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Full text of "Annual report"

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City Document. — No. 89. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 




ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



187 5 



CITY OF BOSTOJS". 

Public Lxbrart, June 29, 1875. 
His Honor ^ Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor of the City of Boston: 
Sir, — I have the honor to transmit to you, herewith, the 
Twenty-third Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public 
Library, prepared in obedience to the fourth section of the 
Ordinance of 1869, relative to the Public Library. 
Very respectfully, 

JUSTIN WINSCm, 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees^ 



TWENTY-THIED ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBEART. 

In conformity with the requirements of the Ordinance con- 
cerning the Public Library, the Trustees have the honor to 
present to the City Council their twenty-third Annual 

EEPOET, 

being the sixth made under the last ordinance, and including 
the results of administration for the year ending on the 
30th April last. 

There are also submitted herewith the reports of the Su- 
perintendent and of the Examining Committee. 

The report of the Superintendent, with its numerous ap- 
pendixes, contains all the material facts relative to the work of 
the Library and its Branches during the past year. A care- 
ful examination of the details therein included is necessary 
to a full understanding of the administrative arrangements, 
and of the extent of the uses of the whole institution, of the 
ap|)ortionment of the expenditures, and of the large amount 
of clerical labor performed. The whole document is framed 
with a clearness and copiousness of statement that leave 
no material point untouched. 

The Examining Committee for the present year consists 
of Wm. T. Adams, Esq., Eev. George A. Thayer, Hon. 
Benjamin F. Thomas, George W. Wales, Esq., Charles E. 
Ware, M. D., with David P. Kimball, Esq., of the Board of 
Trustees, as Chairman. The report is from the hand of the 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 89. 

Rev. Mr. Thayer, and in its introduction gives the first pub- 
lic expression of an embarrassment which has been felt for 
years. In the earlier days of the Library history, with a sin- 
gle collection of books of limited extent, it was an easy task 
to examine all the departments of administration, and the 
methods of use. But with an institution of the present size, 
including six Branches, it is impossible that any committee 
can afibrd the time to more than inform itself upon the 
general system of management, without undertaking the 
minute and precise inquiries customary with the early com- 
mittee of citizens who were invited to and accepted the 
same task. These successive committees have rendered ex- 
cellent service to the institution, and there is, unquestionably, 
a distinct value in the oversight of our present system by 
five intelligent, disinterested gentlemen, drawn from widely 
distinct classes of om* citizens, — by the terms of the ordi- 
nance the committee of" citizens at large, — who, together with 
a Trustee as chairman, shall examine the Library and make a 
report of its condition to the Trustees." This simple re- 
quirement covers all tlie possibilities of the institution, 
which is bound to extend its benefits "as widely as practica- 
ble throughout the community," and this is the problem which 
is to be considered. Whether the trust funds are used upon 
the conditions for which they were given ; whether the city 
appropriations for Library support are properly and judi- 
ciously expended ; whether due attention is given to keeping 
the shelves furnished with the best and most recent publica- 
tions needed by its widely extended constituencies, are ques- 
tions for due examination and consideration. In this general 
way, the overseeing committee can always render real service 
both to the Library and to the powers who regulate its ad- 
ministration. 

Another suggestion of the committee requires respectful 
notice. It is to the effect that the Bates Hall collection 
should be opened for readers in the hall on Sundays. This 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7 

is the same practical question which constantly arises with 
regard to the uses and the hours of the Library. The expe- 
rience of the past twenty-three years has been simply ten- 
tative. The Trustees have gone from step to step in ex- 
tending the freedom of the Library as fast as public demand 
required. If the presumed uses of the books we're sufficient 
to authorize the Board to ask for additional appropriations 
from the City Government to meet the necessary expenses of 
administration, it has not failed to make such application. 
From the density of the surrounding population, the open- 
ing of the reading-room on Sunday, in Boylston street, has 
proved to be a moderate success, while in the Branches it 
has not been found to be either a necessity or a considerable 
convenience. It is just to say, however, that the success in 
the Central Library might have been more marked, had there 
been better accommodations for readers. With regard to 
the Bates Hall and its frequenters, the number of those who 
desire books for table consultation in the hall and of those 
who borrow books for home use is nearly equal. The 
freedom for hall use which is given to non-residents occa- 
sions frequent applications to the Library shelves. For this 
class the Sunday convenience would not contribute to the use 
of the books. In watching the class who desire books, as 
well as the periods when they wish to take them, the Trus- 
tees will give early attention to any proper demonstration 
looking to a still further extension of Library privileges ; but 
as yet no such public demand is apparent. The question is 
one which will hereafter probably require consideration, and 
the suggestion at the present time will give the community 
opportunity to thoughtfully consider the possible results. 

Upon the other points to which reference is made by the 
committee, the Trustees accept with pleasure the conclusion 
to which it arrived. 

During the past year the convenience and safety of the 
building have been largely increased. The new tower con- 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

structecl at the south-west comer has been finished, furnished, 
and devoted to the purposes for which it Avas needed. Other 
accommodations are also required for the public as well as 
for some of the Library departments. 

With a view, then, to the recj[uirements of the immediate 
future, the Trustees desire to call the attention of the City 
Council to a prospective enlargement of the building. The 
open space in the rear of the present edifice cannot now be 
used for the purposes for which it was intended, as the recent 
erection of a large stable upon Van Rensselaer place will 
probably preclude a nearer approach to the line of our 
estate than is at present attained by the recent addition ; 
but the room necessary for the Library purposes can be ac- 
quired from the property purchased by the city for this 
object in 1872, and joining the building on the east. 

The insufficieuc}' of the accommodations for the visitors 
to the reading-room and the waiting-hall of the popular 
Library, apparent fully five years since, has shown itself in a 
more marked degree during the past year. The reading- 
room, containing, in accordance with the condition of Mr. 
Bates' legacy, one hundred chairs, with the arrangements for 
the use of a large number of periodicals, is now quite too 
limited in extent for the purposes to which it is devoted. 
The waiting-room has long been a great evil to the institution 
— small, low studded, unventilated, insufficiently lighted, it 
is often inconveniently overcrowded. Its condition has de- 
prived the lower Library of a large class of borrowers who 
would otherAvise gladly use the books of that favorite collec- 
tion. A hall, sufficiently large to allow separate access for 
the boys, with seats and tables conveniently arranged for the 
use of two or three hundred persons, would eventually in- 
crease circulation, and remove most of the present objections 
to the system of delivery. 

It is obvious that any material alteration of the present 
structure should receive most careful consideration, so that 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

any addition should aflect, as little as is practicable, its air 
and light. The plans for the purpose will be prepared 
during the present year, and laid before the Council for its 
approval previous to the annual appropriation for the coming 
year. 

The accommodations, also, at the South Boston Branch 
are insutficient for the public and the Library. The lease of 
the premises does not expire until the first Saturday of 1878. 
It is hoped that on or before that date the city may be able to 
provide suitable rooms in some building of its own property. 

A brief summary of the condition and uses of the insti- 
tution, inclusive of its branches, will lead, it is hoped, to a 
consultation of the tables of the appendix for fuller and 
more minute information. The whole number of volumes 
now in its possession amounts to 276,922, an increase of 
16,372 during the year. Of these 221,049 are contained in 
the Central Library, and 55,863 in the six Branches. The 
issues of books, during the 306 days of the year, have risen 
to the large aggregate of 758,417, being an increase over 
the previous year of 132,975. A portion of this increase 
is due to the opening of a new Branch in Dorchester, Avhich 
in about three months circulated 16,017 vols. The whole 
number of persons who have made application to use the Li- 
brary since 1867 now amounts to 90,782, of whom 14,599 were 
entered during the last year. The periodical reading-rooms 
were opened 359 days, and were during that period visited 
by 249,870 readers, who used 348,772 magazines. The 
number of books lost, during the year, was So, or about one 
to every 9,000 of circulation. 

It is gratifying also to state that the number of persons evinc- 
ing such interest in the institution as to induce them to make 
donations of books or pamphlets to its shelves was larger 
than ever before: 1,091 friends having given 4,169 vols, 
and 15,889 pamphlets. 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 89. 

An iinalysis of the circulation of the popular department 
of the institution gives the following results : The 32,590 
volumes of the Lower Hall found 272,834 readers, an in- 
crease of nearly 20,000 over the previous year, notwithstand- 
ing the issues of the six Branches, which, with an aggre- 
gate of 55,863 volumes, distributed to their visitors 404,846 
books. South Boston still leads in the uses of its books, every 
volume of its collection having been loaned, on the average, 
seventeen times. The lowest proportional circulation is 
to be found at Brighton, but this naturally arises from the 
fact that the Library is larger, in proportion to the surround- 
ing population, than in any of the other districts of the city. 
The reading of juveniles and fiction is more general in the 
districts than in the city proper, although the proportion of 
literature of these classes is larger in the Lower Hall than in 
any of the Branches. From the Lower Hall only 69 per 
cent, of the issues belonged to these classes, a smaller pro- 
portion than ever before ; while in the Branches it amounted 
to about 80 per cent. This change in the percentage of use 
in the Lower Hall is due to tlic interest shown in a higher 
class of reading, in consequence of the publication of the 
class'^ list of History'-, Biography and Travel, the distribu- 
tion of which swelled the loans in these departments, 
from 16,856 in 1873-4, to 23,925 vols, in 1874-5. 

During the past year the staff of the Library has under- 
gone important and unexpected changes. By an unusual 
fatality it has lost three heads of departments, and by resig- 
nation another. By the death of INIr. Wm. A. Wheeler, the 
Assistant Superintendent, and chief of the Catalogue Depart- 
ment, the institution was deiDrived of an officer from whose 
skilled training in his specialties it had largely profited in 
the past, and had important expectations in the future. To 
the minute exactness of the lexicographer, and to the gen- 
eral knowledge of a scholar, his culture had added the va- 



PUBLIC LIBEAKT. 11 

rious information of a bibliographer, which his tastes and incli- 
nation had developed to a rare degree. After his decease, 
the keeper of the Bates Hall, Mr. Joseph Sykes, died, a gen- 
tleman whose com'teous manners, and' quiet following of his 
line of duty, had secured the kind regards of all those who 
sought his assistance in their various fields of inquiry and con- 
sultation. Subsequently Mr. J. Otis Williams, the special cu- 
rator of the Tosti collection of engravings, and of the great 
pamphlet stores of the Library, also died ; the term of his 
service havino: besrun with the indexing of the Prince mss. in 
1869. 

Mr. Edward Capen, who had faithfully served the Library 
from its foundation, in various capacities, resigned 
his ofiice; and accepted a similar position of trust in a 
neighboring city. These personal changes required to 
some extent a reorganization of the departments. Mr. James 
L. Whitney succeeded to the position of Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Mr. James M. Hubbard to that of principal assis- 
tant in the Catalogue Department, Mr. Henry Ware to the 
charge of the Bates Hall, Mr. Arthur M. KnapjD to the care 
of the Barton and Prince Libraries, and the whole collec- 
tion of periodicals and pamphlets, and Mr. Jose F. Garret 
to the oversight of the Patent Documents and the En- 
gravings. It is believed that the accession of these edu- 
cated gentlemen to the Library force will increase the direct 
usefulness of the Library to its great constituency. It 
is naturally found that in no place are general accomplish- 
ments, no less than special learning, so valuable and important 
as in -a great collection of books to be used and consulted by 
such various classes of students who desire to go at once, 
and without loss of valuable time, to the books which they 
need. 

By the death of Mr. Wheeler, the publication of the Tick- 
nor catalogue, to the preparation of which he had devoted a 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

considerable portion of his labor for the past three years, 
and which the last report of the Trustees announced as to 
be published during the year, was nnavoidably postponed. 
The materials for the work were, however, in such condition, 
that the printing of that most important contribution to the 
bibliography of Sj)anish and Portuguese literature is already 
in progress. 

In rehearsing the details of an institution whose work and 
usefulness have grown in incalculable proportions year by 
year, the Trustees cannot but feel an increasing responsi- 
bility for the right use of the large funds entrusted to their 
care and proper expenditure. Each year brings a more in- 
timate relation between the Library and the education of the 
community ; each year develops new uses and wants, both of 
instruction and indirect cultivation. One distinguishes with 
added experience more narrowly the classes who seek only 
amusement or employment in idle hours and those who 
read for intellectual purposes, as well as those who per- 
ceptibly grade from the lower to the higher class. While, 
from the foresight and bounty of the City Government, the 
Library is not only permitted, but earnestly required, to ex- 
tend its help to all who need, and by whom it has been sus- 
tained in a position of freedom of access previously un- 
known, it is just to say that the experimental trial of one 
generation, just completed, has amply and nobly confirmed and 
surpassed the hopes and expectations of the founders and 
benefactors of the institution. Without any intention to 
magnify any result, while considering that it takes its 
shade and color from the intelligence of the community 
which surrounds it, it has steadily gained in the magnitude 
of its resources, and in its relative importance among the 
great collections of the country. It also has demonstrated 
the fact that enormous numbers of books may be scattered 
freely among a dense and diversified population with such 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 13 

safety to the property as to render the losses quite imma- 
terial. The result has entirely justified the magnitude of the 
experiment. 

WILLIAM W. GKEENOUGH, 
CHARLES A. BURDITT, 
JOHN T. CLARK, 
DANIEL S. CURTIS, 
RICHARD FROTHINGHAM, 
SAMUEL A. GREEN, 
DAVID P. KIMBALL, 
WESTON LEWIS, 
GEORGE PUTNAM. 

Phbuc Library, 29th June, 1875, 



[A.] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE, 



CONSISTING OF 



William T. Adams, Esq., Rev. George A. Thayer, Hon. 
B. F. Thomas, George W. Wales, Esq., Chas. E. 
Ware, M.D., with David P. Kimball, Esq., of the 
Trustees, as Chairman. 



The Committee appointed to examine the condition of the 
Boston Public Library, and to report thereon to the Trustees, 
beg leave to submit the followius: results of their observa- 
tions : — 

It is obviously impossible that a Committee of citizens, 
devoting but a few hours, taken from the many duties of 
their daily occupation, to the inspection of so complicated 
and extensive an institution as a great Public Library, with 
its many branches, should be able to form more than a cur- 
sory acquaintance with its work and needs. At best, unless 
they have a professional lilirarian's knowledge of such insti- 
tutions, which, from the importance of a Committee being 
constituted like the jury of a conrt, of men with untech- 
nical prejudices, it is not desirable they should possess ; 
their chief service must be to serve as intermediary between 
the Library officials and the public at large, by obtaining a 
closer acquaintance with its methods of management, and the 
general aims of those who control its policy, than can be 
gained by ordinary visitors. 

It might be advantageous, in giving partial direction to 
the labors of such Committees, and in affording oi)portunity 
for any complete vindication of the Trustees and Superinten- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 15 

dent from alleged faults, if a more general advertisement of the 
existence of an examining body could be made, to allow, to 
a reasonable extent, the presentation of possible griev- 
ances. 

Your Committee can say, however, that, so far as they are 
competent to speak, there are no indications that all depart- 
ments of the Library are administered in other than the most 
generous and impartial desire to facilitate every legitimate 
interest of readers. 

The marvel has been, as they have explored its treasures, 
and become aware of the many perplexing problems arising 
in at once faithfully guarding books of rare and inestimable 
value, and carrying out the plan of a perfectly free Public 
Library, that so little friction should arise betwixt patrons 
and officials, and that there should be such apparently gen- 
eral acquiescence in the justice of its rules and restrictions, 
as is indicated by the striking infrequency of complaints, in 
any portion of the public newspapers, those sensitive x)rgans 
of every shadow of public discontent. 

Two opposing forces are always at work about a Public 
Library, to afford a severe test of the spirit of its manage- 
ment, viz. : the proper conservatism of those in whose charge 
it is placed, which endeavors to keep steadily in view the in- 
terests of coming generations, for whom as well as for living 
people the institution is created, and the destructiveness of 
those people who regard public property as everybody's 
property, to be used according to individual notions of pro- 
priety ; and in the reconciliation of these two elements, the 
high degree of skill and good sense of the Superintendent 
and his subordinates seems to be amply shown in the con- 
stant increase of readers, and the remarkable immunity from 
loss or irremediable injury of books, alike in the depart- 
ment most frequented by the less careful classes of the com- 
munity, and in Bates Hall, the resort of the more cultivated 
and studious. 



16 CITY DOCUMEKT. No. 89. 

The statistics of the Central and Branch Libraries so 
clearly presented in the statement of the Superintendent, 
published with this report, and covering almost every possi- 
ble ground of inquiry with regard to their work, render it 
unnecessary for the Committee to do more than express their 
gratification that the regular increase of expenditure is neces- 
sary to keep pace with the popular demands upon the re- 
sources of the various departments. It is an occasion of 
pride with those Avho have at heart the progress of general 
education in Boston, that the generous annual and special 
appropriations of the City Council, which from the beginning 
of the institution's existence have been uniformly made in the 
most wise and far-seeing spirit, have met with the best possi- 
ble response on the part of those whom they were designed 
to benefit. The $30,000, representing the yearly cost of 
books, but very inadequately suggests the value to every 
high interest of the people of having all that is of worth in 
recent literature, both in periodical and standard publica- 
tions, and whatever is of classic or established character 
which has moulded the intelligence, or is likely to command 
the thought of the world, easily accessible by every citizen 
of years of discretion ; and the oft-noticed fact, which con- 
tinues to be confirmed, that the extension of the branch sys- 
tem has in nowise diminished the circulation of the Central 
Libnny, but, as was desired, has rather helped to increase 
it, shows a most hopeful popular appreciation of this privi- 
lege. 

It is evident, however, that the utmost enthusiasm for 
taking books will not be a sufficient justification for a large 
expenditure, unless it is also clear that the zeal is rightly 
directed to the end of the growth of sound knowledge. 

There is no lack of taste for reading in our community, but 
much of it, if left to the guidance of the reader's unenlight- 
ened judgment, would be but a slight improvement upon, ir 
it were not worse than, absolute idleness. Leaving out oi 



PUBLIC LIBKART. 17 

consideration the downright vicious books, there is a vast 
range of ephemeral literature, exciting and fascinating, full 
of plausible unrealities, apologetic of vice or confusing dis- 
tinctions between plain right and wrong, fostering discontent 
with the peaceful homely duties Avhich constitute a large 
portion of average men and women's lives, and, according to 
the testimony of good medical writers, responsible for an 
immense amount of the mental disease and moral irres'ulari- 
ties which are so troublesome an element of modern society ; 
and this is the kind of reading to which multitudes naturally 
take, Avhich it is not the business of a town Librar}' to sui>- 
ply, although for a time it may be expedient to yield to its 
claims, while awaiting the development of more elevated 
taste. 

