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Full text of "Annual report"

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THIRTY-NINTH 



ANNUAL El^POET. 



1890 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1890 



BOSTON: 
ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITl' PRINTERS. 

18 9 1. 



To His Honor Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the Citif of Bofilon : — 

The Trustees of the Public Librni-y of the City of Boston 
have the honor to submit herewith their thirty-ninth nnnuiil 
report. 

An ordinance of the city requires that the Trustees " shall 
annually appoint an examinins; committee of not less than 
five members, who, together with one of said Board as chair- 
man, shall examine the Library and make to said Board a 
report of its condition." The members of the committee for 
the past year were : Miss Anna S. Amory, Samuel Arthur 
Bent, Esq., Martin Brimmer, Esq., Miss Harriette S. Law- 
rence, Miss Alice Lee, Sanuiel F. McCleary, Esq., Thomas 
S. Perry, Esq., Dr. Harold Williams, and the Hon. Fred- 
erick O. Prince, who, on behalf of the Trustees, acted as 
chairman. 

In order to give ample time for a thorough examination of 
the condition of the Library, they were appointed in January, 
and the Trustees and the community at large are under great 
obligations to them individually for the diligence and fidelity 
with which they performed the duty imposed upon them. 
Their report — which was submitted on the fifteenth of Janu- 
ary, 1891, and is annexed hereto as Appendix "A" — has 
received from the Trustees the careful and respectful consid- 
eration to which a communication from such a source is 
entitled. 

Some of the suggestions and recommendations made by 
the committee have been adopted by the Trustees ; others 
of them, while their adoption would probably increase the 
usefulness of the Library, are of such a nature that they can 
not be put into practical operation without the expenditure 
of more money than has been put at the disposal of the 
Trustees by the City Council, to whose consideration they 
must, therefore, be respectfully referred. 

The relation of the Public Library to the schools has been 
frequently discussed in previous reports, but as the Examin- 
ing Committee have referred to the subject, it may not be 
out of place for the Trustees to state briefly what appears to 
them to be the purpose for which the Lil)rary was founded, 
and the policy adopted by the first Trustees, which has been 
consistently observed by their successors. 



4 Report of the Library Department. 

The Library was founded not as a subsidiary and collateral 
aid to the schools, but as the complement of the free school 
system. To quote the words of Mr. Everett on the 
occasion of the dedication of the present Library build- 
ini^, "Education does not end with the schools; nor is 
all education conducted within the school-room or lecture- 
room. Even a college degree is but the significant A.B. of 
a whole alphabet of learning still to be acquired. The great 
work of self-culture remains to be carried on long after mas- 
ters and tutors and professors have finished their labors and 
exhausted their arts. And no small part of this work,l need 
hardly say, is to be carried on under the influence of good 
reading and by the aid of good books." 

The great object of this Lil>rary is to enable all citizens to 
have access to the best of books for the pur[)ose of self- 
culture. The education of children in the schools is cared 
for and directed by the school committee, who have abundant 
means to furnish pupils with all necessary liooks required for 
school-work. There seems, therefore, to be no good reason 
why pupils or teachers should have any pi-ivileges in the 
Library not accorded to all citizens alike. Pupils and teach- 
ers are not del)arred from the privileges of the institution, 
but have, in commcm with others not connected with the 
schools, every opportunity to pursue special investigations 
or gratify their desire for good reading. 

In the purchase of books the Trustees aim to put within 
the reach of all citizens books of practical value to the 
artisan, to the professional man, and to the student, which 
otherwise, by reason of rarity or cost, would be inaccessible 
to the great body of citizens. They aim also to place before 
the readers "the pleasant and healthy literature of the day," 
while it is yet fresh. Of good books on matters of great 
interest to the public a nund)erof copies are usually bought. 
It would, however, be beyond the means of the institution, 
and foreign to the purpose for which it was established, to 
attempt to supply fully the inmiediate demand for nevv and 
popular books. No public library should compete with cir- 
culating libraries and booksellers in supplying such a 
demand. The funds of the Library would soon be exhausted, 
and in a few years the shelves would be filled with dui)licate 
copies of books that would not be called for, and that could 
be disposed of only as waste paper; for few popular books 
after a fiee circulation are in a condition to be sold or ex- 
changed. It has not been the object of the Trustees to fur- 
nish what is called " light reading," and considerable care 
has to be exercised to keep from purchasing books that 
would be not only useless, but positively objectionable. 



Report of the Library Department. 5 

The circulation of the Library could be greatly increased 
by the indiscriminate purchase of novels, but it must be 
remembered that the value of the Library to the community 
is not to be measured merely by the number of books lent. 
The use of one good book does more good than the circula- 
tion of a dozen poor ones. 

The Trustees cannot do more than has been done to 
extend the usefulness of the Patent library. They have 
always used their best endeavors to keep it well up with the 
times, and have provided for it greater accommodation 
than they have been able to afford for any other special col- 
lection. They believe the present custodian is a competent 
person for his position, and is satisfactory to those who con- 
sult the lil)rary. No complaints against him have reached 
them. During the coming year they hope to be able to add 
to the collection a complete set of United States patents 
classified according to subjects, to complement the present 
set, which is arranged chronologicaHj-. 

The members of examining committees enjoy, equally with 
all citizens, the privilege — that has always been most freely 
exercised — of at all times, formally or informally, "calling 
the attention of the Trustees to any pressing needs of the 
branch lil)raries or buildings;" but the Trustees can con- 
ceive that if, as is suggested by the sub-conmiittee, examin- 
ing committees should regard it as [)art of their duty to make 
frequent informal reports, they might feel that their functions 
were those of a supervising body, — functions too onerous 
to be required of a committee appointed only " to examine 
the Library, and make a report of its condition." 

By the by-laws, the management of the branches devolves 
upon the Librarian, and it is his duty to visit them as fre- 
quently as is necessary in order to know their condition and 
needs. All the librarians of branches are in direct daily commu- 
nication with the Central Library, and they have every possi- 
ble opportunity to make known their wants. All needed 
repairs are attended to as soon as possible, and are not 
delayed to be called for by examining committees. Some of 
the branch library-rooms, the Trustees are well aware, are 
not what they should be ; but they are the best that can be 
provided with the means at their disposal. No case has, 
however, been reported where books have been injui-ed 
or destroyed by lack of repairs to buildings occupied by 
branch libraries in annexed districts. 

The Trustees are not surprised that the " poor quality of 
gas is a subject of complaint at Jamaica Plain." In this re- 
spect the branch suffers in common with the Central Library 
and other branches. It is to be feared that this is an evil 
that cannot be remedied by the Trustees, 



6 Report of the Library Department. 

The Trustees ajjree with the committee in the dissatisfac- 
tioii they express in regard to the premises occupied by the 
Dorchester branch library. This very useful branch de- 
serves better accommodations than have been provided 
for it. 

The Trustees recognize the fact that new catalogues for the 
ditierent branches are desirable ; but the expense of cata- 
logues is very great, and they have found it impossible, with 
their present means, to do more than they have done. 
Heretofore the branch librarians have not been required to do 
cataloguing work. It is proposed, in the future, to make 
cataloguing one of the requirements of the position, and by 
this means it may be possible to furnish the branches with 
the means needed for their proper use. 

The condition of the North End deli very -station and read- 
ing-room has been the subject of careful consideration. The 
Trustees have made constant endeavors, in which they have 
had the assistance of the police department, to find suitable 
quarters ; but they have thus far been unsuccessful. They 
have reported the condition of the neighboring premises to 
the Board of Health, and have done what they could to ren- 
der the reading-room habitable. In May, in response to 
a request by the City Council to report " upon the expediency 
of maintaining a circulating library instead of the present 
delivery-station and reading-room," they replied as follows : — 

" While they are of opinion that a circulating library at 
the North End would supply a need that has been long felt, 
they do not think it would be expedient or possible to 
establish one in the restricted quarters on Salem street, at 
present used for the North End delivery-station and reading- 
room. 

"At the time this delivery-station was opened they could 
find no better place for the purpose, and they do not know 
where a branch library can now be established, unless the 
city will make suitable provision for one in the proposed 
building for a new police-station." 

Objection was made to the use of any portion of the 
police-station building for a library, and no action was taken 
upon the report. 

There is certainly great need of better library accommo- 
dations for the populous districts in the North and West 
Ends which are now the most poorly served in the city. 
The Trustees believe that a delivery-station and reading- 
room situated in the neighborhood of Bowdoiu square 



Report of tup: Library Department. 7 

and Cambridge street would be more useful than some of 
those already established. 

There has been no change of policy in regard to furnishing 
books to branch libraries. The Trustees are aware that the 
supply of books sent to the branches during the past year has 
not been so great as in some preceding years. This is not the 
result of a change of [)olicy, but of lack of money, as the 
amount appropriated for the purpose by the City was not 
adequate to sup[)ly the demands of the Library. The 
money that can be devoted to the purchase of I)ooks is 
practically what remains of the annual appropriation after 
providing for expense of administration. As the Library 
grows, the cost of administration necessarily increases, and if 
the annual appropriations are not increased in like ratio, the 
supply of books must be reduced and the usefulness of the 
Library be seriously impaired. 

During the past year the cost of maintaining the branch 
libraries, including the Lower Hall, has been seven-sixteenths 
of the whole appropriation ; so that the Trustees were con- 
fronted with the question whether the Central Library should 
1)6 permanently and irre[)arably injured in order to provide 
the customary supply of books to the branches, or whether 
the branches should sutier temporary inconvenience in order 
to keep the Central Library from suti'ering such injury. 
They decided that it was best that the bj-anches should 
suffer. It is a temporary inconvenience for the branches to 
be deprived of their usual supply of books ; but to neglect 
to keep the main Library well up with the times works an 
injury that can never be repaired. 

There has been a marked increase in the use of books, 
especially in Bates Hall — the Library proper — which 
contains only standard literature. This fact is extremely 
gratifying, as it indicates a growing demand for good 
reading. 

The experiment begun in December, 1889, of keeping the 
Bates Hall open until 9 o'clock in the evening has been con- 
tinued during the year, and the result has been entirely satis- 
factory. The hours between six and nine have been found 
to accommodate a large number of workers who are unable 
to use the Library in the daytime. 

The opening of this Hall on Sunday from tvvo till nine, 
which was begun early in February, has been followed 
by a like gratifying result. It is to be hoped that the funds 
placed at the disposal of the Trustees by the City Govern- 
ment will enable them to make this service permanent, as its 
usefulness has been demonstrated beyond doubt. 



Report or the Library Department. 



Bequests axd Gifts. 

Mr. Arthur Scholfield, who died in January, 1883, be- 
queathed to the city $50,000, the income ol' which was to be 
])aid by his brother, the hite Joseph Scholfield, durinof his life, 
and afterwards used for the purchase of books. JNlr. fJoseph 
Scholtield died in 1889, and by his will bequeathed to the 
city for the use of the Library the income that he had re- 
ceived from his brother's bequest, amounting to $11,766. 
This sum was received and invested bv the City Treasurer in 
May. 

The bequest of $10,000 made by the late J. Ingersoll 
Bowditch, and referred to in a previous report, was received 
in Januar}', and the income then became available for the 
purchase of mathematical and astronomical books. 

In May Mrs. John A. Lewis gave to the Library the 
exceedingly valuable collection of books made by her late 
husband, relating to the earl}^ history of America. This was 
considered a gitt of so great importance that it was made 
the subject of a special connimnication to the City Govern- 
ment, who, in June, voted to ^Irs. Lewis the thanks of the 
city. This collection will not be distributed among the 
books of the Library, but will be kept separate and known 
as the "John A. Lewis Library." 

Appended to this report is a list of other gifts, for which 
the thanks of the Trustees and of the city are due to the 
givers. 

It is exceedingly gratifying to note from the number and 
value of these gifts and bequests that the interest taken in 
the Library is constantly increasing. 

In their annual report for 1858 the Trustees of that year, 
in view of the " character of the institution as a public es- 
tablishment in which the community at large will enjoy 
greater advantages than have ever been affoided in any other 
case to the [)oi)ulation of a large city," suggest "to such 
of their fellow-citizens at large that can afford it, the expe- 
diency of making an annual present to the Public Library of 
at least one good book." "This," they say, " might be done 
by many thousands of the citizens of Boston without any 
inconvenience ; and, besides adding to the stores of the 
Library, would tend to extend and strengthen the sympathy 
of the people at large in its welfare." The Trustees venture 
to renew this suggestion. Doubtlessly man}'^ citizens of 
Boston have in their houses great mnnbers of books that are 
practically useless to them, but which woukl be of great 
value to the Librar3^ In cases where such books are dupli- 



Report of the Library Department. 9 

catcs of volumes in the Central liibraiy they can be sent to 
the branches. If any persons desiring to give books to the 
Library will notify the Trustees, a messenger will be sent for 
them. 

The Barlow Sale. 

In the early part of the year the City Council, with great 
generosity and foresight, appropriated $20,000 for the pur- 
chase of books at the sale of the library of the late S. L. M. 
Barlow. The dispersion of this collection afforded an oppor- 
tunity, that may perhaps never happen again, to obtain many 
rare and valuable books relating to early American history 
that should be fV)und in the Public Library of this city, if it 
is to maintain in the future the position it has held in the- 
past. Great care was taken in the selection of the books to- 
be purchased, and in the determination of the amounts to l>e 
bid for them. A full report in regard to this sale was made 
to the Mayor in February, and a list of the books purchased, 
will be found in the April, 1890, Bulletin. 

The most valual)le books purchased were the Latin version, 
of the first letter of Columbus, which was reproduced in fee- 
simile in the October Bulletin, and "A True Copie of the 
Court Booke of the Governor and Society of the Massachu- 
setts Bay in New England." 

Index Digest. 

In January His Honor Mayor Hart, in a letter to the 
Trustees, informed them that an index digest of all city 
documents was greatly needed by both the City Government 
and the public, and suggested that they should devise a 
plan for making one. The subject was carefully considered, 
and Mr. Whitney, the assistant librarian, was instructed to 
prepare sample pages of the proposed index to snbmit to 
the City Government. Owing to the forced reduction in 
Library sei'vice, this work has been delayed, but the Trustees 
hope to be able soon to report further upon the subject. 

Bulletin. 

With the April number began a new series of the Bulletin, 
with a change to a classified arrangement which gives an 
approach to books from a different point from that of the 
card catalogue, and wdiich, to a certain extent, supplies the 
deficiencies of that catalogue. The bibliographical matter 
appended to the Bulletin issued this year is of unusual 
interest. The Trustees are under great obli2:ations to Paul 



10 Report of the Library Department. 

Leicester Ford, Esq., of Brooklyn, New York, for his 
"enerous contribution of a list of the publications of the 
Continental Congress. This list is of very great value to 
students of American history, and has added great interest 
to the Bulletins in which it is published. 

A ninth and greatly enlarged edition of the " Hand Book 
for Readers" has been published, containing the regulations 
of the Library, with an account of the catalogues, a biljliog- 
raphy of special subjects, a list of indexes to periodicals, 
and other information. The book is of great assistance, 
not only to persons using the Library, but to all readers and 
students, and reflects great credit upon the editor, Mr. 
Whitney, and those of the Library force who assisted him in 
this work. 

Owing to the smallness of the amount appropriated for the 
maintenance of the Lil)rary for the present tinnncial year, 
the efficiency of the institution has been serioush* impaired. 
The Library force has of necessity been greatly decreased, 
and much useful work discontinued. It is a matter for the 
serious consideration of the City Council whether the Library 
shall continue to grow in usefulness as heretofore, or whether 
the policy pursued up to this time by the Trustees shall be 
changed so as to meet the necessities of an inadequate ap- 
propriation. The increase of the Library in size and useful- 
ness has been wonderful ; but there has been of late years 
no corresponding increase in the amount of money annually 
appropriated for its maintenance. 

Samuel A. B. Abbott, 
Henry \V. Haynes, 
Frederick O. Prince, 
Piiineas Pierce, 
William R. Richards. 

January 20, 1891. 

NoTK. — The tables that have usually accompanied the Librarian's 
report will be found in the appendixes. Owinj^ to the resignation of 
Mr. (Jhaniberlain there has been practically a vacancy in the office of 
librarian, although his official connection with the institution did not end 
until the first of October. 

The semi-annual report of the Trustees upon the condition of the new 
Public Library building is appended, following page 58. 



Report of the Library Department. 11 



[APPENDIX A.] 



EXAMIxXING COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The Examining Committee orgtinized, with the Hon, F, 
O. Prince of the Board of Trustees as chairman, soon after 
receiving notice of their appointment, and divided them- 
selves into various sub-committees for the better perform- 
ance of their task. They have held several meetings, in 
which various reports and suggestions have been discussed, 
and their work has been greatly facilitated by the readiness 
of the officials and of the Trustees to explain to them the 
complicated matters necessarily involved in the administra- 
tion of the Library. Many matters have been the subject of 
discussion between the committee and the Trustees, and the 
committee are anxious to express their gratification with 
the opportunity to express in oral discussion with the gentle- 
men in charge of the various and complicated aflairs of the 
Library their views on these matters and to learn those held 
by the Trustees. 

At the present time, the duties of the Trustees are much 
augmented by their superintendence of the construction of 
the new Library building. This edifice, already an orna- 
ment to the city, even in its partly completed condition, 
is destined to be of the greatest possible use by offering 
to the public much greater facilities for the consultatioji 
of the rich stores of the Library. At present, the Boyl- 
ston street building is utterly outgrown. Both the Bates 
Hall and the Lower Hall reading-rooms are crowded far be- 
yond their capacity, although measures have been taken to 
give more room to the public. It is not the public alone 
that suffers inconvenience, the officials of the Library have to 
perform their ever-increasing duties in the most cramped 
quarters. In the new building, which, it is to be hoped, 
will be completed with the utmost promptness, great relief 
will be obtained for all who have occasion to enter the 
Library, 

The committee earnestly support the intention of the 
Trusteees to provide in the new building full accommoda- 
tions for a large number of readers and students. The 
greater the facilities, the greater, the committee are sure, 
will be the number of persons using them. Already the 



12 Report of the Library Departmext. 

Lil)rary is resorted to by many workers from other places, 
and the more it is enlarged and improved, the surer the 
Library is to become a phice of resort for strangers as well 
as for citizens, whereby an advantage accrues to the city. 
It is desirable, not merely to provide a room that shall be an 
agreeable spectacle to the chance visitor who walks through 
it, but one giving every student who requires it such isola- 
tion as may be consistent with the interests of the Library 
for work without distraction. Already the service is prompt 
and efficient. Those who recall the delay in receiving books 
with which one is hampered in the libraries of Europe must 
smile at the now rare complaints concerning the slow supply 
of books hi this Library. Volumes from a remote corner of 
the third story cannot be brought instantly, but they can be 
and are brought promptly. The extreme difficulty of work- 
ino- when elbowed by a crowd will doubtless be removed 
in the new building. 

The committee regret the enforced economy in the pur- 
chase of books, which has cut down the supply in the Cen- 
tral Library and in the Branches. It is understood that the 
expenses of the Library have increased not onl}' with the 
natural growth of the Library, but also on account of two 
very important changes that have l)een made in the course of 
the last year. One is keeping the Bates Hall open till 9 
o'clock every evening; the other is opening Bates Hall on 
Sunday from 2 P.M. until 9 P.iM. This last change has been 
the subject of much discussion in past years, and when it 
was first proposed it met with violent op[)osition. Grad- 
ually, however, the objections evaporated ; and when the 
change was made, it did not excite a murnmr. It was 
found, indeed, that the opportunity for visiting and making 
use of the Library was taken by many who were kept away 
by their occupations during the rest of the week, and that 
the Library offered welcome advantages to a number of seri- 
ous workers. Inasmuch as the same change is under dis- 
cussion with regard to the public lil)raries of many cities 
in the country, the conmiittee are anxious that the experi- 
ence of Boston may not be ovei-looked. The committee are 
unanimous in conunending these imiovations ; the public 
shows its appreciation b}' the use it makes of them. An 
additional, or what is for some the only, o])portunity for 
serious reading seems in every way admirable. 

The Examining Committee suggest to the City Council 
that, inasmuch as the money paid into the Library for fines, 
the sale of catalogues, etc., amounting to about $3,000 
yearly, is now turned into the City Treasur}', in accordance 
with the new City Ordinances, it would be well to have the 



Report of the Library Department. 13 

annual appropriations enlarged to the same amount, if it be 
deemed inadvisable to alter the Ordinances to that effect; 
Such sums of money are properly, it seems, the Library's 
earnings, and might conveniently be kept where they would 
be directly devoted to defraying the legitimate expenses of 
the Library. 

The Public Schools. 

