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Full text of "Annual report"

TWENTY-NINTH 



ANNUAL REPOET. 



1881 



[Document 97 — 1881.] 



CITY OF mlm BOSTON. 




TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL EEPORT 

OF THE 

Trustees of the Public Library. 

18 8 1. 



[A.] 

The Trustees have the honor to present to the City Council 
their twenty-ninth annual report, it being the third made 
under their Act of Incorporation, and comprising general and 
special details of the condition of the Library for the year 
ending the 30th of April last. 

The reports of the Examining Committee and of the Libra- 
rian form part of this document. 

In view of the amount of labor required to make even a 
cursory investigation of the various departments of the insti- 
tution, it was deemed advisable to appoint a larger committee 
than heretofore had served, and to increase its number, with 
the chairman, to ten members. It consists for the present 
year of Howard P. Arnold, Esq., Henry P. Bowditch, 
M.D., Mrs. Ednah D. Cheney, George E. Ellis, D.D., 
Edward J. Holmes, Esq., Mrs. Charles C. Smith, Edwin P. 
Seaver, Esq., Hon. Darwin S. Ware, William C. Williamson, 
Esq., with Professor Henry W. Haynes, of the Board of 
Trustees, as chairman. It should be remarked that the 
chairman takes no part in the discussions of the committee, 
but it is his duty to aid the members to ascertain such facts 
as are desired relative to the actual condition of all the vari- 
ous ramifications of its adminstration as may be necessary in 
their opinion to form an intelligent judgment upon the state 
of the institution, its wants, and its relations to the commu- 
nity. 



2 City Docuivient No. 97. 

No Examining Committee within the remembrance of the 
recent Board of Trustees has bestowed so much continuous time 
and service in the execution of their duties as have been given 
during the present year. In understanding fully the working 
of any great social institution two views must naturally be 
taken : the one, by those standing within, and controlling 
day by day the management and apparent results of the dif- 
ferent anns of administration ; the other, by those standing 
without, and looking at these operations from a diiferent 
and opposite post of observation, with an intent to inspect 
the value of the results and the adequacy of each portion of 
the system which produced them. Each view naturally 
embraces points not directly within sight of the other. Their 
report covers a large field, and embraces more questions 
of interest than have beeii undertaken by preceding com- 
mittees. Many of the suggestions made are so eminently 
practical that they will doubtless meet with the full assent 
of the Board of Trustees, and all of them will receive careful 
consideration. Their forcible presentation of the necessity 
of a new building for the invalual)le stores of the Bates Hall 
Library should arrest public attention. The judicial exami- 
nation of the catalogue question is commended to so-called 
experts upon that vexed subject. 

The report of the Librarian gives the administrative system 
of the Library so clear an exposition in its details and results 
that no reader can fail to see with what earnest devotion the 
executive officer of the institution is attending to the details 
of his ofiice. At no time has each department been more 
conscientiously overseen and no better work has been done by 
its industrious force. His statement will be found fuller in the 
collection of the various items of administrative control than 
has heretofore been given to the public. Particular atten- 
tion will naturally be paid to that portion of the work of 
circulation which relates to improvement of reading and to the 
relation of the Library to the su})plemental education of the 
schools, which will indicate to the great body of parents and 
teachers that the institution is fully cognizant of the manner in 
which its best influences may be exerted for the young, with- 
out the ability on its own part to furnish text-books from its 
own funds. 

A New Building. 

A year has now passed since the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, by the vote of its enlightened Legislature, Avisely gave 
to the City of Boston, for the use of the Public Library, a 
valuable estate on Dartmouth and Bojdston streets, upon the 
condition that an edifice should be begun in three years from 



Public Library. 3 

the passage of the act. We have now entered upon the second 
year, and the Trustees of the Library have asked permission of 
the City Government to allow the services of the experienced 
Architect of the city to be retained in consultation with the 
Board of Trustees, in devising and drawing the plan and 
estimates to be submitted to the approval of the Council for 
a suitable fire-proof building, conformed to the exigencies of 
the Library, and to the convenience of students. A building 
constructed for library uses at the present day, and contain- 
ing within its walls a collection of such great value, and whose 
riches are destined to increase year by year, must be built 
m the most improved form, and fashioned to meet, so far 
as is practicable, the future necessities of such an institution. 
For the preparatory work considerable time is requisite. 
The most conveniently arranged buildings recently con- 
structed for this purpose must be carefully studied, and 
thoughtful provision must be made for the peculiar needs of 
this collection, as distinct in its public relations from other 
reference, educational, and scientific libraries. No elegant 
edifice is to be designed in which the books are to be depos- 
ited in conformity to the architectural or ornamental struct- 
ure of the building ; but it should be erected over the 
books, the arrangement and classification of which for con- 
venience of use must determine the form and details of its 
great hall, in which they must necessarily be stored, and 
thus outline the walls of the building. The other conditions 
of the Library can be easily fashioned to conform to this first 
necessity. Provision can be made in other stories for 
rooms for special collections already given to the Library, 
and not classified in its general system of arrangement ; for 
the receiving department ; for ofiices for the Librarian and his 
immediate stafl"; for the catalogue department, adjacent to the 
quarters assigned to the great card catalogue, freely accessible 
to public use ; for the student, who makes the Library his 
workshop, and gives his time at the Library to the prosecu- 
tion of studies which cannot be so fully arranged elsewhere ; 
for sufficient heating without injury to the books ; for 
suitable light and thorough ventilation. There are other points, 
not necessary to be specified here, which aflbrd a basis of 
research and study on the part of the architect for which the 
interval of time before the expiration of its limits hardly 
suffices for adequate preparation. The Boylston-street struct- 
ure is one of the ornaments of the city, externally and 
internally, but is a signal instance of inconvenient and costly 
construction. It was, however, built upon such information 
and knowledge as were accessible at the time, and has 
furnished the general model for other large libraries in this 



City Document No. 97. 



country. But the theories upon which it was based have 
not withstood the proof of service. Its adaptation to its 
theoretic uses has been entirely insufficient. In one point, 
and that not the least important, it did honor to the public 
spirit which intended that the best should be done, and 
contributed the means for its erection. No similar edifice 
can meet the present and coming wants of the institution, 
and it is to be hoped that none such will be attempted. 

The Library and Its Work for the Year. 

The summary of the extent of the Library collections, and 
their work for the past year, is herewith presented. Such 
comments as appear to be needed are subsequently added. 

The afforreffate number of volumes embraced in the Bates Hall 
collection is 244,946 ; in the Lower Hall, 38,073 ; in the 
branches, 108,319, making a total of 391,338, — a net in- 
crease for the year of 14,113 volumes, or 3^'''^ per cent. 

The whole number of days on which the libraries were 
open were 305, with the exception of East Boston and 
Charlestown. 

The use of the books for the year shows a decrease of 
91,640 volumes taken from the shelves, amounting in 
1879-80 to 1,156,721, and in 1880-81 to 1,065,081, as 
shown in the following table, from which the collections 
(comprising 15,941 vols., 12,477 vols.), in the basement of 
the Boylston-street building are excluded : — 



Name of Library. 



Lower Hall . . . . 
East Boston . . . . 
South Roston . . . 

Roxbury 

Charlestown .... 

Brighton 

Dorchester . . . . 

South End 

Jamaica Plain . . . 
West Roxbury . . . 

Bates Hall 

Fellowes Athcnseum 



No. of Vols 
April 30, 

1880. 



36,861 
10,605 
9,633 
12,228 
22,059 
12,970 
10,085 
9,498 
7,811 
3,068 



134,818 

220,683 

5,005 

360,506 



In Use, 
1879-80. 



316,517 
108,201 
143,570 
107,083 
74,748 
27,980 
56,716 
79,291 

54,626 

968,732 

170,142 

17,847 

,156,721 



No. of Vols, 

April 30, 

1881. 



38,073 
10,815 
9,984 
12,702 
23,202 
13,087 
10,597 
9,507 
8,238 
3,069 



139,274 

229,005 

7,118 

375,397 



In Use, 
1880-81. 



266,863 
101,118 
132,858 
94,743 
80,822 
28,177 
55,188 
73,962 

50,108 



883,839 

165,373 

15,869 

1,065,081 



Public Library. 5 

The most striking result of this table is shown in the dimi- 
nution of use, amounting to nearly eight per cent. For this 
various reasons may be assigned. The falling off began after 
the year 1878, when the maximum figures 1,183,991 were 
obtained. From this date several causes have been in opera- 
tion, some of which have been noted before in the reports of 
the Trustees, and have affected the use of the books, espe- 
cially in the popular libraries. Any diminution of the pro- 
portion of fiction, especially of that recently printed, produces 
a similar reduction in the number of patrons of the shelves.^ 

The number of books lost is proportionately less than for 
many years. Last year only one volume was unaccounted for 
in every 11,122 loaned, while for the year just closed only 
one is missing from every 12,104 circulated, — a total of 88 
are gone, 52 volumes from the Boylston-street Library, and the 
remaining 36 from the Branches, with the exception of Dor- 
chester, from which no book was lost. 

The record of the use of periodicals at the Central Library 
and four Branches shows a delivery of 520,672 as against 
481,901 during the previous year. Notwithstanding the lim- 
ited accommodations in Boylston street for its numerous visit- 
ors, it furnished its readers with 400,357 periodicals, — a gain 
on the issues of 1879-80 of nearly 45,000. This does not 
include the higher order of serials and the transactions of 
societies, which are kept in Bates Hall. 

The whole number of volumes sent to be bound were 
16,501. Of these 6,354 went to outside binderies. The 
work done by this department of the institution still retains 
the high character which it has gained in former years. 

The Branches. 

The eight Branches of the Library were established between 
the years 1871 and 1878. Those of Charlestown and Brighton 
were acquired by annexation of these districts, and the others 
were founded by the city. They now contain, irrespective 
of the Fellowes Athenfeum, 101,201 volumes; with the 
exception of Charlestown, which was provided with a new 
catalogue, their circulation has felt in degree the same influ- 
ences which have curtailed the use of the Lower Hall Library 
in Boylston street. Their total issues were 616,976 against 
652,215 volumes of the previous year, or a diminution of 
^T% P^i' cent. ; and this result is reached, notwithstanding 
the average of fiction in the Branches is about 3 per cent, 
less than in the popular library in Boylston street. 

1 Fuller details upon this point will be found in the Report of the Librarian. 



6 City Document No. 97. 

During the coming year it is proposed to extend to the 
Branches a system of help to readers similar to that which 
has been so successful in the Central Library, and also to print 
lists of good books suitable for perusal for the young, which 
will be of great service to parents who overlook or who 
desire to have some voice in the selections for home perusal 
made by their children. 

The expense of the circulation of the books in the Branches, 
including salaries, cost of new books, and general expenses, 
amounted during the previous year to $30,957.83 against an 
issue of 652,215 volumes, or an average 4^^^^ cents per 
volume. For the present year the loan of 616,976 books 
foots up for the same items $28,118.79, or 4^Yo cents per 
volume. For the coming year, with the establishment of the 
South End Branch in more commodious quarters, and with 
the expenditure for its catalogue, as well as a new one for the 
Dorchester Branch, this average expenditure will probably be 
exceeded. 

The Catalogues. 

But little is to be added to the presentation of the case 
given in the last report of the Trustees. For the detail of 
this branch of the Library service reference should be made 
to the report of Mr. Whitney, the head of the department, to 
be found in the report of the Librarian. The Visiting Com- 
mittee, in their report, have given a full examination to the 
merits of the case, and their conclusions will be carefully 
weighed. 

• During the year large progress has been made in preparing 
for the press the Catalogue of the remainder of the Barton 
Library not yet printed, comprising the miscellaneous portion, 
and making about 10,000 volumes. The thorough character of 
the work done by Mr. A. M. Knapp and Mr. Jose F. Carret 
will ensure the most rapid progress, consistent with accuracy, 
when placed in the hands of the printer. As the publication 
of this Catalogue formed part of the contract of the city in 
its purchase of the collection, the Trustees feel that it is 
quite time that an end of the extended time should be within 
reasonable sight. 

The Contents of the Public Library. 

In the last twenty-nine years there has been gathered in 
the Public Library of Boston and its Branches, the largest 
collection of books, under one administration, upon this con- 
tinent. It was originally formed as supplementary to the 
teaching of the public schools, but by the generosity of the 



Public Library. 7 

donors of the various trust funds it has become an institution 
containing probably the largest number of educational books, 
as well as those of great interest and importance, in the 
country, covering the needs of the whole people, and propor- 
tionably useful to the lowest as to the highest intelligences. 
In this respect it differs from the other great collections, no 
less than in the freedom wath wdiich the various classes of 
books are loaned. It is now a Library for the whole people, 
and covers the great field depicted as probable in the first 
report of the Trustees in 1852. 

It is important to refer to that prophetic outlook in order 
that the progress of the institution may be understood, and 
to show how it has grown up to its present magnitude upon 
the lines originally foreshadowed. 

In the establishment of such a Library a beginning should be made, 
we think, without any sharply defined or settled plan, so as to be 
governed by circumstances as they may arise. The commencement 
should be made, of preference, in a very unpretending manner ; erecting 
no new building, and making no sliow ; but spending such money as 
may be appropriated for the purpose chietly on books that are known 
to be really wanted, rather than on such as will make an imposing, a 
scientific, and a learned collection ; trusting most confidently that such 
a Library, in the long run, will contain all that anybody can reasonably 
ask of it. For, to begin l^y making it a really useful Library by 
awakening a general interest in it as a City Institution, important to the 
whole people, a pai*t of their education, and an element of their happiness 
and prosperity, is the surest ivaij to make it at last a great and rich Library 
for men of science, statesmen, and scholars, as well as for the great body 
of the people, many of whom are always successfully struggling up to 
honorable distinctions, and all of whom should be encouraged and helped 
to do it. — p. 19. 

In fact, so wise in forecast as to the future conditions of 
administration and supply of books to be probably met, 
the report of 1852, of which this portion was from the 
hand of Mr. Ticknor (pp. 9 to 21), attracted universal atten- 
tion at the time, and deserves to be often read by those who 
are watching the progress of the institution and the multitu- 
dinous aims which have since been naturally developed. As 
it was, the City of Boston being in negotiation for a loan in 
London, the Mayor, Mr. Seaver, sent, with other City 
Documents, showing what the city was doing, across the- 
water, to the great house of Baring Bros. & Co., of which Mr. 
Joshua Bates was the head, a copy of this document 
relating to the Library. This gentleman, in consequence, 
became so much interested in the scheme that he estalilished 
the institution on a firm foundation by the presentation of 
$50,000 for a trust-fund, the income of which was to be 
expended in the purchase of "books of permanent value," 
and subsequently by the purchase of books, to the amount of 



8 City Document No. 97. 

$50,000, of such high cost and intrinsic value, and beyond the 
means of any ordinary income, as made it, according to the 
words of Mr. Ticknor, quoted above, " a great and rich Library 
for men of science, statesmen, and scholars." Other generous ' 
citizens, whose names are well known to every Bostonian, gave 
special funds to be used for the same grand purpose. The 
Bigelow Fund of $1,000, previously given by Mr. John P. 
Bigelow, was the first money given to the institution, but of 
which Mr. Bates had never heard at the time of his first 
oflering. These funds now amount to $116,600, and yield 
an income of $6,940 per annum, which is devoted to books 
of permanent value. 

Besides the works purchased with the income of those 
funds, great benefactions of books have been made to the 
Bates Hall collection, not only in whole libraries given or 
bequeathed to it, but in thousands of volumes, the result of 
individual interest and generosity ; the total of these benefac- 
tions in 29 years amounts to 143,730 volumes, without any 
count of the acquisition from the income of the trust-funds 
as presented by the donors. Bates Hall has reaped the 
benefits of the larger portion of these gifts ; but the Charles- 
town Li1)rary has a considerable fund of its own ; the Roxbury 
Branch (Fellowes Athenwum) has had a valuable bequest 
during the past year from the estate of Mrs. Bartlett, of 1,045 
volumes. There has also been added to the Green Fund $500, 
the whole income of which has been devoted by its generous 
founder (S. A. Green, M.D.) to the purchase of books 
relating to American History. 

This is now a great Library. While eml)racing within its 
treasures the widely extended stores of ancient and modern 
learning, the acquisitions of science in its progressive march, 
and the best literature in our native as well as in foreign 
languages, it must also in its onward progress be a reflex of 
each decade of time in sufficient copiousness for the student 
of history and manners. While the works of interest to-day 
will to a large extent be superseded by the literature of 
twenty years hence, the Library would not be complete 
which did not include, in due proportion, the thought, 
movement, imagination, fancy, and possibly errors, of each 
successive generation. 

Fiction in the Popular Libraries. 

The great question of the due proportion of fiction and 
juveniles necessary to constitute a popular library, educational 
in its tone and effect, has from the beginning given much 
thought and anxiety to the Trustees. It was evident that no 



Public Library. 9 

immoral book should be procured for circulation, and none 
has ever been put into public use with the knowledge of the 
Trustees. 

In the report of 1852 it is stated that "when such a taste 
for books has once been formed by these lighter pul)lications, 
then the older and more settled works in biography, in his- 
tory, and in the graver departments of knowledge, will be 
demanded. That such a taste can be excited by such means 
is proved from the course taken, in obedience to the dictates 
of their own interest, by the publishers of popular litera- 
ture of the time during the last twenty or thirty years. 
The Harpers and others began chiefly with new novels and 
other books of little value. What they printed, hoM^ever, 
was eagerly bought and read, because it w^as cheap and 
agreeable, if nothing else. A. habit of reading was thus 
formed." 

As early as the year 1867 it w^as evident that a large por- 
tion of the intellectual as well as imaginative power of the 
time was finding its vent in fiction, magazines, and the news- 
papers. This power has developed itself with increased 
energy year by year. While the production of solid books 
slowly and gradually moved forw^ard with the improvement 
of classical learning, historical investigation, and scientific 
research, the literature of the day has received a prodigious 
impulse. No public Library has the means, if it has the 
desire, to keep pace with it, by the purchase of suflicient 
quantities to satisfy popular demand. 

The whole question of the uses of fiction is one upon 
which the most diverse opinions are entertained. The cynic 
or ideal philanthropist or impracticable reformer regards 
every novel as immoral ; while, on the other hand, Sunday- 
schools and religious associations look to important aid 
from the fiction contained in their libraries. Some of the 
most important lessons taught in the Scriptures are in the 
form of fiction. Prose fiction covers the widest possible 
extent in the field of belles-lettres. In its more instructive 
form it teaches lessons in history, geography, the natural 
sciences, general knowledge, biography, the life and customs 
of different ages and people ; while in the more popular 
forms it depicts the manners which illustrate the social con- 
dition of the times, and shows what human nature is in all 
its possible variations. The latter forms the class of books 
most to be dreaded, for it includes books of the most 
elevated tone, but also sensational and immature stories, such 
as do not harm morally, and can only be read with any 
possible advantage by the most uneducated class of readers. 
The choice or selection of books of this degree forms one 



10 City Document No. 97. 

of the most prominent diflSculties in the administration of a 
free public Library, from which every tax-payer has the 
right to expect the purchase of books which will tend to 
what he considers to be his advantage. It is evident, how- 
ever, that the proportion of this class should be very small in 
any well-regulated library. 

The Trustees have recently been charged with wilfully or 
ignorantly consenting to the circulation of immoral litera- 
ture. The only definition which the author of the charge 
gives of his meaning is by referring to books written by such 
writers as Rhoda Broughton, Annie Thomas, Mrs. Ross 
Church (Florence Marryat), Mrs. Annie Edwards, Helen 
Mathers, Mrs. Forrester, Edmund Yates, Jessie Fothergill, 
J. P. Story, Edgar Fawcett, and Mrs. C. F. Corbin. It is 
obviously impossible, as it would be highly improper, for the 
Trustees to exclude such authors as these, whose works are 
read in every circle of society, and which the public, who are 
taxed to support the institution, demand. While they carefully 
exclude from circulation, especially among the young, all 
books of an immoral influence, they do not consider them- 
selves in the position of parents, or guardians to the commu- 
nity, bound to select for it only such books as suit their own 
tastes. The argument of Milton, in his Areopagitica, against 
a censorship of books largely applies to the present question. 
He opposes the prohibition of books which might possibly be 
injurious, on the ground that it is not the intention of the 
Almighty to place us in a world from which all temptation is, 
excluded. Any standard of taste that would deprive the 
Public Library of such books as Jane Eyre, Adam Bede, and 
the Scarlet Letter, would not satisfy the just demands of the 
community. Every reader of English literature will require 
copies of the works of Fielding, Smollett, Swift, Richard- 
son, and other classic authors of like character, as a necessary 
portion of a general Library ; but their use in this institution 
is limited to those of mature years. No volume of fiction 
that represented a world of fair weather and blue skies, with 
no sickness or sufiering, with no vice or crime, could give 
any faithful picture of life. The immoral work represents 
vice and crime in attractive colors, with highly- wrought de- 
tails, calculated to inflame the imagination and distort the 
judgment of the reader ; while fiction that paints the fatal con- 
sequences of error and wickedness, with the concomitant suf- 
fering and distress, while painful in perusal leaves no moral 
stain on the mind of either youth or age. 

Note. Since the above was written a list of hooks has been furnished to the Com- 
mittee on the Library of the City Council^ considered reprehensible, and by them 
transmitted to the Trustees. It is now under examination, but so far as the obsorva- 
tion has extended it presents no features to which the fore<»'oin<;' remarks will not 
apply. Refcreuce upon this point is invited to the report of the Librarian. 



Public Library. 11 

Another striking feature of the use of fiction is the pro- 
portion of new books which are in demand. In the lower 
hall of the Public Library, containing 14,016 volumes of fic- 
tion and juvenile, it is computed that at least 60 per cent, 
of the circulation of this class is furnished from the novels 
printed within two years. This statement when applied to 
the actual loans gives most surprising results. The first year, 
(1867) in which the numeration and circulation of fiction 
was ascertained, the number of volumes was 7,165, being 
5^Q per cent, of the whole number of volumes in the 
Boylston-street Library accessible to the public, and affording 
5^ A P^^' cent, of its circulation. In 1881 the whole number 
of volumes is 14,016, or 5^^ per cent, of the total contents 
of the library, 270,542 volumes, and furnishing 43^2^ per cent, 
of its circulation. In the twenty-nine years of its existence 
these have been collected, and it is fortunate that they are 
the cheapest works purchased for popular reading, when it is 
found that so large a proportion have lost their interest, and 
are only sparingly read. But yet we have the extraordinary 
result of 14,016 volumes of fiction, of which it is safe to say 
that not one-half were circulated during the year, furnishing 
43^2_ pgj. cent, of the use of the Library ; while the 256,526 
volumes of its more instructive and more important books had 
only a demand from 5 6| per cent . of the readers . These figures 
display, more than any argument can state, the part that fiction 
untainted with immorality plays in our households ; yet from 
this fact no inference can be derived showing a want of in- 
telligence and cultivation in the large body of readers. There 
may properly be added to this statement the remarkable 
fact that while the whole contents of the Boylston-street 
Library were doubled from 1867 to 1881, the collection of fic- 
tion was also doubled, and.the proportional use of this branch 
of literature fell otf 18 per cent., which has l:)een nearly com- 
pensated by an increase of over 16 per cent, in the reading 
of books which may be said to be educational according to 
the formulae of those who can see no possible good in 
fiction. 

