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Full text of "Annual report"

DOCUMENT 15 - 1975 



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ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
For the Period Ending June 30, 1974 



DOCUMENT 15 - 1975 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



EDWARD G. MURRAY 
President 



AUGUSTIN H. PARKER 
Vice President 



FRANK B. MAHER 



SIDNEY R. RABB 



PATRICIA H. WHITE 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



DOCUMENT 15 - 1975 

To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

As Director, and Librarian, I have the honor to submit my report 
for the period January 1, 1973 to June 31, 1974. 

The eighteen month period under review was a new era of library 
service with the opening of the new General Library facility late in 
1972. The sharp increase in public use -- both in borrowing for home 
reading and in on-site reading and reference use -- parallels the drama- 
tic change in physical facilities for general library services. Ex- 
pansion from two small rooms occupying some 15,000 square feet of space, 
a crowded open shelf collection of 50,000 volumes, with no reading 
tables and only a dozen or so chairs to a spcaious 150,000 square foot 
facility with reading accommodations for more than a thousand people 
and open access to a book collection of more than 400,000 volumes has 
resulted in a 75% increase in home borrowing in the first two months of 
operation. In 1972 there was a total circulation of 558,217; for 1973 
the comparable figure is 1,025,953. 

A general reference collection and a substantial file of more than 
1,000 periodical titles were added to the old general library concept. 
Children's services have been expanded with the establishment of a 
Children's Resources Center collection of non-circulating books. This 
retrospective collection is for the use of librarians, teachers, 
authors and illustrators. Attached to the center is a storytelling area 
and a section has been set aside for the display of inspection copies of 
new children's books. 

Special services for young adults, for the foreign born, for the 
handicapped, together with an enlarged audio-visual program, round out 
the new general library program. 

The technical services operations, business, buildings and adminis- 
trative offices are located on the third floor of the new building. Com- 
puter control of the circulation records has facilitated the handling 
of the large increase in circulation and at the same time has improved 
the book-reservation system, the overdue notification and the control of 
the book stock. 

The Boston Public Library serves as the headquarters library for 
the state-supported Eastern Regional Library System and as the reference 
library of, last recourse for the state. State and federal Library Ser- 
vices and Construction Act funds have played a significant role in the 
expanded programs. 

While federal support for the building costs was disappointingly 
low, there was substantial support for the audio-visual, foreign lan- 
guage, handicapped and microform programs. The upgrading of equipment 
in the bindery, duplicating and audio-visual areas has been accomplished 
with both state and federal support. The continued strengthening of 
the Library's resources is dependent on an integrated program of city, 
state and private support. 

The availability of the new General Library entails a realignment 
of research library services. They are based in the McKim building 
but with expanded stack facilities on floors four, five, six and seven 
in the Johnson building. The research collections have been severely 
fragmented for decades. These are now being brought together. New 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

quarters for microtext and document services are located on the first 
floor of the McKim building; research reference service in the humani- 
ties, social sciences, and sciences and housed on the Bates Hall level; 
and expanded Rare Book, Print, Fine Arts, Music and special collections 
will be centered on the top floor. With these changes the Central 
Library facility is truly operational, providing service at every level 
to the total community. 

The new lecture hall, media studio and conference rooms will serve 
to highlight the educational role of the Library. In addition to the 
traditional programs -- story hours, film showings, popular lectures — 
a full range of scholarly lectures was held based on the Library's 
fields of collection strength. Significant programs reflecting the his- 
tory and culture of the various ethnic groups in the state were organized, 
In enlarging the scope of the Library's programming we look forward to 
working cooperatively with the cultural and social organizations and 
the consular officers. 

Services and programs, both in the neighborhood branches, the 
Central Library, and regional libraries, must reflect the needs of our 
diverse communities. Whenever anc' wherever appropriate, the new Central 
Library will enlist the cooperation of individuals and organizations as 
it plans to expand and extend its role as a major cultural institution. 

