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Full text of "Annual report"

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BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
UBRT^RY 




DOCUMENT 15 — 1972 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



DOCUMENT 15 — 1972 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



SIDNEY R. RABB 

President 

Term expires April 30, 1974 



EDWARD G. MURRAY 

Vice President 

Term expires April 30, 1972 



ERWIN D. CANHAM 
Term expires April 30, 1973 



LENAHAN O'CONNELL 
Term expires April 30, 1971 

AUGUSTIN H. PARKER 
Term expires April 30, 1970 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 

ml 



DOCUMENT 15 -- 1972 

To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

As Director, and Librarian, I have the honor to submit my 
report for the year January 1 to December 31, 1971. 

The year under review saw much attention given to the ex- 
pansion of the General Library book collection in preparation 
for the opening of the Addition to the Central Library in the 
fall of 1972, The selection, ordering, receipt and process- 
ing of the thousands of books, periodicals, records, films 
and other library materials necessary to meet the goals es- 
tablished for the new General Library have required the high- 
est degree of cooperation within and between units of the 
staff. At the year's end, substantial progress had been made 
in setting up the new general reference and periodical collec- 
tions. Some 80,000 volumes had been added to the circulating 
collection and selection had been completed for the enlarged 
record collection, the children's resource collection, and for 
music, fine arts, science, and the social sciences. 

The year saw several innovations to provide better interim 
service in the Central Library. The card catalogs of the 
General Library's adult and juvenile collections were sub- 
stantially converted from Dewey to Library of Congress 
classification; cards for the books processed for the new 
library, though stored in the Service Building at 380 Bunker 
Hill Street, Charlestown, were interfiled; teletype communi- 
cation between the Central Library and the Service Building 
was established; and a daily delivery service for requested 
material was set up. This recall system satisfied a tremen- 
dous number of readers with minimum inconvenience. 

Registration records indicate that 259,429 residents of 
Boston held borrowers' cards. While there was an increase in 
circulation at the Central Library and the newer branches, 
there was over-all a small decrease in branch library circu- 
lation. Bookmqbile service was plagued by major breakdowns 
in automotive equipment and a request for funds to replace 
two of the bookmobiles is included in the 1972 budget. 

Circulation is but one measure of library activity; in- 
house use of services, reference inquiries, programs to bring 
book and reader, film and viewer, or record and listener to- 
gether all contribute to the social and cultural impact which 
the Library makes on the community. 

GENERAL LIBRARY SERVICES 

The report of the General Library Services for 1971 indi- 
cates that service to adults maintained its vigorous variety 
of programming. The Never Too Late activity was well re- 
ceived and deeply appreciated both in the branches and in the 
Central Library. The new Fields Corner Branch had a core 
membership of 150 participants and Never Too Late programs at 
Grove Hall highlighted activity in this new facility. Central 
Library programs included: 

"Come Speak Your Mindl" Group forum to discuss the 



2 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

issue for the 1971 White House Conference 
on the Aging 

"When The Trolleys Came to Boston": Bradley Clarke, 
President, Boston Street Railway Association 

"A City Councilman Looks at Boston": Thomas Atkins 

"A View from the Inside - Massachusetts Correc- 
tional Institution, Norfolk": Rev. Ralph Tucker, 
Assistant Chaplain 

"A Different Frontier - Service in the Ghetto": 
John T. Hough, Jr., Author and Vista Volunteer 

"Old-Time Theatre Sing-Along" Featuring Jack Hyde, 
Pianist 

"Haiti: The Colorful Island": Royal Cloud, Presi- 
dent, Boston Center for the Arts 

Two teams conducting national surveys of service to the 
elderly studied both the Central Library and branch library 
programs. Mothers' discussion groups, an Investment Discus- 
sion Group, a pioneering Preparation for Retirement program, 
and a Street Fair are illustrative of the Library's group 
services to its adult public. 

The Young Adult Services used programs within the Library, 
co-sponsored programs with community groups, and arranged 
school visits and class visits to the branches to generate 
the interest of teenagers in the many services which are 
available to meet their special needs. In cooperation with 
the Boston School Department, library-centered projects were 
planned for students involved in the "released-time" or 
"flexible campus" program. Working with coordinators of 
twelve City high schools, the Library designed several dy- 
namic activities in art, local history, literature, and audio- 
visual fields for students working and studying outside the 
traditional classroom walls. 

