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Full text of "Annual report"

[Document 78 — 1879.] 



CITY OF fr^Rj BOSTON. 




TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

18 7 9. 



[A.] 

The Trustees hav^c the honor to present to the City Council 
their twenty-seventh annual report. It is the first made 
under the Act of Incorporation of the 4th of April, 1878, aud 
includes the details of condition and of administration for 
the year ending the 30th of A[)ril last. 

Two other reports are also herewith submitted : one of the 
Examining Committee, consisting for the present year of 
Rev. Joshua P. Bodfish, Reginald H. Fitz, M.D., Prof. 
Henry W. Haynes, George B. Hyde, Esq., Charles E. Jen- 
kins, Esq., John T. Morse, Jr., Esq., and Prof. Thomas S. 
Perry, with Alderman Hugh O'Brien, a member of the Board, 
as Chairman ; and the other, of the Librarian. 

In view of the magnitude of the Library, and the continued 
extension of its administrative force, it was deemed expedi- 
ent, under the power given by the ordinance, to add to the 
examining committee, selected from the citizens at large, 
two members, making the number, with their chairman, 
eight, instead of six. The good policy of this enlargement 
is shown by the character of their observations, and the 
enlightened interest which t:hey have taken in the varied 
work of the institution in all its branches. 

Their meetings have been more numerous, and their inves- 
tigations more extensive than those of any committee for 
several years. The important question of the removal of the 
Library; the quality and extent of the circulation of the 
books ; the condition of the branches ; the relation of the 



2 • City Document No. 78. 

institution to its patrons ; the want of provision for suitable 
accommodation tor scholars, — these and other topics receive 
careful attention, and reference must be made to the report 
for a full understanding of their conclusions. This docu- 
ment, from the hands of the Rev. Mr. Bodfish, has the great 
merit of showing the tidelity with which such disinterested 
service may be rendered. 

The report of the Librarian covers the seven months of his 
experience in this most responsible position, and, necessa- 
rily avoiding minute detail, gives his general impressions as 
to the present usefulness of the institution, and such changes 
as his brief experience have shown to be judicious. His con- 
victions about the Library are earnest and are forcibly ex- 
pressed . 

On the 6th of ALay, 1878, the corporation was organized 
under the Act of April 4, 1878, by the election as President 
of the officer who had acted in that position in the previous 
administration, and of Dr. Samuel A. Green, as Librarian and 
Clerk, who had succeeded Mr. Justin Winsor on his resigna- 
tion. After a valuable and disinterested library service of a 
year. Dr. Green terminated his Avork on the 1st of October. 
On the 2(ith of August the Hon. JNIellen Chambeilain was 
unanimousl}' elected, and entered upon the duties of his office 
on the 1st of October. The Library may be deemed fortunate 
to have had no. break in its reguhir service, and no further 
change in its policy than might naturally arise in a new over- 
sight of its internal arrangements. Such traditions as its 
experience has given it, modified by the new relations which 
are constantly arising, may be felt to be safely confided to the 
careful, thorough, and intelligent supervision of the new and 
accomplished Librarian. 

In the inaugural address of His Honor' the jNIayor, in re- 
ferring to the Public Library, he says : "The necessity of 
more ample accommodations for this institution has long been 
recognized, but no government has felt justified in expend- 
ing the moneys required for this pnrpose. 

" Whether such a building as the safety and the conven- 
ience of the Library requires shall be built on some of the 
Back-bay- lots, or whether an addition shall be made to the 
present edifice on the land in its rear (east side), purchased in 
1872 ; or whether relief shall be obtained by removal of the 
Lower Hall Library and Reading-Koom to other quarters, 
are questions which should receive yoiu' attention, as it is 
necessary that something should be done. A proposition to 
build an addition to the present building seems to me inex- 
pedient and unwise, as it would be merely a temporary 
relief, involving a considerable expense. 



• Public Library. 3 

"I would suggest, as the best thing at this time, the re- 
moval of the Lower Hall Library and Reading-Room, to 
some convenient place, until the time shall arrive when it 
will be proper to erect a new building." 

In order that the City Council may understand precisely 
the present state of the institution, with its arrangements for 
the public convenience, it is desiiable to rehearse in part the 
facts which have appeared in previous reports of the trustees. 

Two separate relations must be borne in mind at the out- 
set as affecting its present condition and future usefulness. 

First, the contents of the building are of such inappre- 
ciable value that if destroyed they never could be fully re- 
stored. Second, notwithstanding its great popularity, it 
would receive a much larger number of visitors in its dif- 
ferent departments, and apw rata increase of usefulness, were 
suitable accommodations afforded. 

In consequence of its surroundings and internal structure 
the Boylston-street Library is not perfectly lire-proof; its 
ventilation, insufficient both in the Upper and Lower Halls, 
affects the health of the attendants, and seriously injures 
the condition of the books stored in the upper alcoves ; the 
shelving falls short of the necessities of the classitications ; 
there is no accommodation for the valuable collection of 
newspapers, in quarters convenient for consultation; the 
waiting-room in the Lower Hall has no separation of access 
for men, women, and boys, and requires a much larger area; 
there are no rooms where students can pursue their special 
investigations without interruption ; the Reading-Room, ad- 
mitting only the hundred chairs prescribed under the bequest 
of Mr. Bates, could be extended five or six fold with great 
advantage to its readers. The building is therefore deficient 
in the purposes for which it was constructed, the perfect 
preservation of its contents, and a sufficiency of accom- 
modations for its. patrons. 

Are the dangers and inconveniences of the present struc- 
ture to be only obviated by the construction of a new build- 
ing on a different site, or can such changes and modifications 
be made as will be sufficient for the protection of the prop- 
erty, and the entire convenience of the public? 

Before this question can be rightly determined it is proper 
to consider what the Public Library is. It is an institution of 
widely different but parallel uses ; of both popular and educa- 
tional aim. Its popular side includes the Lower Hall Library, 
Avith the Reading-Room, frequented by the great masses of 
its patrons. These must be situated where they will be most 
convenient to the largest number of the inhabitants of the 
city. The present site, or one in its immediate vicinity 



4 City Document No. 78. 

probably answers these requirements. The great educational 
and reference library is mainly contained in Bates Hall, and 
in the sonth-west tower of the ])uilding. This is the collec- 
tion in relation to the absolute safety of which anxiety 
naturally exists, and the removal to secure this end is 
the debatable point. As it comprises books only to be 
used in the l)uilding, either as a condition of gift or 
acquirement, works for reference and consultation, and 
voliunes of permanent value, many of which, however, cir- 
culate, the location of the building containing them is of im- 
portance to a smaller number of visitors than those interested 
in the other branch of the Library. That is to say, the 
character of the contents of the Up})er Hall is such that the 
great majority of people using it would follow it from its 
present site to almost any other part of the city proper, 
where an estate suitable for its erection could be obtained. 

if deemed expedient to remove the whole Boylston-street 
Librarjs can these economic and divers conditions be combined 
on any other site? This is the real problem to be solved. 

If the Library is to remain in Boylston street new land must 
be acquired from the property adjacent, either for the erec- 
tion of a separate building, to l)e specially used to meet the 
great necessities of the Lower Hall Library and the Reading- 
Koom, or for such enlargement of the present edifice as, so 
far as practicable, would meet the whole of its future require- 
ments. 

If deemed advisable to remove the great collection con- 
tained in Bates Hall and the tower to a perfectly isolated 
and tire-proof structure, might it not be well to consider 
whether the present building could not be adapted to the 
needs of an enlarged popular Library, and the miieh-extended 
accommodation re(iuirtd for the Keading-Koom? 

The summary of libiary work lor the year will be found 
to present details of an important character. The aggregate 
nmnber of volumes contained in Bates Hall is 212,545; in 
the Lower Hall, 3(3,1 1(5 ; in the basement, 17,*J8U; in the 
Branches, i)4,322 ; making a total of 3t)0,9()3, — a net in- 
crease for the year of 14,92(5 volumes, or 4 per cent. 

The libraries were open to the public 3(»8 days, with the 
exception of the South Boston Branch, which was closed for 
alteration and enlargement from August 12th to November 
2d. The East Bo>ton Branch also stopped its delivery of 
books, on account of necessary repairs, from October 7th 
to 19th. 

The exclusion from circulation of the books of the two 
branches during these periods resulted in a diminished 
aggregate of books loaned as compared with last year ; 



Public Library. 5 

the total of 1877-8 having been 1,183,991, and of 1878-9, 
1,180,565. 

The following table shows the comparative contents and 
use of the Central Lil)r.iry, and the Branches for the present 
and previous library year. 

Books in the basement are excluded. 



Lower Hall .... 
East Boston .... 
South Boston . . . 

Roxbury 

Charlestown .... 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South End 

Jamaica Plain . . . 

Total 

Bates Hall 

Fellowes Atheuseum 



No. of Vols. 

April 30, 

1878. 



35,862 

10,049 

8,754 

11,114 

18,681 

12,535 

8,763 

8,804 

6,620 



121,182 

203,928 

4,458 



329,568 



Circulation 

1877-78. 



391,175 

106.596 

140,751 

113,495 

101, .540 

29,247 

64,974 

42,402 

30,280 



,020,460 
146,996 
16,535 



1,183,991 



No. of Vols. 

April 30, 

1879. 



36,116 

10,362 

9,279 

11,749 

19,675 

12,724 

9,325 

9,240 

7,290 



125,760 

212,545 

4,678 



342,983 



Circulation 

1878-79. 



363,193 
98.681 
118,844 
113,763 
88,740 
28,928 
59,673 
75,867 
52,960 



1,000,649 

163,790 

16,126 



1,180,565 



In this table it is first noticeable that the delivery of books 
from the Lower Hall has fallen off about 28,000 volumes. 
This is due to two catises : — 

First, to a limited purchase of the lower grades of fiction ; 
and, second, to the greater convenience of the South End 
Branch to the district which it supplies, and which formerly 
mainly relied upon the Lower Hall Library. 

South Boston Branch would probably have sent out as 
many books as during the previous year had its doors not 
been closed for over eleven weeks. It will be seen also that 
the branches at the South End and Jamaica Plain have met 
with marked success. 

The popular lil)rarie.s during the year were increased 4,578 
volumes, and their circulation diminished 19,811 volumes. 
To the consulting libraries were added 8,837 books, and 
their use increased 16,385 volumes. 

The table indicates that the circulation of the last year is 
nearly as large as that of the year before ; but there is no 
question on the part of the trustees that the books loaned 
were on the whole of a hicrher character. The increase of 



6 City Document No. 78. 

the use of the books in Bates Hall continues to be large, 
amounting to 11 per cent, over the previous year. 

The connection between the Library and the children in the 
schools is receiving particular attention. During the year 
a conference was held with Dr. Eliot, the superintendent, 
and with a committee of the masters, to see whether a jirac- 
tical system could be devised whereby a better class of books 
could be circulated on their recommendation among their 
pupils, and a larger assistance in works of consultation be 
given to the masters. The negotiation is still in progress, and 
it is earnestly to be desiied that some etiicient result may be 
obtained from it. 

While it is no part of the design of the Public Library to 
furnish text-books for teachers or scholars, it is yet not ditii- 
cult to see how it may be made to work in harmony with 
courses of reading and instruction. Popular books of con- 
tinuous interest may be duplicated so as to supply the need 
of a larger demand. 

It is possible, also, that it may be desirable to print a list of 
books considered especiall>^ useful, as well as harmless, for 
school children. To obtain this result, however, the co- 
operation of the teachers will be largely important, and there 
is little doubt but that it Avill l)e gladly rendered. 

In any event, however, it is practical)le that a specified 
number of books may be distributed weekly by the masters of 
schools under the guarantee of the School Conuiiittee for 
their careful treatment and safe return ; and thus cover a 
larger ground of interest and instruction than is at present 
attainable. 

It is, however, in the ditferent grades of fiction that the 
diflicultios of the ade(|uate supervision of the circulation 
chielly arise. With collections of this popular form of 
literature adai)ted in the Lower Hall and branches to 
satisfy the taste and understanding of every man, woman, 
and child, not vicious in tendencies, it is obviously a task 
requiring no common ingenuity, not only to direct atten- 
tion to, but to secure the perusal of, the better class of 
works of imagination. 

Fiction and juveniles now comprise a large and dis- 
tinct class in literature. The extent of subjects upon which 
they treat is of the widest possible compass. AVhile the 
standard historical and social-life stories continue to attract 
the cultivated, it is not surprising that the sensational, vision- 
ary, and vapid narratives should find a full reception from the 
less critical and consequently more numerous class of readers. 

With a view to obtain some approximate results on this 
point, attention has been given to the circulation of the 



Public Library. 7 

works of a few of the popular and sensational writers, 
whose tales were most attractive to youth and to adults. By 
this examination it has been found that the circulation of 
these specified authors in the Lower Hail Library and in the 
branches (with the exception of Charlestown, from which in- 
formation was not obtained), indicates that the apparent 
average delivery of each volume was about forty in the year, 
while the great mass of the less attractive but really better 
class of novels did not find over thirteen readers in a year. 

These figures, however, must be taken only as propor- 
tional, and to bo confirmed or changed by continuous exami- 
nation. It is sufficiently evident, however, that the class of 
fiction not immoral, but of the lowest value, attracts the ma- 
jority of readers. 

Is a remedy to be songht for this condition of things, or is 
this the natural result of the popular reading of fiction not 
immoral? The theory from the outset has been, that a taste 
for reading once formed would continue to rise ; that the mind 
having been fed sufficiently with the thinnest possible intellec- 
tual viands would naturally seek a stronger nutriment ; that the 
sweetened or palatable food, not deemed hurtful in juvenile 
development, would by and by assist in forming a healthy appe- 
tite. If intervals of leisure were not innocently employed, 
other conditions would arise to fill the vacuum, of at least ques- 
tionable tendency. Mental occupation , even in the lowest form 
of simple amusement, is a direct gain to the classes which 
gradually become dangerous for want of any employment in 
their leisure hours. In furnishing reading, then, from a free 
library to every grade, even the lowest in the community, it 
is certainly for the benefit of the body politic that a class of 
books suited to its capacity should be furnished at the pul)lic 
expense ; but the number of these should obviously be limited, 
and this limit will naturally be somewhat in excess of the real 
need, from an anxiety that the least intelligent class in the 
community should be as proportionately well served as the 
best citizens. 

It is not in one year, or in a decade of years, that popular 
libraries can be so constituted as to provide for all the moral 
and intellectual wants of a community. No library could 
ever be collected for the use of all tlescriptions of age and 
cultivation in which all the books shall circulate in equal pro- 
portions, or in which even all the books can be made to cir- 
culate. The classes of books are easily known which the 
more cultivated people in any community desire ; but the 
works which are attractive to the immature intellect, and 
which are not objectionable in style or aim, are more difficult 
of selection. 



8 City Document No. 78. 

The record of books lost still continues to be most satis- 
factory. But one book is unaccounted for out of every 
11,805 circulated, exceeding even the favorable results of 
last year, which were the best yet reported. 

The branches at South Boston, Brighton, Dorchester, and 
Jamaica Plain, with an aggregate issue of 260,405 books, 
lost none. 

The Central Library suffered to nearly the same extent as 
last year, losing from Bates and Lower Hall 87 volumes 
against 90 in 1878. 

These figures are most gratifying, as showing- the general 
care of borrowers, as well as the fidelity of the Library 
service. 

In the report of the trustees, last year, a statement was 
made rehitive to the number of volumes condemned during 
the previous five years ; but, in order to judge what the 
wear and tear of the Library has been, a table is annexed, 
showing the number of condemned books for each interval of 
five years, from 1854 to 1878, inclusive : — 

1854-58 734 

1859-63 1,376 

1864-68 3,012 

1869-73 3,621 

1874-78 . . . . . 15,838 

1879 4,028 



Total 28,609 

When it is i-emembered that these 28,609 volumes were de- 
stroyed and lost in a circulation from the beginning of the Li- 
brary and its branches, of 10,483,431 volumes, or one volume 
to each 366 circulated, in twenty-one years' use of the Central 
liibrary, and a proportionate!}' shorter use of the branches, 
the result on the whole is not surprising. Fortunately, those 
books were from the class of reading which is most popular 
and inexpensive, and new copies have been purchased except 
in cases where file number of duplicates was considered to be 
sufficient, or where the books were out of print, or deemed 
objectionable. During the same period there was ])aid into 
the city treasury, from the sale of cat'ilogues and tines col- 
lected ut the main Library and branches (with tiie exception 
of Charlestown and Brighton, whose contributions were made 
sul)soquent to their accession to the city), the sum of 
$26, ()95. 61, which probabl}'- would have been amply sufficient 
if retained by the Library to make its losses good. 

There would seem to be a special justice that the patrons 



Public Library. 9 

of the Library in whose service these volumes had been 
destroyed should thus pay for their restoration. 

The catalogue work of the year has borne large practical 
fruit : beside the regular quarterly bulletins there have been 
issued two much-needed branch catalogues, — one for the 
Library in East Boston, and the other for that in South 
Boston. The great Ticknor Catalogue, the work of so many 
years, has been thoroughly and accurately completed by Mr. 
James L. Whitney, and will be very shortly ready for distri- 
bution. The first part of the Barton Catalogue, comprising 
the important Shakespeare collection, has been finished, 
micler the careful and scholarly supervision of Mr. James M. 
Hubbard, and printed. 

