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Full text of "Annual report"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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[1JOCUMENT 11 — 1988] 








J 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

for the period 
January 1, 1988, to December 31, 1988 



Boston, February 1, 1991 

Hon. Raymond L. Flynn, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

I submit herewith the annual report of the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment for the period January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1988. 

The rebuilding program continued and antiquated apparatus 
was replaced. In this calendar year, the Boston Fire Department 
placed five new pieces of apparatus into service. This included one 
engine pumper and four 110' aerial ladder trucks. 

Multiple alarms were thirteen fewer than in calendar year 1987 
and this can be credited to the rebuilding program of apparatus 
and related fire equipment. 

The department strength continued at approximately three 
hundred firefighters on duty in every twenty-four hour period, 
which is a top priority for the Boston Fire Department. 

The present administration continues to be a tremendous asset 
in our rebuilding program and for this we are extremely grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Martin E. Pierce, Jr., 
Fire Commissioner/Chief. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



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Fire Department 

HEADQUARTERS STAFF 

Fire Commissioner 
Leo D. Stapleton 

Chief of Operations 

Deputy Chief 

John D. White 

District Chief 

Assistant to the Commissioner 

Jeremiah J. Donovan 

Executive Assistant to the Commissioner 
Gerard J. Horgan 

Department Medical Examiner 
Alan W. Jenest, M.D. 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge 

Personnel Division 

John A. Lockhead 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge 

Fire Prevention Division 

Fire Marshal Martin Fisher 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge 
Special Services Division 
Director of Civil Defense 
Nino N. TIramontozzi 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge 

Training, Maintenance and Research Division 

Martin E. Pierce, Jr. 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division 
Robert J. McCarthy 

Chaplains 
Rev. Msgr. James J. Keating, Catholic 

Rabbi Ira A. Korff, Jewish 
Rev. Earl W. Jackson, Jr., Protestant 



City Document No. 11 

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION 

1) Executive Assistant's Office 

2) Public Information 

3) Accounting 

4) Budget/Fiscal Office 

5) Executive Secretary's Office 

6) Management Information Systems 

7) Payroll 



EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT'S OFFICE 

The Office of the Executive Assistant's first line of responsibility 
is to the Fire Commissioner/Chief of the Boston Fire Department. 
The office assists in the administration of the Department and 
makes recommendations for plans and policies. The Executive As- 
sistant acts as the Commissioner's liaison with various divisions of 
the Fire Department, City of Boston Departments, and state and 
federal agencies. 

Commissioner/Chief Leo D. Stapleton continued his policy of 
replacing antiquated equipment. The Boston Fire Department re- 
ceived four 110-foot Aerial Ladder Trucks in June of 1988. These 
ladder trucks were assigned to Ladder 1 in the North End, Ladder 
11 in Brighton, Ladder 23 in Dorchester and Ladder 24 in Boston. 
This brought the total replacement of apparatus, which began in 
1984, to thirty-three Engine Pumpers, thirteen Ladder Trucks, 
two Rescue Companies, and one 95' Aerial Tower Unit. 

The on duty force averaged three hundred fire fighting person- 
nel in any twenty-four hour period, a personal goal sought by 
Commissioner Stapleton. 

The Office of the Executive Assistant is responsible for the op- 
erating budget and all capital bonding monies invested in the De- 
partment. The operating budget for the fiscal year 1988 was 
$74,837,121. Personal services encompassed the largest part of 
the budget — $68,807,770. 

This office oversees the work of all civilian employees. Depart- 
ments include Auditing, the Executive Secretary's Office, Man- 
agement Information Systems and Payroll. Personnel primarily 
work at Headquarters and assist Department members and the 
general public. 



Fire Department 

BUDGET EXPENDITURES 

FY 1987 



FY 1988 



Total Personal Services 


$62,311,502 


$68,807,770 


Total Contractual Services 


2,328,956 


2,568,467 


Total Supplies and Materials 


1,693,451 


1,925,138 


Total Current Charges 


638,059 


989,515 


Total Equipment 


1,269,816 


546,231 


Grand Total 


$68,241,784 


$74,837,121 



PUBLIC INFORMATION 

The Public Information Office serves as a connecting link be- 
tween the Boston Fire Department and the people living and 
working in Boston. 

Most surveys and requests for information are directed to this 
section. Research materials and information are gathered for doc- 
umentaries, newspaper or magazine articles, radio, and television 
programs. The Office acts as a liaison to the Greater Boston Fire 
Safety Council, a group of Greater Boston business people whose 
efforts assist the Boston Fire Department in fire safety education. 
Arrangements are made to provide fire prevention and fire safety 
materials to interested parties. 

Departmental swearings-in, promotional ceremonies and 
award presentations are coordinated. This section cooperates with 
the Department Chaplains, the Church Committee, and the 
Honor Guard in the preparation of dedications, memorials, fu- 
nerals, and other spiritual functions. 

HEADQUARTERS 

The Boston Fire Department Headquarters Division consists of 
five (5) sections under the direction of the Assistant to the Com- 
missioner. These areas insure that the Department is operated in 
an efficient manner. 

ACCOUNTING 

The Accounting Office is responsible for all fiscal expenditure 
forms and requests forwarded from the Boston Fire Department 
Budget Office. These include service orders, non orders, requisi- 
tions, purchase orders, change orders and contracts. 

Records are kept of all transactions, expenditures and charges 
as they occur. Balances are posted daily The section is in constant 
communication with City Hall Departments such as Auditing, 
Budget, Purchasing and Treasury and vendors to secure informa- 
tion concerning payments, purchases and deliveries, account cod- 
ing, and other changes. 



6 City Document No. 1 1 

BUDGET/FISCAL OFFICE 

The Budget Office is responsible for overseeing fiscal reports 
generated by the Department, including projections, monthly 
progress reports, spending plans, and changes as well as informa- 
tion on the Mayor's priority goals. 

Requisitions, service orders, non orders and contracts are re- 
viewed and either approved or changes recommended. Quarterly 
meetings were held with program managers to review their ex- 
penditures and measurements. 

Annual budget requests for the Boston Fire Department are 
sent to this Office. The budget is then reviewed by the top level 
managers of the Department. The Fire Commissioner, when satis- 
fied with the fiscal year's budget, submits it to the Mayor for ap- 
proval. 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY'S OFFICE 

The Executive Secretary's Office maintains all personnel re- 
cords, accounts and reports pertaining to the Department. 

