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Full text of "Annual report"

NINETEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



ISr?'! 



Citij Document, — iNo. 56. 



CITY OF BOSTON 




NINETEENTH 



ANNUA.L REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



1871 



CITY OF BOSTON 

In Board of Aldermen, June 26, 1871. 

Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed. 
Attest : 

S. F. McCLEARY, Oky Clerk. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



Public Library, June 21st, 1871. 

Uis Honor, William Gaston, Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit to jou, herewith, the 
Nineteenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public 
Library, prepared in obedience to the fourth section of the 
Ordinance of 1869, relative to the Public Library. 
Very respectfully, 

JUSTIN WINSOR, 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TEUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



In conformity with the requirements of the fourth section 
of an ordinance concerning the Public Library passed 21st 
September, 1869, the Trustees have the honor to present to 
the City Council their Nineteenth Annual 

REPORT, 

being the second made under the new ordinance, and 
including the results of administration for a full year, during 
which the Library was opened for the use of the public the 
unprecedented number of 307 days. 

Accompanying this document are the reports of the Exam- 
ining Committee and of the Superintendent. 

The mem])ers of the committee were Rev. Phillips Brooks, 
Calvin Ellis, M. D., the Hon. E. R. Mudge, Charles C. Per- 
kins, Esq., Charles Levi Woodbury, Esq., to whom was 
added as chairman, according to the rule of the ordinance, a 
member of this Board, the Hon. E. W. Morton. Their 
independent investigation of the affairs of the institution will 
convey to their fellow-citizens a judgment upon its condition 
and administration, satisfactory to all who watch the re- 
sponsibilities and employments of this great trust. 

The report of the Superintendent, with its numerous 
appendixes, is filled with information important to those who 
1* 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

contribute to the support, or who are dependent upon the 
proper arrangements, or who wish to understand the work- 
ings of a great librar}'^. Uniting under one roof an impor- 
tant popular circulating library, a large reference library of 
which the great majority of the books are loanable, an ex- 
tensive reading-room for periodicals which is widely fre- 
quented, a proper oversight of their respective uses furnishes 
a mass of statistics deserving of the most careful study, and 
valuable to all who desire to comprehend the educational 
tastes and necessities of a populous community, which also 
has access in its various classes to other collections of books, 
belonging to literary, scientific, benevolent, and religious 
organizations, numbering within the city limits nearly twice 
as many more volumes as are contained upon the shelves of 
this institution. 

A brief statement of the operations conducted by the 
Library during the past year will naturally lead to a fuller 
examination of the tables upon which it is based. It will 
be seen that the year has been one of unusual prosperity, 
usefulness, and activity. 

The use of books and periodicals is larger than ever 
before. The Library having grown by donation and pur- 
chase from 160,573 volumes and 74,770 pamphlets in 1870, 
to 179,250 volumes and 89,746 pamphlets in 1871, fur- 
nished to its readers 322,445 books. This total includes 
26,130 volumes issued at the newly established Branch 
at East Boston, to which further reference will be made. 
In examining and analyzing these figures, it is gratifying to 
notice a diminishing percentage of the calls for fiction. In 
1868, this class of reading attracted 60 per cent, of the read- 
ers ; in 1869 and 1870, 57 per cent., in 1871 less than 52 per 
cent. This is mainly due, not to the smaller demand for 
novels, each of which in the Lower Hall Library circulated on 
the average fifteen times during the past year, but to the 



PUBLIC LIBEAKT. 7 

greatly increased use of the Bates Hall collection, which is 
daily becoming more widely known to the students and 
workers of our own vicinity, as well as of the more distant 
portions of the country. Indeed it is apparent, that with 
its years, the Library has noticeably gained in two ways, — by 
contact with the lower as well as the higher grades of intel- 
ligence and education. Notwithstanding the relaxation ot 
checks, the supposed losses of books during the year num- 
ber only thirty-nine, or one out of every 7,531 volumes 
lent. The total readers of periodicals has swelled from 
117,202 in 1870 to 193,417 in 1871, of whom more than a 
sixth were females. The whole number of cards in the 
hands of registered applicants for the privileges of the Library 
is 32,390, of which 2,240 belong to East Boston. For the 
details of expenditure, as required by the ordinance, and 
for other important tables of the Library service, it will be 
necessary to recur to the report of the Superintendent. It 
is only by a review of all the figures that one can learn how 
close and intricate are the relations subsisting between the 
Library and the public to whose daily wants it ministers. 

Experience alone will show whether the Trustees have pro- 
ceeded too far in their desire to give the freest access to the 
institution practicable in their judgment. It is their duty to 
use their efibrts to extend the uses of the books " as widely 
as possible among the citizens of Boston," under the condi- 
tions of proper usage and a safe return. Last year a change 
was made in the regulations, whereby an applicant was re- 
quired to give one reference instead of two, as was formerly 
the rule. So far, this alteration seems to have given entire 
satisfaction. No complaint has been made of any grievance 
under it. No great library, with a large constituency, has 
yet been administered under so slight a hold upon borrowers, 
and one has yet to see whether a rapidly increasing popula- 
tion will respect the confidence which has so freely placed 



8 



CITY DOCUMENT. — Xo. 5G. 



within its reach such inestimable privileges. It is just to 
say that the history of the past concessions to popular con- 
venience has in the main been highly encouraging for the 
future. 

By the concurrent action of the City Council, the first 
Branch of the Library was established during the past year at 
East Boston. It was opened for circulation on the 28th of 
Januaiy, and for seventy-eight days ending on the 29th of 
April, it had loaned from 5,700 volumes, 23,575 for home 
use, of which one only had been lost. The Branch was for- 
mally opened by an address of the President of this Board, on 
the 22d of March, and committed, on behalf of the Trustees, 
to the good offices of the residents of that important district 
of the city, by whom it is justly expected that a library Avill 
be built up and sustained, which will meet all the needs of a 
busy and intelligent population, and Avill become a source 
not only of local pride, but of daily and hourly reliance. The 
popular interest already excited by this first experiment, de- 
monstrates clearly what is desirable in other quarters of the 
city, and will lead to specific recommendations in this respect 
to the City Council, before the end of the present year. 

But while the Library is extending its accommodations out- 
side of its walls to the public, it must not be forgotten that 
its own necessities for suitable provision for its readers, visi- 
tors, and books have become more pressing. After long con- 
sideration, and careful examination of proposed changes, the 
Trustees have relinquished the project of a removal of the 
Bates Hall Library from the present site, though it may be 
expedient within a few years to provide rooms elsewhere 
in the vicinity for the Reading Room and Popular Library, 
now largely overcrowded by visitors at certain hours of the 
day. Plans are now making, under the auspices of the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings, whereby at a moderate expense, 
compared with the advantages secured, adequate shelf room 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

and light may be obtained iii the Bates Hall, and suitable 
working-rooms for the employes of the Library, who are now 
compelled to perform their work in the alcoves and galleries. 
Possibly, also, increased conveniences, with proper ventila- 
tion, may be obtained for the Lower Halls, but, on this point, 
the feasibilities are not so clear. In due time the plans aud 
estimates, after receiving the approbation of the Committee, 
will be laid before the City Government. 

By adequate arrangements for access to the Library, and 
by preparing commodious waiting-rooms for a large num- 
ber of visitors, its circulation will undoubtedly be enlarged. 
It is not, however, probable that it will evQr equal the uses 
of the popular branches of the larger free libraries in 
England. Here, private access to books is easy to rich and 
poor. The habit of reading pervades all classes, but the 
larger proportion of readers do not depend upon the Public 
Library for the supply of their daily wants. It is true, here 
as there, that about seventy-five per cent, of the popular 
use of books circulated consists of fiction, and that the 
whole circulation of books is enlarged in proportion to the 
extent of the supply in this department. The classification 
of issues in England, is not, however, made upon the pre- 
cise basis which has been adopted to show the uses of this 
li])rary. Polygraphy, and miscellaneous and light literature 
are in part euphemisms for what is called here, simply fiction, 
the wide-spread taste for which in all classes of the commu- 
nity can neither be overlooked nor despised. But in making 
due provision for this want on the part of the adults and 
youth of both sexes, it must be remembered that while books 
arc provided to suit all tastes with no immoral tendencies, 
the responsibility of a proper selection of reading by the 
young and immature must rest with those who have the im- 
mediate charge of their moral culture and intellectual forma- 
tion. 



10 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 56. 



At the close of the year already so rich in donations, the 
Library received within its walls the Spanish and Portuguese 
library bequeathed to it by its late Trustee and President, 
Mr. George Ticknor, who by the same instrument of gift 
committed to the care of the city a trust fund of four thousand 
dollars, the interest of which is to be applied to the increase 
of the books. Of this invaluable collection, so well known 
to scholars on both sides of the Atlantic, it is perhaps enough 
to say that this addition to the treasures of the institution 
advances it to a front rank in this respect, as compared with 
any foreign libraries — and in connection with its stores in 
the French and German and Italian lanouawes and literature, 
offers to the student resources hardly to be found elsewhere 
on this continent. 

The Library is now doing its work regularly and with 
marked results. The system upon which it was gathered 
and administered, and which was first arranged experimen- 
tally, has now become established, settled, and confirmed. 
No force can compel people to read the books which in the 
judgment of others are best suited to their wants and tastes ; 
on these points they act for themselves. So that the provi- 
sion which is made for all is only adequately used by a part. 
Each day changes the relation and value of the institution to 
some portion of the body politic, and as it grows in size, in 
completeness, and in convenience of access, it becomes the 
more useful. Based upon imvate benevolence, extended by 
popular gifts and municipal support, it has become a fact in 
which the whole community is interested, and upon which it 
will from day to day place more reliance as it finds by expe- 
rience and trial that it meets the requirements of an active, 
industrious, inquisitive, and self-helpful population, who will 
look to it in the future as a storehouse of the intellectual 
progress of the time, presenting the science, knowledge, and 
imagination of the past, and to-day as a safe and reliable 



PUBLIC LIBEART. 11 

threshold and steppiug-stone to future intellectual and moral 
growth. 

WM. W. GREENOUGH, 

J. D. BRAMAN, 

WESTON LEWIS, 

ELLIS W. MORTON, 

JOS. H. BARNES, 

M. F. DICKINSON, Jr. 

SAMUEL A. GREEN, 

SAMUEL LITTLE. 
June 21st, 1871. 

Note. — The Rev. Dr. Geo. Putnam, not signing, is absent from the 
country. 



[A] 
I'EPOET OF THE EXj\1]]K]KG COMMITTEE. 



The Committee appointed under an ordinance in relation 
to the Public Library passed September 21, 1869, to " exam- 
ine the Library and make a report of its condition to the 
Trustees," respectfully report : — 

That, sensible of the responsibility "which they assumed 
in undertaking, the duty which was asked of them, they have 
endeavored to inform themselves fully of the condition of 
the Library, of its methods of working, and of the spirit in 
which its methods are constantly applied. They have kept 
in view, as any Examining Committee must find itself con- 
stantly compelled to do, the requirements of the ordinance 
that "in prescribing the regulations for the care and use 
of the Books, the Trustees shall adopt such measures as 
shall extend the benetits of the institution as widely as 
possible among the citizens of Boston." The Library is dis- 
tinctively a Public Library. It is intended for the benefit of 
all the people, and its character and work must always be 
judged with reference tp this design. Its standards must be 
in some important respects difierent from those which would 
be applied to a library which was intended for and satisfied 
with the use of certain classes in the comnmnity. In each 
reference to the library which they make in their report this 
primary design will be kept in sight. 

A library for the people's benefit, of course, does not 
mean a library of popular books alone. The peo^^le must 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. V6 

be benefited both directly and indirectly ; directly by the 
provision of such books as the mass of the people will them- 
selves appreciate and read, and indirectly by the provision 
for those who as students of any special branch of literature 
or science are likely to render service to the public with such 
books as their special studies demand. The two kinds ot 
provision have a common end. Both are for the ultimate 
advantage of the whole community. 

Careful attention to the valuable report of the Superinten- 
dent and its accompanying documents will show, we think, 
a constant growth of interest in the Library, which proves 
how largely both of these purposes have been attained. The 
increase for the year was an addition of 18,099 volumes. 
The entire number of volumes belonging to the Library at 
present is 180,352. It has also 90,162 pamphlets. The 
number of persons who are registered as using the Library 
is 32,370, and the average number still registering daily is 
fifteen. Besides these many others are in the habit of constant 
oi"- occasional use of the Reading-rooms, and of the liberty 
Avhich is ofiered for consulting books at the Library. 

When we come to examine the character of the books 
which have been added, and those which are most constantly 
in use, we find on the whole such results as might be ex- 
pected in a People's Library judiciously and wisely managed. 
Large additions have been made of books which only scholars 
can require, and the Library is steadily approaching that far- 
off completeness at which it must be always aiming, in which 
every student shall be sure of finding upon its shelves all 
that he needs for the perfect mastery of his subject. The 
valuable gift of Mr. Ticknor's library, which has made a large 
part of the increase of the year, has been of this sort. It 
has at once richly furnished the Library in one department 
— that of Spanish Literature — in which it has heretofore been 
meagrely furnished, and has rendered it valuable to one class 
2 



14 CITY DOCUMEXT. No. 5G. 

of special stuclents who have made but little use of it before. 
Such gifts have been numerous, when we consider the youth 
of the Library. There is every reason to hope that there 
will be many more such in the future ; and, with the annual 
appropriation which can ]jc made for the purchase of books 
of a similar character, it will become more and more a 
scholar's Library. He little understands what the people 
need, Avho fancies that in stocking a Library richly for the 
scholar, he is not enriching the people too. 

