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Full text of "Annual report"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06316 868 4 



a. 



Doc. t of 7~ 




[Document 11 — 1989] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

for the period 
January 1, 1989, to December 31, 1989 



Boston, February 1, 1991 

Hon. Raymond L. Flynn, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

I submit herewith the annual report of the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment for the period January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989. 

During this period, the department continued with the rebuild- 
ing program of replacing antiquated fire apparatus and equip- 
ment. Through this continual replacement, the average age of 
apparatus has been reduced to under five years. 

Of over 45,000 alarms responded to in 1989, only fifty-six 
responses became multiple-alarm fires, attributable to adequate 
on-duty manpower and front line apparatus. This, combined with 
the constant upgrading of the auxiliary support divisions, has fur- 
ther increased the protection of the citizens of Boston. 

Without the tremendous cooperation of you and your staff, 
these goals would be unattainable. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Martin E. Pierce, Jr., 
Fire Commissioner/Chief. 



HEADQUARTERS STAFF 

Fire Commissioner, Leo D. Stapleton 

Chief of Operations, Deputy Chief, 
John D. White 

District Chief, Assistant to the Commissioner, 
Jeremiah J. Donovan 

Executive Assistant to the Commissioner, 
Gerard J. Horgan 

Department Medical Examiner, Alan W. Jenest, M.D. 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge Personnel Division, 
John A. Lockhead 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge Fire Prevention Division, 
Fire Marshal Martin Fisher 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge Special Services Division, 
Director of Civil Defense, Nino N. Tramontozzi 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge of Training, Maintenance 
and Research Division, Martin E. Pierce 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division, 
RorertJ. McCarthy 

Chaplains, Rev. Msgr. James J. Keating, Catholic 
Rabri Ira A. Korff, Jewish 
Rev. Earl W. Jackson, Jr., Protestant 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Organization 



Commissioner 



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MAINTENANCE 
RESEARCH 



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CONST. 




WATER & 

HYDRANTS 



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FUMMABLEj CASHIER 



INVESTIGATION 



WOTOQRAPHER 




ANALYTICAL 
CHEMIST 





MEDICAL 
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HOSPITAL 
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ID BOARD 



City Document No. 11 

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION 

1) Executive Assistant's Office 

2) Public Information 

3) Accounting 

4) Budget/Fiscal Office 

5) Executive Secretary's Office 

6) Management Information Systems 

7) Payroll 



EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT'S OFFICE 

The Office of the Executive Assistant's first line of responsibility 
is to the Fire Commissioner/Chief of the Boston Fire Department. 
The office assists in the administration of the Department and 
makes recommendations for plans and policies. The Executive As- 
sistant acts as the Commissioner's liaison with various divisions of 
the Fire Department, City of Boston Departments, and state and 
federal agencies. 

Commissioner/Chief Leo D. Stapleton continued toward the 
completion of his goal of replacing the entire fleet of apparatus 
with the acquisition of four new Aerial 110' Ladder Trucks. They 
were placed in service in Dorchester (Ladder 7), Back Bay (Lad- 
der 15), South Boston (Ladder 18), and East Boston (Ladder 21). 
This brought the total replacement of apparatus which began in 
1984 to thirty-three (33) Engine Pumpers, seventeen (17) 110' 
Aerial Ladder Trucks, two (2) Rescue Companies, and one (1) 95' 
Aerial Tower Unit. 

This year provided the opening of the Fort Hill Square Fire 
House, the largest fire fighting structure in the city. This building 
is the first privately constructed fire house in the country and also 
the first within an office development. 

All hose was replaced with new lightweight more durable hose. 

The on duty force hovered near three hundred (300) fire fight- 
ing personnel per shift through the year attaining one of the Com- 
missioner's personnel goals. 

The Office of the Executive Assistant is responsible for the op- 
erating budget and all capital bonding monies invested in the de- 
partment. The operating budget for the fiscal year 1989 was 
$79,588,078. Personal services encompassed the biggest part of 
the budget — $73,516,905. 

This office oversees the work of all civilian employees. Depart- 
ments include Auditing, the Executive Secretary's Office, Man- 
agement Information Systems, and Payroll. Personnel primarily 
work at Headquarters and assist Department members and the 
general public. 



Fire Department 



BUDGET 








FY 1988 


FY 1989 




Expenditure 


Expenditure 




$68,807,770 


$73,516,905 




2,568,467 


2,578,899 




1,925,138 


1,957,210 


ligations 


989,515 


867,514 




546,231 


667,550 



Total Personal Services 

Total Contractual Services 

Total Supplies and Materials 

Total Current Charges and Obligations 

Total Equipment 

Grand Total $74,837,121 $79,588,078 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

The Public Information Office serves as a connecting link be- 
tween the Boston Fire Department and the people living and 
working in Boston. 

Most surveys and requests for information are directed to this 
section. Research materials and information are gathered for doc- 
umentaries, newspaper or magazine articles, radio, and television 
programs. The Office acts as a liaison to the Greater Boston Fire 
Safety Council, a group of Greater Boston business people whose 
efforts assist the Boston Fire Department in fire safety education. 
Arrangements are made to provide fire prevention and fire safety 
materials to interested parties. 

Departmental swearings-in, promotional ceremonies and 
award presentations are coordinated. This section cooperates with 
the Department Chaplains, the Church Committee, and the 
Honor Guard in the preparation of dedications, memorials, fu- 
nerals, and other spiritual functions. 

HEADQUARTERS 

The Boston Fire Department Headquarters Division consists of 
five (5) sections under the direction of the Assistant to the Com- 
missioner. These areas insure that the Department is operated in 
an efficient manner. 

ACCOUNTING 

The Accounting Office is responsible for all fiscal expenditure 
forms and requests forwarded from the Boston Fire Department 
Budget Office. These include service orders, non orders, requisi- 
tions, purchase orders, change orders and contracts. 

Records are kept of all transactions, expenditures and charges 
as they occur. Balances are posted daily. The section is in constant 
communication with City Hall Departments such as Auditing, 
Budget, Purchasing and Treasury and vendors to secure informa- 
tion concerning payments, purchases and deliveries, account cod- 
ing, and other changes. 



6 City Document No. 11 

BUDGET/FISCAL OFFICE 

The Budget Office is responsible for overseeing fiscal reports 
generated by the Department, including projections, monthly 
progress reports, spending plans, and changes as well as informa- 
tion on the Mayor's priority goals. 

Requisitions, service orders, non orders and contracts, are re- 
viewed and either approved or changes recommended. Quarterly 
meetings were held with program managers to review the^r ex- 
penditures and measurements. 

Annual budget requests for the Boston Fire Department are 
sent to this Office. The budget is then reviewed by the top level 
managers of the Department. The Fire Commissioner, when satis- 
fied with the fiscal year's budget, submits it to the Mayor for ap- 
proval. 

The budget contained forty-five (45) measurement criteria and 
goals. They include tracking the number and types of inspections 
done on a monthly basis by the Fire Prevention Division, reducing 
the number of incidents the Fire Department responds to, and 
reviewing the average response time to an incident. 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY'S OFFICE 

The Executive Secretary's Office maintains all personnel re- 
cords, accounts and reports pertaining to the Department. 

This section acts as the conduit for all matters relating to the 
personnel system including salary adjustments, the hiring of new 
employees, all fire fighter indemnifications, civil service matters 
relative to appointments, and promotions. 

The staff interprets collective bargaining agreements that may 
result in step rate increases, vacation allowances, posting of vacan- 
cies, worker's compensation, bonuses, leaves of absence, and re- 
tirements. 

Motor vehicle accidents, damages to department property, 
third-party payments, and charges to the Massachusetts Turnpike 
Authority for departmental services are coordinated with the City 
of Boston Law Department. 

The personnel budget for each division of the department is 
prepared yearly. 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS UNIT 

The Management Information Systems Unit (MISU) coordi- 
nates the electronic data processing operations of the Boston Fire 
Department. These operations include the development and 
maintenance of computer applications at Headquarters and Fire 
Alarm. 



Fire Department 7 

A Wang VS Minicomputer is used at Fire Alarm to assist in dis- 
patching operations and the identification of special hazards and 
other information. 

A Local Area Network was installed and is currently being used 
by the Fire Prevention Division to share their data. 