In these efforts we are pleased with the contributions which have 
been made by the newly formed Associates of the Boston Public Library. 
The Associates now total 26C members. Early this year a reception for 
the Associates opened an exhibit of autographs in the Sargent Gallery 
from the Virginia and Richard Ehrlich Collection. For the occasion, 
the first publication of the Associates was issued. Handsomely designed 
and printed, it presents both in transcript and facsimile a letter from 
the Ehrlich Collection of April 4, 1776, from George Washington, giving 
Major General Artemas Ward instructions for the defense of Boston. The 
Associates sponsored a spring concert in the Library's courtyard of 
American vocal music performed by the Chorus Pro Musica. 

GENERAL LIBRARY SERVICES 

The report of the General Library Services for the year 1973 and 
the first half of 1974 showed a continuing "settling in" of services 
and systems in the new General Library building, a growth of resources, 
an increase in borrowers and circulation, extensive acquisitions and 
circulation of cassettes. Traditional activities with the various age 
levels were continued. Spscial services for people with limited eye- 
sight included an extensive collection of large-print books, and plans 
are underway to extend service to the blind and physically handicapped 
via talking book cassettes. The rapidly growing foreign language col- 
lection backstops the Multilingual Library in the South Cove section 
of the City, and supplies deposit collections to the branches. 

The Fourth Edition of the Film Catalog was published, and probably 
the most widely circulated publication of General Library Services was 
the "Idea Source Book for Young Adult Programs." A major project which 
promised incalculable bibliographic assistance to other libraries are 
the two book catalogs: The Dictionary Catalog of the Children's Col- 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

lection in the General Library, and the Classified Catalog of the 
Foreign Language Collection in the General Library. 

The Never Too Late Group series, with weekly attendances frequent- 
ly exceeding 200, moves in many intellectual directions with subjects 
such as: "Health in the Later Years," "China: A Hole in the Bamboo 
Curtain," "Black Music in America," and "Pros and Cons of Day Care." 
Members of the Never Too Late Group took part in discussion series on 
Great Decisions, as well as in book review sessions. 

The new building with its lecture hall, media studio and con- 
ference rooms enabled the Library to greatly expand its programming. 
The Boston Public Library hosted a benefit for Mayor White's Summerthing 
series in the Great Hall. The Library sponsored a number of meetings 
in its new facilities: a meeting and exhibition on the occasion of the 
10th Anniversary of the Boston Negro Artists Association; fo^ Black 
History Month, a lecture, on "Negro Poetry: Interpretation and Readings" 
given by Sterling A. Brown; a symposuim on Irish culture led by the 
Irish Georgian Society; a lecture by Herbert A. Kenny, Book Editor of 
the Boston Globe, on "Literary Dublin" sponsored by the Eire Society of 
Boston; an Irish Month with a variety of film and lecture programs on 
Ireland and a symposium of Irish studies; a meeting of the Urban Library 
Trustees Association; a United Nations Week International Book Fair; a 
conference on non-theatrical film exhibition; a Canada Month with a lec- 
ture on Canadian education and a concert tribute by the Berkeley College 
of Music. Numerous musical concerts were held in the Library: a pro- 
gram in honor of Roland Hayes performed by his daughter, Afrika Hayes; 
a concert by John Langstaff and the Cambridge Brass Quintet for National 
Young Audiences Week; a preview by the Metropolitan Opera of their pro- 
duction of "MacBeth," and a concert of Italian music performed by the 
New England Chamber Orchestra. 

The Library received many visitors interested in the Johnson building, 
among those visitors were the Director and Chief of the Dallas Public 
Library, who are planning a new building of their own; 24 students from 
the School of Library Science at Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia; the 
Secretary of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, England; the Dean of the 
Graduate School of Library Studies, University of Hawaii; and a delega- 
tion of ten librarians from the People's Republic of China. This dele- 
gation visited the Boston Public Library for four days with the purpose 
of observing library administration and services, the application of 
modern techniques in libraries, and research and education in librarian- 
ship in the United States. 

Through the Hospital Library service, Homesmobile, and Multilingual 
Library adults with handicaps or special needs were reached. Even 
though the number of bookmobiles had to be reduced from three to two, 
with diminished circulation statistics resulting, materials circulated 
from the bookmobiles exceeded fourteen percent of materials circulated 
from 26 branches. 

