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Full text of "Annual report"

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THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ANNUAL REPORT 



For the Year Ending June 30, 1992 



DOCUMENT 1 5 




THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston 

William M. Bulger, President 
Arthur F. F. Snyder, Vice President 
Robert W. Consalvo 
Berthe' M. Gaines 
William O. Taylor 



Director and Librarian 
Arthur Curley 



Cover photo: Harvard University Center 
for Conservation and Technical Studies; 
photo p. 8: Hutchms Photography Inc.; 
photo p. 10: Diane Asse'o Griliches; 
photo p. 12: Mike Anderson 



Copyright © 1994 The Trustees of the 
Public Library of the City of Boston 



Contents 



Foreword 5 

Director's Introduction 7 

Return to Grandeur 9 

The Research Library 10 

Community Library Services 13 

Attention to Special Constituencies 14 

Programs 1 7 

Exhibitions 18 

The Library as Publishing House 20 

Grants 21 

Gifts in Kind 21 

Monetary Gifts 23 

Partners of the Boston Public Library 23 

Friends of Branch Libraries 23 

City-Wide Friends 23 

Associates of the Boston Public Library 24 

Boston Public Library Foundation 24 

Volunteers 24 

Partners in Programming 25 

A Concluding Observation 26 

Committees, Councils, and Boards 27 

Library Resources and Use 29 

Library Expenditures 31 



Foreword 



T^ 



I HE term "constituency" has always been the key concentration of 
pohticians. Webster calls it "a body of citizens entitled to elect a 

I representative"; but a still broader definition is "the people... 
served by an organization." Thus, the art museum serves lovers of art; the 
symphony, devotees of music; the hospital, the injured or ailing. To the 
library belongs the broadest-based constituency of all: virtually everyone, 
the full range of people in age, economy, ethnicity, education. 

At the time of the Boston Public Library's centennial anniversary in 1952, 
Boston's distinguished poet David McCord walked through the halls of 
the Library and described the people he saw there: "...the anxious youth 
and the happy octogenarian rub elbows at the reading table. The escapist 
IS there. ..the lonely wife and the ambitious secretary.. .the phrase 
hunter.. .the man in search of his home-town newspaper and the high school 
girl in quest of a light in a terrible mid-year darkness." And today we would 
surely remember the homeless man who wrote in the Boston Globe how 
a summer in the stacks transformed his world. 

This year we are mindful more than ever of our Library constituencies. 
As we seek funds to restore the great McKim edifice and to expand ser- 
vice to all, we take stock in images and in words, of where we are and 
where we aim to go. All the drama and vitality of the Library's collections 
and services, all the special attention to the needs and concerns of the peo- 
ple of Boston and beyond are recorded in the annual report which follows. 



William M. Bulger 

President 

Board of Trustees 



Director's Introduction 



WE have heard the story of the two masons working on a building. 
Asked what they were doing, one responded, "I'm laying 
bricks"; and the other, "I'm building a cathedral." 
Like the second visionary worker, we can say at this time of renovating 
and refurbishing the McKim building, "We are restoring the Library. Not 
just the building, emerging behind ladders and scaffolding. Not just the 
structure returning at last to its Renaissance beauty and elegance, not just 
the handsome edifice on Copley Square. Like the cathedral, the Library 
is far more than marbles and bronzes, paintings and statuary. Far beyond 
what the eye perceives, the Library stands tall as a remarkable, inspiring 
symbol. 

The restoration of the McKim building signifies a revival of the greatness 
in the Library's collections and services. As this annual report demon- 
strates, we are rebuilding today the institution first constructed from the 
designs and dreams of Joshua Bates, Justin Winsor, Edward Everett, George 
Ticknor, and many another benefactor and visionary. As the McKim 
building glows once again, it promises rejuvenation, as well, of the 
philosophies and principles of Library leaders across the century. 



Arthur Curley 
Director and Librarian 




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Return to Grandeur 



DIRECTING his remarks to an assemblage 
of library staff, government officials, and 
citizens gathered in the scaffolded foyer of 
the McKim Building on October 8, 1991, the 
Honorable William M. Bulger, president of the 
Library's Board of Trustees, said: "The work which 
we begin today will result in the restoration of this 
gem of architecture which we call the McKim 
Building. Perhaps at no time has there been a 
greater need for a place conducive to learning and 
quiet reflection." 

The occasion was the official launch of the 
restoration of the Renaissance palace on Cop- 
ley Square, constructed in 1894. Mayor Flynn 
noted that the project "complements the ex- 
tensive renovation of 26 branch libraries in 
Boston which the 
city had underway 
since 1985." And Li- 
brary Director Arthur 
Curley noted that 
"this beautiful build- 
ing on Copley Square 
stands as a lasting 
symbol of the ideals 
and aspirations which 
the Library repre- 
sents. As the first 




great public library in the nation, it is known 
throughout the world. But a century of wear and 
tear has left its mark. This essential restoration 
will make the building sound again, as well as safe 
and more efficient, and will restore the beauty 
which has been a source of pride for generations 
of Bostonians." 

In FY92 the Trustees awarded a $10.8 million 
contract to the Peabody Construction Company of 
Braintree for Phase I of a planned three-phase pro- 
ject. Phase I will include replacement of century- 
old plumbing and wiring systems, renovation of 
the basement to create a new space for the Govern- 
ment Documents Department and a new Map 
Department, construction of ground floor exhibi- 
tion and lecture spaces, new public restrooms, 

creation of a new stair- 
case to the lower level, 
modernization of the 
elevator system, and 
some restoration of 
the Dartmouth Street 
lobby. Other changes 
mclude the installa- 
tion of climate con- 
trols, fire detection 
equipment, and sprin- 
kler systems. 



Senator William Bulger, president of the Library's Board 
of Trustees, and Boston Mayor Raymond Flynn officially 
launched the McKim restoration project at a Library ceremony 
on October 8th. They are shown here unveilmg architectural 
drawings of what two new public areas in the Research Library 
will look like when Phase I of the project is completed in about 
two years. 



The Research Library 

A National/International 
Resource 

In the spirit of Senator Bulger's definition of the 
Boston Pubhc Library as a stronghold of diverse 
constituencies, the Research Library serves a tru- 
ly gobal constituency of scholars. The very struc- 
ture of the Research Library into subject specialties 
invites researchers dedicated to pursue their fields 
in depth: in Music or Fine Arts, Science and 
Technology or Business, Prints or Rare Books. 
Primary Sources and other rarities bring patrons 
from across the nation and the world to the 
Research Library's Special Collections. At least 200 
such collections offer unique sources in such areas 
as Women's Studies, Slavery and the Abolitionists, 
Irish law and letters, the Peronista Regime, Humor, 
and the list goes on and on. 

The Rare Books and Manuscripts Department 
this year reported a flow of visitors and researchers 
from England, Australia, Germany, China, Sweden, 
Egypt, Ireland, New Zealand, Argentina, and Japan. 
The researchers frequently sought out rare 
materials not accessible 
in their own countries. 
From Argentina came 
Mayor Iglesias to pursue 
his studies on the great 
educator Sarmiento, 
while visitors from 
Japan conducted re- 
search in the Science 
Reference Department 
on "intellectual pro- 
perty." Still others from 
Japan came to observe 
the services to the 
physically handicapped 
offered by the Access 
Center. 



Newspapers 

In both historical and 
contemporary time- 
lines, newspapers con- 
tinue to occupy a 
key place in the Li- 
brary's preeminence 




in its collections. Ever since The Massachusetts 
Spy launched the news of an emerging nation, and 
the words of Tom Paine sparked the cry for 
freedom, attention to the press has been dominant. 
In 1986 the Library was named the site of the 
Massachusetts Newspaper Program, part of the 
United States Newspaper Program sponsored by 
the National Endowment for the Humanities. Each 
year the Library has received funding in the multi- 
year program to locate, identify, and preserve all 
newspapers published in Massachusetts. A 
distinguished group of Massachusetts citizens has 
served on an advisory board (see listing at end of 
report). 

This year the Massachusetts Newspaper Pro- 
gram completed the cataloging of all the Boston 
and Massachusetts titles held on microfilm. With 
completion of this task, Boston Public Library 
catalogers will work at other newspaper 
repositories in the state. With an LSCA grant this 
year in the amount of $230,000 to microfilm 
Massachusetts newspapers, the Library reached 
cooperative agreements with the Nantucket 
Athenaeum, Nantucket Historical Society, 
Massachusetts Historical Society, and several 
libraries, which resulted in the preservation on 

microfilm of over fifty 
Massachusetts newspa- 
pers. 

