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Full text of "Annual report"

DOCUMENT 15 — 1975 




ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



DOCUMENT 15 — 1975 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



EDWARD G. MURRAY 
President 



AUGUSTIN H. PARKER 
Vice President 



ERWIN D. CANHAM 



SIDNEY R. RABB 



PATRICIA H. WHITE 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



DOCUMENT 15 — 1975 

To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

As Director, and Librarian, I have the honor to submit my report 
for the year January 1 to December 31, 1972. 

The highlight of the year was the dedication and opening of the 
addition to the Central Library in December. On Monday, December 11, 
a group of distinguished speakers and invited guests participated in 
the opening ceremonies. Archbishop Humberto Medeiros led off the 
program with an invocation. After welcoming remarks by Philip J. 
McNiff, Sidney R. Rabb, President of the Board of Trustees, outlined 
some of the history of the Library's plans for expansion, including 
the generosity of past benefactors and the untiring efforts of those 
associated with the present building. He introduced the other Library 
Trustees: Monsignor Edward G. Murray, Erwin D. Canham, Augustin H. 
Parker and Patricia H. White, concluding that the completion of the 
new Library Addition was just a beginning: "And now a greater task 
has begun ... more space, more books, more services, more activities. 
And this, of course, will call for more and more community involve- 
ment." 

David T. W. McCord, poet and essayist, spoke of the important 
role of libraries in providing for the many and diverse needs of people 
of all ages and backgrounds. He also praised the architectural accom- 
plishment of the new General Library: "A building which massively 
and modestly honors the Florentine palace to the east of it; that 
happy marriage of the old and the new, which I, for one, thought could 
not be achieved." 

Rabbi Mayer Strassfeld delivered a message on the nature of books 
and libraries, followed by remarks of the architect of the new Addition, 
Philip C. Johnson. Mr. Johnson described the challenge of designing 
a building which' would harmonize with the magnificent architecture of 
the McKim Library, and praised the city for its ability to present this 
challenge: "It's only Boston that would want to add to already the 
greatest Library in the world, an addition." 

The final speaker. Mayor Kevin H. White, emphasized the signifi- 
cance of the new Library for the City of Boston: "I want to take a 
moment to underscore what this building means to the people of this 
city, and what it signifies in terms of the struggle of one city to 
meet, to manage, and to begin to overcome the challenge of urban crisis. 

"Tonight we are celebrating the opening of the largest modern 
library facility in America. The vision was planted 120 years ago 
when this city took the bold step of opening the first free public 
library in the nation. The standard was to be and remains ... 
excellence. The method ... openness. The goal ... opportunity. So 
tonight we stand in an architectural masterpiece which is the outgrowth 
of this century long dream, and the fulfillment of its promise." 

Reverend Barnes, Pastor of Trinity Church, concluded the speaking 
program with a benediction. 

On the following day the new General Library was opened to the 
public, who came in large numbers to inspect and put to use the ex- 
panded facilities available to them. Several Open House receptions 
were held during the opening week, to welcome all members of the 
community. Wednesday, December 13 was a special day for young adults; 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

on Thursday, December 14 there was a reception for senior adults; and 
on Friday, December 15 children were invited to a program arranged for 
them. The weeks festivities closed on Saturday, December 16 with a 
Christmas caroling concert by the New England Conservatory's Youth 
Singers and the Children's Chorus. 

The opening of the General Library begins a new era of service 
for the Boston Public Library and marks a turning point in its develop- 
ment. It symbolized the commitment of the City of Boston to the advance- 
ment of learning and honors the generosity of private citizens whose 
gifts, to a substantial degree, have made the construction of the new 
building possible. 

Another event of major importance was the founding of the Associates 
of the Boston Public Library. The Associates were established to share 
and stimulate the work of the Library at many levels of education and 
research. With the Associates' help, the Library will be able to pur- 
chase special materials that would be beyond our normal budget alloca- 
tions, ensure the repair and restoration of important works already in 
the collections, and by stimulating exhibitions, publications and 
lectures, make the Library's collection and services more visible and 
useful . 

