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Full text of "Annual report"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06316 866 8 



[Document 11 - jlQf^sfON PuSuCUBRARY^ 
GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 
\ pcrr» irrr\ 

JAN 9 1990 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

for the period 
July 1, 1978, to December 31, 1987 



Boston, February 1, 1988 



Hon. Raymond L. Flynn, 
Mayor of Boston. 



15> 

■ 



Dear Mr. Mayor: 

I submit herewith the annual report of the Boston Fire Department 
for the period July 1, 1984, to December 31, 1987. 

During this period, the department initiated a massive rebuilding 
program to replace antiquated equipment and increase the on-duty 
strength of the fire fighting divisions and modernized the strategic and 
tactical operations in the field. 

The programs have resulted in the replacement of 75 percent of the 
first-line apparatus, reducing the average age of such units from twelve 
years to four years, increased the on-duty strength from 245 members to 
300 members and improved the respiratory protective equipment, hose, 
nozzles and related tools to increase safety and efficiency. 

The period also included the complete reorganization of the Fire Pre- 
vention Bureau, the Arson Squad, the Communications, Training and 
Maintenance Divisions and the Management Information System. 

The results of these efforts to date have increased the protection of the 
citizens of Boston dramatically and I intend to continue this trend dur- 
ing the new fiscal year. 

I want to thank you for the tremendous cooperation you and your 
staff have given me to perform these tasks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leo D. Stapleton, 
Fire Commissioner/Chief. 



2 City Document No. 11 

Fire Commissioner, Leo D. Stapleton 

Chief of Department, LeoD. Stapleton 

Deputy Fire Chief, Chief of Operations 
John D. White 

Executive Assistant to the Fire Commissioner, 
Gerard J. Horgan 

Medical Examiner, Alan W. Jenest, M.D. 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge of Training, Maintenance 
and Research, Martin E. Pierce, Jr. 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge of Fire Prevention Division, 
Martin Fisher 

Deputy Fire Chief in Charge of Communications, 
Nino Tramontozzi 

Deputy Chief in Charge of Personnel 
and Safety Division, John E. Lockhead 

Superintendent of Maintenance, Dennis B. Flynn 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm Division, 
Robert J. McCarthy 

Chaplains, Rev. Msgr. James J. Keating, Catholic 
Rev. Kevin M. Turman, Protestant 
Rabbi Ira A. Korff, Jewish 

Deputy Chaplains, Rev. Daniel J. Mahoney, Catholic 
Rev. Daniel P. Hegarty, Catholic 



STATISTICS 



4 City Document No. 11 

COMPARATIVE FIRE DEPARTMENT 
EXPENDITURES 

1978-1979 1979-1980 1980-1981 

PERSONAL SERVICES 

Permanent Employees $37,357,478 $45,123,137 $48,986,343 

Overtime 1,717,635 3,164,301 1,821,713 

Total Personal Services $39,075,113 $48,287,438 $50,808,056 

CONTRACTUAL SERVICES 

Communications 159,753 132,887 157,046 

Light, Heat and Power 426,890 418,459 557,156 

Repairs and Maintenance of Buildings 

and Structures 118,957 103,554 100,619 

Repairs and Servicing of Equipment... 352,965 415,991 272,974 

Transportation of Persons 900 2,463 1,207 

Miscellaneous Contractual Services ... . 66,919 93,115 49,859 

Total Contractual Services $ 1,126,384 $ 1,166,469 $1,138,861 

SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS 

Automotive Supplies and Materials .... 349,212 435,993 469,698 

Heating Supplies and Materials 237,692 367,975 457,915 

Household Supplies and Materials 22,260 21,314 15,549 

Medical, Dental, Etc 20 65 906 

Office Supplies and Materials 10,010 39,714 32,228 

Clothing Allowance ..'. 380,000 400,000 600,300 

Miscellaneous Supplies and 

Materials 367,995 367,251 184,079 

Total Supplies and Materials $ 1,367,189 $ 1,632,312 $ 1,760,675 

CURRENT CHARGES AND 
OBLIGATIONS 
Other Current Charges and 

Obligations 463,400 468,621 952,643 

Total Current Charges and 
Obligations $ 463,400 $ 468,621 $ 952,643 

EQUIPMENT 

Automotive Equipment 65,200 62,905 9,600 

Office Furniture and Equipment 800 11,487 12,729 

Miscellaneous Equipment 260,822 187,878 377,481 

Total Equipment $ 326,822 $ 262,270 $ 399,810 

GRAND TOTALS $42,358,908 $51,817,110 $55,060,045 

* Includes $521,720 Unemployment and Workmen's Compensation. 
** Includes $91,733 Unemployment and Workmen's Compensation. 



Fire Department 



1981-1982 1982-1983 1983-1984 1984-1985 1985-1986 1986-1987 



$40,513,911 $46,995,569 $50,820,820 $50,946,851 $55,292,793 $60,157,829 

2,140,554 956,434 1,051,803 1,351,865 1,161,425 2,153,673 

$43,176,185* $48,043,736* *$52,872,523 $52,298,716 $56,454,218 $62,311,502 



156,511 235,353 298,468 324,809 292,271 432,659 

555,498 557,846 599,228 617,373 678,090 587,829 

81,935 111,960 170,080 215,012 256,524 338,970 

299,142 346,335 537,189 678,343 935,635 790,881 

603 2,601 10,749 9,650 20,208 17,338 

65,902 579,077 228,121 141,850 229,991 161,279 

1,159,591 $ 1,833,172 $ 1,843,835 $ 1,987,037 $ 2,412,319 $ 2,328,956 



356,974 346,971 259,804 239,413 198,719 138,104 

390,804 376,622 338,449 256,001 274,158 168,953 

16,16918,990,31,274 33,729 35,160 34,483 

6 21 4,936 6,853 10,653 10,714 

19,352 85,919 37,447 67,196 37,569 41,844 

89,350 506,450 509,465 503,745 507,513 533,900 

155,354 333,334 613,685 590,547 705,263 765,453 

671,035 $ 1,321,336 $ 1,795,056 $ 1,697,484 $ 1,769,023 $ 1,693,451 



419,195 1,132,926 758,187 653,868 909,090 638,059 

$ 419,195 $ 1,132,926 $ 758,187 $ 653,868 $ 909,090. $ 638,059 

1,600 4,177 12,442 22,286 24,316 24,119 

38,297 213,994 296,711 501,015 445,709 1,245,697 

$ 39,897 $ 218,171 $ 309,153 $ 523,301 $ 470,025 $ 1,269,816 

$45,465,903 $52,549,341 $56,578,754 $57,160,406 $62,015,075 $68,241,784 



City Document No. 11 

HISTORY 
FIRE COMMISSIONERS 



1874-1876 


Alfred P. Rockwell 


1877-1879 


David Chamberlain 


1879-1883 


John E. Fitzgerald 


1883-1885 


Henry W. Longley 


1885-1886 


John E. Fitzgerald 


1886-1895 


Robert G. Fitch 


1895-1905 


Henry S. Russell 


1905 


Patrick J. Kennedy (Acting February 17 - 




March 20) 


1905-1908 


Renjamin W. Wells 


1908-1910 


Samuel D. Parker 


1910 


Francis M. Carroll (Acting May 27 - 




September 16) 


1910-1912 


Charles C.Daly 


1912-1914 


Charles H. Cole 


1914-1919 


John Grady 


1919-1921 


John R. Murphy 


1921-1922 


Joseph P. Manning (Acting November 8, 1921 - 




April 1, 1922) 


1922 


William J. Casey (Acting April 1 - August 24) 


1922-1925 


Theodore A. Glynn 


1926 


Thomas F. Sullivan (Acting January 26 - July 6) 


1926-1930 


Eugene C. Hultman 


1930-1933 


Edward F McLaughlin 


1933-1934 


Eugene M. McSweeney (October 16, 1933 - 




Januarys, 1934) 


1934-1938 


Edward F McLaughlin 


1938-1945 


William Arthur Reilly 


1945-1946 


John I. Fitzgerald (June 7, 1945 - 




January 7, 1946) 


1946-1950 


Russell S. Codman, Jr. 


1950-1953 


Michael T. Kelleher 


1953-1954 


John F. Cotter 


1954-1959 


Francis X. Cotter 


1959 


Timothy J. O'Connor (March 2 - December 31) 


1960-1961 


Henry A. Scagnoli 


1961-1966 


Thomas J. Griffin 


1966 


Henry A. Scagnoli (Acting July 1 - August 17) 



Previous to 1874, the Roston Fire Department was in charge of 
the Chief Engineer. 



Fire Department 



1966-1968 William J. Fitzgerald 

1968-1975 James H.Kelly 

1975-1984 George H. Paul (from July 11 -January 31, 1984) 

1984 Leo D. Stapleton (from February 1) 



HISTORY 

CHIEFS OF DEPARTMENT 

1826-1828 Samuel D.Harris 

1829-1835 Thomas C. Amory 

1836-1853 William Barnicoat 

1854-1855 Elisha Smith, Jr. 