Ten (10) microcomputers were placed in Headquarters to assist 
in office automation. These computers support word processing, 
data base management and spreadsheet applications. 

PAYROLL 

The Payroll Division's responsibility is to ensure that Depart- 
ment personnel are paid accurately and on a timely basis. 

Employees are assisted in making decisions on payroll deduc- 
tions and medical and insurance options. 

A separate holiday payroll was initiated which enabled the City 
to meet the thirty (30) day payment as required by the Local 718 
contract. An acting out or grade and step rate file for each em- 
ployee was created and is maintained on the Wang network at 
Headquarters. 

On receipt of subpoenas and insurance claims, this division 
does the necessary research of employees' payroll records. 

PERSONNEL DIVISION 

1) Administration 

2) Medical Examiner's Office 

3) Selection Unit 

4) Personnel Assignment 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

The Personnel Division is divided into the following sections: 
Administration, Medical Examiner's Officer, Selection Unit, and 
Personnel Assignment. 



ADMINISTRATION 

The Administration section is responsible for liaison with vari- 
ous departments including: the Department of Personnel Admin- 
istration, Local 718, Law Department, and other departments and 
local unions throughout the country. This division investigates 
charges and grievances and follows them through at Labor Rela- 
tions and Arbitration. A member of this office attends all Civil 



8 City Document No. 11 

Service disciplinary appeals, Selection Unit appeals, M.C.A.D. 
cases, and Court cases concerning the Boston Fire Department. 



MEDICAL EXAMINER'S OFFICE 

The Medical Examiner's Office handled 4,087 personnel con- 
tacts which included office visits, physicals, hepatitis B and flu 
shots. The total number of Medical Indemnification forms proc- 
essed was 1,348. This section is responsible for the security and 
maintenance of medical files for the Department. The Hospital 
Representative made numerous visits to hospitals to see members 
who have been admitted. 



SELECTION UNIT 

This unit is responsible for scheduling numerous examinations 
and tests including: medical tests, strength/agility tests with the 
State, physicals, screening interviews, and fingerprinting. Public 
lotteries are held to place candidates on a list with tied marks. 
Each person's application is reviewed and an in-depth background 
investigation is conducted. The Department of Personnel Admin- 
istration is contacted on all matters regarding hiring procedures. 
The Selection Unit acts as a liaison with medical facilities for drug 
testing purposes and also arranges drug tests for all Firefighters on 
Probation. Fire Departments across the country are contacted to 
compare hiring procedures. 



PERSONNEL ASSIGNMENT 

This Office is responsible for the assignment of all Pool and Act- 
ing Officers. These vacancies occur due to vacations, injured 
leave, department business and other circumstances. All promo- 
tions within the Department are coordinated with the Commis- 
sioner's Office, Executive Secretary's Office, and the Department 
of Personnel Administration. The assignment of all vacations 
within the Department is coordinated with the Deputy Chiefs in 
Divisions 1 and 2. The unit orders, assigns and distributes all 
badges, hat devices, and lapel devices. Ninety-six (96) fire fighters 
were appointed in 1989 to the Boston Fire Department. 



Fire Department 



111TH ANNUAL BALL 



The 111th Annual Ball and Awards Ceremony of the Boston 
Fire Department was held on May 25th, 1990 at the Park Plaza 
Hotel. Deputy Fire Chief John R. Harrison of Division 2 was the 
Master of Ceremonies. 

The following members were honored for their meritorious acts 
during 1989. 

AMERICAN LEGION AWARD 



Fire Fighter Robert M. Staunton Engine Co. 21 

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD 



Fire Lieutenant Robert J. Crawford 
Fire Fighter John J. Forristall 
Fire Fighter Martin J. Fernandes 
Fire Fighter James W Rodgers 
Fire Fighter (Inspector) Paul S. Hicks 



Ladder Co. 15 
Engine Co. 33 
Engine Co. 33 
Ladder Co. 29 
Fire Prevention 
Division 



ROLL OF MERIT 

Fire Lieutenant Timothy F. McGillicuddy, Jr. 
Fire Fighter (Inspector) Phillip E. Marsh 

Fire Fighter Gerard A. Yanovitch 
Fire Fighter John F Kelly 
Fire Fighter John J. Sullivan 
Fire Fighter John L. McKay, Jr. 
Fire Fighter Ralph P. Walker 
Fire Fighter Donald E. Oliver 



Ladder Co. 7 
Fire Prevention 
Division 
Engine Co. 3 
Special Unit 
Ladder Co. 7 
Ladder Co. 7 
Ladder Co. 29 
Ladder Co. 2 



JOHN E. FITGERALD MEDAL 

FOR THE MOST MERITORIOUS ACT 

BOSTON FIRE COMMISSIONER'S AWARD 

Fire Fighter Robert M. Staunton Engine Co. 21 

AWARD OF RECOGNITION 



District Fire Chief Kevin P. MacCurtain 
District Fire Chief Edmund G. Maiorana 
Fire Captain John J. McKenna 
Fire Lieutenant John F. Joyce 



District 5 
District 5 
Engine Co. 4 
Rescue Co. 1 



10 City Document No. 11 

FIRE PREVENTION DIVISION 

1) General Inspections 

2) License and Permit Section 

3) Special Hazards 

4) Fire Investigation Unit 

5) Night Inspection Division 

6) Plans Examiner 

7) Fire Education 

8) Fire Prevention Records 

9) Microfiche 

10) High Rise Sprinkler Retro Fit 

11) Needless Alarm Reduction Program 

12) Chemist 

13) Special Occupancies 

FIRE PREVENTION 

The Fire Prevention Division consists of many sections. The 
following contains a brief overview of each area. 

GENERAL INSPECTIONS 

The District Inspectors inspect smoke detectors for the sale of 
one- to five-family houses under Chapter 148 Section 26F They 
resolve complaints in their districts, review permits and licenses, 
and issue abatements for violations. 

The inspectors follow up on abatements that are sent in from 
the field. Non compliance cases and code violations are resolved 
through court action if necessary. 

Other City departments are notified when a situation is ob- 
served that should be brought to their attention through Form 65s. 
The Fire Marshal meets with the Inspectional Services Depart- 
ment Commissioner regularly to resolve conflicts. 

LICENSE AND PERMIT SECTION 

The License and Permit Section is responsible for conducting 
inspections of facilities, businesses, and construction sites where 
Fire Department permits are required. Permits are necessary for 
such activities as the storage and handling of flammable and com- 
bustible liquids, gasses, and solids; the construction or alteration 
of any structure; placement of dumpsters; the handling of asbes- 
tos; welding or cutting operations; the use, storage or handling of 
explosive materials; and the installation or subsequent impair- 
ment of fire protection or suppression systems. 



Fire Department 11 

As a direct result of aggressive permitting by this section, espe- 
cially where construction and demolition take place, the fire inci- 
dence at construction sites has gone from common every day prac- 
tice to nil. A construction site has not required more than one 
alarm since Rowe's Wharf in 1986. 

A major part of making and keeping construction sites safe has 
been solving the winter heating problem of these sites. This solu- 
tion has involved substitution of steam and/or diesel in place of 
both random and universal use of propane to heat buildings open 
to the weather. This has been accomplished through the permit- 
ting process, and again active and aggressive enforcement. 

This section inspects licensed properties and serves as the Fire 
Commissioner's designee for the City as an appointed member of 
the Committee on Licenses. 

This office is involved in the ongoing restructuring and expan- 
sion of the permit and license system and utilizes its expertise to 
develop codes and procedures to respond to complex fire-related 
problems and hazards. As part of this, the Boston Fire Department 
Fire Prevention Code was rewritten to reflect current thinking 
and practices. 

SPECIAL HAZARDS 

527 CMR 9.00 mandated changes for underground storage 
facilities including requiring double walled tanks and piping, and 
the retrofitting of old tanks with containment manholes, overfill 
and cathodic protection. Quick lube centers fall under the same 
regulations. 

A joint venture with Boston Gas will see the first Compressed 
Natural Gas (CNG) facility opened in the spring of 1991. Sixty (60) 
Boston Gas vehicles will operate using this fuel. Plans are also in 
the works to operate some refuse vehicles with natural gas. 

Self-service gas stations are now the responsibility of local Fire 
Departments. This involves the approval of plans through the final 
inspection before they are allowed to operate. A yearly inspection 
then follows. 

