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Full text of "Annual report"

# ^ 







THIRTEENTH 




ANNUAL REPORT 




OF TUE 




TRUSTEES 


OF THE PUBLIC 

18 6 5. 


LIBRARY. 


_-= 


^^^_ 






B S T xY : 


i 


J. E. FARWELL AND COMPANY, PRINTERS TO THE CITY, | 




No. 37 CONGKESS SteKET. 






1866. 





City Document. — JSo, 96, 



©a^n (^w iB®§'ip®irc 




THIRTEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



18 6 5 



In Common Council, November 27, 1865. 
Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed. 

Attest : S. r. McCLEAKY. City Clerk 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Public Library, 22 November, 1S65. 

His Honor Frederic W. Lincoln, Jr., Mmjor of the City 
of Boston : — 

Sir : I have the honor to transmit to you, herewith, the 
Thirteenth Annual Eeport of the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary, prepared in obedience to the fourth section of the 
Ordinance relative to the Public Library, passed on the 20th 
of October, 1863. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

CHARLES C. JEWETT, 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBEAEY. 



In obedience to the requisitions of an Ordinance 
concerning the Public Library, passed October 20, 
1863, the Trustees have the honor to submit to the 
City Council thefr Thirteenth Annual 

REPORT. 

They cannot offer to the Municipal authorities this 
their accustomed Annual Report, without a renewed 
feeling of the loss, which, in common with the whole 
country, they have sustained during the last year, 
by the death of the eminent statesman and scholar, who, 
from the first foundation of the institution committed 
to their care, presided over their deliberations with 
gentleness, wisdom, efnd dignity. The sorrow they ex- 
pressed and recorded on the sad and sudden death of 
Mr. Everett, immediately after it occurred, is still fresh 
in their thoughts. They have missed him constantly 
in their consultations for the welfare of the Library, 
and shall continue to miss him in the coming year, as 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 90. 

they have in the past. But they have endeavored to 
be careful in the performance of the duties that have 
still rested on them, sure that, so far as they may have 
succeeded, they have trodden in his footsteps, and ren- 
dered an appropriate tribute to his memory. 

Among the more important of these duties is the one 
indicated in the City Ordinance under which they act, 
and which requires them to appoint every year a Com- 
mittee of five citizens at large, who, together with a 
Trustee as chairman, shall examine the Library, and 
make report of its condition to the Trustees (Sect. 6) ; 
which report the Trustees are required to transmit to 
the City Council (Sect. 4). This Committee, con- 
sisting of Dr. Henry I. Bowditch, as chairman, and 
Rev. George F. Haskins, Dr. Thomas M. Brewer, Hon. 
J. P. Putman, Dr. J. Baxter Upham, and Henry H. 
Kimball, Esq., as citizens at large, was duly appointed, 
on the "eleventh of July last ; and their Peport, marked 
A, together with the regular Peport of the Superinten- 
dent, marked B, is herewith submitted. Both are of 
unusual importance, and the Trustees bespeak for them 
the careful consideration of the City Government. 

But, as the Trustees, by the same Ordinance (Sect. 
4), are enjoined to make a separate Peport of their own 
upon the condition of the Library, they would respect- 
fully state : — 

1. That the number of volumes added to the Library 
during the year ending August 1, 1865, was 6,082, and 
the number of pamphlets, 1,516. 

2. That the whole number of volumes in the Library 
on the 1st of August, 1865, was 123,016, and the whole 
number of pamphlets was 32,558. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7 

3. That there were lent, for home use, from the Lower 
Hall and the Bates Hall, during the year endmg the 
1st of August, 194,627 volumes, or an average of 707 
volumes and a fraction per diem, during the 275 days 
when the Library was -open. 

4. That there were used for consultation in the Bates 
Hall of the Library, during the same period, 13,090 
volumes ; besides which, the Hall down stairs was 
greatly resorted to for more popular purposes of the 
same kind, its books of reference being in constant use. 

5. That the number of persons visiting the Library 
for some object connected with its main design was, on 
a daily average, when it was open, 1,058 and a frac- 
tion; so that, without including in the reckoning a 
great number of persons who visited it to make less im- 
portant inquiries, 290,950 visits were made to it, for 
the purpose of reading in its halls, or of taking out or 
consulting the books to be found on its shelves. 

From these facts, and others of the same sort set 
forth among the statistics in the S/iperintendent's Re- 
port, hereto annexed, the Trustees have no doubt that 
the Public Library is an institution eminently beneficial 
and honorable to the city, and that it is now, not only 
in a more useful and efficient condition than it ever was 
before, but that it is actually more used, and doing 
more good. They suppose that it is open more hours 
in the day, and more days in the year, than any similar 
institution of equal size in the world. They suppose, 
too, that the number of persons who resort to it is 
greater than that resorting to any similar free institu- 
tion, even in cities much larger than Boston. They 
should be glad to have the whole of it open every day 



S CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

in the year, except the days of rest and leisure pre- 
scribed by law. TJiis might be difficult or onerous, 
but it can hardly be deemed impossible. They are 
glad, however, to be able to state that it was open from 
nine o'clock in the morning to ten o'clock at night, in 
its Reading Room and Lower Hall, two hundred and 
eighty-one days of the year ending August 1, 1864, 
thus leaving, after the deduction of Sundays, thirty-two 
days only for the secular holidays prescribed by law, 
and for the time consumed in the examination and 
cleaning of the whole establishment. Five more days 
were added for the yeur ending in August, 1865, in 
consequence of events connected with the condition of 
the country, or on occasions ordered by the city author- 
ities. The Trustees do not suppose that it will be 
easy to find a more satisfactory record in the case of 
any library so large and so perfectly free, though it 
may be possible hereafter to make one. 

It is worthy of notice, too, that the resort to the Public 
Library has increased with remarkable regularity, in 
proportion as its benefits have been felt more and more 
widely through the community. In this respect, it has 
not only extravagantly outrun the hopes of such among 
its earliest friends as were most sanguine in their per- 
suasions of its importance and success ; but it has en- 
couraged them to think that the next generation, and 
the generations successively to follow, may, with its 
increasing resources and their increasing use, develop 
benefits to our community which were anticipated by 
nobody at its foundation. Among the remarkable re- 
sults obtained by Mr. Babbage's remarkable calculating 
machine, perhaps none was more striking than the fact, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

that it was found to perform operations not in the least 
foreseen by the genius of its inventor. The Trustees 
think that results equally unforeseen may be obtained 
from the knowledge and power that will hereafter be 
spread through our society by the Public Library, when 
it shall have become what, by a wise forecast and faith- 
ful diligence, it seems likely to become at no far dis- 
tant day. Indeed, they think that some such results 
are already indicated. Nobody, even a few years ago, 
supposed that it would do the work it is now doing. 

But, while the Trustees believe that much good has 
been done by the Public Library, and that more is 
doing now than was ever done before, they are far from 
supposing that the institution itself is perfect, either in 
its organization or in its management. They regard it 
as an experiment, still not very far advanced for an 
establishment with purposes so wide and so far reach- 
ing. It was begun only thirteen years ago, with very 
small resources, and very modest hopes. In this short 
period, it has risen from a collection of a few thousand 
volumes to above a hundred and twenty thousand, and 
from a circulation of about seven thousand a year to 
one of above a hundred and ninety thousand. . In the 
meantime, the very simple and free system on which it 
was first put in motion has worked so well, and has 
proved so satisfactory to those who have been most 
familiar with it, and most benefited by it, that the 
Trustees have been anxious to avoid changes, and have, 
in fact, thus far, made none of decisive importance. 

But, at last. Time has done its inevitable work, and 
developed wants and defects, for which, so far as the 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 90. 

case may admit remedies, they should be found and 
apphed. 

On two points connected with defects in the system 
and management of the Library, the Trustees have, for 
sometime, been especially anxious, and they are the 
more desirous to speak of them, because the remedy 
for the evils to which they respectively refer must, in a 
large degree, be applied by the public. 

The first of them relates to the manner in which a 
portion of the persons resorting to the Library have 
accepted the large confidence reposed in them. As it 
has been already explained in this Report, the Library 
has, from the first, been opened to our whole commu- 
nity with a freedom quite extraordinary. And this has 
not been unintentionally done. On the contrary, the 
Trustees have desired to offer its resources, with every 
justifiable facility, to the largest number of persons pos- 
sible. At the outset, therefore, they laid no restrictions 
on any of its means of instruction or improvement, ex- 
cept such as were obviously inevitable for their pro- 
tection and preservation, and none have been added 
since which have not, by the same considerations, been 
imperatively demanded. At first the Trustees were led 
to hope that their success had been absolute ; that all 
had received and used the attractive privileges of the 
institution in the liberal and faithful spirit that had 
offered them. But, before long, it was found that a 
number of books were defaced by vulgar writing in 
them. Others were wilfully mutilated. A few disap- 
peared. Still, the evil was so very small, and the 
benefits from the freest use of the Library were so great 
and so certain, that no change was deemed desirable. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. H 

Everything was left as unrestricted as possible; but 
everything was exactly reported to the City Govern- 
ment. 

In 1857, the evil had somewhat increased ; — not 
much, indeed, but still so much that it began to be 
noticed more anxiously in the Annual Reports of the 
Xrustees, where it has continued to appear ever since. 
Even the Reading Room, with its excellent collection of 
periodical literature and works of reference, — where 
everybody has been admitted with the least possible 
reckoning or reserve, — has, for the first time during 
the last year, become the subject of abuses too serious 
to be overpassed. Since the first of December last, 
forty-six numbers of difi"erent valuable journals have 
been stolen ; — many more have been mutilated by 
cutting out what was deemed useful or agreeable by 
the persons who so shamelessly abused the privileges 
they enjoyed ; — and a still greater number have been 
so wilfully defaced that it is necessary to replace them 
by other copies. In the Library, there has been a cor- 
responding unprecedented abuse. During the year end- 
ing August 1, four hundred and eighty-nine books 
disappeared, which it has not been possible to trace 
and recover ; and many more were mutilated and other- 
wise wilfully and discreditably ill-treated. The Trus- 
tees make these statements with great regret and pain. 
• Still, they do not believe that any large number of the 
persons who availed themselves of the resources of the 
Library, so frankly ofi"ered to them, have been guilty of 
theft. Nor do they believe that any large proportion of 
them have been guilty of the mean and vulgar ofi"ences 
of writing in the books or of mutilating them. But, 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

whether the iiiinibcr of offenders be hirge or small, the 
evil has become, at last, a great one ; and the Trustees 
are advised by the City Solicitor that, in some important 
respects, this evil is beyond the reach of punishment by 
the present laws of the Commonwealth and the present 
Ordinances of the city. They have, therefore, for some 
time, been -anxiously endeavoring to find for it mearj^ 
of prevention, which they have authority to apply, and 
they are not without the hope that they may succeed in 
discovering such as will in some good degree prove 
effectual, and yet interfere little with the extraordinary 
freedom now enjoyed in the use of the Library. Mean- 
time they are much gratified to observe that the great 
abuses here referred to have attracted the attention of 
the Examining Committee for the present year, who 
have made suggestions in relation to them of which it 
will be the duty of the Trustees carefully and faithfully 
to avail themselves. 

