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T H 1 11 T I E T H 



ANNUAL EEPORT. 



188S 



[Document 92 — 1882.] 



CITY OF iilPl BOSTON. 




THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THH 

Trustees of the Public Library. 

1882. 



The Trustees have the honor to present to the City Council 
their thhlieth annual report, it being the fourth made under 
their Act of Incorporation, and containing details of the con- 
dition of the Library fur the year ending the thirtieth of 
April last. 

The reports of the Examining Committee and of the Libra- 
rian are embraced in this document. 

The vahie of a collection of books, established for the 
benefit of the whole community, is determined by the com- 
pleteness of its gatherings in the various departments of hu- 
man science and learning no less than in belles-lettres and 
popular literature. The unprecedented rapidity with which 
this institution has developed during thirty years, and its 
widely extended ramifications in every branch of human 
knowledge contained in books, in the opinion of the Trustees 
rendered it expedient to have special examination made by 
experts of the collections now in the Library, of books rehiting 
to certain specified and important branches of knowledge. 
Beginning with the present year, the Committee was arranged, 
with this object in view, to contain the same number of mem- 
bers as served in the previous year. It was constituted of 



2 City Document No. 92. 

John Noble, Esq., the Rev. Leigh ton Parks, John C. Phillips, 
Esq., Col. Homer B. Sprague, and the Rev. Julius H. 
Ward, for the general examination ; and for the special sub- 
jects. Prof. J. D. Runkle, of the Institute of Technology, 
for mathematics, Prof. O. W. Holmes, Jr., for jurispru- 
dence, Horace Howard Furness, Esq., for the Shakespearian 
collection, and Prof. Thos. S. Perry, for French and Ger- 
man literature; the Rev. James Freeman Clarke, D.D., of 
the Board of Trustees, serving as chairman of the whole 
committee. Other subjects for examination were proposed, 
but, in the limited time available for the purpose, competent 
scholars could not be found who were willing to undertake 
the labor. The advantages already gained by the institution 
will encourage future boards of trustees to continue the 
system. If the Library cannot be made in all respects as 
full of books important to every seeker after knowledge as 
the British Museum or the National Library at Paris, it can 
yet contain, in proportion to its means of purchase, a suffi- 
cient number of intrinsically impoi-tant volumes to satisfy 
fairly a very extended class of students and readers, and to 
continue to constitute it the best general working library in 
America. 

The Rev. Dr. Clarke sailed for Europe after the commit- 
tee had laid out their work, and liefore it was completed. It 
will be remembered that the chairman of the conmiittee takes 
no part in their discussions, but sim[)ly lends his assistance in 
obtaining such facts as are wanted, and their conclusions pro- 
ceed from their own free and uninfluenced judgment. 

The report of the committee in charge of the general ex- 
amination of the Library needs no special comment l)eyond 
the desire of the Trustees that it should be carefully read. 
Attention should be particularly directed to their remarks 
upon the great and vital question of the Library — its removal 
to a safe and suitable edifice. Their luifettered position 
gives them the largest power of scrutiny into the details of 
its administration, and it is important to the welfare of the 
Librar}^ that such honest examination should l)e made. 
While agreeing with the objects of the members of the com- 
mittee who offer a minority report, and approving their 
earnest desire to benefit the popular reading, the Trustees do 
not deem all the measures recommended by them as practi- 
cable. 

The Trustees propose to increase their efforts to secure 
good reading, with no immoral tendency, for both young and 
old, and they are always happy to receive suggestions in aid 
of this object, especially in regard to those novels "which 
have passed their first youth," now no longer generally read, 



Public Library. 3 

but of which a very few might possibly do harm. The 
Book Committee will give their paiticular attention to this 
point during the coming year. 

Of the report made by experts, but one is suitable for the 
press, — that of Mr. Furness, — which follows this report. 
The other gentlemen have furnished valuable lists of new and 
old books, necessary in their judgment to strengthen the col- 
lections of the Library upon the various subjects submitted 
to their consideration, the most of which must be obtained 
through the services of the agents of the Library residing 
abroad. The shortness of time allowed for examination only 
permitted Prof. Perry to make investigation of the German 
collection, and he will continue his work upon the French 
at convenient seasons through the year, so as to be ready 
for the next annual examination. It is gratifying to find, 
from the inspection of these various lists, that man}^ of 
the books principally needed by the Library were published 
before it was founded, and that the wants were moderate in 
the more necessary modern publications ; thus showing the 
care and attention which have been bestowed on such 
widely extended details, by successive administrations of the 
Library from its beginning, and eflectually answering queries 
occasionally proposed as to its system of purchase. 



The Library and its Work for the Year. 

The summary of the extent of the Library collections, and 
their use for the past year, is herewith presented. 

The aggregate number of volumes embraced in the Bates 
Hall collection is 254,431; in the Lower Hall, 37,186; in 
the branches, 112,604, making a total of 404,221, a net in- 
crease for the year of 13,231) volumes, or 3| per cent. 

The whole number of days on which the libraries were 
open was 304, with the exception of the East Boston Branch, 
whijch was closed 25 days, the Dorchester, 6 days, each for 
purposes of alterations and repairs ; and the South End 
Branch 85 days, required for its transfer and rearrangement 
in the new quarters provided for it in the basement of the 
Public Latin and English High School-house, with the en- 
trance on JNlontgomery street. 

The use of books during the year shows a decrease of 
24,528 volumes taken from the shelves, amounting, in 
1880-81, to 1,065,081, and 1881-82 to 1,040,553, as shown 
in the following table, from which the collections in the base- 
ment of the Boylston-street building (duplicates, etc., not 
circulating), amounting to 16,695, are excluded : — 



City Document No 92. 



Name of Library. 



r^ower Hall .... 
East Boston .... 
South Boston . . . 

Roxbury 

Charlestown .... 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South End ...'.. 
Jamaica Plain . . . 
West Roxbuiy . . . 

Bates Plall 

Fellowes Athenccum 



No. of Vols. 
April 30, 

1881. 



38,073 

10,815 

9,984 

12,702 

23,202 

13,087 

10,597 

9,507 

1 8,238 

j 3,069 

139,274 

229,005 

7,118 



375,397 



In Use, 
1880-81. 



266,863 
101,118 
132,858 
94,743 
80,822 
28,177 
65,183 
73,962 

50,108 



883,839 

165,373 

15,869 



1,065,081 



No. of Vols. 

April 30, 

1882. 



37,186 

11,038 

10,499 

13,281 

24,060 

13,139 

11,332 

9,720 

8,602 

3,070 



141,927 

237,736 

7,863 



387,-526 



In Use, 
1881-82. 



250,792 
95,974 

129,486 
91,697 
87,319 
27,444 
54,485 
71,738 

49,722 



858,555 
167,322 
14,676 



1,040,553 



The aggregate number of days upon which the three 
branches at East Boston, the South End, and Dorchester, 
were closed, as previously enumerated, was IIG. On the 
basis of the average circulation of these libraries for the days 
they were open, the total deliveries would have exceeded 
those of the previous 3^ear. 

With reaard to the numl)er of books lost, a still more 
gratifying statement can be made than was possilne m any 
previous year. Last year only one volume was unaccounted 
for in every 12,104 loaned, while for the present year only 
one is missing from every 10,008 circulated. 65 i)ooks are 
gone, — 54 volumes from the Boylston-street libraries, and 
the remaining 11 from the branches. The branch libraries at 
East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain, 
with an aggregate circulation of 329,667 volumes, did not 
lose a single volume, — a fact probably without a parallel in 
the history of free lending lil)raries. 

The delivery of periodicals at the Central Library and five 
branches shows a record of 492,090, as against 520,672 of 
the previous year. The Boylston-street Reading-room fur- 
nished its readers with 374,246 periodicals. If suitable ac- 
commodations in room and seata Avere provided, this arm of 
the library service would be much more eifective. 

The whole number of volumes sent to the bindery in the 
building was 13,015. These were contributed from the 



Public Library. 5 

branches as well as from the Central Library, and the 
character of the work done was entirely satisfactory. 

Special reports from the librarians of Bates Hall, the Lower 
Hall, and all the branches, together with those of the chief 
of the Catalogue Department, follow the report of the princi- 
pal librarian. It will be seen from these documents that the 
institution has lost nothing in efficiency during the past year ; 
and that the efforts of its officials, in the direction of better 
reading, have been marked by gratifying success. 

The Trustees acknowledge with gratitude the continued 
liberality of J. Ingersoll Bowditch, Esq., in another gift of 
five hundred dollars, for the benefit of the Bowditch Mathe- 
matical Library. They have also received from an anony- 
mous friend one hundred dollars, to be expended in certain 
books of permanent value for the South Boston branch ; and 
a contril)ution of sixty-four dollars, contributed by citizens of 
West Roxbury for an addition to the permanent collection in 
that parish presented to the Public Library by its incorpo- 
rators. 

The tables affixed to the annual report of the Trustees 
give in minute detail the oj^erations of the various depart- 
ments of the institution for tiie present and past j^ears, and a 
careful examination of their contents will give a more satis- 
factory understanding of the uses of the books and the work 
done under the organization than is practicable in any gen- 
eral statement. 

A New Library Building. 

Last year the Trustees were authorized by the City Coun- 
cil, in consultation with its Committee on the Library, to em- 
ploy the services of the City Architect to make plans for a 
new library edifice on the Dartmouth-street lot presented by 
the Commonwealth to the city for this purpose. 

It was soon seen that the room was insufficient for the 
prospective demands of the institution, and the City Council 
authorized the purchase of a sufficient number of lots on St. 
James street, to make the proposed site nearly square, pro- 
vided an arrangement could be made with Harvard Univer- 
sity whereby the passage-way between Boylston and St. 
James streets could be closed. Although the city made an 
appropriation for the purpose far above the taxable valuation 
of the estates on St. James street, the negotiations with the 
owners have failed. 

In pursuance of the same object the State Legislature, at 
its last session, empowered the city to take those estates. 
The necessary steps, however, have not yet been taken by 
the city. 



6 City Document No. 92. 

As work must be begun upon the lot on the corner of 
Boylston and Dartmouth streets before the 1st of May next, 
to hold the property, the necessity of some prompt action on 
the part of the City Government is apparent. Outline phms 
of a Library building have been prepared and are to be sub- 
mitted to the Council, in answer to their special call upon the 
Trustees for information with regard to the possibility of 
utilizing the Latin and High School buildings, and in explana- 
tion of the forms of structure deemed expedient. The sketch- 
plans have shown that the construction of an edifice suited to 
the special exigencies of this Library, and conformed to the 
present knowledge of the best service, where books may be 
read and studied within the building, or may be loaned for 
home use, requires long forethought and careful preparation. 
It is, certainly, for the present and future interest of the 
city that the question of site should receive the earliest prac- 
ticable solution from its government. 

In closing another year of prosperity the Trustees cannot 
relieve themselves of the continued anxiety for the safety of 
the great Bates Hall Library so long as it remains in a build- 
ing not iire-proof, and exposed to destruction from its dan- 
gerous surroundings. 

WILLIAM W. GREENOUGH, 
SAMUEL A. B. ABBOTT, 
GEORGE B. CHASE, 
HENRY W. HAYNES, 
SOLOMON B. STEBBINS. 

Boston, June 26, 1882. 



Public Library. 7 

Report of Horace Howard Furness, Esq., on the Shake- 
spearian Collection. 

Mellen Chamberlain, Esq., Librarian Public Library, 
Boston : — 

Dear Sir, -^ In compliance with your request, I have ex- 
amined, with all the thoroughness at my command, the ad- 
mirable catalogue of "Shakespeare "and "Shakespeariana" in 
the Public Library. 

Among the departments composing a Shakespearian library 
first in importance stand the Quartos. 

These Quartos, as you know, are separate plays, many of 
them published during Shakespeare's lifetime, and are thus 
familiarly termed to distinguish them from the collected 
edition of all his plays, issued after his death, in folio. They 
were printed by enterprising, or, as we Americans would 
say, " smart " publishers, who wished to reap the profit arising 
from a demand to have in print a play highly popular on the 
stage. As Shakespeare, like many another poet of his time, 
was a regular salaried playwright to a theatre, his work, 
when done, belonged to the theatre, and, like the honorable 
man that he was, he never thought he had a right to any other 
profit from his toil than that which he received from the 
theatre ; his plays were written to be seen and heard, not to 
be read, and, after they were performed, belonged to the thea- 
tre, not to him. But this honesty on his part, "indiflerence 
to his own genius" it has been termed by those who forget the 
circumstances under which he wrote, could not prevent an 
unscrupulous printer from obtaining a copy of a popular 
play either by taking it down in shorthand during a per- 
formance, or by bribing poverty-stricken actors to recite 
their roles in private, or by getting access to the prompter's 
MS. It is not hard to see that copies thus " stolen and sur- 
reptitious," as they were stigmatized by Shakespeare's fellow- 
actors, must come very near to giving us the performance as 
heard by Shakespeare's audience under Shakespeare's own 
supervision. The workmanship of these Quartos, originally 
sold at a sixpence each, is of the poorest ; they are printed, 
as a general rule, with battered type, on cheap paper, which 
was l)y no means calculated long to withstand the Puritanic 
storm which set in shortly after Shakespeare's death. Hence 
their excessive scarceness nowadays, and the high prices 
which in modern times have been paid for them. Mere 
scarceness, however, is a fictitious value, — a value for wdiich 
one ma}^ be pardoned for indulging a feeling somewhat akin 
to contempt. It is, therefore, not for their scarceness that 
these Quartos are now so eagerly sought after, but for 



8 City Docuivient No. 92. 

the aid which on every page they give us in studying the 
text of Shakespeare. Some of the best editors of Shake- 
speare assert that the Quartos are our highest authority, — 
higher even than the folio, which Shakespeare's personal 
friends assure us was printed directly from his MS. 

A complete set of these Quartos is contained- in no library, 
public or private, in the world, and never will be ; but, other 
things being equal, it is clear that that library which contains 
the most will be the best. Here in America the Boston 
Librar}^ with its twenty-two copies, stands easily the first. 
There are, I believe, but two other public lil)raries in this 
country, which own any copies at all, viz., the Lenox, in 
New York, with sixteen, and the University of Virginia, 
with seven. In a pecuniary point of view, it is scarcely too 
much to say that these twenty-two diminutive volumes in the 
Boston Library are worth more than a quarter of all the rest 
of the Shakespearian collection put together, including the 
folios. 

Volumes so indispensable to the student, as these Quartos, 
have not remained inaccessible to the ])ublic. They have 
been reprinted, with more or less exactness ; notal)ly, under 
the supervision of Mr. Halliwcll, by Mr. E. W. Ashbee, 
who, for the purpose of lithography, painfully and labo- 
riously traced every letter on every page. For study, under 
almost all circumstances, these lithographic fac-similes are 
equivalent to the originals. At any rate, they are the nearest 
approach that can now be had. It is to be regretted that the 
Boston Library does not possess a complete set of them. 
Of the forty-seven v(dumes lithographed by Mr. Ashbee, the 
Boston Library owns but eight. 

There were many separate plays of Shakespeare published 
in quarto during the seventeenth century other th;m the 
twenty-two above referred to, but the year 1623 divides the 
greater from the less, in value ; in that year appeared the 
folio, which being printed, as Avas asserted, from Shakes- 
peare's own MS., no quartoafter that date, \vith, perhaps, one 
exception, viz., Othello, 1(530, can claim an}' authority inde- 
pendent of the folio. AVhere these later quartos are not 
mere reprints of the earlier, they are known as the " Player's 
Quartos," and were often mere adaptations of Shakespeare's 
plays by Dryden, Tate, and others. In this department, 
which has its value, the Barton Collection is unusually com- 
plete. 

Seven years after Shakespeare's death his personal friends 
and fellow-actors, Hemnige and Condell, issued, in 1(523, 
the first collected edition of his plays, the editio princrjjs, and 
the coveted possession of all libraries, public and private. 



Public Library. 9 

But little sympathy can be felt with those who estimate the 
value of a volume by its size, or hy its margin, or by some 
typographical defect. It is sufficient to be assured, as with 
the folio in the Barton Collection, that every leaf is genu- 
ine, and as clean as a well-used existence of two hundred and 
sixty years can leave it. It would be difficult to name a 
volume second to this about whose typographictd qualities 
a greater difference of opiuion exists. On one point, how- 
ever, all critics are agreed, and that is, that the folio is 
absolutely necessary to a study of Shakespeare. Abuse it 
as we will we are dependent on it as our sole authority for 
seventeen of the plays, for these plays there are no quartos 
to aid us. The Boston Library possesses an admirable copy 
of the hrst folio, and of its subsequent impressions in 1632, 
1664, aud 1(185. 

Of the modern editions of the Collected Plays, beginning 
with Rowe, in 1709, the list is tolerably complete ; it is more 
complete in recent than in older editions. Among the 
more noticeable omissions are the following : Pope's Second 
Edition, in which both text and notes were modified by 
Theobald's Criticisms in his "Shakespeare Restored ;"i Han- 
mer's edition in octavo, in which his variations from the 
received text are indicated ; a complete set of the Variorum 
editions (especially that of 1798,^ often termed "Stevens's 
Own"), no two of which are exactly alike. Although you 
have a recent issue, in a single volume, of Bowdler's edition, 
you do not own the original edition, in four volumes, in 1807, 
nor the fuller text, in ten volumes, in 1818 ; it is an expur- 
gated "Fannly edition," and sufficiently notorious to have 
created the term "Bowdlerized." 

As an offset to these omissions you are rich in the posses- 
sion of such scarce copies as the first American edition, 
published in Philadelphia at the close of the last century, 
and the first Boston edition, pul)lished at the beginning of 
this ; and, best and rarest of all, three volumes of Sir 
Walter Scott's edition, supposed to be the only three vol- 
umes of that edition in existence. 