Special programs for the elderly, children, teenagers, 
parents, and for citizens in general attracted more than 
100,000 people to 1,088 meetings. Some 1,200 film showings 
at branches and 1,600 film loans to Boston schools are in- 
cluded in the 27,990 film loans from the Audio-Visual Depart- 
ment. More than 921,000 people attended these film showings. 

Services to children offered 582 branch library programs, 
631 film showings, 123 story hours, 687 indoctrination visits 
to the Library, and 1,494 visits to classrooms. In addition, 
the bookmobile service reached 6,854 classrooms. 

Involvement with community groups is a major concern of 
branch library staffs. Increasingly the needs of ethnic 
groups enter into the picture and influence the types of pro- 
grams and services to be offered. Among the special outreach 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 3 

programs is the new Multilingual Library established with the 
assistance of a Federal Library Services and Construction Act 
grant. This new store front facility is the outgrowth of an 
earlier outreach program, the Biblioteca Latina, set up three 
years ago, also with the aid of an LSCA grant. The Multi- 
lingual Library supplements the services of the new South End 
Branch. It hopes to build bridges of understanding and to 
provide easily accessible, informal library service to the 
various linguistic groups living in the South End. Materials 
currently available -- books, periodicals, newspapers, re- 
cordings -- include the following languages: Spanish, Portu- 
guese, Chinese, Greek, Japanese, Arabic, Armenian and Italian. 

A second LSCA grant provided a Homesmobile service to 
"shut-ins" in private homes, rest homes and nursing homes. 
Books, film showings, listening services, and professional 
reading counseling have contributed greatly to the lives of 
many handicapped citizens. Large-print books play an im- 
portant role in service to readers with failing vision. The 
Library's rapidly growing collection services the branches 
and the regional library program as well as the Homesmobiles. 
In furthering the program, the Library plans to enlist insti- 
tutions such as the Boston Center for Older Americans and 
Companions Unlimited of the Women's Educational and Industrial 
Union. 

Special note should be made of the 100th anniversary of 
the East Boston Branch Library, the first branch library to 
be established in the United States, Community programs for 
children, young adults and adults signalized this event. A 
special exhibit featured pictures, books and newspaper clip- 
pings about Old East Boston as well as models of famous his- 
toric ships. 

The Grove Hall Branch Library and its neighbor Freedom 
House combined to stage the 1972 Black History Month program, 
"Rgxbury Showcase, Right On into the Seventies", a panorama 
of the social, economic and cultural programs and projects 
being carried out by Roxbury community agencies, organiza- 
tions and institutions. The major program in this annual ob- 
servance has been jointly sponsored since 1965 by the Boston 
Public Library and more than a dozen Black community organi- 
zations. 

RESEARCH LIBRARY SERVICERS 

The in-depth profile study of the collection, which was 
begun last year, continued apace and by the end of the year 
subjects covered included anthropology, business and account- 
ing, national bibliographies, government documents and 
statistics, architecture, graphic arts, music, maps, picture 
collection, English and American literature, little magazines, 
newspapers, American history, photography, philosophy and re- 
ligion, and microform materials. 

Each subject was reviewed as to the existing strength in 
the Library collection, the state of the art in general, the 
recommended level of coverage by the Boston Public Library, 



4 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

and the budgetary implications. This study emphasized the 
need to relate the development of specific subject collec- 
tions to the coordinated growth of the total collection. 

Several major advances in the documents area took place in 
1971. In June the Boston Public Library was designated the 
Regional Deposit Library for U.S. documents in Massachusetts 
and in October it became a full United Nations Depository 
Library. The regional responsibility for U.S. documents was 
formerly held by the Massachusetts State Library. The World 
Peace Foundation, in addition to assisting in having its 
United Nations depository status transferred to the Boston 
Public Library, turned over to the Library its entire file of 
United Nations and related publications, thus assuring the 
uninterrupted documentation of international organizations 
since the end of World War II. Archival papers in the custody 
of the City Clerk were also deposited in the Library. 

The cooperation of neighboring libraries continues to 
strengthen the collections and services of the Boston Public 
Library. The Museum of Fine Arts contributed its files of 
more than 60,000 mounted pictures; the American Antiquarian 
Society transferred its post-1870 collection of American city 
directories, as well as a collection of State documents; a 
consortium of private universities (Boston College, Boston 
University, Brandeis and Tufts) contributed two-thirds of the 
cost of an extensive microfilm file of German Foreign Ministry 
documents. The 5,162 reels, acquired from the National Ar- 
chives, are in the Library's microtext collection. 

