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Full text of "Annual report"

(DOCUMENT 15 — 1982) 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

For the Year Ending June 30, 1981 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ARTHUR F. F. SNYDER 
President 

PAUL PARKS 
Vice President 

MICHO F. SPRING 
JAMES V. YOUNG 



PHILIP J. McNIFF 
Director and Librarian 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 

To the Board of Trustees of the Boston Public Library: 

We have witnessed this past year a most difficult time 
for the Library and for other City departments, as well. 
The reduction of the Library budget by several million 
dollars has resulted in reduction in staff as well as in 
hours of service in both the Central Library and branch 
libraries. Despite this overall fabric of cutbacks, library 
services have been maintained. Dedication and en- 
durance of staff have compensated for significant losses 
in numbers of staff. Cutbacks have resulted also in 
reduction of acquisitions of books and periodicals. 
Building maintenance has suffered because of budget 
deficiencies. 

On the positive side — and as a direct result of fiscal 
difficulties — we have witnessed this year a vocal, 
dedicated constituency throughout the city, calling for 
strong library service both through written expressions 
of support on postcard, letter, and petition and atten- 
dance at meetings of the Trustees. We have witnessed 
the Associates of the Boston Public Library in a strongly 
supportive role, assisting in Library fund-raising efforts 
and program attendance. 

Hard times have led to virtually no retrenchments in 
continuing the traditional activities and programs of the 
Library, again thanks to the firm commitment of staff 
members — and the financial support accruing from 
private bequests and endowments. 

This year saw the major project, the Editing and 
Photoduplication of the Research Library Catalog, near- 
ing completion. Funded by a Federal Higher Education 
grant, this project promises considerable assistance to 
scholars nationally and internationally. It was effective- 
ly described in a Library-published booklet which has 
been well reviewed in library journals. 



2 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

GENERAL LIBRARY SERVICES 

In branch libraries and in the Central Library, library 
service was maintained despite considerable losses in 
numbers of staff (including three branch librarians). In 
the words of the Supervisor of Branches: "We didn't 
close out our preschool programs, we didn't turn our 
senior citizens away, we didn't cancel our film pro- 
grams, we didn't discontinue serving our public." Some 
cutbacks were deemed necessary and they included 
closing of the Hospital Library and the Multilingual 
Library, cessation of Bookmobile service, reduction of 
deliveries from Central to branches, closing of smaller 
branch units during the lunch hour, closing of the Cen- 
tral Library from 5:00 p.m. on Fridays until 1:00 p.m. 
on Monday. In addition, the Fine Arts and Music 
Departments and the Newspaper Room were closed all 
evenings. Four branch libraries, Orient Heights, South 
End, AUston (later closed) and Faneuil were designated 
as Library Book Centers, staffed by Library Assistants. In 
order to continue to provide service within branch 
districts, the Library instituted "paired " schedules 
whereby some branches offered Monday/Wednesday/ 
Friday service and were supplemented by others which 
were open Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

In each case of necessary cutbacks, the Library 
worked energetically to provide positive alternatives. 
Thus, when Bookmobile service was curtailed, the 
Library expanded Book Deposits, placing collections of 
books numbering from 50 to 600 volumes at various 
locations — near former Bookmobile stops, in housing 
developments, rehabilitation centers, U.S.O. centers, 
and apartments for the elderly. 

PROGRAMS 

Program activities in branches and in Central con- 
tinued the Library tradition of bringing articulate ex- 
perts to its public. To the annual Nichols (North End), 
Kaufman (Roslindale), and Gibbons (South Boston) lee- 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 3 

tures, the Library added the Moloney lecture at Jamaica 
Plain Branch in memory of Francis and Elizabeth 
Moloney. Speaker at the first Moloney lecture was Dr. 
Thomas H. O'Connor, Professor of History at Boston 
College. William M. Bulger, President of the Senate, 
spoke on "South Boston's Political Past" in the Marjorie 
Gibbons Lecture. In the 33rd annual awarding of the 
Mary U. Nichols Book Prizes at the North End Branch, 
speaker was Boston City Councillor Frederick C. 
Langone. 