Notwithstanding many popular notions to the contraiy, it 
is no part of the duty of a municipality to raise taxes for 
the amusement of people, unless the amusement is tolerably 
clearly seen to be conducive to higher ends of good citizen- 
ship, like the encouragement of patriotism, the promotion 
of the public health, or the undermining of immorality ; and 
the sole relation of a town Library to the general interest 
is as a supplement to the schf ol system ; as an instrumen- 
tality of higher instruction to ill classes of people. These 
truisms have been recognized jy the Superintendent, as well 
in the use of all reasonable efforts to avoid buying the poor- 
est sort of novels, as in a systematic plan of preparing 
manuals for instructing well-disposed readers, who are hope- 
lessly bewildered in ordinary catalogues in seeking to make 
a judicious selection of sensible books. The apparatus of 
the Library in this direction seems to your Committee thor- 
oughly admirable, and they have only to suggest the advis- 
ability of making some such classification of the Branch Li- 
braries as will correspond with the catalogue of works of 
history, biography and travel in the lower hall of the Central 
Department. The circulation of these Branches is very 



18 CITY . DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

largely iu the direction of prose fiction and juveniles (in 
Eoxbury, in 1874, 81 per cent, of the circulation ; in East Bos- 
ton, 79 per cent. ; in South Boston, 78 per cent.) ; and un- 
doubtedly a fair proportion of the readers of such matter 
would gladly choose thoughtful books of travel and standard 
histories if they had any idea what they were, or how they 
were to be reached. 

It has been pleasant for some of your Committee to learn 
that many solid works are circulated among the poorer 
classes of people, of very limited educational privileges, and 
that, not infrequently, in the distribution of books, it has 
been noticed that while the well-dressed applicant carried 
away some flimsy novel, the less prepossessing and poorly 
clad neighbor showed an appreciation of a volume of sci- 
ence, art or history. 

The advice of the teachers of the public schools is an im- 
portant help in directing aright the choice of books by the 
youth who constitute a very large percentage of the fre- 
quenters of the Library, and particular eflbrts of the Super- 
intendent towards informing the masters of those schools 
what facilities were ofl'ered to their pupils, to aid a wise se- 
lection of profitable reading matter, would be likely to bear 
good fruit in its elevation of the character of the circulation, — 
an aim which the Committee recognize as being always kept 
in view by the Superintendent. 

In this direction may not the Sunday use of the Library 
be converted to better purposes than it now subserves ? The 
success of the Sunday opening has been favoral)ly mentioned 
iu previous annual reports, and seems to have been greatest 
in the more densely populated portions of the city, where edu- 
cational influences are most needed. The readers have now 
but a limited range, this choice being confined to periodicals, 
which, though often of a substantial sort, and quite equal in 
respectability to those which" are likely to constitute the Sunday 
reading of a majority of households, cannot always be of as 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. ■ 19 

profitable a character as frequenters of the reading-room 
might desire. The Bates Hall collection, which contains the 
best of literature, to the exclusion of the inferior matter 
which enters so largely into the circulation of some of the 
other departments, might be made available for use in the 
building only ; thus involving but a slight increase in the 
number of the Sunday oiEcials of the Library, while it 
would hold out an invitation to many persons to make the 
acquaintance of works of a positively educational value, to 
which they remain strangers in the hard working hours of 
the week. 

The endeavors of the Trustees and Superintendent to give 
the Library a truly democratic character, by providing for 
the wants of the scholarly and cultivated, as well as of those 
of moderate attainments, seem to be wisely directed. The 
Committee have been interested to learn of the richness of 
the collection in many special departments ; such as its hav- 
ing the best collection in the world of United States public 
documents ; and that students from all over the Union have 
been glad to avail themselves of its resources for an assist- 
ance to their labors which they could gain in no other city, — 
applications which it has been found for the Lil^rary's repu- 
tation to aid by the generous purchase of additional costly 
volumes of technical treatises. 

In the department of history the strength of the Library 
is of eminent value at times, like that of the present revival 
of interest in revolutionary matters, an indication of which 
is shown in the recent use of its materials by New York 
papers in illustrating their account of the battles of Lexing- 
ton, Concord and Bunker Hill, and the service it afibrds to 
historians of national fame. 

Not long since an unfavorable comparison was drawn, in 
one of our popular magazines, between the foresight of such 
a foreign Library as that of the British iNIuseum, in gath- 
ering up every available document, no matter of how appar- 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

ently ephemeral a character, which bore upon the progress of 
our civil Avar, aud the deficiencies of American institutions 
in this regard ; insomuch, it was intimated, that the future 
historian of the rebellion might be compelled to go to Lon- 
don to obtain access to complete data for his record. What- 
ever justice there may be in this criticism of other American 
Libraries, it certainly does not apply to this of Boston, for 
the labors of its officers seem to have been indefatio:able in 
accumulating everything from handbills, ballatls, and news- 
paper scraps, to the most elaborate volumes, which could 
serve to present to later generations an accurate portrait of 
the spirit of that momentous period of our national life. In 
all directions pertaining to the history which is making by 
the living generation, the managers are showing their ap- 
preciation of the teachings of experience to other librarians 
and book-makers, that nothing which throAVs light upon the 
ideas and tastes of an era of thought is so obscure or trivial, 
so common or unclean, that it is not Avorthy of preservation. 
Other Libraries have learned that street balhids, play-bills, 
political advertisements and caricatures, and like expressions 
of popular opinion, AAdiich are apt to go into the waste-basket 
or the street-sAveepings, often become the most precious of 
relics to the antiquarian of a hitcr age, who seeks to restore 
the past to something lilvc vitality, and have been glad to buy 
collections of such papers at fabulous prices ; and it is there- 
fore well that this Library should be extending its hospital- 
ity to every kind of printed matter Avhich is, in any fair sense, 
of historical consequence, especially welcoming contribu- 
tions illustratino; the grroAvth of Boston. The Committee 
have had occasion, with many of their predecessors, as Avith 
the gentlemen of the Trustees, to regret that such valuable 
matter as the files of newspapers should be exposed to irre- 
trievable ruin in a dark basement. 

In closing, they Avould express their confidence that the 
Lil)rary is performing all, and even more than its founders 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 21 

could have auticipatecl, in fulfilling the function of a univer- 
sity for the education of the people, not only of Boston, but 
of the State ; for not the least of its services is its part in 
presenting a model in the formation of the numerous Libra- 
ries which are springing up in all the chief towns of Massa- 
chusetts ; and they have to thank the Superintendent for his 
patience in answering all inquiries bearing upon the execu- 
tion of this trust. 

For the Committee, 

GEO. A. THAYER. 



[B.] 
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present my eighth annual 
report, and refei'ring you to the appendixes for the body of 
the information which you have a right to expect, I shall 
touch here such points as need further elucidation. 

The addition to the Central Library building, of which a 
plan was given in last year's report, showing how it was 
intended to be only the beginning of a more extensive 
enlargement, was begun, with the breaking of ground, on 
the 10th of June, 1874. The work was carried on during 
the summer, subject to delays, which arose in part from the 
inaccuracy of the working plans. To this is also to be 
assigned a very unfortunate loss of room on each floor, 
which has lessened the importance of a series of small rooms 
up and down the entire new structure. It devolved upon 
the City Architect to make the best of the plans which 
were prepared before the creation of his office. After the 
structure was completed, the wishes of the Library, as to 
the fitting up of the several departments, were fully met by 
the Committee on Piil)lic Buildings ; and the Trustees' room 
and office of the Superintendent was ready for occupancy on 
the 10th of January, 1875. The other stories were finished 
later, at short intervals, and the work was completed in 
March ; and the small anterooms adjacent (in tlie original 
structure) in each story were renovated in April; and, at 
the present writing, all the apartments thus added to the 
accommodations of the Library' are in use. The relief from 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

the narrow confines in which much of the work was formerly 
done is great, and only renders more irksome the necessity 
mider which other departments of the service rest, of 
working in quarters ill adapted to the purpose, and too 
contracted to ensure either promptitude or exactness in 
manifold details. The public derives immediate advantage 
but from one of the new apartments, that given to the 
Patent Collection in the upper story. The increasing use 
of this section of the Library had long rendered an enlarge- 
ment necessary, and it came none too soon for the credit of 
the institution. The appointments in this room for con- 
venience of investigators are complete, and it is calculated 
that its capacity will meet the requirements of a dozen 
years. The next room below, given to the Catalogue 
Department, brings into close relationship with one another 
a force that was before scattered inconveniently about the 
building ; and enables it to work with more ease to itself and 
with greater efficiency for the Lil)rary. The room adjacent to 
the old office of the Superintendent is now ample for the in- 
creasing business of his department, and aifords the Trustees 
the accommodations which they have been deprived of for so 
long. The apartment still lower down is put to use as a 
general work-room ; a use to which the Art-Room has been 
given over much of the time for the last seven or eight 
years, to the disappointment of the public, who have 
accordingly been debarred, except for brief intervals, the 
inspection of its marbles and pictures. But one floor 
remains unmentioned, and that is on the level of the Lower 
Hall. This apartment has been devoted to the Barton and 
Priuce Libraries, with additional shelving for an increasing 
class of books which belong to the general collection, but 
which should be kept under special supervision and not 
allowed to leave the building, or to be seen except with an 
attendant. The small room adjoining is given to the officer 
who is placed in immediate charge of these two collections, 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

which are closed to all visitors except at times when an 
officer is present. 

The lower story of all contains the new apartments of the 
janitor, and they have recompensed that officer for the loss 
of other rooms, Avhich have since been taken to enlarge the 
binder3\ This enlargement was accomplished during Feb- 
ruary and March, through the prompt action of the Superin- 
tendent of Public Buildings. The new shops thus arranged 
give ample room for the nine persons who now constitute 
the force of that department. 

Unfortunately the work of redecorating the Bates Hall, 
which would have interfered with its use b}' the public in 
the smallest degree, had the work been done in July and 
August, it was not deemed practicable to begin till Septem- 
ber, just as the autumn increase of circulation was beginning ; 
and for three months the circulation of that Hall received a 
check such as it had never received before, inasmuch as all 
opportunity for the hall use of books was prevented by 
the staging of the workmen. This was not finally removed 
till December 5. Sections of the galleries were, after this, 
closed to use, one after another, while the workmen were 
engaged in them ; and the decorators were not entirely 
out of the building till early in January. The Hall, in its 
new dress, is much changed from its former api)carance, and 
has, I believe, given general satisfaction. Its floor surface 
is now being more and more encroached upon for official 
purposes, and the time may not be far distant when it will 
not afford the needful accommodation for readers, as further 
encroachments seem inevitable. The extension of the Pub- 
lic Card Catalogue has formed a l)ay, in which the Curator 
of that Catalogue is conveniently placed for her work, and 
for the supervision of the users of the Catalogue. The ad- 
ditional drawers which this extension gives will, perhaps, 
suffice for four or five years longer, Avlien a further exten- 
sion towards the front of the building will become necessary. 



PUBLIC tiBRAKY. 25 

When this is filled there seems no resort but raising a struc- 
ture in the middle of the Hall, upon the base of the existing 
cases, so that its dimensions- can be duplicated in a second, 
and perhaps a third story above. I do not doubt but with 
good architectural discernment it can be managed so as not 
seriously to detract from the appearance of the Hall. 

During the coming summer it seems necessary to enlarge 
the desk facilities of the deliver}^ end of this Hall. With a 
circulation reaching at times 600 volumes a day, the con- 
veniences which were planned to meet the requirements of a 
daily use of one or at most two hundred issues have become 
greatly insufficient to ensure a systematic and expeditious 
waiting upon the public. Accordingly a new counter 
(stretching across the entire width of the Hall on the line of 
the first columns on either side) , which will allow two points 
of public approach, one of delivery, and the other of receipt, 
will do much to meet the just expectations of our patrons. 
In this case the present enclosure could be put in a corre- 
sponding position at the other end of the Hall, and serve a 
useful purpose. 

At the same time it would be highly desirable to extend 
the Parker Gallery laterally into the Hall, so that its addi- 
tional floor shall form a sort of canopy to the enclosure made 
by the new counter below. The city architect has in hand 
his side of the problem, and it is hoped that the way can be 
made clear to accomplish in this manner a much-needed 
enlargement of the space, within which the ordering clerk 
and her attendants perform the critical, laborious and some- 
what confusing details of the work belonging to them. 

The work during the year upon the other buildings of the 
Library can be briefly recounted. The annexation of 
Brighton turned over to Boston an unfinished Library 
building, which was slightly altered in plan, to suit the 
requirements of a Branch ; and in August, 1874, it was 
completed and handed over by the contractor to the 
4 



26 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 89. 

Committee on Public Buildings, who, having accepted it, 
sent the key to this office on the 21st of the same mouth. 
The work of removing the books from the old Library 
rooms was immediately begun, and in ten days the Branch 
Library was in full operation in its new quarters. The 
formal dedicatory services were deferred till the cooler 
weather of October, when they took place in one of the 
churches ; the principal part of the evening's service con- 
sisting of an historical address by the Rev. Frederic A. 
Whitney, who was the President of the Trustees of the 
Holton Library, as the institution was called previous to its 
becoming the Brighton Branch of the Public Lil)rary. 

At Charlestown we were indebted again to the prompt- 
ness of the Superintendent of Public Buildings, under whose 
supervision the old rooms of the Mystic Water Board were 
added to the quarters of the Charlestown Branch. The 
whole of the second story of the old City Hall being thus 
given to our use, the parts were rearranged, additional 
shelving and reading-room accommodations were made ; and 
the rooms of the Charlestown Branch, ornamented as they 
now are with the lai'ge paintings which were a legacy from 
the old city government of that district, now present one 
of the most conveniently planned and cheery-looking of our 
dependencies. 

The formation of our new Dorchester Branch was delayed 
till it was ascertained that quarters could be appropriated 
for it in the new city building at Field's Corner. When 
this was decided upon, the work of gathering the books was 
pushed forward, so that on the completion of the rooms, in 
January, everything was ready for removal, and possession 
was taken on the 7th of that month; and on the 25th 
the business of the Branch began in regular form. A 
dedication service had in the meanwhile been held in the 
Rev. Dr. Hall's meeting-house, when the Mayor presided, 
and addresses and music made up the progranmie of the 



PUBLIC LrBKAKY. 27 

evening. An account of them has been printed as a City 
Document. 

A comparison of this year's figures with antecedent ones 
in the several appendixes will show that the Library has 
made no backward step -during the year. There is one 
sad feature in this twelve months' record, however, which 
it is painful to dwell upon. The service has suffered 
unusually from death. On the 28th of October, Mr. 
William A. Wheeler, the Assistant Superintendent, and 
the head of the Catalogue Department, died of typhoid 
pneumonia, after an illness of about three weeks. On the 
30th, the Trustees met, and it was 

''Resolved, That in the death of William Adolphus 
Wheeler, the Assistant Superintendent of the Library, this 
institution has lost an officer signally fitted by scholarly 
accuracy and thorough research for the special duties of his 
position ; always painstaking and helpful ; courteous in every 
relation, and answering all expectations of this Board, and 
faithful to the interests of the public. 

" This Board tenders its sympathy to his family in their 
affliction, fully cognizant of a loss which to them is 
irreparable." 

Mr. Wheeler entered the Library service in April, 1869, 
and I had formed such an attachment for him, and so 
depended upon his fidelity in his own department, that to 
an official loss was added the poignancy of a personal 
deprivation. I have asked Mr. James L. Whitney, his 
next associate, and most intimate friend in the service, and 
who has succeeded to his responsibilities, to prepare a brief 
sketch of his career, which will be found in the appendix. 
The place that Mr. Whitney vacated has been filled by the 
appointment of the Rev. James M. Hubbard, from whose 
scholarship the Library must gain much. 

On the 9th of January Mr. Joseph Sykes died of 
pneumonia. He joined the Library stafi" in June, 1866, 



28 CITY DOCUIMENT. No. 89. 

and Avas appointed to the charge of the Bates Hall the next 
year, and was in that position when he died. He had been 
a painstaking officer. Mr. Sykes has been succeeded by 
Col. Henry Ware, whose acquirements will find a fit sphere 
in his associations with the readers who draw upon the 
higher departments of the Library. 

Major J. Otis Williams, who for several years had had 
charge of the Pamphlet Collections and of the Tosti 
Engravings, had so far succumbed to an attack of pulmonary 
consumption, that he was forced to leave the service in the 
autumn, and has since died. 

Mr. Edward Capen, whose connection with the Library 
antedated that of any one still surviving, left the service 
at the close of 187 4, and took charge of a new Public 
Library in Haverhill. 

Almost at the beginning of the year Mr. Frederic B. 
Perkins was assigned to my office as a Secretary'' and Sub- 
executive officer, and I have to acknowledge my indebted- 
ness for the alacrity and helpfulness of his labors with me. 

In January Mr. Jose Francisco Carret was appointed to 
the charge of the enlarged Patent Eoom, with added duties, 
covering the care of the engravings, and helping in the Cata- 
logue Department. At the same time ]\Ir. Arthur ]Mason 
Knapp was made Curator of the Periodical and Pamphlet 
Departments, and given the immediate supervision of the 
Barton and Prince Libraries in their new apartments. 
Other changes in the Lil)rary force are noted in the roll of 
the service given in the appendix. 

The work of the Catalogue Department suffered an inter- 
ruption at the time of the death of Mr. Wheeler, and that 
event compelled some change in its organization. The 
current addition of over 20,000 volumes, including dupli- 
cates, has strained the capacity of the force as organized to 
its utmost. The labor of this department on the duplicates 
is small, but it is made up for, in the aggregate of 20,000, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 29 

by the excess of labor on composite volumes, containing 
many titles, and requiring manilblcl cross-references. 

There have been sixty-one of the ordinary broadside sheets 
of titles printed during the year, covering probably about 
6,000 titles. Taking these on the average, as requiring a 
main entry and three cross-references to each title, and 
doubling for the duplication (Public Card Catalogue and 
Official Card Catalogue), it will make about 50,000 cards 
prepared. In addition, five special broadside sheets have 
been printed, containing perhaps an average of twenty-five 
titles each, which, if each required seventy-five cards for the 
two catalogues, would make between six and seven thousand 
additional cards, comprising altogether nearly 60,000 entries 
of the ordinary accessions of the Central Library, which 
have been made by the cataloguers. 

This does not include the subsidiary copying of the work 
for the Lower Hall Catalogues, which is done for official and 
public convenience by the officers of that department. 

