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Full text of "Annual report"


%, ۩SDim.M) 



T H I 11 TT-FIFTH 



ANNUAL KEPOET. 



18 8 6. 




[Document 28 — 1887.] 



CITY OF 1 M BOSTON. 



THIRTY-FIFTH REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

1887. 



The Trustees have the honor to present to the Mayor and 
the City Council their Thirty-fifth Report, embracing the 
details of the condition and administration of the Library 
for the year 1886. 

The usual yearly examination of the institution by a 
committee of citizens, omitted for the last eight months of 
the year 1885, has been resumed. It consisted of eight 
members, viz. : Rev. Pitt Dillingham, Henry H. Edes, 
Esq., Mrs. Charles D. Homans, Mrs. Charles C. Smith, 
Hon. Solomon Lincoln, Col. Henry Stone, John O. Teele, 
Esq., and Wm. F. Wharton, Esq. It organized by the elec- 
tion of Col. Stone as chairman. 

Their important and valuable report, to which fuller refer- 
ence will be made, and that of the Librarian, with its care- 
fully drawn appendixes and sub-reports, will, it is hoped, 
give a satisfactory and encouraging account of the large de- 
tails which enter into the workings of the whole institution, 
including the Central Library, the branches, and the delivery 
stations. 

The Library and its Work for the Year. 

General Statement. 
The present extent of "the Library collections and their 
public use for the last year are herewith presented : — 



2 City Document No. 28. 

The aggregate number of volumes, including the dupli- 
cate-rooms, embraced in the Bates Hall collection, is 305,- 
006 ; in the Lower Hall 41,777 ; in the Branches, 132,638 ; 
making the total number of volumes in all the libraries, 
479,421, — a net increase for the year of 18,428. 

The whole number of days upon which the libraries were 
opened was 305. 

The total use of books for the year was 958,629, — a de- 
crease from the previous twelve months of 63,014. This 
diminution of circulation occurred in all the popular libraries, 
except the Lower Hall, and the North-End Branch, and is 
due to various causes ; principally to the withdrawal of sen- 
sational works for the young, but is also effected by the in- 
creasing sale of the great monthly periodicals, and in the 
ability of the individual reader to purchase at a low price 
such series of attractive books as are issued by the leading 
publishers at minimum rates. 

The annexed table gives the circulation of the various 
libraries for the year : — 



Name of Library. 



Lower Hall , 

East Boston , 

South Boston , 

Roxbury, including Fellowes Athenaeum . . . 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South-End , 

Jamaica Plain , 

West Roxbury , 

North-End 

Bates Hall, exclusive of duplicates not in use 



No. of Volumes 
Dec. 31, 1886. 


In Use, 1886. 


41,777 


183,931 


12,167 


79,435 


12,220 


99,992 


29,334 


87,516 


26,428 


65,977 


13,686 


21,829 


13,791 


69,890 


9,995 


78,718 


10,383 ) 
3,252 ) 


48,344 


1,382 


19,524 


174,415 


755,156 


289,494 


203,473 



463,909 



958,629 



The number of books recorded as missing during the year, 
from all the libraries is as follows : From Bates Hall, 10 ; 
from the Lower Hall, 31 ; from Roxbury, 3 ; from Charles- 
town, 5 ; from East Boston, Dorchester, and South End, 2 
each ; from Brighton, 1 ; from South Boston and Jamaica 
Plain, with an aggregate loan of 148,336, 0; in all, 56, or 



Public Library. 3 

one in 17,110 volumes. A varying portion of these annual 
losses is usually recovered afterward. 

The periodicals delivered to readers at the Central Library 
and Branches since the beginning of the Library year have 
been 506,758, as against 551,550 for the same period in 
1885; of these 327,915 found use in the Boylston-street 
reading-room. 

The aggregate issues from Bates Hall, the Lower Hall, and 
all the Branches, from the original distribution at the main 
library in 1853, and including the work of each branch in 
the successive order of its establishment, amount to the 
large aggregate of 18,437,147 volumes, of which 9,315,517 
were delivered from the Boylston-street libraries. 

The New Library Building. 

Of the important edifice to which the attention and expec- 
tations of the community are so aroused at the present time, 
there is little to be said beyond the following facts. A good 
and sufficient foundation of the building has been completed, 
and is now covered in for protection against the winter's 
climate. The Trustees are ready to give the necessary in- 
struction to such architect as may have the matter in charge, 
as to the proposed internal arrangements of the building, in- 
cluding the stack. After these points are settled, an eleva- 
tion can be projected for the construction, of the most durable 
material, and of sufficient proportion and dignity. While spe- 
cially to be built for great public uses, and for a long duration 
of time, it should have a consistent elegance of its own, 
which will be in sufficient harmony with the other noble struct- 
ures in the finest square of which our city can at present 
boast. 

But the limit of expenditure for the external and internal 
construction of this great temple of learning and general 
knowledge has been fixed by the City Council ; and,"before 
proceeding further in the work, it is the desire of the Trus- 
tees that, after suitable plans have been accepted, specifica- 
tions shall be made of every detail necessary to its proper 
completion, and bids taken from responsible parties for the 
whole cost of finishing the structure ; whether the balance 
remaining of the appropriation will erect such a building as 
will be satisfactory to the community will then be shown. 

The Examining Committee. 

The report of the Examining Committee is the fullest and 
most comprehensive document upon the actual condition, 
working detail, and progress of the institution that has been 



4 City Document No. 28. 

presented for years, if ever, to the public. It deserves the 
careful examination of general readers, as Ave 11 as of the 
friends and advocates of free libraries. 

It has not been considered as within the compass of the re- 
ports of the Trustees of the Library to cover, in their annual 
statement, anything further than the actual statistics of Li- 
brary work for the year, accompanied by such recommenda- 
tions to the City Government as would extend its usefulness, 
although the tables forming the appendix of each statement 
give comparison with the important detail of previous years, 
to which the attention of readers and thinkers is annually 
called. 

The recognition of the principles upon which the libraries 
were based, and have been administered, particularly in ref- 
erence to the Bates Hall collection, is most judicious and 
gratifying. While, of necessity, the larger, more valuable, 
and cosily works cannot be loaned, either because of the 
terms of their gift to the Library, or from the inherent value 
of the book itself, there still remains for circulation a very 
large and valuable collection of permanent value, which is 
within reach of the student and the scholar for home use, and 
sufficient to show the annual movement or progress in science, 
art, and literature. The Library would poorly meet the de- 
mands of inquirers if it did not keep pace, so far as its means 
would permit, with the important accessions to scientific and 
general knowledge, whether derived from our own and Eng- 
lish scholarship, or from the kindred advance of the more 
enlightened communities in Europe. 

With regard to the circulation of fiction in the popular 
libraries the result of its curtailment to the better reading of 
this class of literature forms an interesting study of popular 
tastes. An indiscriminate purchase of works of this class, 
neither expensive in cost nor absolutely immoral in tendency, 
but vapid, unnatural, and sensational, would largely increase 
the circulation of the popular libraries. The reading of fic- 
tion is a natural taste among all classes of the community, 
and, from the experience of former years, the Trustees have 
sought to restrict the additions to this class of books to such 
new works as seemed to have sufficient merit and interest to 
deserve a position upon the Library shelves. They have 
withdrawn from circulation, particularly for the reading of 
the young, such works as seemed simply attractive from 
their exciting relations of life and its accidents, entirely out- 
side of any probable, or, perhaps, possible experience; or if 
not outside of this last condition, not of any prospective value 
for the youthful thought or consideration as fitted to the pos- 
sible emergencies of life. 



Public Library. 5 

The Trustees would most gladly add to the facilities of 
the catalogue department, particularly in reference to the 
popular libraries. The force employed upon transcribing 
the book-titles, cross-references, and classifications is now, 
and has been for years, entirely inadequate to cover the 
whole tield of labor. The number of first-class skilled em- 
ploye's in this index work throughout the country is small 
in proportion to the labor to be accomplished, but more of 
them could be had if sufficient assistance was given from 
the annual appropriation for this necessary work. A good 
library is opened to public use by the maintenance of its 
index of contents. The pertinence of the remarks of. the 
examining committee upon the slow progress to be made by 
the present catalogue force deserves special attention. To 
enable the scholar, student, and reader to find the book of 
which he is in pursuit, either by author, title, or subject, two 
steps are necessary to be taken; first, and most important, 
to catalogue the accessions to the Library as rapidly as possi- 
ble after their arrival, so as to place them within quick 
access of the public ; and, secondly, to bring up the great 
mass of titles previously recorded to the system adopted 
years since as most useful and convenient for general con- 
sultation. 

The principle upon which the Bates Hall catalogue was 
based was that of instruction to the searcher after knowledge 
in that, so far as was practicable, a person ignorant of the 
author or name of a book, but desirous of exploring a sub- 
ject, should find under that subject-title such references as 
would lead him to the books on the shelves. The sugges- 
tion of the examining committee that an attendant should be 
at hand, who could act either as a subject-encyclopanlia of 
the works in the library, or to direct the inquirer how to find 
such as were needed for his purpose, would be most valuable 
if practicable in its fullest sense. The librarian of Dates 
Hall who has a familiarity of years with the contents and 
accessions to the great consulting library, together with his 
assistants, can always be consulted. He will gladly aid 
any reader or student in his researches. With the popular 
libraries, the librarian, or possibly the more experienced 
assistants, should know and be able to advise as to the read- 
ing material under their care. 

The suggestion of the committee upon the expediency of 
opening for public use the card catalogue of the Lower Hall, 
now under the care of a special attendant, who furnishes titles 
and shelf-numbers to the inquirer for books,, requires ex- 
planation of the circumstances to which it owed its origin. 
When the Mason-street Library was moved to the Boylston- 



6 City Document No. 28. 

street building, and the Bates Hall Library was established, 
a selection of books of permanent value was taken from the 
original collection and placed in the alcoves of the upper 
hall. A consulting catalogue, alphabetically arranged for 
the whole library, was placed on the same story on which 
the most important contents of the institution were stored. 
It was largely consulted by visitors to each division of the 
collection ; but its frequent use by borrowers wrought such 
injury to the cards, especially to those for the Lower Hall, 
that it was found necessary to separate the catalogue into 
two parts ; and that devoted to the Lower Hall was sub- 
stantially rewritten, and put in charge of a custodian. The 
newer accessions were placed upon lists within convenient 
access in the delivery-room. If any system can be devised 
by which a larger access can be given with safety to the slips 
in this catalogue, or by which increased facilities for infor- 
mation can be had, it would gladly receive consideration 
from the Trustees. 

The Trustees avail themselves with pleasure of the sug- 
gestion of the committee that a systematic arrangement 
should be made for a closer connection with the branches 
than has hitherto been had. Conferences of these librari- 
ans at different periods with the principal officer of the institu- 
tion, and with one another, have already been inaugurated by 
him, and will take more systematic form hereafter. This 
will naturally increase the interest of each branch officer in 
her work, and will give the advantage of mutual expe- 
rience in assisting readers in increasing circulation and in 
overcoming difficulties, with such advice from the central 
institution as its chief librarian may think necessary. 

The system under which the Public Library has so suc- 
cessfully been administered from its outset was the result 
of the general principles laid down by Mr. Ticknor in his 
well-known initial report, — to which was joined the prac- 
tical experience of experts in administration, — so that it has 
been carried on upon substantially the same lines as at the 
outset, but with such larger liberty to borrowers as could with 
safety be permitted. Other libraries have followed the 
Boston system, but with such changes as the character of 
their readers, or the nature of their collections have demanded. 
The study of the appendixes to the librarian's report will 
show the extent of the work done, and an intelligent inquiry 
into the different methods pursued, with a full understanding 
of the reasons and of the practice, would by itself furnish 
a normal-school education of library knowledge. 



Public Library. 



In General. 

The Trustees acknowledge with pleasure the continued 
bounty of J. Ingersoll Bowditch, Esq., to the Bowditch 
Library ; now, with its additions, forming a collection of great 
importance to students of the mathematical sciences, and 
gradually becoming the most important collection of its class 
in America. 

The condition of the Treadwell Trust-fund remains sub- 
stantially as given in the last report of the Trustees, with 
the exception of the investment of the money balance paid 
to the Library, which with the stock dividend of the Boston 
and Albany Railroad added another share to the property 
already held. 

The restoration of the appropriation for the support of 
the Library to the amount found necessary for the previ- 
ous five years has enabled the Trustees to purchase more 
books for the libraries, but not to bring up the acquisitions to 
the needs of the requests of books " asked for," already 
upon file. 

In conclusion, the Trustees wish to express their great 
gratification at the regular increasins; use of the Bates Hall 
collection, and with the manifest tendencies in the Branches 
to a better class of reading. 

WILLIAM XV. GREENOUGH. 
HENRY W. HAYNES. 
SAMUEL A. B. ABBOTT. 
WILLIAM H. WH1TMORE. 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE. 

Public Librarv, February 4, 1887. 



City Document No. 28. 



[B.] 
REPORT OF EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The ordinance under which the Boston Public Library is 
administered provides for its annual examination by "a com- 
mittee from the citizens at large." This committee for the 
current year was appointed about three months before its 
close, and has given such examination as the limited time 
allowed. 

The object aimed at in the appointment of such a commit- 
tee undoubtedly is to enable the citizens at large, in whose 
stead it acts, to learn, as well as they can, from a perfectly 
independent source, what the condition of the Library is, 
and how the great trust devolved upon its Trustees and 
officers is administered. The committee has no power ex- 
cept to examine and report. 

The Library has been in operation a third of a century. In 
that time it has grown from a petty village circulating- 
library of about 10,000 volumes, and open a few hours 
each day, to a vast institution, — the central building having 
340,000 books on its shelves, and open twelve hours every 
week-day and Sunday afternoons, — and eight Branches, the 
smallest of which is larger and better equipped than was the 
entire library at its opening. So great an aggregation of 
books, collected in so short a time, at the cost and for the 
free use of all the citizens of the city, would, under any 
conditions, be a source of just pride. If, in addition, the 
books have been selected with intelligence, and always 
with the single purpose of making the Library as complete, 
in all directions, as its means will allow; and if it has been 
so administered as to afford anybody wishing to read any 
book or to study any subject quick, easy, and unrestricted 
access to all its treasures, our sense of its value and useful- 
fulness is immeasurably increased. 

That the books have, as a rule, been so selected there is 
abundant evidence. From the beginning one of the aims 
of the Trustees has been to make the Library as full as possi- 
ble in all departments of human knowledge. In this purpose 
they have been heartily seconded by the liberality of many 
citizens. The great gift by Mr. Bates, of |50,000, to be 
expended for books, in addition to the permanent fund of 
the same amount which he established, was spent, under the 
careful advice and direction of literary and scientific gentle- 



Public Library. 9 

men, for books deemed most important in various depart- 
ments of knowledge. About 35,000 volumes were selected, 
and thus the foundation was laid. JVlr. Bates's generous 
example has been followed by numerous smaller gifts, of 
books and money. In this way the Library has grown great 
as a whole, and exceedingly valuable in various directions. 
Thus, the Barton Library, of nearly 14,000 volumes, is, in 
addition to other rare treasures, one of the best Shakespearean 
libraries in the world. The Ticknor Library, of nearly 
6,000 volumes, is one of the best collections, in its way, 
of Spanish books, containing, as it does, some works so 
rare that their very existence has been doubted by accom- 
plished Spanish scholars. The Bowditch Library, of 4,000 
volumes, is a mathematical collection of rare excellence. 
The Prince Library, of 2,600 volumes, in the custody of, 
but not owned by, the city, is unequalled in its way. The 
Parker Library, of 14,000 volumes, is unique, abounding in 
books which could scarcely be replaced. The Patent Library, 
of 3,500 volumes, is practically complete. The collection 
of public documents of the United States government is 
not surpassed anywhere, even in the Library of Congress. 
Other departments might be named which are equally worthy 
of remark. These facts show that the Trustees have con- 
stant^ and steadily kept in view the purpose of having in 
possession every obtainable book of real value to scholars 
engaged in investigating any subject. 

To show how carefully this purpose has been followed the 
following table has been prepared : — 

Table showing the number of books, in each classification, 
in Bates Hall and the special libraries, January 1, 1886, 
villi tlie 'percentage of increase in each class during (he 
preceding five years: — 



American History, etc. 

English History, etc. 

Theology, Ecclesiastical History, etc. 

Periodicals and Transactions 

French History, etc. 

Medical Science 

Mathematics, etc. 

German History, etc. 

Metaphysics and Social Science . 

General History, etc. 

Italian History, etc. . 



N"o. of Volumes. 


Per cent, of In 
crease within 




5 years. 


. 37,656 


26 


. 34,590 


21 


. 26,472 


18 


. 22,634 


18 


. 18,371 


18 


. 13,079 


16 


. 12,690 


25 


. 11,305 


23 


. 10,177 


14 


9,196 


19 


. 8,9*3 


11 





Per cent, of In- 


No. of Volumes. 


crease within 




5 years. 


8,877 


20 


8,722 


17 


8,255 


28 


8,143 


11 


7,511 


25 


6,222 


26 


5,564 


10 


5,302 


25 


3,263 


25 


3,192 


3 


2,353 


2' 


354 





10 City Document No. 28. 



Natural History and Science 

Bibliography, etc. 

Other History, Geography, etc. . 

Greek, Latin, and Philology 

Fine Arts .... 

