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Full text of "Annual report"

[Document 94 — 1880.] 



CITY OF i..,^:;l BOSTON. 




TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL EEPOET 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. , 

1880. 



[A.] 

The Trustees have the honor to present to the City Coun- 
cil their twenty-eighth annual report, it being the second 
made under their Act of Incorporation, and comprising de 
tails of the condition of the Library for the yeai- ending on 
the 30th April last. 

Two other reports also form part of this document ; the 
first, that of the Examining Committee, required by the or- 
dinance, consisting for the present year of Rev. Joseph T. 
Duryea, D.D., Thomas Dwight, M.D., Clement Hugh Hill, 
Esq., James F. Hunnewell, Esq., Hon. Otis Norcross, Sam- 
uel H. Russell, Esq., with Samuel A. B. Abbott, a member 
of the Board as Chairman ; and the other, of the Librarian, 
including the Appendixes. 

Neither of these reports requires any special comment here. 
Some of the more important topics to which they refer are also 
subjects of notice in the statements of facts given by the 
Trustees. 

The necessity of increased accommodations for the Public 
Library, strongly stated by His Honor the Mayor in his in- 
augural address of 1879, has terminated in a result most im- 
portant to the future of the institution. On petitions to the 
last Legislature of the City of Boston and of the Trustees of 
the Library, there was granted to the city, for the site of a 
new Ijuilding, a lot of land favorably situated at the south- 
westerly corner of Dartmouth and Boylston streets, mainly 



2 City Document No. 94. 

upon the condition that the structure should be begun before 
the lapse of three years. This gift will afford the desired 
opportunity, at a suitable time, for the erection of a properly 
planned edifice, adapted to the preservation of the invaluable 
contents of Bates Hall and of the south-west tower ; to be 
strictly fire-proof, isolated from surrounding structures, sys- 
tematically arranged for all the uses of the institution, and 
erected not for ornament, but for utility. The financial con- 
dition of the city requires great economy in its expenditures, 
and during the interval of time fixed by the Legislature for 
the beginning of the structure, plans can be elaborated so 
that the process of construction can be arranged to extend 
over such reasonable time as may be convenient to the reve- 
nues of the government and the gradual removal of the books 
may be eflected in a systematic way to the portions of the 
edifice ready for their reception. It is impracticable now to 
offer any well-considered scheme of the future building, with 
the most convenient arrangement of the present contents of 
the great reference library, and Avith still further storage for 
its prospective growth ; but it is evident that whatever struct- 
ure is built should receive the best preparation affoi-dcd by 
modern experience, in the convenient arrangement of the 
volumes, in the proper separation of the departments of 
administration, and in the general fitness for the working 
students, no less than for the library organization. 

The Trustees of the Library at a suitable time will prepare 
a memorandum of the details of the internal arrangement of 
the edifice, which they will ofter for the consideration of the 
City Council. 

The usual summary of the extent of the Library collec- 
tions, and their work for the past year, is herewith pre- 
sented : — 

The aofSfrejjate number of volumes contained in Bates 
Hall is 220,683 ; in the Lower Hall, 36,861 ; m the base- 
ment, 16,719 ; in the branches, 102,962 ; making a total of 
377,225, — a net increase for the year of 16,262 volumes, or 
4^ per cent. 

The libraries were open to the public 307 days, with the 
exception of the Charlestown branch, which was closed, for 
the purpose of rearrangement of the books to conform to 
the newly issued printed catalogue, from 20th April to 1st 
May. 

The number of books loaned shows a decrease of 23,844 
from the previous year, amounting in 1878-9 to 1,180,565, 
and in 1879-80 to 1,156,721, as appears in detail in the fol- 
lowing table, from which the collections in the basement are 
excluded : — 



Public Library. 





Name of Library. 


No. of Vols. 
April 30, 1879. 


Circulation 
1878-79. 


No. of Vols. 
April 30, 1880. 


Circulated 
1879-80. 


a 
"5 
Q4 



Lower Hall • . 

East Boston 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South End 

Jamaica Plain 

1 West Roxbury .... 


36,116 
10,362 
9,279 
11,749 
19,675 
12,724 
9,325 
8,240 
7,290 


363,193 
98,681 
118,844 
113,763 
88,740 
28,928 
59,673 
75,867 
52,960 


36,861 
10,605 
9,633 
12,228 
22,059 
12,970 
10,085 
9,498 
( 7,811 
( 3,068 


316,517 
108,201 
143,570 
107,083 
74,748 
27,980 
66,716 
79,291 

54,626 


6 


a 




Bates Hall 

Fellowes Athenaeum . . 


125,700 

212,545 

4,678 

342,983 


1,000,649 

163,790 

16,126 

1,180,565 


134,818 

220,683 

5,005 

360,506 


968 732 

170,142 

17,847 

1,156,721 



111 taking note of these various channels of the distribution 
of books, the question naturally arises, with the increasing 
desire for branches and deliveries in districts where the 
inhabitants have no library within moderate reach, what is 
the comparative expense of each issue from the branches 
and from the Central Library ? 

The foUowinoj collections are housed in buildino^s belonsf- 
ing to the city, and consequently pay no rent: viz., the 
Central, or Boylston street; the East Boston; the Charles- 
town ; the Brighton ; the Dorchester ; and the Jamaica 
Plain. 

The premises occupied for the South Boston, the Rox- 
bury, and the South End are leased. 

In comparing the expenses of circulation certain items 
are necessarily excluded. The binding, rebinding, and 
repairs of books, the catalogue work and the printing, are 
all included in the Central Library accounts, and do not 
appear in the branch accounts. They are also clearly not 
chargeable to the expense of circulation of the Central 
Library. 

Including rent and the expenses of the reading-room at 



1 The proprietors of the West Roxbury Free Library presented it to the city, and a 
delivery station was established in the rooms occupied by it. 



4 City Document No. 94. 

South Boston, the cost of the delivery of each vohime per 
aunum was 4^^ cents ; at Eoxbury, 4:^-^-^ cents. 

Including rent, but without a readino^-room, and with no 
janitorial service, the cost at the South-End branch was 3^^^ 
cents. 

Without rent, but inclusive of reading-room service, the 
cost at East Boston was Sy^^ cents ; at Charlestown, 5^^ cents ; 
at Brighton, 10 ^'^^^ cents; at Dorchester, with a delivery 
station at Lower Mills, 5 cents ; at Jamaica Plain, with 
deliveries at Roslindale and West Roxbury parish, 5^^^ 
cents. ^ 

From the Boylston-street libraries, and with the reading- 
room service included, the cost per volume was 6^ cents. 

In considerino* the fisfures of the total circulation of the 
popular libraries, and the diminution from the previous two 
years, one most striking and important result is attained. 
By consulting the table of the average circulation of juveniles 
and fiction (Appendix, Table XV.), it will be found that the 
whole issue of this class of reading has fallen off, owing to 
the gradual restriction by the Trustees of sensational and 
vapid productions, six per cent., that is from an average, on 
the whole amount of distributions, of 76 per cent, to 70 per 
cent. ; or, in actual loans, more than 50,000 volumes. So 
far as the statistics of popular lending libraries have been 
printed, it is l)elieved that the average loan of works of this 
class seldom falls below 75 per cent, of the total issues. 

Another result of this table is very noticeable. Both the 
East Boston and South Boston branches increased their 
issues, having received new printed catalogues of their 
contents during the year 1878-9. That of South Boston 
was begun and finished in the spring of 1879. Though 
printed in such haste that errors of no great importance 
necessarily occurred, in consequence of the facilities afforded 
by its convenience, added to an excellent administration of 
the branch, and to the active requirements of the district, the 
circulation increased from the previous year nearly 25,000 
volumes, or 20 per cent., notwithstanding the deprival of 
the accustomed supply of the weaker class of fiction. Con- 
sidering the number of volumes in the Library, and their 
larger issue, it is the most active and successful of all the 
branches. 

But in addition to the new catalogue, the materially in- 
creased accommodation for the books, visitors, and employes 
of the Library afforded by the enlargement of the premises 

' Brighton ia the smallest precinct enjoying the privileges of a branch, — having a 
populition of a little more than 6,000. The Library was founded and presented to the 
town by Mr, Holton, and became the property of the city on its annexation. 



Public Library. 5 

previously occupied, nearly doubling the conveniences of 
storage and access, also contributed to this result. 

Aside from the diminished uses of fiction, the failure to 
fitly develop the use of the Lower Hall is mainly due to 
the same causes assigned in previous reports, which still 
continue to limit and diminish its issues. Li confined 
quarters, without room for separation and accommodation of 
the difierent classes of age and sex, without proper ventila- 
tion, with disagreeable crowds at the hours of largest demand, 
it is not strange that the loans should be seriously aflected. 
The experience of South Boston is not to be overlooked. 
When sufBcient room is obtained for the Lower Hall visitors, 
one may reasonably expect a use of this Library commensurate 
with the daily increasing value and extent of its resources. 
In the possibly impending changes consequent upon the 
removal of the Bates Hall collection to the Dartmouth-street - 
site, the greatly extended quarters demanded by public 
convenience may be found in the present building. 

Although by the regulations of the Library it is no part 
of its duties to furnish text-books to the schools, permission 
was given during the year to an earnest friend of education 
to try the experiment of what was deemed a more useful 
form of reading than was furnished by the authorities. The 
success of the trial is related in the report of the librarian. 
It is the duty of the Library to cooperate within its means 
with masters and pupils, and its great stores of reading are 
equally open for instruction and information to them as well 
as to the larger mass of readers. The lists prepared by the 
Superintendent of Schools and printed by the Library for 
teachers and scholars, and distributed to all the schools, are 
believed to have been found generally useful. . 

The large number of books shelved in Bates Hall, cover- 
ing very great diversity of subjects, invite at the present 
tixae special interest in the form of the catalogues by which 
they are opened to public use. It will be seen that any 
important change will be radical, and more expensive than 
the present system. 

The card catalogue, to which the public has access in Bates 
Hall, has now reached enormous dimensions, comprising not 
far from 600,000 distinct and separate titles and cross- 
references. It is presumed to include an appropriate notice 
of every work and pamphlet in the reference library. Hav- 
ing been constructed with as much rapidity as was practi- 
cable, to keep pace with the great annual accessions of 
books, it now requires and is undergoing a complete revi- 
sion. It is what is termed a dictionary catalogue, including 



6 City Document No. 94. 

authors and subjects under one alphabet, and has been found 
good and sufficient for libraries of moderate size. 

In addition to this there is also in use for the officials of 
the Library a smaller card catalogue, containing the titles of 
books added to the Bates Hall library since the publication 
of the Supplement to the Index in 186(3. This, together 
with the printed volumes, is also supposed to include all the 
books in the upper hall. 

Besides these conveniences the printed quarterly bulletins 
contain the more important accessions from 1867 to the 
present time. 

It will thus be seen that there is but one complete list of 
all the books for general use, and that is to be found in the 
great card catalogue in Bates Hall, noAv uudergoiug complete 
revision to enable it to perform all its functions with 
accuracy and certainty. It is a work requiring great skill, 
and patient labor, and will occupy a long time in completion. 
In the mean time assistance is gladly rendered by the Library 
officers to those who fail to find the book of which they are 
in search, and to all persons who are willing to make known 
their wants. 

It is a grave question whether the great value of the 
collection, and the important functions which it fulfils, do 
not now, or will not in the immediate future, require some 
form of printed catalogue embracing the whole contents of 
the shelves, with the exception of those already embraced in 
the Index and Supplement, and the catalogues of the Prince 
and Ticknor libraries, already printed, and of the Barton, 
now in process of printing. If this step should be consid- 
ered desirable, it could only be l)egun after the card cata- 
logue shall have been completely revised, as this would form 
its basis. 

The objections to a great printed list of books of a rapidly 
increasing library are obviously, first, its expense, and, 
next, the number of years necessary to its completion. In- 
cluding in its pages books that were in the Library at the 
specified date of its beginning, when completed, other 
volumes in combination must be begun to receive the titles 
added since the first part of the catalogue was started. 

Another condition also complicates the question. If the 
City of Boston concludes to avail itself of the grant of the 
Commonwealth, and decides to begin the gradual erection 
of a new edifice for the Bates Hall and the other special col- 
lections, the whole catalogue enterprise would naturally be 
deferred until such time as the present reference libraries, 
with their subsequent accessions, should have been trans- 
ferred to the shelves of the new building. 



Public Library. ' 7 

Practically, it is a choice between a bulky and cumbrous 
card catalogue on the dictionary system, in one alphabet, 
keeping pace with the daily accessions, and printed cata- 
logues in several alphabets, which do not include the addi- 
tions to the Library for a term of years, — and the publication 
of quarterly bulletins, still adding to the number of alpha- 
bets to be consulted ; or if the last-named publications 
should cease, a further recurrence to the card catalogue to 
fill the vacancy in titles till the issue of a new volume, 
during the printing of which another new card catalogue 
must be begun. 

In this sketch of the catalogue apparatus of the Library, 
mention should be made of the effective card catalogue of 
the lower hall, comprising about eighty thousand references, 
which has been withdrawn from the upper-hall drawers, and 
which now is in charge of a special officer, whose duty is to- 
assist lower-hall readers in the selection, as well as search, 
of books. 

The previous notice of special catalogues was not intended 
to include the class lists, so called, which for a series of 
years have been prepared for the use of readers, for the 
purpose of condensing into one printed alphabet the works 
contained in the popular library in Fiction and Juveniles, 
History, 'Biography, and Travels, Poetry and the Drama, 
and other special subjects. 

In order, however, that the present state of this depart- 
ment may be properly understood, Mr. Whitney, its head, 
has prepared a statement, to which attention is particularly 
desired, and which will be found in Appendix XXIV. 

This notice of the department would be incomplete with- 
out calling attention to the publication of the Ticknor cata- 
logue,, — a work long desired by American and European 
scholars, and which in its execution has received great praise 
from those most competent to judge of its scholarly accu- 
racy and thorough exhaustion of details. It is a product of 
which Mr. Whitney and the Library may well be proud. 

The catalogue of the- Shakespeare portion of the Barton 
Library has also been finished, in a manner reflecting great 
credit upon Mr. James M. Hubbard, to whom was specially 
entrusted its preparation. 

In concluding their observations upon the condition of the 
catalogue department, the Trustees feel that great caution is 
to be exercised in any change of action, so much so that 
the}' are not at this time agreed among themselves on the 
most advantageous course to be pursued. 

The number of books lost still remains moderate. Thousfh 
not quite so comparatively small as last year, when only one 



8 ' City Document No. 94. 

volume was unaccounted for out of every 11,805 circulated, 
the present year shows one to every 11,123. 

In one respect the record is the most remarkable yet 
chronicled. The aggregate circulation of the branches at 
East Boston, Koxbury, Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain, was 
342,807 volumes, and not a single volume was lost. 

The Central Library, in this report, suffered slightly less 
than last year, 81 volumes being recorded as missing in 
1879-80, against 87 in 1878-79, and 90 in 1877-78. 

Among the gifts of the Library during the past year two 
deserve especial mention. 

Li addition to the previous foundation of the Green Fund, 
given by Dr. S. A. Green to the Library two years since, 
he has shown a further mark of his interest in the institution 
by presenting to it his Franklin collection of books and 
engravings, — a collection peculiarly important to all who 
respect the memory of the great Bostonian, and who desire 
to see in the possession of the -city everything illustrating 
his history and memory. Li this patriotic work Mr. W. S. 
Appleton has joined, by adding, from his own valuable 
stores, such engravings of Franklin as he possessed that 
were not included in the Green collection. 

An accession of the West Roxbury Free Library being a 
popular collection of 3,008 volumes, Avas accepted by the 
Trustees, on condition of establishing a delivery in that dis- 
trict, with the proviso that the books given should not be 
removed from that parish neighljorhood. The arrangement 
has proved convenient and inexpensive to the Library, and 
satisfactory to the inhabitants of the precinct. 

In the general summary of gifts it is found that the same 
friendly spirit is evinced as has been recorded in previous 
years. It is indebted to 546 givers for 5,524 volumes and 
8,356 pamphlets. 

Though work at the library bindery has been unusually 
active, it was unable to take care of the whole service 
demanded of it. From the Bates Hall collection there were 
bound 3,958 volumes ; from the Lower Hall and branches, 
10,196 volumes; of which 2,590 were sent to outside 
binders; 1,397 volumes were repaired. 

In conclusion, it is most gratifying to be able to state that 
the experience of the years since its foundation has neither 
added to nor altered the principles upon Avhich the Library 
was founded, and which have constituted the mainspring of 
its success. Such changes in forms of administration as a 
larger contact Avith borrowers showed to be expedient or 
necessary, and could safely be admitted for the general con- 
venience of the public, have from time to time been adopted. 



Public Libkary. 9 

The fostering care of the city government, and the generosity 
of our donors, have established a Library now the largest in 
the country, and the most useful to all classes of the com- 
munity. Its large educational influences have been extended 
and improved, and it has been the steady aim of the Trus- 
tees to elevate the character of the books most widely cir- 
culated, especially among the younger body of readers. 
The facilities for importation are decreasing the cost of the 
13urchases for the reference library. May it continue its 
beneficent assistance to all readers and students, so that in 
the future as now the simplest beginner in knowledge may 
find at hand what he needs, at the same time that the most 
enthusiastic and advanced experts in science, art, and litera- 
ture shall make it their helpful resort. 

WILLIAM W. GEEENOUGH. 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE. 
GEORGE B. CHASE. 
SAMUEL A. B. ABBOTT. 
HENRY W. HAYNES. 
HUGH O'BRIEN. 
CHARLES E. PRATT. 

Public Library, 24:th June, 1880. 



10 City Document No. 94. 

[B.] 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Examining Committee has endeavored to perform its 
task to the best of its ability. The diflSculties before such a 
body are more formidable than might at first sight be sup- 
posed. Several of the questions before them require the 
judgment of the expert ; others demand a much deeper 
knowledo;e of the workinai; of a o-reat institution than a visit- 
ing committee can easily acquire. Happily there are some 
points on which any man of average intelligence is, after due 
observation, competent to form an opinion. The committee 
resrrets that, owins: to the bad health of the Hon. Otis Nor- 
cross, it has been deprived of his valuable assistance. 

It is impossible to contemplate the vast stores of learning 
in many languages and all the departments of science, the 
treasures of literature, suited alike to the scholar and the 
simple reader, the valuable collections of works of art, 
without feeling how just is the pride the citizens of Boston 
take in their Library. 

If we criticise certain points, it is because we believe 
that by doing so we are rendering a greater service to this 
valued institution than we should by referring only to the 
many features we can heartily praise. 