As to the more immediately popular features of the Libra- 
ry, this committee, like all its predecessors, has no doubt 
grown a little sober over the large provision which it has 
been found necessary to make of the lightest literature for 
the liohtest tastes. But we have watched the carefulness 
with which everything positively bad has been excluded, 
we have considered the gain that is made to many an 
untrained mind by reading not very valuable novels instead 
of reading nothing at all, and Ave have appreciated the ten- 
dency which the new habit of reading must possess to lead 
on to a better and better class of books. This last, the self- 
educating power of the taste for reading, is very hard to esti- 
mate, and very easy to exaggerate ; but the committee cannot 
help speaking with interest and hopefulness of the effort which 
has been made by the Superintendent to assist it by the 
preparation of a catalogue of works of imagination, illus- 
trative of historical eras and personages, which, if it is 
used, must do much to regulate many loose habits of read- 
infir, and induce the kind of interest which will lead to 
deeper and more solid research. They are glad to hear 
that it is much asked for. They feel that it indicates a 
direction of usefulness which may be followed out, with dis- 
cretion, to excellent results. On the whole, therefore, the 
committee see nothing to regret, except on the most general 
^rounds of human nature, in the large prominence of feeble 
works of fiction in the circulation. One other branch of the 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 15 

Library's usefulness, — the supply to persons engaged in 
mechanical occupations of books which will help them to a 
fuller and more artistic and scientific mastery of their pro- 
fessions, — we cannot but regard with an unmixed satisfaction, 
greater perhaps than belongs to any of its other departments. 

The system of purchase of books has one feature which is 
too little known, but which is so directly in the line of its 
popular intention that it demands our mention. Any book not 
in the Library is freely purchased at the request of an appli- 
cant, unless there is some special reason why it is undesirable, 
and the applicant is notified as soon as it reaches the Library. 
This generous regulation ought certainly to do much to keep 
the Library in sympathy with the people. They may not 
only use the books, they may select them. It is not an im- 
practicable attempt to force jieople ta read what a group of 
theorists have fancied that they ought to read, but merely an 
efibrt to gather for the people what they cannot gather for 
themselves in any other way. It seems to be a perpetual 
safeguard against any obsolete and narrow ideas getting pos- 
session. Any very large library must contain a good deal of 
rubbish. The danger is lest the rubbish should come to look 
most valuable, as if it were not a necessary encumbrance, 
but the very purpose for which the library exists. It is easy 
for the spider to think and boast that his cobweb holds the 
house together. The titles of ])ooks asked for, and the names 
of the applicants under this rule, show that scholars of art, 
science, and literature, and especially public instructors, are 
constantly looking to the Library for help, and at the same 
time doing much themselves to keep it fresh and alive. 

There have been many improvements in the method of 
administering the details of the circulation of books, all of 
which seem to the Committee to be wisely adapted to the 
increase of the efficiency and popular usefulness of the 
Library. Only one reference is now required of an appli- 
cant instead of two, as heretofore ; and the rule requiring a 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

reference appears to bo so administered as to occasion no 
embarrassment. The rcsulis of the change of the rule are 
entirely satisfactory. The average time taken for the deliv- 
ery of a book has been so reduced that very little improve- 
ment can be expected except through improvements in the 
building itself. The time required for the delivery of a book 
in the Lower Hall averages about five minutes, — in Bates 
Hall still less. The Conmiittee has been greatly pleased with 
the whole spirit of desire to meet the needs of the public 
m every possil)le way, which pervades the whole working of 
the Lil)rary. 

The Eeading-Room has become a much more prominent 
feature of the Library than formerly. Periodical literature 
is a great favorite with our people, and it is claimed that the 
collection of periodicals found here is at least inferior to 
none. 

But the most marked step which has been taken during 
this year has been the practical effort to test the desirableness 
of Branch Libraries which has been made in the establishment 
of the East Boston Branch. Boston is now a large city, and 
it is felt that those who inhabit its outlying sections have a 
right to consideration in the administration of an institution 
like this, which belongs to all. There is now a collection of 
six thousand volumes in East Boston, conveniently arranged 
for use, and a Reading-Tloom with twenty-eight periodicals. 
The books are mostly of the more pojiular sort that are con- 
tained in the Lower Hall of the Central Library, and those 
who are registered at the Branch have also free access to the 
higher Lil)rary of Bates Hall. The issue of books at East 
Boston has been as high as six hundred volumes in one day. 
The Committee has carefully considered the operation of this 
new experiment, and believes that it promises great success and 
usefulness. It is quite in the line of the most popular intention 
of the Library. The addition of the more expensive books 
that belong to higher scholarship may, but probably will not, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 17 

be limited by thus providing the more popular books in 
larger numbers ; but the people have a certain right at first 
to what they choose to read, and all the considerations which 
justify the large accumulation of such books in the Lower 
Hall in Boylston street arc applicable also in East Boston and 
elsewhere. The readiness to read and to be educated by read- 
ing makes the branch library desirable. There need not be 
eagerness, but there must be readiness. Without such read- 
iness, the labor and expense would be wasted. It would be 
like trying to warm a room with the windows wide open. 
The Committee believe that the success of this one Branch 
is such as fully to justify its development, and the establish- 
ment of others on the same plan, as opportunity may offer. 
The Committee refrain from speaking of the defects of the 
Library building only because they have been so often 
described and are so well known. But every year makes 
them more apparent. In almost every department, in Read- 
ing-Room, Delivery Hall, waiting room, passages, working- 
rooms and alcoves, the space is cramped and ill-arranged. 
Many departments are ill-ventilated and dark. Something 
must be done some time, and the sooner the better, to relieve 
the disadvantages under which the Library works. 

Most of the Committee came to their work without a 
knowledge of the details of the management of the Library ; 
all their investigations have impressed them with the excel- 
lence of its system, the faithfulness of its administration, and 
the great and growing advantages which it offers to the citi- 
zens of Boston. 

ELLIS W. TMORTON. 

PHILLIPS BROOKS. 

C. ELLIS. 

E. R. MUDGE. 

CHAS. C. PERKINS. 

CHAS. LEVI WOODBURY. 



June 19th, 1871. 



2* 



[B] 

EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees: — I have to report upon a year's work, 
covering some of the most noteworthy results in the history 
of the Library, — a yearly increase unprecedented, a circula- 
tion largely in excess of what has been accomplished in the 
past, and a new development of our usefulness in the begin- 
ning of a system of Branch Libraries. I shall observe in 
details the subdivisions of previous reports. - 

I. BUILDING. 

"Want of room in the Bates Hall has compelled a new 
application of a principle, originally devised to meet the re- 
quirements of this Library, and patented by Mr. H. K. Tay- 
lor, — a drawer which can be drawn out its full depth, and 
remain horizontal. This drawer, with the front removed, 
and made deep enough to admit of three and even four ])anks 
of books, one behind the other, but each a little elevated 
above the one in front, has enabled us to use to advantage 
the deep bins beneath the counters in the upper tier of alcoves, 
whence the newspapers have been taken to our new News- 
paper Room ; and it has also enabled us to provide for the 
increase of the Ticknor Li})rary, in the space long reserved 
for that collection. Shelving of this kind has })ccn carried 
up to a height that does not require steps, and of the ordi- 
nary kind (with an improvement, however, in the method 
of supporting, due to the ingenuity of Mr. Taylor) above 



PUBLIC LIBEAEY. 19 

that height. This has given us seven hundred and seventy- 
three running feet of shelving, which at the usual average of 
nine volumes to the foot, will provide for 6,957 volumes, 
while the ordinary shelving in the same space would have 
accommodated only 4,608 volumes, — a gain of 2,349 vol- 
umes, or about half as many more. 

These book drawers, wheu drawn out, show the shelf- 
numbers of the back tiers of books at the top of each book, 
and the book is easily lifted from its place. There seems 
little doubt that the method is one admirably fitted for the 
compact stowage of books, where the circulation is not of 
that extent maintained in libraries purely popular. The 
application of it to collections like our Lower Hall or our 
East Boston Branch, would be an experiment, while its ad- 
vantages in our Bates Pall are too apparent to need a test. 
It yet remains to be determined, whether the compression of 
a much larger number of volumes within a given distance of 
the delivery counter will not be a gain over the impediment 
of pulling out the drawers, even in a popular library. An- 
other principle of close stowage, as devised at the East Bos- 
ton Branch, has proved to work with advantage, and would 
seem to be of value in popular libraries, where the books are 
not dressed in elaborate bindings, and where, being covered, 
the shelf-numbers of each book are written at the lower edge 
of its back. To this end, four or five of the lower shelves 
have been kept no farther apart than was necessary to receive 
the books, placed on their fore edges, and allow the attend- 
ants to read easily the numbers on the books, which even on 
the lowest shelves, can thus be done without stooping. 
Eleven or twelve shelves can thus be got within reach of the 
hand, in place of eight or nine. 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 



II. ADMINISTRATION. 

1. LIBRARY SERVICE. 

The establishment of the new Branch at East Boston has 
called for a new department in organizini!; tlie service of the 
Library, the other details of which show little change during 
the year, as will be seen by reference to Appendix XXI. 

2. EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 

The Custodian of the Shelves reports, in Appendix XXII, 
upon the success still attending the new system of examina- 
tion. The irregularities therein registered are as few as can 
be reasonably hoped for in the carrying out of a system nec- 
essarily various in detail, and minute in particulars, where a 
single clerical error may give rise to a series of mistakes. 
How likely errors are to occur which cause irregularities and 
need rectification, may be comprehended from the fact that 
above two millions and a half of figures were made last year, 
by various attendants, and often under a pressure of haste, 
which concerned in some way the record of the books' use. 

3. REGISTRATION OF APPLICANTS. 

It has been necessary to develop the system somewhat, so 
as to include a record, that should both be a convenient reg- 
istration for the inhabitants of East Boston, and a safe one for 
the Liln-ary. Those who register at the Branch are reported 
daily to the Central Library, and if it is found they have al- 
ready registered, they are precluded from a new registration, 
while otherwise the applications are included in the general 
file of all the applicants. Cards granted at either Library 
are good for the Lower Hall of the Central Library or the 
Branch, while the dates upon a card, when in use at either 
place, will prevent its use at the other place, so long as the 
date is uncancelled at the proper delivery. Cards of both 



PUBLIC LIBKAKY. 21 

issues are equally good at the Bates Hall delivery. For 
easy distinction the East Boston card is a pink one, the Cen- 
tral Library issuing yellow ones. 

At the Central Library, our roll has increased by over 
7,000 names, nearly one half of whom needed some verifica- 
cation , as the names were not in the directory ; but only 
about two hundred and forty were refused cards, chiefly for 
reasons of non-residency and insufficient age. 

At the East Boston Branch, the registration began Nov. 
28th, and of the 2,320 names enrolled, 1,012 needed verifica- 
tion, and 80 were denied cards. 

About 32,000 cards are now outstanding and good, having 
been granted since Sept. 1867, though probably about a third 
of that number would represent the borrowers using the 
Libraries at any one time. On the 4th of March, there were 
7,793 volumes from the Lower Hall in the hands of borrow- 
ers ; and April 30, there were 10,783. At the same dates 
there were respectively in such hands, from the East Boston 
Branch 1,723 and 1,576 volumes. On the 4th of March, the 
Bates Hall had 1,298 of its books similarly appropriated. 
These figures would seem to indicate a large number of 
cards hi use at once, and as many borrowers intermit in a 
greater or less degree their use of the collections, a much 
largrer number must be in occasional use of their cards dur- 
ing the twelve month. 

I refer to Appendix XII for data, not necessary to repeat 
here. 

4. EAST BOSTON BRANCH. 

It was not until the 19th of November that the necessary 
changes were made in the second story of the old Lyman 
school-house at East Boston, to fit it for shelving. Mean- 
while, at the beginning of the year, such duplicates as we could 
spare from our Lower Hall were selected, and such as were 
suitable were picked out of our Duplicate Room, and in June 



22 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

the collection thus formed was increased by the first pur- 
chases. The work of preparing the books for the shelves had 
largely been accomplished, and they had even been assigned 
to prospective places on the shelves, when similar work was 
begun in October on the books of the Sumner Library Asso- 
ciation, which, by vote of that body, were made over to us. 
Everything was accordingly ready for transporting the 
books from the Central Library, as soon as the contractor had 
done the necessary shelving, and during the last week in 
November the work of removing the books and putting then* 
in their assigned order on the shelves was done in about three 
days. Then followed the preparation of the slielf-lists, and 
the verification of the slip catalogue, already prepared. 
Meanwhile, the Reading-Room for periodicals was at once 
opened, and received a large use. By the middle of Janu- 
ary the catalogue was ready for the printer, and as soon as a 
few pages were received in proof, the delivery of books 
began, on the 27th of January. On the 3d of March, the 
catalogue was completed in print, and waiting till the 2 2d, 
the success of the experiment being assured, a formal open- 
ing was arranged by the committee in charge ; and to give 
sufficient accommodation, the ceremonies took place in Sum- 
ner Hall. A record of the occasion has been made with com- 
pleteness and perspicuity in the address of the President of 
your Board, which has been printed as a city document. The 
workings of the Branch will be detailed under other heads of 
this Report, in connection with similar results from our Lower 
Hall experience during the year. 