Another point on which the Trustees have failed to 
obtain the assistance they have sought from the public 
is, that they have received so few suggestions concern- 
ing the titles of books which, from time to time, it may 
be deemed desirable to add to the shelves of the "insti- 
tution. The Trustees have always endeavored to sup- 
ply the Library with such books, but it is impossible 
that they should know the wants of the many persons 
who use it, so well as their wants are known to those 
persons themselves. At the outset, the Trustees ap- 
plied to above fifty eminent men, in different parts of the 
United States, for lists of such books as, in their par- 
ticular departments, they might think most desirable for 
such a Library. From all to whom they addressed 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. • 13 

themselves they received kind and, generally, ample 
answers. The books that could be best obtained in the 
United States vs^ere bought at once. Large lists of 
others were sent to Mr. Bates, in London, and he having 
caused them to be examined, presented at once to the 
Library an admirable collection of books from different 
parts of Europe, w^hich still constitute the foundations 
of its strength. Many more have been bought since, 
both at home and abroad, from the income of the large 
fund he had, earlier, munificently given us, as well as 
from the income of other funds, given in the same 
spirit by other liberal friends of the Library ; and not a 
few more are still on orders in the hands of our agents, 
waiting only for the needful appropriations. 

But the Trustees have at no time been satisfied with 
what they could themselves do, or what they could ob- 
tain to be done by persons whose aid they could pri- 
vately ask. They have appealed to all who resort to the 
Library. By one of the standing " Rules, etc.," given, 
from the first, to each person who claims the privileges 
of the institution, every such person who does not find 
belonging to the Library any book that he may need, 
" is particularly requested to enter its title on a card 
which the Librarian will furnish for the purpose." 
Few answered the appeal. Disappointed in this call 
for help, the Trustees, about five years ago, caused a 
printed notice to be put into every book lent from the 
Library during a fortnight, inviting especial attention to 
this regulation, and earnestly asking for suggestions 
concerning books that it might be deemed judicious to 
purchase. Of these notices, many thousands were put 
into the books lent ; and in this way, and in other ways, 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9C. 

it was hoped that nearly, or quite all, of those most 
interested in the Library, or often using it, would be 
reached. But less than twenty-five books were asked 
for in consequence. Of course, they were all bought 
as fast as they could be obtained, and there that par- 
ticular movement ended. 

Nor has the general result for the whole period 
during which the Library has been open, and this 
system of solicitation has been before the public, proved 
more satisfactory. In the record of all requests, kept 
in a separate ledger, and marked " Books asked for," it 
appears that between September 19, 1854, and Septem- 
ber 19, 1865, considerably less than three hundred re- 
quests a year were made. But it is not uninstructive 
to observe how many of the books thus asked for were 
asked for without proper reflection or inquiry, since, by 
the same record, it appears that, before the requests 
were made, the very books asked for were already on 
the shelves, and in the catalogues of the Library. 
Where, however, neither this nor any other valid ob- 
jection existed to the purchase of the works in ques- 
tion, they have been regularly ordered, and, with few 
exceptions, obtained. But, notwithstanding their want 
of success thus far in this plan, the Trustees still deem 
it a wise and liberal one, and do not propose to abandon 
it. They only hope that they may have more assistance 
in carrying it out, and so be enabled to purchase, in 
larger numbers, not only good books, but books urgently 
w^anted. Meantime, they will, as heretofore, do the best 
they can to obtain such, whether they are helped in the 
w^ork or not. On the present occasion, they would 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 15 

gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the Examining 
Committee, who have given them valuable lists of books 
to be bought. It is the first time the Trustees have ever 
been thus aided. They hope that it may not be the 
last. 

Besides these two important points, however, there 
are others to which the attention of the Trustees is 
especially called by the gentlemen of the Examining 
Committee, but which, from their number and im- 
portance, it is obviously impossible to discuss in a Report 
like the present. But that each and all of them will 
receive the faithful and diligent consideration of the 
Trustees, the Trustees themselves here venture to say, 
in advance, is not doubtful. Indeed, the more serious 
of them have, for some months, been under active in- 
vestigation, and most of thfe others for a shorter or 
longer time. In any event, however, the Trustees think 
it right and needful on this occasion to say, that what- 
ever may be ultimately decided, and whatever changes 
they may be called to make in the management of the 
Library, they shall rely on the support they have always 
received in their efforts to make it what a great institu- 
tion for public instruction ought to be. Such changes 
cannot, indeed, be favorable to the wishes and prac- 
tices of those persons who have so grossly abused the 
privileges they have so freely enjoyed. They may even 
trench, in some degree — but, it is believed, in a very 
slight one — on the convenience of others. But, what- 
ever may be done, can be done only to protect the prop- 
erty and reputation of the city, and in defence of the 
rightful claims and privileges of those honest and 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

honorable classes among ns to whose welfare, and that 
of their children, the Library and its management 
always have been dedicated, and always should be. 
All which is respectfully submitted, 

GEO. TICKNOR, 
♦ J. P. BIGELOW, 

NATHL. B. SHUETLEFF, 
WM. W. GREENOUGH, 
HENRY I. BOWDITCH, 
W. W. CLAPP, Jr., 
JOSEPH STORY. 

Public Library, November 14, 1865. 



[A] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 



In accordcance with tlie 6th section of the City Ordinance, re- 
lative to the Public Library, the undersigned present the fol- 
lowing 

EEPORT. 

They have examined the institution under the four general 
heads usually taken by their predecessors, viz. : 1st. Books ; 
2d. Catalogues; 3d. Building; 4th. Administration. 

I. BOOKS. 

The Committee refer to the Superintendent's Eeport for 
many of the statistics of the Library. They examined the 
books in the various alcoves, and found all, so far as they could 
judge, in excellent order. 

They learned that during the recess every volume had been 
taken down and dusted, and each shelf had been washed. An 
air of great neatness, consequently, prevailed everywhere. 

At the first meeting of the Committee, it was decided that 
each member should undertake a specific investigation in some 
branch with which he was particularly interested. It was be- 
lieved that greater good would result to the Library than if only 
one person were to make a general report. 
3 



13 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

The folloAving questions were thus rcfcrrctl : — 

The present condition and wants of the Library in the 
Departments of Theology. 
" Law. 

'* Medicine. 

" Natural History. 

*« Music. 

" American History. 

Besides the above, the two following questions were referred 
to another sub-committee : — 

1. The use and the abuse of the books, and the remedies for 
the latter. 

2. How far have the original wishes of the chief founder of 
the Library, Mr. Bates, been complied with? 

These various sub-committees made separate reports, In 
writing, which were discussed at a general meeting. The re- 
sults are embodied in the following brief statements, and the 
original reports are deposited with the Trustees. Lists of 
books, suggested In some of the departments, are transmitted, 
and it Is hoped that they will, to some extent, meet the oft-re- 
peated request of the Trustees for assistance In this direction. 

On Theology, It Is reported that, in the opinion of the sub- 
committee, " the Library contains the most fair and the best 
collection of works on theology. Catholic and non-Catholic, of 
any library in Boston." 

On Law, the Reporter says that It cannot be expected that 
the collection would be complete. Yv'hile the Library Is a very 
valuable one, and contains works on International Law, etc., 
he thinks that " some Important text-books and treatises by 
English and American writers on these subjects should be pro- 
cured. In addition to those already there. The works now 
found are too exclusively In foreign languages." 

He annexes a list of books, which he recommends should be 
purchased, on International Law, public and private, on the 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 19 

conflict of laws, including the codes of the principal States of 
Europe ; State papers, — State trials ; works on the science of 
Government and political economy. 

The statutes of the United States and of the individual States 
should be made more complete ; and, by proper correspondence 
with the State Departments, these might readily be procured, 
at little expense to the city. 

The reports of adjudicated cases, and the decisions of the 
Supreme Courts of the United States and of Massachusetts, 
should likewise be made more complete. 

The Eeporter of the Medical Department finds an excellent 
groundwork. 

It contains 3,638 volumes, exclusive of those in the Parker 
and Bowditch collections. He finds many of the best works of 
plates ever published, and the writings of many of the earlier 
authors, and not a few of those of modern time. 

Several valuable medical journals, published in America, 
Great Britain, and on the European Continent, are also found 
here. The Library is, in fact, superior, in his opinion, in this 
respect, to any other library in Boston. 

He suggests : — 

1. That some imperfect sets of these journals should be made 
complete. 

2. That valuable works, published by American authors, 
should be procured. 

3. That the Library, though containing many valuable old 
works, and some recent ones, has not quite kept up with the 
progress of medicine the last few years. A list of books for 
purchase is laid before the Trustees. 

The Reporter on the Natural History Department finds the 
subject "imperfectly represented." This, however, was to be 
expected. A good beginning has been made. " A more 
thorough system might be followed in supplying the absent 
requisites for a more perfect illustration of the several branches 
of Natural History." 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

Our American publications on Botany, Zoology, &c., should 
be purchased ; proceedings of societies obtained. All general 
works of systematic classification of the natural sciences should 
be there. It is not advisable, with the present means at the 
disposal of the Trustees, to buy expensive works, but the neces- 
saries, rather than the luxuries, should be procured. 

The Reporter on Music gives the honor of originating this 
department to the munificence of Mr. Bates, who purchased a 
valuable private library of 600 volumes, offered at auction in Ber- 
lin. Though small, it is admirable ; especially rich in early printed 
works of the 15th and 16th centuries, " rare and valuable.'' 
Little additions have been made since. Oliver Ditson has 
generously given all pieces published by him. As the collection 
now stands, it represents fairly the theoretical, the biographical, 
and historical departments of music. Musical journalism, too, 
is well represented in fifty volumes of the Allgemeine Musical- 
ische Zeitung, &c. But, with a few exceptions, we have not 
the complete works of any of the great composers. It is a 
foundation only for a library. The Reporter thinks this depart- 
ment should be kept up, in order to meet the future wants of 
this community, which, under the present system of teaching 
music to every child in our public schools, must, within a few 
years, become thoroughly grounded in a knowledge of the 
principles of music, and will, therefore, look to the Public 
Library for improvement and means of study in this depart- 
'ment. The Handel and Haydn Society and Harvard Musical 
Association will also tend to the same end, viz : the education 
of our people in this branch. Hence, the still greater impor- 
tance of making this department equal to the demand that will 
be made upon it. 

