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Full text of "Annual report, [1st]- [1896/97]-"

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CAPT. SAMUEL FLINT 

AND 

WILLIAM FLINT 

BY D. WEBSTER KING 

WITH THE 

THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PEABODY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
1908 — 1909. 



INCORPORATED AUGUST 15, 1896. 



-Zv' 



Gift 
The Society 

S 0'09 






CAPTAIN SAMUEL FLINT 

AND 

WILLIAM FLINT. 

BY D. WEBSTER KING. 



READ BEFORE THE PEABODY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 19th APRIL, iJ 



Of the Flints who served in the War of the Revolution, history records 
but two as citizens of Dauvers, Samuel and William. These were descend- 
ants respectively of two brothers, Thomas and William, who emigrated to 
Salem probably previous to 1640. It is apparently well established that they 
came from the maritime town of Flint, Flintshire, in the extreme northern 
portion of Wales. 

On the rocky coast close by the shore, stand the ruins of the ancient 
castle of Flint, said to have been built by Edward the First. This castle is 
historic as being the place where Percy betrayed Richard II to Bolingbroke 
in 1399, who put him in the tower of Loudon, where he died. It is not said 
of what disease or if he had medical attendance. Let us hope that he died 
of natural causes. After the death of Richard, Bolingbroke was crowned as 
Henry IV, King of England. In 1643 the castle surrendered to the 
Roundheads and four years after, was dismantled by order of the House of 
Commons. The old castle ruins even now show it to have been no mean cit- 
adel, but a strong fortress of defence, with a moat and other preparations 
for resolute resistance. Mr. David B. Flint of Boston, one of the descend- 
ants of Thomas Flint, has in his possession a fine old painting of 
this old castle. It was said to have been the abode of those who 
were likely to be in rebellion against the government of the times. These 
were evidently in favor of Free Trade and had no marked respect for 
the revenue of the Crown. Surely they were not high Protectionists. The 
railroad from Chester to Holyhead runs very near to the ruins, a huge 
pile of rocks, the only ruins of the kind on the coast. The town was 
once a flourishing seaport, but like many others the old harbor has been 
filled with sand so that it now only has a depth for small vessels. 



Without doubt the early ancestors of Thomas and William Flint were a 
hardy set, full well accustomed to warfare of the roughest andbloodiestkind. 

Whatever may have been the degree of loyalty of the English ancestors, 
it is evident that their descendants in 1775 held slight respect for British 
rule. 

I have no record of Wm, Flint's connection with the Battle of Lexing- 
ton, but he was one of the soldiers from Danvers engaged in the Revolution- 
ary War, 

The actual date of the arrival of Thomas Flint in Salem is not known. 
The first mention made of him in the town Records of Salem was in 1650. He 
was among the first settlers in Salem Village, which embraced the original 
town of Danvers. His estates comprised land formerly belonging to the 
farms owned by the late Thomas Flint of Boston, and by the late Daniel P. 
King, situated in that part of Danvers now known as West Peabody. 

The original homestead built by this first emigrant was occupied by 
Thomas Flint, a prominent Boston merchant, as a summer residence, with 
his children and grandchildren at the time of its destruction by fire, June 
16th, 1874 ; the parties then occupying it, being of the 6th, 7th and 8th gener- 
atious. The estate is now (1898) owned by Wra. P. Upham, Esq. The 
emigrant's first son was Thomas, a farmer and a carpenter, who lived on the 
homestead. He was actively identified in the military organizations of the 
time. He was in King Phillip's War, and was wounded in the expedition 
against the Narragansetts in 1675. He afterward held several military com- 
missions, was an active promoter in establishing the church at Salem Vil- 
lage, and as an evidence of his prominence as a builder, he was selected to 
build the first meeting-house there. He married Ede, the daughter of Joseph 
and Mary Upton. His son Samuel was born in 1693 and inherited his fath- 
er's estate. He was Chairman of the Committee to petition the General 
Court that the village might be set off from Salem ; was one of the first Board 
of Selectmen of Danvers and throughout his life was much engaged in pub- 
lic service as an influential, useful and worthy citizen. 

Capt. Si-MUEi. Flint, second son of Samuel, was born April 9th,1733. He 
was in command of one of the seven companiesfrom Danvers which answered 
to their country's call in the hour of peril, April 19th, 1775. After this bat- 
tle it was reported that the action had been severe with much loss of life to 
the men from Danvers; the anxiety, the anguish and the dread of those 
hours of uncertainty have been too often repeated in our own generation and 
for like causes, to need emphasis in an audience like this. It was rumored 
that Capt. Flint was among the slain and his return to his family and friends 
was a joyful surprise. He was however destined to die a soldier's death. 
"For eight months he was engaged in the leaguer of Boston. On the 7th of 
October, 1777, at Stillwater, he was slain at the head of his company. It was 
one of the severest actions of the war and the last of the series which re- 
sulted in the capture of Ihirgoyne's army, the most decisive event in the 
momentous struggle. This was no false rumor. His friends received mel- 
ancholy tokens, which they could not mistake;" these were his belt, perfo- 



rated with a bullet and crimsoned with his heart's blood, also his sword and 
watch. An officer once asked him where he should find him ou a certain 
occasion. His reply was worthy the proudest days of Sparta; "Where the 
enemy is there will you find me." 

His first Lieutenant, Herrick, of Beverly, was killed in the same battle. 
Captain Flint was probably the only commissioned officer from Danvers, 
killed in the Revolution. The sword which he wore at the time of his death 
is now in my possession. It was preserved with great care until the original 
homestead, built by the first emigrant, Thomas Flint, about 1650, was de- 
stroyed by fire, June 16, 1874. It was taken from the cellar of the old house 
after the fire, in its present condition. I also have a sword which belonged 
to Capt. Samuel Flint but which was not carried at the battle of Stillwater, 
though it may have been carried at the battle of Lexington. This last weapon 
is in a much battered condition, having been to my certain knowledge the 
plaything of some of his descendants and used in vigorous onslaughts upon 
mulleins and other noxious weeds supposed for the time to be British sol- 
diery. 