The Audio-Visual Department has emerged as a vital center of the 
General Library, rapidly increasing its services, expanding resources, 
embarking on innovation in activities and materials, and instituting 
the use of listening equipment for recordings and cassettes. Feature 
films such as "Gunga Din," "Hunchback of Notre Dame," and "Citizen 
Kane" represented dymanic additions to Library film programming. The 
America series narrated by Alistair Cook proved the most popular, 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

well-attended film series. In addition to the America series there 
were extensive efforts in General Library programming with children's 
and young adult screenings as well as noon-time film programs,. Thursday 
evening showings, and film programs built around special events. The 
image of more than two and a quarter million people viewing films from 
the Audio-Visual collection in an eighteen-month period is an impressive 
testament to the importance of the audio-visual dimension in the Library's 
resources and in people's lives. The staff of the Audio-Visual Depart- 
ment provided consultant assistance in the selection of materials and 
equipment for several projects. 

The 25th and 26th annual award of the Mary U. Nichols Book prizes 
were held at the North End Branch Library and given to Rita La Col la 
and John J. Cintolo in 1973 and to Anna Mancini and Frank Cortese in 
1974. The Mary U. Nichols Book Prize was set up in 1949 and is "awarded 
to the North End boy or girl attending high schools in the North End 
who shall have done the best work in English during the senior year." 

On March 3, 1974 the Hyde Park Branch Library celebrated its 
centennial. Branch Librarian Emeritus Ellen Peterson relayed the 
history of the branch, the Young People's Chorus of the William B. 
Rogers Jr. High School performed Daniel Pinkham's choral composition 
"Evergreen," and Richard Grane, who is a member of the Hyde Park 
Board of Trade, paid tribute to the branch. For the occasion prizes 
were awarded for the Hyde Park Branch Library Centennial Contest. A 
reception followed the formal program. 

Children's Services offered story hours, craft events, film and 
record hours, puppet shows, visits to schools, pre-school programs, and 
creative dramatics. The children reached through such activities ex- 
ceeded two hundred thousand. Children's Services also offered considerable 
advisory assistance to parents, teachers, authors, and publishers in 
more than 500 consultations. Young Adult Services reached more than 
25,000 individuals through group activities: workshops, film programs, 
chess tournaments, discussion groups and special projects. 

RESEARCH LIBRARY SERVICES 

The availability of the new General Library building allowed the 
cramped departments of the Research Library to relocate and expand in 
order to be able to better serve the public' In addition to the move 
of departments mentioned earlier in this report, the Sound and Film 
Archives have moved back to the Central Library facility from the 
Charlestown Service Building, the Newspaper Room has moved into new 
quarters, and the West Gallery has been cleared out and renovated by 
the Library's staff in preparation for occupation by the Fine Arts 
Department and the Music Department. A program has been underway to 
paint and refurbish the Research Library building, and as this work is 
completed the remaining Research Library departments will be set up 
in their new locations. The administrative offices which were in the 
McKim building have moved into their new quarters on the third floor 
of the new building. 

The generosity of the Library's contributors greatly enhances its 
collections. The Library received a sizeable gift of over 1,000 photo- 
graphic negatives and photographs relating to twentieth century Boston 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

from Rocco Paoletta. Joseph Coletti bequeathed to the Boston Public 
Library all of his sketches and correspondence. The Library received 
a contribution from Mrs. Portland Allen Rines in memory of her late 
husband, Fred Allen. With this gift the Library has set up a fund in 
Fred Allen's memory, the income of which is to be used for the purchase 
of books and library materials in the field of the performing arts with 
emphasis on radio, television and theatre. 

The Library commenced new annual lecture series this year with a 
gift from the Charlotte Cushman Club to be used for the purchase of books 
and material on primarily the theatre in Boston and for an annual lec- 
ture to be held in the field of the theatre. The first annual Cushman 
lecture was given by drama critic Elliot Norton on "The Theatre in 
Boston." The annual Bromsen lectures, made possible by additional gifts 
from Maury A. Bromsen, were given by Dr. Hellmut Lehmann-Haupt on "Social 
Typology in Renaissance Book Illustration" in 1973, and in 1974 by Dr. 
Frederick R. Goff oft "The Pleasures of Collecting Rare Books." The 
annual William Addison Dwiggins lecture, co-sponsored by the Society of 
Printers, was given by Laurance B. Siegfried on "WAD - A Personal Re- 
collection." Edward Weeks, former Editor-in-Chief of The Atlantic 
Monthly gave a lecture entitled "Looking Back." 

