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Full text of "Annual report"

1967 

Annual 

Report 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



[Document 15 — 1968] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1967 

August 23, 1968. 

Hon. Kevin H. White, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the 
activities of the Boston Public Library for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1967. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Erwin D. Canham, 
President of the Board of Trustees. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ERWIN D. CANHAM 

President 

Term expires April 30, 1973 

SIDNEY R. RABB 

Vice President 

Term expires April 30, 1969 

EDWARD G. MURRAY 
Term expires April 30, 1972 

LENAHAN O'CONNELL 
Term expires April 30, 1971 

AUGUSTIN H. PARKER 
Term expires April 30, 1970 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



Boston Public Library 3 

Boston, July, 1968. 
To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

As Director, and Librarian I have the honor to sub- 
mit my report for the year January 1 to December 31, 
1967. 

Last year the highlight of the annual report was the 
signing of the contract between the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the City of Boston establishing the 
Eastern Regional Public Library System. An account 
of the progress of regional library service will be given 
later in this report. This year's major event was the 
formal approval on February 1, 1967, by the Mayor 
and the Trustees of the Boston Public Library of the 
design for the addition to the Central Library in Copley 
Square. 

The Library Addition of 480,000 square feet will oc- 
cupy the entire area bounded by Boylston, Exeter, and 
Blagden Streets. Its height and roof line will conform 
to the existing Library and its exterior will be similarly 
faced with granite. 

Two complete floors are below grade and house a 300- 
seat auditorium, conference rooms, audio-visual area, 
storage space, and space for mechanical equipment. The 
main entrance to the Addition will be from Boylston 
Street and will directly serve the Main Floor, Lower 
Concourse, Mezzanine, and Second Floor. Administra- 
tive offices and work areas will occupy the Third Floor, 
with book stacks filling the entire upper three floors. 
A service and enclosed truck delivery entrance will be 
located on the Blagden Street side. 

The plan of the new structure is similar in principle 
to the present Library. While the existing building is 
oriented around an open court, the Addition is planned 
around an enclosed interior court, so that a good sense 
of orientation is maintained within the building. The 
fenestration of the new building is kept to a minimum 
and the basic proportions are in sympathetic relation- 
ship to the present Library. 

Philip Johnson, the principal architect, has selected 
the Architects Design Group, Inc., as his associate in 



4 City Document No. 15 

this joint venture. The structural engineer for the 
project is William J. LeMessurier and Francis Associates 
is handling the mechanical engineering. 

Staff committees have been active throughout the year 
reviewing services to be provided in the new and present 
buildings. Basic to the considerations of these com- 
mittees is the plan to provide on the first three floors 
of the new structure a well selected open shelf collection 
of upwards of one-half million volumes. This General 
Library facility will provide service for children, young 
adults, students (both high school and college), and 
adults. 

General Library Services 

Directly related to the evolution of the "Open Shelf 
Department" from a branch within the Central Library 
building to a General Library were the changing of 
the book buying policy for the "Open Shelf Depart- 
ment," the enlargement of its shelving capacity, and 
the modification of its classification system. Beginning 
with the merging of the Branch Issue collection with 
the Open Shelf collection, the former Open Shelf De- 
partment staff embarked on a project of interfiling 
catalogs, integrating shelf lists and doing extensive 
checking toward making recommendations for future 
purchases. Starting in January the Library of Congress 
classification scheme was used for the new General 
Library and branch library collections as well as for 
the research collections. The reclassification of the 
existing collection was undertaken and by the year's 
end approximately 40 percent of the adult nonfiction 
had been reclassified. Advantage was taken of the 
pre-existing lettering of fiction under the Dewey classi- 
fication so that, to all intents and purposes, the fiction 
was already compatible with Library of Congress 
practices. The young adult and children's collections, 
plus the balance of the adult nonfiction, are scheduled 
to be done in 1968. 

