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Full text of "Annual report"

REFERENCE 

Acce^ion No Cj\ 



Class 

Gift of 



0v\\ uUig U»Wara 





T II 1 II T Y - S 1 X T H 



ANNUAL KEPORT. 



1887. 



88071 



y*> 



[Document 40 — 1888.] 



city of §-:-:m boston. 




THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

or THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

18 8 8. 



The Trustees have the honor to present to the Mayor and 
the City Council their Thirty-sixth Report, embracing the 
details of the condition, and of the administrative results of 
the Library for the year 1887, as well as a statement of the 
present prospect for the new Library edifice on Dartmouth 
street. 

The result of the usual annual examination of the whole 
institution, including the Boylston-street libraries and the 
branches, is subjoined to this report. The committee dele- 
gated for this service were appointed October fifth, and con- 
sisted of Edward Bangs, Esq., William S. Eaton, Esq., 
George W. Evans, Esq., Mrs. Eliza L. Homans, Mrs. 
George S. Hale, Col. Henry Stone, and Robert C. Win- 
throp, Jr., Esq. It organized by the choice of Edward 
Bangs, Esq., as chairman. Col. Stone and Mrs. Homans 
brought to the aid of the committee the valuable experience 
and information gained by their services in previous years. 

So far as is within the knowledge of the Trustees no other 
committee has devoted more time to the inspection of the 
institution in its multifold relations to the large population 
which it serves. Further reference will be made to details 
of their examination. 



2 City Document No. 40. 

The important report of the Librarian, with its valuable 
appendixes and departmental sub-reports which form part 
of this document, will, it is hoped, receive the careful atten- 
tion of the great public for whose benefit the institution was 
created and is administered. 



The Library. 

General Statement. 

The number of books, including those in the duplicate rooms, 
composing the Boylston-street collection, counts 357,440 vol- 
umes, of which 43,320 belong to the Lower Hall Library; 
and 135,516 are distributed among the branches at East 
Boston, South Boston, Roxbury, Charlestown, Brighton, 
Dorchester, South End, Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury, 
and the North End. The aoforegate for the whole insti- 
tution amounts to 492, 956, a net increase over last year of 
13,535 volumes. 

The total issues from all the libraries for the year were 934,- 
593, against 958,629 volumes in 1886. This diminution is 
partly owing to the temporary closing of the active South 
Boston and East Boston branches for repairs of the build- 
ings, and to a falling off in Jamaica Plain and Dorchester, 
while the South and North End branches showed a gratifying 
increase. Since the opening of these various libraries, now 
belonging to the City of Boston, or under its charge, there 
have been distributed to readers since 1853, 19,371,740 
volumes, of which more than one-third were issued from the 
Lower Hall Library in Boylston street. 

The use of the reading-rooms for periodicals shows a 
marked improvement. The 933 magazines and literary 
weeklies found 528,839 readers; a gain of over 22,000 from 
the previous year. Of this aggregate 334,419 numbers were 
delivered from the desk of the hall in the Central Library 
devoted to this purpose. 

The wear and tear of the library books is specially felt in 
the collections dedicated to popular use. In the past year 
4,176 books were condemned, either as imperfect or worn 
out. The books from both halls and from the branches which 
from excessive circulation required rebinding numbered about 
10,000 volumes. The volumes unrecovcred from borrowers 
in all the libraries were only 49. 



Public Library 



The New Public Library Building. 

Since the presentation of the last report of the institu- 
tion the prospective construction of this important edifice 
was entirely changed by a special act of the Legislature 
passed 10th March, 1887, making the Trustees of the 
Public Library responsible for the erection of a suitable 
structure. 

The remarkable growth in use and extent of the Boyl- 
ston-street libraries, since the passage of the act of 1853, 
authorizing the City of Boston to found and maintain a Pub- 
lic Library, afforded some reasonable ground for a judgment 
as to the future requirements of the community both for 
books and for convenience of use. 

The Library collection of 16,221 volumes was opened for 
public service in May, 1854, in rooms provided by the city 
for this purpose in the old Mason street school-house. The 
donations of Joshua Bates, of London, in 1853, of $50,000, 
for the purchase of books of a permanent value, and of an- 
other sum of $50,000, the income of which was to be devoted 
to the same object, and of the Jonathan Phillips Trust Fund 
of $10,000, opened up a future for such a large collection 
of works valuable to scholars and students as to induce the 
city government to erect the Boylston-street edifice, dedi- 
cated for public service on 1st January, 1858, which then 
contained about 70,000 volumes, and nearly 18,000 pam- 
phlets. It is now filled to nearly its utmost capacity with 
357,440 volumes. 

The establishment of the branch system, which comprises, 
as previously stated, 135,516 volumes, free for public circu- 
lation, increased to a very large degree the usefulness of the 
institution. 

For some years previous to 1880 it had become apparent 
that the time was fast approaching when the accommodations 
for the storage of books and for the convenience of the 
public would be entirely unsatisfactory and insufficient in 
the Boylston-street edifice, so that in that year the State of 
Massachusetts made the noble grant to the city " of a parcel 
of land, now owned by the Commonwealth," on the southerly 
corner of Dartmouth and Boylston street. This land being 
deemed insufficient for the size of the structure which it would 
be necessary to erect, the Commonwealth, by an act passed 
April 10, 1880, empowered the City of Boston " to take and 
hold by purchase or otherwise, so much land within its limits 
as it may deem necessary for the erection thereon of a Public 
Library, and a yard for the same." Under this act the city 



4 City Document No. 40. 

acquired the remainder of the land situated to the south, 
bounded by St. James street, and of the same^depth as the 
property granted by the Commonwealth. 

The condition annexed to its grant by the State was that 
a suitable building should be begun in the course of three 
years — which time was extended, in 1883, for a further 
term of the same duration. A beginning was made just 
before the limit of time had expired, the construction of 
the editice having been placed by the city government in the 
hands of Mr. A. H. Vinal, the City Architect. 

The Commonwealth, which had given the larger and more 
valuable portion of the land to the City of Boston, then 
intervened, and placed the whole responsibility of the 
structure upon the Trustees of the Library in the following 
carefully drawn section of Chapter 60 of the Acts of 1887 : 
" The said Board of Trustees shall have full power and con- 
trol of the design, construction, erection and maintenance of 
the Central Public Library Building to be erected in the City 
of Boston, and are hereby fully authorized and impowered to 
select and employ an architect or architects to design said 
building and supervise the construction, and a superintendent 
or superintendents to take charge of and approve the work ; 
but work upon said build inn shall not be commenced until full 
general plans of tin' building hare been prepared, and no 
specific work shall be commenced, until the same shall have 
been duly advertised, proposals for such work shall have been 
received from responsible parties, and contracts shall have been 
entered into with satisfactory guarantees for their perform- 
ance." 

The community Inning an interest in the institution will 
recognize the wisdom and foresight of these provisions, 
although they entailed much additional labor and responsibility 
upon a Board of Trustees who had already on their hands 
quite as responsible public duties as they could reasonably 
be expected to fulfil. But they were naturally supposed to 
know from experience the present necessities of the great 
reference Library. It became necessary to provide for these, 
and then to make some reasonable estimate of the require- 
ments arising from its probable use and growth in the 
unknown future for which provision was also to be made. 

Under the powers committed to them the Trustees ap- 
pointed as architects of the proposed structure the well- 
known firm ofMcKim, Meade, «.<; White, of New York, who 
have since established a branch office in Boston, and who have 
been assiduously at work, with a large force of draughtsmen, 
upon the plans and drawings. It will be seen by the act 
of incorporation that the genentl plans must be finished 



Public Library. 5 

before the building can be begun. On no other conditions 
could the judgment of the Trustees be safely exercised. 
There could be no undue haste permitted in preparing 
complete plans of construction for a monumental building 
designed to meet the conjectural wants of an unknov 
future. The provision for coming time must be based ui 
the experience of the present necessities of the institute 
and of the enlargement of its administration requiaa^to 
insure the same freedom of use that has caused its reimrka- 
ble growth in value and usefulness even in its present con- 
fined limits. 

The present condition of the working plans affords reason- 
able assurance that they will be completed and the estimates 
be prepared by the first of April next, and that work can be 
begun as soon as the initial contracts can be advertised and 
let to responsible bidders ; but no more work will be under- 
taken during the coming season than that for which the means 
of payment have already been provided. 



The Reports or the Examining Committee. 

The first suggestion of the committee, that an annual in- 
crease in the appropriation of $30,000 should be made to meet 
the necessities of the institution, if carried into effect, would 
be most gratifying to the Trustees. The usefulness of 
the library is very much circumscribed by its inability to 
keep up with the regular routine work important to the 
public, especially in the catalogue department. Since the 
limit of city debt was settled by the Legislature there has 
been a continual struggle at the time of the annual appropri- 
ation among departments of the government for their full 
preconceived share of the amounts to which they consider 
themselves entitled. The Library has never asked for as 
much as it needed. Last year the Trustees sent to the com- 
mittee having the general subject in charge a statement that 
$120,000 was absolutely wanted to carry on this great organ- 
ization. It is stated that the sum desired was cut down 
to $110,000, and was only finally raised to $115,000 by the 
persistent efforts of one of our body of Trustees, who was 
a member of the City Government. The Trustees have 
decided that, with the present pressure for appropriations 
on account of the limit of city expenditure, the usual sum 
proposed by them is as large as they are likely to obtain, 
although a considerably larger sum could be profitably 
employed for public convenience. 

The suggestion of the appointment of a sufficiently in- 



<> City Document No. 40. 

formed expert to act as " floor-walker " to meet the public 
it? hardly practicable at the present time. Such an expert 
must be taken from other departments of the institution 
where he has quite as much important work to perform as he 
can possibly accomplish. There are no funds at the command 
of the Trustees from which the services of such a superior 
person can receive proper recompense. At the present time, 
and for years past, application has usually been made to 
the Librarian of Bates Hall for this purpose, or, in his ab- 
sence, to the female assistants in charge of the card catalogue 
located in the centre of the hall, and this has heretofore 
been found sufficient for the public convenience. The num- 
ber of visitors frequenting Bates Hall without knowledge of 
the details as to how a book on a certain subject may be pro- 
cured, is, so far as the Trustees are informed, very small. 

The third suggestion, that the Trustees may be empowered 
to sell the unnecessary duplicates, deserves consideration. 
Many books no longer read, and single volumes of which 
duplicates exist, form part of the history of the literary 
movement and romance of the time when they were issued, 
and these single specimens could be removed to the new 
Library building, where there would be ample shelf room, 
and the literary historian of the generation could examine the 
varied examples of society description and character known 
or imagined by many forgotten writers, whose productions 
either met or were once supposed to fill a temporary want. 

The suggestion that the art room be reserved exclusively 
for women after 2 P.M. seems judicious. If the numbers fre- 
quenting it warrant, there is no good reason why it should 
not be given up to their exclusive use after that hour. 

It would prove a great boon to the institution if, according 
to the fifth recommendation of the committee, the sum of 
$100,000 be obtained as a permanent endowment to enable 
the catalogue department to keep up promptly the new 
accessions of books, as well as to finish the important revision 
of the whole collection of catalogue cards, which should lie 
completed at the earliest practicable date. It now comprises, 
with its titles, authors, subjects, and cross-references, con- 
siderably over one and one quarter million cards. 

The Trustees will endeavor to comply with the suggestion 
of the committee that the reference books in Bates Hall 
be placed on the level of the eye. The difficulty will be to 
arrange them at that height without excluding a portion 
of the already insufficient light upon the main floor of the 
building. 

The practical advice of the sub-committee on the branches, 
that appointments for the Examining Committee be made six 



Public Library. 7 

months before the date at which their report is to be com- 
pleted, requires careful consideration. The present com- 
mittee was purposely allowed more time than any previous 
body who have performed the same duties. Notwithstanding 
that the details of the institution are so large, and, to some ex- 
tent, so intricate, in order to ensure accuracy of work, — the 
principles upon which the various departments are managed, 
the required knowledge of their operations, and the results 
of their industry are easily comprehended. After the general 
system is mastered by the examiner, whether any com- 
mittee would embrace individuals of sufficient leisure to de- 
vote six months to the subject of inquiry is more than 
doubtful. 

The darkness of the halls of the Library is not attributable 
to the Board of Trustees. The building was constructed by a 
commission composed of four citizens-at-large and three mem- 
bers of the city government of the day. Artificial light is 
always required during some portion of the day in both the 
upper and lower halls. 

The sub-committee have fairly taken in some of the diffi- 
culties which surround the catalogue department. The per- 
sons engaged in such work must be thoroughly skilled and 
duly possessed of all the principles of correct and accurate 
labor, and for the most part they have received their educa- 
tion in this library. No one seems to have explained to the 
committee the principles upon which the catalogue work is 
based. It is due to want of sufficient appropriations that for 
years this department has not been able to educate and 
employ skilled workers enough to bring the whole work up 
to its standard accuracy in revision of its earlier labors, and 
in line with the new acquisitions of books. 

The report of Mr. Evans upon the Bowditch Library, and 
its present want of suitable arrangement of cognate treatises, 
does not recognize the fact that the books were catalogued 
and placed in their present confined limits with shelf-num- 
bers, on their arrival, in the only vacant space which could 
be allotted, and without the slightest knowledge under what 
special subjects the future additions to the library in math- 
ematical science were to come. If further and better classi- 
fication is necessary or desirable, it can take place after its 
removal to newer and more roomy quarters. 

The complaint that access to the shelves is not granted to 
accredited persons is new to the Trustees. There has here- 
tofore been no difficulty in obtaining access to the alcoves of 
Bates Hall, where books on specific classes of subjects are 
stored, for any person known or properly vouched to any 
member of the Board or to the Library officials. This is, so 



8 City Document No. 40. 

far as information extends, as much liberty as is ever granted 
in any important library in the world. It must always be 
remembered that the Library is a trust confided to the 
care of the Trustees, and for which they are responsible in 
case of unnecessary loss. A very large number of volumes 
in the Bates Hall Library have been presented to the institu- 
tion on condition that they should not circulate, and there 
are many books which could not be replaced if lost or taken 
without leave. The special libraries given under this limita- 
tion will each be placed in separate rooms in the new build- 
ing. 

No further comment is necessary upon the minority report 
of Mr. Evans relative to the purchase of what technically 
may be called a teacher's library than that it has had a respect- 
ful examination, and that the Trustees are not prepared to 
recommend its adoption. Where purchase-money has been 
expended for prescribed classes of books, as, for instance, in 
the case of the Ticknor and Bowditch collections, special 
provision for increase has been made by funds given for that 
purpose by the donors. As for the rest of the Library, it 
has been constituted to contain the largest number of books 
useful, according to its means of purchase, to the largest 
number of people. 

If such a special library, keeping pace with a possible need 
of better text-books or methods of instruction, or treatises 
on the general subject of preparatory school education, is 
needed for the assistance of teachers in their duties, it is 
clearly within the province of the School Committee to pro- 
vide it. 



In General. 

The annual bounty of J. Ingersoll Bowditch, Esq., of five 
hundred dollars for the increase of the very valuable mathe- 
matical Bowditch Library, has been gratefully acknowledged 
to the donor, and it has been expended upon works which 
were satisfactory to advanced students in that important de- 
partment. 

A further sum of seventeen hundred dollars has been 
received from the executors of the Tread well estate, and the 
balance of the fund will be paid to the Library, when satis- 
factory sale of the remainder of the real property can be 
accomplished. 

With the great growth of the institution, the demand upon 
its resources for the public good proportionally increases. 
Wkbout the assistance of the Trust Funds the Library would 



Public Library. 9 

be deplorably behind the progress of the day in science, art, 
and literature, in the languages of Europe read by our 
scholars, and students in the various departments of human 
cultivation. The records of past usefulness furnish the hope 
and expectation of the future. 

WILLIAM W. GREENOUGH, 
S. A. B. ABBOTT, 
JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE, 
HENRY W. HAYNES. 

Public Library, February 25, 1888. 



MINORITY REPORT. 



The undersigned, one of the Trustees of the Public 
Library, is obliged to differ from the report of the majority 
of the Trustees in regard to the matter of the new building 1 
to be erected on Dartmouth street. 

The expressed intent of the Trustees is to proceed this 
summer to the erection of so much of the new building, 
according to the plans of their architects, as can be built with 
the balance of the present appropriation, although it will 
require at least an equal amount to finish the building, and 
the city will be obliged to furnish this sum or lose what has 
been spent. 

To such action the undersigned feels constrained to object, 
for the following reasons : — 

There is no question that when the sum of $450,000 was 
authorized to be raised by a loan, in 1883, it was intended to 
cover the entire expense of erecting the new building. 
The orders therefor are as follows, and were approved by 
the Mayor, April 14, 1883 : — 

" Ordered, That the City Treasurer be authorized to borrow, under the 
direction of the Committee on Finance, and at such rate of interest 
as they shall determine, the sum of $180,000, said sum to constitute a 
special appropriation for the payments for land taken for library pur- 
poses under chapter 143 of the Acts of 1882. 

" Ordered, That the City Treasurer be authorized to borrow, under the 
direction of the Committee on Finance, and at such rate of interest as 
they shall determine, the sum of $450,000 ; said sum to constitute a 
special appropriation to be expended in the erection of a new library 
building on Dartmouth street, according to plans approved by the Trus- 
tees of the Public Library. 1 ' 



10 City Document No. 40. 

In 1883 the Trustees prepared printed specifications to 
guide the architects who desired to compete by sending in 
plans for the new building. 

Page 3, § 3, reads : "The building and book-stacks com- 
plete, including heating and ventilating apparatus, the lifts 
for books, the gas-fitting and plumbing, shall not exceed in 
cost the sum of $450,000." 

As the time for receiving designs was fixed at August 1, 
1884, the Trustees' Report for 1884 has no comments on the 
matter. 

In the first report of the Trustees for 1885 (dated June 
25), they refer to the fact that on March 31 an order was 
passed for the City Architect to prepare plans for a library 
building, and to submit the same to the Trustees for their 
approval. They add : — 

" Two conditions for the building are then to be met : first, 
the production of a set of plans, with a model to scale, which 
shall be satisfactory to the Board of Trustees ; and, secondly, 
the construction of an edifice which shall cost no more than 
the loan authorized by the vote of the city government." 

In their second report for 1885 (dated January 30, 1880) 
the Trustees write : — 

" Since the publication of the last Annual Report of the 
Trustees, and as soon as the regular engagements of the 
office year of the City Architect were well in hand, serious 
work was begun upon the library plans. Much still remains 
to be done. The preparation of all the building detail with 
a convenience of arrangement of the necessary halls and 
offices, with sufficient size and convenience of access, built 
with absolute safety and light, forms the first condition of 
the consideration of the Trustees; — the second, which is 
equally binding upon them, is the ability of the city to con- 
tract for the structure upon the terms of the loan to which 
the cost of the building has been limited by the City Council. 
It is earnestly hoped that the necessary union of the two 
conditions of structure and cost may find a solution before 
the middle of April." 

In the Mayor's address for 1887 will be found an Appen- 
dix, pp. llti-120, signed by the President in behalf of the 
Trustees, which states the progress of the whole matter from 
its beginning. The closing sentence is as follows : — 

"It is proper to add here that the Trustees have no power 
to originate any work of construction ; their duties are lim- 
ited by the City Council, to the approval of plans, which shall 
not exceed the expenditure of $450,000 for the completion 
of the whole edifice." 

These citations, it must be conceded, prove the fact that, 



Public Library. 11 

up to 1887, the Trustees had no doubt that they were limited 
in their powers to the approval of plans covering the ex- 
penditure of $450,000 for the completed building. 

Late in 1886, however, serious and unfortunate disputes 
occurred between the Trustees and the City Architect in 
regard to the new building. Following this, certain citizens 
of Boston petitioned the Legislature for a new act, and, ac- 
cordingly, there was passed Chapter 60 of the Acts of 1887, 
by which the Trustees were authorized " to select and employ 
an architect, or architects, to design and supervise the con- 
struction." In pursuance of the powers so given, the Trus- 
tees made choice of the firm of McKim, Meade, & White, as 
architects. Although the undersigned was and is of the 
opinion that there are architects in Boston equally well qual- 
ified for the work, there can be no question that the gentle- 
men selected are fully capable of preparing suitable designs 
for the new building. But he has been steadily of the 
opinion that since the Trustees had only $450,000 to spend, 
it was their first duty to obtain from their architects plans 
showing what could be done for that amount of money. In- 
stead of this, the only plans prepared by the architects have 
been such as call for the expenditure of at least $750,000. 