1856-1865 George W. Bird 

1866-1874 John S. Damrell 

1874-1884 William A. Green 

1884-1901 Louis P. Webber 

1901-1906, William T. Cheswell 

1906-1914 John A. Mullin 

1914 John Grady (1 day) 

1914-1919 Peter F. McDonough 

1919-1922 Peter E.Walsh 

1922-1924 John O. Taber 

1925-1930 Daniel F. Sennott 

1930-1936 Henry A. Fox 

1936-1946 Samuel J. Pope 

1946-1948 Napeen Boutlier 

1948-1950 John F. McDonough 

1950-1956 John V. Stapleton 

1956 Edward N. Montgomery 

1956-1960 LeoC.Driscoll 

1960-1963 John A. Martin 

1963-1966 William A. Terrenzi 

1966-1967 James J. Flanagan 

1967-1969 JohnE.Clougherty 

1969-1970 Joseph F. Kilduff 

1970-1984 George H.Paul 

(From April 1, 1970, to January 31, 1984) 

1984 Leo D. Stapleton 



City Document No. 11 

MEDAL OF HONOR MEN 
BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1978-1986 

RECIPIENTS OF THE 

JOHN E. FITZGERALD MEDAL 

FOR THE MOST MERITORIOUS ACT 

1978 

Fire Fighter James R. Neff 

Ladder Co. 18 

1979 

Fire Fighter James B. Fitzgerald 

Engine Co. 24 

1980 

Fire Lieutenant Edward J. Callahan 

Ladder Co. 26 

1982 

Fire Lieutenant Anthony J. Orlando 

Engine Co. 21 

1983 

Fire Fighter Robert M. Staunton 

Ladder Co. 4 

1984 

Fire Fighter Patrick A. Monroe 

Engine Co. 22 

1985 

Fire Fighter John R. Greene 

Ladder Co. 4 

1986 

Fire Fighter Robert M. Linnell 

Engine Co. 7 



MEDAL OF VALOR 

1978-1986 

1978 

John J. McDonough, Lighting Plant 1 

Robert M. Greene, Ladder Co. 23 

1981 

Paul M. Lentini, Engine Co. 37 

James M. Gibbons, Engine Co. 37 

1983 

Edward J. Donovan, Rescue Co. 1 

1985 

James D. Ealey, Engine Co. 3 

1986 

Thomas L. Conley, Engine Co. 41 

Edward R. Connolly, Ladder Co. 17 



Fire Department 

RECIPIENTS OF THE 

WALTER SCOTT 
MEDAL FOR VALOR 

1978-1986 

1978 

Acting Fire Lieutenant Edward J. Hudalla 

Ladder Co. 20 

1979 

Fire Fighter James E. Prokop 

Ladder Co. 20 

1980 

Fire Fighter Daniel J. Chisholm 

Engine Co. 18 

1981 

• Fire Fighter John F O'Neil 

Ladder Co. 24 

1982 

Fire Lieutenant George M. Sacco 

Ladder Co. 2 

1984 

Fire Fighter Patrick F. Foley, Jr. 

Engine Co. 22 

1985 

Fire Fighter Francis J. Mahoney, Jr. 

Ladder Co. 4 

1986 

Fire Fighter William J. Boyle, Jr. 

Engine Co. 50 



RECIPIENTS OF THE 

PATRICK J. KENNEDY 

MEDAL OF HONOR 

1979 

Fire Lieutenant Charles E. Graul 

Ladder Co. 19 

1980 

Fire Fighter Patrick F Lee 

Engine Co. 2 

1981 

Fire Fighter Robert T. Gorman 

Engine Co. 41 

1984 

Fire Lieutenant Francis L. McLaughlin, Jr. 

Engine Co. 42 

1986 

Fire Lieutenant Richard L. Harnett 

Tower Company 



10 City Document No . 1 1 

ROLL OF MERIT 

1978-1986 

1978 

Fire Fighter Thomas E. Bernhard 

Engine Co. 21 

Fire Fighter John E. McNally 

Engine Co. 21 

Fire Lieutenant Nicholas P. Keenan 

Ladder Co. 15 

Fire Lieutenant Stephen E. McLaughlin 

Rescue Co. 2 

Fire Fighter Roger J. Dunn 

Rescue Co. 2 

Fire Fighter Ronald Gatnik 

Engine Co. 52 

Fire Fighter Richard L. Stedman 

Engine Co. 43 

Fire Fighter John L. Cheatham 

Ladder Co. 16 

1979 

Fire Fighter Edward G. O'Brien 

Engine Co. 22 

Fire Fighter Thomas J. McDuff 

Aerial Tower 1 

Fire Lieutenant Arthur E . Perkins 

Aerial Tower 1 
Fire Captain George F. Gravallese 

Engine Co. 32 
Aide to Chief John W. McDonald 

District 13 
Fire Fighter Robert M. Staunton 

Ladder Co. 4 
Fire Fighter Kenneth J. Bresnahan 

Ladder Co. 18 

Fire Lieutenant James M. Solletti 

Engine Co. 1 

Fire Fighter James A. Ellis 

Engine Co. 22 

Fire Fighter Richard A. Laureana 

Engine Co. 22 

1980 
Fire Fighter John J. Harrison 

Engine Co. 21 

Fire Fighter Paul J. Spacco 

Engine Co. 17 

Fire Fighter Lawrence F. Rocci 

Engine Co. 17 

Fire Fighter Timothy T. McGillicuddy 

Engine Co. 12 

Fire Fighter John P. Carey 

Engine Co. 12 



Fire Department 11 

Fire Fighter Joseph M. Connolly 

Engine Co. 18 

Act. Fire Lt. Gerald F. Lucas 

Engine Co. 24 

1981 

Fire Fighter David L. Hale 

Engine Co. 24 

Fire Fighter John F. Carey 

Ladder Co. 28 

Fire Fighter Richard M. Feeley 

Ladder Co. 28 

Fire Fighter Joseph M. Gilmore, Jr. 

Engine Co. 18 
Fire Fighter William J. McCarthy 

Ladder Co. 23 

Fire Lieutenant John J. McKenna 

Rescue Co. 1 

1982 

Fire Lieutenant Donald C. Kernan 

Fire Prevention Division 

Fire Fighter John T. Brignoli 

Ladder Co. 7 

1983 

Fire Fighter Timothy T. McGillicuddy 

Engine Co. 14 

Fire Fighter Paul P. Keeley 

Rescue Co. 1 

Fire Lieutenant Martin J. Nee 

Rescue Co. 1 

Fire Fighter Henry J. Belluche 

Ladder Co. 9 

Fire Fighter Arthur E. Hitchman 

Ladder Co. 9 

1984 

Fire Fighter Kevin E. Ranahan 

Ladder Co. 4 
Fire Fighter Henry J. Sheridan 

Ladder Co. 23 
Fire Lieutenant John J. Simpson 

Hdqtrs. (L-23) 

Fire Fighter William J. McCarthy 

Ladder Co. 23 

Fire Fighter John J . Nee 

Engine Co. 7 

Fire Fighter Edward J. Hudalla 

Ladder Co. 29 

Fire Lieutenant Donald R. Mullen, Jr. 

Hdqtrs. (E-22) 

Fire Fighter Joe E . Montoya 

Engine Co. 22 



12 City Document No. 11 

1985 

Fire Lieutenant Robert J. Counihan 

Ladder Co. 29 

Fire Lieutenant John J. McKenna 

Rescue Co. 1 

Fire Fighter Anthony J. O'Brien 

Rescue Co. 1 

Fire Fighter (Aide to District Chief) 

William D. Ferrara 

Engine Co. 53 

Fire Fighter (Aide to District Chief) 

Joseph R. Murphy 

Engine Co. 42 

Fire Fighter Walter T. McGinn 

Ladder Co. 1 

1986 

Fire Fighter (Aide to District Chief) 

Francis L. Shaughnessey 

Engine Co. 17 

Fire Fighter Reynolds A. Shepherd 

Ladder Co. 17 

F.F.O.R Gregory J. Mackin 

Tower Company 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE & 
SPECIAL SERVICE AWARDS 

1978 

Fire Fighter Peter F. Nee 

Ladder Co. 20 

Fire Fighter Lawrence C. Holt 

Ladder Co. 20 

1979 

Fire Lieutenant Stephen A. McLaughlin 

Rescue Co. 2 

1980 

Fire Fighter Joseph F. Davies 

Aide to District 

Fire Fighter James Cullity 

Engine Co. 50 

Fire Fighter Robert B. MacKinnon 

Engine Co. 3 

Fire Fighter (Inspector) 

George Cameron 

Fire Prevention Division (Arson Squad) 

Fire Fighter Richard T. Doyle 

Ladder Co. 10 

Fire Fighter David W. Joseph 

Ladder Co. 10 



Fire Department 13 

1981 

Fire Lieutenant Henry T. Hickey 

Ladder Co. 15 

Fire Fighter (Inspector) 

Michael F. King 
Fire Prevention Division 

1982 

Rev. Daniel J. Mahoney 

Assistant Chaplain 

1984 

Fire Fighter Joseph F. Davies, Jr. 

Engine Co. 33 

1985 

Fire Fighter Robert M. Shaw 

Fire Prevention Div. 

Fire Fighter Francis X. Donlan 

Fire Prevention Div. 

1986 

Fire Captain James Evans 

Engine Co. 4 

Fire Fighter Edward Finch 

Ladder Co. 24 

F.F.O.P. Frank Rogier 

Ladder Co. 24 

F.F.O.P. William M.Gillis 

Engine Co. 10 



RECIPIENTS OF THE 
FIRE COMMISSIONER'S AWARD 

1982 

Fire Lieutenant Anthony J. Orlando 

Engine Co. 21 

1983 

Fire Fighter Robert M . Staunton 

Ladder Co. 4 

1984 

Fire Fighter Patrick A. Munroe 

Engine Co. 22 

1985 

Fire Fighter John R. Greene 

Ladder Co. 4 

1986 

Fire Fighter Robert M. Linnell 

Engine Co. 7 



14 City Document No. 11 

PLANNING AND LOGISTICS DIVISION 

The Planning and Logistics Division is responsible for four spe- 
cific areas of the Fire Department's daily routine: 

1. Office of Civil Defense 

2. Emergency Medical Services 

3. Underwater Recovery Team 

4. Liaison 

OFFICE OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

The Office Civil Defense maintains contact with Federal and 
State Offices of Civil Defense, as well as the general public and 
business community. 

The CD office provides radiological monitoring and testing 
when needed within the city and coordinates with the Police De- 
partment for the rotation and calibration of the 860 Radiological 
Monitoring Survey Meters. 

Frequent visits are made to the Taunton Surplus Depot to as- 
sure continued participation by the city in the acquisition of sur- 
plus property for various city departments. 

Necessary records and reports are submitted quarterly to the 
Federal and State Offices of Emergency Preparedness. 

Participation in "disaster drills" are becoming more frequent. 
These drills involve various city departments and gives opportu- 
nity to coordinate emergency planning. 

