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Full text of "Annual report"

[Document G1— 1878.] 



BOSTON. 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL EEPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

1878. 



[A.] 

In conformity with the requirements of the ordinance con- 
cerning the Public Library, the Trustees have the lionor to 
present to the City Council their twenty-sixth annual report, 
being the ninth and final one made under the last ordinance, 
and including the details of condition and of administration 
for the year ending on the 30th of April last, when the 
organization of the Board terminated. 

They also submit herewith two necessary reports : one 
of the Examining Committee, consisting for the present year 
of Rev. Warren H. Cud\v(n-th, AVilliam Kndicott, Esq., Hon. 
Robert M. Morse, Jr., J. Boyle O'Reilly, Esq., and John 
Collins Warren, M.D., with AYeston Lewis, Esq., of the 
Board of Trustees, as Chairman ; the other, of Samuel A.- 
Green, M.D., the Trustee in charge, with the regular tabula- 
tions of the results of the work of the Library during the 
year, with such comments and recommendations for future 
progress as have been derived from his personal experience 
in its manaofement. 

The report of the Examining Committee bears forcibly 
upon two points which have been previously presented to 
the City Council, and which are most important to its future 
condition. The one presents strongly the insufficient accom- 
modations of the Library, either in space for its shelving, or 
in accommodation to the public, in its reading-room, or iii 
the ventilation necessary to the health of the attendants, and 
for the preservation of the books. 

As a radical and absolute cure for these and other evils, 
they have entered quite fully into the question of a removal 



2 . City Document No. 61. 

of the Library from its present site, recommending early 
action on the part of the City Government. Upon the 
points of the necessity of greatly enlarged and improved 
accommodation, both to the Librar}' and to the public, and 
increased safety for its invaluable treasures, the Trustees 
have expressed their opinion in previous reports. They 
submit the subject to the best consideration of the City 
Council. 

The other portion discusses, in an impartial and thought- 
ful manner, the quality of the reading provided, the diffi- 
culties to be overcome in ministering to the various tastes 
dependent upon the institution, and the principles which, iu 
the judgment of the committee, should control the acquisi- 
tion of its books. The Trustees are glad to find that such 
an independent and practical body approve of the manner in 
which the popular selection, especially, has been made. 

The report of Dr. Green, the Trustee in charge, gives the 
results not only of his work as Superintendent, but also of 
his experience as an active and valued member of this 
Board for ten years. His observations upon the disabilities 
suffered by the institution, and by the public in consquence, 
from the present library structure, will still farther fortify 
the recommendations of the Examining Committee. His 
suggestions relative to the system of book purchases will 
receive the early attention of the Board. AVhen a new 
librarian is obtained, such systematic direction will naturally 
form an important part of the duties of that officer. 

In the month of July it became known that the Library 
was to lose the services of Mr. Winsor, as Superintendent, 
a position which he had filled with eminent ability for ten 
years. Although every effort was made by the Trustees 
and the City Government to retain him in office, he pre- 
ferred accepting the librarianship at Cambridge, which, in 
his judgment, was more permanent, and more agreeable in 
its relations. In severing his personal connection with the 
Board of Trustees, they took great pleasure in bearing tes- 
timony to the distinguished services which he had rendered 
the institution, and which were especially due to his inven- 
tive talent and administrative skill. 

The resignation of Mr. AVinsor, on the 1st of October, 
as Superintendent, in one respect, proved an immediate 
embarrassment to the institution. The appropriate salary 
voted by the City Council had been made dependent 
upon the tenure of office of that incumbent. In 
making a selection of a successor, there were but few 
competent bibliographers in the country, and fewer still 
who added to that accomplishment a large administrative 



Public Libraey. 3 

ability. The very few whose claims might be con- 
sidered by the Trustees were already occupied in positions 
where their services were approximately rewarded by a 
higher compensation than had been appropriated as the 
salary for the most important librarianship on the continent. 
Of large consulting or reference libraries there were but 
three or four in the country of great general value. Of 
popular libraries there was none which served so large a 
constituency, or which spread such a collection of treasures 
so broadcast among the people. It required no argument to 
prove that the position of Superintendent or Librarian could 
not easily be filled. The names presented to the 13oard did 
not, in their judgment, include any one either competent for 
the work, or who was not already in the service of some 
other institution providing a sufficient compensation. 

In the meantime, until a suitable successor could be found, 
the daily details of the machinery of the institution must 
receive attention. The Board were fortunate in having one 
among their number w4io was competent and willing to give 
the time required for the daily executive necessities. Dr. 
Samuel A. Green was placed as " Trustee in charge," at a large 
personal inconvenience to himself, and Avith a disinterested- 
ness worthy of all praise. Such assistance also as could be 
given by the Board was freely rendered. While the Trustees 
by the ordinance were made responsible for the Library, 
they had never, individually, before, been brought into such 
immediate contact with all the problems of administration. 
The result of this experience has produced economical 
changes, which it is expected will in the future materially 
enhance the efiicieiicy of the popular libraries. 

The consideration of the question of the ventilation of the 
Bates, as well as of the Lower, Hall can no longer be deferred 
with safety. The Committee on Public Buildings, in the 
early spring, took in hand the admitted necessities of the 
first floor in the Boylston-street library. Since then, the 
attention of the Trustees has again been forcibly drawn to 
the decay of the bindings in the upper and middle ranges of 
alcoves in Bates Hall. To reptiir the volumes already injured 
will require the expenditure of a considerable sum of money. 
This condition of destruction is not new to this Library. 
The same causes which have proved so injiu'ious to the calf, 
sheep, and russia binding in our own collection, have pro- 
duced similar results at the Boston Athenteum and Harvard 
College liljraries, as well as in the great libraries in Europe. 
An exhaustive examination by Professor Wolcott Gil)bs, of 
Harvard University, has proved, that the leather became 
disintegrated by the atmospheric conditions inseparable from 
insufficient ventilation, and not from the noxious gases 



4 City Document No. 61. 

sui)posecl to 1)6 irenerated in injurious qUcantities from the 
combustion of flame. Having ascertained the cause, it is 
earnestly desired that the city authorities will at once inter- 
pose, and preserve the invaluable contents of the Library 
from farther destructive agencies proceding from this cause. 
Pure air is as necessary to the preservation of books as it is 
to the healthy condition of human existence. 

In presenting the usual sunmiary of library work for the 
year, there will be found a gratif^'ing increase in the extent 
and value of the collections. Two new Branches have been 
established ; one at the South End, and one at Jamaica 
Plain. The amount of donations has been swelled by the 
gift of the library of the Mercantile Library Association. 
The quality of the works added to the popular libraries has 
been higher in grade. 

The number of volumes shelved in Bates Hall are 203,928 ; 
in the Lower Hall, 35,862 ; in the basement, 16,166; in the 
branches, 89,778 ; making a total of 345,734 volumes, — an 
increase for the year of 33,724 volumes, or 12 per cent. 

The libraries were open for the year for popular use and 
consultation 306 days. The loans increased from a total in the 
previous year of 1,U0,572 to 1,183,991, — a gain of 43,419 
volumes. This aggregate gain has not, however, been eflected 
without a loss in certain of the popular departments. The 
establishment of the South-End Branch withdrew applicants 
for books, both from the Central Library and the Koxbury 
Branch. Jamaica Plain, which had received from the lioxl)ury 
Branch to September 1, 3,712 volumes, subsequent to that 
time had a library of its own in successful operation. 

Another cause which has diminished the total number of 
books charged as circulated has been the al)()lition of the 
old seven-day rule, with power of renewal, and the substitu- 
tion of a longer lilierty of fourteen days, without power of 
renewal. It will be seen that every book renewed under the 
old rule, and detained a fortnight for home use, counted as 
two deliveries, while since the 1st of January such detention 
counts only as one. 

What ell'eet has been produced on the popularity ()f the 
Library by the etforts of the Trustees to add as few books 
to the shelves, as was practicable, of the lower grades of 
fiction, not immoral, is yet hardly perceptil)le. The attend- 
ants of the Lower Hall in Bo^lston street, with a less 
number of l)0()ks charixcd than durinE^ the same months 
of the previous year, have never been so busy as during 
the past winter. 

The following table indicates the number of volumes now 
in each library, with the circulation of each during the past 



Public Libraet. 5 

and the present year. Other statistics indicating tlie char- 
acter of that circulation will be found subsequently. The 
division between the consulting and popular libraries indi- 
cates an essential educational difference : — 

Circulation. 



Lower Hall, Boylston street 

East Boston 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South End 

Jamaica Plain 

Total 

Bates Hall 

Fellowes Athenseum 

Volumes in use (excluding duplicates, etc) 



No. of Vols. 
Apl.30,1878 



35,862 

10,329 

8,666 

8,382 

20,300 

11,969 

8,535 

8,793 

5,857 

nS,693 

203,928 

7,181 

329,892 



1870-7. 



405, 
102, 
135, 
1.30, 
106, 
29, 
71, 



732 
627 
179 
419 
816 



141, 

16, 

1,140, 



410 
572 



1877-8. 

391,175_ 

106,596 

140,751 

113,787 

101,540 

29,247 

64,974 

42,402 

30,280 

1,020,460 

146,996 

16,535 

1,183,991 



It will at once be noticed that, with the exception of East 
Boston and South Boston and the new Branches, the popular 
service shows a decrease, while the consulting libraries have 
a slight increase of use. The most marked falling off has 
been in Eoxbury, which shows a diminution of nearly 17,000 
volumes, the larger part of which is to be explained by the 
opening of the Jamaica Plain Branch, to which had been 
furnished the previous year nearly 12,000 volumes. 

The varying figures in the circulation of popular libraries 
have been held to depend in a large degree upon the quantity 
of fiction embraced in such collections, it being popuhvrly 
and reasonably accepted as a fact that extent of circulation 
depends upon such proportion. But the element of quality 
as suited to the popular taste is quite as important. One of 
the Branches, with 49 per cent, of fiction and juveniles, fur- 
nished bo per cent, of its circulation from that portion of its 
contents ; while another, with the same percentage of works 
of this class, but of a higher grade, issued only 72 per cent. 
Another Branch, with 38 per cent, of the same class, but 
poorer, loaned 72 per cent. In direct contrast with these 



6 City Document Xo. 61. 

fiojures, yet another Branch, with 31 percent, of fiction, de- 
rived from it 76 per cent, of its issues. The average contents 
of all the popular libraries was 42 per cent., which covered 
75 per cent, of their total circulation.* In one Branch each 
novel or juvenile was issued, on the average, 24 times, 
while from another, each book of the same class was taken 
on the average but 7 times. 

In considering the readers of fiction as to age and sex, no 
exact figures have yet l)een obtained. It is, however, suffi- 
ciently evident that the female sex predominates. Of adults, 
the men take from the Library less than half as man}' novels 
as women. In juveniles, owing to the sensational character 
of the majority of the books published, bo3's furnish more 
readers than girls ; while the girls make up more than the 
ditFerence, by reading novels. 

The managers of a pu1)lic library cannot afford to neglect 
the constant inspection of this class of its reading. While re- 
quired by the demands of circulation to place upon their 
shelves stories of the most diverse character, not iumioral 
in tendency, they have no power to distribute them as suited 
to the t'lstes and tendencies of the individual borrower. For 
the young the proper oversight is due from the parent ; but 
from observation it is feared that a very large proportion of 
the parents, either from ignorance or disinclination, do 
not fulfil the duty. In this connection, the remarks of the 
Examining Committee upon the quality and use of books 
selected deserve especial attention. 

The record of books lost still continues to show most sat- 
isfactory results. During the past year but one volume is 
missing from among 11,723 issued. This fact is most credit- 
able to borrowers, and surpasses our previous experience. 
The Branches at Roxbury, Brighton, Dorchester, South End, 
and Jamaica Plain have lost no volume from an aggregate 
circulation of 275,6,54 ; and South Hoston but one out of 
140,677. The whole number from all the lil)raries not 
recovered was 101, of which 90 came from the Central 
Libraiy, which, as usual, suffers most from the negligence of 
its patrons ; but even with this drawback its figures are 
better than those of the previous year. 

For the reading-rooms of the lil)rai'ies, the few facts which 
are to be noted show the prescience of Mr. Bates in making 
the establishment of these accessories an essential part of 
his benevolent conditions. They were open to the public 
357 days in the year, inclusive of Sundays, during which 

•These percentages do not include the Charlestown Library, which has not yet 
taken its place in the general system of statistics; but the use of ivhich, it is Loped, 
will bo clearly defined in the course of another year. 



Public Library. 7 

371,693 readers were furnished with 471,984 periodicals, — 
an increase of 32,179 readers, and 47,320 periodicals. These 
amounts would have been largely increased had the sitting 
accommodations in the Central Library been sufficient for the 
visitors. So large a proportion of the immediate intellectual 
activity of the age finds its vent and expression in works of 
this class, that it has become a most important element in 
popular education. 

The gifts to the Library during the year have been unusu- 
ally large. By the public spirit of the Directors of the 
Mercantile Library Association their library, which had 
been in process of collection for 55 years, and containing 
16,927 volumes, was presented to this institution. 8,000 of 
its volumes were transferred to their building in Newton 
street, as the basis of a new Branch founded for the ready 
convenience of an important constituency of the j^arent 
library residing south of Dover street. The uses of this 
collection since its begiiining show a lively interest on the 
part of its patrons, and have had an effect upon the cir- 
culation both of the Lower Hall and of the Roxbnry Branch, 
which are its nearest neighbors. This is the first Branch estab- 
lished which for a portion of its issues appears to have with- 
drawn regnlar visitants of the other libraries. It suggests a 
question for the consideration of the Trustees, as to whether 
further Branches shall be established, at an increased expense 
to the city, unless it is clearly demonstrated that such estab- 
lishment shall not interfere with the usefulness of the libra- 
ries already in snccessful operation. 

But these remarks must not be considered as showing any 
unthankfulness for large gifts of popular books, to which the 
Trustees must assign a sphere of usefnlness. AVhen books 
are largely duplicated by gift in the Lower Hall, beyond the 
necessities of daily demand, they must not on this account 
remain fixtures on the shelves. There are people who will 
use them, if convenient of access, and such has proved to 
be the creditable record of the South End Branch. Although 
the books were not used, and the novels and juveniles had 
mainly been printed more than five years, and were selected 
as of good quality, the circulation at once became notable, and 
indicative of good taste and of educational tendencies. It 
will be fortunate if any fiirther donations of libraries shall 
be so well placed as a selection from this. 

Retm-ning to the general gifts throughout the year, the 
Trustees would next gratefully acknowledije the second gift 
of J. IngersoU Bowditch, Esq., of $500, for the purpose of 
increasing the value of the mathematical collection, — the 
gift to the Library of the sons of the late Nathaniel Bowditch. 



8 City Document No. 61. 

A catalogue of these additions for the past two years has 
been printed. The vakie and use of any such special col- 
lection obviously depend upon its completeness, and upon 
the ready knowledge of its contents offered in print to 
students. 

There was also added to the Library, during the year, the 
bequest of Miss Eliza Mary Thayer, a special collection of 890 
volumes, relating to history and l)iography, and embracing a 
large variety of costly illustrated works, containing great 
numbers of valuable historical portraits. The result of the 
assiduous and careful labor of the owner, it forms a monu- 
ment to her excellent judgment and good taste. 

Another considerable addition of books were the 
1,118 volumes comprising the private library of Miss Char- 
lotte Harris, bequealhed by her to the Branch Library at 
Charlestown, which she still farther enriched by leaving to 
it in trust the sum of $10,0U0, the interest of which was to 
be expended for its benefit in the purchase of books published 
previous to the year 1850. 

A most notable single donation, last July, was due to the 
interposition of the Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, an old and 
constant friend of the Lilmuy. Through his personal efforts 
there was secured to it, by the aid of a few subscribers, the 
original short-hand report of Webster's reply to Hayne in 
the U. S. Senate, by Joseph Gales ; the speech as written 
out by Mr. and Mrs. Gales from the short-hand report ; 
the speech, as prepared by Mr. Wel)ster as copy for the 
press ; an appendix indorsed by ^Ir. Webster ; and the per- 
fected speech as originally printed — the whole bound in one 
volume. This document has a national interest from its 
extraordinary power, and for the important political conse- 
quences which ensued from its delivery. 

Besides the 18,935 volumes thus enumerated, the Library 
was indebted to 674 givers, for 2,271 volumes and 12,453 
pamphlets. 

Nothing more plainly shows the use of the Library than 
its wear and tear. During the past five years 15,392 
volumes have been condemned. jSIost of them have 
been replaced, and the cost of the purchase has formed 
a part of the expenditure for books in each year. They are 
fortunately the more popular and cheaper books which suffer 
the most. During this same i)eriod of time the Library, 
under the city ordinance, has paid into the city treasury 
$13,644.13, from fines and the sale of catalogues, — a sum 
which, had it been placed at the disposition of the Board, 
Avoukl have made good all losses in books, and paid, too. by 
the public in whose service the destruction had taken place. 



Public Library. 9 

Other conditions of wear and tear find their remedy in 
the bindery, which arm of the service, under Mr. Hathawa}^ 
required during the year 12 assistants. Besides its em- 
ployment upon a great variety of miscelhmeous work, 15,284 
vokimes were bound and 949 repaired. Of the quality of 
the work done it is just to say that it is not surpassed by 
that furnished by the best binders in the country. The pub- 
lications of the Library, bound in this department of its 
service, have been sent to the Paris Exhibition of 1878. 

The Catalogue work of the Lil)rary, during the year, has 
been unusually large and important. The public Card Cata- 
logue has been so far completed that it is now an index of the- 
works comprised in Bates as well as the Lower Hall. The 
entries for the last nine months of the year numbered 31,346 
volumes. Besides this, a Catalogue of the Jamaica Plain 
Branch has been issued. Work on the Ticknor Catalogue has 
been diligently prosecuted by Mr. Whitney, so that this long- 
expected volume is approaching a near completion. The print- 
ing of the Barton Catalogue, embracing the Shakespearian 
portion, is also in hand, under the innnediate charge of Mr. 
Hubbard, and will be continued steadily until finished under 
the terms of the contract made by the city at the time of its 
purchase, subsequently modified by consent of the executors 
of Mrs. Barton's will. The quarterly Bulletins have been 
reguhirly issued. 

In terminating the relation of Trustees under the present 
form of organization, they cannot but hope that similar 
conditions of prosperity will be vouchsafed to the new 
corporation. No large change in the general conduct 
of administration can be anticipated so long as means are 
provided adequate to support. The Library in the past 
has been unfailingly sustained by the public spirit of the 
City Government, and of their fellow-citizens. The large 
educational problem, for the solution of which it was created, 
may reasonal)ly be claimed to have been solved. The free 
school and the free library now constitute a large element 
in making up the character of the freeman — worthy of 
freedom. 

