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Full text of "Annual report"

TWENTIETH 



ANNUAL R E P (3 R T . 



187S. 



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City Document. — No. 72. 



CITY OF BOSTON 




TWENTIETH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



In Board of Aldekivien, June 22, 1872. 
Laid upon the table, and ordered to be printed. 
Attest: S. F. McCLEARY, 

City Clerk. 






^ 



fOhl) 



CITY OF bosto:n^. 



Public Libeary, June 12, 1872. 
His Honor, William Gaston, Mayor of the City of Boston: 
Sir: I have the honor to transmit to you, herewith, the 
Twentieth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public 
Library, prepared in obedience to the fourth section of the 
Ordinance of 1869, relative to the Public Library. 

Very respectfully, 

JUSTIN WINSOR, 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



In conformity with the requirements of the fourth section 
of an Ordinance concerning the Public Library, passed Sep- 
tember 21, 1869, the Trustees have the honor to present to 
the City Council their Twentieth Annual 

EEPORT, 

being the third made under the new ordinance, and including 
the results of administration for the past year, in which the 
Library was opened for the use of the public during three 
hundred and eight days, a larger number than in any preced- 
ing year. 

Herewith are appended the reports of the Examining Com- 
mittee and of the Superintendent. 

The .members of the Examining Committee were Daniel S. 
Curtis, Esq., Daniel S. Gilchrist, Esq., Jas. T. Fields, Esq., 
Dr. C. E. Buckingham, and John C. Ropes, Esq., — Weston 
Lewis, Esq., of the Board, acting as chairman. 

The opinions of so intelligent a committee, exercising an 
impartial judgment upon the subjects submitted to them, 
will receive the attention to which they are entitled. 



6 CITY DOCUIMENT. No. 72. 

But l)y those who would fully comprehend the Public Li- 
brary, alike in its theory and practical operation, the report 
of the Superintendent, and the documents accompanying it, 
must be carefully studied. Here may be found the biogra- 
phy of the Library during the past year. Here is the infor- 
mation in detail, important to all who are interested in the 
results of public libraries, as a branch of social science, and 
especially so to those men of fortune — and we hope there 
are many such — who may be contemplating the foundation 
of similar collections in other towns. 

As is well known to all who have had occasion to visit the 
Library during the past year, extensive alterations have been 
made in Bates Hall, and are still going on. By means of these 
we have secured additional space for over 100,000 volumes, 
as well as increase of light. This latter is a very important 
consideration, especially in a city so crowded as ours, and 
where real estate, within certain limits, is so valuable, and in 
such demand for business purposes. 

The Trustees cannot but feel a little uneasy in view of the 
possible destination of the estates adjacent on the east and 
west, which are in the market for sale. Should these estates 
be built upon in a way that sagacious self-interest would 
prompt, the result would be a very serious inconvenience in 
the darkening of rooms already hardly light enough for the 
purpose for which they are used. 

More room is still much needed for the accommodation of 
the Patent Reports, the use of which is steadily increasing. 

On the 16th day of May the South Boston Branch of the 
Library was formally dedicated with appropriate ceremo- 
nies, including an address by the permanent president of the 
Board of Trustees, Wm. W. Greenough, Esq., now tempo- 
rarily absent on a visit to Europe. The books, about 4,500 
in number, are arranged in rooms hired by the city. About 
1,400 volumes, forming the nucleus of the collection, were 
furnished by the Mattapan Literary Association. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7 

An agreemeut made with the Trustees of the Fellowes 
Athenaeum in Roxbury will give the city a good building, now 
going up, and two or three thousand dollars a year for books, 
in addition to the ordinary appropriation by the city. The 
Roxbury Branch will be opened next winter. 

The East Boston Branch is in successful operation. The 
present number of volumes is 6,767, and the circulation dur- 
ing the year has been about 75,000, showing that each vol- 
ume would have been taken out more than ten times, were 
the circulation uniform, which of course is not the case in any 
circulating library. 

The whole collection of books in the Central Library and 
the several Branches is now about 195,000 volumes. Of 
these about 14,000 were added during the past year, nearly 
4,400 being gifts. 

The daily average issue of books was 1,234. 

The noise and confusion attending the work going on in 
the Central Library since last September have lessened the use 
of Bates Hall, and from the same causes, as well as from the 
diminished light occasioned by the scaffolding, the usefulness 
of the Reading room, during the same period, has been 
interfered with. The use 6f the Lower Hall has not suffered 
from these causes, but has rather increased during the past 
year. But the work still to be done in that department dur- 
ing the summer will probably lessen its usefulness some- 
what, though much less than would be the case were the 
work done during the shortest days of winter. 

Only one book in every 9,400 delivered for home use is 
not finally returned to the Library ; a fact honorable to the 
community among whom the books circulate. And with 
hardly an exception such books as are ultimately lost are 
easily replaced, if need be. 

The information required by the Ordinance to be given as to 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

the extent, circulation, and expenditures of the Library, will 
be found in the tables nppeudcd to the Superintendent's Re- 
port. 

G. S. HILLARD, 

President pro. tern. 
WESTON LEWIS, 
ELLIS W. MORTON, 
HERMAN D. BRADT, 
SAMUEL LITTLE, 
GEO. PUTNAM, 
SAMUEL A. GREEN, 
FREDERICK PEASE. 
Public Library, June 12, 1872. 



• [A.] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTRE, 

CONSISTiy^G OF WESTON LEWIS, ESQ., CHAIKMAK, C. E. BUCKING- 
HAM, M.D., DANIEJj S. CVItTIS, ESQ., JAMES T. FIELDS, ESQ., 
VANIEL S. GILCHRIST, ESQ., AND JOHN C. ROPES, ESQ. 



The Committee for 1872 appointed to examine the Boston 
Public Library have attended to that duty, and beg leave to 
report : — 

The general condition of the buildings, of the books, and 
of the other contents of the Central and Branch Libraries is 
satisfactory, especially considering the nature and amount of 
use to which they are constantly subjected. 

The recent alterations, and those projected for the further 
improvement of the Central Library Building, as far as they 
go, have the Committee's approval. 

The system of administration in operation appears to have 
been elaborated with much care and patience, and no ascer- 
tained opportunity for amendment is neglected. From the 
data of its own experience compared with those of other li- 
braries with which ours is in correspondence, are derived 
the means of gauging its performance. In this way progress 
is constantly made towards attaining a maximum of result 
at a minimum of cost and labor. The wise management of 
such an institution calls for a degree of intelligence and per- 
severing industry on the part of those responsible for its 
working, which, we are persuaded, would surprise any casual 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

and superficial observer of its daily operation. This Com- 
mittee has had ample opportunity, with every did and expla- 
nation on the part of the Superintendent, to estimate- the 
position and progress of the Library, and they are gratified 
to be able to say that these are highly satisfactory, and such 
as entitle the institution to the continued favor and support 
of the community. 

Founded in 1852, the Boston Public Library now numbers 
nearly 194,000 volumes, holding the second rank among 
libraries in America. Many of the intelligent and liberal 
men who projected and advanced this noble enterprise have 
been denied the sight of its successful execution, but the 
permanent benefit conferred on a grateful posterity will ever 
be associated with their names and memory. 

During the past year, ingenuity and expense have done 
something to remedy the original defects of the Library 
Building. We however apprehend that the time is rapidly 
coming when no expedients will suffice to keep the present 
building adequate to growing demands. Already the maxi- 
mum of accommodation is reached. Light, ventilation, offi- 
ces, work-rooms, all are wanting ; and as books, readers 
and employes increase in numbers, the difficulty of expedients 
for their reception must also increase. In the face of such 
possible dead-lock as even one decade may bring, we urge the 
wisdom and the economy of seasonable foresight and action. 
We need but allude to the experience of the British Museum 
to justify fears of a like dilemma on a lesser scale. 

As respects the circulation and use of the Library we are 
led to hope that among all classes may be developed an in- 
creased disposition to avail themselves of its advantages. 
That a library shall be useful, people must use it. Yet it is 
far easier to get books than readers. Many intelligent lovers 
of reading have yet to visit the Boston Library for the first 
time, and are still unaware of the value and of the facility 
of its privileges. The completeness of the collection in all 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 11 

departments of Modern Literature, English and foreign, kept 
up by frequent importations of the newest works published 
abroad ; the best of about seven hundred periodicals, American 
and foreign, all perfectly accessible, would surprise and attract 
many who, never having visited^the Library, have no idea of 
its contents. Perhaps an occasional advertisement in the pub- 
lic newspapers that such and such books, American, English, 
French, German, etc., have been received at the Library, relat- 
ing to History, Science, Art, Biography or Travel, would bring 
readers to ask for them. Another benefit, we suggest, would 
be addressed to another class of readers, viz., those who ask 
''what to read?" Such advice in simple form, for distribu- 
tion among schools, clerks and mechanics, would kindle or 
sustain many an aspiration for self-improvement, and would 
save those who " (in the words of Mr. Joshua Bates), "left 
to themselves, waste their time in railroad literature, chiefly 
American novels. These publications are doing immense 
mischief, and the rising generation will grow up destitute of 
positive knowledge." 

We cannot compel young people to read good books, as 
Mr. Bates made his clerks read Law and Admiraltj^ Reports ; 
and very many will read novels, or "nothing. But if since 
Mr. Bates thus wrote, novels have gained more in numbers 
than in elevation of morals and style, we should be not less 
solicitous than he was to discourage their being read by young 
people. There can be little doubt but that modern sensa- 
tional fiction, demanded and supplied in quantity, not only 
occupies the field to the exclusion of better reading, but, like 
other stimulants, perverts the natural taste, and destroys rel- 
ish for plainer aliment. The late Dr. Arnold, of Rugby, in 
a letter to Rev. G. Cornish, says : — 

" Childishness in boys, even of good abilities, seems to 
me to be a growing fault, and I do not know to what to 
ascribe it, except to the great number of existing books of 
amusement, like Pickwick, and Nickleby, Bentley's Magazine, 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

etc. These completely satisfy all the intellectual appetite o£ 
a boy, which is rarely very voracious, and leave him totally 
palled, not only for his regular work, which I could well excuse 
in comparison, but for good literature of all sorts, even for 
History and Poetry." * 

Boys will relish such writing as Irving's " Astoria " or 
Parkraan's " Oregon Trail," as much as fantastic extravagances 
in Natural History or Adventure. In this sense, we regard 
with approval the paper compiled by Mr. Winsor, indicating 
such works of fiction as are based upon History, Biography 
and manners ; an excellent step in the right direction, which 
we would gladly see followed by other similarly useful and 
popular hints for readers who ask, what to read? 

What the Library does daily for the people is visible 
enough ; but in connection with our system of education it 
has some less conspicuous uses, which, in a degree equal to 
their high iniportance, should influence the selection of books 
for purchase. We have schools, colleges, and institutes whose 
scope of instruction is necessarily limited by the period of 
time which our youth can afford to give to the numerous 
and varied branches of human knowledge. They enter upon 
active life with acquirements more general than exact, but 
also with capacity for development, desire for improvement, 
and habits of familiarity with books which should impel them 
towards that self-acquired education which justly ranks above 
all other. To such young men the Public Library should 
offer the means of pursuing advanced and extended courses 
of study on any topic or in any direction, even to carry out 
Mr. J. S. Mill's idea of a good education, which consists in 
"knowing all about one thing, and something about every- 
thing." We would desire that the whole structure of human 
knowledge, from foundation to summit, should be represented 

* Life of Dr. Arnold by Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, p. 341. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 13 

upon the shelves of the Public Library of the capital of New 
England, and that however rapid the " advancement of learn- 
ing," this institution be maintained at a standard of complete- 
ness indispensable to its credit and utility. In this new and 
busy country, where a class of professed scholars does not 
exist, those exceptional men who are able and willing to in- 
struct others, whether by oral lectures or by published writ- 
ings, ought to find at the Public Library full materials and 
ample facilities for study. Not only those who wish to learn 
Jiow to learn, but also those who seek to leaim how to teach, 
should be provided for. A merely provincial Library might 
well enough consist of elementary and popular books where 
few others would be called for or read ; but it is our pride to 
assert that the day has long gone by when so little could sat- 
isfy either the needs of Boston, or our legitimate ambition to 
sustain a Library in all respects worthy of her intelligence 
and resources. 

For the Committee, 

DANIEL SARGENT CURTIS. 
June 10, 1872. 



[B.] 
EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees: — Gentlemen, — I oifer herewith my 
fifth Annual Report. 

I. THE BUILDINGS. 

For many years the Annual Reports have dwelt on the 
insufficiency and unfitness of our Central Library Building. 
Its defects are radical and not to be remedied, but work has 
been done, and is now in progress, which will much improve 
it for administrative uses. Ihe subdivision of the alcoves in 
the Bates Hall will increase its capacity by about 125,000 
volumes, without extending the area over which the books 
must be sought for, — a great gain towards that rapid delivery 
of books which a Library should aim to establish, since noth- 
ing will more certainly build up a large circulation. This 
hall is unfortunately planned to produce the largest instead 
of the smallest average distance of books from the point of 
delivery, — a defect which requires some sacrifice of supposed 
architectural claims to avoid, and Avhich, in consequence of 
the inability of architects and building committees to recog- 
nize the paramount demands of admiuistrative uses over the 
meretricious attractions of vistas of books and displayed al- 
coves, has disfigured some of the more important and recently 
erected library buildings in this State and at the West. A 
central area, with surrounding alcoves, while admirably 
adapted to a Library of small use, where access to the 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 15 

alcoves is free, is not at all fitted for a growing and popular 
collection, in which the conditions of use are entirely difier- 
ent. In the arrangement of the books in relation to the 
delivery, which has been adopted in our Branches, and 
with the better disposition of parts to arise from the con- 
struction of a new building for the Roxbury Branch, it is 
hoped that the practical advantages of an opposite plan will 
be satisfactorily proved. I have found in architects, when 
brought to an intelligent comprehension of the administrative 
requirements of a popular Library, an entire willingness to 
accept anew the first principle of all architecture, the primary 
adaptation of the building to its uses. A want of it, sanctioned 
inider the mistaken plea of architectural effect, will inflict 
much trial of patience upon the public for all time, and 
necessitate with librarians a failure to do all that they would 
do. Books can be very compactly stowed, and a large num- 
ber can be brought within a short radius. In the East Bos- 
ton Library-room about 12,000 volumes can be got, all 
within reach of the hand, within a room seventeen feet by 
thirty-two, and at an average distance of twelve feet from the 
point of delivery. In a room at South Boston, twenty-seven 
feet by twenty-three, about 17,000 volumes can be stored, 
with an average of twelve feet, as to distance to be passed by 
the runner who brings the books to the desk. Librarians 
will know that upon about one-third of a collection — if it is 
constituted according to A\^hat is the experience of the most 
successful libraries — at least three-quarters of his circulation 
will fall, and in a library of 12,000 volumes, 4,000 of them can 
be got, within eight or ten feet of the desk, and the delay in 
fetching a book reduced to a minimum. The impatience of 
the public — not always unreasonable — and the physical en- 
durance of the attendants should teach all who have to do 
with the planning of a library that these claims are incessant, 
while the fancied demands for architectural show rest on the 
most unsettled basis, if the others are ignored. 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 72. 