Hurricane "Gloria," in September 1985, provided a need to 
activate the Emergency Operating Center (EOC) in City Hall. 
Although the hurricane did not reach maximum potential in Bos- 
ton — and thus test our resources — it did test the system and 
revealed some strong and weak points. It did emphasize the need 
for a Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan and Mayor 
Flynn requested the State CD to assist Boston in preparing such a 
plan. The state has provided a Planning Team which is working 
with this office in developing such a plan. 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 

The Emergency Medical Services provides leadership to sev- 
eral ongoing programs. Training is provided at every fire house 
on current techniques used to perform C . P. R . (Cardiopulmonary 
Resuscitation) and other lifesaving measures, as well as training 
in the proper use of Emergency Medical Services equipment and 
materials. All members are required to have C. PR. training on a 
yearly basis under the First Responder Law. New recruits are 
instructed in and must satisfactorily complete the twenty-six- 
hour First Responder Course by Massachusetts state regulations. 



Fire Department 15 

The office keeps abreast of the latest techniques and proce- 
dures in emergency medical care through liaison with the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, Office of Emergency Medical Services of 
Massachusetts, American Medical Association and through at- 
tendance at various training seminars. 

The recertification of Registered Emergency Medical Techni- 
cians is coordinated through this office. Presently there are 120 
Registered Emergency Medical Technicians in the Boston Fire 
Department. A twenty-one-hour Refresher Course for EMTs is 
conducted annually at our Academy. A monthly mailing has 
been instituted to provide our EMTs with notice of various semi- 
nars in order for them to acquire the number of continuing edu- 
cation credits necessary to recertify. 

This office regularly attends various seminars on infectious dis- 
eases to gain up-to-date information. Department protocol is 
kept current for follow-up when dealing with a person who is 
suspected of having an infectious disease. Individual pocket re- 
suscitator masks have been issued to all engine and ladder com- 
panies in order to provide members with a safe and sensible 
solution to prevent cross contamination from exhaled air. AIDS is 
of special concern to our members, so we have continual contact 
with the Department of Health and Hospitals to assure us of the 
latest information and precautions. 

Starting in 1984, all companies have been issued new Trauma 
Kits. These are inspected, cleaned and restocked with bandaging 
materials, splints, obstetrical kits and back boards as needed. 

All Ladder and Rescue Companies are equipped with resusci- 
tators. During the past year, new Flynn Resuscitators were pur- 
chased and put into service on some engine companies in order to 
provide a faster response time to persons in need. Calibrations 
and repairs are done by this office at a savings to the city. 

This office conducts drills in the proper use and precautions of 
the survival suits assigned to certain companies. Warm- and cold- 
water drills are conducted each year to ascertain the suits buoy- 
ancy. 

UNDERWATER RECOVERY TEAM 

The Underwater Recovery Team is comprised of a Lieutenant/ 
Dive Master, an Assistant Dive Master and seven other divers all 
carefully selected. The members of the team work a regular 
schedule on their assigned company but are on call at all times for 
response to water- related emergency incidents. They are notified 
of their need from the Fire Alarm Office via the page system. 

Bimonthly drills help to maintain a high level of proficiency by 
practicing under-ice diving, water sled drills, search patterns, 
signals, and techniques for entering water from various shore ar- 



16 City Document No. 11 

eas throughout the city. Other drill facets include familiarization 
of piers and wharves, use of compass, and checking of dive equip- 
ment to assure constant readiness. 

The team keeps abreast of the latest diving techniques and pro- 
cedures through publications on the subject. New equipment 
and knowledge is constantly being developed to improve the 
safety and efficiency of divers. Seminars are attended on various 
aspects of diving. 

Records of drills and diving incidents are maintained. Routine 
maintenance and repair service for the hulls of the two fire boats 
is provided as necessary. This includes removal of debris which 
accumulates on shafts and propellers which, left unattended, 
could cause extensive damage. By performing this service for the 
Marine Unit, the city is saved considerable expense and it reduces 
the time the boats would be out of service. 

The team regularly responds to: 

1 . Incidents involving motor vehicles in the water; 

2. Incidents involving possible drowning victims due to acci- 
dents, attempted suicides, capsized vessels, and air craft; 

3. Pier and vessel fires which may include use of Monitor noz- 
zle; 

4. Maintenance and assistance on Marine Units and recovery 
of equipment lost overboard; 

5. Requests from Fire Investigating Unit to seek and recover 
items involved in arson investigations; 

6. Requests from Police Department to assist in recovering 
crime evidence; 

7. Calls from U.S. Navy or Coast Guard to assist. 

LIAISON 

The Planning and Logistics Division serves as liaison between 
the Fire Department and many public and private agencies 
which include the Mass. Department of Public Works, Mass. 
Turnpike and Mass. Port Authorities, MBTA, Boston Public Fa- 
cilities, Police, Transportation Department, Health and Hospi- 
tals, as well as other city agencies such as Boston Water and Sewer 
Commission, Housing and Redevelopment Authorities. Liaison 
is also maintained with the private sector which includes meet- 
ings with developers and contractors of the many projects pres- 
ently planned or in progress in Boston, and with utility 
companies (Boston Edison and Boston Gas) . Recently added is 
the Third Tunnel Crossing Committee. 

This division continues to work closely with the MBTA. This 
includes annual testing of sections of the subway standpipe sys- 
tem and is done after trains stop operating for the night. First 
alarm companies are used for the tests as this provides them with 



Fire Department 17 

familiarization of the various stations. Present plans call for ex- 
tending the subway platforms on the Red and Orange lines to 
accommodate longer trains. This involves street openings and 
changing street traffic patterns in the downtown area. This is 
addressed at preconstruction meetings and allows the Fire De- 
partment to add input on these projects before the plans are final- 
ized. The Southwest Corridor project is nearing completion and 
test are being conducted on this standpipe system as sections be- 
come ready. 

Availability of adequate water at easily accessible locations is a 
major concern for fire fighting. We are working with responsible 
agencies and departments to improve water resources at the To- 
bin Bridge, Callahan and Sumner Tunnels, Deer Island and vari- 
ous construction sites throughout the city. 

The division attends preconstruction conferences with the Bos- 
ton Public Works Department before work is started on street 
construction. Our concern is the adding or relocating of hy- 
drants, if necessary, and to assure the design does not prevent easy 
access to all streets and buildings by the Fire Department. Infor- 
mation regarding such work is forwarded to Deputy and District 
Fire Chiefs and when deemed necessary is posted in Special Or- 
ders. The Fire Alarm Office is always kept advised of temporary 
or permanent changes that might affect apparatus response or 
fire- fighting operations. 

Close coordination and cooperation continues with Boston 
Water and Sewer Commission who receive daily reports from us 
relative to defective hydrants. They advise us when repairs are 
made and this information is disseminated to the fire companies. 
A major concern of both parties is the illegal use of hydrants 
which wastes water and also reduces the water pressure and vol- 
ume available from hydrants for fire fighting. 



TRAINING, MAINTENANCE 
AND RESEARCH DIVISION 

The primary function of the Training, Maintenance and Re- 
search Division is twofold: 

1. To initiate and supervise the job development of the fire 
fighter, commencing with the probationary period and continu- 
ing throughout his career. 

2. To become involved in research programs designed to im- 
prove fire-fighting techniques, fire-fighting apparatus and 
equipment, and protection of fire fighters; to prepare specifica- 
tions for new fire apparatus; to test and evaluate newly acquired 
fire apparatus; to test and evaluate new tools and appliances be- 
fore recommending their use in the department. 



18 City Document No. 1 1 

The following summary covers in general the activities of this 
division. 

Available Facilities 

Training, Maintenance and Research Division Office, Head- 
quarters Building. 

Fire Fighting Equipment Stockroom and Repair Facility, 
Headquarters Building. 

Memorial Hall, Headquarters Building. 

John A. Martin Fire Academy. Moon Island. 

Compressed Air Tank and Fire Extinguisher Recharging Sta- 
tion, Moon Island. 

Compressed Air Cylinder Recharging Station, (5,000 pound 
capacity), Headquarters Building. 

Department Drilling and Training Program 

This division develops, formulates, and conducts drilling and 
training procedures covering the wide range of subjects, both ba- 
sic and newly developed, that must be taught and reviewed to 
insure efficient operations at fires and other incidents requiring 
the response of the Fire Department. It is absolutely essential that 
personnel of our department be trained and continuously re- 
viewed on the necessary tasks facing them in the fire service. A 
manual of standard operating procedures, previously estab- 
lished, covering the various activities of this department for the 
guidance of personnel and for uniform operations of the depart- 
ment was used in our training programs. These procedures are 
revised as required. 

Basic Fire Fighting 

This department conducted courses of instruction in the fun- 
damentals of fire fighting and fire safety for groups in the city and 
within the surrounding areas. The facilities of the Fire Academy, 
as well as the classrooms are used. These groups included other 
fire departments, insurance companies, security agencies, police 
departments, municipal organizations, hospitals, etc. In addi- 
tion, members from the various surrounding fire departments 
have attended our probationers' drill school. 

Mutual Aid Program for emergency recharging of high-pres- 
sure, air mask cylinders initiated with Mass. Training Academy, 
Cities of Quincy, Revere, and Worcester. 

Surveys 
Inspections and Tests 

Annual surveys, inspections, and tests are carried out througn- 
out the department to determine the condition of the various 



Fire Department 19 

tools and appliances used in the fire service. It is of extreme im- 
portance that periodic tests and checks of equipment be carried 
out to also insure the safety of personnel who may be called upon 
to use this equipment. 

Servicing and Repair Programs 

In order to maintain and guarantee safe and continuous opera- 
tions of fire-fighting equipment, tools and appliances, a year- 
round service and repair program is conducted by this division, 
at our repair facilities at Headquarters and at the Fire Academy. 
These facilities avoid delay and reduce the cost to the city of serv- 
icing and repairing this equipment. 

Inventory — Fire Fighting Equipment 

In order to carry on our servicing and repair programs and to 
insure the efficient operation of companies at fires, it is necessary 
for this division to maintain an inventory of fire-fighting tools, 
equipment, and parts for the same. This requires extensive re- 
cord-keeping and constant review. 

Research 

A very important function of this division is to conduct tests 
and experiments and thoroughly evaluate the merits of new 
equipment, materials, and appliances developed for the fire serv- 
ice. We are always alert to take advantage of progress made by 
manufacturers when the purchase of equipment becomes neces- 
sary and manufacturers are encouraged to submit samples of 
their products for test and evaluation. 