An 87 percent increase in circulation in the Central 
Library was due in some measure to the enlarged book 
collection. However, circulation in branches seemed to 



Boston Public Library 5 

drop uniformly. The activities of the Bookmobile 
Service were severely dislocated during the protracted 
truck strike. Following the termination of the truck 
strike a "no fines amnesty" was declared to stimulate 
the return of overdue materials. Despite publicity in 
the news media, the returns were rather limited. 

The Library's role of being a community center 
focused upon learning is emphasized by prog'-ams 
run in the branch libraries in cooperation with local 
community councils and in staff participation as council 
members in community affairs. On a city-wide basis, 
the Library worked with such organizations as the 
World Affairs Council, the Massachusetts Council of 
Churches, the Massachusetts Commission on Aging, 
the Jewish Community Council and a number of Negro 
organizations on the presentation of programs and 
exhibits, and on the preparation and distribution of 
reading lists. 

Among the agencies used as speaker resources for 
the eight Parents' Discussion Groups and the nine 
Never Too Late Groups were: Boston Legal Aid Society, 
Northeastern University, Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital, Boston Ballet Company, WGBH-TV, Family 
Service Association, Unicef, and the New England 
Conservatory of Music. School-public library contacts 
resulted in visits by Young Adults Librarians to junior 
and senior high school classrooms and assemblies as 
well as class visits to the Library. 

Communication and cooperation with youth serving 
agencies took the form of special deposit collections, 
film-book presentations, joint sponsorship of programs, 
and the making of subject booklists. One branch 
library summer program which drew a large attendance 
met weekly to hear speakers on the Peace Corps and 
travel, to stud}' - literary forms, to view films, to make 
field trips, and to embark on service projects. 

In the area of children's work the Library was in- 
volved with the Head Start program, tutorial services 
for the disadvantaged areas of the city and advisory 
service for housing project reading rooms. A full range 
of story hours, pre-school programs and parents' dis- 



6 City Document No. 15 

cussion groups were held in the course of the year and 
special programs designed to stimulate the work of 
children's librarians were organized. 

A change in the lending policy for films for school use 
was made in conjunction with the audio-visual units of 
the State Department of Education and the Boston 
School Department. Films for classroom use are now 
the responsibility of the education departments and 
library films are to be lent to schools for assembly use 
only. Despite this change of policy, audiences for the 
showing of library films totaled 568,046. There were 
999 film showings in the Library system and 11,319 
films were borrowed by other libraries, clubs and or- 
ganizations. A new edition of the film catalog was 
prepared for distribution to libraries in the Eastern 
Region. 

The branch library building program moved ahead. 
Work on the West End Branch was substantially com- 
pleted within the year and its formal opening was 
scheduled for January, 1968. 

In November the contract for the demolition of the 
old Brighton Branch Library and the construction of 
the new branch library was awarded. The Architects 
Collaborative have designed this facility. Temporary 
quarters for branch service were secured in the Brighton 
Congregational Church. 

Work on the new libraries for Charlestown, Fields 
Corner, Dudley Street, Grove Hall, South End, and 
Lower Mills reached various stages of completion. 
Because of the excessive cost of the first bids received 
for the Charlestown and Fields Corner Branches, the 
architects were requested to restudy their designs with 
the view of bringing these projects within the budget. 
It is hoped that construction on the Charlestown and 
Fields Corner Branches will get under waj^ early in 
1968. Cost estimates for the South End Branch indi- 
cated the need for a restudy of the design, and the 
progress on the Dudley and Grove Hall Branches could 
result in 1968 construction starts. The site selected 
for the Lower Mills Branch awaits final approval. 



Boston Public Library 7 

The Eastern Massachusetts Regional Public Li= 
brary System 

Funds for the full implementation of the Eastern 
Regional Library Service were provided in the Com- 
monwealth's 1968 fiscal budget for the year beginning 
July 1, 1967. Interim service for the first six months 
of the calendar year was funded in the 1967 deficiency 
budget. 