HI. THE BOOKS. 

I. EXTENT OF THE COLLECTION. 
We number now not much short of 180,000 volumes, as will 
be seen by Appendix 1. This still keeps us second in size in 
the countr3^ The excess over our numljer which the Library 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

of Congress has, is about equal to the extent (27,000 vols.) 
of the Su^Dreme Court Law Library, also under the control ot 
the Librarian of Congress. The Astor Library possessed, 
Jan. 1, 1871, 140,538 volumes. The New York Mercantile 
Library had April 30th, 127,237 volumes. 

Our aggregate of 179,250 volumes is divided thus: — 
Bates Hall, 135,786; Lower Hall, 30,574; East Boston 
Branch, 5,936 ; and Duplicate Room, 6,954. * 

2. INCREASE. 

Our increase of over 18,000 volumes and of nearly 15,000 
pamphlets is the largest by far ever reported. The figures 
for 1857-8 of nearly 36,000 volumes, which stand in Appen- 
dix I, represent the accumulation of two years or more 
besides the ordinary accessions, and it had been gathered in a 
house in Boylston place and elsewhere, and was in that year 
first placed in the present building. When we received the 
Parker bequest, our growth for that year, 1860-61, was under 
17,000. 

The Library of Congress grew last year 12,441 volumes 
and 8,000 pamphlets, of which over 2,700 volumes and 3,000 
pamphlets, accrued under the copyright act. The librarian 
estimates that the reserved copyright books, now gathering 
from their old repositories, will add about 25,000 volumes 
to that Library. The growth of New York Mercantile 
Library was 11,416 volumes, and that of the Astor Library 
was less than 1,500 volumes. 

The receipt of the Ticknor, Channing, and other donations, 
has made the gain of the Bates Hall [see Appendix V] 
uncommonly large. 

Of the entire gain, nearly 4,200 were books newly 2)ub- 
Ushed, including duplicates ; and of this number probably 
2,600 were books of American publication. 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. No 50. 

3. GIFTS. 

We show in Appendix IX, a list of over six hundred bene- 
factors during the year, whose gifts vary in vakie from a 
single pamphlet to the costly collection devised by the late 
JSIr. Ticknor, and in volumes our gain in this way is above 
half our total gain. "VVe have received over a hundred volumes 
each, from the following: W. S. Applcton, Dr. Wm. F. 
Channing and Mrs. Eustis, W. W. Greenough, George S. 
Hale, Mrs. Mary I. Mason, Samuel F. McCleary, Hon. Otis 
Norcross, John C. Eopes, Sumner Library Association, and 
George Ticknor (by bequest). The Ticknor and Channing 
books are sufficiently described in Bulletin No. 17. The 
extent of ]\Ir. Ticknor's previous gifts to the Library was 
4,427 volumes and G07 pamphlets. This included a col- 
lection of books on Moliere (originally formed by the late 
Mr. Prcscott at a time when he was intending to write 
a life of that dramatist) , and a collection of Italian and Greek 
and Latin classics. These, added to the bequest, make a 
total of 8,201 volumes and 1,205 pamphlets. The gift of 
Mr. Hale included a large numljer of books on American 
history, collected by his father, the late Hon. Salma Hale, in 
writing a history of the United States. 

Nearly 11,000 pamphlets came from benefactors. 

The British Government continue to supply us with 
the Specifications of patents, issued by the commissioners. 
An eleventh set has been added to those already in this 
countr}^, by a gift of the Great Seal Patent office to the St. 
Louis Mercantile Library.* At that time (Dec. 1870) it was 
officially announced that the set then included 2,680 volumes, 



* The sets previously in the country arc iu the Patent olllce (Washing- 
ton), the Astor Library, State Library (Albany), Franklin Institute (Phila- 
delphia), Boston Public Library, Philadelphia Library, Chicago Library 
Association, Peabody Institute (Baltimore), Wisconsin Historical Society, 
and Cornell University. 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 25 

costing the government for print and paper £2,550 a set, and 
that the sets increased about one hundred and forty volumes 
yearly (at a cost to manufacture of £130), embracing 3,500 
specifications, — the whole number of specifications then 
amounting to 71,922. Our agent in London receives the 
specifications, etc., every Monday, and transmits them to us 
in bound volumes, seventy or eighty at a time. The folio 
plates are backed with cartridge paper, and the binding is 
done at the Library's expense. 

i. SHELF DUPLICATES. 

In the Lower Hall we have duplicated largely. While 1,116 
new books have been placed there, in 894 additional cases 
duplicates were added, and of the 770 condemned books 
replaced, most of them were also duplicates. The large num- 
ber of condemned books, however (1,233), and the number 
transferred to East Boston (859) and to the Bates Hall (23), 
has reduced the net gain of this Hall for the year to 665 
volumes. [See Appendixes V and VIH.] 

5. SALE DUPLICATES. 

A reference to Appendix IV will show that our Duplicate 
Room, arranged for the reception of such books during the 
year, now holds near 7,000 volumes. It is the result of an 
actual count, and varies somewhat from the figures of a com- 
putation carried forward year after year. A good deal of 
laborious work has been done in the Duplicate Koom dur- 
ing the year, almost entirely by gaslight. 

6. PAMPHLETS. 

Of the 14,976 pamphlets which have been added during 
the year, 10,805 came by gift, and 4,171 by purchase ; most 
of the latter, however, were numbers of periodicals, which 
were bought to complete sets for East Boston, and for the 
Central Library. 



26 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

7. PURCHASE OF BOOKS. 

There have been 8,349 vohimes purchased during the 
year, either with the city appropriation, or with the interest 
of our funds. It will be seen by Appendix XIII that one 
means of selection, namely, by the recommendation of fre- 
quenters of the Library, is *ill more largely than ever availed 
of. There were 1,665 such recommendations of titles made, 
covering probably not fiir from 4,000 volumes. About one- 
quarter of them we already possessed, and the applicants 
were notified; and over 1,200 were ordered, and 549 have 
been thus far received. 

The troubles in Europe have affected our regular receipt 
of books from the Continent. Our Italian invoice for the 
year came in time, but later than usual. From Leipsic there 
has been the usual extent of receipts, but the monopoly of 
the trains by the government has caused occasional delays 
between Saxony and the Baltic ; and for a while the fear of 
French cruisers interrupted the transit across the ocean. 
Books for us left Paris, the last day of free communication, 
before the city was closed about by the German forces, and 
since its surrender, in the continued disturbed state of affairs, 
the departures have been very uncertain, and, as the binderies 
are deserted, books must come unbound till quiet is definitely 
restored. M. Reinwald, the active agent for us in Paris, was 
early obliged to leave the city, owing to his German birth, 
and has not yet returned to give the needful direction to 
affairs. Arrangements were early made to procure all the war 
maps published in both of the contesting countries, and in 
England, and we have gathered about a hundred The earliest 
that came indicated clearly the popular view of the probable 
field of the conflict. The maps of both French and Ger- 
man publishers covered the region running from the Rhine 
country to the interior of Germany. It was the supposition 
of the conqueror as well as the conquered, that such would 



PUBLIC LIBRAKT. ' 27 

be the field of operations. From Leipsic we have received 
a good deal of the current war literature of the Germans, 
much of which has been issued in their favorite divisionary 
form. 

I find in the report of Mr. Furnivall to the Chaucer Society 
a rather significant statement regarding the wide-spread 
interest felt in this country in the higher departments of pure 
literature, as shown by the number of subscribers which that 
society has in this country, compared with the patronage it 
gets in Great Britain. While there are twenty libraries in 
the United States receiving their publications, there are but 
eight in England, one in Ireland, and none in Scotland. It 
is a point of interest to notice the distribution of these sub- 
scribers among the States. Massachusetts has four, — Am- 
herst College, Boston Athenaeum, Boston Public Library, and 
Harvard College. 

New York has five, — Astor Library, N. Y. City; Clinton 
Hall, N. Y. City; Cornell University ; Brooklyn Mercantile 
Library, and Rochester University Library. 

Maryland has three, — Maryland Historical Society, Balti- 
more Mercantile Library, and Peabody Institute, Baltimore. 

Connecticut has two, — Watkinson Library, Hartford, and 
Yale College. 

The following States, one each : — Ohio, Antioch College ; 
Rhode Island, Brown University ; California, San Francisco 
Mercantile Library ; Michigan University ; Pennsylvania, 
the Philadelphia Librarj- Company ; and also the Library of 
Congress. 

IV. CIRCULATION. 

1. USE OF THE LIBRARY. 

It will be seen by the table of Appendix X, that the num- 
ber of days in the year during which the Library has been 
kept open is unprecedented ; namely, three hundred and seven, 



28 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

wMch is ten more than the largest return previously (1,860). 
The present is the first full year since the plan of examining 
the Library without closing was put in operation. This in 
part carries up the aggregate issues to 112,000 more than 
last year, which excluded three months of the year, — among 
the lightest, however. The addition of 26,130 for the issues 
at East Boston, during the seventy-eight days that Library 
has lieen opened, further swells the aggregate. But the 
daily average shows the absolute gain in the Central Lil^rary, 
which has risen from two hundred and seven to two hundred 
and twelve in the Bates Hall, and from seven hundred and 
three to seven hundred and forty-one in the Lower Hall. 
It must be remembered that our daily average this year is 
kept down by including the light months of May, June, and 
July, which were not included in last year's account. The 
daily average of both dcj^artments of the Central Library is 
nine hundred and sixty-five against nine hundred and seven- 
teen for last year. The daily average for East Boston was 
not included in the figures of the tables referred to, since it 
covers only the heaviest months of the year. If it had been, 
it would have carried it up to 1,288. The grand total of 
322,445 issues we may hope largely to exceed when we can 
have the figures of East Boston for an entire year. 

On the 28th of January, we made the largest issue ever 
recorded, namely, 1,856 volumes — for the Central Library 
only. 

The capacit}'^ of the Lower Hall Delivery Room, at hours 
when people most throng it, with the consequent vitiation 
of the atmosphere in it, must always be an impediment in 
the way of reaching such a circulation with that department 
as we might reasonably hope for under better circumstances. 
I think nothing would be so conducive to restoring the 
almost abandoned rights of adults in this popular depart- 
ment, as the withdrawins' from our Lower Hall collection the 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 29 

books that call to it such a great number of boys, and placing 
them in a distinct Juvenile Library, which, with Reading- 
Room attached, could be advantageously made to occupy our 
rear lot on Van Rensselaer place. 

There is one noticeable chano-e in the returns for the Bates 
Hall. Up to 1867 the Hall issues were always in excess of 
the home issues ; for that year and the three following, the 
reverse was the case ; but this year there is a return to the 
former proportion. 

It will be seen by Appendix XI that July has the lightest 
Work, and March the heaviest, and the ratio is about as 7 
to 12. 

2. BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS AND READING. 

In referring to Appendix VII for the relative increase of 
the various classifications in the Bates Hall, I should say that 
in the 7,508 volumes which have been assigned to shelves 
during the year, there is not included the Ticknor Library, 
received too late in the year for such classification, and which 
will necessitate in the future a division of Class X, in which 
is included our previous meagre collection of Spanish and 
Portuguese books. It will be perceived that independently 
of these, the relative strength of the various departments 
does not materially change year from year. The department 
of Theology and Ecclesiastical History is and has been one 
of the strongest in the Library, and it were desirable in a 
general collection like ours to reduce its relative importance, 
but it has not been easy. This department of literature in- 
variably both in this country and in Europe produces the 
largest number of current publications, and though we con- 
fine our choice to such only as are of prime importance, a 
rigid selection will yet give us many additions ; and many 
more are recommended by users of the Library. The clergy, 
as a class, and those peculiarly interested in such books, 
3* 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

are less intermittent in their habits of reading than almost 
any other, and of the 1,G65 titles recommended last year, 979 
were in the spheres of theology and ecclesiastical history. 
The comparative use of the various classifications will be 
seen from Appendix XIV. 

3. LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS AND READING. 

There are the same curious and instructive inferences to be 
drawn from a study of the figures in Appendixes VIII and 
XV this year as in the past. About two-thirds of the addi- 
tions to this department of the Library, and one-third of its 
entire extent, are in the range of prose fiction ; while over 
three-quarters of the circulation of the same department at- 
tests a still larger relative demand^ which might be made 
even greater were there no restraint put upon duplicating 
new and transiently poi)ular novels. I have in the past dis- 
cussed the question of the large amount of fiction read in 
popular libraries. It is an inevitable experience, and the 
/dreams of those hopeful for a change are in vain. The 
•mnltitude not only crave fiction, — something imaginative as 
ja counterpoise to the realities, often stern, of life, — but, in 
consequence of there being comparatively few trained im- 
a""inations, the style of fiction that is craved is oftenest of a 
low order. We may perhaps find a moral in the old fiible of 
the thirsty starling, who got at the water in the urn by drop- 
ping pebbles into it one by one. The reading of books 
which we may grow to despise, like the service of those value- 
less fragments, may imperceptibly raise the fountain of in- 
telligence to a higher level, and this no doubt sometimes 
happens ; but the general results in libraries will not vary, 
since new readers begin at the level from which the old 
readers advanced, and thus keep up the relative debasement. 
Something can be done, in the way of guiding readers, and it 
is a paxt of our duty tp, devise means to that end. For this 



PUBLIC LrBRAKT. 



