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Full text of "Annual report"

ELEVENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



1863 




BOSTON: 
3. E. FARWELL AND COMPANY, PRINTERS TO THE CITY 



3" Conoress Street. 



18 6 3. 



City Document. — No. 98. 



©H 6 !^ ©W ®©OT®Ifo 




ELEVENTH 



ANNUAL IlEPOET 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



1863. 



In Board of Aldermen, November 23, 1863. 
Laid on the table, and 800 copies ordered to be printed. 

Attest: S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Public Library, 18 November, 1863. 

His Honor Frederic W. Lincoln, Jr., Mayor of the City 
of Boston : 
Sir : I have the honor to transmit to you, herewith, the 
Eleventh Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public Library, 
prepared in obedience to the fourth section of the Ordinance 
relative to the Public Library, passed on the 20th of October, 
18(33. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

CHARLES C. JEWETT, 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



In obedience to the fourth section of the Ordinance 
of October 20, 1863, in relation to the Public Library, 
the Trustees ask leave to submit to the City Council 
their Eleventh Annual 

REPORT. 

The Ordinance directs that a Committee shall be 
annually appointed by the Trustees, consisting of five 
citizens at large, with a member of the Board to act as 
chairman, who shall be invited to examine the Library 
and make report of its condition. The members of the 
Committee for the present year are Henry F. Durant, 
Esq., Right Rev. Bishop Eastburn, George Hay ward, 
M.D., Harvey Jewell, Esq., and Benjamin S. Rotch, Esq.; 
George Ticknor, Esq., a member of the Board, acting 
as chairman. The Report of this Committee, marked 
A, is herewith submitted, together with the Report of 



,; CI PI D0< i WENT.— No. 97 

the Superintendent of the Library, C. C. Jewett, Esq., 
marked B. 

The Trustees refer to these documents with pleasure, 
as presenting, in detail, a highly satisfactory view of the 
condition of the Library, and of its operations during 
the past year. They doubt not that the City Council 
will be gratified to learn from them that the institution 
has in no degree suffered by the state of the country, 
and though great numbers of those entitled to its priv- 
ileges have left the city to enter the public service in 
various capacities, the number of books borrowed from 
the Library to be read at home, as well as of those con- 
sulted at the institution, is greater than in any former 
year. 

It is also satisfactory to observe, that not with standing 
the great increase of the price of the foreign books, 
owing to the present rate of exchange, the number of 
volumes added to the Library since the last annual 
enumeration is equal to the average of former years. 

In administering the important institution commit- 
ted to their care, the Trustees have continued to act 
on the principles which have governed the Board in 
former years, viz. : that of making it as extensively and 
practically useful as possible. In purchasing books, 
nothing has been done for luxurious display. No high 
priced book has ever been bought because it was a 
great bibliographical curiosity, but the funds of the 
City and of our generous benefactors, entrusted to the 
care of the Board for the purchase of books, have been 
exclusively expended for those which were deemed of 
substantial utility. The institution, however, is under 
obligations to several of its liberal friends for works of 
costly magnificence. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7 

In the regulations for the consultation and loan of 
books, the Trustees have studied the greatest amount 
of accommodation to the public, consistent with a just 
regard to the safety and proper care of the collection. 
It is correctly observed by the Superintendent, that it 
would not have been difficult, by the adoption of more 
stringent rules, to prevent the loss of some volumes and 
some injury of others in the course of the year, but it 
has been thought better, upon the whole, to submit to 
this inconvenience, which is not great, than to enforce 
regulations which would embarrass the free use of the 
Library now enjoyed ; and which the Trustees think 
they may with truth say, exceeds that of any other 
public library in this country, perhaps in the world. 

In the earlier Reports of the Trustees to the City 
Council, they have discussed at considerable length 
various topics of interest relative to the history and 
progress of the Library. Statements and suggestions 
of this kind become less necessary from year to year as 
experience has been gained in the management of the 
institution, while the public at large have become too 
well convinced of its utility to require an annual ap- 
peal to them on that subject. On the present occasion 
the Trustees believe that they shall sufficiently discharge 
their duty to the City Council, by referring them to the 
Reports of the Examining Committee and the Superin- 
tendent, without further comment on their own part. 

It is, however, but just to bear the willing testimony 
of the Board to the intelligence, zeal, and assiduity with 
which the arduous duties of the Superintendent and 
Librarian have been discharged by those gentlemen, 



CITY" DOCUMENT. —No. 97. 

and to the fidelity and diligence of their assistants of 

cither sex. 

The regular meetings of the Trustees have been 
held, and their personal attention given as in former 
years. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

EDWARD EVERETT, 
GEORGE TICKNOR, 
JOHN P. BIGELOW, 
NATHANIEL B. SHURTLEFF, 
WILLIAM W. GREENOUGH, 
JOHN S. TYLER, 
HENRY A. DRAKE. 

Public Library, November 17, 1863. 