By June of 1967 each of the seven subregional libraries 
— Andover, Falmouth, Lowell, New Bedford, Quincy, 
Taunton, and Wellesley — had signed contracts with 
the Commonwealth. These contracts were the same 
in every detail and state that each subregional center 
will provide interlibrary loan and reference services to 
the cities and towns in the subregion. The subregional 
center is the first point to which requests are to be 
relayed, but if the center cannot fill the request it will 
pass it on to the Boston Public Library, the head- 
quarters for regional service. 

The appointment of A. William Kunkel as Adminis- 
trator of the Eastern Regional Library System was 
announced on August 14. Mr. Kunkel was Librarian 
of the Newton Free Library from 1958 until October 1, 
1967, when he assumed his new duties. As an active 
participant in the planning for the Eastern Regional 
Program, including terms as Secretary, Vice-Chairman, 
and Chairman of the Eastern Regional Library Ad- 
visory Council, Mr. Kunkel brings to this important 
post a thorough knowledge of the aims of the regional 
program and the background and experience to ensure 
its success. 

The steady growth in the number of interlibrary 
loan requests including requests channeled through 
the headquarters libraries in the Central and Western 
regions is an indication of the way in which the state 
program is improving service to the citizens. Reference 
service was strengthened with the installation of a tele- 
type service connecting the Worcester, Springfield, and 
Boston libraries. The substantial increase of non- 
resident borrowers in Boston and the New Bedford 
Public Library's free registration for all citizens in its 



8 City Document No. 15 

subregion are important elements in regional service. 
Reading lists prepared at the Boston Public Library 
for the libraries of the Eastern Regional Library System 
are being printed and distributed under the regional 
program. 

With increased urbanization and greater opportunities 
for. leisure time activities there will be need to expand 
our educational, cultural, and social facilities. The 
regional library system is already improving library 
services for the core cities as well as for the suburban 
areas. Its ultimate goal is to assure each citizen the 
same high quality of library service and to make this 
service readily accessible. 

Exhibits 

The exhibits program publicizes the Library's re- 
sources, takes cognizance of annual events such as 
the Children's Book Fair, Negro History Week, and 
Jewish Book Month, features specialized interests and 
takes note of important events. A major event of the 
year was A Salute to Canada, an exhibit of current 
books relating to Canada. The month-long exhibit, 
honoring the 100th anniversary of the Founding of 
the Canadian Federation, featured a collection of over 
1,000 books and magazines dealing with all aspects of 
Canadian life and culture. The cooperation of the 
Combined Book Exhibits and the Canadian and Ameri- 
can publishers is gratefully acknowledged. The Salute 
to Canada included daily showings of films from the 
National Film Board of Canada, displays provided by 
the Canadian Government Travel Bureau, and a 
special program for Canadian organizations sponsored 
by the Trustees of the Library and the Consul General 
of Canada in Boston. 

The Wiggin Gallery exhibitions for the year included: 
a David McCord show in which various phases of his 
diversified career as writer, collector, and artist were 
represented; A Decade of Experiment — color litho- 
graphs and posters of artists of late nineteenth century 
France: Printmakers At Work — designed to give in- 
sight into the processes by which many graphic works 



Boston Public Library 9 

of art have been created ; A Journey To The Picturesque 
— early French landscape lithographs; a Whistler ex- 
hibit; and two shows by contemporary local artists, 
Ture Bengtz and Barbara Westman. 

In addition to a number of popular exhibits pro- 
grammed by the Exhibits staff the Music Department 
arranged a display of music education materials in- 
cluding many early Boston imprints to celebrate the 
Boston meeting of the National Music Educators 
Conference and an exhibit entitled "New Sights and 
Sounds" which was made up of avant garde scores. 