In cooperation with the Bicentennial Committee of the 
Eastern Regional Library System, an exhibit on the American 
Revolution was prepared for the annual New England Book 
Festival sponsored by the Boston Globe. The Library also 
mounted a display of facsimiles of early American newspapers. 
In recognition of the festival theme, the role of newspapers 
and public information, the Library published a special bib- 
liography entitled The Public Interest ^nd the Right to Know: 
Access to Government Information and the Role of the Press, 
a Selective Bibliographical Guide " 

The preliminary edition of Serials Currently Received in 
the Boston Public Library represents the first step toward 
up-to-date bibliographical control of serials. It serves as 
a most useful reference tool and provides the data necessary 
for a systematic review of the serial program. 

The Rare Books and Manuscripts Department reports that it 
registered some 1,500 visitors representing all sections of 
the country as well as Canada and abroad. Topics under in- 
vestigation ranged from alchemy to the Women's Christian Tem- 
perance Union, although the chief single interest was in the 
Library's anti -slavery materials. 

Some 900 printed items, including three incunables, were 
added to the collections. Noteworthy manuscript additions 
included papers of Harriet Lothrop; account book of Charles 
Apthorp (1698-1758); manuscripts of Edwin O'Connor, the gift 
of his widow; 35 letters of General "Chinese" Gordon; and a 
substantial lot of letters of Reynaldo Hahn, the French composer. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 5 

The Library was host for one of the sessions of the Inter- 
national Congress of Bibliophiles. In addition to mounting 
an appropriate exhibition for the occasion, a facsimile keep- 
sake of George Santayana's earliest work, Lines On Leaving 
the Bedford St. Schoolhouse , was distributed"! 

In addition to publications already cited, a descriptive 
catalog, Canadian Manuscripts in the Boston Public Library , 
was published by G. K. Hall . Approval was also given by the 
Trustees to have published a book catalog of the music collec- 
tion. The Library was joint publisher with the Peabody Museum 
of Salem of John Wilmerding's Robert Salmon . The year also 
included the publication of a checklist of American political 
manuscripts, 1774-1940, prepared by the Curator of Manuscripts; 
Sparks: Science Projects, Avenues of Research and Keys to 
Science , prepared by the Science Reference staff; and the 4th 
edition of the Film Catalog which describes the more than 
2,800 films available in the Audio-Visual Department. A 
special list of films in Spanish, Peliculas en Espanol , was 
prepared for the Spanish community. 

The Print Department celebrated its 30th anniversary with 
an exciting array of exhibitions both in the Wiggin Gallery 
and in the various Newbury Street galleries: 

Children's Book Illustration and Book Design 
by Blair Lent 

Sight! ines, photographs by Elsa Dorfman, 
Kipton Kumber, and Jaye Phillips 

Cool power: Contemporary Prints from the 
Boston Public Library 

Thirty Years of the Wiggin Collection 

American Prints, portraits of famous statesmen and 
generals of the Revolutionary period and 
early America landscapes 

Watered ors, paintings by Andre Boules, S.J., 
French artist 

Robert Salmon.'s Boston - prints and reproductions 
of paintings by Salmon and his contemporary 
artists during his residence in Boston, 
1828-1842 

Eric Gill, woodcuts and woodengravings - a 
salute to the Society of Printers 

The Library is indebted to its many friends for the many 
gifts received. Institutions as well as individuals assist 
the Library in building up its resources. Among the in- 
stitutions presenting materials this year were the Essex 



6 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

Institute of Salem, Leominster Public Library, Memorial Hall 
Library of Andover, Lexington's Cary Memorial Library, and 
the Osterville Free Library. The First National Bank has 
given the Library four large canvases painted by Newell Con- 
verse Wyeth. The paintings depict Phoenician biremes, Eliza- 
bethan galleons, Yankee clipper ships and a tramp steamer. 
Among individual donors Mr, Paul Doguereau of Cambridge 
and the Mason Music Foundation gave his personal collection 
of books and music recordings, and Miss Anna E. Roth of 
Franklin donated the M. C. Crane collection of folk music. 
Mr. Ralph L. Thompson of Washington, D.C. presented his collec- 
tion of early Boston playbills and Mr. Theodore Drury gave 
books on business and accounting. Original sketches were re- 
ceived from local artists Bob Howard and Frederick Kuhn, and 
Allan R. Crite, the distinguished Black artist, added several 
portfolios of his series of Christmas paintings to earlier 
contributions. 