It was very fortunate that the alcoves of the Bates Hall 
were originally constructed of such width as admitted of the 
subdivision to which they have been subjected ; but ^lot so 
fortunate that the altitude of them was too little by a few 
inches to allow an intermediate iron floor to be placed in 
each, by which the necessity for ladders would have been 
avoided, — one of the most serious inconveniences which a 
library can have. The introduction of light, so long needed, 
hardly requires commendation. The alcoves nearest the front 
of the Hall are still not as light as they should be ; and what 
is experienced in them now Avill belong to all the others on 
the western side, and ultimately to those on the eastern side, 
if the dwellings on the contiguous land give place to ware- 
houses of the depth of the respective lots. This light above 
as well as in the lower parts of the building can never be 
made certain for the future, until the city owns these estates. 
The Reading-room is now rendered far less cheerful, and even 
less useful, than it might be from its present insufficiency of 
light. 

The plan by which the Bates Hall is undergoing alteration 
was approved by the Trustees, July 12th, and their ap- 
proval was transmitted to the City Council. It was hoped 
that during the summer the work would have far progressed ; 
but it was not until the 13th of September that the actual 
work of the contractors demanded the practical closing of the 
western alcoves. Mistakes and delays, arising in part from the 
unfavorableness of the season, made the work occupy nearly 
six months ; and it was not until March 8th that these alcoves 
were again thrown open to public use. 

This new shelving on the western side rendered it possible 
to store there the surplus books, that could not be repacked 
in the temporarily diminished space of the alcoves on the 
other side of the Hall. The work of removing such books 
began March 27th. Those still remaining in the alcoves, 
though in some necessary disorder, were made accessible by 



PUBLIC LIBllAllY. 17 

a temporary staging. More care was exercised in the con- 
struction of the temporary partition, behind which the work 
is going on, and the same annoyance from the penetration of 
lime dust has not been experienced, which rendered the work 
on the other side so needlessly annoying to the Library attend- 
ants and to the public, and so injurious to the books. 

The projected changes in the Lower Hall have not yet 
been begun. The plan was approved by the trustees March 
1, 1872. They afford two large rooms and six small ones, 
sufficiently lighted, with their floors on the level of the old 
gallery of that hall. In these the cabinets which were placed 
in the alcoves of the Bates Hall will be put, and the neces- 
sary work of the Lower Hall will be done, while the shelving 
which will still remain can be considered as* adding very 
largely to the capacity of the Bates Hall. The loss of this 
shelving to the Lower Hall is to be made good by sub-divid- 
ing its alcoves, on the main floor, and by otherwise occupy- 
ing the floor spaces for cases. The administrative gain will 
result from the books being thus made far more accessible 
than before. 

These changes, which strongly indicate the abiding of the 
Central Library in its present' site, must also lead to others 
at a no very distant future, such as an addition to the build- 
ing in the rear, which shall contain a juvenile Library and 
Reading-room, with an entrance on Van Rensellaer place, 
whereby the main entrance and the front hall, may be at cer- 
tain hours relieved from the crowds of youths of both sexes , 
which curtail the privileges of adults very materially. Addi- 
tional accommodations for the bindery, for the newspaper 
room, for the working rooms, for official apartments, and for 
special collections ought also to be found in this prospective 
addition, which, extending laterally, can have windows over- 
looking a green towards the Common, if the adjacent estates 
are joined to the Library lot, 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



II. ADMINISTRATION. 

1. LIBRARY SERVICE. 

The present divisions of the service, with the addition of 
the South Boston Department, are given in Appendix XXI, 
where tlie figures are fully explained. 

2. EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 

The alterations in the Bates Hall have rendered it impos- 
sible to conduct the examination of that department with the 
usual detail. Only the alcoves that have now been com- 
pleted have been examined, and with what result the report 
of the Custodian in Appendix XXII will show. It also 
embodies the first report upon the East Boston Branch. The 
irregularities do not seem to be in excess of what may rea- 
sonably be expected, as explained in previous reports. 

3. REGISTRATION OF APPLICANTS. 

The same system, as explained in the last report, in con- 
nection with the East Boston Branch, has now been applied to 
the South Boston Branch. I refer to Appendix XII, where 
the figures are fully explained. 

4. SOUTH BOSTON BRANCH. 

The rooms in the new Savings Bank Building, in Broad- 
way, were profiered by the Committee on Public Buildings 
of the City Council, and being approved by a Committee of 
the Trustees, they were hired by the City during the winter, 
and finished as was desired. Contracts were made for the 
shelving; and other fixtures, and the rooms were in a state of 
readiness on the first of April for the contractor to put this 
work in place. 

As soon as it became evident that a Branch w^as to be 
established in South Boston, the Mattapau Literary Associa- 
tion voted to make over their collection of books, which 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 19 

proved a very good one for the purpose, and they were 
received at the Central Library, Jan. 15th, 1872. The col- 
lection numbered 1,470 vohuues, a very small part of which 
were assigned to the^ Bates Hall as- a fitter repository for 
them. The work of cataloguing the remainder began at 
once, and as the work proceeded, and it became evident what 
desirable books the collection did not contain, purchases 
began, under a special contract with the Library agents, 
Messrs. Lee and Shepard, though a small part of the pur- 
chases came through our agencies for Europe. It was pos- 
sible to anticipate the appropriation, which was not to become 
available until May 1st, because of a special authorization from 
the City Council to expend not over ^5,000 on account of 
any subsequent appropriation. This anticipatory action has 
rendered it possible to open this Branch some six months 
earlier than was possible at East Boston in the year of 
that Branch's establishment. 

As soon as the shelving and other furniture was in place, 
we had 4,350 volumes in the Art Room of the Central Library, 
all prepared for the shelves. They were removed to the 
Branch on the tenth of April ; and after they had been put 
in the places to which each volume had already been assigned, 
according to prepared plans of the shelving, the work of veri- 
fying the catalogue and w^riting up the shelf-lists began. 
There was some delay in opening the Reading-room, on 
account of the condition of the entrance hall ; but on the 
22d this department was opened. As soon as a few strips 
of the catalogue had been received from the printer, every- 
thing was in readiness for delivering books, which began on 
the first of May. 

5. ROXBUEY BRANCH. 

I refer to Appendix XXV for the agreement entered into 
between the City and the Trustees of the Fellowes Athe- 
nreum of Roxbury, by which tlie resources of that institution 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

are made available towards the foundation and increase of a 
new Branch, in addition to the appropriations to be made for 
that purpose by the City Council. The terms of the contract 
are in some measure modified by another agreement, which 
forms a part of the same Appendix. In anticipation of the 
completion of the building, the erection of w^hich by the Trus- 
tees of the Fellow^es Athenteum has already been begun on 
Bartlett street, a collection of books destined for it will be 
gathered the coming summer. 

III. THE BOOKS. 

\ 

1. EXTENT OF THE COLLECTIONS. 

The several departments now hold 194,000 volumes, giving 
us still the second place for size among the Libraries of the 
country. For the divisions of the number among our vari- 
ous departments, I refer to Appendix I. 

\ 
2. INCREASE. 

We have added nearly 14,000 volumes, which is nearly 
double the annual increase for the nine years preceding the 
exceptional increase of last year. In addition to this we enu- 
merate a growth of the pamphlet collection by nearly 11,000. 

The gain in the several departments is shown in Appendix 
V. The gain in the popular departments, owing to the foun- 
dation of the new Branch, is about equal to the increase of the 
Bates Hall. 

Of the entire gain 5,744 books were such as were newly pub- 
lished, of which 3,642 were of American publication, including 
reprints. 

3, GIFTS. 

It appears by Appendix IX that six hundred and ten per- 
sons, besides a few whose names are not known, have given 



PUBLIC LIBRAET. 21 

4,349 volumes and 5,831 pamphlets. Among the most im- 
portant donations was a valuable collection of books on mili- 
tary science, which came from the venerable General Sylva- 
nus Thaj'er to supplement the good collection which we 
already had, and which had been largely selected with Gen- 
eral Thayer's advice. The largest gift was that from the 
Mattapau Literary Association, which formed the nucleus of 
the South Boston Branch. 

The most noteworthy gift of the year is that of an original 
portrait of Franklin by Greuze, which forms a fit pendant to 
the one painted by Duplessis, and heretofore presented to 
the Library by the Hon. Edward Brooks. There is no mention, 
in any of Franklin's printed writings, of his sitting to Greuze ; 
but its authenticity is not questioned, in view of the direct 
testimony to its history which is mentioned in Mr. Gardner 
Brewer's letter making gift of it, and in the interesting paper 
by the Hon. Charles Sumner, which is appended to the letter 
in Appendix XXVI. The first public mention of the exist- 
ence of this portrait was made by Sir George Cornwall Lewis, 
in the Edinburgh Review, in 1854, when it was said to be in 
the possession of Mr. Joseph Parkes, of London, and this 
gentleman, in 1860, when selling it to Mr. Brewer, wrote as 
follows : — 

" I am better content that it should be placed in Boston 
than in England ; and as I told Sumner, it was my wish, 
even if a higher price in England was ofiered me. 
It never was in any possession except his [the late Mr. Os- 
wald's] grand uncle's, — an ambassador in Paris for whom it 
was painted, — his son or nephew, and the late Mr. Oswald, 
the M. P. for Glasgow. He inherited it, and was its donor 
to me. It never was in any sale or offered by me to any one, 
— only mentioned by me to vSumner as a picture I would sell 
for proper ownership or a U. S. Public Institution. It ought 
to be in your State." 

Late in the year it became known that Professor Treadwell, 



22 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

of Cambridge, had bequeathed to the Library a portion of his 
estate, to be paid over upon the death of his widow. In 
Appendix XXVII will be found explanatory extracts from 
the will and from the proceedings of the Trustees and of the 
City Council. 

4. SHELF DUPLICATES. 

We still duplicate largely in the Lower Hall. While 1091 
new books have been placed there, in 894 cases duplicates 
were added, and of the 629 condemned books replaced, most 
of them were also duplicates. See Appendixes V and VIII. 

5. SALE DUPLICATES. 

There has been a net increase of 360 volumes in the Dupli- 
cate Room, making the total 7,314. See Appendixes IV and 
V. 

6. PAMPHLETS. 

Over 100,000 pamphlets have now been added to the Li- 
brary in twenty years, and double the average number was 
added during the past year. 

7. PURCHASE OF BOOKS. 

The appropriation by the City Council and the income of 
our Funds have enabled us to buy 9,359 volumes during the 
year. A few insignificant additions have been made with the 
income of the Ticknor Fund, the catalogue of the Ticknor 
Library not being yet far enough advanced to enable us to 
buy a large extent, without the risk of duplicating what it 
has already. Among our foreign agencies, the re-establish- 
ment of our French agent in Paris is to be noted ; and though 
we are now in regular receipt of French books, the condition 
of the French binderies does not yet seem to have been 
restored to such a state as will ensure the careful work- 
which used to be mven us. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

Appendix XIII shows au increased promptness in securing 
books that have been ordered at the request of readers ; and 
that the number of books recommended is less than last year 
follows upon the partial disuse of the Bates Hall, during the 
progress of alterations. Nevertheless, nearly 1,600 titles were 
recommended during the year. 

One of the vexations of librarians arises from the irregu- 
larities of serial issues, both of periodicals and of sets. A 
certain percentage of delays and failure is almost inevita- 
ble, and with a list like our own, amounting to many hun- 
dred separate subscriptions, — counting those received directly 
in the Bates Hall for the shelves, as well as those which have 
an earlier stage of use in the Eeading-room, — every month 
necessitates more or less correspondence to ascertain the rea- 
sons for delaj's. With books issued in numbers, or b}' vol- 
umes, the difficulty is increased, as the intervals of perio- 
dicity are so irregular ; and more or less failure to get prompt- 
ly or not at all the last consecutive issue is hardly to be 
avoided. When this annoj'ance is added to the other one, 
that books issued in this way occasion an increase of labor in 
preparing them for the shelves, almost in proportion to the 
number of parts, as each is treated separately in many re- 
sjDects, it is very clear that in a library, where the detail is 
necessarily laborious, the subscription to such books is al- 
ways an irksome self-denial to the librarian. It is possible 
that the difficulties may be somewhat regulated by system, 
and to this end blanks have been of late prepared, which are 
sent to such periodicals as are overdue ; and the ordering 
clerk is instructed to report deficiencies as they come to her 
knowledge in adding new numbers or volumes to sets on the 
shelves. In order to rectify the omissions of the past, the 
Custodian of the shelves has carefully examined the shelf- 
lists of the Bates Hall, and made reports on 291 periodicals, 
which are not complete, — no account, however, has been 
taken of very broken series, which have been added b}-- 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

chance donations, — and on 190 s&ts of books, which are 
more or less imperfect. Orders to supply these deficiencies 
will be gradually despatched during the coming year. 

8. BINDERY. 

The bindery of Jerome Seidensticker still does almost all 
the binding we have done for Lower Hall books, and for vol- 
umes of periodicals, when removed from the Reading Room. 
The schedules show an aggregate of 3,219 volumes for the 
year. 

The bindery of Theodore Jackson is only used for binding 
newspapers. 

To the bindery in the basement of the Central Lb rary , 
now under the charge of Mr. Peter Low, almost all our 
Bates Hall books are sent, and the very miscellaneous work 
turned out by its force will appear from the following table : — 
Bates Hall books bound and finished, . . .2,219 
Books of the Lower Hall and Branches, 
Books repaired, ...... 

Catalogues wired and covered for public use in 

Lower Hall and Branches, 
Maps dissected and mounted, .... 

Map-volumes and shelf-lists mounted, 
Pamphlet cases, ...... 

Portfolios, ....... 

Removable covers for catalogues, 

Maps mounted, bound and bordered. 

Hours of miscellaneous work, .... 



1,015 
396 



490 

47 

212 

546 

5 

266 

54 

1,842 



IV. CIRCULATION. 

1. USE OF THE LIBRARIES. 



The Libraries have been kept open one day more than ever 
before, or 308 days, and the daily average circulation has 



PLTBLIO LIBEARY. 25 

been nearly a third more than last year, or 1,234. If East 
Boston be excluded, we have still, notwithstanding the dimin- 
ished use of the Bates Hall, on account of the progress of 
alteration, a larger daih^ average than ever before, namely, 
988 ; for the gain in the issues for the Lower Hall is 23,136, 
while the loss in the Bates Hall is 14,954. The figures for East 
Boston, giving 75,846 instead of 26,130 (as the last figures 
only embraced a few months), further increase the grand to- 
tal of 380,343, which is nearly 60,000 in excess of last year's. 
The largest use of the Central Library in one day (March 
16) is, notwithstanding the deficit in the Bates Hall, nearly 
as large as last year's, being 1,848 against 1,856. The increase 
of reference use over home use, which the Bates Hall showed 
last year, is apparent again this year. March and August 
still retain, respective!}-, the heaviest and lightest use by 
months, the August use being about 68 per cent, of that 
for March. See Appendixes X and XI. 

2. BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS AND EEADINGS. 

I need only remark of the table in Appendix VII, that a 
special class for the literature of Spaiu and Portugal appears 
for the first time, embracino- 558 volumes belono^inoj to the 
General Library, and 2,765 of the 3,907 volumes that make up 
the Ticknor Library, as now arranged, or a total in this class of 
3,425 volumes. The table will show how the remaining 1,142 
volumes of the Ticknor Library are divided among classes 
independent of pure literature and history. 

The percentage given for the difierent classes of reading 
of the Bates Hall in Appendix XIV, shows variations from 
last 3'ear, easily explained by the anomalous condition in 
which this department has been during the year. 

3. CLASSIFICATIONS AND READING OF THE POPULAR 

DEPARTMENTS. 

The proportion going to make up the character of our 
Lower Hall collection remains from yesLV to year much the 



26 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

same, from its natural growth, and the due regard paid to 
the wants of readers and the proportionate numerical impor- 
tance of different classes of publications. An examination of 
Appendix VIII makes this apparent. 

