Congress, the National Agricultural Library, and the 
National Library of Medicine — in participating in a 
Latin American Cooperative Acquisition project. More 
than 3,000 titles were received under this program. 

The circulating collection of foreign language books 
and the film collection were expanded under the LSCA 
program. These federal book credits were made avail- 
able to the Boston Public Library as the headquarters 
library for regional service and as the library of last re- 
course for the state. 

A second federal program was utilized in January, 
1966, when the Library became a participant in the 
Israeli program of the Public Law 480 program. The 
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 
1954 (Pubhc Law 83-480) allowed foreign countries in 
underdeveloped areas to pay for United States surplus 
agricultural products with local currencies. These cur- 
rencies have to be spent mainly in the country of origin 
and in waj's specified by Congress. Since the United 
States was accumulating considerable excess credits in a 
number of countries, an amendment was incorporated 
in 1958 into the PL 480 Act as Section 104n, which 
authorized the Library of Congress "to use foreign cur- 
rencies within such appropriations as are made by 
Congress for financing programs outside the United 
States to purchase, catalog, index, and abstract books, 
periodicals, and related materials determined to have 
technical, scientific, cultural, or educational significance 
in the United States; and to deposit such materials in 
hbraries and research centers in this country specializing 
in the areas to which they relate." 

Participating libraries are selected with the advice of 
appropriate committees of the Association of Research 
Libraries or of joint committees of the ARL and learned 
societies. For a token $500 annual payment Boston, 
along with other research hbraries in the Israeli program, 
received some twenty-three newspapers, 785 periodical 
titles, and more than 1,000 monographic titles in 1966. 
In addition, a cooperative cataloging project supported 
by the participating libraries provides catalog cards for 
these current Israeli publications at a greatly reduced cost. 



10 City Document No. 15 

The successful launching by the Library of Congress of 
the National Program for Acquisitions and Cataloging 
has far-reaching consequences for all libraries and es- 
pecially for the ninety-two United States and Canadian 
libraries, including the Boston Public Library, partici- 
pating in the program. The Association of Research 
Libraries, with the support of other organizations and 
with the concurrence of the Librarian of Congress, was 
influential in persuading the 89th Congress to amend 
Title II of the Higher Education Act of 1965 by adding 
Part C, ''Strengthening College and Research Library 
Resources." It authorizes appropriations to enable the 
Commissioner of Education to transfer funds to the 
Librarian of Congress to: 

(a) Acquire, so far as possible, all library materials 
currently published throughout the world which are of 
value to scholarship. 

(b) Provide catalog information for these materials 
promptly after receipt and distribute bibliograpliic in- 
formation by printing catalog cards and by other means, 
and enable the Library of Congress to use for exchange 
and other purposes any of these materials not needed 
for its own collection. 

This program will enable this and other libraries to 
ehminate backlogs of uncataloged and thus unusable 
books ; it will expedite current cataloging and permit the 
handling of the ever-increasing flow of material without 
large additions to the staff; it will prevent unnecessary 
duplication of effort; and it will provide a new tool for a 
systematic acquisition program. Significant use has 
been made of the Title IIC program in 1966, although 
the maximum returns will not be felt until the total pro- 
gram is in operation. 

No attempt will be made to note in this report an 
extensive list of significant acquisitions. However, the 
acquisition of some 1,000 manuscripts and cognate 
ephemera relating to Haiti, ranging from the early 
seventeenth century to recent years, strengthened one 
of the Library's most noteworthy collections. Virtually 
complete collections of the writings of the eminent nine- 



Boston Public Library 11 

teenth -century Italian authors, Carducci and Leopardi, 
were also acquired. A collection of 3,256 Italian opera 
librettos was added to our music resources. 

Building and Organization Changes 

The overcrowded conditions in the Library make the 
establishment of efficient work patterns most difficult. 
The absence of adequate staff work space, the lack of 
shelving for books, and pressures of increasing use are 
further compounded by the necessity to evacuate the 
Annex building, which is to be demolished to make way 
for the Library Addition. The shifting of the Annex 
book collection to a storage facility, the renovation of 
the Lower Open Shelf area to house additional books, 
and the building changes inherent in the setting up of a 
new staff lounge, acquisition and book preparation areas 
created a heavy work load for the mechanical and cus- 
todial staff. The Buildings Department staff is to be 
congratulated for doing an excellent job. 