New permits have been developed which will provide more in- 
formation on hazardous materials. These hazardous materials 
range from flammable liquids, solids and gases to chemicals such 
as oxidizers, corrosives, poisons, anhydrous ammonia and chlorin- 
ated solvents. Plans are being made to track biohazard laborato- 
ries. 

FIRE INVESTIGATION UNIT 

The Fire Investigation Unit responds to fires, other Boston Fire 
Department incidents, citizen's complaints, delivers charges, and 
follows up on investigations. Members respond to calls of Fire Per- 
sonnel being harassed at an incident. 



12 City Document No. 11 

The F.I.U. now has the ability to do searches of paper trails on 
different properties. This has allowed them to get a better handle 
on arson-for-profit, which may have a tendency to increase as the 
economy and real estate values are depressed. Presently the F.I.U. 
is tracking certain high risk properties in the hope of preventing 
arson from occurring. 

The Major Case Unit continues to be a very effective tool in 
investigation follow-ups. This has led to the apprehension of peo- 
ple responsible for arson, attempts to burn, and fraud. 

Individual members of the Unit are active in the Massachusetts 
Chapter of Arson Investigators (IAAI) and the Massachusetts As- 
sociation of Auto Theft and Arson Investigators (MAATAI). Both 
organizations consist of members from law enforcement agencies 
(state and local), fire services, insurance companies, private inves- 
tigators, and the State Fire Marshal's Office. The goal of these 
groups is to reduce arson fires through in-depth investigations and 
the prosecution of guilty parties. 

The photographers of the Fire Investigation Unit respond to 
fires, accidents, and other emergency calls taking color and black 
and white photos and videos when necessary. The majority of the 
developing and printing was handled by the Photo Unit. Video 
tape copying is processed for the Training Division. 

Community involvement is part of the Unit's activities. Mem- 
bers attend community meetings coordinated by Fire Preven- 
tion's Fire Education Office. 

Vehicle fires continue to decline due in part to the work of the 
Boston Fire Department's Auto Arson Investigation Unit (AAIU). 
They have decreased thirty-one (31) percent from 1988 and fifty- 
five (55) percent from 1986. This is a tremendous savings to the 
City in that wear and tear on fire fighters and apparatus has been 
significantly reduced. The foundation of this program is the legis- 
lation that went into effect in August 1987 requiring vehicle own- 
ers to report to their local Fire Department and complete a re- 
quired amount of paperwork before they could collect on their 
insurance. This legislation was conceived and written by the 
Boston Fire Department. The aggressive enforcement of this law 
by the AAIU has led directly to the marked reduction in auto fires 
in the City of Boston. 

As of this writing, it appears there is an upward trend in arson. 
Structure fires are down nine (9) percent while arson is up two and 
one half (2.5) percent. Economic trends are being watched closely 
to see if arson rates are affected. 

The Fire Investigation Unit works very closely with two (2) 
Boston Police Detectives, a State Police Trooper from the State 
Fire Marshal's Office, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and 
Firearms. 

In 1989 the unit investigated eighteen (18) civilian fire deaths 
and all reported burn cases. 



Fire Department 13 

NIGHT INSPECTION DIVISION 

The Night Inspection Division inspects approximately 1,600 fa- 
cilities with a capacity of fifty (50) or more people. All places of 
assembly are inspected quarterly. The busier night clubs are in- 
spected weekend nights for overcrowding. Special events in places 
of assembly are checked for overcrowding and other violations. 
These events include concerts, live theater, the Boston Garden, 
Fenway Park, the Hynes Auditorium, and college arenas. Begin- 
ning in 1991, homeless shelters, lodging houses and group homes 
will be inspected leading to a projected 1,200 additional inspec- 
tions. 

PLANS EXAMINER 

The Boston Fire Department Plans Examiner provides a com- 
prehensive review of building plans to insure compliance with 
State and City codes. These codes include the Massachusetts State 
Building Code, the Massachusetts Fire Prevention Regulations, 
Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts General Laws — better known 
as the Fire Prevention Laws, Fire Prevention Order 87-2 (Boston 
Fire Alarm Regulations) and the Boston Fire Department's Fire 
Prevention Code. 

Items reviewed include locations and requirements for fire hy- 
drants, Fire Department vehicular access, automatic sprinkler 
systems, fire alarm systems, and hazardous material storage. 
Proper installation of these items provides safer buildings for 
occupants and fire fighters. 

Meetings are held with building owners to discuss fire preven- 
tion strategies. Technical assistance is given to other City and State 
agencies. Involvement prior to building construction insures 
building designs are consistent with the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment's goal of protecting life and property. 

The City of Boston is fortunate to have Mr. Paul Donga, a Fire 
Protection Engineer in training on its staff, affording the Boston 
Fire Department a uniquely professional approach to fire safety, 
benefitting the public's safety as well as fire fighter safety. 

FIRE EDUCATION 

The Office of Fire Education is responsible for promoting 
public awareness of fire safety and prevention. 

Fairs, community meetings, senior groups, health care facilities, 
schools, group centers, summer camps, tours, organizations, busi- 
nesses, and day care centers are used to promote fire education. 
Fire Department personnel share an understanding of the princi- 
ples involved with fire safety. 



14 City Document No. 11 

Fire education covers topics such as smoke detectors, fire extin- 
guishers, escape planning, smoking, and cooking safety. Individ- 
uals are encouraged to pass this information onto their family, 
friends, and neighbors. 

FIRE PREVENTION RECORDS 

This section interacts with the public during business hours. 
They assist fire victims, citizens applying for permits and licenses, 
and provide research on inquiries. 

Company commanders are notified by this section when in- 
spections for certain occupancies are needed. Basic information 
on each occupancy and their inspection dates are recorded. 

The records section is responsible for the collection or dis- 
bursement of Fire Prevention Division fees. Fees for permits, li- 
censes, smoke detector inspections, fire reports, and other miscel- 
laneous items are collected daily. In 1989, $1,372,597 was 
collected. 

MICROFICHE SECTION 

Fire Department records are stored on microfiche for future 
needs. Fire reports, fire alarm dispatch slips, arson reports, chiefs 
reports, emergency medical reports, morning reports, abate- 
ments, permits, licenses, underground storage tanks, complaints, 
and interagency forms are among the documents that have been 
transferred to microfiche. 

The use of microfiche has made it easier to access old records 
and make copies of them. This system provides a legally accept- 
able document for court cases and the public. 

HIGH RISE SPRINKLER RETROFIT LAW 

A serious fire at the Prudential in January 1986 led to a High 
Rise Sprinkler Law which was passed and signed into law in the 
Fall of 1987. It is officially known as Massachusetts General Law 
— Chapter 148 — Section 26A 1 / 2 . 

The wording of the law was questioned and a legal opinion was 
sought on the condominium issue. Attorney General James Shan- 
non ruled favorably on this issue in the Spring of 1988. 

The owners of high rise buildings received literature about the 
law and were required to make decisions regarding the sprinkler- 
ing of their building. The compliance enforcement had met with 
great success. All "classic" high rise buildings (15 or more stories) 
are either fully sprinklered and alarmed or actively engaged in the 
process. 

All work is to be completed by 1998. The threat of a "towering 
inferno" will then be effectively eliminated in the City of Boston. 



Fire Department 15 

NEEDLESS ALARM REDUCTION PROGRAM 

The Needless Alarm Reduction Program (NARP) started on 
September 1, 1987 with the institution of Fire Prevention Order 
87-2. Its intent was to reduce the number of responses of Boston 
Fire Department personnel and apparatus to needless alarms. 
Alarm system malfunctions caused by sprinklers, smoke detec- 
tors, and heat detectors at properties with central stations and 
master boxes are addressed by this program. 

An ordinance requiring mandatory fines for needless fire alarm 
responses was passed unanimously by the Boston City Council in 
1988. This legislation became an integral part of the Needless 
Alarm Reduction Program and became effective January 1, 1989. 

Numerous locations have made significant improvements to 
their safety systems, relocated smoke detectors, and decreased 
their sensitivity Engineers, facility managers, and fire safety offi- 
cials have all helped make an impact on needless alarm reduc- 
tions. 

The fine process has made it financially prudent for many prop- 
erty owners to address their problem rather than continue to pay 
fees to the City. 