EASTERN REGIONAL LIBRARY SERVICE 

The extension office in Fall River was transferred to 
Taunton; a supplementary film deposit was established at the 
North Reading Extension Center; bookmobile service to the 
Middlesex House of Correction was instituted with materials 
selected by inmate volunteers; in January Boston began re- 
gional delivery service three times a week to 14 communities 
and two times a week to 15 communities; Wellesley's delivery 
service to libraries in its area began in April and in May 
Quincy's program for 30 communities was started; in addition 
to the work of a Bicentennial Committee mentioned earlier in 
this report, it should be noted that exploration of a co- 
operative cataloging program was instituted by another re- 
gional committee. 

As in the past several years, the Headquarters Library has 
greatly increased and broadened its collection of basic 
reference and research tools such as printed catalogs of 
world- important library collections; reprint editions of major 
sources such as the British Parliamentary Series covering much 
sought after documents on slavery, crime, and social welfare; 
extensive out-of-print collections on specific subjects such 
as Irish history and culture and Afro-American literature; 
and microtext materials in the following basic categories: 
newspapers and other serial publications, public documents 
and official records, archival papers, and specially as- 
sembled subject collections. 

BUILDINGS 

The new South End Branch Library was completed in 1971, 
the Central Library building was cleaned, and progress on the 
Central Library Addition was on schedule. 

The South End Branch was designed by Mitchell/Giurgola 
Associates and c-onstructed by the Sabia Construction Company 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 7 

under the direction of the Public Facilities Department. The 
new, 9,443 square foot branch library building was opened in 
1971. The building, located on a shallow, block-long site on 
Tremont Street between West Newton and Rutland Streets, pre- 
sents a careful architectural solution which recognizes the 
cultural and architectural integrity of the South End of the 
1870's and the program needs of a branch library in the 1970' s. 
The exterior of red brick and the two-level height complement 
the traditional red brick structures and the roof lines of the 
neighborhood. 

The first floor provides space for two clearly defined 
reading areas, one for adults and young adults, the other for 
children. Natural light is brought into the reading areas by 
skylights. Clerestory windows along the West Newton and 
Tremont Street facades of the building effectively reduce the 
noise and distraction of traffic on these busy streets. This 
solution also provides good space for wall shelving, thus 
keeping to a minimum the number of free-standing bookcases. 

The branch library is air-conditioned and carpeted. It is 
heated by gas. The metal wall shelving and natural oak floor 
shelving accommodate some 25,000 books. The adult area pro- 
vides seating for 24 readers at tables and an equal number in 
lounge chairs. The children's area seats 24 at tables and 
has very flexible seating capabilities for story hours, pre- 
school programs, and informal reading. Staff and work quarters 
are also located on the first floor. 

The stairway to the second floor divides the adult area 
from the children's area. A meeting room, with adjacent stor- 
age and kitchen facilities, and a small special activities room 
occupy the second floor. 

Work on the Central Library Addition moved ahead on schedule 
and is expected to be completed in the fall of 1972. The last 
piece of steel was added to the framework on March 12, 1971 and 
the "topping off" ceremony was attended by representatives of 
the Trustees, the Public Facilities Department, the architects, 
the general contractor, and consulting engineers. 

The cleaning of the exterior of the existing building, 
arranged by the Public Facilities Department, and the in- 
stallation of exterior lighting on the Dartmouth Street facade, 
a special Boston Redevelopment Authority project, set the stage 
for a Christmas-Hanukkah ceremony on December 13. The music of 
the St. Paul's Choir School, the lighting of the menorah candle, 
and the turning on of the lights on the Copley Square facade of 
the Library at the signal of Mayor Kevin White produced, in the 
words of a Boston Globe editorial, "a friendly little ceremony 
that spoke volumes accidentally rich in symbolism. . .For 
the noble facade of the library, which is one of this 
country's architectural treasures (as its contents are 
intellectual treasures) stood suddenly forth in the night 
as it had not stood before in all tlie 76 years it has been 
embellishing the square. To have rediscovered this 
loveliness and to have proceeded with dignity and mutual 



8 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

affection to illuminate it should be a source of pride to 
Bostonians. Civilization is composed of such acts..." 