The Library's activities continued to reach interests 
and tastes of all age levels and spanned a broad range of 
subjects in the hands of expert lecturers. Programs were 
consistently on a cerebral, probing plane and 
demonstrated scholarly research often based on the 
Library's extensive collections in the Humanities. 
Presentations by and about authors, in the format of the 
Learning Library series, The Writer in Society, con- 
tinued an important dimension to this year's program- 
ming as did lectures on contemporary themes, e.g., 
women's role and China. In addition to offering expert 
speakers, the lectures and courses were cosmopolitan 
and international — in the mode of the true university. It 
was not uncommon for speakers to come from abroad. 
A sampling of this year's program efforts follows: 

"Portugal in the Time of Camoes. " This special 
observance at the quadricentennial of the death of 
Camoes was delivered by speaker Antonio Henrique 
de Olivera Marques, Dean, Faculty of Social and 
Human Sciences, New University of Lisbon, Portugal. 

"Boston's Heritage as Reflected in Eight National 
Historical Sites." Co-sponsored with Boston National 
Historical Park were eight lectures which showed the 
intersections of man/place/historic event. Among the 
lecturers: Frederic C. Detwiller, architectural 
historian; William M. DeMarco, historian of the In- 
stitute of Conservation Archeology at Harvard; 
Thomas W. Parker, Director, Bostonian Society. 



CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

"Expanding Women's Role in the Developing World: 
Prospects and Problems ' This study represented 
research done by Gloria Scott, Adviser on Women in 
Development, World Bank. 

Writer in Society Programs included: 

Ruth Whitman, poet, dealing with "Woman's 
Journey" in which she dealt with four stages in 
women's progress: passivity and subjugation, 
rebellion and revolution, creating and nurturing, 
aging and surviving. 

Author Kurt Vonnegut spoke on "A Strange Col- 
laboration" delving into his work with illustrator 
Ivan Chermayeff on the book Sun Moon Star. 

British poet and novelist D. M. Thomas discussed 
the "Trends in Modern Poetry." 

"An Evening with the Alcotts " offered dramatic 
readings by Madelon Bedell from her book The 
Alcotts : A Family Biography. 

And still other presentations by or about authors 
included: 

"Happy Birthday, Robert Frost," presented by Henry 
Augustine Tate, Professor of Humanities, New 
England Conservatory of Music. 

Dr. Gerda Neumann, German author and authority 
on children's literature, speaking on "Main Trends in 
German Juvenile Literature Today." 

"Black Leadership: Historical Perspectives for the 
80's" presented by Dr. Nathan I. Huggins, Director, 
DuBois Institute, Harvard University. 

In still another quadricentennial celebration, Manuel 
Emil Duran, Professor of Spanish, Yale University, 
presented his study on Francisco de Quevedo and 
John Donne, "Two Approaches to the Baroque Style 
of Literature." 

A major Learning Library sequence which coupled 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 5 

person with place was delivered by Sam Bass Warner, 
Jr., Professor of History, Boston University in eight 
lectures. Among his subjects under the umbrella 
theme, "Discovering Twentieth-Century Boston 
Through Autobiographies," were black essayist 
Walter J. Stevens; comedian Fred Allen; and Fred Beal 
and the New England labor scene. 

The People's Republic of China, its history, the cur- 
rent changes in government and culture, and inter- 
national relationships formed the content of several 
lectures. Among them: Joseph C. Harsh, Columnist, 
Christian Science Monitor, speaking on "China and 
U.S. Foreign Policy"; "Edgar Snow's China: 
1928-49," in which Snow's widow lectured on 
themes developed in her book, A Personal Account 
of the Chinese Revolution. 

The harsh lessons of history emerged forcefully in a 
series directed to Young Adults on "Genocide and 
Survival." Among the speakers were Lawrence 
Langer, Alumnae Professor of English, Simmons 
College. 

The record of this past year's significant programs 
seems almost endless, but this constant bringing to the 
podium of eminent contributors to studies in history, 
the human condition and human creativity are as 
unabating as the calendar. Sometimes as often as two or 
three times a week members of the Library's constituen- 
cy, the public, have access to major thoughts and major 
thinkers. And the rewards to lecturers match the 
benefits for listeners. As historian Sam Bass Warner, Jr. 
phrased it "The challenge for the lecturer lay in the 
variety of the listeners and the wide range of their train- 
ing and interests." 