Of course, the architect is limited by the conditions im- 
posed upon him by the Trustees, and the number and size 
of the rooms required of him may be greater than can be 
provided for $450,000 ; but it would seem beyond a question 
that an architect can in consultation so modify the terms im- 
posed, as to be able to show what can be done within the 
limit fixed by the money already appropriated. 

In the report of the Trustees for 1882 (City Doc. No. Ill 
of that year) will be found the plans of George A. Clough, 
then the City Architect, for a building to cost $450,000. 
The " stack" is to contain 1,100,000 volumes, with a chance 
for a future extension of 400,000 volumes more. There 
"were two public reading-rooms, 75 x 36 feet, and a delivery- 
room as large or larger, and apparently ample provision for 
all departments of the Library. The building was to be three 
stories high, covering an area of 28,700 feet, leaving 15,000 
feet for future growth. 

The undersigned confidently relies upon the official opinion 
of such an excellent architect as a warrant for his belief that 
the appropriation already made is sufficient to provide for 
the erection of as fine a building as the city needs or can 
afford. 

Later on, in 1886, the Trustees settled upon the plan of 
having a "stack-building" to contain about one million vol- 
umes, being an edifice about eighty-five feet square, for which 



12 City Document No. 40. 

general plans and estimates were made. The piles required 
to make a solid foundation for the "stack " were accordingly 
driven, at an expense of some $15,000. 

The undersigned is of the opinion that it would be feasible 
still to complete this " stack," and to provide on Dartmouth 
street a front building which would cover the whole of that 
important line, and afford all the accommodation required by 
the public for the next forty years. At the same time a 
large part of the land would remain unoccupied, and, should 
the public requirements necessitate more buildings, they 
could be added on Boylston and St. James streets. 

At all events the undersigned objects to spending the re- 
maining appropriation for any building which shall not be a 
complete and well-proportioned edifice. He objects to any 
building which, being a portion of a larger whole, will force 
the city to proceed with the full plan. 

If, however, the City Council is prepared to grant the 
further sum of $G00,000, which will be needed to build 
according to the Trustees' plans, it is certainly probable that 
the Trustees will be able to come to a unanimous decision 
upon all the details of the expenditure. 

Undoubtedly some money would be realized by the sale of 
the present library building and land, but at least one-half 
of the sum would be needed to build another circulating- 
library in that vicinity, to take the place of the present 
Lower Hall Library, which is by far the largest branch in 
our system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM H. AVHITMOEE, 

A Trustee of (he Boston Public Library. 



Public Library. 13 



REPORT OF THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE. 

The committee were first called together for organization 
late in October. 

Two members of the committee have, fortunately for the 
rest, served before ; but the new members have not had time 
to become familiar with the Library, and they feel much as 
the passengers on an ocean steamship might do, if they were 
called upon to report upon the engine on the second day out. 
They have indeed seen the great and complicated machine 
working with wonderful smoothness and apparent efficiency ; 
but of its details they are ignorant, and they cannot venture 
to do much more than to praise it in general terms. 

It is with diffidence that they offer the following sugges- 
tions : — 

First. That the city government should make a more 
liberal appropriation for the Library. The committee are 
satisfied that $150,000 a year is little enough if the Library 
is to be managed in the best and most satisfactory way. 

Second. The second depends upon the first, for without 
more money it is not to be expected that the Trustees can 
adopt it. It is that there should be an official stationed in 
Bates Hall to receive the public as they come in — inquire 
into their wants, and advise them how to gratify them — to 
do, in short, for the public at the Library what the "floor- 
walker" does for the public at large shops. 

Third. That legislation should at once be asked for to 
enable the Trustees to sell, or at their discretion to give 
away, unnecessary duplicates ; these are now being piled up 
in the storage rooms of the building very much as silver 
dollars are in the vaults of the treasury at Washington. 
They are even harder to get rid of, for there is absolutely 
no power residing in any one to dispose of them, unless they 
are so far worn out that they can be sold for waste paper. 
And this, too, when they would be so acceptable to many 
poor communities, to whom they might be sold at a moder- 
ate price, if not absolutely given away. 

Fourth. That the "Art Room," so called, should be re- 
served for the exclusive use of women after 4 o'clock P.M. 

Fifth. The committee desire here to repeat the sugges- 
tion made in the admirable report of the last Examining 
Committee that a permanent fund of, at least, $100,000 



14 City Document No. 40. 

should be in some way secured, the income of which should 
be exclusively devoted in perpetuity to the Bates Hall Cata- 
logue. 

(See The Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Trustees, 
p. 14.) 

Sixth. That the books of reference in Bates Hall, the 
Reading Room, and the Branches should be removed from 
the lower shelves, where they are not readily accessible, and 
put upon shelves as far as possible upon a level with the eye, 
and that lists of such books should be made and conspicu- 
ously posted. 

The sub-committee on the branches presented, by their 
chairman, Mr. Winthrop, the following 

Report. 

The sub-committee to which was assigned the duty of 
visiting the ten branch libraries has been agreeably impressed 
by their convenient arrangement, neatness, and good order, 
by the intelligence of the persons in charge, and by the 
appropriate selection of books. 

With a single exception, the city has provided ample 
accommodations for these branches, the ventilation of which 
is generally more satisfactory than that of the main Library, 
and the artificial heat less oppressive. On the other hand, 
the gas-light is not all that could be desired, and there would 
be a manifest advantage in lowering such gas-jets as are 
immediately over the tables for readers. It is, moreover, to 
be regretted that a suitable room cannot be procured for the 
South-End Branch, now situated in a basement which cannot 
fail to be damp, and which is liable to be overcrowded. If 
this branch is to continue where it is, some appliance should 
be adopted for checking the direct current of air from the 
windows when it is necessary to leave them open. 

The committee is of opinion that the efficiency of the 
annual examination would be promoted by introducing more 
method into its initial steps, and by allowing more time for 
the preparation of reports. The following suggestions are 
respectfully offered : — 

1. That within one week of the appointment of an exam- 
ining committee, the librarian shall cause to be sent to each 
member thereof a copy of the report for the preceding year, 
together with a notification of the latest date at which a new 
report can be presented. 

2. That within one week of the assignment of the sub- 
committees, the librarian shall cause to be sent to each 
member of the Examining Committee a list of the sub-corn- 



Public Library. 15 

mittees, together with a notification of the latest date at which 
the chairman of a sub-committee can present his or her 
report. 

3. That, after the organization of the Examining Commit- 
tee and its sub-committees, a period of at least six months 
shall be allowed to elapse before any report shall be required 
of them, in order to enable the members of the various com- 
mittees to make as exhaustive an examination of the Library 
and its branches as may be consistent with their other 
engagements. 

For the sub-committee, 

(Signed) R. C. WINTHROP, Jr., 

Chairman. 
Boston, January 18, 1888. 

The sub-committee on Administration, Finance and Cata- 
logue, by their chairman, Mr. Eaton, presented the following 

Report. 

The sub-committee appointed by the Examining Commit- 
tee of the Boston Library, on the departments of Adminis- 
tration, Finance and Catalogue, report as follows : — 

They find the Library in good order, the rooms kept in a 
neat and orderly condition, and the delivery of books prompt, 
and satisfactory to the public so far as they are able to judge. 
They would call attention to the Lower Hall, where both the 
reading-room and the delivery-room require and should 
have better light. The use of the incandescent light would 
be a great benefit by giving a more steady light and by pre- 
venting foul air which comes from the gas. If the incan- 
descent light cannot be had it would be a great improve- 
ment, particularly in the delivery-room, if the walls and ceiling 
could be painted white, instead of the present dull gray color 
which absorbs the light, and if the gas-lights could be placed 
over the desks instead of between them, and some small gas- 
burners with shades and reflectors over the bulletin-boards 
where the new books are posted. 

It is suggested by the attendants that it would be a con- 
venience to women who call for books, if there were two 
more settees in the delivery-room, as women often have 
to stand some time while waiting for a book. 

An examination of the account books shows a very accu- 
rate and careful attention to the charging of the Library 
books to the different funds, and that a clear statement of 
the different funds and their income can be produced at any 
time when called for. 



16 City Document No. 40. 

The committee appreciate that the work of the cataloguer 
in a library like that of Bates Hall is full of perplexing 
duties that require trained and patient skill, and a thorough 
acquaintance with the Library itself; not deep learning, but 
a many-sided capacity for all learning, and a thorough famil- 
iarity with sources of ready information. No great library 
is more fortunate in its cataloguers than ours. 

But a corps whose time is entirely occupied in the work 
of this department are open to the danger of seeing only 
their own view of the catalogue, and not that of the reading 
public ; it is conceivable that a catalogue may be beautifully 
consistent and extremely simple from the cataloguer's stand- 
point, and yet be full of snares for the unskilled reader. 
It would be very desirable for some cataloguer to make a 
study of the troubles of intelligent people who use the cata- 
logue and to surest means for obviating them. Such a 
question must be studied on both sides, and the task is not 
for the Examining Committee, unless some member should be 
found to devote many days of hard work to learning the art 
of the cataloguer before he should apply himself to the 
special study of this question ; but if once undertaken, the 
fruits of the investigation would be for the benefit of all 
libraries. 

A good catalogue for a large library is sure to be expen- 
sive, and it is a valuable principle, established in the expe- 
rience of this Library, that a very prolific source of expense 
is misguided economy. Makeshifts must always be finally 
discarded, and the process of their undoing calls for more 
skill and industry and patience and valuable time — all to be 
paid for with money — than a satisfactory catalogue to start 
with. The Trustees are to be congratulated that they can 
devote money saved from the bindery to the hiring of com- 
petent help for the revision of the catalogue now in progress. 

The effort made to ascertain the full name of some authors is 
frequently objected to as useless expense ; but the cheapest 
way to prevent tin; purchase of duplicates is the complete 
identification of books by the catalogue, and the complete 
identification of books requires that of authors. Names likely 
to be repeated must be carefully given in full ; sometimes a 
name is not enough : there are, for instance, two of the name 
John Lloyd ' represented in our Library, both English clergy- 
men ; their date or place of residence musl distinguish them. 
It is submitted that the trouble taken to place the responsi- 
bility for mistakes in cataloguing is wasted, for incompe- 
tence would be otherwise detected, and it is not a question 

1 There arc fourteen of the same name among the graduates of Jesus College, 
Oxford. 



Public Library. 17 

of inflicting logical penalties, but of securing a perfect cata- 
logue as soon as possible. And further, that minute index- 
ing should be postponed till all the pamphlets have been 
catalogued. 

(Signed) WILLIAM S. EATON, 

Chairman. 

Mr. Evans, who was appointed a sub-committee on the 
Bowditch Library, presented the following 

Report. 

It is to be regretted that students in any advanced subject 
who come to the Library duly accredited cannot be admitted 
to the shelves. The privilege of rummaging among books 
is one that any student can appreciate, especially in a sub- 
ject where the title-page can tell so little of the character of 
the book, as in mathematics. The Harvard Library issues 
cards admitting their holders to the shelves, and it is even 
possible that in the future Bates Hall can extend to students 
a similar favor. When that time does come it will be a 
matter of concern that no systematic arrangement of the 
volumes in the Bowditch collection has been attempted ; and, 
of course, the longer a rearrangement is postponed in a 
growing library, the more difficult and expensive a rearrange- 
ment becomes. It is true that in this Library there can be 
no certainty of finding among the officers a mathematician 
competent to direct an arrangement of the shelves by sub- 
jects, and the occasional advice gratuitously given by outside 
scholars cannot be relied upon for locating accessions from 
day to day. But a strictly chronological arrangement can 
certainly be followed, and it would be of advantage, for in 
almost no other subject does the future depend upon the past 
so absolutely as in mathematics ; its very materials are the 
fruit of its own existence, and a large part of its activity is 
occupied in finding for its methods and results an interpreta- 
tion among the realities that furnished its starting-points and 
original subject-matter. 

There is a card-catalogue of the Bowditch Library, excellent 
when one considers the difficulties under which it was made, 
but certainly needing revision. If it were possible, it would 
be extremely desirable to catalogue extended articles and 
contributions at first hand in mathematical periodicals as if 
they were separate volumes. It is admitted that this is 
rather a special privilege to ask for mathematical books ; but 
many, or rather most, of the works of great modern mathe- 
maticians appear only in periodicals, because the expensive 



18 City Document No. 40. 

printing and small sales make the aid of an established 
foundation like that of the great journals very acceptable. 
But we may claim for this class of books special privileges 
on more general grounds ; for the nature of mathematical 
progress, as indicated above, and the essential order of suc- 
cession which that nature imposes on the achievements of 
mathematicians, make of peculiar importance exact biblio- 
graphical knowledge and easy and complete access to 
contemporary literature. Booth's pair of volumes " On some 
new geometrical methods," are a striking illustration of the 
danger of reduplication which in this science attends imperfect 
knowledge of books. 1 

One of the most important uses of large special collections 
is that for occasional consultation by those who have access 
to other tolerably complete libraries. For this purpose some 
one line or description of books should be especially sought, 
so that in that feature, at least, one would feel reasonably 
certain of finding here complete sets. A collection of publi- 
cations from German universities, including the inaugural 
dissertations of students receiving the doctorate, and the 
programs of professors entering upon the duties of their 
chairs, would be in every way desirable. Comparatively 
inexpensive, these pamphlets are full of the freshest infor- 
mation about the course of modern mathematics, and in the 
case of the programs at least are often invaluable as original 
editions of classical memoirs. Such is Klein's " Vergleich- 
ende Betrachtungen iiber neuere geometrischeForschungen," 
published in 1872 and mapping out the lines of mathematics 
in Germany at the present day. 

(Signed) GEO. W. EVANS, 

Committee. 



The sub-committee on the Lower Hall presented no formal 
report; but their chairman, Colonel Stone, stated that, in the 
opinion of the committee, that part of the Library seems to 
be managed with very great appreciation of the wants of the 
constituency, and with constant and patient attention to every 
demand made upon it. There is, of course, the old, and, 
unfortunately, true story to tell of lack of room and proper 
facility for carrying on its work ; but so far as possible, with 
the limited space and means at command, its work is w r ell 
done, and, generally, that it would be difficult to improve 

1 If Rip Van Winkle, instead of being an idle scapegrace, had been a most original 
and accomplished geometer; and if, instead of sleeping on the mountains for twenty 
years, he had from time to time applied himself in a sheltered cave to mathematical 
pursuits, he might, on rejoining his friends in the valley, have produced such a treatise 
as this. — W. K. Clifford. 



Public Library. 19 

upon what is now being done, and what is proposed, in con- 
nection with the Library. Every one of the officials seems 
to be actuated by the proper spirit and to labor for the gen- 
eral good. 

All the foregoing reports of sub-committees were unani- 
mously adopted, and the committee present them as part of 
their report. 

Mr. Evans, for the sub-committee on the relations between 
the Public Schools and the Public Library, presented a 
report which the committee have not had time to consider 
sufficiently to enable them to pass upon it. It seems to them 
an interesting and suggestive document, and they annex it 
that it may be printed as an appendix to their report. 

EDWARD BANGS. 
HENRY STONE. 
ELLEN S. HALE. 
GEO. W. EVANS. 
WM. S. EATON. 
ELIZA L. HOMANS. 
R. C. WINTHROP, Jr. 



20 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX TO THE REPORT OF THE EXAMIN- 
ING COMMITTEE. 



Report of the Sub-Committee on the Relations be- 
tween the Public Library and the Public Schools. 

It is not to be questioned that a library can help schools 
by lending them books ; but it will be disputed whether the 
school committee or the library should furnish these books. 
The school committee seems to us the less desirable, for the 
following reasons : If they furnished the books, they would 
be selected and distributed impartially, that is, without de- 
pending solely on the teacher's preference ; and the teacher's 
intimate knowledge of the needs of his pupils and of his own 
aptitude makes his preference of great account ; the books, 
especially foreign books, will probably not be bought so 
cheaply ; a change in the books or in the method of furnish- 
ing them cannot be brought about without great delay ; sec- 
tarian objections and others of less account will often arise, 
which would not have to be met in the purchase of books by 
a library, nor in their occasional use by a teacher ; books 
cannot be disposed of to good advantage when the demand 
for them falls off; and the supply for these reasons would 
not depend entirely on the demand, as it should, but enthusi- 
astic teachers would be hindered and repressed by an iron- 
clad uniformity, while slow and indifferent teachers would be 
pushed into a perfunctory discharge of duties that more than 
anything else demand eager interest and thorough-going 
scholarship. 

There are three kinds of loans that may be made by libra- 
ries for helping schools : loans of large numbers of duplicates 
for simultaneous use not lomr continued enough to make 
their purchase necessary; loans of reasonably small sets of 
books for reference use in a class-room while the class is oc- 
cupied with the subject of the books; and loans of assorted 
books in sets, to be left in the custody of the teacher to be 
loaned to the pupils at her discretion, either as collateral 
reading or for the purpose of interesting them in a good class 
of books. 

A well-known experiment with a loan of the first kind was 



Public Library. 21 

made in 1879 in the Wells Grammar School, in Boston, and 
was described by Judge Chamberlain in his report for 1880. 
The matter was abandoned by the Library, and the school 
committee now furnishes the school sets of books for continu- 
ing the work begun as described. There are two kinds of 
sets: one kind, called supplementary reading, serves more 
efficiently the same purpose as the old-fashioned reading 
books ; the other is called circulating supplementary reading, 
and passes from class to class and from school to school, 
while the teachers comply with the requirements of their po- 
sition by having the books read aloud in the class as an exer- 
cise in reading, and making occasional comments on allusions, 
etc. Sometimes, if not always, the teachers refuse to allow 
the pupils to take the books home. In one case the refusal 
was based on the ground that the pupils' homes were such 
that proper care of the books was not to be expected. In 
the minds of very many of the most intelligent teachers there 
is an utter misconception of the method and purpose of Mr. 
Metcalfs experiment, and any course which familiarizes the 
teachers with a totally wrong use of valuable material is 
more than worthless, it is harmful ; because when the right 
use is suggested, it will seem to these practical teachers a 
useless refinement, a purposeless innovation. 

In regard to the second kind of loans, it is frequently 
quoted as part of the history of the Library, that teachers 
were once upon a time allowed special-privilege cards, which 
permitted them three or four books at a time and extended 
the time of use to about a month. Such a grant would be 
of the greatest service to teachers of history and literature in 
the high schools, especially if accompanied with the privilege 
of renewal. But the statistics are said to show that the 
greater part of these cards were used for light reading, and 
not for their proper and only justifiable purpose. The fact 
is not to be denied ; but one must regret that the recall of 
this privilege was the only way of checking its abuse ; and 
that there was not some way by which it could be brought 
before the eyes of teachers such as Boston is not ashamed of. 
Certainly this disastrous experiment was made many years 
ago, and we may have better teachers now ; and when even 
one sincere teacher asks for it, he should have it, if it does 
not threaten the Library's interests. An arrangement could 
readily be made that the school authorities, say the supervis- 
ors, should receive and transmit the application for this 
privilege, and should be notified of its withdrawal because of 
abuse. Such a precaution would frighten idlers away with- 
out deterring those who would be useful to their pupils. 

The third kind of loan merely makes the school a branch 



22 City Document No. 40. 

delivery station, and the teacher a custodian, who is per- 
sonally responsible for the books in her care. This kind of 
loan has not, to the knowledge of the committee, been made 
in this city ; but in another city the librarian has deposited 
in each of five grammar schools a set of books to the value 
of three hundred dollars. Two purposes for such a course 
seem justifiable to us : either to furnish collateral reading in 
connection with school work, or to serve as healthy literary 
food for appetites destined otherwise to be depraved. It 
was discovered that a teacher in one of our grammar schools 
was biding books out of her own salary to supply this latter 
need, and lending them to pupils whose only reading out of 
school was of the most debasing kind. It is worthy of no- 
tice that though nearly all these pupils were from one of the 
poorest and lowest neighborhoods of Boston, the books were 
very well taken care of and the teachers generosity thor- 
oughly appreciated. 