Protective Clothing and Equipment 
Work Clothes and Uniforms 

Field testing and evaluation programs will continue in an ef- 
fort to obtain safer, suitable, nonhazardous and flame retardant 
materials and products for fire fighters. Flame retardant sweat 
shirts, shirts, trousers and work gloves have been issued to the 
members of this department. 

Fire Coats 

Various types of fire coats continue to be field-tested and evalu- 
ated in the department. New specifications were formulated by 
this division in an ever-continuing effort to design and produce a 
coat suitable for fire-fighting purposes. 

Fire Helmets 

Field-testing will continue to be conducted on the various 



20 City Document No. 11 

models and types of materials. Leather and plastic fire helmets 
from Cairns Company are presently being field-tested in various 
fire companies in the department. Nonmetallic and other designs 
are being examined. 

Fire Boots 

Field-testing and evaluation on various types of boots, and re- 
lated equipment was continued. 

Miscellaneous Fire-Fighting Equipment 

Testing and evaluation on various tools and equipment, in- 
cluding nozzles, hose, fire-extinguishing compounds, rescue and 
forcible entry tools, etc. were continued. 

New Equipment 

The following equipment has been placed in service: 
Amkus Rescue Systems 
Holmatro Rescue Systems 

Hose 

Each engine company of the department has been equipped 
with 650 feet of 4-inch high-volume hose, a hydrant assist valve 
and an incoming relief valve. With the addition of this equip- 
ment, the water supplies at the fire scene have been greatly im- 
proved, thereby improving the overall fire-fighting operations. 

The l 3 /4-inch hose is another piece of equipment which has 
greatly benefited the department. This hose, being light weight 
and easily maneuverable, can be put into operation quickly to 
deliver 200 gallons per minute. 

Protective Breathing Equipment 

All the 4.5 air masks of this department have been converted 
from demand to positive pressure operation. 

Hydrant Thawing Devices 

The hydrant thawing devices are in the process of being re- 
built. 

Recruit Training 

From 1985 to 1987, ten recruit classes, totaling two hundred 
and forty-eight new trainees, both male and female, have been 
trained, tested and graduated from the Moon Island Training 
Academy. These people are now in their assigned companies do- 
ing fire duty. Additional classes will be trained until the proper 
complement has been attained. 



Fire Department 21 

In addition to the training of the new recruit classes at the 
Academy, a constant program of instructions and drills is held at 
both company level and at the Academy. For example, a maze 
has been constructed at Moon Island for additional training and 
confidence enhancement in the use of the 4 . 5 air mask. The entire 
fire-fighting force has completed the first phase of this training 
and is now progressing through additional phases. 

The convenience of video cassettes makes it possible to expand 
upon the training program at company level. With the cassettes, 
many subjects can be introduced and drilled upon, such as high- 
volume hose, fire-fighting techniques, fire-protective clothing, 
safety factors, etc. 

The Training, Maintenance and Research Division of this de- 
partment compares favorably with the outstanding training set- 
ups throughout the country. We have every reason to believe that 
the Fire Department will continue to be trained and maintained 
at this present high caliber and that progress through teaching 
and training will be the forerunner of greater efficiency. 



FIRE PREVENTION DIVISION 

Fire Investigation Unit 

The Arson Squad of this division is charged with the responsi- 
bility of investigating the cause and circumstances of every fire 
and explosion occurring within the city limits. The Boston Fire 
Department and Boston Police Department combination Arson 
Squad went into effect in April of 1977 and is still in progress. 
This has greatly increased the efficiency of the Arson Squad as 
shown by the number of arrests and convictions. Results of inves- 
tigations are to determine whether a fire was caused by careless- 
ness, design, or is a violation of law. These investigations are 
carried on for the use of the Boston Fire Department in removing 
causes of fires and explosions, apprehending of culprits responsi- 
ble for fires, and turning over all the facts and evidence to the 
State Fire Marshal. Many hours are spent on these investigations. 
The work done by the Fire Investigation Unit Squad in obtaining 
these convictions deserves a "well done" because arson is a diffi- 
cult crime to prosecute and requires many hours of hard work. 

In 1982, in order to eliminate duplication of efforts, a cohesive 
strike team was organized consisting of Fire Department person- 
nel, three Boston Police detectives, and agents from the Alcohol, 
Tobacco, and Firearms Division of the Treasury Department. 
The newly enlarged arson squad was moved to larger quarters at 
a disbanded f irehouse next to Fire Headquarters where two com- 
puter consoles were installed. One of the computers is directly 



22 City Document No. 11 

connected to City Hall and gives access to the records of other city 
departments such as the Building and Assessing Departments. All 
arson case data is now being entered into the WANG and IBM 
Computer systems; using the new report format called the BARS 
system — Boston Arson Reporting System — which is a complete 
arson reporting and tracking system that allows for the transla- 
tion of the narrative report into computer format. The sorting 
and analysis of information by computer allows the arson investi- 
gator to study each fire location in relation to an entire neighbor- 
hood as well as with other case histories with similar 
characteristics. 

Meetings are held at Fire Headquarters with Arson Investiga- 
tors from surrounding cities and towns to discuss the arson prob- 
lem on a metropolitan basis and to see if any similar patterns 
existed in the other communities. Many of the suburban cities 
were experiencing arson problems and we discovered the same 
patterns emerging in the suburbs, such as changing neighbor- 
hoods, gentrification, deteriorating housing, over-insurance, 
straw ownerships, etc. The meetings were considered successful 
with the goal of sharing information to be pursued in the future. 

Meetings are also held during the year with representatives of 
other city departments in an attempt to maintain an inventory of 
structures so that they can be identified as hazardous locations 
during fire-fighting operations if necessary. A file of current and 
previous owners of vacant structures is also helpful to the Arson 
Investigator. 

The Fire Department encourages citizen participation in any 
arson problem by holding meetings with neighborhood groups at 
which people are urged to maintain surveillance over vacant 
structures and report suspicious behavior in their neighborhood 
to the Arson Squad. 

During the calendar year 1985, the Fire Investigation Unit re- 
sponded to 2,236 incidents and complaints. As a result of these 
responses, ninety-one arrests for various crimes of arson and in- 
cendiarism were made, and accounted for approximately 546 
court appearances. Of the ninety-one persons arrested, seventy- 
two have been adjudged to have some degree of guilt in the crime 
he/she had been accused of. 

When we look back at the statistics for building fires for 1985, 
we note that there were 140 incidents originally classified unde- 
termined, 50 incidents originally classified arson/ incendiary, and 
425 incidents originally classified as suspicious, it is interesting 
that the seventy- two convictions cleared up a total of 142 inci- 
dents. There are still some persons who were arrested during 
1985 for the various crimes of arson/ incendiarism that have not 
been adjudged as yet; and those incidents that have not been 
cleared are still considered open and under investigation. 



Fire Department 23 

During the year 1985, from June 1 through August 31, an in- 
tense study of automobile fires was undertaken by this unit to 
determine, if possible, the reason for the high incidence of vehicle 
fires in the city. At this time, I report that the preliminary find- 
ings were contrary to our original premise, i.e. , that there was a 
great deal of owner fraud. 

The information concerning vehicle fires is still being analyzed 
in order to make inroads into this crime and thereby reducing it. 

The Fire Investigation Unit is also involved in the Juvenile Fire 
Setters Program sponsored by the F. A.I.R. Plan — where a juve- 
nile who may have a problem with some type of fascination with 
fire is brought in to a psychological setting and evaluated. If the 
juvenile needs counseling the plan provides for said counseling 
and help, until the problem is successfully overcome. 

During the calendar year 1986, the Fire Investigation Unit/ 
Arson Squad responded to 871 incidents for building and motor 
vehicle fires. An additional 1,080 other investigations (Attempts 
to Burn, Threats to Burn, False Alarms and Follow-ups) were 
conducted during the year. These investigations resulted in 94 
persons being arrested, which entitled a total number of 650 
court appearances by members of this unit. The outstanding ac- 
complishment was that said responses, investigations and court 
appearances brought about 92 convictions for violations of the 
law during the year 1986. 

Inspection Activity 

The Night Division of Inspection concentrated its efforts in the 
area of high population wherein our citizenry may be assembled 
for shopping, amusement, or entertainment with particular em- 
phasis in regard to places of public assembly in the City of Boston. 

The building inspection program is still being maintained at a 
high level. A total of 36,784 inspections were conducted during 
the year 1986. This allows the Fire Prevention Division to keep a 
very close surveillance on demolitions and removal of all debris 
from their location, thereby allowing for both the prevention of 
blight in the neighborhood and increasing the fire safety of the 
neighborhoods. This program also includes the supervising and 
posting of hazardous location signs. 

Gasoline tank truck inspections are still in effect in relation to 
the affixing of safety decals. 

All hospitals, clinics, and schools containing laboratories were 
inspected for illegal use and storage of propane. These inspec- 
tions remain a continuous effort. 

Personnel are assigned to new construction sites for the pur- 
pose of ensuring the available water supplies and the fire protec- 
tion equipment, as well as seeing that good housekeeping is 
maintained at these sites. 



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26 City Document No. 11 

Target Hazards 

In keeping with the program, the Fire Prevention Division is 
continuing on the inspections of large industrial complexes and 
warehouse areas along with the hospitals and schoolhouse in- 
spections. These inspections are made by officers of the Fire Pre- 
vention Division who are accompanied by the district chief of the 
fire district concerned and the company officer in whose subdis- 
trict the occupancy is located. Some of the inspections were follo- 
wups of last year and some are new ones that have been added. 

In schoolhouse inspections, a lieutenant has been assigned 
with an inspector from the Department of Public Safety to per- 
form in-depth inspections of all public, parochial, and private 
schools located within the confines of the City of Boston. These 
inspections are in addition to the regularly scheduled quarterly 
inspections required by law and performed by this division in 
conjunction with fire-fighting officers from the fire districts con- 
cerned. The assigned lieutenant worked with officials of the 
School Department and the district chiefs. 