This section acts as the conduit for all matters relating to the 
personnel system including salary adjustments, the hiring of new 
employees, all fire fighter indemnifications, civil service matters 
relative to appointments, and promotions. 

The staff interprets collective bargaining agreements that may 
result in step rate increases, vacation allowances, posting of vacan- 
cies, worker's compensation, bonuses, leaves of absence, and re- 
tirements. 

Motor vehicle accidents, damages to department property, 
third-party payments, and charges to the Massachusetts Turnpike 
Authority for departmental services are coordinated with the City 
of Boston Law Department. 

The personnel budget for each division of the department is 
prepared yearly. 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS UNIT 

The Management Information Systems Unit (MISU) coordi- 
nates the electronic data processing operations of the Boston Fire 
Department. These operations include the development and 
maintenance of computer applications at Headquarters and Fire 
Alarm. 

A Wang VS Minicomputer is used at Fire Alarm to assist in dis- 
patching operations and the identification of special hazards and 
other information. 



Fire Department 7 

PAYROLL 

The Payroll Division's responsibility is to ensure that Depart- 
ment personnel are paid accurately and on a timely basis. 

Employees are assisted in making decisions on payroll deduc- 
tions and medical and insurance options. 

On receipt of subpoenas and insurance claims, this division 
does the necessary research of employees' payroll records. 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

1) Administration 

2) Medical Examiner's Office 

3) Selection Unit 

4) Personnel Assignment 

5) Employees Assistance Program 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

The Personnel Division is divided into the following sections: 
Administration, Medical Examiner's Officer, Selection Unit, Per- 
sonnel Assignment and the Employees Assistance Program (EAP). 



ADMINISTRATION 

The Administration section is responsible for liaison with vari- 
ous departments including: the Department of Personnel Admin- 
istration, Local 718, the Law Department, and other departments 
and local unions throughout the country. This division investigates 
charges and grievances and follows them through at Labor Rela- 
tions and Arbitration. A member of this office attends all Civil 
Service disciplinary hearings, Selection Unit appeals, M.C.A.D. 
cases, and court cases concerning the Boston Fire Department. 



MEDICAL EXAMINER'S OFFICE 

The Medical Examiner's Office came in contact with personnel 
through office visits, physicals, Hepatitis B and flu shots. This sec- 
tion is responsible for the security and maintenance of medical 
files for the Department. The Hospital Representative made 
numerous visits to hospitals to see members who have been 
admitted. 



8 City Document No. 11 

SELECTION UNIT 

This unit is responsible for scheduling numerous examinations 
and tests including: medical tests, strength/agility tests with the 
State, physicals, screening interviews, and fingerprinting. Public 
lotteries are held to place candidates on a list with tied marks. 
Each person's application is reviewed and an in-depth background 
investigation is conducted. The Department of Personnel Admin- 
istration is contacted on all matters regarding hiring procedures. 
The Selection Unit acts as a liaison with medical facilities for drug 
testing purposes and also arranges drug tests for all Fire Fighters 
on Probation. Fire Departments across the country are contacted 
to compare hiring procedures. 



PERSONNEL ASSIGNMENT 

This Office is responsible for the assignment of all Pool and Act- 
ing Officers to vacancies which occur due to vacations, injured 
leave, department business and other circumstances. All promo- 
tions within the Department are coordinated with the Commis- 
sioner's Office, Executive Secretary's Office, and the Department 
of Personnel Administration. The assignment of all vacations 
within the Department is coordinated with the Deputy Chiefs in 
Divisions 1 and 2. The unit orders, assigns and distributes all 
badges, hat devices, and lapel devices. 



EMPLOYEES ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (EAP) 

The Boston Fire Department/Local 718 EAP is a joint venture 
between the Department and Local 718. Its primary purpose is to 
assist the membership in addressing problems in the areas of: sub- 
stance abuse, marital, legal, stress and financial. These services 
are also offered to a member's family and retirees. 

The EAP staff maintains services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 
The location of the EAP is at the Long Island Hospital. It is staffed 
with one officer and three fire fighters who are certified in the 
EAP field. 

The staff addresses every fire house and fire college on an an- 
nual basis. Each new drill class is spoken with. Many smaller de- 
partments have been assisted in establishing EAPs. The BFD/ 
Local 718 EAP is responsible for assisting and establishing the 
International Association of Fire Fighters' Committee on EAPs. 



Fire Department 9 

1 10TH ANNUAL BALL 

The 110th Annual Ball and Awards Ceremony of the Boston 
Fire Department was held on May 26th, 1989 at the Park Plaza 
Hotel. Fire Fighter Daniel L. MacDougall, B.F.D. Betired, was the 
Master of Ceremonies. 

The following members were honored for their meritorious acts 
during 1988. 

AMEBICAN LEGION AWABD 
Fire Captain James M. Flaherty, Headquarters 

AWABD OF BECOGNITION 

Fire Captain John J. McKenna, Engine Company 4 
District Fire Chief Edmund G. Maiorana, District 5 
District Fire Chief Kevin P. MacCurtain, District 5 
Fire Lieutenant John F. Joyce, Bescue Company 1 

DISTINGUISHED SEBVICE AWABD 

Fire Fighter James B. Lavey, Ladder Company 19 
Fire Fighter William D. Trojano, Ladder Company 11 
Superintendent Dennis B. Flynn, Maintenance Division 
Fire Fighter (Inspector) Isaac Hendricks, 

Fire Prevention Division 
Fire Fighter Bobert T Lynch, Engine Company 17 
Fire Fighter William G. Austin, Engine Company 17 

BOLLOFMEBIT 

Fire Lieutenant Charles M. Parillo, Ladder Company 14 
Fire Fighter Bichard F. Felton, Ladder Company 14 
Fire Fighter Paul D. Hynes, Aide to District 12 



JOHN E. FITZGEBALD MEDAL 

FOB THE MOST MEBITOBIOUS ACT 

BOSTON FIBE COMMISSIONEB'S AWABD 

Fire Captain James M. Flaherty, Headquarters 



10 



City Document No. 11 



FIRE PREVENTION DIVISION 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



General Inspections 

License and Permit Section 

Special Hazards 

Special Occupancies 

Night Inspection Division 

Plans Examiner 

Fire Education 

Fire Prevention Records 

Microfiche Section 

High Rise Sprinkler Retro Fit 

Needless Alarm Reduction Program 

Chemist 

Fire Investigation Unit 



FIRE PREVENTION 

The Fire Prevention Division consists of many sections. The 
following contains a brief overview of each area. 