AVILLTAM W. GREENOUGH, 
GEORGE B. CHASE, 
HENRY F. COE, 
RICHARD FROTHINGHAM, 
CURTIS GUILD, 
WESTON LEWIS, 
HARVEY N. SHEPARD, 
BENJAMIN F. THOMAS. 
PcBLic Library, June 30, 1878. 



10 City Document No. 61. 



[B.] 
EEPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE, 



COXSISTING OF 



Rev. Warren H. Cudavorth, William Endicott, Jr., Esq., 
Hon. Robert "SI. Morse, Jr., John Boyle O'Reilly, 
Esq., J. Collins Warren, M.D., with Weston Lewis, 
Esq., of the Trustees, as Chairman. 

In accordance Avith the requirements of a City Ordinance 
concerning the Public Li!)rary, passed in September of 1869, 
the committee above named beg leave to report upon its con- 
dition on the last of April, 1878, as follows : — 

The tirst impression made upon the visitor by the Library 
is very favorable, and to the City of Boston extremely cred- 
itable. The building is imposing without and within ; and 
although situated in one of the busiest quarters of the city, 
where horse-cars and vehicles of every description pass and 
repass continually, and thousands of pedestrians hurry along 
intent on work or pleasure, the rooms are tilled with the 
spirit of repose, and by their very aspect seem to invite 
tiioughtful contemplation, or silent fellowship Avith those 
gifted minds or soaring souls, the record of whose best hours 
or noblest efforts rise shelf above shelf from floor to 
ceiling. 

It seems scarcely credible that only twenty-six years have 
elapsed since the movement Avas started whose already at- 
tained proportions are so colossal ; scarcely credible that in 
1852 the first l)ook was deposited in this collection so vast 
and valuable, Avhich has been followed by 347,244 companions, 
A\arying in size and value, of course, but nearly all worthy 
of the places they occupy and the consideration they have 
received. One Avould think that he was beholding Avhat it 
had cost centuries of labor and millions of treasure to col- 
lect ; and that this library had been established l)^' some 
opulent, powerful, and cultivated nation long before the 
present generation ajipeared. 

A library of this character, that is, a libraiy selected for 
the people, adapted to the wants of the people, managed 
and supported by the people, is the most difficult of all 
libraries to secure, on accaunt of the mixed character of 
its patrons. For students in law, medicine, theology, art 
or science, for example, a library must supply books of the 



Public Library. 11 

character needed for their study or consultation alone ; but 
for the people, most of whom are readers and not students, 
books of tins character would possess very little interest, 
and from them receive very little atteution. To select a 
library for the people, therefore, which shall attract, instruct, 
and improve them at the same time ; which shall excite, in- 
crease, and retain their interest, — requires a combination of 
qualities rare indeed to iind. 

It must be remembered that professional students are com- 
pelled to read and study professional books, whether they 
find them interesting or not ; just as a carpenter must use 
carpenter's tools, or a dentist the instruments furnished by " 
the practice of dental surgery in the past ; and it is not diffi- 
cult to decide upon the nature of the books such students 
must peruse, and to secure them accordingly. But to be 
equally wise and decided concerning the books best adapted 
to secure mentally and morally the good of a great popula- 
tion, composed of people from every rank and grade in 
society ; of all ages, both sexes, with every conceivable 
taste, style of thought, peculiarity of nature, and degree of 
culture, is far more difficult. It may be assumed at the out- 
set to be utterly impossible to suit all. Some people are so 
eccentric, or so captious, orso self-opinionated, thattheyseem 
foreordained to sneer at everything and scowl at everybody. 
They are the constitutional cynics and growlers of society, 
whose grapes are always sour, whose times are invariably 
out of joint. We must let them pass. Their conmiendation 
of a library or anything else would make us suspicious and 
distrustful. Fortunately, however, they form so small a 
portion of urban or suburban communities that they need 
not be taken into account. We must consult the people at 
large to ascertain how useful the Library has become, if use- 
ful at all. The verdict of the people has been very fjivorable 
thus far to those who have had the selection and control of 
their books in the Public Library and all its branches since 
1852 ; so favorable indeed as to produce embarrassment, 
not only to the Superintendent of the Library, his librarians 
and their assistants, but to the City Council also ; who, 
nearly every year for the last twenty -five years have been 
appealed to for additional appropriations for changes in the 
Central building, or for the establishment of new branches 
to meet the great and growing demand for something con- 
veniently at hand to read. 

In the year 1868, for instance, the call for books from 
the Central Library, previously to the establishing of six of 
the existing eight branches, did not exceed 176,000 volumes ; 
but in the year 1876-77 the call reached 1,140,572 volumes, 



12 City Docu.ment Xo. 61. 

and since the Library was started the call has reached the 
astounding number of nearly 10,000,000 of volumes. This 
shows not only how much Boston people read, but also where 
they get most of the books they read, and how well satisfied they 
are with the character and quality of these books, and with 
the method of procuring and returning them again. On one 
day of the present year, z'.e.,thc 23d of February, 1878, nearly 
10,000 books were issued to borrowers, and this number, 
large as it appears, bids fair to be exceeded repeatedly, es- 
pecially during the fall and winter months, when the evenings 
are long, and the people have leisure in-doors to inform and 
regale themselves with the choicest products of human 
thought and progress. During the month of May in 1875, 
64,3<)() books were called for and credited ; increasing in May 
of 1876 to 81,486 ; and in May of 1878, to 95,469. Think 
of nearly 100,000 people every month resorting to the 
Public Library and its various branches, with books in 
their hands which they have read, and returning to their 
various homes with books which they have borrowed, and an 
exact idea of the magnitude of this great, growing, and 
important interest can be entertained. Xo wonder it re- 
quires a stall' of 130 persons to wait upon so many people, 
attending to their wants with as nmcli despatch as accuracy 
and the safety of the property entrusted to their keeping 
will allow; the wonder is, it does not require more. And 
no Avonder, for the speedy and successful prosecution of all 
their work, with keeping the Library fully up to the demands 
of the times, that the sum of $129,000 was required last 
year to pay bills incurred ; the wonder is, it did not need 
more. 

Granted, however, that the people as a whole, approve the 
Public Library, favor its management, pay cheerfully the 
taxes requisite for its support, and with numbers largely in- 
creasing from year to year resort to it, or some of its branches, 
for mental food and satisfaction, is the character of the books 
supplied by the management, donated by friends or recom- 
mended by readers, precisely such as could be w'ished? To 
this question, asked repeatedl3S and asked by the Iriends of 
our youth all over the city, we nuist, on the whole, return an 
aflirmativc reply. No doubt there are books in the Central 
building, and in every one of the eight branches throughout 
the city which belong to a poor class, and which are not the 
best specimens even of that class ; l)ooks which are not ex- 
actly pernicious in statement nor tendency, nor prejudicial 
to good morals ; but books not directly and positively bene- 
ficial ; concerning which the best you can say is, that they 
form a taste, they whet and sharpen an appetite for reading. 



Public Library. 13 

Banish them from the Lil^rary, as some advise, and you ban- 
ish their readers also. Keep them in the Library and you 
keep their readers also ; who, with constantly improving 
tastes, will finally select books of unquestionable excellence 
and profit. Moreover, has one class of tax-payers the right 
of judgment and selection concerning the books which an- 
other class, or all other classes, shall peruse and ponder? In 
a pul)lic library can any portion of the public justly deny to 
all other portions the only books they are enough interested 
iu to go after and carry home with them? Manifestly not, in 
both cases. 

The only thing to do, then, is precisely what is done, to 
leave this whole question to the Superintendent and Board 
of Trustees, making them the umpires, from whose decision 
there shall be no appeal. 

There is much cause for gratification arising from the fact, 
that calls for works of fiction, especially those of a light and 
ephemeral character, are not so numerous as they have been, 
and that the people, with the exception of a few young per- 
sons, are beginning to demand books designed to instruct 
and improve rather than only to amuse them. 

This affords evidence that the management of the Library 
is in good hands ; and if we are willing to wait patiently 
until the experiment initiated by Mr. Jewett and the Trus- 
tees of his day, of alluring readers into the Library by sup- 
plying books adapted to their condition and attractive to 
their tastes, — the experiment also approved by Mr. Winsor, 
and continued by the Trustees associated with him, — shall 
have had fair and thorough trial, we shall feel assured that it 
has brought forth, and will bring forth, good results. A city 
is not unlike a family ; and if we look over the books read by 
any well-regulated, high-toned family in Boston, although 
we see in the father's hands Avorks containing the last results 
of science or the most recent speculations in philosophy, in 
the mother's hands some treatise on ^Esthetics or Sociology, 
and in the hands of the older children, poems, histories, 
works of invention, travel and discovery, or adventure, we 
shall see Mother Goose in the hands of the little children, 
and fables, and fairy stories, with all sorts of grotesque and 
fantastic imaginations to stimulate the nascent power of 
thought and compel judgment and the understanding to take 
tlieir places on the stage of action. " When I was a child," 
says the greatest thinker among the writers of the New Tes- 
tament, "I spake as a child, 1 thought as a child, I under- 
stood as a child ; but when I Ijecame a man I put away 
childish things." We must not expect, therefore, of the 
childish borrower the relish and strength shown by those 



14 City Document No. 61. 

better developed and farther on in the fields of literature ; 
but, at the same time, must supply somethiug to such a bor- 
rower, which shall help him along as fast as possible, and 
finally as far as the farthest. 

It is plainly apparent to those most familiar with the 
growth and working of the Boston Public Library in the 
past, that, useful and popular as it has been made ])y those 
having charge of its interests, its usefulness and popularity 
could be very much increased by enlarged accommodations, 
or an entire change of location. In considering which of 
these measures it would be the more advisable to recommend, 
the committee appointed to prepare this paper, for various 
reasons, some obvious, others easily demonstrable, have 
decided to favor the latter. The present building must con- 
tain, at the present rate of increase, by another quarter of 
a century, nearly a million of volumes, which it is altogether 
inadequate to furnish with shelf-room, and to purchase 
Hotel Pelham for this purpose, as has been suggested, would 
compel the ex])enditure of a larger sum of money than a 
new library building would cost. 

In its present location, surrounded by lofty and combus- 
tible structures, the present building could never be made 
securely lire-proof, neither can quiet or thorough ventilation 
be obtained. It is respectfully recommended by this com- 
mittee, therefore, that the Board of Trustees solicit the City 
Council to petition the Massachusetts Legislature, at its next 
session, to give and set apart an entire square of the Back 
Bay lands, now belonging to the State, to the City of Bostou, 
whereon a new building for the Public Library can be 
erected, which shall not only be convenient, commodious, 
quiet, and well ventilated, but isolated and absolutely tire- 
proof. 

There are certain features providentially developed in the 
history of the Boston Public Library which seem to forecast 
for it a career of high and honorable usefulness second to 
none iu this country. One is the location within its walls of 
the entin; collections of distinguished scholars, like the Bow- 
ditch collection, the Parker collection, the Ticknor collection, 
and others, embodying the results of years of careful thought, 
of patient research, of mature and ripened judgment, and of 
generous investment; results which money alone could never 
secure, and which, providentially placed within reach of all 
our citizens, suggest the desirableness of making even more 
special provision than now exists for the reception and pres- 
ervation of such model private libraries as may be unusually 
rich and valuable in particular departments, the owners of 
which may feel solicitous to have them kept entire after their 



Public Libraky. 15 

decease, and may be willing to set apart ample funds for 
their care and increase, provided they are assured that such 
libraries will be welcomed and preserved unscattered for the 
good of others, and will be assigned a special place for public 
consultation. The libraiy of a man so great and good as Dr. 
Bowditch, for example, becomes in time to those in sympathy 
with his line of thought, or professionally engaged in liis 
sphere of worldly activity, a kind of intellectual shrine, where 
devotees from other places and from distant climes may 
come to do him reverence, or to honor the land which gave 
him birth, and study the institutions which made his great- 
ness possible. 

Another feature of this sort is the exceptionally full, well- 
preserved, and well-guarded collection of folios in the Patent 
Eoom. America is the home of inventors, the fruitful soil 
from Avhich have gone forth during the last hundred years 
more useful inventions, important discoveries, and sterling 
improvements, than any other single country on the earth can 
boast during the same period of time. It is not remarkable, 
therefore, that 310 persons, during only one month of the 
present year, the month of January, 1878, should have 
sought the Patent Boom for study and reference. If the 
wisdom shown hitherto in the management of this room 
be continued, and the liberality of the City Council allow 
the comi)letion of its collections from foreign countries where 
the patent system prevails, there will be reason to expect thou- 
sands of visitors and students annually at the Boston Public 
Library from every State in the Union, and from other lands, 
to consult the treasures which wait their appropriation in this 
room alone. 

Another feature of this sort is the large number of public 
documents which have been accumulated in the central 
building, making a lil)rary of reference for statesmen, jurists, 
students of natural history and political economy, second to 
none accessible in the land. Although it is to be regretted 
that excessive heat and dryness, insufficient ventilation, or 
the presence of some corrosive vapor, have singly, or all 
combined, greatly injured and, in some cases, rendered use- 
less the binding of many of the volumes iji this department, 
it is to be hoped that the Trustees will be empowered to take 
such precautions, and make such expenditures, as shall arrest 
further ravages in this direction, and prevent, if possible, 
their recurrence in the future. 

Another feature of the Library worthy of commendatory 
mention is the gradual accumulation of literary curiosities, 
historical mementos, relics, portraits of famous persons, 
statues, busts, medals, and the like works of art which, aside 



16 City Document Xo. 61. 

from its large and costly collection of books, make the build- 
ing an attractive centre of resort to students of antiquity and 
lovers of the rare and beautiful from all sections. Although 
it has been suggested that everything of this character should 
be sent to the Museum of Art, close by, it may be replied,' 
that there such articles would not be so free to public in- 
spection as in the City Library, would not be sure of such 
a careful and thorough showing, on account of the lack 
of funds wherewith to pay trained attendants, and would not 
have a corporation so opulent and generous as the City Coun- 
cil of Boston to provide every facility for their exhibition 
and safety. 

In conclusion, the committee desire to express their thanks 
to members of the city government for the generous appro- 
priation they have made to the Public Librarj'and its Branches, 
and to urge that measures be taken to secure temporarily 
more ample accommodations for the constantly increasing 
number of books in the Library, for better ventilation in the 
central building, and for a place where the books now being 
injured by dampness, and various causes, may be secured 
against farther injury. 

They desire also to express their gratitude to Dr. Samuel 
A. Green, the superintendent in charge, to members of the 
Board of Trustees, and to the Library otiicials in general, for 
the uniform courtesy with which their investigations have 
been facilitated. 

For the Committee, 

WARREN H. CUDWORTH. 



Public Library. 17 

[C] 
REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT. 

To the Trustees : — 

The principal events of the past Library year have been the 
close of jNIr. Winsor's term of service as Superintendent and 
the incorporation of the Trustees by an act of the Legis- 
lature. 

For the statistical details of the year's service I respect- 
fully refer to the usual tables which form the Appendix. 

The observations that I shall here lay before the Board 
are such as seem suitable in view of the close of my own 
connection with the Library, and they have been in some 
measure shaped by the approach of that close. 

The history of the Library up to the present time falls 
naturally into two chief periods. The first of these ends with 
the death of Mr. Jewett, the first superintendent, and may 
perhaps be called the literary or bibliographical period, 
as it was during this period that the general plan was laid 
down npon which the Library has been collected, classified, 
and catalogued ; the second of these two terms covers Mr. 
Winsor's superintendency, and may be described as the 
organizing or administering period. This distinction implies 
no defect during either one of these periods in the leading 
qualification of the other, for each suited the needs of its 
time and arose naturally out of them. 

The work of gathering and assorting a Library must pre- 
cede that of regulating its nse. The organizing power of 
Mr. Winsor was brought into requisition when that trait 
was most required. His management of the Library, aided 
by the unprecedented liberality of the City of Boston and by 
the cooperation of the Board of Trustees, has made it, in more 
than one respect, an acknowledged model for imitation, while 
in mere numerical extent it has become the largest on this con- 
tment. It was through Mr. Winsor's instrumentality that the 
system of reference-note catalogues was introduced, which has 
marked a new era in Library administration. By means of 
this system the Library not only ofiers its books, but tells 
everybody which of them to read. The School District 
Lil)raiy movement of about a generation ago was an attempt 
of the same kind, to popularize good reading, but it was 
a decided failure, for the reason, not understood at the time, 
though now it seems obvious enough, that mere books on a 
shelf will not make themselves read. Abreast of this full 



18 City Document No. 61. 

supply of instruction in the choice of reading, apian has been 
carried forward to aid in the convenient use of our books by 
increasing the number of deliveries. This mechanism can go 
on, subdividing the channels and multiplying the depositories 
of reading matter as fast and as far as may be required. The 
ease with whicli the deliveries for the firemen and the public 
institutions of the city have been kept up, shows that the 
question is one only of care and detail, and of little cost. 

The two periods mentioned as covering the history of the 
Library thus far amount to about tAventy-four years. If we 
date from the time when the project of a Public Library first 
began to be seriously contemplated, and when actual elForts 
toward it were made, we may reckon that the institution has 
about a generation of human life to look back upon. But 
whether we date from the year 1841, or from Mayor Quincy's 
conditional ofier of $5,000, and the appointment of a joint 
committee of the City Council on a Library in 1847, or from 
the enabling act of 1848, or from the first opening in Mason 
street, in 1854, — in any case it is a splendid achievement for 
the City of Boston to have established within that time a 
Library of 350,000 books, creditably representing the chief 
departments of literature, and, to a fair degree, meeting the 
intellectual requirements of this community. 

The j^rogress of these years has now for the first time 
brought into plain view a fresh set of considerations, which 
must be considered in any competent action for the future 
of the Library. These might possibly in some measure have 
been foreseen at the outset ; but some of them could not have 
been, and they are such as to require, in order to be fully 
appreciated, exactly the practical experiuicnt which has now 
been made. Of all of these, the most striking, from a libra- 
rian's point of view, is the consumption of books in Bates 
Hall. The light literature of the Lower Hall and branches 
is expected to be in due time literally used up. It is ground 
to pieces ; its material fabric is actually worn out, with con- 
siderable rapidity, under the diligent application of the public 
thumb and finger. This actual consumi)tion of the fabric of 
the books is a matter of course, under the swift and vigorous 
treatment applied to them in the Lower Hall circulation, and 
to a certain extent it is no doubt legitimate even for standard 
literature and reference-books. Under these circumstances it 
might well be considered whether or not to modify the usual 
rule of not duplicating Bates Hall volumes, so far as to per- 
mit two copies each of certain classes of books to be pro- 
cured, one to be a two-starred book, on purpose to l)e always 
found within the building, while the other should be for the 
purpose of circulation. Such a duplication would servo two 



Public Library. 19 

ends at once : it would secure for one copy a practically un- 
limited existence, since the use of boolcs within the Library 
exposes them to the minimum of wear and tear ; and it would, 
in a great many cases, prevent the obvious inconvenience of 
a collision of interests between two users. As far as it could 
be applied it would avoid the primary difficulty of a Library 
like this, which seeks to meet the two incompatible purposes 
of reference and circulation. With two copies we could have 
any given book always in the Library and always out of it. It 
is hardly necessary to point out how helpful such a provision 
would be in a community where books of standard merit are 
so frequently in popular demand. 