The Reporter on American History and Biography says that 
the collection is very small and very deficient in what the Com- 
mittee thinks the most important works an American Library 
should possess. Time and money avIII be needed to get many 
books, but to no better use could their means be employed, for 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 21 

every day the works are growing scarcer and more valuable, 
and by-and-by neither time nor money will procure them. Al- 
lusions are made to large collections of English county histories 
(the munificent gift of Mr. Bates), and he suggests that 
vigorous exertions should be made to obtain similar ones from 
America ; of State, county, and local historical and biographical 
works relating to our own country. As very small editions of 
this class are printed, oftentimes privately or by subscription, 
some method better than that believed to have been used by the 
Trustees should be put in operation. 

The plan now used, of having one bookseller in Boston send 
the books he has in his possession is good, but insufficient for 
the purpose. Some agent should be appointed in all the large 
cities to secure every original book or tract relating to American 
history. 

If the British Museum adds to its collection all original Amer- 
ican works, surely the Boston City Library should contain all 
those pertaining to its local history, or that of the State or 
nation of which it is a part. 

The Reporter on the Abuse of Books fully sustains the 
views of the General Committee, as shown in a subsequent part 
of this Report. 

There is, in his view, no doubt of the gravity of this evil, 
not only as injuring city property, but in its influence upon the 
youths of the city, in teaching them to desecrate rather than 
respect books. To see the evil is easy, to correct it difficult. 

The system of recording the books must be made more ac- 
curate, so as to be able to trace a book when one is given out. 

He proposes a heavy assessment for any injury. A constant 
collation of books should be made, and the last borrower should 
be held responsible. Greater promptness In the return of 
volumes should be required, and, finally, certain officers of the 
institution should be vested by law, with judicial and police 
powers, for the arrest of offenders, etc. 

The Committee on the question ichether the wishes of Mr. 



22 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

Bates liavc been complied ivUh, reports, that, if anything is want- 
ing to that end, it may be tliat the young men wlio resort to 
the Eeading lloom in the evening arc more restricted in their 
use of books in the Upper Ilall than is desirable, owing to the 
impossibihty, under the present arrangements, of getting books 
from the alcoves after dark. 

THE SUCCESS OF THE LIBRARY. 

Taken in connection with the Superintendent's Report, these 
documents show, in many respects, a very gratifying result. 
In fact, when it is remembered that in thirteen years from the 
first germ of the Library being planted, over one hundred and 
twenty thousand volumes have been accumulated ; that last year 
we circulated nearly two hundred thousand volumes among our 
citizens ; that, at least, three quarters of these volumes have 
been given to the city ; and, finally, that the Library has also 
received ninety-six thousand dollars, which are invested in the 
city six per cent, stocks, the interest of which must be devoted 
to the purchase of books, the result cannot but be regarded 
as truly extraordinary, and a sufficient proof of the foresight and 
wisdom of the early advocates of the Library. The cause of this 
success seems obvious. The Library had been for some time 
unconsciously called for, if such an expression may be allowed, 
by our community. It was, as Mr. Everett has said, in one of 
the previous Reports, simply the complement of our Common 
School System, and, as such, was needed, as its crowning grace 
in this city. The Committee would hail with pleasure the 
establishment of similar institutions in all the greater cities and 
towns of our land. Hereafter, the sneer has no weight here, 
which says that the Common School System affords a wide- 
spread, but very superficial education for the masses ; but that 
real learning is wholly neglected by it. At this Library, 
learned men now resort with profit. A few weeks since, an 
eminent professor, connected with one of our colleges, was seen 
consulting, in the Upper Hall, books that he said could be 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

found nowhere else on this continent. Even at this early period 
of the history of the Library, the earnest student can, if he 
choose, make here extensive study on almost any favorite topic. 
In some specialties, few libraries of its size in either hemisphere 
are so rich. 

In the free circulation of the books in the Lower Hall, there 
is no institution, so far as the undersigned know, comparable with 
it. A broad and deep foundation has evidently been laid by 
the original managers of the institution ; and, as it has become 
one of the jewels of the city, it is believed that the city will always 
duly cherish it by granting, from time to time, all the facilities 
possible to enable the Trustees rightly to sustain it. 

THE BENEFITS EXTEND BEYOND THE LIMITS OF THE CITY. 

The Committee cannot but feel regret that the right to re- 
ceive benefit from the institution, so far as the direct action of 
the City Government is concerned, has not been extended be- 
yond our own citizens ; but a margin of discretion in this regard 
is permitted to the Trustees. 

The undersigned are fully aware that it would be impossible 
to allow every one out of the city to take books from the Li- 
brary. But it is the unanimous opinion of your Committee 
that any one from any quarter of the globe who presents proper 
credentials to the Trustees or Superintendent, that prove him 
to be engaged in literary or scientific pursuits, or desirous of fol- 
lowing, for a special purpose, or for a certain time, a particular 
line of study, should be allowed the privilege of consulting the 
books, and of copying therefrom, though not of removing them 
from the building, except under the special and individual re- 
sponsibility of one or more of the Trustees that such books 
shall be properly cared for, and returned within the time al- 
lotted ; and provided, moreover, that they shall be easily re- 
turnable if another person, having rights in the Library, shall 
need them. The City Government, therefore, acted wisely in 
leaving: this matter somewhat in the hands of the Trustees ; and 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 06. 

it is to be hoped that the Trustees, while jealously guarding the 
best interests of the city, will interpret this permission in the 
most liberal manner, in order that the Library may fulfil, to 
the utmost, its important mission in this community. 

True learning ought not and cannot be confined to one city 
and one community. Like the air, it overflows all narrow 
limits. In every way possible, therefore, we ought to cultivate 
sound learning outside, as well as inside of our own limits, be- 
cause good will therefrom flow back upon us. Such charity is, 
indeed, *' twice blessed." 

ABUSE OF BOOKS. 

This subject earnestly engaged the attention of the whole 
Committee. Upon this topic the undersigned refer to the re- 
port made by one of their number, an abstract of which is given 
above. They, however, cannot forbear expressing their pro- 
found astonishment that there should be any persons in this 
community so lost to all respect for books, and so regardless of 
their own duties to this community, through whose liberality 
they are all enabled to take out and to use the books, that they 
can be guilty of wilfully injuring some of the most valuable 
works contained in the Library. Doubtless, many mark on the 
leaves and do other injury from thoughtlessness. This palli- 
ation cannot be extended to others, who are evidently gross 
culprits, and, as such, should be dealt with by the higher power 
of the law. It would be impossible to cite the numerous abuses 
of this kind ; but two come up prominently before the Commit- 
tee. A long addition sum, occupying the whole of the fly- 
leaf of a fine copy of " Enoch Arden," is a specimen of thoiight- 
hssncss. A gross attack upon the memory of our martyred 
President, written in doggerel lines and surmounted by the late, 
so-called, Confederate States' flag, on the fly-leaf of another 
equally valuable work, is a specimen of the wilful injury of city 
property. Evidently, it has become the duty of some one to 
see that such desecration shall not be allowed hereafter. Other!^ 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

wise, in addition to the injury which the Library will sustain, 
we shall encouragfi, not a sacred regard for books, but shall 
promote in the youth of this community a tendency to the dese- 
cration of them, than which scarcely anything could be more 
injurious in a Republic. 

FURTHER LEGISLATION BY THE STATE DEEMED NECESSARY 
TO CURE THIS DIFFICULTY. 

As this is a general subject, and similar troubles will arise in 
other cities of the Commonwealth, the State should be appealed 
to ; because, on occasions of gross misuse of the books, and in 
which the evidence seemed all-sufficient to convict, the City So- 
licitor declared the contrary to be the fact under the present law. 

The Committee would, therefore, respectfully, but earnestly, 
submit to the Trustees, whether the time has not fully come for 
them, as guardians of this city property, to give official notice 
to the city authorities that the Trustees cannot, under existing 
laws, properly defend what has been committed to them, and for 
asking that the city would appeal to the State for further legis- 
lation upon the subject. 

OTHER PLANS TO PREVENT THE ABUSE OF BOOKS. 

The undersigned would also suggest the propriety of having 
the books from a part of the Library carefully collated when 
taken, and when they are returned to the Library, whatever the 
expense that may be incurred in so doing, in order that, imme- 
diately upon any injury having been committed, the offender 
may be punished by a withdrawal of his right to take out 
books until the Trustees have acted upon the case. It may be 
a question whether a similar plan might not be pursued in this 
Library to that followed, at times, by the British Museum, viz. : 
whether the most grossly abused books should not be conspic- 
uously placed to the public view? This method, whether 
thought wise or not by the Trustees, would be very effective in 
preventing similar offences being hereafter committed. Notices 
4 



26 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

might also be posted on the backs of the books, requesting every 
citizen to aid in preventing injury to them, arid informing offen- 
ders that they will be punished. If the State should pass any 
law, the legal penalty for abuse should be also thus placed on 
every book. 

A BETTER SYSTEM FOR RECORDING BOOKS, BORROWED FROM 
THE LIBRARY, SHOULD BE INTRODUCED, IF WE WOULD CURB 
THIS EVIL. 

It needs no argument to prove that the strictest accuracy at- 
tainable should be attempted. This proposition is self-evident, 
even on the most general grounds, and to meet two important 
difficulties, viz. : the abuse of, and the loss of, books, it becomes 
of paramount importance. Nothing can be done towards check- 
ing these growing evils, unless we can trace with perfect ac- 
curacy and ease the passage of books to and from the Library. 
Your Committee are well aware of the difficulty surrounding 
this subject, and admit that when six or twelve hundred volumes 
are given out in one day, very rapid action is necessary. But, 
just in proportion to the numbers thus taken out, must be the 
caution observed in all our records. The present method, al- 
though it answered very well in the earlier days of the Library, 
is evidently unfitted for present use in the vastly enlarged cir- 
culation of the books. It is an undoubted fact that it is im- 
possible for any one to know by this method who has had a 
particular cop]] of a book within five minutes after its return to 
the Library, unless, perchance^ the discovery may be made by a 
long and tedious examination of the records. The discovery 
would be im-possihle if the book were a favorite one, and if 
several copies of it had been asked for at the same time. There 
might be other objections made to the present method, but your 
Committee have no desire to discuss, in detail, any of the im- 
perfections of this or that course, but simply to state that, during 
their investigations in regard to the abuse of books, they were 
led to look at the present method of recording them. Hearing 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 27 

from the Librarian tliat some years since another had been de- 
vised by J. C. J. Brown, Esq., a former Trustee, they asked 
for an interview with that gentleman, and had a detailed state- 
ment of his plans. The Committee were gratified with that 
interview. They would respectfully and unanimously urge the 
adoption of Mr. Brown's system, or some other equally good 
plan. 

A statement of Mr. Brown's system may be found among the 
Reports of the Sub-Committees, and is respectfully presented 
for the consideration of the Trustees. 

LOSS OF BOOKS. 