[A] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 



The Examining Committee, appointed in obedience to the re- 
quisitions of the seventh section of an Ordinance in relation to a 
Public Library, dated October 14, 1852, respectfully 

REPORT, 

That they have endeavored to examine the Library so as to 
understand its successive operations fronTthe time when its books 
are first received to the time when they begin their course of 
duty by use within the halls of the building, or by circulation 
through the community. In doing this, they have naturally 
made their inquiries under the different heads of the Books them- 
selves ; the Catalogues that render the books easily accessible ; 
and the forms of Administration, through which they are offered to 
the public. Under these same heads, therefore, the Committee 
can most easily and simply explain the results of their investiga- 
tions. 

I. And, first, of the Books and their condition, it being the 
main object of every well-conducted public library to collect 
books and to preserve them carefully for use. 

Regarded from this point of view, your Committee find that 
the number of volumes in the Public Library is materially 
larger than it ever was at any previous annual examination, 
having increased, since the last was made, above five thousand 
five hundred volumes. And they further find that, from a very 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 07. 

economical arrangement recently adopted for the repair of such 
books as may need it in their binding's, the condition of the 
books generally is better than it ever was before, and is con- 
stantly improving. 

But, as the Committee passed from alcove to alcove in the 
course of their successive examinations of the whole Library, 
they could not fail to observe with pride and gratitude that by 
far the largest, the most important, and the most instructive 
part of this excellent collection of books has come to the City 
from the liberality of generous individuals interested that Bos- 
ton should make constant progress in whatever is most worthy 
of distinction and honor. The gift by Mr. Bates of fifty thou- 
sand dollars in books of permanent value, and of fifty thousand 
dollars more as a fund the income of which is to be annually 
spent in the purchase of other books of the same class, will not 
be forgotten while the City lasts. Nor will the generosity of 
Mr. Phillips, Mr. Lawrence, or the other benefactors who have 
contributed to our Book Fund, including the liberal-minded 
young men who have increased its resources this very year, 
ever fail of grateful recognition and record. Their example, too, 
will be cherished and followed. Men of a wise and far-seeing 
benevolence, like theirs, will no more be wanting in the future 
than they have been in the past. For it will, we believe, con- 
tinue to be felt that there is no way in which a thoughtful man, 
who wishes to promote the intellectual culture, the real pros- 
perity, and the moral and religious advancement of the com- 
munity to which he and his children belong, — while at the same 
time he cherishes the natural desire that his own memory should 
be kept fresh in the hearts of his descendents and their con- 
temporaries, — can accomplish an object so wise and worthy, 
more honorably, or more surely, than by the gift of a fund the 
income of which shall be appropriated forever to the purchase of 
books, in each volume of which his name will always be re- 
corded as a public benefactor, and circulated as such through all 
classes and conditions of our citizens in all future time. 



PUBLIC LIBEARY. H 

Your Committee, therefore, report to you that, so far as 
its books are concerned, the Public Library is in a better con- 
dition than it has been at any previous period, and that it is 
likely to make similar progress hereafter, not only from its pres- 
ent means, but from other resources which will surely be sup- 
plied to it by a forecast and munificence like those which have 
made it what it now is. 

II. But books without Catalogues to facilitate their use are 
little better than a dead mass growing more and more unman- 
ageable as it increases in bulk. Holding, therefore, as we 
do, that a book is never so much in the way of its duty as 
it is when it is in hand to be read, we believe that, next in im- 
portance to having a good and ample collection of books, is that 
of having Catalogues fitted not -only to render their use possible 
or convenient, but to make it easy, pleasant, and inviting. In 
this respect, your Committee believe that the Public Library has 
fairly earned no little reputation. On the one hand, for any 
person who wishes thoroughly to investigate any subject what- 
soever, its system of manuscript catalogues opens at a glance all 
the resources of the Library in a way which leaves nothing to be 
desired that can reasonably be asked ; while, on the other hand, 
its printed Indexes, abridged from these same manuscript cata- 
logues, and beginning with the large Index of the Upper Hall 
and coming down to the convenient supplements which every 
year make known to the public what accessions of the newest 
and most popular books have been made in the Lower Hall, 
have proved so entirely satisfactory to the thousands who con- 
stantly use them, that, as we understand, not a complaint has 
been heard or a doubt expressed as to their peculiar fitness and 
success. 

Your Committee, however, do not feel at liberty to stop here. 
They feel bound, while speaking of the catalogues, to add that 
the large " Index to the Catalogue of Books in the Upper 
Hall," published in 1861, has been received and acknowledged 
in other parts of the United States and in Europe, by persons 



12 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 97. 

eminently fitted to pronounce judgment on its merits, as a 
contribution to the facilities for acquiring knowledge through the 
use of large libraries, such as has not been afforded elsewhere. 
The Public Library, in fact, through this printed Catalogue, 
modestly called an Index, has made its influence felt not only 
here at home by the multitudes who avail themselves of the 
privileges it opens to them, but by cultivated persons and im- 
portant institutions in the rest of the country, and abroad. 