Among the organizations which cooperated with the 
Library by supplying speakers were American Cancer 
Society, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Boston Athenaeum, 
Boston Edison, Boston Police Department, Museum of 
Afro-American History, to name just a few. 



6 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

In the endowed lectureships speakers were publisher 
David R. Godine, speaking on "The Life and Work of 
Rudolph Ruzicka in the seventh annual WilHam A. 
Dwiggins Lecture. The Library also observed the 
centennial of the birth of Dwiggins with a special event 
including lectures by Dorothy Abbe, Associate of W. A. 
Dwiggins, and Ruari McLean, British graphic designer 
and a symposium on printing featuring John Benson, 
stonecutter; Howard Graiia, independent book 
designer; and Gerard Unger, Dutch type designer. In the 
annual Wiggin Symposium emphasis was on the human 
dimensions of collecting with brief talks by Crosby 
Forbes, Curator of the Museum of the American China 
Trades; Ann Gabhart, Director of Wellesley College 
Museum, and Sinclair Hitchings, Keeper of Prints, 
Boston Public Library. 

EXHIBITS 

The Library used displays and exhibits as dynamic 
modes of program definition and demonstration of a 
wide range of holdings and special collections. Among 
the exhibitions offered in FY 80/8 1 : 

Great Cities of the World with books and prints 
celebrating the great cities — from Amsterdam to 
Kyoto, London to Istanbul, Barcelona to Jerusalem. 

Working in Boston, 1920-70. Photographs from the 
old Boston Herald focus on people in many walks of 
life at work in Boston. 

The Elegance of Papermaking: Herbert Farrier and 
the Japan Paper Company. This exhibit brought 
together exquisite paper samples, greeting cards, 
posters and other memorabilia illustrating the arts 
and business of a remarkable firm and its equally 
remarkable Boston manager. 

Watercolors by Joanna Kao. Cityscapes, still lifes, and 
traveller's sketches of a 1979 journey to her parents' 
village in China by a talented watercolorist who 
teaches at the Winsor School. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 7 

Collector's Choice: Treasures from the Library's 
Special Collections. Portraits of Islam. Prints from the 
Holt Collection showing the European vision of the 
Islamic World, 1550-1900. 

The Artist and the Child. A major exhibition of the 
collection of John Merriam comprising a superb 
assembly of the works of such leaders in illustration 
as Artzybasheff, Vera Bock, Maxfield Parrish, Kay 
Nielsen, and other notable artists. 

Jefferson: A Tribute. This impressive exhibition 
served as backdrop to the impressive Tenth Jefferson 
Lecture of The National Endowment for the 
Humanities in which Gerald Holton spoke on 
"Where Is Science Taking Us?" 

RESEARCH LIBRARY 

The major project dedicated to the rehabilitation of 
the Research Library catalog reached final stages this 
year. Remaining on the project agenda were final 
editing to be followed by photographing of several 
million cards. 

The various departments of the Research Library 
maintained a forward moving stance in services, ac- 
quisitions, and projects despite serious reductions in 
staff and budget support. 

The Government Documents Department this year 
entered a contractual agreement to coordinate the par- 
ticipation of federal depository libraries in the newly 
created Center for Massachusetts Data. Known by the 
initialism CMD, this center was created by an agreement 
between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
U.S. Bureau of the Census to make available the results 
of published and unpublished census data. In addition 
to coordinating participation of federal depository 
libraries in CMD, the Library's role will include distribu- 
tion of information through news releases and other 
means, sponsorship of local seminars, and provision of 
assistance on census data to the public. As part of this 



8 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 15 

new function, the Department released the first issue of 
an irregular newsletter in April, CMD Affiliates News- 
letter. 