In this connection it is a fact worthy of notice that the Lower 
Hall Library contained upon the 30th of April, 1881, but 
117 more volumes of fiction than it had upon the same date 
in 1876. 

.The Administration. 

The administration of this Lil)rary was placed by ordinance 
and is now vested by the act of incorporation in a Board of 
Trustees. The principles wdiich have given this institution its 
great success were laid down by the original Board of Trus- 



12 City Document No. 97. 

tees, and have not been varied from in principle since, although 
experience has given points of usefulness not directly within 
the knowledge of a body of men who saw clearly whatwas then 
wanted, but not what the different tastes and judgments of the 
coming generations might require as necessary to their intel- 
lectual development. While the principles at the outset were 
right, they were not derived from a corps of librarians and the 
heads of the different administration departments of a great 
Library. After Mr. Bates had established this Library on a 
secure foundation, and the lists for books wanted had been pre- 
pared and sent at his request by the Trustees, the services of 
Mr. Jewett, probably the most eminent bibliographer of the 
time in the country, were secured for the still further devel- 
opment of the reference Library. In this department he was 
facile j)rinceps. But this was but one, though a very impor- 
tant, portion of the work to be done. Beside this acquisition 
of the best books and the important plan of a more perfect 
system of cataloguing than had hitherto been known, two 
other conditions were needed in the formation, growth, and 
success of this Library, of which no bibliographer had any pos- 
sible experience : first, the selection of a simply popular 
Library ; and, secondly, its administration, founded upon a 
knowledge of the character of the people to whose wants it 
should be a growing ministration, and of the degree of trust 
on which the books might be loaned. 

The Trustees of the Library have no power to lay aside 
their responsiliility. By the by-laws of the institution they 
have given to the Librarian, the chief executive officer, all the 
authority which may reasonably and properly be given to such 
an administrator of its affairs. The institution is to be man- 
aged for the greatest good of the largest number of people, 
and so it has come down to the present from former Boards 
of Trustees. The original ordinance requires it. 

In an institution so peculiarly and obviously free, where 
every change in development can be within the knowledge of 
every one who honestly seeks information about its principles 
and its policy, and their results, and when the fuller details 
of those results are given for the information of their fellow- 
citizens, it is easy to see how stern reformers may claim that 
various details of administration miijht have been more sue- 
cessfully i)rojected, after the whole work has been done. No 
one can claim that this is not a human institution, and as 
such liable to errors of judgment in its management ; but no 
just criticism can be had upon its progress without an under- 
standing of the motives of the Board of Trustees, for which 
they alone are responsible. 

With the uses of the Library increasing in importance and 



Public Library. 13 

value year by year, and with a fluctuating and diminishing 
use of the lower grades of fiction, it would appear to be now 
steadily exerting its influences in the directions where for the 
most part salutary and intellectual results may follow. The 
collection of books is so large, and by this means so various, 
that few seeking improvement can fail to find books suited to 
their condition. This great charity is oflered freely to the 
whole community, which has honorably availed itself of the 
trust. May its resources and its influence still continue to 
increase as the years roll on, so long as they are exercised 
for the extension of human knowledge and instruction in 
human character. 

Mr. Geokge B. Chase, one of the Trustees, is in Europe, 
and has had no opportunity of reading this re[)ort. 

WM. W. GEEENOUGH, 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARIS, 
HENRY W. HAYNES, 
HUGH O'BRIEN, 
CHARLES E. PRATT. 



I cannot sign the foregoing report. 

SAM'L A. B. ABBOTT. 

Public Library, June 25, 1881. 



14 City Document No. 97. 



[B.] 
REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Committee for Examining the Public Library have 
welcomed the opportunity which this service has given 
them for adding to the knowledge which their use of its con- 
tents has aftbrded them, the privilege of a more intimate ac- 
quaintance with the details of its management. Though the 
freest facilities have been extended to them in their investi- 
gations, all their inquiries having been frankly met, and their 
curiosity, interest, and critical spirit abundantly gratilied, the 
committee, even after the completion of the work assigned to 
them, under the limitations of time and circumstances, might 
naturally hesitate to pronounce any summary judgments in 
general or in particular. Like all their fellow-citizens who 
have informed themselves on the subject, they are aware that 
the interests and conduct of the Library now, as from its be- 
ginnings, are, as they have always been, in the charge and 
under the willing and wholly unremunerated oversight and 
management of a body of intelligent, accomplished, and thor- 
oughly conscientious men, to whom grateful acknowledg- 
ments are due. 

It could hardly, however, be otherwise than that there 
should be reason and occasion for regular and renewed exam- 
ination of the management and methods of those who have 
such responsible trusts committed to them in the care of such 
valuable property, the conduct of so much administrative 
business, the apportionment and disbursement of so much 
money, the selection of so many officers and employes, and 
the making and enforcing of rules for their own guidance and 
that of others. The Trustees will not object to any re- 
minders of their responsibility, to suggestions or counsels 
against merely routine or mechanical management. The in- 
crease of the stores of literature of which they have the 
oversight ; the extension and complication of their duties by 
the provisions for Branch Libraries and other devices not 
proposed or provided for in the original scheme of the insti- 
tution, and the rapid growth of the constituency which they 
represent in its wide variance of opinions and preferences, 
have added very much to the responsibilities and obligations 
of the Trustees. Whatever, therefore, an Examining Com- 
mittee might be prompted to suggest, should not be at all in 
the tone of fault-finding, but with a view to helping and en- 
couraging them. 



Public Library. 15 

A sub-committee, appointed to consider the subjects of 
finance and administration, lias offered the following; suo;o:es- 
tions : — 

We are convinced that no means should be neglected to keep the Li- 
brary before the people, and to impress upon its patrons a vivid sense 
of the treasures gathered for their use within its walls. They should 
be led to feel a pride in its high standard of merit, and the rank it has 
attained, together with a pei'sonal concern for its prosperity and a de- 
sire for its increase. To this end every effort should be made to com- 
raerul it to all classes in the community, and to give it a more permanent, 
strong, and tenacious hold upon them. 

AV'e are well aware of the attempts that have alread}- been made in 
this direction by its managers, and of the success that has followed; but 
this very fact should encourage them to renewed exertions. We are con- 
vinced that much more may be done through the press in various forms, 
since thousands may be reached in this manner who even now are quite 
ignorant of the real value and extent of the pi'ivileges in their grasp. 
Well-written articles in a popular style might be prepared for the maga- 
zines and newspapers, with numerous illustrations, setting foi'th the 
superior advantages of the Library, and affording some insight into the 
priceless accumulations that have already been made. In this way, not 
only will the prestige of the Library be eminently increased both at 
home and abroad, but the reactive eiiVct upon our ritizens will be of in- 
calculable benefit to it and to them, adding to their pride in its prosper- 
ity and to their appreciation of its influence. 

We regaid it as particularly desirable to develop in every way the 
concern of the employes of the Library for its progress, and to make 
it, in this sense, a cooperative institution, with whose fortunes they 
should be led to identify themselves. ]\Iuch may be done to eftect this, 
to encourage a healthy enthusiasm, an esprit cle corjjs, as it were, by 
neglecting no opportunity to impress ujDon them the high aims of the 
institution, its jilans of working, and the really philanthropic objects 
for which it was established; to make them sharers in its success, and 
even g<nng so iar, if necessary, as to ofter some substantial reward to 
any who should discover a new and practical method of expanding its 
usefulness, of augmenting its resources, of improving the details of its 
operation, or in any way multiplying its facilities. The older em- 
ployes, who have proved the worth of their services, should be retained, 
if possible, ami favored as to their health and the duties required of 
them in every way, and should it be thought best to shorten their hours 
of labor, or to increase their salaries, the Trustees should not hesitate to 
do this at whatever risk of criticism or censure, should they consider 
it demandetl by the best interests of the institution. One old and 
well-tried servant is worth more for the time being than ten new ones. 

One of the most important branches ot Library administration, as 
vrell as the one most obvious to public criticism, is the delivery of the 
books applied for to the applicants at the desk. It is of the greatest 
consequence that this work should be promptly and accurately per- 
formed, and that the public should have full assurance that any book 
upon the shelves can be obtained on proper application. Unfortunately, 
this assurance has not always been felt, instances having occurred in 
which books have been reported to be "out," when a subsequent and 
more careful investigation has shown them to be in or near their places 
on the shelves. 

With a view of reducing this difliculty to a minimum, the following 
plan, devised by the Librai'ian, has been in operation during the past 
six months: The number of every book put into circulation or sent to 
the bindery is placed upon a separate slip of paper, and the slips, 



18 City Document No. 97. 

they afford to the service of the Central Lil^raiy, and the 
reduction of the occasional pressure of applicants there, are 
to be credited in their favor. 

The books in the Lower Hall and in the Branches exliibit 
evidence of much and frequent use, many of them being 
dilapidated. It is easy to replace the most desirable of 
them ; while of others of them, of only ephemeral interest, 
and of no instructive or disciplinary value, we may w^elcome 
the natural decay, as they will yield their space to some- 
thing better. The survival of the fittest is a wholly unobjec- 
tionable process and result in a Public Library. 

From time to time, before they were called to this 
service, members of the committee had observed in the 
public prints, charges, sometimes vague, and occasionally 
more or less distinct or pointed, that many volumes not only 
of an unimproving," sensational, and exciting character, but 
some that were of a positively injurious, demoralizing, and 
corrupting influence over the young, were in free circulation, 
especially through the Lower Hall and the Branch libraries. 
Nothing in the shape of evidence for these charges, in speci- 
fied cases, names or descriptions of books, or complaints 
of parents or teachers, has been presented to or put within 
the reach of the committee on this serious matter. They 
would not have failed to probe the subject thoroughly. But 
in giving due attention to it they can find no present grounds, 
at least, for the charges, other than that among the books 
circulating here, as through the whole community, are many, 
imaginative, exciting, and trashy works, high-wrought, sensa- 
tional, and unwholesome in their tone and influence. There 
may have been heretofore a disproportion of such books 
within the reach of applicants, and the records may show 
that they were much in use. But caution and watchfulness 
are not wanting. We recognize with satisfaction the earnest 
efforts of the Trustees to secure the Library and the circula- 
tion against all reasonal>le objections of this sort. In the 
year ending April 30, 1880, the excess of the condemned 
and not replaced books of fiction over the replaced was 
566, besides 215 volumes transferred to the duplicate room 
and no longer circulated. In the last lilirary j^ear the 
excess of condemned over replaced novels was 241, and 4 
were transferred to the duplicate room. 

The restriction upon the circulation of all books of an ob- 
jectionable character among the young presents the point of 
least difficulty in dealing with some very perplexing questions 
relating to what may or may not be properly gathered for 
free or for limited and guarded use on the shelves, or in the 
cabinets, of a large and miscellaneous public library. The 



Public Library. 19 

literature of every aQ;e and land and lan^uaofe emliraces works 
classed as products of genius, in which the literary, histori- 
cal, biographical, moral or imaginative elements, that are of 
the hio^hest interest and value to us, are wroug-ht in with 
coarse, impure, indelicate material in relation, description, 
insinuation, or disclosure. A censorship for discriminating 
and pronouncing upon these objectional^le qualities would 
follow tests and standards of a most varialile, vague, and in- 
consistent character, as different individuals might apply it, 
for inclusion or exclusion in the contents of a Public 
Library. 

There are Christian families in which the Old Testament is 
a forbidden book to the young. The classics are expurgated 
for schools. More than once has Shakespeare been purged 
for the household. The series of British poets, when found 
in their completeness, embraces writers and pieces stained 
with vulgarity and obscenity. Pul)lications of historical and 
antiquarian societies, in order to meet their special ends of 
fidelity and accuracy, nuist put into print what would be 
unfit for school or family reading. 

It hardly needs to be said that no Public Lil)rary should 
furnish books to young readers, or to those of any age, 
which will inflame their passions or pervert their moral 
sense. But works which would have such effects on some 
persons would have no such influence on other readers. 

The conclusion would be, that, while works of the whole 
class here referred to should not l)e positively excluded from 
a great library, nor from the carefully guarded use of those 
who may safely be trusted with them, they should be re- 
stricted and denied in all cases to the young. 

There is a considerable class of books which, though they 
may not be positively impure and corrupt in their tone and 
contents, are so utterly worthless, and so lacking in any 
good quality and influence for heart, mind, or character, 
that the committee would advise their exclusion from cir- 
culation and from the shelves. Nor do they regard the 
plea as a valid one that the Library is bound to meet and 
satisfy the demands of all readers of every taste and mental 
capacity. The Library is sustained as a public educator, 
with functions like those of our public schools. It is to im- 
prove and elevate tastes, capacities, and moral and mental 
qualities, and to minister innocent delight to wearied toilers ; 
and for those whom it cannot directly or indirectly serve to 
such ends its funds and facilities are not available. 

The committee have scrutinized with care these three mat- 
ters : the amount and quality of objectionable matter in the 
Library ; the conditions and limitations of its use for any 



20 City Document No. 97. 

applicants ; and the securities in selection, purchase, and 
examination by proper officials, to prevent the circulation 
among the young of any harmful books. 

The most emphatic remark which we have to make as the 
result of our inquiries bearing upon the complaints or anxie- 
ties relating to this subject is, that all due attention and 
watchfulness are given to prevent the accession on the shelves 
of the Lower Hall and the Branch libraries of any really 
immoral and dangerous book. Great care is taken in limit- 
ing and restricting the orders given to agents, who are not at 
liberty to send anything that they may please to the Library. 
In very many cases the known and high character of a pub- 
lishing firm may guarantee its issues. Books coming from a 
firm of dubious repute, and all other volumes of uncertain 
characteristics, are examined, and when reason is found are 
condemned. A most efficient and friendly officer in the 
Lower Hall (doing better service than a Catalogue), Mr. T. 
H. Cummings, offers advice, instruction, and valuable coun- 
sel, highly appreciated and improved by young applicants in 
guiding their selection, and leading them to the best kind of 
reading. Mr. Tiffany and Miss Jenkins perform this excel- 
lent service when he is off duty. It is very desirable simi- 
lar aid should be furnished in the Branches, and measures are 
in working to increase and turn to account this excellent 
method of help for young readers. 

The Librarian is to give two afternoons a week to visiting 
the Branches, and the respective Branch librarians are to be 
instructed to give similar advice to readers to what is given 
in the Lower Hall, either from their own resources or from 
directions given them from the Central Lil^rary. 

Many of the matters which engage criticism, complaint, and 
wide diversities of judgment as to the province of a large Pub- 
lic Library may be suggested by merely setting down two ques- 
tions, which are often put emphatically by those who speak as 
if representing antagonistic interests. Why should the City 
Treasury be drawn upon to stock and maintain a Public 
Library, with local branches, to furnish thousands of volumes 
of light and unprofitable literature, for the mere amusement 
and dissipation of mind and energy of young persons ? The 
other question is. Why should the city assume the guar- 
dianship of and add to special collections of costly, erudite, 
and curious literary works, books of taste and fancy, or helps 
in advanced science or skill, which are of use only to geniuses, 
critical scholars, amateurs, experts, or bibliophilists ? 

One answer covers both these questions ; and that is, that 
the larger and more miscellaneous in contents a free Public 
Library is, especially if those two qualities in the character of 



Public Library. 21 

its contents were recognized and provided for by its founders, 
benefactors, and supporters, the more impartially must it have 
regard to both of those contrasted classes of literary works. 

The only practical way of dealing with this mgitter of 
expense is to ask if the citizens receive an equivalent in return 
from it. It is believed that no argument in detail is necessary 
to prove that they do. Great civic celeljrations, free con- 
certs, and other public occasions of ungrudged outlay, are jus- 
tified on grounds of local pride, patriotism, and generous 
regard for the people. Though the scenes and pleasures are 
temporary, the profits may be permanent. There are in the 
Library large numl)ers of books of unique character, and of 
a value not admitting of any pecuniary estimate. But it 
should not for a moment be supposed that what is called " the 
people's money " has been used by the city to purchase these 
treasures. 

For the year ending May 1, 1881, the city appropriated, 
for the purchase of books, $17,000. 

Of this sum there was spent for periodicals . $2,826 97 

For books for the Branches .... 3,562 79 

Balance 10,610 24 



Total . . . . . . $17,000 00 

This balance was spent for books of a popular character 
placed in the Lower and Bates Halls. 

The special collections and deposits were gathered by 
scholars, and men of philosophic, scientific, and artistic 
tastes and genius, at their own cost and for their own 
improvement, and they have been munificently given to the 
citv, often with a fund for addino- to them, and with a view 
to facilitate the lal)ors of students and inquirers of like 
special talents who may highly appreciate such aid. If that 
extraordinary and highly gifted man. Dr. Nathaniel Bow- 
ditch, found it necessary to gather around him a special and 
valuable collection of mathematical works, whatnol>ler legacy 
could he leave to some youths of like genius in this city and 
Commonwealth, than such helps, if so it might be, to exceed 
him in their attainments ? And what could be a more graceful 
favor than that of his family in providing for the enrichment 
of the deposit? If Mr. Ticknor needed and had a private use 
for the precious Spanish and Portuguese collection gathered by 
him, has he left a l)urden of debt or of gratitude in commit- 
ting the collection to the care of the city, with a pecuniary 
gift for its increase ? The Librarian of CongTcss felt justified 
in spending thirteen hundred dollars of the " nation's money" 



^2 City Document No. 97. 

for a copy of John Eliot's Indian Bil)le. Shall Boston be 
challenged for accepting the volume as a gift? Indeed, it is 
from the breadth and comprehensiveness of the views of the 
founders and private benefactors of the Library that the mis- 
cellaneousness of its stores has l)ecome a standard for our 
acceptance and following. Besides works of art, there are at 
least eighty thousand volumes, which, from their special 
value, or conditions attached by the donors, cannot be taken 
from the Library. This leaves some three hundred thousand 
for home use by readers of various tastes and needs. 

The committee have been gratified to observe the high 
standard of completeness which the Trustees have sought to 
maintain in the supply of l^ooks in the manifold departments 
of learning and literature within the limits appropriate to 
such an institution. The Library, however, has become so 
large, its growth from year to year is so rapid, and these 
departments have become so much subdivided, in the applica- 
tion to the pursuit of knowledge of the principle of the 
division of labor, that while the importance of maintaining 
this high standard becomes a duty of increasing ol)ligation 
the difficulty of discharging it increases in a corresponding 
deo-ree. The task is so great that it has led the committee 
to consider in what way it can be most effectually and 
advantageously performed . 

The Library is designed to promote the advancement and 
diflusion of knowledge and culture in this community. This 
it does, in consideral^le measure, by meeting the demand of 
our most learned men for the books they seek and need in the 
prosecution of their studies. Some arrangement by which 
the cooperation of representative men of learning in Boston 
and its vicinity may be engaged in organized relations to the 
Trustees, as an advisory council for the selection of books, 
has seemed to the committee a very desirable measure, and 
likely to meet the necessities of the case. Such counsel from 
men who, through vocations to which their lives are devoted, 
obtain the "widest acquaintance with the literature of their 
respective branches of learning, could not fail to be of the 
highest utility. By ensuring the acquisition of the best 
l)ooks it would enhance the usefulness of the Library as well 
to the intelligent many as to the learned few, and make the 
whole collection the best possible for the money expended. 

It is too much to expect of any Superintendent or Book 
Committee of Trustees that they should keep themselves in- 
formed concerning the most profital)le literature of the past 
and present, pertaining to all the arts, learning, and sciences, 
in all the languages, at least of civilized nations, in all 
periods of their history ; and yet, with more or less com- 



Public Library. 23 

pleteness, this is what the Ijuilders of a great Library, like 
that of the City of Boston, undertaJve. 

The committee Ijelieve that the Trustees would have no 
difficulty in procuring the requisite number of suitable 
persons to aid in this important work, who would render 
the service desired of them in a liberal spirit of devotion to 
the public welfare, while at the same time finding an un- 
sought advantage to themselves in having the Library pro- 
vided with the books which, in their judgment, were of the 
greatest value in their own departments of study. The 
committee hope that the formation of this advisory council 
will have the early and favoraljle attention of its Trustees. 

We come now to offer some suggestions upon the most 
perplexing of the points that have engaged our attention, 
namely, the subject of a Catalogue. Yet we can hardly hope 
to give any considerable help towards the practical dealing 
with a matter upon which the widest and the most discord- 
ant differences of judgment and opinion prevail among the 
experts, who meet in the conferences of Librarians to dis- 
cuss the subject of catalogues in all its relations and methods. 
Next to the collection, preservation, and judicious disposal 
of the books in a large and miscellaneous Lil)rary, the mak- 
ing them accessil)le and available for use is hardly of sec- 
ondary importance. It is expected of a Public Library, 
very much as of one of the most extensive and miscel- 
laneous of our retail stores for the sale of a large variety of 
goods, that it will not only answer to the special calls of 
customers for the articles asked for, but that it will also give 
information of the whole contents and stock, and even make 
pulilic advertisement of them. This we know, however, 
even Avith the spur of traffic, if it may ])e attempted, can 
be l)ut partially realized. The announcements must be 
readjusted by the seasons, and the changing years with their 
new styles. The contents of a Library are intended to be 
permanent, while steadily increasing. In its character as 
an agent in public education such a Lilirary must multiply 
its facilities, not onl}^ for aiding in the circulation of its books, 
but for aiding the least informed of those who wish to borrow 
them to some knowledge of the relative merits, qualities, 
and contents of the volumes. One applicant's call may be 
for a certain book l)y author and subject. Another will ask 
for any new and interesting l30ok on a given subject by 
any good author. Special and critical students want informa- 
tion as to particular collections and editions. Here is a 
Central Library, with eight Branches. In each and all of 
them it is necessary that all classes of applicants sliall be 
served ; those who know more or less clearly what they 



^2 City Document No. 97. 

for a copy of John Eliot's Indian Bil)le. Shall Boston be 
challenged for accepting the volume as a gift? Indeed, it is 
from the breadth and comprehensiveness of the views of the 
founders and private benefactors of the Library that the mis- 
cellaneousness of its stores has become a standard for our 
acceptance and follo\ving. Besides works of art, there are at 
least eighty thousand volumes, which, from their special 
value, or conditions attached by the donors, cannot be taken 
from the Librar}^ This leaves some three hundred thousand 
for home use by readers of various tastes and needs. 

The committee have been gratified to observe the high 
standard of completeness which the Trustees have sought to 
maintain in the supply of Ijooks in the manifold departments 
of learning and literature within the limits appropriate to 
such an institution. The Library, however, has become so 
large, its growth from year to year is so rapid, and these 
departments have become so much subdivided, in the applica- 
tion to the pursuit of knowledge of the principle of the 
division of labor, that while the importance of maintaining 
this high standard becomes a duty of increasing obligation 
the difficulty of discharging it increases in a corresponding 
degree. The task is so great that it has led the committee 
to consider in what way it can be most eliectually and 
advantageously performed. 