The second suggestion which I shall offer arises in like 
manner from the experience of the Library. Perhaps it 
might fairly enough have been judged on December 20, 
1858, when the Lower Hall was first open to use, that the 
stately Library building was the permanent home of the col- 
lection ; but twenty years' experience has taught otherwise. 
Something very different from the present building must now 
be anticipated as a permanent Library edifice. When this 
building was erected, not only were the actual requirements 
of the community unknown, but there was no such thing as 
library architecture, in the present meaning of the term. It 
is, therefore, no cause for blame that a structure, which 
might have accommodated one million and a half of books, 
is visibly approaching its storage limit with three hundred 
thousand ; that the interior details turn out such as to re- 
quire as much time and labor as possible, instead of as little, 
in finding and delivering a book ; that the sanitary conditions 
and domestic arrangements are defective to a degree not 
merely annoying, but discreditable ; and that the accommoda- 
tions for readers and students are by far too limited. Radical 
as these defects are, their existence hitherto is not just cause 
for blame ; but to perpetuate this state of things any longer than 
is necessary would be such cause. What these considerations 
indicate is, that the defects of the present building should be 
remedied as far as practicable, but that the Library should not 
be irretrievably anchored in its present inadequate and unsuit- 
able accommodations. On the contrary, its administration 
should be shaped with a view to its transfer, at the earliest 
possible period, to an edifice which shall be safe from fire 
risks, both within and without, plamied and built upon com- 
j)lete principles of library economy and architecture, and 
to be the permanent home of the Library in all future times. 

There seems, lastly, to be room in the administration of 
the Library for a definitely organized method, within certain 
guarded limits, of systematizing the purchase of certain 



20 City Document Xo. 61. 

books. There should be an arrangement supplementary to 
the wise and successful policy hitherto followed of occasion- 
ally filling up some one department under the advice of 
sj)ecialists. The proposed additional method would consist 
of what might be called an official watch on the part of the 
Library on the whole field of literature, both past and cur- 
rent, with constant parallel reference to the condition of the 
Library itself. It would seek to recognize promptly any im- 
portant new question, and provide not merely that some- 
thing should be procured in relation to it, but that nothing 
important for its competent study should be omitted. And 
80 far as may be, a similar care should be constantly main- 
tained to supply deficiencies in the older parts of the 
collection. 

For one instance in point : W' e have received perhaps as 
many books as were necessary upon the Russo-Turkish war, 
and so we have upon recent African travel and discovery. 
Upon the important German cooperative or mutual benefit 
system, known by the name of its chief advocate, Schultze- 
Delitzsch, we have something, but not a full collection. 
On the other hand, an inquiry within a few days about a 
subject of not less pressing significance, the labors of the 
European extreme socialist leaders, Karl Marx and Lassalle, 
shoAved that their names are not in our catalogue and that 
our materials for an account of them are scanty. It is not 
meant that the present method of adjusting our current sup- 
plies of literature is a bad method. It is a good one, but 
the additional feature here suggested would carry it- some 
ways toward practical completeness. This watchfulness 
after omitted subjects and omitted books is something 
quite difierent from the ordinary routine scrutiny of cata- 
logues and trade lists. It calls for a constant survey 
over the past and present growth of the institution with 
reference to its systematical development. The position and 
ofiice of this Library are such as to require the services of a 
trained scholar in thus supervising its accessions. 

In closing this brief report, the last, as it is the first, 
which it will be my duty to lay before the Board, I beg to 
express my thanks for the personal and olticial kindness 
which I have invariably received from all with whom my 
oflScial duties have brought me in contact. 

SAMUEL A. GREEIS', 

One of (he Truslees in charge. 

PcBLic LiBRAKY, May 1, 1878. 



APPENDIXES 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



1878. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Extent of the Bates Hall Collection. 

IV. Extent of the Lower Hall Collection. 
V. Sale of Duplicates and Odd Volumes. 

VI. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VII. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VIII. Volumes Located in Bates Hall. 

IX. Bates Hall Classifications. 

X. Lower Hall Classifications. 

XI. Funds and Donations. 

XII. Circulation. 

XIII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIV. Books Recommended. Use of British Patents. 
XV. Bates Hall Reading. 

XVI. Lower Hall Reading. 

XVII. East Boston Reading. 

XVIII. South Boston Reading. 

XIX. Roxbury Reading. 

XX. Brighton Reading. 

XXI. Dorchester Reading. 

XXII. South Boston Branch Reading. 

XXIII. Jamaica Plain Branch Reading. 

XXIV. Periodical Reading Rooms. 
XXV. Losses and Delinquents. 

XXVI. Financial Statement. 

XXVn. Library Funds. 

XXVIII. Library Service. 

XXIX. Report on the Examination of the Shelves. 

XXX. Work in the Library Bindery. 



Public Library. 



23 



appe:n^dix I. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 



Pamphlets 

added from the 

beginning. 



Jamaica 

Plain 
Bhancii. 



South End 
Branch. 



Dorchester 
Branch. 



Brighton 
Branch. 



Charlestown 
Branch. 






. C^ -* It- (N C-1 



^ OJ ODl- CO 
. t- .o o "* o 



, cc -f ^" *— (^ 
o H^ci cc o 

' t-rr-rr-"crci 



CO O Tf -^ i-H 
. OC C. O^ 00 oo 

• o CD fc— oS^ao 



, 4C OC O O 'C (M 
r— CC — O M t— 
, «0 C3^ 00 t— lO O 



, »n O t- rt C<I GC 

CC Ol CD C-l O uo 



"!2 



South Boston 
Branch. 



East Boston 
Branch. 



^^ 



■53 



na 



, O CO M i-i CO -^ 
»0 Cr. ■3' CO l^ rH 



. xo ■*# t- rN 00 CO -^ 

CC t- O IM CC t- lO 

. co_.-^cz:^ic C-^T-^i-^ 

•vftc »0 CO t-^CO CfT 



,cOl— T-HClCOt-COOi 

COCOCli— CiCO-T-:** 

o CD t- 1-^ CO*" oi oTo" 



'n'Tfoo'*t-cO'i''-'«0' 



SCOiCrfTj^COOcO-— iiOTf* 
•C2=2 = ai(rj — CO-i'TOOTtc^r-'GOO'-COO'lCO-^ 
COCOO^t-^C-JrH.:^.— T-HCO_t--^C^J^a:cOr--*a;CQCld 
r-Tr-i CO f O »r3 "Tt'iO >0 ^O to CD *:£ t-^ CC d^ O^ tS -^ cS' 



•ooc;aico — ccrr 



Previously included in the Bates Hall ^c^SSoS 
collection. 



CI W C^ C^CO CO 



' ~ o r? '31 -T t- >n o o ^1 cc c 
~. O C^l O t— 01 O Ci C". »n^ I— : 

: T— . -^ t- o: .ra cc -^ ic CO t-i ■^ c 






i^ I- 01 o tM r: ' 



I;^(W(NC->!N!?^CNCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO 



-CJ <© ■ 



i-- T oi CO ■: 



GO CO CO 

. . CO ■:^i (M 

_rHC-^COC^^ 
C^I 00 C^ o irr I— I t- rj< .0 rf cTcO lO TfcTco" 
COjOCIOO'— i-<C^C0'^^COt-a. CIO 



. C-J C^ — tfj O (N t' t- CO CO X »— vj 

'T_ r»_ -M^CO CO 'T^ rH^ f-^ l-^ :C^ Ci^ -^ l- 
' o" CD*" U^ cT C^f 00 co" cT "' 



Total Volumes 
in the Libraries. 



COi-.i^OCD'-'CO^-CD-TCO-r'^GOO'MCDCOOCOCD CODCOO'^t 

oo n — 00 :j- 'it -^ rt ■^ CO '^ CO I— > I - CO CI CI »- «c u^ uc o — »■- r- CO 
<D^oi_--co_cooo_o oeoo ic c^otc — ^o_i-*»f:oici-^ lo c:qc 01^ 

c^ -Soi aa'f S(y^ i!:^ t-^ ,r{ d^ 'S ri :d -^ 'f '>i c: c^ ':-i c^ r:^ ^t^^oS iO 

r-" C^ C^ CO t— t' GO C- O — I— C^J rt CO -^ O CO i- 01 C:' eO t— C rH -T 
* f->?-lr-'»-ir-irHi-lr--»-Hr-ir-iCNiMC-?C^:OC0 

COTt<iO*i;b-OOClO'—'MCO-*«i^cDl--00 0>0'— 'iMCO-^LOCOt— ao 
i-t O «0 lO m lO ITS CO CO 'O 'X? CC CO ',0 CO CO CO t— t^ t— t^ t- !>. l-. I-- t^ 
J, J. ' ' ' '•''"' I ' I ' ' ' I 'I II I I II 

oico-^ir:icot'OOc:0'-<'Mco*t».Tcci^cociCi-i(McOTj'iocoi— 
trt o lO '.T vrr <.t o -^ CO CO CD CO :o co -c cc co co i- t- i~ i - t^ i- i-- t— 

cccoccocoooooococoaconGCcocc ioooooiccocooocoocaojoco 

i-((MCOTj4xf5CDt-COOlOrHdcO'*uO<Dt*OOOiOr-''MCO'^'CcO 



6 C3 



^ c3 *i 



? > 'rt 






K > 



24 



City DoctnviENT No. 61. 



APPENDIX n. 



YEAELY INCREASE OE THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE 
AND BY GIFTS. 

Note. — The increase of volumes ia not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because lost and 
condemned books are deducted. 



Tears. 


Increase. 
(iV"«< after 1861.) 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
cliarged to funds 
and added by 
exchange. 


s 

w 3 

^ Si 

c a 

"•3 


•«3 

Bo 

£ a 






Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


*Pamph. 


Vols. 


.t so 


1. . . 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


4,000 


961 


5,688 










75 


2. . . 


1853-54 


6,533 


2,989 


2,152 


2,989 


4,381 










105 


3. . . 


1854-55 


6.396 


2,557 


2,663 


2,468 


3,733 


, 89 








153 


4. . . 


1855-56 


5,463 


5,879 


1,865 


5,C30 


3,598 


549 








126 


5. . . 


1856-57 


6,816 


3,667 


1,686 


3,646 


5,130 


21 








132 


6 . . . 


1857-58 


35,955 


1,885 


30,214 


1,885 


5,741 










381 


7 . . . 


1858-59 


7,192 


1,317 


3,405 


1,317 


3,787 










247 


8. . . 


1859-60 


6,989 


1,452 


3,744 


1,452 


3,245 










297 


0. . . 


1860-61 


16,943 


6,674 


12,299 


6,656 


4,649 


18 








242 


10. . . 


1861-62 


7,391 


1,493 


1,274 


1,493 


6,117 











234 


11. . . 


1862-63 


5,529 


2,169 


829 


1,958 


4,700 


212 








194 


12. . . 


1863-64 


6,226 


2,939 


1,081 


2,772 


5,145 


167 








219 


13. . . 


1864-65 


6,082 


1,516 


804 


1,026 


5,178 


490 








328 


14. . , 


1865-66 


7,662 


4,013 


1,470 


3,342 


6,286 


671 








S36 


15. . . 


1866-67 


5,303 


7,877 


1,405 


7,769 


7,732 


108 








300 


16. . . 


1867-63 


7,673 


2,811 


1,554 


2,513 


6,396 


298 








342 


17. . . 


1868-09 


8,685 


13,923 


2,138 


10,984 


6,531 


2,939 








649 


18. . . 


1869-70 


7,775 


13,593 


1,643 


10,228 


6,129 


3,365 








660 


19. . . 


1870-71 


18,099 


14,976 


9,750 


10,805 


8,349 


4,171 








604 


20. . . 


1871-72 


13,708 


10,637 


4,349 


5,831 


9,359 


4,806 








610 


21. . . 


1872-73 


14,644 


11,770 


3,939 


8,060 


10,705 


3,710 


865 


601 


22. . . 


1873-74 


51,094 


22,475 


4,783 


17,138 


18,671 


6,337 


1,330 


739 


23. . . 


1874-75 


16,372 


16,293 


4,169 


15,899 


17,080 


394 


572 


1.091 


24. . . 


1875-76 


20,955 


30,732 


6,749 


5,891 


15,206 


24,841 


752 


694 


25. . . 


1876-77 


16,974 


13,305 


8,562 


11,071 


16,544 


2,234 


73S 


1.125 


26. . '. 


1877-78 


33,724 


15,554 


21,206 


12,453 


17,579 


3,101 


196 


677 



* Includes pamphlets addeil both bv purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession Catalosue. 

+ Included in previous columns. These volumes are not the property of the Public Library, but form a 
part of the Uo.vhuiy Branch liy nsreemeiit. 

(«) Of the increase, 24.1518 were the Mates Eif- 

(il) Of tlie increase, ll,7;;l were the I'nrker bequest. 

(ISO .'!,77l volumes of the Tickuor bciiuest, and 2,C82 from the Sumner Library Association, ore included 
in the iticrensc. 

(2(1) 1,171 volumes from the Mnttnpan I.iterarv Assneiation are included in the increase. 

('-'2) The increase of this vcar includes the totals of the libraries ut Charlestown and lirighton, and also, 
under pureluises, the Barton I,ibrarv. 

(24) The purchases of this year include thirty volumes to replace books in the Bates Ilnll lonp; lost. The 
great nece.'sion •'( pamphlets came f.inn the purchacc of <lupljcates from Harvard-College I.ihrivry- 

(2(1) The unusual inerenae is owin)t to the addition of the books of the .Mercantile Librarv Association 
which form the nucleus of the South End Branch, 



Public Library. 



25 





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26 



City Document No. 61. 



APPENDIX lY. 

EXTENT OF THE LOWER HALL COLLECTION. 





SB 


<x 
« 
at) 

H 


e 

H 





H 
« 


n 

H 


M 
»» 

Xl 

H 


H 


H 


O 

H 


H 


2 


Reported the pre- 
ceding year . . 

Added during the 


• • • 


25,199 
2,003 


26,606 
2,469 


28,723 
1,417 


29,909 
2,780 


30,574 
2,614 


31,827 
1,799 


32,605 
1,465 


32,596 
3,385 


33,395 
3,570 


35,1.52 
3,830 


35,478 
2,728 






Total .... 

Books tr.in8ferred 
to Bates Uall . 

Books transferred 
to I3r;uifhcsand 


• 


27,202 
339 


29,075 
93 


30,140 
19 


32,689 
23 

859 
1,23" 


33,188 

7 

535 
819 


33,626 

1 

342 
678 


34,070 

6 

166 
1,308 


35,981 
37 

10 
2,539 


.36,965 
394 

1,419 


3S,982 
19 

27 

1,655 
1,803 


38,206 
22 

756 


Condemned dur- 




257 


259 


212 


1,567 


Losees often years 


























Total left . . . 


*25,199 


26,606 


28,723 


29.909 


30,574 


31,827 


32,605 


32,596 


33,395 


35,152 


*35,478 35,862 



* Actual count. 
Note. — The "Losses of ten years" are explained in Appendix X. 

APPENDIX Y. 

SALE DUPLICATES AND ODD VOLUMES. 

f2fot including the Parker duplicates, or a large lot of odd and imperfect volumes of books, not likely 
to have the missing volumes supplied, which are boxed up at intervals. J 





e 
aci 

H 


OB 
9 
X) 

M 


ft 


9 

XI 

H 


H 

XI 

H 


« 

X 

IN 


« 

X 


•* 

X 
H 


t* 

X 

H 


X 

9,938 
1,902 


1* 

X 


X 

X 

H 


Number at begin- 
ning of year . . 

Added during the 
year 


4,955 
714 


5,140 
1,004 


5,805 
847 


6,100 
443 


383 


G,9J4 
906 


7,314 
1,375 


8,183 
1,641 


9,490 
1.234 


11,321 

1,015 


11,985 
1,677 


Disposed of . . . 


6,669 
523 


6,150 
a45 


6,652 
546 


6,54(1 
304 


234 


7,950 
636 


8,689 
506 


9,824 
331 


10,72-1 
786 


ll,84r 
519 


12,336 
t351 


13,662 
718 


Total 


5,146 


5,805 


6,106 


6,245 


*6,954 


*7,314 


*8,183 


9,490 


9,038 


*11,321 


11.9SJ 


12,944 



* This number is by an actual count of the serviceable volumes now arranged in our Duplicate 
Room; and it includes 158 volumes of newspapers. 

t Of these 524 were parted with on exchange account, and 194 were transferred to different depart- 
ments of the Library 

Note. — There arc also of pamphlets some 40,C0O duplicates, arranged and ready for cxcbangoa. 
Libraries are invited to make such exchanges. 



Public Library. 



27 



APPENDIX YI. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 







« 


9 


O 


H 


« 


« 


^ 


Vi 


O 


r» 


as 






« 


O 


l» 


l» 


♦» 


t» 


i» 


r. 


t» 


j» 


t» 








1^ 


H 


H 


H 


aD 


at) 

H 


ati 

H 


<x> 

H 


5B 


ao 

H 




f Gain in located 


























books (App. 


























vni.) . . . 


6,297 


7,475 


6,296 


7,508 


10,384 


6,622 


6,198 


6,564 


9,227 


9,337 


11,286 




Of these not 


























located at last 


























Report . . . 
Added and lo- 


1,678 


1,327 


140 


294 


4,135 


651 


829 


187 


. . . 


591 


303 


1 
























cated .... 


4,619 


6,148 


6,156 


7,214 


6,249 


5,971 


5,369 


6,377 


9,227 


8,746 


10,983 


Added and not 
























^ 


located . . . 
Total gain . . . 


1,327 


140 


294 


4,135 


651 


829 


*12,244 


• • • 


591 


303 


655 




5,946 


6,288 


6,450 


11,349 


6,900 


6,800 


17,613 


6,377 


9,818 


9,049 


11,638 




Condemned and 


























transferred . 
, Net gain . . . 


• • • 


2 






1 


5 


• • • 


3 


2 


21 


36 












5,946 


6,290 


6,450 


11,349 


6,899 


6,795 


17,613 


6,874 


9,816 


9,028 


11,602 



1 
1 


Gain in books . 