Useful Arts .... 

Spanish and Portuguese History, etc 

Jurisprudence .... 

Political Economy 

Shakespeare . . . 

Cyclopaedias, etc. 

Books for Blind 

Miscellaneous bound pamphlets and 

MSS 756 

The Bates Hall Library has, in the same time, grown from 
227,804 volumes to 274,467 volumes, — a gain of 46,663, or 
21 per cent., in five years. Of this gain 20,000 volumes 
have been given to the Library, in addition to the number 
bought with the funds bequeathed to the city for that pur- 
pose, and yielding an annual income of $7,000, nearly all of 
which is required to be spent for " books of permanent 
value." 

In the Lower Hall, which is specifically tlie popular 
library, the classification is, of course, necessarily different 
from that in Bates Hall, which is the scholars' library. Of 
the 40,911 books on its shelves, January 1, 1886, 14,694, 
or 36 per cent., are classified under the heading English 
prose fiction, including juvenile fiction and other juvenile 
books; 3,490, or 8^ per cent., come under the heading 
poetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric; 3,105, or 7^ per cent., 
are biography; 2,680, or 6| per cent., are travels. The 
remaining 42 per cent, are generally standard works in his- 
tory, politics, theology and moral science, mathematics and 
natural science; and books in foreign languages, — German, 
French, Italian, and Spanish, — of which there are about 
3,000. 

The committee does not propose to discuss the much-vexed 
question of the propriety of so large a proportion of works 
of fiction. The fact that everybody reads such books, and 
has read them from time immemorial, justifies their admis- 
sion, in huge numbers, into the popular branch of the Public 
Library. In the purchase of such books the committee has 
ample evidence that great and unremitting care is exercised 
that nothing which appears to have an evil tendency shall be 



Public Library. 



11 



admitted. But it is as useless to attempt to exclude " story- 
books " from a library as to exclude fancy or imagination 
from the human mind. The desire for hearing and telling 
stories is innate, and cannot be suppressed. The Public 
Library judiciously and carefully ministers to this healthy 
appetite, and, as the committee believes, with no injurious 
result. 

The growth of circulation in the Library, and in each 
Branch, during the last ten years, is shown in the following 
table : — 

Table showing the aggregate circulation of books in the entire 
Librar//, and in Bates Hall and the Brandies, with the 
increase or decrease in each, during the ten years 1876- 
1885: — 



The whole Library 

Bates Hall 

" Hall use .... 

" " Home use .... 
Lower Hall 

" " Hall use .... 

" " Home use . . . 

East Boston 2 Branch . . . . 
South Boston " .... 
Roxbury " .... 

Charlestown " .... 
Brighton " .... 

Dorchester " .... 

South-Eud 3 " (8 years) 
Jamaica Plain 3 " " 



1,027,393 

202,764 

124,134 

78,630 

183,594 

32,768 

150,826 

98,537 

128,666 

106,180 

71,541 

24,892 

73,502 

90,857 

51,192 



1S7G. 



947,621 
114,329 
59,373 
54,956 

348, S42 
10,392 

338,450 
99,987 

115,530 

101,297 
79,375 
24,805 
56,016 
42,402 
30,280 



Increase in 
10 years. 



79,772 

88,435 

64,761 

23,674 

U65,248 

22,376 

1187,024 

11,450 

13,136 

4,883 

17.S34 

87 

17,486 

48,455 

20,912 



Per cent, of 
Increase. 



8.4 

80. 
109. 

43. 
147. 
215. 
'55. 

U.5 

11. 
4. 

no. 

0. 

31. 

111. 

61. 



i Decrease. 

2 Library was closed forty-four days, for which the circulation is estimated. In 1834 the 
circulation was 95,442. 

3 Opened 1878. 

During these ten years, while the libraries have increased 
from 297,873 to 400,993 volumes, or about 55 per cent., the 
circulation has only increased 8.4 per cent. But a close ex- 
amination will show that this difference is more apparent than 
real. The use of the Bates Hall books, which is by far the 
most valuable part of the Library, has nearly doubled ; and 
the hall use of books in the Lower Hall is three times as 
great as it was ten years ago. 



It is only in the home use 



12 City Document No. 28. 

of books belonging to the Lower Hall that there has been any 
serious decline. That is largely due to two causes, — the 
opening of the South-End Branch, which has drawn to itself 
a considerable part of the former constituency of the Lower 
Hall ; and the cheap issues of the better class of fiction in 
the Franklin-square, the Seaside, and similar so-called " Libra- 
ries." As a consequence the demand for works of fiction has 
decreased, as is shown by the following table, which gives 
the per cent, of increase in the several classifications of the 
Lower Hall Library. 

Table showing the percentage of increase of volumes in the 
various classifications in the Lower Hall of the Public Li- 
brary, for ten years, 1876-1885 : — 

I'd- cent, 
of Increase. 

Whole Library (Lower Hall) . . . . II). 

Reference books . . . . . .. 65. 

Useful and Fine Arts, etc. ..... 53. 

Jurisprudence, etc. ...... 42. 

German books ....... 34. 

Biography . . . . . . . . 32. 

Medicine, Physics, etc. . . . . . 31. 

Poetry, the Drama, etc. . . . . . 31. 

Travels 30. 

French books . . . . . . . 22. 

American History, etc. . . . . . 21. 

Foreign History, etc. . . . . . . 21. 

Theology, Moral science, etc. . . . . 12. 

Fiction and juvenile books, etc. . . . . 5. 

Libraries, collections, etc. . . . . . 1.5 

These facts are significant, as showing the very small in- 
crease in the number of works of fiction compared with other 
books in the popular branch of the Library, during ten 
years. They show that the ample supply of standard works 
of fiction, which from the beginning had been gradually sup- 
plied to the Library, almost reached the maximum ten years 
ago, and that the additions of that kind of literature since 
have been made as sparingly as a due regard for its welfare 
and completeness required. 

That the Library has lost none of its hold on the interest 
and regard of the people is evident from the fact that while 
the total population of the city on the 30th of June, 1885, 
was 390,406, the registration on the 1st of January, 1886, 
was 224,118, — or 57 per cent, of the entire population. 
The Central Library is also daily visited by an average of 



Public Library. 13 

more than 2,200 persons, of whom over 1,600 use the Lower 
Hall, and over COO Bates Hall. 

It now remains to consider whether the Library, thus es- 
tablished and developed, is so administered that the books 
are freely and easily accessible to the public, to whom they 
belong, and for whose use they are held in trust. 

Perhaps there is no Library in the world the management 
and administration of which are so difficult as the Boston 
Public Library. A College Library is for the use of pro- 
fessors and students, and it is comparatively easy, with such 
a constituency, to make and enforce rules the practical work- 
ing of which will yield the best results for all concerned. A 
Social Library, like the Athenaeum, is for the use of its 
owners. A Consulting Library — like the Astor, or the 
Lenox — is very easily managed, since its use is given to 
the public, subject to certain conditions, and its rules 
can be made as narrow and inflexible as desired, with- 
out giving any just cause of complaint. But the Boston 
Public Library, like its public schools, is mainly supported 
by the city, and is "open to all" its citizens. The chief 
question to be answered in its administration is, how can it 
best be made to subserve the purpose for which it was estab- 
lished? In answering this question, no consideration of 
personal convenience, or even of ordinary expediency, is to 
be taken into account. 

The committee has found, so far as its examination has 
enabled it to judge, that the Library, in all its departments, 
is administered with constant and unusual attention to the 
wants of the public. One cause of complaint has come to its 
attention, which seems to require explanation, viz. : the large 
number of starred books, i.e., books which can be taken 
out only by special permission, or not at ail. It is to be 
remembered that there are not less than 30,000 volumes in 
the Library, nearly 10 per cent, of all the Bates Hall collec- 
tion, which, by the very conditions of their gift, are not to go 
into ireneral circulation. The only question which concerns 
the Trustees is, whether it is better to have the books, subject 
to such condition, or not to have them at all. To such a ques- 
tion there can be but one intelligent answer. The Library would 
be an incalculable advantage to the city if no book on its shelves 
ever went outside its walls, as is the case with the British 
Museum in London, and the Astor Library in New York. 
The starred books, aside from those given with the condition 
stated, consist almost entirely of bound pamphlets, magazines, 
reviews, etc., which, once lost, could not be replaced at all, 
or only at the cost, perhaps, of the full set, from which a 
single volume is missing ; and books containing valuable en- 



14 City Document No. 28. 

gravings, maps, etc. All such works, while they are indis- 
pensable to the completeness of a great Library, ought to be, 
and, for the benefit of the whole population, must be, so 
guarded as to reduce the risk of loss or injury to the minimum. 
It is not merely better, it is necessary, in such case to use 
the ounce of prevention. The pound of cure could never 
be administered. 

A catalogue is the only means by which, in a large library, 
books can be found. That is the only key to the treasures. 
It should, therefore, be so complete and so accurate as never 
to disappoint or mislead ; so plainly written or printed as not to 
try the eyes severely, and so accessible that no time is un- 
necessarily lost in consulting it. The card catalogue in Bates 
Hall is, perhaps, as good as can be expected, in the present 
state of things; but, with the limited room, its arrange- 
ment is necessarily inconvenient and cramped. When the 
system of card-cataloguing was first undertaken the method 
adopted was far less complete and serviceable than now ; and, 
in many cases, the titles were written, or printed in type so fine 
that it is difficult to read them. The work of remedying this 
defect has already begun ; but, at the present rate of progress, 
it will be some fifteen years before the catalogue will be made 
as complete and legible as it ought to be. The only way in 
which this indispensable work can be brought to an early 
completion is by an addition to the cataloguing force. This 
can only be brought about by the employment of special 
help. The time of every one of the present Library em- 
ployees is fully occupied with useful, necessary, and legitimate 
duties. An additional appropriation should be made by 
the city ; or, perhaps, some generously disposed persons, who 
know the value of a really good catalogue, might furnish the 
means. 

This pressing need of the Library deserves special atten- 
tion. It is earnestly wished that a permanent fund of at least 
$100,000 might be secured, either by public grant, private 
subscription, or testamentary bequest, — or by all combined, 
— the income of which should be exclusively devoted, in per- 
petuity, to the Bates Hall catalogue. If this shall appear to 
some persons a large sum to dedicate to the object named, it 
should be remembered that, with the rapid growth of the 
Library, in the not distant future the requirements of this 
department will be immense. 

The Lower Hall catalogue, in its entirety, is inaccessible 
to the public. The only way in which books can be found is 
by personal application to the curator, or by consulting the 
bulletin-board, where the titles of later additions are dis- 
played in manuscript, or the printed. quarterly Bulletins, in 



Public Library. 15 

which the books belonging to the Lower Hall and the Branches 
are arranged together. It seems to the committee that there 
should be a complete catalogue of the Lower Hall, more simple 
in form, perhaps, than that of Bates Hall. The latest printed 
catalogues of the Lower Hall have been as follows : One of 
works included in poetry and the drama, in 1871 ; history, 
biography, and travel, in 1873 ; art and science, and foreign 
books, 1881 ; fiction, 1885. Thusthereare at least five different 
printed catalogues, of various dates, as well as the Bulletin, to 
consult, before one can be sure whether the book one wants 
belongs to the Library or not. Many books are not easy of 
classification, and might readily be placed in one of two or 
three classes. A consolidated alphabetical catalogue, as free 
as possible from cross-references, to be issued as a supplement 
to those already in print, would be a great convenience, and 
probabl}^ would also bring into circulation many books now 
lying unused on the shelves. 

But if it is impracticable, for any reason, to supply such 
a catalogue, it is suggested that the printing, yearly, of class- 
lists of history, fiction, science, etc., for the use of the 
Lower Hall and Branches, shall be made a part of the regu- 
lar work of the Library. These lists could be made by 
classifying the titles, as printed in the three Bulletins pub- 
lished each year, and could be prepared at comparatively 
little expense. Such lists, mounted and hung on the walls 
of the Lower Hall and Branches, will, it is believed, give 
help often needed by the public, especially by young readers. 

In addition to what has already been said on this subject 
the committee presents here the substance of a special report 
made by the sub-committee on the Lower Hall : — 

The suggestions of this sub-committee seem to sum themselves up 
into one cataloguing: 1st, making the card catalogue accessible to the 
public; 2d, bringing the printed catalogue for history, biography, and 
travel down to date. It is now nearly fourteen years behind time in 
lields where the last fourteen years have made the most important con- 
tributions. It is us if a great mercantile house should fail to advertise 
its best goods. To fix the attention is a first principle in education. 
How much may we be losing in chance to educate the public taste, 
so long as we cannot call the attention of the public using the Lower 
Hall to the recent books in these departments of literature ! 

If the card catalogue were accessible to all those above a certain 
age, and the present superintendence of that catalogue continued, the 
difficulty would be partly solved; but the printed catalogue, especially 
just such an annotated one as the present down to iy?3, is most 
urgently needed, and seems indispensable. 

Such a catalogue, once published, the committee believes would 
lessen the demand tor ephemeral fiction, and help to turn public atten- 
tion in a better direction, even if it would not result in a sufficient 
saving of money, now spent to supply the demand for lighter novels, 
to enable the Trustees to increase the department and keep up the 
catalogue of history, biography, and travel. 



16 City Document No. 28. 

The relation of the Public Library to the school can only partially 
enter into the province of this committee. The Lower Hall must, 
however, take the lead in any development here. Jt is the belief of the 
committee that a world yet remains to be conquered by the Boston 
Public Library* i-c, in establishing a vital relation with the public 
schools. We do not speak without careful consideration of results else- 
where. How to graduate the pupils of the schools into the Library, — this 
seems to be the problem : to make them know and appreciate that the 
city offers them a university, where the charges are nothing. We 
know that something has been done and is doing in this direction, and 
that adventures have been made in the hope of expanding the use of 
the Library through the schools. But, from the committee's point of 
view, this is a matter which merits special attention of all who believe 
in a wide use of the Library. If some one with a genius for this subject 
should devote a very large part of his or her time to a development of 
the latent possibilities a few years would tell an important story. In 
this connection the committee are glad that the lists of supplementary 
reading, prepared from time to time for the Lower Hall, and hitherto 
confined to its use, are now to be sent to the Branches. 

The committee would say, in conclusion, that it fully realizes that, 
with the present shortness of means and lack of space, many things are 
impossible which are highly desirable, and it submits this report with 
a strong sense of the present usefulness of the Lower Hall, and its 
faithful management, and also in the belief that in its present lies the 
promise of much more to come. 

For the Sub-committee on Lower Hall, 

(Signed,) PITT DILLINGHAM, 

Chairman. 

Since the Library was opened, in 1854, the total expense 
of carrying it on, including books, salaries, etc., ba3 
amounted to $2,283,369, — an average of $71,355 per year. 
The largest amount appropriated in any one year was 
$135,000, in 1875. The sum annually appropriated, of late 
years, has been $120,000. The amount spent for books has 
aggregated $533,065, showing a cost per volume of the 
460,993 books in the Library of $1.15. Deducting the in- 
come from funds given for the purchase of books, — about 
$230,000, — the cost to the city has been only about 65 
cents per volume. For this trifling sum our city is possessed 
of one of the largest and best libraries in the world. All 
the additional cost of these priceless treasures of learning, 
as well as of more than three-fourths of the vast collection 
of pamphlets, numbering nearly 320,000, has been paid by 
generous donors from all parts of the world. 

The total expense of the British Museum since its estab- 
lishment has averaged over $107,000 yearly, of which sum 
an average of $13,000 per year has been spent for books ; 
while the average amount spent for books in the Boston 
Public Library has been over $24,000, nearly double the 
amount spent by the British Museum. It is to be said, 
however, that a copy of every book copyrighted in England 



Public Library. 17 

has to be given to the Museum, so that the sum paid for 
books represents only that spent for foreign or uncopyrighted 
books. 

The number of visitors to the reading-room of the British 
Museum in 1874 was 104,727 ; ten years later, 152,983, — an 
increase of 48,256, or 46 per cent., in ten years. 

In the Astor Library, which is the great consulting library 
of New York city, the use of books, which in 1876 aggre- 
gated 143,545 volumes for the year, was, ten years later, 
166,561, — an increase of 23,016 volumes, or nearly 17 per 
cent., in ten years. 

The use of books in Bates Hall, in 1876, aggregated 59,373 ; 
and ten years later 124,134, — an increase of 64,761, or 109 
per cent. 

These figures show more plainly than any words the value 
of the Boston Public Library, and the appreciation in which 
it is held. Notwithstanding the limited accommodations, 
and the great inconvenience attending the consultation of 
books in Bates Hall, its use has more than doubled since 
1876. With the completion of the new Library building, for 
which every lover of reading is ardently longing, it is evident 
that the use of books will be onty governed by the capacity 
of the library to supply the demands upon it. 

What the Library wants, and ought to have, beyond every- 
thing else, is more money. That is needed for the revision and 
completion of the catalogue ; for the increase of the working- 
force ; for the purchase of new books constantly called for ; 
and for facilitating, in every way, knowledge of and access 
to the books that crowd its shelves. With every additional 
10,000 volumes the expense of administration correspond- 
ingly increases. Each Branch, also, adds to the item of sala- 
ries far more than to that for books. In the Central Library 
their are 80 persons ; in the Branches, 66. Not one of them 
could be spared without serious injury to the efficiency of the 
Library. The number should be increased rather than 
reduced. A very large proportion of the persons now in the 
service of the Library have been there for so many }'ears as to 
be thoroughly familiar with and efficient in their duties. Forty- 
two, including all but five of the heads of the eighteen depart- 
ments and branches into which the Library is divided, have 
been connected with it for more than ten years, and, of those 
who have been there a shorter time, the most are runners 
and persons employed in the merely mechanical work of the 
institution. It is evident that the Trustees have faithfully 
carried out the spirit of civil-service reform. 