In the report of the Examining Committee for 1888 cer- 
tain recommendations were made to the Trustees concernino: 
cards to be issued to teachers and pupils, which have not 
been adopted. Since that time your committee understand 
that the School Board makes an annual appropriation to 
increase the number of l)ooks for use in the higher grades of 
schools, and does not ask the Trustees at present for further 
legislation. The subject of assistance to be given by 
public libraries to the young is of growing importance. 
Your committee find that large cities like Philadelphia and 
Chicago, and smaller municipalities like Providence, Worces- 
ter, Cambridge, and Newton, give a larger number of 
books to school children than to other citizens, regarding 
the library as a means of education, like a laboratory of 
philosophical or chemical apparatus. The committee are 
glad to know that in the absence of any such system in 
Boston, the Library officials, both in the main building and 
in the Branches, spend nmch time and a very laudable degree 
of effort in directing the young to books which assist them 
in their studies and give them a taste for pure and noble 
literature. 

Patent Department. 

In the new Library building many of the inconveniences 
here mentioned will be done away with, and what is true of 
this department is true of all the other departments of the 
Library, which now suffer seriously from overcrowding. 
The shelves are uncomfortably full, and new books have to 
be placed in new and often remote quarters, and the staff of 
Library assistants works under very unfavorable conditions. 

The beneficial results of removing the Patent Library 
from its former contracted quarters into its present and 
more accessible room is shown in a marked degree l)y a 
gratifying increase in the number of examiners ; and it 
exhibits an undoubted proof that the greater and wider the 
facilities of consultation, the more satisfactory and advan- 
tageous will be the consequent results. 

It was a felicitous remark of John Heard, Jr., a member 



14 Eeport of the Library Department. 

of the Examining Committee for 1888, that the artisan, 
thouirh " accustomed to tools, is afraid of books." Indeed, 
the average mechanic, upon his entry into the patent-room 
of the library, with its shelves on all sides litted to the 
ceiling with specifications and plans, foreign and domestic, 
is fairly bewildered at such an array, and at once feels his 
inability to fultil his purpose alone. In the absence of a 
general card catalogue for this department he Avould un- 
doubtedly feel relief at once, could he be sure that he had a 
right to apply to some person familiar with the books and 
methods of consultation, who would not only furnish the 
material he seeks Init would answer all his questions fully 
and readily. Without such aid, he must employ, if he is 
not disheartened in his quest, some patent solicitor at a 
considerable ex[)ense. To bring these books and their 
contents, subject to judicious rules, within the original reach 
of our mechanics and artisans should be the purpose of the 
Trustees ; otherwise the use of the Library is subordinate to 
a mere exhibition of the extent of its possibilities. 

We recommend, therefore, that in the new building a 
special curator be employed in the patent-room, who shall 
devote his whole time in promoting a ready and easy access 
for all inquirers to the manifold treasures of this depart- 
ment. 

To carry this suggestion into eflfect would not involve a 
great expense, for it is necessary now to have a special at- 
tendant upon duty in this room. It is a question merely of 
additional salary to be paid to a competent })crson. 

The area of the present Patent Lil)rary room is about 
60 X 30 feet, a large portion of which is utilized as a 
reading-room for women, and is also intruded upon by the 
Lower Hall catalogue case, before which are usually found 
numerous apjilicants who block up at times the entrance to 
the room. 

These obstructions, it is understood, are but temporary. 
In the new building the room assigned for the accommoda- 
tion of the Patent Library has a lioor area of (>.5i X 83.10, 
only a few feet larger than the present room — but it will be 
devoted solely to its special purpose. 

With an enlarged area for the accommodation of the Library, 
and especially w'ith increased facilities for the consultation of 
books, and with a generous service in expediting the search 
for special topics, the committee feel confident that the Patent 
Libraiy cannot fail to invite a wider and a more satisfactory 
use of its contents. 



Report of the Library Department. 15 

Branch Libraries. 

The committee to visit the Branch libraries have paid four 
official visits and many informal ones to the Branches and 
delivery stations during the year 1890. The delivery 
stations were included this year for the first time in the 
official visit and the committee recommend that they be 
henceforth examined with the Branches, that the entire woi'k 
of the latter may thus be better understood. The stations 
echoed the call for new catalogues which was heard at the 
Branches, and the committee urge the importance of their 
speedy publication. It is a singular fact that the Branch 
using the catalogue of earliest date (1872, with a supplement 
in 1874) is that which shows the smallest circulation. The 
committee admit the popularity of the " finding lists," fre- 
quently published, at an expense of two cents to the pur- 
chaser. Nothing, however, can supersede the usefulness of 
a full catalogue, published at the expense of the city, and 
put within reach of every citizen. 

The committee feel strongly the importance of the deliv- 
ery stations, and commend them to the hearty support of the 
Trustees. They are glad to know that at least one has been 
established since the committee made their official visit, and 
that another has been called for by the City Council. They 
hope to see one in operation at the West End (wiiere it may 
be possible to use the lil)rary of the West Church), and one at 
the Roxbury crossing. It will be noticed that what was once 
the city of Roxbury has no delivery station, and that there 
are none at the South and West Ends of the city proi)er. 
When the new building is opened, the need of stations in 
these districts will be im[)erative. The committee do not rec- 
ommend the transfer of the South End Branch to any other 
locality, but rather the opening of a station nearer the old 
Roxbury line. The delivery stations, like an arterial system, 
bring not only the nearest branch, but the main library to 
the most remote sections of the city. They are established 
and maintained with comparative cheapness, and are a most 
powerful ftictor in spreading the benetits of the free public 
Library throughout the entire community. In selecting the 
rooms for such stations, the committee hope that a reading 
room for papers and periodicals may always be included, or 
that the citizens asking for such a station may help to con- 
tribute this essential feature. 

The committee are not satisfied with the rooms assigned 
to the Dorchester Branch. They have reason to believe that 
the Trustees share this dissatisfaction, but feel that no im- 
provement is possible at present. The committee have no 



16 Report or the Library Department. 

doubt that the use of the Library in that thickly settled 
neighborhood suffers by reason of the poor accommodation. 
Perhaps if it were known that the Library was seeking more 
commodious quarters, they would be offered. The committee 
recommend to the Trustees to make public their dissatisfac- 
tion with a building so unsuited to the wants of a large and 
intelligent section of the city. 

The committee found the buildings to be generally in good 
repair, and in charge of intelligent and faithful officials. Cer- 
tain improvements which seemed imperative were reported 
to the Trustees immediately after the committee's visit, at an 
informal meeting with several members of the Board. The 
repairs thus recommended were at once undertaken. The com- 
mittee hope, therefore, that similar opportunities may l»e given 
to their successors of calling the attention of the Trustees to 
any pressing needs of the Branch libraries or buildings. The 
time between the official visit in the month of April and the 
publication of the annual report nearly a year later is too long, 
and should be broken, if necessary. In' an informal report 
made whenever thought expedient by the committee. 

Needed repairs, however, should not be delayed until 
called for by a visiting committee, but should be made when- 
ever the Branch librarians direct the attention of the Trustees 
to their necessity. In the case of annexed districts, the same 
care should be taken of the library buildings which the orig- 
inal municipalities .would have shown had annexation not 
occurred, and no re])airs should be neglected whereby the 
buihiings may deteriorate or the books in tlxMU be injured or 
destro3'ed. From tiie complaints and requests made to them 
last spring, the committee feel that there is a lack of proper 
communication between the Branches and the main building, 
possibly that the Trustees do not hear requests, which there- 
fore fail of response. The committee, therefore, report these 
com|)laints and requests to the Trustees, with the hope that 
they may be carefully considered and acted upon. At the 
North and South Ends, South Boston, Dorchester, and 
Jamaica Plain, a want of pro[)er ventilation was reported, 
which at South Boston the lil)rarian herself has imi)roved. 
At South Boston an urjrent call is made for a hiijher class of 
childi-en's l)0()ks, such as would aid in school work, and for 
books of a more serious character for adults. The committee 
are glad to find here a call for other books than fiction. The 
})oor (|iiality of the gas was the subject of a complaint at 
Jamaica Plain. At Roxbury a railing would jireserve the de- 
livery table from the excessive zeal of youthtul patrons. At 
the South End the " Scientific American" has been called for, 
and the committee repeat the recommendation made by their 



Eeport of the Library Departmext. 17 

predecessors. Dorchester calls for an agricultural paper, and 
Jamaica Plain wishes to oiler its large German population a 
periodical in their native language. The South End Branch 
seeks police protection from five to eight every evening 
during the months of January, February, and March, because 
the Library is in a basement, and the interruptions caused 
by mischievous persons on the sidewalk seriously annoy the 
officials and readers. 

These requests were made to this committee (who have 
no j)ower to grant them), because the Branch librarians had 
made them elsewhere in vain, and thought that the com- 
mittee's recommendation would assist them. 

That such requests may in future reach the Trustees di- 
rectly and quickly, the committee recommend that one of 
the higher officials of the Library service be detailed to 
make periodical visits to the Branches and stations, and re- 
l)ort at least once a month upon the condition of each build- 
ing, its furniture, heating, lighting, police supervision, or the 
want of it, and upon the administration, the efficiency of the 
Branches, and the fidelity and intelligence of tlie librarians 
and attendants. Such duties were once required of an offi- 
cial styled "the Lispector of Circulation." With the in- 
crease of stations, and the consequent widening of the 
Libraiy's circulation and usefulness, the reestablishmeut of 
such an office is imperatively demanded. 

Were such an officer to visit the North End Library dur- 
ing the hours in which it is open, he would at once report 
that it is unfit for human occupancy, in spite of the repairs 
recently made at the urgent lecommendation of the commit- 
tee. In all their visits to this Library the committee have 
never met both attendants on duty at the same time, as one 
or the other has been absent on account of sickness incurred 
by living several hours each day in a fetid atmos[)here, only 
improved by opening windows upon a back alley, concerning 
which the committee have asked the Trustees to complain to 
the Board of Health. The people of the North End have to 
some extent learned to stay away from a room with noxious 
odors without and a gas-consumed atmosphere within. The 
1,400 books which this room contains, and which cannot be 
taken from it, had a maximum daily call of 522 in 1887 and 
230 in 188U, the total use falling from 32,896 to 25,176. 
But this community is one towards which the educational 
character and appliances of the Library should be not only 
active but positively aggressive, and it cannot assume such a 
l)osition in its present equipment. Immediate steps should 
be taken to procure other accommodations, with good air and 
light, and, in the meantime, the Liln'ary should be made a 



18 Report of the Library Department. 

Branch Library, to be opened at a much earlier hour, and 
supplied with books now lying unused elsewhere. 

The Examining Committee of 1888 recommended an ap- 
plication to the Supreme Court for a modification of the terms 
of the will of the late Charlotte Harris, so that the income 
from that fund might not be limited to the purchase of books 
for the Charlestown Bran<jh published prior to 1850. Your 
committee do not repeat that recommendation, because they 
believe that the income can properly be expended in accor- 
dance with the terms of the bequest. They call attention to 
the fact that it is not now so expended, but is allowed to ac- 
cumulate. The purchase of books from this source, not in- 
cluding replacements and bound periodicals, has fallen from 
159 in 188tj to 7 in 1890, to Dec. 1. The committee think 
that a larjxe amount of literature of a date earlier than 1850 
could be purchased with the income ot this fund, that re- 
prints of lilnglish and American authors could be kept up, 
and that the terms of the will could be observed and proper 
accessions be made to the Charlestown Branch. If any 
change in the provisions of the will were to be sought, it 
might possibly be that books purchased under it, of a per- 
manent and valuable character, might be placed in the new 
building. 

At the same time the committee notice that the purchase 
of books from the annual appropriation has also fallen off in 
this Branch to a remarka])le degree, the total of 2GG in 1889 
being reduced to 123 in 1890 to Dec. 1. Th6 committee hope 
that this great reduction does not indicate the policy of the 
Trustees towards the branch library system. Such a policy, 
if maintained, would prevent the proper development of 
the Branches and the delivery stations dependent upon 
them. Li the purchase of books and the supply of dupli- 
cate copies to the Central and Branch libraries, the fact should 
be recognized that the books people wish to read arc those 
of living, stirring interest at a particular time. To send 
applicants in East Boston or Jamaica Plain to the Central 
lil)rary for duplicate copies of such books is practically to dis- 
appoint them after a tedious delay. If the Library is to satisfy 
tax-payers it must offer, within reasonable limits, what tax- 
payers and their families demand, or they will look to other 
sources, to circulating libraries, which advertise the books 
that every one is talking about, or to mercantile houses, 
which offer at a nominal price ])irated editions of such books 
printed on poor paper with worse type. Of course, it is 
impossible to satisfy all demands. Nevertheless, the com- 
mittee feel that the free policy of previous years has yielded 
in the matter of duplicate copies to a closer practice to-day, 



Keport of the Library Department. 19 

and that the pendulum has swung too far in the ()[)po.site 
direction, so that the lunnber of duplicates [)urchased this 
year for the Central and Branch libraries, less than two hun- 
dred in all, is insufficient to satisfy the reasonable tleniands 
of the public. 

The committee are aware that the current expenses of the 
Library, by evening and Sunday openings es|)ecially, are 
largely increased. To keep within the appropriation of the 
City Council, the Branch lil)raries may have sutlered, .-ind 
the Trustees may be excused for a policy which is but 
temporary and transitional. If the Branches or the Central 
libraries are deprived of their due supi)ly of new books l)y 
reason of increased ex[)enses, the fact should be brought to 
the attention of the City Council in the strongest manner 
possible that the appropriations made for the years l<:)8t) and 
1890 are entirely inadequate, and that thereby the Library 
sutlers in one of its most vital points, in tlie care and sup- 
port of the Branches. Ihey should be made the supplying 
centies for the people in their homes, while the main build- 
ing will become more and more the resort of students in 
special fields of investigation. The attention of the Trus- 
tees should tirst be directed to the purchase of tit and proper 
books in sufficient quantities, and then to the best means of 
placing them expeditiously in the hands of an eager and 
book-loving community. 

In conclusion, the Examining Committee cono^ratulate the 
city on the approach of the time when the new Library 
building shall be completed. In the new quarters, with 
ample acconnnodations for the librarian and his assistants, 
and with abundant space for a large number of readeis and 
students, this usefulness of the Library and its consequent 
popularity will be enormously enlarged. In the new build- 
ing it is intended that the various special libraries shall be 
placed in separate rooms. Not only will these treasures be 
secure in absolutely fire-proof quarters, they will also be so 
quartered that the generosity of many benefactors will be 
plainly manifested in the most desirable way, and it is to be 
hoi)ed that this method will lead to further endowments of a 
most useful sort. The advantage to the student of findins: 
SO many valuable collections under one roof cannot be over- 
estimated. The Barton Library, with its valuable Shake- 
speare volumes, and its general literary collections, the re- 
cent rich additions from the Barlow Library, acquired by 
the generosity of the city, the unequalled Prince Lil)rary, 
the Ticknor Library, the Parker Library, all combine to 
make a full collection of books of the most precious sort. 
Already they bring to Boston students from the remote parts 



20 Report of tiie_Library Department. 

of the country. Possibly even those Bostonians who live in 
the suburbs will cease to complain of the hardship of going 
to the Central Lil)rary which contains stores that cannot pos- 
sibly be duplicated. A great increase of readers may be 
looked for in the future; the worth of the Library will be 
more widely known, and, doubtless, with this knowledge 
will come even greater readiness to further its admirable and 
diverse aims, extending as they do in many directions, from 
guiding school children in Avise and instructive reading to 
aidino; scholars in their researches. Neither of these two ex- 
tremes, it is to be supposed, is the sole aim of the Lil)rary ; 
it is by meeting the wants of all that it has acquired its rep- 
utation, which, it is hoped, will ever be maintained. 

Anna S. Amory, 
Samuel Arthur Bent, 
Martin Bruaoier, 
Harriette S. Lawrence, 
Alice Lee, 
!Sam'l F. McCleary, 
Thomas Sergeant Perry. 



Report of the Library Department. 21 



REPORT ON MEDICAL BOOKS. 

In previous years there has l)een some question among 
members of the Examinino- Committee as to the advisability 
of the purchase and provision of works of a strictly medical 
character. This year Dr. Harold Williams was appointed 
by the Trustees with the view of reviewins: this question, 
and for the purpose of makinir an examination of the medical 
department of the Public Library. 

Dr. Williams reports : — 

There are now in the Public Library 15,000 volumes of a 
strictly medical character. All branches of (nedical literature 
are included in its catalogue ; even such speciiil subjects as 
the "Eye " and " Ear" find a place upon its shelves. 

In previous years the question has been asked, " Would not 
the money spent upon these works, if applied to general 
literature, be of greater assistance to the general public, and 
should not physicians and medical students apply to medical 
and other Iil)raries rather than to tax the resources of 
the Public Library, and this, too, at the expense of general 
literature?" 

At first sight this question seems difiicult to answer, but 
a glance at the population of Boston and at the circulation 
of the Library shows that too little rather than too much is 
now done for the encouragement of the medical sciences. 
This department of the Library is chiefly used by [)hysicians 
and dentists, by medical students, by nurses, pharmaceutical 
and other students, and by lawyers, chemists, instrument 
makers, engineers, etc. 

The only other source of supply besides the Athenaeum is 
the Boston Medical Lil)rary Association, a library free 
of access only to members of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society. But the Homoeopathic, Eclectic, Botanic, Electric, 
Galvanic, Thompsonian, Hydropathic, Faith Curers, Indian, 
Christian Scientists and other followers of Galen, have no 
fountain of knowledge provided for them whereof to drink. 
Either they must purchase their reference books or go 
without. Few of us realize how large a proportion of our 
population these disciples of exclusive schools of medicine 
represent. It is estimated that there are no less than 1,100 
physicians of exclusive systems now practising in Boston, 
a number which is yearly augmented by the restrictions re- 
lating to the practice of medicine from time to time adopted 



22 Report of the Library DeparTiMext. 

by other States ; the 400 members of the Massachusetts Medi- 
cal Society, wlio are entitled to tlie use of the Boston Medical 
Library, and we see tliat there are upwards of 1,500 
"pliysicians " now practising in Boston. Added to these 
l,oOO "physicians," we have nearly 1,000 medical students, 
600 res:istered nurses, 300 dentists. Supposing that 1,000 
lawyers, chemists, instrument makers, druggists, and engi- 
neers make use of this library, we see that 4,500 persons 
depend upon it, more or less, for professional reference, or 
one per cent, of our population ! When we add to this list 
the invalids and their relatives and anxious friends, we see 
that the demand in this department should be very great. 
Turning then to the statistics of circulation, we find that 
this demand h very great; that according to the figures of 
1890, more than 13,000 medical books were taken from the 
shelves, nearly five per cent, of the total circulation of Bates 
Hall. 

Thus having considered the demand, let us turn our at- 
tention to the supply. 

There are in the Boston Public Lil)rary 15,000 books 
devoted to medical science, or about 5,000 less than the 
total number owned l)y the Boston Medical Library Associa- 
tion. On the other hand the number of medical journals 
taken by the Public Library is very much smaller than those 
of the Boston Medical Library, and perhaps wisely so. 

Carrying our scrutiny farther, we find that the number of 
purchases of new books has been greitly restricted in recent 
years, and that many of the latest standard pul)lications are 
not included in the Library, as for extimple : Sajous' Annual 
of the Universal Medical Sciences, Keating's Encyclopedia 
of the Diseases of Children, Hirst's American System of 
Obstetrics, Bradford and Lovett's Orthopedic Surgery. But 
these and other omissions could be remedied by a small 
outlay. 

Thus, to capitulate, we find that a legitimate demand exists 
for medical books ; that this demand is well supplied by a 
large and valuable library which is as complete as could be 
expected or advised, with the exception of trifling and easily 
remedied deficiencies. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold AVilliams, M.D. 



APPEIS^DIXES 



18 90. 



LIST OF APPENDIXES. 



I. Extent of the Library (by years). 

II. Volumes ix the Sphxial Collections of Bates IIallc 

III. Increase of the Several Departments. 

IV. Bates Hall Classifications. 
V. Givers and Amount <>f Gifts. 

VI. Circulation. 

VII. Registration of Applicants. 

VIII. Reading. 

IX. Financial Statement. 

X. Library Funds. 

XI. Library Service. 

XII. List of Examining Committees for Thirty-nine Years. 

XIII. List of Trustees for Thirty-nine Years. 



Report of the Library Department. 



25 



APPENDIX I. 

EXTENT OF THE LIBRARY BY YEARS. 







a 






.9 • 






a 






E 5 






£.2 

as 






si 




Years. 


la 


Years. 


