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Full text of "Annual report"

THIRTY-THIRD 



AISTNUAL REPORT, 



1885. 



[DOCU3IENT 105—1885.] 




CITY OF fe™..i BOSTON. 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THB 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

1885. 



The Trustees have the honor to present to the City Council 
their Thirty-third Annual Report, the seventh made under their 
Act of Incorporation, and embracing the details of the con- 
dition and administration of the Library for the year ending 
on the 30th of April last. 

The document also contains the reports of the "Examining 
Committee from citizens at kirge," and of the Librarian with 
its important Appendixes, necessary to a full understanding 
of the workings of the institution, including the central and 
branch libraries. 

The Examining Committee for the present year consists of 
the following ten members, viz. : Thomas Cushing, Esq., 
Rev. George A. Gordon, D.D., John T. Hassam, Esq., Mrs. 
Charles D. Homans, Edward J. Lowell, Esq., George H. 
Lyman, M.D., Charles J. Morrill, Esq., Henry Parkman, 
Esq., Prof. Thomas S. Perry, and Col. Henry Stone. As 
required by the ordinance a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees, George B. Chase, Esq., was added as chairman. His 
term of office having expired on the 30th April, Prof. Henry 
W. Haynes succeeded to the position, and served until the 
committee had finished their work. All the members were 
new to the service except Prof. Perry, who, for a third year, 
continued his valuable investigations of the condition and 
wants of the belles-lettres collections in various languages in 
Bates Hall. 



2 City Document No. 105. 

Their report is a sensible and thoughtful document, and 
will 1)0 read with interest by all friends of the institution. 

Of their practical suggestions but few require any com- 
ment on the part of the Trustees. 

The Art-room Avas originally set aside for the ladies' read- 
ing-room, and devoted to that ])ur[)ose. But after the 
various additions made to the art collection, so many visitors 
were attracted by it that it was found expedient to limit its 
occupation for women alone to the hours after 6 P.M. — the 
time when ill-disposed persons might possibly intrude. It is 
not understood that any complaint has been made to those in 
charge of the room of any incivility to ladies or young 
women by daylight. 

With regard to the character of the "fiction and juveniles," 
purchased of late years for the Lower Hall and P>ranches, 
it should be stated that an examination of each volume 
has been made by a competent person J)efore purchase, and 
those of questionable usefulness rejected. The new cata- 
logue of this class of books, now passing through the press, 
has been subjected to critical examination for the purpose of 
excluding any and all volumes whose tendencies were doubt- 
ful or injurious. 

The public demand for this class of reading increases year 
by year, and one is not surprised to tind that of the books 
published in the United States, as tabulated by the "Publish- 
ers' Weekly," — out of a total of 3,459 l)ooks issued in 1883, 
1,001, or a fraction over 25 per ceut., were Hction and juve- 
niles, — which, in a total of 4,088 in 1884, had increased to 
1,301, or a fraction over 31 per cent. 

The construction of a second card catalogue for the Lower 
Hall is, at the present time, beyond the tinancial ability of 
the institution, and the question of its form and expediency, 
as suggested by the conunittee, will j)robably arise under 
the new conditions of a separation of the Bates and Lower 
Hall libraries, after the comi)letion of the new liln'ary edifice. 

In regard to the suggestions of the committee relative to 
securing the services of experts in the purchase of books for 
the great reference library, it must be remembered that the 
collection was practically formed on that basis. At first, lists 
of books were furnished by specialists in those departments 
which were not within the knowledge of the accomplished 
members of the Board and of Prof. Jewett who had the pur- 
chase orders in hand. This made the strength of the Library 
at its outset. Since then, from time to time, assistance has 
been sought, and lists furnished in the subjects on which the 
collection did not api)ear sufficiently full. To-day, the books 
asked for in science, literature, and art, exceed our means of 



Public Library. 3 

purchase, and there are now on hand over 2,500 slips sent in 
by scholars and readers, requesting the acquisition by the 
Library of works desired and not yet ordered in these 
classes, the majority of applications being for books recently 
published in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe. 

The Library and its Work for the Year. 
General Statement. 

The present extent of the Library collections, and their 
public use for the last year, are herewith presented. 

The aggregate numljer of volumes, exclusive of the dupli- 
cate rooms, embraced in the Bates Hall collection, is 289,- 
927 ; in the Lower Hall, 40,5(54 ; in the branches, 123,476 ;, 
— making a total of 453,967, a net increase for the year of 
15,353. This gives an average percentage of gain in all de- 
partments of a little over three and one-third per cent. 

The whole number of days on which the libraries were- 
open was 303^. 

The total use of books for the year was 1,027,393, a de- 
crease of 29,513, or nearly three per cent, from the previous 
year. They were delivered from the the various libraries 
according to the comparative table below ; — 



Name of Library. 



Lower Hall . . 
East Boston . . 
South Boston . . 
Roxbury . . , . 
Charlestown . . 
Brighton . . . . 
Dorchester . . . 
South End . . . 
Jamaica Plain . 
West Roxbury . 
North End . . . 

Bates Hall . . . 



No. of Vols. 
April 30, 1884. 



39,519 

11,549 

11,407 

23,078 

24,633 

13,3.54 

12,469 

10,042 

9,416 

3,218 

664 



159,349 

260,602 



419,951 



In use, 1883^. 



203,992 
95,442 
124,220 
111,357 
76,966 
26,141 
72,173 
98,801 

51,271 

11,630 



871,993 
184,913 



1,056,906 



No. of Vols. 
April 30, 1885. 



In use, 1884-5. 



40,544 

11,846 

11,805 

23,893 

25,405 

13,436 

12,925 

10,001 

9,861 

3,229 

1,075 



164,020 

270,817 



434,837 



183,594 
84,457 

128,666. 

106,180 
71,541 
24,892; 
73,502 
90,857 

51,192- 

9,748 



824,629 
202,764 

1,027,393 



4 City Document No. 105. 

It will be seen from the above table that, in tlie past 
year, the three popular libraries in the city proper, contain- 
ing in the aggregate 51,620 volumes, had 284,199 issues, 
and the seven district branches, comprising 112,400 volumes, 
distributed 540,430. Although the circuhition of these ad- 
juncts to the central institution diminished everywhere 
except in South Boston and Dorchester, the percentage of 
circulation to the number of volumes in the ontl3Mng districts 
will probal)ly increase in the future. 

The number of books recorded as missing is as follows : — 

From Bates Hall, 15 volumes; fron) the Lower Hall, 25; 
Roxbury, 11 ; Charlestown, 5 ; Dorchester, and the South 
End, 2 each ; and from East Boston, 1 ; — making a total of 
52 volumes missing, or 1 to every 16,571 loaned. 

The delivery of periodicals at the Central Library and 
Branches is recorded as 551,294, as against 541,738 for the 
previous year. Of these, 377,187 found use in the Boylston- 
street Reading-room. 

The Bates Hall Library. 

With the increase of this great store of books of permanent 
value its uses are proportionably developed. During the 
library year of 1883-4 there were in this library, contained 
in the upper hall and the newspaper room", 264,260 volumes, 
which were consulted or borrowed by 184,913 readers and 
students. In the year just ended these two collections had 
increased to 274,733 volumes in use by 202,764 visitors. 

By the conditions of this great working collection of books 
free access is given to all comers to make use in the building 
of such works as are desired for consultation or study. To 
the citizens of Boston is reserved the riiiht of borrowing; such 
books as are permitted to circulate. 

This last sentence suggests a condition not readily under- 
stood by the public. Complaint is occasionally made that in 
a free library all books should be free, and therefore to be taken 
away from the safe-keeping of the institution. But there are 
live special libraries, now the property of the city, Avhich 
were given or acquired upon the condition that the books 
should not circulate. No possible accident beyond the walls 
of the Lil)rary must happen to any one of the many thou- 
sand volumes which were received and accepted u[)on these 
conditions. Beside these collections there is a large num- 
ber of books, which, if lost, could not be replaced in years, 
and prol)ably never. The tirst condition of a great reference 
library is the absolute safety of its contents ; and no book 
may be loaned outside of the building, the loss of which can- 



Public Library. 5 

not be made good by the borrower, not in a money value, 
but in another copy of the same edition of the lost volume. 

But, for general library purposes, the number of books 
which can be loaned and replaced in case of accident is at 
present larger than the immediate needs of borrowers require. 
It is premature to discuss what the demand on the resources 
of the institution may be when suitable acconmiodation is 
provided in the proposed new building for students and 
readers. 

Books are written and printed for pul)lic use. 'Jlie best 
works of to-da}^ are sim[)ly stepping-stones to something 
better and wiser in the future. To keep pace with the progress 
of human knowledge in all departments of science, art, and 
literature is the a})propriate work for a great library ; but 
this is obviously impracticable unless sufficient means of 
purchase are within its reach. 

With the present position and uses of this beneficent insti- 
tution the city has a reasonable cause for pride. The result 
of public support and private muniticence, it has risen in the 
few years of its existence, as compared with simihir European 
libraries, to a position of strength and working power 
which these larger collections have not attained. 



THE POPULAR LIBRARIES. 
The Lower Hall Library and Branches. 

City Proper. 

The Lower Hall Library was opened in the Mason-street 
building in May, 1854, with 16,221 volumes, and closed on 
the 30th of June, 1858, for the purpose of removal to the 
new library edifice on Boylston street. It now contains 
40,544 volumes. During these thirty-one years it has issued 
in loans nearly 6,500,000 volumes. The largest annual ser- 
vice was in the year 1877, when it comprised 35,478 books, 
of which 38 per cent, were fiction, with an issue of 405,732, 
of which 283,964, or 71 per cent., were fiction and juveniles. 
The year just passed it contained 40,544 volumes, of which 
14,552 volumes, forming 35| per cent, of the collection, and 
furnishing a distribution of 107,162 books, a small fraction 
more than 61 percent., were fiction and juveniles, in a total 
circulation of 175,298. 

This larofe decrease in the circulation of the Lower 
Hall is mainly due to the establishment of the South End 
Branch, which mostly supplies residents in that populous 



6 City Docu]vient No. 105. 

quarter of the town previously dependent upon the Lower 
Hall lending library. A further reference to this matter will 
be made in the account given in this report of that branch. 

The South End Branch. 

This Library, formed substantially from books selected 
from the collection of the Mercantile Library Association, 
wdiich had been generously presented by this organization to 
the City of Boston, was opened to the public in the basement 
story of their building in the year 1877-8, with 8,804 vol- 
umes, which obtained a circulation for that period of 42,402. 
The arrangements being insutficient for the proper shelving 
of the books, and for public convenience, the collection was 
removed in the summer of 1881 to larger accommodations 
in the basement of the Latin and High-school building on 
the Montgomery-street front, and about three-quarters of a 
mile distant from the Boylston-street Libraries. From its 
easy access for the southern wards, and for the portions of 
the Back Bay territory below Dartmouth street, it has become 
one of the most active and economically administered of all 
the branches. It now contains 10,042 ]>ook8. During the 
eight years of its existence it has distributed to readers 
627,166 volumes. 

Since the formation of this Library its nearness to a 
large class of readers previously dependent upon the Lower 
Hall collection has seriously affected the loans from the 
parent institution. With the changes possibly consequent 
upon the construction of the new building, it may be found 
convenient to the public, and less expensive to the city, to 
unite the two libraries under one roof. 

The North End Branch 

was opened in 1883-4, with 664 volumes, from a special 
appropriation for the purpose by the city government. It 
is not a free lending library, its books having been selected 
with special reference to the wants of the neighborhood, 
which embraces a population to which the quiet and comfort 
of the rooms provided for their reception aflbrds often greater 
attraction than their home surroundings. In its first year 
it had 10,630 readers. Last year the collection was extended 
to 1,075 volumes, but the loans diminished to 9,748. 

The three popular libraries su])plying the city proper, 
containing in the aggregate 51,620 volumes, distributed 



Public Library. 7 

284,199 in loans, to a population numbering by the last 
census 140,142. 

The East Boston Branch. 

This Library, dedicated b}'- appropriate ceremonies on the 
22d of March, 1871, was the tirst of the branches. It was 
based upon two collections previously existent, — one begun 
by the East Boston Library Association in 1852, — which 
was merged with the Sumner Library Association in 18(50. 
To these were added by the Trustees of the Public Library 
such variety of reading as would apparently meet the expec- 
tations of general visitors. When opened it contained 
5,936 volumes, which obtained in the first year a circulation 
of 26,130. On the 30th of April last it embraced 11,846 
volumes, which had been issued to 84,457 readers. 

During the fifteen years of its existence it has loaned 
1,381,849 books. 

By the last census the population dependent on this 
Library was 29,926. 

The South Boston Branch. 

This most active of the branches, based upon the well- 
selected library of 1,670 volumes of the Mattapan Literary 
Association, and presented l)y it to the City of Boston, was 
opened in 1872 with a collection of 4,365 books, which 
found the large numl)er of 96,797 borrowers. For the past 
year, with 13,287 volumes, its issues were 128,666. 

During the thirteen years of its work its loans amount to 
1,618,828 volumes. 

In 1880 South Boston was the most populous district of 
the city, numbering 56,370 inhabitants. 

The Charlestown Branch. 

This Branch was added in the library year 1873-4, upon 
the annexation of the city of Charlestown to the corporation 
of Boston. At that time there was added to the Public 
Library, and subject to its conditions of circulation, a collec- 
tion previously opened in the annexed city in the year ]<iG'2, 
all the volumes of which were within the reach of borrowers, 
and including within its scope many books of permanent 
value. To the foundation have since been added, in 1877, 
the income of $10,000 invested in the 6 per cent. 20-year 
bonds of the City of Boston, from the will of Charlotte Harris, 
to be used for the purchase of books for this Branch, pub- 



8 City Document No. 105. 

lished previous to the year 1850 ; and in 1884 a further sum 
of $1,000 from the will of Thomas B. Harris, invested in the 
City of Boston 30-year bonds, at 4 per cent, interest, to be 
used for the purchase of books for the benefit of the 
Charlestown Branch. These funds constitute the only con- 
siderable endowment of a Branch, and are an example of great 
importance to the growing population of each of the districts 
of this rapidly increasing city in the neighborhoods where free 
•libraries are already established, and which, from any reason- 
able outlook, are already self-limited in popular reading, as 
shown by the statistics. 

In the first year of annexation this Library embraced 15,- 
788 volumes, with a circulation of 33,391 volumes. For the 
last year, with a collection of 25,405 volumes its circulation 
rose to 71,541. During the twelve years since the annexa- 
tion to Boston it has issued 974,377 books. 

The population dependent on this Library numbered by 
the last census 33,734. From the permanent funds added to 
the city's appropriation for its support, there can only be 
purchased books of permanent value, and of these the larger 
portion must have been printed previous to the year 1850. 
This requisition presents great difficulty to the Trustees. The 
works of this class are within reach by catalogue of all the in- 
habitants of Boston entitled to borrow books from the Public 
Library ; but so far as the residents of Charlestown are con- 
cerned the boon has not been fully recognized, and from no 
fault of theirs. With the natural tastes of the day, preference 
in reading is given to the books more recently published, 
and the results are in some degree parallel, though not so 
favorable, to what would happen were the circulation of the 
Bates and Lower Halls combined in one table of statistics. 

In comparing the classified collections in the Library with 
the percentage of circulations it is found that in the past 
year the Charlestown works of fiction comprised 15.7 per 
cent., and the juveniles 5 per cent, of the whole Library, and 
furnished in fiction 52.5 per cent, of the reading ; and in 
juveniles 21.2 per cent. A detailed account shows that 
20.7 per cent, of the books furnished 73.7 per cent, of the 
loan, and nearly four-fifths of the collection only 2(3.3 per cent. 

The Eoxbury Branch and Fellowes Athenjeum. 

This com])ination of a popular Library established by the 
city, and of a collection, of books of permanent value, the 
property of the Trustees of the Fellowes Athenaaum, all of 
which are within reach of borrowers, was opened in 1873-4 
with an aggregate collection of 6,088 volumes and a circula- 



Public Library. 9 

tion of 67,342 books. In 1884-5 the number of l)()oks in 
both collections was 23,078, and their joint issues were 
106,180. A similar, though a better, result is found here 
than that noticed in Charlestown ; for 23 per cent, of fiction 
and juveniles furnishes 67 per cent, of the total reading. 

The population of Roxl^ury in 1880 was 52,076, ranking 
next in numbers to South Boston, but spread over a larger 
territory. 