By Appendix XV it will be seen that there is an almost un- 
appreciable diminution in the percentage of prose fiction 
drawn for reading. Still, over eighty per cent, of the use of 
the Lower Hall may be safely set down to the use of works 
of the imagination, in every department of its range ; and the 
results are not different at the East Boston Branch, as can be 
reckoned from Appendix XVI. 



4. PERIODICAL READING-ROOMS. 

The same cause which has diminished the use of the Bates 
Hall has in some degree affected the use of the Central Read- 
ing-room, as the apartment has been more or less darkened 
from the scaffolding on the exterior, and its frequenters have 
experienced unusual noise and dust. The daily average issue 
of magazines, which last year was 792, has fallen for this year 
to 740. The large use of the Readins^-room at East Boston 
reported last year arose from the novelty of its first opening, 
and from the dependence placed upon it for reading before 
the books were put in circulation. The issues there for 
twelve months are accordingly but little in excess of those for 
five months last year, but these five were naturally the heav- 
iest ones of the year. From these causes the average daily 
issues from both Reading-rooms has fallen from 992 to 825. 

The table in Appendix XVII will also show that fifteen 
new magazines have been added to the Central Room, and 
nine to the East Boston Room, making the total of the first 
389 and of the latter 37 ; Avhile 80 duplicates swell the grand 
total of the two rooms to 506. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 27 



5. LOSSES AND DELINQUENTS. 

On a circulation for home use of about 346,000 volumes, 
it will be again seen by Appendix XIX that the proportion 
of delinquents is regularly maintained from year to year. 
Last year one borrower in fifteen had to be notified, and the 
figures stand the same this year ; and it is even more remark- 
able that one borrower in 348 both this year and last had to 
be sought by messenger for the recovery of the book charged 
to him. Last year we finally recovered all the books that 
were taken from the Library except one in 7,531, and this 
3^ear it is one in 9,351 for the entire I/ibrary, and one in 3,860 
for the Bates Hall, and one in 8,001 for the Lower Hall, while 
not one was lost out of the 75,000 delivered at the East 
Boston Branch, — a remarkable instance of the safety of cir- 
culation without guaranty. 

Other particulars in the same Appendix will indicate the 
wear and tear of the popular departments, as for instance the 
condemning of 872 volumes, and the putting on of nearly 
82,000 paper covers. 

It will be seen that the delinquents who require mail no- 
tices make a charge upon the Library of about $1,100 — no 
inconsiderable sum. Of this about |500 is for postage, 
notices to Dorchester still requiring three cents. Action by 
Congress establishing a postal card system, with a cent for 
the postage, will materially reduce this cost. The card system 
without the reduction of postage has been introduced in the 
sending of these notices in this Library during the past few 
months, at a saving of fifty per cent, on the cost of printing, 
paper and envelopes, under the old system. 

Under the law, approved May 16, 1867, for the protection 
of libraries from the mutilation of books, it was found diffi- 
cult to secure a conviction. The evil being one of consider- 
able magnitude, the Hon. Ellis W. Morton was requested by 
the Board to represent the interests of the Library at the 



28 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

State House, and the result was the passage of an act which 
became a law March 26, by which " whoever wilfully and 
maliciously or wantonly and without cause" commits such an 
offence, is rendered liable to a fine of from five to fifty dol- 
lars, or to imprisonment not exceeding six months. It is 
very desirable for its salutary effect that a few convictions 
should be got under this amended law. 

V. CATALOGUES. 

1. BATES HALL. 

An important change has taken place in the management 
of our catalogue. Thirty years ago the British Museum 
abandoned the plan of a printed catalogue. The Bodleian has 
not printed any since 1859, and does not intend to do so here- 
after. Dr. Pertz, the Librarian of the Royal Library of Berlin, 
and other of the chief bibliographical authorities of the 
continent, are likewise united in the view that such printing 
in a large and rapidly growing library is impracticable, both 
from the expense, and from the constant reduplication of 
alphabets, which will in not a long time become very burden- 
some to examine, with the necessity of turning to one from 
another. It has always been felt that our Library might in 
time find itself in the same circumstances with the older libra- 
ries of Europe, but when our repeated efforts during the last 
four or five years to begin on a new volume of the Bates Hall 
Catalogue have been as repeatedly thwarted by the increasing 
detail of this department, arising from ramifications and 
a rapid growth, it has become more and more apparent 
that the contingency was not so far removed as it had been 
felt to be. At the rate of growth which the Library is now 
maintaining, we should have found after increasing the force 
of this department for the purpose of adding the proof-read- 
ing of a new volume to its other work, that its completion 
would only have been the signal for a repetition of all the 



PUBLIC LIBEAIIY. 29 

labor, upon the material Avhich had accummulated while the 
other was going through the press. This would be equiv- 
alent to adding largel}^ to our permanent force, besides 
entailing a heavy cost for printing. 

While the use of a catalogue in print is vastly more 
convenient than the best in manuscript, and while our 
printed volumes may be of great advantage in other 
libraries, and to a few students who possess them, it is 
very apparent from observation that the great bidk of users 
of the Bates Hall are in search of the newer books, which 
cannot be found in printed catalogues, or else they find it 
more convenient to consult the catalogues in the building 
than elsewhere. Any deprivation which would ensue from 
the abandonment of printing the catalogues in volumes was 
likely therefore to fall upon distant libraries and a very few per- 
sons, not always among those who assist in supporting the 
institution. There was to be other gain than economy in 
making the change, and that consisted largely in massing in 
one alphabet an index to the stores of the entire Library ; 
and it was not felt, moreover, to be necessary to give up the 
advantages of print. 

In some correspondence with the Librarian of the Univer- 
sity of Leydeu, it had been learned that they used a printed 
card catalogue, uniting the marked advantages of both sys- 
tems. Their titles were set up in the order of accession and 
printed in sheets, one hundred and fifty titles at a time, on 
thin paper ; and then being cut out and pasted in different 
records, they made up their catalogue of accessions; their 
alcove lists ; the public alphabetical catalogue ; the same for 
ofiicial use ; and a systematic catalogue. It seemed that in 
this plan there was a solution of our difiiculties. The multi- 
plication of titles by print promised much saving of clerical 
labor, with fewer chances of error, and was capable of devel- 
oping a great variety of use by the mere labor of assortment. 
It had been found at the British Museum that their augmen- 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

tatiou of copies by the carbon process, which yields only 
four transcripts, allowed them no chance of adding variety to 
their catalogues in the way of different systems, suited to 
varied wants in the users of the collections. Their small 
reserve of copies of titles for replacing those worn out pre- 
vented any more systematic use of them than a simple alpha- 
betical catalogue, to Avhich they might add an index in the 
case of important articles like Shakespeare and the Bible. 
In a catalogue that now numbers about 1,900 folio volumes, 
and is expanding so rapidly that a binding force is constantly 
at work interleaving and re-guarding, there is some dangler 
that in no long time this reserve, with the constant wear, will 
not be enough. The dilemma we believe is recognized by 
the authorities of that Library ; but no change is yet made 
in their processes. 

Taking then the idea indicated by the practice at Leyden, 
and after some experimenting with printing directly upon cards, 
and in establishing the form of the title, a method has finally 
been worked out which seems to meet every requirement. 
The cataloguer, having prepared his title, indicates the cross 
references, and then draws his pen through them, to guard 
against the compositor's setting them up. A day's accumu- 
lation of such slips goes to the printer at night, and comes 
back in the shape of printed strips, several copies being re- 
turned, one of which is corrected and sent back. One of 
such strips is posted at once on a bulletin-board, showing the 
freshest books, and another is scanned for books known to be of 
interest to specialists, to whom the title thus printed is de- 
spatched. About one hundred titles are enough for a form, 
which is then printed on thin paper, and ordinarily about 
thirty copies of each sheet are printed, though more are 
struck off in special instances, one or two hundred being 
sometimes the number, when a form is made up of titles of 
pamphlet volumes, with contents, or other works requiring 
a larger number of cross-references, — the object being to 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 31 

provide enough copies of such titles to supply all the entries 
in duplicate (tlie public and official catalogues being kept 
up independently, for convenience and ai a necessary check) 
and to furnish a reserve for future contingencies. 

To each title is appended, beside the shelf number, the 
accession number, the number of the sheet in which it is 
printed, and to some the letter B, to indicate snch as are to 
be made to reappear in the quarterly bulletins. The sheet 
number is a clue at once to the pigeon-hole in which the re- 
serve titles are kept. By referring to the cross-references on 
the printer's "copy" of such titles, the attendant knows just 
how many copies to cut out of the sheet for each title, and 
just what headings to give them. These are pasted on cards and 
rolled smooth ; and the cards are then put in their proper 
places in both the public and official catalogues. 

The reserve of copies renders it of course possible to ar- 
range by assortment any special alphabetical or systematic 
catalogue, as may be required of the medical or any other de- 
partment of the Library ; and in the case of any special collec- 
tion, like the Ticknor Library, they afford ready-made " copy" 
for a separate volume. Indeed, while abandoning the print- 
ing of volumes of the General Library of the Bates Hall, it is 
not at all improbable that the publication of special catalogues, 
in departments for which we may from time to time become 
known, will follow. 

To perfect the system indicated by this description, the 
work is not by any means to' be confined to the entry of titles 
of books yet to be acquired. It is hoped gradually to em- 
body in this one alphabet, not only all previous additions to 
the Bates Hall, with all their cross-references ; but also the 
titles of the Lower Hall Collection, so that it shall represent 
the entire Central Library. It is not likely that the 
Branches, except in very rare instances, will contain any 
books not to be found in the Boylston street Buildino*. 
Work was begun in this direction with the Prince Catalogue, 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

the titles and cross-references from which have been put upon 
cards, and are ah-eady inserted; and progress is making on 
the printed bulletins, proceeding backwards from No. 19. It 
must be long before this work is entirely done, so as to in- 
clude the titles of the two printed volumes. 

This new system was begun on the first of October, ;]and 
up to this time there have been printed 39 sheets, beside 
2 extra ones, covering the titles and contents of pamphlet 
volumes. This gives a total of 3,840 titles, and has necessi- 
tated 10,396 entries on the cards in each catalogue, or count- 
ing the triplication of the titles in the Ticknor Librar}^ — 
another set being made to constitute a special catalogue of 
this collection, — we have a record of nearly 21,000 cards, 
prepared in six months, an extent of manual labor in mount- 
ing, inscribing and assorting, that has severely taxfed the 
faithful Curator of the Card Catalogues, and the assistants 
who have aided her. ; 

2. LOWER HALL AND BRANCHES. 

The sj'stem of printed lists of books for the popular de- 
partments of the Library is not affected by the new arrange- 
ments for the Bates Hall. The fifth edition of the Lower 
Hall Class List for Fiction and Juveniles Avas issued in 
August, and the second edition of that for the Arts, Sciences 
and Professions in September ; and in these a new stjde of 
page, more economical as well as more handsome, w^as 
adopted. The first edition of the List for History and Pol- 
itics, and that for Travel and Biography, has been for some 
time exhausted, beyond what is necessary for use in the 
building, and a great deal of labor has been expended in pre- 
paring a new Class List, which would unite the two, their 
subjects being too far interlinked for successful treatment 
independently. This catalogue, which will shortly be put to 
press, promises to be very large, and as inconvenience has 
been experienced from the absence of the place and date of 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 33 

publication in connection with the titles, these particulars 
have been restored, A more extensive system of cross-refer- 
ences, and a brief indication — in case of biographies — of 
who the subject was, is also to be introduced. A new edi- 
tion of the Index to Historical Fiction is likewise in prepara- 
tion. Since January, the collection for the South Boston 
Branch has been catalogued, and the printing of the list is 
now in progress. 

3. BULLETINS. 

Four (Nos. 18 to 21) have been printed, covering about 
4000 titles. Since the first printing, in October, of the broad- 
sides of titles for the card catalogue we have reserved a 
selection of the titles contained in them as " copy " for the 
Bulletin ; which has proved a gain in accuracy, and a saving 
of expense for corrections of type. Out of the 3,840 titles 
mentioned above, 2,152 were considered important enough 
for reproduction in the Bulletins, which establishes a ratio 
very nearly of two in every three. 

During the year a list of the portraits in the Tosti Engravings 
has been printed ; and a further instalment of the list of other 
prints was given in the Bulletin for April. With that for 
October (No. 19) the first volume of the Bulletins was 
brought to an end. 

VI. FINANCE. 

In Appendix XX will be found the usual financial state- 
ment. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

JUSTIN WIN80R, 

Supermtendent. 
Public Library, May 9, 1872. 



APPENDIXES 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



1873. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent and Inceease of the Library. 

II. Extent of the Bates Hall Collection. 

III. Extent of the Lower Hall Collection. 

IV. Sale Duplicates and Odd Volumes. 
V. Increase of the Library. 

VI. Volumes Located in Bates Hall. 

VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

VIII. Lower Hall Classifications. 

IX. Donors. 

X. Circulation of Books. 

XI. Books Returned. 

XII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIII. Books Recommended. Use of British Patents. 

XIV. Bates Hall Reading. 
XV. Lower Hall Reading. 

XVI. EiST Boston Branch Reading. 

XVII. Periodical Reading room. 

XVIII. Periodicals Duplicated. 

XIX. Losses and Delinquents. 

XX. Financial Statement. 

XXI. Library Service. 

XXII. Report on the Examination of the Library. 

XXIII. List of Examining Committee for Twenty Years. 

XXIV. List of Trustees for Twenty Years. 

XXV. The Eellowes Athenjeum and Roxbury Branch. 

XXVI. Papers Concerning Greuze's Franklin. 

XXVII. The Bequest of Daniel Treadwell. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



37 



APPENDIX I. 

EXTENT AND INCREASE OF THE LIBRARY. 



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Note. — The aggregate of pampLlets ''added from the beginning" hicludes of course many since bound, 
singly or in groups (which are now counted among volumes), and a very large number of duplicates, which are 
thrown out and put among our pamphlets held for exchange. 



38 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 72. 



APPEOT)IX II. 

EXTENT OF THE BATES HALL COLLECTION IN VOLUMES. 



The General Library 

Bowditch Library* 

Parker Library* 

" Duplicates (not for sale)t 

Prince Library 

Ticknor Library 



Entered on the Accession Catalogue, 
but not yet located at the end of the 
year . ■ 



1867. 



87,658 
2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 



Condemned 



Total 



1868. 



93,553 
2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 



105,735 



1869. 



101,428 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 



1870. 

107,724 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,952 



1871. 



115,232 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

11,970 

3,774 



187S. 



121,709 

2,542 

11,721 

186 

1,970 

§3,907 



111,681 117,969 
2 



117,967 



134,419 




124,419 



135,786 




135,786 



142,686 
1 



142,685 



* See Appendix VII. 

t Including 18 vols, of MS8. 

{ Boxed and stored in the basement. 

§ Includes 31 vols, of MSS. as bound. When received they were mostly in stitched 
brochures, several of which are now bound in one volume. The remainder of the difference 
between the present year's figures and those for last has arisen from some discrepancy last 
year in the count of pamphlets destined for volumes. 

Note. — Something less than 100 volumes have probably been lost from the Bates Hall 
since 1861, and each year some reappear, while a few in excess disappear, increasing the 
aggregate loss a little ; so that it is probable the figures of the Bates Hall collection are a 
trifle in excess of what an actual count would indicate. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

APPENDIX III. 

EXTENT OF THE LOWER HALL COLLECTION. 



39 





186T. 


186S. 

25,199 
2,003 


1869. 

26,606 
2,469 


18TO. 

28,723 
1,417 


ISTl. 