1^ 




Years. 


ii 






35 

o « 






35 

o -^ 






35 

o -^ 


1 


1852-53 


9,688 


14 


1865-66 


130,678 


27 


1878-79 


360,963 


2 


1853-54 


16,221 


15 


1866-67 


136,080 


28 


1879-80 


377,225 


3 


1854-55 


22,617 


16 


1867-68 


144,092 


29 


1880-81 


390,982 


4 


1855-56 


28,080 


17 


1868-69 


152,796 


30 


1881-83 


404,221 


5 


1856-57 


34,896 


18 


1869-70 


160,573 


31 


1882-83 


422,116 


6 


1857-58 


70,851 


19 


1870-71 


179,250 


32 


1883-84 


438,594 


7 


lS.i8-59 


78,043 


20 


1871-72 


192,958 


33 


1884-85 


453,947 


8 


1859-60 


85,031 


21 


1872-73 


209,456 


34 


1885 


460,993 


9 


1860-61 


97,386 


22 


1873-74 


260,550 


35 


1886 


479,421 


10 


1861-62 


105,034 


23 


1874-75 


276,918 


36 


1887 


492,956 


11 


1862-63 


110,563 


24 


1875-76 


297,873 


37 


1888 


505,872 


]2 


1863-64 


116,934 


25 


1876-77 


312,010 


38 


1889 


520,508 


13 


1864-65 


123,016 


26 


1877-78 


345,734 


39 


1890 


536,027 



Note. — Many thousand pamphlets have been added but are not included in the above 
figures. When bound tliey are regarded and counted as volumes. 

In the various reading-rooms are the current numbers of 960 periodicals. 



VOLUMES IN LIBRARY AND BRANCHES Dec. 31, 1890. 



. fBates Hall 

■£•:■, Duplicate room 

^*i (.Lower Hall 

Total, Central Library . 

>. ■ 

3 o Fellowes Athenaeum . . , 

"^ B i 

4m [City part , 

Total, Roxbury Branch 



333,273 
16,652 
44,854 

394,779 

15,826 
15,901 
31,727 



East Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

South-End 

Jamaica Plain 

West Roxbury delivery 
North-End 



12,616 
13,088 
27,179 
14,099 
15,338 
10,894 
11,579 
3,313 
1,415 



26 



Report of the Library DErARTjiENT. 



APPENDIX II. 

VOLUMES IN THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS OF BATES HALL. 





H 

3,066 




n 






OB . 


e 
ac 


ac 

H 


at) 

ac 
ac 


ae 
ac 

H 


O 
9 
ae 

iH 


Patent library . . 


3,142 


3,259 


3,382 


3,478 


3,513 


3,641 


3,796 


3,965 


4,097 


4,218 


Bowditch library, 


3,152 


3,224 


3,456 


3,701 


3,854 


3,933 


4,510 


4,706 


4,935 


5,225 


5,348 


Parker library . . 


12,337 


12,363 


13,952 


13,971 


14,024 


14,057 


14,069 


14,077 


14,104 


14,112 


14,114 


Prince library . . 


2,230 


2,274 


2,327 


2,397 


2,510 


2,581 


2,706 


2,775 


2,824 


2,905 


2,935 


Ticknor library . 


5,454 


5,463 


5,507 


5,544 


5,724 


5,731 


5,764 


5,790 


5,877 


5,923 


5,966 


Barton library . . 


14,360 


13,487 


13,610 


13,610 


13,642 


13,652 


13,800 


13,841 


13,755 


13,724 


13,735 


Franklin library . 


202 


240 


292 


357 


378 


382 


382 


403 


416 


427 


446 






893 


920 


1,085 


1,123 


1,175 


1,217 


1,280 


1,368 


1,427 


1,500 


John A. Lewis lib- 






















633 


^ 

























APPENDIX III. 

NET INCREASE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 





188.-5 
(8 mos.) 


1880 


1887 


1888 


1880 


180O 


Bates Hall , - 


4,882 

367 

377 

85 

112 

122 

209 

343 

64 

276 

167 

20 

10 

12 


9,879 

866 

loss 59 

236 

303 

362 

4,748 

680 

186 

590 

355 

loss 26 

13 

295 


8,671 

1,543 

443 

158 

310 

262 

358 

443 

146 

546 

417 

204 

25 

9 


9,733 

874 

loss 52 

170 

284 

280 

390 

145 

46 

423 

335 

2G0 

20 

8 


11,857 

710 

330 

63 

l.')9 

199 

397 

loss 70 

130 

309 

294 

248 

6 

4 


13,518 






loss 50 






419 


East Boston branch . . 
South Boston branch . 




58 
115 
146 


Fellowes Athenaeum . 
Chark'stown branch . . 




361 
233 
91 


Dorchester branch . . 
Jamaica Plain branch . 




269 
150 

187 


West Rox bury branch 
North-End branch . . 




10 
12 


Total 




7,046 


18,428 


13,535 


12,916 


14,636 


15,519 








Added. 


Deducted, 

coiideinncd, 

transferred 

or lost. 




Bates Hall 


13,525 
563 


7 
Ml 


•; 2 


\yt gain, i 
above. 






1 detail, as 


I>ower Hall and branches 


4,747 




3, 


165 





APPKNDIX IV. 

BATES HALL CLASSIFICATIONS. 
(Representing books located only.) 



Gknekal Librak 






Cyclopsediiis, etc 

j Bibliography and literary history 

I General history, biography, travel, and ge<»grapliy 

American history, geogi-iiphy, biograpliy, travel, and polite lilenitun 

English history, etc 

j French liistory, etc 

i ^Italian history, etc 

I German history, etc 

Greek, Latin, and philology 

Spanish and Portuguese history and literature 

Other history, geography, biography, travel, and literature 

Periodicals and transactions 

Theology, eccIcBiaBtical historj', etc 

Metaphysics and social science 

Jurisprudence 

Political economy 

I Medical science 



Total in 
general 
library 
Jan. 1, 



1,918 

'8,939 



Special Libraries. 



l»71 , 1873 1 1875 1880 



Natural history and e 

Mathematics and physical science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Bound volumes of misi^ellaneous pamphlets 

Bound volumes of manuscripts 

Shakespeare 

Books for the blind 



Totals 



17,291 


00 


620 


9,361 


11 


326 


11,236 


9 


1,423 


6,986 


9 


1,181 


1,8S8 


22 1 


95 


9,657 


2 


399 


23,674 


1,339 j 


787 


24,993 


147 


3,492 


11,523 


«! 


1,360 


6,726 


3 j 


307 


4,154 


65 


98 


14,988 


3 


76 


10,499 


15 


170 


13,051 


3,152 


136 



14 1 ... . 




7 1 ... .'i 16 
26 1 ....... . 


41 10 
6 ; 28 


.... 


.... 1 3 
2 1 ... . 





6,966 ! 13,735 1,500 



2,616 
10,571 
10,828 
47,923 
41,269 
20,958 
10,123 
13,049 
9,139 
6,216 
10,206 
26,562 
30,438 
13,224 
11,144 
4,358 
15,123 
10,807 
16,493 
7,802 
9,353 
545 



ClasB IV. includes the collected works of American writers, and what of American literature is 
sometimes termed polygraphy. 

Classes V., VI., VII., and VIII. have the same scope for the respective countries that Class IV. 
has for America. Class VIII. includes also Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the 
Scandinavian nations. 

i XIV. includes political science and ethics, applied and unapplied, education, phrenology, 



etc. 



Class XIX. includes mechanics, military and naval arts, agriculture, domestic arts, etc. 

Class XXIV. does not include the Shakespeare collection of the general library. 

The subdivisions of classes are kept in ranges by themselves, so that for purposes of enujuera- 
tion or learning percentage of use, it is practicable at any time to get exact figures upon the sub- 
divisions; as also upon such points as biography, travel, and voyages, etc., by summing the results 
of the ranges devoted to them in the several alcoves. 

Note. — The dates given in the special libraries column show the yearwhen they were acquired 
by the library. 



* Includes ail books in room G-, — 12,108 of them belonging to the Barton library, as originally shelved there. 



Report of the Library Department. 



27 



APPENDIX V. 



GIFTS, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1800. 



Tiivers 

Volumes 

Pamphlets 



1,081 
4,129 

7,682 



Givers. 



Abbott, J. J. C, Ottawa, Can. 

Abbott. S. A. B 

Abbott Academy, Andover, Mnsa. 
AbcUan, F'raticisco Cubillos, Buenos Ayres 
Adams, Henry C. ..... . 

Adams Nervine Asylum ..... 

Asjassiz, Alexander. Harvard College, Cambridge 
Aijent General for Victoria, Ijoyidon, England 
A<jricultural Experiment Station, Mansfield, Conn. 
Asjricnltural Experiment Station, Auburn, Ala. 
Agricultural and Mechanical College, Auburn, Ala. 
Alabama State IJar Association, Montgomery . 
Albree, John. jr. ...... 

Alcott, VVm. P., Boxford 

Alden, John E. 

Alexander. S. B. 
G. 



maps 



W. 



All( 

Allen, Willard S , . 

Alliance News, The, Manchester, England 

Alniy, Francis ........ 

Alunmi Association, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
Amaron, Calvin E., Springfield .... 

Ameri(;an Academy of Arts and Sciences 

American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Salem ......... 

American Baptist Publication Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Bar Association, Baltimore, Md. 
American Bar A-ssociation, Philadelphia . 
American Bible Society ...... 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 
American Congregational Association ... 
American Economic Association. Baltimore, Md. 
American Entomologist Society, Philadelphia . 
American Historical Association, Baltimore, Md. 
American Home Missionary Society, New York City 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, New York 

City . . 

American Institute of Homoeopathy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 
American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia . 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York City 
American Society of Railroad Superintendents . 



19 



2 
3 

2 
1 

25 



PphB. 



7 

28 

I 



Ifi 



28 



Keport of the Library Department, 



Givers. 



An do 



idg. 



American Surgical Association, Philadelphia, 1 

Ames, John N., Chelsea 

Amiiert Collesje, Amherst, Mass. 

Ammen, Daniel, Washington, D.C. . 

Amory, Robert ..... 

Andover Theological Library Seminary, 

Andrew, John F. . . . . 

Andrews, Charles M., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Anonymous ..... 

Appleton, Yi. . . 

Appleton, Nathan .... 

Appleton, William S. ... 

Apprentices' Libiary, Philadelphia, 1'a. 

Archajological Institute of America, Camb 

Arnold, Howard P. . 

Arnoux, William N., New York City 

Art Club, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Associated Charities .... 

Association of American Physicians . 

Astor Library ..... 

Athenaeum of Philadelphia 

Atkinson, W. P. . . . . 

Averili, Russell ..... 

Ayer, J. C, & Co., Zomt/^ 

Babcock, James F. . . . . 

Baker, B. F., Brookline . 

Balfour, David. Charlestmvn 

Ballantyne, John F., Chicago, 111. 

Ballou, Maturin M 

Baudelot, Max, Chicago, 111. 
Bangs, Edward, Wareham, Mass. 
Barbour, Edmund D. ... 

Barker, Henry R. , Providence . 
Barnard Memorial .... 
Barnes, Lemuel C, Newton Centre . 
Barnwell, James G., Philadelphia 
Barrett & Spencer, Germantown, Pa. 
Barry, Charles A. .... 
Batchellor, A. S., Littleton, N.I/. 
Bates, Wm. C., Newton, Mass. 
Ba.xter, James P. . . . . 
Bayard, T. F., Wilmington, Bel. 
Beer, Wm., Topeka, Kan. 

Benet, S.V 

Bennett, Edmund H., Taunton, .Mass. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur .... 

Benton, Josiah H.,yr. 
Berea College, Berea, Kg. 
Biblioteca Nacional, Argentine Republic, S..i 
Biblioteca Nationaie Central! di Kirenze, f/nly 
Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale Vittorio Emanuel 
Biblioteca Nazionale di Palermo, Sicily . 
Bildiotheque Hoyale, Copenhagen, Denmark 
Bigelow, Henry J. .... . 

Billings, F'rank S., Chicago 
Billings. Frederick, Woodstnck, Vt. . 
Birmingham. England, Public Library 
liissel, Artemus, New York City 
Blaine, James G.. Washington, D.C. 



Mass 



Mass 



edi 




1 
50 



47 
1 

1 
PJ2 

1 



I 
1 
1 
1 



Report or the Library Department. 



29 



GiVEKS. 



Wis. 



newspaper 



Blaisdell, F. C. . 
Blaisdell, J. J., Beloit 

Bloil;j;ett, Alhert N 

Bluinenlierg & Floerslieim, JV. Y. 

Board of Education of the City of New York 

Board of Railroad Coniniissioners, Topeka, Kan. 

Board of State Charities and Corrections, Providence 

R.[. 

Board of Trade, Hartford, Ct. . 
BohHventure, h ., New York City 
Boston, Board of Health . 

(;ity Auditor .... 

City Enj^ineer 

City Messeni^er 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 

Mayor's Office 

Overseers of tiie Poor 

Park Commissioners 

— — Sciiool Committee . 

Water Board .... 

Boston Art Club .... 

Boston Athenaeum .... 
Boston Christian Scientist Publishing Society 
Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society 
Boston Fish Bureau .... 
Boston Latin School .... 
Boston Eunatic Hospital . 
Boston & Maine li.li. 
Boston Museum .... 

Boston Provident Association 
Boston Society of Civil Engineers 
Boston Society of Natural History 
Bo>ton University .... 
Biisioii Young Men's Christian Associatio 
Bostonian Society .... 
Boutell, Lewis Henry, Chicago^ HI. . 
Bout well, Francis M., Groton, Mass. 
Bouiinot, J. G., Ottawa, Canada 
Bourke, John G., Washington D.C. 
Bowditch, U'm. I. . . . . 
Bowduin College, Brunswick, Me. 
Bradlee, Caleb D., lot of broadsides and 

])hotographs ..... 
Bradlee, N. J., Mrs., Roxhury . 
Bradner, L.,//-., Neto Haven, Conn. 
Branner, J. C, Little Rock, Aikansas 
Branihwaite, 1{. W , Rickmansworth, Her 
Bridges, Robert, London, England . 
Brinmier, Martin .... 
Brinton, Daniel G. , Philadelphia, Pa 
Bri>tol County Agricultural Society, Taunton, Mass 
British and Foreign Unitarian Association, London, 
Brockhoven, John A., Cincinnati, 
Brookline Public Library . 
Brooklyn Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
Brooklyn, Superintendent of Public Instruction, N. 1 
Brooks Library, Brattleboro, Vt 
Brooks, Fred .... 



paper 



is, Englan 



and 



d 



Eng 



Vols. 



210 
1 

7 
2 



230 
24 



Pphs. 



21 
6 
1 
1 
1 



3 
1 
4 
1 

1 

2 

2 

1,683 

3 
I 
1 

1 
1 
1 

32 

1 
2 
1 



30 



Report of the Library Department. 



GirsBS. 



Brooks, J. Henry, Milton . 

Brooks, Wm. Henry .... 

Brown, Francis H. . 

Brown, H. II., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brown,' J. C. J., Dorchester 

Brown, Leonard. Des Moines, Iowa . 

Brown Univer^ily, Providence, R.I. . 

Browne, Miss Alice .... 

Browne!!, T. Frank. New York Citij . 

Brownless, A. C, Melbourne, Australia 

Bruslifield, T. N., Devonshire, England 

Brynmer, Douglas, Ottawa,^ Canada 

Buclianan, J. II. 

Buell, /I/ ;s. Caroline B., East Hampton, Conn 

Buff' & Herger ..... 

Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, iV. Y. 

Buffalo Lil)rary, Buffalo', N. i. 

Bunclier, Mrs. M. J., Manchester, N.II. 

Bunker Hill Monument Association . 

Buonanno, G., Cremona, Italy . 

Bureau of Industrial Statistics, Proridem:e, R 

Bureau of Labor Statistics, Jefferson City, Mo 

Bureau of Labor Stsitistics, Mudtson, ]\'is. 

Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics, Lan 

Bureauof Labor and Industrial Statistics, Topi 

Burr, Edson, San Francisco, Cat. 

Burrell & Co., J., Cambridge, England . 

Butler, Eber K., Revere .... 

Butler H(>s])ita! for tlie Insane, Providence, R., 

Butler, John George, Washington, D.C. . 

(^aley,^ Benj. S. . . . . 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco. 

California State Library, Sacramento 

Cambridge Oi)servatory, Cambridge, England 

Cambridge Public Library .... 

Canada Geolouical and Natural History Survey 

Candage, R. G. F 

Cannell, H., & Sons, Kent, England 
Cant, Benjamin K., Colcheater, England . 
Capen, E. IL, Medjord, Mass. . 
Carleton College Library, Northfield, Minn. 
Carpenter, Warren, St. Paul, Minn. 

Carret, .IF 

Cartee, Miss E. F. , Charlestown 
Carter, James, & Co., London, England . 
Carter. William, Great Yarmouth, England 
Chadwick, James K. . . . newsj)apcr 

Chalmers, I'atrick, Wimbledon , England . 
Chamber of Commerce of the State ot New 
York City ...... 

Cliamberlain, Mellen .... 

Clianning Club ...... 

Chapman, Alfred F 

Charleston, City of, 5'. C. .... 
Cliauncy Hall Scliool .... 

Chicago Hoard of Trade .... 
Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, III. . 
Chicago Public Library, Chica/o, III. 
Ciiildren's Aid Society, JVew York City 



;a, K 



Mich 
an. 



Cat 



s, 1 
ork 



cba 



eda 
Aew 



)lan 




153 



1 
1 



1 
I 

1 

I 

I 
I 

I 

•J 

IH 



1 

*» 
11 

1 



17 
1 
2 



1 

10 
2 



Report of the Library Department. 



31 



Givers. 



N. 



ma[ 



I ago 



Christern, Friedricli W., New York City . 
Cluirc'iiill, J. 1)., London ..... 
Cincinnati. 0., Public Library .... 
Cincinnati Observatory, Cincinnati , 

Citizens' Association of Boston .... 

City Library, Lowell ...... 

City Lit)rary Association, Springfield 

Civil Service lieform Association, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clark, A. P., Washington, D.C. 

Clarke, John M., Albany, N. Y. ... 

Clarke, Miss Lilian F., Jamaica Plain 

Clarke, Wm. IJ., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Clay, C. M., White Hall, Ky 

Clerkenwell Free Public Library, Ijondon 

Cleaves, Converse, Germantown, Pa. 

Clevebmd Public Library ..... 

Cobbe, Frances Power, Dolgelly, \Vales . 

Cocker, James, &• Sons, Aberdeen, Scotland 

Colieii, Max, JVew York City .... 

Colby University, Waterville, Me. 

College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, Syracuse, 

College of Physicians, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Collins, Walter H 13 

Columbia College Library, New York City 

Columbus, Ohio, Public Library 

Comins, Linus B., Roxbury .... 

Coniissaria General de la Exposicion Nacional, San 
Chile 

Commission for the Relief of Lynn Sufferers . 

Commissioner of Education, Washington, D.C. 

Commissioners of the State Reservation at Niagara 
York City .... 

Common Council, Alleghany, Pa. 

Concord, City of, A.//. 

Concord Public Library, N.II. . 

Cone, Orello, Akron, Ohio 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven 
Conn. ........ 

Connecticut Bureau of Labor Statistics, Hartford, 

Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn. 

Coolidge, David H. . 

Cooper Union, New York City . 

Corliss, George, Phila., Pa. 

Cornell University Ijibrary, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Corning, Charles R., Concord, N.H. . 

Corse, John M. . 

Council Bluffs Free Public Library, la. 

Crawshay, Mrs. Rose Mary, Breconshire, 

Cresson, Charles C, Germantown, Pa. 

Crocker, Uriel H. . . . . 

Croes, J. J. 11., New York City . 

Crosby, J. L., Bangor, Me. 

Culin, Stewart, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Culting, Andrew .... 

Cunningham, Henry H. . . . 

Cur ran, Mrs. Mary H., Bangor, Me. 

Currier, J. M. . 

Curry, J. L. M., Richmond, Va. 

Cust, Robert N., London, England . 




1 broadsid 



Wales 



Sew 



Conn 



Pphs. 



84 

1 
I 
1 



10 



32 



Report or the Libkary Department. 



Givers. 



Cutler, Miss M. S., Albany, JV'. Y. 

Cutter, Abram E. . . . 

Cutter, Charles A. . . . 

Cutting, Andrew .... several newsp 

Dadman, Girard P., Lowell, Mass. 

Dall, William Healey, Washington, Mass. 

Dalton, Cliarles H 

Dalton, Samuel ...... 

Danch, John H., Springfield, III. 
Davenport, Henry ..... 

Davis, Andrew McFarland, Cambridge, Mass. 
Davis, Walter A., Fitchburg, Mass. . 
Davis, William Morris, Harvard College, Cambridge, 
Dawes, Henry L., Washington, D.C. 

Day, K. L.,&Co 

Dayton. Ohio, Board of Education . 