Separate coding for local alarms was instituted late in 1990. 
Whereas Fire Prevention Order 87-2, and City of Boston Ordi- 
nance Title II, Chapter 4 (Fire Alarm Fires) address system need- 
less alarms, local alarms (under 25 units) had not been addressed. 
Information will be gathered in 1991 on local alarm problems, and 
enforceable solutions will be sought to this problem while work- 
ing toward continued reductions in overall needless alarms. 

CHEMIST 

The duties and responsibilities of the Chemist include the de- 
velopment and implementation of regulations based on the Fire 
Prevention Code, Article IX, Decorations, Furnishings and Inte- 
rior Finish, and Article XX, Hazardous Materials and the estab- 
lishment of an analytical laboratory to support fire investigation. 
The Chemist participates in ongoing programs in the Fire Preven- 
tion Division, the Training, Maintenance and Research Division 
and the Special Services Division. 

FIRE PREVENTION LABORATORY 

The establishment of the Fire Prevention Laboratory was ac- 
complished in accordance with the order of the Fire Commis- 
sioner following the mandate of the Mayor in February 1984. The 
Laboratory is operated under the direction of a full time profes- 
sional forensic chemist. Laboratory reports and the testimony of 



16 City Document No. 11 

the Senior Analytical Chemist are accepted in criminal cases pros- 
ecuted in Suffolk County. The Senior Analytical Chemist has re- 
sponded to major fires to assist the Fire Investigation Unit in its 
selection of material for analysis. This Laboratory has enhanced 
the capability of the Fire Department to successfully investigate 
and prosecute arson cases. 

CONTROL OF DECORATIONS, FURNISHINGS, 
AND INTERIOR FINISH 

The Chemist has continued the development and implemen- 
tation of controls on combustible building contents under the au- 
thority of Article IX of the Fire Prevention Code. 

The regulations for upholstered furniture have received na- 
tional recognition and have played a major role in the develop- 
ment of standardized full scale test procedures. These new tests 
are the focus of a national effort to control furniture in hotels, 
hospitals, entertainment facilities and other regulated occupan- 
cies. 

A potential fire hazard in hospital bedding was uncovered and 
investigated. Hospitals were contemplating the use of foam pads 
of substantial size on top of mattresses to reduce the incidence of 
bed sores. Tests were performed with pads and hospital mattresses 
and the potential fire hazard of the pads was confirmed. It was 
further determined that some of the mattresses routinely used by 
hospitals constituted a fire hazard. The existing regulation for mat- 
tresses for hotels and dormitories will be extended to hospitals. 
The foam pads used in hospitals will be regulated. 

In addition to classification of materials by performance of fire 
test, considerable effort was expended to inform and communi- 
cate with architects, designers, purchasing agents and sales orga- 
nizations the importance of the Fire Department regulations and 
procedures for compliance. 

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 

Fire Prevention concerns include the Laboratory Safety Pro- 
gram, the regulations controlling the transportation of hazardous 
materials, and the permit/license controls for the storage and use 
of hazardous materials. 

Training, Research, and Maintenance activities include the re- 
sponsibility for the specifications used to procure protective cloth- 
ing and equipment and field evaluations of newly developed pro- 
tective clothing. The Chemist takes part in the special training 
exercises conducted for fire companies and chief officers who re- 
spond to major hazardous materials incidents. He serves on com- 
mittees designated to prepare Standard Operating Procedures for 
hazardous material incidents. 



Fire Department 17 

Participation with Special Services involves the Title III, Super- 
fund Amendments and Reauthorization Act and serving as the 
Right-To-Know person on the Local Emergency Planning Com- 
mittee. The Chemist is currently designated as the Acting Munici- 
pal Coordinator for the Massachusetts Right-To-Know law. 

The Department has a technical specialist on-call for response 
to hazardous material incidents. Five (5) members of the fire fight- 
ing force have the technical expertise and training to handle these 
emergencies. 

SPECIAL OCCUPANCIES 

Company officers in the field complete quarterly inspections of 
hospitals and schools. The Inspectors assist the field due to the 
complexity of the occupancies involved. Abatements are reviewed 
to insure that a location has complied with the Fire Department's 
findings. Consultation and suggestions are made concerning new 
construction or modifications to existing structures. Fire educa- 
tion for a specific occupancy is provided to assist the management 
in preventing fires. 

There are a number of different occupancies that, due to their 
size and potential life safety hazard, require special knowledge 
and are assigned full time inspectors by the Roston Fire Depart- 
ment. These include hospitals, hotels, schools, nursing homes, day 
care centers, and laboratories. Legally mandated, routine inspec- 
tions are made to insure code compliance, as well as responses to 
fire incidents in support of the field forces on an as called basis. 

TRAINING MAINTENANCE & 
RESEARCH DIVISION 

1) Department Training Program 

2) Field Evaluation of Safety Equipment 

3) New Equipment 

4) Research and Evaluation 

5) Servicing and Repair Programs 

6) Driver Safety and Training Program 

7) Harzardous Material Training Program 

8) Apparatus 

9) Facilities 

TRAINING, MAINTENANCE & RESEARCH DIVISION 

The primary functions of the Training, Maintenance, and Re- 
search Division are: 

1) To initiate and supervise the job development of the fire 
fighter, commencing with the probationary period and continuing 
throughout their career. 



18 City Document No. 11 

2) To become involved in research programs designed to im- 
prove fire fighting techniques, fire fighting apparatus and equip- 
ment, and protection of fire fighters; to prepare specifications for 
new fire apparatus; and to test and evaluate new tools and appli- 
ances before recommending their use in the Department. 



DEPARTMENT TRAINING PROGRAM 

The recruit training for 1989 had three (3) separate drill classes. 
Ninety-eight (98) members successfully completed the training 
program. 

The first drill class was held February 22, 1989 with 54 mem- 
bers from Boston and 1 member from Dedham attending and 
graduating on April 28, 1989. 

The second drill class was held on June 14, 1989 with 36 mem- 
bers from Boston, 5 members from the Newton Fire Department, 
and 1 member from the Needham Fire Department attending for 
a total of 42. This class ended on August 18, 1989. 

A third drill class was held on November 29, 1989 with 6 mem- 
bers attending and was completed on January 12, 1990. 

A total of nine and one-half (9 Vz) weeks of intensive training was 
held at the John A. Martin Fire Academy, Moon Island. Those 
members who satisfactorily finished drill school are now in their 
assigned companies. 

Fire College for all company officers and acting officers was 
held at Memorial Hall, Headquarters, from January 4 through Jan- 
uary 27. Subject matters included Structural Hazards, Flammable 
Liquids, Hazardous Materials, the Personnel Division, the Fire 
Prevention Division, and the Fire Investigation Unit. 

There is a constant program of instruction and drills held at 
both the company level and at the Academy. 

A seminar for all Deputy Fire Chiefs, District Fire Chiefs, and 
the Tower Company was conducted from April 4 through April 7. 
Topics discussed were the Collapse of Burning Buildings and Fire 
Fighter Safety and Survival. 

A Portable Maze was put into operation in late October, 1989, to 
ensure that all members were able to fulfill their drill require- 
ments on the Scott 4.5 SCBA. This drill was a basic review of S.O.P 
32, 32A, 32B which covers care, maintenance and operation of the 
4.5 air mask. 

A vehicle extrication course provided training in the overall as- 
pects of the use of power tools, hand tools, and patient care. A 
thirty (30) minute video was shown to all members prior to the 
actual on hands drill. 

All engine companies were trained on proper foam operations, 
the hydrant assist valve and drafting operations, portable deck gun 



Fire Department 19 

and basic engine company evolutions. All ladder companies and 
the Tower Unit were trained in the proper operation of ladder 
pipes and the proper techniques of raising and lowering the differ- 
ent size ground ladders and aerial. 

Familiarization with High Pressure hydrants in Division One 
was held for all engine companies of both Divisions One and Two. 

A Special Hazards Response Drill was held on the Use of the 
"Draeger Analyzer" and Advanced Breathing Techniques and Air 
Line Breathing Procedures. 

A program at the Fire Academy reviewed tactics in handling LP/ 
LNG trucking incidents, vapor cloud control, liquid and vapor 
pressure fires, liquid spill fires and dry chemical extinguishers and 
High Expansion Foam. 