The Associates of the Boston Public Library held their first 
meeting on March 10, 1972, to hear Philip Johnson speak about his 
experiences in designing the new General Library Building. On June 6, 
Mr. Johnson led the Associates on a guided tour of the new building 
and the Associates were also among the invited guests at the 
ceremonies opening the building on December 11. In the future the 
Associates will meet twice annually, and will also receive notices 
of exhibitions and the opportunity to buy library publications at a 
special discount. 

The South Boston Branch of the Library celebrated its 100th 
anniversary in October. The centennial program on October 19 included 
a hymn written in 1872 for the original dedication ceremony and sung 
by three residents of South Boston who are students at St. Paul's 
School, Cambridge. The principal address was delivered by Mr. Francis 
W. Sidlauskas, Execytive Director of the Massachusetts Revolutionary 
War Bicentennial Commission. 

BUILDINGS 

The major function of the Library's Addition will be the housing 
of the General Library Division, v/liich includes a 450,000 volume open 
shelf circulating collection; expanded childrens' and young adult 
collections and services; a 50,000 volume foreign language collection 
in a dozen or more languages; a comprehensive modern Audio Visual 
Department; and large circulating collections of phonograph recordings, 
films, pictures, and fine arts materials. Public service will be 
provided on four levels of the new building. On the third floor will 
be much needed room for the Library's processing operations, its com- 
puter center, and its business and administrative offices. The four 
upper floor levels are designed primarily for book stacks of the 
Research Library division. Among the special facilities of the Addition 
are a new 374-seat Lecture Hall, conference rooms, and new staff quarters. 
Noteworthy also is the inclusion within the building of entirely new 
quarters for the Library's distinguished Rare Book Department, including 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

offices, book stacks and a display area. 

The new building is a monumental structure, simple in basic plan, 
pure in line, functional in design, handsomely and lastingly impressive. 
It conforms with the older building in such major respects as the 
height of its cornice line, its rectangular shape, its massive pro- 
portions, and the use in its exterior walls of pink Milford granite. 

A spectacular Great Hall, or inner court, faced throughout with 
the same granite that is used on the exterior walls, is the dominent 
architectural feature of the building's interior; it soars from street 
level to roof line, where a square-shaped skylight, 50 feet by 50 
feet in area, illumines the building's whole central core with a flood 
of natural daylight. From the floor of the Great Hall access is pro- 
vided to the mezzanine and second floor levels by a graceful double- 
branched granite staircase. Despite the mass of its great structural 
piers and upper facade, the building's open, well-defined interior 
spaces give an impression" of amplitude, clarity and light. 

The total cost of constructing and furnishing the Central Library 
Addition was $24,100,000. The construction cost was $22,700,000 
and the cost of furniture and equipment was $1,400,000. By extra- 
ordinary efficiency, the Vappi & Company, Inc. construction firm was 
able to keep costs below the original contract price. This achievement 
permitted the absorption, within the original contract totals of 
certain additional construction costs made necessary by special 
requirements of the City's Building Commissioner. The City of Boston 
contributed $19,000,000 toward the cost of the new building and Library 
trust funds dedicated to building purposes contributed $4,395,000. 
To these sums was added a grant of $605,000 from the Federal government 
under terms of the Library Services and Construction Act. 

GENERAL LIBRARY SERVICES 

The opening of the General Library was the culmination of years of 
cooperation and effort by all levels of library staff to make the new 
expanded service a reality. Preparation for the move to the new 
building reached its height during 1972, but at the same time the ongoing 
activities of the General Library Service continued without interruption. 
School visits were made by branch library staff. Reading lists were 
prepared. Meetings of Never Too Late Groups, film programs, etc. were 
held. 

