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GENERAL LIBRARY of the 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Attorney-General 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES 



FOR 



The Year 1900. 



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WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

I 9OO. 



THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Department op Justice, 
Washington, B. C, November SO, 1900. 
To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of 
America in Congress assembled : 

In obedience to the requirement of section 384 of the Revised Statutes 
of the United States, I have the honor to submit the following report 
of the business transacted by the Department of Justice for the last 
preceding fiscal year: 

SUPREME COURT. 

The accompanying table shows the result of last year's work of the 
Supreme Court of the United States so far as the number of cases can 
show it. There was a decrease of 150 in the number of cases docketed 
on the appellate docket, and a decrease of 158 in the number disposed 
of, the number remaining having been reduced thereby from 304 to 303. 









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The appellate docket at the close of the last term shows a decrease 
of 1 case since the close of the preceding term. At the close of the 
October term, 1898, there remained undisposed of on the appellate 
docket 304 cases, and upon the original docket 4 cases, making a total 
of 308. The number of cases docketed at the October term, 1899, was 
384, 370 of which were on the appellate docket, and 14 on the original 
docket, which, with the 4 cases pending on the original docket, make 
the total number of eases pending at that term 692, of which 674 



132533 



4 REPOBT OP THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 

were on the appellate and 18 on the original docket Of this number 
375 were disposed of during the October term, 1899, of which 371 
were on the appellate and 4 on the original docket, leaving undisposed 
of at the close of the October term, 1889, 317 cases, of which 303 were 
on the appellate and 14 on the original docket. 

The number of cases actually considered by the court was 328, of 
which 174 were argued orally and 154 submitted on printed arguments. 
Of the 371 appellate cases disposed of, 129 were affirmed, 65 reversed, 
58 dismissed, 30 settled by the parties and dismissed; in 9, questions 
certified were answered, and 80 were denials of petitions for writs of 
certiorari under the act of March 3, 1891. 

The total number of cases on the appellate docket in which the 
United States was a party or had a substantial interest disposed of at 
the October term, 1899, was 74. The United States was appellant, 
etc., in 18 of these cases and appellee , etc., in 56. 

Of the 18 cases appealed, etc., by the Government, 8 were decided 
in its favor and 8 adversely, and 2 cases were dismissed by it. 

Of the 56 cases in which the Government was appellee, etc., 36 were 
determined in its favor and 8 adversely, 1 was dismissed by the appel- 
lant, 2 were dismissed by the court for failure of the appellant, etc., 
to comply with the rules, 7 were docketed and dismissed, and 1 was 
dismissed by the court and 1 decided in part in favor of the United 
States. 

Of the above 74 cases, 8 were appeals from the Court of Claims, of 
which 1 was taken by the Government. The 1 case so appealed was 
decided in favor of the Government, while of the 7 cases in which it 
was appellee 6 were decided in its favor and 1 was dismissed by the 
court for noncompliance with the rules. 

Of the 74 cases disposed of 3 were capital, of which 1 was decided 
in favor of the United States and 1 adversely and 1 affirmed in part. 

Ten cases were appeals, etc., from the circuit court of appeals, of 
which 6 were decided in favor of and 2 against the United States, 1 
was dismissed for noncompliance with the rules, and 1 was dismissed 
by the court. 

Eighteen cases were from the Court of Private Land Claims, 8 of 
which were appealed by the Government and 10 by the other side. 

Of the 8 cases appealed by the Government 4 were decided in its 
favor, 2 adversely, and 2 dismissed by it, while of the 10 cases in which 
the United States was appellee 4 were decided in its favor and 6 were 
docketed and dismissed. 

The United States was respondent in 6 petitions for writs of cer- 
tiorari under the act of March 3, 1891, and in 2 petitions for certiorari 
to the court of appeals of the District of Columbia in capital cases, 
which were denied. 



RFP0RT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 5 

Of the whole number of cases in which the Government had a sub- 
stantial interest heard and decided by the court, 45 were decided in its 
favor, 1 in part for the United States, and 16 against the United States. 

In addition to the above, in 2 original cases in which the Govern- 
ment was respondent motions for leave to file petitions for writs of 
habeas corpus and certiorari were denied. 

Among the many cases heard and decided by the Supreme Court of 
the United States during the October term, 1899, the following are the 
more important: 

The Addyston Pipe and Steel Company v. The United States. (175 TJ. S., 211.) 

This case grew out of a combination of six shops, located, one in 
Ohio, one in Kentucky, two in Tennessee, and two in Alabama, which 
were engaged in making cast-iron pipe for gas, water, and sewer pur- 
poses. These shops controlled the market in that commodity in thirty- 
six States west of the Allegheny Mountains and south of Virginia. 
They entered into an agreement to control prices by suppressing com- 
petition among themselves. This was done by appointing a repre- 
sentative board of one from each shop, to which all inquiries for pipe 
were referred. The board fixed the price it thought the job would 
stand. The job was then sold over the table, the shop which bid the 
highest bonus for the benefit of the pool getting it. At the public 
letting the shop that got the job bid the fixed price, and the other 
shops overbid in order to deceive the public. 

On behalf of the combination it was contended that the power of 
Congress, under the interstate commerce clause, does not extend to 
agreements among private corporations, but is limited to acts of inter- 
ference by the States and by quasi public corporations, such as rail- 
roads. Private manufacturing corporations, it was insisted, are not 
public agencies and can not be compelled to keep their shops running 
or sell their goods to any person who applies. In the next place, it 
was urged that there was no restraint put upon interstate commerce, 
and that under the decision in the Knight case the creation of a 
monopoly in the manufacture of a commodity is not prohibited by 
the antitrust law. 

The Supreme Court held, however, that Congress may prohibit the 
performance of any agreement between individuals or corporations 
where the natural and direct effect of it is to regulate or restrain inter- 
state commerce. In other words, the antitrust law applies to every 
agreement in restraint of interstate trade, whether made by corpora- 
tions or individuals. 

In the next place the court held that any agreement or combination 
which directly restrains not only the manufacture but the sale of a 
commodity among the several States comes within the antitrust law. 



6 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

The distinction between direct and incidental restraint is to be observed. 
A combination formed for the purpose of monopolizing the manufac- 
ture of a commodity within the States may, indirectly and incident- 
ally, suppress competition in the sale of the articles among the several 
States. But the Supreme Court held in the Knight case that such 
indirect and incidental result would not be sufficient to bring thq com- 
bination within the reach of the act. It must be shown that the 
combination was formed not only to monopolize the production of the 
commodity, but to suppress competition and enhance prices in its sale 
among the several States. The syllabus of the case is as follows: 

Under the grant of power to Congress, contained in section 8 of 
Article 1 of the Constitution, "to regulate commerce with for- 
eign nations and among the several States, and with Indian tribes," 
that body may enact such legislation as shall declare void and pro- 
hibit the performance of any contract between individuals or cor- 
porations where the natural and. direct effect of such a contract 
shall be, when carried out, to directly, and not as a mere incident 
to other and innocent purposes, regulate to any extent interstate 
or foreign commerce. 

The provision in the Constitution regarding the liberty of the 
citizen is to some extent limited by this commerce clause; and 
the power of Congress to regulate interstate commerce comprises 
the right to enact a law prohibiting the citizen from entering into 
those private contracts which directly and substantially, and not 
merely indirectly, remotely, incidentally, and collaterally, regulate, 
to a greater or less degree, commerce among the States. 

Interstate commerce consists of intercourse and traffic between 
the citizens or inhabitants of different States, and includes not only 
the transportation of persons and property and the navigation of 
public waters for that purpose, but also the purchase, sale, and 
exchange of commodities. 

The power to regulate interstate commerce and to prescribe the 
rules by which it shall be governed is vested in Congress, and 
when that body has enacted a statute such as the act of July 2, 
1890, c. 647, entitled "an act to protect trade and commerce against 
unlawful restraints and monopolies," any agreement or combina- 
tion which directly operates, not alone upon the manufacture, but 
upon the sale, transportation, and delivery of an article of inter- 
state commerce, by preventing or restricting its sale, thereby regu- 
lates interstate commerce to that extent, and thus trenches upon 
the power of the National Legislature and violates the statute. 

The contracts considered in this case, pet forth in the statement 
of facts and in the opinion of the court, relate to the sale and 
transportation to other States of specific articles, not incidentally 
or collaterally, but as a direct and immediate result of the combi- 
nation entered into by the defendants; and they restrain the manu- 
facturing, purchase, sale, or exchange of the manufactured articles 
among the several States, and enhance their value, and thus come 
within the provisions of the "act to protect trade and commerce 
against unlawful restraints and monopolies." 

When the direct, immediate, and intended effect of a contract 
or combination among dealers in a commodity is the enhancement 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 7 

of its price, it amounts to a restraint of trade in the commodity, 
even though contracts to buy it at the enhanced price are being 
made. 

The judgment of the court below, which perpetually enjoined 
the defendants in the court below from maintaining the combina- 
tion in cast-iron pipe as described in the petition, and from doing 
any business under such combination, is too broad, as it applies 
equally to commerce which is wholly within a State as well as to 
that which is interstate or international only. 

Although the jurisdiction of Congress over commerce among 
the States is full and complete, it is not questioned that it has 
none over that which is wholly within a State, and therefore none 
over combinations or agreements so far as they relate to a 
restraint of such trade or commerce; nor does it acquire any juris- 
diction over that part of a combination or agreement which relates 
to commerce wholly within a State, by reason of the fact that 
the combination also covers and regulates commerce which is 
interstate. 

La Abra Silver Mining Company v. United States (175 TJ. S., 423) and 

Weil et al. v. United States. 

It is gratifying to say that the cases which had occupied the atten- 
tion of this Government in its three departments, successively, for 
nearly a quarter of a century have been absolutely disposed of, and 
that the money in the hands of this Government abiding their deter- 
mination (namely, the sum of $60,863.85) has been paid back to the 
Government of Mexico. 

These cases it will be remembered had their origin in the claim of 
Mexico that the awards made against her in favor of La Abra Silver 
Mining Company, a corporation created by the State of New York, 
and Benjamin Weil, a citizen of the United States, under the treaty 
between the United States and Mexico, of July 4, 1868 (15 Stat. , 679), 
had been obtained by fraud effectuated by means of false swearing or 
other false and fraudulent practices on the part of said claimants. 
The seriousness of the evidence supporting the representations of 
Mexico, on the one hand, and the express provision of the treaty, on 
the other, that the awards made under it should be absolutely " final 
and conclusive upon each claim decided" and that "full effect" should 
be given to such awards, "without any objection, evasion, or delay 
whatsoever," presented a queer situation, which seriously menaced the 
friendly relations between the two Governments. 

Mexico, with the utmost good faith, paid to the United States every 
dollar awarded against her in favor of the said claimants, but at the 
same time insisted that there was nothing in the treaty or in the law 
of nations that prevented this Government from defeating the attempt 
to make it an instrument in consummating the fraud and perjury 
charged by turning over to the perpetrators, its own citizens, the 
money resulting therefrom. 



8 BEP0BT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 

The executor, finding itself unprovided with the means of dealing 
effectively with the questions presented, turned the whole matter over 
to Congress, after having distributed to the said claimants a consid- 
erable part of the money paid to this Government by Mexico under 
the said awards, namely, $412,572.70, with the recommendation that 
provision should be made by proper legislation for a judicial examina- 
tion and determination of said questions. 

After much discussion and delay Congress finally passed the two 
acts, dated, respectively, December 28, 1892 (27 Stat., 409-410), giv- 
ing the Court of Claims jurisdiction to determine the question of fraud 
in suits to be instituted by the United States against La Abra Com- 
pany and Benjamin Weil, respectively, and those claiming under them, 
and providing that, in case the court should find fraud and perjury 
to have been used in procuring either of said awards or any part 
thereof, the claimants should be barred and foreclosed as to the whole 
or such part of said award, and the money paid thereunder returned 
to Mexico. 

The suits contemplated by said act of Congress were duly brought, 
and, after volumes of testimony introduced and much laborious and 
protracted discussion in the Court of Claims and in the Supreme Court 
of the United States, decided in favor of the United States; in other 
words, that the awards in question had been obtained by means of 
fraud and perjury as to the full amounts thereof. 

Thus has ended a litigation which will be always memorable in the 
history of this Government. 

The syllabus is as follows: 

The commissioners appointed under the treaty between the 
United States and Mexico concluded July 4, 1868, and proclaimed 
February 1, 1869 (15 Stat., 679), having differed in opinion as to 
the allowance of the claim of the La Abra Silver Mining Company, 
a New York corporation, against Mexico, the umpire decided for 
that company and allowed its claim, amounting, principal and 
interest, to the sum of $683,041.32. Mexico met some of the 
installments of the award and then laid before the United States 
certain newly discovered evidence which it contended showed that 
the entire claim of the La Abra Company was fictitious and 
fraudulent. The Secretary of State thereafter withheld the 
remaining installments paid by Mexico, and, upon examining the 
new evidence, reported to the President that in his judgment the 
honor of the United States was concerned to inquire whether, in 
submitting the La Abra claim to the commission, its confidence 
had not been seriously abused, and recommended that Congress 
exert its plenary authority in respect of the disposition of the 
balance of the funds received from Mexico and remaining in the 
hands of the United States. Finally, Congress passed tne act of 
December 28, 1892 (27 Stat., 409, c. 14), by which the Attorney- 
General was directed to bring suit in the name of the United 
States in the Court of Claims against the La Abra Company and 



EEPOBT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 9 

all persons asserting any interest in the award of the Commission 
to determine whether that award was obtained, as to the whole sum 
included therein or as to any part thereof, by fraud effectuated by 
means of false swearing or other false and fraudulent practices on 
the part of the company or its agents, attorneys, or assigns, and, if 
so determined, to bar and foreclose all claim in law or equity on the 
part of the company, its legal representatives or assigns, to the 
money or any such part thereof received from the Republic of 
Mexico for or on account of the award. By that act lull juris- 
diction was conferred on the Court of Claims, with right of 
appeal to this court, to determine such suit, to make all proper 
interlocutory and final decrees therein, and to enforce the same 
by injunction or other final process. The act further authorized 
the return to Mexico of any moneys paid by it on the award and 
remaining in the custody of the United States if the issue of fraud 
was determined adversely to the company. If the decision was 
favorable to the company, it was made the duty of the Secretary 
of State to proceed with the distribution of the funds in his hands. 
The act of 1892 was presented to the President on December 20. 
Two days thereafter Congress took a recess until January 4, 1893. 
The President signed the bill on December 28, 1892. Hdd: 

(1) That the act of 1892 was not invalid by reason of its having 
been signed during a recess of Congress. Whether the President 
can sign a bill after the final adjournment of Congress for the ses- 
sion was not decided; 

(2) The suit brought by the Attorney-General involved rights 
capable of judicial determination and was a "case" within the 
meaning of the clause of the Constitution extending the judicial 
power of the United States to all cases in law and equity arising 
under that instrument, the laws of the United States, and the 
treaties made by it or under its authority. The act did not in any 
wise trench upon the constitutional functions of the President. 
Nor was it simply ancillary or advisory to him. Whatever decree 
was rendered by the Court of Claims was, unless reversed, bind- 
ing and conclusive upon the United States and the defendants; 

(3) The act was not liable to the objection that it was inconsist- 
ent with the principles underlying international arbitration. On 
the contrary, such legislation is an assurance in the most solemn 
and binding form that the Government of this country will exert 
all the power it possesses to enforce good faith upon the part of 
citizens who, asserting that they have been wronged Tby the 
authorities of another country, seek the intervention of their 
Government to obtain redress; 

(4) This court was entitled to look at all the evidence in the 
cause on the issue as to fraud, because the act did not contemplate 
a special finding by the Court of Claims of the ultimate facts estab- 
lished by the evidence; 

(5) The question stated in the act of 1892 — whether the award 
in question "was obtained as to the whole sum included therein, 
or as to any part thereof, by fraud effectuated by means of false 
swearing or other false and fraudulent practices on the part of the 
said La Abra Silver Mining Company, or its agents, attorneys, or 
assigns" — is answered in the affirmative as to the whole sum 
included in the award. 



10 BBPOBT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 

The United States v. The Oregon and California Railroad Company. (176 

U.S., 28.) 

The question involved in this case was the right of the United 
States to about 218,000 acres of land near Portland, Oreg., granted to 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company by the act of "July 2, 1864, 
and forfeited, for failure to construct the road, to the Government by 
the act of September 29, 1890, in view of the overlapping grant to the 
Oregon and California Railroad Company by the act of July 25, 1866, 
under which that road was constructed and the lands patented to it. 

The original suit was brought by direction of Attorney-General 
Miller to cancel the patents to the Oregon and California and restore 
the lands to the public domain. The court held that as the route of 
the Northern Pacific had not been definitely fixed prior to the time of 
the grant to the Oregon and California and the date of the definite 
location of the latter road the lands were lawfully entered by the 
Oregon and Calif or nia and were rightfully patented to it. The syllabus 
of the case is as follows: 

By the act of July 2, 1864 (13 Stat. , 365, c. 217), Congress granted 
lands to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company to aid in tne con- 
struction of a railroad and telegraph line from a point on Lake 
Superior in Wisconsin or Minnesota to some point on Puget Sound, 
with a branch, via the valley of the Columbia River, to a point at 
or near Portland, in the State of Oregon. The grant was of 
"every alternate section of public land, not mineral, designated 
by oda numbers, to the amount of twenty alternate sections per 
mile on each side of said railroad line as said company may adopt 
through the Territories of the United States, and ten alternate 
sections of land per mile on each side of said railroad whenever it 
passes through any State, and whenever, on the line thereof, the 
United States have full title, not reserved, sold, granted, or 
otherwise appropriated, and free from preemption, or other claims 
or rights, at the time the line of said road is definitely fixed, and 
a plat thereof filed in the office of the Commissioner of the Gen- 
eral Land Office; and whenever, prior to said time, any of said 
sections or parts of sections shall have been granted, sold, reserved, 
occupied by homestead settlers, or preempted, or otherwise dis- 
posed of, other lands shall be selected by said company in lieu 
thereof, under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, in 
alternate sections, and designated by odd numbers, not more tnan 
10 miles beyond the limits of said alternate sections." In March, 
1865, the president of that company filed in the Land Department 
a map which, if of value for any purpose, was only a map of 
" general route," not one of definite location between Wallula and 
Portland. That map was not accepted. By act of July 25, 1866 
(14 Stat., 239, c. 242), Congress made a grant of land in aid of 
the construction of a railroad and telegraph line between Port- 
land, Oreg. , and the Central Pacific Railroad Company in California. 
That grant was in the usual terms employed in such acts. Subse- 
quently the benefit of that grant as to the part of the road to be 



REPOBT OF THE ATTOBBTEY-GENEBAL. 11 

constructed in Oregon was conferred upon the Oregon Central 
Railroad Company. The lands here in dispute, whether place or 
indemnity, were within the limits of the grant of 1866. The 
entire line of road of the Oregon and California Railroad Com- 
pany, which was the successor of the Oregon Central Railroad 
Company, was fully constructed and duly accepted by the Presi- 
dent, and at the time this suit was begun was being operated and 
had been continuously operated by that company. The Oregon 
Company filed its map of definite location m 1870, and it was 
accepted by the Land Department. By the act of September 29, 
1890 (26 Stat , 496, c. 1040), all lands theretofore granted to any 
State or corporation to aid in the construction of a railroad oppo- 
site to or coterminous with the portion of any such railroad not 
then completed and in operation, for the construction of which 
such lands were granted:, were forfeited to the United States. 
There never was any withdrawal of indemnity lands on the pro- 
posed line of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company between 
Wallula and Portland, nor was there any definite location or con- 
struction of its road opposite to the lands in suit. Held, 

(1) That nothing in the act of 1864 stood in the way of Congress 
subsequently granting to other railroad corporations the privilege 
of earning any lands that might be embraced within the general 
route of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

(2) That as the grant contained in that act did not include any 
lands that had been reserved, sold, granted, or otherwise appro- 
priated at the time the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad was 
"definitely fixed;" as the route of the Northern Pacific Railroad 
had not been definitely fixed at the time the act of July 25, 1866, 
was passed, or when the line of the Oregon Company was defi- 
nitely located; as the lands in dispute are within the limits of the 
grant contained in the act of 1866; as the route of the Oregon 
Railroad was definitely fixed, at least when the map showing that 
route was accepted by the Secretary of the Interior on the 29tn day 
of January, 18TO — the Northern Pacific Railroad Company having 
done nothing prior to the latter date except to file the Jrerham map 
of 1865; and as prior to the forfeiture act of September 29, 1890, 
there had not been any definite location of the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road opposite the lands in dispute, there is no escape from the conclu- 
sion that these lands were lawfully earned by the Oregon Company 
and were rightfully patented to it. Of course, if the route of the 
Northern Pacific road had been definitely located before the act of 
1890 was passed and had embraced the lands in dispute different 
questions would have been presented. 

The United States v. The Northern Pacific Railroad Co. (177 U. S., 435.) 

This was a suit brought by the Government to cancel the patent 
granted to the Northern Pacific for a tract of land more than 10 miles 
east of Duluth, Minn. The question involved was whether Duluth, 
Minn., or Ashland, Wis., is the eastern terminus of the Northern 
Pacific under the act of July 2, 1864. In this suit the Government 
contended that Duluth, Minn., is the eastern terminus; but the court, 



12 BEPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENEBAL. 

following the decision in Doherty r. Northern Pacific, argued and 
decided at the same time, held Ashland to be the terminus. The 
following is the syllabus: 

The important questions of fact and law are substantially the 
same in this case and in Doherty v. Northern Pacific Kailway 
Company, ante 421, and that case is followed in this in regard to 
the questions common to the two cases. 

The obvious purpose of this suit was to have the question of 
the proper terminus of the company's road determined; and if 
that terminus was found to be at Ashland, then the complainant 
would not be entitled to any relief. 

Under the act of July 4, 1864, noncompletion of the railroad 
within the time limited did not operate as a forfeiture. 

As the bill in this case does not allege that it is brought under 
authority of Congress for the purpose of enforcing a forfeiture, 
and does not allege any other legislative act looking to such an 
intention, this suit must be regarded as only intended to have the 
point of the eastern terminus judicially ascertained. 

As the Evidence and conceded facte failed to show any mistake, 
f raud, or error in fact or in law in the action of the Land Depart- 
ment in accepting the location of the eastern terminus made by 
the company, and in issuing the patent in question, the bill was 
properly dismissed. 

The United States v. The|Bellingham Bay Boom Company. (176 U. S., 211.) 

This was a suit brought by the Attorney-General, upon the request 
of the Secretary of War, under the authority conferred by the river 
and harbor act of September 19, 1890, to enjoin the Bellingham Bay 
Boom Company from maintaining a boom in the Nooksak river, a 
navagable stream in the State of Washington. The boom company 
contended that its boom was authorized by the law of Washington and 
that whether it was constructed in accordance with that law was a State 
question, to be determined by the courts of the State of Washington, 
with which the Federal courts could have no concern. This was the 
view taken by the lower courts, but the Supreme Court reversed the 
case, holding that the question whether the boom was an obstruction 
to navigation and whether it was affirmatively authorized by the State 
law were questions to be passed upon by the Federal courts. The 
Supreme Court held that the boom was an obstruction and was not 
authorized by the State law. The following is the syllabus: 

The power of Congress to pass laws for the navigation of public 
rivers, and to prevent any and all obstructions therein, can not be 
questioned. 

When the Attorney-General acts under the authority conferred 
by the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, c. 907, he has 
the right to call upon the court, upon proper proofs being made, 
to enjoin the continuance of any obstruction not authorized by 
statute, and the court has jurisdiction, and it is its duty, to decide 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 13 

whether the existing obstruction is or is not affirmatively author- 
ized by law. 

In such inquiry the court is bound to decide whether the boom, 
as existing, is authorized by any law of the State, when such law 
is claimed to be a justification for its creation or continuance. 

There is no doubt that the boom in question in this case violates 
the statute under which it was built, because it does not allow free 
passage between the boom and the opposite shore for boats or 
vessels as provided for in the State law. 

Rider v. The United States. (178 U. S., 251.) 

In this case Rider and his associates, the county commissioners of 
Muskingum County, Ohio, were indicted and convicted under the act 
of September 19, 1890, for failing to comply with an order of the Sec- 
retary of War directing them to remove an obstruction to the naviga- 
tion of the Muskingum River by altering in a certain way a bridge 
•across that river which the law of Ohio placed under their control. 
Without passing upon any questions raised in the case, the court held 
that the conviction could not be sustained, because it appeared that the 
commissioners did not have in their hands, and under the laws of Ohio 
could not obtain, public money that could be applied in execution of 
the order of the Secretary of War within the time fixed by that officer 
to complete the alteration of the bridge. 

The fourth and fifth sections of the river and harbor act, approved 
September 19, 1890, provide: "Sec. 4. That section 9 of the 
river and harbor act, act of August 11, 1888, be amended and 
reenacted so as to read as follows: That whenever the Secretary 
of War shall have good reason to believe that any railroad or 
other bridge now constructed or which may hereafter be con- 
structed over any of the navigable waterways of the United States 
is an unreasonable obstruction to the free navigation of such waters 
on account of insufficient height, width or span, or otherwise, or 
where there is difficulty in passing the draw opening of the draw- 
span of such bridge by rafts, steamboats, or other water crafts, it 
shall be the duty of said Secretary, first giving the parties reasona- 
ble opportunities to be heard, to give notice to the persons or cor- 
porations owning or controlling such bridge so to alter the same 
as to render navigation through or under it reasonably free, easy, 
and unobstructed; and in giving such notice he shall specify the 
changes to be made and shall prescribe in each case a reasonable 
time in which to make them. If at the end of such time the altera- 
tion has not been made, the Secretary of War shall forthwith 
notify the United States district attorney for the district in which 
such bridge is situated to the end that the criminal proceedings 
mentioned in the succeeding section may be taken, bee. 5. That 
section 10 of the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, be 
amended and reenacted so as to read as follows: That if the per- 
sons, corporations, or associations owning or controlling any rail- 
road or other bridge shall after receiving notice to that effect, as 
hereinafter required, from the Secretary of War, and within the 
time prescribed by him, wilfully fail or refuse to remove the sanas^ 



14 REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

or to comply with the lawful order of the Secretary of War in the 
premises, such person, corporation, or association shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction thereof, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine not exceeding* $5,000, and every month such per- 
son, corporation, or association shall remain in default as to the 
removal or alteration of such bridge, shall be deemed a new offence 
and subject the person, corporation, or association so offending to 
the penalties above described." (26 Stat. , 426, 453, c. 907.) Pro- 
ceeding under that act the Secretary of War gave notice to the 
county commissioners of Muskingum County, Ohio, to make on 
or before a named day certain alterations in a bridge over the 
Muskingum Kiver, Ohio, at Taylorsville, in that State. The com- 
missioners, although having control of the bridge, did not make the 
alterations required and were indicted under the act of Congress. 
ITeld, That however broadly the act of Congress may be con- 
strued, it ought not to be construed as embracing officers of a 
municipal corporation owning or controlling a bridge who had 
not in their hands, and under the laws of their State could not 
obtain, public moneys that could be applied in execution of the 
order of the Secretary of War within the time fixed by that officer 
to complete the alteration of such bridge. 

Leovy v. The United States. (177 U. S., 621.) 

In this case the court reversed a conviction of Leovy for building a 
dam across the Red Pass, claimed to be a navigable stream flowing 
into the Gulf of Mexico from the Jump, an outlet of the Mississippi 
into the Gulf. The defendant below claimed to have acted under 
authority of the State of Louisiana. The views of the court are suf- 
ficiently stated in the syllabus, which is as follows: 

Subject to the paramount jurisdiction of Congress over the nav- 
igable waters of the United States, the State of Louisiana had, 
under the act of March 2, 1849, c. 87, and the other statutes 
referred to in the opinion of the court, full power to authorize 
the construction and maintenance of levees, drains, and other 
structures necessary and suitable to reclaim swamp and overflowed 
lands within its limits. 

The dam constructed by the plaintiff in error at Red Pass was 
constructed under the police power of the State and within the 
terms and purpose of the grant by Congress. 

The decision of the jury, to whom it had been left to determine 
whether the plaintiff in error was guilty, that the pass was in fact 
navigable, is not binding upon this court. 

The term navigable waters of the United States has reference to 
commerce of a substantial and permanent character to be con- 
ducted thereon. 

The defendant below was entitled to the instruction asked for, 
but refused, that the jury should be satisfied from the evidence 
that Red Pass was at the time it was closed substantially useful 
to some purpose of interstate commerce, as alleged in the indict- 
ment. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 15 

Upon the record now before the court it is held that Red Pass, 
in the condition it was when the dam was built, was not shown by 
adequate evidence to have been a navigable water of the United 
States actually used in interstate commerce and that the court 
should have charged the jury, as requested; that upon the whole 
evidence adduced the defendants were entitled to a verdict of 
acquittal. 

Cruickshank v. Bidwell. (176 TJ. S., 73.) 

This was a suit brought by Cruickshank, an importer of tea, against 
the collector of the port of New York, to enjoin the latter from retain- 
ing possession of certain teas which he had seized under the act of 
March 2, 1897, "to prevent the importation of impure and unwhole- 
some tea." It was claimed that this act is unconstitutional. The 
court held that no sufficient ground for an injunction was shown; that 
the importer had an adequate remedy at law by a suit to recover from 
the collector the value of the teas seized, in case the act were uncon- 
stitutional. The following is the syllabus: 

The mere fact that a law is unconstitutional does not entitle a 
party to relief by injunction against proceedings in compliance 
therewith, but it must appear that he has no adequate remedy by 
the ordinary processes 01 the law, or that the case falls under 
some recognized head of equity jurisdiction; and in this case the 
averments of the complainants' bill did not justify such an inter- 
ference with Executive action. 

The seizure of importations of teas purchased after the approval 
of the act of March 2, 1897, c. 358, entitled " An act to prevent 
the importation of impure and unwholesome tea," and the estab- 
lishment of regulations and standards thereunder, publicly pro- 
mulgated and known to complainants, because falling below the 
standards prescribed, could inflict no other injury than what it 
must be assumed was anticipated, and the interposition of a 
court of equity can not properly be invoked, under such circum- 
stances, to determine in advance whether complainants, if they 
imported teas of that character, could escape the consequences on 
the ground of the invalidity of the law. 

United States v. Harris. (177 TJ. S., 305.) 

The original suit was brought against the receivers of the Philadel- 
phia and Beading Railroad Company under sections 4386, 4387, 4388, 
and 4389 of the Revised Statutes to recover a penalty for confining 
horses, in the course of interstate transportation, in cars more than 
twenty-eight consecutive hours, without unloading them for rest, 
water, and food. 

The court held that under the rule of strict construction applicable 
to a penal statute the receivers of a railroad company do not come 
within the terms of the law. 



16 REPOET OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

In view of this holding, it is a matter for the consideration of Con- 
gress whether the existing law ought not to be amended so as to apply 
to railroads when managed by their receivers as well as to railroads 
when managed by their directors and officers. Obviously, no reason 
can be suggested for preventing cruelty to animals by railroads oper- 
ated by their officers which do not equally apply to such railroads 
when operated by receivers. 

Ex Parte Baez. (177 TJ. S., 378.) 

Baez, a native-born inhabitant of Porto Rico, applied for leave to 
file a petition for writs of habeas corpus and certiorari to secure his 
release from further imprisonment under the judgment of the United 
States provisional court of Porto Rico, sentencing him to be confined 
for thirty days at hard labor for illegal voting at a municipal election 
held under a military order. Interesting questions were raised by the 
petition, but the court declined to grant leave to file it on the ground 
that if the writs should issue, the term of imprisonment would expire 
before they could be served and returned. 

Carter v. Roberts. (177 TJ. S., 496.) 

This case and the decision of the court are sufficiently stated in the 
syllabus, which is as follows: 

Captain Carter, of the Corps of Engineers in the Army of the 
United States, was duly and regularly tried before a legally con- 
vened court-martial, was found guilty of the charges made against 
him, and was sentenced to dismissal; to be fined; to be imprisoned, 
and to publication of crime and punishment; and the sentence was 
duly approved and confirmed. On a motion in his behalf the 
United States circuit court for the second circuit issued a writ of 
habeas corpus to inquire into the matter, which resulted in the 
dismissal of the writ and the remanding of Carter to custody. 
He took an appeal to the circuit court of appeals for the second 
circuit, which affirmed the judgment below, and this court denied 
an application for a writ of certiorari to review that judgment. 
An appeal and writ of error was allowed on the same day by a 
judge of the circuit court to this court. 

Held, that the appeal and writ of error could not be maintained, 
as they fall directly within the ruling in Robinson v. Caldwell 
(165 U. S., 359), where it was held that the judiciary act of March 
3, 1891, does not give a defeated party in a circuit court the right 
to have his case finally determined both in this court and in the 
circuit court of appeals on independent appeals. 

When cases arise which are controlled by the construction or 
application of the Constitution of the United States, a direct 
appeal lies to this court, and if such cases are carried to the circuit 
courts of appeals those courts may decline to take jurisdiction, or 
where sucn construction or application is involved with other 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 17 

questions may certify the constitutional question and afterwards 
proceed to judgment, or may decide the whole case in the first 
instance; but when the circuit court of appeals has acted on the 
whole case, its judgment stands unless revised by certiorari to or 
appeal from that court in accordance with the act of March 3, 1891. 

Fitzpatrick v. The United States. (178 U. S., 304.) 

Fitzpatrick, jointly indicted with two others, was convicted in the 
district court of Alaska of the crime of murder, but the jury qualified 
their verdict by finding him guilty " without capital punishment." 
The judgment was affirmed. A number of interesting questions 
respecting the sufficiency of the indictment and the relevancy of testi- 
mony were passed upon by the court. Probably the most important 
finding was that a conviction for murder is a conviction of a capital 
crime, although the jury qualify their verdict of guilty by adding the 
words " without capital punishment." The following is the syllabus: 

Under the court of appeals act of March 3, 1891, a conviction 
for murder is a "conviction of a capital crime," though the jury 
qualify their verdict of guilty by adding the words "without capital 
punishment." The test of a capital crime is not the punishment 
which is imposed, but that which may be imposed under the 
statute. 

Under the statute of Oregon requiring the offense to be stated 
"in ordinary and concise language and in such manner as to enable 
a person of common understanding to know what was intended," 
an indictment for murder charging that the defendant feloniously, 
purposely, and of deliberate and premeditated malice inflicted 
upon the deceased a mortal wound of which he instantly died is a 
sufficient allegation of premeditated and deliberate malice in killing 
him. 

Evidence that one jointly indicted with the defendant was found 
to have been wounded in the shoulder, and his accompanying state- 
ment that he had been shot, were held to be competent upon the 
trial of the defendant. 

Any fact which had a bearing upon the question of defendant's 
guilt, immediate or remote, ana occurring at any time before the 
incident was closed, was held proper for the consideration of the 
jury, although statements made by other defendants in his absence 
implicating him with the murder would not be competent. 

The prisoner, taking the stand in his own behalf and swearing 
to an alibi, was held to have been properly cross-examined as to 
the clothing worn by him on the night of the murder, his acquaint- 
ance with the others jointly indicted with him, and other facts 
showing his connection with them. 

Where an accused party waives his constitutional privilege of 
silence and takes the stand in his own behalf and makes his own 
statement, the prosecution has a right to cross-examine him upon 
such statement with the same latitude as would be exercised in 
the case of an ordinary witness as to the circumstances connecting 
him with the alleged crime. 

H. Doc. 9—2 



18 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Evidence in rebuttal with respect to the effect of light from the 
flash of a revolver was held to be competent where the defense 
put in a calendar, apparently for the purpose of showing the time 
the moon rose that night. 

Knowlton v. Moore. (178 U. S., 41.) 

In this case the court sustained the constitutionality of the Federal 
tax on legacies and distributive shares of personal property imposed 
by the war-revenue act of June 13, 1898. The act was assailed on 
many grounds: 

1. It was insisted that it was a direct tax, within the decision in the 
income-tax cases, because it falls ultimately upon the property inher- 
ited, and being unapportioned among the States was invalid. 

2. It was urged if not a tax on property, but a tax upon the privi- 
lege of transmitting or receiving property, it is invalid because the 
privilege of inheritance is conferred and regulated by the States. To 
permit the General Government to tax this privilege would be to allow 
it to abridge or destroy a right lawfully conferred by the States. 

3. Moreover, it was contended that if an excise the tax violated the 
rule of uniformity laid down by the Constitution, more especially in 
the graded feature, which raises the rate as the Value of the legacy 
increases. 

The court, in a most able and elaborate opinion by Mr. Justice White, 
overruled all these contentions and vindicated in the amplest manner 
the authority of the General Government to raise its revenues by tax- 
ing valuable privileges however obtained, and in so doing to apportion 
the burdens of government equitably, keeping in mind "the ability of 
the person on whom the burden is placed to bear the same," The 
following is the syllabus: 

The plaintiffs in error were the executors of the will of Edwin 
F. Knowlton, of Brooklyn, N. Y. The defendant in error was the 
United States collector of internal revenue for the first collection 
district for the State of New York. Mr. Knowlton died at Brook- 
lyn in October, 1898, and his will was duly proved. Under the 
portion of the act of Congress of June 13, 1898, which is printed 
at length in a note to the opinion of the court in this case, the 
United States collector of internal revenue demanded of the execu- 
tors a return, showing the amount of the personal estate of the 
deceased and the legatees and distributees thereof. This return 
the executors made under protest, asserting that the act of June 
13 was unconstitutional. This return showed that the personal 
estate amounted to over two and a half millions of dollars, and that 
there were several legacies ranging from under $10,000 each to 
over $1,500,000. The collector levied the tax on the legacies and 
distributive shares, but for the purpose of fixing the rate of the 
tax considered the whole of the personal estate of the deceased as 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 19 

fixing the rate for each, and not the amount coming to each indi- 
vidual legatee under the will. As the rates under the statute were 
progressive from a low rate on legacies amounting to $10,000 to 
a high rate on those exceeding $1,000,000, this decision greatly 
increased the aggregate amount of the taxation. The executors 
protested on the grounds (1) that the provisions of the act were 
unconstitutional; (2) that legacies amounting to less than $10,000 
were not subject to any tax or duty; (3) that a legacy of $100,000, 
taxed at the rate of $2.25 per $100, was only subject to the rate of 
$1.12£. Demand having been made by the collector for payment, 
payment was made under protest, and, after the Commissioner of 
Interna) Revenue had refused to refund any of it, the executors 
commenced suit to recover the amount so paid. The circuit court 
sustained a demurrer upon the ground that no cause of action was 
alleged, and dismissed the suit, which was then brought here by 
writ of error. Held: 

(1) That the statute clearly imposes the duty on the particular 
legacies or distributive shares, and not on the whole personal 
estate; 

(2) That it makes the rate of the tax depend upon the character 
of the links connecting those taking with the deceased, being 
primarily determined by the classifications, and progressively 
increased according to the amount of the legacies or shares; 

(3) That the court below erred in denying all relief, and that it 
should have held the plaintiffs entitled to recover so much of the 
tax as resulted from taxing legacies not exceeding $10,000, and 
from increasing the tax rate with reference to the whole amount 
of the personal estate of the deceased from which the legacies or 
distributive shares were derived. 

Death duties were established by the Soman and ancient law, 
and by the modern laws of France, Germany, and other con- 
tinental countries, England and her colonies, and an examination 
of all shows that tax laws of this nature rest in their essence 
upon the principle that death is the generating source from which 
the particular taxing power takes its being, and that it is the 
power to transmit or the transmission from the dead to the living 
on which such taxes are more immediately vested. 

When a particular construction of a statute will occasion great 
inconvenience or produce inequality and injustice, that view is 
not to be favored if another and more reasonable interpretation 
is present in the statute. 

The provision in section 8 of Article I of the Constitution, that 
"all duties, imports, and excises shall be uniform throughout the 
United States, refers purely to a geographical uniformity, and is 
synonymous with the expression "to operate generally through- 
out the United States." 

The statute considered in this case embraces the District of 
Columbia. 

High v. Coyne. (178 U. S., 111.) 

This case involved substantially the same questions as Knowlton v. 
Moore, and was argued, submitted, and decided at the same time. 



20 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

Fidelity Trust and Safe Deposit Company v. McLain. (178 U. S., 113.) 

This case also was argued, submitted, and decided along with Knowl- 
ton v. Moore and High v. Coyne, and upon the same lines. 

Murdock v. Ward. (178 U. S., 139.) 

In this case, in addition to the questions decided in Knowlton v. 
Moore, the court held that the portion of a legacy invested in United 
States bonds is not exempt from the Federal legacy tax, thus applying 
to the Federal legacy tax the same principles which in Plummer v. 
Coler(l78 U. S., 115) are applied to the State inheritance tax of New 
York. 

Sherman v. The United States. (178 XJ. S., 150.) 

The rules laid down in Knowlton v. Moore and Murdock v. Ward 
are followed and applied in this case. 



Boske v. Comingore. ( 177 XJ. S., 459.) 

This was an appeal from a final order of the district court of the 
United States for the district of Kentucky, in a habeas corpus pro- 
ceeding, discharging Comingore, collector of internal revenue for 
the Sixth district of Kentucky, from the custody of the appellant, as 
sheriff of Kenton County. Comingore, the collector, had been adjudged 
in contempt of court for refusing, while giving his deposition in a case 
pending in the State court, to file with his deposition copies of certain 
reports made by distillers which were in his custody as an officer of 
the Treasury Department, and sentenced to be confined in the county 
jail until he furnished the reports called for. The questions raised 
and decided are stated in the syllabus, which is as follows: 

A United States collector of internal revenue was adjudged by 
a court of limited jurisdiction in Kentucky to be in contempt 
because he refused, while giving his deposition in a case pending 
in the State court, to file copies of certain reports made by dis- 
tillers, and which reports were in his custody as a subordinate 
officer of the Treasury Department. He based his refusal upon a 
regulation of that Department which provided: 

" All records in the office of collectors of internal revenue or 
of any of their deputies are in their custody and control for pur- 
poses relating to the collection of revenues of the United States 
only. They have no control of them and no discretion with 
regard to permitting the use of them for any other purpose." 
This regulation was made by the Secretary of the Treasury under 
the authority conferred upon him by section 161 of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States, which authorized that officer, as 
the head of an executive department of the Government, u to 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 21 

prescribe regulations, not inconsistent with law, for the govern- 
ment of his department, the conduct of its officers and clerks, 
the distribution and performance of its business, and the custody, 
use, and preservation of the records, papers, and property apper- 
taining to it. " The collector having been arrested under the order 
of the State authorities sued out a writ of habeas corpus before 
the district court of the United States for the Kentucky district. 
Held: 

(1) That the case was properly brought directly from the dis- 
trict court to this court as one involving the construction or appli- 
cation of the Constitution of the United States. 

(2) As the petitioner was an officer in the revenue service of the 
United States whose presence at his post of duty was important 
to the public interests, and whose detention in prison by the State 
authorities might have interfered with the regular and orderly 
course of the business of the department to which he belonged, it 
was proper for the district court to consider the questions raised 
by the writ of habeas corpus and to discharge the petitioner if held 
in violation of the Constitution and laws of the United States. 

(3) The regulation adopted by the Secretary of the Treasury 
was authorized by section 161 of the Revised Statutes, and that 
section was consistent with the Constitution of the United States. 
To invest the Secretary with authority to prescribe regulations 
not inconsistent with law for the conduct of the business of his 
Department and to provide for the custody, use, and preservation 
of the records, papers, and property appertaining to it, was a 
means appropriate and plainly adapted to the successful adminis- 
tration of the affairs of his Department; and it was competent for 
him to forbid his subordinates to allow the use of official papers in 
their custody except for the purpose of aiding the collection of 
the revenues of the United States. 

(4) In determining whether the regulation in question was valid, 
the court proceeded upon the ground that it was not to be deemed 
invalid unless it was plainly and palpably against law. 

Motes v. The United States. (178 TJ. S., 458.) 

Motes and others were indicted and convicted in the circuit court of 
the United States for the northern district of Alabama for having, in 
furtherance of a conspiracy to deprive a citizen of that State of a right 
or privilege secured by the Constitution and laws of the United States, 
committed the crime of murder. This was a proceeding to reverse 
the judgment of conviction. Several interesting questions are raised 
and decided and are stated in the syllabus, which is as follows: 

By the Revised Statutes of the United States it is provided: 
" Sec. 5508. If two or more persons conspire to injure, oppress, 
threaten, or intimidate any citizen in the free exercise or enjoy- 
ment of any right or privilege secured to him by the Constitution 
or laws of the United States, or because of his having so exercised 
the same; or if two or more persons go in disguise on the high- 
way, or on the premises of another, with the intent to prevent or 
hinder his free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege, *>q> 



22 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

secured, they shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars 
and imprisoned not more than ten years; and shall, moreover, be 
thereafter ineligible to any office or place of honor, profit, or 
trust created by the Constitution or laws of the United States. 
" Sec. 5509. If in the act of violating any provision in either of 
the two preceding sections any other felony or misdemeanor be 
committed, the offender shall be punished for the same with such 

1)unishment as is attached to such felony or misdemeanor by the 
aws of the State in which the offense is committed." 

Several persons were indicted under the above provisions in the 
circuit court of the United States for the northern district of Ala- 
bama for the crime of murder committed in execution of a conspir- 
acy to injure, oppress, threaten, and intimidate one Thompson 
because 01 his having informed the United States authorities of 
violations by the conspirators of the laws of the United States 
relating to distilling. In Alabama murder in the first degree is 
punishable by death or imprisonment for life, at the discretion of 
the jury. At the preliminary trial before a United States com- 
missioner, Taylor, one of the accused, testified, and his evidence 
was put in writing and signed by him. It was sufficient, if accepted, 
to establish the guilt of all the defendants. The accusea had 
opportunity to cross-examine him. At the final trial in the cir- 
cuit court, Taylor, who had pleaded guilty, was called as a wit- 
ness for the Government, but did not respond. He had disap- 
peared, although seen in the corridor of the court building about 
an hour before being called. His absence was not by the procure- 
ment or advice of the accused, but was due to the negligence of 
the officers of the Government. The court, over the objections 
of the accused, allowed Taylor's written statements, made under 
oath at the examining trial, to be read in evidence to the trial jury. 
The accused were found guilty as charged in the indictment, and 
sentenced to the penitentiary for life. At the trial one of the 
accused testified and stated that he and Taylor committed the 
murder, and that the other defendants knew nothing of it and had 
nothing to do with it. Held: 

(1) That no constitutional objection could be urged against sec- 
tions 5508 and 5509; 

(2)That under the act of January 15, 1897, c. 29, 29 Stat., 487, 
the circuit court could not have imposed the penalty of death for 
the offense charged, but only imprisonment for life; 

(3) That under the circuit court of appeals act, 1891, any crim- 
inal case involving the construction or application of the Consti- 
tution of the United States can be brought, after final judgment, 
directly to this court from the circuit court; 

(4) That the admission as evidence of the written statements 
made by Taylor at the examining trial was in violation of the 
rights of the accused under the clause of the sixth amendment to 
the Constitution of the United States, declaring that in all criminal 
prosecutions the accused shall enjoy the right to be confronted 
with the witness against him; 

(5) That the defendant who testified under oath as to his guilt, 
and whose testimony was sufficient to convict him independently 
of Taylor's written statement at the examining trial, was not 
entitled to a reversal for the error committed in allowing that 
statement to be read, because it could not have prejudiced him. 




refobt of the attobney-genebal. 23 

Dewey v. The United States. (178 U. S., 510.) 

The original suit was brought in the Court of Claims to recover 
bounty money earned by the plaintiff in error as the commanding officer 
of the American fleet at the battle of Manila on May 1, 1898. In fixing 
the amount of the bounty it was necessary for the court below to 
determine whether the Spanish vessels engaged at Manila were of supe- 
rior or inferior force to the American fleet, and to determine, as matter 
of law, whether, in determining the relative strength of the two fleets, 
the land batteries and mines and torpedoes of the Spanish should be 
taken into consideration in arriving at the strength of the Spanish fleet. 
The Court of Claims held that the land batteries and mines and torpe- 
does should not be considered in determining the question whether the 
Spanish forces were of superior or inferior force, and found them to be 
inferior to the American vessels. The Supreme Court affirmed this 
judgment. The syllabus of the case is as follows: 

In this case it was rightly decided in the court below that in 
determining under the provisions of Kevised Statutes, section 902, 
whether the Spanish vessels sunk or destroyed at Manila were of 
inferior or superior force to the American vessels engaged in that 
battle, the land batteries, mines, and torpedoes, not controlled by 
those in charge of the Spanish vessels, but which supported those 
vessels, were to be excluded altogether from consideration, and 
that the size and armaments of the vessels sunk or destroyed, 
together with the number of men upon them, were alone to be 
regarded in determining the amount of the bounty to be awarded. 

PRIZE GASES. 

The Pedro. (175 U. S., 354.) 

This was a Spanish vessel engaged with other vessels of the same 
line in regular trade from European to Cuban ports to discharge, 
thence to the United States in ballast for return cargoes. She was 
captured on April 22, 1898, about 12 miles from Havana on her way 
from that port to other Cuban ports to discharge the balance of her 
cargo, and thence to proceed to Pensacola, Fla., without cargo, to load 
for European destination. She was condemned below, and this judg- 
ment was affirmed by the Supreme Court. 

It was contended by claimants that the Pedro, although an enemy's 
vessel, was exempted from capture by the terms of the Executive 
proclamation of April 26, 1898; but the majority of the court held 
that she did not come within either the fourth article of the prolama- 
tion allowing certain Spanish merchant vessels in any ports or places 
within the United States until May 21, 1898, to load their cargoes and 
depart; nor within the fifth article permitting Spanish merchant ves- 
sels which, prior to April 21, 1898, had sailed from a foreign. t^\** 



24 BEP0BT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 

bound to a port of the United States to enter such port to discharge 
and afterwards to depart without molestation, because the fact that 
the Pedro was actually trading from one enemy port to another when 
captured, and that the ultimate destination to the United States was 
merely for a return cargo, withheld from her this exemption. The 
syllabus follows: 

On the 20th of April, 1898, a joint resolution of Congress was 
approved by the President, declaring that the people of Cuba are, 
and of right ought to be, free and independent. On the same day 
the minister of Spain at Washington demanded his passport, and 
the diplomatic relations of Spain with the United States were ter- 
minated. On the 22d of the same April a blockade of a part of the 
coast of Cuba was instituted. On tne 23d of the same month, in a 
proclamation of the Queen Regent of Spain, it was declared that 
a state of war was existing between Spam and the United States. 
On the 26th of the same month the President issued a proclamation 
declaring that a state of war existed between the United States and 
Spain, the fourth and fifth articles of which proclamation were as 
follows: 

"4. Spanish merchant vessels in any ports or places within the 
United States shall be allowed till May 21, 1898, inclusive, for 
loading their cargoes and departing from such ports or places; 
and such Spanish merchant vessels, if met at sea by any United 
States ship, shall be permitted to continue their voyage if, on 
examination of their papers, it shall appear that their cargoes were 
taken on board before the expiration of the above term: Pro- 
vided, That nothing herein contained shall apply to the Spanish 
vessels having on board any officers in the military or naval service 
of the enemy, or any coal (except such as may be necessary for 
their voyage), or any other article prohibited or contraband of 
war, or any dispatch of or to the Spanish Government. 

5. "Any Spanish merchant vessel which, prior to April 21, 1898, 
shall have sailed from any foreign port bound for any port or place 
in the United States, shall be permitted to enter such port or place 
and to discharge her cargo, and afterwards forthwith to depart with- 
out molestation; and any such vessel, if met at sea by any United 
States ship, shall be permitted to continue her voyage to any port 
not blockaded." 

The Pedro was built in England, sailed under the British flag 
till 1887, and then was transferred to a Spanish corporation and 
sailed under the Spanish flag. Sailing from Antwerp she arrived 
at Havana with a cargo April 17, 1898. She remained there five 
days, discharged her cargo, and left for Santiago April 22. At 6 
o'clock on that evening, when about 15 miles east of the Morro and 
5 miles north of the Cuban coast, she was captured by the New 
York, of the blockading fleet, sent to Key West, and there libeled 
and condemned. 

Held, 

(1) That the language of the proclamation was plain, and not 
open to interpretation; 

(2) That the Pedro did not come within article 4 of the procla- 
mation; nor within article 5; nor within the reasons usually 
assigned for exemption from capture; 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 25 

(3) That it must be assumed that she was advised of the strained 
relations between the United States and Spain; 

(4) That being owned by a Spanish corporation, having a Spanish 
registry, and sailing under a Spanish flag and a Spanish license, 
and being officered and manned by Spaniards, she must be deemed 
to be a Spanish ship, although she was insured against risks of 
war by British underwriters — that fact being immaterial. 

The Guido. (175 TJ. S., 382.) 

The facts in the case of the Guido are almost identical with those in 
the case of the Pedro, and the opinion of the majority of the court, 
affirming the condemnation below, proceeded upon the same ground. 
The syllabus is as follows: 

This was an appeal from a decree condemning the Ghiido as 
prize of war. On the facts, concisely stated in the opinion of the 
court, it is held, following The Pedro, ante 355, that the case was 
properly disposed of below. 

The Buena Ventura. (175 TJ. S., 384.) 

This enemy's vessel cleared on the 16th and sailed on the 19th of 
April, 1898, from a port of the United States with a cargo of lumber 
for Rotterdam, Holland, and was captured on the 22d of that month 
in the Florida straits, between Key West and Cuba. She was con- 
demned in the court below on the ground that being enemy property 
captured upon the high seas she did not come within any of the pro- 
tective exceptions of the Executive proclamation of April 26, 1898. 
She bore from our customs authorities, with a coastwise as well as 
foreign manifest, a permit to touch at Newport News for coal. 

The majority of the court held that, although in ascertaining the 
intent of such an instrument as the Executive proclamation, we must 
look to the words used, which may end the matter if the meaning is 
not open to discussion, nevertheless where construction must be 
resorted to, such a public instrument should receive a liberal interpre- 
tation; and it is found on this view that the Buena Ventura may fairly 
be regarded as within the fourth article of the proclamation. The 
opinion suggests that possibly the construction adopted is in advance 
of any previous adjudications on the subject, and continues: 

Where, however, the words are reasonably capable of an inter- 
pretation which shall include a vessel of this description in the 
exemption from capture, we are not averse to adopting it, even 
though this court may be the first to do so. If the Executive 
should hereafter be inclined to take the other view, the language 
of his proclamation could be so altered as to leave no doubt of 
that intention, and it would be the duty of this court to be guided 
and controlled by it. 



26 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

The syllabus: 

In the fourth clause of the President's proclamation of April 
26, 1898, issued after the declaration of war against Spain by Con- 
gress, April 25, 1898, it was said: 

a 4. Spanish merchant vessels in any ports or places within the 
United States shall be allowed till May 21, 1898, inclusive, for 
loading their cargoes and departing from such ports or places, 
and such Spanish merchant vessels, if met at sea by any United 
States ship, shall be permitted to continue their voyage if, on 
examination of their papers, it shall appear that their cargoes 
were taken on board before the expiration of the above term: 
Provided, That nothing herein contained shall apply to Spanish 
Vessels having on board any officer in the military or naval service 
of the enemy, or any coal (except such as may be necessary for 
their voyage), or any other article prohibited or contraband of 
war, or any dispatch of or to the Spanish Government." 

The Buena Ventura, a Spanish vessel, being at Cuba in March, 
1898, was chartered to proceed with all convenient speed to Ship 
Island, Mississippi, and there to take on board a cargo of lumber 
for Rotterdam. Under this charter she arrived at Ship Island in 
the latter part of March, 1898, and took on a cargo of lumber for 
Rotterdam. She cleared at the custom-house on the 14th of April 
accordingly, but was detained by low water until April 19, when, 
between 8 and 9 a. m., she proceeded on her voyage. While so 
proceeding she was captured by a man-of-war of the United States 
about 10 miles off the Florida coast. Up to the moment of cap- 
ture all her officers were ignorant of the existence of a state of 
war, and the vessel, at the time of her capture, was following the 
ordinary course of her voyage. After hearing in the district 
court or the United States t\i& Buena Ventura was condemned and 
sold under a decree of court, and the proceeds were deposited to 
abide the event of an appeal from that decree. Held: 

(1) That an innocent vessel like the Buena Ventura, which had 
loaded within a port of the United States, and had sailed there- 
from before the commencement of the war, was entitled, under 
the proclamation, to continue its voyage, that being clearly within 
the intention of the President, under the liberal construction which 
this court is bound to give to that document; 

(2) That the reversal of the judgment below, condemning the 
Buena Ventura, should be without costs or damages in her favor; 

(3) That the moneys arising from the sale of the vessel must be 
paid to the claimant, deducting only the expenses properly inci- 
dent to her custody and preservation up to the time of sale. 

The Paquete Habana; The Lola. (175 TJ. S., 677.) 

These are the test cases selected to determine whether fishing vessels 
of the enemy are liable to capture as prize of war. 

The argument on behalf of the Government undertook to show that, 
while by express allowance of the sovereign or executive in the past, 
small fishing boats of the enemy near their own coasts were exempted 
on humane grounds and sometimes because they supplied subsistence 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 27 

to the belligerent's own vessels on blockade duty, larger vessels of 
the types here involved ought not to be exempted, and were not in 
fact exempted under any well-established rule of international law, 
unless by express executive ordinance. On this view the court below 
condemned these vessels; but the majority of the Supreme Court took 
the other view and found, after an exhaustive review of the authori- 
ties, especially in international law and under the recent practice of 
nations, including the course of this Government during the Mexican 
war, that the exemption of such vessels had become an established rule 
of prize law, and, in effect, that an affirmative executive order would 
be necessary to justify capture. In consequence, it was held that the 
seizure was without probable cause, and restitution to the claimants 
was ordered, with damages and costs. The dissenting opinion expressed 
the contrary view that the vessels were not exempt as matter of law, 
and stated that — 

The rule is that exemption from the rigors of war is in the con- 
trol of the Executive. He is bound by no immutable rule on the 
subject. It is for him to apply, or modify, or to deny altogether 
such immunity as may have been usually extended. 

It may be added that the question whether under the allowance of 
damages the Government or the naval captors individually are respon- 
sible is still pending in the district court. 

The following is the syllabus: 

Under the act of Congress of March 3, 1891, chapter 517, this 
court has jurisdiction of appeals from all final sentences and decrees 
in prize causes, without regard to the amount in dispute and with- 
out any certificate of the district judge as to the importance of the 
particular case. 

International law is part of our law, and must be ascertained 
and administered by the courts of justice of appropriate jurisdic- 
tion as often as questions of right depending upon it are duly pre- 
sented for their determination. For this purpose, where there is 
no treaty and no controlling executive or legislative act or judicial 
decision, resort must be had to the customs and usages of civilized 
nations, and, as evidence of these, to the works of jurists and 
commentators, not for the speculations of their authors concern- 
ing what the law ought to be, but for trustworthy evidence of what 
the law really is. 

At the present day, by the general consent of the civilized 
nations of the world and independently of any express treaty or 
other public act, it is an established rule of international law that 
coast nshing vessels, with their implements and supplies, cargoes 
and crews, unarmed, and honestly pursuing their peaceful calling 
of catching and bringing in fresh fish, are exempt from capture as 
prize of war; and this rule is one which prize courts, administer- 
ing the law of nations, are bound to take judicial notice of and to 
give effect to in the absence of any treaty or other public act of 
their own government in relation to the matter. 



28 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

At the breaking out of the recent war with Spain, two fishing 
smacks — the one a sloop, 43 feet long on the keel and of 25 tons 
burden, and with a crew of three men, and the other a schooner, 
51 feet long on the keel and of 35 tons burden, and with a crew 
of six men — were regularly engaged in fishing on the coast of 
Cuba, sailing under the Spanish nag, and each owned by a Spanish 
subject residing in Havana; her crew, who also resided there, had 
no interest in the vessel, but were entitled to shares, amounting in 
all to two-thirds of her catch, the other third belonging toiler 
owner; and her cargo consisted of fresh fish, caught by her crew 
from the sea, put on board as they were caught, and kept and sold 
alive. Each vessel left Havana on a coast fishing voyage and sailed 
along the coast of Cuba about 200 miles to the west end of the 
island; the sloop there fished for twenty -five days in the territorial 
waters of Spain; and the schooner extended her fishing trip a hun- 
dred miles farther across the Yucatan Channel, and fished for 
eight days on the coast of Yucatan. On her return, with her 
cargo of live fish, along the coast of Cuba, and when near 
Havana, each was captured by one of the United States blockad- 
ing squadron. Neither fishing vessel had any guns or ammuni- 
tion on board; had any knowledge of the blockade, or even of the 
war, until she was stopped by a blockading vessel; made any 
attempt to run the blockade, or any resistance at the time of her 
capture; nor was there any evidence that she, or her crew, was 
likely to aid the enemy. Held, that both captures were unlawful, 
and without probable cause. 

The Newfoundland. (176 TJ. S., 97.) 

The Newfoundland was a British steamer, seized on July 19, 1898, 
off Havana for attempting to violate the blockade. Highly suspicious 
circumstances affecting the vessel and her course along the Cuban 
coast were shown, especially loitering and hovering about in the 
neighborhood of Havana, which led the district court to enter a decree 
of condemnation. This decree the Supreme Court, however, reversed 
on the ground that the proof offered on behalf of the Government was 
not adequate; that a more definite demonstration of intention and 
attempt to break the blockade must appear; and that, while the record 
raises doubts and suspicions and makes probable cause for the capture 
of the ship and justifies her captors, it does not sustain a forfeiture. 
Accordingly the syllabus holds — 

The question in this case is as to the adequacy of the proof 
offered on behalf of the Government and the captors to show that 
the Newfoundland was trying to violate the blockade of Havana, 
and the court is of opinion that it does not attain to that degree 
which affords a reasonable assurance of the justice of the sentence 
of forfeiture in the court below; that it raises doubts and sus- 
picions and makes probable cause for the capture of the ship and 
justification of her captors, but not forfeiture. 



EEPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 29 

The Adula (176 U. S., 361). 

The Adula was an English vessel which had been chartered to a 
Spaniard during the Spanish war, and sailed from Kingston, Jamaica 
for Guantanamo, Cuba, among other Cuban ports, and was there 
seized for breach of the blockade de facto established at Guantanamo by 
direction of the admiral commanding in those waters. The case was 
carefully argued and considered on a voluminous record in the prize 
court, and the vessel condemned. It was so argued and considered in 
the Supreme Court, and the condemnation affirmed, four of the justices 
dissenting. The claimants thereupon filed a petition for rehearing, 
which was denied, and have now made application to the Executive 
for restitution as an act of clemency or grace. This latter application 
is not yet determined. 

The claimant relied in part upon an asserted intention of humane 
motive, namely, to bring away refugees, and the purpose to obtain 
permission of the blockading fleet to enter the Cuban ports. The 
majority of the court, however, finding that Guantanamo was actually 
and effectively blockaded, held that the owner and charterer of the 
Adula were duly warned by the American consul at Kingston not to 
let the vessel go on the trip in question, and that — 

While the mission of the Adula was not an unfriendly one to 
this Government, she was not a cartel ship privileged from capture 
as such, but one employed in a commercial enterprise for the 
personal profit of the charterer, and only secondarily, if at all, for 
the purpose of humanity. Her enterprise was an unlawful one, 
in case a blockade existed, and both Solis and the master of the 
Adula were cognizant of this fact. 

The syllabus follows: 

A legal blockade may be established by a naval officer acting 
upon his own discretion, or under direction of superiors, without 
governmental notification. 

In view of the operations being carried on for the purpose of 
destroying or capturing the Spanish fleet at Santiago de Cuba and 
the reduction of that place, it was competent for the admiral com- 
manding the squadron to establish a blockade there and at Guan- 
tanamo as an adjunct to such operations, and such blockade was 
valid as against all vessels having notice thereof. It appearing 
that Guantanamo was 18 miles from the mouth of Guantanamo 
Bay and was still occupied by the enemy, held, that although the 
American troops occupied the mouth of the bay, the blockade was 
still operative as to vessels bound to the city of Guantanamo. 

The legal effect of a lawful and sufficient blockade is a closing 
of the port and an interdiction of the entrance of all vessels of 
whatever nationality or business. 

The sailing of a vessel with a premeditated intent to violate 
a blockade is ipso facto a violation of the blockade, and renders 
her subject to capture from the moment she leaves the port of 
departure. 



30 EEPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

If a master has actual notice of a blockade, he is not at liberty 
even to approach the blockaded port for the purpose of making 
inquiries. 

If a neutral vessel be chartered to an enemy, she becomes to a 
certain extent and pro hoc vice an enemy's vessel, and a notice to 
her charterer of the existence of a blockade is a notice to the 
vessel. 

It appearing in this case that both the charterer and the vessel 
had been previously engaged in bringing away refugees from 
Cuba, and were chargeable with notice of the military and naval 
operations against that island, that such facts were of common 
knowledge at the port from which she sailed, and that intercourse 
with Cuban ports was dangerous; and it appearing from a pre- 
ponderance of evidence that both the charterer and master 01 the 
vessel had knowledge of the blockade: Held, that the vessel was 
properly condemned. 

If an examination of the ship's papers and the testimony of the 
crew, taken in prepwratorio, make a case for condemnation, an 
order for further proof is only made where the interests of justice 
clearly require it: Held^ in this case that there was no error in 
denying the motion of the claimant for further proofs. 

The Panama. (176 TJ. S., 535.) 

This vessel sailed from New York for Havana with a general cargo 
on April 20, 1898, and was captured on the 25th while approaching 
that port. She was condemned in the court below on the ground that, 
since by the act of Congress of April 25, 1898, and by the Executive 
proclamation on the succeeding day, it was determined that the war 
with Spain began on April 21, including that day, all Spanish prop- 
erty afloat captured from that time became liable to condemnation, and 
that this vessel was not exempt under any provision of the Executive 
proclamation. 

The majority of the Supreme Court affirmed the condemnation and 
found that the Panama was not entitled to the exemption of article 4 
of the proclamation because, being under a contract with the Spanish 
Government, which attached her provisionally to the naval reserve, 
she carried an armament susceptible of use for hostile purposes, and 
was liable, upon arrival at the enemy port of destination, to be appro- 
priated for such purposes. This decision and the other points involved 
are shown by the syllabus, as follows: 

No general rule of international law exempts mail ships from 
capture as prize of war. 

A Spanisn mail steamship carrying mail of the United States 
from New York to Havana at the time of the breaking out of the 
recent war with Spain was not exempt from capture by the sixth 
clause of the President's proclamation of April 26, 1898. 

At the time of the breaking out of the recent war with Spain 
a Spanish mail steamship was on a voyage from New York to 
Havana, carrying a general cargo, passengers, and mails, and 



BEP0RT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 31 

having mounted on board two breech-loading Hontoria guns of 
9-centimetre bore, and one Maxim rapid-firing gun, and having 
also on board twenty Remington rifles and ten Mauser rifles, with 
ammunition for all the guns and rifles, and thirty or forty cut- 
lasses. Her armament had been put on board more than a year 
before, for her own defense, as required by her owner's mail con- 
tract with the Spanish Government, which also provided that, in 
case of war, that Government might take possession of the vessel, 
with her equipment, increase her armament, and use her as a war 
vessel, and, in these and other provisions, contemplated her use 
for hostile purposes in time of war. Held, that she was not 
exempt from capture as prize of war by the fourth clause of the 
President's proclamation of April 26, 1898. 

The Benito Estenger. (176 TJ. S., 568.) 

The Benito Estenger was a Spanish vessel, but was sailing under the 
English flag after transfer from the Spanish owner to the neutral, and 
was captured off Cape Cruz, on the south coast of Cuba, at the end of 
June, 1898. She was condemned in the court below as enemy prop- 
erty, and that condemnation was affirmed by the Supreme Court, three 
justices, however, dissenting, the opinion resting the condemnation 
also on the ground that, although there was.no breach of blockade 
duly established, the vessel had been engaged in illicit intercourse 
with the enemy after warning given. The transfer to the neutral was 
found to be merely colorable, and the claimant's charterer, the former 
or rather the real owner to be, a Cuban subject of Spain, although he 
claimed to be an adherent of the insurgent cause, and therefore an ally 
of the United States rather than a loyal subject of Spain. The court 
found little to support this claim, and applied the general doctrine that 
in time of war citizens or subjects of the belligerents are enemies to 
each other without regard to individual sentiments or dispositions. 
Upon this point the owner of the Benito Estenger has now addressed a 
petition to the Executive for restitution, which has not yet been 
determined. 

The syllabus states: 

The general rule is that in time of war the citizens or subjects 
of the belligerents are enemies to each other without regard to 
individual sentiments or dispositions, and that political status 
determines the question of enemy ownership. 

By the law of prize, property engaged in any illegal intercourse 
with the enemy is deemed enemy property, whether belonging to 
an ally or a citizen, as the illegal traffic stomps it with the nostile 
character and attaches to it all the penal consequences. 

Provisions are not, in general, deemed contraband; but they 
may become so if destined for the army or navy of the enemy, or 
his ports of naval or military equipment. 

In dealing with a vessel asserted to be an enemy vessel, the fact 
of trade with the enemy in supplies necessary for the enemy's 
forces is of decisive importance. 

Individual acts of friendship can not chau^, -^o>\&AR»k. ^\s£«^ 



32 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

where there is no open adherence to the opposite cause and former 
allegiance remains apparently unchanged. 

A consul has no authority by reason of his official station to 
grant exemption from capture to an enemy vessel, and this vessel 
was not entitled to protection by reason of any engagement with 
the United States. 

In cases of peculiar hardship, or calling for liberal treatment, 
it is not for the courts, but for another department of the Gov- 
ernment, to extend such amelioration as the particular instance 
mav demand. 

Transfers of vessels flagrante hello can not be sustained if sub- 
jected to any condition by which the vendor retains an interest in 
the vessel or its profits, a control over it, or a right to its restora- 
tion at the close of the war. 

The burden of proof in respect of the validity of such transfers 
is on the claimant, and the court holds as to the transfer in this 
case that the requirements of the law of prize were not satisfied 
by the proofs. 

The Carlos F. Roses. (177 TJ. S., 655.) 

The Carlos f. Roses was a Spanish bark and was proceeding from 
Montevideo, where her outward cargo from Spain had been dis- 
charged, to Havana, with a cargo of jerked beef and garlic, when on 
May 17, 1898, she was captured in the Bahama Channel. She was 
duly condemned as enemy property and no appeal was taken from 
that judgment. But neutral bankers claimed the cargo on the ground 
that they had made advances upon the security of the bills of lading 
indorsed in blank, and were wholly unindemnified except through 
insurers who would be subrogated to their own rights. Their claim 
was allowed in the court below; but the majority of the Supreme Court 
found that the face of the papers and the transactions so far as they 
were shown presented evidence of an enemy interest which called upon 
the asserted neutral owners to prove beyond question their right and 
title, which they had not sufficiently done within the rules and require- 
ments established by the authorities reviewed. 

The decree of the lower court was reversed and a decree of condem- 
nation was entered. The court adverted to the fact (without deciding 
the question) that provisions by the modern law of nations may become 
contraband although belonging to a neutral, on account of the particu- 
lar situation of the war or on account of their destination, as for 
military use at ports of naval or military equipment, and that in this 
instance the concentration and accumulation of provisions at Havana 
might be considered a necessary part of Spanish military operations 
imminente hello, and these particular provisions as especially appro- 
priate for Spanish military use. 

The syllabus is: 

The Carlos F. Roses, a Spanish vessel, owned at Barcelona, 
Spain, sailed from that port for Montevideo, Uruguay, with ^ 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 33 

cargo which was discharged there and a cargo of jerked beef and 
garlic taken on board for Havana, for which she sailed March 16, 
1898. On May 17, while proceeding to Havana, she was captured 
by a vessel of the United States and sent to Key West, where she 
was libeled. A British company doing business in London laid 
claim to the cargo on the ground that they had advanced money 
for its purchase to a citizen of Montevideo, and had received bills 
of lading covering the shipments. The vessel was condemned as 
enemy's property, hut the proceeds of the cargo, which had been 
ordered to be sold as perishable property, was ordered to be paid 
to the claimants. Held, 

(1) That as the vessel was an enemy vessel, the presumption 
was that the cargo was enemy's property, and this could only be 
overcome by clear and positive evidence to the contrary; 

(2) That on the face of the papers given in evidence, it must be 

E resumed that when these goods were delivered to the vessel, they 
ecame the property of the consignors named in the invoices; 

(3) That the British company got the legal title to the goods 
and the right of possession only if such were the intention of the 
parties, and that that intention was open to explanation, although 
the persons holding the papers might have innocently paid value 
for them; 

(4) That in prize courts it is necessary for the claimants to show 
the absence of anything to impeach the transaction, and at least 
to disclose fully all the surrounding circumstances, and that the 
claimant had failed to do so; 

(5) That the right of capture acts on the proprietary interest of 
the thing captured at the time of the capture, and is not affected 
by the secret liens or private engagements of the parties; 

(6) That in this case the belligerent right overrides the neutral 
claim, which must be regarded merely as a debt and the assign- 
ment as a cover to an enemy interest. 



United States v. Mrs. Gue Lim. (176 U. S., 459.) 

In this case the question was raised whether a wife, or minor chil- 
dren, of Chinese merchants who are already domiciled in this country, 
may enter the United States without the certificates prescribed by sec- 
tion 6 of the act of July 5, 1884. The court held that a certificate is 
not necessary in either case, resting the decision upon the following 
interpretation of the law: 

To hold that a certificate is required in this case is to decide that 
the woman can not come into the country at all, for it is not pos- 
sible for her to comply with the act, because she can not in any 
event procure the certificate even by returning to China. She 
must come in as the wife of her domiciled husband or not at all. 
The act was never meant to accomplish the result of permanently 
excluding the wife under the circumstances of this case, and we 
think that, properly and reasonably construed, it does not do so. 
If we hold that she is entitled to come in as the wife, because the 

H. Doc. 9 3 



34 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

true construction of the treaty and the act permits it, there is no 
provision which makes the certificate the only proof of the fact 
that she is such wife. In the case of the minor children the same 
result must follow as in that of the wife. 

The syllabus is: 

iTnder the act of July 5, 1884, chapter 220 (23 Stat, 115), con- 
strued in connection with the treaty with China of November 17, 
1880 (22 Stat., 826), the wives and minor children of Chinese 
merchants domiciled in this country may enter the United States 
without certificates. 

BUSINESS IN OTHER COURTS. 

The business of the Department conducted in the Court of Claims 
and in the Court of Private Land Claims is showq in detail in the 
reports of Assistant Attorney-General Pradt, Assistant Attorney- 
General Thompson, and United States Attorney Matt. G. Reynolds. 
The same promptness and efficiency that have distinguished the con- 
duct of the different branches of business under the charge of these 
gentlemen, respectively, during former years have been maintained 
during the past year. The business of their respective branches is 
well in hand, and no litigant has just cause of complaint by reason of 
any delay interposed by the attorneys for the Government. 

NEW DEPARTMENT BUILDING. 

In my last annual report I informed Congress of the selection of an 
architect and the approval of a plan for the new building for the 
Department of Justice, provided for by act of March 3, 1899. In that 
report I stated that it was probable that on account of the extraordi- 
nary increase in the cost of building materials and labor it would be 
impossible to complete a building of the design selected with the money 
authorized by the original appropriation, and that an additional appro- 
priation would be necessary. Subsequently to the date of my report 
I advertised for and received bids for the construction of the building 
according to the proposed design. These bids verified the prediction 
I had made, and disclosed the fact that a very substantial increase of 
the appropriation would be necessary if the building were to be of the 
capacity and style contemplated at the time the act was passed, and in 
dignity and finish worthy of the objects for which the structure is 
intended. 

To construct a building of the size required and of the design pro- 
vided for within the present appropriation would require the use of 
materials so cheap and common as to render the building a blemish 
rather than an ornament to the national capital. It would be neces- 
sary, instead of constructing the outside walls of the building of mar- 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 35 

ble, as is proposed, to construct them of terra cotta, and the interior, 
which, according to the present plans and specifications, is to be of 
a style and finish which would render it an object of beauty and of 
general interest, would need to be constructed on the plane of an ordi- 
nary cheap office building. I have the honor, therefore, to renew my 
recommendation for the increase of the limit and an additional appro- 
priation which will enable the Department to erect and furnish a build- 
ing of the material and in the style provided for by the architect's 
plans and specifications. It is my purpose to secure new bids for the 
work, which I shall hereafter submit to Congress as a basis for such 
further appropriation. 

PACIFIC RAILROAD MATTERS. 

On September 19, 1900, 1 received an additional dividend of $132,- 
942.89 on account of the deficiency due the United States on account 
of the subsidy debt of the Kansas Pacific branch. The case against 
the American Loan and Trust Company, of Boston, as trustee, the 
object of which is to secure on account of said deficiency claim certain 
moneys in the hands of the trust company, which are the proceeds of 
securities mortgaged for the benefit and further security of first- 
mortgage bonds of the Kansas Pacific Railway, and for the benefit, 
protection, and further security of the United States in respect to 
their subsidy bonds and interest thereon, is still undisposed of. It is 
my expectation that ultimately the Government will receive an addi- 
tional dividend from this source. 

The total sum heretofore paid or secured to be paid to the United 
States on account of Pacific Railway subsidy claims since November 1, 
1897, is $124,554,550.84. 

UNITED STATES PRISONERS. 

Exhibit J, with this report, shows where United States prisoners have 
been confined during the year, the districts from which they were 
received, the number from each district, and the total number in each 
institution. 

On July 1, 1899, there were 3,137 United States convicts in the 
various prisons and reformatories of the country, as against 2,932 at 
the close of the last fiscal year on June 30, 1900. Of the total number 
in confinement at said last date, 902 were in the United States peni- 
tentiary at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., and 68 in the United States 
penitentiary at McNeils Island, Wash. The remainder, 1,962, were in 
the various State institutions made use of for the purpose. 



36 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

STATISTICS. 

Number of prisoners received during the year m penitentiary. 

Total number in custody 4, 583 

Discharged during the year 1, 651 

In confinement on June 30, 1900 2, 932 

Discharged by expiration of sentence 1, 527 

Died 54 

Pardoned 50 

Released by writ* of habeas corpus 9 

Transferred to insane asylum 11 

Received during year ending June 30, 1900 1, 536 

Of those in prison on June 30, 1900, there were employed, on piece-price, 436; 

on State account, 496; on prison duties, 1,636; total working 2, 568 

Convicted of violations of revenue laws 150 

Counterfeiting 207 

Violation of postal laws 282 

Introducing liquor into Indian country or selling liquor to Indians 205 

Violation of laws relating to pensions 82 

Larceny 244 

Murder ami manslaughter. . 50 

Embezzlement 27 

Perjury 30 

Forgery 23 

Conspiracy 11 

Offenses other than those named 225 

Born in United States 1, 329 

Foreign born 210 

Males 1, 503 

Females 33 

Whites 1,017 

Colored , 336 

Indians 183 

Chinese 29 

Could read and write 1, 139 

Could read only • 45 

Could neither read nor write 352 

Married 614 

Single 922 

In prison for first time 1, 384 

Heretofore served sentence 152 

Received under 20 years of age 280 

Between 20 and 30 603 

Between 30 and 40 336 

Between 40 and 50 183 

Over 50 years of age 134 

Idle.... 364 

UNITED STATES PENITENTIARY AT FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANS. 

