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Full text of "Annual report"

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BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




[Document 15 — 1978] 





ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

For the Period Ending June 30, 1977 



CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING SECTION 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



FRANK B. MAHER 

President 

SIDNEY R. RABB 
Vice-President 



EDWARD G. MURRAY 

AUGUSTIN H. PARKER 

PATRICIA H. WHITE 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director, and Librarian 



2 City Document No. 15 

To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

As Director and Librarian, I have the honor to submit my 
report for the year July 1, 1976, to June 30, 1977. 

This year was not unlike Dickens' much-quoted "It was the 
best of times, it was the worst of times." Because of the city's 
tight fiscal situation there was need for constant, careful atten- 
tion to use of energy, personnel, and materials. We were deepiy 
aware of the need to operate efficiently, minimizing use of 
resources but maximizing services to the citizens of Boston. On 
the side of the "best of times" was the Library's success in 
bringing eminent contributors and contributions to Library pro- 
grams and holdings. This report will call attention to the grim 
realities of cutbacks, but — dominantly — to the postive ac- 
tivities and events which pushed the Library forward in service 
to a great city. 

In response to the city's "tight" fiscal situation which man- 
dated a drastic cut in budgeted expenditures, the Library cur- 
tailed or eliminated certain valuable services: Sunday openings 
and operation of bookmobiles; and Saturday hours in the Rare 
Book Department. The Trustees announced these retrenchments 
in service and the postponement of filling key positions with 
regret. They indicated that the Library would "exert every effort 
to minimize the impact of these curtailments." Announcement 
was similarly made that service at Kirstein Business Branch 
would be curtailed as part of stringent reductions. The plan was 
almost immediately reversed when Friends of the Kirstein 
Business Branch launched an effort to raise $200,000 "to keep 
Kirstein open." The fund-raising is spearheaded by a committee 
of leading citizens with Thomas Boylston Adams in the 
forefront and with the First National Bank of Boston assisting in 
receiving donations. 



GENERAL LIBRARY SERVICES 

In service to all age groups the branches and General Library 
maintained a high level of activity in spite of staff shortages and 
reduced hours. Speakers, films, and special events gave 
testament to the Library's stance as a center of activity. The 
statistics of branch-centered programs are as follows: 



Boston Public Library 



Children's Programs 




Number of 




Program Programs 


Attendance 


Film 319 


16,790 


Preschool 448 


6,315 


Reading Club 85 


2,487 


School classes at library 221 


4,828 


Special events 128 


2,807 


Story hours 199 


3,205 



1,387 



33,945 



Adult Programs 



Number of 




Programs 


Attendance 


104 


1,826 


107 


2,023 


256 


3,295 


76 


2,362 


7 


345 



Program 

Never Too Late Group 

Film 

Discussion Groups 

(Book and Parent) 
Special events 
Friends of the Library 



550 9,851 

Among the important events in branches at least two should 
be recorded here: the annual awarding of the Mary U. Nichols 
Books Prizes (to Angela Abbondanza and Maurizio Romeo) at 
the North End Branch Library, with Carlo L. Golino, 
Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts at Boston, 
delivering the address; and Professor James R. Green of 
Brandeis University speaking of the historical roots of the com- 
munity. 

In several branches and the Central Library the very popular 
group, geared to senior citizens and appropriately named Never 
Too Late, provided programs of dynamism and relevance. Sam- 
ple events included Christina tree of the Boston Globe offering a 
slide tour entitled "How New England Happened"; Antonio 
Franco, singing stirring arias by Verdi in "Opera in the Round"; 
Captain Jonathan Lucas, master of the schooner "R/V 
Westward," presenting "Eavesdropping on Whales"; John 
O'Brien, an actor and teacher at Maiden High School, perform- 
ing a one-act play on the famous lawyer, Clarence Darrow. 