To indicate the variety and extent of work which falls upon 
this department, it may be added that the number of volumes 
catalogued during the year was 2.5,259, which requiredr 
inclusive of cross-references, 6'i.205 cards. Of these cards 
8,<i24 were for the branches. The niunber of persons inves- 
tigating special subjects, assisted during the year by the 
catalogue attendants, and by Mr. Knapp, Librarian of Bates 
Hall, amounted to 9,172. For the previous year consulta- 
tion was had b}' 6,284 persons, showing a gratifying increase 
in this important part of library service. 

The accommodations for visitors at the branch libraries, 
with the exception of the one at the South End, are found to 
be amply sufficient. The room occupied by the South Boston 
Branch has been nearly doubled in size during the past year, 
and a lease of the premises taken by the city government for 
ten years. The condition of the South End Branch has been 
noted in the report of the Visiting Committee as insufiicient, 
and the trustees recommend that the suliject be referred to 
the Committee on Public Buildings of the City Council, to 
make such provisions for its necessities as the interests of the 
Library require. 

During the past year, also, the premises occupied in the 
Library building for the bindery, having been found entirely 
inadequate, were much enlarged and improved. This de- 
partment is now provided with sufficient room and every 
needed convenience for its work, — a work, too, which must 
necessarily increase year by year, from the wear and tear of 
circulation, and the continued influx of books requiring re- 
binding. 

It continues to maintain the high standard of workmanship 
which obtained for it a medal at the Centennial Exhibition, 
a^id secured for the Library also a gold medal at the Universal 
Exhibition at Paris in 1<S78, from which the Library is to 
receive another medal for its published contribution. 



10 City Document No. 78. 

The total woi^k of the year in the bhicleiy, derived fi'om 
Bates Hall and the branches, amoiuited to 14,356 volumes 
bound and 1,371 repaired. Besides this there has been a 
large variet}^ of labor which canuot be tabulated in any 
convenient form of statistics. 

In addition to this there has been employed, under the spe- 
cial direction of the Librarian, a person who finds continued 
occupation in attending to the slight repairs of the volumes 
on the shelves, in which, if the injury is not at once taken 
care of, the books will soon require to be wholly rebound. 

The trustees have again to acknowledge with pleasure au 
addition of $1,000 to the permanent funds of the institution, — 
the generous gift of Dr. Samuel A. Green, who requires 
that its income should be spent in the purchase of books re- 
lating to Anierican History. The Library has also received 
from J. Ingersoll Bowditch, Esq., a third sum of $500, to be 
devoted t(^ the increase of the Bowditch collection. 

One of the trustees, whose name is withheld at his request, 
has made a large purchase of recently published periodicals, 
in order to try the experiment of their use in circulation, 
which so far has met with a marked snccess. Besides this 
the Library is indebted to 470 givers for 3,680 volumes and 
8,786 pamphlets. In addition, an arm-chair, constructed 
from the wood of the old Elm on the Common, has been given, 
for the perpetual use of the President, by a member of the 
Board . 

This closes the record of another prosp^^rous 3'ear. With 
the Library strengthened in all its departments of learning, 
art, and literature, it yearly becomes better fitted to meet the 
multitudinous wants which it is called upon to fill. The 
number of volumes in any library does not indicate value ; 
but for the great collection of works of an important charac- 
ter in this institution all scholars and readers have reason to 
pay a thankful tribute. 

WILLLVM AA\ GREENOUGH, 
WESTOX LEWIS. 
RICHARD FROTHIXGHAM, 
GEORGE B. CHASE, 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE, 
HUGH O'lUHEN, 
ROGER WOLCOTT. 

Public Libuvry, June 21st, 187!). 



Public Libhary. 11 



[B.] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE, 

CONSISTING OF 

Rev. Joshua P. Bodfish, Geo. B. Hyde, Esq., Charles 
E. Jenkins, Esq., Henry W. Haynes, Esq., Reginald H. 
FiTz, M.D., John T. Morse, Jr., Esq., T. S. Perry, 
Esq., with Alderman Hugh O'Brien, as Chairman. 

In behalf of the Examining Committee appointed under the 
sixth section of the City Ordinance to examine the Lil)raiy, 
the undersigned has the honor to present the following re- 
port to the Trustees : — 

The committee has held frequent meetings, during which 
they have examined the Central Library in all its depart- 
ments. They have also visited all of the Branches. They 
all unite in commending the efficient administration of those 
in charge of the Library. The money appropriated for 
works of permanent vaUie has been judiciously expendeil, 
until we have the best collection of useful works for refer- 
ence and study in the United States. » 

We regret to say, however, that for want of accommo- 
dation for students and literary workers this valuable collec- 
tion of books can be comparatively little used by the persons 
it was intended to benefit. 

Prof. Henry W. Haynes, whose experience as an author 
and a former trustee of the Library renders his suggestions 
especially valuable, w^as appointed a sub-committee to con- 
sider this matter, and made the following report : — 

Your committee — while finding complete satisfaction in the use made 
by the community of the Circulating Department of the Library, and 
ev^erything to commend (with a single exception) in the facilities fur- 
nished for its enjoyment; and while appi'oving the polic}" that has of 
late prevailed in its management, which almost thrusts a book into the 
hands of every inhabitant, and insists upon his reading it — is, neverthe- 
less, unable to speak in like terms of gratification, either of the general 
use thus far made of the other great department, — the Reference Li- 
brary, — or of the conveniences afforded those who seek to avail them- 
selves of its priceless treasures. 

This is said in no spirit of fault-finding, and with no disjjosition to. 
impute blame to any one. It is only a recognition of one of the inevita- 
ble results that have followed upon the rapid growth of the collection 
of books, and the expansion of the system ol" circulation. We wish 
merely to present from another point of view, what has been so strongly 
forced upon our minds by many other considerations, the fact that the 



12 City Document No. 78. 

Library has outgrown its present accommodations, and imperatively 
demands ampler space and larger and better C(inveniences for the class 
of students and literary workers. That the needs of this class were 
present to the far-sighted thought of the genei'ous founder of the Li- 
brary is evident from the terms of his benefaction, Avhich restricts the 
income of the invested fund to the purchase of " books of permanent 
and general utility." 

It was natural that a public-spirited American, knowing how much 
the noble librai-y of the British ]\Iuseum and its constant use by schol- 
ars and writers have contributed to the literary glory of Great Britain, 
should desire to help in accomplishing somewhat of the same result for 
his native country. How well his desires have been carried out, and 
how many other generous donors have seconded his wishes, the suc- 
cessive addition of the Parker, the Bowditch, the Ticknor, the Barton, 
and the Thayer collections bears witness, to say nothing of the steady 
flow of lesser gifts from hundreds of friendly sources. The treasures 
of learning thus collected within these walls have been principally the 
free gift of private munificence to the citizens of Boston, for a specific 
purpose, and have not been purchased with their own money, however 
cheerfully paid in taxes, and however liberally appropriated hj sncces- 
.';ive municipal governments^, as is the case with the books that are con- 
stantly circulating among the j^eople and being legitimately worn out 
in that good service. 

The possession of great powers and capacity for good implies equally- 
great responsibilities in their employment. Where so much has been 
given much is required. Ought we to rest satisfied that such a combi- 
nation of generosity on the part of the donors, and the rare felicity 
which secured for our city the invaluable services of Everett, of Tick- 
nor, of Jewett (to say nothing of the living), at the inception of the 
undertaking, and which have resulted in bringing together liere by far 
the most valuable collection of books in the United States, and one of 
the remarkable libraries of the world, through the painstaking vigi- 
lance of the trustees and oflicers in securing the best works in all 
departments of human knowledge, ought we to rest satisfied that 
all these should fail to bear their legitimate fruit? And yet how_ 
is it possible for any satisfactory or general use to be made of 
this great collection of books under the existing circumstances, and 
in the present condition of the Library building? How can any im- 
portant literary production, sucli as Macaulay's history, for example, 
which requires for its composition access to large stores of books, 
such as only a Public Library affords, how can such a work be 
accom])lished here, where no privacy is affortied the student, and no 
opportunity for consulting numerous volumes at tiie same time, and of 
keeping them together over night in one place reserved for his use on 
the succeeding \lay ? In the present crowded state of the Library 
building, scarcely half-a-dozen people can eacli be supplied with a table 
and the opportunity of making notes from the Ijook he is consulting. 
Are scientific research and literary creation possible under these circum- 
stances, and will not the Library necessarily remain sterile in one of 
its most imj^ortant functions utd'ess proper consideration be shown for 
the needs of literary workers in all the varied brandies of intellectual 
activity? Would it not nthl a crowning merit to our city's reputation 
for intelligence, and culture, and liberality, if we could say to the 
tiiinkers, the writers, the special students, and all the toiling delvers 
after knowledge, not only in our own community, but throughout our 
whole country — here you can find stored up the treasured wisdom of 

" The ftssembled souls of all that men held wise." 

We bid you all heartily welcome to these accumulations of knowledge. 
Use them freely for the common benefit of our country and of man- 



Public Librarf. 13 

kind. Such would seem to be the ripe and noble outgrowth of this 
great public institution, and a just recognition of the debt whicli Boston 
owes to the literature of America. 

This report was unanimously accepted, and the necessity 
recognized by all of providing, at once, greater facilities for 
those who desire to make use of this valuable collection. 

More room is needed also for the convenient delivery of 
popular works, which circulate more freely. The space al- 
lotted for reading-rooms is altogether insufficient. The val- 
uable coMections of newspapers are stored away in the 
basement, where they are practically inaccessible. The room 
allotted for the working force in charge of the Library is far 
too small, thereby increasing the labor of administration. 

For these, and many other reasons, increased accommoda- 
tions seem imperatively demanded. 

Various plans were suggested and duly considered. The- 
possibility of utilizing the Adams estate, east of the present 
building, and thus providing for immediate wants, was dis- 
cussed, and plans and estimates considered. The great 
expense, however, of making an addition which would be 
fire-proof, and the unsatisfactory character of the building 
when completed, forbid us to recommend such an expenditure 
of money. 

The committee would therefore recommend that sufficient 
land be acquired for the erection of a new building. This 
building to be of a quadrangular form. A portion of it 
could be built at once sufficient to accommodate the books 
used for reference and consultation. It should also contain 
ample space for the accommodation of students. The plan 
should be such that it could be enlarged as the necessities of 
the Librar}^ require. This would leave the present l)uilding 
for the use of the popular or circulating library, commodious 
reading-rooms, etc. 

This beginning could be made without a very great outlay 
of money. As scholars would follow this valuable collection 
of works for reference and study, the new building could be 
placed on land, at present unoccupied, which could be 
acquired at a moderate price. Such a location would be 
better suited for the purpos.e than the crowded section of the 
city. The new building would become a literary exchange, 
where scholars and literary and scientitic workers would 
assemble for the exchange of views and the pursuit of their 
special branch of study. The masses using the popular 
works would also be better accommodated, having the whole 
of the present building for the purposes of the circulating 
branch of the Library, reading-rooms, etc. 

The committee would urge this matter at the present time, 



14 City Document No. 78. 

because the land, Avhich could now be obtained at a moderate 
price, will soon be built upon, and could not be bought with- 
out a much greater outlay of money. We are convinced that 
such a building must be built not long hence, and it can be 
done much cheaper noAV than in the future. The same gen- 
erous spirit which has led our citizens to provide this splendid 
collection of books for the wants of tiie people demands 
that a proper building be provided for their preservation. 
The present building is far from he'mg fire-p7-oof. It is in an 
exposed location. If its pricek^ss treasures should be con- 
sumed by tire, money could not rephice them. 

The Branches have all been examined and found to be in 
excellent condition. They are doing an important work in 
the easy and convenient distribution of books. The apart- 
ments occupied by the South-End Branch, however, are 
w^holly inadequate to the wants of that important Branch. 

Mr. T. S. l^erry was, on account of his familiarity with 
the Library, appointed a sub-committee on the subject of 
circulation, and reports as follows : — 

With regai'd to the circuhvtion the showing- for the past year is most 
satisfactory. An apparent diminution of about three thousand four 
hundred volumes is explained by the tact that the Branch Librarj^ at 
South Boston was closed from the 12th of August to the 2d of Novem- 
ber, and that at East Boston for 12 days of last year. Had these branches 
been open during the whole time the total number of books in the hands 
of readers would have shown the normal rate of increase. As to other 
variations in the statistics it is to be noticed, in the tirst place, that there 
is a decided increase of nearly thirty thousand in the number of books 
from the shelves of Bates Hall. In view of the character of these 
books this is an excellent sign. A diminution in the nundjer of books 
taken irom the Lower Hall of the Central Library is to be explained in 
part by the increase of the nundjer of books taken out at the 8outh-End 
Bran^i, and partly l)y the pains that have been taken of late to provide 
rather a suflicient supply of good books, than a very large supjdy of 
books possiblj^ harmless, yet surely not benelicial to any reader. 

In this way, and by the excellent device of maintaining books of a 
good class, readers are gradually secured lor more improving, and no 
less entertaining, literature. 

In discharging this function of purveying for more scrujtulous taste, 
it would seem that the Trustees were but following out part of their 
duty as educators, and that they must exercise their discretion hei'c as 
they do in other departments of the Library when they have to decide 
what books shall be bought and Avhat left unbought. While there is an 
abundance of good literature which the Library can buy, it would 
seem absurd to purchase even remotely deleterious works for general 
reading. 

Still evo»-y question of this kind is better settled by the examination 
of particular instances than by general i)rinciples. In case of doubt 
any injustice can be easily remedied. Judging, however, from the in- 
spection of shelves and the books returned l)y renders in the Lower Hall, 
it is impossible not to have the feeling that the majority of the books 
read are of a good sort. They are to a great extent novels, but novels 
it will do no one harm to read. 

The examination of the shelves of Bates Hall has shown your com- 



Public Libeart. 15 

mittee how few are the books that have never been taken out. The 
number of times thej' may have been consulted in the hall does not ap- 
pear. Volumes on all sorts of remote and generally uninteresting sub- 
jects will be found to have gone out at least once or twice from the 
Library. Indeed, it would seem as if there were scarcely a book 
printed that some one did not want to see at some time. 

We desire to commend the effort of the Superintendent 
and Trustees to cooperate Avith the School Committees in 
exercising a supervision over the books delivered to the 
school children. It would surely be inconsistent for the 
city, while endeavoring to cultivate the mind and taste of 
the young in school, to deliver to them, Irom the shelves of the 
Library, books which Avould be to ttem injurious. 

"The number of good books is so great that a lifetitne 
would not suffice to read them. A wise man can only lind 
time to read the best. Surely time spent in reading bad- 
books is worse than wasted. It is certainly no part of the 
city's duty to provide books that can be in any way harmful. 

In view of the fact that the only complete catalogue of the 
Library is the Card Catalogue, the use of which is not under- 
stood by the majorit}^ of applicants for books, we earnestly 
recommend that some person or persons be specially charged 
with the duty of finding the numbers and making out slips 
for books asked for. 

It seems almost a hopeless task to the uninitiated to find the 
particular title and number he wants, when referred to an 
array of one million (1,000,000) cards. 

Such a person could be of great service to readers by 
advising them in regard to the best works on the subject they 
were studying. We hope in time some more perfect form 
of catalogue may be devised than the present one, which 
seems fast becoming unwieldy. 

Great good would result, in our opinion, if some of the 
officials connected with the Library, who are familiar with the 
literary and scientific treasures it contains, were to give, in 
the form of familiar lectures, instruction to the earnest seeker 
after knowledge as to what he should read. 

The Library has been established to assist in the great 
work of education, so dear to all. It seems, therefore, within 
the province of those in charge to help those who desire it 
to pursue a systematic course of reading which will be a 
permanent benefit, rather than leave them to an aimless and 
desultory perusal of books. 

The present condition of the Library reflects great credit 
upon those in charge. The percentage of losses has been 
wonderfully small for so great a circulation. Serious dam- 
age is being done however to some of the most valuable 



16 City Document No. 78. 

books by the foul air aiul noxious vapors that collect in the 
upper part of Bates Hall. The remedy for this is a new 
building, better suited for Library purposes. 

We have to thank the city government for its foster- 
ing care of the Library. It is an institution of which our. 
citizens may well be proud. We feel assured that those 
who have seen its wonderful development and increasing 
usefulness under the charge of the present Board of Trustees 
do not wish to see its growth checked, as it must be unless 
increased accommodations are provided for its expansion. 

In conclusion, the committee desire to express their grati- 
tude to the Superintendent and Board of Trustees, and to 
the Library otHcials in general, foi- the cheerful cooperation 
they have afforded the committee in their investigations. 

For the Committee, 

JOSHUA p. BODFISH. 



Public Library. 17 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

To the Trustees: — 

By the laws of the corporation, the Lilirariaii is required, 
at the close of the library year, to report to the Trustees, in 
writing, whatever may relate to the condition and increase of 
the whole estal)lishment, and whatever, in his judgment, may 
extend its usefulness. 

Within the last year there has been no territorial extension 
of library facilities, except by the establishment of a branch- 
delivery station at Roslindale, which was opened December 
3, and Dr. Samuel T. Bowthorpe appointed delivery agent. 

At South Boston, the branch library was closed from 
August 12 to November 2, while undergoing enlargement 
and alteration ; and that at East Boston from October 7 to 
October 19, in order to make some desirable changes. 

During my short term of office, the condition of the Library 
has not changed so materially as to require any extended re- 
port ; but some new measures have been adopted, and these, 
so far as they have become part of the permanent adminis- 
tration of the Library, will be briefly noticed as belonging to 
its history. 

The tables annexed show the increase and use of the 
Library in its various departments, with such other infor- 
mation as is usually exhibited in that form. 