31 



recason, I have prepared a list of liistorical novels, poems, 
and plays, which, it was thought, might become the stepping- 
stones to the less imaginative works upon the corresponding 
periods of the world's history. The plan has seemed to meet 
■with favor, and I hope for good results. 

Nevertheless, the great effort is to get people to read at 
all. You may give the average reader "Romola," and find 
the book returned but half read. Give him next " The 
Planter's Northern Bride," or the "Deserted Wife," and you 
make a confirmed reader of him, and have got good material 
for a possible rise. Let it not be forgotten that most of the 
judgments upon this greed for low fiction come from those 
who have the ability for selection and the literary amenities 
about them which fit them for the comprehension of the 
higher grades, and they forget that the want of such abil- 
ity and the absence of such amenities are fatal to the enjoy- 
ment of the reading which they aflfect ; and without enjoy- 
ment the masses will not read, because they are by the nature 
of the case under the impelling power of Shakspeare's hack- 
neyed rule, that no profit grows where pleasure is not taken. 
Every literary man knows, that, with his varying moods he 
can read a work of high culture at one time with advantage, 
and at another with none ; and how can it be expected that 
those without his culture can do better than he, when his cul- 
ture is centralized ? I have no doubt, hard as it is for a man 
of trained mind to come to this belief (involving as it does an 
abnegation of his cherished ideas), that there is the same 
relative mental elevation gained in the two cases. " Romola " 
incites the highest intellectual condition in a manner no 
stronger than is done by the novels of Mrs. South worth 
with the kind of mind upon which they so invariably work. 

I have been struck with the reference to the books of 
our Library which I find in the recently published Report of 
the Bureau of Statistics, presented to the legislature of the 
Commonwealth. Two extracts will suffice : — 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 56. 

Visited next Mr. , laborer ; gets two dollars per daj^ in sum- 
mer ; has a wife and two children, oldest is about fifteen years 
of age, youngest twelve ; latter at home ("Wednesday P.M.) read- 
ing a book from Public Librarj'- ; family occupies three rooms, liv- 
ing room and two bedrooms, rent two dollars and a half; dimen- 
sions of living room 10X14, with two windows : bedrooms 8X10, 
with one window, casing of windows broken, and roof so dilapi- 
dated that they are obliged to set tubs to catch water when it 
storms ; paper ver}- much defaced by smoke ; an utter impossibil- 
ity to have a fire in anj' room in this building without filling the 
room with smoke. 

Next visited Mrs. , a coat finisher in a shop on Milk 

street, — occupies one room, 12X9, at one dollar and a half a week, 
— room shockingly out of repair, but kept perfectly neat and in or- 
der. She is the widow of a soldier killed in the Avar ; has a daugh- 
ter ten 3'ears old ; will remove as soon as wages justify ; goes to 
shop at 7.30 A.M., returns to dinner, then to shop again, reaching 
home at 6 P. M. Child prepares meals for mother, attends public 
school, and Sunday school at Dr. Ellis's church ; she was reading 
(Wednesday P. M.) a book from the Public Library, with the door 
fastened for fear of the rough neighbors and the rougher landlord, 
who frightened her by threats of turning out unless the rent was 
paid by Saturday night. 

This is an indication of the places into which our books 
go, and one has only to look over the slips of the applicants, 
where they have recorded their occupations, and to observe 
the throng which gathers in our Lower Hall delivery room, 
to find due confirmation. There can be no question if there 
is any mental amelioration or intellectual pastime to be en- 
joyed from a popular library by the lowest classes, that, if you 
confine your selection of fiction to Scott and Miss Edgeworth 
alone, as some good people would have you do, you 
debar the vast majority of such from becoming readers at all. 
If we exclude the positively vicious books, we have gone 
as far as we can without thwarting the desires of the great 
masses of readers, which are legitimate because arising from 
their condition and wants. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 33 

It is the experience of the book trade, I think, that a desire 
for reading can be engendered. One of our most intelligent 
booksellers says, that " every new book, — such as Lothair or 
Put Yourself in His Place, — which has a great circulation, 
cultivates the habit of reading books, and makes thousands 
of new book buyers." I think our experience clearly shows, 

— whether it is in the results of furnishing the most popular 
books, or in the habit of supplying particular needs, under a 
system of purchasing such as are particularly recommended, 

— that we multiply our readers by giving them what they 
want, and may advance their tastes in the main. If the habit 
of reading is fixed, the greed may extend to something in the 
end requiring more exercise of mental power. Home de- 
monstrated in regard to one of his books, that the desire for it, 
once created, would in the end overleap obstacles that would 
have been an insurmountable barrier without the desire. He 
sold, at a farthing a copy, three editions of a book at a loss, 
but they went off rapidly. A fourth edition, raised to a shil- 
ling, did not lag upon the market. A fifth, at half a crown, 
went at a rate to remunerate him for the aggregated editions. 
A parallel experience I believe possible in the reading, as 
well as in the buying, of books. 

Some statistics which they have gathered at the Taunton 
Public Library during the past year are indicative of the 
all-engrossing interest of novels to the bulk of readers. 
^Vhat is their experience I presume would be ours, only in 
larger proportion. They had 1,766 borrowers for the year, 
and of these nearly one-half (837) took novels invariably. 
There were 252 others who took novels in all but one or two 
cases ; leaving but 677, or not much over one reader in three 
who seemed to have any idea that novel reading was not the 
only reading. Then again the 837 pure novel readers took 
more than 21 volumes each during the year on an average, 
while those who read other books, took an average of not 



34 CITY DOCIJMEXT. — No. 56. 

much more than half as many (11) ; two persons took 115 
books during the year, the largest issue to a single person, 
and they were all novels. 

The statistics of last year's book trade in England shows 
that novels oftenest reached a second edition, and books of 
travels the least often. 

The figures in Appendix XV show a slight falling off 
in the percentage of novel reading, which loss has consti- 
tuted the gain in the classification of Poetry, Drama, and 
Miscellanies, the new Class List for which has been in use 
for the first time during the year. The results of Appendix 
XVI give indication of the same excess of novel reading at 
the East Boston Branch, the percentage for prose fiction 
and juvenile story books amounting to 64. That collection 
was opened with few duplicates, it being intended to add 
such as the demand required, and it is wholly to the want 
of them that I ascribe the less percentage of fiction, so far. 

4. PERIODICAL EEADING ROOMS. 

Seventy more periodicals are now kept in the Central Read- 
ing Room than last year, the number now being 374, which, 
wdth 77 duplicates, makes an aggregate of 451 in the boxes. 
The daily number of readers has advanced from 510 for last 
year to 596 for this, or nearly three times the number that 
frequented the room in 1867. 

At East Boston the Reading Room was opened for two 
months before the delivery of books began, and it received 
naturally in that period a much larger use than when books 
could be taken. In 130 days it has had over 10,000 readers, 
who have read nearly 26,000 periodicals. 

For both Reading Rooms the grand total of readers is 
193,417; of magazines read, 269,150, — a daily average of 
675 readers and 992 magazines. 

I refer for further particulars to Appendix XVII. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 35 

5. LOSSES AND DELINQUENTS. 

There were 293,710 volumes taken for home use during 
the year, and 18,700 had to be sent for by notice through the 
post, which means, that, in every fifteen books taken home, 
there will be one kept beyond the prescribed time, either 
from carelessness or because further use is required. Of 
this number thus notified, 17,856 were returned within a 
week, leaving 844 to be sent for by special messengers, which 
shows that one book in every 348, taken for home use, must 
be regained in this way. Of this 844, all were recovered 
except 39, and the grand result is, that, of every 7531 vol- 
umes that leave the Library, we lose only one. That this 
number is in excess of what might be the case, were we to 
grant the use of the Library only to such as could become 
pecuniarily vouched for by some tax-payer or householder, 
can easily be conjectured from the fact, that, at the lending 
Branches of the Liverpool Library for the last year, there 
was only one book unrecovered or not restored by an equiva- 
lent out of every 36,000 issues. The length of time that the 
Lower Hall books have been in use — some of them nearly 
twenty years — is beginning to be shown in a rharked man- 
ner in the number of volumes condemned. Over 1,200 were 
thrown aside, being four or five times as many as during any 
year of late, while new books or old books with soiled cov- 
ers required 51,537 paper covers during the year. 

Three months' wear at East Boston required over 2,500 
new covers. Further results are given in Appendix XIX. 

The figures above given do not include books whj^h may 
be lost and accounted for. In seventy-three cases during the 
year. Lower Hall borrowers reported that they had lost the 
books charged to them, and in twenty-four of these cases, the 
book had been taken by another at the delivery counter, when 
the name was called — an error which may often arise by mis- 
take (as was known to be the case in three of the instances 



36 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 56. 

where the book was returned) , but can easily be made a 
method of theft, with no ready protection to the Library or 
the proper borrower, except his own vigilance. 

V. CATALOGUES. 

Of our printed Bates Hall Catalogues, the first volume, 
which was stereotyped, is now put of print, but we have a con- 
siderable supply of the second volume, which was not stereo- 
typed. Owing to a variety of circumstances, no work of conse- 
quence has been done in the preparation of " copy " for the 
third volume, nor is it very likely to be done the coming year, 
with the cataloguing of the Ticknor Library now to be pro- 
vided for. Meanwhile, the Card Catalogue (supplemental to 
volumes I and 11) is growing with great rapidity, and prob- 
ably now would furnish material for a much larger volume 
than any we have yet printed. The increased ratio of 
growth of the Bates Hall naturally accelerates the accumu- 
lation of cards. Beyond this, there are several hundred 
bound pamphlet volumes now annually put on the shelves, and 
when it is remembered that each of these in cataloguing requires 
for the main entry and cross references, on an average from 
ten to twenty cards, and in some cases that as many as forty 
or even more are necessary, it will be seen that the cards in 
the drawers must accumulate very rapidly, and when the 
labor of carrying catalogue work through the press is 
considered, the accretion becomes almost a portent of future 
unavailing efforts to keep up in print with the growth of 
this part of the collection. There were assigned to the 
Bates Hall during the year an average of twenty-four volumes 
a day, and, if the Ticknor books be included, the average is 
raised to thirty-seven ; and experience has taught all librarians, 
that the proper cataloguing in multifarious records of that 
number of volumes, (a large part of them needing very careful 
treatment, or in foreign languages, and a considerable por- 



PUBLIC LIBRAET. 



37 



tion being in the conglomerate condition of pamphlet vol- 
umes,) will take a strong force. It is a question of prime 
importance, with the future so promising for continued 
growth, whether some change in the method of presenting 
this record of our accessions to the public will not be abso- 
lutely forced upon us, and in view of such a contingency, 
which is made more pressing from the work of the catalogue 
department devoted to our Lower Hall and to the Branch, I 
have the whole subject under examination, to ascertain what 
escape is possible. 

Our Lower Hall Class Lists are now all in use, but oar 
supplies of that for "Poetry, the Drama, and Miscellanies," 
and that for "Foreign Languages," are only sufficient to 
carry us through another year. That for " Biography and 
Travel " is nearly out of print, and those for " History," 
"Arts and Sciences," and "Prose Fiction," are entirely so. 
We are now printing a new edition of the last named. 

A catalogue for the East Boston Branch has been issued, 
in the same general style of the Lower Hall Class Lists. 

As supplemental to these popular catalogues, an index to 
Historical Fiction, including novels, plays, and poems, has 
been issued, and it is hoped to make a second edition of it 
a part of a more comprehensive key to Historical and Bio- 
graphical literature, arranged upon the same general plan. 

During the year we have issued four Bulletins, containing 
seventy-five pages of closely printed main entries of titles, 
covering bothBates Hall, Lower Hall, and, in the last Bulletin, 
East Boston books ; an aggregate of more than 3,000 titles. 
In addition to this they have contained nearly twelve pages 
of catalogue work on the Tosti engravings. A list of the por- 
traits in this last collection is now in press, as an independent 
issue. 

There has been the usual work bestowed upon the public 
Card Catalogues of both Halls, upon the Consolidated Inter- 
4 



38 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

leaved Bulletins, the manuscript Indicator Finding List, and 
upon the posting of new titles, as soon as catalogued, on the 
diiferent bulletin boards. 

VI. FINANCE. 

In Appendix XX, will be found the usual financial state- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JUSTIN WINSOR, 

Superintendent. 
Public Library, May 17, 1871. 



APPENDIXES 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

1871. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES 



I. Extent and Increase of the Libkary. 

n. Extent of the Bates Hall Collection. 