Large Loss Fires 

Large loss fires encompassed all sections of the city that taxed 
the capabilities of the Boston Fire Department. In view of these 
large loss fires, both in material things and human life, the Fire 
Prevention Division maintains their "beefed-up" inspection pro- 
gram and their community relations and educational program 
with neighborhood committee meetings pardy aimed at the mi- 
nority groups located within our city and also those who do not 
speak our tongue. These educational programs and community 
relations programs have been aimed at all ethnic communities. 
This is being brought out by presentations and civic meetings of 
neighborhood committees and through educational programs in 
the schools. 

Inspection Force 

The Inspection Force of this division has established a program 
of inspection designed so that the occupants of the premises to be 
inspected can make no advance preparations to circumvent the 
honest viewing of any location. Additional inspections were 
made by the officers in the sub-districts where places of assembly 
are located. In locations requiring a special knowledge, the in- 
spectors of this division specially trained in that field were as- 
signed to make inspections to ascertain that no fire hazard existed 
or continued due to a lack of knowledge. All matters concerning 
other city departments were reported by the inspectors of this 
division on the necessary forms to the department charged with 
this responsibility. 



Fire Department 27 

FIRE DEPARTMENT CHEMIST 

The Fire Department Chemist reports to the Office of the Fire 
Marshal. The duties and responsibilities of the Chemist include 
the development and implementation of regulations based on the 
Fire Prevention Code, Article IX, Decorations, Furnishings and 
Interior Finish, and Article XX, Hazardous Materials and the es- 
tablishment of an analytical laboratory to support fire investiga- 
tion. The Chemist is generally responsible in other divisions for 
technical matters relating to occupational safety and health, pro- 
tective clothing and equipment and the development of opera- 
tional procedures for incidents involving hazardous materials. 

(1) The Department achieved a substantial increase in the 
regulation of combustible building contents such as draperies, 
upholstered furniture, and floor and wall coverings. This action 
particularly affected materials and products for hotels, hospitals 
and high-rise office buildings. The enforcement of the expanded 
fire prevention regulations was achieved in part through infor- 
mation and educational meetings with designers, specifiers, pur- 
chasing agents, safety personnel, building owners, and building 
managers where the Chemist discussed the reasons for the new 
regulations and then presented visual demonstrations of burning 
furniture and bedding. He also provided information on the pro- 
cedures used to apply for, and obtain approval of, regulated ma- 
terials and products. 

(2) During 1982, new testing procedures to evaluate products 
containing combustible foam padding such as upholstered furni- 
ture and mattress pads were implemented, which included the 
use of full-scale fire tests. Action taken by the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment on the basis of these evaluation procedures has materially 
contributed to decreasing the risk of serious fire problems in the 
City. The development of new upholstered furniture with im- 
proved fire safety, which is now being specified in many locations 
throughout the country, has brought national recognition to the 
department. In April of 1982, the Commissioner, acting on the 
recommendation of the Fire Department Chemist, issued a ban 
on the uncontrolled use of highly flammable, foamed plastic 
mattress pads which were being used in many of the City's hospi- 
tals. A number of new mattress pads were subsequently devel- 
oped and have been approved for use in hospitals. This action 
received widespread attention and similar regulations have been 
adopted across the nation. 

(3) Administrative procedures were organized to implement 
and enforce regulations controlling the transportation of hazard- 
ous materials in the City of Boston. This effort required designa- 
tion of special police powers for the Chemist and support 
personnel to enforce the above regulation. The enforcement ef- 



28 City Document No. 11 

fort included stopping motor vehicles which were transporting 
hazardous materials, examining the contents, and then carrying 
out administrative action in court proceedings for the offenders. 
The result of this effort was possible because of considerable in- 
teraction and cooperation between the Chemist and the City 
Law Department. These regulations have proven effective in 
substantially reducing the transportation of LNG (Liquefied 
Natural Gas), LPG (Liquefied Propane) , and flammable liquids 
including gasoline through the city. 

(4) The Department Chemist worked with the Fire Fighting 
Division and the Boston Edison Company to develop a standard 
operating procedure for responding to fires and other emergen- 
cies involving high- voltage transformers. Special procedures 
were developed to protect members of the department working 
at incidents which involve the potentially dangerous dielectric 
fluids containing PCB's (polychlorinated biphenyls) . 

(5) Activities in the Training, Maintenance and Research Di- 
vision included updating specifications for fire coats, field testing 
a new glove for fire fighters, and development of a specification 
for improved trousers to be worn by fire fighters, particularly 
when fire boots are not worn. The Department Chemist also rep- 
resented the Boston Fire Department as Chairman of the NFPA 
Committee on Protective Clothing and Equipment for Fire 
Fighters. 

(6) The Department Chemist is involved in emergency re- 
sponse to fires and emergencies where chemicals were involved, 
and where fire fighters or building occupants had been exposed to 
potentially hazardous conditions. In several of these incidents, it 
was necessary for the Chemist to don protective clothing and to- 
gether with suitably protected fire fighters, enter a building 
which was, or had recently been involved in a fire or where a spill 
of hazardous material had occurred. 

Analytical Laboratory 

The establishment of the Fire Department Analytical Labora- 
tory was accomplished in accordance with the order of the Fire 
Commissioner following the mandate of the Mayor in February 
1984. The laboratory is equipped with modern analytical instru- 
ments and has been staffed by a graduate intern from Northeast- 
ern University and a uniformed fire fighter who was employed in 
a research laboratory prior to joining the Fire Department. A 
new position, entitled "Senior Analytical Chemist," was estab- 
lished and filled in 1985 to provide full-time professional staff for 
the laboratory. The immediate goal is to establish a sound scien- 
tific basis for the acceptance by the courts of the laboratory re- 
ports and the testimony of the Senior Analytical Chemist in 
criminal cases. The establishment of the Fire Department Ana- 



Fire Department 29 

lytical Laboratory will enhance the capability of the Fire De- 
partment to successfully investigate and prosecute cases 
involving arson. 

Control of Decorations, Furnishings and Interior Finish 

Under the authority of Article IX of the Fire Prevention Code, 
the Department Chemist has continued the development and im- 
plementation of controls on combustible building contents, in- 
cluding draperies, upholstered furniture, floor coverings, wall 
coverings and mattresses in hotels and university dormitories. In 
addition to classification of materials by performance of fire 
tests, considerable effort was expended to inform and communi- 
cate with architects, designers, purchasing agents and sales orga- 
nizations the importance of these regulations and the procedures 
for compliance. 

In 1985, special controls were ordered by the Fire Marshal for 
combustible display materials in auditoriums and exhibition 
halls as part of the Fire Prevention Program for these high-den- 
sity public assembly occupancies. 

Hazardous Materials 

Under the authority of the Fire Prevention Code, Article I and 
XX, the Fire Marshal issued Fire Prevention Order 85-1 to Re- 
quire a Permit for Asbestos Removal in Boston. The Department 
Chemist developed this program following the occurrence of sev- 
eral incidents in which fire fighters were accidentally exposed to 
asbestos dust and the equipment was contaminated. This pro- 
gram required contractors to obtain permits, instituted on-site 
control of combustible debris, required the use of flame-retard- 
ant enclosure materials and instituted notification to the Fire 
Alarm Office of the ongoing asbestos-removal operation sites so 
that upon receipt of an alarm, responding companies are notified 
and appropriate precautions are taken to reduce risk of exposure 
to the hazardous environmental conditions. 

In 1985, fifty-eight permits were issued by the Fire Prevention 
Division and incidence of Fire Department personnel exposure to 
hazardous atmosphere containing asbestos was substantially re- 
duced. 

The program to identify the location of electrical transformers 
and other high- voltage equipment containing PCBs and other di- 
electric fluids was continued in the Fire Prevention Division. 
Computerization of information has been implemented so that 
upon receipt of an alarm for any location in the City, the presence 
of electrical transformers and the type of dielectric fluids present 
will be automatically indicated to the Fire Alarm Office and 
transmitted to the responding fire companies and chief officers. 
The implementation of this program substantially reduces the 



30 City Document No. 1 1 

occurrence of occupational exposure 1 to the hazardous atmo- 
spheres which can be produced when these fluids are spilled or 
ignited. 

Under the direction of the Department Chemist, the Fire De- 
partment has developed the capability to provide a technical spe- 
cialist on-call at all times for response to hazardous material 
incidents. This capability is provided by the Department Chem- 
ist and two alternates who are members of the Operating Divi- 
sion assigned to fire companies. The two alternates have an 
undergraduate degree in physical science and have received spe- 
cial training in the handling of hazardous materials spills and 
fires. The ready availability of professional personnel can expe- 
dite the resolution of these incidents and reduce the risk of injury 
to Fire Department personnel. 

Massachusetts Right To Know Law 

In April of 1985, the Mayor appointed the Fire Department 
Chemist as the Acting Municipal Coordinator for the City of Bos- 
ton for the Massachusetts Right to Know Law. The Chemist, or a 
designated alternate, is available in this capacity at all times. 
Prior to this time, the Chemist worked with the Department of 
Health and Hospitals and the Department of Labor Relations to 
develop a program by which the City could itself comply with the 
law by providing information and training to employees. The 
Department Chemist developed and implemented a compliance 
program for the Fire Department. 

Inspection Section 

The Inspection Division has been expanded to include an on 
duty force from 0900-0230 hours. 

The Day Inspection Division is available 0900-1700 hours and 
Night Inspection Division 1830-0230 hours. 

The Inspection Division's primary role is to address com- 
plaints, follow up on abatement notices and the enforcement of 
the smoke detector compliance law Chapter 148, section'26F. 

The Inspection Division also includes a Hotel/Motel Safety Of- 
ficer, School Inspection Officer, a Hospital Safety Officer, a Lab- 
oratory Safety Officer, a Flammable Decorations Inspector and a 
Flammable liquid and gas inspection section. 

These inspectors are available to assist department personnel 
in the performance of their duties, as well as performing every- 
day inspections of the identified properties. 

Plans Examination Section 

The Plans Examination is mandated by Mass. State Building 
Code 113.5 and the Boston Fire Prevention Code 1.06D to ap- 



Fire Department 31 

prove all plans and specifications submitted to the Building De- 
partment which require Fire Protective Systems. 