Exhibitions mounted by the Rare Book Department 
included: The Christmas Story through Artists' Eyes: 
medieval manuscripts and woodcuts of the fifteenth 
and sixteenth centuries; Years of Bondage: books and 
manuscripts relating to the Abolitionist movement; 
Manse and Mansion: early books on domestic archi- 
tecture; and The Literary Back Bay. 

Resources 

The circulating collection of foreign language books 
and the film collection were expanded again this year 
with federal support. These federal book credits, made 
available to the Boston Public Library for its regional 
and statewide services, also enabled the Library to ex- 
pand its research resources in a number of fields. New 
serial files have been acquired and at the same time a 
constant effort is under way to fill in gaps in titles al- 
ready held. The Library continued to receive all current 
Israeli publications under the Public Law 480 program; 
similarly, it received current Latin American works 
as one of the major libraries participating in the Latin 
American Cooperative Acquisition project. 

In preparation for the expanded General Library 
services scheduled for the 1970 opening of the new 
building the Coordinator for Research Services was 
assigned the task of identifying the serial and reference 
titles for the new facility. A preliminary list of 1,000 
periodical titles was prepared and some 2,000 reference 
titles selected. Files of some of the periodical titles 
have been donated by libraries in the Eastern Region. 



10 



City Document No. 15 



It is possible to note but a few of the significant 
acquisitions in any given year. A collection of some 
1,800 Peronista items was acquired to strengthen our 
Latin American holdings. In 1967 some 7,000 prints 
were added to the collection. Just over 6,000 of these 
were color lithographs produced by the printing firm 
of Louis Prang in Boston between the years 1865 and 
19Q0f The prints range from big New England land- 
scapes and portraits of famous Americans to thousands 
of greeting cards. During 1967 in conjunction with 
Francis Comstock's work on a definitive catalog of the 
work of Thomas W. Nason, the Library's Nason collec- 
tion has grown from about 80 prints to roughly 500 
prints and 20 drawings and watercolors. Most of these 
have been gifts from Mr. Nason, some have come from 
Francis Comstock. The Nason Catalog will be pub- 
lished by the Library in 1968 or 1969. 

The Rare Book Department, with income from trust 
funds, reports the purchase of distinguished books or 
broadsides in the following fields: 

Titles 
American and English Literature .... 82 
Americana 95 

Caribbeana 129 

Books of Common Prayer 7 

Defoe and his contemporaries .... 72 

Graphic Arts 31 

Juvenilia ... 12 

Landscape architecture and related areas . . 97 

Gifts 

Each year the Library receives gifts of books, pam- 
phlets, and other library materials from a number of 
individuals and organizations. Grateful acknowledg- 
ment is made for all contributions of money and ma- 
terials. These gifts can play an ever-increasing role in 
the Library's aspirations to high quality. The con- 
tinued support of donors combined with support from 
local, state, and federal funds will ensure the growth 
that is necessary for any urban research library which 
intends, at a level of high quality, to serve the total 
library needs of today's community. 



Boston Public Library 11 

Among the noteworthy gifts of 1967 were the follow- 
ing: 

The Hon. Elijah Adlow: An extensive collection of 
Boston legal records of the late 18th and early 19th 
centuries. 

Miss Vera Andrus: Printer's copy (typescript) for 
her book Black River. 

Boston School Department: Administrative records 
of School Committee, 1789-1914. 

Mayor John F. Collins: Official papers. 

Charles D. Childs: Group of books relating to the 
graphic arts. 

Richard Eberhard: Manuscripts and related cor- 
respondence for poem commissioned for 1967 Winter- 

fest. 

Robert W. Greenwood: Collection of documents, 
clippings, photographs, etc., on narrow-gauge rail- 
roads serving Winthrop; Boston, 1875-1942. 

Walter C. Irving: Minutes of Soldiers' Relief Com- 
mittee; Boston, 1862-1865. 