Less transfers 
and condem'd 
books .... 

Net gain . . . 


2,003 
596 


2,469 
352 


1,417 
231 


2,780 
2,115 


2,614 
1,361 


1,799 
1,021 


1,465 

1,480 


3,385 
2,586 


3,570 
1,813 


3,830 
1,701 


2,728 

12,344 


o 

S 


1,407 


2,117 


1,186 


665 


1,253 


778 


(loss) 15 


799 


1,757 


2,129 


384 



« ("Gain in books . 












254 


101 


402 


335 


157 


126 
















g-S i 
























;S t Net gain . . . 












254 


101 


402 


335 


157 


126 

















^ rOainbyaddition 
"g ^ Less loss by ex- 












1,375 
506 


1,641 
334 


1,234 

786 


1,902 
519 


1,015 
351 


1,677 
718 












R.,2 ) 














^ I. Net gain . . . 


659 


301 


139 


149 


360 


869 


1,307 


448 


1,383 


664 


959 











5,936 


881 
50 


621 


fifi4 


915 


917 


856 
250 


676 


o ^ Condemned and 








97 1 lis 


334! 97S 


270 


^El 




















i^*^ AT . • 








5,936 


831 


524 


521 


581 


644 


606 


406 















f Gain in books . 












885 
76 


850 
217 


1,359 
644 


1,261 
495 


1,303 
413 


8-'3 


.s-^ 


Condemned and 
lost 












247 


^? 


^ Net gain . . . 














5i^ 










4,365 


-809 


633 


715 


766 


890 


576 

















* Includes 12,057 (close estimate) of the Barton books, and 187 other volumes, 
t This Item is exceptionally large, as many duplicates not in use, and broken sets have been 
transferred to Duplicate Room, to make room on the shelves for fresh accessions. 



28 



City Document No. 61, 



APPENDIX ^l.— Co7itiwaed. 



f Grain In city part 

Condemned and 

lost 



J Net gai 
) Fellowe 



gain .... 

8 Athe- 
nseum. (Xet 
gain) , . . . 



l Total gain 



3,754 
4 



3,750 
865 



4,615 



1,069 
26 



1,043 
1,330 



2,373 



1,296 

46 

1,250 

572 



1,8:22 



1,299 
163 



1,136 
759 



1,895 



1,396 
304 



1,830 



3,542 
701 



2,841 
196 



3,037 



s 














15,932 
14-1 


1,305 
403 


1,004 
300 


1,123 
433 


995 


•S'S Condemned and 
2 £ . lost 














398 
































15,788 


902 


704 


690 


597 
































11,049 
12 


480 

75 

405 


599 
130 


430 
74 


264 


•2'S Condemned and 














46 
































11,037 


469 


406 


218 


















fe • fGain in books . 
go 1 Condemned and 
^ £ <! lost 
















3,905 


3,179 
32 


1,057 
16 


641 
25 


f^*^ Net gain . . . 














. . . 54 


















3,005 


3,147 


1,041 


610 





















g r ("Gain in books . 
■g'S Condemned and 
b;!'! 'ost 

•^•^ [ Net gain . . . 



24 19 39 139 



6,401 

2 

0,399 



^ ^ f G.iin in books . 
e5"5 Condemned and 

< S < lost 

si I 

t§^ L Net gain . . . 



8,856 

52 

8,804 



Bates Hall gain . 
Lower Hall gain 
XewspapiT 

Ilodin train . . 
l)iil)li<atc Koom 

gnin 

K. B. Hrauch 

gain 

8. B. Branch 



llox. Branch 

gain 

, I'\ Howes Athc- 
'^ naaum gain . . 
Clin. Branch 

gain 

Bri. liranch 

gain 

Dor. Branch 

gain 

S. E. Branch 

g;iin 

J. r. Branch 

gain 



Total gain 



5,946 

1,40 



6,290 
2,11 



8,0)2 8,708 



6,450 
1,186 



11,349 
665 



149 
5,936 



6,899 
1,203 



360 

831 

4,365 



6,795 

778 

254 
860 
524 
809 
3,750 
865 



7,775 



18,099 13,708,14,044 



19.271 
(loss) 16 

101 

1,307 

521 

633 

1,043 

1,330 

15,788 

11,037 

54 



24 19 

61,109:16,372 



6,374 

799 

402 
448 
58 1 
715 

1,250 
672 
902 
405 

3,905 



9,816 
1,767 

335 

1,383 

644 

766 

1,136 

759 

704 

469 

3,147 



39 
20,9)5 



9,028 
2,129 



157 
064 



1,092 
738 
690 
406 

1,041 



11,602 
384 

126 

059 

406 

576 

2,841 

196 

597 

218 

616 

8,804 

6,399 



17,277 1 33,724 

I 



Public Librart. 



29 



APPEJ^DIX YII. 

INCREASE EROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





H 


o 

H 


H 




H 

at) 

H 


ac 

H 


J- 


ao 

H 


O 

ac 

H 


e 


aD 

H 


at) 
ao 

H 


English Books with 1 
British imprint . \ 


635 


708 


625 


811 


899 


1,096 


1,389 


1,294 


1,533 


2,830 


2,237 


1,763 


English Books with ) 
American imprint i 


1,154 


1,445 


1,455 


1,411 


2,200 


3,642 


4,301 


3,807 


7,365 


10,501 


6,761 


5,546 


English Books with ) 
Coutin'tal imprint ) 


104 


100 


80 


50 


48 


115 


291 


125 


375 


316 


180 


191 


Foreign hooks .... 


539 


673 


789 


487 


561 


891 


1,064 


858 


767 


1,858 


1,742 


1,269 


Duplicates of either"] 
class, when not in- 1 
eluded in the other j 
items J 


97 
2,529 


2,926 


447 
3,396 


248 


480 
















Total 


3,007 


4,194 


5,744 


7,045 


6,084 


10,040 


15,505 


10,920 


8,769 



APPENDIX YIII. 

VOLUMES LOCATED IN BATES HALL, BY MONTHS. 



Months. 


<X) 

<s 

H 


© 

1 

© 
O 

3D 
H 


H 

1 
© 


el 
{• 
1 

H 

aD 

H 


« 

H 


1 

H 


1 
f 

aD 

H 


19 

aD 


1 
aD 

H 


aD 
aD 

H 




758 
509 
1,037 
383 
713 
866 
443 
639 
626 
563 
521 
417 


347 
833 
697 
763 
632 
834 
633 
382 
1,175 


727 
480 
462 
520 
378 
546 
695 
905 
427 
706 
1,001 
661 


455 
464 
291 
518 
511 
295 
* 4,528 
651 
611 
724 
783 
t598 


584 
584 
631 
554 
457 
620 
489 
646 
658 
456 
551 
492 


357 
527 
839 
405 
436 
414 
377 
507 
665 
594 
472 
605 


383 
477 
713 
560 
622 
590 
722 
758 
427 
349 
419 
544 


830 
845 
829 
566 

1,036 
602 
925 
567 
579 
645 
752 

1,050 


671 
613 
733 
591 
611 
751 
697 
772 

1,014 
677 
649 

1,558 


654 




963 




984 




2,078 
899 
842 


September 

October 


November 


940 
lib 




881 


February ... 

March 


707 
654 


April 


939 






Total 


7,475 


6,296 


7,508 


10,384 


6,622 


6,198 


6,564 


9,226 


9,337 


11,286 




Pamphlet volumes \ 
arranged by the Curator J 








385 


554 


206 


159 


317 


29 


28 













* 3,876 are books of the Ticknor Library, then assigned to permanent places. 

t Includes 31 volumes of the Ticknor MSS. 

Note. — These monthly figures are*hc results of the tables made out year by year, like the 
one constituting Appendix VI for 1869. The figures for May, June, and July, 1868-69, should 
lollow those for April of the same year. They were misplaced to adapt the table to a change of 
the Library year. 

Pamphlets. — During the year the Curator of pamphlets has continued the arrangement of 
all the loose pamphlets by subjects, etc., in the Cabinet Room; and such as were duplicates and 
not needed have been arranged in adjacent apartments. 



APPENDIX IX. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. — [G.] 
(Representing books located only.) 





CLASSES 


General Libraries. 




Special Libhabies. 




1 


1S5S. 


1861. 


1866. 


1871. 


1873. 


Total 




►J" 


t3 


li 


as 


|S 


a" 




►J'"' 


1-1 "^ 


li 


iJ~ 


1= i 


is 


>> 

(2^ 


1^ 


P3 


■§■2 


. Special 
j^ Libraries. 

(5" 




etc 


24 
170 
170 

515 

493 
188 
87 


86 
231 
140 

1,168 

762 

335 

229 

159 
100 


19 
326 
184 

1,438 

739 

413 

189 

266 
112 


22 
271 
157 

918 

207 

160 

222 
97 


22 
278 
223 

1,305 

1,018 

263 

238 

250 
107 


32 
235 
284 

911 

635 

443 

. 249 

250 
82 

176 
397 
496 
263 
106 
68 
669 
331 
434 
181 
215 
3 


10 
205 
199 

983 

605 

530 

60 

260 
123 

47 

222 
394 
620 
324 
116 
101 
747 
239 
323 
256 
201 
9 
49 


9 
160 
210 

962 

712 

433 

198 

210 

98 
67 

143 
208 
072 
290 
109 
97 
499 
188 
301 
265 
162 
6 
1 


13 
178 
240 

1,.'586 

611 

271 

147 

184 
114 

148 
222 
684 
397 
116 
148 
670 
223 
263 
174 
215 
9 


16 
179 
285 

1,265 

953 

84S 

520 

264 
116 
81 

289 
769 
797 
363 
190 
88 
400 
183 
355 
273 
379 

9 


220 
444 

1,708 

1,306 

597 

96 

330 
207 
94 

476 
465 
1,000 
418 
128 
174 
323 
302 
462 
361 
287 
1 


1 

19 
5 

2 

1 
1 

2 
2 

1 


1,311 
5,222 
5,930 

23,261 

18,638 

10,758 

6,903 

6,156 

4,609 

813 

4,865 
15,041 
16,602 
6,392 
3,610 
1,919 
10,013 
6,359 
7,496 
4,089 
5,033 
455 


244 
32 
16 

96 

75 

69 

9 

6 
20 

2 

928 

144 

6 

3 

66 

3 

14 

1,194 

4 

6 


276 
596 
650 

712 

573 

413 

291 

1,290 
1,124 

82 

369 

708 

3,242 

1,247 
307 
98 
66 
1-J4 
90 
9 
29 


6 
3 
54 

681 

69 

8 
196 

1 
5 
874 
49 
13 

22 

20 

1 


256 
33 

241 

21 

66 

30 

130 
3,488 

1 
171 
367 
120 
66 
21 
4 
31 
01 
24 
4 


21 

715 
154 

996 
3,621 
2,669 

307 

-B91 
629 
208 

221 
475 
244 
141 
29 
17 
26 
91 
4S 
15 
68 
73 
39 
2,892 


. . . 1,858 
. . . 6,825 
. . . 6,837 

213 26,200 

2,389 25,386 




KbV '' ' d Literar Hiator 


III. 

IV. 


General History, Biography, Travel, and Geography .... 
American History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Po- 


V. 


English History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Polite 


VI. 


French History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Polite 


VIZ. 


Italian History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Polite 




vm. 


Germanic History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Po- 








190 








. . . 4,611 


XL 


Other History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Litera- 


214 
314 

963 
185 
145 

79 
370 
155 
312 

96 
197 


216 
341 
695 
343 
161 
06 
556 
170 
318 
116 
205 


189 
507 
836 
429 
111 
118 
706 
172 
394 
119 
193 
15 


160 
445 
617 
444 
112 

515 
212 
449 
102 
338 
6 


262 
560 
985 
378 
114 
130 
365 
191 
485 
76 
253 
5 


4t 6,463 
. . . 17,328 




Periodicals and Transactions 






. . . 20,473 






... 7,954 






. . . 3.917 


XVI 




. . . 2,120 






. . . 10,133 






6,619 






. . . 8,909 


w 




4,141 


XXI. 




5,134 






... 634 


xxin. 










18 


32 


. . . 89 


XXIV. 


























. . . 2,892 












































Totals 




0,297 


7,475 


6,296 


7,608 


6,477 


6,622 


5,996 


6,383 


8,026 


9,424 


36 


164,375 


2,932 


12,296 


2,029 


6,171 


13,960 


2,823 203,576 















Explanation. — Class III includes General Histury, Universal Biographies, Histories of Eras, Voy- 
ages, and Travelt*, when embracing several countries, and collected works of historians. 

Class IV includes North and South American History, Documents and Statistics, Biographies of 
Americans, Geography of, and Voyagesand Travels in America, with the collected works of American 
writers, and what of American Literature is sometimes termed Polygraphy. 

Class V, Cla-'S VI, Class VII, Class VUl. — These have the same scope for the respective countries 
that Class IV has for America. Class VIII includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as 
also the Scandinavian nations. 

Class XI includes Russia, Greece, Turkey, with Asia, Africa, Australia, Polynesia, etc. 

Class XIV includes Political Science, Social Science, and Ethics applied and unapplied, Intellectual 
Science, Education, Rhetoric, Logic, Phrenology, etc. 

* Includes all Books in Room O, — 12,10S of them belonging to the Barton Library, 
t Patent Records of the Colony of Victoria. 



Class XIX includes Mechanics. Military and Naval Arts, Agriculture, Domestic Arts, etc. 

Class XXII embraces all such pamphlet volumes as mav have been received from time to time, and 
are generally too heterogeneous in their make-up to be classed otherwise than by themselves. 

Class XXIV includes only the Shakespeare collection of the Barton Library, and not that of the Gen- 
eral Library. . - *• »■ 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by thomselves, so that for purposes ot enumeration or 
learning percentage of use, it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the subdivisions ; :is also 
upon such points ao Biography, Travel, and Voyages, etc., by summing the results of the ranges devoted 
to them in the several alcoves. , , . »_ r. * ,_ tv. ■ 

Note. — The increase of the several special libraries is Included m the figures for these libraries. 



i originally shelved there. 



APPEN^DIX X. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. [G] 



1867 1868 18e» 



18TO 1871 187a 



1873 1874 



1870 


1877 






a 


a 


1 


1 


1 853 


1,844 


322 


328 


2,191 


2,202 


710 


715 


1,112 


1,129 


1,392 


1,477 


2,687 


2,868 


13,S99 


13,501 


2,347 


2,439 


2,061 


2,186 


3,928 


3,805 


1,201 


1,313 


203 


165 


992 


1,002 


1 


2 


267 


402 


35,152 


35,478 



To be deducted. 



TJ 




2 


S 


Si 




V-S 


■s 


■g 


■s « 


"HS 








la 


IP 


f =• 


1 
-a 






gn 


s« 


s« 




o« 


H 


c-* 


h 


H 


O 


9 


28 





1 


32 


6 





4 








4 


2 


19 


58 


2 





12 


26 


7 


30 


1 





6 


6 


7 


17 








19 


14 


12 


46 


1 





65 


13 


42 


127 








11 


54 


773 


1,817 


3 


22 


285 


1,266 


17 


74 





1 


80 


25 


15 


48 


6 


7 


67 


32 


54 


415 


9 


11 


133 


92 


11 


38 











17 
















1 


7 


20 










7 



















2 


6 






42 




2 


975 


2,728 


22 


713 


1,667 
1 



Theology, Moral and Intellectual Science, etc 

Jurisprudence and Political Science 

Medicine, Mathematics, Physics or Natural Science 

Useful and Fine Arts, Military and Naval Science 

American History and Politics 

Foreign History and Politics 

Poetry, Drama, Oratory, Rhetoric 

English Prose Fiction, including Juvenile Fiction, and other juvenile books 

Biography 

Travels 



Libraries, Collections, Periodicals, etc.* 

German 

Italian Books 

French Books 

Spanish Books 

Books of Reference 



7,185 
2,342 



2,621 
1,137 



629 
1,059 
1,374 
2,344 
3,062 
2,223 
1,871 
2,798 
1,206 



647 
1,082 
1,387 
2,534 
9,130 
2,300 
1,939 
3,125 
1,232 



664 
1,089 
1,401 
2,576 
9,813 
2,336 
2,041 
3,305 
1,246 

224 



2,467 
10,469 
2,298 
1,990 
3,478 
1,247 
220 



2,529 
11,231 
2,281 
1,980 



056 
1.077 
1,354 
2,544 
11,864 
2,246 
1,965 
3,827 
1,262 

227 



1,070 
1,362 
2,540 
11,853 
2,234 
1,986 



Totals ■ 25,199 



723 29,909 30,674 31,827 32,605 32,596 33, 



1,072 
1,380 
2,672 
12,426 
2,278 
2,040 



732 
1,113 
1,439 
2,930 
13,742 
2,448 
2,132 
4,035 
1,334 
154 



* This class, embracing sets like Bobn's *' Libraries," etc., includes many hooks, of course, which, in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heads of this table. 
t The books enumerated in this item are mostly imperfect sets. 

Note. — The column of *' Conuemne<l books replaced" includes books condemned in previous years as well as in the current year. The column "Total added" shows the number of volumes a 
bound two volumes in one, etc The small gain in this Hall is accounted for by the fact that mrttiy old books not in request and broken sets have been taken off the shelves, to make room for newer books. 



put upon the shelves. 



Public Library. 



31 



APPENDIX XI. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1877, to APRIL 30, 1878. 

Givers (excluding auonj'mous) ..... 677 

Volumes 21,206 

Pamphlets 12,453 

The following large gifts and bequests are included in this List : 
from the Mercantile Library Association of Boston, 16,927 vol- 
luiies ; from the bequest of Eliza Mary Thayer, 890 volumes ; 
from the bequest of Charlotte Harris, 1,118 volumes. The Library 
has also received from J. Ingersoll Bowditch, Esq., $500, for the 
purchase of books in pure mathematics, to be added to the 
Bowditch Librar}'. 

Note. The income of the Library Funds is expended for books, which are credited yearly 
to the respective founders. See Appendix XXVII. 



Abbot, Francis E. . . 

Abbot Public Library, Marllehead 

Academy of Science, St. Louis, Mo. ..... 

Adams, John S. . . 

Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, Scotland .... 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences .... 
American Antiquarian Society, Worcester .... 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 

Salem .......... 

American Asyhim for the Deaf and Dumb, Hartford, 

Conn. .......... 

American Bible Societ^y . 

American College and Education Society .... 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, Easton, Pa. 
American Pharmaceutical Association, Fhiladelphia 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia . 
American Socialist, Publisher, Oneida, N. Y. . 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 
American Tract Society . . . . 

American Unitarian Association ...... 

American Veterinary Hospital, N'ew York City 

Amherst College 

Andrews,. C. Stanley 

Andrews, Robert R., Cambridge 

Anonymous, 5 broadsides, 2 maps 

Appleton, William S. 

Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia . 
Arkansas and Texas Bureau of Emigration, St. Louis, Mo. 

1 map .......... 

Arnold, Howard P 

Ashurst, John, M.D., Philadelphia 

Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad Company . 

Babbs, Mrs. Sarah S 

Baldwin Cbarles C, Cleveland, 

Baldwin Place Home for Little Wanderers 

Balfour, David JNI 



Vols. 



1 
1 

1 
1 
5 

10 



1 

40 
2 



Pphs. 



1 

3 

2 
5 

7 

401 



32 



City Document No. 61, 



Bancroft, Hon. George, Newport, R.I. 

Bar Association ..... 

Barlow, Samuel L. M., New Yorh City, 1 newspaper 

Barrows, Henry D., Los Angelas, Cal 

Battle, Hon. Kemp P., Raleigh, N.C. 

Beaman, Rev. Charles C. . 

Bearce, Horace M. . . . . 

Bell, Frof. Alexander G , London 

Bell, IToii. Charles H., Exeter, N.II. 

Bell, William, Jr., Columbus, 0. 

Ben^t, Brig. -Gen. Stephen V., Washington, D 

Berea College, Berea, Kg. 

Berlin, Germany, Statistisches Bureau 

Berry, Ira, rortland. Me. ... 

Betts, Rev. Beverley E., New York City 

Beverly Yacht Club . ... 

Bigelow, Hon. Erastus B. . 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton 

Birmingham, England, Free Libraries' Committee 

Blackburn, England, Free Public Library 

Blackburn University, Carlinville, III. 

Blake, Clarence J., M.I). . 

Blake, John H 

Bolles, Rev. IS.. C, Salem, G broadsides 

Bolton, England, Free Library and Museum 

Bond, Miss Anna E. . 

Bond, George W. ... 

Boston, City of, 10 broadsides . 

City Hospital . 

Gas Liglit Company 

Latin School Association 

Medical Library Association 

University, 1 broadside . 

Both, Carl, M.I). 

Bouton, James W., New York City 

Bowditcli, Henrv L, M.D. 

Bowditch, Henry P., M.IJ. 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. 

Bradford, George P. . 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., 59 broadsides, 170 newspapers 

Bradlee, .T. Putnam . 

Brewer, Thomas M., M.D. 

Brigham, Edwin H. . 

Brigham Hull Hospital, Canandaigua, N. Y. 

British Museum, London . 

Brock, 11. A., Richmond, Va. . 

Brockhans, F. A., Leipzig, Germany 

Brooks, William G. . 

Brown, Francis .... 

Brown, Francis H., M.D. . 

Brown, Henry A., Philadeljjhia 

Brown, .John C. J. . 

Brown, Leonard .... 

Brunn, Dr. Chr., Copenhagen . 

Buciianan, Koberdeau, Washington, D.C. 

Buffalo, N. Y, General Hospital 

Bugbee, James !\L . 

Bunker Hill ^lonument Association 

Burke, 'i'homas. New York City 



Burke, William, 1 map 




rphs. 



19 



15 

39 

10 

1 



1 
1 
1 
40 
•> 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
4 
1 



Public Library. 



33 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



/. 



/. 



Burroughs, Rev. Henry 

Butler, George B., New Torh City . 

Butler, Prof. James D., Madison, Wis. 

Caldwell, Eev. Samuel L., Providence, R 

Canto, Dr. Ernesto do, Miguel, The Azor 

Carey, Henry C, Philadelphia 

Carleton, Isaac N., Neiv Haven, Conn. 

Carleton College, Northfield, Minn. . 

Carmany, John H., San Francisco, Cal. 

Carpenter, Henry F., New York City 

Carret, Jose F. .... 

CartSe, Cornelius S., M.D. 

Carter, Caj^t. 11. K., Chester, Pa. 

Case, Thomas S., Kansas City, Mo. 

Case, Lockwood and Brainard, Messrs., Ilartfor 

Caswell, Edward T., M.D., Providence, R 

Caulfield, liichard, LL.D., Cork, Ireland 

Caverly, Ciiarles 

Chadwick, James R., M.D. 

Chandler, Horace P. . 

Chaney, Rev. George L. 

Chaplin, Rev. Jeremiah 

Chase, George B. . 

Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D. . 

Cheney, Rev. Oren B., Lewiston, Me 

Child, Prof. Francis J., Cambridge 

Christern, F. W., New York City 

Claghorn, James L., Philadel2Jhia 

Clapp, Ebenezer ... 

Clapp, William W. . 

Clark, W. A., 1 broadside. 

Clark, William S., LL.D., Amherst 

Clarke, Edward K., Binghamton, N. 

Clarke, Robert, Cinciyinati, Ohio 

Clements, V. . . . . 

Cobden Club, London 

Cobham, Claude D. . 

Colby & Rich, Messrs. 

Cole, J. 0., Albany, N. Y. 

College of the Holy Cross, Worcester 

Columbia College, New York City 

Compton, G. W., Woirester 

Connecticut, State of 

Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven 

Mutual Life Insurance Company, Hartford 

Conwell, Russell H 



d, Conn 



Corey, Ueloraine P., 7l/aZ^m .... 
Cotting, Benjamin E., M.D., 136 newspapers . 
Cowdin, Hon. Elliot C, New York City . 

Cvoshj, 3o\mTi., Bangor, Me 

Cross, JumQ&M., Providence, R.I. . 

Croswell, Hon. Charles M., Adrian, Mich. 

Crowell, John, M.D., Haverhill 

Crunden, Prof. Frederick M., St. Louis, Mo. . 

Curtis, Daniel S., Paris, France 

Curtis, Miss Isabel P., 7 maps. 

Gushing, J. E., Laivrence 

Cutter, Abram E., 4 engravings, 6 maps, 3 portraits 
Cutter, Thomas E., Salisbury .... 
Dana, Gen. James ...... 



30 
9 



27 
5 
1 
1 



2 
13 



2 

1 

25 

216 

37 

1 

106 

13 

1 

21 

1 

2 



1 

1 

10 



1 
1 

1 

1181 
2 



100 
4 



34 



City Document No. 61. 



GrVEKS. 


Vols. 
1 


Pphs. 


Dana, Richard H., Jr 




Day, Albert, jM.B 




3 


Dean, John W 




1 


Deane, Charles, LL.D., Cambridge 




1 


De Bernardy, C. W., London 




1 


De Costa, Rev. Benjamin F., New York City . 




1 


Delafield, Mrs. Julia, New York City .... 


1 




Dennet, Charles F., Brighton, England .... 


1 


1 


Deutscher Medicinischer Verein 


4 


5 


Devens, Gen. Charles 


3 




Dexter, George 




1 


Dickinson, Rev. Cornelius E., Elgin, 111 


1 






1 




Dixwell, Mrs. John J 


180 


988 






1 


Dodd, Horace 




1 




2 




Doyle, Hon. Thomas A., Providence, R.I. 


2 




Drowne, Henry T., New York City ..... 




2 


Duane, William, Philadelphia ...... 


1 




Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me 




1 


Dyer, Frank B 


2 




Earl, B., & Son, Fall River 




7 


Earle, Pliny, M.D., Northampto7i 




1 


Earnshaw, Rev. William, Dayton, Ohio .... 


1 




Eastern Yacht Club 


2 




Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio 




1 


Edes, Rev. Richard S., Bolton 


2 


440 


Ela, Alfred, Cambridge 


20 


64 


Ela, Richard, Cambridge 


3 




Ellis, iJer. George E., Z».Z> 


1 




Elze, Prof. Karl, Bonn, Germany 


1 






1 




Emery, Charles E., Neiv York City ..... 


1 




Emery, George E., Lynn 


1 




Emery, Rev. Samuel H., North Middleborough 


1 






1 




Ericsson, John, LL.D., New York City .... 


1 




Erie Railway Company 




1 


Essex Institute, Salem 


1 




Estuhrook, J., Newburgh, NY. 


1 




Fales, Lewis, Milford 




1 




1 




Public Library ....... 


3 


33 


Fernald, Prof. 0. M., Williamstown .... 


3 


61 


Ferry, lion. Thomas W., Washington, B.C. . 


1 




Fette, W. Elliot 


U 


174 


Field, //o)!. Walbridge A., Washington, D.C. . 


G 




Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Yt 


1 




Flint, Charles L 


22 




Fogg, William J. G., M.D 




1 


Folev, William J 


2 




Folsom, Charles F., M.D. . . . ' . 


1 




Folsom, Charles W., Cambridge, a lot of broadsides, 62 








4 


106 


Folsom, George M. ....... . 


2 


47 


Folsom, Rev. Nathaniel S., Concord 


1 




Foote, Rev. Henry W 


1 




Fowler, William C., LL.D-, Durham Centre, Conn. 


1 




Fox, IIo7i. Gustavus V., Boston 


1 





Public Library. 



35 



c. 



338 



Repu 



Friends' Asylum for the Insane, Philadelphia 

Frothinirham, Miss Martha W. . 

Gaffield"; Thomas .... 

Gaines, Rev. A. G., D.D., Canton, N.Y. 

Galloupe, Francis E., Lynn 

Gallup, H. E., London 

Galvin, Rev. Edward I. . . . 

Garceau, Treffle, M.D. 

Garfield, Hon. James A., Washington, D. 

Garland, George M., Cambridge 

Garratt, 3Irs. A. C 

Garratt, Joshua H. . . . . 
General Theological Library 
Gerould, Samuel L., Goffstown, N. H. 

Gifford, Stephen N 

Globe Publishing Company 

Godkin, E. L., Neiv York City, 8 broadsides 

papers, 2 photographs . 
Goeje, Prof. J. de. Ley den 
Goodnow Library, Sudbury 
Goodwin, //om. John A., Lowell 
Goold, William, Windham, Me. . 
Gould, Prof. Benjamin A., Cordoba, Argentine 
Gould, John, Cincinnati, Ohio . 
Gould, S. C, Manchester, N.H. . 
Granger, Rev. Francis, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Gray, Rev. George Z., Cambridge 
Great Britain. Commissioner of Patents 

Green, Aliss H. E 

Green, Samuel A., M.D. 
Greene, Reuben, M.D. 
Greenough, William W. 

Griffin, Laroy F 

Groton, Town of .... 

Guicciardini, Conte Piero, Florence, Italy 
Hale, Rev. Edward E. . . . 

Hale, George S 

Hall, Edward W., Waterville, Me. 
Halliwell-Phillips, James O., London 
Hammond, Rev. Charles, iMonson 
Hampton, Hon. Wade, Columbia, S.O. 
Hancock, John, Dayton, Ohio . 
Hanno, V. . 
Harris, Miss Charlotte, Bequest of 

Harris, Elisha, M.D 

Harrison, George L., Philadelphia . 
Hart, Charles H., Philadelphia . 
Hart, Prof. Samuel, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. . 
Harvard University, Cambridge 
Harvard Library, 5 broadsides, 1 map, 3 newspapers 
Observatory 



Haskiris, Rev. David G., Cambridge . 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. . 
Hebbard, E. Cola, M.D. . 

Heinzen, Karl 

Henshaw, Miss H. E., Leicester, 1 portrait 
Herschel, Clemens .... 
Hewins, Miss Josephine ... 
Hill, George W., Washington, D.C. . 




Pphs. 



1 
2 

10 
1 



76 
1 
9 
1 
3 



1 

47 

3 

1 

1,118 

1 
1 



332 

1 
1 
1 
3 

4 
1 
1 

1 
71 

24 
1 
2 



6 
1 

1 

613 

4 

1 
1 
1 
4 
50 



9 
54 



36 



City Document No. 61. 



Vols. 



Hill, Hon. Hamilton A., 41 broadsides 

Hill, Walter S., New York City 

Hilton, William, Bradford 

Himes, Rev. William L., South Groveland ... 1 

Hitchcock, David K., Newton ...... 1 

Hodgkins, William H 1 

Hodgman, Rev. Edwin R., Westford . 
Hoe, Kichard & Co., New York City . 

Holland, Rev. F. M., Concord 1 

Homes, Henry A., Albany, N.Y...... 1 

Hooper, Miss Alice S. ...... . 1 

Hornell Library Association, HorneUsville, N.i 
Hospital of St. Barnabas, Neicark, N.J. 
Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Radnor, Pa. 

Hough, Franklin B 

Houghton, Horatio, West Boylston 

Howard, C. Frusher, San Francisco, Cal. 

Howard Benevolent Society 

Howe Memorial Committee ...... 1 

Howes, Osborne, Jr. ........ 4 

Howson & Son, Messrs., Philadelphia .... 1 

Hubbard, Hon. Gardiner G. 

Hubbard, Rev. James M., 40 broadsides, 1 newspaper . 1 

Hudson, Ho?i. Charles, Lexington ..... 1 

Hughes, H. T., M.D., Carmarthen, Wales 
Hunt, Setii, Florence .... 

Hunter, William ........ 1 

Huntoon, Daniel T. V., Canton ...... 1 

Hurnard, .James, Colchester, England .... 1 

Hutchins, Rev. Charles L., Medford ..... 1 

lasigi, Joseph A. .... 

Ingraliam, Robert C, New Bedford . 

Institution for the Instruction of Deaf-Mutes, New Yor'i 

City . . ._ . . . 
Institution of Civil Engineers, Loiidon 
Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa . 
Iowa State University, Iowa City 
Iowa Wesleyan University, Mt. Pleasant 
Ives, Charles L., Philadelphia . 
Jarvis, Edward, M.D. 
JefiVies, B. Joy, M.D. 
Johnson, Franklin, Cambridge . 
Jones, Augustine .... 

Jones, C. W., Needham 

Jones, Jesse II., East Ahington 

Jones, Rev. .Joseph H., Baltimore, Md. .... 1 

Joslyn, Miss Mary E., .32 newspapers .... 6 

Kaiserliche Ivonigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vientia. 2 

Kelly, Hon. William 1)., Washington, B.C. 

King, Albert T., Baltimore, Md. 

King, George B., 

Kirhy, Thomas E. .... 

Knapp, Artliur M 8 

Kna])]), (u'orge B. ....... . 6 

Ladies' I.,iterary Association, Flint, Mich. 

Lancaster Library Coanmittee ...... 2 

Lansing, Mrs. Catharine G., Albany, N.Y.... 1 

Lapham, William B., Augusta, Me. . 
Laurie, Rev. Tliomas, D.D., Providence, R.I. 
Laval University, Quebec .... 



Public Library. 



37 




Lawrence, Abbott 

Lawrence, Hon. Edward . 

Lawrence Academy, Groton 

Lawrence Public Library . 

Leavitt, George A., Neiv York City 

Lee, Francis H., Salem 

Lee & Shepard, Messrs. 

Leicester Public labrary . 

Leland, D. T. S. ... 

Lenox Library, New York City . 

Lescu3'er, r.. Saint Dizier, France 

Lewis, Weston . • . 

Ligue Nationale Fran^aise, San Francisco, Cal 

Lincoln, Prof. John L., Providence, R.l. 

Lincoln, Marshal .... 

Lindgrist, C. A., Stockholm 

Lindsay, Lord, London ... 

Lindsay, W. Lander, M.D., Perth, Scotland 

Literary and Philosophical Society, Leicester, England 

Little, Brown, & Co., Messrs. 

Littlefield, J. W 

Liverpool, England, Free Public Library 

Livingston, Charles F., Manchester, N.H. 

Locke, John L., Belfast, Me. 

Long, John D., 1 broadside. 

Loomis, E. J., Washington, D.C. 

Loring, James S., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Loring, Joseph C. . . . 

Lowell City Library . 

Luckenbach, Rev. W. H., Tarrytown, 3Id 

Lunt, Horace G., Evanston, 111. 

Lynn Public Library . 

Lyon, Henry, M.D. . 

Lyons, J. A.. Notre Dame, Ind. 

McAuley, Jeriy. New York City 

McCarthy, NaJ^haniel J. 

McDonald, Maj. W. J. Washington, D. C. 

Macedo, Joaquin M. de, Rio de Janeiro 

McKay, George F. 

Maclean, John, Princeton, N.J. 

Macmillan & Co., Messrs., New York City 

McPhetres, Samuel A., Lowell . 

Maine Historical Society, Brunswick 

Manchester, England, Literary Club 

Manning, Robert 

Marcus, Alfred A. 

Marsh, Prof. 0. C. . 

Marthens, John F., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Massachusetts, State of 

Board of Health 

Board of State Charities 

^ Historical Society . 

• Horticultural Society 

Medical Society 

May, Miss Abby W. . 

Means, Rev. James H., D.D. 

Medical Society of the County of Kings, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Medical Society of West Virginia, Wheeling 

Medlicott, William G., Longmeadow . 

Meek, Henry M., ^aZcOT . 



19 



27 
1 

1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
I 
1 
1 



30 

12 

1 

2 



24 



Pphs. 

10 

1 

4 

2 

131 

1 

1 



1 
1 

11 



1 
1 
1 
126 
2 
1 
1 



38 



City Document No. 61. 



GrVEK. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Memorial Hall Library, Andover 




1 


Mendum, Josiah P 






18 




Mercantile Library Association .... 






16,927 




Mercantile Library Association, A'^ew York City 








1 


Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. 








1 


Merrinian, Prof. Mansfield, Aew Raven, Conn. 






1 




Metcalf, Miss Kate ...... 






2 




Metropolitan Museum of Art, Xew York City . 








1 


Michigan State Board of Health .... 








2 


Mixter, Calvin S., Arlington .... 








4 


Montgomery, Thomas H., New York City 






1 




Montpellier, France, City of ... . 






2 




Moore, Rev. William H., Hartford, Conn. 








1 


Moradi, P., Philadelphia 








3 


Morris, Hon. Dwight, Hartford, Conn. 






25 


24 


Morse, //oh. Leopold 






4 


1 


Morton, William J., M.D 








1 


Mullen, Samuel, Melbourne 






2 




fvluller, Frederik, Amsterdam .... 






2 




Munsell, Joel, Albany, N. Y. . 






1 


45 


Murray, David, Glasgow, Scotland . 








1 


Myrick, E., Ayer 






2 


3 


Nash, Josepii 






1 




Nashville, ye?;/!., Board of Trade .... 






1 




National Home for Disabled Soldiers, Milwaukee, W 


s. 






1 


Needlewoman's Friend Society ..... 








1 


Neill, Edward D., Minneapolis, Minn. 






1 




Nelson, William, Paterson, N.J. .... 






1 




New Bedford Free Public Library 








1 


New Church Board of Publication, New Yo7-k City 






22 


29 


New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association 








3 


New England Historic Genealogical Society 








1 


New England Normal Institute, Fast Greenwich, R.i 


r 






1 


New Hampshire Medcial Society, Concord 








I 


Now Jersey, State of 






2 




Newton, City Council 






1 




New York City, Board of Education . 