At the inception of the Library a contract was made 
between the City of Boston and the Trustees of the Fellowes 
Athenaeum, defining the conditions of the management of the 
joint collection of books. Among these conditions was one 
which has not proved equitable to the Trustees of the Public 
Library. It was provided that the " city shall appropriate 
towards a Branch Public Lil)rary, for the territory now 
comprising Wards 13, 14, and 15, as large a sum of money 
as has been, or shall be, appropriated for outfit and mainten- 
ance to any other Branch Library in the said city ; and the 
said city shall pay for the rental of said building the sum of 
$1,600 per annum." By a further provision of the contract it 
was arranged that it " shall be terminable by either party 
at any time upon giving six months' notice to the other party, 
and upon its termination the l)Ooks shall belong to the 
party which shall have pvuchased them, or to whom they 
have been given. The furniture, shelving, and all other 
movable property which shall have been purchased by the 
city shall belong to the said city." 

Under those conditions a notice has been given to the 
Trustees of the Fellowes Athen?eum by the Trustees bf the 
Public Library of a termination of the present subsisting 
relations. This has arisen from two principal causes ; the 
first arising from the necessary expenses of administration, 
which have been larger than those of the branch having the 
widest circulation, and the other from the fact that the posi- 
tion of the Library is not convenient for a large section of the 
inhabitants desiring to make use of its collections of books 
and periodicals. 

If it be found to be just to the city to make a new contract, 
or a revision of the one now existing, it will be necessary to 
arrange for one or more delivery-stations, on the system 
which has been found satisfactory in Dorchester. 

The Brighton Branch. 

This Library is the oldest of the organizations now included 
amono^ the Branches. Its orio-in dates back to 1824, when 
the Brighton Social Library was formed, which in 1858 



10 City Document No. 105. 

■was merged into the Brighton Library Association, which 
again in 18()4 added its joint store to the Holton Library, 
due to the munificence of Mr. James Holton, and maintained 
by the town as a Pul)lic Library. On the completion of the 
costly Library building, after annexation to the City of Bos- 
ton, the Library was opened in Octol)er, 1874, with a collec- 
tion of 11,037 books, of which a portion were works of per- 
manent value. During the remainder of the Library year it 
loaned 9,642 volumes. For the past year, with a collection 
of 13,354 books, its issues were 26,141. During the twelve 
years of city ownership it has distributed 307,147 volumes. 
The population of this district, by the last census, was 6,693, 
and, from the limited number of readers, the expenses of distri- 
bution per volume have been larger than in any other Branch. 

The Dorchester Branch. 

This well-appreciated Branch was established in the Li- 
brary year 1874-5. As adjuncts to its circulation, three 
delivery-stations have since been arranged ; the tirst at 
Lower Mills, in 1875-6 ; the second at Mattapan, in 1881-2 ; 
and a third at Neponset, in 1882-3. 

This Library was opened in January, 1875, after appro- 
priate ceremonies in the Rev. Dr. Hall's Meeting-house in 
the neighborhood. It contained at the outset 3,959 volumes, 
and for the remainder of the year had a circulation of 16,017. 
During the past year, with its three delivery-stations, its 
loans amounted to 73,502. For the eleven years of its ex- 
istence it has issued 658,281 volumes. The population to 
which it ministers numbered, in 1880, 16,871. 



The Jamaica Plain Branch. 

This Library was dedicated in December, 1877, and at once 
opened for public use. Two delivery-stations were after- 
wards added — one in 1878-9, at Eoslindale, since discontin- 
ued ; the other at West Roxbury, 1879-80, with a circulating 
library of its own, previously incorporated, and from which 
books can be borrowed for Jamaica Plain upon the delivery 
system. On the establishment of the Branch, it contained 
under the oversight of the Librarian, Mr. Winsor, the most 
complete selected collection of books, both standard and 
new, that had entered into the formation of any of the dis- 
trict libraries. It began its work with 6,620 volumes, from 
which 30,280 were issued during the remainder of the year. 

It now embraces, including the West Roxbury station, 



Public Library. " 11 

12,634, which were loaned to 51,192 borrowers during the 
year. 

The population of the precinct was 26,723, in 1880. 



The total expenses of the popular libraries, exclusive of 
the Lower Hall, amounted to $38,074.61, with an aggregate 
circulation of 668,001 volumes. 

Every neighborhood in this city embraces a population of 
active minds working for certain practical results, and whose 
tastes in reading are directed toward additions to knowledge, 
the topics of general interest of the times, and to books gen- 
erally known to be in large demand. With the younger gen- 
eration of both sexes, to whom books have been their closest 
friends from their school-days, and whose time is not yet 
fully employed in the active duties of life, these libraries 
find their largest and most assiduous patrons. 

It is obvious that a o-eneral collection of volumes finds 
readers not in proportion to its size, but m proportion to 
the works which its constituency desire to read. 

The New Library Building. 

In the last report of the Trustees some account was given 
of the progress made toward the accomplishment of this long- 
desired haven of safety for the treasures of the Bates Hall 
Library. 

The period of time for the receipt of the competitive de- 
signs had been extended to the 1st of August, 1884, at 
which date there had been received twenty sets of plans, 
under the specifications issued ])y the joint committee whose 
powers and duties had expired with the city government of 
that year, and had not been renewed. 

By the specifications no provision had been made for the 
payment of the premiums offered after the joint committee 
lapsed. The loan for the erection of the building could not 
be issued except upon the approval of the plans by the Trus- 
tees, and upon them necessarily fell the duty of such study 
and examination of the merits of the competing designs as 
should be at the service of whatever body might be entrusted 
with the distribution of the money award, whether it were 
themselves or some other body constituted by the city gov- 
ernment. It therefore became their first duty to obtain an 
individual judgment from each member of the Board, independ- 
ent of every other member. On the 1st of August it was 
ordered that " a notice should be sent to each of the Trustees, 



12 City Document No. 105. 

requesting him to examine the phms for the new Library 
buikling, so as to be prepared, at some time agreed ui)on, for 
the discussion of their various merits." 

While this examination was going forward, and had l)een 
prolonged ])y the absence from the city of members of the 
Board, a question had arisen of the proper interpretation 
of the conditions issued by the joint committee in the docu- 
ment of specifications, and the Corporation Counsel was con- 
sulted, on the last of October, as to the limit of their duties. 
On the 31st of October, he addressed a letter to the President 
of the Board of Trustees, stating that he had been unable to 
find that the Board had any authority to make awards. 

Various efforts were made by the City Council to settle 
this embarrassment, which remained an open question until 
the 1st January, 1885, with the termination of the govern- 
ment of 1884, and it was then ordered that "the Trustees of 
the Public Library, together with the City Architect, be au- 
thorized to award the prizes for the new Library l)uilding." 

Under further legal instruction, of 7th January, 1885, 
from the Corporation Counsel, all plans with a front entrance 
were ruled out. 

After the Trustees had finished their examination of the 
plans, Mr. Vinal, the City Architect, the other member of 
the commission, made an independent examination of his own 
"without knowledge of the conclusions of the Trustees, and 
selected the same plans for award as they had agreed upon, 
except in the order of merit of the third and fourth prizes. 
This point was settled, after discussion, at the meeting of the 
joint committee on the 13th January. " It was then unani- 
mously voted that in transmitting the award to the City 
Council, the chairman of the commission accompany it by a 
statement that, in the opinion of the commission, no one of 
the ])lans is suitable to build upon." 

The four successful plans became the property of the 
city, but neither was available as a whole. The}' were 
each the result of faithful work upon a great and novel prob- 
lem, and all were productions of merit. Other plans with a 
single front entrance, and ruled out, showed also much 
ability and study. With the erection of an edifice to meet 
such possibilities of the future as present foresight might 
dimly outline, with the assurance of a large growth from the 
income of the trust funds already })aid into the city treasury, 
Avith other considerable legacies knowr. to be devoted to the 
same purpose by the wills of benefactors, and with further 
donations naturally to be presented to it by ])resent and 
future friends of the institution, the building nnist necessarily 
be constructed, first, with reference to the absolute safety 



Public Library. . 13 

of its contents, and with a sufficient capacity of book storage, 
compact, evenly heated, thoroughly ventihited, and sutficiently 
lighted by day, and with large arrangements for students and 
visitors. With these details must be included, in the gen- 
eral scheme, a catalogue-room convenient of access and 
use, apartments for the administrative force of officials 
immediately connected with the work, suitable rooms for the 
special libraries, easier and quicker access to the great col- 
lections of parliamentary and official documents and of patent 
specitications, whether American, British, French, or Ger- 
man, and beyond these a particular forethought must be had 
for special continuous students, and for other means of mak- 
ing the ii'reat collection of books useful to those for whose 
benefit they had been gathered, and their contents laid open 
by a great encyclopaedic catalogue containing nearly a 
million title references. 

One or more schemes were proposed after the report of 
the Library Commission for the construction of the new 
Library building. That which found favor on the part of 
the city government was approved by the mayor on the 
31st of March, when it Avas ordered "That the City Archi- 
tect be directed to prepare plans for a Library building to 
be erected on the lot on Dartmouth street held by the city 
for that purpose, and to submit the same to the Trustees of 
the Public Library for their approval." 

This is the present condition and outlook for this highly 
important edifice. The regular important constructive duties 
of the City Architect have engrossed so much of his valuable 
time, that, so far as the Trustees are informed, it is from 
no want of zeal or interest on his part, that no formal com- 
munication has yet been made to them of his inceptive 
steps in the great problem submitted for his solution. 
Possession of the land was taken by the city authorities 
before the expiration of the limit of the time of entrance 
under the generous gift of the Common^vealth lands by the 
Legislature. To remove any question of possessive rights 
the period of occupation was extended to two years, by the 
State authorities, expiring in April, 1886. 

Two conditions for the building are then to be met : first, 
the production of a set of plans, with a model to scale, 
which shall be satisfactory to the Board of Trustees ; and, 
secondly, the constru-ction of an edifice, which shall cost no 
more than the loan authorized by the vote of the city govern- 
ment. In the present condition of the finances of the city, 
and with its limitation of loan, it becomes a question of vital 
consideration whether a building, even at this cost, will be 
within its power of construction. Under any event it 



14 City Document No. 105. 

would seem that, whatever may be desired, it must be framed 
to be within reasonably defined economical estimates. 

The Trustees acknowledge Avith gratitude another donation 
of the sum of $500 from the hand of J. Ingersoll Bowditch, 
Esq., whose continued generosity to the Library lias added 
so largely to the value of the Bowditch mathematical collec- 
tion, now among the most important in the United States. 

The outlook in usefulness for this institution is less favor- 
able than might be wished. The appropriation by the city 
government for its support was cut down $10,000, in the 
reduction of expenses, to meet the legal limit of taxation. 
The Trustees cannot spend more money than they are au- 
thorized to spend, and they must meet the exigencies of the 
case with the smallest practical interference with the con- 
venience of the public. The expenses are now reduced 
within the average sum which they are authorized to dis- 
burse without, as yet, any expressed complaints, but the 
acquisition of new books will be sensibly afiected. 

Other details of the Library condition for the year will be 
found in the Librarian's report. 

Through the enlightened support of the city government, 
and by the continued aid and strong arms of its friends, the 
Boston Public Library has attained a position of respect 
throughout the civilized world which should be sustained by 
every intelligent and patriotic citizen. 

(Signed), 

WM. W. GREENOUGH, 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE, 
EDWARD J. JENKINS, 
CHAS. V. WHITTEN, 
HENRY W. HAYNES. 

Messrs. S. A. B. Abbott and George B. Chase, the other 
Trustees, are absent from the State. 

Public Library, June 25, 1885. 



Public Library. 15 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The Boston Public Library is divided, for many purposes, 
into two main divisions, which may best be considered sepa- 
rately. These divisions are called "Bates Hall," and "the 
Lower Hall and Branches." Bates Hall is that library 
which is especially intended for advanced students in vauious 
departments, or for persons making researches of a learned 
nature. The Lower Hall and Branches are intended for 
persons who seek in the Library only a means of relaxation, 
or of the prosecution of comparatively simple studies. Both 
these divisions are important to the community, and must be 
kept in an efficient condition, if Boston is to maintain its 
place as a centre of learning and of education. The two 
divisions of the Library correspond, to some extent, with the 
divisions in education, — the Lower Hall and Branches 
being the counterpart of the primary, grammar, and high 
schools ; Bates Hall, of the technical schools and colleges. 

Bates Hall 

contains 269,596 volumes. It is thus in itself the second 
library in the country in size ; and it is probably equal to 
any in the quality of the books which it contains. 

The circulation of the books in Bates Hall has increased 
from year to year. It can never be large in proportion to 
the numl)er of volumes in this division of the Public Library, 
nor to the amount of money expended. The benefit reaped 
from it by the community cannot, however, be reckoned by 
any method of statistics. It is by means of such collections 
as this that some of the greatest benefactors of the i)ublic 
are enabled to prosecute their researches and to do their 
work. It is in this division that the higher education of 
some of the most useful of our citizens is conducted. It is 
expedient, moreover, to attract to good reading many per- 
sons whose leisure might be less profitably employed. 

The Lower Hall 

contains 40,576 volumes. These are of a popular character, 
comprising history, biography, travels, and science, with a 
great deal of fiction ; but, if the supply of fiction is great, 
the demand is greater. The books in the Lower Hall circu- 
late much more rapidly than those in Bates Hall. The 



16 City Document No. 105. 

average circulation of Lower- Ilall books, during the last 
library year, was 4:^^^ times per volume. Of English prose 
fiction for children and grown people, there are 14,552 
volumes. The circulation of these books was 107,142, 
making the average circulation per volume Tj^q times. Nor 
do these figures tell the whole story, for several thousand 
volumes of fiction are practically unread, but are counted in 
the number of the volumes above given, thus bringing down 
the average of circulation. 

S^me books are in such demand that a copy is never long 
on the shelves, and that a reader is exceptionally fortunate 
if he do not have to apply several times before obtaining 
one. These books, for which the demand is great, are of 
two kinds, viz., books of permanent value, and books of 
temporary interest. In each of these classes are some books 
of fiction and some works of a more serious nature. In 
respect to books of permanent value, it would seem advisable 
to have copies enough nearly to supply the demand. As to 
books of temporary interest, the case is different. The last 
new novel, eagerly asked for to-day, will be little read next 
year. It would be unwise to spend the funds of the Library 
on duplicates, which, after a short time of popularity, will 
only encumber the shelves. 

It will be found that the character of the books called for 
in the Lower Hall improves from year to year. This is due 
to the diminution of the supply of the most valueless kinds 
of fiction, and also, in no small degree, to the intelligent 
efibrts of the librarian of the Lower Hall and his assistant. 
The labors of these very useful officers have been particu- 
larly .successful in improving the reading of children and 
young persons. 

We would recommend that the Ladies' Reading-Room be 
reserved for ladies at all times of the day, and not only after 
six o'clock in the evening, as at present. The room is some- 
times used as a lounging-place by ill-mamiered persons, who 
annoy the ladies coming there to read. 

There are eight 

Branch Libraries 

in various parts of the city. Each of them contains a col- 
lection of books which may be taken out, and a reading- 
room, with periodicals. At every Branch, books which have 
no place on its own shelves may be ordered from Bates Hall 
or the Lower Hall without expense to the reader. There 
are also two delivery stations, having neither books nor 
reading-rooms of their own, where books may be ordered 



Public Library. 17 

from the Central Library, and three establishments of inter- 
mediate character, one of them beino: the valuable reading;- 
room and delivery station at the North End. 

Several of the Branches embody libraries already existing 
at the time when the towns which contained them were 
annexed to Boston, or have received valuable contributions 
from persons living near them. The buildings occupied by 
such Branches are fully adequate to their needs. Some of 
the Branches, however, are supported entirely by the city, 
and a few of these do not appear to have convenient reading- 
rooms. Such are the Branches at the South End, at P^ast 
Boston, and at Dorchester. With the reduced appropriation 
of this year it is not to be expected that the Trustees, un- 
aided, can provide more comfortable rooms ; but perhaps 
the inhabitants of the parts of the city more immediately 
concerned might be induced to cooperate with the Trustees in 
procuring better quarters. At the same time, we think it 
would be unwise for the Trustees to enter into any engage- 
ment which would bind them permanently as to the exact 
position of any Branch. They should remain free to make 
such changes from time to time as altered conditions may 
render advisable. 

More frequent visits to the Branches on the part of the 
Trustees, or of one of the higher officers of the Library, 
would probably be attended with good results. 

Books. 

The question constantly recurs in the management of the 
Library: What books should be procured for the public? 
It seems to the Committee that a few simple principles can 
be laid down on this subject. 

The purchases for Bates Hall should include all works of 
any permanent interest and value ; a limit being placed on 
such purchases only by the amount of funds at the disposal 
of the Trustees. 

The officers of the Library have had, at various times, the 
benefit of the advice of several learned men, who have made 
lists of books which were needed. The Committee would 
recommend that an effort be made to secure such assistance 
more systematically in future. It might be possible to find 
a number of experts who would present from time to time, 
for the consideration of the Trustees, lists of books, whether 
new or old, in their especial departments. It would still be 
the duty of the Trustees to decide ultimately on every book 
and to keep some proportion among the collections on vari- 
ous subjects. The Committee would also recommend a 



18 City Document No. 105. 

careful revision of the lists of periodicals furnished to the 
reading-rooms of the Central Library and of the Branches. 