The system of pupil-cards now in use in the Lower Hall 
is a step in the right direction, and its etfect admirable in 
every way. The benefits secured by them might be ex- 
tended to lower classes by the last kind of loans described 
above. It might be supposed that in higher classes the place 
of these cards is filled by the ordinary cards in the hands of 
high-school pupils ; but it was recently decided by the libra- 
rian of one of the branches that for a teacher to fill out the 
application-slips of her pupils with shelf-numbers of books, 
to be read in connection with their class-work in history, 
is a violation of the text-book rule. The prevention of 
mistakes like this, assuming it to be a mistake, lies in a clear 
statement of the justifiable part of the rule ; and it is the 
committee's opinion that the Library should refuse to furnish 
only school text-books published as such and required for 
daily use. It is submitted that if a pupil calls daily for a 
standard work, say of history, and monopolizes its use to 
that extent, such a case is in no wise different from the use 
of standard treatises by other special students ; and that the 
privileges granted to these in this regard should not be re- 
fused to school children of high-school grades. 

The policy of the Trustees is, unfortunately, declared in 
opposition to the first kind of loan described in this report; 
and it is expected that the other recommendations will meet 
with opposition. This report is not, however, intended to 
present plans which the Trustees should formally accept, 
publish, and bind themselves to follow; but only to indicate 
as plainly as possible the directions in which the Library 
may be of further help. All details of work should be left 
open to their discretion, as now ; but it should be an assured 



Public Library. 23 

principle, embodied, if possible, in the organization of your 
Board, that that discretion is to secure liberal and cordial 
relations between the Library and the public schools, as 
coordinate departments of the educational system of our city. 
Your committee feel that popular interest in the Library 
has recently lessened, and that, in the reaction which will 
probably follow the expense of the new building, it will con- 
tinue to lessen ; and any justifiable device which may serve 
to maintain or revive that interest should be carefully 
weighed before final rejection. The Library cannot afford to 
alienate any considerable portion of its constituency. The 
scholarly Bates Hall can live only as consort to the popular 
Lower Hall. It is therefore noted as an element of danger, 
that a plan has recently been proposed and favorably discussed 
among the school-teachers of Boston, for founding and main- 
taining, partly at public expense and partly by private gifts, 
a library for the exclusive use of schools and school-teachers, 
which should furnish all the privileges asked for here, with 
others ; and it is respectfully submitted that the successful 
establishment of such a library would weaken the hold of the 
Public Library upon the rising generation, and possibly lead 
to disaster in the future. 

(Signed) GEO. W. EVANS, 

For the Committee. 



24 City Document No. 40. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees: — 

Herewith I submit my report for the Library year ending 
December 31, 1887, and respectfully refer to the appended 
tables for statistics in detail. 

Increase of the Library. 

For the purchase of books and periodicals the Library had 
at its disposal, from all sources, during the year, $28,945.29, 
of which $9,383.42 was expended for popular reading, 
$4,252.55 for periodicals, and $15,309.32 for works of per- 
manent value. This last sum, inadequate for the purchase of 
the first-class works published during the year, was necessa- 
rily applied, in part, to secure those previously published, 
equally important, and growing scarce under the competition 
of numerous libraries. The character of the growth of the 
Library, therefore, apart from gifts, was determined by the 
judgment of the Trustees as to the relative importance of 
literature, new and old. 

Statistics of the number of books in the English tongue 
published in 1887 show that 4,437 were American, and 
5,680 British. Of the former, original and reprints, about 
one-fourth were fiction, one-eighth juvenile books, and about 
the same Dumber legal ; education and language, 283 ; 
literary history and miscellany. 253; poetry and drama, 225 ; 
biography and memoirs, 201 ; travel and descriptive works, 
187 ; line arts and books depending largely on illustrations 
for sale, 173 : medical science, 171 ; history, 150; sports and 
amusements, 4<S ; humor and satire, 26, and philosophy, 21. 

Of the literature published in America, lew if any works 
of value have l>crn overlooked, and the accessions to the Li- 
brary include many privately printed books not for sale in open 
market, and only to be secured by personal application to 
their respective authors. In law, excepting public and con- 
stitutional, few books have been purchased, and the same is 
true of medicine, the Trustees not deeming it wise to du- 
plicate the collection of the Social Law Library, nor that 
of the Medical Library in Boylston place. 

Through the discretion confided in the London agents of 
the Library, together with the orders sent forward to them, 



Public Library. 25 

the Trustees have secured the most desirable publications of 
the British press, except when the price was beyond the funds 
at their command. Of accessions in French, German, and 
Italian literature I must speak with less confidence. The de- 
mand for such books is, of course, less active than for those in 
the vernacular, but the Library still has the valuable and gra- 
tuitous services of Prof. Thomas Sergeant Perry in bringing 
to the attention of the Trustees such works in French and 
German as come within the range of his wide and varied 
reading. Russian literature, except in translations, is in little 
demand, though there are a few who read it in the original ; 
a larger number of Norwegians, Danes, and Swedes find 
something to their purpose on our shelves. Mr. Griffin, 
the Custodian of the Shelves, under whose scrutiny all ac- 
cessions to the Library pass, has, at my request, given the 
results of his observations, as follows : — 

In the department of American history and literature, which, from its 
immediate interest, receives the greatest attention in the buying of 
books, the most numerous accessions have been in Genealogies and 
Local Histories. A second edition of Durrie's Index of Genealogies, 
and the American Local History Index, in course of publication in the 
Bulletin of the Library, enhance the usefulness of the large collection of 
works of this class now in the Library. The new publications relating 
to Colonial history are promptly procured, and tracts published in the last 
century are added in good proportion, among which several volumes of 
tracts which belonged to Thomas Prince have been secured by purchase. 
The relations between the United States and France, and the steps which 
led up to the French alliance, have been made the subject of research, 
under the auspices of the French government, by Henri Doniol, and two 
quarto volumes, comprising the documents found in the French archives, 
covering the years 1774 to 1778, with the, title " Histoire de la participa- 
tion de la France a retablissement des Etats-Unis d'Amerique," have 
been added to the Library. The historical societies throughout the 
country have never been more active in the development of the history 
of their respective localities, and the Library is thought to have procured 
everything published by them. Many of the States have issued volumes 
of documents from their archives, and the aim has been to obtain them 
all. The failure to secure the four volumes of colonial records of North 
Carolina, published by the State, is regrettable, and it is to be hoped 
that later on some way will be found on the part of the State authorities 
to place a copy here. In the English department, outside of general 
literature, the chief additions have been in the line of county histories. 
The publications of the societies of the following counties are among the 
more important received during the year : Chester, Cumberland, West- 
moreland, Somerset, Sussex, and Yorkshire. A set of the periodical 
" Anglia, 11 devoted to early English, has reinforced this department. In 
the French collection, there are to be noted the publications of the Insti- 
tut de France, entitled "Recueil des historiens des Croisades," five folio 
volumes, and the set of " Ordonnances des rois de France," in 22 folio 
volumes. A series of histories of French regiments, and the " Diction- 
naire topographique de la France, 1 '' may also be mentioned. In other 
sections of the Library the noteworthy additions include the "Annales du 
MnseeGuimet" (10 v.), devoted to the investigation of the history of 
Oriental religions ; 30 volumes of the reports of the Pennsylvania Geologi- 
cal survey ; the " Journal de Micrographie " (10 vols.) ; in the literature 



26 City Document No. 40. 

of the East, Naville 1 s edition of " The Book of the dead " (the Egyptian 
funeral ritual), and the "Corpus inscriptionum Semiticarum." In 
Fine Arts, " Dieulafoy. L'art antique de la Perse " (4 v., folio) ; " Recueil 
d'estampes d'apres les tableaux del a Gal erie de Dresde," three imperial 
folio volumes ; a collection of engravings of paintings in the Munich 
gallery, and a sumptuous work on " La Basilica di San Marco," are most 
important. The Library receives very little in Scandinavian histoxy and 
literature, and Italian works are not promptly received. There is no 
provision for the procurement of works published in what may be called 
Spanish- America. In Mexico many historical works are "published 
which do not find their way into the Library. 

The selection for the Library from the mass of current 
publications is becoming more onerous with their increasing 
number, even with the assistance of students in various de- 
partments of investigation, and, with all the care taken in 
this regard, oversights have doubtless happened. It would 
be well if some plan of systematic examination of newly 
published books by experts in every department of litera- 
ture could be adopted. Some of the Library assistants ex- 
amine, as far as possible, the bibliographical periodicals 
for this purpose, with good results. 

The increase of the Library by gift has been 3,285 vol- 
umes, among the more important of which are thirty-three 
volumes from Mrs. R. Anne Nichols and fifty-eight from Miss 
Caroline Coddington Thayer, supplementing their former 
benefactions. The annual gift of $500 by J. Ingersoll Bow- 
ditch, Esq., has been expended in the purchase of books in 
pure or applied mathematics for the Bow ditch Library. 
From Prof. Paul Haupt, of Johns Hopkins University, has 
been received a copy of a valuable work, not in commerce, 
consisting of contributions from Egyptologists, dedicated to 
Dr. Leemanns, the eminent archaeologist. 

Lack of Room for Books and for Students. 

This is becoming serious in Bates Hall and in several 
of the Branches. The Custodian of the Shelves is embar- 
rassed in locating new acquisitions with due regard to classi- 
fication, and the Library is not unlikely to fall into some 
confusion in this respect before finding more ample quarters 
in the Back Bay. Readers and students, the number of 
whom is rapidly increasing, would have a right to complain 
of the scant accommodations afforded them were it not obvi- 
ous that the Trustees have exhausted the resources of the 
present edifice. 

The Catalogue Department. 

Mr. Whitney, the Chief of the Catalogue Department, has 
made the following report in regard to the Catalogues of 
the Library : — 



Public Library. 27 

During the past year there have been catalogued for the Central 
Library 21,540 volumes and 8,284 pamphlets, and for the Branch 
Libraries 8,705 volumes, making a total of 38,529 volumes and pamph- 
lets, a larger number than during any previous year. In the enumera- 
tion for the Central Library the books recatalogued in the work of the 
Revision of the card catalogue are included. 

In the enumeration for the Branch Libraries are included 4,559 vol- 
umes, purchased by the Fellowes Athenaaum of the Roxbury Athe- 
naeum, work on which is not yet fully completed. 90,441 cards have been 
added to the various card catalogues, besides about 10,000 cards for the 
Roxbury Athenaeum books above mentioned. New catalogues have been 
printed in book form for the Jamaica Plain and West Roxbury branch 
libraries. 

Of the Catalogue of the miscellaneous portion of the Barton collection 
488 pages have been printed, ending with the title Rochechuart. It is in 
page form as far as page 509, and in type to the title Sertorius. There is 
every prospect now that it will be finished dining the coming year. 
The Bulletins of new books have been printed as usual, and the Index of 
United States Congressional documents has been continued. An Index 
has been prepared to the Bates Hall card catalogue. At the Branch 
Libraries measures have been taken to give readers better access to the 
card catalogues ; either the entire collection of cards is placed before 
the public, or the titles are copied back to the printed catalogues. 
More has been accomplished than heretofore in the Revision of the card 
catalogue of the Central Library. This revision consists in bringing 
every title up to a uniform standard. Books requiring such treatment are 
in process of recataloguing and their titles are printed in plain type. The 
recatalogued work embraces: 1. Titles found in the printed volumes 
of catalogues. These are in small print, and in a form too con- 
densed for the present needs of the Library. 2. The titles of books 
added to the Library between 186G and 1872. As it was expected that 
another catalogue would be issued in a printed volume, these manu- 
script titles were not written in a form intended for preservation, but 
only for use as printer's copy or for other temporary purposes. 3. 
When there are several editions of a book, these, if not too numerous, 
are printed on the same card. 4. Duplicates of pamjjhlets in their vari- 
ous editions are united. There are many thousands of these, and it is 
very slow and laborious work to bring them together. A volume con- 
taining fifteen pamphlets will often require the time needed to catalogue 
fifty new books. 5. Often periodicals and volumes of the transactions 
of learned societies need to be recatalogued owing to a change of title, or 
because the cards are soiled by erasures or crowded by entries for new 
volumes. 6. Many volumes in sets are analyzed for the purpose of 
bringing to notice their component papers and articles, as, for example, 
the publications of the various departments of the United States govern- 
ment, the Smithsonian Institution, the Geological surveys, the Colonial 
documents of the State of .New York, the Pennsylvania Geological sur- 
vey, as also such composite works as " Le tour du monde," Petermann's 
" Mittheilungen," Winsor's " Narrative and Critical History of America," 
etc. Several monumental works have recently been analyzed, wholly or 
in part, and their thousands of articles treated as independent works. 
Such are Migne's " Patrologia," the "Monumenta Germaniae historica," 
Muratori's " Rerum Italicarum scriptores," and the " Recueil des histo- 
riens des croisades." These have greatly enriched the catalogue. In 
cataloguing new books discoveries are made in regard to their author- 
ship or other matters which render it necessary to recatalogue the works 
of a particular author already in the Library. 7. Many pamphlets are 
excerpts from the transactions of learned societies, scientific reviews, 
etc. In such cases not only the pamphlet, but the original article, is 
catalogued. Most of the above-nvjntioned work, as being upon volumes 



28 City Document No. 40. 

already in the library, appears in the statistics of the Catalogue Depart- 
ment, found in the Librarian's Quarterly report, as Volumes and pam- 
phlets recatalogued. These greatly exceed the new books in number. 

This department has recently lost its oldest member in point of 
service, Mrs. Roxanna M. Eastman, who died November 11, 1887. 
While many of the catalogues owe much of their usefulness to her 
labors, the Library is especially indebted to her for its Index of United 
States Congressional documents, to which most of her time was devoted 
for several years. 

New Registration. 

When it appeared that the list of those entitled to books for 
home use was incumbered with the names of persons deceased, 
or of those removed from the city, but still using their cards, 
it was decided to call in all cards and open a new registra- 
tion. This was entered upon May 1, 1886, and the result 
will be given. Since the establishment of the Library there 
have been four registrations, and their history, as gathered 
by the registrar, Mr. Rice, is as follows : — 

The Public Library was opened May 2, 1854, in the Adams School- 
house, Mason street. Applicants for Library cards were required to be 
permanent residents of Boston, sixteen years of age or over, and were 
obliged to sign, in a ledger, a promise to obey the rules and regulations. 
In four years' time 17,066 persons applied for cards. This constituted 
the first registration. 

The Mason-street rooms were closed June 30, 1858, and on September 
17, 1858, the Library was opened in the new building on Boylston street. 
A new registration was begun, and during the firsl year 10,154 persons 
entered their names for cards. The second registration numbered 
52,82'.) names at its close. 

in 1867 the third registration was begun. Cardholders were not re- 
quired to sign ; but as fast as the cards came to the desk, new ones 
were given in exchange, and the name of the holder was transferred 
from the registration ledger to a printed form such as is now in use. 
The form of the card was also changed, one card being used in both 
Halls instead of a card in each Hall. Finally the use of the registra- 
tion ledger was discontinued. It cannot be claimed thai this system of 
re-registration resulted in clearing up all discrepancies, or righting all 
abuses, or preventing cards from use by people not entitled to them. 
About the year 1875 the age of applicants for cards was reduced from 
sixteen years to fourteen. The third registration closed April 80, 1886, 
and embraced 227,681 names. 

Between the years 1867 and 1886 the Branch Libraries and Delivery 
Stations were established. Each Branch had it- own registration. The 
Delivery Stations derived their registration from the Branches to which 
they belonged. Two forms were signed, — one for the Branch record 
ami one for the Central Department, to lie tiled with the consolidated 
registration. 

A person reporting the loss of a card was required to wait fifteen 
da\s before it could be replaced. Application for renewal could be 
made al the Central Department, a Branch Library, or at a DelirerySta- 
tion. The number of cards thus reported increased so rapidly, and card- 
holders evidently became so careless with their cards, that a System of 
dating was begun in 1883. When a card was replaced it received a new 
date. In this way any fraudulent use of a reported lost card after a 
new one had been issued, was at once detected and the card detained. 



Public Library. 29 

Various educational institutions in Boston, including the Harvard 
Medical School, New England Conservatory of Music, the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, and a number of others, in the early part 
of the third registration, arranged with the Trustees for the use of the 
Library by non-resident students. Limited cards were granted to such 
applicants, and were signed by the deans or treasurers of the institu- 
tion to which the applicant belonged. Many students availed them- 
selves of this pi"ivilege. 

The fourth registration was begun May 1, 1886, and is now in prog- 
ress. Owners of cards are required to sign a new application, to furnish 
a proper reference, to give correct address, and occupation, if any. 
The re-registration is a positive benefit to the Library. Errors of long 
standing have been rectified, cards in wrong hands have been held, 
non-residents using the Library for years have been compelled to sur- 
render their cards, cards once belonging to deceased people have been 
detained, and many abuses and irregularities have been corrected. 

It was deemed best that lost cards should be replaced from the 
Central Department only. By that method some infringements of the 
fifteen days' rule have been effectually stopped. The registration at 
each Branch is now a part of the whole, not separate, as formerly. 

It appears to the clerk that the re-registration is practically over. 
The new applications now outnumber the re-registrations. It will, how- 
ever, be some time before the re-registrations entirely cease. 

There have been a number of cases where, rather than re-register, card- 
holders have chosen to surrender their cards. Many persons have re- 
registered under protest. A number of new applicants, when a ref- 
erence is asked for, decline to give one, and go away without 
completing the registration. 

Many lost cards have been replaced. It is safe to say that 
two-thirds of the cards reported lost will be, or have been, found and 
used. The clerk always detains a card when its date does not cor- 
respond with the last recorded date on the holder's record. In this 
way many people have been prevented from using two cards. 

The following is the total registration from May 1, 1886, to December 
31, 1887: — 

Central Department 18,730 

South Boston Branch 3,643 

South End Branch 2,995 

Roxbury Branch 2,957 

Dorchester Branch ......... 2,636 

East Boston Branch 2,424 

Charlestown Branch ......... 2,253 

Jamaica Plain Branch ........ 1,800 

Brighton Branch ......... 688 

Total 38,126 

Lost cards replaced since May 1, 1886 5,100 

Circulation and Use of Books. 

When the Trustees, some years since, decided to purchase 
less of fiction, even that of an unobjectionable character, and 
to remove from circulation the books of some authors whose 
works, in large numbers, had served to swell it, they doubt- 
less were aware that the falling off in circulation would at- 
tract attention, and possibly give rise to an opinion, in some 



30 City Document No. 40. 

quarters, that the public were losing interest in the Library ; 
and the statistics, unexplained, would give color to such an 
opinion. 

The largest circulation ever attained was 1,183,991, in 
1877, and for the year 1887 it was 934,593 volumes, or a de- 
crease in ten years of 249,398. 

It would be a mistake to attribute this lessened circulation 
entirely to the diminution of popular literature in the Library, 
unless it should appear that a similar policy has been adopted, 
and with like results, pretty generally throughout the country, 
for a decline of circulation generally is noticeable. Nor, on 
the other hand, would it be safe to conclude that boys and girls 
are reading altogether better books, and, therefore, fewer than 
formerly. Without doubt the causes are many. There are 
times when the passion for literature, like that for roller- 
skating or tobogganing, rages ; and there are times when it 
grows cold. 

This is a subject of earnest discussion at the monthly meet- 
ings of the Lower Hall and Branch librarians, which, I am 
happy to say, continue with unabated interest; and various 
plans are suggested for promoting easy access to their several 
collections, and for awakening a desire for good literature. 

From the Appendix X it appears that, with the exception 
of the Lower Hall, the South End branch, and the North End 
Reading-room, the circulation in all departments of the Library 
for 1887 was less than the previous year ; and yet the indica- 
tions for the coming year, as gathered from the home use of 
books, between Jan. 1, 1888, and the writing of this report, 
are most favorable, — the circulation of Bates Hall exceeding 
that of January and February in any year since it was opened. 

Lower Hall and Branches. 