Of the fifteen books noticed by the Superintendent in last 
year's Report as having been then missing from the Bates Hall, 
and not charged to any one, eight have come to light. Seven 
remain unaccounted for. Nineteen books have disappeared in 
the same way from the same Hall this past year, of which two 
have already been found. To lose books by the fault of others 
who are borrowers is the fate of every library. It would require 
an unceasing vigilance, an almost superhuman amount of cau- 
tion and wisdom, to prevent it. But to have books leave the 
shelves, and to be unable to trace them, excites very painful 
emotions. Is it possible that any one connected with the Li- 
brary, from Trustees to the lowest official, ever takes thought- 
lessly, or for any cause, however worthy, a book out of the 
building without proper record? If so, such loss is easily ex- 
plained, and if such a proceeding be allowed by the Trustees or 
Superintendent, it seems to your Committee that it should be, 
by express vote of the Trustees, in future prevented. The 
number of books missing from the Lower Hall is 529. Less 
than 100 have been regained. The Committee regret to learn 
that more than one half of the whole is probably lost, and that 
of the delinquents in the Lower Hall none can be positively 
traced. The Committee cannot but anticipate an improvement 
in this respect in future, if Mr. Brown's plan be adopted and its 
provisions in regard to delinquents vigorously carried out every week. 



28 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

YOUNG CHILDREN SHOULD NOT BE PERMITTED TO DEMAND 
MANr BOOKS, AT A TIME, UPON THE CARDS OF OLDER 
PERSONS. 

Children under eighteen years of age are not, by the rules of 
the Librai-y, permitted to have cards for receiving books ; but, 
with a laudable desire to extend as widely as possible the benefits 
of the institution, persons having cards have been permitted to 
send their children or servants for books. This seems reason- 
able ; but it is evident that due discretion has not been exercised 
in this regard by parents and others who have received cards. 
This has become a very serious evil. Small children are seen 
not unfrequently carrying away more books and larger ones 
than they can conveniently hold. One of your Committee saw, 
on a rainy day, two small girls carrying five books, and holding 
them in such a tvay that it was evident that a very small acci- 
dent would throw some of the five volumes into the gutter. 
Eight or ten books have at times been taken out by one individ- 
ual at one time. Books are found on the Common, left there 
by the takers of them, who, perhaps, will repeat the careless- 
ness the following day, because by the present method of giving 
out books, as has already been stated, it would be impossible, 
unless with the greatest difficulty, to discover who had left them 
thus exposed. Obviously such carelessness, and so large a 
number of books being taken out at once, should be stopped. 
Your Committee would respectfully suggest whether the number 
of books taken by one person on various cards should not be 
limited, and whether any rule can be adopted whereby too 
young children and irresponsible persons should be restrained 
from taking any, or, at least, more than one at a time. 

CARE OF PAJVIPHLETS AND DUPLICATES OF JOURNALS. 

During the examination of the various rooms in the building, 
aside from the Library rooms proper, the Committee were 
struck with an apparent want of care in the arranging of various 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 29 

pamphlets said to be duplicates, and numbers of journals be- 
longing to sets waiting to be made perfect. All such should be 
so distinctly labelled and so neatly arranged that every one at a 
glance could recognize the series collected in each group. Some 
of the closets and parts of the cellar are occupied by books and 
pamphlets, apparently thrown together in a way to produce con- 
fusion. Such should not be the fact, and the Committee draws 
the attention of the Trustees to it. They would also respect- 
fully inquire whether it would not be well to inaugurate a more 
thorough system of communication with the various libraries of 
the country, whereby exchanges of duplicates might be pro- 
cured? On inquiry, it appears that, owing to various causes, 
no regular files of various journals have been uniformly kept ; 
and it seems, at present, impossible to learn definitely about the 
whole subject. The Committee learn with pleasure that the 
Trustees have recently employed in the Library one amply 
qualified to superintend this matter, and who is to be made re- 
sponsible for the preservation of accurate series of the various 
periodicals. The Committee would urge the propriety of these 
several works being immediately put into the binder's hands on 
the termination of a volume, and that if, perchance, any number 
be wanting, that number be immediately bought, so that' the 
volume may be forthwith placed upon its proper shelf. 

FACILITIES FOR USING THE BOOKS. 

These may, it is believed, be improved. The Library is now 
large enough to be made in every manner useful to the student. 
Two things are important to this end, viz. : First, catalogues, 
well-arranged, complete, and accessible; and, second, an at- 
tendant, by whose assistance the resources of the Library, not 
attainable from the catalogues, may be known. Of course, there 
will always be some, and generally a large number of books 
whose titles will not appear on the printed catalogues. These 
books are, as soon as practicable, entered in an interleaved cata- 
logue ; but even this cannot possibly be kept up to the last ac- 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. -No. 96. 

quisitions. Besides, there are many persons so unskilful as not 
to be able to use advantageously a catalogue of the simplest con- 
struction, and whose inquiries, therefore, would not be met 
by anything of the kind. There are others, on the contrary, 
quite able to use with skill any means in their power, and yet, 
when entering upon any special subject of investigation, they may 
be at a loss what books to ask for. Now, to both of these classes 
an attendant might be able to make valuable suggestions. This 
attendant should be one of the higher officers of the institution, 
a courteous and able man, who, from his well-stored mind and 
thorough acquaintance with at least the outlines of the varied 
learning contained in the Library, might be able to suggest to 
a student some of the books most likely to aid him in his inves- 
tigations. This duty would naturally devolve first upon the 
Superintendent ; and the Committee are Informed that he is very 
frequently thus consulted. But it is obvious that, with the- 
various duties now resting on tliat officer, he could not be sub- 
jected to nvmerous Inquiries of the kind ; yet your Committee 
fully believe that such an officer will be eventually needed, and 
that, at present, he would be of Infinite Importance to the 
thorough carrying forward of the beneficent objects of the 
Public Library. 

VALUABLE PLATES AND BOOKS ; SHOULD THEY BE OPENED 
TO THE 'public AT LARGE? 

This subject is a delicate matter, and yet it should be care- 
fully considered. It is plain that no course should be pursued 
which will, in the end, tend to ruin valuable and very expen- 
sive plates. Yet that is what must happen in the daily exhibi- 
tions to the public of such plates as the splendid ones by 
Audubon, those by Lepsius on Egypt, and others. Al- 
ready, some of them are, In a measure. Irretrievably 
marred, and the Committee suggest that these, and others 
of the same class, should not be opened to the whole public, 
and that the free use of them by casual visitors, such as at 
present prevails, be materially modified. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 31 



PROCURING OF NEW BOOKS. 



Complaints have been made to members of the Committee 
that new books are not procured at the City Library as they 
are at private circulating libraries, where gain is the object. 
If this complaint may be true, — and, from the repeated state- 
ment of it, and from what your Committee have observed, they 
believe that it is so, — then it is obviously the duty of the Trus- 
tees to see that it be otherwise in future, at least for the ma- 
jority of books published. It is, however, but just to the Trus- 
tees to remark that the proprietors of circulating libraries, 
opened for purposes of gain, are not required to be so circumspect 
as to the character of the books they place upon their shelves 
as the Trustees of our City Public Library should be. The 
former give their chief attention to the novelties of literature, 
much of which is often of a transitory nature, while the Trus- 
tees of this institution are bound to dispense the means at their 
disposal, not alone on new and popular works, but upon those 
that will prove of permanent value and usefulness. 

Moreover, no just complaint can be made by any one who 
has failed to attend to the oft-repeated request of the Trustees, 
as provided in the following : — 

" Whenever a hook wanted by any one usmg the Library, does 
not belong to it, such iierson is particularly requested to enter the 
title of the book on a card furnished for tlie purpose, to which the 
person^ s name and residence shall be added." 

The Committee cannot forbear alluding to the above standing 
rule of the Trustees. They do this for the purpose of bringing 
it prominently before their fellow-citizens. It is evidently not 
as yet fully known to the public. It has often been alluded to 
in other Reports, and it is hoped that every one hereafter, after 
making an unsuccessful application for a book, will act upon it. 

II. CATALOGUES. 

The various catalogues were examined. In previous Reports, 
they have been described. It seems unfortunate that the shelf 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

catalogues in tlie Lower Hull should not bo in perfect order. 
A very large number of books are still catalogued on separ- 
ately-written sheets, instead of being fairly transcribed in the 
blank-books intended for these records. 

But a for more serious difficulty has been noticed, in the 
sluggish manner with which the " Supplement" to the " Index'* 
is printing. A few facts in connection with this subject, the 
Committee desire to refer to, before making any suggestion 
in the premises. The larger " Index," printed several years 
ago, contains nine hundred and two pages, and those who were 
then City Printers completed it in nineteen months, without 
complaint from any one as to any want of promptness of action 
on their part. Sixteen months have already elapsed since the 
"Supplement" was commenced by the present printers, and 
only three hundred pages are printed. Seven hundred pages, 
in all, will probably be needed before it will be finished, which, 
at the rate of printing during the first sixteen months, would 
take more than three years, from commencement to its comple- 
tion ; and all this while new books would be added preparatory 
to a new Supplement. The Committee learn with pleasure that 
the Trustees have made many efforts to procure more rapid print- 
ing, and of late a great improvement is perceptible. The fault 
has appeared to lie chiefly with the present arrangements, and 
partly, at least, in the fact that the present City Printers have had 
a much smaller font of a certain type than their predecessors had. 
It may, therefore, be a question, whether the city be not a real 
loser, when it takes from the Trustees the right of selecting the 
printers of such an immense and peculiarly difficult work as this 
has proved to be. The Committee believe that no private per- 
son or business corporation would submit to such uncalled-for 
delays, or allow of the removal of agents qualified, and in every 
respect willing, to perform their duty, simply on political grounds. 
As this subject will be perpetually recurring, owing to the fact 
that printing will be going on much of the time, in cataloguing 
books to be hereafter deposited in the Library, the Committee 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 33 

would submit to the Trustees the question whether it wouhl not 
be well to petition the City Government to allow the institution 
to choose its own printers, as it chooses its other officers, provided 
that no increased expense be incurred by the city beyond what 
would be incurred were the regular city printers to undertake 
the work. 

III. BUILDING. 

The Committee examined the building. It is in good order 
in its various parts, except in the southeast corner, near the 
staircase, there is evidently a leakage, the wall being stained 
by the water that has penetrated near the windows. Fortu- 
nately, it does not come near the Library proper. But it is 
very evident that, ere many years, additional rooms will be 
needed. Much of the clerical duties and the binding of many 
books are now carried on in the alcoves of the Upper Hall. 
Rooms ought to be provided for these duties. But, ere long, we 
shall have so many very valuable books or plates, that accom- 
modation will be needed for them. The English patent specifi- 
cations have already increased so much that the small room 
devoted to them is inadequate to the purpose. The large col- 
lection of maps and charts can hardly be said to have any place 
really allotted to them, and to exhibit a large map the floor of 
an alcove is the only place, at present, available. The under- 
signed would suggest that the room formerly intended as a 
Ladies' Reading Room should be devoted to the more valuable 
plates, maps, patent specifications, and works of art, until such 
time as the growth of the Library shall require further buildings 
to be erected. 