The selection of books for the Lower Ilall and Branches 
presents serious difficulties. The books may properly be 
divided into two classes : those which are read only by grown 
people, and those which are read by the young. 

As to the first class, we do not see that the Trustees can 
refuse to provide any book, not absolutely immoral, for 
wdiich there may be a decided demand. To do so would be 
to establish an unjustifiable censorship. We think, however, 
that they may fairly, in their discretion, multiply copies of 
works which they may consider useful to the public, includ- 
ing the higher classes of fiction, to an extent which shall 
make them very generally procurable at the desk, and at 
the same time provide but a small number of duplicates of 
books which, although equally popular, they may consider 
valueless ; thus putting them into the hands of fewer readers. 

We would recommend a very large extension of the use of 
this discretion in the case of books for the young. Persons 
under age have neither a legal nor a moral claim to be free 
from censorship ; and while we consider it one of the legiti- 
mate functions of the Library to provide amusing reading for 
people of all ages, we hold that it is the duty of the Trustees 
to see to it that the books which they put into the hands of 
young people shall be not only harmless but wholesome. 
Especially is this the case in view of the fact that not only 
do the rules allow boys and girls from the age of fourteen 
years to take out books in their own names, but that children 
under fourteen constantly take out books in the names of 
their parents or others. We would, therefore, especially 
commend the revision of the catalogue of " Fiction and Juve- 
niles " now making for the Lower Hall, and the excision 
from the new catalogue of certain books for the j^oung, 
which seem to the Trustees objectionable in their tendencies ; 
and we hope that the books in question, which have already 
been withdrawn from circulation at the Lower Hall, will soon 
be removed from all the Branch Libraries. 

While stating the principles on wdiich we think that books 
should be selected, we would say that we believe that they 
are substantially those now in force, and that the decision 
in particular cases should be left to the Trustees, with whom 
the responsibility rests. 

Considering the custom, now firmly established, that chil- 
dren shall use the Library, the Committee would ask the 
Trustees to consider whether it would be desirable and feasi- 
ble to recognize the natural division among readers officially. 
Children, even under the age of fourteen years, might then be 



Public Library. 19 

given especial cards, distinguished by their color, or other- 
wise, for whose proper use a parent, or other suret}', should 
be made responsible. On these cards only appropriate l)ooks 
would be given out. Children might then be forbidden to 
use the cards of adults, except in the case of messengers 
with specitic written orders. This suggestion might imply a 
greater change than is possible in the crowded building now 
occupied in Boylston street. Such a change might be effected 
on the occasion of the contemplated removal of Bates Hall. 

The Building 

now in use is not well adapted to any of the work which is 
done in it. The alcoves, which contain the books, are over- 
crowded. The Central Hall has neither the space, the light, 
nor the quiet, which would be desirable. There are not 
proper places for the work of the officers of the Library ; nor 
is there any adequate accommodation for scholars who may 
find it necessary to keep hirge numbers of books together for 
several days in succession. Under these circumstances the 
usefulness of the Library is seriously crippled. All this we 
hope to see remedied by the erection of the new building on 
Dartmouth street, for which plans are in preparation, and we 
believe that when the books of Bates Hall are removed 
thither they will be used by a much larger number of readers 
than at present. 

Administration. 

The Librar}'^ has been managed from the first by a Board 
of unpaid Trustees. The Librarian, employed by this Board, 
has charge of the administration. These gentlemen have 
given much valuable work to the City, and have made the 
Library a model in many respects. 

The Catalogue 

for the use of the public in Bates Hall we believe to be 
excellent. 

The catalogue of the Library in the Lower Hall is in charge 
of a curator, and is not open to public use. The curator is 
diligent in giving advice and assistance to readers, and the 
catalogue is probably more useful in this way than it would 
be in any other. But we would ask the Trustees to consider 
the practicability of providing a duplicate card catalogue in 
the Lower Hall, for the use of the public. The confusion of 
printed catalogues, bulletins, and finding-lists is now very 
great, and we believe that no means can be found to remedy 



20 City Docuivient No. 105. 

it. No catalogue but a card catalogue has yet been invented 
which can conveniently be kept up to time. That such a 
catalogue should be worn out by those who use it would be 
but a proof of its utility. The personal assistance of the 
officers of the Library is invaluable, but many readers will 
always prefer to make their own researches. 

In this connection we cannot too highly commend the 
practice, long established, of publishing in the quarterly 
bulletins, and in the catalogues of the Lower Hall, hihliogra- 
phies of various subjects, and especially of such subjects as 
may happen at the time to be largely occupying the public 
mind. Some of these bibliogra})hies are of great value. 
They are now hidden away in back numbers of bulletins, and 
in obsolete catalogues. We would suggest that they be 
revised and published in a volume. Similar bibliographies 
are published by the authorities of several libraries in New 
England. If these valuable works could be combined and 
printed together, whenever a sufficient number of them might 
appear, a great service would be rendered to scholars. One 
step in this direction has been taken by the publication of 
the "Index to Notes About Books," in the Handbook for 
Readers, of this Library. 

The cost of ordering and cataloguing in the Boston Public 
Library averages '^b^f-^ cents per volume acquired. We have 
reason to believe that this is much lower than the cost of the 
same operation in other large libraries. 

It constantly happens that books which were once in 
demand, and of which there are several duplicates in the 
Library, go out of fashion, and are little called for. Such 
duplicates might be sold for a small price, or even given 
away, to advantage. It is probable that some of them might 
be of use in country libraries, or in places where books are 
scarce. Here they are only an encumbrance. If a city or- 
dinance be needed, to give the Trustees authority to sell, we 
would suffo'est that such an ordinance be asked for. 

The Committee have learned, with regret, that the City 
Council have found it necessary to reduce the appropriation 
for the Public Library. It ai)pears to the Committee that 
the reduction that must consequently take place in the expen- 
ses of the Library should not be made by reducing the salaries 
of the persons employed. These persons are already rather 
underpaid than overpaid. A reduction should rather be made 
in the number of books bought and in the accommodation 
furnished, especially at the Brauches. If these were kept 
open during a shorter time every day, some of the extra as- 
sistants might be dispensed with. It might be found possible, 
also, to do without one or more of the Branches. If the 



Public Library. 



21 



citizens of Boston find it necessary to spend less money on 
their Library, it is they who should sufler, in the loss of some 
of the conveniences now enjoyed ; and it would, in our 
opinion, be neither generous nor honest to lay the burthen 
on those whom they employ. 

The Committee take the liberty of submitting two tables 
of statistics, which, they think, may prove suggestive: — 

TABLE I. 

Concerninsr the Branch Libraries. 



Branches. 




a 
c 


P 

d 
o 


2 




C8 

o2 


•a !E 
2 a 

£ o . 

S t- o 


2 a 
SB 


a-: 
P o 

0) a 






no 




— CO 


¥ 


fl a 
00 a 
0.2 








East Boston . 


1S70 


29,926 


13,715 


11,549 


2.6 


95,442 


7. 


3.2 


8.3 


South Boston 


1871 


56,369 


17,311 


11,407 


4.9 


124,220 


7.2 


2.2 


10.9 


Roxbury . . . 


1872 


52,073 


17,245 


23,0781 


2.2 


111,357 


6.5 


2.2 


4.8 


Charlestown . 


1873 


33,731 


16,888 


24,633 


1.4 


76,966 


4.5 


2.3 


3.1 


Brighton . . . 


1873 


6,693 


4,741 


13,354 


2.2 


26,141 


5.5 


3.9 


2. 


Dorchester . . 


1873 


16,871 


6,105 


12,469 


1.3 


72,173 


11.8 


4.3 


5.8 


Jamaica Plain^ 


1873 


26,717 


3,725 


12,634 


2.1 


51,271 


13.8 


2. 


5.4 


Central Lihr'y* 




140,429 


127,173 


68,868 


2. 


314,423 


2.5 


2.2 


4.6 



1 Includiua: 8,916 books belonging to the Fellowes AtheniBum. 

2 Two books per inhabitant. 
2 luchidiug West Roxbury. 

■• Exclusive of Bates Hall and inclusive of South End and North End. 



22 



City Document No. 105. 



TABLE II. 

Circulation of Books on Various Subjects in the Lower 
Hall Library. 



I. English prose fiction for grown 
people and children 

n. History and biography 

III. Travels 

IV. Theology, law, medicine, arts and 

sciences 

V. Periodicals and collections .... 

VI. Foreign languages 

VII. Poetry, the drama, rhetoric, etc. . 

Books of reference 



Numher of 
Volumes. 



14,552 
6,085 
2,660 

6,445 
3,933 
2,972 
3,487 

40,134 
442 

40,576 



Circulation. 



107,142 
13,731 

7,790 

16,547 
8,721 
8,460 

12,907 

175,298 



Average 
Circulation 
per Volume. 



7.36 
2.26 
2.92 

2.57 
2.22 
2.85 
3.70 



EDWARD J. LOWELL, 
THOMAS GUSHING, 
JOHN T. HASSAM, 
HENRY STONE, 
GEO. A. GORDON, 
T. S. PERRY, 
E. L. HOMANS, 
HENRY PARKMAN, 
C. J. MORRILL. 

Dr. George H. Lyman, a member of the Committee, is in 
Europe, and has not had an opportunity to sign the report. 



Public Libeaey. 23 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees : — 

I herewith respectfully submit my seventh annual report, 
with the accompanying tables, which may be referred to for 
details;. 

Increase of the Libeaey. 

During the year 15,353 volumes have been added to the 
Library, distributed among the several departments as fol- 
lows : Bates Hall, 10,215; Lower Hall, 1,025; Branch 
libraries, 4,113. By direction of the book committee I 
have endeavored, so for as the funds would permit, to com- 
plete important serials which year by year are becoming 
more difficult to obtain. To the Journals of the House of 
Lords have been added 31 volumes, and of the House of 
Commons, 27 volumes, completing both series to the end 
of the years 1883 and 1880 respectivel3^ These additions, 
with the 84 volumes of Parliamentary Sessional Papers, 
including a few which will soon be supplied, make our col- 
lection as complete and of as late date as can be found in any 
public library. The Journals of the Senate and of the House 
of Representatives of the United States lack nothing ; and 
the addition of 30 volumes of the Congressional Record, 
which succeeded the Congressional Globe, brings within the 
reach of our readers the latest information to be found in 
those sources. AVithin the year we have added about 21 
volumes to the "London Gazette," comprising the first eight 
volumes, from November 7, 16G5, to December 31, 1694. 
We now have of this serial 268 volumes, the earlier of which, 
apparently unknown to our historical writers, have brought 
to light several documents of great interest in our colonial 
history. But I am sorry to add that neither the set of the 
" Gazette," nor that of the "London Chronicle," which l)egan 
to be published in 1757, and contains much matter relating 
to American affairs, is complete, though the first is more 
nearly so, I am informed, than any other set in the country. 
The set of the Encyclopedie d' architecture has been com- 
pleted by the addition of the first 12 volumes ; that of Hermes, 
a periodical devoted to classical philology, by volumes 1 to 
19, 1846 to 1884 ; that of the Annales de la philosophic chre- 
tienne by 104 volumes, 1850 to 1883, and that of the Gazette 



24 City Document No. 105. 

archeologique by 32 volumes, 1843 to 1875. The following 
are among the large illustrated works added within the year : 
Bastian's Amerika's Nordwest-Kiiste, — a large work repre- 
senting collections of scientific specimens gathered by a 
German expedition to the coast of British Columbia and 
Alaska ; Eicerheck^ 8 Die Rennaisance in Belgien ; Gruner's Die 
decorative Kunst ; Les manuscrits de L. de Vinci ; Vedder's 
Omar Khayyan ; RcnjeCs Monuments de I'art antique, and 
Thompson's Sepulchral monuments of Italy. The Library 
has received the following works concerning the history of 
earl}^ wood-engraving, particularly of the German school ; 
HirtJi's Kulturgeschichtliches Bilderbuch aus drei Jahrhun- 
derten ; Liebhaber-Bibliothek alter Illustratoren, a series of 
fac-simile reproductions, now comprising 10 volumes, and 
including reprints of works illustrated by Dlirer and his school, 
Holbein, etc. ; Muthefs Die deutsche Biicherillustration der 
Gothik und Friihrenaissance ; and Pfintzin(fs Tewrdaunckh, 
Holbein Societj-'s publication, being a reproduction of the 
1519 edition of this early German poem, in which are 
recounted the deeds of the Emperor Maximilian, and fur- 
nishes in the illustrations examples of early wood-engraving. 

Although the acquisition of the foregoing works by the 
Library has been made known to the public through the Card 
Catalogue and the Bulletins, I advert to them in this manner 
for the purpose of recording the gratifying fact that the 
increased use of the Bates-Hall collection is not confined to 
its more popular departments or to treatises in which may be 
found the results of the labors of previous investigators, but 
extends to those original sources of information the use of 
which implies a spirit of research and more scientific methods 
of study. And I think there is evidence that this spirit has 
been stimulated liy the existence in this city of a collection 
of some degree of completeness, which attracts the attention 
not only of local scholars but calls them hither from distant 
parts of the country. 

How to bring the contents of such collections within easy 
reach of investigators is a problem not easy of solution. But 
the value of copious indexes as manifested by the infiuence of 
Dr. Poole's Index upon the use of periodical literature in 
Bates Hall can readily be seen if we compare the successive 
years since 1881-2, the year preceding the publication of that 
invaluable work. The number issued that year was 5,663 
volumes. The Index was added to the Library in December, 
1882, so that for four months of the library year, 1882-3, 
the public had access to that work, and the number of maga- 
zines issued increased to 6,783. The following year there 
were given out 8,137, and in the year ending April 30, 1885, 



Public Library. 25 

the large number of 10,941. This is the remarkable growth 
of nearh" one hundred per cent, in three years ; while the 
wdiole circulation from Bates Hall has been, in the same time, 
but twenty per cent., showing an advance in this class of 
literature nearly live times as great as that in the whole cir- 
culation of this part of the Library. The extension of Dr. 
Poole's plan to the more important fields of science and 
history is not altogether chimerical ; and its need in one 
department — that of congressional and departmental papers 
of the general government — is manifest to one wdio is a 
daily witness of the almost hopeless groping of inquirers in 
an unexplored wilderness, in search not only of historical 
facts but of matters which more immediately touch their 
interest. 

Donations to the Library. 

Among the more important gifts to the Library within the 
the library year (including some received shortly after its 
close, and omitting a few mentioned in my last report) are 
the following : from the Boston Journal Company, at the in- 
stance of Col. W. W. Clapp, 104 volumes of the "Boston 
Journal ; " from ]Mrs. Edward J. Holmes, 93 volumes and 202 
pamphlets ; from Miss Alice James, 173 volumes and 4.5 pam- 
phlets ; from the estate of Hiland Lockwood, 90 volumes ; 
from Mrs. Curtis B. Raymond, 113 volumes ; from Mrs. John 
C. Phillips, 186 volumes, and from Shepherd Brooks, 58 vol- 
umes ; from Eliot C. Clarke, 40 volumes ; from Thomas E. 
Frothingham, 187 volumes ; from William W. Greenough, 
57 volumes and 95 pamphlets, and from Chester Guild, 36 
volumes and 360 pamphlets. Mrs. R. Anne Nichols has 
added 22 volumes to her former donations, which, with 
those given by her deceased sister, Eliza jNIary Thayer, and 
her surviving sister, Caroline Coddington Thayer, from time 
to time, make their joint donations among the largest, and, 
in respect to the character of the books, among the most 
important gifts to the Library. Joseph A. Donahoe, at the 
instance of John T. Doyle, Esq., has added to the Librarj^ 
Noticias de la Nueva California, escritas por el Rev. Padre 
Fr. Paloic, in four volumes, — an important work in the 
history of the early Spanish missions in California, of which 
only one hundred copies were published. In addition to 
their annual contribution, the children of the late Nathan- 
iel Bowditch have presented to the Library a bust of Dr. 
Bowditch, with a collection of his published writings, origi- 
nally given to the now discontinued Bowditch school ; and 
the original manuscript of his translation of Laplace's Mecau- 



26 City Document No. 105. 

ique Celeste has been transferred from Harvard College, at 
the request of the Bowditch heirs, and deposited with the 
Bowditch mathematical collection in the Public Library. 
Capt. Nathan Appleton has presented a marble bust of 
the late Thomas Gold Appleton, to whom the Library is in- 
debted for the Tosti collection of engravings, etc. The 
heirs of the late George Ticknor have presented to the 
Library the original manuscript of the History of Spanish 
Literature, and the copy from which the third edition of that 
work was printed, and a bust of Cervantes, a more particu- 
lar account of which may be found in the last Bulletin. In 
the same number may also be found some notice of a gift 
from Miss Anna E. Ticknor of a very interesting and valu- 
able donation, consisting mainly of volumes of early Ameri- 
can poetry, pamphlets, and broadsides, which has not been 
exceeded in importance by any recent donation to this 
Library. 