David T. W. McCord: Collection of manuscript 
essays, poems, and correspondence relating to Boston 
and the Boston Public Library, 1953-1967. 

Cornelia Otis Skinner: Printer's copy, galley and 
page proofs of her Madame Sarah, 1966. 

Stephen Tilton: Collection of first editions of 
Arnold Bennett. 

The family of Joseph Welch : M em or abilia including 
photographs, recordings, correspondence, etc., re- 
lating to the Army-McCarthy hearings. 

Mrs. Benedict FitzGerald: The holographs and 
scrapbooks of the late Benedict FitzGerald. 

Quaintance Eaton : Manuscript of The Boston Opera. 

Mrs. Serge Koussevitzky: Collection of scores, 
books, recordings, correspondence and memorabilia 
from the Koussevitzky home in Seranac, at Tangle- 
wood. These materials are to be inventoried before 
being transferred to the Boston Public Library. 



12 City Document No. 15 

Miss Dolores Carrillo: Fifteen recordings of com- 
positions by her father, the Mexican composer, 
Julian Carrillo. 

John Henry Cutler: Typed manuscript of his 
Honey Fitz plus a number of miscellaneous items on 
James M. Curley. 

Senator Leverett Saltonstall: City of Boston and 
United States flags which were aboard General Lee 
Wade's airplane, "The City of Boston," when it became 
the first American airplane to fly around the world 
in 1924. 

Boston Authors Club: Annual gift for its collection. 

Morris Goodman: Annual contribution for the 
purchase of books. 

Boston Stock Exchange Investors Information 
Committee: Contribution for the purchase of invest- 
ment publications in honor of the 175th anniversary 
of the New York Stock Exchange. 

Robison Peters: Scrapbook of his father, Andrew J. 
Peters, Mayor of Boston, 1917-1921. 

Staff Promotions 

Mrs. Vera L. Cheves, from Cataloger and Classifier 
to Chief Cataloger. 

Rosalie A. Lang, from Chief of General Reference to 
Coordinator of the Humanities. 

Macy Margolis, from Curator of History to Coordi- 
nator for Research Services. 

B. Joseph O'Neil, from Coordinator of General 
Reference to Supervisor of Readers Services. 

Louis Polishook, from Chief of Central Charging 
Records to Assistant Supervisor of Readers Services. 

Louis R. O'Halloran, appointed Chief of Central 
Charging Records. 

Staff Retirements 

Gerald L. Ball, since 1964 Curator of Engineering 
Sciences. Mr. Ball entered the full-time service of the 
Library in 1927 and was appointed Chief of the Book 
Purchasing Department in 1950. 



Boston Public Library 13 

Russell A. Scully, Coordinator of Resources and Ac- 
quisitions. Mr. Scully's library career began in 1920. 
He served in the Periodical and Newspaper and the 
General Reference Departments and in the Director's 
Office prior to his appointment as Chief of the Book 
Selection Department in 1957. 

Special mention should be made of the retirement of 
two long-term employees, Mary A. Brennan who has 
worked in the Library since 1918 and Palmira Piciulo 
whose first employment took place in 1915. 

Staff Appointments 

Gunars Rutkovskis as Assistant to the Director in 
charge of personnel. Before joining the Boston Public 
Library staff, Mr. Rutkovskis, who holds masters 
degrees from Boston College and Columbia University, 
served as Head of the Periodical Division, Fordham 
University, Head of the Circulation Division, Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Administration, and Gift 
and Exchange Librarian, Harvard College Library. 

A. William Kunkel as Administrator of the Eastern 
Regional Public Library System. His appointment was 
noted above under the Regional Library Services. 

Dr. Yen-Tsai Feng as Assistant Director for Research 
Library Services. Miss Feng has her doctorate in the 
field of social sciences from the University of Denver 
and an M.S. from Columbia University. She held the 
post of Assistant Librarian in the Harvard College 
Library where she had served as Reference Assistant 
and Subject Specialist in the Resources and Acquisitions 
Department. 