The Library is designed to promote the advancement and 
diffusion of knowledge and culture in this community. This 
it does, in considerable measure, by meeting the demand of 
our most learned men for the books they seek and need in the 
prosecution of their studies. Some arrangement by which 
the cooperation of representative men of learning in Boston 
and its vicinity may be engaged in organized relations to the 
Trustees, as an advisory council for the selection of books, 
has seemed to the committee a very desirable measure, and 
likely to meet the necessities of the case. Such counsel from 
men who, through vocations to which their lives are devoted, 
obtain the widest acquaintance with the literature of their 
respective branches of learning, could not fail to be of the 
highest utility. By ensuring the acquisition of the best 
])ooks it would enhance the usefulness of the Library as well 
to the intelligent many as to the learned few, and make the 
whole collection the best possible for the money expended. 

It is too much to expect of any Superintendent or Book 
Committee of Trustees that they should keep themselves in- 
formed concerning the most prohtable literature of the past 
and present, pertaining to all the arts, learning, and sciences, 
in all the languages, at least of civilized nations, in all 
periods of their history ; and yet, with more or less com- 



Public Library. 23 

pleteness, this is what the builders of a great Library, like 
that of the City of Boston, undertaJve. 

The committee believe that the Trustees would have no 
difficulty in procuring the requisite number of suitable 
persons to aid in this important work, who would render 
the service desired of them in a liljeral spirit of devotion to 
the public welfare, while at the same time finding an un- 
sought advantage to themselves in having the Library pro- 
vided with the books which, in their judgment, w^ere of the 
greatest value in their own departments of study. The 
committee hope that the formation of this advisory council 
will have the early and favorable attention of its Trustees. 

We come now to offer some suggestions upon the most 
perplexing of the points that have engaged our attention, 
namely, the subject of a Catalogue. Yet Ave can hardly hope 
to give any consideral)le help towards the practical dealing 
with a matter upon Avhicli the widest and the most discord- 
ant differences of judgment and opinion prevail among the 
experts, who meet in the conferences of Librarians to dis- 
cuss the subject of catalogues in all its relations and methods. 
Next to the collection, preservation, and judicious disposal 
of the books in a large and miscellaneous Library, the mak- 
ing them accessible and available for use is hardly of sec- 
ondary importance. It is expected of a Public Library, 
very much as of one of the most extensive and miscel- 
laneous of our retail stores for the sale of a large variety of 
goods, that it will not only answer to the special calls of 
customers for the articles asked for, but that it will also give 
information of the whole contents and stock, and even make 
public advertisement of them. This we know, however, 
even with the spur of traffic, if it may be attempted, can 
be but partially realized. The announcements must be 
readjusted by the seasons, and the changing years with their 
new styles. The contents of a Library are intended to be 
permanent, while steadily increasing. In its character as 
an agent in puljlic education such a Lil)rary must multiply 
its facilities, not only for aiding in the circulation of its books, 
but for aiding the least informed of those who Avish to l>orrow 
them to some knowledge of the relative merits, qualities, 
and contents of the volumes. One applicant's call may be 
for a certain book by author and suljject. Another will ask 
for any new and interesting book on a given subject by 
any good author. Special and critical students want informa- 
tion as to particular collections and editions. Here is a 
Central Library, with eight Branches. In each and all of 
them it is necessary that all classes of applicants shall be 
served ; those who know more or less clearly what they 



24 City Document No. 97. 

want, and those who know only that they want something. 
A complete, intelligible, and accessible Catalogue, free and 
ready for use, with authors, subjects, cross-references, and 
guiding hints, can alone fully meet the requisite conditions. 
The preparation of such in a large Library, even if no 
additions were made, is a work of time and labor, and demands 
a heav}'' outlay for putting it into print. But, when constant 
and extensive additions are made to the Library each month, 
a problem is presented to be dealt with which tasks and 
divides the judgment of those most competent for it. 

When the Index and Supplement were published the 
Library contained 140,554 volumes. 

There have since been added to it 250,784 volumes. 

The putting into type of a complete Catalogue of the 
books and pamphlets would involve an enormous amount of 
preparatory labor, the publication of ten stout volumes, and 
the cost would be nearer two than one hundred thousand 
dollars ; and while the work was in progress the additions 
made to the Library j^ear l^y year would make the Catalogue up 
to any fixed date of gradually diminishing value year by year. 

It is Ijelieved that this Library has more skilfully and use- 
fully than any other substituted or compensated for the lack 
of a full published Catalogue by its original and most helpful 
device of bibliographical, literary, and topical notes in the 
bulletins for the service of readers. 

Of these 125 are now in print. 

As any special subject in art, science, personal or social 
interest, l)iography, history, or local concern, is for the time 
engaging conversation or inquiry, a syllabus has been pre- 
jDared, indicating sources of information upon it. 

The committee would be very reluctant to acquiesce in the 
conclusion that there can be no substitute for and no essential 
improvement upon the present Card Catalogue. With a 
reasonable regard to the inherent difficulties of the matter, 
to the varying opinions and judgments of experts, and to the 
wisdom of delay in the hope that ingenuity may devise some 
method preferable to the present, the committee have dis- 
cussed the question whether a simpler, less elal)orate, and 
even incomplete Catalogue, as regards minutiai, details, notes, 
cross-references, etc., might not be provided for the help of 
the larger number of ordinary readers, while the Card Cata- 
logue should still be relied upon for more complete and 
systematic information. 

The whole number of volumes in the Library 

is now . 391,338 

In Bates Hall . . . . . . 229,005 



Public Libeary. 25 

In the Lower Hall 38,073 

In the Branches 108,319 

In the Central Buildmg .... 283,019 

The increase from last year is . . . 14,113 

The circulation during the 304 open days has 

been 1,065,181 

Daily average circulation . . . . 3,504 

Nearly one hundred thousand green slips rep- 
resent the number of volumes called for for 
consultation in the Library. 
The number of special inquirers for advice 
and help, special students, examinei's of the 
patent records, etc., is .... 60,084 

The number employed in the Central Library is 81 

The number employed in the Branches is . 62 

A matter of chief importance, on which the interest and 
anxiety of the committee have been engaged, is that of the 
actual and pressing need of a new Library edifice, constructed 
with reference to special purposes and uses, of which experience 
and many embarrassments and risks attending the present edi- 
fice in its inconveniences, limitations, and exposure, have been 
forcibly urging upon the attention of very many of our citi- 
zens. There would be reason enouo-h for advisino- immediate 
measures for obtaining enlarged accommodations and in- 
creased safety for the Library, if we had regard only to the 
steady and rapid increase of its contents. But the emer- 
gency is more pressing than that. The present building is 
but another illustration of the fact, of which we have had 
abundant experience, and are yet to have more, in Boston, 
in the matter of public edifices and thoroughfares, and that 
is, that without having forecast the rapid gro^\i:h and develop- 
ment of the city or the incorporation of the suburbs, all our 
public edifices have well-nigh burst their walls. The rooms 
for public business in the City Hall are complemented Ijy 
outside ofiices. The Sufiblk Probate Office has its annex. 
The railroad stations have each and all been three or four 
times reconstructed for enlargement. Apartments, divisions, 
and arrangements for special objects, have had to be provided 
for in the Library, for which there was not the slightest ex- 
pectation or regard in its plan and construction. There is a 
wasteful fault in the great hall which cannot be remedied. 
The contents and the facilities for the use of the Library are 
suifering grievously for lack of space, means, and conven- 
iences. It is crowded in every part, impeding desirable ar- 
rangement, and subjecting its employes to unnecessary and 
wearisome labor. The mode of heating is proving destruct- 



26 City Document No. 97. 

ive to the books on its highest shelves. Any citizen who is 
informed as to the really priceless value of the contents of 
the Library, and is aware that the city in accepting the 
precious and munificent gifts there gathered has constituted 
itself their guardian, will realize with dismay the risks from 
fire, and even from the water-pipes, to which they are ex- 
posed. 

A conflict of opinions has already found expression as to 
the expediency and wisdom of availing of — under the condi- 
tions imposed by the Commonwealth, which sul)stantially ap- 
ply to the use of the Lil)rary now — and building upon the 
lot oflered to the city for a new and better designed edifice. 
The objections raised to a removal of site, concern distance, 
inconvenience, etc. 

A ready compromise or alternative offers, viz., that the 
present edifice be reserved for a centre for books that circu- 
late, for a reading-room, and for maintaining connection with 
the Branches, and that a new edifice be constructed on the 
proffered lot, to receive the special collections and treasures 
of which the city has become the trustee and guardian. 

And inasmuch as the city is indel)ted to private generosity 
and munificence for those valual^le deposits, it might be alto- 
gether reasonable and hopeful to appeal to a larger circle of 
like liberal and public-spirited persons for pecuniary aid in 
building the desired structure. 

The committee would therefore advise, that in connection 
with and in support of an urgent call upon the city to enter 
at once upon plans and measures for l)uilding a new edi- 
fice, some method be adopted for engaging voluntary and 
generous pecuniary gifts from our public-spirited citizens in 
aid of the work. 

GEORGE E. ELLIS. 

EDWIN P. SEAVER, 

HENRY P. BOWDITCH. 

DARWIN E. WARE. 

WILLIAM C. WILLIAMSON. 

EDWARD J. HOLMES. 

HOWARD P. ARNOLD. 

GEORGIANA W. SMITH. 

EDNAH D. CHENEY. 



Public Library. 27 



[C] 
LIBRAEIAN'S EEPOET. 

To the Trustees: — 

The Li1)rarian is the executive officer of the Trustees, 
and, under them, has the general charge, management, and 
control of the Library and its Branches, and of all persons 
employed therein. He not only promulgates their orders, 
as well as those of the several committees within the scope 
of their authority, and sees that they are duly observed and 
executed, but is also required to note and report in respect 
to their efficiency, and to make such suggestions as, in his 
judgment, will promote the interests of the Library in all of 
its departments. 

These relations of the Librarian to administration imply 
ample powers and corresponding oliligations ; for though he 
has no vote in the proceedings of the Trustees, and, there- 
fore, no responsibility for the results of their delil)erations, 
yet, Avhen these take form in legislative acts, he is brought 
into immediate relations to those acts in their execution, and 
with that his responsibility begins, and is limited only by 
the requirements of successful administration. AVith these 
views of my relations to the Public Library, I now lay 
before the Trustees my 

Third Annual Report. 

The principal functions of the Library are the selection, 
purchase, circulation, and preservation of books ; and, under 
these heads, I respectfully submit the following observa- 
tions : — 

Selection and Purchase of Books. 

The present mode of selecting and purchasing books for 
the Public Library has the sanction of its founders and early 
Trustees ; and, with some changes of agents, some reduc- 
tions in the rate of commissions and charges, and additional 
limitations of the discretionary powers of the agents, the 
contracts remain, for substance, the same as they were at 
the beginning, and bear date as follows : for German books, 
1857 ; for French books, 1868 ; for American books, 1871 ; 
and for English books, January, 1880. 

These agents are expected to bring to the notice of the 
Trustees, by means of catalogues, publications, and corre- 



28 CiTT Document No. 97. 

spondence, the latest and most reliable intelligence respecting 
the current literature of the several nationalities ; but the 
agents of Spain, Italy, and Germany are not permitted to 
send, and, during my term of office, — since October, 1878, 

— never have sent, to the Pul^lic Library any work not pre- 
viously ordered by the Trustees. 

With respect to France, England, and the United States, 
the facts are somewhat difterent ; and of these countries in 
their order. The agent for French literature — his appoint- 
ment datino; from 1868 — is instructed to send to the Public 
Li])rary " books recently published, which shall he standard 
in their character, whether in science, art, or belles-lettres, 
with the exception that, in works costing one hundred francs 
($20) or more, he shall advise before purchasing, and also 
that the amount of new books purchased and sent forward, 
without specific order, shall not average over two hundred 
francs ($40) per month," or $480 a year. 

These terms seem to be sufficiently guarded to protect the 
Lil)rary from the purchase, by its agents, of expensive pub- 
lications, as well as from the ao-gregated cost of excessive 
invoices. 

But for a public library, the paramount considerations are 
these : Are the books wisely selected ? Are the purchases 
preceded by the fullest examination compatible with their 
timely receipt; and is the discretion of the agent judiciously 
exercised ? 

There are some facts which bear upon these questions ; 
and that I may speak from personal knowledge I confine 
my statements to the two full years of my personal service, 

— 1879 and 1880. 

During these two years the whole number of books 
received from the French agent, which became a part of the 
Public Library, was 1,172. Of these, 971 were sent on 
specific orders from the Trustees ; and 209, — 104 volumes 
a year, — were forwarded under the discretionary power 
lodged in the agent. Nor have I any reason to doubt that 
they conformed to his instructions, as " standard works in 
science, art, or belles-lettres" Eight others, for various 
reasons deemed unsuitable for the Library, were returned. 

With these facts before them, the Trustees can determine 
what additional safeguards, if any, are needed to protect the 
Library, not from excessive purchases, — for the aggregated 
cost of these purchases was far within the agent's limits, — 
but from the accumulation of undesirable books. With regard 
to current publications — and the discretion of the agent 
extends to none other — there may be some difficulty in deter- 
mining what works shall be deemed standard. When the 



Public Libeart. 29 

book is from a well-known author of high character, that fact 
in itself, perhaps, is a reasonable guaranty for the value of the 
work in question ; but if from an unknown author, then the 
reputation of the publishing house, the estimate formed hy 
the literary journals, with such light as the agent may derive 
from a cursory examination, must guide him in his selections. 
An occasional mistake may be made ; but it will be observed 
+hat the field for mistake is a narrow one, — science, art, and 
belles-lettres, — one in which meretricious works are not often 
found. On the other hand, the Library may, perhaps, l)e 
justified in running some risk in order to insure the prompt 
receipt, by those to whom time is an important consideration, 
of the earliest intelligence resjDecting science and art, 
especially the useful arts. However that may be, I have 
abundant reason to believe that the efibrts of the Trustees 
in this direction are appreciated ; and an inspection of 
the works forwarded to the Library, under existing ar- 
rangements, afibrds evidence of their constant use, as 
well as of the fidelity and general good judgment of the 
agent ; and from no one, as far as I am aware, has come 
a suggestion that the books thus purchased are not 
worthy of an honorable place in any well-selected public 
library. 

With respect to English publications the agent's instruc- 
tions are similar to those which guide in the selection of 
French literature, though somewhat more in detail, — having 
been modified early in 1880, when it was found that the 
library was receiving a small number of books which , though 
of excellent character, were not in all respects adapted to 
the patrons of the Public Library. By the instructions as 
modified, none of the following classes of books are for- 
warded except on specific orders from the Trustees, viz. : 

1, Fiction, juveniles, theology, law, surgery, and medicine. 

2, Works on art costing more than £4 ; and all works of 
this class not of solid merit. 3, Editions de luxe. 4, New 
editions of works, unless the editorial matter justifies the 
purchase of a duplicate. 5, Works published serially, such 
as public documents, works and transactions of learned 
societies. 

The new English books forwarded to the Public Library 
by the agent under these instructions seem to me to be in all 
respects admirable ; and I take pleasure in saying that by 
the arrangement which, with the approval of the Trustees, I 
made with the Post-Ofiice Department, the Library now 
receives weekly the best English books, and by the same 
mail which brings the weekly journals announcing their pub- 
lication. I have no suggestion to ofier in regard to this 
agency. It is enterprising, prompt, and judicious. 



30 City Document No. 97. 

There remains to be considered the plan by which the 
Public Library receives current American publications. No 
foreign fiction or juvenile books are received into the Lil)rary 
unless specifically ordered by the Trustees ; but in respect to 
domestic works of the same class the practice is different. 
The agent sends without orders one copy at least of such 
books as, in his judgment (informed as to the views of the 
Trustees by years of experience) , are suited to the Library or 
its branches. But a!l these books are forwarded for exam- 
ination and approval. If found satisfactory, they are 
retained ; if otherwise, they are returned at once. No book 
goes to the shelves — much less into circulation — without 
examination. This examination is made with respect to all 
books ; but not with equal thoroughness in respect to all. 
In some cases the name of the author, or of the pul)lishing- 
house, with a cursory examination, is deemed sufficient ; but 
where these are not well known, or are of questionable char- 
acter, then the scrutiny is conducted with a degree of care 
which at least prevents the acceptance of books which fall 
below the general library standard of the country ; and by 
that I mean the standard fixed with a remarkable degree of 
unanimity by the judgment and action of the trustees of pub- 
lic libraries maintained by municipal taxation. For those 
selecting the books found in other pul)lic libraries in this 
country, acting upon a matter where sound practical judg- 
ment is specially needed, and indulging less in theories 
because they are responsible for practical results, have 
arrived at substantially the same conclusion, as may be 
seen by comparing their printed catalogues. It appears, 
however, from the most recent of these catalogues that the rule 
of exclusion is more strictly applied in the Pul)lic Liln-ary 
than in other similar libraries. It should be added that the 
scrutiny of books is not limited to those newly pul)lished, 
but extends to those already in the Library, or its Branches ; 
and whenever a book of questionable tendency is discovered 
it is inunediately removed from circulation. 

Still the question remains, what is the proper standard for 
the fiction purchased for the Public Library? On this point 
unanimity of opinion will be reached slowly. The Trustees 
are in possession of all the facts, and familiar with the argu- 
ments adduced in support of opposing theories. I have 
nothing to add. The settlement of the question, which must 
be settled by somebody on the publication of each new book, 
and not postponed to await the opinion of a convention, will 
probably be left — where the fundamental law of the Library 
and the good sense of its founders have left it — with the 
Trustees ; and in this, as in all matters which involve the 



Public Library. 31 

impartial expenditure of public money, public opinion will 
finally declare itself, and will be heeded. 

But while the efi'orts to foi'ce pul)lic sentiment have not 
been followed by encouraging results, something has already 
been done in elevating the standard of the public reading. 
Rational expectations are in that direction. Nor is there 
any present relaxation of efforts ; on the contrary, while 
former agencies retain their original vigor, some new influ- 
ences have been set in operation with valuable realized, and 
still more valuable promised, results. 

Class Lists, Annotated Catalogues, and Bulletins. 

These are pul)lished in new editions, with added matter, 
as often as circumstances, in each case, seem to warrant the 
expense. The following will show these lists in their latest 
edition, date of publication, numl)er of copies printed, and 
number remaining undisposed of at the time of this writing : 

1. Class List for Poetry, the Drama, etc., in the Loicer 
Hall, published July, 1870, in an edition of 5,000 copies, 
of which 2,829 remain on hand. 

2. Class List for Works in the Arts and Sciences, in the 
Lower Hall, second edition of 3,000 copies, published Sep- 
tember, 1871, of which 425 copies remain. To this a sup- 
plementary list is in preparation, and will be pul)lished early 
in June. This will contain the popular works in the arts and 
sciences added to the Lower Hall since 1871, with refer- 
ences to l)ooks in Bates Hall on the same subjects. 

3. Catalogue of Bool' s in the Lower Hall, in the Classes 
of History, Biograjyhy , and Travel. Second edition, July, 
1873, consisting of 3,000 copies, of which 440 copies are 
unsold. 

4. Books in Foreign Languages in the Lower Hall, Jan- 
uary, 1876, in a second edition of 750 copies, which are all 
sold. A new edition has been prepared and will appear in 
May. 

5. Class List of English Prose Fiction, in the Lower 
Hall, sixth edition, April, 1877, of 4,500 copies, of which 
1,084 are vmsold. 

6. Hand-book for Readers, new edition, 1879, of 5,000 
copies, 440 now on hand. 

7. A Chronological Index to Historical Fiction, second 
edition, 1875, exhausted. 

These lists, the publication of which was begun many 
years since, leaving to all the exercise of a free choice of 
books, have undoubtedly done much to elevate the standard 
of the reading public, by calling their attention to the better 



32 City Document No. 97. 

classes of literature in the Library ; and the foregoing state- 
ment presents very distinctly to the Trustees the question 
whether more should be done in the same direction. New 
editions will be called for from time to time ; and if the 
editions now on hand (besides those of foreign languages 
and science and art, of which new editions are in prepara- 
tion) were nearly exhausted ; or if the books of value 
recently printed were more numerous than they are, I should 
recommend the immediate preparation of supplementary lists. 

In the meantime the bulletins show, at the end of each 
quarter, the principal additions to the Library in all depart- 
ments of literature ; and the titles of new books received 
are immediately displayed — with some diflerence in their 
effectiveness — in all the departments from which they are 
delivered. 

. These means of information and guidance are now sup- 
plemented in the Lower Hall by the personal efforts of the 
Librarian and his assistant, according to the time at their dis- 
posal, and by the unintermitted services of the curator of the 
Lower Hall card catalogue ; and I now have it under con-, 
.sideration whether a similar service is practicable in the 
Branch Lil)raries. 

But notwithstanding these appliances designed to promote 
the circulation of books, and to improve the standard of 
reading for those who resort to the Public Library, I have to 
report a falling off" in the , 

Circulation of Books 

in all departments of the Library, but by a percentage con- 
siderably less than is found in many of the public libraries in 
the country. If this could be wholly accounted for on the 
ground that better and, therefore, fewer books are now read 
than formerly, it would l)e a cause for congratulation rather 
than for solicitude. But while I have no doubt whatever 
that there is a growing improvement in the character of the 
books read, I think it would be uncandid to assign solely to 
this cause the diminished circulation which the tables show. 
We must therefore seek for other causes. Nor have we far 
to seek. Some of these causes are general, affecting the 
public libraries throiighout the country ; and one, at least, 
special with the Public Library. 

Since the revival of business people of all classes are 
reading less, as they find themselves less at leisure ; a fact 
indicated not only by the diminished circulation from public 
libraries, but also by the reported diminished sales of books 
in nearly all branches of literature. The special cause which 



Public Library. 33 

for the last three years has been constantly affecting the 
Public Library is the comparatively few copies of tiction 
purchased for it during that period. Where, formerly a 
dozen, or even two dozen, copies of a popular story were 
purchased, now the largest number does not exceed three ; 
and as the old stock is worn out by use it is seldom re- 
placed by more than a single copy. 

That there is some cause which operates throughout the 
country is evident from the statistics of other libraries. The 
following table made from the latest reports at hand, and 
without any attempt at selection, will show the fact to be as 
stated above : — 

Comparative Circulation in Several Libraries, Show- 
ing Decrease of Circulation for the Years 1879 
and 1880. 





1879. 


loan Per cent, of 
^^^^- decrease. 


Boston Public Library, 


1,170,767 


1,093,628 .06 h. 


Mer. Library Co., Phila.,, 


186,834 (1878) 


168,040 (1879) .10 


Taunton Public Library, 


63,598 


61,347 .03 h 


Chicago Public Library, 


368,428 


306,751 .16^5 


Cincinnati Public Library, 


^803,228 


769,367 .04 i 


Young Men''s Chr. Asso., 






Buffalo, N.T., 


72,440 


77,826 (gain) .07^ 


Mer. Lib. Asso., New York, 


158,799 


143,251 .09 1 


Toledo Public Library, 


80,160 


71,502 .10^ 



The library year is not precisely identical in all the libra- 
ries above named ; but being reduced, so far as is practicable 
with the information at hand, to calendar years, the result of 
comparison shows that the percentage of decrease in the 
Public Library is less than in the most of those libraries 
which are fairly representative of different sections of the 
country. 