Circulation. 

The total circulation of the Library for the year is 
1,027,393. This is a falling off from the last year!^ in the 
popular departments, of 29,513 volumes, though not evenly 
distributed, the Bates Hall and the South Boston and Dor- 
chester branches gaining, and the East Boston, Roxliury, 
Charlestown, Brighton, South End, Jamaica Plain, and 
North End In-anches and the Lower Hall losing. 

The closing for repairs of the East Boston and North End 
branches for forty-four and twenty-five working days re- 
spectively accounts for the losses at these branches, and the 
fact that the past library year was shorter by two working 
days than the preceding year accounts for very nearly 7,000 
of the decrease. Althougli there is a loss in the number of 
books circulated from the Lower Hall there is a gain in the 
quality, as is shown in the following comparative view for 
last two years : — 

Percentages of Lower Hall Circulation by Classes 
FOR 1883-4 AND 1884-5. 

Fiction and Juveniles 
History and Biography 
Voyages and Travels . 
Science, Art, etc. 
Periodicals, bound 
Foreio;n lano;uages 
Poetry, Drama, Miscellany 



1883-4 


1884-5 


62.37 


61.11 


7.54 


7.84 


4.08 


4.44 


9.24 


9.44 


5.32 


4.98 


4.22 


4.83 


7.23 


7.36 



Public Libraey. 27 

Facility for learning shelf numbers, without doubt, has 
much to do with the circulation of books. It increases with 
the publication of a catalogue, and diminishes as people are 
obliged to consult tJie Card Catalogue or the Bulletins. The 
publication of the new Fiction-list for the Lower Hall, now 
nearly completed, will doubtless be followed by a large in- 
crease of circulation in that department, as were the Sup- 
plement to the Catalogue of Arts, Sciences, and Professions, 
and the new edition of the Catalogue of books in Foreign 
Languages, in 1881. But more obvious causes for the 
falling off of circulation of popular books is the curtailment 
of purchases of that class of literature. 

Mr. Whitney, the principal Assistant Librarian, reports 
that during the year 20,141 volumes and 8,972 ])amphlets 
have been catalogued. 92,239 cards have been added to the 
catalogues of the Central Library and Branches, and 4,622 old 
cards have been revised. In these statistics additions to the 
Barton catalogue and much miscellaneous work are not in- 
cluded. A new catalogue of the English Prose Fiction, 
including translations and books for the young, in the 
Lower Hall of the Central Library, is in press, and will be 
issued in July or August. The catalogue of the miscella- 
neous works in the Barton collection has been completed 
and printed to the title Deloney, making 144 pages, and is 
in type through the title Drama. The Bulletins have been 
published, as usual. More work has been done than in any 
previous year in the revision of the Card Catalogues, which 
are beginning to assume the orderly arrangement and com- 
pleteness for which those in charge have been lal)oring for 
several years. A Key or Hand-book to these catalogues will 
be finished next year. 

MELLEN CHAMBEKLAIN, 

Librarian, 

May 1, 1885. 



APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



1885. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES, 



I. Extent of the Library (bt Years). 
II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Volumes in the Special Collections of Bates Hall. 

IV. Volumes Located in the Lower Hall. 
V. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VI. Increase from Newly Published Books. 
VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 
VIII. Lower Hall Classifications. 
IX. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

X. Circulation. 
XI. Registration of Applicants. 
XII. Books Recommended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIII. Bates Hall Reading. 

XIV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XV. Fellowes Athen^um, Brighton, and North-End Reading. 
XVI. Periodical Reading-Rooms. 
XVII. Losses and Delinquencies. 
XVIII. Financial Statement. 
XIX. Library Funds. 
XX. Library Service. 

XXI. Report of- Examination of the Shelves. 
XXII. Work in the Library Bindery. 



Public Library. 



31 



APPENDIX I. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 







u 


■c'Sb 

•a a 






4» • 






Years. 


1-^ 

a 






Years. 


^5 

•s3 


fit 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


74,770 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


3,950 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


89,746 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


6,507 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


100,383 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


12,386 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


112,153 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


16,053 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


134,628 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


17,938 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


150,921 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


19,255 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


181,653 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


20,707 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


196,958 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


27,381 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


212,414 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28,874 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


227,010 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


31,043 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


236,534 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


31,837 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


250,495 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


32,553 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


261,056 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


36,566 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


275,425 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


44,443 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


292,793 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


47,254 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


308,242 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


61,177 











Note. — The aggregate of pamphlets " added from the besjlnning" includes many since 
bound, singly or in groups (which are now counted among volumes), and a verj' large num- 
ber of duplicates which are thrown out and put among the pamphlets held for exchange. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, 1884-85. 



Bates Hall . . . 
Newspaper room 
Duplicate room . 
Lower Hall . . . 



Total, Central Library , 
" ji ( Fellowes Athenaeum . . , 
g« (City part 

Total, Roxbury Branch , 




East Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South End 

Jamaica Plain 

West Roxbury delivery 
North End 



11,846 

11,805 

25,405 

13,436 

12,925 

10,001 

9,861 

3,229 

1,075 



32 



City Docujient No. 105. 



APPENDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE AND BY GIFTS. 

Notice. — The increase ofyolumee is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because lost and 
condemned books are deducted. 



Years. 


Increase. 


Gifts. 


Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
charged to funds 
and added by 
exchange. 


fe 3 


a 

1i 
P 

5 




Vols. 


Paraph. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


Vols. 


' Pamph 


Vols. 


1852-81 


395,177 
12,239 
17,895 
16,478 
15,353 


251, .538 
10,561 
14,369 
17,368 
15,449 


143,745 
5,291 
5,340 
3,815 
2,975 


178,866 
8,773 
11,844 
16,203 
10,831 


250,474 
15,986 
16,222 
18,392 
17,005 


67,974 
2,068 
2,525 
1,165 
4,618 


7,143 
745 
522 
531 
457 


12,583 


1881-82 

1882-83 


520 
575 


1883-84 


778 


1884-85 


899 







1 Includes pamphlets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession 
catalogue. 

"Included in previous columns. The volumes are not the property of the Public Library, but 
form a part of the Roxbury branch, by agreement. 

Details for the years 1852-81 can be found in Appendix II. to the report for 1881. 



APPENDIX lit. 

VOLUMES IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





f 




H 


<X) 
H 


H 


9 

H 


« 

H 


ae 

H 


1-1 


« 

QC 
H 


H 


10 

ge 

ae 

H 


Patent library . . 


2,323 


2,457 


2,596 


2,731 


2,823 


2,897 


3,003 


3,066 


3,142 


3,259 


3,382 


3,478 


Bowditch library' 


2,542 


2,542 


2,542 


2,592 


2,932 


3,043 


3,060 


3,152 


3,224 


3,456 


3,701 


3,854 


Parker libraryi . 


11,907 


11,935 


12,292 


12,291 


12,296 


12,309 


12,322 


12,337 


12,363 


13,9.52 


13,971 


14,024 


Prince library . . 


1,970 


1,970 


1,970 


2,028 


2,029 


2,037 


2,159 


2,230 


2,274 


2,327 


2,397 


2,510 


Ticknor library . 


3,907 


3,940 


4,285 


4,929 


6,171 


5,354 


5,432 


5,454 


6,463 


5,507 


5,544 


5,724 


Barton library . . 


12,057 


11,902 


12,1082 


12,804 


13,950 


14,210 


14,301 


14,360 


13,487 


13,610 


13,610 


13,642 


















202 


240 
893 


292 
920 


.357 
1,085 


378 


Thayer library . 
















1,123 























^ See Appendix VII. 

'The number given in 1874 was as near as could be reckoned before the entry on the Accession 
catalogue was made. The number given in 1875 is what hacV actually been entered, and the full num- 
ber is given since these dates. 



Public Library. 



33 



H-l 



p-l 



» 


S 


g 


00 


s 




o 
-* 






1 


11 


ge 


S 




tc 






o_ 
























ac 


OS 


IM 








f-i 




o 


H 


CO 




1 ^ 










•* 


^ 


3 


to 


o 


■* 


•* 


S? 




o^ 


IX) 




P 


a-. 






CJ_ 




"^ 


IX) 


















00 


ci 


o 










oT 


H 


CO 




^ 










CO 


» 


to 

00 


00 


S 






§ 




1 


aD 




c^ 


U5 






CO 






« 




















<^j 


03 












H 


CO 




CO 










so 






to 


CO 


CO 


to 


00 




to 










o 


OS 




00 


1^; 


ifi 


c- 




to 


-^ 






» 




















cl 


o 






Ijf 






H 


CO 




•<* 










CO 


H 
X) 


m 


to 


i-H 


o 


rH 


CO 




^ 


c 




a 














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X) 




















c^ 














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CO 




CO 










CO 





to 


CO 


Ol 




t- 


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o 






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•^ 






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to 


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to 


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CO 




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CO 




« 


o> 


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ac 


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t- ^ 




00 


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^ 










in 


04 


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c" 










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t» 




oc 


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to OO 


•* 


















OD 


\n 


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00 








H 


m 




CO 






CO 
















" 


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o> 




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t- 


to o 






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or 


ir 


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at) 


















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to 








o 


H 


or 




CO 






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CO 












E 












































c 






















fc 




































































































































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< 










































P 






















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c 










































"r 














> 






CI 


c 


^ 
%. 












" S; 




p 


12 


1 










a 


a 


^ 


c 


c 


M :, 










c 

C 


a 






a 

L. 


9 fe 

s s 








a 


5 


1 


^ 


1 


' a 


<s 




^ 










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*C 




C 


! 


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■« 


1 


L 




3 




c 


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J 


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— ,2 



34 



City Document No. 105. 



APPENDIX Y. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 







1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 






8,506 
184 


8,750 
19 


11,729 
25 


11,216 

54 


10,230 
15 


:§ 


Condemned and transferred 


<^ 


8,322 


8,731 


11,704 


11,162 


10,215 





1 
S 


'Gain in books 

Condemned and transferred 


2,376 
1,164 


2,576 
* 


2,378 
1,400 


2,716 
1,361 


2,099 
1,074 


1,212 




978 


1,355 


1,025 








Is 




69 


41 


98 


55 


258 


















69 


41 


98 


55 


258 










386 
1,233 


936 
223 


1,764 

781 


1,340 

528 


420 


Is 


Less loss by exchanges, etc 


211 


5-£ 




713 


983 


812 


209 




847 













587 
377 

210 


596 
372 


604 
379 


669 
383 


585 




288 


^ C ] 




go 


223 


225 


286 


297 







o f Gain in books . . . . 

c^ g ! Condemned and lost 



^ L^et gain 



995 
644 



1,000 

485 



351 



1,105 
659 



935 
537 



398 



■4 


'Gain in city part 

Condemned and lost 


811 
335 


839 
260 


1,090 
757 


976 
428 


908 
540 


§ 


Net gain 




rfs 


476 
2,111 


579 
745 


333 

522 


548 
531 


368 


5 


PelloweB Athenaeum. (Net gain) .... 
.Total gain 


447 


ft! 


2,587 


1,324 


855 


1,079 


815 









* There is a loss of 531 volumes for 18S2, owing to the transfer of a large number of 
duplicates to the duplicate room, and also to the fact that the number of books condemned 
this year exceeds those supplied. 



Public Library. 
APPENDIX Y. — Continued. 



35 





18S1 


1882 


188a 


1884 


1885 




1,568 
425 

1,143 


1,533 
675 

858 


1,326 
561 


1,199 
1,391 


1,2S.3 

5n 


* =j 1 Condemned and lost 


765 


*los8 192 


772 









183 
26 


lOS 
56 


140 
97 


262 

98 


142 


o-c; 

<: 5 . Condemned and lost 

Net gain 


60 


117 


52 


51 


164 


82 









640 

128 

512 


828 
93 


767 
189 


961 
402 


1,120 
664 


^<1 

^ ~ 1 Condemned and lost 


o^ 


735 


578 


559 


456 









450 
23 


460 
96 


569 
195 


559 

119 


569 


« ^ J Condemned and lost 

1^ 


124 


427 


364 


374 


440 




S 





•« ("Gain in books . , . 

J i! / Condemned and lost 

ll 

gain 



^ I. Net 



215 

206 



410 
197 



515 

288 



386 
291 



400 
441 



loss 41 



Bates Hall gain 

Lower Hall gain 

Newspaper- room gain . . . 
Duplicate-room gain .... 
East Boston branch gain . 
South Boston branch gain . 
Roxbury branch gain . . . 
Fellowes Athenaeum gain . 
Charlestown branch gain . 
Brighton branch gain . , . 
Dorchester branch gain . . 
Jamaica Plain branch gain 
Soulh-End branch gain . . 
West Roxbury branch gain 
North-End branch gain . . 



Total gain 



8,322 

1,212 

69 



210 

351 

476 

2,111 

1,143 

117 

512 

427 

9 



14,113 



8,731 

loss 531 

41 

713 

223 

515 

579 

745 

858 

52 

735 

364 

213 

. . . . 1 



13,239 



11,704 
978 

98 
983 
225 
462 
333 
522 
765 

51 
578 
374 
227 

74 
521 



17,895 



11,162 

1,355 

55 

812 

286 

446 

548 

531 

loss 192 

164 

559 

.440 

95 

74 

143 



16,478 



10,215 
1,C25 
258 
209 
297 
398 
368 
447 
772 

82 

456 

445 

loss 41 

11 
411 



15,353- 



* This excessive loss at Charlestown is required to correct a mistake of some years' 
standing in the aggregate number of volumes, which is reported correctly this year in 
Appendix I. 



36 



City Document No. 105. 



APPEJS^DIX VI. 

INCREASE FROM NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOKS. 





e 

X) 
H 


H 


CO 

X) 
H 


H 


e 
ae 

XI 

H 


IN 
X) 
X 

H 


X 
X 
H 


tf) 

X 
X 

H 


X 
X 
H 


IS 

X 
X 

H 


English books with British 
imprint 

English books with American 


2,830 

10,501 

316 
1,858 


2,237 

6,761 

180 
1,742 


1,763 

5,546 

191 
1,269 


1,781 

5,295 

233 
1,372 


1,555 

5,637 

238 
1,399 


1,841 

4,346 

186 
1,245 


2,091 

4,856 

235 
1,411 


2,058 

4,755 

232 
1,427 


2,113 

4,683 

265 
1,655 


2,100 
4 438 


English books with Continental 


200 


Foreign books 


2,008 


Total 


15,505 


10,920 


8,769 


8,681 


8,829 


7,618 


8,593 


8,472 


8,716 


8 746 







APPENDIX VII. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 
(Representing books located only.) 



Cyclopaedias, etc 

Bibliograpliy and literary history 

General liistory, Ijiography, travel, and geograpliy 

American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite literature 

English history, etc 

French history, etc. . , 

Italian history, etc 

German history, etc 

Greek, Latin, and philology 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geography, biography, travel, and literature 

Periodicals and transactions 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, etc 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Political economy 

Medical science 

Natural history and science 

Mathematics and physical science 

Useful arte 

Flue arts 

Bound volumes of miscellaneous pamphlets 

Bound volumes of manuscripts 

Shakespeare . 

Books for the blind 



1,580 
1,077 



Totals . 



Total in 
general 
library, 
May 1, 
18S6. 



8,867 
32,480 
26,210 
14,560 
8,184 
9,312 
6,916 
1,401 
7,487 
19,713 
20,675 
9,014 
4,818 
2,973 
12,671 
8,402 
10,116 
6,036 
7,244 



Special Libraries. 



1,413 

1,180 



3,492 
1,360 



3,854 14,024 



3,236 
2,486 



1 countries, 
riters, and what of American literature is 



li^xpuvNATloN. — Class III. includes general history, etc., when embracing 
and collected works of historians. 

Class IV. includes the collected works of American ■ 
sometimes t<^rmed polygraphy. 

Classes ■V.,\^., VII., and VIII. have the same scope for the respective countries that Class IV. 
has for America. Class VIII. includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the 
Scandinavian nations. 

Class XIV. includes polilical science and ethics, applied and unapplied, education, phrenology. 



Class XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 

Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for purposes of enumera- 
tion or learning percentage of use, it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the sub- 
divisions; as also upon such points as biography, travel, and voyages, etc., by summing the results 
of the ranges devoted to them in the several alcoves. 

Note. — The dates given in the special libraries column show the year when they were acquired 
by the library. 

Details for years previous to 1882 can be found in Appendix VIU. to the Report for 1881. 



^ Includes all books in i 



1 G, — 12,108 of them belonging to the Barton library, as originally shelved there. 



Public Library. 



37 



appe:n^dix yiii. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 



CLASSES. 