The Library hosted a reception for a meeting of the Eighteenth 
Annual Wedgwood International Seminar and exhibits on "Books Used by 
Wedgwood," "Georgian Prints," and a local exhibition from the Wedgwood 
Society. On this occasion Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Chatfield presented the 
Boston Public Library with a medallion that had been used on an anti- 
slavery broadside. The Archaelogical Institute of America gave an 
illustrated lecture 1n the Library's new lecture hall on "The Holy Land 
-- Excavations in Israel and Jordan, 1972-73," and two archaelogical 
film-documentaries from the People's Republic of China. 

A workshop sponsored by the New England Technical Services Librari- 
ans on "Cost Reduction in Technical Services" was co-sponsored by the 
Library, as well as a symposium on "Historical Business and Commercial 
Records," and a MARC Serials Institute in cooperation with the New 
England Chapter of the American Society for Information Sciences. 

The Print Department received a generous gift of prints relating 
to North Africa and British caricatures, scenes and views in acquatint, 
and mezzotint portraits and allegories given by Donald Angus and Frances 
Damon Holt, which were exhibited in the Wiggin Gallery. Other exhibits 
in the Wiggin Gallery included an exhibition of original lithographic 
and copperplate prints published by Impressions, a full-time professional 
graphic arts workshop; an exhibition of prints from Georgian England 
1714-1830; an exhibition of drawings by Arthur Heintzelman, former 
Keeper of Prints from 1941 to I960; "A Vision of England" which was com- 
prised of a group of prints by artists who have known and dreamed of the 
countryside of England and introduced by a talk by David McCord; and an 
exhibition of the chromolithographs of Louis Prang. 

The final display of this eighteen-month period was entitled 
"American Posters of the Nineties" which exhibited posters made in the 
large part in the 1890' s and which represent posters with an impact as 
a chronicle of the times. This display was accompanied by the publica- 
tion of a book American Posters of the Nineties , which was suggested 
by the poster collections of three northern New England "neighbors," 
the Boston Public Library, The Currier Gallery of Art, and Dartmouth 
College. The Albert H. and Jessie D. Wiggin Foundation gave a generous 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

contribution to the Library to establish a permanent fund to be used for 
the publication of the annual Wiggin Symposium, for the continuance of the 
Albert H. Wiggin Memorial Purchase Prize Program and/or related publica- 
tions which serve the educational mission of the Wiggin collection. 
The eighth annual Wiggin Symposium was entitled A Rowlandson Festival, 
which initiated two exhibitions: Rowlandson: Comparisons , a drawings 
exhibit, and A Century of Caricature in London , a selection of prints 
from the years 1730 to 1830. The ninth annual Wiggin symposium centered 
around the pleasure of an art collection with a universal theme: the 
circus. Richard D. McMullan's circus collection was on exhibition in 
the Wiggin Gallery and Mr. McMullan talked on his collection adventures 
and his perception of the circus. The Print Department hosted a meeting 
of The Society of Printers with a preview of an exhibition of Lynd 
Ward's illustrated books, prints, and drawings, which was attended by 
the artist. 

A few of the exhibitions prepared by the Rare Book and Manuscript 
Department in the Sargent Gallery were as follows: Josiah Wedgwood and 
the Wedgwood Tradition, Masterpieces of Renaissance Book Illustration, 
The Many Worlds of Numismatics, and America's Musical Heritage. 