Major Elijah Flint was the second son of Capt. Samuel Flint, and inher- 
ited the homestead. The third son, Capt. Hezekiah Flint, inherited that 
portion of the homestead afterward owned by Daniel P. King, and built the 
house now standing there and owned by Captain George W. Taylor. In early 
life he quitted the occupation of farmer to engage in the more active em- 
ployment of a mariner. He made many voyages as Master to Denmark, 
Sweden and Kussia, also to the West Indies. When in command of the 
schooner "Scynthia" in 1794, he was captured on a voyage from the Wind- 
ward Islands by a Bermudian Privateer who put on board eight men and took 
out the mate and three seamen belonging to the schooner, leaving on board, 
of the original crew, only Capt. Flint and his carpenter. They succeeded, 
when the Privateers were below deck, in nailing down the hatchways, thug 
confining the prize master and his men in the cabin, while he and his com- 
panion, after 14 days passage, brought the schooner to Martha's Vineyard. 
In the meantime they were compelled to sleep on deck. He thus illustrated 
that he possessed the energy and characteristics of his father. 

Capt. Hezekiah Flint married Sally Putnam, the daughter of Tarrant 
and Sarah (Page) Putnam. Tarrant Putnam was born in Danvers, Feb. 8th, 
1743, and was graduated at Harvard College in 1763. He was one of the 
minute-men engaged in the Battle of Lexington in the company under the 
command of Deacon Edmond Putnam. He was Ensign in the same company 
and afterwards Adjutant in the army, and died of disease which he con- 
tracted in the service. Sarah, the wife of Tarrant Putnam, was daughter of 
Col. Jeremiah Page of Danvers, also of Revolutionary fame. 

Hezekiah Flint's daughter, Sarah Page, married Daniel Putnam King, 
and their children and grandchildren are his only descendants. 



THE BATTLE OF STILLWATER. 



The engagements preceding the surrender of Burgoyne, October 17, 1777, 
equally well known as the first and second battles of "Stillwater," "Bemis' 
Heights," "Freeman's Farm," or "Saratoga," occurred on September 19, and 
October 7, 1777. 

Many Massachusetts men were present; among them. Captain Samuel 
Flint, from our own town, who lost his life at this time. 

The Broadside, describing the first battle of Stillwater, was therefore of 
special interest to the relatives and friends of soldiers from this vicinity. It 
was preserved in the family of Nathaniel and Rebecca (Harwood) Newhall, 
and passed through their daughter Sally, who married Jacob Galeucia, to 
their daughter Charity Bancroft, whose daughter, Elizabeth O. Bancroft, pre- 
sented it to the Historical Society. 

The Broadside was printed by Ezekiel Russell, the first printer in Dan- 
vers, in the Bell Tavern, on the south east corner of what is now Washington 
and Main streets.^f"!'^ civ. 

Frefh ADVICES from the Nobthern 
ARMY. 

DANVERS, Friday, September 27, 1777. 
Twelve o'clock at Noon. We are favored by 
New-Hampf hire Exprefs, with the following im- 
portant Hand-bill, publifhed by Authority at 
Boston this Morning. 

BOSTON, September 26, 1777. 
Laft Evening a Gentleman arrived here from Pro- 
vidence, by whom we are favored with the following: 

PROVIDENCE, September 25, 1777. 
The following Intelligence was laft Night received 
here, in a Hand-Bill from Connecticut. 

Norwich, Tuofday Evening, 7 o'Clock 
In Council at Lebanon, Sept. 23. 
By Ml-. Brown, this Moment arrived from the Nor- 
thern Army, wo have the following authen- 
tic INTELLIGENCE. 

8 



/^N Friday the 19tli Inft. the American army lay en- 
camped four miles above Stillwater, on Behraus's 
heifjlits, the weft fide of Hudfon's River; the enemy at 
Van Veghten's mills, feven miles north. At one o'clock, 
P. M. the advanced guard of our army, compofed of 
Morgan's corps of rifllemen from Virginia, and detachments 
from the other corps ported about one mile and a half 
in front of the army, were attacked by three regiments 
of Britifh troops, and after an obftinate difpute obliged 
the enemy to give way, with confiderable lofs. At 
three o'clock, the enemy being reinforced, renewed the 
attack ; our troops being at the fame time fupported 
by the left wing of the army, confifting of the whole of 
General Arnold's divifion received them warmly; and 
though the enemy brought on their whole force, againft 
not more than half ours, maintained their ground until 
night, when both parties retired. 

The lofs of the enemy, killed, wounded and prifo- 
ners (who are about fifty) amounts to near a thou- 
fand. Our killed are one hundred, wounded one 
hundred and fifty, prifoners none. The enemy had 
two pieces of artillery in the action, one of which was 
taken by us, and retaken four different times, the enemy 
finally keeping it. 

A general engagement was expected the next day, but 
did not take place. Deferters fay that Gen. Burgoyne 
is wounded in the fmall of his back. They likewise fay 
that they were informed in general orders that Gen. 
Lincoln had arrived at Fort Edward with fix thoufand 
men, by which all hope of retreat being cut off, it re- 
mained for them only to conquer or perifh. 

A detachment of 500 men were fent, the 13th, from 
General Lincoln's divifion, lying then at Paulet, near 
Skeenfboro, under the command of Colonel Brown, to 
attack the enemy at the landing of Lake George, 3 miles 
from Ticonderoga, with a view to retake our prifoners 
and deftroy the enemy's ftores: Another detachment of 
equal number, under the command of Colonel Johnfton, 
marched the fame day for Mount Independence, to 
divert the enemy's attention from Colonel Brown: thefe 
parties have orders (if they find it practicable) to attack 
Ticonderoga and the Mount, and endeavor to poffefs 
themfelves of them. Colonel Woodbridge, with an 
equal detachment marched at the fame time for 
Skeenfborough, Fort-Ann, and Fort Edward : all 



which places the enemy had evacuated, and collected 
their whole force at the grand army. 

The day after the action near Stillwater, General 
Gates was joined by two hundred Oneida Indians, who, 
with the riflemen, were detached the evening of the 
20th, to give information of the enemy's fituation, and 
to attack their out pofts. The whole army expected 
to follow them early the 21ft. 

