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Full text of "Annual report"

THIRTY-FIRST 



ANNUAL KEPORT. 



1883. 



[Document 103 — 1883.] 



CITY OF NHS BOSTON. 




THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



Trustees of the Public Library. 



18 8 3. 



[A.] 

The Trustees have the honor to present to the City Council 
their Thirty-first Annual Report, it being the fifth made under 
their Act of Incorporation, and containing details of the con- 
dition of the Library for the year ending on the thirtieth of 
April last. 

The reports of the Examining Committee from the citizens 
at large, and the Librarian's Report, are embraced in this 
document. 

The system of examination first adopted last year has been 
continued with equally satisfactory results. The collections 
of the Library are so extensive and various, and the work 
performed at the central institution and its branches is so 
widely diffused, that the time necessarily required to master 
the details and workings of the whole organization is ob- 
viously not afforded in the usual limited number of visits 
within the convenience of an annual committee appointed in 
the early spring of each year. The assignment of special 
subjects is within better control. 



2 City Document No. 103. 

The general committee for the present year consists of 
John G. Blake, M.D., Augustus Lowell, Esq., J. Audley 
Maxwell, Esq., Richard Sullivan, Esq., and the Rev. Alex- 
ander S. Twombly. The scholars having in charge the 
examination of special subjects were Thomas W. Higginson, 
Esq., for the investigation of the valuable Parker Library; 
Professor Thomas S. Perry, who has continued and com- 
pleted the survey begun last year of the French and German 
collections of the institution ; and Prof. Win, F. Apthorp, 
who reports upon the condition of the musical department. 
To these was joined, as required by the ordinance, a member 
of the Board, the position falling in turn this year to its Pres- 
ident. 

It must always be remembered that the functions of the 
committee are of the most independent character, and that 
the form and extent of its investigations are wholly under 
its own control. 

It will be seen, from the report of the committee, that it 
has devoted a larger amount of time to the questions before 
it, than has usually been within the convenience of average 
committees. The suggestion made in the report, that the 
services of the committee should be retained for two years, 
is impracticable under the ordinance ; but there is no objec- 
tion to its appointment earlier in the library year, thereby 
giving the members an opportunity of larger familiarity with 
the daily work of the institution in. all periods of its annual 
service. • 

The Trustees would invite particular attention to the 
portion of the report relating to "the popular circulating 
department." 

In the special reports, the monograph of Thomas XV. 
Higginson, Esq., upon the Parker Library, will be found to 
be thoroughly appreciative and valuable, as giving the first 
accurate description of this very remarkable collection. Pro- 
fessor Perry's faithful and continuous work, in reference to 
our French and German collections, brings the institution 
under large indebtedness for his thorough and discriminative 
examination in a field which few scholars in. this country 
have so adequately explored. Professor Apthorp's examination 
points out the deficiencies in the musical library, — a collection 
originally formed in Germany, and slowly increased since, 
according to the means within the disposal of the Trustees. 
A full library of the best classic and modern composers is 
a most desirable element in this important branch of popular 
education. It is hoped that sufficient means may be provided 
to meet the necessities of the increased and Avidely extended 
culture of this civilizing accomplishment. 



Public Library. 



The Library and its Work for the Year. 

The extent of the Library collections and their use by the 
public during the past year are herewith presented. 

The aggregate number of volumes embraced in the Bates 
Hall collection is 267,21(5; in the Lower Hall, 38,164; in 
the branches, 116,736, — making a total of 422,116, — a net 
increase for the year of 17,895 volumes (of which 5,340 
were gifts), — making the percentage of gain within a slight 
fraction 4.25 per cent. 

The whole number of days on which the libraries were 
open to the public was 306. 

The total use of the books for the year was 1,045,902, — an 
increase of 5,349 over the previous year. These were dis- 
tributed from the various libraries, as shown in the following- 
table : — 



Name of Library. 



Lower Hall . 
East Boston . 
South Boston . 
Koxbury . . . 
Charlestown . 
Brighton . . . 
Dorchester . . 
South End . . 
Jamaica Plain 
West Koxbury 
North End . . 

Bates Hall . . 



No. of Vols. 

April 30, 

1S82. 



149 
237. 
387, 



790 
736 
526 



In Use, 

1S81-S2. 



250,792 
95,974 
129.4S6 
106,273 
87,319 
27,444 
54,485 
71,736 

49,722 



873,231 
167,322 
,040,553 



No. of Vols. 

April 30, 

1883. 



3S.164 

11,263 

10,961 

21,999 

24,825 

13,190 

11,910 

9,947 

8,976* 

3,114 

521 



154*900 

249,440 



404,340 



In Use, 

1882-83. 



195,930 

100,940 

126,411 

112,525 

87,304 

28,257 

67,558 

94,250 

49,137 

3,515 



1 S65,827 
1S0,075 



1 In the totals of popular circulation, the issues of the Fellowes Athenaeum (8,385 
vols.) are included with the Hoxbnry Branch. The Charlestown and Brighton libraries hav- 
ing come into the possession of the City as single libraries, there are uo present means of 
marking the use of the reference volumes in each collection. 



The aggregates of the circulation for the past year de- 
mand especial attention ; while the branches have either 
increased, or substantially held their own, in the distribution 
of books, the Lower Hall collection has experienced a very 



large diminution. 



4 City Document No. 103. 

Yet the Lower Hall library never before contained so 
many books of popular interest, or so well selected to meet 
the wants of the very wide-spread classes of readers who 
have heretofore depended upon its resources for their read- 
ing. 

But the uses of the Reading-room have increased. This 
obviously arises from the fact that this is the only room 
accessible to the public, on the lower floor of the building, 
which is moderately light by day, since the new structure, 
on the adjacent estate to the eastward, was erected. The 
waiting-rooms are now neither cheerful nor attractive to the 
visitors to the Lower Hall library. 

Beyond this palpable fact there are grounds for the belief 
that the circulation of other large popular libraries has di- 
minished during the past year. It is not difficult to explain 
why this should generally have ocurrred, nor why our own 
popular collections have suffered. 

When, in 1878, the South-End branch was established in 
West Newton street, it found its readers in a community pre- 
viously dependent upon the Boylston street library. When 
it was removed, in 1881, to a site within four-fifths of a mile 
from the main institution, and placed in pleasant apartments, 
among a reading population, its influence was more perceptibly 
felt. The popular libraries in the city proper issued last year 
to readers 293, G95 volumes, against 322,528 in the previous 
year : but of the aggregate for 1882-3, 22,514 is due to the 
increase of the circulation at the South End, and 3,515 to 
the establishment of the North-End branch, — a branch which 
is expected to show much larger results in the coming year. 

But, notwithstanding the decrease of circulation, as com- 
pared with former years, it is found that in the volumes now 
issued there is a larger percentage in science and technique, 
in voyages and travels, in history and biography, than was ob- 
tained in the year of the largest distribution from the Lower 
Hall. So that in proportion, as the work of the Library goes 
on, it accomplishes better results among its readers. 

Another cause directly affecting the circulation of free 
libraries is to be found in the cheap reprints issued of 
popular novels, histories, biographies, travels, and science, 
which are within the means of every reader. When for a 
small sum of money one can purchase an attractive new 
book, why should one be dependent upon a library, 
which cannot reasonably have duplicate copies enough 
on its shelves to supply an immediately numerous and 
urgent demand? The books desired by the large body 
of readers are the new books. Failing to obtain 
these when wanted, it is the easiest possible thing to ac- 



Public Library. 5 

quire them at a trifling outlay, within the means of a moderate 
daily wage. 

It is not strange that the issues of any popular library de- 
pend, to a great degree, upon its accessions of new and desira- 
ble fiction, — a branch of literature of growing importance 
throughout the civilized world. It attracts the attention of 
both sexes, of all ages. It has enlisted the services of au- 
thors of great talent, of wide knowledge of human life, man- 
ners, and social conditions ; it draws pictures from ancient, 
mediaeval, and modern history, and from barbaric and 
civilized races. From the simplest and most innocent forms 
of social condition it extends step by step through the vary- 
ing shades of daily life till it reaches the most complicated 
forms of crime and immorality known to ancient or mod- 
ern civilization. Within its wide ran^e manv readers can 
tind the book which shall rivet attention, quicken the pulses, 
and exert either good or bad influence according to the pre- 
vious moral training or general information of the individual. 

But to a large library it presents grave questions. If 
duplicates of the newest fiction sufficient to supply the im- 
mediate demand are purchased, the shelves are filled with vol- 
umes which at the end of live years will be so much dead 
material. A few great novelists have written works that have 
lived and still live. But of the books of this description, 
which were read in one's youth, how few are attractive to the 
present generation ! Every decade shows some new develop- 
ment in thought, invention, arrangement, and character, as 
society becomes more complicated. It does not seem to the 
Trustees to be a legitimate use of public funds to purchase 
any considerable quantities of duplicate books, for the sake 
of present popularity, which, in the space of five years, shall 
cease to find readers. 

The delivery of periodicals at the Central Library and 
branches is recorded at 518,226, as against 492,090 for the 
previous year. Of these, 381,810 found use in the Boylston- 
street reading-room. 

The number of volumes sent to the bindery during the 
year from all the libraries amounted to 13,261. The charac- 
ter of the work done has been fully up to the regular stand- 
ard of the institution. 

The records show a larger number of books lost than 
during the preceding year. There are gone from Bates 
Hall, 18 volumes; from the Lower Hall, 53; from South 
Boston, Dorchester, and Brighton, 1 each; from Roxbury, 
4 ; and from Charlestown, 2, — making a total of 80 
volumes missing, or one to every 13,074 loaned. From the 
East Boston, South End, and Jamaica Plain branches, with 



6 City Document No. 103. 

an aggregate circulation of 237,380 volumes, every book 
has been returned. 

The Trustees gratefully acknowledge the receipt of another 
gift of five hundred dollars, from J. Ingersoll Bowditch, for 
the increase of the Bowditch Mathematical Library. The 
accessions to this collection during the past two years have 
been most valuable and important, including complete sets of 
Crelle's Journal far die reine und angewandte Mathemalik , in 
93 vols, quarto ; and of Liouville's Journal de mathematiques 
pures et apjpliqudes, in 46 vols, quarto. 

A New Library Building. 

The Trustees of the Library congratulate their fellow- 
citizens that the City Government has settled the question 
of the proposed construction of a new Library building. 
The steps which led to this most important result may be 
briefly told. 

The first order looking to a new structure on the Dartmouth- 
street estate was passed Dec. 1, 1881. By this the Com- 
mittee on the Public Library were authorized to consult the 
Trustees concerning a new Library building. No action, 
however, was taken under this order, as the City Govern- 
ment had not indicated by its action whether it intended to 
occupy the site presented for the purpose by the Common- 
wealth, or to acquire the additional land necessary for the 
structure, which a special act of the Legislature had author- 
ized it to take. Preparation for the work had, however, been 
made, in the meantime, by the City Architect, by visits to 
and examinations of some of the newer library buildings in 
Europe. 

The next step towards the removal of the Library to new 
quarters proceeded from a member of the Board of Trustees, 
who was also a member of the City Council. On the 9th of 
March, 1882, he introduced, with other orders, having refer- 
ence to the High and Latin Schools, the following mandate 
to the Trustees of the Library : — 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Public Library be requested to 
report upon the fitness of the present High and Latin School Building 
for the purpose of the Public Library. 

After a careful examination of this structure, and the em- 
ployment of the services of Mr. Henry Van Brunt, the 
eminent architect, in making a separate examination and 
report, it was voted, on the second of May, one member of 
the Board dissenting, — 



Public Library. 7 

That the president be directed to report to the City Council, in re- 
sponse to their order, dated 10th April, 1882, that, in the opinion of the 
Trustees, the English High and Latin School Building, neither in part 
nor as a whole, is fit for the uses of the Public Library, together with 
the reasons of the Board for this opinion. 

Mr. Whitmore, the dissenting member, gave notice of his 
intention to present a minority report. 

In preparing the statement of reasons called for by the 
above vote, it was soon found that in order to show more 
distinctly what was not wanted, it would be necessary to 
draw plans which should show approximately what was 
wanted. 

The services of the accomplished City Architect were 
engaged, and a set of drawings was made, as fully complete 
as the great press of his engagements in other city work 
would permit. The study of the plans of a great modern 
library for popular use presented questions never before 
fully met. In the limited time the most that could be done 
was to show how the largest and most convenient access to 
the public of readers and students could be accomplished ; 
how the great library could be stacked ; how special rooms 
of suitable size could be assigned to special libraries and art 
collections ; and, lastly, how the arrangement of apartments 
could be most fitly contrived for the administration of the 
library. As a whole, it was concluded that the edifice to be 
erected on this basis, to meet the probable requirements of a 
century, need not occupy more than two-thirds of the land. 
This, in brief, was the plan proposed by the Trustees. No 
elevation of the structure was designed ; the studies on light, 
air, ventilation, and fire-proofing could only be approximately 
treated, yet the main principles of the structure seemed 
satisfactory to the Trustees. 

On the 1st August the President signed the report required 
by the order of the Trustees, and it appears in City Docu- 
ment No. Ill, 1882. The minority report (City Document 
No. Ill B) appeared subsequently. After a series of delays 
these papers did not reach the City Council till its meeting 
of the 3d Oct., and were referred, on the 18th Dec, to the 
next City Government. 

' The next movement forward came from the Board of 
Trustees. On the 24th Feb., 1883, the following order and 
vote were offered, and unanimously accepted, and transmitted 
on the 26th, by His Honor the Mayor, to the Board of Alder- 
men, by whom they were referred to the Committee on the 
Public Library : — 

Ordered, That the plans for the Public Library building, on the Back- 
Bay land, drawn by George A. Clough, and the estimated cost thereof 



8 City Document No. 103. 

at $450,000, as contained in City Document No. Ill, of the year 1882, 
be, and they are hereby approved. 

Voted, That the Trustees recommend to the City Council to take the 
land fronting on Dartmouth street and St. James avenue, and adjacent 
to the lot given by the Commonwealth to the City of Boston, for a Pub- 
lic Library, under the provisions of Chapter 143 of the Acts of the Gen- 
eral Court for the year 1882. 

On the 28th February, a public hearing was given by the 
Committee on the Public Library, for the purpose of listen- 
ing to any statements of the Board of Trustees, or other 
friends of the institution, in favor of the proposed action of 
the City Government, and also to hear any objection thereto. 
At this meeting the President presented a statement of facts ; 
and speeches in urgency of immediate action were made 
by Colonel Jonas H. French, Hon. Mellen Chamberlain, 
Hon. Charles Levi Woodbury, Mr. Henry P. Kidder, Rev. 
George E. Ellis, D.D., Rev. Joshua P. Bodfish, Mr. George 
B. Chase, Mr. Edwin P. Seaver, and Henry W. Williams, 
M.D. Mr. William H. Whitmore made remarks in op- 
position. 

On the 5th March, the Committee on the Public Library, 
through their Chairman, Alderman VVhitten, reported in favor 
of the recommendation of the Trustees, and submitted orders 
for the purchase of the land on St. James street, for $180,000, 
and the erection of a building for the sum of $450,000 ; pay- 
ment for the same to be made through the medium of a 
public loan for $630,000. The orders thus reported were, on 
the 19th March, referred to the Committee on Finance, who, 
on the 26th March, reported in favor of the passage of the first 
order (in City Doc. 45), and of the second order in a new 
form, so that the orders as presented for the consideration of 
the City Government were as follows : — 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be authorized to borrow, under the 
direction of the Committee on Finance, and at such rate of interest 
as they shall determine, the sum of $180,000, said sum to constitute a 
special appropriation for the payments for land taken for library pur- 
poses under chapter 143 of the Acts of 1882. 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be authorized to borrow, under the 
direction of the Committee on Finance, and at such rate of interest as 
they shall determine, the sum of $450,000; said sum to constitute a 
special appropriation to be expended in the erection of a new library 
building on Dartmouth street according to plans approved by the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library. 

These two orders then passed the Board of Aldermen 
unanimously, and came up by special assignment in the 
Common Council on the 12th April, and were passed in con- 
currence by a vote of 55 yeas to 11 nays, and on the 14th 
April received the approval of His Honor the Mayor. 



Public Library. 9 

On the 21st April the city authorities took formal posses- 
sion of the land given by the Commonwealth, and also of the 
estates on St. James street. 