To this exposition of the excellent condition and peculiar fit- 
ness of the catalogues, both manuscript and printed, the Com- 
mittee desire to state a further fact, which, they suppose, can 
be stated in relation to the catalogues of few large public libra- 
ries anywhere, desirable and important as it may be that the 
same fact should everywhere be .true. They refer to the cir- 
cumstance, that the entries in the different catalogues of this 
Library are not permitted to fall behindhand. They are kept up 
to the time, neatly, fully, and in the most satisfactory manner. 
This has always been the case in relation to the Accessions' 
Catalogue and the Shelf Catalogues, which are, in some respects, 
peculiarly important, because the first contains the whole history 
of the Library as a collection of books, and the other is an exact 
inventory of it as a valuable part of the City's property. The 
interleaved indexes, too, for the convenience of the public, have 
never failed to be carried on from week to week, so as to show 
constantly what new popular books have been added for circu- 
lation. But owing to the sudden influx of large masses of books 
at two or three periods, especially when Mr. Bates made his 
great donation, and when Mr. Parker's bequest was received, it 
was not possible to observe the same promptness in relation to 
the ampler and more minute catalogue on cards ; although that 
catalogue, too, was always in hand and always advancing. 
But time and industry have enabled the Superintendent and his 
assistants to overcome this difficulty, as, by the same means, they 
have overcome so many others. The Card Catalogue is now as 
complete as the rest, and likely to continue so. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 13 

Of the catalogues, therefore, as of the books, — the two 
items of most consequence in the account of any such institu- 
tion — your Committee are happy to report that the Library was 
never in a condition to be so useful to the City as it is now, or 
to do it so much honor. 

III. And, finally, in regard to the real benefits of the 
Library to the City ; or, in other words, in regard to the circula- 
tion of its hooks and their use in its halls, the Committee are able 
to make a report no less satisfactory. The Library was more 
used during the last year than it ever was before ; that is, more 
books were taken out on a daily average and more on one par- 
ticular day ; more persons consulted it as a library of reference ; 
more persons resorted to its pleasant and attractive reading- 
room ; more visited it from a curiosity which it is honorable to 
the City to have excited. It has, in short, in every way appro- 
priate to such an institution, done more good during the last 
year than it ever did before, and there seems to be no sufficient 
reason why it should not continue to do more and more good 
every year hereafter. 

Your Committee are confirmed in this conclusion as to the 
increasing usefulness and importance of the Library when they 
look back to its origin, and, from its progress to the present 
time, take, so far as they fairly may, a measure for coming 
years. In this respect, indeed, a simple recurrence to the dates, 
concerning which there can be no mistake or question, is full 
of instruction and encouragement. The first report of the 
Trustees, setting forth the principles on which they hoped to build 
up the institution committed to their care, was made in July, 
1852, and the Library itself was opened in May, 1854. Its 
resources at that period were small; perhaps, considering the 
objects aimed at, ttey should be called humble. They consisted 
of about twelve thousand volumes, a very large part of which, 
though valuable, was the result of donations, and was not well 
fitted for the popular circulation and reading which constituted 
the primary object of this institution. Its local arrangements, 



14 <ITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 

confined to two rooms, we're narrow, inadequate, and thoroughly 
uncomfortable ; but no more space was to be had, and it was no 
deemed advisable to wait for the accumulation of more appro- 
priate books. The project was regarded by many whose judg- 
ment and influence could neither be wisely nor safely overlooked, 
as an experiment promising little real or lasting good to the city. 
At this uncertain and anxious period came the most opportune 
expressions of Mr. Bates's munificence in 1852, 1853, and 1855 ; 
— unsolicited, unexpected, in fact wholly spontaneous, — which, 
for the first time, placed the Library upon a safe foundation as 
a City institution of permanent and acknowledged importance. 
Scarcely ten years have elapsed since this change came over its 
character and prospects ; but already above an hundred thou- 
sand volumes, well suited to their purpose, have been gathered 
on its shelves, and accounts have been opened for their use in 
the freest and most trusting manner, with above thirty thousand 
different persons. It is become an institution which does 
honor to the City at home and abroad, and of which the City in 
return is justly proud. Above all, it is an institution which 
does great good to great numbers, and does it every day to the 
full acceptance of an intelligent community. Results like these, 
in so short a period, were certainly not anticipated by the most 
earnest and sanguine of its original friends ; and standing where 
we now do, we may assuredly accept them as the augury of a 
prosperous and beneficent future. 

GEORGE TICKNOR, 
HENRY F. DURANT, 
MANTON EASTBURN, 
GEORGE HAY WARD, 
HARVEY JEWELL, 
BENJAMIN S. ROTCH. 
Public Library, November 4, 1863. 



[B] 
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Publtc Library of the City 
of Boston : 

Gentlemen : In compliance with a requirement of the "By- 
Laws relative to the Trustees and Officers of the Public Li- 
brary," I have the honor to present to you a Report upon the 
condition and increase of the Library from the first of Novem- 
ber, 1862, to the first of September, 1863. 