A CPR First Responder course was conducted for all members. 

L.R.V. Training for selected companies was held at the Cleve- 
land Circle MBTA Yard. 

FIELD EVALUATION OF SAFETY EQUIPMENT 

Fire Coats 

The division conducted field testing of Morning Pride Fire Coat 
and Night Hitch as a complete package. Another test was 
Morning-Pride Fire Coat and Night Hitch Anti-Stress protective 
clothing as a complete package. 
Boots 

A new style boot (Lite-Styling) from Morning Pride (40 ounce 
weight per pair) was evaluated. 
Suspenders 

Dyna-Back suspenders from Morning Pride for wear with night 
hitch were tested. 
Gloves 

Gloves from Morning Pride — a Fire Guardian, Kevlar and 
Leather combination were examined. Leather gloves from Knox- 
ville Glove Co. containing an all leather outer shell with a Gore- 
Tex liner were tested. 

NEW EQUIPMENT 

Ladder Companies 7, 15, 18, 21 received new Emergency One 
Aerial Ladders. Their members were trained on operation and 
driving techniques. 

New cable and lamps and accessories were obtained for the 
Special Unit (H-2). Extrication tools and equipment were contin- 
ually updated. Five (5) complete Amkus extrication tools were is- 
sued to Ladder Companies 7, 10, and 18 and Rescues 1 and 2. 
Ladder Companies 21 and 29 had their Hurst power units con- 
verted to a 4 Cycle Power Unit. Guardian tools were issued to 
various companies. 



20 City Document No. 11 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION 

Field testing of various type donner switches on Scott regula- 
tors was accomplished. Anti fog devices for Scott face pieces were 
tested. Kohler lights, ladder beacons, and various nozzles were 
evaluated. 

SERVICING AND REPAIR PROGRAMS 

A service and repair program is conducted by this division on all 
fire fighting equipment, tools, and appliances at our repair facili- 
ties at Headquarters and the Fire Academy. 

All ladder companies and the Tower Unit were steam cleaned, 
weight tested, lubricated and checked for any defects at the Fire 
Academy by the Maintenance Division. Hydrostatic testing of all 
air cylinders is an ongoing process and every air cylinder is hydro- 
statically tested every three years. 

DRIVER SAFETY AND TRAINING PROGRAM 

Driver training was scheduled by the District Fire Chiefs for 
companies in their districts during weekend day tours. Training is 
given to any fire company upon the recommendation of a Deputy 
Chief following an accident hearing. All new recruits received 
driver training at the Fire Academy beginning with the class of 
March, 1989. 

HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRAINING PROGRAM 

There are mandatory training requirements for fire personnel 
concerning Title III which began in November, 1988. The fire 
fighting divisions are involved in a 24-hour program and the spe- 
cial response team has a 40-hour program. Training guides have 
been issued to each company and video tapes to each district as 
part of the curriculum. 

SAFETY EQUIPMENT ISSUED 

Fire Coats 182 

Fire Boots 325 

Helmets 126 

Work Gloves 1,785 

Short Sleeve Fire Resistive 1,695 
Station Uniform Shirts 

Fire Resistive Work Trousers 1,708 

Fire Fighter's Sweatshirts 1,698 



Fire Department 21 

DRESS CLOTHING ISSUED 

Deputy Chief Sack Coats 5 

Officer's Sack Coats 50 

Fire Fighter's Sack Coats 125 

Dress Trousers 250 

White SS Dress Shirts 425 

White LS Dress Shirts 240 

Light Blue SS Dress Shirts 320 

Light Blue LS Dress Shirts 60 

Navy Blue Dress Shirts 225 

Dress Caps 205 

BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

APPARATUS IN SERVICE 

BY FIRE DISTRICT 

DECEMBER 31, 1989 

Division 1 

District 1 



E 


5 


1984 Em-One/Ford 


E 


9 


1987 Em-One/Cyclone 


E 


56 


1985 Em-One/Ford 


L 


2 


1984 Em-One 


L 


21 


1989 Em-One 

District 3 


E 


4 


1987 Em-One/Cyclone 


E 


8 


1987 Em-One/Cyclone 


E 


10 


1985 Em-One/Ford 


E 


32 


1985 Em-One/Ford 


E 


50 


1984 Em-One/Ford 


L 


1 


1988 Em-One 


L 


9 


1976 Seagrave RB 1988 


L 


24 


1988 Em-One 


R 


1 


1986 Em-One/Ford Van 


T 


C 


1985 Em-One 


M 


U 


1971 (2 Boats) 

District 4 


E 


3 


1984 Em-One/Ford 


E 


7 


1988 Em-One Cyclone 4 Door Cab 


E 


22 


1985 Em-One/Ford 


E 


33 


1985 Em-One/Ford 


L 


15 


1989 Em-One 


L 


17 


1984 Em-One 


H 


2 


1980 GMC/1970 Intl RB 1987 



22 City Document No. 1 1 

District 6 
E 2 1985 Em-One/Ford 
E 39 1984 One/Ford 
L 18 1989 Em-One 
L 19 1985 Em-One 

District 11 
E 29 1984 Sutphen 
E 41 1985 Em-One/Ford 
E 51 1985 Em-One/Ford 
L 11 1988 Em-One 
L 14 1984 Em-One 



Division 2 

District 5 
E 14 1985 Em-One/Ford 
E 37 1987 Em-One/Cyclone 
L 4 1986 Em-One 
L 26 1986 Em-One 

District 7 
E 17 1986 Em-One/Ford 
E 21 1985 Em-One/Ford 
E 24 1986 Em-One/Ford 
L 7 1989 Em-One 
L 23 1988 Em-One 

District 8 
E 16 1986 Em-One/Ford 
E 18 1987 Em-One/Cyclone 
E 20 1984 Sutphen 
FBR 1979 Sutphen/Ford 

L 6 1984 Em-One 

District 9 
E 28 1984 Em-One/Ford 
E 42 1985 Em-One/Ford 
L 10 1976 Seagrave RB 1987 
R 2 1987 Em-One/Ford Van 

District 10 
E 30 1985 Em-One/Ford 
E 49 1985 Em-One/Ford 
E 55 1984 Sutphen 
BU 2 1981 GMC/Brush Truck 
L 25 1976 Seagrave RB 1988 



Fire Department 



23 









District 12 


E 


48 


1984 


Em-One/Ford 


BU 


1 


1981 


GMC/Brush Truck 


E 


52 


1987 


Em-One/Cyclone 


E 


53 


1987 


Em-One/Cyclone 


L 


16 


1984 


Em-One 


L 


28 


1976 


Seagrave RB 1987 


L 


29 


1986 


Em-One 



Air Supply Unit 
Communications Unit 



1979 Sutphen/Em-One 
Body Rebuilt 1985 
1984 Ford/Wheeled Coach Bodv 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

APPARATUS IN SERVICE 

DECEMBER 31, 1989 

All units are diesel powered. 
ENGINE COMPANIES 



2 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




3 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




4 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


5 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




7 


1988 


Em-One Cyclone 










4-Door Cab 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


8 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


9 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


10 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




14 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




16 


1986 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




17 


1986 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




18 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


20 


1984 


Sutphen 


1500 GPM 


With 67 ft. ladder 


21 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




22 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




24 


1986 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




28 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




29 


1984 


Sutphen 


1500 GPM 




30 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




32 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




33 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




37 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


39 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




41 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




42 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




48 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 


and 




1981 


GMC 


750 GPM 


Brush Fire Unit 1 


49 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




50 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




51 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




52 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 



24 City Document No. 1 1 



53 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


7 BR 


1979 


Sutphen Ford 


1250 GPM 




55 


1984 


Sutphen 


1500 GPM 


and 




1981 


GMC 


750 GPM 


Brush Fire Unit 2 


56 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 





BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

APPARATUS IN SERVICE 

DECEMBER 31, 1989 



All units are diesel powered. 