The remainder of the English portion, viz., the Spurious 
Plays, the Selections, etc., is excellent, and throughout the 
" Shakespeariana," with its illustrations, portraits, medals, etc. , 
the Shakespearian book-hunter recognizes treasures, intrinsi- 
cally worthless perhaps, but which are excessively prized 
for their rarity, — such books as Malone's Second Appendix, 
whereof the substance was afterward incorporated in his 
edition ; Dr. John Hall's " Select Observations," etc., wherein 

' We Lave the 1st and 3d editions. ^Have Vol. 8 only. 



10 City Document No. 92. 

is recorded the ailments and cures of innumerable Jacks and 
Joans throughout the shire, but never a word of the fatal 
illness of the author's own father-in-law — Shakespeare ; 
Holt's Remarks on "The Tempest ; " Finnegan's "Notes," etc., 
etc. Among the medals you would be rich indeed if you 
could count two diflferent cents struck in Pennsylvania in the 
3'ear 1770 or thereabouts, for one is undated, each .bearing 
the head of Shakespeare aud his name as the legend. 

Unquestionably in this department alone of " Shakespeari- 
ana" an opportunity is afforded for study such as is held out 
by no other public institution in America. Perhaps its most 
valuable portion, certaiuly the portion most difficult to 
replace, although it is not one which costs the collector the 
most money, is the number of articles from reviews, ephem- 
eral literature, and even from the daily press ; to collect 
these requires constant vigilance and promptitude. It is not 
so much from the editions of Shakespeare, however sumpt- 
uous or costly, but from these waifs and strays over the 
length and breadth of the land that an estimate may be 
formed of the deep and ever-active interest taken by the 
whole world in Shakespeare. An English scholar has lately 
collected into a quarto volume of three hundred and sixty 
pages the allusions to Shakespeare to be found in the litera- 
ture of the first hundred years after the poet's death. The 
allusions here, in America, during only one year, at the pres- 
ent time, would fill such a volume, and it would be to the 
Boston Library that the collector would have to repair for 
his material. 

There are onl}'^ three public libraries in England, which, 
in their Shakespearian departments, are superior to that in 
Boston, — the British Museum, the Bodleian, and Trinity 
College, Cambridge. 

Here, in the United States, the Boston Pul)lic Library is 
easily the first ; its wealth of Quartos will long keep it so, but 
in all other departments it will fall behind unless it be kept 
up on the same liberal, comprehensive plan pursued by its 
chief contributor, Mr. Barton. 

Pardon me if I urge upon you the propriety of complet- 
ing your set of Ashbee's fac-similes, and especially of pro- 
curing the originals whenever any opportunity offers. AVith 
so fine a start as the Boston Public Library now has, no 
chance should be lost of maintaining the lead. 

I remain, sir, very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 
HORACE HOWARD FURNESS. 

Philadelphia, May 16, 1882. 



Public Library. 11 



[B.] 
EEPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

To the Trustees of the Public Library : — 

Gentlemen, — Your Examining- Committee have foimr] the 
Library in a healthy condition, and are much impressed with 
its increasing tacilities for both schoLirly and popular use. 
We have first been led to consider the Library in its bearing 
as a whole. The Trustees know better than the general pub- 
lic its value and advantages in diffusing popular culture and 
in furnishing assistance to scholars ; but your Committee, 
recognizing their position as informers to the public as well 
as interpreters to the Trustees of the will of the people, 
deem it worth while to emphasize the position of the Library 
as a public educational institution. It occupies a unique 
position in Boston, and, in fact, in New England. It is one 
of the distinguishing features of the city. Our local antiq- 
uitit^s will always be a centre of attraction, and our unrivalled 
seaboard will more and more bring pilgrims from the South, 
the West, and the middle section of the country ; but not 
the edifices of the Pilgrim Fathers, nor the rock-bound 
coast on which they landed, are more important in the 
thought of the nation than the fact that Boston possesses 
the largest and best working library in America; the only 
library in the United States wdiere Shakespeare and the 
dramatists contemporary with him can be studied, and, since 
the destruction of the Birmingham Library, the fourth 
Shakespearian library in the world. Its fame is national ; 
it is also European. It renders a great service to the people 
of Boston. It is their perpetual high school, the great dem- 
ocratic centre for the difiusion of universal culture. Its 
relations to the people are not likely to be ignored, and they 
cannot be too thorcjughly worked out. We are only beginning 
to understand the popular benefits of great libraries. But 
the scholarly use of our Public Library may be overlooked 
by -its proper guardians. 

If the traditions of culture are to be maintained here ; if 
Boston is to continue to be one of the literary centres of 
America ; if it is tc gather thousands of special students 
from the country at large, and even if its secular interests 
are considered from the higher point of view, the Library 
has a close relation to the vital interests of the city. It 
makes us known abroad ; it is a chief means of popular cult- 
ure at home. There is not a feature on either its popular or 



12 City Document No. 92. 

scholarly side which is not related directly or indirectly to 
things which are fondly cherished by our best citizens ; and 
the foresight which led to its foundation, less than thirty 
years ago, and the munificence of its j^early public endow- 
ments and of its private bequests, give abundant evidence 
that our people have grown to some conception of its impor- 
tance and usefulness. Tiie authors of America look to it 
as the quarter in which they may be assisted in their investi- 
gations, and thousands of students are yearly attracted to 
Boston l)ecuuse the Library furnishes better facilities for their 
researches and studies than can elsewhere be obtained. This 
reputation is increasing, and it is something unique and 
deserved. It helps to maintain the ancient reputation of the 
city as a literary centre, and is the nucleus about which all the 
interests of the highest culture cluster, and near which they 
must always remain. The Bostonian of to-day and of the 
future may be stripped, in the race of business and in the con- 
test for monopoly, of much that constitutes the solid strength 
of affairs ; but this great Library is like our granite hills. It 
has been ])uilt into the life of the people, and is here to rsmain. 
Its Barton collection alone is enough to give it a high posi- 
tion in the libraries of the world ; but this is only a single 
feature in its equipment, — an aside, so to speak, — not its 
equipment for constant service to scholars and to the peo- 
ple. The collection of its works on the beautiful arts is 
only surpassed by the collections of Europe, and its accumu- 
lation of books on the various industrial pursuits which con- 
stitute the business life of New Enuland is such that it 
might in that department alone be called the chief industrial 
libraiy in the United States. These are leading depart- 
ments ; but the historian, the botanist, the editor, the statis- 
tician, the scholar in belles-lettres, and the specialist in almost 
any branch of literature, finds in it the works without which 
he cannot pursue the studies he has in hand. Not only is 
the Library singularly complete in these respects, but its 
discovered deficiencies are constantly in the way of being 
made up, and the best works in every department of litera- 
ture, and in all the languages in which books are printed, are 
constantly added to its shelves. 'J'he more the Connnittee 
have studied the Library and entered into its working plans 
the more have they been impressed with the wisdom of its 
management in these directions and with the clear intelligence 
with which its great purposes as a national educator have 
been kept in mind. 

But there are drawbacks so serious and so possibl)'' fatal to 
its aim that at this time they must be considered in full. 
This great collection, an investment in books alone of from 



Public Library. 13 

one to two million dollars, is crowded into a building which, 
with all its precautions against fire, is not in any sense fire- 
proof, and can never be made secure against the possible rav- 
ages of a conflagrution that may occur at any moment in the 
tinder-boxes that surround it. It borders upon a section 
where the danger from fire is always imminent, and its col- 
lection of books is such that, to a great extent, neither time 
nor money could replace them. It runs greater risks than 
would be willingly incurred by private owners, even with large 
insurance, and is, to a certain degree, beyond the pale of pro- 
tection from insurance. The need is ui-gent for a building 
that shall be absolutely fire-proof, in which the non-circnlating 
books of the Library may be placed, and where the proper 
facilities for their use may be obtained. The risk from tire 
is such that it can be said that no proper security at present 
exists, and the first and imperative duty of the City Council 
seems to be to protect the institution, which to-day is the 
chief glory of Boston, from its greatest and most formidable 
enemy. This can only be done by a new building, and the 
Committee are emphatic that it should be a building erected 
solely for the purposes of the Library. In addition to the 
point of security, which is the thing to be first thought of, the 
necessity of larger facilities for the classification and arrange- 
ment of books, for the proper display and use of works 
on art, for the seclusion necessary to scholars and authors 
who are pursuing investigations within the Library, and for 
the natural groAvth of its collections are different but equally 
imperative reasons for the transfer of the scholars' portion of 
the Library to a building where safety may be secured, and 
where the books may be profitably consulted. At present 
neither the popular nor the scholarly use of the Library is 
satisfactor}^ for the want of room, and no suitable develop- 
ment of the purposes for which it was created is possible, 
unless the present building is devoted to the general reading 
public, and the non-circulating part of the Library is placed 
where scholars can have the necessary arrangements for con- 
sulting it. The new building cannot long be postponed, and 
the time has arrived when both security and necessity urge 
its speedy erection ; and yet, important as it is for all the in- 
terests of the Library to have a suitable edifice for the pres- 
ervation of its best books, the need is not so urgent thtit it 
can justif}^ any blunder in construction, or any short-sighted- 
ness in the provision for its future interests. 

The Committee gladly recognize the increased facilities 
now furnished in Bates Hall for obtaining books, and the aid 
given by assistants to those who found difficulty in consult- 
ing the card catalogue. Such a system of reference to 



14 City Document No. 92. 

books, perhaps the best that has yet been devised, will 
always have its ditficulties ; but it is hoped that Mr. Whit- 
ney's key to the catalogue, as soon as published, will re- 
move many of them. The quarterly bulletins should be bet- 
ter known to the public ; their lists of new books and of the 
additions to the Library for the quarter, whether of new or 
old publications, with the bibliographical notes on current 
topics of discussion, are of great value, both to general 
readers and special students. Mr. Knapp's book of notes 
and queries is a useful record of the helps and hindrances 
which are inevitable in the use of such a collection of books, 
and might be used even more than it is. And the Committee 
feel impelled to say that the pul)lic do not always distinguish, 
in their demands for service in obtaining and using the books, 
between what is possil)le and what is impossible. The Library 
assistance seems to be excellent, and every attention is paid to 
those who desire to take out or consult the books ; but if the 
rules as to the taking of books and the enforcement of fines 
were not observed, the efficiency of the Library service, and 
also of the service of the pul)lic, Avould be greatly impaired. 
The connection of the bindery with the Library seems to 
justify itself in many ways, especially in keeping the books 
within the building, and so within constant reach, and in the 
uniformity and thoroughness of the work, which is done at a 
reasonable price. In regard to the salaries, it may be said 
that from that of the Librarian to that of the humblest assist- 
ant, whether in the Central Lil>rary or in the branches, it is 
below that of the officials and teachers in the pul)lic schools 
by perhaps one-fourth, while the requirements are as exact- 
ing and the hours longer, and that from this cause the Com- 
mittee have been mad^ aware of difficulties existing here and 
there in securing such service as the Library needs. It is 
believed that a larger alloAvance for salaries w^ould be wise, 
and that it would result in advantage to the Library. 

The Committee cannot too strongly indorse the popular 
management, whether in the Lower Hall or in the branches, 
where the circulation, for the most part, is of a similar char- 
acter. There is never much danger that the older persons 
who frequent the Library shall not be efficiently served ; the 
difficulty is lower dow^n and with the younger generation ; 
and the improvement of this popular work, under the direc- 
tion of the Liljrarian of the Low^er Hall, has marked an 
epoch in the usefulness of the Library to the masses of the 
people. This is to be noted at all hours of the day, but it 
is seen especially in the evening hours, when the working 
people of both sexes are most free to come for books. 



Public Library. 15 

According to the statements of those who used to resort to 
the Library in the evening four years ago, the confusion, un- 
satistactoriness and coarseness of the entire evening manage- 
ment finall}' Avent so far that persons of any refinement, 
especially women, ceased to visit the Library iat all, and 
their places were too often supplied by a very questionable 
class. The disorder outside had its eftect upon the force 
inside, and their work was not properl}^ performed. At 
these evening hours as well as by day a complete change has 
now been effected. Persons of an humble class are encour- 
aged to make their wants known; everv assistance is ren- 
dered them in seeking information ; and at the same time 
persons of more culture are no longer repelled, as they used 
to be, by the low tone of the Hall ; and the same influences 
have raised the tone and service of the younger assistants in 
the Library. Nothing is now left undone in the way of 
helping young and old, both to obtain suitable books and to 
w^ork their way up to the best kinds of reading. The assist- 
ants have attempted, with great success, to suggest books to 
boys and girls who did not know what books to call for, and 
to guide them in the selection when this was advisable. This 
service has largely reduced the reading of worthless books. 
It has helped young persons to discriminate in the choice of 
suitable reading. It has called forth in many instances the 
gratitude of parents. It has been a useful adjunct to the 
public school. It has done more to improve and lift up the 
popular use of the Library than any other agency that has yet 
been employed. To some extent, what has been done in the 
Central Library has been done in the ])ranches. Less fiction 
is now read than formerly, and the Library has given im- 
portant help in the education of the young without departing 
from its leoitimate functions. Tlie Committee gladly recog- 
nize and commend the efforts of the Librarian and' his as- 
sistants to improve the moral character of the books circu- 
lated and their watchfulness as to the tone of those which 
are intended for popular use. It is their wise policy to ex- 
clude books against which serious doubts may be raised, but 
not to withhold those against which the general reading pub- 
lic brings no charge. It is believed that the vigilance in this 
respect is quite equal to, if not in excess of, what can be re- 
quired where a library is to supply the reading for the aver- 
age human family. It is also Avithin our knowledge that the 
older books for popular circulation are under constant in- 
spection, and that whenever volumes are found (and the in- 
stances are few) to which exceptions can be justly taken, 
they are quietly laid aside. This plan has been eflectively 



16 City Document No. 92. 

carried out, and it can now be said with truth that no im- 
moral book, and no book of even a doubtful character, is 
ever knowingly allowed to go out from the Lower Hall or 
the branches. Whatever books of this sort are in the 
Library arc placed under restrictions which forbid their 
general circulation. This, it seems to us, is as far as the 
officers of the Librarj' can go, and their wise, discreet, and 
temperate action is entitled to great praise. A portion of 
the Committee felt that still more stringent measures for re- 
stricting: the circuhition of doubtful books and of works of 
fiction were necessary, but the majority were ot the opuiion 
that the Trustees and the Librarian are thoroughly consci- 
entious in the matter and are doing all that can be done in the 
way of examining new books and withdrawing those against 
which excei)tions can reasonably be taken. It is not possi- 
ble, however, to be too careful, and in order that still greater 
safeguards may be emploj'^ed, it is suggested that minors 
under fifteen years of age should have colored cards, and that 
considerable oversight should be given to the character of 
the fiction supplied to the youthful public, every advantage 
being taken to induce them to read more instructive works. 
The advisory plan, now in operation throughout the popular 
departments of the Library, which assists the people Avithout 
abridging their liberties, seems to meet the public needs bet- 
ter than anything that has yet been proposed, and should be 
pursued with the steady aim of carrying readers up to the 
higher grade of books. In this connection, while the Com- 
mittee have no instructions to give, they recognize with 
much satisfaction the attempts heretofore made to bring the 
pupils of the public schools into closer relations Avith the 
Librarj^ and in such ways that they may hereafter become 
its intelligent patrons. The present management of the 
Library is in the direction of broadening its local usefulness 
to the people, and in the way of efforts which have much to 
do Avith public and general eductition. 

The Connnittee have pushed inquiries in many directions, 
and have had every facility furnished them for this purpose. 
They close their labors with a profound conviction that the 
Public Lil)rary, both in its intermd administration and in its 
general aim, is fulfilling the purposes for Avhich it Avas 
founded. It is easy to pick flaAvs here and there, or to con- 
ceive that a different way of doing things would in some 
things be an improvement ; but, these points aside, it is be- 
lieved that the management of the Public Library is as hon- 
est, efficient, and disinterested, as men Avho have a large and 
noble sense of Avhat belongs to a great institution of public 



Public Library. 17 

and national education, can make it. It sustains no sine- 
cures, and the enthusiasm of liard work prevails with its en- 
tire force. 

JULIUS H. WARD, 
THOMAS S. PERRY, 
JOHN C. PHILLIPS, 
JOHN NOBLE. 

Boston, June 13, 1882. 

To the Trustees of the Boston Public Library: — 

Gentlemen, — We, the undersigned, mem]>ers of the "Ex- 
amining Committee," concurring most heartily in tlie Report 
of the Examining Committee for 1882, excepting that portion 
which refers to the " Fiction and Juvenile " departments of 
the Library, respectfully beg to call your attention to one or 
two evils, in the midst of great good, which we believe your 
wisdom will remedy. 

I. In the hurried visit paid by the Committee to the dif- 
ferent Branches, little or nothing could be learned of the 
quality of the books in circulation ; yet certain books, be- 
lieved to be of an objectionable nature, were found, and, on 
being called to the attention of the Librarian, were imme- 
diately withdrawn. At four of the Branch Libraries the 
Committee learned that l)ooks had been complained of by 
parents as improper, and that they had been placed in the 
"Inferno," or " Starred." From these facts, the undersigned 
feel that they are justified in concluding that there is a class 
(whether large or small they do not know) of books to which 
the attention of the Trustees should be called. 

II. In order that this work may he thoroughly done, the 
undersigned would respectfully suggest that the Trustees 
should engage as many persons as in their judgment would 
suffice to do the work within a reasonable time, to examine 
the Juvenile and Fiction Departments of the Library and 
report to them : — 

(1.) All books of a positively immoral character (if any) ; 

(2.) All books tending to lower the moral tone of the 
reader ; and 

(3.) All books tending to encourage a spirit of irreverence 
concerning religion and virtue. 