The Boston Public Library published NOVA reading lists to be used 
as background material for the NOVA science films and held a series of 
weekly discussions on the topics of the films with an expert in the 
field as discussion leader. Michale Ambrosino, Executive Producer of 
NOVA, discussed the series and commented on the first program "The 
Making of a Natural History Film;" Thomas Maddocks, Jr., Senior Scien- 
tist of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey in 
Reston, Virginia (formerly Chief Engineer of the U.S. Bureau of Re- 
clamation) discussed "Where Did the Colorado Go?;" Prentice K. Stout 
of the American Littoral Society in Sandy Hook, New Jersey spoke on 
"Whales, Dolphins and Men;" Dr. Timothy Ashe of Brandeis University in 
Waltham, Massachusetts led the discussion on the film "The Last of the 
Cuiva." The film "Strange Sleep" was accompanied by a discussion led 
by J. Francis Gladstone, the producer of the film, and by Dr. Martin 
Cameron, Obstetric Anesthesiologist at the Boston Hospital for Women; 
"The Crab Nebula" discussion was led by Philip Morrison, Professor of 
Physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "Bird Brain: The 
Mystery of Bird Navigation" was discussed by Jeremy Hatch, Associate 
Professor at the Biology Department of the University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston, and Dr. Franz Ingelfinger, Editor, New England Journal of Medicine, 
talked about the film "Are You Doing This For Me Doctor, or Am I Doing 
It For You?" The last four discussion sessions were as follows: 
"Story of the Washoe," with discussion leader Professor Robert Trivers 
of the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University; "Case of the 
Midwife Toad" was discussed by Stephen Gould, Professor of Geology 
at Harvard University; Bruno Coppi , Professor of Physics at M.I.T. led 
the discussion on "Fusion -- The Energy of Promise;" and Dr. Stephen 
Williams, Professor of Archaeology and Director of the Peabody Museum, 
Harvard University, presented the discussion for "Mystery of the Anasazi." 

Theresa Cederholm compiled and edited the publication Afro-American 
Artists: A Bio-bibliographical Directory , which presents data on more 
than 1,700 Black painters, sculptors and ceramists, and includes a com- 



10 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

prehensive bibliography on the subject. This Boston Public Library 
publication was made possible by grants from the National Endowment for 
the Arts and the Massachusetts Council for the Arts. The Rare Book 
Department compiled and published a checklist entitled American Literary 
Manuscripts in the Boston Public Library . 

Staff members in the Music Department have been actively involved 
with both the Boston area Music Librarians programs and the New England 
Chapter of Music Library Association activities. Fine Arts Department 
staff members have been instrumental in the establishment of the Boston 
Art Archives, a joint program under the aegis of the New England Chapter 
of the Art Libraries Society/North America whereby art librarians in 
major scholarly and special institutions of the area work together to 
collect and maintain an archival file of gallery exhibit materials. 
The variety and richness of the Library's print collection is well il- 
lustrated by the loans to museums, galleries, universities and libraries 
for exhibit purposes, and television stations for programs and special 
issues from the Print Department. 

The growth of the Greater Boston Consortium of Academic and Re- 
search Libraries continued with the addition of three new members, i.e. 
University of Massachusetts Library - Amherst, Northeastern University 
and Wellesley College. The State Library became the Consortium's first 
affiliate member. During this period the major thrust of the Consortium 
was organizational. The Directors spent much of their meeting time on 
drawing up the Constitution and By-Laws fundamental to the development 
of a strong organization. Meetings of the Directors were held on a 
regular monthly basis. Under the by-laws three subcommittees were 
established, i.e. Readers Services, Selection-Acquisitions and Cataloging. 
The committees were comprised of the heads of the respective departments 
in each of the member libraries - their purpose- to draw up programs 
for the implementation of Consortium policy in each member library. 

The publication of a Union List of Microforms Held in the Member 
Libraries marked the first successful effort at developing computer 
based union form bibliographic tools which will facilitate access to the 
resources of all member libraries. Complementing this step toward im- 
proved bibliographic access, a daily delivery service to all members was 
extended, ensuring speedy deliveries of all interlibrary loan material . 
Two successful grant applications were submitted to funding agencies. 
In March of 1974 two member libraries: the Boston Public Library and 
the Brandeis University Library received a grant in the amount of $25,000 
from the Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund for the purpose of 
jointly implementing (on a pilot basis) a computer based catalog system 
that would be capable of supporting the on-going cataloging operation in 
the participating libraries, as well as supporting an on-line union 
catalog for the full Consortium. The project got underway in April 
with the installation of terminals in both libraries. Another success- 
ful grant application was submitted to the Bureau of Library Extension 
on behalf of the full Consortium. This grant was intended to cover the 
cost of purchasing and publishing a Union List of Serials Currently 
Received using as a basis the machine readable data base that was 
developed by the University of Massachusetts/Amherst Library, with an 
increased membership and progress toward a much stronger organization, 
it appears that the Consortium has made significant advances toward its 
ultimate goal of effecting broadly based resource sharing for all library 
users within the Greater Boston community. 