All the branch library buildings seem to be reasonably 
secure from fire, and I discover no deterioration of the books 
in them save such as is incident to the nature of their use. 
With the exception of the apartments at the South End, they 
fairly answer the public demands ; nor is there anything in 
their situation, surroundings, or internal arrangements preju- 
dicial to the health of those who resort to them, or of those 
by whom the public is served. But of the Central Library, 
none of these pleasant things can be said. It is neither 
suited to the proper arrangement or preservation of the 
books stored in it, nor to theh* convenient use. Its temper- 
ature is not agreeable, its air is not "pure ; it is safe neither for 
the books nor for those who consult them, nor for the officers 
or their assistants ; and it would seem that the consideration 
of the reconstruction and enlargement of the existing edifice, 
or of seeking adequate accommodations elsewhere, cannot 



18 City Document No. 78. 

be much longer postponed. But the subject of present solici- 
tude is the safety of the edifice and its collections. 

The Central Library edifice was designed as a fire-proof 
structure, and when erected was so regarded until the result 
of the fires at Chicago and Boston excited apprehensions as 
to its safety in case of an extensive conflagration, and led to 
the adoption of some additional safeguards. Iron shutters 
were hung to the more exposed windows. The high service 
stand-pipe was placed in the south-eastern tower. Fire-ex- 
tinguishers were distributed in various parts of the building, 
and other means of prevention were adopted. But it has 
l)een questioned whether these precautions were not partially 
neutralized by the erection of the wooden structure at the 
rear of Bates Hall ; and are cent trial of one of the instru- 
ments relied on as useful in an emergency showed that the 
confidence was not well phiced. It seemed tome, therefore, 
in view of the menacing facts in the vicinity of the Public 
Library, that the precautions already taken place ivere insuffi- 
cient to warrant a feeling of security ; and, accordingly, with 
the approl)ati()n of the Trustees, application was made to 
the Police Commissioners to detail, as at the Court House 
and City Hall, an officer to act as night-watchman in the 
building. But the Commissioners, having no supernumerary 
officer at their disposal, were obliged to deny the request. 

Under these circumstances, I recommend that the Trustees 
employ a vigilant and discreet person whose business it shall 
be to visit each half hour of the night every exposed portion 
of the Library, and also to attend to what may occur outside 
of the building, in its immediate' vicinit}'. By such watch 
incipient fires might be detected and suppressed, and timely 
alarm given of those outside of a threatening character, and 
thus enabling the people in the Library to use all the ap- 
pliances at hand for protection against fire. Of course 
efficient measures should be taken to secure absolute and un- 
varying fidelity on the i)art of the watchman, which, as I am 
informed, will involve no dispr()[)orti()ned expense. I will 
only add, by Ava}^ of emphasis to these reconmiendations, that 
the grief of all liberal minds at the irreparable loss of the 
splendid collections at Birmingham is rendered more poignant 
by the statement of a British journal, that the catastrophe 
might have been prevented by the employment of a watch- 
man, as is here proposed. 

Note. — Sinco flie dnto of fliis report, tho Trustees have employed a watcliman, 
who elite cil upon his ihilics .Tunu "Jlst; luitl >i\tccn iiointsof the huildiii^ hiive been 
coiHRCled witli a clock whicli rc^risters his ])i-eseiicc at those points every half hour 
of the nifrhl. The wooden doors at tlie connection of the atldition with the main 
iiuilding have received a metallic covering, and it is expected that similar shutters 
will be hun<;' to the windows of the wooden gallery. 



Public Library. 19 

The next subject to which I wish to call attention is that of 
the preservation of the bindings of books in Bates Hall. 
This, I am aware, is no new matter, but one which has been 
repeatedly urged upon the attention of the city government 
in various reports and communications ; nor has it failed of 
respectful consideration by that body. The highest profes- 
sional skill has been invoked to ascertain the cause, and to 
devise a remedy for the rapid deterioration of the bindings 
now going on, but thus far without substantial results. The 
difficulty is to discover a remedy. Those which have been 
suggested are inconvenient of application, expensive and ex- 
perimeutal, even in the judgment of those who propose them. 
So the matter remains, and is likely to remain, until a new 
structure is erected, with an efficient system of ventilation, 
or a remedy is discoveied more promising than any yet 
suggested. 

Meanwhile measures have been adopted which promise 
some alleviation of the evil. Early in January last a book- 
binder of experience and good judgment was engaged to go 
through the alcoves taking down each volume, removing the 
dust from the books and shelves, and making such repairs 
of the bindings as would serve to arrest the progress of de- 
terioration. In about seven months after entering upon the 
work the binder will have gone entirely through Bates Hall 
without delaying the patrons of the Library in the receipt of 
books, or discommoding the runners ; and, after the first 
year, the annual spring cleaning will be unnecessary. It 
has also been made a part of his work to correct the mal- 
adjustment of shelves to books by which they are relieved 
from uneasy and damaging positions, and I am happy to say 
they seem not insensible to his attention. I recommend 
that his position be made permanent, and I feel confident 
that his salary will be more than saved by postponing the 
time when the Library must go to the bindery, to say nothing 
of other considerations. 

The daily observations I have made of the progress of the 
work above mentioned have led me to notice some of the 
deficiencies of the Library. They consist mainly of uncom- 
pleted or imperfect sets of periodicals, serials or continued 
works : of the lack of the best book in some, and of the 
second best book in many departments, and of books on the 
shelves rapidly perishing from use, and not easily replaced 
after the lapse of some years. 

I have caused an examination to be begun which in its 
results will present in convenient and permanent form the 
nature and extent of these deficiencies, and shall recommend 



20 CiTr Document No. 78. 

the systematic application each year of some portions of the 
funds necessary to their supply. 

In the selection of a library the primary purpose is to col- 
lect all, or as many as possible of the best books, and of the 
best only ; but large liljraries should include not only all of 
the best books, but all useful books ; as it is frequently the 
case that of two or more books covering the same ground, 
the second best is in some respects best, and equall^with 
the best, indispensable to the student of the subject-matter. 
This is also sometimes true of different editions of the 
same work. Of course, in a collection so large as that of 
the Public Library these deficiencies are not general ; and 
yet they are larger, I apprehend, than would be suspected. 
What surprises most on a cursory examination of any great 
collection is its completeness ; on a more careful examination, 
its deficiencies. 

With respect to books perishing from use, and the re- 
placement of which is growing yearly more diflicult, this is- 
true of many valuable histories, printed in limited editions, 
much used and soon becoming despoiled of maps and plans 
essential to the understanding of the text. These it might 
be well to purchase in duplicate and have one copy withdrawn 
from circulation that it might be always found in the Library 
and in good condition. 

But this class of considerations does not end here. Dr. 
Samuel A. Green, late trustee in charge of the Library, in 
his report for the year 1878, says : "It might be well con- 
sidered whether or not to modify the usual rule of not 
duplicating Bates Hall volumes, so far as to permit two 
copies of each of certain classes of books to be procured, 
one to be a two-starred book, on purpose to be always found 
within the building, while the other shall be for the purpose 
of circulation." 

This suggestion gives prominence to the twofold relation 
which the Public Library holds towards its patrons. The 
widest and freest circulation of books consistent with their 
safet}' has given it distinction among great libraries, and this 
characteristic it is likely to retain. But it is also a great 
reference library, and as such, resorted to from distant parts 
of the country. The records show that this mode of use is 
increasing rapidly, and it is already evident that two things 
onl}^ are needed to render its value and prestige as a library of 
reference as remarkable as it has already become in respect to 
circulation, — the never-failing presence in the Library of such 
books as students desire and reasonable fiicilitics for their use. 
Such facilities cannot at present be accorded ; and though they 
may not be speedily secured to the fullest extent, it seems to 



Public Library. 21 

me that plans may be formed and measures adopted which 
at no remote period will relieve the present discontent and 
yield partial satisfaction at least. If Dr. Green's suggestion 
were adopted the desired books would come with the lapse 
of time ; and the erection of a new edifice, or the radical 
alteration and extension of the present edifice would supply 
the fiicilities for their use. 

Under the most favorable circumstances, however, some 
years must pass away before the trustees can off*er to students 
the conveniences essential to the successful prosecution of 
their work ; and as the case stands to-day, with no general 
concurrence of opinion as to the desirability of removal from 
present quarters, or if removed, to what locality, the posses- 
sion of such facilities seems to be indefinitely postponed. 
In the meantime, while these questions are seeking solution, 
something may be accomplished and without unreasonable . 
delay, by the transfer of the Lower Hall library to some 
other quarters, and converting the space thus obtained to 
reading-rooms. This separation seems to me only a question 
of time ; and as a step in that direction, I would recommend 
the removal of the Lower Hall cards from the Bates Hall 
catalogue, and especially since their continued union as at 
present, with the rapid increase now going on, will in a short 
time result in further encroachment on the already crowded 
space in Bates Hall, and render it still more inconvenient as 
a reading-room. 

If the removal of the Lower Hall collection must be de- 
layed for want of suitable quarters to receive it, then it is 
worth consideration whether or not the time has come when 
the estate adjacent to the Library and already owned by the 
city may be used >so as to afford partial relief.^ 

I have stated in the preceding pages what has occurred to 
me in relation to the condition and increase of the establish- 
ment, and it now remains to report what in my judgment may 
increase its usefulness. Were it entirely a matter of choice I 
would willingly postpone the expression of opinions on that 
subject until longer experience and more careful thought 
shall bring — if, perchance, they may — greater assurance 
of their practical value ; but as the thought I have already 
given to certain matters has led to certain convictions, and 
as their expression is in the line of official duty, I have con- 
cluded to submit them to the judgment of the trustees. 

When I came to the service of the Library seven months 
ago, it seemed to be my first dut}^ apart from the daily 
routine of business, to examine its condition and gain some 

1 This subject is now in_,the hands of the committee or administration. 



22 City Document No. 78. 

clear ideas respecting the aims, plans, and administration of 
an institution, which, at the end of twenty-tive years from its 
organization, had put into use three hundred and sixty 
thousand volumes, and attained to an actual circulation of 
nearly twelve hundred thousand volumes a year ; and which 
had widened from the Central Department so as to include 
eight branches and two delivery stations, employing under 
one general direction one hundred and forty persons. Be- 
sides seeking to become familiar with the administration of 
the institution, I deemed it advisable to study the law of its 
organic life and growth as found in the successive reports of 
the trustees, examining committees, and sui3erintendents, 
with such aid as the records and files of the institution 
afforded. This examination I have now made; and the 
impression left on my mind is, that the Library has been 
almost exceptionally fortunate in having had through the 
entire period of its historv the services of a1)le and devoted 
men in all departments of organization, direction, and admin- 
istration, who have carried it forward with no false steps to a 
point where little remains to be desired either in the com- 
prehensiveness of its plans or completeness of detail, so far 
as its plan, according to the fulness of time, has been devel- 
oped. There have been no wide intervals between well-con- 
sidered plans and their practical adoption. It holds to-day 
all the ground it has taken, and still seeks new positions of 
public usefulness even in advance of puljlic requirement. 
And in what I have to suggest in respect to the increase of 
the usefulness of the institution I desire expressly to recog- 
nize the fact that all will be found either to have been 
suggested by my predecessors, or fairly included in the 
original desiijn of the founders and carlv laborers in the 
Library service, and only waiting for further development ot 
the system to render its adoption practicable. 

It has been said that the chief end of a library is to get 
itself read: not primarily for amusement, though that may 
be a legitimate purpose, but mainly for instruction ; and it 
is claimed that books, even the most frivolous, may serve 
two useful purposes. First, that they engage attention 
through vacant hours which would otherwise be unwisely 
spent, if not in crime, and so serve as an auxiliary to the 
police force; and, secondly, that the mere fact of reading, 
irresj^ective of its character, tends to improve the taste and 
judgment, until at length they come to demand better things 
than they have been accustomed to. Whatever degree of 
truth may l)e allowed to these claims, it is evident that so 
long as taste and judgment may be improved by external 
influences such influences should be called into requisition, 



Public Library. 23 

and young readers not be wholly left to their own caprice. 
And I understand the problem in respect to public libraries 
to be, not how their patrons, young or old. shall extract a 
certain amount of amusement from books provided for their 
use, but rather how they can be induced to enter into the 
fullest possession of the accumulated wealth which rightfully 
belongs to them. 

There is ample testimony that young people who have had 
the education which common schools afford can be taught to 
appreciate the best of literature, and for that best, to aban- 
don the worst or the indifferent. But it is also clear that 
they must be taught. Such preference of the best does not 
come by any process of natural evolution. In this, as in 
other matters, good influences come mainly from without and 
above. 

Excellent things in this direction have already been ac- 
complished. The publication of Mr. Winsor's class lists 
formed an epoch in the history of circulating libraries ; and 
there is little likelihood of their being superseded by better 
work. They will be in the future, as in the past, most 
important auxiliaries for promoting the reading of good 
books. 

What every good book needs is a good teacher behind it. 
Sometimes this teacher may be another book ; but better 
still, a living, personal influence, as constant and as active, 
and, if possible, as well sj'stematized as that of the public 
schools, meeting every youth in the community arriving at 
a certain age, and continuing friendly companionship until 
judgment, matured by age and best associations, shall un- 
erringly direct such j^outh to the best fields of literature. 
And by reason of a present lack of such personal influence 
in the Public Library, I would seek io secure such healthful 
association by establishing more intimate relations between 
the Public Library and the personal educational force of the 
public schools. - Not tliaf either should be merged in the 
other, or delegate its functions to the other ; but that each 
working after the law of its organic life should coijperate 
w'itli the other in their common purpose of educating the 
community. The best literature of the Public Library should 
find its way into the public schools ; and the best influence 
of the public schools should accompany those who enter the 
Public Library. 

Nor is there anything novel in these suggestions. It was 
claimed by those most active in founding the Public Library 
a,t municipal expense, that, rightly considered, it was a part 
of the public school system, and when fully developed would 
take its place naturally at the head of that system. 



24 City Document No. 78. 

And there are those whose convictions are becoming clear 
that the use of the Pubhc Library by the pupils in the public 
scliools will subserve its most beneficent ends only when 
regulated in accordance with the views of those more imme- 
diately charged with the education of youth. Amusements 
at public expense have as yet become no part of our system, 
nor are likely to become ; but to furnish the means of educa- 
tion to every child on the soil .is a fundamental idea likely 
to lose its place neither in the organic law nor in the minds 
of the people. And the Public Library will maintain its place 
in public favor and receive the supplies necessary to its 
etficient existence, not by furnishing that amusement which 
is found in sensational and low-toned reading, but rather by 
showing its efficiency as a public educator. 

This leads directly to the question : How can the Public 
Library be made to participate more efficientl}' than at pres- 
ent in the work of public education? Assuming that the 
reading of poor literature leads to the reading of better 
literature, still the process is slow and expensive, and can 
only be defended on the further assumption that any more 
direct and less expensive process is inipracticable. A better 
way is worth seeking. 

If we regard the Puldic Library as a })art of a system of 
public education, and carry the idea to its legitimate results, 
then the way begins to become clear, since every system of 
education worthy the name includes some personal educator. 
It is not enough that school-houses are built and l)ooks fur- 
nished gratuitously to pupils, nor that free lil)raries exist 
and are brought to every man's door. Schools and libraries 
require the teacher behind them if best results would be 
secured. 

The problem, then, as it seems to me, is this : How to 
make tlio Pul)lic Library, in like manner as the ])ublic school, 
an instrument in the hands of the public teacher of imparting 
knowledge at the public expense to those whom the city is 
under legal obligations to educate. 

I may as well say at the outset, that what I have in mind 
contenqdates some restriction ui)on the indiscriminate and 
often harmful use of the Public Library by pupils in the pub- 
lic schools while they remain such, and substitutes therefor its 
use under the guidance of the legally constituted instructors 
of youth ; nor, as I conceive, is this course oi)en to any 
theor(>tical objection. The puldic uoav claims and exercises 
the right, and with legal sanction and obligation as well, to 
determine the kind of educati(m it will furnish to children at 
the public ex]icnse, and from what books they shall or shall not 
be taught ; and with equal right and propriety, as it seems 



Public Library. 25 

to me, the public may determine what books for I'eacling it 
will provide for children, and under what direction they shall 
be read. 

But the initiation of the plan requires no such radical 
measures. What I respectfully submit to the consideration of 
the trustees is the propriety of setting apart some portion of 
the annual appropriation to meet the requisitions of teachers 
of the public schools, by the purchase of such books as in 
their judgment might be useful to their pupils, and these 
books to have their local habitation in the several school- 
houses under their charge, but always to remain the property 
of the Public Library and subject to such regulations as 
might be found necessary. 

If this plan should commend itself to the judgment of the 
trustees, it would not necessarily follow that its adoption 
with respect to all schools should be simultaneous. The ex-- 
periment might be tried in one school, and its success noted ; 
and in all cases the judgment of the superintendent of schools 
Avould naturally be sought before filling any requisition for 
books. 