29,909 
2,780 


187SS. 


Reported the precediu? year 




30,574 
2,614 










Total 




27,202 
339 


20,075 
03 


30,140 
19 


32,689 

23 

1859 

1,233 

30,574 


33,188 

7 

535 

819 

31,827 


Books transferred to Bates Hall . . . 
Books transferred to Branches .... 




Condemned during the year 




257 
26,606 


259 
28,723 


212 

29,909 


Total left 


*25,199 





* Actual count. f To East Boston. 

Note. There have been perhaps since the last actual count in 1837, about sixty or sev- 
enty volumes irrecoverably lost in the Lower Hall. Perhaps an equal number are to be 
classed as " unaccounted for," but may reappear. 



APPEISTDIX lY. 

SALE DUPLICATES AND ODD VOLUMES. 

{Not including Parker duplicates, or a large lot of odd volume-') of books, not likely to have 
the missing volumes supplied, which are now boxed up.) 





ISGT. 

4,955 
714 

5,669 
523 


1868. 

5,146 
1,004 

6,150 
345 


1869. 

5,805 

847 

6.652 
546 

6,106 


1870. 


ISTl. 


18T». 


Number at beginning of year 

Added during the year ........ 

1 


6.106 
443 

6,549 
304 

6.245 


383 


6,954 
996 


Disposed of 


234 
*6,954 


7,950 
t636 


Total 


5,146 


5,805 


*7,314 



* This number is by an actual count of the volumes now arranged in our Duplicate 
Room ; and it includes three hundred and eighty-one volumes of British Sessional documents, 
ready for exchange. 

t Of these one hundred and eighty-eight were exchanged and four hundred and forty- 
eight sent to the South Boston Branch. 

Note. There are also of pamphlets some thirty thousand duplicates, arranged in boxes, 
and ready for exchanges. Libraries are invited to make such exchanges with us. 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPENDIX y. 

INCREASE OF THE LIBRARY. 





1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 

6,296 
140 


1871. 

7,508 
294 


1873. 


Increase of the Bates Hall. 

Gain in located books (App. VI.) . 
Of these not located at last Report . 




6j297 
1,678 


7,475 
1,327 


10,384 
4,135 






4,619 

1,327 

659 


6,148 
140 
801 


6,156 
294 
139 


7,214 
*4,135 


6 249 


Added and not located at end of year 

Net increase of sale duplicates . . . 

(App. IV.) 


• • • 


651 






6,605 


6,589 
2 


6,589 


11,349 


6 900 






1 














6,605 


6,587 


6,589 


11,349 


6 899 









Increase of the Lower Hall. 




2,003 
596 


2,469 
352 


1,417 
231 


2,780 
2,115 


2,614 


Les8 transfers and condemned books 


... 


1,361 






1,407 


2,117 


1,186 


665 


1,253 









Increase of East Boston Branch. 










5,936 


881 












50 




























831 

















Increase of So. Boston Branch. 




























Gain 












4,365 




















Increase of Duplicate Room. 






































149 


360 















Increase of Entire Collection. 



Bates Hall gain . . . 
Lower Hall gain . . . 
E. B. Branch gain . . 
S. B. Branch gain . . 
Duplicate Room gain 



Total gain 



6,605 

1,407 



6,568 
2,117 



8,685 



6,589 
1,186 



11,349 

665 

5,936 



18,099 



6,899 
1,2.53 

831 
4,365 

360 



13,708 



Increase from Newly Published 
Books. 

Engli.sh Books ■with British imprint . 

English Books with American im- 
print 

English Books with Continental im- 
print 

Foreign Books 

Duplicates of either class, when not 
included in the other items .... 



Total 



635 


708 


625 


811 


899 


1,154 


1,445 


1,455 


1,411 


2,206 


104 
639 


100 
673 


80 

789 


50 

487 


48 
561 


97 




447 


248 


480 


2,529 


2,826 


3,396 


3,007 


4,194 



1,096 

3,642 

115 



5,744 



* Inclndes Ticknor Library. 



PUBLIC LIBKAKY. 



41 



APPENDIX yi. 

VOLUMES LOCATED IN BATES HALL, BY MONTHS. 



Months. 



May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . 
November 
December , 
January . 
February 
March . . 
April . . 

Total 



1868-69. 



7,476 



1869-70. 



758 




727 


509 




480 


1,037 




462 


383 


,347 


520 


713 


833 


378 


866 


697 


546 


443 


763 


695 


639 


632 


905 


626 


834 


427 


563 


633 


706 


521 


382 


1,001 


417 


1,175 


661 



6,296 



1870-71, 



7,508 



1871-78. 



_455 
464 
291 
518 
511 
295 
*4,528 
651 
611 
724 
738 
t598 



10,384 



Note. — These figures are the results of tables made out year by year, like the one con- 
stituting Appendix VI for 1869. The figures for May, June and July, 1868-69, should fol- 
low those for April of the same year. They were misplaced to adapt the table to a change 
of the library year. 

* 3,876 are books of the Ticknor Library, then assigned to permanent places, 
t Includes 31 vols, of the Ticknor MS3. 

Pamphlets. During the year the Curator of pamphlets has beside assorting the cur- 
rent additions, arranged for the binder 385 volumes, of an average of 12 pamphlets each, 
and of these 59 related to the Slavery question. 



42 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 72. 



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44 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPENDIX YIII. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 







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*Thi8 class, embracing sets like Bohn's "Libraries," etc., includes many books, of coiirse, 
■which, in a minute classification, -would have been divided among all the previous heads of this 
table. 

Note. — The column of" Condemned books replaced "includes books condemned in previous 
years as well as in the current year. The column " Total added " show.'' the number of volumes 
as put upon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



45 



APPENDIX IX. 



LIST OF DONORS, 1871-72. 

Bates, Joshua, London, interest in gold on the fund of . $50,000 

Bigelow, Hon. John P., " " " " . 1,000 

Franklin Club, " " " " . 1,000 

Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, " " " " . 10,000 

Phillips, Hon. Jonathan, " " " " . 30,000 

Tieknor, George, " " " " . 4,000 

Townsend, Mary P., " " '" " . 4,000 

$100,000 

DONATIONS MAY 1, 1871, TO APRIL 30, 1872. 

Donors (excluding anonymous), ..... 610 

Volumes, 4,349 

Pamphlets, 5,831 



Academia, Lugduno-Batava, Ley den, 

Adams, i7o?i. Charles F., Q(/z«C7/, 

Alden, Miss Mary Anne, Ditxhury, 1 newspaper, 

Allen, George H., . 

Allen, Joseph H., 

Allen, Nathan, M. D., 

Allen, SteplienM., 

Alameida, Joao de, Brazil, 

Alton, 111., Horticultural Society, 3 newspapers, 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, . . 

American Baptist Missionary Union, 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 

American Colonization Society, Washington, D. C, 

American Iron and Steel Association, Pliiladelphia, Pa. 

American Philosophical Society, P/ii7«(ZeZ/?Ata, Pa., 

American Statistical Association, ... 

American Tract Society, New England Branch, 

American Unitarian Association, 

Amiens, France, Bibliotlieque communale, 

Andover Theological Seminary, 

Andrews, Frank "\V., ..... 

Anonymous, 20 numbers of periodicials, 1 broadside, 



Vols. 



1 

29 
1 
1 



42 



Pph. 



3 

110 



1 

2 

24 



46 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 72. 




City, 



Appleton, Thomas G., 

Ashley, J. N., New York City, . 

Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, .... 

Attwood, Gilbert, and Co., 

Austin, Miss, 158 numbers of periodicals, 

Austin, Ivers J., 

Babcock, Rev. William G., 

Baird, Henry Carey, Philadelphia, Pa.,. . 

Baifour, David M., Charlestown, 

Ballantyne and Co., Edinburg, Scotland, 

Baltimore, 3Id., City of, .... 

Commissioner of Public Schools, 

Bankers' Magazine, The, Publisher, New York City, 
Barclay, James J., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Barton, 3Irs. L. T 

Bates, Stockton, Philadelphia, Pa., . 

Beadley and Power, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Beaman, Charles C, Jr., New York City, 

Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York 

Benhara, Oen. H. W., 

Bennett, Joseph, Brighton, 

Bigelow, Henry J., M. D., 

Bigelow, Jacob, M. D., . 

Birkenhead, England, Free Public Library, 

Birmingham, England, Free Libraries Committee, 

Blair, Prof. Walter, Hampden Sidney College, Va. 

Blake, Clarence J., M. D., 

Blatchford, Jolm S., . 

Bolton, England, Public Library and 

Bossange, Gustave, Paris, 

Boston, City of, .... 

Athenaeum, 

Bethesda Society, . 

Board of Trade, 

Children's Hospital, 

Gas Light Company, 

Home for Aged Men, 867 numbers of perio 

Mattapan Literary Association, 1 MS. 

Mercantile Library Association, 

Port and Seaman's Aid Society, 

Provident Association, 

St. Stephen's Chapel, 

Temporary Home for the Destitute, 

Young Women's Christian Association 

Boston and Albany Railroad Library, 

•Both, Carl, 7?f.Z>., 
Bowditch, Henry 1., M. D., 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me., 
Boyd, David F., New Orleans, La., 
Bradford, George P., . 
Bradlee,i?ei'. Caleb D., 
Brady, William, Houston, Texas, 
Brennecke, Dr. W., Posen, Prussia 
Brewer, Gardner, 1 oil painting. 



Museum 



dicals. 



28 
6 



70 



107 
1471 



Pph. 



1 

70 



120 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 



11 

6 
1 

29 
19 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 

2 

5 
1 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 



47 



Pph. 



Brewer, Thomas M., j!/. Z)., 
Bridgeraan, Alfred, and Son, New York City, 
Briggs and Brother, Rochester, N.Y., 
Brighton, Town of, "^ . 

Holton Library, 

Brinckle, J. Gordon, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Brinton, D. G., M. D., Philadelphia, Pa., . 



n. 



ntho 



Briscoe, J. J., Executor of. West Surrey, England, 

British and Foreign Unitarian Association, London, 

British Museum, London, 

Brookline Public Library, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Mercantile Library Association. 

Brown, Prof. George W., Paltimore, 3Id., 

Brown, J. C. J., 

Brown, Orren L., ..... 

Brown, Rev. S. E., Yokohama, Japan, 
Brown, William M., . 
Brown University, Providence, R. I., 
Bryant, H. W., Portland, Me., . 
Buccellati, Dr. Antonio, Pavia, Italy, 
Buck, David, ...... 

Buffalo, N. Y. Board of Trade, 

University, ..... 

Bunker Hill Monument Association, Charleston- 
Burbank, Edwin C, Medford, ... 
Burgess, George, London, Bequeathed by Sir A 

Sterling, .... 
Burritt, Elihu, Neiv Britain, Conn. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, 
Buswell, Edwin S. . . . 
Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, R.L 

Buteux, Rev. S., 

Campbell, Loomis J., 

Capen, Barnard, ..... 

Capen, John, ...... 

Capen. Nahum, ...... 

Centro, Kobert E., ..... 

Chamberlain, David, ..... 

Chandler, Horace P., 24: numbers of periodicals 

Ch.andler, Col. 3. G., 

Chapman, George A., 

Charlestown, City of, .... 

Public Lil3rary, .... 

Cheever, David W., M. D 

Chicago, /?Z., Board of Trade, . 

Medical College, .... 

Eeform School, 



Christern, E. W., Xew York City, 

Christian Eegister Association, . 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Mercantile Library Association 

Public Library, 5 maps, ... 

Claghorn. James L., Philadelp)hia, Pa., 
Clapp, Herbert C, . 
Claxk, Henry G., JiL D., . 



ny 



125 



48 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



Ohio 



4 numbers of 



periodicals, 10 



Clark, William A., 

Clarke, Rev. Dorus, D.D., 

Clarke, Edward H., M.D., 

Clarke, M. E., . . . . _ 

Clarke, Robert, and Co., Cincinnati, 

Collar, William C, 

Collins and M'Leester, Philadelphia, Pa. 

periodicals, . 
Colton. G. W., andC. B., and Co., New York City, 
Columbia College, New York City, 
Conant, Caleb A., 
Coolidge, Algernon, M. B., 45 numbers of 

newspapers, 
Cowdin, Elliot C., New York City, 
Cowley, Charles, 

Crestadoro, A., Ph. D., Manchester, England, 
Crosby, Sumner, .... 

Cupples, Joseph G., . 
Curtis, lion. George T., New York City, 
Curtis, Thomas W., Qwmci/, 
Cutter, Charles A., . 
Dalton, John C, M. D., New York City, 
Dana, Israel T., M. D., Portland, Me., 
Dana, Hon. Richard H., Jr., . , , 
Elanforth, Jolm, Lynnfield Centre, 
Davis, Hon. J. C. V., Washington, D. C, 
Davis, Mrs. Paulina W., Providence, R. I., 
Davis, Tliomas W., 13 engraved plans, 
Dennet, William H., .... 

Derby, George, M. D. , 

Detroit, Mich., Public Library, . 

Deutsclier medicinischer Verein, 4 numbers 

De Voe, Edwin, Ckao'lestown, 

Dexter, John H., 1 engraving. 

Dexter, Williams., 

Dix, Miss D. L., Washington, D. C, 

Doliber,' Thomas, .... 

Donahoe, Patrick, 

Dowse, J., Jr., Sherhoy-n, . 

Drowne, Rev. T. Stafford, D, D., BrookUne, N. Y. 

Duane, William, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 lithograph, 

Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me., 

Dux, Gustav, ....... 

Eastern Railroad Company, .... 

Eclectic Medical College, New York City, . 
'Edes, Harry H., Cliarlestown, .... 

Eliot, John F., 16 broadsides, .... 

Elliot, J., Wolverhampton, England, 

Emerson, Hot.. George B., 8G numbers of periodicals 

map, . . . ... 

Emigrant Union, San Francisco, Col., 
Espinassous, Alphonse d', Salinelles, France, 
Essex Institute, Salem, . . . 
Estes, Edwin C, Brooklyn, N. Y., 



of periodicals 




rph. 



14 

87 
1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 



2 
22 



1 
1 
1 

54 

1 
3 
1 



36 
1 



1 
5 
1 

2 

3 

10 

12 



2 
2 

6 

14' 

2 



641 
5 

2 



I 
PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 



49 



Evans, Mrs. Lucy D., Duxbury, 

Everett, Pcrcival L., 77 numbers of periodicals, 

Fall River, ^. /., Public Library, 

Fielding and Son, 4 framed photographs, 

Finotti, Rev. Joseph M., Brookline, . 

Fislier, Theodore W.,i¥.Z>., .... 

Fitchburg Railroad Company, . . '. . 

Fliigel, Br. Felix, Leipzig, Germany, 12 numbers of peri 

odicals, ....... 

Foote, Rev. Henry W., 2 numbers of periodicals, 

Ford, William E., 

Forstemann, Dr. E. W., Dresden, Saxony, 

Foster, Joseph, Portsmouth, N. IL, . 

Franklin County Agricultural Society, Greenfield, 

Frazar, 3frs. 'Maria W., Duxbury, 

Freke, Henry, M. D., Duhliyi, Ireland, . . , 

French, Jonathan, 13 plans of real estate, 

Gaffield, Thomas, ...... 

Galveston Texas, Mercantile Library, 

Gannett, Rev. William C, 193 numbers of periodicals, 59 

maps and broadsides, and 1 engraving. 
Garrison, Wendell P., NeivYork City, 
Genealogical Registry of the United States, New York City, 
General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, N'. York City, 
General Theological Library, ...... 