The Science Reference Department saw significant 
developments this year. In September it was announced 
that the Boston Public Library was one of three Patent 
Depository Libraries to receive a grant from the Office 
of Energy-Related Inventions of the National Bureau of 
Standards to set up an Inventor Information Resource 
Center. For this two-year project, to be carried out by 
the staff of the Science Reference department, the 
Library is receiving a grant of $75,000 a year. It is the 
aim of the grant to stimulate and encourage 
technological innovation by individuals and small 
businesses, to offer them some of the support services 
which an inventor in a large corporation can expect to 
find. With the assistance of the grant, the Science 
Reference department now has the capability of 
performing computer literature searches. We have ac- 
quired the hardware and many of the reference tools 
needed for online searching; all professional staff 
members in the department have received training. So 
far we have been searching the databases through BRS, 
the Bibliographic Retrieval Service. Up to now, all 
online searching has been subsidized by the grant as 
training costs. We will begin to charge non-inventors in 
the near future. Although we are concentrating on 
databases in science and technology, we are willing to 
search databases in all disciplines. A series of 
demonstrations of the online services were held in 
April, May and June, first for other BPL staff and then 
for members of the Inventor's Association of New 
England. 

With the acquisition, this past spring, of U.S. patents 
on microfilm from 1900 to 1938, the Library now owns 
the entire run of U.S. patents from 1790 to date on 
microfilm. This has considerably reduced the need for 
fetching paper copies of patents. 

Like other research departments, Science Reference 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 9 

had to cancel subscriptions to many important 
periodicals. 

With diminished staff the Microtext-Newspaper 
Department continued its considerable range of ser- 
vices in reference, in delivery on request of thousands 
of photocopies, and in providing data on microforms 
and microform service and equipment. 

The acquisition during the past year of important 
microform materials strengthened Library resources in a 
number of areas — in music, with the Complete Works 
of Beethoven on microfiche and the Albert Schatz Col- 
lections of Opera Librettos on microfilm, in govern- 
ment with the Congressional Committee Prints (CIS) on 
microfiche; and key pamphlet collections on microfilm 
dealing with world peace issued by the Carnegie En- 
dowment for International Peace and the World Peace 
Foundation. 

The staff of the Social Sciences Department con- 
tinued work on its major undertaking, a bibliography of 
Boston, 1930-1980. At present the list numbers more 
than 8,000 items. Important department acquisitions 
included Biography and Genealogy Master Index (8 
volumes) and Genealogy and Local History {vcipTim col- 
lection of microfiche). 

The Fine Arts Department proceeded with several 
notable projects in the face of extreme staff shortages, 
reduction of serial titles, and backlog of uncataloged 
materials. Projects included reshelving isolated pockets 
of books so that they were in proper sequence in stacks; 
pursuing individual artists and arts organizations for ar- 
chive material; soliciting architectural firms for profes- 
sional brochures; taping oral history interviews of 
Robert Vose, Allan Crite, Irwin Hoffman, Charles 
Childs, and others; and superivising nine independent 
study projects by students from Simmons College, 
Boston University, Tufts University, and Boston Ar- 
chitectural Center. 

Fine Arts Department activities were considerably 
buttressed by the efforts of volunteers who shared in in- 



10 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 1 5 

dexing Building Inspector Reports; cross-referencing 
cards generated by the Reports; organizing current 
news articles on Boston architecture, identifying sets of 
plans from the city's collection and re-shelving the 
backlog of plans. These efforts testify to the importance 
of the faithful, expert volunteer in the Library's pro- 
grams — and to the important role of department heads 
who stand ready to supervise such contributions by 
volunteers. 

The Fine Arts Department this year added a number 
of notable purchases to its holdings, among them: Arts 
in America: A Bibliography (4 volumes); the O.K. Hall 
catalogue of the Archives of American Art Collection of 
Exhibition Catalogues, the massive Contemporary Ar- 
chitects, and Arte Moderns Italiana dal Liberty al Com- 
portamentismo. 

The Music Department continued its cooperation 
with Boston Area Music Librarians on the Boston Area 
Composers' Project. The directory of greater Boston 
composers is scheduled for Fall 1981 publication by 
MIT Press. As a result of this project, the Music Depart- 
ment has received a number of gifts in the form of 
manuscripts, manuscript facsimiles and recordings. 

The Sound Archives went forward with its priority 
activity of making a complete department inventory. 
This department also proceeded with handling tapes of 
lecture hall programs and acquiring important cassette 
series. 