The Library's sub- 
scriptions to global 
newspapers continues 
daily. Any hour in 
the Newspaper Room 
yields a contemporary 
view of the Library's in- 
ternationalism. Patrons 
may be seen immersed 
in their homeland 
papers: Ha'Aretz from 
Tel Aviv; The Irish 
Times from Dublin; 
Le Monde from Paris,- 
La Stampa from Turin, 
Italy — altogether more 
than 75 weekly and 
daily newspapers from 
around the world. 
Similarly, the Library 
continued this year 
the active acquisition 
of books in foreign 
languages. 



Searching periodical references via Infotrac in Bates HalL 



10 



Other Library Roles 

In addition to serving as a major research resource 
for newspapers, the Library plays several other 
roles as the only public research library in New 
England. Since its very beginnings the Library has 
served as an offically designated Federal Depository 
for government documents, and in 1971 became 
a regional repository for all New England. The 
Library also collects state, local, and city 
documents and, as a United Nations Depository, 
acquires publications from the U.N. and other in- 
ternational bodies. 

The Library serves as a U.S. Patent Depository 
Library. It also pursues a long-standing commit- 
ment to acquire all foreign patents from Europe and 
Canada. Scientists, engineers, attorneys, students, 
and inventors from throughout the region make 
use of this valuable resource. In a significant na- 
tionwide project, the Boston Public Library this 
year became one of fourteen nationwide test sites 
in a pilot project to access the Automated Patent 
System. In this effort, full-text, on-line patent 
search capability was made possible in the Science 
Reference Department. Full deployment of the 
system is planned for next year. 

The Library also plays a unique role for the Com- 
monwealth, which in 1972 designated the BPL 
as the Library of Last Recourse. The dynamic, 
double objective in this mandate is for the BPL to 
develop, maintain, and preserve comprehensive 
collections of a research and archival nature, and 
to provide all citizens of the Commonwealth full 
access to the Research Library of the Boston Public 
Library. 



Change 

Committed firmly to maintaining the Library's 
preeminence as an international, national, and 
state research library while at the same time deal- 
ing with immediate needs, the Research Library 
counted change as the hallmark this year — change 
in staff assignments, in service, and in function- 
ing departments. A new department was opened, 
service changes were made in another department, 
and two departments were temporarily closed. 
Change was mandated by positive and negative fac- 
tors: on one hand by the preparations for return- 
ing the McKim building to its 19th-century ar- 
chitectural grandeur and redesigning the interior 
for 21st-century service; on the other hand, to ex- 
act such change within budgetary constraints. 



No. 250,126 



F. BLAKE. 
SPEASINGTELEPHONt. 

Patented Nov. 29, 1881. 




7)- -P^ji^/r 



The Science Reference Department owns a collection of 
patents granted by the U.S. Patent Office in Washington. 
Complete specifications and drawings are available for in- 
ventions from the speaking telephone to genetically 
engineered mice. 



First step in the preparation for the McKim 
restoration was the move of vast numbers of 
materials housed in the areas being first readied for 
restoration, while service to the public was main- 
tained. Begun last year, the massive effort of 
management and shifting of items involved 
transportation, storage, and planning for sub- 
sequent retrieval on request. The shifting de- 
manded action and led to accomplishment. Impor- 
tant in the process was an analysis of materials and 
subjects frequently called for and those identifiable 
for remote storage. 



11 



Telephone Reference Service 

The launch of a new department brought im- 
mediate, positive results. Analysis over a period of 
years had revealed the need to streamline reference 
service previously fragmented among walk-in, 
write-in, and telephone users. Last year's answered 
queries among the Research Library departments 
numbered far in excess of a million, a demonstra- 
tion of staff-intensive, time-intensive service. 

With the creation of a Telephone Reference Ser- 
vice remote from the walk-in public, equipped with 
several phone lines, and a major at-hands-reach col- 
lection, the Library enhanced and expedited ser- 
vice. Other special departments were then freed to 
help walk-in or write-in patrons. First launched just 
before the end of FY92, Telephone Reference 
answered more than 3,000 questions during the 
first month of operation. Questions were as dis- 
parate as thfe Library's patrons themselves: "How 
much potato salad should I make for seven people 
at a picnic?" or "What is the value of a 1984 
Oldsmobile Cutlass?" or "Who wrote the Pledge 
of Allegiance?" 



Other Departmental Changes 
and Developments 

Restructuring of two departments into one service 
function also expedited and enhanced Research 
Library services and cut expenditures. The 
Research Library assumed servicing of what in past 
years had been the General Library Periodicals Sec- 
tion. The Book Delivery Department of the 
Research Library provided staffing at the 
Periodicals desk in the Johnson building and 
duplication of titles was considerably reduced. 

Two key special collections, Jordan and Sound 
Archives, were "put on hold" this year pending 
budget increases and the McKim restoration. 
However, acquisition of children's research 
materials and historic recordings continued. 

In its acquisitions, the Research Library invested 
a large segment of its budget in fiche and electronic 
formats. Microfiche readers/printers, CD ROMs 
(Compact Disc/Read Only Memory) and subscrip- 
tions to on-line databases buttressed the Library 
considerably as a major research center. In the 
Humanities Reference Department, Government 
Documents Department, Kirstein Business Branch, 
the Microtext, Science Reference and Social 
Science Departments, virtually millions of sources 
became instantly viewable. 



To cite just a few examples of the content of 
CDs: The Bible Library in the Humanities 
Reference Department contains the complete texts 
of nine Bibles, including the King James version 
and the Hebrew-Greek transliteration; Standard 
and Poor's Corporations in Kirstein Business 
Branch contains information on more than 9,000 
public and 35,000 private companies; and Hazar- 
dous Materials Information System in the Science 
Reference Department offers data on more than 
50,000 chemical substances. 

As was noted earlier, the use of such resources 
expands the magnitude of the Library's more than 
six million books and other formats — and cir- 
cumvents problems of space, conservation, and 
accessibility. 




Even though there is a major emphasis on providing elec- 
tronic sources of information, printed books will always 
have an important place in people's quest for knowledge. 
Here in Bates Hall, a researcher uses one of the titles from 
the collections of the Library. 



12 



Community Library 
Services 

A sense of purpose and vitality pervaded services 
this year in the General Library and community 
libraries. Faneuil Branch commented on how 
"community awareness and support continued to 
grow." West End pointed out that its program- 
ming "increased branch visibility, strengthened its 
commitment to public service, and enhanced its 
role as an educational and cultural force in the 
community." Each branch librarian evaluated 
the year in various words, but the total message 
spelled out positive planning, growth, and out- 
reach. 

Several areas of enhanced service emerged this 
year: automated circulation services, expansion of 
video-cassette collections, response to changing 
demographics, increased attention to special needs 
of special constituencies, and vigorous support by 
Friends groups. 

Already educated in the DRA system which ex- 
pedited reservations of books, the public re- 
sponded in FY92 to the installation of PACS (Public 
Access Catalogs) with enthusiasm: "A far cry," 
reported Adams Street, "from catalog cards and 
drawers." In addition to the DRA reserve system 
and PACS, other units like Codman Square noted 
the aid to informational/research services pro- 
vided by Infotrac in locating periodical references 
and in FAX for transmitting them. Again and again 
in the branches, various electronic devices ar- 
rived on library desks, marking the growing 
usefulness of technology. But the machines were 
not counted as important in themselves. Their im- 
portance remained always a means to an end, to 
assist in fostering learning. 

The Boston Public Library has compiled a 
historic record of trying out new formats and 
systems for circulating materials for information 
and recreation. A pioneer in building film and 
recordings collections, the Library also pioneered 
in circulating paperbacks and large-print books. 
This year witnessed attention to audio-cassettes. 
West Roxbury reported a "tremendous demand for 
books on tape and learning language cassettes. We 
cannot keep them on shelf," says the report. Other 
branches added testimony to the demand for 
audio-cassettes. 

Also on the year's agenda was response to chang- 
ing demographics in collection-building and pro- 
gramming. New materials were selected with em- 



phasis on the needs of arrivmg immigrants. 
Languages targeted were Russian, Chinese, Viet- 
namese, Portuguese, Amharic, Armenian, Lao, 
Thai, Khmer/Hmong, Greek, French/Haitian, and 
Spanish. Emphasis was placed on materials that 
could be shared by parents and children, and many 
instructional materials were acquired to help those 
who were learning English as a second language. 
Library staff with language strengths contributed 
their expertise in such selections. 

To name just a few of the ethnic programs: Irish 
stepdancers, a Russian winter festival, a 
LatinoAmerican musical ensemble, and celebra- 
tion of the Chinese New Year. The librarian of 
Fields Corner summarized branch response for 
many branch staffs: "Always a magnet for Boston's 
immigrant populations, Dorchester is once again 
swelling with newcomers, most of them non- 
English speaking. The Fields Corner and other 
neighborhood branch libraries welcome these 
groups and will try to continue to provide programs 
and services of interest to them." 