Lieutenant-Colonels Adams and Colbourn of our 
troops were killed, and feveral other officers of inferior 
rank. The militia from this State were in the action, 
and it is with pleasure we ai'e informed, that they be- 
haved on the occafion with a bravery becoming 
FKEKUEN. Publifhed by order of the Council. 



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BROADSIDE 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OK THE 

PEABODY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

INCORPORATED AUGUST 15th, 1896. 



OFFICERS, 1908-1909. 

President - - - Wm. Armstrong 

1st Vice President - - Jefferson K. Cole 

2nd Vice President - - Willard W. Woodman 

Treasurer ... Sylvanus L. Newhall 

Assistant Treasurer - - Helen C. Allen 

Recording Secretary - - Mary A. Forness 

Corresponding Secretary - Mrs. Elizabeth C. Osborn 

Curator .... Mary A. Osborn 

Librarian ... Mrs. Elizareth C. Osborn 

Chairman Hospitality Com. - Mrs. Alice C. Osborn 

DIRECTORS. 

Daniel H. Felton, Lyman P. Osborn, P. H. O'Conor, 

Rev. Geo. W. Penniman, Mrs. Nancy J. Moulton, Mrs. J. J. Thorndike 

Richards B. Mackintosh, Mrs. Jos. G. Porter, Albert Robinson. 



DELEGATE TO THE BAY STATE HISTORICAL LEAGUE, 
Thomas Carroll. 



REGULAR MEETINGS, 1908-1909. 

1908. 
May 6. The Annual Meeting of the Society was held ; after which fol- 
lowed the reading of a Paper on the "Old Proctor Tavern Sign," 
by Mrs. Mehitable C. (Proctor) Baxter, of Portland, Me. Mrs. Bax- 
ter had recently presented this old sign to the Society. The paper 
was a most interesting story of the old Tavern and its inmates, the 

9 



Proctor Family, from the earliest immigrants in 1635 until 1851. 
The Hon. James P. Baxter of the N. E. Hist, and Gen. Society of 
Boston, then spoke of the importance of the historical material 
in this vicinity, maintaining that as tlie relation of Paris to France, 
so is that of Massachusetts to the United States. Miss Sarah J. C. 
Needham spoke along the same Hue. A vote of thanks was passed 
to the retiring officers; a social hour followed and light refresh- 
ments were served. 

Nov. 10. The regular quarterly meeting of the Society was held, through 
the courtesy of the School Committee, at the High School Hall, 
when the Kev. G. W. Penuiman gave his most interesting lecture 
on "Old Colonial Music," which was illustrated by a chorus under 
the direction of Mrs. Susan L. Ferguson, assisted by Mrs. Herbert 
H. Buxton at the piano and Mr. Alvah J. Kelley with the bass viol. 
Mr. Penniman was introduced by the President, Mr. Armstrong, 
and gave a history of the evolution of church music in this coun- 
try from the time of the early Puritans, when nothing but psalms 
were allowed to be sung in the churches. The Chorus rendered a 
number of the old hymns to the great delight of the audience, and 
Mrs. Ferguson gave an illustration of the "lining out" of the hymns 
which was greatly enjoyed. 

The hymns selected to illustrate Mr. Penniman's lecture were: 
Invitation, Greenwich, Denmark, Easter Anthem, Emanuel, Rose 
of Sharon, David's Lamention, Austria, New Bethlehem, Corona- 
tion, Chester, and the Pilgrim's Farewell. The members of the 
chorus who spent several weeks in preparation, and to whom the 
sincere thanks of the Society are also due, are: Mrs. Alice Ducey 
McKenney, Mrs. G. W. Penniman, Miss Eva D. Raddin, Miss Nel- 
lie McCarthy, Miss Mary Hall Poole, Mrs. Ida A. Bushby, Miss 
Bessie Tigh, Mrs. Alice L. Woodman, Mrs. Margaret Galloupe, 
Miss Ethel Trask, Richards B. Mackintosh, Nathan Poor, Geo. A. 
Bursley, Roger C. Merrill, and Henry A. Lord. 

1909. 
Fob. 3. Tlio next quarterly meeting was held, at which President Arm- 
strong gave a talk on the "Merchant Marine." This was one of the 
most instructive as well as entertaining lectures ever given before 
the Society, tracing the history of the Merchant Marine from 1800, 
when we had as large a one as any country, to the present when we 
have practically none, our commerce being all carried on by means 
of foreign vessels. He made an earnest plea for the establishment 
of a larger Merchant Marine by the passage of the Ship Subsidy 
Bill, which has been tlie subject of much contention in Congress. 

At the close of the lecture Mr. Armstrong presented the Society 
with an official copy of the "Proceedings at the Final Interment of 
John Paul Jones at Annapolis." This was much appreciated by 
the Society, and a vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Armstrong at 
the close of his lecture. A social hour followed and light refresh- 
ments were served. 

Mc.h. 10. A meeting was held in the Masonic Banquet Hall at which Mr. 
George Francis Dow of Topsfield, the Secretary of the Essex In- 
stitute, gave a most delightful lecture on the "Ipswich or Agawam 
River." Tliis lecture was most profusely illustrated by stereop- 
ticon views of the country through wliich the river Hows. Mr. 
Dow described a canoe trip down the river and noticed particularly 

10 



the various bridges spanning it, many of which were of special 
interest. 

After a vote of thanks to Mr. Dow, the company adjourned to 
tlie rooms of the Society where light refreshments were served. 

April 19. The matter of decorating with flags the graves of the Kevolu- 
tionary Soldiers in town, which has always been done on April 19 
by the Society, has this year been given over to the members of the 
S. A. R., who have furnished the flags and will decorate the graves 
on Memorial Day. The Betsy Ross flags with thirteen stars will be 
used. Buff and blue ribbon streamers for the flags have been fur- 
nished by the Bethia Southwick Chapter Mass. D. R. 