PERSONNEL 

The staff was saddened by the deaths of several staff 
members in 1971. Thomas J. Manning, under whose kindly di- 
rection the Library's exhibits program prospered, died after 
a lingering illness shortly before his scheduled retirement; 
Miss Catherine M. MacDonald, who handled the position of 
Personnel Officer with wisdom and equanimity, died suddenly 
while on vacation;and Joseph M. Hulme, the efficient chief of 
the Duplicating Section, collapsed and died at a tragically 
early age. Mrs. Audrey Cohen, a valued worker in the Cata- 
loging Department, also died suddenly. Edward F. Clonan, a 
senior building custodian, and Gerald L. Ball, retired cura- 
tor of Science and Technology, also died during the year. 

We must also record the death, after a long illness, of 
Mrs. Ruth Hill Viguers, author, editor, critic and lecturer 
on children's literature. Shortly before her death she had 
given the Library her extensive collection of children's 
books to be added to the newly established historical collec- 
tion of children's books. 

The year 1971 also saw the retirement of a number of long- 
term employees who had contributed much to the success of 
library operations during the past three or four decades. 
Included in this group were: Miss Elizabeth B. Brockunier, 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees and Assistant to the Di- 
rector; Mrs. Elizabeth L. Wright, Assistant to the Director; 
Mrs. Bridie P. Stotz, Branch Librarian, Charlestown; 
Mrs. Eleanora N. Chaplik, Branch Librarian, Codman Square; 
Miss Nura Globus, Branch Librarian, Egleston Square. These 
officers of the Library were given emeritus status. Other 
retirees included Miss Martha C. Engler, Mrs. Evelyn Korn- 
muller, Mrs. Alice E. Driscoll, Mrs. Helen M. Harrington, 
and Mrs. Bertha S. Keswick. 

The Trustees honored at a luncheon two officers who had 
completed 50 years of service: Miss Ruth M. Hayes, Co- 
ordinator of Children's Services and Miss Mary M. McDonough, 
Chief of Preparation. At the annual meeting honoring those 
who had completed 25 years of service, the President of the 
Board of Trustees presented citations and B.P.L. chairs to the 
following: 

Mrs. Anna M. Brackett 
Frank J. Gallagher 
Mrs. Mary E. Lebert 
Frederick N. Rodenmacher 
Mrs. Helen A. Scollins 

Among the many staff contributions to professional activi- 
ties could be cited Miss M. Jane Manthorne's service as 
President, Young Adult Services Division of the American 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 9 

Library Association; Raymond E. Agler's chairmanship of the 
ALA's Notable Books Committee; Mrs. Margaret Brown's chair- 
manship of the Massachusetts Library Association's Adult 
Services Round Table; and Edward J. Montana, Jr.'s activities 
in the area of library public relations. Euclid J. Peltier 
was elected to the Board of Directors of the Education Film 
Library Association; Miss Mildred C. O'Connor served as Ar- 
chivist of the Special Libraries Association; John M. Carroll 
served as Director of the Massachusetts Council for the Humani- 
ties; Monsignor Edward G. Murray was elected Vice President of 
the Urban Library Trustees Council; and John Alden was a 
Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, London; the Director 
participated in a Seminar on Foreign Acquisitions at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin and was a speaker at the 100th anniversary 
celebration of the Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield; James Ford 
continued his editorial and bibliographical work in Irish 
studies; John Alden addressed the Professional Librarians 
Association of Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario, Canada; 
Louis A. Sasso was involved in a cooperative program to provide 
library careers for minorities (this program involves the 
Boston Public, Harvard and M.I.T. Libraries and Simmons Col- 
lege). 

The year 1971 saw a revision of the state aid law which 
increased substantially both the direct grants in aid and sup- 
port for the regional library programs. However, local sup- 
port is the mainstay of library activities and once again the 
support of the City authorities is deeply appreciated. I 
wish to express appreciation to all members of the staff for 
their cooperation and to the members of the Board of Trustees 
for their leadership and support. 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