Some changes were introduced. For the first time films were 
circulated through branch libraries. Registration processes and bor- 
rowers' cards were made bilingual. Use of 8mm films in service to 
nursing homes was introduced. The circulation techniques in the Central 
Library were adapted from film charging to a punch card operation 
transitional to the move to the new building and to the use of more 
sophisticated equipment. Changes in hours of opening were experimented 
with in branch libraries -- more Saturday hours, fewer evening hours. 
At the same time the imminence of transition of the General Library to 
its new quarters, where it could properly fulfill the role of a robust 
resource center for a true city-wid° general library service as well as 
become a prime force in an Eastern Regional Library System, permeated 
the thinking, the decisions, the planning and daily functions of the 
whole General Library Services Division. 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

The rallying of resources for the expanded General Library re- 
flected the transitional stages preparatory to launching service itself 
in the new building. The count of material reported in the units of 
the Division grew as follows: 





Total 


Total 


Books 


Added 


Record i 


ings Added 




Books 


Recordings 


GL 


Branch 


GL 


Branch 


1968 


856,787 


15,708 


28.848 


81,738 


2,490 


2,184 


1969 


876.061 


19,209 


19.850 


63,193 


3,342 


2,035 


1970 


925,881 


22,104 


34,726 


91,089 


3,137 


1,352 


1971 


1,020,757 


24,099 


79,424 


62,730 


2,328 


1,722 


1972 


*1, 112, 517 


*24,400 


132,641 


56,567 


1,917 


488 



The registered use of such resources offers an encouraging, endor- 
sement of the fact that improved resources will be sought out by waiting 
readers. 





Book 


Circulation 






Film 






Central 
535,492 


Branches 
2,270,277 


Total 
2,805,769 


Circulation Attendance 


1968 


18,964 




567,403 


1969 


520,330 


2,027,854 


2,548,184 


22,156 




873,376 


1970 


502,795 


2,021,171 


2,523,966 


22,344 




695,595 


1971 


533,539 


1,956,488 


2,490,027 


27,990 




921,021 


1972 


558,217 


1,817,317 


2.375.534 


36,050 


1 


,563,593 



The formally registered borrowers' tally can be reported as follows 
and reflects the same response to service offered. 





Boston 


Non-Boston 


Total 


1968 


259.741 


48,602 


308,343 


1969 


289,000 


67,197 


356,197 


1970 


290,243 


68,739 


358,982 


1971 


**259,429 


67,990 


**327,419 


1972 


256,471 


73,158 


329,629 



These figures, while showing certain positive aspects of service 
such as more registered borrowers, more use of the central General 
Library, also reveal the diminution of borrowing from branch libraries, 
a phenomenon that occurred in other metropolitan libraries five, seven 
years ago, which is now reflected in Boston's figures. Here those services 
that cannot be measured in terms of home borrowing must be considered. 
During the year 1972 sampling figures show that as many as 1,250 people 
were using the branches at a 3:30 p.m. on January 12, that 7,700 came and 
went in the course of the same day. Thirteen thousand seven hundred 
and thirty questions were answered in the week between January 10 and 
January 15. Beyond this the staff maintained specific services. 

*These figures do not reflect material processed and not fully available. 
**Drop reflects change in method of keeping statistics. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Children's Services provided 8,300 classroom orientation 
meetings, 480 story hours, 836 pre-school story hours, 59 listening 
programs. One hundred eighty-two agencies were visited. Four hundred 
thirteen other activities (summer reading clubs, puppet shows) were 
held. In all 60,000 children participated in these activities, 
exclusive of those who were readers, or made classroom visits or who 
visited the libraries only to browse, do homework, or borrow without 
participating in a group. 

Parallel to this Children's Program the Young Adult Program in 
branch libraries offered school contacts (176 classroom or school 
assembly visits), film programs (116) and other professional library 
sponsored programs or consultations (3291). This program is supported 
essentially in 14 of the 26 branches. 