In order the better to accommodate a large number of those 
who make most use of the books, and in consequence of sugges- 
tions made by the last Committee of Examination, the Trustees 
have changed the time for the annual examination of the Li- 
brary, from October to August. On this account, therefore, the 
statistics of the present report apply to a period of ten months 
instead of twelve. This fact should be borne in mind, when 
comparing the aggregates of increase and of circulation, herein 
given, with those of former years. 

It is pleasant to be able to say, in general terms, before pre- 
senting in detail the results of our annual review, that, during 
the continuance of the great patriotic struggle upon which Bos- 
ton has bestowed so liberally the best she had to give, her citi- 
zens have found time and means to cherish with constant care, 
an institution like this, and to avail themselves of its resources, 
even more extensively than ever before. 



1,; CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 

The Library contains at present, — 

In the Upper Hall . . 88,038 volumes 

In the Lower Hall . . 22,525 

Total .... 110,563 « 

These are all bound volumes, but about 1,600 of them are 
pamphlets separately bound, and 5,237 are duplicates. Some 
exchanges of duplicates have already been made, and arrange- 
ments are in progress for disposing of the greater part of them 
in the same way. 

There are also in the Library, according to the enumeration 
continued from year to year, 31,043 unbound pamphlets. But 
this number includes many duplicates of pamphlets already 
placed upon the shelves • and catalogued ; numerous copies of 
certain publications ; odd numbers of magazines and public 
documents ; and many articles of very little value. During the 
year much has been done towards sorting out the duplicates, 
and making a more satisfactory arrangement of the pamphlets 
which remain. It is proposed further, as time and funds will 
permit, to select the most valuable of the pamphlets, bind them 
separately, and place them in the Library as books. It is hoped 
that this system may be pursued till nothing shall be left in the 
room devoted to these productions, but such as are incomplete 
or not worth binding. The mode of binding pamphlets which 
has recently been adopted for this Library, while it is neat and 
strong, is so inexpensive — not costing more than eight or ten 
dollars a hundred — that it will be practicable to place upon the 
shelves, as books, all pamphlets which seem worthy of preserva- 
tion. About 1,500 of the pamphlets of Mr. Theodore Parker's 
library have, during the last year, been thus bound, and they 
form a very interesting portion of his bequest. 

It is not indeed proposed to destroy any of these publica- 
tions. Some which now seem utterly worthless, may hereafter 
become of value. It will be easy, so long as there is room 



PUBLIC LIBKAKY. 17 

in the building, to preserve them, and to arrange them so that 
they can readily be found. 

The increase and active service of the Library, during the 
period covered by this report, may be concisely presented in the 
following: tabular statement : — 



No. of books added : 






In the Upper Hall, 


3,885 




In the Lower Hall, 


1,644 




Total, 




5,529 




No. of pamphlets added, 




2,169 


" " separate papers, 




772 


" " maps, broadsides, etc.. 




24 


Donations of volumes, 




829 


" " pamphlets, 




1,958 


Purchases " volumes, 




4,700 


" " pamphlets, 




212 


No. of accounts opened in the loan books, 


3,495 


Total No. of accounts, 




30,481 


No. of lendings for home use, 




138,027 


Daily avei'age, 




643.56 


Largest No. of lendings in one day, (7Febn 


l- 


ary, 1863,) 




1,534 


No. of lendings for use in the building, 


7,124 


Books missing (September 1, 


1863,) 


234 


Books regained of last year's 


loss (294), 


156 


Books worn out, 




106 



Books replaced (of which 75 are of those worn 

out this year), 127 

Amount collected in fines, $ 87 90 

The additions to the Library by purchase are equal to the 
average in former years, notwithstanding the enhanced price of 
foreign books. 

The number of new names upon the loan books is 105 less 
than during the like period last year. 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 

The daily average of circulation is larger than ever before 
Last war it was 626; tin.- year G43 and a fraction. In one 

day during the present year 1,534 books were lent out of the 
building. The largest Dumber on any previous day was 1,517. 
Notwithstanding the large aggregate of the circulation, it should 
be remembered, that it does not in any way represent some of 
the most important uses of the Library. The Reviews, Mag- 
azines, and Books of Reference in the Reading Room are acces- 
sible and are constantly used, day and evening. The Specifica- 
tions of English Patents form a Library of themselves, and are 
much consulted. There are also almost constant references to 
books of which it is impossible to make record. The great 
number of lendings is so striking and valuable a feature, that 
we 'may be pardoned, perhaps, for dwelling less than we ought 
upon those other benefits of the institution, which are sufficient, 
however, of themselves to commend it to the highest favor of 
the public. 

The number of books missing and worn out is about the same 
as usual, as also of books regained ; making the average of 
final losses, (almost entirely confined to cheap books easily 
replaced,) less than 300 volumes a year. 

The remark made in former reports applies with at least equal 
force this year, that the amount collected in fines will go far 
towards replacing the whole that is actually lost by the circula- 
tion. 

The larger and more costly works are for the most part asked 
for only by those Avho know their value and guard them care- 
fully. The losses are mostly accidental. They could be nearly 
all prevented by a stricter method of record ; but it has always 
been feared that such strictness would prevent many, who now 
frequent the Library, from availing themselves of its privileges. 