GENERAL INSPECTIONS 

The District Inspectors inspect smoke detectors for the sale of 
one- to five-family houses under Chapter 148 Section 26F. They 
resolve complaints in their districts, review permits and licenses, 
and issue abatements for violations. 

The inspectors follow up on abatements that are sent in from 
the field. Non compliance cases and code violations are resolved 
through court action if necessary. 

Other City departments are notified when a situation is ob- 
served that should be brought to their attention through Form 65s. 

The Fire Marshal meets with the Inspectional Services Depart- 
ment Commissioner regularly to resolve conflicts. 

LICENSE AND PERMIT SECTION 



The License and Permit Section is responsible for conducting 
inspections of facilities, businesses, and construction sites where 
Fire Department permits are required. Permits are necessary for 
such activities as the storage and handling of flammable and com- 
bustible liquids, gasses, and solids; the construction or alteration 
of any structure; placement of dumpsters; the handling of asbes- 
tos; welding or cutting operations; the use, storage or handling of 
explosive materials; and the installation or subsequent impair- 
ment of fire protection or suppression systems. 



Fire Department 11 

As a direct result of aggressive permitting by this section, espe- 
cially where construction and demolition take place, the fire inci- 
dence at construction sites has gone from common every day prac- 
tice to nil. A construction site has not required more than one 
alarm since Rowe's Wharf in 1986. 

A major part of making and keeping construction sites safe has 
been solving the winter heating problem of these sites. This solu- 
tion has involved substitution of steam and/or diesel in place of 
both random and universal use of propane to heat buildings open 
to the weather. This has been accomplished through the permit- 
ting process, and again active and aggressive enforcement. 

This section inspects licensed properties and serves as the Fire 
Commissioner's designee for the City as an appointed member of 
the Committee on Licenses. 

This office is involved in the ongoing restructuring and expan- 
sion of the permit and license system and utilizes its expertise to 
develop codes and procedures to respond to complex fire-related 
problems and hazards. As part of this, the Boston Fire Prevention 
Code has been amended to reflect current thinking and practices. 



SPECIAL HAZARDS 

527 CMR 9.00 mandated changes for underground storage fa- 
cilities including requiring double walled tanks and piping, and 
the retrofitting of old tanks with containment manholes, overfill 
and cathodic protection. Quick lube centers fall under the same 
regulations. 

Self service gas stations are now the responsibility of local Fire 
Departments. This involves the approval of plans through the final 
inspection before they are allowed to operate. A yearly inspection 
then follows. 

The even numbered years create additional work. The State 
Fire Marshal's stickers for tank trucks and other vehicles carrying 
flammable/combustible liquids expire on August 31st of even 
numbered years. Over 300 vehicles were inspected during the 
year. 

With a growing concern world wide in our environment, we are 
seeing constant change in federal and state regulations governing 
underground tanks. There were almost 400 underground tanks 
removed this year in the City. With new regulations going into 
effect, we should see a big increase in underground tank work 
throughout the City in the next few years. A reminder that all work 
being done on underground tanks requires a permit from the Fire 
Department. 



12 City Document No. 1 1 



SPECIAL OCCUPANCIES 



Company officers in the field complete quarterly inspections of 
hospitals and schools. Fire Prevention Inspectors assist them due 
to the complexity of the occupancies involved. Abatements are 
reviewed to insure that a location has complied with the Fire De- 
partment's findings. Consultation and suggestions are made con- 
cerning new construction or modifications to existing structures. 
Fire education for a specific occupancy is provided to assist the 
management in preventing fires. 

There are a number of different occupancies, that due to their 
size and potential life safety hazard, require special knowledge 
and are assigned full time inspectors by the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment. These include hospitals, hotels, schools, nursing homes, day 
care centers, and laboratories. Legally mandated, routine inspec- 
tions are made to insure code compliance, as well as a review of 
Fire Department responses to these locations. 

NIGHT INSPECTION DIVISION 

The Night Inspection Division inspects approximately 1,600 fa- 
cilities with a capacity of fifty (50) or more people. All places of 
assembly are inspected quarterly. The busier night clubs are in- 
spected weekend nights for overcrowding and other violations. 
These events include concerts, live theater, the Boston Garden, 
Fenway Park, the Hynes Auditorium, and college arenas. 

PLANS EXAMINER 

The Boston Fire Department Plans Examiner provides a com- 
prehensive review of building plans to insure compliance with 
state and city codes. These codes include the Massachusetts State 
Building Code, the Massachusetts Fire Prevention Regulations, 
Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts General Laws — better known 
as the Fire Prevention Laws, Fire Prevention Order 87-2 (Boston 
Fire Alarm Regulations) and the Boston Fire Prevention Code. 

Items reviewed include locations and requirements for fire hy- 
drants, Fire Department vehicular access, automatic sprinkler 
systems, fire alarm systems, and hazardous material storage. 
Proper installation of these items provides safer buildings for oc- 
cupants and fire fighters. 

Meetings are held with building owners to discuss fire preven- 
tion strategies. Technical assistance is given to other city and state 
agencies. Involvement prior to building construction insures 
building designs are consistent with the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment's goals of protecting life and property. 

The City of Boston is fortunate to a have a Fire Prevention Engi- 
neer in training on its staff, affording the Boston Fire Department 
a uniquely professional approach to fire safety, benefitting the 
public's safety as well as fire fighter safety. 



Fire Department 13 

FIRE EDUCATION 

The Office of Fire Education is responsible for promoting pub- 
lic awareness of fire safety and prevention. 

Fairs, community meetings, senior groups, health care facilities, 
schools, group centers, summer camps, tours, organizations, busi- 
nesses, and day care centers are used to promote fire education. 
Fire Department personnel share an understanding of the princi- 
ples involved with fire safety. 

Fire education covers topics such as smoke detectors, fire extin- 
guishers, escape planning, smoking, and cooking safety. Individ- 
uals are encouraged to pass this information onto their family, 
friends, and neighbors. 

In 1988, the Boston Fire Department in conjunction with the 
National Fire Protection Agency, introduced the "Learn not to 
Burn" curriculum in two elementary schools in East Boston: the 
Patrick J. Kennedy School and the Hugh R. O'Donnell School. 
The goal of the program was to teach children how to protect 
themselves, their family members, their friends and others from 
the hazards of fire. Children were taught to be responsible for the 
protection of their own property as well as the property of others. 
Our overall goal is to reduce the number of fatalities. 



FIRE PREVENTION RECORDS 

This section interacts with the public during business hours. 
They assist fire victims, citizens applying for permits and licenses, 
and provide research on inquiries. 