The facts here stated are nearly all to be found in the 
annual reports of the Trustees ; but the committee has 



18 City Document No. 28. 

thought them of sufficient significance to invite renewed atten- 
tion to them, that all our citizens may realize more nearly 
the greatness of the work which the Library is doing at so 
.small a cost. 

The committee feels called upon to make certain recom- 
mendations, some of which are repetitions of those made by 
former committees, and chiefly in regard to the administra- 
tion of affairs at the Central Library. 

There should be, in Bates Hall, a person whose sole duty 
it would be to answer questions of all sorts, and to direct in- 
quirers in their search for information. In this way the use 
of the Library would be greatly increased, and much informa- 
tion furnished which would save students and others a great 
amount of useless labor. Indeed, almost the only drawback 
to the complete fulfilment of the hopes of the founders of the 
Library is to be found in the barriers between the book and 
the reader. Every such obstacle should be reduced to the 
minimum. The catalogue is only one means of enabling a 
reader to find what he wants. It is sometimes as important to 
avoid what he does not want. Many a beginner in the use of 
a great library has wasted precious hours in searching the 
wrong trail, when, by intelligent answers to a few questions, 
he would have saved his time and trouble. 

The committee has found, also, a certain degree of separa- 
tion, or lack of sympathy or closeness of action, between the 
Branches and the Central Library. Each Branch seems to be 
carried on in its own way, as if it were the only library, and 
according to the plan or method of the Branch librarians. 
While, of course, a certain amount of freedom and individu- 
ality in the conduct of each Library will yield the best 
results, there ought, also, to be a general harmony of action, 
which draws its inspiration and guidance from the Central 
Library. To this end the committee recommends either the 
frequent inspection and personal oversight of the Branches by 
some officer of the Central Library ; or, what seems still 
better, frequent stated meetings of the librarians of all the 
Branches at the Central Library, where they can compare 
notes and results with each other, and each learn what the 
other is doing, and so the combined experience of all be 
made common to each. While the most competent and skil- 
ful librarian cannot compel people to make use of a library, 
an incompetent or inefficient one can greatly hinder its use. 

It is also siujofested that such a method might result in 
making the Library a sort of normal school for librarians, 
where persons wishing to qualify themselves for such a pro- 
fession may spend two or three years in a sort of apprentice- 
ship, learning, by actual experience, every part of a librarian's 



Public Library. 19 

duties, and so fitting themselves to become chief librarians, 
either of the Branches, when vacancies may occur, or wherever 
competent service of this kind may be required. 

There are several petty inconveniences, which, if they 
cannot be remedied in the present building, ought, if pos- 
sible, to be done away with in the new library, the erection of 
which is so eagerly looked forward to. One is the method of 
notifying an applicant for books of the result of his applica- 
tion. In the Lower Hall this is done by calling out the 
person's name; in Bates Hall, by placing the book or the 
card on the table and waiting for the applicant to take it. 
Both these methods are undesirable, the latter especially; 
for there is usually a considerable crowd at the one place of 
inquiry in Bates Hall, and some time is thus lost to the ap- 
plicant. The light in Bates Hall is also inadequate for 
readers, and especially for those consulting the catalogue. 
In the evening, particularly, when the gas is lighted, the card 
catalogue is in shade. Perhaps the ingenuity of some of the 
assistants might remedy all these inconveniences, to the great 
satisfaction and comfort of the public as well as of them- 
selves. 

Making every possible deduction, and considering every 
objection and criticism that can justly be brought against the 
Library, the committee has been more than ever impressed 
with a sense of its vast usefulness, and also with the excel- 
lence of its general administration. Every facility has been 
given to the committee for seeing it in all its aspects. Every 
portion of the Library has been at all times open to inspec- 
tion ; and the members of the committee have, either as a 
body or individually, visited it at all hours. They believe 
that its work is as faithfully and efficiently carried on as the 
means at the command of the Trustees will permit ; and they 
have been gratified to find, in every part of its widely 
separated operations, that spirit of intelligent interest which 
no mere money-service can secure, and without which the 
Library would fail of a large part of its usefulness. 

HENRY STONE, 
PITT DILLINGHAM, 
HENRY H. EDES, 
ELIZA L. HOMANS, 
SOLOMON LINCOLN, 
GEORGIANA W. SMITH, 
JOHN OSCAR TEELE, 
WILLIAM F. WHARTON, 

Examining Committee. 



20 City Document No. 28. 



[C] 
LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees: — 

Herewith I submit my report as Librarian for the year 
ending December 31, in which I have passed over, or lightly 
touched upon, matters contained in your own report to the 
City Council. 

The net increase of the Library for the past year has been 
greater than for any other year within the last ten, the gifts 
being especially numerous and valuable. The contributions 
to the Library from all parts of the world, as will appear in 
Appendix IX., show the wide-spread esteem in which the 
institution is held. 

Many works privately printed, or not offered for sale, have 
been freely given to the Library upon intimation that they 
were desired, or have been sent as the voluntary act of their 
authors. 

Among the more notable accessions are : — 

In Fine Arts Jahrbuch der Koniglich preussischen 
Kunstsammlungen ; Koehler's American etchings ; Book of 
American figure painters; Foreign etchings; Portfolios of 
reproductions of Chodowiecki's Kupferstichen, etc. ; Port- 
folio of eleven photographs of municipal buildings of Leeds, 
England ; Chenneviere's Les dessins du Louvre ; Vacher, 
Fifteenth century Italian ornament; Audsley, Ornamental 
arts of Japan ; Darcel, Les tapisseries decoratives du Garde 
meuble ; Brook Taylor's Method of perspective (folio). In 
English County History the Archseologia Cantiana, published 
by the Kent Archeeo logical Society, in 15 volumes, and pub- 
lications of the Harle.ian, Lancashire and Cheshire, Chetham 
and Camden Societies. In periodicals and transactions the 
Comptes rendus of the Academie des inscriptions et belles- 
lettres, in 29 volumes, completing the Library's collection of 
the publications of the Institut de France ; the London Maga- 
zine from 1732 to 1783 (98 volumes) ; ^Vcstermann*s Monats- 
hefte, 1857-8(5 ((50 volumes) ; the Revue d'artillerie, 1873- 
86 (24 volumes). In Oriental research, Benndorf, Reisen in 
Lykien und Karien (folio), the Indian antiquary, 1872-SH 
(16 volumes); Memoires publies par les membres de la. 
Mission archeologique francaise an Caire, and in general 
biography, Niceron, Memoires pour servir a l'histoirc des 



Public Library-. 21 

homines illustres, Paris, 1728-45 (44 volumes). The depart- 
ment of English family and county histories has been strength- 
ened by numerous accessions from purchases at sales in 
England. In American history the collection of early 
American prints which occupies a section of the Prince al- 
cove has also received important accessions. Pains have 
been taken to keep up with the latest productions of foreign 
literature in works of literary criticism and history. With 
the Bowditch fund for mathematical works 517 volumes have 
been purchased during the year. In American local history 
and publications of historical societies effort has been made 
to make the collection as complete as possible. 

Catalogue Department. 

During the } 7 ear 28,967 volumes and pamphlets have 
been catalogued, and 84,994 cards, prepared in connection 
with this work, have been placed in the catalogue drawers at 
the Central Library and Branch libraries. This does not in- 
clude a special collection, numbering about 4,600 volumes, 
purchased by the Fellowes Athenaeum, the cataloguing of 
which is not yet finished. In this work intelligent aid has 
been received from the officers at the Roxbury Branch 
Library. 

A new catalogue for the Jamaica Plain Branch Library has 
been prepared, and is in the hands of the printer. New printed 
catalogues are needed in several of the Branch libraries, as 
well as in certain departments of the Lower Hall. The cata- 
logue of the miscellaneous works in the Barton collection 
has been completed and printed to the title Massachusetts, 
making 368 pages, and is in type through title Mercier. The 
Bulletins, with titles of new books and lists of works on 
special subjects, have been printed as usual, and the Index of 
Congressional documents has been continued. 

The Index to the Bates Hall card catalogue is finished to the 
letter W. This, which forms a guide or key to the subjects 
of books in this collection, is contained in blank books, which 
can be consulted by those who wish. It is also duplicated 
in the cards in the catalogue drawers. 

The work of revision of the card catalogues of the Cen- 
tral Library has gone forward steadily, and the result is 
apparent in their more orderly arrangement and increased 
use. , 

By the two clerks at the northern end of the Bates Hall 
4,246 readers have been helped, and many more by the 
Librarian of this department and his assistants; 17,185 per- 
sons have been helped by the assistant in charge of the 



22 City Document No. 28. 

Lower Hall card catalogue. Many are helped by other 
officers in this department of which no numeration is made. 
Changes have been made in the Branch libraries with a view 
to increasing the use of their catalogues. 

Bates Hall. 

The circulation in Bates Hall has been satisfactory, both in 
the number and in the character of books issued to readers. 
There have been the same difficulties to contend with as in 
former years, arising from the lack of room for students, 
and, in general, from the faulty arrangement of the Library 
building. These obstacles cannot be overcome, and can 
hardly be mitigated so long as the Library is in its present 
location. In the proposed new structure it h to be expected 
that readers can be waited upon more promptly than at pres- 
ent, and can have greater conveniences in their investigations. 

The straitened condition of the shelves is felt more and 
more with each year's growth of the collection. The custo- 
dian of the shelves reports that he is much embarrassed in 
trying to maintain the lines of classification. Already inroads 
have been made in the system. This stringency in shelf ac- 
commodation is perhaps most to be regretted in the case of 
large, illustrated works of fine arts ; for many of them are 
necessarily located in places remote from the reading-room 
of Bates Hall, and in their transportation to and from which 
they suffer more or less damage in their bindings. 

New Registration. 

The new registration, the fourth, begun Saturday, May 1, 
1886, is progressing favorably, not only at the Central De- 
partment, but at the Branches. 

The rule requiring a delay of two weeks before a lost card 
can be replaced is the chief difficulty connected with regis- 
tration, and causes some dissatisfaction. This regulation, 
however, should be strictly enforced, for the reason that 
many persons, after giving notice, find their cards. An 
average of 75 lost cards each week is sent to the Branches. 
Over 1,500 lost cards have been replaced since May 1. 
The registration work at the North-End Branch and at the 
Mount Bovvdoin delivery station is included in the returns 
of the Central Registration Department. 

Losses of books issued to borrowers are so small as to 
be significant, only because of the remarkable state of things 
indicated. It is certainly worthy of remark that in a library 
sending out a million of books only one in 17,000 should fail 



Public Library. 23 

to return, and that those lost are generally of the cheaper 
sort. 

Lower Hall. 

In the Lower Hall there is little in the way of change in 
organization to report. The old complaint, once so fre- 
quently heard in the Library and outside of it, of the 
length of time required to get a book from it, seems to have 
completely died away. 

The reading of the Hall steadily appreciates in quality and 
variety. No figures, based upon a classification of only 
seven divisions, can properly show this, but such is the 
testimony of all who come directly in contact with the public. 
The more recent German books, in this Hall, have a circula- 
tion but little less than the more popular English ones. 

AVholesome recreation for the public is one of the functions 
of a popular library, and efforts have been made to provide 
this end in the examination and selection of lighter books 
adapted to readers of this class, especially to boj's and girls. 
Where books have been found to be good, duplicates have 
been procured, and the attention of young readers called to 
them, — a course which has exercised a wholesome influence. 
Many of these stories of Indian life, hunting adventures, 
etc., for boys, have been spoken of by teachers as a welcome 
relief from the sensational books which at one time seemed 
to be the only ones heard of by the average boy. No diffi- 
culty is found in the circulation of these better books, and 
they have diversified and increased the attraction of the Hall. 

The express connection with the Branches and deliveries is 
steadily increasing; the largest draft being made by the Ros- 
lindale and Mt. Bowdoin deliveries. 

The Librarian and assistants share the work of assisting 
readers, and the demands made upon their time and service 
grow more frequent, and vary from those of the seeker for 
the fairy story to the insatiate reader of fiction, or the student 
in quest of general information. 

It is impossible not to regret that want of space and light 
and necessary accommodation for the public prevent the 
development of some plans, and render impracticable others 
which would increase the usefulness of the Hall. 

The lack of shelf-room and of numbering capacity grows 
more serious each year: New alcoves would obstruct light, 
air, and passage, and add to the difficulty, rather than lessen 
it. The transference of books to the galleries above would 
greatly increase the work of the runners. The use of the 
galleries, however, seems feasible, if a part of the work can 
be done by mechanical means. 



24 City Document No. 28. 

Branch Libraries. 

A general falling off in the circulation of books at the 
Branches is noticeable, and is the natural result of the 
multiplication of low-priced books of all kinds, with which 
the market is flooded. Many people prefer purchasing these 
to waiting for the one copy only with which each Branch is 
supplied. The withdrawal, early in the year, of a large 
class of sensational books for the young is an important 
item to be considered in connection with the diminished 
circulation ; this withdrawal reduced the number of juvenile 
books used, but not the number of juvenile readers. Bound 
volumes of such magazines for the young as St. Nicholas, 
Wide-Awake, and Harpers' Young People, together with the 
works of travel for young people which have appeared in 
recent years, require a longer time for their reading than 
the class of books now not allowed to circulate. 

There seem to be at the present time fewer boys and girls 
who change their books every day than formerly. The 
example of the Lower Hall would tend to show that the 
diminished circulation will be only temporary, and that the 
diminution Avill be partially, if not wholly, redeemed by 
numbers representing a higher order of reading. 

To the stopping of the use of cards whose owners are 
either dead, or removed from the cit} r , required by the new 
registration, may be attributed, in some of the Branches, a 
part of the decrease of circulation. This has especially been 
the case at the South Boston Branch. 

I would recommend to the Trustees that the rule pro- 
hibiting the duplication of works of fiction and books for 
the young, at the Branches, be modified so as to allow the 
better class of such literature, to a limited extent, to be 
represented by more than one copy of each book. This 
would act as a sort of compensation for the withdrawal of 
the large number of sensational works. 

The quarters in the Hancock School-house, used for the 
North-End delivery station, having been required by the 
School Committee, new accommodations were secured at the 
corner of North Bennet and Salem streets. This station, 
which is carried on not without some annoyance to its 
frequenters and employees by rude boys, is, nevertheless, 
justifying its continuance. The number of readers for the 
eight months that the delivery was open is larger than for 
the whole of the preceding year. 

During the year the experiment was tried of direct com- 
munication, by express, for the transmission of books at 
stated times between the Central Library and the respective 



Public Library. 25 

delivery stations. The success of the plan has fully justified 
it, and the result has given satisfaction to the citizens who 
draw upon the Central Library through these stations. 

A new delivery station has been opened at Mt. Bowdoin, 
in connection with a reading-room, which is maintained at 
private expense ; and there is every reason to believe, from 
the active interest shown by those who use it, that it will be 
a permanent as well as a vigorous establishment. 

MELLEX CHAMBERLAIN, 

Librarian. 

Public Library, Feb. 7, 1887. 



APPENDIXES 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



1886. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Volumes in the Special Collections of Bates Hall. 

IV. Volumes Located in the Lower Hall. 
V. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VI. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

VII I. Lower Hall Classifications. 

IX. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

X. Circulation. 

XL Registration of Applicants. 

XII. Books Recommended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIII. Bates Hall Reading. 

XIV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XV. Fellowes Athenaeum, and Brighton Reading. 

XVI. Periodical Reading-rooms. 

XVII. Losses and Delinquencies. 

XVIII. Financial Statement. 

XIX. Library Funds. 

XX. Library Service. 

XXI. Report of Examination of the Shelves. 

XXII. Work in the Library Bindery. 

XXIII. List of Examining Committees for Thirty-five Years. 

XXIV. List of Trustees for Thirty-five Years. 



Public Library. 



29 



APPENDIX I. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 



Years. 


a 

8 J 

£ g 

U 


2"=* 

w o 

ca - - 


Years. 


a 

s'i 


"Si 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


19 


1870-71 


179.250 


89,746 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


3,950 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


100,383 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


6,507 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


112,153 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


12,386 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


134,628 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


16,053 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


150,921 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


17,938 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


1S1,653 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


19,255 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


196,958 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


20,707 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


212,414 


9 


1860-61 


97.3S6 


27,381 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


227,010 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28,874 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


236,534 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


31,043 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


250,495 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


31,837 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


261,056 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


32,553 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


275,425 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


36,566 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


292,793 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


44,443 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


308,242 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


47,254 


34 


1885 


460,993 


319,778 


IT 


1868-69 


152,796 


61,177 


35 


1886 


479,421 


335,017 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


74,770 











Note. — The aggregate of pamphlets "added from the beginning" includes many since 
bound, singly or in groups (which are now counted among volumes), and a very large num- 
ber of duplicates which are thrown out and put among the pamphlets held for exchange. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, Dec. 31, 18SG. 



f Bates Hall 

? £' | Newspaper room .... 
.* ~ Duplicate room 

(. Lower Hall 

Total, Central Library . 