Boston's chidren and teenagers were well served this year in 
several directions — through diligent attention to building a fine 
book collection, lively programming, and continuing coopera- 
tion with schools and other youth-serving agencies. Among the 
bright activities which summoned young people to their 
neighborhood and Central Library were a presentation of "Rip 



4 City Document No. 15 

Van Winkle," a musical play based on A. A. Milne's "When We 
Were Very Young"; and "The Elegant Dollhouse," a lecture 
demonstration. 

The Young Adult Department sponsored the annual 
workshop on creative writing for the fourth year. Among the 
author/speakers were Nancy Garden, John M. Landsberg, and 
Bob Elliot. 

The major program of the year was Children's Books Interna- 
tional III, this year focusing on the design, illustration, and art 
of children's books. Called "Global Graphics: A Many Splen- 
dored Thing," the symposia this year brought speakers from 
England, France, Germany, Japan, and Canada and included 
such outstanding people of the book/film world in this country 
as Virginia Haviland of the Library of Congress, Morton 
Schindel of the Weston Woods Studio, and Zena Sutherland of 
the University of Chicago Graduate Library School. 

The circulation of materials was considerably facilitated this 
year with the installation of eight new IBM computer terminals 
in the General Library Circulation Division. The new terminals, 
of the 5230 system type, represent the latest technology in data 
collection. This new system inputs data electronically onto 
diskettes (thin, flexible disks coated with magnetic recording 
material) rather than the prior system which collected data on 
punch cards. The changeover to the new systems will bring in- 
creased efficiency to the Circulation Division. 

Research Library Services 

In its continuing in-depth development of collections, in im- 
portant acquisitions, donations, exhibits, publications, and pro- 
grams the Research Library maintained a profile of growth and 
vitality. 

Several high points of the Library's calendar were provided by 
the annual endowed lectureships: Philip Hofer spoke on 
"W.A.D. as I Knew Him" for the fourth Dwiggins Lecture; the 
annual Maury A. Bromsen Lecture in Humanstic Bibliography 
was presented by Dr. John Parker, "Windows into China: The 
Jesuks and Their Books, 1580-1730"; the twelfth annual Wiggin 
Symposium this year centered on the art and craft of printmak- 
ing. Entitled "Impressions," the event featured art historian 
Peter Wick and artist Barbara Swan. 

Programs 

In addition to offering vital one-to-one services, the Library 
functioned throughout the year as the site of dynamic pro- 



Boston Public Library 5 

grams — lectures, symposia, conferences, demonstrations, 
readings, and concerts. These programs drew in a diverse range 
of audiences, called on experts in many disciplines, and — in 
content — encompassed the arts and humanities, science, and 
business. The programs were sometimes single events, other 
times part of a series format. 

Music — classical, folk, instrumental, vocal — sounded fre- 
quently through the Library halls. The popular "Music 
Makers" series included several concerts, among them "The 
Message of the Woodwinds," "Music from the Attic," and "In- 
ternational Folk Instruments." This last event created an 
engrossing listening/learning experience. Exotic instruments 
such as the Arabic oud, the Turkish kanon, the Russian 
balalaika, the Greek buzuki, and others were introduced both by 
commentary and demonstration. Other musical performances 
included Trio Mexico, an ensemble sponsored by the Mexican 
government as a tribute to the U.S. Bicentennial; a program of 
Handel and Haydn offered in conjunction with the NEH Learn- 
ing Library course, "From the Psalm Book to the Symphony"; 
a concert of Afro-American spirituals; and a "preview in sight 
and sound" of Meyerbeer's "Le Prophete," cosponsored with 
the Boston Opera Association in advance of the Metropolitan 
Opera's Boston season. Dance also became a delightful program 
ingredient in a lecture/demonstration of modern dance by 
Patrice Regnier and the Rush Dance Company of New York. 

Numbered among the year's high points in drama was 
"Freedom and Angelina," base on the letters, speeches and 
diaries of Angelina Grimke, abolitionist and early feminist. 
Noteworthy, too, was "An Evening with Siobhan McKenna," 
in which the leading member of Ireland's Abbey Theater related 
anecdotes and presented passages from Shaw's "Saint Joan." 