The perfected plans, designed to fulfil the large expecta- 
tions of the proposed structure, it is hoped will be ready 
for acceptance, under the terms of the loan, before the begin- 
ning of another year. 

WILLIAM W. GREENOUGH, 
SAMUEL A. B. ABBOTT, 
GEORGE B. CHASE, 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE, 
JAMES J. FLYNN, 
HENRY W. HAYNES, 
CHARLES V. WHITTEN. 

Public Library, June 29, 1883. 



10 City Document No. 103. 



[B.] 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE OF 
THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

To the Trustees : — 

Gentlemen, — Your committee, chosen for a single an- 
nual examination of the Library, and serving but a few 
months, must necessarily present imperfect results of their 
labors. 

Although every possible facility has been afforded them by 
the Trustees, a thorough scrutiny of all, or indeed of any 
one department of this vast establishment, including its eight 
branches, is impracticable under the circumstances. It is there- 
fore suggested that gentlemen be chosen hereafter on this com- 
mittee who will be willing to serve for two or more years. 

Our inadequate investigation, however, has revealed to us 
the rich treasures of the Library, its usefulness to students 
and the general public, and the increasing honor it confers 
on its founders and promoters, as a conservator of literature 
and literary tastes in our city, already distinguished for its 
intellectual life. 

Although Boston may not say, with Prospero, " My library 
is dukedom large enough," yet, by means of it, a princely 
feature is added to the public educational system which is 
the city's pride. 

Without this Library and its present generous maintenance, 
the ancient traditions which gather about us would be im- 
paired ; our reputation abroad as a literary centre of the 
republic would be jeopardized, and our citizens themselves 
would lack an opportunity for self-improvement which no 
public buildings, parks, or mere material conveniences can 
supply. 

Even our admirable public schools would miss this crown- 
ing strength of a great popular treasure-house of learning. 

In regard to the whole vast 

Collection of Permanent Literature, 

one of our number, who has exceptional opportunity to 
judge of this department, reports as follows : — 

A former librarian, Mr. Justin Winsor, calls it the most 
symmetrical library that he knows. Experts also say that it 
offers abundant material to investigators in many departments. 



PUHLIC LIBRARY. 11 

The excellence of the Shakspeare collection and of the 
Tioknbr Library of Spanish literature is well known. 

When the catalogue of the Barton Library is published it 
will be seen how very rich it is in the early dramatic litera- 
ture of England, and, to some extent, in that of France. It 
is a collection of gems. 

How, then, shall the Library be kept abreast of the times 
in all departments? At present it depends on the orders of 
the officials, the demands of students, and the suggestions 
of agents. Experts are also appointed to inspect and report 
occasionally on special departments. 

Would it not, however, be well to have the process con- 
tinuous instead of sporadic, by inviting competent persons 
to keep an eye on current publications, and on catalogues of 
remote books of the past, so that no chance be lost to enrich 
the Library, without great outlay at any one time? 

To these persons the critical journals in each department 
might be regularly sent ; also all valuable booksellers' 
catalogues. 

This plan is now in operation to a certain extent, but 
needs enlargement to make it fully clfective. 

The officials of the Library, on whom this labor might be 
thought properly to fall, are too busily occupied with the 
more immediate duties of the Library to accomplish all that 
is desired for the symmetrical growth of the permanent col- 
lection. Besides, this suggestion still leaves the officials 
abundance of room to work for the same result. 

In connection with this subject of increasing the permanent 
collection of valuable literature, the committee finds that no 
German books are sent from abroad without special order ; 
less than one-sixth to one-seventh of the French works, and 
those of an entirely scientific character. 

English books are largely sent without special order, be- 
cause, otherwise, the delay would be very inconvenient in 
most cases. 

There seems, however, to be no objection to purchases of 
English books abroad without the personal endorsement of 
each book by the administration of the Library, so long as 
the books pass under strict scrutiny on their arrival, and can 
be returned if undesirable. 

In regard to 

Further Assistance to Readers, 

the present facilities would be ample, were it generally known 
that three courteous and intelligent persons are at the desk 
on Boylston street, and two at the other end of Bates Hall, 



12 City Document No. 103. 

a part of whose duty it is to answer all proper questions of 
visitors. Could this fact he fully understood, even the card 
catalogues would he a mystery to no one, and there would 
be less difficulty in finding some books. It is gratifying to 
learn that more readers than ever before frequent Bates Hall ; 
that scholars from a distance resort to its matchless collec- 
tions, and that some even choose Boston as a residence for 
the winter, in order to use this part of the Library which is 
freely placed at their disposal. Many authors might be named 
who acknowledge great indebtedness to the special collec- 
tions. Some write to ask for a verification of facts ; some 
for copies of title-pages ; others for information not elsewhere 
to be obtained. 

The Patent Room 

is fast becoming one of the more important parts of the Li- 
brary. A record is kept of visitors to this department, and 
shows that it is a benefit to the whole countiy. The collec- 
tion, received by gift from the United States Government 
and from foreign governments, needs larger and more acces- 
sible quarters, which your committee is glad to know will be 
provided in the new building. 

The Present Building 

is already too small, inconvenient, and unsafe for the Library 
as a whole. When Mr. Winthrop, in his dedicatory address, 
spoke of ample accommodations for many coming genera- 
tions, he hardly thought he would live to see the day when 

" Infinite riches in a little room " 

would crowd and cry for space. 

Owing to its location and the contiguity of lofty buildings 
the risk of fire ought not to be overlooked. 

The present danger is too great for such a depository of 
thousands of priceless volumes, many of which, if destroyed 
or damaged, could not be replaced. 

The whole building is also sadly deficient in ventilation 
and light. 

Your committee are pleased to know that plans have been 
obtained from the City Architect, providing, at a very reason- 
able expense, better air and light for the temporary purposes 
of Bates Hall, until the whole structure shall be remodelled 
(as we trust it soon will be), exclusively for the popular 
circulating portion of the books, the larger part of which 
is now in the basement rooms. 



Public Library. 13 

We forbear to comment on the dark and disagreeable 
apartments below, used at present by the public at large, 
inasmuch as the desirable change above mentioned will 
probably be accomplished within a few years. Meanwhile, 
we solicit your attention to the temporary improvement thus 
rendered possible. 

The theory of a great Public Library necessarily includes 

The Popular Circulating Department. 

This is somewhat distinct in its use and value from such 
parts of the Library as are used for the accumulation and 
preservation of literature for the researches of scholars, and 
for circulation among them. 

A Public Library in a crowded city consists in part 
of a collection of entertaining and more or less instructive 
works for the people at large : popular books of history, 
biography, fiction, travel, and adventure; also, periodicals 
and elementary treatises in science and the mechanical arts. 

This department aims among other objects, to provide 
employment and pleasure for minds which seek relaxation, 
and also for those who might otherwise be occupied in less 
profitable pursuits. 

Thus it indirectly fosters a taste for better reading. 

It also takes the place of special libraries in our common 
schools, and supplies mechanics with facilities for improving 
themselves in their various occupations. It ought there- 
fore to contain the very best books for these purposes. 
Your committee finds, from statistics carefully kept from 
day to day, that books of the better sort are more read 
than ever before in the history of this Library, and that this 
department is continually increasing the number of the 
improved class of instructive and entertaining books for 
the young, which is a characteristic of our times. It should 
always be kept in mind that three-quarters at least of the 
readers are young persons ; this is especially true of the 
branches. The employment of persons to advise the young* 
in the selection of books, and the readiness of all the officials 
to give such advice, cannot be too highly commended. 

Your committee is fully aware of the charges urged 
against the Library on the score of circulating books of a 
harmful character. 

The suggestions of the minority committee of last year 
have also been duly considered and weighed. 

It should be remembered that in a vast reservoir of lit- 
erature like this, good and bad books must exist together, 
and that the wisest supervision cannot prevent some harmful 



14 City Document No. 103. 

use of corrupting works. Besides, the keeping out of circula- 
tion of all books to which exception may be taken is bi'\ T ond 
the power of any administration, so long as the best "critics 
of morals " are divided in their opinions as to what books are 
injurious. It would be impossible for this committee per- 
sonally to inspect the thousands of volumes of fiction in the 
Lower Hall and in the branches. 

While deprecating the fact that there may be injurious 
works in the accessible parts of the Library, which have 
escaped the vigilance of the authorities, Ave do not see how 
a committee of inspection outside the present administration, 
could be made efficient. We are inclined therefore to 
intrust this important matter of suppressing all works dis- 
covered to be vicious, to the men and women who hase 
charge of the Library, and who can find out its contents 
better than any one else. We are satisfied that, so far as they 
can, the librarians conscientiously deny to the public access 
to any works fairly considered to be of a demoralizing charac- 
ter ; the Trustees refuse to provide duplicates of recent works 
of fiction which cumber the shelves after their novelty is gone ; 
feeble books give place to those of a more robust char- 
acter, and the really objectionable ones, when discovered, 
are kept under lock and key ; very little if any " trash " 
is now purchased, and therefore we can only recommend the 
most constant vigilance and the utmost circumspection pos- 
sible. To do more than this would be to imply a lack of 
purity, or at least an indifference to it in others, on the part 
of those appointed to provide reading for the public. We 
rejoice that the percentage of the poorer sort of reading is 
gradually diminishing, and we heartily commend all honest 
efforts, within and without the Library, to reduce such read- 
ing to a minimum, especially among the young. Let 
parents, teachers, and others give immediate notice of any 
improper book with the stamp of the Library upon it. The 
committee would also suggest that the lists of the better class 
of popular books, historical, scientific, instructive, or enter- 
taining, which have from time to time been posted in the 
public schools for the stimulation and guidance of the pupils, 
be extended, and accompanied with a request from the libra- 
rian to the teachers that more pains be taken to encourage 
the scholars in a proper use of the Library. 

The public schools and the Library, as parts of one great 
system of education, might thus be brought into even more 
helpful relations to each other than exist at the present time. 

In addition, it may be possible to elevate the literary 
standard of the schools by giving to the higher classes an 



Public Library. 15 

occasional talk on books and their uses, at the Library build- 
ing, by one or more of the teachers or librarians. 



Catalogues. 

The problem of the best catalogue is how to bring the 
greatest number of books in the simplest and most con- 
venient way to the largest number of readers, — a problem 
by no means easy of solution, even if the factor of expense 
be excluded. 

Your committee cannot venture to advise, with their 
present limited knowledge, between the several modes of 
cataloguing the immense number of books in this Library. 
While for younger readers and mechanics a printed cata- 
logue seems almost a necessity, for scholars the card 
catalogue must at present suffice, especially when the large 
number of books added every year is taken into account. 
For the special collections, like the Barton and Ticknor 
libraries, the more precise and full the printed catalogues 
the better, since these collections are complete in themselves 
and permanent. 

We would, however, advise a consolidated catalogue of 
authors and titles, including subject-references, supple- 
menting the lists now in use in the popular circulating 
department. 

This would do much towards satisfying many who ask 
only for new publications, by aiding them in making other 
selections. 

Your committee is impressed with the fact that so few 
books are lost or stolen out of the immense number circu- 
lated among all classes. It seems to argue that a sense of 
honor, as well as a love of reading, is developed among the 
people, by freely trusting them with the books, which are 
understood to be the property of all alike. 

The Branches. 

We doubt if the general public is aware of the effective 
work done by this Library, by means of its eight branches 
and six delivery-stations. 

At several of the branches there are special collections of 
valuable books. Such are the rich Library of the Fellowes 
Athenreum at the Highlands, and the Harris collection at 
Charlestown. 

In some localities the accommodations are excellent, espe- 



16 City Document No. 103. 

cially at the Highlands, where the building in which the Fel- 
lowes Library is deposited is superb, although it is a most 
inconvenient location for the general public. 

It is very obvious however, to your committee, that the 
rooms of the East Boston branch are not only inadequate in 
size, but very unfortunately placed over the police-station 
of that district. The present plan of enlarging this building, 
with its Public School and Library above, and its court-rooms 
for criminals below, appears to us the very worst possible 
arrangement for the good of this branch. That ladies and 
children visiting this Library are compelled to witness the 
scenes that daily occur in and around this building is a re- 
proach to the city which ought to be removed. 

The lack of many duplicates of recent works of fiction at 
the branches — which has been sometimes complained of — 
esems to us a wise economy on the part of the Trustees, who 
decline to increase the number of such books indefinitely. 

The librarians of the various branches are enthusiastic over 
the improvement they see in the reading public which uses 
their rooms and books. 

They are anxious to maintain as high a standard in all de- 
partments as the surroundings will allow. In the more 
favored locations the citizens take a just pride in their local 
collections, and the Trustees are wisely adding new delivery- 
stations wherever the population and the demand warrant the 
increased outlay. 



The Administration. 

The complicated machinery of this great institution is now 
adjusted admirably to the working force. The business of 
the various financial departments appears to be most system- 
atically conducted. The current expenses, for which the 
means are furnished by the city, are paid each month by the 
city treasurer, after being approved by the Trustees. Thus, 
very little money passes through the hands of the officials or 
Trustees. 

The more expensive books for Bates Hall and the special 
collections are bought with the income of funds given by 
individuals. 

Your committee concur with the opinion of the Examining 
Committee of last year in regard to a larger allowance of 
salary for such members of the working force as might be 
designated by the Trustees. The skilled intellectual labor 
of a portion of those employed demands exceptional qualifi- 
cations, which ought to be correspondingly remunerated. 



Public Library. 17 

The advantages of having the binding done in the building, 
under the immediate supervision of the librarian, are so ob- 
vious, that it is commended, even at a slightly increased cost 
over the same work done outside. 

The relations between the Trustees and the Librarians 
appear to be harmonious and satisfactory. 

While the Trustees give a great deal of valuable time and 
thought gratuitously to the Library, those in daily charge of 
its affairs seem to be no less interested in the endeavor to 
enrich and purify the streams that flow from this source of 
public benefaction. 

We commend to them the use of even greater efforts to 
satisfy the demands, both of those who read and those who 
are interested in the elevation of the great variety of readers. 

Our investigations cause us to realize more than ever 
before, how much good citizenship depends on the use that 
is made of this noble institution, which contains within its 
walls enough of health to make the whole world well. 

In conclusion, your committee congratulates the com- 
munity on the recent decision of the City Government to 
build 

A New Library Building. 

The site which is now secured is a most commanding and 
suitable one. When placed in the new structure the most 
valuable part of the Library will be permanently safe. 

Facilities will there be offered to scholars which will leave 
little to be desired ; and the general public will be far better 
served than ever before, by the occupation and improvement 
of the whole of the building on Boylston street as a centre 
for the circulating department. 

It is obvious that great care and forethought must be ex- 
ercised in adapting the new structure to its most desirable 
ends. 

We commend the wisdom of the city in obtaining sufficient 
space for any future of which the present can justly take 
thought. The construction will naturally be carried forward 
under the watchful eye of all friends of free libraries. The 
plans will require the best professional talent, and to that 
talent must be added a knowledge and practical experience 
of the needs of such a library in its actual working. 

Your committee consider the public fortunate in being able 
to entrust the execution of this important work to the excel- 
lent Board of Trustees, and to its President, Mr. W. W. 
Greenough, w T hose able care and sound judgment may be 



18 City Document No. 103. 

confidently relied upon, notwithstanding the magnitude of 
the undertaking. 

ALEXANDER S. TWOMBLY, 
RICHARD SULLIVAN, 
THOMAS S. PERRY, 
JOHN G. BLAKE, 
T. W. HIGGINSON, 
J. AUDLEY MAXWELL, 
WM. F. APTHORP, 
AUGUSTUS LOWELL, 

Examining Committee. 



Public Library. 19 



Report on the Parker Library. 

To the Trustees of the Public Library : — 

The remarkable collection of books bequeathed by Rev. 
Theodore Parker to the Public Library of Boston has never 
been separately catalogued, as has been the case with the 
Ticknor and Barton collections. It was simply included in 
the books indexed in the Supplement to the Bates Hall Cata- 
logue ; and the books coming from this source are not there 
distinguishable from the mass of other works. The collec- 
tion has always been kept by itself in the Library, and there 
is a manuscript catalogue of a portion of it, prepared under 
Mr. Parker's own direction. The bequest has now been 
completed by the reversion of that part of the library re- 
tained by Mrs. Parker until her death, under the pro- 
visions of her husband's will. It therefore seems proper that 
there should be some special report upon a collection so 
valuable in itself, so interesting through its personal asso- 
ciations, and historically so important to the Public Library, 
as being the first considerable private collection which it in- 
herited by bequest. 