WANT OF LIGHT IN THE ALCOVES IN THE UPPER HALL. 

It is a very grave defect in the construction of the building 
that it is nearly impossible, even with a brilliant sunlight com- 
ing in from the ceiling at noonday, to read some of the smaller 
printed titles on the backs of books in the depths of the lower 
6 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9G. 

alcoves. This should be remedied, if possible. Various 
methods have been suggested. It appears that, for some rea- 
son not very obvious to the undersigned, the building originally 
was erected Avith the intention of having windows in the fluted 
sides. No sucli windows were subsequently made. The result 
is, the great want of light spoken of. On consultation with the 
architect, Mr. Kirby, it appears that two methods might be 
pursued: 1st. Remove the flutings entirely; carry up the 
building directly in the line of the wall of the Lower Reading 
Rooms, as might be done with perfect safety. A window might 
then be opened in each alcove, and enough light obtained ; but 
it would be very expensive, and might, while the alterations were 
making, disturb those who frequented the Library. Whether 
this course be pursued in regard to the present building or not, 
the Committee cannot but hope that, when the time comes for 
enlarging the main building, the fluting will be given up, and a 
plain wall, with windows enough in it to afford the amplest 
supply of light, be erected. 2d. A circular window might 
easily be opened in each alcove, as the building now stands ; 
but it would derange the present situation of several of the 
books. The Committee would not recommend either course, 
but would earnestly repeat the necessity for more light, and 
leave it to the Trustees to devise the method for obtaining it. 



WOEKS OF AET IN THE UPPER LIBEAEY ROOM. 

The Committee cannot but regard it as Avholly inappropriate 
to the Reading Room of any Library that is habitually used by 
students for consultation and the reading of books, that any 
works of pictorial or plastic art should be placed therein. 
Beautiful in themselves, they excite — nay, seem to demand — 
conversation and criticism. Conversation, save what is abso- 
lutely necessary in the obtaining of books, is, of course, wholly 
inadmissible. The Committee would suggest that, if a Gallery 
of Art is to be added to the Library, the so-called Ladies' 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 35 

Eeading Room, but which has never been used for the purpose, 
be the place for the reception of statuary and paintings, &c. 
The undersigned trust that their criticisms upon the selection of 
the place of deposit of the valuable works now possessed by the 
city, by the liberality of some of its citizens, will not be deemed 
ungracious to the donors, to whom, certainly, the thanks of 
every citizen should be heartily given for these beautiful speci- 
mens of the Fine Arts. 

COMPLAINTS OF UNNECESSARY NOISES IN THE UPPER HALL. 

There is, doubtless, some ground for these complaints, 
although the evil is much smaller than one, knowing the struc- 
ture of the Hall, and the various duties that are performed there, 
would anticipate. Those connected with the Hall arise from 
various causes. There is a great reverberation from the gal- 
leries. The floors are uncarpeted, and, unless great care be 
taken, every step resounds with great force. The legs of the 
chairs should have leather or india-rubber upon them, to prevent 
noise when they are moved. If, by some contrivance, the 
present movable steps in each alcove could be wholly given up, 
or made to rattle less than they now do, it would be very de- 
sirable. To obviate the noise of trampling feet, it may be a 
question whether a strip of india-rubber, or kamptulikon, the 
material now used in the British Museum, might not be adopted 
by the Trustees, so far, at least, that a narrow strip should 
cover the pathway through the alcoves. Until this or some- 
thing similar be used, it might be well to have a rule that all 
attendants should use slippers, with felt soles, whilst in the 
Library. 

All unnecessary conversation should be interdicted. One of the 
undersigned was in the hall for nearly an hour, and all the 
while a gentle " tete-a-ieto'' was being carried on by a young 
couple, who had found the luxurious chairs a pleasant spot in 
which to pass an agreeable hour. Small children, except in 
company with parents, should be totally excluded, and, in 
general, every noise that can be avoided should be prevented. 



36 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 



IV. ADMINISTEATION. 

Importance of the recent vote of the Cily Government^ whereby the 
election of Superintendent and Librarian was given to the 
Trustees. 

A very important change-has been made this year by a re- 
cent vote of the City Government. The choice of Superin- 
tendent and Librarian, instead of the mere nomination of tlicse 
officers for election or otherwise by the city authorities, was 
given to the Board of Trustees. This, in the opinion of the 
Committee, was a wise measure. The office of Superintendent 
of a hirge, and constantly increasing, public Library is one of 
the highest and most honorable in the community. It is on a 
par with that of the Presidency of a University. As such, it 
should be removed far above even the mere breath of political 
partisanship. But, if any one will examine the list of qualifica- 
tions required of the Superintendent of the City Library by the 
rules of the Trustees, he will perceive that more is required of 
a superintendent than can be found in most men. He must be 
a man extremely learned in books ; a proficient in the modern 
languages ; a competent and skilful business agent, and one of 
infinite tact, to enable him to meet, with equanimity, the 
various annoyances incident to the position. In addition to 
these natural and acquired qualifications, it would be unfortu- 
nate if he should not have studied in the various large libraries 
of Europe, in order that he might avoid their dangers, or seek 
to engraft their good qualities upon the institution committed 
chiefly to his care. It is obvious that such a man would not 
often be found in or near the arena of mere politics. Nor, 
having chosen his profession of librarian, M^ould he ever for a 
long time submit to the annual uncertainties of political strife in 
the matter of his election. The city authorities, in the opinion 
of your Committee, have elevated the office to its proper rank 
by their recent action, and by resigning to the Trustees those 
elections which they had previously retained in their own hands. 



PUBLIC LIBRAEY. 37 



NECESSITY FOR THOROUGH SYSTEM AND CLASSIFICATION OF 
THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL EMPLOYED IN 
THE INSTITUTION. 

As the Superintendent is the highest officer in the Library 
under the Trustees, so there should be, as in the military ser- 
vice or in large mercantile establishments, regular gradations 
of under-officers, and specific duties devolving on each station, 
the performance of which duties should be rigorously required 
of the incumbent in each office. All the work necessarily car- 
ried on in the institution should be thoroughly systematized. 
The Committee are unable to say how far such systematic 
action has been introduced ; but they have been led to believe 
that they should not do any injury to the institution by submit- 
ting that, at times, there has not seemed to them such entire 
care in this respect as could be wished, and they would, there- 
fore, bring this whole subject up for the candid consideration of 
the Trustees. 

THE CLOSING OF THE LIBRARY IN AUGUST. 

Some complaint has been made by individuals, and recently 
in one of the public prints, that the Reading Rooms were 
closed during the month of August. The length of time for 
closing the Library, also, it is believed, has been gradually in- 
creasing since the first opening of the institution. This, 
doubtless, is owing — in part, at least — to increased necessi- 
ties for painting, repairs, and cleaning. The Committee would 
suggest the propriety of closing the Library only the shortest 
time possible for thorough examination, cleaning, and repairs, 
and they see no reason why the Lower Reading Room may not 
remain open all the time, though other parts of the Library 
shall, of necessity, be closed. 



38 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 



OPENING OF THE READING ROOM ON SUNDAY. 

The question of opening the Reading Room on Sunday 
evenings was touched upon by the Committee ; but, as a unani- 
mous report could not be procured, owing to radical differences 
of opinion on the part of members, the subject was laid aside. 

In conclusion, the undersigned would remark that, while 
they have thus drawn attention to some apparent defects and 
evils which have become noticeable in the working of the in- 
stitution, they have done so for the sole purpose of aiding the 
proper authorities in applying suitable remedies, although by so 
doing they should increase the expense of the establishment, and 
for a time, perhaps, give occasion for inconsiderate complaints ; 
and they would not fail to add that they have experienced the 
highest gratification at the thought of the extraordinary success 
that has really attended the Library hitherto, which success is 
due to the care of the Trustees, and to the excellent labors of 
its various employes. 

HENRY I. BOWDITCH, 
THOMAS M. BREWER, 
GEO. F. HASKINS, 
HENRY H. KIMBALL, 
J. P. PUTMAN, 
J. BAXTER UPHAM, 

Examining Committes. 

Public Library, November 10, 1865. 



[B] 
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To THE Trustees of the Public Library of the City or 
Boston : — 
Gentlemen : In obedience to a requirement of the By-Laws, 
I take leave to present the following as the Report of the Super- 
intendent for the year ending on the first of September, 1865. 

INCREASE OF THE LIBRARY. 

During the year, there have been added to the Library 6,082 
books, 1,516 pamphlets, about 3,000 newspapers, and 467 
other articles, consisting of maps, charts, broadsides, prints, 
and one piece of statuary. 

Of these, 804 books, 1,026 pamphlets, and most of the other 
objects enumerated above, were donations from 328 individuals 
and societies. A list of the donors is appended to this Report, 
and marked BB. 

Among the donations, I may be permitted to allude especially 
to the following : — 

Benjamin B. WifFen, a cultivated Quaker of Bedfordshire, 
England, has presented 26 volumes of the works of the Spanish 
reformers, reprinted a few years since in elegant style, at private 
expense, and now become extremely rare. The copies pre- 
sented are on large paper. They form a very curious and 
valuable collection. 

To John Lovell, Esq., a bookseller of Montreal, we are in- 



4Q CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 

debtcd for a collection of his own publications, and of other 
works relative to the history of Canada. 

The Honorable William McDougall, Provincial Secretary of 
Canada, has obligingly sent to us upwards of a hundred volumes 
of the publications of the Canadian Government, Avhicli we had 
previously found it difficult to procure, and which are of much 
importance for the Library. 

Our thanks are especially due to Henry J. ]Morgan, Esq., of 
Quebec, for procuring for us the above, and other valuable 
works relative to Canada. 

Gardner Brewer, Esq., of this city, has given to the Library 
a beautiful group in marble, representing the Holy Family, 
made some years ago, to his order, by Julius Troschel, a dis- 
tinguished sculptor of Berlin, residing in Rome. 

Among the donations of the past year, are the original pa- 
roles signed by Generals Burgoyne and Riedesel, and the officers 
under their command, subsequent to the surrender at Saratoga, 
in 1777. J. Wingate Thornton, Esq., being the owner of these 
valuable papers, gave them to the Boston Sanitary Fair, on 
condition that if one thousand dollars were subscribed for them, 
the money should be given to the Fair, and the paroles pre- 
sented to the Public Library. The requisite sum was subscribed, 
and these interesting relics of the Revolution were thus secured 
for the Library. They have been neatly framed, and are sus- 
pended in the Bates Hall. 