2 


1 








1 


2 
7 


Nichols, Prof. William K., 3 broadsides . 






Nicholson, James B., Philadelphia . 








1 


Nottingham, Fngland, Free Libraries and Museum 








1 


Nowell, Cvrus, Portland, Me 






1 




Noyes, S.'B., Brooklyn, N.Y. . 






1 




Odiorne, James C, Framinghani 








1 


Ohio Central College, Iberia .... 








1 


Ohio State Library, Columbus .... 






11 


1 


Old Bcsidents' Historical Association, Lowell 








1 


Onderdonk, Henry, Jr., Jamaica, L.I. 






1 


1 


Oregon State Board of Emigration . 








3 


Osten-Sacken, C. Robert, Baron von, Newport, R.I 






1 




Othis, R. M., M.D 






1 




Otori, K. S , Tokio, Japan .... 






1 




Otterl)ein l^niversity, Westerville, Ohio 








1 


Pacific Medical College, Santa Rosa, Cal. 








1 


Page, James A 








207 


Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester .... 








1 


Palmer, Miss Alice W 






1 


1S2 


Paris, City of 






15 




Prefet dc la Seine 






11 


2 


Paton, Allan P., Greenock, Scotland .... 






1 





Public Library. 



39 




Patten, William L., Denver, Col. 

Patterson, Cai^t. Carlile P., Washington, D.C. 

Patterson, Joseph W., New York City 

Payne, J. T., M.D 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, 3rd. 

Peabody Institute, Peabody 

Peabody Museum, Cambridge . 

Pearson, Bev. R. W., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Peloubet, Rev. Francis N., Natick 

Penitent Females' Refuge . 

Pennsylvania Board of Public Charities 

Peoria, III., Board of Trade 

Perkins, Samuel L. • 

Perry, Ira, M.D. .... 

Perry, Rt. Rev. William S., D.D., Davenport, 

Philadelphia Library Company . 

Phillips, Henry, Jr., PhiUulelphia 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.II. 

Pierce, Hon. Edward L. . . . 

Pierce, Hon. Henry L. . . . 

Pike, Israel S., Calais, 3Ie. 

Pike, James S. . 

Plymouth, England, Free Library 

Poole, William F., Chicago, 111. 

Portland, Me., Public Library . 

Potocki, Albert, Paris, France . 

Potthast, Dr. August, Berlin, Germany 

Prescott, Hon. B. V., Concord, N. H. 

Preston, Edward, London . 

Prince, Hon. Frederic O. . 

Providence, R.I., Athenaeum 

Quincy, Hon. Josiali, 1 photograph. 

Redwood Library, Newporty R.I. 

Reed, J. Harris ..... 

Reed, John H., 4 broadsides, I map, 4 newspap 

Remsen, Ira, M.D 

Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Co7in. 

Rice, Hon. Alexander H. . 

Rice, Roswell, Cambridge, JV. Y., a lot of 

Rich, Charles T., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Richards, Samuel W. 

Richards, William .... 

Richardson, William L., 31. D. . 

Roberts, Ellis H., Utica, N.Y. . 

Rochester Free Public Library . 

Rogers, Edward H., 7 broadsides 

Rogers, John 

Rollins, Edward F 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England 
Russell, Charles T., Jr. 
Russell, F. P., Lynnfield . 
Rutter, Josiah, Walthom . 
St. Ignatius College, Chicago, III. 
St. Louis, 3Io., Mercantile Library . 
Salisbury, Stephen, Jr., Worcester . 
Sanger, George P., Jr., Cambridge . 
Santa Clara College, Santa Clara, Cat 
Sargent, Charles S., Cambridge 
Sargent, Epes ..... 
Sauveur, Prof. Lambert . 



Iowa 



roadsides 



1 

1 

11 

2 

1 

7 



153 
1 



Pphs 



1 

1 

34 
1 



1 
9 
1 

3 
59 



2 

69 

2 

1 



36 
24 



2 

1 

666 



40 



City Document No. 61. 




Pphs. 



Savage, Edward H. . 

Schultz, Adolph S. . . 

Scrosoppi, Edouard, Florence, Italy 

Scudder, Samuel H., Cambridge 

Sehvyn, Hon. Alfred R. C, Montreal 

Shaw, Lemuel, Barnstable 

Sheffield, England, Public Library 

Shepardson, Rev. D., Hancock . 

Sheppard, S. A. D. . 

Sherman, Hon. Amos, Woonsocket 

Shreve, William P. . 

Sibley, John L., Cambridge 

Simpson, J., Alexander, Philadelphia 

Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J., a lot of broadsides. 

Skinner, Benjamin, Acton ..... 

Smiley, Charles AV., Madison, N.J. . 

Smith, Albert, Peterborough, N.H. . 

Smith, Amzi, Washington, D.C., 1788 broadsides 

Smitli. Charles C 

Smith, Chauncey ...... 

Smith, Franklin W 

Smith, Gustavus W., New York City 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 
Snow, Edwin M , M.D., Providence, R. I. 
Societe Franklin, Paris ..... 

Society of Arts, London ..... 

Somerset Club ....... 

Somes, John J., Gloucester .... 

Sotheran, Henry, London ..... 

South Carolina Medical College, Charleston 

State Library, Columbia 

Spaulding, Rev. Henry G. . 

S[)ooncr, I^ysander ...... 

Springfield City Library ..... 

State J^unatic Asylum, Utica, N. Y. . 

Sterns, E. C, New York City .... 

Stevens, B. F., London ..... 

Stewart, Samuel B., Lynn .... 

Stickney, J. H., Baltimore, Md., 1 broadside. 
Stockport, England, Public Free Library. 

Stockwell, Stephen N 

Stockwell, Thonuis B., Providence, R.I. . 

Stone, Gen., Charles P., Cairo, Egypt 

Stone, Charles W., Templeton .... 

Stone, Rev. Edwin M., Providence, R.I. . 

Stow, B. J., M.IJ., Brooklyn, NY. . 

Strauss, J., Paris, France .... 

Sumner, Charles A., San Francisco, Cal. . 

Swinney, E. Hazzard, New York City 

Sydney, New South Wales, Free Public Library 

Tanaka, Fujimaro, Tokio, Japan 

Taunton Public Library ..... 

Tennessee School for the Blind, Nashville 
Tenney, Rev. Edward P., Colorado Springs, Col. 
Tliaxter, Levi D., Newton, 2 broadsides, 7 ncwspapc 
Thayer, Miss, Eliza Mary, Bequest of 
Tliayer, George A., Braintree .... 

Tiiayer, Rev. William M. ..... 

Thompson, lion. A. B., Concord, NIL 



2 
1 
1 
1 
130 
1 
1 



30 
2 

1 

8 

800 

1 



1 
1 
1 
1 

94 



221 



1,468 



6 

134 
1 



Public Libkart. 



41 



Thomson, Peter G., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Thornton, J. Wingate, 1 newspaper . 

Ticknor, Mrs. George 

Tileston, Harvey .... 

Tileston, Miss Mary W. . 

Tinkhani, J. G., Somerset . 

Titus, Charles H. . . 

Toledo, Ohio, Public Library 

ToAvne, E. H., Worcester . 

Townsend, John P., New York City . 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. 

Trumbull, J. Hammond, LL.D., Hartford, Co 

Tuck, Henrv, M.D. . 

Tufts College, Medford 

Turner, Joseph W. 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D.D., Craufordsville, 

1 newspaper .... 
Tyler, Arthur W., Baltimore, Md. . 
Tyndale, Theodore H. . . . 
L'nion Christian College, Dayton, Ohio 
United States, Adjutant-General's Office 

Board of Indian Commissioners 

Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Engineers, 1 map 

Bureau of Statistics 

Department of Agriculture 

■ Department of State 

Department of the Interior 

Department of the Treasury 

Hydrographic Office 

Light-House Board 

Naval Observatory . 

Office of the Coast Survey 

Patent Office . 

Post Office Department . 

University of London 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 
University of Missouri, Columbia 
University of Nashville, Nashville, Tenn. 
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Ind 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadcljjhia 
University of the City of New York . 
University of Vermont, Builington . 
LTniversity of Wisconsin, Madison 
Vermont Historical Society, Moyitpelier 

— State Library .... 

Verona, Italy, Biblioteca Comunale . 
Victoria Public Library, Melbourne . 

Registrar General . 

Wadsworth, Prof. Edward M., Cambridge 
Waite, Henry E., Neu-ton 
Walke, Rear- AdiniralR., Washington, D.C. 
"Walter, Joseph R., Wilmington, Del., 2 newspapers 
Waltham Puldic Library .... 

Ward, Miss Ellen M 

Ward, Elijah, New Yo7k City . 

Ware, Col. Henry, Cambridge, 2 broadsides 

Ware, Rev. Loammi G., Burlington, Vt. . 



Ind 




Pphs. 





1 




1 




1 


20 


281 




8 


4 




1 


36 




5 


1 






1 


1 




6 




1 


3 


7 




3 


2 


1 




1 




16 


9 


5 




1 




19 


6 


4 


16 


8 


2 


27 




11 


15 


1 






6 




1 


1 






1 




2 


1 






1 




1 




1 


1 




9 


2 


1 






1 


4 






1 




1 


1 






1 




1 


2 


7 


1 






32 




1 



42 



City Document No. 61. 



Warren, J. Collins, 31. D., 2 maps, 3 newspapers 
"Warren, William W. .... 
Washburn, Col. John D., Worcester . 
Washingtonian Home 
Waters, E. C, Chicago, 111. 
Watertown Free Public Library 
Watson, Sereno, Cambridge 

Wells, Mrs. Kate G 

Welch, A. S., LL.D., Ames, Iowa 

West Bromwich, England, Free Library 

Westerly, R.I., Hicrh School 

Western Maryland College, Westminster, Md 

Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa. 

Wlieildon, William W., Concord 

White, James C, M.D. .... 

Whiting, John E., West Dedham 
Whitney, David K. . . . . . 

Whitney, James L., 2 broadsides, 1 newspaper 
Whitney, Mrs. Josiah D., Cambridge 
Whitney, Prof. William D., Xew Haven, Conn 
Wild & Stevens, Messrs. .... 

Wilder, Burt G., M.D 

Wilder, lion. Marshall P 

Williams, Frederick ..... 

Williams, Miss Helen L. . 
Williams, J. Fletcher, St. Paul, Minn. 
Williams, James, Columbus, Ohio 
Williams, Thomas ..... 

Williams, W. B., Lansing, Mich. 
Williams College, Williamstown 
Williamsburgh Library Association . 
Wilson, J. Ormond, Washington, B.C. 
Winchell, N. W., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Winchester, Prof. Caleb T., Middletown, Conn 
Winsor, Justin ...... 

Winthro]), Hon. Robert C, Brookline 

Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison 

Woman's Bajjtist Missionary Society 

Woman's Hospital, Philadelphia 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelph 

Wood, William C, Wenham 

AVorcesterFree Public Library . 

Worthington & Flanders, Messrs. 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 

Young, James, and K. Angus Smith, Manchester, 

Young Men's Association, Buffalo, N. F. 

Young Men's Association, New Fork City 

Young Men's Christian Union . 

Y'oung Men's Institute, Hartford, Conn. 

Young Men's Mercantile Library Association, Cincinnati 

Ohio 

Young AYomen's Christian Association 



Eng 




12 

1 
5 

1 
1 
1 



1 
1 

10 
6 

28 



Pphs. 



101 



5 
1 
1 
1 
12 
1 



66 



92 
30 

2 
16 

2 



2 
2 
2 
3 

14 
1 



APPEBTDIX XII. 

CrnCULATION. 
(Books issucd-J 





1 

1, 


TOT.lI, ClHCPLATION. 


b.™h.... 


^^.^ 


B..xBo.™Bn..e„. 


SOOTH B09TOS BRASCH. 


Bo„o„B...c.. 


C„..„.™^B„,.-„. 


Bn,o™,o.„c„. 


Dorchester Bhanch. 


BO„HE„,B..,c.. 


jA.A,ox p..... B.A,c. 


Y» 


86.389 

S3,S61 
80,423 

151,020 
160,877 
180,302 
138,027 
184,03^ 
10J,92T 
193.W2 

2ie,«T7 

310,083 
380,313 

7i8,«T 
1,1*0,672 


E 


1 


j:i. 


J_ 


i 


i 

1 


i 


i 

81,281 

80,423 
75,670 

151,020 
160,877 

126.681 

141,853 
22T,67fl 

338,450 
3»2,WS 
37S,43g 


i 
1 

1,328 


i 

1 

1 


if 


i 


1 


1 


1 


i 

1 


1 
3 
S 


i 

n 


i 

is 


i 

1 


1 


1 


i 
1 


1 


^ 


i 


1 


i 


i 
f 

1 


1 

I 


1 


i 


. 


i 

1 


i 
1 

1 


i 
1 


, 


i 
J 


i 
1 
1 


i 

1 

1 


I 


1 


i 


1 
.3 


1 


^ 


1 


5 


i 
1 


1 


1 

1 

1 


, 


.1164 


z 


etpi. la 

Prb. 10 


z 















,n„ 






1 


1 






















































































71M 


1 






'■ 






















































































im 






























































































tms 


6M ! FDb ^7 


1 


























































































1U9 


1,421 
1,<M 
1,5» 

1.321 
1/1,858 

8.038 


Fib. » 



























































































isgo 






























































































mi 








1 


1.3.3 






















































































iss: 


T.MO 

s,2a 
<•.;«> 

23,203 
26.008 
31,080 
23,180 
28,261 
34.M1 


10,438 

21,801 
34,228 
27,(«2 

30,018 
8C.8J3 


17,603 

18,625 
23,461 

72,313 
























































































clH3 
























































































ISO 
























































































IBU 


z 



























































































]6« 
























































































iin 
























































































lUS 


1,060 
1,385 

1,538 






















































































[/IMl 






















































































A ISM 


3,831 

7,046 
7,863 


163,366 

238,057 
253.007 
272.63* 


















































































IKl 


80,771 
80,040 


°E 


= 


1.042 
1,870 


76,840 








































































nil- 








































































UTS 


101.688 

111.67T 
113.331 

137.010 


430 


1,043 
1,414 


3,'lo' 


102,322 
108,506 
112,523 
115,630 
136,170 
140,751 






























































KU 


140,053 
122,517 


E 


E 


3,260 


67,342 
80,530 


32,023 
78.169 


z 


z 


1,383 

1,805 
2,003 


33.891 
79,870 
85,819 
106.816 
lOl.GlO 


0,842 
21,304 
23,831 


280 


I 


!^ 


S,»2 
































im 




15,675 
67.802 


z 


E 


z 


gl6.017 
56.016 






















,.,. 




























8^832 
80,328 






















INTS 30S 11 


10,«8 




«,303 






1,000 


43,402 


!S,1T4 


Z» .3S 


2,106 


».=^ 




1' 




4..008 „. I 


1,04. 1 


887 


Itemovsl of the Ltbrarf. 

JEleyen montlia (Library doI closed for eiimin»lloD). 




/Nine monthe. 

ff Coiitrnl Library only. 

A If Ibe Usues uf Uaat Boston be eselndcd. tbU rootlnj; wouli] be 208,315; and If 


i Open acvcnt7-cl{(bt days. 
In Appendix Xin. 


The E. 8. Branoh was open only 307 ilaya. owing to repaira on fUmace. 
p Includca the largost of each di-parlment on any day, without regard to lU behw 
the Bame day, ae in previaus entries under tlila bead. . 



332 
307 
441 
457 
286 



544 
603 

877 
93( 
1,00 



Public Library. 



43 





IB 


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to -^ to 


CO 


in 


r-l CO O 


to 


ira 


CO 


o 


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<M CO O 






T)< ,-1 O 


o 


o 


IN 


CO 


o 




to 




C? 


T|l O 


c-\ 








to 


I-l c-i o> 


CO 


c^ 






-^ 




CO 












































o 


■* O 


o 


o> 


ir> r-i to 






OO 1 t- CO 


ef 












to 




H 




iH 












C-1 CO 














T 


It 


00 


to r-( 


00 


to 


CO CO to 


» 


■o 




> ijl 00 


o 


00 




^ 


o 




^ 






•o 


rH 




CO 




tl 


> t- CO 




CO 




CO 


o 




"* 




i» 


t- 00 


c-i. 


C^^ 




lO 


to 


tc 


5 00 CO 


iH 


f 






-* 








« 






































to 








CO 


r-T 




t£ 


CO 














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t« 


to o 


m 


^ 


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f_ 


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e^ 


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a> 
















Ol 
















t- G) 




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44 



City Document No. 61. 



o 

s 

< 
a 

H 
to 

3 

« 

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g 


3 

o 


tO"*a)eoooeoo>co .CJ> 
egcncot-e^ no'-* 

eO_ rH r^ rH . <N 
N , CO 


Mtscot-fr-iirae-iNoo 

Oi-IOOlOO CltOrHCO 

t;_ to CO « 1-1 c3_ 
•^ to" 


as 

H 


COOO ."» .•'J'OO .t« 

o o oo 
<^' . . . c^ 




H 


Ol C-l ■* 00 O . r-l . . -!■ 
IM . . . C-) 


e<i to (M to o . t- . .CO 
•a c^ to t- >a 1-1 3 
(^^ . . . ^ 


H 


n< CO o >o rH . t- . .in 

'*< 1-1 1-1 c^ o 
CI . . . e> 


»*1 •* O « CO . t- . . tc 
C-l CO O O CO i-t c^ 
IN . , . -^ 


' 


19 

H 


CO m 00 « o> . t- . .CO 

OD 1-1 i-( O CO 

s^ . . . r> 


O 11 O C-) C-l . o . . « 
CO CO to O O vn t- 
IN 1-1 . . . "5 


X) 

H 


«- e^ to o CO CO . . . o 

oo ^ o CO : . . s 


rH O lO t~ .1-1 . . . •* 
0> O to 1-1 0» 


ac 

H 


g 2 S 3 

<N CO 


CT CO O —1 

^ ^ ^ s 




t~ CO U5 

§ ^ s 


S3 § 

•* rH lO 




3 ":::::;: ^ 


" t- 2 

O rH O 

....... 




ae 

H 


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i-c . 1-1 


o o 

■* ■* 


H 


o o 

(N <N 


o a 

CO oo 

o o 


ac 
« 

ac 

H 


8 ?? S S 

c» e^ 00 00 


Note. — The first registration, 1854-58, had 
17,066 name.s; the second, 1859-67, had 52,829 
names. 


c 
i. 

s 


East Boston Branch 

Sonth Boston Branch 

Roxbury Branch 

Churlestown Branch 

Brifj/iton Branch 

Dorchester Branch 

South End Branch 

Jamaica Plain Branch 

Tnf.nl 




1 


East Boston Branch 

Sonth Boston Branch 

Roxbury Branch 

Gharlestown Branch 

Brighton Branch 

Dorchester Branch 

South End Branch 

Jamaica Plain Branch 

Total 




Cards refused 

(mostly for 

non-residency • 

or under 

age). 