'heology, moral and intellectual science, etc 

urlsprudence and political science 

iledicine, matliematics, ph\'sics or natural science . . 
Jseful and fine arts, military and naval science .... 

American history and politics 

•"oreign history and politics 

'oetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric 



Snglish prose fiction, including juvenile fiction, and 
other juvenile books 



Biography 

Travels 

Libraries, collections, periodicals, etc.* 

Serman books 

[talian books 

French books 

Spanish books 

Books of reference 



Extent of L. H. collection 39,519 



1884 



2,028 
427 
2,750 
1,031 
1,292 
1,644 
3,439 

14,098 

2,976 

2,.543 

3,913 

1,5S7 

156 

1,193 

5 

437 






35 
23 
86 
40 
37 
35 
46 

317 
92 
67 
71 
30 






5 

1 
13 

3 
13 

6 
26 

512 
12 
23 
31 

22 



49 
31 
113 
63 
63 
58 
78 

1,193 

124 

128 

135 

52 



2 a) 



672 2,099 29 1,045 40,544 



7 
2 
25 
3 
15 
39 
30 

731 
26 
21 
97 
39 



as 



o P< 



2,070 
456 
2,838 
1,081 
1,338 
1,663 
3,486 

14,552 

3,074 

2,650 

3,933 

1,600 

156 

1,201 

5 

441 



Reported last year 39,519 

Gain in 1884-85 1.025 



*Thi8 class, embracing sets like Bohn's'I " Libraries, " etc., includes many books, of course, which, 
in a minute classification, would have been divided among nil the previous heads of this table. 

Note. — The column of "Condemned books replaced" includes books condemned in previous 
years as well as in the current year. The column " Total Added " shows the number of volumes as put 
upon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. 



38 



City Document No. 105. 



APPENDIX IX. 



GIFTS, MAY 1, 1884, TO APRIL 30, 1885. 



Givers (excluding anonymous) 
Volumes .... 

Pamphlets .... 



899 

2,975 

10,831 



Givers. 



Adams, Prof. Charles Kendall, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Adams, Z. B., M.D., Framingham . 

Adams Nervine Asylum 

Adolph, Dr. Carl, Sorau, Germany . 

Agassiz, Alexander, Cambridge 

Aiken, Walter H., College IIill, Ohio 

Alabama Historical Society, Tuskaloosa, Ala. 

Alumni Association of Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. 

Alumni Association of the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy, Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences . 

American Academy of Dental Science 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

American Bankers' Association, New York City 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 

American Congregational Association 

American Exchange, Paris, France .... 

American Forestry Congress ..... 

American Home Missionary Societ}', New York City 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American Missionary Association, New York City 

American Philological Association 

American Pliilosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American Society of Civil Engineers, New Yoo-k City 

American Society of Microscopis^, Buffalo, N. Y. 

American Unitarian Association 

Amherst College Library, Amherst . 

Anagnos, Michael .... 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover 

Angell, George T. . . . . 

Annerstedt, Claes, Upsala, Sweden . 

Anonymous ..... 

Appleton, D. & Co., New York City . 

Appleton, William S. . . . 

Apprentices' Library, Neiv York City 

Apprentices' Library, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Archaeological Institute of America . 

Arens, E. J., M.D 

Astor Library, New York City . 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Co 
Ayer, J. C, & Co., Lowell 




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Ayers, J., M.D., Rockland, Me. 

Bacon, Mrs. William . 

Baird, Prof. Spencer F., Washington, B.C. 

Baker, Rev. Charles R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Baker, W. Yi., M.D 

Baldwin, Charles H. . 

Balfour, Uavid M 

Bancroft, Miss Jane M., Evanston, III. 

Barclay, James J., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Barnes, Henry J., 31. D. 

Barrow-in-Furness. England, Free Public Library 

Bartlett, Commander iohnYl., U.SN. 

Bartlett, Rev. S. C, Hanover, N.II. . 

Bartow, Morey-Hale, New York City 

Bates, Arlo ..... 

Baxter, Edward F 

Baxter, .James P., Portland, Me. 
Beers, William A., BridgeiJort, Conn. 
Belgium, Chamber of Representatives 
Bell, Alexander G. , Washington, B.C. 
Bell, C. H., Exeter, N.II. 
Beloit College, Beloit, Wis. 
Belrose, Louis, jr. .... 
Benet, Brig. -Gen. S.V., Washington, B.C. 
Benjamin, Rev. Raphael, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Benton, J. H.,y?\ 
Berkshire Independents 
Betts, E. C, Auburn, Ala. 
Bibliographie de Belgique, Brussels 
Bibliotheque de la Ville de Paris 
Bicknell, Thomas W. 
Biewend, Rev. Adolphus . 
Biker, Julio F. J., Lisbon, Portugal 
Birmingham, England, Borough of 
Blaisdell, Frank C. . . 
Blake, Francis E. . . . 
Bliss, Rev. J. Isham, Burlington, Vt 
Boardman, James, 3Ianchester, England 

BoUes, W. P 

Bolton, England, Public Library 
Bond, T. Edward 

Borland, J. N., M.B., New London, Conn 
Boston, City of . 

Auditor .... 

Board of Health 

City Hospital . 

Collector's Office . 

Commissioners of Parks 

Overseers of the Poor 

School Committee . 

Water Board . 

Boston Athenseum 

Boston Commandery Knights Tempi 

the California pilgrimage 
Boston Commercial Exchange . 
Boston Gas Light Company 
Boston Journal Company . 
Boston Lying-in Hospital . 
Boston Medical Library Association 



Committee on 



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maps 



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Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society 
Boston Provident Association . 
Boston Society of Natural History . 
Boston University ..... 
Boston Young Men's Christian Association 
Bostonian Society, ..... 
Boursaud, Rev. Edward V. . . . 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D. 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. 
Bowman, S. Z., Somerville 
Boyd, Mrs. L. T., New Orleans, La. 
Boyle, Charles E., Washington, D.C. 
Boylston, Edward D., Amherst, N.II. 
Brace, Charles L., New York City . 
Bradlee, Eev. Caleb D., a lot of broadsides, 

newspapers ...... 

Branner, John C, Scranton, Pa. 
Brewer, Mrs. Adele, Stockbridge 
Bridge, Samuel J. .... . 

Bridgeport, Conn., Public Library . 
Brigham, Edwin H., M.D. 
Brightly, Frederick C, Germantown, Pa. 
Brinton, Daniel G., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 
British Museum ..... 

Brookline, Public Library .... 

Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N.Y.. 
Brooks, Erastus, New Brighton, N. Y. 
Brooks, Morgan ..... 

Brooks, Shepherd ..... 

Brooks, Rev. William H., Hanover . 

Brown Francis H., M.D. . 

Brown, J. Willard ..... 

Brown, John F., Nantucket 
Brown, Sevellon A., Washington, D.C. . 
Bruun, Dr., Chr. V., Copenhagen, Denmark 
Buck, William J., Jenkinstown, Pa. . 
Buff & Berger ...... 

Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, N. Y. . 

Burdach, Dr. Konrad, Halle, Germany . 

Burnham, A. W., Andover 

Burnham, George, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Burt, Silas W., Albany, NY. . 

Bush, George G. 

Bussey Institution 

Buswell, A. T. . 

Butler, Eben R. 

Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, R 

Byram, Charles R 

Byram, Edward R. . 

California, State Mining Bureau 

California Institution for the Education of the 

Dumb, and the Blind, Berkeley, Cal. . 
Cambridge, England, Public Free Library 
Cambridge, Public Library 
Canada, Geological and Natural History Survey 
Cannon, Henry W., Washington, D.C. 
Carney Hospital .... 
Carpenter, Rev. H. Bernard 
Carret, Jose F 



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CartciC, Cornelius S., M.D. ...... 3 

Carter, Elwyn ......... 1 

Cartwright, J. A., Nashville, Tenn. ..... 1 

Cathedral Total Abstinence Society, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Chamberlain, Mellen 12 

Chandler, Horace P. . 4 

Channing, Walter, M.D.., Brookline ..... 

Chapman, Alfred F 

Chase, George B. ....... . 

Chetham's Hospital and Library, Manchester, England . 2 

Chicago, III., Public Library ...... 1 

Chicago Athenaeum ........ 

Chicago Historical Society ...... 

Chicopee, Town of ....... . 

Children's Aid Society, New York City .... 

Childs, George W., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 1 

Christern, F. W., New York City ..... 3 

Christian Philosophical Institute, Balham, England 

Church Home for Orphan and Destitute Children 

Church Press Association, New York City ... 1 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Public Library ..... 2 

Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce ..... 1 

City Missionary Society ....... 

Civil Service Reform Association, New York City . 

Clarke, Eliot C 40 

Clarke, James Freeman, D.D. . . . . . . 3 

Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, NoHhampton 
Cleveland, Ohio, Public Library ..... 

Cobbett, Miss Susan, Manchester, England 

Cobden Club, London, England ..... 

Codman, John T., Z>.J/.Z> 

CofBn, Charles E., Muirkirk, Md. ..... 

Cohen. Bev. S. S 

Colby LTniversity. Waterville, Me. ..... 

Collar, William C 

College of New Jersey, Priwce^rt, N.J. .... 1 

Collier, Henry ......... 1 

Collins, Patrick A 25 

Colorado Scientific Society, Denver, Col. .... 

Columbus. Ohio, Public Library ..... 

Concord, Free Public Library ...... 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven, 

Conn. .......... 

Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, Hartford, 

Conn. .......... 1 

Cook, E. B., New York City 1 

Cork and Orrery, Earl of, London, England ... 1 

Corliss, George, Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. 

Correspondence University Publishing Co., Chicago, III. . 

Cort, Rev. Cyrus, Greencastle, Pa. ..... 

Costello, Martin J., Clinton 

Courtenay, William A., Charleston, S.C. . 

Cowley, Charles, Lou-ell ....... 

Cox, William R., Washington, B.C. 

Crane, Prof. T. F., Ithaca, NY. 

Crawford, T. H., Portland, Oregon 

Crocker, George G. ....... . 

Crosby, Rev. Jaraes H., Bangor, Me 



42 



City Document No. 105. 



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Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 
Crowell, .John, M.D., Haverhill 
Crunden, Frederick M., St. Louis, Mo. 
Cumniing'.s, Thomas H. . . . 

Currier, .John M., M.D., Castleton, Vt. 

Curtis, Hall 

Curtis, Col. Herbert P., Washington, D.C. 

Cushing, Laurence B., Newhuryport 

Cutter, Ephraim, M.D., New York City 

Da Costa, Charles W., .racksonville, Fla 

Daly, Charles P., New York City 

Dame, Walter K., Clinton 

Dana, C. I^., M.D., New York City . 

Dana, liichard H. . . . . 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., Class of 1864 

Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences, Davenport 

Iowa ..... 
Davie, Curtis, Plymouth . 
Davis, Alonzo, Fitchburg . 
Davis, Horace, San Francisco, Cal. 
Davis, Simon .... 
Dawson, William F. . 
Dayton, Ohio, Board of Education 

Public Jjibrary 

Deane, Charles, Cambridge 

Deane, I^., Washington, D.C. 

DeBonsat, Faber 

Dedham, Town of . . . 

DeMilt Dispensary, New York City 

Demmon, Prof. Isaac N., Ann Arbor, Mich 

DeNardis, YnxteXW, Aquila degli Abruzzi, Italy 

Dennett, W. S., Saco, Me. 

Dennis, H. .J., Topeka, Kan. 

De Peyster, .John W., New York City 

Derby, England, l^ublic Library 

Deuerlich, G., Gottingen, Germany 

Dewey, Melvil, New York City 

Dillenback, Miss E. P. 

Dixwell. Mrs. J. J. . . . 

Dodge, James H. . . . 

i:)oliber, Goodale & Co. . 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Societyof the Protestant 

Episcopal Church, New York City 
Domett, Henry W., New York City . 
Donohoe, .Joseph A., San Francisco, Cal. 
Dorr, Miss Caroline .... 
Doyle, John T., San Francisco, Cal. 
Doyle, Thomas A., Providence,- R.I. 
J^rury College, Springfield, Mo. 
Dubbs, Joseph H., D.D., Lancaster, Pa. 
Dumbarton, England, Public I^ibrary 
Duren, Elnathaii F., Bangor, Me, 
Duryea, .Joseph T., D.D. . 
Dutton, George, vJAZ). 
Earle, Pliny, M.D., Northampton 
Eastern Banking Company 
Eaton, .John, Washington, D.C. 
Edes, Henry H. . 
Eddy, Robert H. . . . 




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EcUund, G. W., Tlelsingfors, Finland 
Eafvpt, Ministry of Public Works 
Elson, Louis C. . 

Emmons, Tlieo. H. . . . •• • 
Enofineers' Club, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Entomological Society, London, Ontario . 
Essex Institute, Salem .... 
Ette, Prof. Edward von .... 
Evening Post Publishing Company, New York 
Everett, Public Library .... 
"Express" Company .... 

Eyssenhardt, Prof. F., Ilamhurg, Germany 
Fairbank, N. K., Cliicago, III. . 
Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, 
Fanning, J. T., Manchester, N.H. 

Farley, John, & Sons 

Farmer, L. G. . 

Farmer, Silas, Detroit, Mich. 

Fay, Henry G 

Fearing, C. W 

Fegan, Lawrence ..... 
Fell, George E., M.D., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Fernald, Prof. O. M., Williamstown 
Finck, Henry T., New York City 
Fisher, Charles H., Providence, R.I. 
Fitzgerald, Desmond .... 

Floye, W. J 

FlUgel, Dr. Felix, Leipzig, Germany 
Fogg, E. T., South Scitiiate 

Fogg, John S. H., ^/.Z> 

Folsom, Albert A. .... . 

Folwell, William W., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Forbes, R. B 

Forbes, S. A., Normal, 111. 

Ford, William E 

Forster, Edward J., j]/./) 

Fort, George F., Camden, N. Y. 

Foster, William H 

Fox, John A. ..... . 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Frazer, Persitbr, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Free Hospital for Women 
Freeman, Jno. C, Madison, Wis. 

French, A. D. Weld 

Friend, A 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa. . 
Frotliingham, Mrs. Richard 
Frothingliam, Thomas G. . 
Fuller, Mrs. Arthur B., Cambridge . 
Fuller, Arthur O., Exeter, N.H. 
Ganzhorn, Williatn 
General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the 
of New York ...... 

Gerard, James W., New York City . 
Gernerd, J. M. M., Miincy, Pa. 
Gerould, Rev. Samuel L., Goffstown, N.H. 
Gibson, W. T., D.D., Utica, N. Y . 
Giles, Mrs. S. R. H., Hyde Park 
Gilmore, George C, Manchester, Nil. 



broadside 



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City Document No. 105. 



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Glasgow, Scotland, City of 

Globe Publishing Company 

Goodell, Abner C., jr., Salem 

Gookin, Fred \V., Chicago, III. 

Gould. Benjamin A., Cordoba, Argentine Republic 

Gould, George M 

Gould, Sylvester C, Manchester 

Grafton, F;!., Public Library 

Grabam, Cbarles D. . 

Grant, S. Hastings, New York City . 

Gray, Capt. W. H., Olney, Oregon, . . 2 newspapers 

Great Britain, Astronomer Royal 

Commissioner of Patents 

Green, Milbrey, M. D. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D. . 

Greene, Miss Fannie M., Clinton 

Greenleaf, Edward H. 

Greenough, C. P. 

Greenougb, W. A , & Co 

Greenough, William W. 

Griggs, S. M., Westboro' 

Groveland, Town of . 

Guernsey, Fred. R. . 

Guild, Chester . 

Guild, Reuben Aldridge, Providence, R.I. 

Gurney, George B., Chelsea 

Guthrie, Malcolm, Liverpool, England 

Hale, Edward Everett, D.D. 

Hale, George S. .... 

Haliburton, R. G. . 

Hall, Prof. E. W;, Waterville, Me. . 

Hall, John A., Springfield . 

Ham, J. R., M.D., Dover, N.H. 

Hamilton, Rev. John A. . . . 

Hamilton, Walter, London, England 

Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, Hampton, Va 

Harris, Francis A., M.D 

Harrisse, Henry, Paris, France, ... 1 chart 
Hart Printing and Publishing House, Harrisburg, Pa 
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. . 
Hartford Library Association, Hartford, Conn. 
Hartwig, Dr. Otto, Halle, Germany . 
Harvard College, Cambridge 

Astronomical Observatory 

Library ...... 

Theological Faculty 

Harvey, Augustus J., London, England, 12 broadsides 
Haskell, Rev. Augustus M 



Havemeyer, Theodore A., Mahwah, N.J. 

Haynes, Henry W. 

Hazen, Rev. Henry A. 

Head, J. F., M.D. . 

Hegarty, J. 

Hegarty, M. 

Herkness, Alfred M., & Co. 

Hermes, Paul, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hertwig, John George, Washington, D.C. 

Higginson, Henrv L. 