Personnel 

In addition to establishing new salary scales for the 
professional and administrative staffs note should be 
made that the Trustees adopted new salary scales for 
the nonprofessional service and voted to authorize 
the President of the Board of Trustees to approve an 
agreement to be entered into between the City of Boston 
and the American Federation of State, County and 
Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO and Affiliates in respect 



14 City Document No. 15 

to certain employees of the Library in the Library 
Assistants Service, the Clerical Service, the Mechanical 
Service, and certain of the Bookbinders. 

Special library projects were aided immeasurably by 
the assistance given under the federally aided College 
Work-Study Program. Some thirty to thirty-five 
college students were employed during the college year 
on a part-time basis (10 to 15 hours per week) and sixty 
students were employed full time during the summer 
months. Cooperating institutions in 1967 were Boston 
College, Boston University, Brandeis, Emerson College, 
Northeastern University, Simmons College, Suffolk 
University, Tufts University, and the University of 
Massachusetts. 

In addition the Library participated in the Work 
Training Programs for Disadvantaged Persons, and 
cooperated with the Action for Boston Community 
Development, Inc., the Boston Welfare Department, 
'and the John F. Kennedy Family Service Center in 
making job-training programs available to disadvan- 
taged youths and older persons. 

Professional Activities 

The Boston Public Library was host for an afternoon 
session of the Second Annual Convention of the As- 
sociation of Jewish Libraries which met at the Statler- 
Hilton Hotel from May 28 to 31. At the end of August 
following the International Federation of Library Asso- 
ciations meetin at the University of Toronto, 114 dele- 
gates and observers came to Boston. Eighteen nation- 
alities were represented in the group. The largest 
delegation numbering 26 came from Great Britain. 
Other large delegations iecluded the French, German, 
and Russian librarians. The Boston Public Library 
and Boston College served as co-hosts and the program 
arranged by Mrs. Elizabeth L. Wright, of the Director's 
Office, was greatly appreciated by the participants. 

Among the many visitors in the course of the year, 
two might be singled out because of the extent of their 
visits. Mr. David E. Gerard, City Librarian of Notting- 



Boston Public Library 15 

ham, made Boston his first port of call. He spent the 
first two weeks of April here studying all facets of public 
library administration. Mr. Gerard was the first 
librarian to have been awarded a Winston Churchill 
Traveling Fellowship. The second visitor, Miss Patricia 
Dunn, served an internship of approximately six weeks 
in the Rare Book Department. Miss Dunn was on 
leave from her post as Chief Cataloger, West India 
Reference Library, Institute of Jamaica, and came to 
Boston as a participant in the 1967 Multi-National 
Librarian Project of the U. S. Department of State. 

Each year members of the professional staff take an 
active role in national, regional, state, and special 
library organizations. In addition to contributions 
made to workshops, institutes, and training programs 
staff activities to be noted are: 

Mr. John M. Carroll and Miss Mildred C. O'Connor 
taught courses at the Simmons College Graduate 
School of Library Science. 

Mr. Sinclair Hitchings was the main speaker at the 
Annual Senior Convocation of Utica College. He 
also lectured at the Currier Gallery in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, and gave a series of eight seminars 
on the appreciation of prints at the Worcester Art 
Museum. 

Miss Rose Moorachian was elected President of 
the Boston Chapter of the Women's National Book 
Association and had the lead article, Trends in Young 
Adult Reading, in the January-February issue of 
North Country Libraries. 

Miss M. Jane Manthorne contributed to the 
bibliographical projects of the Troubled Child Com- 
mittee of the Association of Hospital and Institution 
Libraries. 

Mr. Euclid J. Peltier was the main speaker at the 
annual program of the New England Unit of the 
Catholic Library Association. He spoke on Literature: 
Challenge for the Film Maker. 