Learning Library 

Continuing a pattern of excellence demonstrated since its in- 
ception, the Learning Library series (funded by a grant from the 
National Endowment for the Humanities) featured several emi- 
nent teachers contemplating diverse areas of knowledge. The 
courses and teachers were as follows: "Painting in Boston, 
1670-1970," taught by Professor Margaret Supplee Smith of 
Boston University; "After Strange Fruit: Changing Literary 
Taste in post-World-War-II Boston," delivered by Professor P. 
Albert Duhamel of Boston College; "Images of Boston: 
Writers' Views of the City," led by Professor Robert Hollister 



6 City Document No. 15 

of M.I.T.; "From the Psalm Book to the Symphony: Music in 
the Culture of Boston," taught by Professor John Swan of 
Tufts University; "Growth and Development in the Boston 
Metropolis," delivered by Professor Donald Levitan of Suffolk 
University; "The Way We Really Live," taught by Professor 
Sam Bass Warner, Jr. of Suffolk University; "Boston's 
Workers: A Labor History," by Professor James Green of 
Brandeis University; "Broadway down East: The Story of the 
Theatre in Boston from the Puritans to the Present Time," by 
Elliot Norton, drama critic with the Boston Herald-American; 
"From Common School to Magnet School," taught by Dr. 
James Fraser of the Church of the Covenant and Radcliffe In- 
stitute. 

Each of the vital explorations offered by leading teachers and 
philosophers of the area fulfilled the goals of the Learning 
Library plan: to bring to enrollees, free and unencumbered by 
rules and academic requisites, a challenging and involving 
experience of the intellect. 

Two additional events marked the Learning Library year. One 
was the visit from Ronald Berman, Chairman of the National 
Endowment for the Humanities, who paid tribute to the success 
of the pilot program in Boston. The second key moment was the 
announcement of the extended funding of the Learning Library 
for an additional year. In the 1977-78 period the Boston Public 
Library is firmly committed to finding patterns and support for 
bringing permanence to the people's university concept evinced 
in the Learning Library. 

Literary Boston 

The Literary Boston series, supported by grants from the 
National Endowment for the Humanities and the Massachusetts 
Council for the Arts, was originally designed to extend from 
April, 1975, through the Bicentennial year. Because of its 
demonstrated popular support and educational/cultural impact, 
the series was extended six months. The eminent literary figures 
who gave lectures, readings, and commentaries included many 
poets — John Malcolm Brinnin, George Starbuck, James Tate, 
Jane Shore, Sam Cornish, Alan Dugan, Edwin Honig, Ruth 
Whitman, Denise Levertov, Kathleen Spivack, Marge Piercy, 
Elizabeth Bishop, Ai, Michael Harper, Robert Pinsky, Dona 
Stein. In the concluding program of the series the Library was 
honored to present Robert Hayden, poet and poetry consultant 
for the Library of Congress. Novelists who participated in the 



Boston Public Library 7 

series were Alan Lelchuck, Tim O'Brien, Ivan Gold, Anne 
Bernays, and Penelope Mortimer. Critic Richard Todd and Pro- 
fessor Sacvan Bercovitch of Columbia University also took part 
in this important group of programs. 

Other Programs 

Belles lettres and the arts served repeatedly as sources for pro- 
grams. For example, Professor Henry A. Tate celebrated the 
birth of Robert Frost with a special illustrated lecture, "Happy 
Birthday, Robert Frost." Scholar/writer Richard Hobbs 
vivified an eminent artist and his work in "The Symbolist Art of 
Odilon Redon." 

Providing a practical antipode to programs in the arts were 
other lectures in business and science. From January to June the 
Library joined forces with the U.S. Department of Commerce to 
present "Business Briefings." Designed as a series of six 
monthly seminars on timely topics, the lectures brought in such 
experts as James N. Gabriel, U.S. Attorney, speaking on 
"Crime in Business," and Joseph Lawless, Director of the 
General Services Administration Business Service, speaking on 
"Doing Business with the Federal Government." Other experts 
addressed themselves to patents, bankruptcy, metrics, and 
product liability. 