The fifth annual report of the warden accompanies this report as 
Exhibit K. On June 30, 1899, there were 799 prisoners confined in 
the institution. On the corresponding date in the present year 902 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 37 

were in confinement, the maximum number which the prison can pos- 
sibly accommodate. 

The convicts have been chiefly employed in building the wall to 
inclose the grounds of the new prison and on the foundation walls for 
the new buildings. 

The total expense of maintaining the institution during the year 
ended June 30, 1900, has been $159,124.59, and the average daily cost 
per capita about 55 cents. The average daily per capita cost of sub- 
sistence alone was about 11 cents. The increase in expenditures over 
last year is due to the large increase in the number of prisoners and 
the increased cost of supplies. 

The health of the inmates has been generally excellent, as shown by 
the report of the penitentiary physician, due largely to the fact that 
the prisoners have been employed in outdoor labor, on the farm, in 
the quarry, and in the erection of the walls. 

The prison farm has been very productive and the crops gathered, 
and to be gathered, will add materially in furnishing subsistence for 
the prisoners. . 

THE NEW PENITENTIARY, FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANS. 

Attention is invited to the report of the warden and superintendent 
of construction, which shows the amount of work performed during 
the year at the new prison site. When it is considered that this labor 
has been performed by men without previous training in mechanical 
pursuits, and in the face of many obstacles, among them the loss of 
time consumed in the daily marches to and from the site, the results 
are exceedingly gratifying. 

As the work progresses, carried on almost wholly by the prisoners 
themselves, it becomes evident that considerable time must elapse 
before the new buildings, or any portion of them, can be completed 
and ready for occupancy. So far it has been the practice to march 
the prisoners from the old prison to the new site daily — a distance of 
about 2i miles — where they are employed on the walls and in the 
quarry or brickyard, and returned to their quarters after the day's 
labors are ended. In this way a considerable portion of the working 
day is lost in going to and fro, and this loss of time in marching and 
on account of the frequent abandonment of work because of unfavor- 
able weather is injurious in many ways and seriously interferes with 
the proper discipline of the institution. It is therefore deemed neces- 
sary and for the best interests of the Government that the original 
plan of erecting this penitentiary shall be so far modified as to provide 
for the erection by contract, as speedily as possible, of a cell wing, 
with accommodations for at least a portion of the prisoners, with the 
requisite additions for heating, lighting, dining rooms, etc. In this 
way the prisoners engaged in the erection of the walls and building 



38 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

can be housed and cared for on the grounds of the new prison, thus 
voiding the danger involved in marching them to and fro, as is now 
done, as well as loss of time and injury to discipline referred to 
above. 

It is estimated that it will require about $300,000 to complete the 
buildings thus described. If this arrangement can be effected, the 
erection of the remaining prison buildings, workshops, and wall can 
then be readily accomplished by the prisoners themselves under the 
superintendence of the officials. 

The warden calls attention, in his report herewith (Exhibit K), to 
the paramount necessity for the early completion of a cell wing as here 
recommended, in order that the prisoners may be removed from the 
old prison to the new at the earliest possible date, and states that if 
this provision can be effected during the coming year it will be possi- 
ble to remove the prisoners entirely to the new prison in 1902 and 
to continue the work of construction by their help alone to final 
completion. 

The appropriation as requested is strongly urged. . 

UNITED STATES PENITENTIARY AT ATLANTA, GA. 

Since my last report the contract for the erection of a United States 
penitentiary at Atlanta, Ga., has been let, and the work is well under 
way. The plans, as approved, contemplate the erection of a prison, 
complete, as provided in the act, to consist of a cell house with accom- 
modations for about 500 prisoners, administration building, dining 
room, offices, steam and electric plant, etc. It has been ascertained 
that this is probably the utmost which can be accomplished within the 
limits of the present appropriation, but the plans are prepared with a 
view to the addition at any time the Government may deem necessary 
of an additional building large enough to afford accommodations alto- 
gether for at least 1,200 convicts. It is expected that the buildings 
now provided for will be completed by next summer and ready for 
occupancy soon after. 

The penitentiary will be modern in every respect, and will, it is 
believed, embody in its construction the best and most enlightened 
ideas relative to prison buildings. It will be necessary to provide for 
the conduct and maintenance of the institution, and the proper legis- 
lation to these ends has been suggested in the annual estimates sub- 
mitted as provided by law. 

UNITED STATES PENITENTIARY AT M'NEILS ISLAND, WASHINGTON. 

This institution now contains 68 prisoners, employed chiefly in cut- 
ting timber and other outdoor labor on the island. It can accommo- 
date 150 inmates. The entire cost of maintenance for the year has 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 39 

been $13,915.38, an average per capita of 65 cents per diem. The 
average daily per capita cost of subsistence alone has been about 18 
cents. 

UNITED STATES JAIL, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The report of the warden accompanies this report as Exhibit N. 
The average daily number of prisoners during the year was 357. The 
average cost of maintenance was 34& cents per capita per day, with 9 
cents the average cost per capita % for subsistence alone. The jail is 
well conducted, and is among the best in the country. 

TREASURY CASES. 

The report of the Solicitor of the Treasury shows the amount, 
character, and results of the litigation conducted under his direction 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. I have pleasure in indorsing 
the recommendation made by the Solicitor in favor of an increased 
appropriation for the purchase of law books for the library of the 
Solicitor, which office, as Congress is aware, is not physically con- 
nected with the Department of Justice, but is housed in the Treasury 
building, where it is necessary for convenience and dispatch to have at 
hand a full supply of books and legal literature in order to properly 
and promptly advise and instruct the Treasury officials upon legal 
questions arising in the course of the administration of their various 
departments and bureaus. 

I also call attention to the gratifying success which has attended the 
litigation conducted on behalf of the United States during the past 
year. Out of more than 3,000 cases decided, over 90 per cent were 
adjudged in favor of the United States and less than 10 per cent 
adversely. 

I desire to approve and indorse likewise the recommendations made 
by the Solicitor with reference to the compensation of certain of the 
clerks in his bureau. 

COMMISSION TO REVISE AND CODIFY THE CRIMINAL AND PENAL LAWS. 

The report of the commission to revise and codify the criminal and 
penal laws of the United States mentions the action of the Senate in 
returning the revision previously submitted of those chapters of the 
Revised Statutes relating to the organization and jurisdiction of the 
courts of the United States, to the end that the commission might 
consider communications from any bar associations that desired to be 
heard on the proposed changes. The commissioners express their 
desire for such suggestions, especially with reference to the reforma- 
tion of procedure, and in the hope that they may be received they 
have postponed the resubmission of that part of their work. 



40 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

The commissioners further report that they have substantially com- 
pleted the revision of the criminal and penal laws. A bill has already 
passed the House of Representatives providing for a revision of all 
laws of a general and permanent nature, and as it would materially 
affect their work, both as to the arrangement and otherwise, they have 
postponed the completion of the codification of the criminal laws until 
Congress shall have manifested its will in the premises. The report 
calls attention to certain omissions or ambiguities in recent acts of 
Congress that come within the purview of duties of the commission, 
with the suggestion that Congress may deem it desirable to cure them 
without delay. 

CRIMINAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE. 

In my report for the year 1899, 1 urged upon Congress the necessity 
of providing, by suitable legislation, for an appeal on the part of the 
Government in cases of decision adverse to the United States by the 
courts upon demurrers interposed to indictments. Since that report 
was written other instances have arisen emphasizing the necessity for 
such a change in criminal procedure. One instance, among others, 
will suffice to illustrate the importance of this subject. A criminal 
information was filed in a United States district court against a person 
charged with pasturing sheep on the Sierra Forest Reserve, in violation 
of the act of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat, 35). There are about thirty cases 
in that district involving the same question, but against different parties. 
The defendant in the test case instituted filed a demurrer to the infor- 
mation, which the court decided against the Government on mere 
questions of law. Under the present procedure it is impossible for 
the Government to have the decision of the district court reviewed, 
although it is the opinion of the district attorney having charge of the 
case and of the Attorney-General that the decision was erroneous and 
ought to be reversed. 

It is not conceived that such a law as is proposed would interfere in 
any way with the constitutional rights of defendants, but would per- 
mit the construction of statutes and of the Constitution in criminal 
cases, where such construction is adverse to the Government, to be 
submitted in regular course to the appellate courts, and to receive the 
construction of those courts, a course which is quite as reasonable and 
necessary in criminal cases as in cases involving mere property rights. 

The report of the attorney in charge of pardons shows in sufficient 
fullness and detail the record of the Department in that respect during 
the past year, and no special comments thereon appear to be neces- 
sary. The same may be said of the report of the librarian and of the 
clerk in charge of the administration of the bankruptcy act. 

The attention of Congress is called to the full and satisfactory 
reports of the officers in charge of these various subjects and branches 
and to the recommendations contained therein. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 41 



REFORM SCHOOL, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The report of the board of trustees of the Reform School of the 
District of Columbia (Exhibit L) shows that at the beginning of the 
last fiscal year there were in the school 206 boys; there were received 
during the year 103, a total of 309, as against 313 for the previous 
year. There were discharged during the year 117, leaving in the 
school June 30, 1900, 192. In the eleven years, from 1887 to 1898, 
the average number of boys in the school increased from 157 to 236. 
The present report shows that the diminution in the number which 
began after that period has continued, and that the reasons for such 
diminution given by the trustees in their report for the previous 
fiscal year still exist, but, owing to the passage of the act at the last 
session of Congress authorizing parole discharges and extending the 
limit of age for admission to under 17 years instead of under 16 years, 
it seems probable that the number will increase during the current 
year. The trustees report a growing improvement in the character 
of the work in the schoolroom, manual training school, and the 
instruction given in the various shops, as well as in the outdoor work. 
A new assembly hall, for which Congress made an appropriation, is 
nearly completed, and will be of great use. 

An instructor has been provided for physical culture, the good 
effect of which is already apparent. The trustees suggest that the 
school be utilized as far as possible to the limit of its capacity by 
sending boys to it whenever circumstances seem to warrant such 
course, rather than the turning of them over to agencies intended 
more strictly for charitable work, thereby distributing them to per- 
sons or places where possibly they get little or no instruction, those 
to whom they are committed getting not only their services but com- 
pensation, making an additional expense to be paid from the public 
Treasury. 

I agree with what the trustees say on this subject. 

girls' reform school. 

The reports of the trustees, of the superintendent, and other officers 
(Exhibit M) show that the condition of the school is good and the 
direction of its affairs satisfactory. The new building is substantially 
completed, and will be occupied about January 1. This addition will 
provide for 68 more inmates, will permit the admission of white girls 
as well as colored girls of the statutory classes, and will, it is believed, 
result in increased effectiveness of administration and in a marked 
reduction of per capita cost. 

I urge again upon Congress the importance of legislation which 
shall reduce the age limit of admission to the school and enlarge the 



42 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

powers of the trustees, so as to provide by parole when earned, or 
by transfer to the workhouse in refractory cases, and in other ways 
for more complete authority over the inmates. Congress is referred 
to the exhibit mentioned for additional information upon this topic, 
which, is believed to be of vital interest to the school. I suggest, as a 
means to the desired end, that the act of June 5, 1900, conferring 
similar power upon the board of trustees of the Boys' Reform School, 
might properly be extended to this school. 

EXHIBITS ACCOMPANYING THIS REPORT. 

Exhibit 1 is a tabular statement showing the number of cases, civil 
and criminal, before the United States circuit courts of appeals during 
the fiscal year 1900, with the number disposed of. 

Exhibit 2 is a report of the Assistant Attorney-General in charge 
of the business of the Government in the Court of Claims. 

Exhibit 3 is a report of the Assistant Attorney -General in charge of 
Indian depredation claims. 

Exhibit 4 is the report of the United States attorney for the Court 
of Private Land Claims. 

Exhibit A is a statement of the civil suits to which the United States 
is a party, terminated in the circuit and district courts of the United 
States during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, and of such suits 
pending in said courts July 1, 1900, as reported by the district 
attorneys. 

In 907 of the 1,602 civil suits terminated during the last fiscal year 
judgments were for the United States, in 206 against the United States, 
and 489 were either dismissed or discontinued; 23 were appealed to 
the circuit court or to the circuit court of appeals, and 5 to the Supreme 
Court. 

Many of the civil suits reported dismissed or discontinued were 
settled by authority of the Treasury Department and discontinued 
under its direction. There were pending July 1, 1900, 6,130 civil 
suits to which the United States was a party. 

Exhibit B is a statement of the criminal prosecutions terminated in 
the circuit and district courts of the United States during the last 
fiscal year, and of such prosecutions pending July 1, 1900. 

Of the 17,033 criminal prosecutions terminated during the last year, 
197 were prosecutions under the customs laws, in which there were 
126 convictions, 22 acquittals, and 49 were entered nol. pros., discon- 
tinued, or quashed; 6,275 under the internal- revenue laws, in which 
there were 3,749 convictions, 768 acquittals, and 1,758 were entered 
nol. pros., discontinued, or quashed; 1,153 under post-office laws, in 
which there were 772 convictions, 88 acquittals, and 293 entered nol. 
pros., discontinued, or quashed; 6 under naturalization acts, in which 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 43 

there were 4 discontinued and 2 entered nol. pros., discontinued, or 
quashed; 963 under the intercourse laws, in which there were 630 
convictions, 52 acquittals, and 281 entered nol. pros., discontinued, or 
quashed; 206 under the pension laws, in which there were 145 convic- 
tions, 13 acquittals, and 48 entered nol. pros., discontinued, or quashed; 
53 for embezzlement, in which there were 32 convictions, 4 acquittals, 
and 17 entered nol. pros., discontinued, or quashed; 8,180 miscella- 
neous prosecutions, in which there were 4,880 convictions, 1,014 
acquittals, and 2,286 entered nol. pros., discontinued, or quashed. 

In many of the prosecutions under the internal-revenue laws entered 
nol. pros., discontinued, or quashed a compromise and settlement 
were made in the Internal -Revenue Bureau of the Treasury Depart- 
ment. 

Of the 10,047 criminal prosecutions pending July 1, 1900, 107 were 
for violations of customs laws, 4,379 for violation of internal-reve- 
nue laws, 748 for violation of post-office laws, 20 under the election 
laws, 58 under naturalization laws, 674 under the intercourse laws, 
218 under the pension laws, 76 for embezzlement, and 3,767 miscel- 
laneous prosecutions. 

Exhibit C shows the amount arising and realized from civil suits to 
which the United States was a party, and from criminal prosecutions 
in the circuit and district courts of the United States during the last 
fiscal year. 

The aggregate amount of the judgments rendered in favor of the 
United States in civil suits during the last year was $663,299.39, and 
the amount actually collected on these judgments was $52,795.57, 
while $52,748.61 was obtained during the year on judgments rendered 
in former years for the United States, and $27,130.42 was otherwise 
realized in civil suits. 

The aggregate amount of fines, forfeitures, and penalties imposed 
during the year in criminal prosecutions was $705,137.41, and the 
amount of these fines, forfeitures, and penalties collected during the 
year was $104,020.11, while $8,203.31 was realized on fines, forfeit- 
ures, and penalties imposed in former years. 

Exhibit D is a statement of civil suits to which the United States 
was not a party, commenced and terminated in the circuit and district 
courts of the United States during the last fiscal year, and of such 
suits pending July 1, 1900, 10,628 were commenced during the year, 
of which 1,643 were cases in admiralty and 8,985 were other miscella 
neous suits. 

Judgment for plaintiffs in these cases were as follows: 644 in admi- 
ralty, amounting to $818,555.12, and 3,009 in other suits, amounting 
to $165,019,575.78. 

Judgments for defendants were 136 in admiralty, amounting to 
$11,599.77, and 994 in other suits, amounting to $254,772.55; 808 in 



44 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

admiralty were either dismissed or discontinued, as were also 4,868 
other suits; 46,347 civil suits to which the United States was not a 
party were pending in the district and circuit courts of the United 
States July 1, 1900, viz, 4,776 in admiralty and 41,571 other miscella- 
neous suits. 

Exhibit E is a general statement of all appropriations placed under 
the Department of Justice which were available and those from which 
payments were made during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Exhibit F 1 . is a statement of the court expenses incurred in th6 
fiscal year 1898 and paid in the fiscal year 1900. 

Exhibit F 2 is a statement of the court expenses incurred in the 
fiscal year 1899 and paid in the fiscal year 1900. 

Exhibit F 3 is a statement of the court expenses incurred and paid 
in the fiscal year 1900, viz: 

To United States marshal $1, 156, 215. 13 

To attorneys * '. 542, 571. 49 

To special assistant attorneys 20, 755. 29 

To clerks 162, 671. 50 

To jurors 645, 332. 25 

To witnesses 952, 627. 60 

To commissioners 98, 940. 75 

To prisoners 674, 774. 82 

To rent 77,359.83 

To bailiffs 159, 869. 80 

To miscellaneous expenses 262, 280. 79 

Total 4, 758, 899. 35 

Exhibit F 4 is a statement showing items, amounts, cause of expendi- 
ture, and persons paid from the appropriation for contingent expenses, 
Department of Justice, including the appropriations for furniture and 
repairs, books for Department library, books for office of the Solicitor, 
stationery, official transportation, and miscellaneous items. 

Exhibit G shows the number of special assistant attorneys and the 
compensation paid to each, as required by sections 195 and 385, 
Revised Statutes. 

Exhibit H is the report of the Solicitor of the Treasury, showing 
the amount, character, and results of the litigation under his direction, 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Exhibit I is the report of the librarian of the Department. 

Exhibit J is a detailed statement giving names of the institutions 
where United States prisoners are confined, their location, and the 
number of convicts in each. 

Exhibit K is the report of the warden of the United States peniten- 
tiary at Fort Leavenworth. 

Exhibit L is the annual report of the president of the board of 
trustees of the Reform School of the District of Columbia for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 45 

Exhibit M is the report of the president of the board of trustees of 
the Girls' Reform School of the District of Columbia for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1900. 

Exhibit N is the annual report of the warden of the United States 
jail in the District of Columbia. 

Exhibit O is a report of the Architect of the Capitol upon the 
improvements and repairs to the court-house, District of Columbia, 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Exhibit P is a report of the attorney in charge of pardons, Depart- 
ment of Justice, showing the names of the prisoners convicted in the 
United States courts who were pardoned during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1900, the districts in which they were tried, the term of 
court at which they were convicted, their offenses, sentences, dates of 
pardon, and the principal reasons for recommending Executive 
clemency. 

Exhibit Q is a report of the special attorney in charge of matters 
relating to the Mission Indians. 

Exhibit R is a statement showing by districts the annual salaries of 
United States district attorneys, their assistants and clerks, and the 
expenses claimed and approved by this Department for the fiscal year 
1900. 

Exhibit S is a statement showing by districts the salaries paid to 
United States marshals, their deputies and clerks, their expenses of 
travel and subsistence, as claimed and approved, and the fees earned 
and compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved, 
together with amounts paid to clerks of United States courts for 
deposit for the fiscal year 1900. 

Exhibit T is a statement showing emoluments and office expenses of 
clerks of the United States courts, as indicated by their emolument 
returns, for the fiscal year ending J une 30, 1900. 

Exhibit U is a report on bankruptcy matters. 

Exhibit V is the report of the Commission to Revise and Codify the 
Criminal and Penal Laws of the United States. 

The exhibits and appendix are a part of the report. 

John W. Griggs, 

Attorney- General. 



EXHIBITS. 



47 



Exhibit 1.— Statement of cases docketed, disposed of, and pending in 
'/'(■■ f'nitcd •StaU-a circuit courts of appeals and court of appeals of the 
District of Columbia. 

UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS. 





lVtsrt inn July 


[Im-kTlrf 

l.l.ssftM. 


July 
one 


liisjHifrti l>f, 
[Iwn] v.'iir 


Pending July 
1,1900. 


Cm 
pen 


;ed 


fh-i^-V.s 


Circuit. 


| 


a 
"a" 

5 


3 


s 


1 


| 


i 


■a 

III 


4 

105 
25 
99 

104 


| 

4 

"a" 


39 
110 


"ill?" 

I'li'il'r.) 


1 M 


*9 

51 
« 

019 
51. 


41 

89 

IB 
SI 

62 


181 

194 
« 

n 


s 

3 


4fl 
189 

68 
63 
131 
188 

174 


EI 
168 

47 
183 


i 

3 


SI 

48 

126 


40 


, 










































St 


Is 


:,:. 


■-■"' 


- 


■::,: 




MS 




214 



















('m;HT OK APPEALS OP THE DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA. 



















I' IiiiL- July 


Dwlicteil .Inly l. 
' 1900. 


Dispowd of. flf- 
c»l year 1900, 


Pending juij- 

1,1900. 


T ■ i.- r 1 1 : ! r , l; . ,'r- 


rm'.'r!,',;.! 












,lis|inS|'ll 






































[H'Jlll'll 




1 






: 






1 








| 








1 








["TliliMl 








1 


j5 


i 


| 


1 




| 


1 


1 


'-_ 


I 


1 


J 


1 


3 


1 


3 


Court. 


Total 


* 


22 1 3 49 ! 44 


13 


15 


141 


19 


« 


i. 


108 


9 


24 


t 


85 


i 


6 




5 


12 



Exhibit 2. — Report of the Assistant Attorney- General in charge of the 
business of the Department of Justice in the Court of Claims. 

Department op Justice, 
Washington, D. C, November 2, 1900. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report for the year 
ending October 31, li)00, of business pertaining to matters within my 
official charge: 

BUSINESS OF THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 



Since my last report there have been filed 886 cases, claiming, as far 
as can be ascertained from the petitions, upward of $4,150,528.26. 
The total number of cases now pending, exclusive of those known as 
H. Doc. 9- — 4 »& 



50 BEPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

"letter-carrier cases," to which reference is hereinafter made, is 2,948. 
The amount involved is very large but can not be stated even approxi- 
mately on account of the indefiniteness of many of the petitions filed. 

During the year 290 cases (exclusive of letter-carrier cases) were 
disposed of, the amount claimed being $71,731,881.53. In 151 cases, 
claiming $70,223,300.75, judgments of dismissal were secured. In 139 
cases, claiming $1,508,580.78, judgments were for claimants for 
$300,479.77. 

The extraordinarily large amount involved in the cases disposed of, 
as above stated, is due to the fact that in one case, which was dismissed 
for want of prosecution, the amount claimed was over $64,000,000. 

In the above statement the number of cases disposed of is given 
merely by their docket numbers. In certain cases, nowever, notably 
the " , land-entry" and the "night-inspector" cases, a great number of 
individual claims were embraced in each docket number and therefore 
appeared as but one case, while in fact they represented 676 cases. 

Number of cases disposed of (exclusive of ' ' letter-carrier cases " ) . . . 290 

Amount claimed in them $71, 731, 881. 53 

For defendants, 151 cases, claiming 70, 223, 300. 75 

For claimants, 139 cases, claiming 1, 508, 580. 78 

Amount recovered by claimants therein 300, 479. 77 

In addition to the above the court has rendered a decision favorable 
to the United States in the case of The United States v. Alice Weil, 
and an appeal therefrom to the Supreme Court by respondent was 
docketed and dismissed. 

The case of A. C. Peralta v. The United States, for the recovery of 
large tracts of land, under certain alleged Spanish grants, was also 
brought to trial and the petition dismissed. 

CONGRESSIONAL CASES. 

Under the acts of March 3, 1883, C. 116 (1 Supp. R. S., 403), and 
March 3, 1887, C. 359 (1 Supp. R. S., 559), authorizing the reference 
to the Court of Claims of certain claims pending before Congress, or 
any of its committees, for an advisory finding of facts, there have been 
transmitted to* the court since my last report 317 cases, claiming 
upward of $6,434,959. 36. 

The total number of cases so transmitted to date is 10,303, of which 
there are now pending 6,760 cases. 

Number disposed of. — During the year 331 cases, claiming $1,783,- 
171.23, were acted on by the court, and have been or will be reported 
to Congress. Of this number, 240 cases, claiming $874,502.06, were 
dismissed because claimants or those they represented were disloyal, 
or for other causes. In 9 cases, claiming $41,758.50, findings on the 
merits favorable to the United States were filed by the court, and in 
82 cases, claiming $866,910.67, findings favorable to the claimants 
were filed for $159,998.09. 

Whole number of cases disposed of 331 

Amount claimed in them $1, 783, 171. 23 

Number of cases dismissed 240 

Amount claimed in them $874,502.06 

Number of cases favorable to defendants on merits 9 

AmoUnt claimed in them $41, 758. 50 

Number of cases favorable to claimants 82 

Amount claimed in them $866, 910. 67 

Amount awarded in them $159, 998. 09 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 51 

The total of general jurisdiction and Congressional cases disposed 
of during the past year greatly exceeds the total disposed of during 
the preceding year for the reason that a considerable number were 
determined by the decisions in a few test cases, in which the work was 
largely done in the prior year, and that I have been able to obtain the 
dismissal for want of prosecution, during the past year, of a large 
number of ancient cases on the docket. It is expected that many more 
may be dismissed for the same reason during the ensuing year. 

DEPARTMENTAL CASES. 

Under the act of March 3, 1883, C. 116 (1 Supp. R. S., 403), there 
have been referred by the Executive Departments to date 66 cases, in 
which the court is asked to pass upon certain disputed questions of 
law or of fact. 

During the year two cases referred by the Secretary of the Treasury 
have been disposed of, one being dismissed and in the other a finding 
and opinion being filed by the court and certified to the Secretary of 
the Treasury. 

There are now pending 23 cases. These include the 6 State claims 
referred to in my last report in which the reports of the auditors of 
the court have been made. Two of them, which were selected as test 
cases, have been briefed and will be argued before the court at the 
beginning of its next term. 

CLAIM8 AGAINST THE DI8TRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

These suits are brought under the acts of June 16, 1880, and Feb- 
ruary 13, 1895. 

Since the last report 19 cases have been disposed of. Two cases 
were decided in favor of the District, and in 7 cases judgments were 
rendered against the District. These cases have been taken on appeal 
to the Supreme Court. 

Ten cases, awaiting the decision of the Supreme Court upon two test 
cases, are still upon the docket of the Court of Claims. Three other 
cases are ready for trial in that court and will be disposed of during 
the coming term. 

FRENCH SPOLIATIONS. 

The following statement shows the present status of the cases filed 
in the Court of Claims under the French spoliation act of January 20, 

1885: 

• 

Total number of vessels on which claims have been filed 2, 399 

Total number of principal cases (intervening or subordinate claims 
not being treatea as separate cases in this report) 5, 569 

Cases dismissed by claimants 244 

Cases passed upon by the court prior to November 1, 
1899 687 

Cases passed upon by the court since November 1, 1899. 94 

781 

Cases dismissed by the court prior to November 1, 
1899 83 

Cases dismissed by the court since November 1, 

1899 16 

99 

Cases remanded or pending on motion prior to No- 
vember 1, 1899 50 

Cases remanded or pending on motion November 
1, 1899, and since decided by the court 18 

31 



52 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Cases remanded or in which motions for new trial 
have been made since November 1, 1899 30 



Cases in which the court had filed findings for 
claimants prior to November 1, 1899 554 

Cases in which the court has filed findings for 
claimants since November 1, 1899 66 



62 



620 



Amount of findings for claimants prior to November 1 , 

1899 $3,500,130.61 

Amount of findings for claimants since November 1, 
1899 399,115.14 



781 



Total amount of findings for claimants $3, 899, 245. 75 

Cases found for claimants certified to Congress prior 

to November 1, 1899 490 

Cases found for claimants certified to Congress 

since November 1, 1899 85 



Total number of cases certified to Congress 575 

Cases found for claimant not certified to Congress 

prior to November 1 , 1899 64 

Of these there have been since certified 22 



42 
Cases found for claimant since November 1, 1899, 
but not certified to Congress 3 



45 



Amount in cases not certified to Congress November 1, 

1899 $350, 1 1 9. 85 

Of this amount there has been certified since Novem- 
ber 1, 1899 107,653.37 



620 



242, 466. 48 



Amount in cases passed upon by the court since No- 
vember 1, 1899, and not certified to Congress 95, 600. 94 

Amount in cases not certified to Congress November 1, 

1900 338,067.42 

Motions for new trial pending November 1, 1899, 

affected 254,704.88 

Cases in which motions then pending are now decided. 5, 382. 00 

249, 322. 88 
Amount in cases wherein motions for new trials have 
been made since November 1, 1899 74, 527. 06 



Motions for new trials pending November 1, 1900, affect 323, 849. 94 

Cases appropriated by Congress 364 

Amount appropriated: 

Act of 1891 $1,304,095.37 

Act of 1899 1,091,902.27 

$2, 395, 997. 64 



Cases found for claimants pending in Congress, not appropriated, prior 

to November 1, 1899 116 

Cases certified since November 1, 1899 85 



Cases pending in Congress, not appropriated, November 1, 1900, 201 

Amount of cases pending in Congress not appropriated 

prior to November 1, 1899 $754,013.12 

Amount of cases certified since November 1, 1899 416, 494. 57 

Amount of cases pending in Congress not appropriated Novem- 
ber 1, 1900 $1,170,507.69 

Number of vessels the cases on which are in the hands of the court . . 44 

Number of vessels as to which both parties are ready for trial 92 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 53 

The proviso of the act of March 2, 1891, requiring the Court of 
Claims to certify as to the next of kin was repeated in the act of March 3, 
1899, and the following proviso was added: 

That any French spoliation claim appropriated for in this act shall not be paid if 
held by assignment or owned by any insurance company. 

This proviso does not forbid payment to insurers if they were not 
companies, and insuring then was oftener done by individuals than by 
companies, the business being otherwise identical. Of the claims now 
pending in Congress, amounting to $1,170,507.69, over three-fifths are 
those of insurance companies. 

Among the opinions of the court rendered since my last report are 
several of importance as affecting classes of cases. One, the case of 
the ship Juliana, Hay ward, master, decides that whether a claim named 
in the appropriation act was "held by assignment," within the mean- 
ing of its proviso above quoted, is a question for the Treasury, not the 
court. Accordingly the Treasury now has under advisement, sub- 
mitted on briefs, some of the numerous claims of C. F. Adams, adminis- 
trator of Brooks, who kept an insurance brokerage in Boston and took 
assignments from the underwriters who insured in his office. 

Other important opinions, rendered, in the case of the ship Parkman, 
MacMillan, master, and schooner Henry and Gustavus, Smith, master, 
decide that debts owing to the United States by the original claimants 
may be set off by the court, or, after appropriation, by the Treasury, 
against the amounts found due to their estates. 

Another, in the case of the ship Apollo, Walker, master, decided 
that where vessels, as often happened, were carried by French priva- 
teers into Spanish ports and condemned there by French consuls, 
Spain and France were joint tortfeasors, each, therefore, liable for the 
loss, and the United States having elected to hold Spain, thus releasing 
France, did not become liable over to claimants, as in the case of the 
other French spoliation claims. It was contended by the United 
States, in the case of the ship Star, Burchmore, master, that the same 
principle applied where Spain permitted the French to take our vessels 
into her ports, hold them there, and sell them under French decrees, 
although these last were pronounced on French territory, but the 
opinion was to the contrary. 

In the case of the Apollo it was held also that the United States are 
not liable in cases of ''property captured and not yet definitively con- 
demned" (art. 4, treaty of 1800) wnere restoration by France became 
impossible by destruction of the property or otherwise. 

A number of important questions have recently been submitted to 
the court, and are awaiting decision. 

These claims continue to be vigorously pressed since their revival 
in 1899, and the preparation of the defense of the same requires the 
attention of two assistant attorneys, as stated in my last report, and in 
addition the services of a docket clerk and stenographer. 

SUITS PENDING AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT IN THE CIRCUIT AND 
DISTRICT COURTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Suits under this jurisdiction are brought pursuant to the provisions 
of the act of March 3, 1887, entitled "An act to provide for the bring- 
ing of suits against the Government of the United States." (1 Supp. 
R. S., 559.) 



54 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

During the year ending October 31, 1900, 18 suits were brought in " 
the circuit and district courts throughout the United States, the amount 
involved therein being $223,411.96. The amount of this litigation is 
considerably less than that of previous years, by virtue of the acts of 
June 27, 1898, and July 1, 1898, which took away the jurisdiction of 
the circuit and district courts over suits for fees or salaries of Govern- 
ment officers. Under these last-mentioned acts considerable difference 
of opinion arose in Federal courts as to the disposition of pending 
cases involving contested questions of fees and salaries of public officers, 
some holding that the jurisdiction was taken away in pending as well 
as future cases, while others held that the pending cases were not 
affected. To meet this divergence of opinion, relief was obtained from 
Congress through the passage of the act of February 26, 1900 (Session 
Laws, first session, Firty-sixth Congress, p. 33), by which it was pro- 
vided that no suit of this character should be abated or affected by the 
acts above mentioned, and that any suits which were pending in any cir- 
cuit court or circuit court of appeals at the time of the passage of said 
acts, which were dismissed by reason thereof, should be restored to their 
places in such courts and proceeded with as if the same had not been 
enacted. 

The matters involved in the various suits brought during the year 
may be tabulated as follows: 

Labor and material on public works 6 

Suits arising under the war-revenue act 3 

Duties on exports into Porto Rico 2 

Various services performed for the Government 2 

Diversion of water supply 2 

Miscellaneous 3 

During the year 17 suits brought under this jurisdiction were 
decided in the circuit and district courts, judgments of dismissal being 
obtained in 6 cases, and the remainder resulting in favor of the 
claimants. In the circuit courts of appeals, 4 appeals taken on behalf 
of the Government were decided, resulting in a judgment of affirm- 
ance in 1, whilst in 3 the judgment of the lower court was reversed in 
part. In the Supreme Court the judgment in 1 case appealed by the 
claimant was reversed in part. 

Since this jurisdiction was created 1,393 suits have been brought 
against the United States, of which 130 are pending in the circuit and 
district courts. Appeals have been directed to be taken to the circuit 
courts of appeals in 2 cases, and in 1 to the Supreme Court of the 
United States, which latter has not as yet been perfected. 

SPECIAL CASES UNDER THE ACT OP AUGUST 15, 1894. 

The act of August 15, 1894, chapter 290, par. 5 (2 Supp. R. S., 246), 

tave the circuit courts of the United States jurisdiction to try and 
etermine any action, suit, or proceeding arising within their respec- 
tive territories, involving the right of any person, in whole or in part 
of Indian blood or descent, to any allotment of land under any law or 
treaty. Under this jurisdiction 6 suits were brought during the past 
year and 17 suits in the several years previous, making in all 23 suits 
now pending. In a test case a demurrer was filed by the United States, 
but was overruled. 



M2P0RT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 55 



SUITS ARISING OUT OF RIYER AND HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS. 

A test case in a class of claims of considerable importance, and 
likely to be of some magnitude, was recently decided in South Caro- 
lina, in which judgment was rendered for the plaintiff for a large sum, 
on account of certain alleged injuries resulting to land by reason of 
river and harbor improvements. A motion for a new trial has been 
made in the case, and it will ultimately be taken to the Supreme Court 
of the United States. 

APPEALS IN THE SUPREME COURT. 

There have been 8 appeals from judgments of the Court of Claims 
determined in the Supreme Court within the year. The United States 
was appellant in 1 case, in which the decision of the Supreme Court 
was favorable to the Government, while in 7 cases, in which the United 
States was appellee, the Supreme Court decided 6 in favor of the United 
States and 1 was dismissed by the court. 

There are 15 appeals now pending in the Supreme Court from the 
Court of Claims, of which 2 are appeals on behalf of the District of 
Columbia, 3 in which the rights of Indians are involved under the* gen- 
eral jurisdiction of the court, 6 appeals on behalf of the claimants, and 
4 on behalf of the United States. 

CLASSES SPECIALLY MENTIONED. 

The following classes of cases are specially referred to by reason of 
the importance of the questions involved, or because of their magnitude: 

LETTER-CARRIER CASES. 

These suits are brought by letter carriers to recover compensation 
for time claimed to have been worked in excess of eight hours per day, 
pursuant to the act of May 24, 1888 (1 Supp. R. S., 587). While the 
number of individual claims of this nature which have been brought 
in the Court of Claims aggregate in the neighborhood of 20,000, they 
are now substantially all closed, there remaining but about 275 indi- 
vidual claims, from about 35 cities, upon which no report has as yet 
been filed. About 200 of these cases, however, have been made the 
subject of an examination by a commissioner, in accordance with the 
method heretofore adopted, and reports will be filed at an early date. 
Supplemental reports will soon be made in about 75 or 100 claims, 
upon receipt of which this class of cases will be closed. 

During the year judgments have been rendered in 98 suits, embrac- 
ing 955 individual claims, and based on reports from 82 cities. The 
amount claimed in these petitions was $203,145.25, while the amount 
awarded was $58,774.73, or about 28.9 per cent. 

In the suit of the letter carriers at San Francisco, covering about 
200 individual claims and involving about $90,000, in which petitions 
were dismissed on the ground of waiver, a motion for a new trial was 
allowed by the court, and the case has been resubmitted on the merits 
and is now awaiting a decision. 



56 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

POST-OFFICE CLERKS' CASES. 

m 

These cases are brought to recover the difference of salary between 
that actually paid and tne minimum sum allowed b} r virtue of the act 
of March 2, 18S9 (1 Supp. R. S., 080), and are based upon the decision 
of the Court of Claims in the case of Belcher v. United States (34 C. 
Clms., 400). While it at first appeared that the number of these suits 
would be very large, the decision in the test case has restricted the 
right to recover to a very small number. Since such decision, in April. 
1809, 335 individual claims, from 133 cities, were examined and reported 
upon by the commissioner, the same course being pursued relative to 
their reference as in the case of the letter carriers, and, as a result, 
judgments have been rendered in 20 cases, aggregating in amount 
$5,869.59. 

There are 176 of these cases still pending. 

Reports in 139 cases have been made in which nothing was recom- 
mended for allowance, and in 4 cases allowance was recommended, but 
no judgment has as yet been rendered. In 4 pending cases points of 
law are involved upon the decision of which depends the right to 
recover in about 400 cases, most of which have already been filed. 
Since most of the suits of this character would now be barred by the 
statute of limitations, the number that will hereafter arise must of 
necessity be inconsiderable. 

ALCOHOL CASES. 

Embraced in the 886 general jurisdiction cases brought during the 
year are 324 cases for rebate of tax on alcohol, claiming in the aggre- 
gate $1,501,481.76. 

Amended petitions have also been filed in 205 cases previously 
brought, increasing the amount claimed $1,671,791.75. The total 
number of these suits now pending is 1,483, and the amount claimed 
in the same is $7,734,150.60. 

The demurrer to the amended petition in one of these cases — Ameri- 
can Aristotype Company v. United States — of which I made mention 
in my last report, was sustained by the court on the authority of 
Dunlap v. United States (173 U. S., 65), and an appeal from this deci- 
sion will be promptly made by the claimant to the Supreme Court. 
This will result in a virtual rehearing of the Dunlap case, the ques- 
tions being substantially the same in both cases. 

NAVAL BOUNTY CASES. 

There have been filed to date 9 general engagement cases and 3,827 
individual claims. 

The claim of Admiral George Dewey, based on the engagement of 
Manila Bay, was decided by the Court of Claims on February 26, 
1900, awarding the minimum bounty, amounting in the aggregate to 
$191,400. Ol this amount the claimant Admiral Dewey was given 
judgment, pursuant to the statute, for $9,570. 

An appeal from this judgment was determined by the Supreme Court 
May 28, 1900 (177 U. S., 510), affirming the judgment. 

Subsequently the claim of Admiral William T. Sampson, based on 
the engagement off Santiago de Cuba, was decided by the Court of 
Claims, the award being $166,700, the minimum bounty, and judgment 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 57 

being entered for the claimant Admiral Sampson out of the award, 
for $8,335. 

The remaining minor engagements are now before the court and 
will be determined shortly. 

If appropriation shall be made by Congress during its coming ses- 
sion to pay the amount of these various general awards, the distribu- 
tion of the same to the individual claimants can be promptly made. 

• 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

In view of the constantly increasing volume of business of this 
branch of the Department, I renew my request for the appointment 
of a stenographic clerk for assignment to this office. 
Very respectfully, 

Louis A. Pradt, 
Assistant Attorney- General. 
The Attorney-General. 



Exhibit 3. — Report of the Assistant Attorney- General in charge of 

Indian depredation eases. 

Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C. , JVovember P, 1900. 

Sir: I submit herewith for your consideration my annual report of 
the business of the Department relating to the defense of Indian dep- 
redation claims. 

The following tabulated statement shows the result of the litigation 
during the year ending October 31, 1900, together with a resume of 
the number and amount of the cases adjudicated since March 3, 1891, 
the date of the passage of the act conferring jurisdiction upon the 
Court of Claims in Indian depredation cases: 

Total number of cases filed 10, 841 

Amount claimed $43, 515, 867. 06 

Cases reduced to judgment 2, 774 

Amount claimed $11, 774, 141. 49 

Judgments in favor of claimants 1, 602 

Amount claimed $6, 233, 731. 26 

Amount of judgments in favor of claimants $2, 923, 587. 11 

Judgments in favor of defendants 1, 172 

Amount claimed $5, 540, 410. 23 

Judgments for claimants from November 1, 1899, to November 1, 1900 . 416 

Amount claimed $1, 616, 541. 40 

Amount of judgments for claimants $686, 743. 00 

Judgments for defendants from November 1,1899, to November 1, 

1900 144 

Amount claimed $589, 437. 81 

Number of cases in which depositions have been taken (reported) 

from November 1, 1899, to November 1, 1900 967 

Of these the depositions in 43 cases were for the defendants, and in 
924 for the claimants. 

The foregoing table shows an increase over the preceding year, 
both in the number and the amount of cases tried, which have resulted 
in judgments favorable to the claimants. The proportion of recovery 
in such cases, however, was slightly smaller. The number of cases in 



58 BEP0BT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAl*. 

which judgment has been rendered for the defendants, and the amount 
involved in such cases, is smaller than in the preceding year. Both 
the increase and the decrease noted are due to the fact that the energies 
of the force engaged in the defense have been devoted to the effort to 

five every claimant who stood ready for trial an immediate hearing. 
his naturally results in the trial first of the cases most likely to be 
decided favorably to the claimants. At the same time a very consid- 
erable number of cases already prepared for trial, some of which 
involve large amounts, are certain to result in judgments of dismissal 
as soon as they can be heard. 

Many other cases which have been passed for future action are 
"dead" cases, where the testimony already taken will defeat the claim, 
where the claimant has abandoned the suit, or where, from the lapse of 
time or for some other cause, it is impossible to produce the necessary 
proof. Such cases can be taken up and dismissed at any time. If the 
progress now being made shall render it possible to do so without 
delaying the trial of cases where the claimants are ready, it is my pur- 
pose to endeavor during the coming year to clear the docket of many 
cases of this character. 

As stated in my last report, many cases remain on the docket which 
are subject to dismissal on jurisdictional grounds which have been estab- 
lished in leading cases. No steps have been taken during the past year 
to dispose of such cases. The status of many of them is yet in doubt 
pending the decision of the Supreme Court in the cases of Montoya 
against the United States, and the Apache Indians and Conners against 
the United States and the Sioux Indians, now awaiting trial. The final 
decision in these cases will open the way for the disposal of a large 
number of cases which now stand on the docket. 

The work of taking depositions in the field has been delayed to a 
considerable extent by the failure of the claimants to appear or to have 
their witnesses present at the appointed time. In more than 500 cases 
the time of the defendants' attorney has been consumed without result. 
Notwithstanding this obstacle, depositions have been taken in a larger 
number of cases than during the preceding year, and it is now possible 
for the.first time to give to claimants an opportunity to take testimony 
in any case without appreciable delay. 

Three cases have been passed upon by the Supreme Court since the 
date of my last report. In the first, the case of Price against the United 
States and the Osage Indians (174 U. S., 373), it is held that the juris- 
diction of the Court of Claims under the act of March 3, 1891, does not 
extend to claims for consequential damages resulting from the taking 
or destruction of property. The case of the Corralitos Company against 
the United States (178 U. S., 280) involved the right of recovery where 
the offense was committed on foreign soil, the claimant in that case, a 
domestic corporation, having suffered a loss of property in Mexico at 
the hands of Indians domiciled in the United States. The decision of 
the court, affirming that of the Court of Claims, was adverse to the 
claimant. The remaining case, that of Andrews against the United 
States, recently decided and not yet reported, turned upon the right of 
claimants to recover for property taken or destroyed while in transit 
across the Indian reservations in the Indian Territory. In this case 
the decision was favorable to the contention of the claimants. In each 
of the latter cases, as in the first, the decision of the Court of Claims 
was affirmed by the Supreme Court. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 59 

Before I took charge of the work in this department a great deal of 
the time of the office force had been taken up in the settlement of 
legal questions. In June, 1897, when I assumed charge of the work, 
the Government was about three years behind the claimants in the 
briefing of cases. In other words, when a claimant had filed his brief 
it was almost, if not quite, three years before the case would be reached 
for briefing by the defendants. During the past three years I have 
endeavored to bring this work up to date, and have succeeded in doing 
so. On November 1, 1900, every case that had been briefed by the 
claimants, and that had not been sent to the field bv the Government 
for the purpose of taking evidence in behalf of the defense, had either 
been briefed or was being briefed by an attorney of this department. 
In the present condition, where the evidence is taken and the case ready 
for trial, when the claimant files his brief, it is taken up immediately 
for briefing by the defense. With the work of this department in this 
condition it will be possible to expedite the work and get better results 
in the coming year than it has been in any one of the past three years. 
Respectfully, 

John G. Thompson, 
Assistant Attorney- General. 

The Attorney-General. 



Exhibit 4. — Report of the United States Attorney for the Court of 

Private Land Claims. 

Santa Fe, N. Mex., Octobers, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following annual report as to 
the business transacted by the Court of Private Land Claims from 
October 5, 1899, up to and including October 5, 1900. 

During that period two terms of court have been held at Santa Fe 
and two terms held at Tucson, Ariz. , at which sessions a large portion 
of the unfinished business shown by my last annual report was consid- 
ered and disposed of by the court. I have embodied in the schedules 
hereto attached, numbered, respectively, 1 to 4, both inclusive, a state- 
ment of the matters disposed of in the New Mexico district, and also 
a statement showing the status of each of the cases still remaining for 
determination in one form or another. 

Schedules numbered 5 to 7, both inclusive, set forth in detail the 
business disposed of in the Arizona district and the status of the cases 
remaining undisposed of on that docket. 

From schedule 1 it will be seen that in the New Mexico district the 
court has during the past year decided 22 cases, involving 17 grants, 
with a claimed area of 3,255,674.94 acres. Of this area claimed there 
have been confirmed 13,007 acres and rejected 3,242,667.94 acres. The 
cases just named include two of very considerable importance — one of 
them, the Nacimiento grant, wherein 131,000 acres were claimed, and 
the other, the Conejos grant, involving 2,500,000 acres. The first of 
these is situated in a very prosperous portion of New Mexico and includes 
very valuable mineral, pasture, and farming lands, and the pendency 
of this claim has retarded very considerably the growth of that section 
of the Territory of New Mexico. The Conejos grant, as claimed, is 
located in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, including tha 



60 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

larger portion of several counties in that State. The decision in each 
of these cases was favorable to the Government, and the rejection of 
the claims will contribute largely to the prosperity of the localities in 
which thev were located. 

During the past year there has not been overlooked the importance 
of a careful investigation of the survey of any grants returned for 
approval by the court by the General Land Office. During the 
period covered by this report, as shown by schedules 2 and 3, seven 
surveys have been considered by the court, and six of these, involving 
an area of 55,536.79 acres, were approved by the court. Upon objec- 
tions filed by the Government, one of these, the Las Lagunitas, con- 
taining an area of 43,653.03 acres, was rejected by the court and a 
resurvey ordered. 

Schedule No. 4 is devoted to indicating the status of each case in 
the New Mexico district not finally disposed of. From this it will be 
seen that there still remain for primary determination — that is, a 
hearing on the merits of the claim as a grant, distinguished from the 
correctness of any survey made under confirmation — five grants, 
involving an estimated area of 23,897 acres. 

As shown bv subschedule B of schedule 4, one case has been tried 
and submitted and is now under advisement by the court, the area 
claimed being 11,480 acres. 

The decrees in 25 grants, involving an estimated area of 625,513.49 
acres, have been certified by the clerk of the Court of Private Land 
Claims to the Commissioner of the General Land Office for survey, as 
provided by section 10 of the act creating the Court of Private Land 
Claims. A detailed statement of these grants thus pending on survey 
appears in subschedule C of schedule 4, attached to this report. 

There are pending on appeal 5 grants, involving an area of 4,553,264 
acres. In three of these cases the claimants appealed and in the other 
2 the United States. A statement of these cases, with their area, 
appears in subschedule D of schedule 4, attached to this report. 

In 2 cases, involving an area of 27,130 acres, a confirmation has been 
announced by the court, but, owing to a difference as to boundaries, 
no decree has been entered and the confirmations are not vet final. 
(Subschedule E of schedule 4.) 

There is pending, on motion for rehearing filed by the Government, 
1 case, involving an area of 2, 500 acres. (Subschedule F of schedule 4. ) 

Summarizing, it will be noted from the schedules attached that there 
are now pending in the New Mexico district, including grants on appeal, 
39 claims, with a total area of 5,243,787.49 acres. 

During the past year there have been filed in the office of the clerk 
of the Court of Private Land Claims, at Santa Fe, 2 claims for a money 
judgment against the United States, for lands disposed of within grants 
heretofore confirmed by the court. These claims are presented under 
the provisions of section 14 of the act creating the Court of Private 
Land Claims. One of these claims was filed in case No. 140, being the 
case of Jose Isabel Martinez et al. v. United States, involving the Juan 
Jose Lobato grant, and is for $2,320.91. This case came on for hear- 
ing before the court at its May session, 1900, and was resisted by the 
Government on the ground that the claim for a money judgment, if 
ever valid, was presented to the court too late, there having been no 
claim for such money compensation in the original suit, which was 
terminated favorably to the plaintiffs on December 4, 1893. The court 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 61 

at its May (1900) session rendered a judgment in favor of the claimants 
for $2,320. 91. The full facts pertaining to this claim were some months 
ago fully reported by this office, and in view of the importance of the 
questions as affecting similar claims that may hereafter be presented, 
authority was granted by you to sue out an appeal from this judgment, 
and that appeal has been duly perfected. The other case in which a 
claim for money damages has been filed is that of Louise J. Purdy et 
al. v. United States, iNo. 6, involving the Sebastian de Vargas grant. 
It is anticipated that the decision of the Supreme Court on the appeal 
in the case of Martinez v. United States, No. 140, just referred to, will 
be decisive of the claim in the De Vargas case, as well as similar claims 
that may hereafter be filed. 

Schedules 5, 6, and 7 set forth fully the condition of the Arizona 
docket. 

From schedule 5 it will be seen that during the past year 8 claims 
have been decided by the court, involving a total area of 448,052.89 
acres. Of this amount claimed there have been confirmed 69,151.53 
acres and 378,901.36 rejected. 

During the same time one survey has been completed and approved, 
involving an area of 17,355.86 acres. (Schedule 6.) 

From schedule 7 it will be seen that there are no cases remaining for 
primary trial on the Arizona docket. One case, with an area claimed 
of 12,147.69 acres, is pending on motion for rehearing filed by the 
Government. (Subschedule A of schedule 7.) 

Two grants, involving an area of 19,720.35 acres, are being surveyed. 
(Subschedule B of schedule 7.) 

The remaining cases on the Arizona docket, 7 in number, are all 
pending on appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States. In 6 
of these the appeal was sued out by the claimants, and in the remaining 
1 the appeal is being prosecuted by the United States. The total area 
involved in said cases on appeal is 442,193.84 acres. (Subschedule C 
of schedule 7.) 

Summarizing, it will be seen that there are pending in the Arizona 
district 10 cases, with an estimated area of 474,061.88 acres. These 
cases, however, have all progressed to a point where their early and 
final disposition may be anticipated and the many vexed questions 
which have surrounded the settlement of these Arizona grant titles 
will have been finally disposed of. 

I desire to express an appreciation of, and commend, the intelligent 
ability of Messrs. William H. Pope, assigned to my office as assistant 
attorney, and Will M. Tipton and Henry O. Flipper, special agents, 
whose assistance has facilitated the discharge of the duties belonging 
to this office. 

In conclusion, permit me to extend my thanks for the confidence 
heretofore bestowed by you and to indulge the hope that my labors in 
the future may merit its continuance. 

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

Matt. G. Reynolds, 
United States Attorney, Court of Private Land Claims. 

The Attorney-General, 

Washington, D. C. 



62 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



Schedule No. 1. — List of cases in New Mexico district decided by the Court of Private 

Land Claims from October 5, 1899 > to October 5> 1900. 



P. L. c. No. 



87 
99,152,233 
108 
109 
112 
114 

144,252 
168 

203,213 
213 
215 
227 
228 

257,263 
260 
278 
279 



Name of grant. 



Sierra Mosca * 

Petaca l 

Cebolla 1 

Conejos 

Cuyamiingue » 

San Jose del Encinal * 

San Pablo y Nacimiento 

Santa Teresa 

San Joaquin del Nacimiento 

Pueblo ae Quemado 

Bishop's Ranch 

Jose Ignacio Alari 

Joque Jacinto Jaramillo* 

Bartolome Trujillo or San JosedeGracia 3 

Juan Joseph Moreno 

Jose de Leyba 

Joaquin Mestas 

Total 



2, 



Claimed. 



Acres. 

47,743.00 

37,000.00 

27,000.00 

500,000.00 

1,086.00 

12,207.00 

131,000.00 

9,681.00 

131,725.00 

288,000.00 

600.00 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

2,000.00 

35,000.00 

18,000.00 

3,632.94 



3,255,674.94 



Confirmed, 

Acres. 
600. 66 



226.00 
'9*681*66 



2, 500. 00 



13,007.00 



Rejected. 



Acres. 

47,743.00 

36,400.00 

27,000.00 

2,500,000.00 

860.00 

12,207.00 

131,000.00 



131,725.00 

288,000.00 

600.00 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

2,000.00 

35,000.00 

18,000.00 

1,132.94 



3,242,667.94- 



1 Rejected under mandate from the Supreme Court United States. 

2 Confirmation denied because wholly within confirmed grant. 

3 Dismissed. 

Schedule No. 2. — Grant surveys approved in New Mexico district during same period. 



p. L. c. 

No. 



31 

43 

67 

116 

179 

272 



Name of grant. 



Louis Jaramillo 

Polvadera *. 

Felipe Tafoya 

Talaya Hill 

Juan Bautista Valdez 

Miguel and Santiago Montoya 

Total 



Area in 
survey. 



Acres. 

10,693.98 

35,761.14 

4,340.23 

319.20 

1,458.67 

2,963.57 



55,536.79 



Schedule No. 3. — Grant surveys rejected in New Mexico district during same period. 



P. L. C. 

No. 


Name of grant. 


Area in 
survey. 


70 


Las Laguni tas 


Acres. 
43,653.03 









Schedule No. 4. — Cases on docket of New Mexico district not finally disposed of; also 

status of each case. 

A.— PENDING POR PRIMARY DETERMINATION. 



P. L. C. 

No. 


Name of grant. j ^f| 


Remarks. 


8 
25,60,198 

107 


Town of Albuquerque 

San Miguel del Bado 


17,361 
3,000 

2,736 

500 

. 300 


Remanded by Supreme Court (171 U. S.,685). 
This represented estimated area of allotments 


Canon de Chama 


to determine extent of which cause was re- 
manded by Supreme Court (167 U.S., 278). - 
Same as last (See 167 U. S. , 298) . 


211 
262 


Santo Domingo de Cundiyo . . 
Francisco Xavier Romero 

Total 




23,897 











REPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



63 



Schedule No. 4. — Cases on docket of New Mexico district not finally disposed of; also 

status of each case — Continued. 

B.— CASES TRIED AND SUBMITTED AND UNDER ADVISEMENT BY THE COURT IN NEW 

MEXICO DISTRICT. 



P. L. C. 

No. 


Name of grant. 


Acreage 
claimed. 


270 


Sitio de Navajo - 


11,480 









C— GRANTS PENDING ON SURVEY IN NEW MEXICO DISTRICT. 



P. L. C. 
No. 



5 

15 

16 

17 

24 

55 

70 

74 

75 

91,183 

122,148 

130, 182 

137 

139 

149 

151 

157 

205 

229 

264 

267 

90,269 

273 

274 

275 



Name of grant. 



Arroyo Hondo 

Antonio Sedillo 

Gijoso 

Canada de Santa Clara 

Dona Ana Bend 

Cevilleta 

Las Lagunitas 

Canon de Carnue 

San Mateo Spring 

Juan Salas or Alamitos 

Penasco Largo 

Ojo de San Jose 

Santo Tomaa de Iturbide . . 
Jose Manuel Sanchez Baca 

Fernando de Taos 

Mesilla Colony 

El Ranchito 

Canada de Cochiti 

Angostura 

Bartolome Sanchez 

Santa Rosa de Cubero 

Las Huertas 

Lode Padilla 

Antonio Gutierrez 

Joaquin Sedillo 

Total 



Estimated 

area 
confirmed. 



Acres. 

20,171.00 

86. 606. 21 

15,540.97 

1,343.03 

29, 323. 00 

285,431.36 

43,653.03 

1,000.00 

4,340.00 

500.00 

665.00 

4,340.00 

6,680.00 

4,340.00 

1,899.89 

17,361.00 

8,000.00 

15,000.00 

2,319.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

20,000.00 

27,000.00 

12,000.00 

8,000.00 



625,513.49 



D.— CASES ON APPEAL FROM NEW MEXICO DISTRICT. 



P. L. C. No. 



44, 128, 135, 154, 
216 

114 

. 134,184,185 

152 

168 



Name of grant. 



Las Animas 



San Jose del Encinal 

Santo Domingo and San Felipe 

Estancia 

Santa Teresa 



Total 



Area claimed. 



Aci-es. 
4,096,340.00 

12, 207. 00 

20,000.00 

415,036.00 

9,681.00 



4,553,264.00 



By whom ap- 
pealed. 



Claimants. 

United States. 
Claimants. 

Do. 
United States. 



E.— GRANTS CONFIRMED, BUT CONFIRMATION NOT YET FINAL. 



P.L.C. 1 
No. 


Name of grant. 


Area con- 
firmed. 


150, 193 


Refugio Colony 


Acres. 
26,130.00 
1,000.00 


194 


Santa Cruz 




Total 




27. 130. 00 









64 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Schedule No. 4. — Cases im docket of New Mexico district not finally disposed of; also 

status of each case — Continued. 



V.— PENDING ON MOTION FOR REHEARING. 



P.L.C. 

No. 



Name of grant 



279 




Area 
claimed. 



Movant. 



United States. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Cases not tried 

Cases under advisement 

Cases on survey 

Cases on appeal 

Cases, confirmation not final .. 
Cases on motion for rehearing. 



Total pending in New Mexico district 



Number. 



5 
1 

25 
5 
2 
1 



39 



Area. 



Acres. 

23,897.00 

11,480.00 

625, 513. 49 

4, 553, 264. 00 

27, 130. 00 

2,500.00 



5,243,784.49 



Schedule No. 5. — List of cases in the Arizona district decided by the Court of Private 
Land Claims during the year from October 5, 1899, to October 5, 1900. 



P. L. C. 

No. 



1 
2 

3* 

5 

6 

7 

10 
40 



Name of grant. 



Claimed. 



San Bernardino 13, 746. 00 

San Rafael de la Zanja 152, 889. 62 

San Ignacio del Babocomari I 123, 068. 87 

Agua Prieta j 68, 530. 05 

Buena Vista ' 18, 648. 00 

Aribac 20, 400. 60 

San Pedro 38, 622. 06 

San Jose de Sonoita , 12, 147, 69 



Confirmed, 



Acres. 

2, 366. 50 
17,353.85 
34,707.70 



7, 128. 00 



7,595.48 



Total 448, 052. 89 69, 151. 53 



Rejected. 



Acres. 
11,379.50 
135,535.77 
88,361.17 
68,530.05 
11,520.00 
20, 400. 60 
38,622.06 
4,552.21 



378,901.36 



Schedule No. 6. — Surveys of grants approved in Arizona district during the year ending 

October .5, 1900. 



P. L. C 
No. 



Name of grant. 



42 San Juan de las Boquillas y Nogales 



Area in 
survey. 



Acres. 
17, 355. 86 



Schedule No. 7. — Cases on Arizona docket not finally disposed of; also status of each of 

said cases. 

A.— PENDING ON MOTION FOR REHEARING. 



P. L. C. 

No. 


Name of grant. 


Acreage 
claimed. 


Movant. 


40 


San Jose de Sonoita 


12, 147. 69 


United States. 









REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



65 



Schedule No. 7. — Cases on Arizona docket not finally disposed of; also status of each of 

said cases — Continued. 

B.— PENDING ON SURVEY. 



P.L.C. 
No. 



1 
6 



Name of grant. 



San Bernardino 

San Ignacio de la Canoa 

Total 



Area con- 
firmed. 



Acres. 
2,366.50 
17,363.85 



19,720.35 



C— PENDING ON APPEAL. 



P. L. C. 
No. 



2 
3 
3* 
5 
6 
7 
10 



Name of grant. 



San Rafael de la Zanja 

San Rafael del Valle 

San Ignacio del Babocomari 

Agua Prieta 

Buena Vista 

Aribac 

San Pedro 

Total 



Area 
claimed. 



Acres. 

152,889.62 
20,034.62 

123,068.87 
68,530.05 
18,648.00 
20,400.60 
38,622.06 



442,193.82 



By whom ap- 
pealed. 



Claimants. 
United States. 
Claimants. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Cases pending on motion for rehearing 

Cases pending on survey 

Cases pending on appeal 

Total 

H. Doc. 9 5 




E stimated 
area. 



Acres. 
12,147.69 
19,720.35 
442,193.84 

474,061.88 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



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REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



Exhibit D (Supplement) . — Statement of tlie amount* of judgments in civil suits to which 
the United States was not a party in the district and circuit courts of the United States 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 



Amount of judgments for plaintiff. 



Districts. 



Admi- 
ralty. 



Alabama, northern ' 

Alabama, middle ' 

Alabama, southern i $2,608.74 

Alaska ; 2,740.82 

Arizona 

Arkansas, eastern 

Arkansas, western ' 

California, northern I 10, 230. 34 

California, southern ! 194.76 

Colorado - 

Connecticut ' 781.20 

Delaware 116. 73 

District of Columbia 

Florida, northern j 3, 811. 45 

Florida, southern ! 39, 430. 71 

Georgia, northern I . 



Other suits. 



$498, 709. 97 

3,112.10 

46.20 

7,247.51 



Total. 



$498 
3 
2 
9 



709.97 
112. 10 
654.94 
988.33 



Amount of judgments for 
defendant. 



Admi- 
ralty. 



Other suits. 



Total. 



$510.80 $657.60 < $1,168.40 



214,457.50 

153,930.08 
42,953.54 
20, 297. 69 

317,713.15 
38,309.02 

137,295.60 
1,500.00 



138.00 



20, 986. 38 



28.80 



12, 960. 00 

13,272.32 

385.40 

1,626.19 

24,307.46 

55,707.65 

103, 120. 39 

328.88 

2,568.07 



14.50 



12,297.38 



Georgia, southern 

Idaho 

Illinois, northern 

Illinois, southern 

Indiana 

Indian Territory, northern 
Indian Territory, central . 
Indian Territory, southern 

Iowa, northern 

Iowa, southern 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana, eastern 

Louisiana, western 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan, eastern 

Michigan, western 

Minnesota 

Mississippi, northern 

Mississippi, southern 

Missouri, eastern 

Missouri, western 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York, northern 

New York, eastern 

New York, southern 

North Carolina, eastern. . . 
North Carolina, western . . 

North Dakota 

Ohio, northern 

Ohio, southern 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania, eastern 

Pennsylvania, western 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee, eastern 

Tennessee, middle 

Tennessee, western 

Texas, northern 

Texas, eastern 

Texas, western 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia, eastern 

Virginia, western 

Washington 50, 092. 34 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin, eastern 

Wisconsin, western 

Wyoming 



701.53 

108, 442. 52 

263,284.29 

2,084.00 



3,459.49 
214. 35 



8, 585. 61 

23, 699. 42 

299.98 

1,780.00 

6,163.00 



215. 00 



175.00 



41,702.43 



157, 

238, 

28, 

349, 

2, 159, 

12, 184, 

15,003, 

615, 

45, 

42, 

143, 

1,104, 

1,735, 

359, 

2,807, 

14, 

12, 

100,236, 

81, 

422, 

14,352, 

216, 

7, 

17, 

620, 

1,744, 

110, 

905, 

517, 

11, 
137, 



087.26 
450.38 
410.00 
151.57 
957.95 
724.16 
542.86 
608.53 
106.71 
217. 69 
397. 18 
239.83 
311.35 
284.33 
463.98 
000.00 
816. 10 
374.65 
000.00 
960.60 
670.90 
031.28 
342.96 
117.82 
633.72 
450.64 
975.65 
777. 66 
149. 16 
472.99 
850.60 



214 

153 

53 

20 

317 

39 

137 

1 

3 

196 

238 

28 

349 

2,180 

12, 184 

15,003 

615 

45 

42 

143 

1,104 

1,735 

372 

2,820 

14 

14 

100, 260 

136 

526 

14,352 

218 

7 

17 
620 
1,744 
110 
905 
517 
11 
150 



457.50 
930.08 
183.88 
492.44 
713.15 
090.22 
412.33 
500.00 
811.45 

517. 97 
450.38 
548.00 
151.57 
944.33 
724. 16 
542.86 
608.53 
106.71 
217. 69 
397.18 
268.63 
311.35 
244.33 
736.30 
385.40 
442. 29 
682. 11 
707.65 
080.99 
999.78 
599.35 
342.96 
132. 32 
633. 72 
450.64 

975. 65 

777. 66 
149. 16 
472. 99 

147. 98 



257. 81 

16,688.83 

1,534,956.11 

101,111.93 

2,000.00 

51,458.67 

154, 422. 87 

815,836.34 



959.34 

125. 131. 35 
1,798,240.40 

103, 195 93 

2, COO. 00 

51,458.67 

157. 882. 36 
816,050.69 



67.30 
114.40 



321.38 



412. 45 

1,608.50 

4,522.36 

5,425.48 

404.56 

547.80 

350.00 



500.00 



158. 78 
2,020.00 



214.87 
2,175.55 



5,016.82 



308. 10 



703.71 7,110.35 



3, 162. 39 
4, 622 52 



2,794.69 

1,067.02 

8,809.01 

209.45 



348, 

214, 

50, 

18, 

563, 

23, 

185, 

8, 

19, 

698, 

165, 

117, 

81, 

2, 

4, 

5, 

1,109, 

42, 



528. 93 
691.11 
545.57 
690.00 
797. 67 
644.22 
692.27 
500.00 
000.00 
879.54 
292.01 
075.93 
581.60 
955. 52 
989. 95 
200.19 
627. 84 
000.00 



357, 

238, 

50, 

20, 

569, 

23, 

185, 

8, 

19, 

698, 

165, 

117, 

81, 

2, 

46, 

5, 

1,159, 

42, 



114. 54 
390. 53 
845.55 
470.00 
960.67 
644. 22 
692. 27 
500.00 

215. 00 
879.54 

467. 01 
075. 93 
581.60 
955. 52 
692.38 
200. 19 
720.18 
000.00 



1,260.37 



1,407.00 
1,270.20 
6,801.90 



684.00 



560.00 



861, 000. 00 



Total 818,555.12 



165,019,575.78 



864,000.00 



165,838,130.90 



152.90 



263. 50 
97.58 



58,020.11 

10,616.30 

898.00 

323. 15 



500.00 

17.22 

93, 680. 32 

6,016.56 



11,599.77 254,772.55 



27,293.62 
506.60 
640.65 




105.90 



412. 45 

1,608.50 

4,522.36 

5,425.48 

404.56 

547.80 

350.00 



500.00 



226.08 
2,134.40 



214.87 
2,496.93 



5,016.82 



308.10 



7,814.06 



2,794.69 

4,229 41 

13,431.53 

209.45 



1,407.00 
1,270.20 
8,062.27 



1,244.00 



263.50 
97.58 



58,020.11 

10,616.30 

898.00 

323.15 



500.00 

17.22 

93,833.22 

6,016.56 



266,372.32 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 81 

Exhibit E. — A general statement of all appropriations placed under the control of the 
Department of Justice vihich were available and those from which payments were made 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Fees and expenses of marshals, certified claims: 

Balance July 1,1899 $248.56 

Appropriation warrant 73. 14 

$321. 70 

Payments during fiscal year 73. 14 

Carried to surplus fund 8. 56 

81.70 

Balance July 1, 1900 $240. 00 

Fees and expenses of marshals, 1891 and prior years: 

Balance July 1, 1899 410.64 

Balance July 1,1900 410.64 

Salaries, fees, and expenses of marshals, 1897 and prior 
years: 

Repayments 4, 765. 46 

Carried to surplus fund 4,765.46 

Salaries, fees, and expenses of marshals, 1897: 

Balance July 1,1899 100,533.97 

Payments during fiscal year $473. 68 

Carried to surplus fund 100, 060. 29 

100, 533. 97 

Salaries, fees, and expenses of marshals, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $31, 280. 43 

Repayments , 9, 601. 19 

40, 881. 62 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 145. 97 

Carried to surplus fund 38, 735. 65 

40,881.62 

Salaries, fees, and expenses of marshals, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $29, 835. 24 

Repayments 41,067.31 

70, 902. 55 

Payments during fiscal year 15, 935. 17 

Balance July 1, 1900 54,967.38 

Salaries, fees, and expenses of marshals, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $1, 165, 000. 00 

Repayments 11, 047. 78 

1, 176, 047. 78 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 157, 167. 05 

Balance July 1, 1900 18,880.73 

Fees of jurors, certified claims: 

Appropriation warrant 28. 05 

Payments during fiscal year 28. 05 

Fees of jurors, 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 232.00 

Balance July 1, 1900 '. 232.00 

Fees of jurors, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 9.70 

Payments during fiscal year 9. 70 

Fees of jurors, 1897 and 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $65.60 

Repayments 56. 70 

122. 30 

Payments during fiscal year 6. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 116. 30 

122. 30 

H. Doc. 9 6 



82 REPORT OF THE ATTORN EY-GENERAL. 

Fees of jurors, 1897 and prior years: 

Repayments $76. 11 

Carried to surplus fund 76. 1 1 

Fees of jurors, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $52, 813. 39 

Repayments 157. 03 

52, 970. 42 

Payments during fiscal year 615. 28 

Carried to surplus fund 52, 355. 14 

52, 970. 42 

Fees of jurors, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $62,672.51 

Repayments 45, 124. 01 

107, 796. 52 

Payments during fiscal year 3, 200. 80 

Balance July 1, 1900 $104,595.72 

Fees of jurors, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $655, 000. 00 

Repayments 25,477.40 

680, 477. 40 

Payments during fiscal year 646, 032. 25 

Balance July 1, 1900.... 34,445.15 

Fees of witnesses, certified claims: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $269.03 

Appropriation warrant 332. 30 

601. 33 

Payments during fiscal year 332. 30 

Carried to surplus fund 269. 03 

601. 33 

Fees of witnesses, 1879: 

Balance July 1, 1899 9. 50 

Balance July 1 , 1900 9. 50 

Fees of witnesses, 1880: 

Balance July 1, 1899 10. 90 

Balance July 1, 1900 10. 90 

Fees of witnesses, 1889: 

Balance July 1, 1899 37. 50 

Balance July 1, 1900 37. 50 

Fees of witnesses, 1890: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 96. 10 

Carried to surplus fund 96. 10 

Fees of witnesses, 1891 : 

Balance July 1, 1899 166. 40 

Balance July 1 , 1900 166. 40 

Fees of witnesses, 1892: 

Balance July 1, 1899 84.70 

Balance July 1, 1900 84.70 

Fees of witnesses, 1893: 

Balance July 1, 1899 161. 30 

Balance July 1, 1900 161.30 

Fees of witnesses, 1894: 

Balance July 1, 1899 93.20 

Payments during fiscal year 43. 90 

Balance July 1, 1900 49. 30 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 83 

Fees of witnesses, 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $369.80 

Payments during fiscal year 95. 60 

Balance July 1, 1900 $274.20 

Fees of witnesses, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 533.90 

Payments during fiscal year 223. 85 

Balance July 1, 1900 310.05 

Fees of witnesses, 1897 and prior years: 

Repayments '. 308. 61 

Carried to surplus fund 308. 61 

Fees of witnesses, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 102,796.99 

Payments during fiscal year $610. 45 

Carried to surplus fund 102, 186. 54 

102, 796. 99 

Fees of witnesses, 1898 : 

Balance July 1, 1899 9,557.78 

Repayments 1, 118. 96 

10, 676. 74 

Payments during fiscal year 754. 80 

Carried to surplus fund 9, 921. 94 

10, 676. 74 

Fees of witnesses, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $124,776.08 

Repayments 63, 156. 59 

187, 932. 67 

Payments during fiscal year 13, 187. 70 

Balance July 1, 1900 , 174,744.97 

Fees of witnesses, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $955, 000. 00 

Repayments 41,498.28 

996, 498. 28 

Payments during fiscal year 952, 627. 60 

Balance July 1, 1900 43,870.68 

Support of prisoners, certified claims: 

Balance July 1, 1899 104.00 

Payments during fiscal year 104. 00 

Support of prisoners, 1894: 

Balance July 1, 1899 16.10 

Balance July 1, 1900 16.10 

Support of prisoners, 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 4,092.68 

Payments during fiscal year $12. 40 

Carried to surplus fund 4, 080. 28 

4, 092. 68 

Support of prisoners, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1, 665. 74 

Payments during fiscal pear 17. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,648.74 

Support of prisoners, 1897 and prior years: 

Repayments 245. 17 

Carried to surplus fund 245. 17 



. -• -ZOmA 



84 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

Supi>ort of prisoners, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $9,743.2fr 

Payments during fiscal year $380. 80 

Carried to surplus fund 9, 3(52. 43 

9, 743. 23 

Support of prisoners, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $6,601.49 

Repayments 1, 584. 96 

8, 186. 46 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 136. 16 

Carried to surplus fund 7, 050. 29 

8, 186. 45 

Support of prisoners, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $46,128.34 

Repayments 56, 387. 54 

102, 515. 88 

Payments during fiscal year 100, 285. 26 

Balance July 1, 1900 $2,230.62 

Support of prisoners, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $700,000.00 

Repayments 7, 048. 90 

707, 048. 90 

Payments during fiscal year 631, 762. 82 

Balance July 1 , 1900 75, 286. 08 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., certified claims: 

Appropriation warrant 18. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 18. 00 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1893: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 10. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 6. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 4. 00 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1894: 

Balance July 1,1899 188.75 

Payments during fiscal year 10. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 178. 75 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 135. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 102. 00 

Balance July 1 , 1900 33. 00 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1896: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 55. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 30. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 25. 00 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 6, 882. 96 

Payments during fiscal year $198. 60 

Carried to surplus fund 6, 684. 36 

6, 882. 96 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1897 and prior years: 

Repayments 36.40 

Carried to surplus fund 36. 40 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $22, 698. 24 

Repayments 629. 60 

23, 327. 84 

Payments during fiscal year 102. 00 

Balance July 1,1900 23,225.84 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 85 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $18, 403. 50 

Repayments 18, 439. 60 

$36, 843. 10 

Payments during fiscal year 896. 09 

Balance July 1, 1900 $35,947.01 

Pay of bailiffs, etc., 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $160, 000. 00 

Repayments 4, 945. 01 

164, 945. 01 

Payments during fiscal year 159, 869. 80 

Balance July 1, 1900 5, 075. 21 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, certified 

claims: 

Appropriation warrant 1, 100. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 100. 00 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1892: 

Balance Jul y 1 , 1899 22. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 22. 00 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1893: 

Balance July 1,1899 8.74 

Balance July 1, 1900 8.74 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1894: 

Balance July 1, 1899 28.57 

Balance July 1,1900 28.57 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 224.30 

Balance July 1, 1900 224.30 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 207.45 

Payments during fiscal year 179. 78 

Balance July 1 , 1900 27. 67 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1897 and 

prior years: 

Repayments 158. 37 

Carried to surplus fund 158. 37 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1897: 

Balance July 1,1899 551.44 

Payments during fiscal year 417. 13 

Balance July 1,1900 134.31 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $1, 628. 38 

Repayments 366.63 

1, 995. 01 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 238. 13 

Balance July 1,1900 756.88 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $15,574,53 

Repayments 10,208.67 

25, 783. 20 

Payments during fiscal year 15, 101. 85 

Balance July 1, 1900 10,681.35 



86 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $260, 000. 00 

Repayments 3, 069. 36 

$263,069.36 

Payments during fiscal year 262, 280. 79 

Balance July 1, 1900 $788.57 

Supplies for United States courts, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $19,947.75 

Repayments • 2, 819. 14 

22, 766. 89 

Payments during fiscal year 13, 994. 57 

Balance July 1, 1900 8, 772. 32 

Supplies for United States courts, 1900: 

Appropriation* warrant 35, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 18, 769. 09 

Balance July 1, 1900 16,230.91 

Rent of court rooms, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 2,769.51 

Payments during fiscal year $75. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 2, 694. 51 

2, 769. 51 

Rent of court rooms, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 3,725.85 

Payments during fiscal year 495. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 3,230.85 

Rent of court rooms, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $25,752.17 

Appropriation warrant 3, 600. 00 

29, 352. 17 

Payments during fiscal year 29, 339. 50 

Balance July 1, 1900 12.67 

Rent of court rooms, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 100, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 77, 359. 83 

Balance July 1, 1900 22,640.17 

Fees of commissioners, certified claims: 

Appropriation warrant 418. 60 

Payments during fiscal year 418. 60 

Fees of commissioners, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 103,865.76 

Payments during fiscal year $239. 50 

Carried to surplus fund 103,626.26 

103, 865. 76 

Fees of commissioners, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $148,532.11 

Repayments 115.20 

148, 647. 21 

Payments during fiscal year 342. 90 

Carried to surplus fund 148, 304. 41 

148, 647. 31 

Fees of commissioners, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $103,623.35 

Repayments 7. 20 

103, 630. 55 

Payments during fiscal year 46, 088. 15 

Balance July 1, 1900 57,542.40 



REPORT OF T. T E ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 87 

Fees of commissioners, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $150, 000. 00 

Repayments * 271. 15 

$150,271.15 

Payments during fiscal year 98, 940. 75 

Balance July 1, 1900 $51,330.40 

Fees of clerks, certified claims: 

Appropriation warrant 2. 70 

Payments during fiscal year 2. 70 

Fees of clerks, 1897 and prior years: 

Repayments 19. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 19. 00 

Fees of clerks, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 76,259.75 

Payments during fiscal year $2, 037. 81 

Carried to surplus fund 74, 221. 94 

76, 259. 75 

Fees of clerks, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $84,125.47 

Repayments 132. 85 

84, 258. 32 

Payments during fiscal year. 6, 789. 77 

Carried to surplus fund 77, 468. 55 

84, 258. 32 

Fees of clerks, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $124,202.55 . 