At the close of the year the Librarians of the Lower Hall 
and Branch Libraries made detailed reports of the condition 
of the libraries under their charge, brief extracts of which 
are as follows : — 

The circulation of the Lower Hall for 1887 was slightly in 
excess of that for 1886, and those sections of the city sup- 
plied by Branch Libraries or Delivery Stations — especially 
Roslindale and Mt. Bowdoin — have availed themselves in an 
unusual degree of the facilities of communication by express. 
The following classification shows the character of the books 
circulated from the Lower Hall and Branches, and some 
improvement from the preceding year in the character of the 
reading : — 



Public Library. 



31 



Percentages of the Lower Hall and Branch reading. 



1886. 



1887. 



I. 
II. 

ni. 

IV. 

v. 

VI. 
VII. 



Fiction and juveniles 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, theology, law, 
medicine, professions 

Periodicals 

Foreign languages 

Miscellaneous 



70.81 


70.04 


5.22 


6.84 


6.84 


4.97 


4.75 


4.37 


7.31 


8.15 


.65 


.63 


4.42 


5.00 



It is noticeable that the immediate patrons of the Lower 
Hall more frequently than those of the Branches make known 
their wishes for new books by personal application instead of 
by recommendation slips. This habit is attended by one ad- 
vantage, that it brings them into personal relations with the 
Librarian, the Custodian of the card catalogue, and other at- 
tendants, by which opportunities are afforded for direction 
in reading. It is also noticeable that the pupils in the pub- 
lic schools are somewhat persistent in their demands for a 
class of literature chiefly to be found only in Bates Hall. 
These demands have been complied with in part by the Trus- 
tees, and they have also added some well-selected volumes in 
the Swedish and Norwegian literatures which seem to be ap- 
preciated by readers of those nationalities. 

The Curator of the Lower Hall card catalogue reports 
14,655 readers assisted; a consolidated bulletin, prepared 
to date and accessible to readers; a special card catalogue, 
containing an index of the twenty-six numbers of the " One 
Hundred Choice Selections," and designed to include other 
collections; 3,218 new cards added to the catalogue; 1,941 
cards revised and copied ; 479 books recatalogued. 



South Boston Branch. 

This Branch was closed thirty-six working days for re- 
pairs, and this, with other causes, materially diminished its 
circulation. The falling off was in the first half of the year, 
and during the second half there was a gain in circulation 
over the corresponding half of the previous year, and the use 
of the reading-room shows a gain of nearly one thousand 
readers* A list of books specially adapted for boys and 



32 City Document No. 40. 

girls, prepared by the Librarian, is much used ; but though 
the card catalogue is now made accessible to the public, the 
want of a new printed catalogue is much felt. A supple- 
mentary card catalogue of authors, now in course of prep- 
aration, will be found useful. 

East Boston Branch. 

The circulation at this Branch for the year is the least for any 
year since its organization ; nor is this to be entirely accounted 
for by the fact that it was closed for four working days for 
repairs of the building, nor, perhaps, by the withdrawal 
from circulation of a large number of popular books during 
the suspension of the bindery. It is doubtless true here, as 
seems to be the case throughout the country, that there are 
bad years for reading as well as good years. In this Branch, 
as in some other Branches, while there was a loss in the first 
half of the year, there was a great gain in the second half; 
and there was a noticeable increase in the use of periodicals 
and books of reference. 



Roxbury Branch. 

In this Branch library the use of the reading-room was 
largely increased. There has also been a greater use of 
reference-books by adults and the children of the public 
schools. Statistics of such uses are more readily gathered 
in this Branch than in any other ; but as they are regarded 
as of considerable interest and importance, the Branch 
librarians, at their last monthly meeting, decided to note 
them hereafter, if found to be practicable. For almost the 
first time in the history of this Branch, books have been 
stolen from the reading-room ; but of the four taken away, 
two have been recovered. What is said in regard to the 
loss and gain in the circulation at the East Boston and South 
Boston Branch Libraries is also true in respect to this Branch. 
The revision of the catalogue of the books purchased by 
the Fellowes Athenoeum from the Roxbury Athenaeum has 
been continued through the year, and is now so nearly com- 
pleted that in a few months all the books will be ready for use. 
Several hundred of these volumes are now in circulation. The 
last catalogue of the Branch bears date 1870, and only a 
few dozen copies remain for sale. Early in the year the 
card catalogue, previously restricted in use to persons em- 
ployed in the Library, was opened to the public. This plan 
has been adopted in all the Branches, and, though attended 



Public Library 33 

with some difficulties, seems to be appreciated, and a con- 
siderable number of volumes have acquired a more extended 
circulation. 

Charlestown Branch. 

The facts in regard to circulation and use of the Library 
and of the card catalogue at this branch are substantially the 
same as reported of the above-named four Branches. Special 
attention has been given to the wants of school-children, and 
these efforts seem to be successful. Some additions have 
been made of books adapted to the use of that class of readers, 
but it is a matter for regret that the income of the Harris 
fund cannot be applied, in part, to that purpose. 

Brighton Branch. 

The addition of a large number of popular books on Eng- 
lish and American history to this Branch has met a demand 
of the school-children, and the percentages of reading show 
a tendency to a higher grade than formerly. The location 
of this Branch is remote from the populous neighborhood of 
Allston, and the time is not far distant — perhaps has now 
come — when a Delivery Station ought to be opened at that 
point. 

Dorchester Branch. 

This Branch shows the same amount of work done as in 
former years, especially in supplying Delivery Stations, though 
there is some falling off in the demand at Neponset. The 
class of reading has always been high, and during the last 
year, though fiction held the first place, scientific works 
come next, and history third. The plan of keeping within 
the reach of the public a dozen or more of attractive books 
of travel and history has been found both practicable and 
useful in bringing into circulation many volumes which would 
not otherwise have been called for. The reading-room ac- 
commodations are limited ; nevertheless the magazines have 
been used in 15,099 instances during the year. 

South End Branch. 

Mrs. Grace A. DeBorges, the accomplished librarian of this 
Branch, died in June, after a long illness, and was succeeded by 
her first assistant. Contrary to the general experience else- 
where, the circulation of this Branch has increased during the 



34 City Document No. 40. 

past year, and a demand for a higher class of books than was 
formerly called for is reported. Proximity to the schools gives 
a large circulation among young people, and special care has 
been taken to interest them in good reading, and to give them 
a supply of it. A new card catalogue, supplemental to 
the printed one, has been prepared and opened to the public. 
There has been a large increase in the hall use of books and 
of periodicals. This, doubtless, would be still larger were 
there accommodations for readers. 



Jamaica Plain. 

A card catalogue, in continuation of the recently published 
printed catalogue, has been made accessible to the public, 
and lists of new books have been posted on the bulletin 
board. Books classified as " Science and Professions " have 
increased in circulation by one per cent. The circulation 
has been without the loss of a single volume during the Year. 



North End Delivery Station. 

There has been a marked increase in the use of books in 
the reading-room, the daily average for the year being 122, 
while that of the previous year was 114 ; and the largest use 
for any one day was (514, against 401 for the previous year. 
This department is in a densely populated section of the city, 
and is patronized by children under fourteen years of age, 
of all nationalities, many of whom are chiefly dependent on 
official assistance for advice in the selection of their reading. 
This help is cheerfully given, and especially to the boys 
and girls who wish to read history in connection with 
their school studies. There is some dissatisfaction because 
the books belonging to the" station are not allowed to circu- 
late, and this is doubtless increased by the fact that appli- 
cations to the Central Library are so frequently unsuccessful. 



The Bindery. 
Mr. Gray, the Inspector of Binding, reports as follows : — 

On August 31 the employees of die Bindery were discharged. A 
reduced force, consisting of former employees, was engaged from Sep- 
tember l to November 1 to finish the work awaiting- completion at the 
time of this change. The services of a finisher only were required 
during the last twenty working days of this period. November 11 the 
Bindery was reopened with two men, two women, and the apprentice, 
all of whom were former employees in the Bindery. No binding was done 



Public Library. 35 

until December, the force being- engaged on miscellaneous work, and in 
advancing a number of volumes through various stages of rebinding 
without finishing them. As no binding of " Lower Hall style, 1 ' that is, 
half-sheep, without lettering or ornamentation, was taken up anew, and 
as it was decided to have Bates Hall periodicals bound at outside 
binderies, there was an accumulation at the end of the year of 810 Bates 
Hall books and 1,479 Lower Hall and branch books. 

MELLEN CHAMBERLAIN, 

Librarian, 

January 1, 



APPENDIXES 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



1887. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by Years). 

II. Yearly Increase by Purchase and Donation. 

III. Volumes in the Special Collections of Bates Hall. 

IV. Volumes Located in the Lower Hall. 
V. Increase of the Several Departments. 

VI. Increase from Newly Published Books. 

VII. Bates Hall Classifications. 

VIII. Lower Hall Classifications. 

IX. Givers and Amount of Gifts. 

X. Circulation. 

XL REGISTRATION OF APPLICANTS. 

XII. Books Recommended. Use of Patent Library. 

XIII. Bates Hall Reading. 

XIV. Lower Hall and Branch Reading. 

XV. Fellowes Athen.ei m, and Brighton Reading. 

XVI. Periodical Reading— rooms. 

XVII. Losses and Delinquencies. 

XVIII. Financial Statement. 

XIX. Library Funds. 

XX. Library Service. 

XXI. Report of Examination of the Shelves. 

XXII. Work in the Library Bindery. 

XXIII. List of Examining Committees for Thirty-sin Years. 

XXIV. List of Trustees fob Thirty-six Yeabs. 



Public Ltbrary. 



39 



APPENDIX I. 



EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 







a 


a g 






a 


•3 - 




Years. 


u 

P ri 

$ a 


2 -< 

S a 




Years. 


Si 

IS 

"3 a 

O -3 


2 M 
w o 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


961 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


89,746 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


3,950 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


100,383 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


6,507 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


112,153 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


12,386 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


134,628 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


16,053 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


150,921 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


17,938 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


181,653 


7 


1858-59 


78,043 


19,255 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


196,958 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


20,707 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


212^414 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


27,381 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


227,010 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


28,874 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


236,534 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


31,043 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


250,495 


12 


1863-64 


116,934 


31,837 


30 


1881-82 


404,221 


261,056 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


32,553 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


275,425 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


36,566 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


292,793 


15 


1866-67 


136,0S0 


44,443 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


308,242 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


47,254 


34 


1885 


460,993 


319,778 


17 


1S68-69 


152,796 


61,177 


35 


1886 


479,421 


335,017 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


74,770 


36 


1887 


492,956 


343,931 



Note. — The aggregate of pamphlets " added from the beginning" includes many since 
bound, singly or in groups (which are now counted among volumes), and a very large num- 
ber of duplicates which are thrown out and put among the pamphlets held for exchange. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES, Dec. 31, 18 



fBates Hall 

g b I Newspaper room .... 
a — , I Duplicate room 

(.Lower Hall 

Total, Central Library 

C a ( Fellowes Athenaeum . . 

fi | ( City part 

ttiffl 

Total, Rosbury Branch 



294,010 
4,155 
15,955 
43,320 



357,440 

14,678 
15,276 



•2<.i.<X,i 



East Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South-End 

Jamaica Plain 

West Koxbury delivery . 
North-End 



12,325 

12,530 
26,871 
13,832 

14,337 
10,199 
10,800 
3,277 
1,391 



40 



City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX II. 



YEARLY INCREASE OF THE WHOLE LIBRARY BY PURCHASE AND BY 

GIFT. 

NOTICE. — The increase of volumes is not the sum of those added by gift and purchase, etc., because 
lost and condemned books are deducted. 



1852-81 

1881-82 , 

1882-83 , 

1883-84 , 

1884-85 

1885 (eight months) 

1886 

1887 



Increase. 



Vols. Pamph 



395,177 
13,239 
17,895 
16,478 
15,353 
7,046 
18,428 
18,535 



251,538 

10,561 
14,369 
17,368 
15,449 
11,536 
15,239 
8,914 



Gifts. 



Purchases, in- 
cluding those 
charged to funds 
and added by 
exchange. 



Vols. Pamph. 



14:5,745 
5,291 
5,340 
3,815 
2,975 

4,105 
3,285 



17S,S!-,6 

8,773 
11,844 
16,203 
10,831 
10,690 
12,500 

s,47:; 



Vols. Pamph. 1 



250,474 
15,986 
16,222 
18,392 
17,005 
6,749 
15,512 
15,627 



67,974 
2,068 
2,525 
1,165 
4,618 

663 
2,740 

441 



is 

if 



Vols. 



7,143 
745 

531 
457 
231 
4,789 
349 



-z 



12,583 
520 
575 
778 
899 
663 
'.122 
980 



1 Includes pamphlets added both by purchase and exchange, as taken from the Accession 
catalogue. 

- included in previous columns. The volumes are not the property of the Public Library 
but form a part of the Roxbury branch, by agreement. 

Details for the years 1852-81 can be fouud in Appendix II. to the report for 1881. 



APPENDIX III. 

VOLUMES IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





ft 
* 





/ 
/ 


OB 
X 


X 


X 




96 


X . 

* V 


s 
* 

X 


X 
SB 


Patent library . . 


2,823 


2,897 


3,003 


3,066 


3,142 






::,47^ 


3,513 


3,641 


3,796 


Bowditcb library ' 


2,932 


3,043 


3,060 


3,152 


3,224 




3,701 


3,S54 




1,510 


4,706 


Parker library ' . 


12,296 


12,309 


12.:. 22 


12,331 


12,363 


13,952 


13,971 


1 1,024 


1 i,057 


14,069 


ll.oTT 


Prince library . . 


2,029 


2,037 


2,159 


2,230 


2,274 


2,327 


2,397 


2,510 


2.. '.si 


2,706 


2,775 


Ticknor library . 


."..171 


6 354 


5,482 


5,454 


5,463 


5,507 


5,544 


5,724 


5,731 


5,764 


."..700 


Barton library . . 


13,950 


14,210 


14,301 


14,360 


13,487 


13,610 


13,010 


13,642 


13,652 


13,800 


13,841 










202 


240 
893 


292 

920 


357 

1,085 


378 

1,12: 


382 
1,175 


392 

1,217 


403 


Thayer library . . 








1,280 



1 See Appendix VII. 



Public Library. 



41 



a* 



(J 
< 

S3 



1> 

Q 5 
ft a 

P 

O 
> 



O i-l lH JO 



8 * 



2 2 3 



« <1 



w m o 



42 



City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX V. 

INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





1883 


1884 


1885 


1885 
(8mos.) 


1886 


1887 






11,729 
25 


11,216 
52 


10,230 
15 


4,877 
6 


9,733 
12 


8,623 
22 


* 

CD 


J Condemned and transferred . . . 


* 


11,704 


11,162 


10,215 


4,871 


9,721 


8,601 





~ fGain in books 

^ I Condemned and transferred 

b ] 

| 

k} (. Net gain 



2,378 
1,400 



2,716 
1,361 



2,099 
1,074 



737 
370 



1,355 1,025 367 866 1,543 



1,728 

862 



2,523 





98 


55 


258 


11 


158 


70 






g«3 











98 


55 


258 


11 


158 


70 







<U 1 

c . Lees loss by exchanges, etc. . . . 
&! 1 


1,764 
783 


1,340 
528 


420 
211 


651 
274 


1,026 
1,095 


892 
349 


983 


812 


209 


377 


59 


443 



















s fGain in books . . . . 

oc < I 

S i ondemned and lost 
< Ni-t gain 



. 604 


669 


585 


233 


567 


379 


3S3 


288 


148 


331 


225 


286 


297 


85 


236 



459 
301 

158 



f Gain in books 



S J Condemned and lost 



Bq < { Net u-aill 



766 


1,105 


935 


520 


1,052 


304 


659 


537 


408 


749 


462 


446 


398 


112 


303 



951 

»41 



Gain in city part . . 
1 'ondemned and lost 



■[ Net gain 

Fellowes &.then»nm. (Net gain.) 

Total gain 



1. 


976 


908 


495 


820 


;:>7 
833 


4-Js 


540 


373 




548 


368 


122 


362 


522 


531 


417 


209 


4,748 


855 


1,079 


815 


331 


5,110 



262 
858 



Public Library. 



43 



APPENDIX V. — Concluded. 





1883 


1884 


1885 


1885 
(Smos.) 


1886 


1887 


3 -• 
Ig 1 


1,326 
561 

765 


1,999 
1,931 


1,285 
513 


549 

206 


1,352 
672 

680 


1,223 
780 


cS 


*loss 192 


772 


343 


443 







8 J 


140 

97 


262 
98 


142 
60 


88 
24 


251 
65 


262 
116 


5* 1 . 


51 


164 


82 


64 


186 


146 







2 5 ! Condemned and lost .... 

o e ) 


767 
189 


961 

402 


1,120 
664 


475 
199 


908 
318 

590 


988 
442 


578 


559 


456 


276 


546 







S 


569 
195 


559 
119 


569 
124 


268 
101 


626 
271 


564 
147 


I 5 


374 


440 


445 


167 


355 


417 


s 





S s- 


515 

2S8 


3S6 

291 


400 
441 


252 
232 


393 
419 


362 

158 


227 


95 


loss 41 


20 


loss 26 


204 







f Bates Hall gain 

Lower Hall gain 

Newspaper-room gain . . . 
Duplicate-room gain . . . 
East Boston branch gain . 
South Boston branch gain . 
Roxbury branch gain . . . 
Fellowes Athenaeum gain . 
Charlestown branch gain . 
Brighton branch gain . . . 
Dorchester branch gain . . 
Jamaica Plain branch gain 
South-End branch gain . . 
West Roxbury branch gain 
North-End branch gain . . 



, Total gain 



.,704 
978 

9S 
983 
225 
462 
333 
522 
765 

51 
578 
374 
227 

74 
521 



17,895 



11,162 

1,355 

55 

812 

286 

446 

548 

531 

*loss 192 

164 

559 

440 

95 

74 

143 



10,215 


4,871 


9,721 


1,025 


367 


886 


258 


11 


158 


209 


377 


loss 59 


297 


85 


236 


398 


112 


303 


368 


122 


362 


447 


209 


4,748 


772 


343 


680 


82 


64 


186 


456 


276 


590 


445 


167 


355 


loss 41 


20 


loss 26 


11 


10 


13 


411 


12 


295 


15,353 


7,046 


18,428 



8,601 

1,543 

70 

443 

158 

310 

262 

358 

443 

146 

546 

417 

204 

25 

9 



13,535 



* This excessive loss at Charlestown is required to correct a mistake of some years' 
standing in the aggregate number of volumes. 



44 



City Document No. 40. 



M 

Q 

fin 
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= 


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5 




















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o 


c 






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APPENDIX VII. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 

(Representing books located only.) 



Cyclopaedias, etc 

Bibliography and literary history 

General history, biography, travel, and geography 

American history, geography, biography, travel, and polite literature 

English history, etc 

French history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

German history, etc 

Greek, Latin, and philology 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geography, biography, travel, and literature 

Periodicals and transactions 

Theology, ecclesiastical history, etc . 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Political economy 

Medical science 

Natural history and science 

Mathematics and physical science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Bound volumes of miscellaneous pamphlets 

Bound volumes of manuscripts 



General Library. 



Books for the blind . 



1.-J77 

1 ,234 



Total in 
general 
library 
Jan. 1, 



1,793 

7,707 

8,820 

36,101 

28,890 

15,781 

8,737 

10,249 

6,373 

1,573 

8,309 

21,416 

22,179 

9,983 

5,158 

3,364 

13,726 

9,187 



Special Libraries. 






1,420 
1,181 



3,492 
1,360 



i writers, and what of American literature i 



Explanation. — Class III. includes general history, etc., when embracing several countries, 
and collected works of historians. 

Olaefl IV. includes the collected works of Ameri 
sometimes termed polygraph}-. 

( 'last's V., VI., VII., and VIII. have the same scope for the respective countries that Class IV. 
has lor America, class VIII. includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the 
Scandinavian nations. 

Class XIV. includes political science and ethics, applied and unapplied, education, phrenology, 



Class XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 

Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for purposes of enumera- 
tion or learning percentage of use, it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the sub- 
divisions; as also upon such points as biography, travel, and voyages, etc., by summing the results 
of the ranges devoted to them in the several alcoves. 