De Costa, B. f ., New York City 

Dediiam, Town of .... . 

Dedham Historical Society 

Denison Board of Trade, Denison, Texas . 

l^ennet, C. F., Brighton, England . 

Denver, Col., Public Library, newspapers and 3 litiioi 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada 

Department of Mines, Sydney, New South H'ales 

De Peyster, ,1. W., Neiv Yo>k City 

Detroit, Mich., Public Library . 

Deutscher Wissenschaftliclier Vercin, Santiag 

Dewey, K. S., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dexter, Henry M. 

Dexter, F. H., Ncvj Haven, Conn. 

Diekerman, Lysander 

I^ickson, Messrs. Chester, England 

Di Crollalanza, G. B., l*isa, Italy 

Dillaway, Charles P., Roxbury . 

Direccion de Estadisiica, Buenos Ayr 

l)irecci()n General de I'^stadistica. Mexico 

Direction Generale de Stalistique, Buenos Ayr 

Dodge, C. R., Washington, D.C. 

Dodge, Francis M., Wenham 

Dodge, John Richards, Washington, D.C. 

Dole, Nathan H 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of Prot 

Episcopal Churcli, New York . 
Doncaster, England, Free Public Library 
Donga n Club, Albany, N. Y. 
Dorr, Cliarles H. . . . . 
Dorsey, George W. E. . . . 
Doughty, F. W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dover, N^ew Hampshire, Public Lil)rary 
Drowne, Henry T., New York City . 
Drnry College, Springfield, Mo. 
Dunbar, Newell ..... 
Duncan, the Hon. G. . 
Duren, Kinathan F. . 
Dwiglit, Timothy, New Haven, Conn. 
Dyer, Eli>lia, /»-., I'rovidence, R.J. 
Eames, Wilberforce, New }'ork . 
Earwaker, John P., Manchester, England 
Eaton, N. A., Me^le, Cal. . 



ipers 



;)/as5 



»ph 



Chili 




1 

1 

39 

1 

3 
1 

1 

1 

19 



Report of the Library Department. 



33 



GivEns. 




Eddy, R., Providence R.I. 

Editorial Committee of tlie Norwegian North Atlantic Ex 

pedition, Cliristiania, Norway 
Edmands, John, Philadelphia . 
Edmands, Thomas F. 
Ehrhard, A., Clermont, France. 
Ehi, Waiter, Cambridge, Mass. 
Ellcins, S. B., New York City . 
Ellis, George H. ... 

Elson, L. C 

Endres, II.. Jamaica Plain 

Engineers' Club of Philadelphia 

Engineering News Publishing Company, New York City 

English Fruit and Rose Company, Hereford, England 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 

Ensign, Charles S., Watertown ..... 

Erine, P., Sa,n Francisco, Cal. ..... 

Ernst, C. W 

Ernst, George A. O., .Jamaica Plain 

Essex Institute, Salem ...... 

Etheridge, Mrs. M. L., Roxbury .... 

Evening Post Publishing Company, New York City . 

Everts, W. W.,/?- 

Ewing & Co., Hampsliire, England .... 

Faculty and Trustees of Bangor Theological Seminary 
Fairchild, James H., Ripon, Wis. .... 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Farnham, C. C, Randolph, Mass. .... 

Fernald, O. M., Williamstown ..... 

Fewkes, J. Walter ....... 

First Congregational Church, Franklin 

First National Bank, Pasadena, Cal. 

Fisher, Sidney G., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fitchburg Railroad Company ..... 

FitzGerald, David, Washington, D.C. 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. . 

Ford, David B., Hanover, Mass. .... 

Ford, Paul Leicester, Brooklyn .... 

Ford, Wm. E 

Foster, George E., Ottawa, Canada .... 

Foster, Joseph, Portsmouth. N.H.. 

Foster, Wm. H., Concord, N.H. 

France, Ministere des Affaires fitrangeres, Paris, France 

Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, Stadtbibliothek 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa 

Eraser Institute, Montreal, Canada 

F'razer, Persifor, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Freeman, John R., Neiv York . 

Freise, P. C, Washington, D.C. 

French, J. D. W. . 

French Protestant College, Springfield, Mass. . 

Free Public Library, Borough of Plymouth, England 

Free Public Library, Concord, Mass. 

Free Public Library, Lawrence . 

Free Public Library, New Bedford . 

Free Pul)lic Library, Topeka, Kansas 

Frick Company, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 

Fuller, Edith 1) 



50 newspapers 



34 



Report or the Library Department. 



GiVEBS. 




Pphs. 



City 



Furber, James T . . 

Gage, Mrs-i Fayetteville, N.Y. . 

Garrison, Wendell P., New York City 

Gately, William P 

Gaylord, I. C, New York City . 

Geer, Everett S., IfaHford, Conn. 

General Association of Congregational aud Presbyterian 
Church ...... 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of New- 
York City 

Geographical Society of Quebec, Quebec, Canada 

Geological and Natural History Survey, Minneapolis 
Minn. ......... 

Geological and Natural History Survey, Ottawa, Canada 

Geological Survey of New Jersey, New Brunswick, N.J. 

Geological Survey of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Georgetown University, Washington, B.C. 

German American Stenographic Society, New York 

German Society of the City of New York 

Gibson, George Rutledge . 

Gilman, N. P 

Goddard, Matilda .... 

Goodell, Henry H., Amherst 

Goodwin, J. M., Sharpsville, Pa. 

Goodwin, William B., Loivell . 

Gould, Miss Ida W 

Gould, S. C, Manchester, NIL 

Graham, Andrew J., New York City . 

Graham, Douglas .... 

Grand Rapids Board of Trade, Grand Rapids 

Gray, Mrs. Asa, Cambridge 

Great Britain. Commissioner of Patents 

Greely, A. W., Washington 

Green, Bernard K., Washington 

Green, Charles A. . . . . 

Green, Milbrcy ..... 

Green, Samuel A. . . 2 maps, portrait 

Green, Samuel S., Worcester 

Greenougli, William W. 

Greenough, Mrs. W. W. . 

Griffin, A. P. C 

Griffin, Martin I. ,J., Philadelphia . 

Griffis, AVilliam E 

Griscom, William W., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Guessel, Frederick C. D., St. Louis, Mo. 

Guild, Chester ..... 

Gloucester, City of . 

Gunning, Mrs. W. D., Waltham, Mass. 

Gurney, George B., Chelsea, Mass. . 

Gutierrez, .1. J. . 

Hagerty, Frank H., Aberdeen, S.D. . 

Haigii, Jolm, Somerville, Mass. 

Hall, Edward W., Waterville, Me. . 

Hamilton Bank, New York 

Hamilton, Ontario, Public Library . 

llarkness & Sons, Yorkshire, England 

Harlan, Caleb, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harlan, W. Bcatty, Bel Air, hid. 

Harrington, Francis A., Worcester, Mass. 



Mich 



31 



map 



paper 



1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

111 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 



12 
2 



1 
2 
1 
1 

61 
1 
1 



83 
2 



1 

1 

55 

2 

2 

6 

1 



Report or the Library Department. 



35 



Givers. 



Ala. 



Harris, George F 

Hart, Thomas N 

Hart, W. Fairburn, Leeds, England . 

Hart & Akin, New Bedford, Mass. 

Hartford Library Association, Hartford, Conn. 

Hartford Seminary Record, Hartford, Conn. 

Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Con 

Harvard College, Cambridge 

Astronomical Observatory . 

Board of Overseers . 

■ Library ..... 

Museum of Comparative Zoology 

Harvard Dental Alumni Association . 

Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass. . 

Haverford College, Faculty of, Montgomery, j. 

Hawley, Elias S., Bvffalo, N. Y. 

Hay, Robert, Junction City, Kan. 

Hayden, J^verett, Washington, D. C. 

Hayden, Mabel, Washitigton, D.C. 

Haynes, Tilly ..... 

Hayward, W. W., Medford, Mass. 

Hazen, Harry A., Auburndale . 

Hazen, Henry A. . . . . 

Hedges, H. P., Bridgehampton, N. Y. 

Hegeler, Edward C, La Salle, III. . 

Uelnzle, J. \]., Biiffalo, N.Y. . 

Hemenway, 3Irs. Mary 

Henslowe, Spencer Vassal, Colchester, England 

Herrick, Samuel E. . 

Hewins, Caroline M., Hartford, Ct. . 

Hewins, James ..... 

Higginson, H. L. 

Higginson, Thomas W, , Cambridge . 

Hll, Hamilton A 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelph 
Hoar, Geo. F., Washington, D.C. . 
Hodges, Almon T)., jr. .... 

Hodges, E. Ratlenburg .... 

Hognet, Henry L., New YorTc City . 
Homans, John ...... 

Home for the Friendless, New Haven, Ct. 
Homoeopathic Medical College, New York City 
Hopedaie Public Library .... 

Hosmer, James K., St. Louis, Mo. 
Hosmer, S. D., Auburn .... 

Hotchkiss, Samuel M., Hartford, Ct. 
Houghton, .John C, Lynn, Mass. 

Houghton, Mifflin, & Co 

House of Refuge ..... 

Housewife Publishing Co., New York City 

Howard, George E., Lincoln, Neb. 

Howard, Jas. E., Watertown 

Howard University, Washington, D. C. 

Howe, A. M., Cambridge .... 

Hughes, Charles H. . 

Huguenot Society of America, New York City 

Huling, Ra^' Greene, New Bedford . 

Hume, Harrison ..... 

Hunnewell, James F., Charlestown, 3Iass. 



map 



1 portrait 
ia, Pa. 




6 




1 


1 


1 




4 






16 






1 


14 


28 








1 
















1 








1 








1 




1 












3 








1 




1 




1 






2 



36 



Report of the Library Department. 



Givers. 



Vols. Pphs. 



Hunt, Nathan, East Milton, Mass. . 
Hunter, Robert, Cincinnati, 0. . 

Hurd, H. F., Baltimore, Md 8 photos 

Hutchinson, Charles C, Lowell, Mass. 

Ingalls, Melville E., Cincinnati, 0. . 

Ingersoll, Edward, Philadelphia, Pa. 

IngersoU, W. H., Brookbjn, N. Y. 

Institution of Civil Engineers, Westminster, Lond. . 

Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes, 

New York Ciiy _ • 

International Committee of Y.M.C.A., New York City . 
Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington, B.C. 
Irelan, Wm., ;V. , Sacramento, Cat. ..... 

Isaac Pitman & Sons, New York City . broadsides 

Italy, Direzione della Sanita Publica .... 

Italy, Minister of Public Institution, Florence, Italy . 
Italy, Ministero dell' Interno ......" 

Ivison, Blakeman, & Co., N'. Y. 

Jeffries, B. Joy . . . newspapers and engravings 
Jeffries, N. L., Washington, DC. . 

Jenks, F. H 

Jenkins, Miss M. A. . 

Jenney, Charles F., Jlyde Park, Mass 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

Johnson, \Vm. L., East Boston . ..... 

Joint Counties Asylum, Carmarthen, Wales 

Jones, A. .....•••• • 

Jones, Charles C, jr., Augusta, Ga. .... 

Jones, Samuel A. ....... . 

Journal Newspaper Co. ....... 

Judson, A. B., N^ew York City, N.Y. 

Kais. -Koniglichu Geologische lieichsanstalt, Vienna, 
Austria .......... 

Kansas State Board of Agriculture, Topeka, Kan. 

State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan. newspaper 

list 

Kate Field's Washington, Washington, D.C. . 

Keller, W. B., New York City 

Kelso & Co., Glasgow', Scotland ..... 

l-Cennedy, John ii.,N.Y. 

Keynes, Williams, & Co., Salisbury, England . 

Keyser, Charles S., Philadelphia, Pa. .... 

Kidder, Natliiin P., Manchester, N.IJ. .... 

Kiornan, Thomas, ;'/•., Harvard College Library 

Kindergarten for the Blinil ...... 

King, Horatio C, New York City 

Kingman, Bradford, Brookline, Mass. .... 

King's Chapel ......... 

Kirkpatrick, George E., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Knapp, Artiiur M. ....... . 

Knapp, Geo. B newspapers 

Knowlton, T. S., West Brookfield, Mass. .... 

Koehler, S. H. , Roxhury ....... 

Koeniglich-Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, .Mu- 
nich, Germany ........ 

Konvalinka, J. G. . 

Kulp, George B., IVilkesharre, Pa. ..... 

Lacey, H. B., Bridgeport, Ct. ..... . 

Ladd, William H 



G 
10 



11 



Report of the Library Departme>"t. 



Givers. 




Ppha. 



Pa 



Lancaster Public Library .... 

Lane, William C, Cambridge. Mass. 

Laniijan, John A , Hyde Park . 

Lansing, G. L., Snn Francisco. Cal. . 

Larison, C. W., Riiigos, New Jersey . 

Larreniore, Wilbur, N. Y. City . 

Laurie, T., Providence, R.I. . 

Lawrence, Abbott ..... 

Lawrence, John, Cambridge 

Lawrence Public Library, La^vrence, Mass. 

Leach, Edward ()., Washington 

Leavitt, T. H., Lincoln, Neb. 

Leeds, England, Public Library 

Legoff, Laurent, Montreal, Can. 

Lehigh University Library, South Bethlehem, Pa 

Leicester Public Library .... 

Leipzig. Bureau der Handels-Kararaer 

Lenox Library, New York City 

Leo, F. A., Berlin 

Le Plongeon, Augustus .... 

Lewis, n. K., London, England 

Lewis, Mrs. John A. . . broadsides and m 

Lewis, T. H 

Lexington, City of .... . 

Liautard, A. 

Library Bureau ...... 

Library Coinniittee of the Corporation of the C 
London . . . ' . 

Library Company of Philadelphia, Pliiladelphi 

Library of tlie University of California 

Lincoln, Mrs. Alvin C, Ballardvale, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mrs. A. C, Dorchester 

Literary and Philosopliical Soc, Liverpool, England 

Little, John M. . ' 

Little, Sophia L 

Liverpool, England, Free l^ublic Library . 

Lloyd, Henry O., Chicago, 111. . 

Lombard Investment Company . 

Loomis, W. B., iVarietta, Ohio. 

Lord, Henry D. ..... 

Lovett, Robert W 

Lowell, City of . 

Ludwig Salvator, Archduke of Austria and Tuscany 

Lyman, Mrs Theodore, Brookline 

MacDonald, Arthur, Worcester, Mass. 

Mack, Robert, and Sons, Yorkshire, England 

Macon Eveninii News, Macon, Ga. 

Maine, State Reform School, Cape Elizabeth 

Maisch, John M , Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Maiden Public Lilirary .... 

Ma.nv\\i's\.eT, England, Public Library 

Manchester, NIL, City Library 

Mansfield, Mtss S. L 

Marlboro' Public Lilirary .... 

Marcou, John Belknap .... 

Marcus, Alfred A. .... . 

Marietta College, Marietta. O. . 

Marine Hospital Service, Washington, B.C. 

Maroney, F. H. . 



ript 



ty of 



pape 



spapers 



293 



1 

210 

41 

2 

1 
2 

2 

39 

1 

2 

3 
I 
423 
1 
1 
1 



2 

1 

14 



17 

11 

4 

2 
1 
1 
67 
1 



38 



Eepokt of the Library Department. 



Givers, 


Vols. 


Pphs. 


Marquette, L. M., & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 


1 




Marsilen & Co., Manchester, England .... 


1 




'iA!\.rVaex\%, 3 o\\r\Y., Pittsburgh, Fa 


1 




Martin, Edward F. ....••• • 


1 




Marvin, W. T. R. . . 


51 


42 


Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md. . 


5 


1 


Massachusetts, State of . ' 


10 


I 




1 




Boird of Gi^ Cnrnmis'^ioners 


1 




Bureau of Statistics of Labor . . . . • 


54 




Secretary of the Commonwealth . . . • 


7 




Stitc BoTrd of Health 


3 




Cf.i*-r» I3/-.o>.rl ri^Tnno/iir tiryA /^ImT-ifTT 


3 










3 


20 






State Lunatic Asylum, Northampton 




I 


Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst . . ' • 




12 


Massachusetts College of Pharmacy . . . . • 




I 


Massachusetts General Hospital 




1 


Massachusetts Historical Society 


1 


2 


Massachusetts Horticultural Society 




3 


Massachusetts Infant Asylum 




1 


Massachusetts Institute of Technology .... 


1 


4 


Massachusetts Medical Society 




2 


Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society 




1 


Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded . 




3 


Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati .... 


1 




Master Car Builders' Association, Chicago, III. 




1 


Matthews, Brander, New York City ..... 


30 


265 


May, H. A 


1 


33 


McClure, P. T 


1 




McGill College and University, Montreal .... 


1 




McKim, Mead, & White . large framed photographs 






McKnight, David A., Philadelphia, Pa 


1 




McLaren, Donald, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 


1 




Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco, Cal. 


1 




Medical Society of the State of New York, Albany . 


1 




Medical Society of tiie State of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 


1 




Meek, Henry I\L, Salem, Mass. ..... 


1 




Meginiu'ss. .John F., Williamsport, Fa 


1 




Melrose Public Library 




1 


Memorial Hall Library, Andover 




2 


Mercantile Lii)rary, Netv York City 




2 


Mercantile Library, Philadelphia, Pa 




7 


Mercantile Library, San Francisco, Cal 




I 


Mercier, Honore, Quebec 


2 


7 


Merrinian, Mrs. Anna L. 


1 




Metcorologic^al Institute, Chrisiiania, Norway . 


1 




Miami University, Oxford, 




1 


Michigan, Railroad Commissioner, Lansing 


1 




il + n^^-. TiIhm T «' Mf J. 


16 




Oldie Xjiorary, ijansing , itixcn. .... 




Mieusset, E 


1 


1 


Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Cincinnati, 0. . 


20 




Miller, .1. HIeecker, New York City 


1 




Mills, John H 


2 


1 


Milwaukee, Public Library 


1 


6 


Minneapolis, ,Vi«?i., City of 


1 




Park Commissioners, 




2 


i>.i 1, 1 : .. T ; I «._ 


2 


6 


1 Uijiic ijiDriiry •*.•••• 




Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul .... 


1 





Report of the Library Departaient. 



39 



Givers. 



Mass 



newspapers 



Mohn,E. Chrisiiania, Norway 
Momerie, Alfred, London^ England 
Mooney, John A., New York City 
Mooradian, Jacob, Worcester 
Moore, George H., New York City 

Moore, B. K 

Moore, Wm. H., Hartford. Ci. . 

Moravian Tlieolo<jical Seminary, Bethlehem, Pa 

Morris, Jonathan F., Hartford, Ct. . 

Morris, Martin, Washington, D.C 

Morse, Leopold, Washington, D.C. . 

Morse Institute, Natick 

Mount, George, Canterbury 

Mount Auburn Cemetery . 

Mount Holyoke Seminary, South Hadley, 

Mudge, Messrs. A. & Son . 

Mullet, A. E., Charlestown 

Mundo, J. J 

Museum of Comparative Zoology 

Museum of Fine Arts 

Narragansett Machine Co., Providence, R 

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C. . 

National Agricultural Society of Victoria, Melbourne 

National Electric Medical Association, Newark, N.J. 

National Library of Buenos Ayres .... 

National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution 

New York ........ 

Nationalist Education Association .... 

Naval Institute, Annapolis. Md. 

New England Historic Genealogical Society, newspapers 

New England Hospital for Women and Children, Roxbury, 

New England Meteorological Society, Cambridge 

New Hampshire State Medical Society, Concord, N.H. 

New Hampshire, Secretary of State, Concord . 

New Jersey, Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries 

Trenton, N.J. ....... 

Geological Survey, Trenton, N.J. 



New Jersey Historical Society, Orange, N.J. 

New London County Historical Society, New London, Ct. 

New York, Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Albany, N. Y. 

State Entomologist, Albany, N.Y.. 

State Library, Albany, N. Y. . 

State Lunatic Asylum ..... 

New York Academy of Science, Columbia College, New 

York 

New York Cancer Hospital, New York City 

New York Catholic Protectory, West Chester, N. Y. 

New York Civil Service Reform Association, New York 

City 

New York Free Circulating Library, New York City 

New York Historical Society, New York City . 

New York Life Insurance Co., N. Y. 

Newark, N.J., Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111. 

Newburyport, Public Library . 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England 

Newcomb, John B., Elgin, III. . 

Newell. William W., Cambridge 

News Publishing Co., Macon, Ga. . . 1 newspaper 




Pphs. 



40 



Report of the Library Department. 



GiTEBS. 



newspaper 



Newton, Hubert A., New Haven, Conn. 

Newton Free Library 

Nickerson, Sereno D. ... 

Nichols, Miss A. A 

Nicliolson, E. B., Oxford, England . 