The Rare Books and Manuscripts Department, despite 
reduced staff, was extensively involved in servicing, ac- 
quiring, and exhibiting notable rarities. Among the 
department-supported exhibits were "Collector's 
Choice," "The Artist and the Child," "Jefferson: A 
Tribute," and "Calderon de la Barca and His Contem- 
poraries." In "From Bondage to Freedom " the Rare 
Books Department exhibited important material from 
the anti-slavery collection. 

Important Rare Books acquisitions dated to the 16th 
century and came from Portugal, Italy, England, the 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 1 

Netherlands. To cite only a few of these impressive ad- 
ditions: Elemens de la philosophie de Neuton (Amster- 
dam 1738); Samuel Johnson's Marmor norfolciense 
(London 1739); Simone Porzio's De rerum naturaliutn 
principiis; and Marco Polo's Delle merauiglie del mon- 
do vedute per lui (Venetia 1597). 

In cooperation with Harvard University and Dart- 
mouth College the Department was able to bring the 
well-known Spanish poet Rafael Alberti for a lecture on 
Picasso. The Department also set up an exhibit of books 
illustrated by the artist. 

The spirit of cooperation of the Department has ex- 
tended overseas. A Psalter, a manuscript of the 13th 
century, was sent by diplomatic pouch to Bruges to be 
shown at a very important exhibit of Flemish 
manuscripts. The Department also loaned material for 
exhibit to the Boston Athenaeum, the American Jewish 
Historical Society, the Grolier Club of New York, The 
Essex Institute in Salem, and Mount St. Vincent Univer- 
sity in Nova Scotia. 

Diminished hours of service were reflected in the 
Humanities Reference Department service statistics for 
the year ended June 30, 1981. Telephone reference, one 
of the Library's most popular "outreach" programs, 
was reduced by almost 15%. This service, which brings 
the resources of the Library into thousands of homes 
and offices in Eastern Massachusetts, is a highly valued 
convenience for many, and the only source of informa- 
tion and assistance for others who are unable to leave 
home or employment for needed information. 



COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Significant this year in the area of computer systems 
development was the implementation of the first phase 
of the on-line union catalogue. This gives the Library 
direct on-line access to the constantly updated 
catalogue records in addition to providing location in- 
formation for those books added to all of the Boston 
Public Library's own collections as well as those books 



12 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 1 5 

added to the collections of the other libraries using the 
system. As of the end of this year there were approx- 
imately thirty-five outside libraries participating in 
what is rapidly becoming an important Eastern Massa- 
chusetts library network. 

In addition to these developments, this year also saw 
the installation of an on-line terminal in one of the 
busiest Central Library check-out stations. As a result, 
the Library now has the computer capability to check 
the delinquency status of each borrower. The Library 
presently looks forward to the installation of these ter- 
minals through central and branch libraries. 

STAFF 

Beyond their day-to-day contribution to Library ser- 
vice, many staff members extended their professional/ 
creative activities to other good works. Suzanne Gray 
continued her service with the Massachusetts State 
Science Fair Committee, also as guest reviewer for the 
Reference and Subscription Books Review Committee 
of the American Library Association and contributing 
reviewer to American Reference Books Annual. Mrs. 
Gray represented the Library at the Patent Depository 
Library Conference. 

Marilyn McLean addressed members of the Boston 
Chapter of Special Libraries Association on "Alternative 
Energy Sources" and also spoke on medical information 
for lay people to groups at Charlestown and East Boston 
Branches. The expert assistance of Edwin Sanford was 
acknowledged in the foreword of Divine Rebel by 
Selma R. Williams, a book about Anne Hutchinson. Tess 
Cederholm served as national treasurer of the Art 
Libraries Society of North American and Vice-President 
of MassCOPAR. Ms. Cederholm also served as thesis 
reader for M.A. and PhD theses. Janice Chadbourne also 
maintained active memberships in several art societies 
and serves on the local arrangements committee for the 
annual conference of ARLIS/NA, Art Library Society of 
North America, scheduled in Boston in February 1982. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY I3 

Diane Ota worked as the Music Department liaison per- 
son on the Boston Area Composers' Project. Also in the 
area of music activities, Patricia Brennan sang with the 
Cecelia Society. 