Hilgard, Pro/, j! E., Washington, D.C. . 



., Philadelphia, Pa. 



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Hill, Benjamin D., Salem . 
Hill, Don Gleason, Dedham, 

Hill, E. B 

Hill, Hamilton A 

Hine, Miss Edith C 

Hinsdale, B. A., Cleveland, Ohio 

Historical, Natural History and Library Society of South 

Natick ......... 

Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands 

JVewburgh, N.J. ....... 

Historical Society of Southern California, Los Angeles 



Cal. 



Hoar, George F., Wo7xester ..... 

Hogg, John W., Washington, D.C. .... 

Holbrook, Albert, Providence, R.I. .... 

Holland, Rev. F. W., Concord ..... 

HoUs, Friedrich W., New York City 

Holmes, Mrs. E. J. . . . ... 

Homans, John, M.D. ...... 

Home for Aged Men 

Horhe for the Friendless, New Haven, Conn. 
Homes, Henry A., Albany, N.Y.. 
Homes for Inebriates Association, London, England 
Hood, C. I., «&; Co., Lowell ..... 
Hosmer, Rev. Sanmel D., Auburn .... 

Hough, Prof. G. W., Chicago, III 

Howard, Wendell Stanton, New Orleans, La. . 

Hubbard, Mrs. Gardiner Green, Cambridge 

Hubbard, H. W., New York City 

Hunnewell, James F. 

Huntoon, Daniel T. V., Canton 

IngersoU, Ernest, Neiv York City 

Innes, William P., Lansing, Mich 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England 

International Committee of Young Men's Christian Asso 

ciations. New York City ..... 

International Inventions Exhibition, London, England 
Inwards, Kichard, London, England 
Ireland, Joseph Norton, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Jack, D. R., .S"^. John, N.B. 
James, Miss Alice 
Jarvis, Edward, M.D. 
Jay, John, New York City . 
Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D. 
Jenkins, Miss Mar^' A. 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 
Johnson, Arnold B., Washington, D.C- 
Joint Counties Asylum, Carmarthen, Wales 
Jones, Charles C, jr., Atlanta, Ga. 
Kaiserlich-Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna 

Austria ......... 

Kalisch, Isidor, D.D., Newark, N.J. 

Kansas, Board of Agriculture ..... 

State Librarian ...... 



Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan. 
Kato, H., Tdkid, Japan ' . 
Kay, Robert, Adelaide, South Australia . 
Kelker, Rudolpli F., Ilarrisburg, Pa. 
Keller, W. B., New York City . 




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Kelly, W. L 

Kennard, William H 

Kimball, Sumner I., Washington, D.C. 
King, George Gordon, Newport, R.I. 
Kingman, Abner A. ... 

Knapp, Arthur M 

Knapp, George B 

Kneeland, Samuel, M.D. . 

Knox, Jobn J., Washington, D.C. 

Koenigliche Bayerische Akademie der Wisse 

Munich, Germany ..... 
Koenigliche Oeffentliche Bibliothek, Dresden, 
Lancaster, Public Library .... 
Landreth, David, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Lasceli, G. W., Lynii .... 

Law Association of Philadelphia 
Lawrence, A. A. 

Lawrence, Abbott, . . . . .16 
Lawrence, William, Washington, D.C. 
Lawrence, Public Library .... 
Lea's, Henry C, Son & Co., Philadelphia, Pa 
Ledyard, L. Wolters, Cazenovia, JV. V. 
Lee, Jolin W. M., Baltimore, Md. . 
Leeds, Josiah W., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Leeds, England, Free Public Library and Musi 
Leliigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 
Leicester, Public Library .... 
Leicester Academy, Leicester 
Leonard Scott Publishing Company, Philadelphia, Pa 
Levi Parsons Library, Gloversville, N. Y. . 
Levy, Simeon, Mexico .... 
Lewis, Prof. H. Carville, Haverford, Pa. 
Library Company of Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lile & Pawcett, London, England 
Lincoln, Public Library .... 
Linnajan Society, Lancaster, Pa. 
Little, Charles J., Ilarrisburg, Pa . 
Littlefield, George E. .... 

Liverpool, England, Free Public Library 
Lockwood, Hiland, Estate of, . .a lot of 
London, England, City of . . . 

London Library, London, England . 
Long Island Bible Society 

Long Island Historical Society, Broo'dyn, N. 1 
Louisville, A'y., Board of Trade 
Lovell, John W., New York City 
Lovering, Henry B.,Z/2/ra» 
Lowell, J/iA-s Anna C. .... 

Lowell, City of . 

City Library ..... 

Ludwig Salvator, Arch-Duke, Prague, Austria 
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, Northampton, . 

Lyon, Charles E. F 

McCartney, R. C 

McCleary, Samuel F. .... 

McKellar, Smiths & Jordan, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McKenny, .Tames H., Washington, D.C. . 
McVicker, J. H., Chicago, III. . 
Maimonides Library, New York City 



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Maine Historical Society, Portlan'^, Me. . 
Maiscli, Jolin M., Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Maize, D. O. E 

Maiden, Public Library .... 

Manchester, England, Public Free Libraries 
Manciiester, N.IL, City Library 
Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, 
Canada ....... 

Mann, B. Pickman, Washington, D.C 

Marcy, Henry O., M.D 

Marlborou":!!, Public Library 

Marrin, Jolin F. ..... 

Marshall, James P., Chelsea 

Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md. 

Massachusetts, State of ... . 

Board of Education 

Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity 

State Library 



Win 



nip eg 



Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
Massachusetts Historical Society 
Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Massachusetts Medical Society . 
Massachusetts School for the Feeble-Minded 
Massachusetts State Pharmaceutical Association 
Master Car Builders' Association, New York City 
Maxwell, J. Audley ...... 

Maxwell, Mrs. S. B., Des Moines, Iowa . 

May, Miss Abby W 

May, Henry A. . 

Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa. . 
Mechanics' Institute, Sail Francisco, Cal. 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State of Mar 
Baltimore, Md. ...... 

Meek, Henry M., Salem ..... 

Melrose, Public Library ..... 

Melvin & Badger . 

Mercantile Library, JVew York City . 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Michigan, State Library ..... 

Middleton, Jonas ...... 

Milwaukee, Wis., Public Library 
Minneapolis Athengeum, Miniieapolis, Minn. 
Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn. . 
Mississippi State Medical Association 
Mitchell, Prof. Hinckley Gilbert ... 
Moore George H., JVcw York City . 
Moore, John B., Concord ..... 

Morse, Leopold ....... 

Morse Institute, Natick ..... 

Morton, John P., & Co., Louisville, Ky. . 
Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, South Hadley 
Murdock, Lieut. J. B., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Murpliy, John F. ..... . 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge . 
Museum of Fine Arts ..... 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Educational Association 



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City Document No. 105. 



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National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, North- 
western Branch, Milwaukee, Wis. .... 
Netherlands, Government of the ..... 

New Bedford, Free Public Library 

New England Education Society ..... 

New England Historic-Genealogical Society 

New England Society in the City of ^rooA/j/n. . 

New Hampshire, Secretary of State ..... 

State Library ........ 

New York, CiYj/, Board of Education . . . . . 
New York, State, Asylum for Insane Criminals, Aubin'n, 

N.r. 

State Library 

State Lunatic Asylum, Utica, N.Y. 

New York Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N. Y. 
New York & New England Railroad ..... 

New York City Mission and Tract Society, New York City, 
New York Hi.-;torical Society, New York City . 
New York, Lake Erie & Western K.R. Co., President's 
Office, Aew York City ....... 

New York Produce Exchange, Neiv York City . 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, Public Libraries 
Newhall, Mrs. Benjamin B. ..... . 

Newton, Public Library 

Nichols, Mrs. li. Anne 

Nickerson, 3frs., Cambridge ...... 

Nimnio, Joseph, y?-., Washington, B.C. . . . . 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis ........ 

North Adams Savings-Bank ...... 

Norton, Charles B. ....... . 

Norwegian North-Atlantic Expedition, Chrisiiania, 
Norway ......... 

Nourse, Henry S., Lancaster ...... 

Noyes, Isaac P., Washington, D.C. . 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Nutting, Miss Mary E 

Odd Fellows' Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. 
Ohio, State Library ........ 

Old South Church 

Oliver, Edward B. ....... . 

Olney, Peter B., New York City ..... 

Onderdunk, Henry, jr., t/amaica, i/./. . . . . 

Oneida Historical Society, Utica, N.Y.. 

Orphans' Home and Asylum of the Protestant Episcopal 

Church, New York City ...... 

Otterbein University, Westerville, Ohio .... 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester ...... 

Palmer, C. M., 3IinneaiJolis, Minn. .... 

Pancoast, Henry S., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Paris, France, City of ....... 

Parker, Henry J. ....... . 

Parkhurst, V. P., East Templeton ... 1 plan 
Patton, John M., Ashland, Va. ..... 

Peabody Academy of Science, Salem .... 

Peabody Library, Peabody ...... 

Peabody Museum of American Archseology and Ethnology, 

Cambridge ......... 

Pearce, Wahlo A. ....... . 

Peaslee, John B., Cincinnati, Ohio ..... 




22 
4 



13 
1 



17 
1 
1 



Public Library. 



49 



Givers. 



District, Phila 



Peck, Miss Anna L., New York City 
Peck, George B., M.D., Providence, R.I. 
Pell; Mrs. Anna, Newport, R.I. 
Pembroke Academy, Pembroke, N.H. 
Pennington, J. A. . 
Pennsylvania, Penitentiary of the Eastern 
delphia ...... 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia 

Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg 

Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia 

Peoria, III., Board of Trade 

Perkins, A. O., Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Perkins Institution for the Blind 

Perry, John S., Albany, N.Y. . 

Perry, Miss Maria, New Ipswich, N.H. 

Perry, Thomas S. ..... 2 broadsides 

Perry, William S., D.D., Davenport, low 

Pettee, Edward E 

Pettingell, Rev. J. H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia City Institute . 

Philadelphia Social Science Association 

Phillips, Henry, yr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phillips, Mrs. John C. . . . 

Pickering, Prof. Edward C, Cambridge 

Pickering, William H., Cambridge . 

Pink, John, Cambridge, England 

Plymouth, England, Free Public Library 

Poole, William F., Chicago, III. 

Pope, Albert A. .... 

Porter, Rev. Edward G., Lexington . 

Portsmouth, N.H., City of 

Presbyterian Board of Publication, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Prescott, F. A 

Providence, R.I., City of . 

Auditor ..... 

Public Library 

Providence Athenaeum, Providence, R.I. 
Putnam, F. W., Cambridge 
Putnam's, G. P., Sons, N'ew York City 
Pychamska, 3I)S. L. D., Hoboken, N.J. 
Q. P. Index, Bangor, Me. . 
Quebec, City of . 

Quincy, Josiah P 

Ramsay, Capt. F. M, Annapolis, Md. 
Eanck, David H., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Ranney, Ambrose A. ... 

Rawle, Francis, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Raymond, Mrs. Curtis B. . 
Reale Istituto Lombardo, Milan, Italy 
Redington, Lyman Williams, Rutland, Vt 
Redwood Library, Newport, R.I. 
Reeves, Charles F., State College, Pa. 
Reynolds, John, Indianapolis, Ind. . 
Rhode Island, Adjutant-General 

Commissioner of Public Schools 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R 
Rice, Charles B., Danvers 
Rice, Franklin P., Worcester 
Rice, Harvey, Cleveland, Ohio . 
Rice, William, Springfield 




24 
14 



1 
186 



113 
1 
1 



3 
1 
14 
1 
1 

1 
1 

11 
3 



13 
2 
3 

5 

1 

26 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

30 



1 
3 
13 
2 
1 



7 
14 



1 
18 
1 
1 
2 



50 



City Document No. 105. 



Givers. 



Mo. 



1 picture 



Richardson, Ernest C, Hartford, Conn. . 
Robertson, C. F., D.D., St. Louis, Mo. . 
Robinson, John, Salem, .... 

Robinson, W. F 

Rockland County Historical and Forestry Society 

Rotch. Mrs. B. S 

Roy, Rev. Joseph E., New York City 

Royal Astronomical Society, London, England 

Royal Society, Edinburgh. Scotland 

Royal Society of Canada, Montreal, Canada 

Russell, Samuel H. . . 

Rutland County Historical Society 

St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y. . 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, 5'^. Louis 

Saint Nicholas Club, New York City 

Salter, Edwin, Washington, D.C. 

Sandoz & Fischbacher, Paris, France 

Sanger, Charles Robert, Cambridge . 

Sargent, John O., New York City 

Satchell, Thomas, London, England 

Sauveur, Dr. L. ..... 

Sawyer, Charles W. ..... 

Sawyer, Samuel E., Gloucester . 

Schaefer, Mrs. B. A. 

Schaffers, V., Antwerp, Belgium 

Schlegel & Fottler 

Scudder, Samuel H., Cambridge 
Seeley, Montressor S., Woburn 
Seidensticker, Oswald, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sewell, Robert, Madras, India . 
Shaw, Miss ...... 

Shaw, Samuel S. . . . . .26 newspapers 

SheflBeld, England, Free Public Libraries and Museum 

Shepard, Edward N, . 

Shepard, Harvey N. . 

Sherren, John A., Weymouth, England 

Simms, Joseph, M.D. .... 

Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J., 1 newspaper 

sides ....... 

Slack, Charles W 

Smith, Amzi, Washington, D.C. 
Smith, Benjamin G., Cambridge 
Smith, Charles C. . . . . . 

Smith, Henry H., Washington, D.C. 
Smith, Lloyd P., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Smith, Perkins F. . . . . . 

Smith, Thomas E. . . . . .1 photograph 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Snow, Edwin M., M.D., Providence, R.L 

Societe Franklin, Paris, France 

Society for the Study and Cure of Inebriety, London, Eng 

land ....... 

Society of Arts, London, England 

Society to Encourage Studies at Home 

Somerville, Public Library 

South Carolina, State Library . 

South Carolina Medical Society, Charleston, S. 

Southbridge, Town of ... . 

Public Library .... 



25 broad 




18 



Public Library. 



51 



Givers. 



Spooner, Lysander .... 

Spybey, F. G., NoUingham. England 

Stanton, R. L., D.D., Washington, D.C 

Stearns, Eben S., D.D., Nashville, Tenn. 

Stearns, George T., New York City 

Stedman, C. Ellery, J/.Z>. . 

Steele, Henry T., Chicago, III. . 

Stenger, W. S., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Stevens, Charles VV. . 

Stevens, Miss H. G. . 

Stevenson, William G., M.D., Poughkeepsie, N. 

Stimson, R. M., Marietta, Ohio . 

Stockport, England, Public Free Library 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.I. 

Stratton, Charles E 

Swan, Charles H., New York City . 
Swansea, England, Borougli of. 
Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. 
Swift, Lindsay ..... 

Tancred, P 

Tapper, Thomas, yr., Canton 

Taunton, Public Library . 

Taylor, Edward, Andover . 

Technological, Industrial, and Sanitary Museum of 

South Wales, Sydney, Australia 
Tennessee Historical Society, Nashville, Tenn 
Thayer, Miss Caroline C. . 
Thayer, Prof. J. B., Cambridge 
Thayer & Son, East Somerville 
Thomas, Prof. Allen C. , Ilaverford, Pa. 
Thomas, L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Thompson, Augustus C, D.D. . 
Thompson, Mrs. J. P., New Haven, Conn 
Tileston, Miss Mary W., Salem 
Titcomb, Miss Sarah E. . . . 
Toledo, Ohio, Public Library . 
Toronto, Canada, Public Library 
Towne, Enocii H., Worcester 
Townsend, Belton O'Neall, Florence, S. C. 
Trenchard, Edward, New York City . 
Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. 
Truman, Joseph M., jr., Philadelphia, Pa 
Tuckerman, Bayard, New York City 
Tufts College, Medford . 
Turner, Rev. D. K., Philadelphia, Pa 

Tattle, J. H 

Tuttle, Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Tuttle, M. E 

Union University, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Unitarian Sunday School Society 
United States, Army, Adjutant-General 

Chief of Engineers 

: Paymaster-General 

> Surgeon-General 



Board of Indian Commissioners 
Bureau of Education 
Bureau of Ethnology 
Bureau of Indian Affairs 
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 



New 




17 

1 

2 

25 



1 

10 

1 



1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

16 
5 



Pphs. 



4 
1 

2 

14 



2 
13 

3 
1 

1 
9 



21 




1 




2 




3 


63 


9 


2 


1 




4 


1 


1 




3 


14 


2 




1 


4 


1 





52 



City Document No. 105. 



Givers. 



United States Bureau of Navigation . 

Bureau of Ordnance 

Bureau of Statistics 

Census Office .... 

( 'ivil Service Commission 

■ Coast and Geodetic Survey 

Commissary-General of Subsistence 

Comptroller of tlie Currency . 