The former Branch Issue book stock, shelved in the 
Annex, was merged with the Open Shelf collection, thus 
doubling the number of volumes immediately available 
for circulation in the Central Library. The new shelving 
in the lower Open Shelf Room accommodated all the 
fiction in the combined collections, and plans are being 
developed to expand the shelving for the nonfiction. 

The shift from Dewey to the Library of Congress 
classification for the Open Shelf and branch collections 
was a major decision. The use of one classification sys- 
tem will simphfy cataloging and processing procedures, 
make the transition from the general library to the re- 
search collections easier for the user, and expedite the 
full utilization of the benefits of the shared cataloging 
being developed under the Title IIC section of the Higher 
Education Act of 1965. 

Microform services previously housed in the Patent 
Room were expanded substantially with the acquisition 
of the Readex Microprint collection and placed under 
the jurisdiction of the Coordinator of Social Sciences. 
Plans for a comprehensive Social Science Reference Ser- 
vice will permit the reorganization of the serials docu- 
ment section. 



12 City Document No. 15 

The Science and Technology Department, which had 
been located on the third floor in the middle of the fine 
arts collections, was examined. A revised science and 
technology reference collection was developed and trans- 
ferred to the Patent Room. The nonreference books 
were transferred to the Stack Service and serviced from 
Bates Hall. 

Gifts 

A gift of $1,000 was received from the Boston Chapter 
of the Woman's National Book Association to establish 
a book fund, the income to be used for the purchase of 
books for the historical collection of children's books 
which is being estabhshed to honor Ahce M. Jordan, first 
Supervisor of Children's Services, Boston Public Library. 

The sum of $250,000 was added to the Friedman 
Building Fund, estabhshed on June 30, 1959, through 
bequest by the will of Lee M. Friedman; an additional 
$18,579 was added to the Lee M. Friedman Fund es- 
tabhshed in 1962. The Arthur W. Heintzelman Fund 
(not yet funded) received $370 from several contributors. 

Gifts for current use included $1,600 from the Albert 
H. and Jessie D. Wiggin Foundation to support the 
Wiggin Gallery's twenty-fifth anniversary program; 
$2,000 from Mrs. Marjorie Wiggin Prescott for the 
pubhcation of a catalog of the Wiggin collection; $1,400 
from Mrs. Prescott for the program for the opening of 
the dioramas 'Trintmakers at Work"; $5,000 for the 
Griggs Fund, a contribution from Francis A. Comstock; 
$577.97 from Francis A. Comstock for the purchase of 
books and prints; and $300 from the Boston Authors 
Club. 

Gifts of books, pamphlets, and other library materials 
were received from a large number of individuals and 
organizations. The Library is grateful for each of the 
gifts of money and material received during the year 
and wishes to record its appreciation of the generosity 
of all who have contributed to the support of the Li- 
brary's resources and programs. Among the useful 
gifts were those received from : 

American Legion, West Roxbury Post No. 167 

Angelino, Dominic 



Boston Public Library 13 

Anthony, Julian D. 

Barrero, Alfonso 

Baxter, Percival P. 

Benton, Nicholas 

BibUoteca Nacional 

Boston College Library 

Boston Stock Exchange 

Brazil, Consulate of U.S. in Boston 

Cameron, George 

Carter, Catherine C. 

Carter, Kathryn J. 

Case, Mrs. Richard D. 

Cohen, Yohanan, Consul of Israel 

Colvario, Frank 

Consul General of Italy 

Dates, Marion 

Davidoff, Sydney E. 

De Wolfe, Morton 

Diario De Noticias 

Dooley, Mary 

Dow, Norma 

Emerson, Royce 

Fay, Ella V. 

Forziati, Mario 

French Consulate in Boston 

Friends of the Mattapan Branch Library 

Governor Dummer Academy 

Hale, Mrs. Joseph 

Harvard College Library 

Hopkins, Prescott 

Houghton Mifflin Company 

Jackson & Moreland Division, United Engineers & 

Constructors, Inc. 
Jewish National & University Library 
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 
Johnson, Bessie M. 
Katz, Gloria 

Lindahl, Wilham Allen (Collection) 
McLaughhn, Louise E. 
May, E. L. 
Moore, L. W. 
Nolan, Alfred A. 