Company commanders are notified by this section when in- 
spections for certain occupancies are required. Data, including 
inspection dates, is recorded for each occupancy. 



MICROFICHE SECTION 

For the year 1988, microfilming Fire Department records for 
future use has been beneficial for the safe keeping of the following 
documents: fire reports, fire alarm dispatch slips, arson reports, 
underground storage tanks, complaints, chiefs reports, emer- 
gency medical reports, licenses, abatements, permits and inter- 
agency forms. 

The use of microfiche has made it easier to access old records 
and make copies of them. This system provides a legally accept- 
able document for court cases and the public. 



14 City Document No. 1 1 

HIGH RISE SPRINKLER RETROFIT LAW 

A serious fire at the Prudential in January 1986 led to a High 
Rise Sprinkler Law which was passed and signed into law in the 
Fall of 1987. It is officially known as Massachusetts General Law 
— Chapter 148 — Section 26AV2 . 

The wording of the law was questioned and a legal opinion was 
sought on the condominium issue. Attorney General James Shan- 
non ruled favorably on this issue in the Spring of 1988. 

The owners of high rise buildings received literature about the 
law and were required to make decisions regarding the sprinkler- 
ing of their building. The compliance enforcement has met with 
great success. All "classic" high rise buildings (15 or more stories) 
are either fully sprinklered and alarmed or actively engaged in the 
process. 

All work is to be completed by 1998. The threat of a "towering 
inferno" will then be effectively eliminated in the City of Boston. 

NEEDLESS ALARM REDUCTION PROGRAM 

The Needless Alarm Reduction Program (NARP) started on 
September 1, 1987 with the institution of Fire Prevention Order 
87-2. Its intent was to reduce the number of responses of Boston 
Fire Department personnel and apparatus to needless alarms. 
Alarm system malfunctions caused by sprinklers, smoke detec- 
tors, and heat detectors at properties with central stations and 
master boxes are addressed by this program. 

An ordinance requiring mandatory fines for needless fire alarm 
responses was passed unanimously by the Boston City Council in 
1988. This legislation became an integral part of the Needless 
Alarm Reduction Program and became effective January 1, 1989. 

Numerous locations have made significant improvements to 
their safety systems, relocated smoke detectors, and decreased 
their sensitivity. Engineers, facility managers, and fire safety offi- 
cials have all helped make an impact on needless alarm reduc- 
tions. 

The fine process has made it financially prudent for many prop- 
erty owners to address their problem rather than continue to pay 
fees to the City. 

CHEMIST 

The duties and responsibilities of the Chemist include the de- 
velopment and implementation of regulations based on the Fire 
Prevention Code, Article IX, Decorations, Furnishings and Inte- 
rior Finish, and Article XX, Hazardous Materials and the estab- 
lishment of an analytical laboratory to support fire investigation. 
The Chemist participates in ongoing programs in the Fire Preven- 
tion Division, the Training, Maintenance and Research Division 
and the Special Services Division. 



Fire Department 15 

FIRE PREVENTION LARORATORY 

The establishment of the Fire Prevention Laboratory was ac- 
complished in accordance with the order of the Fire Commis- 
sioner following the mandate of the Mayor in February 1984. The 
Laboratory is operated under the direction of a full time profes- 
sional forensic chemist. Laboratory reports and the testimony of 
the Senior Analytical Chemist are accepted in criminal cases pros- 
ecuted in Suffolk County. The Senior Analytical Chemist has re- 
sponded to major fires to assist the Fire Prevention Unit in its 
selection of material for analysis. The laboratory has enhanced the 
ability of the Fire Department to successfully investigate and 
prosecute arson cases. 

CONTROL OF DECORATIONS, FURNISHINGS, 
AND INTERIOR FINISH 

The Department Chemist has continued the development and 
implementation of controls on combustible building contents un- 
der the authority of Article IX of the Fire Prevention Code. 

The regulations for upholstered furniture have received na- 
tional recognition and have played a major role in the develop- 
ment of standardized full scale test procedures. These new tests 
are the focus of a national effort to control furniture in hotels, 
hospitals, entertainment facilities and other regulated occupan- 
cies. 

A potential fire hazard in hospital bedding was uncovered and 
investigated. Hospitals were contemplating the use of foam pads 
of substantial size on top of mattresses to reduce the incidence of 
bed sores. Tests were performed with pads and hospital mattresses 
and the potential fire hazard of the pads was confirmed. It was 
further determined that some of the mattresses routinely used by 
hospitals constituted a fire hazard. The existing regulation for mat- 
tresses for hotels and dormitories was extended to hospitals. The 
foam pads used in hospitals are regulated. 

In addition to the classification of materials by performance of 
fire test, considerable effort was expended to inform and commu- 
nicate with architects, designers, purchasing agents and sales or- 
ganizations the importance of the Fire Department regulations 
and procedures for compliance. This work was recognized in 
1988. 

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 

Fire Prevention activities include the Laboratory Safety Pro- 
gram, the Regulations Controlling the Transportation of Hazard- 
ous Materials, and the permit/license controls for the storage and 
use of hazardous materials. 



16 City Document No. 1 1 

Training, Research, and Maintenance activities include being 
responsible for the specifications used to procure protective cloth- 
ing and equipment and making field evaluations of newly devel- 
oped protective clothing. The Chemist takes part in the special 
training exercises conducted for fire companies and chief officers 
who respond to major hazardous materials incidents. He serves on 
committees designated to prepare Standard Operating Proce- 
dures for hazardous material incidents. 

The Department has a technical specialist on-call for response 
to hazardous material incidents. Five (5) members of the fire fight- 
ing force have the technical expertise and training to handle these 
emergencies. 

FIRE INVESTIGATION UNIT 

The Fire Investigation Unit (FLU.) responds to fires, other 
Boston Fire Department incidents, citizens' complaints, delivers 
charges, and follows up on investigations. Members respond to 
calls of fire personnel being harassed at an incident. 

The FLU. has the ability to do searches of paper trails on differ- 
ent properties. This allows them to get a better handle on arson- 
for-profit, which has a tendency to increase as the economy and 
real estate values are depressed. The Unit is tracking high risk 
properties in the hope of preventing arson from occurring. 

The total number of incidents responded to by the Fire Investi- 
gation Unit in 1988 was 863. The breakdown is as follows: 
Incendiary 366 

Suspicious 159 

Cause given 299 

Undetermined 39 

863 
The above resulted in the following: 

Arrests 64 

Court Cases 254 

Convictions 103 

The numbers above do not reflect responses to citizen com- 
plaints, delivering charges, follow up investigations, interviews 
and other services provided by Unit members. Assistance is given 
to Fire Prevention Inspectors when requested. Members also re- 
spond to assist fire companies when police are requested for har- 
assment. 