While the circulation of books is to be promoted by all 
reasonable means, that is not, I think, to be regarded as the 
principal consideration ; but rather this : how can the 
Public Library, within its proper sphere, best promote the 
public welfare, and duly regard the rights of all those who 
repair to it? Following the design of its founders, it has be- 
come a Library for scholars, as well as a great popular 
Library ; and both of these features it probably will retain. 
That part of the Library which consists of literature belong- 
ing to the higher departments of learning is made up largely 
of gifts, and is mainly increased by the income of funds 
scrupulously devoted to the purposes indicated by their sev- 
eral donors. These collections — some of which are now 

^Including periodicals. 



34 City Document No. 97. 

very full — will continue to grow, and meet, more fully than 
ever, the requirements of those — a rapidly increasing num- 
ber, especially in the useful arts — for whose purposes the 
Library has already become indispensable. 

The Public Library is also a gi'eat popular institution, 
deemed by its founders to be intimately related to the other 
educational forces in the city, and especially to the common- 
school system, of which they declared it to be the crowning 
glory. This idea seems to have been prominent in the minds 
of the Trustees during the existence of the Library thus far, 
and has become specialized in the work which it is carrying 
on in connection with the public schools by furnishing 

Supplementary Readestg. 

Since my last report this system has been in successful 
operation in several of the public schools ; and after a fair 
trial it stands approved by educators and librarians, with no 
dissenting voice that I hear. I have transmitted to the 
School Committee the action of the Trustees in voting to 
unite with that Board in a petition to the City Council for 
the appropriation needed for the work. When that is made, 
nothing will remain except to meet the wishes of the teach- 
ers — already becoming manifest — on the plan proposed by 
the Trustees, from which, in all confidence, I look for valu- 
able and far-reaching results. 

Library Administration. 

The tables appended will show the present Library service. 
There have been some changes by death, resignation, or 
other cause ; and there are now one hundred and forty-three 
persons connected with the Library as employes, of whom 
sixty-eight are at the central library, sixty-two at the 
branches, and thirteen in the bindery. Of these, one hun- 
dred and ten are fully and constantly employed, and thirty- 
three partially and intermittently employed, according to the 
exigencies of the service. The Lil^rary seems to me to be 
in a reasonably satisfactory condition in respect to adminis- 
tration. It is not necessary for me to say — though con- 
venient in respect to what follows — that, with the general 
policy of the Library, the appointment and salaries of the 
employes, with the making general or special orders, with 
the purchase of books, in fine, with the general legislation of 
the Trustees, the Librarian has nothing to do ; for, by the 
fundamental law, all these matters are untransferrably vested 
in the Trustees. But, for whatever relates to administration, 
the Librarian, as the sole executive ofiicer of the Trustees, 



Public Library. 35 

is wholly responsible. Through him are promulgated all 
orders of the Trustees, and of the committees, and with him 
is the entire responsi1)ility for their prompt and successful 
execution. The several departments of Library work are in 
charge of responsible heads, through whom the Librarian 
transmits all orders — either from the Trustees or himself — 
affecting these departments ; and the Librarian-in-chief is 
the organ of communication between these departments and 
the Trustees. This system is simple and effective. It is 
essential to any responsible administration. It informs the 
Librarian of all matters necessary for him to know. It pro- 
duces unity and prevents confusion. It works well, and I 
have no change to propose. If the administration is not in 
good order, and working to successful results, the fault is 
mine. I now lay before the Trustees reports from the heads 
of the several departments of the Library. 

Ordering Department. 

The work of this department consists mainly in ordering 
the books required by the Library and in verifying and enter- 
ing those received. 

This work increases from year to year with the growth of 
the Library in size and in usefulness to the public. 

Orders have been sent during the year to the number of 
about 8,407 ; of these 1,662 were ordered on the recom- 
mendation of the public. Great trouble arises from the 
vagueness and incorrectness of the recommendation slips, 
and not only the unlettered offend in this respect, but those 
whose education would lead one to hope for more exactness. 
This is to be regretted, as it causes much waste of time, and 
often defeats the ol)ject of the recommendation slips by 
rendering it impossible to verify the titles given and order the 
books desired. Of the recommendation slips sent in during 
the year 334 were for books already in the Library. In 
each of these cases a notice giving the number of the book 
desired was sent to the person recommending. 

There have been received by purchase, exchange, and gift, 
and distributed to the Central Library and branches, 17,532 
volumes, or an average number of a little less than 1,500 
volumes per month. Of these 8,246 volumes were assigned 
to Bates Hall, and a large proportion of these, being con- 
sidered more suited for the use of the scholar and specialist 
than for that of the general public, was paid for by special 
funds given for the purpose, to the amount of $6,256.71. 

Of the whole number of books received 14,490 were pur- 
chased from the regular agents of the Library and others, 



36 City Document No. 97. 

315 came by exchange, and 2,727 were gifts. It will thus 
be seen that much is due to the generosity of the public, not 
only of this country, but also of foreign lands, since valuable 
gifts have been received from England, France, Germany, 
and other countries. Each of these gifts, when accompanied 
by the name of the giver, is duly acknowledged ; the others 
are credited to anonymous givers, and it will be seen by the 
list of donors that their number is large. The above figures 
do not include pamphlets, of which about 14,000 have been 
received from various sources. 

It is the duty of the department duly to enter each book 
received, and to give it an accession number. A descriptive 
slip is then made and put on file for future reference. The 
accession numl)ers for the year have been those from 
277,621 to 292,510, 277,620 numbers having been used 
in previous years. Although it occupies much time, it 
is judged necessary to collate, or examine for defects, all 
foreign books (including English), all books purchased 
by Fellowes Athenaeum, as well as American books of the 
value of $5.00 and upwards. 

Great care is taken by the department to avoid the pur- 
chase of unnecessary duplicates, which would encumber the 
already crowded shelves, and cause needless expense. In 
this particular, the past year shows a good record ; the 
duplicates purchased have been, with rare exceptions, those 
deemed necessary to suppy the wants of the public. An 
important branch of the work of the department is the prepa- 
ration of books and periodicals for binding. A strict ac- 
count is kept, and the number during the year has been 
5,015. 

Much method and exactness are required in order to give 
to each of so numerous details a proper and timely atten- 
tion, and at the same time to cause the whole to progress 
harmoniously, and for the best interests of the public and 
the Library ; the system must, nevertheless, be so flexible as 
to allow for the unexpected arrival of a large invoice, 
donation, or auction purchase. Error or delay in this de- 
partment is felt injuriously in every part of the Library and 
by the public. 

HARRIET N. PIKE, 
EDITH D. FULLER, 
Ordering Department. 

The work of this department becomes more complicated 
and diflScult with the growth of the Library, and somewhat 
irrespective of the amount of the annual accessions. Its 
work is always exigent. It requires absolute accuracy, and 



Public Library. 37 

even in its routine will allow of no inattention. I think it 
should be relieved of the examination which precedes all 
purchases ; and that this work should be transferred to a 
new officer, to whom also should be intrusted the official 
card catalogue, with the duty of incorporating into it all new 
cards, as well as attending to its correction and improvement. 

Catalogue Department. 

The following report of Mr. Whitney, the chief of the 
Catalogue Department, will show the work of that branch 
of the service during the library year. 

A summary of the year's work, in the Catalogue Depart- 
ment, is as follows : — 

Volumes catalogued (new books) . . . 13,917 
Pamphlets catalogued ..... 3,664 

Number of cards added to the catalogues of the 

Central Library and Branches . . . 73,221 

Number of readers assisted by the catalogue 
clerks in the Bates Hall of the Central 
Library ....... 9,653 

A new catalogue for the Dorchester Branch Library is 
in course of preparation. As soon as the South End 
Branch Library is moved to the High-School building, work 
upon the partially finished catalogue will be resumed. In 
the Lower Hall of the Central Library two new catalogues 
will shortly be published : one an author catalogue of books 
in foreign languages ; the other, a list of works in the arts 
and sciences. 

In order that the last-mentioned catalogue may help, as 
far as possible, to improve the character of the reading at the 
Library, notes have been added calling attention to the best 
books in the Upper or Bates Hall, and purchases have been 
recently made by the Trustees of such books as will prove 
helpful to the artisan, mechanic, and the young who are in- 
terested in .science and the study of nature. 

The most important work of the department during the 
year has been the revision of the Card Catalogue of the 
Central Library, the plan of which was outlined in the last 
Annual Report. In the progress of this revision, the sys- 
tem of the catalogue has been greatly modified, and, it is 
believed, put upon a solid and enduring basis. Clearly, in 
a library such as this, the aim above all others should be to 
make its readers promptly acquainted with the new books as 
they are received from day to day, and to bring before the 



38 City Document No. 97. 

public, in the most simple and economical manner, under 
one alphabet, arranged by authors and subjects, the title of 
every book in its keeping. This object is never forgotten 
by those who have the catalogue in charge ; but the difficul- 
ties of the undertaking in a library as large as this, growing 
with such rapidity, can hardly be conceived. If there has 
ever been any ground for the charge that this object has been 
lost sight of in the zeal for bibliographical research, such is, 
certainly, the case no longer. There is the closest economy 
and simplicity consistent with the character of the books, 
which form so large a part of the Library. 

Considerable progress has been made during the year up- 
on the catalogue of the Barton collection. The quarterly 
Bulletins have been published as heretofore. Aid has been 
received in their preparation from Mr. Griffin, custodian of 
the shelves, by whom a card catalogue of the mathematical 
works in the Bates Hall has been prepared. The catalogue 
department has been severely crippled during the past two 
years by the loss of valuable assistants. Since the last 
Annual Report one assistant has died and two have been 
disal)led through ill health. It is believed that those who 
remain are animated by the common purpose of keeping up 
the high standard which this department has always main- 
tained. 

JAMES L. WHITNEY, 

Principal Assistant Librarian. 

Shelf Department. 

The Custodian of the Shelves makes the following re- 
port ; — 

This department has in charge the location, according to 
their classification, of all books added to the Central Library. 
Appendixes 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 9, furnish the statistics of this 
part of the work. A no inconsiderable portion of the time 
of the undersigned is occupied in transferring periodical sets, 
which have outgrown their accommodations. No record has 
been kept of these changes, as they do not affect the general 
statistics of the Library. The duty of making the annual 
examination of the Library devolves upon this department, 
for the detailed results of which I refer you to the tables in 
Appendix 22. 

Althoujjh a slight increase in the total of books unac- 
counted for is shown, it is not such an increase as to excite 
apprehension. The larger part of the deficiency is, as usual, 
in the fiction collection, and the less valuable books in the 
Lower Hall collection. 



Public Library. 39 

The number of hooks missing from Bates Hall is less than 
last year ; and there are probably none of them which cannot 
be accounted for. 

The return of a book to the Library after an absence of 
over twenty years, seems worthy of some notice. The book 
in question, which bore the shelf marks assigned to it when 
the Library was in Mason street, was retm'ned at the Bates 
Hall desk by a person who found it among the effects of 
one long since deceased. The Lil)rary has l)een in its pres- 
ent quarters since 1858 ; consequently, this book must have 
been out of its possession for twenty-three years at least. 

I have also to report that one book has disappeared from 
the Central Library Reading-room, and one from the Bates 
Hall desk. 

APPLETON P. C. GRIFFIN, 

Custodian of the Shelves. 

Bates Hall. 

[The report of the Librarian of Bates Hall, which follows, 
states clearly some of the .causes which interfere with the 
prompt delivery of books applied for in that department ; 
and I regret to add that some of these delays seem to be 
irremediable so long as the Library remains in the present 
building. Such, however, as are within administrative con- 
trol will continue to receive attention until they are reduced 
to the minimum. Much has been done in this direction during 
the library year.] 

The various tables in the Appendix will give the most im- 
portant facts in regard to the number of volumes, circula- 
tion, and classification of reading, in Bates Hall. There are 
other matters, however, connected with the administration 
which seem to me deserving of lirief mention. 

The most common criticism, or complaint, of the Lil)rary 
is, that there is unnecessary delay in the delivery of books, 
that applicants are frequently kept waiting an unreasonable 
time before they are informed whether the book wanted is in 
or not. That there is some ground for complaint cannot l)e 
denied, but there are facts, with which the public are un- 
acquainted, or which they do not consider, that would, in 
most cases, satisfactorily explain the delay. 

The principal ol)stacles to a speedy delivery are the follow- 
ing : 1st. The great distances to be traversed in procuring 
books located in distant parts of the Library. This applies 
especially to green slips where the applicant expects all the 
numbers to be brought, which, in many cases, cannot be done 
in less than ten or fifteen minutes. 2d. The crowded con- 



40 City Document No. 97. 

dition of some of our alcoves, which has obliged us to trans- 
fer many of our books to other alcoves or to distant rooms, 
so that the shelf-numbers given in our catalogues may not 
correspond with those in the books. 3d. Mistakes of the 
boys who bring the books, arising from their inexperience 
and from the perfect similarity of the alcoves. 

It is due to the administration to say that, in a very large 
number of instances, delay is caused by carelessness on the 
part of the public, as shown by mistakes in numljers, by 
obscurity in designating the volume required, and by return- 
ing l)ooks with the card and slip carefully concealed within. 

The attendants can justly be held responsible for delays 
coming under the third head only, and for general careless- 
ness and neglect. It has been our constant aim during the 
past year to overcome these difficulties. A system of rewards 
and penalties has done much towards checking mistakes on 
the part of the boys. Much, too, has been effected by the 
Indicator, which now shows what books are in the hands of 
borrowers, at the bindery, transferred, or for any other 
reason absent from the shelves for any considerable time. • 
If applicants would report at once to the officer in charge 
any unreasonable delay, instead of deferring the complaint 
till it is too late to ascertain who is responsible, the neglect, 
if any, would be detected, or reasons for the delay would be 
given. It is the testimony of the desk attendants, which 
also agrees with my own observation, that complaints are not 
nearly so numerous now as in former years. Foreigners and 
others accustomed to the use of libraries abroad, express 
astonishment at the promptness with which books are 
delivered here. 

The book of "Notes and Queries," kept at the desk, and 
intended as a means of communication between the public 
and the administration, has proved of great advantage, not 
only to readers but to the Library. Mistakes and omissions 
in the catalogue are pointed out, desirable books recom- 
mended, and suggestions, often of practical value, made. 
ARTHUR MASON KNAPP, 

Librarian of Bates Hall. 

LowEK Hall. 

Mr. Tiffany's report of the Lower Hall Library shows the 
class of subjects, connected with administration, which have 
received his special attention : — 

By reports already submitted you have been advised of 
the extent and character of the circulation of this Hall for 
the past year, as well as of the details of its various lines 



Public Library. 41 

of work. In respect to the latter some gain has been made 
by a more systematic division of them ; while to secure a 
prompter delivery of books, special attention has been paid 
to their quick return to the shelves, and to the careful 
adjustment of the force to the varying demands of days and 
hours in the Hall. I think the number of complaints of 
delay has been reduced, and that our delivery is as prompt 
as possible, considering the height of our shelves, and the 
great pressure upon the force at certain hours ; but no effort 
shall be spared to effect improvement, if in any way pos- 
sible. I feel justified in speaking well of the general 
industry and faithfulness of the subordinate force. 

How best to assist the public in the selection of books, is 
a question that now engages largely the attention of libra- 
rians. Much can, of course, be done by personal influence, 
but the presence must be recognized in all libraries of a con- 
sideral)le class of persons who prefer that the fullest infor- 
mation of what is to be had shall be set before them, and then to 
be their own assistants . This class of persons here rely largely 
upon the catalogues and bulletins, and for titles of recent 
books, upon the wall slip-board. I have endeavored, where 
especial reason seemed to call for it, to supplement these by 
lists of particular classes of books, or series of more than 
ordinary merit. The free use that has been made of these 
convinces me of their acceptability to the public, and the 
importance, where time will allow, of continuing them. 

Within the last year an advance has been made in the 
establishment of closer relations with the public in this Hall, 
and there have been many evidences that where this personal 
assistance is rendered in an unobtrusive manner, it is cor- 
dially met and often gratefully recognized. Information of 
the most varied character is sought, and lines of inquiry 
begun which lead to further investigation, and stimulate 
mental activity, both on the part of the applicant and the 
assistant. There is every reason to anticipate an increase of 
this useful and interesting Avork, much of which, especially 
in its relation to the younger visitors of the Hall, has de- 
volved upon my principal assistant. Miss Jenkins. 

Important additions of books have recently been made to 
the German collection, and to that of Arts and Sciences. 
The former are beginning already to circulate freely among 
a class of persons who can only visit the Library in the even- 
ing, and these, to a considerable extent, will be the users of 
the latter. The selection was in general an admirable one, 
most of them being of popular character, many relating to 
arts of design, while some, more purely technical, will 
benefit students or inquirers in special lines. The excellent 



42 City Document No. 97. 

recent catalogue, with its full cross references to subjects, 
will greatly aid in the use of these books. 

I have felt it to be an important part of my duty 
to recommend that desirable and interesting books, which 
might otherwise be overlooked, should be added to this 
Hall, particularly in view of the fact that duplicates are 
not placed in Bates Hall, and that so many l>ooks suitable 
to both departments are now published. These requests 
have been liberally met by the Trustees, to the great im- 
provement of the Lower Hall collection. 

In conclusion, in view of the high character of the addi- 
tions in fiction made to this department during the last four 
years, including many English stories not so well known to 
the public as they deserve to be, I earnestly recommend 
the printing, in simple form, of a supplementary finding list. 

EDWARD TIFFANY, 
Librarian of the Lower Hall. 

LowEE Hall Caed Catalogue. 

The following presents a summnry of what has been done 
during the library year, by the curator of the Lower Hall 
Card Catalogue : — 

This department has now entered on the second year of its 
existence, and ma}-- fairly be said to have vindicated its right, 
at least, to live. Whether it should still be considered a 
simple experiment, or a regular system, forming part of the 
Lower Hall working force, can be readily gathered from 
a glance at its results. 

From May 1, 1880, to May 1, 1881, a total of 45,664 
readers have been assisted at the catalogue desk. Out of 
this sum, 16,939 were readers of non-fiction, assisted on 
special subjects ; and about 8,000 were juveniles. The bal- 
ance, 20,725 general readers, were merely helped to num- 
bers from the card catalogue, or to the titles of popular 
books of fiction. It is to be remarked, however, that this 
help was not given with a view to making readers dependent. 
The explanations were intended only to remove such obsta- 
cles as would render further investigation by the reader easy 
and interesting. Perhaps the best test of the new depart- 
ment's influence for good is, not so much the amount of help 
given, as the quality of the effects produced. That there is 
a decided advance in the reading of the Lower Hall, is cer- 
tain beyond a doubt. For, not only has much of the useless 
reading of fiction dropped off during the past year, but even 
the quality of fiction now circulated has itself been much 



Public Library. 43 

improved. The amount of this improvement can be exactly 
calculated from the statistics of the Lower Hall circulation. 

The question now arises, are these results permanent, — are 
they likely to endure ? It can best be answered by an exam- 
ination of the system employed to produce these results. As 
the object was to make good reading easy, in every available 
way, the most effective plan was found to be the bringing of 
special books to the notice of individual readers; thrusting 
into the hands of the borrower the book best adapted to his 
actual wants. Now the means at our disposal for ascertain- 
ing these wants are of the best ; for, through the agency of 
the new department, the Librarian is brought into breathing 
contact with the public, and even the poorest attempts at 
self-culture can be easily recognized, encouraged, and helped. 
Therefore, Ijesides the material good resulting from helps of 
this kind rendered, there is a moral effect accruing from it 
of sufficient importance to bear mention here. The depart- 
ment is gradually building up an intelligent and grateful 
constituency to the support of the Library ; and no class of 
readers will be so warmly attached to the institution, by an 
active interest, as those who are conscious of being person- 
ally aided and improved through its influence. 

T. H. CUMMINGS, 

Curator of the Lower Hall Catalogue. 

From the foregoing reports the Trustees will be able to 
form some judgment as to the present condition of library 
administration in the several departments. It is not perfect, 
and probably never will be, either theoretically or practi- 
cally ; but it is the subject of constant study and of constant 
endeavor to adapt it to the ever-changing conditions of the 
public service, which will continue to be as it ever has been — 
the paramount consideration. 

The Bindery. 

By reason of the diminished force in the bindery during the 
calendar year 1879, at its close there was found to be a large 
accumulation of unbound books. To reduce their number, 
those of the Lower Hall and Branches, for the following year, 
were sent to an outside binder. Before the close of the 
year arrearages were well brought up. Since January 1, 
1881, all the Library work has been done in the Library bind- 
ery. 

The bindery has recently been placed on the same footing 
as outside binderies ; and the narrowing of the morocco 



44 City Document No. 97. 

sidings, and omission of all unnecessary tooling and gilding, 
promise to effect a considerable saving in labor and materials 
without impairing the value of the work. 

To determine with anything like precision the cost of the 
whole work done by the bindery, compared Avith its probable 
cost if done by an outside bindery, would be difficult if not 
impossible, even to an expert ; and the opinions of others 
would be of little or no value unless they were daily cog- 
nizant of the varied special services required of the 
establishment. These special services are incapable of precise 
definition by contract, and their cost would be necessarily 
left to the judgment and conscience of the party rendering 
them. 

It cannot be fairly claimed that the Library bindery, more 
than any other department of municipal labor, is conducted 
with the same refinement of economy as is reached by private 
parties stimulated by that self-interest which enforces the 
most rigid discipline, and is prompt to avail itself of substi- 
tutes for sound materials and conscientious work, the lack of 
which is only manifest when it is too late to demand restitu- 
tion. 

But it may be fairly said that its methods and its results 
are the subjects of constant supervision'; that its employes 
are held to exact accountability for full and diligent use of the 
time for which they are paid ; that the stock is economically 
purchased and judiciously used, and that the work turned out, 
judged by any standard at home or abroad, is first-class. 

On the general question whether the Library should main- 
tain a l)indery or have its work done outside, there are some 
considerations which seem to me to be worthy of note. The 
public are justly impatient when delayed in the use of books 
essential to their purposes ; and it is therefore of the first im- 
portance — even if it should cost a trifle more — not only 
that binding and rebinding should be done with all possible 
promptitude, but that in case of exigency, books may be con- 
sulted when in the bindery. This is practicable when the 
binding is done in the Library building, and the books are 
consulted in the presence of the Librarian, but not otherwise. 

Much of the work is exigent, especially all those small re- 
pairs needed to fit the book for circulation which can be 
promptly done, and the book immediately delivered to the 
applicant, when the bindery is at hand ; otherwise long and 
vexatious delays may ensue. 

A considerable part of the work -— especially works pub- 
lished serially, with complicated tables and plates in foreign 
languages — can be properly done only by one specially ex- 
perienced in such work and who has constant and easy refer- 



Public Library. 45 

ence to the preceding volumes. Attempted by any other, 
confusion and loss inevitably follow. 

The greater safety from fire in a building substantially fire- 
proof, of valuable, and, it may be, unique works, is a fact too 
obvious in its importance to be dwelt upon ; but the greater 
safety of maps, plans, portraits, and views — which, in many 
cases, chiefly give value to the works in which they are found 

— though less obvious, is not less important. To collate 
them in every instance — and nothing less would insure their 
safety — once before they go to the bindery and again on 
their return, and to make an accurate list of the same, would 
involve troublesome delay and great cost of labor. 