Cards not 
called fordur- • 
ing the year. 






d 










> 



Public Libeart. 



45 



OrHCOOOl-OOl-l .•* 
OrHCOOOir-tTil (O 
0_ CO CO CO r-l . M 


CO-^i-lO-^ .CirH .«-» 
•-1 <N CO O ■>)< • 00 
C< . . CO 


SS S 2! 22 "S . " . . " 
c^ . . . -w 


•^ -^ <7I CO OO . to . •»»' 

^ ■» u5 to eo c^ >- 


CO-*<OOOr-( • 'tH 


O to to lr~ Tfl 

^ ^ ^ ^ ..... ^ 


to O C^ . . CO 

<5> ■* 00 C, 

'-' CO 


■* «^ . . . . to 
to 00 ^ 

C^ CO 


1,215 
1,215 








' Central Library 

East Boston Branch 

South Boston Branch 

Roxbui-y Branch 

Charlestown Branch 

Brighton Branch 

Dorchester Branch 

South End Branch 

Jamaica Plain Branch 

Total 


Applications 

cancelled. 
(Bix months on ^ 

file, and one 
month longer 
after notice.) 

1 


> 



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46 



City Document No. 61. 






B 



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Public Libeary. 



47 



BOOKS 



APPE^TOIX XIY. 

KECOMMENDED, USE OF BRITISH PATENTS AND 
TOSTI ENGRAVINGS. 





„ 


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* 2 



* The partial disuse of the Bates Uall, on account of the alterations going on, affected this number. 

Note. — The coUuiin of "Received since" denotes those received of the "Total recommended " the 
same j'ear. AVhat maybe in subseiiuent years received of such "Total recommended" does not appear in 
this table. For instance, of the 1,120 — (ISJ + 43) = 51-! not received in IStW ol the total recommended that 
year, a large part has since been received. 

Pi'e«(». — The American, French, and British Patents have now been placed in the new Patent Room, 
under charge of a Curator. The figures before 1874 in the table showed the use of the British Fulents only. 

JSngravings. — The statistics refer only to the bound volumes, not to those framed and on the walls. 

The Curator Bhowe them every day from 9 to 12. 



48 



City Document No. 61. 



APPENDIX XY. 

BATES HALL KEADIXG. 



CliASSIFICATION. 



English History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel, and Po- 
lite Literature 

American (North and South) 
History, Topography, Bi- 
ography, Travel, and Polite 
Literature 

French History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel, and 
Polite Literature 

Germanic History, Topogra- 
phy, Biography, Travel, 
and Polite Literature . . . 

Italian History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel, and Po- 
lite Literature 

Other History, Topography, 
Biography, Travel, and Po- 
lite Literature 

General and Epochal History, 
Geography, Biogr.iphy, etc. 

Greek, Latin, and Philology . 

Bibliography 

Transactions 

Periodicals 

Fine Arts 

Natural History and Science . 

Theologj', Ecclesiastical His- 
tory, Ethics, Education, etc. 

Medicine 

Law, Government, and Politi- 
cal Economy 

Useful Arts, Mathematics, 
Physics, etc 

Miscellaneous Pamphlets, 
bound 



Percentage of Use. 



o 


C 

H 


x 


9 
x 




X 

X 
H 


9 
9 
X 


X 
H 


H 

r» 

X 




X 


f 

X 
H 


X 


X 


X 


X 

X 
H 


17.5 


16 


13 


18 


20 


17 


17 


17 


17 


12 


19 


16 


15 


15 


13 


13 


6 


8.5 


10 


8 


12 


12 


12 


12 


13 


10 


12 


11 


11 


12 


10 


14 


6 


7.5 


6 


6 


7 


4 


6 


5 


6 


4 


6 


6 


6 


5 


5 


4 


2.5 


2 


2.5 


2 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


6 


4 


2.5 


2 


8 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


8.5 


3.5 


2.5 


4 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 


4.5 


4.25 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3.5 


S 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 




4 


3 


4 


4 


2.5 


3 


3 


8 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1.5 


2.3 


5 


7 


5 


4 


6 


1 


1 


1 




2 


1 


6 


2 


7 


6 


6 


11 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


10 


8 




7 


7 


6 


5 


9 


12 


16.5 


8 


6 


8 


8 


8 


9 


11 


10 


11 


11 


10 


9 


12 


4 


4 


4.6 


3 


3 


4 


8 


4 


4 


5 


3 




3 


3 


3 


1 


11 


11 


8.5 


4 


4 


8 


9 


8 


11 


14 


10 


11 


11 


10 


10 


8 


7 


5 


4.6 


8 


6 


6 


8 


8 


9 


9 


8 




6 


6 


6 


6 


1.6 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


5.5 


6.5 


7.5 


7 


8 


7 


6 


5 


6 


8 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


10 


2 


.76 


.76 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


5 


3 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of books In the Bowditch, Parker, Barton, 
and Prince Libraries — which are kept apart from the general classifications of the Library — 
is reckoned as near as possible and included in the usual divisions, as is indicated in the 
table. (See Explanations to Appendix IX.) 



APPENDIX XVI. 

LOWER HALL R E A D I N fj . 
Shown from slips of books returned. 





a 


Alcoves. 


Classes. 


1868 


180» 


18»0 

(Nine months.) 


1871 


1872 


187S 


1874 


1875 


1870 


1877 


1878 


![ 5 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loaus 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Par 

cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


1 1 

1 2 

■ 3 

4 

i 


I, XI and ranges 8, 9, 
10 of X, XX 

II, XII 1 

IX, XIX i 

III, XIII 

IV, XIV 1 

VII, XVII ) 

V, XV 

VI, XVI 

vm, x\nii 

X, XX, eseept rungcB 
8, 9, 10 


Sciences, Arts, Professions . . 

American Ilistory and Polities 

Foreign History and Politics . 

Poetry, Drama, Rhetoric, Mis- 
cellaneous Essays, etc. . . . 

Prose Fiction for adults and 


10,522 
2,633 
3,030 

3,692 

105,227 
3,641 
3,289 
5,941 

3,078 


7.4 
1.8 
2.1 

2.6 

74.2 
2.6 
2.3 
4.2 

2.8 


11,436 
2,682 
3,221 

2,461 

125,273 
4,570 
6,363 
4,650 

4,482 


6.97 
1.63 
1.06 

1.5 

76.36 
2.78 
3.26 
2.77 

2.73 


7,607 
2,071 
2,386 

2,441 

120,355 
4,025 
5,164 
6,747 

3,637 


4.9 
1.4 
1.6 

1.6 

78.4 
2.7 
3.4 
3.8 

2.4 


12,662 
2,270 
2,702 

6,964 

167.604 
6,108 
6,062 
11,030 

4,461 


6.7 

1 

1.2 

2.7 

77.2 
2.2 
2.8 
5.2 

2 


15,990 
2,090 
2,716 

8,019 

173,438 
4,100 
4,998 
14,815 

2,691 


6 
-1 

1+ 

4 

76 
2 
3 
6 

1+ 


12,757 
1,496 
1,863 

7,651 

1.54,835 
2,641 
3,631 
17,167 

6,341 


6+ 

!■ 

7 

74 
1 
1 

8 

2 


14,422 
2,706 
2,834 

8,636 

168,453 
5,027 
6,290 
15,663 

6,388 


1- 

4 

71 
3 
3 
7 

3 


16,218 
3,873 
3.983 

9,704 

163,667 
7,415 
8,649 
16,100 

7,394 


4+ 

69+ 
3+ 
4+ 
6+ 

3 


20,065 
6,467 
4,879 

11,618 

209,070 
0,710 
10,227 
17,827 

9,123 


4 

4 

70 
3 
3 
6 

3 


23,318 
6,644 
6,820 

12,677 

253,964 
11,229 
10,419 
20,404 

11,845 
355,320 


4 

71 
3 
3 

6 

3 


21,684 
6,300 
6,395 

11,915 

251.856 
10,076 
10,034 
18,668 

12,037 


6 

!■ 

4 

72 
3 
3 
6 

3 


1 


8 
9 


Biography 

Travels, Voyages, etc 

Collections, Periodicals, etc. . 

French, German, and Italian 












Totals 


141,863 




164,038 




163,423 




216,696 




228,864 




207,382 




221,418 




236,004 




297,986 






346,866 



NoTji. — The columns of "Loans i-etnrnttl" do not include the liooks t-ikcn and returned the i 



Public Libeary. 



49 















•aSc^aaoaad 


i-( 


rH 


in 


IH « 


10 


-1 


■* <N (N 


I-H 


1 ; 






































M 


00 


^ 


g S 


m 


O 


o CO en 


CO 


1 to 








H 


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n 


5 


>n 


05 


O 


S S 5 




Is 








eqoog 


'-'" 




CO 


n" 


CO 


rn" 


•*" cf (N 


rH* 


II 


































•sSBictaojStj 


-H 


^ 


s 


(N 


o 

CO 


N 


X5 IM « 


CI 


1 : 








I* 




















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31,93 
5 

1,81 
25,85 

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o 












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t. n 














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P^ P= 


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K 


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50 



City Document No. 61. 



I— I 

<1 





1 




ao 


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«? 


7 


7 




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7 


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o 


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3 


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00 




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Public Library. 



51 



APPEjSTDIX XIX. 



EOXBURY BRANCH AND FELLOWES ATHENi^UM READING. 
Note. — The two sections of this table refer to two different collections of books. 



n 



Ranges. 


Classes. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


- 


1 ? 




g <u 


13 


+j , 


'6 


J 


ri 
o 


^ . 


tm 






^ t. 




/d t. 


O t>D 


M 1^ 




^ i 


o 5* 


^ s 


^ ^n 










O 3 




O 3 




O 3 


^S 


O D 






















o -^ 


o -e 




o 






e d 


e-, 


f2 d 




P 2 
47,307 


53 


M S. 


3^ 


61,642 


^ 


I. 


1,3,5,7,23 


Prose Fiction . 


28,675 


-49 


40,666 


,r)2 


68,965 


54 


54 


II. 


2, 4 . . . 


Travels .... 


2,623 


-5 


2,555 


3+ 


2,519 


3 


2,745 


2 


2,333 


i 


m. 


6, 8 . . . 


nistory .... 


1,121 


-2 


1,133 


1+ 


1,598 


2 


2,377 


2 


2,371 


2 


IV. 


9, 11 , . 


Juveniles . . . 


19,261 


32+ 


26,6i0 


34 


28,918 


32 


40,871 


32 


35,917 


31 


V. 


10,12 . . 


Biography . . 


1,351 


2+ 


1,583 


2 


1,575 


2 


2,143 


2 


1,908 


1 


VI. 


13, 14 . . 


Periodicals . . 


1,019 


-2 


1,338 


_2 


1,785 


2 


3,110 


2+ 


2,810 


2+ 


VII. 


15,17 . . 


Arts, Sciences, 


























Professions . 


2,757 


-4 


2,815 


4 


2,992 


3 


3,858 


3 


3,369 


3 


VUI. 


16. . . . 


Poetry and 


























Drama . . . 


1,219 


-2 


1,235 


2+ 


1,326 


1 


1,712 


1+ 


1,451 


1 


IX. 


18,19 . . 


Collected 
Works and 
Lit. Miscel- 








X. 


















lanies .... 


724 


1 


1,069 


2+ 


887 


1 


1,815 


1 


1,699 


1 


X. 


20. . . . 


Books in For- 
eign Lan- 




r--2 
J 












>-2 




. 2 






guages . . . 


55 


114 


1+ 


119 
89,026 


1 


190 


J 


287 
113,787 






Total . . . 


58,605 


. . . 


78,S5> 


. . . 


127,786 






'^^ 


















' 








fel 


1 
























o 



























I. 


50, 64, 59 


History, Biog- 
























raphj-,Travels 


1,982 


35 


3,754 


-43 


3,548 


38 


5,335 


33 


4,941 


30 


II. 


55, 57 . . 


Modern For- 
eign Lan- 


























guages . . . 


729 


13 


1,073 


12+ 


921 


9 


1,773 


11 


1,654 


10 


III. 


51,53,65,67 


Periodicals . . 


160 


2 


331 


4 


488 


5 


2,313 


14 


2,798 


17 


IV. 


52,56 . . 


Miscellaneous 


























Literature . . 


661 


12 


921 


10+ 


976 


10 


1,474 


9 


1,344 


8 


V. 


58,70 . . 


Theology, So- 


























ciology, Ethics 


412 


7 


550 


6+ 


517 


5 


1,151 


7 


1,212 


7 


VI. 


60. . . . 


Medicine . . . 


46 


1 


81 


1 


126 


1 


249 


1 


343 


2 


vn. 


61. , . . 


Greek and Latin 
Languagts 


























and Literature 


262 


5 


374 


4+ 


376 


4 


687 


4 


713 


4 


VIII. 


62 ... . 


Fine Arts, En- 


























gineering . . 


684 


12 


750 


8i 


932 


10 


1,243 


7 


1,220 


7 


IX. 


63,69 . . 


Law, Politics, 


























Government . 


36 


1 


149 


-2 


250 


3 


446 


3 


414 


3 


X. 


64, 66, 68 


Mathematics, 
Natural and 
Applied Sci- 


























ence .... 


719 


12 


846 


-10 


1,414 
9,548 


15 


1,739 
16,410 


11 


1,896 12 






Totals . . 


5,691 




8,829 




16,535J . . 

1 



52 



City Document No. 61. 



APPE-ISTDIX XX. 

BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 





Ranges. 


Classes. 


1874-5. 


187.5-6. 


1876-7. 


1877-8. 


1 

a 


-3 
O 

Is 


C3 
C 

o 

1 


•6 

m ~ 

o a 

pa?3 


Si 

s 

a 
o 

o 


o 

Ih 


C 


•6 

m C 


6 

s 

(2 


I. 
II. 

ni. 


1, 2, 3, 4, 
5, 6, 7, 8, 

9 to 20 . 


Fiction 

Biography, Travel, 
and History . . 

Others 


17,662 

1,424 
1,957 


84 

7 
9 


19,532 

1,677 
3,226 


80 

7 
13 


22,8.^8 

2,451 
4,611 


8 
15 


22,114 

2,306 
4,780 


76 

7 
17 






Totals 


21.043 




24,435 




29,900 




29,200 





APPEXDIX XXI. 

DORCHESTER BRANCH READING. 





Ranges. 


Classes. 


1874-5. 


1875-6. 


1676-7. 


1877-8. 


6 


■6 
o 


g 


13 
4) 

Is 

o « 


o 

3 

c 


II 


3 

p 

S 


•6 

a 

If 


1 
i 


I. 

n. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 
VI. 

\^I. 

VIII 
IX. 
X. 


1,11,21. 

2, 12 . . 

3, 13, 23 1 

4, 14, 24 ) 
5, 15, 25 . 

6, 16, 2^5 . 

7, 17, 27 . 
8,18 . . 
9, 19 . . 
10, 20, 28, 


Poetry, Drama . . 
Travels 

Fiction 

Juveniles 

History 

Biography .... 
Periodicals .... 
Arts, Sciences, etc. 
Miscellanies . . . 


221 

535 

( 3,9831 

1 2.877) 

5,343 

285 

414 

162 

465 

311 


— 1 

-4 

47 

-37 

2 

—3 

1+ 
3+ 
2+ 


927 

2,233 

21,880 i 

13,701 ) 

17,368 

1,555 

1,567 

1,311 

2,274 

1,671 


1 

4 

55 

27 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 


1,021 
2,133 
26,107 1 
14,059 ) 
18,071 
1,650 
1,655 
2,193 
2,157 
1,459 


—2 
8 

67 

26 
2+ 
2+ 
3 
3 
2 


1,152 

2,090 

19,779 1 

15,522 ) 

16,778 

1,510 

1,600 

2,047 

2,168 

1,431 


3 
3 

55 

26 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 






Totals 


14,601 




64,487 




70,505 




W.077 





CIIARLESTOWN BRANCH READING. 

Note. — No classification of the use is practiciblo, as the books are shelved ■without regard to 
classes. Tables similar to those of the other branches will be possible when a rearrangement of the 
books is made. 



Public Library. 



53 



APPEOT)ix xxn. 

SOUTH END BRANCH READING. 



I. 

n. 
in. 

IV. 
V. 

VI. 
VII. 

vm. 

IX. 



Ranges. 



3,4 

1, 2, 13, 14, 17, 18 
5 



7,8 

12 

9, 10 

15, 16 

11 



Classes. 



Biography 

Prose, Fiction and Juveniles 

American History 

Foreign History 

Travel 

Miscellaneous 

Arts, Sciences, and Theology . 

Poetry and Drama 

Bound Periodicals 



Total 



1878. 



13 
O 3 

n2 


J, 

go; 


1,210 


-3 


33,728 


81+ 


1,076 


-3 


903 


2+ 


1,177 


-3 


711 


-2 


722 


-2 


732 


_2 


999 


2+ 



41,258 



APPEIS^DIX XXIII. 

JAMAICA PLAIN BRANCH READING. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 



Ranges. 



I, 2, 3, 
7,8 . 
9,10 

II, 12 
13,14 
15, 16 
17,18 
19,20 
^1. . 

22. . 

23. . 

24. . 



5. 6 



Classes. 



Fiction and Juveniles . 

Collections 

History 

Biography 

Travel 

Miscellaneous 

Poetry and Drama . . 
Science and Professions 

Periodicals 

Foreign Languages . . 

Fine Arts 

Useful Arts 

Total 



O 3 

«2 



19,470 

3,760 

1,121 

736 

785 

373 

322 

193 

344 

12 

100 

116 



27,332 



54 



City Document No. 61. 







in 


Oi 


to n 


IM 




m >r 


o 






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m 


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CO 


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5 












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Public Library. 



55 



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F I N .4 N C I 




IS70-71 


.„..« 


.,„.,3 


1873-74 




City Appro- 
piiatloas. 


Expended. 


pnatJooe. 


Expended. 


C..,^ppr«prt.. 


Expended. 


Aiheoisum. 


City ftppropria. 


Expended. 