In the area of science the Library provided the site for the first 
public lecture sponsored by a new organization, the Massachu- 
setts High School Science Association. On this occasion 
physicist Robert Var spoke on "The Unification of Matter, 
Energy, and Space." Dr. Timothy Johnson, well-known for his 
TV series "House Call," provided an "Update on Health" pro- 
gram. 

The Library continued to pay tribute to Boston's rich diversity 
in national/cultural heritages with ethnic celebrations. A 
"Salute to Finland" was mounted in October which turned at- 
tention on "Life in Finland Today," Finnish epic poetry, con- 
temporary architecture of Finland, Finnish cinema and crafts, 
and— of course— Sibelius. In a "Salute to the Baltic States" 
similar attention was accorded the culture of the people of Lat- 
via, Lithuania, and Estonia. In time-honored deference to 
February as Black History Month, the Library sponsored pro- 
grams on black an and drama 

Exhibits 

Particularly noteworthy this year were the exhibitions in both 



8 City Document No. 15 

the McKim and Johnson buildings which, often with visual 
dynamism, keynoted special collections, recent acquisitions, 
materials loaned by other agencies, or items topical or thematic. 
Among the exihibits were: photographs which won recognition 
in the John Hancock Tower color photography competition; 
Boston documents and books of significance to the Bicenten- 
nial; archives of four colonial towns; selections from the Holt 
Collection, donated by Mr. and Mrs. John D. Holt and reflect- 
ing three centuries of the European visions of Islam; "Roland 
Hayes, 1887-1977, Remembrances in Print and Pictures"; 
"Around the World in Fairs," featuring banners, coins, 
photographs, and other memorabilia derived from the World 
Fair events, all part of the collection developed by Robert A. 
Feer; rare Christmas items from the Herbert H. Hosmer collec- 
tion, loaned to the Library from Mr. Hosmer's John Greene 
Chandler Museum in South Lancaster. In addition, several 
special displays augmented programs and symposia; among 
them were exihibits tied in with the Dwiggins Lecture, Literary 
Boston, and Marigold Garden. Especially impressive and 
elegant was the exhibit in the Boston Room drawn from the 
American Institute of Graphic Arts "Best Books" and the 
Stinehour Press. 

Gifts 

Several gifts this year added significantly to the Library's 
holdings in several disciplines. Among the donated items were a 
White Mountain Collection presented by Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Rendell of Newton; a handsome collection of more than 600, 
steel-engraved covers celebrating issues of postage stamps, a be- 
quest by Blanche E. Robinson to the West Roxbury Branch 
Library; ninety-one prints by eminent artist Samuel 
Chamberlain, donated by his widow, and filling out the 
Library's Chamberlain collection. From Mr. and Mrs. William 
Randolph Hearst came a rare volume related to the War of 1812. 
The work, in beautiful condition, belonged to Mrs. Phoebe A. 
Hearst and is valuable for its rare textual content as well as for 
the full-page wood engravings which it contains. Another in- 
teresting donation, four Olympic medals, came to the Library 
from Jean-Louis Delisle, Consul General of Canada. 

An important new endowment was established, the Maury A. 
Bromsen Endowment for Latin American Acquisitions. The in- 
come will be used for the purchase of Latin-American 
manuscripts and rare books. 



Boston Public Library 9 

A gift with important implications for future library service in 
West Roxbury was the donation of a plot of land adjacent to the 
library which eventually will provide the site for an addition. 
The land, "situated at the northwesterly corner of Mount Ver- 
non and Centre Street, said parcel containing 18,590 square 
feet," was given by members of the West Roxbury Congrega- 
tional Church, whose church on this land burned down some 
time ago. 