>> . 

p-f ( Fellowes Athenasum . . . 

■° £ \ 

Qjg ( City part 

Total, Roxbury Branch . 




East Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South-End 

Jamaica Plain 

West Roxbury delivery 
North-End 



12,167 

12,2.0 

26,428 

13,686 

13,791 

9,995 

10,383 

3,252 

1,382 



30 



City Document No. 28. 



APPENDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE AND BY 

GIFTS. 

Notice. — The increase of volumes is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because 
lost and condemned books are deducted. 



Years. 



1852-81 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1885 (eight months) 
18S8 



Increase. 



Vols. Pamph, 



395,177 
12,239 
17,895 
16,478 
15,353 
7,046 
18,428 



251,538 
10,561 
14,369 
17,368 
15,449 
11,536 
15,239 



Gifts. 


Vols. 


Pamph. 


143,745 


178,866 


5,291 


8,773 


5,340 


11,844 


3,815 


16,203 


2,975 


10,831 


2,518 


10,690 


4,105 


12,500 



Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
charged to funds 
and added hj r 
exchange. 


« E 

£ 3 

* Si 
— p 


M 

a 

•3 CO 

S p 
"3 o 

m a 
- >. 

w c 


Vols. 
250,474 


'Pamph. 


Vols. 


5 


67,974 


7,143 


12,583 


15,986 


2,068 


745 


520 


16,222 


2,525 


522 


575 


18,392 


1,165 


531 


778 


17,005 


4,618 


457 


899 


6,749 


663 


231 


663 


15,512 


2,740 


4,789 


922 



1 Includes pamphlets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession 
catalogue. 

2 Included in previous columns. The volumes are not the property of the Public Library, 
but form a part of the Roxbury branch, by agreement. 

Details for the years 1852-81 can be found in Appendix II. to the report for 1881. 



APPENDIX III. 

VOLUMES IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





QB 

H 


at 

H 


9 
J» 

at 

H 


9 
at 
X 

H 


H 
90 
00 


OB 

00 


99 

at 

St 

H 


at 

3D 

H 


/ 

at 

H 


at . 


e 

X 

at 


Patent library . 


2,731 


2,823 


2,897 


3,003 


3,066 


3,142 


3,259 


3,382 


3,478 


3,513 


3,641 


Bowditch libr'y ' 


2,592 


2,932 


3,043 


3,060 


3,152 


3,224 


3,456 


3,701 


3,854 


3,933 


4,510 


Parker library 1 . 


12,291 


12,296 


12,309 


12,322 


12,337 


12,363 


13,952 


13,971 


14,024 


14,057 


14,069 


Prince library . 


2,028 


2,029 


2,037 


2,159 


2,230 


2,274 


2,327 


2,397 


2,510 


2,581 


2,706 


Ticknor library . 


4,929 


5,171 


5,354 


5,432 


5,464 


5,463 


5,507 


5,544 


5,724 


5,731 


5,764 


Barton library . 


12,804 


13,950 


14,210 


14,301 


14,360 


13,487 


13,610 


13,610 


13,642 


13,652 


13,800 












202 


240 
893 


292 
910 


357 
1,085 


378 
1,123 


382 
1,175 


392 












1,217 

















1 See Appendix VII. 



Public Libeaby. 



31 



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32 City Document No. 28. 

APPENDIX Y. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 



f Gain in books 



*" J Condemned and transferred 
05 L Net gain 



1882 


188.1 


1884 


1885 


1885 

(8 mos.) 


8,750 
19 


11,729 
25 


11,216 
54 


10,230 
15 


4,877 
6 

4,871 


8,731 


11,704 


11,162 


10,215 



9,733 
12 

9,721 





2,576 
* 


2,378 
1,400 


2,716 
1,361 


2,099 
1,074 


737 
370 


1.728 
862 


7 1 ! Condemned and transferred . . 






978 


1,355 


1,025 


367 


866 









41 


98 


55 


258 


11 


158 


S. • 1 


12 


41 


98 


55 


258 






11 


158 







936 
223 

713 


1,764 
7S1 


1,340 

528 


420 
211 


651 
274 


1,036 
1,095 


"S . 1 Less loss by exchanges, 
K § J 


etc. . . 


983 


812 


209 


377 























fGain in books 



(S 3 J Condemned and lost 

« s- I 
so I 
I*) I. Net gain 



596 


604 


669 


585 


233 


372 
223 


379 
225 


383 


28S 


148 


286 


297 


85 



567 
331 



«< fGain in books 



5 s I 

6q 5 I Net gain 



1,000 


766 


1,105 


935 


520 


485 


304 


659 


537 


408 


515 


462 


446 


39S 


112 



1,052 
749 







839 
260 


1,090 

757 


976 

42S 


908 
540 


495 
373 




< 
1 




458 


1 

ft; 


579 
745 


333 

522 


548 
531 


368 

417 


122 
209 




Fellowes Athenaeum. 


(Net gain.) 


4,748 


1,324 


855 


1,079 


815 


331 


5,110 







* There is a loss of 531 volumes for 1882, owing to the transfer of a large number of 
duplicates to the duplicate-room, and also to the fact that the number of books condemned 
that year exceeds those supplied. 



Public Library. 33 

APPENDIX Y. — Concluded. 





1883 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1885 
(8mos.) 


1886 


l< 1 

%t\ Condemned and lost .... 

■eg 1 


1,533 

675 


1,326 
561 


1,999 
1,931 


1,285 
513 


549 
206 


1,352 
672 


858 


765 


*loss 192 


772 


343 


680 







•< 3 J Condemned and lost .... 


108 
56 


140 
97 


262 

98 


142 
60 


88 
24 


251 
65 


(S5 1 


52 


61 


164 


82 


64 


186 







jb " ! Condemned and lost .... 

££ i 


828 
93 


767 
189 


961 
402 


1,120 
664 


475 
199 


908 
318 


<^"° 


735 


578 


559 


456 


276 


590 







'5 r Gain in books . . . 
e S J Condemned and lost 



[Net! 



460 
96 



569 
195 



559 
119 



569 
124 



26S 
101 



626 
271 

















■ i J Condemned and lost .... 

-! i 


410 
197 

213 


515 

288 

227 


386 
291 


400 
441 


252 
232 


393 
419 


05 (. Net gain 


95 


loss 41 


20 


loss 26 







f Bates Hall gain 

Lower Hall gain 

Newspaper-room gain . . 

Duplicate-room gain . . . 

East Boston branch gain . 

South Boston branch gain 

Roxbury branch gain . . . 

Fellowes Athenaeum gain . 
{ Charlestown branch gain . 

Brighton branch gain . . . 

Dorchester branch gain . . 

Jamaica Plain branch gain 

South-End branch gain . . 

West Roxbury branch gain 

North-End branch gain . . 



(.Total gain 



,731 
3 531 

41 
713 
223 
515 
579 
745 

8r.8 
52 
735 
364 
213 
1 



11,704 
978 



225 
462 
333 
522 

765 
51 
578 
374 
227 
74 
521 

17,895 



11,162 

1,355 

55 

812 

286 

446 

548 

531 

loss 192 

164 

559 

440 

95 

74 

143 

16,478 



10,215 


4,871 


1,025 


367 


258 


11 


209 


377 


297 


85 


398 


112 


368 


122 


447 


209 


772 


343 


82 


64 


456 


276 


445 


167 


l0S8 41 


20 


11 


10 


411 


12 


15,353 


7,046 



9,721 
866 
158 

loss 59 
236 
303 
362 
4,748 
680 
186 
590 
355 

loss 26 

13 

295 

18,428 



*This excessive loss at Charlestown is required to correct a mistake of some years' 
standing in the aggregate number of volumes. 



84 



City Document No. 28. 



do a 



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a: 

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APPENDIX VII. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 

(Representing books located only.) 



Cyclopaedias, etc 

Bibliography and literary history 

General history, biography, travel, and geography 

American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite literature 

English history, etc 

French history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

German history, etc 

Greek, Latin, and philology 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geography, biography, travel, and literature 

Periodicals and transactions 

Theology, ecclesiastical histor)', etc 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Political economy 

Medical science 

Natural history and science 

Mathematics aud physical science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Bound volumes of miscellaneous pamphlets 

Bound volumes of manuscripts 

Shakespeare 

Books for the blind 



General Library. 



:: 



Total in 
general 
library 
Jan. 1, 



1,785 

7,425 

8,542 

34,887 

27,656 

15,194 

8,613 

9,951 

6,221 

1,540 

7,935 

20,857 

21,646 

9,652 

5,026 

3,219 

13,362 

8,816 

10,785 

6,394 

7,677 



23S,0S6 



Special Libraries. 



1,156 


1,072 


858 


120 


520 


7 


325 


2 


1,420 


8 


1,181 


196 



3,492 
1,360 



3,237 
2,495 



Total, 
including 

special 
libraries. 



2,373 

9,055 

9,537 

39,236 

35,571 

18,831 

9,371 

11,739 

8,378 

5,707 

8,554 

23,551 

27,100 

11,360 

5,441 

3,423 

13,508 

9,124 

13,569 

6,463 

7,841 

554 



Explanation. — Class III. includes general history, etc., when embracing several countries, 
and collected works of historians. 

Class IV. includes the collected works of American writers, and what of American literature is 
sometimes termed polygraphy. 

Classes V., VI., VII., and VIII. have the same scope for the respective countries that Class IV. 
has for America. Class VIII. includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the 
Scandinavian nations. 

Class XIV. includes political science aud ethics, applied and unapplied, education, phrenology, 



Class XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 

Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for purposes of enumera- 
tion or learning percentage of use, it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the sub- 
divisions ; as also upon such points as biography, travel, and voyages, etc., by summing the results 
of the ranges devoted to them in the several alcoves. 

Note. — The dates given in the special libraries column show the year when they were acquired 
by the library. 



• Includes all books in room G, — 12,108 of them belonging to the Barton library, as originally shelved there. 



Public Library. 



35 



APPENDIX VIII. 



LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 



CLASSES. 



Theology, moral and intellectual sci- 
ence, etc 



Jurisprudence and political science . . 

Medicine, mathematics, physics or 
natural science 



Useful and fine arts, military and naval 
science 



American history and politics .... 

Foreign history and politics ..... 

Poetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric . . . 

English prose fiction, including juvenile 
fiction and other juvenile books . . 

Biography . . v 

Travels 

Libraries, collections, periodicals, etc.* 

German books 

Italian books 

French books 

Spanish books 

Books of reference 



Extent of L. H. collection 



2,0"fi 
459 

2,873 

1,093 
1,349 
1,679 
3,490 

14,694 

3,105 

2,680 

3,981 

1,609 

156 

1,222 

5 

440 



40,911 



1880 






25 

25 
37 
66 

425 
63 
52 

106 
43 



970 



£ p. 



434 

2 

5 

7 

11 



36 
35 
50 
73 

1,021 

76 
66 
158 
55 



1,728 



To be de- 
ducted. 



7 
16 

9 
17 

651 
14 
16 
51 
27 
1 
3 



832 






so 



2,105 
474 

2,944 

1,122 
1,368 
1,718 
3,546 

15,064 

3,165 

2,728 

4,088 

1,637 

155 

1,238 

5 

420 



41,777 



Reported last year 40,911 



Gain in 1S86 , 



*Thi»jclass, embracing sets like Bohn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of course, 
which, in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous heads of 
this table. 

Note. — The column of "Condemned books replaced" includes books condemned in pre- 
vious years as well as in the current year. The column " Total Added " shows the number of 
volumes as put upon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. 



36 



City Document No. 28. 



APPENDIX IX. 



GIFTS, JANUARY 1, 1886, TO DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



Givers (excluding anonj-mous) 
Volumes .... 
Pamphlets .... 



922 

4,105 

12,500 



Givers. 



Abbott, Rev. Edward 

Abbott, Josiah G 

Aberdeen, Scotland, Public Library . 

Academy of Science, St. Louis, Mo. . 

Adams, Charles Kendall, Ithaca, N Y. 

Adams, Henry C., Ellsworth, Kan., 1 framed portrait 

Adams Nervine Asylum .... 

Alba-Raymond, Gabriel, & Tobie M. Genoud 

Albany Medical College, Albany, N. Y. 

Aklen, Edwin, & Bro., Cincinnati, Ohio . 

Alexander, Sigmond B 

Algonquin Club ..... 

Allen, Ezra P., M.D., Athens, Pa. . 

Alumni Association of the Philadelphia College of Phar 

macy ......... 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

American Bankers' Association .... 

American Baptist Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Bar Association ...... 

American Bible Society ...... 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 

American Chemical Society, New York City 

American Congregational Association 

American Home Missionary Society 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American New Church Tract and Publication Society 

Philadelphia, Pa. ...... 

American Ornithologists' Union, New York City 
American Otological Society ..... 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Philadelphia, Pa 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 
American Society of Microscopists .... 

American Steam Boiler Insurance Company, New York 

City 

Ames, John G., Washington, B.C. . 
Ames, John N., Chelsea 
Amherst College. Library, Amherst . 
Andover Theological Seminary, Andover 
Anonymous, 



1 chart 




46 



1 
102 

1 

7 

1 
4 
1 
2 



1 
« 
4 

1 
236 



Public Library. 



37 




rapli 



Appleton, William S., 26 maps, 88 prints, charts, etc 

Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Archaeological Institute of America . 

Arnold, Howard P. .... 

Association for the Advancement of Women 

Astor Library, New York City . . 

Atwater, Prof. W. O., Middletown, Conn- 

Auburn Theological Seminary, Auburn, N. Y. 

Austin, Henry Willard, Med field 

Ayer, J. C, & Co., Lowell .... 

Baker, Benjamin F., Brookline 

Baker, Walter, & Co 

Baldwin, William H 

Ballou, Maturin M 

Bank Presidents' Association 

Banks, Charles E., M.D., Chelsea 

Barnard, James M., Milton, . . a lot of photog 

Barrett, Edwin S., Concord 

Barry, John L. . 

Basadre, Modesto, Lima, Peru . 

Battell, Robbins, and Miss Anna, Norfolk, Conn 

Bell, A. Graham. Washington, D.C- . 

Bell, Alexander Melville, Washington, D.C. 

Bell, Clnrk, New York City 

Benet, Brig. -Gen. S.V., Washington, DC. 

Berea College, Berea, Ky. 

Berkshire Historical and Scientific Society, Pittsfield 

Berry, Ira, Portland, Me. ...... 

Berry, Stephen, Portland, Me., . . .38 newspapers 
Berthoud, H., . . . .a lot of newspapers 

Betts, C. Wyllys, New York City ..... 

Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale Vittorio Emanuele, Rome 
Italy ......... 

Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, France 
Bibliotheque Royale de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium 
Bigelow, Prescott, .... 1 drawing, frame 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton 

Biker, Julio Firmino Judice, Lisbon, Portugal . 

Birchard Library, Fremont, Ohio 

Birmingham, England, Borough of 

Bishop, James, Trenton, N.J. . 

Blaisdell, Frank C. . . . 

Blake, C. M., San Francisco, Cal. 
Blake, Clarence J., M.D. . 
Blake, Francis E. . . . 

Blatchford, John S. . 
Bodge, Rev. George M. 
Bogert, R.R., New York City . 
Bolton, Prof. H. Carrington, Hartfoi 
Bolton, England, Public Library 
Bund, Charles H., Middletown, Conn 
Borland, Miss Alida L. 
Boston, City of, ... 

Board of Health 

City Hospital . 

Inspector of Buildings 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 

Overseers of the Poor 

Park Commissioners 

Water Board . 



d, Conn. 



map 



Pphs. 



54 



1 

48 
1 

38 
1 
1 



89 
204 



870 
1 
1 
10 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 



19 
129 

10 
5 
1 
3 

1 
1 
3 
1 



I 
1 
1 

3 
1 

4 
1 

1 
60 



38 



City Document Xo. 28. 



Givers. 



newspaper 



maps 



Boston and Albany Railroad Company 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

Boston Firemen's Relief Fund . 

Boston Gas Light Company 

Boston Hygieina Publishing Company 

Boston Latin School Association 

Boston Lying-in Hospital .... 

Boston Medical Library Association . 
Boston Museum ...... 

Boston Port and* Seamen's Aid Society 
Boston Provident Association 
Boston Society of Architects 
Boston Society of Natural History 
Boston Theatre ...... 

Boston University ..... 

Boston Young Men's Christian Union 
Bostonian Society, . . . . a lot of 

Botume, J. Frank ..... 

Bourinot, John George, Ottaiva, Canada . 

Bowditch, Henry I., M.D. 

Bowdoin College. Brunswick. Me. 

Bowman, Selwyn Z., Somerville 

Boyd, John. St. John. N.B., 

Bracquemont, Leopold de, Grivesnes, France 

Bradford, Charles F 

Bradford. England. Free Library 

Bradford Academy, Bradford . 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D., a lot of newspapers and broad 

sides ....... 

Bradley, C. B., Berkeley, Cal. . 
Braintree, Records Publication Committee 
Bridgeport. Conn., Public Library . 