To all the foregoing it may be answered that an outside 
bindery can be secured having a force thoroughly instructed 
in all general and special work of the Library, and which, 
putting aside all private orders, could do the Library work 
as well, and meet all exigencies as promptly, as the Library 
bindery, which may be true ; and if true, with this result : 
that the Library, instead of having its bindery in its own fire- 
proof, convenient, and accessible apartments, under its own 
immediate daily supervision and control, Avould maintain it 

— substantially — outside, with all the added risks and un- 
avoidal)le delays, inconvenience to the public and its own 
employes, without authoritative supervision and with doubt- 
ful economy in the long run. I am not prepared to recom- 
mend the change. 

For further detailed information, I respectfully refer you 
to the appended tables. 

MELLEN CHAMBERLAIN, 



Librarian. 



Boston, April 30, 1881. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



LIBEAEIAN'S EEPOET. 



1881. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent op the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Extent of the Bates Hall Collection. 

IV. Extent of Lower Hall Collection. 
V. Sale of Duplicates and Odd Volumes. 

VI. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VII. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VIII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

IX. Lower Hall Classifications. 

X. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

XI. Circulation. 

XII. Registration of Applicants. 

XIII. Books Recommended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIV. Bates Hall Reading. 

XV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XVI. Fellowes Athen^um and Brighton Reading. 

XVII. Periodical Reading Rooms. 

XVIII. Losses and Delinquents. 

XIX. Financial Statement. 

XX. Library Funds. 

XXI. Library Service. 

XXII. Report of Examination of the Shelves. 

XXIII. Work in the Library Bindery. 



Public Library. 



49 



Pamphlets 

added fioin the 

heginning. 



West 

ROXEURT 

Delivery. 



Jamaica 

Plain 
Branch. 



South End 
Branch. 



Dorchester 
Branch. 



r-tOt-COCOOOiOt^r^-^COt 



■CO'X)CO-^t-0<DC5COOOr-(MOO-^0-^»0 

lOyDrfiTil— r--f<a0iOC')C-l»n>i^rHr-Hp0O5 

' »n i--^ H* c-1 r-t t— t^ r? — < o c- o a; -+ o lO ^ 



CO CO c<J CO 1- a; o t- 00 T^ f 



CJ CO T* 1^ .^ -.t r: o c-i -^ o I-* o Tl 



Brighton 
Branch. 



Charlestown 
Branch. 



Fellowea 
Athe- 
naeum. 



City part. 



South Boston 
Branch. 



East Boston 
Branch. 



Duplicate 
Boom 



News- 
paper 



Lower 
HaU. 



Bates 
Hall. 






i-lrHT-lT-IC^ClC^CCCOCOCO-^-^CDt-Xwr-ic:OXCli-HC-lcO'-'^ 



; ^ r- o o ^ oD 
^ t- C-? 'r» CI rH ro 

(N O C^ 00 CN 



. -t< O 00 l^ 

o -* -. o 
x'^o oi" 



. O O ^ -O (M c 



• 00 00 CTi O O 



n ^ <-! r-in <» t~ (x> 

T-Ti-rrHriofofcToo' 



, 00 O -+ -^ f-H o c 
cao cr. OJ 00 00 t 



'rHi-Hi-Hr-Hi-Hr-iriC^ 



.lAOOOOU^OIt-COO 

■ -■) rt o CO i^ e-1 CO oi 

1 00 t^ 1.-5 o -t« -M GO 



rH 00 ^ O CO 1 
, CO CI 00^ ^- '-"5 I 

T* cooo ocf . 



5 O i' r*- ri 00 00 »o c» 

5 Ci CO C-1 CO u-^ I- O rH 

(N of co" ■^ •* ■* o" i~r 



.oroco^eo-+a>oooi 
CO ■<* CO* t-^ GO t-h" i-T of of 





Sit 

CO.-I 


I^IM 00 OO-C 
O Ol 00 t- o 
00 ^ Ol r-(t~ 






SS^ 




T* OU5 to t- 


00 


QD 


C3> OJ CS 
























CO 

o> 


co 


t^ jt-^ 00 oT 









,0000— ■l-'rii-Ha)i-frHCCi-(ririC0rHT^3i?0aJOt— co-^ 



i-li-iC0"^^0i0-^OO>0CC'O'X'l 



■30CJOi-lT-iC^'*C0C^ 



rH -M •* CJ -r- -M ^3 O 'r** 

Previously included in the Bates Hall ^-^J-S-frS"!^ ""^^^' 
collection. ^' ^' ^■>^^-^' 



<MC^C<»Ci?5COCOCOCO 



a!Or-(i-lv0C^Ot001'XJC0CftTt<lr-OCD»n!(N00C^O.-IC0 



i-iocoao'MaiocoaiociC'i 



■ c-1 o '31 a: o t 



r-lT-(rH(MC^C^<N(N^C^(M<MCOC^?:)COcOCO?3cOcOCOCO 



C^l <S ^ lt:; o ri t- t^ 

"t. ^1 '^1 ^ ^ - 1 "I *"! 



CO O "t:) rl 



"tJOt-t-XCOOiOOi-trHC^rSrt* 



f-H t- Ol '^ O r- 30 C~1 Xi CD X* O CO O 
00 --O i-H 30 CO t- -^ CI CO ri -M -tJ< 3C O 
O ^'*,'^*-^'*,'^ -— ( 3! CO O O '^ O 

* — r oc" '--f 't' cT ^f c^r o" oT 

-* --C W X- r. O rH CI C^ 



Total Volumes 
in the Libraries. 



ao<-^r-OcD»-HCOi— ico-*cO-^'tOaooc^i:OcOOGO!OOacr5 C -tcOLOco 
aot^i— <aoj;»-.':>--+rox. co'-ocoi— ir-GoaJ3it--»ooou'2i-Hr-i-iroocico 

(0 "M '^^O 3(^30 O^O^ CO O^ir^ri^C^O^OOl-^ij^C^CJl^-l^uOO^ 

oT CD* cf x" -^ o CO irf ^^ lo" o" '^ co" cT CO Tf c<r o oT c-f ^r cT -^ 1- 

*rH<NC^C^C<COWcOCOCO 
• OrHO^COrl*OeDt-<»aiO.-l 



r-IC^?4COt-t*COaiC)r-»t— iC^COCO- 



r- CO OS o '-I ^ CO 't uo O t 

i.O»OOOcC'OOOtOCDCDCOXil - - - - , _ _ - 

I -i r- x 3i C' F-H ri cc -* '-o O t^ : 



• t^r-t— t— t-t-GOoo 



OO aC 30 GO 3C C 



; c. — '- ri CO ■ . _ _ . 

; ,.t tr -r CD --D CD CD X> -D CO : 



1 X X X X : 



' X X XCC : 



i-IC^CO-^OOt-COOSOr-tC-ieO-rfliftcOt-aOaiOr-llMcO-^iO'OiwXCS 



.af=< 



,= T3 3 

=5 o 

S ■* " 
P ■S'3 

•a g 






0^ a> 

H a 



50 



City Document No. 97. 



appe:ndix n. 

YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE AJSTD BY GIFTS. 

Note. — The increase of volumea is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because lost 
and condemned books are deducted. 



Yi 


AR3. 


Increase. 
(Net after 1861.) 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
charged to funds 
and added by 
exchange. 




•a 3 
s o 

■sa 

eg 




Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


*Pamph. 


Vols. 




1 . . . 


1852-53 
1853-64 
1854-55 


9,688 
6,533 
6,396 


961 

2,989 
2,557 


4,000 
2,152 
2,663 


961 
2,989 
2,468 


5,688 
4,381 
3,733 






75 


2 , . . 








105 


3. . . 


89 






153 


4. . . 


1855-56 


5,463 


5,879 


1,865 


5,330 


3,598 


549 






126 


5. . . 


1856-57 


6,816 


3,667 


1,686 


3,646 


5,130 


21 






132 


6 . . . 


1857-58 
1868-59 
1859-60 
1860-61 


35,955 
7,192 
6,989 

16,948 


1,885 
1,317 
1,452 
6,674 


30,214 
3,406 
3,744 

12,299 


1,886 
1,317 
1,452 
6,656 


5,741 
3,787 
3,245 
4,649 








381 


7 . . . 








247 


8 . . 








207 


9 . . . 


18 






242 


10 . . . 


1861-62 
1862-63 


7,391 
5,529 


1,493 
2,169 


1,274 
829 


1,493 
, 1,958 


6,117 
4,700 








234 


11. . . 


212 






194 


12. . . 


1863-64 


6,226 


2,939 


1,081 


2,772 


5,145 


167 






219 


13 . . . 


1864-65 


6,082 


1,516 


804 


1,026 


6,178 


490 






328 


U. . . 


-1865-66 


7,662 


4,013 


1,476 


3,342 


6,286 


671 






336 


15. . . 


1866-67 


5,303 


7,877 


1,465 


7,769 


7,732 


108 






300 


16. . . 


1867-68 


7,673 


2,811 


1,564 


2,613 


6,396 


298 




. . 


342 


IT. . . 


1868-69 


8,685 


13,923 


2,138 


10,984 


6,531 


2,939 






649 


18. . . 


1869-70 


7,775 


13,693 


1,643 


10,228 


6,129 


3,365 






666 


19. . . 


1870-71 


18,099 


14,976 


9,760 


10,805 


8,349 


4,171 






604 


20. . . 


1871-72 


13,708 


10,637 


4,349 


5,831 


9,359 


4,806 






610 


21. . . 


1872-73 


14,644 


11,770 


3,939 


8,060 


10,706 


3,710 


865 


601 


22. . . 


1873-74 


51,094 


22,475 


4,783 


17,138 


18,671 


5,337 


1,330 


730 


23. . . 


1874-75 


16,372 


16,293 


4,169 


16,899 


17,080 


394 


572 


1,091 


24. . . 


1876-76 


20,955 


30,732 


5,749 


6,891 


15,206 


24,841 


769 


694 


25 . . . 


1876-77 


16,974 


13,305 


3,662 


11,071 


16,644 


2,234 


738 


1,125 


26. . . 


1877-78 


33,724 


15,554 


21,206 


12,453 


17,679 


3,101 


196 


677 


27. . . 


1878-79 


14,926 


14,596 


3,680 


8,786 


14,403 


5,810 


211 


470 


28. . . 


1879-80 


16,262 


9,524 


5,524 


8,356 


15,016 


1,367 


361 


546 


29. . . 


1880-81 


14,113 


13,961 


2,742 


10,787 


13,396 


3,176 


2,111 


499 



♦ Includes jjamplilets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession catalogue. 

t Included in previous columns. These volumes are not the property of the Public library, but form a 
part of the Roxbury branch by agreement. 

(6) Of the increase, 24,618 were the Bates gift. (9) Of the increase, 11,721 were the Parker bequests. 

(19) 3,774 volumes of the Ticknor bequest, and 2,682 from the Sumner library association, are included 
in the increase. (20) 1,471 volumes from the JIattapan Literary association are included in the increase. 

(22) The increase of this year includes the totals of the libraries at Charlestown and Brighton, and also, 
under purchases, the Barton library. 

(24) The purchases of this year include thirty volumes to replace books in tlie Bates Ilall long lost. The 
great accession ot pamphlets came from the purcliase of duplicates from Harvard College library. 

(26) The unusual increase is owing to the addition of the books of the Mercantile library association, 
ifhich form the nucleus of the South-End branch. 



Public Library. 



51 





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54 



City Document No. 97. 



APPEIS^DIX YI. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 









H 


H 


H 


H 




Qt 

H 


9 

OD 

H 


e 

ac 


H 
H 


! 


G-ain in books . 

Condemned- and 

transferred . . 

L Net gain .... 


11,349 


6,900 
1 


6,800 
5 


17,613 


6,377 
3 


9,818 
2 


9,049 
21 


11,638 
36 


8,362 
48 


7,782 
24 


8,506 
184 


^ 


11,349 


6,899 


6,795 


17,613 


6,374 


9,816 


9,028 


11,602 


8,314 


7,758 


8,322 





■ Gain in books . 

Less transfers 

and condemn'd 

books .... 

. Net gain .... 


2,780 
2,115 


2,614 
1,361 


1,799 
1,021 


1,465 
1,480 


3,385 
2,586 


3,570 
1,813 


3,830 
1,701 


2,728 
* 2,344 


2,339 
2,085 


2,483 
2,094 


2,376 
1,164 




665 


1,253 


778 


(loss) 15 


799 


1,757 


2,129 


384 


254 


389 


1,212 









254 


101 


402 


335 


157 


126 


66 
25 


132 


69 


^ 








§■§ 1 






















sg 1 






255 


101 


402 


335 


157 


126 


41 


132 


69 











^ C Gala by addition 
e • Less loss by ex- 






1,375 
506 


1,641 
334 


1,234 

786 


1,902 
519 


1,015 
351 


1,677 
718 


3,216 
1,443 


784 
2,177 


386 






1,233 


§•? 1 








^ i. Net gain .... 


149 


360 


869 


1,307 


448 


1,383 


664 


959 


1,773 


1,393 
loss. 


847 
loss. 



^ Gain in books . 
Cond'd and lost 

L Net gain .... 



5,936 


881 


621 


664 


915 


917 


856 


676 


716 


649 




50 


97 


143 


334 


273 


250 


270 


403 


406 


5,936 


831 


524 


521 


581 


644 


606 


406 


313 


243 



587 
377 









885 
76 


850 
217 


1,359 
644 


1,261 
495 


1,303 
413 


823 
247 


854 
329 


935 
581 


995 


■§< 






644 


fiqPl 








°^ [Net gala .... 




4,365 


809 


633 


715 


766 


890 


576 


525 


354 


351 











■ Gain in city part 
Cond'd and lost 






3,754 

4 


1,069 

26 


1,296 
46 


1,299 
163 


1,396 
304 


3,542 
701 


1,167 
532 


778 
333 


811 


« 






335 


^ 








§ 






3,750 

865 


1,043 
1,330 


1,250 
572 


1,136 
759 


1,092 
738 


2,841 
196 


635 

220 


445 
361 


476 


.5 < 

i 


Fellowes Athe- 
nseum. (Net 






2,111 


Total gala . . . 














4,615 


2,373 


1,822 


1,895 


1,830 


3,037 


855 


806 


2,587 











* Tbis item is exceptionally large, as many duplicates not in use, and broken sets, have been 
transferred to the Duplicate room, to make room on the shelves for fresh accessions. 



Public Library. 



55 



APPE:N^DIX yi. — Continued. 







an 

H 


ae 

H 


H 


H 




H 




OS 
j» 

ac 

H 


© 
at) 
at) 


H 

ac 
aD 

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15,932 
144 


1,305 
403 


1,004 
300 


1,123 
433 


995 
398 


1,268 
274 


1,310 
340 


1,568 
425 


^t; 








■£ g 










J'* (.Net gain .... 








15,788 


902 


704 


690 


597 


994 


970 


1,143 

















11,049 
12 


480 
75 


599 
130 


480 
74 


264 
46 


236 
47 


273 
27 


183 


j-s 








26 


•~ g 










(^•^ Net gain .... 








11,037 


405 


469 


406 


218 


189 


246 


117 













s. 


' Gain in books . 








54 


3,905 


3,179 
32 


1,057 
16 


341 

25 


672 
110 


926 
166 


640 










128 


i^« 
















^^- 










3,905 


3,147 


1,041 


616 


562 


760 


512 























24 


19 


39 


139 


6,401 
2 


696 

26 


539 
18 


450 


■§•§ 

C^ s < Cond'd and loBt . 








'3 




















^•* Net gain .... 
















6,399 


670 


521 


427 
til 





































8,856 
52 


522 
86 


368 
110 


215 


•■s s -i Cond'd and lost . 
















206 


S !« 

t§ ■* Net gain .... 
































8,804 


436 


258 


9 





















Bates Hall gain . 

Lower Hall gain 
Newspaper room 

gain 

Duplicate room 

gain 



E. B. branch gain 

8. B. branch gain 

Rox. branch gain 
Fellowes Athe- 
naeum gain . . 

Chn. branch gain 

Bri. branch gain 

Dor. branch gain 

J. P. branch gain 

9. E. branch gain 



I. Total gam 



11,349 
665 



149 
5,936 



18,099 



6,899 
1,253 



360 

831 

4,365 



13,708 



6,795 
778 
254 
869 
524 
809 

3,750 
865 



14,644 



19,271 

(loss) 15 

101 

1,307 

521 

633 

1,043 

1,330 

15,788 

11,037 

54 

24 



51,109 



6,374 
799 
402 
448 
581 
715 

1,250 
572 
902 
405 

3,905 
19 



16,372 



9,816 

1,757 
335 

1,383 
644 
766 

1,136 
759 
704 
469 

3,147 
39 



9,028 

2,129 
157 
664 
606 
890 

1,092 
738 
690 
406 

1,041 
139 



11,602 

384 

126 

959 

406 

576 

2,841 

196 

597 

218 

616 

6,399 

8,804 



17,277 33,724 



8,314 
254 
41 

1,773 
313 
525 
635 
220 
994 
189 
562 
670 
436 



14,926 



7,758 



243 
354 
445 
361 
970 
246 
760 
521 
258 



14,112 



8,322 
1,212 



210 

351 

476 

2,111 

1,143 

117 

512 

427 

9 



14,113 



The total gain includes the 1 vol. at the "West Roxbury delivery gained during the year, less 847 
vols., the loss in the Duplicate room. 



56 



CiTT Document No. 97. 



APPEOT)IX YII. 

INCREASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





H 

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English books -with 
British imprint . . 

English books with 
American imprint . 

English books with 
Continental impiint 

Foreign books . . . 

Duplicates of either 
class when not in- 
cluded in the other 


899 

2,206 

48 
561 

480 


1,096 

3,642 

115 
891 


1,389 

4,301 

291 
1,064 


1,294 

3,807 

125 
858 


1,533 

7,365 

375 
767 


2,830 

10,501 

316 
1,858 


2,237 

6,761 

180 
1,742 


1,763 

5,546 

191 
1,269 


1,781 

5,295 

233 
1,372 


1,555 

5,637 

238 
1,399 


1,841 

4,346 

186 
1,245 
























Total 


4,194 


5,744 


7,045 


6,084 


10,040 


15,505 


10,920 


8,769 


8,681 


8,829 


7,618 



APPENDIX VIII 



BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS, 

(Representing books located only.) 



VII. 

vm. 



XI. 



xn. 
xm. 

XIV. 
XV. 

XVI. 

xvn. 
xvm. 

XIX. 
XX. 

XXI. 

xxn. 
xxm. 

XXIV. 



Cyclcpfedias, etc 

Bibliography and literary history 

General history, biography, travel, and geography 



English history, etc 

French history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

German history, etc 

Greek, Latin, and philology , 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geography, biography, travel, and litcratur 

Periodicals and transactions 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, etc 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Political economy 

Medical science 

Natural history and science 

Mathematics and physical science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Bound volumes of miscellaneoua pamphlets 

Bound volumes of mauuscripts 



Totals 7,508 



General Libraries. 



1,305 
1,018 



1,109 
1,023 



1,105 
1,120 



Si 



73 73 SI'S 



1,410 
5,828 
6,775 

26,5« 
21,670 
12,179 
7,38' 
7,496 
5,221 
1,095 
5,769 
16,757 
17,480 
7,37 
3,82 
2,403 
11,014 
7,125 
8,446 
4,869 



Special Libraries. 



1861. 1866. 1871. 1873. 



1,307 
1,125 



3,243 
1,254 



161 

1,004 

3,702 

2,628 

36' 



Total, 
including 
special 
libraries. 



1,9.'>S 
7,420 
7,fi9.i 

29,8.33 
28,705 
15,570 
8,089 
9,141 
7,316 
0,058 
0,353 
19,110 
22,495 
8,9.56 
4,-236 
2,604 
11,146 
7,385 
lO.OSi 
4,925 
6,981 
643 



Explanation. — Class in includes general history, universal biographies, histories of eras, voyages, and 
travels, when embracing several countries, and collected works of historians. 

Class IV includes North and South American history, documents and statistics, biographies of Americans, 
geography of, and voyages and travels, in America, witli the collected works of American writers, and what 
of American literature is sometimes termed polygi-aphy. 

Class V, Class VI, Class VII, Class VIII. — These have the same scope for the respective countries that 
Class IV has for America. Class Vm includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as also the 
Scandinavian nations. 

Class XI includes Russia, Greece, Turkey, with Asia, Africa, AustraUa, Polynesia, etc. 

Class XIV includes political science, social science, and ethics, applied and unapplied, intellectual science, 
education, rhetoric, logic, phrenology, etc. 



Class XIX includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 

Class XXII embraces all such pamphlet volumes as may have been received from time to tune, and al6 

generally too heterogeneous in their make-up to be dassed otherwise than by themselves. fenei-al 

Class XXIV includes only the Shakespeare collecUon of the Barton Ubrary, and not that of the General 

"^^ The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for P>'r.l'?f„« "^ T'un nn^n s°ucb uointf 
percentage of use, it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the subdrasions «» a |o upon ''"^1> P"'"'» 
as biogrlphy. travel, and voyages, etc., by summing the results ot the ranges devoted to ihem in the s. veral 

^'°°Note - The increase of the several special libraries is included in the figures for these libraries. The dales 
given in the special libraries column show the year when acquired by the library. 



' Includes all books in room G, — 12,108 of them belonging to the Barton library, as originally shelved there. 

[ 114 books transferred to B. H., and deducted. 

f Patent records of the Colony of Victoria. 

* 44 of these books were transferred to the Franklin collection, and are enumerated with that collection. 



APPENDIX IX. 

EXTENT OF LOWER HALL COLLECTION, AND ADDITIONS TO AND TOTALS OP THE DIFFERENT CLASSIFICATIONS. 



Theology, moral and intellectual eciunce, etc 

Jurisprudence and political science 

Medicine, mathematics, physics or natural science 

Useful and fine arts, military and naval science 

American history and politics 

Foreign liistory and pohtics 

Poetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric 

English prose fiction, including juvenile fiction, and other juvenile hooks 

Biography 

Travels 



Libraries, collections, periodicals 

German 

Italian books 

French books 

Spanish books 

Books of reference 



639 
1,086 
1,363 
2,467 
10,469 



3,478 
1,247 



639 
1,070 
1,359 
2,529 
11,281 
2,281 
1,980 
3,771 
1,260 

226 



ExtentofL.H. collection 30,574 1 31,827 32,605 32,596 33,395 35,152 35,478 36,862 36,116 



656 
1,077 
1,354 
2,544 
11,864 
2,246 
1,965 



1,070 
1,362 
2,540 
11,868 
2,234 
1,986 
3,728 
1,261 



1,822 

301 

2,116 

691 

1,072 

1,380 

2,572 

12,426 

2,278 

2,040 

3,698 

1,263 

229 



716 
1,112 
1,392 
2,667 
13,899 
2,347 
2,061 
3,928 
1,201 

203 



715 
1,129 
1,477 
2,868 
13,601 
2,489 
2,186 
3,865 
1,313 



732 
1,113 
1,439 
2,930 
13,742 
2,448 
2,132 
4,035 
1,334 

154 



1,868 

334 

2,276 

750 

1,119 

1,463 

2,964 

13,695 

2,476 

2,153 

4,072 

1,361 

155 



757 
1,132 
1,507 
3,030 
13,633 
2,586 
2,189 
4,083 
1,376 



794 
1,151 
1,W1 
3.197 
14,016 
2.672 
2,294 
4,225 
1.479 

158 



Reported last ye 



Total gain in 1880-81. 