The unfitness of the main building on Boylston street has 
been repeatedly commented upon. It is inadequate, incon- 
venient, not fire-proof, and in parts ill-lighted and ill-venti- 
lated. If we are to hope for a new building, no expensive 
alteration would be justifiable ; but wo may call attention to 
the fact that the rear corner is a vulnerable point to fire, and 
that too much reliance jnay be placed on iron shutters when 
exposed to a hot blaze. If, on the other hand, the new 
building should be long delayed, we would suggest that 
space might be gained and the distribution of books facili- 
tated by removal of the second gallery in Bates Hall, and 
the substitution of three light iron floors. This would in- 
volve the insertion of skylights. 

It is apparent to the Committee and to the Trustees that a 
new building is a crying necessity. But any new building 
will be a comparative failure which is not built on a radically 
ditferent plan from the present one. The chief defect is 
that the Library is sacrificed to the great Bates Hall ; a very 
handsome room, we admit, but out of place in a large and 
growing librar}', unless there are land and money enough for 



Public Libraet. 11 

indefinite expansion. The new building should contain 
numerous moderate-sized rooms and wide corridors, both 
well lighted and not too high-studded, in some of Avhich 
there should be coveniences for students who, under special 
circumstances, should be allowed access to them. The 
waiting and reading rooms should be separated from the 
room for general delivery. In one of the reading-rooms 
there should be a reference library, in which, under proper 
regulations, every one should be permitted to take down 
and consult the books at pleasure. The present building 
could then be used in the place of the Lower Hall, and the 
South End Branch for the storing and delivery of popular 
books, and for a reading-room of periodical literature. It 
should be borne in mind, in making the plans for the new 
building, that fitness must not give place to show. 

The Boston Public Library has many rare and valuable 
books that will be wanted by many generations in the 
future. Such a collection appears one not merely for present 
uses, but a trust for a future that is very likely to judge 
present care of the great wealth held in charge. It seems, 
accordingly, that many of these books should be kept under 
glass doors, protected from bad air and dust, and secured by 
locks. Fine bindings and those Avith which it is undesirable 
to interfere should be further protected by wrapping covers, 
and the wear on heavy volumes reduced by linings on the 
shelves. All the Prince Library, parts of the Barton, 
Ticknor, and other collections, and the English County 
Histories are of this class. The deterioration of common 
bindings, largely in the upper part of Bates Hall, is evident. 
The great heat there appears in some cases to have seriously 
dried the leather; but there are indications that on some 
volumes the rapid decay may be owing to the badness of 
congressional sheepskin rather than to that of a Boston 
literary atmosphere. 

We find that the work done in the bindery is good, and 
that bindings of the finest quality can be furnished when 
desired. We are not prepared, however, to offer any 
opinion as to the policy of maintaining a bindery as a part 
of the Library. 

The collection of books in Bates Hall is a magnificent 
one, and the well-known readiness of the government of the 
Library to fill any gaps to which attention is called assures 
its still greater perfection. The Lower Hall contains an 
excess of juvenile stories and poor novels, which, though 
not immoral, give such false views of life to the young and 
inexperienced that they must be considered bad reading. 
Their tendency, moreover, is to develop a taste for similar 



12 City Document No. 94. 

and worse literature, rather than for that of a higher grade. 
The same criticism applies in a greater or less degree to 
most of the branches. We are glad to understand that 
literature of this class is not encouraged by the authorities, 
that its circulation is proportionally less than it has been, 
and that efforts are making to turn the attention of readers 
to more worthy objects ; still ^ve believe that more energetic 
action would be advisable. 

With regard to the purchase of books, it would appear 
that the plan of allowing foreign booksellers to send Avhat 
they please is at least liable to abuse, even though the right 
of returning books is retained. It is certain that no book 
of a character at all doubtful should be permitted to be sent 
without a definite order. 

The question of cataloguing has been considered with 
great care. It may be divided into three heads : First, the 
catalogues of special collections, namely, the Prince, 
Ticknor, and Barton. The Ticknor has been completed in 
a most creditable manner, but at very great expense. The 
catalogue of the Shakespearean part of the Barton collection 
has been finished, but there remain some eleven thousand 
volumes which, according to aggreement, must be cata- 
logued. It is to be hoped that it will be done with all pos- 
sible economy, and that the part already published ma}'^ be 
given -to public. 

Under the second head Ave consider the catalogue of the 
Bates Hall. This has already outgrown its usefulness, for 
purely mechanical reasons. The plan and the work are, we 
believe, on the whole satisfactory, though too close adher- 
ence to rule has sometimes interfered with clearness. It 
seems to us unfortunate that well-knowni pseudonyms are 
not treated as proper names. The cost, though apparently 
large, does not strike us as extravagant, and the plans we 
could suggest to diminish it -svould cflect only minor points. 
The greattrouble is that it is already too large, and Avill not 
admit of indefinite expansion. We believe the best plan 
will be a book catalogue, to be published in revised editions, 
say, every fifteen years, and to be supplemented by a card 
catalogue to record current additions. The catalogue should 
contain as many cross-references as are necessary for clear- 
ness, but should be as simple and brief as possible, contain- 
ing no notes. We would recommend that this be under- 
taken as soon as practicable, and that, as a measure of 
economy, the quarterly bulletins be discontinued. 

Under the third head we would speak of the catalogues of 
the Lower Hall and Branches. These present wide varia- 
tions, some being very satisfactory, while others show great 



Public Libeary. 



13 



deficiencies. Probably the South End Branch is the most 
wanting in this respect. 

With regard to the service of the Library we liave but 
one point to criticise. The demand for books from the 
Bates Hall is so great that, especially on Saturdays in winter, 
the delay in obtaining them is often considerable. We 
recommend that a larger force be emploj^ed, at least on 
Saturdays, during the busiest months. This is advised both 
in the interest of the public and of the boys whose duty it is 
to bring the books, who, on tlie occasions referred to, are 
severely taxed. 

The great development of the system of Branch Libraries 
has struck the committee as a very important subject. On 
referring to last year's report, Ave find that the total hall and 
home use of books in all the branches exceeded that in the 
main building by over one hundred and tw^enty-six thousand. 

Few will deny that it is right to maintain branches in 
thickly settled districts, at a considerable distance from the 
Library ; but the case is very diflerent in the rural outskirts, 
and in that part of the city from which the main hall can be 
easily reached. The idea that every citizen has a right to 
have a book- delivery near his dwelling is wrong in theory 
and mischievous in practice. We l)elieve that this system 
has passed the point at which it should have been checked. 
We would call attention to the following table, showing the 
cost of the branches during the past year : — 





East Boston. 


South Boston. 


ROXBURY. 


Charlestown, 


Salaries, 

Books, 

Expenses, 


$3,062 74 
591 03 
873 75 


$3,330 03 
757 68 
646 91 


$3,079 68 
543 93 

1,289 78 


$3,323 75 
932 57 
800 01 


Total, 


$4,517 52 


$4,734 62 


$4,913 39 


$5,056 33 




Brighton. 


Dorchester.' 


South End. 


Jamaica Plain. 


Salai-ies, 

Books, 

Expenses, 


$1,279 85 
176 88 - 
737 47 


$2,077 17 ' 
932 15 ; 

767 56 1 

1 


$1,510.92 
397 28 
178 38 


$2,040 35 

451 95 

1,185 74 



Total, 



M,194 20 



5,776 88 



^2,086 85 



},678 04 



This shows a total cost of $30,957,56 ; but this is not all, 
for the above figures represent oidy the suras that come from 
the Library appropriations. The city paid, in addition, 
$5,883.33 for rent and taxes for Branch 
and $1,385.80 for repairs on the same, 
outside the appropriation. 



Libraries in 1879, 
making $7,269.13 



1 Including the Lower Mills delivery. 

- Including the lioslindale and West Roxbury deliveries. 



14 City Document No. 94. 

It will be well to consider for what this large sum is ex- 
pended. A glance at the tables appended to the Librarian's 
Report, showing the kind of reading, will show that it is 
essentially for amusement. As these branches increase, the 
expenses will necessarily increase also, and at no distant 
time will become very hard to bear. 

The committee cannot pass over the South End branch, 
concerning which there has been so much discussion, with- 
out comment. If there is to be a branch at all, the present 
quarters are certainly inadequate ; but we fail to find any 
excuse for its existence. With the present horse-car facili- 
ties, it is no hardship for the inhabitants of the South End 
to go to Boylston street. Some, indeed, may find Roxbury 
more convenient. During the past year works of fiction 
and juveniles have composed 74- per cent, of the circulation 
of this branch; miscellaneous works, 1-f- percent. ; poetry 
and the drama, 3- per cent. ; and bound periodicals, 5-|- per 
cent. Thus certainly four-fifths of its circulation may fairly 
be called very light reading. The number of books used is 
very great ; Avhich shows, no doubt, that it is pleasant to 
have a branch, but not that it is needed. 

In the opinion of the committee the South End branch 
is utterly unnecessary. If it were feasible, we should re- 
commend its suppression. We can at least protest against 
opening any new branches. 

A fine public library is necessarily very expensive, and 
the just appreciation in which ours is held makes the citizens 
of Boston pay the bills very cheerfully ; but, that this may 
continue, all extravagance should be carefully avoided. We 
are compelled to say that this has not been done in the 
matter of the branches, and the policy may be questioned 
by which very large sums are expended on catalogues of 
special collections, which are used by very few. 

We find that the accounts arc kept with great neatness 
and accuracy by ]Miss Nichols, and appear to be arranged ex- 
pressly for the needs of the Libraiy. As far as we have 
observed, all the employes are faithful to their duties. 

In conclusion, we have to express our thanks for the 
courtesy and ready assistance in the discharge of our duties 
we have received from every one connected with the 
Library. 

THOMAS DWIGHT, 

For the Committee. 



Public Library. 15 



[C] 

LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees : — 

'Agreeably to the by-laws, I herewith submit my report 
for the library year ending April 30, referring to the tables 
annexed for the information usually presented in that form. 

Library Facilities. 

The agencies by which books are brought more nearly to 
their readers have been multiplied within the past year by a 
deposit of duplicate volumes with the Wells Memorial 
Workingmen's Club and Institute, at the corner of Wash- 
ington and Dover streets ; and also by opening a delivery 
station of the Jamaica Plain branch at West Roxbury, in 
the room formerly occupied by the Free Library. In No- 
vember last the proprietors of that library voted to transfer 
their books, numbering about three thousand volumes, to the 
Trustees, for the use of the inhabitants of Boston, on the 
condition that they should forever remain, as a collection, in 
that precinct. This gift was accepted, and the room opened 
as a delivery station on the 6th of January last, under the 
charge of Marion L. Woodward. The success of this de- 
livery justifies its existence ; and the petition of the inhabit- 
ants in its neighborhood for an increase in the number of 
delivery days is entitled to favorable consideration. 

A petition, numerously signed by those dwelling in the 
vicinity of Grove Hall, for the establishment of a delivery 
station at that point, has led to the examination of that 
territory in respect to library facilities. Grove Hall is not 
so remote, by right lines, either from the Roxbury or Dor- 
chester branches, as to warrant the establishment of a 
branch or delivery station at that point ; but, by the only 
practicable modes of conveyance to those branches, access is 
indirect and costly, and the necessity of providing for a full 
branch at that point will ultimately force itself upon the 
attention of the City Council. 

Nothing has occurred to interrupt the usual circulation of 
books at either of the branches, except Charlestown, which 
was closed from April 27 to May 11, both inclusive, for 
the rearrangement of the books, so as to conform to the 
system of classification which prevails both at the central 
and branch libraries. It was deemed a favorable time to 



16 City Document No. 94. 

make this change simultaneously with the issue of a new 
catalogue of this the largest and most valuable of the 
branch libraries. 

The branch library apartments remain the same as at the 
date of my last report ; all fairly answering the public re- 
quirements, except that at the South End. In respect to 
the rooms occupied by this branch all opinions concur as to 
their unfitness ; and the City Council are considering the 
site best adapted to the requirements of this growing 
branch. 

Central Library Building. 

All the measures deemed necessary to render the Central 
Library secure from fire have been adopted. A night-watch- 
man has been employed, as recommended by my last report, 
and his fidelity is attested in a satisfactory manner. 

Nothing further seemed to be required to render the col- 
lection safe, so far as safety can be secured while it remains 
in its present position, except to close certain doorways be- 
tween the furnace-room and the adjacent apartments used 
for storing duplicates ; and these openings have now been 
closed, on the suggestion of a member of the Examining 
Committee. 

Condition of the Library. 

There is nothino- new to be said as to the condition of the 
Library. Its deterioration by use, especially that part 
which circulates most freely, as well as from heat, gas, or 
other undetermined causes, still continues to excite apprehen- 
sion, and doubtless will continue to do so until the erection 
of a new building on the lands granted by the State for that 
purpose. 

Increase of the Library. 

During the past 3'ear the increase of the Library l)y gift, 
as well as l)y purchase, has been regular and gratifying. 
The whole number of volumes is now 377,225 net, of which 
15,016 have been purchased, and 5,524 have been given 
within the year. 

Some of the gifts are worthy of special mention. In 
1863 the Franklin Club gave to the Library the sum of one 
thousand dollars, to be invested, and the income thereof to 
be applied to the purchase of books of permanent value, 
and preferably works on government and political economy. 
On the 15th of April, 1871), the surviving trustees of the 
Franklin Club expended the balance of the funds then re- 



Public Library. 17 

maining in their hands in the purchase aud presentation to 
the Public Library of six magnificent volnmes, comprisiug 
Roberts' "Holy Land and Egypt," and " Nubia," with some 
other volumes of less note. 

This transfer to the Public Library of the funds of the 
Franklin Club is in accordance with the spirit and conduct 
of the great man whose name it bore, and recalls the ex- 
pressed intentions and efforts of those in the government 
of the library to make a collection of Frankliniana. In 
the report of the Superintendent for the year 1869, it is 
said : " It has been thought that Franklin is to Boston of 
something like the same importance [as that of Shakespeare 
to England] , and I have lost no opportunity of securing 
what I could illustrative of the man and his works, and 
hope the collection may prove in the end of credit to the 
city of his birth." 

The result, however, was less than might have been 
reasonably hoped for, since, until the donation about to be 
mentioned, the number of volumes and pamphlets in the 
Library relating to Franklin was inconsiderable. 

But, by gift from Dr. Samuel A. Green, there has been 
added to the Library about 135 books and pamphlets, to- 
gether with y7 portraits and engravings, all of which in some 
way relate to Franklin ; and to these some important 
additions have been made by William S. Appleton, Esq. 

The Library has also received an interesting letter of 
Josiah Franklin, the tallow-chandler, dated January 11, 
1744, addressed to some correspondent unknown, except 
that he was a collateral relative, and of the English branch 
of the family. This letter contains facts of interest not 
hitherto known. 

This collection of Frankliniiina is now made to comprise 
everything in the Library respecting Franklin, not dupli- 
cates, and is kept apart by itself. It contains more than 
eighty titles of books aud pamphlets not found in the most 
complete bibliography of Franklin published, though it is far 
from complete. But it is gratifying to be able to say that the 
publicity given to Dr. Green's donation has led to some im- 
portant additions from other sources, and will doubtless lead 
to others ; and it now may be reasonably expected that the 
Public Library will ultimately possess as complete a col- 
lection of Frankliniana as is anywhere to be found. 

Nor should it fail of mention that the Youngs Men's 
Library of Bufi'alo, New York, have presented to the Public 
Library a volume of the greatest interest and value, and 
thought to be unique in some portions. It is the first 
printed Journal of the House of Representatives of the 



18 City Documjent No. 94. 

Province of Massachusetts for the political year 1715-16. 
The value of this donation is enhanced by the fact that it 
contains important historical matter nowhere else to be 
found, as well as by the fact that it was the only copy pos- 
sessed by that library; and, in a spirit of comity, has been 
given to the Boston Public Library, as the place where 
Massachusetts history would properly be found. 

The Bindery. 

It was deemed unfortunate that, when the Library was 
making large demands upon the bindery, it should lose 
from that department the services of its foreman, Mr. 
Hathaway, under whose administration it was- raised to high 
rank. This branch of the service has now been reinforced 
by the addition of several competent workmen, and it is 
expected that arrearages will soon be brought up, and the 
current work promptly attended to. But it is evident that 
with the increasing circulation of books from Bates Hall, and 
their consequently increased wear, the expenses of the 
bindery will be larger than heretofore. 

Lower Hall Catalogue. 

The recommendations of my last report that the Lower 
Hall cards should be separated from those in Bates Hall, and 
transferred to that department, were adopted and have been 
carried into effect. 

On the tirst of September that portion of the catalogue was 
placed in the charge of Mr. Thomas H. Cunnnings (and, in 
his absence, of Miss Mary A. Jenkins), whose business it is 
to assist all comers in finding the books they desire, and, 
what is of more importance, to direct the attention of young 
and inexperienced readers to the best literature. I have rea- 
son to think that the influence of this new department in the 
Lower Hall is very considerable and most salutary, and is 
likely to increase. From Mr. Cunnnings' report, it appears 
that from Dec. 1, 1879 — when the account was opened — to 
May 1, 1880, 7,351 persons were assisted on special sub- 
jects ; and of general readers, including readers of fiction, 
juvenile books and miscellanies, there were above 10,000. 
As the working days for this period were 128, the daily 
average of special readers assisted is 57, and of general read- 
ers, 84. 

A detailed account of the services thus rendered would 
include many interesting facts bearing upon the question of 
the possibility of bringing personal influence to supplement 



Public Library. 19 

the use of catalogues, class lists, and other printed aids, in 
wisely directing the reading of those who come to the Library 
for books. 

The Public Library and the Public Schools. 

In this connection, as well as in any other, I may allude 
to the subject of a closer union between the public library and 
the public schools, as auxiliaries of each other in the work of 
education. 

In my report of last year I suggested to the Trustees "the 
propriety of setting apart some portion of the annual appro- 
priation for books to meet the requisitions of the teachers of 
the public schools, by the purchase of such books as in their 
judgment might be useful to their pupils, and those books to 
have their local habitation in the several houses under their 
charge, but always to remain the property of the Public Li- 
brary, and subject to such regulations as might be found 
necessary." 

This subject I have not lost sight of. On the contrary, it 
has engaged much of my attention, though in an unofticial 
way ; and I now^ desire to restate, though briefly, the nature 
of the union I consider desirable, and the way in which, as I 
conceive, it may be brought about. 

Perhaps this may be best shown by a statement of what 
has already been done. 