III. (1.) These books (if any such are found) having been 
removed, the undersigned would suggest that the Trustees 
should designate such books as are, in their judgment, suited 
to the use of minors, and should issue cards to minors, who 
should be allowed to take out only such books as have been 
approved by the Trustees. 



18 City Document No. 92. 

(2.) That, in addition to the careful examination now 
made at the Central Library, the Librarians of the various 
Branches be instructed to examine all books sent to them, in 
order that, if any objectionable book should have escaped the 
notice of the general examiner, the mistake may be rectitied 
before the book is put into circulation. 

(3.) That whenever a book is "starred" in one of the 
Branches it be immediately "starred" in all others. 

IV. The undersigned, with great deference to the judg- 
ment of the Trustees, would venture to express the opinion 
that, considering the vast amount of moral and intellectual 
trash published year b}' year, the Library is not justitied in 
circulating such an enormous quantity of liction. 

In conclusion, the undersigned would beg to express their 
hearty concurrence in the opinion of their colleagues that 
the Library is steadily improving in usefulness ; but they feel 
it their bounden duty to call attention to that evil which, if 
not checked, may make the Library a means of corrupting 
the moral sense of the community, believing that the Trustees 
are both willing and able to correct it. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

HOMER B. SPRAGUE, 
LEIGHTON PARKS. 

Boston, July 5, 1882. 

Postscript. 

Since the Examining Committee decided upon their Report, 
two of their colleagues have presented a Minority Report, 
which calls for a supplementary note. This report empha- 
sizes a supposed evil in the circulation of tiction and of juve- 
nile books, and urges the removal of hooks which " tend to 
encourage a spirit of irreverence concerning religion and 
virtue," by a mixed board of examiners. With considerable 
knowledge of the management of the Public Library, the 
Committee do not find any such condition of aflairs as is in- 
timated in the Minority Report, nor do they they think that 
it belongs to the Trustees to relieve parents of a proper care 
for the reading of their children. Further than this, they 
feel called upon to state positively and emphatically that, 
with proper allowance for the diversity of tastes and opinions 
which must be recognized in a public institution, the Trustees 
not only act up to the limit of their official responsilfility that 
the Library shall not become " a means of corrupting the moral 
sense of the community," but exercise the most watchful 
care over the purchase of books. This vigiiance, however, 
cannot be absolutely perfect. Under any system an occa- 



Public Library. 19 

sional mistake will be made, no matter what the Board may 
be, or who may exercise the critical judgment. But when the 
attention of the Trustees was called to ihis subject, some two 
years ago, by a Memorial addressed to the City Council, they 
caused a thorough examination of all the libraries to be 
made, and all inculpated books to be withdrawn for exam- 
ination, and the Examining Committee have reason to think 
that this examination was as searching and efficient as the 
nature of the case allowed. The call for a new and mixed 
board of outside examiners is believed to be superfluous. 
The objectionable books, if any still linger in the Library, are 
of limited circulation and essentially out of use, and the 
newer books, which constitute the chief part of the present 
circulation, are always carefully inspected before they are 
added to the catalogue. Besides this, it is not asked of the 
Trustees and officials of the Library that they shall turn Pu- 
ritans in their literary tastes when public sentiment fails to 
justify such action. They are the servants of the general 
public, not the censors of their morals or manners. The pur- 
chase of works of fiction has been diminished for several 
years, partly in consequence of an apparent improvement of 
the public taste, and is replaced l)y works of biography, 
history, natural science, and general information ; and, so far 
as is consistent with their duty as servants of the public, the 
assistant librarians are doing what they can to guide readers 
to the better class of books. This is as far as they can prop- 
erly go. The Committee would also add that one of the two 
gentlemen whose names are affixed to the Minority Report 
has been absent from the country for several weeks, and did 
not hear the testimony concerning the point in question, 
which was presented at their later meetings. 

JULIUS H. WARD, 
THOMAS S. PERRY, 
JOHN C. PHILLIPS, 
JOHN NOBLE. 



20 City Document No. 92. 

[C] 
LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees : — 

Herewith I submit my fourth annual report. Neither in 
reviewing the work of the Library for the year just closed, 
nor in forecasting that of the year which opens, do I see 
reason for calling the attention of the Trustees to its general 
policy or management for the purpose of recommending 
change. Its history is little more than a record of the de- 
velopment of the ideas of the early Trustees and friends of 
the institution. Their views were so comprehensive and 
far-sighted that the institution has not outgrown them, and 
so wise that it has found no room to depart from them. 
This is apparent in the extraordinary growth of the Library 
and its conceded usefulness, as well as in its ready adapta- 
tion to the new fields opened by the territorial enlargement 
of the city and the increase of its population. 

I took occasion, in my last annual report, to state some- 
wdiat in detail such facts as the public presumably might 
wish to know in respect to Library administration, — the se- 
lection and purchase of books, the agencies by which they 
were made accessible to the pu1)lic, the moans employed by 
the Trustees to ensure their usefulness to the patrons of 
the Library, and to influence the reading of young people 
without attempting to exercise any absolute control over 
them, except such as is implied in Avithholding books of 
pernicious tendencies. There has been no change in these 
respects during the past year, except in giving greater 
efficiency to administration. 

In presenting to the Trustees the work of the Library for 
the last year, I shall follow the plan adopted in my third 
report, and this year extended to the branches, of allowing 
the heads of the several departments to speak for themselves, 
not l\y presenting their reports in full, — as I would do if 
space allowed, — but by making such extracts as seemed to 
me of most interest and value. Presenting the reports in 
the order of library work, the first is that of the 

Ordering Department. 

STATISTICS. 

Books ordered 

recommended 

received by purchase ..... 

gift 

exchange 



1880-1. 


1881-2. 


8,407 


11,366 


1,662 


2,223 


14,490 


15,833 


2,727 


5,291 


315 


158 



Public Library. 21 

Some attention has been given during the year to a catalogue for our 
own use of serial publications received by the Library, including peri- 
odicals, official publications of countries, states, towns, learned 
societies, etc. This now includes about 3,000 titles. 

According to the suggestion of the Librarian, this department has 
been partially relieved of the examination which precedes all purchases. 
Several labor-saving devices have also been adopted, which tend to 
lighten the work of the department and decrease its expenses. 

For other statistics relating to our work, we would respectfully refer 
to Appendixes II., VI., IX., and XII. 

HARRIET N. PIKE. 
EDITH D. FULLER. 

Catalogue Department. 

The following report of Mr. Whitney, the chief of the 
Catalogue Department, will show the work of that branch of 
the service since the last annual report : — 

During the past year a catalogue of the Dorchester Branch Library 
has been published in a volume of 229 pages, in double columns, and 
containing the titles of 11,246 volumes. The South End Branch 
Library, having been moved into the English High School building, 
on Montgomery Street, it was found to be necessary to rearrange and 
renumber the books, and to prepare a catalogue, the only one in use 
hitherto having been a temporary list in manuscript. At this time a 
new shelf-list was made, and a new tem23orary catalogue, and also a 
card catalogue by authors and subjects. This card catalogue is now ia 
course of revision for the printer, and will be published in a volume 
during the current year. On its completion, all of the eight branches 
of the Public Library will have catalogues in printed books, five of 
them issued since 1879. \Vith the growth of the Branch Libraries, 
the preparation of each new catalogue becomes more laborious and ex- 
pensive. They are, therefore, made in as simple and condensed a form 
as possible. 

The Catalogue of books in foreign languages in the Lower Hall of 
the Central Library being out of jji-int, a new edition has been pub- 
lished, and also a Supplementary catalogue of works in the arts and 
sciences in the same department of the Library. That readers might 
be invited to the larger collection of books in the Upper Hall, an ex- 
amination was made of the scientific books in that Hall, and the titles 
of many, such as are generally regarded as the best, were added to this 
catalogue of the Lower Hall. There are few departments of the Library 
in which the reader needs help in the selection of books so much as in 
this, and it is believed that this catalogue will serve a good purpose. 

In the Bulletins of the Library, which contain the titles of new books 
and lists of works on special subjects, improvements have been made in 
the type used and in other ways. Within a year a check list has been 
begun of the A'olumes in the Library composed of pamplilets. Brief 
contents of each volume are given, and the cards are arranged numeri- 
cally, by the shelf-numbers. If one of these composite volumes is lost 
this list will tell what pamphlets it contained. 



Barton Catalogue. 

The work upon the second portion of the Barton catalogue has been 
pressed with all the vigor consistent with the other duties of the officers 
having it in charge. It is expected that the revision of the cards, now 



22 City Document No. 92. 

going on, will be finished and the printing of the catalogue begun 
during the current year. 

Card Catalogue. 

The method adopted for printing within the building the Card Cata- 
logue of the Central Library has been found to work successful!}', the 
cards giving the titles in a compact and legible form. The contract at 
first made with the printer called for twenty-four titles a day. This 
number was increased to thirty-six, and afterwards to forty-eight. 
Arrangements have recently been made for a still larger number, the 
endeavor being to print seventy-two titles a day. These include the 
titles of pamphlets as well as books, and not only those of recent addi- 
tions, but of works for some time in the Library, which, for various 
reasons, need to be re-catalogued. 

In the revision of the Card Catalogue, while more has been accom- 
plished than during any year since the work was undertaisen, still those 
in charge are desirous of doing much more in future. This, however, 
seems very difficult, by reason of the pressure of other work. 

The Card Catalogue in use by the officers of the Library was found 
to need closer attention, and a year ago a new assistant was ajjpointed, 
whose time is now divided between the Catalogue and the Ordering 
departments. Under the care of this assistant this catalogue has been 
very much improved. 

Catalogue Statistics. 

The work of the Catalogue Department for the year may be summed 
up approximately as follows : — 

Volumes catalogued (new books, and including work on the 

South End Branch Library) 24,080 

Pamphlets catalogued 4,695 

New volumes of serials catalogued ..... 1,980 

Vols, of serials re-catalogiied . ...... 1,830 

Number of cards added to the catalogues of the Central 
Library and Branches (not including those made in 
work on the Barton catalogue and in cataloguing the 

South End Branch Library) 81,384 

Cards added to the Bates Hall catalogue in process of revision 

of that catalogue (included in the preceding item)' . 16,472 

Readers assisted in the Bates HalP 9,672 

Readers assisted in the Lower Hall of the Central- Libraiy . 43,928 

During the past year the efficiency of the department has been less 
affected than usual by the absence of assistants from sickness and other 
causes. 



Shelf Department. 

The Custodian of the Shelves, in the following report, 
alludes to a difficult}' already quite serious, and one which 
will grow rapidly with the increase of the Lil)rary : the lack 
of suitable shelf-room to preserve the classification of books. 



1 This falls considerably sliort of the actual number. Much of this work it has not been 
found convenient to count. 

* Includes only the readers who are assisted by the three catalogue clerks, and not those 
who apply to the keepers of Bates Hall. 



Public Library. 23 

The only remedy seems to be a new building, which shall 
avoid, in its construction, the difficulties insuperable in the 
existing edifice. 

The details of the results obtained by the examination of the Library 
and its branches are given in Appendix XXI. One hundred and 
seventy-three books were found missing, divided among the departments 
as follows : — Bates Hall, 28; Lower Hall, 127; Roxbary branch, 6; 
Charlestown branch, 1 ; Dorchester branch, 2 ; South End branch, 7 ; 
Jamaica Plain branch, 2. The East Boston, South Boston, and Brightoa 
branches report everything accounted for. From the Bates Hall refer- 
ence desk five books have disappeared. In examining the Bates Hall* 
department a special effort has been made this year to discover where 
deficiencies exist in sets, and although I have kept a record of those for 
only a portion of the time, yet my memoranda show that one hundred 
and twenty-five difi:"erent works were found incomj)lete, wanting in. 
some cases only one volume, and in other instances publications covei*- 
ing several years were lacking. Some one hundred and fifty odd 
volumes have been added as an outcome of this search. In the Bates 
Hall, 8,744: volumes ; in the Lower Hall, 1,164 new books, 250 dupli- 
cates, and 1,162 supplies, have been located during the year. The 
classification and other information regarding the books added are pre- 
sented in the proper ap])endices. Some embarrassment has been felt 
in locating the books in their classifications, owing to the limited 
available shelf-room in many sections of the Library. 

In the State document department it has been necessary to resort to 
the awkward expedient of doubling up the books on the shelves, and 
we have been forced to place the later Congressional documents in a 
room apart from the general collection. 

The employment of an assistant to dust and repair books has proved 
of great advantage to their neat and orderly appearance on the shelves, 
and has undoubtedly aided in the preservation of the bindings. 

APPLETON P. C. GRIFFIN, 

Custodian of the Shelves. 



Bates Hall Library. 

The figures given by Mr. Knapp, the librarian of Bates 
Hall, show tliat the use of this fine collection is steadily 
increasing, and that the character of the books called for 
improves from year to year. 

The past year has, on the whole, been a very satisfactory one, the 
circulation having advanced from 165,000 in 1881 to 167,000 in the year 
just closed. Though this gain is not so large as in some years, yet it is 
sufficient, when we consider the character of the works consulted, to show 
that the taste for good reading has not, to any marked degree, abated. 
Of the 167,000 volumes applied for, more than 20,000 were on American 
history, biography, etc. ; about the same number on English. Of 
works illustrating the professions, there were issued 19,000 on theology, 
15,000 on the mechanical and other useful arts, 14,000 on the fine arts, 
li,000 on medicine, 6,000 on classics. The remainder were distributed 
among various arts, languages, and countries, an exceedingly small 
proportion being fiction, whether English or foreign. 

The demands made by readers for assistance have kept pace with the 
increased circulation. In meeting these demands, 1 have been assisted 
by Messrs. Garret and Griffin (one of whom is always present when my 



24 City Document No. 92. 

duties call me elsewhere), and especially by the four la.dies who have 
desks in Bates Hall. Thus far this force has been suflScient to meet all 
demands. Among readers aided should be included those who have 
recourse to the book of " Notes and Queries," which is in great favor 
as a means of obtaining information which cannot be given at sight. 
One valuable feature of the book is, that information reaches the lai'ge 
number of persons who regularly look through its pages. 

I would repeat a suggestion, made more than once in former reports, 
that in many cases it would be good policy to pi'ocure duplicate copies 
of works in certain branches, one to be reserved for hall use, the other 
to circulate freely. In this way one copy would be preserved perma- 
nently for reference ; the other could be read leisurely at home. This 
••would often prevent disappointment on the part of students who wish 
to verify facts or quotations, but find that the work desired is in the 
hands of some reader. 

ARTHUR MASON KNAPP, 

Librarian of Bates Hall. 

Lower Hall. 

The classified list of reading for the year deserves notice, based, as 
• it is, upon figures varying so little as 25.^,554 compared with 25.5,642 
for the year preceding. The great gain of nearly three per cent, in arts 
and sciences may be traced in general to the marked growth of public 
interest in this direction, and immediately to the large addition of such 
books made a year ago, accompanied by tlie sujjplementary catalogue 
of May, 18S1. A gain of about one and one-third per cent, in class 7 — 
poetry, drama, and miscellanies — arises, probably, from an increased 
use of works upon the English language and literature, from a per- 
ceptibly larger reading of Shakespeare, and from our better present 
supply of collections of pieces for recitation in schools and elsewhere, — 
ademand always active, and at times difficult to meet. The publication 
of many poijular books of travel for young persons accounts, in jDart, 
for the gain in that division, while in that of foreign languages, our 
recent German books and accompanying list may be supposed to account 
for the gain noticeal)le of about one-half of one per cent. There is no 
question that the circle of readers of this nationality can be extended 
here by a fair supply of recent popular books in their language. 

I think it may be claimed with perfeet confidence that each of the 
last few years has raised the average standard of the Lower Hall col- 
lection of books. Poor ones have been worn or weeded out, and their 
places supplied by (jthers of better character and more ijermanent 
value. Did space permit, notice might be taken of change or develop- 
ment of taste in readers here, which is not without interest. In the 
use of books upon or allied to the graphic arts, a decided increase can 
be seen, while the latterly somewhat neglected "fairy book" seems to 
be regaining its old charm for juvenile readers, — a result due in part, 
perhaps, to the jJi'aiseworthy etibrts of Mr. H. C. Lodge. 

Never has it been so apparent as in the past year that the Public 
Library and the schools of Boston are forming a still closer connection, 
and that the teachers of the latter are influencing those under their care 
to avail themselves freely of our resources in books to supplement the 
regular text-books in use. Recognizing this, we have labored to make 
our own equipment complete, so that almost every department of 
elementary study should be supplied with books of interest and attrac- 
tion, calculated to diversify without interfering with the severer study 
of the school. I have found no part of my duty more agreeable than 
the frequent aid to the use of these which I have myself been called 
upon to give, and beg leave to state, in conclusion, some especial lines 
of assistance which lier intimate personal acquaintance with those en- 



Public Library. 25 

gaged in educational work has enabled Miss Jenkins, the Assistant 
I^ibrarian of the Hall, to render. The Woman's Educational Union was 
furnished by her with lists of our books to illustrate their stated winter 
course of lectures; and to a number of boys of the Brimmer and Eliot 
schools reo;ular weekly assistance and advice have been given by her 
in connection with their studies in English and American history. The 
new Kindergarten Library, for teachers of that grade, has been largely 
stocked with books, examined at her suggestion by its librarian, and 
frequent conference with and assistance to teachers, as well as aid to 
pupils of schools by furnishing books treating of subjects given out for 
English composition, constitute part of her work in this hall's important 
mission in connection with the schools. 