» This class, embracing sets like Bohn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of course, which, in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heads of this table, 
t The books enumerated in this item are mostly imperfect sets. 

Note. — The column of "Condemned books replaced," includes books condemned in previous years as well as in the current year. The column "Total added" shows the number of volumes ae put upon the shelves, counting as one thosi 
bound two volumes in one, etc. The small gain in this Hall is accounted for by the fact that many old books not in request and broken Sets have been taken off the shelves, to make room for newer books. 



Public Libkaey. 



57 



APPENDIX X. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1880, TO APRIL 30, 1881. 

Givers (excluding anonymous) . . . . . 499 

Volumes 2,742 

Pamphlets 10,787 



Givers. 



Australia 



Abbot, Francis E., Cambridge . 

Abbott, Samuel A. B. 

Adelaide Philosophical Society, Adelaide, 

Albree, John ..... 

Albree, Joseph, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Allen, Bev. George, Wo7-cester . 

Allen, Stephen M., Duxbury 

Allen, Willard S 

Allen, Zachariah, Providence, R.L 
American Antiquarian Society, Worcester 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 
Salem ......... 

Local Committee of the Boston Meeting 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, Easton, Pa. 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia 

American Oriental Society, New Haven, Conn. 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Philadelphia 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia . 

American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 

Ames, John D., Binghamion, N. Y. 

Anonymous .... 

Appleton, Nathan 

Arana, Vicente de, Bilbao, Spain 

Archseological Institute of America 

Associated Charities of Boston . 

Astronomical Observatory, Harvard 

Atkinson, Edward 

Ayer, Dr. J. C, & Co., Lowell . 

Baird, Henry C, & Co., Philadelphia 

Balfour, David M 

Bancroft, C. F. P., Ph. D., Exeter, N.H. . 
Barry, Sir Redmond, Melbourne, Australia 
Bastide, Comte de . . . . . 

Baxter, Joseph N 

Bearse, Austin 

Beedham, B. H., Kimbolton, England 
Bell, Hon. Charles H., Exeter, N.H. 
Benet, Brig. Gen. S.V., Washington, D.C. 
Berkshire Life Insurance Company, Pittsfield 

Bethune, George A., M.D 

Bianciardi, Carlo, Florence, Italy 
Biddle, Chapman, Philadelphia 
Bigelow, Timothy 



College, Cambridge 



map 




2 

11 

1 

1 



3 
2 
2 

92 



Pphs. 



23 
U 

1 
1 
2 

1 

1 

1 
5 



1 
1 

887 



17 

2 



58 



City Document No. 97. 



Givers. 



1 map 



71 newspapers 



34 cards, 2 maps 



^ork City 



Biker, Julio F. J., Lisbon, Portugal. 
Blakiston, Presley, Philadelphia 
Bliven, Charles E., Perry sburg, Ohio 
Boehraer, Prof. Eduard, Strasshurg, Germany 
Bolton, Prof. H. Carrington, Hartford, Conn. 
Boston, City of . 

Water Board . 

Boston Gas Light Company 
Boston Medical Library Association 
Boston Society of Natural History 
Boston Traveller Office 
Boston University 

Bourinot, John G., Ottawa, Canada 

Bowman, Hon. S. Z., Washington, D.C. 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., 1 map, a lot of broadsides, 75 

newspapers ......... 

Bradley, G. P., Portland, Me., 2 boxes of old newspapers 
Breck, Charles, Milton .... 1 broadside 

Brewster, J. L., Lawrence 

Bridges, Robert, London 

British Museum, London 

Brock, R. A., Richmond, Va 

Brooks, Francis A. 

Brooks, Frederick 

Brophy, Thomas C. . 

Brown, Ammi 

Brown, Francis H., iLD. 

Brown, William R. 

Buckingham, John, New I 

Bunker, Miss S. 

Burroughs, Rev. Henry, D 

Butler, E. R. . 

Byram, E. R. . 

Caldwell, Joseph 

Calvert, George H., NewpoH, R.I. 

Canada Geological Survey, Montreal 

Carnes, George A., San Francisco, Cal 

Carret, Jose F. 

Cartee, Cornelius S., 3LD. . . • . . 
Cary, Thomas G., Cambridge ..... 

Caulfield, Richard, LL.D., Cork, Ireland 
Chadwick, Lieut. F. E., Washington, D.C. : 
Chamberlain, Hon. Joshua L., LL.D., Brunswick, Me 
Chamberlain, Hon. Mellen . . . .16 broadsides 

Chandler, Horace P. . 

Chandler, Hon. Peleg W. .... 

Chapin, Alfred C, New York City 
Chapman, A. F. ..... 

Chelsea, City of . » . 

Cheney, Mrs. E. D 

Cheney, Rev. Oren B., D.D., Lewiston, Me 
Chevaillier, Miss A. A. . 
Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, III. . 
Child, Prof. Francis J., Cambridge . 
Christern, F. W., New York City 
Christian Register Association . 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Public Library 

Clapp, Herbert C, M.D 

Clark, Rev. George Faber, Mendon . 
Clarke, Rev. James Freeman, D.D. . 



D. 



1 newspaper 



1 map 




Pphs 



163 
1 
4 

1 

102 

1 
3 



16 
2 

2" 
1 

1 
2 
1 

1 



9 
37 



16 



49 
1 



1 

182 



50 
2 



15 

20 
32 



11 



1 

30 



59 
1 
3 
1 
2 

18 
1 
1 
2 



Public Library. 



59 



Givers. 




France 



6 broadsides, 1 map 
. 28 broadsides 



maps 



Clarke, Robert, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleaves, Emery .... 
Cobden Club, London 
Coffin, Charles C. . . . 
Colbert, Mme. la Marquise de, Paris 
Concord Free Public Library 
Connecticut State Library, Hartford 

Cook, G 

Cook, George J. . . . 

Coolidge, David H. . 

Coolidge, Henry J. . . . 

Coolidge, Mrs. J. H. . 

Corey, Charles A., Bedford 

Crofton, Henry T., Manchester, England. 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 

Cross, James M., Providence, R.I. 

Culley, Eli, Fitchburg 

Curtis, Col. H. P., Washington, D.C. 

Gushing, William, Cambridge . 

Cutter, Abram E. . . . 

Cutter, George F., Washington, D.C. 

Cyr, Prof. Narcisse . 

Darling, F. O 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. 

Davenport, Bennett F., J/. Z>. . 

Davis, Thomas W. 

Day, Albert, M.D. . 

Dean, Benjamin .... 

De Costa, Rev. B. F., New York City 

Delaware Historical Society, Wilmington, Del. 

Del Mar, Alex., Sa7i Francisco, Cal. 

De Medicis, Charles, New York City . 

Denison, Charles, M.D., Denver, Col. 

Dennet, Charles F., Brighton, England . 

Dennett, William S 

Depew, Chauncey M. .... 

Devonshire, Duke of, London . 
Dexter, Franklin B., New Haven, Conn. . 
Dexter, G., Cambridge .... 

Dillaway, Charles K 

Dixwell, Mrs. John J. . . . . 

Doliber, Thomas ... 26 broadsides, 5 

Drury College, Springfield, Mo. 

Duane, William, Philadelphia . 

Duncan, J. T., Meriden, N.H. . 

Earle, Pliny, M.D., Northampton 

East Boston Advocate, Publishers 

Eastern Yacht Club . 

Eastman, Edson C, Concord, N.H. 

Eaton, John, Washington, D.C. 

Edes, Henry H. .a lot of broadsides, 11 newspapers 

Edes, Robert T., if.Z> 

Edinburgh Geological Society, Edinburgh 

EUery, Harrison ..... 

Ellis, Rev. George E., D.D. 

Elson, Louis C. . 

Elwyn, A. L., Philadelphia . . 

Emerson, Hon. George B., 100 broadsides, 5 

64 maps, 145 newspapers 
Engineers Club, Philadelphia . 



engravmgs 



maps 



Pphs. 



1 

2 

51 

43 



1 

24 

11 

1 

2 



77 
40 



2 
2 
1 

835 



18 
1 



427 

4 

10 

3 

1 

2 

2 

7 
1 

12 

3 
1 
2 
1 
1 



2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

4 

438 

25 

1 
1 



3 
6 
986 
5 
1 
1 



3,806 
4 



60 



City Document No. 97. 



GlTBBS. 



Essex Institute, Salem 

Faber, Paul 

Farnham, C. C, Randolph ...... 

Field, Richard M 

'F\e\di,Hon.W.k.,Wa$hington,D.C. , . . . 
First Church, Boston ....... 

First Church, Dorchester 

First Parish, Gloucester . 

Firth, Abraham 11 broadsides 

Fisher, Charles H., ^.Z>., ProOTcZtncc, JS./. 

Fitch, Edward Oliver 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 

Floye, W. J 

Folsom, A. A. . 

Folsom, Norton, M.D., Cambridge 

Ford, William E 

Forster, Edward J., M.D. 

Foster, William E., Providence, E.I. 

Foster, William H 

France, Bureau des Travaux Publics .... 

Francis, Miss A. B., Cambridge ..... 

French, Seth, Jacksonville, Fla. ..... 

Friends' Free Library, Germantovm, Pa. 

Furnivall, Frederick J., i/ondo^ 

Gaffield, Thomas 

Ganz, Edward N., M.D 1 etching 

Geist, Mrs. C. F., New York City 

Germantown Relief Society, Germantown, Pa. 

Gifford, S. N 

Gilpin, Edwin, Halifax, N.S. 

Globe Newspaper Company 

Goddard, Delano A. ....... . 

Godkin, E. L., & Co., New York City, 37 broadsides, 1 

map, 725 newspapers ....... 

Goeje, Prof. M. J., de, Ley den 

Goldsmith, Benjamin W. ....... 

Goodrich, James J., Ipswich ...... 

Goodwin, W. N., Philadelphia ...... 

Gould, S. C, Manchester, N.H. 

Gray, Miss ......... 

Great Britain, Commissioner of Patents .... 

Green, Milbrey, M.D 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1 broadside, 6 Franklin medals, 

3 maps, 1 photograph, 1 portrait 

Greenough, Charles P 

Greenough, W. A., & Co. . . . . . • . 

Greenough, William W . 

Groton, Town of . 

Hale, Rev. Edward E 

Hall, Prof. E. W., Waterville, Me 

Hall & Whiting 

Halliwell-Phillips, J. O., Brighton, England . 

Harlow, Hon. George H., Springfield, III . 

Hart, Charles H., Philadelphia ..... 

Hartwell, Edward M., Baltimore, Md 

Harvard College Library, Cambridge .... 

Haskins, David G. ....... . 

Hawkins, Dexter A., New York City . . . 

Haynes, Prof. Henry W. . .... 1 chart 

Hazard, Rowland, Providence, R.I. . 




Pphs. 



8 
7 
1 
3 
26 
4 
1 

25 
2 
1 
1 
2 



1 

13 



1 

119 



31 
2 
3 

1 
2 

4 

49 

1 

28 

1 

92 



1 

498 



15 

21 
11 
8 
1 
1 
1 

75 
1 
1 
1 
1 

56 



1 

843 



27 
120 



6 
1 

50 
1 
5 
1 
1 
7 



Public Library. 



61 



GrvEES. 



newspaper 



R.I. 



83 maps 



Hilgard, J. E., Washington, D.C.y 

Hill, Mrs 

Hodgson, William, Bequest of . 

Homes, F. B., St. Louis, Mo., . 

Hovey, William A. . 

Hughes, H. T., Carmarthen, Wales . 

Huling, Ray Greene .... 

Hunter, Rose & Co., Toronto, Canada 

Huntington, E. A., Auburn, N. Y. 

Huson, Mrs. H. C. . 

Hutchins, Charles .... 

Huth, Alfred H 

Hylton, John D., Palmyra, N.J. 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London 

Jarvis, William P. . . . . 

Jay, John, New York City 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D., 4 broadsides, 4 maps, 2 newspapers 

Jenkins, Miss M. A. . 

Jenks, Rev. Henry F. . . . 

Johnston, Henry P., New York City . 

Jones, G. I. & Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Jones, Mrs. Susan C. ... 

Joy, Prof. C. A., Stockbridge . 

Kansas Board of Agriculture 

Kelley, Hon. Frank H., Wo7-cester . 

Kemp, Charles P., 31. D., Rugby, Term. 

Kerr, Prof. W. C, Raleigh, N.C. . 

Kimball, David P. . . . . 

King, Rev. Henry M., B.D. 

Knapp, Arthur M., . 

Knapp, Prof. William J., New Haven, Conn. 

Knortz, Karl, Johnstown, Pa. 

Knowlton, T. S., West Brookfield 

Knox, Hon. John J., Washington, D.C. 

Koenigliche Bayerische Akademie der 

Munich, Germany .... 
Koenigliche Oeffentliche Bibliothek, Dresden, Germany 
Ladd, Charles R., Springfield 
Lamson, A. W., Dedham . 
Landis, Mrs. Henry K., Philadelphia 
Laurie, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Providence, 
Lawrence, Abbott .... 
Lawrence, Robert M., J/. Z). 
Lawrence Academy, Groton 
Lawrence Free Public Library . 
, Le Due, William G., Washington, D.C. 
Lee & Shepard ..... 
Leicester Public Library . 
Lenox Library, New York City . 
Leonard, Miss Clara F., Springfield . 
Leroux, Ernest, Paris, France , 
Lewis, Mrs. Winslow 
Lick Observatory, San Francisco, Cal. 
Ligue d'Enseignement, Paris, France 
Li Kwei, Li Siao-Chih, Ningpo, China 
Linderfelt, K. August, Ph. D., Milwaukee, Wis 
Lindsley, J. Berrien, M.D., Nashville, Tenn 
Lippincott, J. B., & Co., Philadelphia 
Literary and Philosophical Society, Leicester, England 
Long, H. A., Glasgow, Scotland .... 



2 maps 



Wisaenschaften 




5 
1 
4 
9 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 

3 
1 

2 
1 
1 
10 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 

24 



1 

163 
1 



6 
1 

4 

40 
1 
1 
1 

6 



1 

37 

1 

a 

1 

2 
1 

1 

2 



62 



City Document No. 97. 



Givers. 




Lowell, 3Iiss Anna C. . . . 
Lowell, Mrs. C. R., JVew York City . 
Macdonald, James, Edinburgh, Scotland 
McPhetres, Samuel A., Lowell . 
Manning, Mrs. A. H. . 
Martin, Prof. S. D., New York City . 
Marvin, William T. R. . 
Massachusetts, State of . 

Board of Agriculture 

Board of Health, etc. 

Library 



Cal 



Massachusetts College of Pharmacy . 
Massachusetts Historical Society 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 
Massachusetts Medical Society . 
Maxwell, Sidney D., Cincinnati, Ohio 
May, Miss Abby W. ..... 

Meek, Henry M., Salem .... 

Meigs, J. v., Lowell ..... 

Memorial Hall Library, Andover 
Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelx^hia 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City 

Metcalf, Miss Kate' 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn. 

Minot, Charles S 

Moore, Rev. W. H., Hartford, Conn. 
Morrison, Rev. Nathan J., D.D., Springfield, Mo. 
Morse, Hon. Leopold .... 

Morton, William J., M.D., New York City 

Mudge, Alfred 

Mudge, Rev. James, Lucknow, India 

MuUett, Alfred E 

Munsell, Frank, Albany, N.Y. 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge 

Myer, Isaac, Philadelphia 

Nelson, Henry M., Peabody 

New Bedford Free Public Library 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 

New York Board of State Charities, Albany, N. 

New York Produce Exchange, New York City 

New Zealand Institute, Wellington, N.Z. . 

Nichols, Prof. W. R 

Nicholson, James B., Philadelphia . 

Norcross, Hon. Otis . .... 1 broadside 

Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, Norwich, 
JEtigland ....... 

Noweil, Cyrus, Portland, Me. .... 

'^oyes, Isixac, v., Washi7igton, D.C. . 

Noyes, Rufus K., M.D., Lynn .... 

Noyes, S. B., Brooklyn N.Y. . 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia 

Nye, Gideon, jr.. Canton, China 

Oliver, Fitch E., M.D 

Onderdonk, Henry, yr., Jamaica, L.I. 

Ordway, Albert, ]^as/l^?^5'^?^, Z>.C. . 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester .... 

Paine's Furniture Factory . 

Park, iZev. Edwards A., J?./)., ^ncZovcr 

Paris, Prefet de la Seine . . ... 



2 
13 

4 
12 

1 



4 

18 



13 
13 



1 
10 

100 

2 

2 
1 
16 
2 
2 
2 
5 
2 



1 
1 

140 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 



5 

1 
264 

1 

1 

3 

7 

2 

3 
2 

22 



Public Library. 



63 



Givers. 



Iowa 
1 portrait 



Pathological Society, Philadelphia . 

Patten, Otis, Litile Rock, Ark. . 

Patterson, C. P., Washington, B.C. . 

Patterson, Joseph W., A'eif Vork City 

Peabody Museum, Cambridge . 

Peoria, 111., Board of Trade 

Peraza, Gen. Nicanor Bolet, Brooklyn, N. 

Perkins, F. B., San Francisco, Cal. . 

Perkins, Samuel C, Philadelphia 

Perry, Thomas S. . . . . 

Perry, Rt. Rev. William S., D.D., Davenpoii 

Phillips, Henry, jr., Philadelphia 

Phillips, John, Waltham . 

Philosophical Society, Glasgow, Scotland 

Philosophical Society, Washington, D. C. 

Pickering, William H. . . . 

Pierce, Hon. Henry B. . . . 

Pierson, John S., New York City 

Plymouth, England, Free Public Library 

Poole, Wellington, Wenham 

Poole, William F., Chicago, 111. 

Poor, Henry W., New York City 

Pope Manufacturing Company . * . 

Porter, 3Iaj. Gen. Fitz John, 3Iorristown, N.J. 

Portland, Me., Public Library ... 1 

Pray, Lewis G. . 

Pray, T. J. W., M.D., Dover, N.R. . 

Prince, Hon. Frederick O. 

Quebec, City of . 

Quincy, 3[iss Eliza S., Quincy . 

Rand, B. Howard, M.D. . 

Ray, Richard ..... 

Real Academia de Buenas Letras, Barcelona, Spain 

Reale Istituto Lombardo, Milan, Italy 

Reed, George B. .... 

Rice, William, Springfield 

Richards, Samuel W. 

Richardson, W. L., 31. D. . 

Richmond & Southwestern Railway Company 

Rogers Edward H. . . . . 

Roland, Worthington & Co. 

Rolfe, William J., Cambridge .' 

Ropes, John C. . 

Ross, Denman W., Cambridge . 

Ros y Ferrer, jaime, Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Royal Arcanum, Supreme Council of . 

Royal Astronomical Society, London 

Royal Geographical Society, London 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England 

B.oya.l Society, Edinburgh . 

Royal Society, London 

RutFner, W. H., Richmond, Va. 

St. Louis Public School Library, St. Louis, Mo 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, 3Io. . 

Salisbury, Stephen, y?-., Worcester 

Salter Richard H., 3LD. . 

San Francisco Chronicle, Publishers, San Francisco 

Savage, James W., Otnaha, Neb. 

Schindler, Rev. Solomon, New York City 

Scudder, Samuel H., Cambridge 



newspaper 



broadsides 



Cal 




10 

1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
5 
1 



2 
7 
i 

9 
10 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



88 
I 
2 
1 
I 

10 



10 



55 
4 



64 



City Document No. 97. 



GrvEBS. 




a lot of broadsides 



Searle, Frederick A. . 

Sears, J. Montgomery 

Sellen, Francisco, New York City 

Shaw, Samuel S. . . . 

Shelbourne, Maj. Sidney F., New York City 

Shepard, Carl C, Manchester, N.H. 

Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J. . . 10 

Slack, Charles W. . 

Slack, Miss Helen M. D. . 

Small, Augustus D., Salem 

Small, John C, Portland, Me. 

Smith, Charles C. 

Smith, J. W., Andover 

Smith, James S., Philadelphia 

Smith, Lloyd P., Philadelphia 

Smith, Nathaniel S., New York City 

Smith, Walter G:, Philadelphia 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Snider, Denton J., St. Louis, 3Io 

Society of Arts, London 

Steiger, E., New York City 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.L 

Swift, John L. . 

Swift, Lindsay .... 

Talbot, J. T., M.D. . 

Taylor, Edward, A7idover . 

Thimm, Franz, London 

Thompson, Rev. Augustus C, D.D. 

Thompson, Francis M., Greenfield 

Thrupp, George A., London 

Tillinghast, C. B. 

Tolraan, Mrs. James . 

Towne, Enoch H., Worcester 

Triibner, N., London 

Turner, Alfred T. . . . 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsville, Ind 

Twelves, Richard, Camden, N-L 

Tyler, Prof. M. C, Ann Arbor, Mich 

Union of American Hebrew Congregations 

United States. Adjutant General's Office 

Attorney General's Office 

Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Engineers 

■ Bureau of Navigation 

• Bureau of Statistics 

Coast Survey Office 

Department of Agriculture 

Department of State 

Department of the Interior 

Department of the Treasury 

Department of War 

Hydrographic Office 

Life Saving Service 

Military Academy, West Point, N. Y. 

Naval Institute, Annapolis, 3Id. 

Naval Observatory 

Patent Office 

Signal Office .... 

Surgeon General's Office 

Univereity of California, Berkeley, Cal. 



broadsides 



1 map 



Philadelphia 



1 

14 

1 

1 

1 
1 



1 

12 

37 

1 

2 

10 



2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 
5 
53 
2 
2 
1 
1 



1 
1 

16 

1 
1 
5 
1 

3 

2 

189 



Public Library. 



65 



Givers. 



Vt 



University of Edinburgh . 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich 
University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo 
University of Vermont Library, Burlington, Vt 
Upham, Warren, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Vermont Historical Society, Montpelier, 
Vermont State Library, 3Io7itpelier, Vt. 
Vibbert, Rev. G. H., Brunswick, Me. 
Victoria Public Library, Melbourne . 
Vienna Pressed Yeast Company . 
Vose, Miss Kebecca G. . . . 
Wadsworth, Alexander 
Wallace, William A., Washington, D.C. 
Ware, William, & Co. ... 

Waterburg, Rev. Julius H. 
Waters, Henry P., Salem . 
Webber, Samuel G., M.B. 

Weld, Mrs. CM 

Weld, Francis M., M.B., New York City 

Wells, Benjamin W. 

Weymouth Historical Society 

White, Samuel S., Trustees of, Philadelphia 

Whitney, Prof. Henry M., Beloit* Wis. 

Whitney, James L. . . . . 

Whitney, Prof. William D., New Haven, 

Whyte, Thomas .... 

Wigan, England, Free Library . 

Willard, Mrs. . . . . 

Williams, AV. B., Lansing, Mich. 