On the reopening of the public schools in September last 
an experiment Avas made, which, though not on precisely the 
same basis as that I recommend, led to some interestino; 
and valuable results, which I now propose to lay before the 
Trustees. 

By previous arrangement with the principal of the Wells 
School I received from him a requisition on the Public Li- 
brary for fifty copies of " A Sunmier in Leslie Goldthwaite's 
Life," by Mrs. Whitney, to be retained for an indefinite 
period; and, some months later, for the same number of 
"Pizarro; his Adventures and Conquests," by George M. 
Towle. 

Several difficvdties arose with respect to these requests. 
In the first place there were no more than two or three 
copies, instead of fifty, of each in the Library, and no funds 
from which they could be properly purchased ; and, sec- 
ondly, the nature of the loans, and the time for which they 
w^ere desired, were in contravention of the Library rules. 
But, there being a good will, a good way was found. The 
books were purchased from funds supplied from a private 
source, and presented to the Library, and accepted by the 



20 City Document No. 94. 

Trustees, with the conditions annexed, that they should be 
loaned according to the will of the donor. 

After nearly a year's use the books have been returned to 
the Library, in as good order substantially as when they 
left; and there they remain to meet a similar requisition, 
and to be subjected to the same use on the reopening of 
the public schools in September. I have assurances that 
they will then be demanded by more than one teacher. 

But in the mean time it seems to me that it is worth stat- 
ing what they have already done. When they were loaned 
to the Wells School, before being issued to the pupils, they 
were neatly covered by them and made ready for use. These 
pupils seem to have taken pride in using them carefully, as 
only one of them shows the results of carelessness. And 
this fiict is worthy of being contrasted with the general use 
of the Library by a similar class of persons who draw books 
from it under different circumstances. 

" Leslie Goldthwaite " was read successively by three 
classes, comprising more than one hundred and fifty girls ; 
and " Pizarro," by two classes, comprising over one hundred 
girls. 

The reading of these books Avas not a part of regular 
school exercises ; that is, the pupils were expected to read 
each her own copy at home, as she would read any other 
book taken from the Public Library, but to be ready once a 
week, in her class, to be examined on what was thus read. 

In this examination is found the chief interest and value 
of the scheme ; and it seems to be new. 

Reading is an art which, with a little of almost everything, 
has been taught in the public schools immemorially ; but how 
to read a book — an entire book — is an acquisition made by 
few, and never, so far as I am aware, systematically taught 
in the public schools. 

This experiment made in the Wells School, with the 
cooperation of the Pul)lic Library, is, I think, the first ever 
made, and it was successful. 

By simultaneous reading of the same book, and by class 
examination in respect to what they read, these pupils, under 
the skilful teaching of their master, came finally to see, as 
they would be likely to learn in no other way, that every 
good story is a work of art, 'consisting of a plot in which the 
incidents should follow each other in such order and re- 
lation as properly to bring abont the result; that the 
personages should act and talk consistently, and with 
reference to the result; and, finally, that style should 
be simple, clear, and appropriate, and the ornamen- 
tation just. They came to see that the true value and 



Public Library. 21 

chief interest in novels consist in these very qualities, rather 
than in the sensational and exaggerated. 

These one hundred and fifty girls, under the instruction 
which was only possible with the facilities thus ex- 
ceptionally granted by the Public Library, have acquired 
a critical judgment which will serve them in good stead, 
not only with respect to the books they may hereafter draw 
from the Public Library, but, if the same system could be 
made applicable to all the schools, would soon settle the 
vexed question of what sort of fiction should be purchased 
by the Trustees. 

I have dwelt less on the details of the experiment because 
several of the Trustees have witnessed at least one of the 
weekly examinations, and have reached a conclusion as to 
its value not unlike my own. 

Why, then, may not what has proved of value in a single 
school be extended so as to include ultimately all the schools 
whose teachers have the requisite interest to undertake and 
skill to carry forward a similar work ? 

The Public Library keeps books to read, and is using all 
possible devices to get them read. This is one of its func- 
tions ; possibly it may be said, that its chief function is to 
provide the books, leaving the manner of their reading, and 
consequently the value of the reading, to the care of those 
more immediately charged with the education of youth. 
And, further, that if there is any deficiency, either in the 
number or character of the books needed for this purpose, 
they should be furnished, as are other text-books, by the 
school committee, with funds provided them for that purpose. 

It is submitted, however, that it is less a question of a 
theoretically perfect distribution of functions among difierent 
bodies serving the same public, from which they draw their 
resources, and having the same general aim in view, — the 
education of the community, — than of practical efiiciency in 
bringing about a desirable purpose ; and if this is so, then 
if the school committee can best expend the public money 
required for this end, let them answer the requisitions of 
teachers ; but if, theory apart, the Public Library can best 
administer the trust, by its disciplined force and adequate 
machinery, then let the Public Library enter upon the work. 

Which body can best perform the service is best deter- 
mined by considering the elements which are essential to its 
success. 

And the first is, that the teacher should be absolutely free 
to choose the book he desires to use. This is essential. A 
book which interests another and serves another's purpose 
may not interest him nor serve his purpose. He wants his 



22 City Document No. 94. 

own tools. Consequently, no stock of books, in numbers 
however large, selected by the school committee or the Trus- 
tees, will answer. 

Again, the books should be furnished just when wanted ; 
not a week or fortnight afterwards. The Trustees, in a sense 
in which the school committee are not, are buyers of books. 
They have the best facilities, and can command the best 
terms. This new form of loans can be made promptly and 
without confusion or causing trouble in the ordinary work of 
the Library. 

Finally, should this work be entered upon, I do not appre- 
hend any such general and immediate requisitions by the 
teachers as will deplete the treasury, or embarrass the em- 
ployes of the Library. The cost of the experiment for a 
year in the AVells School was less than fifty dollars. Books 
thus read are read slowly, — nmllum non multa. The plan, 
if adopted, will be adopted only by the best and most enter- 
prising teachers ; and even with the best will make its way 
slowly. But should it come to be generally adopted, against 
the expense, however great, would stand this grand result: 
a community of readers, S3stematically educated in the 
public schools, not only to read, but to select the best books 
for their reading which a great public library offers. Then 
will the Public Library take its true place at the head of the 
educational system of the city, and as truly a part of it, not 
merely in name. 

Use of the Lower Hall Books. 

The Trustees cannot have failed to notice from my monthly 
reports some interesting facts respecting the circulation of 
books bolh at the Central and Branch libraries. The circu- 
lation of the Lower Hall has fallen off* considerably Avithin 
the year. This was doubtless foreseen by the Trustees when 
they determined to lessen the supply of that class of books 
which most rapidly swells the statistics of circulation. But 
an analysis of tables of the classes of books circulated shows 
the gratifying fact that the proportion of the better books is 
constantly increasing ; and this is the case aside from the in- 
crease of the Bates llall circulation by nearly seven thousand 
over that of the last year. This improvement in the quality 
of the circulation is in part due to the vigilance of the In- 
spector of Circulation, Mr. Tifftmy, in recommending the 
purchase of a liberal supply of newly-published books of a 
superior quality, in anticipation of the public demand. 



Public Library. 23 



The Purchase or Books. 

With a view to the economic use of the public money, as 
well as to the establishment of surer safeguards in respect to 
the character and cost of books forwarded by our foreign 
agents under general orders, I have, under the direction 
of the Trustees, entered into new contracts, by which will be 
obviated such objections as had become apparent. These 
contracts will be kept well in hand, and, by their terms, 
may be cancelled or modified whenever it may be found 
desirable. 

So long as our agents are restricted in their purchase, on 
our account, to first-rate works in science, literature, and 
art, there seems to be little dan2:er of their forwardinsf ob- 
jectionable books ; nor costly works, so long as they are 
limited, as now, not only in the amount of their aggregate 
purchases, but also as to the cost of any one work. 

That foreign works must be purchased in some such way 
is obvious, and is followed by every considerable library in 
the country. Time is an important element in the value of 
books, especially those of a professional or scientific char- 
acter ; and the public would have good cause for dissatisfac- 
tion if they were received only after the delay attendant on 
specific orders. 

With the purpose of bringing important English publica- 
tions promptly before the patrons of the Library, I have 
made arrangements for receiving by mail such books as are 
adapted to that mode of conveyance, which is more speedy, 
and not more costly for small packages than the usual 
method ; and the experience has proved so successful that I 
recommend its adoption with respect to a similar class of 
continental publications. 

Kevision of the Card Catalogue. 

Mr. Whitney, the head of the Catalogue Department, will 
make a special report respecting his work, and the state of 
that department generally. I will only add that, within a 
few months past, I have caused to be made the experiment 
of printing within the building of the card catalogue and 
broadsides displayed in Bates Hall, and I am happy to 
report that arrangements have finally been made by which 
the work is done expeditiously as well as satisfactorily, at 
an expense not greatly exceeding that of transcription ; and 
this dilferencc in cost is more than compensated for by the 
superiority of the printed card. 



24 City Document No. 94. 



Books Lost and Condemned. 

The reports of the custodian of the shelves and of the 
librarians of the several branches show the number of books 
lost and condemned for the last year. 

MELLEN CHAMBERLAIN, 

Librarian. 

April 30, 1880. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



LIBEAEIAN'8 EEPOET. 



1880 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Extent of the Bates Hall Collection. 

IV. Extent of the Lower Hall Collection. 
V. Sale of Duplicates and Odd Volumes. 

VI. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VII. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VIIL Bates Hall Classifications. 

IX. Lower Hall Classifications. 

X. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

XI. Circulation. 

XII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIIL Books Recommended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIV, Bates Hall Reading. 

XV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XVL Fellowes Athen^um and Brighton Reading. 

XVn. Periodical Reading Rooms. 

XVIII. Losses and Delinquents. 

XIX. Financial Statement. 

XX. Library Funds. 

XXL Library Service. 

XXII. Report on Examination of the Shelves. 

XXIII. Work in the Library Bindery. 

XXIV, The Catalogues of the Library. 



Public Library. 



27 









<1 




H 




fcH 




>H 


^ 


« 


M 






>^ 


X 


-53 


1— 1 


K 


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J^ 


hJ 


w 


W 



Pamphlets 

added from the 

beginning. 



West 

ROXBUEY 

Deliveky. 



Jamaica 

Plain 
Branch. 



South End 
Branch. 



Dorchester 
Branch. 



Brighton 
Branch. 



Charlestown 
Branch. 



Total. 



Fellowes 
, Athe- 



City Part. 



South Boston 
Branch. 



East Boston 
Branch. 



Duplicate 
Koom. 



News- 
paper 
Koom. 



Lower 
Hall. 



Bates 
Hall. 



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oo'cToT 



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oo a> C5 CO 00 t- o 
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CO 0> <D 04 <0 t~ ' ' 



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'OOOOSCOi-HOOTfi'^OO.^UO^-OOOlt 



1(M00"* i-CM 



i-HM-l-dcOOJCOO 

-- — ocooi'Mcoai 

Previously included in the Bates Hall l^-^-^-S'S^ZJS'S- 
collection. ~~~.vj^^^^ 



C^iMC^INCOCOeOCO 



.OSOi-l^'OC-10<OC3icOCOOi'^l-->racOW5(NOOMCOi-4 
rHOCCOO'NOiCDCOOSO'MOt'(MOCi05iOt-COi-<CO 
,00Oi— iOO"OOOC^i-WCCt^05>OOOCO>OCO.— •^OOi-lOO 



l«l'OiO(MCO^»0»OeOOOOiO^-01'^^COlO»0>CCOCO 
•i-li-(i-lO>MC^«(M(MN<NO<C0C0COC0COC0C0C0COC0 



OOOt— OSiHCDiMi-iiOi— it—OiC 



lOl^'COO-ii-i^cOooco — QOcz:i r ^ 



'cocoi— 1— oocoo>oOi-ii-io^co-^-fcot^cocr. o— -o> 



Total Volumes 
in the Libraries. 



ooiHt-oco — ^?r^co■*co-.Tcooooc^cocoooocoooocoo•^co•ra 
cool— '^Oiirt-^cococococOi-ti-QOOicr-i-irt'iftirau't.-^t- — cocoes 

c0 01COO0000OOC0O't^05OC0OOI^ir?(M05i3*irt0". OOOt'O^ 

oT ccT of oo ^ o cc" .r^ t^ ^ cT CO CO o CO -*" oT cT ar of Oi" o" CO t-^ ci" if^ o" t-^ 

-• — — - ' m.-Ti(^.— l^-CMCOCO-rtlift^Oh— f-TiOCOl^dt— •^CDt'- 
l M H OJ CO CO CO CO 



■COOSOi-' — dcoco-^i^coi 



iC O ifS I 



i*iOcOt^COOOr^ClCOMii(OCOt-OOCSO 

.^ re-\ t^ rt^ .^ f0 ^^ ^^ (^ 1^ ^_ I— t— I— t^ I— OD 

p r I 1 r ] I I I I I r I 

I— OOOSCSl— <'7-ICO-Tir3CO|--OOClO — Ol?0-rJ<.rtCOt— COOS 
CO»/^^COOCOtDCOCDCOCOCOCDt— t~.t-»--t^t^r— h-I^t— 
cCCncOCOCOQOQOCOQOOCOOCOOOCOOOOOCOOOOOOOCOOOOO 



CO -^ 1^ CO t- 00 Ci o ^^ - . >.^ ^ ■ . 

ire»o*n>irt'ft.nu^cocococDcoco 
IllllllillllJ. 

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- - - - --- -sirtjcoococD ' 

D 00 00 00 00 OO 



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Se3l38S<SSSS 



28 



City Document No. 94. 



APPEisroix n. 



rEARLT INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE 
AND BY GIFTS. 

NOTB. — The increase of volameaisnot the bdiu of those added by gift and puichase, etc., because iO<t and 
eondemned books are deducted. 



YXABS. 


Increase. 
(JV^ei after 1861.) 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 

eluding those 

charged to funds 

and added by 

exchange. 


a 

%% 
o a> 


£ O 






Vols. 


Pampb. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


*Pamph. 


Vols. 


£:>» 

^a 


, 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


4,000 


961 


6,688 






75 


2 


1853-54 


6,533 
6,396 


2 989 


2,152 
2,663 


2,989 


4,381 
3,733 






106 


8. . . 


1854-55 


2,557 


2,468 


89 




163 


4. . . 


1855-56 


5,463 


5,879 


1,865 


5,330 


3,598 


549 




12« 


6 . . . 


1856-57 


6,816 


3,667 


1,686 


3,646 


5,130 


21 




132 


e 


1857-58 


35,955 
7,192 
6 989 


1,885 
1,317 
1,452 
6,674 


30,214 


1,885 


5,741 
3,787 
3 245 






381 


7 . 


1858-59 


3,405 

3,744 

12,299 


1,317 
1,452 
6,656 






247 


8 


1859-60 






207 


0. . . 


1860-61 


16,948 


4,649 


18 




242 


10 


1861-62 


7,391 
5,529 


1,493 
2,169 


1,274 
829 


1,493 
1,958 


6,117 
4,700 






234 


11. . . 


1862-63 


212 




• 194 


12. . . 


1863-64 


6,226 


2,939 


1,081 


2,772 


6,145 


167 




219 


13. , . 


1864-65 


6,082 


1,516 


804 


1,026 


5,178 


490 




328 


14. . . 


1865-66 


7,662 


4,013 


1,476 


3,342 


6,286 


671 




33« 


18. . . 


1866-67 


6,303 


7,877 


1,465 


7,769 


7,732 


108 




300 


16. . . 


1867-68 


7,673 


2,811 


1,554* 


2,513 


6,396 


298 




342 


17. . . 


1868-69 


8,685 


13,923 


2,138 


10,984 


6,531 


2,939 




649 


18. . . 


1869-70 


7,775 


13,593 


1,643 


10,228 


6,129 


3,365 




666 


19. . . 


1870-71 


18,099 


14,976 


9,750 


10,805 


8,349 


4,171 




604 


20. . . 


1871-72 


13,708 


10,637 


4,349 


5,831 


9,359 


4,806 




610 


21 . . . 


1872-73 


14,644 


11,770 


3,939. 


8,060 


10,705 


3,710 


865 


601 


22. . . 


1873-74 


61,094 


22,475 


4,783 


17,138 


18,671 


5.337 


1,380 


730 


S8. . . 


1874-75 


16,372 


16,293 


4,169 


15,899 


17,080 


394 


572 


1.091 


24. . . 


1876-76 


20,966 


30,732 


6,749 


6,891 


15,206 


24,841 


759 


694 


26. . . 


1876-77 


16,974 


13,305 


3,562 


11,071 


16,544 


2,234 


738 


1.126 


96. . . 


1877-78 


33,724 


15,554 


21,206 


12,453 


17,579 


3,101 


196 


677 


27 . . . 


1878-79 


14,926 


14,596 


3,680 


8,786 


14,403 


5,810 


211 


470 


28. . . 


1879-80 


16,262 


9,624 


5,624 


8,356 


15,016 


1,367 


361 


646 



• Includes pamphlets adde<t both bv purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession Catalogue. 

tincluded in previous columns. These volumes are not tlie property of the Public Library, but fonn • 
part of the Roxbury Branch by agreement. 

(6) Of the increase, 24.r.l8 wori> the Bates gift. 

(9) Of the increase, 11,721 were the Parker bequest. 

(19) .'1,774 volumes of the Ticknor bequest, and 2,G82 from the Suiudci- Librarv Asaocintiou, are included 
in the increase. 

(201 1,471 vohimos from the Mattapan Literary Association are included in the increase. 

(2'-) The increase of this year includes the totals of the libraries at Charlestown and Brighton, ond alio, 
under purchases, the Barton Library. 

(24) The purchnics of this vear include thirty volumes to replace books in the Bates Hall long Inst. The 
great accession nf pninphlots cninc fmrn thf purchase of duplicates fnini Harvard-Cullege Librarv 

(26) The unusual increase is mviiipto the addition of the hooks of tho Mercantile Librarv Associatinn 
which form the nucleus of the South End Branch. 



Public Library. 



29 





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30 



City Document No. 94. 



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32 



City Document No. 94. 



APPENDIX YI. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





9 

H 


H 

Xi 

H 


2 

00 

H 






Mi 
i* 

ge 

H 


e 

FN 


OD 

H 


ae 1 9 
« gfD 

H H 


O 

at) 

H 




Gain in located 
books (App. 
VUI.) . . . 

Of those not 
located at last 
Report . . . 

Added and lo- 
cated .... 

Added and not 
located . . . 

Total gain . . 

Condemned and 

transferred . 

^ Net gain . . . 