1 1 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 
EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM 

The Headquarters Office of the Eastern Massachusetts Regional Lib- 
rary System moved into the new building in the spring of 1973 and plans 
were developed for regional participation in some of the on-going and 
planned applications of the newly expanded data processing activities of 
the Boston Public Library. Two new services became available to member 
libraries of the Eastern Region: the use of the Book Examination Room, 
where adult and young adult books are available for examination, and 
the new staff library. 

The Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library System received LSCA 
federal grants which enabled them to pursue a number of projects, the 
most notable of which were projects to study the recreational and infor- 
mational needs of exceptional persons, a multi -media approach to voca- 
tional guidance, and the library as a crisis center. The Eastern 
Regional System sponsored workshops on the administration of the small 
public library and a three day workshop for administrators conducted 
by a labor consultant concerned with handling grievances and the 
implications of the new law pertaining to bargaining by state and muni- 
cipal employees. 

The Headquarters Office appointed a new Adult Services Librarian, 
Jack Forman, and Edward Montana replaced Mrs. Leila-Jane Roberts as 
chairman of the Bicentennial Committee. The Langley-Adams Library in 
Groveland was welcomed as a member of the Eastern Regional System. 

BUILDINGS 

Early in 1973 the Massachusetts Historical Commission presented 
a citation to the Boston Public Library certifying it as a Historic 
Landmark to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places . 
The Library vacated the two buildings used for storage on Long Island 
and transferred these buildings to the City of Boston's Public 
Facilities Commission to be used for whatever purposes they deem ap- 
propriate. 

PERSONNEL 

Many staff members extended their professional contributions beyond 
the Boston Public Library and served as officers in library and educa- 
tional organizations, among them: Irenemarie Cull inane served as 
Children's Services Division (ALA) Representative to the Committee on 
Cataloging Children's Materials; Ruth Hayes was a member of the Task 
Force Committee to Stimulate Discussion of the Notable Children's Books 
(ALA), the National Planning Committee for Special Children's Literature 
Collections (ALA), and a member of the Coordinators of Children's 
Services in Large Public Libraries; Kathleen Hegarty served as Treasur- 
er of the Adult Education Association of Massachusetts. Euclid Peltier 
was named Chairman of the Executive Board of the Film Library Informa- 
tion Council; Jane Manthorne remained involved in the American Library 
Association as past President of the Young Adult Services Division; 
Rose Moorachian serves as consultant for H. W. Wilson Company for the 
next edition of the Junior High School Catalog. South Boston Branch 
Librarian, Marjorie Gibbons, and Philip Driscoll, Assistant to the 
Director, participated in Channel 5's Outlook New England series. Sin- 

12 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

clair Hitchings, Keeper of Prints, gave a lecture on "The Drama of 
Marine Photography" at the Peabody Museum of Salem. Mr. Hitchings also 
wrote a book review for the Print Collector's Newsletter on two publica- 
tions which had been written about Thomas Rowlandson. Suzanne Gray 
taught a course entitled "Literature of Science and Technology" at 
Bridgewater State College and reviewed reference books for Microform 
Review and the American Reference Books Annual . Raymond Agler was 
chairman of the Notable Books Council of the American Library Associa- 
tion. 

There were many changes in personnel in the past year and a-half. 
Ruth Cannell , Chief, General Library Services Office, retired, as did 
Madalene Holt, Branch Librarian at Lower Mills. Adams Street Branch 
suffered the death of Branch Librarian Margaret Morgan. Katherine 
Dibble left her post as Branch Librarian at Hyde Part to head up Inter- 
library Loan. Newly appointed Branch Librarians were Alice Roberts to 
Lower Mills, Judith Lieberman to Adams Street, Belle Levin to Hyde 
Park, Martha Patterson to West Roxbury. Irenemarie Cullinane became the 
first incumbent in the new post of Children's Literature Specialist. 
Raymond Agler was appointed as Coordinator of Humanities, leaving his 
post in charge of Interlibrary Loan. Philip Driscoll was appointed 
Assistant to the Director for the Library's programs of information, 
exhibits and publications. Mr. Driscoll 's former position was that of 
Executive Director of the Twelve College Exchange. 