It is not my purpose in this report to follow the plan into 
matters of detail, or to consider the objections which may be 
urged against its adoption. These matters I reserve for some 
less formal consideration should the occasion present itself. 
I will only add that the advantages of the plan seem to 
me obvious and important. It would have a tendency to 
restrict the use of hurtful books and the injurious use of good 
books ; and, should its operation become efficient, teachers 
would less often than now find their best efibrts thwarted by 
influences they are powerless to control. It would lead teach- 
ers to form the habit of preparing themselves for the duties of 
this new function by more careful examination of the minds, 
character, and acquirements of their pupils, and to enlarge 
their own by cultivating a familiarity with the best books. It 
would also — which is of prime importance — tend to es- 
tablish more intimate personal relations between themselves 
and their pupils than at present exist, and to counteract the 
fatal tendency to separation which has shown itself in graded 
and classified schools. And, finally, if teachers in this way 
could even measurably direct the reading of their pupils, it 
would promote unity and symmetry of education ; and it is 
to be hoped that many pupils in after years would be able 
to look back with satisfaction and grateful feelings to their 
teachers for the needed book and the no less useful word 
which changed the direction of thought and purpose for life. 

If any experiment in this direction should be deemed wise, 
the present time is not unpropitious if I rightly understand 



26 City Document No. 78. 

the spirit which animates those charged with the administra- 
tion of the pul)lic school system. 

The general purpose I have in mind, however, would not 
be fully subserved when the Public Library should have been 
made useful in the fullest and best sense to the pupils in the 
public schools, since these, after the nominal completion of their 
education, still remain, for a season at least, in the formative 
period of life, and still receptive of good influences ; and 
will then, as now, naturally resort to the Pul)lic Library for 
works of instruction or amusement. To the Public Library, 
then, good influences should follow them. 

And so the problem changes in form only, not in sub- 
stance. At first the question is, How can the most salutarv 
influence of good books reach the public schools? and, sec- 
ondly. How can the benign influence of personal instruction, 
similar to that found in the public schools, be made to 
attend those who frequent the Public Lil)rary? Doubtless 
it would be difficult, if not impossible, to organize any sys- 
tem of personal instruction in connection with a library, as 
thorough and continuous as that which belongs to the schools ; 
nor would that be necessary unless the schools should utterly 
fail in laying that foundation of good judgment and taste in 
the minds of their pupils which would serve in some good 
degi-ee to guide their later reading. 

But that something may be accomplished in this direction, I 
am fully persuaded ; and this conviction rests in part upon a 
basis of experiment and ol)servati()n which I shall not hesi- 
tate to explain. Occasionally I have found young persons in 
Bates Hall vaguely searching the catalogues, and yet appar- 
ently persistent in the accomplishment of a purpose of some 
sort. A question as to their wishes has led to the suggestion 
of the needed book, with a word as to its special value and 
right use, Avhich, if later assurances may be relied on, was not 
Avithout l)enefit. The number of persons of this class is, or 
would soon be, sufiiciently large to justify the presence in 
Bates Hall, in the lil)rary service, of some person of the 
requisite cidture and zeal in the cause of good literature, who 
should devote certain hours of the day to the advice and 
assistance of all comers. In the hands of such a person the 
Library would become an instrument of innneasurable influ- 
ence in the cause of sound learning. It would be alive ; not 
merely a reservoir, with skilfully contrived conduits, leading 
to each main door, but a living fountain, to which all nn'ght 
repair, each to quench his individual thirst, and bring away 
what he might need for less public use. 

I am not aware that the experiment has yet been tried of 
a course of lectures in a public lil)rary designed to induce the 



Public Library. 27 

critical and appreciative reading of the best things in litera- 
ture by those who might repair to them for instruction ; and 
yet there is always in every community a considerable number 
of persons who would gladly avail th(miselves of such oppor- 
tunities, for which no substitute is found in the occasional 
intermittent courses of lectures designed primarily for the 
"•ratification of those whose tastes are already formed. If 
such a course could be made permanent, meeting every year, 
the young men and young women who reach a certain stage 
in their progress, with the same unvarying regularity as 
marks a college curriculum, it is obvious that a power 
would be organized from which the happiest results might 
be expected. There may be practical difficulties in the in- 
stitution of such a course more formidable than any wdiich 
have occurred to my own mind, but I think 1 see the way 
clear, and I should look hopefully to the results of an experi- 
ment in this direction, the details of wdiich I reserve for 
some less public expression. 

It will be observed that I estimate highly the value of per- 
sonal influence as a means of giving vitality to a library, but 
I hope the estimate is not extravagant. The Public Library 
has not as yet become the centre of any considerable num- 
ber of literary people resorting to it for the interchange of 
opinions. 

I think it may be made to be such a centre and its power 
indefinitely enlarged, its prestige increased, and its. influence 
widely felt in the republic of letters. 

MELLEX CHAMBEELAIN, 

Libvarian. 

Public Library, 

April 30, 1879. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



LIBKARIAN'S EEPORT. 



18 7 9 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

IF. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Extent OF the Bates Hall Collection. 

IV. Extent of the Lower Hall Collection. 
V. Sale of Duplicates and Odd Volumes. 

VI. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VII. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VIII. Volumes Located in Bates Hall. 

IX. Bates Hall Classifications. 

X. Lower Hall Classifications. 

XL Gifts. 

XII. Circulation. 

XIII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIV. Books Recommended. Use of British Patents. 
XV. Batks Hall Reading. 

XVI. Lower Hall Reading. 

XVII. East Boston Reading. 

XVIII. South Boston Reading. 

XIX. Roxbury Reading. 

XX. Brighton Reading. 

XXI. Dorchester Reading. 

XXII. South End Reading. 

XXIII. Jamaica Plain Reading. 

XXIV. Periodical Reading Rooms. 
XXV. Losses and Delinquents. 

XXVI. Financial Statement. 

XXVII. Library Funds. 

XXVIII. Library Service. 

XXIX. Report on the Examination of the Shelves. 

XXX. Work in the Library Bindery. 



Public Ltbraky. 



31 






Pamphlets 

added tVom the 

beginning. 


961 

39.50 

6,507 

12,386 

16,0,53 

17,938 

19,-j55 

20,707 

27,381 

28,874 

31,043 

31,837 

32,553 

36,566 

44,443 

47,254 

61,177 

74,770 

89.746 

100,383 

112,153 

134,6-.8 

150,921 

181,653 

196,958 

212,414 

227,010 






Jamaica 

Plain 
Branch. 


-*MC^ — o = 


0^ tb -M 






South End 
Branch. 




::..::::;:;:: :s^ 












Dorchester 
Branch. 


* ■ Th c: CO 1^ CO lO 


Oi_r-^rHl-CO 

" • cot-Gccc'cT 






Brighton 
Branch. 




t- (M j-H t— »0 Tt* 


" ' * O rj< Oi CO O t- 


, .... , rH I-" I-H »-( r-i rH 




Charlestown 
Branch. 




X O -^ -^ rH lO 


l-CC^^OCDO 


»r:rcDt--occocr 

. ..•• t— <■— i-Hi— irHi— i 




a 

< 
« 

Hi 

tj 
n 
« 
o 






OS 

1 


4,61 
6,98 

8, SI 
0,70 
2,53 
5,57 
6,42 


r-< T—l I— ( 7— ( 


11 

< 




' * ' • CO OJ CD CN CD to t- 


, , , , C-» C-1 CO Tl< '^ -^ 




5(2 




^CiTt^COl-i-t^ 


.... CO -^ CO t-00 ^ r-i 


1— < 1—* 


South Boston 
Branch. 




s:?o^§oSS£ 






East Boston 
Branch. 




COCDClrHCiCO'^-^i) 






'-"-' 


i>^ 
a 
•< 

PS 

n 

< 

t- 

iz 
H 
O 


;^ S 


1,804 

1,804 

3,008 

4,794 

5,237 

5,116 

4,984 

5,141 

5,146 

5,>05 

6,106 

6,245 

»6,954 

*7.314 

*8,1S3 

9,4i0 

9,938 

11.321 

11,985 

12,944 

14,717 


? S i Previously included in the Bates Hall -i^^ 2 3 S g ?! S 
^go collection. ^-S-S-«'|-m'«- 




15,819 
17,000 
19,161 
20,881 
-'2,525 
23,592 
24,860 
25,366 

*25,199 
26,606 
28,723 
29,909 
30,574 
21,827 
32,fi05 
32 590 
33,395 
35,152 

* 35,478 
35,862 
36,116 




60,420 

66,228 

75,217 

79,359 

82,801 

88,226 

93,172 

100,171 

105,735 

111,681 

117,967 

124,419 

135,786 

142,685 

149,477 

]6H,748 

175,122 

184,938 

* 192,326 

203,928 

212,545 


Total Volumes 
in the Libraries. 


9,688 

16,221 

22,617 

28,080 

34,896 

70,861 

78 043 

85,031 

*97,386 

105,0.34 

110,563 

116,9.34 

123,016 

130,678 

136,080 

144,092 

152,796 

160,573 

179,250 

192,958 

209,456 

260,.5.'iO 

276.9:8 

297,873 

312,010 

345,734 

360,963 


DC 

K 

< 


1852-53 

1853-54 

1854-55 

1855-.'i6 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

l»65-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70t 

1870-71 

1871-72 

187-.'-73 

1873-74 

l>74-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

187!;-79 






i-((MCOT^tO^Dr-ceClO^ClCO^iCCDt-OOOiO — C^03Tt<i«CDt- 





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32 



City Document No. 78. 



APPEISTDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OE THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE 
AND BY GIFTS. 

Notts.— The increase of volumes is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because lost and 
condemned books are deducted. 



Years. 


Increase. 
(A^e« after 1861.) 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 

eluding those 

charged to funds 

and added by 

exchange. 


^ a 

C CJ 


Bo 






Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


*Pftmpb. 


Vols. 






1852-53 
1833-54 

1854-55 


9,688 
6,533 
6.396 


961 


4,000 
2,152 
2,663 


961 


5,688 
4 381 






76 


2. . . 

3. . . 




2,989 
2,463 






105 


2,557 


3,733 


89 




158 


4. . . 


1855-56 


5,463 


5,879 


1,865 


6,330 


3,.598 


549 




126 


6. . . 


1856-57 


6,816 


3,667 


1,686 


3,646 


6,130 


21 




132 


8 . . . 

7 . . . 
8. . . 

9 . . . 


1857-58 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1860-61 


35,955 

7 192 


1,885 
1,317 
1,452 
6,674 


30,214 
3,405 
3 744 


1 885 


5,741 
3,787 






881 


1,317 
1,452 
6,656 






247 


6,939 
16,94S 


3 245 






207 


12,299 


4,649 


18 




242 


10. . . 
11 . . . 


1861-62 
1862-63 


7,391 
5,529 


1,493 
2,169 


1,274 

829 


1,493 
1,958 


6,117 
4,700 






234 


212 




194 


12. . . 


186.3-64 


6,226 


2,939 


1,081 


2,772 


6,145 


167 




219 


13. . . 


1864-65 


6,082 


1,516 


804 


1,026 


5,17S 


490 




328 


14. . . 


1S65-66 


7,662 


, -J-ois 


1,476 


3,342 


' 6,286 


671 




336 


15. . . 


1866-67 


5,303 


7,877 


1,465 


7,769 


7,732 


103 




300 


16. . . 


1867-63 


7,673 


2,811 


1,554 


2.513 


6,300 


j298 




342 


17. . . 


1868-69 


8,685 


13,023 


2,138 


10.984 


.6,531 


2,939 




649 


18. . . 


1869-70 


7,775 


13,593 


1,648 


10,228 


6,120 


3.865 




666 


19. . . 


1870-71 


18,099 


14,976 


9,750 


10,805 


8,349 


4,171 




604 


20. . . 


1871-72 


13,703 


10,637 


4,349 


6,831 


9,359 


4,806 


_ 


610 


21 . . . 


1872-73 


14,644 


11,770 


3,039 


8,060 


10,705 


3,710 


865 


601 


22. . . 


1873-74 


51,094 


22,475 


4,783 


17,138 


18.671 


5,337 


1,330 


739 


23. . . 


1874-75 


16.372 


16,293 


4,169 


15,899 


17,080 


394 


572 


1.091 


24. . . 


1875-76 


20,955 


80,732 


5,749 


6,891 


15,206 


24,841 


759 


694 


25. . . 


1876-77 


16,974 


13,805 


3,662 


11,071 


10,544 


2,234 


738 


1.125 


ae. . 


1877-78 


83,724 


16,554 


21,206 


12,453 


17,570 


3,101 


196 


677 


27 . . . 


1878-79 


14,926 


14,596 


3,680 


8,786 


14,403 


6,810 


211 


470 



• Includes pamphlets nddct both bv purchase ond exchatiK?, as taken from the Accession Catalopie. 
t Included in previous coUimns. These volumes aro not the property of the Public Library, but form a 
part of tlic rioxbury Branch by nRreement. 

(fl) Of the increase, 2t.(',l8 were the Bates (fift. 

(9) Of the increase, 11,7l'1 wore the Parker beiuest. 

( 19) M,774 volumes of tlio Tieknor beijuest, and 2,082 from the Sumner Library Association, arc included 
in tlip increase. 

120) l.'I'l volumes from t)ic Jlattapan Literarv Association arc included in the incrcafe. 

(22) The increase of this ,\ cur includes the totals of the libraries at Charlestown and Brij(bton, and also, 
under purchases, the Barton lilbrarv. 

(24) The purclinios of tliis viar include thirtv volumes to replace books in the Bates Ilall lonf; lost. The 
great nccession I'f pamphlets caiue f.oni the purchase of duplicates from Harvard-CnllcKe Library 

(20) The unusual incrcnsc is nwiniito the addition of the books of the Mercantile Library Association 
which form tha nucleus of the South End Branoh. 



Public Library 



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34 



City Document No. 78. 



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36 



City Document No. 78. 



APPENDIX YI. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 







« 


& 


e 


^ 


« 


n 


^ 


KS 


e 


^ 


OD 


« 






« 


O 


»» 


»» 


♦» 


t» 


t» 


t» 


t» 


t» 


»» 


r» 






OD 


ec 


« 


K 


aD 


« 


SO 


oe 


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00 


30 


5C 






rt 


i-< 


<-< 


H 




1M 


*4 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 




C Gain in located 


























books (App. 




























Vlll.) . . . 


6,297 


7,475 


6,296 


7,508 


10,3S4 


6,622 


6,198 


6,. 564 


0,227 


9,357 


11,286 


8,459 




Of these not 




























located at last 




























Report . . . 
Added and lo- 


1,678 


1,.327 


140 


294 


4,135 


651 


?29 


1ST 




691 


303 


655 


!. 






















cated .... 


4,619 


6,148 


6,1.56 


7,214 


6,249 


5,971 


5,369 


0,377 


9,227 


8,746 


10,983 


7,804 


.\dded and not 




























located . . . 
Total gain . . . 


1,.327 


140 


294 


4,135 


651 


829 


*12,244 




591 


303 


655 


558 




5,940 


6,288 


6,450 


11.349 


6,900 


6,800 


17,613 


6,377 


9,818 


9,049 


11,638 


8,362 




Condemned and 




























transferred . 
, JTet gain . . . 




2 






1 


6 




3 


2 


21 


36 


48 












5,946 


6,290 


6,450 


11,349 


6,899 


6,796 


17,613 


6,374 


9,816 


9,028 


11,602 


8,314 



f Gain In books . 

Less transfers 

I and condem'd 

■( books .... 



. Net gain . . . 



:,003 

536 



1,407 



2.460 

352 

2,117 



1,417 


2,780 


2,614 


1,799 


1,465 


3,385 


3,570 


231 
1,186 


2,116 
665 


1,361 


1,021 


1,480 


2,586 


1,813 


1,253 


778 


(1om)15 


799 


1,757 



3,830 2,72S 
1,701 t2,344 



2,129 384 



2,339 

2,085 

254 















254 


101 


402 


335 


157 


126 


66 














25 


s-i^ 


























^ t Xet gain . 










254 


101 


402 


335 


157 


126 


41 















,j, rOainhj-additlon 
"g ^ Less loss by ex- 












1,375 
506 


1,641 
334 


1,234 

786 


1,902 

519 


1,015 
351 


1,677 
718 

959 


3,216 












1,443 


=^.11 














^ l.Xct gain . . . 


659 


301 


139 


149 


360 


860 


1,307 


448 


1,383 


664 


1,773 













5,936 


881 
50 


621 
97 


664 
143 


915 
334 


017 
273 


856 
250 


676 
270 


716 




Condemned and 








403 


•^r 














M^ 








5,936 


831 


524 


521 


681 


644 


606 


406 


313 



























885 

76 


850 
217 


1,359 
644 


1,261 
495 


1,303 
413 


823 
247 


854 


^< Condemned and 












329 


^§1 "-' 






















4,365 


809 


633 


715 


766 


890 


576 


525 















♦Includes 12.057 (close estimate) of the Barton books, and 137 other volumes. 

t This item is exceptionally large, as many duplicates not in use, and broken sets have been 
transferred to Duplicate Room, to make room on the shelves for fresh accessions. 



Public Library. 



37 



APPENDIX YI . — Continued. 





o 

H 


O 

9 
H 


X) 
H 


11 


« 

at) 

H 


« 

H 








OD 
H 




H 


Cnoir, in /.;tTr Tvnrf 












3,754 
4 


1,069 
26 


1,296 
46 


1,299 
163 


1,396 
304 


3,542 
701 


1,167 


« 


Condemned and 












532 


^ 
















1 \ 

H 












3,760 

805 


1,043 
1,330 


1,250 
572 


1,136 

759 


1,092 
738 


2,841 

11:0 


6;^5 


Fellowe.s Athe- 
naeum. (-N'et 












220 


»i; 




























4,615 


2,373 


1,822 


1,895 


1,830 


3,037 


855 


















s • 
















15,932 
144 

15,788 


1,305 

403 


1,004 
300 


1,123 
438 


995 

398 


1,268 


Condemned and 














274 






























902 


704 


690 


597 


994 
















^ 



1^ ' 
















11,049 
12 


480 1 


599 


480 

74 


264 
46 
218 


236 


Condemned and 














751 130 


47 


































11,037 


405 


469 


408 


ISO 


















*■ r 


Gain in books . 
Condemned and 












3,905 


3,179 
S2 


1,057 
16 


341 

25 


672 
110 
































. . .54 


3,905 


3.147 


1,041 


616 


562 






















Is. 