A meeting of the Society was held on the evening of April 19, 
at which Mr. Sidney Parley of Salem, Editor of the Essex Antiqua- 
rian, gave a most interesting lectiire on "Town House Scjuare, Sa- 
lem." This lecture was the second of a series; the first, on the "Set- 
tlement of Salem," having been given before the Society last year. 
This lecture was illustrated by blackboard sketches. Mr. Perley 
spoke of the house of Mr. Higginson, the first preaclier in the First 
Church, which was afterv/ards bought by Roger Williams. He 
told of the trouble with Roger Williams, resulting in his banish- 
ment, and with the Quakers. He also spoke of the Witchcraft 
times, and mentioned particularly the houses of two of the Judges 
and spoke of the important part the Court House on this Square 
always played. At the close, remarks were made by Mr. Amr- 
strong, Mr. Penniman and others. 



NEW MEMBERS. 



April 19, 1909. 

Albert H. Whidden, 
Mrs. Helen E. Whidden. 



May 5, 1909. 

Albert W. Dennis, 
Mrs. Harriet C. Dennis. 



NECROLOGY. 



Mary Ellen Crane, 

Nathaniel Ward Felton, 

Bennett Blake Humphrey, 

Mrs. Caroline (Poor) Hutchinson, 

Amos Merrill, 

Abbie Morrill Stimson, 

Mrs. Georgie Stanley (Hart) Weed, 

Sophia Wilhemina Wheeler, 



born Dec. 3, 1831, died March 25, 1909 
Nov. 25, 1823, " Nov. 25, 1908 



April 11,1838, 
Sept. 8, 1839, 
Nov. 15, 1820, 
Jan. 24, 1841, 
Aug. 2, 1863, 
April 22, 1834, 



July 

April 

April 

April 

Aug. 



3, 1908 
2, 1909 
27, 1909 
26, 11109 
31, 1908 



April 22, 1909 
Mary A. Forness, Rec. Sec. 



11 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



The Treasurer of the Peabody Historical Society respectfully submits the 

followiug report for the year ending May 1, 1909: 
May 1, 1908. Amount in hands of Treasurer, 

Received for Admissions and Dues, 
From sale of Post Cards, 
From sale of Vital Statistics of 

Danvers, 
Interest from Warren F. C. S. Bank, 
From town for April 19, 1909, 
From Sons of Am. Revolution, for 

flags for soldier's graves. 
For Colonial colors buff and blue 
ribbon from BethiaSouthwick 
Chap. Mass. D. R. 



$188.22 

143.25 

45.20 

4.25 
3.64 
5.00 

4.35 



2.20 



SAMUEL 8TIMP80N FUND. 



Deposit in Warren Five Cents Savings Bank, 
Interest to Nov., 1908, undrav?n, 



$1,000.00 
40.40 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND. 



Deposit in Warren Five Cents Savings Bank, 

Received of Mrs. M. C. P. Baxter, 
Interest on same to Nov., 1908, 



25.00 
.25 



$396.01 



1,040.40 



25.25 



Paid Rent, 1 year to April 1, 1909, $150.00 

Electric Light, 1 year to April 1, 1909, 5.58 

Electric Lamp, .70 

Insurance, 1 year, 12.50 

Bill of Entertainment Committee, refreshments, 1.55 

Dues to Bay State Historical League, 1 year, 2.00 

Lantern Operator, 5.00 

Expressage from and to Beverly, 1.00 

Munroe & Arnold's Express, expressing, 1.00 

American Express, expressing, .90 
4 dozen Flags for graves of Revolutionary Soldiers, 4.00 

Washing floor in room, 1.00 

Envelopes for Reports, 1.35 

One quire Envelopes printed, .25 

Postage on Annual Reports, 1.25 
November meeting, paid Alvah Kelley for Bass 

Viol accompaniment, 5.00 

Mr. Collins and Mr. Teague, 2.00 

Decorating Lexington Monument, 19th April, 5.00 

Printing Post Cards, 11.26 

" Due Circulars, 1.50 

" 300 Copies Eleventh Annual Report, 18.00 

" 300 Copies Twelfth Annual Report, 27.75 

" Post Cards, 4.50 

Envelopes for Due Circulars, 2.13 

BufI' and Blue Ribbon, 2.20 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, 128.60 



$396.01 



12 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND. 

Withdrawn and deposited in general account, .25 

Balance, 25.00 

$25.25 



All of the above is respectfully submitted by the Treasurer. 

Sylvanus L. Newhall, Treas. 
Peabody, May 5, 1909. 



REPORT OF CORRESPONDING SECRETARY AND 
LIBRARIAN. 

Invitations have been received by the Society to attend the following 
meetings: 

1908. 
June 30. The Essex Institute entertained the Bay State Historical League* 
The President, Gen'l Appletou, gave an address of welcome; lunch 
was served at the Willows, and Professor Morse gave au address in 
the afternoon at the Peabody Museum of Science. 

Nov. 19. The Old Planters' Society met at the Massachusetts Historical 
Society Building, Boston, where a Paper on "The Settlers About 
Boston Bay prior to 1630," was read by Miss Lucie M. Gardner. 

Dec. 5. The Lynn Historical Society entertained the Bay State Historical 
League, the subject of the day being, "What can be done to broaden 
the interest in local Societies?" It was suggested that although 
we may not all of us become Sons or Daughters of the American 
Revolution, there is a possibility of becoming Sons or Daughters 
of the American Evolution. Many interesting speakers were heard, 
among them Mr. Howard Mudge Newhall, Secretary of the Lynn 
Society, whose recent death seems a personal loss to all who know 
him. The special thought urged by the President, Mr. Eddy, and 
other speakers, was that each Society should encourage the rcj>re- 
sentation of the Town's history in tableaux, plays or better still, 
by Pageant after the manner of the Celebrations of Danvers in 1852 
and 1856. This would prove a reminder to the descendants of the 
early settlers and an education to our new citizens. 

Dec. 9. The Massachusetts Historical Society commemorated the birth 
of John Milton at the First Church in Boston with a most impres- 
sive service. 

1909. 
Mar. 25. The Old Planters' Society held its meeting in Salem, when an ad- 
dress was given by the Rev. Peter H. Goldsmith, D. D., on "The 
New England Minister of Early Puritan Communities." 