Bridgham, P. A., 

Briggs, N. A., Shaker Village, X.H. 
Brinton, Daniel G., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa 
British Association for the Advancement of 

Montreal Committee 
British Museum. London. England . 
Brookline. Public Library 
Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
Brooklyn Institute, Brooklyn, X. Y. . 
Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
Brooks, Frederick .... 
Brooks. Rev. ^Yilliam Henry, Hanover 
Bross, William, Chicago, 111. . 
Brown, Arthur N. 
Brown, Francis H, M.D. . 
Brown, Joseph M., Atlanta, Ga. 
Brown University, Providence, R.I. . 
Browne, George M. . 
Browne. Henry R. . 
Brownell, T. Frank. Xew York City . 
Brunei, Isambard, London, England. 
Bruun, Chr., Copenhagen, Denmark . 
Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, A 
Buffalo Library, Buffalo", X. Y. . 
Bullard, William N., M.D. 
Bunker. Miss Sarah .... 
Burgess, George C, Portland, Me. . 
Butler, George, New York City 



Y. 



maps 



Science 




32 



Public Library. 



39 



Givers. 




Butler Hospital for the Insane, Providence, R.I. 

Byram, E. R. . 

Cadit'iix & Derorae, Montreal, Canada, . \i newspaper 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, Cat 

Cambridge. Public Library 

Cambridge University Library, Cambridge. Englan 

Canada. Geological and Natural History Survey 

Candage, R. G.F 

Canfield, Thomas H., Burlington, Yt. 

Canfield Thomas W 

Cannon, Henry W., Washington, D.C. 

Carret, Jose F. . 

Carter, Elwyn ...... 

Chalmers, Patrick. Wimbledon. England . 

Chamberlain, Edward G., Hyde Park 

Chamberlain, Mellen ..... 

Chambers, Talbot W., D.D., New York City 

Chandler, Horace P., .... a lot of newspapers 

Channing, Walter, M.D., Brookline . 

Chapman. Alfred F. . 

Chase, William L. . . . . . 

Chelsea, City of 

Public Library .... 

Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. 

Chenery, William E. . 

Chicago, ///., Public Library 

Chicago Historical Society. Chicago, III. 

Children's Aid Society. New York City 

Christern. F. W., New York City 

Church Press Association, Xeic York City 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Board of Education 
Public Library .... 

City Missionary Society .... 
Claflin, John, New York City 
Clapp, Charles, Union Yillage, Ohio 

Clapp, Herbert C, M. D 

Clarke, Eliot C 

Clarke, Col. I. Edwards. Washington, D.C. 

Clarke, James Freeman, D.D. 

Clarke, John S.. Auburn, X. Y. 

Clarke, Miss Julia C. .... 

Clarke, Robert. Cincinnati. Ohio 

Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, Xorthampto 

Cleveland, Ohio, Public Library 

Cloudman. F. A.. Rondout, N.Y. 

Cobbett, Miss Susan. Manchester, England 

Codman, Arthur Amory .... 

Coffin, C. C 

Colburn, Theodore E. .... 

Colby, Charles C, Stanstead, Canada 
Colby University, Watervi/te, Me. 
Collins, Frank S., Maiden 

Collins, Patrick A 

Colored Home and Hospital, New York City 
Columbia College, New York City . 
Concord, iV.//., City of .... 

Public Library .... 

Connecticut. Bureau of Labor Statistics . 
Cook, George H., Xew Brunswick, X.J. . 
Coolidge, Mrs. J. R 



PphB. 



1.-, 
1 



29 

18 



1 
1 

19 



1 
22 

17 
1 

2 

4 

67 

I 

80 

1 

?, 

1 

1 
1 
9 
1 
3 



40 



City Document No. 28. 



Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Cotgreave, Alfred, London, England 
Courtenay, William A., Charleston, S.C. 
Cox, William R., Washington, D.C. 
Crawford, T. H., Portland, Oregon 
Crocker, Uriel H. . . . . 

Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 

Cross, James M., Providence, R.I. 

Cummings, Joseph, D.D., Evanston, 111. 

Cupples, Joseph G. . 

Curtis, George Ticknor, New York City 

Curtis, Major Herbert P., West Point, A'. 

Cust, Robert, London, England 

Cutler, Elhridge G., M.D. 

Cutler, Henry S. .... 

Cutter, Abram E. 

Dacosta, Charles W., Jacksonville., Fla. 
Dakota Territory, Commissioner of Immi 
Dana, Richard H. . . . . 

Dante Society, Cambridge 
Darapsky, L., Santiago, Chili . 
Darling, C. W., Utica, N.Y. . 
Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. 
Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences, 
Iowa ...... 

Davie, Curtis, Plymouth . 

Davies, Rev. E., Reading 

Davis, Andrew McFarland, Cambridge 

Dawson, C. C, Lowell 

Day, Albert, M.D. . 

Dean, Benjamin 

Dedham, Town of 

Public Library 



ration 



Dp! 



Davenport 



J. 



De Lancey, William H., New York City 

Delaware Historical Society, Wilmington 

Demurest, Rev. David D., New B run sir irk. N 

Demmon, Prof. Isaac N., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

De Peyster, Gen. John Watts, New York City 

Detroit, Mich., Public Library . 

Deu'tscher Gesellig-Wissenschaftlicher Verein, New 

City . . . . . 
Dewey, Melvil, New York City 
De Wolf, William F., Chicago, III. . 
Dexter, George .... 

Dixwell, Mrs. J. J 

Dodge, James H. .... 

Doggett, Frederick F., M. D. 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the 

Episcopal Church .... 
Donaldson, James, Liverpool. England 
Doncaster, England. Free Library . 
Dover, NIL, City of 
Doyle, Thomas A., Providence, R.I. 
Drowne, T. Si afford, D.D., Flatbush, L.I. 
Dryden, Miss Minta I., Dayton, Ohio 
Dudley, L. Edwin .... 
Dunlap, Lauren, Huron. Dakota, 
Durande-Claye, Alfred, Paris, France 
Duren, Elnathan F., Banqor, Me. 
Dwight, Prof. Thomas, Cambridge . 



Yor, 



Protestant 




Pphs. 



1 
43 



Public Library 



41 



City 



Dyer, Frank P. 

Eames, Wilberforce, New York City 
Eason, Charles, Dublin, Ireland 
Eastern Dispensary, New York City 
Eaton, Rev. Arthur Wentworth, Brookline 

Eaton, C. H 

Eaton, Dorman B., New York City . 

Eddy, Mrs. Mary Baker G. 

Edes, Henry H., I newspaper, a lot of cards and 

Edgerly, Joseph G., Fitchburg . 

Edmonds, Mrs. E. M., Carisbrook, Blackheath 

Eliot, Rev. C. R., and Rev. C. J. Staples . 

Ellis, John, M.D.. Edgewater, N.J. 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 

Essex Bar Association, Salem . 

Essex Institute, Salem. .... 

Evening Post Publishing Company, New York 
Farmer, E. J., Cleveland, Ohio 
Farnham, J. M. W., D.D., Shanghai, China 
Fa rra is, Perez J., City of Mexico 
Fellows, I. W., Manchester, Nil. . 
Female Auxiliary Bible Society 
Ferguson, John, Columbo, Ceylon 
Ferguson, R.. Henry .... 

Ferrette, Julius, Leipzig, Germany . 
First Parish and Shepard Congregational Society, 
bridge ...... 

Fisher, G. G., &Bro., York, Pa. 
Fisher, Theo. W., M.D. . 
Fiske, W., Florence, Italy 
Fitchburg. Public Library 
Fitchburg Railroad Company 
Fitzgerald. Desmond, Brookline 
Fletcher, J. V. .... 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 
Flick, Lawrence F., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Floye, W. J 

Fogg, Ebenezer T., South Scituate . 
Folsom, A. A. 

Folsom, Charles W., Cambridge 
Forbes, R. B., Milton 

Ford, William E 

Fosdick, Frederick, Fitchburg 

Foster, William H 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Frazer, Persifor, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Free Hospital for Women 
Free Masons, Grand Chapter of Maine 

Grand Lodge of Iowa 

■ Grand Lodge of Maine . 

French, A. D. Weld .... 



broadsides 



England 



Friends' Free Library, Germantoivn, Pa. . 
Fritsch, Hugo, Konigsberg, Germany 

Fuller, Miss Edith D 

Fuller, Mrs. Sarah E 

Galloupe, F. E 

Gardner, Mrs. George .... 

General Association of the Congregational Churches of 

Massachusetts ........ 



Cam 




Pphs. 



5 
1 

2 
23 

2Gi 



365 
5 



10 
3 



1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
29 

1 
11 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

135 
4 
2 

512 



42 



City Document No. 28. 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, New York 






City 




2 


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga 




3 


German Society of the City of New York .... 




3 


Gerould, Rev. Samuel L. , Hollis, N. //., 97 newspapers, 


7 


9G 




1 




Gilson, F. H 


1 




Glasgow University Library, Glasgow, Scotland 


9 






1 




Goode, G. Brown, Washington, B.C. 




1 


Goodell, Henry H., and F. Tuckerman, Amherst 


1 




Goodrich, Prof. J. E., Burlington, Vt., . 1 photograph 






Goodwin, Daniel, jr., and Thomas Pitts, Chicago, III. 


1 




Gorman. Arthur P., Washington, B.C. 




1 


Gould, Benjamin A., Cambridge ..... 


1 




Gould, Miss Elizabeth P., Che/sea, . . 1 newspaper 






Grand Rapids, Mich., Public Library .... 




1 




1 






1 


3 


Great Britain, Commissioner of Patents .... 


99 




Green, Samuel A., M. B 




110 


Green, Samuel S., Worcester ...... 




1 




1 




Greene, William Batchelder ...... 


1 






1 






7 


234 


Greey, Edward, Neiv York City ..... 


1 




Griffin, Martin I. J., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 




10 


Griggs, S. M., Westborough ...... 




1 


Grube, F., Schleswig, Germany ..... 


1 








170 


Guild, Edward P 


1 




Hackett, Frank W ., Washington, B. C 


1 




Hall, Mrs. F. A 


26 


820 


Hamel, Prof. Thomas E., Quebec, Canada, 




4 


Hamilton, James ........ 




o 


Hamilton, Morris R., Trenton N.J. ..... 


1 




Harris, George H., Rochester, N.Y. .... 


1 


1 


Harris, George William, Ithaca, N. Y., . 1 photograph 






Harris, J. Kendel, Cambridge, England .... 




1 


Harrisse, Henry, Paris, France ..... 




1 


Hartford, Conn., City Clerk ...... 


1 




Hartford Library Association, Hartford, Conn. 




5 


Hartwell, E. Adams, Fitchburg ...... 


1 




Harvard Club, New York City ...... 


1 




Harvard College, Astronomical Observatory, Cambridge . 


2 


1 


Class of 1830 


1 




Class of 1835 


1 






1 


9 
2 


Hauselt, Edward, & I. Birkner, New York City 


Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. ..... 




1 


Hayden, Jabez H., Windsor Locks, Conn. .... 




1 


Hayes, John L., Cambridge ...... 


1 






6 




Hazen, Rev. Henry A., Andover ..... 




1 


Hebbard, E. C, M.B 




555 


Hildeburn, Charles R., Philadelphia, Pa 


1 




Hildrath, John L., Cambridge ...... 


1 




Hill, Don Gleason, Bedham ...... 




1 




1 





Public Library. 



43 



Givers. 



Hill, Miss Lucy A., Belmont ..... 

Hilt, Warren E., Brooklyn, N. Y. .... 

Hind, J. I. 1)., Lebanon, Tenn. ..... 

Bingham, Public Library ...... 

Hitchcock, Edward, M.D., Amherst .... 

Hoadley, Charles J., Hartford, Conn. 
Hoadley, John C, Executors of the Estate of . 
Hoar, George F.. Worcester ..... 

Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y. ..... 

Hodges, Richard M., M. D 

Hoff, Ludwig, Coesfeld, Germany .... 

Holbrook. Public Library ..... 

Homans, Mrs. E. L. . 

Home for Aged Men ....... 

Home for the Friendless, New Haven, Conn. 
Homes, Henry A., Albany, N.Y. .... 

Homes for Inebriates' Association, London, England 
Hopkinson, Charles H., Groveland .... 

Horsford, Prof. Eben Norton, Cambridge 

Hosmer, Rev. Samuel 1)., Auburn .... 

Houghton, Mifflin, & Co 4 calendars 

Howard, Cecil H, Brooklyn, N.Y. .... 

Howard University, Washington, D.C. 

Howe, Archibald M., Cambridge .... 

Hoyt, Albert H 

Hoyt, Thomas R., Goffstown, N.H. .... 
Hubbard, Rev. James M. . 

Hubbard, L. P., New York City ..... 

Huguenot Society of America ..... 

Hull, Charles J., Chicago, III 

Humane Society of Massachusetts .... 

Hunrath. Karl. Hadersleben, Schlesu'ig-Holstein,Gennany 
Hunt, Edward B. ...... . 

Huntington, William R., D.D., New York City 
Hurlburt, Miss Harriet P., Chicago, III. . 
Iglehart, A., St. Paul, Minn., . 1 lithograpl 

Illinois, Department of State ..... 

Imperial University of Japan, Tokio, Japan 

Index Society, London, England .... 

Indian Eights Association ...... 

Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Ind. . 
Institute for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes 

New York City ....... 

Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England 
International Committee of Young Men's Christian Asso 

ciations ......... 

Iowa, Bureau of Labor Statistics .... 

Irish Catholic Benevolent Union .... 

Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Co., New York City 
Jack, John G. ....... . 

Jay, John, Albany, N.Y. . 

Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D 

Jenks, Rev. H. F 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

Johnson, H. L., . . . . . .4 newspapers 

Jones, Charles C, jr., Augusta, Ga. 

Journal Newspaper Company ..... 

Kaiserliehe Konigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna, 

Austria .......... 

Kansas, Bureau of Labor Statistics 



Vols. 


Pphs. 




1 




1 




1 


1 






4 


15 




1(5 


281 


3 






28 


82 


39 


1 






5 


10 


24 




1 




1 


1 






1 




2 


9 






1 


1 






4 




1 




1 




1 


1 


301 




4 


1 




1 






1 


1 






2 




4 




1 




1 


210 






1 




1 




1 


5 


1 




1 


1 






7 


1 




2 


2 


1 






42 




2 




2 


1 






1 


8 




1 




1 





44 



City Document No. 28. 



Givers. 



nschaften 



Germany 



Sera ni 'on 



Kansas State Library .... 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan 

Kay, Robert, Adelaide, South Australia . 

Keenan, John J. 

Keller, W. B., New York City . 

Keyes, John S., Concord . 

Kilburn, D. W. . . ' . 

Kimball, John, Concord, NIL . 

Kimball, William T., Lawrence 

King, John, Toronto, Canada . 

Kingman, A. A. 

Kingsbury, F. J., Waterbury, Conn 

Knapp, Arthur Mason 

Knight, Joseph K., D.D.S. 

Knowlton, T. S., West Brookfield 

Koenigliche Bayerische Akademie der Wisse 

Munich. Germany ...... 

Koenigliche Oeffentliche Bibliothek, Dresden, 
Kongligt Universitetet, Upsala, Sweden . 
Kuebler, Prof. O., Berlin, Prussia . 
Lackawanna Institute of History and Science 

Pa 

Lake, George W., Pembroke, NIL . 

Lamberton. Robert A., South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Lancaster, Public Library .... 

Lane, Rev. James P., Norton 

Lanza, Miss Mary P., . .1 chart, 79 newspapers 

Lapham, W. B., Augusta, Me. . 

Lathers, Col. Richard, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lawrence, Abbott, .... a lot of newspapers 

Lawrence, Samuel C, Medford 

Lawrence, City of ... 

Free Public Library 

Lee, William Wallace, Meriden, Conn. 
Leeds, Josiah W., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Leeds, England, Free Public Library 
Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 
Leicester, Public Library . 
Levick, James J., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Levy, Simeon, City of Mexico 
Lewis, H. K., London, England 
Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lincoln, George, Hingham 
Lincoln, Public Library 
Lintner, J. A., Albany, N. Y. 
Little, George T., Brunswick, Me. 

Little, Brown, & Co 

Livermore, Rev. S. T., Bridgewater . 
Liverpool, England, Free Public Library 

Loring, H.rB 

Lovering, Henry B., Washington, D.C. 
Low, Lyman H., New York City 
Lowell, City of . . . . 

Public Library 

Ludlow, Thomas W., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Ludwig Salvator, Arch-Duke, Vienna, Austria 

Lugrin, diaries H., Fredericton, N.B 

Lyman. Mrs. Theodore, Brookline 

Lynn, Public Library 

McCamant, Joel B., llarrisburg, Pa. 




Pphs. 



1 
1 
6 
5 
51 
1 
1 



2.H 



lli 



2 
20 



25 
1 



24 
1 



Public Library. 



45 



Givers. 



McClurg, A. C, & Co., Chicago, III. 
MacDonald, Carlos F., M.D., Auburn, N F. 
McDonnell Bros., Chicago, III. . 
McPherson, William, jr., Lansing, Mich. 
Maimonides Library, New York City 
Manchester, England, Public Free Libraries 
Manchester, N.H., City Library 
Marcou, John B., Cambridge . 
Marcy, Henry O., M.D. . . . 
Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio 
Marlborough. Public Library . 
Marquette College, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Marsh, Edward B., Amherst 
Marshall, Gen. J. F. B., Hampton, Va., newspaper cut 
tings ....... 

Marvin, W. T. R 

Marx, Henry, New York City . ■ . 

Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md. 

Mason, Edward G., Chicago, 111. 