6,296 

140 


7,508 
294 


10,384 
4,135 


6,622 
661 


6,198 
829 


6,564 
187 


9,227 


9,337 
691 


11,286 
303 


8,459 
655 

7,804 
558 


7,494 
558 


-~5 

1 


6,156 
294 


7,214 
4,135 


6,249 
651 


5,971 
829 


5,369 
*12,244 


6,377 


9,227 
691 


8,746 10,983 
303 655 


6,936 
846 




6,450 


11,849 


6,900 
1 


6,800 
6 


17,613 


6,377 
3 


9,818 
2 


9,049 11,638 
21 36 


8,362 

48 


7,782 












6,450 


11,349 


6,899 


6,795 


17,618 


6,374 


0,816 


0,028 11,602 8,314 7,758 


,^ f Gain in books . 
e Less transfers 
Cq andcondera'd 
,, -( books .... 


1,417 
231 


2,786 
2,116 


2,614 
1,861 


1,799 
1,021 


1,465 

1,480 


3,385 
2,686 


3,570 

1,813 


3,830 
1,701 


2,728 
t2,344 


2,339 

2,085 


2,483 
2,094 


o 

s 


^ Net gain . , . 


1,186 


665 


1,263 


778 


(losi)16 


799 


1,767 


2,129 


384 


254 


389 



« ("Gain in books . 








254 


101 


402 


336 


167 


126 


66 

25 


132 


§"2 Less loss . . . 










II 






















Ife Net gain . . . 








254 


101 


402 


835 


167 


126 


41 


132 












<a [■ Gain by addition 








1,375 
606 


1,641 
834 


1,234 

786 


1,902 
619 


1,016 
351 


1,677 
718 


3,216 
1,443 


784 


e jj Less loss bj- ex- 
;2 S , changes, etc. 








2,177 


1^1 

^ (.Net gain . . . 










139 


149 


860 


869 


1,307 


448 


1,383 


064 


959 


1,773 


1,393 
loss. 



e f Gain in books . 

5< 1 

S s J Cond'dand lost 




5,936 


881 
60 


621 

97 


664 
143 


016 
834 


917 
273 


856 
250 


676 
270 


716 

1 
403 

1 


649 
406 


''I 








6a^ 

^ Net gain . . . 




5,986 


831 


524 


621 


681 


644 


606 


406 


313 


243 









g ("Gain in books . 

•S-g I 

gel Cond'd and lost 

""I 

I Net gain . . . 



CO 









885 
76 


850 
217 


1,359 
644 


1,261 
495 


















4,365 


609 


633 


715 


766 







1,303 


823 


854 


413 


247 


329 


800 


676 


525 



935 
581 



* Includes 12,057 (close estimate) of the Barton books, and 187 other voluraes. 
t This item is exceptionally large, as manj' duplicates not in use, and broken sots have been 
transferred to the Duplicate Room, to make room .pn the shelves for fresh accessions. 



Public Library. 
APPEOT)IX Yl.— Continued. 



33 





H 


H 
H 


E 

S 


n 

H 


IZ) 

H 


as 


e 

90 
H 


t» 

90 

H 


90 

90 
H 


90 
H 


e 

90 
90 
r4 




Gain in city part 
Cond'd and lost 








3,754 
4 


1,069 
26 


1,296 

46 


1,299 
163 


1,396 

304 


3,542 
701 


1,167 
532 


778 
333 


-s 
















1^ 








3,750 
865 


1,043 
1,330 


1,250 
572 


1,136 
759 


1,092 
738 


2,841 
196 


635 
220 


445 

361 


Fellowes Athe- 
nfeura. (Net 








OS 


















4,615 


2,373 


1,822 


1,895 


1,830 


3,037 


855 


806 












a 

* Si 










15,932 
144 


1,305 
403 


1,004 

800 


1,123 
433 


995 
398 


1,268 
274 


1,310 
340 


nnn^>/1 an/1 Inst. 










fc S 










1^ 
?5 












15,788 


902 


704 


690 


597 


994 


970 












II 












11,049 
12 


480 
75 


599 
130 


480 

74 


264 
46 


236 

47 


273 

27 












•pH 










|<=q 












11,037 


405 


469 


406 


218 


189 


246 












^ • C Gain in books . 
•g g <! Cond'dand lost 










3,905 


3,179 
S2 


1,057 
16 


341 

25 


672 
110 


926 
166 














^•^ 












... 54 


3,905 


3,147 


1,041 


616 


562 


760 




























24 


19 


89 


139 


6,401 
2 


696 
26 


539 












18 


ft, e •> vyuiiu u auu HJBU 




















S^ 




















6,399 


670 


521 




















1< 
No 




















8,856 
52 


522 
86 


368 




















110 










































8,804 


436 


258 
























Bates Hall gain 
Lower Hall gain 
Newspaper 


6,450 
1,186 


11,349 

665 


6,899 
1,253 


6,795 

778 

254 
869 
624 
SOS 
3,750 
866 


19,271 
(loss) 16 

101 

1,307 

621 

633 

1,043 

1,330 

15,788 

11,037 

64 

24 


6,374 

799 

402 
448 
581 
715 

1,250 
572 
902 
406 

3.906 
19 


9,816 
1,757 

835 

1,883 

644 

766 

1,136 

759 

704 

460 

8,147 

39 


9,028 
2,129 

157 

664 

606 

890 

1,092 
738 
690 
406 

1.041 
139 


11,602 
384 

126 

959 

406 

576 

2,841 

196 

597 

218 

616 

6,399 

8,804 


8,314 
254 

41 

1,773 

313 

525 

635 

220 

994 

189 

562 

670 

436 


7,758 
389 

132 




Duplicate Room 
gain .... 

E. B. Branch 
gain .... 

S. B. Branch 


139 


149 
5,936 


860 

831 

4,365 


243 

354 


c 


Rox. Branch 






445 


1 \ 


Fellowes Athe- 
naeum gain . 
Chn. Branch 








861 

970 


"e 








^ 


Bri. Branch 










246 




Dor. Branch 


. . . 








760 




J. P. Branch 










521 




S. E. Branch 










258 




Total gain . . 






















7,775 


18,099 


13,708 


114,644 


51,109 


16,372 


20,955 


17,277 


33,724 


14,926 


14,112 



The total gain includes the 8,068 vols, at the West Eoxbury delivery given during the yea*, less 
1,393 vols, the loss in the Duplicate Boom. 



34 



City Document No. 94. 



APPEOTDIX YII. 

INCREASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





O 


H 


H 


H 


X) 

H 


19 

H 


gc 

H 


r» 

H 


ae 

H 


OD 
H 


O 
at 
ac 


English Books with 1 
British imprint . j 


811 


899 


1,096 


1,389 


1,294 


1,533 


2,830 


2,237 


1,763 


1,781 


1.555 


English Books with ) 
American imprint ( 


1,411 


2,206 


8,642 


4,301 


3,807 


7,365 


10,501 


6,761 


5,546 


5,295 


5,637 


English Books with ) 
Contin'tal imprint ( 


50 


4? 


115 


291 


125 


375 


316 


180 


191 


233 


238 


Foreign Books . . . 


487 


561 


891 


1,064 


858 


767 


1,858 


1,742 


1,269 


1,372 


1,399 


Duplicates of either"! 
class, when not in- 1 
eluded in the other | 
items J 


248 


480 






































Total 


3,007 


4,194 


5,744 


7,045 


6,084 


10,040 


15,505 


10,920 


8,769 


8,681 


8,829 



APPENDIX YIII. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 
(ReprescDting books located only.) 



VII. 

vni. 



XI. 
XII. 

xin. 

XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII. 

XIX. 

XX. 

XXI. 

XXII. 

-XXIII. 

XXIV. 



Cyclopaedias, etc 

Bibliography and Literary History . 
General History, Biograpby, Travel, 



and Po- 
nd Polite 



Hislory, Geography, Biography, Travel, and Po- 



lite Literi 

Greek, Latin, and Pbilology 

Spanish and Portuguese History and Literature 



I'eriodicals and Transactions 

Theology, Ecclesiastical History, etc. . . . 

Metaphysics and Social Science 

Jurisprudence 

Political Economy . 

iledical Science 

Natural History and Science 

Mathematics and Physical Sciences .... 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arw 

Bound Volumes of Miscellaneous Paraphlei 

Bound Volumes of Manuscripts 

Shakespeare 



Totals 



25J 



508 6,47; 6,622 6,995 6,383 8,626 9,424 7 



1,336 
5,569 
6,509 

25,473 

20,784 

11,832 

7.239 

6,867 
4,932 



3,704 
2,272 
10,622 



Special Libraries. 



1,298 
1,125 



1,018 
3,662 



3,060 12,322 2,159 6,432 14,301 3,003 



Explanation.— Class III includes General History, Universal Biographies, Histories of Eras, Voy- 
j!*, and Travels, when embracing several countries, and collected works of historians. 

Class IV Includes North and South American History, Documents and Statistics, Biographies of 
nericans. Geography of, and Voyages and Travels in .•\merica. with the collected works of American 
iters, and what of American Literature is sometimes termed Polygruphy. 

r.1...... v^ (jla^s VI, Class VII, (Mass Vlll. — These have the same scope for the respective countries 

Class VIU includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as 



Class XIX Includes Merhanics. Military and Naval Arts, Aariculturi-, Domestic Arts, etc. 
Class XXII embraces all such p.imphlet volumes as may have been received from time t. 
■ ■ • • • ■ classed otherwise than by thernselvei 



that Class IV has for A 
also the Scandlnavi: 

Class XI includes Russia, Gree 

Class XIV Ineludea Political Si . 

Science, Bducation, Rhetoric, Logic, Phrenology, etc. 



!y, with Asia, .-Vfrica, .\ustralia, Polynesia, etc. 

cial Science, and Ethics applied and unapplied, Intellectual 



are generally too heterogeneous in their make-up to hr classed otherwise than by themselves. 

Class XXIV includes only the Shakespeare collection of the Barton Library, and not that of the O- 
eral Library. 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by them 
learning percentage of use, it is practicable at 
upoti such points ao Biography, T 

•luded in the figures for these libi 



, so that for purposes of enumeration or 

eao.e »•, u„. .,.„,.- ,i, s' . --act figures upon the subdivisions; as also 

1, and Voyages, etc., by summing the results of the ranges devoted 

the several alcoves. 

Note. — The increase of the several special libra: 



dates given in the special libraries colnnin show the year when acquired by the library. 



♦ Includes all Books in Room Q, — 12,108 of thom belonging to the Barton Library, aa originally shelved there. 
t One volume transferred to B. H.; three from American History were also transferred, and are deducted. 
i Patent Records of the Colony of Victoria. 



APPEI^DIXIX. 

EXTENT OF LOWER HALL COLLECTION, AND ADDITIONS TO AND TOTALS OF THE DIFFERENT CLASSIFICATIONS. 





isro 


18T1 


1873 


1873 


1874 


187S 


1870 


1877 


1878 


187» 




1880 




To be deducted. 






CLASSES. 


1 


1 

s 


1 


s 


3 
1 


1 

3 

c 


3 


i 


^ 


>> 

a 








•J 
•ax 

36 
10 
114 

14 
25 
54 

117 
1,640 
168 
77 
165 
31 
1 
3:i 


|3J 


II 


Jl 


1 

11 
2 
29 
4 
12 
10 
40 
1,481 
35 
37 
94 
17 
3. 






1,-oa 

283 
1,898 

664 
1,089 
1,401 
2,676 
9,818 
2,336 
2,041 
3,306 
1,246 

224 
1,209 


1,753 

269 
1,908 

639 
1,086 
1,363 
2,467 
10,469 
2,298 
1,990 
3,478 
1,247 

226 

1,209 

1 

171 


1,805 

275 
1,948 

629 
1,070 
1,369 
2,529 
11,281 
2,281 
1,980 
3,771 
1,250 

226 

1,213 

1 

214 


1,802 

285 
2,043 

656 
1.077 
1,354 
2,644 
11,864 
2,246 
1,985 
3,827 
1,262 

22J 

1,232 

1 

225 


1,792 

294 
2,098 

668 
1,070 
1,362 
2,640 
11,858 
2,234 
1,986 
3,728 
1.261 

228 

1,244 

1 

232 


1,822 

301 
2,110 

Ml 
1,072 
1,380 
2,672 
12,426 
2,278 
2,040 
3,698 
1,263 

229 

1,241 

1 

260 


1.853 

322 

2,191 

716 

1,112 

1,392 

2,667 

13,899 

2,347 

2.061 

3,928 

1,201 

203 

992 

1 

267 


1,844 

328 
2,202 

716 
1,129 
1,477 
2,868 
13,601 
2,489 
2,186 
3,805 
1,313 

155 

1,002 

2 

402 


1,834 

326 
2,220 

732 
1,113 
1,439 
2,930 
13,742 
2,448 
2,132 
4,035 
1,334 

154 

1,015 

2 

406 


1,868 

334 

2,276 

750 

1,119 

1,463 

2,964 

13.690 

2,478 

2,153 

4,072 

1,361 

155 

1,016 


25 
9 
76 
13 
12 
^6 
75 
418 
105 
64 
59 
18 
1 
28 


4 
19 

6 

14 

4 

307 

50 
9 

44 
1 


6 
1 
19 
1 
8 
4 
'38 
916 
13 
14 
62 
12 


1,892 
















8 


2,363 




3 










1,132 
1,507 
3,039 
13,633 












2 
6 
1 






Koglish Proae Fiction, including Juvenile Fiction, and other juvenile books. 


48 


216 

22 
2 












1,375 














.... 

6 






















126 


410 


5 


1 


3 


9 








3 






.... 










29,909 


30,674 


31,827 


32,606 


32,696 


33,305 


35,152 


36,478 


35,862 


36,116 


934 


458 


1,0111 


2,483 


14 


48 


249 


1,783 


36,605 











IlL'ported last year 



Total again in I87fl-a0 



* This class, embracing seta like Bohu's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of coiu'se, which, in a minute classification; would have been divided among ail the previous heads of this table, 
t The books enumerated in this item are mostly imperfect sets. 

Note. — The column of " Condemned books replaced," includes book*) condemned in previous years as well as in the current year. The column * ' Total added " shows the number of volumes us put upon the shelv. 
bound two volumes in one, etc. Tlie smiill ^ain in this Hall U accounted for by the fact that many old books not In request and broken sets have lieun taken off" the shelves, to make room for^newer books. 



Public Library. 



35 



APPEOT)IX X. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1879, TO APRIL 30, 1880. 

Givers (excluding anon^-mous) ..... 546 

Volumes ......... 5,524 

Pamphlets ,. . 8,356 



Givers. 



etc 



relating to 



Abbott, Samuel A. B. 

Academia Rheno-Trajectina, Utrecht 

Adams, Charles F., jr. 

Adams, James O., Manchester, N.H. 

Advocate's Lilirary, Edinburgh . 

Albree, John, jr., Amherst 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences . 

American Association for the Advancement of S 

Salem ........ 

American Bible Union ..... 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, Easton, Pa 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia 
American Metric Bureau ..... 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Philadelphia 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 
Amiens, France, Bibliotheque Communale 
Amory, Thomas C. . . . 

Anonymous .... 

Appleton, D. & Co., New York City 

Appleton, Nathan 

Appleton, William S., 35 portraits 

Franklin ..... 
Atkinson, Prof. E. . . . 
Attwood, Gilbert 
Atwood, Charles 
Baetz, Henry, Milwaukee, Wis. . 
Baker, Voorhis & Co., New York City 
Baldwin, William H. . 
Balfour, David M. . . . 
Banks, Hon. Nathaniel P. . 
Barnes, Hon. Milton, Columbus, Ohi 
Barrett, Miss M. L. . ' 
Barstow, John S. . . . 
Bates, Joseph L. . . . 

Beardsley, J. L., Cleveland, Ohio 
Beers, William A., Fairfield, Conn. 
Bell, Alexander G., Cambridge . 
Benet, Brig.-Gen. S. V., Washington 
Benson, M. D., Cambridge 
Berry, A. Hun .... 
Bibliothek des Deutschen Reichstags 
Bibliotheque Natiqnale, Paris . 
Bishop, Levi, Detroit, Mich. 
Bliss, R., Cambridge . 
Bogart, William H. , Aurora, N. Y. 



I) 



Ber 



C. 



tin 



Pphs. 



43 

47 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
I 



187 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 



9 
22 
1 
1 
6 
1 

1 

2 

1 

17 

3 

1 



121 
1 



1 
1,761 



353 
17 
1 
5 
3 
2 



2 

1 

12 

38 



36 



City Document No. 94. 



Givers. 



Bolles, H. Eugene 

Bolles, William P., 31. D 

Bolton, England, Free Library and Museum 

Bond, Geo. W 

Boston, City of, 1 engraving 

Commissioners of Parks . 

School Committee . . . 

Water Board ..... 



133 



Boston Daily Globe, Publishers . 

Boston Gas Light Company 

Boston Marine- Society .... 

Bowditch, Henry P., M.D. 

Bowditch, J. I. >,^ 

Bowen, Mrs. Sarah E 

Bowker, R. R., New York City . . 
Bowman, Ho7i. Selwyn Z., Washington, B.C. 

Bradford, Charles F 

Bradlee, Rev. Qaleb D., a lot of broadsides, 
papers ....... 

Brill, E. J., Leyden . . . . . 

Brinton, Daniel G., M.D., Philadelphia . 
British Museum, London .... 

Brock, R. A., Richmond, Va., 8 newspapers 
Brophy, Thomas C. . . . . . 

Brown, Francis H., M.D., Chelsea 

Brown, Henry A., Saxonville 

Brown, John P. . 

Brown University, Providence, R.I. . 

Browne, T. Quincy . . . . . 

Brownell, T. Frank, New York City. 
Bunker Hill Monument Association . 
Burchard, Horatio C, Washington, B.C. . 
Burnham, J. H., Bloominqton, III. . 
Burnham, Leavitt, Omaha, Neb. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, D.D. . 
Butler, Wentworth S., New York City 
Cabot, Miss Helen J., 4 broadsides . 
Caldwell, Augustine, Ipswich 
Caldwell, Joseph H. ..... 

Calvert, George H., Newport, R.I. . 

Cambridge, England, Observatory . 

Capon, Miss M. F., 52 newspapers. 

Carret, Jos6 F. . 

Cartee, Cornelius S., M.D, 

Carter, John G. . 

Cassell, Fetter, Galpin & Co., New York City 

Cervantes, Alejandro M.agarinos, Montevideo, Uruguay 

Cervi, Romeo .... 