Genin, John N., New York City, 

George, W. S., Lansing, Mich., 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga., 

Gilmau, Arthur, Lee, ....... 

Gilman, JohnH., M. D., Lowell, 

Gould, Prof. B. A., Cordoba, Argentine Republic, 
Grand Commandery of Knights Templars of Massachusetts 

and Rhode Island, 

Gray, Hon. John C, 78 numbers of periodicals. 

Gray, W. H., St. Louis, Mo., 

Great Britain, Commissioners of Patents, . . . . 

Green, J. Orne, M. D., 

Green, Rev. Orion, ........ 

Green, Samuel A., M. D., 5 broadsides, 1 newspaper, 1 

print, 1 bookplate, ....... 

GvQQXiQ, Rev. 3. S. C, Brookline, . . . . . 

Greenleaf, A. W., Newbwryport, 

Greenough, William W., 

Griffin, Prof. Nath. H., WillioMistown, .... 
Griscon, R. D., Reading, Pa., 1 newspaper, 2 circulars, 

GuUd, Curtis, and Co., 

GuUd, R. A., Providence, R. L, 

Haitian Embassy, Secretary, Washington, D. C, 
Hale, Hon. Charles, Washington, D. C, . 

Hale, George S., 

Hanover, College, Hanover, Ind., 

Harding, William P., 

Hart, Charles H., Philadelphia, Pa., 3 engraved portraits, 
Hartford, Cow w., Young Men's Institute, . . . . 




394 



1 

10 
1 
1 



1 
162 



92 

7 



2 
1 
2 

12 



Pph. 



3 

12 

1 



13 
I 
1 

3 

2 

34 

1 



976 
2 
2 

2 



28 
1 



86 
28 

106 
1 

15 
9 



50 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 




Harvard College, Cambridge, 

Class of 1864, 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, 2 plates, • 

Pcabody Museum, 

Haskell, Daniel N., 18 numbers of periodicals, . . 

Haskins, Ealpli, 1 plan, 

Hatch, Samuel, and Co., 64 plans, ... 

Haverford College, Haverford, Pa., 

Haynes, Prof. Henry W., Burlington, Vt., 

Heinzen, Karl, 

Henry, Prof. Joseph, Smithsonian Institution, Washing- 
ton, D- C, 

Higginson, Col. Thomas W., Newport, R. L, . 

Hill, C. H., Washington, D. C, 

Hill, Hamilton A., 6 broadsides, 

Hillard, Hon. George S., 

Hingham Agricultural and Horticultural Society, 

Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y., 

Hodges, iJey. Richard M., CamSricZg'e, . . . . 
Holland, Rev. Frederick W., Canvbridge, .... 

Holmes, Prof. Oliver W., 

Homes, Henry A. , ^ZZ)a/ii/, iV. T., 

Horton, S. D., Cincinnati, Ohio, newspaper cutting, 

Hyren, Frederick, 

Illinois College, Jacksonville, III., ..... 
Indiana Inst, for the Education of the Blind, Indianapolis, 

State Library, Indianapolis, ..... 

University, Bloomington, . . . . 

Institution of Civil Engineei-s, i/oraif 071, . . . . 
Iowa Hospital for the Insane, Mount Pleasant, . 

Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Council Bluffs, 

State Historical Society, Iowa City, 

Ivey, Herbert, London, . 

Jarvis, Edward, M. D., 

Jefferson, Daniel, 

Jeffries, E. Joy, M. D., 1 broadside, 

Jeffries, John, jr., . 

Johnson, Edwin F., New York City, 

Johnson, W. Forbes, Dublin, Ireland, .... 
Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenchaften, Munich, . 
Kaiserliche Kdnigliche Geologische Ecichsanstatt, Vienna, 
Kansas Institution for the Blind, Wyandotte, 
Keep, N. C, M. D., 666 numbers of periodicals, 

Kehrhahn, Ernest, 

Keith, James M., , 

Knight, Albert M., 

Kongelige Bibliothek, Copenhagen, 

Kongelige Nordiske Oldskrift-Selskab, Copenhagen, . 
Kongelige Norske Frederiks Universitet, Christiana, 
Landreth, David, and Son, Philadelphia, Pa., . 
Lane, Thomas W., Manchester, N. H., .... 
Lawrence, Abbott, 19 numbers of periodicals, . 
Lawrence, Hon. William Beach, Nervport, R. I., 
Lawrence, William C, 



1 

18 



76 



14 
1 



1 

128 



21 

46 

1 

\ 



4 

29 



1 
2 

29 
1 
2 



PUBLIC LIBKART. 



51 



Pph. 



Lawton, Miss Antoinette, .... 

Lee, W. M., Baltimore, Md., . 

Lenox, James, Neiv York City, 

Leonard and Co., ..... 

Leonard, M. Bloonifield, M.D., 100 numbers of perioi 

Liberal Ciiristian, Tlie, Publisher, New York City, 

Lincoln, Henry W., 

Literary and Historical Society, Quebec, . 
Little, T. II., Janesville, Wis., .... 

Little, Brown and Co., 

Liverpool, England, Free Public Library, 
Livingston, Cliarles F., Manchester, N. II., 

London, City Mission, 

Library of tlie Corporation 

Lord, Rev. Charles E., Easton, 
Loring, lion. George, B-? Salem, 
Lonng, John G., 1 oil painting, 

Lothrop, Daniel, 

Louisville, A')/., Library Association, 
Lovering, P;o/. Joseph, Cambridge, 

Lo-vvell, City Clerk, 

City Library, 

'Lyma.n, Jieniamin S., PhiladeljjJiia, Pa.,. 



dicals 



■k City, 



Lynn, City Clerk, 

McCartee, Cliarles B., Washington, D. C, 

Macearty, William, West Roxbury, . 

McCleary, Samuel F., 

Mace, Jean, Pa ?-is, 

Mackellar, Smiths, and Jordan, Philadelphia, Pa., 
McMichael, lion. M., Philadelphia, Pa., . 

Magee, Henry F., 

Maine, Superintendent of Common Schools, Augusta 

Mallory, Wheeler, and Co., New Haven, Conn., 

Manchester, England, Free Libraries, 

Manchester, N. II., City Library, 

Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, Neiv Yo 

Marietta College, llarietta, Ohio, 

Marquette, 3Iiss Lydia, 

Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, 

Mason, Erskine, 31. D., New York City, 

Massachusetts, State of, . 

Agricultural Society, Amherst, 

Board of State Charities, 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor, 

Eclectic Medical Society, 

General Hospital, . 

Historical Society, . 

Humane Society, . 

Institute of Teclmology, 

Medical College, . 

restate Normal School, Bridgewater 

Temperance Alliance, 

Matthews, Nathan, . . 
May, Miss Abby W., 



U 



1 

1 

1 

31 

20 
1 

1 
1 

3 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 



52 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



May, Rev. Samuel J., Syracuse, N. T., . 

Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa., . 

Meriden Britannia Company, West 3Ieriden, Conn., , 

Michigan State Library, Lansing, Mich., .... 

University, Ann Arbor, 

University Library, ...... 

Milan, Italy, Municipality of, 

Minnesota Historical Society, Saint Paul, 

Moore, Emery N., . . 

Moore, George H., Librarian of the New York Historical 
Society, New York City, 

Moore, Jonathan F., 

Morse, Edward S., Salem, 

Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 

Morton, Mrs. W. T. G., Wellesley, 

Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, South Hadlcy, . 

Mullen, Wm. J., Philadeljohia, Pa., 2 newspaper cuttings, 

MuUer, Frederick, Amsterdam, 

Munday, Eugene H., Philadelphia, Pa., .... 

Munsell, Joel, Albany, N. Y., 

Nahant Public Library, 

Nashua, N. IL , City Library, 

Nation, The, Publisher, New York City, 129 numbers of 
periodicals, 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers, . 

National Library of Greece, ...... 

National Transition Moonly Voice, The, Publisher, Tren- 
ton, N. J., 14 numbers of periodicals. 

Nelson, Thomas and Sons, New York City, 

New Bedford Public Library, ...... 

Newburyport Public Library, 

Newcomb, John, ' . 

New England Farm Agency, 

New England Female Medical College, .... 

New England Hospital for Women and Children, 

New England Society, New York City, .... 

New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, .... 

Newport, R. /., Young Men's Christian Association, 

Newton Free Library, 

Newton Theological Institution, Neivton Centre, 

New York, City, Board of Commissioners of Public Parks, 

Bo.ard of Health, 

City Mission and Tract Society, .... 

Mercantile Library Association, .... 

Young Men's Christian Association, 

New York State, ........ 

Cliamber of Commerce, ...... 

• Library, 

Lunatic Asylum, Utica, 

Nichols, Hon. George, Northjield, Vt., . 

North Bridgewater, Town Clerk, 

North Carolina, University of. Chapel Hill, 

Northern Home for Friendless Children, Philadelphia, Pa., 

North Reading, Town of, 




Pph. 



3 
1 

12 

14 

5 



12 
1 
2 

15 
2 
1 



11 
5 
1 

80 



22 
2 
1 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



53 



Vols. Pph. 



Nottingham, Englaiid, Committee of Free Libraries and 

Museums, . 
Nowell, Cyrus, Poiiland, Me., . 
Noyes, Lewis E., Ahington, 
Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, 
Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, 
Ochs, Florian, .... 
Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Ga., 
Ohio. State Library, 

University, Athens, 



Philadelphia 



Ourt, Andrew J. , Philadelphia, Pa. , 

Owen, G., 2 maps 

Paine, George T., Providence, R. I., 1 map. 

Paine, H. M., M. D., Albany, ^\ Y., 

Paine, Prof. T. O., Elmwood, . 

Pawcatuck, R. I., Library Association, 

Peabody Academy of Science, Salem, 

Peabody Institute, i?aZ^more, J/(^., . 

Peabody Institute, Danvers, 

Peck, George W., Cincinnati, Ohio, 15 numbers of 

odicals, 2 autograph letters, 
Peckham, Rev. Joseph, Kingston, 16 numbers 

icals, 

Peirce, Prof. Benjamin, Cambridge, 
Peirce, Prof. James M., Cambridge, 
Pennsylvania. Board of Public Charities, 

Institution for the Instruction of the Blind, 

Peoria, 7ZL, Board of Trade, 
Perkins, Charles C, . . 
Philadelphia, Pa., City of, 

Apprentices' Library Company, 

Board of Health, 



College of Pharmacy, 

Library Company, . 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. II., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Mercantile Library Association 

Poore, Hon. Ben. Perley, Washington, D. C, 

Porter, J. K., 22 engraved plans. 

Porter, Noah, D. D., President of Yale College 

Portland, Oregon, Library Association, 

Vosi a.nA Co., •Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Preble, Capt. George H., U.S. N., Charlestow)i, 

Preussischer Provinzial-Verein fiir Blinden-Unterricht, Ko 

nigsherg, Prussia, 
Protestant, A, 
Providence, R. I, City of, 

Athena?um, 

City Solicitor, 



Pa. 



pen 



of period 



ige, 



Pumpelly, Prof. Raphael, Harvard College, Cambria 
Purdie, Henry A., . 
Putnam, Charles G., M. D., 483 numbers of periodicals, 
Putnam, G. P., Metropolitan 3Iuseitm of Art, New 

City, 

Putnam, Mrs. M. Lowell, 



York 



U 



179 



1 

27 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 

38 

328 
1 



2 
1 

2 
1 
1 

2 

2 

1 

24 



1 

516 
62 



54 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



Vols. 



Pph. 



Quincy, Miss E. S., 

Quincy, IIo)i. Josiah, 4 broadsides, 1 plan, 

Eantoul, Robert S., Salem, ..... 

Reading. Trustees of the Public Library, . 

Reale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere, Milan, 

Reavis, L. U., <S'^. Louis, Mo., ..... 

Redpath and Fall, 6 numbers of periodicals. 

Reed, John H., 

Reinwald, Charles, Paris, ..... 
Rhode Island. Board of State Charities and Corrections, 
M. W. Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons 

Providence, ....... 

Richardson, William L., 31. D., 

Ripley, Henry J., D. D., Newton Theological Institution 

Robbins, Chandler, D. D., 

Rockwell and Churchill, 

Rolfe, William J., Cambridge, ..... 
Ross, Jaines, Madison, Wis., ..... 
Rowell, George P., and Co., Neio York City, 1 number of 

a periodical, ....... 

Rowlands, Walter, 

Royal Astronomical Society, London, 

Royal Geographical Society, London, 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England, 1 chart. 

Ruppaner, Anthony, M. D., New York City, 

Russell, Mrs. Edward, 

Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J., . 

Sabin, J., and Sons, New York City, 8 numbers of period 

icals. ......... 



Sabine, John D., Washington, D. C, 

St. Louis, Mo. Board of Public Schools, . 

• Mercantile Library Association, 

• Public School Library, .... 

Sakellarios, D. Z., Athens, Greece, . 

San Francisco, Cal., Board of Supervisors, 

Savage, Edward H., Chief of Police, 

Sawyer, A. W., D. D., Wolfville, N. S., . 

Searle, Frederick A., 1,100 play bills. 

Seaverns, Joel, 3L D., 2G5 numbers of periodicals, 

Selwyn, Alfred R. C, Director of the Geological Survey 

of Canada, Montreal, 

Sewall, J/iss Eunice D., Vassar Coll., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Shattuck, George C, 3L D., 37 numbers of periodicals, 
Shepley and Co., Fitchhurg, .... 
Shimmin, 3Irs. Charles F., Hingham, 
Shoe and Leather Record, The, Editor, 
Silas Bronson Library, Waterhury, Conn., 
Slack, 3Irs. Mary R. F., Brookline, . 

Slafter, Rev. Edmund F., 

Smith, Alfred R., London, .... 

Smith, Charles C, 

Smith, Edward, Superintendent of Schools, Syracuse, 
Smith, William B., New York City, . 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C, 



NY. 



4 

10 

1 



28 



1 
1 

12 



102 
1 



1 
1 

15 
1 



139 



1 
246 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 



55 



Snow, Edwin M., M. D., Providence, R. I., 
Socicte Franklin, Paris, ..... 
Society of Antiquaries, i;0??<?o?i. 
Society of Arts, London, 4rG numbers of periodicals 
Soutl) Carolina, University of, Colmnhia, . 
Spauhling, Bev. John F., Erie, Pa., . 

Sprague, Henry H., 

Springfield, //?., Board of Trade, 

Springfield, 3Iass., City Library Association, 

Stansbury, Charles F., Grand Master of Masons of the 

District of Columbia, Washington, 
Stednian,- C. Ellery, 31. D., 253 numbers of periodicals, 
Steele, James G., San Francisco,\Cal., 
Steiger,,E., New York City, .... 
Stevens Institute of Technology, Tlohoken, N. J. 
Stevenson, tliss Hannah E., . 

Stoddard, Charles, 

Storer, Horatio E., Jr., 31. P., . 

Stratton, Henry B., 

Strout, James C, Washington, D. C, 

SuUivant, Joseph, Columbus, Ohio, . 

Sumner, Hon. Charles, 28 broadsides, 4 newspaper slips, 

Sunday Times, The, Publisher, . 

Sykes, Joseph, ...... 