The Major Case Unit continues to be an effective tool in investi- 
gation follow ups and enabling the apprehension of people respon- 
sible for arson, attempts to burn and fraud. 

The Unit remains involved with the Boston Arson Prevention 
Commission (B.A.P.C.) in assessing possible arson locations and 
suspicious, persons. B.A.P.C. receives tips and anonymous calls 
which are forwarded to the Fire Investigation Unit. 



Fire Department 17 

Community liaison is a part of the Unit's activities. Members 
attend meetings in the neighborhoods throughout the city. Arson 
or potential arson problems are discussed. 

Due to enforcement of Chapter 44, which pertains to the re- 
porting of vehicle fires, the total number of vehicle fires (incident 
types 130 and 131) has been steadily decreasing, as has the num- 
ber of suspicious, incendiary and undetermined vehicle fires. 

1986 1987 1988 
Total: (incident types 

130 & 131) 4,027 3,477 2,651 

Estimated loss $13,891,725 $12,070,054 $9,789,193 

Total: (ignition factors 

00-11-21) 3,443 2,943 2,149 

Total estimated loss $12,760,085 $10,770,284 $8,430,693 

The reduction in incident types 130 and 131 is as follows: 

1986 to 1987: 14% decrease 

1987 to 1988: 24% decrease 
1986 to 1988: 32% decrease 

Due to the high dollar loss, the time spent on investigation of 
vehicle fires, with resulting apprehension and arrest of persons 
setting these fires, seems well spent. We have been working dili- 
gently to attempt to have burnt vehicles towed more promptly so 
that fire companies are not responding two or three times for the 
same vehicle. Ideally, we would like to see them removed before 
they are burnt again so that fire companies are not needlessly oc- 
cupied. So far, despite the Unit's efforts and those of the Boston 
Arson Prevention Commission, we have been unsuccessful. 



TRAINING MAINTENANCE & 
RESEARCH DIVISION 

1) Department Training Program 

2) Protective Breathing Equipment 

3) New Equipment 

4) Field Evaluation of Safety Equipment 

5) Research and Evaluation 

6) Servicing and Repair Programs 

7) Driver Safety and Training Program 

8) Harzardous Material Training Program 



18 City Document No. 1 1 

TRAINING, MAINTENANCE & RESEARCH DIVISION 

The primary function of the Training, Maintenance, and Re- 
search Division is twofold: 

1) To initiate and supervise the job development of the fire 
fighter, commencing with the probationary period and continuing 
throughout his career. 

2) To become involved in research programs designed to im- 
prove fire fighting techniques, fire fighting apparatus and equip- 
ment, and protection of fire fighters; to prepare specifications for 
new fire apparatus; to test and evaluate newly acquired fire appa- 
ratus; and to test and evaluate new tools and appliances before 
recommending their use in the Department. 

DEPARTMENT TRAINING PROGRAM 

Recruit training for 1988 totaled 36 new trainees for the Boston 
Fire Department and eight new trainees from outside towns total- 
ing 44 fire fighters on probation. The class was held from January 
27 through March 31, 1988. A total of nine (9) weeks of intensive 
training was held at the John A. Martin Fire Academy, Moon Is- 
land. All new recruits were tested and graduated on April 1, 1988. 

In addition to the training of the new recruit classes at the Fire 
Academy, a constant program of instruction and drills are held at 
both the company level and at the Academy. 

The Maze located at the Fire Academy was used from January 
through August to complete the training of the 4.5 Air Mask for all 
Department members. The Portable Maze was put in operation in 
October 1988 at the quarters of Engine 2 in District 6 for the 
required training of the 4.5 Air Mask for 1989. The Portable Maze 
will be moved to various fire districts in the city until every mem- 
ber has completed the requirement. 

A drill on respiratory protective equipment was conducted by 
the Training Officers of every fire company in the city. This drill 
was a basic review of the S.O.P. 32, 32A, 32B which covers the 
care, maintenance, and operation of the 4.5 Air Mask. 

A lecture and video presentation on Fire Fighter Safety was 
conducted by a District Chief from the Safety Division. Every 
member and all Chief Officers in the Department received this 
training on Fire Fighter Safety. 

Each fire company equipped with the Rescue Survival Suit was 
drilled on the correct operation and maintenance of the Survival 
Suit according to S.O.P. 44 by the Training Officer from the Fire 
Academy. The drill was conducted at Jamaica Pond, Turtle Island, 
Orient Heights, Kelly's Landing and the MDC boat ramp on Non- 
antum Road. Both companies, in a house that had a survival suit, 
participated in the drill. 



Fire Department 19 

Fire College for all Company Officers and Acting Officers was 
held at Memorial Hall, Headquarters. Subjects covered included 
matters relating to the Personnel Division, Safety Division, the 
Employee Assistance Program, Fire Prevention, Administrative 
Division, Training Division and Fireground Procedures. 

A Vehicle Extrication drill was held for all companies who carry 
the Hurst Tool, Amkus Tool or Hamatro Tool. A thirty-minute 
video was shown prior to the actual on hands drill. 

A Vehicle Extrication Course was held at Memorial Hall for the 
classroom video presentation and the actual on hands training was 
held at the Fire Academy. The course provided training in the 
overall aspects of vehicle extrication, use of power tools, hand tools 
and patient care. 

All engine companies and the Tower Unit were trained at the 
Fire Academy in the principles of Foam operations. Every mem- 
ber received training in foam operations with the use of hand lines 
and heavy stream appliances. Engine companies with the Mini X 
Foam nozzle (High Expansion) and both the IV2 " and 2 V2 " pick 
up tube were also drilled on the foam procedure. 

Engine companies were drilled at the Academy on the proper 
procedure for operation of the Hydrant Assist Valve and also on 
the correct drafting procedure. Ladder companies and the Tower 
Unit were drilled on the proper technique for raising and lowering 
ground ladders (28', 35', 40') roof ladders, dogging of ladders, rais- 
ing and lowering the aerial ladder to the roof, and the ladder pipe 
operation. 

All ladder companies and the Tower Unit were steam cleaned, 
weight tested, lubricated, and checked for any defects at the Fire 
Academy by the Maintenance Division. 

An Arson Seminar, with the actual burning of automobiles at the 
Fire Academy, was held. 