The Adult Services maintained its Never Too Late Groups, Friends 
Groups, film showings, Great Books contacts. Great Decisions programs. 
The Central Library Never Too Late Group continued to reach from 200 
to 300 people per program. The Branch Adult work included active 
Friends Groups at the Adams Street and the Charlestown Branches with 
an average of 50 members participating in each of the 11 meetings; 
active Never Too Late Groups in 15 branches with an average attendance 
of 50 at 193 meetings; Parents Discussion Groups in ten branches with 
programs reaching 2,580 parents; six Book Review, Book Discussion 
Groups holding 50 meetings with 581 members; two Great Decisions 
Groups holding 16 meetings with 216 in attendance; and some 75 general 
adult programs (films plus speakers) with 2,600 in attendance, an 
average of 35 people per meeting. 

Beyond formal programs, not registered in circulation or reading 
room attendance, the needs of those with a language background other 
than English continued to receive major attention through the "Multi- 
lingual Library," as well as through more foreign language deposits 
in Branch Libraries, and foreign language reading lists (Arabic Chinese, 
Spanish, Portguese). The activities of the Jamaica Plain/Connolly 
Branch reflected the transition of the neighborhood from a black/white 
community to a Spanish speaking/black/white community. Both Multilingual 
Library and Jamaica Plain Branch were strengthened not only in their 
book collections but also by recruiting staff with language backgrounds 
invaluable in working with the community and the materials. 

Attention to the shut-in and visually handicapped was developed 
via the Homesmohile Service which was administratively made a part of 
the Bookmobile Service. A program of buying books in larger type was 
continued. Homesmobile and Bookmobile Collections were merged with 
the expectation that both would be enriched and staff working with any 
potential reader would be able to draw on more resources. 

Both these activities, service to the foreign-language public and 
to the shut-in, enjoyed substantial but not total support via Federal 
funds allocated by the Massachusetts Library Extension Division. 

Discussion that would hopefully lead to prison service did not 
result in formal service being initiated, but individualized and in- 
direct services continued. Changes in the youth corrective system and 
creation of half-way houses and youth centers led to new conversations 
and new solutions. Deposit of books was used on a larger scale than 
before. 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

It must be mentioned that this 1972 year was a discouraging one 
as far as disorder within libraries, fear of visiting- branches after 
dark, vandalism of property were concerned. Undoubtedly these are 
deterents to use of a library by the community. 

As one measure of community service, a census of flyers and post- 
cards show that 341 pieces of publicity were designed and executed with 
the General Library Services Office to publicize library events within 
Branch Libraries. These were preponderantly for adult programs. Copy 
for 24 reading lists and 12 bookmarks was prepared. 

A major undertaking was the preparing of the Young Adult Card 
Catalog for reproduction as a book catalog, published in two volumes 
by G. K. Hall. 

A notable bibliography of Young Adult literature resulted from 
this publication. The catalog is a wonderful key to material of 
long-range use for those working with young adults in any library. 

The Division participated in five neighborhood street fairs 
(Charlestown, Brighton, Uphams Corner, Mattapan, West End), three 
art shows with neighborhood support (Brighton, South Boston, Charles- 
town). Notably the Division participated in the Boston Globe Book 
Fair, with booths on Poetry, Foreign Language Services, World Affairs, 
and Children's Services, representing the joint efforts of various 
departments, divisions, and individual members of both the Library" and 
the Eastern Regional Library Service staff. 

With the imminence of the opening of the General Library in its 
new quarters, restaffing was in order. Miss Rosalie Lang, Coordinator 
of Humanities, was appointed Supervisor of the General Library. Miss 
Dorothy Becker was appointed Coordinator of the General Library. Miss 
Louisa Metcalf, Miss Ollie Partridge, and Miss Gladys White were ap- 
pointed Senior Reading and Information Specialists. Miss Shirley 
Utudjian was appointed Chief of the Audio- Visual Department, releasing 
Mr. Euclid Peltier to give his full time to his duties as Coordinator 
of Audio-Visual Services. Miss Rose Moorachian was appointed Young 
Adult Specialist. 