These invitations have been accepted and enjoyed by the follow- 
ing members: Mr. Thomas Carroll, Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Osborn, 
Mr. Woodman, Miss Allen, Mrs. Foster, Miss Trask, Rev. Mr. Pen- 
niman, Mrs. E. C. Osborn and others. Notices of these invitations 
are announced in the News and further particulars may be obtained 
by the members of the Society, at the Rooms of the Society, or by 
corresponding with the Secretary. 

13 



The Society has beeu the recipient during the past year, of 57 
Bound Volumes, 58 pamphlets, 97 manuscripts, several Genealogical 
records, 30 articles for the cabinets or rooms, 61 sheets and pro- 
grams, 17 coins, pictures, stamps, newspaper clippings, etc., etc.; 
the gifts of 30 members and 13 friends. The number in our acces- 
sion book has now reached 3388. 

In response to the published classified list of our gifts the fol- 
lowing additions may be mentioned: A list of certain High School 
graduates, written by Mr. Amos Merril, one of our most interested 
friends; the new High School Magazine by Caleb Warner; a baton 
and sash worn at the George Peabody Reception in 1856, by Mrs. 
Mayhew Clark; The Memorial Book with the souvenir plate, by 
Jordan Lodge; an addition to our collection of Fire-buckets, by 
Mrs. Dolly Osborne; from the Benevolent Society a basket which 
has done good service for three generations; from Mr. Sydney 
Perley, copies of the Antiquarian containing illustrations to the 
interesting lectures he has given us on early Salem. Vol. 1 of "The 
Vital Statistics of Danvers," containing births 1752-1850, has been 
received and a limited number of copies are for sale. The literary 
side has been increased by the addition of a volume of verse by 
Mr. Ingraham, and the collection of the favorite quotations of 
many of our members and friends. The completion of a set of 
Farmer's Almanacs 1792-1909, is nearing an end with a goodly num- 
ber of still earlier date. Peabody newspapers have been donated, 
but many more are needed. The beginning of what we hope will 
be a large collection of interesting articles of wearing apparel or 
bits of hand work brought into town or made by our new citizens 
has been made by Mrs. Palmer, in the gift of a Swedish aporn. We 
have also been remembered by one of our townsmen who has made 
good progress in the navy, Mr. Michael Dillon, who brought home 
from the World's Tour of the Battleships, pieces of Philipi)ine 
money and bits of Japanese work. Some copies of old Deeds relat- 
ing to the Stimpson Bakery by Mr. Andrew Nichols, and other notes 
concerning the records by Mr. Jacob Osboru, are of practical value 
iu our work. Donations of Peabody newspapers and other publi- 
cations, are most needed and it is hoped will be greatly increased 
the coming year. 

One of the most valuable recognitions our Society has received, 
is from Mr. Bolton, Librarian of the Boston Athenaeum, who has 
been for many reasons interested in the life of Elizabeth Whitman. 
Mr. Bolton has finished a monogia])h the result of much historical 
research by one who has had years of experience. This manuscript, 
Mr. Bolton has oifered our Society to publish as being the appro- 
jiriate source for such a Paper. 

This will be iu a certain way a new departure, and a matter for 
special i)ride and gratitude from our Society as a whole. 

Exchange of Reports has been made with The Bay State His- 
torical League, The Boston Athaenum, Cambridge Historical So- 
ciety, Congressional liibrary, Danvers, Essex Institute, Ipswich, 
Leominster, Lynn, Maiden, Marblehead, and Massachusetts His- 
torical Societies; Massachusetts State Library, Sec'y of State of 
Masschusetts, New England Hist, and Gen. Society, New York 
Public Library, Norwood Historical Society, Old Planters' Society, 
Rhode Isl.iiid Historical Society, South Natick Historical Society, 
State Society of Wisconsin. 

The Rooms of the Society have been open to visitors every Mon- 
14 



day afternoon, from 2.30 to 5.00 o'clock, when the following list of 
members have acted as a Hospitality Committee: Miss Helen C. 
Allen, Mrs. Nancy J. Moulton, Mrs. Alice C. Osborn, Mrs. Alice L. 
Osborn, Mrs. Eliz. C. Osboni, Mrs. Annie S. Porter, Mrs. H. Maria 
Palmer, Mrs. Minnie A. Shanahau. 

Grateful acknowledgment is due the donors of the following 
articles, books, etc., connected in some way with the Pievolution. 
It is hoped that all omissions or errors will be brought to our at- 
tention. 



Gift 
Cannon Ball 

Lexington Battle 
Anniversary of 

Banner carried 

Bread taken 

Broadside of 

Bullet from 
Engraving of 

Accounts of, in 1875 



Photo of, Salem Gazette 
Secretary's Book of Dan- 
vers Lexington Monu- 
ment Committee 

"Gen. John Glover and his 
Reg't" 

"North Bridge of Salem," 
picture of 

"One Hundred Tears Ago" 

"Origin of the Stars and 
Stripes" 

"Origin of the Stars and 
Stripes" 

New York Herald, Extra edi- 
tion, 19 April, 1875 

Pewter Plate, of 

Pistol carried by 



DONOE 

Bryan Healey 
Mrs. M. O. Stevens 



Author 

from gravel pit, Low- 
ell St. 

Apr. 20, 1835, in South 
Ch urch 

Apr. 19, 1875, at Lex- 
ington G. A. R. 

Apr. 19, 1775, from 

British Clarissa Jacobs 

Apr. 19, 1775, by Salem 
Gazette Joseph Burbeck 

Apr. 19, 1775 Fred'k Lamson 

E. Tisdale, del. 

C. Tiebout, sculpt. Thomas Carroll 

Boston Advertiser, 

Boston Journal 

Dorchester Newsgath- 
erer 

Merrimac Valley Vis- 
tor 

Salem Register Adaline A. Little 

Apr. 25, 1775 Chas. A. Sanger 

Geo. Osborne, M. D. Geo. S. Osborne, M. D. 