Challen, Howard, Philadelphia 
Chamberlain, IIo7i. Mellen 
Chambers, George E., Philadelphia 
Chandler, Alfred D. . 
Chandler, Horace P. . 
Chandler, J., Titusville, Pa. 
Chandler, Thomas H., M.D. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., Cambridge 
Chapin, Alfred C, New York City 
Chase, George B. . . . 

Clieales, Rev. Alan, Brockham, Siirf-ey, England 
Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, 111. . 



27 
2 

26 

109 

1 

17 
6 
2 
4 
1 
1 
7 



30 
1 
1 

7 



89 

3 
1 
1 
2 
1 



1 
1 
1 

50 
1 



10 
1 
8 



196 
1 

45 

207 



3 
1 
6 
57 
1 



6 

81 

2 



30 

1 
1 



2 
6 
1 
217 
1 
6 



Public Libraey. 



37 



Givers. 




Child, Hon. Linus M. 

Christern, F. W., New York City 

Claflin, Hoti. William 

Clapp, Ebenezer, 48 newspapers. 

Clapp, Herbert C, jV.Z>. . 

Clapp, William W. . 

Clark, Rev. George Faber, Meyulon 

Clarke, Isaac E., Washington, D.C. 

Clarke, Rev. James Freeman, D.D. 

Clarke, Robert & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Clough, Joseph W. . . . 

Clyde, Rev. John C, Frazer, Pa. 

Cobden Club, London, 9 broadsides 

Coghill, James H., New York City 

Colby University, Waterville, Me. 

Cole, H. Hammond . 

Connelly, William T. 

Cook, Samuel F., Lansing, 3Iich. 

Cook & Townsend, 3Iarlboro' 

Cornulier-Luciniere, E. de, Orleans, France 

Cowles, 3Iiss Jennie E. 

Crane, T. Frederick, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Crocker & Brewster . 

Crooke, William B. . 

Crosby, Mrs. E. L., Bangor, Me. 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 

Culley, Eli, Fitchburg 

Cummings, Thomas H. 

Cunningham, Peter F., Philadelphia 

Cure and Bath Administration, Kreuznach, Oer 

Curtis, Col. H. P., Washington, D.C. 

Cushing, Luther S., Heirs of 

Cushings & Bailey, Baltimore, M.D. 

Cutter, Abram E. 

Cutter, Ge7i. George F., Washington, D.C. 

Dall, W. H., Washington, D.C. 

Davenport, George E. 

Dawson, C. C, Lowell 

Dawson Brothers, Montreal 

Day, Albert, M.D. . 

Day, J. Alphonso, Lunenburg . 

Dean, John W. .... 

De Costa, Rev. Benjamin F., New York City 

Delaware Historical Society, Wilmington, Del 

Dennet, Charles F., Brighton, Eng. 

Dennis, M. T 

Depping, Guillaume, Paris 
Dexter, George .... 
Dickinson, M. Y., jr. 
Dimmock, Prof. George, Cambridge 

Ditson & Co 

Dixwell, Mrs. John J. 
Dodd, Mead & Co., New York City 
Dorchester and Milton Circulating Library 
Draper, George & Sons, Andover 
Dreher, Prof. Julius D., Salem, Va. 
Drowne, Henry T., New York City 
Dudley, Dean . ... 

Dudley Observatory, Albany, N. Y. 
Dupee, James A., Winchester . 



many 



Pphs. 



3 
15 

2 
4 
1 
1 
1 



241 
5 



1 

12 
1 

2 
2 

22 

1 



1 
4 
1 
46 
2 
3 
1 



162 



38 



City Document No. 94. 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, 3fe 




1 


Durrie, Daniel S., Madison, Wis. 






20 


7 


Dutch Church, Austin Friars, London 






1 




Dwight, Prof. Timothy, JVew Haven, Conn. 






1 




Earle, Pliny, M.D., Nortliam'pion 








2 


Eastman, Edmund T., M.D 








1 


Eaton, John, Wasliington, D.C. 








5 


Edes, Henry H., a lot of broadsides and cards . 






2 


199 


Emery, George E., Lynn 






1 




Evans, Warren ^., 3LD 






1 




Everett, Rev. William, Quincy .... 








1 


Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia . 








1 


Fales, Lewis, Milford 








1 


Fearing, A. C, jr. ...... 






1 




Fernald, Prof. Orlando M., Williamatown 






2 


6 


Fisher, Charles H., M.D., Providence, R.L 








1 


Fisher, S. D., Springfield, III 






1 




Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 








7 


Floye, W. J 






2 




Folsom, Rev. George M 






5 




Ford, Rev. David B., Hanover .... 






1 




Ford, William E 








2 


French, A. D. Weld 






1 




Furness, Horace H., LL.D., Philadelphia 






1 




Gallaudet, E. M., LL.D., Washington, D.C. . 








2 


Galvin, Rev. Edward J., Walla Walla, Washington Ty., 1 






portrait. 






Ganzhorn, William 


1 




Garbit, Frederick J., J/. Z> 




1 




Gardiner, George, London . . . ... 




1 




Garrett, T. Harrison, Baltimore, Md. 




1 




Garrison, William Lloyd, Children of . . . 




1 




Gassett, Edward 




4 




Gayangos, Pascual de ...... 




1 




Gerould, Rev. Samuel L. Goffstown, N.H. 






1 


Getchell, Annie, M.D 




1 




Giles, Alfred E., Hyde Park 






1 


Gloucester, City of 




1 




Godkin, E. L. & Co., New York City, 25 broadsides 








1 maj), 41 G newspapers ...... 




22 


293 


Goeje, Prof. M. J. de, Leyden 




1 




Gold, T. S., West Cornwall, Conn 




2 




Gorgas, Gen. Josiah, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 






1 


Gould, I'rof. Benjamin A., Cordoba, Argentine Republic 




2 




Gould, E. W 




4 


4 


Gould, S. C. Afanchesier, N.H. 




1 


1 


Graham, Douglas, M.L) 






1 


Gray, John F., M.D., mica, N.Y. .... 






1 


Great Britain, Commissioner of Patents 




91 




Green, Miss H. E 




1 




Green, Millrey, M.D 




1 




Green, Samuel A., M.D 




143 


40 


Green, Samuel S., Worcester 






1 


Greenougli, Charles P., 3 broadsides .... 




1 


5 


Greenough, William W 






30 


GriflRn, A. P. C 






3 


Grimshaw, W. A., Pittsfield, III 




1 




Groton, Town of 






2 


Guitoau, Charles J 




2 




Gulliver, Rev. John P., Andover 








1 



Public Libeary. 



39 



Givers. 



Pphs. 



Hampton, 



Gunton, William, M.D., Washington, D.C. 
Hackett, Frank W., Portsmouth, N.H. 
Hagen, Prof. Herrmann A., Cambridge 
Hall, Edward W., Ithaca, N.Y. . 

Hallet, Miss H 

Hamm, Mrs. C. H 

Ham[)ton Normal and Agricultural Institute, 

Va 

Hanaford, Rev. Phebe A., Jersey City 

Happy Hours Companj^, New York City 

Harney, G. J., Cambridge . 

Harper Brothers, New York City 

Harris, Joseph, Rochester, N. Y. 

Hart, Charles H., Philadelphia . 

Harvard Art Club, Cambridge . 

Harvard College Library, Cambridge . 

Hassam, John T. .... 

Hatch, Hon. J. D., Burlington, Vt. . 

Haven, S. F., Worcester 

Haynes, Prof. Henry W. 

Hazen, Rev. Henry A., Billerica 

Heikel, Felix, Helsingfors, Finland . 

Heinzen, Karl ..... 

Hennell, Sara S., London . 

Herschel, Clemens .... 

Hickey, M., Detroit, Mich. 

Hill, Rev. James L., Lynn 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Hitchcock, Edward M.D., Amherst . 

Holder, Thomas W., 1 broadside. 

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 31. D., 23 broadsides 

Holmgren, Frithiop, M.D., Upsala, Sweden 

Holt, Henry & Co., New York City . 

Holway, F. B 

Homes, Henry A., Albany, N.Y. 

Houghton, J. C, Lynn .... 

Hovey, E. F., Philadelphia 

Howard Association, Memphis, Tenn. 

Hubbard, Rev. James M., 20 broadsides 

Hudson, Rev. John Clare, Horncastle, England 

Hughes, H. T., Carmarthen, Wales . 

Huidekoper, Frederic, Meadville, Pa. 

Humphrey, William F. ' . 

Hunnewell, James F. . 

Illinois Board of Public Charities, Springfield 

Ingraham, Robert C, New Bedford . 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London 

James, Mrs. Thomas P., Cambridge . 

Janvier, C. A. Philadelphia 

Jarvis, Edward, J/. Z> 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D 

Jenks, Mrs. John H., 2 broadsides, £7 newspapers 

Joslyn, Mrs. S. A 

Joy, Prof. Charles A., Stockbridge 

Kaserliche Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna 

Kansas State Board of Agriculture, Topeka 

Ketchum, Rev. Silas, Poquonock, Conn. 

King, Moses, Cambridge .... 

King, Thomas D 

Knapp, Arthur M., 51 newspapers 



1 
2 

2 

249 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



15 
1 

29 



1 
161 
126 

1 



40 



City Document No. 94. 



Givers. 



Knapp, Frederick N., Plymouth 

Kneeland, Samuel, M.D. . 

Knevels, D. C. Verplanck . 

Knortz, Karl, Johnstown, Pa. 

Knust, Herrmann, London . 

Koenigliche Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschften 

3Iunich 
Koenigliche Sammlungen fiir Kunst und Wissenschaft 

Dresden ..... 
Koenigliches Zoologisches Museum, Dresden 
Ko-Kun-hua, Prof., Cambi-idge . 
Lambert, William H., Philadelphia . 
Lamson, 3Iiss C. M., Dedham . 
Langworthy, Rev. Isaac T., D.D. 
Laurie, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Providence, R.I. 
Lawrence, Abbott ..... 
Lawrence Public Library .... 
Laws, James H. & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio . 
Lawton, O. & Co., San Francisco, Cal. 
Lea, Henry C, Philadelphia 
Lee, John W. M., Bcdtimore, Md., specimens of bank-note 

paper .... 
Lee & Shepard . 
Leicester Public Library . 
Lenox Library, New York City 

Library of the University of Vermont, Burlingt 

Lincoln, Francis H. . 

Lincoln, Marshall ..... 

Lincoln, Varnum, Andover 

Lindsley, J. Berrien, M.D., Nashville, Tenn 

Literary and Historical Society of Quebec 

Lippincott, J. P. & Co., Philadelphia 

Locke, J. S. 

London, City of . 

London Library .... 

Lowell, Miss Anna C. 

Lowell, Augustus 

Lowell, City of .... 

Luiz, King of Portugal 

Lyman, Theodore 

MacCarthy, Denis Florence, London 

McCleary, S. F. ... 

McClellan, lion. George B., Trenton, N.J. 

McNeill, George E., West Somerville 

Macullar, Parker & Co. 

Maim on, Bernhard 

Mann, B. Pickman, Cambridge . 

Manning, Mrs. J. E. . 

Mansill, Thomas 

Marsh, lion. George P. 

Massachusetts, State of 

Board of Health 

• Bureau of Statistics of Labor 

Library 



Massachusetts Historical Society 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 
Massachusetts Medical Society . 
Massachusetts Society for the Prevention 
Animals ...... 

Maxwell, Sidney D., Cincinnati, Ohio 



of 



Cruelty to 




226 



11 



11 
6 
3 

67 
2 



27 



4 
1 
18 
1 
1 
1 
1 



63 



31 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



Public Library. 



41 



Givers. 




May, Miss Abby W. . ' . 
Medical Society of the County of New York 
Meek, Henry M., Salem .... 
Memorial Hall Library, Andover 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia 
Metcalf, T. & Co., 7 newspapers 
Milner-Barry, John, 31. D., Tunhridge Wells, England 
Minns, Thomas, 380 newspapers. 
Montague, William L., Amherst 
Montpellier, France, Conseil Municipal 
Morel-Fatio, Alfred, Paris 
Morrison, N. J., D.D., Springfield, Mo. 
Morse, Hon. Leopold, Washington, D C. 
Muckle, M. Eichards, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mudge, Augustus, Danvers 
MuUer, Frederik, Amsterdam . 
Myer, Brig. -Gen. Albert J., Washington, B.C. 
Nelson, Thomas & Sons, Ifew York City . 
Newburyport, City of .... 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 
New England Society of Orange, N.J. 
New York, City of. Department of Public Parks 
Health Department 



D.D. 



New York City Mission and Tract Society 

New York Produce Exchange, New York City 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 

Nichols, Prof. William R. ... 

Nicholson, Prof. James B., Philadelphia 

Nickerson, Sereno D. .... 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia 

Nuiiez, Abelardo 

O., Mrs. E. M., Oxford, England 

Ohio State Library, Columbus . 

Orwig, J. R., Harrisburg, Pa. . 

O'Shea, P., New York City 

Osier, William, 31. D., Montreal 

Otori, K. S., Tokei, Japan 

Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benjamin H 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester 

Parce, J. Y., Deland, Fla. 

Park, Rev. Edwards A., Andover 

Parrish, Robert A., jr., Philadelphia 

Payot, Upham & Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

Peck, John Lord, Philadelphia 

Peirce, Hon. Henry B 

Peirce, Prof. James M., Cambridge . 
Penitent Females' Refuge .... 
Peoria, III., Board of Trade 
■ Perkins, Charles C. . 

Perry, Prof. Thomas S 

Perry, Rt. Rev. William S., D.D., Davenport, 
VhiWiYis, Henry, jr., Philadelphia 
Phoenix, S. Whitney, New York City 
Pickering, 3Irs. Charles .... 

Pike, Benjamin F. . . . . . 

Pike, James S., Neiv York City 

Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan, Lansing 

Peymouth, England, Free Library 

Pool, Wellington, Wenham 

Porquet, Ch., Paris . 



Iowa 



26 



1 

10 



Ppha. 

3 
4 

1 

102 

46 



2 

10 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 



42 



City Document No. 94. 



Givers. 



R. 



C. 



Pratt, Charles E 

Pratt Brothers, Marlboro' . 
Probasco, Henry, Cincinnati, Ohio . 
Providence, R.I., City of . 
Providence Athenteura, Providence, R.I. 

Pryor, T. H., M.D 

Punchard, Rev. George 

Putnam's Sons, New York City . 

Quincy, Miss E. S., Quincy 

Raw, Charles, Washington, D.C. 

Ray, Richard, 1 broadside . 

Read, George B. .... 

Redwood Library and Athenaeum, Newport 

Reed, J. Harris 

Riaiio, Juan F., Madrid 

Rice, Roswell, Cambridge, N.Y., 6 broadsides 

Rice, William Springfield . 

Richards, Samuel W. . 

Robinson, William F 

Rodman, Thomas R., New Bedford . 
Rolfe, William J., Cambridge . 
Root, William H., Burlington, Vt. . 

Ropes, J. C 

Ross, Augustus ..... 

Rotch, William, Fall River 

Royal Astronomical Society, London . 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England 

Royal Society, London 

Russell, lion. William A., Washington, D 

Sabine, John 1)., Washington, D.C. . 

St. Louis Public School Library, St. Louis, Mo 

St. Louis & San Francisco Railway Company, 

City 

Salem Lyceum . . 
Salisbury, Stephen, yr., Worcester 

Salter, W. M 

Sands, J • • 

Sargeant, Mrs 

Sargent, Charles S 

Sawtoll, Edward B., Fitchbnrg . 

Schwab, Emil ..... 

Scull, G. D., Oxford, England . 

Searle, Frederick A., 215 broadsides. 

Sears, Daniel W. .... 

Sears, J. Montgomery, 3 broadsides . 

Selwyn, lion. Alfred R. C, Montreal 

Sharpe, William, M.D., London 

Shaw, Benjamin S., M.D. . 

Shaw, Samuel S 

Sheffield, England, Central Library . 

Slack, Charles W 

Smith, Elbridge 

Smith, James ..... 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C- 

Society of Arts, 7yOW(?on ... 

Southbridgo Public Library 

Spybey, F. G., Nottingham, England 

Staples, Rev. Carlton A., Providence, R.L 

State Charities Aid Association, New York City 

Stearns, Prof. Robert E. C, Berkeley, Cal. 



New 



Yor 




1 
2 

1 

156 

2 

1 

9 
30 



14 
1 

20 
1 



74 
3 
1 



1,473 
2 

15 
917 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
3 



Public Library. 



43 



Givers. 



Vols. Pphs. 



Stevens, B. F., Londoii, 2 broadsides 
Stilson, Arthur E., Ottumwa, Iowa . 
Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.I. 
Stone, F. D., Philadelphia, 7 broadsides 
Swift, Lindsay ..... 
Tatham, John, M.D., Salford, England 

Taylor, William B 

Tebb, William, London . . . 
Teele, Eev. A. K , Hilton . 
Tenney, David B., Haverhill 
Tenney, 3frs. H. A., Lansing, Mich. 
Thompson, Rev. H. A., D.D., Westerville 
Thomson, Peter G., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Thurston, Robert K., Hoboken, N.J. . 

Ticknor, Miss A. E 

Titus, Rev. Anson, jr., Weymouth 
Todd, D. P., Washington, D.C. 
Toledo, Ohio, Public Library 
Townc, E. H., Worcester . 

Tucker, William W 

Turner, Alfred T 

Tuttle, Charles W 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsv 
Tuttle, Lucius ..... 
United States, Adjutant General's Office 

Attorney General . 

Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Engineers 

Bureau of Navigation 

Bureau of Statistics 

Census Office .... 

Centennial Commission, Philadelph 

Coast Survey Office 

Department of the Interior 

Department of State 

Department of War 

Director of the Mint 

Life-Saving Service 

Naval Observatory . 

Navy, Department of 

Ordnance Department 

Patent Office .... 

Paymaster General's Office 

Post Office Department . 

Signal Office .... 

Surgeon General's Office 

Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada 
University of California, Berkeley, Cat. 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich 
Vaux, Richard, Philadelphia 
Vermont State Library, Montpelier, Vt. 
Victoria, Chief Secretary's Office, Mclbour 

Public Library, Melbourne . 

Wadsworth, M. E 

Wallace, Capt. William 

Waller, James B., Chicago, 111. . 

Waller, .Jcjhn, London, 1 engraved portrait 

Walworth Manufacturing Company . 

Warren, William F., LL.D. 

Warren County Library, Monmouth, III 



Ohio 



ille, 



Ind. 



2 
2 

28 
1 
1 
1 

11 
1 
5 
3 

13 
1 
1 

U 

4 

26 

1 

33 

2 

3 

2 



14 
1 



1 
1 

1 

17 

I 



1 

12 

1 

6 

1 
10 



24 
4 



24 
3 



1 
17 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 



194 



44 



City Document No. 94. 