Roberta Zonghi was named Assoicate Editor of New 
England Chapter of the APHA (American Printing 
History Association). This year Irenemarie H. Cullinane 
continued her service as Editor of the Friends of IBBY 
Newsletter. Also in an editorial capacity, Ron Brown 
served as Editor of the column "Adult Books for Young 
Adults" in School Library Journal and advisor for 
H. W. Wilson's Senior High School Library Catalog. In 
the Spring 1981 issue oi Journal of the Print World 
tribute was paid to Sinclair Hitchings on the occasion of 
his 20th anniversary in the Boston Public Library. The 
full-page spread on the Library's Keeper of Prints in- 
cluded a lithograph of Hitchings by Harvey Breverman. 

Kate Waters served as Chair of the Oral History Pro- 
ject of the Roundtable of Children's Librarians and 
Board member of the Young Adult Librarians Round- 
table and Council member for Horn Book, Inc. In addi- 
tion to numerous such contributions to professional 
organizations. Library staff were frequent lecturers at 
regional colleges, universities, and associations. Among 
the groups addressed by Children's and Young Adults 
Librarians this year were Emerson College, Suffolk 
University, Wheelock College, Roxbury Community 
College, Bunker Hill Community College, and Regis 
College. Irenemarie Cullinane was the featured speaker 
at a conference of the Massachusetts Council of Social 
Studies, speaking on the international books for 
children. Ron Brown addressed the Massachusetts 
Association for Educational Media. 

Four children's librarians shared in a project designed 
to alert Bostonians as to the cultural resources available 
for children. Taped by the WRKO Studios, Dorothy 
Bavicchi, Jackie Hogan, Irenemarie Cullinane, and 
Elizabeth Knight described highpoints in Library 
resources for young people. 



14 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 1 5 

In addition to his direction of the Boston Public 
Library, Philip J. McNiff served in other professional 
leadership capacities. On behalf of the Association of 
Research Libraries, he addressed the House Subcom- 
mittee on Appropriations on the matter of the Library 
of Congress appropriation for Fiscal 1982 (26 February 
1981). The Director's affiliations include membership 
on the Boards of the French Library and the Spanish 
Cultural Institute of New England; also membership in 
the Commission on Telecommunications, Chancellor's 
Advisory Council of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston, and the Massachusetts Archives Advisory Com- 
mission. Mr. McNiff also serves as Chairman of the 
Center for Chinese Research Materials. 

This year saw the retirement of G. Florence Connolly, 
Curator of Fine Arts after more than 38 years of service. 
Changes in branch library administration came with the 
resignation of Paula J. Todisco, head of the East Boston/ 
Orient Heights Branches, Carol Coxe Dever, Branch 
Librarian of Faneuil/Allston Branches; and Yolanda 
Rivas, head of Jamaica Plain/Connolly Branches. Mrs. 
Mary G. Langton retired after more than 37 years with 
the Boston Public Library, 18 of them as Chief of the 
Hospital Library. 

ASSOCIATES OF THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The support of the Associates continued on a high 
level this year. It was this group of enthusiastic able 
volunteers who manned the Library's Sales Desk part 
time, provided staffing for a major fund-raising book 
sale, and participated in many of the Library's program 
efforts. 

The Associates sponsored a small, successful mini- 
series of evenings which featured Rodney Dennis, 
Curator of Manuscripts at Houghton Library, speaking 
on the Trotsky Papers; Eugenia Janis of the Art Depart- 
ment, Wellesley College, speaking on early pho- 
tography; Peter Wick, art historian, on the John Mer- 
riam collection; and bookbinder Kathleen Wick on 
creative bookbinding. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 15 

EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS 
REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM 

The appropriation provided by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts was increased by more than $600,000 
in FY80/81 and was shared with the seven other con- 
tracting libraries in the Region. For the regional service 
program operating out of Boston Public Library the ad- 
ditional funding provided for the assignment of four ad- 
ditional reimbursable positions to the regional budget 
and a sizeable increase for the single year for the pur- 
chase of l6mm films. In addition, funds were allocated 
for some of the operational costs of the automated 
cataloging program which is available to member 
libraries through the Boston Public Library. 