Note. — The dates given in the special libraries column show the year when they wire acquired 
by the library. 



* Includes all hooks in room G, — 12,108 of them belonging to the Barton library, as originally shelved there. 



44 



Public Library. 



45 



APPENDIX YIII. 

LOWER HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 



CLASSES. 



Theology, moral and intellectual sci- 
ence, etc 

Jurisprudence and political science . 

Medicine, mathematics, physics or 
natural science 

Useful and fine arts, military and naval 
science 

American history and politics . . . . 

Foreign history and politics 

Poetry, drama, oratory, rhetoric . . . 



English prose fiction, including juve- 
nile fiction and other juvenile books 

Biography 

Travels 

Libraries, collections, periodicals, etc.* 

German books 

Italian books 

French books 

Spanish books 

Books of reference 



Extent of L. H. collection 



1886. 




1887. 




To be de- 
ducted. 












/ 




,.? 


CO 

d 

CD 

A 

H 
o 
EH 


o • 
0-3 
o CD 

. -a 


0) 

'-■ o 

— ■a 
a a 
A 


-d o 

CD o 

is 

a aa 

,0 


■a 

o> 

T3 
T3 
CS 

"ca 
o 

Eh 


■ o 

CO * 
oS 

-" rt 
T3 O 
OS 

|a 


T3 

0. 

a 

n 
o 
O 


6 
o 

A 

W 
A 

.9 

3§ 

Eh 


2,105 


36 


3 


1 


40 




1 


2,144 


474 


16 


3 




19 




1 


492 


2,944 


87 


12 


9 


108 




9 


3,043 


1,122 


24 


5 


1 


30 


. . 


4 


1,148 


1,368 


34 


13 


7 


54 


2 


16 


1,404 


1,718 


24 




1 


25 




4 


1,739 


3,546 


108 


2 


6 


116 


3 


8 


3,651 


15,064 


401 


347 


738 


1,486 




827 


15,723 


3,165 


100 


17 


7 


124 


2 


11 


3,276 


2,728 


54 


24 


8 


86 




14 


2,800 


4,088 


236 


40 


12 


288 




41 


4,335 


1,637 


101 


9 


5 


115 




22 


1,730 


155 
1,238 














155 


11 




8 


19 




14 


1,243 


5 
420 


2 
11 






2 
11 






7 




1 


430 








41,777 


1,245 


475 


803 


2,523 


7 


973 


43,320 



Reported last year 41,777 

Gain in 1887 1,543 



*This class, embracing sets like Bonn's " Libraries," etc., includes many books, of 
course, which, in a minute classification, would have been divided among all the previous 
heads of this table. 

Note. — The column of " Condemned books replaced " includes books condemned in 
previous years as well as in the current year. The column " Total added " shows the num- 
ber of volumes as put upon the shelves, counting as one those bound two volumes in one, etc. 



46 



City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX IX. 



GIFTS JANUARY 1, 1887, TO DECEMBER 31, 1887. 



Givers (excluding anonymous) 

Volumes 

Pamphlets .... 



980 
3,285 
8,473 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Abbott, James C, Lowell ...... 


1 








3 


34 


Actors' Fund of America, New York City 






1 


Adams, Charles K., Ithaca, N. Y. 






1 


Adams, George C. , Brooklyn, N. Y. 






1 








1 


Albany Law School, Albany, N. Y. 






2 


Albany Medical College, Albany, N. Y. 






1 


Allen, Willard S., .... 52 newspapers 






Alumni Association of the Philadelphia College of Phar- 






macy, Philadelphia, Pa. ...... 




1 


American Academy of Arts and Sciences 


3 


5 


American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, a lot of broad- 










1 


American Association for the Advancement of Science, 








1 




American 15ar Association ...... 


1 




American Bible Society, Xew York City .... 




1 


American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 




2 


American Chemical Society, New York City 


1 




American Colonization Society, Washington, D.C. . 




6 






1 


American Geographical Society, New York City 




28 


American Home Missionary Society .... 




2 


American Institute of Homoeopathy, Pittsburg, Pa. . 


16 




American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City, 


1 




American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa., 


3 


16 


American Pharmaceutical Association .... 




1 


American Philological Association ..... 




1 


American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 






American Society of Civil Engineers .... 






American Surgical Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 










3 








Amherst College, Amherst ...... 




2 


Anderson, Joseph, Waterbury, Conn. .... 






Andover Theological Seminary, Andover 




3 










107 


284 






20 


Apprentices' Library, New York City .... 




6 


Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia. 1 


°a. . 




1 



Public Library. 



47 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



de 1 



Argentine Republic, Ofieina Meteorologica, Buenos Ayres, 

Arkansas. Geological Survey 

Arnold. Howard P. 

Associated Charities 

Association Geodesique Internationale. Commission 

Norvege, Christiania, Norway 
Association of American Physicians 
Astor Library, New York City 

Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad Company 
Atkins & Huffman, Lincoln, Neb. 
Atwood & Forbes, Paris, Me. .... 

Auburn Theological Seminary, Auburn, N.Y. 
Axon, William E. A., Manchester, England 
Ayer, J. C, &Co., Lowell .... 

Badenfeld, Charles ...... 

Bailey, F. H., Northville, Mich. 

Balfour, David M 

Ball, Rev. T. H., Crown Point, Ind. 

Ballou, Maturin M 

Bangor. Me., Public Library .... 

Barnard, James M. ..... . 

Battell, Robins, and Miss Anna, Norfolk, Conn. 
Battle, Kemp P., Chapel Hill, N.C . 
Baxter, Rev. Michael, New York City 
Beebe Town Library, Wakefield 
Bell, Clark, New York City .... 

Bell, George, & Sons, London, England . 

Bellows. John, Gloucester, England . 

Bender. "ro*per, M D. 

Bennett. Edmund H. . 

Benton, Josiah H., jr. 

Berkshire Baptist Association 

Berry, Ira, Portland, Me. . 

Berry, Stephen, Portland, Me 

Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Florence, Italy 

Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale Vittoria Emanuele, Rome 

Italy . . 
Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton 
Biker, Julio Firmino Judice, Lisbon, Portugal . 
Birmingham, England, Free Libraries Committee 
Bishop, Seth S., M.D., Chicago, III. 
Blaisdell, Frank C. . 
Bloss, James 0., New York City 

Bobrick. G. A 

Bolles, William P., 31. D., . 
Bolton, Henry Carrington, New York 
Borland, J. N., New London, Conn 
Boston, City of . 

Board of Directors of Public I 

: Board of Health 

City Auditor . 

City Hospital . 

City Registrar . 

Inspector of Milk, Butter 

Lunatic Hospital 

Overseers of the Poor 

Park Commissioners 

Water Board . 

Boston and Providence Railroad Corporation 
Boston Children's Friend Society 



and 



City 



3 newspapers 



nstitutions 



Vinegar 



in 



250 



59 
37 



2 

219 
96 



48 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 



Vols. Pphs. 



Boston College Stylus Association 
Boston Gas-Light Co. 
Boston Latin School Association 
Boston Lying-in Hospital . 
Boston Medical Library Association . 
Boston Museum ..... 
Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society 
Boston Provident Association . 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers 
Boston Society of Natural History 
Bostonian Society .... 
Bourinot, John George, Montreal, Canada 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D. . 
Bowditch, Henry P.. M.D. 
Bowditch, Vincent Y., M.D. 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. 
Bowen, Clarence W., New York City 
Bowman, Selwyn Z., Somerville 

Bradford, Charles F 

Bradlee, Rev. Caleb D.. 1 Bunker Hill medt 

broadsides, photographs, and newspapers 
Brattleborough, Vt., Public Library . 
Brayley, George ..... 

Breck, Edward ...... 

Brewer, Miss Adele, Stockbridge, . a lot of 

Briggs, N. A., Shaker Village, X.ll. 

Brinton, Daniel G., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bron«on, 15. F., D.D., Andover 

Brookline, Town of . 

Public Librarv .... 



2o newsp 



newsj 



Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N. 1". 
Brooks, Rev. William II., Hanover . 
Broom, William A., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Brophy, T. O 

Brown, Francis II., V D 

Brovi n, Joseph M 

Brown, Lieut. William C, West Point, X i 
Brown University, Providence, A'./. . 
Brymner, Douglas, Ottawa, Canada. 
Bui), Henry ...... 

Buffalo Evening News, Buffalo, .v. ). 
Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, X. V. . 
Buffalo Library, Buffalo, X. Y. . 
Bumpus, A. L., Quincy .... 

Bunker, Miss Sarah ..... 

Bunker Hill Monument Association . 
Burgess, John W., New York City . 
Burnell, Miss Carrie K. . 
Burr, William Henry ..... 

Butler, George, New York City 

By ram, Edward 11. ..... 

Cades, William H. 

California. State Mining Bureau 

Cambridge Public Library .... 

Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, En 
Canada. Fisheries Department 

Geological and Natural History Survey 

Cardiff, Wales, Free Library, Museum, etc. 
Carney Hospital ...... 

Carpenter, K. 1'., Foxborough . 



gland 



ipers 



ot of 



apers 



papei 



184 



2 
5 
2 

20 

1,202 

1 



4 
246 



95 
1 



1 



Public Library. 



49 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



Carpenter, Harvey, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Carrasco, Dr. Gabriel, Buenos-Ayres 
Carret, Jose F. . 
Carrington, Gen. Henry B. 
Carter Family Association . 
Castromediano, Duca Sigismondo, Lecce, Italy 
Caverly, Charles . 

Cayuga County Historical Society, Auburn, N 
Chace, Mrs. George I., Providence, R.I. 
Chadwick Lead Works .... 
Chalmers, Patrick. London, England 
Chamberlain, Mellen ..... 
Chambers, Rev. Talbot W., New York City 
Chapin, Ethan S., Springfield . 
Chapman, Alfred F. . 

Charlestown Free Dispensary and Hospital 
Chase, Charles A., Worcester 
Chelsea Public Library .... 
Chemical Society, Washington, D. C. 
Chicago, III., Public Library 
Chicopee Public Library .... 
Child, Rev. Frank S., New Preston, Conn. 
Children's Aid Society, New York City 
Christern, F. W., New York City 
Church Home for Orphan and Destitute Children 
Church of the Unity, Springfield 
Church Ophanage of St. John's Parish, Washingt 
Church Press, New York City . 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Board of Education 
Public Library 



City Library Association, Springfield 
City Missionary Society .... 

Clark, C. E., M.D 

Clark, Rev. Lyman, Ayer .... 

Clarke, James Freeman, D.D. . 

Clarke, Robert, & Co., Cincinnati, 0. 

Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, Northam.pt 

Clinton, Town of .... . 

Cloudman, F. A., Brooklyn, NY. 

Cobbe, Miss Frances Power, London, England 

Cobden Club, London, England 

Coffey, John A. . 

Cohen, Mendes, Baltimore, Md. 

Colby University, Waterville, Me. 

Collar, William C 

College of Physicians, Philadelphia, Pa. . 
Collins, Patrick A. .... 
Colored Home and Hospital, New York City 
Columbia College, New York City 

Library ...... 

■ School of Library Economy . 

Commissioners of the State Reservation 

Buffalo, NY. 

Congregational Church, Brighton 

Conn, Granville P., M.D., Concord, N.H. 

Connecticut. Board of Health . 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 



Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
Conn. ....... 

Cook, George H., New Brunswick, N.J. . 



o/u 



D.C. 



at 



1 

1 

26 

1 
1 



36 

1 



I 
13 



13 



New 



6 

27 

2 



1 
43 



9 

1 
1 

2 

290 

1 
1 
1 



31 
1 



1 

62 

4 

3 



Haven, 



50 



Oxr Document No. 40. 



Givers. 



Vols. 



a lot of newspapers 



1 portrait 



2 portraits 



Cooley, T. M., Washington, D.C. 
Coolidge, Algernon, M.D., 
Cooper Union, New York City . 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Corpus Christi College, Oxford, England 
Courtenay, "William A., Charleston, S.C. 
Crawford, Thomas H., Portland, Oregon 
Crocker, George G. . 
Crocker, Uriel H. 
Crook, George F. 
Cropper, John, New York City, 
Crosby, John L., Bangor, Me. . 
Cudworth, Miss A. M. . . . . 
Cuervo, Angel, Paris, France . 
Culin, Stewart, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Curtis, Miss M. G 

Cutter, A brum E 

Cutting, Charles F 

Dacosta, Charles W., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Dakota Territory. Department of Immigration and Sta 
tistics ....... 

Dall, Rev. W. H., 

Damrell & Upham ..... 
Dana, Richard H. 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. . 
Davenport, A. B., Brooklyn, X. Y. 
Davies, Rev. Edward, Reading . 
Davis, Andrew McFarland, Cambridge 
Davis, \V. M., Cambridge .... 
Dawson, Charles C, Lowell 
Dawson, E. A., Columbus, 0. 

Day, Albert, M. 1) 

Dayton, Ohio, Public Library . 

Dean, John Ward ..... 

Deane, Charles, Cambridge 

Deane, Llewellyn, Washington, D.C. 

Dedham, Town of. 

Delaware Historical Society. Wilmington, Del 
Denny, C. C, Leicester .... 
Densmore, L. W., Hillsborough, N.H. 
De Peyster, Gen. John Watts, New York City 
Detroit. Midi., Public Library . 
Deutsche Gesellscb aft, New York City 
Deutscher Wissenschaftlicher Verein. Santiago 
Dexter, Franklin 15., New Haven, Conn 
Dicey, Allien V., Oxford, England . 
Dillaway, Charles K. ... 
Dimmock, George, Cambridge . 
Dixwell, Mrs. J. J 

Doliber, Goodale & Co. 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protes 

taut Episcopal Church .... 
Dover, A".//., Public Library 
Duclos, R. P., Montreal, Canada 
Dunlap, Lauren, Bismarck, Dak. 
Duren, Elnathan F., Bangor, Me. 
Du Verge, L. de Rathier .... 
Dwight, Henry E., M.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Dwight, Theodore F., Washington, D.C. . 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D 



Chili 



50 



o 
2 
1 

50 

1 
1 



358 



Public Library. 



51 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



N.C. 



Pa. 



fur Kunst 



33 
6 
1 



3 
194 



Eason, Charles, Dublin, Ireland . 

Edes, Henry H., . . 1 map, a lot of broadsides 

Edmands, Miss A. S., Lynn 

Edmands, William S. ... 

Edwin Alden Company, Cincinnati, 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, Chapel Hill, 

Ellis, John, Edgewater, N.J. 

Emmons, Henry 

Engineers' Club, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 

Entomological Society, Ontario, Canada 

Ernst, C. W., ..... a lot of newspapers 

Esling, Charles H. A., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Essex Institute, Salem .... 

Evening Post Publishing Co., New York City 
Everett, William, Quincy .... 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, 
Faunce, Linus ...... 

Fe, Fernando, Madrid, Spain . 

Fearing, A. C, jr. ..... 

Fell, Thomas J., Annapolis, Md. 
Fellows, James I., London, England 
Ferguson, Rev. R. Henry .... 

Fernald, O. M., Williamstown, . . a lot of newspapers 

Fette, W. Eliot 

Field, B. Rush, M.D., Easton, Pa. . 
Fisher, Sydney G., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fiske, W., Florence, Italy 
Fitchburg Railroad Company 
Fitzgerald, Desmond ..... 
Flandrau, Charles E., St. Paul, Minn. 
Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. . 
Fleurv, Edouard ..... 

Floye, W. J 

Fliigel, Dr. Felix, Leipzig, Germany 
Folsom, Nathaniel S., D.D. 

Ford, W. E 

Foster, William H 

Fox, Rev. Bonaventure, Santa Barbara, CaL, 2 pictures 

Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. 

Franklin Typographical Society 

Eraser Institute, Montreal, Canada . 

Frederick, Rev. T. J., Oriole, Pa. 

Free Hospital for Women .... 

Free Masons, Grand Lodge of Massachusetts 

French, William B 

Friends' Book Association, Philadelphia, Pa 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa. . 

Gale, John B., Troy, N. Y. 

Gardiner, Edward G. 

Garrison, Francis J. . 

Gately, William 

General Theological Library 

Generaldirection der Koniglichen Sammlungen 

und Wissenschaft, Dresden, Germany . 
Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga. 
Gerould, Rev. Samuel L., Mollis, N.H. 
Gilman, Arthur, Cambridge 
Gloucester, City of .... . 
Goodell, A. C, jr 



100 
4 



1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

17 
114 

2 
1 
2 
1 
I 
2 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

2 



52 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



lot 



Gould, Miss Ida W 

Gould, S. C, Manchester, N.H. . 
Goulding, Frank P., Worcester . 
Grand Rapids, Mich., Public Library- 
Grant, F. E., a 

Gray, Louis F. . 

Great Britain, Astronomer Royal 

Commissioner of Patents 

Great Yarmouth, England, Free Library 

Green, Milbrey, M.D. 

Green, Samuel A., M.D. . . .1 

Greenhalge, F. J., Lowell . 

Greenough, Charles P. 

Greenough, F. B., M.D. . 

Greenough, William W. . 

Griffin, A. P. C. ... 

Griffin, Martin I. J., Philadelphia, Pa., 

Griffis, Rev. William Elliot 

Griffith, F. C, & Co., Revere . 

Grimes, J. Stanley, Evanston, 111. 

Guild, Chester 

Guild, Mrs. Samuel E. 
Gurney, George B., Chelsea 
Hakes, Ilarrv .1/./'., Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Hale, Edward E., D.D. 
Hale, George Silsbee .... 
Halliwell-Phillips, J. O., Brighton, Engla 
Hallowell, Richard P. ... 

Hambleton, Chalkley J., Chicago, III. 
Hamburg, Germany, Public Library, 
Hamilton, James .... 

Hamilton, John B , M.D., Washington, D 
Hammond, Isaac W., Concord,, N.H. 
Hampden, John, London, England . 
Handel and Haydn Society 

Harrassowitz, Otto, Leipzig. Germany 

Harrington, C. Sydney, Halifax, X.S. 

Harris, William T. .... 

Hartford Library Association, Hartford, 

Hartley, Isaac S., D.D., Utica, N.Y. 

Harvard College, Cambridge 

Astronomical Observatory 

Library ..... 

Harvard Law School Association 

Harvey, Augustus J., London, England, 

Hassain. John 1'. . . . . 

Haupt, Dr. Paul, Baltimore, Md. 

Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. . 

Hawaiian Government Survey, Honolulu 

Hay, C. A., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Haynes, Rev. Emory J., 

Haynes, Henry W. .... 

Hazen, Rev. Henry A. 

Headland, I. T., Thornhill, Pa. 

Heywood, J. C. . 

Hey wood. John II., Melrose 

Hickox, John 11., Washington. D.C. 

Hill, Hamilton A 

Hill, William G., Maiden . 

Hillard, James L 



of newspapers 



ed portrait 



newspape 



Conn 



2 plans 



broadsides 



newspaper 



1 

1 

127 

2 
2 
1 



1 

1 

is 
2 
2 
2 
1 



Public Library. 



53 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Hinsdale, B. A., Cleveland, 0. . 




1 


Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati, 0., 




1 




1 




Hoar, George F., Worcester 








2 


Hodges, Richard M., M.D. 






92 


121 








36 


19 










5 








1 




Homans, John, 2d, M.D. . 




. 


26 












1 


Home for the Friendless, Isew Haven, Conn. 




1 


Homes for Inebriates Association, London, England 




1 


Hooper, Franklin H., M.D 




1 


Hooper, Rev. Joseph, Newport, Vt. . 






1 


Hopkinson, Charles H., Groveland . 


. 




1 


Horsford, Eben N., Cambridge . 




1 




Hosley, John, Manchester, NIL 






2 


Hosmer, Rev. Samuel IX, Auburn 






1 


Howard University, Washington, D.C. 






2 






1 




Hoyt, James Phillips, Newtown, Conn., 


1 broadside 










1 




Hudson, William M., Hartford, Conn. 






4 


Huling, Ray Greene, New Bedford . 






1 


Huntington, James F. 