Givers. 



Waterburry, Rev. Julius H. 

Weeks, Joseph D., Pittsburg, Pa. . 

West Roxbury Public Library . 

Wheeler, Harold, Cambridge 

Wheelwright, 3Irs. Josiah . 

Whitaker, Alfred E., San Francisco, Cal. 

White, Charles J 

Whitmore, William H. . , . 

Whitney, James L. . . , . 

Wigglesworth, The Misses . 

Wilder, Miss Anna Dora, 17 newspapers. 

Wilder, Hon. Marshall P. . 

Willey, Rev. S. H., D.D., Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Williams, A., & Co 

Williams, James, Columbus, Ohio 

Williams, W. A., Chelsea . 

Wilson, James, Grant, New York City 

Wilson, Silas N 

Winthrop, Hon. Robert C. . 

Witkowski, C 

Woburn Public Library 

Woodberry, George E., Cambridge . 

Woodward, W. Elliot .... 

Woolley, M., M.D.,Streator, 111. 

Wormley, Mrs. K. P., Newport, R.I. 

Wprthington, Roland, & Co. 

Yendell, George ..... 

Young, Prof. Edward J., Cambridge, 1 newspaper 

Young, W. Maynard L. . . . 

Young Men's Institute, Neio Haven, Conn. 

Young Men's Library, Buffalo, N. Y. . 

ZUUig, Mrs. A. A. P., 1 newspaper. 



Vols. 



1 






1 


3,067. 


120 


1 


10 


12 






1 


25 


18 


3 






11 




66 



1 
1 

10 



Pphs. 



12 
1 
1 



APPEiq^DIX XI 

CIRCULATION. 
(Books issued.) 



a 1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 



Total Cekcolatiok. 







J, 


Issues. 




if 
3 


21 0,903 


917 


1,708 


c 3i;,44 J 


li 965 


b 1,856 


380,3« 


1,»» 


2,425 


467,865 


1,519 


3,073 


625,442 


2,031 


5,124 


758,417 


2,581 


6,074 


947,621 


3,097 


8,035 


1,140,672 


3,727 


8,348 


1,183,991 


3,882 


10,478 


1,160,565 


3,833 


8,747 


1,1.56,721 


3,768 


8,781 



Feb. 19 
Jan. 28 
Mar. 16 



Bates Ham.. 




S 


i 


f 


>> 

1 


a 

n 


m 


1 


1 

n 


1 

3 


25,99(5 


21,601 


47,897 


207 


441 


31,080 


34,225 


65.206 


212 


457 


23,169 


27,092 


60,251 


163 


286 


23,261 


31,003 


59,264 


192 


388 


34,441 


37,872 


72,313 


235 


644 


41,721 


39,016 


80,737 


263 


603 


54,956 


69,373 


114,329 


373 


877 


66,832 


74,786 


141,618 


463 


930 


80,326 


66,670 


146,996 


483 


1,001 


74,027 


89,163 


163,790 


632 


926 


69.042 


101,100 


170,142 


554 


1,045 



LowBK Hall. 



m*: 



161,631 
227,579 
248,029 
230,111 
245,244 
264,826 
333,450 
392,995 
378,439 
350,521 
306,148 



1,140 
1,326 
1,265 

1,179 
1,031 



1,386 
1,413 
1.472 
1,443 
1,535 
1,759 
2,598 
2,439 
2,902 
2,085 
1,999 



1,735 
3,631 
6,217 
7,946 
7,863 
8,009 
10,392 
12,737 
12,738 
12,672 
10,369 



163,366 
231,110 
254,246 
238,057 
253,097 
272,834 
348,842 
405,732 
391,176 
.363,193 
316,517 



East Boston Branch. 



26,151 
74,804 
67,754 
80,771. 
86,134 
89,949 
101,022 
104,717 
96,887 
106,197 



1,038 



26,130 

76,846 
68,212 
81.091 
85,648 
90,987 



1,605 1102,627 

1,879 1 106,696 

2,794 198,681 

3,00,4 ] 108,201 



Sooth Boston Branch. 



101,688 
107.651 
111,677 
113,334 
131,969 
137,010 
115,609 
138,3119 



860 
1,046 
1,075 3,210 
1,414 3,741 
1,200 I 3,335 ■ 
1,190 I 5,261 



102,322 
108,566 
112,625 
115,630 
136,179 
140,7M 
i 118,844 
143,.i7U 





BozBOBT Branch. 


Chaklestown Branch. 


Brighton Branch. 


Dorchester Branch. 


Sooth End Branch. 


Jamaica Plain Branch. 


Yfar. 


S 

1 


1 

1 
5 


i 




i 


H 




1 


1 

a 

a 


i 

1 


1 


S 

a 

n 




i 




n 


1 

H 


i 
1 


i 

1 

3 


i 

t. 


5 

a 


H 


1 


"a 

} 


1 


a 


H 


i 

e 
a 


S 

S 


2 


i 

a 


1 


1874 


64,092 
87,079 
93,304 
140,059 
122,617 
123,492 
119,450 


612 
686 
925 
1,190 
1,100 
1,013 
1,017 


263 
285 
320 
477 
404 
403 
388 


3,250 
2,460 
2,993 
6,770 
7,513 
6,397 
5,480 


67,342 
89,539 
101,297 
146,829 
130,030 
129,889 
124,930 


32,023 
78,169 
84,631 
105,211 
99,537 
86,925 
73,302 


734 
704 
830 
902 
970 
685 
616 


327 
260 
279 
348 
332 
289 
246 


1,368 
1,206 
1,184 
1,606 
2,003 
1,816 
1,446 


33,391 

79,375 
86,815 
106,816 
101,540 
*88,740 
74,748 


9,642 
21,394 
23,631 
27,832 
27,649 
26,737 
26,406 


225 
234 
314 
290 
328 
312 
302 


88 
70 
81 
97 
89 
93 
91 


448 
1,274 
1,960 
1,698 
1,869 
1,674 


9,642 
21,842 
24,805 
29,792 
29,247 
28,928 
27,980 


















1 












1876 


15,675 
63,357 
67,692 
63,025 
66,786 
56,690 


439 
662 
620 
624 
675 
541 


197 
206 
220 
197 
184 
176 


132 
899 
4,287 
1,949 
1,423 
1,026 


/a6,017 
66,016 
71,979 
64,974 
69,673 
56,716 




















187i; 


' 


















1877 


1 


















1878 
1879 
1880 


41,303 
73,154 
77,016 


667 
622 
080 


188 
247 

258 


1,099 
2,713 

2,275 


42,402 
76,867 
79,391 


28,174 
50,467 
52,406 


384 
413 

437 


138 
171 
176 


2,106 
2,503 
2,220 


30,280 
52,960 
.'.4,620 



a Nine months. 
Central Library odIj". 

c If the issues of East Boston "be excluded, tlii 
if Hall issues be excluded, there will be a record <»: 
d Open seventy-eight days. 



' day, 



white slips, 



i footing would be 290,315; ai 
293,71U volumes used at home. 



e Includes books borrowed and returned the i 
shown in Appendix XHI. 

/The E. B. Branch was open only 307 days, owing to repairs on furnace. 

g Includes the largest of each department on any day, without rei^ard to i 
being the same day, as in previous entries under this head. 



/( The use of the Dorchester Branch is for a little over three months. 

i The East Boston Branch was closed from October 7th to 19th for repain 
Souili Boston from August 12th to November 2d for repairs and enlargement. 

ytThe Charlestown Branch was dosed from April 20th to the 30th, to r 
arrange the books. 



Public Library. 



45 



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46 



City Document No. 94. 



CO 

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n the 1 
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What 
at year 
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t"l. '.S2»;= = 
2 2 



Public Library. 



47 



APPENDIX XIY. 

BATES HALL READING. 













Percentage 


OF 


Use. 






Classification. 


H 
17.5 


16 


9 

H 
13 


18 


9 

H 

20 


H 
17 


e 

H 

17 


© 
H 

17 


H 

17 


QC 
H 

12 


« 

oc 

H 
19 


f 

» 

H 

16 


QfD 
H 

15 


9 

QC 

15 


QC 
H 

13 


■5C 
t» 

T> 
H 

13 


9 

QC 
H 

13 


O 
QD 


English History, To- 
pography, Biogra- 
phy, Travel, and Po- 
lite Literature . . 


13.2 


American (North and 
South) History, etc. 


6 


8.5 


10 


8 


12 


12 


12 


12 


13 


10 


12 


n 


11 


12 


10 


14 


13 


11.8 


French History, etc. . 


5 


7.5 


6 


6 


7 


4 


5 


5 


5 


4 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


6.1 


Germanic History, etc. 


2.5 


2 


2.5 


2 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3.4 


Italian History, etc. . 


4 


2.5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1.5 


Other History, Topog- 
raphy, Biography, 
Travel, and Polite 
Literature .... 


3.5 


3.5 


2.5 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 


5 


4.2 


General andSEpochal 
History 


4.5 


4.25 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3.3 


Greek, Latin, and Phi- 
lology 


3 


3.5 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3.6 


Bibliography .... 


2.5 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1.2 


Transactions .... 


3 


1.5 


2.3 


5 


7 


5 


4 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


2 


2 


.5 


Periodicals ....*. 


7 


6 


6 


11 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


10 


8 


8 


7 


7 


6 


5 


5 


3.9 


Fine Arts 


9 


12 


16.5 


8 


5 


8 


8 


8 


9 


11 


10 


11 


11 


10 


9 


12 


13 


8.9 


Natural History and 
Science 


4 


4 


4.6 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3.8 


Theology, Ecclesiasti- 
cal History, Ethics, 
Education, etc. . . 


11 


11 


8.5 


4 


4 


8 


9 


8 


11 


14 


10 


11 


11 


10 


10 


8 


8 


11.0 


Medicine 


7 


5 


4.6 


8 


6 


6 


8 


8 


9 


9 


8 


7 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7.3 


Law, Government, 
and Political Econ- 
omy 


1.5 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


27 


Useful Arts, Mathe- 
matics, Physics, etc. 


5.5 


5.5 


7.6 


7 


8 


7 


6 


5 


6 


8 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


10 


10 


9.7 


Miscellaneous Pam- 
phlets bound . . . 


2 


.75 


.75 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


4.0 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker, Barton, 
and Prince Libraries — which are kept apart from the general classification of the Library — 
Is reckoned as near as possible and included in the usual divisioud, as is indicated in the table. 
(See Explanations to Appendix VIII.) 

The figures for 1878-9 are only approximately correct. 



APPENDIX XV. 



LOWKR HALL AND BRANCH RKADING 



0LABSE8. 
The figures give the relative percentages. 

Fiction and juveniles 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, law, medi- 
cine, profesaioDd 

Periodicals 

Foreign languages 

Miscellaneous 





1871 




1872 




1873 




1874 






187B 






1876 


B3 


CQ 


i 


a 


M 


3 


a 


cd 


ca 


3 


w 


n 


« 




3 


K 


ri 


(0 


« 


^ 


3 


w 


» 


n 


,• 


S 


►J 


H 


f- 




H 


H 




w 


m 


H 


vj 


H 


CO 


« 


H 


►J 


M 


m 


PS 


P 


t^ 


hJ 


tA 


to 


« 


a 


77 


64 


70.6 


76 


78 


77 


74 


82 


79 


78 


71 


80 


78 


31 


78 


69 


82 


"9 


85 


84 


80 


70 


80 


79 


86 


82 


4 


8 


6 


4 


3 


3.5 


■2 


3 


6 


3+ 


5 


4 


5 


4 


4+ 


7 


4 


5 


3 


5 


6 


7 


4 


6 


3 


4 


3 


5 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


3 


3 


2+ 


3 


3 


3 


>> 


3.0 


4 


2 


4 


3 


4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


4 


6 


3 


4.6 


6 


3 


4.6 


6 


2 


4 


4 


7 


2 


4 


4 


4 


7 


2 


4 


4 


3 


4 


7 


2 


4 


3 


4 


6 


6 


5 


6 


6 


6 


8 


6 


4 


6 


7 


6 


6 


2 




6 


5 


4 


2 


1 


3 


, « 


6 


4 


2 


2 


3 


1 , 
U 


1.6 
8.6 


1 
4 


7 


0.6 
5.5 


2 

7 






1 

5+ 


3 
4 








1 
4.6 


3 
4 








3 


I 

4 


1 3' 








4 


4 


5 


5 


6 


4 


^ 


4 


3 


6 


6 


4 



» 




1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 

































































The figures give the relative percentages. 


K 




ca 


1 


1 


1 


J 


to 


ra 


1 





H 


1 




n 


m 


« 


P, 


W 


►-a 


1 








[2 


P 


H 


B.' 


1 


I. 




71 


83 


79 


86 


83 


80 


72 


83 


80 


86 


81 


81 


80 


72 


81 


76 


84 


82 


78 


62 


76.4 


70 ■ 


80 


76 


83 


79 


73 


62 


74.7 


II. 


History and biography 


6 


3 


6 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


6 


4 


5 


8 


5 


6 


6 


6 


4 


4 


7 


6 


6.3 


6 


4 


6 


4 


6 


8 


6 


5.3 




T I A 








., 










































3 




. 


3 


3 


IV. 


Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, 
law, medicine, professions 


7 


2 


4 


3 


3 


4 


6 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


3 


6 


2 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 




3 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


4.4 




Periodicals 


6 


5 


4 


2 


3 


4 


6 


4 


4 


2 


3 


2 


3.5 


6 


6 


'- 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 


7 


6 





3 


'" 


' 


4 


5 






1 






4 


6 


6 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


6 


3 


6 


4 


4.5 


4 


J 


6 


3 


4 


6 


24 


7.3 


4 


6 


5 


3 


4 


4 


21 


6.6 









Public Library. 



49 



APPEIN^DIX XYI. 

FELLOWES ATHEN^UM EEADING. 



cj 

s 


Classes. 


J* 

ac 

H 


H 


H 


« 
H 


H 


H 


O 


I. 


History, biography, and travels . 


35 


43 


38 


33 


30 


37 


39 


n. 


Modern foreign languages .... 


13 


12 


9 


11 


10 


11 


10 


ni. 




2 

12 


4 
10 


5 
10 


14 
9 


17 

8 


6 
9 


5 


IV. 


Miscellaneous literature 


11 


V. 


Theology, sociology, ethics .... 


7 


6 


5 


7 


7 


6 


6 


VI. 




1 
6 


1 
4 


1 

4 


1 

4 


2 
4 


2 
4 


2 


VII. 


Classics 


4 


vni. 


Fine arts, engineering 


12 


8 


10 


7 


7 


8 


7 


IX. 


Law, pdlitics, government .... 


1 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


X. 


Mathematics, science 


12 


10 


15 


11 


12 


14 


13 



BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 



d 
1 

5 


Classes. 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


T 


Fiction 


84 
7 
9 


80 

7 

13 


77 

8 

15 


76 
7 
17 


75 

8 

17 


76 


n. 

ITT 


Biography, travel, and history . 
Other n 


8 
16 









CHARLESTOWN BRANCH READING. 

Note. — No classification of the use is practicable, as the books were originally shelved 
without regard to classes. Tables similar to those of the other branches will be possible in 
future now that a rearrangement of the books has been made. 



50 



City Document No. 94. 





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o 




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oo 




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r~ 'S 


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o c 


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t';. 


f-^ 


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OD 




















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^ 


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CO 


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H 






















CO 




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o 






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o »r 


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CO 


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CO 


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co 


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o 


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o 


ss 


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CO 


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00 


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p 


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co^ 


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J:; 




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CO 




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k 




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CO (N 1 -^ c- 


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1% ** -M • 

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S E n '- 

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<^ S ^ " = 



CO g 



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c o So 
Co :?■ a, 

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3 £ j: ■- • 

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■3 rt ■- -^ = 

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3 ^ O C 
3 CJ X J, r 



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•C.S C— i- 

p-i n ; p s 
■" * 3« 

C* iJ f- C 

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f_i D .2 ;i ?5 
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Public Library. 



51 



M 


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k 


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r-i 


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o 


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in 


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^ 




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■^ 


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oa 


rH O 










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o 










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t- r^ 


■* 




o 








cT 


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m 










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(M 


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OB f-H 


o 


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rH CO 






o 




l^ 


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t~~^ 






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Its 


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3 to 


CD 




rH 




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to 


to 




o o 

rH to 






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# a 



APPENDIX XIX. 

FINANCIAL S T A T E JI E N T . 



♦ The nppvopiWilion for periodicals ie included in that for books. 

1 liWr~''''"'" "'"'"''.""7'' *■"■■ ^""^^ "O"^' "^'^ "="" <" "«"'« chargeable to our Trust Funds Account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the City, and also Include sucu „= »,. uuu,„. „ e ,„.,„„..- 

J J ears now nominally correspond, but .t will happen that bills accruing subsequently to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year payable April 1st, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's 
d ni one year's growth, and paid for in the subsequent year's account. The cost of maintaining Branches after the first year makes part of the general items of the several appropriations. 
int of the Fellowes Athenieum is spent under the direction of the Book Comniilt«e of the Trustees of the Feliowes Fund. 



Oenxkal Lidbart Account. 


1875-70 


1876-77 


1877-78 




1878-79 




I870-80. 


Years. 


Paid into City 




City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenxum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenseum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
AthenEeum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenseum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenseum. 


Treasury from 
tines and sales 
of Catalogues. 


Binding 


$4,500 00 

15,000 00 

6,000 00 
4,000 00 
4,500 00 
3,000 00 
5,000 00 

5,000 00 

69,600 00 
2,600 00 


$5,137 14 
( 26,308 13 
i 3,945 44 
3,181 91 
2,499 76 
2,971 87 
2,444 55 
6,5.'j0 60 

6,i:;o 37 

07,051 92 
2.323 09 


$1,547 18 


$5,000 00 

10,000 00 

6,000 00 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
6,000 00 

6,600 00 

69,500 00 
2,500 00 


$3,786 85 
t 21,714 60 
( 2,849 88 
6,722 67 
3,004 27 
2,278 01 
2,528 31 
4,885 69 

6,S94 20 

09,332 10 
2.401 12 


$1,833 80 


$6,500 00 

15,000 00 

6,000 00 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
6,000 00 

6,000 00 

70,626 00 
3,000 00 


$2,734 67 
! 20,981 20 
( 4,117 29 
4,807 82 
3,649 33 
2,116 86 
2,050 16 
5,307 81 

6.267 59 

66,038 97 
2,710 51 


$1,414 37 


$3,290 00 

15,040 00 

7,520 00 
3,290 00 
2,350 00 
2,350 00 
5.170 00 

5,170 00 

73,000 00 
2,820 00 


$2,365 54 
1 24,499 97 
i 3 407 67 
6,915 80 
3,479 73 
1,978 94 
3,006 12 
6,074 48 

3,962 12 

68,,149 78 
2,160 78 


$907 93 


$3,000 

16,000 

6,000 
3,200 
2,000 
2,000 
5,000 

4.600 

72,000 
2,:i00 


$2,913 22 
t -22,442 92 
( 3,299 83 
4,795 21 
3,061 61 
1.635 86 
1,765 49 
4,990 47 

4,007 21 

69,937 53 
1,!'80 72 


$809 80 


1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1 868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1SV2 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 






$437 80 




450 00 




■J46 34 




360 00 


Farnlture (cabinets, shelving, fixtures, etc.) .... 
Oaa 


628 49 
314 60 




386 64 




203 92 




504 18 




607 72 




659 86 


Bbancheb. 