The books which came to the Library at Mr. Parker's 
death numbered 11,190 volumes, besides 2,500 pamphlets, 
which were afterwards bound and accounted as books. (In- 
dex of Books in Bates Hall ; Supplement; Prefatory Note.) 
At the death of Mrs. Parker, 2,117 additional volumes be- 
came the property of the Library, besides 280 volumes of 
her own which she bequeathed. To these are to be added 
a small number of volumes relating to Mr. Parker, but pre- 
sented by others, and properly to be considered in connec- 
tion with his library, making up the whole number of books 
under this head to nearly sixteen thousand. This does not 
include Mr. Parker's manuscripts and literary materials, 
these having passed, at Mr. Parker's death, into the pos- 
session of Mr. F. B. Sanborn, of Concord, who is to act 
henceforth as literary executor. 

The library was formed under circumstances somewhat 
peculiar. It was the work of a man possessing a more 
omnivorous passion for books than almost any of his con- 
temporaries in this country, and enabled by circumstances 
to gratify that passion more and more as time went on. 
Beginning as a poor scholar, and then living on a very 
modest salary as the minister of a small suburban parish, 
he was early a collector of books to supply his actual needs ; 
and, after he had been transferred to a large city parish, and 
had become a very popular lecturer, he was enabled to set aside 



20 City Document No. 103. 

most of his income from the lecture source for this object. 
Books, which were at first the necessaries of his life, became 
at last his only luxuries. He justified himself for incurring 
the expense of their purchase partly by looking forward to 
a great work which he had planned on the History of Re- 
ligion, partly by the purpose, long cherished, of bequeathing 
these literary collections for some public service. For a 
long time this prospective destination Avas Harvard College, 
of whose library he had made much use ; but soon after the 
formation of the Free Public Library, in 1852, he was led 
to change his purpose by the conviction that the plan of this 
institution would make the books even more useful than if 
given to Harvard College. It is pleasant to know that one 
controlling influence which brought about this change of plan 
was — according- to his life-long friend and housemate, Miss 
Hannah Stevenson — his confidence in Mr. George Ticknor 
as a library organizer. These two men, resembling each 
other in their love of books and in their public spirit, but 
cut off almost from personal intercourse by their difference 
of opinion on public questions, thus cooperated in endowing 
the greatest institution of the city which they both loved. 

The library of Mr. Parker was thus collected with a view 
to actual use by himself, and prospectively by others, audi 
this affected its very selection from the beginning. It was 
not a show library, or the library of a technical biblioma- 
niac ; it was the collection of a specialist, but of a specialist 
with a wide horizon. It was formed by a scholar upon 
the lines of his own particular studies, but projecting 
those lines far beyond what he could reasonably expect to 
accomplish in a lifetime. In the midst of a career so exact- 
ing and laborious that, in spite of a most vigorous organiza- 
tion, he died an old man at fifty, Mr. Parker was always 
making a collection of books that represented both his pursuits 
and his purposes. On particular occasions he ransacked these 
books to his heart's content ; but they also represented the 
vast range of study which he never lived to accomplish. It 
often happens that the most valuable part of a student's col- 
lection may be that on which time has for him written JVo 
thoroughfare, but which opens such a thoroughfare for others 
after he is gone. 

It is easy to select the single book with which a view of 
the Parker Library should properly begin. " Which of all my 
books," the donor once said to the present writer, " do you 
think that I have most enjoyed ? " Then turning, he took 
down a well-worn copy of Ainsworth's Latin Dictionary 
(Philadelphia, 1820), inscribed in a boyish hand on the 
fly-leaf, "Theodore Parker, ejus liber, 1822," He was then 



Public Library. 21 

twelve years old ; it was the first book he had ever owned ; 
he had earned the money for its purchase by picking- 
berries on his father's farm — the farm which had been in 
his family for a century and a half, and from which his 
grandfather had gone forth to take part in the battle of 
Lexington. On this corner-stone the costly library was 
built up. 

It is doubly fitting to regard this book as the corner-stone 
of the library, because it is on a copious variety of diction- 
aries and grammars that its foundations are farther laid. No 
class of books contained in it has been more used by the public. 
Mr. Parker had himself the greatest facility for learning 
languages. Dr. Convers Francis used to say of him in his 
youth that when he had lent Theodore Parker the grammar 
of a new language he usually found, at their next meeting, 
that he had devoured half its literature ; and Professor 
Seligstrom, who taught him Swedish, said that he took it in as 
one eats an apple. He had given more or less attention to 
Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Arabic, French, Spanish, Portuguese, 
Italian, German, Anglo-Saxon, Mceso-Gothic, Dutch, Danish, 
Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, and several American Indian 
dialects — making more than twenty in all. The apparatus 
for nearly all these is to be found in the Parker Library, with 
that of many more which he had only wished to study. 
These last cover a wide geographical range, from the minor 
Sclavonic dialects to the African lanjmao-es and the Kawi 
language of Java ; and include, for instance, the very rare 
Mexican and Spanish dictionary of Molina, now worth £20 
at book auctions. Counting all these, the full number of 
languages or dialects represented cannot fall much short of 
forty. 

After the grammars and dictionaries comes a class of books 
to which the general public is inevitably indifferent, but 
which for scholars are of the very greatest value. Mr. Parker 
had a great taste for those formidable and ponderous works 
of which Bayle's Dictionary is the most familiar type, — vast 
and voluminous encyclopaedias, giving a summary of all the 
wisdom of their time ; books which, in one sense, are super- 
seded, but which, in another sense, can no more be superseded 
than the Pyramids, because they preserve indestructibly 
that of which the present has lost sight. They are inestimable 
as a part of the history of knowledge ; their very omissions 
are exceedingly important, for it may be as essential to as- 
certain definitely what was not known on a given point at a 
certain period as what was known. Such books are, for in- 
stance, llofmann's Lexicon universale, in 4: vols., folio (1698) ; 
Beyerlinck's vast Magnum theatrum vitce humance, in 7 vols. 



22 City Document No. 103. 

folio (1631) ; Moreri's Dictionnaire historique, 4 vols., folio 
(1724) ; Joeher's Gelelir ten- Lexicon, 4to (1750) ; 
Senders Welthistorie, 72 vols., 8vo (1744) ; Pierer's Uni- 
versal- Lexikon, being the copy presented by the author to 
J. E. Worcester, 34 vols., 8vo (1840) ; the series closing 
with Ersch and Gruber's enormous Allgemeine Encydo- 
pddie, 150 vols., 8vo, which belongs to our own time, and 
is still unfinished. With these should be classed the well- 
known French Biographie Universelle, and many other 
works not enumerated. Few American libraries are so well 
furnished in what may be called the retrospective-encyclo- 
paedic department ; and there is always a possibility that the 
faithful scholar may find in these vast mausoleums of 
knowledge some fact which he might otherwise have had to 
take a voyage across the Atlantic to obtain. 

In the department of literary history these great collections 
are especially to be found. These are, for instance, Meusel's 
two great lexicons of German authors, 38 volumes in all ; 
the Bibliothek des Literarischen Vereins in Stuttgart in 150 
vols., and a similar collection of equal size from a society in 
Halle. There is also Hammer-PurgstalPs great history of 
Arabian literature in seven bulky volumes, with other works 
by the same author. In the department of travels and 
geography there are similar voluminous collections, begin- 
ning with Strabo, including a fine copy of Minister's 
quaintly illustrated Cosmographia of 1554, with the great 
Allgemeine Ilistorie der Beisen in 21 vols., 4to (1747). 
There are also the more modern collections of Malte-Brun, 
Mannert, Herrera, Torquemada, Pallas, Berghaus, and 
others. 

Another favorite department of Mr. Parker was that of 
Jurisprudence, and this he used largely in preparing his 
defence — perhaps more laboriously learned than the occa- 
sion required — when indicted in the Anthony Burns case. 
In this department there are great folios of Roman law, with 
the works of Bynkershoek, Savigny, Rein, and Hugo. He 
even pleased himself by possessing the great Jurisprudence 
Musulmane, of Khalil-Ibn-Ishak', in six volumes, 8vo. In 
theology, as in other departments, his tendency was towards 
monumental works ; thus he not only has the early Christian 
fathers in the hundred-volumed Patrologia, of Migne, but 
has also the Maxima BibliotJteca veterum patrwn, published 
at Lyons in 1677, in 21 volumes, folio. He has also the 
Annates Ecclesiastici of Ceesar Baronius, published at Ant- 
werp, from 1597 to 1642, in 12 vols., folio; the works of 
John of Launoy (1731) in 9 vols., folio; Mabillon's Annates 
ordinis S. Benedicti (1739-45), in 6 vols., folio, and simi- 



Public Library. 23 

lar ponderous foundations of ecclesiastical history. Upon this 
is, of course, reared a great superstructure of modern and 
especially of German theology. There are also the com- 
plete works of the German metaphysicians of the first class, 
and some of the second class. 

Mr. Parker bought the Latin and Greek classics in the 
large collections which comprise them all, and had a few 
tine old folio editions, with many modern editions and 
commentaries. These all have their value, though often 
superseded by the more critical work since done. In some 
cases we see his special tastes in the accumulation : — thus 
there are a dozen different works on Aristotle, and all the 
best editions of the Greek Anthology, the Palatine text, as 
edited by Brunck (3 vols., 8vo), and Jacobs (10 vols., 
8vo), and that of the Planudenn text, edited by Bosch, with 
the versions of Grotius (3 vols., 4to). There ma}' also be 
mentioned Wolfs Mulierum Groecarum Fragmenti (4to), 
the Oudendorp edition of Apuleius (7 vols., 4to), Spalding's 
Quintilian, with Bonnell's Lexicon (b' vols.), and the com- 
mentary of Eustathius on the Iliad and Odyssey (5 vols., 
4to). 

There is not much in English literature, three-quarters of 
the books, perhaps nine-tenths, being in foreign languages. 
There is little in natural science, which he gets rather by the 
conversation of his learned friends, like Desor, than by 
personal study. There is something in the way of botany, 
for which he always preserved a farmer's love ; and one is 
surprised to find books on mathematics, to which he is not 
known to have given much attention. There is a good deal 
of European and ancient history, and a large collection of 
the more common histories, biographies, and a collection of 
works in American history, but few rare Americana. There 
is, of course, a large collection of books and pamphlets 
bearing on American Slavery. There is also a very consid- 
erable gathering of out-of-the-way books on the Occult 
Sciences, for which he had, like many studious men, a 
covert taste. This includes such books as Lobeck's Agla- 
qphamus — a study of ancient systems — and KeifFs edition 
of the Oneirocritica of Artemidorus, — a work on the inter- 
pretation of dreams. 

One naturally wishes to track the personal footsteps of a 
man like Theodore Parker through the books he used ; but 
this is rather difficult, and one is a little disappointed at the 
infrequency of notes and memoranda. No doubt it is the 
more indolent scholars, like Coleridge, who annotate their 
books ; and Parker was the busiest of men apart from all 
literary work. He wrote largely for the "Dial," and he 



24 City Document No. 103. 

edited the "Massachusetts Quarterly Review," which was 
to be, he said, " the f Dial ' with a beard" ; but there are no 
notes in his copy of either. 

The interleaved copy of his translation of De Wette has 
a few notes and emendations for another edition. It is in- 
teresting, as a proof of his promptness and activity as a 
student, to see that he owned, in 1837, Comte's Oours de 
Philosophic Positive, which was originally published in 
1830-1842, and attracted so little attention that it is said 
not to have been noticed in any leading review until 1846. 
But there are no notes in his copy. Nor are there many in 
his copies of the classics, though the present writer was once 
told by Mr. John G. King, of Salem, one of the last of our 
old-fashioned classical scholars, that Theodore Parker was 
the only person he had ever encountered who could sit down 
with him and seriously discuss a disputed passage in a Greek 
play. Accordingly there are some hints and criticisms of this 
kind in one of his copies of JEschylus ; and there are many 
critical notes and references at the end of almost every one 
of the nine volumes of Duncan's edition of Euripides. It 
must be remembered that most of his classical study took 
place in his earlier life, when he had little money to buy 
books. 

The one department in which his notes are full and inter- 
esting is that of American history ; and these books show 
the great amount of work that went to prepare for his 
"Historic Americans," and also his extreme independence 
and freshness of criticism. His set of John Adams' writings, 
for instance, has plenty of such notes, including a very spicy 
summary at the beginning, in which he gives his opinion 
both of the statesman and his biographer; and in the works 
of Webster, and many others, there are similar notes. It is 
understood that an enlarged edition of "Famous Americans" 
is now being prepared by Mr. Sanborn ; and this when pub- 
lished may enable us to understand how it is that we have in 
his library ampler traces of preparation for this book than for 
most others. 

The element of personal biography in Mr. Parker's collec- 
tion seems naturally to culminate in a remarkable collection of 
personal memorials of him, prepared by Miss Matilda Goddard 
and contained in eleven thick volumes presented by her to 
the Public Library. These are neatly bound, arranged, and 
indexed ; they contain most of his pamphlets and magazine 
papers and a large number of those occasioned by him ; there 
are also many original letters or documents bearing upon 
his life. It is, in short, such a collection as only affectionate 



Public Library. 25 

care could plan and close personal intimacy create. Aided by 
these and by the unconscious reflection of Theodore Parker 
in the library he collected, the future historian will be able 
to furnish a better picture than any yet given of his remark- 
able character and career. 

THOS. WENTWORTH HIGGINSON. 



26 City Document No. 103. 



Report of Mr. Thomas S. Perry, on French Literature 
in the Puhlic Library* 

To the Trustees of the Public Library : — 

Gentlemen, — Lust year I handed to you a list of the 
German books that, in rny opinion, were most immediately 
needed in the Public Library ; and since then, as I had done 
before, I have suggested many additions to what is already 
a satisfactorily full collection. With regard to the French 
books, my task is much more difficult ; for, although the Library 
already contains material for a careful study of French litera- 
ture, there are many directions in which gradual growth is 
desirable. What may be called the framework is provided. 
In the Barton library alone there is an admirable selection 
of important books in costly editions. 1 need only mention 
the now rare reprints of early Avorks that were made before 
1850, such as the Poteies morales et historiques of Eustace 
Deschamps, Paris : 1832; LLIistoire du Chatelain de Coucy 
et de la Dame de Fayel, Paris: 1829; the Chansons de 
Chatelain de Coucy; Legrand d'Aussy's and Barbazan's 
editions of the fabliaux, and very many reprints of the 
romans, la is, moralites, confes, fables, etc., etc. Among early 
editions are to be found the Roman de la Pose, 1529 ; 
Gamier s plays, 1585 ; those of Montchrestien, 1027 ; 
Tragedies sainctes, 1583 ; La Guisiade, 3d ed., Lyon, 1589 ; 
Jean de laTaille, vol. n., Paris : 1573 ; a volume of Scarron's 
comedies, 1670 to 1688 ; Le Marchant converti, 1582 ; Char- 
ron's De la sagesse, 1601 ; Le Tombeau de Marguerite de 
Valois 1551 ; the Marguerites dela Marguerite des princesses, 
1547 ; the works of Alain Chartier, Paris : 1529 ; Jean Antoine 
de Baif's Les Mimes, Paris : 1597 ; Le Moyen de parvenir, 
12 mo, pp. 623, possibly the oldest edition, at any rate very 
rare, etc., etc., etc. 

These books are obviously not mere bibliographical curi- 
osities. They enable the student to carry on his investigation 
of the beinnnino-s of modern French literature more 
thoroughly than he can do with even the numerous reprints 
of the early authors. These rare books fill many gaps. 

The Barton library contains also numerous early but not 
specially rare editions of various other important books. 
The best known, as well as many secondary writers, up to 
the middle of the present century, appear in the best edi- 
tions. The stage is exceptionally well represented. Many 
of Potrou's plays in their original form, those of Fagan, 



Public Library. 27 

Pannard, Boursault, Quinaulfc, and of many others, indicate 
the collector's taste for the drama and form an important 
supplement to the rich collection of early English plays in 
the original editions. The copy of Ducis is further enriched 
by the insertion of the original drawings for the illustrations, 
and of the engravings in three states. This is an excellent 
example of Mr. Barton's method in forming his collection. 
Besides his love for the best books, he had the book-buyer's 
hunger for whatever was unique. 