1 




Icazbalceta, Joaquin Garcia, City of Mexico 


1 




Imperial University of Japan, Tokyo, Japan 




5 


Indian Rights Association. Philadelphia, Pa. 


1 


3 


Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, bid. 




1 


Indiana Hospital for the Insane, Haughville, Lid. 




2 


Indiana Hospital for the Insane, Indianapolis, Lid. . 




I 


Indianapolis, Lid., Public Library ..... 




1 


Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes, 










9 


Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England 


5 




International Committee of Young Men's Christian Asso- 










1 


Interstate Commerce Commission ..... 




2 


Iowa Agricultural College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 




1 


Irish Catholic Benevolent Union, Philadelphia, Pa. 




1 




1 








1 


Jay, John, New York City ...... 




1 


Jefferson County Historical Society, Watertown, N. Y. 




1 


Jeffries, B. Joy, M. D 


1 


60 


Jenkins, Miss Mary A. ...... . 


4 




Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 


1 


2 


Johnson, Thomas M., Osceola, Mo. ..... 




1 


Johnson, W. B. ..... . ... 


1 




Joint Counties Asylum, Carmarthen, Wales 




7 


Jones, Charles C, jr., Augusta, Ga. .... 


2 


1 


Jordan. Mrs. M. C., Pittsfield 




29 


Joslin, Charles A., Leominster ...... 




1 


Journal Newspaper Company ...... 


2 




K., W. L 


1 




Kaiserliche Koenigliche Geologische Reichsanstalt, Vienna, 








2 




Kalisch, Samuel, Newark, N.J. ..... 


1 




Kansas. Board of Agriculture ...... 


2 


4 


Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan. 2 news- 














1 



54 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 



City 



Kansas State Horticultural Society, Lawrence, Kan 
Kean, R. G. H., Lynchburg, Va. 
Keenan, John J. ... 

Keller, W. B., New York City . 
Kelly, Giles M., Haverhill . " . 

Kelly, W. L 

Kelsey, Charles B., M.D., New York 

Kennard, Martin P. . 

Kiernan, Thomas J., Cambridge 

Kimball, David P. 

Kirwan, Thomas 

Klinksieck, Paul, Paris, France 

Knapp, Arthur Mason 

Knapp, George B. 

Knapp, W. I., New Haven, Conn. 

Knowlton, T. S., West Brookfield 

Koehler, S. R 

Koniglieh-Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Mu 

nich, Germany ....... 

Konigliche ( )effentliche Bihliothek, Dresden, Germany 

Konglige Bihlioteket, Stockholm, Sweden . 

Konglige Universitetet, Upsala, Sweden . 

Kramer, Lewis R., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ladies' Aid Association of the Soldiers' Home in Massa 

chusetta ..... 
Laedlein, John F., Williamsport, Pa 
Lafrance, C. J. L. , Quebec, Canada 
Lampray, A., London, England 
Lancaster Public Library . 
Langworthy, Isaac P., D.D., Chelsea 
Lapham, W. B., Augusta, Me. . 
Lamed, J. N., Buffalo, NY, . 
Lawrence, Abhott, 
Lawrence, Samuel C. 
Lawrence, City of 

Free Public Library 

Lea, James II., Fairhaven 



photographs, etc 

a lot of newspapers 



Dei, 



nit. Mich. 



Museum 



Leavenworth & Burr Publishing Co 

Lee, Francis W. 

Leeds, England, Free Public Library and 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Leicester, Public Library . 

Leipzig, Germany, Chamber of Commerce 

Leominster, Town of . 

Lewis, II. Carville, Ifaverford, Pa. . 

Lexington, Town of . 

Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Licbtenstein, Richard C. . 

Lincoln, Francis H. . 

Literary and Historical Society. Quebec, Canada 

Literary and Philosophical Society. Liverpool, England 

Liverpool, England, Free Public Library 

Lombard, Josiah S., London, England 

Lombard, R. T., Way land 

London, England, Corporation of 

Long Island Bible Society . 

Lord, William R., Wollaston 

Lovering, Henry B., Lynn 

Loth , Setli ..... 

Lowell, Mrs. John, 



4 maps, 3 newspapers 



Vols. 


Pphs. 


2 






1 




3 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


3 


1 




3 




1 




3 


51 


1 


1 


17 


1 
595 


2 


14 

1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
2 


4 


1 
146 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
2 

1 

12 

1 


2 


1 
3 
1 
1 

1 


1 


1 


2 




1 




2 




17 




141 


67 



Public Library. 



55 



Givers. 



Vole. 



Pphs. 



Lowell, City of . 

City Library ..... 

Ludwig Salvator, Archduke, Prague, Austria 
Lyman, Mrs. Theodore, Brookline . 
Lynn, Public Library ..... 

MacCalla, Clifford P., Philadelphia, Pa. . 
MacDonald. Carlos F., M.D., Auburn, N.Y. 
Madison University, Hamilton, N. Y. 
Maimonides Library, New York City . 
Maine Historical Society, Portland, Me. . 
Maiden, Public Library .... 

Manchester, England, Public Free Libraries 
Manchester, N.H., Public Library 
Manitoba Historical and Scientific Society, 
Manitoba ...... 

Mann. B. Pickman, Washington, B.C., 16 maps 
Manning, Jacob W., Reading . 
Manufacturers' Record Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Marble, Manton, New York City 
Marlborough Public Library 
Marshall, D. H., Kingston, Ontario . 

Marston, L. M., M.D 

Marvin, W. T. R. . . . . 
Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md. 
Mason, George C, Newport, R.I. 
Massachusetts, State of ... 

Adjutant General .... 

Board of Arbitration and Conciliation 

Board of Health .... 

Board of Lunacy and Charity . 

Civil Service Commission 

Commissioners of Prisons 

Department of Agriculture 

Railroad Commissioners . 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 

State Library ..... 

State Lunatic Asylum, Northampton 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy . 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
Massachusetts Historical Society 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society . 
Massachusetts Infant Asylum 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Massachusetts Medical Society . 
Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society . 
Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 

Children ...... 

Massachusetts State Firemen's Association 
Massachusetts State Pharmaceutical Association 
Massachusetts Universalist Convention 
Master Car-Builders' Association, New York 
Mathews, Robert, Rochester, N.Y. . 
Matteson, Mrs. Mary E., Providence, R.I. 
Mattox, A. H. , Cincinnati, 0. . . .2 

Maxwell, Sidney D., Cincinnati, 0. . 

May, Miss Abby W 

May, Henry A. . .3 portraits, 3 charts, 1 

May, Rev. Samuel, Leicester 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco, Cal. . 



Winnipeg 



, 3 charts 



Cruelty to 



City 



broadsides 



newspaper 



129 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

26 
2 

4 
1 



2 
15 

1 



23 



IS 

581 



1 
1 
1 

1 
12 
10 

56 

42 

135 



5fi 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



Meek, Henry M., Salem .... 

Melrose Public Library .... 

Mercantile Library, New York City . 
Mercantile Library, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Merchants' and Manufacturers' Bureau, 
Texas ....... 

Miami University, Oxford, 0. . 
Michigan. State Board of Health 
State Library 



Fort Worth 



Middlesex Mechanics' Association, Lou-ell 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States 

Ohio Commandery, Cincinnati, 0. ... 

Milwaukee, Wis., Public Library .... 

Milwaukee, Wis., Chamber of Commerce . 
Minnesota. Geological and Natural History Survey . 
Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn. . 
Mitchell, S. Weir, Philadelphia, Pa. ... 

Momerie, Rev. A. W., London, England . 
Monroe, Alfred C. ...... 

Moore, Charles A., St. Paid, Minn., . 1 newspape: 

Moore, George H., New York City .... 

Moore, Rev. William H., Hartford, Conn. 

Morris, John E., Hartford, Conn. .... 

Morrow, William W. ....... 

Morse Institute, Natick ...... 

Mount Auburn Cemetery, Trustees of 
Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, South TTadley 
Muller, Freilerik, & Co., Amsterdam, Holland . 
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge . 
Museum of Fine Arts . ...... 

Nation, The, Publisher of, New York City, . 1 newspaper 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Board of Health 

National Civil-Service Reform League 

National Conference of Unitarian and other Christian 

Churches ........ 

National Divorce Reform League .... 

National Woman's Christian Temperance Union 
Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Neb. 
Neill, Rev. Edward D., St. Paul, Minn. . 
Nevins, Mrs. David ....... 

Nevins Family, Methuen ...... 

New Bedford Free Public Library .... 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 
New England Meteorological Society 

New England Methodist Historical Society 

New Hampshire, Asylum for the Insane, Concord, NIL 

Secretary of State ..... 

New Haven Free Public Library .... 
New Jersey, Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries 
New York, City, Board of Education 

New York, State. Forest Commission 

Regents of the University .... 

State Library ...... 

Superintendent of the State Land Survey 

New Fork Academy of Sciences, New York City 

New York Civil Service Reform Association, New York 

City 

New York City Mission and Tract Society 

New York Free Circulating Library, New York City 



17 



Public Library. 



57 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



New York Homoeopathic Medical College, New York City, 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, Public Library 

Newton, Simon, Washington, D.C. 

Newton Public Library 

Nichols, Miss A. A. . 

Nichols, Mrs. R. Anne 

Nizet, F., Brussels, Belgium 

Norcross, G. H. . 

North Brookfield, Town of 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. 

Norwegian North-Atlantic Expedition, Christiania, Norway 

Norwich Free Academy. Norwich, Conn. . 

Nottingbam, England, Public Library 

Nova Scotia, Library Commissioners 

Nova Scotia Historical Society, Halifax, N.S. . 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia, Pa 

Nutter, F. H., Minneapolis, Minn. .... 

O'Brien, J. F 

Ohio, Railroad Commissioner ..... 
State Library 



Olcott, Col. Henry S., Madras, India 

Omaha, Neb., Public Library ..... 

Omaha, Neb., Board of Trade 

Orphans' Home of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 

New York, New York City ..... 
Oswell, O. N., Cambridge ..... 

Otis, Charles P 

Otis, Edward O., M.D 

Owen, Gen. Joshua T. . . . . . . 

Paine, Nathaniel, Worcester ..... 

Palestine Exploration Fund, London, England 
Palfrey, Miss Sara Hammond ..... 

Parker, Henry J. ....... 

Parker, W. Thornton, M.D., Newport, R.I. 
Paulding, Edwin S., Plymouth ..... 

Peabody, Miss Elizabeth P. .... 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, M.D. . 

Peabody Institute, Peabody ..... 

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnol 

ogy, Cambridge ....... 

Pembroke Academy, Pembroke, N.H. 

Pennell, Mrs. L. C 

Pennsylvania, Eastern State Penitentiary . 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Peoria, III., Board of Trade ..... 
Pepper, William, M.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 

Pernin, H. M., Detroit, Mich 

Perry, Thomas Sergeant ...... 

Perry, William Stevens, D.D., Davenport, Iowa 
Peter, James B., East Saginaw, Mich. 
Philadelphia City Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Philbin, John F., Clinton 

Philbrick- James Library, Deerfield, N.H. 

Phillips, Henry, jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.. 

Philosophical Society, Glasgow, Scotland, 1 newspaper 

Philosophical Society, Washington, D.C. . 

Pickering, Edward C, Cambridge .... 

Pickering, John, Family of .... . 



33 



4 

28 
1 



1 
23 



1 
150 

1 
3 

1 
1 

1 
2 

2 



1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

21 

1 
2 

3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 

48 



58 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



Pike, Robert G., Middletown , Conn. . 

Plymouth, England, Public Library . 

Pollard. Mrs. Andrew 

Pool, Wellington, Weriham 

Poor, H. V. & H. W., New York City 

Poree, Miss Caroline E. J. 

Portsmouth, England, Public Library 

Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Preston, D. S 

Price, B. S 

Prime, Temple, Huntington, N. Y. 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Princetoi 
Providence, R.I., Auditor . 
— City Registrar 
Public Library 



n, N.J. 



Ontario 



Putnam, Allen 

Queen's College and University, Kingston 
Rae, Robert, London, England . 
Rantoul, Robert S., Salem 
Real Academia de Buenas Letras, Barcelona, Spain 
Reale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze e Lettere, Milan 
Italy ........ 

Redwood Library, Newport, R.I. 
Reily, John F., Martinsburg, W. Va. 
Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Conn. . 
Reyer, Alexander, Vienna, Austria . 
Reynolds. John, Indianapolis, Ind. . 
Rhode Island, Adjutant General 

Board of Charities and Corrections 

Board of Health 

Registrar of Vital Statistics . 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. 

Richmond, Surrey, England, Free Public Library 

Rijks-Universiteit, Leiden, Ho/land . 

Rijks-Universiteit, Utrecht, Holland . 

Bobbins, Gilbert F., Providence, R.I. 

Roberts, Rev. Oliver A., Amesbury . 

Robertson, Douglass Argyll, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Robertson, John E., Concord, N. H. . 

Robins, Robert Patterson, M.D , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rochester, N.Y., Board of Education 

Romero, Matias, Washington, D. C. . 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York City . 

Root, J. P., Providence, R.I. .... 

Rosengarten, J. G., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rotch. A. Lawrence, Readville .... 

Row, P. S., & Orton, Col. Henry S. . 
Rowlands, Walter ...... 

Roxbury Charitable Society .... 

Royal Humane Society, London, England 
Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland . 
Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England . 
Royal Society of Canada, Montreal, Canada 
Rutland County Historical Society, Castleton, Vt. 
S., A. B 



St. Botolph Club, a large lot of newspapers and periodi 
cals ........ 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. . 

St. Lawrence University, Canton, N.Y.. 

St. Louis, Mo., Public Library .... 



Public Library. 



5a 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



land 



3 broadsides 



61 newspapers 



St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, St. Louis, Mo., 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. . 

St. Nicholas Club, New York City . 

St. Paul, Minn., Public Library 

St. Paul, Minn., Chamber of Commerce 

Salem County Historical Society, Salem, N. Y., a lot of 

newspaper cuttings . 
Sanford, Rev. Enoch, Eaynham 
Sanford & Davis, Worcester 

Sargent, C. S 

Sarmiento, Gen. D. F., Buenos Ayres 

Savage, E. H 

Sawyer Free Library, Gloucester 
Schriftgiesser, Emil S. A. . 
Science and Art Museum, Dublin, Ir 
Scientific American, New York City 
Scudder. Samuel H., Cambridge, 
Searle, Charles P. 

Seymour, Norman, Mt. Morris, N. Y. 
Shattuck, Frederick C, M.D. . 
Shattuck, Mrs. H. R., Maiden . 
Shaw, Samuel S., 

Shed, Joseph G 

Sheffield, William P., Newport, R.I. 

Sheffield, England, Free Public Libraries . 

Sheldon, W. D., Colorado Springs, Col. . 

Sheltering Arms, New York City 

Shorthand Writers' Association, London, England 

Silas Bronson Library, Waterbury , Conn. . 

Simes, William ....... 

Simmons, J. Edward, New York City 

Simms, Joseph, M.D., New York City 

Simonds, Alvan, Children of ... 

Sinks, Rev. P. W., Detroit, Mich. 

Sinnickson, Robert, Trenton, N.J., 1 newspaper, a lot of 

broadsides ...... 

Smith, Charles C 

Smith, Eugene A., Tuscaloosa, Ala. . 
Smith, Horace J., Germantown, Pa. 
Smith, Mrs. J. L. D., Chicago, III. . 

Smith, W. Everett, M.D 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

S mucker, Isaac, Newark, 0. .... 

Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents, Ran 

dalVs Island, NY. . 
Society for the Study and Cure of Inebriety, London 

England ..... 
Society of Arts .... 
Society of Arts, London, England 
Society of California Pioneers . 
Society of St. Vincent de Paul . 
Society of the Cincinnati of the State of Rhode Island and 

Providence Plantations . 
Somerville Public Library . 
South Carolina. Department of Agriculture, 3 newspapers 
South Scituate, Town of . 
Southbridge Public Library 
Spencer, William H., Waterville, Me 
Sproull, John J., New York City 
Spurr, George W., Winchester . 



is 



Yi 

45 



13 

2 



1 

2 

12 



5 
4 

32 

2 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 



60 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Ppbs. 


Staedtisches Realgymnasium, Leipzig, Germany 


1 




Staples, Samuel E., Worcester, ... 1 newspaper 




2 


State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 


1 


3 


Stearns, A. W., Somerville ..... 






1 


Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D 






1 




Steen, Aksel S., Christiania, Norway 








1 


Steiner, Lewis H., Baltimore, Md. 








1 


Stevens, B. F., London, England 






1 




Stevens, Charles E., Worcester . 








1 


Stickney, Joseph A., Great Falls, N.H. . 






1 




Stille, Charles J., Philadelphia, Pa. . 








1 


Stimson, R. M., Marietta, 0. 








2 


Stinson, William H., Dunbarton, N.H. 








2 


Stirling's and Glasgow Public Library, Glasgow 


, Scotland 






1 


Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.I. . 






1 




Stone, Henry ...... 








3 


Storer, Horatio R., M.D., Newport, R.I. . 








1 


Storrow, James J. .... 






2 


4 


Strong, Augustus H., D.D., Rochester, N.Y. 






1 




Strout, James C, Washington, D.C. . 






1 




Stryker, William S., Trenton, N.J. . 






2 




Sutro, Theodore, New York City 






1 




Swan, Charles H. 






1 


4 


Swansea, England, Public Library . 








1 


Swift, George B., Chicago, III. . 








1 


Swift, Lindsay ...... 








36 


Sydney, New South Wales, City of 






1 




Taft, George S., Worcester 






1 




Talbot, Miss Marion ..... 








1 


Tapper, Thomas, jr. ..... 






2 




Taunton Public Library .... 1 broadside 




4 


Technical, Industrial, and Sanitarj' Museum, Sydney, 






N.S. W. 




1 


Thayer, Miss Caroline Coddington 






58 




Thayer, Eli, Worcester .... 








2 


Thimm, Franz, London, England 








1 


Third Minnesota Infantry Association, St. Paul 


, Minn. 






1 


Thompson, Miss Mary P., Durham, N.H. 






1 




Thurber, Samuel ..... 






1 




Ticknor, Thomas B. . 










4 


Tiffany, Edward .... 










1 


Tilton, Rev. George 11., Rehoboth 








1 




Titus, Rev. Anson, Amesbury 










1 


Todd. William C 










1 


Toledo, 0., Public Library 










1 


Toronto, Canada, Public Library 










1 


Torrey, Joseph V., Newton 










62 


Towne, Edward C, Cambridge . 








1 




Traveller Newspaper Association 








1 




Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. 










2 


Triibner & Co., London, England 








1 




Truman, Joseph M., jr., Philadelphia, P( 


,. 






12 


48 


Tuesday Club, Newton 










1 


Turner, A. R., jr. .... 










1 


Turner, Joseph W 








2 




Turner, Samuel Epes, Cambridqe 








1 




Tuttle, Joseph F., D.D., Crawfordsville, i 


r nd. 






1 


5 


Underwood, F. II., Glasgow, Scotland 








1 




Underwood. Lucien M., Syracuse. N. Y. 










1 


Union League Club, New York City . 








1 


1 



Public Library. 



61 



Givers. 



Vols. 



Pphs. 



Union Pacific Railway Company 
Unitarian Church Temperance Society 
United States, Army, Adjutant General 

■ Paymaster General 

Surgeon General 



16 atlas sheets 



map 



Board of Supervising Inspectors of Stea 

Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Ethnology 

Bureau of Labor 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 

Bureau of Navigation 

Bureau of Statistics 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 

Comptroller of the Currency 

Department of Agriculture 

■ — Department of Justice . 

Department of State 

Department of the Interior 

Department of the Navy . 

■ Department of the Treasury 

■ Department of War 

Director of the Mint 

Fish Commission 

■ General Land Office 

Geological Survey, 15 maps, 

Hydrographic Office, 

Indian Commissioners 

Life Saving Service 

Light-house Board . 

Military Academy, West Point, iV. Y. 

Nautical Almanac Office 

Naval Observatory . 

Ordnance Office 

Patent Office . 

Signal Service, . . 179 maps, 1 broadside 

Supervising Surgeon General of the Marine Hos- 
pital Service ...... 

United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 

Universalist General Convention 

Universalist Publishing House . 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal., . 14 broad 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich 

University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Madison, M 

Updike, Berkeley ...... 