Marblehead Marblehead Hist. Soc'y 

Feb. 26, 1775 Gen. F. H. Appleton 

Edward Everett Hale John Brown 

Adaline A. Little 

Chas. C. Hills 



Mcrritt Cook 
Sarah P. Foster 



Lt. Eben'rPeabody 
Rev. Isaac Morrill, 
Chaplain 
Pocket Book, marked 
"Constantinople and Amer- 
ican Liberties" July 2, 1775 
Program of Prospect Hill 

Dedication Somerville Hist. Soc'y Gen. F. H. Appleton 

"Prospect Hill Dedication" " " " Somerville Hist. Soc'y 



Samuel Stimpson 
Mrs. M. O. Stevens 



15 



Sketch in letter of Revo- 
lutionary times 

"Soldiers and Sailors of the 
Revolution" 

S. A. R. Record of Graves 
marked 

"Some Patriots of the Revo- 
lution" 

"Somerset," British Man o' 
War, Chip from 

"S. A. R. Membrship List" 

Southwick Home, photo, of 

Stillwater, Battle of, Broad- 
side of 
Sword carried by 

"Taxation" poem 
Washington, his acc't book 
His letters on Agriculture 
"Ancestry of" 
"Birthday Address," 1797 
"Birthday Address," 1862 
Broadside, OfMcial 
Button marked "G. W." 
"Long live the President" 
Clippings, his marriage 

and Valley Forge 
Damask from canopy of 

bed occupied by him 
"Eulogies and Orations," 

1800 
"Farewell Address," etc. 

for schools 
"Home at Mt. Vei-non" 
Memorial Sermons 
"National Testimonials," 

1800 
"Patriotic Addresses," 

1798 
Pitcher "Independence" 
Pitcher "Memorial" 
Portraits 

Death of 

Family of 

Lith. of G. W.& M.W. 

Head eng. from Mack- 
iiitire 

Head, medalion 
Ulster Co. Gazette with 

acc't of funeral of 
Ulster Co. Gazette with 

acc't of funeral of 
Ulster Co. Gazette with 

acc't of funeral of 
"Visit to Marblehead and 

Salem, 1789" 



Abner Sanger, Sr. 
Com. of Mass. 
S. A. R. 



S. A. R. 

orig. by Votin of Eng- 
land 

pr. at Bell Tavern 
Rev. Issac Morrill, 

Chaplain 
on Broadside 

fac-similie 

t( It 

Henry F. Waters 
Hon. Beuj. Pickman 
Rev. Geo. W. Briggs 
Crossing the Delaware 



Newbury port in 1789 

Com. of Mass. 1805 
Salem, Dec. 29, 1799 
Oliver Farnsworth 
J. W. Folsom 



Stuart, eng. by Hill 
Lith. by N. Currier 
Plu)tograi>h 
from Stuart 



fac-simile 



Mrs. D. P. Hudson 



Chas. A. Sanger 

Com. per B. F. Southw'k 

Robert H. Gowing 

Adaline A. Litlte 

G. Elmer Fowle 
Robert H. Gowing 

B. S. Chapter Mass. D.R. 

Eliz. O. Bancroft 

Samuel Stimpson 
S. H. Humphrey 
Henry H. Procter 
George S. Osborne, M.D. 
Chas. B. Farley 
Susanna Mills 

Adaline A. Little 

Daniel H. Felton 

Lucy L. Symonds 

Misses Philbrick 

Nellie M. Merrill 

George S. Osborne, M.D. 
E. C. Osborn 
Mary Ellen Crane 

Mrs. Isaac Drowne 

Geo. S. Osborne, M. D. 
Mrs. Isaac Wilson 
Sarah F. Kittredge 
Eliz. C. Kimball 
Eliz. C. Kimball 
E. C. Osborn 
Eliza S. Osborn 

Thomas Carroll 
Adaline A. Litttle 

Samuel Stimpson 

Mrs. H. K. Foster 

Paul Tibbetts 

Mrs. D. P. Hudson 



16 




•j^-iS^fe,. 



^^. 







TABLET ON GATE 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS OF DANVERS (NOW Peabody) 
WHOSE GRAVES HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED BY S. A. R. MARKERS. 



In Remembrance of the Revolutionary Soldiers of our Town, formerly a 
part of Danvers, a Petition was signed by Francis H. Appleton, Alec B, 
Clark, B. B. Humphrey, Arthur F. Poole, Herbert M. Berry, Frank C. Mer- 
rill, Thomas M. Stimpson, Sylvanus L. Newhall, S. A. Clark and Robert H. 
Gowing, and an article placed in the Warrant for the Town Meeting held 
March 9, 1896. At this time it was voted: "that the town appropriate the 
sum of fifty dollars towards the purchase of markers adopted by and to be 
placed by the local members of "The Sons of the American Revolution," to 
designate the burial places in this town of each Revolutionary Soldier and 
Sailor whose grave can be located, as is authorized by the State, Chapter 42, 
Acts of the year 1884." 

Members of the S. A. R. and other members of the Peabody Historical 
Society, located the resting places of the following men, and on May 29, 1897, 
the Markers were placed by this Committee: Robert H. Gowing, S. A. R. ; 
Warren D. King, President of the Society, and Mrs. King, Daniel H. Felton, 
Mrs. Annie S. Porter, Mary M. Farley, Lyman P. Osborn, and Mrs. Osborn. 

Since that time for eleven years a committee from the Historical Society, 
including Mr. Gowing and Mr. Richards B. Mackintosh, S. A. R., have dec- 
orated these graves on the 19th of April, by placing a flag in each Marker. 
This year (in March, 1909), the local members of the S. A. R. offered to pro. 
vide the flags and the local Chapter D. R. offered to tie upon them the colo- 
nial colors buff and blue, and it was voted, that the graves be decorated on 
the 30th of May instead of the 19th of April as heretofore. Additional graves 
have been located from year to year, and further information will be grate- 
fully received and acted upon. The following is a complete list to date: 

CEDAR GROVB CEMETERY, LYNN STREET. 

Capt. Daniel Galeucia, Died 9th December, 1825, Aged 85 years 

EMKR80N BURIAL GROUND, WASHINGTON STREET. 