EDWARD TIFFANY, 

Librarian of the Lower Hall. 



Report of the Lower Hall Catalogue Department. 

Perhaps the most marked feature in this year's work is the depart- 
ment's steady growth in popular favor. The people have not been slow 
to recognize the benefits it oftered them. An evening assistant has 
been appointed, and, at all hours of tlie day and evening, old and 
young, cultured and uncultured, alike have crowded round the cata- 
logue desk to ask for help in their choice of books and assistance in the 
use of catalogues. 

From May 1, 1881, to May 1, 1882, a period of eleven working 
months [during July no regular account was kept], a total of 48,9_'8 
readers have been assisted at the catalogue desk. This gives a monthly 
average of 4,000 readers, — a larger number than for anj- previous year 
in the history of the department. Of this number, 16,000 were readers 
assisted on special topics, while upwards of 9,000 wei-e juveniles. To 
calculate exactly the amount of work represented b}^ these figures is, 
of course, almost impossible. The questions range through the whole 
scale of literature, art, science, politics, trade, and religion; and they 
frequently entail an almost endless search to be satisfactorily answered. 
They stand for much more, however, than the same figures stood for in 
last year's report. 

There is a marked increase in the use of Bates Hall books ; a fact 
distinctly traceable in part, at least, to this deijartment's influence. 
There is also a steady increase in the use of Lower Hall reference books. 
As our plan of direction embraced the pointing out not only of ?r/i«< <o 
read, but also hoxv to read, we have been frequently led, in this connec- 
tion, to suggest the intelligent use of reference books, and the conse- 
quent increase in the use of such books has been very decided. 

These are, perhaps, the two most tangible outward eff"ects resulting 
from our labors this year. But there is another side to this work of 
assisting readers, the efl:'ects of which cannot be measured by any out- 
ward rule of statistics. No one, for instance, can measure the influence 
of a wise counsel that opens up treasures of taste and culture to the 
man of limited opportunities. No one can estimate the value of a good 
thought that awakens a buried intellect to life and action. And no one 
can gauge the efl'ect of a book sowing in a young mind the seeds of 
wisdom, disinterestedness, and truth. The extent of such an influence 
is practically illimitable. 

But, ai)art from these considerations, the practical aim of this depart- 
ment is, in brief, to be useful to all readers, and useful in particular to 
those who are in earnest. Yet the problem of direction with us is 
not, as is sometimes aimounced, how best can be diminished the num- 
ber of fiction readers? But. how best can be formed habits of mental 
and moral culture whether with or without the aid of fiction ? How far 



26 City Document No. 92. 

our efforts, with other influences, have been successful in this direction 
can be learned from the statistics of the Lower Hall circulation. These 
figures show a marked increase in the use of the arts and sciences, 
poetry, travels, and the foreign language alcoves. And it is Avorthj^ of 
remark that this improvement does not represent merel}- a temporary 
advantage, but it stands for a positive growth in the tastes and habits of 
our readers. We have proceeded on the jjlan that a taste for good 
reading is the only door to true culture, and that perseverance is the key 
to success. To this end we have sought to bring readers regularly, at 
fixed intervals, to the Library. This ensures their perseverance besides 
giving us a chance to know them individually. From the personal 
relations thus established, we are better able to quicken their interest 
in good books and to stimulate their love for reading. With their per- 
severance assured and a taste for reading formed, or even in process of 
formation, there is an absolute certainty of the success of direction, — a 
certainty of tlie attainment of a degree of culture, which persevering 
years in the use of catalogues or in indiscriminate reading will never 
give. In this sense there is»a wide career of usefulness in store for the 
Lower Hall Catalogue Department. 

T. H. CUMMINGS, 

Ciirator of the Lower Hall Catalogue. 

The following reports from the librarians of branches pre- 
sent many interestini>- details, to which I need not ask special 
attention. These libraries are in good order, and w^ell 
e(iuii)ped for their work. Those having charge of them are 
alive to their obligations to meet the just wishes of the 
public, and to promote in all practicable ways the use of the 
books under their care. Catalogues of all the branches, ex- 
cept Brighton and the South End, have been printed since 
1876, and, with the bulletins and supplemental card cata- 
logues, enable readers easily to learn what books these libra- 
ries contain. Considerable attention has been given by the 
librarians to assisting readers, after the plan which has 
proved so successful in the Lower Hall. 

The new catalogue of the South End branch Avill be printed 
in the coming autumn. The removal of this branch to its 
new rooms in the English High and Latin School building 
has l)een followed by a very large increase in the circulation 
of books. I took occasion, after the removal was made, to 
report to the Trustees the special services of Mr. Whitney 
and his staff in the catalogue department, and of ]Mrs. De 
Borges and her assistants, by which the transfer was effected, 
the books arranged, numbered, and catalogued with such ex- 
pedition that the public were deprived of the use of the 
books for a time much shorter than is usual in such cases. 

Since my last report a new delivery system has been 
opened at Mattapan, under the charge of Harriet L. Towner. 
Jiooms in the Hancock School-house, at the North End, are 
now being fitted for a delivery station and reading-room in 
that section of the city. The City Council has made the ap- 



Public Library. 27 

propriation needed for this purpose, and the School Com- 
mittee have manifested their interest in the enterprise by 
promptly placing the needed roams at the disposition of the 
Trustees. I now expect that these rooms — well supplied 
with books of reference, histories, travels, popular works, 
and periodicals — will be opened about the first of August. 



South Bostox Branch. 

The number of volumes circulated at this branch was 3,372 less than 
the year previous. This decrease in number is more than compensated 
for by the higher character of the volumes circulated. I desire to testify 
to tlie eflflcacy of the plan recommended by the management for per- 
sonal assistance and advice to readers generally, and to those engaged 
in the investigation of special subjects. I have found that readers, in 
most instances, have appreciated my efforts and the generous spirit of 
the plan, and have expressed much satisfaction with its practical work- 
ings. Routine labor has preventetl me during the past year from 
devoting as much time as I had hoped to give to this most satisfactory 
and enjoyable part of library work, but the management having, with 
characteristic promptness, placed it in my power to remedy the defect 
in some measure, I promise myself the pleasure of enlarging my use- 
fulness in more' fully carrying out their suggestions in the coming year. 

The books which have been added to this branch have generally 
been those highly calculated to interest, improve, and elevate. Con- 
sulting the wants and studying the interests of our readers, I have 
recommended a class of books which, almost without exception, have 
met with approval, and my recommendations have been promptly 
honored by the Committee. Our readers, generally, have expressed 
their appreciation of the improved character of the books added ; and 
here I wish to acknowledge the valuable assistance rendered by the 
editor of our local paper, who has gratuitously loaned the use of its 
columns each week to the interests of the Library and the public, in 
publishing lists of new books. By this means information of what the 
Library has had to offer to readers has been carried directly into tiie 
home circle, and to the notice of many who might otherwise have 
remained in ignorance of the daily additions to our stock of reading- 
matter. 

I have undertaken the preparation of a series of "Hints for Progres- 
sive Reading" in History, Biography, Travel, Natural History, etc., 
designed especially for the young, and to lead readers^ by easy steps, 
from elementar}' works or compendiums, to the more detailed and 
complete publications in each class. These " Hints" the editor of our 
weekly paper has kindly offered to publish from time to time as they 
are prepared, and to furnish me with printed lists of each class for 
distribution as occasion offers, and it is hoped that they may prove 
useful and instructive to many wjio might not otherwise adopt any 
regular method or system of reading. 

A friend of the branch — a citizen of South Boston — has presented 
this department with his check, to be filled for an amount not exceeding 
$100, for the purchase of books of reference and three additional period- 
icals for our reading-room. So far as possible, those pertaining to the 
useful arts will be selected under this donation, as it is judged that of the 
books most needed they will be of the most benefit to the greatest num- 
ber of frequenters of our rooms. 

I desire, in closing, to bear witness to the valuable work which manj'^ 
of the teachers of our public schools, and others, are constantly doing in 



28 City Document No. 92. 

directing the minds and tastes for reading of those under their charge. 
Hardly a day passes that the results for good are not seen by me in this 
department, and it is both encouraging and lielpful. 

ALICE J. BRAGDON, 

Librarian. 

RoxBURY Branch and Fellowes Athen^um. 

Our circulation, in point of numbers, is not equal to last year, but it 
has been more satisfactory and of a higher quality. 

During the year our intercourse with the public has been almost 
uniformly pleasant. In all prt)fessions there will always be the carping 
few, — these, as a rule, represent those who seek the last new magazine 
or popular fiction, and their refrain is, " Where do the new books go?" 
Although this has trying aspects, while we are conscious of aljsolute 
imi)artiality, we can only reply that it is not strange they do not suc- 
ceed when nearly 13,0UU cards have been delivered, and there are not 
enough new books in the market to meet such a demand. 

We have tried to meet all with a spirit of accommodation and cheer- 
ful acquiescence ; but, with the long hours, the tired brain and body of 
the peison at the desk often has the last pound laid by those who 
should be grateful for the great blessing the Library furnishes, so fully 
and so freely. To offset- this, we have repeated testimony from 
students, from the home-study teacliers, and many wiio are hunting 
their specialties, of the pleasure they have taken with the books ; a 
note from a teacher of English Literature, in which she says, "One of 
my regrets at leaving lioxbury is for your available literature." 

We would express gratitude for our harmonious connection with the 
Central Library. This is wortliy of mention, because the library system 
is on such a phin, all branches depending on the head centre for sup- 
plies, ailvice, and general cooperation, that, in a sense, one great family 
is represented, and any discord would create a lack of uselulness and 
progress in the cause which interests us all, as the strongest powers 
lor advance umst have unity of purpose and perfect harmony. 

SARAH BUNKER, 

Librarian. 

Charlestown Branch. 

I herewith submit a report of the present condition of the Charles- 
town Branch Library. 

Founded in 1861 by the liberality of the city of Charlestown, and the 
fostering care of the City Council, it had grown from a collection of 
4,842 volumes to' 10, U73" volumes by the first of January, 1874, when, 
by act of Legislature, the city of Charlestown was united with the city 
of Boston, and its library became a branch of the Boston Public Library. 

Being one of the eight branches of the great Boston Public Library, 
we are receiving, from time to time, our lair share of books from the 
city appropriation. In addition to this, the Harris Fund is fast increas- 
ing our stock of standard works. .Since this Fund became available, 
we have added to the Harris Library 1,(516 volumes, which now num- 
bers 2,620 volumes in all. This collection is made up largely of His- 
tory, Biography, Travel, Miscellanea, and works in foreign languages; 
luul is becoming more and more appreciated by readers. 

Since tiie publication of our new catalogue two years ago, and the 
distribution throughout this district of a circular calling attention to the 
Library, the circulation has been much increased. In 187'J-SU it was 
74,748 volumes; in the year following it was 80,822 volumes; and in 
the year just closed it has been 87,ol'J volumes. Notwithstanding these 



Public Libkart. 29 

efforts to increase the circulation, the locality of this branch is incon- 
venient, by reason of distance, for most residents in Wards 3 and 4. A 
delivery station, situated towards the northern extremity of the penin- 
sula, would surely call forth more applicants for the privileges of the 
Library. 

Our reading-room is an important adjunct in the uses of the Library. 
During the past year we have had 27,165 readers, of whom 5,270 were 
ladies. The Higli-School pupils derive great benefit in consulting our 
works of reference. 

A monthly supply of books is loaned for use at the Marine Barracks, 
in the Navy Yard, under the guidance of the Chaplain of the Yard, — a 
privilege which is highly appreciated bj' the men. The naval officers 
and their families, on this station, have been allowed the privileges of 
the Library ever since its foundation. 

CORNELIUS S. CARTfiE, 



Librarian. 



Brighton Branch. 



The use of the books for the year show a decrease of 733 volumes, 
amounting in 1880-81 to 28,177, and in 1881-2 to 27,444. There is a 
slight increase in the Hall use ; 277 was the largest daily use, 89 the 
daily average. The examination of the alcoves shows no books un- 
accounted for. None have disappeared from reading-room nor hall. I 
can assign no cause for decrease in circulation, unless it may be that 
the population is vacillating. Again, those living in the extreme parts 
of the district will use the J^ibrary for a time, then cease, considering 
the distance too long to traverse. The circulation of works of 
fiction has been three per cent, less during the past year, in favor of 
biography, travel, history, and other works. For the five succeeding 
years there was not much change ; but since 1875 there has been a 
decrease of eleven per cent., with an increase in circulation of 5,602. I 
think the teachers have a great infiuence upon the young people, aa 
their constant aim is to lead the mind of the young into a more elevat- 
ing class of reading. I can otter nothing by way of suggestion, except 
to say that there is a class of people whose constant call is for the new 
fiction, and by them I often hear the complaint we are not as well sup- 
plied as the other branches. No other fault ever reached me. The 
building contains every facility to circulate a large number of books 
expeditiously, if we have the demand. 

MARY E. BROCK, 

Librarian. 

Dorchester Branch. 

This Branch Library was closed for alterations for one week in 
March, making the number of days open, during the year, 298. The 
circulation for the -year is, therefore, less than the previous year. 

On December 27, 1881, the Mattapan delivery was opened and began 
drawing books from our branch. We have now two deliveries, and 
there seems to be a need of more than one copy of a popular book to 
sujjply the demand. This complaint is often made. 

The number of books in our branch is 10,812. 692 have been added 
during the past year. Our circulation has averaged 144 books a day. 

We feel the need of larger quarters at our branch, and a separate 
reading-room would be of great advantage. 

MARY G. COFFIN, 

- Librarian. 



30 City Document No. 92. 



South End Branch. 



In consequence of removal from Newton street to the English High 
School building, and the necessary labor of rearranging the Ijooks, the 
branch was closed from June 28 to October 1, the delivery of books 
ceasing June 21. This period attbrded a suitable chance of determining 
the number of volumes, as it was impossible to give a ccu'rect account 
in my last year's report, owing partly to the meagre shelf-room, books 
often lying concealed in the spaces between the shelves, and partly 
to my not understanding thoroughly my predecessor's work. 

The number, ]\Iay 1, 1881, was 9,507. Since then 410 volumes have 
been received. These, added to the former collection, make the entire 
number 9,917. 

The branch was open to the public 225 days, there being a loss of 
87 days to the circulation. There have been 1,065 applications for 
cards, and 1,0(53 names registered. 71,736 books have been loaned. 

The circulation of the Library has increased greatly during the past 
3'ear, the daily average being 318, while that of last year was 2-12. 
The largest daily use was 670, last year the number l)eing 578. Cora- 
paring the present report with former ones, I found, to my surprise 
that the reading of fiction and juveniles had increased somewhat, the 
percentages being as follows: 1878, 81 per cent.; 1879, 1880, 78 i)er 
cent. ; 1881, 74 per cent., and 1882, 80 per cent. This, at first, for 
cogent reasons, appeared incredible to me; but a possible explanation 
has suggested itself. Formerly the juveniles embraced only fiction, 
but, by the present classification, a large immber of works in history, 
biography, travels, and the sciences, are included. This may or may 
not be the solution of the difficulty, btit it is the only one I can offer, 
and the decided change as i-egards the character of the books in this 
classification is certainly reassuring, the worthless ones circulating less 
freely than before. 

The works added to the Library have been carefully and wisely 
selected by the Committee ; but there is an increasing demand for books 
of a scientific character, frequent inquiries being made for the latest 
treatises in j)hysics, theology, and the questions of the day ; and, in 
this place I wish to state, not as a suggestion, however, that recently 
complaint has been made by a few readers that our reference library is 
inadequate. There is certainly room for improvement here. 

A classified catalogue of our books seemed to be a pressing need, 
the manuscript one made during the summer months not satisfying the 
requirements of our readers ; but their impatience has been somewhat 
allayed b}' carefully-written lists of all the more recent books, each 
one being entered under author, title, and subject, in books kept for 
the purpose, and lilvcwise placed upon the slipboards in the same 
riianner. 

In conclusion, I wish to state that our relations with the public have 
been, with rare exceptions, very pleasant; that annoyances caused by 
unreasonable or mischievous persons have been almost unknown, the 
boys especially conforming to the rules and regulations. I also desire 
to testify to the good service and punctuality of all my assistants. 
, GRACE A. DE BORGES, 

Librarian. 

Jamaica Plain Branch. 

The circulation during the 304 open days has been 49,722. The 
number of volumes used for consultation in the Library is 223. There 
is no record kept of the books of reference in the reading-room, nor of 
the 83 periodicals placed upon the counters. It is a fact worthy 



Public Library. 31 

of mention, that although the books and periodicals in the reading- 
room are in almost constant use, none are missing. A sliglit decrease 
in the circuhition is, perhaps, owing to an improvement in the quality. 
There is a marked increase in the use made ot the Library for purposes 
of reference by pupils of the public and private schools. Scarcely a 
day passes but many pupils come for books that will give them infor- 
mation concerning some jjarticular subject. There is an increasing call 
for United States history, and from students of the fligh School foi" good 
French books. 

Nothing has occurred to interrupt the usual circulation. We have 
endeavored to render assistance, as far as possible, to readers, and to 
direct the attention of young readers to the best literature. The number 
of our patrons who knew what thej^ want is small, and the standing in- 
quiry is, *' What have you that is new ?" 

I hear no complaints, and my assistants are faithful and attentive to 
their duties. 

ELIZA R. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 

East Boston Branch. 

It will be seen, by comparing the total circulation for the year ending 
April, 1882, with that of previous years, that there is a difference of 
about 5,000 volumes less. This can he accounted for principally from 
the fact that tlie rooms occupied l)y this branch were obliged to be 
closed for repairs from June 27 to July 13, inclusive, and not only was 
the public deprived of the use of the Library for this time, but for two 
weeks previous to the closing books for home use were not delivered, 
the time being occupied in receiving books only. However, the loss at 
this season was much less than it would have been at any other season. 