The cataloguer's work is followed by that of the Curator 
of the Public Card Catalogue and her assistants, and she 
reports that the number of cards mounted and inscribed 
under her direction has been nearly 70,000 from the broad- 
sides. Li addition to this, and in order to make the Public 
Card Catalogue a complete representation of the entire 
collection of the Central Library, considerable progress has 
been made in cutting up the Bulletins (issued anterior to 
the establishment of the printed card system), the printed 
volumes of the Bates Hall Catalogues, and the Lower Hall 
Class Lists. The titles thus cut out are pasted on as many 
cards as the cross-references require, and are then inserted 
in their proper alphabetical places. Over 30,000 such 
cards have been added to this Public Catalogue, and this 
makes a total of about 100,000 cards mounted and inscribed 
during the year. 

Considerable labor has also been expended on the original 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

large cards of the Official Catalogue, to reduce them to the 
dimeDsions of the present standard ; but the work is not 
yet wholly done. 

About 1,100 of the Ticknor volumes have also been 
catalogued during the year, completing that work ; and 
since August the whole of the Catalogue of that collection 
has been revised, preparatory to going to press, which is 
shortly to be done. 

As regards the books of the Barton Library the year has 
been occupied in entering them on the Accessions Catalogue, 
and in getting those needing binding through that process, 
which is nearly completed. At present writing the books 
are undergoing transfer to their future depository in the 
new addition ; and when the Ticknor Catalogue is well 
started in the press, ISIr. Whitney hopes to begin the work 
of cataloguing the Barton. For the present the slips of 
main entries prepared for the Accessions Catalogue answer 
the purpose of a Finding List. 

Nothing further has been done in cataloguing the Barton 
Library except .in the preparation of the bibliographical 
notes relating to the early quarto and folio editions of 
Shakespeare, which have appeared by instalmfents in the 
monthly reports of the Superintendent during the year. 
They have elicited responses from Shakespearians in this 
country and in Europe, and opened a correspondence that 
will be of advantage as the work of cataloo^uinor ffoes on. 

The usual quarterly Bulletins of the latest accessions have 
also been prepared, printed and distril)uted, and biblio- 
graphical notes, with characterizations of books, and 
surveys of subjects in their literary aspects, have been a 
feature of increasing prominence, and it is hojjed of growing 
importance to the users of the books. These notes have 
been of the character of those which were given in the 
Class List of IIistor\'", Biography and Travel, mentioned in 
the report of last year, and whose effect upon the circulation 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 31 

of the Lower Hall (popular department) has been care- 
fully noted daring the year. For the first four months the 
increase of use of the books in these classes over the cor- 
responding period of the previous year was about 160 per 
cent. ; and not more than 2 or 3 per cent, of this can be 
attributed to the increased circulation of that department. 
For the next eight mouths of the year, that is from 
September, 1874, to April, 1875, the relative effect was 
diminished, because the same Catalogue was in use the 
previous year in corresponding months. With this disadvan- 
tage, the accumulative gain in inciting readers to a better 
choice of books is shown by an increase of 23 per cent, in 
these classes of books, of which not more than 6 or 7 
per cent, is due to the general increase of reading. The 
figures in Appendix XVI show that the use of fiction and 
juveniles has been reduced during the year in an unprece- 
dented manner. Having been as high as 78 per cent, it is 
now reduced to 69, and the gain has been entirely in the 
departments of History, Biography and Travel. 

There is no direct means of ascertaining the influence 
that the Catalogue may have had upon the use of the Bates 
Hall. The increased demand upon that department is 
considerable, notwithstanding that for more than three 
months, when the staging of the decorators encumbered the 
Hall, the use of books was confined to such as could take 
them away. And this enlarged use is hot improbably 
owing in some considerable degree to the assistance of that 
catalogue, which is found to be in frequent requisition by 
the patrons of that Hall. 

Early in 1871 a young man one day inquired in which of 
Scott's novels he could find Cromwell as a character ; and 
his question gave rise to a determination to ascertain if an 
enumeration of imaginative literature in some way by which 
historical personages and events could be traced, would be 
generally desirable. A list was rapidly prepared of the 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 89. 

most obvious instances of such books, whether in prose 
fiction, ill dramas or in verse, arranging the titles iDrimarily 
by countries, and then by chronology ; and an edition of 500 
copies was struck off. The speed with which the edition 
was exhausted seemed to prove the point, and as oppor- 
tunity offered, considerable labor was bestowed upon the 
plan, and the list having swelled to several times the extent 
of the trial issue, it was printed and put before the public in 
January last ; and it has been received with an avidity 
which argues well for the interest it has for the general 
reader. It was not devised as a catalogue, and so no 
shelf-numbers were appended to the entries, which are 
usually mere memoranda, intended rather as suggestions. 
In its scope it fitly supplements the History Class List, 
and the tAvo together are doing not a little, it is hoped, to 
teach people the relations of books to subjects, to each 
other, and to the needs of intelligent readers. 

There is no doubt that the fineness of the type in the 
notes of the History Catalogue debars many from using it ; 
and perhaps too much sacrifice was made to economy in its 
printing. I am, however, of the opinion, that when the 
present supply is exhausted, or nearly so, a reissue of the 
notes, increased as they can be to advantage to two or 
three times their present bulk, for which material is already 
gathered, and embodying also the matter of the "Historical 
Fiction" already referred to, and all put in type of a size 
that will be more grateful to the eye, will serve a better 
purpose as a manual for readers, to be used in connection 
with the catalogues, than in its present form of notes 
appended to catalogue entries. It is not intended, however, 
to omit the bracketed shelf number as now given in 
connection with the references to the books. 

Our stock of Lower Hall Catalogues is ample for the 
coming year, except the list of books in the foreign 
languages, which is nearly exhausted. Preparatory to 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 33 

going to press with a new edition, the alcoves devoted to 
this class have been gone over, and such books as have not 
proved to be in demand in the popular departments have 
been prepared for removal to the Bates Hall. This will 
somewhat diminish the extent of the list, which, during the 
year, it is hoped to carry through the press with fuller 
titles than before, and corresponding in methods to the 
more recent issues of these Class Lists. Of the other lists 
we have these copies on hand : — 

Fiction and Juveniles .... 850 

Arts and Sciences ..... 1,300 

Poetry, Drama, etc. .... 3,450 

History, etc. ...... 1,500 

In this connection a word of explanation may be made 
about the Indicator of the Lower Hall, which, during the 
last two months, has been disused. It was put in position in 
1867, the joint device of Prof. Jewett, the late Superintend- 
ent, and of Mr. H. E. Taylor, the cabinet-maker. It was 
thought at the time to be unique both in principle and 
purpose ; but it was afterwards discovered that a similar 
instrument had been in use at Manchester, England, for sev- 
eral years. Its use here led to its adoption in other libraries, 
sometimes with modifications of its construction. At the 
time it was thought to work well, and in some particulars it 
does now ; but the large increase of use of the Lower Hall 
has brought out its weak points more prominently, which 
chiefly consist in the inability to get the users of the Library 
to use it invariably, and in the misleading it gives fre- 
quently regarding books much in demand. These go out for 
instance to earlier applicants, causing the pegs to be turned 
(to indicate the going out) after applications have been put 
in by later applicants. Upon an investigation of the matter 
it was decided that the advantao;es and disadvantasfes — 
among these the delay necessary in checking off a book 
5 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

before it goes out — were so evenly balanced, that in 
the narrow q^iiarters now allowed the growing crowds 
of the public, the room it occupies can be more serviceably 
used in other ways. Accordingly it is hoped during the 
dull season of next summer to have some modifications 
made of the Lower Hall Delivery Room, to fit it better for 
the accommodation of adults and girls at hours when the 
boys largely monopolize it. 

In the enumeration already made of the catalogue work 
mention was not made of this service as regards the 
Branches ; one assistant in the Catalogue Department does all 
this work. While the necessary cards are sent with the books 
to the respective Branches, a consolidated record for all the 
Branches is kept by this cataloguer at the Central Library ; 
such consolidated file supplementing the printed catalogues 
of the several Branches, and corresponding to the entries in 
the printed quarterly Bulletins. The Card Catalogues, kept 
at the several Branches, would, however, supply the copy 
to be used by the printer, whenever Supplemental Branch 
Catalogues become necessary. The catalogue of the 
Charlcstown Branch needs thorough revision and reduction 
to our system ; that of the Library in its former independ- 
ence not conforming to our usages. With this recata- 
loguing would come a rearrangement of the books whenever 
the expense attending it can be readily borne. The present 
confused state of afiairs has more or less deleterious eflfect 
upon the usefulness of the Library. The same statement 
in some measure applies to the Brighton catalogue, which 
came to us with the transfer of the Library ; but there is no 
difficulty in this case from bad arrangement of the books, and 
the want of conformity of system can well enough continue 
till there is urgency for a new catalogue for other reasons. 
The gathering and opening of the Dorchester Branch called 
for the printing of its list of books, which was done under 
the immediate charge of Mr. Wm. H. Foster, the Library 
proof-reader. 



PUBLIC LIBKART. , 35 

The cataloguing aud other care of the bound newspapers 
has devolved upon Miss Elizabeth J. Stevenson, and the 
growth of that department, over 400 volumes during the 
year, does not indicate in an adequate degree the labor of 
collation and preparation for the binder which is involved. 
This work during the early part of the year was done 
in the dark and coniined central area of the undero^round 
Newspaper Room, where a current of out-door air is 
necessary in the summer to prevent the condensation of 
moisture ; and in winter the apartment is only less adapted 
to its purposes. Gaslight is necessary at all times. Since 
the new addition was completed this labor of arrangement 
has been done in the new general workroom, which strongly 
contrasts with the unhealthy gloom of the Newspaper 
Eoom. Its remoteness from that collection, however, ren- 
ders it more or less inconvenient to do the work there. 

Our collection of bound newspapers now numbers over 
2,600 volumes ; and on the upper wall surface of the 
same rooms are i:)laced the sale duplicates, numbering 
between 9,000 and 10,000 volumes. This is not an 
undesirable plan to save room, inasmuch as the bulk 
of newspaper volumes renders it impracticable for easy 
handling to place them above reach from the floor, and the 
upper wall surfaces are thus economically available for 
the storage of duplicates. That they cannot long, however, 
remain in the present unfit apartments, without bringing 
more or less discredit to the Library, is quite certain in the 
opinion of those who are forced to make the descent to our 
Newspaper Room to consult its files ; and it is to be hoped 
that the City Council will put the Library and its patrons 
under renewed obligations at as early a day as is possible, 
by allowing an addition to the south-east corner of the 
building, similar to that which has just been completed 
at the opposite angle. 

The service of the Central Library, which from modest 



36 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

beginnings has grown to over sixty persons, is hardly 
decently provided with the toilet arrangements and retiring 
closets which must be needed by so large a number 
of the two sexes. There is absolutely no provision made 
for this purpose, except in an extemporized way in public 
passages, where privacy is impossible. This omission in 
the planning of the building needs also to be remedied in 
this prospective addition. 

I need not enlai-ge here upon the advantage of better 
accommodations for students, as distinct from borrowers of 
books, which will in time doubtless be provided for. 

That the accommodations in the Lower Hall, both for 
frequenters of the Reading-Room and for borrowers of 
books, are not sufficient has long been felt ; and I confi- 
dently look forward to the enlaiging and rearranging of 
these several apartments, by making use of the lot between 
the Library and the Hotel Pelham, and avail iug of the 
passage under that building for another entrance to the 
Library. At certain hours the space of the Lower Hall 
apartment is so largely monopolized by boys, that adults 
and girls are deprived of their rights ; and an arrangement 
of the divisionary nature in use at the Roxbury Branch 
seems desirable. 

The Sunday opening of the Reading-Room has had 
another year's trial. From the start the use of the Central 
Reading-Room has been abundantly commensurate and has 
justified the movement. At the Branches the trial has not 
given similar results. The use of the second year has 
hardly increased over the first year ; and at Biighton the 
opening, for want of support, has been discontinued. At 
Dorchester there has been no demand for it as yet. 

Our benefactors continue mindful of us. The record of 
those who send us, gratuitous!}', books and other publica- 
tions still evinces an interest in the institution, which tells 
largely of the hold it has upon the sympathies of our 



PUBLIC LIBEAEY. 37 

citizens and of strangers. There are those in distant parts 
of the country and in other lands who never fail to remem- 
ber us as occasion offers ; and among the agents of our 
government abroad we have had evidence of the kindly 
intercession of Judge Eussell at Caraccas ; and among pub- 
lishers of our own country, Robert Clarke & Co., of 
Cincinnati, have bestowed many of these gratifying remem- 
brances. We owe to Mrs. Lydia H. Parker, the widow of 
Theodore Parker, the gift of a number of interesting scrap- 
books and other volumes, which had been retained by her 
when the Library of her husband was removed to our 
alcoves. President Tattle, of Wabash College, has sent a 
hundred or more books and pamphlets, many of them 
monographs of a class peculiarly difficult to obtain, — a 
welcome instance of discriminating assistance. Mention 
should also be made of the characteristic labors of the Rev. 
E. P. Tenney, of Ashland, who has constantly rescued for 
us, from the paper mills, old books and pamphlets, which 
do much towards completing our records of the past. 

The fisrures showino^ the extent of our collection still 
place the institution in the foremost rank among American 
Libraries ; and as the Library grows it seems to strengthen 
in sinew as well as to stretch in frame, and, with the pros- 
perity of our city running on in the future, there can be no 
reason why it shall not have a success still more gratifying to 
its conductors ; acquire a name more creditable to the munici- 
pality which supports it ; and present attractions more 
grateful to the public which uses it. No one can know 
more continually than its officers its shortcomings. To no 
one are its defects so often presented, both by those who 
conceive of the difficulties of its administration, and offer 
sympathy with their suggestions, and by those, happily few 
in number, who measure the regularity of a great machine 
by any chance ungearing that may attract their notice. The 
wonder is perhaps that all runs so smoothly. If a day is 



38 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

spent iu rearranging and readjusting parts — and few days 
are passed without more or less of such labor — we might 
think that human agencies stand badly the trial ; but when 
we surve}^ the year's work, as made up iu the appendixes of 
this report, see the constancy of averages, and the sensi- 
tiveness of the system to outer agencies, we feel much more 
inclined to hold that we are contemplating a sensate 
organism, which fulfils the law of its destiny. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JUSTIN WINSOR, 

Superintendent. 
May 8, 1875. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



1875. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES, 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Extent of the Bates Hall Collection. 

IV. Extent of the Lower Hall Collection. 
V. Sale Duplicates, etc. 

VI. Increase of the several Departments. 

VII. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VIII. Volumes Located in Bates Hall. 

IX. Bates Hall Classifications. 

X. Lower Hall Classifications. 

XL Funds and Donations. 

XII. Circulation. 

XIII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIV. Books Recommended. Use of British Patents. 
XV. Bates Hall Reading. 

XVI. Lower Hall Reading. 

XVII. East Boston Reading. 

XVIII. South Boston Reading. 

XIX. RoxBURY Reading. 

XX. Brighton Reading. 

XXI. Dorchester Reading. 

XXII. Periodical Reading Rooms. 

XXIII. Losses and Delinquents. 

XXIV. Financial Statement. 
XXV. Library Funds. 

XXVI. Library Service. 

XXVII. Report on the Examination of the Shelves. 

XXVIII. "Work in the Library Bindery. 
XXIX. Sketch of William A. Wheeler. 



PUBLIC LIBRAIIY. 



41 



APPEOT^IX I. 

EXTENT OF THE LIBRAEY, BY YEARS. 





•2 a to 


^ 


O 


r-. 


o 


CO 


CO 


ira 


^ 


^ 


-1" 


CO 




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Note. — Tlio aggregate of pamphlets "added from the beginning" includes many since hound, singly or in groups 
(which are no-w counted among volumes), and a very large number of duplicates, which are thrown out and put amonir 
the pamphlets held for exchange. 
6 



12 



CITY DOCUMEXT. No. 89. 



APPENDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE 
AND BY GIFTS. 

Note. — The increase of volumes is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., 
because lost and condemned books are deducted. 



Years. 



Increase. 
{Net after.1861.) 



I 
Vols. I Pamph. 



Gifts. 



Vols. Pamph. 



Purchases, in- 
ckuliiig those Fellowcp 
charged to funds . Atlience- 
and added by uni.f 

exchange. 



Vols. *Pamph. 



Donors, 
exclud- 



anony- 
mous. 



1S52-53 


9,688 


1853-54 


6,533 


1854-55 


6,396 


1855-56 


5,463 


1856-57 


6,816 


1857-58 


35.955 


1858-59 


7,192 


1859-60 


6,989 


18G0-C1 


10,948 


lSOl-62 


7,391 


1302-63 


5,529 


18G0-C4 


6,22j 


1S64-65 


6,GS2 


186V-GG 


7,602 


1860-07 


5,303 


18G7-GS 


7,073 


1S6S-G9 


8,085 


1800-70 


7,775 


1870-71 


18,090 


1871-72 


13,708 


1872-73 


14,644 


1873-74 


51,094 


1874-75 


16,372 



901 

2,983 

2,557 

5,879 

3,067 

1,885 

1,317 

1,452 

6.074 

1,493 

2,169 

2,033 

1,516 

4,013 

7,S77 

2,811 

13.923 

13,, -,93 

14,076 

10.6J7 

11,770 

22.475 

16,293 



4,003 
2,152 
2,603 
1,865 
1,086 

30,214 
3,405 
3,744 

12,209 
1,274 
829 
1,031 
834 
1,476 
1,465 
1,554 
2,138 
1,643 
9,750 
4,349 
3,033 
4,783 
4,169 



CCl 


5,088 


2.983 


4,381 


2,463 


3,733 


5.330 


3,598 


3,040 


5,133 


1,885 


5,741 


1,317 


3,737 


1,452 


3.245 


6,05(3 


4,649 


1,403 


. 6,117 


1,953 


4,700 


2.772 


5,145 


1,023 


5,178 


3,342 


6.286 


7,709 


7,732 


2,513 


6,330 


10,084 


0,531 


10,228 


6,li9 


10,805 


8,349 


5,831 


9,359 


8,060 


10,705 


17,138 


18,671 


15,899 


17,080 



89 
549 
21 



18 

212 

107 

490 

671 

108 

298 

2,939 

3,305 

4,171 

4,800 

3,710 

5,337 

394 



86.3 

1,330 

672 



75 
105 
153 
126 
132 
381 
247 
207 
242 
234 
194 
219 
3-28 
336 
300 
342 
649 
666 
604 
610 
601 
739 
1,091 



* Includes pamphlets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession 
Catalogue. The large number, of recent years, has been occasioned by tlje systematic com- 
pletion of serials and pcriodicaln for the Central Library, as well as for the Branches. 

t Included in previou.s columns. These volumes are not the property of the Public 
Library, but form apart of the Uoxbury B.'aiich by agreement. , 
(0) Of the Increase, 2J,618 were the Bates gift. 
(9) Of the increase, 11,7'Jl were the Parker bequest. 