There are also a few volumes of the plays published at 
the time of the Revolution, and about thirty volumes of 
curious historical pamphlets belonging to the same period. 

Outside of the Barton library there is a large number of 
French books. The cheap reprints that have appeared in 
profusion during the last thirty years have been generally 
bought by the library, and it is to be hoped that the same 
policy will be pursued in the future. The mere fact that a 
book is reprinted shows that it has some importance and, 
since the price at which the}' are republished is generally 
low, the Library can evidently thus enrich its shelves at mod- 
erate expense. It is to be remembered that the editions are 
generally small, and that thus delay is dangerous. Just 
now many minor writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries are reappearing at a moderate price. I earnestly 
recommend their purchase whenever they are not already in 
the Library. 

I add no list of other books which seem to be needed, be- 
cause not a week passes, I think I am safe in saying, that I 
do not hand in titles for your consideration. I have during 
the year, however, marked in Saintsbury's History of French 
literature the lacking books which it seemed desirable to 
have. I have also run over Lorenz's catalogues for thirty- 
five years, and several volumes of the Bibliocjraphie de la 
France, marking what, in my judgment, it was important 
that the Library should possess. Not all the books thus 
marked are, of course, of equal value, yet all, I think, 
might well, in time, find a place on your shelves. 

Let me, in conclusion, say that the more I have examined 
the Library the more I have been impressed with the richness 
of its collections. The French and German departments 
were originally begun by ripe scholars. The lines in which 
they have been built up, in the direction of solid literature, 
show the wise spirit of those who began the task of col- 
lection, and their frequent use by readers attests their value 
in the public estimation. Doubtless with time the interde- 
pendence of all modern literatures, — the fact that they are all 
working together in behalf of civilization, — will become more 



28 City Document No. 103. 

manifest; the study of the modern languages will spread, 
and these departments will be more used even than hoav 
when this division of the Library is invaluable to all scholars 
and most readers. 

T. S. PERRY. 



Public Library. 29 



Report of William F. Apthorp, Esq., on the Musical 
Department in the Public Library. 



Mellen Chamberlain, Esq., Librarian Public Library, 
Boston : — 

Dear Sir, — As requested by you, I have examined the 
musical department of the Public Library, and find that the 
collection of musical biographies, theoretical treatises, and, 
in general, of such works as come under the head of" Musical 
Literature," is what may be called measurably complete. 
On the other hand, the musical library, properly so-called, 
the collection of works by great composers, is by no means 
rich, when compared with the condition of other special de- 
partments in the Public Library. 

As you have intimated that the trustees of the Public 
Library are anxious to place the musical department upon a 
footing worthy of the dignity, and of the prominent position 
the art of music holds at the present clay as an element of 
general culture, and have furthermore asked me to make 
such suggestions as seemed to me best calculated to obtain 
this result, I submit the following : — 



It seems to me important, in every respect, that the Pub- 
lic Library should own as many of the full orchestral scores 
as possible of the great masters. Such scores may be di- 
vided into two classes, — 

Class I., comprising such standard works as it is beneath 
the dignity of a great library to be without ; 

Class II., comprising such modern works as it is of inesti- 
mable and immediate importance to the music-student to 
have at his disposal, but the costliness of which makes it 
generally impossible for him to purchase. 

I therefore suggest that the Public Library purchase, as 
soon as practicable, the following works : — 

A in Class I. 

1. Such numbers of the complete edition of the works of 
Johann Sebastian Bach, by the German " Bach-Gesellschaft " 
(published by Breitkopf und Hartel, of Leipzig), as are not 
already in the alcoves. 



30 City Document No. 103. 

2. The entire edition of the works of G. F. Handel, by 
the German " Handel-Gesellschaft," in so far as it has yet 
appeared. It also is published by Breitkopf und Hartel. 

3. The following complete editions by Breitkopf und 
Hartel: — Beethoven, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Schu- 
mann. 

4. The following standard scores, completed by Robert 
Franz : — 

Bach's" St. Matthew Passion," Breitkopf u. Hartel, Leipzig ; 
Bach's " Trauer-Ode," Kistner, Leipzig ; Bach's " Weih- 
nachts-Oratorium, Leuckart, Breslau. Cantatas by Bach, 
published by Leuckart, Breslau : — 1. " Es ist dir gesagt " ; 
2. "Gott fahret auf " ; 3. "Ich hatte viel Bekiimmerniss " ; 
4. "Wer sich selbst erhohet " ; 5. "O ewiges Feuer"; 6. 
"Lobet Gott"; 7. "Wer da glaubet"; 8. "Ach, wie rltich- 
tig"; 9. "Freue dich"; 10. " Gottes Zeit " ; 11. " Sie 
werden aus Saba. Handel's "l'Allegro," etc., Leuckart, 
Breslau ; Aslorga's " Stabat Mater," H. Karmrodt ; Du- 
rante's "Magnificat," Ibid.; Handel's "Jubilate," Ibid. 

5. The following scores by Handel filled out by Mo- 
zart : — 

"Acis and Galatea," Novello, London; "Alexander's 
Feast," Peters, Leipzig; "The Messiah," Ibid. 

B in Class II. 

1. The following full orchestral scores by Wagner: — 

1. "Lohengrin," Breitkopf und Hartel; 2. "Tristan," 
Ibid. ; 3. " Die Meistersinger," Schott, Mainz ; 4. " Das 
Rheingold"; 5. " Die Walktire " ; 6. "Siegfried"; 7. Got- 
terdammerung," Schott, Mainz. 

2. The following full orchestral scores by Berlioz : — 

1. Requiem (Ricordi's 2d edition) ; 2. Te Deum ; 3. 
Symphonic Fantastique ; 4. "Harold en Italie " ; 5. Sym- 
phonic Funebre et Triomphale ; 6. " Romeo et Juliette." 

Furthermore, it seems to me a good idea for you, sir, to 
put yourself in communication, at the beginning of every 
season, with Mr. Georg Henschel, of the Boston Symphony 
orchestra, with the presidents of the Handel and Haydn 
Society, the Philharmonic Society, the Cecilia, the Apollo 
Club, and the Boylston Club, and find out from them what 
important new choral works with orchestra (oratorios, can- 
tatas, etc.), or new orchestral works (symphonies, overtures, 
suites, concertos), they purpose bringing out during the 
season, and for you to purchase the full orchestral scores of 
the same for the Public Library. 



Public Library. 31 

I would also suggest that all the scores I have mentioned 
be classed as special books, and only allowed to be taken 
from the Library for purposes of study. 

I remain, sir, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM F. APTHORP. 

Boston, June 1, 1883. 



32 City Document No. 103. 

[O.] 

LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees: — 

My fifth annual report is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Increase of the Library. 

At the close of the library year, April 30th, the Public 
Library contained 422,116 volumes, a net increase for the 
year of 17,895 volumes, and the largest of any year not 
marked by the accession of an entire library. 

Of these volumes, 16,202 came by purchase, 404 by ex- 
change, and 5,340 by gift, a detailed account of which will 
be found in the Appendix. Nearly 12,000 have been added 
to the Bates Hall collection, and the remainder distributed in 
the Lower Hall and the branches. 

The largest donations are as follows : Mrs. E. B. Bigelow 
has presented, from the library of the late Erastus B. Bigelow, 
138 volumes on industrial science, uniformly and handsomely 
bound. Dr. Henry J. Bigelow has permitted the Librarian 
to select from the library of the late Dr. Jacob Bigelow 
927 bound volumes and 749 pamphlets, many of which 
are of very considerable value. From the British govern- 
ment has been received its annual contribution of British 
patents, this year comprising 6G volumes; from Dr. William 
Moon, of Brighton, England, 351 volumes and 200 printed 
sheets, in embossed type for the blind ; from Mrs. Edward 
Wiggles worth, and from Miss Caroline Dorr, valuable collec- 
tions of newspapers and pamphlets ; from Wendell Phillips, 
Esq., 1,303 books and 4,682 pamphlets, many of which are 
of great value, with a mass of anti-slavery literature which 
will strengthen a division of the Library previously uncom- 
monly full ; from the Arch-Duke Ludwig Salvator, of Austria, 
ten volumes of his own works, finely printed and illustrated, 
and from Charles F. Shimmin, Esq., the publications of the 
Chaucer society, the Early English text society, and the 
New Shakspere society, in 158 volumes and parts. Nor 
will I omit to mention in this place several important dona- 
tions made shortly after the close of the library year. Mrs. 
R. Anne Nichols, of the Roxbury Highlands, has presented 
to the Library 77 volumes, chiefly folios and quartos, and 
many of them richly illustrated with portraits and engravings. 
This collection, which has rarely been exceeded in value by 



Public Libeary. 33 

any single donation to the Library, has already been assigned 
to the same apartment which contains the library given by 
Mrs. Nichols' sister, the late Miss Eliza M. Thayer. From the 
family of the late Deacon Moses Grant have been received 
several hundred volumes and many pamphlets, comprising 
copies of many desirable books printed in Boston ; and from 
Mrs. S. A. Clark a collection of more than a thousand por- 
traits and engravings, gathered by her late husband, Elijah 
P. Clark, Esq., to illustrate Carlyle's History of the French 
Revolution. 

Nor has the Central Library been the sole recipient of bene- 
factions. Dr. Edward J. Forster has presented to the 
Charlestown branch a complete set of Braithwaite's Retrospect 
of Practical Medicine and Surgery, from 1840 to 1883, and a 
nearly complete set of the Boston Medical and Surgical 
Journal. Friends of the Public Library living in West 
Roxbury have given sixty-four dollars, which have been ex- 
pended in books for the Library in that ward ; and a citizen 
of South Boston has given one hundred dollars for the pur- 
chase of reference books for the South Boston branch 
library. 

The family of the late Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch have con- 
tinued their annual liberality, enabling the trustees to pur- 
chase, during the year, several hundred volumes on mathe- 
matics, selected mainly by the advice of Professor Runkle, 
and his assistants, of the Institute of Technology. And I 
desire to mention in this connection similar services to the 
Library, rendered by Hon. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., and 
Edward W. Sanborn, Esq., in the department of jurispru- 
dence, and by Prof. Thomas S. Perry, in French and Ger- 
man literature. 



Library Facilities. 

The additional facilities for the distribution and use of 
books added during the year are the North-End Reading- 
room and Delivery station, opened in the Hancock school- 
house, in which eligible rooms w r ere placed at the disposal of 
the Trustees, by the school committee, and fitted for library 
purposes by a special appropriation of the City council. A 
Delivery station has been opened at Neponset, which appears 
to be appreciated by the inhabitants of that section of the 
city ; and the trustees will soon be in possession, by vote of 
the City Council, of rooms in the old Blue Hill bank building, 
more convenient than those at present occupied at the Lower 
Mills, Dorchester. 



34 City Document No. 103. 



Circulation. 

The circulation of books from the whole Library exceeds 
that of the last year by 5,349 volumes, and presents some 
gratifying features. From Bates Hall, for home use, were 
taken 66,948, against 63,782 the preceding year ; and the 
hall use was 113,127 against 103,540, for the same period ; 
and the aggregrate use of 180,075 is larger by more than 
12,000 than in any previous year. 

This increase in the circulation of books from Bates Hall 
extends through all the classifications into which books are 
divided, with two exceptions. In the classics and in French 
literature, especially the latter, the circulation has fallen 
off. On the other hand, in American history, English his- 
tory, and theology, the growth of circulation has been most 
marked, being more than one third of the total circulation. 
Works illustrating the tine and the useful arts have been in 
demand. 



Circulation in the Lower Hall. 

From the following tables the Trustees will see the 
improved character of the books circulated from the Lower 
Hall, during the last year, as compared with the year 
previous : — 

Classification of Lower Hall Circulation by Per- 
centages for 1881-2 and 1882-3. 

Fiction and juveniles 

History and biography 

Voyages and travels 

Science, art, etc. .... 

Periodicals, in volumes 

Foreign languages .... 

Miscellaneous, poetry, etc. 

The above figures show a very considerable decrease in the 
use of fiction, and a corresponding increase in the use of 
other departments of literature. But, while the foregoing 
figures are gratifying as indicating the efficiency of those 
means, used particularly in the Lower Hall, to improve the 
quality of the reading, still it will be noticed that there is a 
very large decrease in the circulation of books from that 
department. 



1881-82. 


1882-83. 


64.23 


61.49 


7.01 


7.26 


4.03 


4.57 


8.96 


9.47 


4.93 


5.11 


3.52 


4.41 


7.32 


7.69 



Public Library. 35 



Catalogues. 

During the last year a much needed catalogue of the 
South-End branch has been published, and the effect on the 
circulation at that branch has been marked, as is always the 
case. All the branch libraries now have printed catalogues, 
issued as follows: Brighton, in 1874; Charlestown, 1880; 
Dorchester, 1882 ; East Boston, 1879 ; Jamaica Plain, 1878 ; 
Koxbury, 1876; South Boston, 1879; South End, 1883. 
These are supplemented by card catalogues at each branch, 
by titles published in the Quarterly bulletins, and by those 
in forms upon the walls in each building. Supplementary 
printed volumes will soon be desirable at Roxbury and other 
branches, and a new catalogue at Brighton. Nothing will 
supply the place of a printed catalogue, embracing under 
one alphabet, the titles of all the books in a library ; and 
since the branch libraries are designed for popular use, it 
becomes a serious question whether superannuated books 
should be allowed to remain in such libraries, thereby swell- 
ing the number of useless volumes, so as to render impracti- 
cable the frequent issue of new catalogues. 

At* the Central Library the work of revision of the card 
catalogue has gone steadily forward, and the improvement 
in its condition is quite marked. The aim has been to re- 
duce the bulk of catalogues as far as possible without inter- 
fering with its completeness, and to condense the titles 
within the closest limits. 

The Quarterly bulletins have been published as usual. 
Several lists begun during the year promise to be of great 
value. The preparation of the catalogue of the Benjamin 
Franklin literature in this and other libraries, for the 
Bulletin, has brought to light much unpublished material. 
The publication of special lists has served to show the defi- 
ciencies of this library, which, as in the case of the Franklin 
collection, have been largely supplied by gift. The index* 
of articles upon American local history, contained in miscel- 
laneous collections in the Public Library, which was begun 
in the April number of the Bulletin, has been received with 
favor. 

The final revision of the cards of the Barton catalogue 
previous to printing is now going on ; and work is in progress 
upon a new edition of the Hand-book for Readers, which will 
consist largely of such lists of books as will serve to make 
the Library more accessible. One of these lists — an index 
to the notes upon books found in our own bulletins and cata- 
logues, and in those of other libraries, as also in various 
literary periodicals — has been finished and duplicated on 



36 City Document No, 103. 

cards which have been inserted in the card catalogues in 
Bates Hall. 

During the period from May 1, 1882, to May 1, 1883, 
16,025 new books, 4,217 pamphlets, and 4,084 serial volumes 
have been catalogued ; and 92,394 cards have been added to 
the catalogues of the Central library and branches, including 
those for books re-catalogued, but not those made for the 
Barton and Bowditch libraries. 

MELLEN CHAMBERLAIN, 

Librarian. 

April 30, 1883. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



LIBKABIAN'S EEPOET 



1883. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Volumes in the Special Collections of Bates Hall. 

IV". Volumes Located in the Lower Hall. 

V. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VI. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

VIII. Lower Hall Classifications. 

IX. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

X. Circulation. 

XL Registration of Applicants. 

XII. Books Recommended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIII. Bates Hall Reading. 

XIV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XV. Fellowes Athenaeum and Brighton Reading. 

XVI. Periodical Reading Rooms. 

XVII. Losses and Delinquencies. 

XVIII. Financial Statement.' 

XIX. Library Funds. 

XX. Library Service. 

XXI. Report of Examination of the Shelves. 

XXII. Work in the Library Bindery. 

XXIII. Examining Committees for Thirty-one Years. 



Public Library. 