Nathaniel Davis, Died 20th March, 1849, Aged 84 " 

David Newhall, " 

17 



FELTON BURIAL GROUND, PROSPECT STREET. 

Asa Felton, Died 9tli August, 1848, Aged 84 years 

Timothy Felton, " 12th October, 1811, " 69 " 

Moses Preston, " 26th February, 1824, " 65 '^^ 

Capt. Jonathan Procter, " 4th August, 1808, " 69 * 

Newhall Wilson, " 22ud September, 1832, " 77 

FLINT BURIAL GROUND, OFF LOWELL STREET, WEST PEARODY. 

William Flint, Died 6th February, 1843, Aged 84 " 

HARMONY GROVE, WALNUT STREET ENTRANCE. 

Gen. Gideon Foster, Died 1st November, 184.5, " 96 " 

Joseph Osborne 4th, " 27th August, 1829, " 72 

Major Sylvester Osborne, " 2ud October, 1845, " 87 " 

.JACOBS BURIAL GROUND, LOWELL STREET. 

Honry Jacobs, Died 19th April, 1775, " 22 " 

John Jacobs, " 9th January, 1826, " 69 " 

.JACOBS BURIAL GROUND, MARGIN STREET. 

Capt. Seth Richardson, Died 27th February, 1831, " 72 " 

KINO (AMOS) BURIAL GROUND, SUMMIT STREET. 

Amos King, Died 28th April, 1831, " 80 " 

KING TOMBS AND CEMETERY, LOWELL STREET. 

Jonathan King, Died 16th March, 1825, " 80 " 

Zachariah King, " 16th November, 1832, " 88 " 

Major Andrew Munroe, " 7th August, 1836, " 73 " 

LINDSEY BURIAL GROUND (bROWN's POND) LYNN STREET. 

Capt. Eleazer Lindsey, Died 1782, Aged 67 " 

MONUMENTAL CEMETERY, WALLIS STREET. 

Benjamin Giles, Died 16th April, 1834, " 70 " 

Aaron Porter, " 3rd December, 1843, " 86 " 

John Southwick, " 

Joseph Tufts, " 10th March, 1840, " 85 " 

Nathan Upton, " 17th March, 1795, " 63 " 

NEEDHAM BURIAL GROUND, GOODALE LANE. 

Benjamin NeodJiam, Died 9tli October, 1779, " 41 " 

Stephen Needham, " 28th December, 1801, " 69 " 

18 



OLD BURIAL GROUND, MAIN STREET. 



Joseph Barrett, 
Samuel Cook, Jr., 
Benjamin Deland, 
Ebenezer Groklthwaite 
James Goldtliwaite, 
Nathaniel Goldtbwaite, 
Lt. William Goldtliwaite, 
Benjamin Jacobs, 
Major Caleb Low, 
Samuel Peabody, 
Daniel Reed, 
Robert Shillaber, 
Capt. Silas Smith, 
Ebenezer Sprague, 
George Southwick, 
William Southwick, 
Dennison Wallis, 
Joseph Whittemore, 



Died 4th 


May, 


1825, 


' 75 years 


" 


19th 


April, 


1775, 


' 33 " 


" 


19th 


April, 


1775, 


' 25 " 


" 


Iflth 


April, 


1775, 


' 22 


(i 


21st 


January, 


1824, 


, rj^ 11 


II 


2nd 


April, 


1842, 


' 88 


II 


29tb 


March, 


1808, 


' 71 " 


II 


23rd 


October, 


1814, 


' 75 " 


" 


13th 


May, 


1810, 


1 70 " 


11 


26tli 


January, 


1839, 


1 79 II 


II 


20th 


June, 


1808, 


1 72 " 


11 


5 th 


November 


, 1806, 


1 76 II 


i< 


r)th 


January, 


1801, 


' 66 " 


(1 


19 th 


April, 


1775, 


• 25 " 


II 


11th 


Septembei 


,1828, 


' 75 " 


" 


16th 


August, 


1825, 


' 69 ' = 


It 


12 th 


June, 


1821, 


' 77 " 



KUSSELL BUKIAL GKOUND, RUSSELL STREET. 

Now removed to Middleton Cemetery. 
Benjamin Russell, Died 22nd April, 1838, 



82 " 



Asa Upton, 



UPTON BURIAL GROUND, BIRCH STREET. 

Died 4th October, 1824, 



90 



WILSON BURIAL GROUND, OFF ANDOVER STREET. 



Isaac Wilson, 
Job Wilson, 
Robert Wilson, 3rd, 
Jonathan Wilson, 3rd, 



Died 13th January, 1809, 

" 24th February, 1791, 

" 4th January, 1797, 
" about 1815. 



51 



19 



THE OLD MAIN STREET "BURIALL PLACE" (1) 



Upon the Salem Town Records may be seen: 

"9th: Imo: IGSjJ: — Its to care for to (?) fee Conuenuency for a buringe 
place about ye glaffehoufe people and what Chardge is needful to be alowd 
ye Towne to pay for it, . . . 

March 20, IGSi: — Voted y' the request of those Inhabiteing aboute the 
Glafsehouse, ttc. Concerning the Incloafeing of the Burying place neere 
William Trasks; is left to the Selectmen to determine & Settle as they shall 
Judge Nefsessary. . . 

March 17, 170,i:— Voted That Jo" Trask Jun^s Petition ab* fenceing ye 
burying place by his house is granted it left to ye Selectmen to determine 
how much he shall take in. 

March 23, 171 1 See ye Town Treasurer Impowered to prosecute Mr. John 
Trask for his Incroachmeut on ye Town Commons nigh his houfe, as per 
waste. 

March 23, 171f : — In answer to ye petition of John Trask Jun^ respect- 
ing his fencing in the burying place on ye mill plain: That he have liberty 
to fence in a fmall peice of land more adjoining to faid burying place, During 
the Town's pleasure and that ye Selectmen fett it out to him: — being about 
one acre. 