More than 100 diverse programs celebrated Black 
History month. For more than 30 years the Library 
has observed this tribute to African-American men 
and women, which originated in Boston, the brain- 
child of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard graduate 
and founder of the Association for the Study of 
Afro-American Life and History. The observances 
in January, February, and March took many forms, 
among them: a panel discussion on the Civil Rights 
Movement; "From Opera to 
Rock: A Medley of Black 
American Music"; a lecture 
series on "The Black Family 
Today and Yesterday"; "How 
Black Folktales Came to Be"; 
and many more lectures, ex- 
hibits, film programs, con- 
certs, and demonstrations. 

A major series of programs 
was developed by the Adult 
Services section of the Gener- 
al Library and funded by 
federal grants adminis- 
tered by the Board of 
Library Commission- 
ers. "Asian Focus" targeted 
themes and events related to the 
cultures of more than 20,000 Asians 
living in the Metropolitan area, 
recent immigrants from Cambo 
dia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Num- 
bered among the events, which 



FROM OPERA 

TO ROCK: A 
MEDLEY OF 

BLACK 

AMERICAN 

Mil 




at times drew overflow crowds, were a traditional 
Vietnamese Moon Festival that included a dragon 
dance, fashion show, folk songs, and games,- films 
from China and other Asian nations; a Cambodian 
Folk Festival featuring a performance by Lowell's 
Angkor Dance Troupe; and an exhibition of 
Chinese brush painting and calligraphy. 



Attention to Special 
Constituencies 

Children 

when the library opened the doors of the McKim 
Building in 1895, it welcomed children to their 
own room and to more than 3,000 books within 
"an unhampered space for young readers." In all 
the years that have followed the early pioneer Alice 
M. Jordan, the BPL has moved in the forefront of 
reaching out to children in dynamic, innovative 
ways. FY92 carried on the tradition. In addition to 
more than 5,000 programs this year — films, 
storytelling, book talks, instruction in the use of 
the library, puppet workshops and performances, 
arts and crafts, readings by authors and demonstra- 
tions by illustrators — the Library added still more 
special moments to children's library experiences. 



A touring company from New Hampshire, The 
Hampstead Players, presented a participatory 
show, "Aladdin and Fiis Magic Lamp"; two per- 
formers, one of them formerly a clown with Ring- 
ling Brothers, gave a summertime program of 
magic, music, and juggling; guitarist Tom 
Pendergast used his guitar to delight toddlers with 
chants, rhymes, and songs — these events represent 
just a few of the 5,000 plus routes to young peo- 
ple's attention and delight. 

The Library's tradition of formal storytelling 
dates to 1902 with the first appearance of Marie 
Shedlock, a celebrated European storyteller who 
was known as the "English interpreter of Hans 
Christian Andersen" and "the Fairy Godmother." 
The tradition of storytelling continued at full pace 
this year with many programs focusing on folk 
tales. 

Probably the most popular and challenging pro- 
ject for children in 1991 and 1992 drew more than 
2,000 children from throughout the city to com- 
munity centers, juvenile justice facilities, schools, 
and — of course — the Boston Public Library. Week 
after week the young people came to match wits, 
to deal with knights and bishops and queens in 
chess games. "Chess makes kids smarter!" claims 
Dr. Michael Charney, a child psychologist from 
Back Bay, who is founder and director of Boston's 
Games Project, a nonprofit educational program 
that promotes chess to inner-city youth. "There is 




Children at the Hyde 
Park Branch Library 
enjoy a performance of 
"Hansel and Gretel" 
presented by puppeteer 
ludith O'Hare and the 
"You and Me Puppets" 
during the April school 
vacation. 



14 




"Chess makes kids smarter!" 

something magical about chess," says Dr. Chamey. 
"It's a brain sport which helps to build thinking, 
concentration, problem solving, and self esteem, 
particularly among youngsters." Altogether there 
were nine branches offering chess. There's no 
scientific measurement of the effects of chess on 
the participants' brain power; but, as one branch 
librarian reported: "Chess has become the thing to 
do for younsters here." 

In FY92 visits by staff to school classrooms for 
registration and book talks numbered 940; class 
visits to branch libraries and central totaled 1,183. 
Programs for children numbered 2,851 with an at- 
tendance of 91,327 children. 



Young Adults 

Probably more than any other age group, teens are 
caught up in a time of change and decision mak- 
ing. The collection building and programming of 
the Boston Public Library targets the areas of 
adolescent concern: physical development, sexual 
growth, peer associations, education and career 
choices, science fiction, and sports. FY92 brought 



full attention to teens. Workshops were offered on 
writing college application essays and creative 
writing; experts dealt in several programs with the 
HIV virus, violence, and drugs. In a departure from 
events built exclusively around teens, Connolly 
Branch sponsored a dialogue between seniors and 
teens. The intergenerational dialogue was ap- 
propriately titled "Senior and Youth Empower- 
ment." 



Senior Citizens 

More than 200 elders attended the weekly pro- 
grams at the Central Library for the Never Too 
Late group, and many more took part in branch ac- 
tivities. Founded at the Boston Public Library in 
1949, the Never Too Late group is the longest- 
running library-sponsored group for older citizens 
m the country. To demonstrate the diversity of 
subjects covered this year, here are a few programs: 
"European and American Impressionism," 
delivered by Henry Tate; a film on a solo canoe ex- 
pedition to the Arctic Ocean; and a slide lecture, 
"Boston Under Ground: Digging Up the History of 
the Hub," by City Archeologist Steven Pendery. 

Clearly the highlight of the year was the 42nd 
anniversary program, the Fred Allen Show, a revue 
of the career of the renowned Boston radio come- 
dian. Written and directed by award-winning 
playwrights Lois and Arnold Peyser, and per- 
formed by talented local actors, the play provided 
a capacity audience with nostalgia and humor. 

One "regular" spoke for the other devotees of the 
Never Too Late series: "Come snow or rain, the 
group is never cancelled. I like that. I like to keep 
active, to learn new things, to keep my mind ac- 
tive. It's the best way I know to keep on living." 



New Readers 

Use of the Literacy Resource Centers throughout 
the system grew at a dramatic pace this year. In 
addition to providing a growing collection of 
materials for new readers and English-as-a-Second 
Language students, Library service took many 
shapes: collaboration with statewide agencies in 
recruiting and training volunteers and in referrals; 
monthly orientations by CLC (Commonwealth 
Literacy Campaign) for volunteers combatting il- 
literacy; in conjunction with the Adult Literacy In- 
stitute, an annual Literacy Materials Fair to 
showcase literacy materials and advisory services; 
and lectures by the Literacy Services Coordinator. 



15 




Hariotte Cook composed her resume and cover letters on the Access Center Braille and Speak 
Machine that led to mainstream employment. 



Patrons with Disabilities 

The Access Center for Persons with Disabihties 
this year took major steps forward in opening up 
the resources of the Boston Pubhc Library. Various 
approaches were offered to place such patrons in- 
to the mainstream of access through adaptive 
technologies and materials in special formats. 

The highlight of the year was continued im- 
plementation of the LSCA project "Computer 
Technology for Disabled People, Phase 2." This 
project makes it possible for blind and visually im- 
paired people to access CD ROM reference 
materials, and eventually, the Library's on-line 
catalog, by use of an IBM compatible computer 
with Braille, speech, and large print peripherals and 
software. Reach-out efforts to deaf and hearing- 
impaired individuals took the form of several ma- 
jor programs. A sensitivity workshop titled "It's 
a Deaf, Deaf World" was a key point in the obser- 
vance of Deaf Awareness Week. The Boston Public 
librarians in attendance were "thrust into a silent 
world where attempts to obtain social security, 
hospital aid, job counseling, or library assistance 



had to be accomplished through non-verbal com- 
munication." 

In one of many success stories among Access 
Center users, one woman described how she found 
employment after using Access Center equipment 
for several months. "The Access Center has not 
only made me an enthusiastic user of the Boston 
Public Library," she noted; "I can definitely say 
that it's changed my life for the better." She calls 
herself now "a productive member of the work 
force." 

Mobile Library Services 

The Mobile service is an extension activity 
directed to patrons who are immobilized: elderly 
readers, as well as some younger, physically and 
mentally handicapped. Materials for individuals 
and groups are delivered to nursing homes, private 
homes, and public and private housing for the 
elderly and handicapped. This year circulation in- 
creased by 42%. Service was provided in FY92 to 
some 60 sites with circulation of materials in ex- 
cess of 150,000. 



16 



Women 

In the Year of the Woman, the Library acknowl- 
edged female achievements in diverse dramatic 
ways. The Library's historic record in women's 
studies goes as far back as the gift in 1896 by Col. 
Thomas Higginson of more than 4,000 items, the 
pioneer Galatea Collection. The record continued 
in FY92. 