Winchell, N. H., 3Iinneapolis, Minn. 

Winsor, Justin, Cambridge 

Winthrop, //o?i. Robert C. 1 newspaper, 1 

Winthrop, Robert C. , jr. .... 

Wisconsin, Department of Public Property 

Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wis. 

Wolcott, J. W. .... 

Woods, John H., Jacksonville, III. 

Yale College Library, New Haven, Conn. 

Yendall, George .... 

Yohn, Albert B., hidianapolis, Ind. 

Young, Edward J 

Young, W. Maynard .... 
Young Men's Library, Buffalo, N. T. 



2 newspapers 



Conn 



4 maps 



newspaper 



1 chart 
photograph 




2 
1 

42 



1 
1 

13 
1 

94 
1 



1 
1 
1 

2 
73 



10 



53 

26 

1 

9 

1 



27 



APPENDIX XI. 

CIRCULATION. 

(Books issued.) 



1873 
1874 



1878 
1879 



Total Circulation. 



b 322,445 

380,343 

467,855 

625,442 

768,417 

947,621 

1,140,572 

1,183,991 

1,180,565 

1,156,721 

1,065,081 



a 965 
1,234 
1,619 
2,031 
2,681 
3,097 
3,727 
3,882 
3,833 
3,768 
3,504 



a 1,856 
2,435 
3,073 
6,134 
6,074 
8,035 
8,348 

10,478 
f<,747 
8,781 
8,637 



Date of 

Jast 
column. 



Jan. 28 

Mar. 16 

/ 



Bates Hall. 



31,080 
23,159 
28,261 
34,441 
41,721 
64,956 
66,832 
80,326 
74,627 
69,042 



ta 



34,225 
27,092 
31,003 
37,872 
39,016 
59,373 
74,786 
66,670 
89,163 
101,100 
96,764 



65,205 
60,251 
89,264 
72,313 
80,737 
114,329 
141,618 
146,996 
163,790 
170,142 
166,373 



1,001 

926 

1,045 

1,046 



Lower Hall. 























? 












• D. 


i» 




ft 










o " 


i 




1 S 


83 


— ' 




— ^ 










a-s 







kS 


227,579 


741 


1,413 


3,631 


248,029 


805 


1,472 


6,217 


230,111 


772 


1,443 


7,946 


245,244 


822 


1,635 


7,853 


264,826 


864 


1,759 


8,009 


338,460 


1,140 


2,598 


10,392 


392,996 


1,326 


2,439 


12,737 


378,439 


1,265 


2,902 


12,736 


350,621 


1,179 


2,085 


12,672 


306,148 


1,031 


1,999 


10,369 


257,692 


847 


1,849 


9,271 



231,110 
254,246 
238,057 
253,097 
272,834 
348,842 
405,732 
391,176 
363,193 
316,517 
266,863 



East Boston Branch 




3 

1 

IB 




i 

1 


E 


H 


26,151 


c335 


586 


979 


26,130 


74,804 


243 


609 


1,042 


75,846 


67,764 


e 222 


553 


458 


68,212 


80,771 


263 


712 


320 


81,091 


85,134 


277 


789 


414 


85,648 


89,949 


203 


866 


1,038 


99,987 


101,022 


335 


902 


1,606 


102,627 


104,717 


343 


1,088 


1,879 


106,596 


95,887 


320 


916 


2,794 


A98,681 


105,197 


303 


951 


3,004 


108,201 


97,024 


318 


989 


4,097 


101,118 



South Boston Branch. 



101,688 
107,651 
111,677 
113,334 
131,969 
137,010 
115,509 
138,309 
129,261 



1,045 
1,075 
1,414 
1,200 
1,196 
1,137 



3,210 
3,741 
3,335 
5,261 



102,322 
108,666 
112,625 
116,530 
135,179 
140,751 
h 118,844 
143,570 
132,868 





RoxBUHT Branch. 


Chahlestown Branch. 


Brighton Branch. 


Dorchester Branch. 


South End Branch. 


Jamaica Plain Branch. 


Year. 


W 

64,092 
87,079 
98,304 
140,059 
122,617 
123,492 
119,4.50 
105,700 


i 

1 


t 


1 


1 


i 
w 


1 


O 




1 
B 


1 


i 
1 




W 


1 


i 

1 

w 


i3 


i 


i 


1 


1 


>> 

1 
1 

i3 


i 


i 


1 


3 


i 
1 


i 
t 


i 

n 


1 


1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 


612 

686 

925 

1,190 

1,100 

1,013 

1,017 

9T2 


263 
286 
320 
477 
404 
403 
388 
360 


3,250 
2,460 
2,993 
6,770 
7,613 
6,397 
6,480 
4,912 


67,342 
89,539 
101,297 
146,829 
130,030 
129,889 
124,930 
110,612 


32,023 
78,169 
84,631 
105,211 
99,637 
86,925 
73,302 
78,682 


734 
704 
830 
002 
970 
685 
616 
789 


327 
259 
279 
348 
332 
289 
246 
273 


1,36S 
1,206 
1,184 
1,605 
2,003 
1,816 
1,446 
2,140 


33,391 
79,375 
85,815 
106,816 
101,540 
88,740 
i74,748 
80,832 


9,642 
21,394 
23,531 
27,832 
27,549 
26,737 
26,406 
26,067 


226 
234 
314 
290 
328 
312 
302 
269 


8S 
70 
81 
97 
89 
93 
91 
85 


448 
1,274 
1,960 
1,698 
1,859 
1,574 
2,110 


9,642 
21,842 
24,805 
29,792 
29,247 
28,928 
27,980 
28,177 






























15,676 
63,367 
67,692 
63,026 
56,786 
65,690 
63,904 


439 
552 
620 
624 
675 
641 
641 


197 
206 
220 
197 
184 
176 
177 


132 
899 
4,287 
1,949 
1,423 
1,026 
730 


gl6,0V 
66,016 
71,979 
64,974 
59,673 
66,716 
55,188 






















! 








































41,303 

73,164 
77,016 
71,432 


667 
622 
680 
578 


188 
247 
258 
242 


1,099 
2,713 
2,275^ 
2,530 


42,402 
75,867 
79,291 
73,962 


28,174 
60,467 
82,406 
47,797 


384 
413 
437 

467 


138 
171 
176 
164 


2,106 
2,503 
2,220 
2,311 


30,280 
62,960 
84,626 
80,108 


a Cent 

6 If til 

and if H 

at home. 

c Open 


al library 
e issucD 
all issues 

seventy-i 


only, 
of Ea 
be ex 

ight di 


t BOKt 

eluded 
ys. 


on bo e.^ 
there w 


eluded, t 
ill be a i 


his footii 
ecord of 


g wou 
293,710 


Id be 
volum 


296,316 ; 
ee used 


din 

Bhowl 

eT 

./•■In 
being 


eludes b 
in Appe 
le E. B. I 
eludes th 
the same 


ooks b 
ndixX 
ranch 

e larg 
day, a 


III. 
was op 
jst of 
in pre 


d and i 

en only 3 
each dep 
rious ent 


eturued 

D7 days, o 
artraent 
ries undt 


he same 

wing to r 
on any da 
r this hea 


day, c 

epaire 
y, wit 
d. 


n whi 

op furn 
lout re 


e slips 

ace. 
gard tt 


its 




g The use of the Dorchester branch is for a little over three months. 

h The .East Boston branch was closed from October 7th to 9th for repairs ; 
Jouth Boston from August 12th to November 2d for repairs and enlargement. 

i The Charlestown branch was closed from April 20th to the 30lli, to rearrange 
he books, and also from May let to the 11th. 



Public Library. 



67 









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68 



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Public Libraky. 



69 



APPENDIX XIY. 

BATES HALL READING. 













Percentage 


OF 


Use. 




Classification. 










































f4 




w4 


« 
9 
X 


X 

H 


© 
X 


H 

X 
H 




X 
r4 


X 
H 


18 


X 
H 


H 


X 

J» 

X 
H 


X 
H 


© 
X 
X 
•4 


X 
H 


English history, to- 
pography, biogra- 
phy, travel, and po- 
lite literature . . . 


16 


13 


18 


20 


17 


17 


17 


17 


12 


19 


16 


15 


15 


13 


13 


13 


13.2 


13.1 


American (North and 
1 South) history, etc. 


8.5 


10 


8 


12 


12 


12 


12 


13 


10 


12 


11 


11 


12 


10 


14 


13 


11.8 


11.1 


French history, etc. . 


7.5 


6 


6 


7 


4 


5 


5 


5 


4 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


6.1 


5.8 


German history, etc. . 


2 


2.5 


2 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3.4 


3.9 


Italian history, etc. . 


2.5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1.5 


1.8 


Other history, topog- 
raphy, biography, 
tftivel, and polite 
literature 


3.5 


2.5 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 


5 


4.2 


4.6 


General and epochal 
history 


4.25 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 




2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3.3 


3.3 


Greek, Latin, and phi- 
lology 


3.5 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3.5 


3.6 


Bibliography .... 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1.2 


1.5 


Transactions 


1.5 


2.3 


5 


7 


5 


4 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


2 


2 


.5 


.6 


Periodicals 


6 


6 


11 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


10 


8 


8 


7 


7 


6 


5 


5 


3.9 


3.5 


Fine arts 


12 


16.5 


8 


5 


8 


8 


8 


9 


11 


10 


11 


11 


10 


9 


12 


13 


8.9 


8.7 


Natural history and 
science 


4 


4.6 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3.8 


3.7 


Theology, ecclesiasti- 
cal history, ethics, 
education, etc. . . . 


11 


8.5 


4 


4 


8 


9 


8 


11 


14 


10 


11 


11 


10 


10 


8 


8 


11.0 


11.5 


Medicine 


5 


4.6 


8 


6 


6 


8 


8 


9 


9 


8 


7 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7.3 


7.0 


Law, government, and 
political economy . 


2 




2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2.7 


2.5 


Useful arts, mathemat- 
ics, physics, etc. . . 


5.5 


7.5 


7 


8 


7 


6 


5 


6 


8 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


10 


10 


9.7 


8.9 


Miscellaneous pam- 
phlets boimd .... 


.75 


.75 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


4.0 


4.9 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker, Barton, 
and Prince libraries — which are kept apart from the general classification of the Library — 
is reckoned as near as possible and included in the usual divisions, as is indicated in the table. 
(See Explanations to Appendi.x VTII.) 

The figures for 187S-9 are only approximately correct. 



APPENDIX XY. 



LOWER HALL AND BRANCH READING. 



CLASSES. 
The figures give the relative percentages. 

FictioD and juvenilet^ 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, 
law, medicine, professions 

Periodicals 

Foreign languages 

Miscellaneous 







1874 










1875 










1876 










1877 












1878 






1 "^ 


33 


a 


^ 


1 


i-i 

69 


82 




(2 


O 


^ 




P4 


e 


1 


a 

82 


3 

79 


B 


n 
w 

83 


79 


1 


1 


1 


i 




03 

00 


« 


a 


H 


71 


80 


78 


81 


78 


79 


85 


84 


80 


70 


80 


79 


85 


71 


86 


83 


80 


72 


S3 


80 


86 


81 


81 


5 


4 


5 


4 


■H- 


7 


4 


5 


3 


5 


a 


7 


4 


5 


3 


4 


4.5 


6 


3 


5 


4 


4 


4 


•6 


4 


5 


4 


5 


8 


3 


3 


3 


5 


3.5 


4 


2 




3 


4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


3 


7 


2 


4 


4 


4 ( 


7 


2 




4 


3 


4 


7 


2 


4 


3 


4 


4 


7 


2 


4 


3 


3 


4 


e 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


7 


6 


5 


2 


5 


6 


5 




2 


1 


3 


« 


6 


4 


2 


2 


4 


6 


5 


4 


2 


3 


4 


6 


4 


4 


2 


3 


2 


3 








1 
4.5 


3 
4 








3 


1 
4 


3 

4 








4 


1 

4.6 


1 ^ 

4 








4 


1 
4 


3 
4 








6 


4 


5 





4 


5 




3 


6 


5 


4 


5 


■^ 


3 


4 


5 


3 





CLASSES. 
The figures give the relative percentages. 


1879 


1880 










1881 








K 


= 


■^ 


■V 


K 


1 




''. 1 


1 


S 


W 


S3 
•f. 


1 




-i. 


f 


H 


►i 


n 

S3 




i 


1 




•A 


0^ 


1 


I. 
U. 


Fiction and juveniles 


72 
6 
3 

6 
6 
3 
4 


81 
5 
2 

2 
5 


76 
6 
4 

3 

5 


84 
4 
2 

4 
3 


82 
4 
3 

4 
3 

4 


78 
7 
4 

3 

8 


62 1 

3 

4 
2 


76.4 
5.3 
3 

4 

4 


1 ™ 
6 

3 
7 

3 

4 


80 
4 
2 

3 


76 
6 
3 

4 

e 


83 
4 
3 

4 
3 


79 
5 
3 

4 

5 

4 


8 
6 

5 
5 

4 


62 
6 
3 

4 
4 

21 


74.7 
5.3 
3 

4.4 
5 
1 
6.S 


70 
7 
3 

6 
5 
3 
6 


80 
4 
3 

3 
« 

4 


76 
5 
4 

3 

7 

5 


82 
4 
3 

3 
4 

4 


78 
6 
3 

3 
4 

6 


79 
5 
3 

4 
5 

4 


74 
4 
9 

4 
5 

4 


79 
6 
3 

4 
4 

1 
4 


77 


m. 




4 


IV. 


Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, law, medicine, i 


4 


V. 


Periodicals .^ 


5 


VI. 




.6 


vn. 




5 


6 


3 


24 1 


7.3 


5 


5 


3 


4.5 










Public Library. 



71 



APPENDIX Xyi. 

FELLOWES ATHEN^UM EEADING. 



1 

3 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 


at) 

H 


i» 

X) 
H 


H 


aD 

H 


OCI 

X) 
H 


9 

H 


O 

QfD 
H 


H 


I. 


History, biography, and travels 


35 


43 


38 


33 


30 


37 


39 


33 


n. 


Modem foreign languages . . 


13 


12 


9 


11 


10 


11 


10 


13 


TTT. 




2 
12 


4 
10 


5 
10 


14 
9 


17 
8 


6 
9 


5 
11 


4 


IV. 


Miscellaneous literature . . . 


11 


V. 


Theology, sociology, ethics . . 


7 


6 


5 


7. 


7 


6 


6 


9 


VT. 




1 

5 


1 
4 


1 
4 


1 
4 


2 
4 


2 
4 


2 
4 


•7 


vn. 


Classics 


4 


vni. 


Fine arts, engineering .... 


12 


8 


10 


7 


7 


8 


7 


6 


IX. 


Law, politics, government . . 


1 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


X. 


Mathematics, science 


12 


10 


15 


11 


12 


14 


13 


11 


XI. 


Fiction 
















5 























BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 



6 

1 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 


18T5 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


I. 


Fiction 


84 


80 


77 


76 


75 


76 


76 


n. 


Biography, travel, and 
history 


7 


7 


8 


7 


8 


8 


7 


m. 


Other 


9 


13 


15 


17 


17 


16 


17 



72 



City Document No. 97. 





CO 




O 




O 


i— 1 


P5 


1— 1 




k 


Ci! 


M 






P 


X 


<l 


I— 1 


P^ 


P 


« 




1-3 


(1h 


c:) 


PM 


1— 1 


<i1 


Q 




O 




i—( 




P5 




H 




Ph 







t- 


05 t- N N 


t- 


CO CO 


















T-( 


•* '* 


rH 


CO o 
















-2 


s 




T-( 


00 








































o 
























H 
























lo 




it^ 


1 lO 


















CO 




CO 


CO 
















Ph 
























^ 
























o 




"o" 


o 
















o 


<M 




c^ 


(M 


































- 


. 


^ 






1 y-f 














*t^ 


T* 




5< 


' ^ 
















« 








• 1 
















-. 




CO 


1 CO 


CD 


O CO 


05 


N 








o 




<D 


. CO 


cn 


^ o> 




o 






C3 










<N 


CO 


CO^ 


T— 1 






43 












t^r 


O 








o 












c^ 


CO 








00 


t- IM _ _ 


"o" 


0^ i (M 


o 


o 5! 


"I" 


IN 




H 


M 

^ 










CO 


CO 


S" 








J_^ 


CI 


1 CO 


>n 1 CO 


m 


O IH 


■* 


CO 








lo 




lo 


o 


o 


CD 03 


t- 


CO 






B 










CO 






•* 






















o 








OQ 












IM 


Ttl 








,_^ 




~^" 


CO •* 


>n 


00 in 


a> 


a> 








CO 




CO 


CO 


o 


CO m 


« 


00 






m 










CO 




CO 








w 




• 








'"' 


d 








lO 


g ^ « c. 


1 ^ 


CO o 


Q 


u 


00 


»~ 


<M in 








05 




t- CD 









a 


rH ."i 








s> 






•* 




o> 00 


CO 


rH in 






6 


































00 




rH 
















g 


s 










e 


»o 


ro g CO c^ 


^ 


in CO 




C-5 t- 


tH 


cr> t- 




oc 


00 


a> c~ 




^ >-l 


o 


CO c^ 




00 






CO 






C-J^ "* 


"i. 


in^ ir 




(X) 












w '"' 


00 


'"' 




H 








1 




■* 


■* 






OS 


pi 


5 ^ " ^ 


CO 


vO CI 

Oi CO 




CD 00 

r-^ T— 1 


^ 


^ S 


t« 


lO 




CO 






t^ ^ 


CO 


CO in 


(X> 












»* 1-1 


o 


iH 




fH 












CO 


't 








iC 


CJ CD CO C4 


~io 


>n 1 o 




t- o 


-<t 


in CJ> 


CC 




Si -^ 




O r- 




00 00 


00 


t: ?? 


t» 


40 




CO 






CO_ ci 


en 


CO Tj 




00 












T-T IH 


T-T 


?-r 






















« 












M 


tX 








C5 


g ^ CO <N 


" ~co 


CO CD 


o 


^ t- 


^ 


1—1 b.- 


t» 




o 


o o 


CD 






S 2 




>c 






i-H 00 


CO 


in a> 


co^ 


C^ Tj* 












oT 


Ttl 
















CO 


IM 






H 












CO 


■^ 








Oi 


O lO CO r-l 


00 


O 00 


00 


CO o 


e-5 


OO CO 


ao 




iO rit 




(N O 




O CO 




r-i t- 


- 


lO 




CO 




CO 


CO 00 


T* 


rH ■* 














C3 


rH 
















o 






« 












CO 


"* 








Ci 


O OS tJ* 




CO i-i 




O 00 


~eV" 


CO CO 




o 


s ^ 


c< 


O CO 




t- q; 


t^- 




s 






»-( 00 




00 CO 


*^ 


cn •* 












i 


00 






H 












CO 








'I 


5 9". 


Tc 

CC 


s 1 




1 1 


in 














CO 
CO 


^ 






IH 












(M 


CO 








^ 


Tj4 iH CO N 


" "^ 


(M CD 




00 00 


c^~~ 


t.. 




n 




S 5! 


1:^ 


Ol CD 




CO ir 




s 




t« 


CO 




'* 


in 




in CO 


"^ 


OO 




« 












00 


00 






H 












IM 


C-1 








CO 


(M CO CO 


"~co 


O CO 


00 


S 5 


OJ 


in 




91 


CO 


lO CO 


C-1 


CO o 


o 






ly 






CO 




Tf 


? 


CO 


in in 


in 


00 




H 












"-1 


(M 








itZ 


ro CO CO 


" "S 


N ^ 




t— in 


o 


IM 




H 




Tjl CO . 


o 














t» 


CO 




■^ 


tH 




■<* CO 


iH 


o> 




IZ> 












CO 


cn" 

CO 






H 












tH 


c^ 
























o 






















bo 






















rt + 






a 
< 
p 








a 




. ^ 


'ri 


• ° 

•a 5 


3 
3 


n 






! 5 


O o 




a) 

; 1 


-a 


3 

5, 


o 


» 






o 






03 


03 « 





e 




pa ^ 

"5 

c 

pi 


French . . . 
German . . 
Italian . . . 
Others . . . 


c 


1 1 


So 
^25 




o rt 


2 
1 


2 5 
1 = 

1 ^ 


10 

5 



51 



g ?o 



a -5 


8 in bra 
indays. 
branch 
t Brigh 
ents. 


■ScK d * a 


S a 1 S & 


o°|Si 


SaiJ'si: 


tion of p 
ading roo 
the Char 
statistics 
present a 




"3 '^ =«5-=3 


t'.a S fri 


, !lC film's 


s g « "^ 9 


only, 
rant op 

of new 
B of the 
Eicticabl 


ibrary 
to war 
he use 
reader 
are pr 


1-1-bH.m a 


^ A 1 o-a 




t Centr 
en suffici 

Note. - 
e numbei 
maica PI 





"a 



pq ►- 



•3 c« 



o »^ 

"53 






c; ■►^ oQ 

oQ d *— ' 

* 3.2 

2 «> 
5p^ 



Public Libeary. 



73 







t- 


to 


•<* 


«- 


<3> 


03 


t- 




o 


CO 


IM 


I 








CO 




O 


tH 






CO 




o 


o 






o 


o 


iH_ 


C5_ 


at 




IM 


o 


Tj( 




tjl 




















'^ 










i 


.o 


■* 


cT 


i-T 






CO 






lO 




■lO 


r-l 


CO 










s 










o 
























H 
















~ 












05 


05 


___ 


<3i 


^ 


(N 


CO 




CO 


o 


CM 






^ 


rn 






iH 




IM 


o 


tH 




Tl( 




a^ 


05 


to 


to 










CO 






CO 




i-i 




























a> 


^ 


00 


o> 


to 


CO 


^ 


>o 


00 


o 


to 










-^ 










CO 










H 


CO 


00 


CO 








"^ 


CO 






^ 




od 




























^ 


o 


^ 


eq 


(M 


o 


00 


to 


CO 


to 


CO 






-* 


^ 


e^ 


IN 


C^ 




IM 


to 




rt 






C 


CO 


to 


to 








iH 












o 


CO 














CO 










ft 




























o> 


^ 


o 


^ 


O 


T~i 


lO 


•* 


■!t< 


o 


o 






00 


^ 




'"' 






IM 


to 






^ 




'C 


























IH 














t^ 










n 
























. 




o 


o 


^^ 


CO 


t» 


to 


CM 


^ 


to 


00 


CO 


V* 




r: 


o 


o 


(N 






^ 


-* 








IX) 


a 




00 










c= 






o 


X) 


5a 


CO 




CO 










^ 






f-T 


H 


3 




























o 


Oi 


00 


rH 


•* 


^ 


~ 


IM 


^ 


o 


(3^ 






t~ 


<N 






to 




CC 










M 


o 


0^ 


1-1 








CO 


oc 






r-H^ 




o 


to 














ci 










« 
















CO 












00 


OJ 


e^ 


I:- 


to 


iH 


i 


c^ 


05 


CO 


^ 






-s 


o 


CO 










•^ 


CO 


-* 




« 


>« 


^ 


CO 










CO 






t- 




OQ 
















T)< 












CO 


K 


C^ 


^ 


>o 


to 


~ 


to 


to 


to 


CM 






o 




(M 


to 


lO 






o 


CO 


■t 


at 




M 


o 
•* 


1H 










CO 


to 






T* 




W 
















'l' 














^ 


O 


at 


00 


^ 


-i 


at 


^ 




U3 






t£ 




t- 


00 


^ 


•^ 










^. 