(19) 3,774 volumes of tlie Ticknor bequest, and 2,682 from the Sumner Library Association, 
arn included in the increase. 

(20) 1,471 volumes IVoni tlie Mattapan Literai-y As.tociatlon are included In the increase. 
(221 The increase of lln.- year includes the totals of the libraries at Churlestowu aud 

'iriyhton, and also, under purchases, the Barton Library, 12,057 vols. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



43 



APPEI^DIX III. 

EXTENT OF THE BATES HALL COLLECTION IN VOLUMES. 





186T. 


1808. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


The Gen'l Library . 


87,658 


93,553 


101,428 


107,724 


115,232 


121,709 


126,207 
2,120 
2,542 
11,907 
1,970 
3,907 


133,585 
2,323 
2,542 

11,907 
1,970 
3,907 

12,057 

187 


140.379 
112,457 
2,542 
11,935 
1,970 
3,940 


Bowditch Libraiy* . 
Parker Library * . . 
Prince Library . . . 


2,542 

111,907 

1,952 


2,5-12 
11,907 
1,952 


2,5-:2 

11,907 

1,952 


2,542 
11,907 
1,952 


2,542 
11,907 
tl,970 

3,774 


2,542 
11,907 

1,970 
§3,9J7 












**11,902 


Entered on the Ac- 
cession Catiilogiie, 
but not yet lucuted 


1,678 


1,327 


140 


294 


361 


651 


829 


Condemned .... 


105,737 



111,281 



117,969 

2 

117,967 


124,419 



124.419 


135,786 



142,686 

1 


149,482 
5 


166,453 




175,125 
3 


Total 


105,737 


111,281 


135.786 


142,685 


149,477 


168,478 


175,122 



* See Appendix IX. 

t Including 186 duplicates, which are boxed and stored in the basement, 

X Including 18 vols, of MSS. 

§ Includes 31 vols, of MSS., as bound. 

II Included before 1873 in the General Library. Now in charge of a special Curator. The 
additions for the year are 134 vols , namely. 115 English; 11 American; and 8 French. 

** The number given last year was as near as could be reckoned before the entrj- on the 
Accession Catalogue was made. The number given this year is what have actually been 
entered, and the full number will probaoly, in the end, exceed last year's report. 



Note. — Of the volumes lost from the Bates Hall some reappear each year, while a few in 
excess disappear, increa^ing the aggregate loss a little, so that it is probable the figures of 
the Bates Hall collection are a trifle in excess of what an actual count would indicate. 



44 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



APPENDIX IV. 

EXTENT OF THE LOWER HALL COLLECTION. 





18G7. 


1868. 


1869. 


18T0. 


1S71. 


1873. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


Reported the proced- 




25,199 
2,003 


26,606 
2,469 


28,723 

1,417 


29,909 
2,780 


30,574 
2,614 


31,827 
1,799 


32,005 
1,465 


32,596 
3,385 


Addod during the 








Total 




27,202 
339 


29,075 
93 


30,140 
19 


32,689 

23 

859 

1,233 


33,188 

7 

535 

819 


33,626 

1 
342 
678 


34,070 

6 

166 

1,303 


35,981 
37 


Books transferred to 




Books transferred to 




10 


Condemned during 




2J7 


259 


212 


2,539 








Totalleft . . . 


*2J,199 


26,006 


28,723 


29,909 


30,574 


31,827 


32,605 


32,596 


33,395 



* Actual count. 
Note. — There have been since the last actual count in 1867, over k hundred volumes irro- 
coverahly lost in the Lower Ilall. Perhaps an equal number arc to be classed as " unao- 
counted for," but may reappear. 

APPEOT)IX Y. 

SALE DUPLICATES AND ODD VOLUMES. 

(Not including the Parltr duplicates, or a large lot of odd and imperfect volumes of books, 
not likely to have the missing volumes supplied, which are boxed up at intervals.) 





1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1S70. 


1871. 


1873. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875- 


Number at beginning 
of year 

Added during the 
year 


4,955 
714 


5,140 
1,004 


5,805 
847 


6,106 
443 


383 


6,954 
996 


7,314 
1,375 


8,183 
1,041 


9,400 
1,234 


Disposed of ... . 


5,669 
523 


6,150 
345 


6,052 
546 


6,549 
304 


234 


7,950 
036 


8,689 ! 9,824 
506 334 


10,724 
t786 


Total 


6,146 


5,835 


6,106 


6,245 


*6,954 


*7,314 


*8,183 


9,490 


*9,938 



* This number is by an actual count of the serviceable volumes now arranged in our Duplicate 
Room ; and it includes one hundred and forty volumes of newspapers. 

t Being divided as follows : — 241 sent to Branches ; 50 Blue books, assigned to Bates Hall by sub- 
jects, the lirst copies being in the set of British documents; 3J6 Blue books sent to Tale College 
Library on excliange account; and 109 volumes otherwise disposed of by exchange. 

Note. — There are also of pamphlets some forty thousand duplicates, arranged and ready for ex- 
changes. Libraries are invited to make such exchanges. 



PUBLIC LnJEARY. 



45 



APPENDIX YI. 

INCKEASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





1868. 


1869. 


ISTO. 


1871. 


1873. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 




'Gain in located books 
(App. VIII.) .... 

Of tliese not located at 
last Report 

Added and located . . 
Added and not located 

Total gain 


6,297 
1,678 


7,475 
1,327 


6,296 
140 


7,508 
294 


10,384 
4,135 


6,622 
651 


6,198 
829 


6,564 

187 


E2 

1 


4,619 
1,027 


6,148 
140 


6,156 

294 


7.214 
4,135 


6,249 
661 


5,971 

829 


5,369 
*l-.',244 


6,377 


5,946 


6,288 
2 


6,450 


11,349 


6,900 


6,800 
5 


17,613 


6,377 
3 




.Net gain 












5,946 


6,290 


6,450 


11,349 


6,899 


6,795 


17,613 


6,374 


1 

^ 1 


Gain in located books . 
Less transfers and con- 
demned books .... 

Net gain 


2,003 
596 


2,469 
352 


1,417 
231 


2,780 
2,115 


2,614 
1,361 


1,799 
1,021 


1,465 
1,480 


3,385 
2,586 


s 


1,407 


2,117 


1,186 


665 


1,253 


778 


15 

(loss) t 


799 


w 














254 


101 


402 


ft,^ 














































254 


101 


402 
















^- 














1,375 
506 


1,641 
334 


1,234 


1 n=Q lr.a*i V.wovnVi'«.Q off 












786 


'•3 s J 

^ iNetgain 














659 


301 


139 


149 


360 


869 


1,307 


448 




s 










5,936 


881 
50 


621 
07 


664 
143 


915 










334 




















5,936 


831 


524 


521 


681 












li- 














885 
76 

809 


85(1 
217 

633 


1,3.59 
644 














.Net gain 






















4,365 


715 















• Includes 12,057 (close estimate) of the Carton books, and 187 otber volumes. 

t The condemnations have been large for the year, the transfers few; but their combined 
esccBs over the gains, which are exceptionally small on account of the few books published 
In this country, shows, for the first time, an absolute Joss for the year. 



46 



CITY DOCUMEXT. — No. S9. 



APPENDIX VI, Continued. 





1868. 


1809. 


1870. 


1871. 


1873. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 
















3,754 
4 


1,069 
26 


1,296 


. 














46 


1 


























3,750 
865 


1,043 
1,330 


1,260 
672 


ft5 














H 


(Net gain.) 

Total gain 














6; 












4,615 


2,373 


1,822 



















•5^ 














15,932 
144 


1.305 


a 














403 


a 
































15,788 


902 


d 

































11,049 
12 


480 
















75 


«5 I 




























11,037 


405 





















1 1 1 








3,905 







; : ;i: . . . t. . : . 




































64 


3,905 


S 
















;§ g < Duplicates reserved for 














24 


19 


^«5 



















'Bates nail gajn .... 
Lower IIiUl gain .... 
Ncwsp:»pcT lioom gain 
DupUc.ite Koom gain . 


5,946 
1,407 


6,290 
2,117 


6,450 
1,186 


11,349 
665 


6,899 
1,253 


6,795 
778 
254 
869 
524 
809 

3,750 

865 


19.271 

(loss) 15 

101 

1,307 

621 

633 

1,043 

1,330 

15,788 

11,037 

54 

24 


6,374 

799 
402 




650 


301 


130 


149 
5,936 


360 

831 

4,365 


448 
681 


» 










T15 


e 












1,250 
672 




Feilowca Athonajura 


























902 


i? 


Bri. Eraiicli gain . . . 








.... 


. . . . 


. . . . 


405 

3,905 

19 




W. R. Branch gain . . 
. Total gain 










.... 


.... 




8,012 


8,708 


7,775 


18,099 


13,703 


14,644 


61.094 


16,37i 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



APPEJSTDIX VII. 

INCEEASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





1867, 


18GS. 


1860. 


1870. 


1871. 


1873. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


English Books with 
















British imprint . . 


635 


708 


625 


811 


899 


1,086 


1,389 


1,294 


1,533 


English Books with 




















American imprint . 


1,154 


1,445 


1,455 


1,411 


2,2C5 


3,C42 


4,301 


3,807 


7,365 


Eni^lish Books with 




















Continental imprint 


104 


100 


SO 


50 


43 


115 


291 


125 


375 


Foreign Books .... 


539 


673 


789 


487 


561 


801 


1,064 


858 


767 


Duplicates of either 




















class, when not in- 




















cluded in the other 




















items 


97 


.... 


447 


248 


480 


.... 


.... 


.... 




Total 


2,529 


2,926 


3,396 


3,007 


4,194 


5,744 


7,045 


6,084 


10,040 



APPE:^rDix yiii. 

VOLUMES LOCATED IN BATES HALL, BY MONTHS. 



MONTHS. 


1868-69. 


1869-70. 


1870-71. 


1871-73. 


1873-73. 


1873-74. 


1874-75. 


May 

June 

July 

August .... 
Bepteraber . . 
October .... 
November . . 
December . . . 
January . . . 
February . . . 
March .... 
April 


758 
509 
1,037 
3S3 
713 
803 
443 
639 
626 
563 
521 
417 


347 
833 
697 
703 
632 
834 
633 
382 
1,175 


727 
480 
462 
520 
378 
546 
695 
905 
427 
706 
1,001 
COl 


455 
464 
291 
518 
511 
295 
*4,528 
651 
611 
724 
788 
t59S 


584 
5S4 
631 
554 
457 
520 
489 
646 
658 
456 
551 
492 


357 
527 
839 
405 
436 
414 
377 
507 
665 
594 
472 
605 


383 
477 
713 
560 
622 
590 
722 
758 
427 
349 
419 
544 


Total. . . . 


7,475 


6,296 


7,503 


10,334 


6,022 


6,198 


6,564 


Pamphlet vols 
arranged bj 
the Curator . 








385 


554 


206 


159 













Note. — These monthly figures are the results of tables made out year by year, like tlio 
CDC constituting Appendix Vl for 1S60. The figu-cs for May, June, and July, 18G3-69, should 
follow thos(? for April of the same year. They were misplaced to adapt the table to a change 
of the Library year. 

* 3,876 are books of the Ticknor Library, then assigned to permanent places. 

♦ Includes 31 vols, of the Ticknor MSS. 

Pamphlets. During the year the Curator of pamphlets has continued the arrangement 
of all the loose pamphlets by eubjectg. etc., in the Cab'net Room; and Euch as were dupli- 
cates and not needed have been arranged in adjacent apartments. 



48 



CITY DOCUJMEKT. No. 89. 



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50 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



appe:n^dix X. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 











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• This class, ombracing sets like Bohn's "Libraries," etc.. Includes many books, of course, wlilch 
in a min-ito classilication. would bavo beer divided amon? all the previous heads ot Una table. 

NoTF —The column of "Condemned books replaced" Incu.des books condemned In previous 
years n^ wi'll aH in tin- rurrent V'lr. The ■■olumn '• Total .added" shows the number of volumes a.s put 
UDOU the alu'lvcs. couutin;: as one those bound t\^o_yolumcaia-OI10i-£tgi 



PUBLIC LIBEAKT. 



51 



appe:n^dix XI. 



DONATIONS MAY 1, 1874, TO APRIL 30, 1875. 



Donors (excluding anonymous), 
Volumes, .... 
Pamphlets, .... 
Nos. of Periodicals, 



10,153 
5,746 



1,091 
4,169 

I 15,899 



I^te. — The income of the Library Funds is expended for books, which are credited yearly 
to the respective founders. See Appendix XXIII. 



Abbot, G. J., 3Ieadville, Pa., 

Acadia College, Wolfville, N. S., 

Adams, Hon. Charles F., . 

Adams, J. F. A., M. D., PUtsfieU, 

Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, 

Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College, Auburn 

Ala . 

Alabama Insane Hospital, Tuscaloosa, Ala., 

Albany County Bible Society, Albany, N. T., 

Albany Law School, Albany, N. Y., . 

Alberi, Chev. Eugenio, Florence, Italy, 

Alfred University, Alfred Centre, N. Y., . 

Allen, J. C, Leominster, .... 

Allen, Miss Margaret, .... 

Allen, Hon. William, Columbus, Ohio, 

Allibone, S. Austin, LL. D., Philadelphia, Pa., A set of 

proofs of Article Shakespeare in his "Dictionary of 

authors," ......... 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 

American Association for the Advancement of Science, 

American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, Hartford, 

Conn., .... 

American Baptist Missionary Union 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 
American Congregational Association, 
American Education Society, 
American Female Guardian Society, New Yorh 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, . 
American Ophthalmological Society, New York City, 
American Pharmaceutical Association, Philadelphia, Pa., 



City, 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



6 

9 

11 

2 

8 

12 

2 

1 



52 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 89. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



Iren 



American Pliilological Association, .... 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa., . 
American Social Science Association, 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New Yoi'k City, 
American Swedi-nborg Printing and Publishing Society 

New York City, . 
American Tract Society, 
American Unitarian Association, 
Anderson. Rev. liufus, D. D., 
Anciover, Town of, . 
Andover Theological Seminary, 
Andrews, C. Stanley, 

Anonymous, 3 broadsides, 1 map, 74 newspapers 
Antioch College, Yellow Springi, Ohio, 
Apgar, Ellis A., Trenton, N. J., 
Appleton, Nathan, .... 
Appleton, William S., . . . 
Apprentices' Library, New York City, 
Appreniices' Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Archibald, lion. Adams G., Halifax, N. S., 
Argentine Confederation, .... 
Arkansas Institute for the Blind, Little Rock, 
Arnold, R. A., Nashua, N II., . 
Association f(jr the PrDtection of Roman Catholic Chi 
Astor Library. New York City, . 
Atkinson, Edward, ..... 
Atlanta University, Atlania, Ga., 
Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad Company, 

Me., 

Attwood, Gilbert, 

Atwood, Charles, ..... 
Auburn Theological Seminary, Auburn, N. Y. 
Austin, Hon. Arthur W., .... 
Austin, S. Harris, Grantville, 1 broadside, 
Ayer, Rev. Franklin D., Concord, N. II., . 
Babcock, Albert, Berlin, .... 
Baglf^y, Hon. Joim ,T., Lansing, Mich., 
Bailey, Hon. A. J., 4 broadsides, 1 newspaper, 
Bailey, .John E., Manchester, England, 
Bailey, Mrs. Mary Otis, .... 
Baird, Prof. Spencer F., Washington, D. C, 
Baker, Henry B , Lansing. Mich., 
Bakewell and Marthens, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Bangor Theological Seminary, Bangor, Me., 
Baptist Union Theological Seminary, Chicago, 
Barber, Lieut. F. M., 

Barker, Edward T., 

Barnard, Jatnes M., ..... 
Barnett, Hon. N. C, Atlanta, Ga,, . 

Bartlett, C. L., 

Bartlett, Edward J., Concord, . 
Bartlett, William S., Chelsea, . 
Baxter, W. J., Lansing. Mich., 
Bayes, T. P., Orange, N. J., . 



Portland, 



111., 



114 



45 
5 



61 



1 

27 



1 
14 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 



1 

2 

12. 



17 
4 

1 
2 
2 

14 

1 

3 

153 

1 



3 
9 
6 
2 
1 
4 

34 
2 

20 

24 

9 

30 

143 



40 
1 
9 
1' 

1 
1 
6 



PUBLIC LIBEART. 



53 



Pphs. 



ia, Pa 



Beardsley Library, West Winsted, Conn., . . ' . 1 

Beckwith, Harvey J., . . ^ . . . . 1 

Bell, Maj. James B., 

Beloit Collejre, Beloit, Wis 

Benliam, Gen. H. W., 

Berea College, Berea, Ky. 

Bigelow, Jacob, M. D., 2 maps, 

Bigelovv Free Public Library, Clinton, .... I 

Binney, Henry P., 155 newspapers, ..... 47 

Bird, Joseph, 1 broadside, 

Birmingiiam, England, Free Libraries Committee, . . 1 

Bishop, Levi, ......... 1 

Blaisdell, Charles, 

Blake, Andrew M., 

Blake, Nathaniel F., . 

Blake, Tiionias H., Kensington, K. H., 

Blatcliford, John S., 3 broadsides, 1 

Blood, Benjamin P., ....... . 1 

Boarding Home for Young Women, Philadelph 
Bolander, Hon., Henry N., Sacramento, CaJ., 
Bordentown Female College, Bordentown, N. J., 1 broad- 
side, 

Bergman, M. V., Detroit, Mich., 

Bosson, George T., 

Boston, City of, 2 broadsides, 139 

Athenaeum, 

Board of Trade, ....... 8 

City Missionary Society, 

Dispensary, . 

Gas Light Company, 

Lying-in Hospital, . 

Provident Association, . 

Society of Medical Sciences 

Boston and Lowell Hailroad Corporation, . 
Boston and Providence Railroad Corporation, 

Boutwell, Hon. George S., Groton, 53 

Bowditch, Ernest W., 1 

Bowditch, Henry I., M. D., 
Bowditch, Henry P., M. D., 

Bowditch, William I., BrooJcUne, 1 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me., 

Bowles, William B., 1 

Boylston Medical Society, . 