Among the speakers who used the dais to com- 
municate their timely, often controversial, views 
were Gloria Steinem, who spoke on her new book 
Revolution from Within, and TV columnist 
Monica Collins on gender bias. Other speakers 
dealt with "Sisterhood among Women of Color," 
"A Nambian Woman," and "Tales of Women in 
History." 



Programs 



The Boston Public Library has never limited itself 
to a passive role as repository or as center of 
solitude and quiet study. Added to these roles is 
a commitment to be a place where ideas are 
generated and shared, where discoveries and inven- 
tions are born. Both the speakers' platform and the 
exhibition hall are essential for communication to 
the mind and eye. Several programs have already 
been cited elsewhere in this report. Among the 
types of events which should be noted: 



Author Programs 

The most notable programming naturally revolves 
around the creators of books. This year, both in 
central and the branches, authors unfolded the 
essence of their background and their works. Many 
authors appeared under the aegis of the 12th an- 
nual Harvard Book Store Cafe: Clyde Edgerton 
[Killer DilleT]-, Joseph Finder [Red Carpet]-, Marcie 
Hershman [Tales of the Master Race]-, and Eileen 
Pollack [The Rabbi in the Attic and Other Stories], 
and many more. 

The monthly author series launched by the 
Library in 1991 yielded several other creative 
voices, among them: Joan Millman [The Effigy]; 
Jack Drummey [Dry Run]-, Lawrence L. Langer 
[Holocaust Testimonies]; and Olga Anastasia 
Pelensky [Isak Dinesen]. 

The Associates of the Boston Public Library 
sponsored their elegant annual affair. Literary 
Lights, with a gathering of stellar authors. John 
Guare, playwright, producer, and lyricist, headed 
the list. Other guests were William Alfred [Hogan 's 
Goat]; Frank Bidart [In the Western Night]; Sven 
Birkerts [An Artificial Wilderness]; Henry Louis 
Gates, Jr. [The Signifying Monkey]; John Hawkes 
[The Blood Oranges]; Gish Jen [Typical American]; 
Sue Quinn [Biography of Karen Horney]; Margaret 
Rey [Curious George series); and Simon Schama 
[Citizens]. 




Playwright John Guare 
and his wife, Adele 
Chatfield-Taylor (right], 
share a moment at the 
annual Literary Lights 
dinner with Mrs. Francis 
O. Hunnewell, cochair- 
person of this year's 
gala held at the Hotel 
Meridien. 



17 




Massachusetts 



Audiovisual Programs 

The most popular programs in FY92 were film 
series. The two "Made in Massachusetts" se- 
quences and the Frank Capra series often played 
to capacity audiences in the Rabb Lecture Hall and 
generated much publicity in the local press. Several 
other programs, coordinated with the Special Pro- 
jects Librarian, utilized the large-screen video pro- 
jection system making viewing possible outside 
the program site in the lecture hall: among them, 
the Boston Globe Spring and Fall Forums and Book 
Fair, and Mayor Flynn's State of the City speech. 
The Audiovisual Department's circulating film 
and video collections, used extensively by branch 
and outside organizations, reached a total of 8,300 
titles with 11,500 circulating copies. Circulating 
audio cassettes, compact discs, and recordings con- 
tinued to be broadly used in FY92, numbering 
about 900 items a week. 

Newsmakers 

Still another form of programming testified to the 
Library's stance on the cutting edge of what's cur- 
rent, what's newsworthy in the mainstream of 
events. Thus former Surgeon General of the U.S. 
Dr. C. Everett Koop spoke before an overflow 
crowd in the Rabb Lecture Hall on the need to 
revise our nation's health system; more than 500 
people attended workshops on AIDS, violence 
against women and children, and care for the 
homeless and the elderly; and staff members from 
the Faulkner Hospital conducted a four-part series 
on substance abuse and violence prevention. 



Boston History 

while their minds were trained on late-breaking 
news, users remained mindful of their Boston 
heritage and many programs targeted key moments 
of local history. Thus Dr. Alan Taylor of Boston 
University dealt with "Yankees and Strangers: The 
New England Town from 1636-1992" in a North 
End Branch series cosponsored with the Old North 
Church. Local historian Anthony Sammarco lec- 
tured on "Neponset through Ashmont Hill and 



Stops in Between." Still other programs dealt with 
the Bunker Hill Monument, Castle Island, the Old 
Fall River Line, and the Irish-American Soldier in 
the Civil War. Boston College Professor Thomas 
O'Connor, author of BPL publications This 
Momentous Affair and Bibles, Brahmins and 
Bosses, offered a presentation on "The New Boston 
and the Old West End." 

Sounds of Music 

Since the first strains of Rossini's overture to 
Mahomet II resounded on opening day in 1858 
from the hall of the Boston Public Library on 
Boylston Street, music has pervaded the collections 
and programs of the Library. In FY92 the musical 
renditions in central and branch program halls 
ranged from rock to jazz to opera and symphony. 
Mary Arapoff delighted members of the Never Too 
Late Group with music from her native Russia. 
Other performances featured the Latino American 
Musical Ensemble, the Melvia Butler Trio, and 
Serenata Chamber Players. Probably the highpoLnt 
for music listeners were the rich, mellow vibra- 
tions which flowed from the cello of Yo-Yo Ma, 
who enchanted a full house as part of a "Reverence 
for Life" program in tribute to Dr. Albert 
Schweitzer. 



Exhibitions 



when William Wetmore Story's Arcadian shepherd 
boy piped his tune on opening day of the original 
library on Boylston Street, the Research Library 
began a tradition of ennobled, beautified walls and 
ceilings, stairways and quiet niches. Murals, 
bronzes, statuary, and paintings transformed the 
Renaissance palace into a museum as well as a 
library. 

This appeal to the eyes of the beholders ex- 
tended richly this year to several exhibitions. Ex- 
hibits are constantly used in branches and depart- 
ments as topical support to programs, events, cur- 
rent news, and such. Among such exhibits were 
"What So Proudly We Hailed," which explored en- 
vironmental threats to America's best-known land- 
scapes such as Walden Pond and Civil War battle- 
fields; "Seeds of Change," a traveling exhibit 
organized by the American Library Association and 
Smithsonian Institution commemorating the 
500th anniversary of Columbus's voyages to the 



18 









THE 

^". WHOLE 



Sk^ BOOKE Ol-PSALMES 






TRANSLATED mo 

tJMetrt. 



ENClISH 



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-i5- 
e3-2 

: " Whercuato is pre fixed idifcourfedc- ,x,^ 
',7'^claring notooly ihc Uwliillnts, butalfo 'I'-J! 
^f<) the nccclfity of the heavenly Ordinance S^tJ^ 
j-"**J" offinging scripture P.'alincs in ,I>t> 

%•", *='"^- %l. 

J^M) Lttthcwm-dtfCediatllfltntttHfljin ^fj*; 
;'i^>' jeH,in*tlwifdtme,tfihii^iiidexheTt- J.r ' 

pJf'., in^i,iifaiMkeriiiPftlmt',Hirmc>,»iid r\\^ 

JTifS lp,riiM*/li,en^s,Jixgi>'gtnheLerdmlh Cilv 
, •' fruce injtur henrls. 

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fmprinted 
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r.n^. 






The Bay Psalm Book. 



New World; and "Eyewitness: World Press Photos 
Exhibition," featuring news photos by photojour- 
nalists from 61 countries. 

Exhibitions also brought forth Library treasures 
in books and art, a feast that often takes witnesses 
back many centuries. Several such outstanding ex- 
hibitions graced the cases of the Rare Books and 
Manuscripts Department: 

"Shakespeare: Splendid Editions." Com- 
memorating the 375th anniversary of 
Shakespeare's death, the exhibition drew from the 
16,000 items in the Thomas Pennant Barton 
Collection. 

"Religion and Politics in the Prince Collection," 
exhibited the first book printed in the English col- 
onies, the Whole Booke of Psalmes. 

The "The Bay Psalm Book, " printed in Harvard 
in 1640 by Stephen Day. The Boston Public Library 
holds two of only 10 or 11 copies of the book in 
existence. 

Other exhibitions focused on original illustra- 
tions and caricatures by George Cruikshank; ar- 
chival holdings which give testament to the suf- 
ferings of Afro-American slaves; and a showing of 
works from the collection of Harry C. Bentley, a 



noted accountant and educator who founded his 
own school of accounting in 1917. 

Serving truly as a presidential library, the Boston 
Public Library exhibited rare items from the per- 
sonal library of America's second president, lohn 
Adams. Thanks to the Library's conservation 
laboratory, in a project completed this year, the 
3,300 books in the collection were brought as close 
to their original form as possible. 