Tennessee, Scliool for the Blind, Nashville, 

Tenney, Rev. E. P., 

Tewksbury, M. W., Fall River, 

Thayer, Miss Caroline C, 31 numbers of periodicals, 

broadside, ..... 
Thayer, Rev. R., 
Thayer, Gen. Sylvanus, Soiith[Braint7~ee,3 charts, 6 MSS 
Thompson, N. A., and Co., _187 plans of real estate in 

Boston. . . . ' . 
Thornton, J. Wingate, 1 engraving. . 
Ticknor, 3Irs. George, ... 
Tiffany, John K., St. Louis,'3Io., 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., . 
Toledo, Ohio, Index Association, 
Townsend, George A., Washington, D. C. 
Trask, AVilliara B., . 
Trumbull, Hon. J. H., Hartford, Conn., 
Tufts College, Medford, . 
Turner, Alfred T., . 
Tuttle, Charles W., . 
Tyler, W. P., 1 plan of Chicago. 
Tynemouth, England, Borough of, Free P 
Union Theological Seminary, Neiv York City, 
United States. Bure'au of Education, 

Bureau of Navigation, 

■ Bureau of Statistics, 

Census Office, 

Coast Survey Office, 4 charts, 

Department of Agriculture, 

Department of the Interior, 2 broadsides, 1 map. 



ublic 



Libr 



aiT; 




16 
3 



2G 
1 
1 



81 

183 



52 
1 
3 
1 

84 
1 



1 

45 



2 
I 

137 
1 

7 



1 
G 
1 

10 



56 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 




United Stales. Department of State, 

Library of Congress, 

Military Academy, West Point, iV. Y., 

Naval Observatory, 

Office of the Chief Engineers, 

Patent Office, 2 circulars, 

Quartermaster General's Office, 

Signal Office, . 

Surgeon General's Office, 

Van Name, Addison, Librarian of 

Haven. Conn. 
Vassar College, Poughheepsie, N. Y., 
Vauchez, Emmanuel, Paris, 
Veazie, W., 1 plan. . 
Vermont. Dairyman's Association, St. Albans, 
Historical Society, 



Yale College, 



I^rew 



Vick, James, Rochester, N. Y., . 
Villard, Henry, 18 maps and broadsides, . 
Walker, A. K., and Co., 1 broadside, 3 plans. 
Walker, Gen. Francis A., Washington, D. C., 

Waltham, Town Clerk, 

Warren, Hon. Charles H., 109 numbers of periodical 
Warren, Hon. G. Washington, .... 
Warren, George Willis, ..... 
Washburn, Hon. Emory, Cambridge, 
Washburn, Frank T., Milton, .... 
Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., 
Watertown. Free Public Library, . 
Webster, Warren, M. D., U. S. A., Fort Independence, 
Westermann, B., and Co., New York City, 3 numbers of 

periodicals. . 

Western Lunatic Asylum, Staunton, Va., 
Western Reserve College, Hudson, Ohio, . 
Western University of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, 

Weston, Town of, 

Westphal-Castelnau, Alexandre, Montpellier, France, 
Wetzel, Rev. H., Woodstock, Va., .... 
Wheeler, William A., 37 numbers of periodicals, 
Wheildon, William W., Concord, 118 broadsides, 

Whipple, Charles K., 

White, Horace, Chicago, 

White, James C., M. D., 43 numbers of periodicals, . 

Whitney, Rev. Frederic A., Brighton, 

Whitney, James L., 4 numbers of periodicals, 2 broadsides 

Whitney, Prof. William D., New Haven, Conn., 

Wilder, Hon. Marshall P., .... 

Willcox, E. S., Peoria, III, .... 

Williams, Henry W., M. D., . 

Williams, J. Fletcher, St. Paul, Minnesota, 

Williams, Major 3. Otis, 19 numbers of periodicals, 

Williams College, Williamstown, 

Williams Review, The, Editors, Williamstown, 9 numbers 

of periodicals. 
Wilson, Hon. Henry, Natick, 



4 
1 
1 

2 

4 

30 



1 
6 
1 
23 
1 
6 

47 
1 
1 
1 
1 



11 



Pph. 



25 



1 
243 



1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

7 

53 

14 

32 
3 

21 
4 
1 
1 
1 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



57 



Pph. 



"Wilson, Henry W., 1 plan, 

Wilstach, Baldwin, and Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, ... 17 

"Winchell, Rev. Eensselaer, 7 9 

Winchendon. Public Library, 2 

Winchester, Caleb T., Librarian of Wesleyan University, 

Middletown, Conn., ....... 

Winslow, J/rs. Ellen A., 10 

Winsor, Justin, . 12 15 

Winthrop, Ho7i. Robert C, 61 

Wisconsin, State of, 1 

Historical Society, 1 newspaper slip, ... 4 

Institution for the Education of the Blind, Janesville, 1 

Office of the Secretary of State, .... 1 

Woburn, Town of, 1 2 

Woodman, Cyrus, Cambridge, 1 map, .... 1 

Woodward, Joseph T., Augusta, Me., . . . . 2 

Worcester, City of, . 1 

Free Public Library, 2 

Worthington, Flanders, and Co., 

Wuertembergischer Thierschutzverein, StuttgaH, Wurtem- 

berg, .......... 1 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn., ..... 1 



58 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPENDIX X. 

CIRCULATION. 

(Books issued. No account is made of the great use of books within the Library rails.) 





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a Six months, h Removal of the library, c Ten months, d Eleven months (library, not 
closed for examination), f New restrictions put upon costly books. /Nine months, f/ Cen- 
tral library only, h If the issues at East Boston be excluded, this footing would be 296. .315; 
and if hall issues be excluded, there will be record of '2VI.3.710 volumes used at home, i Open 
seventy-eight days, k Includes B. H., L. H., and E. B. Branch, m See report for 1S68. 
n Includes books borrowed and returned the same day, on white slips, as showu in Ap- 
pendix XI. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



59 



APPENDIX XI. 



LOWER HALL. 

Books returned for each month, (Books issued appear in Appendix X.) 









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-* 


^ 


Ci 


05 


00 


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60 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 72. 



APPEISTDIX XII. 

REGISTRATION. 



Note. The first registration, 1854-8, 
had 17,066 names; the second, 1859-67, 
had 52,829 names. 



II. 



in. 



IV. 



VI. 



Applications. < 



Central Library 

E. B. Branch . . 

S. B. Branch . . 

(. Total 



C Central Library 
[Total 



Central Library 
Cards Refused. <! K B. Branch . . 
t Total 



Third Registration. 



12,057 



12,051 
2,810 

2,810 
233 



I Central Library 
Cards not called | 
for during the i E. B. Branch . . 
year. ■> 

L Total 



C Central Library 



^ScelieT^-^-^--^' 



L Total , 



{Central Library 
E. B. Branch . , 
Toted 



233 



6,490 



6,577 



6,490 



3,462 



3,462 



202 



852 



6,577 



1,904 



1,904 
179 



179 
404 



7,096 
2,.320 



9,416 

3,040 
1,012 
4,052 

241 
80 
321 

393 
117 
610 



1,215 

30,150 
2,240 
32,390 



6,688 
993 
232 

7,913 

2,876 

474 

3,350 

26' 

28 
295 

439 
151 
690 



346 

36,307 
3.123 
39.430 



3,313 

232 

42,453 

14,092 
1,486 
16,578 

1,122 

108 

1,230 

2,677 

268 

2,945 

1,479 

82 

1,561 



The largest weekly nimiber of applicants at the Central Library was 202, for the week 
beginning Oct. 30, 1871 ; and the smallest 56, for the week beginning Maj- 29, 1872 (the Li- 
brary was closed part of Dedication Day) ; and the weekly average has been 128. The 
largest number of applicants in any one day was 39 for Feb. 28; the smallest 2 for Sept. 18. 

Up to October, 1870, there had been a large number of applicants from the beginning of 
the present registration, who had not called for tlieir cards, and a system was then begun of 
notifying applicants of six months standing that their cards were held subject to their order 
for one month longer, and if then not called for the application would be cancelled. Under 
this rule at the Central Library there had been sent this year 327 notices, and 264 applications 
had been cancelled, leaving 63 cases which were satisfactorily adjusted. 

The number of applicants, who are residents of Dorchester, since January let, 1870 (when 
they became entitled to the privileges of the Library), is 565 for 1870, 293 for 1871, and 295 
forl872 — total, 1,153. 

Most of the " cards refused " are for reason of non-residency or being under age. 

Since the change was made in the registration of fines, March 16, 1869, cards have been 
retained for non-payment of lines, until redeemed, and May 1, 1871, the Clerk had in his pos- 
session 505 such cards. There have been 273 cards detained during the past year. 

Applications are sent to the police, when the Directory and all other means of verification 
fail. 

Cards Lost. 2,493 notices of such were given at the Central Library during the year, 
and 1,636 were restored on further application. 



rUBLIC LIBRAKY. 



61 



APPENDIX XIII. 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED, AND USE OF BRITISH PATENTS. 



Books Recommended. 



185-1 

1855 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 . . 

1865 

1866 

1867 . • 

1868 

1869 

1870 (nine months) 

1871 

1872 



123 

221 

121 

18 

85 

178 

91 

115 

204 

135 

56 

58 

306 

646 

,120 

,178 

,231 

,665 

,576 



A Iready in 
Library. 



95 
183 
226 
257 
418 
334 



Received 
since. 



260 
423 
535 
448 
549 
756 



Use of British 
Patents. 



182 
187 
197 
269 
361 
346 
347 
642 



Hours' 
use. 



243 
243 
248 

367 
589 
389 
301 
815 



Note. — The column of " Received since " denotes those received of the " Total recom- 
mended'" the same year. What may be in subsequent years received of such "Total 
recommended," does not appear in this table. For instance, of the 1,120 — (183+423) = 514 
not received in 1868 of the total recommended that year, a large part has since been re- 
ceived. 

* The partial disuse of the Bates Hall, on account of the alterations going on, affected this 
number. 

Patof^s. — The American and French Patents have been placed in an alcove contiguous 
to the room of the British Patents, and the whole collection put in charge of a curator. No 
record is made of the use of either the American or French Patents. 



62 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPEIN^DIX XIY. 

BATES HALL READING 



Classifications. 



English History, Topography, Biography, 
Travel and Polite Literature .... 



American (North and South) History. To 
pography, Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



French History, Topography, Biography, 
Travel and Polite Literature . . . . , 



Germanic History, Topography, Biogra- 
phy, Travel and Polite Literature . . 

Italian History, Topography, Biography, 
Travel and Polite Literature 



Other History, Topography, Biography, 
Travel and Polite Literature 

General and Epochal History, Geography, 
Biography, etc 



Greek, Latin, and Philology 

Bibliography 

Transactions 

Periodicals 

Fine Arts . . . . • .... 
Natural History and Science 



Theology, Ecclesiastical History, Ethics, 
Education, etc 



Medicine , . . . 

Law, Government, and Political Economy 
Useful Arts, Mathematics, Physics, etc. . 
Micellaneous Pamphlets, bound 



Percentage of Use. 



CO 


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13 


18 


20 


17 


17 


17 


17 


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10 


8 


12 


12 


12 


12 


13 


7.5 


6 


6 


7 


4 


5 


5 


5 


2 


2.5 


2 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2.6 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3.5 


2.5 


4 


4 


5 


6 


3 


3 


4.25 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3.5 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1.5 


2.3 


5 


7 


5 


4 


5 


1 


6 


6 


11 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


12 


16.5 


8 


5 


8 


8 


8 


9 


4 


4.6 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


11 


8.5 


4 


4 


8 


9 


8 


11 


5 


4.6 


8 


6 


6 


8 


8 


9 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


5.5 


7.5 


7 


8 


7 


6 


5 


6 


.75 


.75 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 



10 

4 

2 

1 

3 

1 
2 
1 
1 
10 
11 
5 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker and 
Prince Libraries, — which are kept apart from the general classifications of the Library, — 
is reckoned as nearly as possible and included in the usual divisions, as is indicated in the 
table. See Exjjlanations to Appendix VII. 

The want of a Catalogue to the Spanish books of the Tickuor Library has prevented any 
use of those books which would enter into the^tatistics. 

During a considerable part of 1872, the first nine classes were partially inaccessible on ac- 
count of the alterations in the Hall, which has caused the unusual diminution of the per- 
centage of use of those classes. 

During the year bound volumes of the Tosti Engravings have been shown on ilondaj- s 
and Saturdays to 812 persons ; 553 ladies and 259 gentlemen ; and three copyists have been 
accommodated. 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. 



63 



APPENDIX XV. 

LOWER HALL READING 





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64 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPEI^DIX XVI. 



EAST BOSTON BRANCH READING. 



{Shown from slips of Books returned.) 



I. 
II. 
III. 

rv. 

V. 
VI. 

VII. 

vin. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 



Ranges. 



10,11,12,19,21 . . . 

4,33 

24,26,28,30,32,34 . 

27 

13,14,18,35 . . . . 

1,2 

15,20 

5,6,7,17,37,39,40,41 

13,22 

3,36,38 

8,9,23 



Classes. 



Biography 

Collections, Libraries, etc. . 

Fiction in Prose 

Foreign books 

History 

Juvenile books 

Miscellaneous 

Periodicals {bound) 

Poetry and Drama 

Sciences, Arts, Professions . 
Travels, Voyages 

Total 



1871. (3 mos.) 



Books 
returned, 



669 

552 

8,593 

27 

1,096 

6,639 

747 
1,119 
2,071 

883 
1,179 



23,575 



Per- 
centage. 



181 



Books 
returned 


Per- 
centage. 


1,104 


1 


1,002 


1 


31,937 


43 


57 


. . 


1,819 


2 


25,855 


35 


1,256 


2 


4,009 


6 


2,447 


4 


2,057 


3 


2,296 


3 


73,839 





There were 965 volumes in the hands of borrowers April 30, 1872. 

Note. The classification in this Branch is somewhat different from that of the Lower 
Hall of the Central Library, where juvenile books are scattered among the other classes, as 
the character of the book, whether fiction, history, biography, etc., would require. The 
above table can better be compared, then, with the statistics of the Public School Library of 
St. Louis, where, according to their last report, the circulation of novels was 52 per cent. ; 
of juvenile books, 27 per cent. ; of scientific books, 5 per cent., and of historical and all others, 
16 per cent. Fiction and juveniles will be found in each case to be about 78 per cent, of the 
circulation. The percentage of English prose fiction and juveniles at the Public Library of 
Cincinnati, during the past year, has been nearly 75. 



66 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 72. 



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CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 72. 



APPEI^DIX XYIII. 

PERIODICALS OF WHICH DUPLICATES ARE TAKEN. 



Titles. 



American Artisan 

Appleton's Journal 

Army and Navy Journal . . 

Atlantic Monthly 

Boston Journal of Chemistry 

Boys of England 

Catholic World 

Dwight's Journal of Music . 

Every Saturday 

Galaxy 

Godey's Lady's Book . . . . 
Good Words for the Young 
Harper's Bazar 

" Monthly 

" Weekly 

Illustrated London News . . 
Lippincott'B Magazine . . . 

Little Corporal 

Merry's Museum 

Nation 

North American Review . . 

Old and New 

Oliver Optic's Magazine . . . 

Our Young Folks 

Overland Monthly 

Peterson's Magazine .... 
Phrenological Journal . . . . 

Scientific American 

Schoolmate 

Scribner's Monthly 

Woman's Journal 

Copies taken 

Magazines duplicated .... 
Duplicates taken 



Copies Taken. 



Central K. R. E. B. R. R, 



2 
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No. 72. 



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71 



APPENDIX XX. 

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KOTE. The expenditures for books cover the cost of those chargeable to our Trust Funds 
Account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the City, and also in- 
cludes such as are bought with the balances with our foreign agents at the close of the ure- 
■vious year. Our financial and library years now nominally correspond, but it will happen 
that bills accruing subsequent to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year, 
payable April 1st, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account, beginning 
nominally May 1st. In this way books added between March 1.5th and May 1st may be 
counted in one year's growth, and paid for in the subsequent year's account. The cost of 
maintaining Branches after the first year makes part of the general items of the several ap- 
propriations. 