Bradbury, John M., Ipswich, 1 

Bradford, T. G., Likeness of Gov. Gore in wax, 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., 57 broadsides, 204 newspapers, . 132 

Bradner, N. Roe, Jr., M. D., Philadelphia, Pa., . . 1 

Breck, Charles, Milton, 2 

Breck, Rev. J. Lloyd, D. D., Benicia, Cal., 

Brevoort, J. C, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1 

Brewer, Fisk P., Columbia, S. C, 1 

Brewer, Thomas M., 3f. D., 

Brewer and Tileston, 

Bridgeman, Alfred, New' York City, 



5 
33 

9 
551 

15 

1 

12 

4 

1 

1 

13 



7 
3 

3 

8 
9 

31] 

10 



85 



11 
2 



54 



CITY DOCUMEISTT. No. 89. 



Briggs, Daniel B., Lansing, 3Iich., 
Briffgs, G. C. 



Home fo 



Aged 



Brigham Hall, Canandaigua, N. Y., 
British Museum, London, .... 
Brookline Public Library, .... 
Brooklyn Industrial School Association, and 

Destitute Children, Flatbush, N. Y., 
Brooklyn Society for the Relief of Respectable 

Indigent Females, Brooklyn, N. Y., . 
Brown, Charles, Ayer, .... 

Brown, F. A., Hartford, Conn., 
Brown, Henry A., Philadelphia, Ta., 
Brown, Rev. Leonard, Folk City, Iowa, 
Brown, S. J., Salisbury, .... 

Brown Universitj', Providence, R. I., 

Browne, George M., . 

Brownell, S. B., New York City, 

Brunn, Dr. Chr., Copenhagen, . 

Bryant, Josephus, Hanson, 

Buck, David, ....... 

Buckingham, Charles E., M. D., 
Buckingliam, Rev. S. G., Springfield, 
Buffalo, N. Y., Bark Commissioners, 

Bugbee, James M., 

Bunker Hill Monument Association, 

Burlington University, Burlington, Iowa, 

Burnliam, David B., Essex, 

Burroughs, Rev. Henry, .... 

Burt, T. Preston, Berkley, 

Butler Hospital fur the Insane, Providence, R, I., 

Cades, William H., .... 

California Insane Asylum, Stockton, Cal., 

California Institution for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind 

Stockton, 

California State Board of Health, Sacramento 
Capen, Barnard, ..... 

Capen, Edward, Haverhill, 

Capen, John, ...... 

Carlton, Miss H. M., 1 broadside, 

Carpenter, Harvey, 13 broadsides, 3 newspaper 

Carpenter, J. H., Madison, Wis., 

Carpenter. Hon. Mason B., Northfield, Vt., 

Carroll College, Waukeska, Wis., 

Cart6e, Cornelius S., iV. B., . . . 

Carter, S. C, Amherst, .... 

Caswell, Edward T., M D., Providence, R. I. 

Caverno, Arthur, Dover, jV. I[., 

Centenary College, Jackson, La., 

Central Lunatic Asylum, Richmond, Va., 

Champney, George M., Woburn, 

Cliandler, Horace P., 

Chandler, Hon. Joseph R., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Cluindler, Thomas H., 2 broadsides, . 



cuttings. 




10 



12, 



38 



20 



Pphs. 



2 
I 
1 

9 
19 
4 
1 
4 



1 
11 



1 

72 

3 

4 



1 
25 
25 

1 

3 
3 
9 
43 
1 
593 



PUBLIC LIBKAKY. 



55 



DONORS. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Chapin, Alonzo, Wi)ichesier, 




1 


Chapman, Mrs. Maria W., 23 engraved portraits, 1 photo- 






grapli, 1 broadside, ....... 






Charity Hospital, JVew Orleans, La., .... 




9 


Charity Organization Society, Claphar/i, England, . 


3 


9 


Charlestown Free Dispensary, 




1 


Chelsea Board of Water Commissioners, .... 




4 


Chicago, III., Board of Education, 


1 




Public Library, 




2 


Chicago and Alton Railroad Company 




2 


Child, Prof. F. J., Cambridge 


22 




Children's Aid Society, New York City, .... 




1 


Children's Home Association, ...... 




3 


Children's Mission, ........ 


, 


3 


Childs, George W., Philadelphia, 


1 




Childs, J. F., Oskaloosa, Iowa, ..... 




12 


Chnsti}Tn,F. W., Hew York City, 


2 




Cincinnati College. Law School, 




4 


City Point Mutual Protective Association, 




1 


Claflin, Ethan C, Milford, 




21 


Claghorn, James L., Philadelphia, .... 




1 


Clapp, David, and Son 




1871 


Clapp, Col. W. W., 2 broadsides, 




5 


Clarke, Robert, and Co., Cincinnati, 20 engravings. 


7 


8 


Clarke, Thomas H., Newport, R. I., 




9 


Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, Northampton, 




7 


Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway 






Company, ......... 




1 


Cleveland ami Pittsburgh Railroad Company, . 




23 


Cobb, Hon. Sanmel C 


1 




Cobb, Stephen S., Lansing, Mich. 


1 




Cohden Club, London, ....... 


20 




Colin, M., Bash and Co., 




1 


Coit, Daniel 'i\, M. D 


209 


6 


Colby University, Waterville, Me., ..... 




5 


Coles, Mrs. E., Philadelphia, ...... 




3 


College of Charleston 




1 


College of the City of New York, 


7 




College cf New Jersey^ Princeton, 




2 


College of Piiysicians and Surgeons, Keokuk, Iowa, 




1 


College of Veterinary Surgeons, iVeit; York City, 




2 


Collier, V. P., Lansing, Mich., 




23 


Colored Home, A'ew York City, ..... 




23 


Colt, lion. James D., Pittsfield, 




1 


Columbia College, Neio York City, 


1 




Columbia Institution for the Blind, Washington, D. C, 




9 


Concord Free Public Library, 


2 


1 


Concord Railroad Corporation, . , " . 




7 


Coney, H. M., Ware, 




22 


Congregational Publishing Society, ..... 


10 




Conklinu, Hon. Roscoe, Washington, D. C, . 




1 


Connecticut. Board of Education, 


2 




Medical Society, New Haven, .... 




15 


State Library 


2 


11 



56 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



Dumfries, 



Scot 



plioto 



raplis, 3 broiid 



Consistory of the Reformed Dutch Church, JVew Yo7-k City, 

Cook, George H., New Brunsivick, N. J., 2 maps, 

Cook, Son and Jenkins, 

Coolidge, T. Jefferson, 

Cooper Union, New York City, 

Corliss, Steplien P., New York City^ 

Corson, Prof. H., Ithaca, N. Y., 

Coster, Rev. R. J., Pittsburgh, Pa., 

Cotter, James F., 

Cowles, Edward, M. D., . 

Crane, Hon. Samuel D., . 

Cricliton Royal Instilution for Lunatics, 

land, ...... 

Crosby, Aaron S., Barnstable, . 
Cross, James M., Providence, R. I., 
Culver, John P., Jersey City, N. J., 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., 
Cu;tis, Charles R., .... 

Curtis, Daniel S., . . . . 

Curtis, Col. H. P., San Francisco, Cal., 

Curtis, II. R., 

Cushman, James M., Taunton, 
Cutter, Abram E., 17 engravings 

sides, i maps. 
Cutting, George W., Jr., Weston, 
Cyr, Rev. Narcisse, 1 lithograpli portrait 
Dakota League of Massachusetts, 
Dalton, John C, M. D., New York City, 

Daniell, Moses G 

Daniels, A. J., Grand Rapids, Mich., 
Danville Tlieological Seminary, Danville, 
Davies, Rev. Philip, .... 
Davis, (^virtis, Plymouth, . 
Davis, Hon. Lsaac, Worcester, . 
Davis, Hon. William T., Plymouth, . 
Dawson, J. W., LL. D., Montreal, Canada, 

Day, J. W., 

Dean Academy, Franklin, 

De Heriy, Hon. A. W., Austin, Texas, 

Dedham Public Library, 

Delano, Hon. C, Washington, D. C, 

Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, 

Dennet, William IL, .... 

Dennett, Charles F., .... 

Denny, Joseph A., Leicester, 

Derby, Ilasket, M D , 

Detroit Medical College, Detroit, Mich., 

Deutscher Medicinischer Verein, 

Devon and Exeter Albert Memorial M 

England, 
Dewburst, Rev. E., Hinsdale, 
Dickinson, Lester, Chicopee, 
Dickinson, M. F., Jr., 
Dillaway, Charles K., 



Ky. 



useum, Exeter. 




2 

61 

1 

1 

10 



10 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



57 



DONORS. 


Vola. 
15 


Pphs. 


DixTvell, John J., 1 broadside, ...... 


37 


Doliber, Thomas, 2 broadsides,. 






29 


80 


Dorman, A., Boxford, ..... 








12 


Dorr, Charles H., 3 maps, . . 






102 


584 


Dorr, Eben P., Buffalo, JSf. F., . . . 






1 


1 


Drew Tlieoh),irieal Seminary, Madison, N. J., . 








4 


Dreyer, Herman, 






2 




Drowne, Rev T. Stafford, D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y., 








1 


Diiane, William, Philadelphia, Pa., 






U 


4 


Dundee, Scotland, Free Library and Museum, 








3 


]{oyal Asylum for Lunatics, . 








26 


Dupee, Janes A., 1 map, . . . 






26 


345 


Duren, Dea. Elnathan F., Bangor, Me., . 








1 


Duy, Rev. Jacob C., Montvale, N. J., 








1 


Duyan Dipuck Press, Bombay, .... 








1 


Duyckinck, Evert A., New York City, 






1 




East Maine Conference Seminary, Backsport, Me., 








2 


Eastern Lunatic Asylum, Williamsburg, Va., . 








5 


Eaton, Homer, Albany, N. Y., . 








2 


Eclectic Medical Collejije, Cincinnati, Ohio, 








2 


Eclectic Medical College, New York City, 








5 


Edes, R. S., Bolton, 








18 


Edinburgli. Scotland, Geological Society, . 






1 




Edwards, Henry, 






1 




Eliot, Samuel, 






1 




Ellis, Mrs. G. A., 4 broadsides, .... 






65 


634 


Ellis, H. G. 0., Sandwich, .... 








7 


Ellis, S. A., Rochester, K. Y. 






4 


6 


Ellis, Rev. Sunmer, North Cambridge, 






1 




Elmira Female College, Elmira, NY.,. 








8 


Emerson, ffon. George B., 7 broadsides, 1 map, 






4 


116 


Emory College, Oxford, Ga., .... 








3 


Erie Railway ('ompany. New York City, . 








10 


Essex Agricultural Society, Danvers, 








2 


Essex Institute, Salem,, . - . . . 






1 


22 


Evans, F. \V., Mt. Lebanon, N. Y, . 






I 


I 


Fagen, Laurence, ...... 






2 




Fairbank, Wdliam G., Waterbury, Vt., . 








1 


Fairniount Art Park Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 








I 


Fales, Lewis, Milford, ..... 








1 


Fall River Public Library, .... 






1 


2 


Fearing, A. C , Jr , 






2 


9 


Felt, Charles W., Ayer, 








20 


Felton. Charles E., Chicago, III., .... 








1 


Ferrette, Bp Julius, Cambridge 






6 




Fdlebrown, Edward, ....... 






1 




Fish, Hon. Hamilton, Washington, D. C, 






2 




Fitchburg Railroad Company, 








13 


Fitz, R. H., M. D 








18 


Foard, J \V., San Francisco, Cal., .... 








1 


Foley, William J., 






1 


1 


Folsom, Albert T,, Springfield, .... 








17 


Footi', Rev. Henry W., 








2 


Ford, Mrs. E. G., ...... . 








1 



58 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 89. 



Forster, Edward J., M. D., 

Foster, C. S., Brewster, 

Foster, E. W., JVew York City, 

Foster, Warren F., Winchester, . 

Foxcroft, George A., . 

Francis, Hon. John M;, Troy, N. Y., 

Francis, Samuel VV., M. D., Newport, R. I., 

Franklin County Agricultural Society, Green 

Franklin Typographical Society, 

Freedmen's Aid Society, New York City, 

Frencl), Hon. John H., Burlington, Vt., 

Fullerton, George H., Brockton, 

Furnivnll, F. J., London, . 

Gage, Mrs. M. E. J., Fayetteville, N. Y, 

Galesville University, Galesville, Wis., 

Geiger, Mrs. A., 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen 

City, . . . . 
Gerardin, J)r. A., Paris, . 
Gibbs, Alvin S., Wareham, 
Gilman, D. C, Oakland, Cal., . 
Gilman, William C, New York City, 
Globe Publisiiing Company, 
Godkin, E. L., and Co., New York City, 1 

newspapers, .... 

Goldsmitli, W. L., Atlanta, Ga., 
Goodrich, Rev. Alfred B., D. D., Utica, N.Y., 
Gordon, Rev. A. J., . 
Gordon, Gen. George H., Framingham, 
Goss, Elbridge H., Melrose, 
Gould, Dr. Benjamin A., Buenos Ayres, 
Great Britain, Commissioner of Patents, 
Great Western Railway of Canada, 
Green, Charles C, Hampton Falls, N. H., 

Green, Miss H. E., 

Green, Joshua, M. D-, Morristown, N. J., 
Green, Samuel A., M. D., 10 broadsides, 

Greenougl), C. S., 

Greenougl), William W., 1 map. 

Griffin, Appleton V. C, .... 

Griggs, Sanmel M., Westhorough, 

Groton, Town of, .... . 

Guild, Bcuhen A., Providence, R. I., 

Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa 

Hale, Rei'. Edward E., .... 

Hall, Rev. K. S., Lake Village, N. H., 

Ilamel, Tliomas S., Quebec, 

Hamm, ,l/i's5 A. A., . 

Hannii, Miss II. G., . 

Hampden Sidney College, Va., 

Hampton Agricultural and Normal Institute, 

Va., 

Hanover College, Hanover, Ind., 
Harkness, John C, Wilmington, Del., 



ijield 



broadsid 



New 



York 



700 



Hampton 




1 

1 

117 



1 
146 
7 
1 
Go 
2 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



59 



Lancaster 



Harlow, Arunali, Shrewsbury, . 

Harlow, Edward D., 

Harlow, Hon. George H., Springfield, 111 

Harmon, J. M., West Springfield, 

Harney, George J., .... 

Harris, Hon. B. W., East Bridgeivater, 1 broadside, 

Harris, C. Fiske, Providence, R. L, . 

Harris, William T., St. Louis, Mo., . 

Harrisburg, Portsmouth, Mount Joy, and 

road Company, .... 
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn., 
Hartshorn, Charles F., Wakefield, 
Hartwick Seminary, Otsego Co., N. Y., 
Harvard University, Cambridge, 

Astronomical Observatory, 

Bussey Institution, 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, 

Peabody Museum, 



Haskins, John, 1 broadside. 

Hatch, Samuel, ...... 

Hawks, A. K., Shelbu7'?ie, . • . • 
Hawley, Hon. Joseph R., Washington, D. C, 
Hayden, F. V., Washington, D. C, , 
Hayden, Newton, Ashburnham, 
Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum Society, 
Yo7-k City, ....... 

Heinzen, Karl, ....... 

Helmboldt, H., 

Heness, Frof. T., 

Henkle, W.D., Salem, Ohio, .... 

Heywood, C. L., ...... 

Hey wood, E. H., Princeton, 31 newspapers, 
Higgins, John E., Hartford, Conn., . 
Higginson, Col. T. W., Newport, R. I., 
Hill, C. H., Washington, D. C, ... 

Hill, Sir Stephen J., St. Johns, Newfoundland, 
Hills, Thomas, ....... 

Hiwassee College, near Sweetwater, Tenn., 
Hoar, Hon. E. R., Concord, .... 

Hodgman, Edwin R., Westford, 

Hogan, John, ....... 

Holden, C. F., 

Holden, Hon. E. G. D., Lansing, Mich., . 

Holmes, F. M., 

Home for Aged Colored "Women, 
Home for Aged Women, Providence, R. L, 
Home for Destitute Colored Children, Philadelphia 
Home for Friendless Children, Newport, R. I., 
Home for the Friendless, New Haven, Conn., . 
Hood, George, Holliston, ..... 
Hornell Library Association, Hornellsville, N. V., 
Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, New York 
House of the Angel Guardian, . . . • 
Howard, Charles P., North Reading, 



Rail 



New 



Pa., 



City, 




Pphs. 



7 

15 

5 



2 
2 
1 

2 
4 
1 
6 
15 

15 



6 
17 
18 

3 



60 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



•No. 89. 



Howard University, Washington, D. C, . 

Howell, B. P., Woodbury, JST. J., . . . . 

Howland, H. T., Worceste?-, ..... 

Hoyt, Col. Albert H., 

Hubbard, Hon., Gardiner G., Cambridge, 
Hubbard, Rev. James M., 1 broadside, 1 newspaper, 
Hudson, Miss Mary E., ...... 

Hunt, George P., Neiv York City, .... 

Hlinois Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Jacksonville 
111, 

Institution for Feeble-Minded Children, Jac^-soni-i7/e 

Normal Universtiy, Normal, . . . • . 

State Hospital for the Insane, Jacksonville, . 



Imperial Library, Si. Petersburg, 

Indiana, State of, ...... . 

Institution for the Blind, Indianapolis, 

University, Bloomington, .... 

Indianapolis Public Library, ..... 

Industrial Aid Society, ...... 

Industrial Home for Girls, Philadelphia, Pa., . 
Ingliam, E., Manchester, N. H., .... 

Ingham University, Le Roy, N. Y., . 

Itiglcc, Edwin, Halifax, ...... 

Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes 

New York City, 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London, 

Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa, ..... 

IIosj)ital for the Insane, Mount Pleasant, 

Institution for the Education of the Deaf and 

Dunib, Council Bluffs, .... 

Jackson, Henry, Fitchburg, .... 

Jacob, Hon. Charles I)., Louisville, Ky., ■ 

Jarvis, Edward, M. D., ..... 

Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., . 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M. D., 12 broadsides, 

Jerome, George IL, iV7?e5, J/ic/i., 

Johnson, Cliarles, Lansing, Mich., . 

Johnson, Norton, M. />., ..... 

Johnston, Sliepherd, Chicago, 111., 

Joint Counties Lunatic Asylum, Carmarthen, Wales, 

Jones, Edward, Jacksonville, III., 

Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenchaften, Munich, 

Kaiserlich-Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna, 

Kansas City College of Physicians and Surgeons, Kansas 

City, Mo., 

Kansas Institution for the Blind, Wyandotte, Ks., 

Kansas Pacific Railroad Company, . . . . . 

Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, 

Keith, (Charles E., . . 

Kelly, William L., . 

Kenyon College, ffawiijer, Ohio, . . . . . 

Keystone Bridge Company, Philadelphia, Pa., 

Kimball, David P., 

Kimball, William, Littleton, 



3 
41 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. 



61 




urch 



Kingman, William, New London, Cotin., . 