39 



APPENDIX I. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 







§ 3 








s'S 


"s a 

a j 




Years. 


o3 
^3 


■i u 


Years. 


c-2 • 
^3 


00 cj 






so 

o ♦» 

Ha 








o *■ 


■5 9 <£ 

g £-1 

Ph 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


47,254 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


3,950 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


61,177 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


6,507 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


74,770 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


12,386 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


89,746 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


16,053 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


100,383 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


17,938 


21 


1S72-73 


209,456 


112,153 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


19,255 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


134,628 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


20,707 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


150,921 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


27,381 


24 


1S75-76 


297,873 


181,653 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28,874 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


196,958 


11 


1862-63 


110,563* 


31,043 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


212,414 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


31,837 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


227,010 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


32,553 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


236,534 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


36,566 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


250,495 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


44,443 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


261,056 










31 


18S2-S3 


422,116 


275,425 



Note. — The aggregate of pamphlets " added from the beginning " includes many since 
bound, singly or in groups (which are now counted among volumes), and a very large num- 
ber of duplicates which are thrown out and put among the pamphlets held for exchange. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, 1882-83. 



i 



^s 



Bates Hall 

Newspaper room .... 

Duplicate room 

Lower Hall 

Total, Central Library . 
Fellowes Athenaeum . . 
City part 

Total, Roxbury Branch 



249,440 

3,603 

14,173 

38,164 

305,3SO 

8,385 

13,614 

21.999 



East Boston 

South Boston .... 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South End 

Jamaica Plain .... 
West Roxbury delivery 
North End 



11,263 

10,961 

24,825 

13,190 

11,910 

9,947 

8,976 

3,144 

521 



40 



City Document No. 103. 



APPENDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE AND BY GIFTS. 

Note. — The increase of volumes is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because lost 
and condemned books are deducted. 



Years. 


Increase. 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
charged to funds 
and added by 
exchange. 


it 

u 
< 


p 

B a 

« a 

° >> 




Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


'Pamph. 


Vols. 


> CS 

3 




395,177 
12,239 
17,895 


251,538 
10,561 
14,369 


143,745 
5,291 
5,340 


178,S66 

8,773 

11,844 


250,474 
15,986 
16,222 


67,974 
2,068 
2,525 


7,143 
745 
522 


12.5S3 
520 
575 



1 Includes pamphlets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession 
catalogue. 

2 Included in previous columns. The volumes are not the property of the Public Library, 
but form a part of the Roxbury branch, by agreement. 

Details for the years 1852-81 can be found in Appendix II. to the Report for 1881. 



APPENDIX III. 

VOLUMES IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





M 
l» 

X) 

H 


X) 


1ft 
i» 

3D 

H 


OB 

H 


OB 
H 


X) 

at 

H 


e 
t» 

x> 

H 


© 
XI 

tie 

H 


H 
XI 
Xi 
H 


x> 

H 


» 

X) 
X) 
H 


Patent library . 


2,120 


2,323 


2,457 


2,596 


2,731 


2,823 


2,897 


3,003 


3,066 


3,142 


3,259 


Bowditch libr'y 1 


2,542 


2,542 


2,542 


2,542 


2,592 


2,932 


3,043 


3,060 


3,152 


3,224 


3,456 


Parker library 1 , 


11,907 


11,907 


11,935 


12,292 


12,291 


12,296 


12,309 


12,322 


12,337 


12,363 


13,952 


Prince library . 


1,970 


1,970 


1,970 


1,970 


2,028 


2,029 


2,037 


2,159 


2,230 


2,274 


2,327 


Ticknor library, 


3,907 


3,907 


3,940 


4,285 


4,929 


5,171 


5,354 


5,432 


5,454 


5,463 


5,507 


Barton library . 




12,057 


11,902 


12,1082 


12,804 


13,950 


14,210 


14,301 


14,360 


13,487 


13,610 


Franklin library 
Thayer library, 


















202 


240 


292 




















893 


920 























1 See Appendix VII. 

2 The number given in 1874 was as near as could be reckoned before the entry on the 
Accession catalogue was made. The number given in 1875 is what had actually been entered, 
and the full number is given since these dates. 



Public Libraky. 



41 



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42 



City Document No. 103. 



APPENDIX Y. 

INCREASE OE THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 



' Gain in books . . 

. Condemned and 

S I transferred . . 



fiq (.Net gain, 



c 


H 


« 




00 


cc 


OB 


* 


95 


H 


p< 


H 


7,782 


8,506 


8,750 


24 


184 


19 


7,758 


8,322 


8,731 



11,729 
25 

11,704 



1 . 


'Gain in books . . 

Less transfers 

and condemned 


2,483 
2,094 


2,376 
1,164 


2,576 


2,378 

1,400 


s 


289 


1,212 




978 



Gain in books 



5 o 



$ I] 



132 69 41 98 






Gain by addition . 
Less loss by ex- 
changes, etc. . . 



Net gain 

Loss . 



784 

2,177 



386 
1,233 



936 

223 



713 



1.764 

781 



g f Gain in books . . 
o< I Condemned and 
1 5 ) lost 

"ill 

^ [ Net gain 



649 


587 


596 


406 


377 


372 


243 


210 


223 



604 
379 



f Gain in books . . 
o^ Condemned and 

is lost 


935 
581 


995 
644 


1,000 

485 


766 
304 


354 


351 


515 


462 



( Gain in city part . 

Condemned and 

lost 



Net gain 

Fellowes Athe- 
naeum. (Net 
gain) 



[ Total gain . 



77s 
333 



44:. 
361 



811 

335 



476 
2,111 



2,5S7 



1,090 
757 



579 


333 


745 


522 


1,324 


855 



' Gain in books 
: I Condemned and 



^ I. Net gain 



1,310 
340 



1,568 
425 



1,533 
675 



f Gain in books . . 
5 -^ 1 Condemned and 

■;- = 1 

fi5«Q 1 


273 
27 


183 
26 


108 
56 


140 
97 


246 


117 


52 


51 



«. fGain in books . . 
~ < ; 1 Condemned and 


926 
166 


640 

128 


828 
93 


767 
189 


JS£ 


760 


512 


578 



b; 1 ■ 


'Gain in books . . 
Condemned and 


539 
18 


450 
23 


460 
96 


569 
195 


Si 


521 


427 


364 


374 



"5 fGain in books . . 
■~ J 1 Condemned and 
*j| ) lost 

I Pi 


368 

no 


215 
200 


410 
197 


515 

288 


.55 1 


258 


9 


213 


227 



'Bates Hall gain . 


7,758 


8,322 


8,731 


11,704 


Lower Hall gain . 


389 


1,212 


loss 531 


978 


Newspaper room 










gain .' 


332 


69 


41 


98 


Duplicate room 
















713 


9S3 


E. B. branch gain, 


243 


210 


223 


225 


S. B. branch gain. 


354 


351 


515 


462 


Rox. branch gain, 


445 


476 


579 


333 


Fellowes Athe- 










naeum gam . . 


361 


2,111 


745 


522 


Chn. branch gain, 


970 


1,143 


858 


765 


Bri. branch gain . 


246 


117 


52 


51 


Dor. branch gain . 


760 


512 


735 


578 


J. P. branch gain . 


521 


427 


364 


374 


S. E. branch gain. 


258 


9 


213 


227 


W. Rox. branch 








74 


N.E. branch gain, 








521 










Total gain . . . 


14,112 


14,113 


**13,239 


17,895 



* There is a loss of 531 volumes for 1882, owing to the transfer of a large number of duplicates to the duplicate 
room and also to the fact that the number of books condemned this year exceeds those supplied. 
**This total gain includes the 1 vol. at the West Roxbury delivery gained during 1682. 



Public Library. 



43 



APPENDIX VI. 



INCREASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





<* 


IS 


ts 


!» 


an 


99 


O 


H 


« 






t» 


*• 


t» 


»» 


»» 


1» 


ac 


ac 


ao 






ue 


OB 


ao 


ac 


ac 


ac 


X 


t. 


ac 


at 


English books with 






















British imprint . . . 


J, 294 


1,533 


2,830 


2,237 


1,763 


1,781 


1,555 


1,841 


2,091 


2,058 


English books -with 






















American imprint . . 


3,807 


7,365 


10,501 


6,761 


5,546 


5,295 


5,637 


4,346 


4,856 


4,755 


English books 'with 






















Continental imprint . 


125 


375 


316 


180 


191 


233 


238 


1S6 


235 


232 




858 


767 


1,858 


1,742 


1,269 


1,372 


1,399 


1,245 


1,411 


1,427 


Total 


6,084 


10,040 


15,505 


10,920 


8,769 


8,681 


8,829 


7,618 


8,593 


8,472 



APPENDIX VII. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 

(Representing book* located only.) 



XIII. 
XIV. 
XV. 
XVI. 
XVII. 
XVIII. 
XIX. 
XX. 
XXI. 

xxn. 

XXIII. 
XXIV. 
XXV. 



Cyclopa-dias, etc 

niblkitjiajiliy and literary liUtory 

General history, biography, travel, and geography 

American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite literature . 

English history, etc 

French history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

German history, etc 

Greek, Latin, and philology 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geography, biography, travel, and literature ...... 

Periodicals and transactions 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, etc 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Politicale tomy 

Medical science 

Natural history and science 

Mathematics and physical science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Bound volumes of miscellaneous pamphlets 

Hound volumes o: 






Hooks tor tin' blind . 



(1 knckai, LlBRAr.T. 



1 ,685 
6,344 



23,733 
13,807 
7,634 
8,039 
5,520 
1,218 

1H.137 
19,129 
8,263 



5,414 
6,497 



Special Libraries. 



3,457 
1,359 



Total, 

including 
special 



2,267 
7,961 
8,392 
33,112 
31,227 
17,048 



5,228 
7,102 

20,704 
24,406 
9,958 
4,618 
2.S20 

11,992 
7,00s 

11, till 

5,474 

6,631 

547 



Kxci.anation,— < Oa-s III. includes general history, etc., when embracing several countries, 
and collected works of historians. 

Class I V. includes tie- collected works of American writers, and what of American literature is 
sometimes termed polygrapby. 

t I isse. \\, VI., VII.. and VIII. have the same scope for tie- respective countries that Class IV. 
has lor America Class VIII. includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the 
Scandinavian nations. 

i la-- XIV. includes political science and ethics, applied and unapplied, education, phrenology, 



Cla-s XIX. includes mechanics, military alel naval alt-, act iciiltnre, domestic aits, etc. 
Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the geueral library. 
The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for purposes of 

r learning percentage of use. it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the sub 



dft LsionB; as also upon such point* 

of the ranges devoted to tbeni ' 

Note. — The dates given in the special libraries column show 
by the library. 

Details for years previous to 1SS2 can be found i 



, etc., by summing the r 
year when they were acquired 
Appendix VIII. to the Report for 1881. 



■ Includes all books i 



i G, — 12,108 of them belonging to the Barton library. 



finally shelved the 



Public Library. 



45 



APPENDIX VIII. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 



CLASSES. 



Theology, moral and intellectual science, etc. . . . 

Jurisprudence and political science 

Medicine, mathematics, physics or natural science . 
Useful and line arts, military and naval science . . 

American history and politics 

Foreign history and politics 

Poetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric 



English prose fiction, including juvenile fiction, and 
other juvenile books 



Biography 

Travels 

Libraries, collections, periodicals, etc.* 

German books , 

Italian books , 

French books , 

Spanish books 

Books of reference 



Extent of L. H. collection 



1882 



1,961 
385 
2,558 
918 
1,169 
1,571 
3,279 

13,195 

2,732 

2,355 

3,800 

1,524 

158 

1,152 

3 

426 



37,186 



46 
13 
78 
55 
34 
33 
80 

347 
97 
71 

103 



1,026 



1,079 



1883 



49 

16 

109 



41 
123 

1,343 
126 
121 
210 



2,378 



To be de- 
ducted. 



5 
2 

12 
11 
19 
6 
37 

1,040 
31 
35 
156 
26 



1,393 






£2 



2,005 
399 
2,655 
979 
1,226 
1,606 
3,364 

13,498 

2,826 

2,441 

3,854 

1,546 

156 

1,171 

4 

434 



38,164 



Reported last year 37,186 

Gain in 1882-83 978 



* This class, embracing sets like Bohn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of course, which, 
in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heads of this table. 

Note. — The column of " Condemned books replaced," includes books condemned in previous 
years as well as in the current year. The column " Total added " shows the number of volumes as put 
iipon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. 



46 



City Document No. 103. 



APPEOT3IX IX. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1882, TO APRIL 30, 1883. 

Givers (excluding anonymous) ..... 575 

Volumes 5.340 

Pamphlets 11,844 



Givers. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B. 

Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Aldrich, A. J., & Co., Coldwater, Mich. 

Allibone, S. Austin, New York City . 

Almy, Francis, Chicago, 111. 

A lmy, Frederic, New Bedford . 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences 

American and Foreign Bible Society 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Salem .... 
American Bar Association . 
American-Belgian Chamber of Commerce, Philadelphia 

Pa 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 
American Ephemens and Nautical Almanac Office, Wash 

ington, D.C. ....... 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, Easton, Pa. 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Pharmaceutical Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 




American Swedenborg Printing and Publishing Socie 

American Unitarian Association 

Anonymous, 3 charts .... 

Anthony, Susan B., Rochester, N. Y. . 

Appleton, Nathan .... 

Appleton, William S. 

Archaeological Institute of America . 

Armas, Juan Ignacio de, Havana, Cuba 

Arnold, Howard Payson 

Arnold Arboretum, Brookline . 

Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railroad Company 

Baker, Henry A., D.D.S. . 

Balfour, David M 

Ballon, Maturin M 

Bancroft, Harlow P., San Francisco, Cal 

Bangs, E. D., Amherst 

Barlow, Samuel L. M., New York City 

Barry, T. S 

Bartlett, Mrs. M. D., Mendon . 

Barton, Rev. Walter, Lynn 

Basford, James L. 

Bcal, Hon. George L., Avgusta, Me. 

Bell, Alexander G., Ph. D., Washington, D.C. 



ty 




1 
1 
l 

2 
1 

108 

109 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
12 

1 

4 
2 

2 

1,053 



Public Library. 



47 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Benet Brig.-Gen. S. Y., Washington, P.C. 


2 






1 






138 




Bigelow, Henry J., M.D 


927 


749 


Biker, Julio F. J., Lisbon, Portugal. .... 


1 


1 






1 


Blaisdell, Frank C 


1 




Blake, Eli W., New Haven, Conn. ..... 


1 




Blodgett, Albert N., M. D 




5 


Blood, Mrs. James G. ...... 


1 




Boardman, Mrs. W. L. P 


1 




Bolles, William P., M.D. . 


16 




Bolton, H. Carrington, Ph. P., Hartford, Conn. 




1 


Bontemps, George, Amboise, France .... 




1 


Boston, City of, 3 maps, 6 newspapers .... 


380 


370 


Assessors' Department ...... 


17 




Auditor of Accounts ...... 


4 


66 


Board of Health 




2 


Fire Commissioners, 1 engraving .... 


1 








1 






1 


Overseers of the Poor ...... 


1 




Police Commissioners ...... 




4 






2 


_ S\r*lirww Ptimtnit'tr'P 


1 

7 




AV'itor Rn*irrl 




Boston Commercial Exchange ...... 


2 


Boston Gas Light Company ...... 


4 






1 


2 


Boston Young Men's Christian Union .... 




1 






1 


Boston & New York Air-Line Railroad Company 




1 


Bourinot, John G., Ottawa, Canada ..... 


1 


1 


Boutwell, Francis M., Groton ...... 




1 






2 


Bowman, Hon. S. Z., Washington, P.O. . 


6 


1 


Brace, Charles L., New York City ..... 


1 




Brackett, C. A., P.M. P., Newport, R.I. .... 




1 


Bradford, Charles F 


1 




Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., a lot of broadsides, 2 maps, 119 






newspapers, 2 photographs ...... 


18 


350 


Brewer, Mrs. Gardner ....... 


2 




Bridgeport, Conn., Public Library ..... 




1 


Brigham, William T., 1 map ...... 


1 


1 


Brighton Health Congress, Brighton, England 


1 






4 




Brookline Civil Service Reform Association, Brookline . 




1 


Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 




13 


Brooks, Rev. William Henry, Hanover .... 




13 






35 


Brown, Francis H., M.P., 7 broadsides .... 


4 


70 


Brown, J. C. J. . 


1 




Brown, J. Hurd ......... 


1 




Brown, Mrs. John Carter, Providence, R.I. 


1 




Brown, W. Symington, M.D. 


1 




Brown University, Providence, R.I. . 




1 


Budapest, Hungary, Statistical Bureau .... 




4 


Bulkeley, Hon. Morgan E., Hartford, Conn. 


1 




Burnham, Sherburne W., Chicago, III. .... 