III. Extent of the Lower Hall Collection. 

IV. Sale Duplicates and Odd Volumes. 
V. Increase of the Library. 

VI. VoLtiMES Located m Bates Hall. 

VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

VIII. Lower Hall Classifications. 

IX. Donors. 

X. ClRCUI>ATION OF BoOKS, 

XI. Books Returned. 

XII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIII. Books Recomjiended. Use op British Patents. 

XIV. Bates Hall Reading. 
XV. Lower Hall Reading. 

^■XVI. East Boston Branch Reading. 

XVII. Periodical Reading Room. 

XVIII. Periodicals Duplicated. 

XIX. Losses and Delinquents. 

XX. Financial Statement. 

XXI. Library Service. 

XXII. Report on the ExAinNATiON of the Library. 



PUBLIC LIBEARY. 

APPEISTDIX I. 

EXTENT AND INCEEASE OF THE LIBRARY. 



41 





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Note. — Prior to the Report of 1861, the annual statement of the whole numher of volumes was obtained by 
adding' the accessions of the year to the previous aggregates; and, although the numbers in both Halls have 
been since obtained ordinarily by adding the accessions and subtracting the losses, there still remain several 
Bources of unavoidable discrepancies, such as the following: Works reported at first as containing a certain 
number of volumes, afterwards for good reasons bound in a different number; worljs reported as duplicates 
subsequently exchanged for works in a different number of volumes; pamphlets bound separately and counted 
as books; also volumes lost or worn out, but for some reason not replaced, which disappear in the aggregates, 
but remain as originally reported among the accessions. 

The aggregate of pamphlets " added from the beginning" includes of course many since bound, singly or 
in groups (which are now counted among volumes), and a very largo number of duplicates, -which are thrown 
out and put among our pamphlets held for exchange. 
4I" 



42 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 56. 



APPENDIX II. 

EXTENT OF THE BATES HALL COLLECTION IN VOLUMES. 



The General Library 

Bowditch Library * 

Parker Library * 

" Duplicates (not for sale) 
Prince Library 



Entered on the Accession Catalogue, 
but not yet located at the end of 
the year 



Ticknor Library, not yet located 



Condemned 



Total 



1867. 



87,658 
2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,962 

1,678 



105,735 



1868. 



93,953 
2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 

1,827 



111,681 



1869. 



101,428 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 



117,969 
2 



117,967 



1870. 



107,724 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 

294 



124,419 




124,419 



1871. 



115,232 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

l,970t 

361t 
3,774 



135,786 




135,786 



* See Appendix Vn. 

t Including 18 vols, of MSS. 

X Of these 67 were in the hands of the binder; and others were not yet located, because 
of want of shelf-room in their several departments. 

Note. — Something less than 100 volumes have probably been lost from the Bates Hall 
since 1861, and each year some reappear, while a few in excess disappear, increasing the 
aggregate loss a little ; so that it is probable the figures of the Bates Hall collection are a 
trifle in excess of what an actual count would indicate. 



PUBLIC LEBRARY. 



43 



APPENDIX III. 

EXTENT OF THE LOWER HALL COLLECTION. 





1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 






25,199 
2,003 


26,606 
2,469 


28,723 
1,417 


29,909 






2,780 












27,202 
339 


20,075 
93 


30,140 
19 


32,689 


Books transfer'd to Bates Hall 
Books transfer'd to E. Boston 




23 

859 




257 


259 


212 


1,233 








Total left . 


*25,199 


26,606 


^28,723 


29,909 


30,574 



* Actual count. 

Note. There have been perhaps since the last actual count in 1867, about 60 or 70 vol- 
umes irrecoverably lost in the Lower Hall. Perhaps an equal number are to be classed as 
" unaccounted for," but may reappear. 



APPEN^DIX lY. 

SALE DUPLICATES AND ODD VOLUMES. 

(N'ot including Parker duplicates, or a large lot of odd volumes of books, not likely to 
have the missing volumes supplied, which are notu boxed up.) 





1867. 


1868. 


1869. 

6,805 
847 


1870. 


1871. 


Number at beginning of year .... 
Added during the year 


4,955 
714 


5,146 
1,004 


6,106 
443 


383 




5,669 
523 


6,150 
345 


6,652 
546 


6,549 
304 


234 






Total 


6,146 


5,805 


6,106 


6,245 


6,954* 





* This number is by an actual count of the volumes now arranged in our Duplicate 
Room ; and it includes 381 volumes of British Sessional documents, ready for exchange. 
There have been 768 pamphlets received and 667 sent away on exchange account during the 
year. 

Note.— There are also of pamphlets some thirty thousand duplicates, arranged in boxes, 
and ready for exchanges. Libraries are invited to make such exchangas with us. 



44 



CITY DOCUMEXT. No. 56. 

APPENDIX Y. 

INCREASE OF THE LIBRARY. 





1867. 


1S68. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


Increase of the Bates IIaxl.' 

Gain in located books (App. VI) . 
Of theeo not located at last Report . 


::: 


6.297 
1,078 


7,475 
1,327 


6,296 
140 


7,508 
294 


Added and located 

Added and not located at end of year 

Net iucreiise of sale duplicates . . . 

(App. IV) 




4,619 

l.o27 

659 


0,148 
140 
301 


6,156 

294 

- 139 


7,214 
4,135* 


Total gain 




6,605 


6,589 
2 


6,589 


11,349 


















6,605 


6,587 


6,589 


11,349 








Increase of the Lower Hall. 

Added during the year 

Less transfers and condemned books 




2.003 
596 


2,469 
352 


1,417 


2,780 
2,115 


Net gain 




1,407 


2,117 


1,186 


665 








Increase of East Boston Branch. 










5,936 


Gain 










5,936 




Increase of Duplicate Room. 












Gain 










149 






Increase of Entire Collection. 

Bates Hall gain 

Lower Hall gain 

E. B. Branch gain 

Duplicate Room gain 




6,605 
1,407 


6,568 
2,117 


6,589 
1,186 


11 ,.349 

665 

5.936 

149 


Total gain 




8,012 


8,685 


7,775 


18 099 








Increase from Newly Published 
Books. 

English Books with British imprint 
English Books with American im- 


635 

1,154 

104 
539 

97 


708 

1,445 

100 
673 


625 

1,455 

80 
789 

447 


811 

1,411 

50 
487 

248 


899 
2 206 


English Books with Continental im- 


48 




561 


Duplicatcs of either class, when not 
included in the other items .... 


480 


Total 


2,529 


2,826 


3,396 


3,007 


4,194 





* Includes Ticknor Library, 



PUBLIC LrBKAET. 



45 



APPE^^DIX YI. 

VOLUMES LOCATED IN BATES HALL, BY MONTHS. 



MONTHS. 



May .... 
June .... 
July .... 
August . . . 
September . 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 
January . . 
February . . 
March . . . 
April .... 

Total 



1868-69. 



758 
509 
1,037 
383 
713 
866 
443 
639 
626 
563 
621 
417 



7,475 



1869-70. 



347 
833 
697 
763 
632 
834 
633 
382 
1,175 



6,296 



1870-71, 



727 
480 
462 
520 
378 
546 
695 
905 
427 
706 
1,001 
661 



7,508 



Note. — These figures are the results of tables made out year by year, like the cue 
constituting Appendix VI for 1869. 



4t> 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 56. 



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5 <1 .2 « 52 ^5 



48 



CITY DOCUIMENT. — No. 56. 



APPEOT3IX yni. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 







n 


a 


00 


3! 


tc 


c' 


1- 


c- 


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c 


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o 


tc 


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books repla'd 








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*Thi8 class, embracing sets like Bohn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of course, 
which, in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heads of 
this table. 

Note. — The column of " Condemned books replaced " includes books condemned in previous 
years as well as in the current year. The column "Total added" shows the number of vol- 
umes, as put upon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. 



PUBLIC LIBRAKT. 



49 



APPENDIX IX. 



LIST OF DONORS, 1870-71. 
Bates, Joshua, London, interest in gold on the fund of 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., " " 
Franklin Club, " " 

Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, " " 
Phillips, Hon. Jonathan, " " 
Townsend, Mary P., " " 



1 the fund of 


S50,000 


u a 


1,000 


(( (( 


1,000 


(( u 


. 10,000 


u u 


30,000 


(( (( 


4,000 



$96,000 



DONATIONS MAY 1, 1870, TO APRIL 30, 1871. 

Donors (excluding anonymous), ..... 604 

Volumes, 9,750 

Pamphlets, 10,805 



Abbe, Cleveland, Cincinnati, 0., 
Adams, Hon. Charles F., Quincy, 
Alabama, State of, • 
Albany, ^V. T., Young Men's Association, 

Alger, Bev. William R 

Allen, Joseph H. 

Alton, JIL, Horticultural Society, 1 newspaper, 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 

American Association for the advancement of Science, 

Cambridge, . 

American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, Hartford, Conn., 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 
American Colonization Society, Washine/ton, D. C. 
American Free Trade League, Neiv York City, 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Journal of Education, Publisher, Hartford, Conn. 
American Literary Bureau, Neio York City, 
American Oriental Society, . . .... 

American Philosophical Society, P/a7adeZp^i«, Pa., . 
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 

New York City, 

American Social Science Association 



Vols. 



Pph. 



3 
1 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 

17 



50 



CITY DOCUMEXT. No. 56. 




American Tract Society, of Boston, 

American Tract Society, New England Branch, 

American Unitarian Association, 

Ames, Hon. Ellis, Canton, 

Amliorst College, Librarian, Amherst, .... 

Amraidown, E. H., iVfio York City, 

Araory, K., M. D., BrooMine 

Audover Theological Seminary, 

Andre-ws, C. Stanley, 2 newspapers, .... 

Anonymous, 1 newspaper, 19 numbers of periodicals, 1 map 

Appleton, Nathan, 

Appleton, William S 

Ashley, J. N., Neio York City, • 

Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 

Astor Library, Neio York City, 

Atkins, Charles J. Augusta, Me. 

Attwood, Gilbert, 

Austin, J/rs. Ivers J., 468 numbers of periodicals, . 

Balfour, David M., Charlestoton, 

Baltimore, 3Id., City of, 

Mercantile Libraiy Association, .... 

Peabody Institute, 

Bangor, Me., City of, 

Barnard, W F., Superintendent of the Five Points House 

of Industry, New York City, 

Barrande, Joachim, Prague, 

Barre, Private Institution for the Education of Feeble- 
minded Youth, 

Bicknell, Hon. Thomas "W., Providence, R. I. . 

Birmingham, Eng., Public Library, 

Blackwell, S. W 

Bogart, Hon. William H., Albany, N. Y. . , 

Bollcs, W. P 

Boris, Prof. P. J., 3 broadsides 

Boston, City of, 1 map, 

Board of Trade, 

Chief of Police, 

Children's Friend Society, 

Children's Hospital, 

City Hospital, 

Congregational Sabbath School & Publishing Sec, 

Discharged Soldiers' Home, 

Gas Light Company, 

• Lodge of St. Andrew, Ezra Palmer, Master, . 

. Mechanics Apprentices' Library Association, 

• Mercantile Library Association, .... 

North End Mission, 

Provident Association, 

Roxbnry Children's Home,& Home for Aged Females, 

St. Stephen's Chapel, 

Seaman's Aid Society, 

Society for Medical Improvement, 

Temporary Asylum for Discharged Female Prisoners, 

Theological Seminary 



20 

58 

175 

I 



13 
3 



1 
11 



PUBLIC LIBRAKT. 



51 



Pph. 



Boston Type Foundry, .... 

Union Maternal Association . 

Warren Street Chapel, . 

Young Men's Christian Association, 

Young Women's Christian Association, 



104 



:,N. 



Boston Daily Evening Traveller, Publishers, 
Boston Daily Evening Transcript, Publishers 

bei's of pei'iodicals, .... 
Bowditch, Henry I., 31. D. . . . 
Bowdlear, Capt. John A., Stoughton, 
Bowdoiu College, Brunswick, Me. 
Bowdoin Scientific Review, Editors, Brunswick, Me 

Bradford, Charles F 

Bradlee, Bev. Caleb D., 1 newspaper . 
Breslau. Blinden-Anstalt, 
Brewer, Thomas M., M.D. 
Brewer and Tileston, .... 
Briggs and Brother, Bochester, N. Y. 

Brigham, William T 

Brigham Hall, Hospital for the Insane, Canandaigua 
British Museum, London, . 
Brookline, Town of . . . 

Massachusetts Infant Asylum, 

Brooklyn, X Y., Mercantile Library, 

Brooks, Eon. Edward, 

Brunswick, Germany. Blinden-Iustitut, 

Buck, David, G numbers of periodicals, 

Buflalo, ]V. Y., Historical Society, 

Bulkley, J. W., Brooklyn, N. T. 

Bumstead, J. F. .... 

Burroughs, Bev. Henry, jr. 

Bushnell, Bev. George, Beloit, Wis. 

Butler, Hon. Benjamin F., Lowell, 

Butler Hospital for the Insane, Brovidence, B. L 



California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, 
Cambridge, City of, .... 
Canada, Library of Parliament, Ottaioa, 
Capen, Barnard, .... 