24 


19 


89 


139 


6,401 
2 


696 


Condemned and 












26 












































6,-399 


670 


























1^1 
























8,856 
52 


522 


Condemned and 






















86 










































8,804 


436 












1 














Bates Hall gain . 
Lower Uall gain 
Newspaper 


5,946 

1,407 


6,290 
2,117 


6,450 
• 1,186 


11,349 
665 


6.899 
1,253 


6,795 

778 

254 
869 
524 
809 
3,750 
865 


19.271 
(loss) 1.-) 

101 

1,307 

521 

633 

1,043 

1,330 

15,788 

11,037 

54 

24 


6,374 

799 

402 
448 
581 
715 

1,250 
572 
902 
405 

3,905 
19 


9,816 
1,757 

335 

1,383 

644 

760 

1,136 

759 

704 

480 

3,147 


9,028 
2,129 

157 

6G4 

606 

890 

1,092 
738 
690 
406 

1.041 


11,602 
384 

126 

959 

400 

576 

2,841 

190 

.597 

218 

610 

6,399 

8,804 


8,314 
254 

41 




Duplicate Room 

s;;iin 

E. B. Branch 


659 


301 


139 


146 
5,936 


380 

831 

4,365 


1,773 
313 




S. B. Brunch 








525 


S 


Rox. Branch 










635 


5 


Fellowes Atbe- 












220 




Chn. Branch 












994 


^ 


Bri. Branch 














189 




Dor. Branch 














562 




J. P. Branch 










1 

1 . . . 




39 139 


670 


* 


8. E. Branch 














436 




Total gain . . 
























8,012 


8,708 


7,77o| 18,099 


13,708 


j 14,644 


51,109 


: 16,372 


20,955 17,277 


33,724 


14,926 



38 



City Document No. 78. 



APPENDIX yil. 

INCREASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





H 


(X 
9 
SB 

H 






H 
Z) 


9» 

H 




H 






at) 

H 


at) 
at) 

H 


e 

3D 

H 


English Books with 1 
British imprint . \ 


635 


703 


625 


811 


899 


1,096 


1,389 


1,294 


1,533 


2,830 


2,237 


1,763 


1,781 


English Books with ) 
American imprint ( 


1,154 


1,445 


1,455 


1,411 


2,20C 


3,642 


4,301 


3,807 


7,365 


10,501 


6,761 


5,546 


6,295 


English Books with ) 
Contin'tal imprint j 


104 


100 


80 


50 


48 


115 


291 


125 


375 


816 


180 


191 


233 


Foreign hooks .... 


539 


673 


789 


487 


561 


891 


1,064 


858 


767 


1,858 


1,742 


1,2G9 


1,372 


Duplicates of either ^ 
class, when not in- 1 
eluded in the other ( 
items ...... J 


97 




447 


248 


480 


















Total 


2,529 


2,926 


3,3^6 


3,007 


4,194 


5,744 


7,045 


6,084 


10,040 


15,505 


10,920 


8,769 


8,681 



APPENDIX YIII. 

VOLUMES LOCATED IN BATES HALL, BY MONTHS. 



Months. 


1 

1 

at) 
O 
ac 

H 


© 

e 

e 

Ot) 

H 


1 


ao 

H 




M 
1 

r4 


M 

at) 

r4 


la 

1 

f 

aD 


1 
at) 


1 

90 

H 


9C 
I* 

1 

X 


« 

ao 




758 
509 
1,037 
883 
713 
866 
443 
639 
626 
663 
621 
417 


347 
833 
697 
763 
632 
834 
633 
882 
1,175 


727 
480 
462 
620 
878 
646 
695 
905 
427 
706 
1,001 
661 


455 
464 
291 
618 
611 
295 
* 4,628 
651 
611 
724 
788 
t598 


534 
684 
631 
554 
457 
52j 
489 
646 
656 
456 
551 
492 


357 
527 
839 
405 
436 
414 
377 
507 
665 
694 
472 
605 


883 
477 
713 
660 
62'2 
590 
722 
758 
427 
849 
419 
544 


830 
845 
829 
666 

1,036 
602 
825 
567 
579 
645 
752 

1,050 


«71 
613 
738 

591 
611 
751 
697 
772 

1,014 
677 
649 

1.558 


654 
963 
9S4 
2,078 
899 
842 
940 
745 
881 
707 
654 
939 


751 




677 


July 


641 




456 


September 


620 
816 


November 


945 
843 


January 

February 


887 
567 
531 


April 


725 


Total 


7,475 


6,2'J6 


7,608 


10,:i84 


6,62.i 


6,198 


6,564 


9,226 


9,337 


11,286 


8,459 







Pamphlet volurnes j 
arranged by the Curator ( 



385 



554 



206 



159 



20 



121 



•3,876 are books of the Ticknor Library, then assigned to permanent places. 

t Includes 31 volumee of the Ticknor MSS. 

Note. — Tlieso monthly figures arc the results of the tables made out year by year, like the 
one constituting Appemlix Vt fur lSfi9. The figures for May, June, and July, 1868-69, sliould 
follow those for April of the same year. They were misplaced to adapt the table to a change of 
the Library year. 

I'amphleU. — Hunng the year the Curator of pamphlets has continued the arrangement of 
all the loose pamphlets by subjects, etc., in the Cabinet Room; and such as were duplicates aud 
not needed have been arranged in adjacent apartments. 



APPENDIX IX. 

BATIiis HALL CLASSIFICATIONS, 
fllepreeenting books located only.) 



General Libraries. 



Special Libraries. 



Total, 
including 

Special 
Libraries. 



Cyclopaedias, etc 

Bibliography and Literary History 

General History, Biography, Travel, and Geography . . . . 

American History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Po- 
lite Literature 



English History, Geography, Biography, Tr.avel, and Polite 
Literature 



French History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Polite 
Literature 



Italian History, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Polite 
Literature 



, Biography, Travel, and Po- 



Greek, Latin, and Philology 

Spanish and Portuguese History and Literature 



Periodicals and Transactions 

Theology, Ecclesiastical History, etc 

Metaphysics and Social Science 

Jurisprudence 

Political Economy 

Medical Science 

Natural History and Science 

Mathematics and Physical Sciences 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Bound Volumes of Miscellaneous Pamphlets 
Bound Volumes of Manuscripts 



22 
278 
223 

1,305 

1,018 



16 
179 
285 

1,265 

953 



220 
444 

1,708 

1,306 



1,109 
1,023 



1,326 
5,412 
6,238 

24,369 



6,420 

4,783 

862 

8,203 
15,579 
16,440 
6,714 
3,623 
2,169 
10,322 
6,635 
7,825 
4,372 
5,294 
455 



1,290 
1,124 



3,243 
1,253 



162 
1,012 
3,645 
2,616 



t220 



Totals 6,100 6,297 7,475 6,296 7.508 6,477 ■ 6,622 5,995 6,333 8,626 9,424 7 



. . .1 



44 172,137 3,043 12,309 2,037 5,354 14,210 2,89' 



1,873 
7,076 
7,163 

27,362 

26,474 

14,692 

7,823 

8,048 
6,871 
4,770 

5,801 
17,906 
21,389 
8,283 
4,033 
2,370 
10,446 
6,895 
9,347 
4,425 
5,401 
634 



Explanation. — Class III includes General History, Universal Biographies, Histjories of Eras, Voy- 
ages, and Travels, when embracing several countries, and collected works of historians. 

Class IV includes North and ciouth American History, Hocuments and Statistics, Biographies of 
Aiiiericans, Geography of, and Voyagesand Travels in America, wilh the collected works of American 
writers, and what ot American Literature is sometimes termed Polygraphy. 

Class V, Class VI, Class VII, Class Vlll. — These have the same scope for the i-espective countries 
that Class IV has for America. Class Vlll includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as 
also the Scandinavian nations. 

Class XI includes Russia, Greece, Turkey, with Asia, Africa, Australia, Polynesia, etc. 

Claea_XIV includes Political Science, Social Science, and Ethics applied and unapplied. Intellectual 
ology, etc. 



Science, Education, Rhetoric, Logic, Phr^ 



Class XIX includes Mechanics, Military and Naval Arts, Agriculture, Domestic Arts, etc 
Class XXII embraces all such p.,mphlet volumes as may Imvo been received from time to time, and 
are generally too heterogeneous in their make-up to bo classed otherwise than by themselves 

Class XXIV includes only the Shakespeare collection of the Harton Library, and not that of the Gtn- 

"'^'''The'eJbdivislons of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for purposes of enumeration or 
learning percentage of use, it is practicable .it any time to get exact igures upon tbe subdivisions > »» ff » 
^*^ ■ ,.= ..„ n,-„„r„T,i,„ 'p-o^oi »n,i Vovaoes. etc.. bv summing ihe results of the ranges devoted 



upon such points ao Biography, Travel, and Voyages, etc., by summing i 
to them in the several alcoves. . . ,,,,,.« 

Note. — The increase of the several special libraries is included In the ngnr 



for these libraries. 



* Includes all Books in Room G, — 12,108 of them belonging to tlit 
t One volume transferred to B. H. ; thjrec from American History ' 
X Patent Records of the Colony of Victoria. 



APPEIS^DIX X. 

OWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS 



1875 isro 



1877 I 1878 



To be deducted. 



SB 
-« o 



sa 



Theology, Moral and Intellectual Science, etc 

jQritpmdence and Political Science 

Uedlcine, Matliematici, Physics or Natural Science 

Useful and Fine Arts, Military and Naval Science 

American History and Politics 

Foreign History and Politics 

Poetry, Drama, Oratory, Rhetoric 

English Prose Fiction, Including JuTenil* Fiction, and other Juvenile books. 

Biography 

Travels 



Ubrarles, Collections, Periodicals, etc.* 

(German 

Italian Books 

French Books 

Bpanish Books 

Books of Reference 



270 
1,705 

699 
1,023 
1,333 
■i,268 
7,165 
2.342 
1,897 
2,621 
J,ia7 

221 



l,6fli) 

278 

1,77^ 

«2I^ 

1,050 

1,374 

2,344 

8,06i! 

2,223 

1,871 

2,798 

l,20e 

221 

1,104 



1,867 
647 
1,082 
1,387 
2,634 
9,130 
2,300 
1,989 
3,125 
1,232 



1,703 

283 

1,898 

664 

1,089 

1,401 

2,576 

9,818 

2,336 

2,041 

3,305 

1,246 

224 



209 
1,908 

639 
1,086 
1,363 
2,467 
10,469 
2,298 
1,990 
3,478 
1,247 

226 



1,805 

275 

1,948 

629 

1,070 

1,359 

2,529 

11,281 

2,281 

1,980 

3,771 

1,250 

226 



2,043 
656 
1,077 
1,354 
2,544 
11,864 
2,246 
1,965 
3,827 
1,262 
227 
1,232 



2,098 

668 

1,070 

1,362 

2,540 

11,858 

2,234 

1,986 

3,728 

1,261 

228 

1,244 

1 



691 
1,072 
1,380 
2,672 
12,426 
2,278 
2,040 
3,698 
1,263 

229 
1,241 



2,191 

716 

1,112 

1,392 

2,667 

13,899 

2,347 

2,061 

3,928 

1,201 

203 

992 



1,844 

328 I 
2,202 j 

715 
1,129 
1,477 
2,868 
13,501 
2,489 
2,186 
3,866 ! 
1,313 
156 



"32 
1,113 
1,439 
2,930 
13,742 
2,448 
2,132 
4,035 
1,334 



Totals 25,199 26,606 28,723 29,909 30,574 31,827 32,605 32,596 33, 



35,152 36,478 36,8 



1,863 
S34 

2,276 
750 
1,119 
1,463 
2,964 
13,696 
2,476 
2,153 
4,072 
1,361 
165 



• This class, embraciug seta like Bohn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of coarse, which, in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heuds of this tabic. 
t The books enumerated in this it«m are mostly imperfect sets. 

Note. —The column of " Condemned books replaced" includes books couden(ned In previous years as well as in the current year. The column "Total added" shows the number of volumei 
bound two volumes in one, etc The small gain in this Hall Is accounted for by the fact that many old books not in request and broken sets have been taken off the shelves, to make room for newer books. 



put upon the shelves, couutiug t 



Public Library. 



39 



APPENDIX XI. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1878, TO APRIL 30, 1879. 



Givers (excluding anonymous) 
Volumes .... 

Pamphlets .... 



470 
3,680 

8,786 



GiVEHS. 




Pphs. 



Abbott, Francis E. 

Adams, C. F., Topeka, Ks. 

Adams, Hon. Charles Francis 

Adams, R. B. . 

Advocate's Library, Edinburgh 

Ainsworth, F. S., M.D., Jaffray, N.H. 

Amalgamated Society of Engineers, London 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences . 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester . 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Worcester 
American Bible Society 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, Easton, Pa. 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia . 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia . 
American Society of Civil Engineers, JVew York City 
Anderson's University, Glasgow, Scotland 
Andrevr, John A., Monument Association 

Angell, George T 

Anonymous, 1 map .... 

Appleton, Prof. John H., Providence, E.I. 

Appleton, Nathan 

Appleton, William S., 1 broadside. 

Apprentice's Library Company, Philadelphia . 

Argentine Meteorological Office, Cordoba, Argentine Re 

public . . .- . 
Aristarchi Gr6goire, Bey, Turkish Envoy, Washington 

D.C. 



Arnold, Howard P 

Astor Library, New York City . 
Atkinson, Prof. William P. 
Bachelder, John B., Chelsea 
Baetz, Henry, Milwaukee, Wis. . 
Baker, William H., M.JD. ... 
Baldwin, William H, . 
Baldwin Place Home for Little Wanderers 
Balfour, David M. . . . . 

Barber, George W., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Batchelder, Joseph A., Middleton 
Beardsley, J. L., Cleveland, Ohio 
Belrose, Louis, jr., Chester, Pa. 
Benson, Mason D. . . . , 
Bertrand, Arthur, Paris . 



1 
1 
1 
101 
1 



4 
1 
1 

2 
1,336 

fi 

1 



12 



40 



City Document No. 78. 



Givers. 




Beverly Yacht Club . 
Biblioteca Nazionale, Milan, Italy 
Bigelow, Henry J., M.D. 
Bliss, Alexander . 
Blodaett, Albert N., M.D. 
Booth, Alfred, M.D. . 
Boothby, Josiah, London 
Boston, City of . 

Overseers of the Poor 

Art Club . 

Gas Light Company 

Bowditch, Henry I., M.D. 

Boxer, F. N., Montreal 

Brace, Charles L., New York City 

Bradford, Charles F.' . 

Bradford, Miss Rebecca, Bequest of . 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., 90 broadsides, di newspaper 

Breck, Charles, Milton 

Brewer, Frof. Fisk. P., Grinnell, Iowa 

Brewer, Thomas M., 31. D. 

Brigham, Rev. Charles H., Ann Arbor, Mich 

British Museum, London .... 

Brock, R. A., Richmond, Va., 4 newspapers 

Brooks, Frederick, 1 map. 

Brooks, Rev. John G. . . . 

Brophy, Thomas C. . 

Brown, Ammi, M.D. .... 

Brown, Walter L., New York City . 

Brown University, Providence, R.I. . 

Budapest, Hungary, City of 

Burnham, Gordon W. 

Burnham, Leavitt, Omaha, Neb. 

Burroughs, Rev. Henry, D.D. . 

Butler, George ..... 

Byram, Cliarles R. . . . . 

Calvert, George H., Newport, R.I. 

Campbell, George, London 

Capcn, Miss Mary F. 121 newspapers 

Carr, Henry J., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Garret, Jose F 

Cartoe, Cornelius S., M.D. 
Carter, Samuel C, Amherst 
Castromediano, Sigismondo,Z)Kcadi Caballino, Lecce, 
d'Otranto, Italy .... 

Caswall, Mrs. M. C 

Caulfield, Richard, LL.D., Cork, Ireland 
Cavaleri, Miclieli, Milan, Italy . 
Chadwick, James R., M.D. 
Chandler, Horace P. . 
Chase, George B. . . . . 
Chase, Richard M., Annapolis, Md. . 
Cheever, David W., M.D., I broadside. 
Chicago, III., City of . 

Public Library 

Historical Society, Chicago, 111. 

Child, Hon. Linus M. 
Child, Mrs. Lydia Maria . 
Choate, Joseph IL, New York City . 
Christern, F. W. New York City 



Terra 



1 

93 

1 



7 

5 

26 



Pphs. 



>70 

1 



13 



18 



1 

If.O 


•7 
9 


5 


9 



Public Librakt. 



41 



Givers. 




Claghorn, James L., Philadelphia 
Clarke, Rev. James Freeman, D.D. . 
Clarke, Robert, & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Coffin, Charles C 

Coghill, J. Henry, New York City 

Cogswell, Gen. William 

Cole, H. Hammond .... 

Collins, Frank S 

Concord Public Library 
Connell, William,*/?-., Fall River 
Conwell, Russell H. . . . • 

Cotting, Bliss Julia A. . . . 
Coxe, Brinton, Philadelphia 
Crooke, Reuben ..... 
Crosby, John L.,i?a?2^or, J/e. . 
Crosswell, Hon. Charles M., Lansing, Mich. 
Crunden, Frederick M., St. Louis, Mo 
Curtis, Col. H. P., Washington, B.C. 