Mason, Orion A., Med way 

Mason, Thomas, Glasgow, Scotland . 

Massachusetts, State of 

Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity 

■ Bureau of Statistics of Labor 

Railroad Commissioners . 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 

State Library ..... 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy . 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Massachusetts Historical Society 

Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 

Massachusetts Infant Asylum . 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded 

Massachusetts State Pharmaceutical Association 

Master Car-Builders' Association, New York City 

Maxwell, Sidney D., Cincinnati, Ohio 

May, Henry A., . . . .1 wood-cut, 5 map 

May, Samuel P., Newton . 

Mayo, Rev. A. D. . 

Melrose. Public Library . 

Mercantile Library, New York City 

Mercantile Library, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mercantile Library, San Francisco, Cal. . 

Merriman, Rev. Daniel, Worcester 

Michigan, State Library .... 

Michigan Agricultural College, Lansing, Mich. 

Michigan Central Railroad Company, Detroit, Mich 

Middlesex Mechanics' Association, Lowell 

Millis, Mrs. Lansing, Millis 

Milwaukee, Wis. , Public Library 

Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce, Milwaukee, Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn., Park Commissioners. 

Minot, Charles S 

Missouri Bureau of Labor Statistics . 
Missouri Agricultural College and University 
Mitchell, Clifford, M.D., Chicago, III. 
Mitchell Library, Glasgow, Scotland 
Monks, Richard J. .... 




Pphs. 



4 

4 

30 

1 
4 
2 



1 
28 



oo 
1 



1 

1 

3 

2 
2 

4 
8 

2 

1 
5 

1 

2 
Hifi 
1 
2 
1 
1 
20 
1 



1 
2 

1 
3 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 

52 
1 

r32 
i 

3 



3 

1 

39 

3 

1 



46 



City Document No. 28. 



GlVEBS. 



Moore, George H., New York City 

Moore, John B., Concord ..... 

Moroney, T. W., 1 

Morrison, Nathan J., D.D., Springfield, Mo. . 
Morse, Edward S., Salem ..... 

Morse, Leopold ....... 

Morse Institute, Natick ..... 

Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, South Hadley 
Muckle, M. Richards, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Mundo, John J. ...... 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge . 
Museum of Fine Arts 

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C. 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Board of Trade ..... 

New Bedford, Free Puhlic Library . 
New England Historic Genealogical Society 
New England Meteorological Society 
New England Methodist Historical Society 
New England National Bank 
New Hampshire, State of . 

Secretary of State . 

New Jersey, State Geologist 
State Library 



New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, N.J. . 
New London County Historical Society, New London, 
New York, City, Board of Education 
New York, State, Bureau of Statistics of Labor 
— Forest Commission .... 

Lunatic Asylum, Utica, N. Y. 



City 



Com 



New York Civil-Service Reform Association, New 
City 

New York Free Circulating Library, New York City 

New York Historical Society, New York City 

New York Homoeopathic Medical College, New York 

New York Microscopical Society, New York City 

New York Produce Exchange, New York City . 

New York State Agricultural Society, Albany, N. Y. 

Newark Library Association, Newark, N.J. 

Newburyport. Public Library .... 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, Public Libraries 
mittee ........ 

Newton. Free Library ..... 

Nichols, Mrs. R. Anne ..... 

Northwestern University, Evanston, III. . 

Nova Scotia, Library Commissioners, Halifax, N.S. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia, Pa 

Nutter, F. H., 3Iinneapolis, Minn. .... 

Nye, Gideon, Canton, China ..... 

Nymanover, E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

O'Connor, Mrs. Ellen M., Washington, D.C . 

Odd Fellows' Library Association, San Francisco, Cal. 

Ohio, Forestry Bureau ...... 

Secretary of State 



chart 



Co tin 



York 



Omaha, Neb., Public Library 

Orphans' Home and Asylum, New York City 

Otterbein University, Westerville, Ohio 

Ottofy, Louis, Chicago, III. 

Owens Art Institution, St. John, N.B. 

Oxford Historical Society, Oxford, England 




141 
4 
3 

1 
1 

4 
1 
1 



28 



Public Library. 



47 



givkks. 



Paine, Robert Treat .... 

Parato, Antonino, Turin, Italy . 

Park, Mrs. John C, Newton 

Parker, Henry J. 

Parks, G. D. A., Joliet, III. 

Parvin, T. S., Cedar Rapids, Iowa . 

Paterson, N.J., Public Library 

Paton, Allan Park. Greenock, Scotland 

Pattee, Asa F., M.D. 

Peabody Academy of Science, Salem 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 

Peabody Institute, Peabody ..... 

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 

Cambridge ........ 

Pennsylvania, Penitentiary of the Eastern District, Phila 

delphia, Pa. ........ 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pa 
Peoria Board of Trade, Peoria, III. .... 

Perkins, Charles C, 3 maps, 317 newspapers, a lot o: 

plates ......... 

Perkins, Samuel C, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Perry, Thomas Sergeant ...... 

Perry, William Stevens, D.D., Davenport, Iowa 
Phelan, James,' Memphis, Tenn. . ... 

Philadelphia City Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Philadelphia Social Science Association, Philadelphia, Pa 
Philadelphia Society for Organizing Charity, Philadelphia 

Pa. 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.II. 
Philosophical Society, Washington, D.C. . 
Pickering, Prof. Edward C, Cambridge . 
Pickett, Rev. Joseph 1)., Frankfort, Ky. . 
Pillsbury, Parker, Concord, N.II. 
Pine, John B., New York City . 
Pinkham, Joseph, Newmarket, N.II., 
Plymouth, England, Free Public Library 

Pollard, Mrs. A 

Pool, Wellington, Wenham 
Portland, Oregon, Superintendent of Schools 
Pratt, Charles, New York City . 
Presbyterian Church, Eaglewood, N.J. 
Prime, Temple, Huntington, N. Y. . 
Providence, R.I., City of . 

City Registrar .... 

Public Library 



1 newspaper 



Providence Athenaeum, Providence, R.I. 
Provident Life and Trust Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Public Library, Museum, and Art Gallery of South Aus 
tralia, Adelaide, S.A. ..... 

Puffer, A. D., & Sons 

Putnam, Charles F., Davenport, Iowa 

Queen's College and University, Kingston, Canada 

Quint, Rev. Alonzo H., Dover, N.II. 

Ranney, A. A. . . . . . . 

Rawle, Francis, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Reale Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Florence, Italy 

Reale Istituto di Studi Superiori, Florence, Italy 

Reale Istituto Lombardo, Milan, Italy 

Redwood Library and Athenaeum, Newport, R.I. 

Reed, Mrs. E. T 




Pphs. 



150 
21 



lu 



1 

1581 
1 

47 
9 

] 
1 
6 



1 

11 



48 



City Document No. 28. 



Givers. 


Vole. 


Pphs. 


Remfry, John, Calcutta, India ..... 




1 


Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Conn. . 






1 


Reynolds Library, Rochester, N.Y.. 






1 


Rhode Island, Adjutant-General's Office . 




1 




Board of Health ...... 




1 




Board of State Charities .... 






1 


Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. . 






3 


Roberts Brothers ....... 






1 


Robinson, A. W. ....... 




2 




Robinson, F. T., East Somerville .... 






1 


Robinson, H. E., Maryville, Mo. .... 






1 


Rochester, N Y., Board of Education 




2 




Rockford, III., Public Library 




1 




Rogers, Edward EL, Chelsea ..... 




1 




Rogers, Gorham ....... 




1 




Rolfe, William J., Cambridge ..... 




1 




Romero, Matias, Washington, D.C. 




2 




Rosengarten, J. G., Philadelphia, Pa. 






2 


Roxbury Latin School ...... 






2 


Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland . 




2 




Royal Society of Canada, Montreal .... 




1 




Rue Manufacturing Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 






1 


Russell, E. P., Lynnfield ...... 






1 


Russell, Samuel H. ...... 




3 




Rutgers College Library, New Brunswick, N..T. 




1 


48 


St. Botolph Club, . . . . a lot of newspapers 




26 




St. Louis, Mo., Public Library ...... 




1 


1 


St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, St. Louis, Mo. . 






2 


St. Paul, Minn., Public Library ..... 






1 


Salem, City of . 






1 




Sanguineti, Angelo, Genoa, Italy 








1 


Sargent, Charles S. . 








2 


Sargent, William M., Portland, Me. . 






1 




Sauveur. L., Germantown, Pa. 








2 


Savage, James W., Omaha, Neb. 








1 


Saville, Leonard A., Lexington 








1 


Sawyer, Timothy T. . 






1 




Schmitt, William, New York City . 








1 


Scholfield bequest, ..... 


60 newspapers 




958 


724 


Science and Art Museum, Dublin, Ireland 






1 


Scottish Text Society, Edinburgh, Scotland 






1 


Scripps, James E., Detroit, Mich. .... 






2 


Scudder, Horace E., Cambridge .... 






1 


Scudder, Samuel H., Cambridge .... 




1 


3 


Shaw, Samuel S. ....... . 




3+ 


94 


Sheean, John T., Pembroke, Nil. ..... 




1 




Sheldon, George, Deerjic/d . 






1 


Sheltering Arms, New York City ..... 






1 


Shepard, Col. Elliott F 






1 


Sibley, John Langdon, Estate of, Cambridge . 




1 




Sibley, Mrs. John Langdon, Cambridge, . . 1 portrait 


1 




Silas Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn. .... 


4 


8 


Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J., a lot of broadsides, 2 






newspapers. 






Slafter, Rev. Edmund F 




6 




2 








2 




1 




Smith, Erwin F., Ann Arbor, Mich. ..... 




1 


Smith, Hamilton, jr., New York City 






1 





Public Library. 



49 



Givers. 



15 newspaper 



Smith, Perkins F., . . . -24 newspapers 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Snivelev. Rev. William A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snow. Edwin M., M.D., Providence, R.I. 

Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, London 

England ....■■■• 

Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents. New 

York City 

Society for the Study and Cure of Inebriety, London 

England ........ 

Society of Arts . 

Society of Arts, London, England .... 

Society of the Alumni of the New (Means High Schools 

New Orleans, La. ...... 

Society of the Sons of the Revolution, New York City 

Somerville, Public Library, . . 1 plan of library 

South Shields. England, Public Library 

Southhridge, Town of 

Spaulding, Rev. H. G. 

Spear Library, Oberlin, Ohio . 

Spooner, Mrs. D. M. ... 

Sprague, Homer B., San Francisco, Cal. 

Springfield. Public Library 

Start, Rev. W. A. 

Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D. 

Stevens, Charles E., Worcester 

Stevens, George T., M.D., New York 

Stimson, R. M., Marietta. Ohio 

Stirling's and Glasgow Public Library, Glasgow, Scotland 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R 

Stone, George F., Chicago, 111. 

Stone, Henry .... 

Storey, Moorfield 

Stoughton. Public Library . 

Stratton, Charles E. . 

Stringham. Prof. Irving, Berkeley, Cal. 

Swansea. England, Public Library . 

Swarthmore College, Swarthmore. Pa. 

Swift, Lindsay ..... 

T. K. Eaile Manufacturing Companv, Worcester 
Talbot, I.T.. M.D. . 
Taunton. Public Library, ... 1 broadside 

Technological, Industrial, and Sanitary Museum, Sydney, 

N S. W. " 

Tennessee, State Board of Health 

Thayer, Miss Caroline Coddington 

Thompson, Rev. A. C. 

Ticknor, Miss Anna Eliot .... 

Tilley, R. H., Neicport, R.I. . 

Toledo, Ohio, Public Library . 

Toronto, Canada, Public Library 

Trask, William B. . . . 

Traveller Newspaper Association 

Tree. Miss Ellen F., Washington, D.C. 

Trinity College, Hartford. Conn. 

Trinity College Library, Cambridge, England 

Triibner & Co.. London, England 

Tubbs. Frank H., New York City 

Tucker, James F., Annntta/iga, Fla. 

Tucker, Willis G., M.D., Albany, X. Y. . 



City 



I. 




15 



96 

1 



1 
1 

y 

14 



13 



26 
2 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 



1")5 
68 
1 
3 
1 
-) 

2 



154 
1 



50 



City Document No. 28. 



Givers. 


Vols. 


1'phs. 


Tufts College, Medford .... 






16 


Turner, A. R., jr. ..... 






2 


Tuskegee Normal School, Tuskegee, Ala. 






1 


Tuttle, Julius IL, Dedham, a lot of cards, 4 newspapers 




(i 


Tvler, Mrs. Abby L. Hitchcock, Winchester 




1 




Tyler, Rev. B. B., New York City . 






1 


Union League Club, New York City . 




1 




Union Theological Seminary, New York City 






12 


Union University, Albany, NY. 






1 


United States, Army, Adjutant General 




1 


1 






- 








1 


16 




Surgeon General . 




1 




■ Bureau of Education 




8 


8 


Bureau of Labor .... 




11 




Bureau of Medicine and Surgery . 




1 




Bureau of Ordnance 




1 




Bureau of Statistics, . . . 163 


broadsides 


6 


42 


Civil Service Commission 






1 


Coast and Geodetic Survey 




2 

1 


l ■' 




i _ 


Department of State 




158 


14 


Department of the Interior 




9!) 


2 


Department of the Treasury . 




3 








4 




l/L [jti i iiiieiiL or vv ai . • 










i 


j director 01 me iviint . . • 


i 


Fish Commission .... 




1 


i 


Geological Survey, .... 


. 39 maps 


(5 


c 




4 maps 


2 


i 


ny ui o&* rapine vjmce, . • . 








1 




Indian School Superintendent 






i 


Light House Board .... 




1 




Marine Hospital Service 






i 








•> 










] 


1 


IN cl llll(_ ill ,*\ 1 1 1 1 cLI IclC. UIllLc. . • 

Naval Observatory .... 




2 


o 


Patent Office 




71 




Signal Service, .... 


14 maps 


1 




Supervising Inspector-General of Steam 


Vessels . 


1 


2 


Universalist General Convention 






1 


University College and Free Library, Nottingham, Eng- 












1 


University of California, Berkeley, Cal., 9 


broadsides 


1 


<; 


University of Ley den, Leyden, Holland . 




2 




University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 






l 


University of Pennsylvania, Greek Play Committee, 






Philadelphia, Pa. ..... 




1 




University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. . 






2 


University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Holland . 






80 


Upton, Winslow, Providence, R.I. 






G 


Utica, N. Y., City Library .... 






1 


Van Voorhis, John C, Everett . 




1 




Vassar Brothers' Institute, Poughkeepsie, X. Y. 






1 


Vassal College, Ponghkeepsie, N.Y.. 






1 


Vaux, Richard, Philadelphia. Pa. 






1 


Vermont, Superintendent of Education 




1 




Vermyne, J. J. B., M.D., New Bedford, . 


1 broadside 




2 






1 




Victoria Public Library and Museums, Melbo 


urne, Aus- 










G 





Public Library. 



51 



Givers. 




f new 



2 broadside 



Waterloo, N. I 



spaper cuttings 



Victoria Street Society, London, England 

Vose, George L. ... 

Walker, Isaac, Pembroke, N.H. 

Wallace, Rodney, Fitchburg 

Walton, J. R., Muscatine, Iowa 

Ware, William, & Co. 

Warren, Charles E., M.D., 

Warren, Mrs. J. Mason 

Warren, Joseph W., M.D. 

Warren, Lucius H. . 

Warren St. Chapel . 

Washburn College, Topeka, Kan 

Washingtonian Home 

Watanabe, H., Tokio, Japan 

Waterloo Library and Historical Society, 

Waters, Henry F., Salem . 

Watertown, Free Public Library 

Watson, A. M., London, England 

Watson, F. W., M.D. 

Watson, Irving A., Concord, N.H. 

Watson, Paul Barron 

Wayland, Francis, New Haven, Conn 

Wayland, Town of 

Webb, Rev. E. B., Wellesley 

Welcker, Adair, Sacramento, Cal 

Weld, Miss Hannah M., . a lot o 

Wellesley College, Wellesley 

Wendell,' Barrett 

Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn 

West End Nursery and Hospital for Infants 

Western Reserve and Northern Ohio Historical Society 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Wheildon, William W., Concord 

Whitaker, Rev. N. T., Providence, R 

Whitcomb, H. C, & Co. . 

White, F. R. S., New York City 

White, James C, M.D. 

White, John P., Chicopee . 

Whitmore, William H. 

Whitney, James L., . . 1 engraving, 1 newspaper 

Whitney, W. Channing, Minneapolis, Minn., 6 photo- 
graphs. 

Wiggin, James B. 

Wight, O. M., M.D., Detroit, Mich. 

Wilder, Marshall P 

Wilkinson, J. J. Garth, London, England 

Willard, 31iss Frances E., Evanston, III. 

Williams, B. W 

Williams, Rev. F. F. ... 

Williams, J. Fletcher, St. Paul, Minn. 

Williamson, Joseph, Belfast, Me. 

Wilmington Institute, Wilmington, Del 

Wilson, AbielE., Worcester 

Winchell, Rensselaer, Orange, N.J. . 

Winchester Historical and Genealogical 
Chester .... 

Winsor, Justin, Cambridge 

Winthrop, Robert C. . 

Winthrop, Robert C, jr. . 

Wisconsin, Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics 



/. 



Society, 



Win 



G8 
1 



4G 
1 
1 



1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

169 



3 
3 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
fi 
1 
1 
118 



191 



52 



City Document No. 28. 