The usual list of the donors to the Library is appended to 
this report, and marked AA. They are 194 in number, and 
include the names of several who have, from year to year, re- 
peated their benefactions. Mr. Ticknor has presented 176 



PUBLIC LIBEAKY. 19 

volumes ; Mr. William G. Cranch of Washington, 63, besides 
a large number of pamphlets ; the Rev. Dr. Gannett, 53, and 
Mr. John A. Loring, 45. The Hon. Henry Wilson has con- 
tinued to send the full series of government publications to the 
Library. 

Scarcely a year passes when we have not the pleasure of re- 
cording some addition to the permanent funds of the Library. 
During the last year one of peculiar interest was received from 
the Trustees of a literary association of young men, formerly 
existing in this City, under the name of the Franklin Club. 
After several years of useful activity the association was dis- 
solved, and the funds in its treasury were placed in the hands 
of trustees, with instructions to bestow the same as to them 
might seem most judicious. The sum, originally about four 
hundred dollars, by prudent and skilful management had become 
a full thousand. The judgment and action of the trustees 
with regard to it may best be told in the words of the following 
letter : — 

Boston, June 8, 1863. 

Hon. F. W. Lincoln, Je., Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir : The Franklin Club, an association of young men, at its 
dissolution, deposited in our hands the funds then in the treas- 
ury, with authority to dispose of them in such manner as should 
seem judicious. 

We now Oiffer to the City of Boston the sum of one thousand 
dollars, to be placed at interest forever for the benefit of the 
Public Library, on the following conditions, namely : 

In trust, that the income of this fund, but its income only, 
shall year by year, be expended in the purchase of books of 
permanent value for the use of the Free Public Library of the 
City, and as far as practicable of such a character, as to be of 
special interest to young men. 

And without wishing to impose upon those who may adminis- 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 

ter the fund, an inflexible condition, we would express a prefer- 
ence for books relative to Government and Political Economy. 
Respectfully, 

THOMAS MINNS, 
JOHN J. FRENCH, 
J. FRANKLIN REED. 

The money thus presented was gratefully accepted and ac- 
knowledged by the City, invested in six per cent City scrip, 
the income of which is to be expended year by year, by the 
Trustees of the Public Library, in accordance with the condi- 
tions imposed most judiciously by the donors. 

Among the numerous gifts which have been made to the 
Library, none is more encouraging than this, betokening as it 
does the affectionate and intelligent interest with which the 
institution will be cherished and conducted, when it shall be 
confided, as ere long it will be, entirely to the hands of those 
who are now the young men of the City. 

The class of books for which the donors of this fund expressed 
a preference, is very appropriate to be provided for, by young 
men of culture, in a community so generally devoted to mercan- 
tile pursuits. The principles and wide relations, social and 
political, of what is popularly denominated business, are but too 
little understood. Books of more immediate and transient pop- 
ularity are too often perferred to those which treat of subjects 
connected with political economy and government. 

The indication of preference, modestly expressed^ in the letter 
of presentation, does honor to the writers, and is an instructive 
testimony, from the most desirable source, to the importance of 
placing in the Library, not merly attractive books, but also 
books of sober, substantial, scientific value. 

In this connection it may be well to say that while the money 
appropriated for books by the City has been from year to year 
expended wholly upon the most popular English books and the 
best magazines of the day, private liberality has supplied the 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 21 

funds which have made the Library already valuable to those 
engaged in researches in almost every department of science 
and of the arts. The use of the less popular portion of a li- 
brary is apt to be too little noticed. It does not show itself 
conspicuously in a statement of the circulation, but it is suited 
to produce results of highest moment to the intellectual and 
material progress of the community. Impressed with this con- 
sideration, the Trustees have desired to secure for the Library 
the best works in all departments, in order that the earnest 
student trained in our schools, however poor he may be, and 
the mechanic and professional man, may find and may freely 
use the means for the highest intellectual achievements. 

During the year an enumeration of the books with reference 
to the languages in which they were written, was made, and the 
result is herewith presented, as descriptive of the character of 
the Library. At the suggestion of Mr. Bates, the principal 
donor to the funds, the Trustees have endeavored, so far as the 
means in their hands allowed, to procure the best works in all 
languages, as well as in every direction of scientific and literary 
activity. To this end they early sought, and were successful 
in securing, from gentlemen of known eminence in various pur- 
suits, assistance in making lists of such books as were deemed 
most important in different branches of knowledge. Thus the 
wants and wishes of all classes of the community were primarily 
consulted ; and no pains have since been spared in maintaining 
at each stage of the progress of the Library a due harmony of 
proportion in all departments of reading and investigation. The 
judgment of those best competent to form an opinion upon 
the subject, has been emphatic in praise of the selections which 
have been made. 

3 



11 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 



ENUMERATION OF THE BOOKS BY LANGUAGES. 



No. of Volumes in Upper 

English 

French f 

German 

Italian 

Latin < 

Greek 

Spanish 

Chinese 

Dutch , 

Danish 

Swedish 

Portuguese 

Russian 

Polish 

Norwegian 

Various languages or dialects . , 



Total. 