Kirk, Miss A M., 300 sermons cut from newspapers, 

Kirk, Jolin Foster, Philadelphia, Pa., 

Kleim, Benjamin F., .... 

Kniii'lit, Hiram, North Brookfield, 

Ladd, Horatio O., Plymouth, N. H., 

Ladies' Board of Missions of tlie Presbyterian Ci 

Yorh City, ..... 
Ladies' Relief Agency, 
Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., 
Lancaster Library Committee, 
Lane, H. B., Neiv York City, 
Langworthy, Rev. Isaac P., Chelsea, 
Larrabee, John, Melrose, 
Laurie, Rev. Tliomas, D. D., 
Lawrence, Abbott, .... 
Lawrence Academy, Groton, 
Lawrence Public Library, . 
Lawson, Joseph M., Albany, N. Y., . 
Lawton, Blaisdell and Co., 
Leacli, Rev. Daniel, Providence, R. I. 
Le Borden, — , Tom's Brook, Va., 
Leeds, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Leeds, England, Public Library, 
Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, 
Lenox, James, New York City, 
Lester. John E., Providence, R. I., 
Lewis, Hon. Henry G., New Haven, Conn. 
Lewis, R. M., Philadelphia, Pa , 
Lewis, Weston, ..... 
Lewis, Winslow, M. D., 1 broadside, 1 

papers, ..... 

Lincoln, Miss S. W., 
Lindsley, J. Berrien, Nashville, Tenn., 
Litchfield, P. R., Medford, 
Little, L , and Co., Ridgway, Pa., 
Little, William, Newbury, . . 

Little Miami Railroad Company, 
Little Wanderers' Home, 
Littlehale, M. F., , . . . 
Liverpool, England, Free Public Library and Museu 
Locke, Mrs. J. T., . 
Lombard, Jacob H., . 
Loomis, William I., 3fartindale, N. Y., 
Loomis, Rev. W. I., Nantiicket, 
Lord Industrial School, New York City, 
Louisiana State Board of Health, 

University, Baton Rouge, 

Louisville University, Louisville, Ky., 
Lowell City Library, .... 
Luckey, Georire J., Pittsburg, Pa., . 
Lyceum and Natural History Association, 
Lyman. Benjamin S., Shiba, Yedo, . 
Lynn Public Library, 



map 



Woj-c 



23 



ster 



New 



1 
32 



20 
54 



3 

24 

1 

5 



Pphs 



4 
54 



4 
2 

19 
1 

18 
1 



1 
2 
20 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

3 
2 

4 
6 

4 
4 
3 

243 

112 

2 

15 
1 

27 

15 
1 
107 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

11 
4 
7 
2 



62 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



DONORS. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Lyon, Henry, M. D., 




161 


McCarthy, Nathaniel, 






5 




McCarty, H. D., Topeka, Kansas, .... 








2 


McCollom, John H., M. D., 






1 




Mclver, Alexander, Raleigh, N. C, . 








2 


M'Kendree College, Lebanon, III., .... 








2 


McLallen, James, Trumansburg, N. Y., . 








39 


McNeill, George E., Cambridgeport, 








3 


McPhetres, Samuel A., Loivell, ..... 






1 


5 


Madison University, Hamiltori, N. T., 








89 


Maine Central Railroad Company, 








3 


Mainez, Ramon Leon, Cadiz, .... 








6 


Mallory, Rev. Charles L., Milwaukee, Wis., 








4 


Manchester, England, Free Public Libraries, . 






2 


1 


Geological Society, .... 








1 


Manchester, N. H., City Library, 








4 


Manchester and Lawrence Railroad, . 








4 


Mandell, Mrs. H. 0., 






22 




Manliattan College, New York City, . 








1 


Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, Netv York City, 








2 


Marble, Albert P., Worcester, 1 broadside. 








9 


Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio, .... 








5 


Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad Company, 








16 


Marsh, Charles N., Ilingham, .... 








1 


Marston, Hon. Isaac, Lansing, Mich., 








16 


Marston, William H., Lansing, Mich., 






9 


7 


Martin, Henry S., Keene, X. II., 








18 


Maryland House of Refuge, Baltimore, 


• 






22 


Institute for the Promotion of Mechanic Arts 


Bal 








iimore, ....... 






i 




Institution for the Blind, Baltimore, 








7 


Prisoners' Aid Association, Baltimore, . 








3 


Mason, Davenport L., Norton, .... 








17 


Mason, Orion A., Medway, .... 








11 


Massachusetts, State of, 






41 


4 


Atjricultural College, Amherst, 








1 


Board of State t'harities. 






1 




Bureau of Statistics of Labor, 






24 












1 


Charitable ^Iec]lanic Association, . 






3 












3 








1 


2 


Horticultural Society, .... 








3 


Industrial School for Girls, 








11 










2 


Institute of Teclinology, 








11 


Medical Society, ..... 








2 


New Clmrch Union, .... 








6 


C?i.„*^ T>«««,1 .^C TT.^^UU 






12 












1 






May, .Foim J., . 






GG 




May, Rev. Samuel, Leicester, 2 broadsides. 








10 


Mayo, William, Westminster, 1 manuscript. 








2 


Mead, William W., Belmont, .... 








7 


Meade, Co7n., R. W., U. S. N, Washington, D. C. 


> 




1 





PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



63 




Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa., 

Means, Mrs. C. A., 

Means, Rev. James H., . 
Medical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 
Meek, Henry M., Salem, . . . . 
Meigs, Capt. J. T., Lowell, ... 
Melrose Public Library, .... 
Memorial Hall Library, Andover, 
Memphis, Tenn., Chamber of Commerce, . 
Mercantile Beneficial Association, Philadelphia 
Mercantile Library, St. Louis, Mo., . 
Mercantile Library Association, Baltimore, Md 
Mercantile Library Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Mercantile Library y\ssociation. New York City, 
Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, Cat 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Mercer University, Macon, Ga., 

Merrill, Hon., Moody, 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, . 
Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Michigan Asylum for the Insane, Kalamazoo, . 
Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt., 
Milan, Italy, Municipality of, . 

Milton Public Library, 

Milwaukee, Wis., Chamber of Commerce, 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway Company, 
Minnesota Hospital for the Insane, St. Peter, . 

Institution for»the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind, 



bault, 
Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, 
Moore, Rev. William H., Berlin, Conn., 
Morgan, Albert and Son, . 
Morrill, Cliarles, Lowell, . 
Morrison, H. K., Cambridge, 
Morrow, Hon. William, Nashville, Tenn 
Mount Hope Retreat, Baltimore, Md., 
Mudge, C. C, Brooklyn, N. Y, 

MuUett, John, 

Munroe, Henry S., Tokei, Japan, 

Munsell, Joel, Albany, N. Y., . 

Murray Royal Institution for the Insane, Perth, Scotland. 

Museum of Fine Arts, 

Nash, E. A., Lewision, Me., 

Nashua and Lowell Railroad Company, 

National Association for Destitute Colored Women 

Children, Washington, D. C, . 
National Temperance Society, New York City, 
Naugatuck Railroad Company, .... 

New Bedford, City of, 

Newberry, J. S., Columbus, Ohio, 

Newburyport Public Library, .... 

New Ciiurch Board of Publication, New York City, 

New England Agricultural Society, . 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association, 



Fari 



and 



Pphs. 



16 

1 
9 

1 

4 

3 
23 
1 
25 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 

9 
3 
5 

14 

1 
1 

14 
5 

5 

1 

11 

10 
2 
1 

2 

2 

1 
44 
44 

7 
5 

7 
5 
3 
3 



64 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



DONORS. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


New Enjrland Farm Agency, ...... 




1. 


New En>rlanii Historic Genealogical Society, 




1 


Nfwhall, II. L., Dracut, 




6 


New Hanipsliire Medical Society, Concord, 




10 


State Library, Concord, ..... 


5 


4 


• State Keform School, Manchester, .... 




I 


New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, .... 


1 






1 


3 
2 


New Jersey llailroad and Canal Company, 


Newman, William H. H., 7 broadsides, .... 


12 


251 


New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado Missionary Association, 






New York City, ........ 




3 


Newton Free Library, ....... 




3 


Newton Theological Institution, ..... 




1 


New York, City, Board of Education, ..... 


47 


3 


Bureau of Charities, ...... 




1 


Chamber of Conuiierce, ..... 


1 




City Mission and Tract Society, .... 




25 


Council of Political Reform, ..... 




3 


Infant Asyluiu, ....... 




2 


Produce Exchange, ...... 


1 








24 
2 


New York, Slate, 


2 


Inebriate Asylum, Binghamton, .... 




4 






2 

1 


Institution for the Blind, Binghamton, . 




Lil)rary, Albany, ....... 




2 


New York, Providence and Boston Railroad Company, * . 




8 


Nichols, Ifon. George, Northjitld, Vt., .... 


1 




Nichols. I'rof. William R., 




1 


Niver, James B , 1 broadside, ...... 




1 


Norcross, Hon. Ot's, ........ 


1 




Norfolk Aiiricultural Society, 




17 


Norihboro' Free Library, 




1 


North Carolina Insane Asylum, Raleigh, .... 




5 


Northern Railroad Company, 




2 


North Reading, Town of, 




1 


North-Western Branch of the National Soldiers' Home, 










1 


Northwestern University, Evanston, III., .... 




2 


Nottingham, England, Free Library, 3 broadsides. 


1 


5 


Nowell, Cyrus, Portland, Me., ...... 


1 




Noyes, Isaac 1'., Wasliington. D. C, . . • . 




4 


Nye, Gideon, Jr., Canton, China, ..... 




2 


Oberlin College, Oberhn, Ohio, 


1 


14 


O'Conor, I/on. Charles, New Yoik City, .... 


1 




Odd Fellows' Library Association, San Francisco, Cal., . 




1 


Ohio Institute for the Blind, Colinnhus, .... 




4 


Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, Columbus, . 




14 


Medical College, Cincinnati, .... 




1 


St'iti^ inil T^ninn T Tiir OnllorT* f^l fVfl n^nfl 




1 


Mtnto A '-'tIhtti fni* THintif* finil Tnilippilf* Yniit}i 




Columbus, ......... 




10 


State Industrial School, Wiite Sulphur Springs, . 




2 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



65 



Vols. Pphs. 



Episcopa 



Ohio State Library, Columbus, . 

Ohio and Missouri Railroad Co., 

Old Colony Railroad Company, • 

Oliver, Francis B , . 

Olmstead. Dwiglit H., JVew York City, 

Ophthalmic Hospital, N'ew York City, 

Orne, Miss C."F., Cambridge, 

Orphans' Home and Asylum of the Protestant 

Church, Keiv York Citi/, 
Osgood, Rev. Samuel, D. D., New York City, 

Otis, Mrs. H., 

Owens, S. H., Fetersbxirg, Va., 
Owens College, Manchester, Eng., 
Oxford, Town of, ..... 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester, 
Paine, Prof. W., Philadelphia, Fa., 
Palmer, Julius A., Jr., .... 
Pardee, Charles I., JYeiv York City, . 
Park Row Industrial School, Bristol, Eng., 

Parker, Miss E. T., 

Parker, Henry J., 

Parker, Mrs. L D., 27 broadsides, 6 manuscripts 

Parkmnn, Francis, .... 

Patterson, C. P., Washington, D. C, 

Peabody Academy of Science, Salem, 

Peabod}- Education Fund, Trustees, . 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md., 

Peabody Institute, Danvers, 

Peabody Institute, Peabody, 

Peekskill Academy, Peekskill, JV. Y., 2 broadsi 

Pelham, Charles, Methuen, 

Penitent Feniah's' Refuge and Bethesda Socie 

Pennsylvania, Board of State Charities, 

Industrial Home for Blind Women, Ph 

Lunatic Hospital, Ilarrisburg, 

Railroad Company, 

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 



jties 



to 



Philadelphia, 
— Training School 



for Feeble-Minded 



Media, 

Women's Medical College, Philadelphia 



Peoria, III., Board of Trade, 
Perkins, Augustus T., 1 broadside, 
Perkins, Charles C, . 
Perkins, Rev. J., D. D., Weymouth, 
Perkins, Samuel C. Philadelphia, 
Perkins Institution for the Blind, 
Perry, J. A., New York City, 1 map. 
Perry, Thomas S., 
Perry, Rev. William ;.S., D. D., Geneva, N. Y. 
sides, ....... 

Peters, Alvah H., City of Boston messenger, 
Philadelphia Athenaeum, .... 

13oard of Health, .... 



de 



ladelphia 
Animals 



Children 



6 broad 



30 
4 
3 

2 



40 
1 

97 
1 
1 



20 
6 
2 



19 



2 
13 



118 



1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
6 
42 
1 

6 
11 



1 

22 
6 

1 

4 

2 

17 



39 

1 
1 



66 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 




Philadelphia City Institute, 

College of Pharmacy, 

Library Company, 

Philadelphia Tract and Mission Society, 
Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, 

Philbrick, John D., 

Phillips, J. O., London, .... 
Phipps, D. Golfe. JVew Haven, Conn., 
Phoenix, S. Whitney, New York City, 
Pierce, Abraham P., M. D., 

Pierce, E. F., Greenville, iV. //,, 

Pierce, Ron. Edward L., Milton, 

Pierce, Hon. Henry L., 7 maps, 

Piper, W. T., Cambridge, . 

Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railroad 

Pool, Wellington, Wenham, 5 broadsides, . 

Porter and Bainbridge, JVew York City, 

Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad Company, 

Portsmouth, iV. //., City of, 

Pratt, Charles E., 

Preble, Com. George H., U. S. iV., Philadelph 
Prefect of the Seine, Paris, France, . 
Presbyterian Board of Home Missions, New Yo 
Presbyterian Board of Publication, Philadelphi 
Prime, John S., Rowley, .... 

Private Institute for Feeble-Minded Youth, Bar 
Protestant Home for the Friendless, Cincinnati 
Providence Athena;um, Providence, R. I., 
Putnam, Allen, ...... 

Putnam, Charles P., 31. D., . . . 

Putnam, Rev. George, D. D 

Putnam, James, Lunenburg, 

Putnam, James J., .... . 

Quincy, Edmund, Dedham, 

Quincy, Miss Eliza S., . . . . 

Quincy, Hon. Josiah, 1 map, 

Quincy Public Library, .... 

Raines, Hon. Thomas, Albany, N. Y., 

Randolph, Charles, Chicago, III., 

Randolph Macon College, Ashland, Va., . 

Rapid Writer Association, Andover, . 

Rayner, Jolm J , 199 newspapers, 

Reading Public Library, .... 

Redpath, James, ..... 

Redwood Library and Athenajura, Newport, R. I. 

Reed, John H., 

Reed, William H 

Reviere, Mrs. C. E., . 

Rhind, Thoniiis, Halifax, N. S., 

Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R. /., . 

Rhode Island State Normal School, Providence 

Rice, Col. Edmund, Cambridge, 

Rice, L. L., Columbus, Ohio, 

Rice, Roswcll, Cambridge, N. Y., 



ompany. 



k City, 



Ohio 



13 



1 
2 
1 
1 
6 

I 

9 

110 



1 
224 
"l3 



1 
30 
44 



Pphs. 



14 

45 

2 

5 

18 
1 



147 
8 

33 
1 
3 

25 
1 
1 

3 
3 
17 
2 
5 
2 

70 
37 
33 
32 



276 
2 
1 



12 
459 



2 
12 
1 
1 
1 
2 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



67 



DONORS. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Ricliards, Thomas, Sydney, New South Wales, . 


6 


5 


Richardson, Francis, Gardner, 




9 


Richardson, William L., M. B., 




4 


Richmond College, Richmond, Va., ..... 




6 


Riddle, Hon. A. G., Washington, D. C, . 


1 




Robbins, Rev. Chandler, D. D., 


1 


1 


Robbins, H. W., Baltimore, Md., . . . . • . 




2 


Robbins, Thomas J., Nashua. N. TL, 




11 


Robeson, lion. George M., Washington, D. C, 


1 




Robinson, W. F., 1 newspaper, 






Robinson Female Seminary, Exeter, N. H., 




2 


Rockwell and Churchill, 


1 




Rodriguez, Jose Ignacio, Washington, D. C, . 


1 




Rogers, E. H., Chelsea, 




6 


Rogers, John, 


3 


104 


Rogers, John K., ........ 


1 




Rolmer, R. C, Cincinnati, Ohio, ..... 


5 




Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburgh Railroad Company, . 




8 


Root, AVilliam H., Burlington, Vt., ..... 




1 


Royal Geographical Society, London, .... 


2 




Royal Lunatic Asylum, Montrose, Scotland, 




24 


Royal Society, London, ....... 


1 




Royle, Vernon, Paterson, N. J., 




5 


Ruffner, Lieut. E. H., U. S. Eng., Washington, D. C, . 




I 


Ruggles, John, Brookline, 


1 




Rush Medical College, Chicago, III., .... 




2 


Russegue, A. A., Franklin, 




15 


Rutland Railroad Company, 




17 


Sabin, J., and Sons, New Yo7-k City, .... 


1 




St. Augustine's College, Beiiicia, Cal. 




7 


St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., 




4 


St. Joseph's College, Bardstown, Ky., .... 




2 


St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y., . 




3 


St. Louis, Mo., Board of Public Schools, .... 


1 








9 

6 


Public School Library 




University, ........ 




1 


St. Luke's Home for Convalescents, ..... 




2 


St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, .... 


1 


4 


St. Mary's Falls Ship Canal Company, .... 




1 


St. Marylebone Charity Organization, London, . 




3 


St. Paul, Minn., Chamber of Commerce, .... 




5 


T tU.<in-.T A ri^rtrtirt+:^« 




1 




St. Stephen's College, A7inandale, N. Y., . 




3 


St. Xavier"s College, Cincinnati, Ohio, .... 




2 


Salmon, Harvey W., Jefferson City, Mo., .... 


1 


4 


SunUi&nni College, Santa Clara, Cal., .... 




16 


Sarmiento, President Domingo F., Buenos Ayres, 




1 


Sauveur, Prof. Lambert, 


10 


1 


Savage, Edward H., Chief of Police, .... 




1 


Sawyer, A. J., Harvard, 




19 


Saxton, William B., Sheffield 




8 


Seaver, Rev., Nathaniel, Jr., ...... 




3 


Schenectady, N. Y., Board of Education, .... 




1 



68 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 89. 



Ppha. 



, Ky 



En 



land, 



Schwerrltfeger, Emil, Ithaca, N. F., 

Second Kentucky Lunatic Asylum, Hophinsville 

Seeley, Mi)ntressor S., Woburn, 

Selwyn, Hon. Alfred R. C, Montreal, Canada, 

Setli, Martin, 

Seventh Buy Adventist Tract Society of New 

South Lancaster, .... 