14 City Document No. 15 

Ortiz-Bello, Ignacio 
Pan American Union 
Pietrina, Maravigna 
Podolsky, Vitali 
Robart, E. Leslie 
Shattuck, George C. 
Smith, Charlotte B. 
Smith College Library 
Toledo Public Library 
Tross, Ernest 
Warner, John 
Zoll, Herbert 

Promotions 

Carolyn Kirkham, Branch Librarian, Memorial 
and Mt. Pleasant Branch Libraries, effective October 5, 
1966. 

Retirements 

Bradford M. Hill, Consultant to the Director (for 
the Care of the Collections), effective March 22, 1966. 

Ada A. Andelman, Supervisor of Home Reading 
Services, effective April 30, 1966. 

Sarah W. Flannery, Coordinator of the Humanities 
and Curator of History, effective January 18, 1966. 

Irene H. Tuttle, Branch Librarian, South Boston 
Branch Library, effective March 31, 1966. 

Ellen C. Peterson, Branch Librarian, Hyde Park 
Branch Library, effective September 30, 1966. 

Appointments 

Raymond B. Agler, Branch Librarian, Hyde Park 
Branch Library, effective September 28, 1966. 

Edward C. Fremd, Chief, Long Island Project, 
effective September 28, 1966. 

Philip Januszkiewicz, Acquisitions Librarian, Re- 
sources and Acquisitions Department, effective August 
31, 1966. 



Boston Public Library 15 

A Data Processing Section was established to expedite 
the procedures of Central Charging Records. Effective 
September 28, 1966, Rodney D. Mosher was appointed 
Data Processing Supervisor, in charge of this operation. 

Staff Activities 

Mr. ]\Iilton E. Lord, Director Emeritus, conducted a 
Seminar on Public Libraries at the Graduate School of 
Library Science of McGill University in Montreal. 
Mr. Lord has also been active in national and regional 
library affairs. 

Mr. PhiHp J. McNiff, the Director of the Library, 
deUvered the Independence Day Oration in Faneuil 
Hall on July 4. His topic was "Freedom and Respon- 
sibility." 

Mr. John M. Carroll, Chief Librarian, Division of 
Home Reading and Community Services, taught at 
the Graduate School of Library Science of Simmons 
College as did Miss Mildred C. O'Connor, Coordinator 
of the Social Sciences, and Miss M. Jane Manthorne^ 
Coordinator of Work with Young Adults. 

Miss Manthorne dehvered the Hewins-Melcher 
Lecture at the meeting of the Round Table of Children's 
Librarians during the annual conference of the New 
England Library Association in Portsmouth. 

I wish to take this occasion to express my appreciation 
to the members of the Hbrary staff for their cooperation 
and service during the past year and to thank the 
members of the Board of Trustees for their support. 

Philip J. McNiff, 
Director, and Librarian. 



16 




City Document No. 1 


5 








Table 1. Circulation 










BOOK CIRCULATION 










1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 




Central Library 


. 493,229 


494,130 


477,242 


492,880 


482 


Kirstein Business Branch 


8,341 


9,554 


9,090 


8,744 


S 


Deposit Circulation 












(Estimated) . 


. . . 6,346 


3,736 


4,602 


6,654 


^ 


Adams Street . 


142,264 


149,534 


147,735 


142,235 


13] 


Allston 




64,239 


62,183 


61,715 


57,261 


54 


Brighton . 




83,516 


84,081 


85,458 


81,462 


7i 


Charlestown 




68,822 


72,861 


71,441 


58,088 


5^ 


Codman Square 




146,031 


155,238 


150,708 


142,902 


13( 


Connolly . 




85,595 


88,630 


85,255 


81,372 


7;: 


Dorchester 




71,416 


71,831 


75,087 


68,992 


6; 


East Boston 




57,189 


62,404 


69,325 


67,035 


5.^ 


Egleston Square 




107,020 


103,594 


91,790 


80,534 


6^ 


Faneuil 




57,197 


57,517 


58,741 


54,531 


5t 


Hyde Park 




111,453 


112,503 


118,128 


118,740 


u; 


Jamaica Plain 




85,728 


81,271 


82,674 


84,492 


7{ 


Lower Mills 




73,658 


69,312 


69,574 


67,322 


6: 


Mattapan . 




132,023 


130,234 


127,848 


119,727 


10- 


Memorial . 




42,383 


40,203 


48,833 


42,234 


3: 


Mt. Bowdoin 




61,636 


62,097 


60,326 


56,134 


4: 


Mt. Pleasant 




41,968 


42,640 


43,234 


37,941 


3: 


North End 




39,532 


38,793 


36,465 


48,353 


4( 


Orient Heights 




43,485 


43,021 


40,445 


35,999 


3. 