Givers. 



Wisconsin State Historical Society . 
Wohurn, Town of .... 

Public Library .... 

Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society 
Woman's Medical College of the New York 
New York City 

Wood, Rev. W. C 

Wood, William, & Co., New York City . 

Woodbury, C. J. H 

Woodbury, diaries Levi .... 
Woodman, Edgar H., Concord, Nil. 
Worcester, City of .... 

Free Public Library 

Wyman, Morrill, M.D., Cambridge . 
Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 

Observatory, New Haven, Conn. 

Young, Rev. Edward J., Cambridge . 
Young Men's Association, Albany, N Y. . 
Young Men's Association, Buffalo, N. Y. . 
Young Men's Christian Association, New York 



Infii 



mary 



City 




Pplis. 



APPENDIX X. 



CIRCULATION. 

(Books issued.) 





















ISM 
























1888 

1SM> 


(8 


mos.) . 



Total Circulation. 




Bates Hall 










I 










I 




1 


la >> 


I 


i 




| 


! 


i 


>> 






£ 


-z 


>> 


bo 


































" 





.J 


w 


w 


B 


a 


►J 


1,183,991 


3,882 


10,478 


80,326 


66,670 


146,996 


483 


1,001 


1,180,565 


3,833 


8,747 


74.627 


89,163 


163,790 


532 


926 


1,156,721 




8,781 


69,045 


101,100 


170,142 


554 


1 ,046 


1,065,081 




8,637 


68,609 


96,764 


165,373 


547 


1,046 


1,040,553 


3,434 


8,170 


63,782 


103,540 


167,322 


552 


1,052 


1,045,902 


3,418 


8,209 


66,948 


113,127 


180,075 


588 


1,181 


[,056,908 


:;,454 


8,694 


65,080 


119,833 


184,913 


604 


1,220 


1,027,393 


3,880 


7,977 


78,630 


124,134 


2112.764 


667 


1,210 


602,431 


2,953 


6,988 


38,345 


81,507 


119,852 


586 


1,027 


058,629 


3,143 


7,614 


62,672 


140,801 


203,473 


667 


1,235 



Lower Hall. 













c 






= ~ 


ai § 


^ 




E? 


-O 






IS 


3 


37S.439 


12,736 


350,521 


12,672 


306,148 


10,369 


257,592 


9,271 


239,601 


11,191 


163,811 


32,119 


168,926 


35,066 


150,826 


32,768 


92,847 


18,489 


154,402 


29,529 



391,175 
363,193 
316,517 
266,863 
250,792 
195,930 
203,992 
183,594 
111,336 
183,931 



1,2115 

1,179 

1,031 

847 



2,902 
2,085 
1,999 
1,849 
1,670 
1,301 
1,333 
1,186 
1,136 
1,362 



East Boston Branch. 



104,717 
95,887 

105,197 
97,024 
88,901 
92,833 
88,394 
75,710 
48,288 
70,926 



H 



1,879 
2,794 
3,004 
4,097 
7,073 
8,107 
7,048 
8,747 
4,647 
8,509 



106,596 
c 98,681 
108,201 
101,118 
e96,974 
100,940 
95,442 
? 84,457 
52,935 
79,435 



Soutfi Boston Branch. 







1 


K 


137,010 


3,741 


115,509 


3,335 


138,309 


5,261 


129,251 


3,607 


125,409 


4,077 


121,939 


4,472 


119,564 


4,656 


123,570 


5,096 


66,547 


2,383 


97,715 


2,277 



140,751 
C 118,844 
143,570 
132,858 
129,486 
126,411 
124,220 
128,666 





IIoxbury Branch. 












I 
































p 

§ 


1 


3 


>, 


1 












K 


X 


Eh 


P 


hi 


122,517 


7,513 


130,030 


404 


1,100 


123,492 


6,397 


129,889 


408 


1,013 


119,450 


5,480 


134,930 


388 


1,017 


105,700 


4,912 


110,612 


360 


972 


101,534 


4,739 


106,273 


::47 


876 


105,797 


6,728 


112,525 


370 


906 


103,483 


7,874 


111,357 


360 


850 


98,350 


7,830 


106,180 


349 


884 


55,863 


5,069 


60,932 


300 


674 


79,057 


8,459 


87,516 


287 


749 



99.537 

B6.92S 
73,305 
78,682 
B5.038 
84,660 
71,453 
69,18] 
3K,»3'J 
62,863 



« 



2,003 
1,815 
l,44f. 
2,1411 
2.2S1 
2,744 
2,513 
2,360 
1,368 
3,114 



n Branch. 














p 




&> 


>> 
















a 


« 








3 


■3 








tn 


O 


hi 


101,540 


332 


970 


88,740 


289 


685 


./74.74^ 


246 


616 


80,822 


273 


789 


87,319 


254 


741 


87,304 


285 


775 


76,966 


25 1 


687 


71,541 


235 


587 


40,2(17 


194 


533 


65,977 


216 


593 



Brighton Branch. 



= 



27,549 
26,737 
26,406 
26,067 
25,152 
25,965 
24,214 
22, •is:: 
12,265 
19,936 



pq 



1,698 
1,859 
1,574 
2,110 
2,292 
2,295 
1,927 
2,209 

1.222 
1,893 



29,247 
28,928 
27,980 
28,177 
27,444 
28,257 
26,141 
24,892 
13.4S7 
21,829 



Dorchester Branch. 







p 


m 






a 








H 


w 


63,025 


1,949 


56,785 


1,423 


55,690 


1,026 


53,904 


730 


53,036 


1.449 


65,678 


1,880 


70,260 


1,913 


71,863 


1,639 


43.1S9 


914 


67,862 


2,028 



64,974 
59,673 
56,716 
55,188 

e 54,485 
67,558 

/72.173 
73,502 
44,103 
69,890 



South-End Branch. 



W 



41,303 
73,154 
77,016 
71,432 
61,453 
76,472 
76,693 
68,362 
/i36,470 
59,459 



w 



1,099 
2,713 
2,275 
2,530 
10,283 
17,778 
22,108 
22,495 
13,343 
19,259 



42,402 
75,867 
79,291 
73,962 
■71,736 
94,250 
98,801 
90,857 
49,813 
78,718 



25S 



593 



Jamaica Plain Branch. 



w 



28,174 

50,457 
52,406 
47,797 
48,316 
44,758 
43,039 
41,526 
25,732 
40,851 



2,106 
2,503 
2,220 
2,311 
3,406 
4,379 
8,232 



30,280 
52,960 
54,626 
50,108 
49,722 
49,137 
51,271 
61,192 
31,736 
48,344 



NOKTH- 


End Branch. 


K 


P 


>> 

T3 

hi 
































3,515 
11,630 
9,748 

9,101 
1 19.524 


20 
38 
35 
45 
98 


99 
183 
102 
204 
369 



a Includes the largest of each department on any day, without regard to its being 
the same day. 

h Includes I k- borrowed on white Blips, and returned the same day. 

• Tin- East Boston branch was closed from October 7th to 9th, 1S79, for repairs; 
South Boston from August 12th to November 2d, 1S79, for repairs and enlargement. 



d The Charlestown branch was closed lrom April 20th to the 30th, to rearrange the 
books, and also from May 1st to the 11th, 1880. 
i The East Boston branch was closed 25 working-days. 

•• South-End " " " 85 " 

" Dorchester " " " 6 " " during 1882. 

The North-End branch was open 177 days during 1833. 



/The Dorchester branch was closed one day. for repairs, during 1884. 

g The East Boston and North-End branches were closed 41 and 2.5 working-days 
respectively, during i** : '. 

h The South-End blanch was closed 15 working-days during the period from May 1 
to December 31, 1885. 

j The North-End branch was open only 19S clays in 1886. 



Public Library. 



53 



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DO 



APPENDIX XIII. 

BATES-HALL READING. 





Percentage of Use. 


Classification. 


<• 
t 

13 

10 
5 
3 

2 

2 
4 
1 

9 
3 

6 


\" 

t 

13 

14 
4 
5 
2 

2 

4 
2 

12 

1 

6 


*- 
t 

13 

13 

4 
5 
2 

3 
4 

2 



* 

t 


— 
/ 
/ 

13.1 

11.1 

5.8 
3.9 
1.8 

3.3 
3.6 

1.5 

8.7 
3.7 

7.0 


?1 

« 

/ 

12.3 

12.2 
5.3 
3.9 
1.6 

3.6 
3.9 
1.6 

8.5 
3.6 

6.6 


> 

X 

12.0 

12.4 
4.6 
3.9 
1.6 

3.5 
3.3 

1.6 

8.4 
3.8 

6.4 


/ 
/ 


19 

/ 
/ 

11.8 

10.6 
5.1 
4.5 
1.6 

3. 

2.9 

1.5 

8. 
3.5 

6.8 


■I 
- 




English history, topography, l>i- 
ography, travel and polite lit- 

American (North and South) 


13.2 

11.8 
6.1 
3.4 
1.5 

3.3 
3.5 

12 


11.8 

11.3 

5.2 
3.8 
1.6 

3.5 
3.5 
1.9 

8.3 
3.9 

7.0 


11.8 

12.82 
5.16 
4.09 
1.72 

3.19 
3.03 
1.5 

7.4 
3.0 

6.5 
1 .52 

5.3 

5.87 


12.1 
13 27 


Greek, Latin, and philology . . 


5.4 

4.01 

1.09 

3.07 
2.62 
1 31 




13 8.9 

! 
1 3.8 

6 7.3 




Natural history and science . . 
Theology, ecclesiastical history, 


3.19 










Metaphysics and social science 
Mathematics and physical sci- 




















4.52 
6 ' 








1 















in May, 1883, a change was made in the classification, some classes being divided, others 
modified. Hence in ab.iut half the classes no comparison can be made with former years. 



APPENDIX XIV. 

LOWER HALL AND BRANCH READING. 



Fiction and juveniles* 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages . 

Science, arts, fine and useful, the 
ology, law, medicine, proft 

Periodicals 

Foreign languages . . 

Miscellaneous ..... 



1882 


1883 




►4 




a 


(§ 


.= 


O 


H 




1 


►4 




to 
m 


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A 
O 


C 


CO 


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3 

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4 




64.23 


78 


73 


81 


78.2 


77.4 


80.3 


79 


76.6 


61.49 


77.50 


75 


79 


759 


77.8 


77.2 


77 


75.1 


62.37 


77.33 


7.01 


5 


11 


5 


6 


4.1 


5.4 


5 


6.1 


7.26 


3.75 


7 


5 


6.3 


4.6 


6. 


5 


5.6 


7.54 


5. 


4.03 


2 


4 


3 


3 


2.8 


3.2 


3 


3.1 


4.57 


3.00 


3 


3 


3. 


3.5 


4. 


4 


3.6 


4.08 


2.17 


8.96 


4 


4 


5 


2.7 


4.5 


4.8 


4 


4.8 


9.47 


2.75 


5 


5 


3.2 


5.3 


5.7 


4 


5.1 


9.24 


3.42 


4.93 


7 


3.5 


4 


4 


5.2 


3.1 


5 


4.6 


5.11 


7.38 


7 


5 


4.6 


3.8 


2.9 


6 


5. 


5.32 


8. 


3.52 




.5 


1 


.1 


.1 






.6 


4.41 


.12 


- 


1 


.2 


- 


.3 


- 


1. 


4.22 


- 


7.32 


4 


4 


1 


6 


3.9 


3.2 


4 


4.2 


7.69 


5.50 


3 


2 


6.8 


5. 


3.9 


4 


4.7 


7.23 


4.08 



O 


£ 


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O 


m 


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76 


77 


75.29 


76 


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5.96 


6 


43 


3 


6 


4.55 


4 


24 





5 


5.55 


5 


15 


5 


5 


2.36 
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6.06 


6 


- 


7 


4 


3 


11 



CLASSES. 
The figures give the relative per- 



Fiction and juveniles* 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, the- 
ology, law, medicine, professions . 

Periodicals 

Foreign languages 

Miscellaneous 











1885 


















188i> 
May 1-Dec. ^ 


1.) 
















1880. 










to 

M 

78 


a 
m 

75 


& 


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e 


0Q 


0^ 


H 
26 


s 


a 


79 


I 


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78 


70 


*s 


Id 

to 

22 


1 


W 


a 
H 

~7 


PQ 


« 


6 











' 61.11 


79 


73.7 


78.6 


73.11 


76 


74.3 


63.83 


80 


75 


75 


68.65 








81.81 


75 


28 


7.84 


5 


8 


5 


7.4 


5.6 


8.51 


6 


18 


6.7 


7.25 


4 


6 


4 


3 


6 


15 


7 


14 


7.36 


6.76 


4.75 


7 


5 


6.2 


5 


4.37 


7 


10 


4.44 


2 


4 


3 


3.7 


3.2 


5.51 


4 


32 


3.7 


3.91 


2 


4 


3 


6 


3 


4 


4 


27 


6.32 


3.18 


2. 


3 


3 


3.1 


3 


3.28 


4 


28 


9.44 


3 


3 


3 


3.6 


4.6 


6.59 


5 


4 


4.8 


8.78 


3 


5 


3 


5 


4 


6 


4 


3 


4.64 


7.46 


2.25 


5 


4 


5.2 


5 


4.53 


4 


5 


498 


8 


5 


6 


4.4 


4.3 


2.18 


5 


- 


5. 


4.29 


7 


7 


9 


3 


5 


2 


7 


29 


7.81 


3.61 


7.50 


7 


e 


4.9 


5 


.92 


6 


25 


4.83 






1 


.2 




.25 




- 


.8 


4.78 


- 


- 


1 


7 












4.19 


- 


- 


l 


.3 


- 


.33 


- 


- 


7.36 


4 


5 


3 


'• 


3.7 


3.85 


4 


20 


4.7 


7.16 


5 


3 


3 


1 


4 


3 


3 


5 


3.80 


7.27 


5.62 


3 


3 


4.2 


4 


4.76 


4 


4 



* A large number of the juveniles are not fiction. 
Books taken out on white slips and returned the same day are not included. 
The total percentage for 1991 and 1885 (ending April 30) do not include the North-Eud percentages, on account of the difference of classification; now, ho 



the classification conforms with that of the other departn 



Public Ltbrary 



57 



APPENDIX XV. 

FELLOWES ATHEN2EUM HEADING. 



6 

03 

5 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 


X) 

30 
10 


05 
!« 

/ 
H 

37 
11 


e 
/ 

X 
H 


- 
X) 
X 
H 

33 
13 


« 

X 
X 
p* 

42 
11 


Si 

X 
X 

44 
6 


X 
X 
wi 

46 
6 


11 

X 
X 
H 


X c 
X c 

40 


e 

X 
X 

h 


I. 


History, biography, and 


39 
10 


39 
4 


42 


IT. 


Modern foreign languages, 


5 


III. 


Periodicals 


17 


6 


5 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 


4 


IV. 


Miscellaneous literature . 


8 


9 


11 


11 


10 


11 


10 


13 


14 


16 


V. 


Theology, sociology .ethics, 


7 


6 


6 


9 


1 


6 


7 


8 


8 


6 


VI. 


Medicine 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


VII. 




4 


4 


4 


4 


J- 28 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 








VIII. 


Fine arts, engineering . . 


" 


8 


7 


6 


1 


6 


7 


5 


6 


5 


IX. 


Law, politics, government, 


3 


3 


3 


2 




2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


X. 


Mathematics, science . . . 


12 


14 


13 


11 


J 


10 


9 


10 


11 


9 


XI. 










5 


5 


4 


4 


8 


' 


7 















BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 





Classes. 


X 


9 


© 


H 


« 


X 

X 
H 


f 


« 


is » 


<e 


00 




J» 


l> 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X fc 


X 


5 


Relative percentages. 


X 
H 


X 


X 
H 


X 
H 


X 

H 


X 

H 


X 

H 


X 


I. 




6 


75 


76 


76 


73 


74 


73 


73 


72 


73 


II. 


Biosraphv, travel, and his- 








< 


8 


8 


^ 


8 


9 


10 


10 


10 


10 


in. 




17 


17 


16 


17 


19 


17 


17 


17 


18 


17 



5<s 



City Document No. 28. 









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II I I I I I I 

I l l l l l l l • • 

////////// 



60 



City Document No. 28. 



APPENDIX XVIII. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



General Library Accounts. 



Binding 

Books 

Periodicals* 

Expense 

Fuel 

Furniture (cabinets, shelving, fixtures, 
etc.) 

Gas 

Printing and catalogue 

Stationery 

Salaries 

Transportation, Postage, etc 

Total 



188G. 

(Jan. 1-Dec. 31.) 


Paid into City Treasury 
from fines and sales of 
catalogues. 


City appro- 
priations. 


Expended. 


Year. 


Amount. 


$2,000 


$1,912 33 


1877 


$3,092 12 


j 17,000 


19,046 55 
3,773 19 


1878 
1879 


3,266 31 
2,618 32 


5,000 


2,326 67 


1880 


2,984 12 


3,000 


2,461 64 


1881 


3,497 03 


1,500 


1,090 73 


1882 


2,945 74 


5,500 


5,697 57 


1883 


3,223 14 


8,000 


4,984 32 


1884 


3,018 01 


1,000 


1,133 88 


1885 


2,952 86 


75,000 


73,359 55 


(8 mos.) 