Jamaica Plain. 






990 63 
1.160 00 
1,472 44 
















10,000 00 


• 4,917 80 
3,288 73 
1,373 68 
















1,681 79 


Fixtures, Catalogues, Printing, etc 

Salaries 




2,000 00 
2,360 24 
2,505 35 
3,092 12 
3,266 31 






2,618 32 
2,984 12 


Totals 


$118,000 00 


$128,204 00 


$1,647 18 


$111,500 00 


$124,390 86 


$1,833 86 


$130,126 00 


$129,361 38 


$1,414 37 


$120,000 00 


$124,200 91 


$907 93 


$115,000 


$120,729 96 


$809 86 








$28,715 80 



• bought with tlie balances Willi < 



March 15th and May Ist may be counted 
The money for books bought 



• foreign agents at the close of the previous year. Our final 
Oeginniiig nuniinally May Ist. In this way books added bet» 



Public Library. 



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54 



City Document No. 94. 



APPE:^rDix XXI. 

LIBEARY SERVICE. 

{April 30, 1880.) 



Name. 



Mellen Chamberlain. 



James L. Whitney. 
Jose F. Carrct 



Edward Tiffany 



Adelaide A. Nichols 

Samuel McConncll . 

Total 






1869. 
1875. 

1877. 

1877. 
1868. 

1877. 



Position, duties, etc. 



« .'as 



Librarian and Clerk of the Cor- 
poration 



Principal Assistant Librarian. . 

Register and Curator of Patents 
and Engravings 



Inspector of Circulation for Low- 
er Hall and Branch Libraries 



Librarian's Secretary. 
Auditor and Cashier . 
Librarian's Runner. . . 



5 a 



James L. Whitney . 
William II. Foster . . . 



Jose F. Carret . 



Lindsay Swift . . .. 
Anna C. D. Keen.. 
Susan A. Joslyn .. 
Elizabeth T. Reed 



Roxanna M. Eastman. 



Frank C. Blaisdell . . . 

Card Catalogues. 

Harriet E. Green . 

Josephine Hewins . . . 

Mary F. Osgood 

Ellen F. McCarthy . . . 
Total 



1869. 
1860. 

1876. 

1878. 
1872. 
1873. 
1873. 

1859. 

1859. 

1873. 
1875. 
1877. 
1872. 



Principal of the Department. . . . 

Cataloguer for Branch Libraries 
and Proof Reader 



Register, Curator of Patents .and 
Engravings and Assistant . . 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent Room, etc. 



Assistant and Cataloguer of 
Lower Hall and Branch books 

Extra Assist.int, and Cataloguer 
of U.S. Documents 



Copyist . 

Curator . 
Assistant. 
Assistant 
Assistant 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



55 



Harriet N. Pike... 

Edith D. Fuller 

Mary A. McGrath . . . 

Frederic W.Blaisdell. 

Total 



1867. 
1879. 
186S. 
1880. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Chief Clerk 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Runner (entered M!ay 21st) . . 






Appleton p. <^. Griffin. 

Arthur S. Knight , 

Samuel C. Appleton 



John Speak 
Total 



1865. 
1876. 
1879. 

1879. 



Custodian 
Assistant . 



Assistant in charge of repairs, 
etc., of books on the shelves. . 



Arthur M. Knapp . . . 

Alice M. Poree 

Lydia F. Knowles 

Thomas Whyte 

Richard Ray 

W. Maynard L. Young . 



Robert J. Donovan.. 
William J. Ferris . . 

Andrew Kehoe 

Thomas H. O'Kane 

George Merrill 

Total 



1875. 
1866. 
1867. 
1874. 
1876. 
1878. 

1876. 
1879. 
1879. 
1880. 
1880. 



Librarian of Bates Hall 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 



Assistant in charge of Branch 
boxes 



Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner. (Entered May 12th) .. 



Edward Tiffany. 



Elbridge Bradshaw. . . . 
"William F. Robinson. . 

Mary A. Jenkins 

Thomas H. Cummings 

Caroline E. Poree 

Sarah A. Mack 

Eliza J. Mack 

Annie M. Kennedy 



1878. 

1869. 
1872. 
1877. 
1879. 

1859. 
1863. 
1863. 
1869. 



Inspector of Circulation for Low- 
er Hall and Branch Libraries 



Librarian of Lower Hall 

Clerk for Registration and Fines 
Assistant Librarian 



Curator of Lower Hall Card 
Catalogue 



Reading Room Clerk 

Delivery Desk 

Receiving Desk 

Registration and Assistant . 



56 



City Document No. 94. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Ella R. Dillon .. 

Ellen E. Bresnahan .. 

Ella Sturmy 

Margaret A. Sheridan 

Margaret Doyle 

Annie G. Shea 

Florence Richards . . . . 

Mary A. Doyle 

Mary Anderson 

Edward Moore 

Evening Service. 
T.P. Bennett 



Robert B. Ross 

Catherine McGrath. 

Albert Carter 

John J. Butler 

Daniel Donovan . . . 

F. von Olker 

Harry Young 

Total 



1876. 
1869 
1872. 
1875. 
1875. 
1874. 
1878. 
1879. 
1879. 
1878. 

1879. 

1873. 
1873. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1880. 
1880. 



Position, duties, etc. 



"5 a 



Delivery Desk and Assistant . . 
Assistant in Reading Room. . . . 

Care of shelves 

Record of slips and Substitute. 
Return slips and Assistant . . . . 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Care of shelves 



( Registration Clerk andSun- 
j day Service 



Reading Room . . 
Receiving Desk 
Runner 



Runner 
Runner 
Runner 
Runner 



































William E. Ford 

Jeremiah Sullivan 

John White 

Extra daily Asnistants. 
Total 



1858. 
1884. 
1880. 



Janitor. 
Porter . 
Porter 



Andrew M. Blake . 

Romeo Cervi 

P. B. Sanford 

Michael J. Healy 

Edward M . Roe 

Wra. F. Sampson . . . 

Frederic Allen 

Mary E. Austen 



1870. 
1874. 
1879. 
1875. 
1876. 
1880. 
18S0. 
1874. 



Foreman 

Extra Forwarder 

Finisher 

Forwarder 

Pressman 

Forwarder (Entered May 24th) 
Finisher (Entered June 1st) . . 
Forewoman 



Public Library. 

LIBKARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



57 



Martha M. Wheeler 
Mary G. Moriarty . . 

Sarah E. Bowen 

Frank Thomas 

Total 






1869. 
1875. 
1876. 
1874. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Apprentice. 





aj 




u 


tl 


"6 














S o 












'^ d 




a '" 


fl ^ 


o <" 


O 


O 


H 


1 






1 






1 






1 






12 




12 



Sarah C. Godbold. 

Mary R. Pray 

Alice M. Wing 

Mary E. Cathcart . . . 

Harriet E. Ellis 

Adelia H. Ghen 

Laura B. Morse 

Eva D. Merrill 

Grace E. Hahn 

George H. Hosea 

Total 



1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1880. 
1876. 
1875. 
1879. 
1879. 
1873. 



Librarian 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner .. 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Janitor 



AlICE J. BRAGDON . 

Nora McCarty 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Emogene C. Davis . . 
Idalene Sampson. . . . , 

Cora G. Hale , 

Minnie E. Sampson... 

Mabel Pond 

Mary Watson 

Elizabeth McCarthy , 
Marguerite Watson. . 

Joseph Baker 

Total 



1872. 
1872. 
1872. 
1873. 
1877. 
1877. 
1877. 
1879. 
1873. 
1873. 
1877. 
1872. 



Librarian 

Receiving Clerk . . 
Registration Clerk 
Delivery Clerk .... 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Runner .... 
Extra Runner . . . . 
Extra Runner . . . . 
Janitor 



Sarah Bunker . 
Mary Bradley . . . 
Dora Puffer 



Helen M. Bell 



1876. 
1876. 
1878. 

1878. 



Librarian 
Assistant. 



Reading Room and Registration 
Clerk 



58 



City Document No. 94. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Conimued. 



a 
g 


Name. 


^8 


Position, duties, etc. 


go. 

1 


ci a 
|| 

O 

1 
1 
1 

3 


o 
>. 

o 

— ft 

S 3 

o « 




Margaret E. Blood 

Elizabeth E. Berry 

Florence A. Vose 


1872. 
1877. 
1876. 
1879. 
1873. 






•s 






a. 








Francena E. Ryder 

Charles R. Curtis 












1 

6 




fe; 


Total 


















Dr. Cornelius S. Cart£e 
Annie E. Eberlo 


1870. 
1874. 
1878. 
1878. 
1880. 
1878. 
1879. 
1879. 
1874. 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 






1 
1 
1 

3 






Mary P. Swain 






S 


Annie C. Davis 






f^ 


Abbie F. Kinmartin 

Anna 8. Woodberry 

Sarah E. McConnoIl 

Susan E. Livermore 

Thomas E. Smith 






s 






"£ 








e 












1 
6 






Total 




9 














MaryE. Brock 


1875. 
1880. 
1875. 

1878. 




1 
1 






s 


Mary K. Grailey 






cq 


Alma J. Wilson 




1 




•e: 




. 


1 
3 






Total 




1 


4 












Maky G. Coffin 


1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1874. 




1 
1 






o 


Esther R. Whiton 

Mary J. Sheridan 








2 




1 
1 




^ 










o 


Edward Davenport 

Total 




1 
3 




<^ 




5 












< 

^ 


Milton Austin 


1877. 
1877. 

1R7S 




1 
1 
1 
1 
4 






1 

'2 










Esther M. Hinckley 






I? 


Charles H. Reuter 1S7n. 








1 


Total 









4 



Public Library. 

LIBRAEY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



59 



Name. 



Eliza R. Davis 

Anna J. Barton 

Nellie F. Riley 

George L. Hargraves. 

Harry F. Davis 

Timothy Johnson ... 
Total 



1877. 
1876. 
1878. 
1878. 
1879. 
1877. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Janitor 



P u 
a o 



— o< 
SB 
o « 



Mary A. HiU 

Samuel G. Bowthorpe 

Marion L.Woodward.. 

Total 



1875. 
1878. 
1880. 



Custodian, Lower Mills .. 

Custodian, Roslindale 

Custodian, West Roxbury 



SUMMARY. 

Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, and 

Runner ..... 
Catalogue Department . 
Purchase and Entry Department . 
Shelf Department. 
Bates Hall Circulation Department 
Lower Hall Circulation Department, Day 

Evening, and Sunday Service 
Janitor's Department 
Bindery 

East Boston Branch 
South Boston Branch 
Roxbury Branch . 
Charlestown Branch 
Brighton Branch . 
Dorchester Branch 
South End Branch 
Jamaica Plain Branch 
Deliveries 

Totals 



Grand Total 



4 

11 

i 

4 

11 

19 

3 

12 

5 
6 
6 
6 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

107 
32 

139 



I Central Library. 
I 6'8 regulars, 
j 9 extras. 

I 77 in all. 



5 1 

6 

3 

3 

1 

2 



32 



Branches. 
39 regulars. 
23 extras. 

62 in all. 



AGENTS. 



Messrs. Lee and Shepard, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London, 

Messrs. N. Triibner and Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New Fork end Paris. 

Dr. Felix Fiigel, Leipzig. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Senor Don Juan F. Eiaiio, Madrid. 



Not on shelves 

0/ these found io be 

Lent 

At the binderies . . . . , 
Otherwise accounted for . 
Not accounted for ... 



Not on shelves 

0/ these found to he 

Lent 

At the bindericfl 

Otherwise accounted for . 
Not accounted for . . . . 



APPENDIX XXII. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY 



Bates Hall. 



IS 


S 




IB 

X 
H 


3,612 


3,653 


3,222 


3,205 


1,970 


2,161 


1,991 


2,003 


907 


920 


622 


707 


596 


542 


573 


462 


49 


30 


36 


33 



<e X 



4,110 4,511 

2,436 2,607 

1,142 1,303 

493 664 

39 37 



Lower Hall. 



7,001 , 7,510 



6,254 6,121 



8,063 I 8,592 



948 I 536 445 



East Boston B jakch. 



South Boston Branch. 



« 


« 


^ 


X 


•• 


^ 


«> 


f 


« 






« - 




H 


H 




2,012 


2,022 


1,820 


1,831 


1,729 


1,811 


1,618 


■ 1,609 


137 


73 


44 


37 


, 








146 


133 

5 


163 

5 


178 

7 



h3 V 

-5 ^ 



UOXBURV URANCH.t 



CUARLESTOWN BRANCH. 



Brighton Branch. 



t 

X 


t. 

X 
H 


X 
X 


728 


707 


829 


591 


519 


629 


62 


91 


116 


54 


90 


83 


21 


7 


1 



Dorchester Branch ■ 



X 


X 
!• 

X 
H 


3> 

^ 

X 


1,382 


1,341 


1,363 


1,269 


1,261 


1,238 


52 


67 


34 


39 


13 


41 


2 











S.E.Branch. ; J. P. Branch. 



14,816 

2,121 

1,917 

244 



18,815 
2,296 



18,968 

2,095 

1,477 

135 



2,212 
1,747 



* Tills examination took place while the Library was closed for repairs. 



t Includes Feltowea Athena 



"Public Library. 61 



APPE:NrDIX XXll.— Continued. 

To the Librarian : — 

Herewith I beg leave to submit the Annual Report of the 
examination of the Central Librarj^ and Branches for the year 
ending April 30, 1880. By a comparison of the figures in the 
annexed tables, which give the result in detail, the nun^ber of 
books found to be missing compares favorably with that of pre- 
ceding years, especially in the total, where a reduction of 57 is 
shown from last 3-ear. In 

Bates Hall, 

where the circulation has been much larger than during any pre- 
vious year, the loss is less than in 1879. Ten books reported as 
missing last 3'ear have been found, and one, in 1878, has also re- 
appeared. In the 

Lower Hall 

91 books have to be reported as missing this year, against 132 last 
3'ear. 14 books missing in previous 3'ears have been accounted 
for. At the 

Branches 

nothing requires comment, unless it is the diminution of loss at 
the South End. This result was anticipated, as at the examination 
of 1879, being the first made of this branch, the large number of 
books found missing was thought to be traceable to errors in the 
shelf records. From the 

Bates Hall Desk 
a catalogue of the Tosti Engravings has disappeared. 

Central Reading Room Desk. 

The following have disappeared : Cruden's Concordance to the 
H0I3' Bible ; Yonge's Latin-English Dictionar3\ 

South Boston Branch Reading Room. 

American Almanac, 1879 ; Chambers' C3'cl. of Literature, v. 2. 
I have also to report that 6 books sent to the Binder are probably 
lost, as they have been charged to him for a great length of time, 
in one case as long ago as 1877. 

Respectfully' submitted, 

APPLETON P. C. GRIFFIN, 

Custodian of the Shelves. 
June 4, 1880. 



62 



City Document No. 94. 



APPENDIX XXIII. 



WORK IN THE LIBRARY BINDERY. 



















9 


O 


Character of Work. 


H 

H 


H 


» - 


X) 
H 




r4 




FN 


9 


Bates Hall books bound and 
finished 


2,219 


2,008 


2,635 


2,613 


3,223 


4,759 


4,155 


4,272 


3,958 


Books of the Lower Hall 
and Branches 


1,015 


744 


753 


1,508 


7,766 


8,743 


11,129 


10,084 


7,606 


Books repaired 


396 


430 


492 


444 


959 


873 


949 


1,371 


1,397 


Catalogues wired and cov- 
ered for public use in 
Lower Hall and Branches 


490 


437 


287 


143' 












Maps dissected and mounted 


47 


23 


91 














Map volumes and shelf-lists 
mounted 


212 


165 


109 


493 


820 


2,712 


958 


3,014 


2,14S 


Pamphlet cases 


546 


64 


24 














Portfolios 


5 


8 


8j 














Removable covers for cata- 
logues and for paper-cov- 
ered books 


266 


263 


450 


1.520 


1,287 


1,271 


1,469 


1,970 


1,946 


Maps mounted, bound, and 
bordered 

Hours of miscellaneous 


54 


41 


8 














1,842 


2,297 


1,437 


2,486 


2,183 


2,586 


2,778 


2,615 


2,205 





During the last five months of the year 2,590 Lower Hall and Branch books were bound in 
outside binderies. 



Public Library. 63 



APPENDIX XXIV. 

THE CATALOGUES OF THE LIBRARY. 

To the Trustees: — 

During the past three years there has been great activitj' in the 
Catalogue Department. 

In August, 1877, at which time two new Branches were estab- 
lished, and unusual gifts and bequests were made to the Library, 
there were more than 35,000 books and pamphlets uncatalogued. 
These, with few exceptions, have been catalogued, and, besides 
them, the subsequent additions to the Librar}-, numbering from 
August, 1877, to May, 1880, 52,713 volumes, and also more than 
12,000 pamphlets. 

"Within this period of time the Ticknor Catalogue has been 
finished — upon which a larger amount of work has been expended 
by the Library than upon any single volume — the Shakespearian 
part of the Barton Catalogue, most ably edited, has been com- 
pleted, and the preliminar}' work of the transcription of titles of 
the remaining portion is nearly finished. Four Branch Catalogues, 
containing the titles of nearly 50,000 volumes, have been pub- 
lished, the Bulletins have been kept up, as well as the Catalogues 
of Special Subjects, such as of the United States Congressional 
Documents, the Indexes to Periodicals and Newspapers, and the 
Supplementary Ticknor Catalogue. 

Economy. 