During the year, Miss Dorothy Smith was appointed Branch Librarian, 
Mattapan Branch Library; Miss Carol Coxe, Branch Librarian, Fanueil 
Branch Library; Mrs. Francina Gelzer, Branch Librarian, Egleston Square 
Branch Library. 

Miss Pauline Walker retired as Branch Librarian, West Roxbury 
Branch Library; Miss Anne Coleman retired as Branch Librarian of the 
Faneuil Branch Library; and Miss Nura Globus, Branch Librarian of the 
Egleston Square Branch Library, retired as of December 31, 1971. 

RESEARCH LIBRARY SERVICES 

The year began sadly with the untimely death of Macy J. Margolis, 
Coordinator for Research Services, on January 28. A highly esteemed 
and much loved member of the Boston Public Library staff since 1945, 
Mr. Margolis served key positions and played important parts in many 
recent library programs, including development of a periodical collec- 
tion and reference collection for the new General Library and the 
pivotal role of the coordinator for collection building in the Research 
Library, and a grievous shock to all his friends and colleagues. 



10 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

With the generous support of the Research Library staff, much was 
accomplished in spite of this loss. Miss Rosalie Lang, Coordinator for 
the Humanities, took over and finished the General Library Reference col- 
lection project and assisted in general much of the collection building 
coordination both within the Research Library and between the General 
Library and the Research Library. Mr. Charles Longley, Curator of 
Periodicals and Newspapers, assumed the clearing house duties for all 
periodical and serial subscription recommendations in the Research 
Library. The Assistant Director for Research Library Services worked 
closely and directly with the curators and coordinators in the overall 
development of library resources. 

The preservation program for research materials, particularly 
early American newspapers, continued under the general direction of 
Mr. B. Joseph O'Neil, Supervisor of Readers Services. In accordance 
with the consensus decision of representatives from neighboring libraries 
(Harvard, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston Athenaeum, American 
Antiquarian Society, etc.) priority was given to 19th century newsprints, 
particularly those from New England mill towns and/or those on poor 
paper. First newspaper to be selected in this category was the Lowell 
Sun , which was being put on microfilm with the cooperation of the Lowell 
Public Library. Other filming projects included the special events 
collection and the documentation and report on the 2000 Commonwealth 
Avenue building collapse, which was reproduced by the library at the 
request of the City Law Department, The Ultra-Security Vault (Hull, 
Massachusetts) where library master negatives had been stored ceased 
service at the end of the year. Graphic Microfilm at Waltham generously 
offered temporary storage facilities, and permanent relocation is to be 
established in the new General Library building in 1973. 

The consortium of Boston College Library, Boston University Library, 
Brandeis University Library, Tufts University Library, and the Boston 
Public Library continued to develop. A union list of microform holdings 
V"/as compiled, and a printed bibliography was expected in 1973, Re- 
ference and acquisition cooperation was furthered with joint meetings 
among the Consortium librarians, and inter-library loans were much 
facilitated by the daily book delivery service provided by the Boston 
Public Library. 

A major publication for the Research Library in 1972 was the book 
catalog of the Music Collection, published by G. K, Hall of Boston. This 
catalog represents not only a significant reference tool for all students 
of music research, but also provides the Library with additional biblio- 
graphical facilities and makes possible the interfiling of the existing 
Music card catalog in the Research Library Public Catalog at a later date. 