Cutler, E. G., 3/.i? 

Cutter, George F., Washington, B.C. 

Dana, Miss Elizabeth E. . 

Davis, Andrew J., Orange, N.J. 

Davis, Charles E., jr., 90 newspapers. 

Davis, Thomas W., 1 map. 

Davis & Son, London .... 

Dayton, Ohio, Public Library . 

Dean, Hon. Benjamin, Washington, D.C. 

Deane, Cliarles, Cambridge 

De Costa, Rev. Benjamin F., New York City 

Dexter, D. Gilbert, Cambridge, newspaper cuttings 

Dexter, George, Cambridge 

Dillaway, Charles K. 

Dimmock, George, Cambridge 

Dixwell, George B. 

Dixwell, Mrs. John J. 

Dorr, 3Irs. C. H., 1 map . 

Duane, William, Philadelphia 

Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me. 

Earle, Pliny, M.B., Northampton 

Eliot, John Fleet 

Elliot, Joseph D., Newton 

Elze, Karl, Halle, Germany 

Essex Institute, Salem 

Evanston, III., Philosophical Associat 

Fales, Lewis, Medford 

Fay, Joseph S., Wood's Hole 

Fellowes Athenreum . 

Fernald, Prof. 0. M., Williamstown 

Field, Hon. Walbridge A., Washingt 

Fisher, Horace N. 

Fiske, Daniel W., Ithaca, N. I 

Floye, W. J . 

Fliigel, Br. Felix, Leipzig, Germany 

Folsom, George M. . 

Forster, Edward J., M.B. . 

Fol-t Worth Eclipse party . 

Foster, William E., Providence, R.I. 

Francis, Miss, Cambridge . 

Francis, Samuel W., 31. B., Newport, R.I. 



on, B. C 



I'plis. 



1 
1 

1 
1 

4 
IS-t 

1 
3 
1 

1 
1 



15 
1 



117 

88 
1 



28 
1 



193 
1 
1 
1 



15 

27 

1 

1 



42 



City Document No. 78. 



Givers. 



Franklin Club 

Free Eelisious Association 
Frothingham, Henry K., Cambridge. 
Frothingham, 3Iiss Martha W. . 
Gassett, Edward ..... 

Gassett, M 

Georgetown College, Georgetown, D. C. 
Gerber, Dr. C. F. V. von, Dresden, Germany 
Gerrish, Frederic H., M.D., Portla?id, Me. 
Gibbs, Montgomery, London 

Giles, Alfred E 

Globe Publishing Company 
Godkin, E. L., & Co., New York City, 14 broadsides, C31 
newspapers ........ 

Good Health Publishing Association, Battle Creek, Mich 

Gottlob, J. J 

Great Britain. Commissioner of Patents 

Green, Samuel A., 31. D., 1 broadside 

Greener, Richard T., Washington, D.C. 

Greenough, C. P. 

Greenough, "William W. 

Groton, Town of ... . 

Hale, George S. .... 

Hall, Gustavus V 

Hall, Miss H. W 

Hamburg, Germany, Stadtbibliothek. 
Hamilton, J. B., M.D., Washington, D.C 

Hanna, William 

Harlem Library, New York City 
Hart, Charles. H. Philadelphia . 
Harvard College, Cambridge 

Library 

Observatory 



2 pho 



Haverford College, Ilaverford, Pa. . 
Haverhill Public Library .... 
Hawkins, Dexter A., New York City 
Hcrschel, Clemens ..... 
Hewins, Eben N. . . . . • 
Hewitt, lion. Abram S., Washington, D.C. 
lUckey, M., Detroit, Mich. ... 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, PhiladeliM 
Hoar, lion. George F., Washington, D.C. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.D., 4 broadsides. 1 map 

tographs ...... 

Holland, Henry "W., Cambridge 

Holmes, Henry. Water-color painting of old building 

corner ^loon and Sun-court Streets 
Horton, S. Dana, Pomeroy, Ohio 
Horton, Mrs. William R. . 
Houghton, George, Ne%v York City . 
Houghton, Osgood & Co. .... 
Howell, Edward, Liverpool, Eng. 
Howgate, Capt. Henry W., Washington, D.C. 
Hubbard, Rev. James JNL, 74 broadsides, 4 newspapers 
Hudson, Charles, Lexington, 2 engravings. 
Huidekoper, Frederic, Meadville, Pa. 
Humphreys, Brig. -Gen. Andrew A., Washington, D.C. 
Indianapolis, Ind., Public Library .... 
Industrial League, Philadelphia .... 




3 
2 
3 

2 

1 

2 

2 

13 
4 

43 
2 

1 
2 

5 
2 



163 
1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



Pphs. 
18 

9 
1 
1 

447 



56 
1 

61 
1 

76 

152 

1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
19 
1 

118 



1 
41 



Public Libraey. 



43 



Givers. 



eichs 



der 



City 



Ingleby, Clement M. . 

Ingraham, Robert C, New Bedford . 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London 

Iowa Agricultural Society, Ames, Iowa 

Jackson, Henry B. . . . 

James, Henry, Cambridge 

Janssens, E., 31. B., Brussels 

Jav, John, New York City 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D. 

Johnson, A. H., M.D., Salem . 

Jones, J. M. and F. . 

Jones & Laughlin, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jones, McDuffee, & Stratton 

Kaiserliche Kpniglich Geologische % 
Austria ... 

King, James W. . 

Knapp, Arthur M., 7 broadsides 

Knapp, William I. 

Kneeland, Prof. Samuel W-, 10 broadside 

Knortz, Karl, Johnstown, Pa. . 

Konigliche Bayerische Akademie 
Munich .... 

Lane, Eev. James P., Bristol, R.I. 

Langworthy, Pev. Isaac P. 

Laurie, Eev. Thomas, D.D., Providence, R.I. 

Lawrence, Abbot 

Lawrence, Hon. Edward . 

Lawrence Academy, Oroton 

Leavitt, George A., & Co., New York 

Lee, Francis H., Salem 

Lee, Henry .... 

Lee & Shepard .... 

Lefort, J., Lille, France 

Leicester Public Library . 

Leslie, J/155 Annie M. 

Lewis, George .... 

Library Association, Portland, Oregon 

Lindsay, W. Lander, 3LD., Perth, Scotland 

Lindsley, J. Berrien, M.B., N'ashville, Tenn. 

Literary and Philosophical Society, Liverpool, 

Little, Brown, & Co. . . . " . _ 

Liverpool, Bng-, Free Public Library 

London Athenaeum .... 

Lord, Henry W., Detroit, Mich. 

Lyman, George H., M.B. . 

Lyncli, Frank H. . . . . 

MacDonald, Carlos F., 3LB., Auburn, N. 

IMcPhail, H. A. C, Sa7ita Barbara, Cal. 

McPhetres, Samuel A., Lowell . 

Mallalieu, Rev. Willard F. 

Manchester, Bng., Fi'ee Public Library 

Committee .... 
Manchester, Nil., City Library 
Mann, Hon. Horace, Heirs of . 
Marble, Albert P., Worcester . 
Marcus, Alfred A. . 
Marsh, Spencer, Burlington, Vt., 2 newspapers 
Marthens, John F., Pittsburgh, Pa., 2 maps 
Martin, Henry A., 31. 1) 



anstalt, Vienna 



newspaper 



Wissenschaften 



Y. 



and 



P?ig. 



Museum 




Pphs. 



1 

2 
12 
1 
2 
8 
1 
1 



1 

1 
18 

6 
1-1 

1 



2 

24: 



13 
6 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

164 



1 



11 

2G8 



15 
350 



1 

1 

55 

101 

1 

1 
1 



1 
« 

636 
2 



44 



City Document No. 78. 



Givers. 



Marvin, William T. E. 
Massachusetts, State of 

Board of Health . 

Board of State Charities 

Bureau of Statistics 

State Library . 

Massachusetts Historical Society 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Massachusetts New Church Union 

May, 3Iiss Abby W., 50 broadsides 

May, Samuel, & Co. . 

Meek, Henry M., Salem . 

Memorial Hall Library, Atidover 

Mercantile Library Association . 

Mercantile Library Association, Cincinnati, Oh 

Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia 

Merrill, George S., 1 newspaper. 

Metcalf, Theodore 

Michell. Nicholas, Falmouth, Eng. 

Missouri University Library, Columbia, Mo. 

Mixter, Calvin S., Arlington 

Morse Institute, N'atickf 596 broadsides 

Mudie's Select Library, London 

Munsell, Joel, Albany, A". Y. . . ■ 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge 

Myer, Isaac, Philadelphia 

Napier, Macvey, London .... 

Nash, Joseph ...... 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

Neill, Rev. James L., Lynn 

Nelson, C. A., West Somerville . 

New Bedford Free Public Library 

Newburyport Public Library 

New Hampshire Medical Society, Concord 

Newton, T. W., London .... 

New York City, Board of Education . 
New York Historical Society 
Nichols, Smith W., Melrose 

Nichols, Prof. William R 

Nicholson, Col. John P., Philadelphia 
Nicliolson File Company, Providence, R.I. 

Nicholson, S. D 

Norfolk County Commissioners . 

Nottingham, Eng., Free Libraries and Museums Committe 

Nowell, Cyrus, Portland, Me. . 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia 

Nutting, Miss Mary O. . . . • 

Ohio State Librarv, Columbus . 

Ohse, Mrs. . ' 

Onderdonk, Henry, /r., .Tamaiea, L.I. 
Osgood, Rev. Samuel, D.D., New York City 
Ostori, K. S., Tokio, -lapan 

Oti^j Robert M., M.D 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester 

Paris, France, Prefet de la Seine 

Parker, Augustus ..... 

Peabody, J/i's.'? Elizabeth P., Cambridge . 

Peet, Stephen D., Ashtabula. Ohio, 5 broadsid 

Pennsylvania Board of Public Charities, Ifarrishurg 




2 
1 
1 
1 

12 



9 

200 

I 
1 

154 



129 

1,002 

.5 

(11 

1 



49 
1 



Public Library. 



45 



Givers. 



Peoria, III., Board of Trade 
Perkins, Albert C, Exeter, N.H. 
Perkins, Charles C. . 
Perkins, Samuel C, Philadelphia 

Perry, Thos. S 

Philbrick, John D 

Pike, James S. . 

Plymouth, Eng., Free Library . 

Pool, Wellington, Wenham 

Poole, William P., Chicago, III. 

Poor, Hon. Amos, Providence, R.I. . 

Porter, Gen. Fitz John, Morristown, N.P. 

Pulsifer, R. M 

Putnam, Charles P., 31. D. 

Putnam, G. P., & Sons, New York Oity 

Putnam, Mrs. J. P 

Quincy Public Library 

Quint, Rev. Alonzo H., New Bedford 

Hand, George D., Portland, 3Ie. 

Randolph, English, & Co., Richmond, Va. 

Rawle, William B., Philadelphia 

Reale Istitiito Lombardo, 3Iilan, Italy 

Reed, J. Harris ..... 

Richards, Samuel W. 

Richardson, William L., M.I). . 

Robinson, Miss Harriet H., 3Ialden . 

Robinson, James R., Cambridge 

Rockwell & Churchill 

Rogers, Henry B. . . . . 

Rolfe, William J., Cambridge . 

Rotch, W^illiam, Fall River 

Royal Astronomical Society, London 

Royal Geographical Society, London 

Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotlatid 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, Eng. 

Royal Society, London 

Russell, David F 

Sabine, John D., Washington, D.C. . 

Saigo-Tsukumichi, Jushii, Tdjcio, Japan 

St. Marylebone Charity Organization Committee, London 

Salisbury, Stephen, /r., Worcester, 1 map 

Sargent, Charles S., Cambridge 

Sauveur, Prof. Lambert 

Schlaginweit, Robert von, Giessen, Germany 

Schlegel, Everett, & Co. . 

Scudder, Samuel H. . 

Searle, Frederick A., 100 broadsides. 

Selwyn, Hon. Alfred R. C, 3Iontreal, Canada 

Sexton, Andrew, 3Iadison, Wis., 13 maps . 

Shattuck, George C, 31. D. .... 

Shepherd, Herbert M 

Sherman, Hyde, & Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J., 18 broadsides. 

Slafter, Rev. E. F 

Smith, Amzi, Washington, B.C., 1,950 broadsides 
. Smith, Charles C 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Societe Franklin, Paris ..... 

Somers, John J., Gloucester .... 




1 
1 

IG 
1 

1 



10 



34 
1 



1 
] 

18 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
10 
1 
1 



46 



City Document No. 78. 



GrvEKa. 




map. 



lie, Ind. 



South Carolina State Library, Columbus, S.C. 

Shields, JSng., Public Library . 

Stevens, George H., Newburyport 

Stillman, Oscar B. . . . . 

Stilson, Rev. Arthur C, Ottumwa, Iowa 

Stockbridge, Prof. Levi, Amherst 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Frovidence, R.I. 

Stone, Gen. Charles P., Cairo, Egypt 

Stone, Ormond, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Stuart, A. H. H., Olympia, Washington T., 1 

Swift, Lindsay ..... 

Swinncy, E. H. . 

Syracuse, N. Y., Central Library 

Tache, J. C, Ottawa, Canada . 

Tappan, S. S 

Taylor, Rev. D. Henry 
Tenney, David B., Haverhill 
Thaxter, L. L., Neivton, 5 broadsides 

Titus, Charles H 

Toles, Rev. R. G 

Town, E. H., Worcester 
Triibner & Co., London 

Turner, Alfred T 

Tuttle, Charles W 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsv 
Twombley, Rev. A. S. 
Uhde, Mrs. John W. . . . 
UUmann, Joseph, New Yoj-k City 
United States. Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Engineers, 6 maps . 

Bureau of Navigation 

Bureau of Statistics 

Chief of Engineers 

Coast Survey Office 

Comptroller of the Treasury . 

Department of the Interior 

Department of the Treasury . 

Light-House Board . 

Naval Observatory . 

Patent Office .... 

Post-Office Dejjartment . 

Surgeon-General's Office 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 
University of Michigan Library, Ann Arbor, A 
Utter, D. N., Olympia, Washington T. 
Van Antwerp, Bragg, & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Van Hengel & Ettyes, Rotterdam 
Vermont Historical Society, Monipelier, Vt. 
Victoria, Keiv South Wales, Public Library 
Vose, Hon. William H., Fitchburg . 

Wade, George T 

Wallace, Capt, William .... 
Walter, Joseph R., Wilmington, Del., 3 newspapers 
Walworth Manufacturing Company . 

Ward, Miss Ellen M 

Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 2 maps 
Washburn, Mrs. F. T. 

Waters, Edwin F 

Watorston, Rev. Robert C. 



Mich. 



1 

10 

1 
2 
3 

1 
1 

59 
1 

4 

85 

4 



1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

210 
4 

1 

6 

63 



Pphs. 



41 
1 



25 



1 

13 



2 

1 

8 

1 

15 

1 
1 
3 



43 
1 



27 

150 

1 



Public Library. 



47 



Givers. 



Watrous, 'William, Sacramento, Cal. 
Watson, James R. . . . . 

Weld, Miss Alice C 

Weld, Hon. Stephen M. . 
Wheeler, Everett P., New York City 
Whitaker, Alfred E., San Francisco, Cal 
White, Rev. Isaac C, Newmarket N.H. 
Whitford, John, Liverpool, Eng. 

Whitman, George H 

Whitmore, William H. . . . 
Whitney, James L., 10 broadsides, 2 newspapers 
Whitney, Prof. William D., New Haven, Conn 
Williams, James, Columbus, Ohio 
Wilson, Frank ...... 

Wilson, John B. 

Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1 portrait 
Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wis. 
Woman's Baptist Missionary Society . 

Wood, Rev. Will C 

Woodward, Charles L., New York City 
Woodward, Frederic E., Chelsea 

Wright, Carroll D 

Wright, Elizur ...... 

Wyman, Charles F., 133 newspapers . 

Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association 

Huddersfield. Eng. 
Young Men's Christian Association 




1 
1 
1 

47 



197 



Pphs. 



65 
1 







1 

u 


TO,..C,.™o,. 


Batm Hjo.!,. 


V-,. 


— • 


1 

a 

3,M5 
3.M> 


'it 

i 

8,7*7 


"l" 


i 

1 


1 


1 


i 

1 


1 

1 

1 




89,m 
]iM.oas 

1.1*0.672 
l,lB3.0gi 
l,1S0,S6i 


Sept. W 


• l&M 












IBS 












JSM 












1857 












MU 












IteB 












1B«0 












/.WTO 


T.tffl 
74,827 


37,(«2 

!».n« 

56.873 


W.2S1 


I 


S07 
1,001 






■™ 




■•" 








b BemoTil of the Llbmrr. 

d Sleren montbi <Ltbrary not doted for euralnationj. 

























APPENDIX XII. 

CIRCULATION. 
(Bogks issuuJ.) 



Icpartmcat on any iay, ' 









Public Library 



49 







t_ 


^-^ 


k^ 


•M 


O lO 


to 


p_i 


CO 


,_ 


-f 


^— 


lO 


2 


f- 


^^ 


to 




-f 










c^ 














CC 




-* 






oi 














cc 








C-. CO 




to 


CO 


































































o 










o 


of 




d 


o 


■rr 


Ol 












o 






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HS 2 



54 



City Doct'MENT No. 78. 