Upham, Capt. F. K., Fort Custer, Montana 
Upham, Warren ...... 

Urbino, S. R 

Van Deusen, Mrs. Mary W., Rondont, N. Y. . 
Vassar Brothers' Institute, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. . 
Vermont. State Library ..... 
Victoria, Australia, Public Library and Museums 
Victoria Street Society for the Protection of Animal 

Vivisection, London, England 
Viele, Egbert L., Washington, B.C. 
Vose, George L. . . . 

Walcott, Charles H., Concord . 
Walker, Albert H., Hartford, Conn 



m Vessels 



sides 



from 



1 

1 

11 
3 

1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

10 
i 
108 
1 
2 
8 
5 
6 
5 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 



2 

37 

5 



9 

11 



21 

1 

17 

39 



12 
9 



5 
155 

2 
9 

1 
11 

7 
1 
1 

2 

1 

1 
32 

1 
1 
5 

1 



62 



City Document No. 40. 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Pptas. 


Walker, Benjamin, Lowell 


1 




Walker, Francis A. ....... 


1 




Walton, J. P., Muscatine, Iowa ..... 




1 


Ware, Miss Emma F., Milton ...... 


1 


1 


Ware, Hie Misses H. and E. F., Milton .... 


5 


138 


Warner, Theodore Davenport, Philadelphia, Pa. 


1 




Warner Observatory, Rochester. N.Y. 




2 


Warren, Mrs. George W. ....... 




4 


Warren, J. Collins, MB 




1 


Warren, Joseph W., M.D. ...... 


8 




Warren-Street Chapel ....... 




1 


Warring, C. B., Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 




1 


Washburn College, Topeka, Kan. ..... 




2 


Washingtonian Home ........ 




1 


Waters, Mrs. C. E 


1 




Watertown Public Library . ...... 




1 


Way, C. Granville ........ 


1 




Weeden, William B., Providence, R.I. 




2 


Weeks, Stephen B., Chapel Hill, N.G. .... 




3 


Weiss, II. W., Chicago, III 




1 


Welch, Rev. Edward II., Washington, D.C. 




8 


Weld, Francis M., M.D 


1 




Weldon, Lawrence, Bloomington, III. .... 


1 




Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Dixmont, Pa. . 




1 


Wharton, Francis, Washington, B.C. .... 


3 




Wheildon, Wm. W., Concord, . a lot of newspapers 


24 


1 


Whitaker, Alfred E., San Francisco, Cal. 




1 


White, John I)., Chicopee ....... 




1 


White, Samuel, Clinton ....... 




1 


Whitman, Royal 




1 


Whitmore, William H. ....... 


37 


1 


Whitney, II. M., Beloit, Wis 




1 


Whitney, J. D., Cambridge, . . .10 atlas sheets 






Whitney, James L., ..... 1 newspaper 


1 


87 


Whittlesey, E., Washington, B.C. 


1 




Wilder, Alexander, .)/./->., Orange, N.J. .... 




1 


Wilder, Edward B 




1 


Wilder, Rev. It. G., Princeton, N.J. ..... 


1 




Wilkinson, Warring, Berkeley, Cal. ..... 


1 




Willey, Henry, New Bedford ...... 




1 


Williams, Henry W., M.D 




2 


Williams, J. 1<\, St. Paul, Minn 




3 


Williams College, Williamstown ..... 




1 


Williamson, Joseph, Belfast, Me. ..... 


1 


2 


Willson, Rev. E. !>., Salem ...... 




1 


Winnipeg, Manitoba, Board of Trade .... 




1 


Winslow. John, Brooklyn, X. Y. .... 




1 


Winsor, Justin, Cambridge ...... 




14 


Winthrop, Robert C 


5 


129 


Winthrop, Robert C, jr. ....... 


3 




Withington, CharlesF., M.D 




1 


Woburn Public Library ....... 




2 


Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society 




1 


Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 






Pa 




3 


Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, 






New York City ........ 




1 


Wood, Rev. W. C 




1 


Woodruff, E. H., Ithaca, N. J. 




1 


Woods, Rev. Alva, Bequest of, Providence, R.I. 


1 





Public Library. 



63 



Givers. 


Vols. 


Ppbs. 


Woodward, Charles L., New York City .... 
Woodward, P. H., Franklin, Conn. ..... 

Worcester County Free Institute, Worcester 

Wright, Alexander H., New York City .... 

Wright, Stephen M., New York City .... 

Wyoming Historical and Genealogical Society, Wilkes- 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn. ..... 

Young, William H., Troy, NY. .... 
Young Men's Christian Association, New York City . 




1 
1 
7 
3 
1 

1 
1 

1 
6 
1 

1 



Total CIRCULATION. 



187» 

18SO 

1881 . . . . 

1888 

1883 

1884 

188S 

188B (8 mos.) 

188(1 

1887 



SOS 1,180,566 

307 1,156,721 
304 I 1,065,081 

303 1,040,553 
306 1,045,902 
306 1,056,1 

304 1,027,398 
204 602,431 

305 958,829 



3,833 
3,768 
3,504 
3,434 
3,418 
3,454 
3,380 
2,953 
3,14:; 
3,041 



8,747 
8,781 
8,637 
8,170 
8,209 



7,614 
7.029 



APPENDIX X. 

CIRCULATION. 
(Books issued.) 



Bates Hall. 



74,627 
69,042 



38,345 
62,672 
61.1S3 



89,163 
101,100 

96,764 
103,540 
113,127 
119,833 
124,134 

81,507 
140,801 
13S.870 



163,790 
170,142 
165,373 
167,322 
180,075 
184,913 
202,764 
119,852 
203,473 
200,053 



926 
1 ,045 
1,046 
1,052 
1,181 
) ,220 
1,210 
[,027 
1 ,236 
1 ,287 



Lower Hall. 

























B, 










- 




2 


■p 


ai^ 


i 1 




> 


T3 


If* 


-a 


rt 


>. 


bn 


a 


a 


c- 1 


P 


J 


350,521 


12,672 


363,193 


1,179 


2,085 


306,148 


10,369 


316,517 


1,031 


1,999 


257,592 


9,271 


266,863 


847 


1,849 


239,601 


11,191 


250,792 


828 


1,670 


163,811 


32,119 


195,930 


640 


1,301 


168,926 


35,066 


203,992 


667 


1,333 


150,826 


32,768 


183,594 


606 


1,186 


92,847 


18,489 


111,336 


546 


1,136 


154,402 


29,529 


183,931 


603 


1,362 


154,007 


29,981 


183,988 


005 


1,309 



East Boston Branch. 



105,197 
97,024 
88,901 
92,833 
88,394 
75,710 
48,288 
70,926 
60,524 



w 



2,794 
3,004 
4,097 
7,073 
8,107 
7,048 
8,747 
4,647 
8,509 
7,7M 



(•98,681 

108,201 

101,118 

e 05,074 

100,940 

9'.,442 

<7S4,457 

52,935 

79,435 

j 68,313 
I 



& 

320 


3 


010 


303 


951 


318 


989 


328 


868 


329 


876 


311 


871 


325 


855 


237 


764 


260 


813 


228 


533 



B 

115,509 3,33s 
138,309 5,261 

125,409 4.077 

121,939 4,472 

119,561 4,656 

123,570 | 5,096 

86.547 2,383 

'.'7,7 r. 2.277 

81,470 4,077 



:■ 118,844 
143,570 
132,858 
129.486 
120,411 
124,220 
128,666 
68,930 
99,992 
./ 85,517 



508 1,200 
407 1,196 

I 15 i i 17 
426 1.U7+ 
1,062 



4115 



Roxbttby Branch. 







































§ 


>. 










~. 


i 


i 




>. 


P 












ta 


= 


■— 


a 


~ 


123.402 




129,889 




1,013 


119,450 


5,480 


124,930 


388 


1,017 


105,700 


4,912 


110,612 




972 


101,534 


4.730 


106,273 


347 


876 


1"5.707 


6,728 


112,525 


370 


906 


108,488 


7,874 


111.::.-. 7 


360 


'..V.. 


98,350 


7,830 


106,180 




884 


55,863 


5,069 


60,932 


300 


674 


79,057 


S.450 


87.510 


281 


749 




10,347 


16,7 IS! 




739 



18?» 

I88«> 

1881 

1KSJ 

18*:t 

1SKI 

iN»r, 

lssr, 

188« 

188? 



Chari.estown Branch. 



B6.925 

73,302 
78,682 
85,038 
84,560 
74,453 
69,181 
38,839 
62,863 



S 



1,815 
1,440 
2,140 
2.2S1 
2,744 
2,513 



3,114 
4,739 



88,740 
d 74,748 
80,822 
87,319 
87,304 
76,966 
71,541 
40,207 
65,977 



Brighton Branch. 



H 



26,737 
26,406 
26,067 
25,162 
25,965 
24,214 
22,683 
12,265 
19,936 
18,813 



















w 


h 


1,859 


28,928 


1,574 


27,980 


2,110 


28,177 


2,292 


27,444 


2,295 


28,257 


1,927 


26,141 


2,209 


24,892 


1,222 


13,487 


1,893 


21,829 


1,378 


20,191 



r>0KciiESTER Branch. 



56,785 


1,423 


55,690 


1,026 


53,904 


730 


53,036 


1,449 


65,678 


1,880 


70,260 


1,913 


71,863 


1,629 


43,189 


914 


67,862 


2,028 


62,633 


2,095 



59,673 
56,716 
55,188 

e 54,485 
67,558 

/72.17:; 
73.502 
44,103 



South-End Branch. 










M 


>, 
























% 




rt 


eg 


a 






>> 


bo 




















m 


w 


^ 


A 


« 


73,154 


2,713 


75,867 


247 


622 


77,016 


2,275 


79,291 


253 


680 


71,432 


2,530 


73,962 


242 


578 


61,453 


10,283 


e 71, 736 


318 


670 


76,472 


17,778 


94,250 


308 


774 


76,693 


22,108 


98,801 


322 


757 


68,362 


22,495 


90,857 


299 


676 


It 36,470 


13,343 


49,813 


263 


551 


59,459 


19,259 


78,718 


258 


593 


62,931 


21,370 


84,301 


277 


641 



Jamaica Plain Branch. 










&> 


>» 




















































£ 




















2 


p3 


=h 


fi 


iJ 


50,457 


2,503 


52,960 


171 


418 


52,406 


2,220 


54,626 


17''. 


4:;7 


47.797 


2,311 


50.10S 


164 


46,7 


46,316 


3,406 


49,722 


164 


381 


44.758 


4,379 


49,137 


101 


411 


43,039 


8,232 


51,271 


167 


505 


41,520 


9,666 


51,102 


10s 


444 


25, 732 


6,003 


31,735 


156 


401 


40,851 


7,40:j 


4S.:i44 


158 


481 


37,104 


5,079 


42,783 


141 


345 



North-End Branch. 



3,515 
11,630 
y9,748 

0,101 
l 10,524 



a Includes the largest of each department on any day, without regard t.. it> being 
tl..' Bame day. 

h Includes books borrowed on white Blips, ami returned the same day. 

.The East Boston branch was closed from October 7th to 9th, 1879, for repairs; 
i., I. from August 12th to November 2d, is7o. for repairs and enlargement. 

./ III. ( Iharlestown branch was closed from April 20th to the 30th, to rearrange the 
I !--■ an. I also from Maj l-i to the Uth, 1880, 



€ The East Boston branch was closed 25 working-days. 
" South-End " " " 85 " 

" Dorchester " " " 6 " " during 1882. 

The North-End branch was open 177 days during 1883. 
/The Dorchester branch was closed one day, for repairs, during 1884. 
g The East Boston aud North-End branches were closed 44 and 25 working-days 
respectively, during 1885. 



It The South-End branch was closed 15 working-days during the period from May 1 
to December 31, 1885. 

i The North-End branch was open only 19S days in 1886. 

; The Boutfa Boston branch was closed 36 working-days, and to.- K:i-t Boston 
branch 4 working-days in iss7. 



Public Library. 



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Public Libkary. 



67 



APPENDIX XIII. 

BATES-HALL READING. 



Classification. 



English history, topography, 
biography, travel and polite 
literature 



American (Xorth and South) 
history, etc 



French history, etc 

German history, etc 

Italian history, etc 

Spanish history, etc 

Oriental history, etc 

General history 

Greek, Latin, and philology . 

Bibliography 

Periodicals and Transactions . 

Fine arts 

Natural history and science . 

Theology, ecclesiastical his- 
tory 



Medicine 

Law 

Useful arts 

Metaphysics and social science, 
Political economy 



Mathematics and physical sci- 
ence 



Miscellaneous 



Percentage of Use. 



13.2 

11.8 
6.1 
3.4 
1.5 



7.3 



13.1 

11.1 

5.8 
3.9 
1.8 



12.3 12.0 11.8 11.8 11.8 



12.2 
5.3 
3.9 
1.6 



12.4 
4.6 
3.9 
1.6 



3.8 



11.3 
5.2 
3.8 
1 



7.0 



* a 
X - 



10.6 
5.1 
4.5 
1 



12.82 13.27 



5.16 
4.09 
1.72 
.81 
4.8 
3.19 
3.03 
1.5 
5.0! 
7.4 
3.6 



6.9 

6.5 

1.52 

5.3 

4.59 

1.07 



5.87 
3.6 



5.4 
4.01 
1.09 
.71 
4.59 
3.07 
2.62 
1.31 
6.34 
7.75 
3.19 



6.57 
5.49 
1.47 
4.52 
5.18 



6.00 
3.43 



13.45 

12.72 
5.4 
3.78 
1.46 
.69 
4.94 
3.11 
2.7 
1.14 
6.00 
7.21 
3.16 



6.08 
5.55 
1.55 
4.23 
5.63 
1.13 



5.66 
3.53 



In May, 1885, a change was made in the classification, some classes being divided, others 
modified. Hence in about half the classes no comparison can be made with former years. 



APPENDIX XIV. 

LOWER HALL AND BRANCH READING. 



give the relative per- 
centages. 



Fiction and juveniles* 

History and biography 

Travels and voyages 

Science, arts, fine and useful, the 
ology, law. medicine, professions 

Periodicals 

Foreign languages 

Miscellaneous 



~ 


« 


J 


H 


61.49 


77.50 


7.26 


3.75 


4.57 


3.00 


9.47 


2.75 



1 





a 


79 


75.9 


77.8 


5 


6.3 


4.6 


3 


3 


3.5 


5 


3.2 


5.3 


5 


4.6 


3.8 


1 


.2 


.- 


2 


6.8 


5 



9.24 
5.S2 

4.22 



76 


77 


75.29 


6 


3 


5.96 


8 


6 


4.55 


3 


5 


5.55 


5 


5 


2.36 


- 


- 


.23 


7 


4 


6.06 



1 — — 



43 5.8 

24 4.2 











■ »»-, 








Pti 


pa 


a 




c 


1 


00 


pi 

"5 


a 


61.11 


78 


75 


79 


73.7 


78.6 


73.11 


76 


26 


7.S4 


5 


8 


5 


7.4 


5.6 


8.51 


6 


18 


4.44 


2 


4 


3 


3.7 


3.2 


6.51 


4 


32 


9.44 


3 


3 


3 


3.6 


4.6 


6.59 


5 


4 


4.98 


S 


5 


li 


4.4 


4.3 


2.18 


5 


- 


4.83 






1 


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.25 




- 


7.36 


4 


5 


3 


7 


3.7 


3.85 


4 


20 



(May 11. 



'I'll.' figures give the relative per- 
centages. 



Fiction and juveniles * i>:;.s:: 

History and biography T.j. r - 

Travels and voyages :;.'.'i 

Science, arts, fine and useful, the- 
ology, law , in. .1 | . B.78 

Pcriodicala 4.-J'.» 

languages 4.;s 

Miscellaneous 7.16 



s 




| 


- 


O 


02 


._ 


79 


75 


80 


75 


7S 


70 


75 


4 


6 


4 


3 


3 


15 


7 


"' 


4 


3 


6 


3 


4 


4 


:: 


5 


3 


."> 


4 


11 


4 


7 


7 


9 


3 


5 


2 


7 


- 


- 


1 


7 


- 


- 


- 






3 


1 


4 


3 


3 



22 


58.65 


67.58 


14 


7. 3.; 


e re 


27 


6.32 


3.18 


3 


1.64 


7.).: 


29 


7.S1 


3.61 


- 


1.42 


4.19 


5 


3.80 


7.27 



77. ss 


a' 

X 


78 


u 

76.1 


7S 


W 


(C 


si. SI 


75 


4.7:. 


7 


5 


6.2 


5 


4.37 


7 


2 


3 


3 


3.1 


3 


3.3S 


1 


2.2:. 


.'1 


4 


3.2 


5 


4.5S 


1 


: i0 


7 


3 


43.1 


5 


.92 


3 




- 


1 


.3 


- 


.38 


- 


.v.. 2 


3 


3 


4.2 


1 


4.76 


4 



18.82 


6.52 


2.73 


7.3.7 


S.8S 


4. us 


7.113. 



a 


• 


■/. 


£ 


75 




in 


5 


3 


3. 




4 


1; 


7 




1 


3 


3 



*A large number of tin:- juveniles are ool fiction. 
Books taken out mi white nli|.> and returned the same dai are nol Included. , .. . 

I'll.' total percentage for issi and 1885 (ending April 311. ,1.. not Include the North-Bod percentages, "ii account of the ili ir.-r <■ >r .i:i.-^iil.:itint> ; mm-, however, the claaeihcatli 



:. 5 4.37 
6 I 33 8.15 



wiih linn ui tin- other departments. 



Public Libraey. 



69 



APPENDIX XV. 

FELLOWES ATHEN^UM READING. 



6 
ft 

5 


Classes. 
Relative percentages. 




O 
f 
/ 

H 


/ 
» 
H 


5C 
X) 
H 


M 

X> 
* 


1* 
/ 
OB 

1H 


z 

H 


» 2 

* a 




99 

H 


I. 


History, biography, and 


37 
11 


39 
10 


33 
13 


42 
11 


44 
6 


46 
6 


39 
4 


40 
3 


42 
5 


40 


n. 


Modern foreign languages, 


6 


in. 




6 


5 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 


4 


5 


IV. 


Miscellaneous literature . . 


9 


11 


11 


10 


11 


10 


13 


14 


16 


14 


v. 


Theology, sociology, ethics, 


' 6 


6 


9 




6 


7 


8 


8 


6 


6 


VI. 




2 
4 
8 


2 
4 

7 


2 
4 
6 


.28 


2 
4 
6 


1 
4 

7 


2 

4 
5 


1 
5 
6 


1 
4 
5 


1 


vn. 




4 


vin. 


Fine arts, engineering . . . 


5 


IX. 


Law, politics, government, 


3 


3 


2 




2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


X. 


Mathematics, science . . . 


14 


13 


11 


. 


10 


9 


10 


11 


9 


10 


XI. 








5 


5 


4 


4 


8 


7 


7 


8 













BRIGHTON BRANCH READING. 



I. 

n. 

in. 



Classes. 
Relative percentages 



Fiction 

Biography, travel, and his- 
tory 

Other 



9 

3D 


O 

0D 


H 
* 
* 




M 

/ 


r 

99 


IS 

99 

/ 


99 B 


9 
99 
/ 


75 


76 


76 


73 


74 


73 


73 


72 


73 


8 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


10 


10 


10 


17 


16 


17 


19 


17 


17 


17 


18 


17 



10 
17 



70 



City Document No. 40. 





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71 



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72 



City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX XVIII. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



General Library Accounts. 



Binding 

Books 

Periodicals * . 

Expense 

Fuel 

Furniture (cabinets, shelving, fixtures, 

etc.) 

Gas 

Printing and catalogue 

Stationery 

Salaries 

Transportation, postage, etc. .... 

Total 



1887. 
(Jan. 1-Dec. 31.) 



City appro- E ded- 

priations. 



$2,012 83 

17,000 00 

3,282 06 
2,615 40 

1,307 67 

4,794 s7 

6,705 13 

871 77 

76,333 34 

1,743 59 



$116,166 66 



$3,050 95 
24,692 74 

4,252 55 

2,967 

2,924 30 



692 74 

214 34 

167 46 

,634 .".4 

760 47 

,022 03 



$128,679 84 



Paid into City Treasury 
from fines and sales of 
catalogues. 