The Afro-American Artists Bio-Bibliographical Directory, initiated 
by Mrs, Theresa Cederholm, Reference Librarian in Fine Arts, received 
financial support from both the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and 
Humanities ($3,000) and the National Endowment for the Arts ($10,000). 
Under the general direction of William Lewis, Coordinator for Afro- 
American Programs and Services, the project progressed apace and the 
printed Directory is expected to be published at the conclusion of the 



project in June 1973 



11 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

The single most important event in 1972 was cf course the completion 
of the General Library building and the December opening of the new 
General Library. Personnel changes in the Research Library include the 
promotion of Miss Rosalie Lang as Supervisor of the General Library, the 
appointment of Mr. Raymond Agler as Coordinator for the Humanities, 
and the transfer of Mrs. Margot Sullivan, Reference Librarian in Social 
Science, to the General Library. In November 1972, 800,000 volumes of 
Research Library books hitherto housed on Long Island were moved to 
the new stacks on the upper floors of the General Library building, with 
more volumes in the old stacks in the Research Library building to 
follow. Following the official opening of the expanded General Library, 
the Research Library ceased to circulate its books and thus became 
strictly a reference collection for on-site consultation and research. 

Some programs and plans, however desirable and important, had 
perforce to be postponed. The useful and successful in-depth profile 
study of the Research Library collections was not continued in 1972. 
Collection building progressed along established lines and curators and 
coordinators actively participated in the selection and addition of 
reference and research materials. New comprehensive book acquisition 
arrangements were made with Casalini of Florence, Italy for current 
Italian publications, and further expansion to cover other major 
cultural areas was explored. 

The first five years (19C8-1972) in the existence of the Sound 
Archives saw a rapid accumulation of a vast collection of recordings 
in a variety of fields. Through gifts and purchase, the Library's 
archival collection continued to grow and at year's end numbered more 
than 130,000. Contents include the entire range of classical music, 
literature, drama, public addresses, jazz and folk music, and ethnic 
and language recordings. 

Another rapidly growing collection in the Research Library is that 
of Microtext. With substantial federal and state funding, the Library 
houses one of the most comprehensive microtext collections in the area. 
Again, the last five years represent significant expansion, and the 
total collection at the end of 1972 consisted of: 47,257 microfilm 
reels; 3,516 boxes (approximately 800,000 sheets) of microprint; 174,568 
microfiches; and 11,357 microcards. Main categories in the collection 
are newspapers and government documents, local, national and international, 
and these serve as important resource materials in the Boston Public 
Library in its role as the bibliographical and reference center of the 
entire region. 

The Government Document program anci service at the Boston Public 
Library continued to grow. In addition to its unique responsibility 
for local documents, it has also increasingly built up its strength in 
international documentation. Following its designation as an official 
United Nations Depository, the Library systematically sought to acquire 
important source material on other international organizations, including 
the League of Nations. 

In 1972 members of various subject reference areas jointly partici- 
pated in several highly successful exhibits, among which were those on 
Science Projects; Mass Transportation; Consumer Education; Services to 
the Disadvantaged; Resources in Microform; Books and Recordings in Many 
Tongues; and Travelling through New England. The Rare Books & Manuscript 



12 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Department presented a series of exhibits in the Sargeant Gallery 
including: For the Philatelist; Fire! Fire! Fire!; The World of James 
Arnold; U.S. Politics and Government; and "A Splendid Misery" - Cam- 
paigning for the U.S. Presidency. In the Wiggin Gallery, the Print 
Department mounted the following exhibits: Ind^'a: Photographs by Steven 
Trefonides; Cityscapes and Landscapes by Susan Shatter; Across America: 
The Art of a New Nation; Copper: Etchings and Engravings by Contemporary 
Artists; Houses of Boston's South End; Thomas Waterman Wood and 19th 
Century American Drawings; and La Lithographie Originale En Couleur. 

EASTERN REGIONAL LIBRARY SERVICE 

The delivery service for libraries in the Boston Metropolitan Region 
was expanded to daily service in March. A new Eastern Region Extension 
Center opened at Yarmouth Port in April. Two new bookmobiles purchased 
for the North Reading and Taunton areas were put into service in August. 