APPEJS^DIX XV. 

BATES HALL READIXG. 













Pekcextage of Use. 














Classification. 


« 


2 


9 

H 




^ 

c 

X 


H 


2 



X 


X 

H 


H 


« 

X 
H 


X 


X 

H 


X 


X 
13 


X 

t» 

X 
H 

13 


9 
i» 

X 

H 


English History, Topogra- 
phy, Biograi^hy, Travel, 
and Polite Literature . . 


17.5 


16 


13 


18 


20 


17 


17 


17 


17 


12 


19 


16 


15 


15 


13 


American (N'orth and 
South) History, Topog- 
raphj% Biography, Trav- 
el, and Polite Literature. 


6 


8.5 


10 


8 


12 


12 


12 


12 


13 


10 


12 


11 


11 


12 


10 


14 


13 


French History, Topogra- 
phy, Biography, Travel, 
and Polite Literature • . 


5 


7.5 


6 


6 


7 


4 


5 


5 


5 


4 


6 


6 


5 


6 


5 


4 


4 


Germanic History, Topog- 
raphy, Biography, Trav- 
el, aud Polite Literature. 


2.-5 


2 


2.5 


2 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


5 


Italian History, Topogra- 
phy, Biograi)hy, Travel, 
and Polite Literature . . 


4 


2.5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Other History, Topogra- 
l)hy. Biography, Travel, 
and Polite Literature . . 


3.5 


3.5 


2.5 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 


5 


General and Epoclial His- 
tory, Geography, Biog- 
raphy, etc 


4.5 


4.25 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


Greek, Latin, and Philology 


3 


3.5 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 




4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


Bibliographj- 


2.5 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Transactions 


3 


1.5 


2.3 


5 


7 


6 


4 


6 


1 


1 


1 




2 


1 


5 


2 


2 


Periodicals 


7 


6 


6 


11 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


10 


8 




7 


7 


6 


5 


5 


Fine Arts 


g 


12 


16.5 


8 


6 


8 


8 


8 


9 


11 


10 


11 


11 


10 


9 


12 


13 


Natural History and Science 


4 


4 


4.6 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


5 


3 




3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


Theology, Ecclesiastical 
History, Ethics, Educa- 


11 

7 


11 
6 


8.5 
4.6 


4 
8 


4 
6 


8 
6 


9 

8 


8 
8 


11 
9 


14 
9 


10 

8 


11 


11 
6 


10 
6 


10 
6 


3 
6 


8 


Mcdicine 


6 


Law, Government, and 
Political Economy . . . 


1.5 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


Useful Arts, Mathematics, 
I'hysics, etc 


5.5 


5.5 


7.5 


7 


8 


7 


6 


5 


6 


8 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


10 


10 


Miscellaneous Pamphlets, 


2 


.75 


.75 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 







Note. — In computing tliis percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker, Barton, 
and Prince Libraries — which are kept apart from the general classification of the Library — 
is reckoned as near as possible and Included in the usual divisions, as is indicated in the 
table. (See Eyplanations to Appendix IX.) 

The llgures for 1878-9 are only approximately correct. Hereafter they will be given with 
the utmost accuracy. 





















APPENDIX 

LOWER H.1LL RI 

Shown froin slips of hook 


XVI. 

; A ]) I N G . 

reinrne<^. 




























s 


A.COV.S. 


Olahsbs. 


1888 


1809 


I »70 

(Nine months.) 


iNri 


1873 


1873 


1874 


187(J 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1870 


5 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent. 


Loan 


d. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


1 

2 
3 
4 

6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


I, XI Jind rnngCB, 8, 9, 
lOof X, XX . . . . 

U.XII \ 

IX, XtX ) 

m.xm 

IV, XIV j 

VU, XVU j 

V, XV 

VI, XVI 

VIII, XVIU 

X, XX, except ranges 
8,0.10 


Bciences, Arts, Profesalooa . . 

American History and Politics 

Foreign History and Politics . 

Poetry, Drama, Rlietoric, Mis- 
cellaneous EsBiiys, etc. . . . 

Prose Fiction and Juveniles . . 

Biography 

Travels, Voyages, etc 

Collections, PcriodicaU, etc. . 

French, German, and Italian 


10,522 
2,533 
3,030 

3,692 

105,227 

3,641 
3,289 
5,941 

3,978 


7.4 
1.8 
2.1 

2.6 

74.2 

2.6 
2.3 
4.2 

2.8 


11,436 
2,682 
3,221 

2,461 

12;),273 

4,570 
5,303 
4,.550 

4,482 


6.97 
1.63 
1.96 

1.5 

76.36 

2.78 
3.26 
2.77 

2.73 


7,60' 
2.071 
2,38< 

2,441 

120,3S 

4,025 
5,154 
6,747 

3,637 


6 

i 

r 


4.9 
1.4 
1.5 

1.5 

78.4 

2.7 
3.4 
3.8 

2.4 


12,662 
2,270 
2,702 

5,954 

107,604 

5,108 
6.062 
11,530 

4,451 


5.7 

1 

1.2 

2.7 

77.2 

2.2 
2.8 
5.2 

2 


15,996 
2,0% 
2,715 

8,019 

173,433 

4,106 
4,998 
14,315 

2.691 


6 
-1 

1+ 

4 

76 

2 
3 
6 

1+ 


12,757 
1,496 
1,863 

7,601 

154,836 

2,641 
3,631 
17,167 

5,341 


6+ 

v 

7 

74 

1 
1 

8 

2 


14,422 
2,705 
2,834 

8,636 

168,4.53 

6,027 
6,290 
15,563 

6,388 


1" 

4 

71 

3 
3 

7 

3 


16,218 
3,878 
3,983 

9,704 

163,657 

7,416 
8,049 
15,106 

7,394 


-7 

V 

4+ 

69+ 

8+ 
4+ 
«+ 

Z 


20,065 
6,467 
4,879 

11,618 

209,070 

0,710 
10,227 
17,827 

9,123 


7 

1' 

4 

70 

3 

3 
6 

3 


23,318 
6,6J4 
6,820 

12,677 

263,964 

11,229 
10,419 
20,404 

11,845 


4 

71 

3 
3 
6 

3 


21,684 
5,300 
6,395 

11,915 

251,856 

10,076 
10,034 
18,668 

12,037 


6 

!■ 

4 

72 

3 
3 
6 

3 


18,630 
6,198 
4,712 

11,382 

230,101 

9,225 
9,(;36 
19,127 

9,357 


6 

!■ 

4 

72 

3 
3 

e 

3 














. 141,853 






153,423 




216,696 




228,864 




207,382 




221,418 




236,004 




297,986 




355,320 




346,866 




316,828 















Note. — The oolnrontl of *' LoanB returned " do not include the hooke taken and rettimed thi> b 



Public Libhaky. 



55 



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Public Library. 



57 



APPENDIX XIX. 



ROXBURY BRANCH AND FELLOWES ATHENiEUM READING. 
ISTOTE. — The two sections of this table refer to two different collections of books. 





Ranges. 


Classes. 


1874. 


18T5. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


'6 

a 
m a 

O 3 

<§2 




G 3 


2 3 


CD C 
.a t. 

O 3 

P 2 
47,307 


53 


O 3 


3 " 


2 

% s 

O 3 

fa %. 

61,642 


54 


'6 

.M t. 
o a 
.So 

56,970 




I. 


1,3,5,7,23 


Prose Fiction . 


28,575 


-49 


40,666 


52 


68,965 


54 


53 


II. 


2,4 .. , 


Travels .... 


2,623 


-5 


2,555 


3-1- 


2,519 


3 


2,745 


2 


2,333 


2 


2,573 


2+ 


in. 


6, 8 . . . 


History .... 


1,121 


-2 


1,133 


1+ 


1,598 


2 


2,377 


2 


2,371 


2 


2,403 


2-t 


IV. 


9, 11 . . 


Juveniles . . . 


19,261 


32+ 


26,650 


34 


28,918 


32 


40,871 


32 


35,917 


31 


33,737 


31 


V. 


10,12 . . 


Biography . . 


1,351 


2+ 


1,583 


2 


1,575 


2 


2,143 


2 


1,90S 


1 


2,099 


2 


VI. 


13, 14 . . 


Periodicals . . 


1,019 


_2 


IjooS 


-2 


1,785 


2 


3,110 


2+ 


2,810 


2+ 


2,705 


2+ 


VII. 


15,17 . . 


Arts, Sciences, 
Professions . 


2,757 


-4 


2,815 


4 


2,992 


3 


3,8.38 


3 


3,369 


3 


3,831 


3-1- 


VIII. 


16 ... . 


Poetry and 
Drama . • . 


1,219 


-2 


1,235 


2-1- 


1,326 


1 


1,712 


1+ 


1,451 


1 


1,793 


1+ 


IX. 


18, 19 . . 


Collected 
Works and 
Lit. Miscel- 
lanies .... 


724 


.. 


1,069 


2-F 


887 


1 


1,815 


._2 


1,699 


1 


1,720 


"1 


X. 


20. . . . 


Books in For- 
eign Lan- 
guages . . . 


55 


1-2 


114 


1+ 


119 


1 


190 


287 


) 2 


23S 


r 


XI. 


21 ... . 


Theological 
Works . . . 












^^ 




-^ 




^^ 


S9 

108,108 








Total . . . 


58,605 


. • . 


78,858 




89,026 


127,786 


113,787 




<^ 






























'J 






























I. 


60, 54, 59 


History, Biog- 
raphy, Travels 


1,982 


35 


3,754 


-43 


3,548 


38 


5,335 


33 


4,941 


30 


5,964 


37 


II. 


55, 57 . . 


Modern For- 
eign Lan- 
guages . . . 


729 


13 


1,073 


12+ 


921 


9 


' 1,773 


11 


1,654 


10 


1,742 


11 


III. 


51,53,65,67 


Periodicals . . 


160 


2 


331 


4 


488 


5 


2,313 


14 


2,798 


17 


941 


6 


IV. 


52, 56 . . 


Miscellaneous 
Literature . . 


. 661 


12 


921 


10+ 


97G 


10 


1,474 





1,344 


8 


1,4S1 


9 


V. 


58, 70 . . 


Theology, So- 
ciology ,Ethica 


412 


7 


550 


6+ 


517 


5 


1,151 


7 


1,212 


7 


1,035 


6 


VI. 


60. . . . 


Medicine . . . 


46 


1 


81 


1 


126 


1 


249 


1 


343 


2 


294 


2 


VII. 


61 ... . 


Greek and Latin 
Languages 
and Literature 


262 


5 


374 


4+ 


376 


4 


687 


4 


713 


4 


683 


4 


VLIl. 62. . . . 


Fine Arts, En- 
gineering . . 


684 


12 


750 


81 


932 


10 


1,243 


7 


1,220 


7 


1,225 


T 


IX. 63,69 . . 


Law, Politics, 
Government . 


36 


1 


149 


-2 


250 


3 


446 


s 


414 


3 


430 


.■J 


X. 64, 66, 68 


Mathematics, 
2!fatural and 
Applied Sci- 
ence .... 


719 


12 


846 


-10 


1,414 


15 


1,739 
16,410 


11 


1,896 


12 


2,331 


14+ 


j 
i 


Totals . . 


5,691 




8,829 . . . 


9,548 




16,535 




16,12P 





58 



City Document No. 78. 



APPENDIX XX. 

BRIGHTON BKANCH EEADIXG. 









1874-5. 


187.5-6. 


1876-7. 


1877-8. 


1878- 


». 


6 






















^ 


Ranges. 


Classes. 


S 


1 


o 


to 

C3 


a 


to 


S 


rt 


■B 


St) 


^ 






1^ 


a 






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5 s 




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S 


O 






























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o u 








o a> 














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-' 


pass 


P-, 


P2;i 




«« 


^ 


fa» 


- 


I. 


1,2,3,4, 


Fiction 


17,662 


84 


19,532 


80 


22,8.'58 


77 


22,114 


76 


21,831 


75 


II. 


5, 6, 7, 8, 


Biography, Travel, 
and History . . 


























1,424 


7 


1,677 


7 


2,451 


8 


2,306 


7 


2,416 


8 


m. 


9 to 20 . 


Other 


1,957 


9 


3,226 


13 


4,611 


15 


4,780 


17 


4,711 


17 






Totals 


21,043 




24,435 




29,900 


. . 29,200 




28,958 





APPENDIX XXI. 

DORCHESTER BRANCH READING. 





Ranges. 


Classes. 


1874-5. 


1875-6. 


1876- 


7. 


1877-8. 


1878- 


9. 


6 




-3 
a 

m ° 


6 

a 
to 

I 


'6 

o 

Is 

o a) 

«03 


6 

a 
I 




i 
1 




3 
g 

1 


ll 

O ») 


8) 


I. 


1, 11,21 . 


Poetry, Drama . . 


221 


— 1 


927 


1 


1,021 


—2 


1,152 


3 


1,070 


2 


II. 


2, 1-2 . . 


Travels 


535 


—4 


2,233 


4 


2,133 


3 


2,090 


3 


1,949 


3 


III. 

IV. 


3, 13, 23 \ 

4, 14, 24 ) 


Fiction 


( 3,9831 
i 2,877) 


47 


21,580 |, 
13,701 ) 


55 


26,107 1 
14,059 j 


57 


19,779 ) 
15,522 ) 


55 


15,573 i 
18,425 ) 


57 


V. 


5, 15, 25 . 


Juveniles 


5,343 


-37 


17,363 


27 


18,071 


26 


16,778 


26 


15,008 


25 


VI. 


6,16,23. 


History 


285 


2 


1,.555 


2 


1,660 


2+ 


1,510 


2 


1,522 


2 


VII. 


7, 17,27. 


Biography .... 


414 


—3 


1,567 


2 


1,655 


2+ 


1,600 


3 


1,305 


2 


\aii 


8, IS . . 


Pcriodicala .... 


162 


1+ 


1,311 


2 


2,193 


S 


2,047 


3 


1,924 


3 


IX. 


9, 10 . . 


Arts, Sciences, etc. 


465 


3+ 


2,274 


4 


2,157 


3 


2,168 


3 


2,230 


4 


X. 


10, 20, 2^, 


Miscellanies . . . 


311 


2+ 


1,671 


3 


1,459 


2 


1,431 


2 


1,252 


2 






Totals 


14,601 




64,487 




70,505 




64,077 




60,258 





CHARLESTOWN BRANCH READING. 

Note. — No classification of the use is practicable, as the books arc shelved without regard to classes. Tables 
■similar to those of the other branches will bo possible when a rertrraiigenient of the books is made. 



Public Library. 
APPENDIX XXII. 

SOUTH END BEANCH EEADING. 



59 



6 

5 


Ranges. 


Classes. 


1878. 


1879. 




c . 
Pn 






I 


3,4 

1,2,13,14,17,18. 

5 

6 

7,8 

12 . 

9, 10 

15, 16 

11 




1,210 
33,728 

1,076 
903 

1,177 
711 
722 
732 
999 


-3 

81+ 
-3 

2+ 
-3 
-2 
-2 
-2 

2+ 


2,530 
58,587 
1,220 
1,499 
3,173 
1,310 
2,424 
1,936 
2,521 


3+ 
-78 
-2 
-2 

4+ 
-2 

3+ 
-3 

3+ 


II. 
III. 

IV. 

V 


Prose Fiction andjuveniles . 

American History 

Foreign History 

Travel 


VI. 
VII. 

vin. 

IS. 


Miscellaneous 

Arts, Sciences and Tlieologj'. 

Poetry and Drama 

Bound Periodicals 






Total 


41,258 




75,200 





APPENDIX XXIII. 

JAMAICA PLAIN BRANCH READING. 



6 

o 


Ranges. 


Classes. 


■Si 

2 


o 

C3 

s 

p 

3 


.32 

2 


p 


I. 

II. 


1,2, 3,4,5,6. . . 

7, 8 

9, 19 

11,12 

13, 14 

15,16 

17,18 

19, 20 

21 

22 

23 

24 


Fiction and Juveniles .... 


19,470 

3,760 

1,121 

736 

785 

373 

322 

193 

344 

12 

100 

116 


72 
14 
4 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 





30,984 

9,823 

1,649 

1,207 

1,661 

760 

855 

952 

828 

53 

426 

5r'3 


62+ 
20 


III. 


History 


3+ 
2+ 
8+ 

-2 

-2 

-2 

-2 

1 


IV. 




V. 


Travel 


VI. 

vn. 

VIII. 
IX. 
X. 
XI. 


Miscellaneous 

Poetry and Drama 

Science and Professions . . 

Periodicals 

Foreign Languages 

Fine Arts 


XII. 


Useful Arts 


1+ 






Total 


27,332 




49,791 











60 



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.25 



APPENDIX XSrVI. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



BookB 

UBUlogae*(priDliiig) 

Fuel 

Fnnutaru (cabioels, abelving, llxturee, eU;.) 

Om 

Printing (mlNcellaDcouB) 

TnuuporUtion, Postage, etc 

BolariM 

; t25.Kn.28 or thl* nmOBnl brought 
pa>abk' April lat, is approved) will be auc! 



eouiJi Boiiton and Rott 



•85,000 00 tTO^S TO »0T, 



ar hnd iDcladed llie eatarleit of ihe workmon In Uje Bindery, but 1 

cost of tlioiic chnrecubli; Ut our 1'rii«t l^in 
e ■ubRequeiil yunr'a nccouiil, bi-glnnliig iion)iniil)>| M 
i Pellowea Atlienu'iun In spent under tbe d 






Doroliuslcr Braiic 



IK'.°- 






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Public Library. 