Public Education Section 

In addition to the duties of the School Safety Officer is the pre- 
sentation of Public Fire and Life Safety Education programs. 
Presentations are made to students, private businesses and civic 
groups. 

Management Information Section 

The Management Information Systems Unit is responsible for 
coordinating all electronic data processing applications and op- 
erations. It is responsible for the maintenance and integrity of the 
Boston Fire Incident Reporting Systems. The MISU issues daily, 
weekly and monthly reports pertaining to fire incidents and anal- 
ysis to the Commissioner, Chief of Operations, Fire Marshal, Fire 
Investigations Unit and other appropriate personnel. 

The MISU is also responsible for meeting the reporting re- 
quirements of the State Fire Marshal and the United States Fire 
Data Center. 

Photographic Activity 

This unit responds to all working fires and multiple alarm 
fires, accidents involving Fire Department vehicles or property, 
special calls for specific photographic records, Fire Prevention 
Code violations and fire hazard conditions for correction or pros- 
ecution. Approximately 15,000 prints are made each year. The 
unit also utilizes video cameras and video cassette recorders when 
that type of coverage is required. This unit is also a very impor- 
tant part of the Fire Investigation Unit in photographing arson- 
related materials. 

Plans Examiner 

Each year the Plans Examiner examines and approves approxi- 
mately 700 sets of plans. He is also required to convey by tele- 
phone, information relative to applicable codes for specific 
occupancies. Review of plans are made for autonomous authori- 
ties, preliminary discussions are made relative to proposed struc- 
tures with regard to requirements, and appearances are made at 
both state and local hearings to voice opinions of the Fire Depart- 
ment. As a result of complaint or request, on-site inspections are 
made of various projects, particularly in the area of self-service 
gasoline stations prior to their openings to assure compliance 
with the Fire Prevention Regulations of the state and the fire pre- 
vention orders of this department. Research work on existing and 
proposed code changes or additions are also part of the Plans Ex- 



32 City Document No. 1 1 

aminer's function. From time to time, he is called upon to read 
and comment on various items of interest to this department, 
such as other city code requirements and proposed changes to 
accepted fire protection reference standards. In addition, cleri- 
cal work is necessary to maintain microfilm files on projects ap- 
proved by this department. The Plans Examiner is also a 
designated representative of the Fire Commissioner at Fire Pre- 
vention and Fire Protection Board meetings, and State Building 
Code Commission. 

Another function of this office is to convey information to the 
public relative to code requirements for smoke detectors, alarm 
systems, sprinklers, and other fire protection devices. 

Fire Prevention Activity 

The Fire Prevention Division continues its efforts with an 
around-the-clock program of fire prevention, 365 days a year. 
Financial assistance is obtained through funds donated by the 
Fire Safety Council, which is a citizen-sustained group that aids 
in the purchase of educational material in our fire prevention 
program. Their assistance in our effort is extremely valuable. 

Members of the Boston Fire Department in uniform, passed 
out pamphlets containing a brief department history at the cor- 
ner of Summer and Washington Streets in the heart of the shop- 
ping district. Members also passed out approximately 60,000 
pamphlets to Senior Citizens and other groups concerning smoke 
detectors and Life Safety. 

General 

The Fire Prevention Division maintains a constant, in-service 
training of all members assigned to this division. Seminars are 
held for all members assigned to the Fire Prevention Division to 
keep abreast of current changes in inspection techniques, 
changes in rules and regulations, or any change in statute law. 
This includes the explanation, use, and implementation of the 
new State Building Code with regards to changes as it effects the 
Boston Fire Department. These seminars are also extended to 
members of the fire fighting force by holding instructional peri- 
ods on Fire Prevention Code enforcement, and also instructional 
courses for officers of the department relative to their responsibil- 
ities in inspections, corrections, and the issuance of all necessary 
notices ordering the correction, or the appearance of delinquents 
into the various district courts. This also includes Smoke Detector 
Laws and Ordinances. The constant supervision by the night 
club inspectors and theatre inspectors of this division results in 
the continuing correction of any violations or deficiencies or 
overcrowding in places of assembly. The thoroughness with 
which the fire prevention inspectors follow through on the 



Fire Department 33 

flameproofing of decorative materials used in the various occu- 
pancies within this city, i.e. , places of assembly, institutions, the- 
atres, etc. , maintains a high level of safety to life from fire in these 
occupancies. The work performed by the members of this divi- 
sion makes the City of Boston a safer place in which to live, work, 
or play. 



PERMITS, LICENSES, AND FEES 

During the period covered by this report, 1978 through 1987, 
the following revenue was collected for permits, licenses, and 
fees: 

1978 $ 66,267.89 

1979 484,134,15 

1980 448,854.95 

1981 305,904.03 

1982 223,825.82 

1983 481,752.51 

1984 547,175.52 

1985 706,944.60 

1986 753,652.70 

1987 1,164,079.18 

TOTAL $5,182,591.35 

FIRE ALARM DIVISION 

In 1979, the Operating Force of the Fire Alarm Division han- 
dled 55,307 incidents. This figure includes building fires, auto 
fires, medical assist and other related Fire Department re- 
sponses. The Operating Force received two new fire alarm oper- 
ators. 

The Fire Alarm Construction Force installed 40,550 feet of un- 
derground and overhead cable throughout the city. They also re- 
ceived eight new employees as linemen. Various other related 
work activities were performed, including replacement of defec- 
tive fire alarm boxes (locks, hinges, shells, etc.). The Construc- 
tion Force also installed fourteen new EVCS boxes in Roxbury, 
Dorchester, and Downtown Area to reduce the number of false 
alarms. With the installation of these new EVCS boxes, the cir- 
cuits had to be rerouted in some areas. Fire Alarm Inspections of 
Internal Fire Alarm Systems totaled fifty. New master boxes tied 
into the Municipal Fire Alarm System was fifteen. Pre- fix boxes 
discontinued from the records was six. The inside wiremen re- 
paired and maintained all electrical equipment in all Fire De- 
partment buildings. Plans reviewed by the Fire Alarm Division 



34 City Document No. 11 

for installation of fire alarm system or relocating cables due to 
various construction projects was approximately 125. 

The Radio Shop started to replace the old radio system with an 
updated system within the Fire Alarm Office. They also installed 
new mobile radio units in department vehicles. During the year, 
the following equipment was purchased by the department: two 
paging units; eight mobile radio units; and sixteen base station 
units with testing equipment. Tone keying equipment was pur- 
chased and new voting sytems. The arrival of seventy-eight new 
portable radio units in the department was the start of the up- 
grading of the Radio System. All of this equipment purchased 
was installed by the Radio Shop and assigned to various compan- 
ies throughout the City of Boston Fire Deparment. 

During the year of 1980, the Operating Force of the Fire Alarm 
Division handled 53,717 incidents which resulted in the dis- 
patching of Fire Department apparatus. These figures included 
building fires, auto fires, false alarms, and medical assists. 

The Fire Alarm Construction Force installed approximately 
37,000 feet of underground and overhead cables, resulting in up- 
grading the Fire Alarm System. The Construction Force contin- 
ued to maintain the circuits and fire alarm boxes. Also during the 
year, the division installed approximately twenty new EVCS 
boxes in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Downtown Areas to re- 
duce the false alarms. The planning process for relocating equip- 
ment and cables in the path of the proposed Southwest Corridor 
Project was implemented. Fire Alarm System inspections num- 
bered in the 100 range of which include Local, Central Station, 
and Master Box Connections. New master boxes installed into the 
Municipal System was nineteen. Pre-fix boxes discontinued from 
the system was eight. 

The inside wiremen assisted in the planning and wiring of a 
new generator at Fire Headquarters. They also installed new 
electric fixtures at various firehouses. Also they started installing 
the necessary equipment to be used for the Wang Computer Sys- 
tem planned for this department. 

The Radio Shop started converting the radio consoles on the 
Main Floor at the Fire Alarm Office. In preventive maintenance 
program, they replaced various paging units for Channel 5 re- 
ceivers in the firehouses. More new equipment was purchased 
during 1980 as follows: one voting station; four base stations; 200 
mobile radio units; and one new radio console unit. All of the 
above-mentioned equipment was installed by the Radio Shop. 

The Boston Fire Department responded to a total of 50,010 
alarms during 1981, which is a decrease of 6.9 percent from 
53,717 alarms in 1980. False alarms totaled 12,988, including 
10,650 boxes pulled false and 2,338 false still alarms. 



Fire Department 35 

The number of false alarms has been declining in recent years, 
partially due to the purchase of new telephone boxes. Although 
there was no money available in 1981 for additional phone boxes, 
several of those already in service were moved from downtown 
locations, where they saw little use, to the East Boston District 
where they have helped to reduce the false alarm problems in 
that district. In addition to that program, sixty-eight boxes were 
removed from service during the year in high false alarm areas 
and changed to phantom status. 

In order to increase fire safety in private buildings containing 
large populations, forty-three master boxes were installed during 
1981, principally in hotels. The total number of box locations has 
increased from 2,709 in service on December 31, 1980, to 2,722 
boxes in service on December 31, 1981. 

In the year 1982, the operating force of the Fire Alarm Division 
handled 44,484 incidents including eighty-one working fires and 
177 multiple alarms. The period which reflects a great amount of 
credit to the operating force from May to August, when twenty- 
five working fires and eighty-five multiples occurred. This per- 
iod greatly strained all the resources of the department, but most 
particularly, those of the Fire Alarm Office. During this period, 
the on-duty strength of the office was normally four men, but 
quite often one of these men was a volunteer from the Construc- 
tion Force whose normal duties did not include dispatching. At a 
time when it was not uncommon to have two or three multiple 
alarms at the same time, the Fire Alarm Office met all of the 
challenges of providing service to the Fire Fighting Force in the 
manner which the department expects of it. 

The Radio Shop is responsible for maintaining thirty-six base 
stations and twelve satellite receiving sites. These include the 
four new radio channels, the dispatch channel, Fire District 13, 
the MBTA tunnel radios, and the paging system. 