Repayments 126. 96 

124, 329. 51 

Payments during fiscal year 88, 476. 58 

Balance July 1, 1900 35,852.93 

Fees of clerks, 1900: . 

Appropriation warrant $250, 000. 00 

Repayments " 40. 50 

250,040.50 

Payments during fiscal year 154, 871. 50 

Balance July 1, 1900 95,169.00 

Salaries and expenses of district attorneys, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 3,501.96 

Balance July 1 , 1900 3, 501. 96 

Salaries and expenses of district attorneys, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $310.00 

Appropriation warrant 193. 04 

503. 04 

Payments during fiscal year 478. 89 

Balance July 1 , 1900 24. 15 

Salaries and expenses of district' attorneys, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 '. . . . $18, 509. 13 

Repayments 637. 15 

19, 146. 28 

Payments during fiscal year 11, 487. 84 

Balance July 1, 1900 7, 658. 44 

Salaries and expenses of district attorneys, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $400, 000. 00 

Repayments 1, 569. 41 

401,569.41 

Payments during fiscal year 385, 802. 84 

Balance July 1 , 1900 15, 766. 57 



88 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Fees of district attorneys, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 16,369.31 

Carried to surplus fund 6, 369. 31 

Fees of district attorneys, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 2,370.14 

Carried to surplus fund 2, 370. 14 

Fees of district attorney for District of Columbia, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 295.95 

Carried to surplus fund 295. 95 

Fees of district attorney for District of Columbia, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 2,607.37 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 134. 39 

Balance July 1, 1900 $472.98 

Fees of district attorney for District of Columbia, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 23, 800. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 21, 015. 19 

Balance July 1, 1900 2,784.81 

Fees of district attorney for southern district of New 
York 1899: 
Balance July 1, 1899 77.60 

Balance July 1,1900 77.60 

Fees of district attorney for southern district of New 
York, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants 2, 541. 24 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 441. 24 

Balance July 1,1900 100.00 

Special assistants to the Attorney-General in the Supreme 
Court: 

Balance July 1, 1899 2, 018. 60 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 310. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 ; 708.60 

Pay of special assistant attorneys, 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 3,290.00 

Carried to surplus fund 290. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 3,000.00 

Pay of special assistant attorneys, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1,744.74 

Payments during fiscal year $600. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 1, 144. 74 

1, 744. 74 

Pay of special assistant attorneys, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 6, 272. 39 

Payments during fiscal year $2, 050. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 4, 222. 39 

: 6, 272. 39 

Pay of special assistant attorneys, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 11,172.88 

Payments during fiscal year 11, 172. 88 

Pay of special assistant attorneys, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $25,431.98 

Repayments 50. 00 

25, 481. 98 

Payments during fiscal year 25, 473. 28 

Balance July 1,1900 8.70 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 89 

Pay of special assistant attorneys, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $60, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 20, 755. 39 

Balance July 1, 1900 $39,244.61 

Rent and incidental expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1893: 

Balance July 1, 1899 31.95 

Payments during fiscal year 26. 45 

Balance July 1, 1900 5.50 

Rent and incidental expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1,285.38 

Carried to surplus fund 1, 285. 38 

Rent and incidental expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $795.42 

Appropriation warrant 72. 50 

867. 92 

Payments during fiscal year 566.10 

Balance July 1, 1900 301.82 

Rent and incidental expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $3,215.00 

Repayments 33. 05 

Appropriation warrant 2, 675. 60 

5, 923. 65 

Payments during fiscal year 5, 919. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 4.65 

Rent and incidental expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $10, 000. 00 

Repayments 501. 40 

10, 501. 40 

Payments during fiscal year 9, 691. 40 

Balance July 1, 1900 810.00 

Traveling expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 210.25 

Carried to surplus fund - 210. 25 

Traveling expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 345.50 

Balance July 1, 1900 345.50 

Traveling expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1899: 

Balance July 1,1899 $503.00 

Appropriation warrant 122. 00 

625. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 602. 50 

Balance July 1 , 1900 22. 50 

Traveling expenses, Territory of Alaska, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants 2, 730. 90 

Payments during fiscal year 1,698.90 

Balance July 1, 1900 1, 032. 00 

Salaries and expenses, Court of Private Land Claims, 
1897-98: 

Balance July 1, 1899 100. 99 

Carried to surplus fund 100. 99 

Salaries and expenses, Court of Private Land Claims, 
1898—99 • 
Balance July 1, 1899 30. 65 

Balance J ul y 1 , 1900 30. 65 



90 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Salaries and expenses, Court of Private I .and Claim*, 
1899—1900' 

Balance July 1, 1899 $10, 503. 76 

Payments during fiscal year 8, 185. 82 

Balance July 1,1900 $2,317.94 

Uniform system of bookkeeping : 

Balance July 1, 1899 338.80 

Payments during fiscal year 238. 45 

Balance July 1, 1900 100.35 

Claims of deputy marshals in Oklahoma: 

Balance July 1, 1899 773. 40 

Balance July 1, 1900 773. 40 

Expenses of settling title to Greer County, claimed by 

Balance July 1, 1889 1, 122. 01 

Carried to surplus fund 1, 122. 01 

Expenses of litigation, Eastern Band of North Carolina 
Cherokees: 

Appropriation warrant .60 

Payments during fiscal year .60 

Protecting interests of the United States in suits affecting 
Pacific railroads: 

Balance July 1, 1899 72,786.56 

Payments during fiscal year 3, 600. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 69,186.56 

Payment for legal services in circuit court of appeals: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $1,949.29 

Appropriation warrant 2, 050. 71 

4, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 4, 000. 00 

Counsel for Mission Indians of southern California, 1896: 

Balance July 1, 1899 8.40 

Balance July 1 , 1900 8. 40 

Counsel for Mission Indians of southern California, 1897: 

Appropriation warrant 159. 45 

Payments during fiscal year 159. 45 

Counsel for Mission Indians of southern California, 1898: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 650. 00 

Payments during fiscal year $425. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 225. 00 

650. 00 

Counsel for Mission Indians of southern California, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 500. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 50. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 450. 00 

Counsel for Mission Indians of southern California, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 500. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 450. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 50. 00 

Oil portrait of Chief Justice Marshall: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1,000.00 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,000.00 

Compromise of suit, T. F. Townsley against the United 
States: 
Appropriation warrant 1, 718. 88 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,718.88 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 91 

Fees and expenses in suit against Benjamin Weil and 
La Abra Mining Company: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $3,442.41 

Appropriation warrant 10, 000. 00 

$13, 442. 41 

Payments during fiscal year 5, 442. 41 

Balance July 1, 1900 $8,000.00 

Prosecution and collection of claims, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 500.00 

Carried to surplus fund 500. 00 

Prosecution and collection of claims, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 500.00 

Balance July 1, 1900 500.00 

Prosecution and collection of claims, 1900: , 

Appropriation warrant 500. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 500.00 

Payment for legal services rendered the United States: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $567. 95 

Appropriation warrant 13, 780. 91 

14, 348. 86 

Payments during fiscal year 11, 332. 49 

Balance July 1, 1900 3,016.37 

Fees and expenses in suit of Peralta-Reavis r. The United 
States: 

Balance July 1, 1899 647.51 

Carried to surplus fund 647. 51 

Distributing acts of Congress to United States judges, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 .10 

Carried to surplus fund .10 

United States penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kans., 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 18,236.46 

Carried to surp] us fund 18, 236. 46 

United States penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kans., 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $9,212.00 

Repayments 3,843.08 

13, 055. 08 

Balance July 1, 1900 13,055.08 

United States penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kans., 1900: 

Appropriation warrants 159,912.00 

Payments during fiscal year 159, 287. 85 

Balance July 1, 1900 624.15 

United States penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kans., site: 

Balance July 1,1899 $39,940.87 

Repayments 5,192.69 

45, 133. 56 

Payments during fiscal year 33,934.20 

Balance July 1, 1900 11,199.36 

Buildings for United States courts, Territory of Alaska: 

Balance July 1, 1899 6,643.41 

Payments during fiscal year 722. 76 

Balance July 1, 1900 5,920.65 

Sites for United States prisons: 

Balance July 1, 1899 14,921.30 

Payments during fiscal year $1, 089. 57 

Amount transferred to United States peni- 
tentiary, Atlanta, Ga 13,831.73 

14, 921. 30 



92 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

United States penitentiary, Atlanta, Ga. : 

Balance July 1,1899 $500,000.00 

Appropriation warrant 100, 000. 00 

Amount transferred from sites for United 

States prisons 13,831.73 

$613,831.73 

Payments during fiscal year 12, 489. 38 

Balance July 1, 1900 $601,342.35 

Court-house and jail, Juneau, Alaska: 

Balance July 1, 1899 40,000.00 

Balance July 1, 1900 40,000.00 

United States jails, Indian Territory: 

Balance July 1, 1899 60,000.00 

Balance July 1, 1900 . 9 60,000.00 

United States jail, Fort Smith, Ark. : 

Balance July 1, 1899 5,000.00 

Balance July 1, 1900 5,000.00 

United States penitentiary, McNeils Island, Washington: 

Repayment 5. 85 

Balance July 1, 1900 5.85 

Temporary quarters for Court of Claims: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $25,000.00 

Repayments 304. 78 

25, 304. 78 

Payments during fiscal year 11, 956. 33 

Balance July 1, 1900 13,348.45 

Building, Department of Justice: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 $1,000,000.00 

Repayments 866. 97 

1,000,866.97 

Payments during fiscal year 37, 116. 54 

Balance July 1, 1900 963,750.43 

Care of rented buildings, Department of Justice, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 5, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 235. 89 

Balance July 1, 1900 2,764.11 

Traveling and miscellaneous expenses. Department of 
Justice, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $10, 000. 00 

Repayments 1 , 977. 90 

11,977.90 

Payments during fiscal year 4, 026. 90 

Balance July 1, 1900 7,951.00 

Docketing reports of United States attorneys, Depart- 
ment of Justice, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 500. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 400. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 100.00 

Removal of circuit court records, New Hampshire, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 200. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 56. 66 

Balance July 1, 19001 143.34 

Relief of R. E. Vaughn: 

Balance July 1, 1899 23.00 

.Payments during fiscal year 23. 00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 93 

Payment of physicians' claims for treatment of wounded 
deputy marshals: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 -. $76. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 76.00 

Reimbursement to 0. L. Carter for legal expenses: 

Appropriation warrant 30. 50 

Payments during fiscal year 30. 50 

Reimbursement to Henry Rechtin, Department of Justice: 

Appropriation warrant 83. 50 

Payments during fiscal year 83. 50 

Expenses of commissioners to revise the statutes relating 
to patents, etc.: 

Balance July 1, 1899 210.05 

Payments during fiscal year 85. 40 

Balance July 1, 1900 $124.65 

Revising criminal and penal laws of the United States: 

Payments during fiscal year 1 21. 715. 04 

Expenses of United States courts, 1879 and prior years: 

Repayments 1, 500. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 1, 500. 00 

Salaries, Department of Justice, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1,894.16 

Carried to surplus fund 1, 894. 16 

Salaries, Department of Justice, 1899: 

Balance July 1,1899 $1,872.44 

Repayments 7. 39 

1, 879. 83 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,879.83 

Salaries, Department of Justice, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 202, 500. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 200, 722. 47 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,777.53 

Prosecution of crimes, certified claims: 

Appropriation warrant 7. 50 

Payments during fiscal year 7. 50 

Prosecution of crimes, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 770.32 

Carried to surplus fund 770.32 

Prosecution of crimes, 1899: 

Repayments 641. 53 

Payments during fiscal year 403. 46 

Balance July 1, 1900 238.07 

Prosecution of crimes, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $40, 000. 00 

Repayments 1, 050. 76 

41, 050. 76 

Payments during fiscal year 40, 952. 46 

Balance July 1,1900 98.30 

Defending suits in claims against the United States, 1897: 

Appropriation warrant 32. 20 

Payments during fiscal year 32. 20 

1 Only such amount as was necessary to pay the commissioners and their expenses 
during the fiscal year was appropriated. — Sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



94 REPORT OB' THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Defending suits in claims against the United States, 1898: 

Balance July. 1, 1899 $4, 469. 94 

Payments during fiscal year $46. 20 

Carried to surplus fund 4, 414. 74 

4, 469. 94 

Defending suits in claims against the United States, 1899: 

Repayments $116. 93 

Appropriation warrant 849. 06 

965.99 

Payments during fiscal year 964. 82 

Balance July 1, 1900 $1.17 

Defending suits in claims against the United States, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $46, 000. 00 

Repayments 1, 067. 54 

46, 067. 54 

Payments during fiscal year 45, 843. 55 

Balance July 1, 1900 223.99 

Defense in Indian depredation claimy, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 399.31 

Carried to surplus fund 399. 31 

Defense in Indian depredation claims, 1898: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 3. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 3. 00 

Defense in Indian depredation claims, 1899: 

Repayments $0. 64 

Appropriation warrant 808. 26 

808. 90 

Payments during fiscal year 808. 26 

Balance July 1, 1900 .64 

Defense in Indian depredation claims, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $66, 500. 00 

Repayments 832. 29 

56, 332. 29 

Payments during fiscal year 56, 053. 53 

Balance July 1, 1900 278.76 

Repairs to court-house, Washington, D. C, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 .06 

Carried to surplus fund .06 

Repairs to court-house, Washington, D. C, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 1, 500. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 500. 00 

Repairs to court-house, Washington, D. C, 1900-1901: 

Appropriation warrant 4, 348. 50 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 500. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,848.50 

Punishing violations of intercourse acts and frauds, 1896: 

Appropriation warrant 50. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 50.00 

Punishing violations of intercourse, acts and frauds, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1,308.77 

Carried to surplus fund 1, 308. 77 

Punishing violations of intercourse acts and frauds, 1899: 

Balance July 1,1899 $7,383.20 

Repayments 153. 72 

7, 536. 92 

Payments during fiscal year 253. 10 

Balance July 1,1900 7,283.82 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 95 

Punishing violations of intercourse, acts and frauds, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $5, 000. 00 

Repayments 428.61 

$5, 428. 61 

Payments during fiscal year 4, 591. 93 

Balance July 1, 1900 $836.68 

Pay of regular assistant attorneys, 1897: 

Balance July 1,1899 4,020.32 

Carried to surplus fund 4, 020. 32 

Pay of regular assistant attorneys, 1898: • 

Balance July 1,1899 1,665.01 

Balance July 1,1900. 1,665.01 

Pay of regular assistant attorneys, 1899: 

Balance July 1,1899 6,253.35 

Payments during fiscal year 671. 27 

Balance July 1, 1900 5,582.08 

Pay of regular assistant attorneys, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $160, 000. 00 

Repayments : 923. 79 

160, 923. 79 

Payments during fiscal year 160,923.79 

Salaries and expenses, United States courts, Indian Terri- 
tory, 1895: 

Balance July 1, 1899 18.00 

Payments during fiscal year 18. 00 

■ 
Salaries and expenses, United States courts, Indian Terri- 
tory, 1897 and prior years: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $0.10 

Repayments 435. 78 

435.88 

Carried to surplus fund 435. 88 

Salaries and expenses, United States courts, Indian Terri- 
tory, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 36,784.57 

Payments during fiscal year $205. 73 

Carried to surplus fund 36, 578. 84 

36, 784. 57 

Salaries and expenses, United States courts, Indian Terri- 
tory, 1878: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $14,442.02 

Repayments 31. 04 

14, 473. 06 

Payments during fiscal year 150. 05 

Carried to surplus fund 14, 323. 01 

14, 473. 06 

Salaries and expenses, United States courts, Indian Terri- 
tory, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $17,758.69 

Repayments 951. 28 

18,709.97 

Payments during fiscal year 523. 25 

Balance July 1, 1900 18, 186. 72 

Salaries and expenses, United States courts, Indian Terri- 
tory, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $90, 000. 00 

Repayments 301. 10 

90,301.10 

Payments during fiscal year 80, 612. 53 

< Balance July 1, 1900 Qk<$&&:sv 



96 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Furniture and repairs, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $49.04 

Carried to surplus fund 49. 04 

Furniture and repairs, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 . 7.30 

Balance July 1, 1900 $7.30 

Furniture and repairs, 1899: 

Repayments 112. 10 

Balance July 1, 1900 • 112.10 

Furniture and repairs, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $750. 00 

Repayments 174. 45 

924. 45 

Payments during fiscal year 924. 45 

Books for Department library, 1899: 

Appropriation warrant 228. 50 

Payments during fiscal year 228. 50 

Books for Department library, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $2, 750. 00 

Repayments 695. 21 

3, 445. 21 

Payments during fiscal year 3, 445. 21 

Books for office of solicitor, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $300. 00 

Repayments 134. 00 

434. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 434.00 

Stationery, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1.71 

Carried to surplus fund 1. 71 

Stationery, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $2, 650. 00 

Repayment 176. 61 

2, 826. 61 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 826. 61 

Transportation, 1897: 

Balance July 1, 1899 437.86 

Carried to surplus fund 437. 86 

Transportation, 1898: 

Balance July 1,1899 215.75 

Balance July 1,1900 215.75 

Transportation, 1899: 

Repayment $56. 57 

Appropriation warrant 202. 50 

259. 07 

Payments during fiscal year 202. 50 

Balance July 1,1899 56.57 

Transportation, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $2, 600. 00 

Repayments 123. 48 

2, 723. 48 

Payments during fiscal year 2, 723. 48 

Miscellaneous items, 1897 and prior years: 

Balance July 1, 1899 46.86 

Balance July 1,1900 46.86 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 97 

Miscellaneous items, 1897: 

Balance July 1,1899 $2.47 

Carried to surplus fund 2. 47 



Miscellaneous items, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 10. 63 



Balance July 1, 1900 $10. 63 

Miscellaneous items, 1899: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 1 , 399. 40 

Payments during fiscal year 61. 27 



Balance July 1, 1900 1, 338. 13 

Miscellaneous items, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $8, 575. 00 

Repayments 177. 10 

8, 752. 10 

Payments during fiscal year 7, 677. 10 



Balance July 1 , 1900 1 , 075. 00 

Salaries, governor, etc., Territory of Alaska, 1900: 

Amount paid the district judge, United States mar- 
shal, deputy marshals, clerk, commissioners, and 

United States attorney x 23, 639. 51 

Salaries, governor, etc., Territory of Arizona, 1900: 

Amount paid the justices of the supreme court 1 12, 000. 00 

Salaries, governor, etc., Territory of New Mexico, 1900: 

Amount paid the justices of the supreme court 1 15,000.00 

Salaries, governor, etc., Territory of Oklahoma, 1900: 

Amount paid the justices of the supreme court 1 15, 000. 00 

Salaries, district court, Territory of Hawaii, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 196. 15 

Balance July 1, 1900 196.15 

Salaries, Supreme Court, 1898: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 1, 536. 83 

Balance July 1,1900 1,536.83 

Salaries, Supreme Court, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 107, 900. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 107, 900. 00 

Salaries, circuit courts, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 125.03 

Carried to surplus fund 125. 03 

Salaries, circuit courts, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $645. 16 

Repayments 368. 77 

Appropriation warrant 5, 000. 37 

6, 014. 30 



Payments during fiscal year 5, 098. 20 



Balance July 1, 1900 916.10 

Salaries, circuit courts, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $179, 000. 00 

Repayments 994. 60 

179, 994. 60 

Payments during fiscal year 179, 994. 60 

Salaries, district judges, 1898: 

Balance July 1,1899 3,787.22 

Carried to surplus fund 3,787.22 



x Only such amounts as were necessary to pay the salaries of the justices of the 
supreme court, United States marshals, etc., were amenable to disbursement by the 
Department of Justice. 

H. Doc. 9 7 



« 



98 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Salaries, district judges, 1899: 

Balance J uly 1 , 1899 $2, 227. 40 

Balance July 1, 1900 $2, 227. 40 

Salaries, district judges, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants 325, 920. 35 

Payments during fiscal year 322, 462. 90 

Balance July 1 , 1900 3, 457. 45 

Salaries, retired judges, 1900: 

Payments during fiscal year l 54, 324. 66 - 

Salaries, Court of Claims, 1899: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 52. 19 

Balance July 1 , 1900 52. 19 

Salaries, Court of Claims, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 35, 840. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 35, 798. 43 

Balance July 1, 1900 41. 57 

Salaries, Court of Private Land Claims, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants 35, 100. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 35,100.00 

Salaries and expenses, court of appeals, District of Colum- 
bia, 1899: 

Repayments 12. 79 

Balance July 1, 1900 12.79 

Salaries and expenses, court of appeals, District of Colum- 
bia, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants 26, 220. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 25, 720. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 500. 00 

Salaries, supreme court, District of Columbia, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 27.82 

Balance July 1, 1900 27. 82 

Salaries, supreme court, District of Columbia, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 30, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 28, 777. 1 7 

Balance July 1, 1900. . .• 1, 222. 83 

Salary, clerk district court, northern district of Illinois, 
1900: 

Appropriation warrant 3, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 3, 000. 00 

Salary, commissioner of Yellowstone National Park, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $1, 000. 00 

. Repayments 84. 20 

1,084.20 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 084. 20 

Salary, warden of jail, District of Columbia, 1898: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 19. 72 

Carried to surplus fund 19. 72 

Salary, warden of jail, District of Columbia, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant 1, 800. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 1, 800. 00 

1 To pay the salaries of the United States judges, retired, under section 714, Revised 
Statutes, only so much as was necessary to pay them during the current fiscal year 
was appropriated. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 99 

Defending suits in Court of Claims, District of Columbia, 
1897* 

Balance July 1, 1899 $500.00 

Carried to surplus fund 500. 00 

Defending suits in Court of Claims, District of Columbia, 
1900: 

Appropriation warrants 3, 000. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 3, 000. 00 

Support of convicts, District of Columbia, 1899: 

Balance July 1, 1899 $13,476.90 

Repayments 432. 88 

13, 909. 78 

Payments during fiscal year 10, 903. 78 

Balance July 1, 1900 $3,006.00 

Support of convicts, District of Columbia, 1900: 

Appropriation warrant $46, 000. 00 

Repayments 277. 40 

46, 277. 40 

Payments during fiscal year 32, 760. 73 

Balance, July 1, 1900 13,516.67 

Salaries of employees, court-house, Washington, D. C, 
1899* 

Balance July 1, 1899 127.52 

Carried to surplus fund 127. 52 

Salaries of employees, court-house, Washington, D. C, 
1898: 
Repayments 70. 15 

Balance July 1, 1900 70.15 

Salaries of employees, court-house, Washington, D. C, 
1900: 

Appropriation warrant $12, 960. 00 

Repayments 780.00 

13, 740. 00 

Payments during fiscal year 13, 740. 00 

Support of prisoners, District of Columbia, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 1,507.79 

Balance July 1, 1900 1,507.79 

SuppoVt of prisoners, District of Columbia, 1899: 

Balance July 1 , 1899 $1, 300. 00 

Repayments 1,108.72 

2, 408. 72 

Payments during fiscal year 20. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 2,388.72 

Support of prisoners, District of Columbia, 1900: 

Appropriation warrants $45, 000. 00 

Repayments 2,020.54 

47, 020. 54 

Payments during fiscal year 43, 020. 00 

Balance July 1, 1900 4,000.54 

Cells and repairs to jail, District of Columbia: 

Balance July 1, 1899 2,770.95 

Payments during fiscal year 7. 50 

Balance July 1, 1900 2,763.45 

Jail grounds, District of Columbia, 1898: 

Balance July 1, 1899 10, 000. 00 

Carried to surplus fund 10, 000. 00 






» -» . 



100 



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104 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit F 2. — Statement showing the expenses of the United States 



Judicial districts. 



Alabama, northern. . 
Alabama, middle — 
Alabama, southern. . 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas, eastern . . . 
Arkansas, western . . 
California, northern 
California, southern 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida, northern ... 
Florida, southern . . . 
Georgia, northern . . . 
Georgia, southern . . . 
Hawaii 



Idaho 

Illinois, northern 

Illinois, southern 

Indiana 

Indian Territory, northern. 
Indian Territory, central... 
Indian Territory, southern 

Iowa, northern 

Iowa, southern 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana, eastern 

Ijouisiana, western 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan, eastern 

Michigan, western 

Minnesota 

Mississippi, northern 

Mississippi, southern 

Missouri, eastern 

Missouri, western 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York, northern 

New York, eastern 

New York, southern 

New York, western 

North Carolina, eastern 

North Carolina, western 

North Dakota 

Ohio, northern 

Ohio, southern 

Oklahoma 

Oregon. 



Pennsylvania, eastern . 
Pennsylvania, western. 

Porto Rico. 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee, eastern 

Tennessee, middle 

Tennessee, western 

Texas, northern 

Texas, eastern 

Texas, western 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia, eastern 

Virginia, western 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin, eastern 

Wisconsin, western 

Wyoming 



Total 



Salaries, 
fees, and 
expenses 

of 
marshals. 



$24.31 

250.00 

9.51 

582.35 



14.00 
8.00 



128.14 
100.78 
986.16 
250.00 



578.50 



108.71 

3.05 

7.40 

57.08 



434.36 



98.05 

45.50 

6.00 

52.00 



8.55 
1,402.66 
1,269.51 
1,000.00 



346.25 

673.48 

4.12 



21.16 

75.90 



994.12 
1,247.94 



65.31 



2,960.49 
342.40 



15.00 
1,000.00 



32.50 
21.66 



835.00 



16,059.95 



Fees of 
jurors. 



$48.00 



52.30 



2.00 



640.80 

24.40 

516.00 



2.00 



50.00 



61.30 



4.00 
100.00 



300.00 



1,000.00 
400.00 



3,200.80 



Fees of 
witnesses. 



$92.20 

21.00 

6.02 

441.10 



3,222.19 



56.80 



65.45 
i,"007."42 



20.25 



24.50 
3,987.35 



78.40 



76.15 

7.50 

17.65 



9.00 



541.70 
17.30 



6.00 
200.00 



37.80 



108.26 
558.40 



1,700.00 



3.50 
IX). 65 



502.15 
22.90 



6.00 

2,081.25 

1,230.00 

158.30 



13.90 



72.80 
' *6."66" 



16,409.89 



Support 
of pris- 
oners. 



$131.38 

800.96 

48.40 

9,578.45 

1,072.85 



3,520.65 



479.95 
374.77 



1,151.06 
"268.64" 



1,352.96 

965.90 

1,372.03 

13.24 



14.23 

1,078.26 

963.17 

314.85 

14,008.51 



95.50 



782.50 

954.76 

5,264.67 



872.12 

342.65 

28.40 



5,798.18 
572.20 



411.50 
97.50 
1,260.23 
1,230.75 
4,950.93 
1,657.10 
1,689.86 



5,701.01 



29.75 

108.45 

15,831.65 

829.46 

410.57 

1,635.60 

1,069.05 



125.71 
1,391.80 
1,614.20 



1,210.25 
"""91.35" 



324.20 

459.20 

217.88 

39.20 

20.50 

332.30 

2,896.23 

1,345.79 



458.00 



99,661.26 



REPORT OK THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



105 



courts incurred in the fiscal year 1899 and paid in the 


fiscal year 1900. 




Pay of 

bailiffs, 

etc. 


Miscella- 
neous 
expenses. 


Salaries 
and ex- 
penses of 
district 
attorneys. 


Pay of 
regular 
assistant 
attor- 
neys. 


Pay of 

special 

assistant 

attorneys. 


Fees of 
clerks. 


Fees of 
commis- 
sioners. 


Rent of 
court 
rooms. 


Total. 


$15.00 
24.00 


$65.00 
15.00 


$86.73 

9.50 

7.50 

95.75 

368.09 

69.92 

61.80 

115.92 

96.74 

62.96 

1.10 

5.00 






$1,009.17 

1,499.75 

736.20 


$2,382.40 
825.05 
398.40 
1,119.15 
163.70 
691.05 
659.20 
419.65 

96.30 
223.10 

49.90 




$3,791.19 
3,436.26 












$1,289.50 
100.00 


1,230.03 








11,864.80 


450.00 


1.86 






5,173.38 

1,264.06 

1,541.97 

884.63 

982.21 

1,279.17 

4.40 

538.40 


8,519.38 




$900.00 


3,025.03 
5,499.16 
6,307.80 








12.00 

15.00 
14.00 

5.00 


1,294.65 
3.50 
1.75 








1,543.10 




2,721.85 




480.00 


2,598.73 






444.17 


302.00 

986.37 

34.00 








845.40 






99.45 

901.10 

328.75 

3,140.45 

1,075.75 




2,430.47 


126.84 

145.32 

74.55 

483.57 






1,346.58 

769.79 

1,287.92 

708.20 




2,516.30 




4,525.00 


350.00 


7,373.66 
5,760.34 














112.50 




2,380.02 
















126.16 
127.91 
384.05 
419.06 
150.10 
100.17 

86.55 
241.25 
130.29 

76.86 
155.64 

26.15 

21.25 
153.11 

33.02 
159.43 

31.83 
447.89 
226.83 
106.57 
260.75 

74.10 
106.95 
128.68 

79.44 

25.50 






694.41 

889.83 

1,123.12 

883.41 

5.90 


264.70 
527.95 
394.40 
362.05 


787.50 
6,937.00 


2,451.27 




654.90 






10, 510. 80 






2, 767. 47 


207.00 


11.00 
418. 15 
183.40 
200.00 








3,072.05 






2,665.50 
1,855.00 
2,747.50 


8, 196. 75 








2, 166. 02 










3,650.08 






933.50 
1,448.17 

310.25 
3,289.07 

643.96 


456.95 

1,451.85 

330.75 

3,002.95 

120.65 

51.90 

408.30 

233.05 

169.85 


2,767.04 












3,993.48 




1,455.00 

280.90 

43.20 








2,922.07 




600.00 
900.00 




21,413.22 




1,743.46' 






284.35 





.25 






332.85 
484.40 




940.01 








1,538.97 




43.35 








1,388.39 






1,934.40 
236.09 
2(59.96 

2,376.72 

1,305.05 
988.87 

1,317.60 
439.63 

2,481.24 
446.34 


81.60 




7,312.50 










135.95 
330.35 
718.20 
141.35 
528.25 




828.48 




30.50 




2,665.00 


50.00 


5,847.42 




5,405.35 


14.00 
20.00 


10.00 
60.21 
46.75 








2,776.85 








1,651.43 




70.00 


787.30 

177.55 

613.65 

22.45 




8,152.68 




1,007.50 


2,871.81 








100.00 


3,947.81 










909.91 




253.92 






65.40 
561.30 

71.55 
799.00 

99.90 
354.15 


162.50 


640.62 


43.47 

90.45 

544.55 

28.17 






307.85 

2,597.41 

238.60 

424.37 


2,231.81 


10.00 


2,851.18 

254.60 

14.80 

3,050.23 






700.00 
150.00 


7,627.24 






7,049.94 






2,882.74 








5,094.24 










• 




6.17 


200.70 


234.83 
490.20 

90.15 
174.86 
264.33 
322.17 

17.11 
150.95 
357.75 






2,013.20 
4,702.17 
1,377.10 
130.98 
1,535.33 
6,843.87 
2,073.85 


2,940.40 
3,073.10 
126.25 
193.50 
243.95 
966.80 
41.20 
394.35 
568.95 




14,090.43 





1,583.35 


60.00 
1,700.00 


11, 156. 76 




1.25 


3,324.50 
607.79 






10.97 


25.00 




4,000.00 

1,768.12 

134.50 




21,903.76 




2,405.00 


13,222.35 






2,' 677. 23 










2, 180. 90 


8.50 


9.75 






1,128.22 




3,142.22 




















449.75 

2,733.66 

802.38 

715.02 

996.05 

1,593.50 

1,010.96 

3,809.93 

1,332.94 

333.12 


10.15 

1,636.90 

327.05 

1,304.35 

1,685.60 

818.80 

385.00 

201.35 

442.25 

19.15 

26.70 

279.55 

2,168.59 

925.85 

955.25 

421. 15 

63.25 

32.20 




585.61 


8.00 


1,363.05 

45.00 

1.26 


347.89 

164.89 

123.50 

4.26 

45.61 

84.35 
192.04 
309.43 

52.34 
148.71 
111.95 

69.22 
667.20 
278.22 
146.86 
133.73 
120.18 




5,000.00 




15,943.94 




1,200.00 
240.-00 


4,518.82 






2,384.13 




1,000.00 


4,896.16 




196.90 






2,654.81 






250.00 


1,842.66 










8,284.57 


75.45 


324.12 
214.25 


$123.60 






4,561.99 


321.71 


1,252.50 


2,810.57 




393.29 


16.00 






250.00 


790.61 

2,470.88 

1,445.16 

2,598.04 

726.00 

764.23 

770.80 




1,519.81 








4,764.75 










2,350.00 


5, 720. 51 










6,727.74 












2,712.60 




169.10 








1,130.31 






600.00 


2,822.18 












911.09 


15,116.85 


11,500.20 


123.60 


25,473.28 


88,576.58 


46,088.24 


29,239.50 


352,36t.2A 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

Exhibit F 8. — Statement showing tlie expenses of the United States 



Judicial districts. 


Salaries, fees 

eipensea of 

marshals 


Fees of 


Fees of 


prisoners. 




e3.7oo.cn 
i5.a«i.nj 

p, 300.00 

6,683.00 
13,629.73 
18,600.110 
31,175.59 
15, 732. 66 

H. 450. (X! 

ii.ooo.oo 
8, 750. no 

4, 400. 00 

so, an. b» 

K 375. Of! 

o. rso. on 

33,600.00 
15,600.00 


in. liou. I'm 

3,854.70 
3,370.00 
13,000.00 

10,100.35 

15, aw. oo 

10,0X1.00 

*.;too.oo 

3.900.00 
5,10O.(X) 
1,903.0(1 
2. 1(10. 00 
41 *«•■■■ 

3,700.00 
4. 1175. IX) 
9,000.00 
6,300.00 


138,000.00 

19.0nd.no 
7,449.10 

7'600!00 
13.010. 00 
16.00.1 00 
3,700.00 
0.600. 00 
3, .500. 00 
1.150.00 
1,000.00 
7.543.50 
13,600.00 
6. 800. 00 
32,500.00 
17,000,00 


$8,200. (XI 
1,900.00 
1,433.25 

34,000.00 
12.453.09 
5.500.00 
16,500.00 

15. 553. SIS 

2. 4.50. im 

3.419,50 

2,1X11.53 

160.00 

4.5,466.60 
3,700.00 
2,625.00 

15,250.00 
3,300.00 






































10,301.10 

22,900.50 

30.ono.oo 

14,800.00 

43,174.40 
34,000.00 
40,923.82 
12.050.00 
12. -lOO. 00 
13, 629. 69 
20, 615. 21 
7, 707. 30 
4,950.00 
B, 800. 00 
*, 71X1.70 
13,710.00 
0,300.00 
7,320.11(1 
17,400.00 
14,402.00 
13,600.00 
13,407.80 
15,000.00 
13,239.66 
IB, 786. 73 
6,650.00 
IS, 450. no 
7,400.(10 
14,837.50 
1(1. 550. 411 

io, esc. on 

31, 765. 15 

i,oe8. es 
ie.39s.es 

28,100.00 
14,500.00 
13.3M.B6 
17,395.25 
23,000.00 
13,800.00 
10,803.85 
0,450.00 


3, 350. Of) 
15,500.00 

eiiooioo 

31. 500. ID 

11,000.00 

17,(iio. no 
0,71*). no 
7,aoo.oo 

18.IXM.00 
14,000,00 
9,524.00 

l 3Do.oo 

5,-500.00 
4.00O.1O 
H. 7:50. 00 
5.01X1. IX) 
5,500.00 
19,000.00 
8,050.00 

r>: mi. on 

8,900.00 
10,500.00 

5.010.00 

15,500.00 

i ; ooo. m 

3.135.00 
3! 700. (XI 
13.750.00 
5,500 no 
6,600.00 


;], 750. on 
11,500.00 
15.0(0.00 
8,750.00 
65,000.00 
31.700.00 
51,000.00 
5.7.50.00 
10,000.00 
ll.3tXl.on 
58.600 00 
II. 5O0. (XI 
1,700.00 
5,800.00 
S. .550.W 
5. 1171. 00 
1,700.00 
1,500.00 
9,350.00 
12, 750. 00 
11, 600. 00 

ii.ooo.no 

13. 5.50. on 

11,250.00 

17, ooo. oo 

2, 050. 00 

UXHj.OO 

5,200.00 
9,700.00 

2] 050.00 

6, 100. 00 

500.00 

24,000.00 

02.5110 1X.1 
13. 41X1. 00 

3.2111.00 
Ji.h5i.UI0 
15 SO.M 

I0150JXI 
4,500.00 


7.318.0X1 
9,369.62 
5,723.15 
5,950.00 

39,537.50 

37.000. (X) 

23,000.00 
3,437.11 
6,995.16 
2, 743. 50 

23,941.59 
460.00 
800.00 
1,374.75 
4,670.24 
5,050.23 

14,464.29 
1,100.00 
9,784.70 
4,7(0. 00 
1,950.00 
3, 700. 00 

26,843.43 
3,058.00 
5,374.75 
3,648.00 
852.76 
4,990,28 
8,034.80 

13,278,73 
4,232.13 

1', 000! 00 

16,723.55 
9,800.00 
6,800.00 
3,354.20 
48,390.24 
13.900.00 
3,259.41 
7,784.55 
4,744.61 












































Montana 
















6. 300. no 
I0.54J.SX) 
8,500.1X1 
8,750.00 

8,600. no 
ii.500.no 

3,300.00 
9,500.1X1 
18,000.00 






















3. 300. 00 
16,900.00 
10,500.00 
13,2117.50 
12,600.00 
9,982.30 
14,850.00 
21,600.00 
16,000.00 
7,860.00 
6,400.00 
8,741.40 

.1 Ml] 11 

lJ-.815.50 

iR.moo 

0,611101) 
P.. 500. (.HI 
7,851.07 


sxxi.on 

7,350.00 

11,500. (XI 
o. ti50.no 

( ••»• M> 

0.400.(10 
IAOOO.uTj 

iB,5no.no 

11,511 .15 

■i, UK). no 

) . 1XX). (X) 
5, 750. 1X1 
8,200.00 
'■■ 

7,700. IX) 

o.ono.ixi 

5.300.00 
3,523.35 


;i50.(») 
14,000.00 

25,000.00 
6,300.00 
6.600.00 

7] 000! 00 

17,500 00 

14,900.00 
3.5111.011 
0,950.00 
3,500.00 

30.5011. (Ii 
9,000.00 

22.000 IX) 
5,300.00 

13,900.00 


939.86 
5,686.73 
9.992.73 
5,200.00 

13 572.07 

1,900.00 
2,500.00 

3,600.00 
10.500.00 
1,803.60 
2,073.47 




Sontli Din-.ia 




















19|001 
9.854 
6,041 
1,801 


no 
(XI 
13 

3! 
00 
















Tot*l - 


1,1,59,215.13 


645,332.25 


952,627.60 


674,774.82 



d 



REPOKT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



courts incurred and paid in the fiscal year ending Junt 


30, 1900 






Im'iiitfs, 


Miscelln- 


■li-i.H.-l 
ueys. 


Pay of Pay of 
regular I special 


Foe* of 
clerks. 


Ss 


Rent of 


Total. 


.103.011 

1. (Mi. Ill 

uii i.i 
B.5iki.hi 

iir-.-J'^iKi 

IJ.Ht.MKI 

i, :ani. iw.= 

1.150. IK' 

731 i«i 

9.3INI.IH1 
4UI. OH 

1,1511.00 

iMiinuNi 


1850.00 

181.00 

moo 


$4..HU.8S 

1. 123 in 

l.u32,5u 
118. !N) 

;,.i;i-.iii 

.".. 379. Sit 
;. 7H.1. :.".! 

1 ,"- !; ' T . :: . : 

"'JHIMH, 

BHI. on 
5, IB*. 71 


(3,000.00 

2, 71*1. INI 

'""isisi.'ivV 

1. UK). Ill 

B.IHhi.ni, 
l.Uii.in 


SI 50. 00 

""".iiinVi 

,183. 1.1 
"""5U0.W 

'""re.50" 


■ i.!V;.i,5 
1 . n.52. :-[.-. 
1,(101.35 

"n.iio'iW 

4,173.73 
1.100. ,11 

1. 0.13.1" 
1137.00 
1.0S9.M5 


si. 731. BO 
B.3io.ini 
,-BH. S1I 
1.371.1,1 
.HIO.IJI.I 

l..Ui7. 71, 
OH 1.50 

mil. m 

,513.711 
343.10 

Tii.'.id" 

1.453.30 
l.i.OI.B,'. 
«.:>I1.15 
B, 575. 00 




illlB KH 73 

.v:, 3~o. i.-, 


S4SO.OU 
3,iWO.(Nl 

aoo.iw 




I.hki.imi 

a.irtMNi 

■MllTo 
B.1130.95 

3.013.7(1 
I.SINl.lll 

ril.7in.3l 

S11. INI 

3. 1.10. INI 


CO. 4:5. 15 
ll!l.ril!i.:17 
lll.r-Hl.dl 


" "ia6."oo" 

""iso.tui" 

""535."{Vi" 


lo.i'.'.o 11 
35.lHO.i55 
15, H.-HJ. S,3 

ll.iiril H5 


I'M. 01 
S.B.I 


1,4118.111 
1. 30V 71 
10.317.51 
1,017.95 


57. ('.Hi :, 
34. 111. 01 
13-5.157.4ii 


575. 00 
li.iiou.mj 
67.1.1111 

5.1135.111 

S.TSMIl 
l.SOO.II) 
B. 0-10. Ill 

wn>. mi 

850. i»i 
l.lni.m 

-.HI. INI 

(i.fllii mi 
armj. cxa 

b.bih.io 

In. ('.h.; m 

"'ijilMHI 

500.00 

3tni.UU 

:t.sm;.3ii 

2,i mi [<ii 

3,iuuii 

:jis.ou 

U. .150. 'HI 

1.310. (Hi 

051 Mil 

170 (X) 
7,7iXl.0l> 


1. 150. 00 
IS.iim.iil 

1.INI0.INI 

3.0.10.111 

3. .TUMI' 

a. loo. no 

3, UNI. INI 
SN1.1NI 
1.7W.INI 
ll.07H.iN) 

llfl.i'l 


:t. SBS. 3-1 

>..;;i i -» . • ■ 1 
il. 331 . 50 
.5. 597.37 
.5.5.51.99 
.-,. ;-,]-o. *(1 
(i. 171.1m 
5.721.70 

5. -531.09 
B. rum. in 


' 'i."(»Vi.'iiiV 

i!'.i'"'.oii 

3.B Kl 

I.BIII.mi 
1.105 i!B 
I.J.INJ.ili, 
1, Mil. Ill 
3 0111.111 


"ioo.oo 
soo.no 


1119.01 
309. Kl 

:i.lS'.ill 
1.878. 73 

i.Bi.i.'iii" 

1. 31 19.11.- 
1.02.5. *ri 
3.3111.97 
1,403.31 


101 iji 

1. iHNl.lt, 
83-1.30 
RS3.75 

" "f.TeT.'i/i 

1.(1111.75 
■ lill.Vlll 
5.471.30 
41114.5 
37. 115 
:S44. 01 
510. X, 
CBIi.OO 
300. 115 
1.111. HI 

1.713.1.1 
*-4.(HI 

l.llr.'.lCi 

1.5.57.111 
133. 70 

1. Bid. To 
31)7. INI 
18.05 
5ll:S.!Ni 
347. 10 

1.13.1.1(5 
IJtil.STi 
T06.10 


B, 301 . -V.i 
31, 701. (HI 


:!-:. 535. IB 
lls.KI'i.Vl 


"(i;sT"ii."5o" 

7,775.40 


.11.7011.01 
191.135. -3 
I13.31ii.rib, 
1-51. 751. 70 
5n.3M.iKi 
11,7311.39 




I1M.5BI.75 






1.153.37 

i.:w.'" 

B.HNl.IKi 
l.lilHI.IK) 

1.153.119 
1.131 I'll 

5.305.53 




s99..a.i 
1.001.87 






I,KB.ptl ft 118.88 




liil.375.35 


1.07.1 (Nl 

-.id-,. on 

ail. INI 
100. INI 

:(.. --i7.il-, 

1.950. H! 


5,ns0..5B 
l.KWTIi 

1. |1C I"! 

5. 35 (.41 

.-,. .SB. il 


' ' Olll. To' 

ij'iiti.ViiV 

'417.75' 


I.M7.07 
1,37(1.59 

3. :<■-:>. :» 

4.103.04 
1,779.13 

B, liio.ll 
1.7'li.lB 
Lout. ill 

1.550.53 






so.'oo 

"3/377"5l"j" 


Bo.rii.'B.lKi 
7S.301.07 
-51.II3H. S3 
15.511.00 
54. 331.70 
M. 1.53. in 
4i.riTi.iill 
73.1.11 74 


850.00 a, 500. (W 


337. SO 




7i)l.(iH 
I. rtKl.ru) 
1,7*1 11 

::.'_iii.oii 
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3.315 nil 
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108 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Exhibit F 4. — Contingent expenses, Department of Justice. 

Furniture and Repairs. 

1899. A. H. Chace & Bro.: 

July 28. For cleaning 1 , 182 yards carpets, at 2 cents per yard $23. 64 

The Julius Lansburgh Furniture and Carpet Co.: 

July 1. 1 oaktable $6.00 

2 clothes poles 4. 00 

2 mirrors 3. 50 

13. 50 

A. H. Chace & Bro. : 

Aug. 5. 356 yards carpet cleaned, at 2 cents 7. 12 

356 yards carpet subjected to superheated steam 7. 12 

14. 24 

James S. Topham: 

July 28. 1 dozen leather chair seats 13. 20 

Notley Anderson: 
July 27. Repairing umbrella stand, 1 galvanized basin for same. 1.50 
Caning 5 chairs, upholstering 2 chairs, and 1 perforated 

bottom 14. 10 

Aug. 4. Repairing chair (Mr. Plummer) 1.25 

Caning chair (Mr. Boyd ) 1. 75 

15. 1 cabinet, disbursing clerk 10. 00 

19. 1 foot rest (Mr.Pradt) 1.50 

Sept. 2. 1 cabinet, Attorney-General 12. 00 

42. 10 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Aug. 14. 1 8-drawer roll-top cabinet, order 649 40. 50 

Library Bureau: 
Sept. 29. 22 by 12 c, 1 oak case for 10 by 15 cm. cards; 1 commercial base 
for same; 24 c. 2 200 buff guides, halves; 25 thirds middles; 
12 thirds middles printed; 500 fawn cards; 15,000 tab. cards 

to order 178.37 

The Julius Lansburgh Furniture and Carpet Co.: 

Aug. 8. Mirror 1. 00 

Sept. 8. Table 2.25 

18. Repairing 12 shades 3. 00 

Oct. 30. 2 13 by 22 mirrors 3.00 

Nov. 7. 1 No. 133 wardrobe _ 12.50 

1 oak table 2. 75 

24. 50 

Notley Anderson: 
Oct. 20. Repairing, varnishing, and covering table (Mr. Pradt), 

No. 8 4.00 

Nov. 21. Repairing, varnishing, and putting on casters (Mr. 

Sheibley) 6.50 

25. 1 bulletin board No. 8 1. 75 

27. 1 screen, plate glass (Judge Thompson) 15. 00 

27. 25 

W. B. Moses & Sons: 

Sept. 11. 1 velour chair cushion 2. 50 

1 pillow 2.00 

1 pillow 1 2.50 

7.00 

1900. Henry Knoch: 

Jan. 31. For opening a desk lock, making a key, and repairs to 2 desks. . 2. 25 
1899. The Julius Lansburgh Furniture and Carpet Co. : 

Nov. 17. 1 oak table 5.75 

1 oak table 2. 75 

30. 1 flat-top desk 40. 00 

Dec. 29. Repairing desk 2.00 

1900. 

Jan. 10. 2 Wad. Vic. office chairs 11.00 

15. 1 Wad. Vic. office chair 5. 50 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 109 

1900. Henry Knoch — Continued. 

Jan. 18. 2§ yards holland, at 60 cents $1. 60 

1 roller 35 

M. and H., 1 shade .25 

1 pulley and cord .50 

23. 17$ yards new border, at $1.15 20. 12 

Altering and laying 69| yards old carpets, at 10 cents. . 6. 97 
Altering and laying 53 yards old carpets, at 10 cents. . . 5. 30 

31. 8 oak chairs, at $4.40 35.20 

$137. 29 

Julius Lansburgh : 

Mar. 1. Upholstering office chair 10.00 

Julius Lansburgh: 

Mar. 21. 12 feet leather, at 35 cents. 4. 20 

6 yards gimp, at 10 cents .60 

9 dozen leather nails, at 10 cents .90 

Upholstering and repairing 2 chairs 9. 00 

14. 70 

Notlev Anderson: 

Jan. 24. Moving bookcase and desk (Mr. Ashford ) 1. 25 

Feb. 12. Repairing and caning 1 chair, third floor .75 

19. Repairing and caning 6 chairs and 1 perforated bottom. 5. 50 

Repairing desk, third floor 9. 50 

Mar. 20. Repairing cases 2. 00 

1 9. Repairing, varnishing, and covering screen 3. 50 

23. Altering desk for typewriter 23. 80 

46. 30 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Feb. 27. For 1 4-drawer desk 9. 00 

1899. Wm. B. Moses & Sons: 
Oct. 18. 1 oak Morris chair frame 5.00 

1 set of cushions 4. 50 

Dec. 14. 1 Gol. oak S. and T. chair 6.00 

23. 30£ yards metal binding laid, at 20 cents 6. 10 

1900. 

Jan. 10. Reupholstering 2 sofas in same covers 11.75 » 

33. 35 

Julius Lansburgh: 

Apr. 2. 2 Vic. oflice chairs 12.00 

2 Cong, office chairs 18. 00 

30.00 

James B. Lambie: 

Feb. 13. 2drawerlocks 80 

19. 1 drawer lock .40 

1.20 

Notlev Anderson: 

Apr. 2. 1 W. P. bookcase for Mr. Sheibley, K street 9. 50 

May 19. Repairing table for room 405, K street 1. 50 

24. Repairing and caning 3 chairs 4. 50 

Repairing and covering with leather 4 chairs 9. 87 

25. 37 

Apr. 20. To making 2 desk cabinets, 4 feet 11 inches long, 16 inches high, 

and 11 J inches deep, made into pigeonholes as per estimate of 

February 19, 1900, at $9.50 each 19.00 

Julius Lansburgh: 

Apr. 27. 1 flat-top desk 17.50 

May 16. 32 yards grass, at 60 cents 19.20 



36.70 



Books for Department Library. 



1899. J. B. Lippincott & Co. : 

Aug. 1. 1 copy Biographical Dictionary (sheep binding) net 8. 00 

Lawyers* Cooperative Club Co. : 

Aug. 3. Lawyers' Reports Annotated, vols. 39-43 (at $5) 25. 00 

Digest Lawyers' Reports Annotated, vols. 21-40 5. 00 

30.00 



110 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

Aug. 7. North Carolina Criminal Code and Digest, Peml>erton 

and Jerome $6. 00 

New York Code Civil Procedure, 1898 3. 00 

Annotated Corporation Laws of the States, 3 vols 18. 00 

Compiled Laws of Michigan, 4 vols 9. 50 

Wisconsin Statutes, 1898, 2 vols 9. 00 



T.L.Cole: 

Aug. 5. Pennsylvania Statutes at Large, vol. 5 2. 35 

Kentucky Statutes Supplement, 1894-1898, 1 vol 3. 10 

Pratt's National Bank Laws, 1 vol 2. 00 

Hawaii Laws, 1840, reprint, 1 vol 4. 00 

Rhode Island Public Laws, 1808, 1 vol *. . 4. 00 

Maryland Archives, 1637-1692, 4 vols 18. 00 

Chickasaw Statutes, 1899, 1 vol 5. 00 

South Dakota Statutes, 1899, 2 vols 15. 00 



W. H. Lowdermilk: 

Aug. 7. Valentine, Kansas Digest, 2 vols 15. 00 

Tucker on Constitution, 12 vols 8. 00 

Pennsylvania State Reports, vol. 189 2. 00 

Appellate Division New York Supreme Court Reports, 

vols. 36 and 37 6.00 

Wood, Master and Servant 4. 50 

Burns, Indiana Index Digest, vol. 2 10. 00 

Colorado Appeal Reports, vol. 11 5. 00 

New York Appeal Reports, vol. 158 1. 50 

Indiana Appellate, vol. 21 3. 75 

Smith, Digest National Bank Decisions 4. 00 

Balser, First Steps in International Law 4. 20 

Oklahoma Reports, vol. 7 5. 00 

Jefferson's Works, edited by Ford, 9 vols., No. 36 45. 00 

Gorham's Life of Stanton, 2 vols 4. 00 

Scone, Newman & Battle's Spanish Dictionary 4. 00 

Memorial, H. D. Gilpin 1.00 

Mackenzie, Lives of Butler and Hoyt 1. 25 

Rush, Recollections of the English and French Courts, 

2 vols 4.00 

Pennsylvania Superior Courts Reports, vol. 9..; 2. 00 

New York Appellate Reports, vol. 38 3. 00 

Fiske, Discovery of America, 2 vols. . . u 

Fiske, Old Virginia, 2 vols 

Fiske, American Revolution, 2 vols 

Fiske, Critical Period, Beginning of New England, 2 vols. 

Illinois Appellate Court Reports, vol. 80 3. 50 

Travelers' Official Railway Guide, October, 1896, to 

1899, 3 vols 15.00 



12.80 



$45.50 



John Bryne & Co. : 

Sept. 7. Vol. 100, U. S. Reports 1.75 

Adams's Defense of the Constitution, 3 vols 4. 00 

Vol. 173, U. S. Reports with parts (4 copies) 12. 00 

Vol. 173, U. S. Reports (7 copies) 14.00 

Desty's Federal Procedure, ninth edition, 4 vols., 

(3 copies) 36.00 

Missouri Digest (Patterson), vol. 4 7. 50 

Pepper and Lewis Pennsylvania Digest, vol. 4 7. 50 

Woerner's American Law of Administration, 2 vols 12. 00 

Vol. 7, Thompson on Corporations 6. 00 

Virginia Digest (Hurst), vol. 3 6.00 



53.45 



164.50 



The Lawyer's Cooperative Publishing Co.: 
Sept. 15. U. S. Supreme Court Reports, Book 42 5.00 

Washington Law Book Co. : 

Sept. 7. English Law Dictionary 6. 50 

American Practice Reports, vol. 1 5. 00 



11.50 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. Ill 

1899. John Bryne & Go. — Continued. 

Sept. 7. Virginia Reports, vol. 96 $4. 00 

Northwest Digest (Church) , supplemental 7. 50 

American Bankruptcy Reports, vol. 1 5. 00 

May's Supreme Court Practice '. 6. 00 

Greenlear on Evidence, vol. 1, sixteenth edition 5. 00 

South Carolina Criminal Digest ( Hey ward ) 6. 00 

American Law Review, September, October, 1898 1. 00 

Albany Law Journal, vol. 59, No. 21 .25 

$141. 50 

John Bryiie & Co. : 

Sept. 7. Maryland Code Supplement ( 1890-1898) 6. 50 

T. and J. W. Johnson & Co. : 

Sept. 7. 1 Pennsylvania Laws, 1788, first, second, and third sittings 

1 Pennsylvania Laws, 1789, first sitting > 40. 00 

1 Pennsylvania Laws, 1790; second sitting 

The Boston Book Co. : 

Sept. 4. McG loin's Louisiana Reports, vol. 2 10.00 

Manson's Bankruptcy Reports, vol. 5 6. 50 

Encyclopedia of the Laws of England, 12 vols 60. 00 

Law Journal Reports, Journal and Digest, 1899 23. 00 



The Robert Clarke Co. : 
Sept. 18. Acts of Ohio, second session, thirty-third assembly, vol. 

33 2.00 

Local acts of Ohio, first session, twenty-third assembly, 
vol.23 6.00 



99.50 



8.00 

Arthur Whiteley: 

Sept. 19. Public acts of North Carolina, 1715-1803 15. 00 

Statute Law T Book Co. : 

Sept. 22. Cherokee Laws, 1881-1883, 1 vol 8.00 

Chickasaw Laws, 1878-1884, 1 vol 12. 00 

Muscogee Laws, 1880, revised, and 1880 and 1881, 2 vols. 20. 00 

Virginia Laws, 1814-15, 1 vol 6.50 

Arkansas Laws, 1819-20, 1835, facsimile, 2 vols 25. 00 

Connecticut Laws, 1832, 1 vol 8. 75 

Florida Laws, 1833, 1 vol 8.50 

Indiana Laws, 1844, 1 vol 6. 75 

Iowa Laws, 1840, 1 vol 12.50 

Maine Laws,1822,l vol 10.00 

Maryland Laws, 1787 and 1790, 2 vols 18. 00 

New Hampshire Laws, 1830, 1 vol 3. 75 

New Mexico Laws, 1853, 1 vol 15. 00 

New York Laws,1819,l vol 6.50 

North Carolina Laws, 1802-1805-1807, 3 vols 18. 00 

Choctaw Laws, 1898-99,1 vol 1.75 



W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

Sept. 9. District of Columbia Appeal Cases, vol. 13 5. 00 

Michigan Reports, vol. 115 3. 25 

Illinois Appellate Reports, vol. 81 3. 50 

Montana Reports, vol. 21 5. 75 

Iowa Reports, vol. 107 2. 75 

Bliss Code Pleading, third edition 6. 00 

Franklin's Works, 10 vols 15. 00 

New York Appellate Division Reports, vols. 39 and 40. . 6. 00 

Kleber, Void Judicial Sales 4. 50 

Wisconsin Reports, vols. 101 2. 25 

Illinois Appellate Court Reports, vol. 82 3. 50 

West Publishing Co. : 

Sept. 7. Northwest Reporter, vol. 78 3. 75 

Southeast Reporter, vol. 32 3. 75 

Northeast Reporter, vol. 53 3. 75 

New York Supplement, vol. 57 3. 75 

Southwest Supplement, vols. 50 and 51 7. 50 



181.00 



57.50 



It2 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. West Publishing Co.— Continued. 

Sept. 7. Southern Supplement^ vol. 25 $3. 75 

Federal Supplement, vol. 93 (3 copies) 10. 50 

American Digest, 1899 6.00 

Century Digest, vols. 9 and 10 1 2. 00 

$54.75 

The Carswell Co., Limited: 

Sept. 7. Canadian Supreme Ccurt Reports, vol. 28 3. 80 

Queensland Supreme Court Reports, vol. 1 8. 65 

Nova Scotia Reports, vol. 31 4. 20 

Consolidated Digest of Quebec Reports, vol. 1 7. 90 

24. 55 

T. L. Cole: 

Sept. 12. For Hawaiian Laws, 1887, 1890 (at $5 each), 2 vols 10. 00 

Stevens & Haynes: 

Sept. 12. Irish Reports, 1898 20.54 

Law Magazine, August, 1898, to May, 1899 5. 00 

25.54 

Marshall & Bruce Co. : 

Sept. 30. Private Acts of Tennessee, 1833 5.00 

C. N. Caspar Co. : 

Oct. 6. Laws of Wisconsin, October, 1847 15.00 

C. J. Harris: 

Oct. 11. Burn's Law Dictionary 3.00 

E. J. Best: 

Oct. 30. Collection of the Public Acts of North Carolina, by 

Swann, 1752 20. i ; ; 

Ernest Lee Conant: 

Nov. 2. Alcubilla-Macelo-Martinez iMccionario, 15 vols 68. 07 

Pastor y Avira, Derechos Romanos, 1 vol 1. 60 

Abella, Fermin, Formulario, 1 vol .40 

Antequera, Jos6 Maria, Historia de la Legislacion, 1 vol . . 1. 30 

Broca G.M. de, Manuel de Formulario, 1 vol 1. 00 

Clarens, Angel Ley Hipotecaria, 1 vol .80 

Colmeiro, Manuel Derecho Administrativo, 2 vols 1. 20 

Colmenares, Eduardo Alonso, Jurisdiciones Especiales, 

2 vols 64 

Codigo Civil, 1 vol 90 

Delgado, P. Y. Derecho Civil, 1 vol 2.40 

Dorado, Montero Problemas Juridicas, 1 vol 1. 00 

D' Aguameo, Legislacion Civil, 1 vol 1. 20 

Erenchen, Felix, Anales de la Isla de Cuba, 6 vols 3. 20 

Falcon, Modesto, Codigo Civil, 5 vols 4. 80 

Gomez-Salazar Derecho Canonico, 3 vols 3. 70 

Galnido, Leon, Legislacion Hipoterania, 4 vols 9. 60 

Codigo de Comerico, 1 vol .90 

Codigo Penal, 1 vol .90 

Hernena y Espenosa, Diccionario, 7 vols 4. 40 

Hidalgo, Santos, Practicas Forenses, 1 vol .40 

Lamas Varela Luis, Proc6dimientos Civiles, 1 vol .40 

Reces, Jos6, Ley de Enjuiciamiento Civil, 6 vols 3. 70 

Ruiz-Juan Eugenio, Ultimas Leyes y ordenes, 1 vol . 80 

Marfa Juan, Resumen Legislativo, 4 vols 2. 80 

Moreno, Instrumentos Publicos, 1 vol .64 

Santa Maria, Derecho Admin, and Derecho Politico, 2 

vols 6.00 

Scaevola, O. M., Codigo Civil, 12 vols 27. 82 

150.57 

Goodpasture Book Co. : 

Oct. 5. Tennessee Acts, First to Fifth Assembly, 1800 10. 00 

Tennessee Acts, First to Seventh Assembly, 1807 10. 00 

Tennessee Acts, First to Eighth Assembly, 1809 8. 00 

Tennessee Acts, First to Ninth Assembly, 1811 10. 00 

Tennessee Acts, Second to Ninth Assembly, 1812 10. 00 

48.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 113 

1899. Lawson D. Melton: 

Oct. 30. South Carolina Acts, December, 1805, December, 1811 . $4. 00 

South Carolina Acts, December, 1812, December, 1817. 4.00 

South Carolina Acts, December, 1818, December, 1823. 4.00 

South Carolina Acts, December, 1824, December, 1829 . 4. 00 

South Carolina Acts, December, 1829, December, 1832 . 3. 00 

South Carolina Acts, December, 1837, December, 1839 . 3. 00 

$22.00 

W. O. Davies & Co. : 

Sept. 30. Ohio Acts, vols. 1 and 2 25.00 

Edward Thompson Co. : 
Nov. 20. Vol. 12 American and English Encyclopedia Law, sec- 
ond edition 6. 00 

Vols. 15-16 Encyclopaedia of Pleading and Practice 12. 00 

18.00 

W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

Nov. 20. Pennsylvania State Reports, vol. 190 2. 00 

Georgia Reports, vol. 105 4. 00 

Utah Reports, vol. 17 5.35 

Fiske, Dutch and Quaker Colonies, 2 vols 3. 20 

Jefferson's Works, vol. 10 5. 00 

New York Reports, vol. 159 1. 50 

Meigs, Growth of Constitution 2. 00 

Texas Supreme Reports, vol. 92 3. 00 

Texas Criminal Reports, vol. 38 3. 30 

Texas Civil Court Reports, vols. 15, 16, 17 9. 00 

Webb & Meigs, Tennessee Digest, vol. 2 8. 00 

Connecticut Reports, vol. 71 3. 00 

Bullitt, Review of Constitution 2. 00 

Pennsylvania State Reports, vol. 191 2. 00 

Maryland Reports, vol. 88 .' 3. 75 

Indiana Reports, vol. 152 3. 50 

New York Criminal Reports, vol. 13 5. 00 

District of Columbia Appeal Cases, vol. 14 5. 00 

U. S. Circuit Court Reports, vols. 50, 59, 60 • 9. 00 

Bailey, Law oi Jurisdiction, 2 vols 12. 00 

Foreign Policy of United States 1. 50 

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Woolsey, American Foreign Policy 1. 25 

Nebraska Reports, vol. 56 3. 00 

Georgia Reports, vol. 106 4. 00 

Illinois Appellate Court Reports, vol. 83 3. 50 

106.10 

John Byrne & Co. : 

Nov. 20. 4 vols. 174 U. S. Reports 12.00 

Harvard Law Review, April, 1898, to April, 1899 2. 50 

Dreyfus Cases . ... .50 

Vol. 4 Notes California Reports 7.20 

Vol. 7 Ohio Circuit Reports 3.00 

. Corwin, Abstract of Titles 2.50 

7 vols. 174 U. S. Reportse 14.00 

Vol. 172 Massachusetts Report 2. 10 

Vol. 182 Notes U. S. Reports 13.00 

Abbott's Clerk's Assistant 6.00 

Lowell on Bankruptcy 6. 00 

Vol. 5 Pennsylvania Digest 7. 50 

Greeley's Patent Law, $5; Vol. 173 U. S. Reports, $2 . . 7. 00 

2 vols. Perry on Trusts, fifth edition 12.00 

95.60 

West Publishing Co. : 

Nov. 13. Federal Reports, vols. 94, 95, 3 copies each, at $3 per copy 18.00 

New York Supplement, vols. 58, 59 7. 50 

Atlantic, vol. 43 3. 75 

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N. W., vol. 79 3.75 

Supplement Court, advance sheets to October 24, 1899 . 2. 00 

Century Digest, vols. 11, 12 12.00 

Statutes Indian Territory 10. 00 

H. Doc. 9 8 



114 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. R. A. Dinsmore: 

Jan. 10. HalsteaoVs History of the War With Spain $4. 00 

Washington Law Book Co. : 

Jan. 6. American Practice Reports, vol. 2 5. 00 

N. D. McDonald Co., Limited: 

Jan. 24. Brewer's Orations, vols. 1 and 2, at $4 8. 00 

John Byrne & Co. : 

Jan. 27. American Law Review, January to December, 1899 $5.00 

American Law Register, January to December, 1899 ... 3. 00 

Washington Law Reporter, January to December, 1899. 3. 00 

North American Review, January to December, 1899 . . 5. 00 

Vol. 174 U. S. Reports 2.00 

Vol. 2 Abbott's Forms of Pleadi ng 6. 00 

Dos Passos on Inheritance Tax Law, second edition ... 6. 00 

Greenleafs Evidence, vols. 2 and 3, sixteenth edition.. 10.00 

Bispham's Equity, sixteenth edition 5. 00 

General Digest, vol. 7 _ - 6. 00 

Rose, Notes on U. S. Reports, vol. 3 6. 50 

Rose, Notes on U. S. Reports, vol. 4 6. 50 

Bancroft, The New Pacific 2.50 

Worth's National Citations 1. 50 

Gould and Tucker, Notes on U. S. Revised Statutes, 2 

vols 15.00 

Index to Pepper and Lewis Digest of Pennsylvania Deci- 
sions 3. 50 

86. 50 

West Publishing Co. : 

Jan. 29. Southeast Reporter, vol. 23 3. 75 

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Federal Reports, vols. 1 to 56 168. 00 

194.25 

W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

Feb. 2. Brightley, New York Digest, vol. 5 10. 00 

Blackman, Making of Hawaii 1 . 60 

Martin, Civil Procedure 3. 50 

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Michigan Reports, vol. 116 3. 25 

Smith on Equitable Remedies 5. 00 

West Virginia Reports, vol. 45 3. 50 

U. S. Appeal Reports, vols. 61 and 62 6. 00 

Baeck, de la Propriete Privee, etc 3. 70 

New York Appellate Division Reports, vols. 41 and 42. 6. 00 

Annotated Corporation Laws of all the States, vol. 4 . . . 4. 50 

Texas Civil Appeal Reports, vol. 19 3. 00 

Colorado's Reports, vol. 25 5. 00 

Penneville, Delaware Reports, vol. 1 10. 00 

Illinois Appellate Court Reports, vol. 84 3. 50 • 

World Almanac, 1900 25 

Texas Civil Appeal Reports, vol. 18 3. 00 

Missouri Appeal Reports, vols. 76, 77, 78 7. 50 

81.30 

Brentano's: 

Jan. 23. 1 Whittaker Almanac 1.00 

The Lawyers' Cooperative Publishing Co. : 

Feb. 3. Lawyers Reports Annotated, vol. 44 5. 00 

U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vol. 43 5. 00 

Index Digest U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vols. 1 and 2. 12. 00 
Index Digest U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vol. 4 (2 

copies) 7. 00 

29.00 

Canadian Law Book Book Co. : 

Feb. 3. Subscription Canada Law Journal, 1899 5. 00 

British Columbia Statutes, 1897, 2 vols 15. 00 

20.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 115 

1900. Lemcke & Buechner: 

Feb. 2. 1 Revue de droit internat., 1899 $4.40 

1 Centralblatt f . Rechtswissenschaft, XIX 3. 60 

$8.00 

The Carswell Co., Limited: 

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New Brunswick Eq. Reports, vol. 1 7. 25 

Practice Reports, vol. 18 5. 20 

Ontario Reports, vol. 29 5. 30 

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33. 30 

Statute Law Book Co. : 

Feb. 24. Alabama Acts, 1892-93, 1 vol 1.50 

New York Laws, 1808, Priv. 1810, Pub. 2 vols 45. 00 

Connecticut Statutes, Swift's System of Laws, 1790-92. . 4. 05 

50. 55 

Little, Brown & Co. : 

Apr. 2. Law Quarterly Review for 1899 2. 75 

English Law Reports, 1899 (parts) 28.50 

Subscription to Law Times and Reports to April, 1900. . 18. 00 

49.25 

Ed. D. Peirce: 

Apr. 9. Encyclopedia of Forms, vols. 8, 9, and 10, at $6 18. 00 

The Tribune Association: 

Apr. 9. Tribune Almanacs, 1889-1900 2.00 

W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

June 18. United States Appeal Reports, vol. 63 " 3. 00 

Almanac de Gotha, 1900 2.50 

Meigs's Tennessee Digest, vol. 3 8. 00 

Pennsylvania County Court Reports, vol. 22 5. 00 

Utah Reports, vol. 18 5.35 

New York Civil Procedure Reports, vol. 29 3. 50 

Kentucky Reports, vol. 100 4. 75 

New Jersey Law Reports, vol. 62 3. 25 

Pennsylvania State Reports, vol. 192 2. 00 

Walton's Civil Law in Spain and Spanish America 6. 25 

Colorado Court of Appeals Reports, vol. 12 5. 00 

Pennsylvania Superior Court Reports, vol. 11 2. 00 

Indiana Appellate Reports, vol. 22 3. 75 

White, English-Latin Dictionary 1. 20 

Rhode Island Reports, vol. 20 6. 50 

Tennessee Reports, vol. 101 3. 50 

Nebraska Reports, vol. 57 3. 00 

Arkansas Reports, vol. 65 3. 25 

Parton, General Butler 1. 25 

Butler's Book 2.00 

Walker, Law of Nations, vol. 1 3. 00 

New Jersey Equity Reports, vol. 57 3. 25 

Illinois Appeal Reports, vol. 85 3. 50 

New York Appellate Division Reports, vol. 43 3. 00 

Maryland Reports, vol 89 3. 75 

Tennessee Reports, vol. 102 3. 50 

New York Appeal Reports, vol. 160 1. 50 

Goodloe, Birth of Republic 1. 50 

McMasters's History of the United States, vol. 5 ..... . 2. 00 

Underhillon Wills, 2 vols 12.00 

Kentucky Reports, vol. 101 4. 75 

Georgia Reports, vol. 107 4. 00 

- Heydecker and McMahon's War- Re venue Law 2. 25 

Pennsylvania State Reports, vol. 193 2. 00 

Montana Reports, vol. 22 5. 75 

Wisconsin Reports, vol. 103 2. 25 

Wisconsin Reports, vol. 102 2. 25 

Illinois Appellate Reports, vol 86 3. 50 

Michigan Reports, vols. 117 and 118 6. 50 

Texas Criminal Reports, vol. 39 3. 30 



116 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. W. H. Lowdermilk & Co.— Continued. 

June 18. New York Appellate Division Reports, vols. 44 and 45. . $6. 00 

Missouri Appeal Reports, vols. 79 and 80 5. 00 

Arkansas Reports, vol. 66 3. 25 

New York Court of Appeals Reports, vol. 161 1. 50 

Colorado Court of Appeals Reports, vol. 13 5. 00 

Indiana Reports, vol. 153 '. 3. 50 

Oklahoma Reports, vol. 8 5. 00 

Texas Civil Appeals Reports, vols. 20 and 21 6. 00 

New York Appellate Division Reports, vols. 46 and 47. . 6. 00 

Howard, United States Reports, vol. 15 5. 50 

Illinois Appellate Reports, vol. 87 3. 50 

Utah Reports, vol. 19 5.35 

Pennsylvania Superior Court Reports, vol. 12 2. 00 

. $206. 20 

John Byrne & Co: 

June 18. Oregon Reports, vol. 33 4. 50 

Note on U. S. Reports (Roe), vol. 5 . . 6. 50 

Index, Digest U. S. Superior Court Reports, 4 vols 20. 00 

Opinions Attorney-General, vol. 2 3. 00 

Common-Law Practice Forms .75 

U. S. Statutes at Large, vols. 1 and 7 5. 00 

Digest Pennsylvania Decisions (Pipper & Lewis), vol. 6. 7. 45 

47. 20 

Benjamin Cases, annotated, 6 vols 14.05 

American Bankruptcy Reports, vol. 2 5. 00 

Pennsylvania District Court Reports, vol. 8 5. 00 

Ohio Circuit Court Reports, vol. 18 3. 00 

Ruling Cases on Patent Law 6. 50 

Massachusetts Reports, vol. 173 2. 00 

Sanders's Patent Digest, 1899 3.50 

Maupin's Digest District of Columbia Reports 10. 00 

U. S. Reports, vol. 175, 4 copies, at $3 12. 00 

U. S. Reports, vol. 175, 7 copies, at $2 14. 00 

Thayer's Cases on Constitutional Law, 2 vols 12. 00 

Abbott's New York Digests, Reports and Statutes, 1898 

and 1899 8.50 

Bright, Submarine Telegraph 25. 00 

California Reports, vol. 126 2. 50 

123.05 

The Boston Book Co. : 

June 21. Jones Index, vol. 2 10. 00 

Weekly Reporter, vol. 47 11 . 00 

21.00 

West Publishing Co. : 

June 15. Century Digest, vols. 14, 15, 16, and 17 24. 00 

Pacific Reporter, vols. 58 and 59 7. 50 

Northwestern Reporter, vols. 80 and 81 7. 50 

Northeastern Reporter, vols. 55 and 56 7. 50 

Atlantic Reporter, vols. 44 and 45 7. 50 

Southwestern Reporter, vols. 53, 54, and 55 11. 25 

Southeastern Reporter, vol. 34 3. 75 

Southern Reporter, vol. 26 3. 75 

New York Supplement, vols. 60, 61, 62, and 63 15. 00 

Federal Reporter, vols. 91, 98, and 99, 3 copies each ... 27. 00 

Barrows on Negligence 3. 75 

Blue Book, vol. 1 3.75 

American Digest, 993 6. 00 

Federal Cases, vol. 31 10.00 

138. 25 

By discount 52. 50 

85.75 

Lawyers' Cooperative Publishing Co. : 

June 15. Lawyers' Reports Annotated, vols. 44 and 45 10. 00 

U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vol. 43 5. 00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 117 

1900. Lawyers' Cooperative Publishing Go. — Cont'd. 

June 15. Index, Digest U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vols. 1 

and 2 $12.00 

Index, Digest U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vol. 4 (2 
copies) 7. 00 

$34.00 

Edward Thompson Co. : 

June 15. Vols. 13-14-15, second edition, American and English 

Encyclopedia of Law 18.00 

Vols. 17-18, Encyclopedia of Pleading and Practice 12. 00 

30.00 

N. D. McDonald Co., Limited: 

June 18. Brewer's World's Best Orations, vols. 3-8, at $4 24. 00 

1899. Stevens & Haynes: 

Nov. 23. Law Magazine, August and November, 1899 2. 50 

1900. 

May 8. Irish Law Reports, 1899, 2 vols. , compared 17. 90 

Law Magazine, February and May, 1900 2. 50 

Irish Law Reports, Digest, 2 vols. , compared 9. 94 

32. 84 

M. E. Mann: 

June 18. For Appleton's Cyclopedia American Biography, vol. 7, sheep 

binding 5. 00 

Books for Office of Solicitor. 