10 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

Table 1 . Circulation 
BOOK CIRCULATION 





1970 


1971 


Central Library 


502,795 


533.539 


Kirstein Business Branch 


8,447 


9,557 


Adams Street 


110,172 


108,422 


Allston 


42,703 


41,965 


Bookmobile Service 


268,774 


247,087 


Brighton 


132,175 


143,039 


Charlestown 


50,885 


48,524 


Codman Square 


66,582 


54,467 


Connolly 


49,512 


46,242 


East Boston 


39,876 


39,552 


Egleston Square 


40,259 


38,096 


Faneuil 


44,111 


37,977 


Fields Corner 


105,687 


110,246 


Grove Hall 


21,114 


42,029 


Hyde Park 


116,013 


114,695 


Jamaica Plain 


67,028 


64,508 


Lower Mills 


53,942 


53,109 


Mattapan 


60,242 


50,036 


♦Memorial Bookmobile 


1,519 





#Mt. Bowdoin 


15,711 





Mt. Pleasant 


27,753 


24,686 


North End 


39,621 


32,727 


Orient Heights 


34,153 


33,789 


Parker Hill 


43,287 


37,655 


Roslindale 


143,219 


130,687 


South Boston 


83,950 


79,789 


South End 


23,837 


27,340 


Uphams Corner 


51 ,388 


51,218 


Washington Village 


35,943 


33,750 


West End 


67,000 


68,990 


West Roxbury 


151,179 


154,145 


Hospital Library Service 


27,831 


28,278 


##Multilingual Library (Biblioteca 


Latina) 5,998 


13,440 



Total, Branch Libraries 2,021,464 1,956,488 

Total, Entire Library 2,532,706 2,499,584 



♦Service transferred to Bookmobile Service, March 1, 1970 
#Branch closed December 11, 1970 

##Biblioteca Latina service transferred to Multilingual Library, 
October 13, 1971 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
NON-BOOK CIRCULATION 



11 



1970 



Films and Film Strips 

Recordings 

Pictures 



22,344 
41 ,906 
11,722 



1971 



27,990 

42,841 

9,463 



Totals 



75,972 



80,294 



VOLUMES SENT ON INTERLIBRARY LOAN 



Interlibrary loans 



1970 
12,404 



1971 
14,3S9 



Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



1970 



1971 



General Library: 
Volumes added 
Volumes withdrawn 

Total on hand December 31 

Research Library: 
Volumes added 
Volumes withdrawn 

Total on hand December 31 



131,287 156,757 
81 ,467 61 ,881 

925,881 1,020,757 



103,189 106,943 
1,032 5,641 

1,879,889 1,981,191 



Total Book Stock 



2,805,770 3,001,948 



12 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

NON-BOOK MATERIALS 



1970 1971 



Films 

Filmstrips 

Recordings 

Lantern Slides 

Negatives 

Pictures 

Postcards 

Prints and Drawings 

Projected Books 

Microcards 

Microfiche (sheets) 

Microfilm (reels) 

Microprints (boxes) 

(673,650 shs.)(728,325 shs.) 



3,042 


3,560 


142 


160 


22,124 


24,099 


14,884 


14,884 


2,130 


2,130 


420,511 


426,426 


133,805 


133,805 


50,255 


53,264 


178 


178 


11,283 


11,283 


90,837 


128,338 


34,759 


42,040 


2,994 


3,237 



Table 3. Cataloging Statistics 



1970 1971 



Volumes processed 233,562 278,003 

New titles cataloged 58,069 62,868 

Original cataloging 11,963 13,373 

LC cataloging 46,025 48,119 

Rare Book cataloging 81 1,376 

Films 350 518 

Recordings 6,092 6,474 



Table 4. Binding 



1970 1971 



Volumes bound 55,756 58,338 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 13 

Table 5. Library Expenditures 



1970 1971 



Salaries and Wages: 

City Appropriation $4,729,008.99 $4,821,322.16 

Eastern Regional Public Library System 241,264.07 260,630.65 

Trust Funds Income 3,836.05 2,304.82 

-Total $4,974,109.11 $5,084,257.63 

Books and Other Library Materials: 

City Appropriation $757,523.54 $764,603.33 

Eastern Regional Public Library System 361,657.09 435,051.10 

Trust Funds Income 81,008.10 64,609.74 

Gifts for Current Use 5,142.95 23,931.27 

Library Services and Construction Act 281,965.48 183,461.27 

Book Credits 

Total $1,487,297.16 $1,471,656.71 

All Other Expenses: 

City Appropriation $588,649.29 $610,539.96 

Eastern Regional Public Library System 111,361.56 101,297.98 

Trust Funds Income 12,225.15 12,020.84 

Library Services and Construction Act - 30,612.62 

Book Credits 

Total $712,236.00 $754,471.40 



GRAND TOTAL $7,173,642.27 $7,310,385.74 



KIS, n"^'-"= LIBR^BV 



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