Mr. Francis X. Moloney represented the Library 
at the dedication of the Merrimack College Library 
and the Director attended dedication ceremonies at 



16 City Document No. 15 

the RadclifTe, Newton College, and St. John's 
Seminary libraries. 

Mr. Edward G. Fremd, who for the past three 
years has served as Higher Education Advisor to the 
U. S. State Department Agency for the International 
Development Mission in Guatemala, has had primary 
responsibility for the establishment of a central 
library at the University of San Carlos de Guatemala. 
Mr. Philip J. McNiff was a panelist at a conference 
on Libraries and the Future sponsored by the Atlantic 
Provinces Library Association at Dalhousie Univer- 
sity in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He delivered a paper 
at the annual University of Chicago Graduate Li- 
brary School Conference. He was appointed a mem- 
ber of the Advisory Committee to the Massachusetts 
Board of Higher Education on Library Needs in the 
Public Institutions of Higher Education in the Com- 
monwealth. 

■' Mr. John Alden was interviewed by a Saint Croix 
radio station on the Boston Public Library's West 
Indian collections. At the invitation of Bishop 
Bernardine Mazzarella, O.F.M., Mr. Alden surveyed 
the episcopal archives of Comayagua, Honduras. 
Bishop Mazzarella was at one time stationed in the 
North End and requested the assistance of the 
Library during a visit to Boston. 
I wish to express my appreciation to the members of 
the staff for their cooperation and to thank the members 
of the Board of Trustees for their support. 

Philip J. McNiff, 
Director, and Librarian. 



Boston Public Library 



17 



Table 1. Circulation 
BOOK CIRCULATION 



1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


Central Library 494,130 


477,242 


492,880 


482,000 


521,340 


Kirstein Business Branch . . . 9,554 


9,090 


8,744 


8,212 


7,884 


Deposit Circulation 










(Estimated) 3,736 


4,602 


6,654 


8,969 


11,735 


Adams Street 149,534 


147,735 


142,235 


131,470 


130,918 


Allston 












62,183 


61,715 


57,261 


54,188 


49,040 


Brighton . 












84,081 


85,458 


81,462 


76,544 


66,758 


Charles town 












72,861 


71,441 


58,088 


58,848 


57,362 


Codman Square 












155,238 


150,708 


142,902 


130,998 


122,207 


Connolly . 












88,630 


85,255 


81,372 


73,810 


71,193 


Dorchester 












71,831 


75,087 


68,992 


63,880 


62,280 


East Boston 












62,404 


69,325 


67,035 


58,617 


50,168 


Egleston Square 












103,594 


91,790 


80,534 


67,022 


62,318 


Faneuil 












57,517 


58,741 


54,531 


50,018 


51,683 


Hyde Park 












112,503 


118,128 


118,740 


115,918 


116,771 


Jamaica Plain 












81,271 


82,674 


84,492 


79,157 


77,572 


Lower Mills 












69,312 


69,574 


67,322 


63,367 


62,932 


Mattapan . 












130,234 


127,848 


119,727 


104,360 


96,426 


Memorial . 












40,203 


48,833 


42,234 


37,465 


28,452 


Mt. Bowdoin 












62,097 


60,326 


56,134 


42,671 


34,863 


Mt. Pleasant 












42,640 


43,234 


37,941 


32,872 


27,834 


North End 












38,793 


36,465 


48,353 


46,743 


42,048 


Orient Heights 












43,021 


40,445 


35,999 


35,360 


38,059 


Parker Hill 












58,756 


57,334 


52,751 


47,742 


40,078 


Roslindale . 












221,428 


200,919 


190,495 


182,609 


174,897 


South Boston 












133,785 


130,794 


124,680 


112,500 


99,694 


South End 












36,571 


41,892 


42,808 


39,207 


35,256 


Uphams Corner 










103,963 


100,841 


88,578 


78,729 


70,409 


Washington Village 










79,647 


75,967 


73,166 


67,037 


64,439 


West Roxbury . 