Nicliolson, James B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Norcross, Mrs. Otis .... 

Norcross, Otis, family of . 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 

Norton, C B., Chicago, III. 

Norton, Charles Eliot 

Nova Scotia Library Commission, Halifax, N.S. 

Norwegian Geodetic Commission, Christiania, Norway 

Nojes, William, Somerville 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Observatorio Nacional, Cordoba, Argentine Republic 

O'Farrell, Charles .... 

O'FLinlon, John Canon 

Ohio Meteorological Bureau, Columbus, Ohio 

Ohio State Forestry Bureau, Cincinnati 

Ohio State Library .... 

Old Colony Historical Society, Taunton 

Oliver, Wm. T., Lynn 

Omaha Druggist Pub. Co., Omaha . 

Omaha Public Library, Omaha 

Osterhout Free Library, WiLkesharre, Pa 

Oxford Club, Brooklyn, N. F. . 

Page, Cyrus A. . 

Paige, Lucius R., Carnbridgeport 

Paine, Nathnniel, Worcester 

Parker, Moses Greeley, Lowell . 

Parker, IL A., Cambridge . 

Parker, Wm. Thornton, Providence, R.I. 

Paton, Allen Park, Greenock, Scotland 

Paiiksztis, Jose|)h, Plymouth, Pa. 

Peabody Institute, Peabody 

Peabody, Philip G 

Peabody, Dean, Wenham, Mass. 
Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. . 
Peale, A. C, Washington, D.C. 
Pennsylvania State Committee on Lunacy 

State Library, Harrisbiirg 

State Penitentiary for the Eastern 



4 maps 



52 newspape 



Philadelphia 

District, Phila 

delphia 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia 
Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, Pa 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Ar 

Philadelphia. Pa. . 
Peoria Public Library-, Peoria, III. 
Perkins, John W., [iy field, Mass. 
Perkins Institution for the Blind 
Perry, Ji/rs. B. F., Greenville, S.C. 
Perry, Thomas S. . . . 
Perry, Wm. S., Davenport, la. 
Phelps, Miss Fannie L. 

Philadelphia, Board of Directors of City Trusts 
Pliiladeljjhia City Institute 
Philbin, John F., Clinton, Mass. 
Phillips, Edgar M., Southbridge 



Vols. Pphs. 



1 
15 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
2 
1 

1 
U 



1 

1 

1 

18 



12 



10 



Report of the Library Department. 



41 



GiTEKS. 



Phillips Exeter Academy .... 
Philosophical Society of Glasgow, Scotland 
Picking, Henry F., Washington, D.O. 
Pierce, Henry B. . . . . 
Pinson, H., Port Natal, S.A. . 

Plumb, H. B 

Polanil, W. C, Providence, R.I. 
Poor, H. V. anrl H. W., N. Y. . 
Porter, Edward G., Lexington . 
Portland Public Library 
Pratt, E. Granville, Qnincy 
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, JV. Y. 
Presbyterian Board, New York City . 
Price, John, Manchester-hy-the- Sea . 
Prince, George, Oxford, England 
Providence, City of . 

City Auditor's Office 

Public Library 

Public Library, Cleveland, 0. . 
Public Library, Fall River, Afass. 
Public Library, Indianapolis, Ind. . 
Public Library, Melbourne, Australia 
Public Library, Neivhuryport, . 

Public Library, Portland, Me. . 
Public Library, Somerville 

Public Library, Toledo, 0. 

Public Library, Wandsworth, England 

Publishers, Florida Despatch 

Publishers, National Bottlers' Gazette 

Quaritch, Bernard, London, England 

Queen's College, Kingston, Canada . 

Queensland Patent Office, Brisbane, Aus 

Kand, 0. J., Cambridgeport 

Randolph, Richard .... 

Randolph & English, Richmond, Va. 

Reale Istituto Lombardo, Milan, Itali/ 

Register American Steam Vessels, New York City 

Republican State Committee, 7o broadsides, 3 newspapers 

Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Conn. 

lieynolds, John, India na.polis, Ind. . 

Reynolds, Sheldon, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I. 

Richards, Mrs. R. A., Cambridge 

Ricliardson, C. A lot of newspaper 

Rigdon, Jonatlian .... 

Robinson, J. H. . 

Rochester Academy of Science, Rochester, N. Y. 

Rockwell, A., East Cambridge . 

Rosengarten, J. G., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rowe, G. H. M 

Rowell, Josepli C, Berkeley, Cal. 

Royal Astronomical Society, London. England 

Royal Observatory, London, England 

Royal Society of Canada, Montreal . 

Royal Societ}- of Edinburg, Scotland 

Ruggles, George P., Charlestown 

Russell, William E.. Cambridge 

Rutherford, John, Owen Sound, Ont. 

St. Botolph Club .... 




1 

1 

12 

2 
1 
3 
1 
I 



140 



1 

1 
1 
4 

1 
1 
48 
1 
1 
1 



1 

10 

1 



5 
7 
2 
2 
54 



42 



Report of the Library Department. 



Givers. 




St. Louis, Mo., Public Library . 
St. Louis Mercantile Library Association 
St. Louis University .... 
St Paul, Minn., Public Library . 

Salem, City of 

Salem Public Library 
Salvador, Isquierdo S., Santiago, Chili 
Samuel, D. L., Portland, Oregon 
Sanborn, Charles E. . 

Savasje, E. H 

Scudder, Samuel H. . 

Sears, George E., New York City 

Seccomb, Daniel F., Concord, N.II. . 

Shaw, Samuel S. . . . . 

Siiepard, Harvey N. . 

Sherman, David H., Dover Plains, N. Y. 

Siloam Lodge No. 2, I.O.O.F., Boston 

Simes, William ..... 

Small, Herbert, Cambridge 

Smith, Richard & Co., Worcester, England 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Smvth, Thomas ..... 

Snow, S. T 

Society of Arts, London . 

Society for the History of the Germans, Baltimore, Md. 

Society for the Study of Inebriety, London 

Soldan, F. J., Peoria, 111 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Historical Society of Rhode Island 

Providence, R.I. . 
South P^nd Industrial School, Roxhury 
Southern Pacific Radroad Co., San Francisco, Cal.. 
Souvenir Volume Committee, Washington Centennial 
Stadt Bihliothek, Zurich, Switzerland 
Standard, The ..... 

Standard Union Print, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Staples, C. A., Lexington, Mass. 
Start, W. A., Cambridge, Mass. 
Stearns, Robert E. C, Washington . 
Stein, E. II., Grand Rapids, Mich. . 
Stevens, Hermon Weed, Dover, N.II. 
Stewart, Howard .... 

Stewart, William M., Washington, D.C. 
Stillman, James W. .... 

Stockwell, Thomas B., Providence, R.L 
Stone, Mrs. Ellen A., East Lexington 
Stone, Eben F., Newburyport . 
Stone, George H., Colorado Springs, Col. 
Stone, Henry ...... 

Storrs School, Hartford, Conn. 
Stucky, .1. A., Lexington, Ky. . 
Sui)reme .Judicial Court .... 

Swan, lv()b(?rt T. ..... 

Swett, Charles E 

Swift, Lindsay ...... 

Sydney, New South Wales, Free Public Library 

•Technological, Industrial, and Sanitary Museum 

Tanaka, L, Tokyo, -Japan . 
'I'iipi)an, I'vUgene, Winchester 
Taj)per, Thomas, jr. . 



newspapers 



1 
2 
1 

2 
1 
1 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 

19 
1 
I 
I 



U 
1 
1 
1 



37 
1 



1 
1 
3 
1 
20 
19 

111 
1 
2 



27 
1 



RErORT OF THE LIBRARY DePAIITMENT. 



43 



Givers. 



Taunton, City of, MassacJiusetis 

Free Public Library 

Taussisr, Edward, Washington, D.C. 

Tebb, William, London, JEngland 

Thayer, Caroline C, Roxbury . 

Thomas Crane Public Library, Quincy 

Thompson, A. C, Roxhury 

Thrnm, Thomas G.. Honolulu . 

Thurber, Samuel, Roxhvry 

Thwaites. Reuben G. , Madison, Wis. 

Tiffany, Edward .... 

Tileston, Mrs. John B., Mattapan, Mass. 

Toronto Public Library 

Torrey, D., Detroit, 3Iich. 

Torrej', .Joseph V. . . . . 

Trades Publishins: Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Travellers' Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn. 

Trenchard, Edward, New York City . 

Troup, C. A. S 

Triibner & Co 

Trustees of the Estate of .Tohn Crerar, Chicago, III. 
Trustees of the Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass. 
Trustees of the Salem Public Library, Salem . 
Trustees of Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Tucker, Gilbert, M., Albany, N.Y. . 
Tucker, Willis, G., Albany 
Tuckcrman, Frederick, Amherst, Mass. 
Tufts College, Medford . 
Tufts Library, Weymovth, Mass. 
Tumock, F. H., Winnipeg, 3Ianitoba 
Tupper, Julius H. . . . . 
Turin, Italy, City of . 

Turner, A. T 

'J'urner Free Library, Randolph 
Tuttle, Josejdi F., Eva.nsville, Ind. . 
Tuttle, Joseph F., Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Tuttle, Julius H 

Tyler, J. K., Charlestown . 

United States. Bureau of Ethnology 

Commission of Fish and Fisheries 

Court of Claims 

Department of Agriculture 

Bureau of Animal Industry 

Department of the Interior 

Bureau of Education 

Bureau of Labor 

Census Office . 

Geological Survey . . .62 atlas sheets 

Patent Office . 



Department of State ... 1 broadsid 
Navy Department . 

Bureau of Equipment and Recruiti 

Bureau of Navigation 

Hydrographic Office ... 1 chart 

Nautical Almanac Office 

Naval Academy Library 

Naval Intelligence Office 

Naval Observatory 

Treasury Department ... 1 broadside 




1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

11 

1 

256 

20 

5 

23 

59 
4 

13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
4 

14 



44 



Report of the Library Department. 



Givers. 



United States. Treasury Department, Bureau of Statistics, 

Coast and Geodetic Survey Office, G maps 

156 charts . 

Life Savini? Service 

Liu^lit House Board 



Marine Hospital Service 

Supervising Inspector General 

boats ..... 
— War Department .... 
U. S- Army. Engineer Corps 

Medical Dei)artment 

Ordnance Department 

Signal Office 



of Ste 



mal 



University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. . 
University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 
University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind, . 
University of Kansas, Laurence, Kan. 
University of Leyden .... 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Mich. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. . 
University of Utrecht .... 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. . 
University of Wisconsin, .Vac^t'soH, iris. . 
Uphani, Warren, Somerville, Mass. . 
Upton, Winslow, Providence, R.I. . 
Upson, Irving S., New Brunswick, N.J. . 
Urban, Theo. L. , Columbia, Pa. 
Utley, Henry M., Detroit, Mich. 
Vail, Roger, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Vanderbilt, Mrs. Gertrude L., Flatbush, N.I 
Veazev, W. G., Washington, D.C. . 
Venable, F. P., Chapel JJUl, NC. . 
Vermont, State Library, Montpelier . 

Ver Planck, Mrs. J. C., Wayne P.O., Pa. 
Victoria Street Society for the Protection of Ani 
Vivisection, London .... 

Vinton, Alex. N., Worce.<!ter 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Wadlin, Horace G., Washington, D.C. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelp 

Waite, II. E., West Newton 

Walker, Isaac, Pembroke, NIL 

Walker, Nnthaniel U 

Wall, Caleb A., Worcester 

Walton. J. B., Muscatine, 0. . 

Ware, Thomas S. . . . . . 

Ware, William & Co 

Warren, E. ...... 

Warren, Henry C. . . . . . 

Warren, Lucius H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Washl)urn, Henry S., Newton Centre 

Washtnirn, William T., New York City . 

Washburn College Laboratory of Natur 
Topeko,, Kan. ..... 

Wasliburn & Moen Manufacturing Co., M^orcester 

Washington & Lee University, Lexington, Va. . 

Waterliouse, S., St. Louis .... 

Watertown Public Library .... 



31 



map 



il 



from 



story 



Vols. 



1 

23 
4 
1 
1 
8 



19 
1 
3 
1 



I 

40 
1 



Pphs. 



RErORT OF THE LiBRARY DEPARTMENT. 



45 



Givers. 



1 newspaper 



wspapers 



Watson, Abram W. .... 

Watson, N 

Wayland Library, Way/and, Mass. . 

Webster, Miss H. L. , Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. J 

Weld, Miss Aii^e B., Jamaica Plain 

Weld, Francis M., Jamaica Flam 

Wells, William Goodwin . 

West, James H. . 

Wheeler, Horace L., Cambridge, Mass. 

Wiieelwriglit, Edmund M. . 

Wheildon, William W., Concord, Mass. 

White, James C. .... 

White, John S., New York City 

White, S. v., Brooldyn, N.Y. . 

Whitehouse, Cope, London, England 

Whitman, W. A 

Whitmore, W. H 

Whitney, J. I 

Whitney, W. L. Ponsville, Pa. 
Whittemore, Henry, New York City . 
AVillard, Miss Frances E., Evanston, III 
Williams, B. S., & Son 

Williams, Henry W 

Williston Seminary, Easthampton 
AVilmington Iiisiitiite, Wilmington, Del. 
Winchester Home Corporation, Charlestown 
Winchester I'ublic Library, Winchester, Mass 
Winlock, William C, Washington, D.C. . 
Winsor, Justin ...... 

Winthrop, Robert C 

Wintlirop Training School for Teachers, Colum 
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Milwaukee, H 
Wisconsin, State Historical Society, Madison, 
Woman's Medical College of the New York 

New York City ..... 

Wood, Will C 

Woodl)ury, C. J. H 

Woodruff, Milford, Salt Lake City . 
Worcester, William, Pliiladelphia, Pa. 
Worcester Free Public Library 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass. 
Wright, J. O., New York City . 

Wyeth, E. A 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society 

barre, Pa. ...... 

Yale College, Obsers'atory, New Haven. Conn. 
Yale University ...... 

Y'oung Men's Dramatic Club of Massachusetts 
Young Men's Christian Association . 
Zioba, Jlatliias ...... 



nanuscript 

bia , S. C. 



nfirmary 



Wilkes 




1 

277 



19 



12 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

i 

4 
2 



3 
11 



188». 
18«0 . 



APPENDIX Vl. 

CIKOULATION. 



188U . 
18»0 . 



1,775,49+ 64,261 152,840 217,101 [ 
1,870,411 , 73,a55 201,305 i 275,260 



1,272 '■] 187,163 
1,607 I; 181,246 





SODT 


H Boston 












i 


i- 


































3 








E 


^ 


S 


1 




til 


a 


^ 1 






1UC|,231 


67,800 


177,031 ! 


585 


849 


97,740 


74,140 


171,880 1 


653 


896 



tOWES HjkLL 






1 Reading-room.: 

1 1 




East Boston. 




1 


?n 






a 








o 


^ 










































qj 1 




•^ 


<u 


g 


1 


flj 




s 


•o 


all us 
otal. 




ii 


1 


t 


, 1 


= 


3 


>. 


Ii 


* 1 ^ i 


P 


1,660 


K 





' ca 


a 


B 


R 




60,452 1 247,617 


820 


362,846 


1,026 


: 68,345 


69,367 


127,712 


423 


660 


74,471 1 255,771 1 


841 


1,825 


389,708 


1,038 


1 71,468 


60,823 


l.'52,291 


436 


769 



i 






a 1 


^ 










•3 


S 

P 


i 




s 




g 


__ 


"rt 


x* 


bOffi 








"3 




« , 


K 


t^ 


« 


J 


90,404 


41,382 


131,786 


436 


768 


88,919 


38,668 


127,477 


457 


790 





Charlestow 


N. 






Brighton. 












» 1 


>. 




j 1 


i, 


^ 




















i i 


i 


S 


1 

i 


% 1 


1 
1 


all use. 
otal. 


>. 


•c 




W 
36,694 


99,084 



328 


540 


ts 


K 1 H 


n 


-i 


' 62,490 


17,338 


3,629 20.967 


69 


IWj 


1 63,779 


43,798 


109,577 


361 


608 


19,420 


2,099 21,619 


71 


193 



Dorchester. 



188» ... 70,728 32,167 
1890 . . . 70,860 I 24,388 



102,886 
95,248 



>» 


;3 




B 


606 


77,667 


616 


87,266 



83,347 I 161,004 I 533 
90,963 ; 178,229 586 



JA3IAICA Plain. 









0) 1 


















i 


i 




1 


























w 


w 


H 





47,300 


19,438 


66,738 


221 '• 


j 53,262 


17,685 


70,847 


233 



NoRTu End. 



I Lower Mills. 



a 


«■ 


1^ 


33,849 


112 


230 


44,893 


157 


327 





" 






























a 


O 


22,872 


76 


22,711 


75 



Report of the Library Department. 



47 



APPENDIX VII. 

REGISTRATION. 



The first registration, 1854-58, had 17,066 names ; 
the second, 1859-67, had 52,829 names; the 
third, 1868 to April 30, 1886, had 227,581 names. 



Central Library . . . 
East Boston branch . 
South Boston branch . 
Roxbury branch . . . 
Charlestown branch . 
Brighton branch . . , 
Dorchester branch . • 
South-End branch . . 
Jamaica Plain branch 

Totals 



at) 

H 




XI 

aci 

<Z) 


XI 

x> 


8,997 


9,733 


7,752 


7,133 


1,307 


1,117 


877 


1,065 


1,862 


1,781 


1,395 


2,156 


1,372 


1,585 


1,260 


1,769 


630 


1,623 


860 


762 


323 


365 


270 


277 


1,405 


1,231 


815 


1,005 


1,484 


1,511 


1,040 


1,740 


874 


926 


705 


892 


18,254 


19,872 


14,974 


16,799 



6,370 
896 

1,435 

1,371 
735 
286 
827 

1,470 
785 



14,175 



APPENDIX VIII. 

READING. 





Bates Hall. 


Lower Hall 

and 
Branches. 






65 




47 

44 

6 

3 


15 




6 




6 




8 






Totals 


100 


100 







48 Report of the Library Department. 

APPENDIX IX. 

riNANCIAL STATEMENT. 



General Library Accounts. 



Expended, 1890. 



Binding materials $1,186 70 

Binding hooks 1,715 64 

Books, City appropriation .f 10,623 70 

Special appropriation for purchases made 

at tlie Barlow sale .... 20,000 00 

Income from Trust funds . . . 4,536 51 

44,160 21 

Periodicals 2,871 35 

Expense 3,822 38 

Euel 2,510 88 

Furniture, etc 1,199 11 

Gas *. 4,037 17 

Printing and cataloguing 9,549 73 

Stationery ........... 1,46.") 07 

Salaries 87,918 99 

Transportation, postage, etc. ....... 2,475 95 

Kents . . . "" 5,600 69 

Repairs 2,570 68 

Electric lighting 3,089 18 

Total $174,173 73 



Note. — The cost of maintaining tlie branches, $41,735.69, makes part of the general 
items of the several appropriations. 



Keceipts from fines and sales of catalogues, $3,473.05. 



APPENDIX X. 

LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. — INVESTED IN CITY OF BOSTON BONOS. 



Joshua Bates $50,000 00 

20,000 00 



Amount. When delivered. No. of Bond. When due. 



2 Jonathan Thillipe . 

3 Abbott L.iwience . 

4 Charlotte Harris . . 

5 Henry L. Pierce . . 

6 Mary P. Townsend . 

7 George Ticknor . . 

8 John P. liigelow . . 

9 Fiankliu Club . . . 



10,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

6,000 00 i 

4,000 00 j 

4,000 00 I 

1,000 00 [ 

1,000 00 I June, 



March, 

April, 

April, 

May, 

August, 

Dcci-nibe 

April, . 

April, 

.■\UgU6t, 



11 South Boston . . 

12 Arthur Scholfield . 

13 Joseph .Scholflekl . 

14 Thomas B. Harris 



Edward LawrciR-e . . . 
J. Ingersoll Bowditch . 



■ 1,500 00 

600 00 

100 00 
60,000 00 
11,800 00 
1,000 00 

I 

•2,000 00 , 1 
1,700 00 
1 ,400 00 ' J Xoveml 
600 00 I May, 



April, 

Septcmbe 

December 

July, 

April, 

j October, 



1853 
1861 
1S53 
1860 
1877 
1873 
1879 
1871 
1850 
1863 



, 1879 
1883 
1800 
1684 



1889 
1880 



2,579 
1,567 
2,930 
10,480 
1,726 
1,224 
3,714 



1,244 
1,382 



.Jan'y, 
April, 
July, 
Oct., 
Jan'y, 
April, 
April, 
April, 
Jan'y. 
Oct., 
April, 
April, 
July, 
Oct., 
July. 
April, 
April, 
Oct., 
Nov. 15, 
April, 



1894 
1906 



1894 

1914 

1900 1 

1908) 

1914 

1918 

1013 

1920 I 

1914 



1919 ;j 

1916 1 



To buy " books of permanent value." 

i" To the maintenance of a frci- public library." 
" Purchase of books." 
Books having a permanent value. 
Books for Charlestown branch, published before 1850. 
" Books of permanent value for the Bates Hall." 
Books five years old in some one edition. 
Books in Spanish and Portuguese five years old in some one ci 
Purchase of books. 