The Region also received federal funds. Library Ser- 
vices and Construction Act Title I, for the provision of 
equipment in the contracting libraries — CRT terminals 
and acoustic couplers which allow them to participate 
in the bibliographical data base and the catalog products 
program. Microcomputers with word processors and 
printers were also ordered for all the contracting 
libraries, with delivery expected during FY 82. 

Interlibrary loan, delivery, and film service have 
traditionally been among the most highly used of all ser- 
vices. It appears that the implementation of Proposition 
2 Vi in the middle of the year resulted in a drop in film 
usage at a number of libraries. But even with this, over 
50,000 films were viewed by over one and a half 
million people in libraries and other places in the com- 
munities served. Approximately 50,000 interlibrary 
loans were completed by the eight contracting libraries. 
Delivery service was extended to the libraries in the 
Taunton subregion. 

Both the bookmobile/deposit centers on the Cape and 
in Taunton were relocated to newer and more ap- 
propriate quarters. Statistics at these centers were down 
because of the lack of service during and just before and 
after the moves. Like all service agencies the Eastern 
Region Office had the usual turnover in staff especially 



16 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 1 5 

in support staff. For the last three months of the fiscal 
year the Office operated without secretarial staff, par- 
ticularly difficult during the preparation of the budget 
and the documents for the annual meeting. 

The Eastern Region program was strongly supported 
by the directors and staff at the contracting libraries, the 
bookmobile/deposit centers, members of the Executive 
Committee, and the administration and staff at the 
Headquarters Library. 

BOSTON LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 

In FY 80/81 a primary focus of the Consortium con- 
tinued to be Serials including NELINET membership, in- 
vestigation of union listing capabilities, continuation of 
the Serials Review Project, and participation in the on- 
line serials data base of the National Library of 
Medicine. 

Another major area of interest was staff development 
including a series of training sessions on AACR2 and 
tours of library research facilities and round tables 
in specialized area of interest, e.g. bibliographic 
instruction. 

Other activities relating to the new cataloging code 
AACR2 were recommendations to the Library of Con- 
gress on appropriate headings and investigation of im- 
plications of AACR2 for both technical and public ser- 
vice staff. Among the accepted recommendations of the 
Goals Committee of the Board was the decision to shift 
emphasis from cooperative acquisitions to the technical 
aspects of acquisition. Also recommended and accepted 
was the formation of two new committees. Automation 
and Preservation. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Table 1. Circulation 

BOOK CIRCULATION 



17 



Fiscal 
1979 



Fiscal 
1980 



Fiscal 
1981 



Central Library 802,992 755,733 570,381* 

Adams Street 57,470 57,609 51,598 

Allston 28,976 26,395 18,731" 

Bookmobile Service 37,445 37,900 12,128" 

Homesmobile 35,150t 33,194 39,326 

Brighton 68,606 68,361 64,335 

Charlestown 41,658 43,347 42,010 

Codman Square 33,247 40,158 37,266 

Connolly 28,231 27,079 28,385 

Dudley 28,844t 26,6l2t 25,432 

EastBoston 41,524 41,694 33,009 

Egleston Square 23,218 24,049 20,524 

Faneuil 30,924 31,1117 22,729 

Fields Corner 69,334 66,510 68,648 

GroveHall 25,419 31,829 25,664 

Hyde Park 88,090 84,940 75,287 

Jamaica Plain 45,968 46,308 36,221 

Lower Mills 30,185 25,458 22,853 

Mattapan 18,288 20,084 13,730 

North End 28,500 28,373 24,074 

Orient Heights 31,345 30,793 35,044 

Parker Hill 19,475 19,933 18,192 

Roslindale 70,652 71,940 62,980 

South Boston 57,906 55,402 59,605 

South End 24,986 22,305 17,676 

Uphams Corner 26,773 28,242 19,838 

West End 44,242 46,495 44,965 

WestRoxbury 123,224 124,115 101,563 

Hospital Library Service 19,688 17,001 6,001" 

Multilingual Library 1 6,605 1 17,516 5,680" 