The Music Department drew on its special col- 
lections this year for exhibitions: a lecture and ex- 
hibit marking the 200th anniversary of the birth 
of Lowell Mason, the foremost pioneer in the in- 
troduction of music instruction to American 
public schools and the establishment of teacher 
training in music education; an exhibition of the 
Library's recently acquired Marshard Orchestras 
Music Collection, paying tribute to the two Mar- 
shard brothers Harry and Jack, who became two of 
the nation's most successful orchestra leaders from 
the early 1930s to the mid-1960s. Perennially 
engaged by such clients as the Roosevelts, 
Saltonstalls, Mellons, Pulitzers, and Du Ponts for 
society parties, the brothers launched such big 
name performers as Vaughn Monroe, Jack Edwards, 
and Ranny Weeks. Irish-born bandmaster, im- 
presario, and composer Patrick S. Gilmore was 
commemorated for his contributions to 19th cen- 
tury American music as military bandleader, per- 
former at the national political convention that 
nominated Abraham Lincoln for the presidency, 
and composer of a number of songs, most famous 
of which was When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home (1863). 

A major exhibition commemorating the 200th 
anniversary of the death of Wolfgang Amadeus 
Mozart drew on rare items in the Library's Allen 
A. Brown Collection. Highpoint in the show was 
Mozart's Fugue, K443, one of only a few original 
Mozart manuscripts in this country. 




rt and 



Contempomries 



19 




Le DocteuT Francklin Couronne par la Liberie, aquatint by 
the Abbe de Saint Non, 1778, after a drawing by Fragonard. 

Print Department 

Exhibitions by the Print Department reached the 
zenith of Library exhibitions. Begun in 1941 with 
a major gift from Albert H. Wiggin, the Print 
Department this year celebrated 50 years. Two 
curators, the American graphic artist Arthur Heint- 
zelman (1941 to 1960), and Sinclair H. Hitchings 
(1961 to the present) have shaped the Print collec- 
tions into one of the larger, more notable public 
collections in the United States. 

In celebration of its 50th anniversary, the Print 
Department held several exhibitions: "A Salute to 
the House of Weyhe," the pioneering New York 
gallery from which the Library acquired a number 
of important American prints; "Hiriam Merrill: 
Memories of a Wood Engraver"; and the third com- 
memoration of "A Salute to Boston," featuring gifts 
and purchases of area artists. 

Exhibitions this year in the Wiggin Gallery and 
South Gallery included "The Prints of Letterio 
Calapai," "The Americans: The Eighteenth Cen- 
tury," "Micossi's Italy," and "The Americans: The 
Nineteenth Century." 

This year the Print Department holdings 
reached more than 75,000 prints, drawings, and 
watercolors; 650,000 photographs; and 100,000 
architectural drawings and designs. 



The Library as 
Publishing House 

A major book came off the presses this year under 
the BPL imprint. African-Americans in Boston: 
More Than 300 Years by Robert C. Hayden follows 
three centuries of Black achievement in 12 key 
areas including community development, civil 
rights, education, business, politics, and jour- 
nalism. The facts of the vignettes of history were 
unearthed by Hayden in old books, magazines, and 
journals, and were "locked in the memories of 
Boston's older residents," waiting to be unlocked. 
The book, handsomely designed by Richard Zonghi 
of the Library's Graphics Department, was edited 
and indexed by Curator of Publications Jane Man- 
thorne. Trustee Mrs. Berthe' M. Gaines served as 
coeditor and proofreader. Mrs. Gaines was also an 
important biographical entry in the book for her 
achievements on behalf of libraries. Funding was 
provided by Bank of Boston in response to an idea 
and proposal originated by Joyce Ferriabough. 

In other publishing efforts, the Young Adult 
Department produced a monthly newsletter for 
teens including announcements of upcoming pro- 
grams and peer book reviews. Adult Services of the 
General Library released monthly bibliographies, 
"Quick Picks," and joined staff in branches to 
develop several booklists including the annual 
"Black Is..." The Government Documents Depart- 
ment released a second microfiche edition of the 
State and Local Catalog, adding approximately 

1,700 items to 
the database. 
And children of 
Faneuil Branch 
Library used a 
computer/print- 
er awarded by a 
Boston Works 
Smarter grant 
to revive their 
popular publica- 
tion, "The Oak 
Leaf." 




African-Americans 
in Boston: More 
Than 350 Years. 



20 



Grants 



Several major grants were received this year that 
provided for support of projects imperative to the 
Library's status as a leading research hbrary: 

National Endowment for the Humanities 

$130,366.00 

Continued the multi-year activities of the 
Massachusetts Newspaper Program. 

U.S. Department of Education — Title IIC 
$130,866.00 

Strengthening Library Resources (Allen A. 

Brown Collection) 

Library Services and Construction Act — Title I (To 
Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library System) 
$100,000.00 

Boston Sub-Region Union List of Serials: Pro- 
vides for input of sub-regional libraries into 
OCLC, production of hard copy listing of BPL 
holdings for distribution to member libraries, 
and for scanning equipment and FAX machines. 



Gifts in Kind 

The benefactions that marked the library's very 
beginnings — from Everett, Bates, Ticknor, and 
others — continued in generous pace in FY92, both 
in monies and in kind. The range of gifts reached 
into as many formats as the Library's collections. 
A selected list is offered here to demonstrate the 
scope of gifts, from a bronze duckling to rare prints: 

Sigmund Abeles 

Seventeen drawings and nineteen prints 

Albert Alcalay 

Forty-six prints, constituting virtually his entire 
work in printmaking 

Robert Anzalone 

One hundred and eighty-six sound recordings 

Associates of the Boston Public Library 

Medieval illuminated manuscript, Constitu- 
tiones FratTum Celestinorum Provincie 
Gallicane 

Attleboro Public Library 

Twenty periodical titles, representing over 500 
volumes, used for replacement 

Elfriede Bowditch 

Books and scores of thirteen song sheets, in- 
cluding a handwritten copy of songs which Mrs. 



Bowditch (her husband a descendant of 
Nathaniel Bowditch) collected as a young musi- 
cian touring Europe 

Varujan Boghosian 

A wash drawing by Theodore Stams and water- 
colors by Edward Giobbi and Bernard Chaet 

Bernard Chaet 

A drawing by Barbara Swan 

City-Wide Friends of the Boston Public Library 
26 admission passes to the New England 
Aquarium, valued at $13,000 

Gertrude Weyhe Dennis 

Ten American prints, most from 1919 

Janet Eltinge and the Estate of Thomas Nason 
Original wood blocks and copper plates by 
Thomas Nason 

Mark Fried 

Three hundred twenty-seven sound recordings 

Friends of Various Branch Libraries 

$3,000 from Friends of the Charlestown Branch 

Library through a grant to Friends from the 

Greenspace Alliance Program for landscaping of 

Library grounds 

$ 1 , 100 from Friends of West Roxbury Branch to 

underwrite costs of poetry writing workshop 

and competition 

Other contributions, the aggregate contribution 

estimated in excess of $9,000 to underwrite 

costs of programs for children and adults 

Gerald and Flora Gross 

Drawings for children's books, mainly by Irene 
Haas and William Pene du Bois, and other art 
items 

Grogan &. Co. (Grace A. Yeomans) 
Typed galleys of Fred Allen's letters 

Roger Howlett, Childs Gallery 

Five boxes of exhibition catalogs, monographs, 
ephemera 

Sidney Hurwitz 

Six hundred fifty-six sound recordings 

Minuetta Kessler 

90 holograph scores, also sketches illustrating 
her compositional techniques 

David McCord 

Three hundred hardcover books, 220 paper- 
backs, 10 cassettes, and 4 records 

Estate of Richard D. McMullan 

Collection of circus prints and memorabilia and 
$10,000 

The Honorable Gordon Martin 

Archives of the Boston School desegregation 
case collected by Judge Martin 

John Merriam 

Prints and drawings 



21 



Dagma and Karen Reutlinger 

Sixty-two works on paper, prints and drawings 

of contemporary artists 
Estate of Beryl Robinson 

Personal library of Mrs. Robinson, who served 

the library for many years as storyteller and 

Readers Advisor for Children 
Nancy Schon 

Bronze statue of duckling modeled after Quack 

in McCloskey's Make Way for Ducklings. Value 

estimated in excess of $10,000 
Robert Severy 

Restoration of portraits of Dr. James Freeman 

Clarke, Walter Savage Landor, and Caleb 

Fellows; also 1,566 black/white photographs of 

buildings in Boston area designed by Peabody 

and Stearns 
Joe Smith 

Four hundred compact discs from the President 

and CEO of Capitol EMI Music 
Society of Arts and Crafts 

Society records, including correspondence, 

craftsmen's resume's, scrapbooks 
Stanhope Framers and Maud Morgan 

Twenty silkscreen prints by Maud Morgan 



State Library of Massachusetts 

More than 1,200 periodical volumes 

Stephen and Sybil Stone 

Drawing by Hyman Bloom, Rabbi and Torah 

Streetfeet Women's Touring Company 

Decorative cabinet, handmade by Ted Dodd, to 
hold gift of Company archives. Estimated value 
of gift in excess of $5,000 

Tufts University, Music Library 

Fifteen 19th-century collections of American 
songs, many not previously in Library's 
collections 



Daniel J. Rea, Sr. of Readville gave a remarkable 
gift to the Rare Books and Manuscripts Depart- 
ment this year as a tribute to his parents' devotion 
to their family, neighbors, church, and country. 
Rea's very special gift is a facsimile of the beautiful- 
ly illustrated Book of Kells. Created in the 8th cen- 
tury by Irish monks of the Monastery of Kells in 
Ireland's County Meath, the manuscript consists 
of the four Gospels of the New Testament. The 
book has been described as the "calligraphic 
wonder of the western world." 