TT = Tractor Trailer Type 
RM = Rearmount Type 

LADDER COMPANIES 



1 


1988 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


2 


1984 


Em-One 




llOftRM 


4 


1986 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


6 


1984 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


7 


1989 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


9 


1976 


Seagrave 


RB 1988 


lOOftTT 


10 


1976 


Seagrave 


RB 1987 


lOOftTT 


11 


1988 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


14 


1984 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


15 


1989 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


16 


1984 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


17 


1984 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


18 


1989 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


19 


1985 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


21 


1989 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


23 


1988 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


24 


1988 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


25 


1976 


Seagrave 


RB 1988 


lOOftTT 


26 


1986 


Em-One 




HOftRM 


28 


1976 


Seagrave 


RB 1987 


lOOftTT 


29 


1986 


Em-One 




HOftRM 



RESCUE CO. 1 

1986 Ford/Em-One Aluminum Van Body with Cascade 

RESCUE CO. 2 

1987 Ford/Em-One Aluminum Van Body 

TOWER COMPANY 

1985 Em-One 95 ft RM Tower with 1500 GPM Pump 

1979 Sutphen 1970 Maxim 1250 GPM/Squrt, rebuilt in 1986 

MARINE UNIT 

1971 Fire boats, 1-6000 GPM, 1-1500 GPM 



Fire Department 



25 



SPECIAL UNIT 

1980 GMC/1970 International Lighting Plant, rebuilt in 1986 

HAZ-MAT UNIT 

1979 Ford Sutphen Chassis/Aluminum Body — rebuilt in 1987 

AIR SUPPLY UNIT 

1979 Sutphen/Em-One body rebuilt in 1985 

COMMUNICATIONS UNIT 

1984 Ford/Wheeled Coach Body 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 
FACILITIES 




26 



City Document No. 11 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 
FIRE DEPARTMENT FACILITIES 



FACILITY 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


CONSTRUCTED 


Eng33/Ladl5 


Back Bay 


1888 


Engl8/Lad6 


Dorchester 


1894 


Eng 24/Lad 23 


Roxbury 


1898 


Eng 30/Lad 25 


West Roxbury 


1898 


Eng 5/Dist 1 


East Boston 


1902 


Eng 51 


Allston/Brighton 


1913 


Eng 49 


Readville 


1918 


Eng 50 


Charlestown 


1918 


Fire Alarm 


Fenway/Kenmore 


1925 


Eng 21 


Dorchester 


1926 


Eng 17/Lad 7/Dist 7 


Dorchester 


1928 


Eng29/Ladll/Distll 


Allston-Brighton 


1929 


Eng2/Ladl9 


South Boston 


1932 


Eng 37/Lad 26/Dist 5 


Fenway/Kenmore 


1933 


Eng 3/Special Unit 


South End 


1941 


Eng 54/Fire Brigade 


Long Island 


1946 


Eng 8/Lad 1 


North End 


1948 


Safety Unit 


Beacon Hill 


1949 


Eng56/Lad21 


East Boston 


1950 


Arson/Maintenance 


Roxbury 


1951 


Headquarters 


Roxbury 


1951 


Eng 42/Rescue 2/Dist 9 


Roxbury 


1952 


Eng 16/Dist 8 


Dorchester 


1958 


Eng 20 


Dorchester 


1958 


Eng 53/Lad 16/Dist 12 


Roslindale 


1959 


Eng 22 


South End 


1960 


Training Academy 


Moon Island, Quincy 


1960 


Eng 4/Lad 24/Dist 3 


Downtown 


1965 


Eng 32/Lad 9 


Charlestown 


1970 


Eng 7/Ladl 7/Dist 4 


Downtown 


1971 


Eng 48/Lad 28 


Hyde Park 


1972 


Eng 52/Lad 29 


Dorchester 


1973 


Eng 1 4/Lad 4 


Roxbury 


1974 


Eng55/Distl0 


West Roxbury 


1974 


Eng 9/Lad 2 


East Boston 


1977 


Eng39/Ladl8/Dist6 


South Boston 


1977 


Eng41/Ladl4 


Allston/Brighton 


1977 


High Pressure Station 


Downtown 


1979 


Eng 28/Lad 10/Div 2 


Jamaica Plain 


1984 


Eng 10/Div 1/Haz Mat/ 






Rescue 1/Tower Co 


Downtown 


1989 


Marine Unit 


Charlestown 


1989 



Fire Department 27 

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION 

1) Planning and Logistics 

2) Safety Operational Unit 

3) Fire Alarm Section 

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION 

The Special Services Division consists of three sections: Plan- 
ning and Logistics, Safety Operational Unit, Fire Alarm Dispatch 
and Construction. 

PLANNING AND LOGISTICS SECTION 

The Planning and Logistics Section is responsible for five (5) 
specific areas in the Department. 

1) Liaison 

2) Emergency Medical Services 

3) Underwater Recovery 

4) Local Emergency Planning 

5) Office of Civil Defense 

LIAISON 

This section serves as a liaison between the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment and public and private agencies that interact in matters of 
fire safety. Among these agencies are Police Departments, other 
Fire Departments, Public Works, Traffic, Public Facilities, Hous- 
ing and Redevelopment, Health and Hospitals, Schools, Massa- 
chusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), Port Authority, 
Turnpike Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority 
(MWRA), and Boston Water and Sewer Commission. These 
groups have important considerations that are vital to the general 
public living, working or visiting our city. The Department's coor- 
dination with these agencies is essential for public safety during an 
emergency. 

This section works closely with the MBTA inspecting and test- 
ing subway station standpipe and alarm systems as well as other 
fire safety related matters. 

Planning maintains a working relationship with the Boston 
Water and Sewer Commission (BWSC) to assist them in their work 
of maintaining the city's hydrant system. We are currently working 
under an agreement to coordinate a hydrant inspection program 
for the BWSC using the fire companies of the suppression force. 
Hydrant defects are reported to this office and then sent onto 
BWSC for repairs. 

A major concern of the Department is the availability of ade- 
quate water for fire fighting purposes at easily accessible locations. 
The section works with the responsible agencies and departments 



28 City Document No. 11 

to improve the water resources at the Tobin Bridge, the MWRA 
Sludge Treatment Plant on Deer Island, the Sumner and Callahan 
Tunnels, and various construction sites in the city. 

Members of this section attend pre-construction meetings with 
the Public Works Department and many contractors involved 
with construction projects to assist in coordinating the problems 
associated with street closings, accessibility to buildings under 
construction, bridge repairs, and other impediments to fire appa- 
ratus. This information is disseminated to the field by special or- 
ders and department radio. The Fire Alarm Office receives all 
temporary and permanent changes that might affect apparatus 
responses. 

Private developers and contractors have their plans reviewed 
and automatic initiating and suppression fire systems in new and 
rehabilitated commercial developments are tested. The office 
meets with the Massachusetts Elevator Safety Board regarding 
elevator and escalator incidents encountered during Fire Depart- 
ment responses. 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE 

The Emergency Medical Service Office directs several ongoing 
programs. Training is provided at every fire company on current 
techniques used to perform CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscita- 
tion) and other life saving measures. The proper use of EMS 
equipment and materials is reviewed. All members are recertified 
in CPR on a yearly basis according to the requirements of the 
Massachusetts First Responder Law. 

Eighty-five (85) recruits satisfactorily completed a twenty-six 
(26) hour First Responder course held at the John A. Martin Fire 
Academy. 

A one hundred twenty hour (120) basic emergency medical 
technician's course was coordinated and held over a six (6) month 
period. A total of thirty-eight (38) new Emergency Medical Tech- 
nicians have been added to Department rolls, bringing the 
present number to one hundred fifty-one (151) registered Fire 
Fighter/Emergency Medical technicians. 

The instructors regularly attend seminars on infectious diseases 
in order to gain up to date information which is then passed on to 
the members in the field. 

New resuscitators were purchased and placed in service on en- 
gine companies. This acquisition means that every engine, ladder 
and rescue company has a resuscitator which provides a faster 
response time to a person in need. 

Various vaccines were administered to personnel who were ex- 
posed to contagious diseases. The office in conjunction with the 
Department Medical Examiner coordinated the Hepatitis B inno- 
culation program. 



Fire Department 29 

UNDERWATER RECOVERY 

The Underwater Recovery Team consists of twelve (12) special- 
ists in Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus 
(S.C.U.B.A.). The members work assigned tours of duty at their 
fire companies and are on call for water incidents if the scene 
commander requests their expertise. 

Bi-monthly drills are held to maintain high levels of proficiency 
for under ice dives, search patterns, water sled drills, signal drills, 
and techniques for entering the water from different locations on 
the waterfront. 