M 


00 


QC 


CO 


■* 




1- 


c> 


CM 








IS 


•^ 


to 








r- 


Ol 






'* 




h3 






1-1 










o 












CO 


lO 


00 


K5 


1 


^ 


lO 




CO 




o 






CO 














■* 








td 


o 




to 


iH 














o 




m 




































• 








t-t 




























8) 


e 


















* 


s 






a 


_t 


















^ 


a 






1 
















# 


1 


g 


tn 

a 
>> 






a 


z 


^ It. 






00 


a 

c 


: 1 


a 

1 


a 

.2 

p 

o 

CO 


i 
a; 

o 
o 


■a 

CD 
> 

8 

2 

o 


t 

£ 

a 

c 
z 


1 

! 


C3 

a. 

. 1 


1 

1 


; 1 

? .g 

3 -° 

J o 
J fl 

2 m 






J 


i z 


5 


^ 


.« 


M 


i 


J 


i '-^ 


1 


3 ^ 






c 


> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 




^ ^ 




O 






c 


5 .1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


c 


5 S 




u O 






p 


5 :5 


cq 


n 


M 


pq 


p: 


5 P 


5 fe 


p 


^ M 


•ON 


9SB10 






H 1— 1 
M 




> 


> 


t 




i ^ 


^ 


< > 


3 



- - .a 



to IM CO 

CsTcOrH 



- tCi-H r-l ;D 



rH ^rH CM t3 
rHrHrHrH a 



_H IM r-l lA 1-1 rH C3 
(V| t- Oi to IM 00 £ 



C3i r-^'-t '-;,'-;, 0_ (J 

oooooo ^ 

1 1 I I I 1 I 

ce rC ae » e "^ - 

I « ' » I A ■§ 

q6aexx»2 2 



APPENDIX XIX. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 





1S76-77 


isr7-7» 


1878-rO 


1879-80 


1880-81 


Years. 


raid into City 
treasury from 




City appro- 
prlatfoos. 


ExpL-nded. 


Fellowes 
Atbcnfeum. 


City ajipro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Atheuseum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Atbeu»uni. 


City appro- 
priations. 

$3,000 00 

16,000 00 

5,000 00 
3,200 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
5,000 00 

4,500 00 

72,000 00 
2,300 00 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenaeum. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenteum. 


of catalogue s. 




$5,000 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 
3,000 00 
4.000 00 
2,000 00 
5,000 00 

5,500 00 

60 ,.500 00 . 
2,500 00 


$3,785 85 
( 21,714 50 
( 2,849 88 
5,722 87 
3,004 27 
2,278 01 
2,528 31 
4,885 09 

5,S94 26 

69,332 10 
2,401 12 


$1,833 86 


$5,500 00 

15,000 00 

6,000 00 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
5,080 00 

6,000 00 

70,626 00 
3,000 00 


$2,734 57 
j 20,981 26 
i 4,117 29 
4,807 82 
3,549 33 
2,115 86 
2,050 16 
5,397 81 

5,267 59 

66,038 97 
2,710 51 


$1,414 37 


$3,290 00 

15,040 00 

7,520 00 
3,290 00 
2,350 00 
2,350 00 
5,170 00 

5,170 00 

73,000 00 
2,820 00 


$2,365 54 
( 24,499 97 
( 3,407 67 
5,915 80 
3,479 73 
1,973 94 
3,006 12 
5,074 48 

3,962 12 

68,349 78 
2,160 70 


$907 93 


$2,91S 22 
( 22,442 92 
1 3,299 83 
4,795 21 
3,061 51 
1,535 85 
1,765 49 
4,990 47 

4,00' 21 

69,93- 53 
1,980 72 


$809 86 


$3,000 00 

17,000 00 

4,000 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,250 00 
5,000 00 

4,500 00 

72,000 00 
2,250 00 


$4,915 20 
j 22,607 06 
( 2,826 97 
3,006 09 
2,914 94 
2,441 52 
1,436 4;l 
5,105 9» 

3,841 29 

67,954 79 
2,036 31 


$2,019 43 


1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1366 
1867 
1303 
1369 
1370 
1871 
1372 
1873 
1874 
.1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1830 
1381 






$437 80 




450 00 


CaUlo UM .rtotto 


241) 34 




350 00 




523 49 


Furniture (cabineta, shelving, fixluree, etc.) .... 


314 60 
385 64 




203 92 




504 IS 


Solarles 


507 72 


TraUBliorUilion, i)oatage, etc 


659 35 
996 63 


BllANCHES. 




Jaulaicu I'laiu. 








1,150 00 
1,472 44 
1,631 70 
2,000 00 










10,000 00 
$130,126 00 


■ 4,917 80 
3,288 73 
1,373 68 






















Fixturei), catalogues, printing, etc 




2,360 24 
2,505 35 
3,092 12 
3,260 31 
2,613 32 






2,934 12 
3,497 0:l 




tlll,oOO 00 


$121,396 36 


$1,833 36 


$129,351 38 


$1,414 37 


$120,000 00 


$124,200 91 


$907 93 


$115,000 00 


$120,729 96 


$809 86 


$115,000 00 


$119,086 58 


$2,019 43 


i 


$32,212 «1 







- liaaQcial aud librury 



* The appropriation for periodioil* is Included In tliat for books. 

Note. - The expendilures for hooks cover the cost of those chargeable to our Trust fuuds account, as welU^ those charged to the annual appropriations from the City, and also include sucli as are bought with the balances with our foreign agents at the "^'o** "»" ^'"^ ^"^"^^^^1 eiween March 15lh and M«y 
years now norahiaUy correspond, but it will happen that hills accruing subsequently to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year, payable April 1st, ia approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account, beginning nomhially May Ist. In this W8) DooKs aaaea 
Isl may be counted iaone year's growth, and paid for in the Huhsequent year's account. The cost of maiutaiaing branches after the first year makes part of tlie general Items of the several appropriations. 

Tlie money for books bought on uieounl of the Fellowf!* Atheiiteum is spent under the direction of the Book euuiinittee of llie Trustees of the Fellowes fund. 



Public Library. 



75 



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76 



City Document No. 97. 



APPEIS^DIX XXI. 



LIBRAEY SEEVICE. 



{April 30, 1881.) 



Name. 



Mellen Chamberlain . . 

James L. Whitney . . . . 
Jos6 F. Garret 



Louis F. Gray . . . 
Adelaide A. Nichols 
James L. Gethins . . 
Total 



?.v 



1878. 

1869. 
1875. 

1880. 
1868. 
1881. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian and Clerk of the Cor- 
poration 



PrinciiJal Assistant Librarian 

Register, and Curator of patents 
and engravings 



Librarian's Secretary 
Auditor and Cashier 
Librarian's Runner . 



a u 



2t 






James L. Whitney 
William H. Foster . . 



Jo86 F. Carret , 



Lindsay Swift . . . 
Elizabeth T. Reed , 



Roxanna M. Eastman . 



Frank C. Blaisdell . . . 
Annie C. Miller . . . . 

Maria C. Otis 

Card Catalogues. 
Harriet E. Green . 
Carrie K. Burnell . . . 
Ellen F. McCarthy . . 
Mary F. Osgood . . . . 
Harriet C. Blake . . . 
Patrick H. CarroU . . . 
Total 



1869. 
1860. 



1878. 
1873. 

1859. 

1876. 
1881. 
1880. 

1373. 

1S81. 
1872. 
1877. 
1880. 
1881. 



Principal of the department . . 

Cataloguer for Branch Libraries 
and Proof Reader 

Register, Curator of patents and 
engravings and Assistant . . 

Assistant 



Assistant and Cataloguer of 
Lower Hall and branch books 

Extra Assistant, and Cataloguer 
of U.S. documents 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent room, etc. 



Curator 

Curator of official card catalogue 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Runner . 



14 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



11 



Name. 



Habreet N. Pike . . 
Edith D. Fuller . . . 
Mary A. McG-rath . . 
Frederic W. Blaisdell 
Total 



1867. 
1879. 
1868. 
1880. 



Position, duties, etc. 



CMef Clerk . . 
Associate Clerk 
Assistant . . . 
Runner .... 



o « 



Appleton p. C. Griffin. 

William Canny 

WilUamRoflfe ...... 



George K. Merrill 
. Total 



1865. 
1880. 
1881. 

1880. 



Custodian 
Assistant 



Assistant in charge of repairs, 
etc., of books on the shelves . 



Arthur Mason Knapp 

Alice M. Poree 

Lydia F. Knowles . . . 
Thomas M. Whyte . . . 
Margaret Doyle .... 

Richard Ray 

W. MajTiard L. Young , 



Daniel Donovan . . 
Thomas H. O'Kane 
James Johnson . . . 
Harold Smith . . . 
Total 



1875. 
1866. 
1867. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1878. 

1880. 
1880. 
1881. 
ISSl. 



Librarian of Bates Hall . 

Assistant 

Delivery Clerk .... 
Receiving Clerk ..... 

Assistant 

Assistant .' 



Assistant in charge of deliveries 
to branches 



Runner 
Runner 
Runner 
Runner 



Edward Tiffany . . 
William F. Robinson . 
Mary A. Jenkins . . . 
Thomas H. Cummings 

Caroline E. J. Por6e . 

Sarah A. Mack . . . . 

Eliza J. Mack . . . . 

Annie M. Kennedy . . 



1878. 
1872. 
lS'/7. 
1879. 

1859. 
1863. 
1863. 
1869. 



Librarian of Lower Hall .... 
Clerk for registration and fines . 
Assistant Librarian 



Curator of Lower Hall card cata- 
logue 



Reading room Clerk .... 

Delivery desk 

Receiving desk 

Registration and As^stant . 



78 



City Document No. 97. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Ella R. Dillon . . . 
Ellen E. Bresnahan 
Annie G. Shea . . . 
Florence Richards . 
Margaret Clifford • . 
Mary A. Doyle . . . 
Mary Anderson . . 
Mary Sheridan . . . 
Louisa Twickler . . 
Edward Moore . . . 
Evening Service. 
T. P. Bennett . . . 



Robert B. Rosa . . 
Catherine McGrath , 
John J. Butler . . , 
Samuel Anderson . 
P. von Olker . . . . 
Harry Young . . , 
Benjamin F. Latz , 
Total 



13 o 



1876. 
1869. 
1874. 
1878. 
1877. 
1879. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1878. 

1879. 

1873. 
1873. 
1878. 
1880. 
1880. 
1880. 
1881. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Delivery desk and Assistant . . 
Assistant in reading room . . . 
Record of slips and Substitute . 
Return slips and Assistant . . . 

Desk Assistant 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Care of shelves 



( Registration Clerk and Sun- 
( day service 



Reading room . 
Receiving desk 
Runner ; . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Runner • . . . 
Runner . . • . 



s a 
o « 

Eh 



William E. Fobd . . . , 

John White , 

William G. Adams . , . , 

Timothy McCarthy . . . , 

Extra daily Assistants . 

Tot;il 



1858. 
1880. 
1879. 
1881. 



Janitor 

Porter 

Night Watchman 
Porter 



Andrew M. Blake 
Romeo Cervi .... 
P. B. Sanford . . . 
Edward M. Roe . . 
Wm. F. Sampson . 
Arthur Siguere , . . 
Mary E. Austen . . 



1870. 
1874. 
1879. 
1876. 
1880. 
1881. 
1874. 



Foreman . . . , 
Extra forwarder , 

Finisher . . . . < 

Pressman . . . . 

Forwarder . . i 

Forwarder . . , 

Forewoman . . , 



^Public Libeaey. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



79 



1 
a 


Name. 




Position, duties, etc. 


c « 
O 


o 

a « 
O 


•6 

o 

— "S* 
3 S 




Martha M. Wheeler . . . 
Mary G. Moriarty .... 

Sarah E. Bo wen 

Sarah Dumas 

Mary J. Morton 

Sam'l Macconnell .... 
Total 


1869. 
1875. 
1876. 
1881. 
1881. 
1877. 




1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
13 




















'1 












13 












Sarah C. Godbold . . . 

Mary R. Pray 

Alice M. Wing 

Mary E. Cathcart 

E. L. Lcnnon (entered ) 
June 13) \ 

AdeUa H. Ghen 

Eva D. Merrill 

Grace E. Hahn 

Ada J. McConnell .... 

George H. Hosea 

Total 


1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1881. 
1876. 
1879. 
1879. 
1881. 
1873. 


Librarian 


1 

1 
1 

1 


5 








< 




1 


Extra Assistant 


e 

1 

GO 


Extra Runner 












6^ 


Extra Runner 








1 
5 






10 














Alice J. Bragdon . . . 

Nora MeCarty 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Emogene C. Davis .... 

Idalene Sami^son 

Cora G. Hale 

Minnie E. Sampson . . . 

Mabel Pond 

Mary Watson 

Marguerite Watson .... 

Joseph Baker 

Total 


1872. 
1872. 
1872. 
1873. 
1877. 
1877. 
1877. 
1879. 
1873. 
1877. 
1872. 






5 






Receiving Clerk 

Registration Clerk 

Delivery Clerk 




g 


Extra Assistant 

Extra Assistant 








s 

^ 






Extra Rimner 








1 

6 






11 












< 


Sarah Bunker 

Mary Bradley 

Dora Puflfer 

Helen M.BeU 


1876. 
1876. 
1878. 

1878. 


Librarian 


1 
1 

1 
1 






1 






Reading room and registration 
Clerk 




1 


Assistant 





80 



City Document No.- 97. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Margaret E. Blood . 
Elizabeth E. Berry . 
Florence A. Vose . 
Emma McGowan . . 
Charles R. Curtis , . 
Total 



II 



1872. 
1877. 
1876. 
1880. 
1873. 



Poeition, duties, etc. 



Runner .... 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor .... 






-2 © 
^ r. 



Db. Cornelius S. Cart^e 

Annie E. Ehorle 

Mary P. Swain 

Annie C. Davis 

Aima S. Woodberry . . . 
Sarah E. McConnell . . . 
Susan E. Livermore . . . 
Abbie F. Klnmartin . . . 

Thomas E. Smith 

Total 



1870. 
1874. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1879. 
1879. 
1880. 
1874. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . , . 
Runner .... 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor .... 



Mabt E. Brock 
Mary F. Grailey 
Sara R. Brock . 
James M. Brock 
Total .... 



1875. 
1880. 
1880. 
1878. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor .... 



Mart G. Coffin . . . 
Mary J. Sheridan . . . 
Frances Willard Pike . 
Lucy Adelaide Watson , 
Edward Davenport . . . 
Total , 



1874. 
1875. 
1881. 
1881. 
1874. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor .... 



Grace A. De Bobgbs < 
Maude M. Morse . . , . 
Margaret A. Sheridan 
Charles H. Renter . . 
Mary Arkinson .... 
Total 



1880. 

1877. 
1875. 
1879. 
1881. 



Librarian . . 
Assistant . . 
Assistant . . 
Runner . . . 
Extra Runner 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



81 



a 

a 

a 
t. 




Name. 


T3§ 

a "» 


Position, duties, etc. 


Is 

a " 
O 

1 
1 


0) 

U 
a « 
O 

1 
1 
1 

.1 


o « 




Eliza R. Davis 

Anna J. Barton 

NelUe F.Riley 

George L. Hargraves . . . 

Harry F. Davis 

Timothy Johnson .... 
Total 


1877. 
1876. 
1878. 
1878. 
1879. 
1877. 








Assistant 














e 

c 
a 








Janitor 


1 
3 


e, 
















Mary A. Hill 

Samuel G. Bowthorpe . . 

Marion L. Woodward . . . 

Total 


1875. 
1878. 

1880. 


Custodian, Lower Mills .... 

Custodian, Roslindale 

Custodian, West Roxbury . . . 


1 
1 
1 
3 


— 


?, 















SUMMARY. 

Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, and 

Runner 

Catalogue department . 

Purchase and Entry department . 

Shelf department .... 

Bates Hall circulation department 

Lower Hall circulation department, day 

evening, and Sunday service 
Janitor's department 
Bindery 

East Boston branch 
South Boston branch 
Roxbury branch . 
Charlestown branch 
Brighton branch . 
Dorchester branch 
South End branch 
Jamaica Plain branch 
Deliveries 



Totals 



Grand total 



5 

13 

4 

4 

11 

18 
4 

13 
5 
6 
6 
5 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

110 
33 

143 



Central Library. 
72 regulars. 
9 extras. 

81 in all. 



5 
5 
3 

4 

U 
2 
1 
3 



33 



Branches. 
38 regulars. 
24 extras. 

62 in all. 



AGENTS. 



Messrs. Lee and Shepard, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triibner and Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New Yorh and Paris. 

The Deuerlich ' sche Buchhandlung, Gottingen. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Senor Don Juan F. Riaiio, Iladrid. 



APPENDIX XXn. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY 





ItATR»t nAI.I.. 


Lower Hali,. 


East Boston Branch. 






aotjT) 


Boston 


Branch. 


UoXBURY Branch.! 




I 


g 








S 

S 


s 


IS 


I 






s 


s 

I 


s 


t 

z 


\ 




2 


• 


e 

M 


» 


1 


1 




l> 


a 




s 




t 


5 

fri 




1 


e 




Not on BhelvpH 


8.612 


3.6(>3 


3,222 


3,205 


4,110 


4.611 


3,746 


7,001 


-.610 


8,063 


8.592 


8.344 


7,182 


6,491 


2,012 


2.022 


1,820 


1,831 


174 


2.188 


2.114 


2.396 


2,068 


2.047 


1,852 


&5 

1% 


2.560 


1,860 


2,441 


2.8.10 


3,300 


2.991 


3,139 


3,122 


3,061 


ilflhfuffounti In he 




















































\l 




















I.illt 


1,070 


•J.Iiil 


1,091 


2,003 


2.436- 


2.607 


2,2»4 


6,254 


6,121 


6,808 


7.134 


7,431 


0,376 


5,508 


1.720 


1.811 


1,618 


1.609 


12 


1.893 


l.snl 


2,101 


1.870 


2.932 


1,739 


\^i 


2.417 


1.770 


2.283 


2.577 


3.017 


2.810 


2,984 


2,899 


2,815 


At llu' blndi'lli^" 


(KIT 


(120 


022 


707 


1,142 


1,303 


704 


622 


718 


081 


018 


216 


203 


283 


137 


73 


44 


37 


20 


67 


41 


l.i5 


141 


72 


88 


1 ^1 


90 


65 


144 


lOS 


253 


70 


77 


128 


41 


DtlicrwiBo apcoinilfil r..i- . 


r.yii 


M2 


f.73 


462 


403 


064 


633 


048 


636 


446 


448 


666 


512 


541 


146 


133 


153 


178 


132 


220 


271 


128 


50 


'43 


26 


ll ^ 


..51 


34 


8 


98 


20 


103 


74 


87 


108 


Nol«ccount«lfor 


40 


30 


36 


33 


30 


37 


35 


117 


136 


60 


02 


132 


91 


99 




5 


6 


7 


10 


2 


1 


12 


I 






iji 


1 









4 


2 


4 


8 














ClIARI.RHTOWN RRANrll. 


Brighton Branch. 


Dorchester Branch. 


S. 


E. Branch. 


,T. P. Branch. 


T0TA„„ 




I 


s 




« 


1 


■M 


i 


e 
<• 

n 


I 


X 






e 




e 






i 


e 


ge 


5 

1.756 


e 

1,704 


1,376 


a 

£ 

H 

1,344 


1 
1,320 


i 

1.201 


6 

10,098 


I 

s 




6 


• 


e 




Not on sholvee 


1,<36 


2.200 


2,002 


2.034 


1,071 


1.867 


2.01- 




728 


707 


820 


804 


680 


772 


1.835 


1.362 


1,341 


1.363 


1,458 


1.220 


22,876 


22,613 


22,676 


23,004 


26,681 


23,067 


Of thtfx! fonnil in he 






































































1.471 


2,010 


1,010 


1.777 


l.SOO 


1.632 


1,701 




591 


510 


620 


606 


022 


640 


1.662 


1.260 


1.261 


1.238 


1,2M 


1.121 


1,607 


1.673 


1,073 


1,236 


1,270 


1,234 


14.810 


18,816 


19,130 


18.068 


10,308 


22,473 


20.097 


At llif bI»(!iTlc« 


06 


03 




02 


03 


166 


133 




02 


91 


116 


41 


33 


34 


151 


52 


67 


84 


78 


64 


164 


122 


287 


04 


34 


40 


2,121 


2,200 


1,887 


2,096 


1,920 


2,212 


1.772 


OtluTwiflf iiccomittd for . 


ei 


130 


101 


105 


77 


68 


02 




64 


90 


83 


98 


25 


08 


21 


39 


13 


41 


95 


46 


17 


6 


4 


12 


13 


13 


1.017 


1,560 


1.468 


1,477 


1,610 


1,747 


1.020 


Not accounted for 










, 




^ 


3 


oi 




I 








1 


2 






1 




17 


3 


12 






4 


244 


204 


128 


135 


200 


149 


150 






















1 








1 























• ThlB examlnntion took place whilp the Librarj' waa closed for repaln 



tInc-IudeH FellowfB Alhenajum fxan^lnfttion. 



Public Library. 



83 



appe:nt)ix XXIII. 



WORK IN THE LIBRARY BINDERY. 



Character of 
Work. 


H 
t» 

H 


« 

1 
« 


If 
t' 
1 
« 

ac 

H 


H 


6 




on 
t» 

H 


9 
l» 

1 
» 

aci 

H 


© 

9 

at) 

H 


H 
QC 
1 

© 

ao 

H 


Bates Hall books 
bound aud finished 


2,219 


2,008 


2,635 


2.613 


3,223 


4,759 


4,155 


4,272 


3,958 


5,839 


Books of the Lower 
Hall and branches 


1,015 


744 


753 


1,508 


7,766 


8,743 


11,129 


10,084 


7,606 


2,752 


Books repaired . . 


396 


430 


492 


444 


959 


873 


949 


1,371 


1,397 


1,201 


Catalogues wired 
and covered for 
public use in 
Lower Hall and 
branches .... 


490 


437 


287 


143' 














Maps dissected aud 
mounted .... 


47 


28 


91 

109 
r 
















Map volumes and 
shelf-lists mounted 


212 


165 


493 


820 


2,712 


958 


3,014 


2,145 


3,205 


Pamphlet cases . . 


546 


64 


24 1 
















Portfolios 


5 


8 


8J 


. 














Removable covers 
for catalogues and 
for paper-covered 
books 


266 


263 


450 


1,520 


1,287 


1,271 


1,469 


1,970 


1,946 


1,032 


Maps mounted, 
bound, and bor- 
dered 


54 


41 


8 
















Hours of miscel- 
laneous work . . 


1,842 


2,297 


1,437 


2,486 


2,183 


2,586 


2,778 


2,615 


2,205 


1,959 



During the first eight mouths of the year 
in outside binderies. 



0,354 Lower Hall aud branch books were bound 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

llllllillilllllii , 

3 9999 06314 632 6