Publications 

The Boston Public Library published several booklists, 
booklets, and major books this year. A particularly important 
addition to history and books is a short history of Boston based 
on the Learning Library lectures delivered by Professor Thomas 
H. O'Connor of Boston College, titled Bibles, Brahmins and 
Bosses. The book covers the total experience of an American ci- 
ty. The most impressive, artistic work to be published by the 
Library is The Work of Thomas W. Nason. The handsome book 
draws on the expertise of Francis Comstock and William Flet- 
cher, who prepared the definitive catalogue of prints and con- 
tributed essays; Walter Muir Whitehill, who wrote a 
biographical essay; and Sinclair Hitchings and Paul Swenson, 
who also made contributions. The book presents a many-sided 
picture of Nason's life and work both in text and more than 800 
illustrations presented in folio format. 

This year witnessed, also, the publication of the Catalog of 
the Large Print Collection, an invaluable listing of works 
published for readers with sight problems. 

A "best seller" among library publications is "Medical Books 
for the Layperson," an annotated bibliography compiled by 
Marilyn McLean Philbrook of the Science Reference Depart- 
ment. Released this year was an important reprint, Marionettes 
in Motion, written by William A. Dwiggins in 1939. A new edi- 
tion of "Books Build Background," a list of ancient and 
modern classics, was also released this year. 

Visitors 

Year after year the Boston Public Library draws visitors from 
all over the nation and the world who seek out its rich holdings, 
behold its art and architecture, or study its systems of operation. 
Among the guests this year were Gustave Girardot, Director of 
the Comite des Expositions de Livre et des Arts Graphiques- 
Francais (Paris); Dr. David Clemente of the British Library 



10 City Document No. 15 

(London); Ms. Siliam Haydar Ei-Zein, Chief Librarian at the 
John F. Kennedy American Center (Beirut). Other visitors eame 
from New Zealand, Malaysia, Korea, Venezuela, and Uraguay. 
Tours of the building were scheduled throughout the year, 
effectively handled in many cases by members of the Associates. 

Associates of the Boston Public Library 

This year the Associates continued their supportive activities. 
A major contribution from the group of friends is a handbook 
of the arts and architecture of the Library. Prepared by Peter 
Wick, the handbook calls attention to the McKim, Mead and 
White Library, its significant attributes as a building and as a 
center of art. The book is scheduled for publication shortly. 

Eastern Regional Library Service 

In this fiscal year the Eastern Region continued to provide 
services, programs, and materials to member libraries without 
any increase in funding. Numbered among the activities and 
developments of the year were improvements in communication. 
Advances were made with the installation of two IN- WATS lines 
at the Headquarters Library and with the implementation of 
UPS delivery for the New Bedford Public Library. A major 
improvement in facilities was realized with the relocation of the 
North Reading Bookmobile Center to quarters in Andover. 
Future relocations of the Yarmouth Port Deposit Center and the 
Taunton Bookmobile Center are being explored. 

Film services continued to receive intensive attention — 
demand for 16mm films was unabated; new feature films were 
added, including Roots; new film booking and registration 
forms were devised; work progressed on a cumulated supple- 
ment to the film catalog. 

Interlibrary loan remained a major service to member 
libraries. A new loan form was devised and put into use. 
Statistics for this year show that 56,797 interlibrary loan and 
reference requests were handled. 

Grants under the Library Services and Construction Act 
brought $15,000 for captioned or non-verbal films; $5,000 for a 
new delivery vehicle for Yarmouth Port; $5,000 for Adult Basic 
Education materials; $20,000 for materials for bookmobile 
deposit centers. 

The staff specialists in the Eastern Region office were active in 
attendance at professional meetings, consultant visits to member 



Boston Public Library 11 

libraries, conducting workshops, and participation in commit- 
tees of library associations. 

The Boston Library Consortium 

The Boston Library Consortium, the association of academic 
and research libraries, continued actively this year in cooperative 
projects. The two-volume, First Edition of the Consortium's 
Union List of Serials Currently Received was released this year. 
Another activity was the cosponsorship of an energy conserva- 
tion colloquium. A major step ahead was the opening of an 
office on the third floor of the Johnson building and the 
appointment of a Coordinator of the Consortium. The post is 
held by Joanne E. Poage. 