During the year the total of books recommended has been much 
smaller than in previous years. Although the requests for history have 
been much larger, the requests for all classes have been liberally met 
by the trustees, to the great improvement of the collection. 

The demand for many works is much larger than the supply, only 
about one book in twelve having a duplicate ; consequently, in order 
to meet the demand as promptly as possible, it is necessary that every 
book be returned to the shelf as quickly as possible after its return to 
the Libraiy. All books returned, and found not to be in a proper con- 
dition to be so returned, are newly covered and returned as soon as 
possible. 

As the book-room is only about 15 by 30 feet, very little time is re- 
quired in passing to and from the alcoves for the books — less than half 
a minute from point to point — and from 165 to 170 books can be de- 
livered in one hour. 

During the year a total of 1 ,594 readers have been assisted at the 
catalogue desk. Of this number 210 were assisted in classes, excepting 
fiction; 317 were juveniles, and the remainder assisted to works of 
fiction. The above figures show that a very small proportion of the 
readers have been assisted, as the total circulation for the year ending 
April, 1882, was 95,974. 

SARAH C. GODBOLD, 

Librarian. 

Increase of the Library. 

The net increase of the Library during the last year was 
13,239 volumes. These include several important dona- 
tions. The late Theodore Parker, by will, gave his library 



32 City Document No. 92. 

to the city, the gift to take effect on the decease of Mrs. 
Parker. She relinquished her life-interest in the larger part 
of her collection; and now, since her decease, the books re- 
tained, together with her own library, amounting in all to 
1,592 vohmies, and 2,117 pamphlets, have come to the 
Library. With these, also, came the marble bust of Mr. 
Parker, by W. W. Story ; his library desk, and crayon por- 
traits of Mr. and Mrs. Parker, by the late Seth Cheney. 

In this connection mention should be made that the 
Library has received a marl)le bust of John Greenleaf Whit- 
tier, l)y Preston Powers, — a gift from friends of the distin- 
guished poet, made effectual by the disinterested efforts of 
Charles H. Brainard, Esq., now of Washington. 

The late Samuel Gurney, Esq., of Enghind, recently de- 
ceased, gave to the Lil)rary the scriptures of the Old and New 
Testament, in 65 quarto volumes, printed in em))ossed 
letters for the blind, the invention of Dr. William Moon, 
England, — himself now forty-two years blind. The pecu- 
liarity of Dr. ]Moon's invention consists in the simplification 
of the old embossed type, adapting it to the use of those 
whose sense of touch has been blunted l)y age or manual 
labor. 

Dr. James Freeman Clarke, one of the Trustees, has 
caused to be copied for the Library, from originals in the 
British Museum, eleven maps, plans, or sketches of Boston 
and its vicinit}^ ranging from 1705 to 1775. So far as is 
known, the maps and plans are new to Boston antiquaries, 
and furnish interesting and valuable details of the harbor, 
islands, and the adjacent main. 

MELLEN CHAMBERLAIN, 

Librarian* 

Public Librart, 
April 30, 1882. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



LIBEAEIA^'S EEPORT. 



1882. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Librart (bt Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Volumes Located in the Special Collections of Bates Hall. 

IV. Volumes Located in the Lower Hall. 
V. Increase or the Several Departments. 

VI. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

VIII. Lower Hall Classifications. 

IX. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

X. Circulation. 

XI. Registration of Applicants. 

XII. Books Recoumended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIII. Bates Hall Reading. 

XIV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XV. FeLLOWES ATHENiEUM AND BRIGHTON READING. 

XVI. Periodical Reading Rooms. 

XVII. Losses and Delinquencies. 

XVIII. Financial Statement. 

XIX. Library Funds. 

XX. Library Service. 

XXI. Report of Examination of the Shelves. 

XXII. Work in the Library Bindery. 



Public Library. 



35 



appe:ndix I. 

EXTENT OF THE LIBRAEY BY YEARS. 







11 


o a 
2 5) 






11 


11 . 




rEARS. 


o ♦^ 


a o 5 
Ph 




i'EAES. 


II 

^.3 


II 
S S-9 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


47,254 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


3,950 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


61,177 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


6,507 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


74,770 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


12,386 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


89,746 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


16,053 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


100,383 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


17,938 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


112,153 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


19,255 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


134,628 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


20,707 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


150,921 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


27,381 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


181,653 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28,874 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


196,953 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


31,043 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


212,414 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


31,837 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


227,010 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


32,553 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


236,534 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


36,566 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


250,495 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


44,443 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


261,056 



Note. — The aggregate of pamphlets " added from the beginning " includes many since 
bound, singly or in groups (which are now counted among volumes), aud a very large num- 
ber of duplicates which are tbrown out and put among the pamphlets held for exchange. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, ] 881-82. 





[Bates Hall 


237,736 


East Boston 


11,038 


It 

03 


Newspaper room .... 


3,505 


South Boston . 


10,499 


Duplicate room 


13,190 


Charlestown 


24,060 




^ Lower Hall 


37,186 


Brighton .... 


13,139 


Total, Central Library . 
t-ja f Fellowes AthensRum . . 


291,617 

7,863 

13,281 

21,144 


11,332 
9,720 
8,602 
3,070 


South End 




City part 


Jamaica Plain 

West Roxbury delivery .... 


Total, Roxbury Branch 



36 



City Document No. 92. 



APPENDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE AND BY GIFTS. 

Note. — The increase of volumes is not the sura of those added by gift and purchase, •tc, because lost 
and condemned books are deducted. 



Years. 


Increase. 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
charged to funds 
and added by 
exchange. 


^1 


:-3 




Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


'Pamph. 


Vols. 


if 
> * 

3 


1852-81 

1881-82 


395,177 
13,239 


251,538 
10,561 


143,745 
5,291 


178,866 
8,773 


250,474 
15,986 


67,974 
2,068 


7,143 
745 


12,583 
520 



* Includes pamphlets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession 
catalogue. 

* Included in previous columns. The volumes are not the property of the Public Library, 
but form a part of the Roxbury branch, by agreement. 

Details for the years 1852-81 can be found in Appendix II. to the Report for 1881. 



APPENDIX III. 

VOLUMES LOCATED IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





at) 

H 


IN 


ae 


(X) 

H 


OD 

H 


<x> 


9 
l- 

ae 

H 


9 

H 


H 

ae 
ae 

H 


9t 

ac 


Patent library .... 


2,120 


2,323 


2,457 


2,596 


2,731 


2,823 


2,897 


3,003 


3,066 


3,142 


Bowditch libraryi . , 


2,542 


2,542 


2,642 


2,542 


2,592 


2,932 


3,043 


3,060 


3,152 


3,224 


Parker library' .... 


11,907 


11,907 


11,935 


12,292 


12,291 


12,296 


12,309 


12,322 


12,337 


12,363 


Prince library .... 


1,970 


1,970 


1,970 


1,970 


2,028 


2,029 


2,037 


2,159 


2,230 


2,274 


Ticknor library . . . 


3,907 


3,907 


3,940 


4,285 


4,929 


5,171 


5,354 


5,432 


5,454 


5,463 






12,057 


11,902 


12,108' 


12,804 


13,950 


14,210 


14,301 


14,360 
202 


13,4ST 
240 






















, 










893 
























* See Appendix VII. 

* The number given in 1874 was as near as could be reckoned before the entry on the 
Accession catalogue was made. The number given in 1875 is what had actually been entered, 
and the full number is given since these dates. 



Public Library. 



37 





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CO 






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38 



City Document No. 92. 



APPENDIX Y. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 



^ ("Gain in books . . 
"c Condemned and 
tq j transferred . . 



s^ (.Net gain 



7,758 



8,506 
184 



8,322 



_^ f Gain in books . . 

~ Less transfers 

b; and condemned 

. < books 



■^ I, Net gain 



2,483 2,376 



2,094 



1,164 



389, 1,212 



'Gain in books 



g S I Less loss 
"^ [ Net gain , 



f Gain by addition . 
Less loss by ex- 
changes, etc. . . 






Net gain 
Loss . . . 



784 
2,177 



1,393 



386 
1,233 



84, 



jj ("Gain in books . . 
o < Condemned and 
S g J lost 

Ed'* 

^ I, Net gain 



649 
406 


687 
377 


243 


210 



8,731 



2,576 



936 
223 



595 
372 



f Gain in books . . 

Condemned and 

lost 



e,e 



,Net gain , 



935 


995 


1,000 


581 


644 


485 


354 


351 


615 



' Gain in city part . 

Condemned and 

lost 



Net gain , 
Fellowes 

nseum. 

gain) . 



Athe- 

(Net 



Total gain 



778 811 
333 335 



445 
361 



476 
2,111 



2,587 



260 ! 



679 

745 

1,324 



g C Gain in books . . 
5 <; Condemned and 
"S ii I lost 



§ t^et gain 



o 


H 


go 


ae 


OD 


ac 


H 


■H 


1,310 


1,56S 


340 


425 


970 


1,143 



1,633 
675 



("Gain in books . . 
S j; Condemned and 
:S e J lost 



ft^- 



(.Net gain . 



273 
27 


183 
26 


246 


117 



108 
56 



V f Gain in books . . 
•~ .^ Condemned and 
^ ^ lost 



^Nct gain 



926 
166 



760 



640 
128 



828 
93 



735 



(Gain in books . . 
Condemned and 
lost 

I. Net gain 



539 

18 


450 
23 


521 


427 



460 
96 



'Gain in books . . 

Condemned and 

lost 



.Net gain , 



368 
110 


215 
206 


258 


9 



410 
197 





'B.ites Hall gain . 


7,758 


8,322 


8,731 




Lower Hall gain . 


389 


1,212 


loss 531 




Newspaper room 
gain 


132 


69 


41 




Duplicate room 


« 




713 




E. B. branch gain, 


243 


210 


223 





S. B. branch gain. 


354 


351 


515 


h 


Rox. branch gain. 


445 


476 


579 


•5 1 


Fellowes Athe- 








B 


naeum gain . . . 


361 


2,111 


. 745 


F.° 


Chn. branch gain. 


970 


1,143 


858 




Bri. branch gain . 


246 


117 


52 




Dor. branch gain . 


760 


512 


735 




J. P. branch gain . 


521 


427 


364 




S. E. branch gain . 


258 


9 


213 




Total gain . . . 


14,112 


14,113 


13,239 



* There is a loss of 531 volumes in this collection, owing to the transfer of a large number of 
duplicates to the duplicate room, and also to the fact that the number of books condemned this 
year exceeds those supplied. 

The total gain includes the 1 vol. at the West Roxhury delivery gained during the year. 



Public Library. 



39 



APPEOT)IX YI. 

INCREASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





« 




19 








9 

X) 
H 



ac 

H 


H 

ac 

H 


ac 
aD 

H 


English books with 
British imprint . . . 


1,389 


1,294 


1,533 


2,830 


2,237 


1,763 


1,781 


1,555 


1,841 


2,091 


English books with 
American imprint . . 


4,301 


3,807 


7,365 


10,501 


6,761 


5,546 


5,295 


5,637 


4,346 


4,856 


English books with Con- 
tinental imprint . . . 


291 


125 


375 


316 


180 


191 


233 


238 


186 


235 


Foreign books 


1,064 


858 


767 


1,858 


1,742 


1,269 


1,372 


1,399 


1,245 


1,411 


Total 


7,045 


6,084 


10,040 15,505 


10,920 


8,769 


8,681 


8,829 


7,618 


8,593 



APPENDIX Vir. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 

(RepreseDtiag books located only.) 



XI. 

xn. 
xni. 
xrv. 

XV. 
XVI. 

xvn. 
xvrn. 

XIX. 
XX. 

XXI. 

XXII. 
XXUI. 
XXIV. 



CyclopffldiaB, etc , 

Bibliography and literary history 

General history, biography, travel, and geography , 

American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite liltrature , 

English history, etc , 

French history, etc , 

Italian history, etc 

German history, etc 

Greek, Lfttin, and philology 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geogi'aphy, biography, travel, and literature 

Periodicals and trausactious 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, etc 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Political economy 

Medical science 

Natural history and science 

Mathematics and physical science 

Useful arts 

Fineart8 

Bound vohimes of nt^scellaneous paiii])hlfts . 

Bound volumes of manuscripts 



SPECIAL L|: 



Total in 
Gent-ral 
library, 
May 1, 



7,079 
27,739 
2'2,62S 
12,994 
7,463 
7,761 
5,341 
1,133 
0,182 
17,430 
18.366 
7,681 
4,004 
2..'>02 
11,406 
7,459 



5,463 13,487 



Total, 
including 

Special 
libraries. 



7,999 
31,087 
29,728 
16,390 
8,165 
9.416 



19,810 
23,414 



11,538 
7,719 



Explanation. — ClaBS HI. includes general history, etc., when cmbra 
and collected works of historians. 

Class IV. includes the collected worki? ol 
sometimes termed polygraphy. 

Classes V., VI., VIl., and VIII. have tlie same scope fur the respective countries that Class IV. 
has for America. Class VIU. includes also Belgium, Che Netherlands, Switzerland, and the 
Scandina^an nations. 

Class XIV. includes political e 



what of .A.merican liieraturi 



i and ethics, applied and unapplied, education, phrenology. 



' Iiicludee all bcjuke 



-12,liWuf them Ijl-1..j 



Class XEX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arte, etc 
Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the General Ubrary. 
The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by Ihemaelves, so that for purposes of 
n or learning perchntage of use, it is practicable 'at any time to get exact figures upon the sub 

.;-! "■'"'■" upon such points as biography, trivel, and voyages, - ' ... 

>ted to them in the several alcovesJ 



of the ranges devoted to them in the several alcoves. 

Note. — The dates given in the special Ubrarie* tolumn show the y 
by the library. j 

Details of previous years can be found iu AppeUlix VIII. to the Report for H 



, by summing the r 
when lliey were acquired 



) the Barton library, 



nally slielveil thereJ 



Public Library. 



41 



APPEiSDix yin. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 





1881 








1882 


To be deducted 








•' 


CLASSES. 


f-4 


M 

fa 


1 . 

S.-3 
3 IS 

Q 


ll 

IS- 


o 

0! 1 
B 00 


o 

a'"' 

2 

E-t 


2 
2-° 


2 . 
-Si 
<s ■ 

S a 


■a 
a 

i 

o 


^1 


Theologj', moral and intellectual science, etc. 
Jurisprudence and political science .... 
Medicine, mathematics, physics, or natural 


1,923 
363 

2,425 

794 
1,151 
1,541 
3,197 

14,016 

2,672 

2,294 

4,225 

1,479 

158 

1,056 

2 

421 


32 
21 

139 

116 
36 
31 

104 

325 
94 
79 
78 
24 

79 

1 
6 


4 
3 

12 

9 

10 
4 
4 

165 
7 

14 
18 


5 
3 

18 

5 
11 

2 
21 

931 
19 

22 
47 
63 

25 


41 
27 

169 

130 
57 
37 

129 

1,421 
120 
115 
143 

77 

104 

1 
6 


2 
1 


3 


165 
7 

431 


3 
3 

36 

6 
39 

7 
46 

2,077 

50 

54 

137 

32 

8 


1,961 
385 

2,558 

918 


Useful and fine arts, military and naval 


American history and politics 

Foreign history and politics 

Poetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric 

English prose fiction, including juvenile fic- 
tion, and other juvenile books 


1,169 
1,571 
3,279 

13,195 
2 732 


Travels 


2 355 


Libraries, collections, periodicals, etc.* . . . 


3,800 

1,524 

158 






1,152 
3 






426 








37,717 


1,164 


250 


1,162 


2,576 


3 


3 


603 


2,498 


37,186 





Reported last year 37,717 

Loss in 1881-82 531 



* This class, embracing sets like Bohn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of course, which,, 
in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heads of this table. 

Note. — The column of "Condemned books replaced," includes books condemned in previous 
years as well as in the current year. The column " Total added " shows the number of volumes as put 
upon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. The loss in this Hall is accounted 
for by the fact that many old books not in request and broken sets have been taken off the shelves and 
sent to the duplicate room. 



42 



City Document No. 92. 



APPENDIX IX. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1881, TO APRIL 30, 1882. 

Givers (excluding anonymous) .... 520 

Volumes 5,291 

Pamphlets 8,773 



Givers. 



1 newspaper 



Academia de Buenas Lctras, Baixelona 

Adams, Hon. Charles F., Jr., Qumcy 

Alameda Free Library, Alameda, Cal. 

Alcott, A. Bronson, Concord 

Alexander, James ... 8 maps, 4 broadsides 

Allen, Rev. J. H., Cambridge ..... 

Allen Brothers, West Newton ..... 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester ... 

American Association for the advancement of Science 

Salem, ......... 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, Easton, Pa. 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa 
American Loan and Trust Company ... 
American Philological Association .... 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 
American Unitarian Association .... 

Amory, Thomas C. ...... 

Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company . . ■ . 

Andover Theological Seminary Library 

Andrews, Hon. C. C, St. Paul, Minn. 

Anonymous ... 1 newspaper, 1 portrait, 1 map 

Appleton, Prof. John H., Providence, R.I. 

Appleton, Nathan ..... 

Appleton, "William S. .... 1 broadside 

Apprentices' Library of the City of New York 

Associated Charities of Boston 

Association of the Graduates of the United States Military 

Academy, West Point, N.Y.. 
Atkinson, Edward ..... 
Baldwin, Charles C, Cleveland, Ohio 

Balfour, David M 

Ballou, Maturin M 

Bangor Mechanic Association . 

Bangs, E. D., Amherst .... 