37,273 

16,841 

7,380 

7,068 

3,064 

590 

240 

189 

130 

78 

21 

16 

12 

8 

6 

177 



58,489 

17,417 

8,139 

7,277 

3,064 

590 

241 

189 

130 

78 

21 

16 

12 

8 

6 

177 

95,854 



This enumeration includes only those books which, at the time 
when it was made, had been entered on the shelf-lists, and does 
not comprise the duplicates nor those since received. The 
books enumerated under "various languages and dialects," are 
nearly all translations of the Bible and parts thereof, published 
by the British and Foreign Bible Society, and by the American 
Bible Society. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



23 



I present below a statement of the relative use of different 
classes of books in the Upper Hall, repeating the remark which 
I had occasion to make in a former report, that the rapid method 
of charging books in the Lower Hall, renders impracticable the 
classification of lendings in that department. 



CLASSIFICATION OF BOOKS LENT IN THE UPPER HALL. 



English history and literature 

Theology and ethics 

Useful arts and fine arts 

Periodicals .... 

Medicine .... 

American history 

Mathematical and physical sciences 

French history and literature 

General history 

Italian history and literature 

Natural history 

Oriental history and literature 

Greek and Latin classics 

Transactions of learned societies 

Bibliography 

German history and literature 

Miscellaneous 

Law ..... 



17 J per cent. 
11 

9 

7 

7 

6 

5£ 

5 

4* 

4 

4 

U 

3 

3 

2i 
2 

n 



The condition of the books is, in general, excellent. The 
most popular books in the Lower Library are, indeed, much 
soiled and injured by writing in them and otherwise. The 
expense of covering and of rebinding is considerable. Many 
books are heedlessly, — few, however, wilfully, — mutilated. 
It would be easy to put a stop to such injuries, as to the losses 
already mentioned, but only by measures which, it has been 
feared, would make it too difficult for a large class of people to 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 

use the Library. It is well, therefore, to consider that both the 
losses and the injuries fall upon a small part of the books, and 
those generally such as are neither scarce nor clear ; that they 
are, for the most part, the result of misfortune, of carelessness, 
of uncleanly habits, and of ignorance, which it is one great 
object of the free circulation of books to remove or diminish ; 
and that, after all, they are of small importance compared with 
the great benefits which the Library confers by the freest circu- 
lation of its books. 

In the Upper Hall much has been done to improve the ex- 
ternal appearance of the books by repairing such as were torn 
and defaced. A hand printing-press, and a small quantity of 
type and materials, have enabled us, with the occasional services 
of a person employed in the Library, who was formerly a printer, 
to letter handsomely several thousand volumes, destitute of titles 
upon the backs, besides all the pamphlets which have been bound, 
as already stated. A binder, Mr. Seth Goldsmith, has for several 
months been employed in the building, repairing and renovat- 
ing the bindings, and binding pamphlets. By his services more 
has been done for the good appearance and preservation of the 
books than could have been effected in the ordinary way in a 
much longer time and at a much greater cost. 

During the last year, as during the years preceding, the new 
books received in the Library have been, with the least possible 
delay, placed on the shelves, ready in all respects for public use. 
Neither the Catalogue, nor any part of the work on accessions, 
has ever been allowed to fall in arrears. 

The printed Index can never, of course, fully represent the 
condition of the Library so long as the Library continues to 
increase. While the great work of preparing and printing the 
Index to the Upper Hall was in progress, large accessions were 
received, among them the bequest of the late Theodore Parker. 
These additions are now all catalogued and accessible to the 
public. The Supplementary Index will, it is hoped, be printed 
before the close of the present Library year. It will be nearly 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

half as large as the original volume, and will represent more 
than twenty-five thousand books. The printed guides to the 
books will then be : — The Index to the Lower Hall in 204 
pages, printed in 1858, with six supplementary lists, issued 
annually for the convenience of the public, and containing 
abridged titles, without cross references, — and the Index to the 
Upper Hall, issued in 1861, in 902 pages, with a Supplement 
containing probably 400 pages. It will soon become a matter 
of pressing importance to consolidate the Index and Supple- 
ments to the Lower Hall. About 8000 copies of the Index 
first published will speedily have been distributed, and a new 
edition, or a new Catalogue, will be demanded. The several 
supplements maybe combined into one, and the cross references 
added, so as to form a single large Supplement ; but it will 
doubtless be thought best to reprint the whole Index and Sup- 
plements in one alphabet. The whole printed Catalogue will 
then be in three alphabets, and it will appear practicable to 
publish in one alphabet an index or catalogue of the whole col- 
lection in both halls, with short titles, under authors and sub- 
jects. This is the great desideratum, and becomes more and 
more important as the books increase in number. 

I' cannot close this report without saying that, through the 
last year, as through previous years, the good order of the 
Library has never once been disturbed by rudeness or impro- 
prieties on the part of visitors, though nothing has been done, 
as nothing was needed, by way of restraint. A fact like this 
is worth repeating, when it is considered that on some days not 
less than two thousand persons visit the Library for borrowing 
or returning books, for reading or for reference, besides many 
more who come from mere curiosity. 