During the year, four base stations were removed from the 
Quincy City Hospital and placed at St. Margaret's Hospital to 
improve coverage in the Meeting House Hill area. Equipment 
was also installed in Engine 55's quarters to improve coverage in 
the West Roxbury-Hyde Park area. 

The year 1982 was remarkable in that our radio system which 
includes all of the above equipment, plus 216 mobile radios, 
ninety portable radios, and receivers and P. A. systems for each 
firehouse was maintained by three members of the Fire Alarm 
Division during a period in which the resources of the depart- 
ment were strained to the limit. 

In 1982, the Fire Department acquired 1.4 miles of under- 
ground duct from the MBTA in connection with the Southwest 
Corridor development. In addition to this, the Fire Alarm Divi- 



36 City Document No. 1 1 

sion installed 7,000 feet of sixty-one conductor cable, 5,000 feet 
of nineteen conductor cable, 6,000 feet of ten conductor cable 
and 2,900 feet of four conductor cable in connection with the 
same project. All labor and materials were paid for under a grant 
from the MBTA. 

In cooperation with the Economic Development Corporation, 
the Construction Force began a major project to replace all the 
cable in the Old South Boston Navy Yard. Over the course of the 
next two years, all such cable will be replaced in this area and 
work will begin on the renovation of the Army Base fire alarm 
system. 

In cooperation with the Boston Redevelopment Authority, 
that portion of the Charlestown Navy Yard taken over by the 
BRA was recabled and six voice fire alarm boxes were installed. 
The cable in that portion of the old Navy Yard, now known as the 
National Historic Park, was replaced in cooperation with the Na- 
tional Park Service. 

During 1982, the construction force erected radio antennas at 
St. Margaret's Hospital, at Engine 55, and at Faulkner Hospital. 
They also made the initial installation of conduit at Fire Head- 
quarters for the routing of cable for the new Wang Computer 
System. 

Under the requirements of Fire Prevention Order 80-1, which 
covers Hotel Fire Alarm Systems, twenty-four hotels were tied to 
the Fire Alarm Office through the installation of master boxes. In 
addition to these, thirty-eight other master boxes were installed, 
including that which protects the USS Constitution. 

The division also carried out inspection of 134 fire alarm sys- 
tems connected by master boxes and removed eighty-four fire 
alarm boxes from service in connection with the false alarm re- 
duction program. 

For the year 1983, the Operating Force of the Fire Alarm Divi- 
sion handled 40,568 incidents resulting in the response of Fire 
Department apparatus. The Fire Alarm Operating Force was in- 
creased by the hiring of an additional five new fire alarm opera- 
tors. 

The Construction Force installed 50,000 feet of underground 
and overhead cable, which included replacing of defective cable 
and new cable for new cable routes. This figure includes the ca- 
ble being installed for the necessary relocations of cable and 
equipment along the Southwest Corridor Project. Other tasks 
performed during the year included the preventive maintenance 
program of Fire Alarm boxes (locks, hinges, ruby domes, etc.). 

Inspections increased to about 175 during the year; this in- 
cluded high-rise complex, hospitals, apartment buildings and 
schools. These inspections included Master Box, Central Station, 
and Local Systems. 



Fire Department 37 

New Master Boxes connected in the Municipal System totaled 
twenty-seven. Pre-fix boxes discontinued totaled ten. Plans re- 
viewed by the Fire Alarm Division for Internal Fire Alarm Sys- 
tems was approximately 125. Also other plans were received for 
various other projects involving the relocation of fire alarm 
equipment. The inside wiremen continued their program of pre- 
ventive maintenance on electrical equipment at various depart- 
ment buildings. They also helped in installing wiring and the 
other related equipment for the new air-conditioning units at the 
Fire Alarm Office. 

The Fire Alarm Division — Radio Shop personnel — started to 
install new receivers and base station equipment at various loca- 
tions. Continued to work on the installation of the new radio sys- 
tem throughout the department. Also during 1983, the Fire 
Department took over the new radio system in the MBTA Sub- 
way System. Additional new radio equipment purchased in or- 
der to update the radio system was purchased as follows: forty 
satellite receivers; twelve paging units; and a desk top remote 
console. 

In the year 1984, the Operating Force of the Fire Alarm Divi- 
sion handled 43,499 incidents. Fifty-eight of these incidents were 
working fires, 84 were multiple alarms and 7,473 were false 
alarms. 

During 1985, the Operating Force received 48,983 incidents. 
Of these, 54 were working fires, 92 were multiple alarms and 
8,829 were false alarms. 

The beginning of CAD (computer assisted dispatch) occurred 
within the Boston Fire Department with the installation of a 
Wang VS-25 computer at the Fire Alarm Office in 1984. The de- 
velopment of all the various programs and data bases which com- 
prise such a system has been an ongoing project of the division 
since that time. Because of the restriction on data storage, the 
system has not yet reached its full implementation. At the present 
time, the system is used for box and apparatus assignments. Tim- 
ing of the various steps in the receipt of an alarm has shown that 
up to three minutes can be saved in the processing of an alarm 
especially during periods of heavy alarm activity. 

A three-minute saving means that the nearest apparatus is at 
least a mile closer to the scene of the incident than it would other- 
wise be. 

With the installation of newer computers with faster process- 
ing times and larger storage media, the Fire Alarm Office can 
retrieve almost any type of information for use in the activities of 
the Fire Department. This would include access to other City of 
Boston data bases as well as the department's own. 

The increase in the strength of the Operating Force is also a 
welcome addition to the efficiency of the Fire Alarm Office. 



38 City Document No. 1 1 

In 1984, radio repeaters were installed in both the Sumner and 
Callahan Tunnels, both for use of units working in either of the 
tunnels or for en- route instructions to companies responding to 
fires in either East Boston or Boston. This installation was com- 
pletely funded by Massachusetts Turnpike Authority. 

Because of problems associated with a fire in the Turnpike tun- 
nel under the Prudential Center, we were also able to persuade 
the Turnpike Authority to install a similar radio repeater in this 
tunnel. This work was completed in 1985. 

In 1985, all the fire stations had new receivers installed in them 
on the new channel 1, 483.1625 mhz. Prior to this, the communi- 
cations on channel 1 were repeated to the fire stations on the old 
33.74 mhz channel. 

In the past two years, forty-three pagers were placed in opera- 
tion on the new radio system. 

During 1984, two, new satellite- receiving locations were in- 
stalled at the William Barton Rogers School in Hyde Park and at 
the West Roxbury High School to improve portable operation in 
the Hyde Park/West Roxbury area. 

In 1985, a new portable, more resistant to water, was received 
and placed in operation. It appears to have diminished the porta- 
ble radio problems related to water. 

The following amounts of cable were installed by the Con- 
struction Force: 



No. of Conductors 
RuralC 

4 

7 

10 

19 

37 

61 



Two major projects of note were completed in 1985, the re- 
placement and relocation of 7,000 feet of 7 conductor cable in 
Western Avenue, Brighton. The relocation was from old Fire De- 
partment duct to Telephone Company duct, reducing our main- 
tenance requirements on the old duct. The second major project 
was the replacement of nearly 2 miles of 37 conductor cable from 
Centre and Moraine Streets to Brigham Circle. 

The work on the major phases of the Southwest Corridor cable 
project has been finished. There is some minor work to be com- 
pleted. This work was done at no cost to the City of Boston be- 
cause of MBTA funding. 



1984 


1985 


2,000 


4,000 


5,000 


8,000 


3,000 


11,000 


17,000 


5,000 


8,000 


8,500 


4,850 


15,000 


800 





Fire Department 39 

New Master Boxes Boxes Placed Back 
Installed in Service 

1984 65 1984 17 

1985 50 1985 2 

The number of interior fire alarm systems connected to the 
Boston Fire Department has increased as shown. Aside from this, 
there were also plans examination and system inspection/ accept- 
ance tests on approximately 500 systems during the two-year per- 
iod. 

A unique, new concept has been added to interior fire alarm 
systems. In the Copley Place complex, a radio repeater has been 
installed to insure Fire Department communications in even the 
remotest part of the complex-. This requirement was initiated be- 
cause of the vast amount of concrete and reinforcing rods re- 
quired in building construction. 

The division, as a result of its action against Cablevision, re- 
covered approximately $24,000 in material for damages to the 
Fire Alarm System. 

A program has been instituted to put new lighting fixtures in a 
number of the older fire stations and will be continued. The sta- 
tions affected by this program were Engine Companies 51 , 21 , 30 
and 37. As part of this same program, a new electric service was 
installed on the fireboats' pier. A part of this work on the pier was 
as a result of equipment donated by the Massachusetts Port Au- 
thority. 

In an effort to reduce false alarms from smoke detectors, Fire 
Alarm Regulation No. 1 has been revamped so that the minimum 
obscuration of any smoke detector shall be 2 percent and that in 
all cases the rating of the smoke detector shall reflect the actual 
conditions found in the areas where smoke detectors are required 
to be installed. 

During the year of 1986, the Operating Force of the Fire Alarm 
Division handled 49 , 300 incidents resulting in the response of fire 
apparatus. The CAD System continued in the forward mode 
with the additional installation of necessary equipment to make 
it become a reality in the near future. The installation of the new 
telephone system moved a step closer with the awarding of a con- 
tract. The Fire Alarm Operating force was increased by eight 
new fire alarm operators. Also the construction force was in- 
creased by five new employees. 

The Fire Alarm Construction Force installed a total of 42,000 
feet of underground and overhead cable in various locations of 
the City; worked on the defective splices; and replaced defective 
parts on boxes. 

The Inspection Force conducted over 150 inspections involv- 
ing Fire Alarm Systems connected to Central Stations and Master 



40 City Document No. 1 1 

Boxes. There were sixty-two installations of new Master Boxes in 
the Municipal Circuit System . Various surveys were conducted of 
Fire Alarm Systems that have planned additions or retrofits. A 
total of 191 plans were reviewed and approved for the installa- 
tion of Internal Fire Alarm Systems. Plans were also submitted 
for review regarding the relocation of cables in Charlestown, 
Huntington Avenue and Nashua Street. Nine new fire alarm 
boxes were installed in the Prudential Tunnel for any emergency 
that may arise on the Turnpike Extension. 