72 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

APPENDIX XXI. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. 

JUSTIN WINSOR, Superintendent. 

William A. Wheeler, Assista^it Superintendent. 

James L. Whitney, Principal Assistant. 

Miss Caroline F. Adams, Accountant. 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 
William A. Wheelee, Chief. 
James L. Whitney, Princi^^ial Assistant ; Max Auerbach, Assistant and 
Curator of Patent Room ; Miss M. E. Joslyn, Assistant ; J. Otis Williams, 
Curator of Pamphlets and Engravings ; William H. Foster, Proof-Reader. 
Mrs. R. M. Eastman, Extra Work ; Miss Harriet N. Pike, Ordering Clerk; 
Miss Mary McGrath, Assistant Ordering Clerk; Miss Elizabeth J. Steven- 
son, Newspapers and Duplicates ; Miss A. B. Loud, Pamphlets ; Miss A. A. 
Nichols, Catalogues for Branches ; Miss Margaret McGrath, Curator of Public 
Card Catalogue. 

Miss Alice M. Poree, Lower Hall Assistant. 

SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

Mrs. L. T. Barton, Custodian. 
Appleton P. C. Griffin, Assistant Custodian; Ellen Stevenson, Annie M. 
Kennedy, Assistants. 

BATES HALL DEPARTMENT. 

Joseph Stkes, Keeper. 
Charles A. Wilson, Miss L. S. Norton, Miss Mary A. Tyler, Assistants. 
Charles H. Ginness, John Bresnahan, John Barry, Runners. 

LOWER HALL DEPARTMENT. 
Edward Capen, Keeper. 
Miss Elizabeth S. Haley, Delivery Clerk ; Miss Lydia F. Knowles, Receiv- 
ing Clerk ; Lucy A. W. Qinness, Keeper's Clerk ; Miss Elizabeth Ross, Misses 
Eliza J. Mack, Sarah A. Mack, Assistants. 

Ellen E. Bresnahan, Ellen F. McCarty, Eliza F. Cotter, Henrietta E. Mack 
(extra'), Florence E. Ginness (extra), Runners. 

Elbridge Bradshaw, Registration Clerk. 

Miss Matilda J. Ross, Assistant Registration Clerk. 

Miss Caroline E. Poree, } r, t r. 

,.,,^ ,, , . i Reading Room Attendants. 
Miss Amelia McGrath (extra), } 

J. G. Cupples, Reading Room Attendant (evenings). 

JANITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

William E. Ford, Janitor. 

Thomas Collins, Assistant. 



PUBLIC LIBRAKT. iO 

' BINDING DEPARTMENT. 
Petek Low, Foreman. 
Andrew M. Blake, Mrs. Martha Wheeler, Assistants. 
Note. — The binderies of Theodore Jackson and Jerome Seidensticker are 
also employed. 

EAST BOSTON BRANCH LIBRARY. 

Miss Sarah C. Godbold, Librarian. 

Miss Mary R. Pray, Miss Addie G. Tracey, Assistants. 

Mary E. Cathcart, Runner. 

A. W. Trask, Janitor. 

Misses Mary Lennon, Martha Hill, Alice Wing, Emma Pond, and Phebe 

Prince, Substitutes and extra Assistants. 

SOUTH BOSTON BRANCH. 

Mrs. Anna C. D. Keen, Librarian. 

Miss Clara F. Mulloy, Miss L. Anna Baldwin, Assistants. 

Norah McCarthy, Runner. 

Joseph Baker, Janitor. 

Note. — The extra assistants and substitutes are not yet engaged. 

AGENCY DEPARTMENT. 

Messrs. Lee & Shepard, Boston. 

Messrs. Little, Brown & Co., and Sampson Low, Son & Marston, Boston 
and London. 
Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 
Dr. Felix Fliigel, Leipsic. 
Chev. Eugenio Alberi, Florence. 



SUMMARY. 

Superintendent 
Accountant 
Catalogue Department 
Shelf Department 
B. H. Circulating Department 
L. H. Circulating Department 
Janitorial Dejjartment 
Binding Department . 
East Bostoil Branch . 
South Boston Branch 

Regularly employed in the Libraries 
Substitutes and extra Assistants 



1 

1 

13 

4 

7 
14 
2 
•6 
5 
5 

55 
10 



Total 
10 



65 



74: CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

APPENDIX XXII. 

KEPOET ON THE EXAMINATION OE THE LIBRARY. 
To the Superintendent: — 

Sir, — For the year ending the 30th of April, 1871, there has 
been no regular examination of the Bates Hall collection, as the 
alterations in the hall and temporary changes in the location of the 
books have rendered it impossible. Since the completion of the 
shelving on the west side of the building the books have, however, 
been read by the shelf-lists and re-arranged in their proper places. 
Comparatively few of the volumes are missing, and it is believed 
that when the alterations on the east side are completed and the 
library again restored to its wonted order, the results of a full ex- 
amination will prove as satisfactory as usual. Upon the Lower 
Hall library and the East Boston Branch, I beg leave to present 
the following 

REPORT. 

In the Lower Hall there were missing from the shelves 

at the time of examination . . . 5,198 vols. 



5,171 



Loaned ...... 

At the Binder's 

Otherwise accounted for 


. 4,402 
340 
429 


Not at present accounted for, — 

Fiction 

Duplicates of Fiction 

Miscellaneous 


6 

4 

17 



27 " 

Missing volumes are constantly and persistently sought, yet acci- 
dents are liable to occur in a library of so large a circulation, and 
make it quite possible for a few books to slip away without being 
accounted for. 

Eleven volumes recorded missing during previous years appeared 
on the shelves at the last examination, and nearly all of them were 
found to have been wrongly numbered. Of this number one was 
reported missing last year, five were missing in 1868, three in 
1867, and two in 1866. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 75 

The number of books missing from each alcove, is as follows : — 



1st alcove 


2 vols. 


8 th alcove . 


3 vols. 


2d " . 


1 " 


13th " 


2 " 


3d " . 


2 " 


14th " 


2 « 


4th " 


. • 1 " 


18th " 


3 " 


6th " 


2 " 


20th " 


2 " 


7th " . 


3 " 


Dup's of 7th alcove 


4 " 



At the East Boston Branch there were missing from the shelves 
at the time of examination . .... 1,451 vols. 

Loaned ....... .1,331 

At the Binder's 105 

Otherwise accounted for . . . . .11 

1,447 » 

Not at present accounted for, — 

Fiction . ' 2 

Juveniles ....... 2 



I have also to report the following books which have disappeared 
from the Bates Hall desk, during the past library year : — 

I. 13 Burke's Dictionary of English peerage. Nov. 1871. 
I. 4 Haydn's Book of dignities. Nov. 1871. 
F. 4 Bartlett's Familiar quotations. Dec. 1871. 

D. 5 Cleveland's Concordance to Milton. Dec. 1871. 

Also the following from the desk in the Periodical Eeading 
Room : — 

E. 7 Biographic des Contemporains, v. 14. June, 1871. 
C. 1 Burke's Dictionary of peerage. Oct. 1871. 

B. 19 Index to Works of Charles Dickens. Oct. 1871. 

A. 5 Godwin's Hand-book of universal biography. Nov. 1871. 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. T. BARTON, 

Custodian of the Shelves. 

PcRLic LIBRA.RY, May 8th, 1872. 



76 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPE:^rDix XXIII. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR TWENTY YEARS. 

The followiuor gentlemen have served on the Exammhiof 
Committees for the years given. The names in italics are 
those of Trustees, who have acted as chairmen of the various 
committees. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 

Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Bigeloiv, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1865. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Buckingham, C. E., M.D., 1872. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, jr., 1869. 

Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 

Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 
Dix, James A., 1860 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 



Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871. 

Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 
Fields, James T., 1872. 
Foote, Rev. Henry "W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F., 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 

Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gould, A. A., M.D., 1864. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1868. 
Greenough, William W., 1858. 

Hale, Rev. Edward E., 1858. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hay ward, George, 3f.D., 1863. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Hillard, H071. George S., 1853. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.jD., 1870. 
Holmes, Oliver W., M.D., 1858. 
Homans, Charles D., i/.Z>., 1867. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 

Jeffries, B. Joy, 3I.D., 1869. 
Jewell, Ho7i. Harvey, 1863. 

Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
liirk, Edward N., D.I)., 1859. 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 



77 



Lothrop, Loring, 18GG. 
Lawrence, Eon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lewis, Weston, 1872. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. "W., 1856. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 

Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
MoHon, Eon. Ellis W., 1871. 
Miidge, Eon. E. R., 1871. 

Neale, RoUin H., D.D., 1853. 

Otis, G. A., 1860. 

Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Prescott, William II., LL.D., 1853. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Eon. John P., 1865. 

Rice, Eon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 



Rotch, Benjamin, 1863. 

Sanger, Eon. George P., 1860. 
Shnrtleff, Eon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Spraguc, Charles J., 1859. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Eon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861, 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 

Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 

Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 

Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 

Ticknor, George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tobey, Eon. Edward S., 1862. 

Upham, J. B., M.D., 1865. 

Walley, Eon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Warner, Herman J., 1867. 
Warren, Eon. Charles II., 1859. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitney, Daniel E., 1862. 
Wightman, Eon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Winthrop, Eon. Robert C, 1854. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 



78 



OITY DOCUMENT. — No. 72. 



APPENDIX XXIY. 

TRUSTEES FOR TWENTY YEARS. 

The Honorable Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1852 to 1864; the late George Ticknor m 1865; and 
William "W. Greenongh, Esq., from 1866 to the present time. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that 
for 1853 making what is called the first annual report. It 
consisted of one alderman and one common councilman, and 
five citizens at large, till 1867, .when a revised Ordinance 
made it consist of one alderman, two common councilmen, 
and six citizens at large, two of whom retire, unless re- 
elected, each year, while the members from the City Council 
are elected yearly. 



Allen, James B., 1852. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852, 1854-5. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871. 
BiGELOw, John P., 1852 to 18G8. 
BowDiTCH, Henry L, 1865-6. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868 to 1871. 
Brown, J. C. J., '1861. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864-5. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860. 
Dennie, George, 1858-9. 
Dickinson, M. E., jr., 1871. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852 to 1864. 
Frost, Oliver, 1856-7. 
Gaffield, Thomas, 1867. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868 to 1872. 
Greenough, William W., 1856 to 

1872. 
Harris, William G., 1869. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858. 
HiLLARu, George S., 1872. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870. 



Jackson, P. T., 1864, 
Keith, James M., 1868-9. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867 to 1872. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-2. 
Messenger, George W., 1855. 
Morton, Ellis W., 1870 to 1872. 
Munroe, A. B., 1854 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870. 
Pease, Frederic, 1872. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Plummer, Farnhara, 1856. 
Putnam, George, 1868 to 1872. 
Reed, Sampson, 1852-3. 
Sanger, George P., I860. 
Sears, Philip H., 1859. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
SiiURTLEFF, Nathaniel B., 1852 to 

1867. 
Story, Joseph, 1855, 1865-6. 
Ticknor, George, 1852 to 1866. 
Tyler, John S., 1863, 1866. 
Warren, George W., 1852 to 1854. 
Washburn, F. L., 1857. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 79 



Whipple, Edwin P., 1867 to 1SG9. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 18G2. 
Wilson, P:iisliaT., 18G1-2. 



Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNSOR, Justin, 18G7. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868. 



Whole number, 56 ; citizens at large in small capitals, two 
of whom, Jarvis D. Braman and Weston Lewis, have also* 
represented the City Council. 



80 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

APPEI^DIX XXY. 

THE FELLOWES ATHEN^UM AND ROXBURY BRANCH. 

To THE Mayor and City Council of the City of Boston : — 

Gentlemen, — Under the will of the late Caleb Fellowes, the un- 
dersigned were invested with a trust, whose purpose is to establish 
a library, and erect a building for it, within half a mile of the Rev. 
Dr. Putnam's church. The will j^rovides that forty thousand 
dollars shall be spent in the purchase of land and in the erection 
of the said building. The available fund now amounts to about 
fifty-four thousand dollars, and the excess over that appropriated 
for the land and building we are required to invest as a fund, the 
income of which shall be available for the purchase of books ; and 
to this will be added, when the building is completed, a further 
sum of about thirty thousand dollars, which will then be paid to 
us by the executors under the will of the late Mrs. Fellowes. 

We deem it for the interest of all concerned that the advantages 
of these funds shall be joined with such others as may accrue from 
the provisions to be made for the benefit of the District of Rox- 
bury, in the way of a Branch of the Public Library. 

To that end we respectfully request that we may be allowed a 
hearing before the appropriate committee of the City Council ; and 
further request that the Trustees of the Public Library be invited 
to attend. 

In behalf of the Trustees of the Fellowes Athenaeum, 

GEORGE PUTNAM, 

President. 



In Board op Aldermen, December 26, 187 L 

The Committee on the Public Library, to whom was referred the 
foregoing communication from the Trustees of the Fellowes Athe- 
nseum, having carefully considered the subject, would respectfully 
.recommend the passage of the accompanying order. 
For the Committee, 

GEORGE D. RICKER, 

Chairman pro tern. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 81 

Ordered, That His Honor the Ma3'or be authorized to sign, 
seal, and deliver the Indenture (a Qopy of which is appended 
hereto) between the City of Boston and the Trustees of the 
Fellowes Athenaeum in Roxbury, for joint action in the estab- 
lishment of a Branch Public Library, for the territory now com- 
prising Wards 13, 14 and 15. 



This Indenture between the City of Boston and the Trustees of 
the Fellowes Athenfeum in Roxbury, a corporation duly created by 
law, witnesseth : — 

That, whereas the said trustees hold certain funds under the will 
of Caleb Fellowes, late of Philadelphia, in the State of Peunsyl- 
vauia, deceased, in trust, to la}' out and expend forty thousand 
dollars upon land, and a building to be erected thereon, within 
half a mile of the meeting-house of the first religious society in 
Roxbury, to be used for an Athenaeum for literary and instructive 
purposes for the benefit and pleasure of the inhabitants of said 
Roxbur}' and of other worthy persons who may visit that city : 

And in further trust, to keep the remainder of said sum over 
and above said forty thousand dollars, constantly and safely invest- 
ed, and to expend the income thereof, half-yearly forever, in pur- 
chasing and supplying books and periodical works for the said 
Athenaeum. 

And whereas it is expedient that the City of Boston should 
establish in that part of said city called Roxburj', and formerly the 
Cit}' of Roxbury, a Branch of its Public Library : 

And whereas, the said city and the said trustees can accomplish 
the purposes of said Athenaeum and of said Public Library more 
efiectually in conjunction than separatel}', and have accordingly 
agreed upon a method of co-operation so as to bring about a union 
of the resources of the two institutions : 

And whereas, in order to furnish the needful accommodations 
for tlie united institutions, it may be necessary for the said 
trustees to expend somewhat more than forty thousand dollars 
upon land and building, and in that case they will be obliged to 
treat the surplus as an investment of which the income is to be ap- 
plied for the purchase of books as aforesaid : 

And whereas, upon the completion of said building, the said 



82 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

trustees will become entitled to a further sum under the will of 
Sarah Fellowes, upon trust, to be applied to the purchase of such 
books and periodicals as the said trustees may from time to time 
deem best to be placed in said Athenaeum, as the property thereof: 

Now, therefore, it is agreed between the parties hereto as follows, 
viz. : — 

The said trustees shall proceed as soon as may be to erect a 
building which shall contain suitable accommodations for a Branch 
Public Library of the City of Boston as well as for said Athena3ura. 