I append to this report the usual financial statement, marked 
BB. 

Respectfully submitted , 

CHARLES C. JEWETT, Superintendent. 

Public Library, October 20, 1863. 
3* 



[AA] 



LIST OF DONORS. 



Bates, Joshua, London, interest of fund, 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., " " 

Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, " " 

Phillips, Hon. Jonathan, " " 

Townsend, Mary P., " " 



$3,000 00 

60 00 

600 00 

1,800 00 

240 00 



Trustees of the Franklin Club, $ 1,000, the income of which 
is to be expended annually in the purchase of books. 



Abbott, G. J., Washington, 

Agassiz, L., Prof., Cambridge, 

A. E. E., 

Albany Young Men's Assoc, for Mutual Improvem't. 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 

American Anti-slavery Society, 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, 

American Unitarian Association, 

Andrews, William T., 

Ann Arbor, University of Michigan, 

Anonymous, 1 paper, 1 broadside 

Appleton, Charles Hook, 

Appleton, George E., Pittsburgh, Pa., 

Baker, Nathaniel B., Adjutant-General of Iowa, 



Vols. 

2 



Pamps. 

3 

1 
2 



2 

27 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



27 



Balfour, David M. , 

Barnard, Henry, Hon., Hartford, 

Bartlett, J. R., Hon., Providence, 

Bates, Samuel P., Harrisburg, Pa., 

Bedlington, Timothy, 

Beverly Public Library, 

Binney, W. G., Burlington, N. J., 

Boston, City of, 5 portfolios, 

Boston, Twelfth Cong'l. Society, Francis Brown, 

Bowditch, H. I., M. D., 

Bowditch, Nathaniel, Sons of, 

Bradlee, Caleb Davis, Rev., 1 manuscript, 

British Museum, London, 

Brooklyn Mercantile Library Association, 

Burnham, T. O. H. P., 

Burroughs, Henry, Rev., 

Burroughs, Thomas H., Hon., 

Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, 

Byington, E. M., 

Canada, Government of, 

Chambers, George E., 

Charlestown Public Library, 

Christern, F. W., New York, 

Cincinnati Young Men's Mercantile Lib. Association, 

Cochrane, James, Edinburgh, 

Colby, Anthony, Adjutant-General of N. Hamp., 

Colton, F. P., Adjutant-General of Connecticut, 

Connecticut State Library, J. Hoadley, 

Cradlebaugh, John, Hon., M. C, 

Cranch, William G., Washington, D. C, 7 papers 

Gushing, Isaac, 

Darrow,*G. R., 

Dean, John Ward, 

Detroit Young Men's Society, 

Dudley, Dean, 

Dunphv, James W., 

Dutton, E. P., &Co., 

Edinburgh Royal Society, 

Edinburgh Scotsman, Editor of, 

Eliot, Samuel, Hartford, Conn., 

Elliott, E. B., 

Essex Institute, Salem, 



Tola. 


Pamps. 


3 


1 


1 


1 




3 




2 


1 




1 


1 


1 




4 




2 




3 


3 


3 




2 


2 


6 






1 


28 




1 




1 




• 


2 


1 




6 





63 

1 
1 



4 
183 



2S 



CITY DOCUMENT.- No. 97. 



Everett, Edward, Hon., 142 papers, 

Fall River Public Library, 

Farley, Hubert, 

Felt, LydiaB., 

Fluegel, Felix, Leipzig, 

Foley, William J., 

Fuller, Allen C, Adjutant-General, Springfield, 111., 

Gannett, Ezra S., 1). D., 

Garrison, Wendell Phillips, 

Gaylord, Augustus, Adjutant-General of Wisconsin, 

Gilman, D. C., Prof., New Haven, 

Goldsmith, Seth, 

Gould, Nathaniel D., 1 broadside, 

Grant, S. Hastings, New York, 

Green, S. A., M. D., 

Greenough, W. W., 240 papers. 

Grout, Lewis, Rev., Saxton's River, Vt., 

Guild, -Samuel E., Mrs., 

Hale, Salma, Hon., Keene, N. H., 

Hall, Charles B., 

Hall, J. P., 

Hall, W. W., M. D., 

Harvard Cullege, 

Harvard College Observatory, 

Hayden, John C, M. D., 

Hedge, J. Dunham, Providence, 

Hill, Charles W., Brigadier-General, Ohio, 

Hodsdon, John L., Brigadier-General, Maine, 

Holmes, Oliver W., M. D., 

Homans, J. Smith, New York, 

Hooper, Samuel, Hon., 

Jackson, Abby C, 

Jarvis, Edward, M. D., Dorchester, 

Jewett, C. C, 

Kibbe, Wm. C, Adjutant-General of California, 

Lawrence, Abbott, 3 papers, 20 maps, 

Lawrence, T. Bigelow, 1 engraving, 

Library of Congress, 

Lieber, Francis, LL. I)., 

Livermore, George, 

Liverpool Library, 

Loring, Charles G., 



Vols. 