Media Package programs which contain books, pamphlets, pesters, 
films, filmstrips, tape cassettes and exhibit material were purchased 
and made available for loan to regional libraries. It is planned to 
make more of these package programs available next year. Circulation 
of films from the Boston Public Library continued to increase. Some 
changes were made in the circulation procedures for films to improve 
public service. 

Mary A. Heneghan, formerly Senior Supervisor of Public Library 
Development witfi the Bureau of Library Extension, was appointed Regional 
Administrator for the Eastern Regional Public Library System in August, 
1972. The Region was saddened by the sudden death of A. William Kunkel , 
retired administrator of the Eastern Region in January, 1972. 

PERSONNEL 

Appointments to the Library staff during the year included the 
following: Joseph Quinton was appointed Library Personnel Officer; 
Joseph J. Gelly was appointed Chief of Duplicating; Rosalie A. Lang 
was appointed Supervisor of the General Library; Dorothy K. Becker was 
appointed Coordinator of Reader's Services, General Library; and 
John J. Doherty was appointed Assistant Director. 

At the annual recognition ceremony for Library employees with 25 
years of service, the President of the Board of Trustees presented 
citations and BPL chairs to the following: Rhoda Blacker, Patricia 
Harrington, Helen McDonouah and flelen Sevagian. 

Professional activities and publications of Library staff members 
during 1972 included the following: Jane Hanthorne, Coordinator of 
Young Adult Services served as President of the Young Adult Division of 
the American Library Association, and edited J ane Manthorne's Choice 
of Current Books for Young Adults (Second Edition). Kay Hegarty, 
Coordinator of Adult Services served on the NCCJ Awards Committee, on 
the Mayor's Inter-departmental Committee on Senior Affairs, as a Board 
Director for the Boston Center for Older Americans, and as Treasurer 
of the Adult Education Association in Massachusetts. Ruth Hayes, the 
Coordinator of Children's Services served as convenor of the Annual Meeting 
of Supervisors of Children's Services at the American Library Association 
Convention. 



13 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

Mrs. Suzanne Gray, Coordinator of Science Reference, published "A 
Guide to Resources: Science Projects for Young People" in Wilson Library 
Bulletin (March, 1972). John Alden, Keeper of Rare Books and Manuscripts 
published "Manuscripts and the Philatelist" Manuscripts (Spring, 1972). 

The Library was saddened by the death of three staff members during 
1972: Macy J. Margolis, Coordinator for Research Services; Ann E. 
Armstrong, Professional Library Assistant, Children's Room, and Frederick 
Rodenmacher, Special Library Assistant, Central Charging Records. A 
number of staff members retired during the year, many after long years 
of service. Among those retiring were four branch librarians: Anne 
F. Coleman of Faneuil, flura Globus of Egleston Square, Christina P. 
Jordan of Allston and Pauline A. Walker of West Roxbury. 