Parker Hill 




58,526 


58,756 


57,334 


52,751 


4' 


RosHndale 




227,539 


221,428 


200,919 


190,495 


IS: 


South Boston 




138,591 


133,785 


130,794 


124,680 


ii: 


South End 




37,846 


36,571 


41,892 


42,808 


31 


Uphams Corner 


115,038 


103,963 


100,841 


88,578 


7.' 


Washington Village . 


79,912 


79,647 


75,967 


73,166 


6" 


West Roxburv . 


142,750 


146,496 


159,787 


168,402 


17( 


Bookmobile Service 


430,873 


447,268 


410,650 


380,059 


37: 


Hospital Librarj^ Service 


20,955 
. . . 2,767,185 


31,458 
2,787,319 


31,262 


29,646 
2,595,939 


2< 
2,42 


Total, Branch Libraries 


2,734,228 


Total Book Circulation . 


. 3,275,101 


3,294,739 


3,225,162 


3,104,217 


2,92' 




NON=BOOK CIRCULATION 








1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 




Film .... 


9,835 


10,311 


10,704 


11,502 


i; 


Filmstrips . 


— 


— 


— 


31 




Recordings 


50,874 


53,599 


52,233 


59,246 


6 


Pictures 


25,949 


31,445 


30,040 


25,063 


2' 


Total . 


86,658 


95,355 


92,937 


95,842 


10; 

















Boston Public Library 

VOLUMES SENT ON INTER-LIBRARY LOAN 



17 



1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 



J)lumea 



902 1,111 1,277 5,349 6,126 



Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


)me Reading and Community Services: 










Volumes added 70,281 


63,987 


94,132 


88,665 


71,092 


Volumes withdrawn .... 61,496 


57,449 


78,179 


87,592 


64,974 


Total on iiand December 31 . . 756,563 


763,101 


779,054 


780,127 


786,245 


iference and Research Services: 










Volumes added 26,835 


21,576 


26,255 


31,816 


44,780 


Volumes withdrawn .... 4,663 


1,184 


4,329 


4,299 


5,623 


Total on hand December 31 . . 1,456,749 


1,477,141 


1,499,067 


1,526,584 


1,565,741 


tal book stock 2,213,312 


2,240,242 


2,278,121 


2,306,711 


2,351,986 


Non=Book Materials 


ms 1,344 


1,423 


1,496 


1,561 


1,710 


ms trips . 










— 


— 


— ■ 


91 


101 


cordings 










16,248 


16,360 


16,036 


17,103 


16,670 


ntem slides . 










28,962 


28,962 


14,884 


14,884 


14,884 


jgatives . 










1,964 


1,964 


2,008 


2,008 


2,118 


Jtures 










125,105 


127,972 


386,829 


397,385 


400,006 


stcards . 










133,805 


133,805 


133,805 


133,805 


133,805 


ints and drawings 










28,578 


29,499 


29,758 


30,276 


31,779 


DJected books 










178 


178 


178 


178 


178 


tcrocards 










— . 


— 


— 


— 


3,298 


ccrofiche . 










— . 


— 


— 


— . 


852 


crofilms 










14,639 


14,904 


15,257 


16,221 


16,969 


croprints 










— 


— 


— 


— 


1,727 bxs 



18 City Document No. 15 

Table 3. Cataloging Statistics 



1966 



Volumes processed 110,670 

New titles cataloged 35,174 

Original cataloging 8,923 

LC cataloging 23,065 

Rare book cataloging 1,044 

LC cards processed for volumes cataloged 1965 . . . 2,091 

Other 51 

Volumes reclassified 163 

Films 64 

Recordings 1,446 

Microprints — Titles 23 

— Boxes 1,429 

— Cards 217 

Microfilms — Titles 41 

— Reels 320 

Microfiche — Titles 1 

— Sheets 466 

Card Production 

LC cards processed 22,004 

Typed cards 97,879 

Stencils 337 

Mimeographed cards run 26,834 

General Microfilm cards 721,260 

Cards sent to National Catalog 28,973 

Cards sent to National Union Catalog (withdrawn) . . 2,903 



Table 4. Binding 



1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 



Volumes bound .... 22,269 18,772 20,788 18,459 31,292 

Volumes repaired . . . .2,137 2,500 2,671 2,800 2,935 
Photographs, plates, and maps 

mounted 2,312 2,375 2,560 2,000 1,000 



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