1,965 51 


2,000 


2,127 33 


1886 


3,000 00 


$120,000 


$117,913 76 







* The appropriation for periodicals is included in that for books. 

Note. The expenditures for books cover the cost of those chargeable to the trust-funds 

account, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the city, and also include 
such as are bought with the balances with the foreign agents at the close of the previous year. 

Bills accruing subsequently to the middle of March (when the last requisition of the year, 
payable April 1st, is approved) will be audited in the subsequent year's account beginning 
nominally May 1st. In this way books added between March loth and May 1st may be 
counted in one year, and paid for in the subsequent year. The cost of maintaining a branch 
after the first year makes part of the general items of the several appropriations. 

The money for books bought on account of the Fellowes Athenasum is spent under the 
direction of the book committee of the trustees of the Fellowes fund. 



NORTH-END BRANCH. 

City Appropriation, §4,000. 

f Salaries $672 48 

I Books 705 71 

1883. { Expense 1.0W S6 

(.Amount actually expended $2,406 05 

I Balance of City appropriation $1,593 95 

I**.s. j E X p en ,ied for books 186 08 

( Balance $1,407 87 

1884. { Books $415 08 

( Alterations and repairs 506 51 

921 59 

$486 28 

1885. Books 281 20 

$205 08 

( Books 95 54 

( Balance $ 109 54 



Public Library. 



61 



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62 



City Document No. 28. 



APPENDIX XX. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. 



(Dec. 31, 1886.) 



Mellen Chamberlain 

James L. Whitney . . . 
Jose F. Carret 



Louis F. Gray . . . 

Adelaide A. Nichols 

John J. Keenan . . 

Total 



James L. Whitney 
William H. Foster . 
Jose F. Carret . . . 



Lindsay Swift .... 
Edward B. Hunt . . . 
Roxanna M. Eastman 

Elizabeth T. Reed . . 
Annie C.Miller . . . . 
Mary H. Rollins . . . 
Ida W. Gould .... 
Card Catalogues. 
Carrie K. Burnell . . . 
Alice Browne . . . . 
George Whalen . . . 



Total 



1878 

1869 
1875 

1880 
1868 
1885 



1860 
1875 

1878 
1883 
1859 

1873 
1881 
1886 
1S84 

1881 
1883 
1886 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian and Clerk of the cor 
poration 



Principal Asssistant Librarian . 

Registrar :ind Curator of Pat- 
ents and Engravings 



Librarian's Secretary 
Auditor and Cashier . 
Librarian's Runner . 



Principal of the department . 
Assistant 



Registrar, Curator of Patents 
and Engravings and Assistant 



Assistant 

Assistant 



Extra Assistant and Cataloguer 
of U.S. Documents 



Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant in ratent-room, etc. . 

Curator of officers' card catalog. 

Assistant. 

Runner 



bi. o 
2*& 



Plblic Library. 



r,3 



LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Harriet N. Tike . . 
Edith D. Fuller . . . 
Agnes R. Dame . . . 
Mary A. McGrath . . 
Patrick D. Gorman . . 
Total 



'A 



1867 
1879 
1883 
1868 
1S85 



Position, duties, etc. 



Chief Clerk . . 
Associate Clerk 
Assistant Clerk 
Assistant . . . 
Runner .... 



O O 



Appleton P. C. Gkiffin, 

William Roffe 

John S. Morrison 

Matthew T. Keenan . . . 
Total 



1865 
1881 
1882 

18S0 



Custodian 

Asst. in charge of repairs, etc. 

Assistant 

Runner 



Arthur Mason Knapp 
Lydia F. Knowles . . . 
Louise A. Twickler . . 
Agnes C. Doyle .... 
W. Maynard L. Young 
Alice M. Putnam .... 

Edward Grady 

James P. Donahoe . . . 
Walter E. Clark .... 
Michael F. Duffley . . . 
Total 



1875 
1867 
1881 
1885 
1878 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1886 



Librarian of Bans Hall 
Delivery Clerk .... 
Receiving Clerk .... 

Assistant 

Clerk of the branches . 

Assistant 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 



Edward Tiffany 

Mary A. Jenkins . , 
Frank C. Blaisdell 



Edwin F. Ilice . . . 
Caroline E. J. Poree 
Sarah A. Mack . . . 
Eliza J. Mack . . . 
Annie G. Shea . . . 
Florence Richards . 
Mary Sheridan . . . 
Rebecca J. Briggs . 



1878 
1877 
1876 

1885 
1859 
1863 
1863 

1874 
1878 
1880 
1881 



Librarian of Lower Hall . . . . 

Assistant Librarian 

Curator of Lower Hall card 
catalogue 

Clerk for registration and fines . 

Reading-room Clerk 

Delivery Clerk 

Receiving Clerk 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant . 



64 



City Document No. 28. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



Julia C. Twickler . 

Esther Nurenberg . 

Agnes C. Murray . . 

Elinor S. Briggs . . 

Ella K. Murray . . . 

Kathleen M. Hunter 

Evening Service. 
Louis F. Gray . . . 

Fred. W. Blaisdell . 



William Boffe . . 
Amelia McGrath . 
William L. Day . 
Calvin A. Jones . 
Freeman L. Zittel 
Thomas Murray . 
Total 



a <d 



1S82 
1883 
1885 
1885 
1886 
1886 

1881 
1886 

1884 
1885 
18S1 
1SS4 
1885 
l!-85 



Position, duties, etc. 



Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 



Card Catalogue 

Registration Clerk and Sunday 
service 



Reading-room . 
Delivery Clerk 
Receiving Clerk 
Runner .... 
Runner .... 
Runner .... 



^ U I O, 

tV HE 
■" 3 S m 

c b 



William E. Foud . . . 
John L. Williams . . . 

John White 

William Monahan . . . 
Ertra daily Assistants. 

Total 



1858 
1886 
1880 
1883 



Janitor 

Night Watchman 

Porter 

Porter 



Andrew M. Blake . . 

Frank Ryder 

P. B. Sanford 

Wm. Hemstead .... 
William F. Sampson . . 

Arthur Siguere 

S.irah E. Bowen .... 
Martha M. Wheeler . . 
Mary G. Moriarty . . . 
Sarah J. Dumas .... 
Mary J. Morton .... 

Mary Roslund 

John F. Murphy .... 
Total 



1870 
1S83 
1879 
18S3 
1880 
1881 
1S76 
1869 
1875 
1881 
18S1 
1883 
1S83 



Foreman 

Extra Forwarder 

Finisher 

Pressman . . . . 
Forwarder . . . . 
Forwarder . . . . 
Forewoman . . . 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Sewer 

Apprentice . . . 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



65 



a 
1 

03 

C. 

w 

A 


Name. 


■a J 

flQQ 


Position, duties, etc. 


J3 • 

«! 

'" o 
a <*> 

O 

1 

1 
1 

1 


o 

n ■- 

o * 
= i: 

^ V. 

a *> 
O 

1 
1 
1 
1 

4 

1 
1 
1 
1 

4 

1 

1 

Tf 


V 

>. 

o 

_ 3, 

2 5 

3 - 




Sarah C. Godbold . . . 
Mary R. Pray 

Emma D. Coleman . . . . 

Florence E. Wheeler . . . 


1871 
1870 
1872 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1885 
1885 
1873 


















c 


Assistant 




e 
















« 








^ 




1 

5 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 








9 














N. Josephine Buxlard . 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Idalene L. Sampson . . . 

Alice B. Orcutt 


1883 
1872 
1877 
1873 
1877 
1881 
1884 
1885 
1885 
1872 












< 

8 
c 






«5 






1 














"3 












1 

6 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 








in 














Elizabeth C. Berry .... 


1878 
1877 
1878 
1884 
1885 
1883 
1886 
1873 






e 






* 






















1 

fi 








8 



fitf 



City Document No. 28. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Elizabeth F. Cartee 
Annie E. Eberle . . . 
Mary P. Swain .... 
Susan E. Livcrmore . 
Alice G. Willougbby 
Lydia E. Eberle . . . 
Emma L. Willougbby 
Thomas E. Smith . . 
Total 



Mary E. Brock 
Mary F. Grailey 
Sara R. Brock . 
James M. Brock 
Total 



Mart G. Coffin ... 
Mary J. Sheridan . . . . 
Lucy Adelaide Watson 
Frances Willard Pike . 
Ida B. Lefavour ... 
Edward Davenport . . 
Total 



Grace A. De Borges 
Maud M. Morse . . . 
Margaret A. Sheridan 
Mary A. Avkinson . . 
Peter Sheridan . . . 

Emma Lynch 

Frank Hathaway . . . 
Total 



1886 
1S74 
1878 
1879 
1882 
1881 
1882 
1869 



1875 
1880 

18S0 
1878 



1874 
1875 
1880 
18S1 
1885 
1874 



1880 
1877 
1875 
1881 
1884 
1885 
1884 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . , 
Assistant . . . . 
Runner . . . . , 
Extra Assistant - 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor .... 



Librarian . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant . 
Janitor . . . . 



Librarian 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Runner . 
Janitor . 



Librarian . . . 

Assistant . . . 

Assistant . . 

Assistant . . . 

Runner . . . . 

Runner . . . . 
Extra Runner . 



_ e. 

£ S 

C * 



Public Library. 



07 



LIBRARY SERVICE. 



Concluded. 



a 

01 

a 

a 
o 



Name. 




Position, duties, etc. 


K • 

— v 

3 :. 
irr 

.- u 

" Z) 

o 


a ■— 
a •- 

o 


V 
>, 

o 

_ o< 
B £ 

o ° 
H 




Nellie F. Rilev 

Margaret S. Barton .... 

Total 


1877 
1876 
1878 
1882 
1884 
1877 






<S 




1 
1 
1 


i 

i 




s 
a 






b; 






I 




1 

4 

1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 






5 














Catherine G. J. Mooney . . 
Total .... 


1882 
1884 
1886 
















^ 




3 












3 


Julia W. Richards .... 
Harriet L. Atkinson . . . 

Samuel T. Bowthorpe . . . 
Bessie G. Fairbrother . . . 


1875 
1884 
1882 
1886 
1885 
1886 


Custodian, Lower Mills .... 
Custodian, West Roxbury . . . 

Custodian, Mt. Bowdoin .... 


R 













68 



City Document No. 28. 





SUMMARY. 






Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, anc 


I 






Runner ....... 


5 


1 




Catalogue department .... 




11 


1 




Purchase and Entry department . 




5 




Central Library 


Shelf department .... 




4 




69 regulars. 


Bates Hall circulation department 




10 




9 extras. 


Lower Hall circulation department, 


day 






— 


evening, and Sunday service . 




17 


8 


78 in all. 


Janitor's department . 






4 






Bindery 


• 






13 






East Boston branch 


. 






5 


4] 




South Boston branch 


. 






6 


4 




Roxbury branch . 








6 


2 


Branches. 


Charlestown branch 








6 


2 


51 regulars. 


Brighton branch . 


. 






3 


1 


■ 15 extras. 


Dorchester branch 


. 






6 




— 


South-End branch 


. 






6 


1 


66 


Jamaica Plain branch 








4 


1 




North-End branch 


, 






3 






Deliveries 


• 






6 








120 
24 


24 












144 







AGENTS. 

Messrs. W. B. Clarke & Carruth, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triibner & Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Christern and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 

Deuerlich'sche Buchhandlung, Gottingen. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Senor Don Juan F. Riaho, Madrid. 



Public Library. 



Ii9 



APPENDIX XXI. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 























^a 


















ja 




,3 




a 


.a 














































a 




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a 


a 


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h 


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02 


2,287 


O 


M 





02 


1-5 


B 


H 


Not on shelves . . . 


4,240 


6,212 


1,359 


2,152 


1,546 


563 


1,614 


2,175 


985 


5 


23,138 


Of these found to be 




























1,836 


3,321 


1,118 


1,608 


1,821 


1,250 


480 


1,249 


1,778 


875 




15,336 


At the binderies . . 


789 


137 


47 


54 


65 


65 




71 


144 


1 




1,373 


Otherwise account- 




























1,552 


2,457 


192 


489 


399 


230 


83 


292 


253 


109 


1 


6,057 


Not accounted for . 


63 


297 


o 


1 


2 


1 




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Public Library. 



71 



APPENDIX XXIII. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR THIRTY-FIVE YEARS. 

The following gentlemen have served on the Examining 
Committees for the years given. The names in italics are 
those of Trustees, who have acted as chairmen of the various 
committees. The thirty-fourth year was from May 1 to 
Dec. 31, 1885, a period of eight months, for which no 
Examining Committee was appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 18G0. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball. Joshua 1)., 1861. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Biqeloic, Hon. John P., 1X56. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake. John G., M.D., 1883. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua F., 1879. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Hen > y I., M.D., 1865. 
Bowditch, H. P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll. 1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Browne, Causten. 1876. 
Buckingham. C. E., M.D., 1872. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henry, jr., 1869. 
Chadwiek. James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheney, Mrs. Kdnahl)., 1881. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.B., 1882. 
Collar, Wm. C, 1874. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thos. B., M.D., 1874. 
Cushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton. Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, S<muel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benj., 1873. 



Denny, Henry G., 1876. 

Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 

Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 

Dix, James A., 1860. 

Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 

Durant, Henrv F., 1863. 

Duryea, Jos. T., D.D., 1880. 

Dwight, John S., 1868. 

Dwight Thomas, M.D., 1880. 

Easthurn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 

Edes, Henrv H., 1886. 

Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 

Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871 

Ellis, Geo. E., D.D., 1881. 

Endicott, Wm., jr., 1878. 

Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 

Fields, James T., 1872. 

Foote, Rev. Henrv W., 1864. 

Fowle, William F., 1864. 

Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 

Frost, Oliver, 1854. 

Frothingham, Richard, 1876. 

Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 

Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D., 

1882. 
Gannett. Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., 31. D., 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, jr., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1868. 
Greenough, William W., 1858, 1S74, 

1883. 1886. 
Grinnell, Rev. C. E.. 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., Is58. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T.. 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
I/aynes, Henry W., 1881, 1884. 
Havward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 



72 



City Document No. 28. 



Hillard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., M.D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver VV., jr., 1882. 
Homans, Charles 1)., M.D., 1867. 
Homans, Mrs. Charles D., 1885, 

1886. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D., 1869. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Kben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1875. 
Kimball, Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lewis, Weston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. W\, 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring. Hon Charles G., 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., 1885. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Minns, Thomas, 1864. 
Minot, Francis, 1866. 
Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 
Morse, John T.. jr., 1879. 
Morse, Robert M., jr., 1878. 
Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 
Mudge, Hon. E. R . 1871. 
Neale, Rollin II., D.D., 1853. 
Noble, John, 1882. 
Norcross, Otis, 1880. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 
Otis, G". A., I860. 
Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benj. H., 1876. 
Parkman, Henry, 1885. 
Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882. 
Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 
Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885. 



Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Prescott, William H., LL.D., 1853. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon.\John P., 1865. 
Randall, Charles L., M.D., 1884. 
Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H.. 1880. 
Sanger, Hon. George I'., 1860. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Teele, John O., 1886. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 
Thayer, George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, B. F., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 
Ticknor. George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Twombly. Rev. A. S., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., M.D.. 1865 
Vihbert, Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Wales, George VV., 1875. 
Warner, Herman J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitney, Daniel //., 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Wilson, Elisha T., 31. D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Winthrop, Hon. Robert C, 1854. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



Public Library. 



73 



APPENDIX XXIV. 

TRUSTEES FOR THIRTY-FIVE YEARS. 

The Honorable Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1852 to 1864; the late George Ticknor in 1865; an.d 
William W. Greenough, Esq., from 1866 to the present time. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that 
for 1853 made what is called the first annual report. It 
consisted of one alderman and one common councilman, and 
five citizens at large, till 1867, when a revised Ordinance 
made it consist of one alderman, two common councilmen, 
and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, unless re- 
elected, each year, while the members from the City Council 
were elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board 
was changed to include one alderman, one councilman, and 
five citizens at large, as before 1867 ; and in 1885, by the pro- 
visions of the amended city charter the representation of the 
city government upon the Board by an alderman and a 
councilman was abolished, leaving the Board, as at present, 
consisting of five citizens at lar^e. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1S79-87. 
Allen. James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G. , 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Bigelow, John P., 1852-68. 
Bowditch, Henry I., 1865-68. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D , 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis I).. 1868-69. 
Braman, Jakvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. C. J.. 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A.. l.s7: J .-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Chase, George B., 1877-85. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 
Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, 1878-87 
Clapp. William W , jr., 1864-66. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61 
Curtis, Daniel S.. 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-f.O. 
Dickinson, M. F., jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-61. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett. Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1875-79. 
Gaffield. Thomas, 18(i7-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
Greenolgii. William W., 1856-8* 
Guild, Curtis. 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 



Haynes, Henry W., 1880-87. 
Hillard, George S., 1872-75; 1876- 

77. 
Howes, Osborne, jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith. James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Ellis W., 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870-71. 
O'Brien. Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman. 1852. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Pltnam, George, 1868-77. 
Heed, Sampson, 1852-53. 
Sanger, George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Philip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey N., 1878-79. 



74 



City Document No. 28. 



Shurtleff, Nathaniel B., 1852- 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 1855-56; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
Ticknor, George, 1852-66. 
Tyler, John S., 1863-64; 1866-67. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
"Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 



Whitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H., 1885-87. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, ElishaT., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



Citizens at large in small capitals. 



KHPUBLIC LIBRARY 



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