1 


1 



48 



City Document No. 103. 



Givers. 




Butler, James D., LL.D., Madison, Wis. 

Butts, Bryan J., Hopedale 

Byrani, Edward It. .... 

Calvert, George II., Newport, R.I. . 

Campbell, John L., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Campbell, Samuel S. .... 

Canada, Geological and Natural History Survey, Montreal 

Candler, lion. John W., Brookline . 

Capen, John ...... 

Carret, Jose F 

Cartee, Cornelius S., M.D. 

Cayuga County Historical Society, Auburn, N. 

Chamberlain, Hon. Mellon 

Chandler, Horace P., 31) newspapers 

Chapin, Alfred C, New York City 

Chase, George B. 

Cheney, Rev. Oren B., D.D., Lewiston, Me. 

Chicago Athenaeum, Chicago, 111. 

Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, III. . 

Children's Hospital ..... 

Childs, George W., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Christern, F. W., New York City 

Christian Register Association . 

Christian Union, New York City 

Chute, J. M 

Cincinnati Observatory, 3ft. Lookout, Ohio 
Claflin, Hon. William .... 

Clapp, Herbert C, M.D 

Clark, Rev. George F., Mendon 
Clarke, Rev. James Freeman, D.D. . 
Clarry, Miss C. F. . . . . 

Cobb, Hon. Samuel C. 

Cobden Club, London .... 

Colby University, Waterville, Me. 

Collet, 0. D., London .... 

Collet, Prof. O. W., St. Louis, Mo. . 
Comite Central Itusse de Statistique. St. Petersburg, Russia 
Commission Geodesiquede laNorvege, Christiania, Norway, 
Connecticut Board of Education ..... 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven, 
Conn. ....... 

Cook, Clarence, New York City 

Cook, George H., Trenton, N.J. 

Cook, George J. . 

Cooke, Mrs. ...... 

Cooley, Mrs. MaryE., Adrian, Mich. 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 

Costello, Martin J., Clinton 

Cotton, Mrs. Lizzie E., West Gorham, Me. 

Courtenay, Hon. William A., Charleston, S.C. 

Cox, Hon. William It., Washington, D.C. 

Crane, Phineas M., M.D 

Crawford, T. H., Portland, Oregon . 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 

Crunden, Frederick M., St. Louis, Mo. 

Cullum, Brig. -Gen. George W., New York City 

Cummings, T. H. 

Curtis, Prof. H. S., West Point, N. Y. . 

Cusliings & Bailey, Baltimore, Md. 



1 
44 



1 
1 

2 

16 
1 
1 



15 

1 
1 

1 



1 
1 

15 

1 

15 

3 

1 

135 

1 
3 

2 



1 
33 

1 

2 
3 

10 
1 



Public Libraky. 



49 



Givers. 



Del. 



1 



Cutter, Abram E. 

Dahlgren Post 2, G.A.R. 

Dalton, Joseph G. 

Davis, Hon. Alonzo, Fitchburg 

Davis, Robert C, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Dawson, Henry B., New York City . 

Day, Albert, M. D 

Delaware Historical Society, Wilmington, 

Dennet, Charles F., Brighton, England 

Depping, Guillaume, Paris, France . 

Derby, Orville A., Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Devoe, F. W., & Co., New York City 

De Voe, Thomas F., New York City 

Dexter, George .... 

Dexter, Julius .... 

Dickerman, Rev. Lysander 

Dillaway, Charles K. 

Dixey, Wolstan, 12 newspapers 

Dixwell, George B. . 

Dodd's Newspaper Advertising Agency 

Dodge, James H. 

Dorr, Miss Caroline, lot of newspapers 

Dryden, Miss Minta I., Dayton, Ohio 

Duane, William, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Duffield, Rev. Samuel W., Bloomfield, N.J., 

Dunnell, Hon. Mark H., Washington, D.C. 

Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me. 

Dwight, Theodore F., Washington, D.C. 

Eads, H. L., South Union, Ky. 

Eaton, Prof. D. Cady, New Haven, Conn 

Edes, Henry H. .... 

Edes, Robert T., M.D. 

Edison Electric Light Company, New York 

Edmands, Thomas J. . 

Eigenbrodt, Rev. William E., D.D.,New 

Ellicott, Joseph P 

Elze, Dr. Karl, Halle, Germany 
Emery, George E., Lynn . 

Ernst, C. W 

Essex Institute, Salem 

Evening Post Publishing Company, New York City 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa 

Fall, Charles G 

Fall River, Public Library 
Fernald, Prof. O. M. ... 

Fernandez, Leon, Sa?i Jose, Costa Rica 
First Church, Lynn .... 
First Religious Society, Roxbury 
Firth, A., 1 map .... 

Fisher, Charles H., M.D., Providence, R.l. 
Fitz, Reginald H., M.D., 42 newspapers 
Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 
Floye, W. J. . . . 
Fliigel, Dr. Felix, Leipzig, Germany 
Folsom, Albert A. . . 

Forbes, J. M 

Ford, William E 

Forster, Edward J., M.D. . 
Foster, W. E., Providence, R.I. 



City 



'ork 



newspaper 



City 




Pphs. 



2 

14 
1 



1 
1 
1 

1 
2 

19 



2 

130 

1 



50 
1 

1 

10 

93 

2 

2 



2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
28 



146 



18 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



609 

1 

10 

1 
1 
6 

2 

1 

60 

14 



2 

1 

2 

18 



77 

59 

2 
7 

14 
11 

1 
32 

2 



50 



City Document No. 103. 



Givers. 



Foster, William H. . 

Fox, Capt.G.V., U.S.N. . 1 

France, Ministry of Public Instruction .... 1 

Frazer, Prof. P., Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 1 

French, John D. W ■ . . .3 

Fteley, A 

Fuller, Miss Edith D 

Gauthier, Mine. Victor ....... 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga., 2 newspapers . 

Gerould, Rev. Samuel L., Goffstown, N.H. 

Gibbs, J. Willard, Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 

Giles, Alfred E., Hyde Park 

Gillman, Henry, Detroit, Mich. ..... 

Globe Newspaper Company ...... 3 

Gloucester, City of 1 

Gould, Benj. A., Ph.D., Cordoba, Argentine Republic 

Gould, S. ('., Manchester 

Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Rhode Island, Provi- 
dence, R.I. ........ 1 

Gray, Miss Ann G 14 

Great Britain, Commissioners of Patents .... o'6 

Green, S. W., New York City ...... 

Green, linn. Samuel A., M.D., 15 broadsides, 1 chart, 73 

maps, 48 portraits, 32 prints ...... 28 

Greenough, Harry P., San Francisco, Cal. 

Greenough, Malcolm S. ...... . 

Greenough, W. A., & Co 1 

Greenough, William W 19 

Groo, lion. William J., Middleton, N.T. .... 
Groton, Town of ....... . 

Hale, Rev. Edward E., D.D 20 

Hale, George S., 3 maps ....... 6 

Hallett, lion. W. II., Brighton, England 
Hampshire, Franklin & Hampden Agricultural Society, 
Northampton ........ 

Harlan, Caleb, M.D., Wilmington, Del. .... 

Harlow, James H., Pittsburgh, Pa. ..... 

Harney, George J., Cambridge ...... 

Harris, Samuel T. ....... 

Harrison, J. B., Franklin Falls, N.TL, 2 broadsides 
Hart, Charles H., Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 

Hassam, John T. . . 

Hawkins, Dexter A., New York City .... 

Hayes, Miss Abby Stanley ...... 

Ilaynes, Prof. Henry W. ....... 2 

Hazard, Thomas R., Vauclitse, R.I. ..... 

Head-quarters of the Military Division of the Missouri, 
Chicago. III. ......... 

Herrick, Hon. R. R., Cleveland, Ohio .... 

Hildeburn, Charles R., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hill, Hon. Hamilton A 

Hill, Walter H., Jr 

Hinds, J. I. D., Ph.D., Lebanon, Tenn 

Hoar, Hon. E. R., Concord ...... 1 

Hoar, Hon. George F. ....... 5 

Holder, Thomas W 1 

Hollis, John W 4 

Homes, Henry A., LL.D., Albany, N.Y. . . . . 6 

Houghton, Mifflin, & Co., 4 calendars .... 



Public Library. 



51 



Givers. 



, Vi 



Norw 



Howland, Joseph, Matteawan, N. Y. . 
Hughes, Hon. John, Liverpool, England . 
Hunnewell, James F. .... 

Huntington, 3Irs. L. A. . 

Huntington, W. H 

Hutchins, Rev. B. T., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London 

Iowa Historical Society, Iowa City . 

Italy, Ministry of Agriculture, Rome 

James Lick Trust, San Francisco, Cal. 

Jay, John, Katonah, N Y. 

Jeffries, B. Joy, 31. D., 7 maps . 

Johnson, Rev. Samuel, Family of 

Jones, E. U., M.D. . 

Judd, Chauncy P. 

Kaiserliche Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt 

Austria ....... 

Kennedy, Frederick C, Burlington, Vt. . 

Knapp, Arthur M., 5 broadsides . 

Knapp, George B. . 

Knapp, Prof. William I., New Haven, Conn. 

Knowlton, T. S., West Brookfield 

Kongelige Fredericks Universitet, Cliristiania, 

Korschelt, 0., Tokio, -Japan 

Krewson, W. E., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Lancaster Town Library .... 

Lang, Hon. Henry, Newark, N.J. 

Latham, Williams, Bridgewater 

Lathers, Richard, New York City 

Laurie, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Providence, R.I. 

Lawrence, Abbott, 1 map .... 

Lawrence, Richard H., New York City 
Lawrence Academy, Groton 
Lee, John W. M., Baltimore, Md. 
Leicester Public Library .... 

Leicester Literary & Philosophical Society, 

England ...... 

Le May, Leon P., Quebec, Canada 
Lenox Library, New York City ■ 
Leve & Alden .... 

Lewis, John A. . 

Library Company of Philadelphia 

Lincoln, Francis H. . 

Literary and Historical Society, Quebec, Canada 

Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. . 

Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lowell, Mrs. John 

Loyal Legion of the United States, Massachusetts 

mandery ...... 

Ludington, J. ..... . 

Ludwig Salvator, Arch-Duke, Prague, Austria 
Lyon, W. B., San Francisco, Cal. . 
McCleary, Samuel F. . 

McDanolds, James S., Trenton, N.J. 
MacDonald, Carlos F., 31. D., Auburn, N.Y. 
McDonald, Frank V., San Francisco, Cal. 
Mace, Jean, Monthiers, France . 
McPhetres, Samuel A., Lowell . 
Mallinckrodt, James F., St. Louis, Mo. . 



a 'J 



Leicester 



Com 




Pphs. 



6 
1 
1 
20 
1 

4 

1 

1 

107 



11 
9 



2 
1 

10 

41 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 



297 

1 
3 

1 
1 
35 
4 
1 
2 
2 



1 
1 
40 
1 
1 



9 
1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
195 



1 
247 



52 



City Document No. 103. 



Manchester, England, Public Free Libraries 
Manning, Jacob W. . 
Marcus, Alfred A., and family . 
Marcy, Henry O. 

Massachusetts, State of ... . 
- Bureau of Statistics of Labor 
Library 



Massachusetts College of Pharmacy . 
Massachusetts Historical Society, 3 newspapers 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 
Massachusetts Medical Society . 
Massachusetts Universalist Convention 
Maxwell, Sidney D., Cincinnati, Ohio 

May, Miss Abhy W 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco, Cal. . 
Medical & Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 

Mai. 

Medical Journal Publishing Company, St. Louis, Mo 
Melbourne, Australia, Public Library 
Mercantile Library, San Francisco, Cal. 
Michigan, State of, Lansing 
- Railroad Commissioner . 
State Library 



Baltimore 



200 broad 



Milwaukee, Wis,, Public Library 

Minnesota, State Board of Health, Red Wing, Minn 
Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, Mo. 
Mitchell, Clifford, M.D., Chicago, III. 
Montague, Rev. Richard, Providence, R.I. 
Moon, William, LL.D., Brighton, England, 
sides ....... 

Morgan, Henry J., Ottawa, Canada. 
Morrison, Nathan J., D.D., Springfield, Mo. 
Morse, lion. Leopold .... 

Morse, William B. 

Morse Institute, Natick .... 

Murdock, A. L., 12 maps .... 

Murphy, Hon. Charles M., Dover, N. 11. . 
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge 
Nagle, JohnT., M.D., New York City . 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Board of Health, Washington, B.C. 
New Bedford, City of .... 

Free Public Library 

New England Manufacturers' and Mechanics' Institute 
New Hampshire, State of . 

Library, Concord, Nil. 

New Jersey, State Geologist, Trenton, N.J. 
New York City Mission and Tract Society, New 
New York Historical Society, New York City 
New York Produce Exchange, New York City 
New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 
Newbrough, Br. W. J., New York City 
Newburyport, City of 

Public Library 



Nichols, Mrs. B. W. 

Nichols, James R 

Nichols, Mrs. Mary P. 
Northumberland, Buke of, London . 
Norwegian North-Atlantic Expedition, 
tee, Christiania, Norway 



York 



City 




Editorial Commit- 



18 
12 
10 



351 



97 
1 
1 

42 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
2 
13 



Public Library. 



53 



GlTERS. 



Nourse, Henry S., Lancaster ...... 

Noyes, Charles J. ....... 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Odd Fellows' Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. 

Ohio Mechanics' Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Ohio State Library, Columbus, Ohio ..... 

Oliver, Mrs. J. P., 4 newspapers ..... 

Olney, Peter B., New York City 

Oregon State Medical Society, Portland, Oregon 

Owings, N. H..,Olympia, Washington Territory 

Packard, Rev. E. N 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester ...... 

Panin, Ivan, Cambridge ....... 

Paris, France, City of ....... 

Municipal Council ...... 

Parish, Roswell ........ 

Park, Rev. Edwards A., D.D., Andover .... 

Parmenter, Hon. William E., Arlington .... 

Parsons, Charles E., Lynn ...... 

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, 
Cambridge ......... 

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Perry, Thomas S., 2 broadsides ..... 

Phelps, Hon. Edward J., Burlington, Vt. ... 

Philadelphia Society for Organizing Charity, Philadelphia, 
Pa. . 

Phillips, Wendell, 6 broadsides, 2 maps, a lot of news- 
papers 

Pittsburg, Pa., City of 

Plymouth, England, Free Public Library. 

Pool, Wellington, Wenham ...... 

Poole, William F., Chicago, III 

Porter, Rev. Edward G., Lexington 

Portland, Me., City of 

Pray, Lewis Glover, Estate of 

Prescott, B. F 

Preston, Edward, London ....... 

Prince, C. Leeson, Crowborough, England 

Prince, Hon. Frederick O. 

Prisoners' Aid Association, Chicago, 111. .... 

Proctor, Lewis A., Milwaukee, Wis. .... 

Providence, R.I., Auditor 

Public Library 

Putnam, Benjamin W. ....... 

Putnam, Hon. Horace B., Manchester, N.H. . 

Putnam, Burr, & Co 

Quincy, Miss Eliza S., Wollaston 

Ray, Richard ......... 

Reale Biblioteca Nazionale, Florence, Italy 

Reale Istituto-Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere, Milan, Italy 

Redpath Lyceum Bureau 

Reed, John H., Cotuit 

Rhode Island, State Board of Health, Providence, R.I. 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. . 

Richardson, Miss Susan C. 

Rideing, William H 

Roberts, George, York, England 

Robertson, Hon. John B., New Haven, Conn. . 




Pphs. 



13 
2 

1 



36 



1,303 
1 



1 
1 

1 
2 

87 



135 
1 
2 



1 

3 

31 

1 



4,682 

2 
1 
2 
2 

40 



5 

27 



54 



City Document No. 103. 



Givers. 



Robinson, F. T 

Robinson, S., Glasgow, Scotland 
Rolfe, William J., Cambridge . 
Ross, W. T., Louisville, Ky., 1 broadside 
Rotherham, England. Free Public Library 
Royal Astronomical Society, London 
Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England . 
San Francisco, Cat., Free Public Library . 
Sawyer, Hon. Timothy T. ... 

Schlegel & Fottler 

Scudder, Samuel EL, Cambridge 

Seeley, Montressor S., W'obum 

Seymour, Hon. Norman, Ml. Morris, N. Y. 