1899. W. C. Morrison: 

July 31. Arkansas, vol. 57 3. 00 

New York Report, vol. 158 1.50 

Pennsylvania Report, vol. 189 1. 50 

6.00 

W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

July 14. Desty's Federal Procedure, 4 vols 12. 00 

John Byrne & Co. : 
July 15. Randolph, Commercial Paper 18. 00 

West Publishing Co. : 
Oct. 2. Federal Reporter, vols. 92, 93, and 94, at $3.50 10. 50 

W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

Sept. 27. D. C. Appeal Cases, vol. 13 5.00 

U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vol. 174 2.00 

7.00 

Edward Thompson & Co. : 

Sept. 28. Vol. 12, American and English Encyclopedia of Law 6. 00 

Washington Law Book Co. : 

Sept. 18. English Law Dictionary 6. 50 

Walter C. Morrison: 

Oct. 4. Pennsylvania Report, vol. 90 1.50 

Nov. 4. Wisconsin Reports, 89, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 

101 30.25 

9. Pennsylvania State Report 1. 50 

33. 25 

Edward Thompson Co. : 

Nov. 29. Vol. 13 of American and English Encyclopedia of Law, second 

edition 6.00 

1900. Edward Thompson Co. : 

Jan. 27. Vol. 13, second edition, Encyclopaedia of Law 6. 00 

G. L. Dobson: 

Feb. 5. Iowa Reports, vols. 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, and 107 9. 70 

W . H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

Feb. 3. District of Columbia Appeal Cases, vol. 14 5. 00 

9. Illinois Reports, vols. 175, 176, 178, 179, and 180 15. 00 

Massachusetts Reports, vol. 172 2. 50 

14. Kentucky Reports, vols. 96, 97, 98, and 99 16. 00 

38. 50 



118 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. John Byrne & Co. : 

Mar. 13. West Virginia Reports, vols. 38 to 45 inclusive, $3 per vol $24. 00 

West Publishing Co. : 

6. Federal Reporter, vols. 95, 96, and 97, at $3.50 each 10. 50 

John Byrne & Co. : 

31. Maupin's Digest of District of Columbia Reports $10. 00 

Rose Notes on U. S. Supreme Court Reports, vols. 1 to 5 . . 32. 50 

42.50 

John Byrne & Co. : 

Apr. 3. California Reports, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 7 vols., 

at $3.50 24.50 

Ohio Reports, 58, 59, 60, 3 vols., at $2.50 7.50 

District of Columbia Reports, vol. 18 4. 00 

36.00 

W. H. Morrison: 

May 7. New York Appeals Report, vol. 159 1. 50 

Wisconsin Reports, vol. 91 2. 50 

Maryland Reports, vol. 88 4. 00 

Pennsylvania Reports, vols. 192, and 193 4. 00 

Illinois Reports, vol. 177 3. 25 

15. 25 

West Publishing Co. : 

June 11. Federal Reporter, vol. 98 3. 50 

W. H. Lowdermilk & Co. : 

June 8. 1 U. S. Report, vol. 175 2.00 

1 Brantley, Maryland Digest 3. 00 

1 Kentucky Reports, vol. 100 3.80 

8. 80 

Stationery. 

1899. Fred. A. Schmidt: 

July 26. 1 bottle of Pomeroy's snow-white ink .12 

Easton & Rupp: 

July 22. 50 reams bond letter, at $1.65, item 3 82. 50 

75 reams bond cap, at $1.65, item 12 123. 75 

206.25 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

July 25. 3 gross Dreka pens, No. 3, 52} cents „ 1. 58 

5 gross Miller pens, No. 4, 45 cents 2. 25 

9 gross Spencerian pens, 64J cents 5. 77 

1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 14 .35 

2 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 122, 37.7 cents .75 

1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 161 B, 43.5 cents. .43 

25 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 048, 34.8 cents 8. 70 

1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 442, 43.5 cents .44 

1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 182, 31.9 cents .32 

2 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 209, 43.5 cents .87 

11 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 312, 43.5 cents 4. 78 

1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 79, 34.8 cents .35 

2 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 314, 43.5 cents .87 

3 gross Esterbrook pens, silver, No. 1, 58 cents 1. 74 

3 gross Esterbrook pens, silver, No. 2, 43.5 cents 1. 30 

2 dozen T. W. brushes, 69 cents 1.38 

28. 30 great gross bands, No. 16, $1.55 46.50 

10 great gross bands, No. 17, $1.66 16. 60 

168 gross bands, No. 32, 40 cents 67. 20 

24 gross bands, No. 000J, 66 cents 15. 84 

24 gross bands, No. 000}, 88 cents 21.12 

12 gross bands, No. 00J, $1.11 13.32 

2 gross erasers, T. W., No. 1087, 60 cents per dozen 14. 40 

4,000cards, 3£ by 5J, $1.85 7.40 

1,000 cards, 2 by 3| 80 

4,000 fasteners, R., No. 1, 79 cents 3. 16 

2,000 fasteners, R., No. 2, 94 cents 1.88 

1,000 fasteners, R., No. 3 1.24 

29. 2 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 135 75 

1 dozen fountain sponge cups 3. 15 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 119 

1899. R. Carter Ballantyne — Continued. 

July 29. 3 dozen paper weights, 65 cents $1. 95 

1£ dozen pen trays, 82 cents 1. 23 

31. 10,000 Farmer's clips, $1.05 10. 50 

$258. 92 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

Aug. 1.8 reams Treasury blotting paper, $8.50 68. 00 

3. 1 gross Spencerian pens, No. 13 .64 

3 dozen pyramid pins, No. 3, 56.4 cents 1. 69 

3 dozen pyramid pins, No. 4, 61.4 cents 1. 84 

7. 1£ dozen scissors, 6-inch, $3.15 4. 72 

10. 2 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 314 .87 

3. 1 gross Esterbrook probate pens .43 

12. 2 dozen baskets, No. 2013, $4.18 8.36 

14. 72 notebooks, No. 1337J 3. 06 

300 scratch books, No. 4026 3. 15 

100 scratch books, No. 4060 3. 05 

150 scratch books, No. 4068, $10 per 100 15. 00 

150 scratch books, No. 4070, $16 per 100 24. 00 

134.81 

R. P. Clarke & Co. : 

Aug. 2. 3 dozen silk ribbon, i-inch, $1.74 5.22 

R. P. Andrews & Co. : 
July 27. 48 dozen typewriter erasers — 

12 dozen No. 875, at 16 cents per dozen 1. 92 

12 dozen No. 896, at 23 cents per dozen 2. 76 

24 dozen No. 874, at 30 cents per dozen 7. 20 

i dozen arm rests, $3. 10 per dozen 1. 55 

6 dozen shorthand notebooks, No. 1142, at 68 cents per 

dozen 4. 08 

100 tablets, perforated and ruled 3. 25 

20.76 

Frank M. Evans: 

July 14. 1,500 sheets cobweb carbon, 8 by 10, 3 cents 45. 00 

1,500 sheets cobweb carbon, 8 by 12J, 3 cents 45. 00 

90.00 

American Hard Rubber Co. : 

July 25. 12 dozen penholders, 64 cents 7. 68 

Easton & Rupp: 

July 29. 50 reams Crane's all-linen T. W. paper, at 76 cents 38. 00 

5 reams woven linen, white, at $2.40 12. 00 

5 reams Whiting's bond, No. 25, $1.90 9. 50 

25 reams Crane's all-linen, 90 cents 22. 50 

Aug. 1.3 dozen library paste, Carter's, at $1 3. 00 

2 gross De Haan's pens, No. 19, 47 cents .94 

1 gross De Haan's pens, No. 38 .47 

6 gross Lyon & Patterson pens, No. 12, $1.05 6. 30 

2 gross Lyon & Patterson pens, No. 14 2. 10 

4 gross Lyon & Patterson pens, No. 21 4. 20 

4 gross Tadella pens, No. 1, 65 cents 2. 60 

3 gross Tadella pens, No. 3 1. 95 

1 gross Tadella pens, No. 5 .65 

1 gross Tadella pens, No. 15 .65 

4. 5 reams T. W. paper coupon, 8 by 10, at $1.30 6. 50 

9. 4 gross Hoosier pens, No. 4, $1.50 6. 00 

1 gross L. and P. pens, No. 13 1. 05 

4 gross L. and P. pens, No. 708, at $1.05 4. 20 

11.4 dozen quarts Carter's writing fluid, $3 12. 00 

15. 3 dozen typewriter oil, 97 cents 2. 91 

1 dozen envelope openers, cabinet 1. 28 

i dozen ink pads, $1.50 .75 

139.55 

Easton & Rupp: 

Aug. 1. i dozen quarts Stephens's blue-black ink, $4.80 2. 40 

i ream Crane's kid-finish octavo note, $2.80 1. 40 

i ream Crane's bond octavo note, $2.20 1. 10 

2 reams Crane's antique bond commercial note, $2.40. . - 4. 80 



120 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. Easton & Rupp — Continued. 

Aug. 1. 1 ream Wedgewood note, "Colonial" $3.60 

500 Wedgewood envelopes, "Colonial," $5.50 2. 75 

2 balls white linen twine cable, 25 cents .50 

5. 3 quarts Stephens's blue-black copying ink, 75 cents 2. 25 

9. 1 new bedplate and repairing press 4. 50 

1 gross manila pens 1. 75 

18. 4 gross steel pens, No. 708, Jacobs' s aluminum, $1.05 4. 20 

3 gross Wm. Mitchell "J" pens,$1.20 3.60 

1 gross Turner & Harrison pens, legal .65 

24. 1,000 linen envelopes, No. 9 3. 75 

250 old style envelopes, bar. 1 , $6. 40 1. 60 

29. 18 reams oriental linen letter, 8 by 10 J, $1.20 21. 60 

1 rubber stamp rack, 3 tiers 2. 25 

24 dockets, indexed in front, 8£ by 11, 90 cents 21. 60 

72 boxes McGill's staple fasteners, brass 25. 92 

$110. 22 

Fred. A. Schmidt: 
July 21. 6 gross Faber pencils, hexagon: 1 gross No. 1, 3 gross No. 

2, 2 gross No. 3, at $4 24.00 

5 gross steel pens, 4 gross Gillott's No. 404, at 61 cents; 1 

gross Gillott's No. 170, at 82 cents, less 38 per cent ... 2. 02 
10 dozen thumb tacks, silver head: 3 dozen, at 3 cents 
dozen, 9 cents; 3 dozen, at 3 J cents dozen, 10£ cents; 4 

dozen, at 4 cents dozen, 16 cents .35 

Aug. 4. 1 gross Gillott's No. 294 pens .38 

26. 75 

John C. Parker: 

Aug. 2. 500 rolls No. 1 pyramid toilet paper, 5 J cents 27. 50 

100 rolls No. 1 velvet toilet paper, 7£ cents 7. 25 

34.75 

Willard Fracker: 

Sept. 21. 6 sets "Fracker backing sheets," at 25 cents 1.50 

J. P. Nanrath: 

Aug. 7. 3 pounds No. 1 cup sponge, at $1.50 per pound 4. 50 

24 dozen No. 21 red tape, at $1.43 per dozen 34. 32 

38.82 

W. I. Ticknor: 

Aug. 7. 18 dozen paragon ribbons, at $4 72.00 

D. Frank Parker: 

July 29. 6 quires minneograph stencil paper, at $2, less 15 per cent. 10.20 

2 tubes minneograph ink, black, at 60 cents, less 15 

per cent 1. 02 

4 tubes minneograph ink, blue, at 90 cents, less 15 per 

cent 3.06 

J dozen sheets of minneograph silk 2. 30 

2 bottles minneograph varnish, 20 cents, less 15 per cent. . 34 

2 varnish brushes .42 

17. 34 

Easton & Rupp: 

Aug. 31. 1,000 Dennison No. 27 red paper seals 3. 00 

Sept. 6. 12 press copying books to order, at $1.65 19. 80 

20. 50 document file boxes to order, 9-inch, 6-inch, 4£-inch, 

at 50 cents 25.00 

12 document file boxes to order, 10£-inch,6£-inch,4$ -inch, 

at 60 cents 7.20 

55.00 

United States Envelope Co. : 

Sept. 13. 2,000 printed to the Auditor for Post-Office Department, 

$1.49 2.98 

4,000 printed onice of the Solicitor of Treasury, $1.36. . . 5. 44 

500 printed onice of the Solicitor of Treasury, $7. 35 3. 68 

500 printed onice of the Solicitor of Treasury, $4. 07 . . . 2. 03 

14. 13 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

July 29. 2 boxes rubber bands 2. 00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 121 

1899. R. Carter Ballantyne: 

Aug. 28. 1,000 envelopes, item 149, Crane O. S $4. 88 

29£ gross pyramid pins No. 2, item 131 3. 03 

Sept. 2. 3,000 envelopes, item 134, Crane bond, $4. 15 12. 45 

500 envelopes, item 126 2. 48 

7. 2,000 envelopes, item 141,$2.90 5.80 

$28.64 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

Sept. 2. l,000cards : 2.10 

29. 1 dozen boxes eyelets 1. 00 

• 3.10 

Carter, Rice & Co., Corporation: 

Aug. 3. 3 reams 24 by 36, 50 manila paper, $1.44 4.32 

3 reams 40 by 48, 120 manila paper, $3.45 10. 35 

14. 67 

Rudolph, West & Co, : 

Aug. 19. 1 dozen large desk baskets, wire 1. 72 

1 dozen small desk baskets, wire 1. 48 

1 dozen Scotch eraser hones 2. 20 

1 dozen 9-inch shears 7. 44 

1 dozen 10-inch shears 7. 44 

20. 28 

William Mann Co. : 

Aug. 24. 36 parchment imp. books 20. 88 

William Mann Co. : 

16. 26 parchment copy books, 500, 9 by 11, at 58 cents 20. 88 

Easton & Rupp: 

Oct. 11. 6 perfect mucilage bottles 1. 75 

26. 1 Shannon file perforator, No. 27 1. 50 

28. 2 reams copying parchment paper, 10 by 12, at 65 cents. 1. 30 

Nov. 2. 1 Star auto machine 1. 50 

1 cash book, 200 pages .85 

13. 1 S. E. ledger, No. 1421 35 

14. 2 sets Collins ink eradicator, large, at 50 cents 1. 00 

8.25 

Easton & Rupp: 

Nov. 6. 1 dozen wooden rulers, 12 inches 1.00 

R. P. Andrews & Co. : 

Nov. 11. 2,000 envelopes like sample, at $2 4.00 

John C Parker* 

Oct. 24. 2 dozen boxes Challenge eyelets, at $2. 16 4. 32 

Woodruff Manufacturing Co. : 

Nov. 18. 50 W. F. files, 10 by 4£ by 10, oiled, at50 cents 25. 00 

Woodruff Manufacturing Co. : 
Dec. 4. 72 qt. O. F. fileholders, 10f by 4£ by 12, card receivers, var- 
nished, at 50 cents 36. 00 

Easton & Rupp: 
Dec. 6. 30 reams Crane's antique No. 21 cap paper, 8 by 12£, at 

$1.65 49.50 

30 reams Crane's antique No. 21 cap paper, at $1.65 49. 50 

99.00 

Easton & Rupp: 

Nov. 18. lbillbook 1 1.50 

1 tin cash box 1. 25 

Dec. 7. 10 reams Crane's antique laid No. 29 commercial note, 

at $2 20.00 

22. 75 

Library Bureau: 

Nov. 20. 1,500 No. 34 J white tab cards to order; 500 each of bank, Chinese, 

and land, at $7.50 per thousand 11. 25 

1899. R. Carter Ballantyne: 

Oct. 24. 1,500 envelopes, at $3.88 5.82 

Nov. 21. 1 gross Faber pencils, No. 4323 3. 60 

Dec. 11. 250 envelopes 1. 54 

500 envelopes 2. 44 

12. 6 dozen shorthand notebooks, 51 cents 3. 06 

16.46 



122 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

# 

1899. R. Carter Baliantyne: 

Oct. 23. 3,000 envelopes, size of item 134, $5.20 $15. 60 

Nov. 20. 1,000 envelopes, size 4 by 8£ 10.30 

1,000 envelopes, size 4 by 9| 11. 70 

Deo. 1. 1 dozen file cases, 3 by 9£ by 4 1.90 

8. 2 pounds wax, No. 2, 40 cents .80 

$40.30 

John C. Parker: 

Aug. 2. 4 dozen quarts Superior mucilage, $3.83 ... * 15. 32 

5 dozen pints red ink, $3 15. 00 

5 dozen steel erasers No. 686, $3.40 17. 00 

2£ dozen steel erasers, No. 681, $2.75 6. 88 

36 fountain inkstands, 55 cents 19. 80 

3 dozen No. 86 sponge cups, 90 cents 2. 70 

76. 70 

John C. Parker: 

Dec. 28. 10 reams white silk copying paper 9 J by 12, 45 cents 4. 50 

John C. Parker: 

Dec. 7. J dozen protection letter files, $2 1.00 

Sept. 18. \ dozen protection letter files, $2 1.00 

2.00 

C. S. Braisted: 

Aug. 3. 12 gross 272 shorthand pencils, at $3.36 40. 32 

3 gross T? V* tJts Tfav cor ^ tip penholders, $3.36 10. 08 

1 gross E. 130 steel pens, 1 gross vertical steel pens No. 6, 

1 gross vertical steel pens No. 7, at 30 cents .90 

3 dozen 488 ink and pencil erasers, each 5 cents 1. 80 

24 dozen 489 ink and pencil erasers, each 6.8 cents 19. 58 

72. 68 

1899. Library Bureau: 

Dec. 11. 1,000 white criminal tab cards to order (A 9212), 1,000 buff bond 
tab cards to order (A 9212) , 1,000 buff timber tab cards to order 

(A 9212) 3,000, at $7.50 per 1,000 22.50 

Fred B. Nichols & Co. : 

Dec. 28. 12 daily memorandum calendar pads, at 5 cents .60 

1900. Fred A. Schmidt: 

Jan. 6. 12 dozen thumb tacks, at 4 cents per dozen .48 

1899. E. Morrison Paper Co. : 

Oct. 12. 1 Challenge eyelet punch 3.00 

1900. John Underwood & Co. : 

Jan. 20. 1,500 sheets 8 by 10£ No. 1 blue semicarbon $41. 25 

1,500 sheets 8 by 12 No. 1 blue semicarbon 41. 25 

82. 50 

1899. William Mann Co. : 

Dec. 9. 1 dozen press copy books, 1,000, 10 by 12, at $1 . 15 , . . 13. 80 

1900. Easton & Rupp: 

Jan. 8. 6 reams paper (6} by 10J) Whiting's woven linen, white, 

at $2.40 $14.40 

3, 000 envelopes, 5^ by 3 T 9 ^, Whiting's woven linen, white, 
as sample, at $4. 66 13. 98 

28. 38 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co. : 

Feb. 1. 6 cabinet perforators, at $1 each 6. 00 

John C. Parker: 

Jan. 31 . 1 dozen desk pads, 19 by 24 3. 08 

500 special red wafer seals 2. 50 

United States Envelope Co. : 

Mar. 1. 30,000 envelopes, item 3, printed, at $1.36 $40. 80 

1,000 envelopes, item 1, printed 1. 75 

42. 55 

1899. Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co. : 

Dec. 27. 12 No. 5 E. Shan files 2.90 

12 No. 4 comp. covers 1. 10 

4.00 

E. Morrison Paper Co. : 

Mar. 7. 300 li tubes, at$2.25 6.75 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. * 123 

1899. Easton & Rupp: 

Jan. 8. Engraving die as per sample $2. 50 

22. 1 McG ill's patent single stroke staple press No. 3 2. 25 

1 McGilFs fastener prod .40 

$5. 15 

1900. Rudolph, West & Co. : 

Mar. 15. 1 dozen eraser hones, Scotch 2. 20 

1899. R. Carter Ballantyne: 

Dec. 16. 4,000 McGill fasteners No. 1 R. , 79 cents $3. 16 

30. 1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 182, 55 cents .32 

1900. 

Jan. 9. i dozen Star fasteners .76 

1,000 Star staples 35 

25. 1J dozen scissors, 6-inch, $3.15 4. 72 

Feb. 8. 1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 161 .43 

21. 20 dozen notebooks, 51 cents 10. 20 

24. 1 gross Esterbrook pens, No. 477 .43 

2,000 envelopes, Crane O. S. , $4.88 9. 76 

Mar. 5. 2,000 envelopes, Crane 6i, $6.96 13.92 

£ dozen Star fasteners, $9. 15 4. 57 

26. 1,500 envelopes, 5J by 4 T V, $3.62 5.43 

54.05 

1899. R. Carter Ballantvne: 

Dec. 27. 60 daily memorandum calendars, 5 cents 3. 00 

30. 3 perfection pads, 20 cents .60 

1900. 

Jan. — . 1 perfection pad and stand .85 

4. 4 daily memorandum calendars, 5 cents .20 

3 stands for same, 12 cents .36 

2 stands for same .24 

25 blank books 65 

5.90 

Fred A. Schmidt: 

Mar. 31. 1 gross pencils, A. W. Faber, 6 dozen No. 4, 6 dozen No. 2 5. 50 

John Underwood & Co. : 

Apr. 19. 1,500 sheets 8 by 10 No. 1 blue semicarbon paper 41. 25 

500 sheets 8 by 12 No. 1 blue semicarbon paper 13. 75 

55.00 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

Apr. 3. 1 gross Esterbrook pens No. 313 .44 

16. 500 envelopes, 5J by 4 T V 1.81 

2.25 

D. Frank Parker: 

Mar. 5. J pint mimeograph varnish, 60 cents, less 15 per cent . . .51 

Apr. 12. 1 mimeograph slate, 20 cents, less 15 per cent .17 

1 mimeograph roller, $1, less 15 per cent .85 

1.53 

Library Bureau: 

Apr. 7. 1 No. 22 Z 4 oak case, 1 commercial base for No. 22 d 12 

case, 6 sets No. 24 e 5 A-Z guides 21. 10 

24. 500 No. 34 p tab cards, 200 white admiralty, 200 white 

government official, and 100 buff injunction (A 18428) 5. 50 

William Mann Co. : 

Apr. 21 . 2 dozen press copy books, 500, 10 by 12, at 58 cents each 1 3. 92 

United States Envelope Co. : 

Apr. 24. 1,000 envelopes, heavy manila, 10 J by 6J 5. 26 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

May 16. 2,000 fasteners, R. No. 1, at 79 cents 1. 58 

1,000 fasteners, R. No. 2 94 

1,000 fasteners, R. No. 3 1. 24 

A dozen boxes Star fasteners .69 

4.45 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

May 10. 2 scrap books, at $1.50 3.00 

23. 1 gross Eagle pens No. 90 .50 

3.50 



124 REPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Apr. 5. 1 set cushion keys, order No. 1044 $2. 50 

May 8. 2 cleaning brushes .30 

$2. 80 

John A. Dushane & Co. : 

July 3. 50 reams Crane's all-linen letter, 2J pounds; 10 reams 

Crane's all-linen legal, at 71 cents 35. 50 

2 J pounds, at 71 cents 7. 10 

6. 8 reams Crane's note paper, parchment vellum, un- 
ruled, white, at$2.80 22.40 

9. 200 reams letter paper, 8 by 10, Crane's antique laid, 

No. 25, Un. G. bond, at$1.50 300.00 

100 reams cap paper, 8 by 12, Crane's antique laid, No. 

21, Un. G. bond, at$1.50 150.00 

5 reams note paper, Crane's antique laid, commercial 
unruled, at $1.80 9.00 

524.00 

Easton & Rupp: 

Feb. 16. 1 dozen Lindsay's perfect aluminum mucilage bottles . . 3. 50 

May 29. 10 reams Crane's bond, No. 25, 8 by 10, at $1.65 16. 50 

15 reams Crane's antique, No. 25, 8 by 10, laid, $1.65 . . . 24. 75 

10 reams Crane's all linen, 8 by 10, 2 J, 76 cents 7. 60 

2 reams Crane's all linen, 8 by 12 J, 3, 90 cents 1. 80 

June 15. 1 dozen quarts Carter's writing fluid 3. 00 

15 reams Crane's all linen, 8 by 10, 2£, 76 cents 11. 40 

5 reams Crane's all linen, 8 by 12J, 3, 90cents 4. 50 

18. 3 dozen bottles T. W. oil, 97 cents 2.91 

28. 30 reams Crane's antique, laid, No. 25, 8 by 10, $1.65 49. 50 

30. 1 dozen Lindsay's perfect aluminum mucilage bottles .. 3. 50 

4 dozen Lindsay's perfect aluminum mucilage, $3.50 ... 14. 00 

142.96 

Easton & Rupp: 

Mar. 6. 1 Keystone binder 1. 50 

Apr. 4. 5 reams oriental linen parchment as per sample, at $1.20. 6. 00 

1 8. 1,000 woven linen envelopes, Treasury No. 2 10. 50 

June 30. i dozen mucilage brushes .60 

18.60 

United States Envelope Co. : 

30. 1,500 envelopes, item 26, printed 13. 77 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

25. 1 dozen fountain sponge cups, item 83 3. 15 

26. 3,000 McGill fasteners, No. 1 R., item 111, 79 cents 2. 57 

28. 5,000 envelopes, item 131, $3.88 19.40 

29. 50 scratch books No. 4068, 10 cents 5. 00 

5,000 envelopes, item 124, $4.77 23. 85 

53. 77 

R. Carter Ballantyne: 

1. 1,000 sheets, reporter's paper 3. 25 

E. Morrison Paper Co. : 

30. 100 pieces of strawboard, size 24 by 20 inches 5. 00 

John C. Parker: 

Feb. 10. 4 bottles Sanford's stamping ink 1.00 

Mar. 1. 1,000 Dennison's standard No. 5 P. tags 1. 60 

May 3. 12 boxes 1-ounce challenge eyelets 2.16 

4. 76 

Transportation. 

1899. R. L. Saunders: 

July 31. Pasturing and stabling 2 horses from July 9 to 31, 1899, inclusive, 

at $10 each, per month 14. 84 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 
July 31. Livery of 3 horses for the month of July, 1899, at $20 

each 60.00 

Livery of 2 horses from July 1 to July 8, 1899, inclusive, 
at $20 per month each 10.32 

70. 32 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 125 

1899. Philip Elwood: 

July 31. Carting 6 loads of ashes, dirt, and rubbish from Department of 

Justice and annex during month of July, at 40 cents $2. 40 

Thos. M. Hughes: 

July 7. 4 new steel shoes $2. 00 

8. 6 new steel shoes 3. 00 

20. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

22. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

24. 2 new steel shoes : 1. 00 

25. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

9.00 

The Andrew Joyce Carriage Co. : 

July 3. New spring bar for surrey 2.00 

8. New half bottom; new band-iron strap; 10 new screws 

in same; new tail-gate staple; new tail-gate pins and 
chains; 8 new bolts; repair front and bottom of cush- 
ion, Dayton 3. 75 

Aug. 4. Washing linen slip lining for surrey; tacking in slip; 

binding and repairing 1. 50 

Rockers 2.00 

7. Overhaul wheels and reset 4 tires; reset axles; burn 
rust off springs and brad between plates to prevent 
rusting; overhaul and tighten up; piece out king bolt 
and new safety bolt in same; reset dash and re-cover 
same with best patent leather; 4 new silk festoon cur- 
tains; overhaul and clean mountings and trimmings; 
dress and dye laces; morocco dress front trimming; 
repair covers on glass frames; 2 trace bolts; burn off 
old paint, repaint, stripe, and varnish body and gear, 
Solicitor-General's C. rockaway 61. 50 

70. 75 

Grenfell & Showalter: 

Aug. 4. Professional services to bay mare with colic and indiges- 
tion, 6 visits, including medicines 10. 00 

July 31. 5 dozen powders 5.00 

15.00 

C. Becker: 

July 10. Repairing saddle, 35 cents; Tilbury tugs, 25 cents .60 

Repairing turnback and hip strap .25 

New silver face clip in hame tug 1. 00 

Repairing choke-strap, 25 cents; traces, 25 cents .50 

Repairing bridle, 50 cents; wash, oil, and blacking har- 
ness, $2.50 3.00 

1 whip 2.00 

Can vasaline .25 

Repairing reins .25 

New drop on choke-strap 1. 00 

New centerpiece in checkrein .50 

29. Repairing turnback, 50 cents; bridle, 25 cents .75 

10. 10 

The Andrew J. Joyce Carriage Co. : 

Aug. 28. New cover 3 glass frames with best cloth; new cover front rock- 
ers with patent leather; thoroughly overhaul and screw up 
gear; new washers on axe; replate pole crab; repaint, stripe, 
and varnish gear; color and varnish body (6 passenger C. 

rockaway) 62. 50 

Thos. M. Hughes: 

Aug. 2. 4 new steel horseshoes and 2 removals 2. 50 

9. 4 new steel horseshoes 2.00 

10. 4 new steel horseshoes 2. 00 

14. 2 new steel horseshoes 1. 00 

23. 2 new steel horseshoes 1. 00 

25. 2 new steel horseshoes 1. 00 

29. 2 new steel horseshoes 1. 00 

10. 50 



126 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

1899. R.L.Saunders: 

Aug. 31. Pasturing and stabling 1 horse from Aug. 1 to 9, 1899, 

inclusive, at $10 per month $2. 90 

Pasturing and stabling 1 horse from Aug. 1 to 31, 1899, 

inclusive, at $10 per month 10.00 

Resetting 2 shoes .30 

$13.20 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 

Aug. 31 . Livery of 3 horses for the month of August, 1899, at $20. 60. 00 

5. Hire horse 1.50 

Hire horse 1. 50 

Livery of 1 horse from Aug. 10 to 31, inclusive, 22 days. 13. 26 

76. 26 

R. L. Saunders: 

Sept. 23. Pasturing and stabling 1 horse from Sept. 1 to 15, 1889, 

inclusive, at $10 per month 5. 00 

Resetting 4 shoes .60 

5.60 

Thos. M. Hughes: 

Sept. 9. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

13. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

16. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

17. 4 new steel shoes 2. 00 

19. 2 new steel shoes ." 1. 00 

20. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

25. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

30. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

9.00 

Capital Traction Co. : 

Oct. 2. 600 street-car tickets at 4fc cents 25.00 

Philip El wood: 
Sept. 30. Hauling 7 loads of refuse and ashes from Department of Justice 

during month of September, 1899, at 40 cents 2. 80 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 
Sept. 30. Livery of 4 horses for the month of September, 1899, at 

$20 80.00 

Livery of 1 horse from September 16 to 30, 1899, inclu- 
sive 10. 00 

90.00 

G. G. C. Simms: 

Sept. 15. 1 bottle of witch hazel .25 

George C. Mountcastle: 

Oct. 31. Livery for 5 horses for the month of October, 1899, at $20 100. 00 

Thomas M. Hughes: 

Oct. 2. 2 new shoes and 2 removals 1. 50 

4. 2 new shoes .-. . 1. 00 

12. 2 new shoes 1. 00 

13. 2 new shoes 1. 00 

14. 4 new shoes 2. 00 

21 . 2 new shoes and 2 removals 1. 50 

24. 4 new shoes 2. 00 

10.00 

The Andrew J. Joyce Carriage Co. : 
Oct. 28. Repairing and repainting mail wagon as per proposal submitted 

Sept. 18, 1899 74.00 

Oct. 7. New rubber apron, bound with leather, for wagon 5. 00 

C. Becker: 

Aug. 19. New patent leather ears, and repairing collar 1. 50 

New drop, and repairing choke-strap .70 

Sept. 12. Repairing hame tug .50 

Piecing and repairing 2 traces 1. 00 

Shorten 4 traces, at 15 cents .60 

Piecing 3 traces 1. 00 

New billet, and repairing choke-strap .40 

2 new billets, $1; repairing saddle, 25 cents 1. 25 

20. Piecing and repairing collar .75 

1 pair names 2. 75 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 127 

1899. C. Becker— Continued. 

Sept. 20. 2 new clips in names $1. 00 

Repairing saddle, 50 cents; reins, 50 cents 1. 00 

New billet on reins : .50 

Repairing shaftings .35 

New crownpiece in bridle .75 

New billet and repairing checkrein .30 

New front on bridle .75 

1 pair rosettes .75 

Repairing 4 short tugs on hame tugs .40 

Repairing 2 turnbacks .25 

Repairing billets on pads .25 

New billet on choke-strap .35 

Repairing 2 nosebands .25 

Repairing coach reins .50 

$17.85 

Philip Elwood: 

Oct. 31. To hauling 11 loads of ashes, paper, and rubbish from Depart- 
ment of Justice during the month of October, 1899, at 40 cents. 4. 40 
Philip Elwood: 
Nov. 29. Hauling 36 loads of ashes from Department of Justice and annex 

during the month of November, at 40 cents 14. 40 

Thos. M. Hughes: 

Nov. 2. 4 new steel shoes 2. 00 

6. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

11.2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

13. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

15. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

18. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

20. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

22. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

9.00 

C. Becker: 

Nov. 1. 1 pair No. 3 rubber hoof pads 1.50 

2. 1 pair No. 5 rubber hoof pads 1. 75 

27. 1 pair steel bite 5.00 

8. 25 

G. G. C. Simms: 

Nov. 20. 1 pound bluestone .10 

1 pound glauber salts .10 

1 quart witch-hazel .40 

.60 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 

Nov. 30. Livery of 5 horses for the month of November, 1899, at $20 per 

month each 100. 00 

Thos. M. Hughes: 

Dec. 5. 8 new steel shoes 4.00 

6. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

8. 2 new steel shoes 1. 00 

6.00 

Blue Line Transfer Co. : 

Sept. 30. Hauling 1 box oil boards .25 

Merchants' Parcel Delivery Co. : 
Sept. 27. Hauling 1 bookcase .75 

Philip Elwood: 
Dec. 30. Hauling 37 loads of ashes during the month of December, 1899, 

at 40 cents 14. 80 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 
Dec. 30. Livery of 5 horses for the month of December, 1899, at $20... 100.00 

Myers & McKeown: 

Dec. 20. 2 shoes 75 

4 shoes 1.50 

2 shoes .75 

4 shoes, 6 reset, 4 box pads 7. 00 

2 shoes, 2 reset, 2 box pads 3. 25 

2 reset 50 

13. 75 



128 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Capital Traction Co. : 

Jan. 11. 600 street-oar tickets for official use of this Department, at 4J 

cents $25.00 

1899. Geo. 0. Mountrastle: 

Oct. 4. Hire of cab 1.50 

1900. Geo. C. Mountcastle: 

Jan. 31. Livery of 5 horses for the month of January, 1900, at $20 100. 00 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 

Feb. 28. Livery of 5 horses for the month < >f February, 1 900, at $20 100. 00 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 

Mar. 31. Livery of 5 horses for the month of March, 1900, at $20 100. 00 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 
Apr. 30. Livery of 5 horses for the month of April, 1900, at $20. . $100. 00 

1 pair pole straps 5.00 

Liverv of 1 extra horse April 24 to 30, inclusive 4. 65 

109.65 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 

May 31. Livery of 5 horses for the month of May, 1900, at $20. . 100. 00 

Livery of 1 horse Mav 1 to 5, inclusive 3. 23 

103 # 23 

D. H. Mudd &Bro.: 
Jan. 3. 4 removed 1. 00 

4. 1 shoe .37 

6. 2 shoes, * 2 pads 2. 75 

10. 2 removed .50 

20. 6 shoes 2.25 

22. 2 shoes, * 2 pads 2. 75 

29. 6 shoes, 6 removed 3. 75 

29. * 10 pads 10.00 

30. 2 shoes 75 

24. 12 

D. H. Mudd & Bro. : 

Feb. 8. 2 shoes 75 

9. 2 shoes 75 

10. 2 shoes 75 

13. 4 shoes 1. 50 

14. 8 shoes .• 3. 00 

14. *2pads 2.00 

16. 2 shoes, 2 removed 1. 25 

17. 8 removed, *2 pads 4. 00 

19. 8removed ' 2.00 

26. 4 removed 1. 00 

17.00 

D. H. Mudd & Bro. : 

Mar. 3. 4 shoes '. 1. 50 

5. 2 shoes, 2 removed 1. 25 

7. 6 shoes, *2 pads 4. 25 

12. 4 removed 1. 00 

13. 4 shoes, *2 pads 3. 50 

14. 4 removed 1. 00 

22. 4 shoes, *4 pads 5. 50 

28. 2 shoes 75 

31. 2 shoes 75' 

D. H. Mudd & Bro.: 

Apr. 5. 2 shoes .75 

9. 2 shoes .75 

1 2 shoes 75 

12. 2 shoes 75 

13. 2 shoes 75 

14. 2 shoes .75 

20. 4 shoes 1 . 50 

25. 4 shoes, *2 pads 3. 50 

26. 2 shoes 75 

27. 2shoes, * 2 pads 2.75 

13.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 129 

1900. D. H. Mudd & Bro. : 

May 1. 2shoes $0.75 

2. 2 shoes 75 

4. 4 shoes 1 . 50 

5. 2 shoes .75 

11.4 shoes 1. 50 

12. 2 shoes 75 

15. 2 shoes .75 

16. 6 shoes 2. 25 

17. 2 shoes 75 

26. 2 shoes, * 2 pads 2. 75 

28. 4 shoes 1.50 

29. 2shoes 75 

31. 4 shoes 1.50 

$16.25 

Philip El wood: 

Jan. 30. Hauling 40 loads of ashes and rubbish from the Department of 
Justice and annex building during the month of January, at 

40 cents 16.00 

Philip El wood: 
Feb. 27. Hauling 36 loads of ashes from the Department of Justice 

buildings during the month of February, at 40 cents 14. 40 

Philip El wood: 
Mar. 29. Hauling 34 loads of ashes from Department of Justice buildings 

during the month of March, at 40 cents 13. 60 

Philip El wood: 
Apr. 30. Hauling 25 loads of ashes and rubbish from Department of Jus- 
tice during the month of April, at 40 cents '. 10. 00 

Grenfell & Sho waiter: 
May 5. Professional attendance and medicine for 2 horses at 
Mountcastle's stables; brown horse with hipicaria, 
also influenza, sore throat, etc; bay horse with influ- 
enza and sore throat; 31 visits to the 2 horses, at 

$1.50 per visit 46.50 

1 physic ball 1.00 

5 packets of powders, at 50 cents per packet 2. 50 

5 bottles of medicine, at 75 cents per bottle 3. 75 

53. 75 

The Capital Traction Co. : 

June 15. 600 street-car tickets, at 4J cents 25. 00 

David A. Clark: 

May 4. Hire 1 bay horse for 11 days, at $1 per day (April 24 to May 4, 

inclusive) 11. 00 

1899. C. Becker: 

Nov. 18. Can hoof dressing .75 

Dec. 4. 2 pairs hoof pads, $1.50 3. 00 

9. 2 pairs gloves, $1.25 and $1.75 3.00 

11. Repairing harness .90 

16. 1 saddle pad 1.00 

26. 1 whip 2.50 

1900. 

Jan. 8. Can neat' s-foot oil, 75 cents; 1 pair stay straps, 75 cents. 1.50 

11. 3 rubber horse covers at $5, $15; 1 rubber coat, $6 21. 00 

29. Repairing pole straps, $1 ; whip, 25 cents 1. 25 

Feb. 3. 2 whip crackers 20 

8. Repairing reins, 25 cents; wrapping whip, 40 cents .65 

15. Repairing harness 2. 50 

23. New top on whip 1. 50 

28. Repairing 2 choker straps, 40 cents; 2 nosebands, 50 

cents .90 

Mar. 8. Clip, 50 cents; repairing hame tug, 25 cents; shafting, 

25 cents; breeching, 40 cents 1. 40 

Set bandages .75 

Apr. 9. 2 pairs gloves 3. 00 

19. Repairing reins, 50 cents; 1 whip, $2; 2 lap robes, at 

$3.75, $7.50 10.00 

H. Doc. 9 9 



130 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. C. Becker— Continued. 

Apr. 30. Silver terret in pad, $1.50; 4 new straps on collar pads, 

60 cents $2.10 

May 14. Repairing breeching .25 

28. Repairing bridle .40 

Mar. 26. Wrapping whip, 25 centa; 4 loops and billets on bridle, 

60 cents 85 

$59.40 

1899. The Andrew J. Joyce Carriage Co.: 

Nov. 17. New end on singleton iron, thread and nut, same 1. 25 

1900. 

Jan. 2. New forged scowel iron for singletree 2. 50 

Mar 8. 16 new spokes and reset 1 tire; new shaft bar weld and 
reset shaf t T iron; reset axle arms (wagon); 5 new car- 
riage bolts in gear; reset 2 corner irons and straighten 

top; level body, 6 new carriage bolts 19. 00 

June 7. 1 new spoke (surrey) , repair, and new piece in rim, and 

redrive old spokes; reset 1 tire and all new tire bolts. 2. 85 

4 new carriage bolts in job 1.00 

Jan. 29. New forged singletree, iron 2. 50 

29.10 

1899. Saks & Co. : 
Dec. 5. 1 livery overcoat 35. 00 

1 suit 18.00 

1900. 

Jan. 3. 1 storm coat 25. 00 

2. 2pairgloves 8.00 

86. 00 

Merchants' Parcel Delivery Co. : 

Apr. 23. Baltic Building, mail post-office 1. 00 

Geo. C. Mountcastle: 
June 30. Livery of 4 horses for the month of June, 1900, at $20. . 80. 00 
Livery of 1 horse, June lto9 6. 00 

86.00 

Philip El wood : 

June 30. Hauling 14 loads of ashes and rubbish from Department of Jus- 
tice building during the month of June, at 40 cents 5. 60 

D. H. Mudd & Bro. : 

June 5. 4 shoes put on 1. 50 

8. 2 shoes put on .75 

11. 6 shoes put on 2. 25 

12. 4 removes 1. 00 

16. 2 removes .50 

20. 4 shoes put on 2. 00 

22. 2 shoes put on .75 

23. 2 shoes put on .75 

30. 2 shoes put on .75 

10. 25 

Miscellaneous Items. 

1899. Notley Anderson: 

July 13. Putting up shelving, stationery rooms 16. 75 

2 night locks 4. 50 

1 lock on toilet closet door, 6 keys 3. 00 

18. Putting up shelving, 1 pair brackets, 1 lock, room 307.. 10. 92 
Putting up shelving, room 309 10. 40 

21. Repairing ice box and building paper bin 8. 90 

Lining ice box and connecting waste pipe with sewer . . 16. 80 

71. 27 

Joseph Thomas: 

July 26. Whitewashing boiler room during month of July, 1899 9. 06 

The Sun Printing and Publishing Association: 
July 1. Daily and Sunday Sun, 1 year, from July 1 , 1899, to June 30, 1900, 

to the Department of Justice, Washington, D. C 8. 00 

C. A. Hartman: 
Aug. 1. For 2 copies Orth Patent Tel. index to June 30, 1900, 11 month?, 

at $2. 75 5.50 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 131 

1$99. National Electric Supply Co. : 
July 21. 15 feet No. 16 silk cord, at 3 cents :...•. $0.45 

1 Ed. att. plug .15 

$0.60 

W.S.Thompson: 

July 1. 10 pounds chloride of lime 1.00 

31. Ice for July, 1899, 8,825 pounds, at 20 cents 17.65 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 
Aug. 9. Subscription, Aug. 9 to June 30, 1899, inclusive, omitting Sun- 
days 6.82 

John A. Merritt: 

Aug. 14. United States postage stamps 5..00 

The Tilaen Manufacturing Co. : 
July 8. 1 index stamp .10 

2 one-line hand stamps .10 

2 two-line hand stamps .20 

3 three r line hand stamps .45 

3 three-line hand stamps .90 

1 four-line hand stamp .20 

11. 2 four-line hand stamps .50 

2 four-line hand stamps .70 

1 blue pad .35 

18. 1 new pad and die for S. P. L. S. index 1. 25 

1 large ink pad .35 

1 bottle black ink .40 

5.50 

Thomas W. Power: 

July 1. Repairing and adjusting Sprague electric elevator 6. 00 

G. G. C. Simms: 
July 6. 1 pint benzine .10 

2 pounds camphor gum. . 1. 20 

3 pounds moth balls .15 

1 gallon benzine .60 

l]ug 25 

2 dozen bottles ammonia ■. 2. 00 

17. i dozen bottles roach paste. .". 1. 50 

28. 1 gallon benzine .60 

1 jug 25 

6.65 

James B. Lambie: 

July 5. J dozen sash brushes 1.50 

17. 2 pounds pure rubber, $1 2. 00 

i dozen sandpaper .10 

18. lsaw 1.15 

5 pounds wire nails .25 

Fitting flat key to br. padlock .25 

20. 1 trowel 60 

1 gasket .50 

2 pounds sheet rubber .70 

27. 2 steel hatchets, 70 cents 1. 40 

1 steel hammer .60 

1 screw-driver .35 

1 nail puller 1. 50 

1 handsaw 1. 35 

1 pair 8 by 10 brackets .18 

1 8-inch screw wrench .60 

1 pair hedge shears, long handles 3. 50 

16. 53 

Dulin & Martin: 

July 11. 1 plated ice pitcher 7.00 

1 tray 4.00 

11.00 

Washington Post Co. : 

July 1. Subscription to Washington Post, from July 1, 1899, to 

June 30, 1900 8.40 



132 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. J. B. Morrey: 

July 1. New glass and mounting drawings, plans, United States 

penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans $2. 00 

John T\ Springmann, jr., & Bro. : 

Aug. 22. 12 grate lwirs, 582 pounds, at 3 tents per pound 17. 46 

J. C. Newton's Sons: 
Aug. 24. Whitening the brickwork of the court in rear of 1433 

K, as per contract ; 24. 50 

R. P. (Hark & Co.: 

Aug. 2. lOdozen Pear's soap, at $1.35 13.60 

James B. Lambie: 

July 26. 1 dozen whisk brooms $1.40 

2 dozen King's polish 3. 50 

2 dozen Winterton polish 1. 10 

6.00 

The J. C. Ergood Co. : 

July 25. 2 dozen brooms, $275 5.50 

200 pounds B. B. soap 10. 00 

15.50 

Geo. A. Schwarkopf: 

Sept. 2. Silver' plating 1 tray 4.00 

Fannie Jackson : 

Aug. 31. Washing 70J dozen towels during August, 1899, at 12 cents 8.44 

James Ragan: 

Aug. 25. 1 large galvanized iron funnel 2. 50 

1 cesspool top .75 

1 i fine wire compression cock 1. 50 

2 hours' time, plumber and assistant 1. 00 

5.75 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 

July 31. 5,100 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of July, 
1899, at $1 net per M cubic feet— 

3,800 cubic feet, 8 Jackson place 3. 80 

1,300 cubic feet, 1435 K street 1. 30 

5. 10 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 
Aug. 31 . 1 ,600 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of August, 

1899, at $1 net per M cubic feet, 1435 K street 1. 60 

G. G. C. Simms: 

Aug. 2. 2 pounds powdered borax .30 

7. 2 quarts turpentine .20 

.50 

J. B. Morrey: 

Aug. 21. Repairing corners and frame containing portrait ex- 
Attorney-General Judge Harmon 2. 00 

N.L.Burchell: 

July 25. 1 dozen cakes Elder Flower soap .85 

1 dozen cakes Turkish Bath soap .44 

8 dozen cakes Cashmere Boquet soap, at $2.47 19. 76 

21.04 

N. L. Burchell : 

July 21 . 1 gross safety matches at 75 cents, per gross .57 

Dulin & Martin Co. : 

Aug. 3. 1 dozen soap dishes 4.80 

1 dozen soap dishes 4. 80 

1 dozen soap dishes 3. 00 

27. 1 water cooler 5. 88 

: 18. 48 

Dulin, Martin & Co. : 

Sept. 8. 4 water coolers, $4. 75 19. 00 

J. P. Nauvath : 

Aug. 7. 25 pounds No. 3-ply jute, at 7 cents 1.75 

25 pounds No. 4-ply jute, at 7 cents 1. 75 

50 pounds No. 4^-ply Russia, at 10} cents 5. 25 

8.75 

W. I. Ticknor: 

Aug, 5. 1 No. 7 typewriter and cover, order 631 and 25 92. 25 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 133 

1899. Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

Aug. 31. Ice for August, 9,000 pounds, at 20 cents per 100 pounds $18. 00 

Shoemaker & Busch: 

Julv 25. 2 dozen hairbrushes, A, $7.50 $15.00 

2 dozen hairbrushes, B, $4.50 9. 00 

3 dozen nailbrushes, $2 6. 00 

6 dozen combs, $1 6. 00 

6 dozen soap, laundry Ivory, 45 pounds, at 12| cents. . . 5. 74 

50 gross matches, safety, 53£ cents 26. 75 

3 dozen polish, 74 cents 2. 22 

3 dozen disinfectant, $2.20 6.60 

$77.31 

Adams Express Co. : 

July 18. 1 box, London, England, via New York, Department 

of Justice, $1.25 2.93 

1. 1 box, W. S. Ames, St. Louis, Mo., $2.75 .55 

25. 1 box, 11, H. L. Burnett, New York, N. Y., $1.25 50 

28. Tro. 11, D, Keller, Hartford, Conn., $1.75 60 

Tro. 5, J. W. Yost, Columbus, Ohio, $1.75 45 

Tro. 6, Rankin &K, Philadelphia, Pa., $1 35 

Tro. 17, G. W. Hewett, Philadelphia, Pa. , $1 45 

Tro. 15, Cannon&Co., New York, $1.25 50 

Tro. 15, G. B. Post, New York, $1.25 50 

Tro. 17, Warren & W., New York, $1.25 .55 

Tro. 8, Kimball & Co., New York, $1 .25 45 

Tro. 8, Brice&Co.,New York, $1.25 45 

8.25 

Adams Express Co. : 

Aug. 14. 1 box, 50, Boston, Mass., Department of Justice library, 

$1.75 1.00 

22. 1 package, 1, Jacksonville, Fla., United States attor- 

ney , $3 . 25 25 

2. Package, 12, J. W. Yost, Columbus, Ohio, $1.75 60 

1.85 

U. S. Express Co. : 

July 3. P. 12, Department of Justice, from Philadelphia, Pa .40 

James B. Lambie: 

Aug. 4. 1 box scraper 50 

2 marking brushes .20 

8. 2 oval toilet fixtures, nickel 3. 60 

9. 2 key files and handles .30 

10. 6 key blanks, 10 cents 60 

1 10-inch shutter bolt and screws ^ .35 

1 hasp .10 

15. 1 merchandise truck 15. 00 

21. 1 hatchet 65 

23. 6 dozen sandpaper, 15 cents .90 

28. 2 pairs hinges and screws, 17 cents .34 

22.54 

Fannie Jackson: 

Sept. 30. Washing 73f dozen towels during month of September, 1899, at 

12 cents 8.85 

Notley Anderson: 

Aug. 8. Making 3 oak blocks for letterpress 4. 50 

Sept. 2. For repairing newel, first floor 1. 00 

20. Building coal bin 5. 25 

1 case for library, as per estimate 30. 00 

Removing coping and putting on railing No. 8, as per 

estimate 35. 00 

75. 75 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Aug. 12. Adjusting typewriter No. 6-4153 .55 

21. Adjusting typewriter No. 7-3100 60 

25. Adjusting typewriter No. 6-27031 50 

1.65 

Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

Sept. 30. Ice for September, 8,625 pounds, at 20 cents 17. 25 



134 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEV-GENERAL. 

1899. Dulin & Martin Co. : 

Sept. 29. 4 oak cooler stands, $2.15 $8.60 

National Electric Supply Co. : 
Sept. 30. Maintenance of 1 observatory clock, Department of Justice, for 

quarter ended September 30, 1899, at $50 per annum 12. 50 

James B. Lambie : 

Sept. 18. 2 scoop shovels, $1.25 $2.50 

23. Repairing punch .50 

25. 1 dozen C. and H. hooks .20 

3 ice picks, 25 cents .75 

2 pairs ice tongs .70 

2 ice hatchets, 75 cents 1. 50 

28. 2 Stillson wrenches 2.75 

30. 100 feet rope 38 

Repairing F. D. lock 1.25 

Fitting lkev 40 

Drilling and repairing F. D. knob .75 

1 bracket for eclipse door check .75 

12. 43 

United Typewriter and Supply Co. : 

Sept. 29. 1 No. 1 Densmore typewriter, No. 12568, with cover 65. 00 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 

Sept. 30. Exchange rental from September 7 to 30, 1899: 

Switchboard instruments, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Attorney-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief clerk, at $38 per annum 6.25 

General agent, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Pardon attorney, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

File room, at $38 per annum 6.25 

Stationery room, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Solicitor-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General Hoyt, at $38 per annum. 6. 25 

Appointment division, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Second-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General Boyd, at $38 per annum . 6. 25 

Disbursing clerk, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Fourth-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief of finance division, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General, second floor, No. 8 La- 
fayette square, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Second-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Library, Old Corcoran Building, at $38 per annum. 6. 25 
Private secretary to Attorney-General, at $38 per 

annum 6. 25 

First-floor hall, at $24 per annum 6. 00 

Third-floor hall, at $24 per annum 1. 56 

132.56 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 

Sept. 30. In Exchange rental for Solicitor for Treasury from July 1 to Sep- 
tember 30, 1899, at $34.50 per annum 6.25 

B. B. Earnshaw & Bros. : 

Sept. 29. J gross Sapolio, $9 2.25 

National Electrical Supply Co. : 

Sept. 16. Repairing elevator, Baltic Building .60 

Repairing bells, appointment clerk' s room 1. 80 

Installing bell in Mr. Randall's room, electrician, three 
hours, $1.80; 1-4 P. and C. bell, 80 cents; 2 C. and C. 
batteries, at 40 cents, 80 cents; 1J pounds annunciator 
wire, at 35 cents, 44 cents; \ pound D. P. tacks, 5 
cents 3.89 

Sept. 28. Installing 3-light cluster, basement Baltic Building, elec- 
trician, four hours, $2.40; 1 3-light cluster ball, 35 
cents; 3 extra key sockets, at 25 cents, 75 cents; 3 feet 
5 inches |-inch iron pipe, at 5 cents, 17 cents; 12 feet 
No. 16 elevator cord, at 2 cents, 24 cents; 3 feet 4 inches 
casing, at 20 cents, 67 cents; 1 canopy, 20 cents; 1 16 
flat porcelain shade, 60 cents; 1 2} shade holder, 20 
cents; 1 f crowfoot, 5 cents S. 63 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 135 

1899. National Electrical Supply Co. — Continued. 

Sept. 28. Repairing elevator, Baltic Building $0. 60 

Repairing lights, room 411, Baltic Building .90 

Line to No. 8 Lafayette Square; no light (trouble with 
outside service) .60 



Washington Gaslight Co. : 
Sept. 30. 3,100 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of Sep- 
tember, 1899, at fl net per M cubic feet: 

No. 8 Jackson place .30 

No. 1435 K street NW 2.80 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 

Oct. 4. 1 No. 1001 Nat. radiator 2.50 

8 feet tubing .. .40 

1 independent connection .25 

Rudolph, West & Co. : 

Aug. 19. 4 dozen mop handles, 57 cents 2.28 

4 dozen cuspidors, at $3.96 15. 84 

. United States Electric Lighting Co. : 
Sept. 30. Use of electric current at 1435 K street NW., from July 
1 to September 30, 1899, as follows: 
Light meter, 1,831,200 watt hours, at 6 cents per 

1,000 109.8? 

Motormeter, 800,000 watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000. 48. 00 

J. A. Pierpont: 

Sept, 23. 2 24 portable grates 13.50 

1 19 basket 2.25 

Repairing frame of grate 1. 00 

Oct. 10. 1 galvanized-iron ash receptacle 26. 00 

Repairing brass wood hod 1. 25 



$14. 02 



Postal Telegraph and Cable Co. : 
July l. Attorney-General, Washington, D. C, McClaughy, 

Leavenworth, 22 .27 

18. C. N. Bank, Raleigh, N. C, Roberts, D. C, 38 38 

13. United States marshal, Albuquerque, N. Mex., Boyd, 

D.C.,36 63 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 
July 1. Boyd to United States marshal, Montgomery, Ala., 25 . . .25 

3. Button to Fernald, York Beach, Me. , 22 22 

Button to Shipman, Coldwater, Mich. ,18 .20 

Button from Fernald, York Beach, Me. ,17 .20 

Boyd to United States marshal, Salt Lake, 27 .51 

5. Cooper to Post, New York, 27 27 

Griggs to Purdy, St. Paul, Minn., 62 78 

Griggs to insane asylum, Warm Springs, Mont., 37 .65 

Griggs from Warren, Warm Springs, Mont. ,24 .42 

Griggs to United States attorney, Harrisonburg, Va., 46 . 46 

6. Boyd to United States marshal, New York, 21 .21 

Boyd to United States marshal, Montgomery, Ala., 17 . . .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Indianapolis, 21 .21 



3.10 



3.15 



18.12 



157. 87 



44.00 



John Schafer: 
Oct. ' 13. Pointing up cracks in stonework in front of Department of Jus- 
tice, 8 hours* time, including material, at 60 cents per hour. . . 4. 80 
James Ragan: 
Sept. 30. Replacing wash basin in room and cleansing out water- 
closet, 1435 K street: 

1 14 by 17 oval basin 3.50 

1 gum washer .10 

1 quart plaster of paris .15 

i day's time plumber and assistant 3. 00 

Oct. 13. J day's time cleaning out water-closet 3.00 



9.75 



1.28 



136 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

July 1. Griggs to Burke, Cheyenne, Wyo., 40 $0.60 

7. Griggs to United States marshal, Harrisonburg, Va., 16 . .20 
Griggs to Burke, Cheyenne, Wyo., 64 .76 

8. Griggs to United States marshal, Macon, Ga. ,21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Cleveland, Ohio, 21 . . . .21 

9. Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind. T. , 25 . . .31 

Griges to United States marshal, Pensacola, Fla., 21 .21 

Boyd to Lind, St. Paul, Minn., 45 .56 

11. Griggs to superintendent, Louisville, Ky. ,27 .27 

Griggs from Caldwell, Louisville, Ky. ,26 .26 

Griggs to United States attorney, Raleigh, N. C. , 20 20 

Griggs to warden, Columbus, Ohio, 28 .28 

Griggs from Coffin, Columbus, Ohio, 35 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Austin, Tex. ,16 .30 

Griggs to Flint, Burlington, Vt., 21 21 

12. Boyd to United States marshal, Helena, Mont. ,24 .42 

Boyd to United States marshal, Atlanta, Ga. ,14 .20 

Cooper to Bird, Wilmington, Del., 21 .21 

Cooper to Scott, Wheeling, W.Va., 22 22 

13. Cooper to Lauterbach, New York City, 25 .25 

Clay to Campbell, Saranac, N. Y. (O. L., 20, 25), 15 65 

Clay from Campbell, Saranac, N. Y. (O.L.,31),20 71 

Cooper to Stewart, Patersori, N. J., 18 .20 

Griggs to Storm, Los Angeles, 16 .40 

14. Roberts to National Bank, Helena, Mont. ,36 .63 

Clay to Campbell, Saranac, N. Y. (O. L., 50), 10 1. 15 

Cooper to Peck, Chicago, 111., 26 26 

Boyd to United States attorney, Moscow, Ind. ,47 .98 

Boyd to United States marshal, San Antonio, Tex., 14 . . .30 

15. Boyd to United States marshal, Raleigh, N. C. , 27 27 

17. Cooper to Peck, Chicago, 111., 15 20 

Boyd to Squire, New York, 38 . 1 38 

18. Boyd to Ball, New York, 21 21 

Boyd to United States marshal, San Francisco, Cal., 26 . . 52 

19. Boyd to United States marshal, Cleveland, Ohio, 19 .20 

Boyd to United States marshal, Cleveland, Ohio, 19 .20 

Boyd to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 20 .35 

Chief Clerk to Bidwell, New York, 16 20 

20. Meline to assistant treasurer, San Francisco, 27 .54 

Boyd to United States marshal, South McAlester, 24 . . . .30 

Boyd to United States marshal, San Francisco, 18 .40 

21. Griggs to Warden, Wethersfield, Conn. (O. L., 28) , 28. . . .56 

Griggs from Garvin, Hartford, Conn. ,27 .27 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 26 .26 

Griggs to Warden, Fort Leavenworth, 27 .36 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 16 .40 

Griggs to United States attornev, Seattle, 24 .48 

Griggs to New York Sun, New York, 28 28 

Griggs to Warden, Weathersfield, Conn. (O. L., 25), 25. . 50 

Griggs to Frederick, Sitka, Alaska (O. L., 2), 35 72 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 31 .62 

Griggs to Pradt, Warsaw, Wis., 14 .20 

Griggs from Pradt, Warsaw, Wis., 31 .31 

Griggs from Garvin, Hartford, 28 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Prescott, Ariz., 31 . . . .54 

Brandenburg to Pradt, Warsaw, Wis., 23 .23 

Brandenburg from Pradt, Warsaw, Wis. ,21 .21 

Boyd to Moody, Asheville, N. C, 23 23 

25. Gnggs to Burnett, New York, 47 47 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind. T., 32. .40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 22 .39 

Griggs to Warden, Columbus, Ohio, 27 .27 

Griggs to United States marshal, Seattle, Wash., 57 1. 02 

Griggs from Coffin, Columbus, Ohio, 33 .33 

26. Griggs to Wetmore, New York, 38 38 

Griggs to United States marshal, Nashville, 20 .20 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 137 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 
July 26. Grigg8 to United States marshal, Sitka, Alaska, 20 $0. 40 

27. Griggs to United States marshal, Boston, Mass., 22 .22 

Griggs to United States marshal, Prescott, Ariz., 17 .35 

28. Griggs to Hamblett, Nashua, N. H., 32 32 

Griggs to Miller, Pittsburg, Pa., 33 33 

Griggs to United States attorney, Pittsburg, Pa., 81 .81 

Boyd to United States attorney, Charleston, W. Va., 37. .37 
Boyd to Bond, Baltimore, 62 62 

29. Pradt to Collins, Elizabethtown, Tenn., 31 31 

Pradt to Hawkins, Huntington, Tenn., 37 .37 

Pradt from Hawkins, Huntington, Tenn., 21 .21 

31 . Pradt to Chisolm, Birmingham, Ala. ,23 .23 

Pradt to Johnson, Jackson, Miss. ,27 .34 

Boyd to Chisolm, Albuquerque, 51 .73 

Boyd to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 18. .30 

Pradt to Collins, Elizabethtown, 20 20 

Pradt from Collins, Johnson City (N. M. ), 22 17 

Pradt to Smoot, Gainesville, Tex. ,25 .38 



Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Aug. 1. Boyd to United States attorney, Prescott, Ariz., 14 .35 

Clay to W.&W., New York, 30 30 

Pradt to Moody, Calhoun, Miss., 29 .36 

Pradt to Dougherty, Baton Rouge, La. ,25 .31 

Pradt from Dougherty, Baton Rouge, La. (N. M. ), 25 . . .20 

Pradt to Eastertia, Utica, Miss., 24 .30 

Pradt to Collins, Norristown, Tenn. ,35 .35 

• Button to Bowles, New York, 22 22 

2. Clay to Griggs, Hillhurst, Conn., 43 43 

Clay toGriggs, Hillhurst, Conn., 28 28 

Clay to Griggs, Hillhurst, Conn., 54 .54 

Boyd to United States attorney, Charleston, W. Va., 44. .44 

Boyd to Dawes, Marietta, Ohio, 32 .32 

Boyd to Cooke, Aberdeen, Miss., 43 .54 

Boyd to United States attorney, Prescott, Ariz. ,15 .35 

3. Boyd to United States marshal, Portland, Oregon, 18 .40 

Boyd to Sullivan, Helena, Mont, 20 .35 

Boyd to United States marshal, Los Angeles, Cal., 23 . . .46 

Boyd to United States attorney, Los Angeles, Cal., 32 . . .64 

Smith to Hawkins, Memphis, Tenn. ,i8 .20 

Peyton to Smith, Seattle, 31 62 

Peyton to Denee, Denver, Col., 27 .41 

4. Boyd to United States marshal, Aberdeen, Miss., 25 .31 

Boyd to United States marshal, Helena, Mont. ,14 .35 

Boyd to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 23 .40 

Boyd to Childers, Albuquerque, 51 .87 

Boyd to United States attorney, Seattle, 17 .40 

Boyd to United States marshal, Madison, Wis., 16 .20 

6. Boyd to United States marshal, Ardmore, 20 .25 

Campbell to United States marshal, Tacoma, 25 .50 

Peyton to Ingalls, Fort Worth, 43 65 

7. Boyd to Thurston, Omaha, Nebr., 28 29 

Smith to Collins, Humboldt, Tenn., 15 20 

8. Griggs to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 14 .35 

Griggs to Brooklyn Eagle, Brooklyn, 29 .29 

Griggs to Moyer, Sitka, Alaska (mail O. L. ), 24 .50 

9. Griggs to Jones, Boston, Mass., 93 .93 

Pradt from Collins, Humboldt, 29 29 

10. Pradt to Cole, Paris, Tenn., 16 20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Rutland, Vt, 33 .33 

Griggs to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 16 .25 

11. Campbell to United States marshal, Tacoma, 24 .48 

13. Boyd to United States attorney, Savannah, 39 .39 

Boyd to United States marshal, Indianapolis, 31 .31 

Boyd to Cortelyou, Clinton County, N. Y. (O. L. 26), 26 . 52 

Griggs to Gay, Seattle, 17 .40 



$36. 87 



138 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

July 14. Boyd to United States marshal, Tacoina, 27 $0.54 

Boyd to Brown, Buffalo,N. Y., 23 23 

Pradt to Collins, Morristown, Tenn. (for. 40), 35 .75 

Pradt to Dougherty, New Orleans, La., 34 .43 

Pradt from Collins, Elizabethtown, Tenn. ,41 .41 

15. Boyd from Cortelyou, Clinton County, N. Y. (O. L. 

28), 28 56 

Boyd from Brandenburg, Providence, 20 .20 

Boyd to warden county jail, San Antonio, 27 .41 

Boyd to United States attorney, Macon, Ga. ,46 .46 

16. Perry to Frost, Pulaski, N. Y. (O. L. 20), 19 40 

Pradt to Conner, Jackson, Tenn., 56 .56 

Pradt to Collins, Cleveland, Tenn. ,23 23 

Pradt from Collins, Cleveland, Tenn., 32 32 

Boyd to United States attorney, Denver, 38 .57 

Boyd to United States marshal, Pensacola, 33 .33 

Boyd to United States marshal, Indianapolis, 28 .28 

Peyton from Foster, Boston, Mass. ,30 .30 

1 7. Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 32 .40 

Boyd to postmaster, Plattsburg, N. Y. (O. L. 25), 25 . . .50 

18. Pradt from Dougherty, Monroe, La. ( n. m. ) , 28 .23 

Boyd to Co. Mann, Philadelphia, 33 .33 

Boyd to warden, Fort Leavenworth, 27 .34 

Boyd to United States marshal, Guthrie, Okla., 20 .25 

Boyd to Fallett, Hot Springs, 21 37 

Boyd to United States attorney, Oshkosh, Wis., 23 ... .23 

Peyton to Finn, Salt Lake City, 32 56 

Peyton to Wright, San Francisco, 28 .56 

Pradt to Dougherty, Monroe, La., 23 .29 

20. Peyton from Wright, Delmonte, Cal. (n. m.) , 16 .25 

18. Pradt to Casper, Austin, Tex., 28 42 

20. Boyd to United States attorney, Galveston, 21 .32 

21. Boyd to United States attorney, Oshkosh, 25 .25 

Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 25 .31 

Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 47 .59 

Pradt to Kruchelor, Loraine, 111., 31 .31 

22. Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 97 1. 21 

24. Pradt to Dougherty, Jackson, Miss. ,18 .25 

Boyd to United States marshal, Jacksonville, 47 .47 

Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 44 .55 

25. Boyd to United States marshal, Jacksonville, 32 .32 

Boyd to United States attorney, Seattle, 15 .40 

27. Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 20 .25 

Perry to Buie, Buies, N. C, 18 20 

28. Boyd to United States attorney, Sitka, Alaska, (02) 72. 1. 46 
Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 37 .46 

29. Pradt to Cole, Paris, Tenn., 27 27 

Boyd to United States attorney, Buffalo, N. Y., 22 22 

Pradt to Brannigan, Rye Beach, 10 .20 

Boyd to United States judge, Sioux Falls, 44 .66 

30. Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 49 .61 

Boyd to United States marshal, Tucson, 19 .35 

Boyd to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 102 1. 02 

Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 23 .29 

Boyd to United States marshal, Helena, 27 .47 

Boyd to United States marshal, Greensboro, N. C, 24 . . 24 

Boyd to Star, Dead wood, 47 71 

Boyd to Moyer, Wrangell, Alaska (02), 24 50 

Boyd to United States marshal, Tampa, 28 .28 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Aug. 1 6. Reese to Nelson, Prescott, 23 .40 

Reese to Coombs, San Francisco, 34 .68 

Reese to Coombs, San Francisco, 23 .46 



$43.48 



1.54 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 139 

1889. Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Sept. 1 . Boyd to United States attorney, St. Louis, 16 $0. 25 

Boyd to -United States attorney, Brooklyn, 32 .32 

Boyd to United States attorney, Lisbon, N. Dak., 28 . . . .42 

Marean to manager, Lisbon, N. Dak., 25 .38 

Marean from manager, Lisbon, N. Dak., 29 .44 

Boyd to United States marshal, Deadwood, 21 .32 

Boyd to United States attorney, San Francisco, 33 .66 

BoydtoStar, Deadwood, 25 38 

5. Boyd to United States attorney, Williamsburg, Ky., 16. .20 

Hoytto Follett, Las Vegas, 18 35 

Hoyt to Childers, Santa Fe, 39 68 

Boyd to Marshall, Deadwood, 30 .45 

6. Boyd to United States attorney, Buffalo, 29 .29 

Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 55 .69 

Boyd to Brown, Wenoka, Ind. T., 31 39 

Boyd to United States attorney, Seattle, 39 .78 

7. Boyd to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 45 .45 

Boyd to United States marshal, Atoka, Ind. T., 19 .25 

Boyd to United States marshal, Boston, 20 .20 

8. Pradt from Dougherty, New Orleans, 19 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Boston, 15 .20 

Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 44 .55 

Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 50 .63 

Pradt to Button, Middlebury, Vt., 11 20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 30 .60 

Griggs to Erwin, Macon, Ga., 27 .27 

Griggs to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 77 .96 

Griggs to Springer, Muscogee, 69 .86 

10. Griggs to United States attorney, Tampa, 18 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 27 .54 

Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 65 .81 

Boyd from Brown, Wenoka, Ind. T., 17 .25 

Boyd to United States marshal, Atoka, Ind. T. , 21 .26 

Boyd to United States marshal, Muscogee, 22 .28 

Boyd to United States marshal, Knoxville, 25 .25 

Boyd to United States marshal, Santa Fe, 15 .35 

12. Boyd to Sutherland, Rochester, 30 30 

Boyd to United States marshal, Charleston, S. C, 26 _ . _ .26 

Pradt to Dougherty, New Orleans, 15 .25 

13. Pradt from Dougherty, New Orleans, 20 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Jacksonville, 22 .22 

Griggs to United States marshal, Atoka, 19 .25 

Griggs to McMurray, South McAlester, 25 .31 

Griggs to United States marshal, Des Moines, 16 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Deadwood, 16 .30 

14. Boyd to United States marshal, Deadwood, 21 .32 

Boyd to United States attorney, Cincinnati, 26 .26 

Boyd to United States marshal, Boise, Idaho, 22 .44 

Grigjgs to United States marshal, Detroit, 14 .20 

15. Pradt from Dougherty, Memphis, 15 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Philadelphia, 18 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Des Moines, 19 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Helena, 26 .46 

Griggs to United States marshal, Raleigh, 18 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 26 .39 

Griggs to United States marshal, Seattle, 33 .60 

7. Department of Justice from Diffenbach, Spokane, 23. . . .46 

Department of Justice to Diffenbach, Spokane, 31 .62 

Boyd to Brownlow, Knoxville, 30 .30 

Boyd to United States attorney, Abingdon, Va., 24 .24 

Boyd to United States attorney, Chicago, 58 .58 

Pradt to Dougherty, Memphis, 26 26 

18. Boyd to United States marshal, San Antonio, 17 .30 

Boyd to United States attorney, Knoxville, 54 ..54 

Boyd to United States marshal, Pittsburg, 27 .27 

Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 34 .34 



140 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Sept. 18. Boyd to United States marshal, Macon, 22 $0. 22 

Pradt to Moran, Chicago, 19 20 

PradttoGay, Seattle, 33 66 

19. Griggs to United States marshal, Boston, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Wilmington, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 21 .37 

Griggs to United States marshal, Helena, 21 .37 

Griggs to Summit, Miss., 21 .26 

Griggs to St. Paul, Minn., 21 26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Grand Rapids, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Portland, Dreg., 21 . . .42 

Griggs to United States marshal, Madison, Wis., 21 . . . .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Milwaukee, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Pittsbure, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Knoxville, 13 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Paris, Tex. ,21 .32 

Griggs to United' States marshal, Brooklyn, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Elmira, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Raleigh, 21 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, Okla., 26 .33 

Griggs to United States marshal, Des Moines, 21 .26 

20. Clay to Dieffenbach, Spokane, 22 44 

Field to Parey, Topeka, 19 25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Staunton, Va., 23 .23 

Griggs to United States attorney, Guthrie, Okla., 23 . . . .29 

Griggs to United States attorney, Raleigh, N. C, 31 . . . .31 

Griggs to United States attorney, Raleigh, N. C, 36 . . . .36 

Griggs from United States attorney, Greenville, 15 .20 

Griggs to keeper, Greenville, 27 .27 

Griggs to United States marshal, Topeka, 23 .29 

21. Griggs to United States marshal, Lynchburg, 36 .36 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 38 .67 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, 25 .38 

Clay to United States marshal, Buffalo, 16 .20 

Pradt to Cole, Paris, Tex., 18 20 

22. Clay to Cole, Paris, Tex., 25 25 

Clay to Wyatt, Nashville, 26 26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Boston, 18 .20 

Clay from Friedrich, Sitka, 55 1. 10 

25. Clay to Wyatt, Nashville, 26 26 

Clay to Wyatt, Nashville, 16 20 

Griggs to Winthrop & S.,New York, 195 1.95 

Richards to United States marshal, San Antonio, 23 .23 

Richards to United States judge, Chicago, 19 .20 

Richards to Winthrop & Stinson, New York, 40 .40 

Burch to Byres, Minneapolis, 44 .55 

Boyd to United States attorney, Cincinnati, 45 .45 

Boyd to Bond, Baltimore, 62 62 

Boyd to United States attorney, Charleston, 64 .64 

Boyd to United States attorney, Charleston, 52 .52 

27. Griggs to Post, New York, 31 31 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 19 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Butte, 15 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Antonio, 23 .35 

28. Evans to Evans, Louisville, 36 .36 

Evans to United States attorney, Nashua, N. H. , 15 .20 

Evans to United States attorney, Fargo, N. Dak., 36 .54 

Evans to United States marshal, Portland, Oreg. ,22 .44 

Evans to United States attorney, Lynchburg, Va., 15 , . . .20 

27. Clay to United States attorney, Cheyenne, 14 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Abingdon, Va., 15 .20 

Griggs to Hansbrough, Devils Lake, N. Dak. ,26 .39 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, 26 .36 

Griggs to United States attorney, Nashua, 35 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ada, Ind. T. , 16 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind T. , 13 . . . .25 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 141 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Sept. 27. Griggs to Post, New York, 42 $0.42 

Griggs to United States Treasurer, New Orleans, 32 .40 

30. Richards to United States attorney, San Antonio, 23 .35 

Richards to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 28 .35 

Richards to United States attorney, Omaha, 25 .31 

Richards to United States marshal, Chicago, 18 .20 

Other lines toll, 20 20 

$50.77 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Sept. 6. Reeve to Pettit, Brooklyn, 44 .44 

10. Reeve to Whitmore, Shelter Island, N. Y. , 26 26 

Solicitor from Gay, Atlantic City, N. J. , 22 .22 

11. Reeve to Gay, Seattle, 50 1.00 

15. Reeve to Gay, Spokane, 37 .74 

25. Reeve to Gordon, Detroit, 37 37 

3.03 

Fannie Jackson: 

Oct. 31. Washing 73J dozen towels during month, at 12 cents per dozen. . 8. 79 

United States Electric Lignt Co. : 
Oct. 1. Use of electric current at 1435 K street NW., October 1 
to 31, inclusive, light meter, 705,600 Watt hours, at 6 

cents per 1,000 42.33 

Motor meter, 295,200 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000. . . 17. 71 

60.04 

United States Electric Light Co. : 

Oct. 1. Use of electric current at Department of Justice, Pennsylvania 
avenue and Seventeenth street, NW., from October 1 to 31, 

inclusive, 62,400 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 3. 74 

United States Electric Light Co. : 

Nov. 4. 25 16-candlepower Edison lamps, at 20 cents 5.00 

Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

Nov. 31 Ice for October, 8,850 pounds, at 20 cents 17.70 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 
Oct. 1. 6,800 cubic feet gas consumed in month October, 1899, 
at $1 net per M cubic feet: 

2,800feet, 8 Jackson place 2.80 

4,000 feet, 1435 K street 4.00 

6.80 

John B. Daish: 

Oct. 31. 60tons white ash egg coal, at $4.49 269.40 

2 cords2pc. pine, at$4.80 9.60 

279. 00 

George F. Muth & Co. : 

July 24. 5 dozen chamois skins, at $3.25 16. 25 

8 dozen mops, at 70 cents 7. 20 

23.45 

United Typewriter and Supply Co.: 
Oct. 21. Remodeling No. 1 Densmore typewriter into latest model ma- 
chine 45.00 

Rudolph West & Co. : 

Oct. 18. 18 feather dusters, 22 in., at $11 , 16.50 

Felt and Farrant Manufacturing Co. : 

Oct. 25. 1 8-column comptometer 125. 00 

National Electric Supply Co. : 

Oct. 12. Repairing desk bell .70 

G. G. C. Simms: 

Oct. 17. i dozen Maurey's paste 1.50 

1 gallon benzine and jug .85 

2.35 

C. Becker: 

Sept. 28. New handles and repairing mail bag 2.75 

Dulin & Martin Co. : 
Oct. 18. 6 water carriers (buckets) , at 75 cents 4. 50 

D. Rickenbacker: 

Sept. 12. Repairing an American clock 2. 00 

Repairing a Howard regulator 5. 00 

7.00 



142 BEPOBT OF THE ATTOKXEY-GENERAL. 

1899. John A. Merritt: 

Nov. 14. 80 5-cent stamps $4.00 

10 10-cent stamps 1.00 

$5.00 

Keasbev & Mattison: 

Nov. 6. Covering boifer, supply and return Hteain piping in Baltic 

Building 460.00 

James B. Lambie: 

Oct. 1. 1 Lignum- vita mallet .35 

1 lj-socket framing chisel 1. 00 

4. 2 scoop shovels, $1.25 2.50 

5. 1 pound 14-ounce tinned tacks .10 

1 pound 1-ounce upholsterer's tacks .05 

6. 12 No. 19 M. G. coal hods, 65 cents 7.80 

12 galvanized shovels, 20cents 2.40 

11. 1 2-inch flat paint brush .40 

1 painter's duster .50 

1 can graphite lubricant .60 

6 f-inch G. G. washers .15 

1 j-pint copper oil can .25 

2 ^-gallon copper oil cans .50 

1 can vaseline .18 

12. 30 feet } hose, complete 6. 00 

1 lf-socket framing chisel 1. 00 

1 chisel handle .10 

13. 1 set casters .15 

20. 1 cylinder-rim deadlock 1. 75 

23. 1 bronze knob for front door 1.00 

25. 1 wood smooth plane 1.00 

1 sledgehandle .15 

27. 3 flat key blanks 30 

1 4-inch round smooth file .13 

1 8D. E. sawfile 10 

32. 91 

Washington Gas Light Co. : 