The gain in economy is worth}^ of attention. The number of 
assistants has been reduced, notwithstanding the increase of labor 
caused by the addition of two new Branch Libraries, and the 
salaries, which in the year 1876-7 amounted to $13,127.28, will, 
under the present organization, it is estimated, be for the current 
year, $10,825. 

During the past year I have collected from several libraries 
statistics in regard to their catalogues, and a comparison with our 
own has strengthened the conviction that this department of the 
Library is managed with vigor and economy. A greater economy 
would, I think, be perilous to the best interests of the Library, 
and it is a serious question whether the working force has not 
already been reduced beyond its proper limit. 

The Card Catalogue. 

There has been a marked progress in the revision of the Card 
Catalogue during the past year. In the process of this revision 
all the cards in the Public Card Catalogue in Bates Hall, for each 
book, are compared with each other, with the similar cards in the 



64 City Document No. 94. 

catalogue prepared for the use of the officers of the Library, with 
the shelf-lists, and, in many cases, with the books themselves. 
The Public Card Catalogue contains the titles of books received 
since 1871, with which have been incorporated the titles previously 
printed in thirty-five Catalogues and Bulletins. The catalogue 
for the use of the officers of the Librar}' contains only additions 
since the catalogues were printed in volumes. These man}' 
catalogues, prepared for different purposes, vary in their mode of 
construction, their system, with the growth of the Library, having 
become more and more elaborate. To reduce these catalogues, 
containing nearly three-quarters of a million cards, to one standard, 
and to supply their deficiencies, is to be the most important work 
of this department for some time. Its progress so far would have 
been greater had not the gi'owth of the Libraiy been so rapid 
within a few years that our energies have been taxed to keep up 
with the current additions, which between the 3'ears 1869 and 
1879 have averaged 36,528 volumes and pamphlets a year. 

A catalogue such as this, where each subject is entered under its 
most specific head, must be ver}- imperfect unless these isolated 
subjects are connected with all others with which the}' stand related. 
This is to be accomplished by references from each subject to the 
others. This part of our work, begun in the printed Index and 
Supplement, and carried on with greater fulness since that time, is 
to be still further developed. A synoptical scheme of subjects has 
already been partly prepared, which will serve as the basis of a 
hand-ijook to the catalogue. 

The possibilities of a catalogue perfected on the system now be- 
ing pursued are outlined in the Rules for a Piintcd Dictionar}^ Cat- 
alogue, published by the United States Bureau of Education, and 
it is our aim to reach this high standard. The difficulties in the 
way are grave ones, and progress must be slow. 

Given two catalogues, of enormous proportions, increasing with 
great rapidity, hard to consult, as such catalogues must be, how 
can they be made self-explanatory and tiie most direct guide possi- 
ble to tiie books? How can they be simplified, and to what extent 
reduced in bulk? These and many other problems that have 
arisen in the course of this work are difficult of solution. It is 
gratifying to be able to report that each day's work upon the cata- 
logue has brought new readers to it, quick to understand its ar- 
rangement, and that its use is fourfold what it was five years ago. 
The testimony to the great and constantly increasing usefulness of 
the Card Catalogue is positive and unanswerable. In offers of 
help which I have made during the past few months to nearly five 
hundred persons using the catalogue, I have found only one in 
seven that needed assistance, and but few from defects in the cata- 
logue. During the past year 9,426 readers have been assisted by 
the catalogue clerks in Bates Hall, and this has done much to 
increase the acquaintance of the public with the catalogue. Dur- 
ing the past five years the numl)er of readers in Bates Hall has 
doubled, and this is due, probably, more than to anything else, to 
the improvement of the Card Catalogue. 

Economy, simplicity, and compression have been constantly stud- 
ied during the past year. The titles of books have been largely 



Public Library. 65 

abridged ; different editions of the same work have been united 
upon as few cards as possible, reducing the number in such cases 
from one-half to three-fourths ; and help in copying titles has been 
obtained from assistants who have leisure moments from other nec- 
essar}' duties. As a result, the printer's bill for the Card Catalogue 
has been reduced from $3,318.65 in 1875 to $272 in 1879. By a 
recent arrangement the cards for the Central Library catalogues 
are ncvw printed within the building, bj' which a saving in time and 
mone^" will be effected. 



Lower Hall. 

During the past year the cards for the Lower Hall have been 
taken ft-om the Bates Hall Catalogue, with which they were at first 
united, and they have been moved to the Lower Hall, for the use 
of the public there. A keeper has been placed over them, and he 
has begun to revise the cards. This will supply — what has long 
been felt to be a necessity — a complete catalogue of the Lower 
Hall under one alphabet. 



Branch Libraries. 
A recent inspection has shown that the Card Catalogues of the 
Branches are in good condition. These Libraries have printed 
catalogues, and, for additional titles, catalogues on cards, which 
are prepared at the Central Library. By this arrangement there 
is a great gain in econom}' and time. 



The Future. 

Probabl}" for the coming year the amount of current work will 
be less than heretofore, and our chief attention can be given to the 
revision of the Card Catalogue. Doubtless, as this becomes more 
unwieldy, the pressure already begun to be felt for a new printed 
catalogue will be more urgent. If this is ever to be undertaken 
the work of revision of the cards, now going on, must precede it. 

In such a Library as this, it must be remembered tliat the expense 
for cataloguing the purchases for any year is less than is often sup- 
posed, and is much less than what is required for the proper care of 
the catalogue of books long in the Library, for the constantly increas- 
ing revision needed of the Card Catalogue, for the republication of 
the catalogues of the Lower Hall and Branch Libraries, and for the 
publication of special catalogues. 

A library has been contrasted with a mercantile establishment, 
where goods come in, are sold, and more goods are ordered. In a 
librar}^ on the other hand, the goods stay and are constantly 
accumulating, and the library record must show, over and over, how 
each item of goods is distinguished from every other, and its history 
must be carefully followed from year to year. Tliis is especially 
true of the catalogue, and is the source of a burden and expense 
little understood. 



66 City Document No. 94. 

In conclusion : if this institution is to be what its founders in- 
tended, its catalogue must maintain the reputation it has already- 
gained. It must be thorough and accurate, and its compilers skilfully 
trained, patient, and exact. To risk this, in the desire for haste or 
excessive economy, will prove fatal to the best interests of the 
Librar3\ 

I wish to thank j'ou for having, during the past year, as always, 
sustained me and my associates in carr3'ing on the Catalogue 
Department in accordance with these principles. 

Yours respectfully, 

JAMES L. WHITNEY. 

Boston Pctblic Libkart, June 1, 1880. 



A P P E N Li'± XXII. 

(.: I I! C U L A T 1 ( ) N . 

(Books issued. No account is liept of tlie great use of liooks williin tlie Library rails.) 





g 


Year. 


!i 








K 


a 1854 


142 


1855 


286 


1856 


284 j 


1857 


288 


41858 


1»7 


1850 


254 


1660 


297 


1S61 


274 


1802 


288 


c 1863 


215 


mi 


280 


1865 


275 


I860 


278 


1S87 


277 


rfl869 


284 


/i8;o 


236 


1S71 


807 


1872 


309 


187! 


309 


1874 


308 


1875 


300 



Total Circulation. 









I..11C.. 


>,' 


^1 




n 




35,380 


250 


535 


81,281 


281 


606 


82,661 


291 


647 


80,423 


310 


730 


76,570 


383 


693 


140,468 


5S8 


1,335 


151,020 


60S 


1,052 


160,877 


587 


1,303 


180,302 


626 


1,517 


138,027 


644 


1,634 


184,035 


664 


1,424 


194,627 


708 


1,464 


193.862 


732 


1.599 


m 208,003 


754 


1.813 


176,727 


630 


1,323 


218,677 


770 


1,498 


210,003 


017 


1,768 


J 322.445 


J 965 


(J 1,866 


386.343 


1,234 


2.425 


407,855 


1.519 


3.073 


625,412 


2,031 


6.124 


768,417 


2,581 


6.074 



Pol) 


23 


J,,n. 


24 


Fob. 


27 


Mu- 


6 


Fob 


4 


Feb 


23 


M«r 


1 


Fob 


7 


Fob 


27 


Nov 


10 


Fob 


10 


Fob 


23 


Fob 


1 


Fob 


26 


Fob 


10 


Jnn. 


28 


Mnr 


10 


P 









Bates Hall. 



25.996 
31,080 
23,150 
28.261 
84.441 
41,721 



Loiter Hall. 



163,366 
231.110 



253,097 
272,834 



East Boston Branch. 



26,130 
75,846 
68,212 
81.091 
85,548 



South Bobton Brahcb. 



101,688 
107,651 
111,677 



102,322 
108,566 
112,525 



ROXBURT BRANCa. 



Charlestovn Branch. 



Brighton Brakch. 



Dorchester Branch. 



0,642 
21,394 



« Hlx monllio. 

b U.-nif.v.il (if ihe Library. 

c Ton monUiH. 

d Elovon months (Library not closed for cxnmiiiaUon). 

e New rcBtricllonB put upon coBtly books. 



/ Nine months. 
g CenirnI Library only. 

h ir tlic UsiicB of Eiuit Boston be excluded, thte footing would he 290,315; nn(i if 
Ilitll isBuee be excluded, there will he record of 293,710 volumes used at home. 



i Open seventy-eight days. 
m See report for 1868. 
71 Includes books borrowed Jiud : 
II Appei.diu XIIL 



I white slips, as shown 



The E. B. Brnnch wna open only 307 dnys. owing to repairs on furnace. 
p Includes the Inrgest of each depnrtmcnt on any da}', without regard to iW beln 
tile same day, a» in previous entries under this head. 
The dally avtruge of the I>ower Hiill Is on tho entire issuo for tbe present year. 
The use of the Dorebester Branch la for little over three months. 



APPEISTDIX XVI. 

LOWER HALL R E A D I N G. — (A. P. C.) 

Sftoirn from slips of bookn retui-ned. 



1 
5 


AlrovES. 


Classes. 


1868 


1869 


18TO 

(Nine months.) 


ISTl 


1872 


isra 


1874 


18715 


1876 


1877 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent, 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 
cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


Per 

cent. 


Loans 
returned. 


1 

Per 
cent. 


1 

2 
3 

4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


I, XI and ranges 8, 9, 
10 of X, XX 

II, xu 1 

IX, XIX i 

iii,xm 

IV, XIV 1 

VII, xvn i 

V, XV 

VI, XVT 

vra, XVIII 

X, XX, except ranges 
8, 9. 10 


Sciences, Arts, Professions . . 

American History and Politics 

Foreign History and Politics . 

Poetry, Drama, Rhetoric, Mis- 
cellaneous Essays, etc. . . . 

Prose Fiction for. adults and 


10,522 
2,633 
3,030 

3,692 

106,227 
3,641 
3,289 
6,941 

3,978 


7.4 
1.8 
2.1 

2.6 

74.2 
2.6 
2.3 
4.2 

2.8 


11,436 
2,682 
3,221 

2,461 

128,273 
4,670 
5,363 
4,660 


6.97 
1.63 
1.96 

1.5 

76 ..36 
2.78 
3.26 
2.77 

2.7S 


7,607 
2,071 
2,386 

2,441 

120,355 
4,026 
6,154 
6,747 

3,037 


4.9 
1.4 
1.5 

1.6 

78.4 
2.7 
3.4 
3.8 

2.4 


12,662 
2,270 
2,702 

6,964 

167,604 
6,108 
6,062 
11,630 

4,451 


5.7 

1 

1.2 

2.7 

77.2 
2,2 
2.8 

2 


15,996 
2,096 
2,715 

8,019 

173,438 
4,106 
4,998 
14,815 

2,691 


6 
-1 

1+ 

4 

76 
2 
3 
6 

1+ 


12,767 
1,496 
1.863 

7,651 

154,836 
2,641 
3,631 
17,167 

6,.341 


6-1- 

7 

74 
1 
I 

8 

2 


14,422 
2,705 
2,834 

8,636 

158,453 
5,027 
6,290 
15,563 

6,388 


V 

4 

71 
3 
3 

3 


16.218 
3,878 
3.983 

9,704 

163.657 
7,415 
8,649 
15,106 

7,394 


i-' 

•1+ 

69+ 
3-1- 
4+ 
6+ 

3 


20,065 
6,467 
4,879 

11,018 

209,070 
9,710 
10,227 
17.827 

9,123 


4 

70 
3 
3 
6 

3 


23,318 
6,644 
6,820 

12,677 

253,964 
11,229 
10,419 
20,404 

11,846 


!■ 

4 
71 

3 

6 

3 




Travels, Voyages, etc 

Collections, Periodicals, etc. . 

French, German, and Italian 












141,853 




104,038 




163,423 




216,696 




223,864 




207,382 




221,418 




236,004 




297,986 




356,320 







Note. — The columns of " Loans returned " do not include the books taken and returned the i 



APPENDIX XXIV. 



FINANCIAL 



T A T E M E N T . 





1870-71 


1871-72 


1872.7a 


1873-74 


1874-75 


1875-76 


Tears. 


Paid intt. City 
Treaaury from 
lilies and aalea 
of Catalogues. 


General Library Account. 


City appro- 
priatiouB. 


Expended. 


City appro- 
priationa. 


Expended. 


City appropiia- 


Expended. 


Fellowea 
Athenaium. 


City appropria- 
tions. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Alhenseum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowea 
Athenaium. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenaeum. 




«4,4CI0 00 

7,500 60 

J,80O 00 
1,600 00 
1.300 00 
1,300 00 

1,700 00 

1.050 00 

30,000 00 

700 00 


$5,231 38 

1 12,109 68 

I 1,979 63 

3,433 62 

1,678 90 

1,083 80 

1,982 03 

2,041 76 

2,247 28 

1,303 95 

29.074 00 

9J7 22 


$5,200 00 

9,000 00 

6,700 00 
2,000 00 
1,650 00 
1,650 00 
2.200 00 
2,200 00 
1,400 00 
35,000 00. 
1,000 00 


$6,569 12 
1 14,538 60 
t 3,130 08 
3,731 85 
2,487 04 
1.596 20 
2,012 83 
2,303 98 
2,299 14 
1,637 44 
34,507 71 
1.210 85 


$4,000 OOf 

9,000 00 

6,500 00 
2.000 00 
1.650 00 
1,500 00 
2,500 00 

J 4,000 00 

39,650 00 
1,200 00 


$2,511 10 
( 12.677 89 
( 1,895 84 
3,963 16 
2.628 59 
1,543 75 
1,062 SO 
2,425 45 

4,217 59 

38,252 45 
1,213 87 


$2,181 10 


$5,866 00 

35,697 28 

8,010 00 
4,305 00 
2.580 00 
2,870 00 

6,022 00 

6,457 00 

60,000 00 
2,440 00 


$5,883 63 
( 44.131 66 
< 2,679 67 
7,613 20 
3,141 01 
2,720 60 
1,452 55 

3,460 oe 

5,280 72 

48,782 76 
2,440 2) 


$1,652 22 






$6,800 00 

15,000 00 

6,000 00 
5,000 00 
4,000 00 
13,500 00 
4 600 00 

6,000 00 

62,000 00 
2,600 00 


$8,080 84 
{ 16,962 45 
( 5,395 16 
3,361 67 
4,159 69 
3,440 88 
10,256 55 
4,528 65 

4,687 57 

60,101 03 
2.298 18 


$2,193 61 


$4,500 00 

15,000 00 

5,000 00 
4,000 00 
4,500 00 
3,000 00 
6,0C0 00 

5,000 00 

69,600 00 
2,£00 00 


$5,137 14 
1 26,368 13 
< 3,945 44 
3,181 81 
2,499 76 
2,971 87 
2,444 55 
6.560 60 

6,130 37 

67.651 92 
2,323 09 


$1,547 18 


-1859 
1800 
1861 
1862 
1863 
18« 
1865 
1860 
1867 
1863 
1869 
1870 




^ 












Ota g p 




E p 




Furniture {cabinets, siiclviug. tixturca, etc.) .... 


385 64 






Priming ( 




^ 




Tranaponation, I'oetnge, etc 


996 63 




En»t BoBl 


n Branch. 




South Boston 


and Roxhury B 


ranchea. 


Roxbury Branch completin 


' outfit. 


Dorchester Branch. 










4,250 00 
1,700 00 
3,000 00 


3,899 69 
2,323 41 
1,117 35 






I S. B. . 3,000 00 
' Rox. . 3,000 00 

la.B. . 4,600 00 
i llox. . 4,500 00 

( 8. B. . 2,600 00 
( Rox. . 2.500 00 


3,037 76 
2,274 10 

4,669 30 
595 25 

2,660 43 
268 88 




c Ch'n , , 746 66 
I Bri 

r" 

\ Bri 

1 

1, Rox. . . 3,000 00 

tCh'n 

* Bri 


602 40 

343 42 
175 34 
4,084 97 
791 87 
291 89 




3,000 00 
4,500 00 
2,600 00 


3,629 33 
2,684 96 
1,026 45 










1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 


1,160 00 




1,472 44 
1.681 79 




2,360 24 
2,505 35 








$65,000 00 


$70,443 70 


$67,000 00 


$74,924 84 


$91,000 00 


$80,498 41 


$2,181 10 


{$127,593 83 


$133,-75 68 


$1,662 22 


$136,000 00 


$130,453 11 


$2,193 61 


$118,000 00 


$128,204 00 


$1,547 18 











* The appropriation for Periodicals U included in thnt for books, 

t The appropriation for binding before this year hnd included the salaries of the ■workmon in the Bindery, hut is now changed lo the nppropvintion for salaries. 

t $25,lU7.2fi of this amount brought from last year, and added lo thi- appropriaiions for boobs, to enable the Trustees to buy the Barton Library. The total appropriation iiicludoa s 
of the total amount expended and appiopriated is met by [he income of Uie Trust Funds. 

Note. — The expenditures foi- books cover the cost of those chargeable to our Trust Funds Account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the City, and also includes such ri 
correspond, but it will bappen that bills accruing subsequently to the midrile of Mari^h (when the last requisition of the year, payable April Isti is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's ace 
and paid for in the feubacquc-nt yuar's account. The cost of maintaining Hranches after the first ye:ir makes part of the general items of the several appropriations. 

The money for books bought on account of the Fellowes Athenaeum ts spent under the direction of the Book Committee of the Trustees of the Fellowes Fund. 

During the year $214.20 has been spent on account of the Special Ticknor Bequest appropriation. 



B of $11,650, by TOle of ihe Clly Council in December, 



:i of Charleetown and Brighton. The differenc* 



B bought with the balances with our foreign agents at the close of the previous year. 
,, begioning nominally Hay Ist. In this way books added between March 15th and 



Our financial and library years v 
May iBt may be counted in one j 



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