4 



2 
3 
1 
53 
1 
1 



1 
6 
1 

1 

1 

18 

3 
1 
1 

6 

8 
1 

1 
2 
4 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



29 



Vols. Pamps. 

Loring, J. Spear, 9 27 

Loring, John A., 45 

London, Institution of Civil Engineers, 1 

London, Royal Astronomical Society, 2 

London, Royal Geographical Society, 

London, Royal Society, 1 

Lord, Melvin, 2 

Lowell City Library, 1 

MacCarthy, Denis Florence, Dalkeld, Ireland, 1 

McDougall, J. A., Hon., 1 

Maha Raja Kalee Krishna Bahadur, Calcutta, 3 2 

Malmros, Oscar, Adjutant-General of Minnesota, 1 

Massachusetts Historical Society, 2 

Mauran, Edward, Adjutant-General of R. I., 

Moore, Charles W., 

Morgan, Henry J., Quebec, 1 

Moscow, Societe Imperiale de, 1 

Mumford, S. R., Detroit, 

Napoleon, Emperor of the French, 2 

New Bedford Public Library, 1 

Newbury port Public Library, 1 

New York Chamber of Commerce, 2 

New York, Mercantile Library Association, 1 

New York, Regents of the University, 1 

New York Society Library, 

Onderdonk, Henry, Jr., Jamaica, L. I., 2 

Otis, Mary, 3 

Palfrey, Sarah H., 2 

Palfrey, Francis J., 

Parker, Henry T., 8 

Parker, Theodore, part of bequest, 138 1371 

Parsons, Usher, M. D., Providence, R. I., 1 

Peabody Institute, South Danvers, 1 

Perry, W. S., Rev., 1 

Philbrick, JohnD., 

Philadelphia Mercantile Library Co., 

Picarfl, William, Cadiz, 

Pray, Lewis G., 

Preble, George H., U. S. N., 11 

Randall, Stephen, Esq., 

Rawlinson, Robert, England, 

Redding, Isabella, 



30 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 97. 



Redwood Library, Newport, 

Reynolds, Ann C., 

Rhees, William J., Washington, 

Richardson, James B., 

Robertson, John, Adjutant-General of Michigan, 

Rosenstein, Moritz, M. D., 

Russell, A. L., Adjutant-General of Penn., 

St. Louis Mercantile Library, 

Scudder, C. W., 

Seidensticker, James G., 

Shaw, Benjamin S., M. D., 

Sherman, John, Hon., 

Smith, C. C, 

Smith, Samuel, Worcester, 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 

Snow, Edwin M., M. D., Providence, 

Stevens, B. F., 

Stockton, R. F., Adjutant-General of New Jersey, 

Stone, Edwin M., Rev., Providence, 

Storer, H. R., M. D., 

Sumner, Charles, Hon., 

Tappan, John L., Ann Arbor, Mich., 

Thornton, J. Wingate, 

Ticknor, George, 

Ticknor & Fiefds, 

Tolman & Co., 7 papers. 

Tyler, John S., Mrs., 

United States, Department of the Interior, 

United States, Department of State, 

United States, Naval Observatory, 

Upham, J. B., M. D., 

Urbino, S., 

Venice, I. R. Istituto Veneto, 

Vienna, K. k. geolog. Reichsanstalt, 

Waggoner, R. H., 

Wallace, John W., 1 broadside. 

Walley, S. H., Hon., 

Warren, Charles H., Hon., 

Warren, J. M., M. D., 

Warren & Co., 360 papers, 

Washburn, Peter T., Adjutant-General of Vermont, 

Weiss, John, Rev., 



Vols. 

2 

2 
1 



Pamps. 
1 



1 

12 

2 
176 



25 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



31 



Wells, E. M. P.,Kev., 

Whitney, Frederic A., Rev., Longwood, 

Whitney, J. D., 

Whitwell, E. H., Miss, 

Willard, Joseph, 

Williams, Jos. D., Adjutant-General of Connecticut, 

Willis, Nathaniel, 13 papers. 

Wilson, Henry, Hon., 

Wisconsin Institution for the Blind, 

Wise, Henry A., U. S. N., 

Wood, Horatio, Rev., Lowell, 

Wright & Potter, 



rois. 


Pamps 


1 


2 


1 




1 




1 






2 


3 




17 


1 




1 


1 






1 




9 



[BB] 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 

For ten months, from November 1, 1862, to August 31, 1863, 



Books, American. $4,237.67 

foreign books, $4,933.33, 
Expense, 

Furniture and fixtures, 
Gas, . 
Printing, 
Salaries, 
Stationery, 
Transportation 



Remittances for 



including insurance, postage, etc 



$2,666 13 


9,171 


00 


713 


17 


65 


84 


749 


41 


365 


66 


10,369 


70 


582 


88 


388 


43 


$25,071 72 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

milium 

3 9999 06314 626 8 



-Bindery. 
NOV 23 1878