Sewall, Samuel, Burlington, 
Shedd, J. Herbert, Providence, R. /., 
Shew, Abrani M., Middletown, Conn., 

Short, Frank, 

Shove. George A., Dighton, 
Shurtleff College, Upper Alton, 111., . 
Sigourney, Mrs. H. H. W., Milton, . 

Simpson. Daniel P , 

Slack, Cliarles W., and Son, 

Slafter, Rev. Edmund F., . 

Slaughter, H. C, Memphis, Tenn., 

Slocum, William R., Dartmouth, 

Small, Alvan, Dennis, .... 

Small wood. I/on. W. H., Topeka, Kansas, 

Smith, A. E., Northampton, 

Smith, Miss A. L 

Smith, Andrew, North Andover, 

Smith, Charles C, 

Smith, Eugene A., Montgomery, Ala., 

Smith, Capt. James 

Smith, .Joseph A., Dover, .... 

Smith, Samuel, Worcester, 

Smithsoiiiiin Institution, Washington, D. C, 

Smucker, Isaac, Newark, Ohio, 

Snovy, Edwin M., M. D., Providence, R. I., 

Societe Franklin, Paris, France, 

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal 

Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents 

York City, ..... 
Somers, Jolin J., Gloucester, 4 broadsides, 
Sothoran, Henry, and Co., London, . 
Soutligate, Rev. W. S., Annapolis, Md., 8 broadsides 
Springfield, Mass., City Library Association, 
Stebbins, S. B., 
Steiger, E., New York City, 
Stewart, S., M. D., Baltimore, 3fd., 
Stevens, G. H., Newbiiryport, . 
Stevens Institute of Technology, Roboken, 
Stewart, C. F., Concord, N. II., 
Stirling-Maxwell, Sir William, Dunblane, 
Stone, Amos, Cambridge, 
Stone, Gen. Charles P., Cairo, Egypt, 
Stow, Benjamin J., M. D., Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Stowe, Huso and Co., Lowell, 

Stratton, G. W. 

Stratton, H. B., 

Strauss, F. A., 



N. J., 
Scotland, 



New 



17 
1 
1 



I 

12 

1 



16 
1 



47 
1 



3 

20 



7 
11 



6 
1.5 



12 

1 
7 
2 



4 

28 



10 
13 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



69 



Vols. 



ghanny 



Striker, Hon. Daniel, Lansing, Mich., 
Stronji, Selali W., West Troy, N. Y., 
Stryker, William S., Trenion, N. J., 
Stuart, F. A. M., 

Stuait, R. L. and A., Ne^v York City, 
Sturgis, Jolin H., Brookline, 
Sturtevant, E. Lewis, M. D., South Framin 
Swarthniore College, Swarthmore, Pa., 
Swinney, E. Hazzard, New York City, 
Sydney, New South Wales, Free Public Library 
Sykes, Joseph, Hyde Park, 
Tabor College, Tabor, Iowa, 
Taft, Henry VV., Pittsfield, 1 newspaper, 
Talbot, Prof. Guillaume H., 
Taunton Public Library, 
Tennessee, Bureau of Agriculture, . 
State Library, 



Tenney, Mrs., Albany, N. Y., . 

Tenney, D. B., Haverhill, 

Tenney, Rev, E. P., Ashland, 1 broadside 

Texas and Pacific Railway Company, 

Thayer, David, M. D., 

Thayer, Rev. W. M., 

Thompson, C. G., 

Thompson, James F., Philadelphia, Pa,, 

Tiiornton, J. Wingate, 1 newspaper, . 

Thwing, S. C, 

Thwing, W. E., .... 

Ticknor, Miss Anna E., 

Titfany, John K., St. Louis, Mo., 

Times Publishing Company, 

Timmins, Samuel, Birmingham, Eng., 1 Shakesperean 

draught board, .... 
Tinkham, J. G., Somerset, 
Titus, Charles H., 1 broadside, . 
ToUes, Robert B., . . . . 
Trask, Mrs. George, Fitchburg, 
Treat, A. O., 31. D., 3 Japanese napkins, 

Trifet, E., 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., 

Tufts College, Medford, 

TurnbuU Brothers, Baltimore, Md., . 

Turner, Alfred T., Auditor of Accounts, 

Turner, John, M. D., 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., Craufordsville, Lid , 1 broadside 

Twitchell, Hon. Albert S., Concord, N. IL, 

Ullman, Daniel, Piermont, N. Y., 5 broadsides 

Union Home and School, New York City, 

Union Iron Company, Buffalo, N. Y., 

Union League Club, New York City, 

Union Library Company, Hatbord' Pa., 

Union Theological Seminary, New York City, 

United States. Board of Indian Commissioners, 

Bureau of Education, .... 



1 
4 
24 
1 
1 



1 

34 

1 

50 



1 
4 

18 



70 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 




United States Bureau of Navigation, . 

Bureau of Statistics, 

Cliief of Engineers, 

Cliief of Ordnance, 

Civil Service Commission, 

Department of the Interior, . 

l)ei)artment of Justice, . 

Library of Congress, 

Naval Observatory, 

Mint, 

Patent Office, .... 

Quartermaster General's Office, 

Surgeon General's Office, 

Universalist Publishing Company, 5 newspapers 
University of Louisiana, New Orleans, 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
University of Missouri, St. Louis, 
University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, 
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Ind., 
University of Kochester, Rochester, N. Y., 
University of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C, 
Upham, J. Baxter, M. D., . 

Van Nort, Hon. G. M., New York City, . 
Veazie, Joseph, ...... 

Venezuela, Government of, . . . 

Vermont and Massachusetts Railroad Company 

Vermont State Lilirary, Montpelier, . 

Very, Lieut. Samuel W., U. S. N., Washington 

Vibbert, Rev. George IL, Somerville, 

Viles, Daniel F., Wnltham, 

Vinton, Frederick, Princeton, N. J., . 

Waldo, Misses C. and P., Cambridge, 

Wallace, Capt. W., 

Ware, Col., Henry, ..... 
Warner, Bon. F. A., Des Moines, Iowa, . 
Warren, Hon. G. W., .... 

Warren, Hon. William W., 
Warren County Library, Monmouth, III., . 
Washington and Jefferson College, Washington 
Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va 
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., 
Washingtonian Home, Chicago, III., . 
Waterston, Rev. R. C, 
Watertown Free Public Librarj', 
Wattson, Thomas B., Philadelphia, Pa., 
Weaver, Abram B., Albany, N. Y., . 
Webber, S. G., M. D., 
Weigel, Hon. Eugene F., Jpfferson City, Mo., 
Welsh, Isaac, Columbus, Ohio, . 
West Chester Library Association, 
Western Lunatic Asylum, Staunton, Va., 
Western University of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh 
West Newton English and Classical School, 
West Virginia Medical Society, Wheeling, . 



D. 



Pa 



C, 



Pphs. 



1 

2 

7 
3 

56 
1 



24 
2 



1 

1 

12 



140 
2 

4 

2 

87 

2 

1 



6 
2 
3 
6 
32 
1 



1 

7 
1 

4 
1 
1 

15 

1 

5 

1 

83 

3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 
78 
7 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
4 



PIJBLIC LIBPARY. 



71 




Wharton, i?ef. Francis, D .D., Camlridge, 

Whcaton College, Wheaton, III., 2 })roHdsi(!os, 

Wheeler, Lieut. George M., Washington, D. C. 

Wheeler, William A., .... 

Wheeler, Mrs. William A., 

Wheildon, William W., Concord, 5 manuscript 

Whitaker, J., London, .... 

White, Andrew D., Ithaca, iV. T., . 

White, James C, M. D., . 

White, James W., Grafton, 

Whiting, Mrs. William, .... 

Whitman, Afrs. Mary K., 46 newspapers, . 

Whitmore, William H,, 

Whitney, Edmund B., 

Whitney, Eev. Frederick A., 

Whitney, Mrs. Frederick A., 

Whitney, Mrs. George, 

Whitney, George C, Worcester, 

Whitney, Henry A., . 

Wliitney, James L., 6 broadsides, 47 newspapers 

Whitney, Prof. Josiah D., Cambridge, 

Whitney, Prof. William D., New Haven, . 

Whittier, D. B., 1 broadside, 

Willard Asylum for tlie Insane, WiJlard, N. Y. 

William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo., 

Williams, B. W., 

Williams, James, Columbus, Ohio, 
AVilliams, Hon. John M. S., Washington, D. C. 
Williams College, Williamstown, 
Williamson, R. S., Philadelphia, Pa., 
Wilmington, Del., Board of Trade, . 
Institute, 



k City 



Wilson, Gen. James Grant, New York City, 
Wilson Industrial School and Mission, New Yor 
Winchester Home for Aged Women, . 
Winchester Town Library, 
Winsor, Justin, ..... 
Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, 

Horticultural Society, Madison, 

Industrial School for Boys, Waukesha, 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home, Madison, 

State Agricultural Society, Madison, 

Woburn Library Committee, 

Woman's Christian Association, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Woman's Christian Association, Pittsburgh, Pa,, 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 

Episcopal Church, Bloomingion, III., 
Woman's Medical College, Chicago, III., . 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Pa., 

Woman's Union Missionary Society, New York City 
Woodman, Cyrus, Cambridge, .... 
Woods, George, LL. D., Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Woodwortl), John M., M. D., Washington, D. C, 



1 

27 



Pphs. 

2 

6 

6 
4 

1 

278 
- 7 

1 

16 

208 
2 

42 



4 
1 

9 

1 
2 

17 
2 
3 
2 

17 
5 

16 
1 
2 
3 
5 



72 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



Wooster University. Wooster, Ohio, . 
Worcester County Musical Association, Worcester, 
Worcester Free Institute, 
Pulilic Liljrary, 



k City, 
City, 



Worcester iind Nasiiua Railroad Company, 
Working Churcli Publishing Company, JVew To 
Working Women's Protective Union, New Fork 
Worthington and Flanders, 
Wright, J/on. Albert J., 3 broadsides, 6 maps 

Wriglit and I'otter, 

Wynne, Tiiomas H., Richmond, Va., . 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn., 

York Institute, Saco, Me., 5 nevrspapers, . 

Young Men's Association, Buffalo, N. Y., 

Young Men's Cliii>tian Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Young Men's Christian Association, New York City, 

Young Men's Christian Association, Washington, D. C, 

Young Men's Christian Association, Worcester, . 

Young Men's Christian Association of the United States 

and the British Provinces, ..... 
Young Men's Christian Union, 1 broadside, 
Young Men's Institute, JIar/ford Conn., . 
Younir Men's Mercantile Litjrary Association, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, . . 



193 
2 



1 
3 
5 
17 
2 
2 

16S3 

5 

1 

14 

2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

7 
1 
1 




a Six months. 

6 lUmoval of the Library. 



APPENDIX XII, 

CIRCULATION. [W.] 



LOWEB Hall. 



35,389 
81,281 



76,570 
149,468 
151,020 
160,877 
162,639 
125,681 
165,510 
171,168 
173,661 
183,714 
141,853 
175,772 
161,631 
227,670 
248,029 
230,111 
245,244 
264,826 



163,366 
231,110 
254,246 
238,057 
253,097 
272,834 



East Boston Branch. 



South Boston Branch. 



Ro&BORY Branch. 



Charlestown Branch. 



81,091 
85,548 



101,688 
107,651 



113,334 
131,999 



I i 



112,525 

115,530 



67,342 
89,530 
101,297 
146,829 



1,206 
1,184 



79,375 
86,815 
106,816 



/ Nine montLB. 
ff Central Library oiily. 

h If the IsHuea of East Boaton be excluded, this footing would be 296,316; and if 
Hall iBsues be excluded, there will be a record of 293,710 volumes used at Lome. 



len seventy-eight daye. 
e report for 18U8. 
I icludcs books borrowei 
leodix XUl. 



I wliiU- Blips, as BhowQ 



PUBLIC LIBHART. 



73 



APPEiS^DIX XIII. 

REGISTRATION. 





Note. The first registration, 
1854-8, had 17,066 names; the 
second, 1859-67, had 52,829 
names. 


Third Registration. 


55 

a 

5 


00 

H 




o 

90 
H 


90 

H 


»■- 

90 


M 

90 
H 


90 

H 


90 


o 

Eh 




Applica- 
tions. 


' Central Library . 
E. B. Branch . . 
S. B Branch . . . 


12,057 


6,490 


6,577 


7,096 
2,320 


6,688 
993 
232 


6,670 

826 

3,094 


8,016 
1,244 
1,665 
3,475 
693 
108 


7,885 
1,001 
1,560 
1,470 
1,070 
263 
1,349 
14,599 


61,479 
6,384 
6,552 
4,945 














I. 


Chn. Branch . , . 
Bri. Branch . . . 


Pr 
Pr 


evious 
evious 


Registration i 
Registration ! 


issume 
issume 


a. 

d. 


8,391 
1,672 
1,349 

90,782 




Total 


12,057 


6,490 


6,577 9,416 
1 


7,913 


10,596 


16,202 




Applica- 
tions sent 
to Police 
(forverifi-- 
cation 
■when 
needed). 


' Central Library . 
-ff. JB, Branch . . 


2,810 


3,462 


1,904 


3,040 
1,012 


2,876 
474 


3,419 
265 
645 


3,642* 

453 

515 

237 

11 




3,906 

476 

340 

353 

8 



53 

5,136 


25,059 
2,691 












1,500 
















590 


n. 
















19 





































53 


- 


\^Total 


2,810 


3,462 


1,904 


4,052 


3,350 


4,330 


4,868 


29,912 




Cards Re- 
fused 
(mostly 
for non- •< 
residency 
or under 
age). 


^ Central Library . 


233 


202 


179 


241 
80 


267 

28 


288 
10 
64 


287 

12 

36 

89 

3 

3 


283 

15 

18 

51 

9 

7 
383 


1,980 
145 




S B Branch . . 








118 
















140 


m. 
















12 








































. Total 


233 


202 


179 


321 


295 


362 


430 


2,402 



10 



74 



CITY DOCUMENT. 



No. 89. 



APPENDIX Xm.— Continued. 

REGISTRATION. 





Note. The first registration, 
1854-8, had 17,066 names; the 
second, 1859-6T, had 62,829 
names. 


Third Registration. 


m 

a 

5 


i 


i 

2 


o 


00 
H 




eo 




M5 






Cards not 

called for 

during the "^ 

year. 


' Central Library . 
E. B. Branch , . 


852 


589 


404 


393 

117 


439 
151 


409 
93 
179 


291 
90 
65 
17 

1 


230 
84 
60 

102 
52 

50 

578 


3,607 
535 




S. B. Branch . . 








306 
















119 


IV. 
















62 




































50 




.Total 


852 


589 


404 


610 


690 


681 


894 


4,669 




Applica- 
tions Can- 
celled. 
(Six 
monthson 
file, and ' 
one month 
longer 
after no- 
tice). 










1,215 


264 
82 


196 
45 
82 


245 
46 
106 
17 



414 


335 
44 
68 

102 
62 
17 

618 


2,255 
217 




E. B. Branch , . 




















256 
















119 


V. 
















62 




Bri. Branch , , . 














17 























Total 








1,215 


346 


323 


2,916 















During the past two years an attempt has been made to separate the slips of persons believed 
now to be using the Library, distinguif^hing them by the fact of their visiting the libraries during 
the year, and the result shows that nearly two-thirds of the cards may be considered alive. 



PUBLIC LrBKART. 



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76 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



APPENDIX XIY. 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED 



USE OF BRITISH PATENTS AND TOSTI 
ENGRAVINGS. 



(^^ iM 00 

t-C Tjl o 

00 O fc^ 



O 00 
«£> F-l 

l-H C< 







1^ 

& 3 




00 


S 


§ 




s 
s 


o 

CO 


s 


o 






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^ 


cs 


t- 










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<3> 


1 




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'-> 


1?^ 


































KOTE. — The column of "Received since" denotes those received of the '-Total recommended," the 
yenr. What may be in subsrquont years received of such " Total recommended " does not appear in this 



10 same 

,, . ^ ., . „ — appear in this table 

l-ormstance, of the 1,120— (183 + 423) = 614 not received in 1868 of the total recommended that year, a large part 
has since been received. 

* The partial disuse of the Bates Ilall, on account of the alterations going on, affected this number. 

r(ite»ti. — Tho American, French and British Patents have now been placed in the new Patent Room, under 
charge of a Curator. The figures before 1874 in the table showed the use of the British Patents only. 

/;«(7mr(H(/«. — The statistics refer only to the bound volnmes, not to those framed and on the walls. The 
showing of them during the greater part of the year has been very irregular, owing to the illness of the former 
Curator, and the want of space while the work of decorating the Bates Hall went on. But it is now arranged 
that the Curator shows them every day from 9 to 12. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



77 



APPENDIX xy. 

BATES HALL READING. 



Classifications. 



Percentage of Use. 



English History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



17.5 



American (North and South) 
History, Topogriiphy. Bi- 
ography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



French History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



Germanic History, Topogra- 
phj-. Biography, Travel and 
Polite Littsrature 



Italian History, Topographj', 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 



Other History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel and Polite 
Literature 

General and Epochal History, 
Geography, Biography, etc. 

Greek, Latin and Philology . 

Bihiiography 

Transactions 

Periodicals 



Fine Arts 

Natural History and Science 

Theology, Ecclesiastical His- 
tory, Ethics, Education, etc. 

Medicine 



Law, Government, and Politi- 
cal Economy 



Useful Arts, Mathematics. 
Physics, etc 

Miscellaneous Pamphlets, 
bound 



2.5 



8.5 



7.5 



2.5 

3.5 2.5 

4.25 3 
3.5 
3 

1.5 2.3 
6 
12 16.6 



20 



12 



17 



12 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker, and 
Prince Libraries, — which are kept apart from the general classifications of the Library, — 
is reckoned as nearly as possible and included in the usual divisions, as U indicated in the 
table. See Explanations to Appendix IX. 



78 



CITY DOCUME:NrT. No. 89. 





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PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



79 



APPEjvTDix xyn. 

EAST BOSTON BRANCH READING. 

{Shown from slips of Books returned.) 





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PUBLIC LIBEAKT. 



81 



appe:ndix XIX. 



EOXBURY BRANCH AND FELLOWES ATHENiEUM READING. 

Note. — The two sections of this table, refer to two different collections of books. 



Box. Br. 

Class No. 



I. 

n. 
m. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

vin. 

IX. 



F. A. 

Class No. 



I. 

II. 
III. 
IV. 

V. 
VI. 

vn. 