Nov. 16. 1 radiator 3.50 

6 feet tubing 30 

1 independent connection .25 

4.05 

J. Baumgarten & Sons: 

Aug. 17. 1 stamp, oval 1.10 

10 stamps .60 

Sept. 14. 4 stamps .24 

20. 1 box type 4.75 

2 handles .50 

27. 1 rubber stamp 1.00 

Oct. 25. 5 rubber stamps 1.50 

9. 69 

J. Baumgarten & Sons: 

Oct. 10. 1 brass dating stamp - 3.50 

J. Baumgarten & Sons: 

Nov. 6. 1 rubber stamp for pardon attorney 1.00 

National Electric Supply Co. : 

Nov. 7. Installing pear push for Mr. Tanner, No. 8 Lafayette square 1. 00 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

Aug. 18. United States marshal, Rutland, Vt., Boyd, 22 .22 

23. United States attorney, St. Paul, Minn., Boyd, 49 .... . . 61 

31. United States attorney, New Orleans, Boyd, 31 .39 

United States marshal, Albuquerque, N. Mex., 16 .35 

United States marshal, Sitka, Alaska, 29 .58 

2.15 

James Ragan: 

Repairing leaks in sewer and soil pipes, K street build- 
ing, 3 days , time and assistant 18.00 

6 pounds lead, 60 cents; 2 pounds packing, 30 cents .90 

1 new handle for basin cock .75 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 143 

1899. James Ragan — Continued. 

Aug. 31 8 Fuller washers, at 10 cents $0.80 

2 pounds solder, at 25 cents .50 

2 days' time, plumber and assistant 12. 00 

$32.95 

Zellers & Co. : 

Nov. 18. 3 J nipples, 3 inch .15 

If by fell 07 

Labor, helper .32 

.54 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Oct. 11. 1 set finger-key cushions 2.50 

23. 1 set finger-key cushions : 2. 50 

24. 1 dozen metal shields 1.80 

6.80 

Rudolph, West & Co. : 

Nov. 18. 1 dozen dust-pan brushes 4. 50 

Notley Anderson: 
Oct. 13. Taking down and putting up cases, moving and replac- 
ing floor, putting in 2 panes of glass 9. 20 

16. Taking out panels and putting up same for radiator 2. 00 

Putting on 1 Yale lock, nardon attorney 2. 50 

30. Putting on 2 Eclipse springs, basement No. 8 Lafayette 

square 9. 20 

Nov. 6. 2 lights of glass in door to roof (Baltic Building) 1. 25 

Putting spring on door and repairing lock, basement 

No. 8 Lafayette square 3. 50 

7. Putting spring on closet door No. 8 Lafayette square ... 3. 50 

31. 15 

D. Rickenbacher: 

Nov. 13. Repairing an eight-day striking clock 2. 00 

Repairing a French marble clock 5. 00 

7.00 

Fannie Jackson: 
Nov. 29. Washing 88J dozen towels during month November, 1899, at 

12 cents 10.58 

R. O. Hutterly: 
Nov. 20. 1 oak drop octagon clock 5.00 

1 enameled mantle clock 6. 00 

11.00 

W. S. Thompson: 

Nov. 10. 1 hat brush 50 

J. B. Money: 
Dec. 1. Packing and shipping 1 portfolio to Whitney, Warren 

& Wetmore 1.50 

Express charges on same 1. 15 

2.65 

John Meany: 

Dec. 9. Taking down and tagging 70 awnings at No. 1435 K street and 

23 at No. 8 Jackson square, at 7 cents a piece 6. 51 

Adams Express Co. : 
Sept. 30. I package 2, value $100, Macon, Ga., Attorney-General, 

at $3. 25 45 

14. 1 package, 1}, Eames and Y., St. Louis, Mo .30 

.75 

United States Express Co. : 

Nov. 9. Box 16, C. Clav, Chicago, 111 90 

National Electric Supply Co. : 
Nov. 13. Order 812, changing and lengthening 4-light cluster in Assistant 

Attorney-General Pradt's room 3. 50 

National Electric Supply Co. : 
Nov. 13. Furnishing and installing 2 10-sunlight shades and 6 32- 

107 Edison lamps, electrician 1 hour .60 

2 10-inch sunlight shades, $1.25 2.50 

6 32-107 Edison base lamps, 30 cents 1.80 

4.90 



144 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. National Electric Supply Co. : 

Nov. 21. Repairing motor wires at the Court of Claims, electrician 

5 hours $3.00 

6 feet 2- W. molding for No. 8 wire, 2 cents .18 

14 feet 8- W. R. C. sterling, 2 cents 28 

5 feet J-R. Cir. loom, 6 cents .30 

$3.76 

James B. Lambie: 

Dec. 4. 6 pounds wire nails .30 

1 hinge hasp .15 

J dozen sandpaper .10 

1 claw hammer .60 

1 gross screws .25 

2 5-foot stepladders, $2 4.00 

2 dozen picture hooks, 35 cents .70 

2 $ picture gauge glasses, 15 cents .30 

6.40 

Dulin & Martin Co. : 

Dec. 8. 1 dozen sponges 3. 75 

Oct. 14. 1£ dozen buckets, $2.50 3.75 

7.50 

John Meaney: 

Dec. 12. Covering lawn in front of Department of Justice, including labor 

and manure 4.00 

Grove Lime and Coal Co. : 
Sept. 14. £ cord sawed and split pine 2. 50 

19. 1 cord sawed and split pine 5. 00 

Oct. 11. 1 cord sawed and split pine 5.00 

20. 1 cord sawed and split pine 5. 00 

Dec. 4. 1 cord sawed and split pine 5.00 

22.50 

John B. Daish: 

Nov. 26. 60 tons white ash egg coal, $4.49 269.40 

John B. Daisn: 
Nov. 1. 1 cord 3 piece hickory wood 5.90 

James Ragan : 
Plumbing work, No. 8, Jackson place: 

Toilet room, second floor, 1 siphon flush tank 7. 50 

3 i stopcocks, $1 3. 00 

3 i lead connections, 50 cents 1. 50 

8 } nippers, 10 cents .80 

2 pounds wiping solder, 25 cents .50 

1 rubber suction cup 1. 00 

1} days' time, plumber and assistant 9. 00 

Repairing flush tank and hopper, and 1 new valve 

for tank 2.00 

1 i stopcock 1.00 

1 i lead connection .50 

1 day's time, plumber and assistant 6.00 

Painting toilet room, carpenter's work 7. 00 

Cutting out and putting in new door 7. 50 

47.30 

Knickerbocker Ice Co.: 

Nov. 29. Ice for November, 8,550 pounds, at 20 cents 17. 10 

Thomas W. Powers: 
Dec. 11. Repairing elevator motor, adjusting armature bearings, main 

break blocks, and connections 21. 50 

J. E. Hurley: 
Nov. 17. Repairing fire tools for boiler, blacksmith and helper 

3£ hours, at 70 cents 2.45 

10 pounds iron, at 3 cents .30 

2. 75 

John Owens: 

Dec. 16. 8 loads manure, at $1.25 10.00 

Removing load of rubbish 30 cents, 3 days' labor, $1.50. 4. 80 

14. 80 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 145 

1899. James Ragan: 

Dec. 14. Furnishing the labor and necessary material to ventilate 3 water 

closets on second floor of No. 8 Jackson place $65. 00 

James Ragan: 
16. Removing old bath tub and furnishing complete 1 galvanized 
iron sink, with water supply to same, properly trapped and 

vented, at 8 Jackson place 35.00 

Postal Telegragh Cable Co. : 
Sept. 16. United States marshal, Kansas City, Mo. , to Boyd, D. C. , 

30 $0.38 

United States marshal, Knoxville, Tenn. , to Boyd, D. C. , 
30 30 

18. United States marshal, Topeka, Kans., to Boyd, D. C, 26 .33 
20. United States marshal, Louisville, Ky . , to Griggs, D. C. , 28 . 28 

26. Speyer & Co. , New York, to Griggs, District of Columbia, 

46 46 

28. United States marshal, Boston, Mass., to Griggs, District 

of Columbia, 21 .21 

29. United States marshal, Atlanta, Ga., to Griggs, District 

of Columbia, 14 20 

30. United States marshal, Boston, Mass., to Richards, Dis- 

trict of Columbia, 27 .27 

2.43 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

Oct. 2. United States marshal, Milwaukee, to Griggs, District 

of Columbia, 24 24 

United States attorney, Nashville, to Griggs, District of 
Columbia, 22 22 

4. United States attorney, Cleveland, Ohio, to Griggs, Dis- 

trict of Columbia, 15 .20 

5. Shine, San Francisco, to Richards, District of Colum- 

bia, 54 1.08 

10. United States attorney, Chicago, to Hoyt, District of 

Columbia, 21 21 

United States marshal, Chicago, to Perry, District of 

Columbia, 20 20 

United States marshal, Chicago, to Hoyt, District of 

Columbia, 26 26 

12. Coffin, Columbus, Ohio, to Hoyt, 25 25 

14. United States attorney, Boston, to Boyd, 54 .54 

19. United States attorney, Savannah, Ga., to Sergant Gil- 

lett,16 20 

20. United States attorney, Springfield, 111., to Griggs, 16. . .20 
United States marshal, San Francisco, Cal. , to Griggs, 42 . .84 
Jones, New York, to Griggs,' 42 .42 

24. United States attorney, Phoenix, Ariz., to Boyd, 29 .51 

27. Woodward, Atlanta, Ga. , to Griggs, 16 .20 

5.57 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

Nov. 2. Stimson, New York, to Pradt, District of Columbia, 24. .24 
United States attorney, Louisville, Ky., to Boyd, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, 15 .20 

3. United States marshal, Kansas City, Mo. , to Griggs, 18. . .25 

United States attorney, New York, to Griggs, District 

of Columbia, 29 29 

Jones, New York, to Griggs, District of Columbia, 33. . .33 

United States marshal, Boston, to Griggs, District of 

Columbia, 17 20 

United States attorney, Grand Rapids, to Griggs, District 

of Columbia, 43 43 

United States attorney, Chicago, to Griggs, District of 

Columbia, 43 43 

7. United States marshal, Omaha, to Richards, 28 .35 

United States attorney, Helena, Mont., to Griggs, 30. . . .53 

9. United States marshal, Omaha, to Griggs, 18 .25 

Brannan, Birmingham, to Griggs, 31 .31 

H. Doc. 9 10 



146 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. Postal Telegraph Cable Co.— Continued. 
Nov. 10. United States marshal, Montgomery, to Griggs, 16 $0. 20 

11. United States marshal, Kansas City, Mo., to Griggs, 25. .31 

United States marshal, Omaha, to Richards, 21 .26 

United States attorney, Boston, to Bovd, 30 .30 

United States marshal, Omaha, to Griggs, 16 .25 

United States attorney, Cincinnati, to Richards, 23 .23 

14. Whitney, New York, to Hughes, 22 22 

Page&Conant, New York, to Hoyt, 22 22 

16. Piatt, New York, to Griggs, 32 32 

United States attorney, New Orleans, to Griggs, 38 .48 

United States attorney, Montgomery, to Griggs, 22 .22 

Saley, New York, to Pradt, 31 31 

20. Griggs from Washington, D. C, to Earhardt, New Or- 
leans, La., 39 49 

Hayes and G. , Philadelphia, to Griggs, 21 .21 

Earhardt, New Orleans, to Griggs, 29 .36 

Barrett, Philadelphia, to Griggs, 29 .29 

United States attorney, Philadelphia, to Richards, 18.. .20 

Semmes, Omaha, to Griggs, 38 .48 

Benyuard, New York, to Pradt, 27 27 

Brown, Buffalo, to Griggs, 47 .47 

Getman, New York, to Griggs, 46 .46 

Earhardt, New Orleans, to Griggs, 22 .28 

20. United States attorney, Pittsburg, to Richards, 27 27 

27. Sterling, New York, to Boyd, 26 26 

United States attorney, Buffalo, to Griggs, 43 .43 

United States attorney, Cleveland, to Griggs, 34 .34 

Shearman & Co., New York, to Boyd, 25 .25 

United States attorney, Cincinnati, to Clay, 32 .32 

United States attorney, Portland, Me., to Griggs, 37 . . . .37 

$12.88 

A. H. Chase & Bros.: 

Dec. 19. Storage on carpets, 1,538 yards, at 1 cent 15. 38 

Johnson Bros. : 
Oct. 25. 3 tons cannel coal, at $10 30.00 

Storing, at 25 cents per ton .75 

Dec. 19. 2 tons cannel coal, at $10 20.00 

Storing, at 25 cents per ton .50 

51.25 

J. A. Pierpont: 

Dec. 5. Remodeling and bricking up 4 fireplaces, resetting grates, 
furnishing 1 new basket grate, and cleaning chimney: 

1 19-incn basket grate 4. 00 

250 fire bricks, at 5 cents...'. 12.50 

2 bushels fire clay 2.00 

1 frame for fireplace 4. 50 

2 iron blowers 4. 00 

Cleaning 11 flues 14.00 

5 days' time mason and laborers, $6 30. 00 

71.00 

Western Union Telegraph Company: 

Oct. 2. Attorney-General from Erwin, Macon, 16 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Omaha, 27 .34 

Griggs to United States attorney, Aberdeen, Miss., 19 . - .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, St. Paul, 19 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Fort Leavenworth, 19. .25 

Griggs to Hummer, Chickasha, Ind. T. , 22 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Macon, 19 .20 

Pradt to Button, New York, 18 20 

Pradt to Cole, Paris, Tex., 22 22 

Griggs to United States marshal, El Paso, Tex., 18 .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Abingdon, Va., 11 ... .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Elmira, N. Y., 18 .20 

Griggs to Burnell, New York, 35 .35 

Praat to Cole, Russellville, Ark., 15 .25 

4. Richards to Walker, Kansas City, Mo., 48 .60 

5. Pradt from Chisholm, Birmingham, 25 .25 



A 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 147 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Company — Continued. 

Oct. 5. Pradt to Chisholm, Birmingham, 31 $0. 31 

Pradt to Dougherty, Nashville, 17 20 

Pradt to Greeve, St. Louis, Mo., 30 . . .38 

Boyd to United States attorney, Greensboro, N. C, 32. . 32 

Richards from Walker, Kansas City, 26 .29 

Richards to United States marshall, St. Paul, Min., 21 . .26 

Richards to United States attorney, Chickasha, Ind. T. .25 

Richards to United States attorney, Macon, Ga., 12 .20 

Richards to Root, New York, 29 .29 

Richards to Speyer & Co. , New York, 12 .20 

6. Boyd to Spooner, San Francisco, 20 .40 

7. Pradt from Dougherty, Memphis, Tenn. ,40 .35 

Finn to De Witt, Denver, 23 ;.. .35 

Richards to United States marshal, Topeka, 22 .28 

Richards to United States marshal, Detroit, 24 .24 

Richards to W r alker, Kansas City, 24 .43 

9. Richards from Walker, Kansas City, 24 .30 

Richards to United States attorney, Tucson, Ariz., 24 . . .42 

Richards to United States attorney, Omaha, 29 .36 

Richards to Peyton, Bowie, Tex., 23 .35 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Atoka, Ind. T., 22 .28 

10. Hoyt to United States marshal, Nashville, Tenn., 22. . . .22 

Hoyt to United States attorney, Fargo, 16 .30 

Hoyt to Wallace, Kansas City, Mo., 40 .50 

11. Hughes to Richards, Hot Springs, Va., 25 .25 

Hughes to United States marshal, Guthrie, 21 .26 

Hughes to Wallace, Kansas City, 22 .28 

Hughes to United States marshal, Louisville, Ky., 19 .. .20 

Hughes to Flirt, Los Angeles, Cal. ,37 .74 

12. Hughes from French, IoTa, Kans. ,22 .28 

Hughes from Grant, Paris, Tex., 31 .47 

Hughes to Binney, Richfield Springs, 27 .27 

Hughes to French, Iola, Kans., 25 .31 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind. T., 30. . . 38 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Duluth, Minn., 17 .25 

Hoyt to United States marshal, St. Paul, 14. .25 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Paris, Tex. ,28 .42 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Lascruces, N. Mex., 29. . .51 

Hoyt to McAlee, Enid, Okla., 27 34 

13. Russell to Burkett, Huntsville, Ala. ,23 23 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Jacksonville, 20 .20 

Hoyt to United States attorney, Moscow, Idaho, 20 . . . .40 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Boise, Idaho, 20 .40 

Hoyt to United States marshal, Aberdeen, 26 .45 

Hoyt to United States attorney, Lascruces, N. Mex. , 15 . . .35 

14. Boyd to United States attorney, Oshkosh, 38 .38 

Boyd to United States marshal, El Paso, 18 .30 

Boyd to United States attorney, Fargo, 22 .33 

Boyd to United States marshal, Elmira, N. Y., 26 26 

Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 27 .34 

Boyd to United States attorney, Atlanta, 71 .71 

Boyd to United States marshal, Fort Smith, 24 .30 

Boyd to United States attorney, Tucson, 22 .39 

Richards to Burkett, Huntsville, 26 26 

Roberts to assistant treasurer, St. Louis, Mo., 26 .33 

16. Clay to Bingham, Philadelphia, 25 .25 

Boyd to United States marshal, Paris, 42 .63 

Boyd to United States marshal, El Paso, 22 33 

Boyd to United States marshal, Fargo, 14 .30 

Boyd to United States marshal, Ryan, Ind. T., 25e .31 

Boyd to United States attorney, Boston, 76 .76 

17. Clay to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 19 .40 

Boyd to United States attorney, N. Brunswick, 64 .64 

Boyd to United States marshal, Raleigh, N. C, 18 .20 

18. Boyd to United States marshal, Elmira, 23 .23 

Boyd to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 16 .20 



148 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Company— -Continued. 

Oct, 18 Boyd to United States marshal, Louisville, Ky., 22 $0. 22 

Boyd to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 15 . . .» . . .20 

19. Boyd to Gillett, Savannah, 51 51 

Oct. 19. Boyd to United States marshal, Elmira, 17 .20 

Griggs to Jones, New York, 37 .37 

20. Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, Okla., 30 38 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 61 .61 

22. Boyd to United States attorney, Boston, 25 25 

Boyd to United States attorney, San Francisco, 17 .40 

Boyd to United States marshal, Ardmore, 24 .30 

Boyd to Coffin, Columbus, Ohio, 22 22 

Boyd to United States attorney, Guthrie, 40 .50 

Boyd to United States attornev, Charlestown, W. Va., 30. . 30 

23. Boyd to United States marshal, South McAlester, 30 . . _ .38 

Boyd to United States attorney, Brooklyn, 19 .20 

Boyd to United States marshal, Guthrie, 16 .25 

Boyd to United States marshal, Greenville, S. C, 19 .20 

24. Gnggs from United States commissioner, St. Paul, 67 . . . .84 

Boyd to United States marshal, Moscow, Idaho, 21 .42 

Boyd to United States attorney, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., 36. .54 

25. Griggs from commissioner, Omaha, 96 1.20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Brooklyn, 21 .21 

Griggs to commissioner, Omaha, 23 .29 

Clay to Felt and T. Manufacturing Co., Chicago, 28 .28 

Clay to Collier, Riverside, Cal., 21 42 

26. Griggs from Owen, Albuquerque, 19 .35 

Griggs from Owen, Albuquerque, 17 . .35 

Griggs from Thurston, O'Niell, Nebr., 39 49 

Griggs to clerk United States court, Albuquerque, 20. . . .35 

Griggs to clerk United States court, Albuquerque, 31 . . . .54 

Griggs to Thummel, Omaha, 11 .25 

Griggs to Thurston, Omaha, 60 .75 

Griggs to Led better, Pauls Valley, Ind. T. , 16 25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 40 .80 

Griggs to United States attorney, Madison, Wis., 11 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Cincinnati, 11 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Pittsburg, 16 .20 

Griggs to Johnson, Sitka, Alaska (mail, 2 cents), 41 .82 

Boyd to United States attorney, Charleston, W. Va., 73. .73 

27. Griggs to United States attorney, Winston, N. C, 12... .20 

29. Boyd to United States marshal, Atoka, Ind. T., 21 26 

Boyd to United States marshal, Los Angeles, 23 .23 

30. Hoyt to Kirlin, New York, 24 24 

Griggs to United States attorney, Boston, 18 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Francisco, 26 .52 

Griggs to Reynolds, Santa Fe, 30 .53 

Griggs to United States attorney, Buffalo, N. Y., 16 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, Okla., 17 .25 

31. Griggs to United States marshal, Montgomery, Ala., 14. .20 

Hoyt to Barker, Charleston, S. C, 26 26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Portland, Oreg., 16. . . . 40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, Okla., (mail 

2cents),15 25 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Oct. 5. O'Connell to Gay, Seattle, 21 42 

O'Connell to Morrison, Prescott, Ariz., 21 .37 

O'Connell to Whitford, Denver, 21 32 

O'Connell to Miles, Corydon, Iowa, 20 .25 

7. O'Connell to Gurley, New Orleans, 71 87 

12. O'Connell to Gurley, New Orleans, 60 75 

25. O'Connell from Mieklejohn, Genoa, Nebr. ,41 .51 

O'Connell to Morrison, Prescott, 45 .79 

26. O'Connell to Mieklejohn, Ord, Nebr., 29 36 

O'Connell to Sumner, Omaha, Nebr. ,52 .65 

31. Reese to Rourke, Fargo, N. Dak., 23 .35 



$46.87 



5.06 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 149 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Nov. 1. Griggs to Rogers, Fort Smith, Ark., 16 $0. 25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fort Smith, Ark., 28 . . 35 
Griggs to warden United States penitentiary, Fort Leav- 
enworth, Kans. ,24 .30 

Rechtin to Thummel, Omaha, Nebr. ,25 .31 

Rechtin to Brown, Buffalo, N. Y.,33 33 

2. Hoyt to United States attorney, Charleston, S. C, 78 .. . 78 

Boyd to United States attorneV, Albuquerque, 32 .56 

Easby Smith to Soper, Vinita,*Ind. T., 27 34 

Boyd to United States marshal, Pauls Valley, 24 .30 

3. Burch from Sutton, Eagle Pass, Tex. ,37 .57 

Griggsto Soper, Vinita, Ind. T., 31 39 

Griggs to United States marshal, St. Paul, Minn., 28 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, New Bruns wick, N. J. ,21 . 21 

Griggs to United States attorney, Fargo, 49 .74 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 19 .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tacoma, 18 .40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tacoma, 15 .40 

Griggs to United States attorney, Oshkosh, 43 .43 

4. Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 21 .26 

Boyd to United States attorney, New Orleans, 33 .41 

Boyd to Foraker, San Fiancisco, 20 .40 

Boyd to United States attorney, Oxford, Miss., 16 .25 

Boyd to Terrell, San Antonio, 23 35 

Boyd to United States marshal, Tacoma, 18 .40 

6. Hughes to Whitney, New York, 21 21 

Hoyt to Jones, New York, 31 .31 

Hoyt to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 27 .27 

Boyd to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 29 .36 

Richards to United States marshal, Guthrie, 24 .30 

Pradt to Collins, Elizabethton, Tenn., 28 28 

7. Boyd to Clayton, South McAlester, 32 40 

Boyd to United States marshal, South McAlester, 27 . . . .34 

Richards to United States attorney, Asheville, 22 .22 

8. Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 19 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Helena, Mont., 16 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Omaha, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States marshal, Omaha, 28 .35 

9. Pradt from Chisholm, Birmingham, 24 .24 

Pradt to Chisholm, Birmingham, 26 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fort Smith, 23 .29 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 26 .33 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 30 .38 

10. Clay to Bingham, Philadelphia, 25 .25 

Griggs to United States judge, Birmingham, 14 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Cedar Rapids, 28 .35 

11. Pradt from Chisholm, Red Bank, Miss., 19 .25 

Pradt from Binney, New York, 15 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 18 .40 

Griggs to United States attorney, Sioux Falls, 34 .51 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sitka, Alaska( mail 2) , 20 . 40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Charleston, W. Va., 18. . 20 

Clay to United States attorney, Vinita, Ind. T., 24 30 

Boyd to United States attorney, Fargo, N. Dak., 41 .62 

Boyd to United States attorney, Portland, Oreg., 35 .70 

Boyd to United States attorney, Indianapolis, i9 .20 

Richards to United States attornev, Denver, Colo. , 31 . . . .47 

13. Pradt from Chisholm, New Orleans, 22 28 

Griggs from Burford, Guthrie, 28 .35 

Pradt to Collins, Chattanooga, 11 .20 

Pradt to Chisholm, New Orleans, 39 49 

Richards to United States marshal, Purcell, Ind. T., 62. .78 

Richards to United States marshal, Muscogee, Ind.T. ,23. .27 

Richards to United States marshal, San Antonio, 23 .25 

Boyd to United States attornev, Fargo, 40 .60 

Roberts to Merchants and P tenters' National Bank, 

Sherman, Tex., 44 .46 



150 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. Western Union Telegraph (A*.-— Continued. 

Nov. 14. Pradt to Collins, Chattanooga, 13 $0. 20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, 28 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Los Angeles, 26 .52 

Pradt from Collins, Chattanooga, 21 .21 

15. Griggs to United States attorney, New Orleans, 28 .35 

Griggs to Earhart, New Orleans, 47 .59 

Griggs to Bingham, Philadelphia, 17 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Los Angeles, 30 .60 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 43 .54 

Griggs to United States marshal, Louisville, 27 .27 

16. Griggs to United States attorney, Asheville, N. C, 25. . _ .25 
Griggs from Burford, Guthrie, 27 : . .34 

17. Pradt from Dougherty, Memphis (n. m. ), 33 .28 

Griggs from Burch, El Paso, Tex., 56 .84 

Griggs to United States attorney, Cheyenne, 26 .37 

Griggs to Moxey, Kansas City, 15 .25 

Griggs to United States marsnall, Elmira, 19 .20 

Griggs to Burford, Guthrie, 24 30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Sioux Falls, 28 .42 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 16 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Sioux Falls, 20 .30 

Pradt to Dougherty, Memphis, 38 .38 

18. Johnson from Erwin, Macon, 24 .24 

Griggs from Earhart, New Orleans, 67 .84 

Griggs to United States attorney, Prescott, 25 .44 

Griggs to Earhart, New Orleans, 18 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 19 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Helena, 29 .51 

Griggs to United States marshal, Helena, 20 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, Albuquerque, 21 .37 

Griggs to Burch, El Paso, Tex., 40 60 

Griggs to United States marshal, San Antonio, 18 .30 

Griggs to Soley, New York, 23 23 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 27 .47 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 19 .25 

Griggs to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 34 .43 

Pradt to Collins, Elizabethton, Tenn. ,34 .34 

21. Clay to United States Attorney, Cincinnati, 28 .28 

Pradt from Collins, Chattanooga, 41 .41 

Griggs to Rodgers, Helena, 59 1. 03 

Griggs from Starke, Jefferson City, 31 .39 

Griggs to Guillotte, New Orleans, 68 .85 

Griggs to United States attorney, Philadelphia, 22 .22 

Griggs to Trieber, Helena, 60 .75 

Griggs to United States marshal, Purcell, 20 .25 

Griggs to superintendent, Jefferson City, Mo., 17 .25 

Roberts to Montana National Bank, Helena, 40 .70 

Richards to United States marshal, Boston, 19 .20 

Richards to United States attorney, Muscogee, 27 .34 

Richards to United States marshal, Purcell, Ind. T., 27. .34 

Richards to United States marshal, Omaha, 28 .35 

Richards to United States attorney, Guthrie, 26 .33 

Richards to United States Marshal Thompson, Charles- 
ton, W. Va., 29 29 

23. Finch from Summers, Omaha, 21 .26 

Richards to McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, 22 .28 

Richards to United States marshal, Shreveport, La., 30. . 38 

Richards to United States marshal, Aberdeen, S. Dak. , 27 . .41 

Pradt to Collins, Chattanooga, 41 .41 

24. Richards to United States attorney, Vinita, 34 .43 

Richards to United States attorney, San Francisco, 21 . . .42 

Roberts to Nebraska National Bank, Omaha, 40 .50 

25. Attorney-General from Burch, El Paso, 20 .20 

27. Attorney-General to United States attorney, Brattle- 

boro, Vt, 18 20 

Easby Smith to Whittemore, Salt Lake City, 21 37 

Griggs to Burch, El Paso, 36 54 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 151 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Nov. 27 Griggs to McBride, Portland, Oreg. ,22 $0. 44 

Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, 40 .50 

Griggs to United States attorney, Albuquerque, 38 .67 

Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, 66 .83 

Griggs to Rogers, Texarkana ( forwarded, 25 ) , 21 .26 

Griggs to United States attorney, Fort Scott, 29 .36 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fort Scott, 27 .34 

Griggs to United States marshal, Boston, 13 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Cheyenne, 20 .30 

28. Griggs to United States marshal, Florence, Ariz, (case F, 

75), 13 35 

Griggs to Soper, Wagoner, 24 .30 

Pradt to Scott, Sharpsburg, Md. (via Antietam, 15), 24. . 24 

29. Attorney-General from Burch, El Paso, Tex., 34 .51 

Richards to Burch, El Paso, Tex, 29 44 

Richards to board prison commissioners, Nashville, 31 . .31 

Richards to United States attorney, San Francisco, 28. . .56 

Richards to United States marshal, Florence (case G, 

90), 22 39 

Richards to United States marshal, Omaha, 21 .26 

Boyd to Adams, Greensboro, N. C. , 21 .21 

Pradt to Collins, Jackson, Tenn., 27 .27 

Other lines toll 2.07 

159.58 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Nov. 8. Reese to Angell, New York, 45 .45 

Reese from Earhart, New Orleans, 48 .60 

Reese to Earhart, New Orleans, 35 .44 

1.49 

Notley Anderson: 

Oct. 1. Cutting out partitions, putting in jams, and trimming 

same 20. 00 

5. Putting up old and new shelving, No. 8 5. 00 

7. Easing door, putting on spring, and putting in door in 

basement, K street 2. 50 

9. Three sash cords and light of glass in attic (No. 8), 
hinges to transom window over door of arcn base- 
ment 4. 00 

16. Making 2 24-inch-wide ventilators for front windows 

for first and second floors (No. 8) 5. 00 

1 window-glass ventilator (Colonel Boyd). 5. 00 

Altering back basement door to slide, Department of 

Justice 7. 32 

48. 82 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 

Dec. 27. 1 gas heater 4.00 

8 Feet tubing .40 

1 ind. connection .25 

1 No. 4 Vulcan heater 3. 50 

8 feet tubing .40 

8.55 

Fannie Jackson: 

Dec. 30. Washing 91 J dozen towels during month December, 1899, at 

12 cents per dozen 10.95 

Adams Express Co. : 

Oct. 6. 1 package, 3, from St. Paul, Minn., 4.25 .45 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 
Dec. 30. 10,200 cubic feet gas consumed in month December, 
1899, at $1 net per M cubic feet: 

8,200 cubic feet, No. 1435 K street NW 8. 20 

2,000 cubic feet, No. 8 Jackson place 2. 00 

10. 20 

1900. Washington Gaslight Co. : 

Jan. 4. 1 No. 6 Vulcan gas heater 4.75 

INo. 270 Vulcan gas heater 2.00 

1 2 feet tubing at 5 cents .60 

7.36 



152 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1899. The Tribune Association: 

Dec. 21. Daily Tribune 1 year from Jan. 1, 1900 $10.00 

Zeller & Co. : 
Dec. 23. Furnishing and placing (1) Nason atmospheric trap to 

radiators in front basement $25. 00 

For repairing old trap and connecting to radiators 15. 00 

40.00 

National Electric Supplv Co. : 

Dec. 7. Installing light in basement of No. 8 Jackson place: 

Electricity, 5 J hours 3. 30 

7 feet No. 18 silk cord, at 3 cents .21 

4 pounds No. 12 W. P. wire, at 30 cents 1.20 

6 No. 5 knobs and screws .10 

2 tubes f by 4, 2 cents .04 

1 G. E. Ed. key wall receptacle .40 

1 10-amp. M. line .15 

2 10-amp. fuse links, at 2£ cents .05 

19. Repairing call bell for Captain Glover 1. 10 

29. Installing light in Mr. Randall's room 1. 60 

8. 15 

United States Express Co. : 

Oct. 27. Case, J. A. Finch, from Habana, Cuba; expressage, $16.25; 

cust.,$2.75 '.. 19.00 

L. G. Mangam: 
Jan. 3. Thawing out frozen waste and water pipes, moving and 
resetting wash basin in basement, repairing bath tub 
and 2 water-closets, and furnishing necessary material: 

4 i Globe stop and waste cocks, $1.50 6. 00 

4 washers, at 10 cents .40 

1 f pet cock .95 

1 bottle for bowl trap 1. 00 

4 J galvanized nipples, at 15 cents .60 

1 J galvanized lone screw .40 

1 J galvanized angle ell .12 

6 feet i galvanized pipe, at 13 cents .78 

5 J galvanized fiting, at 10 cents .50 

Lamp wick .10 

2 J days' time plumber and helper, at $6 15. 00 

25.85 

John B. Daish: 

Jan. 10. 60 tons egg coal, $4.49 269.40 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 
Nov. 30. 10,000 cubic feet of gas consumed in month of Novem- 
ber, 1899, at $1 net per M cubic feet: 

8, 500 cubic feet, 1435 K street NW 8.50 

1, 500 cubic feet, 8 Jackson place 1. 50 

10. 00 

National Electric Supply Co. : 

Dec. 30. Maintenance of 1 Observatory Department clock, for 

quarter ended Dec. 31, 1899, at $50 per annum 12. 50 

Automatic Telephone Co. : 
Dec. 30. Rental of 1 automatic telephone, 1 switch, from Oct. 1 

to Dec. 31, 1899, at $6 per annum 1. 50 

Chas. H. Soran: 
Dec. 20. Altering 8 glass doors into ventilators at No. 8 Jackson 

place, and 3 at Department of Justice, at $1.25 each 13. 75 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 

Jan. 15. 1 gas stove, pipe, connections, and fitting ,. . 7. 80 

Francis Miller: 

Jan. 11. 1 light glass, 16 by 32, double • .60 

1 light glass, 18 by 28, double 65 

3 pounds putty .12 

1.37 

The G. W. Knox Express Co. : 

Nov. 29. Freight on 1 box stationery .35 

United States Express Co. : 
Dec. 2. P. 20, L. A. Pradt, from New York to Washington, D. C 56 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 153 

1899. United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

Oct. 31. Use of electric current at No. 8 Jackson place, July 1 to 

Sept.30, 1899, 1,029, 500 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000. $61. 77 
Use electric current, No. 8 Jackson place, Oct. 1 to 31, 
inclusive, 1899, 343,100 Watt hours, at 6 cents 1,000 . . 20. 58 

$82.35 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

Nov. 30. Use of electric current at No. 8 Jackson place, from 
Nov. 1 to 30, 1899, inclusive, 501,400 Watt hours, at 

6 cents per 1,060 30.08 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 
Dec. 30. Use of electric current at No. 8 Jackson place, from Dec. 
1 to 31, 1899, inclusive, 547,200 Watt hours, at 6 cents 

per 1,000 32.83 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 
Nov. 30. Use of electric current at 1435 K street, from Nov. 1 to 
30, inclusive, as follows: 
Light meter, 1,378,800 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 

1,000 82.72 

Motor meter, 260,800 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 15. 64 

98. 36 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

Dec. 30. Use of electric current from Dec. 1 to 31, 1899, inclusive, 
at 1435 K street, as follows: 
Light meter, 1,342,800 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 

1,000 80.56 

Motor meter, 258,000 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 15. 48 

96.06 

Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

Dec. 30. Ice for December, 8,850 pounds, at 20 cents 17. 70 

James B. Lambie: 
Nov. 2. 1 18 lever wrench 1.80 

1 12 Stillson wrench 1.65 

7. 1 quart can glue .80 

2 blank keys .10 

1 round smooth 4-inch file .13 

7. 14J Ward file 12 

INo.SD.E.file 12 

1 grindstone 3. 25 

11. 1 dozen C. and H. hooks .20 

15. 1 screw-driver .45 

2 hatchets 1.25 

1 nail puller 1. 35 

18. 1 sash weight, 8-pound : .21 

12 feet cord 05 

2 screw eyes .05 

1 pulley 07 

11.60 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co., 

exchange rental for — 

Dec. 30. Switchboard instruments, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Attorney-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief clerk, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

General agent, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Pardon attorney, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

File room, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Stationery room, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Solicitor-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Colonel Hoyt's office, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Appointment division, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Second-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Colonel Boyd' 8 office, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Disbursing clerk, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Fourth-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief of finance, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General second floor, No. 8, 

Jackson place, at $38 per annum 6. 25 



154 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co., 
1891). exchange rental for — Continued, 

Dec. 30. Second-floor hall, No. 8 Jackson place, at $38 per 

annum $6. 25 

Library, old Corcoran Art Gallery, at $38 per annum . 6. 25 
Private secretary to Attorney-General, at $38 per 

annum 6. 25 

First-floor hall, at $24 per annum 6. 00 

Third-floor hall, at $24 per annum 6.00 

(From Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, 1899) : 
Exchange rental for Mr. Sheibley, from Dec. 20 to 31, 

1899, at $24 per annum 78 

$137. 78 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 
Dec. 30. Exchange rental for Solicitor for Treasury, from Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, 

1899, at $34.50 per annum 6.25 

Notley Anderson: 

Dec. 30. Building partition in stationery room, 1435 K street 84. 00 

1900. Notley Anderson: 

Jan. 2. Weather stripping 8 windows and repairing skylight, 

No. 8 Jackson place, and weather stripping 2 win- 
dows at Baltic $12.50 

10. Making and putting up shelf and securing shelf 2. 00 

Boxing closet in basement, 1435 K street 1. 00 

12. Repairing door to roof and molding on door, 1435 K 

street 2.20 

16. Building 1 quartered-oak cabinet, Solicitor-General 10.00 

27. 70 

1899. James B. Lambie: 

Dec. 16. 1 punch .25 

1 key blank .15 

1 eclipse spring 1. 15 

4 sash lifts 20 

1. 75 

Dulin & Martin Co. : 

Dec. 18. 6 china cuspidors, 2, $1.12}; 2, 45 cents; 2, 90 cents 4. 95 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Dec. 1 . Richards from Burch, El Paso, Tex. ,75 $1. 13 

Richards to United States attorney, St. Louis, Mo., 51 . .65 

Richards to United States attorney, San Francisco, 18 . .40 

Richards to United States marshal, Guthrie, Ok la., 23. . .29 

Richards to Sutton, Brownsville, Tex. ,36 .54 

Richards to Burch, El Paso, Tex., 38 57 

2. Richards to Sutton, Brownsville, Tex. ,44 .66 

Richards from Sutton, Brownsville, Tex. ,37 .56 

Perry to Erwin, Savannah, Ga., 18 .20 

Richards to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind. T. , 43 . .54 

Richards to United States attorney, Vinita, Ind. T., 19 . .25 

Richards to Dale, Philadelphia, 22 22 

4. Griggs to United States marshal, Birmingham, 27 .27 

Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, Ind. T., 39 . .49 

Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, Ind. T., 28 . .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, McAlester, Ind. T. , 14. _ .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Topeka, 21 .26 

Griggs to United States attorney, Kansas City, 29 .36 

Griggs to United States attorney, Salt Lake City, 35 .61 

5. Griggs to United States assistant attorney, Jackson- 

ville, Fla., 22 22 

6. Roberts to Berney National Bank, Birmingham, 39 .39 

Griggs to United States attorney, Denver, 20 .30 

7. Griggs to Bethea, Chicago, 72 .72 

Griggs to Clavpool, Seattle, 34 .68 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 42 .53 

8. Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 18 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 23 ... .23 

Griggs to United States marshal, Carson, Nev., 12 .40 

9. Griggs to United States attorney, New York, 20 20 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 155 

1899. Western Union Telegraph Co.— Continued. 

Dec. 9. Richards to United States attorney, Denver, 17 $0. 30 

Richards to United States marshal , Charleston , W. Va. , 1 7 .20 

Richards to United States marshal, Cheyenne, 23 .35 

11 . Griggs to Stripling, Jacksonville, 39 .39 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 21 . . .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Shreveport, 18 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Greensboro, N. C, 16 . .20 

1 2. Richards to United States marshal, Boise, 17 .40 

Richards to United States marshal, Savannah, 13 .20 

Richards to United States marshal, South McAlester, 17 . .25 

13. Easby Smith to Alderson, Abingdon, Va., 22 .22 

Richards to United States marshal, McAlester, Ind.T. , 40. .50 

Richards to United States attorney, Madison, 23 .23 

Pradt from Button, Middleburv, V t. , 18 20 

Pradt to Button, Middlebury, Vt., 20 20 

Richards to Beck, Philadelphia, 8 .20 

14. Griggs to Earhardt, New Orleans, 48 .60 

Richards to Clayton, South McAlester, 54 .68 

Richards to United States marshal, South McAlester, 22 . .28 

Richards to United States marshal, South McAlester, 26 . .33 

Richards to United States marshal, South McAlester, 45 . .56 

15. Richards to United States attorney, Seattle, 22 .44 

16. Griggs to United States attorney, Atlanta, 34 .34 

18. Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 22 .39 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 21 .32 

Griggs to United States attorney, Brattleboro, Vt., 25. . . 25 

19. Griggs to United States marshal, Charlotte, N. C, 17 _ . .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Helena, 26 .46 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind. T., 27. . .34 

Griggs to United States marshal, Indianapolis, 22 .22 

20. Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 28. . .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 23 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, New York, 35 .35 

21. Griggs to Erwin, Macon, Ga., 59 .59 

Roberts to Merchants and Planters' National Bank, 

Sherman, Tex., 42 63 

22. Rudy to Winston, Muscogee, 19 .25 

Rudy from Winston, Muscogee, 13 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 32 .40 

Griggs to Warner, Rochester, 40 .40 

Griggs to Warner, Raleigh, 25 .25 

Griggs to Warden, Columbus, Ohio, 70 .70 

Griggs from Warden, Columbus, Ohio, 84 .84 

24. Johnson from Erwin, Macon, Ga., 24 .24 

Richards to United States marshal, Muscogee, 12 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 25 .38 

25. Richards to Secretary of Treasury, city, 42 .42 

Richards to Osborne, Los Angeles, 36 .72 

Richards to United States attorney, Boston, 39 .39 

26. Richards to United States marshal, Guthrie, 25 .31 

27. Pradt from Collins, Pikeville, Tenn. ,33 33 

Griggs to United States marshal, Montgomery, 17 .20 

Griggs to Grady, South McAlester, 24 ". .30 

Griggs to Bennett, Muscogee, 23 .29 

Griggs to Bennett, Muscogee, 28 .35 

Griggs to Bennett, Ardmore, 23 .29 

28. Richards to Hammer, Ardmore, 23 .29 

Rudy to Bennett, Muscogee, 24 .30 

29. Pradt from Dougherty, Opelousas, La. (N. M.), 16 .21 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, N. Dak., 17 . . . .30 

Clay to Robinson, McConnellsburg, Pa., 14 .20 

30. Griggs to United States marshall, Muscogee, 20 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Louisville, 15 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 17 .20 

Pradt from Collins, Knoxville, 26 26 

$34.32 



156 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1R99. Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Doc. 5. Griggs to Conant, Habana, 35 $0. 35 

Western Union Telegraph Co.: 

4. ; Connell to (linstock, Hartford, Conn. ,33 $0. 33 

O'Connell to Comstoek, New Haven, Conn., 33 .33 

O'Connell to Gav, Seattle, 19 40 

O'Connell from fcarhart, New Orleans, 36 .46 

1.51 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co.: 

Dec. 5. Sawyer, Lincoln, Nebr. , from Griggs, 27 .34 

Bethea, Chicago, 111., from Griggs, 32 32 

U nited States marshal, Memphis, Tenn., from Griggs, 26. .26 

6. Bethea, Chicago, from Griggs, 41 .41 

United States marshal, Memphis, from Griggs, 12 .20 

1 1. United States marshal, Albuquerque, from Griggs, 17. . . .35 
Dougherty, Memphis, from Pradt, 11 .20 

12. United States attorney, Portland, Me., from Richards, 

102 1 1.02 

13. United States attorney, Seattle, from Richards, 57 1. 14 

14. Bist>el, Jacksonville, from Richards, 38 .38 

United States attorney, Boston, from Richards, 33 .33 

16. Black, Philadelphia, from Cooper, 22 22 

18. United States marshal, Des Moines, from Griggs, 14 .25 

Sumners, Omaha, from Griggs, 84 w 1.05 

19. United States marshal, Raleigh, from Griggs, 32 " .32 

20. McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, from Griggs, 30 .38 

United States attorney, Indianapolis, from Griggs, 42. . . .42 

21. United States attorney, New York, from Griggs, 28 .28 . 

United States marshal, Toledo, Ohio, from Griggs, 16. . . 20 

McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, from Griggs, 42 .53 

Warden, Jefferson City, Mo., from Griggs, 28 .35 

22. United States marshal, San Francisco, Cal., from Griggs, 

40 80 

United States attorney, Boston, Mass., from Boyd, 27.- .27 

Erwin, Macon, from Griggs, 37 .37 

26. De Witt, Denver, Colo. , from Smith, 32 48 

McClaughry, Fort Leavenworth, from Richards, 32 .40 

27. Erwin, Macon, from Griggs, 21 .21 

Fritsche, Cincinnati, from Griggs, 39 .39 

Vale, Chicago, from Button, 16 .20 

Brainard, Chicago, from Button, 16 .20 

Handbury Detroit, from Button, 18 20 

28. United States marshal, Montgomery, from Richards, 28.. .28 

Bromwell, Cincinnati, Ohio, from Richards, 20 .20 

Hamblett, Concord, N. H., from Richards, 26 .26 

29. First National Bank, St. Paul, Minn., from Roberts, 39. . . 49 

United States marshal, Helena, from Griggs, 17 .35 

United States marshal, Los Angeles, from Griggs, 45. . . .90 

United States attorney, Los Angeles, from Griggs, 37 . . .74 

United States marshal, Los Angeles, from Griggs, 20. . . .40 

United States attorney, Boston, from Griggs, 47 .47 

30. Pavey, Mobile, from Griggs, 15 .20 

United States marshal, St. Paul, from Griggs, 25 .31 

United States marshal, Montgomery, from Griggs, 18. . . .20 

26. Johnson, E. C, Washington, D. C, from Gillette, Savan- 
nah, Ga., 26 26 

17.53 

Herman Baumgarten: 

July 8. New die in stamps 2.00 

Tvpe for disbursing clerk 5. 16 

Aug. 7. 2 bottles ink .50 

Sept. 11.1 logotype 20 

22. Metal type 5.00 

Nov. 3. 18 Universal holders .75 

Dec. 23. 6 type, 18 letters 36 

13. 97 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 157 

1899. Rudolph, West & Co. : 

Oct. 24. 1 dozen hand mops $0. 75 

1900. Rudolph, West & Co. : 

Jan. 15. 1 dozen hand shears, No. 9 $7. 44 

1 dozen hand shears, No. 10 7. 44 

14. 88 

M. G. Copeland & Co. : 

Jan. 15. 1 storm flag, 12 feet 6.30 

Jas. Ragan: 
Jan. 8. 1 brass reducing coupling, 2 J by 1 inches 2. 50 

G. G. C. Simms: 
Jan. 3. 1 dozen boxes matches .20 

Fannie Jackson: 
Jan. 31. Washing 101^ dozen towels during January, at 12 cents per dozen 12. 19 

Dulin & Martin Co. : 

Jan. 5. 2 dozen tumblers, at 45 cents .90 

2filters, at$8.50 17.00 

17.90 

James B. Lambie: 

Jan. 22. 5 pounds plumbago grease, at 20 cents 1. 00 

25. 1 paper 14-ounce upholstering tacks .14 

1 paper 4-ounce upholstering tacks .05 

1 i-bit stock drill 18 

26. 2 screw-drivers .50 

27. 6B. H. whisk brooms 2.40 

4.27 

1899. The Automatic Telephone Electric Co., Limited: 

Sept. 30. Rental of 1 automatic telephone and switch from July 1 to Sep- 
tember 30, 1899, at $6 per annum 1 . 50 

1900. United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

June 31. Use of electric current at Department of Justice, 1435 K street, 
from Jan. 1 to 31, inclusive, as follows: 

Motor, 293,800 watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 17. 62 

Lighting, 1,570,800 watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000. 94. 24 

111.86 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

Jan. 31. Use of electric current at No. 8 Lafayette Square from 
Jan. 1 to June 31, inclusive, 180,600 Watt hours at 6 

cents per 1,000 34.83 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 
Jan. 31. 12,600 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of Janu- 
ary, 1900, at $1 net per thousand cubic feet — 

8,600 cubic feet, 1435 K street 8.60 

4,000 cubic feet, 8 Jackson place 4. 00 

12.60 

John B. Daish: 

Feb. 3. 60 tons egg coal, at $4.49 per ton 269. 40 

James Ragan: 
Feb. 8. Repairs to water-closet, K street NW. — 

1 pound solder, 1 brass coupling .75 

i day's time, plumber and assistant 1. 50 

10. Putting new traps and waste pipes under sink at No. 8 

Jackson place, 1 lj-inch lead trap 1.50 

15 pounds lj-inch lead pipe 1.50 

3 pounds solder .75 

1 rubber sink collar .25 

1 pound putty, 10 cents; 1 calked joint, 15 cents .25 

1 day's time, plumber and assistant 6. 00 

12. 50 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

Jan. 2. Burch, from Sutton, Albuquerque, 72 1.26 

Collins, Fairmount, Ga., from Pradt, 34 .34 

3. Stryker, St. Paul, from Griggs, 27 34 

Humphrey, Springfield, IlL7from Griggs, 35 .35 

Childers, Albuquerque, from Griggs, 20 .35 

United States marshal, Topeka, from Griggs, 17 .25 



158 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Postal Telegraph Cable Co.— Continued. 

Jan. 2. United States marshal, San Antonio, from Griggs, 25 $0. 38 

4. United States attorney, Topeka, from Griggs, 22 .27 

5. Warner, Rochester, from Griggs, 45 .45 

United States attorney, Boston, from Griggs, 42 .42 

United States marshal, New York, from Griggs, 26 .26 

6. Brannigan, Hot Springs, Ark. , from Pradt, 17 .25 

United States attorney, Dallas, from Richards, 38 .57 

United States attorney, New Orleans, from Richards, 25. .31 

Myndene, New York, from Hoyt, 26 .26 

8. Lindsay, Philadelphia, from Early Smith, 33 .33 

United* States attorney, Boston, from Griggs, 20 .20 

United States marshal, St. Paul, from Griggs, 23 .29 

Childers, Albuquerque, from Griggs, 26 .46 

10. Assistant treasurer, New York, from Roberts, 28 .28 

Hamlin, Boston, from Hoyt, 30 .30 

11. Winslow, Louisville, from Boyd, 24 .24 

9. United States attorney, San Antonio, from Griggs, 21 .32 

13. United States attorney, Albuquerque, from Richards, 21 . .36 

15. McClaughey, Leaven worth, from Richards, 31 .37 

17. Pardon attornev, Washington, D. C, from Bone, Topeka, 

14 \ 25 

Childers, Albuquerque, from Griggs, 37 .65 

United States attorney, New Orleans, from Griggs, 25. _ . .31 

Lambert, Topeka, from Early Smith, 20 .25 

United States marshal, Mobile, from Griggs, 17 .20 

18. Underwood & Co. , New York, from Griggs, 30 .30 

Cowin, New York, from Richards, 19 .20 

Parker, New York, from Hoyt,30 30 

R., S. & Histed, Topeka, from Griggs, 35 .44 

Bethea, Chicago, from Early Smith, 17 .20 

19. Friedrich, Sitka (mail), from Griggs, 61 1. 22 

Shoup, Sitka, from Griggs, 27 .54 

23. United States attorney, Charleston , S. C. , from Griggs, 17 . .20 

United States marshal, Concord, N. H., from Griggs, 17 . .20 

29. Superintendent, Detroit, from Griggs, 24 .24 

Rice, Trenton, N. J., from Griggs< 09 ' oi 

30. United States attorney, Santa Fe, from Griggs, 21 .36 

Trieber, Little Rock, from Griggs, 22 .28 

Gunby , New York, from Richards, 59 .59 

United States marshal, Wilmington, from Griggs, 19 .20 

31. United States attorney, New York, from Richards, 39. . . .39 

$17.41 

1899. The E. F. Brooks Co. : 

Oct. 21. 12 feet mohair tubing for droplight .72 

Nov. 17. 1 dozen lava tip burners* .50 

1 dozen 3-foot lava-tip burners .20 

1 dozen 4-foot lava-tip burners .20 

1.62 

1900. Randolph West & Co. : 

Feb. 13. 2dozen feather dusters, $11 22.00 

Lansburgh & Bros. : 

Jan. 23. 8 dozen towels, $2.15 17.20 

Adams Express Co. : 
10. 1 package, 1 pound, from New York, addressed J. K. 

Richards .25 

16. 1 truss, 19, from Department of Justice to M. G. Reynolds, 

Santa Fe, N. Mex 2.50 

25. 1 box, 47, from Canton, Ohio, addressed Department of 

Justice 1.00 

8. 1 box, 75, from New York, addressed to C. C. Binney . ... 1. 25 

5.00 

1889. J. Baumgarten & Sons: 

Nov. 24. Inking pad for stamp .25 

Dec. 2. 2 stamps .30 

9. 2 bottles India ink .50 

29. 4 pads for numbering machine and ink .85 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 159 

1900. J. Baumgarten & Sons — Continued. 

Jan. 9. lstamp $0.45 

18. 7 rubber stamps 1. 05 

Repairing numbering machine 1. 50 

$4.90 

J. A. Pierpont: 

15. Repairing roof — 

56 sheets tin, at 15 cents 8. 40 

22 pounds solder, at 25 cents 5. 50 

2 pounds nails, at 5 cents .10 

J barrel coal .25 

1 gallon metallic paint .90 

2 days' time, tinsmith and helper, at $6 18. 00 

33. 15 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co: 

Feb. 1. United States attorney, New Orleans, from Griggs, 19.. .25 

United States marshal, Mobile, from Griggs, 28 .23 

Higgins, Wilmington, Del. , from Cooper, 28 .28 

2. United States attorney, New Orleans, from Griggs, 21 . . .26 
United States attorney, New Orleans, from Griggs, 15. . .25 

3. United States attorney, Seattle, from Griggs, 20 .40 

McClaughry, Fort Leavenworth, from Richards, 18 .25 

Coffin, Columbus, Ohio, from Richards, 43 . 43 ' 

United States attorney, Cleveland, Ohio, from Griggs, 15 . .20 

5. Attorney-General, Sitka, Alaska, from Friedrich 43 .86 

6. Attorney-General, Sitka, Alaska, from Shoup, 23 .46 

7. United States attorney, Seattle, from Griggs, 40 .80 

9. United States marshal, Paris, Tex., from (Sriggs, 38 .57 

14. Phillips, Oshkosh, Wis. , from Griggs, 39 39 

15. United States marshal, Louisville, from Griggs, 17 .20 

Button, New York, from Pradt, 20 20 

16. Postmaster, Chattanooga, from Pradt, 18 .20 

21. Moxey, New Orleans, from Griggs, 25 .31 

United States attorney, Prescott, from Griggs, 17 .35 

23. Hill, Louisville, from Griggs, 36 36 

24. Hill, Louisville, from Griggs, 18 20 

27. United States attorney, New York, from Griggs, 46 .46 

28. United States attorney, Louisville, from Griggs, 43 .43 

8.34 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Jan. 1. Burch from Sutton, El Paso, N. Mex. ,32 .27 

2. Griggs to Childers, Albuquerque, 40 .70 

Griggs to Childers, Albuquerque, 23 .40 

3. Griggs from Siebricht, San Antonio, N. Mex., 23 .18 

4. Pradt to Cole, Paris, Tenn., 22 22 

Pradt to Brannigan, Hot Springs, 18 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Boston, 18 .20 

Richards to United States attorney, Boston, 49 .49 

Richards from Brannigan, Hot Springs, 52 .65 

5. Pradt from Cole, Paris, Tenn., 26 26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Memphis, 19 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Francisco, 33 .66 

7. Pradt from Brannigan, Hot Springs, 21 .26 

Pradt to Collins, Gorden, Pa., 10 20 

Boyd to Winslow, Carrollton, 27 27 

Griggs to Johnson, South McAlester, 44 .55 

Richards to United States marshal, Boston, 22 .22 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 18 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, New York, 23 .23 

Rudy to Young, Chattanooga, 28 .28 

Boyd to Winslow, Carrollton, 40 .40 

Boyd to United States attorney, Detroit, 105 1. 05 

9. Griggs from Freeman, South McAlester, 21 .26 

Griggs to Freeman, South McAlester, 33 .41 

Griggs to United States marshal, Omaha, 55 .69 

10. Roberts to First National Bank, St, Paul, 37 46 

Griggs from W. A. Carpenter, Norfolk, 34 .34 

Griggs from Sutton, Lamy, N. Mex. , 23 .40 



160 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Jan. 10. Griggs from Bates, Detroit, 50 $0.50 

Griggs to United States marshal, Little Rock, 23 .29 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Antonio, 42 .63 

Pradt to Button, Middlebury, Vt., 24 24 

Richards to Tisdel , Chicago, 21 21 

11. Griggs to United States marshal, Portland, Oreg., 14.. . . 40 

Griggs to United States attorney, Detroit, 52 .52 

Griggs to United States marshal, Detroit, 38 .38 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 27 .34 

Hoyt to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 44 .44 

Griggs to Barrett, Philadelphia, 43 .43 

Hoyt to Sewell, Mare Island, 68 1. 38 

Hoyt to Helm, Memphis, 66 66 

Hoyt from Sewell, Mare Island, 27 .32 

Easby Smith to Wishard, Indianapolis, 21 .21 

Easby Smith from Wishard, Indianapolis, 22 .22 

12. Hoyt from Buckman, Key West, 55 55 

Attorney-General from Burgwvn, Durham, N. C, 45 . . .45 

Pradt to Button, Middlebury, Vt, 18 20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Philadelphia, 32 .32 

Griggs to United States marshal, Philadelphia, 33 .33 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 18 .25 

Griggs from United States marshal, South McAlester, 20 . 25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Omaha, 20 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Nashua, N. H., 15 . _ . .20 

Griggs to Childers, Albuquerque, 15 .35 

14. Griggs to Burgwyn, Henderson, N. C. , 35 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, Guthrie, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Venita, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Ardmore, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Little Rock, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Fort Smith, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States marshal, Little Rock, 17 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Antonio, 22 .33 

Griggs to United States attorney, South McAlester, 24. . . 30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Albuquerque, 26 .46 

Roberts to Nebraska National Bank, Omaha, 40 .50 

Easby Smith to Jewett, Orlando, 27 27 

Johnson to Griggs, Paterson, 30 .30 

15. Richards to United States attorney, South McAlester, 22 . .28 
Richards to United States marshal, South McAlester, 31 . .39 
Richards to United States attorney, South McAlester, 37 . .46 

Richards to United States marshal, Ardmore, 26 .33 

Richards to Sutherland, Albany, 76 . .76 

Richards to United States attorney, San Antonio, 16 .30 

Richards to United States attorney, Brattleboro, 113... 1. 13 

15. Richards to United States attorney, Seattle, 15 .40 

Richards to United States attorney, Oshkosh, 53 .53 

Easby Smith to Hammer, Ardmore, 32 .40 

16. Richards to United States marshal, Parkersburg, 32 .32 

Richards to Hammer, Ardmore, 29 .36 

10. Griggs to Carpenter, Norfolk, 46 .46 

17. Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 42 .53 

Richards to Beck, Philadelphia, 8 .20 

18. Richards from Cowin, New York, 94 .94 

20. Griggs to Day, Canton, 20 20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Shreveport, 25 .31 

Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, 18 .25 

22. Griggs from Hoyt, Canon City, Colo. ,18 30 

Griggs from Maurer, Covington, 14 .20 

Griggs to Maurer, Covington, 24 .24 

Griggs to warden, Canon City, 24 .36 

24. Griggs to United States marshal, Concord, N. H., 16... . 20 

26. Griggs to United States marshal, Parkersburg, 17 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Omaha, 20 .25 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 161 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Jan. 26. Griggs to United States marshal, Carson City, Nev., 20. _ $0. 40 
Richards to United States attorney, Sioux Falls, 

S. Dak., 56 84 

27. Griggs to United States attorney, Brooklyn, 22 .22 

29. Griggs from warden, Anamosa, 22. .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Raleigh, 19 .20 

Griggs to warden, Anamosa, Iowa, 23 .27 

Griggs to United States marshal, Alexandria, La., 28. . . .35 

Griggs to warden, Boise, 22 ." .44 

30. Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 16 . . .25 

Griggs to Barnes, Fort Smith, 23 27 

Richards to Seathom, Guthrie, 24 .30 

31. Griggs to United States marshal, Raleigh, 16 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Macon, 18 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Birmingham, 21 .21 

Other lines* tolls .45 

$40.43 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Jan. 5. O'Connell to Bethea, Chicago, 24 .24 

17. O'Connell to Gordon, Detroit, 80 80 

27. Reeve to Evans, St. Paul, 42 53 

1.57 

R. P. Clarke: 

Mar. 16. 3 dozen toilet soap, Pears, $1.35 4. 05 

Herman Baumgarten: 

Jan. 27. 2 No. 12 holders 70 

Feb. 21. 1 No. 2 excelsior pad .50 

1.20 

Adams Express Co. : 

Feb. 6. Transportation charges on 1 package, weight 4J pounds, to M. G. 

Reynolds, Santa Fe, N. Mex., at $9.25 cwt .75 

John B. Daish: 

Mar. 17. 60 tons egg coal, $4.49 269.40 

S. P. Johnson: 

Mar. 19. 1 No. 1 Densmore typewriter, 13854, with cover 66. 50 

United States Electric Light Co. : 
Feb. 28. Use of electric current at 1435 K street NW., from Feb- 
ruary 1 to 28, inclusive, as follows: 
Light meter, 1,358,400 watt hours, at 6 cents per 

1,000 $81.50 

Motor meter, 253,600 watt hours, at 6 cents per - 
1,000 15.21 

96. 71 

United States Electric Light Co. : 

Use of electric current at No. 8, Lafayette Square, from February 
1 to 28, inclusive, 597,400 watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 .... 32. 84 
United States Electric Light Co. : 

24. 7 32-candlepower electric lamps, 30 cents 2. 10 

James Ragan: 
27. Repairing leaks in water pipes at No. 8, Jackson place: 

1 pound solder .25 

i day's time, plumber and assistant 3. 00 

3.25 

N. L. Burchell: 

Mar. 19. 1 dozen Elder Flower soap. . .84 

1 dozen Turkish Bath soap .43 

2 dozen Cashmere Bouquet, at $2.47 4. 94 

6.21 

Henry Baumgarten: 

Mar. 16. 1 font Reese's adjustable stencils 1. 75 

6 stencil plates 2. 40 

1 font of rubber type 1. 70 

5.85 

The Evening Star Newspaper Co. : 

Mar. 6. Subscription to Even ing Star from March 6 to July 1 , 1900 1 . 62 

H. Doc. 9 11 



162 BEPOBT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 

1900. John Owens: 

Mar. 29. Raking of grass plot in front of Court of Claims and 
Department of Justice, sowing seed on same, and 
carting away refuse matter: 

Time, 12J hours, at $1.60 per day *- $2.34 

Carting .60 

$2.84 

Fannie Jackson: 

Mar. 31. Washing 100J dozen towels during March, 1900, at 12 cents 12. 02 

D. Rickenbacher: 

Jan. 23. Repairing 3 clocks $3.00 

30. Repairing 1 clock 2. 00 

Feb. 6. Repairing American clocks 2.00 

15. 1 double key 26 



United States Electric Lighting Co. : 
Mar. 31. Use of electric current at 1435 K street NW. from March 
1 to 31, inclusive, as follows: 
Light meter, 1,537,200 Watt hours, at6centsper 1,000 92. 23 
Motor meter, 294,400 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 17. 66 



7.26 



109.89 



United States Electric Lighting Co. : 
Mar. 31. Use of electric current at No. 8 Lafayette square, from March 1 

to 31, inclusive, 663,200 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000 39. 79 

The Grove Lime and Coal Co. : 

Feb. 19. J cord sawed and split pine ( order 978) $2. 50 

21. \ cord sawed and split pine 2. 50 

Mar. 28. J cord sawed and split pine (order 1029) 2. 50 

J cord sawed and split pine 2. 50 



Washington Gaslight Co. : 
31. 13,200 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of March, 
1900, at $1 net per M cubic feet: 

8,300 feet, 1435 K street NW., at $1 8.30 

4,900 feet, 8 Jackson place, at $1 4.90 

William I. Ticknor: 

Feb. 27. 2 No. 6 typewriters, with covers, at $90 180. 00 

2 copyholders, at $2 4. 00 

1899. Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Oct. 16. 1 card attachment and adjusting No. 6-28895 2. 95 

Dec. 13. Adjusting typewriter No. 7-3104 .60 

18. Adjusting typewriter No. 6-45050 60 

1900. 

Jan. 15. Remodeling 1 typewriter 52.75 

17. Adjusting typewriter No. 2-4789 9. 65 

17. Adjusting typewriter No. 6-3444 1.60 

Feb. 1 . Adjusting typewriter No. 4135 .60 

10. Adjusting typewriter No. 28895 70 

21. Adjusting typewriter No. 2-57083 1. 00 

23. Adjusting typewriter No. 6-32243 65 

Jan. 8. 1 No. 6 typewriter 87. 75 

10. 1 No. 6 typewriter 87.75 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Feb. 1. Griggs to warden, Fort Leavenworth, 41 .51 

Griggs to Speed, Guthrie, 41 .51 

Griggs to keeper State prison, Trenton, 22 .22 

Griggs to United States marshal, Concord, N. H. , 19 .20 

Richards to Dewhurst, St. Augustine, 20 .20 

2. Griggs to United States attorney, Ardmore, 37 .46 

Griggs to United States attorney, New York, 55 .55 

Griggs to United States attorney, Atlanta, 28 .28 

4. Griggs to keeper State prison, Trenton, 25 .25 

Rechtin to Baker, Memphis, 17 .20 

Richards to United States marshal, Madison, 20 20 



10.00 



13.20 



184.00 



246.60 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 163 







1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Feb. 4. Richards to Burnett, New York, 20 $0.20 

Roberts to assistant treasurer, New Orleans, 24 .30 

Clay to Erwin, New York, 21 21 

5. Richards to United States marshal, Tucson, 34 .60 

Richards to United States attorney, New York, 21 .21 

Richards to United States marshal, Dallas, 20 .30 

7. Rechtin to Scothorn, Guthrie, 19 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 20 .35 

8. Griggs to United States attorney, Albuquerque, 41 .72 

Griggs to Johnson, Ardmore, 31 w .39 

Pradt to Nott, New Orleans, 19 25 

9. Griggs to United States attorney, Oshkosh, 31 .31 

Praat to Underwood, Marietta, Ohio, 39 .39 

10. Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 16 .25 

Griggs to Johnson, Dallas, 23 .35 

12. Richards to United States attorney, Winston, N. C, 50. . .50 

Richards to Irwin, El Reno, Okla., 44 ._ . .55 

Richards to Irwin, El Reno, Okla., 29 .36 

Richards to United States attorney, Guthrie, 40 .50 

Rudy to United States attorney, Guthrie, 32 .40 

13. Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, 28 .42 

Griggs to United States marshal, Shreveport, 24 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Baltimore, 18 .20 

14. Griggs to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 32 .64 

Griggs to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 20 .40 

Griggs to Randolph, Memphis, 33 .33 

15. Griggs to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 36 .36 

Roberts to assistant treasurer, New Orleans, 25 .31 

16. Griggs to United States attorney, New Orleans, 18 .25 

Griggs to Fallett, El Paso, 20 30 

19. Griggs to United States attorney, Louisville, 17 .20 

20. Boyd to Gaines, Charleston, 38 38 

Boyd to Hammer, Ryan, Ind. T. , 27 .34 

Boyd to United States marshal, Tucson, 27 .47 

21. Boyd to Campbell, San Antonio, 22 .33 

Griggs to United States attorney, Philadelphia, 22 .22 

23. Richards to Evarts, New York, 28 -.28 

25. Griggs.to United States attorney, Cheyenne, 21 .32 

Griggs to United States attorney, Chicago, 14 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Chicago, 23 .23 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 29 .51 

Griggs" to United States marshal, South McAlester, 13. . .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, 14 .25 

26. Griggs to United States marshal, New Orleans, 17 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Oxford, Miss., 17 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, Okla. ,27 .34 

Griggs to Griggs, El Paso, 25 38 

Griggs to McCoughey, Fort Leavenworth, 23 .29 

27. Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, 25 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, San Antonio, 28 .42 

28. Griggs from Young, St. Louis, 39 .49 

Griggs to Young, St. Louis, 44 .55 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 40 .80 

Boyd to United States attorney, Charleston, W. Va, 29. .29 

Finn to Carr, San Antonio, 39 .59 

■ $23. 36 
Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

23. Reeve to Hill, Louisville, Ky., 46 46 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

Mar. 1. United States attorney, New York, from Boyd, 31 .31 

2. United States attorney, Kansas City, from Griggs, 15 . . .25 

5. United States attorney, Portland, Me. , from Griggs, 23 _ . .23 

6. Boyle, Seattle, from Hoyt, 48 96 

United States attorney, Portland, Me., from Griggs, 19. .20 

7. United States attorney, Portland, Me., from Griggs, 20. .20 

8. United States attorney, New Orleans, from Richards, 34. .43 



164 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Mar. 9. Benedict, New York, from Pradt, 15 $0.20 

10. United States Attorney, Boston, from Rechtin, 34 .34 

13. Post, New York, from Griggs, 19 20 

14. Post, New York, from Griggs, 25 25 

15. Warden, Fort Leavenworth, from Griggs, 22 .28 

United States marshal, San Antonio, from Griggs, 23 . . .35 

16. Tillman, Nashville, from Griggs, 21 21 

United States marshal, Topeka, from Griggs, 20 .25 

United States marshal, Jackson, from Griggs, 17 .25 

19. United States marshal, Los Angeles, from Griggs, 11... .40 

20. Collins, Chattanooga, from Pradt, 16 20 

22. United States marsnal, Little Rock, from Griggs, 16. . . .25 

Childers, Albuquerque, from Griggs, 31 .54 

United States attorney, Utica, from Griggs, 19 .20 

United States attorney, Portland, from Griggs, 23 .23 

23. Pradt, Washington, D. C, from Collins, Chattanooga, 

Tenn., 39 39 

United States attorney, Denver, from Griggs, 15 .30 

24. Page, New York, from Richards, 66 66 

United States attorney, New York, from Richards, 122. . 1. 22 
United States attorney, New York, from Richards, 22. . _ .22 

Collins, Chattanooga, from Pradt, 26 .26 

27. United States attorney, Denver, from Griggs, 28 .42 

United States marshal, Macon, from Griggs, 13 .20 

United States marshal, Albuquerque, from Griggs, 28.. .49 

United States marshal, Pensacola, from Griggs, 13 .20 

28. Moyer & Taylor, Memphis, from Griggs, 27 .27 

United States attorney, New Orleans, from Richards, 26. .33 

29. United States attorney, New York, from Richards, 75 . .75 
Roosevelt, Albany, from Richards, 139 1. 39 

30. United States attorney, Denver, from Griggs, 28 .42 

United States attorney, Cleveland, from Griggs, 28 .28 

$14.53 

Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

Mar. 31 . Ice for March, 8,225 pounds, at 20 cents per 100 16. 45 

National Electric Supply Co. : 
Mar. 31. Maintenance of 1 Observatory Department clock for quarter 

ended March 31, 1900, at $50 per annum 12. 50 

J. C. Hurley: 
Mar. 3. Making new fire valve and repairing old valve: 

Blacksmith and helper, 5J hours, at 70 cents $3. 85 

20 pounds iron, at 4 cents '.... .80 

4.65 

Thomas Somerville & Sons: 

Jan. 16. 2 S by J bushings .04 

Chase bushings .10 

.14 

1899. J. Hall Semmes: 

Sept. 12. 1 dozen matches (boxes) .20 

1900. 
Apr. 16. 3 dozen matches ( boxes) .60 

.80 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 

Mar. 31. Exchange rental for — 

Switch-board instrument, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Attorney-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief clerk, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

General agent, at $38 per annum v 6. 25 

Pardon attorney, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

File room, at $38 per annum 6. 25 • 

Stationery room, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Solicitor-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Colonel Hoyt's office, at $38 per annum . . />. 6. 25 

Appointment division, at $38 per annunr^k 6. 25 

Second-floor hall, at $38 per annum .1 6. 25 

Colonel Boyd's office, at $38 per annum . » . ^ . * - 6. 25 

Disbursing clerk, at $38 per annum 6. 25 



m 



Report of the attorney -general. 165 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. — 
Continued. 
1900. Exchange rental for — 

Mar. 31. Fourth-floor hall, at $38 per annum $6. 25 

Chief finance division, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant attorney-general, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Second-floor hall, No. 8 Lafayette square, at $38 per 

annum 6. 25 

Library old Corcoran Art Gallery, at $38 per annum . 6. 25 
Private secretary to Attorney-General, at $38 per an- 
num 6. 25 

First-floor hall, at $24 per annum 6. 00 

Third-floor hall, at $24 per annum 6. 00 

Mr. Sheibley , at $24 per annum 6. 00 

Captain Glover, at $24 per annum 5. 73 

Assistant Attorney-General, second floor Lafayette 

square, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

$148. 73 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 
Mar. 31. Exchange rental for Solicitor for Treasury from Jan. 1 to Mar. 31, 

at $34.50 per annum 6. 25 

John B. Daish: 

Apr. 20. 1 cord 3-piece hickory wood $5.90 

60 tons white ash egg coal, at $4.49 269. 40 

275.30 

National Electrical Supply Co. : 

Jan. 13. Moving and replacing electric-light fixtures in basement. 1.80 
Feb. 12. Repairing electric indicator, second floor, Baltic Build- 
ing 2.90 

Repairing electric lights and bells at No. 8 Jackson place . 4. 00 
20. Repairing electric fan and electric light at No. 8 Jackson 

place 1. 80 

Apr. 9. Fusing up at No. 8 Lafayette square 1.15 

11. 65 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Company: 

Mar. 1. Attorney-General, from Johnson, New York, 17 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, Philadelphia, 20 .20 

2. Griggs, from Ford, Lynchburg, Va., 88 .88 

Griggs, from Ford, Lynchburg, Va. ,23 .23 

4. Griggs to United States attorney, Sioux Falls, 19 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Tucson, 24 .42 

5. Griggs, from Eames & Young, St. Louis, 16 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Albuquerque, 12 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, St. Paul, 16 .25 

Griggs to Eames & Young, St. Louis, 28 .35 

Griggs to White, Princeton, Mercer County, W. Va., 

(25) 25 25 

6. Griggs to United States marshal, New Haven, Conn. , 21 . .21 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 29 .29 

Griggs to United States marshal, Pauls Valley, Ind. T., 

27 34 

Griggs to United States attorney, Galveston, 49 .74 

7. Richards to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 21.. .21 

Griggs to Con vers & Kirlin, New York, 73 .73 

Griggs to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 27 .27 

8. Pradt to Benedict, New York, 25 , 25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 147 1. 47 

9. Griggs to Convers & Kirlin, New York, 25 .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Boston, 18 .20 

11. Richards to United States marshal, Omaha, 17 .25 

Richards to United States marshal, Ardmore, Ind. T., 24. . 30 

12. Attorney-General, from Speer, Savannah, 78 .78 

Attorney-General to Watkins, Woodbury, N. J., 31 .31 

Attorney-General to United States marshal, Guthrie, 

Okla.,37 49 

Attorney-General to United States marshal, Savannah, 

25 25 

Attorney-General to Speer, Savannah, Ga., 15 .20 



166 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Mar. 13. Richards to United States attorney, New York,' 32 $0. 32 

14. Attorney-General, from Locke, Jacksonville, 55 .55 

Griggs to Severens, Grand Rapids, 31 .31 

Griggs to United States marshal, Brownsville, Tex., 19. _ .30 

Griggs to Soper, Wagoner, Ind. T., 17 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Boise, 16 .40 

• Griggs to Locke, Jacksonville, 44 .44 

Griggs to Convers & Kirlin, New York, 37 37 

Griggs to United States attorney, Lynchburg, 24 .24 

15. Griggs, from Locke, Jacksonville, 44 .44 

Griggs to Locke, Jacksonville, 35 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, 22 .28 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 17 .30 

Richards to Speed, Guthrie, 23 .27 

16. Richards to Convers & Kirlin, New York, 20 20 

Attorney-General, from Tillman, Nashville, 18 .20 

Attorney-General to United States attorney, Portland, 

Me., 20 20 

18. Attorney-General to Clark, Jacksonville, 20 .20 

Attorney-General to United States marshal, Des Moines, 

20 25 

Attorney-General, from Locke, Jacksonville, 24 .24 

Roberts to Austin National Bank, Austin, Tex., 38 .57 

Griggs to Webster, Rochester, N. Y., 24 .24 

Griggs to United States marshal, San Antonio, 18 .30 

Pradt to United States attorney, Nashville, 26 .26 

Pradt, from United States attorney, Nashville, 20 .20 

Easby Smith to Angier, Atlanta, 34 .34 

Griggs to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 17 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 38 .76 

Griggs to United States marshal, Chicago, 17 .20 

20. Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 17. . .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Atoka, Ind. T.,15 .25 

Griggs to jailer Fulton County jail, Atlanta, 26 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 19 .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, Chicago, 21 .21 

Hughes to Richards, Columbus, Ohio, 22 .22 

21. Griggs to United States attorney, St. Louis, 21 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Rutland, Vt., 51 .51 

22. Griggs to United States marshal, St. Paul, 14 .25 

Griggs to Shummel, Omaha, 24 .30 

Griggs to Church, El Paso, 16 30 

23. Pradt from Dougherty, Nashville, 35 .35 

Pradt to Lewis, Forest City, Ark., 19 .25 

Pradt to Dougherty, Memphis, 34 .34 

Pradt to Collins, Elizabethton, 26 26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Carson City, 15 .40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Oxford, 22 .28 

Richards to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 90 . . . .90 

24. Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 20 .20 

26. Griggs to United States attorney, Little Rock, 36 .45 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 26 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 18 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Antonio, 37 .59 

27. Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 26 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Purcell, Ind. T., 22. . . .28 

28. Richards to United States attorney, Grand Rapids, 33.. .33 
Richards to United States marshal, Loreta, Tex., 29 . . . .44 

29. Richards to United States attorney, Woodbury, N. J., 46 .46 
Roberts to Austin National Bank, Austin, 40 .60 

30. Griggs to United States attorney, Charleston, S. C, 42. . .42 

Griggs to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 20 .35 

Griggs to Post, New York, 28 28 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fort Smith, 21 .26 

31. Griggs to United States marshal, Fort Smith, 21 .26 

Other lines toll, 25 25 



$32.60 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 167 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Mar. 2. Reese to Wishard, Indianapolis, 36 $0. 36 

28. O'Connell to Morrison, Prescott, Ariz. ,47 .82 

29. 0* Connell to district attorney, Prescott, Ariz. ,39 .68 

$1.86 

Adams Express Co. : 

Mar. 6. One package, 4J pounds, from Washington, D. C, to M. G. Rey- 
nolds, Santa Fe, N. Mex., at $9.25 per cwt »« - .75 

1899. The Geo. W. Knox Express Co. : 

Dec. 8. Drayage on 1 case books $0. 50 

15. Drayage on 2 cases books .50 

1.00 

1900. Jordon & Balser: 

Apr. 3. 5 hours' time, at 50 cents, overhauling and adjusting electric 

motor 2. 50 

Fannie Jackson: 
Apr. 30. Washing 88J dozen towels during month April, 1900, at 12 cents. 10. 59 

Bates Manufacturing Co. : 
Apr. 19. Chaining and repairing 1.6 W. E. automatic numbering 

machine, No. 17254 $1.75 

25. 1 bottle No. 2 black copying ink .50 

1 bottle No. 2 red copying ink .50 

4 ink pads, at 15" cents .60 

3.35 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 

Apr. 30. 9,600 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of April, 
1900, at $1 net per M cubic feet: 

7,800 cubic feet, 1435 K street $7. 80 

1,800 cubic feet, 8 Jackson place 1. 80 

9.60 

Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

Apr. 30. Ice for April, 7,875 pounds, at 20 cents 15. 75 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 
Use of electric current at 1435 K street NW., from April 1 to 30, 
inclusive, as follows: 
Light meter, 1,323,600 watt hours* 6 cents per 1,000. $79. 41 
Motor meter, 277,000 watt hours, 6 cents per 1,000. 16. 62 

96.03 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

Use of electric current at No. 8 Lafayette square, from April 1 

to 30, 1900, inclusive, 627,600 watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000. 37. 65 
Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

Apr. 2. United States marshal, Paris, Tex., from Griggs, 49 $0. 74 

United States marshal, Kansas City, from Richards, 22. .28 

United States attorney, Baltimore, from Griggs, 16 .20 

3. United States attorney, Baltimore, from Griggs, 30 .30 

4. United States attorney, New York, from Gnggp, 37 .37 

United States attorney, Montgomery, from Griggs, 23.. .23 

United States attorney, Paris, Tex. , via Galveston, from 

Griggs, 28 72 

6. Brockway, Elmira, New York, from Griggs, 23 .23 

Rose, New York, from Richards, 44 .44 

7. Jailer, Atlanta, from Griggs, 24 .24 

United States marshal, Aberdeen, from Richards, 15. . . .25 

Randolph, Memphis, from Richards, 18 .20 

United States attorney, Buffalo, N. Y., from Griggs, 31 . .31 

9. Myers, Philadelphia, Pa. , from Russell, 25 .25 

Knott, New Orleans, from Pradt, 20 25 

Evans, Louisville, from Boyd, 18 .20 

10. United States marshal, San Francisco, from Griggs, 26. . . 52 

11. Pitney, Newark, N. J., from Griggs, 19 .20 

United States attorney, Las Cruces, N. Mex., from 

Griggs, 19 35 

12. UnitecTStates attorney, St. Paul, from Griggs, 26 .33 

United States marshal, Charleston, S. C. , from Griggs, 18 . .20 

United States attorney, San Francisco, from Richards, 36 . .72 

Richards, Washington, D. C, from Reeve, Stillwater, 

Minn., 55 69 



168 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. United States Electric Lighting Co. — Continued. 