Bfoaiii 


• 1,300 00 

1.050 00 
30,000 00 


|&,231 3B 

3,M3 02 
l.OMW 
3,041 TG 

30,074 00 


»i.»0 00 
5.O0OOO 
6,700 00 

1,050 00 
2,200 00 
2,200 00 
1.400 00 
il5,000 00 




(4,000 OOt 

5,500 00 
2,000 00 
1,060 00 
1.600 00 
2,500 00 


•2,511 10 

1 1,815 84 
3,003 18 
2,028 50 

2,455 46 


•2,181 10 


2,870 00 


•S.8S3 OS 
( 2,670 57 


11.^.::::::::.'. :.::::.::: 


r: 

2 
2 
2 


5M20 
012 83 

2M14 
210 85 


*" ' ' 




Fninitnre (cabinutit, *lielvin|;, fUturce, I'tc.) .... 


nuitln (nl.c«lto o».) 




"^ 


Trannporution, Poito«c, ctt 


B„,o„„. 


~ 


— 




Bomb BoKton and Roxbiu? Brancbei. 


Roxbury Brnneh completing o 
Charlestowo und Brighton llbrarlca r 




=.«„™ 


3,Rno no 







r S. E. 3,000 00 
, 8, B. 4,600 00 


z: 




r Cb'n. . . T4B 66 


•133.775 08 














T 


tlAOOOCO 


»T0.44a 70 


»l)7,000 00 




•01.000 00 


|M,46S « 


#2.181 10 


t»127.6»3 83 




* 





L- approprlatton for blmllng boforc ihl* year had Included ihc faUricn of the workmen In the 
i.I0T.S8 of tliU amount I)Ton|{ht trom lost year, and added lo the approprlatioD for hooka, « 
E, — The expenditure* for books cover the cost of thoae chnrseable to our Truit Fundii Ac< 
lBi>l rpquWtlim of the year, payable April Isl, t» opprovod) will bo audlud In the lubMquc 
money for book* bon|[ht on account of tho Fvltowo* Alhontriim la apcnt under the djrcctioi 



proprinllotiH from the City, and a 



'ENDIX XXVI. 

AL STATEMENT. [N.] 




























«.7,.,, 


1875-70 




187a.?7 


3«7.7, 


.e.„. 


Md Into City 






Expended. 


ASi'n=. 


prralioiis. 


Eipended. 


Pcllowea 


ofCataloguM. 


aTwo". 


Cllynppro- 

priaiiouB. 


Expitodcd. 


AS.'n=. 


Citpppro. 


Eipcuded. 


A=i. 


■p'jar 






#3,786 Bi 

( 2.M9 88 
6.722 87 
a.004 27 
2,278 01 
3,518 31 
4,885 69 

6.S04 20 

00.332 10 
2.401 12 


• 1,833 86 


#5,500 00 
15.000 00 

fl.onooo 

3.000 00 
4.000 00 
2,000 00 

5.000 00 

6.000 00 

70.626 00 
3.000 00 


#3.734 5J 

( 4.117 29 

3,M9aS 
2,US 86 

6.307 81 
66.038 07 


•1.414 37 


1 




»1,06S 22 


»0.50n 00 

16.000 00 

6,000 00 
6,000 00 
4,000 00 
13.500 00 

6,000 00 
02.000 00 


»9,O80 8* 
( 16,082 45 

3.361 5T 
4,1S9 SO 

10.256 55 

4,087 67 


• 2,103 01 


«i.50O 00 

S,000 00 
4.000 00 
4,500 00 
3,000 00 
5,000 00 


#5,137 U 

( 20.303 13 

i 3.945 44 

3.181 fll 

2.400 TO 

2,4«65 

2.323 09 


• 1.647 IS 


#5.000 00 

10,000 00 

6,000 00 ' 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
6,000 00 

6,600 00 

60,600 00 
2.500 00 


350 00 






Jamaica rloin. 






"inl»d 


.otebe.,e,3™eb. 














10.000 00 


I 1,373 03 




E 


1 150 00 




3.O00 00 
2,500 00 


— 












2.000 OO 
2,800 24 

3.002 12 






#124,300 86 


• 1,833 86 


#130.126 00 


• 129.351 38 


(1,414 37 


1 23.113 42 


11,652 22 


#13&.000 00 


,130,483 11 


#2,103 61 


#118,000 00 1 #128.204 00 


•1.547 18 


»IU.BOO 00 


^ 


650, f vote of Ihp Clly CO 
re b ight with the balnnc 


H with our foreiKn ugonla at t 
no year's growth, and piild fo 


lelpallon of ih 
in the atibscqu 


previous year 


-— 


nrt Brighton, 
and library ; 
of malutalnJoj 


rrrlnZAX 


"ally eom.ro. 


L^T.vJZ\ 


-::si 


::ra'rj.°.™ 


^uenlly to tb 


^„,ddb.o,M„. 



Public Library; 



57 







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58 



City Document No. 61. 



appe:n^dix xxyiii. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. 

(^April 30, 1878.) 



o 

S 


Name. 


T3 . 


Position, Duties, etc. 


a 
"3 . 


"1 

s ^ 

OS 


i 

_- o 
So. 








Librarian and Clerk of the Cor- 








James L. Whitney . . . 
James M. Hubbard .... 
Frederic B. Perkins . . . 
William H. Foster .... 

Edward Tiiraiiy 

Charles A. Wilson .... 

Annie P. Call 

Adelaide A. Nichols . . . 

narry A. Rawlins .... 

Total 


1869. 
1874. 
1874. 
1860. 

1877. 

1871. 
1872. 
1868. 

1878. 






Principal Assistant Librarian . 








S 


Register and Assistant Librarian 
Cataloguer for Branch Libraries 








g 
1 


Inspector of circulation in Lower 
Hall and Branch Libraries . . 

Clerk for Branch Libraries . . . 

Librarian's Secretary 

Auditor and Cashier 

Librarian's Runner 






4 














James L. Whitney . . . 
James M. Hubbard .... 
William H. Foster .... 
Jose F. Garret 

Anna C. D. Keen 

Susan A. Joslyn 

Elizabeth T. Reed .... 

Mary F. Osgood 

Roxatma M. Eastman . . . 
Frank C. Blaisdell .... 

Richard Ray 

Card Catalogues. 
Harriet E. Green . . . 
Josephine Ilewins .... 

Emily 0. Osgood 

Ellen F. McCarthy .... 
Total 


1869. 
1874. 
1860. 
1875. 

1872. 
■ 1873. 
1873. 
1877. 
1859. 
1876. 
1876. 

1873. 
1875. 
1875. 

1872. 


Principal of the Department . . 




1 
1 




•** 

1 

1 


(See Executive Department.) . 

Curator of patents and engrav- 
ings, and Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent Room, etc. . 

Assist.ant 

Assistant 




1 


Runner 

Runner 


14 






Assistant 














la 













Public Libraet. 



59 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



BLarriet N. Pike 
Adeline S. Baylies 
Mary A. McGrath 
Louisa Hewins . . 
Richard Paine . . 
Total 



Hg 



1867. 
1877. 
1868. 
1877. 
1878. 



Position, Duties, etc. 



Chief Clerk 
Assistant . 
Assistant . 
Assistant . 
Runner . . 



C ' 

O 



5 a. 



Appleton p. C. Griffin 

Arthur L. Knight 

Samuel McConnell .... 
Total 



1865. 
1876. 
1877. 



Custodian 
Runner . 
Runner . 



Arthur M. Knapp , 

Charles A. Wilson . , 
Alice M. Poree . . . . 
Lydia F. Knowles . , 
Thomas Whyte . . . . 
Henry F. Barrett . . , 
Thomas Driver . . . . 

Albert Carter 

Robert J. Donovan . , 

William M. S. Young , 

Total 



1875. 
1871. 
1866. 
1867. 
1874. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1876. 
1878. 



Librarian of Bates Hall .... 
Deputy and Clerk of the Branches 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 



Edit ARD Tiffany . 

Elbridge Bradshaw . 
William F. Robinson 
Mary A. Jenkins . . 
Caroline E. Por6e . . 
Sarah A. Mack . . . 
Eliza J. Mack . . . 
Elizabeth Ross . . . 
Annie M. Kennedy . 
Ellen E. Bresnahan . 
Ella Sturmy .... 
Margaret A. Sheridan 



1878. 

1869. 
1872. 
1877. 
1859. 
1863. 
1863. 
1869. 
1869. 
1869. 
1872. 
1875. 



Inspector of circulation for Low- 
er Hall and Branch Libraries 

Librarian of Lower Hall . . . . 

Clerk for Registration and Fines 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant • 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 



60 



City Document No. 61. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Margaret Doyle . . . , 
Mary N. Burke . . . . 
Mary Connor . . . . . 
Margaret Donovan . 
Annie G. Shea . . , . 
Evening Service. 
William Hanna ... 
Robert B. Ross . . . , 

Ella Dillon 

Catherine McOrath . 
Amelia McGrath . . 
Hannah Clifford . . 
Florence Richards . 
Margaret Clifford . . 
Total 



1875. 
1875. 
1873. 
1874. 
1874. 

1876. 
1873. 
1876. 
1873. 
1869. 
1876. 
1876. 
1876. 



Position, Duties, etc. 



^3 y 



|« 



Assistant 
Runner . 
Runner . 
Runner . 
Runner • 



( Registration Clerk and Sun- 
( day service 

Assistant 



Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Runner . 
Runner . 
Runner . 



William E. Ford . 
Thomas Collins .... 
Jeremiah Sullivan . . 
Extra daily assittants 
Total 



Frank P. IIatiia-way 
Andrew M. Blake . . . 

Romeo Cervi 

Joseph R. Beckett . . . 
Michael J. Hoaly . . . . 
James Pondergast . . . 
Edward M. Roe . • • . 
Martha M. Wheeler . . 
Mary E. Austen . . . . 

Mary Morlarty 

Sarah E. Bo wen . • . . 
Katherine Rollly . . . . 

Frank Thomas 

Total 



185S. 
1867. 
1874. 



Janitor 
Porter . 
Porter . 



1871. 
1870. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1876. 
1869. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1876. 
1874. 



Foreman . 

Binder . . 

Binder . . 

Binder . . . 

Binder . . . 

Binder . . . 

Binder . . 

Stitcher . . 

Stitcher . . 

Stitcher . . 

Stitcher . . 

Stitcher . . 
Apprentice 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Conthiued. 



61 





c 
S 

q 


Name. 


a) o 


Position, Duties, etc. 


u 

"3 . 


T3g 
C3 > 

5 


o 
_ o 

p a 




Sarah C. Godbold . . . 

Mary R. Pray 

Alice M. Wing 

Mary E. Cathcart 

Ellen L. Lennon 

Adelia H. Ghen 

Laura B. Morse 

Abbie M. Keen 

Jessie C. Eraser 

George H. Hosea 

Total 


1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1872. 
1876. 
1875. 
1874. 
1876. 
1873. 
















< 

o 




8 

e 










1 










^ 










5 




















Alice J. Bragdon . . . 

Nora McCarty 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Emeogene C. Davis .... 

Idalene Sampson 

Cora G. Hale 

Minnie E. Sampson .... 

Mary Watson 

Elizabeth McCarthy . , . 
Marguerite Watson .... 

Joseph Baljer 

Total 


1872. 
1872. 
1872. 
1873. 
1877. 
1877. 
1877. 
1873. 
1873. 
1877. 
1872. 






5 














fci 




S 




-^ 




O 












3 
















6 






n 














Sarah Bunker 

Mary Bradley 

Dora Puffer 

Helen M. Bell 

Margaret E. Blood .... 

Florence Vose 

Louisa Karcher 

Alice Morrison 

Alitbea M. Hutching . . . 
Elizabeth C. Berry .... 
Charles E. Curtis 

Total 


1S76. 
1876. 
1878. 
1878. 
1872. 
1876. 
1877. 
1877. 
1877. 
1877. 
1873. 






5 


















4- 




1 


Extra Runner 






5 

8 






ftj 
















6 






11 



62 



City Document No. 61. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Dr. Cornelius S. Cart£e 

Susan Edwards 

Annie E. Eberle 

Lilian Davis ....... 

Harriet N. Davis 

Mary P. Swain 

Anna S. Woodberry . . . 
Frederick W. Parker . . . 
Frederick W. Baxter . . . 
Thomas E. Smith 



H 



Total 



1870. 
1869. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1878. 
1878. 
1877. 
1878. 
1874. 



Position, Duties, cet. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Runner .... 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor .... 



_H o 



Mary E. Brock . 
Bridget T. Grailey 
Alma J. 'Wilson . 
James M. Brock . 



Total 



1875. 
1874. 
1875. 
1878. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor .... 



Mart G. Coffin . . 
Esther R. Whiton . 
Mary Jane Sheridan 

Mary Elms 

Mary A. Hill . . . . 
Edward Davenport . 



Total 



1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1875. 
1875. 



Librarian 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant 

Extra Assistant 

Agent at Lower Mills Delivery , 
Janitor 



Milton Austin . , 
Maude M. Morse . . 
Esther M. Hinckley , 
William M. Dudley , 

Total . . . . , 



1877. 
1878. 
1878. 
1877. 



Librarian 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Runner . 



Public Library. 

LIBEARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



63 



o 

a 

t; 

Q 


Name. 


C 'T, 


Position, Duties, etc. 


1^ 
a 

to aj 

H 

o S 

1 
1 
1 


tl 
Is 

o S 

1 

1 

2 


— o 




Eliza R. Davis 

Anna J. Barton 

Herbert A. Johnson . . . 

Ellen F. Riley 

Orlando Johnson 

Total 


1877. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1878. 


Librarian 




< 








1 






•S 

s 














"3 
S 




3 


5 















SUMMARY. 

Regulars. Extras. 

Register, Secretary, Auditor, and Runner, 4 

Catalogue Department .... H 1 

Purchase Department .... 5 

Shelf Department ..... 3 

Bates Hall Circulation Department . . 10 
Lower Hall Circulation Department, Day, 

Evening, and Sunday Service . . 17 8 

Janitor's Department .... 3 

Bindery . 13 

East Boston Branch 5 5 

South Boston Branch .... 6 5 

Roxbury Branch 6 5 

Charlestown Branch 5 5 

Brighton Branch 3 1 

Dorchester Branch 3 3 

South End Branch 4 

Jama ca Tiain Branch .... 3 2 

Totals 104 35 

35 

Grand Total .... 139 



Central Library. 

G9 regulars. 

9 extras. 

78 in all. 



Branches. 
35 regulars. 
26 extras. 



61 in all. 



AGENTS. 

Messrs. Lee and Shepard, Boston. 

Messrs. Little, Brown, and Co., and Sampson Low, Marston, Low, and 
Searle, Boston and London. 
Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 
Mr. F. W. Christern, and 'M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 
Dr. Felix Fliigel, Leipzig. 
Chev. Eugenio Alberi, Florence. 
Seiior Don Juan F. Riaiio, Madrid. 



APPENDIX XXIX. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LII5RARY , 



Not on shelves 

Of these found to be 

Lent 

At the binderies . . . . 
Otherwise accounted for 
Not accounted for . . . 

Not on shelves 

Of these found to be 

Lent 

At the binderies . . . . 
Otherwise accounted for 
Not accounted for . . . 



Bates Hall. 



1874 


1875 


1870 


1877 


2,621 


3,612 


3,653 


3,222 


939 


1,970 


2,161 


1,991 


85-2 


997 


920 


622 


801 


696 


642 


673 


29 


49 


30 


36 



3,205 



Lower Hall. 



5,254 
622 



East Boston Branch. 



1876 


1877 


2.022 


1,820 


1,811 


1,618 


73 


44 


133 


153 


5 


" 



South Boston Branch. 



1874 


1875 


1876 


1877 


2,309 


2,396 


2,068 


2,047 


1,993 


2,101 


1,876 


1,932 


129 


155 


141 


72 


185 


128 


60 


43 


2 


12 


1 





Eoxbcry Branch. 



Charlestown Branch. 



1874 


1875 


1876 


1877 


2,908 


2,441 


2,850 


3,300 


2,200 


2,283 


2,577 


3,017 


89 


144 


168 


253 


7 


8 


98 


26 


2 


6 


7 


4 



Brighton Branch. 



Dorchester Branch. 



1,835 



1,662 



13,181 

1,396 

2,010 

67 



14,816 

2,121 

1,917 

244 



18,815 

2.296 

1,560 

204 



19,130 
1,887 



18,968 

2,095 

1,477 

135 



* Including Fellowes Athenaeum. 



Public Libraey. 65 



APPENDIX XXIX. 



To the Superintendent: — 

In the foregoing tables ai*e respectfull}' presented the results of 
the annual examination of the Central Library and Bi-anches, for 
the year ending April 3U, 1878 In the 

Bates Hall 

the examination has resulted in finding 31 books missing. Many 
of these are onl}' temporaril}" missing, and probabl}^ will be found 
b}' another examination of the shelves. Of 34 books missing 
at the last report, 10 have been found; 2 missing in 1875 have 
also reappeared. In the 

Lower Hall 

a larger number of missing books is to be reported than that of last 
3'ear. There seems to be no special reason to assign for the in- 
crease. 2 books missing in 1864, 1 in 1867, '72 and '74, 3 in 
1875, and 4 in 1876 have reappeared. From the 

Branches 

very satisfactor}' returns are made. The largest number un- 
accounted for, from an}' one Branch, being 7, and 3 report all 
accounted for. The following are missing from 

Reading-Room Desk. 

Putnam's Best Reading ; Gage's English-French Dictionary ; Bart- 
lett's Familiar Quotations ; Gorton's Biographical Dictionary ; 
Chambers' Encyloptedia, Index. 

Bates-Hall Desk. 

Putnam's Best Reading (2 copies) ; Bartlett's Familiar Quotations ; 
Dictionar}' of Latin Poetical Quotations ; Rich's Companion to 
Latin Dictionar}- ; Fairholt's Dictionary of Terms in Art. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. P. C. GRIFFIN, 

Custodian of the Shelves. 



66 



City Document No. 61. 



APPENDIX XXX. 



WORK IN THE LIBRARY BINDERY. 



Character of "Work. 



Bates Hall books bound and 
finished 

Books of the Lower Hall 
aud Branches 

Books repaired 

Catalogues wired and cov- 
ered for public use in 
Lower Hall and Branches 

Maps dissected and mounted 

Map-volumca and shelf-lists 
mounted 

Pamphlet cases 

Portfolios 

Removable covers for cata- 
logues and for paper-cov- 
ered books 

Maps mounted, bound, and 
bordered 

Hours of miscellaneous 
work 



« 


« 


* 








2,219 


2,008 


2,635 


1,015 


744 


753 


396 


430 


492 


490 


437 


2S7 


47 


28 


91 


212 


165 


109 (, 


646 


64 


24 


5 


8 


sj 


266 


263 


4o0 


54 


41 


8 


1,842 


2,297 


1,437 



,508 
444 

143-) 
493 1 



2,486 



3,223 



7,766 
959 



1,287 



4,759 

8,743 
873 



2.712 



1,271 



4,155 

11,129 
949 



953 



1,469 



2,183 



2,586 



2,778 



rt 




3^