Department of Atjriculture 

Department of State 

Department of the Interior a lot of 

Department of the Navy 

Department of the Treasury . 

First Comptroller 



broadside 



broadsides 



Department of War 

Director of the Mint 

Fish Commission 

Geological Survey . 

Hydrographic Office, .... 2 map 

Internal Revenue Office 

Land Office 

Life-Saving Service 

Light-House Board 

Marine Hos{>ital Service 

Military Academy, West Point, N. Y. 

Nautical Almanac Office 

Naval Observatory 

Patent Office . 

Pension Office 

Postmaster-General . . . .57 map 

Signal Service 

Superintendent of the Senate Document Room 

Sui)ervising Inspector-General of Steamboats 

University Library, Cambridge, England . 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal. . 22 bro.adside 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

University of Minnesota, Minneaiiolis, Mitm. 

University of Rochester, Rochester, jV. F. . 

Upham, Warren, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Urbino, S. R. . 

Van de Sande, Miss Mary F., Washington, D.C. 

Van Name, A., New Haven, Conn. . 

Vanos-Dewolf, M., Antwerp, Belgium 

Varney, William H., Newport, R.I. . 

Vaughan, J. C, Chicago, III. 

Vermont, State Library 

Verrill, Prof. A. E., New Haven, Conn. 

Victoria Public Library and Museums, Melbourne 

Australia ..... 
Vose, Prof. George L., Brookline 
Walker, Francis A. . 

Walton, G. L., M.D 

Ward, Mrs. Anna L. Bloomfield, N..I. 

Ward, Rev. F. DeW., Geiieseo, N. F. 

Ware, William & Co. 

Warner & Foote, Philadelphia, Pa. ... 1 map 

Warren, Winslow ..... 1 newspaper 

Washburn, Israel, ^r., Widow and Children of, Portland, 

Me. 

Washburn College, Topeka, Kan 



Vols. 


Pphs. 


1 




1 


264 




6 


9 


3 




11 


4 






1 


2 




1 


28 


5 


35 


92 


62 


6 


3 


3 


3 


2 




1 


2 


4 




1 


4 


6 


5 


4 


231 


3 




1 


1 


1 


1 
52 


1 


7 


2 


1 


32 


7 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1 
5 


1 


3 
3 


3 




23 


14 
1 


1 




2 




19 


9 
6 


12 


24 
o 


9 


13 


5 


2 
2 


1 


I 



Public Library. 



52a 



Givers. 




broadsides 



Waterhouse, Prof. Sylvester, St. Louis, Mo. 

Watertown, Free Public Library- 
Watson, Miss M. F 

Wayland, Prof. Francis, New Haven, Conn. 

Webster, Frank B., Pawtucket, R.I. 

Webster Historical Society 

Weiser, Rev. C. Z. Uast Greenville, Pa. . 

Werneke, Dr. B., Montabaur, Germany . 

West Brookfield, Town of . 

West Virginia. Department of Free Schools 

Western Eeserve and Northern Ohio Historical Society 
Cleveland, Ohio ..... 

Weston, David B. . . . . . 

Weymouth Historical Society, Weymouth . 

Whitaker, Alfred E., San Francisco, Cal. 

Whitcher, Miss Mary, Shaker Village, N.H. 

White, James C, i»/.Z) 

White, Eichard E., San Francisco, Cal. . 

Whiting, Isaac S., M«o?i, iV.^. 

Whitney, James L., . . 1 newspaper, 9 

Whitney, Prof. Josiah D., Cambridge 

Whittier, Charles C 

Whittlesey, E., Washington, D.C. . 

Wickes, W. B., Sharon .... 

Wilcox, Eeynold W., M.D., New York City 

Wilder, Marshall P 

Williams, J. L 

Wilson, Horace, San Francisco, Cal. 

Winchester, G. F., Middletown Conn. 

Winchester Observatory, Yale College, New Haven, Conn 

Winsor, Justin, Cambridge ..... 

Winthrop, Eobert C, . . . .12 newspapers 

Wisconsin Institution for the Education of the Blind, Mad- 
ison, Wis. ......... 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis. . 

Woburn, Public Library ....... 

Woodbury, C. J. H 

Woodbury, John ........ 

Woodward, George B. ...... . 

Woodward, W. Elliott 

Worcester, Free Public Library . . . . . 

Worthington, Eoland & Co. ...... 

Wright, Carroll D 

Wright, Elizur 

Wright, Prof. J. H., Hanover, N.H. 

Wuerttembergischer Thierschutzverein, Stuttgart, Ger- 
many .......... 

Wyman, Gerald ......... 

Xavier Union, New York City ...... 

Yale College, New Haven, Conn 

Yerkes, Rev. Stephen, Danville, Ky 

Yorkshire Archasological and Topographical Association 

Young Men's Association, Buffalo, N.Y. . 

Young Men's Christian Association, New York City . 

Young Men's Library, Atlanta, Ga 

Young Men's Library, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Young Men's Mercantile Library Association, Cincinnati, 
Ohio .......... 

Zion's Advocate, Portland, Me. . . . . . 

Zoological Society, Philadelphia, Pa 



12 



29 
2 



3 
11 



Pphs. 



1 
4 
3 

1 

97 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
3 
2 

186 



1 
1 
1 
10 
2 
2 
1 



APPENDIX X. 



CIRCULATION. 
(Books issued.) 







Total Circulation. 


Bates Hall. 


LowEB Hall. 


East Boston Branch. 


South Boston Branch. 


RoxBuBT Branch. 


Tear. 


•a 

*3 




i 












1 


« a 


, 




i 


p 








i 


>i 








a 


i 
>> 








i 


>» 








E 


'A >. 


p 


s 




1 


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1.1 


n 




1 


■3 

13 




i 




£ 


'TS 


1 


a 




1 


4 


1 


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1 


i 




S 


3 


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1 


£ 


= 


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>> 


& 

s 


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1 


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3 


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& 


a 




s 


S 


1 


a 


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S 


>. 


I 




fc 


" 


a 


1-1 


a 








tJ 














a 


H 




>-) 


w 


a 


Eh 


a 


.3 


K 


a 


H 


a 


>j 


1876 


306 


947,621 


3,097 


8,035 


64,906 


59,373 


114,329 


373 


877 


338,450 


10,392 


348,842 


1,140 


2,698 


89,949 


1,038 


99,987 


293 


866 


113,334 


988 


115,530 


370 


1,045 


98,304 


2,993 


101,297 


320 


925 


1877 


306 


1,140,572 


3,727 


8,348 


66,832 


74,786 


141,618 


463 


930 


392,995 


12,737 


405,732 


1,326 


2,439 


101,022 


1,605 


102,627 


335 


902 


131,969 


3,210 


135,179 


430 


1,075 


140,059 


6,770 


146,829 


477 


1,190 


1878 


305 


1,183,991 


3,882 


10,478 


80,326 


66,670 


146,996 


483 


1,001 


378,439 


12,736 


391,175 


1,265 


2,902 


104,717 


1,879 


106,696 


343 


1,088 


137,010 


3,741 


140,751 


447 


1,414 


122,517 


7,513 


130,030 


404 


1,100 


187» 


308 


1,180,565 


3,833 


8,747 


74,627 


89,163 


163,790 


632 


926 


350,521 


12,672 


363,193 


1,179 


2,085 


95,887 


2,794 


c 98,681 


320 


916 


115,509 


3,335 


c 118,844 


603 


1,200 


123,492 


6,397 


129,889 


403 


1,013 


1880 


307 


1,156,721 


3,768 


8,781 


69,042 


101,100 


170,142 


554 


1,045 


306,148 


10,369 


316,517 


1,031 


1,999 


105,197 


3,004 


108,201 


303 


951 


138,309 


6,261 


143,570 


467 


1,196 


119,450 


5,480 


124,930 


388 


1,017 


1881 


304 


1,065,081 


3,504 


8,637 


68,609 


96,764 


165,373 


547 


1,046 


257,692 


9;271 


■266,863 


847 


1,849 


97,024 


4,097 


101,118 


318 


989 


rj9,251 


3,607 


132,858 


435 


1,137 


105,700 


4,912 


110,612 


360 


972 


1888 


303 


1,040,553 


3,434 


8,170 


63,782 


103,540 


167,322 


552 


1,052 


239,601 


11,191 


250,792 


828 


1,670 


88,901 


7,073 


e 95,974 


328 


868 


125,409 


4,077 


129,486 


426 


1,074 


101,534 


4,739 


106,273 


347 


876 


188:l 


306 


1,045,902 


3,418 


8,209 


66,948 


113,127 


160,075 


583 


1,181 


163,811 


32,119 


195,930 


640 


1,301 


92,833 


8,107 


100,940 


329 


876 


121,939 


4,472 


126,411 


413 


1,062 


105,797 


6,728 


112,525 


370 


906 


1884 


306 


1,056,906 


3,454 


8,694 


65,080 


119,833 


184,913 


604 


1,220 


168,926 


35,066 


203,992 


667 


1,333 


88,394 


7,048 


95,442 


311 


871 


119,564 


4,656 


124,220 


405 


1,161 


103,483 


7,874 


111,357 


360 


959 


1885 


304 


1,027,393 


3,380 


7,977 


78,630 


124,134 


202,764 


667 


1,210 


150,826 


32,768 


183,594 


606 


1,186 


75,710 


8,747 


384,457 


325 


855 


123,570 


5,096 


128,666 


423 


1,145 


93,350 


7,830 


106,180 


349 


834 





Chablbstown Branch. 


Bbighton Branch. 


Dobchesteb Branch. 


South-End Branch. 


Jamaica Plain Branch. 


North- 


End Branch. 


Tear. 


i 

1 


1 


1 


4 

> 

a 


i 
>> 

1 


H 


M 


1 


n 


i 
>> 

T3 

5 


1 


a 


1 


1 



T3 

1 


i 
I 


i 

3 


1 


i 


■B 
1 

i3 


a 


K 


^ 


i 
> 


>> 

1 

3 


Is 


g 

> 


i 

1 


187» 


84,631 


1,184 


85,815 


279 


830 


23,.531 


1,274 


24.805 


81 


314 


63,357 


899 


66,016 


206 


552 




























1877 


105,211 


1,605 


106,816 


348 


902 


27,832 


1,960 


29,793 


97 


290 


67,692 


4,287 


71,979 


220 


620 
































2,003 
1,815 


101,640 
88,740 

d 74,748 
80,822 






27,649 
26,737 
26,406 
26,067 


1,698 
1,859 
1,574 
2,110 


29,247 
28,928 
27,980 
28,177 


89 
93 
91 
85 


328 
312 
302 
269 


63,025 
56,786 
65,690 
53,904 


1,949 

1,423 

1,026 

730 


64,974 
59,673 
56,710 
55,188 


197 
184 
176 
177 


624 
675 
641 
541 


41,303 
73,154 
77,016 
71,432 


1,099 
2,713 
2,275 
2,530 


42,402 
75,867 
79,291 
73,962 






28,174 
50,457 


2,106 
2,503 
2,220 
2,311 
















86,925 
73,302 
78,682 


289 
246 
273 




247 
258 
242 


622 
680 
578 


52,960 
54,626 
50,108 














616 
789 














2,140 


47,797 


164 


467 


















85,038 


2,281 


87,319 


254 


741 


25,152 


2,292 


27,444 


89 


277 


53,036 


1,449 


e 54,485 


144 


561 


61,453 


10,283 


e 71,736 


318 


670 


46,316 


3,406 


49,722 


164 


381 
















1883 


84,560 


2,744 


87,.-!0i 


285 


775 


25,965 


2,295 


28,257 


92 


273 


65,678 


1,880 


67,558 


219 


650 


76,472 


17,778 


94,250 


808 


774 


44,758 


4,379 


49,137 


161 


411 


3,515 


20 


9» 


1884 


74,463 


2,513 


76,966 


251 


687 


24,214 


1,927 


26,141 


85 


277 


70,260 


1,913 


/72,173 


237 


741 


76,693 


22,108 


98,801 


322 


757 


43,039 


8,232 


51,271 


167 


505 


11,630 


38 


183 


1885 


69,181 


2,360 


71,541 


235 


587 


22,683 


2,209 


24,892 


82 


255 


71,863 


1,630 


73,502 


242 


633 


68,362 


22,495 


90,857 


299 


676 


41,526 


9,666 


51,192 


168 


444 


g 9,748 


35 


102 


a Includes the largest of each department on any day, 
the same day. 


withou 


t regard to its being 




b 


d The Charlestown branch was closed from iVpi'il 20th to t 
ooks, and also from May 1st to the 11th, 1880. 


he 30th, to t 


carrangc 


the 


/The Dorchester bran 
g The East Boston an 


ch was closed one 
d North End bra 


day, for repairs, during 1384. 
ichea were closed 44 and 25 working-days 


b Includes books borrowed on white slips, and returned 


the Bam 


e day. 






e The East Boston branch was closed 25 working-days. 








respectively. 


during 188. 
















cThe East Bos 
South Boston fron 


ton branch 
August 12 


W!i8 close 
th to NoTe 


. from Oct 
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Public Library. 



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Public Library. 



55 



APPENDIX XIII. 

BATES-HALL READING. 



Classification. 



English history, topography, hi- 
ography, travel, aud polite lit- 
erature 

Atnerliran (North and South) 
history, etc 

French history, etc 

German history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

Other history, topography, hiog- 
raphy, travel, and polite litera- 
ture 

General and epochal history . . 

Greek, Latin, and philology . . 

Bibliography 

Transactions 

Periodicals 

Fine arts 

Natural history and science . . . 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, 
ethics, education, etc 

Medicine 

Law, government, and political 
economy 

Useful arts, mathematics, phys- 
ics, etc 

Miscellaneous 



Percentage op Use. 



13.2 
11.8 

a.i 

3.4 
1.5 

4.2 
3.3 
3.5 
1.2 
.5 
3.9 
8.9 
3.8 

11.0 
7.3 

2.7 

9.7 
4.0 



13.1 

11.1 
5.8 
3.9 
1.8 

4.6 
3.3 
3.6 
1.5 

.6 
3.5 
8.7 
3.7 

11.5 
7.0 

2.5 

8.9 
4.9 



12.3 

12.2 
5.3 
3.9 
1.6 



3.9 
1 
.6 
3.4 
8.6 
3.6 

11.3 
6.6 

2.5 

9.0 
5.0 



12.0 

12.4 

4.6 
3.9 
1.6 

4.7 
3.5 
3.3 
1.6 
.7 
3.7 
8.4 
3.8 

15.0 
6.4 

2.3 

9.1 

4.8 



11.8 

11.3 
5.2 
3.8 
1.6 

5.0 
3.5 
3.5 
1.9 
.7 
4.4 
8.3 
3.9 

11.0 
7.0 

2.7 

9.3 
4.9 



11.8 

10.6 
5.1 
4.5 
1.6 

5.2 
3. 
2.9 
1.5 
.5 
5.4 
8. 
3.5 

11.2 
6.8 



10.2 
5.7 



APPENDIX XIV. 

LOWER HALL AND BRANCH READING. 

(^Based upon the record of hooks returned*) 



The figures give the relative per- 
ceutiges. 



Fiction and juveniles* 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, the- 
ology, law, medicine, professions . 

Feriodicals 

Foreign languages 

MisceUaneous 



a 


n 


m 


^ 




^ 


H 


A^ 


i 


J 


H 


(E 


K 


Q 


OQ 


•-s 


70 


80 


76 


82 


78 


79 


74 


79 


77 


7 


4 


6 


4 


6 


5 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


9 


3 


4 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 
3 
6 


6 


7 


4 


4 


6 


5 


4 
1 
4 


6 

.6 
4.5 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 


4 



7.01 
4.03 

8.96 
4.93 
3.62 
7.32 



1 


CLASSES. ' 

The figures give the relative per- 
centages. 


1883 


1884 


1883 


o 


►4 




n 


1 


6 


Q 


H 


hi 


§• 


W 
i-j 






1 


O 


a 


M 
m 




5 


« 






1 


o 


c 


fi 




H 


I. 
II. 
m. 

IV. 
V. 


Fiction and juveniles* 

History and biograjihy 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, the- 
ology, law, medicine, professions . 


61.49 
7.26 
4.57 

9.47 
6.11 
4.41 
7.69 


77.50 
3.75 
3.00 

2.75 
7.38 
.12 
5.50 


75 
7 
3 

5 
7 

3 


79 
6 
3 

6 
5 

1 
2 


75.9 
6.3 
3. 

3.2 
4.6 
.2 

6.8 


77.8 
4.6 
3.5 

5.3 

3.8 

6. 


77.2 
6. 
4. 

5.7 
2.9 
.3 
3.9 


77 
6 
4 

4 
6 

4 


75.1 
6.6 
3.6 

6.1 

6. 
1. 
4.7 


62.37 
7.64 
4.08 

9.24 
5.32 
4.22 
7.23 


77.33 
5. 
2.17 

3.42 
8. 