The team keeps abreast of the latest diving techniques and pro- 
cedures through seminars and publications. Three (3) members 
completed a five (5) day seminar for Public Safety SCUBA Instruc- 
tors. They are currently training other members of the Depart- 
ment in the techniques divers use to search for victims in the wa- 
ter. 

New equipment is constantly being developed to improve the 
safety and efficiency of the divers. 

LOCAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING 

A program has been developed by the Special Services Division 
to comply with the provisions of Title III of the Superfund Amend- 
ments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) for emergency response 
planning. 

Any facility that uses, stores or produces any of 366 hazardous 
materials must contact the Local Emergency Planning Commit- 
tee (LEPC) and the Boston Fire Department. Chemical reporting 
forms (Tier I and Tier II) and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) 
are required. The reporting is further enhanced by submittal of 
Title III Facility forms. The Fire Department compiles informa- 
tion concerning the chemicals stored and their amounts, hazards 
and exact location, emergency response procedures for the facil- 
ity, on site and off site emergency equipment to deal with a spill/ 
release, transportation routes of hazardous materials, and contin- 
gency plans. 

This data is used to conduct an on site inspection to confirm the 
information received, correct deficiencies, and to work with the 
facility coordinator to implement an emergency response plan. A 
meeting with the District Fire Chief in whose district the facility is 
located is conducted to disseminate the data and develop a pre- 
incident plan. 

The pre-incident form contains data relating to the type of busi- 
ness, type of construction, common hazards, special hazards, 
sprinklers, standpipes, accesses and entrances, procedures to be 
used in the event of a spill/release, target hazards in the area, and a 



30 City Document No. 1 1 

completed site plan of the facility by the District Fire Chief. The 
Chief then submits his pre-incident plan for review. 

Information is then passed on to Fire Alarm for dispatching pur- 
poses, Deputy Chiefs for review, District Chiefs and Safety Chiefs 
for training, and company officers for dissemination to members, 
thus decreasing the possibility of injury to members as they will be 
better prepared and informed. The completed pre-incident forms 
are available at an incident for use by the incident commander to 
mitigate the hazard in a more efficient and safe manner. 

OFFICE OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

The Office of Civil Defense maintains contact with Federal and 
State Offices of Civil Defense, as well as the general public and 
business community. Radiological monitoring and testing is pro- 
vided when needed within the city and is coordinated with the 
Police Department for the rotation and calibration of the 860 Ra- 
diological Monitoring Survey Meters. 

Two new Radio Officers were appointed for the Civil Defense 
City Emergency Radio System. The Packet Radio System was 
tested and operational during the last drill. 

Records and reports are submitted on a quarterly basis to the 
Federal and State Offices of Emergency Preparedness. 

Participation in "disaster drills" involve various city depart- 
ments and allows an opportunity to coordinate emergency plan- 
ning. 

SAFETY OPERATIONAL UNIT 

The Safety Unit, under the direction of a Deputy Fire Chief has 
one District Fire Chief assigned to each working group whose 
responsibility is to respond to all working fires and above, monitor 
the water supply and fire fighting evolutions at all incidents and 
the proper use of protective equipment and tools and appliances 
in an effort to reduce personal injuries and loss of time. 

This section field tests safety equipment and investigates all ac- 
cidents both personal and vehicle to determine if they were 
caused by defective equipment or procedures. 

After any major incident, they review the procedures and rec- 
ommend any changes that would make a safer environment for fire 
fighters to work in. 

FIRE ALARM SECTION 

The Fire Alarm Section is responsible for the installation, main- 
tenance and operation of the vast emergency communications 
network incorporated by the Roston Fire Department. This is ac- 
complished through the activities of four (4) subsections: Opera- 
tions, Radio Shop, Construction, and Inside Wiremen. 



Fire Department 31 

FIRE ALARM OPERATIONS 

The Operating Force of the Fire Alarm Section dispatched ap- 
paratus to 46,265 incidents during 1989, of these 41 were working 
fires and 56 required transmission of multiple alarms. 

A major step in the modernization process for Fire Alarm Oper- 
ations was achieved with the activation of a state of the art digital 
alarm decoder and transmitter system. These devices were in- 
stalled in conjunction with four (4) completely redundant Mo- 
torola Centracom II six bay communication consoles. 

This accomplishment was the culmination of over two years of 
extraordinary cooperation and coordination between members of 
this Department and representatives of many public and private 
agencies including the City of Boston Management Information 
Systems, New England Telephone Company, Nynex Corp., R. B. 
Allen Company Inc., Digitize Inc., and F. H. Chase, Inc. 

The alarm decoding equipment referred to as the "DIGI- 
TIZER", has replaced all the marble, slate and brass components 
of the original Gamewell equipment which was installed in 1925 
and has resulted in a tremendous space saving within the Opera- 
tions area. 

The new communication consoles allowed the consolidation of 
the six (6) major functions involved in the receipt of alarms and the 
dispatching of emergency units to be achieved from one position: 
telephone correspondence, computer generated unit dispatch in- 
formation; preprogrammed and manual paging capabilities; radio 
operations; a remote DIGITIZER coded alarm receiver and trans- 
mitter; and an MBTA subway radio system. 

A portable "FAX" machine was acquired for use in the Mobile 
Communications Unit. This enabled hard copy messages, inci- 
dent forms, permits and other information to be transmitted 
directly to the scene in a timely and efficient manner. 

The Wang Computer System at Fire Alarm was utilized to de- 
velop a program that allows more effective monitoring of the re- 
quired testing and maintenance of fire alarm systems as specified 
in Fire Prevention Order 87-2. Implementation of this program 
enabled any deficiencies noted on quarterly test reports to be re- 
corded by the Department and a notice forwarded to alarm serv- 
ice companies and property managers for rectification, thereby 
maintaining more fully effective fire alarm systems. Presently over 
2,500 systems are being monitored. 

Personnel of the Fire Alarm Section were actively involved with 
nationally recognized associations concerned with the many 
facets of public safety communications through serving on various 
committees, attending seminars and participating in sponsored 
workshops. These activities afforded members an opportunity to 
keep abreast of the many advancements in emergency communi- 
cations technology such as COMPUTER AIDED DISPATCH 
(CAD) systems and Enhanced 9-1-1. 



32 City Document No. 1 1 

FIRE ALARM CONSTRUCTION 

A new heavy duty cable pulling truck with some of the latest 
essential options was acquired enabling extensive replacement of 
multi-conductor cable to be completed in the following areas of 
the city: 

Brighton 48,000 feet 

Downtown Boston 11,350 feet 

East Boston 74,100 feet 

Hyde Park 2,000 feet 

Jamaica Plain 4,400 feet 

Mattapan 155,400 feet 

Roxbury 16,600 feet 

South Boston 10,000 feet 

West Roxbury 81,000 feet 

Other areas 10,150 feet 

Total footage of conductors: 403,000 

The final phase of the Southwest Corridor Project (MBTA) was 
completed with the relocation of fire alarm box 2552 and associ- 
ated cable at Washington and Morton Streets. The ongoing feder- 
ally funded CANA Tunnel Project in the City Square section of 
Charlestown required the relocation and replacement of thou- 
sands of feet of multi-conductor cable and fire boxes at no cost to 
the City. 

Fire Alarm Personnel attended numerous meetings for the 
Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Projects which involved re- 
viewing map layouts. Procedures were recommended for various 
Federal, State, City , and other agencies for new and reconstruc- 
tion projects in reference to the relocation of fire alarm equip- 
ment. 

An electric jack hammer was acquired which allowed the Con- 
struction force to complete projects which previously required 
outside contractors. 

A new state of the art digital decoding unit providing a visual 
display and hard copy has been installed in Engine Co. 10's quar- 
ters for evaluation. This could replace the outmoded punch tape 
register currently utilized by the Department for the receipt of 
alarms. 

Seventy (70) new master fire alarm boxes were installed for a 
total of 1,103 master boxes and 1,354 street boxes connected to 
the municipal system. The requirements of the NFPA standard 
were achieved through the testing of 5,785 fire boxes. Preventive 
maintenance, repairs and/or painting was performed on 2,975 
boxes. 



Fire Department 33 

RADIO SHOP 

The Radio Shop is responsible for the installation, maintenance 
and testing of all wireless communication equipment and associ- 
ated electronic hardware utilized by this Department. 