Training on the proper operation and familiarization of new 
Emergency One Aerial Ladders (Ladders 1, 11, 23, 24) and new 
Emergency One Pumps (Engines 7 and 49) was completed. 

All Engine Companies were given a familiarization drill of the 
standpipe connections and hydrant locations to Sumner and 
Callahan tunnels. 

PROTECTIVE BREATHING EQUIPMENT 

S.O.P 32, 32A, 32B and 32C was revised effective November 1, 
1988. 

The harness on all the 4.5 Air Tanks in the department have 
been replaced with the Kevlar flame resistant type harness. 

A maintenance program was initiated in December 1988 for all 
air masks to have a complete maintenance check of all parts and to 
be tested prior to being returned to service. 

Hydrostatic testing of all air cylinders is an ongoing process and 
every air cylinder is hydrostatically tested every three years. 



20 City Document No. 1 1 

NEW EQUIPMENT 

The following equipment has been placed in service: 

Around the Pump Proportioner (Foam) — Engine 7 drilled at 
Fire Academy and now in use. 

Engine 20 had its piping arrangement overhauled and added a 
feed booster tank directly from hydrant and a connection to en- 
able the engine to get foam directly from container. 

All engine companies have been supplied with 300 feet of 1 % " 
synthetic rubber hose and 200 feet of 1 l A " synthetic rubber hose. 
All ladder companies have been given 300 feet of 1 % " cotton 
polyester hose. 

FIELD EVALUATION OF SAFETY EQUIPMENT 

Field testing of the Globe fire coat and night hitch as a complete 
protection package was conducted. The Carns-Firefighter coat 
with two outer shells, nomex and neoprene, was evaluated. 

The Cairns & Brothers New Yorker N6A1 Sam Houston fire 
helmet was tested. 

A new non-skid safety sole for better contact with different sur- 
faces from Ranger Rubber Company was evaluated. Ranger 
FIRE WALKERS leather work boots were field tested for practica- 
bility in the fire service. Servus brand fire boots with Urethane 
insulation were field tested. 

Testing of gloves produced by the Shelby- Wolverine Company 
with an outer shell of 3 ounce reverse grain pigskin was con- 
ducted. Gloves submitted by the Shelby- Wolverine Company with 
an outer shell of tanned cowhide were evaluated. Two different 
styles of leather work duty gloves made by Firecraft Inc. were field 
tested. 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION 

Biosystem Posicheck is a computerized test bench used to dy- 
namically check the performance of fully assembled supplied air 
respirators and on SCBA and print out results. 

An evaluation was conducted at the Fire Academy of the 35 foot 
(3-Section) ground ladder by seven different ladder companies. 

SERVICING AND REPAIR PROGRAMS 

A year round service and repair program is conducted by this 
division on all fire fighting equipment, tools, and appliances at our 
repair facilities at Headquarters and at the Fire Academy. 



Fire Department 21 

DRIVER SAFETY AND TRAINING PROGRAM 

Driver training was scheduled by the District Fire Chiefs for all 
companies in their respective districts for weekend day tours. 
Driver training is given to any fire company whose deputy recom- 
mends it after an accident hearing at the Division. All new re- 
cruits, starting with the class of March 1989, will complete the 
driver training course. 



HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRAINING PROGRAM 

Under Title III, there are mandatory training requirements for 
fire personnel which involve a minimum of 24 hours per year for 
all members of the fire fighting divisions and 40 hours per year for 
members of special response teams. 

The program was started in November of 1988. Training guides 
have been issued to each fire company and video tapes to each 
District Fire Chief for distribution to companies on a monthly 
schedule to meet the required drill period. 



DRESS CLOTHING ISSUED 

Deputy Chief sack coats 5 

Officer's sack coats 50 

Fire Fighter's sack coats 125 

Dress trousers 250 

White dress shirts 340 

Light blue dress shirts 250 

Navy blue shirts 275 



SAFETY EQUIPMENT ISSUED 

Fire coats 178 

Fire boots 210 pair 

Helmets 108 

Work gloves 1,789 pair 
Short sleeve fire resistive 

station uniform shirts 1,687 

Fire Fighter sweatshirts 1,691 

Fire resistive work trousers 1,684 



22 City Document No. 1 1 

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION 

1) Planning and Logistics 

2) Fire Alarm Section 



SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION 

The Boston Fire Department undertook a reorganization of the 
Fire Alarm Division, which consists of the Fire Alarm Office and 
the Fire Alarm Construction Unit, and the Planning and Logistics 
Division, which consists of Civil Defense, the Water and Hydrants 
Unit, the Elevator Unit, the Fire Department Emergency Medical 
Services Unit, the Underwater Recovery Team and the Local 
Emergency Planning Unit into the Special Services Division 
during 1988. 

PLANNING AND LOGISTICS 

In 1988, the Planning and Logistics Division began a program 
of computerization of the fire hydrants in the city, both munici- 
pally owned and privately owned. This program will allow the Fire 
Department to identify those hydrants subject to damage by vehi- 
cles and/or vandals as well as keeping an inventory of hydrants 
used at incidents and the condition found during such use. The 
annual inspection of hydrants by fire companies throughout the 
city will be monitored. 

The Elevator Safety Officer has been attending the State Eleva- 
tor Safety Board's meetings in order to assure the incorporation of 
safety measures that are of concern to the Fire Department. These 
issues are mainly in the fire fighter's key switch phases I and II and 
the safety of fire fighters working about the elevators when people 
are trapped within an elevator that has malfunctioned. These 
issues will remain a concern of the elevator safety officer until 
resolved. 

The Emergency Medical Services Section made advancements 
in the area of Emergency Medical Technician (E.M.T) training 
while assisting in the recertification of E.M.T.s by the State Office 
of Emergency Medical Services. Yearly retraining of fire fighters in 
first responder courses and CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscita- 
tion) courses was continued to meet federal and state mandates. 

The Underwater Recovery Team (S.C.U.B.A.) has continued to 
assist in the search and rescue efforts of victims reported to be in 
any of the waters of the City of Boston. They also have done survey 
work on the piers and wharves of the harbor to assist in the re- 
moval of navigational hazards found in these areas. The Team sur- 
veys the underside of the Fire Department's Marine Units ("Fire- 



Fire Department 23 

fighter" and "St. Florian") in addition to handling requests by 
other governmental agencies for similar types of surveys. 