Shaw, B. S 

Shaw, Samuel S 

Sheffield, England,, Central Library . 
Sheridan, Lieut. -Gen. P. EL, Chicago, III. 
Shimmin, Charles F. .... 

Shirley, Hon. John M., Andover, N.H. 
Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J., 102 broadsides 

Slack, Charles W 

Slocum, Charles E., M.D., Syracuse, NY. 

Smith, Charles C 

Smith, W. L., Lansing, Mich. . 

Smith, Walter 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Smyth, C. Piazzi, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Snow, Edwin M., M.D., Providence, R.I. 

Societe de Geographic, Paris, France 

Societe rlistorique de Montreal, Montreal, Can 

Spangler, William VV., Bloomington, Ind 

Starck, E. G. . 

State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 3Iadison 

Stearns, Robert E. C, Berkeley, Cal. 

Stennett, W. H., Chicago, III. . 

Stevens, Abel F., Natick .... 

Stevens, Henry, London . 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.I. . 

Strahan, Thomas, Chelsea 

Strict-Constructionist Publishers, 70 newspapers 

Strout, James C, Washington, D.C. 

Stryker, Adj. -Gen. William S., Trenton, N.J. 

Suplee, Thomas I)., San Francisco, Cal. 

Swansea, Wales, Public Library 

Sweet, Frank ...... 

Swift, Lindsay ...... 

Taylor, Daniel T., Hyde Park . 

Taylor, Edward, Andover 

Teele, Rev. A. K., Milton 

Thayer, Miss C. C, & Mrs. R. A. Nichols 

Thayer, Samuel J. F 

Thompson, Rev. Augustus C, D.D. . 
Thompson, Mrs. Elizabeth, New York City 
Thomson, John H., Santa Fe, New Mexico 
Tileston, Miss Mary W., Salem 
Towne, E. II., Worcester .... 
Truhner & Co., London .... 

Tucker, W. W 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsville, Ind. 



ada 



Wi 



Vols. 


Pphs. 


1 




1 




3 






1 




1 


1 




2 




2 






1 


1 


4 


1 






6 


1 




1 






1 




1 


123 


19 


1 




1 




1 






4 


1 






9 


4 


2 


2 






1 


7 






1 




1 


1 






1 




4 


1 






6 




1 


4 






1 




1 




3 


1 






1 


1 






4 




1 




1 




1 


2 




1 




1 


1 


2 






16 


3 




1 






1 


2 


2 



Public Library. 



55 



Givers. 



Vols. Pphs. 



ociety, Chicag 



III 



t, N 



Tyndale, Mrs. Hector, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Union Ferry Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Union Lodge .... 
United Polish National Benevolent 
United States. Adjutant General 

Army, Surgeon-General 

• Board of Indian Commissioners 

■ Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Engineers, 1 map 

Bureau of Statistics 

Census Bureau 

Coast & Geodi'tic Survey 

Department of Agriculture 

Department of the Interior 

■ Department of Justice . 

Department of tlie Navy 

Department of State 

Department of the Treasury 

Department of War 

Director of the Mint 

General Land Office, 1 map 

Geological Survey . 

Hydrographic Office 

Library of Congress 

• Light-house Board 

Marine Hospital Service 

Military Academy, West Poin 

Naval Observatory . i 

Navy, Surgeon-General 

Patent OflSee . 

Signal Service 

Supervising Inspector-General of Steamboats 

United States Naval Institute, Annapolis, 3Id. 
University of Kiel, Germany . 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. 

Van Etto, Prof. E 

Victoria Public Library, Melbourne, Australia 
Wadsworth, M. E., Ph.D., Cambridge 

Walcott, Charles F 

Waldo, Miss Phoebe M., Salem. 
Walker, Francis A. . 
Walker, Isaac, Pembroke, N.H. 
Ware, Rev. L. G., Burlington, Vt. . 

Ware, William, & Co 

Waring, George E., jr., Newport, R.I. 

Warren, J. Collins, 31. D 

Warren, Joseph H., M. D., and James R. Osgood & Co 
Waterloo Library and Historical Society, Waterloo, N. Y. 
Weckherlin, G. de, Minister from the Netherlands 

Wheelwright, John T. 

Whipple, E. P. 

Whitcher, Miss Mary, Shaker Village, N.H. . 

White, James C, 31. D 

White, Smith, & Co. 

Whitney, James L., 6 broadsides, 2 newspapers 
Whitney, Prof. Josiah D., Cambria 



Whitney, Prof. William D., New Haven, Conn. 



1 
1 
1 
1 

o 

1 
1 

1 
6 
1 
1 
3 
1 
62 
1 

51 
1 
4 



1 

34 

G 



29 
1 
1 
1 



3 

1 

12 

4 
11 

17 
3 

2 
1 
1 



106 

2 
2 
1 
1 



5 

1 

4 

28 

3 



10 

4 
20 

1 
1 
1 
2 



2 

1 

114 
1 

4 



56 



City Document No. 103. 



Givers. 



Whittier, Charles C. .... 1 broadside 

Whyte, Thomas M 

Whyte, Hon. William P., Baltimore, Md. 
Wigglesworth, Mrs. Edward, a lot of newspapers 
Wilder, Alexander, M.D., Newark, N.J. .... 

Wilder, Hon. Marshall P. 

Winchester Public Library 

Winsor, Justin, Cambridge ...... 

Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 45 newspapers 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 

Pa 

Woolrich & Co., Palmer 

Worcester, Samuel, M.D., Salem, 

Worthington, Roland, & Co 

Wright, Elizur ......... 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, Wilkes- Barre, 

Pa 

Yale College Library, New Haven, Conn 

Young Men's Library, Buffalo, NY. 

Young Men's Library Association, Ware .... 




1 
2 
2 
20 
1 



Pphs. 



1 

1 

1 

37 

1 
2 
1 



APPENDIX X. 



CIRCULATION. 

(Books issued.) 







Total Circulation. 


Bates Hall. 


Lower Hall. 


Bast Boston Branch. 


Sovtu Boston Bkanch. 


Roxbury Branch. 


« 








§ 


i 










i 


~ 


„ 






i 










( 










i 










- 




i 
1 


p 


B 




a 


C 


| 


Eh 


>. 

a 


| 


„,3 


aO 


| 


O 


2 


1 


& 


H 


i 

fl 




B 


3 




B 


- 

684 
762 


S 


K 


6h 


>> 
B 


►J 




308 

308 


467,855 
625,442 


1,519 
2,031 


3,073 
5,124 


e 


28,261 
34,441 


31,003 
37,872 


59,264 
72,313 


192 
235 


388 
544 


230,111 
245,244 


7,946 
7,853 


238,057 
253,097 


772 
S22 


1.44:: 
1,536 


07,754 
80,771 


458 
320 


68,212 

81,091 


6222 

263 


558 
712 


101, OSS 
107,651 


634 
915 


102.322 
108,566 


330 
350 












18T4 






64,092 


3,250 


07,342 


203 


612 


1875 


306 


758,417 


2,581 


6,074 








41,721 


39,016 


80,737 


263 


603 


264,325 


8,009 


272,S:;4 


864 


1,759 


85,134 


414 


85,548 


277 


789 


111,677 


84S 


112,525 


364 


S60 


87,079 






285 


680 


1870 


306 


847,021 


3,097 


8,035 










59,373 


114,329 


373 


877 


338,450 


10,392 


348,842 


1,140 


2,698 


89,949 


1,038 


99,987 


293 


856 


113,334 


988 


115,530 


370 


1,045 


98,304 


2,093 


101,297 


320 


925 


1877 


306 


1,140,572 


3,727 


8,348 








66,832 


74,786 


141.018 


463 


930 


392,995 


12,737 


405,732 


1,326 


2,439 


101,022 


1,605 


102,627 


335 


902 


131,969 


3,210 


135,179 


430 


1,075 




6,770 


140,829 


477 


1,190 


1878 


305 


1,183,901 


3,882 


10,478 








80,326 


66,670 


146,996 


4S3 


1,001 


378,439 


12,736 


391,175 


1,265 


2,902 


104,717 


1,879 


106,596 


313 


1,088 


137,010 


3,741 


140,751 


447 


1,414 


122,517 


7,513 




404 


1,100 


187« 


308 


1,180,565 


3,833 


8,747 








74,627 


89,163 


163,790 


532 


926 


350,521 


12,672 


363,193 


1,179 


2,085 


95,887 


2,794 


e98,681 


320 


916 


115,509 


3,335 


ell8,844 


503 


1,200 


123,492 


6,397 


129,889 


403 


1,013 


issii 


307 


1,156,721 


3,768 


8,781 








60,042 


101,100 


17U.142 


554 


1,045 


306,148 


10,369 


316,517 


1,031 


1,999 


105,197 


3,004 


108,201 


303 


951 


138,309 


5,261 


143,570 


467 


1,196 


119,450 


5,480 


124,930 


388 


1,017 


1881 


301 


1,005,OS1 


3.504 


8,637 








68,609 


96,764 


165,373 


547 


1,046 


257,592 


9,271 


266,863 


847 


1,849 


97,024 


4,097 


101,118 


318 


989 


129,251 


3,607 


132,858 


435 


1,137 


105,700 


4,912 


110,012 


360 


972 


1883 


303 


1,040,553 


3,434 


8,170 








03,782 


103,540 


167,322 


552 


1,052 


239,601 


11,191 


250,792 


828 


1,670 


88,901 


7,073 


£95,974 


328 


868 


125,409 


4,077 


129,486 


426 


1,074 


101,534 


4,739 


100,273 


347 


876 


1883 


306 


1,045,002 


3,416 


8,209 








66,948 


113,127 


180,075 


588 


1,181 


163,811 


32,119 


195,930 


640 


1,301 


92,833 


8,107 


100,940 


329 


876 


121,939 


4,472 


126,411 


413 


1,062 


105,797 


6,728 


112,525 


370 


906 





Charlestown Branch. 


Brighton Branch. 


Dorchester Branch. 


South End Branch. 


Jamaica Plain Branch. 


North End Branch. 


Vear. 


K 


| 


2 

33,391 

79, 17 i 
85,815 
106,816 
101,540 
88,740 
/74.74S 
80,822 
87,319 
B7.304 


B 


*a 


a 


a 


H 


> 
B 


T3 


a 


W 


H 


B 


^3 

>3 


& ' 


H 


H 


a 


>> 

5 


& 


j 


E-i 


i 


2 


i 


Daily average. 
Largest flail 




32,023 
78,169 
84,631 
105,21] 
99,537 
8 i,925 

78,682 
85,038 


1,368 
1,206 

1.184 
1,605 
2,008 

1,815 

1,440 
2,140 
2,281 

2,744 


327 
259 
279 
348 

289 
246 
273 

254 
285 


734 
704 
830 
902 
970 
685 
616 
789 
741 
775 


9,642 
21,394 

23,531 
27,832 
27,549 

20.737 
26,400 
26,067 
25,152 
25,905 


448 
1,274 
1,960 
1,698 

1,859 
1,574 
2,110 
2,292 

2 2'.-.'. 


9.042 
21.842 
24,805 
29,792 
20,247 
28,928 
27,980 
25,177 
27,444 
28,257 


8S 
79 
81 
97 
89 
93 
91 
a;, 
89 
92 


234 

314 
290 
328 
312 
302 
269 
277 
273 






































16,675 
632367 

67,692 
63,025 
56,785 
55,690 
53,904 
53,036 
65,678 


132 

899 

4,287 

1,949 
1,423 
1,026 
730 
1,449 
1,880 


r*16,017 
56,016 
71,979 
61,974 
59,673 
50,710 
65,188 

p54,,485 
67,558 


197 
206 
220 
197 
184 
170 
177 
144 
219 


439 
552 
620 
624 
575 
641 
541 
501 
650 

















































































1878 
1870 
1SSO 
1881 

188a 
18s:t 


41,303 

73,154 
77,016 
71,432 

01,453 
70,472 


1,099 
2,713 
2,275 
2,530 
10,283 
17,778 


42,402 
75,867 

79,291 
73,962 

;/71,730 
94,250 


183 
247 
258 
242 
318 
308 


667 
622 
080 
578 
670 
774 


28,174 
50,457 
52,406 
47,797 
16, 116 
41,758 


2,100 
2,503 
2,220 
2,311 
3,406 
4,379 


30,280 

52,969 
54,626 

50,108 
49,722 
49,137 


138 
171 
170 
104 
164 
161 


384 
413 
487 
467 
381 
411 






















211 





■ irrowed on \vlntc slip.-;, an J returned the same day. 
6 The E. B. branch was open on]} 807 days, i on furnace. 



C Includes the largest of each department on any day, without regard to il- brin- 
the same day, as in the previous entry under this head. 

(7The use of the Dorchester branch for 1875 was a little over three months. 

cThe Easi Boston branch \\.i ■ : ; . r 7th to 9th, 1879, for repairs \ 

South Boston from August 12th to November 2d, 1879, for repairs and enlargement. 



/ The Charlestown branch was closed from April 20th to thi tO 

books, and also from May 1st to the Lit! 
( /'l'hi.' Bast Boston '-ranch tfas cl ■ days. 

" SontaEnd " " " ^ 
» Dorchester " " li 6 " " durlni 

The North End branch was open 177 days during 1883. 



Public Library. 



57 



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City Document No. 103. 



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Public Library. 



59 



APPENDIX XIII. 



BATES-HALL READING. 



Classification. 



English history, topography, biogra- 
phy, travel, and polite literature . 

American (North and South) histo- 
ry, etc 

French history, etc 

German history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

Other history, topography, biogra- 
phy, travel, and polite literature . 

General and epochal history .... 

Greek, Latin, and philology .... 

Bibliography 

Transactions 

Periodicals 

Fine arts 

Natural history and science .... 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, eth- 
ics, education, etc 

Medicine 

Law, government, and political econ- 
omy 

Useful arts, mathematics, physics, 
etc 

Miscellaneous pamphlets bound . . 



Percentage of Use. 



13.2 

11.8 
6.1 
3.4 
1.5 

4.2 
3.3 
3.5 
1.2 
.5 
3.9 
8.9 
3.8 

11.0 
7.3 



13.1 

11.1 

5.8 
3.9 
1.8 

4.6 
3.3 
3.6 
1.5 



11.5 

7.0 



12.3 

12.2 
5.3 
3.9 
1.6 

5.1 
3.6 
3.9 
1.6 
.6 
3.4 
8.5 
3.6 

11.3 
6.6 



12.0 

12.4 
4.6 
3.9 
1.6 

4.7 
3.5 
3.3 
1.6 

.7 
3.7 
8.4 
3.8 

15.0 
6.4 

2.3 

9.1 

4.8 



Note. —In computing this percentage, the use of books in the Bowditch, Parker, Barton 
and Prince libraries — which are kept apart from the general classification of the Library — 
is reckoned as near as possible and included in the usual divisions, as is indicated in the table. 
(See Explanations to Appendix VII.) 

The figures for 1879 are only approximately correct. 



APPENDIX XIV. 

LOWER HALL AND BRANCH READING. 
[Bused upon Hie record of looks returned.] 



CL IBSE8. 

percentages. 



Fiction and 

iphy 



Science, arl . fine and useful, Iheologj , law, n 

profeesioxu 



• 





hi 


H 


CO 


« 


a 


H 

GO 


fc 


3 


70 


80 


76 


83 


70 


73 


62 


74.7 


G 


4 





4 


5 


8 


6 


5.3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


6 


3 


3 


7 


3 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


4.4 


7 


6 


6 


3 


5 


5 


4 


5 


4 


5 


6 


3 


4 


4 


21 


6.6 



.... 

spby 

Travel! and voyage* 

Periodicals 

a 

Miscellaneous 



7.01 

t.oa 

S.96 
4,98 



*A large number of the juvenile 
Books taken out on white Blips and returned the same day are not included. 

illation of the entire library for the past year was 1.045,902 [App. X.] of i 



are not fiction. 



fiction and juvenile 



Public Library. 



61 



APPENDIX XV. 

FELLOWES ATHENAEUM READING. 



d 

03 

5 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 


X 
H 


* 
t 

H 




*• 

/ 


9 

OB 

H 


* 

X 
OB 


H 
X 
X 
H 


« 

X) 

X 
H 


« 

X 
X 

H 


i. 


History, biography, and travels . 


43 


38 


33 


30 


37 


39 


33 


42 


44 


ii. 


Modern foreign languages . . . 