As soon as said building shall be read}^ for occupancy, the said 
city shall appropriate towards a Branch Public Library, for the 
territor}' now comprising Wards 13, 14 and 15, as large a sum of 
money as has been, or shall be, appropriated for outfit and main- 
tenance to an^r other Branch Library in said cit}', and the said 
city sliall pa}^ for the rental of said building the sum of sixteen 
hundred dollars per annum, which shall be paid annuall}' to the 
said trustees, to be laid out by them, after pacing insurance, re- 
pairs, etc., in the purchase of books and periodicals, to be the 
property of said Trustees of the Fellowes Athenaeum in Roxbur3r, 
and their successors in said trust. 

The rest of said appropriation shall be expended in the purchase 
of books and the administration and management of the joint in- 
stitutions by the Trustees of the Public Librar}^ 

All books and periodicals purchased by the said Trustees of the 
Athenaeum from any of the funds in their hands for the purchase 
of books as aforesaid, shall be put in charge of the custodians of 
the said Branch Public Librarj^ being first distinctly marked as the 
property of said Trustees, and shall be subject to the direction of 
the Trustees of the Public Libi'ary, as to custody, care, and ar- 
rangement within the said building, and shall be open to the public 
for reading and • circulation under such regulations as the said 
Trustees of the Public Library may, with the consent of the said 
Trustees of the Fellowes Athenasura, from time to time establish. 

This contract shall be terminable by either party, at an}^ time, 
upon giving six months' notice to the other party, and, upon its 
termination, the books shall belong to the party which shall have 
purchased them, or to whom they have been given ; the furniture, 
shelving, and all other movable property, which shall have been pur- 
chased by the city, shall belong to the said city ; and the property 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 83 

which shall have been fixed to the real estate, and any furniture 
which may have been purchased by the said Trustees of the 
Fellowes Athenaeum, shall belong to the said Trustees. 

A suitable room shall be provided by the Trustees of the Fel- 
lowes Athenffiutn, in tlie building to be erected by them, and fur- 
nished by the city, for the joint use of the Trustees of the Fellowes 
Athenreura and the Trustees of tlie Public Library. 

It is further agreed that all questions of detail of management, 
not herein provided for, shall be settled in conjunction by the 
Trustees of the Fellowes Athenauuu and of the Public Library. 



The above order was passed by the City Council, Dec. 30, 1871. 
The Lidenture was on the 29th of January, 1872, signed by William 
Gaston, Mayor, in behalf of the City of Boston ; and, under author- 
ity given, .January 22d, 1872, by the Trustees of the Fellowes 
Athenseum, it was signed in their behalf by their President, George 
Putnam. 

This was again modified by the following agreement, which was 
executed in consequence of an order of the City Council, author- 
izing the Mayor to sign such a supplemental indenture as may be 
approved by the Trustees of the Public Library : — 

This Indenture, made this twelfth day of April, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, between 
the City of Boston and the Trustees of the Fellowes Athenaeum, 
in Roxbury, a corporation duly created by law, 

Witnesseth : — 
That the contract entered into by the said parties by an Inden- 
ture, duly executed, dated the twent^'-ninth day of Januar3'^, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, shall be and here- 
by is changed and altered by striking out and expunging from the said 
Indenture the words " with the consent of the said Trustees of 
the Fellowes Athenaeum," in the paragraph relating to the custody, 
care, arrangement, reading and circulation of books and peri- 
odicals purchased by said trustees ; and also by striking out and 
expunging the paragraph in said Indenture which is in the follow- 



84 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

ing woi'ds, viz., " A suitable room shall be provided by the Trus- 
tees of the Fellowes Athenoeum, in the building to be erected by 
them and furnished by the city for the joint use of the Trustees of 
Fellowes AthenjBum, and the Trustees of the Public Library" — 
and the said Indenture shall be construed for all purposes as though 
the words and provisions, hereby agreed to be stricken out and 
expunged, had not been inserted therein. 

In witness whereof the said parties have caused their seals to be 
hereto affixed and these presents to be signed by William Gaston, 
Mayor of said City, and George Putnam, President of said Trus- 
tees, respectively, the day and year first above written. 

City of Boston, 
By WILLIAM GASTON, Mayor. [Seal.] 
In presence of 
James R. Carret. 

The Trustees of the Fellowes Athen^um, 

by GEORGE PUTNAM, Pres't. 
Approved, by vote of the Trustees of the Public Library. 

W. W. GREENOUGH, 
Pres't of the Board. 



DESCEIPTION OF THE PLANS 

of the building for the joint use of the Roxbury Branch of the 
Public Library and the Fellowes Athenoeum, as drawn by N. J. 
Bradlee and W. J. Winslow, architects. The building is situated 
on Bartlett street, near Shawmut avenue. 

Library Room. The bottom of the windows are eight feet from 
the floor, so that a range of shelving runs round the entire wall, 
broken only by the doorways. This shelving, not above reach of 
hand, will hold not far from 15,000 volumes. Twenty cases, oi", 
without over-crowding, twenty-two cases, each nine feet long, 
double-faced, holding about 1,750 volumes each, and not over eight 




FIRST FLOOR 
Scale, 20 feet to inch. 




SECOND FLOOR. 

Scale, 20 feet to inch. 



PUBLIC LEBEART. 85 

feet high, will provide for about 35,000 volumes, making the 
capacity of the floor about 50,000 volumes. The altitude of the 
room renders it possible, when required, largely to increase its 
capacity, by galleries or intermediar}^ floors. 

Waiting-room. This is divided by a rail into apartments for 
adults and youths, and while but one record of borrowers is kept, 
the books can be delivered over either end of the counter to visi- 
tors on either side of the rail. The wall space back of the counter 
is to be shelved for the books most often in demand. 

Reading-room. Public access to this is had by the staircase 
in the tower, but the official access is by the winding staircase 
connecting the space behind the counter with the Librarian's room. 
The rear wall has windows (not shown in the plan), through which 
the public can have oversight of the main library floor. The ante- 
room over the Trustees' room can be used for storing the accumu- 
lating numbers of periodicals before binding, and as a writing 
room for students, and for the showing of illustrated works. 

jf OTE. — Since the above was written, the Metropolitan Horse Railroad 
Company, having purchased the land bounding the Library lot on all sides ex- 
cept the street side, and purposing to erect stables thereon, the Trustees of the 
Fellowes Athenasum have deemed it advisable to sell to the same corporation 
the lot on which the building was in progress. Another lot has not at this 
date [Aug. 10] been secured. 



86 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 



APPENDIX XXYI. 

PAPEES CONCERNING GREUZE'S FRANKLIN. 

Boston, March 7, 1872. 
To the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston: — 

Gentlemen, — It having been announced that you are desirous 
of forming a collection of books and other objects connected with 
the history of Benjamin Franklin, it has occurred to me that such 
a collection would be the most fitting repository for a valuable 
original portrait of him, by Greuze. which I possess. 

This portrait I purchased some j'ears since, in London. It was 
painted for Mr. Oswald, British Ambassador to France, who was 
associated with Franklin in the negotiation of the Provisional 
Articles of Nov. 30, 1872, acknowledging the Independence of the 
United States. The gentleman of whom I bought it, Mr. Joseph 
Parkes, an eminent lawyer, and well known in London for his 
literary ability, received it from the late Mr, Oswald, M. P. for 
Glasgow, and grand-nephew of the ambassador, in consideration 
of valuable legal services rendered. 

I take pleasure in offering this portrait to the Public Library, 
with the single condition that it always shall be kept in the 
Library, and where it can be freel}'' seen by visitors. If you 
decide to accept it on these terms, I shall be happy to place it in 
your charge. 

I enclose an interesting paper written by the Hon. Charles Sum- 
ner, together with some other documents, relating to the portrait, 
all of which are at the service of the Librarj'^, if you wish to pre- 
serve them on file as evidence of its authenticity. 

Respectfully yours, 

GARDNER BREWER. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 87 

MEMORANDA 

By the lion. Charles Sumner. 

I fiist saw Mr. Brewer's portrait of Franklin, in the snmmer of 
1857, in London, at the house of a valued friend, the late Joseph 
Parkes, Esq., then living in Saville Kow. In the summer of 1859 
I saw it again at the house of Mr. Parkes, who had removed to 
Wimpole street. 

I was interested in the portrait, and Mr. Parkes took pleasure 
in speaking of it. He called it " a Greuze," and said that it had 
always been so regarded in the family from which it came. He 
had received it, in consideration of certain services, from the grand- 
nephew of Mr. Oswald, who negotiated with Franklin the Pro- 
visional Articles of Nov. 30th, 1782, ackilowledging the Independ- 
ence of the United States. Mr. Parkes thought it had been given 
b}^ Franklin to his brother negotiator, in whose family it was 
known as " An ambassador's portrait." 

The position and character of Mr. Oswald appear in the con- 
temporary coiTespondence, especially of Franklin and John 
Adams. He was introduced to the former by the Earl of Shel- 
burne, Prime Minister of England, in a letter dated April 6, 
1782, where it is said : — 

" I have had a high opinion of the compass of your mind and 
of your foresight. I have often been beholden to both, and shall 
be glad to be so again, so far as is compatible with your situation. 
Your letter discovering the same disposition has made me send to 
you Mr. Oswald. I have had a longer acquaintance with him than 
ever I have had the pleasu^'e to have with you. , I believe him an 
honest man, and after consulting some of our common friends, I 
have thought him the fittest for the purpose. He is a pacifical 
man and conversant in those negotiations which are most interest- 
ing to mankind. This has made me prefer him to any of our 
speculative friends, or to any person of higher rank. He is fully 
apprized of my mind and you may give full credit to everything 
he assures you of." (Franklin's "Works b}" Sparks, Vol IX., pp. 
240, 241.) 

Franklin, in a letter dated April 18, 1782, reported to the Earl 
of Shelburne his impression of Mr. Oswald, as follows : — 



88 CITY DOCUMEI^T. No. 72. 

" I have conversed a good deal with Mr. Oswald, and am much 
pleased with him. He appears to me a wise and honest man," 
(Ibid. p. 245.) 

John Adams in writing to Secretary Livingston, of the Conti- 
nental Congress, under date of Nov. 6, 1782, said : — 

"The English have sent Mr. Oswald, who is a wise and good 
man, and if untrammelled would soon settle all." (John Adams's 
Works, Vol. VII., p. 600.) 

At the negotiation of the definitive Treaty of Peace of Sept. 3, 
1783, Mr. Hartley was substituted for Mr. Oswald, on which John 
Adams remarks, in a letter to Secretary Livingston, under date of 
April 14, 1783: — 

" It would have been more agreeable to have finished with Mr. 
Oswald. But the present Ministry are so dissatisfied with what is 
past, as they say, though nobody believes them, ihat they choose 
to change hands." (Ibid., Vol. VIII., p. 54.) 

I remember to have heard Sir Charles R. Vaughan, British Min- 
ister at Washington many years ago, say, that on his return to Lon- 
don, and finding the dissatisfaction with his course, Mr. Oswald 
burst into tears. It is hardly possible that he did anything with- 
out the sanction of the Ministry ; but it was probably convenient 
to allow the burden to fall on him. 

From this statement it is easy to see how natural it would be for 
Mr. Oswald to have a portrait of Franklin. 

Mr. Parkes, into whose hands it passed from the family of Mr. 
Oswald, and from whom it came to Mr. Brewer, was a remarkable 
person, extensively known in London, full of information, fond of 
pictures, much interested in our countrj'-, with an excellent Amer- 
ican library, and with an American wife, born in Pennsylvania, and 
grand-daughter of Priestley. He is known as author of the unfin- 
ished memoirs of Sir Philip Francis, completed by Mr. Merivale, 
and also early in life of a volume on the History of the Court of 
Chancery, which Brougham complimented highly in his famous 
speech on Law Reform, Feb. 7, 1828. 

I am sure that Mr. Parkes had,. entire confidence in this por- 
trait, as painted by Greuze, and belonging originally to Mr. Os- 
wald. 

CHARLES SUMNER. 

Washington, 6th Aug., '71. 



rUBLIC LIBRARY. 89 



APPE]N^DIX XXVlI. 

THE BEQUEST OF DANIEL TREAD WELL. 

Extract from the ivill dated Nov. 7, 1863. 

In the ninth place, all the residue of my estate, both real and per- 
sonal, I give, devise and bequeath to my executors hereinafter 
named, to have and to hold the same to them and their heirs suc- 
cessors and assigns forever, but in trust nevertheless for the fol- 
lowing uses and purposes, viz. : to pay over all the net income 
thereof to my wife during her life for her own use and benefit ; and 
if at any time my said Trustees shall not deem the net income 
thereof sufficient for a suitable allowance for her, they may make 
such further allowance to her from the principal of the said residue 
of my estate, as shall seem to them proper and expedient. At the 
decease of my wife, or as soon thereafter as shall be found conven- 
ient and desirable, my said Trustees shall divide the residue of my 
estate then remaining in their hands, into five equal parts, and pay 
over and transfer one of the said fifth parts to the President and 
Fellows of Harvard College for the use of the College Library ; 
and transfer and pay over one of the said fifth parts to the Ameri- 
can Academy of Arts and Sciences ; and transfer and pay over one 
of the said fifth parts to the Boston Athenaeum ; and transfer and 
pay over one of the said fii'th parts to the Trustees of the Boston 
Library ; and transfer and pay over the remaining one-fifth part 
thereof to the town of Ipswich aforesaid, for the Library above pro- 
vided for. 

Extract from a codicil, dated 25th March, 1864. 

I hereby declare that it was my intention by the said Will, to 
give one fifth part of the residue of my estate after the decease of 
my wife, and as more pai'ticularly set forth in the said Will, for 
the use and benefit of " the Public Library of the City of Boston," 
now located in Boylston street in the said City, and it is according- 



90 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 72. 

ly my will that where the words " Trustees of tlie Boston Library" 
occur on the fourth page of my said Will, the words " Public Li- 
brary of the City of Boston" shall be substituted therefor ; and 
that where the same T,^ords occur on the fifth page of my said Will 
the words " Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Bos- 
ton" shall be substituted therefor, and my will carried into eflect 
accordingly by my Executors therein named. 

Extract from the Records of the Trustees. 

In Board of Trustees, Apr. 11, 1872. 

The President presented a cop}^ of the will of the late Daniel 
Treadwell, under which the Library, on the death of his widovv, it 
was thought, would come into the possession of almost $12,000. 
The President was requested to notifj- the City Council of the fact, 
and to address an acknowledgment to the Executors. 

The Committee on the Library of the Cit}' Council reported to 
that body the following order, which was passed and approved by 
the Mayor, May 17, 1872. 

Ordered, Tliat the bequest to the Public Library of the City of 
Boston, named in the ninth article of the will of Daniel Treadwell 
of Cambridge, Engineer and late Eumford Professor in Harvard Col- 
lege, be, and the same is hereb}^ accepted ; and that the Trustees of 
the Library be authorized to receive said bequest when it becomes 
due ; and invest the amount received in bonds of said city, and ex- 
pend the income in such manner as they may deem for the best in- 
terests of the Library. 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Public Library be requested 
to make a suitable acknowledgment of this generous contribution 
to the funds of the Library by the late Professor Treadwell, whose 
distinguished services in the application of science to the useful 
arts, have given him a high position among public benefactors. 

Public Library, in Board of Trustees, 

June 12, 1872. 
Ordered, That the action of the City Council in relation to the 
Treadwell bequest be communicated to the Executors of the estate, 
as supplemental to the resolutions of gratitude already passed by 
the Board, and communicated in due course to said Executors. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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