The Local Emergency Planning Unit arranged the Local Emer- 
gency Planning Committee's (L.E.P.C.) Hazardous Materials Drill 
in October of 1988. The drill proved that the City of Boston has a 
workable hazardous material incident plan and will continue to 
upgrade the plan in order to be able to handle any and all types of 
such incidents whenever and wherever they might occur. The 
L.E.P.C. submitted the city's plan to the area office of Civil De- 
fense by the designated date prescribed in the Superfund 
Reauthorization Act of 1986. 

The Civil Defense Director took part in many Civil Defense 
Planning Sessions with the state offices of Civil Defense. The Civil 
Defense Unit undertook a survey of facilities within the City of 
Boston and will begin to upgrade said facilities needed and phase 
out those facilities where not practical. The Civil Defense Unit 
also participated in "Civix" 88 as part of the Civil Defense 
requirements. 

FIRE ALARM SECTION 

The Fire Alarm Section is responsible for the installation, main- 
tenance and operation of the vast emergency communications 
network incorporated by the Boston Fire Department. This is ac- 
complished through the activities of four (4) subsections: Opera- 
tions, Radio Shop, Construction, and Inside Wiremen. 



FIRE ALARM OPERATIONS 

The Operating Force of the Fire Alarm Section dispatched ap- 
paratus to 49,969 incidents during 1988, of these 60 were working 
fires and 60 required transmission of multiple alarms. 

Fire Alarm personnel are involved with nationally recognized 
associations concerned with the many facets of public safety com- 
munications by serving on various committees, attending semi- 
nars and participating in sponsored workshops. These activities 
afford the members an opportunity to keep abreast of the many 
advancements in emergency communications technology such as 
Computer Aided Dispatch systems, Enhanced 9-1-1 and fiber op- 
tic cable applications. 

Four (4) Motorola Centracom Series II Consoles were installed 
in March 1988. Features include the following: 

8 channels — four of which operate in Half-Duplex Mode 
Simulcasting on any combination of channels 
3 preset simulcast modes/set by operator 



24 City Document No. 11 

1 button paging of up to 125 units 
Private line disable when paging 
Phone patch capability 
Intercom system between consoles 
Multiple repeater sites for each channel 
Repeater disable function 
Special location repeaters/tunnels 
Voter-Comparator receive system 
Uninterruptible Power Supply 

The following equipment is also installed in each of the 
Motorola Consoles: 

NYNEX 80 line Centrex Telephone 
Dicataphone Call-Check/endless loop recorder 
Wang VS-65 Dispatch/Reference computer terminal 
Digitize remote alarm terminal 

Radio Channel Assignments 

Channel 1 483.1625 General radio traffic 

Channel 2 483.1875 Fireground 

Channel 3 483.2125 Fireground 

Channel 4 483.2375 High-Rise Evacuation/FAO Construction 

Channel 5 453.650 Dispatch 

Channel 6 1 53 . 890 Paging 

Channel 7 154.220 Mutual Aid/Metro Fire 

Channel 8 153.890 MBTA Subway Radio System 

Digitize Equipment 

Four (4) consoles capable of receiving alarms and transmitting 
boxes were installed in March 1988. 
This system handles - 97 Box circuits 

9 Mutual Aid circuits 
20 Alarm circuits 
17 E.V.C.S. circuits 
Features include - Hard copy of all system activity 

Ability to receive and store multiple boxes 
Decode acknowledgments from fire houses 
Uninterruptable Power Supply 

FIRE ALARM CONSTRUCTION 

The last portion of the Southwest Corridor MBTA project was 
completed in the Forest Hill Station area. This included installing 
1,500 feet of 37 Conductor Cable at no cost to the City of Boston. 

Cable was rerouted in the City Square area from its present 
location to a new location due to reconstruction and the Central 
Artery Project. Cable was also rerouted at Post Office Square due 
to a major reconstruction project. 



Fire Department 25 

Plans were reviewed for cable routing to new housing develop- 
ments in Roslindale - Hyde Park and Allendale Wood (Jamaica 
Plain) for installing new Fire Alarm street boxes. Plans were exam- 
ined for proposed new Fire Alarm street boxes and on Haul Road 
for the new Third Harbor Tunnel Project. 

Plans were reviewed regarding the equipment that will be 
needed to furnish the new fire house on Purchase Street. 

There are 1,350 Fire Alarm street boxes in existence and 1,017 
master boxes connected to the city system. 

New cable was installed during the year replacing defective 
cable. 

Rural C 3,650 feet 

4 Conduct Cable 23,210 feet 

6 Conduct Cable 1 ,500 feet 

7 Conduct Cable 2,050 feet 
10 Conduct Cable 20,430 feet 
19 Conduct Cable 16,450 feet 
37 Conduct Cable 8,800 feet 
61 Conduct Cable 800 feet 
Total Footage 76,980 feet 

Fire Alarm Roxes Knocked Down 182 

Fire Alarm Roxes Repaired/Replaced 1,272 

New Fire Alarm Roxes Installed in Harbor Point 4 

Citv Roxes Tested 2,810 



RADIO SHOP 

The Radio Shop is responsible for the installation, maintenance 
and testing of all wireless communication equipment and associ- 
ated electronic hardware utilized by this Department. 

Radio Shop personnel were involved in a number of mainte- 
nance and ungrading projects such as: relocating radio and public 
address system equipment to allow more efficient operation and 
easier access for maintenance, participating in a cooperative effort 
with telephone company personnel for upgrading radio loop cir- 
cuits, periodic testing of fire subway radio systems and the re- 
vamping of fire house alerting systems by replacing electron tubes 
with a solid state integrated circuit made up by shop personnel. 

Activities 

Issued new portable radios 7 

Installed new base stations at various locations 6 

Repaired/replaced speakers 159 

Readjusted satellite receiver at various locations 4 

Issued new pagers 7 



26 City Document No. 11 

Repaired mobile/portable radios 262 

Removed equipment from apparatus 8 

Installed new radios in cars and apparatus 10 

Repaired sirens 65 

Repaired portable radio mis's 15 

Issued portable radios to District for details 12 
Installed new channel 1 - 3 & 4 receivers at Filene's 
Installed new consoles at Fire Alarm 



INSIDE WIREMEN 

The Inside Wiremen are responsible for the installation and 
maintenance of all electrical wiring and the associated apparatus 
and appliances, including the internal Centrex telephone system 
of the Department. 

The expanded use of computers within the Department re- 
quired the installation of cable and peripheral equipment at Fire 
Department facilities. Fire Alarm was equipped with an Uninter- 
ruptable Power Supply for the Wang computer system. 

The main floor of Fire Alarm required new wiring with the in- 
stallation of the new Form 4 Digitize Fire Alarm System. 

Electrical equipment for the new Marine Unit location in 
Charlestown was put in place. 