Director Arthur Curley 
and Mr. Daniel J. Rea, 
Sr. holding the Book of 
Kells, a gift from Mr. 
Rea to the Library. 



22 



Monetary Gifts 

This is a selective listing of gifts of $1,000 and 
more. The full listing of all gifts has been fully 
recorded and ackowledged by the Research Library. 



Fred Allen Fund 


$500,000.00 


Antiquarian Booksellers Association 




of America 


1,250.00 


Associates of the Boston Public 




Library 


32,178.00 


The Boston Foundation 


1,451.00 


f. Linzee Coolidge 


25,000.00 


Fiduciary Charitable Foundation 


3,000.00 


Bradford Field and Lee Bottome 




Story Foundation 


2,400.00 


Mrs. Berthe' M. Gaines, Trustee 




Boston Public Library 


1,000.00 


Estate of Dorothy Elizabeth Green 


3,166.00 


Octavia Hirschman 


1,000.00 


Anne S. Howells Charitable Trust 


5,000.00 


lingo Foundation 


10,000.00 


Payne Fund, Inc. 


3,500.00 


Barbara Lee Pindar Smith 


2,500.00 


Stephen and Sybil Stone Foundation 


3,500.00 


Eleanor M. Tate 


1,000.00 


Time, Inc. Book Co. 


1,100.00 


Total 


$597,045.00 



Approximately $7,000.00 in additional gifts under 
$1,000.00 were received. A sizeable portion of all 
money gifts received this year ($23,100) vi^as 
specified for the Print Department General Fund, 
for the purchase of works by Boston artists, or for 
publication of catalogues. 



Friends of Branch 
Libraries 

In FY 91 the number of Friends groups in branch 
libraries reached 21 of the 25 branches. Dedicated 
to strengthening neighborhood libraries and 
reachout to the communities, they developed 
many imaginative shapes for their goals. A 
sampling: 

A "funky" auction of everything from bird cages 
to pizzas (Faneuil). 

A children's fair with pony rides and clowns 
(Fields Corner). 

A car wash for fundraising (South End). 

A town meeting on "AIDS in the Black Com- 
munity" (Codman Square). 

A bilingual (English/Spanish) open house (Con- 
nolly). 

Writing competitions (Hyde Park, West Rox- 
bury, and Egleston Square). 

The Friends groups were quintessential 
volunteers. They invested time and enthusiasm,- 
they energized their neighbors to build a path for 
themselves and their children to their local library. 
They worked to put their libraries, not on a side 
road, but in the mainstream of people's lives. Pro- 
bably one of the best examples this year of a 
dynamic Friends group is Friends of Faneuil 
Branch. Their holiday party at the branch drew 350 
people; their celebration of the 50th birthday of 
Curious George involved 140 children. Houghton 
Mifflin donated Curious George books for the 
affair. 



Partners of the 
Boston Public 
Library 

Several significant groups of citizens have incor- 
porated to support Library objectives and to raise 
funds for that support. The methods of pursuing 
these objectives and their fund-raising for Library 
needs beyond tax-generated support varied from 
group to group, but their commitment, energy, and 
tirelessness are shared. 



City-Wide Friends 

True to their name, City-Wide Friends is a grass- 
roots organization that raises funds to benefit the 
entire Library system. This year the group con- 
tributed $7,000 to landscape the central library 
buildings in Copley Square and $2,000 to purchase 
puppets for a number of branch libraries. The funds 
are derived from monthly book sales held at the 
central library. The City- Wide Friends also spread 
the word, through media appearances and adver- 
tising, in advocacy of the needs of the Boston 
Public Library at times of budget crisis. 



23 



Associates of the 
Boston Public Library 

Each year the Associates add ghtter to the very 
laison d'etre of hbraries, books and authors, with 
the Literary Lights dinner. In this year's event, a 
distinguished gathering of writers were in at- 
tendance. 

The Associates' main goals are fundraising for 
acquisition of special collections, publications, ex- 
hibitions, and guided art/architecture tours. In ad- 
dition to the Literary Lights dinner, the Associates 
sponsored a festive dinner in the Abbey Room of 
the McKim Buildmg. "Una Cena E Una Festa 
Friulana" marked the 50th anniversary of the Print 
Department and coincided with the opening of a 
major exhibition in the Great Hall, "Micossi's 
Italy." The celebrated Italian printmaker, Mario 
Micossi, was the featured speaker at the dinner. 

This year the Associates contributed $10,000 to 
the Boston Public Library Foundation to assist in 
the restoration of the lohn Singer Sargent murals. 
The Associates also added a rare medieval il- 
luminated manuscript to the Rare Book and 
Manuscripts Department, Constitutiones Fratrum 
CelestinoTum Provincie Gallicane. 



Boston Public 
Library Foundation 

"This effort is not just about raising money. It's 
about getting people involved; people who care 
about the cultural well-being of this city, state, and 
region; people who appreciate the importance of 
this world-class institution." Speaking was lohn J. 
Cullinane, founder of Cullinet Software, Inc., 
whose plan was to establish a foundation charged 
with raising substantial funds for the Boston Public 
Library. In March 1992 the Trustees of the Boston 
Public Library announced the establishment of 
Cullinane's brainchild, the Boston Public Library 
Foundation. 

loining Cullinane in the newly incorporated 
foundation is Karyn Wilson, former director of Cor- 
porate Contributions for Bank of Boston, to serve 
as full-time director, and John Larkin Thompson, 



former chairman and CEO of Blue Cross and Blue 
Shield, as chairman. (See end for listing of members 
of Foundation Board.) 

With the immediate goal of raising $16 million 
to assist in Phases II and III of the McKim restora- 
tion, the Foundation moved dramatically forward 
in the first seven months to raise more than $3 
million. Among the contributions this first year of 
the Foundation: 

Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund, for restoration 
of the McKim building foyer $1,000,000 

Baring Brothers Foundation, London, England, in 
the name of early benefactor Joshua Bates 

50,000 

Houghton Mifflin Company for establishment of 
a Special Collections Reading Room in McKim 
building built around Alice M. Jordan Col- 
lection 100,000 

Shawmut Bank for restoration projects and 
branch events 100,000 

Bank of Boston for community outreach 

150,000 

New England Telephone, to advance Library's 
technological capabilites 250,000 

Raytheon Corporation, for additional tech- 
nologies 150,000 

Associates of the Boston Public Library, for 
restoration of John Singer Sargent murals 

10,000 

Other gifts in support of McKim restoration: 

John Hancock Mutual Insurance Company 

150,000 

Gillette Company 125,000 

Polaroid 50,000 

The New England 20,000 



Volunteers 



In FY92 people continued to be the centerpiece of 
the Library's collection building and services: the 
people who read and who attend programs; the 
Library staff; members of support and fund-seeking 
organizations; and staff of area colleges and univer- 



24 



Monetary Gifts 

This is a selective listing of gifts of $1,000 and 
more. The full listing of all gifts has been fully 
recorded and ackowledged by the Research Library. 



Fred Allen Fund 


$500,000.00 


Antiquarian Booksellers Association 




of America 


1,250.00 


Associates of the Boston Public 




Library 


32,178.00 


The Boston Foundation 


1,451.00 


J. Linzes Coolidge 


25,000.00 


Fiduciary Charitable Foundation 


3,000.00 


Bradford Field and Lee Bottome 




Story Foundation 


2,400.00 


Mrs. Berthe' M. Gaines, Trustee 




Boston Public Library 


1,000.00 


Estate of Dorothy Elizabeth Green 


3,166.00 


Octavia Hirschman 


1,000.00 


Aime S. Howells Charitable Trust 


5,000.00 


Jingo Foundation 


10,000.00 


Payne Fund, Inc. 