Apr. 13. United States attorney, Madison, Wis., from Griggs, 17. $0. 20 

United States marshal, El Paso, Tex., Griggs, 13? .30 

United States marshal, Topeka, Griggs, 23 .29 

United States attorney, Aberdeen, Miss., Griggs, 25 .31 

Warden, Stillwater, Minn. , Griggs, 25 .31 

14. United States marshal, El Paso, Tex., Griggs, 20 .40 

United States attorney, Nashua, N. H., Griggs, 22 .22 

16. Grand Central Hotel, El Paso, Tex., Griggs, 20 30 

17. United States marshal, Paris, Tex., Griggs, 17 .30 

United States attorney, Seattle, Griggs, 37 .74 

18. Bates Manufacturing Co. , Orange, Clay, 21 .21 

19. Griggs, Washington, Cowin, Omaha, 28 .35 

20. Terrfil, El Paso, Tex. , Griggs, 47 71 

21. United States marshal, San Antonio, Griggs, 28 .30 

United States marshal, San Francisco, Griggs, 18 .40 

United States attorney, Seattle, Griggs, 14 .40 

24. United States attorney, Topeka, Boyd, 57 .71 

United States attorney, Cleveland, Boyd, 47 .47 

Subrecht, San Antonio, Boyd, 37 .59 

United States marshal, Nashville, Griggs, 19 .20 

26. Griggs, Washington, D. C, Cowin, 14 25 

Brown, Juneau, Alaska, Rudy, 33 : .66 

United States attorney, Portland, Me. , Griggs, 11 .20 

Howe, New Orleans, Griggs, 25 .31 

Eames & Young, St. Louis, Griggs, 30 .39 

Marvin, New Haven, Griggs, 20 .20 

27. Dougherty, Memphis, Pradt, 20 20 

28. Austin National Bank, Austin, Roberts, 38 .57 

United States attorney, Kansas City, Griggs, 16 .25 

30. United States marshal, El Paso, Tex., Griggs, 17 .30 

United States attorney, Albuquerque, Griggs, 12 .35 

$19.51 

Pennsylvania Railroad: 

Aug. 21. Transportation of 1 case copying books from Washing- 
ton, D. C, to Philadelphia, Pa., per B. L. 616, con- 
signed to Wm. Mann Co., care deputy quartermaster, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 101 pounds, at 28 cents per cwt. . . .28 

1900. Willis & Clements: 

May 10. Framed print of the Hon. H. Conrad 15. 00 

Boxing and express 1. 10 

16. 10 

James B. Lambie: 

Feb. 3. 1 padlock 85 

13. 1 pint can glue .40 

i dozen blank keys .38 

14. 1 squirt can .25 

15. To repairing pole .75 

19. 1 drill bit 20 

2.83 

James B. Lambie: 

Mar. 31. 17 feet sash cord .15 

1 blank key 06 

1 saw file .12 

Apr. 4. 2 Yale locks, $1. 15 2.30 

26. 1 drill 30 

1 dozen screws .05 

1 blank key .05 

1 pound cotton rope .30 

6 galvanized awning pulleys, 5 cents .30 

1J pounds |-inch gum packing, 30 centH .75 

1 ball twine 20 

2 2 by J lag screws .04 

i dozen awning slides, 45 cents .23 

2 dozen screws, 5 cents .10 

4 gross screw eyes, 65 cents 2. 60 

2 dozen rings, 3 cents .06 

8.41 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 169 

1900. W. H. Cooper: 

May 7. 2 gold signs for paintings, at $1 „.. $2.00 

United Typewriter and Supply Co. : 

Mar. 14. Repairs to No. 1 Densmore 9114 .50 

United States Express Co. : 

Apr. 25. Package, 2, Department of Justice, from Orange, N. J .25 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Apr. 2. Griggs to United States attorney, Albuquerque, 12 $0. 35 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 20. . . .25 

3. Griggs to United States marshal, Kansas City, 24 .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Paris, Tex. ,32 .48 

5. Boyd to attorney, New York, 29 .29 

Griggs to attorney, Antlers, Ind. T., 29 .36 

Griggs to attorney, Boise, 42 .84 

Griggs to Speed, Guthrie, 29 36 

Griggs to Hartford, Nashville, 27 .27 

Richards to United States attorney, South McAlester, 25 . 31 

9. Griggs to United States marshal, (ruthrie, 30 .38 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 24 .30 

Richards to United States marshal, Guthrie, 25 .31 

Roberts to Speed, Guthrie, 48 .60 

10. Pradt to Dougherty, Memphis, 31 .31 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 24 .36 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 12 .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 17 .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Aberdeen, 19 .25 

Roberts to assistant treasurer, San Francisco, 27 .54 

11. Griggs to United States marshal, Tucson, 24 .42 

Griggs to United States marshal, Birmingham, 26 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 27 .34 

Griggs to Watkins, Woodbury, N. J. , 24 .24 

Griggs to United States marshal, Sioux Falls, 20 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Danville, Va., 29 .29 

Griggs to United States marshal, Aberdeen, Miss., 21 . . .26 

Clay to Bates, Orange, N. J., 26 26 

13. Griggs to United States attorney, Chicago, 15 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, El Paso, 16 .30 

15. Richards to United States attorney, San Francisco, 16. . .40 

16. Griggs to United States attorney, South McAlester, 34. . .43 
Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 18. . .25 

17. Hoyt to Beecher & Scovill, N. Y., 26 26 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 14.. .25 

Boyd to United States attorney, Sitka, 34 .68 

18. Griggs from Dukes, Orangeburg, S. C. , 20 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Omaha, 13 .25 

• Griggs to United States jailer, Orangeburg, S. C, 23 . . . .23 

19. Griggs from Brawley , Greenville, S. C. , 27 .29 

Smith to Speer, Macon, 29 29 

Griggs to United States attorney, New York, 15 .20 

Griggs to United States attorney, San Francisco, 26 .52 

Griggs to United States marshal, Trenton ( forwarded ) , 30 .30 

Griggs to Brawley, Charleston (38), 33 33 

Griggs to United States marshal, San Antonio, 21 .32 

21. Richards te United States attorney, Moscow, 28 .56 

23. Roberts to Austin National Bank, Austin, 37 .56 

Griggs to board of directors, Moundsville, 36 .36 

Griggs to United States marshal, El Paso, 24 .36 

Griggs to board, Nashville, 24 .24 

Griggs to United States marshal, Albuquerque, 16 .35 

Griggs to United States marshal, Trenton, 28 .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Helena, Mont. , 23 . . . .40 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 16. . .25 

Griggs to United States warden, Fort Leavenworth, 37 . .46 

24. Griggs to United States attorney, New York, 88 .88 

25. Roberts to First National Bank, Trenton, 40 .40 

Griggs to Brockway, Elmira, 18 .20 

Boyd to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 21 .42 



170 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GKMERAL. 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

Apr. 25. Boyd to United States marshal, South McAlester, 34... $0.43 

26. Griggs to United States attorney, El Paso, Tex., 24 36 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 29. . .36 

Griggs to United States marshal, Portland, Me., 40 .40 

Griggs to United States attorney, Portland, Me., 49 .49 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 12 .20 

27. Pradt from Dougherty, Memphis, 25 .25 

Griggs to Bergen, Elizabeth, 34 .34 

Griggs to United States attorney, St. Paul, 45 .56 

28. Roberts to assistant treasurer, St. Louis, 24 .30 

29. Griggs to United States attorney, St. Paul, 30 25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Los Angeles, 32 .64 

Griggs to United States marshal, Little Rock, 31 .39 

Griggs to United States marshal, Salt Lake, 14 .35 

30. Griggs to United States marshal, St. Paul, 28 35 

Other lines, toll 38 

$27.30 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

Apr. 2. O'Connell to Terrell, San Antonio, 24 36 

4. O'Connell to Griffith, Tucson, 38 67 

5. O'Connell to Reese, Montgomery, 55 .55 

O'Connell from Reese, Montgomery, 18 .20 

13. O'Connell to Angier, Atlanta, 49 49 

14. O'Connell to Angier, Atlanta, 86 86 

20. O'Connell from Morrison, Prescott, 24 .42 

O'Connell to Menager, Tucson, 39 68 

O'Connell to Morrison, Prescott, 34 .60 

30. O'Connell to Warner, Kansas City, 20 25 

5.08 

The Washington Post Co. : 

Apr. 7. Proposals for stationery and miscellaneous supplies, 23 lines once 

a week, 4 times •. 12. 65 

The Times Co. : 

Apr. 8. 20 lines, 4 days, proposals for stationery, etc., 4-8, 14, 21, 28 9. 00 

The Evening Star Newspaper Co. : 
Apr. 7. Advertising in the Evening Star in its issues of April 7, 14, 21, 

28, 1900, for proposals, 19 lines once a week, 4 times 9. 88 

Fannie Jackson: 
May 31. Washing 99 J dozen towels during month of May, 1900, at 12 

cents 11.90 

D. Rickenbacher: 

7. Repairing engine-room clock 2. 00 

Knickerbocker Ice Co. : 

31. Ice for May, 8,225 pounds, at 20 cents 16.45 

Washington Gaslight Co. : 
31. 4,100 cubic feet of gas consumed in the month of May, 
1900, at $1 net per 1,000 cubic feet— 

3,800 cubic feet 1435 K street $3.80 

300 cubic feet 8 Jackson place 30 

4.10 

Theodore B. Lyman: 

31 . For services in assisting the librarian in arranging, classifying, and 
cataloguing books in the library of the Department of Justice 

from April 30 to May 31 , 1900, inclusive 77. 50 

William S. Ballard: 

Bryant's History of the United States, vol. 5 7. 50 

W. Andrew Boyd: 
Feb. 1. 7 District of Columbia directories, 1900, at $5 35. 00 

1899. M.E.Mann: 

Nov. 4. 1 vol. Appleton's Annual Cyclopaedia for 1898 6.00 

1900. M. E. Mann: 

June 14. Cyclopaedia of American Biography, vol. 7 6. 00 

M.E.Mann: 
Feb. 20. Appleton's Annual Encyclopaedia, 1898 (third series, vol. 3) 7. 00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



171 



UKX). Notley Anderson: 

Apr. 6. Building coal vault at No. 8 Jackson place $2. 85 

16. Putting up reflector to window of Attorney-General, K 

street 7. 25 

Repairing curtains room 402, K street .50 

Putting up shelves with bronze brackets, rooms 404 and 

and 410 K street 3.29 

$13.89 

James B. Lambie: 

May 1. 50 feet f-inch extra Para hose complete 9.75 

4 No. 50 whitewash brushes, $1.25 5.00 

4. 1 f-inch machine bolt .10 

1 8-inch half-round smooth file and handle .30 

5 pounds graphite grease, 20 cents 1. 00 

22. 3 tack claws, 40 cents 1 . 20 

29. 2 pounds white lead, 12J cents .25 

3 pounds dry red lead, 10 cents .30 

i pound litharge .08 

2 manhole gaskets, 50 cents 1. 00 

— — — — 18 98 
Geo. F. Muth & Co. : 

Apr. 7. 1 dozen small hand mops .70 

R. P. Clarke & Co. : 

June 14. 2 dozen Pears soap, $1.35 2. 70 

1900. Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 

May 1. Prison commissioners, Nashville* from Griggs, 24 .24 

Childers, Santa Fe, from Griggs, 33 .58 

4. United States attorney, St. Paul, from Griggs, 23 .29 

United States attorney, Brattleboro, from Griggs, 19c. . 20 

United States attorney, Madison, Wis., from Griggs, 16 . . 20 

5. United States attorney, Pittsburg, from Griggs, 16 .20 

7. Attorney-General, District of Columbia, from Sayers, 

Austin, 55 .83 

United States attorney, Buffalo, from Griggs, 70 .70 

United States attorney, Denver, from Griggs, 32 .48 

United States marshal, Little Rock, from Griggs, 26 .33 

Governor of Texas, Austin, from Griggs, 45 .68 

United States attorney, Pittsburg, from Griggs, 18 .20 

United States attorney, Buffalo, from Griggs, 16 .20 

United States attorney, New York, from Griggs, 37 .37 

8. United States attorney, New York, from Griggs, 111 1.11 

Sanger, Lincoln, from Griggs, 61 .76 

Attorney-General, District of Columbia, from Sanger, 

Lincoln, 40 .50 

Attorney-General, District of Columbia, from Sanger, 

Lincoln, 23 29 

Attorney-General, District of Columbia, Frederick, 

Sitka, 41 82 

10. United States marshal, Louisville, from Griggs, 22 .22 

11. United States attorney, Salt Lake City, from Griggs, 22 . .60 

Nott, New Orleans, from Pradt, 26 26 

United States attorney, Louisville, from Griggs, 19 .20 

12. Superintendent prisons, Philadelphia, from Griggs, 35. . .35 

14. Warden, United States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, 

from Griggs, 30 38 

Eames, Atlanta, from Griggs, 31 .31 

15. Griggs, District of Columbia, to Stark, Jefferson City, 

Mo., 28 '. ; 35 

Sutherland, Utica, from Griggs, 50 .50 

Warden Missouri Penitentiary, Jefferson City, from 

Griggs, 24 30 

16. UnitedStates attorney, Baltimore, from Griggs, 14 .20 

United States attorney, Grand Rapids, from Griggs, 30. .30 

United States attorney, Galveston, from Griggs, 35 .53 

United States attorney, Montgomery, from Griggs, 24.. .24 

Chisholm, Birmingham, from Pradt, 14 .20 



172 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Postal Telegraph Cable Co.— Continued. 

May 17. Richards, District of Columbia, from Gorham, Boston, 

40 -. $0.40 

Baldwin, New York, from Griggs, 26 .26 

McClaughey, Fort Leavenworth, from Griggs, 16 .25 

United States attorney, St. Louis, from Griggs, 23 .27 

Collins, Chattanooga, from Pradt, 18 .20 

Gorham, Boston, from Richards, 31 .31 

19. Attorney-General, District of Columbia, to Hartford, 

Nashville, 15 20 

United States attorney, San Antonio, from Griggs, 25.. .38 

Warden prison, Nashville, from Griggs, 22 .22 

United States attorney, Atlanta, from Easby Smith, 21 . .21 

21. United States marshal, Elmira, N. Y. , from Richards, 19. . 20 

Sutherland, Rochester, N. Y., from Richards, 55 .55 

United States marshal, Sitka, Alaska, from Richards, 22 . 44 

22. United States marshal, Elmira, N. Y., from Griggs, 24. .34 
Bohle, St. Louis, from Griggs, 23 .27 

23. Rozier, St. Louis, from Griggs, 25 .31 

Shine, San Francisco, from Griggs, 17 .40 

26. United States marshal, Denver, from Griggs, 16 .30 

28. Collins, Fayetteville, from Pradt, 21 21 

United States attorney, Portland, Oreg., from Griggs, 31 . 62 

Eames & Young, St. Louis, from Griggs, 49 .61 

Pradt, District of Columbia, to Collins, Fayetteville, 

N.C.,35 35 

29. United States attorney, St. Louis, from Griggs, 46 .58 

31. United States attorney, New Orleans, from Griggs, 15. . .25 

Marshal, Cleveland, Ohio, from Griggs, 20 .20 

United States attorney, Portland, Me., from Griggs, 24, .24 

Erwin, Macon, from Easby Smith, 18 .20 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

May 2. Roberts to First National Bank, St. Paul, 43 .54 

Griggs to United States marshal, Woodburv, N. J. , 20. . . .20 

3. Griggs to Soper, Vinita, Ind. T.,26.. " 33 

Griggs to Burnett, New York, 29 29 

Griggs to United States attorney, Woodbury, N. J., 22 . . .22 

Sheibley to United States attorney, Vinita, Ind. T., 22. . .28 

Griggs to United States attorney, Fargo, N. Dak. ,19 .30 

Griggs to Corwin, Omaha, 37 .46 

Griggs to United States attorney, New York, 25 .25 

6. Boyd to Rawlins, New York, 19 20 

Boyd to Harrity, Philadelphia, 29 29 

Boyd to West, StLouis, 25 31 

Griggs to Brown, Buffalo, 105 1.05 

7. Griggs to United States attorney, New Orleans, 24 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Cheyenne, 21 .32 

8. Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, N. Dak., 46 .69 

9. Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, N. Dak., 29 .44 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 21 .26 

10. Griggs to United States attorney, San Antonio, 20 .30 

13. Griggs to United States marshal, Guthrie, 15 .25 

14. Attorney-General from Sheibley, Oyster Bay, N. Y., 66. .61 
Griggs from superintendent Philadelphia prison, Phila- 
delphia, 37 37 

Griggs to United States marshal, Salt Lake City, 21 .37 

Griggs to superintendent Philadelphia prison, Philadel- 
phia, 20 20 

Easby Smith to superintendent Philadelphia prison, Phil- 
adelphia, 20 20 

15. Griggs to Terrell, San Antonio, 44 .66 

Griggs to United States attorney, Fargo, 30 .45 

Griggs to Hunt, Helena, Mont. ,44 .75 

Griggs to United States marshal, Kansas City, 63 .79 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 25.. .31 

16. Meline to D. , National Bank, Salt Lake, 37 .65 



22.73 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 173 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co.— Continued. 

May 16. Griggs to United States attorney, South McAlester, 36. . $0. 45 

Smith to Dewitt, Tucson, 51 .89 

17. Griggs from Jones, New York, 26 .26 

Griggs to Conell, Grand Rapids, 31 .31 

Griggs to Hunt, Helena, Mont., 23 40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Salt Lake City, 27 .47 

17. Binney from Morrisey, Philadelphia, 64 .64 

Pradt from Collins, Chattanooga, 27 .27 

Pradt to Collins, Chattanooga, 14 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Jacksonville, 15 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Montgomery, 17 .20 

Griggs to Burke, Cheyenne, 27 .41 

21. Burch from Griggs, Delrio, Tex., 25 38 

Richards to United States marshal, St. Louis, 21 .26 

Richards to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 34 . . . .34 

Richards to Griggs, Delrio, Tex., 18 .30 

Roberts to D., National Bank, Salt Lake City, 40 .70 

22. Griggs to Rozier, St. Louis, 75 .94 

Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 15 .20 

Griggs to Scathum, Kingfisher, 20 .25 

Griggs to Griggs, Delrio, Tex., 25 .38 

Griggs from Griggs, Delrio, Tex., 10 .30 

Griggs to Erwin, Macon, 27 .27 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, 25 .38 

Griggs to Coombs, San Francisco, 94 1. 88 

Griggs to Rozier, St. Louis, 93 1. 16 

Griggs to Rozier, St. Louis, 93 1. 16 

Griggs to Rozier, St. Louis, 17 .25 

24. Griggs to United States marshal, Salina, Kans., 21 .26 

Griggs to United States marshal, Ardmore, 32 .40 

Griggs to United States marshal, Los Angeles, 21 .42 

Griggs to United States attorney, Brattleboro, Vt., 30 . . .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Fargo, 15 .30 

25. Richards to United States marshal, South McAlester, 20. .20 
Roberts to First National Bank, St. Paul, 37 46 

26. Roberts to L. , National Bank, Leavenworth, 38 .48 

28. Pradt from Dougherty, Bay St. Louis, 51 .46 

Attorney-General from Coombs, San Francisco, 60 1. 38 

29. Richards from United States attorney, Cincinnati, 22. . . .22 

Pradt from Smith, New York, 23 23 

Griggs from United States marshal, South McAlester, 27 . .34 

Griggs to United States marshal, Louisville, 22 .22 

31. Griggs to United States attorney, Ardmore, Ind. T., 11 . .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, South McAlester, 24. .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Guthrie, 24 .30 

Other lines toll .59 

33.85 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

May 19. Reeve to Rourke, Fargo, N. Dak., 54 .81 

A. G. Rome: 
June 20. 12 No. 6 polished copper underwriters' fire extinguishers, at $12. 144. 00 

Fannie Jackson: 
June 30. Washing 95 J dozen towels during month June, 1900, at 12 cents. 11. 44 

Theodore B. Lyman: 
June 30. Services in assisting the librarian in arranging, classifying, and 
cataloguing books in the library of the Department of Justice, 

from June 1 to June 30, 1900, inclusive 75.00 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 

Nov. 24. 1 call to Philadelphia, Pa $1.25 

1 call to Paterson, N. J 2.25 

Dec. 14. 1 call to New York 2.40 

29. 1 call to New York 2.80 

1900 
Mar. 30 1 call to New York 2.00 

17. 70 



174 BEPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

1900. Wvckoff, Seamans & Benedict: 

Apr. 14. Adjust ins; typewriter No. 6-32898 $0.65 

81. Adjusting typewriter N'o. 14-676 .50 

May 7. Atljnsiirij.' typewriters Noa 6166,24698,3383,3382 3.10 

June 1. Ailju.-itidg typewriter No. 238243 70 

29. Adjusting typewriter No. 6-27031 11.20 

30. A. .lju.-( in- typewriter No. 7-3104 60 

$1S. 75 

United States Electric Lighting Co.: 

June 30. Use of electric current at 1435 K street NW. from June 1 
to June 30, 1900, inclusive, as follows: 
Motor meter, 286, 800 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1 ,000 17. 20 
Light meter, 1,136,400 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 

1,000 68.18 

85.38 

United States Electric Lighting Co. : 

June 30. Use of electric current at No. 8 Lafayette square from June 1 

to June 30, inclusive, 570,400 Watt hours, at 6 cents per 1,000. 34. 22 
Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. : 
June 30. Exchange rental for — 

Switchboard instruments, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Attornev-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief clerk, at $38 per annum 6.26 

General agent, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Pardon attorney, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

File room, at $38 per annum 6.25 

Stationery room, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Solicitor-General, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Colonel Hoyt's office, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Appointment division, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Second-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Chief of finance division, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Assistant Attorney-General, at (38 per annum 6.25 

Assistant Attorney-General, second floor, I jifftyMte 

square, at $38 per annum 6.25 

Second-floor hall, 8 lafayette square, at $38 per 

annum 6.25 

Library, old Corcoran Gallery, at $38 per annum . 6. 25 

Colonel Boyd's office, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Disbursing clerk, at $38 per annum 6. 25 

Fourth-floor hall, at $38 per annum 6.25 

Private secretary, Attorney-General, at $38 per an- 
num 6.25 

First-floor hall, at $24 i>er annum 8.00 

Third-floor hall, at $24 per annum 6.00 

Mr. Sheibley, at $24 per annum 6.00 

Captain Glover, at $24 per annum 6.00 

1.49 

Chesapeake and Potomac -Telephone Co.: 

June 30. Exchange rental for solicitor for Treasury from April 1, 1900, to 

June 30, 1900, at $34.50 per annum 6.25 

Knickerbocker Ice Co.: 

June 30. Ii-e for June, 8,250 pounds, at 20 cents 16.50 

1900. Washington Gaslight Co.: 

5,500 cubic feet gas consumed in the month of June, 
1900, at $1 net per 1,000 cubic feet— 

5,000 at 1435 K street NW $5.00 

500 at 8 Jackson place 50 

5.50 

National Electric Supply Co.: 

May 14. Repairing fan 4.25 

15. Repairing 5 fans 3.00 

24. Difference in price between 16 Crescent desk fan in- 
stalled and 12 Crescent dealt fan taken 5. 00 

28. Repairing lights and fans 2.75 

June 1. Repairing lights, No. 8 Lafayette square .90 

8. 1 P. 12-inch G. E. trunnion fan with cord and plug 14.50 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. 175 

1900. National Electric Supply Co.— Continued. 

June 11. Repairing fan, Baltic Building,,..., .*,*.•* $4.25 

13. Changing wires in room of Attorney-General * « * 2. 10 

26. Fuzing up and repairing lights, No. 8 Lafayette square. 1. 97 

•■■•• ■ - $38.72 
National Electric Supply Co. : 
June 30. Maintenance of 1 Observatory Department clock for quarter 

ended June 30, 1900 12.00 

Rudolph, West & Co. : 

June 30. 1 anvil, 15 pounds 2.50 

N. L. Burchell: 

June 13. 2 dozen Cashmere Boquet soap, at $2.47 4. 94 

G. G. C. Simms: 

June 1. 2 pounds camphor $1.50 

Mothballs 20 

Mar. 24. 1 dozen bottles ammonia 1. 00 

3.70 

Richard L. Lamb: 

June 30. 1 5-A font Reese's adjustable stencils 1. 75 

1 5-A font rubber type 1. 60 

1 dozen Universal stamp holders .45 

3.80 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

June 1. Faulkner to Gaines, Charleston, W. Va., 37 .37 

Faulkner to Jackson, Charleston, W. Va., 80 .80 

Faulkner to Jackson, Charleston, W. Va., 76 .76 

Faulkner to Gaines, Charleston, W. Va., 49 .49 

Faulkner to Jackson, Charleston, W. Va. ,34 .34 

Griggs to Harlan, Chicago, 41 .41 

Griggs to Holt, Frankfort, Ky., 41 .41 

Griggs to warden, Monosa, La., 38 .48 

Clay to United States attorney, Philadelphia, 15 .20 

3. Roberts to assistant treasurer, St. Louis, 24 .30 

Griggs to United States marshal, Batesville, Ark., 24. . . .30 

4. Griggs to United States marshal, Muscogee, Ind. T., 19. .25 
Griggs to United States attorney, South McAlester, 28. .35 

Griggs to United States attorney, Pensacola, 23 .23 

Roberts to Bank of Cleveland National Association, 

Cleveland, Ohio, 40 40 

5. Griggs to House Reformation, Cheltenham, Md., 24... .24 
Easby Smith to warden, Moundsville, W. Va., 21 .21 

6. Griggs to Moore, Cadiz, Ohio, 17 .20 

Griggs to Stripling, Jacksonville, 14 .20 

7. Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 24. . .30 
Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 30. . .38 

Pradt to Fowler, New York, 18 20 

Cooper from Griggs, Paterson, N. J., 50 .50 

10. Binney from Riley, Marietta, Ohio, 17 .20 

Richards to United States attorney, Prescott, 30 .53 

Pradt to Collins, Chattanooga, 15 .20 

11. Richardson to United States marshal, South McAlester, 

35 44 

Richardson to United States attorney, St. Paul, 30 .38 

13. Griggs to United States marshal, Paris, Tex., 32 .48 

Richards to United States attorney, Cleveland, Ohio, 25. .25 

14. Richards to United States marshal, Ardmore, 18 .25 

17. Rudy to Post, Columbus, Nebr., 21 26 

18. Attorney-General from Sawyer, Lincoln, Nebr., 17 .25 

Griggs to Sawyer, Lincoln, Nebr., 29 .36 

Griggs to Post, Columbus, Nebr., 46 .58 

Griggs to Stripling, Jacksonville, 24 .24 

19. Griggs to Kendrick, Providence, R. I. , 16 .20 

Griggs to United States marshal, Montgomery, 18 .20 

Griggs to Perry, Dubuque, 36 .45 

Rudy to Sulzbacher, Kansas City, 20 .25 

20. Sheibley to United States attorney, Boston, 36 .36 

21. Sheibley to United States attorney, New York, 23 23 



176 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Western Union Telegraph Co. — Continued. 

June 21. Griggs to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 12 $0. 20 

23. Clay to Dempsev, Lockport, N. Y., 22 22 

Cooper to Holt, "Frankfort, Ky., 21 21 

25. Attorney -General from Hawk, Moundsville, W. Va., 21 . .21 
Attorney-General f r6m warden, Columbus, Ohio, 44 . _ . .44 
Attorney-General from warden, Columbus, Ohio, 28... .28 
Attorney-General from warden, Moundsville, W. Va.,22. . 22 
Easby Smith from Wilkins, South McAlester, 17 .25 

26. Griggs from Spooner, Madison, Wis. ,89 .89 

Griggs to United States marshal, South McAlester, 23. . .27 

Griggs to United States attorney, Louisville, 32 .32 

Griggs to United States attorney, St. Paul, 17 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Kansas City, 15 .25 

Griggs to United States marshal, Winston, N. C, 25... .25 

Griggs to United States attorney, Tyler, Tex., 18 .30 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 19 .40 

27. Griggs from Spooner, Madison, 21 .21 

Griggs to Spooner, Madison, 23 .23 

Griggs to United States marshal, Madison, 19 .20 

Attorney-General from Faulkner, Parkersburg, W. Va. ,67 .67 

Attorney-General to Nixon, NashviUe, Tenn., 37 .37 

Attorney-General to Bowman, Berwick, 56 .56 

Attorney-General to Pritchard, Marshall, 35 .35 

Attorney-General from Ward, Missoula, Mont., 14 .35 

Attorney-General to Ward, Missoula, Mont., 18 .35 

Attorney-General to United States marshal, Kansas City, 

21 .26 

Roberts to Nebraska National Bank, Omaha, 28 .48 

28. Griggs from Wickersham, Tacoma, 23 .46 

Griggs to United States attorney, Madison, 16 .20 

Griggs to Wickersham, Tacoma, 26 .52 

Griggs to United States attorney, Seattle, 23 .46 

Griggs to Pritchard, Marshall, N. C, 69 69 

Griggs to United States attorney, Buffalo, 37 .37 

Griggs to jailer, Atlanta, 26 .26 

Griggs to Burnett, New York, 21 21 

27. Griggs to Soper, Vinita, 35 .44 

14. Thompson to superintendent, Booneville, 24 .30 

30. Richards to United States attorney, Fort Smith, 26 .33 

Richards to United States attorney, Jacksonville, 35. . . .35 

Richards to Bryant, Sherman, Tex. , 24 .36 

Richards to United States attorney, Woodbury, N. J. , 31 . . 31 

25. Easby Smith to Mallory, West Baden, Ind., 22 22 

Feb. 19. Attorney-General from Coffin, Columbus, Ohio, 23 .23 

$29.35 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

June 5. Reeve to assistant treasurer, New York, 35 .35 

11. Reeve to Hess, New York City, 28 .28 

23. O'Connell to Hill, Louisville, Ky., 24 24 

27. 0' Connell to Summers, Omaha, Nebr. ,32 .40 

1.27 

Western Union Telegraph Co. : 

June 18. Griggs to Conant, Habana, 10 .20 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. : 
June 1. United States marshal, Cleveland, Ohio, to Griggs, 27. . .27 

2. Harlan, Chicago, Til., toGriggs,29 29 

United States attorney, Kansas City, to Griggs, 30 .38 

United States marshal, Elmira, N. Y., to Griggs, 23 . 23 

United States attorney, New Orleans, to Griggs, 22 .28 

4. United States marshal, Montgomery, Ala., to Griggs, 23. .23 

6. Warden United States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, 

Kans., to Griggs, 26 33 

7. Warden United States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, 

Kans., to Richards, 40 .50 

United States attorney , New York, N. Y., to Sheibley, 26 . 26 

Attorney-General, Paterson, to Cooper, 46 •. .46 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 177 

1900. Postal Telegraph Cable Co. — Continued. 

June 8. United States marshal, Helena, to Richards, 17 $0. 35 

9. United States marshal, Montgomery, to Richards, 18 . . .20 

12. Darby, Columbus, Ohio, to Richards, 20 , .20 

United States attorney, Louisville, Ky . , to Richards, 16 . .20 

13. United States attorney, Prescott, Ariz., to Richards, 25. . .44 

14. Sheriff, Atlanta, Ga. , to Thompson, 24 .24 

Collins, Chattanooga, to Pradt, 11 .20 

15. United States attorney , Omaha, Nebr., to Richards, 16. . .25 
United States attorney, San Francisco, to Thompson, 43. .86 
Warden, United States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, 

Kans., to Thompson, 35 .44 

16. United States warden, Elmira, to Boyd, 24 .24 

United States attorney, New York, to Boyd, 21 .21 

Perkins, United States attorney, San Francisco, to Boyd, 

20..... 40 

18. Erwin, Macon, to Griggs, 52 .52 

Wickersham, Tacoma, to Griggs, 26 .52 

Wickersham, Tacoma, to Griggs, 53 1. 06 

Griggs, District of Columbia, to Wickersham, 75 1. 50 

United States attorney, Portland, Oreg., to Griggs, 20.. .40 

Noyes, Minneapolis, to Griggs, 55 .69 

Brown, Sitka, via Seattle, to Griggs, 76 1. 52 

Henderson, Dubuque, Iowa, to Griggs, 64 .80 

United States attorney, San Francisco, to Griggs, 21 .42 

United States attorney, Omaha, to Richards, 20 .25 

19. Kingsley, Boston, to Griggs, 35 .35 

Kingsley, Boston, to Griggs, 24 .24 

20. Eames & Young, St. Louis. , Mo. , to Griggs, 30 .38 

United States attorney, Seattle, to Griggs, 19 .40 

Wickersham, Tacoma, to Griggs, 51 1. 02 

Foster, Philadelphia, Pa. , to Griggs, 27 .27 

21 . Warden, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. , to Griggs, 18 .35 

Noyes, Minneapolis, to Griggs, 59 .74 

22. Warden, Fort Leavenworth, to Griggs, 20 .25 

23. Chisolm, New Orleans, to Pradt, 13 25 

Babcock, Chicago, to Griggs, 53 .53 

25. United States marshal, Omaha, to Griggs, 27 .34 

United States attorney, Omaha, to Griggs, 18 .30 

Warden, penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., to 

Griggs, 23 29 

Vawter, Seattle, to Griggs, 17 .40 

26. Kerens, New York, to Boyd, 24 24 

United States marshal, Spokane, to Griggs, 26 .52 

27. United States attorney, Madison, to Griggs, 16 .20 

Keyser, Chicago, to Pradt, 21 .21 

29. Heiling, Tacoma, to Griggs, 32 .64 

United States attorney, Buffalo, to Griggs, 19 .20 

Jan. 29. Estie, San Francisco, to Griggs, 47 .94 

Griggs, Washington, D. C. , from Busch, Philadelphia, 23 . .23 

Griggs, District of Columbia, from Vawter, Seattle, 15. . .40 

30. Griggs, District of Columbia, from Darby, Columbus, 

Ohio, 28 28 

Beck, Philadelphia, to Richards, 50 .50 

United States attorney, Buffalo, to Richards, 20 .20 

United States marshal, Tacoma, to Richards, 35 .70 

Warden penitentiary, Columbus, Ohio, to Richards, 23. .23 

$26.64 

Postal Telegraph Co. : 

June 4. Allen, San Juan, P. R. , to Griggs, 31 4. 19 

Francis Miller: 

June 11. 1 glass, 26 by 28, double glazed 1. 50 

A. H. Chase & Bros. : 

June 30. Storage, Turkish rugs, from January 1 to June 30, 1900 2. 48 

Dulin & Martin Co. : 
June 9. 2 ash traps, 75 cents 1. 50 

H. Doc. 9 12 



• 



178 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

1900. Woodward & Lothrop: 

June 28. 6 pieces of ribbon, at 75 cents $4. 50 

The American Watchman's Time Detective Co.: 
June 28. 1 ten-station watchman's clock, put up complete at 1435 K street, 

NW 140.00 

J. T. Walker Sons: 

June 11. 1 box lime, 40 cents .40 

The Strowger Automatic Telephone Exchange Rental: 
June 30. Rental of 1 automatic telephone and switch from April 1 to June 

30, 1900, at $6 per annum 1.50 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 179 

l arid special asxisUxnl 



ASSISTANTS TO THE ATTORNEYS OF THE tMIKH STATUS. 



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Exhibit H. — Report of the Solicitor of the Treasury.. 

Department of Justice, 
Office of the Solicitor of the Treasury, 

Washington, D. C. , November IS, 1900. 

• 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith seven tabular statements 
exhibiting the amount, character, and results of the litigation under 
my direction for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, shown by the 
docket entries of this office. 

The tables embrace, respectively: 

1. Suits on transcripts of accounts of defaulting public officers, 
excepting those of the Post-office Department, adjusted by the account- 
ing officers of the Treasury Department. 

2. Post-office suits, embracing those against officers of the Post- 
Office Department, and cases of fines, penalties, and forfeitures for 
violation of postal laws. 

3. Suits on custom-house bonds. 

4. Suits for recovery of fines, penalties, and forfeitures under the 
customs revenue and navigation laws. 

5. Suits against collectors of customs and other officers or agents of 
the Government, excepting internal-revenue officers, for refund of 
duties and acts done in the Tine of their official duty, including appeals 
from the decisions of the Board of General Appraisers. 

6. Suits in which the United States is a party or is interested and 
not embraced in the other classes. 

7. A general summary or abstract of all the other tables. 

An examination of the tables will show that the whole number of 
suits commenced within the year was 2,977, of which 18 were of class 
1, for the recovery of $97,2t2; 425 were of class 2, for the recovery 
of $28,917.68; 16 were of class 3, for the recovery of $10,459.70; 113 
were of class 4, for the recovery of $77,713.66; 210 were of class 5; 
and 2,195 were of class 6, for the recovery of $1,252,501.61. 

Of the whole number of suits brought, 1,829 were decided in favor 
of the United States, 22 were adversely decided, and 270 were settled 
and dismissed, leaving 856 still pending. 

Of those pending at the commencement of the year, 921 were decided 
for the United States, 250 were adversely decided, and 768 were set- 
tled and dismissed. 

The whole number of suits decided or otherwise disposed of during 
the year was 4,060; the whole amount for which judgments were 
obtained, exclusive of decrees in rem, was $567,046.84, and the entire 
amount collected from all sources was $188,020.22. 

The number of cases in which offers of compromise were pending 
and received during the fiscal year was 159, involving the sum of 
$794,055.99. 

The number of offers accepted was 107, involving the sum of 
$162,052.31; amount accepted, $61,431.89. 



184 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

The number of offers rejected was 45, involving the sum of 
$614,365.12; amount rejected, $66,103.70. 

The number of offers pending at the close of the vear was 7, involv- 
ing the sum of $17,638.56; amount offered, $1,793.85. 

There has been collected during the fiscal year for rent of property, 
by law in charge of this office, the sum of $1,059.25, less the sum of 
$249.25, expended or authorized for custody and repairs thereof. 

A statement of real property, by law in charge of tnis office, acquired 
and sold during the fiscal year is appended. 

The number of letters and communications received by this office 
during the fiscal year was 9,267; the number of letters, etc., sent out 
was 5,479; the number of written opinions rendered on questions of 
law submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury, heads of bureaus of 
the Treasury Department, and others was 153; the original official 
bonds, contracts, leases, and deeds received for examination as to their 
correctness in form and legal sufficiency and returned was 1,044; the 
number of duplicates, triplicates, quadruplicates, etc., which required 
the same careful examination as the originals, was 1,234, making 1 a 
total of 2,278 legal instruments examined and returned. 

The foregoing represents only to a limited extent the business of 
this office. The various cases in charge of the office are entered in 
dockets kept for that purpose, and every step in the progress of each 
case, from its inception to its close, as well as all data relating thereto, 
are noted therein. 

Constant vigilance and zeal is required upon the part of the individ- 
uals having charge of these cases in order to bring them to a successful 
issue for the Government, for as a general thing every power of inge- 
nuity or technicality is employed to defeat the Government in its 
prosecutions. 

The statistical statements herewith will demonstrate that efforts in 
this direction upon the part of the office have not been relaxed. 

There are frequent consultations with the solicitor and the officials 
under him by the heads of bureaus, chiefs of divisions of the Treasury 
Department and other departments relative to cases pending, investi- 
gations made, and verbal opinions given, which require time, care, 
and research that can not be tabulated. 

Within the year there was compiled in the office a digest of the laws 
and decisions relating to the Chinese exclusion acts, requiring much 
time, research, and labor, which was very valuable to the office, and 
the demand for the work at home and abroad would indicate that it 
had a general value; and also a Digest of Immigration Laws and 
Decisions, which is exceedingly useful. 

Repeated efforts have been made to obtain a larger appropriation 
for the purchase of law books for the library of this bureau, but so 
far it has been unsuccessful. The Solicitor, in his official relation to 
the Secretary of the Treasury, is required to give legal opinions on 
questions arising in that Department, and in all parts of the country, 
concerning the business of the Government, and unless he has the stat- 
utes of the States and the decisions of the courts of the various States, 
he must be embarrassed in the performance of his duties. 

Besides, the utility of the library is not confined to this office, for, 
it being the only law library in the Treasury building, the officers of 
that Department are dependent on it for the legal information often 
required in the performance of their official duties. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY- GENERAL. 185 

It would require several thousand dollars to bring the library up to 
a proper standard of completeness, and the longer the delay the greater 
the amount that will be required. Therefore, I most earnestly recom- 
mend that some suitable action be taken to bring this matter to the 
attention of Congress so that an appropriation may be made for an 
increase of the library. 

It will be observea that nearly 3,000 suits have been commenced 
during the year and that more than 4,000 suits have been disposed of, 
as follows: 2,750 decided in favor of the United States and 1,038 set- 
tled and dismissed, while only 272 have been decided adversely to the 
Government. 

It will not be questioned that the work of giving directions as to the 
management of these thousands of suits should be in the hands of law- 
yers of first-class attainments. Very many of the written opinions 
going from this office are of the greatest importance, and much time 
is necessarily consumed in their preparation, and I may sa}~, in addition 
to this, more of the time of the Solicitor and Assistant Solicitor is 
occupied in giving oral opinions and advice than in the preparation of 
the written opinions. 

Some of the best work on questions of law is done by a $1,600 clerk, 
whose services are certainly worth $2,400. He ought to be promoted 
and made a "law clerk" at a salary of not less than $2,400. 

His time is devoted to strictly legal work, and no part of it is 
employed in mere clerical work. During the last year he wrote and 
compiled two valuable works: A Digest of the Chinese Exclusion 
Laws and Decisions and a Digest of Immigration Laws and Decisions, 
which have already been worth more to the Government than his salary 
for two years. 

Law clerks in the various departments receive salaries ranging from 
$2,000 to $3,000, and I feel justified in earnestly urging that the next 
appropriation bill provide for a law clerk in this bureau, with a salary 
of $2,400. 

There should be one more fourth-class clerk and one less second-class 
clerk in this office. The clerk who for many years has acted as pri- 
vate secretary to the Solicitor has, by his ability and faithfulness, well 
earned the promotion which he could receive if there should be an 
increase in the number of fourth-class clerks. This would enable him 
to be placed on a footing with clerks in other bureaus who are employed 
in similar work. 

1 would also invite your favorable consideration to the fourth-class 
clerks, who keep the principal dockets in this office and write a large 
number of very important letters in relation to the institution and con- 
duet of suits and other business of the bureau. Men of ordinary ability 
or with limited experience could not do the work required of these 
clerks. 

I regard the salaries paid them as inadequate, and would earnestly 
recommend that they be paid $2,000 each per annum. The clerk doing 
similar work in the Department is paid $2,500 per annum. 
Very respectfully, 

Maurice D. O'Connell, 

Solicitor. 

Hon. John W. Griggs, 

Attorney- General. 



186 

1 
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REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



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BEPOBT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GENEBAL. 191 

No. 5. — Report* of wilt agaiiut coRectON "/customs and other Federal officers, includmg 
appeals worn tlie decisions of the Board of General Appraisers, instituted during the fiscal 
umr ntdrnti Juin' .HO, 1900, in the several United States courts, and of proceedings had 
during said peri vd in raid irh.kh were instituted prior thereto. 





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194 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



No. 7. — Statistical summary of business arising from suits, etc., in which (he United States 

fiscal year ending 









In suite brought during the fiscal year. 


Judicial district. 


Suits on 

Treasury 

transcripts. 


Poet-office 
suits. 


Suits on 

custom-house 

bonds. 


Suits for fines, 

penalties, and 

forfeitures under 

customs-revenue 

and navigation 

laws. 


Suits against 
collectors of 
customs, etc. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 




1 


$43.40 


1 
5 
2 


































$1,116.91 


















10 


$8,633.00 


2 








1 


42.20 












5 
5 
5 


























• 






California, northern 


1 


332.49 




1 


295.49 


3 


$1,000.00 


13 












7 
10 


3,709.25 












Connecticut 










2 










































Florida, northern 






1 
5 
14 
13 
11 
27 
12 
11 
2 












1 

2 


Florida, southern 






2,379.49 

624.87 

2,426.00 

80.00 

9,000.00 






3 


























































9 




8 
































Indian Territory, northern. 


















Indian Territory, central . . 


















Indian Territory, southern. 


2 


1,856.83 


4 
7 

12 
13 
11 
















214.61 








■ 






































Kentucky 






17.00 






















1 




1 
























2 

12 

6 

7 
5 








1 

1 

5 

12 






Maryland 






1,000.00 








2 
6 

1 


Massachusetts 


1 


1,174.19 








Michigan, eastern 












1 
.1 


22,902.24 
878.30 
























Mississippi, northern 


5 
3 
22 
21 
2 
6 














Mississippi, southern 


















Missouri 'eastern 












2 






Missouri! western 






780.47 
1,950.43 










Montana 


1 


1,010.50 












































1 
1 


419.08 
5,530.22 
















New Jersey 


2 
3 
4 
2 
7 
4 
4 
3 
10 
23 








8 




6 


New Mexico 










New York, northern 












6 

1 

32 






New York, eastern 
















New York, southern 






6,379.49 
17.00 


1 


173.93 


69,713.66 


172 


North Carolina, eastern. . . . 






North Carolina, western . . . 
















North Dakota 


















Ohio, northern 












3 


2,000.00 




Ohio, southern 






























Oregon 


2 


9,131.58 


6 
13 
10 
3 
4 
5 
7 
2 
1 
5 
1 








2 

7 






Pennsylvania, eastern 




4 


1,357.28 




2 


Pennsylvania, western 










Rhode Island 


















South Carolina 
















1 


South Dakota 
















Tennessee, eastern 


















Tennessee, middle. ........ 


















Tennessee, western ........ 


















Texas, northern 


1 


1,815.20 














Texas, eastern 


























7 






Utah 


3 


51,625.27 


3 
2 




















i 







REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



la suite brought during the flacal year. 


MlscellmeoiM 


sfs 


Tola! 

[nirlri! in 


Total 

l.lilLII.-Sril. 


i 
r 


li 
P 

r 


^1 
i 

i 
1 


J 
1 


11 

t- ■ 


No. 


Amount, 


71 


**3&!8 


H4,Sffi. 49 

ilOulBl 

7:oij!-o 

Ol.Olii.SS 
14. 021!. 07 

U6,SS6.Sfl 
8,663.90 

5ft!ooo'oo 


SB, 300. 02 

2, 102! 35 

2, m 00 
6,414.56 

2, 382. !!0 
5,350.00 
324.00 
S, WO. K) 
3,461.00 


831.78 

mio 

■liiTJju 

'220! 13 

S, XII. 05 
320.00 
44.96 
636.34 


so 

28 
9 

16 




13 
8 


48 
25 


78 
IB 
28 


- : : 

23 

l':i 
6 


7, DUO. DO 

iot,229.(io 
s, w:j. 99 
sn. m-. .w 
55,000.00 




2 


» 










i 


M 




1 


30 


14 
IS 

20 

1- 
6 
8 
1 
















8 

12 




19.2118 25 

40.516.82 
37,109.00 


)■'!»*■ ' 
37.724. 87 
2. 426.00 

13.7X5.47 

11,600.00 


S, 585. (XI 
456.00 

1,850.00 
1,1MI. IB 

ii; S'k< us 

5, 6H7. Wl 
2,31-1. 10 

SI, 293. IB 

7i lio! (m 

% i6fi! DO 

■7'. din! 00 
850.00 


:), 159.61 
378. Ill 
129.20 


8 
16 
M 

BB 

i:\ 

:i 

19 

31 

s 




68 


49 
IS 


ia.70fr.J7 

a. 600. oo 


2:50. 00 

0, 1 19. 15 

987. 78 

ess! 00 

211V 3d 

443! 56 
768. SJ2 
3, 454. 42 
399.46 










10 


69 


16, »B '.-. 

i!k*'ou 

IH.lIiO.OO 


45. (75.26 
7.: SOB. 00 

l«,j>M. 38 

76a 00 






16 

8 

Si 




* 


8 


am 

144 

181 


79). 00 


8 


3 


IB 




m26 




708.26 




1 


• 


i ■ 






1,501. IB 

3,532.00 
1,107.00 

'579! 60 

ljmoo 

■i! -i.-'?! w 


072.21 
1,060.87 

■1,7(11- W 

'250! OO 
568.30 


- 

87 

IS 

8 
45 
□ 

U 

41 

ill 












1,174.18 

22.902.24 
5!l0o!o0 




7 


8 








KU-W 










58 

31 

1, 
21 

2S 


■•>!ioo!bo 

WO. 00 


8 


i 


St 






101. S3 
195. 35 

1, 932! 33 

419!o8 

7, 3-1!. SO 

. -'V- 4 '"' 

SO! 55 




1,300.00 
753.65 


3,' 71^68 


49 


2,507.50 


2,507.511 
419.08 

12,879.03 
i.ooo.oo 

2! 543! 40 

23.KS0.OO 
200.00 

500! 00 

>;.-ii: : 27 

1.460.82 






T 
3 
S3 






8 

1 

;'■ 

S3 




16 

16 
63 
58 

19 

20 

16 

22 

4D 
1 

12 
B 


-■"''■'■J" 

23, S.-0. oo 
200.00 


s! 211! 00 

4)351! bo 

liiilioi 

5, 7S.«. S3 
8,433.69 

mJKi'^r; 

3,549.00 
2,308.00 

""m!« 

520.00 

1 S.IM.U7 

s!*0o!oo 

i!i7.;,!mi 

185! 00 
704.00 
236.76 


11 

3 

"■'. 
>: 
..- 
i: 

17 

a 

8 
.r. 
IS 
IT 
11 
1 
3 
11 


• 


48 

19 
80 
IS 
265 
62 


1J75!S5 

883.92 
130.00 
563.51 




3 


1 




500.00 

l-^Tfrjii/i 
93. 04 






4 

8 


77 
IT 


















1 




6 




1,320.51 

S.IXW.IHJ 

3, 250. oo 
1,950.00 
750.00 
«. 28S. 21 
1, 138. 9.", 

14, an. so 


1,32(1.51 
3.000.00 

i ! Ski; ik.i 
2,605.20 
0, 288. 21 
1,138.95 
66.530.57 


667! 96 
1,062.65 




1 


8 
S 


81 


658.60 


10 


'SMLM 




2 


■ 





BEPOST OP THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 





In soitt brought tf urlntr the fiscal year. 


Judicial district. 


transcripts. 


miu. 


Suits on 


Suits tor fines, 
penalties, and 
rtirfciiuris iinik-i 

and navigation 


III 




No. 


Amount 


No. 


i "it. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 








« 

6 
3 
2 




















WS.10 
169.18 














' 


n,oio.w 






* 


■0,000 00 


1 


















































































In 


97,272 


425 


■-■•.-f ):.'■■ 


16 


tin. !■■.'.-(' 


m 


77,713.«i 


210 





d 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY -OENERAL. 





In 


uila brought during the fiscal fear. 








units. 


Total 

[jorti-i] Mi>.[ 


jllllffllU-lll.. 


Total 
i'.J!i-(-li-'l. 


S3 

il 

r 


II 

1 B 


1 

1 


1 


si 
11 

3| 


No. 


Amount. 


46 

56 






SI, 945. 00 

■10, oo 
fi&sa 

1,704.00 

Ii7ft. m 


870.83 

1'Jl. J ft 

7o!oo 


7 
17 

as 

30 








7 


;i.h.7!"i.'.-> 

7,200.00 


S1N.7C.I..10 
i:!,3M.S6 




" 


* 


48 


3.000.00 

m'Mv.m 


OT^SKsj 




i 


; 


IS 




i 


36 


1. 1 >:. 


1,252,601.61 


1,468,864.65 


tttit&M 


78, 802.651 


] , f ■.".! 


a 


/7ll 


•Cx, 


«,W7 



iyS REPORT OF THE ATTOBNEY-aENERAL. 

No. 7. — Statistical summary of businett arising from suits, etc., in which the UniUd States 
it a party or has an interest, under charge of the Solicitor of the Treasury, during the 
fiscal year ending June SO, 1900. 



Judicial district. 



IikUh: I. " :in. . im. 
Indimi ~ ,-riiuf., -■jl.'ii-n, 



Kentocky 

L.iui- i .. . . -'. ■ p 4 
loalriiuift. wwtern... 

Maine 

Maryland 

Mien uwi ■L--.I ■-< 
Miction wii-urn . . . 
Minn.-.'., 

Mi Si: v .J ' . : .."[i. V. . 

MiftH)i--|.|.l BOUtl it:i . 
MIhwiii .■ ancm 



Ohio. iii.iili.Tii. 
Ohio -.ii-h.rni 

ok i 

Oregon 



naytaraJa, western .. 



In guita brought jwieir lo tin- lis 



l.aM'fi 

"i'mw 

1.M8.W 

'>;■* :.> 
>.:•:■ ■*: 

W.Kitl ■■ 
2.6OU.00 
!>.:!■».* 

mOO 



,..-.■! . 

■-J.H."- ". 

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10,660. 






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.c ■':-.■ 

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3,511. 






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:. liM..K> 



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S.i«:mi 
■2. M',.\r 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 199 

No. 7. — Statistical summary of business arising from suits, etc., in. which the United States 
in a party or has an interest, under charge of the Solicitor of the Treasury, during the 
fiscal year ending June SO, 1900 — Continued. 





Insults brought prior l.i ltu!u*.'n] yciir 


U 

'fi 


-a 

!■ 

1 

1 


Total 

mij.jimEoi 
j '..1:.-i '■:■■:■ if 
riinl'i'i '1 
in Iuv..r,.i 
!!>:■ i:ui(..-L 
States. 




Indicia] district. 


& 


linns iii 
old nulls. 


1 

H 

% 


ii 


i 

i 
1 


mjiii nil" 


TJtah 


m 


812,333 «t 
300 

ill) 

«B ':< 

2,165. flu 


a 






- 

K 


IB 


S3M.7! 

1 . Uss! IX 

iSSO.Ol 

l',l(JS.!H 

770. 77 


812,959.95 




50 

41 

'J, Hit 

&,876 

101 

2,95; 


,1, 




6 












...* 


*? 




































*"■" 


'■'-■ 






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i. " 


-7,0-m.s 

















Where situated. 



October — , 
December 1 



, 1900; Hiram 



1 tract of 160 acres of land, described by 

metes and bounds. 
1 tract of 800 acres of land, being grant 
No. 11361 in district No. B. 

' 300 acres of land, being grant 
in district No. 9. 
' 90 acres ol land near Boone- 



i tract ol 



ville. 



Folk Comity, Tex. 
Graham County, N.C. 



Owsley County, Ky. 



Statement of real property in charge of the Solicitor of the Treasury, sold under the provisions 
of section 3749, United Stales Revised Statutes, during the fiscal year ending June SO, 
1900. 



? yit County,' 



Calumet and Chicago Canal 
South Chicago, in sees.5 and 



May 5,1900; Zack Willlam- 
Aub;.25,18W; Lottie Mette. 



sr 



leridlan, Cook County, 



bit I. — Report of the Mbraricun, 

Department of Justice, 
<n, D. C, October 37, 1900. 
Sir: I respectfully submit the following report on the library of the 
Department of Justice for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900: 

This library has had in its possession for many years quite a collec- 
tion of foreign books, but until recently they were seldom or never 
called for. The late Spanish-American war brought the Spanish books 



200 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

into demand^ and made it desirable for the Department to have a cata- 
logue of all its foreign books — that is, books in languages other than 
English. Mr. Theodore B. Lyman, as you are aware, has been assist- 
ing me in this work, which is now Tvell under way. New shelving 1 has 
been erected, and the books collected, catalogued, and arranged on the 
shelves according to countries. The catalogue will show the publica- 
tions of each country in the following manner: First, list or codes, 
laws, etc.; second, list of treatises, in alphabetical arrangement, 
according to the names of the authors; third, subject list of treatises. 

It is believed that this arrangement will prove satisfactory. This 
catalogue, especially the subject part of it, is in the nature of a pio- 
neer, as we were unable to find any other catalogue which was of the 
slightest assistance. 

At the date of this report the manuscript is nearly all in the hands 
of the printer. 

Each summer it is customary for me to go over the shelves, select 
such books as need rebinding, and send them to the bindery, together 
with the year's accumulation of periodicals. This I have been unable 
to do during the past summer, owing to the work on the foreign cata- 
logue. 

The library is receiving a thorough cleaning, which it has needed 
ever since it was moved into this bunding. The work is being done 
carefully and well. 

It is earnestly hoped that Congress will take some action on Senate 
bill 3181, introduced during the last session. While the Superintend- 
ent of Documents has not yet refused to supply this Department 
with additional copies of Statutes at Large, etc., beyond the number 
indicated in the statute, yet he has no authority for so doing, and he 
feels that the law should be amended in such a manner as to allow him 
to supply the Department with the number of copies actually needed. 
With regard to current publications of the statutes, 500 copies are 
authorized, and each time ne is obliged to furnish 200 additional copies. 
The new courts and officers of Hawaii and Porto Rico require 23 addi- 
tional copies, and in view of the fact that at every session of (jongress 
new courts are created, I suggest that 750 copies of each statute issued 
should be sent to this Department. 

It is the librarian's duty to distribute these books to every Federal 
court and officer throughout the United States. The books have to 
be properly stamped and prepared for shipment and requests for 
receipts mailed to each person to whom they are sent; perhaps a second 
or third request is necessary before the receipt is received. The receipts 
are then filed. Obtain from each incoming officer an inventory of the 
statutes delivered to him by his predecessor, ascertain what has become 
of the missing books, and supply such as can not be found. This, it 
will be seen, necessarily takes considerable time. 

Except as found in the library set, this Department has no copies 
of the Opinions of Attorneys-General prior to volume 13. Tney 
were printed as a private enterprise and can only be had by purchase. 
Some of the volumes are very scarce. Recently, by reason of the 
assignment of a local law-book dealer, I have had offered me at a 
remarkably low figure a large number of the early volumes in unbound 
form. They comprise practically all the stock known to be in exist- 
ence, and are as follows: One hundred and fifty copies each of volumes 
1 to 5, and fifty copies each of volumes 6 to 8, in all 900 volumes, for 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 201 

$ 225. This Department is the proper depository for these books, and 
I should have purchased them at once if our regular appropriation 
could have been used for that purpose. I suggest that Congress be 
asked to appropriate $ 225 for the purchase of these books, the same 
to be distributed in like manner as other volumes of the opinions 
published by this Government. 

Last year I spoke of the desirability of purchasing the trinity series — 
the American Decisions, the American Reports, and the American State 
Reports, and suggested an addition to the regular appropriation for 
that purpose, which was not made. As it is quite out of tne question 
for us to purchase the entire three series at one time out of the regular 
appropriation, it is my intention to buy each series separately. Iliave 
purchased at a moderate price a good secondhand set of the American 
Reports, and hope next year to add a set of the American Decisions. 

Last year Congress appropriated as a deficiency for the purchase of 
books for this library $500. I suggest that the same amount be appro- 
priated for this year, and that the regular appropriation for the ensuing 
year be made large enough so that next year we will not be obliged to 
ask for a deficiency appropriation. To accomplish this, the appropria- 
tions for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1901, should be as follows: 

For law books for the library of this Department $2,250 

For session laws and statutes of the States and Territories for the library of 
this Department 500 

Very respectfully, 

James A. Finch, Librarian. 
The Attorney-General. 



PURCHASES. 

Volumes. 

United States Supreme Court reports 38 

United States circuit and district courts reports 87 

State reports 171 

English, Irish, and Canadian reports 26 

Statutes of the United States, including citations and notes 5 

Statutes, codes, and session laws of the several Stales 99 

English and Canadian statutes 3 

Digests (general) of all the courts, Federal and State 12 

Digests of State reports, including notes 19 

Digests of English and Irish reports 3 

Digests of patent decisions 1 

Works on jurisprudence 51 

Cyclopedias, legal 30 

Dictionaries 4 

Trials 1 

Opinions of the Attorneys-General 1 

History 13 

Biography 17 

Works, writings, and correspondence 21 

Scientific books 1 

Atlas 1 

Almanacs 17 

Railway guides 3 

Legal periodicals 17 

Index to legal periodicals 1 

Other periodicals 2 

Spanish books, codes, and treatises 85 

Total 729 



202 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

REGULAR RECEIPTS. 
Interstate, national, and foreign exchanges. 

FROM STATES AND TERRITORIES. 

Arkansas: 

Acts of Arkansas, 1899 

Colorado: 

Laws of Colorado, 1899 

Connecticut: 

Public Acts of Connecticut, 1899 

Special Acts of Connecticut, 1899 

Delaware; 

Laws of Delaware, 1899 

Florida: 

Laws of Florida, 1899 

Georgia: 

Laws of Georgia, 1899 

Idaho: 

Laws of Idaho, 1899 

Illinois: 

Laws of Illinois, 1899 

Illinois Reports, vols. 178-183 

Indiana: 

Laws of Indiana, 1899 

Kansas: 

Kansas Reports, vol. 60 

Kansas Court of Appeals Reports, vol. 7 

Louisiana: 

Louisiana Annual Reports, vol. 50 

Maine: 

Maine Reports, vol. 92 

Thirty-first Annual Report of the Insurance Commissioners, 1899 

Massachusetts: 

Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts, 1899 

Michigan: 

Public Acts of Michigan, 1899 

Private Acts of Michigan, 1899 

Laws of Michigan, extra session, 1899-1900 

Minnesota: 

Minnesota Laws, 1899 

Minnesota Reports, vols. 71-74 

Missouri: 

Laws of Missouri, 1899 

Revised Statutes of Missouri, 1899, vols. 1 and 2 

Montana: 

Laws of Montana, 1899 

Nebraska: 

Laws of Nebraska, 1899 (2 copies) 

New Hampshire: 

Laws of New Hampshire, 1899 

New Hampshire Reports, vol. 68 : 

New Hampshire Journals, Senate and House, 1899 

New Jersev: 

Laws of New Jersey, 1898, 1899 2 

New York: 

Laws of New York, 1899, vols. 1 and 2 2 

North Carolina: 

Public Laws of North Carolina, 1899 1 

Private Laws of North Carolina, 1899 1 

North Carolina Reports, vol. 123 1 

North Dakota: 

Revised Codes of North Dakota, 1899 1 

North Dakota Reports, vols. 7 and 8 2 

Ohio: 

Ohio State Reports, vols. 59 and 60 2 



KEPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 203 

Oregon: 

Laws of Oregon, 1898, special session 1 

Laws of Oregon, 1899 1 

Pennsylvania: 

Laws of Pennsylvania, 1899 1 

Rhode Island: 

Rhode Island Public Laws, 1899, January and February 2 

South Carolina: 

Acts of South Carolina, 1899 1 

South Carolina Reports, vols. 52 and 53 2 

Tennessee: 

Acts of Tennessee, 1899 1 

Texas: 

General Laws of Texas, 1899 1 

Special Laws of Texas, 1899 : 1 

General and Special Laws of Texas, 1900, First Called Session Twenty- 
sixth Legislature 1 

Utah: 

Laws of Utah, 1899 1 

West Virginia: 

Acts of West Virginia, 1899 1 

Wisconsin: 

Laws of Wisconsin, 1899 1 

Wyoming: 

Revised Statutes of Wyoming, 1899 (2 copies) 2 

Wyoming Reports, vols. 5 and 6 2 

FROM THE UNITED STATES. 

Bureau of the American Republics: 

Monthly Bulletins, 1899-1900, vols. 7 and 8 2 

Civil Service Commission: 

Fourteenth Report of the U. S. Civil Service Commission, 1896-97 1 

Fifteenth Report of the U. S. Civil Service Commission, 1897-98 1 

Sixteenth Report of the U S. Civil Service Commission, 1898-99 1 

Court of Claims: 

Court of Claims Reports, vol. 33 (23 copies) 23 

Court of Claims Reports, vol. 34 (24 copies) 24 

Department of the Interior: 

Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1897, 1898 2 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents, 1898 1 

Report of tne Commissioner of Railroads, 1899 1 

Official Register of the United States, 1899, vol. 1 ( 18 copies) 18 

Specifications and Drawings of Patents, May, 1896, parts 1 and 2 2 

Geological Atlas of the United States, Nos. 52, 54, and 57 3 

Department of Labor: 

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Commissioner of Labor, 1898: Hand and 
Machine Labor 1 

Department of State: 

Local Acts of Alabama, 1898-99 1 

Laws of New York, 1899, vols. 1 and 2 2 

Bulletin of the Bureau of Rolls and Library, Department of State, No. 9 

(October, 1897) 1 

La Constitution du Grand-Duch6 de Finlande, 1899 1 

Diete de Finlande, 1899: Reponses 1 

Gerechtelyke der Nederlanden, 1898 1 

Fish Commission: 

Bulletin of the United States Commission of Fish and Fisheries, 1898, 
vol.18 1 

Government Printing Office: 

Congressional Record, vol. 32,index 1 

Messages and Papers of the Presidents, vol. 10 (6 copies) 6 

Interstate Commerce Commission: 

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 1899. 1 

Navy Department : 

Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, 1898 1 

Post-Office Department: 

United States Official Postal Guide, 1900, vol. 22 1 

Smithsonian Institution: 

Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution, 1898 — 



204 REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Superintendent of Documents: 

Document Index, Fifty-fifth Congress, second session 1 

Annual Report of the Supervising Surgeon-General, Marine-Hospital 

Service, United States, 1897 1 

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Commissioner of Labor, 1898, vols. 1 

and 2 2 

Proceedings of the United States National Museum, vol. 21 1 

Report of the Cruise of the United States Revenue Cutter Bear and the 

Overland Expedition, 1897-98 1 

Decisions of the Comptroller of the Treasury, vol. 5 1 

Decisions of the Department of the Interior relating to Public Lands, 

vol.28 1 

Index Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office, United 

States Army, vol. 4 1 

Congressional Record, vol. 32, parts 1, 2, and 3, and index 4 

United States Statutes at Large, vol. 30 1 

Flags of Maritime Nations, 1899 1 

United States Coast Pilot, Atlantic Coast, part 4 1 

Internal-Revenue Laws, 1900 1 

Official Congressional Directory, Fifty-sixth Congress, first session, third 

edition, April 18, 1900 1 

Drill Regulations and Outlines of First Aid for the Hospital Corps, United 

States Army 1 

Congressional Documents (Senate and House) 203 

Treasury Department: 

Navigation Laws of the United States, 1899 1 

Customs Laws of the United States, 1899 (6 copies) 6 

Decisions of the Comptroller of the Treasury, vol. 5(2 copies) 2 

Report of the United States Marine-Hospital Service, 1897 1 

Report of Fur-Seal Investigations, 1896-97, parts 1-4 4 

List of Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1899 1 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Navigation, 1899, part 1 1 

Estimates of Appropriations, 1901 1 

Report of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1899 1 

Digest of Decisions of the Second Comptroller of the Treasury 1 

Decisions of the Comptroller of the Treasury, vol. 6, part 1 1 

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, 1899: Finance (2 copies) . 2 

Treasury Decisions, 1899, vol. 2 (6 copies) 6 

Annual Report of the Light-House Board, 1899 1 

Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1899 . 1 

Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States, 1899, vol. 1 1 

War Department: 

Annual Report of the Major-General Commanding the Army, 1899, 

parts 1-3 3 

Report of the War Department, 1899, vol. 1, parts 2, 3, 5, and 6 4 

War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate 

Armies, Series 3, vols. 2-6; Series 4, vols. 1-3 7 

FROM CANADA. 

Statutes of Canada, Eighth Parliament, 1899, 2 vols. in 1 . . . 2 

Statuts du Canada, Huitieme Parlement, 1899, 2 vols inl 2 

Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Canada, 1897 1 

Total 441 

SPECIAL RECEIPTS. 

From miscellaneous sources, donations 11 

From exchange 3 

Total 14 

SUMMARY. 

Acquired by purchase -■ 729 

Acquired by regular receipts (interstate, national, and foreign exchange) 441 

Acquired otherwise (special exchanges and donations) 14 

Total number of accessions: 

Books 1,174 

Pamphlets 97 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNET-GETEEAL. 





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REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Receipt and distribution of publications of the Department of Justice. 



Annual Reports of the Attorney-General: 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1896, Appendix 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Registers of the Department of Justice: 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1876 

1883 

1884 - 

1886 

1891 

1895 

1897 

1898 

Opinions of the Attorneys-General: 

Volume 13 



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Volume 14 

Volume 15 

Volume 16 

Volume 17 

Volume 18 

Volume 19 

Volume 20 

Volume 21 , 

Volume 21, part 1 (pamphlet) . 

Volume 21, part 2 (pamphlet) . 
Digest of Opinions of Attorneys-Ge: 
Cousar's Digest... 



neral 



50 
6 
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19 

5 

102 

94 
138 
141 
127 
167 
209 
318 

74 
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16 



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3 
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1 
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19 
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17 
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72 
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2 
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132 
188 
145 
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246 
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292 
318 
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118 



10 



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4 
516 



50 

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218 
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BEPOBT OP THE ATTORNEY- GENERAL. 



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216 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Exhibit K. — Report oftha warden of the United State* penitentiary 

at tort Leavenworth* Kans. 

United States Penitentiary, 
Fort Leavenworth, Juzns. , June SO, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith the annual report of this 
penitentiary for the year ending June 30, 1900, and to call attention 
to the accompanying reports of the chaplain, surgeon, chief clerk, 
record clerk, superintendent of farm, and superintendent of construc- 
tion of the new prison. 

PRISON POPULATION. 

The population at the close of last fiscal year was 779. The gain 
during the year was 497, loss 374, leaving a total of 902 present at 
this date. Average population for the year, 791.8, against 608 the 
previous year. 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATION. 

The appropriation for the fiscal year was: Regular, $149,912; defi- 
ciency, $10,000; total, $159,912. The amount expended under this 
appropriation was $159,124.59,* leaving an unexpended balanee of 
$787.41. The items of expenditure are fully shown in the accom- 
panying tables. 

SUBSISTENCE. 

The net cost of subsistence for the year was $33,890.57. A slight 
increase will be noticed in the average yearly cost of subsistence per 
man. This is due to the increased cost of supplies purchased during 
the last two quarters of the fiscal year. The average yearly cost of 
subsistence per prisoner was $42.80. The average daily cost per pris- 
oner was 11.72 cents. A decrease is shown, however, in the gross 
cost of maintenance per prisoner. It amounts to $200.97 per man for 
the year, a fraction over 55 cents per man per day, Last year the 
gross cost per prisoner was $218 per year or 59 cents per day. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the prison has continued uniformly good throughout 
the year, as will be shown more fully by the surgeon's report. An 
outbreak of smallpox, which threatened to become epidemic, was 
promptly checked by organizing an isolation camp, in whicn the 
patients were treated; the entire prison popoulation was thoroughly 
vaccinated, and the ravages of the disease prevented. 

chaplain's report. 

The report of the chaplain shows that the work in his department 
has been prosecuted with commendable zeal, and the results have been 
very encouraging. It is a matter of regret that school work can not 
be carried on in this prison as it should be, for lack of room. A large 
number of prisoners who are listed as being able to read and write are 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 217 

really very ignorant and in great need of primary instruction, such as 
will enable them to meet the ordinary responsibilities of citizenship 
after their release. Ample provision is made for this purpose in the 
plans of the new prison, and this fact alone constitutes a strong argu- 
ment for early completion of the same. 

RECORDS. 

The report of the bookkeeper and record clerk shows that the meas- 
urements, descriptions, and records of the prisoners have been care- 
fully made, properly tabulated, and corrected to date, so that reference 
to the same is rendered easy, and the identification of habitual and 
professional criminals thoroughly secured. 

• 

FARM AND GARDEN. 

The work of the farm and garden has been successfully prosecuted, 
and a vast amount of transportation has been accomplished, as will 
appear more fully from the subjoined report of the superintendent of 
farm and transportation. 

NEW PRISON. 

* 

Attention is called to the report of the superintendent of construc- 
tion, showing amount of work performed in connection with the new 
prison. I can not emphasize too fully the importance of this work, nor 
recommend too strongly its completion to the point that the prisoners 
from the old may be removed to the new prison, at the earliest day 
possible. Over 50 per cent, on the average, of the working time of 
the prisoners is lost in marching back and forth. But this is not the 
most serious loss. The marching of such a mass of men together is, 
of itself, despite all precautions, a demoralizing influence that tells 
with fearful effect upon the morale of the prisoners. It is earnestly 
hoped by all who are familiar with the situation, that the continuance 
of this state of things may be made as short as possible, both for the 
interests of the prisoners and the honor of the Government. The foun- 
dations of the two interior cell houses will be completed by the 1st of 
January, 1901. If provision can be made for the completion of said 
cell houses during the year 1901, it will be possible to remove the 
prisoners to the new penitentiary by July 1, 1902, and continue the 
work of construction with their help alone until the entire institution 
is completed. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of the penitentiary has steadily improved during the 
year. No escapes have occurred since December last. Several escaped 
prisoners have been recaptured. The prisoners generally have per- 
formed their labors cheerrully, and manifested a willing obedience to 
the rules. Fewer punishments have been found necessary than might 
reasonably have been expected under the circumstances. My acknowl- 
edgments are due to the officers who constitute the staff of the peniten- 
tiary for their vigilance, industry, and cordial cooperation in tne work 
of the past year. The guards, with few exceptions, have discharged 
their duties faithfully. 



218 



BEPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



To yourself, sir, and the Department which you represent, I am 
under many obligations for support and assistance. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R, W. MoClauqhrt, Warden. 
The Attorney-General. 



United States Penitentiary, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kan*., June 30, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith a statistical statement of 
the records of this penitentiary for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

In addition, I would state that during said fiscal year original 
anthropometric measurements (according to the Bertillon system) were 
taken of 326 prisoners, and remcasurements were taken of 253 pris oners. 

The measurements and descriptions of all prisoners who nave been 
inmates of this institution since July 1, 1895, including those above 
mentioned, have been properly recorded in an appropriate book: classi- 
fied, and filed in a cabinet constructed for the purpose, facilitating 
ready reference and the identification of criminals. 

All prisoners received during the fiscal year have been photographed, 
the negatives properly marked by number, and filed for future use. 
Prints Tiave been made in all cases from the negatives, and mounted 
on descriptive cards. 

In addition, I have the honor to report that the descriptive cards, 
photographs, and corresponding negative plates of 1861 prisoners, 
who were inmates of this penitentiary prior to its transfer from the 
military to the civil authorities, have been classified, recorded, and 
properly filed for future reference. 

Very respectfully, M. W. McCladghry, 

Bookkeeper and Becord Clerk. 

The Warden. 



Table 1.— Alterations in prison population- since June SO, 1S99, giving number of prison- 
ers received, discharged, pardoned, escaped, died, transferred, or otherwise released, and 
number remaining in the penitentiary at close of fiscal year, June SO, 1900. 





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REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



219 



Table 1. — Alterations in prison population since June 30, 1899, giving number of prison- 
ers received, discharged, pardoned, escaped, died, transferred, or otherwise released, and 
number remaining in the penitentiary at close of fiscal year, June 30, 1900— Continued. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Date. 



July, 1899 

August, 1899 

September, 1899 
October, 1899 . . . 
November, 1899 
December, 1899. 
January, 1900. . . 
February, 1900 . 

March, 1900 

April, 1900 

MAy,1900 

June, 1900 



Total. 



In prison 
at begin- 
ning of 
month. 