Capen, John, 

Caul field, Sophia F. A., London, 
Chambers, George E., Bhiladelphia, Fa. 
Chandler, Horace P., 102 newspapers, 59 numbers 

riodicals, 
Channiug, William F., M. D., and Mrs. Mary Channing 

Eustis, . 
Charlestown, City of, 

Public Library, 

Chelsea, City of, 

Pu])lic Library, 



Chicago, III, Board of Public Works, 

Board of Trade, . ■ . 

Charitable Kye and Ear Infirmary 

Franklin Society, . 

■ Medical College, 



of pe 



r., 



10 



14 
1 



26 
3 

15 
7 
1 

26 
1 



285 
1 



180 
119 

2 

2 

2 

45 

6 
1 

18 



22 



20 
1 
1 



46 
1 



123 

2259 

2 

3 

1 

11 

4 

2 



52 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 56. 




Chicago Reform School, 

Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Rail Road Company, . 

Choato, Isaac B., Portland, Mc. 

Christcrn, F. W., New York City, 

Chnstie, Dr. T. M.L., New York City, . . . . 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Young Men's Mercantile Library Asso- 
ciation, 

Claghorn, James L., Philadelphia, Pa 

Clapp, David and Son, 1,567 numbers of periodicals, 

Clapp, Eben, 

Clarice, John R., Manchester, N. H. . . • , 

Clarke. Robert and Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, 1 newspaper, . 

Cleavelaud, Pev. Charles, 

Cobl) Brothers, 

Colt, Mrs. Sanmel, Hartford, Conn. .... 

Columbus, Ohio, Office of the Commission of the Sink- 
ing Fund, 

Cook, George H., Rutgers College, New Brunsioick, N. J. 

Copeniiagen, Kongelige Bibliothek, 

Cornell. William M., .L/. i) 

Cornell Uuiversitj', Ithaca, N. Y. 

Cotrel. F., Board of Water and Sewerage Commissioners, 
Brooklyn, ^V. i". 

Covell, John C, Principal of the Institution for the 
Deaf, Dumb and Blind, Staimton, Va. 

Cragin, Hun. Aaron H., LeJianon, N. H. . 

Creiiore, C. F., M. D., Neivtun, 29 numbers of peri- 
odicals, 

Crocker, H. S. and Co., Sacramento, Cal. 

Crofutt, George A. and ("o,, Neio York City, . 

Crosby, Prof. Alpheus, Salem, 

Crosby and Damrell, 

Cupples, Joseph G 

Cushman, James M., City Clerk, Taunton, 

Cutter, C. A 

Dana, Bon. Richard H., jr. 

Day, Horace, M. D., Neio Haven, Conn 

Deane, ("harles, Cambridge, 

Denny, Henry G. 

Derby, George, M. D. 

Dexter, Franklin B., Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 

Dexter, Julius, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Dickinson, M. F., jr. 

Dillaway, Charles K. '. . 

Dollii)er, Thomas, 20 numbers of periodicals, . 

Dorr, E. Ritchie, 

Dresden, K. Blinden-Anstalt, 

Dureu, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me 

Eastern Rail Road Company, 

Edes, Henry H., Charlcstown, . . . . 

Edinburgh. Royal Society, 

Eliot, John F. 

Ellis, George I!,., D. D 



20 
1 



41 

18 



2 

1 

49 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



53 




Ellis, Mrs. J. H., 40 numbers of periodicals, 

Emerson, George B., LL.D. 

Essex Institute, Salem, .... 



Fall River, Public Library, 

Fearing, Hon. Albert, Hingham, 

Fitchburg Rail Road Company, . . . . ' . 

Foley, William J 

Folsom, Charles W., Superintendent of Mt. Auburn Cemetery, 
Foote, Eev. Henry W., 2 newspapers, .... 

Ford, William E 

Forster, E. J., 31. D., Charlestoion, 

Fox, Hon. Daniel, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Francis, S. W., 21. D., Newport, B. I. 

Frankfort. Blinden-Anstalt, 

Franklin County Agricultural Society, .... 
Freemasons' Monthly Magazine, Publisher, 
Freiburg im Breisgau, Bliuden-Institut, .... 
French, Miss, 307 numbers of periodicals, 64 newspapers, 
French, Jonathan,157 numbers of periodicals, 1,174 news- 
papers, .... 
Frothingham, Thomas B. 
Fuller, F. A., 1 map, 



Pph. 



D. 



Gaffleld, Thomas, 

Gannett, Ezra S., D 

Gardner, William S. 

Garrison, William Lloyd, 

Geary, John W., Harrisburg, Pa 

Georgia, Historical Society, 

Gilman, Arthur, Lee, 

Gilman, John H., M. D., Lowell 

Ginness, Charles H. 

Gluge, Dr., Brussels, 

Gmiiud, Wurtemberg. Blinden-Asyl, 

Goddard, Francis W., Providence, B. L 

Goodwin, Albert G 

Goodwin, W. F., Concord, N.H. 
Grand Commandery of Knights Templars, 
Great Britain Commissioners of Patents, 
Gregory Samuel, M. D. .... 
Green, J. O., M. D.. 48 numbers of periodicals 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 2 broadsides, 
Greene, Bev. J. C. Copley, BrooJdine, 
Greene, Col. W. B., BrooJdine, . 
Greeuough, Charles P. .... 

Greenough, William W 

Griffin, N. H., D. D., Williamstown, . 
Guild, Curtis, and Co., 2 maps, . 



Haines, A. M., Galena, III. 
Hale, George S., 83 numbers of periodicals, 
Haliburton, Miss G. .... 

Hamlin, Prof. Charles E., Waterville, Me. 
Hamlin, Hon. E. L., Bangor Me. 



56 
4 



43 
1 



2 
1 

1 
1 

89 



1 

1 

139 



333 
1 



27 

97 

3 



13 

81 



2 
10 



1 

3 

15 



64 
3 

4 

344 

1 

13 

1 
21 
12 

2 



6* 



54 



OITT DOCUMENT. — No. 56. 



aud 



Hanover. Blinden-Anstalt, 
Hart, Cliarles IT., Philadelphia, Pa 
Hart, John S., State Normal School, X J. 
Hartford Ketreat for the Insane, 

Young Men's Institute, 

Harvard College, Camhridge, 

Medical Faculty, 

^luseum of Comparative Zoology, 

Peabody Museum of American ArcUaeolog; 

Kthnologv, 

Hassan, T. F., Philadelphia, Pa. ... 

Hatcher, John E., Louisville, J\>j., 2 newspapers, 
Haynes, Prof. Eleury \V., JJurlinyton, Vt. 

Heinzeu, Carl. 

Her.schel, Clemens, 

Higgiuson, Col. Thomas W., Newport, E. I. . 
Hill, C. II., Washington, D. C. . 

Hill, Hamilton A 

Hillard, iron. George S 

Hiugliam Puljlic Library, 

Uiuton, James, M.D., London, .... 
Hoadley, C. J., Hartford, Conn. 
Hobart College, Geneva, N. Y. . 
Holden, William, Charlestoivn, 1 map, 
Holland, liev. Frederick W., Cambridge, 
Holwell W. W., St. Anthony, Minnesota, 

Homer, George, 

Holmes, Henry A., Neio York State, Library, . 
Holmes, Luther, Xeio Orleans, La. 

Hooper, Edward W 

Hooper, Hon. Samuel, 

Hornel I Library Association, jHojvie^smZZe, iV. Y. 

Hosford, Oramel, Lansing, Mich. 

Howard Charles P., Town Clerk, N'o. Beading, 

Howai'd Association, Neiv Orleans, La. 

Howe, Mrs. Julia Ward, 2 numbers of a periodical 

Hudson, Jiev. Henry N 

Hudson, M. E., 6 numbers of periodicals, 
Huntington, Bev. Gurdon, .... 



Indiana Hospital for the Insane, 

Institute for the Education of the Blind, 

Institution for the IJeaf and Duml), 

Indiana University, Bloominglon, Lid. 

Ingraham, It. C, New Bedford, 

Iowa State Historical Society, loioa City, . 



Jackson, Charles T., M. D 

Jackson, Henry, Fitchburg, .... 
Jackson, Mrs. IMerriara, 89 numbers of periodicals, 
Jetl'erson, Daniel, Melrose, .... 

Jeffries, B. Joy, J/. D 

Johnson, Miss Elizabeth, 

Johnson, Olive, New York City, 



79 
1 
1 



PUBLIC LIBKAKY. 



55 



Vols. Pph. 



Kansas Institution for the Blind, Wyandotte, 
Kemp, Kobert, .... 
Kueelaud, Prof. Samuel, 
Koehler, S. k'. . 

Konlgsberg. Preussische Provinzial- 
UnteiTicht, .... 



Ladreyt, Prof. C. 

Lancaster Town Library, . 

Lawrence, Edward, Charlestovm, 

Leavenworth, E. W. Stjracuse, N. T. 

Lee, J. W. M., Baltinwre, Md., 1 n 

Leicester Public Library, 

Lenox James, New York City, 3 engr 

Leominster, Town of, 

Lewis, Winslow, M. D. . 

Leyden, University of, 

Leypoldt and Holt, New York City, 

Lincoln, Henry W. 

Littleton, Town of, . 

Liverpool Public Library, . 

Livingston, C. F., Manchester, N. H. 

Logan, T. M. Sacramento, Cal. 

London City Mission, 

Institution of Civil Engineer 

Library Committee, 

Peace Society, 

Royal Astronomical Society, 

Royal Geographical Society, 

Lougview Asylum, Ohio, 
Loriug, Joseph C. 
Loring, Joseph G. 
Loud, Andrew J. 
Lowe, Bev. Charles, . 
Lowell, City of, . 

Eire Department, 

Lunt, \\ illiam Parsons, 
Lyman George H., M. B. 
Lynn Free Public Library, 



wspaper 



aved 



Vereins 



portraits 



McCarthy, W., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McCleary, Samuel F., City Clerk, 

McFarland, G. J. 

McEarland, Prof. R. W., Miami University 

McGrath, Miss Emily, 

Mclntyre, Bev. Thomas, Indianapolis, Ind 

Macli, Robert C, Londonderry, N. H. 

Madison, Wis., Board of Education, . 

Maine State Library, .... 

Manchester, N. H. City Library, 

Mann, Hollis, Natick, 

Marcli, Dr. Hcury, Albany, N. Y. 

Marlborough Public Library, 

Marsh, Benjamin, Newport, B. I. 

Marsh, Col. Lucius B. . . . 



fiir Blinden- 



Oxford, 



Ohio 



I 
1 
1 

2G 
2 



129 



1 

2 

11 

1 

24 

7 

1 

12 

2 



80 

38 

1 



39 
3 



3 
13 
10 



2 

52 

1 

2 



11 
1 



56 



CITY DOCUjVIENT. No. 56. 




Marshall, A. L., North Bridgewater, .... 

Martin, J. G 

Marvin, Theophilus R. 

[Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, . 
Maryland Hospital lor the Insane, .... 
Mason, Mn<. I\Iary I., Legatee of dliss Mary Otis, 105 

numbers of periodicals, 820 broadsides, 

Massachusetts, 8tate of, 

Board of Health, 

Boai-d of State Charities, . • . . 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor, 

Charitable Mechanic Association, 

College of Pharmacy, 

Eclectic Medical Society, .... 

Grand Lodire of Free Masons, 

Historical Society, 

Horticultural Society, 

Temperance Alliance, 

Massachusetts Weekly Spy, 2 newspapers. 

Matthews, W. H., Middlehury, Vt 

Mav, Miss Abby W. 

May, H. A 

Means, liev. James H. 

Merrill, Samuel, Governor of loioa, .... 

Michigan, State of, 

Milan, Italy, R. Istituto Lombard© di scienze e lettere, 

Milton Public Library, 

INlinnesota, Historical Society, .... 

Sui)eriuteudeut of Public Instruction, St. Paul, 

University of, 

Minns, Thomas, 

Missouri, Adjutant General, 

Commissioner of Statistics, .... 

Board of Immigration, .... 

Moore, George H., Librarian of the New York Historical 

Societv, Xeio York City, 

Morrill, lion. D. J. 

Morton, Hon. Ellis W 

Mullen, William J., Prison Agent, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mumford, Samuel R., Detroit, Mich. 

Munsell, Joel, Albany, N. Y. 

Munson, Bev. Myron A., Xorthfield, Minn. 

Muusou and Bailey, 



Nashua and Lowell Rail Road Company, . 

Nation, Tlie, Publisher, New York City, 53 numbers of 

Periodicals, . . 

National Association for the Relief of Destitute Colored 

Women and Children, Washington, D. C. . 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers, . 

Negri, Signor C. 

Neu-Torney bei Stettin. Pommersche Blindenanstalt, 

New Bedford Public Library, 

New England Female Medical College, 

New England Hospital for Women and Children, 



307 



19 
6 



12 
1 



PUBLIC LrBRARY. 



57 



New Hampshire Asylum for the Insaue, . 
New Haven, Conn., City Cleriv's Office, 
New Jersey Historical Society, Trenton, . 
New York, Citi/. College of the City, . 

Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, 

House of Kefuge, .... 

Mercantile Library, 

Pastoral Aid Society, 

Union Theological Seminary, . 

New Yo7-k State, Chamber of Commerce, . 

Committee of Public Charities, 

Historical Society, .... 