Bank of North America, Philadelphia, Pa 

Barrows, H. G., M.D 

Bartlett, Mrs. Hannah E., Bequest of 

Batchelder, Joseph A., J/icZ(Weio?i 

Bates, Joseph L. . . . . . 




1 

4 

19 



133 
1 



2 
1 

1,054' 



Pphs. 



1 
1 
5 
1 
7 
1 
1 
1 
2 
. ] 
696 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 



13 
1 



1 These volumes were included in Appendix II. to annual report for 18S1. 



Public Library. 



43 



Givers. 



Bates, Mis. R., Bombay ....... 

Ba.tt\e, Kemp F., Chapel Rill, N'.C. 

Bayard, Jlon. Thomas F., Washington, D.C. . 

Benson, Mason D. ....... . 

Bergstrom, K. L. ....... . 

Berry, Adj. Gen. A. Hun ...... 

Biblioteca Nazionale Vittorio Emanuele, Rome, Italy 

Biblioteca Nazionale, Florence, Italy .... 

Bibliothek des Deutschen Reichstages, Berlin, Ger- 
many. .......... 

Bibliotheque Royale de Bclgique, Brussels, Belgium, 

Biker, Julio Firmino Judice, Lisbon, Portugal 

Black, J. W. ..... 8 photographs 

Blaine, Hon. James G., Washington, B.C. 

Boston, City of ........ . 

Water Board ........ 

Boston Gas Light Company ...... 

Boston Journal ...... 1 photograph 

Boston Medical Society ....... 

Boston Society of Natural History ..... 

Boston University ........ 

Boston & Lowell Railroad Corporation .... 

Bowman, IIo)i. S. Z., Washington, D.C. 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., a lot of broadsides, 14 cards, 1 
map, 67 newspapers ....... 

Brewer, Prof. Fisk B., Grinnell, Iowa .... 

Brigham, Edward H. ....... 

Brinton, Daniel G., M.D 

British Museum, London ....... 

Brooks, Mrs. Francis ....... 

Brooks, Rev. John G. ....... 

Brown, Ammi, M.D. . 

Brown, Charles R. ....... . 

Brown, F. H., iV.Z) 2 broadsides 

Brown, George William, Baltimore, M.D. 

Brown, Henxy Redington ....... 

Brown, Mrs. John Carter, Providence, R.I. . 

Brown, J. Coffin Jones ....... 

Brown Brothers & Co., Providence, R.I. . 

Buff&Berger ......... 

Bullock, Alex. H., Worcester ...... 

Burnham, George, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Burnham, Leavitt, Omaha, Neb. ..... 

Burroughs. Rev. Henry, D.D. ...... 

Butler, Alfred ......... 

Butler, George, New York City ..... 

Butler, James D., LL.D., 3Iadison, Wis., 1 broadside . 

Byram, Edward R. . ....... 

Candage, R. G. F 

Candler, Ron. John W., Washington, D.C. . 

Capen, John . . . . . . . . . 

Cardiff, Wales, Free Library, Museum, etc. 

Garret, Jose F. ........ 

Cartee, Cornelius S., 3I.D. 

Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York, New 
York City 

Chamberlain, Ron. Mellen 

Chandler, Dr 8 broadsides 

Chandler, Horace P. 




. 1 

358 
1 

i 

17 
17 



1 

1 

3 

160 

9 



6 
3-1 

1 
15 

1 
10 



108 



7 
1 
1 
1 

230 
4 



1 
14 



1 

1 

11 



313 
114 



44 



City Document No. 92. 



GiTERS. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Chapman, Alfred F 




4 


Chase, George B 






1 




Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D. . . . 






1 




Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, III. 






1 


10 


Choate, Joseph R., New York City . 








1 


Christern, F. W., New York City 






3 




Church of the Saviour, Brooklyn, N. Y. 






1 




Cincinnati, Ohio, Public Library 






1 




Claflin, Hon. William 






13 




Clapp, David 








320 


Clapp, Herbert C, M.B. . 






11 




Clark, Eev. George F., Mendon 








1 


Clarke, Rev. James F., D.D. . 








53 


Clarke, Robert, Cincinnati, Ohio 






2 




Clarke and Carruth .... 








6 


Cobden Club, London 






12 


18 


Coffin, Allen, Nantucket . 








1 


Cole, H. Hammond .... 








1 


Collett, John, Indianapolis, Ind. 






3 




Collins, A. M., Son & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1 specimen 






picture-frame. 






Comfort, Richard 


1 




Consulate of Chili ........ 




1 


Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph 


40 


2 


Costello, Martin J., Clinton 




1 


Cotting, Benj. E., ^/./> 


1 




Courtenay, Hon. William A., Charleston, S.C. 


2 




Crosby. John L., Bangor, Me. ..... 


1 


1 


Cunard Steamship Co 1 lithograph 






C\iri\s, Col. YlerhcTtV., Washington, B.C. 


2 




Curtis, Dr. Josiah, Washington, B.C. . 1 broadside 




1 


Cutler, E. G., M.B., and G. M. Garland .... 


1 




Cutter, Abram E 




2 


Dame, John T., Clinton 




1 


Davis, Simon . . . . . . . . ' . 


8 


12 


Day, Albert, M.B 




1 


Dennet, Charles F., Brighton, England .... 


1 


13 


Dennis, M. T 


12 




De Peyster, Gen. J. Watts, New York City 


1 




Depping, 'Guillaume, Pa7-is, France .... 


1 




Derby, England, Free Library and Museum . 




1 


Dexter, George, Camhi'idge ...... 




2 


Dillaway, Charles K. 


11 




Dimmock, George, Cambridge 




1 


Dix, John U., M.B 5 newspapers 




307 


Dodge, Hon. Thomas H., Wo7-cester 




1 


Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant 






Episcopal Church ........ 




1 


Duane, William, Philadelphia, Pa. . . ... 


1 




Dunster, Samuel, Attleboroiigh 


1 




Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me 




2 


D wight, Theodore F., Washington, B.C. . . . • 


2 




Eastman, S. C, Concord, N.H. 




1 


Ebell, William R 


1 




Eddy, Mary B. G 


2 




Edes, Henry H 2 portraits 






Ellis, Eev. George E., B.B 




1 




1 




Elson, Louis C. .... 


• 


. 


6 





Public Library. 



45 



Givers. 



E. M. Museum of Geology and Archaeology, Princeton, 
N.J. 

Engineers' Club, Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Essex Institute, Salem ....... 

Evening Post Publishing Company, New Yoi-k City 

Everett, Miss Anna S. .... 1 photograph 

Everett, William, Ph. D., Quincy 

Executive Committee on the Reception of the Hon. Carl 
Schurz in Boston ........ 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fanning, J. T., Manchester, N.H.. 

Fergus Printing Company, Chicago, III 

Fernald, John C 

Fernald, Prof. 0. M 

Fick, Rev. C. J. Hermann 

Field, Richard M 

Field, Hon. Walbridge A., Washington, D.C. . 

First Parish, Hingham ....... 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. . 

Flint, Charles L 

Floye, W. J 

Fluegel, Dr. Felix, Leipzig, Germany .... 

Fogg, Ebenezer T., South Scituate ..... 

Folsom, Charles W., Cambridge, 298 broadsides, a lot of 
cards, 304 newspapers, 14 maps ..... 

Folsom, George W. . .• 

Folsom, Norton, M.D. ....... 

Ford, William E 

Forster, E. J., M.D. 

Forster, N., .//•. . . . . . .1 portrait 

Fox, Hon. James A., Cambridge 

Fox, John A. ........ . 

Free Mason Lodges of Lowell ...... 

Fuller, Miss Edith D. .... 2 broadsides 

Ganzhorn, William ........ 

Garceau, Treffle, M.D 

Garrison, William Lloyd, Jr., 10 broadsides, 191 news- 
papers, 2 portraits ........ 

Gassett, Edward . 

Gay, Mrs. E. G 

Generaldirection der Koniglichen Sammlungen fiir Kunst 
und Wissenschaft, Dresden, Germany .... 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga. 

Giles, Prof. Alfred E., Hyde Park 

Gilman, D. S., Baltimore, Md. ..... 

Globe Newspaper Company ...... 

Gloucester, City of ....... . 

Goddard, Mrs. Martha Le Baron, 5 maps, 2 newspapers 

Goddard, 3Iiss Matilda, 3 newspapers, several notes, auto- 
graphs, etc 

Godkin, E. L., & Co., New York City .... 

Goeje, Prof. M. J. de, Ley den, Netherlands 

Goodwin, Daniel, Jr., Chicago, III. ..... 

Gorham Manufacturing Co., New York City 

Goul)areff, Demetrius, Beaidieu, France . 1 broadside 

Gould, Elwyn B,, Chicago, III. . . a lot of broadsides 

Gray, John P., Utica, NY. 

Great Britain, Commissioners of Patents . . . . 

Green, Milbrey, M.D 



Vols. 



Pphs. 





1 


1 




2 


4 


1 




4 


235 


2 






1 




1 




1 




1 




67 


6 


2 


1 




41 


3 


1 






1 


1 




1 




3 






1 


29 


672 


1 






7 




1 


27 


141 


1 






6 


1 




1 


5 


3 




3 




4 


119 


1 




50 


77 


1 


10 


1 






1 


4 




1 




I 




41 


247 


37 


16 


2 




1 




1 




' 1 






1 


12 






1 


55 




1 


1 



46 



City Document No. 92. 



Givers. 



8 newspapers 



28 maps 



broadsides 



Green, Hon. Samuel A., M.D., 7 broadsides, 2 maps, 2 

newspapers .... 
Green, Samuel S., [Vo7-cester 
Greenough, Charles P. 
Greenougb, William W. . 
Greenough, W. A., & Co. . 

Griffin, A. B 

Griffin, Appleton P. C. . 

Griswold, W. M., Bangor, Me. 

Guild, Cliester .... 

Gurney, Samuel, Brighton, Eng. Bible for the blind in 

Gurteen, Rev. S. Humplireys, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Hale, J?ey. Edward E., i>.Z?. . 

Hallam, Hon. John, Toronto ... 2 

Halliwell-Phillips, James 0., Brighton, England 

Hallock, Edward J., New York City 

Hamilton Manufacturing Company . 

Harlan, C, M.D., Wilmington, Del. . 

Harris, Samuel T. . 

Hart, Charles Henry, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hartmann, J. F. 

Hassam, Jolin T. . . . . 

Haynes, Prof. Henry AV. 

Hincks, William B., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hinds, Prof. J. I. D., Lebanon, Tenn. 

Hodgman, Edwin R., Westford . 

Holland, Frederick M., Concord 

Holland, Rev. Frederick W., Cambridge, 30 newspapers 

Homes, Henry A., Albaiiy, N. Y. 

Huntoon, Daniel T. V., Canton 

Illinois Industrial University, Campaign, III. 

Ingleby, Clement iNI., LL.D., Jlford, England 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London 

International Committee of the Young Men's 

Association, Ntiv York City . 
Italy, Miiiistero d' Agricoltura, Rome, Italy 
Jacobi, Abraham, M.D., New York City . 
James, George B. . . . . . 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D. . 2 broadsides, 2 newspapers 

Johnson, Mrs. J. A. 

Johnson, William C. 

Jones, McDuffee, & Stratton 

Kaiserliche Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vien7ia 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan. 1 newspaper 

Karney, Prof. Thomas, Annapolis, Md. . . . . 

Knapp, Arthur M. . . 28 newspapers, 1 photograph 

Knapp, George B . . . 

Knapp, Prof. William I., New Haven, Conn. 

Knowlton, T. S., West Brookfield . . . . . 

Koenigliche Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 

Munich, Germany ........ 

Koenigliche Oeffentliche Bibliothek, Dresden, Germany 
Krewson, William E., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Latrobe, Ho7i. Ferdinand C, Baltimore, Md. 
Latrobe, John H. B. ....... 

Laurie, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Providence, R.I. . 
Lavender, W. R. ....... . 

Lawrence, Abbott ........ 

Lee, John W. M., Baltimore, Md 



Christian 




16 

1 

7 
1 



1 

2 

65 



Public Libraet. 



47 



GiVEKS. 




Leicester Public Library ....... 

Library Company of Philadelphia ... 1 map 

Lincoln, D. F. ; 

Literary and Historical Society, Quebec .... 

Literary and Philosophical Society, Liverpool, England . 
Locker, Frederick, London, England .... 

Lodge, Henry Cabot . . . . . . ... 

Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Liverpool Free Public Library, Liverpool, England . 
Loomis, Henry B. ....... . 

Lowell, 3frs. John ........ 

Lunt, Joseph O. ........ 

McCalla & Stavely, Philadelphia, Pa 

McCleary, Samuel F. .... 1 broadside 

McCosh, John, M.D 

McDanolds, James S., Trenton, N.J. .... 

M&cDonaXd, C&tXosY., Aiihurn, N.Y. . . . . 

McDonald, Frank V., Cambridge ..... 

McPhetres, Samuel A., Lowell ...... 

Maine Historical Society, Portland, Me. .... 

Manchester, England, Public Free Libraries Committee . 
Marcoux, Prof. J. E., Quebec ...... 

Marshall, Orsamus H., jBi(/a/o, iV. F. . . . . 

M&viin, Rev. 3 osQ^h.'H., Atlanta, Ga 

Mason, Miss .......... 

Mason, Edward G., Chicago, III 

Mason, Mrs. William ....... 

Massachusetts, State of ...... . 

Board of Commissioners of Savings-Banks . 

Board of Education ...... 

Board of Health, etc. ...... 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor . .... 

Library . 

Railroad Commissioners 

Sergeant-at-arms . . . . • . . 

Massachusetts Historical Society 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society ..... 

Massachusetts Medical Society ...... 

Massachusetts Total Abstinence Society .... 

May, 3Iiss Abby W 

Mayberry, Stephen P., Cape Elizabeth, Me., 1 map, 1 

lithograph, 1 photograph ...... 

Mead, Charles 

Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, Baltimore, 

Md 

Medical Society of the State of New York, Albany, N. Y. 

Meek, Henry M., Salem 

Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Merrill, George ......... 

Merriman, Rev. Daniel, D.D., Worcester 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City . 
Michigan State Library, Lansing, Mich. 
Mitchell Library, Glasgow, Scotland .... 

Moon, William, LL.D., Brighton, England 

Moreau, John B., New York City 

Morissey, D. H 

Morse, Hon. Leopold ..... 1 map 
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge . 



15 

1 

1 

13 

21 



1 

97 



225 

1 

2 
1 



42 



1 

277 

1 
1 
1 



1 

2-t 



1 

1 

3 
1 

8 
97 

160 
1 



1 
26 
I 
1 
2 
30 
1 



48 



City Document No. 92. 



Givers. 




.C. 



Nakayama, Kaurokuro, Tokio, Japan 

Nason, Rev. Elias, Lowell 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Board of Health, Washington, D.C. 

National Mining and Industrial Exposition Association 

Denver, Col. ....... 

New Bedford Free Public Library, 1 broadside, 135 

papers . 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 
New Hampshire State Library, Concord, N.H. . 
New Jersey State Library, Trenton, N.J. 
New York, City of. Board of Education 
New York, State of, Library, Albany, N. Y. 

Secretary of State, Albany, N. Y. . 

New York Historical Society, New York City . 
New York Produce Exchange, New York City . 
New York State Agricultural Society, Albany, N. Y. 
Newburyport, City of . . . 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne Public Library 
Newcomb, Prof. Simon, Washingtoyi, D 

Nichols, B. W 

Nichols, Prof. William R. 

Nicholson, James B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Norcross, Mrs. ..... 

North Adams Savirigs-Bank 

Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition, Christiania, Nor 

way ..... 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia, Pa 
Odd Fellows Library Association, San Fr 
Ohio State Library, Columbus, Ohio 
Ohio Mechanics' Institute, Cincinnati, 

Olin, William M 

Osgood, George W 

Otis, Edmund B 

Paddock, Right Rev. Benjamin H. . 
Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester 
Park, Miss Mary, Pomfret, Conn. 
Parker, Henry J. . . . 7 ph 

Parker, Myron M., Washington, D.C. 
Parker, Rev. Theodore, Bequest of . 
Parker, Mrs. Theodore, " " . 
Pasolini, Pietro Desiderio, Imola, Italy 
Paul, Peter & Bro., Buffalo, N. Y. . 
Peabody Education Fund, Trustees . 
Peabody Museum, Cambridge . 
Peoria, 111., Board of Trade 
Perry, Amos, Providence, R.I. . 
Perrv, Thomas S. . . . . 
Phillips, Henry, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phillips, Wendell .... 
Photo-electrotype Company 
Poole, Silas ..... 

Poole, William F 

Porter, Rev. Edward G. . . . 
Prichard, William M., New York City 
Providence, R.I., Auditor . 
Putnam, C. A. and W. F. . 
Quesada, Vicente G. , Buenos Ayres . 
Hand, Avery, & Co 



ncisco, Cal. 



1 manuscript 



1 broadside 

1 newspaper 

tographic views 



15 



1,311 

281 

1 



35 

1 
1 

19 



1 

1 

89 

2 



1 
31 

5 
66 

1 
2,117 



1 

1 

1 

10 

10 



Public Library. 



49 



Givers. 




Md. 



Rhode Island State Board of Health, Providence, R.I. 
Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. . 
Richards, Samuel W. ..... 

Riley, C. v., Washington, B.C. 

Robbins, George, Fitchburg 

Rodgers, Rear- Admiral C. R. P., A7inapolis, 

Rolfe, William J., Cambridge . 

Ropes, John C. . 

Ross, Denman W., Ph. D., Cambridge 

Royal Astronomical Society, London, England 

Royal Observatory, CW^pe of Good Hope 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, Engla7id 

Royal Society, Edinburgh 

Royce, Josiah, Ph. D., Berkeley, Cal. 