Books of permanent value, pi'efcrably " books on govei'un 
jjolitical economy." 

;■ Books relating to American liisloi-v. 
I 

For beaefit of South Boston branch. 

To bo used for books of permanent value. 



For benufit of Charlebtowu branch. 



10,000 00 



January, 1890 



Jan'y, 1920 



i tbey may de 



*' To bold and apply the income and so much of the principal as they [the 
Trustees] may choose to the purchase of special booksof reference to be 
kept and used only at the Cbarlestown Branch of said Public Library." 

For " the purchase of books of permanent value and authorityin matbe- 
raalics and astronomy," to be added to the Bowditch collection. 



MEMORANDA. 



(11 




(21 


■rhpBumofS 


ClI 


Mr. Lnwrencc 


(4) 


'i'hp beqiiefit o 








Tliis fund wo 


(VI 


Tills beiiucst 




Tills fmiU wa 


(K) 


Given by the 



>i' Charlotte fiarria to the Cli;ir;(st.i\Mi hj-:iijcli. \\" 
of Mavor Pierce, previous tn lii- nlinrurm lii.ni 
e received from Wiliiani Minot ami Williuin Miiio 
accompanied the tostamentury gill of his S[jauish 
fi a sum intended for a tcstinioiiia! to Mr. Bigelow 
Trustees of the Franklin Club, under the authority given them at the dissolution of that literary 



it her private library was also given. 
iff, Tne principal ^ ^- — - ' > - 

Jr., executors of filifiL __ ._ ..._ ,, .. 

d Portuguese library. It required that $1,(H)U, at least, shall "be spent every five years tbr t 

retiring from the mayoralty, and was transferred b^ him to this purpose. 



, for the addition of I 



STOCKS OTHER THAN CITY BONDS HELD BY TREADWELL FUND, PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Shares. 


Par Value 
Share. 


Value per Share Total as 
as received Received from 
from Trustee. Tinastee. 




Income. 


Remarks. 


15 B. & A. R.R. Co 

6 B. & Prov. R.R. Co 

9 Fitchburg R.R. Co 

1 Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co 

18 Cambridge Lyceum 


$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

100 00 
20 00 


$179 00 $2,685 00 
179 50 1,077 00 
118 00 1,062 00 

133 00 133 00 
30 00 540 00 


\ $6,685 00 
Less 88 00 


*$l-28 00 
60 00 

48 00 

6 00 
25 20 


April 5, 1887. The certiflcates of 9 shares of F. R.K. exchanged for a 
certificate of 12 shares preferred stock in same corporation, par value 
$100. Total, $1,200. 

Less paid May 10, 1886, to City Collector, per order of Board of 
Trustees of Public Library. 








1 B. &A. R.R.Co 


100 00 




$5,497 00 
100 00 











1 the one share belo 



Report of the Library Department. 49 



Treadwell Fond. — By the will of the late Daniel Treadvvell, of Cam- 
bridge, late liumfortl Professor in Harvard College, who died Feb. 27, 1872, 
he left the residue of his estate, after payment of debts, legacies, etc., in 
trust to his executors, to hold during the life of his wife for her benefit, and 
after her decease to divide the residue then remaining in the hands of the 
trustees as therein provided, and convey one-fifth part thereof to the Trustees 
of the Public Library of the city of Bostoti. 

The City Council have accepted said bequest and authorized the Trustees 
of the Public Library to receive the same, and invest it in the City of Boston 
Bonds, the income of which is to be expended by said Trustees in such man- 
ner as they may deem for the best interests of the library. 

Invested in the City of Boston Four per cent. Bonds . . #3,700 00 
" " " Three and one-half per cent. Bonds, 1,400 00 

" 16 shares B. & A. R.R. Co. Stock, par value .$100 eacli, 1,«00 00 

6 shares B. & P. R.R. Co. Stock, par value .$100 each, (JOo 00 
" 9 shares Fitchburg R.R. Co. Stock, par value .$100 each, 9ii0 00 

1 share Vt. & Mass. R.R. Co. Stock, par value f 100 each, 100 00 
" 18 shares Cambridge Lyceum Stock, par value $20 each, 3G0 00 

$8,66(.) 00 

Charlotte Harris Fund. — Bequest of Charlotte Harris, late of Bos- 
ton, the object of which is stated in the following extract from her will : — 

" I give to the Charlestown Public Library .$10,000, to be invested on in- 
terest, which interest is to be applied to the purchase of books published 
before 18.50. I also give to said Public Library my own private librar}-, and 
the portrait of my grandfather, Richard Devens." Bequest accepted by City 
Council, July 31, 1877. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . .$10,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris Fund. — Bequest of Thomas B. Harris, late of 
Charlestown, for the benefit of the Charlestown Public Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . .$1,000 00 

ScHOLFiELD FuND. — Bcqucst of the late Arthur Scholkield, who 
died in New York, Jan. 17, 1883. The interest to be paid to certain heirs 
during their lives, and then to be used for the purchase of books of perma- 
nent value. The last heir, Joseph Scholfteld, died Nov. 18, l><8t), and by his 
will bequeathed to the City of Boston the sum of .$11,800, which repre- 
sents the income of said fund, received by him up to the time of his death, 
to be added to the fund given by his brother. Invested in 

One City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . . . .$50,000 00 

... 11,800 00 



$61,800 00 



Green Fund. — Donations of Dr. Samuel A. Green of .$2,000, the 
income of which is to be expended for tlie purchase of books relating to 
American history. Invested in 

Two City of Boston Five per cent. Bonds, for .... $1,.500 00 
One City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for .... 500 00 

.$2,000,00 



South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund. — Donation of a citizen 
of South Boston, the income of which is to be expended for the benefit of 
the South Boston Branch Library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . .$100 00 



50 



Report of the Library Department. 



Recapitdlation ok Public Libraky Trust Funds. 

Scholfield bequests .$61,800 00 

Bates donation 50,000 00 

Phillips bequest 20,000 00 

Bowditch bequest 10,000 00 

Phillips donation • • • * 10,000 00 

Charlotte Harris bequest 10,000 00 

Abbott Lawrence bequest 10,000 00 

Pierce donation ......... 5,000 00 

Townsend bequest 4,000 00 

Ticknor bequest 4.000 00 

Treadvvell bequest 8,6«0 00 

Green donations 2,000 00 

Bigelow donation 1,000 00 

Thomas B. Harris bequest . . .... 1,000 00 

Franklin Club donation 1,000 00 

Edward Lawrence !)equest .... . . 500 00 

South Boston Branch Library Trust Fund .... 100 00 

Invested funds .§199,060 00 



IIeport of the Library Department. 51 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS. 

BiGELOw Fund. —This is a donation made by the hite John P. Bigelow, 
in August, 1850, when Mayor of the city. 

The income from this fund is to be appropriated to the purchase of books 
for the increase of the library. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond for . . $1,000 00 



Payable to the Chairman of the Committee on the Public Library for the 
time being. 

Bates Fcnd. — This is a donation made by the late Joshua Bates, of 
London, in March, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond for . . .$50,000 00 



" The income only of this fund is to be, each and every year, expended in 
the purchase of such books of permanent value and authority as may be 
found most needful and most useful." Payable to the Mayor of the City for 
the time being. 

BowDiTCH Fund. — This is the bequest of J. Ingersoll Bowditch. 

Invested in one City of Boston Three and one-half per cent. 

Bond f 10,000 00 



The whole income in each and every year to be expended in the purchase 
of books of permanent value and authority in mathematics and astronomy. 

Phillips Fund. — This is a Donation made by the late Jonathan Phillips, 
of Boston, in April, 1853. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $10,000 00 



The interest on this fund is to be used exclusively for tiie purchase of books 
for said library. 

Also, a bequest by the same gentleman, in his will, dated 20th September, 
1849. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . .$20,000 00 



The interest on which is to be annually devoted to the maintenance of a 
Free Public Library. 

Both of these items are payable to the Mayor of the City for the time 
being. 

Abbott Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Abbott 
Lawrence, of Boston. 

Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . $10,000 00 



Tiie interest on this fund is to be exclusively appropriated for the purchase 
of books for tiie said Library, having a permanent value. 

Edward Lawrence Fund. — This is the bequest of the late Edward 
Lawrence, of Charlestown. The following clause from his will explains its. 
purpose : — 



52 Report of the Library Department. 

" To hold and apply the income, and so much of the principal as they may 
choose, to the purchase of special books of reference, to be kept and used 
only at the Charlestown branch of said Public Library." 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, due 

April 1, 1916 $500 00 

Pierce Fund. — This is a donation made by Henry L. Pierce, Mayor of 
the city, Nov. 29, 1873, and accepted by the City Council, Dec. 27, 1873. 
Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . $5,000 00 

Townsend Fund. — This is a donation from William Minot and William 
Minot, Jr., executors of the will of Mart P. Townsend, of Boston, at whose 
disposal she left a certain portion of her estate in trust, for such charitable 
and public institutions as they might think meritorious. Said executors ac- 
cordingly selected the Public Library of the City of Boston as one of such 
institutions, and attached the following conditions to the legacy : " The 
income only shall, in each and every year, be expended in the purchase of 
books for the use of the library; each of which books shall have been pub- 
lished in some one edition at least five years at the time it may be so 
purchased." 
Invested in one City of Boston Five per cent. Bond, for . . .$4,000 00 

TicKNOR Bequest. — By the will of the late George Ticknor, of Boston, 
he gave to the City of Boston, on tlie death of his wife, all his books and 
manuscripts in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, about four thousand 
volumes, and also the sum of four thousand dollars. After the receipt of 
said sum, the city is required to spend not less than one thousand dollars in 
every five years during the twenty-five years next succeeding (i.e., the 
income of four thousand dollars, at the rate of five per cent, per annum), in 
the purchase of books in the Spanish and Portuguese languages and litera- 
ture. At the end of twenty-five years the income of the said sum is to be 
expended annually in the purchase of books of permanent value, either in 
the Spanish or Portuguese language, or in such other languages as may be 
deemed expedient by those having charge of the library. The books be- 
queathed or purchased are always to be freely accessible for reference or 
study, but are not to be loaned for use outside of the library building. If 
these bequests are not accepted by tiie city, and the trusts and conditions 
faithfully executed, the books, manuscripts, and money are to be given to 
the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

In order that the city might receive the immediate benefit of this contribu- 
tion, Anna Ticknor, widow of the donor, rclintiuished her right to retain dur- 
ing licr life the books and uumuscripts, and jjlaced them under the control of 
the city, the City Council having previously accejjted the bequests in accord- 
ance with the terms and conditions of said will, and tlie Trustees of the Public 
Library received said bequests on behalf of the city, and made suitable ar- 
rangements for the care and custody of the books and manuscripts. 
Invested in one City of Boston Six per cent. Bond, for . . .$4,000 00 

Franklin Ceuh Fund. — This is a donation made in .June, 1803, by a 
literary association of young men in Boston, who, at the dissolution of the 
association, authorized its trustees, Thomas Minns, John J. French, and J. 
Franklin Reed, to dispose of the funds on hand in such a manner as to them 
should seem judicious. They elected to bestow it on the Public Library, 
attaching to it the following conditions : " In trust that the income, but the 
income only, shall, year by year, be expended in the purchase of books of 
permanent value for the use of the free Public Library of the city, and, as far 
as practicable, of such a character as to be of special interest to young men.' ' 
The Trustees expressed a preference for books relative to Government and 
Political Economy. 
Invested in one City of Boston Four per cent. Bond, for . . $1,000 00 



Report of the Library Department. 



53 



Executive department 
Catalogue department 
Book department 
Bates Hall circulation 

ment 
Lower Hall circulation 

ment 
Janitor's department . 
Bindery 
East Boston branch . 



APPENDIX XI. 



LIBRARY SERVICE. 



7 South Boston brancli 
14 i Roxbury branch 

8 Charlestown branch . 
depart- Brighton branch 

18 Dorchester branch 

depart- South-End branch 

21 Jamaica Plain branch 

4 North-End branch 

8 Deliveries . . . 
5 

Total . . . . 



6 
6 
6 
3 
5 
6 
4 
3 
9 

138 



At some of the branch libraries occasional extra assistance is employed 
when necessary. 

AGENTS. 

Messrs. W. B. Clarke & Co., and Mr. Carl Schoenhof, Boston, 
Mr. Edward G. Allen (for English patents), London. 
Messrs. Kegan Paul, Trench, Triibner & Co., Limited, London. 
Deuerlich'sche Buchhandlung, Gottingen. 



LOCATION OF THE BRANCH LIBRARIES AND DELIVERY 
STATIONS. 



Allston delivery station, 26 Franklin street, Allston. 

Ashraont delivery station, 25 Argyle street. 

Brighton branch, Holton Library building, Rockland street. 

Charlestown branch, old City Hall, City square, Charlestown. 

Dorchester branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams street. 

Dorchester Station delivery, 1 Milton avenue. 

East Boston branch, old Lyman School building. Meridian street. 

Jamaica Plain branch, Curtis Hall, Centre street, Jamaica Plain. 

Lower Mills delivery station, Washington street, near River street. 

Mattapan delivery station. River, cor. Oakland street. 

Mount Bowdoin delivery station, Washington, cor. Eldon street. 

Neponset delivery station, Wood's block. 

North End branch, cor. Salem and North Bennet streets. 

Roslindaie delivery station, Florence, cor. Ashland street. 

Roxbury branch, 46 Millmont street. 

South Boston branch, 372 West Broadway, cor. E street. 

South-End branch, English High School building, Montgomery street. 

West Roxbury delivery station, Centre, near Mt. Vernon street. 



54 



Report of the Libraky Department. 



APPENDIX XII. 

EXAMfNING COMMITTEES FOR THIRTY-NIXE YEARS. 

The following gentlemen have served on the Examining Com- 
mittees for the years given. The names in italics are those of 
trustees who have acted as chairmen of the various committees. 
The thirty-fourth year was from May 1 to Dec. 31, 1885, a period 
of eight months, for which no Examining Committee was ap- 
pointed. 



Abbott, Hon. J. G., 1870. 
Abbott, S. A. B., 1880. 
Adams, Nebemiah, D.D., 1800. 
Adams, Wm. T., 187.5. 
Alger, Ji.ev. Wm. R., 1870. 
Amory, Miss Anna S., 1890. 
Andrew, Hon. John F., 1888. 
Appleton, Hon. Nathan, 1851. 
Apthorp, Wm. F., 188?.. 
Arnold, Howard P., 1881. 
Aspinwall, Col. Thomas, 1860. 
Attwood, G., 1877. 
Bailey, Edwin C, 1861. 
Ball, Joshua D., 1861. 
Bangs, Edward, 1887. 
Barnard, James M., 1866. 
Bartlett, Sidney, 1869. 
Beebe, James M., 1858. 
Beecher, Rev. Edward, 1851. 
Bent, Samuel Arthur, 1890. 
Bigelow, Jacob, M.D., 1857. 
Bigelow, Hon. John P., 1856. 
Blagden, George W., D.D., 1856. 
Blake, John G., M.D., 1883. 
Bodfish, Rev. Joshua P., 1879. 
Bowditch, Henry I., M.D., 1855. 
Bowditch, Henry /., M.D., 1865. 
Bowditch, II. P., M.D., 1881. 
Bowditch, J. Ingorsoll, 1855. 
Bowman, Alfonzo, 1867. 
Bradford, Charles F., 1868. 
Brewer, Thomas M., 1865. 
Brimmer, Hon. Martin, 1890. 
Brooks, Rev. Phillips, 1871. 
Browne, Causten, 1876. 
Buckingham, C. E., M.D., 1872. 
Burroughs, Rev. Henrv, jr., 1869. 
Chadwick, James R., M.D., 1877. 
Chaney, Rev. George L., 1868. 
Chase, George B., 1876. 
Chase, George B., 1877, 1885. 
Cheney, Mrs., Ednah D., 1881. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864. 
Clarke,'James Freeman,>Z>.Z>., 1877. 
Clarke, James Freeman,* D.D., 1882. 
Collar.lWm. C, 1874. 



Cudworth, Warren H., D.D., 1878. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1862. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1872. 
Curtis, Thos. B., M.D., 1874. 
Gushing, Thomas, 1885. 
Dalton, Charles H., 1884. 
Dana, Samuel T., 1857. 
Dean, Benjamin, 1873. 
Denny, Henry G., 1876. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M., 1866. 
Dillingham, Rev. Pitt, 1886. 
Dix, James A., 1860. 
Doherty, Philip J., 1888. 
Donahoe, Patrick, 1869. 
Durant, Henry F., 1863. 
Duryea, Jos. T., D.D., 1880. 
D wight, .John S., 1868. 
Dwight, Thomas, M.D., 1880. 
Eastburn, Manton, D.D., 1863. 
Eaton, William S., 1887. 
Edes, Henry H., 1886. 
Eliot, Samuel, LL.D., 1868. 
Ellis, Arthur B., 1888, 1889. 
Ellis, Calvin, M.D., 1871. 
Ellis, Geo. E., D.D., 1881. 
Endicott, William, jr., 1878. 
Evans, George W., 1887, 1888, 1889. 
Field, Walbridue A., 1866. 
Fields, .Tames t., 1872. 
Fitz, Reginald H., 1879. 
Foote, Rev. Henry W., 1864. 
Fowle, William F., 1864. 
Freeland, Charles W., 1867. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1876. 
Furness, Horace Howard, f.L.D., 

1882. 
Gannett, Ezra S., D.D., 1855. 
Gay, George H., 1876. 
Gilchrist, Daniel S., 1872. 
Gordon, George A., D.D., 1885. 
Gould, A. A., M.D., 1864. 
Grant, Robert, 1884. 
Gray, John C, jr., 1877. 
Green, Samuel A., M.D., 1868. 



Report of the Library Department. 



55 



Greenough, William W., \8r>?., 1874, 

1883, 1886. 
Grinnell, Rev. C. E., 1874. 
Hale, Rev. Edward E., 1858. 
Hale, Mrs. George S., 1887, 1888. 
Hale, Moses L., 1862. 
Haskins, Rev. George F., 1865. 
Hassam, John T., 1885. 
Hayes, Hon. F. B., 1874. 
Ilaynes, Henry W., 1879. 
Hay lies, Henry W., 1881, 1884. 
Hayward, George, M.D., 1863. 
Heard, John, jr., 1888, 1889. 
Heard, JohnT., 1853. 
Herford, Brooke, D.D., 1884. 
Herrick, Samuel E., D.D., 1888, 

1889. 
Higginson, Thomas W., 1883. 
Hill, Clement Hugh, 1880. 
Hillard, Ho7i. George S., 1853. 
Hillard, Hon. George S., 1873. 
Hodges, Richard, M., M.D., 1870. 
Holmes, Edward J., 1881, 1884. 
Holmes, Oliver W., 31. D., 1858. 
Holmes, Oliver W., jr., 1882. 
Homans, Charles D., iV.D., 1867. 
Homans, Mrs. Charle.'s D., 1885, 

1886, 1887. 
Homer, George, 1870. 
Homer, Peter T., 1857. 
Hubbard, William J., 1858. 
Hunnewell, James F., 1880. 
Hyde, George B., 1879. 
Jeffries, B. Joy, M.D., 1869. 
Jenkins, Charles E., 1879. 
Jewell, Hon. Harvey, 1863. 
Jordan, Eben D., 1873. 
Kidder, Henry P., 1870. 
Kimball, David P., 1874. 
Kimball, Henry H.. 1865. 
Kirk, Edward N., D.D., 1859. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 1853. 
Lawrence, Abbott, 1859. 
Lawrence, Miss Harriette S., 1890. 
Lawrence, James, 1855. 
Lee, Miss Alice, 1889, 1890. 
Lewis, Weston, 1872, 1878. 
Lincoln, Hon. F. W., 1856. 
Lincoln, Solomon, 1886. 
Little, James L., 1864. 
Lombard, Prof. Josiah L. , 1868. 
Loring, Hon. Charles G. , 1855. 
Lothrop, Loring, 1866. 
Lowell, Augustus, 1883. 
•Lowell, Edward J,, 1885. 
Lunt, Hon. George, 1874. 
Lyman, George H., M.D., 1885. 
McCleary, Samuel F., 1890. 
Manning, Rev. Jacob M., 1861. 
Mason, Rev. Charles, 1857. 
Mason, Robert M., 1869. 
Maxwell, J. Audley, 1883. 
Metcalf, Rev. Theodore A., 1888, 

1889. 