Lbnatic Asylum, .... 



— Medical Society, 

— Metropolitan Board of Health, 
State Library, 



Newburyport, City of, .... 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, Literary and 

cal Society, 

Newport. B. L, Home for Friendless Children 

People's Library, .... 

Newtou Centre. Theological Institution, . 
Nichols* C. H., Washington, D. C. . 



Philosoph 



Nichols, William, M. D. 

Nickerson, Miss, 

Norcross, Hon. Otis, 47 newspapers. 

North Bridgewater, 

North Brooktield, Town Clerk, 

North Carolina, University of Chapel Hill, 

Nottingham, England. Free Library, 



Ohio. 



State of, . 

Board of State Charities, 



Mechanics Institute, 

Penitentiary, 

State Commissioner of Common Schools 

State Library, .... 

Oliver, H. E., M. D. .... 

Ondei'donk, Henry, jr., Jamaica, L. I. 
Oswego, X. Y. Board of Education, 
Oweu, B. P., Eeadiug Library; Beading, Pa 



Palfrey, S. H 

Parker, Francis J. . . . . 
Parker, Henry J. .... 
Parker, Hon. Joel, Cambridge, . 
Parsons, Charles W., Providence, K. I. 
Paroiu, T., M.D., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Peabocly Academy of Science, Salem, 
Peabody Institute, Baltimore, 3Id. 
Peabody Institute, Peabody, 
Peck, George W. .... 
Peminger, Adolph, State Librarian, Colnmbia, 
Pennsylvania. Adjutant General's Office, 
Department of Common Schools, . 



S. C. 




10 

1 

99 



29 



Pph. 



1 
13 
1 
26 
2 
1 
1 



6 

7 

1 

2 

2 

111 

538 

1 

30 

1 

3 



1 

2 
13 

1 
624 

2 
12 



1 

1 

68 
4 
I 



58 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 5G, 



Eastern State Penitentiary, .... 

Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, riiiladelphia, 

Institution for the Instruction of the Blind, . 

Perkins Institution, and Mass. Asylum for the Blind 
3 numbers of periodicals, 

Perry, Hev. John B 

Perry, William, D.D., Geneva, i\^. Y. 
Peters, J. L., Neiv York City, 
Petersilea, Franz, ..... 
Philadelphia, Fa., Board of Directors of City 

Board of Health, .... 

Apprentices' Library Company, 

Friends' Asylum for the Insane, 

• Girard College, .... 

Library Comi)any, .... 

Mercantile Library, 



Trusts, 



Philbrick, John D., Superintendent of Public Schools, 

Pierce, Samuel B. 

Piper, W. F., 104 numbers of periodicals, 
Pitisfleld Youna: Men's Association, 
Poole, William F., Cincinnati, Ohio, . 
Portland, Jle., City of, ... . 
Portsmouth, N. IL, School Committee, . 
Prairie Farmer Company, Chicago, . 
Prang, L., and Co., 13 Maps, 
Preble, Capt. George H., U. S. N., Charlestoiot 
Providence, 7?. /., City of, ... 
Athenaium, 



Quebec. Literary and Historical Society. 
Quincy, Miss. Eliza S. 
Quincj% Hon. Josiah, 1 plate, 

Eadical, The, Publisher, 
Raj'mond, C. B. 
Reading. Public Library, . 
Reading Library, lieadimj. Pa. 
Reed, C, Montpelier, Vt. . 
Reynolds, B. M., Madison, Wis. 
Rhode Island, State of, 
Robblns, Chandler, D. D. . 
Robinson, Elijah P., Snurjus, 
Rolfe, William J., Cambrid(je, 

Ropes, John C 

Ross, James, Madison, Wis. 
Rowell, George P., Neto York City, 

Russell, E. D 

St. Louis, 3fo., Board of Directors of Public Schools, 

Mercantile Library Association, 

Public School Library, . 

St. Paul, Minn., Library Association, 
fcalem. East India Marine Society, . 
San Francisco, Cal. Mercantile Library Association, 



1 
1 

28 
3 



1 
2 
1 

1 

32 

1 



1 
1 
1 

1 
134 
1 
1 
1 
1 



PUBLIC LIBRART. 



59 



iodicals 



Sarmiento, Domingo Faustion, President of the Argen 

tine Bepnblic, .... 
Savage. Edward H., Chief of Police, 
Sarvin, T. E., Wendell, 
Sawtelle, J. B., Townscnd, 
Seguiu, M , the elder, Paris, France, 

Shattuck, Mrs 

Shatturk, George B., M. D., 33 numbers of pe 
Shaw, Benjainiu S. . . • . 
Sheppard, Maj. I. H., St. Louis, 3Io. 
Sherboru. Town Clerli, 
Shipley, Stephen, Fitchhurg, 
Silas Bronson Library, Waterhury, Conn, 
Slack, Hiin. Charles W., 1 newspaper. 
Slafter, Rev. Edmund F. . . . 

Smith, Charles C 

Smith, Eli A 

Smith, Samuel, City Clerk, Worcester, 
Snow, Edwin M., 31. D., Providence, R. I. 
Society of the Army and Navy of the Gulf, 
Sparks, 31rs. Jared, Cambridge, 
Spirit of Missions, Publisher, New York City, 
Staelili, Francis R., 31. D. 
Steiger E., New York City, 
Steindachner, Dr. Franz von, Cambridge, 
Stodder, Charles, .... 

Stone, Rev. Edwin M., Providence, B. I. 

Stratton, H. B 

Sumner, Hon. Charles, 

Sumner Library Association, East Boston, 

Swan, Clarence A 

Sykes, Joseph, Hyde Park, 



Talbot, I. T., 31. D 

Tappan, John, 

Taylor, Dr. C F., New York City, 
Thayer, Alexander, .... 
Thayer, A. W.. Trieste, Austria, 
Thomas, William, Kingston, 
Thornton, J. Wiugate, 8 newspapers, 3 MSS 
Thurman, W. C, .... 

Ticknor, George, by bequest, lot of unbound 
Ticknor. 3Iiss Anna, .... 
Tingley Automatic Heat Governor Co. 
Tobey, Hun. Edward S. . . . 
Toledo, Ohio. City Clerk, 
Toledo Blade, Editor, 
Truebner and Co., London, 
Trumbull Hon. J. H., Hartford, Conn. 
Tufts College, 3Iedford, ' . 
Twining, Thomas, Twickenham, Eng. 
Tyson, lleury, Baltimore, 31d. . 

Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. 
United States Adjutant General's Office, 



MSS 



Vols. Pph. 



4 

50 

2682 



2 

4 

1 

3774 

1 



2 
1 
1 

49 
15 
24 

14 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
33 



1 
1 

49 
1 
1 
9 



4 

1 

3 
3 

598 



5 

3 

14 



60 



CITY DOCUIMEET. — No. 56. 



ts, 



United States Bureau of Refugees, etc 

Bureau of Statistics, 

Department of Agriculture, 

Department of the Interior, . 

Department of tlie Navy, 105 cliar 

Library of Congress, 

Militarj' Post Library, 

Is aval Observatory, . 

Office of the Chief Engineers, 

Office of the General Superintendent of Educa 

tiou 

Patent Office, .... 

Quartermaster General's Office, 

Smithsonian Institution, 

Surgeon General's Office, 



Upham, J. Baxter, M, D. 



Vermont, State of, 

Asylum for the Insane, 

■ Historical Society, . 

State Prison, . 



Vienna. Blinden-Erziehungs Institution, 

K. K. Geologische Keichsanstalt, 

Vincent, Francis, Wilmington, Del. 
Virginia and Idaho Gold Mining Company, 



peri' 



Ward, 3Iiss H. T 

Warren. William F., D. D., 4 lithographs, 
Washburn, Frank T., 11 maps, 4ll numbers of 

odicals, . • 

Watertown. Free Public Library, . 

Webb, Stephen P., Salem, .... 

Webber, Samuel G., M. D., 20 numbers of pex'iodicals 

Welch, liev. E. H 

Wellington, A. A 

Western Lunatic Asylum, Staunton, Va. 

Western Keserve College, Hudson, Ohio, 

Westford, Town Clerk, 

Wheeler, William A., 1 broadside, . 

Wheelwright, William, London, England, 

Wheildon, William W., Vharlestown, 85 newspapers 

broadside. 3 notices, .... 
Whipple, Charles K., 1 engraved portrait, 
AVhipple, Edwin P. 
White, E. E., Columbus, Ohio, . 
White, James C, M. D. . 
Whiting, J. S., 31. D , Vharlestown, 
Whitmore, William H. 
Whitney, Jiev. Frederic A., Brighton, 
Whitney, James L., 55 numbers of periodicals, 1 

side, 

Whitney, Prof. William D,, New Haven, Conn. 

Wilder, Edward L 

Wilder, Hon. Marshall P. .... 
Wilkius, F. A 



br 



oad 



1 
1 
70 
3 
3 

6 
2 



19 

30 

2 

1 

1 

51 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

IG 

5 

1 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



61 



Ohio 



Willcox, E. S., Peoria, El. 

Williams, A., and Co. 

Williams, Henry J., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Williams, Major J. Otis, Winchester, 

Williams, Hon. Sidney, Providence, B. 

Williams College, Williamstoion, 

Wilson Hon. Henry, Xatick, 

Wilson, Hinkle and Co , Cincinnati, 

Winchell, Rev. Rensselaer, 

Wines, Pev. E. C, New York, . 

Winsor, Justin, 42 numbers of periodicals, 

AVintlirop, Hon. Robert C, 12 engraved portraits, 

Wisconsin Institute for the Deaf and Du ab, 

State Historical Society, 

State Hospital,' .... 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Wise, Prof. J., Lancaster, Pa. .... 

Woodwar'd, A., M.D. 

Woodward, G. E., Xew York City, 5 numbers of peri 
Woodward, James T. 
Worcester, Fr.e Library, . 

Lyceum and Natural History Association 

Young Men's Christian Association, 

Worthington and Flanders, .... 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn., 

Young, Hon. Brigliam, Salt Lake City, Utah, . 

Young, E., Washington, D. C 



odicals 



Vols. 





2 




3 


2 




2 


29 


1 


115 




1 


17 


1 


40 


1 


5 


37 


3 




3G 


138 


3 


13 




1 




1 


1 


14 



1 

15 
1 



Pph. 



1 
17 



62 



CITY DOCUMENT. No 5G. 



APPE^^DIX X. 

CIRCULATION. 
(Boots issued. Ko account is made of tlie great use of books -within the library rails.) 



daily use. 



Doily avrVfi. 



t^ Home use. 



Hall use. 
Green slips. 



Largest 
daily use. 



Daily avr'ge. 



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CO C< «D -rf 



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•Six roonthf. f Removal of the library. J Ten months. § Eleven months (library not 
closed for examination). || New restrictions put upon costly books. ** Nine months. 
ttCentral library oiilj'. Xt If the iss lesat Kast Boston be excluded, this footing would be 
296,31.Tj and if hall issues be excluded, there will be record of 293,710 volumes used at 
home. §§ Open 78 days. 

Note — The fiuuns of the circulation of the Lower Hall for 1887 are considered to be sev- 
eral thousands too l.irL;e, whiih consequently afl'ects the figures of the total circulation for 
that year. See Library Itvportfor 1808. 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. 



63 



APPEN^DIX XI. 



LOWER HALL. 
Books returned for each month. (Books issued appear in Appendix X.) 







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64 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 56. 



APPENDIX XII. 



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PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



65 



APPE^^DIX XIII. 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED, AND USE OF BRITISH PATENTS. 



Books Bscommended. 



1854 

1855 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 (nine months) 
1871 



Total recom- 
mended. 



123 

221 

121 

18 

85 

178 

91 

115 

204 

135 

56 

58 

306 

546 

120 

,178 

,231 



Already in 
Library. 



95 
183 
226 
257 

418 



Received 

since. 



260 
423 
535 
448 
549 



182 
187 
197 
269 
361 
346 
347 



243 
248 
248 
367 
589 
389 
301 



Note. — The column of " Received since" denotes those received of the " Total recom- 
mended" the same year. What may be in subsequent years received of such ''Total 
recommended," does not appear in this table. For instance, of the 1,120 — (1834-423) = 514 
not received in 1868 of the total recommended that year, a large part has since been received. 
6-- 



(jG 



CITY DOCUMEiSTT. 



No. 56. 



APPE:^n)ix xrv. 

BATES HALL READING. 



Classifications. 



English History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel and Poliie 
Literature 



Percentage of Use. 



1863. 1864. 1865 



American (North and South) 
Uislory, Topography, Biog- 
raphy, Travel and Polite Lit- 
craiuru 



French History, Topography, 
Bio^raphj', Travel and Polite 
Literature 



Germanic History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature . ....... 



Italian History, Topography 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



Other History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



General and Epochal History, 
Geography, Biography, etc. . 

Greek, Latin and Philology . • 

Bibliography 

Transactions 

Periodicals 

Fine Arts ... • 

Natural History and Science . . 