4.08 


74. 
8 
4. 

3 
6. 

5. 


77. 
5. 
4. 

5. 
6. 
1. 
2. 


76 
6 
3 

3 

5 

7 


77 
3 
6 

6 
6 

4 


76.29 
5.96 
4.56 

6.56 
2.36 
.23 
6.06 


76 
6 
4 

6 
6 

3 


74.3 
5.8 
4.2 

4.9 
5.4 
.6 
4.3 


61.11 
7.S4 
4.44 

9.44 

4.98 
4.83 
7.36 


78 
6 
2 

3 

8 


76 
8 
4 

3 

6 


79 
6 
3 

3 

6 
1 
3 


73.7 
7.4 
3.7 

3.6 
4.4 
.2 
7. 


78.6 
5.6 
3.2 

4.6 
4.3 

3.7 


73.11 
8.51 
5.51 

6.59 
2.18 

3.85 


76 
6 
4 

5 
5 

4 


74.3 
6.7 
3.7 

4.8 


VI. 






vn. 




4 


6 











* A large nuraher of the jnveniles are not fiction. 
Books taken out on white slips and returned the same day are not included. 



Public Library. 



57 



APPENDIX xy. 

FELLOWES ATHEN^UM READING. 



o 

5 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 


H 


H 


at) 


© 
H 


ac 
ae 

H 


ac 
ac 

H 


W 
ao 
ac 

H 


'J* 
ac 
ao 

H 


US 

XI 

as 

H 


I. 


History, biography, and travels 


33 


30 


37 


39 


33 


42 


44 


46 


39 


n. 


Modern foreign languages . . . 


11 


10 


11 


10 


13 


11 


6 


6 


4 


in. 


Periodicals 


14 


17 


6 


5 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


IV. 


Miscellaneous literature .... 


9 


8 


9 


" 


11 


10 


11 


10 


13 


V. 


Theology, sociology, ethics . . 


7 


7 


6 


6 


9 




6 


7 


8 


VI. 


Medicine 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 




2 


1 


1. 


VII 




4 
7 


4 

7 


4 
8 


4 

7 


4 
6 


.28 


4 
6 


4 
7 


4 


vni. 


Fine arts, engineering 


5 


rx. 


Law, politics, government . . . 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 




2 


2 


1 


X. 


Mathematics, science 


11 


12 


14 


13 


11 


. 


10 


9 


10 


XI. 












5 


6 


4 


4 


8 

















BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 



6 


Classes. 


t» 


ac 


e 





H 


0) 


es 


^ 


10 






l» 


t» 


i» 


ae 




ac 


ac 


ac 


ac 


a 


Relative percentages. 


ac 


ac 

H 


ac 


s 


H 


ac 


ac 

H 


ac 


ac 


O 






















I. 


Fiction 


77 


76 


75 


76 


76 


73 


74 


73 


73 


n. 


Biography, travel, and 






















history 


8 


7 


8 


8 


7 


S 


9 


10 


10 


in. 


Other 


15 


17 


17 


16 


17 


19 


17 


17 


17 



NORTH-END BRANCH READING. 



Relative percentages 
for 


Fiction 

and 

Juveniles. 


History 

and 

Biography. 


Travels 

and 
Voyages. 


Sciences. 


Miscel. 


1884 


7 
26 


43 

18 


24 
32 


15 
4 


11 


1885 


20 







58 



City Document No. 105. 





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j» r» f. t» ac 3t » » 36 
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60 



City Document No. 105. 



appe:n^dix XVIII. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



General Library 
Accounts. 



Binding 

Boolia 

Periodicals* 

Catalogues (printing) . . 

Expense 

Fuel 

Furniture (cabinets, 
shelviiig, fixtures, etc.) 

Gas 

Printing (miscellaneous) 

Stationery 

Salaries 

Transportation, Postage, 
etc 

Total 



1884-85. 



Citj' appro- 
priations. 



$3,000 

17,000 

5,000 
3,000 
3,000 

2,000 
8,000 

4,000 

76,000 

'2,000 



$120,000 



Expended. 



$1,882 04 

25,337 49 
3,630 53 

4,796 49 
3,033 06 

3.051 08 

1.052 32 
5,523 33 

3,775 51 

75,730 85 

2,288 71 



$130,101 41 



Fellowes 
Athenaeum. 



$982 00 



$982 00 



Paid into City Treasury 
from fines and sales of 
catalogues. 



Year. 



1876 

1877 

1878 
1879 
1880 

1881 
1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 



Amouut. 



$2,505 35 

3,092 12 

3,266 31 
2,618 32 
2,984 12 

3,497 03 
2,945 74 

3,223 14 

3,018 01 

2,952 68 



♦The appropriation for periodicals is included in that for books. 

NOTB. — The expenditures for books cover the cost of those chargeable to the trust- 
funds account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the city, and also 
include such as are bought with the balances with the foreign agents at the close of the 
previous year. The financial and library years now nominally correspond, but it will happen 
that bills accruing subsequently to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year, 
payable April 1st, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account beginning 
nominally May 1st. In this way books added between March 15th and May 1st may be 
counted iu oue year's growth, and paid for in the subsequent year's account. The cost of 
maintaining branches after the first year makes part of the general items of the several 
appropriations. 

The money for books bought on account of the Fellowes Athenaeum is spent under the 
direction of the book committee of the trustees of the Fellowes fund. 

Details for previous years can be found in Appendix XIX. to th" report for 1881. 



NORTH-END BRANCH. 

City Appropriation, §4,000. * 

Salaries $672 48 

Books 705 71 

Expense 1,027 86 

Amount actually expended $2,406 05 

Balance of City appropriation $1,593 95 

Expended for books 186 08 

Balance $1,407 87 

Books $415 08 

Alterations and repairs . • 5u6 51 

921 59 

$486 28 



Public Library. 



61 



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62 



City Document No. 105. 



APPENDIX XX. 

LIBRAKY SERVICE. 

(April 30, 1886.) ' 



Name. 



Mellen Chamberlain 



James L. Whitney 
Jos^ F. Garret . . 



Louis F. Gray . , , 

Adelaide A. Nichols 

Johu J. Eeenan . . 

Total 



c «i 



1878 

1869 
1875 

1880 
1868 

1885 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian and Clerk of the Cor^ 
poration ........ 



Principal Assistant Librarian 

Registrar and Curator of Pa^ 
tents and Engravings 



Librarian's Secretary , 
Auditor and Cashier , 
Librarian's Runner . , 



5a 



James L. Whitney 
William H. Foster . 
Jose F. Garret . . . 



Lindsa_y Swift . • . 
Edward B. Hunt . . 
Roxanna M. Eastman 

Elizabeth T. Reed . 
Frank C. Blaisdell . 
Annie C. Miller . . 
Edith C. Hine . . . 
Ida W. Gould . . . 

Card Cataldffiiet. 
Harriet C. Blakb 
Carrie K. Burnell . 
Alice Browne . . . 
Edward P. McLaughlin 
ToUl 



1869 
1860 
1875 

1878 
1883 
1859 

1873 
1876 
1881 

1884 
1884 

1880 
1881 
1883 

1884 



Principal of the department 
Assistant 



Registrar, Curator of Patents 
and Engravings and Assistant 



Assistant 
Assistant , 



Extra Assistant and Cataloguer 
of U.S. Documents .... 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in Patent-Room, etc. . 



Curator 

Curator of officers' card catalog, 

Assistant 

Runner 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



63 



Name. 



Harriet N. Pikje . . 
Edith D. Fuller . . . 
Agnes R. Dame . . . 
Mary A. McQrath • . 

J. F. Keefe 

Total 



1867 
1879 
1883 
1868 
1883 



Position, duties, etc. 



Chief Clerk . . 
Associate Clerk 
Assistant Clerk 
Assistant . . . 
Runner . . . . 



•3> 



a « 
O 



sa 

o « 



Appleton p. C. GRirriN . 

William Roffe 

John S. Morrison 

George W. Hope 

Total 



1865 
1881 
1882 
1884 



Custodian 

Asst. in charge of repairs, etc. 

Assistant 

Runner ..... 



Arthur Mason Knapp 
Lydia F. Knowles . . . 
Louise A. Twickler . . 
Agnes C. Doyle .... 
W. Maynard L. Young . 
Florence Richards . . . 
John H. Reardon . . . 
Thomas E. Taff .... 
Daniel J. Murphy . . . 
Daniel J. Dwyer .... 
Total 



1875 
1867 
1881 
1885 
1878 
1878 
1882 
1884 
1885 
1885 



Librarian of Bates Hall 
Delivery Clerk .... 
Receiving Clerk ... 

Assistant 

Clerk of the Branches 

Assistant 

Runner 

Runner . 

Runner . 

Runner 



Edward Tiffany . • 
Mary A. Jenkins . . . 
William F. Robinson . 
Thomas H. Cummings 

Caroline E. J. Poree . 
Sarah A. Mack .... 
Eliza J. Mack .... 
Annie M. Kennedy . . 
Annie G. Shea .... 
Mary Sheridan .... 
Rebecca J. Briggs . . 



1878 
1877 
1872 
1879 

1859 
1863 
1863 
1869 
1874 
1880 
1881 



Librarian of Lower Hall . . . 

Assistant Librarian 

Clerk for registration and fines 

Curator of Lower Hall card 
catiilogue 



Reading-room Clerk 
Delivery Clerk . • . 
Receiving Clerk . . 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 



64 



City Document No. 105. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Julia C. Twickler . 

Esther Nurenberg . 

Agnes C. Murray . . 

Eleanor J. Briggs . 

John J. Butler . . . 



Evening Service. 
Louis F. Gray . . . . 



J. E. Tisdale 



William Roffe . . . 
Catherine McGrath . 
William L. Day . . 
Calvin A. Jones . . 
Henry L. Jouve . . 
Freeman L. Zittel . 
Thomas Murray . . 
Total 



William E. Ford . . . 
William F. Adams . . , 

John White 

William Monahan . . . 

Extra daily As»i8tants. 

Total 



1882 
1883 
1885 
1885 
1878 

1881 
1884 

1884 
1873 
1881 
1884 
1885 
1885 
1885 



1858 
1879 
1880 
18S3 



Position, duties, etc. 



Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Care of shelves . 

Card Catalogue . 



Registration Clerk and Sunday 
service 



Reading-room . 
Receiving Clerk 
Runner .... 



Runner 
Runner 
Runner 
Runner 



Janitor , 

Night Watchman , 

Porter 

Porter , 



3 o 



16 



Andrew M. Blakk 
Frank Ryder . . • . . 
P. B. Sanford ... 
Wm. Hemstead . . 
William F. Sampson 
Arthur Siguere . , . 
Sarah E. Bowen • . 
Martha M. Wheeler 
Mary G. Moriarty . 
Sarah J. Dumas . . 
Mary J. Morton . . 
Mary Roslund . . . 
John F. Murphy . . 
Total 



1870 
1883 
1879 
1883 
1880 
1881 
1876 
1869 
1875 
1881 
1881 
1883 
1883 



Foreman 

Extra Forwarder . 

Finisher 

Pressman . . . , 
Forwarder . . . , 
Forwarder . . . . 
Forewoman . . . 
Sewer 



Sewer . . 
Sewer . . , 
Sewer' . . 
Sewer . . , 
Apprentice 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



65 



Position, duties, etc. 





4J 




-a-? 








a oj 






P o 




bc-r- 
o > 


s g 










a m 




O 


o 






Sarah C. Godbold , 
Mary R. Pray . . . 
Alice M. Wing . . . 
Mary E. Cathcart . . 
E. L. Lennon . . . , 
Adelia H. Ghen . . 
Anna B. Rollins . . 
Anna C. Carstensen 
Mildred S. Brown . 
George H. Hosea . . 
Total 



1871. 
1870. 
1872. 
1870. 
1881. 
1876. 
1882. 
1884. 
1885. 
1873. 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Assistant . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



N. Josephine Bullard . 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Idalene L. Sampson . . , 

Mary E. Watson 

Reata Watson , 

Lilla F. Davis 

Emmie W. Bragdon . . 
Maude McLaughlin . . . , 
Maria A. Hudson . . . . 

Alice B. Orcutt 

Joseph Baker 

Total 



1883. 
1872. 
1877. 
1873. 
1877. 
ISSl. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1884. 
1872. 



Librarian 

Registration Clerk 
Delivery Clerk . . 
Receiving Clerk . 
Assistant .... 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Assistant . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Extra Runner . . 
Janitor 



Sarah Bunker . 
Helen M. Bell . . 
Elizabeth C. Berry , 
Helen R. Crowell . , 
Dora Puffer . . . . 
Katie R. Albert . 
Mary A. Dowd . . 
Sarah W. Griggs . 
Mary Griffith . . . 
Charles R. Curtis . 



Total 



1876. 
1878. 
1877. 
1882. 
1878. 
1883 
1884 
1884 
1885 
1873 



Librarian . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Extra Assistant 
Runner . . . . 
Runner . . . . 
Janitor 



66 



City Document No. 105. 

LIBRARY SmiYICE. — Continued. 



a 

S 
« 

0) 


Name. 




Position, duties, etc. 


■So; 

a <" 
O 


6 
a i> 


•6 

>> 

o 




Cornelius 8. Cart£e . . 

Annie E. Eberle 

Mary P. Swaiu 

Alice G. Willoughby . . . 
8i>8an E. Livermore . . . 

Lydia E. Eberle 

Emma L. Willoughby . . 

Thomas E. Smith .... 

Total 


1870 
1874 
1878 
1882 
1879 
1881 
1882 
1874 




1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

1 

3 










< 






1 












^ 
















§ 




1 
5 








s 














Mart E. Brock 

Mary F. Grailey 

Sara R. Broek 

James M. Brock 

Total 


1875 
1880 
1880 
1878 




1 

1 


1 
1 




§ 






^ 






o 




1 
3 




1 




4 












Mart G. Coffin .... 
Mary J. Sheridan .... 
Lucy Adelaide Watson . . 
Frances Willard Pike . . 

A. M. Mansfield 

Edward Davenport .... 
Total 


1874 

1875 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1874 




1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 




■c; 






a 


















S 




1 
6 




Cl 




6 














Grace A. De Borges . . 

Maud M. Morse 

Margaret A. Sheridan . . 

Mary Arkinson 

Peter Sheridan 

Frank Hathaway 

Total 


1880 

1877 
1875 
1881 
18S4 
1884 




1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 




< 






5 






-3 






f^ 












^ 




5 


6 



Public Library. 

LIBKARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



67 



o 

a 




Name. 


1 '^ 


Position, duties, etc. 
.4* 


ii 

a a. 

O 


it 

a ^ 
.£ P 

= y. 
O a* 


a 
I- 

_ P< 

sa 


^ 


Eliza R. Davis .... 

Anna J. Barton 

Nellie F. Ritey 

Margaret 8. Barton .... 
Timothy Johnson .... 
Total 


1877 
1876 
1878 
1882 
1877 










s 












Assistant 




c 






a 




4 


^ 













Eliza R. Davis 

Catherine G. J. Mooney . 

J. P. Fleming 

Total ... 


1882 
18S2 
1882 




1 

1 
1 
3 






^< 






|| 


Janitor 


^ 














•S 


Mary A. Hill 

Julia W. Richards .... 
Harriet L. Atkinson . . . 

Grace E. Poware 

Total 


1875 
1884 
1882 
1884 


Custodian, Lower Mills . . . 
Custodian, West Roxbury . . 

Custodian, Mattapan 

Custodian, Neponset 


1 
1 
1 

1 
4 




4 













68 



City Document No. 105. 



Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditoi 


, anc 








Runner 




5 


1 


Catalogue department 






13 


1 




Purchase and Entry department . 




5 




Central Library 


Shelf department . 






4 




70 regulars. 


Bates Hall circulation department 




10 




■ 10 extras. 


Lower Hall circulatio 


n department, 


day 






— 


evening, and Sunday 


service 




16 


9 


80 in all. 


Janitor's department 








4 






Bindery 








13 


, 




East Boston Branch 








5 


5' 




Soutli Boston branch 


, 






6 


5 




Roxbury brancli . 








6 


4 


Branches. 


Cliarlestown branch 








5 


3 


46 regulars. 


Brighton branch . 








3 


1 


^ 20 extras. 


Dorchester branch 








5 


1 


— 


South-End branch 








5 


1 


66 


Jamaica Plain branch 


. 






4 






North-End branch 


. 






3 






Deliveries 


• 






4 




Totals . 


• 


116 
30 


30 


Grand total . 


. 


. 146 








AGE 


NTS 









Messrs. W. B. Clarke «& Carruth, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triibner & Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Christern, and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 

Deuerlich'sche Buchhandlung, Oottingen. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Seiior Don Juan E. Riaiio, Madrid. 



Public Library. 



69 



APPE:^rDix XXI. 



EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 









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