Inside Wiremen continued to replace defective equipment. 
Also work was performed on removing wiring and cutting over 
other wiring at the Fire Alarm Office. Installation continued on 
the necessary wiring for the Wang Computer System . Wiring was 
installed to the area of the Dictaphone for Register Circuits. 

The Radio Shop installed new radio equipment in the Emer- 
gency One Apparatus, District Cars and Division Cars. New 
portable radios were issued to District Fire Chiefs, Deputy Chiefs 
in both Divisions and Company Commanders. A new Dicta- 
phone Machine was installed for recording of all messages. Also, 
the Fire Alarm Register was tied in to same Dictaphone. During 
the year, the following new equipment had been purchased: sev- 
enteen Mobile Units, one Motorola Cellular Phone, twenty-two 
Portable Radios and fourteen Signal Quality Modules. 



PERSONNEL AND SAFETY DIVISION 

The Personnel Section supervises, monitors and records all 
facets of a member's day-to-day career in the fire service, begin- 
ning with the selection of recruits, to a member's retirement or 
separation. This includes the hearing of all disciplinary matters, 
leaves of absence (sick, injury, vacation etc.), promotional ex- 
ams, personal days, daily manpower, performance records, all in 
a master personnel file. 

In addition to the above, the years of 1984-1986 saw the devel- 
opment of a Personnel Tracking System making readily available 
all statistical data related to all members' personal files. 

The Safety Division, under the direction of a Deputy Fire 
Chief along with a District Fire Chief for each working group, is 
responsible for monitoring evolutions of procedures at fires and 
proper use of personal protective equipment in an effort to re- 
duce personal injuries and loss of time. 

Personal safety being of paramount concern in our depart- 
ment, the Safety Division is involved in testing and the evaluation 



Fire Department 41 

of protective clothing, research and field testing of safety equip- 
ment and the issuance of new tools and appliances. 

Accomplishments in the years of 1984-1986 have included ma- 
jor improvements in our respiratory equipment, issuance of a 
new personal fire-fighting light and research on a personal alarm 
signalling system. 



SPECIAL HAZARDS RESPONSE UNIT 

Boston's Special Hazards Response Unit, better known as the 
Haz Mat Unit with call letters H 3, was put into service on May 
12, 1985. 

Recognizing the need for a unit to cope with the increasing 
incidents in hazardous materials, the Fire Commissioner dele- 
gated the task of forming this unit to members and former mem- 
bers of the Rescue Company. 

Through the efforts of this team, the vehicle used as the pri- 
mary section of a four-piece unit consisting of Rescue Company 
1, Ladder Companies 15 and 16, along with the equipment car- 
rier, was put together with little or no expense to the City, due to 
the donation from a national soft drink vendor. 

Presently, this unit and its equipment for handling hazardous 
materials, is equal to and in some cases surpasses that of many 
large cities throughout the nation. 

Members of the team are field testing a variety of hazardous 
materials equipment, and improvement of existing equipment is 
ongoing. The constant emphasis is on training and updating 
methods of handling the unusual incidents. There has been 
"cross-training" of team members with New York City and units 
from other large cities. Team members from throughout the 
northeast met in Brockton to discuss the current status of hazard- 
ous materials response. 

The future looks bright for members of the department re- 
sponding to incidents where hazardous materials are present. 
There are new developments in the field of fire safety with re- 
gards to chemical resistant clothing and materials for containing 
hazardous material incidents, and these products are constantly 
being added to the Special Hazards Unit. 



PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE 

The Public Information Office has been involved in the direc- 
tion and execution of the following: 



42 City Document No. 1 1 

Arrangements for over 5,000 visitors yearly to the various fire 
stations and facilities of the Boston Fire Department. Acquisition 
and distribution of printed fire prevention and fire safety mate- 
rial to the above-mentioned visitors and interested parties. News 
media coverage of multiple alarm fires and unusual incidents, 
including fatal fires. Maintaining records of multiple alarm fires. 
Providing research materials and information for television doc- 
umentaries, radio programs, and newspaper or magazine artic- 
les. Research and answering various types of surveys and 
requests. Participation in several career exhibition programs. Ar- 
ranging and covering departmental swearing-in, promotional 
ceremonies and award presentations. Coordination of the An- 
nual Fire Prevention Parade and apparatus competition during 
Fire Prevention Week. Acting as liaison with the Greater Boston 
Fire Safety Council, a group of Greater Boston business persons 
whose efforts assist the Boston Fire Department in the field of fire 
safety education. Conducted weekly talks and exhibition of films 
to Boston Housing Authority Elderly Housing facilities through- 
out the city. Administer United Way Drive and other charitable 
appeals among Fire Department personnel. Assisted in prepara- 
tion of Annual Ball Award Certificates. Worked with other gov- 
ernmental agencies in the production of fire safety presentations. 
Established and maintained Photo Identification Unit. Partici- 
pated with Department Chaplains, Church Committee and 
Honor Guard in the preparation of dedications, memorials, fu- 
nerals and other spiritual functions including submission of obit- 
uary stories to local newspapers. Maintained Video Library in 
conjunction with Fire Prevention and Training and Maintenance 
and Research Division. Provided assistance and technical advice 
to production companies filming in the area. 

The Public Information Office serves as the connecting link 
between the Boston Fire Department and the Citizens of Boston. 



EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

The Boston Fire Department — Local 718 Employee Assist- 
ance Program (EAP) is approaching the four-year mark! 
Launched on its maiden voyage in March, 1983, the EAP has 
navigated some turbulent waters to firmly establish itself as a 
necessary and integral part of the department's table of organiza- 
tion. 

Along the way, the EAP has also managed to acquire a national 
reputation as, "one of the most visible and active labor-manage- 
ment EAPs in the country, dealing with a specialized population 
— fire fighters and their families." 



Fire Department 43 

In the short time they have been in existence, the EAP has pro- 
vided services for more than 375 clients. The client population 
includes: fire fighters of all ranks; fire alarm office and fire alarm 
construction personnel; retirees, and civilian personnel attached 
to the B.F.D. , or Local 718. Dependent family members are also 
eligible for the benefits of the program. 

As a "broad brush" model, the EAP is designed to provide serv- 
ices in areas other than substance abuse. That is, referrals are 
provided — on a confidential basis — for psychological, psychi- 
atric problems; job and/or emotional stress; legal, marital, finan- 
cial and veteran's affairs. In other words, the EAP has established 
a network of community resources capable of dealing with any 
problems that might arise. 

The EAP has managed to reach out to other fire departments 
— locally and nationally — to provide information and serve as a 
role model to those fire fighters seeking to establish similar EAPs. 
Both of our coordinators; Bill Ostiguy and Jack Canavan, have 
represented the department on many occasions, as they appeared 
at various seminars and workshops, lecturing on the advantages 
of an effective, labor-management EAP for fire fighters. 

The EAP service is available on a twenty-four-hour basis as a 
cost-free benefit to all personnel. The majority of services are 
covered by insurance benefits and all inquiries are held confiden- 
tial. 



44 



City Document No. 11 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

APPARATUS IN SERVICE 

DECEMBER 31, 1987 



All units are diesel powered. 
ENGINE COMPANIES 



2 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




3 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




4 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


5 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




7 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




8 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


9 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


10 


1985 


Em- One Ford 


1250 GPM 




14 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




16 


1986 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




17 


1986 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




18 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


20 


1984 


Sutphen 


1500 GPM 


With 67 ft. ladder 


21 


1985 


Em -One Ford 


1250 GPM 




22 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




24 


1986 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




28 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




29 


1984 


Sutphen 


1500 GPM 




30 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




32 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




33 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




37 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


39 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




41 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




42 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




48 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 


and 1981 GMC 750 GPM 
Brush Fire Unit 1 


49 


1978 


Hahn 


1500 GPM 




50 


1984 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




51 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 




52 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


53 


1987 


Em-One Cyclone 


1250 GPM 


750 Gal Tank 


FB 


1979 


Sutphen 


1250 GPM 




55 


1984 


Sutphen 


1500 GPM 


and 1981 GMC 750 GPM 
Brush Fire Unit 2 


56 


1985 


Em-One Ford 


1250 GPM 





Fire Department 



45 



BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

APPARATUS IN SERVICE 

DECEMBER 1, 1987 

All ladder companies have metal aerials, hydraulically oper- 
ated, and all are diesel powered. 

Em-One = Emergency One 
TT = Tractor Trailer Type 
Rm = Rearmount Type 

LADDER COMPANIES 



1 


1973 


Maxim 


100 ft TT, 


rebuilt in 1985 


2 


1984 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




4 


1986 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




6 


1984 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




7 


1976 


Seagrave 


lOOftTT, 


rebuilt in 1986 


9 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT 




10 


1976 


Seagrave 


lOOftTT, 


rebuilt in 1987 


11 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT 




14 


1984 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




15 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT, 


rebuilt in 1986 


16 


1984 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




17 


1984 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




18 


1976 


Seagrave 


lOOftTT, 


rebuilt in 1987 


19 


1985 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




21 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT 




23 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT 




24 


1973 


Maxim 


100 ft TT, 


rebuilt in 1985 


25 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT 




26 


1986 


Em-One 


HOftRM 




28 


1976 


Seagrave 


100 ft TT 


rebuilt in 1987 


29 


1986 


Em-One 


HOftRM 





TOWER COMPANY 

1985 Em-One 95 ft RM Aerial Tower with 1500 GPM Pump 
1979 Sutphen 1250 GPM/1970 Maxim Squrt, rebuilt in 1986 

RESCUE CO. 1 

1986 Ford/Em-One Van Aluminum Rody — Air Supply System 

RESCUE CO. 2 

1987 Ford/Em-One Van Aluminum Rody — No Air Supply System 

MARINE UNIT 

1971 Fire boats, 1-6000 GPM, 1-1500 GPM 

SPECIAL UNIT 

1981 GMC/1970 International Lighting Unit, rebuilt in 1986 

HAZ-MAT UNIT 

1979 Ford Sutphen Chassis/ Aluminum Body — rebuilt in 1987 



46 



City Document No. 1 1 



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