VIII. 
IX. 
X. 



1, 3, 5, 7 
2,4 . 
6,8. 
9, 11 
10,12 
13,14 
15,17 
16 . 
18,19 

20 . 



60, 54, 59 
55, 57 . 
51, 53, 65 
52,56 
58 . 

60 . 

61 . 

62 . 
63,69 
64, 66, 68 



Classes. 



Prose Fiction 

Travels 

History 

Juveniles 

Biography 

Periodicals 

Arts, Sciences, Professions . . 

Poetry and Drama 

Collected Works and Lit. Miscel- 
laiieous 

Books in Foreign Languages . , 
Total 



History, Biography, Travels . . 

Modern Foreign Languages . . . 

Periodicals 

Miscellaneous Literature .... 

Theology, Sociology, Ethics . v . 

Medicine 

Greek and Latin Languages and 
Literature 

Fine Arts, Engineering 

Law, Politics, Government . . . 

Mathematics, Natural and Applied 
Science 

Total 



1874. 



28,575 
2,623 
1,121 

19,261 
1,351 
1,019 
2,657 
1,219 

724 
55 



58,605 



729 
160 
661 
412 
46 

262 

684 

36 

719 



5,691 



&4 a 



-49 
-5 
-2 

32+ 
2+ 

-2 
4+ 
2+ 



1875. 



40,666 
2,555 
1,133 

26,650 
1,583 
1,338 
2,815 
1,235 

1,069 
114 



78,858 



3,754 

1,073 

331 

921 

650 

81 

374 
750 
149 

846 



8,829 



P-i a 

-52 

3+ 

1+ 

34 

2 

-2 

4 

-5 

-2 
1+ 



-43 
12+ 
4 

10+ 
6+ 
1 

4+ 
8i 
-2 

-10 



11 



82 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



APPENDIX XX. 

BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 





■ Ranges 


Classes. 


1874- 


5. 


Class 
No. 


Books 
returned. 


Per 

centage. 


I. 

n. 

TTT. 


1,2,3,4 

5, 6, 7, 8 

9 to 17 


Fiction 

Biography, Travel and History . . 
Others 


17,662 
1,424 
1,957 


84 
7 
9 












Total 


21,043 











APPEOTDIX XXI. 

DORCHESTER BRANCH READING. 



Class 

No. 



I. 
II. 

in. 
rv. 

V. 
VI. 

vn. 

vni. 

rx. 

X. 



Ranges. 



1,11 . 

2, 12 . 

3, 13 . 

4.14 . 

5.15 . 

6.16 . 

7.17 . 

8, 18 . 

9, 19 . 
10, 20 . 



Classes. 



Poetry, Drama . , 
Travels . . . . . 

Fiction 

Juveniles .... 
History .... 
Biography . . . 
Periodicals . . . 
Art, Sciences, etc, 
Miscellanies, etc. 

Total .... 



1874-5. 



Books 
returned. 



221 

535 

3,983 

2,877 

5,348 

285 

414 

162 

465 

311 



14,601 



Per 
centage. 



-1 
-4 

47 

-37 
2 
-3 
1+ 
3+ 
2+ 



CHARLESTOWN BRANCH READING. 

Note. — No classification of the use is practicable, as the books are shelved without re- 
gard to classes. Tabk-s similar to those of the other branches will be possible when a 
rearrangement of the books is made. 



84 



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88 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 





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'5) a 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 91 



APPENDIX XXYI. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. 

JUSTIN WINSOR, Superintendent. 

James L. Whitney, Assistant Superintendent. ' 

James M. Hubbard, Principal Assistant. 

Frederic B. Perkins, Office Secretary. 

Charles A. Wilson, Despatch Cleric. 

Miss A. A. Nichols, Auditor. , 

Prank H. Thomas, Superintendent's Runner. 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

James L. Whitnet, Chief. 

James M. Hubbard, Principal Assistant; William H. Poster, Proof 
Reader; Arthur M. Knapp, Pamphlets and Periodicals; Jose F. Garret, 
Patents and Engravings ; Mrs. S. A. Joslyn, Patent Room and Accession 
Catalogue ; Miss Annie P. Call, Assistant Cataloguer ; Mrs, A. G. D. Keen, 
Branch Cataloguer ; Miss Elizabeth J. Stevenson, Newspapers and Dupli- 
cates ; George H. Verity, Runner. 

Mrs. R. M. Eastman and Miss Mary E. Joslyn, Extras. 

CARD catalogue. 

Miss H. E. Green, Curator. 
Miss Alice M. Poree, Miss M. I. Brooks, Miss Maude Ross, Assistants. 

ORDERING AND RECEIVING DEPARTMENT. 

Miss Harriet N. Pike, Chief Clerk. 
Miss Mary A. McGrath and Mrs. E. T. Reed, Assistants ; Ellen Stevenson, 
Attendant. 

SHELF DEPARTMENT. 

Appleton p. C. Griffin, Custodian. 
John Bresnahan and Annie M. Kennedy, Assistants. 

BATES HALL DEPARTMENT. 

Henry Ware, Keeper. 
Miss L. S. Norton, Desk Attendant ; Miss M. I. Brooks, Assistant. 
Timothy Donovan, E. M. Thomas, Thomas Whyte, F. A. M. Stuart, Run- 
ners. 



92 CITY DOCUMEN^T. No. 89. 

LOWER HALL DEPARTMENT. 

Elbridge Bradshaw, Keeper. 
Alfred A. Brooks, Assistant Keeper. 
Miss Elizabeth S. Haley, Delivery Clerk ; Miss Lydia F. Knowles, Receiv- 
ing Clerk ; Miss Ellen E. Bresnalian, Keeper's Clerk ; Misses Eliza J. Mack, 
Sarah A. Mack, Ellen F. McCarthy, Assistants ; Ella Sturmy, Art Room 
Attendant. 

Mary Connor, Margaret Donovan, Annie G. Shea, Mary Doyle {extra^, 
Runners. 

W. F. Robinson, Registration Clerk. 
Miss Elizabeth Ross, Assistant Registration Clerk. 
Miss Caroline E. Poree, Reading Boom Attendant. 
Evening Service. Fred. Kyle, Registration Clerk ; Miss Henrietta E. 
Mack, Delivery Clerk; Miss Catharine McGrath, Receiving Clerk; Miss 
Amelia McGrath, Assistant ; R. B. Ross, Reading Room Attendant ; M. A. 
Mears, Margaret Doyle, Runners. 

Sunday Service. Fred. Kyle, Reading Room Attendajit. 

JANITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

William E. Ford, Janitor. 

Thomas Collins and Henry Sullivan, Assistants. 

Extra Daily Assistants. 

BINDING DEPARTMENT. 

Frank P. Hathaway, Foreman. 
Andrew M. Blake, Romeo Cervi, J. R. Beckett, James Pendcrgast, and M. 
.1. Healy, Assistants. 

Mrs. Martha Wheeler, Miss Mary E. Austin, Miss Mary Moriarty, Sewers. 

EAST BOSTON BRANCH. 

Miss Sarah C. Godbold, Librarian. 

Miss Mary R. Pray, Miss A. M. Wing, Assistants. 

Mary E. Cathcart, Runner. 

G. H. Hosea, Janitor. 

Misses E. L. Lennon, IL F. Ellis, J. P. Todd, and A. M. Keen, Substitutes 

and extra Assistants. 

, Sunday Service. 

SOUTH BOSTON BRANCH. 

Miss Alice J. Bragdon, Liirarian. 

Misses E. A. Eaton, Eunice M. Lyon, Assistants. 

H. E. McCartliy, Runner. 

Joscpli Baker, Janitor. 



PUBLIC LIBPvAKY. 93 

Misses Eva C. Watson, M. Webster, Eliz. McCarthy, Emma Davis, and 
Mar}' Watson, Siihstitnies and extra Assistants. 

Josepli Baker, Sunday Service. 

KOXBURY BRANCH. 

Miss H. C. Price, Librarian. 
Mrs. Julia A. Nye, Miss Marietta Goldsmith, Miss Clara E. Sanborn. 
Assistants. 

Margaret E. Blood, Runner. 
Charles R. Curtis, Janitor. 
Misses Ida Blood, Mary Floden, S. Purcell, and L. Burns, Substitutes and 
extra Assistants. 

Mrs. Julia A. Nye, Sunday Service. 

CHARLESTOWN BRANCH. 

Dr. Cornelius S. Cartee, Librarian. 

Misses Susan Edwards, S. M. Eberle, Assistants. 

Lillian Davis, Runner. 

Thomas E. Smith, Janitor. 

Misses A. E. Eberle, H. N. Davis, and M. L. Nicliols, Extra Assistants. 

, Sunday Service. 

BRIGHTON BRANCH, 

Miss Mary J. Boavker, Librarian. 

Miss C. A. Wentworth, Assistant. B. T. Grailey, Runner. 

Miss K. P. Wellington, Sunday Service. 

William T. Osborn, Janitor. 

DORCHESTER BRANCH. 

Miss Mart G. Coffin, Librarian. 

Miss Esther R. Whiton, Assistant. 

Edward Davenport, Janitor. 

Miss Jennie Slieridan, Extra Assistant. 

AGENCY DEPARTMENT. 

Messrs. Lee and Shepard, Boston. 

Messrs. Little, Brown and Co., and Sampson Low, Marston, Low and Scarlo. 
Boston and London. 
Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 
Dr. Felix Fliigel, Leipsic. 
Cliev. Eugenio Alberi, Florence. 



94 



CITY DOCUjVIENT. 



No. 89, 



SUMMARY. 



Superintendent 

Office Secretary, Despatch Clerk, Audi 

tor, and Runner 
Catalogue Department . 
Ordering and Receiving Department 
Shelf Department 
B. H. Circulating Department 
L. H. Circulating Department, Day 

Service 
L. H. Circulating Department, Evening 

and Sunday Service 
Janitorial Department 
Binding Department 

East Boston Branch 
South Boston Branch 
Roxbury Branch . 
Charlestown Branch 
Brighton Branch . 
Dorchester Branch 

Totals 



Regulars. 
, 1 

4 

13 

4 

3 

7 

14 



3 
9 

5 
5 
6 
5 
4 
3 

86 
30 



Extras. 



5 
5 
4 
3 
1 
1 

30 



Central Library. 
58 regulars. 
II extras. 

69 in all. 



Branches. 
28 regulars. 
19 extras. 

47 in all. 



Grand Total 



116 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 95 



appe:n^dix xxyii. 

REPORT ON THE EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 

To tJie Suptrintondent : — 

The examiuation of the Central Library and Branches has 
been made during the year ending April 30th, 1875, of which 
I beg leave to submit the following 

REPORT. 

In the Bates Hall there were missing frem the shelves 
at the time of the examination 
Of these there were found, — 
Loaned ...... 

At the Binder's ..... 

Otherwise accounted for 

Not at present accounted for, — 
Books. ...... 

Periodicals, reports, etc., in boxes 
Bound vols, of miscellaneous pphs. 
Bates Hall Supplement 

Of the twenty-nine books reported as missing last year, 
four have been found on tlie shelves, in their proper places. 
Also four books missing in 1872, and one missing in 1870, 
have been found. 

Everything possible in the way of accounting for these 
missing books has been done ; but many of them may be found 
during another examination of the Library, either misplaced, 
or numbered wrong. And some may have been taken from 
the shelves, and not propei-ly charged. In so large a Library, 





3,612 vols, 


1,970 






997 






596 








3,563 


u 


43 






4 






1 






1 








49 


a 



96 



CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



the chances of misplacement, and errors in numbering or 
charging, are of course great. 

In the Lower Hall there were missing from the shelves 

at the time of the examination . . . 7,001 vols. 

Of these there were found, — 

Loaned 5,254 

At the Binder's 622 

Otherwise accounted for .... 948 

6,824 " 

Not at present accounted for, — 

Fiction 126 

Miscellaneous ...... 51 

177 " 

Of these, one hundred and thirty-eight volumes have not 
been loaned this year, and undoubtedly have been con- 
demned ; but the record of condemned books during the last 
year being incomplete, they cannot strictly be accounted for 
in that way. Deducting this one hundred and thirty-eight 
volumes, it leaves actually missing forty-one volumes. The 
number from each class is as follows : — 

Arts and science .... 
American history and politics . 
Poetry, drama, etc. 
English prose fiction ... 
Biography ..... 

Travels 

Libraries, collected works, periodicals, etc 
Foreign histor}' and politics . 
Foreign books .... 

At the East Boston Branch there were missing from the 

shelves at the time of the examination . . 2,012 

Loaned 1,729 

At the Binder's . . . . _ . . 137 

Otherwise accounted for .... 146 

2,012 



16 


vols 


4 




6 




126 




1 




3 




13 




1 

7 





PUBLIC LIBRART. 97 

At the South Boston Branch there -were missing from 

the shelves at the time of the examination . 2,396 vols. 

Loaned . 2,101 

At the Binder's 155 

Otherwise accounted for . . . . 128 

2,384 " 

Not at present accounted for, — 

Fiction 7 

Juveniles ....... 5 

12 " 

At the Roxburj Branch there were missing from the 
shelves at the time of the examination, — 
Fellowes Athenaeum books .... 307 " 

Loaned 300 

At the Binder's ...... 6 

Otherwise accounted for .... 1 

307 " 

One Fellowes Athenaeum hook is missing from the Readino- 

Room, viz. : — 

Pierce. Dickens' dictionary. 

Of the City books, there were missing from the shelves 2,134 vols. 

Loaned 1,983 

At the Binder's 138 

Otherwise accounted for .... 7 

2,128 " 

Not at present accounted for, — 

Travels ....... 2 

Juveniles ....... 3 

Miscellaneous ...... 1 

6 " 

At the Charlestown Branch there were missing from the 

shelves at the time of the examination. . 1,636 " 

Loaned 1,479 

At the Binder's 6Q 

Otherwise accounted for .... 91 

1,636 " 

13 



98 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 

From the Reading Room, there are missing, — 
Appleton's American Cyclopedia, volumes 7 and 12. , 

" Annual Cyclopedia for 1872. 

Pierce. Dickens' dictionar3\ 

At the Brighton Branch there are at present not 

accounted for, — 

History 2 vols. 

Periodicals 1 " 

3 vols. 

From the Bates Hall Desk, the following reference books are 
missing, — 

Eggleston. How to educate yourself. 

Appleton's New American Cyclopedia, volumes 9 and 10. 

And from the Central Library Reading Room, — 

Bell's Geography, vol. 2. 
Chambers Information for the people, vol. 2. 
Clement. Handbook of legendary art. 
Webster. Unabridged dictionary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. P. C. GRIFFIN, 

CuslocUan of the Shelves. 
Public Library, Maj' 20, 1875. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



99 



APPENDIX XXYIII. 

WORK IN THE LIBRAKY BINDERY. 



Character of Work. 


1871-2. 


18T2-3. 


1873-4. 


1874-5. 


Bates Hall books bound and finished . . 


2,219 


2,008 


2,635 


2,613 


Books of the Lower Hall and Branches . 


1,015 


744 


753 


1,508 




396 
490 


430 
437 


492 

287 


444 


Catalogues wired and covered for public 
use in Lower Hall and Branches . . . 


143 


Maps dissected and mounted 


47 


28 


9 


1 


Map-volumes and shelf-lists mounted . . 


212 


165 


109 


493 




546 


64 


24 


Portfolios 


5 


8 


8 




Removable covers for catalogues and for 
paper covered books 


266 


263 


450 


1,520 


Maps mounted, bound and bordered . . 


54 


41 


8 




Hours of miscellaneous work ...... 


1,842 


2,297 


1,437 


2,485 



100 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 89. 



appe:n^dix XXIX. 

The year's record of the Piihlic Library is shadowed by 
the loss of Mr. AVilliam A. Wheeler, the Assistant Superin- 
tendent, whose character and work reflect honor upon the 
institution. 

Mr. Wheeler was born at Leicester, in this State, in 1833. 
Most of his 3'outh was spent at Topsham, Maine, from which 
place he entered Bowdoin College, graduating in 1853. After 
teaching three years he became associated with the late Dr. 
Worcester in the preparation of a new edition of Worcester's 
Dictionary, upon the completion of which work he accepted 
a similar position from the publishers of the Webster series 
of dictionaries. Under his supervision the new Unabridged 
quarto edition was printed, and on him devolved the prepara- 
tion of new editions of the National, the University and the 
Academic dictionaries as well as of the smaller or school 
editions. All these works, whose reputation is not confined 
to this continent, owe their value in large measure to him. 

Mr. Wheel9r entered the service of the Public Library in 
the spring of 1868, and later in the same year, on the death 
of Mr. William E. Jillson, he was appointed Assistant Super- 
intendent. The Library was singularly fortunate in securing 
the services of a scholar so accomplished and so fitted by 
habits of patient, thorough resear^ch for the work to which 
his best energies were to be given. 

His critical, accurate work may be seen in the various 
catalogues which were prepared, wholly or in part under his 
supervision — in the Prince and Ticknor Catalogues, in the 
Lists of Engravings and Bulletins, and more than all, in the 
Public Card Catalogue of the Library. These bear testimony 



PUBLIC LIBEAKT. 101 

to the thoroughness and wide reach of his learning, and to 
the tenacity of his purpose to leave everything that he 
touched, finished and perfect. 

Of the books written by Mr. Wheeler, all of which are of 
permanent value, the one by which he is most widely known 
is the Dictionary of Noted Names of Fiction, which was 
originally prepared as an appendix to Webster's Unabridged 
Dictionary, and afterwards published independently in an 
enlarged form. Other books, due wholly or in part to him, 
are Worcester's Spelling Book, the Manual of English Pro- 
nunciation and Spelling, a revised edition of Hole's Brief Bio- 
graphical Dictionary, an edition of Mother Goose's Melodies, 
with antiquarian and philological notes, a Record of the class 
of 1853 of Bowdoin College, and a Dickens Dictionary. 
His contributions can be found also in the North American 
Review and in other periodicals. Other books, upon which 
work was begun or outlined, were interrupted by his un- 
timely death. A Cyclopaedia of Shakespearian Literature, 
materials for which he had bfegun to collect, would have been, 
had he lived to complete- it, his most valuable contribution 
to literature. 

The beauty and nobility of Mr. Wheeler's character were 
more striking even than his intellectual gifts. His associates, 
who owed their best inspiration to him, and the scholars as 
well, who sought his counsel and aid, were more attracted 
by the rare qualities of his heart than by the great stores of 
knowledge that always stood open to them. 

His loss will be felt not alone by the Library, or by those 
who personally knew him. Many to whom he was a stranger 
even by name, but who have profited by his labors, will have 
reason to mourn that he was removed in the very prime of 
life, seemingly just when his powers were fully ripened. 

JAMES L. WHITNEY. 




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