I w^ould not omit to mention here that the proprietors of 
newspapers in the city have liberally allowed us to select from 
their exchanges a large number of newspapers containing notices 
of Mr. Everett, and of President Lincoln. The number of 
these is not less than 2,500. 

Those relating to President Lincoln, and to events connected 
with his assassination, coming from all parts of this country, 
with many from England, will present to those who may come 
after us a lively picture of the feelings and sentiments which 
pervaded all minds as the news of this dreadful event reached 
them. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 41 

The number of books purchased during the year was 5,178, 
of pamphlets 490, We have been mindful to gather, as far as 
we could, the publications, both home and foreign, relative to 
the momentous events of the Kebellion. This fact will account 
for the unusually large number of pamphlets which have been 
bought. 

EXTENT OF THE COLLECTIONS. 

The Library contained on the 1st of August, 1865 — 
In the Bates Hall, . . . 98,156 volumes 

In the Lower Hall, . . . 24,860 " 



Total, .... 123,016 " 
In this enumeration are included only bound volumes, but it 
is proper* to state that all the pamphlets which have been 
separately bound and placed upon the shelves are counted as 
books. The number of them at present is about 3,500. But 
several hundred volumes of pamphlets in the Library contain 
each from ten to twenty distinct works, bound together as one. 
The work of binding valuable pamphlets separately, and incor- 
porating them among the more permanent treasures of the 
Library, is continued. 

The number of volumes assigned above to the Bates Hall is 
believed to represent precisely those which now belong upon the 
shelves. The books in the Lower Hall have not been actually 
counted since|1861. Books have from year to year been lost, 
and others have been worn out in the service. Many, but not 
all of these, have been replaced. It is probable, therefore, that 
if a careful enumeration were now made of the books actually 
upon the shelves, the numbers above given would be found 
somewhat too large. 

The above enumeration of books in the Bates Hall also in- 
cludes 4,984 duplicates and odd volumes, which it is not thought 
desirable to retain in the Library. The City Government hav- 
ing granted to the Trustees authority to sell or exchange these 
books so as to procure other books for 'the Library, the actual 



42 CITY DOCUMENT. -No. 9G. 

extent of the collection may not be materially diminished when 
they shall have been thus disposed of. 

During the year, 527 duplicates have been exchanged or sold, 
and 395 have been added to the list, mostly by donations, so 
that the total is somevv'hat less than last year. Overtures have 
also been made for further advantageous exchanges and sales. 
It is hoped that the number may, at least, be kept from in- 
creasing till opportunity occurs for a sale of all which are of 
value. 

The number of pamphlets belonging to the Library, after 
deducting those separately bound, is, according to the enumer- 
ation continued from year to year, 32,558. I have before 
stated, and repeat here, in order to prevent future disappoint- 
ment, that a large portion of these are not of much' value, — 
many of them of none' at all, — comprising as (hey do odd 
.numbers of periodicals, numerous copies of publications already 
upon the shelves, old catalogues of books, etc. All that are of 
consequence are well arranged, but have not been actually 
counted. 

USE OF THE LIBRAEY. 

Dui'ing the last year, 5,324 persons have signed the promise 
to obey the rules, and have received cards to take out books. 
The whole number of signers is at present 40,563. 

The number of lendings of books for home use 

In the Bates Hall, was . . . 10,371 

In the Lower Hall, . . . 184,256 



Total, 194,627 

The number used in the Bates Hall was 13_,090. This state- 
ment does not cover the use of the English Patent specifications, 
which have been consulted by 182 persons on an average of 
IJ hours to each person ; nor does it represent tlie use of the 
Reading Koom for periodicals, nor many protracted investiga- 
tions, for which special permission has been granted. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



43 



It will be seen, by a comparison of this Report with that of 
last year, that the circulation has increased nearly six per cent, 
in the whole Library. The increase in the Bates Hall is about 
twenty-six per cent. This fact indicates, I think, an improve- 
ment in the character of the circulation, — that it is tending 
strongly to the more substantial and useful classes of books. 

The average daily circulation was 707.73. The Library was 
open to the public 275 days. The largest number of books 
given out in one day was 1,464, on the 19th of November, 
1864. 

The average number of visitors in the Reading Room was 
305, in the Bates Hall 274. The whole number of visitors in 
the Bates Hall was 62,316. The whole number of readers in 
the Reading Room for periodicals was 83,364, of which 15,895 
were females. 

I give below a general classification of the books lent from 
the Bates Hall and used therein. A comparison of the table, 
with that presented in the last Report, shows an increase in the 
use of books in the departments of American history, the Fine 
arts and the Useful arts, and the Mathematical and physical 
sciences : — 



CLASSIFICATION. 


Percentage 


Fine Arts and Useful Arts . 


16J 


English History and Literature . 


13 


American History and Literature 


10 


Theology, Ethics, and Education 


. 8i 


Mathematical and Physical Sciences . . 


n 


French History and Literature 


6 


Periodicals ..... 


6 


Medicine 


4f 


Natural History .... 


. 41 


Bibliography 


3 


General History and Literature . 


3 


Greek and Latin Classics . 


3 



44 CITY DOCUMENT. —No 96. 

CLASSIFICATION. Percentage. 

German History and Literature . . 2i 

Oriental History and Literature . . 2i 

Transactions of Learned Societies . . 2 J 

Italian History and Literature ... 2 

Jurisprudence, Government, Political Economy, 2 
Miscellaneous ...... f 

LOSSES AND INJURIES. 

In the Bates Hull, nineteen books were missing from their 
places at the annual examination. It is believed that 
most of them will be found. Of the fifteen reported 
missing last year, eight have been accounted for. Nineteen 
books charged to borrowers previous to the present year have 
not been returned, although several notices have been sent to 
each delinquent. Six delinquents have promised to return, or 
replace, the books charged to them. Thirteen, after diligent 
search, have not been found. In several instances, it is certain 
that no such person had ever resided in the houses designated 
upon their cards. A few cases of mutilation of books in the 
Bates Hall have been discovered ; but nearly all the books 
have been carefully used, and the whole collection may be said 
to be in excellent condition. 

The number of books in the Lower Hall not accounted for 
at the annual examination was 529. This loss is larger than 
for any previous year, and it bears a greater proportion to the 
circulation. It is still, however, less than one third of one per 
cent, of the circulation. 

The number purchased to replace volumes condemned, during 
this year and the year preceding, as unfit for longer use, is 586. 

Adding the losses to the injuries, the proportion to the whole 
circulation is only about one half of one per cent. That is, 
about one book out of every two hundred lent is lost or worn 
out, including those which may be said to be honestly worn out 
in the service. The principal loss and injury fall upon two 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. 45 

classes of books — namely, novels and books for the young. 
If it were proper to separate these books from the rest of the 
Library, the work of the establishment might be conducted' 
much more cheaply and promptly, and, so far as the order of 
the whole establishment is concerned, more satisfactorily. But 
it may well be doubted whether it is wise and proper to give 
the prominence, which such a course would give, to this class of 
publications. 

The injuries to books by marking and mutilation have (I 
mention it with much regret) noticeably increased. These 
damages, it should be remembered, are cumulative, so that, 
although the number reported each year may not seem very 
considerable, the aggregate, in a series of years, becomes a 
striking feature, and one by no means pleasing. 

The losses and injuries in the Reading Room have led to the 
adoption of important, but indispensable changes in the con- 
ditions for the use of the periodicals. 

Such abuses can, doubtless, be prevented ; but not, it has 
been feared, without, in some degree, restricting the benefits of 
the Library. It is a difficult and ungrateful duty to weigh the 
suppression of abuses against the curtailment of such privileges 
as this Library has furnished. 

On the one hand, it is nearly certain that these wrongs are 
the work of comparatively few persons, and are generally the 
result of ignorance and heedlessness, rather than of wanton 
malice, and that they are not, in a pecuniary sense, of very 
great importance ; but, on the other hand, they are disc > editable , 
and, by the toleration of them, the Library fails, so far, in one 
of its duties, — that of educating the public in their respect for 
books. The increase of the evil points surely to a day when a 
due regard for property iield in trust, for future as well as for 
present use, may demand a greater degree of stringency than 
has heretofore been thought imperative. 

The wise policy of the Trustees has been to make the Library 
FREE, and to adopt restrictions only as experience might show 



46 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9G. 

tliem to be necessary. It is for them to jiulgc whether the time 
has or has not come to establish some stricter regulations than 
have heretofore been made, even should it be at the probable 
expense of a temporary decrease of the circulation, and of some 
consequent dissatisfaction. 

I do not, however, apprehend that any measures which may 
be adopted to correct these abuses will, to any considerable ex- 
tent, or for any great length of time, produce results to be 
dejn-ecated. 

The first expedient for repressing abuses seems to me to be 
such a change in the method of charging the books as shall 
make the borrower more certainly and unmistakably responsible 
for the loan. With this there should also be joined facilities, 
such as cannot be furnished without an Increase of the force in 
the Lower Hall, for following up delinquents more promptly, 
and for examining carefully the condition of every book re- 
turned, before It Is again given out. 

The fact that some persons have either registered false 
names, or given a false designation of residence, suggests the 
possible necessity of more scrutiny of the claims of persons ap- 
plying for cards. It may become needful to require the in- 
dorsement of some w^ell-known citizen for those persons whose 
names are not in the directory, or an Immediate Investigation of 
the truth of the statements made by them. Implying a delay, 
possibly, of a day before issuing books on such new cards, which 
will, however, be few in number. 

I make these suggestions now, — not. Indeed, for the first 
time, — but with a more full conviction than I have heretofore 
felt, that they are becoming more and more urgent, and In the 
belief that the intelligent portion of the community are already 
prepared for action upon them. 

THE CATALOGUES. 

A Supplement, the eighth in number, to the Index of the 
Lovver Hall, has been printed, containing the additions, num- 
bering 706 volumes, for the year. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 47 

All the accessions to the Library have been catalogued upon 
cards, and no arrears have been allowed to accumulate in any 
department of the work upon the accessions of the year. 

The printing of the Supplement to the Index of the Bates 
Hall has proceeded very slowly, for reasons unavoidable on our 
part. It will make a book of more than six hundred pages, in- 
stead of four hundred, as at first estimated, in consequence of 
the numerous additions which have been made. We are now 
printing the letter L ; and, if the rate of progress quite lately 
reached can be sustained, as we hope it can be, the whole will 
be completed by next May. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The experience of thirteen years has served, I think, to vin- 
dicate the wisdom and practicability of the early views of the 
Trustees, with respect to the principles for administering the 
Library. Changes have, here and there, proved necessary, and 
have been made without affecting the general plan of the Insti- 
tution. As the establishment becomes more and more developed, 
modifications in details are indicated as important. Suggestions 
for improvement have ever received, and doubtless will always 
receive, the patient attention of the Trustees. 