3,500.00 


Barbara Lee Pindar Smith 


2,500.00 


Stephen and Sybil Stone Foundation 


3,500.00 


Eleanor M. Tate 


1,000.00 


Time, Inc. Book Co. 


1,100.00 


Total 


$597,045.00 



Approximately $7,000.00 in additional gifts under 
$1,000.00 were received. A sizeable portion of all 
money gifts received this year ($23,100) w^as 
specified for the Print Department General Fund, 
for the purchase of works by Boston artists, or for 
publication of catalogues. 



Friends of Branch 
Libraries 

In FY 92 the number of Friends groups in branch 
libraries reached 21 of the 25 branches. Dedicated 
to strengthening neighborhood libraries and 
reachout to the communities, they developed 
many imaginative shapes for their goals. A 
sampling; 

A "funky" auction of everything from bird cages 
to pizzas (Faneuil). 

A children's fair with pony rides and clowns 
(Fields Corner). 

A car wash for fundraising (South End). 

A town meeting on "AIDS in the Black Com- 
munity" (Codman Square). 

A bilingual (English/Spanish) open house (Con- 
nolly). 

Writing competitions (Hyde Park, West Rox- 
bury, and Egleston Square). 

The Friends groups were quintessential 
volunteers. They invested time and enthusiasm; 
they energized their neighbors to build a path for 
themselves and their children to their local library. 
They worked to put their libraries, not on a side 
road, but in the mainstream of people's lives. Pro- 
bably one of the best examples this year of a 
dynamic Friends group is Friends of Faneuil 
Branch. Their holiday party at the branch drew 350 
people; their celebration of the 50th birthday of 
Curious George involved 140 children. Houghton 
Mifflin donated Curious George books for the 
affair. 



Partners of the 
Boston Public 
Library 

Several significant groups of citizens have incor- 
porated to support Library objectives and to raise 
funds for that support. The methods of pursuing 
these objectives and their fund-raising for Library 
needs beyond tax-generated support varied from 
group to group, but their commitment, energy, and 
tirelessness are shared. 



City -Wide Friends 

True to their name, City-Wide Friends is a grass- 
roots organization that raises funds to benefit the 
entire Library system. This year the group con- 
tributed $7,000 to landscape the central library 
buildings in Copley Square and $2,000 to purchase 
puppets for a number of branch libraries. The funds 
are derived from monthly book sales held at the 
central library. The City-Wide Friends also spread 
the word, through media appearances and adver- 
tising, in advocacy of the needs of the Boston 
Public Library at times of budget crisis. 



23 



Associates of the 
Boston Public Library 

Each year the Associates add glitter to the very 
raison d'etre of hbraries, books and authors, with 
the Literary Lights dinner. In this year's event, a 
distinguished gathering of writers were in at- 
tendance. 

The Associates' main goals are fundraising for 
acquisition of special collections, publications, ex- 
hibitions, and guided art/architecture tours. In ad- 
dition to the Literary Lights dinner, the Associates 
sponsored a festive dinner in the Abbey Room of 
the McKim Building. "Una Cena E Una Festa 
Friulana" marked the 50th anniversary of the Print 
Department and coincided with the opening of a 
major exhibition in the Great Hall, "Micossi's 
Italy." The celebrated Italian printmaker, Mario 
Micossi, was the featured speaker at the dinner. 

This year the Associates contributed $10,000 to 
the Boston Public Library Foundation to assist in 
the restoration of the John Singer Sargent murals. 
The Associates also added a rare medieval il- 
luminated manuscript to the Rare Book and 
Manuscripts Department, Constitutiones Fratrum 
Celestinoium Piovincie Gallicane. 



Boston Public 
Library Foundation 

"This effort is not just about raising money. It's 
about getting people involved; people who care 
about the cultural well-being of this city, state, and 
region; people who appreciate the importance of 
this world-class institution." Speaking was John J. 
Cullinane, founder of Cullinet Software, Inc., 
whose plan was to establish a foundation charged 
with raising substantial funds for the Boston Public 
Library. In March 1992 the Trustees of the Boston 
Public Library announced the establishment of 
Cullmane's brainchild, the Boston Public Library 
Foundation. 

Joining Cullinane in the newly incorporated 
foundation is Karyn Wilson, former director of Cor- 
porate Contributions for Bank of Boston, to serve 
as full-time director, and John Larkin Thompson, 



former chairman and CEO of Blue Cross and Blue 
Shield, as chairman. (See end for listing of members 
of Foundation Board.) 

With the immediate goal of raising $16 million 
to assist in Phases II and III of the McKim restora- 
tion, the Foundation moved dramatically forward 
in the first seven months to raise more than $3 
million. Among the contributions this first year of 
the Foundation: 

Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund, for restoration 
of the McKim building foyer $1,000,000 

Baring Brothers Foundation, London, England, in 
the name of early benefactor Joshua Bates 

50,000 

Houghton Mifflin Company for establishment of 
a Special Collections Reading Room in McKim 
building built around Alice M. Jordan Col- 
lection 100,000 

Shawmut Bank for restoration projects and 
branch events 100,000 

Bank of Boston for community outreach 

150,000 

New England Telephone, to advance Library's 
technological capabilites 250,000 

Raytheon Corporation, for additional tech- 
nologies 150,000 

Associates of the Boston Public Library, for 
restoration of John Singer Sargent murals 

10,000 

Other gifts in support of McKim restoration: 

John Hancock Mutual Insurance Company 

150,000 

Gillette Company 125,000 

Polaroid 50,000 

The New England 20,000 



Volunteers 



In FY92 people continued to be the centerpiece of 
the Library's collection building and services: the 
people who read and who attend programs; the 
Library staff; members of support and fimd-seeking 
organizations; and staff of area colleges and univer- 



24 




Volunteer Tour Guide leads visitors through the Abbey Room. 



sities and organizations. People significant in the 
effective functioning of the Library are volunteers, 
many giving their time in the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment, the Print Department, and other areas. 

Notable among volunteers are members of the 
Tour Guide Program. Initially developed by the 
Junior League of Boston under a four-year grant 
from 1987 to 1991 and subsequently assumed by 
the Library with support from the Associates, the 
volunteers offer several tours a week on the Art 
and Architecture of the Boston Public Library. In 
FY92, 43 professionally trained volunteers gave a 
total of 1,522 hours for scheduled and special tours, 
instruction, and other support for special events 
and mailings. 

One tour guide reflects the enthusiasm of many 
of her associate volunteers: "Ever since the day I 
walked into 'the people's palace,' the Boston Public 
Library has had a tremendous influence on my life. 
To me, the Library is not just a collection of books; 
it's a wonderful resource for all the people of 
Massachusetts. I love being a Library tour guide." 



Partners in 
Programming 

Ideas are shared, inventions are generated, interac- 
tions of people take place, prejudices are thrown 
away, lights of understanding shine forth. In all 
these chemistries of mind and spirit, the printed 
word in the Library is important. Just as important 
are the specialists and experts, the teachers and per- 
formers who bring their learning and their talents 
to Library lecture halls and stages. 

This year the "partners in programming," the 
collaborators in Library programs, lectures, con- 
certs, exhibits, and demonstrations read like a 
Who's Who in universities, businesses, agencies, 
clubs, and the like. They range from Allston 
Veterans of Foreign Wars to Black Folks Theater 
Company to the Children's Museum to the 
Massachusetts Port Authority. Virtually hundreds 
of such groups contribute magnificently to the 
Library, quintessential volunteers. 



25 



A Concluding 
Observation 



This report commenced with Senator Bulger's 
reference to the diverse constituencies served by 
the Library: People, all kinds of people with vary- 
ing interests and goals. One person who moved 
from one constituency to another deserves par- 
ticular mention. Michael Brennan described 
himself as homeless. "Since high school," he said, 
"addiction had taken me from mean streets to 



detoxes, to psychiatric wards, and finally to 
prison." 

By FY92, Michael Brennan was spending his 
nights at a shelter for the homeless or in a burying 
ground and his days among the books of the Boston 
Public Library. He vowed to become a writer and 
noted: "The Library was to be my school; the books 
my curriculum." 

Michael Brennan knew he had started on his 
chosen road as author this year when he sold his 
first article to the Boston Globe. He credited the 
Library for the "information, the inspiration, and 
the contemplative refuge. Without them, I simply 
couldn't have done what I did." 



26 



Committees, 
Councils, 
and Boards 

as of June 30, 1992 

Trustees of the Public Library 
of tlie City of Boston 

The Boston PubUc Library's 
Governing Board is comprised 
of the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Boston 
who, by virtue of St. 1878, 
c. 144 constitute a nonprofit 
educational corporation. 