Fellow workers and friends of the late Macy J. Margolis, Coordina- 
tor of Research Services, who died in 1972, established a fund in his 
memory, the income to be used for the purchase of books and/or periodi- 
cals for the Professional Staff Library. 

01 lie J. Partridge, Senior Reading and Information Librarian, and 
Vera L. Cheves, Chief of English Language Cataloging, retired during this 
eighteen month period. Mary M. McDonough, Chief of Preparation, retired 
after 52 years of service and John J. Connolly, Associate Director, 
retired after 50 years of service. A fund was established by associates 
of John J. Connolly, the income to be used for the purchase of books of 
permanent value. 

Frank B. Maher was welcomed as a new member of the Board of 
Trustees; he fills the post vacated by Erwin D. Canham. Mr. Maher is 
Chief Operating Officer of the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. 

At the annual meetings honoring those who had completed 25 years 
of service, the President of the Board of Trustees presented citations 
and Boston Public Library chairs to the following: 

1973 

Dorothy Bavicchi 
Mary Crowe 
Barbard Pearson 

1974 

Rosemarie DeSimone 
Arthur B. Farren 
Dorothea Kane 
Josephine H. Kelley 



13 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 



Stanley Kielczewski 
Mary LaFol lette 
John V. McManus 
M. Jane Manthorne 
Isabel M. Martino 
Louis R. O'Halloran 
John M. Rooney 
Mary T. Sands 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



14 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Table 1 . Circulation 

BOOK CIRCULATION 



Calendar 
1972 



Fiscal 
1973 



Fiscal 
1974 



Central Library 
Kirstein Business Branch 

Adams Street 

Allston 

Bookmobile Service 

Brighton 

Charlestown 

Codman Square 

Connolly 

East Boston 

Egleston Square 

Faneuil 

Fields Corner 

Grove Hall 

Hyde Park 

Jamaica Plain 

Lower Mills 

Mattapan 

Mt. Pleasant 

North End 

Orient Heights 

Parker Hill 

Roslindale 

South Boston 

South End 

Uphams Corner 

Washington Village 

West End 

West Roxbury 

Hospital Library Service 

Multilingual 

Total, Branch Libraries 

Total, Entire Library 



558,217 


787,046 


1,047,926 


9,591 


8,509 


6,997 


99,185 


94,844 


78,549 


38,827 


35,589 


36,677 


221,096 


237,188 


160,581 


123,984 


113,755 


109,403 


48,555 


44,704 


43,004 


52,341 


52,169 


41,258 


43,193 


40,660 


38,397 


39,857 


39,768 


33,966 


28,888 


27,403 


25,066 


39,902 


38,633 


35,373 


103,221 


102,801 


90,879 


41,630 


39,646 


28,336 


107,397 


103,100 


95,647 


60,153 


58,355 


52,619 


48,432 


44,507 


39,084 


39,319 


34,602 


34,551 


16,000* 


18,500* 


17,342 


30,743 


30,656 


25, r 32 


33,894 


33,148 


29,031 


34,780 


36,309 


31,641 


124,849 


119,528 


110,895 


78,749 


78,343 


74,164 


31,863 


32,333 


31,708 


55,948 


54,641 


50,245 


17,911** 


2,573** 


** 


65,608 


62,360 


53,755 


143,688 


138,837 


127,411 


27,289 


24,985 


22,067 


20,065 


18,148 


17,043 


1,596,221 1 


,477,744 


1,373,693 


2,385,125 2 


,510,487 


2,589,197 



♦Estimated. 
**Branch closed due to fire, August 12, 1972. 