Personnel 

The Library staff was active in many directions beyond the 
demands of their various positions. James Lawton of the Rare 
Book Department contributed an essay to the recently published 
book, Caxton, An American Contribution to the Quincentenary 
Celebration. Shirley Utudjian and Euclid Peltier of the 
Audiovisual Department attended the annual American Film 
Festival in New York City, with Euclid Peltier acting as jury 
chairman for the "Performing Arts" category of films. Mrs. 
Irenemarie Cullinane, Children's Literature Specialist, played a 
key role in a University of Wisconsin Extension program by 
speaking via a two-hour, telephone hookup between her home 
and Wisconsin. As Chairman of the A.L.A. Juvenile Book 
Evaluation Committee, she discussed what makes a "notable" 
book. 

Diane Farrell and Jack Forman of the Eastern Massachusetts 
Regional Library System Office accepted important committee 
positions with A.L.A., Miss Farrell as Chairman of the Newbery- 
Caldecott Awards Committee, Mr. Forman as Chairman of the 
Best Books for Young Adults Committee. Miss Rose 
Moorachian, Young Adult Specialist, became editor of the 
Adult Books for Young Adults column of School Library 
Journal. Assistant Director John J. Doherty presented a talk on 
energy management at Boston University's Mugar Memorial 
Library as part of a colloquium sponsored by the Boston 
Library Consortium. Suzanne Gray, Coordinator of Science, 
served as secretary of the Science Fair Committee which helped 
organize and run the annual fair held at MIT. Mrs. Gray also 



12 City Document No. 15 

represented the Library at the Washington Conference o\' Patent 
Depository libraries. 

In the annual recognition ceremony tendered library 
employees with twenty-five years of service, eight staff members 
were honored: Joseph Competiello, Summer Fryhon, Raymond 
Leary, Margaret Lewis, Lrancis Moloney, Joseph Sarro, 
Pasquale Vacca, and Joseph Walsh. 

This year brought changes in branch library administration 
with the retirement o\' three branch librarians: Belle Levin, Hyde 
Park Branch; Dorothy Flood, Uphams Corner Branch; and 
Sarah Richman, Allston Branch Library. New appointees to 
branch librarian positions were Helen Maniadis to East 
Boston/Orient Heights Branches and Ellen Sisco to Parker Hill 
Branch. 

The Library suffered a major loss this year in the untimely 
death of Ann Curran, Assistant to the Director for Systems and 
Data Processing. Her contributions to the Boston Public 
Library and to the library profession were substantial. 

Since tributes to the Library Director and Trustees redound 
favorably to the image of the total library, it should perhaps be 
mentioned here that Philip J. McNiff was so recognized, 
receiving the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters from Tufts 
University; an award from Simmons College for distinguished 
service to the community; a Bicentennial Award from Boston 
College as one of its "finest alumni and friends"; a decoration 
from the Spanish government as Commander of the Order of 
Alfonso X el Sabio. Trustee Sidney R. Rabb was honored this 
year by the City of Boston as one of Boston's outstanding 
community leaders, a "Grand Bostonian." Mr. Rabb was also 
tendered an honorary Doctorate Degree from Brandeis 
University. 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation for the strong 
support accorded the Boston Public Library by the City of 
Boston, for the cooperation from library staff members, and for 
the leadership and support of the trustees. 

PHILIP J. McNIFF, 
Director and Librarian. 