Appointing Authority; The 
Honorable Raymond L. Flynn, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Trustees 

William M. Bulger, President 

Arthur F. F. Snyder, Vice 

President 

Robert W. Consalvo 

Berthe' M. Gaines 

William O. Taylor 

Clerk of the Corporation 

Jamie A. McGlone 

Director and Librarian 

Arthur Curley 



Associates of the Boston 
Public Library 
Officers and Directors 

Arthur F. F. Snyder, Chairman 
Stan M. Godoff, Vice Chair 
Bettina Norton, Vice Chair 
Linda Lago-Katz, Treasurer 
Ann Sargent, Secretary 
Paul Buttenwieser 
feffery Cohen 
Joanna Datillo 
Cynthia D. Fleming 
George Gibson 
Kenneth M. Gloss 



Marjie B. Kargman 
George Lewis, Jr. 
Donald E. Lowrey 
Elaine Rosenfeld 
Karen Rotenberg 
Donald Saunders 
John W. Sears 
John S. Sedgwick 
Janet H. Spitz 



Boston Public Library 

Foundation 

Officers and Directors 

John Larkin Thompson, 

Chairman 

John J. Cullinane, President 

Richard M. Harter, Esq., Clerk 

Karyn M. Wilson, Director and 

Treasurer 

Leo R. Breitman 

Robin A. Brown 

Stephen L. Brown 

James F. Cleary 

S. James Coppersmith 

Diddy Cullinane 

James A. Daley 

Nader F. Darehshori 

Lawrence S. Dicara, Esq. 

Gerard F. Doherty, Esq. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Katherine W. Fanning 

Robert P. Fitzgerald 

Robert B. Eraser, Esq. 

Carol R. Goldberg 

Robert J. Haynes 

Alice Hennessey 

Arnold Hiatt 

Ronald Homer 

Jackie Jenkins-Scott 

Elizabeth B. Johnson 

Alan LeBovidge 

Peter S. Lynch 

George Macomber 

Thomas P. McDermott 

Gerald T. Mulligan 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Kevin C. Phelan 

David E. Place, Esq. 

Bernard W. Reznicek 

Neil R. Rudenstine 

Jeffrey B. Rudman, Esq. 



Arthur F. F. Snyder 
Micho F. Spring 
Ira Stepanian 
Earl Tate 

William O. Taylor 
William C. Van Faasen 
Norman M. Wallack 
Robert E. Wise, M.D. 



Friends of the Boston Public 
Library 

City-Wide Friends Committee 
Donald Oakes, Chairperson 

Friends of the Brighton Branch 

Library 

Olive Silva, President 

Friends of the Charlestown 

Branch Library 

Joanne Massarro, President 

Friends of the Codman Square 

Branch Library 

Jay Larson, President 

Friends of the Connolly 
Branch Library 
Barbara Ernst-DiGennaro, 
President 

Friends of the Dudley Branch 

Library 

Josephine Brown, President 

Friends of the East Boston 

Branch Library 

Helen Howley, President 

Friends of the Egleston Square 

Branch Library 

Sister Mary Cahill, President 

Friends of the Faneuil Branch 

Library 

Debbie Lowe, President 

Friends of the Fields Corner 

Branch Library 

Ed Greary, President 

Friends of the Hyde Park 

Branch Library 

Charlotte Halloran, President 

Friends of the famaica Plain 
Branch library 
Connie Egan, President 



27 



Friends of the Lower Mills 

Branch Library 

Ed Hansbury, Secretary 

Friends of the Mattapan 
Branch Library 
Beverly Olson, President 

Friends of the North End 

Branch Library 

Armando Giampa, President 

Friends of the Parker Hill 

Branch Library 

Marsha Watson, President 

Friends of the Roslindale 
Branch Library 
Joan Byrne, President 

Friends of the South Boston 

Branch Library 

Edward L. Sweda, Jr., President 

Friends of the South End 
Branch Library 
Gail Ide, President 

Friends of the Uphams Corner 

Branch Library 

Dr. Alan Fizer, President 

Friends of the West End 

Branch Library 

Anne T. Barron, President 

Friends of the West Roxbury 
Branch Library 

Gary Strickhartz, Co-President 
Ron Gwiazda, Co-President 



Massachusetts Newspaper 
Program 

Advisory Committee 
Rodney Armstrong 
Bernard Bailyn 
Winifred E. Bernhard 
John Coykendall 
Ralph J. Crandall 
Ellen Dunlap 
William Ketter 
John Laucus 
Michael G. Miller 
Thomas O'Connor 
B. Joseph O'Neil 
Claire Quintal 
William O. Taylor 
Louis L. Tucker 



Technical Committee 

Nat Bunker 
Robert Cunningham 
Ed Fremd 
Charles Longley 
Bobbie Myles 
Joyce Tracy 



Advisory Committee on 
Library Services to Deaf and 
Hard-of-Hearing People 

Jeanne Abrons 
Nancy Becker 
Sally Beecher 
Cathy Clancy 
Patrice DiNatale 
Kevin Donahue 
David Frank 
Paula Hayes 
Jean Healey 
Kathleen Hegarty 
Sr. Bernadette Kenney 
Reginald Krystyniak 
Cathy Mylotte 
Sandy Resnick 
Brenda Schertz 



Advisory Committee on Com- 
puter Technology for Persons 
with Disabilities 

Marsha Bennett 
Kim Charlson 
Daniel Coomber 
Tim Cummings 
Gerald DiFranzia 
Gloria Evans 
Albert Gayzagian 
Kathleen Fiegarty 
Patricia Hill 
Millie Hilliard 
Leslie Langlois 
Jery LaRusso 
Jamal Mazrui 
Cecilia Ojoawo 
John Oliveira 



28 



Library Resources 

The Boston Public Library Annual Report FY92 



General Book Collections 

Volumes 6,132,245 

Special Collections 

Rare Books and Manuscripts 1,257,929 

Prints 1,218,955 

Patents 9,634,370 

Maps 340,149 

Government Documents 2,743,210 

Musical Scores 104,977 

Periodicals 

Current Subscriptions 16,777 

Non-Print Materials 

Audio-Recordings 332,779 

Films & Video Cassettes 17,923 

Pictorial Works 1,892,362 

Microforms 4,794,166 

28,485,842 



Library Use 



Visitors 2,197,032 

Programs 5,096 

Program Attendance 170,992 

Items Borrowed 2,306,407 

Volumes Consulted 985,236 

Reference Inquiries 1,227,998 

Photocopies 1,420,000 



29 



Library Expenditures 

The Boston Public Library Annual Report FY92 



Library Expenditures FY89 FY90 FY91 FY92 

A. Salaries and Wages: 

City of Boston $14,087,657.00 $14,040,104.00 $14,108,404.00 $13,585,568.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

State Aid 191,527.00 197,535.00 

Eastern Regional Library 

System 1,353,318.00 1,197,085.00 1,205,655.00 1,113,240.00 

Library of Last Recourse 1,685,958.00 1,582,391.00 1,896,831.00 1,823,820.00 

Federal, State, and Private 

Grants 89,913.00 309,153.00 333,454.00 148,314.00 

Total Salaries: $17,408,373.00 $17,326,268.00 $17,544,344.00 $16,670,942.00 

B. Books and Other Library 
Materials: 

City of Boston $2,372,978.00 $2,721,258.00 $2,565,034.00 $2,250,132.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Eastern Regional Library 

System 1,196,476.00 1,219,040.00 928,446.00 1,011,745.00 

Library of Last Recourse 1,867,962.00 1,949,982.00 2,233,730.00 2,365,061.00 

Other State Aid 330,456.00 330,500.00 337,071.00 172,186.00 

Trust Fund Income 193,911.00 187,258.00 245,792.00 360,047.00 

Federal Grants 138,551.00 139,074.00 68,310.00 46,329.00 

Total Books and Other Library 

Materials: $6,100,334.00 $6,547,112.00 $6,378,383.00 $6,205,500.00 

C. All Other Expenses: 

City of Boston $ 2,871,479.00 $ 2,999,423.00 $ 2,915,464.00 $ 2, 855,407.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Eastern Regional Library 

System 670,380.00 804,071.00 875,736.00 849,252.00 

Library of Last Recourse 583,920.00 392,752.00 334,432.00 

Other State Aid 195,510.00 394,302.00 

Trust Fund Income 21,790.00 140,983.00 128,322.00 423,401.00 

Federal, State, and Private 

Grants 81,802.00 263,339.00 245,789.00 146,392.00 

Total Other: $ 3,645,451.00 $ 4,791,738.00 $ 4,753,573.00 $ 5,003,186.00 

Grand Total (A, B, and C): $27,154,159.00 $28,665,118.00 $28,676,300.00 $27,879,628.00 



31 



BOSTON 



PUBLIC LIBRARJ' 



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