Russell, Lieut. Andrew H., U.S.A., Watertown 

St. John, C. Henry 

St. lAuis, J/o., Public Library . 
Salisbury, Stephen, Jr., Worcester . 
San Francisco, Cal., Free Public Library 
Sands, J. ...... . 

Sanger, Charles R. Cambridge 

Sargent, Charles S. . 

Schwab, Emil ...... 

Scudder, Samuel H., Cambridge 

Scull, G. D., Oxford, England 

Seaverns, Joel, M.D. 

Sellen, Francisco, New York City 

Shaw, Albert D., Manchester, England . 

Shaw, Samuel S. . . ... 

Sheffield, George ..... 

Sheppard, S. A. D. . 

Sheridan, ZieM^.-(?ew. Philip H., U.S.A. . 

Shorey, D. L., Chicago, III. 

Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J. . . 143 

Slafter, Rev. Edmund F 

Smith, Frank L. 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 
Somes, John .!., Gloucester 
Society of Arts, io7ic?o?i .... 
Spindler, Robert O. . 

Sprague, H. S. 

Spybey, F. G., Nottingham, England 

Staples, Hamilton B., Worcester 

State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison 

Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D. . 

Stevens, B. F., London 

Stevens, Charles W., M.D. 

Stinson, William H., Dunbarton, NIL 

Stockwell, Tliomas B., Providence, R.I. 

Stone, Gen. Charles P., Cairo, Egypt 

Strong, H. A., Montreal, Canada 

Swansea, Wales, Public Library 

Sweet, Edward F 

Sweet, Frank 



Swift, Lindsay . 

Talbot, I. Tisdale, M.D. 

Talbot, Newton . . .3 newspapers, 11 photographs 

Taneyhill, G. Lane, M.D., Baltimore, Md. 

Taunton Public Library .... 



broadsides 



1 map 
7 newspapers 



2 

48 
1 
1 
2 



22 
1 
1 

1 

1 



12 

1 

G 

9 
2 

1 



1 
13 



230 

1 

1 

5 

24 



12 
1 



50 



City Document No. 92. 



Givers. 




Pphs. 



Taylor, Edward, Andover 

Thayer, Miss C. C, and Mrs. R. Anne Nichols 

Thayer, Rev. J. Henry, D.D., Andover 

Thomas, Hon. W. W., Jr., Portland, Me. 

Thompson, Rev. A. C. 

Thompson, F. M., Greenfield 

Thompson, William P., Liverpool, England 

Thurman, William C. . . . 

Times Puljlisliing Con»pany 

Titus, Rev. Anson, Jr., South Weymouth 

Towne, E. H., Worcester . 

Tribou. Rev. D. H 

Trigt, G. A. van, Brussels 
Triibner & Co., London 

Turner, Alfred T 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsville, Lid. 

1 broadside 
Twing, Rev. A. T., D.D., New York City 
United States, .4djutant-General 

Army, Surgeon-General . 

Bureau of Education 

iBureau of Engineers 

Bureau of Navigation 

Bureau of Statistics 

Bureau of Steam Engineering 

Census Bureau 

Coast Survey .... 

Comptroller of the Currency . 

Court of Claims 

Department of Agriculture 

Department of the Interior 

Department of the Navy 

Department of State 

Department of the Treasury . . 1 broadside 

Department of War 

General Land Office 

Hydrograpiiic Office 

Life-saving Service . 

Light-house Board . 

Marine Hospital Service 

Military Academy, West Point, N. Y. 

Naval Observatory 

Navy, Surgeon-General 

Office of Indian Affairs 

Patent Office . 

Quartermaster-General 

United States Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo 

University of Vermont Library, Burlington, Vt 

Upton, J. W., Peabody 

Van Voorhis, Elias W., New York City 

Vermont State Library 

Victoria Public Library, Melbourne, Aus. 

Wadeworth, Mrs. H. F. . 

Walker, F. A 

Walker, Rev. George L., Hartford, Conn 
Warder, John A., M.D., North Bend, 0. 



27 
1 



30 
I 
1 

8 



1 

2:5 

6 
1 
1 

2 

5 

Ifi 
2 

47 

12 
1 
4 
1 




1 
1 
27 
1 



Public Library. 



51 



GlYERS. 



Ware, William, & Co 

Warren, Hon. G. Washington ...... 

Warren, J. Collins, M.D 

Warren, Joseph Yi., M.D. 

Warren, Rev. William F. ...... 

Washburn & Moen Manufiicturing Co., Worcester 
Watertown Free Public Library ..... 

Watson, Paul B 

Western Reserve and Northern Ohio Historical Society, 
Cleveland, 0. ........ 

Weston Town Library ....... 

Wheeler, Mrs. T. D. Ne^v Raven, Conn. .... 

Wheildon, William W., Concord ..... 

White, James C, :»/./? 

Whitman, Mrs. Mary K. . . . 164 newspapers 

Whitney, James L. . . . . .4 newspapers 

Whittier, Charles C 

Wickes, Steplien, M.D 

Wilcox, AVilliam A. ....... 

Wilder, Pro/. Burt G., /i!!/mca, iV; F. . . 

Wilder, Hon. Marshall P 

Williams, William B. . 

Williams, A., & Co 

Wines, Frederick H., Springfield, III. . 1 broadside 
Winsor, Justin, Cambridge ...... 

Winthrop, Hon. Robert C. ...... 

Wolcott Memorial Volume, Proprietors of . . . 
Worcester Public Library ...... 

Worthington, R., & Co. ....... 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn. ..... 

Young, Edward J. ....... . 




97 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
I 
1 
1 



2 
18 



12 



46 
1 



126 
1 



Charles H. Brainard, Esq., of Washington, D.C., representing contributors, 
has given the Library a marble bust of John Greenleaf Whittier, by Preston 
Powers. 



APPENDIX X . 



CIRCULATION. 
(Btjoks issued.) 







Total Circulation. 


Bates Hall. 


I.owEB Hall. 1 


East Boston B^A^-CII. 




South Boston Branch. 




1 






i 


i 










i 










i 










i 










i 




^1 




s 


Is- 




« 






1 


>, 


^ c. 


1 




e 


= 


C 






^ 

2 


t 


. 






E 






S 




rt 


■s*^ 


<- 


3 






« 


S 




w ? 




rt 


« 


~ 


« 




s 


M 


3 


» 




> 






a 


s 


_>, 


1 


S 


1 


^ 


a 


S 


1 


%% 




1 


>> 

"a 


S 


B 


2 


s 




1 




= 


i 


S: 


i 




308 
308 


~ 








w 




H 










H 




^ 


a 


a 

1,042 
458 


75,846 
68,212 


243 

c222 


609 
558 






— - 


a 






380,34.'! 
467,856 


al,234 
1,619 


a2,425 Mar. 16 
3,073 ! d 


23,159 
28,261 


27,092 
31,003 


60,251 
59,264 


163 
192 


236 
388 


248,029 
230,111 


6,217 
7,946 


254,246 
238,057 


805 
772 


1,472 
1,413 


74,804 
67,754 




187» 


101,688 


634 


I02,.322 


330 


684 


18T4 


308 


625,442 


2,031 


5,124 . 








34,441 


37,872 


72,313 


235 


544 


1U5,244 


7,853 


253,097 


822 


1,535 


80,771 


320 


81.091 


263 


712 


107,651 


915 


108,566 


350 


762 


1875 


306 


758,417 


2,581 


6,074 1 . 








41,721 


39.016 


80,737 


263 


603 


264,825 


8,009 


272,834 


864 


1,759 


85,134 


414 


85,548 


277 


789 


111,677 


848 


112,.525 


364 


860. 


I87e 


306 


947,621 


3,097 


8,035 . 








54,956 


59.373 


114,329 


373 


877 


338,450 


10.392 


348,842 


1,140 


2,598 


89,949 


1,038 


99,987 


293 


856 


113.334 


988 


115,530 


370 


1,045 


1877 


306 


1,140,572 


3,727 


8,343 1 . 








66,832 


74.786 


141,618 


463 


930 


392,995 


12.737 


405,732 


1,326 


2.439 


101,022 


1,605 


102,627 


335 


902 


131,969 


3.210 


135,179 


430 


1,075 


1878 


305 


1,18.1,991 


3,882 


10,478 ' . 








80,326 


66.670 


146,996 


433 


1,001 


378,439 


12.736 


391,175 


1,205 


2,902 


104,717 


1,879 


106,696 


343 


1,088 


137,010 


3.741 


140,751 


447 


1,414 


187a 


308 


1,180,566 


3,833 


8,747 j . 








74.627 


89.163 


163,790 


532 


926 


350,521 


12,672 


363,193 


1,179 


2,085 


95,887 


2,794 


J^8,681 


320 


916 


115,509 


3.335 


/118,844 


503 


1,200 


1880 


307 


1,156,721 


3.768 


8,781 . 








69,042 


101,100 


170,142 


554 


1,045 


■ 306,148 


10,369 


316,517 


1,031 


1,999 


105,197 


3,004 


108,201 


303 


951 


138,309 


5,261 


143,570 


467 


1,196 


1881 


304 


1,065,081 


3,504 


8,637 . 








68,609 


96,764 


165,373 


647 


1,046 


267,592 


9,271 


266,863 


847 


1,849 


97,024 


4.097 


101,118 


318 


989 


129,251 


3,607 


132,858 


435 


1,137 


1888 


303 


1,040,553 


3,434 


8,170 . 








63,782 


103,640 


167,322 


552 


1,052 


239,601 


11,191 


260,792 


828 


1,670 


88,901 


7,073 


/|95,974 


328 


368 


125.409 


4,077 


129,486 


426 


1,074 





KoxBURT Branch. 


Charlkstown Branch. 


Brighton Branch. 


D 


ORCH. 


8TER Branch. 


i 


.South End Branch. 


.Tamaica Plain Branch. 


Tear. 


a 


1 


h 


i 

a 


i 

1 


i 


i 


1 




1 


B 


i 


r- 


i 
f 


i 

s 

J 

1 
1 


a 


i 


?■ 


a 


1 

1 


i 

IB 


1 

a 


1 


a 

a 


% 

•3 


i 

1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1H73 
IN7e 


87,079 
98,304 


2,460 
2,903 


89,539 
101,297 


285 
320 


686 
925 


78,169 
84,631 


1,206 
1,184 


79,375 
85,815 


259 
279 


704 
830 


21.394 
23,531 


448 
1,274 


21,842 
24,805 


70 
81 


234 
314 


15,675 
63,357 


132 
899 


el6,017 
56,016 


197 
206 


552 






















1877 

1878 


140,059 
122,517 


6,770 
7,513 


146,829 
130,030 


477 
404 


1,190 
1,100 


105,211 
99,537 


1,605 
2,003 


106,816 
101.540 


348 
332 


902 
970 


27,832 
27,549 


1.960 
1,698 


29,792 
29,247 


97 
89 


290 
328 


67,692 
63,025 


4,287 
1,949 


71,979 
64,974 


220 
197 


620 
624 


41,303 


1,099 


42,402 


188 


667 


28,174 


2,106 


30,280 


138 


384 


1879 


123,492 


6,397 


129.869 


403 


1,013 


86,925 


1,815 


88.740 


289 


685 


26,737 


1,859 


28,928 


93 


312 


56,785 


1,423 


59,673 


184 


575 


73.154 


2,713 


75.867 


247 


622 


60,457 


2,.503 


52,960 


171 


413 


18SO 


119,450 


5,480 


124,930 


388 


1,017 


73,302 


1,440 


974.748 


246 


616 


26,400 


1,674 


27,980 


91 


302 


55,690 


1.026 


66,716 


176 


541 


77.016 


2,275 


79,291 


258 


680 


62.406 


2,220 


54,626 


170 


437 


1881 


105,700 


4,912 


110.612 


360 


972 


78,682 


2,140 


80.822 


273 


789 


20,067 


2,110 


28.177 


85 


269 


53,904 


730 


55,188 


177 


541 


71,432 


2,530 


73.962 


212 


678 


47.797 


2,311 


50,108 


164 


407 


■ 882 


101,634 


4,739 


106,273 


347 


876 


85,038 


2,281 


87.319 


254 


741 


25,152 


2,292 


27.444 


89 


277 


53,036 


1,449 


A64,485 


144 


561 


61,4.53 


10,283 


/i71,736 


318 


670 


46.316 


3,406 


49,722 


164 


381 



a Central Ubvfiry only. 














d Includes the largest of each department on any day, without regard to Its 
heing the same day, as in the previous entry under this head. 


(/lucludee bookt* borr 


wed 01 


while- 


slipH. 


and retn 


ned ibe 


ame day. 


t The use of tile Dorchester branch for 1875 was a little over three months, 
/ Till- East Boston branch was closed from October 7tb to 9th, 1879, for repairs ; 


t ■V\w E. B. brnnch w 


18 open 


only 307 


■luys. 


owing to 


rL'])nirB o 


1 fui-nari.. 


><outii Boston from August i2lh to November 2d, 1879, for repairs and enlarge- 



g The ChnrleatowD branch was closed from'April 20lh to the 30tli, 
the books, and alBO from May Ut to the 11th, 1880. 
A The Ea«t Boeton branch was cloeed 25 working-daye, 

" South End '* " " 8:> 

" Dorchester 6 " during 1882. 



Public Librae .". 



53 



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54 



City Document No. 92. 



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Public Library. 



55 



APPEN^DIX XIII. 



BATES-HALL READING. 



Classification. 



English history, topography, biogra- 
phy, travel, and polite literature . . 

American (North and South) history, 
etc 



French history, etc. 
German history, etc. 
Italian history, etc. 



Other history, topography, biography 
travel, and polite literature . . . . 



General and epochal history 
Greek, Latin, and philology 

Bibliography , 

Transactions 

Periodicals 

Fine arts 

Natural history and science 



Percentage of Use. 



Theology, ecclesiastical history, ethics, 
education, etc 



Medicine 



Law, government, and political econ- 
omy 



Useful arts, mathematics, physics, etc. 
Miscellaneous pamphlets bound . . . 



« 

H 


H 


IS 

at) 




H 


3D 
« 




at ■ 

IH 


ao 
ao 

H 


19 


16 


15 


15 


13 


13 


13 


13.2 


13 1 


12 


11 


11 


12 


10 


14 


13 


11.8 


n.i 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


6.1 


5.8 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3.4 


3.9 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1.5 


1.8 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 


5 


4.2 


4.6 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3.3 


3.3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3.5 


3.6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1.2 


1.5 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


2 


2 


.5 


.6 


8 


8 


7 


7 


6 


5 


5 


3.9 


3.5 


10 


11 


11 


10 


9 


12 


13 


8.9 


8.7 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3.8 


3.7 


10 


11 


11 


10 


10 


8 


8 


11.0 


11.5 


8 


7 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7.3 


7.0 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2.7 


2.5 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


10 


10 


9.7 


8.9 


2 


2 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


4.0 


4.9 



12.3 

12.2 
5.3 
3.9 
1.6 

5.1 
3.6 
3.9 
1.6 
.6 
3.4 
8.5 
3.6 



2.5 
9.0 
5.0 



Note. — In computing this percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker, Barton, 
and Prince libraries — which are kept apart from the general classification of the Library — 
is reckoned as near as possible and included in the usual divisions, as is indicated in the table. 
(See Explanations to Appendix VII.) 

The figures for 1879 are only approximately correct. 



APPENDIX XIV. 

LOWER HALL AND BRANCH READING. 



§, 


CL.4SSES. 
The figures give the rL'lative percentages. 


I8TU 


isrr 


1878 


1870 


s 

3 


IS 

70 
7 
3 

7 
6 
3 
i 


d 

80 
4 
2 

6 


79 
5 
3 

4 
4 


1 

85 
3 
3 

3 

2 




83 
4 
4 

4 
2 

4 


1 

79 
4.5 
3 

4 
4 
1 
4.5 


71 
6 
3 

7 
6 
3 
4 


n 
m 

S3 
3 
2 

2 
6 


n 

79 
6 
3 

4 

4 


1 

8S 
4 
2 

3 

2 


1 

S3 
4 
3 

3 
3 


1 

SO 
4 
3 

4 
4 
1 
4 


» 
I-) 

72 
6 
3 

e 

6 
3 
4 


. 

83 

2 

2 
4 


80 
6 
3 

3 
4 


86 
4 
2 

3 
2 


O 

81 
6 
3 

3 
3 

5 


a 

81 
8 
3 

2 
2 

4 


1 

80 
6 
3 

3 

3.5 
1 
4.5 


H 


3 

6 
6 
3 

1 4 


[4 

31 
6 
2 

2 
5 


a 

70 
6 
4 

3 
5 


1 

84 
4 
2 

4 
3 


82 
4 
3 

4 
3 

4 


W 


fa 


1 


I. 
II. 


Fiction and juvenileB* 

Uistory and biography 


78 

7 

' ' 4 

3 
3 

5 


62 
6 
3 

4 

2 


76.4 
5.3 
3 

4 


IV. 


Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, 
law, medicine, profcBBions 












e 


5 


4 


' 


5 


3 


* 


5 


3 


5 


6 


3 


24 











ll 


CLASSES. 
The figures give the relative percentages. 