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64 



City Document No. 78. 



APPENDIX XXYIII. 



LIBEARY SERVICE. 

April 30, 1S79. 



Mellen Chamberli:^ 

James L. WhitnQj- 
James M. Hubbard 
Frederic B. Perkins 
"William H. Foster 



Edward Tiffany 



Charles A. Wilson 
Aunie P. Call . . . 
Adelaide A. Nicbol 
VVilliom J. Cable . 
Total .... 



K§ 



1878. 

1869. 
1874. 
1874. 
1S60. 

1877. 

1871. 
1872. 
1868. 
1878. 



Position, Duties, etc. 



Librarian and Clerk of the Cor- 
poratlou 



Principal Assistant Librarian 

Assistant Librarian ..... 

Register and Assistant Librarian 

Cataloguer for Branch Libraries 
and Proof Reader 



Inspector of circulation in Lower 
Hall and Branch Libraries 



Clerk for Branch Libraries 
Librarian's Secretary . . . 
Auditor and Cashier . . . 
Librarian's Runner .... 



James L. Whitney 
James M. Hubbard . 
William H. Foster . 
Jos6 F. Garret . . . 



Lindsay Swift . . . 
Anna C. D. Keen . . 
Susan A. Joslyn . . 
Elizabeth T. Reed . 
Roxanua M. Eastman 
Frank C. Blaisdell . 
Card Catalogues 
Harriet E. Green 
Josephine Hewins . 
Mary F. Osgood . . 
Ellen F. McCarthy . 
Total 



1869. 
1874. 
1860. 
1875. 

1878. 
1872. 
1873. 
1873. 
1S59. 
1876. 

1873. 
1875. 
1877. 
1872. 



Principal of the Department . 

First Assistant 

(See Executive Department.) . 

Curator of patents and engrav- 
ings, and Assistant 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent Room, etc. . 

Assist.iut 

Extra Assistant 

Runner 



Cur.-itor , 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



65 






Name. 



Harriet N. Pike 
Adeline 8. Baylies 
Mary A. McGrath 
Richard 8. Payne . 
Total 



Position, Duties, etc. 



1867. Chief Clerk 

1877. Assistant . 

1868. Assistant . 

1878. i Runner . . 



^i 



iM 



Appleton p. C. Griffin 

Arthur 8. Knight 

Henry F. Barrett 

Total 



1865. 
1876. 
1878. 



Custodian 
Assistant 
Runner . 



Arthur If. Knapp . 
Charles A. Wilson . . 
Alice M. Poree . . . . 
Lydia F. Knowles . . 
Thomas Whyte . . . . 

Richard Ray 

Samuel McConnell . . 

John Speak 

Robert J. Donovan . . 

W. Maynard L. Young 

Total 



1875. 
1871. 
1866. 
1867. 
1874. 
1876. 
1877. 
1879. 
1876. 
1878. 



Librarian of Bates Hall .... 
Deputy and Clerk of the Branches 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 



10 



Edward Tiffany . 

Elbridge Bradshaw,. 
William F. Robinson 
Mary A. Jenkins . . 
Caroline E. Poree . . 
Sarah A. Mack . . . 
Eliza J. Mack . . . 
Annie M. Kennedy . 

Ella Dillon 

Ellen E. Bresnahau . 
Ella Sturmy .... 
Margaret A. Sheridan 



1818. 

1869. 
1872. 
1877. 
1859. 
1863. 
1863. 
1869 
1876. 
1869. 
1872. 
1875. 



Inspector of circulation for Low- 
er Hall and Branch Libraries . 

Librarian of Lower Hall .... 

Clerk for Registration and Fines 

Assistant Librarian 

Reading-room Clerk 

Delivery Desk . . • 

Receiving Desk 

Registration and assistant . . . 

Delivery Desk and assistant . . 

Assistant in Reading-room . . . 

Care of shelves 

Record of slips and substitute . 



6Q 



City Document No. 78. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Margaret Doyle . . . 

Margaret Clifford . . . 

Florence Richards , . 

Annie G. Shea . . . . 

Mary A. Doyle . . . . 

Mary Anderson . . . 
Evening Service. 

T. P. Bennett . . . , 

Robert B. Ross . . . . 

Catherine McGrath . , 

Edward Moore . . . , 

Albert Carter . . . , 

John J. Butler . . . , 

Daniel Donovan . . , 
F. W. Blaisdell ... 

Total 



Hi 



1875 
1878 
1878 
1874, 
1879 
1879, 

1879 
1873 
1873 

1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 



Position, Duties, etc. 



Return slips and assistant 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 



I Registration Clerk and Sun- j 
( day service ) 

Reading Room 

Receiving desk 

Care of shelves 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 






o% 






-a 
_ o 



26 



WiLi-iAM E. Ford . . 
Thomas Collins .... 
Jeremiah Sullivan . . 
Extra daily assistants. 
Total 



1858. 
1867. 
1874. 



Janitor ' 
Porter . 
Porter . 



Frank P. Hathaway . 
Andrew M. Blake . . . 

Romeo Cervi , 

P. B. Sanford 

Michael J. Healy . . . , 
James Pendergast . . 
Edward M. Roe . . . . 
Mary E. Austen ... 
Martha M. Wheeler , 
Mary Moriarty .... 
Sarah E. Bowen . . . 
Katherine Reilly . . . 

Sarah Dumas 

Frank Thomai .... 
Total 



1871. 

1870. 
1874. 
1879. 
1875. 
1875. 
1876. 
1874. 
1869. 
1875. 
1876. 
1876. 
1879. 
1874. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 
Extra Forwarder . 

Finisher 

Forwarder . . . . 
Forwarder . . . . 

Pressman 

Forewoman . . . . 

Stitcher 

Stitcher 

Stitcher 

Stitcher 

Stitcher 

Apprentice . . . . 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



67 



Name. 



Sarah C. Godbold 
Mary R. Pray . . . . 
Alice M. Wing . . . . 
Mary E Cathcart . . . 
Ellen L. Lennon . . . 
Adelia H. Ghen . . . 
Laura B. Morse . . . 
Blanche E. Griffin . . 
Grace E. Hahn . . . • 
George H. Hosea . . . 
Total 



Alice J. Bragdon 

Nora McCarty . . . 
Ellen A. Eaton . . . 
Emogene C. Davis • 
Idalene Sampson . . 
Cora G. Hale .... 
Minnie E. Sampson 
Mabel Pond .... 
Mary Watson . . . 
Elizabeth McCarthy 
Marguerite Watson 
Joseph Baker . . . 
Total 



w; 



1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1872. 
1876. 
1875. 
1877. 
1879. 
1873. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor .... 



1872. 
1872. 
1872. 
1873. 
1877. 
1877. 
1877. 
1879. 
1873. 
1873. 
1877. 
1872. 



Librarian . . . . . 
Receiving Clerk . . 
Registration Clerk 
DeUVery Clerk . . 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Runner . . . 
Extra Runner . . . 
Extra Runner . . . 
Janitor 



I'" .2 -5 - 

<~ > -^ u 

Ob. c-g 

o S ,oS 

1 
1 

1 
1 



_, o 



Sarah Bunker . 
Mary Bradley . . 
Dora Puffer . . . 
Helen M. Bell . . 
Margaret E. Blood 
Florence A. Vose 
Francena E. Ryder 
Elizabeth C. Berry 
Charles R. Curtis 

Total 



1876. 
1876. 
1878. 
1878. 
1872. 
1876. 
1879. 
1877. 
1873. 



Librarian 

Assistant 

Reading-r'm & registrat'n clerk. 

Assistant 

Runner 

Extra Runner 

Extra Runner 

Extra Runner 

Janitor 



68 



City Document No. 78. 

LIBKARY SEUYIC^.—Contimied. 



■ 05 



Dr. Cornelius S. Cartj^e 

Susan Edwards 

Annie E. Eberle 

Annie C. Davis 

S. Maria Root 

Harriet N. Davis 

Mary P. Swain 

Anna S. "Woodberry . . . 

Ella Downs 

Frederick "W. Baxter . . . 
Thomaa E. Smith 



Total 



1870. 
1869. 
1874. 
1878. 
1878. 
1874. 
1878. 
1878. 
1879. 
1878. 
1874. 



Position, Duties, etc. 



Librarian . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 

Runner 

Extra Cataloguer 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Janitor 



Mart E. Brock . 
Bridget T. Grailey 
Alma J. Wilson . 
James M. Brock . 



Total 



1875. 
1874. 
1875. 
1878. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor .... 



1 




1 






1 


1 


3 


1 



Mart G. Coffin . . 

Esther R. Whiton . 
Mary Jane Sheridan 

Mary Elms 

Mary A. Hill . . . . 
Edward Davenport . 



Total 



1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1875. 
1875. 



Librarian 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant 

Extra Assistant 

Agent at Lower Mills Delivery 
Janitor 



Milton Austin . 
Maude M. Morse . , 
Esther M. Hinckley , 
Charles M. Renter . 

Total 



1877. 
1878. 
1878. 
1879. 



Librarian 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Runner . 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



69 



s 
a 

u 

a) 
ft 


Name, 


■a • 

u a 


Position, Duties, etc. 


3 . 

£| 
cS 

1 
1 


1 

1 

2 


o s 




Eliza R. Davis 

Anna J. Barton 

Ellen F. Riley 

George L. Hargraves . . . 
Timothy Johnson 

Total 


1877. 
1876. 
1878. 
1878. 
1877. 












1 






"3 








e 




1 

4 




<3 

S 




R 











SUMMARY. 



Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, and 

Runner \ 
Catalogue and Entry Department . 
Purchase Department . 
Shelf Department .... 
Bates Hall Circulation Department 
Lower Hall Circulation Department, 

Evening and Sunday Service . 
Janitor's Dejpartment . 
Bindery . . . 



Dav 



iilars. 


Ex 

1 


tras. 









18 
4 
3 

10 


1 


Central Library 
70 regulars. 
9 extras. 


18 


8 


79 in all. 



14 



East Boston Branch 
South Boston Branch 
Roxbury Branch . 
Charlestown Branch 
Brighton Branch . 
Dorchester Branch 
South End Branch 
Jamaica Plain Branch , 

Totals 



Grand Total 



6 
6 

5 
3 
4 
4 
4 

107 
34 

ik 



34 



Branches. 
37 regulars. 
25 extras. 

62 in all. 



AGENTS. 

Messrs. Lee and Shepard, Boston. 

Messrs. Little, Brown, and Co., and Sampson Low, Marston, Low, and 
Searle, Boston and London. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triibner and Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New Fork and Paris. 

Dr. Felix Fiigel, Leipzig. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Seiior Don Juan F. Riano, Madrid. 



Not on shelves .... 
0/ thete found to be 

Lent 

At tba binderies .... 
Otherwise accounted for 
Not accounted for . . . 



APPENDIX XXIX. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 



Bates Hall. 



4,1{10 



Lower Hall. 



1874 ISrS 18TB 



7,396 7,001 I 7,610 



i,304 5,264 | 0,121 



200 ' 622 \ 718 



853 «48 



7,134 7,431 



East BostoIn Branch 



South Doston Branch. 



1,932 1,739 



« I I 



Not on ihelvGB 

Of theie /mnd to be 

Lent 

At the binderies 

OtherwlBe accounted for . 
Not accounted for ... . 



IloxBtjRY Branch. t 



1874 1875 



1878 1870 



2,908 2,441 



2,200 I 2,283 
1 
89 > 144 



CHARLE8T0WN BRANCH. 



187« 1877 



104 166 



Brighton Branch. 



S. E. Branch 



J. P. Branch, 



13,181 

1,396 

2,010 

67 



14,816 18,816 
2,121 2,296 



1877 


1878 

22,676 


22,613 


19,130 


18,963 


1,887 


2,096 


1,468 


1,477 


128 


135 



19,30S 

1,920 

1,61U 

200 



•The examination of the shelves at Bast Boston took place while the Library was closed for repairs. t Including Fe 



Howes Alhenseum. 



Public Library. 71 



APPENDIX XXIK.— Continued, 

To the Librarian : — 

Herewith I have the honor to submit the report of the 11th an- 
nual examination of the Library, made according to the plan 
adopted in 1869. Previous to that time the examination was con- 
ducted while the Library was closed, and the work shared in by 
the whole force. The s3-stem now in use is described as follows in 
the report for 1869 : " First, to divide the Library into sections 
[alcoves] corresponding to any arbitraiy division of the ^-ear, as 
twelve sections for each month, so that the section examined in 
January-, 1869, will again be reached in January, 1870, giving g^ 
full year between. The shelves are then compared with the shelf 
lists, and every volume missing is noted. When a morning's work 
is thus done, the slips showing books in the hands of borrowers 
are examined, and part of the missing books thus accounted for. 
The binder's schedules are next looked to, and those in his hands 
are further checked off. Others are found to be in some part of 
the building for temporar}" use. The remainder are set down as 
missing, but most of them reappear, misplaced in some alcove sub- 
sequently examined, and are then marked as accounted for. If 
an}' are still missing, they are sought for at intervals, in their 
proper places on the shelves, and sometimes are found, thus cor- 
recting some oversight in charging which did not allow them to be 
discovered when examining the slips." The procedure, while not 
giving the exact condition of the whole Library at a given time, 
has proved satisfactory, as it obviates the annual closing, and fur- 
nishes information in regard to any book at the time its shelf is 
scrutinized. 8ome idea of the number of books finall}' unac- 
counted for can be gained by a consultation of Appendixes IX. 
and X. of the report for 1877, where the losses for ten years in the 
Lower Hall are shown to have been 1,086 ; and from 1858 to 1877 
in Bates Hall amounted to 168. No limit can be assigned to the 
time in which a missing book may reappear, as sometimes after an 
absence of ten years, and even more, books have been restored to 
the Librarj-, either by some negligent borrower, who by some 
means obtained the book without its being properly charged ; or, 
as oftener occurs, have been found in successive examinations on 
the shelves in their legitimate position. By what agency they thus 
reappear generally' remains a mystery. It is gratifying to notice in 
the annexed tables that in 

Bates Hall, 

where the circulation has been steadily increasing, the number of 
books unaccounted for does not aggregate much more than in 1878 ; 
and has been exceeded in 1875, when the circulation was less than 
in the past year. In this hall, 11 books previously reported miss- 



72 City Document No. 78. 

ing have been recovered. • Of these one was found missing as long 
ago as 1871, and its whereabouts in the mean time are unknown. 
The emplo^-ment of a special attendant to clean and repair the 
books has proved an advantage over the old plan of emplo3-ing 
women for that purpose. The books are less roughly handled, and 
subject to fewer displacements. In the 

Lower Hall 

an increase of books unaccounted for is to be regretted, consider- 
ing the diminished circulation. It is expected that the losses from 
this department will be large, from the character of its circulation, 
and the multiplication of duplicates rendering the chances of errors 
in charging or numbering numerous. Whether additional safe- 
guards in charging loans, or in keeping the records, can be devised 
is for the consideration of the Trustees and Librarian. Some plan 
ensuring that the person presenting a card signs the name of the 
card-holder on the loan slip, and not his own name, and that the 
book falls into the hands of the rightful claimant, would be advan- 
tageous. Good returns are received from the 

Branches, 

with the exception of the South-End. The large number missing 
here may perhaps be attributable to inaccuracies in the shelf-lists, 
consequent upon their necessarily hasty preparation before the 
opening of that branch. During the 3'ear the shelf-lists will be re- 
vised, and a better showing may be expected in the next report. 
From the Central Librar}^ 

Reading-Room Desk, 

the following have disappeared : Boston Directory, 1878 ; Yonge, 
Latin-English Dictionary. 

Bates-Hall Desk : 

Andrews, Latin-English Dictionar\' ; Bartlett, Familiar Quota- 
tions ; Clement, Sacred and Legendary- Art ; Dictionary of Poeti- 
cal Quotations ; Franco-Prussian war map ; Gasc, Dictionary of 
French and English language ; Hawes, Chronology of Ancient and 
Modern History ; Milton, Poetical works, edited b}* Cleveland. 

Respectfullj- submitted, 

APPLETON P. C. GRIFFIN, 

Custodian of the Shelves. 
May 17, 1879. 



Public Libkary. 



73 



APPENDIX XXX. 



WORK IN THE LIBRARY BINDERY. 



Character of Work. 



feates Hall books bound and 
finished 

Books of the Lower Hall 
and Branches 

Books repaired 

Catalogues wired and cov- 
ered for public use in 
Lower Hall and Branches 

Maps dissected and mounted 

Map- volumes and shelf-lists 
mounted 

Pamphlet cases 

Portfolios 

Removable covers for cata- 
logues and for paper-cov- 
ered books 

Maps mounted, bound, and 
bordered 

Hours of miscellaneous 
work 



« 
»• 


i 






H 


M 
!• 

90 

H 


2,219 


2,008 


2,635 


1,015 


744 


753 


396 


430 


492 


490 


437 


287 


47 


28 


9I 


212 


165 


109 1 


546 


64 


24 


5 


8 


8 


266 


263 


450 


54 


41 


8 


1,842 


2,297 


1,437 



2,613 3,223 

1,508 j 7,766 
444 I 959 



1,520 



2,486 



1,287 



2,183 



4,759 

8,743 

873 



2,712 



1,271 



4,155 

11,129 
949 



1,469 



4,272 

10,084 
1,371 



3,014 



1,970 



2,615 



r&" 




1? 






"^ 



^ 



'? ~ 



■:-¥^: 



■*?#?wv 



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