146,496 


159,787 


168,402 


170,280 


164,473 


Bookmobile Service 








447,268 


410,650 


380,059 


373,947 


287,581 


Hospital Library Service 






31,458 


31,262 


29,646 


29,035 


27,270 


Total Book Circulation .... 3,294,739 


3,225,162 


3,104,217 


2,924,175 


2,753,946 



NON-BOOK CIRCULATION 



1963 



1964 



1965 



1966 



1967 



Film and Film Strips 
Recordings 
Pictures 
Total . 



10,311 


10,704 


11,533 


13,428 


12,923 


53,599 


52,233 


59,246 


61,414 


65,041 


31,445 


30,040 


25,063 


27,350 


24,588 



95,355 92,937 95,842 102,192 102,552 



18 City Document No. 15 

VOLUMES SENT ON INTERLIBRARY LOAN 



1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 



Interlibrary loans 1,111 1,111 5,349 6,126 6,407 



Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 



General Library: 

Volumes added 63,987 94,132 88,665 66,653 69,525 

Volumes withdrawn .... 57,449 78,179 87,592 60,535 53,674 

Total on hand December 31 . . 763,101 779,054 780,127 786,245 802,096 

Research Library: 

Volumes added 21,576 26,255 31,816 44,780 49,958 

Volumes withdrawn . . . 1,184 4,329 4,299 5,623 2,654 

Total on hand December 31 . . 1,477,141 1,499,067 1,526,584 1,565,741 1,613,045 

Total Book Stock 2,240,242 2,278,121 2,306,711 2,351,986 2,415,141 



NONBOOK MATERIALS 



Films 1,423 

Filmstrips — 

Recordings 16,360 

Lantern Slides 28,962 

Negatives — 

Pictures 127.972 

Postcards 133,805 

Prints and Drawings .... 29,499 

Projected Books 178 

Microcards ...... — 

Microfiche — 

Microfilms 14,904 

Microprints — 



1,496 


1,561 


1,710 


1,787 


— 


91 


101 


113 


16,036 


17,103 


16,670 


17,411 


14,884 


14,884 


14,884 


14,884 


— 


— 


2,118 


2,130 


386,829 


397,385 


400,006 


405,068 


133,805 


133,805 


133,805 


133,805 


29,758 


30,276 


31,779 


38,779 


178 


178 


178 


178 


— 


— 


3,298 


5,456 


— 


— 


852 


16,158 


15,257 


16,221 


16,969 


20,317 


— 


— 


1,727 


1,851 



Boston Public Library 19 
Table 3. Cataloging Statistics 

1966 1967 

Volumes processed 110,670 128,550 

New Titles cataloged 35,174 50,330 

Original cataloging 8,923 8,977 

LC cataloging 23,065 36,069 

Rare Book cataloging 1,044 1,715 

LC cards processed for volumes cataloged 1965 . 2,091 

Other . 51 77 

Volumes reclassified 163 5,154 

Films 64 326 

Recordings 1,446 3,329 

Microprints — Titles 23 5 

— Boxes 1,429 

— Cards 217 4,257 

Microfilms —Titles 41 154 

— Reels 320 3,525 

Microfiche — Titles 1 4 

— Sheets (in boxes) .... 466 12 

Card Production 

LC cards processed 22,004 200 

Typed cards 97,879 52,218 

Stencils 337 1,001 

Mimeographed cards run 26,834 17,351 

General Microfilm cards 721,260 838,157 

Cards sent to National Catalog .... 28,973 33,359 

Cards sent to National Union Catalog (withdrawn) 2,903 2,456 

Cards Xeroxed — 12,337 



Table 4. Binding 



1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 



Volumes bound .... 18,772 20,788 18,459 31,292 36,429 
Photographs, plates, and maps 

mounted 2,375 2,560 2,000 1,000 1,525 



20 



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