I880 


1881 


1S83 


O 


a 

>-9 

70 
6 
3 

7 
7 
3 
4 


d 
a 

80 
4 
2 

3 

6 


n 

M 

-6 
6 
3 

4 
6 


S3 
4 
3 

4 
3 


1 

79 

3 

4 
5 

4 


73 
8 
5 

5 
5 

4 


fa 

63 
6 
3 

4 
4 

21 


H 


a 

►4 

70 
7 
3 

6 
5 
3 
6 


80 
4 
3 

3 
6 

4 


m 

76 
5 
4 

3 

7 

5 


82 
4 
S 

3 
4 

4 


e 

78 
6 
3 

3 
4 

6 


O 


74 
4 
9 

4 
5 

4 


fa 


H 


3 
"^ 

64.23 
7.01 
4.03 

8.98 
4^)3 
3.52 
7.32 


78 



2 
4 

4 


73 
11 
4 

4 

3.5 
.5 
4 


81 
5 
3 

4 

1 
1 


78.2 
6 
3 

2.7 
4 

.1 
6 


a 

77.4 
4.1 
2.8 

4.5 
5.2 
.1 
3.9 


a 

S0.3 
6.4 
3.2 

4.8 
3.1 


79 
5 
3 

4 
5 


5 


I. 
II. 


Fiction and juveniieB* . 

Uietory and biography 


74.7 
6.3 
3 

4.4 
5 
1 
6.6 


79 
6 
3 

4 
6 

4 


79 
6 
3 

4 
4 
1 
4 


77 
5 
4 

4 
5 

.6 
4.5 


76.6 
6.1 
3.1 

4.3 
4.6 


IV. 
V. 


Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, 
law, .mediclDe, professions 

Periodicals 


vn. 


MiBcellaneoua 


6 


6 


3 


3.2 


4 


4.2 



* A large niimljer of the juveDilee a 



Public Library. 



57 



APPENDIX XV. 

FELLOWES ATHEN^UM READING. 



1 

6 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 


X) 


H 




i- 

ao 

H 


ao 

H 


O 


H 


at) 


I. 

n. 
in. 


History, biography, and travels 
Modem foreign languages . . 


43 

12 
4 

10 
6 
1 
4 
8 
2 

10 


38 
9 
5 

10 
5 
1 
4 

10 
3 

15 


33 

11 

14 

9 

7 

1 

4 

7 

3 

11 


30 

10 

17 

8 

7 

2 

4 

7 

3 

12 


37 
11 
6 
9 
6 
2 
4 
8 
3 
14 


39 

10 

5 

11 

6 

2 

4 

7 

3 

13 


33 

13 
4 

11 
9 
2 
4 
6 
2 

11 
6 


42 

11 

4 


IV. 
V. 
VI. 


Miscellaneous literature . . . 
Theology, sociology, ethics . . 


10 

1 


vn. 




1 


vm. 

IX. 
X. 
XI. 


Fine arts, engineering .... 
Law, politico, government . . 

Mathematics, science 

Fiction 


■ 28 
5 



















BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 



I. 
n. 

m. 



Classes. 
Relative percentages. 



Fiction 

Biography, travel, and 
history 

Other 



1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


80 


77 


76 


75 


76 


76 


7 


8 


7 


8 


8 


7 


13 


15 


17 


17 


16 


17 



1883 



73 



58 



City Document No. 92. 

















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60 



City Document No. 92. 



APPENDIX XVIII. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



General Library 


1881-83 


Paid into City 
treasur.v fi-ora 
fines and ftales 
of catalogues. 


Accounts. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Fellowes 
Athenaeum. 


Year. 


Arat. 


Binding 


$3,000 

1 17,000 

4,000 
3,000 
3,000 

2,000 
5,000 

I 4,000 

72,000 

2.000 


$1,953 83 

22,643 04 
2,910 54 

4,102 28 
2,810 20 
2,610 80 

1,617 91 
5,132 19 

3,638 74 

71,321 35 

2,209 84 


$317 55 
1,385 30 


1873 

1874 

1875 
1876 

1877 

1878 
1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 


$1,681 79 


Periodicals* 

Catalogues (printing) . 

Expense . • 

Fuel 


2,000 00 

2,360 24 
2,505 35 
3,092 12 


Furniture (cabinets, 
shelving, fixtures, etc.) 

Gas 

Printing (miscellaneous) 

Stationery 

Salaries 

Transportation, Post- 
age, etc 


3,266 31 
2,618 32 

2,984 12 

3,497 03 

2,945 74 


Total 


$115,000 


$120,950 72 


$1,702 85 







* The appropriation for periodicals is included in that for books. 

Note. — The expenditures for books cover the cost of those chargeable to our Trust 
funds account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the city, and also 
include such as are bought with the balances with our foreign agents at the close of the 
previous year. Our financial and library years now nominally correspond, but it will happen 
that bills accruing subsequently to the middle of March (when the last requistion of the j'ear, 
payable April Ist, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account, beginning 
nominally May 1st. lu this way books added between March 1.5th and May 1st may be 
counted in one year's growth, and paid for in the subsequent year's account. The cost of 
maintaining branches after the first year makes part of the genei^l items of the several 
appropriations. 

The money for books bought on account of the Fellowes Athenaeum is spent under the 
direction of the Book committee of the Trustees of the Fellowes fund. 

Details for previous years can be found in Apjiendix XIX. to the report for 1881. 



Public Library. 



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62 



City Document No. 92. 



APPENDIX XX\ 



LIBRARY SERVICE. 

(Ap7'il 30, 18S2.) 



Name. 



Mellkn Chamberlaik 



James I^. Whitney 
JoBG F. Garret . . 






Lonie F. Gray . . . 

Adelaide A. Nichols 

Thomas H. O'Kane 

Total 



1869. 
1875. 

1880. 
1868. 
1880. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian and Clerk of the Cor- 
poration 



Principal Assistant Librarian , 

Register, and Curator of patents 
and engravings 



Librarian's Secretary , 
Auditor and Cashier 
Librarian's Runner . 



a " 

a ii 
O 



3 a 

3 a» 



James L. Whitney 
William H. Foster . 



Jo86 F. Carret . 



Lindsay Swift .... 
Elizabeth T. Reed , . 
Roxanna M. Eastman 



Frank C. Blaisdell . . , 
Annie C. Miller , . . , 
Robert Levesque . . 
Alice il. Por^e . . . , 
Card Catalogues. 
Harriet E. Green . 
Carrie K. Burnell . . 
Ellen F. McCarthy . . 
Mary F. Osgood . . . 
Harriet C. Blake . . . 
Patrick E. Carroll . . 
Total 



1869. 
1860. 

1875. 

1878. 
1873. 
1859. 

1876. 
1881. 
1881. 
1866. 

1873. 
1881. 
1872. 
1877. 
1880. 
1881. 



Principal of the department . 

Cataloguer for Branch Libraries 
and Proof Reader 



Register, Curator of patents and 
engravings and Assistant . . 



Assistant . 
Assistant . 



Extra Assistant, and Cataloguer 
of U.S. documents 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent room, etc. 



Curator 

Curator of official card catalogue 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Runner 



Public Library. 



63 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Harriet N. Pike 
Edith D. Fuller . . 
Lydia B. Godfrey , 
Mary A. McGrath , 
Harold Smith . . , 
Total 



C CO 

1867. 

1879. 
1881. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Chief Clerk . . 
Associate Clerk 
Assistant Clerk 
Assistant . . . 
Runner . . . . 



Appleton p. C. Griffin 
William F. Caany .... 
William Roflfe ...... 



John S. Morrison 
Total . . . . 



1865. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 



Custodian 

Assistant 

Asst. in charge of repairs, etc. 
Runner 



Arthur Mason Knapp . 
Lydia F. Knowles .... 
Thomas M. WHiyte . . . 

Margaret Doyle 

Richard Ray 

W. Maynard L. Young . 

Daniel Donovan 

James Johnson 

William Walsh 

Herbert R. Brooks . . . 
Total 



1875. 
1867. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1878. 
1880. 
1S81. 
1882. 
1882. 



Librarian of Bates Hall , 
Delivery Clerk .... 
Receiving Clerk . . . 

Assistant . 

Assistant 

Clerk of the branches 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 



10 



Edward Tiffany . . 
Mary A. Jenkins . . , 
William F. Robinson 
Thomas H. Cumraings . 

Caroline E. J. Poree . , 
Sarah A. Mack . . . , 

Eliza J. Mack 

Annie M. Kennedy . . 

Ella R. Dillon 

Louisa Twickler . . . 
Annie G. Shea . . . , 
Florence Richards . . . 



1878. 
1877. 
1872. 
1879. 

1859. 
1863. 
1863 
1869 
1876 
1881 
1874, 
1878, 



Librarian of Lower Hall . . . 

Assistant Librarian 

Clerk for registration and fines 

Curator of Lower Hall card cata- 
logue 



Reading-room Clerk .... 

Delivery desk 

Receiving desk 

Registration and Assistant . 
Delivery desk and Assistant 
Assistant in reading room . 
Record of slips and Substitute , 
Return slips and Assistant . 



64 



City Documgnt No. 92. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Mary Anderson . . . . 

Mary Sheridan 

Rebecca J. Briggs . . . 

Edward Moore . . . . 

Evening Service. 

T. P. Bennett 

Robert B. Ross . . . . 

Louis F. Gray 

Catherine McGrath , . 
John J. Butler . . . . 

Harry Young 

Benjamin F. Latz . . . 

Martin T. Guthrie . . . 

William L. Day . . . . 

Total 



2 1 



1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1878. 

1879. 
1873. 
1881. 
1873. 
1878. 
1880. 
1881. 
1881. 
1881. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Runner . . . 
Runner . . . 
Runner . . . 
Care of shelves 



Registration Clerk and Sunday 
service 



Reading-room 
Card catalogue , 
Receiving desk 
Runner ... 
Runner ... 
Runner . . . 
Runner . . . 
Runner . . . 



as 

O 4) 

H 



William E. Ford .... 
William F. Adams . . . 

John White 

Timothy McCarthy . . . 

Ej-tra daily Assintants. 

Total 



1858. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 



Janitor 

Night Watchman 

Porter 

Porter ...... 



Andrew M. Blake , 
Romeo Cervi . , . . 
P. B. Sanford . . . . 
Edward M. Roe . . , 
William F. Sampson 
Arthur Siguere . . 
Mary E. Austen . . . 
Martha M. Wheeler 
Mary G. Moriarty . 
Sarah E. Bo wen . . 
Sarah Dumas ... 
Mary J. Morton . . 
Samuel Macconnell 
Total 



1870. 
1874. 
1879. 
1876. 
1880. 
1881. 
1874. 
1869. 
1875. 
1876. 
1881. 
1881. 
1877. 



Foreman .... 
Extra forwarder 
Finisher .... 
Pressman . . . 
Forwarder . . . 
Forwarder . . . 
Forewoman . . 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Apprentice . . . 



Public Library. 



65 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Position, duties, etc. 






Sarah 0. Godbold . 
Mary R. Pray .... 
Alice M. Wing , . . 
Mary E. Cathcart . . 
E. L. Lennon .... 
Adelia H. Ghen . . . 
Eva D.Merrill .... 
Grace E. Habn •. . . 
Ada J. McConnell . . 
George H. Hosea . . 
Total 



1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1881. 
1876. 
1879. 
1879. 
1881. 
1873. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



Alice J. Bkagdon . 
Honora MeCarty . . 
Ellen A. Eaton . . . 
Emogene C Davis . . 
Idalene L. Sampson . 
Mary Watson .... 

Mabel Pond 

Lilla F. Davis .... 
Emmie W. Bragdon . 

Amy Acton 

Emma Le Fevre . . . 

Nettie Elms 

Joseph Baker .... 
Total 



1872. 
1872. 
1872. 
1873. 
1877. 
1873. 
1879. 
1881. 
1882. 
1881. 
1881. 
1881. 
1872. 



Librarian .... 
Receiving Clerk . 
Registration Clerk 
Delivery Clerk , . 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Janitor 



7 


13 



Sarah Bunker , 
Mary Bradley . . 
Helen M. Bell . . 
Dora Puffer . . . 



Margaret E. Blood . 
Elizabeth C. Berry 
Florence A. Vose . 



1876. 
1876. 
1878. 
1878. 

1872. 
1877. 
1876. 



Librarian 
Assistant . 

Assistant . 



Reading-room and registration 
Clerk 



Runner . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 



66 



City Document No. 92. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 













6 




























tt 


•a 


a 




6 




.2 n. 


c3 a 


>. 


c. 

P. 


Name. 


T3 o 


Position, duties, etc. 


n 














a "" 


a » 


o <1> 


fi 




W 




O 


O 


H 


•«: 














^ 


Annie McGowan 


1881. 


Extra Runner 




1 




1 


Helen R. Crowell 

Charles R. Curtis 


1882. 
1873. 






1 




6" 




1 




5 




















o 


Total 






6 


4 


10 


e^ 













Cornelius S. Cart£e . . 

Annie E. Ebcrle 

Mary P. Swain 

Alice G. Willoughby . . . 
Sar.ih E. McConnell .... 
Susan E. Liverinore .... 

Lydia E. Eberle 

Emma L. Willougbby . . . 

Thomas E. Smith 

Total 


1870. 
1874. 
1878. 
1882. 
1879. 
1879. 
1881. 
1882. 
1874. 
















•« 






s 






f^- 


Extra Assistant , 




s 
S 








It 








s 




















9 












•c; 


Mart E. Brock 

Mary F. Grailey 

Sara R. Brock 

James M. Brock 

Total 


1875. 
1880. 
1880. 
1878. 










1 


Assistant 

Extra Assistant 




1 


Janitor 




4 














Mart G. Goffin 

Mary J. Sheridan 

Frances Willard Pike , . . 

Lucy Adelaide "Watson . . 

Edward Davenport .... 

Total 


1874. 
1875. 
1881. 
1881. 

1874. 










•s; 






0^ 






j^ 








1 








<a 




5 














Grace A. De Borges . . . 

Maude M. Morse 

Margaret A. Sheridan . . . 

Mary Arkinson 

"William Brydon ..... 
Total 


1880. 
1877. 
1875. 
1881. 
1882. 




5 














Assistant 

Extra Runner 




^ 




5 



Public Libraey. 



67 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



Eliza R. Davis . . 
Anna J. Barton . . 
Nelliu F. Kiley . . 
Harry F. Davis . . 
"Wra. E. A. Cloiigh 
Timotbj' Johnson . 
Total 



W 



1877. 
1876. 
1878. 
1879. 
1882. 
1877. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



B a 

O G> 



Mary A. Hill . . . 
Robert M. Otis . . 
AnnaHibbard . . . 
Harriet L. Towner 
Total 



1875. 
1881. 

1882. 
1882. 



Custodian, Lower Mills . . 
Custodian, Roslindale . . . 
Custodian, "West Roxbury . 
Custodian, Mattapan .... 



SUMMARY. 

Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, and 
Runner ..... 

Catalogue Department . 

Purcliase and Entry department . 

Shelf department .... 

Bates Hall circulation department 

Lower Hall circulation department, day 
evening, and Sunday service . 

Janitor's department 

Bindery ..... 

East Boston branch 

South Boston brancli . 

lioxbury branch .... 

Charlestown branch 

Brighton branch .... 

Dorchester branch 

South-End branch 

Jamaica Plain branch . 

Deliveries ..... 

Totals 



Grand total 147 

AGENTS. 

Messrs. Lee and Shepard, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (tor English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triibner & Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Cliristern, and M. C^liarles Reinwald, Neiv York and Paris. 

The Deaorlich'sclie Buchhandlung, Gottingen. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Senor Don Juan E. Riaiio, Madrid. 



5 


1 




14 


1 


Central Library 


.') 




71 regulars. 


4 




10 extras. 


10 




81 in all. 


16 


9 




4 






13 






5 


51 




6 


7 




6 


4 


Branches. 


5 


4 


41 regulars. 


3 


1 


>■ 25 extras. 


4 


1 


— 


5 




66 in all. 


3 


3 




4 


J 




112 


35 




35 







68 



City Document No. 92. 



APPENDIX XXI. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY, 





Is 

o 

fa 


■3 
K 

u 



a 


a 
3 . 

K a 

^■° 



4 

a 

3 


a 
S 

a 

1 





4 

a 
2 

a 



c 
,0 



c 

C3 

a 
3 


a 
a u 


"3 
1 


Not on shelves . . . 

Of these foitnd to be 
Lent 

At the hinderies . . 

Otherwise accounted 
for 

Not accounted for . 


3,362 

2,240 
486 

608 
28 


6,303 

4,251 
398 

1,527 
127 


357 

63 

56 

238 


1,773 

1,641 
94 

38 


2,968 

2,679 
69 

214 
6 


2,159 

1,803 
151 

204 

1 


738 

616 
29 

93 


1,437 

1,276 
42 

117 
2 


2,074 

1,908 
79 

80 

7 


1,289 

1,128 
107 

62 
2 


22,460 

17,605 
1,511 

3,170 
173 



Details for previous years can be found in Appendix XXII. to the report for 1881. 



Public Library. 



69 



APPENDIX XXIL 

WORK IN THE LIBRARY BINDERY. 



Chakacter of Work. 



Bates Hall books bound 
and finished 



Books of the Lower Hall 
and branches 



Books repaired 

Catalogues wired and 
covered for public use 
in Lower Hall and 
branches 



Maps dissected 
mounted . . . 



and 



Map volumes and shelf- 
lists mounted 



Pamphlet cases 
Portfolios . . . 



Removable covers for cat- 
alogues and for paper- 
covered books 



Maps mounted, bound, 
and bordered 



Hours of miscellaneous 
■work 



753 
492 



109 
24 



2,613 

1,508 
444 



1431 



7,766 
959 



1,287 



2,183 



4,759 

8,743 
873 



2,712 



1,271 



11,129 
949 



1,469 



2,778 



4,272 

10,084 
1,371 



2,015 



© 


H 






<X) 
90 

H 


H 

at) 


3,958 


5,839 


4,598 


7,606 


2,752 


8,417 


1,397 


1,201 


1,376 


2,145 


3,205 


4,387 


1,946 


1,032 


664 


2,205 


1,959 


1,637 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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