Ye ar. 



1-77 
ls7S 
1879 
1880 
1881 

1882 
1883 

]ss4 
1885 
1885 

(8 inos.) 
1886 

lss7 



|3,092 12 

3,266 31 
2,618 32 
2,984 12 
3,497 03 

2,945 74 
3,223 14 
3,018 01 
2,952 86 

1,965 51 
fl,992 n4 



* The appropriation for periodicals is included in that for books. 

f This amount was paid in from January 1 to June 10, when the Ordinance went into 
effect . authorizing the Trustees to retain and expend for the general purposes of the Library 
all lines and money received from sale of catalogues-, waste paper, etc. Since this date 
$1,028,36, received from fines and sales of catalogues, have been bo retained and expended. 
The waste paper is uol sold; it is exchanged for new books, which have been received to 
the vahii during the past year from this source. 

Note. — The expenditures for books cover the cost of those chargeable to the trust-funds 

Hi, as well as those charged to the annual appropriations from the city, and also Include 

such at i with the balances with the foreign agents at the close of the previous 

year. 

Bills accruing subsequently to the middle of March {when at the last requisition of the 
year, payable April Let, is approved "ill be audited in the subsequent year's account 
beginn tallj May 1st. In this way books added between March 15tb and May 1st 

maj be ..Minted In one year, and paid for in the subsequent year. The cost of maintaining 
a branch after the first year makes pari of the general items of the several appropriations. 

The money for hooks bought on account of the l-'ellowes Athenaeum is spent under the 
direction of the book committee of the trustees of the Fellowes fund. 



NOli Til -END BRANCH. 

City Appropriation, §4,000. 

ilariea $<"2 4s 

| Books 705 71 

1882. i Expense • 1,027 B8 

{ Amount actually expended 

lfciw* * Balance of < ity appropriation 

1S8,1, J Expended for hooks 186 us 

i Balance $1,407 87 

188-1. i;..oks fc415 08 

( Alterations and repairs 608 .1 

92] 59 

StM". 2> 

1885. Books 281 20 

(206 os 

( Books 95 54 

1880. 

/ Balance $1"'-' M 

t I looks 28 66 

1887. ] 

l.alauce 



Public Library. 



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74 



City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX XX. 



LIBRAEY SERVICE. 



(Dec. 81, 1887.) 



Name. 






Position, duties, etc. 



n - 
- - 






Mellejt Chamberlain 

James L. Whitney . 
Josd F. Carret . . 



Louis F. Gray . . . 

Adelaide A. Nichols 

John J. Keenan . . 

Total 



Librarian and Clerk of the cor- 
poration 



1869 
1875 

1880 
1868 
1885 



Principal Assistant Librarian 

Registrar and Curator of Patents 
and Engravings . 



Librarian's Secretary 
Auditor and t !ashieT . 
Librarian's Runner . 



James L. Wimtnky 
William II. Foster . 
Jose F. Carret . . . 



Lindsay Swift . . . 
Edward B. Hunt . . 
Elizabeth T. Reed . 
Annie C. Miller . . 
Mary II. Rollins . . 
Anna C. D. Keen . 
Ida W. Gould . . . 
Card Catalogues 
( 'arric K. l'.urnell . 
Alice Browne . . . 
George Whalen . . 



Total 



1869 
1860 
1875 

1878 
1883 

1873 
1881 
1886 
1887 
L884 

1881 
18S3 
1886 



Principal of the department 
Assistant 



Registrar, < toatorof Patents and 

KtiL'nw in','* and Assistant 



Assistant . 

Assistant . 

Assistant . 

Assistant . 

Assistant . 

int 

Assistant in Patent-room, etc. 

Curator of officers' card catalog 
Assistant . 
Runner . . 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



75 



Name. 



Hakriet N. Pike 
Edith D. Fuller . , 
Agnes R. Dame , . 
Mary A. McGrath , 
Patrick D. Gorman 
Total , 






H 



1867 
1879 
1883 
1868 
1885 



Position, duties, etc. 



Chief Clerk . . 
Associate Clerk 
Assistant Clerk 
Assistant . . . . 
Runner . . . . 



a h 
- - 



_ a. 

sb 

o » 



Appleton P. C. Griffin, 

William Roffe 

John S. Morrison .... 

Matthew T. Keenan . . . 

Total 



1865 

1881 
1882 
1886 



Custodian 

Ass't in charge of repairs, etc. 

Assistant 

Runner 



Arthur Mason Knapp . 
Lydia F. Knowles .... 
Louise A. Twickler . . . 

Agnes C. Doyle 

W. Maynard L. Young . . 

Alice M. Putnam 

Michael F. Duffley .... 
Daniel F. Mahoney .... 

James Brown 

James E. McLaughlin . . 

M.J. Melledy 

Total 



1875 
1867 
1881 
1885 
1878 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 



Librarian of Bates Hall 

Delivery Clerk 

Receiving Clerk . . . . 

Assistant 

Clerk of the branches . 

Assistant 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 

Runner 



Edward Tiffany 
Mary A. Jenkins . , 
Frank 0. Blaisdell 



Edwin F. Rice . . . 
Caroline E. J. Poree 

Sarah A. Mack . . . 

Eliza J. Mack . . . 

Annie G. Shea . . . 

Mary Sheridan . . . 

Rebecca J. Briggs . 



1878 
1877 
1876 

1885 
1859 
1863 
1863 
1874 
1880 
1881 



Librarian of Lower Hall 
Assistant Librarian . . 



Curator of Lower Hall card 
catalogue 



Clerk for registration and fines 

Reading-room Clerk 

Delivery Clerk 

Receiving Clerk 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 



76 



City Documext No. 40. 



LIBRARY SERVICE.— Continued. 



B 

s 




Name. 


•73 o 

3 3 
a « 


Position, duties, etc. 


n ■ 
— 

5-2 
v r 

t- r 

a <n 



6 

I'E 

- ■-. 

'- - 

~ ■- 

a » 




■6 

o 
>> 

_o 

— "5. 
a = 
o 3 




Julia C. Twickler .... 
Agnes SI. Slurray .... 

Kathleen M. Hunter . . . 

Evening Service. 
Fred. W. Blaisdell .... 

Amelia MeGrath ..... 
Freeman L. Zittel .... 


1882 
1885 
1885 
1886 
1886 

1886 

1884 
1885 
1881 
1885 
1887 
1887 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
l 
7 




























1 


Registration Clerk and Sunday 




i. 

Sj 








s 












































15 


22 














William E. Ford . . . 
John L. Williams .... 

William Monahan .... 
Extra daily Assistants. 


1858 
1886 
1880 
1883 




1 
1 
1 
1 

4 






















4 














Dennis J. Collins .... 
Mary (1. Moriarty .... 


1883 
1888 
1883 
1876 
1875 
1883 




6 












^ 






s 














6 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE.— Continued. 



11 



Name. 



Sarah C. Godbold . 
Mary R. Pray . • . . 
Alice M. Wing . . . , 
Emma D. Coleman . . 
Lizzie MeBride ... 
Florence E. Wheeler , 
Grace M. Irish . . . . 
Grace L. Roberta . . . 
George H. Hosea . I. . 



Total , 



N. Josephine Bullard 

Ellen A. Eaton 

Idalene L. Sampson . . 

Reata Watson 

Alice B. Orcutt 

Lilla F. Davis 

Lena Parker 

Cora L. Locke 

Sarah Baker 

Joseph Baker 



Total . 



Helen M. Bell . 
Elizabeth C. Berry 
Dora Puffer . . . 
Sarah W. Griggs . 
Mary E. Griffith . 
Katie F. Albert . . 
Mary T. Short . . 
Charles R. Curtis . 



Total, 



1871 
1870 
1872 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1885 
1885 
1873 



1883 
1872 

1877 
1877 
1884 
1881 
1887 
1885 
1887 
1872 



1878 
1877 
1878 
1884 
1885 
1883 
1886 
1873 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian . . . , 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant , 
Runner . . • . , 
Runner . . . . , 

Runner 

Janitor 



Librarian 

Registration Clerk 
Delivery Clerk . . 
Receiving Clerk . 

Assistant 

Extra Assistant . . 
Extra Assistant . . 

Runner 

Runner 

Janitor 



Librarian . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant , 
Extra Assistant , 
Janitor . . . . , 



"2"? 



3 O \<B 



~* la 

a «> o « 
O H 



10 



City Document No. 40. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Continued. 



Name. 



H 



Elizabeth F. Cartee 
Annie E. Eberle . . . 
Mary P. Swain .... 
Susan E. Live rinore . 
Alice G. Willoughby . 
Lydia E. Eberle . . . 
Emma L. Willoughby 
Thomas E. Smith . . . 



Total 



Mart E. Brock 

Mary F. Grailey 
Sara R. Brock . 
James M. Brock 



Total 



Mary G. Coffin . . . 
Mary J. Sheridan . . . 
Lucy Adelaide Wats. hi 
Frances Willard Pike 
Ida B. Lefavour . . . , 
Edward Davenport . . 



Total 



1886 
1874 
1878 
1879 
18S2 
1881 
1882 



1875 
1880 
1880 
1878 



1ST4 
1875 
1880 
1881 
1885 
1874 



Position, duties, etc. 



Librarian . . . . 
Assistant .'. . . 
Assistant . . . . 
Assistant . . . . 

Runner 

Extra Assistant 
Extra Runner . 
Janitor 



Librarian . . . . 

Assistant . . . . 
Extra Assistant 
Janitor 



Librarian 
Assistant , 

Runner . 
Janitor . . 



= 8 

o « 



Mak<;arkt A. Sheridan 

Maud M. Morse 

Florence Richards . . . 
Mary A. Arkinson . . . 

Emma Lynch 

Fred Clasby 

Everett Damon 



is;;, 
1877 
1S76 
1881 
1885 
1887 
1887 



Librarian . . 
Assistant . . 
Assistant . . 
Assistant . . 
Runner ... 
Runner . . . 
Extra runner 



Total 



Public Library. 

LIBRARY SERVICE. — Concluded. 



79 



a 
<o 

3 

eS 

a, 

« 


Name. 


a « 


Position, duties, etc. 


CS . 
7. ° 
? ° 
ti-r 
£• f 
^ a> 

O 


<» 
o 

!■"> 

G ~ 
C3 O 

a a) 
O 


>» 

_o 

— "Si 

2 a 

o « 
Eh 


.« 


Anna J. Barton .... 

Margaret S. Barton .... 

Charles C. Cook 

Timothy Johnson .... 


1876 

1878 
1882 
1887 
1877 




1 
1 
1 


1 
1 




S 






s 






ft. 






e 




1 

4 




s 




5 


S 












Catherine Gr. J. Mooney . . 


1877 
1884 
1886 




1 
1 

1 
3 


— 




■8 . 

■ s 










^ 




3 












00 

3 


Julia W. Richards .... 
Harriet L. Atkinson . . . 

Samuel T. Bowthorpe . . 
Bessie G-. Fairbrother . . 


1875 
18S4 
1882 
1886 
1885 
1886 


Custodian, Lower Mills .... 
Custodian, "West Roxbury . . . 

Custodian, Mt. Bowdoin .... 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 




6 













80 



City Document No. 40. 



SUMMARY. 

Librarian, Register, Secretary, Auditor, and 

Runner ..... 
Catalogue department 
Purchase and Entry department 
Shelf department 

Bates Hall circulation department 
Lower Hall circulation department, day 

evening, and Sunday service 
Janitor's department 
Bindery 

East Boston branch 
South Boston branch 
Roxbury branch . 
Charlestown branch 
Brighton branch . 
Dorchester branch 
South-End branch 
Jamaica Plain branch 
North-End branch 
Deliveries . 



12 
5 
4 

11 



Central Library. 
62 regulars. 
7 extras. 

69 



Branches. 
51 regulars. 



1 \ 15 extras. 



66 



Total 



113 
22 



22 



Grand total . 



135 



AGENTS. 

Messrs. Clarke & Carruth, Boston. 

Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 

Messrs. N. Triibner & Co., London. 

Mr. F. W. Christern and M. Charles Reinwald, New York and Paris. 

Deuerlich'sehe Buchhandlung, Gdttingen. 

Signorina Giulia Alberi, Florence. 

Senor Don Juan F. Iiiano, Madrid. 



Public Library. 



81 



APPENDIX XXI. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LIBRARY. 











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Not on shelves . . . 


3,689 


6,368 


1,228 


623 


2,267 


1,523 


722 


2,015 


1,900 


1,158 


12 


21,505 


Of these found to be 




























1,496 


4,371 


1,015 




1,652 


1,270 


469 


1,495 


1,649 


1,022 




14,439 


At the binderies . . 


669 


317 


25 


106 


130 


41 


15 


78 


58 


53 




1,492 


Otherwise account- 




























1,433 


1,423 


179 


517 


482 


211 


237 


442 


193 


83 


12 


5,212 




91 


257 


9 




3 


1 


1 










362 















37 books missing in previous years from the Lower Hall have reappeared. 



82 



City Document No. 40. 



X 









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Public Library. 



83 



APPENDIX XXIII. 

EXAMINING COMMITTEES FOR THIRTY-SIX YEARS. 

The following gentlemen have served on the Examining 
Committees for the years given. The names in italics are 
those of Trustees who have acted as chairmen of the various 
committees. The thirty-fourth year was from May 1 to 
Dec. 31, 1885, a period of eight months, for which no 
Examining Committee was appointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D., 1860. 
Adams, Wm. T., 1875. 
Alger, Rev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1854. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 1883. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1854. 
Bigelow, Jacob, 31. D., 1857. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, John G., 31. D., 1883. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879. 
Bowditch, Henry I., 31. D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry I., 31. D., 1865. 
Bowditch, H. P., 31. D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingersoll, 1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C. E., 31. D., 1872. 
Burroughs. Rev. Henry, jr., 1869. 
Chadwick, James R., 31. D., 1877. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheney, Mrs. Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman, D.D., 1882. 
Collar, Wm. C, 1874. 
Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thos. B., 31. D., 1874. 
dishing. Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 



Dean, Benj., 1873. 

Denny, Henry G., 1876. 

Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 

Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 

Dix, James A., 1860. 

Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 

Durant, Henry F., 1863. 

Duryea, Jos. T., D.D., 1880. 

Dwight, John S., 1868. 

Dwight, Thomas, 31. D., 1880. 

Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 

Eaton, William S., 1887. 

Edes, Henry H., 1886. 

Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 

Ellis, Calvin, 31. D., 1871. 

Ellis, Geo. E., D.D., 1881. 

Endicott, William, jr., 1878. 

Evans. George W., 1887. 

Field, Walbridge A., 1866. 

Fields, James T., 1872. 

Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 

Fowle, William F., 1864. 

Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 

Frost, Oliver, 1854. 

Frothingham, Richard, 1876. 

Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 

Furness, Horace Howard, LL.D., 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., 31. D., 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, jr., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., 31. D., 1868. 
Greenongh, William W., 1858, 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grinnell, Rev. C. E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., 1858. 
Hale, Mrs. George S., 1887. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Haynes, Henry W, 1881, 1884. 
Hay ward, George, 31. D., 1863. 
Heard, John T., 1853. 



84 



City Document No. 40. 



Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard M., M.D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., M.D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., jr., 1882. 
Homans, Charles D., 31. D., 1867. 
Homans, Mrs. Charles D., 1885, 1886, 

1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D., 1869. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, lion. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1875. 
Kimball Henry H., 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D.. 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, AbbDtt, 1859. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lewis, Weston. 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, lion. F. W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon. 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L., 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G., 1855. 

Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 

Lowell, Edward J., 1885. 

Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 

Lyman, George II.. M.D., 1885. 

Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 

Mason, /.'< v. Charles, 1857. 

Mason, Roberl M., 1869. 

Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 

Minns. Thomas, 1864. 

Minot, Francis, 1866. 

Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 

Morse, John T.. jr.. 1879. 

Morse, Robert M., jr., 1878. 

Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 

Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 

Neale, Rollin H., D.D., 1853. 

Noble, John, 1882. 

Norcross, Otis. 1880. 

O'Brien, Hugh, 1879. 

O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 

Otis, G. A.. I860. 

Paddock, Rt. R, v. Benj. II., 1876. 

Park in an, Henry, 1885. 

Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882. 

Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 

Perry, Thomas 8., 1879, 1882, 1883, 
1884, 1885. 



Phillips, John C, 1882. 

Phillips. Jonathan, 1854. 

Prescott, William H., LL.D., 1853. 

Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 

Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 

Randall, Charles L., M.D., 1884. 

Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 

Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 

Ropes, John C, 1872. 

Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 

Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 

Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 

Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 

Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 

Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 

Smith, Charles C, 1873. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 

Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 

Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 

Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 

Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 

Stock well, S. N., 1861. 

Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 

Story, Joseph, 1856. 

Sullivan. Richard, 1883, 1884. 

Teele, John O.. 1886. 

Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 

Thayer, George A., 1875. 

Thayer, Rev. Thomas B. ( 1862. 

Thomas, B. F., 1875. 

Thomas, Seih J.. 1856. 

Ticknor, George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tobev, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Twomblv. Rev. A. 8., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. 1'.., M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. Ceo. II., 1873. 
Wallev. Eon. Samuel II., 1862. 
Ward." Rev. Julius H., 1882. 
Ware, Charles F., .)/./>.. 1875. 
Ware. Darwin E., 1881. 
Wales, George W.. 1875. 
Warner, Herman J., 1867. 
Warren, lion. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Robert C, 1867. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate C, 1877. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 

Whipple, Edwin I'.. 1869. 

Whitmore, William II. 1887. 

Whitney, Daniel II.. 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A.. 1873. 
Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 

Williamson, William C, 1881. 

Wilson, Elisha /'.. M.D., 1861. 

Winsor, Justin, 1867. 

Winthrop, Hon. Robert C. 1854. 

Winthrop, Robert C. jr., 1887. 

Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll 1)., 1884. 



Public Library. 



85 



APPENDIX XXIV. 



TRUSTEES FOR THIRTY-SIX YEARS. 

The Honorable Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1852 to 1864 ; the late George Ticknor in 1865 ; and 
William W. Greenough, Esq., from 1866 to the present time. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization; that 
for 1853 made what is called the first annual report. It 
consisted of one alderman and one common councilman, and 
five citizens at large, till 1867, when a revised ordinance 
made it consist of one alderman, two common councilmen, 
and six citizens at large, two of whom retired, unless re- 
elected, each year, while the members from the City Council 
were elected yearly. In 1878 the organization of the Board 
was changed to include one alderman, one councilman, and 
five citizens at large, as before 1867 ; and in 1885, by the pro- 
visions of the amended city charter, the representation of the 
city government upon the Board by an alderman and a 
councilman was abolished, leaving the Board, as at present, 
consisting of five citizens at larare. 



Abbott, Samuel A. B., 1879-87. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G., 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
Bigelow, John P., 1852-68. 
Bowditch, Henry I., 1805-68. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. C. J., 1861-62. 
Bnrditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George O., 1870-71. 
Chase, George B., 1877-85. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 
Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke. James Freeman, 1878-87. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864-66. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1S60-61. 
Cortis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
Dickinson, M. F.,jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-6-1. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J.. 1883. 
Frost. Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard. 1875-79. 
Gaffleld, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samdel A., l!S68-78. 
Greenodgh, William W., l85r,-87. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 



Haynes, Henry W., 1S80-87. 
Hillard, George S., 1872-75 ; 1876- 

77. 
Howes, Osborne, ir., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keith, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, John H., 1884-1885. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W. , 1855. 
Morse, Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Ellis W.. 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 
Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Plummer, Farnham, 1856-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
Putnam, George, 1868-77. 
Reed, Sampson, 1852-53. 
Sanger, George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Philip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey N., 1878-79. 



8ti 



City Document No. 40. 



Shurtleff, Nathaniel B., 1852-68. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 
Story, Joseph, 1855-56; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
Ticknor, George, 1852-66. 
Tyler, John S., 1863-64; 1866-67. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 

Citizens at large in small capitals. 



Wbitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H., 1885-87. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, ElishaT., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert J., 1868-69. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 638 3