Philip J. McNiff 
Director, and Librarian 



14 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Table 1. Circulation 

BOOK CIRCULATION 



1971 



1972 



Central Library 
Kirstein Business Branch 

Adams Street 

Allston 

Bookmobile Service 

Brighton 

Charlestown 

Codman Square 

Connolly 

East Boston 

Egleston Square 

Faneuil 

Fields Corner 

Grove Hall 

Hyde Park 

Jamaica Plain 

Lower Mills 

Mattapan 

Mt. Pleasant 

North End 

Orient Heights 

Parker Hill 

Roslindale 

South Boston 

South End 

Uphams Corner 

Washington Village 

West End 

West Roxbury 

Hospital Library Service 

Multilingual 

Total, Branch Libraries 

Total, Entire Library 



533,539 


558,217 


9,557 


9,591 


108,422 


99,185 


41,965 


38,827 


247,087 


221,096 


143,039 


123,984 


48,524 


48,555 


54,467 


52,341 


46,242 


43,193 


39,552 


39,857 


38,096 


28,888 


37,977 


39,902 


110,246 


103,221 


42,029 


41,630 


114,695 


107,397 


64,508 


60,153 


53,109 


48.432 


50,036 


39,319 


24,686 


16,000* 


32,727 


30,743 


33,789 


33,894 


37,655 


34,780 


130,687 


124,849 


79,789 


78,749 


27,340 


31,863 


51,218 


55,948 


33,750 


17,911** 


68,990 


65,608 


154,145 


143,688 


28,278 


27,289 


13,440 


20,065 


1,709,401 


1,596,221 


2,499,584 


2,385,125 



*Estimated 
**Branch closed due to fire August 12. 



1972. 



15 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 
NON-BOOK CIRCULATION 



1971 1972 



Films and Film Strips 27,990 36,050 

Recordings 42,841 40,361 

Totals 70,831 76,411 



VOLUMES SENT ON INTERLIBRARY LOAN 



1971 1972 

Interlibrary loans 14,389 23,926* 

Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



1971 1972 



General Library 
Volumes Added 
Volumes Withdrawn 

Total on hand December 31 

Research Library: 
Volumes Added 
Volumes Withdrawn 

Total on hand December 31 



156,757 
61,881 


233,359 
33,743 


1,020,757 


1,220,373 


106,943 
5,541 


96,048 
437 


1,981,191 


2,076,802 



Total Book Stock 3,001,948 3,297,175 



^Fiscal year 1972. 



16 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
NON-BOOK MATERIALS 



1971 



197: 



Films 

Filmstrips 

Recordings 

Lantern Slides 

Negatives 

Pictures 

Postcards 

Prints and Drawings 

Projected Books 

Microcards 

Microfiche (sheets) 

Microfilm (reels) 

Microprints (boxes) 



3,560 


4,345 


150 


280 


24,099 


160,176 


14,884 


14,884 


2,130 


2,130 


426,426 


426,426 


133,805 


133,805 


53,264 


54,744 


178 


178 


11,283 


11,488 


128,338 


174,568 


42,040 


47,257 


3,237 


3,516 



Table 3. Cataloging Statistics 



1971 



1972 



Volumes processed 
New titles cataloged 

Original cataloging 
NUC cataloging 
LC cataloging 
Rare Book cataloging 

Films 

Recordings (titles) 
Recordings (volumes) 
Microcards (boxes) 
Microfiche (sheets) 
Microfilm (reels) 
Microprints (boxes) 



278,003 


329,407 


62,868 


68,997 


13,373 


12,184 




10.286 


48,119 


44,693 


1,376 


1,834 


518 


785 


6,474 


5,563 




15,902 




74 




46,230 




5,217 




279 



17 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 
Table 4. Binding 







1971 


1972 


Volumes Bound 




58,338 


60,283 




Table 5. 


Library Expenditures 








1971 


1972 



Salaries and Wages: 

City Appropriation $4,821,322.16 $5,347,811.00 
Eastern Regional Public Library 

System 260,264.07 323,596.82 

Trust Funds Income 2,304.82 90.86 

Total $5,084,257.63 $5,671,498.68 

Books and Other Library Materials: 

City Appropriation $764,603.33 $909,791.00 
Eastern Regional Public Library 

System 435,051.10 858,028.97 

Trust Funds Income 54,609.74 83,388.44 

Gifts for Current Use 23,931.27 

Library Services and Construction Act 183,461.27 298,352.37 

Library of Last Recourse 142,228.96 

Total $1,471,656.71 $2,291,789.74 

All Other Expenses: 

City Appropriation $610,539.96 $857,380.00 
Eastern Regional Public Library 

System 101,297.98 194,301.17 

Trust Funds Income 12,020.84 20,190.43 

Library Services and Construction Act 30,612.62 71 ,232.68 

Total $754,471.40 $1,143,104.28 



GRAND TOTAL $7,310,385.74 $9,106,392.70 



,^°^TON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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