This old Burial Place seems to have been associated with the Trask Fam- 
ily from the beginning, and it is believed that Captain William Trask, the 
builder of the first mill in this vicinity and the "Miles Staudish" of this 
early settlement, was buried on this or adjoining ground. Tradition claims 
that this Burial Place, or land to enlarge it, was given the Town by Lydia 
Trask, about 1750 ; though it was still mentioned as "Trask's Bui-ying place," 
on a Deed, dated December 30, 1779.(E8sex Co. Deeds, Vol. 138, p. 182.) The 
oldest stone today is dated, 1089, but the larger number arc later than 1750. 

Many Revolutionary Soldiers are buried here but there are few stones 
to mark their graves, though many graves without stones have been iden- 
tified by relatives. Tradition tells us that those who lost their lives at the 
Battle of Lexington, were buried together in the Southwick Lot and that 
when the street was widened many years ago, they were left outside the 
fence, under the sidewalk. 

20 




A GROUP OF soldiers' GRAVES 



The following inscriptions are from the only stones of Soldiers who 
have been identified here: 



8 

Sacred 

To the Memory of 

MR BENJAMIN JACOBS 

Obt. Oct. 23, 1814 

Aet. 73 



13 

Sacred 
To the Memory of 
Capt- Silas Smith 
Obt Nov. 5th, 1806 

^t. 76 



SACRED 

To the Memory of 

Major CALEB LOW 

Who departed this life 

May 13 A D. 1810 

.E70 

Thi sweet remembrance of the just 
Shall Jiourish ivhile they sleep in dust 



14 

In Memory of 

Mr. EBENEZER SPRAGUE 

who departed this life 

Jan. 5, 1801 

.Et. 66. 



10 

Samuel Peabody 

Died 

Jan. 26, 1839 

aged 79 

A loving and beloved Father 
one of the defenders of his 
Country's rights in '76 



16 

In Memory of 

Mr William Southwick 

loho died 

Sept. 11, 1828 

Aet. 75 years 

Death thou hast conquered me 
I by thy death am slain 

£ut Christ hath conquer'd thee 
And I shall live again 



12 

In 

Memory of 

Mk Robert Shillxbbr 

who died 

June 20, 1808 

^t72 

"Farewell conflicting hopes and fears 
Where lights and shades alternate dwell 
How bright th' unchanging morn appears 
Farewell inconstant world.' Farewell."' 



17 
ERECTED 

TO THK MEMOKY OF 

DENNISON WALLIS 

WHO DIED AUG. 16, A.D. 1825 

^:t. 69 

A Citizen 

Enterprising, industrious, benevolent 

Honest & i)atriotic 

A Friend l<ind and obliging 

A Man not witlioul Ills frailitles 

& 

Who is without them? 

But in the main Honorable wise & 

Virtuous 



21 



The following pamphlets are for sale by the Society, the rooms being open 
to the public every Monday afternoon: — 

"The Home of John Proctor" by William P. Upham, - - ! 

"Dedication of Memorial Tablet at Birthplace of George Peabody, 
History of Peabody, by Theodore M. Osborne, - - - - 

Vital Statistics of Dauvers, Essex Institute, 

"Some places of Historic Interest in our town," ... 

Annual Report with " Lexington Monument Memorandum." 
Annual Report with "Story of the High School," by Thomas Carroll, 
Annual report with "Story of the Lexington Monument," by Thomas 

Carroll, ....---- 

Annual Report with " Dan vers Martyrs," a poem by Rev. A. P. 
Putnam, D. D. 



.25 
.25 
2.00 
4.24 
.05 
.25 
.25 

.25 



Postal Cards with local views. 
Photographs of local views, 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 

17 
18 

19 

20 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 



Peabody Institute. 
George Peabody's Birthplace. 
Queen Victoria's Portrait in Pea- 
body Institute. 
Town Hall. 
High School. 
Soldiers' Monument and Old 

"South Church." 
Lexington Monument. 
John Proctor Memorial, 
Old Proctor House. 
Ship Rock. 
"Bowditch House." 
Osborn House. 

Apple Tree Lane, Osborn Farm. 
Peabody from Buxton's Hill. 
Catholic Church and Parochial 
Residence. 

Convent, Parochial School and 
Parochial Residence. 

ChestnutStreet and Town House 

Elm Street and Entrance to 
Monumental Cemetery. 

Residence of Lewis Brown, 
South Peabody. 

Crystal or Upham's Pond, West 
Peabody. 

"Phelp's Mill," West Peabody. 

Home for Aged Women. 

Cattle Show. 

Unitarian Church. 

Burial Place of George Peabody. 

Parson Prescott House, Central 
Street. 

Peabody Sijuare in 1902. 

Peabody Square in 1905. 

Wilson Square in 1902. 

Wilson yijuarein 1906. 

Triangle at Felton's corner, 1906. 

Buxton's Hill in 1905. 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 



Td 



lb 



34 

35 
36 
37 

38 
39 

40 

41 

42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 

52 

53 
54 
55 
56 
57 



59 
60 
61 
62 

63 



22 



.03 each, or two for .05 
.05, .10, .15, .25, .35, .50 
George Peabody, 1869. 
Tablet. 

Westminster Abbey. 
View of Peabody from the Metho- 
dist Church. 
Peabody Square, cor. Foster St. 
Main Street, looking west from 

Caller. 
Church and Schoolhouse, West 

Peabody. 
Needham's Corner. 
Gen. Appleton's House. 
Salem Country Club House. 
West Peabody Station. 
Needham House. 
Salem Golf Club House. 
Peabody Square, 1890. 
Peabody Square, 1848. 
Post Office. 

Peabody High School, 1850. 
Peabody High School, 1855. 
C Sylvester Proctor's Drug Store, 
] 1806. 

( John Lord's Drying Yard. 
Curtis-Very Burial Lot. 
Peabody from Salem. 
Gateway of Old Burial Ground. 
Gardner House. 
Durkee Farm, or Red Farm, West 

Peabody. 
House of Mr. William E. Sheen, 

West I'eabody. 
Nathan Holt's Gravestone. 
Peabody Square in 1833. 
"Broadside." 
Tablet on (iate of Old Main Street 

"lUnia! Place." 
Group of Tombstones on Revo- 
lutionary Soldiers' Graves. 












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-.^ 



FdT/^^, 



A 













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