779 
758 
719 
719 
746 
812 
814 
784 
821 
789 
854 
865 



Gain. 



6 

10 
17 
63 
89 
27 

7 

64 
12 
84 
49 
69 



497 



Loss. 



27 
49 
17 
37 
22 
25 
37 
27 
44 
19 
38 
32 



374 



In prison 
at close 

of 
month. 



758 
719 
719 
745 
812 
814 
784 
821 
789 
854 
865 
902 



In penitentiary at beginning of year 779 

Gain 497 

Loss 374 

In penitentiary at close of year 902 



Table 2. — Districts and States from which prisoners were committed to the United States 
penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. , during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Arkansas: 

Eastern district 34 

Western district ■__. 22 

56 

Colorado 4 

Indian Territory: 

Central district 83 

Northern district J.45 

Southern district 104 

332 

Kansas 16 

Oklahoma 19 

Texas: 

Eastern district 14 

Northern district 10 

Western district 13 

37 

Military prisoners 28 

Total 492 

Escapes recaptured during the year 5 

Grand total received 497 



Table 3. — Ages of prisoners in confinement in the United States penitentiary, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kans., at close of fiscal year, June 30, 1900. 

From 16 to 20 years of age 177 

From 20 to 30 years of age 432 

From 30 to 40 years of age Z 163 

From 40 to 50 years of age 77 

Over 50 years of age 53 

Total 902 



220 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Table 4. — Crimes, and number of convict* committed for each crime to the Ihiiled States 
penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., at close of fiscal year, June SO, 1900. 



Crime. 



Adultery 

Aiding a felon 

Arson 

Assault, etc 

Attempt to murder 

Bigamy 

Burglary 

Carnally knowing a female under 16 

Counterfeiting, having counterfeit coin, 

etc v 

Disposing of liquor 

Disposing of mortgaged property 

Embezzlement 

False claim 

False pretense 

Forgery 

Illicit distilling 

Impersonating an officer 

Incest 

Introducing liquor 

Kidnaping 

Larceny 

Making false report '. 



Num- 
ber. 



6 
1 
4 

37 
1 
1 

20 
4 

49 
55 

8 
17 

3 
15 
13 
35 

1 

2 
33 

3 
379 

2 



Crime. 



Manslaughter 

Murder 

Perjury and subornation of perjury 

Rape 

Receiving stolen property 

Robbery 

Selling liquor to Indians 

Shooting at passenger train 

Slander 

Smuggling, concealing smuggled property, 

etc 

Trespass and injury to property 

Uttering forged instrument 

Violation of act of March 18, 1884 

Violation of various articles of war 

Violation of postal laws and robbery of 

mail 

Violation of revenue laws 

Violation of pension laws 

Violation of section 3892, Revised Statutes. 
Violation of section 5478, Revised Statutes. 

Total 



Num- 
ber. 



81 

26 

12 

2 

13 

17 

19 

2 

1 

6 
1 
2 
1 
17 

51 
9 
1 
1 
1 



902 



Table 5. — Educational attainments of prisoners in the United States penitentiary, Fort 

Leavenworth, Kans., at close of fiscal year, June SO, 1900. 

Can read and write 663 

Can read but not write 13 

Can not read and write 226 

Total 902 



Table 6. — Number of first and number of repeated convictions of prisoners in the United 
States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., at close of fiscal year, June SO, 1900, 

First convictions 1. 831 

Known or admitted former convictions 71 

Total 902 



Table 7. — Conjugal relations of prisoners in the United States penitentiary, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kans. 

Married 333 

Widowed 39 

Divorced i 11 

Single 519 

Total 902 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



221 



Table 8. — Length of terms and number of prisoners committed for each term to the United 
States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., at close of fiscal year, June SO, 1900. 



Length of term. 



6 months 

lyear 

1 year and 1 day 

1 year and 1 month 

1 year and 2 months 

1 year and 3 months 

1 year and 6 months 

2 years 

2 years and 2 days 

2 years 3 months and 1 day 

2 years and 4 months 

2 years and 6 months 

2 years 6 months and 1 day 

3 years 

3 years and 1 day 

3 years and 3 days 

3 years and 6 months 

4 years 

4 years and 6 months 

4 years and 8 months 



Num- 
ber. 



1 

9 

99 

16 

5 

10 

45 

132 

9 

1 

1 

37 
1 
118 
4 
1 
3 

40 
2 
1 



Length of term. 



5 years 

5 years and 1 day 

5 years and 1 month. . 
5 years and 2 months. 
5 years and 5 months. 

5 years and 10 months 
6year8 

6 years and 6 months. 
7years 

7 years and 6 months. 
8years 

9 years 

10 years 

11 years and 1 day 

15 years 

20 years 

99 years 

Life 

Total 



Num- 
ber. 



276 
1 
1 
3 
2 
2 

12 
1 

10 
8 



3 



3 

1 

12 



902 



Table 9. — Nativity of. prisoners in the United States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., 

at close of fiscal year, June SO, 1900. 



Where born. 



Alabama , 

Arkansas , 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



Num- 
ber. 



28 

73 

1 

2 

3 

3 

2 

25 

23 

12 

255 

16 

21 

30 

11 

1 

6 

5 

29 

65 

2 

1 

12 

9 

18 

1 



Where born. 



Oregon 

Pennsylvania . 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

At sea 

! Austria 

1 Canada 

| China ...• 

England 

France 

Germany 

Ireland 

Mexico 

Nova Scotia 

Scotland 

West Indies 

Unknown 



Total 



Num- 
ber. 



2 
5 
3 

41 

138 

2 

11 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
3 
7 

14 
8 
6 
1 
1 
1 
2 



902 



RECAPITULATION. 

Number born in United States 868 

Number foreign born and nativity unknown 44 

Total 902 



222 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Table 10. — Occupation followed before conviction by prisoners in confinement in the United 
States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth,, Kans., June SO, 1900. 



Occupation 

* 

Accountant 

Bakers 

Banker 

Barbers 

Blacksmiths 

Boiler maker 

Bookbinder 

Bookkeepers 

Bootblacks 

Brakemen 

Bricklayers 

Butchers 

Carpenters 

Carriage maker 

Chiropodist 

Cigar maker 

Civil engineers 

Clerks 

Coachmen 

Cooks 

Coopers 

Cowboys 

Distiller 

Druggist 

Electricians 

Engineers 

Farmers 

Firemen 

Glass blower 

Harness maker 

Horse trainers 

Hostlers 

Jeweler 

Laborers 



Num- 
ber. 



1 
2 
1 

20 
8 
1 
1 
8 
2 
4 
S 
7 

14 
1 
1 
1 
2 

13 
2 

16 
2 

30 
1 
1 
2 
6 
528 
7 
1 
1 
6 
7 
1 

77 



Occupation. 



Laundryman 

Lawyer 

Lineman 

Liveryman 

Machinists 

Marble cutter 

Medical student 

Merchants 

Miners 

Musician 

Newspaper man 

Painters 

Photographers 

Physicians 

Plumbers 

Porters 

Printers , 

Railroad man 

Sailors 

Salesmen 

School-teachers 

Shoemaker 

Showmen 

Soldiers 

Stockmen 

Stonecutters 

Stone masons 

Tailors 

Teamsters 

Telegraph operators 

Tinner 

Waiters 

Total 



Num- 
ber. 



2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
5 
4 
1 
2 
2 
5 
3 
4 
5 
21 
2 
1 
5 



902 



Table 11. — Habits of life of prisoners in the United States penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, 

Kans., June SO, 1900. 

Claim to be temperate 885 

Admit use of intoxicants to excess 17 

Total 902 



Table 12. — Average number of prisoners in the United States penitentiary, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kans., during fiscal year ending June SO, 1900. 



1899. 



July 

August 

September 
October... 
November 
December. 



Average 
number. 



771.29 
736.84 
716.47 
741.90 
784.63 
810.55 



1900. 



January . , 
February 

March 

April 

May , 

June 



Average 
number. 



798.94 
783.93 
812.19 
805.53 
860.35 
879 



RECAPITULATION. 

Average prison population, first six months 760.28 

Average prison population, second six months 823.32 

Average prison population for the year 791.80 



» •. 



• • » 



• « 

* * 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



223 



Table 13. — Race, and number of each race, of prisoners in the United States penitentiary, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kans., at close of fiscal year. June 30, 1900. 

White 555 

Colored 192 

Indians 146 

Mexicans 8 

Chinese 1 

Total 902 



United States Penitentiary, 

Fort Leavenworth, Kans. , Jwne SO, 1900. 

Sib: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the financial 
affairs of the penitentiary for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

While it will be noticed that the per capita cost of subsistence is 
slightly greater than during the previous fiscal year, this increase is due 
to the increased cost of subsistence supplies purchased during the last 
two quarters of the fiscal year. 

The per capita cost of maintenance, as will be seen from the report, 
is considerably less than during the previous fiscal year, due to the 
increase in the average number of prisoners. 
Respectfully, 

C. K. Macey, Chief Clerk. 

The Warden. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT — UNITED STATES PENITENTIARY, FISCAL YEAR 1900. 

Table 1. — Total appropriation and expenditures, United States penitentiary, Fort Leav- 
enworth, Kans., fiscal year 1900. 

Appropriation: 

By sundry civil bill $149,912.00 

By urgent deficiency bill 9,000.00 

By general deficiency bill 1, 000. 00 

Total 159,912.00 

Expended 159,124.59 

Balance unexpended 787. 41 

Total 159,912.00 

Subappropriations. 



Subsistence, tobacco, seeds, farm implements, etc 
Clothing, gratuities, transportation, and rewards 

Fuel, forage, light, and general supplies 

Hospital supplies 

Salaries 

Industries ( pay of foremen) 

Total 



Appropriated. 



$37,000.00 
20,000.00 
33,000.00 

1,800.00 
60,912.00 

7,200.00 



159,912.00 



Expended. 



$36,904.42 
19,965.39 
32,971.19 

1,798.49 
60,285.10 

7,200.00 



159,124.59 



224 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY- GENERAL. 



Table 2. — Amount expended for subsistence during the fiscal year 1900. 

Value of subsistence supplies on hand July 1, 1899 $1, 939. 46 

Expended for subsistence supplies, fiscal year 1900 32, 373. 73 

Total , 34,313.19 

Value of subsistence supplies on hand June 30, 1900 422. 62 

Net cost of subsistence 33, 890. 57 

Average number of convicts fed 791. 80 

Average yearly cost per man $42. 80 

Average daily cost per man $0. 1172 



Table 3. — Total amount expended for maintenance, gross cost per year and per day, dur- 
ing fiscal year 1900. 

Gross expenditures for year $159, 124. 59 

Average number of prisoners 791. 80 

Average cost per man per year $200. 977 

Average cost per man perday $0.5562 



Table 4. — Comparison of expenditures for the fiscal years 1899 and 1900. 



Items. 



Subsistence, etc 

Clothing, transportation, etc 
Fuel and general supplies . . 

Hospital supplies 

Salaries 

Industries (pay of foremen) 



Increase for 1900 over 1899 



Expended in fiscal 
year— 



1899. 



$28,424.10 
10,283.27 
25,411.47 

1,370.98 
55,693.08 

6,965.38 



1900. 



$36,904.42 
19,965.39 
32,971.19 

1,798.49 
60,285.10 

7,200.00 



Increase. 



$8,480.32 
9,682.12 
7,559.72 

427.51 
4,592.02 

234.62 



30,976.31 



In explanation of this increase it is only necessary to state that during the prior year the average 
number of prisoners confined was 608, while during the current year the average was 791.80, an increase 
of nearly 200 prisoners, and also to the fact that the cost of supplies has been greater during the pres- 
ent fiscal year than in 1899. 



Chaplain's Office, U. S. Penitentiary, 

Fort Leavenworth, Kans., June SO, 1900. 
Tho Warden: 

In compliance with your instructions, I take pleasure in presenting 
my report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900: 

As the preaching of the Word is of primary importance in the 
chaplain's work, your attention is called, first, to the — 

Preaching service. — This has been held regularly each Sunday, with 
fairly encouraging results. It is gratifying to state that the attend- 
ance has been usually good. Out of a population averaging 792, fifty 
per cent, at least, were habitual attendants upon these meetings. Our 
chapel will seat 600, and at times it was well filled. I have endeavored 
to preach such sermons as would arouse the conscience and lead to the 
reformation and salvation of the man. As to the results, eternity 
alone can fully reveaL The song service has been in charge of Mr. 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 225 

Hon, a prison guard, during the latter part of the year, and has been 
a valuable aid to the preaching of the Word. The choir meets regu- 
larly once a week for practice. The orchestra has rendered good 
service, and has improved in its work. 

The Bible class. — This class meets immediately after the preaching 
service and continues one hour. The course of study is the Interna- 
tional Sunday School Lessons. Forty-eight sessions were held this 
year, the attendance averaging 127. The chaplain has personally con- 
ducted these studies. He nas enjoyed the work and believes good has 
been done. Many of the members take great interest in Bible study, 
and some appear to have a fairly good knowledge of God's Word. 
Having no lesson helps, and only 83 Bibles and 193 Testaments, we 
have labored under some disadvantages. I am glad to say, however, 
that this condition will be improved, as instructions have been given 
for the purchase of a large number of Bibles. While we are pleased 
with what has been accomplished, we hope for better results the ensu- 
ing year. 

The sick have been regularly visited and such comfort and encour- 
agement given as opportunity afforded. Ten inmates died during the 
year and were buried in the prison cemetery after brief and appropri- 
ate services were held in the chapel. 

The library. — The catalogue snows 4,981 volumes, which is rather 
misleading. Some of these volumes are made up of several parts, and 
each part is numbered as a book. There are nearly 200 books not 
catalogued. Number condemned because unfit for repair, 81, which 
includes 13 Bibles. Books are exchanged each week for those who 
make application. The average number exchanged per week was 500, 
or 26,000 for the year. Three-fourths of the books issued belong to 
the light-literature class. The rest are religious, scientific, historical, 
and poetical works. Eight hundred and fifty-three schoolbooks ? not 
included in the figures given above, are kept by the men for private 
use in their cells; also 179 slates. It may be proper to state that a 
large number of books are old and much worn, and can be of service 
but a short while. It would be a splendid thing if 100 books of good, 
wholesome literature were added annually to the library. No purchase 
of books has been made during the year. 

Friends interested in prison reform have favored the institution 
with papers, magazines, good books in cheap binding, etc., for which 
we are exceedingly grateful. I desire to make special mention of 
religious and church papers that come weekly to this office. They are 
among the best and ablest published, and are furnished gratuitously. 
To insure the regular receipt of these papers, I recommend that they 
be annually subscribed for, as this gratuity may cease at any time. 

Prisoners' mail. — Since August 15, 1899, 1 have had the superin- 
tendence of the prisoners 1 mail. Convicts are permitted to write twice 
a month. Three mails are received each day, except Sundays, when 
no mail work is done in this office. A faithful record of all letters 
and valuables has been kept. Number of letters mailed during this 
time, 16,316; number of stamps received, 16,421; stamps on hand this 
date, 105. 

I have carried out, as far as possible, rule 2, under instructions gov- 
erning the chaplain in his duties, and would refer you to the tabulated 
statement given below for information. 

H. Doc. 9 15 



226 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Number of prisoners interviewed, 329. Of these — 

Married 141 

Unmarried 188 

Illiterate 98 

Having primary instruction only 98 

Fairly educated in common schools 108 

Academies and collegiate** 15 

Total abstainers 180 

Addicted to the moderate use of strong drinks 106 

Intemperate -. 24 

Beared in Christian homes 273 

Not thus reared 51 

In prison Bible school 229 

Not attending Bible school 100 

The foregoing table includes some whose terra of imprisonment 
expired during the year. Moneys received for prisoners in mail, 
$1,811.39. The same has been turned over to the chief clerk. The 
interior of the chapel has been improved in the way of repainting the 
balcony and decorating the walls, which has added much to the appear- 
ance and attractiveness of the auditorium. 

In conclusion, permit me to thank you for your confidence and sup- 
port which has been cheerf ullv given me in my work. I am also grate- 
ful to the deputy warden ana the other prison officials and guards for 
their uniform courtesy and kind treatment shown me in the discharge 
of my official duties. 

Respectfully submitted. F. J. Leavitt, 

Chaplain. 



United States Penitentiary, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kans., June 30, 1900. 

I have the honor to submit herewith my report as physician for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

As shown by the accompanying tabular statement, there were 18 
cases remaining under treatment from the previous fiscal year; 352 
cases were received during the year; 335 were discharged; 11 died, 
and there were 24 cases remaining under treatment at the end of the 
year. There were 12,385 cases reported on morning sick call, of 
which 9,175 were returned to duty, 2,858 were sent to quarters, and 
the remainder, 352, were admitted to the hospital for treatment. 

On December 20, 1899, one of the paroled prisoners developed a case 
of smallpox. He was promptly isolated ana all his clothing and bed- 
ding burned. A pest camp was established on the prison farm about 
three-fourths of a mile from any habitation, to which the patient was 
removed, and a strict quarantine enforced. The building in which the 
case had developed (parole charters) was also rigidly quarantined from 
the rest of the prison, the inmates being confined there until danger 
from contagion had passed. The prisoners, as well as the officers and 
their families, were vaccinated, and in cases where the vaccine did not 
take at first they were revaccinated. 

There was no further outbreak of the disease until January 6, 1900, 
when two cases of varioloid developed, and there were two additional 
cases on the 10th of January. These cases were at once removed to 
the pest camp, and their clothing and bedding burned. All of these 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



227 



patients recovered, with no serious complications, and no other cases 
developed. The pest camp was abandoned February 9, 1900, the 
entire camp being afterwards destroyed by fire. 

Upon removing the quarantine from the parole building the quar- 
ters were thoroughly fumigated and disinfected in the following man- 
ner: First, by sulphur fumes for twenty-four hours; second, by 
generous application of carbolic acid; third, by cleansing with soap 
and hot water; fourth,, by coating the interior of the quarters with 
lime wash and paint. 

On July 2, 1899, a case of measles developed, and from that date 
up to and including August 7, 1899, there were 49 additional cases, 
making 50 in all. These cases were all isolated, as far as possible, in 
the hospital and adjacent building, and all recovered with no serious 
results. 

During the year there were 14 cases of tuberculosis developed, and 2 
cases of this disease were carried over from the previous year. These 
cases were isolated as far as it was possible to do with our limited 
facilities for isolation. 

The following tabular statement shows the number of medical, 
surgical, and mortuary cases, and also a recapitulation of these cases: 

Medical cases treated in hospital. 
Admitted 314 

Discharged 285 

Resulting in death 11 

Remaining 18 

Total 314 

Surgical cases treated in hospital. 
Admitted 56 

Discharged 50 

Resulting in death 

Remaining 6 

Total 56 

Mortuary cases, ivith personnel and diagnosis. 



Name. 



Alex Brown 

Tom Bloodworth 

Wm. Hudson 

Wm. Stringer 

J.H.Shull 

F.M. Liner 

Jeff Hawkins ... 

Shell Wait 

George Jackson . 
John Strickland. 
E. E. Haynes 



Race. 


Age. 


Negro 


37 


White.... 


27 


White 


45 


White 


38 


White.... 


33 


White 


54 


Negro 


21 


White 


22 


Negro 


20 


Negro 


38 


White 


29 



Date of death. 



Aug. 1, 1899 

Jan. 7, 1900 

Jan. 8, 1900 

Jan. 8, 1900 

Feb. 10, 1900 

Mar. 23, 1900 

Mar. 28, 1900 

Mar. 29, 1900 

Apr. 5, 1900 

Apr. 8, 1900 

Apr. 27, 1900 



Diagnosis. 



Pulmonary consumption. 
Pneumonia complications (typhoid). 
Acute Bright' s disease. 

Do. 
Double pneumonia. 
Influenza. 

Acute mania, pneumonia, left. 
Double pneumonia. 
Typhoid fever. 

General tuberculosis and dropsy. 
Remittent fever, pernicious anaemia. 



228 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Recapitulation of medical, surgical, and mortuary reports. 

Total morning sick call 12, 386 

Treated and returned to duty 9, 175 

Treated and sent to quarters 2, 858 

Number remaining under treatment from last year 18 

Number admitted and treated during the year 352 

Number discharged from hospital 335 

Number remaining in hospital 24 

Mortuary 11 

370 
Less number remaining under treatment from last year 18 352 

Total 12,385 

Respectfully submitted. 

F. M. Thomas, Physician. 
The Warden. 



United States Penitentiary, 

Fort Leavenworth, Kans. , June SO, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith my report as superintend- 
ent of farm and transportation for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, 
showing the acreage under cultivation and the estimated yield of the 
several items of farm produce. 

In this report I have not attempted to show the amount of labor that 
has been performed nor the teaming that has been done both in hauling 
ice for the use of the penitentiary and the hauling of sand, cement, 
logs, lumber, cord wood, tiling, etc.. for use at the new site. 

The amount of sand hauled from tne river bed to the new site, a dis- 
tance of nearly 5 miles, was about 2,300 loads. The cotton wood lum- 
ber that was gotten out and hauled to the sawmill and from there to 
the new site amounted to about 65,000 feet. There were about 1,200 
loads of cord wood hauled to the site. The amount of ice hauled and 
stored in the ice houses was about 1,500 tons. 

In addition to the regular farm work, there was dug about 3 miles of 
ditch, 3 feet deep by 6 feet wide, for the purpose of draining certain 
portions of the bottom land, in order that it might be placed under 
cultivation; about 700 stumps were cleared off the farm land, the lane 
leading through the farm was cleared and fenced, and a large part of 
the farm was plowed two or more times to get it in proper shape for 
putting in the crops. 

The entire work under my charge has been performed with an aver- 
age of 25 paroled prisoners a day, with one guard and one teamster. 
Respectfully, 

Geo. T. Holybee, 
Superintendent Farm and Transportation. 

The Warden. 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



229 



Prison farm — Statement showing crop acreage and estimated yield. 



Item. 



Wheat bushels 

Corn do.. 

Potatoes do. . 

Oats do. . 

Broom corn tons 

Onions bushels 

Spinach do. . 

Cabbage heads 

Tomatoes bushels 

Sweet potatoes do. . 

Sweet corn do. . 

Turnips do. . 

Radishes do. . 

Lettuce do. . 

Beans ,. do. . 

Pease do. . 

Carrots do. . 

Parsnips do. . 

Beets do. . 

Peppers do. . 

Pumpkins 

Timothy hay tons 

Total : 



Acreage. 



Estimated 
yield. 



166 


4.500 


225 


10,000 


60 


5,000 


100 


3,200 


8 


8 


9 


3,000 


H 


200 


10 


50,000 


6 


3,000 


4 


1,000 


3 


160 


1 


250 


1 


300 


i 


200 


H 


300 


1 


150 


1 


200 


1 


200 


i 

4 


160 


1 

a 


10 


1 


1,000 


100 


150 


690 





United States Penitentiary, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kcms., August 16, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith my report as superin- 
tendent of construction at the new penitentiary site, showing the 
amount of labor performed and material used in the construction of 
walls and buildings during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900. 
Respectfully, 

F. E. Hinds, 
Superintendent of Construction. 
The Warden. 



Estimate of labor performed and material used in the construction of the new United States 
penitentiary at Fort Leavenworth, Kans. , for the twelve months ending June $0, 1900. 

Excavating and filling grounds yards. . 56, 296 

Concrete footings do. . . 17, 321 

Rough stone laid perch. . 9, 620 

Stone quarried do. . . 14, 864 

Transporting stone from quarry loads. . 13, 562 

CUT-STONE WORK. 

Water table cut feet. . 2, 564 

Ashlar, 8-inch, cut do. . . 13, 212 

Stone sills cut do. . - 411 

Stone caps cut do. . . 480 

Stone coping cut do. . . 300 

Water table set do. . . 1, 795 

Curbing do. . . 480 

Crossings do. . . 1, 560 

Hanger blocks do. . . 126 

Pointed work, boiler house do. . . 15, 744 

Pointed work, laundry do. . . 3, 600 

Footings for sewers do. . . 72 



230 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



BRICKWORK. 



Brick manufactured 3,840,000 

Brick laid in walls 2,575,000 



EXCAVATION WORK FOR TRENCHES. 



Foundations for boiler house, cell house, and walls yards. . 11, 803 

Water pipe do. . . 3, 570 



TEAM HAULING. 

Sand loads.. 1,900 

Cinders do... 1,720 

Cement do. . . 378 

Crushed rock do. . . 695 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Rock crushed on grounds loads. . 642 

Labor: 

New quarry developed days. . 600 

Tramway relaid do. . . 583 

Roads made and repaired do. . . 198 

Fences made and repaired do. . . 62 

Stone shed do. . . 49 

Cable drum do. . . 30 

Turntable do... 42 

Laying incline track do. . . 192 

Carpenter work do. . . 795 

Repairs on buildings do. . . 150 

Car repairing do. . . 98 

Sewers laid linear feet. . 1, 730 

Lumber hauled loads. . 60 



Exhibit L. — Report of the hoard of trustees of th# Reform, School, 

District of Columbia. 

Washington, D. C, November 7, 1900. 

Sir: In accordance with law, I have the honor to submit the report 
of the board of trustees of the Reform School of the District of Colum- 
bia for the fiscal year 1900. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there were in the school 206 boys; 
there were received during the year 103, a total of 309, as against 313 
for the previous year. Eighty-four of those received were committed 
by the police court and 2 by the supreme court of the District of 
Columbia, 14 by United States courts outside of the District, and 3 by 
the president of the board of trustees. 

There were discharged during the year 93 by order of the trustees, 
17 by expiration of sentence (United States courts), 2 by pardon of 
the President of the United States, and 5 escaped and are still absent, 
leaving in the school June 30, 1900, 192. There were no deaths during 
the year, and the general health of the inmates was and is good. 

The accompanying table shows the estimates of appropriations for 
the next fiscal year, ending June 30, 1902, which, under the law, have 
been submitted to the Commissioners of the District of Columbia 
before insertion in the act making appropriations for the District. 
The amount appropriated for salaries for the present fiscal year was 
$16,452. The amount of the present estimate for salaries is the same. 
The amount estimated as necessary for the support of the inmates is 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 231 

the same as was appropriated for the present fiscal year and has been 
appropriated for a number of years past. The estimate of $3,000 for 
an additional boiler, including all expenses of installation, foundation, 
brickwork, connections, etc., is for the purpose of so increasing the 
heating and power plant as to render the school independent of acci- 
dent. The present boiler capacity barely suffices for the needs of the 
school, and is taxed to its utmost capacity during cold winter weather, 
and should an accident or any other cause prevent the use of one of 
the present boilers there would not be left enough to do the work 
required. The putting in of this additional boiler is simply a matter 
of wise economy, whicn is recommended as a sensible business propo- 
sition. 

Congress, at its last session, passed an act changing the age of admis- 
sion to the school from under 16 years to under 17 years, and author- 
izing the board of trustees to grant temporary or conditional discharges, 
thereby making it possible for the board to exercise supervision over 
the boys after discharge, and to return to the school those who, after 
discharge on parole, lapse into vicious ways. This legislation ought 
to reduce the number of commitments of boys to the jail and work- 
house, where they are frequently sent now because their parents prefer 
a short sentence there to the possibility of a long stay at the Reform 
School. 

Congress, at its last session, made an additional appropriation for an 
assembly hall at the school, the appropriation made at the previous 
session having turned out to be too small, because of the rise in the cost 
of building material, etc. A contract for the erection of the build- 
ing was made, and work begun upon it September 14, and, at the date 
of this report, the brickwork of the lower story has been completed 
and the rafters are now being put in place upon the superstructure. 
It is expected that the building will be under roof before bad weather 
sets in, and completed for use Dy the middle of the winter. 

During the year the necessary repairs for the proper care and pres- 
ervation of the buildings and personal property belonging to the school 
have been made, including those to the workshops, family buildings, 
barns, stables, fencing, sewers, roadway, steam plant, etc. , in all of which 
work the boys have been employed whenever practicable. The boiler 
house and coal vaults were thoroughly overhauled, the walls repaired, 
and the vaults lined with cement, to exclude dampness. The green- 
houses were almost entirely rebuilt, and are now in excellent condition. 
The use of the old bathing pools, one of which was located in each 
family building, has been discontinued and their place has been taken 
by shower baths, a measure conducive to good health and cleanliness. 
Tne character of the work in the schoolroom, the manual-training 
school, and the instruction given in the various shops, as well as in the 
outdoor work, has perhaps been better than usual. Owing to the 
season, the farm crops were not as good as usual. 

On the day before the date of this report a fire broke out in the lower 
story of the principal shop building, which destroyed some hundreds 
of dollars' worth of paper boxes, in storage awaiting delivery, and 
injured the building to the amount of possibly $200. The fire was 
controlled by the school authorities without assistance from the District 
fire department. The school is supplied with water by a steam pump 
located at the power house. There is a brick water tower in which are 
two 15,000-gallon wrought-iron tanks, the base of the lower tank being 



232 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

60 feet above the ground level. There is a system of pipes running 
through the grounds, connected with the tanks in the water tower and 
with hre plugs located at points best suited for use. There are two 
hose reels, suitably housea, and a hook and ladder truck all ready for 
immediate service. The height of the water tank makes it possible to 
throw a stream upon the roof of any of the buildings by gravity alone. 
With this apparatus the employees of the school were able to handle 
the fire without outside assistance, and to confine it to the room in 
which it started. The conditions are such as to reduce the danger from 
fire to the boys and other inmates of the school to a minimum. 

The superintendent, in his report which accompanies this as an 
exhibit, suggests the erection of another family building. The pres- 
ent maximum capacity of the school is 250 boys, if the number of 
white and colored boys is such as to utilize the provision made for 
each. In 1898 the average number in the school during the year was 
236; in 1899, 224, and in the year covered by this report, 197. In the 
eleven years from 1887 to 1898 the average number of boys increased 
from 157 to 236. There are a number of reasons for the falling off in 
the last two years; one of these is the tendency to the multiplication 
of agencies for the care of boys. The Board or Children's Guardians 
would seem to be intended primarily for charitable work, but it is a 
question whether it does not obtain through the courts control of many 
boys who should perhaps more properly be sent to the Reform School, 
the reasons for tneir commitment being based upon acts committed 
or general condition of behavior calling for reformation rather than 
for charitable support, the object of the school being the reformation 
and a supplemental carrying out of control where parents are no longer 
able to exercise it. It would seem, as a mere question of economy, to 
be wiser to utilize this school to the limit of its capacity rather than 
to distribute boys to farms and other private places where, possibly, 
they get little or no instruction, the persons to whom they are com- 
mitted getting not only their services, but compensation, making an 
additional expense to be paid from the public treasury. 

The reports of the superintendent, treasurer, and physician are sub- 
mitted as exhibits. 

Very respectfully, Cecil Clay, 

President Board of Trustees. 

The Attorney-General, 

Washington, D. C. 



Estimates of appropriations for Reform School, District Columbia, fiscal year ending 

June SO, 1902. 

One superintendent $1, 500. 00 

One assistant suDerintendent 900. 00 

Teachers and assistant teachers 5, 040. 00 

Matron of school 600. 00 

Four matrons of families, at $180 each 720. 00 

Three foremen of workshops, at $660 each 1, 980. 00 

One farmer 480.00 

One engineer 396. 00 

One assistant engineer 300. 00 

One tailor, one cook, one shoemaker, at $300 each 900. 00 

One baker 300. 00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 233 

One laundress $180. 00 

Two dining-room servants, one seamstress, and one chambermaid, at $144 

each 576.00 

One florist 360.00 

Watchmen, not exceeding six in number 1, 620. 00 

Secretary and treasurer to board of trustees 600. 00 

Total 16,452.00 

Support of inmates, including groceries, flour, feed, meats, dry goods, 
leather, shoes, gas, fuel, hardware, furniture, tableware, farm imple- 
ments, seeds, harness and repairs to same, fertilizers, books, stationery, 
plumbing, painting, glazing, medicines and medical attendance, stock, 
fencing, repairs to buildings, including material for same and for shop 
use, and other necessary items, including compensation, not exceeding 
$900, for additional labor or services, and for transportation and other 
necessary expenses incident to securing suitable homes for discharged 
boys, not exceeding $500, all under the control of the Commissioners. . 26, 000. 00 

One additional 100-horsepower boiler, including all expenses of installa- 
tion, foundation, brickwork, connections, etc * 3, 000. 00 



report of the superintendent. 

Reform School of the District of Columbia, 

November 1, 1900. 

I have the honor to present herewith my annual report for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1900: 

Total number of boys received since opening 2, 559 

Total number of deaths since opening 13 

Rate of mortality, about one-half of 1 per cent. 

Average age of boys received since opening (years) 13. 3 

Number of boys in schoolJune 30, 1899 206 

Received during the year: 

By commitment from police court of District of Columbia 84 

By commitment from the supreme court of District of Columbia 2 

By commitment from the United States district courts 14 

By commitment from the president of the board of trustees 3 

— 103 
Total number during the year 309 

Number discharged during the year: 

By order of the board of trustees, " honor" 81 

By special order of the board of trustees 12 

By expiration of sentence (United States courts) 17 

By pardon of the President of the United States 2 

By death • 

By escape and still absent 5 

— 117 
Number remaining in school June 30, 1900 192 

Maximum number during the year 215 

Minimum number during the year 179 

Average number of boys during the year 197 

Average age of boys received during the year (years) 13. 9 

Time in wnich honorable discharge may be secured (years) 2 

Possible reduction by * ' good time ' ' allowance ( months) 4 

Number received on first commitment 95 

Number received on second commitment 8 



Total number received 103 



234 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Record as to personal habits before commitment: 

Number naving kept bad company and used tobacco 54 

Numberhaving a doubtful record 34 

Number~having a doubtful record but coming from a good home 15 

Total number 103 



Employment prior to commitment: 

Number not employed in any way 45 

Number employed past the time 30 

Number attending school regularly 11 

Number attended school past the time 17 

Total number 103 



Cause of commitment:. 
Assault 



1 

Larceny 45 

5 

1 



Minor larceny 

Grand larceny 

Incorrigibility 27 

Vagrancy 1 

Housebreaking 1 

Depredation on property 1 

Bemg suspicious characters 7 

Violation of revenue laws 2 

Violation United States postal laws 11 

Forgery of United States Treasury notes 1 

Total 103 



Religious associations of boys before commitment: 

Parents attended Baptist Church services 47 

Parents attended Catholic Church services 16 

Parents attended Methodist Church services 27 

Parents attended Lutheran Church services 2 

Parents attended Presbyterian Church services 1 

Parents attended Christian Church services 2 

Parents not attending any religious services 8 

Total 103 



Nationality of boys received during the year: 

Parents born in the United States 95 

Parents born in Germany 1 3 

Parents born in Ireland 3 

Parents born in Italy 2 

Total.. 103 



Parental relations when received: 

Number having both parents living. 49 

Number having both parents living but separated 16 

Number having lost father by death 19 

Number having lost mother by death 18 

Number having lost both parents by death 1 

Total 103 



Educational standing of boys when received: 

Number who did not know alphabet 7 

Number who knew the alphabet only 13 

Number who could read in the primer 32 

Number who could enter the second school grade 37 

Number who could read tolerably well 14 

Total 103 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 235 

Educational standing of boys when received — Continued. 

Number who had no knowledge of penmanship 49 

Number who could write name only 20 

Number who could write imperfectly 19 

Number who could write fairly well 15 

Total 103 

Number who had never studied arithmetic 52 

Number who had practical examples in addition 29 

Number who had advanced to division 15 

Number who had practical examples in decimal fractions 7 

Total 103 

The superintendent has received from various sources and has turned 
the same over, monthly during the year, in lawful money of the United 
States, to Samuel W. Curriden, treasurer of the school, who has car- 
ried the same into the United States Treasury for the credit of the 
United States and the District of Columbia jointly, as follows, viz: 

From gains in paper-box industry $3, 200. 00 

From sales of plants and flowers from greenhouse 703. 11 

From sales of surplus from products 37. 93 

From miscellaneous sources , 233. 97 

Total cash receipts 4, 175. 01 

By reference to the foregoing tables it will be seen that our average 
population has been decreasing for several years. The school, how- 
ever, is in no way responsible for this decrease in number. Two or 
three years ago, it will be remembered, we were overcrowded, and 
you were compelled under existing laws to ask for temporary suspen- 
sion of commitments by the District courts. Had your appeal to 
Congress at that time for another family building been favorably con- 
sidered, our number would have increased rather than diminished, and 
many boys would have been cared for here instead of by private insti- 
tutions outside the District of Columbia. 

The conditions referred to above must be considered from a purely 
local standpoint both in their relation to the school and in their excep- 
tional bearing upon its reduced population. Other and very natural 
agencies have helped to secure these results and may be fo und wjj " 
difficulty in the increased opportunities for ^i^^gfff/fti^ff^^^ 

followed in the wake of the general reviva^SFall business industries 
throughout the country. 

It is not claimed by the committjLsg authorities that any advantage 
has been gained either financially or otherwise by such disposition of 
these juvenile delinquents. It simply became a necessity to have them 
in some way cared for, an^ there was no other means at their com- 
mand. This would clearly indicate our need for another building, 
with additional mean? to not only provide against contingencies of this 
kind, but to enable you to meet all demands made by reason of the con- 
tinued increase o/ population in the District. It would seem to be 
but a practical business transaction upon the part of the Government 
to thus concentrate rather than scatter its efforts in furthering this 
important work. Our general plant is practically complete and well 
equipped to provide for a much larger population. Expansion numeri- 
cally, under these conditions, would be in the line of a true economy 
and eventualy prove a large factor in reducing the per capita cost of 
maintenance. 



236 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

The large tract of land upon which our school buildings are located 
belongs in fee simple to the United States. It is "beautiful for situa- 
tion," within a few miles of and overlooking the city, which is easily 
reached by means of both steam and electric railways. Our cultivated 
fields are already broad and invite the labor of busy hands. Many 
acres are yet waiting to be cleared and made ready for a large increase 
of the varied products which have helped to supply our tables annu- 
ally for many years. The labor required is both nealthful and invit- 
ing to the average boy, knowing that he will share liberally in all he 
thus helps to produce. I therefore beg to repeat, in order to further 
impress, if possible, my suggestion as to another family building, hop- 
ing that you will make an effort to secure from the next Congress an 
appropriation to cover its cost. 

Whatever may be claimed or even admitted as to the higher char- 
acter and general progress of our school work, it is always safe to 
count the cost and thus to be prepared to minimize, as far as possible, 
expenditures in each separate department. A somewhat larger outlay 
than usual has been required on account of necessary repairs, but as 
will be seen from the report of the treasurer this entire expense has 
been more than met by increased gains in our several industries and by 
him covered into the U nited States Treasury. The pro rata cost for 
maintenance has been about 10 per cent more than for the preceding 
fiscal year, owing to a marked advance in the price of all food and 
other supplies. Our total expenditures, however, have been kept 
within the regular appropriations made by Congress. It may be noted 
further that tne school has not appeared as a claimant in any deficiency 
bill within the past eighteen years. 

Fairly good results have followed another year of "farming for 
profit" — profit to the school in many ways, but more directly as a 
manual training for well-grown boys, who have been greatly benefited 
by what they nave learned practically in this branch of honorable 
labor, and also in a healthful development of brawn and muscle. The 
season did not favor a large crop either of cereals, vegetables, or fruit; 
enough, however, to satisfy all reasonable expectations. Much care is 
given daily to the quality and preparation or all table supplies, nor is 
the quantity restricted except by order of the physician. Puree whole- 
some meals are provided daily to each and every boy. After many 
years of experience we still discard the "bread and water line" as a 
means of punishment for any misdemeanor. A bad boy is often hard 
to control, but a hungry bad boy increases the difficulty. Feed him 
well, as a natural antidote for his too hasty temper and boyish pug- 
nacity, and you prepare him in a large measure to accept, often 
willingly, any reasonable and just punishment he may have deserved. 

Our boys' dining room is still made an object lesson and a standard 
of cleanliness and comfort for the entire school. It is also a place for 
discipline — not rigid, but of a character to impress upon every boy 
the importance, especially to himself, of cultivating a manly and man- 
nerly behavior when at meals. An officer connected with each family 
is always present to aid in securing the best results possible. 

Manual training of some kind, with its just equivalent of recreation, 
is stiU the order for every working day. During the fall and winter 
months, however, the daily school sessions are considered of first 
importance. The senior officer of each family is also the teacher, 
having charge of both morning and afternoon sessions. As a rule 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 235 

Educational standing of boys when received — Continued. 

Number who had no knowledge of penmanship 49 

Number who could write name only 20 

Number who could write imperfectly 19 

Number who could write fairly well 15 

Total 103 

Number who had never studied arithmetic 52 

Number who had practical examples in addition 29 

Number who had advanced to division 15 

Number who had practical examples in decimal fractions 7 

Total 103 

The superintendent has received from various sources and has turned 
the same over, monthly during the year, in lawful money of the United 
States, to Samuel W. Curriden, treasurer of the school, who has car- 
ried the same into the United States Treasury for the credit of the 
United States and the District of Columbia jointly, as follows, viz: 

From gains in paper-box industry $3, 200. 00 

From sales of plants and flowers from greenhouse 703. 11 

From sales of surplus from products 37. 93 

From miscellaneous sources 233. 97 

Total cash receipts 4, 175. 01 

By reference to the foregoing tables it will be seen that our average 
population has been decreasing for several years. The school, how- 
ever, is in no way responsible for this decrease in number. Two or 
three years ago, it will be remembered, we were overcrowded, and 
you were compelled under existing laws to ask for temporary suspen- 
sion of commitments by the District courts. Had your appeal to 
Congress at that time for another family building been favorably con- 
sidered, our number would have increased rather than diminished, and 
many boys would have been cared for here instead of by private insti- 
tutions outside the District of Columbia. 

The conditions referred to above must be considered from a purely 
local standpoint both in their relation to the school and in their excep- 
tional bearing upon its reduced population. Other and very natural 
agencies have helped to secure these results and may be found without 
difficulty in the increased opportunities for employment which have 
followed in the wake of the general revival of all business industries 
throughout the country. 

It is not claimed by the committing authorities that any advantage 
has been gained either financially or otherwise by such disposition of 
these juvenile delinquents. It simply became a necessity to have them 
in some way cared tor, and there was no other means at their com- 
mand. This would clearly indicate our need for another building, 
with additional means to not only provide against contingencies of this 
kind, but to enable you to meet all demands made by reason of the con- 
tinued increase of population in the District. It would seem to be 
but a practical business transaction upon the part of the Government 
to thus concentrate rather than scatter its efforts in furthering this 
important work. Our general plant is practically complete and well 
equipped to provide for a much larger population. Expansion numeri- 
cally, under these conditions, would be in the line of a true economy 
and eventually prove a large factor in reducing the per capita cost of 
maintenance. 



236 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

The large tract of land upon which our school buildings are located 
belongs in fee simple to the United States. It is "beautiful for situa- 
tion," within a few miles of and overlooking the city, which is easily 
reached by means of both steam and electric railways. Our cultivated 
fields are already broad and invite the labor of busy hands. Many 
acres are yet waiting to be cleared and made ready for a large increase 
of the varied products which have helped to supply our tables annu- 
ally for many years. The labor required is both nealthf ul and invit- 
ing to the average boy, knowing that he will share liberally in all he 
thus helps to produce. I therefore beg to repeat, in order to further 
impress, if possible, my suggestion as to another family building, hop- 
ing that you will make an effort to secure from the next Congress an 
appropriation to cover its cost. 

W hatever may be claimed or even admitted as to the higher char- 
acter and general progress of our school work, it is always safe to 
count the cost and thus to be prepared to minimize, as far as possible, 
expenditures in each separate department. A somewhat larger outlay 
than usual has been required on account of necessary repairs, but as 
will be seen from the report of the treasurer this entire expense has 
been more than met by increased gains in our several industries and by 
him covered into the United States Treasury. The pro rata cost for 
maintenance has been about 10 per cent more than for the preceding 
fiscal year, owing to a marked advance in the price of all food and 
other supplies. Our total expenditures, however, have been kept 
within the regular appropriations made by Congress. It may be noted 
further that tne school has not appeared as a claimant in any deficiency 
bill within the past eighteen years. 

Fairly good results have followed another year of "farming for 
profit" — profit to the school in many ways, but more directly as a 
manual training for well-grown boys, who have been greatly benefited 
by what they nave learned practically in this branch of honorable 
labor, and also in a healthful development of brawn and muscle. The 
season did not favor a large crop either of cereals, vegetables, or fruit; 
enough, however, to satisfy all reasonable expectations. Much care is 
given daily to the quality and preparation or all table supplies, nor is 
the quantity restricted except by order of the physician. Tnree whole- 
some meals are provided daily to each and every boy. After many 
years of experience we still discard the "bread and water line" as a 
means of punishment for any misdemeanor. A bad boy is often hard 
to control, but a hungry bad boy increases the difficulty. Feed him 
well, as a natural antidote for his too hasty temper and boyish pug- 
nacity, and you prepare him in a large measure to accept, often 
willingly, any reasonable and just punishment he may have deserved. 

Our boys' dining room is still made an object lesson and a standard 
of cleanliness and comfort for the entire school. It is also a place for 
discipline — not rigid, but of a character to impress upon every boy 
the importance, especially to himself, of cultivating a manly and man- 
nerly behavior when at meals. An officer connected with each family 
is always present to aid in securing the best results possible. 

Manual training of some kind, with its just equivalent of recreation, 
is stiU the order for every working day. During the fall and winter 
months, however, the daily school sessions are considered of first 
importance. The senior officer of each family is also the teacher, 
having charge of both morning and afternoon sessions. As a rule 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 237 

our boys are not far advanced in their school grades when received, 
coming to us often because they have been delinquents at home. As 
their stay here is limited, we try to formulate in their interest a 
practical course of study, by which they can be advanced in the primary 
branches, commencing, it may be, with the alphabet, and from that to 
long division in written arithmetic. Short daily recitations are also 
required in geography and history. We have always, however, a num- 
ber of boys who are, when received, prepared to take positions in the 
higher grades and corresponding with those taught in the District 
public schools. Altogether, the work in our schoolrooms has been 
very satisfactory, considering the average mental capacity of those 
with whom our teachers have had to deal. 

Our manual-training school is now fairly well established, and has 
made good progress during the year. It is comparatively a new 
industry with us, but must soon become very beneficial to all boys 
naturally inclined to mechanical rather than to out-door labor of any 
kind. No one, in fact, can practice the lessons taught them in this 
department and not find them both helpful and profitable. 

There has also been recently inaugurated a modified exercise in 
military tactics, to include the u setting-up drill," with other and 
modern athletics as taught in the public schools of our city. This is 
all in the line of a correct and healthful development, and the hour thus 
spent is welcomed almost as much by the boys as one given to a favorite 
game on the ball ground. A competent military instructor has charge 
of these exercises, in which at stated intervals every boy, young and 
old, is expected to take his part. 

Much interesting information could be gif en concerning our many 
honorably discharged boys. Enough here to state that as a rule they 
are doing well, while a large number are deserving of special commen- 
dation. It would be largely in the interest of these boys, however, 
could they have some direct oversight, including limited pecuniary 
aid, when found worthy, after leaving the school. All experience 
teaches the direct advantage gained by such oversight and constant 
supervision as can be secured only through the personal efforts of a 
vigilant and competent agent employed and paid for such service. 
Our regular appropriations should be made to cover such an expendi- 
ture, the same as for other employees. 

Every legal holiday has been observed by the school, but more 
especially Independence Day and Christmas. Thanksgiving turkeys, 
sweet potatoes, and pumpkin pies were plentifully provided for all at 
the noon hour on that particular day. We try to make the most of 
these recurring festivals, and are always ready to welcome their return. 

No death has occurred, and general good health has been prevalent 
throughout the year. Special care has been taken, under the advice 
of the visiting physician, to secure the best sanitary conditions within 
and without every separate building. 

New shower baths nave been placed in the basement of each of the 
four family buildings, for use of the boys, which will certainly prove 
a blessing to them, both as to health and comfort. Our visiting physi- 
cian, Dr. Charles A. Wells, has always responded faithfully ana most 
efficiently to our medical needs. His annual report will appear on 
another page. 

Many visitors from far and near have been received and entertained 
at the school within the year. All have been welcome, as through 



238 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

such friendly visitations opportunities are given for pleasant inter- 
change of social and business experiences. While we have greatly 
enjoyed these visits personally, it may be frankly admitted that we have 
taken a still further interest in them, as they so often bring to us, or 
influence the delivery through other sources, of many choice and well- 
selected contributions to our boys' library. .These consist generally of 
books, magazines, and miscellaneous publications — all acceptable, and 
hereby thankfully acknowledged. Could the generous donors know 
how much these gifts have been enjoyed similar favors would not be 
withheld in the future. 

Religious services have been conducted by ministers of the gospel 
and otners, with but rare exceptions, on Sunday afternoons at the 
usual hour, 3 o'clock. We hereby express our continued obligations 
to all and to each, personally, who have thus aided us in these stated 
religious exercises. 

A Sunday-school session has also been held in each family school- 
room at 10.30 a. m. The "International" lesson papers still furnish 
the scriptural texts for these Sunday morning studies. 

The past school year, in many of its most essential features, has 
been but a duplicate of others that have already been given to the pub- 
lic. It is gratifying to know that our work has been safely and satis- 
factorily advancing in every separate department, and that our united 
efforts, under Providence, have not been in vain. 

Few changes have been made, as few have been required, in our 
working force, while a commendable harmony has been prevalent 
among all. To all who have been associated with me in the daily 
progress of these official duties my thanks are due, and thus freely and 
openly expressed. To these who, because of long and faithful service, 
have been advanced to their present higher and more responsible posi- 
tions I am doubly grateful. 

In closing this my nineteenth annual report permit me, gentlemen, 
members of the board of trustees, to again thank you very sincerely 
for your ever present aid and counsel through all these years of service. 

Respectfully submitted. 

George A. Shallenberger, 

Superintendent. 



report of the treasurer. 

Reform School, District of Columbia, 

Washington, D. 01, October 5, 1900. 

Sirs: I have the honor to submit with this my report in detail of 
my receipts and disbursements as treasurer of the Reform School of 
the District of Columbia for the fiscal year ended June 30 last: 

Receipts: 

P^*om appropriation for salaries $16, 452. 00 

From appropriation for support of inmates 26, 000. 00 

From Department of Justice, support 3, 102. 00 

Total 45,554.00 

Disbursements: 

For salaries, support, repairs, etc., as per statement in detail here- 
with. 45,166.34 

Leaving unexpended 387. 66 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 239 

For the construction of an assembly hall, of $9,750 appropriation, 
none was expended. 

The only account outstanding is that of the Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company for difference between the rates allowed and paid 
under existing law and those claimed by the company, amounting, to 
June 30 last, to $291.66. 

I have also received from the superintendent of the school during 
the year, being income derived from the labor of inmates, sales of farm 
products, etc., the sum of $4,174.02. In accordance with the act of 
Congress approved February 25, 1885, I have paid the same into the 
Treasury oi the United States to the credit of the United States and the 
District of Columbia in equal parts. 

Very respectfully, Samuel W. Curriden, 

Treasurer. 

The Board of Trustees. 



report of the attending physician. 

Reform School, District of Columbia, 

Washington, D. C., June 30, 1900. 

Dear Sir: I am pleased to report that the health of the school for 
the past year has been rather better than the average. We had one 
case each of diphtheria and typhoid fever; 16 cases of measles, 3 of 
which were complicated with pneumonia. It is interesting to note 
that all of these three cases were boys from the South, who had not 
become fully acclimated. There have been no deaths. 

Unremitting attention is given to matters of cleanliness and ventila- 
tion from basement to garret, and I have always had the courteous 
assistance of everyone connected with the school in carrying out my 
suggestions. 

Very respectfully, Chas. A. Wells, M. D., 

Attending Physician. 

Col. C. Clay, President. 



Exhibit M. — Report of the board of trustees of Reform School for 

Girls of the District of Columbia. 

Washington, D. C, October i, 1900. 

Sir: Presenting herewith the eighth annual report, for the year 
ending June 30, 1900, with the accompanying exhibits and reports of 
the superintendent, treasurer, and visiting physician, the board of 
trustees beg to say that the number of inmates of the school has been 
on the average greater than in any previous year of its existence. 
For a large part of the year the number has really been greater than 
the convenient capacity of the building. The conduct or the girls at 
the school and the general condition of the school have been satisfactory 
during the year. The number of girls discharged, released, or inden- 
tured, and of new girls received into the institution, with the other 
details as to the number, movement, and status of inmates, are shown 
on the first three pages of the superintendent's report, which covers 
sufficiently the topics of the work done and the training and teaching 
imparted at the school. 



240 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

It is desirable to emphasize again, as was done in last year's report, 
the number of girls between 18 and 21 years of age who have Deen 
inmates for several years. Some of these girls have been out under 
indenture and on probation once or twice, and have been returned 
because of insubordination or untidiness, or unsatisfactory or depraved 
conduct in other respects in the places which were found for them. The 
record of these girls at the school has, however, been, on the whole, 
excellent. No one of them could fairly be classed as a criminal. In 
the school they are faithful, willing, and efficient workers, and they 
are quite capable of earning their living outside by housework and 
needlework. In retaining such girls in the school, for a successful 
conduct of which a due and steady movement in and out is requisite, 
many children who might be benefited by the care and training 
are excluded. We believe that such girls as have been referred to 
would work as they ought and would behave themselves in the places 
found for them if they knew that instead of being sent back to the 
school for misbehavior under their indentures they would be sent to 
the jail or the workhouse after they reached the age of 18 years. 
Something may be done in the solution of the problem by the impo- 
sition of a more continuous industrial discipline when we are able to 
enlarge the scheme of work of the institution so as to include some 
simple forms of systematic and productive industry. 

But in addition to this remedy it is obvious that the board of 
trustees should be able, in a proper case and after due deliberation, to 
obtain a transfer to the workhouse or the jail, either by their own 
motion or order or upon an order of court, of a girl over 18 who, by 
reason of criminality or indelible incorrigibility, is no longer a proper 
subject for the school, and who may contaminate the other inmates. 
On this point we also renew our recommendation, contained in the 
report for last year, that the age limit of admission to the school 
should be reduced from 18 to 16 years; and it seems to us that the 
courts should be more careful in ascertaining the age of girls com- 
mitted, since there is almost always dispute and disagreement upon 
that subject between parents or guardians and girls themselves, and 
the misrepresentation to the court of a girl's age may work and often 
does work serious disadvantage to the school, the result being that 
girls are admitted and entered on the records as several years younger 
than they really are, and of course must be maintained at the school 
that many years longer. We think, therefore, that scrupulous care 
should be taken to have the court's action and the records based upon 
accurate facts regarding age. 

In this connection we bring to your attention the fact that on June 
5, 1900, an act was passed enlarging the powers of the board of trus- 
tees of the Boys' Reform School so as to provide, both in the way of 
release on parole for good conduct and by disciplinary regulations 
for bad conduct, for fuller authority and power of the board over the 
inmates committed to their charge. This act, either in terms or with 
such modifications as the inherent differences between the two schools 
may suggest, and as are herein suggested concerning a transfer to a 
more distinctly penal institution after the age of 18 years is reached, 
should be extended to this school, and we have to request your earnest 
and active efforts to aid us in obtaining the needed legislation from 
Congress. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL 241 

We repeat, too, the suggestion of previous reports that an amend- 
ment to the acts affecting the Girls' Reform School be enacted by 
which the approval requisite to an appointment of an officer by the 
trustees shall come from yourself rather than from the District Com- 
missioners, as the law provides at present. 

The new building is now completed so far as the structure is con- 
cerned, but the brick wall to inclose the yard, the connecting corridor 
between the two buildings, and some items of equipment remain to be 
built and supplied by the District Commissioners before the building 
will be finished and ready to be opened and occupied. The expecta- 
tion is that this work will be done so that the new building may be put 
into use not later than Januarj^ 1 next. Some moderate repairs and 
renovation of the old building will be necessary when the present 
inmates of the school are moved into the new building, in order to fit 
the old building for the reception of the similar class of white girls 
who have not heretofore been received because there was no room for 
them. No doubt the class of white girls in the District liable to be 
sent to the school is less in number than the corresponding class of 
colored girls, and the old building, having about half the capacity of 
the new one, will be adapted and used for the white girls whom we 
should receive. 

The superintendent's report shows in detail the necessary repairs 
and improvements which have been made during the year. The farm 
has been more productive than in the past and all the vegetables used 
at the school have been raised there, as well as chickens, eggs, and 
sundry stock products. 

Dr. W. W. Johnston, whose connection with and professional and 
other services to the school have been of great value, resigned from 
the board of trustees on November 22, 1899, owing to the demands of 
his private affairs, and the vacancy so caused was filled by the election 
of Mr. Fairfax Harrison. 

The superintendent of the Washington Aqueduct has granted our 
request for an allotment of Government land in the vicinity of the 
school for additional pasturage for the cattle, upon condition that we 
should fence and care for the tract assigned, and we have now a lot of 
about 14 acres, less than a half mile away from the school, up the 
Conduit road, which has been properly fenced and cleared up and 
will be useful, not only for ample pasturage, but also for additional 
planting ground for corn and potatoes. 

The board is much pleased to report a continuance of efficient and 
faithful service from the superintendent and her subordinates. To 
them is largely due the good and improving record made in the admin- 
istration and morale of the institution. With the occupation of the 
new building we are confident that further and rapid advances will be 
made, and that much will be achieved in the way of reduction of per 
capita cost and of enlarging industrial and other wholesome influences 
upon the girls. 

The estimate of appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1902, is appended hereto as Exhibit B. 

All of which is respectfully submitted for the board of trustees. 

Henry M. Hoyt, President. 
The Attorney-General. 

H. Doc. 9 16 



• 



242 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Exhibit A. — Appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1899 y 1900, 1901. 

(1) YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1899. 

Superintendent $1, 000 

Treasurer 300 

Matron 600 

Two teachers, at $480 each 960 

Overseer 720 

Engineer 480 

Night watchman 365 

Laborer 300 

Total 4,725 

For groceries, provisions, fuel, soap, oil, lamps, candles, clothing, shoes, for- 
age, horseshoeing, medicine, medical attendance, hack hire, freight, furni- 
ture, beds, bedding, sewing machines, fixtures, books, horses, stationery, 
vehicles, harness, cows, stables, sheds, fences, repairs, and other necessary 
items 6,000 

For additional building 25, 000 

Total 35,725 

(2) YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Superintendent $1 , 000 

Matron 600 

Two teachers, at $480 each 960 

Overseer 720 

Engineer 480 

Nignt watchman 365 

Laborer 300 

Treasurer 600 

Total 5,025 

For groceries, provisions, light, fuel, soap, oil, lamps, candles, clothing, shoes, 
forage, horseshoeing, medicines, medical attendance, hack hire, transpor- 
tation, labor, sewing machines, fixtures, books, stationery, horses, vehicles, 
harness, cows, pigs, fowls, sheds, fences, repairs, and other necessary items. 6, 000 
For additional building ($50,000 authorized, $25, 000 appropriated).. $25,000 

For furnishing and equipping same 2, 500 

For porch on present building 600 

28, 100 

For balance salary due treasurer from July 1, 1898, to June 30, 1899 300 

Total 39,425 

(3) YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1901. 

Superintendent $1, 000 

Treasurer , 600 

Matron 600 

Two teachers, at $480 each 960 

Four industrial teachers, at $250 each 1, 000 

Observer 720 

Engineer 480 

Assistant engineer 360 

Night watchman 365 

Laborer 300 

Total 6,385 

Fcr groceries, provisions, light, fuel, soap, oil, lamps, candles, clothing, shoes, 
forage, horseshoeing, medicines, medical attendance, hack hire, transporta- 
tion, labor, sewing machines, fixtures, books, stationery, horses, vehicles, 
harness, cows, pigs, fowls, sheds, fences, repairs, and other necessary items. . 8, 000 

For furnishing and equipping new building 5, 000 

Total 19,385 




REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



243 



Exhibit B. — Estimate of appropriations for the salaries of officers and employees and for 
maintenance of the Reform School for Girls for the fiscal year ending June 80, 1902. 

Salaries: 

Superintendent $1, 000 

Treasurer 600 

Matron 600 

Two teachers, at $480 each 960 

Four teachers of industries, at $250 each 1, 000 

Overseer 720 

Engineer 480 

Assistant engineer 360 

Night watchman 365 

Laborer 300 

Total 6,385 

Maintenance: 

For groceries, provisions, light, fuel, soap, oil, lamps, candles, clothing, 
shoes, forage, horseshoeing, medicines, medical attendance, hack hire, 
transportation, labor, sewing machines, fixtures, books, stationery 
horses, vehicles, harness, cows, pigs, fowls, sheds, fences, repairs, and 
other necessary items 11, 000 

Total 17,385 

(Note. — This estimate is based upon an average addition to the inmates of the 

E resent number thereof, say 30, for the appropriation year in question, allowing, 
owever, for a substantial reduction in per capita cost. Trie total capacity of the new 
building, however, will give ultimately an addition of over twice the present number 
of inmates. ) 

Exhibit C. — IAst showing by whom the girls were committed to the school since its opening. 



Year. 


By police 
court. 


By presi- 
dent board 
of trustees. 


By supreme 
court, Dis- 
trict of 
Columbia. 


Total. 


1893-94 


32 
9 

10 
7 

11 
1 
4 


5 
4 


1 
1 


38 


1894-96 


14 


1895-96 


10 


1896-97 


- 1 

4 
3 




12 


1897-98 




14 


1898-99 




5 


1899-1900 


1 


8 






Total 


74 


24 


3 


101 


• 





Exhibit D. — IAst of offenses for which girls were committed to the school since its opening. 



Year. 


Larceny. 


Incorri- 
gibility. 


Malicious 
mischief. 


Assault. 


Va- 
grancy. 


Horse 
stealing. 


House- 
breaking. 


Total. 


1893-94 


14 
3 
2 
2 
4 
1 
2 


16 
5 
6 
10 
10 
4 
5 


1 


1 


6 
5 
2 






38 


1894-95 


1 




14 


1895-96 








10 


1896-97 










12 


1897-98 




i 






14 


1898-99 




1 






5 


1899-1900 










1 


8 














Total 


28 


56 


1 


1 


13 


1 


1 


101 







244 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit E. — Number of inmates released from the school since its opening ', and to whom 

committed. 



Year. 



Released 
to Board 
of Chil- 
dren's 
Guard- 
ians. 



1893-94... 
1894-96... 
1895-96... 
1896-97... 
1897-98... 
1898-99... 
1899-1900. 



Total 



3 
8 
1 



12 



Released 
to parents 
oriamily. 


Ap- 
pren- 
tice. 


Sent to 
Govern- 
ment 
Insane 
Asylum. 


Indicted 
for arson 
and sent 
to peni- 
tentiary. 


Appren- 
ticed or 
released 

but re- 
turned to 

school. 


De- 
ceased. 


21 years 
of age. 


1 
2 
14 
3 
7 
4 
2 


1 
1 
4 
8 
10 
2 
6 


1 






2 


3 
2 
6 
















1 


2 
1 

2 




1 




4 
3 


1 
1 










33 


32 


1 


3 


U8 


18 


5 



Total. 



6 
13 
19 
13 
19 

6 
10 

86 



1 Not included in total. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

Reform School for Girls, 

District of Columbia, 
Washington, D. C. , June SO, 1900. 

The President and Board of Trustees, 

Reform School for Girls, District of Columbia. 

Sirs: I have the honor to present this, the eighth annual report for 
the Reform School for Girls of the District of Columbia. 

July 1, 1899, there were present in this school 27 girls; June 30, 
1900, 28 girls. The smallest number at one time was 21 girls (Decem- 
ber 1) and the largest number 30 girls (on April 17, 1900j. 

As we have room for only 27 girls and not wishing to nave two in a 
single room, we have had to use the little hospital room and punish- 
ment cell as bedrooms, and one little girl slept on a mattress on the 
floor in the superintendent's bedroom. 

We are glad to say the general conduct of the girls has been very 
good during the past year, and there has been no spirit # of mutiny 
shown in any case. Of course, there have been instances where girls 
who have misbehaved have had to be punished, but the result has been 
better behavior afterwards. 

Five new girls have been received from the courts; three were com- 
mitted by the president — former charges of the Board of Children's 
Guardians. 

One girl reached her majority May 25, and was finally released. Two 
were released to parents or guardians. Six were indentured; of these, 
one was returned for incorrigibility and two left the homes provided for 
them and were afterwards taken by the police and returned to the school. 
June 9 two girls who were working in the garden absconded, but were 
captured and returned in six hours. 

Of the girls indentured, I wish to call attention to the three who were 
returned. One was released August 2, and returned February 15 
because of impudence and bad manners. This girl was nearly 20 years 
of age and would in a few weeks have received wages, but she said it 
was so lonely out in the country and she would rather be back at the 
school. She will have to remain here till next May. This is her sec- 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 245 

ond term of probation outside, and both times returned because of her 
insolence and ugly manners. She has been at the school since January, 
1895, and has never been guilty of anything criminal, is honest, and a 
capable houseworker, besides being an excellent needlewoman. 

Another, who was admitted December, 1895, who had a bad reputa- 
tion outside, but who made an excellent record here, was apprenticed 
to a family in the city October 25, 1899. She seemed contented, but 
the people did not seem to keep her up to the standard of neatness 
maintained at the school. A sister enticed the girl away, and in a few 
days she was found in one of the city alleys in an apparently uncon- 
scious condition. She was visited by the school physician, who ordered 
her sent to Freedmen's Hospital, where she remained ten days, when 
she was returned to the school. She seemed glad to get back. This 
girl is 18 years old and is one of the best girls in the school — a quiet, 
steady, willing worker, always polite; rather frail, to be sure, but 
never sick. 

The third girl had been in the school fifteen months; made a good 
record; was placed in a house on a large farm. We heard only the best 
reports from and about her, and felt that this one at least was doing 
very well. The last of January she left her home by night, and Feb- 
ruary 22 was returned to the school pregnant. This is the first case 
of this kind we have had in four years, and in the present condition of 
the school she could not be kept entirely apart from the other girls. 
On May 13 she was taken sick, moved to Garfield Hospital, where she 
was delivered next day of a stillborn child, and after much suffering 
died that evening. Her sudden death was a great shock to our girls, 
and we believe it taught a lesson no words could ever do. The body 
was brought back to the school, and a simple but appropriate funeral 
service was held by Reverend Wiseman, and her boay was buried in 
the little graveyard, where we purchased a lot over a year ago. 

Within the past month a girl of 19, who has been in a home in the 
city since November 12, 1898, and who was paid $10 per month wages, 
has been returned. 

These are the only girls who have been returned during the year, 
but each and every one was capable of earning an honest living, and not 
one of them could be classed as a criminal, yet they are back at the 
school to remain till they reach their majority in one, two, or three 
years' time. Many of our girls have no one who would support them, 
and if they knew they had to work, or if they did wrong would have 
to be sent to the jail or workhouse, they would be more anxious to do 
well in earning an honest and respectable living. Surely the cases just 
cited should prove an argument against keeping girls nere until tney 
are 21 years of age. 

We ao not wish to shirk our responsibility, and we realize that it is 
a serious one, but we have no means at present by which to occupy the 
time and attention of the girls, except the cooking, housework, laundry, 
and sewing, and day school; and the law says these girls must remain 
here until ref ormea or until they reach the age of 21 years, and no girl 
is ever dismissed on probation until she has shown marked improve- 
ment in her ways, yet nearly one-third of those dismissed are returned. 

I would respectfully suggest that for these girls between 18 and 21 
years of age who have been released on probation and returned by 
reason of misconduct, some branch of industry — laundry work, fine 
sewing, paper box, or mattress making — be adopted by which they 



246 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



would earn at least part of their support, and that this class be kept 
apart from the other inmates of the school. The new building is nearly 
completed, and I believe that the time has now come when such a part 
of the work could be successfully begun and carried forward. 

We have had no case of illness during the year. Each new girl 
received has been vaccinated. Dr. Brightwell, dentist, has visited the 
school several times, examining the teeth of each girl and filling or 
extracting as necessary. So we have had no suffering from toothache. 

The work of the school has gone steadily forward, each officer and 
employee doing her or his best to advance the standard of work done 
in all departments and in working harmoniously together. 

Good work has been done in the laundry, and an average of 90 pieces 
for the officers and 400 for the girls has been laundered each week. 

In the kitchen plain cooking of meats and vegetables, bread making, 
preserving fruits and pickles, and caring for milk and making butter 
are taught by the matron; also waiting on table, dishwashing, and 
cleaning. 

Through the kindness of Mrs. Baxter, of the bouse committee, a 
teacher was sent out each week to teach the girls knitting, and nearly 
every one has shown much interest in learning how to knit wash rags, 
stockings, mittens, plain and fancy slippers, etc. A list of knit arti- 
cles is appended. 

The knitting was of great service in furnishing employment and 
preserving order. During the long winter evenings we spent many 
pleasant hours, the girls with their knitting, and one of the teachers 
or a girl reading aloud some interesting book or story. The same plan 
worked well in the sewing room, and many girls enjoyed good books 
by hearing them read who either would not or could not read for 
themselves. 

In the sewing room the girls are taught the different kinds of hand 
sewing — hemming, darning, buttonholes, hemstitching, etc. — and later 
how to use a machine. A list of articles made is given below: 



List of work done in sewing room. 



Dresses 46 

Chemises 49 

Drawers 51 

Gowns 37 

White aprons 30 

Gingham aprons 5 

Waists.... 39 

Table covers 15 



Skirts 28 

Corset waists 15 

Towels 24 

Flannel skirts 24 

Doylies 15 

Napkins ^ 28 

Spreads 12 



Work done in knitting class. 



Wash cloths 60 

Mittens, pairs 31 

Slippers, pairs 9 



Hoods 24 

Stockings, pairs 2 



Five days in each week we have day school in the afternoon, in which 
reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, history and geography, and 
letter writing are taught. The majority of our girls come to us not 
knowing even their letters sometimes, but usually in the first or sec- 
ond grade. Very few are as far advanced as the fourth or fifth grades. 

During the season the girls who work well in the house are allowed 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 247 

to assist with the garden work, and it is gratifying to know the interest 
taken and the labor bestowed to keep the weeds down and to help the 
vegetables and fruit to grow, and they are proud to bring the good 
things in. 

With the exception of half an hour after breakfast and dinner, the 
girls are kept busy all day, but after supper, at 6 p. m., they have 
recreation for an hour and a half. In pleasant weather this time is 
spent in the yard, where each one has a little flower bed, or in games. 
The rustic summerhouse, built last year, has been a great comfort. 

We had a nice Christmas tree and entertainment; besides this we 
have had several concerts or entertainments, and as special rewards 
for good behavior several trips to the Zoological Park; one to Great 
Falls, chestnutting; several picnics in Virginia, etc. Frequently good 
girls accompany the superintendent and other officers on trips to town 
or market, and we take great pride in the fact that our girls have 
proved trustworthy on these occasions. Some people might say these 
girls have too good a time and too much liberty. We answer, we 
believe in work for everybody, but we also believe in play of the right 
sort after work has been finished, and though our girls are often noisy 
over a game of football or croquet, the order in the house is better 
for having had the vent. 

We have a short religious service morning and evening, consisting 
of songs, prayer, memory verses, or the bunday-school lesson, and 
the best token that these services are of value is that they are missed 
when a girl goes away. 

We have had three changes in our staff during the year. John G. 
Shaeffer, who had been overseer since March, 1896, resigned last 
December, and Christian Nielsen was appointed in his place. The 
engineer was changed in March. In May, Mrs. Barry, matron, 
resigned, in order to be constantly with her sick sister, who died in a 
few weeks, and Miss Neale was appointed in her place. 

We are looking forward to occupying the new building with great 
interest, and feel confident that with the increased capacity which it 
will afford the cost per capita will be very materially reduced. 

Some time since, the use as pasture of a piece of ground belonging 
to the Washington Aqueduct was granted to us on condition that we 
fence it properly. This will be done at once, and will be a great com- 
fort, as we have never had pasture sufficient for the cows, and none at 
all for the three horses. 

We have not made many repairs or improvements during the year, 
as the building we now occupy needs many things to be done before 
we take the new girls in, and after we move into the new building this 
can be better accomplished while this one is empty. All walls need 
pointing up and painting; woodwork needs painting, and floors need 
repairing. There is considerable plumbing to be done in order to put 
this building in the condition we would like to see it in. 

The few improvements made are as follows: Electric lights in the 
summerhouse, put in by our engineer. The shed built last summer 
inclosed on the fourth side and a floor put in. The pump house has 
been painted. Our ice house has been reconstructed and enlarged. 

Our supplies of dry goods, shoes, blankets, bedding, etc., are in good 
condition and amount; also stock, farm implements, etc. 

We raised all vegetables used during the past year and slaughtered 
for use 15 hogs, 50 chickens, 4 calves. 



248 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

During the year we had 500 dozen eggs, besides all the milk we 
needed for the whole family. 

We return grateful acknowledgment for the following favors and 
donations to the school: 

To the Commissioners of the District of Columbia and Fire Chief 
Parish for two 2-horse wagon loads of manure each week, from Station 
5 and Truck B. This is of value, as our land is very poor in quality. 

To Major Sylvester and his assistants for prompt work in capturing 
girls who have absconded from the school or from homes provided for 
them; also in looking up the records and characters of persons wish- 
ing to take our girls; also their relatives. 

To Miss Briscoe and the faithful Christian workers from the dif- 
ferent churches in the city who come each Sunday afternoon to hold 
religious services. It is not always easy for them to get here, 4 miles 
from town, especially during the winter, and sometimes irregularity 
in the electric-car service. 

These services are much enjoyed, and, we believe, do much to help 
make our girls better, both now and in time to come. 

To Mrs. Baxter, for many things besides her duties as a trustee. She 
has liberally donated books, songs, dolls, goods, etc., and in April she 
presented the school with a new organ, to the great delight of the 
girls; also a croquet set. 

To members of the board, for money, books, gifts, dress patterns, 
games, workbaskets, football, etc., at Christmas time, given to the 
school. 

Very respectfully yours, Amy Jean Rule, 

Superintendent. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Washington, D. C, October i, 1900. 
The Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to submit herewith report, in detail, of my receipts 
and disbursements as treasurer of the Reform School for Girls, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Receipts: 

July 13, 1899 $2,756.25 

October24, 1899 2,756.25 

January 16, 1900 2,756.25 

April 18, 1900 2,756.25 

$11,025.00 

Disbursements: 

For salaries, as per statement 5,025.00 

For support, as per statement 5, 995. 60 

11, 020. 60 

Balance unexpended 4. 40 

Expenditures for salaries: 

Payrolls 4,425.00 

Treasurer's salary 600. 00 

5, 025. 00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 249 

Statement showing amounts expended for provisions, clothing , fuel, medical attendance, etc., 

separately. 

Provisions: 

Meats $288.97 

Butter 64.67 

Groceries 851. 01 

Vegetables 53.70 

$1, 258. 35 

Clothing: 

Dry goods 942.32 

Shoes 331.20 

1,273.52 

Medical attendance 65. 90 

House furnishings 32. 61 

Fuel, coal 871.13 

School expenses, stationery 29. 45 

Stable expenses: 

Feed 482.91 

Horseshoeing 45. 83 

Hay and straw 112. 83 

Repairing farm implements 15. 50 " 

Repairing carriage and harness 38. 55 

695. 62 

Building repairs: 

Repairing building 213. 50 

Remodeling and enlarging ice house 759. 00 

972. 50 

Necessary items: 

Insurance 112. 60 

Oils, naints, etc 105. 89 

Illuminating building 116. 97 

Hardware 145.23 

Needles 2.42 

Plumbing 5. 49 

Engine and boiler materials and repairs 120. 59 

Printing 72.25 

Labor 47.65 

Engraving plate of building 3. 00 

Plants and seeds 35. 79 

Car tickets 2. 75 

Funeral expenses 22. 50 

Express cost 3. 39 

796. 52 



Total 5,995.60 

Respectfully submitted. 

Anna F. Dean, Treasurer. 



physician's report. 



Washington, D. C, August 11, 1900. 
The Board of Trustees: 

It gives me pleasure to be able to report to you the continued good 
health of the inmates of the school. 

A recent inspection of the premises showed them to be in excellent 
sanitary condition; and, further, the personal hygiene of each girl is 
evidently most carefully and intelligently looked after by the superin- 
tendent, Miss Rule. 

Very respectfully, F. P. Vale. 



250 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Exhibit N. — Report of the warden of the United States jail in the 

District of Columbia. 

United States Jail, 
Washington, D. C., October 31, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith my annual report of this 
jail for the year ending October 31, 1900, and to call attention to the 
subjoined report of the physician to the jail, and that of the clerk. 

In reporting the sanitary condition of the jail, the health of the 
inmates, deaths, etc., I take pleasure in referring you to the report of 
Dr. D. K. Shute, physician to the jail. I also refer you to tabulated 
statement showing the number of prisoners sentenced to jail for long 
terms, and I still oelieve that the law should be so changed that such 
prisoners could be sent to the penitentiary, so that they might have 
work to perform, believing that it would be better for their well-being 
and physical condition. 

FINANCIAL. 

Notwithstanding the prevailing high prices for supplies for the jail 
during the present year, we believe the economy practiced will over- 
come the prevailing high prices so that we may be able to keep within 
the appropriation for the same. During the past year the daily cost 
per capita for food for prisoners was 9 cents. During the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1900, the daily per capita cost, including subsistence, 
repairs, forage, live stock, sanitary, advertising and printing, clothing, 
tobacco, bedding, stationery, convict stationery, fuel, lignt, officers' 
salaries, etc., was 34£ cents, and the annual per capita cost was $127.29. 
It is almost without exception the rule that when a prisoner remains 
in jail for any length of time he goes away weighing more than when 
he came in. 

During the past two years small sums of money have come into my 
hands from time to time from the sale of old barrels and bones, aggre- 

iting the sum of $100, which sum I have turned over to the United 
itates Treasurer, taking his receipt for same. 

VISITING. 

Under the rules of my predecessor visiting was allowed in the jail 
to the extent that, in my judgment, it became a system of loafing with 
the prisoners. It will be noticed by former reports that visitors to 
the number of 17,500 were permitted to visit the jail during the year. 
There have been during this year 3,029 prisoners visited and 2,539 
visitors to see prisoners. The rule now is that persons can visit pris- 
oners in the jail provided they do so upon a matter of business of some 
sort. The management reserves the right to judge whether the bus- 
iness is of any importance to the prisoner or to the visitor. The man- 
agement only requires the visitor to state the nature of the business, 
and not the particulars. We are confident that since this rule has 
been enforced, the prisoners are more obedient, and less punishment 
of prisoners has been necessary. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

I wish to inform the Department that religious services are being 
conducted in the jail on each Sabbath by three distinct denominations, 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 251 

the Catholic denomination holding services during the morning hours, 
the Colored Baptist Association nolding services from 12 m. until 1 
p. m., and the Wesley Chapel Association holding services from 3 until 
4 p. m. We believe these services are productive of good results, and 
in this connection we desire to thank all those who have taken such 
deep interest in the spiritual welfare of those who are confined in the 
jail, and to invite a continuance of these services. 