Theology, Ecclesiastical Histo- 
ry, Ethics, Education, etc 

Medicine 



Law, Government, and Political 
Economy 



Useful Arts, Mathematics and 
Physics, etc 



Miscellaneous Pamphlets bound 



2.5 



4.5 

3 
2.5 
3 
7 
9 
4 

11 

7 

1.5 

6.5 
2 



8.5 



3.5 

4.25 

3.5 

3 

1.5 

6 

12 
4 

11 
5 



1866. 



2.5 



2.5 

3 

3 

3 

2.3 

6 

16.5 

4.6 

8.5 
4.6 



7.5 
.75 



1867. 1868. 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


5 


7 


11 


7 



1869. 



1870. 1871 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of Books in the Bowditch, Parker and 
Prince Libraries, — which are kept apart from the general classifications of the Library, — 
is reckoned as nearly as possible and included in the usual divisions, ns indicated in the 
table. See Explanations to Appendix VII. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



67 



APPEISTDIX* XY. 

LOWER HALL READING 







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Note. — The columns of " Loans returned " do not include the books taken and returned 
the same day. 



08 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No 56. 



APPE^^DIX XVI. 

EAST BOSTON BRANCH READING. 

{Shown from slips of Books returned, January 2Sth to April 29<ft.) 



10.11.12.19.21 
4.33 



21.26.23.30.32 
27. . . . 
13.14.18.35 
1.2 . . . 



15.20 . . . 
6.6.7.17.37.39 
16.22 . . . 
3.36.38 . . 
8.9.23 . . . 



40.41 



Biography 

Collections, Libraries, &c. 

Fiction in prose 

Foreign books 

History 

Juvenile books 

Miscellaneous 

Periodicals {bound) . . . 
Poetry and Drama «... 
Sciences, Arts, Professions 
Travels, Voyages .... 

Total ....... 



Books 
returned. 



669 

*552 

8,593 

27 

1,096 

6,639 

747 
1,119 
2,071 

883 
1,179 



Per- 
centage. 



23,575 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

APPENDIX Xyil. 

PERIODICAL READING ROOMS. 



69 



Periodicals Divided by Lan- 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 




1871. 




guages. 




175 














141 


208 


220 


Central 
Library. 


K. B. 
Branch. 

28 


Total. 


Euglish 


287 


315 




39 

27 


46 
31 


49 
35 


47 
34 


48 
36 




48 
36 


Gurman 




1 


2 


2 


3 
304 


3 




3 






Total not reckoning dupli- 
cates in the same room . 


20S 


254 


294 


374 


28 


402 


Duplicates 










77 


5 


82 


Grand Total 











451 


33 


484 


Br Classes. 












1. Scientific and Professional . 


86 


98 


119 


128 


143 


4 


147 


2. Literary and Miscellaneous 


68 


96 


95 


96 


98 


15 


113 


3. Agricultural and Horticul- 
















tural 




. • 


13 


13 


21 




21 




18 


17 


17 


17 


36 




36 


5. Illustrated and foreign news- 












12 


17 


14 


14 


21 

20 


2 
1 


23 
21 


6. Commercial 


9 


9 


11 


11 




g 


g 


g 


g 


8 
4 


2 


10 
4 


8. Illustrated comic magazines 


3 


3 


5 


5 




3 

3 


4 


g 


g 


11 
12 


3 

1 


14 
13 




4 


4 


4 




Total, excluding duplicates 


208 


254 


294 


304 


374 


28 


402 


Statistics of Use. 
















Number of days open .... 


289 


300 


t299 


J230 


307 


130 


. , 


Readers of pi-riod'ls, males || 


50,846 


70,452 


84,329 


103,609 


156,717 


9,377 


166,094 


Readersofperiod'ls, females II 


4,438 


4,427 


5,225 


13,593 


26,367 


956 


27,323 


'I'otal readers 


55,284 


§76,892 


§91,674 


117,202 


183,084 


10,333 


193,417 


Daily average readers .... 


191 


256 


306 


510 


596 


79 


675 


Magazines read, total .... 


81,783 


88,034 


136.122 


142,962 


243,169 


25.981 


269.150 


Magazines read, daily average 


283 


293 


455 


622 


792 


200 


992 



• i*/'"''".'^''*''^'""'* "*^ ''"'^'■ned societies and costly journals, kept ill the Bates Hall, are not 
included ill this Cdunt, but they are all embraced— if currently received — in ihe Periodi- 
cal List published during the year. fKleven months and nu vacation. JNine months. SThis 
includes for 18w», 2.120, and for 1868. 2.013 non-resident rciiders; but now the distinction is 
not made. || I'his proportion between male and female readers is not fully trustworthy. 
The distinction is made in the count by means of the feminine names on the slips siijned by 
the applicants, but when the signature gives only initials, this means of distinction often fails. 
Note, i'he Heading lioom at East Boston was opened Nov. 23, 1870, making the report 
cover 130 days. i i a t- 



70 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No 56. 



APPEISTDIX XVIII. 

READING ROOMS. 
PERIODICALS OF WHICH DUPLICATES ARE TAKEN. 



Appleton'8 Journal 

Army and Navy Journal 

Atlantic Monthly 

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal 

Catholic World 

Every Saturday 

Galaxy 

Godey's Lady's Boolj 

Harper's Bazar 

" Monthly 

" Weekly • 

Lippincolt's Magazine 

Merry's Museum 

Nation 

North American Review 

Old and New 

Oliver Optic's Magazine 

Our Young Folks 

Overland Monthly 

Peterson's Magazine 

Scientific American 

Schoolmate 

Pcribner's Monthly 

Copies taken 

Magazines duplicated 

Duplicates taken 



Copies takeij. 



90 
23 



72 



PIJBLIO LIBRARY. 



71 



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XOTE. Thp expenditures cover the cost of books, which is chargeable to our Trust Funds 
Account, ii8 well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the City. 

Our financial and library years now nominally correspond, but it will happen that bills 
accruing suhsequent to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year, payable 
April 1st, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account, beginning nominally 
May Ist. In this way books added between March 15th and May Ist may be counted in one 
year's growth, and paid for in the subsequent year'« accouat. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. iO 

APPE]NT>IX XXI. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. 

' JUSTIN WINSOU, Superintendent. 
William A. ^YIlKF,hER, Assistant Superintendent. 
Miss Caroliue F. Adams, Accoicntaiit. 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

William A. Wheeler, CJiief. 
James L. Whitney, i^/rsi Assistant; Max Auerbacb, Assistant; J.Otis 
Williams, Curator of Pamphlets ; William H. Foster, Proof-Header. 

Mrs. R. M. Eastman, Miss Harriet N. Pike, Miss Elizabeth J. Stevenson? 
Miss A. B. Loud, Miss Mary McGrath, Miss Mary A. Tyler, Miss M. E. 
Joslyn, Bates Hall Assistants. 

Miss Alice M. Poree, Lower Hall Assistant. 

SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

Mrs. L. T. Barton, Custodian. 
Appleton P. C. Griffin, Maggie McGrath, Ellen Stevenson, Ellen E. 
Bresnahan, Assistants. 

BATES HALL CIRCULATING DEPARTMENT. 

Joseph Sykes, Keeper. 
George W. Peck, Miss L. S. Norton, Miss A. A. Nichols, Assistants. 
Edward L. Wilder, Charles A. Giuuess, John Bresnahan, Bunners. 

LOWER HALL CIRCULATING DEPARTMENT. 
Edward Capen, Eeeioer. 
Miss Harriet R. Cogswell, Miss Lizzie S. Haley, Miss Lydia F. Knowles, 
Miss Elizabeth Ross, Misses Eliza J. Mack, Sarah A. Mack, Assistants. 

Eliza L. Dorr, Annie M. Kennedy, Lucy A. W. Ginness, Henrietta E. 
Mack, Florence E. Ginness, Bunners. 

Elbridge Bradshaw, Begistration Clerk. 

Miss Matilda J. Ross, Assistant Begistration Clerk. 

Miss Carrie E. Poree, ) 

•Mr- T^ -1 T.r r. ^, i Beading Boom Attendants. 

Miss Emily McGrath, 3 

J. G. Cupples, Beading Boom Attendant {evenings). 

JANITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

William E. Ford, Janitor. 

Thomas Collins, Assistant. 

With extra temporary Assistants. 



74 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 56. 



BINDING DEPARTMENT. 

Fraxk p. Hathaway, Foreman. 

Andrew M. Blake, Mrs. Martha Wheeler, Assistants. 

Note. — The binderies of Orus Clark and Jerome Seidensticker are also 
emploj-ed. 

EAST BOSTON BRANCH LIBRARY. 

Miss Clara B. Pond, Librarian. 

Miss Mary R. Pray, Miss Addle G. Tracey, Assistants. 

Mary E. Cathcart, Runner. 

Wm. Gradon, Janitor. 

AGENCY DEPARTMENT. 
Messrs. William H. Piper «& Co., Boston. 

Messrs. Little, Brown &Co., and Sampson Low, Son&Marston, Boston 
and London. 
Mr. F. "W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 
Dr. Felix Fliigel, Leipsic. 
Chev. Eugenio Alberi, Florence. 



SUMMARY, 
Superintendent 
Accountant .... 
Catalogue Department . 
Shelf Department . 
B. H. Circulating Department 
L. H. Circulating Department 
Janitorial Department . 
Binding Department 
East Boston Branch 

Regularly employed in the Libraries 



I 
1 

13 
5 
7 

17 
2 
3 
5 

54 



PUBLIC LIBEAKY. 75 

appe:n^dix xxil 

REPORT ON THE EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 

To the Superintendent : 

Sir, — Daring ttie Library year ending the 30th of April, 1871, 
a third examination of the entire Library has been made, of 
which I beg leave to present th6 following 

REPORT. 

In the Bates Hall there were missing from the 

shelves at the time of examination . . . 1,929 vols. 



Of these there were found 

Loaned ....... 1,151 

At the Binder's 208 

Otherwise accounted for ... 558 



«- 



Not at present accounted for — 

Books . 10 

Pamphlets 2 



1,917 



12 



Two only of the missing books have been lent and marked re- 
turned within the present Library year ; a third is a Bates Hall 
Supplement located for general circulation, though not known to 
have been taken out ; but none of the books or pamphlets missing 
are recent accessions to the library. 

Of the missing pamphlets, one is a sermon preached during the 
late civil war, and the other an odd annual report of the State 
reform school, each of whi(;h is liable to re-appear in some bound 
pamphlet volume under its special subject. 

During the constant research for missing volumes, there have 
been discovered two pamphlets which were missing at the first 
examination in 1869, and twelve volumes and two pamphlets 
reported missing at the last examination. None of the books 
taken last year from the Bates Hall desk have re-appeared, but as 



76 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 56. 

only throe hooks and one pamphlet at present remain imacconnted 

for, it gives encouragement to think that man}- of the volumes at 

present missing will appear on the sheh'es at no distant period. 

In the Lower Ilall there were missing I'rom the shelves at the time 

of examination 4,763 vols. 

Loaned 3,927 

At the Binder's .399 

Otherwise accounted for .... 408 

4,734 



Not at present accounted for, — 

Fiction 9 

Duplicates of Fiction ..... 9 
Miscellaneous . . . . . .11 



29 



These missing volumes have been sought with the same persis- 
tence as during former examinations. Four of them have been 
added within the past 3'ear, and cannot be traced since their loca- 
tion ; fourteen have been lent during the year, and eleven have not 
been charged to borrowers, and are not recent accessions : all may be 
accounted for as misplaced, misnumbered, or accidentally omitted 
from the record of condemned books. Each year, however, reduces 
the number of the books actually missing, as some of them are 
certain to re-appear on the shelves. 

Of the volumes reported missing at the last examination, three 
have appeared in their proper places ; also, seven which were 
missing in 1869, eleven missing in 1868, four missing in 1867, and 
one in 1866. 

The number of books missing from each alcove, is as follows : — 
1st alcove 
3d 
4th 
5th 
6th 
7th 



2 vols. 


8th alcove 


2 vols 


1 " 


10th '« 


1 " 


3 " 


11th " 


2 " 


1 " 


14th " 


1 '• 


1 " 


17th " 


1 " 


4 " 


20th " 


1 " 




Dup's of 4th alcove 


4 " 




7th 


5 " 



PlIBLIC LIBKART. ii 

I have also to report the following books which have disappeared 
from the Bates Hall desk, during the past Library year : — 

I. 9 Vol. 1 Mass. general statutes. Sept. 5, 1870. 
I. 4 Hayden, J. Book of dignities. Mar. 20, 1871. 

A. 25 Moore, C. A. What to read and how to read. Mar. 20, 

1871. 
E. 3 Dictionary of Quotations, April 22, 1871. 
Also, the following from the desk in the Periodical Reading 
Eooni : — 

B. 20 Bartlett's dictionary of quotations. 

N. 28 Bartlett's dictionary of Americanisms. 
N. 53 Cruden's concordance. 

A. 15 Dictionary of Quotations. 

N. 30 Hayden's dictionary of dates, recently added. •> 

C. 14 Hayden's book of dignities. 

B. 21 Milton (Cleveland's). 
A. 2 1 Moore. What to read. 

C. 13 Payne. Haydn's universal index of biography. 
C. 12 Pierce. Cottage cyclopaedia. 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. T. BARTON, 
Custodian of the Shelves. 

Public Library, May 16th, 1871. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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