Minns, Thomas, 1864. 

Minot, Francis, 1866. 

Morrill, Charles J., 1885. 

Morse, John T., jr., 1879. 

Morse, Robert M., jr., 1878. 

Morton, Hon. Ellis W., 1871. 

Mudge, Hon. E. R., 1871. 

Neale, Rollin H., D.D., 1853. 

Noble, John, 1882. 

Norcross, Otis, 1880. 

O'Brien. Hugh, 1879. 

O'Reilly, John Boyle, 1878. 

Otis, G. A., 1860. 

Paddock, Rt. Rev. Benj. H., 1876. 

Parker, Charles Henry, 1888, 1889. 

Parkman, Henry, 1885. 

Parks, Rev. Leighton, 1882. 

Perkins, Charles C, 1871. 

Perry, Thomas S., 1879, 1882, 1883, 

1884, 1885, 1890. 
Phillips, John C, 1882. 
Phillips, Jonathan, 1854. 
Prescott, William H., LL.D., 1853. 
Prince, Hon. F. 0., 1888, 1889, 1890. 
Putnam, George, D.D., 1870. 
Putnam, Hon. John P., 1865. 
Randall, Charles L., M.D., 1884. 
Rice, Hon. Alexander H., 1860. 
Rogers, Prof. William B., 1861. 
Rollins, J. Wingate, 1888, 1889. 
Ropes, John C, 1872. 
Rotch, Benjamin S., 1863. 
Runkle, Prof. J. D., 1882. 
Russell, Samuel H., 1880. 
Sanger, Hon. George P., 1860. 
Seaver, Edwin P., 1881. 
Shepard, Hon. Harvey N., 1888, 1889. 
Shurtleff, Hon. Nathaniel B., 1857. 
Smith, Charles C, 1873. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles C, 1881, 1886. 
Sprague, Charles J., 1859. 
Sprague, Homer B., 1882. 
Stedman, C. Ellery, M.D., 1888. 
Stevens, Oliver, 1858. 
Stevenson, Hon. J. Thomas, 1856. 
Stockwell, S. N., 1861. 
Stone, Col. Henry, 1885, 1886, 1887. 
Story, Joseph, 1856. 
Sullivan, Richard, 1883, 1884. 
Teele, John 0., 1886. 
Thaxter, Adam W., 1855. 
Thayer, George A., 1875. 
Thayer, Rev. Thomas B., 1862. 
Thomas, B. F., 1875. 
Thomas, Seth J., 1856. 
Ticknor, George, 1853, 1854, 1855, 

1859, 1863, 1866. 
Tobey, Hon. Edward S., 1862. 
Twombly, Rev. A. S., 1883, 1884. 
Upham, J. B., M.D., 1865. 
Vibbert, Rev. Geo. H., 1873. 
Wales, George W., 1875. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H., 1862. 
Ward, Rev. Julius H., 188?, 



56 



Report of the Library Department. 



Ware, Charles E., M.D., 1875. 
Ware, Darwin E., 1881. 
Warner, Hermann J., 1867. 
Warren, Hon. Charles H., 1859. 
Warren, J. Collins, M.D., 1878. 
Waterston, Rev. Kobert C, 1867. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate G., 1877. 
Wharton, William F., 1886. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1869. 
Whitmore, William H.,\887. 
Whitney, Daniel B., 1862. 
Whitney, Henry A., 1873. 



Wightman, Hon. Joseph M., 1859. 
Williams, Harold, M.B., 1888, 1889, 

1890. 
Williamson, William C, 1881. 
Wilson, Elisha T., M.D., 1861. 
Winsor, Justin, 1867. 
Wintiirop, Hon. Robert C, 1854. 
Winthrop, Robert C, jr., 1887. 
Woodbury, Charles Levi, 1871. 
Woolson, Mrs. Abba Goold, 1888, 

1889. 
Wright, Hon. Carroll D., 1884. 



Report of the Library Department. 



57 



APPENDIX XIII. 



TRUSTEES FOR THIRTY-NINE YEARS. 

The Honorable Edward Everett was President of the Board 
from 1<S52 to 1864 ; the late George Ticknor in 1865 ; William 
W. Greeuough, Esq., from 1866 to April, 1888; Samuel A. B. 
Abbott, Esq., since the latter date. 

The Board for 1852 was a preliminary organization ; that for 
1853 made what is called the first annual report. It consisted of 
one alderman and one common councilman, and five citizens at 
large, till 1867, when a revised ordinance made it to consist of one 
alderman, two common councihnen, and six citizens at large, two 
of whom retired, unless reelected, each year, while the members 
from the City Council were elected yearly. In 1878 the organi- 
zation of the Board was changed to include one alderman, one 
councilman, and five citizens at large, as before 1867 ; and in 
1885, by the provisions of the amended city charter, the repre- 
sentation of the city government upon the Board by an alderman 
and a councilman was abolished, leaving the Board, as at present, 
consisting of five citizens at laro;e. 



Abbott, Samukl A. B., 187'J-90. 
Allen, James B., 1852-53. 
Appleton, Thomas G. , 1852-57. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 1871-72. 
BiGELOw, John P., 1852-68. 
BowDiTCH, Henry I., 1865-08. 
Bradlee, John T., 1869-70. 
Bradt, Herman D., 1872-73. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1868-69. 
Braman, Jarvis D., 1869-72. 
Brown, J. C. J., 1861-62. 
Burditt, Charles A., 1873-76. 
Carpenter, George ()., 1870-71. 
Chase, George B., 1877-85. 
Clark, John M., 1855-56. 
Clark, John T., 1873-78. 
Clarke, James Freeman, 1878-88. 
Clapp, William W., jr., 1864-66. 
Coe, Henry F., 1878. 
Crane, Samuel D., 1860-61. 
Curtis, Daniel S., 1873-75. 
Dennie, George, 1858-60. 
Dickinson, M. F., jr., 1871-72. 
Drake, Henry A., 1863-64. 
Erving, Edward S., 1852. 
Everett, Edward, 1852-64. 
Flynn, James J., 1883. 
Frost, Oliver, 1854-55; 1856-58. 
Frothingham, Richard, 1875-79. 



Gaffield, Thomas, 1867-68. 
Green, Samuel A., 1868-78. 
Greenough, William W., 1856-88. 
Guild, Curtis, 1876-77 ; 1878-79. 
Harris, William G., 1869-70. 
Haynes, Henry W., 1858-59. 
Haynes. Henry W., 1880-90. 
HiLLARD, George S., 1872-75; 1876- 

77. 
Howes, Osborne, jr., 1877-78. 
Ingalls, Melville E., 1870-71. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 1864-65. 
Jenkins, Edward J., 1885. 
Keitli, James M., 1868-70. 
Kimball, David P., 1874-76. 
Lawrence, James, 1852. 
Lee, John H., 1884-85. 
Lewis, Weston, 1867-68. 
Lewis, Weston, 1868-79. 
Lewis, Winslow, 1867. 
Little, Samuel, 1871-73. 
Messinger, George W., 1855. 
Morse, "Godfrey, 1883-84. 
Morton, Ellis W., 1870-73. 
Munroe, Abel B., 1854. 
Newton, Jeremiah L., 1867-68. 
Niles, Stephen R., 1870-71. 
O'Brien, Hugh, 1879-82. 
Pease, Frederick, 1872-73. 



58 



Report of the Library Department. 



Perkins, William E., 1873-74. 
Perry, Lyman, 1852. 
Plummer, Farnham, 185G-57. 
Pope, Benjamin, 1876-77. 
Pope, Richard, 1877-78. 
Pratt, Charles E., 1880-82. 
PitRCE, Phineas, 1888-90. 
Prince, Frederick O., 1888-90. 
Putnam, George, 1868-77. 
Reed, Sampson, 1852-53. 
Richards, William R., 1889-90. 
Sanger, George P., 1860-61. 
Sears, Philip H., 1859-60. 
Seaver, Benjamin, 1852. 
Shepard, Harvey N., 1878-79. 
Shurtleff, Nathaniel B., 1852-68. 
Stebbins, Solomon B., 1882-83. 



Story, Joseph, 1855-56; 1865-67. 
Thomas, Benjamin F., 1877-78. 
TiCKNOR, George, 1852-66. 
Tyler, John S., 1863-64; 1866-67. 
Warren, George W., 1852-54. 
Washburn, Frederick L., 1857-58. 
Whipple, Edwin P., 1868-70. 
Whitmore, William H., 1882-83. 
Whitmore, William H., 1885-88. 
Whitney, Daniel H., 1862-63. 
Whitten, Charles V., 1883-85. 
Wilson, ElishaT., 1861-63. 
Wilson, George, 1852. 
WiNSOR, JU.STIN, 1867. 
Wolcott, Roger, 1879. 
Wright, Albert, J., 1868-69. 



Citizens at large in small capitals. 



[Document 9 — 1891.] 




SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



UPON THE 



CONDITION AND PROGRESS OF THE WORK 



THE NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING. 



The Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston 
have the honor to present to the City Council their semi- 
annual report upon the condition and proi^ress of the work 
on the new Public Library buildins;. The Trustees bear 
leave to preface then- report with a statement of their 
relation to the new Public Library building- that seems 
to be proper in order both to show why a further appropria- 
tion is required to complete the work, and to correct cer- 
tain misapi^rehensions in regard to their action. 

Although incorporated by a special act of the Legislature, 
that in some degree removes them from the direct control 
of the City Council, the Trustees have always desired to act 
in accordance with the expressed wishes of the City Council 
as representing the people of Boston. They believe, and 
have always acted upon the belief, that all petitions and 
requests that require the action of the Legislature touching 
matters in wdiicli the Public Library is concerned should 
come from the City Council, and they have, therefore, never 



2 ^ City Document No. 9. 

petitioned, or officially aided in a petition, that did not origi- 
nate therein. 

In the year 1887, when it became evident that the new 
building could not lie built in a satisfactory manner by the 
City Architect, certain citizens of Boston petitioned the 
General Court for an act that should put the whole control 
of the erection of the new building into the hands of the 
Trustees. Although they were requested to aid this peti- 
tion officially, they declined so to do, and appeared before the 
Legislative Committee only in their individual capacity and 
as witnesses. Two of the Trustees, the only ones examined 
by the committee, stated that they appeared only as wit- 
nesses, and that the Trustees declined to take any official 
action in aid of the petition. It should be said here that the 
City Council at that time made no objection to the grant of 
the new powers proposed to be given to the Trustees. 

Again in 1889, wdien the City Council delayed action in 
regard to providing money for continuation of the work 
upon the new building, and it was evident that legislative 
action would be required to enable the city to borrow the 
needed money, the Trustees declined to petition the Legis- 
lature for the reason that in their judgment a petition of such 
a nature should come only from the City Council. 

In order that the matter might be brought before the 
Legislature before the limit of the time fixed for taking up 
new business by that body, and in the a])sence of any action 
on the part of the City Council, certain citizens of Boston 
petitioned that the cit}^ should l)e })eimitted to borrow 
beyond the debt limit a sufficient sum to complete the new 
building. This })etition was not opposed by the City Coun- 
cil and it was understood that they were favorable to it. 
The Trustees at the request of the conunittee appeared before 
it and testilied that in their judgment the building could not 
be completed for $1,000,000, but that a much larger sum 
would be required. The committee, however, reported a 
bill, which became a law, to authorize a loan for $1,000,000 
only. It was stated at the time that the committee thought 
that the rest of the money reipiired could be ajipropriated 
from the annual levy. Acting under this law the City 
Council authorized the borrowing of $1,000,000, to be placed 
at the disposal of the Trustees. 

After the passage of the Act of 1887 the Trustees, with 
reluctance, assumed the responsibility put upon them. Their 
first duty was to select an architect best fitted to design and 
erect a building that should not disappoint the just expecta- 
tions of the citizens. Such a building, they believed, should 
be absolutely fire proof, and afford am[)le room to provide 



New Public Library Buildixg. 3 

for the present and prospective needs of the Hbrary, both 
for storing books accessibly, and for the accommodation of 
readers, students, and the administrative force of the insti- 
tution. It should be so arranged and constructed that the 
annual outlay for management and care should be reduced to 
the lowest possible amount ; and at the same time and with- 
out the sacritice or curtailment of any of these practical ne- 
cessities for architectural eft'ect, it should be a monumental 
edifice and an ornament to the city. Keeping these require- 
ments in view, the Trustees examined carefully the work of 
the foremost architects of the country and consulted freely 
with architects and others whose opinions would be likely to 
afford them assistance, and finally decided that Mr. McKim, 
of the firm of McKim, Mead, & White, could best carry out 
their intentions. It should be said here that Mr. McKim was 
at the time personally unacquainted with any one of the 
Trustees. They believe that their judgment was not at 
fault in making this selection, and that the city will always 
have reason to be proud of the building that Mr. McKim has 
designed. 

In making the plans of the ])uilding the Trustees and Mr. 
McKim availed themselves of all information in regard to 
libraries that was within their reach. They were greatly 
assisted by Dr. James Freeman Clarke and W. W. Green- 
ough, Esq., of their number, who had, probably, as extensive 
an acquaintance with library needs and with library buildings, 
both in this country and abroad, as any two persons living. 
After long and careful study they finally determined upon 
the plans that were presented to the City Council in 1888. 

In their annual report submitted in Januaiy, 1888, they 
stated that they had reasonable assurance that the plans 
would be completed and estimates prepared by the first of 
the succeeding April. During the winter of 1888 an order 
was introduced and passed in the City Council that " His 
Honor the Mayor request the Trustees of the Public Library 
to commence and complete such part of the work as could 
be done within the appropriation already made therefor." 
This order was referred by the Board of Aldermen to the 
Library Committee, who requested information from the 
Trustees, who thereupon appeared before the committee and 
gave what information they had in their power to give, and 
laid before them all the plans for the new building so far as 
they had been completed. They also put at the disposal of 
the committee the architect, his office, and all the plans, 
papers, and figures, of every sort and description, relating 
to the new building. Further than this, they submitted a 
carefully-made model of the proposed building ; and this 



4 City Document No. 9. 

model, toi^ether with all the plans, was put on public exhibition 
in the old State House. 

There were several hearings on the subject at which some 
of the Trustees were present; but no estimates of the cost 
of the building were presented by them. At this time the 
Trustees were Mr. Greenough, who was succeeded in May, 
1888, by Mr. Prince ; Dr. Clarke, who wtis succeeded in July, 
1888, by Mr. Pierce ; Mr. Whitmore, who was succeeded in 
January, 1889, by Mr. Richards; and Messrs. Haynes and 
Abbott. During the latter part of the time that the matter 
was in the possession of the committee, Mr. Greenough, 
President of the Board, was absent from the State by reason 
of ill-health ; Dr. Clarke was too ill to attend to any business, 
and within a few weeks died ; Mr. Abbott was confined to 
his house by a severe iUness ; Mr. Haynes had taken no ac- 
tive part in the hearings before the committee, and was not 
consulted by them in regard to any estimate ; and the re- 
maining Trustee was, with his accustomed energy, opposing 
the grant of any money for the proposed building ; so that 
no member of the Trustees, so far as is known, was consulted 
as to the estimate contained in the preamble of the order 
hereinafter referred to. 

The committee in consultation with the architect fixed 
upon an estimate of $1,166,000, which was eml)odicd in 
the order reported by them. This estimate, it should I)e 
said in justice to the architect, had to be prepared very hur- 
riedly ; it was, however, founded upon figures furnished by 
two contractors of responsibility in their respectives lines of 
business, for each item of construction. It was never sub- 
mitted to or approved hy the Trustees indi\ idually or col- 
lectively. That it was not an estimate made or approved 
by the Trustees is shown by the preamble of the order 
which was finally passed, as follows : — 

City of Bostox, 
In IJoaud of Aldekmen, May 7, 1888. 

Whereas, It appears fi'oni careful estimates presented by the archi- 
tects appointed bv the Trustees of the Public Library, that the cost 
of the new l)uil(ling will bo i§l.lGG,O()0; now, therefore, in order to 
expedite the erection of s;ii(l buildinjx, but intending that no more than 
the above sum shall be used in said construction, 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Puldic I. library be and hereby are 
authorized to commence the construction anil erection of the new Public 
Library building, according to the plans made by the architects McKim, 
Mead, & White, ami approved by said Trustees, and to pi'oceed with 
the work thereon, as tar as it can be done within the limits of the 
appropriation, made for the erection of a new library building on 
Dartmouth street, St. James avenue, and Boylston street, and the said 
Trustees are authorized to expend the balance of said appropriation 
therefoi-. 

Passed. Yeas 10, nays 2. Sent down for concurrence. 



New Public Library Building. 5 

In Common Council, May 10. 
Concurred. Yeas G2, nays 1. 
Approved by the Mayor, May 12, 1888. 
A true cojDy. 

Attest: (Signed) J. H. O'Neil, 

City Cleric. 

It may be further said that this estimate was never seen 
by the Trustees, with the exception of perhaps one of them, 
until it had passed the Board of Aldermen. 

The architect's estimate for the first hirge contract, which 
included foundations, cut-granite, brick masonry, and iron- 
work for the first story, \yas $315,000. These (igure^ 
were based upon those used in making the estimate reported 
to the City Council. This contract was finally let for $26(5, - 
776, so that it seemed at first as if the building could be 
completed for the sura specified. To show the difficulty of 
making an estimate of this character it may be said that the 
bids for it, offered to the Trustees by the most prominent 
contractors in the city, varied from $2Gt),77(), the lowest, to 
$354,555, the highest. As the w^ork progressed, hovvever, 
it became evident to the Trustees that the estimate made by 
the committee was too small, and upon examination it was 
found they had accidentally omitted some very large items, 
namely: architects' commission, decorative work, platforms 
and approaches, shelving, and incidentals, — which latter 
item for a building of this character should be estimated at 
twenty {)er cent, of the cost. In their first annual report 
thereafter the Trustees called the attention of the City Coun- 
cil to this fact. 

During the winter of 1888, as has been stated, the Legis- 
lature authorized the city to borrow $1,000,000 outside the 
debt limit, to be used towards the completion of the build- 
ing ; and in the spring the City Council placed this sum at 
the disposal of the Trustees. The Legislative Committee, 
as has been before stated, were informed by the Trustees that 
this sum was not sufficient ; and in their next annual report 
the Trustees again informed the City Council that the sum 
of $1,000,000 appropriated was not sufficient, and had 
never been approved by the Trustees as an estimate for the 
completion of the building. A full and detailed statement 
of the contracts and expenditures in regard to the building 
was also submitted, showing that the Trustees had not 
enough money to do much more than cover the building in. 

Since the commencement of the erection of the building 
the Trustees have made regular semi-annual reports to the 
City Council, and one additional report that was made by 
special request. 



6 City Document No. 9. 

During the past summer and autumn the architects were 
busily engaged in preparing a detailed and careful estimate 
of the cost of completing the building. This estimate was 
presented to the Trustees complete in the month of Decem- 
ber. It was leased upon the very best means of information 
within the reach of the architects and Trustees, and amounted 
to $985,560. It included the statuary and decorative w^ork 
contemplated at the time the plans and model were submitted 
to the City Council in 1888 and is submitted herewith [marked 

After careful consideration the Trustees decided to reduce 
this estimate to $850,000 by the omission of items of statu- 
ary and other ornamental work which, although they would 
add greatly to the beauty of the building, are not absolutely 
necessary to its completion in a form of which the cit}^ will 
have no reason to l)e ashamed. This revised estimate is sub- 
mitted herewith [marked B]. It was communicated to the 
City Council in December, 1890, and an order was then passed 
requesting His Honor the Mayor to petition the General 
Court for leave to borrow the amount named outside the 
del)t limit. 

If by the liberality of the city all things omitted could l)e 
restored, the result would be most fortunate for the building 
and for the city. 

A detailed statement of the present condition of the build- 
ing, and of the work done during the present year, is given 
in the report of the Clerk of the Works ap[)ended hereto 
[marked C]. 

It is believed that, if there should be no delay in mak- 
ing an appn)priation for the completion of the building, it 
will be ready for occupancy before the end of the next year. 
During the past year the work has been somewhat delayed 
by reason of strikes and other causes beyond the control of 
the contractors. The accomi)anying schedules show all the 
contracts that have been made for the construction of the 
building from the beginning; the amounts that have been 
added to the contracts ; and the amounts that have been de- 
ducted from them ; and the money remaining at the disposal 
of the Trustees. 