12 


9 


11 


10 


11 


10 


13 


11 


6 


ni. 




4 

10 


5 
10 


14 
9 


17 
8 


6 
9 


5 
11 


4 
11 


4 
10 


5 


IV. 


Miscellaneous literature .... 


11 


v. 


Theology, sociology, ethics . . . 


6 


5 


7 


7 


6 


6 


9 


1 


6 


VT. 




1 
4 
S 


1 

4 
10 


1 
4 

7 


2 
4 

7 


2 
4 
8 


2 
4 

7 


2 
4 
6 


■ 28 


2 


VII. 




4 


vin. 




6 


IX. 


Law, politics, government . . . 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 




2 


X. 




10 


15 


11 


12 


14 


13 


11 


. 


10 


XT. 
















5 


5 


4 





















BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 



I. 

n. 

in. 



Classes. 
Relative percentages 



Fiction , 

Biography, travel, and his- 
tory 

Other 



es 


»» 


X 


© 


© 


H 


« 


i» 


*• 


1» 


*» 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


80 


77 


76 


75 


76 


76 


73 


7 


8 


7 


8 


8 


7 


S 


13 


15 


17 


17 


16 


17 


19 



62 



City Document No. 103. 





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63 







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64 



City Document No. 103. 



APPENDIX XVIII. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



General Library 
Accounts. 



1882-83. 



Binding 

Books ... • 

Periodicals* 

Catalogues (printing) . . 

Expense 

Fuel 

Furniture (cabinets, 
shelving, fixtures, etc.) 

Gas 

Printing (miscellaneous) 

Stationery 

Salaries 

Transportation, Postage, 
etc 

Total 



City appro- 
priations. 



$3,000 

17,000 

4,000 
3,000 
3,000 

2,000 
5,000 

4,000 

73,000 

2,000 



Expended. 



$1,436 10 

24,953 49 
3,536 99 

4,554 84 
3,488 10 
3,126 45 



1,178 5. r > 
5,473 96 

3,725 51 

71,623 41 

1.SS0 14 



$116,000 $124,977 54 



Fellowes 
Athenaeum, 



$1,147 47 



1,147 47 



Paid into City 
treasury from 
fines and sales 
of catalogues. 



Year. 



1873 
1874 

1875 

1876 
1877 

1878 
1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 
1883 



$1,681 79 

2,000 00 

2,360 24 
2,505 35 
3,092 12 

3,266 31 
2,618 32 

2,984 12 

3,497 03 

2,945 74 
3,223 14 



* The appropriation for periodicals is included in that for hooks. 

Note. — The expenditures for books cover the cost of those chargeable to the trust 
funds account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the city, and also 
include such as are bought with the balances with the foreign agents at the close of the 
previous year. The financial and library years now nominally correspond, but it will happen 
that bills accruing subsequently to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year, 
payable April 1st, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account beginning 
nominal^- May 1st. In this way books added between March 15th and May 1st may be 
counted in one year's growth, and paid for in the subsequent year's account. The cost of 
maintaining branches after the first year makes part of the general items of the several 
appropriations. 

The money for books bought on account of the Fellowes Athenaeum is spent under the 
direction of the book committee of the trustees ot the Fellowes fund. 

Details for previous years can be found in Appendix XIX. to the report for 1881. 



NORTH END BRANCH. 

City Appropriation, §4,000. 

Salaries $672 48 

Books 705 71 

Expense 1,027 86 

Amount actually expended $2,406 05 



Public Library. 



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66 



City Document No. 103. 



APPENDIX XX. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. 

(April 30, 1883.) 



Name. 



Mellen Chamberlain 



James L. Whitney 
Jose F. Carret . . 



Louis F. Gray . . . , 

Adelaide A. Nichols , 

Frank A. Thain . . . 

Total 



1869 
18T5 

1880 
1868 
1883 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian and Clerk of the Cor 
poration 



Principal Assistant Librarian . 

Register, and Curator of patents 
ami engravings 



Librarian's Secretary . 
Auditor and Cashier . 
Librarian's Runner . 



James L. Whitney , 
William H. Foster . , 



Jose F. Carret .... 

Lindsay Swift .... 
Elizabeth T. Reed . . 
Roxanna M. Eastman 

Frank C. Blaisdell . . 
Annie C. Miller . . . 
Annie E. Hutchins . 
Edward B. Hunt . . 
Alice M. Poree . . . 

Card Catalogues 
Harriet C. Blake . 
Carrie K. Burnell . . 
Mary F. Osgood . . . 
Alice Browne .... 
William Walsh . . . 

Total 



1869. 
1860. 

1875. 

1878. 
1873. 

1859. 

1876. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1866. 

1880. 
1881. 

1877. 
1883. 
1882. 



Principal of the department . 

Cataloguer for Branch libraries 
and Proof Reader 



Register, Curator of patents and 
engravings and Assistant . . 



Assistant . 
Assistant . 



Extra Assistant and Cataloguer 
of U.S. documents 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent room, etc. . 



Curator 

Curator of official card catalogue 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Runner 



15 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



67 



"S 

o 

£ 

u 

o 
ft. 


Name. 


£ co 


Position, duties, etc. 


u 

— V 

5 


1 4 

- 

Vol 

rt eg 
£ ? 
Z * 

5 " 


•a 




Edith D. Fuller 

Agnes R. Dame 

Total 


1867. 
1879. 
1883. 
1868. 
1882. 


Chief Clerk 


1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

5 






8 
3 ?> 














— - 












i 


Appleton P. C. Griffin . 
William F. Canny 

Total .... .... 


1865. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 




1 
1 
1 
1 

4 






c 

a, 

(=1 


Asst. in charge of repairs, etc. 






4 












Arthur Mason Knapp . . 

Thomas M. Whyte .... 

Elizabeth J. Collins .... 
W. Maynard L. Young . . 

Benjamin White 

Total 


1875. 
1867. 
1874. 
1875. 
1865. 
1878. 
1880. 
1882. 
1883. 
1883. 


Librarian of Bates Hall .... 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 












1 

CO 






a 

ft? 






















10 














Edward Tiffany .... 

William F. Robinson . . . 
Thomas H. Cummings . . . 

Caroline E. J. Poree .... 
Sarah A. Mack 

Annie M. Kennedy .... 
Ella R. Dillon 


1878. 
1877. 
1872. 
1879. 

1859. 
1863. 
1863. 
1869. 
1876. 
1881. 
1874. 
1878. 


Librarian of Lower Hall . . . 

Clerk for registration and fines 
Curator of Lowell Hall card 


1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






1 


Registration and Assistant . . 
Delivery desk and Assistant . 
Assistant in reading-room . . 
Record of slips and Substitute . 
Return slips and Assistant . • 





68 



City Document No. 103. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Mary Sheridan . . . 
Rebecca J. Briggs . . 
Julia Twickler . . . 
John J. Butler . . . 
Evening Service. 
Frank C. Blaisdell . . 
Robert B. Ross . . . 
Louis F. Gray .... 
Catherine McGrath . 
Harry Young .... 
William L. Day . . . 
T. J. McCormick . . 
Horace Burnham . . 
J. H. Reardon .... 
Total 



H 



1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1878. 

1883. 
1873. 
1881. 
1873. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1882. 
1882. 



Position, duties, etc. 



Runner . . . . 
Runner . . . , 
Runner . . . , 
Care of shelves , 



Registration Clerk and Sunday 
service 



Reading-room . 
Card catalogue 
Receiving desk 
Runner . . . 
Runner ... 
Runner ... 
Runner . . . 
Runner . . . 



William E. Ford .... 
William F. Adams . . . . 

John White 

William Monahan .... 

Extra daily Assistants. 

Total 



1858. 
1879. 
1880. 
1883. 



Janitor , 

Night Watchman . 

Porter 

Porter 



c »> 



Andrew M. Blake . 
Frank Ryder . . . , 
P. B. Sanford . . . . 
Wm. Hernstead . . 
William F. Sampson 
Arthur Siguere . . . 
Mary E. Austen . . , 
Martha M. Wheeler , 
Mary Gr. Moriarty . , 
Sarah E. Bo wen . , 
Sarah Dumas . . . . 
Mary J. Morton . . 
Samuel Macconnell 
Total 



1870. 
1883. 
1879. 
1883. 
1880. 
1881. 
1874. 
1869. 
1875. 
1876. 
1881. 
1881. 
1877. 



Foreman .... 
Extra forwarder 
Finisher . . . . 
Pressman . . . 
Forwarder . . . 
Forwarder . . . 
Forewoman . . 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Apprentice . . . 



Public Library. 



69 



LIBRARY SERVICE. —Continued. 



Name. 



+5 o 



Position, duties, etc. 



E 



Sarah C. Godbold 
Mary R. Pray . . . 
Alice M. Wiug . . 
Mary E. Cathcart . 
E. L. Lennon ... 
Adelia H. Ghen . . 
Eva D. Merrill . . 
Anna B. Rollins . . 
Ada J. McConnell . 
George H. Hosea . 
Total .... 



1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1881. 
1876. 
1879. 
1882. 
1881. 
1S73. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



N. Josephine Bullard 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Emogene C. Davis . . . . 
Idalene L. Sampson . . . 

Mary Watson 

Reata Watson 

Mabel Pond 

Lilla F. Davis 

Emmie W. Bragdon . . . 

Amy Acton 

Emma Le Fevre 

Etta Le Fevre 

Joseph Baker 

Total 



1883 
1872 
1873 
1877 
1873 
1873 
1879 
1881 
1882 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1872 



Librarian 

Registration Clerk 
Delivery Clerk . . 
Receiving Clerk . 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Janitor 



Sarah Bunker . . 
Mary Bradley . . . 
Elizabeth C. Berry 
Helen M. Bell . . . 
Dora Puffer . . . . 



Helen R. Crowell 



1876. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1878. 

1882. 



Librarian 
Assistant . 
Assistant . 
Assistant . 



Reading-room and registration 
Clerk 



Extra Assistant 



70 



City Document No. 103. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 






Position, duties, etc. 



M 1^ 

5 = 



Etta R.Clark . . 
BertbaM. Nelson 
Katie F. Albert . 
Cbarles R. Curtis 
Total 



1882. 
1882. 
1883. 
1873. 



Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Runner . . . . 
Janitor 



Cornelius S. Cartee 
Annie E. Eberle ... 
Mary P. Swain ... 
Alice G. Willoughby 
Sarah E. McConnell . . 
Susan E. Livermore . , 
Emma L. Willoughby . 
Thomas E. Smith . . 
Total 



1870. 

1874. 

1878. 
1882. 
1879. 
1879. 
1882. 
1874. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



Mary E. Brock 
Mary V. Gralley . 
Sara R. Brock . . 
James M. Brock . 
Total 



1875. 
1880. 
1880. 
1878. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor 



Mart G. Coffin . . . 
Mary J. Sheridan . . . 
Frances Willard Pike . 
Lucy Adelaide Watson 
Susie G. Cook .... 
Edward Davenport . . 
Total 



1874. 
1875. 
1881. 
1881. 
1882. 
1874. 



Librarian . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 

Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor 



Grace A. De Borqes 
Maude M. Morse . . , 
Margaret A. Sheridan 
Mary Arkinson . . . 
Harold Percival ... 
William Brydon ... 
Total 



18S0 
1877 
1875 
1881 
1883 



Librarian . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Extra Runner 



Public Libraey. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



71 



Name. 



W 



Position, duties, etc. 



Ht 



— P< 

b a 

o <u 



Eliza R. Davis . . 
Anna J. Barton . . 
Nellie F. Riley . . 
Margaret 8. Barton 
John Erickson . . 
Timothy Johnson . 
Total 



1877. 
1876. 
1878. 
1882. 
1882. 
1877. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



Eliza R. Davis . 

Mary E. Mooney 

J. P. Fleming . . 

Total 



1882. 
1882. 
1882. 



Librarian . 

Assistant , 
Janitor . . 



Mary A. Hill . . . 
Robert M. Otis . . 
Anna nibbard . . 
Harriet L. Atkinson 
Etta M. Ruggles . . 
Total 



1875. 
1881. 
1882. 
1882. 
1883. 



Custodian, Lower Mills . . 
Custodian, Roslindale . . . 
Custodian, West Roxbury 
Custodian, Mattapan . . . 
Custodian, Neponset . . . 



72 



City Document No. 103. 



SUMMARY. 

Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, and 

Runner ....... 5 

Catalogue Department ..... 1-4 

Purchase and Entry department ... 5 

Shelf department . ..... 4 

Bates Hall circulation department . . 10 
Lower Hall circulation department, day, 

evening, and Sunday service . . . 10 

Janitor's department ..... 4 

Bindery . . . . . . . 18 

East Boston branch ..... 5 

South Boston branch ..... 

Roxhury branch ...... 6 

Charlestown branch ..... 5 

Brighton branch ...... 3 

Dorchester branch ..... 4 

South-End branch ..... 5 

Jamaica Plain branch ..... 3 

North-End branch ..... 3 

Deliveries ....... 5 



L. 



Central Library. 
71 regulars. 
10 extras. 

81 in all. 



Branches. 
45 regulars. 
20 extras. 



71 



Totals . 
Grand total 



116 

30 



152 



36 



AGENTS. 

Messrs. W. B. Clarke & Carruth, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triihner & Co.. Hondon. 

Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 

Deuerlich 'sche Buchhandlung, Oottingen. 

Signorina Giulia Albert Florence. 

Senor Don Juan F. Riano, Madrid. 



Public Library. 



73 



APPEXDIX XXI. 



EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRAEY. 





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Not on shelves . . 
Of these found to be 

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Otherwise ac- 
counted for . . . 

Not accounted for 


3,890 

2,577 
546 

735 
32 


6,863 

■ 4,490 
201 

2,020 
152 


2,123 

1,792 
75 

253 
3 


3,766 

3,571 

88 

107 


3,192 

2,728 
159 

297 
8 


2,452 

1,930 

236 

286 


887 

691 
42 

154 


1,793 

1,596 
57 

137 
3 


2,853 

2,450 
202 

199 
2 


1,283 

1,150 

58 

72 
3 


29,102 

22,975 
1,664 

4,260 

203 



74 



City Document No. 103. 



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Public Library. 



75 



APPENDIX XXIII. 



EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR THIRTY-ONE YEARS. 



The following gentlemen have served on the Examining 
Committees for the years given. The names in italics are 
those of Trustees, who have acted as chairmen of the various 
committees. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 18G0. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.I)., 1857. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, John G., M.I)., 1883. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.I)., 1865. 
Bowditch, H. P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, 1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C. E., M.D., 1872. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, jr., 1869. 
Chadwick, James R., 31. D., 1877. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.I)., 1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1882. 
Collar, Wm. C, 1874. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thos. B., 31. D., 1874. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benj., 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 



Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Jos. T., D.D., 1880. 
Dwight, John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, 31. D., 1880. 
Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Calvin, 31. D., 1871. 
Ellis, Geo. E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, Wm., jr., 1878. 
Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 
Fields, James T., 1872. 
Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F., 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 
Frothing ham, Richard, 1876. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 
Fnrness, Horace Howard, LL.D., 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gould, A. A., 31. D., 1864. 
Gray, John C, jr., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., 31. D., 1868. 
Greenough, William W., 1858, 1874, 

1883. 
Grinnell, Rev., C. E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., 1858. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1881. 
Hay ward, George, 31. D., 1863. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hodges, Richard M., 31. D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881. 
Holmes, Oliver W., 31. D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., jr., 1882. 
Homans, Charles D., 31. D., 1867. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, 31. D., 1869. 



76 



City Document No. 103. 



Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, Henry H., 18G5. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lewis, Weston, 1882. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. W., 1856. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 18G8. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
Morse, John T., jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., jr., 1878. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 
Neale, Rollin H., D.D., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
Otis, G. A., 1860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benj. H., 1876. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883. 
Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Prescott, William H., LL.D., 1853. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 



Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 

Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 

Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 

Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 

Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 

Smith, Charles C, 1873. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881. 

Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 

Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 

Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 

Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 

Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 

Story, Joseph, 1856. 

Sullivan, Richard, 1883. 

Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 

Thayer, George A., 1875. 

Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 

Thomas, B. F., 1875. 

Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 

Ticknor, George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Twombly, Rev. A. S., 1883. 
Upham, J. B., M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin S., 1881. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Warner, Herman J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitney, Daniel H, 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Wilson, ElishaT., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854, 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 



BOSTON pur/ , n 






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