Radio Shop personnel established a system for the fire house 
radio systems that would allow the channel one receiver to be 
muted automatically whenever a priority dispatch message is 
transmitted over channel five thereby eliminating the chance of 
error or a call for repetition of an urgent dispatch call. 

This section was very instrumental in the successful planning 
and installation of the new Motorola dispatch consoles and DIGI- 
TIZER equipment. 

A smaller and lighter waterproof portable radio was evaluated 
and put into service after modifications were made for effective 
waterproofing of the extension speaker/microphone. These new 
radios were issued to all command personnel, Deputy and District 
Fire Chiefs, and 32 Fire Companies. Acquisition of these radios 
enabled an additional portable radio to be issued to all Ladder 
Companies and the Rescue Companies. These radios were desig- 
nated "Roof radios and proved to be a very effective tactical tool 
while providing a critical safety factor. 
Activities 

Issued new portable radios 35 

Service to amplifiers and speakers 106 

Repairs to paging units 4 

Installed new pump panel speakers 

and microphones 4 

Repairs to portable and mobile radios 492 

Removed radio equipment 20 

Installed new radio equipment 

in Department equipment 47 

Issued replacement batteries 

for portable radios 30 

Repaired electronic sirens 25 

Issued new channel 5 receivers 

at fire houses 5 



INSIDE WIREMEN 

The Inside Wiremen are responsible for the installation and 
maintenance of all electrical wiring and the associated apparatus 
and appliances including the internal Centrex telephone system 
of the Department. 

The expanded use of computers within the Department re- 
quired the installation of cable and peripheral equipment at Fire 



34 City Document No. 1 1 

Headquarters and the Fire Alarm Office. The installation of an 
Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) for the Wang VS 65 Com- 
puter gave assurance that the dispatch operations would continue 
if an electrical power outage should occur. 

The temporary installation of the Portable Maze Unit at various 
locations required some ingenuity to obtain the needed electrical 
power. The Lighting Plant was completely overhauled and the 
steam cleaning unit at the Training Academy was rewired. 



STATISTICS 



36 



City Document No. 11 



TOTAL RUNS PER COMPANY 





TOTAL 




TOTAL 




TOTAL 


ENGINE 


RUNS 


LADDER 


RUNS 


MISC. 


RUNS 


2 


867 


1 


1,026 


CU1 


245 


3 


1,483 


2 


1,519 


HOI 


643 


4 


1,607 


4 


3,328 


H02 


648 


5 


1,401 


6 


2,420 


H03 


131 


7 


2,262 


7 


2,314 


MU 


227 


8 


849 


9 


966 


ROl 


1,780 


9 


854 


10 


2,336 


R02 


2,121 


10 


1,986 


11 


1,890 


TC 


2,181 


14 


2,255 


14 


2,494 


W12 


186 


16 


1,484 


15 


3,157 






17 


1,507 


16 


1,914 






18 


1,709 


17 


3,344 






20 


708 


18 


1,923 






21 


2,157 


19 


985 






22 


1,744 


21 


915 






24 


2,225 


23 


2,556 






28 


1,735 


24 


1,808 






29 


1,629 


25 


1,117 






30 


860 


26 


3,619 






32 


614 


28 


1,284 






33 


2,718 


29 


2,256 






37 


3,177 










39 


1,366 










41 


2,349 










42 


2,085 










48 


1,110 










49 


363 










50 


892 










51 


760 










52 


1,794 










53 


1,686 










FB 


87 










55 


676 










56 


735 











Note: This report tallies only responses to the scene of an 
incident. Covering is not recorded here. 



Fire Department 



37 



COMPARISON OF INCIDENT TYPES 



1988 



1989 









% of 




% of 




Type 


Description 


Total 


Incs. 


Total 


Incs. 


+ /- 


100 


Fires or Explosions 


8,138 


16.3 


6,604 


14.3 


- 1,534 


200 


Overpressure 














Ruptures 


14 


* 


17 


* 


+ 3 


300 


Rescue/EMS Calls 


7,936 


15.9 


6,170 


13.3 


- 1,766 


400 


Hazardous 














Conditions 


5,251 


10.5 


6,064 


13.1 


+ 813 


500 


Service Calls 


7,758 


15.5 


6,593 


14.3 


-1,165 


600 


Good Intent Calls 


2,222 


4.4 


2,886 


6.2 


+ 664 


700 


False Alarms/Calls 


18,606 


37.2 


17,884 


38.7 


- 722 


800 


Natural Disasters 


4 


* 


10 


* 


+ 6 


900 


Other Situations 


40 


.1 


' 37 


.1 


3 



49,969 



46,265 



-3,704 



* No Significant % 



FIVE INCIDENT TYPES 
WITH THE MOST OCCURRENCES 

1989 



UNTK 


Type 


Description 


1 


710 


False Alarm - Box 


2 


733 


Smoke Detector Device 
Operated - No Fire 


3 


430 


Food on the Stove 


4 


731 


Alarm System Malfunction 
Smoke Detector 


5 


592 


Public Service 

1988 


1 


710 


False Alarm - Box 


2 


733 


Smoke Detector Device 
Operated - No Fire 


3 


731 


Alarm System Malfunction 
Smoke Detector 


4 


321 


Medical Assist 


5 


592 


Public Service 



Total 


% OF 

Incs. 


6,471 


14.0 


3,348 
2,981 


7.2 
6.4 


2,743 

2,382 


5.9 
5.1 


6,385 


12.8 


4,126 


8.3 


3,511 

3,328 
3,291 


7.0 
6.7 
6.6 



38 



City Document No. 11 



RANKING OF WORKING FIRES 
AND MULTIPLE ALARMS 
COMRINED RY DISTRICT 

1989 



ANK 


District 


Work 


Mult 


Total 


1 


11 


6 


11 


17 


2 


7 


8 


7 


15 


3 


3 


5 


7 


12 


4 


5 


1 


8 


9 




6 


3 


6 


9 


6 


1 


2 


5 


7 




4 


4 


3 


7 




12 


4 


3 


7 


9 


9 


2 


4 


6 


10 


8 


4 


1 


5 


11 


10 


2 


1 


3 



41 



56 



97 



1988 



Rank 


District 


Work 


Mult 


Total 


1 


5 


9 


10 


19 




7 


11 


8 


19 


3 


9 


8 


7 


15 


4 


11 


4 


10 


14 


5 


3 


10 


3 


13 


6 


6 


4 


5 


9 


7 


12 


2 


6 


8 


8 


4 


5 


2 


7 




8 


3 


4 


7 


10 


1 


2 


3 


5 


11 


10 


2 


2 


4 



60 



60 



120 



Fire Department 



39 



COMPARISON OF ALARM LEVELS 
RY MONTH 

WORKING FIRES 
AND MULTIPLE ALARMS COMRINED 



Month 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1988 


1989 


Total 


YTD 


Total 


YTD 


17 


17 


12 


12 


11 


28 


8 


20 


5 


33 


14 


34 


10 


43 


7 


41 


8 


51 


9 


50 


16 


67 


2 


52 


5 


72 


6 


58 


4 


76 


3 


61 


8 


84 


4 


65 


5 


89 


7 


72 


12 


101 


9 


81 


19 


120 


16 


97 



COMPARISON OF ALARM LEVELS 



1988 



1989 



Working Fires 
Second Alarms 
Third Alarms 
Fourth Alarms 
Fifth Alarms 
Sixth Alarms 
Seventh Alarms 
Eighth Alarms 
Ninth Alarms 



60 


41 


47 


34 


6 


9 


6 


7 




2 


1 


1 




1 




2 



120 



97 



40 City Document No. 11 

MUTUAL RESPONSES 



ESPONSES TO 


City/Town 


120 


City of Chelsea 


78 


City of Somerville 


44 


City of Newton 


38 


Town of Dedham 


32 


Town of Brookline 


29 


City of Cambridge 


23 


City of Quincy 


20 


Town of Milton 


15 


City of Revere 


11 


Town of Winthrop 


8 


City of Everett 


2 


City of Lynn 


1 


Town of Arlington 


1 


CityofWaltham 


1 


Town of Watertown 


1 


Town of Weymouth 



CITY OF BOSTON o^#> PRINTING SECTION