In examining these schedules it should be borne in mind 
that a very small amount of the additions have been for 
changes that add to the cost of the building. Owing to the 
fact that the Trustees have not been able, by reason of the 
smallness of the appropriation at their disposal, to make at 
any time contracts for the completion of the whole work, 
but have been obliged in making proposals to give out the 
Avork in i)arts so that bids would not exceed the sums ap- 



New Public Library Building. 7 

propriated, it has been found in many cases that certain 
work left out of the original contracts could be lietter per- 
formed in connection with the work contracted for. They 
have, therefore, where their funds permitted, added such 
work to the original contract. This has never been done 
except in the interest of economy ; and the additions so 
made have l)een for Avork that would be necessary for the 
completion of the building. Such additions, therefore, have 
not added to the cost of the whole building. In every case 
the Trustees have had careful estimates made of the amount 
of the extra work, and have asked bids for it from the con- 
tractors and others ; Init the work has been given to the 
contractor only when his bid was less than that of outsiders. 
It will be seen by examination of the report of the Clerk of 
the Works that the net amount of all additions to contracts 
is but six and four-tenths per cent, of the expenditures made 
and contracted for. Of the work thus added, but a very 
small part, proI»ably one-tenth, has l)een work not contem- 
plated at the time when the original plans were made ; but 
this increase his been many times offset by work omitted. 
With these slight exceptions it is believed that all changes 
in the original plans have tended to reduce the ultimate 
cost of the building. A percentage of six and four-tenths 
for extras would be small even if they increased the final 
cost of the building — as they do not in this case. Very few 
building contracts are completed with so small a percentage 
of work added. A comparison of the contract price with 
the total cost of fourteen government buildings [see Appen- 
dix D] , taken at random from the Supervising Architect's 
report of 1875, the last one that happens to be at hand, 
shows an average addition for extras of eighty-three per 
cent. 

No material changes have been made in the main design 
of the building as laid before the City Council in 1888, ex- 
cept in the interests of economy. The chief changes are as 
follows : the court has been changed from its original design 
in granite to brick and marble, at an estimated saving of 
$45,000 ; the height of the building has been reduced nine 
feet, at an estimated saving of $133,000 ; the plan of' the 
special library floor has been changed, at an estimated saving 
of $50,000 ; changes have been made in the design of the 
new Bates Hall, at an estimated saving of $25,000 ; changes 
have been made in the vestibules, at an estimated saving of 
$15,000; changes have been made in the roof, at an estimated 
saving of $15,000; changes have been made in decorative 
work, and in the whole interior finish of the building, that 
must result in a very large saving over the original plans. 



8 City DocUxMent No. 9. 

but the exact amount of which it is impossible to state with 
accuracy. All these changes have been made with the ap- 
proval and by the advice of the architect ; and it is believed 
that they will not take away from the convenience or beauty 
of the structure. Some changes have been made in the de- 
sign of the Blagden-street elevation, ^vhich, it is believed, 
have not materially affected the cost of the building, but 
have greatly improved its appearance. 

The total cost of the building when completed w^ill be 
$2,218,865, including shelving Imt no other furniture. Tak- 
ino; into consideration the magnitude and the nature of the 
work this cost is not excessive. Exclusive of the court, the 
l)uilding together with the platform covers an acre and one- 
half and contains 4,312,158 cubic feet. The su])erficial area 
of flooring is four acres, and of the ceilings four and one- 
half acres. The present stack, which can be nearly doubled 
when more room is needed, is built to hold fifteen miles of 
shelving, while five miles more are required in other parts of 
the structure. The cost of the building l>v the cul)ic foot 
compares favorably with other public buildings and with the 
best class of fire-proof business buildings. The cost of post- 
offices and custom houses erected by the government varies 
from fifty cents to one dollar — the cost of the court- house 
and post-ofiice at Hartford reaching the latter sum. Tht; 
library building when completed will have cost but fifty-one 
and four tenths cents a cubic foot. 

The old library on Boylston street was built to accommo- 
date 220, ()()() books, and aflorded (5,8(38 square feet of room 
for students and readers, making the cost for housing each 
book $1.15. The new building is built to contain 2,0()0,00l> 
volumes with 82,900 square feet of room for students and 
readers, making the cost for housing each book $1.10. 

There are at present more than 220,000 books in the old 
library, but they are not ])ro])crly and conveniently housed, 
as the real capacity of the building does not exceed the 
figures given. 

It must always be rememl)ered that if the architects have 
underestimated the cost of the new library building, there is 
nothing surprising in such a mistake on their ])art. They 
had no precedents to guide them in their undertaking either 
in this country or in Europe. They were ])ioneers in the 
attempt to solve the embarrassing prol)lcm of how to combine 
in one structure two essentially (listinct and different pur- 
poses. They had not only to provide for the ]H"oper housing 
of a very large and continual ly-incieasing collection of vol- 
umes, for this they might have found examples to study, or 
to imitate, in the Old AVorld, but they had to endeavor to do 



New Public Library Building. 9 

what has never been attempted, — to make this vast storehouse 
of learning accessible and useful to all the people of a great 
city. And this must be provided for in two ways ; not only 
must ample space be furnished for reading and study to all 
who might seek the building, but convenient arrangements 
n)ustalso be devised for the speedy delivery of books to all 
comers to be taken away from the building for home use. 
This is another innovation in library economy, for which, 
upon anything like a similar grand scale, there is no precedent 
to be found. 

Here we have indeed a difficult and perplexing problem, 
and the Trustees feel that it has been satisfactorily solved. 
But the results have not been obtained by intuition ; nor 
have they sprung Minerva-like from the brain of any one 
man. They are the slow and settled issues of long and 
faithful labors, necessitating modifications and changes, which 
hav^e suggested themselves as the work went on. 

Thus has been developed a building which speaks for 
itself; which has won alike the admiration of instructed archi- 
tects and the approval of cultivated amateurs. The Trus- 
tees, believing this structure to be an honor to our city, and 
a credit to the liberal and far-sighted city government that 
has provided the means for its exterior construction, now 
only ask that its interior may be completed in a manner 
worthy of the noble edifice, and creditable to this wealthy and 
public-spirited community, which has always regarded its 
Public Library as one of its chief civic glories. 

There is yet another consideration bearing upon the cost 
and value of the Public Library building, that was stated so 
well by Mr. Winthrop on the occasion of the dedication of 
the old building, that the Trustees cannot do better than to 
quote his words. Mr. Winthrop said : — 

"But there is another reflection, Mr. Mayor, which more 
than reconciles me to any amount of expenditure which may 
have been honestly incurred in the execution of our trust. 
The building which we are here to dedicate is eminently and 
|)eculiarly a building for the people, — not only constructed 
at the cost, but designed and arranged for the use, accom- 
modation, and enjoyment of the whole people of Boston. 
Almost all the other public edifices which may be found within 
the limits of our city, though they may be devoted to pur- 
poses in which the many are more or less deeply and directly 
interested, are yet specially and necessarily assigned to the 
occupation and enjoyment of a few. Our convenient and 
comfortable City Hall is for those who, like yourselves, 
gentlemen, may be intrusted, from time to time, with the 
management of municii)al affairs. Our massive Court- House 



10 City Documext No. 9. 

is for the still smaller number, who are set apart for the ad- 
ministration of civil or of criminal justice. Our excellent 
school-houses are for the exclusive occupation of our chil- 
dren. But the edifice within whose walls we are assembled 
is emphatically for the use and enjoyment of all the inhabi- 
tants of Boston. Even the old Cradle of Liberty itself is 
far less frequently and uniformly devoted to the uses of the 
whole people than this new Cradle of Literature andLearn- 
mcr will be, A political canvass, or a patriotic celebration, 
or an anniversary festival, may fill that hall ten times, or it 
may be twenty or thirty times a year, — but even then the 
free discussion which justly belongs to all such occasions in- 
volves an element of division and strife, of party, of sect, or 
of section. But this hall will always be open, and always be 
occupied, and the free reading which is to find a place in it 
involves neither contention nor controversy. Those who 
entertain the most discordant opinions may here sit, shoulder 
to shoulder, enjoying their favorite authors as quietly and as 
harmoniously as those authors themselves will repose, side 
by side, Avhen restored to a common shelf." 

The Trustees of the Public Library of the 
City of Boston, 

By Saml. a. B. Abbott, 

President. 



Appendix. 



11 



APPENDIX A. 



ITEMIZED ESTIMATE OF THE COST OF COMPLET- 
ING THE NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING. 

1. Metal work; including iron, bronze and bronze 

work, statuary and busts .... $267, L54 

2. Fixtures ; including electric work, heating and 

ventilation, elevators, plumbing, bells and 
speaking-tubes, and book railway . . . 123,500 

3. Marble and mosaic work; including floors (about 

^ acre), walls, wainscots, trims, and ceilings . 118,621 

4. Carpenter and cabinet work; including doors, 

bookcases, screens, and shelving (about 15 

miles in stacks alone), windows and lockers . 67,110 

5. Plastering and stuccto work; including cornices, 

ceilings, walls (about 2^ acres), pilasters, cor- 
bels, and capitals ...... 65,676 

6. Floors, other than marble ; including wood, tile, 

stone, concrete, cement, asphnlt, and grano- 
lithic ; also wood and stone stair-treads . . 50,751 

7. Rough interior work ; including Guastavino tile 

arches, terra cotta partitions, fire-proofing, and 

rough carpenter work ..... 28,780 

8. Painting ; including wood-finish and decorative 

painting on walls and cornices . . . 55,143 

9. Stone-woik, interior ...... 20,224 

10. Other exterior work ; including clock in court, 

sidewalks, arcade ceiling, cellar extensions on 
Boylston street and St. James avenue, columns 
and pedestals lor statuar}' on Dartmouth street, 29,810 

11. Wainscots and bases, other than marble ; includ- 

ing brick-tile, wood, Keene cement, and stone . 16,487 

12. Trims, other than marble ; including stone, wood, 

and Keeue cement ...... 13,292 

13. Bi'ick and tile work; including chimney-pieces, 

hearths, fireplace linings, terra cotta caps and 

bases, and Volkmar tiles on walls . . . 7,433 

14. Carving, stone ....... 11,500 

15. Hardware ........ 2,207 

16. Papier-macli^ work ...... 744 

17. Whitewashing (about 2 J acres) .... 667 

18. Contingencies ....... 50.000 

1929,105 
Architects' commission, at 5% . . . . 46,455 

Office expenses ; inspectors, watchmen, etc. . 10,000 

$985,560 



12 



City Document No. 9. 



appe:n^dix b. 



ITEMIZED ESTIMATE OF THE COST OF COMPLET- 
ING THE NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING, AS 
REDUCED BY THE TRUSTEES. 

1. Metal work; including iron, bronze and bronze 

work, statuary and Inists .... S185,154 

2. Fixtures; including electric work, heating and 

ventilation, elevators, plumbing, bells and 

speaking tubes, and book railway . . . 123,500 

3. Marl)le and mosaic work ; including floors (about 

^ acre), walls, wainscots, trims, and ceilings . 108,121 

4. Carpenter and cabinet work ; including doors, 

bookcases, screens, and shelving (about 15 

miles in stacks alone), windows and lockers . 49,116 

5. Plastering and stucco work ; including cornices, 

ceilings, walls (about 2^ acres), pilasters, 
corbels, and capitals ..... 65,676 
G. Floors, other than marble ; iucludiug wood, tile, 
stone, concrete, cement, asphalt, and grano- 
lithic ; also wood and stone stair-treads . . 50,751 

7. Rough interior work; including Guastavino tile 

arches, terra colta partitions, fire-proofing, and 

rough carpenter work ..... 28,780 

8. Painting; including wood finish and decorative 

])ainting on walls and cornices . . . 25,143 

9. Stone-work, interior ...... 20,224 

10. Other exterior work; including clock in court, 

sidewalks, arcade ceiling, cellar extensions on 
Boylston street and St. James avenue, columns 
and pedestals for statuary on Dartn)outh street, 19,810 

1 1 . Wainscots and bases, other than marble ; includ- 

ing brick-tile and wood, Keene cement, and 

stone 16,487 

12. Trims, other than marble ; including stone, wood, 

and Keene cement ...... 13,292 

13. Brick and tile work; including chimney pieces. 

hearths, fireplace linings, terra cotta ca|)s and 

bases, and Volkmar tiles on walls . . . 7.433 

14. Carving, stone 11,500 

15. Hardware 2,2(i7 

16. Pa|)ier-mach<5 work ...... 74 1 

17. Whitewashing (about 2f acres) .... 667 

18. Contingencies, about 10% 71,395 

$800,000 
Architects' commission, at 5% .... 40,000 
Office expenses ; inspectors, watchmen, etc. . 10,000 



$850,000 



Appendix. 13 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF WORKS OX THE NEW 
PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING, FOR 1890. 

New Contracts. 
Post & McCord, iron roof, Apr. 12, 1890. 
Lindeman Terra Cotta Roofing Tile Co., tile roofing. May 2, 
1890. 

Present Condition of Building. 

Facades and interior masonry walls complete. Granite platform 
around building about half built. Fire-proof floors substantially 
complete throughout, wiih exception of part of stacks C and I^. 
Iron roof practically finished. Tile roofing laid on nearly the whole 
of Dartmouth-street slope. Of the interior finish, the marble 
vestiltule on Dartmouth street, including marble ceiling vault and 
marble floor ; the walls, floor, and mosaic ceiling (all of marble) 
in the entrance hall ; the marble stairs of the staircase-hall ; and 
the Yorkshire stone stairs of the special library staircase, — are all 
built. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF WORK UNDER THE 
VARIOUS CONTRACTS, JAN. 1, 1891. 
Contract with John T. Scully, dated May, 1888, for piling. 

Amount of contract $7,714 44= 

Payments made to date . . . . . . 7,714 44 

Contract with Woodbury & Leightou, dated Aug. 1, 1888, for 
foundations, cut-granite, brick masonry, and iron-work. 

Original contract $266,776 00 

Net amount added by Special Orders . 46,958 84 



Total amount contracted for . . . $313,734 84 

Payments made to date . . . 303,344 61 



Reserve on work done .... $2, .500 00 
Work not done 7,890 23 



Balance $10,390 23 

Contract with R. Guastavino, dated June 2.5, 1889, for fire-proof 
floors (tile arch work). 

Estimated amount of contract . . $71,059 06 

Payments made to date . . 62,677 57 

$8,381 49 



u 



City Document No. 9. 



Reserve on work done 
Work not done 

Balance . 



$5,002 16 
3,379 33 



^381 -19 



Contract with Woodbury & Leighton, dated July 22, 1889, for 
cut-granite, brick masonry, iron-work, freestone, marble, terra 
cotta, carpenter work, glazing, partition blocks, and rough plumb- 
inir. 



Original contract .... 
Net amount added by S[)ecial Orders 

Total amount contracted for . 
Payments made to date 

Reserve on work done . 

Work not done .... 

Balance .... 



$678,750 00 
7,672 80 



6686,422 80 
421,591 00 



$50,000 00 
214,831 80 



$264,831 80 



Contract with R. C. Fisher & Co., dated Aug. 21, 1889, for 
marble-work in entrance hall. 



Original contract .... 
Net amount added by Special Orders 

Total amount contracted for . 
Payments made to date 

Reserve on work done . 

Work not done .... 

Balance .... 



$800 00 
944 50 



$18,600 00 
27,383 75 

$45,983 75 
44,239 25 



$1,744 50 



Contract with Batterson, See, & Eisele, dated Aug. 21, 1889, 
for marble-work in staircase hall. 



Original contract . 
Net amount deducted 

Total amount contracted for 
Payments made to date . 

Reserve on work done . 
Work not done 



$69,173 00 
9,400 00 

$59,773 00 
11,900 00 



$2,100 00 
45,773 00 



Balance . 



$47,873 00 



Appendix. 15 

Contract with Post & McCord, dated April 12, 1890, for iron 
roof. 

Original contract $35,000 00 

Net amount added by Special Orders . 8,732 43 



Total amount contracted for . . . $43,732 43 

Payments to date 32,020 21 



Reserve on work done . . . ' $10,673 40 
Work not done 1,038 82 



Balance . . . . . $11,712 22 



Contract with Lindeman Terra Cotta Roofing Tile Co., dated 
May 2, 1890, for tile roofing. 

Original contract $35,000 00 



Total amount contracted for . . . $35,000 00 

Payments to date 11,263 84 



Reserve on work done .... $3,754 61 
Work not done 19,981 55 



Balance $23,736 16 



General F'inancial Statement, Jan. 1, 1891. 

Amount of appropriation May 1, 1887 . $368,854 89 
Amount of loan authorized b}' Statute, 

approved March 1, 1889 / . . 1,000,000 00 



Total appropriations .... $1,368,854 89 

Amount of original contracts . $1,182,072 50 
Net amount added to contracts 

by Special Orders . . . 81,347 82 

Miscellaneous construction . . 4,412 16 



$1,267,832 48 
Architects' commission on the above . 63,391 62 

Office expenses and incidentals, Superin- 
tendent, Watchman, Clerk . . 22,146 03 
Balance at disposal of Trustees . . 15,484 76 



$1,368,854 89 



1(5 



City Document No. 9, 



Payments to date on contracts, including 
Special Orders, and on miscellaneous 
oonstiuction ..... 

Payments to date on architects' commis- 
sion ....... 

Payments to date on general office ex- 
penses and incidentals 

Reserve on work done . . . .$74,830 17 

"Work not vet done on contracts alreadv 

made " "^.293,889 23 

Architects' commission on above two 

items 11,937 81 

Balance at disposal of Trustees . . 15,484 76 



Balance unexpended 



^899,163 08 
51,4.^3 81 
22,146 03 



396,091 97 



Si, 368,854 ><'J 



The principal items of labor and material which have gone into 
the building during the year 1890 are as follows : — 

Contract with Woodbury & Leighton, dated Jul; 
Cut-o;ranite . . . • .45,' 



Common (including hollow) brick 

Perth Amboy speckled brick 

Perth Amboy court brick . 

Yorkshire stone 

Terra cotta cornice . 

Terra cotta in court . 

Iron beams 

Iron columns 

Concrete .... 

Granite carving (main cornice, imjiosts 
architraves and soflits of arches, book 
marks, key-blocks, and balconies). 

Marble carving, Dartmouth- street vestibule 



2. 



20 



y 22, 1889. 

00 cubic feet. 
928 M. 
167 " 
144 " 

421 cubic feet. 
621 linear feet. 
435 pieces. 
101 tons. 
147 " 
,827 cubic feet. 



Contract with Guastavino Fire Proof Construction Company, 
dated June 25, 1889. 
Tile arches and domes .... 75,700 square feet. 

Iron beams ...... 78 tons. 

Skewbacks cut 1,400 linear feet. 



Contract with R. C 

Marble floor 

Yellow Iowa marble . 

Marble mosa'c . 



Fisher & Co., dated Aug. 21, 1889. 

2.342 square feet. 
3,500 cubic feet. 
2,200 square feet. 



Contract with Battersou, See, & Eisele, dated Aug. 21, 1889. 
Echallion marble 875 cubic feet. 



Appendix. 



17 



Contract with Post & iMcCord, dated April 12, 18'JO. 

Iron roof trusses ..... 71 

Iron plate girders ..... 90 tons. 

Iron beams ...... 144 tons. 

Iron angles, T irons, etc. .... 100,000 pounds. 

Contract with Lindemau Terra Cotta Hoofing Tile Co., dated 
May 2, 1890. 

Roof tiles laid 9,600 

Copper gutter laid ..... 625 linear feet. 

(^Signed) Alrxander S. Jenney, 

Clerk of the W^.rks. 



APPENDIX D. 



CONTRACT PRICE AND ACTUAL COST OF FOURTEEN 
BUILDINGS, TAKEN AT RANDOM FROM REPORT 
FOR 1885, OF SUPERVISING ARCHITECT OF THE 
TREASURY. 



Bangor, Me., Custom House . 
Baltimore, Md., Court House 
Buffalo, N.y., Custom House 
Chelsea Marine Hospital 
Cleveland Marine Hospital 
Detroit Custom House . 
Indianapolis Custom House 
Louisville, K}'., Custom House 
New Haven, Conn., Custom House 
Pittsburg, Pa , Custom House 
Portsmouth, N.H., Custom House 
Providence, R.I., Custom House 
Richmond, Va., Custom House 
San Francisco, Cal., Custom 
House . . . . . 



Contract price. 

S47,549 36 

112,808 04 

117,769 iob 

122,185 39 

25,000 00 

103,160 66 

98,983 78 

148,158 00 

88,000 00 

39,866 00 

82,728 00 

151,000 00 

110,000 00 



Actual cost. 

^03,698 13 
205,176 97 
191,764 34 
233,015 31 
87,703 66 
190,933 00 
166,240 00 
246,640 75 
158,256 00 
99,767 00 
145,046 91 
209,841 71 
194,404 47 



400,000 00 628,581 49 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 638 3