Total Branches 1,195,973 1,194,759 1,033,494 

Total Deposits — — 66Mit 

Total Entire Library 1,998,965 1,950,492 1,670.418 



No Sunday service; Saturday service suspended 

11/29/80-3/7/81 

Closed December 1, 1980 

Closed June 25, 1981 

Omitted in previous reports 

A newly expanded service 



18 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 1 5 

NON-BOOK CIRCULATION 



Fiscal Fiscal Fiscal 

1979 1980 1981 



Films 57,096 48,756 43,301 

Recordings and Audio Cassettes 61,871 64,732 47,797 

Total 118,967 113,488 91,098 



INTERLIBRARY LOAN 



Books 15,863 14,689 14,273 



PHOTOREPRODUCTION 



Photocopies (Interlibrary Loan) . 126,391* 130,674* 18,300 

Microfilm photocopies — — 459,683 

Public photocopies — — 1,325,977 

Total 1,803,960 



Table 2. Growth of the Library 
BOOKS 



General Library: 

Volumes added 1 17,944 1 19,394 57,223 

Volumes withdrawn 18,337 10,352 68,359 

TotalonHand 2,050,460 2,159,502 2,148,366 

Research Library: 

Volumes added 78,398 69,719 60,281 

Volumes withdrawn 400 — 

TotalonHand 2,599,829 2,699,548 2,729,829 

Total Book Stock 4,650,289 4,829,050 4,878,195 

Includes photocopies from microfilm. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY I9 
BOOK AND NON-BOOK HOLDINGS 

Fiscal Fiscal Fiscal 

1979 1980 1981 

PRINT MATERIALS: 

Volumes 4,650,289* 4,829,050**4,878,195*'' 

Serial subscriptions — 16,464 10,172 

Special Collections: 

Rare Books — 250,000 t 

Rare manuscripts 

letters, etc — 750,908 t 

Letters, books, etc. 

on Prints — 2,607 t 

Patents: USA — 4,209,857 4,276,557 

Patents: Foreign — 2,178,696 2,198,556 

Sheet Maps — 302,500 306,900 

Government Documents . . — 2,030,022 2.088,892 

NON-PRINT MATERIALS 

Cassettes 19,035 23,900* '* 25,708 

Audio-Recordings 234,246 230,832***235,461 

Films, 16mm 8,437 9,760 10,295 

Filmstrips 588 621 621 

Slide Sets (including 

lantern slides) 14,884 7,077 t 

Videotapes — 489 529 

Video Cassettes — 161 t 

Recl-to-Reel Tapes — 1,902 t 

Art Prints I6l,000t 162.915 t 

Photographs 535,952 537,447 t 

Glass Negatives 39.503 1 40,603 1 t 

Picture Collection 494,615 199,371t t 

Postcards 148,869***148,999 t 

MICROFORMS 

Microcards 11,861 11,861 ll,851t 

Microfiche (sheets) 492.932 583,120 706,038 

Microfilm (reels) 93,152 100,407 104,250 

Microfilm (master negatives) .. . — 6,245*** 6,295 

Microprints (boxes) 4,992 5,312 5,560 

Aperture cards 32,028 40,620t 43,965t 



This count excludes Rare Books 

Includes Rare Books 

Corrected total 

Inventory of this item not previously reported 

Adjusted total. Statistics reported in prior years have been 

redistributed 

Inventory not yet completed 



20 CITY DOCUMENT NO. 1 5 

Table 3- Cataloging Statistics 



Fiscal Fiscal Fiscal 

1979 1980 1981 



Volumes processed 196,342 

New Titles cataloged 54,069 

Original cataloging 10,794 

NUC cataloging 9,637 

LC cataloging 32, 165 

Rare Book cataloging 688 

Films 421 

Recordings 828 

Cassettes 382 

Sound Archives 9,055 



Table 4. Binding 



89, 1 1 3 


133,424 


50,608 


46,559 


7,596 


6,714 


4,340 


3,981 


38,022 


34,839 


8^6 


437 


1,323 


535 


362 


259 


256 


188 


5.860 


4,387 



Volumes Bound 55,027 48.369 38,493 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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