This is emphatically a Public Library. Its doors are more 
widely, constantly, invitingly opened, than those of any other 
of like magnitude with which I am acquainted. The very 
freedom of access and use brings* with it facilities for abuse, 
and makes the Watchful care of all intrusted with its manage- 
ment peculiarly imperative and difficult. A library belonging 
to an association is far more easily controlled. The very 
fact of men uniting to support a Library limits the prin- 
cipal use to the proprietors, who are, of course, persons 
capable of appreciating such advantages, and each proprietor 
can enjoy privileges, — very desirable, it must be said, in them- 
selves, but obviously impossible where the whole population of 
a city have equal rights. If but one person had the right to use 



48 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9G. 

the Library, he might range in it at will, and Avho can doubt 
that his profiting thereby might be vastly greater than it can be 
if he is restricted to the borrowing of one book at a time, and is 
debarred from free access to the alcoves. But it is obvious that 
such privileges cannot be accorded to many persons without 
greatly impairing the usefulness of a public Library. The 
books would inevitably be displaced and lost, and the Library 
would soon fall into hopeless confusion. 

It doubtless would be more satisfactory to a few to con- 
fine even the sight of the Library, except on stated and 
infrequent occasions, to serious students who wish to pur- 
sue their researches in silence, and free from the interrup- 
tions of visitors. For such persons a separate room might 
be provided, if it were possible, in the present building. 
But the Library is for the public, and one source of grat- 
ification which it furnishes to the people is to view, them- 
selves, and show to their friends from other places, its handsome 
halls and large treasures. This they do invariably without in- 
tentional disturbance or rudeness. It is, indeed, more and more 
felt to be unfortunate that almost all the work of the Library 
must be performed in the same hall frequented by readers and 
the public. Although every measure practicable is taken to 
secure quiet, the room has a marble floor, and is surrounded by 
echoing corridors, and perfect stillness is unattainable. It is well, 
perhaps, to record these suggestions, that in any future enlarge- 
ments of the building they may receive attention. 

I prepared for the tenth annual Report of the Trustees three 
tables of statistics relative to the Increase, use, and losses of the 
Library. In accordance with requests repeatedly made, I have 
continued these statements to the present time, and append them 
to this Report, marked AA. 

I also append the usual financial statement, marked CC. 
Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES C. JEWETT, Superintendent. 

Public Library, 24 October, 1865. 



PUBLIC LIBEAEY 



49 



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Note.— To account for some discrepancies noticeable in the above table, compiled from 
the Annual Keports, it should be stated that, prior to the Report of 1801, the annual state- 
ment of the whole number of volumes was obtained by adding- the accessions of the year 
to the previous aggregates ; and although the numbers in the Bates Hall are now obtained 
by actually counting the books upon the shelf-lists, there still remain several sources of 
unavoidable discrepancies, such as the following: Works reported at first as containing 
a certain number of volumes, afterwards for good reasons bound in a difTerent number; 
works reported as duplicates subsequently exchanged for works in a different number of 
volumes; pamphlets bound separately and counted as books; also volumes lost or worn 
out, but for some reason not replaced, which disappear in the aggregates, but remain as 
originally reported among the accessions. 



50 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. DO. 



TABLE II. 





Signatures. 






ClUCULATION. 






Year. 


VVh'le No. 
Lent. 


Daily 

Av'ge. 


Largest 
No. in 
one day 


Date. 


Lent in 
Bates 
UaU. 


Used in 
Hates 
11 aU. 


1854.... 


6,590^ 




35,389 


250 


535 


Sep. 16 






1855.... 


3,905 


3 


81,281 


284 


606 


Feb. 10 






1856.... 


2,361 


- 1 17,066 


82,661 


291 


647 


Feb. 23 






1857.... 


2,236 


m 


89,423 


310 


730 


Jan. 24 







1858.... 


1,974. 




75,570 


383 


693 


Feb. 27 






1859.... 


13,329 ^ 




149,468 


588.5 


1,335 


Mar. 5 






I860.... 


4,809 




151,020 


508.5 


1,052 


Feb. 4 






1861.... 


4,522 




160,877 


587.1 


1,303 


Feb. 23 






1862.... 


4,326 


^ 'I- 40,563 


180,302 


626 


1,517 


Mar. 1 


7,400 


10,263 


1863.... 


3,495 


3 


138,027 


643 56 


1,534 


Feb. 7 


5,222 


7,124 


1864.... 


4,758 




184,035 


664.34 


1,424 


Feb. 27 


7,468 


11,057 


1865.... 


5,324^ 




194,627 


707.73 


1,464 


Nov. 19 


10,371 


13,090 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



51 



TABLE III. 



Books 

Missing. 



Books 
Regained. 



Books 
Worn out. 



Books 
Replaced. 



Amount 
of Fines. 



1854... 
1854-55 
*1855-56 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1859-GO 
18G0-61 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1864-65 



20 

98 

149 

217 

130 

262 
340 
294 
234 
447 
548 



42 
119 
107 
156 

39 



>0 KB 



134 
116 
261 
306 
106 



57 
206 
127 

586 



87 30 
200 27 
262 13 
130 85 

100 21 
143 02 

101 27 
81 00 

133 63 
87 90 
126 37 
133 62 



[BB] 



LIST or DONORS. 



Bates, Joshua, London, 
Bigclow, Hon. John P., 
Franklin Chib, . 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 
Phillips, Hon. Jonathan, 
Townsend, Mary P., 



50,000 

1,000* 

1,000 

10,000 

30,000 

4,000 



The interest of these donations, with the exception of that of 
the Townsend Fund (which is invested in a mortgage at six 
per cent), has been paid in gold, at the rate of five per cent, 
per annum. 



Vols. Pamphs. 

Abbot, G. J., Washington, 1 
Advertiser, Boston Daily, Proprietors of the, 

100 Papers. 1 

Albany Young Men's Association, 1 

Alberi, E., Florence, 5 

Allen, Joseph H., 1 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston, 1 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 4 

American Baptist Missionary Union, 2 3 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, 2 

American Tract Society, Boston, 5 
American Union (Newspaper), Proprietors of the, 

2 Papers. 

American Unitarian Association, 4 

Amory, T. C, Jr., 1 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



53 



Vols, raiiiphs. 



1 Broadside, 2 Cliculars, 
1 Chart. 



Andrew, J. A., Governor of Massachusetts, 

Andrews, , 

Anonymous, 12 BLinhs, 
14 Papers, 

Appleton, John, M. D., 

Arnold, Howard P., 

Atwood, Charles, 

Avery, Edward, 

Babbage, Charles, England, 

Balfour, David M., 

Barnard, James M., 

Bemis, George, 

Bogart, W. L. A., Albany, 

Boston, City of, 

Boston Athena3um, 

Boston City Hospital, 

Boston Gas Light Company, 

Boston Society for Medical Improvement, 

Bostoniensis, 

Boutwell, George S., Hon., 

Bowditch, H. I., M. D., 2 Circulars. 

Bradlee, Caleb D., Rev., 

Brewer, Gardner, " The Holy Family,"- a group in 
marble, by Troschel. 

Brighton Library, 

Brooklyn Mercantile Library, 

Brooks, Charles, Rev., 

Brooks, James I., Hon., 

Brown, S. G., Professor, Dartmouth College, 

Bryant, , 

Buffalo Young Men's Association, 

Bullock, A. H., Hon., 

Bunker Hill Aurora, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper 

Burnham, T. O. H. P., 

Burroughs, Henry, Jr., Rev., 

Butler, J. S., M. D., Hartford, 

Boynton, E. M., 

Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, 

California Academy of Natural Sciences, San Fran- 
cisco, 

Cartwright, R. J., Kingston, Canada, 

Chambers, George E., 



14 

1 

4 
1 
1 

2 
2 

1 
17 

1 
8 
2 



73 
1 



1 
118 



54 



CITY DOCUMENT.- No. DO. 



Vols. Pamphs. 



1 Paper. 

2 Papers. 

1 Paper. 

pp. Music. 



2 jip. Manuscript, 



Charlestown Advertiser, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper 

Charlestown, City of, 

Charlestown Public Library, 

Child, George H., 

Christern, F. W., New York, 

Christian Era, Proprietors of the, 

Christian Register, Proprietors of the, 

Christian Witness, Proprietors of the, 

Clapp, C. C, &Co., 

Clarke, E. H., M. D., 

Clarke, J. F., D. D., 

Clarke, RufusW., Rev., 

Clarke, W. A., 

Cogswell, J. G., LL. D., 

Colcord, S. M., 

Commercial Bulletin, Proprietors of the, 

Commonwealth, Proprietors of the, 

Congregationalist, Proprietors of the, 

Coolidge, J. I. T., Rev., 

Copeland, Elisha, 

Corson, A. J., 

Courier, Boston, Proprietors of the, 

Cultivator, Boston, Proprietors of the, 

Curtis, Cynthia, 

Cutter, C. A., Cambridge, 

Daly, Charles P., Hon., New York, 

Dana, R. H., Jr., 

Dana Library, Cambridge, 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 

Dawson, Henry B., Morrisania, New York, 

De Costa, B. F., Rev., 

Dennet, Ch. F., London, 

Detroit Young Men's Society, 

De Vries, Ibarra, & Co., 

Dexter, H. M., D.D., 

Ditson, Oliver, 

Doane, Heman S., 

Dubuque, Iowa, Mayor of, by E. W. Sanborn 

Dudley, Dean, 

Dutton, E. P., & Co., 

Eastburn, Right Rev. Bishop, 

Eastern Railroad Company, 



1 Paper. 
1 Paper. 
1 Paper. 



30 Papers 



2 P 



npers 



10 pp. Music, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



55 









Vols. P 


amphs 


Edinburgh Royal Observatory, 






1 




Edwards, Henry, 








2 


Ehot, Mrs. S. A., Cambridge, 






4 




Eliot, S., 






1 




Ellis, G. E.,D.D., 








14 


Emerson, G. B., LL.D., 






1 


7 


Essex Institute, Salem, 






1 


5 


Everett, E., Hon., 




9 Papers. 


1 


5 


Everett, W., 






1 




Fall River Public Library, 








1 


Faribault, G. B., Quebec, 






1 




Farwell, J. E., & Co., 








26 


Fay, Theodore S., Hon., 








1 


Felt, LydiaB., 








2 


Ferguson, Robert, England, 


through 


Professor 






Longfellow, 






1 




Ferland, J. B. A., Quebec, 






5 




Ferland, T. B., Quebec, 






€ 




Field, Chester, Rev., 






1 




Flag of Our Union, Proprietors 


of the. 


1 Paper. 






Flanders, H., 






1 


2 


Foley, W. J., 






12 


51 


Forbes, R. B., 








1 


Ford, W. E., 








1 


Francis, George, Cambridge, 






1 




Frothingham, Edward, 






1 




Frothingham, E. L., 






1 




Fuller, Richard F., 






1 




Gannett, E. S., D..D., 








4 


Gleason's Pictorial, -Proprietors 


of the. 