The Maze, a portable training exercise, required a lot of time 
and effort to meet all of its needs. It was necessary to find a means 
for portable power wherever it was in use. 

The Lighting Plant was stripped and rewired from top to bot- 
tom. This truck, a former Pepsi truck, was donated to the Depart- 
ment. It is used at many fires. Portable lighting was another 
concern. 



STATISTICS 



28 City Document No. 11 

COMPARISON OF INCIDENT TYPES 

1987 1988 









% of 




% of 




Type 


Description 


Total 


Incs. 


Total 


Incs. 


+ /- 


100 


Fires or Explosions 


9,668 


19.0 


8,138 


16.3 


- 1,530 


200 


Overpressure 














Ruptures 


19 


* 


14 


* 


5 


300 


Rescue/EMS Calls 


6,484 


12.7 


7,936 


15.9 


+ 1,452 


400 


Hazardous 














Conditions 


5,384 


10.6 


5,251 


10.5 


- 133 


500 


Service Calls 


7,279 


14.3 


7,758 


15.5 


+ 479 


600 


Good Intent Calls 


5,936 


11.7 


2,222 


4.4 


-3,714** 


700 


False Alarms/Calls 


16,069 


31.6 


18,606 


37.2 


+ 2,537** 


800 


Natural Disasters 


3 


* 


4 


* 


+ 1 


900 


Other Situations 


28 


.1 


40 


.1 


+ 12 



50,870 49,969 - 901 

* No Significant % 
** Incident Types for Detector Incidents have been changed and these 
figures reflect those changes. 



FIVE INCIDENT TYPES 
WITH THE MOST OCCURRENCES 

1988 

% OF 

Rank Type Description Total Incs. 

1 710 False Alarm - Box 6,385 12.8 

2 733 Smoke Detector Device 

Operated - No Fire 4,126 8.3 

3 731 Alarm System Malfunction - 

Smoke Detector 3,511 7.0 

4 321 Medical Assist 3,328 6.7 

5 592 Public Service 3,291 6.6 

1987 

1 710 False Alarm - Box 7,132 14.0 

2 731 Alarm System Malfunction 

Smoke Detector 4,088 8.0 

3 671 Smoke Detector Device 

Operated - No Fire 3,477 6.8 

4 592 Public Service 3,353 6.6 

5 130 Road Transport Vehicle 

Fire - Passenger 3,311 6.5 



Fire Department 



29 



RANKING OF WORKING FIRES 
AND MULTIPLE ALARMS 
COMRINED BY DISTRICT 

1988 



'lANK 


District 


Work 


Mult 


Total 


1 


5 


9 


10 


19 




7 


11 


8 


19 


3 


9 


8 


7 


15 


4 


11 


4 


10 


14 


5 


3 


10 


3 


13 


6 


6 


4 


5 


9 


7 


12 


2 


6 


8 


8 


4 


5 


2 


7 




8 


3 


4 


7 


10 


1 


2 


3 


5 


11 


10 


2 


2 


4 



60 



60 



120 



1987 



Rank 

1 

2 
3 



10 
11 



District 

7 

5 

4 

6 

8 
11 
12 

1 

9 

3 
10 



Work 



Mult 



Total 



9 


19 


28 


4 


9 


13 


3 


8 


11 


3 


8 


11 


6 


4 


10 


1 


9 


10 


5 


5 


10 


1 


6 


7 


4 


3 


7 


4 


1 


5 


3 


1 


4 



43 



73 



116 



30 



City Document No. 11 



COMPARISON OF ALARM LEVELS 
RY MONTH 

WORKING FIRES 
AND MULTIPLE ALARMS COMRINED 



Month 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1987 


1988 


Total 


YTD 


Total 


YTD 


10 


10 


17 


17 


16 


26 


11 


28 


12 


38 


5 


33 


8 


46 


10 


43 


12 


58 


8 


51 


7 


65 


16 


67 


13 


78 


5 


72 


7 


85 


4 


76 


3 


88 


8 


84 


7 


95 


5 


89 


12 


107 


12 


101 


9 


116 


19 


120 



COMPARISON OF ALARM LEVELS 



Working Fires 
Second Alarms 
Third Alarms 
Fourth Alarms 
Fifth Alarms 
Sixth Alarms 
Seventh Alarms 
Eighth Alarms 
Ninth Alarms 



1987 

43 

49 

12 

5 

1 
1 
4 



116 



1988 

60 

47 
6 
6 



120 



Fire Department 31 

TOTAL RUNS PER COMPANY 

TOTAL TOTAL TOTAL 

ENGINE RUNS LADDER RUNS MISC. RUNS 



1 


82 


1 


999 


CU1 


264 


2 


904 


2 


1,614 


HOI 


623 


3 


1,506 


4 


3,521 


H02 


632 


4 


1,632 


6 


2,459 


H03 


129 


5 


1,316 


7 


2,695 


MU 


220 


7 


2,335 


9 


1,032 


ROl 


1,972 


8 


770 


10 


2,426 


R02 


2,220 


9 


872 


11 


1,900 


TC 


2,161 


10 


2,070 


14 


2,636 


W12 


177 


14 


2,361 


15 


3,187 






16 


1,462 


16 


2,083 






17 


1,587 


17 


3,493 






18 


1,881 


18 


2,075 






20 


781 


19 


1,118 






21 


2,353 


21 


933 






22 


1,784 


23 


2,955 






24 


2,489 


24 


2,003 






28 


1,793 


25 


1,272 






29 


1,551 


26 


3,902 






30 


988 


28 


1,384 






32 


641 


29 


2,450 






33 


2,884 










37 


3,365 










39 


1,485 










41 


2,343 










42 


2,088 










48 


1,243 










49 


435 










50 


1,053 










51 


806 










52 


1,895 










53 
FB 


1,805 
98 










55 


684 










56 


680 











NOTE: This report tallies only responses to the scene of an 
incident. Covering is not recorded here. 



32 City Document No. 11 

MUTUAL RESPONSES 



SPONSESTO 


City/Town 


21 


City of Chelsea 


49 


City of Somerville 


38 


Town of Dedham 


36 


Town of Brookline 


33 


City of Cambridge 


32 


City of Newton 


23 


Town of Milton 


16 


City of Revere 


15 


City of Quincy 


5 


Town of Winthrop 


3 


City of Everett 


2 


Town of Needham 


1 


Town of Braintree 


1 


City of Maiden 


1 


CityofMedford 



CITY OF BOSTON c^^p^ PRINTING SECTION