Boston Public Library 



13 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Table 1. Circulation 

BOOK CIRCULATION 



Fiscal 

1975 



Fiscal 
1976 



Fiscal 
1977 



Central Library 1,122,148 1,160,023 1,022,244 

Kirstein Business Branch* *4,525 t t 

Adams Street 77,383 70,204 63,404 

Allston 35,857 38,307 36,885 

Bookmobile Servicet 129,072 178,286 137,610 

Brighton 105,912 97,347 83,542 

Charlestown 44,677 48,239 44,846 

Codman Square 35,566 31,843 24,520 

Connolly 39,433 37,646 29,349 

East Boston 37,526 40,844 40,006 

Egleston Square 28,004 31,833 24,392 

Faneuil 35,940 37,247 31,133 

Fields Corner 90,604 90,475 76,174 

Grove Hall 31,795 32,251 26,660 

Hyde Park 101 ,682 104,046 94,439 

Jamaica Plain 52,387 53,822 48,939 

Lower Mills 36,754 33,202 32,855 

Mattapan 31,308 30,046 21,937 

Mt. Pleasant! 13,078 14,276 4,900 

North End 28,214 28,093 31,563 

Orient Heights 28,614 26,077 26,691 

Parker Hill 27,226 25,978 19,411 

Roslindale 100,088 97,722 85,056 

South Boston 72,681 71,730 66,108 

South End 31,138 28,855 27,702 

Uphams Corner 51,736 58,123 60,781 

West End 56,656 57,048 49,418 

West Roxbury 129,400 137,752 125,667 

Hospital Library Service 20,127 19,533 22,664 

Multilingual Library 24,821 22,246 19,330 

Total, Branches 1,368,607 1,364,885 1,218,372 

Total, Entire Library 2,624,352 2,703,194 2,378,226 



•Ceased circulation of materials in May, 1975 
tSuspended service March 30, 1977. 
{Branch closed Ociober, 1976. 



14 



City Document No. 15 

NON-BOOK CIRCULATION 



Fiscal 
1975 



Fiscal 
1976 



Fiscal 

1977 



Films and Film Strips 40,012 

Recordings 139,560 

Totals 179,572 



44,445 
141,177 



45,417 
130,367 



185,622 175,784 



VOLUMES SENT ON INTERLIBRARY LOAN 



Fiscal Fiscal Fiscal 

1975 1976 1977 



Interlibrary loans. 



15,625 24,222 39,258 



Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



Fiscal 
1975 



Fiscal 
1976 



Fiscal 

1977 



General Library: 

Volumes added 148,699 148,328 1 30,974 

Volumes withdrawn 16,561 27,544 45,628 

Total on hand 1,577,137 1,697,921 1,783,267 

Research Library: 

Volumes added 103,943 86,297 80,429 

Volumes withdrawn 110 16 262 

Total on hand 2,286,649 2,372,930 2,453,097 

Total Book Stock 3,863,786 4,070,85 1 4,236,364 



Boston Public Library 

NON-BOOK MATERIALS 



15 



Fiscal 
1975 



Fiscal 
1976 



Fiscal 
1977 



Films 5,623 

Film strips 577 

Recordings 196,787 

Cassettes 14,352 

Lantern slides 14,884 

Negatives 2, 1 30 

Pictures 426,426 

Postcards 133,805 

Prints and drawings 57,559 

Projected books 178 

Microcards 1 1 ,85 1 

Microfiche (sheets) 268,522 

Microfilm (reels) 73,884 

Microprints (boxes) 4,140 

Aperture cards 10,151 



6,206 


7,607 


577 


581 


206,939 


218,958 


16,638 


18,586 


14,884 


14,884 


2,130 


2,130 


426,426 


426,426 


133,805 


138,805 


57,859 


58,399 


178 


178 


11,851 


11,851 


317,369 


372,448 


79,922 


84,293 


4,246 


4,512 


13,130 


21,669 



Table 3. Cataloging Statistics 



Fiscal 
1975 



Fiscal 
1976 



Fiscal 
1977 



Volumes Processed 

New Titles cataloged 

Original cataloging. . . . 

NUC cataloging 

LC cataloging 

Rare Book cataloging. 

Films 

Recordings 

Cassettes 



152,642 


289,888 


211,403 


71,769 


74,104 


71,110 


14,518 


16,564 


15,581 


5,341 


13,015 


14,151 


61,998 


42,560 


53,783 


1,912 


805 


598 


259 


611 


224 


9,381 


7,650 


6,198 


2,407 


2,286 


1,848 



Table 4. Binding 



Fiscal Fiscal 

1975 1976 



Fiscal 
1977 



Volumes bound. 



57,200 63,194 



61,000 



16 



City Document No. 15 



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