15 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 



NON-BOOK CIRCULATION 



Calendar Calendar 
1972 1973 



Fiscal 



Films and Film Strips 
Recordings 

Totals 



36,050 
40,361 



33,391 
135,608 



76,411 169,499 



36,414 
121,329 

157,743 



VOLUMES SENT ON INTERLIERARY LOAN 



Fiscal Fiscal 
1972 1973 



Fiscal 
1974 



Interlibrary loans 



15.3C5 15,S27 14,924 



Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



Calendar Calendar Fiscal 
1972 1973 1974 



General Library: 
Volumes added 
Volumes withdrawn 

Total on Hand 

Research Library: 
Volumes added 
Volumes withdrawn 

Total on Hand 



233,359 164,234 156,128 
33,743 - 6,376 

1,220,373 1,384,607 1,445,079 



96,048 61,986 71,164 
437 842 568 

2,076,802 2,137,946 2,182,736 



Total Book Stock 



3,297,175 3,522,553 3,627,815 



16 






BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NON-BOOK MATERIALS 



Calendar Calendar Fiscal 
1972 1973 1974 



Films 

Filmstrips 

Recordings 

Cassettes 

Lantern Slides 

Negatives 

Pictures 

Postcards 

Prints and Drawings 

Projected Books 

Microcards 

Microfiche (sheets) 

Microfilm (reels) 

Microprints (boxes) 

Aperture cards 



4,345 


5,267 


5,416 


280 


401 


577 


160,176 


169,255 


179,371 




4,366 


11,945 


14.884 


14,884 


14,884 


2,130 


2,130 


2,130 


426,426 


426,426 


426,426 


133,805 


133,805 


133,805 


54,744 


56,527 


56,897 


178 


178 


178 


11,488 


ll,58 n 


11,843 


174,568 


221,714 


237,719 


47,257 


54,736 


58,157 


3,516 


3,764 


3,919 
10,151 



Table 3. Cataloging Statistics 



Calendar Calendar Fiscal 
1972 1973 1974 



Volumes Processed 329,407 226,220 227,292 

New titles cataloged 68,997 47,595 52,002 

Original cataloging 12,184 11,567 11,518 

NUC cataloging 10,286 5,181 6,272 

LC cataloging 44,693 28,661 32,572 

Rare Book cataloging 1,834 1,793 1,640 

Films 785 922 400 

Recordings 15,902 4,671 7,484 

Cassettes 4,366 5,054 



" ■ - ■ ~ 


Table 4. Binding 




Calendar 
1972 


Calendar 
1973 


Fiscal 
1974 


Volumes Bound 


60,233 


55,500 


55,000* 



♦Estimate. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06315 048 4 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 



Table 5. Library Expenditures 







Calendar 


Calendar 


Fiscal 




1972 


1973 


1974 


Salaries and Wages: 








City Appropriation 


$5,347,011.00 


$5,758,655.00 


$6,041,006.00 


Eastern Regional Public Library 








System 


323,596.82 


394,516.03 


453,556.87 


Trust Funds Income 


90.86 


589.20 
$6,153,760.23 


883.80 


Total 


$5,671,498.68 


$6,495,446.67 


Books and Other Library Materials: 








City Appropriation 


$ 909,791.00 


$ 953,169.00 


$1,036,525.00 


Eastern Regional Public Library 








System 


858,028.97 


799,997.56 


775,323.77 


Trust Funds Income 


83,388.44 


92,840.34 


119,433.00 


Library Services and Construction 








Act 


298,352.37 


29,655.00 


82,483.72 


Library of Last Recourse 


142,228.96 


142,225.74 


142,226.01 


Total 


$2,291,789.74 


$2,017,887.64 


$2,155,991.50 


All Other Expenses: 








City Appropriation 


$ 857,380.00 


$1,330,359.00 


$1,284,336.00 


Eastern Regional Public Library 








System 


194,301.17 


170,204.64 


129,435.50 


Trust Funds Income 


20,190.43 


22,013.91 


33,020.87 


Library Services and Construction 








Act 


71,232.68 


17,066.74 


15,416.58 


Total 


$1,143,104.28 


$1,539,644.29 


$1,656,418.32 


GRAND TOTAL 


$9,106,392.70 


$9,711,292.16 


$10,113,647.12