1 Paper. 






Goldsmith, Seth, 








25 


Gould, A. A.,M. D., 






1 


12 


Gray, Wm., 






2 


2 


Great Britain, Commissioner of Patents, 




73 




Great Britain, Royal Observatory, Greenwich, 


1 




Green, Samuel A., M. D., 








19 


Greenough, W. W., 


205 Papers. 






Groton, Lawrence Academy, 








2 


Guild, Reuben A., Providence, 






1 




Hale, E. E., Rev., 








2 


Hall, Chas. B., 








6 


Hall, W. W.,M. D., New Y( 


)rk, 




1 


5 



56 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 



Vols. Piiniplis. 



7P; 



ipei"! 



6 Maps. 



Ilalliwcll, II. W., 
Hartford Young iSIen's Institute, 
Harvard College, Cambridge, 
Harvard College, Cambridge, Observatory, 
Harvard College, Museum of Comp. Zoology 
Haskins, D. G., Rev., 
Haskins, G. F., Rev., 
Hastings, H. L., 
Heaton, George, M. D., 
Hedge, F. H., D. D., 
Heinzen, Carl, Roxbury, 
Herald, Boston, Proprietors of the, 
Herschel, J. F. W., England, 
Higginson, Major H. L. 
Hilgard, J. E., U. S. Coast Survey, 
Hill, Wm. H., 

Hodgdon, Adjutant-General, Maine, 
Holden,* Frederick A., Washington, 
Hooper, R. W., M. D., 
Horsford, E. N. 
.Horton, John M., Chicago, 
Hosmer, George W., Rev., 
Houghton, H."0., 
Hubbard, C. T., 
Hudson, C. F., 
Humphreys, E. R., LL. D., 
Huntington, F. D., D.D., 
Innes, Charles A., 

Investigator, Boston, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper 
Iowa, Adjutant-General Baker, , 

Jackson, II. T., Professor, Union College, 
Jay, John, New York, 
Jenks, Wm., D. D., 
Jillson, W. E., Professor, 
Johnson, J. C, 

Journal, Boston, Proprietors of the, 113 
Kalee Ki'ishna Bahadur, Rnjah, Calcutta, 
Kemp, N. P., 

Kirk, E. N., D. D., 11 Slips, 3 

Kirkbride, Thomas, M. D., 
Ladreyt, E. N., 
Langworthy, Isaac P., Rev., 3 Papers. 



apers 



ipen 



PLBLIC LIBRARY. 



57 



Leader, Newspaper, Boston, Proprietors of the, 

11 Papers. 

Lincoln, F. "W., Jr., His Honor, 1 Photograph. 

Little, Brown & Co., 

Livermore, George, Cambridge, 

London. British Museum, 

London. Listitution for Civil Engineers, 

London. Royal Astronomical Society, 

London. Royal Geographical Society, 

London. Royal Society, 

Loring, C. G., Hon., 

Loring, J. S., 

Lothrop, S. K., D. D., 

Lovell, John, Montreal, 

Lowell, City, 

Macaulay, George H., Canada, 

McDougall, William, Hon. , Prov. Secretary, Quebec, 

Macedonian, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper. 

McGee, T. Darcy, Hon., Montreal, 

Marble, Manton, New York World, 

Massachusetts Bible Society, 

Massachusetts Historical Society, 

Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 

Massachusetts Ploughman, Boston, Proprietors of 
the, 1 Paper. 

Massachusetts Sabbath School Society, 

May, Abby W.,' 1 Portfolio. 

Michigan University, Ann Arbor, 

Miner, A. A., D. b., 

Moore, C. W., 

Morgan, Henry J., Montreal, 

Mumford, Samuel R., Detroit, 

Napoleon HI, Emperor of the French, 

Nation, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper. 

National Sailors' Fair, 

New Bedford Public Library, 

New England Farmer, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper. 

New England Freedman's Aid Society, 

New England Historic Genealogical Society, 

New England Loyal Publication Society, 236 Cir- 
culars and Broadsides, 



1 

17 

1 

1 

138 



plis. 



1 

37 
3 
4 

2 



1 


4 


5 


10 


1 


10 


2 




1 




1 


1 




5 




1 



13 



53 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 96. 



52 Papers. 

Photographs. 

through Converse, 



Newburyport Public Library, 

New England Women's Auxiliary Association of 

the U.S. Sanitary Commission, 
New Nation, Proprietors of the, 9 Papers. 

New York, xidjutant-General of the State, 
New York Chamber of Commerce, 
New York Homoeopathic Medical Society, 
New York ]Mercantile Library, 
Nichols, W., Jr., Major, 
Nourse & Rand, 

Onderdonk, H., Jr., Jamaica, Long Island, 
Orr, John W., 
Otis, Mary, 

Palfrey, J. G., Hon., LL. D. 
Parker, H. T., London, 
Parker, L. H., 
Patterson, Robert, General, 

Blagden, & Co., 
Peabody, A. P., D. D., 
Peabody Institute, South Dan vers, 
Pettingell, S., & Co., 98 Articles from Newspapers. 
Philadelphia. American Philosophical Society, 
Philadelphia Mercantile Library, 
Pilot, Boston, Proprietors of the 2 Papers. 

Poole, W. F., _ 

Post, Boston Daily, Proprietors of the, 6 Papers. 
Providence AthenaJum, 
Punchard, George, 
Quincy, Eliza S., 
Rand & Avery, 
Randall, J. W., M. D., 

Recorder, Boston, Proprietors of the, 3 Papers. 

Rice, A. H., Hon., 
Richardson, J. B., 
R. H. D., 

Rhees, William J., Washington, 
Rhode Island, Grand Lodge, Providence, 
Robbins, Chandler, D. D., 
Rogers, William, 
Romney, Martha P., Mrs. 

Ruschenberger, W. S. W., Philadelphia, I 

Russell, G. D,, & Co., 5 pp. Music. j 



Vols. Pamphs. 
1 



12 
1 

2 



9 
29 

1 
1 



1 
13 

12 
4 



2 

2 

20 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



59 



Eussell, T. R., Kingston, 

Sabino, L., 

San Francisco Mercantile Library Association, 

Saturday Evening Express, Boston, Proprietors of 
the, 18 Papei's. 

Saturday Evening Gazette, Proprietors of the, 
15 Newspaper Articles. 

Shaw, Benjamin S., M. D., 

Simonds,J. H., & Coleman, Moses J., Franklin, Pa. 

Smith, C. C, 

Smith, Samuel, City Clerk, "Worcester, 

Smith, W. Dexter, 12 pp. Music. 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 

Spencer, W. V., 

Stoddart, J. L., One hundred dollars, for the pur- 
chase of books for the Lower Library, 

Sumner, C, Hon., 

Tache, J. C, Canada, 

Tarbox, Licrease N., 

Thorndike, J. P., 

Thornton, J. Wingate, The original paroles ot 
Generals BurgoyneandRiedesel, and their respec- 
tive officers, after the surrender at Saratoga in 
1777, presented by Mr. Thornton to the Boston 
Sanitary Fair, on condition of sale for not less 
than $1,000, and presentation by the purchasers 
to the Public Library. The money was subscribed 
and given to the Fair, and the documents were 
presented to the Library by William Endicott, 
Esq., on behalf of the subscribers. 

Ticknor, George, 

Ticknor & Fields, 

Tolman, Henry, & Co., 12 pp. Music, 4 Papers. 

Townsend, S. D., M. D., 

Transcript, Boston, Proprietors of the, 40 Papers. 

Treadwell, Daniel, Professor, 

Trimble, James, Col., 

Troy, Rensselaer Institute, 

United States. Bureau of Navigatipn, Charles H. 
Davis, Chief of Bureau, 

United States. Department of the Interior, 

United States. Department of the Navy, Prints. 



Vols. Pampha 



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CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9G. 



United States. Depfirtment of State, 
United States. Library of Congress, 
United States. Patent Office, D. P. Plolloway, Cr., 
Univcrsalist, Newspaper, Boston, Proprietors of 
the, . 8 Papers. 

Venice, Istituto Veneto, 
Vienna, K. K. Geol. Reichsanstalt, 
Voice, Boston, Daily, Proprietors of the, 7 Papers. 
Ward, G. A., Family of, by Jas. C. Ward, North- 
ampton, 
Warner, Herman J., 

Warren & Co., 86 Papers. 

Warren, J. M., M. D., 
Warren, Josiah, Cliftondale, 

Watchman and Reflector, Proprietors of the, 

2 Papers. 
Wells, E. M. P.,D.D., 
Wheildon, W. W., Charlestown, 
Whitcomb, C. C, 
Whitney, Alfred, 
Whitney, D., Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Whitney, F. A., Rev., Brighton, 
Whitweil, B., Mrs., 
Wide World, Proprietors of the, 1 Paper. 

WifFen, B. B., England, 
Wiggin, J. K., 
Wilcocks, A., M. D., 
Wilder, A. C, Hon., 
Willis, Nathaniel, 26 Papers. 

Wilmington Institute, 
Wilson, Henry, Hon., 
Wilson, John, & Son, 
Windship, J. P. C, Brighton, 
Winthrop, R. C, Hon., 
Wood, A. M., Dr., 
Wood, Horatio, Rev., Lowell, 
Woodman, C. C, 
Worcester, S. M., D.D., 
Worcester Free Library, 

Worthington & Flanders, Proprietors of the Boston 
Daily Traveller, 101 Papers. 

Wright & Potter, 
Ziou's Herald, Proprietors of the, 2 Papers. 



Is. Pamphs 


2 




1 




3 




3 


11 


1 


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1 

14 
1 
1 
1 
1 

24 

1 

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[CC] 








FINANCIAL STATEMENT 


. 


EXPENDITURES. 




FROM SEPT. 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 18C5, 


Binding, ...... 


$2,370 82 


Books, 












7,111 93 


Catalogue, 


» 










1,853 42 


Expense, 












945 50 


Fuel, . 












2,044 98 


Furniture, 












184 48 


Gas, . 












1,095 96 


Periodicals, 












1,295 79 


Printing, 












554 34 


Salaries, 












8,811 67 


Stationery, . 












398 75 


Transportation, 












337 99 



$ 27,005 63 



FROM MAY 



Binding, 

Books, 

Catalogue, 

Expense, 

Fuel, . 

Furniture, 

Gas, 

Periodicals 

Printing, 

Salaries, 

Stationery, 

Transportation 



1, TO SEPT. 30, 1865, 



$1,061 


13 


4,622 


50 


1,674 


78 


792 


78 


1,050 


00 


106 


75 


448 


13 


713 


86 


404 


43 


6,913 


08 


125 


15 


249 


86 


$ 18,162 45 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 626 8 



^.P.L.Bittdefy. 
NOV 23 1878