CONCLUSION. 

With rare exceptions all subordinate officers have performed their 
several duties faithfully and well. I am under deep obligations to the 
chief justice and the associate justices of the supreme court of the 
District of Columbia for exceedingly kind treatment; and also Gen. 
Thomas H. Anderson, United States attorney for the District of 
Columbia, and officers connected with his office, for most respectful 
treatment; and I desire to thank the officers of the Department of Jus- 
tice for uniform courtesies shown me. 
Very respectfully, 

James H. Harris, 
Warden United States Jail, District of Columbia. 

The Attorney-General, 

Department of Justice, Washington-, D. O. 



physician's report. 

United States Jail, 
Washington, D. C, October SI, 1900. 

Dear Sir: I respectfully submit my report for the year ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1900, on trie medical conduct of the jail. 

There were 3 deaths by legal hangings and 1 death due to pulmo- 
nary tuberculosis. One prisoner had a severe attack of erysipelas, 
from which he recovered. Large numbers of prisoners came to the 
jail with quite severe forms of venereal diseases, the majority of whom 
are cured and all greatly relieved. There were reports on the physi- 
cal condition of 31 of the prisoners, and the mental condition of 16 of 
the prisoners was reported upon. Seven prisoners were removed to 
the Government Hospital for Insane on account of insanity. Three 
prisoners were removed to a hospital for surgical operation on account 
of the severity of the cases and lack of facilities for operating in the 
jail. The operations were entirely successful. Several operations 
of minor character were performed in the jail with successful results. 
Many other prisoners were treated for minor complaints. 

I am pleased to report that the malarial fever among the officers and 
prisoners of the jail during the past year has not been nearly so severe 
as during preceding years, although a great many cases occurred in the 
jail. It is probable that this is due, to a large extent, to the fact that 
screens have been put in all the lower portions of the windows through- 
out the jail, thereby excluding large numbers of mosquitos, which 
hitherto have been the carriers of malaria. Since there has been so 
great a reduction in the malarial fever, due to this simple procedure, 



252 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



I would suggest that it would be wise, some time before next spring, 
to put screens in the upper part of the windows also, thus making the 
exclusion of mosquitos and flies still more effective, and thus tending 
to promote the health and welfare of officers and prisoners alike. 

It gives me pleasure to report that under the unremitting care and 
diligence of the warden the cleanliness and sanitary condition of the 
jail throughout the year have been in exceedingly first-class condition. 
The greatest care has been exercised in cleansing the cells and corri- 
dors Dy whitewashing them, and other procedures. There can be no 
doubt that the good health of a large majority of the prisoners and 
officers while in the jail is due to the thorough care that has been exer- 
cised in supervising the sanitary condition of the jail. 
Very respectfully, 

D. K. Shute, M. D. , 
Physician to the United States Jail, District of Columbia. 

Capt. James H. Harris, 

Warden United States Jail, District of Columbia. 



Persons committed to jail, and offenses charged against them, during the year ending October 

81, 1900. 



Offense. 



Assault to ravish and carnally know. 

Abandoning infant child 

Attempt at rape 

Assault to rape 

Attempt at highway robbery 

Assault and battery 

Assault 

Assault to kill 

Affray 

Adultery 

Arson 



Abandoning child 

Attempt at arson 

Attempt at larceny 

Attempt at larceny from United States 

Bench warrant 

Bigamy 

Con tempt of court 

Carrying concealed weapons 

Carrying concealed weapons (second offense) 

Carnal knowledge 

Depredation on property 

Depredation on property (second offense) 

Destroying private property 

Default of alimony 

Embezzlement 

False pretenses 

Fornication 

Forgery 

Grand larceny 

Housebreaking 

Housebreaking with intent to rape 

Highway robbery 

Having in possession an obscene picture 

Incorrigibility 

Incest 

Indecent exposure 

Keeping a disorderly house 

Keeping an unlicensed bar 

Keeping an unlicensed bar (second offense).. 

Keeping a bawdyhouse 

Keeping an unlicensed dog 

Larceny from the person 

Larceny from the United States 

Libel 



White 
male. 



1 
l 



Colored 
male. 



Murder 

Money larceny 



122 

62 

11 

8 

6 

2 



1 

1 

1 

17 



32 
*4 



1 
1 

13 
39 
4 
4 
49 
32 



6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 



1 
2 
12 
3 
2 
8 
4 



2 

4 

7 

730 

247 

38 

47 

12 

2 



9 
4 
3 
123 
1 
3 

26 
1 



6 
10 
43 

4 
38 
77 

1 

7 



12 

20 

1 

1 

2 

31 



6 
30 



White 
female. 



Colored 
female. 



3 
1 



1 
6 



1 
1 



142 
34 
1 
5 
9 
1 
3 



1 
5 



1 
44 



8 
1 



17 
6 



6 
8 



Total. 



1 

1 

3 

4 

7 

997 

344 

60 

60 

30 

5 

S 

1 

4 

1 

27 

4 

4 

160 

1 

7 

26 

1 

1 

1 

18 

51 

97 

8 

97 

110 

1 

13 

1 

5 

2 

1 

43 

26 

1 

8 

5 

47 

3 

2 

14 

40 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEYS-GENERAL. 



253 



Persons committed to jail, and offenses charged against them, during the year ending October 

SI, 1900— Continued. 



Offense. 



Malicious mischief 

Malicious trespass 

Manslaughter 

Petit larceny 

Petit larceny (second offense) 

Perjury 

Practicing medicine without license. 
Kape 



Receiving stolen property 

Receiving stolen money 

Resisting Metropolitan police officer 

Refusing to pay hack hire 

Selling liquor without a license 

Seduction 

Threats 

Threats, assault, and larceny 

United States witness 

Violating the policy law 

Violating the game law 

Violating the gaming law 

Violating water and sewer law 

Violating pension law 

Violating fish law 

Violating section 5392, Revised Statutes United 

States 

Violating section 6480, Revised Statutes United 

States 

Violating section 5456, Revised Statutes United 

States '. 

Total 



Total number in jail during the year 



White 
male. 



2 
1 
1 
201 
4 



1 

7 



22 



10 
1 



Colored 
male. 



1 '. 

in 



787 
26 
4 
2 
6 
3 
1 
1 



1 
41 

1 

2 
42 

1 
19 



2 
2 



White 
female. 



2,500 



17 



42 



Colored 
female. 



Total. 



140 
3 
1 



1 
1 



1 
1 



444 



2 

3 

1 

1,145 

33 
5 
2 
7 

10 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

64 
1 
3 

44 
1 

30 
2 
2 
2 

3 

1 

1 
3.703 



4,037 



Persons sentenced to jail, for the offenses named, during the year ending October 81, 1900. 



Offense. 



Assault and battery 

Assault 

Affray 

Attempt at larceny 

Attempt at larceny from United States 

Abandoning infant child 

Contempt of court 

Carrying concealed weapons 

Depredation on property 

Embezzlement 

Fornication 

Housebreaking 

Keeping an unlicensed dog 

Keeping an unlicensed bar 

Keeping a bawdy house 

Keeping a disorderly house 

Label 



Larceny from the person 

Malicious trespass 

Petit larceny 

Practicing medicine without license 

Receiving stolen property 

Selling liquor without license 

Threats 

Violating the policy law 

Violating the gaming law 

Violating the game law 

Violating the water and sewer law 

Violating the fish law 

Violating the postal law 

Violating section 5459, Revised Statutes United States. 

Total 



White 
male. 



106 
...... 



27 



2 
4 
3 
2 



1 
4 
1 
1 



116 
..... 



18 

"io 

.... 



Colored 
male. 



308 



685 
1 

40 
2 



3 

93 
13 

1 
31 

9 

2 



9 



2 
1 
488 
1 
3 



35 

24 

16 

1 



2 
1 



1,463 



White 
female. 



5 

"i" 



9 

"i 



20 



Colored 
female. 



136 

"5' 



1 
1 
4 



32 



1 

2 

10 



93 



1 

1 



288 



Total. 



930 
1 

53 

2 

1 

1 

4 

124 

13 

3 

72 

12 

5 

1 

3 

24 

1 

3 

1 

706 

1 

4 

1 

54 
25 
26 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 

2,079 



254 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Prisoners sent to the penitentiary during the year ending October 81, 1900. 



Offense. 



Assault to rape 
Assault to kill. 



Adultery 

Bigamy 

Carnal knowledge 

Carrying concealed weapons (second offense) 

Embezzlement 

Embezzlement and false pretenses 

False pretenses 

Forgery 

Grand larceny 

Grand larceny and petit larceny (second offense) 

Housebreaking 

Housebreaking and assault to kill 

Housebreaking and larceny 

Highway robbery 

Larceny from United States 

Larceny from the person 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Petit larceny (second offense) 

Petit larceny (second offense) and larceny from the 

person 

Robbery 

Rai 



ipe 
ola 



Violation section 5392,Revised Statutes United States. 



Total 



White 
male. 



1 
2 
1 



4 
2 

8 
1 
4 



Colored 
male. 



1 
1 
1 
3 



32 



1 
8 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
4 
9 



24 
1 
3 
1 
2 

12 
4 
1 

24 

1 

2 

10 

2 



126 



White 
female. 



Colored 
female. 



6 



2 
1 



11 



Total. 



2 

10 
5 
3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
7 
6 

23 
1 

28 
1 
8 
2 
2 

14 
5 
4 

28 

1 

2 

10 

2 



168 



Prisoners committed and released during the year, with daily average, etc. 

Number in jail: 

November 1, 1899 334 

At close of year ending October 31, 1900 — 

White males 52 

White females 5 

Colored males 267 

Colored females 49 

373 

Received during the year 3, 703 

Discharged during the year 3, 330 

Largest number in any one day 406 

Smallest number in any one day 300 

Average daily number for 1900 357^ 

Average daily number for 1899 317j|$ 

Number of prisoners removed: 

To the West Virginia State penitentiary 168 

To the Government Hospital for Insane 7 

To the Reform School, District of Columbia 4 

To the workhouse, District of Columbia 265 

To the penitentiary, for life 4 

Number of prisoners — 

Pardoned by the President 3 

Commuted by the President 3 

Released under the poor-convict act 1 

Deaths during the year: 

By execution 3 

Due to natural causes 1 

Persons committed during the year under the age of 17: 

White males 21 

White females „ 1 

Colored males 188 

Colored females 22 

232 

Number of visitors to see prisoners during the year 2, 539 

Number of prisoners visited during the year 3, 029 

Number of visitors to see the jail 439 

Number of visitors to conduct religious services 2,879 



BEPOET OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



255 



Long sentences imposed during the year ending October 31, 1900. 



Term of sentence. 



11 months and 29 days. 

360 days 

364 days 

390 days 

394 days 

420 days 

439 days 

454 days 

484 days 

644 days 

570 days 

720 days 

724 days 



Total 



White 
male. 



3 
2 



1 
i" 



Colored 
male. 


White 
female. 


Colored 
female. 


Total. 


3 






3 


7 




4 
4 


14 


20 




26 


1 






1 








1 








1 
















1 








5 












1 


i 




1 


| 










42 




8 


57 









Long sentences {now being served) imposed prior to November 1, 1899, 



Term of sentence. 


White 
male. 


Colored 
male. 


White 
female. 


Colored 
female. 


Total. 


720 days 


1 


1 
1 
2 
1 






2 


900 days 


\ 


1 


908 days 




\ 


2 


1,080 days '. 




i 


1 












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1 


5 


i 


6 




1 * 





^ Exhibit O. — Report of the Architect of the Capitol. 

Architect's Office, United States Capitol, 

Washington, D. C. , September 29, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit the following in relation to repairs 
to court-house, District of Columbia, for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1900: 

General repairs have been made to this building during the past 
year consisting of work on the roof and a considerable amount of 
painting and touching up in the various rooms; papering the rooms of 
the court of appeals and the private room attached thereto; papering 
the district attorney's room; repairing the heating and ventilating 
apparatus and plumbing throughout the building. 

Many doors and windows have been repaired. Standpipes with 
water-supply connections and suitable amount of hose for each floor 
have been installed for use in case of fire. 

The general condition of the court-house, owing to the insufficient 
appropriations for its care, led this office to recommend and urge the 
appropriation of $4,348.50, to be made immediately available, for the 
correction of the deficiencies in ventilation of the court-house rooms, 
painting corridors and rooms, and for the necessary care and painting 
of the exterior portion of the old structures. This recommendation 
resulted in an appropriation for the immediate needs of the court- 
house, and at the date of this report arrangements have been made to 
carry on the work above mentioned, some of which is now under way. 

A detailed report will be submitted with my next annual report. I 
would moat earnestly recommend that an appropriation of $3,000 be 



256 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



made for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1902, to continue the repairs 
of the court-house in a suitable and substantial manner. 
Very respectfully submitted. 

Elliott Woods, 

Architect United States Capitol. 

The Attorney-General of the United States. 



Exhibit P. — Report of the attorney in charge of pardons. 

Washington, D. C, July i, 1900. 

Sir: I respectfully submit the following report of the work of this 
office during the year ending June 30, 1900: 

During the year 728 pardon cases were acted upon, which arose as 
follows: 

Applications filed during year 660 

Cases pending June 30, 1899 51 

Cases reopened from former years 17 

728 

These cases have been disposed of as follows: 

Reported adversely by district attorneys and judges and not considered by the 

President 332 

Acted upon by the President 351 

Pending June 30, 1900 45 

728 

Of the 351 cases acted upon by the President he denied 131 and 
exercised Executive clemency in 220. The following table shows the 
classes of cases in which the President's action was favorable and the 
nature and extent of such action: 



Offense. 


Par- 
doned. 


Pardoned 

condi- 
tionally. 


Pardoned 

to restore 

civil 

rights. 


Sen- 
tences 

com- 
muted. 


Fines 
remitted. 


Forfeited 
recogni- 
zances 
remitted. 


Re- 
prieved. 


Total 
acts of 
clem- 
ency. 


Violation of national 
banking laws 


2 




3 
2 
5 

1 


7 

4 

18 

8 
1 

1 
9 








12 


Violation" of pension 
laws 










6 


Violation of internal- 
revenue laws 


16 

2 
5 




6 






45 


Introducing and selling 
liquor in Indian Ter- 
ritory 


1 






12 


Selling liquor to Indians 
Buying cattle from In- 
dians 


1 






7 










1 


Violation of postal laws. 1 6 
Post-office robbery 2 




7 
1 


2 






24 








3 


Mail robberv 


1 

5 
1 
9 

1 
6 
1 




3 
3 








4 


Counterfeiting 




7 
1 
5 








15 


Smufiffiflinfir 










2 


Larcenv 




3 








17 


Larceny of property of 
United States 










1 


Larceny of horses 

Larceny of cattle 

Murder 






4 
2 
4 








10 












3 










4 


8 


Manslaughter 


1 










1 


Assault with intent to 
kill 




2 










2 


Assaulting and resist- 
ing a United States 
officer 


1 












1 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



257 



Offense. 


Par- 
doned. 


Pardoned 
condi- 
tionally. 


Pardoned 

to restore 

civil 

rights. 


Sen- 
tences 

com- 
muted. 


Fines 
remitted. 


Forfeited 
recogni- 
zances 
remitted. 


Re- 
prieved. 


Total 
. acts of 
clem- 
ency. 


Conspiracy to injure a 
United States officer . . 


• 














1 


Robbery 


1* 
1 
1 












2 


Burarlarv 




1 








2 


Housebreaking 












2 


Arson 




1 
3 
1 
1 








1 


Perjury 


1 












5 


Forsrerv 










1 


Embezzlement 














2 


Obtaining money under 
false pretenses 












1 


Conspiracy to defraud | 
the United States 




1 








1 


Conspiracy to utter false 
certificates of natural- 
ization 








2 






2 


Desertion United States 
Army 






1 








1 


Desertion United States 
Navy 


17 
1 


4 










21 


Violation of articles for 
the government of 
the Navy 












1 


Default and forfeiture 
of bail bond 










3 




3 












• 






Total 


81 


5 


43 


73 


11 


3 


4 


220 




i 







Of the 81 unconditional pardons granted 32 were granted solely on 
account of the ill health of the applicants. 

The pardons for desertion from the Navy were granted upon the 
recommendations of the Secretar}^ of the Navy. 

Applications for pardon to restore civil rights are not considered 
until after the applicants have complied with the sentences of the court. 
In each of the 43 cases where pardons were granted to restore civil 
rights a considerable period had elapsed after the applicant had been 
discharged from prison, or had otherwise complied with the sentence 
of the court, and before his application was considered, and his good 
conduct was certified to by the people among whom he had lived after 
his release from prison. 

The statement immediately following shows the names of all per- 
sons convicted in the United States courts who were the recipients of 
Executive clemency during the fiscal year. This statement snows the 
districts where the applicants were tried, when and of what offenses 
convicted, the recommendations made by the Attorney-General, the 
nature of the action of the President, and the dates of such action. 
Respectfully, 

James S. Easbt-Smith, 

Pardon Attorney. 

The Attorney-General. 

H. Doc. 9 17 



258 



REPORT OK THE ATTOUXEY GENERAL. 






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312 REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Exhibit Q. — Report of the special attorney for the Mission Indians. 

Riverside, Cal. , November 8, 1900. 
Hon. John W. Griggs, 

Attorney- General, Washington, D. C. 

Pursuant to your request of date September 28, 1900, I submit the 
following report of matters under my charge as special attorney of 
the Mission Indians of southern California: 

I. 

As shown by my last report, I have in charge a suit pending between 
the Roman Catholic bishop of Monterey, a corporation sole, as plaintiff, 
v. Salomon Cota and others, defendants. This action is brought by 
the bishop of Monterey for the purpose of determining and establish- 
ing, as between the plaintiff and the band or village of Mission Indians 
known as the Santa Ynez Indians, the rights of the respective parties 
in two parcels of land, containing in all 11,500 acres and being por- 
tions of the Canada de los Pinos, or College Rancho, situated in the 
county of Santa Barbara and State of California. 

At the date of my last report I confidently expected that this matter 
would have been disposed of long prior to this date. As shown by my 
last report, there were a number of Indians at that date not yet served 
with summons by the plaintiff in the case, and two or three of the 
individual Indians made parties defendant had appeared in the action 
and set up separate and individual claims as against the bishop. 
Plaintiff's attorneys advised me that these defenses made by individ- 
uals could be disposed of in a summary way, by motion, and their 
answers stricken out. It seems, however, that they were not able to 
so dispose of these defendants, but have been compelled to submit the 
issues made to the court for consideration, and, as I am advised, this 
has not yet been done. 

I have had frequent correspondence with counsel representing the 
bishop and have been urging them to prosecute the matter as rapidly 
as possible to the end that we may have the title of the Indians settled 
and adjusted and a decree entered in accordance with the stipulation 
and agreement heretofore made between the bishop and the Indian 
agent. The matters, however, which have caused the delay are not 
under my control, and I am compelled to await the action of the attor- 
neys of the plaintiff. 

II. 

At the date of my last report I had under consideration the matter 
of the rights of the Indians of the Agua Caliente Reservation at Palm 
Springs to the use of water for domestic and irrigation purposes in a 
certain ditch and other water sources claimed by the Palm Springs 
Water Company, a corporation. I continued my correspondence with 
the president of the Palm Springs Water Company subsequent to my 
last report, and later, Mr. M. F. Holland, as special agent of the In- 
dian Department, called on me for information in regard to the con- 
troversy between the Palm Springs Water Company and the Indians, 
and I furnished him all the data and information I could with 
reference to the controversy, and also arranged with him, in case a 
conference was brought about between himself and the president of 
the water company, to meet, at Los Angeles with them for the purpose 
of considering the difficulties and attempting to arrive at a satisfac- 
tory conclusion. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 313 

On the 9th day of August, 1900, I was notified by Mr. Holland that 
a meeting had been arranged at Los Angeles to be held in the office 
of the district attorney, Mr. F. P. Flint, and I attended and had a 
conference with Mr. H. J. McCallum, president of the Palm Springs 
Water Company, Mr. Holland, and Mr. Flint together, and went over 
the facts of the situation as fully as it was known to us after my for- 
mer investigations, and left the matter for further consideration 
between Mr. Holland and the president of the Palm Springs Water 
Company, who further advised me subsequently that he had reported 
the result of his conference to the Department, but I have not been 
advised further as to what the outcome of the investigation and con- 
ference was. 

I can only say that in view of the fact that our last three seasons 
have been so dry, and water sources have failed so materially in this 
section, that the Palm Springs Water Company, at the date of the 
controversy, and from personal examination made by Mr. Holland, 
seem to have very little water for use for any purposes, and were dis- 
puting very little water to which on behalf of the Indians we could 
make any substantial claim. 

III. 

Subsequent to my last report, and on or about the 10th day of May, 
1900, I was advised by the Indian agent, Dr. L. A. Wright, that the 
rights of the Indians on the La Jolla Reservation in San Diego County 
were being violated in that their highway leading from the reservation 
to their trading village was being obstructed and interfered with by 
a property owner, one Mendenhall, owning land entirely sur- 
rounded by lands of the reservation, and I was requested by the agent 
to visit San Diego, the county seat of said county, for the purpose of 
considering legal questions relating to the rights of the Indians with 
the district attorney of San Diego County, to the end that he might 
give the board of supervisors of said county advice with reference to 
the rights of the Indians. I accompanied the Indian agent to San 
Diego, had a conference with the district attorney with reference to 
legal questions involved, and we agreed as to the matter of legal 
rights, and the controversy was left in the hands of the Indian agent 
and the property holder for the purpose of adjustment and settlement 
according to our determination of these legal questions. 

That on the 20th day of November, 1900, I was also advised by the 
Indian agent to visit the Temecula Indian Reservation for the pur- 
pose of investigating a difficulty arising between the Indians and one 
Jacob Ludy, owning lands adjoining the reservation, and who, it was 
claimed, was so constructing his fences as to obstruct the highways 
formerly used by the Indians and leading from their reservation to 
the village of Temecula. 

I spent some days in making this visit, one of the days being spent 
at the reservation examining the condition of affairs and ascertain- 
ing the facts relative to the ancient highways used by the Indians for 
the purpose of reaching the village. I fully advised myself as to the 
records in San Deigo and Riverside counties bearing upon the ques- 
tion, and after making this investigation, and at a later date, I again 
visited the reservation and had a conference with Mr. Jacob Ludy, 
the party obstructing their highways with fences, and after submit- 
ting the matter to him and calling his attention to the tcvj& ^fe^ss^ss^ 



314 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

lie removed his fences and opened the highways satisfactorily to the 
Indians and the Indian agent, I agreeing to take the necessary steps 
before the board of supervisors of Riverside County to have the road 
legally established as a public highway and an old road abandoned 
which he desired to and had closed by the construction of his 
improvements. 

V. 

That on or about the 14th day of September, 1900, the Indian agent 
at San Jacinto, Dr. Wright, requested me to make a visit to the agency 
for the purpose of investigating and advising him with reference to 
the death of one of the Mission Indians, which had occurred in the 
county of San Diego some time before, and about which the Indians 
in the vicinity of La Jolla and Rincon reservations were very greatly 
excited and disturbed, several committees of Indians having visited 
the agency for the purpose of submitting facts to the Indian agent, 
claiming that the Indian found dead had met with a violent death, 
and believing that some prosecution should be instituted for the pur- 
pose of bringing the offenders to justice, and further claiming that 
the authorities of San Diego County had taken no steps to investigate 
the facts. That the deceased Indian, one Ohoa, had been buried 
without investigation by the coroner or otherwise. 

I went to San Jacinto, visited the agency, examined all the state- 
ments which had been made and taken in writing by the agent, and 
examined all the documents and correspondence of friends of the 
Indians had with the agent, to the end that the Indians might be sat- 
isfied as to the condition of affairs, and made a written report to the 
agent that he might carry with him and submit to the captain of the 
Indians on the reservation, to the effect that I did not believe, from 
all the statements made, and the evidence which had been produced 
up to that time, there was any reasonable ground for a criminal pros- 
ecution against anyone, and that the evidence as submitted would not 
be sufficient to secure a conviction of murder against any person or 
persons suspicioned of the offense, and that, in my judgment, the offi- 
cials of San Diego County would be fully justified in refusing to insti- 
tute proceedings for that purpose; and for the use of the Indian agent 
among the Indians I set out very fully my reasons, so that he might 
make full explanation to the captain and other Indians, and satisfy 
them that all had been done under the circumstances which could be 
done legally. 

VI. 

During the year past my letter book shows correspondence covering 
175 pages, relating to matters pertaining to the welfare of the Indians, 
all of which correspondence I keep separate. These letters are in 
answer to inquiries of parties made in behalf of the Indians, and in 
many instances written by teachers of day schools on the reservations, 
seeking information in regard to the descent of their lands which have 
been allotted to them under the allotment acts, boundaries of their 
reservations, controversies with adjoining owners as to stock trespass- 
ing on the reservations, filings on Government land under allotment 
acts and homestead laws, and as to legal proceedings in prosecutions 
being had by the local authorities in other counties against Indians. 

While some of these matters are not strictly within my duties, yet 
in all such cases I have been very careful to furnish all the informa- 
tion I could, and see that if Indians were arrested by local authori- 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 315 

ties for offenses that they were properly defended under appointment 
of attorneys made by the local courts. I am also called upon fre- 
quently, both by correspondence and personally, by the Indian agent 
for suggestions and advice as to matters coming within his jurisdic- 
tion, to all of which I give attention promptly. 

VII. 

In closing this report, which is exceedingly brief, considering the 
time given and attention given to matters which have been submitted 
to me, I desire to make this suggestion with reference to the allotment 
of lands among the Mission Indians of southern California. 

I have visited most of their reservations, and I think all of those 
where allotments have been made, and from my knowledge of the 
land and the complications which will arise in the next twenty-five 
years as to titles, I do not believe that any good to the Indians can be 
accomplished by these allotments. I have no knowledge whatever of 
conditions in other parts of the country, and it is no doubt true that 
there awe localities where, from the nature of the land and uses to 
which it can be applied by reason of rainfall and other climatic con- 
ditions, the land can be allotted successfully and to the advantage of 
the Indians, but in this locality and by reason of the character of the 
reservation, the barrenness of the soil without irrigation and the want 
of water for irrigation, as well as the difficulties in the management 
of it among the Indians themselves, and further by reason of the veiy 
loose domestic relations of the Indians, and great difficulties arising 
from tracing their relationship, it will result in innumerable compli- 
cations, and practically no substantial good to the Indians. 

They have their own methods of dividing the land among them- 
selves where it is held in common, and in case of controversy they 
usually look upon the Indian agent as authorized to settle their diffi- 
culties, and as a rule they abide by his decisions after investiga- 
tion, so that they, for all practical purposes, allot the land among 
themselves; and I believe that, from the present school system among 
the Indians, at the expiration of twenty-five years there will be very 
few occupying these reservations, and such as may remain will be so 
prepared by the present school system of education that if it is the 
purpose and desire of the Government to give them lands in severalty 
they will be better prepared to take charge of and properly look after 
their interests. I find at present the older ones on these reservations 
to whom lands have been allotted are very poor, have no means to 
proceed in our courts for the purpose of establishing their rights, and 
by our laws of descent, and I do not know of a single instance where 
after the death of Indians to whom lands have been allotted probate 
proceedings have been instituted by them for the purpose of securing 
through the courts the proper distribution of the lands allotted, of 
course, subject to the provisions of the allotment act. 

In a number of instances they have applied to me for the purpose 
of ascertaining their rights in lands as the heirs of deceased parties, 
and I have in every instance proposed and stood ready to carry the 
probate proceedings through court if they would furnish the money 
simply necessary to pay the costs, which in our procedure would not 
in any case exceed $15 or $20, but not a single one has ever been able 
to raise money enough to pay these expenses. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William Collier, 
Special Atty. for the Mission Indians of Southern CalifoKvan** 



316 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R. — Shotting, by districts, the annual salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department, 



District and name. 



Alabama, northern 

William Vaughan 

Shelby S. Pleasants . . 
Julius W. Davidson . . 

Norah Davis 

William A. Anderson 



Alabama, middle 

Warren S. Reese, jr. 
James H. Judkins . . . 
Julius Sternf eld 



Alabama, southern 

Morris D. Wickersham 
Lina W. Gazzam 



Arizona 

Robert E. Morrison. 
Thomas D. Bennett . 
Allen Hill.; 



Arkansas, eastern 

Jacob Trieber 

Ulysses 8. Bratton. 
Powell Clayton 



Arkansas, western 

James K. Barnes . . . 
Frank A. Youmans. 
Nancy Campbell ... 



California, northern 

Frank L. Combs 

Marshall B. Woodworth 

Edward J. Banning 

J. B. Sherrard 

Frederick M. Brown 



California, southern 

Frank P. Flint 

James R. Finlayson 

Thomas Lee Wool wine. 



Colorado 

Greeley W. Whitford . .. 
Thomas E. McClelland . 

Mary C.Lamb 

Samuel D. C. Hays 



Connecticut 

Charles W. Comstock 
Francis H. Parker 



Delaware 

William M. Byrne. 



Florida, northern ... 

John Eagan 

J. Emmet Wolfe 



George P. Wentworth . . 



Florida, southern 

Joseph N. Stripling.. 
Harry H. Buckman . . 
Isadore A. Zacharias. 
Richard P. Marks 



Georgia, northern 

Edgar A. Angier . 
Walter L. Massey 

George L. Bell 

C.D.Camp 

T.L.Galloway.... 



Titles. 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 

do 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 



United States attorney 
Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 

do 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk (|300) 

Clerk ($720) 



United States attorney 
do 



United States attorney 



United States attorney 
Assistant attorney 



Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 

do 



Salaries. 



Attorneys. Assistants. 



$4,000.00 



4,000.00 



3,000.00 



$1,800.00 
1,200.00 



1,500.00 
1,200.00 



4,000.00 



4,000.00 



5,000.00 



4,500.00 



3,500.00 



4,000.00 



} 2 - 



500.00 



2,000.00 



3,500.00 



1,800.00 



1,500.00 



2,000.00 



2,500.00 
2,000.00 



1,500.00 



1,500.00 



3,500,00 



5,000.00 



} 1,200.00 



2,250.00 
2,000.00 



Clerks. 



} 



$720.00 



1,000.00 



900.00 



900.00 



600.00 



1,800.00 
1,200.00 



900.00 



} 



720.00 



600.00 



720.00 



1,800.00 
1,200.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



317 



attorneys, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
for the fiscal year 1900. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 




Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Remarks. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \* 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 












$7,720.00 


$224.76 


$223.15 




$98.81 1 $97.20 








$118.35 
7.60 


$118.35 
7.60 










1 










/::::::::::r::::::::: 










{ :.... 














Vice Davis. 


























6,700.00 


6.25 


6.25 




4.00 


4.00 
























2.25 


2.25 


























4,000.00 


52.20 


43.20 






52.20 


43.20 




• 








































6,700.00 


1,041.37 


1,033.17 




331.42 


327.22 








709.95 


705.95 














































6,400.00 


333.96 


332.71 




275.10 


275.10 








58.86 


57.61 














































7,600.00 


229.12 


228.85 




166.42 


166.15 








62.70 


62.70 
































283.66 














12,000.00 


280.16 




233.06 


230.71 








5.00 
45.60 


5.00 
44.45 










































































5,900.00 


176.17 


175. 17 




176.17 


175.17 




























































6,220.00 




















































/Resigned Apr. 15,1900. 
\Oath Apr. 16,1900. 
























2,500.00 


24.85 


24.35 




f 16.40 
\ 8.45 


15.90 
8.45 


















Vice Comstock. 






















2,000.00 










































% 




4,100.00 


129.70 


129.70 




94.90 


94.90 








34.80 


34.80 








Temporary appoint- 
ments, November and 
December, 1899, and 
April and May, 1900, 
at $1,500 per year. 




































5,420.00 


316.95 


212.25 




241.30 


137.10 
























\ 75.65 


75.15 








Vice Buckman. 


































12,250.00 


165.69 


165.69 




123.69 


123.69 








24.00 
18.00 


24.00 
18.00 



































































318 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R. — Showing, by districts, the annual salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department for 



District and name. 



Georgia, southern . 
Marion Erwin . 
Wm. R. Leaken 
James N. Tally 



Idaho 

R.V. Cozier 

Marshall Cozier 



Titles. 



Attorneys. 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



Salaries. 



$3,500.00 



Assistants. 



$1,800.00 



Clerks. 



$300.00 



United States attorney 
Clerk 



3,000.00 



600.00 



Illinois, northern 

Solomon H. Bethea.. 

Oliver E. Pagin 

C. J. Tisdel . 

Charles B. Morrison. 

Benjamin Davis 

William M. Malloy .. 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

do 

do 

do 

Clerk 



5,000.00 



2,500.00 
2,300.00 
2,000.00 
1,200.00 



1,200.00 



Illinois; southern 

J. Otis Humphrey 

Frank L. Hatch 

Reason H. McAnulty. 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

do 



5,000.00 



1,500.00 
1,200.00 



Indiana 

Albert W. Wishard ... 
Jesse J. M. LaFollette. 
Clarence W. Nichols .. 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



5,000.00 



2,000.00 



900.00 



Indian Territory, northern — 

Pliny H. Soper 

Orlando Wilcox 

Charles H. Sawyer 

LumanF. Parker 

Charles H. Sawyer 

James H. Huckelberry, jr . 
Nathaniel L. Rider 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

do 



4,000.00 



do 

. — .do 
.....do 
Clerk. 



• 2,000.00 
1,200.00 

i,moo 



Indian Territory, central. 

John H. Wilkins 

D. M. Brown 

James E. Gresham — 
Miss Maude Wilkins .. 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 

Extra clerk and stenog- 
rapher. 



4,000.00 



1,200.00 



1,200.00 



Indian Territory, southern. 
William B. Johnson 



James E. Humphrey. 
George F. Gates 



United States attorney 
Assistant attorney 



4,000.00 



1,500.00 



Clerk 



1,200.00 



Iowa, northern 

H. G. McMillan... 
De Witt C. Cram. 
C. M. Flagg 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



4,500.00 



1,200.00 



1,000.00 



Iowa, southern 

Lewis Miles 

Geo. B.Stewart... 
Horace H. Carter. 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



4,500.00 



1,200.00 



1,000.00 



Kansas 

Isaac E. Lambert. 

Harry J. Bone 

Daniel W. Hamer 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



Kentucky 

Reuben D. Hill 

Jno. G.Fitzpatrick. 
H.C.Gillis 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

— .do 



4,500.00 



2,000.00 



780.00 



5,000.00 



2,400.00 



Arthur M. Wallace . 
Terry P. Smith 



do 

Clerk 



900.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



319 



attorneys, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
the fiscal year 1900 — Continued. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 




Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Remarks. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 












$5,900.00 


$1,073.53 


$1,067.33 




$1,073.53 


$1,067.33 




























































3,600.00 


297.70 


287.28 




297.70 


287.28 












































14,100.00 


304.70 


304.20 




268.27 


268.27 








































^■$4."66' 

32.43 


$3.50 
32.43 


























































7,700.00 


1,268.40 


1,265.15 




827.90 


824.65 








300.95 
139.55 


300.95 
139.55 










































7,900.00 


380.56 


379.44 




193.61 


193.24 








186.95 


186.20 














































8,400.00 


593.96 


593.96 




217. 13 
f 


217.13 








142.25 
122.81 


142.25 
122.81 










{..... 










Vice Wilcox. 


f 












\ : ::; : 














Vice Parker. 


1:::.:::::: 




111.77 


111.77 








Vice Sawyer. 






































6,400.00 


266.48 


262.98 




127.20 


123.70 








139.28 


139.28 




































Temporary, 3 months, at 
$780 per annum. 
























6,700.00 


573.50 


570.25 




288.80 


288.05 








284.70 


282.20 








Increased from $1,200 












Sept. 19, 1899. 


























6,700.00 


933.93 


926.43 




822.30 


814.80 








111.63 


111.63 














































6,700.00 


295.66 


294.51 




240.51 


240.51 








55.15 


54.00 
































n 














7,280.00 


449.04 


446.77 




254.69 


252.42 








194.35 


194.35 














































8,300.00 


292.35 


283.10 




203.72 


194.47 








88.63 


88.63 




















Temporary, February 
















term, 1900, $1,800 per 
annum. 
Temporary, 8 days, Jan- 
uary, 1900. 






















— » 











320 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R. — Shotting, by districts, the annual salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department for 



District and name. 



Louisiana, eastern 

J.WardGurley,jr 
Wm. Wirt Howe .. 

Delos C. Mellen 

Chas. P. Cooke 

M. A. Homer 



Louisiana, western . . . 
Milton C.Elstner. 



Maine 

Isaac W . Dyer 



Titles. 



United States attorney 

do 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 



United States attorney 



Salaries. 



Attorneys. 



Assistants. 



} £$,500.00 



2,500.00 



}$2, 



500.00 



Clerks. 



{: 



$1,200,00 



Maryland 

Jno. C.Rose 

Danl. R. Randall 
Morris A. Soper . 
Thos.A. Hays 



Massachusetts 

Boyd B.Jones 

Jno. H. Casey 

Albert H. Washburn. 
Emma P. Locke 



Michigan, eastern 

Wm. D. Gordon - . 
Jas. V.D. Wilcox. 
Chas. W.Smith... 



Michigan, western 

Geo. G. Covell 

D wight Goss 

Stephen L. Newnham. 



Minnesota 

Robt. G. Evans.. 
Milton D.Purdy. 
Joel M. Dickey .. 



Mississippi, northern 

Mack A. Montgomery. 
Albert C. Melchior 



Wm. D. Trazee 
Louise Sykes _. 



Mississippi, southern 
Albert M. Lea 



Albert C. Melchior. 



W. Bruce Banks. 
W. Brace Banks. 
Jeanie Bees Lea . 



Missouri, eastern 

Edward A. Rozier 

Wm. L. Morsey 

Oscar F. Sessinghaus 

G. C. Hitchcock 

Miss Jennie Schoekal 



Missouri, western 

Wm. Warner 

A. S. Van Valkenburg 
Eudora Vestal 



Montana 

Wm. B. Rodgers .. 

Jno. C. English 

Henry G. Rodgers 



United States attorney 



3,000.00 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

....do 

Clerk 



4,000.00 



} 1,200. 



00 



{: 



1,000.00 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 



5,000.00 



2,500.00 
1,800.00 



1,000.00 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



4,000.00 



2,000.00 



1,000.00 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



3,500.00 



1,600.00 



750.00 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 



United States attorney 
Assistant attorney 



do. 

Clerk 



United States attorney 
Assistant attorney 



do 

Clerk 
do 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

do 

do 

Clerk 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



Nebraska 

Williamson S. Summers .. 

Sylvester R. Rush 

Jno. B. Lindsey 



United States attorney. 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



4,000.00 



2,000.00 
1,800.00 



3,500.00 



1,500.00 



1,200.00 



900.00 



3,500.00 



1,200.00 



} 



900.00 



4,500.00 



} 



2,000.00 
1,500.00 



720.00 



4,500.00 



2,000.00 



720.00 



4,000.00 



1,500.00 



1,200.00 



4,000.00 



1,500.00 



900.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



321 



attorneys, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
the fiscal year 1900 — Continued. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 




Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Remarks. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 












$7,200.00 


$36.30 


$31.29 




( $3b.30 


$31.29 


















Vice Gurley. 






























Vice Mellen. 






















i 
















2,500.00 
















































3,000.00 


494.59 


492.20 




494.59 


492.20 




























6,200.00 


169.26 


167.31 




156.41 


155.46 








$2.40 
10.45 


$2.40 
9.45 




















Vice Randall. 






































10,300.00 


533.72 


533.37 




373.14 


372.90 








55.53 
105.05 


55.42 
105.05 












■\ 














































7,000.00 


127.27 


126.27 




79.85 


78.85 








47.42 


47.42 














































5,850.00 


847.14 


843.80 




377.94 


374.60 








469.20 


469.20 














































7,800.00 


513.49 


476.46 




222.80 


185.77 








172.64 
118.05 


172.64 
118. OS 








































| 


7,100.00 


191.82 


190.59 




153.32 


152.09 
















Acted also as assistant 






38.50 


38.50 








attorney in southern 
district of Mississippi. 
Vice Melchior. 






































5,600.00 


412.65 


412.65 




240.10 


240.10 


















See northern Missis- 






172.55 


172.55 








sippi. 
Vice Melchior. 


f 












{ 














Vice Banks. 


























8,720.00 


80.64 


79.64 




46.14 


45.14 








19.65 


19. 65 


























14.85 


14.85 








Vice Sessinghaus. 






































7,220.00 


408.14 


402.64 




254.83 


251.33 








153.31 


151.31 














































6,700.00 


906.22 


906.11 




215.02 


214.91 








691.20 


691.20 














































6,400.00 


182.80 


146.21 




133.13 


96.54 








49.67 


49.67 


































— : 





H. Doc. 9 21 



322 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R. — Shmcing, by districts, the minimi salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department for 



District and name. 



Nevada 



Sardis Summerfl eld . 
W.C. Lamb 



New Hampshire 

Chas. J. Hamblett. 
Annie M. Prescott. 



New Jersey 

J. KearneyRice 

David O. Watkins 

Warren Dixon 

Cortland t Parker, jr 

Frank W. Bradley 

Miss Virginia Andrews. 
Edgar Shivers 



New Mexico 

Wm.B.Childers... 

Geo. P. Money 

Edward L. Medler 



New York, northern (old) 

EmoryJP. Close 

Chas. H. Brown 

Wesley C. Dudley 

Chas. H.Brown 

Stephen W. Dempsey. 
Beattie Schuyler 



New York, northern (new) 

George B. Curtis 

Henry E Owen 



New York, eastern . . 
Geo. H. Pettit.... 
Herbert B. Brush 
Lloyd M. Howell . 
Miss Grace Clark . 



New York, western . . . 
Chas. H. Brown . . . 

S. W. Dempsey 

Wesley C. Dudley. 



North Carolina, eastern 
Claude M. Bernard.. 

Oscar J. Spears 

E. A. Johnson 



North Carolina, western . 

Alfred E. Holton 

E. Spencer Blackburn 

Jas. Martin 

Jno. E. Buxton 



North Dakota 

Patrick H. Rourke . . 

Edward S. Allen 

Miss Sara R. Devine. 



Ohio, northern 

Saml. D. Dodge 
Jno. J. Sullivan 
Geo. R. McKay. 
Robt. Tucker .. 
Chas. M. Buss . . 



Ohio, southern 

Wm.E.Bundy 

Sherman T. McPherson 
Edward P. Moulinier 

EffieV. Ryan 

Harry F. Babe 



Titles. 



Salaries. 



Attorneys. Assistants. 



United States attorney. 
Clerk 



United States attorney 
Clerk 



United States attorney 

do 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk ($800 per annum) 
Clerk (|300 per annum) 
Clerk ($500 per annum) 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

do 

Assistant attorney 

do 

do 

Clerk 



United States attorney 
Assistant attorney 



$3,000.00 



2,000.00 



} 



3,000.00 



4,000.00 



} 



4,500.00 



4,500.00 



United States attorney i 4, 500. 00 

Assistant attorney ! 

do I 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 



4,500.00 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 

do 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

do 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 



United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 

do 

Clerk 

do 



4,000.00 



4,500.00 



4,000.00 



} 4,500.00 



4,500.00 



Clerks. 



$730.00 



500.00 



$800.00 



1,800.00 



} 



2,500.00 
2,500.00 



2,000.00 



2,000.00 
1,200.00 



2,500.00 
2,500.00 



1,250.00 



2,000.00 



1,200.00 



} 1,800. 



00 



2,000.00 
1,200.00 



} 



800.00 



1,200.00 



1,000.00 



900.00 



1,300.00 
1,020.00 



720.00 



900.00 



} 



720.00 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



323 



attorneys, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
the fiscal year 1900 — Continued. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 




Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Remarks. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \* 
proved. 












$3,720.00 




































Increased from $600 May 
1, 1900. 
















$7.95 








2,500.00 


$7.95 


$7.95 




$7.95 












































4,600.00 


225.57 


158.14 




43.28 


43.28 








$125.65 
f 30.97 
\ 25.67 


$66.98 
23.22 
24.66 








Vice Rice. 


























Vice Dixon. 








Vice Bradley. 







































7,000.00 


924.62 


919. 79 




370.22 


365.39 








554.40 


554.40 




















Increased from $900 Jan. 
1,1900. 
























9,500.00 


1,050.49 


1,048.76 














515.69 


514.89 














273.11 
J 56.56 
I 205.13 


273.11 

56.56 

204.20 










































Temporary, Nov. 1 to 
Dec. 6, 1899. 
























6,500.00 






























































8,700.00 


496.79 


494.91 




484.24 


482.36 
























12.55 


12.55 














































9,500.00 


100.53 


100.48 




13.38 


13.33 








87.15 


87.15 














































6,150.00 


309.20 


308.73 




186.98 


186.76 








122.22 


121.97 














































8,820.00 


687.06 


686.20 




569.21 


568.85 








117.85 


117. »> 






























































5,920.00 


194.17 


187. 13 




194.17 


187.13 




























































7,200.00 


369.31 


319.01 




J 183.51 
1 82.41 


142.82 
75.49 


















Vice Dodge. 


/ 84.70 
\ 18.69 


84.70 
16.00 






















Vice McKay. 


































8,420.00 


878.96 


877.65 




j 530.96 


530.60 










122.60 
225.40 


122.60 
224.45 






















/ 












i( 














Vice Ryan. • 


V 


















324 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R.— Showing, by districts, the annual salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department for 





Titles. 


Salaries. 


District and name. 


Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Clerks. 












Saml. L. O verstreet ... 


United States attorney 

do 


1 $6,000.00 




• 


Jno. W. Scothorn 


Horace SDeed 


do 


1 $2,000.00 
1 1,500.00 




Jno. W. Scothorn 


Assistant attorney 


B.S. McGuire 


do ' 




Jno. W. Scothorn 


.do .... 




i 


B. S. McGuire 


do 




L M KfiVM -- - 


....do 




B. S. McGuire 


.do 




1 

} $1,200.00 


Albin A. Stevens 


Clerk 




Miss Marie E. Ketsch 


do 






















Jno.H TTftll 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,500.00 






Edwin Mavs- - -r--- 


| 1,600.00 


f 


Waldemar Seton 


do 




960.66 


Vicoa Comb«. 


Clerk 




















J as. M. Beck 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney.- 


4,600.00 






Francis F. Kane 


2,600.00 
\ 2,000.00 




MVhftAl F M<Onll«Ti _ 


do 




f 


Wm. M. Stewart, jr 


. ...do 




1,666.66 


Mary K. Mason ..". 


Clerk 












Pennsylvania, western 








Danl. B. Heiner 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,600.00 






D.M.Miller 


2,500.00 
1,600.00 
1,200.00 




Jno. B.Myers 


do .". 






J. N.Langham 


do 




Louise MTSchaefer 


Clerk 




} 1,000.00 


Robert M. Gibson 


do 














Porto Rico 








Noah B. K. Pettingill 


United States attorney 


4,000.00 












Rhode Island 








Chas. O. Wilson ... 


United States attorney 

Clerk 


2,600.00 






Bertha Rose Lard 




600.00 










South Carolina 








Abial Lathrop 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,500.00 






Benj.F. Haerood 


1,600.00 
1,200.00 




Ernest F. Cochran 


do 






Sanders Glover 


Clerk 




} 1,200.00 


Jno. L. Heidtman 


do 














South Dakota 








Jas. D. Elliott 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Wm. G.Porter 


1,600.00 




Hattie Zitka 


Clerk 




600.00 










Tennessee, eastern 








Wm.D. Wright 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,600.00 






Jno. M. Simerly 


1,600.00 




Margaret Rowan 


Clerk 




900.00 










Tennessee, middle 








Ahrp-m M - Tillman 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,500.00 






Lee Brock 


1,600.00 


1,200.00 


Edward Trabue 


Clerk 












Tennessee, western 








Geo. Randolph 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,600.00 






Fr. P. Smith 


1,500.00 




Laura R. Morton 


Clerk 




600.00 










Texas, northern 








Wm. H. Atwell 


United States attorney 

Clerk 


3,500.00 






J. J. Wagner 




| 1,200.00 


Miss Lean Snyder 


do 















REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



325 



attorney*, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
the fiscal year 1900 — Continued. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 




Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Remarks. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 












$9,700.00 


$1,594.10 


$1,689.95 




f $97.46 

13.47 

160.69 


$96.86 

13.47 

167.81 


















Vice Overstreet. 












Vice Scothorn. 


$156.48 
299.15 

94.26 
339.60 

93.51 
339.60 


$166.48 
299.15 

94.25 
339.60 

93.16 
389.60 










* 










Vice Scothorn. 












Vice AfcGuire. 
























Vice McGuire. 












Vice Keyes. 


























Vice Stevens. 


























6.900.00 


205.83 


158.79 




126.88 


80.59 








79.95 


78.20 




















Vice Mays. 










































10,000.00 


498.80 


496.84 




498.80 


496.84 


















































Vice McCnllen. 










































10,700 00 


449.94 


449.19 




106.63 


105.78 








45.37 

270.89 

27.15 


45.37 

270.89 
27.15 


































1 












} 














Vice Schaefer. 


























4,000.00 














































3,000.00 






























































8,400.00 


421.91 


421.66 




261.94 


261.94 








78.15 
81.82 


77.90 

81.82 






















f 












1 














Vice Glover. 


























6,100.00 


1,059.26 


1,058.51 




229.26 


228.51 








830.00 


830.00 














































6,900.00 


347.84 


347.04 




93.83 


93.03 








254.01 


254.01 














































7,300.00 


29.00 


29.00 




29.00 


29.00 




























































6,600.00 


190.45 


190.45 




105.86 


106.86 








84.60 


84.60 














































4,700.00 


350.24 


346.02 


4 


360.24 
f 


346.02 




















{ :.... 














Vice Warmer. 



















326 



HEPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R. — Showing, by districts, the annual salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department for 





Titles. 


Salaries. 


District and name. 


Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Clerks. 


Texas, eastern....... 










Marcus C. McLemore 


United States attorney 

Aflflifltant attorney 


$5,000.00 






Fr. Lee 


$1,760.00 
1,760.00 




Henry B. Birmingham 


do 




$1,6(10.00 


Tjemuel J T Sel^y 


Clerk 












Texas, western........ 








Henry Terrell 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Redf^rd Sharp 


1,600.00 
1,200.00 




A. G. Poster 


do ." 




600.00 


Aloys Not zen. .. 


Clerk 












Utah 








Chas. O. Whittemore ..... 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 


• 




Pennel Cherrington 


1,600.00 




Leonora Trent 


Clerk 




600.00 










Vermont 








Jas. L. Martin 


United States attorney 

Clerk 


8,000.00 






Annie M. Brown 




900.00 










Virginia, eastern 








Edgar Allan 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






J.D.C.De Jarnette 


1,600.00 




J. N. Whittaker 


Clerk 




900. GO 










Virginia, western 








Thos. M. Alderson 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,600.00 






Jno. C. Blair 


1,200.00 




Thos. Qr Aldernon 


Clerk 




1,200.00 










Washington 








' Wilson R. Gay 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,600.00 






Chas. E. Claypool 


1,800.00 




AlfredE. Gardner 


Clerk 




1,000.00 










West Virginia 








Jos, FT. Gaines .... , , 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,600.00 






Emmet M. Showalter 


1,600.00 
1,400.00 
1,200.00 




Samuel C. Bnrdett 


do 






Elliott Northcott 


do 




1,000.00 


S. B. Avis 


Clerk 












Wisconsin, eastern 








Milton C. Phillips 


United States attorney 
Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 








1,600.00 


600.00 


Amelia J. Larson 


Clerk 












Wisconsin, western 










United States attorney . . 
Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Henry T. Shelton 


1,200.00 




Sabina A. Warnes 


Clerk 




720.00 














■ 




Timothy P. Burke 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Ben j. F. Fowler 


800.00 




LouiseS. Smith 


Clerk 




900.00 










Total 


305,500.00 


146,700.00 


67,230.00 






Districts not included in the act 
of May 08, 1896. 

Alaska (under old law) 








Robert A. Friedrich 


United States attorney 
Asaisant attorney 


2,500.00 






Alfred. J. Daly 


600.00 










— 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



327 



attorneys, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
the fiscal year 1900 — Continued. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 




Attorneys. 1 Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Remarks. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 






i 
i 




$10,100.00 


$895.27 


$824.74 




$421.37 


$397.89 








$372.45 
1 101. 45 


$372.45 
54.40 


























































7,300.00 


929.48 


907.49 




736.03 


714.28 








86.92 
106.54 


86.92 
106.29 


























































6,100.00 


194.98 


194.98 




129.53 


129.53 








65.45 


65.45 
















< m « 
























3,900.00 


524.86 


523.37 




524.86 


523.37 


















Increased from $720, Oct. 
















1, 1899. 










6,400.00 


299.87 


291.80 




246.67 


241.10 








53.20 


50.70 




















Increased from $600, Dec . 
















12, 1899. 










6,900.00 


250.13 


246.63 




176. 15 


172.65 








73.98 


73.98 














































7,300.00 


713.60 


707.42 




431.20 


425.00 








282.40 


282.40 














































9,600.00 


542.07 


531.17 




130.92 


129.79 








213.52 

17.45 

180.18 


203.75 
17.45 

180.18 






































































6,100.00 


192.73 


170.89 




94.75 


72.91 








97.98 


97.98 














































5,920.00 


446.71 


439.12 




354.65 


347.06 








92.06 


92.06 




















Increased from $600, Jan. 
















31, 1900. 










5,200.00 


196.49 


191.86 




188.49 


183.86 








8.00 


8.00 






































18,110.30 


17,633.40 


12,086.44 


11,936.86 


518,430.00 


30,196.74 


29,570.26 












3,100.00 


623.25 


584.75 




306.75 


308.75 




* 




3H.50 


276.00 













__ 











1 Includes an account of $47.05 not included in amount approved, action thereon having been 
pending when this exhibit was prepared. 



326 



HEPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit R. — Showing, by district*, thr annual salaries of United States district 

approved by this Department for 





Titles. 


Salaries. 


District and name. 


Attorneys. 


Assistants. 


Clerks. 


Texas, eastern 








Marcos 0. McLemoT'e r 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


$5,000.00 






Pr. Lee 


$1,750.00 
1,750.00 




Henrv B. Birmingham 


do 






Lemuel J. Selby 


Clerk 




$1,6110.00 










Texas, western..— 








Henry Terrell 


United States attorney ., . 
Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Bedford Sharp 


1,600.00 
1,300.00 




A. G. Poster 


do .". 






Aloys Notzen . . 


Clerk 




600.00 










Utah 








Chas. a. Whittem^re 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Pennel Cherrington 


1,600.00 




Leonora Trent 


Clerk 




600.00 










Vermont 








Jas. L. Martin 


United States attorney 

Clerk 


3,000.00 






Annie M. Brown 




900.00 










Virginia, eastern ...... 








Edgar Allan 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






J. D. C. De Jarnette 


1,600.00 




J. N. Whittaker 


Clerk 




900.00 










Virginia, western 








Thos. M. Alderson 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,500.00 






Jno. 0. Blair 


1,200.00 




Thos. G. Alderson 


Clerk 




1,200.00 








Washington 










Wilson B. Gay 


United States attorney . . . 
Assistant attorney 


4,500.00 






Chas. E. Claypool 


1,800.00 




AlfredE. Gardner 


Clerk 




1,000.00 










West Virginia 








Jos. H. Gaines 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,500.00 






Emmet M. Showalter 


1,500.00 
1,400.00 
1,200.00 




Samuel C. Burdett 


do 






Elliott Northcott 


do 




1,000.00 


S. B. Avis 


Clerk 












Wisconsin, eastern 








Milton C. Phillips 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney - 


4,000.00 






Chas. McC. Anderson 


1,500.00 


600.00 


Amelia J. Larson 


Clerk ."_ 












Wisconsin, western 








David P. Jones 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Henry T. Shelton 


1,200.00 




Sabina A. Warnes 


Clerk 




720.00 


















Timothy P. Burke 


United States attorney 

Assistant attorney 


4,000.00 






Benj. P. Fowler 


800.00 




Louise S. Smith 


Clerk 




900.00 










Total 


905,500.00 


145,700.00 


67,230.00 




Districts not included in the act 
of May <HS, 1896. 

Alaska (under old law) 










Robert A. Friedrieh 


United States attorney 

Assisant attorney 


2,600.00 






Alfred J. Daly 


add. oo 














REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



327 



attorneys, their regular assistants and clerks, the expenses claimed, and the expenses 
the fiscal year 1900 — Continued. 



Expenses. 


District totals. 


Remarks. 


Attorneys. 1 Assistants. 


Salaries. 


Expenses. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 






i 




$10,100.00 


$895.27 


$824.74 




$421.37 i $397.89 










$372.45 
» 101. 45 


$372.45 
54.40 


























































7,300.00 


929.48 


907.49 




736.02 


714.28 








86.92 
106.54 


86.92 
106.29 


























































6,100.00 


194.98 


194.98 




129.53 


129.53 








65.45 


65.45 








































3,900.00 


524.86 


523.37 




524.86 


523.37 


















Increased from $720, Oct. 
















1, 1899. 










6,400.00 


299.87 


291.80 




246.67 


241.10 








53.20 


50.70 




















Increased from $600, Dec. 
















12, 1899. 










6,900.00 


250.13 


246.63 




176. 15 


172.65 








73.98 


73.98 














































7,300.00 


713.60 


707.42 




431.20 


425.02 








282.40 


282.40 














































9,600.00 


542.07 


531.17 




130.92 


129.79 








213.52 

17.45 

180. 18 


203.75 
17.45 

180.18 






































































6,100.00 


192.73 


170.89 




94.75 


72.91 








97.98 


97.98 














































5,920.00 


446.71 


439.12 




354.65 


347.06 








92.06 


92.06 




















Increased from $600, Jan. 
















31, 1900. 










5,200.00 


196.49 


191.86 




188.49 


183.86 








8.00 


8.00 






































18,110.30 


17,633.40 


12,086.44 


11,936.86 


518,430.00 


30, 196. 74 


29,570.26 












3,100.00 


623.25 


584.75 




308.75 


308.75 




• 




314.50 


276.00 

























1 Includes an account of $47.05 not included in amount approved, action thereon having been 
pending when this exhibit was prepared. 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GEN'EKAL. 





Snliirira. 


F 






Miirwhul*. i.i| 




mi. .■]..|k.- 








Cliuiuud. 




































































U.OiW.OO 
1.1,1100. 1*1 


3, fits:. :ii 

11. 5ilH. 7s 


















































GeorniuMotbom .... 


ti.OOO.OO 


10.5K7.S! 


10,174.30 












































































II, V~J. w 


B,i5a.sa 


s, ma;;. 




























Marvl*:i! 


























5. 729. 1*1 


2,9uo.9i 


2,9i>U.i. 






■U»2.l*i 


N,lt'2.«i 


7,rn8.i7 






























7,11811. 71! 


l"..-.l>.i':l 


in. ;bli. ?,'..i 






■i.M.m 




2, Hsj. «; 








s,:fl;.rm 


![,■::«. m 


9, BOS. Oil 






















29, Ilia, is 


17, 113S.au 


15.911.51 






D.WItt.Si.- 
III. 1LK1.IK] 


!2.!N«.1-S 

::].-Wn.£! 


12, 505. :P.' 
S1.SW.(H1 








0.731. Si I 
lr.'..-!'j 25 


ti.iW.1'7 
lu,;m'.i.3s 


ll.I75.iil 
L0,til:.i 77 
































2,80jj.i.<j 


2.347.1)8 
7. 1150. 12 


2. LIU. ill 
7,119.94 
























5.050 no 


ij. 951.71 

m.ai-i.so 














ii.noo.iio 


!'. 730. 5!_l 










D.am.m 


8,295.79 


a,'»8.7s 














H. ill JO. Mil 
li.UUO. i'ki 


l:i.ir.tt.% 

■l.il'B.H!'. 


12,1.195. 71 
4. 179. H 




















039.5SI.93 


dBB.41B.30 


971,824 ai 





1 Account for Jqm quarter not rmuUrwi whan this •ihlbi t was praparad. 



REPORT OK THE ATTORNEY-GEN EKAL. 



F 


BO. 




Espe 


DM. 




.\ii.ii!in!]-.ni.[ 


Payable. 


SubsnWen 


e and t ravel. 


Other e 


xpenflea." " 


N-Kf.,1- 


"claimed. 


Approved. 


I'liiiiH,'.!. 


Approved. 


Claimed. " 


Approved. 


depoail. 


510..US...S* 


810,034. 10 


SI. 5*2 03 


54,502.81 


$18.36 


(18.26 


1238.03 


5.238.8] 


5.143.30 


2.573.01 


3,184 


80 


14.80 


14.30 


313 .64 


1,399.40 


1,343 (16 


LOW. 3" 


1.011 


TO 






366.30 


1.554.45 


1,538.45 

1.171). 1(1 


3.438.3.1 
3,810.65 


it™ 


30 
4fl 


l.BB 
135.60 


1.88 
134.43 




74.73 


2.570.37 


3.561.67 


4.008.38 


4.804 


99 


36.39 


85.99 


876. 38 


8.4011.28 


8,304. 87 


3.014.01 


3,000 


41 


35.35 


35.35 


131.01 


31.88 


30. 88 


2.017.78 


3, 1117 


78 


368. 3) 




8,651 43 


483.37 




1. 1175. SO 


1,061 


30 




141.50 


814. 31 


3.609. 13 


3. 075. SI 


i mi £i 


1,252 


89 


48.53 


48.58 


2,000.84- 


468. as 


448.47 


204. 62 
36.05 


202 
101 


87 








196.38 


120.38 








68.57 


58 




■J. 033. 78 


2.(81.7" 


4,688.07 


3.514.78 


2,340.65 


1,232.07 


1,301 


32 


19.31 


18.31 


632. 74 


a.arcj.iu 


3. 043. 30 


1,581.33 


1,521 


08 


17.33 


17.33 


1.046.82 


IT,:VM.iMl 


17.484.11 


3, 808. 57 


3,890 




77.00 


77.00 


213. 21 


6,961. 25 


6,857.38 


3,740.41 


3,637 


38 


23.10 


33.10 


875. 64- 








3,838 


95 


43.20 


43.16 


001. 30 






1,480.41 


1.486 


41 




342.03 


2, 002. 4(1 


8,151.02 


8,033.93 


1.878.63 


1,661 




' 83! 03 


82.49 


2, 571). 47 


1,571.35 


1,571.13 


2, 784. 06 


3,777 


17 


131.60 


131.60 


1,574.80 


I4.14n.2-i 


13,931.18 


13. SOI . 55 


13.413 


41 


1,040.41 


1.940.41 


1,543.72 


1 1 . m. on 


11.433.31 


[0,(134.87 


9,987 


SO 




834.81 


708 00 


1;!. ~til . 3! 


13.534. 93 


13,513.57 


12,381 


69 


81.13 


68.39 


3, ii*). 16 


4,312.44 


4,175.75 


i . 258. 58 


1,337 


81 


89.50 


89.25 


421.311 


3.824.61 


3,741.40 


560.81 




88 


86.60 


91.40 


470. 2' 1 


4,3»3.47 


4,800.78 


1,571.81 


1,554 


38 


56.55 


66.64 




15.074.21 


14,693.31 




2.673 


69 


108.20 


106.07 








"'lh3.!5 


475 
411 


« 


.88 


.74 
3.21 




433.51 


393.12 


308! 18 






1,447 '54 


1.439 
160 


ia 


367! 95 
88.00 


<..(. 




375.57 


375.37 


1,198! 54 






i,s«Je 


1,545 






317.14 




106.07 


403.37 


835. 22 


581 


98 


25.36 


25.35 


2! 214! Hi 






1,434.34 
3.507. 10 


i. 5811 


88 


54.40 
217.33 


51.40 
216. B2 




4.854.24 


4,770,87 


I.730! 93 


fi.4flj.7ti 


5,070.54 


[.WO. 7(1 


1,468 




81.70 


39.18 


93.40 


?.tttto.;a 


7,645.61 


1,645.03 


1,634 


18 


20.62 


20.50 


881.90 


3. 204 76 


3,648.43 


1,574.75 


1,570 






133.35 


2,034. 10 


0.745. 0" 


8,836. 03 


804. 3.1 


880 


86 


130.50 


130.58 


1,314.13 


684.61 


566.44 


1,308.81 


4,136 


U 


77.54 


66.17 


1.267.(18 


ii,0i>j..> 


3.357. B4 


2,648.64 


2,431 


IS 


138.68 


139.58 


1,877.08 


331.65 


165.82 


1 , 108. 85 


1,164 


36 


4,79 


1.69 


050. 12 






348.22 
694.32 


33; 


46 


3.11 

100.27 


8.11 

100.27 




1,333.01 




1,787! 58 






5.535.31 
1, 7BT. 13 


4,B4£ 
1,770 


56 


216 80 
135.98 


315.66 
136.08 




8,919.19 


6,517.18 


535! 71 






890. TO 


098 


99 






1.002 64 






1,334. Hi 
86.04 


1.333 
S3 


88 

04 


'OOO! 84 
3.61 


'OOO! 84 
8.51 




130.3(1 


135.73 




H. 332. 78 


8,107.71 


2, 1 19 32 


1,988 


07 


111.64 


109.33 


1,383.66 


14. 434.46 


11,313.94 


3. 063. 4* 


3,016 


87 


388.30 


388. 30 


443.33 


1.005.92 


087.03 


5, 516. 07 


6,388 




62.67 


53.67 


468.78 


590.31 


573. 38 


3.211.(15 


2.208 


06 


314.86 




2,141.67 


1, HIT. B0 


1,045.11 


3, 768. .54 


3,603 


09 


113.30 


113.09 


1,988.60 


4,1144.06 


4,845.33 


0,190. 83 


6,361 


17 


887.67 


387.87 


352. 47 






2. 076. 23 


3,608 


SO 


102.78 


103.78 


1,388.55 






1,1155.13 


1,353 




664.60 


518.77 


2,608. 23 


1, TIB. 06 


1,688.03 


753. B4 


738 




9.81 


9.81 


1,30.13 






169.44 
1,061.72 


143 
1.808 


78 
97 


46.00 
14.63 


45.00 
11.63 




6,178.41 


5,143.01 


SOB! 89 


1,063.93 


4. 91'. 61 


3.134.74 


3,098 




199.33 


189.00 


581.95 


i. 180. 20 


4,015.00 


1,535.88 


1.457 


88 


63.02 


01.00 


261.98 


3.846.91 


3.810.08 


1.340.44 


1,225 


-,.-, 


109.51 


109.61 


685.07 


3,044.31 


3,006.68 


1, 131. 46 


1,105 


SB 


31.28 




324 20 


6. 107.00 


5. 86". ;S! 


3. 1(25. 36 


2.561 


58 


97.99 


07.89 


2.6(13. 55 


4,403.63 


4.431.37 


3, 121 . SO 




78 


68.50 




2.1*1.28 


5.873.38 


5,015,84 


3.708.73 


2.316 


U 


77.33 


75.50 


1,141.17 


17. OS 


17.63 


771,70 


754 


80 


113.19 




218. 25 


1.5711.33 


1,533.30 


561.64 


648 


13 


67.79 


67.58 


638.38 


3. (SO. 70 


1,983.94 


1, 219 66 


1,183 




50.53 




1,199.08 


10,235.50 


10,134.80 


3,401.57 


2,361 


11 


19.33 


19.33 


618.71 






2,811.48 
1.343.40 


2.831 
1,335 


K 


153,16 
64,69 


150.58 
64.88 




8,185.00 


7,818.75 


l!07l!l2 






1,134.89 
2,674.81 
821.15 


M 

2.67E 


ii 


83.89 
19.44 
100.70 


38.89 
98! 70 










14.38 


14.33 


ibt:*o 


278,199.41 


206,782.91 


184.046 13 


178.014.81 


14,617.25 


14,353.38 


A3. 633. 35 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 





Titles. 


Periods. 


Balarlea. 


Dbtricteland uuum 


uUet-aad 

clerks. 


aJabama northern: 






H.O00 0O 
1.S00 0U 

i.'at'u: 




Ublet office deputy 
Office drputy . . 




John I. Wblte 








Field d-puiy 




George 6 Danid™>0 














....do 

... do 






Wm A Ooilaey . ... 






















tia-.i. -lai a. 1«h. service termlna- 
fd.luuein.1Mrj. 
















Rob*t B Thompson . 
C- M Tciopklna . . . 








....do 












... do 

. .do 








1 ■ i- - service termina- 
ted Jan 81,19X1. 

:>arh >l-r Ii..-- service termlua- 
fd Oct. 9. uhb. 

. mi: - L ,-. -■■- surv'.r» termina- 

Oatb-Bral 1 UM "«rvice t» rmina- 
:■•] K.-U IS. 1909. 

I'atb. Oct. 1. MM servli-e termina- 
ted Mar. 1. ■ • ■■ 

n,.il ,!m, .-. .1- . (wrv:i-B termina- 
i.'.KM 1K.1W9. 












k 








....do.. 

... do 






















T.roOCu 




Marshal 

Chi-f i.fflVedcjinty 
••<»■■ deputy 
Steoi«rft|>ber and 




Alabama.mlddle: 
Leander J Rryan 
Nenlan 1. rlteele 


4.000 01) 

i.ris ui 

1.31K.M 
SO. 80 


....do 
















....do . 














... do 






Byron Trammel! 






'.'.'.'.'da'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
do... 








■..■■i ■ r ;i: 'v.i eervliie tormina- 

i,-d Vi.t MM 
.-,.:h Mil J.-. -!'.■ Hurvloe terudna 

•.-.1 Aiik.H.IbUb. 
• ■..'■. sji.r ■.'. 1- ■■ st- rvl re tannine ■ 

tPillhst.n.lSW 


















.. .do 

.. .do 

. .do 


?.■ ii tA-t.iit.iaw. 

(m-.Ii hoi. in !•■> service tormina- 

:■■] ins: l&UM 
Oitth. Mnr. 11 i*- nnrvloe tormina- 

(.-! Mar f.,1800. 
unit, l.-li 1- ',-." set-vlee tonnllia- 

ted Mar. 19, 1 ->■ 


















T.OUU ]u 










1.73B.38 

i.otam 


CharleaD. [{ncdurwii 


Chief office depot y 
Flelddeputy. . . . 












do 

.... do 


















Jan ».190D.toJnnot0,lM0 


!.«■.« 


Charlt* D, Baodaraoi 


Chief offJ« deputy 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



IW 




Expensus. 






Enrnnd 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel 


Other expenses 


l.l.l.i I,. 

l.-rU-. 1 


Claimed. 


Approvl. 


o,i„„> 


P ™™i 


Maimed. 


prosed. 


I— ' pro^d 


dcutwit 




19.82 
8.00 
132 50 
IS. 60 

L. 42b 92 

989.28 
I.OO.Y92 

1, I4o! 86 
779.88 
1,108.40 

18.60 
60S. 84 
838.12 

870. 81 
000. 30 
20.78 
282.30 

76.33 

125.82 

628.56 

784.24 

lltl.70 

687.26 






$194,25 

02. T5 
81.05 
097.05 
58. 55 
201 Oil 
35H 23 
34!. 35 

lift rm 

258.81* 
121* 42 
250.27 

16.06 
lit) id 

31(1. W 
181. > 
107.18 


fim <v. 

62.75 

•j v. 
087,15 

54.49 
343 II 
-in v: 
240 1*1 

97.60 
258 •> 
IJ- 13 
252 73 

li.05 
101 35 

2H5 hh 
IT. !"• 
106 66 






is 
■3 

MM 

l.MS 

Cm 

3D) 
1,148 

78" 

LIU 

60 

71T 

as 

i,oa 
a 


50 
50 
» 
03 

ill 

a 

OS 
H 
OB 

64 

50 

68 
SB 

48 
Si 
78 
































SiOiv :u 
1.0*8 h' 

781 !. 67 
808. 8f- 

80L71 
6S5.74 
856.23 

37. ST 

533.26 
640 18 
663.61 
794 63 
15.58 
212.23 

67.25 

94.37 

476.68 

552.18 

148.77 

52B.37 


1.071 >i0 
741.9* 
790. 51 
233.58 
fiftfl. 15 
5*4.1*3 
831.30 

37.20 

51 n m 

638. 58 
653. 13 
075.21 
15.68 
211.74 

57.25 

94.37 

471.18 

148.77 

515.45 














































































ioo.oa 

23.22 

40.00 
788.93 


98.28 

22.72 

97.26 

38.09 

786.93 






711.33 
125.82 
1186.66 

788.24 
181.70 
BW.SU 







































13, (H3. :.« 


13. .»!>. 15 


Hl.S18.88 


HI. Til. lit 


1.5*3 "-■ 


1,503.81 


18.26 


IB. 28 


238. 08 


758.14 
44.48 
17. BO 


768.14 
44.48 
17.00 






132.72 
332.07 


132 78 
388 07 


1430 


...» 


ais.84 
































£47.84 
1.356.3(1 

399. 7" 
i.ooo.47 

Mil. 25 
267.74 
lift. 15 


242.62 

1.8.51., 50 
■1'J. 70 

r.iii" ii 

us! is 


186.73 

'Li'.i ";'t 

799.86 
412.40 

200 81 
80.36 


181. 80 

1,387.8" 
298.77 
731*. 40 
112.40 
106.46 
89.36 


166.88 

373.03 
3HIII!i 
■JIM. 9h 
253. 1X1 
HH 03 


164.96 
969.63 
800 69 
207 in 
248 85 

5t'17 


































































26.30 
IK), 30 

383.84 
1,3*. MS 

616,38 


26.30 
00.:*) 

883.84 
1,339.38 

611.68 


18.08 
67.72 
386. 88 

1,004,99 

482.89 




18.88 
67.72 
296.39 
1,004.08 
458.77 


16.60 
34.47 
104.68 
280.88 
164.10 


88.89 

91.91 
284,10 
164.10 






































7,7110.73 


7. fiT0.fi> 


5. 338. 81 


5. 142. 31) 


2.573. li! 


2.484.80 


14.30 


14.3.1 


313.04 


90.00 
136.61 

46.64 
514. 56 
861.06 


SO. 00 
138.61 
46.64 

171.72 
810.70 






272.65 
1.10 

88.16 
192. (14 
330.40 


368 65 
I 10 
78 05 
177.91 
197 09 






43 25 












34.08 
365.84 
688.30 


114.98 
:tvt m 
614.86 


























147.60 

86.51 
88.00 


"2 


110.70 


109.84 


55.25 

161.40 

20. 25 


47.7* 

164.40 

26.25 












223.05 













REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 





Titles. 


Periods. 


Salaries. 


Districts and nimis. 


Marshals, 

office dep- 
uties, and 


Alabama, snuth'n C't'd 


Field depot y . „ 






















. ..do... 














I* in-ii 




Mar-, 




Alaska 

.lames M. Shoup. 
JauieM'. Blaine .. .. 
Lewis I.. Bowers 


sioom 




... do 


no 

v*> 

ja 

?.v 

750 

ft* 
w 
ft) 

l 601 


HI 
III 
... 

(0 

... 
.11 

ml 

.11 
III 
III 


Edward 0, Hw-\ . . 
Jobn T. McElbeny 

W.S Staley 


. ...do 

.....do... 

V.'.'.'.io'.'.'.'.. 


... do 




■ M". u. Jan 31. 1900 






W H MoNalr 

I'r.dxractofHar.8. IWB. 


liter* and deputy 
; >.-. nty marabal . . 


' A " 


















do 












... do 








Appointed Ana MW 






do 










M E. Handy 


do.... 








































io, mw 








Aruoos 


4.000. (W 

!.50ri in- 
BO HI 
'.«. 70 

tro.oo 




i h i ." II ...•:■■;..■ y 

Office deputy 








l*eorae F. ricullln 


.Ian >: I-HH . i . .1 ;., ■ JO. 1000 . . 








ElherlL Benuronk . 
W. M, Brif jetirldKC 


■■..;:. .\i..r. :,1599 






MJItt! VuK J0.1SW 








Wm W. Kli.wuiiinu 


■*° 


■,,i!. t'.i.. :.ii9» 






'.'.'.'.0t> '.'.'.'. '..'.'. 
....do 


'■air. Apr. ID.I^BS 




John McCarty. . . 
J. D. Milton 




Oatb.Dec 8, 1W? 




















































Lyman W.Waifeflcli*. 


























....do 






















...do... 


Oi.it N..i- i. !->.. -rvice termina- 
ted Not. 2K. 189V. 










a. ts» ~i 




Marshal 

Chief office deputy 




Arkansas . eastern : 
H<>iiry M Cooper 
'.■ ■ A Hosier 


4.000 00 
1.800 00 





REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



335 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



' Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 

$213.26 
75.02 
17.70 


Approved. 


Claimed. 

$159.95 
56.27 
13.26 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. pr A £ d 


deposit. 


$213.26 
75.02 
17.70 


$159.95 
56.27 
13.26 


$41.50 
11.00 


$41.50 
11.00 






- 










































2,216.56 


2,141.30 


1,399.40 


1,342.96 


1,083.30 


1,013.70 






$266.30 
















729.10 


729.10 


$1.88 


$1.88 














21.30 
209.50 

90.20 
426.10 
365.00 

94.50 

19.50 
221.00 


21.30 
209.50 

90.20 
426.10 
365.00 

94.50 

19.50 
221.00 


21.30 
209.50 

90 20 
426.10 
365.00 

94.50 

19.50 
221.00 


21.30 
209.50 

90.20 
426.10 
365.00 

94.50 

19.50 
221.00 


205.00 
1,046.50 
10.00 
190.40 
278.50 
190.70 
400.50 
387.50 


205.00 
1,046.50 
10.00 
190.40 
278.50 
190.70 
400.50 
387.50 














































































































40.15 


40.15 


40.15 


40.15 
























































j 




















































8.00 

8.00 

4.00 

47.20 




8.00 

8.00 

4.00 

47.20 




























4.00 
47.20 


4.00 
47.20 
































1,554.45 


1,538.45 


1,554.45 


1,538.45 


3,438.20 


3,438.20 


1.88 


1.88 






3,703.53 

692.10 

684.41 

1,790.21 

2,192.82 

211.64 

52.00 


3,687.89 

649.30 

656.41 

1,790.21 

2,133.02 

211.64 

52.00 






755.95 
286.80 
384.95 
704.50 
1,390.80 
15.85 


755.95 
285.80 
367.75 
704.00 
1,387.80 
15.85 


131.56 
2.00 


129.92 
2.50 


74.72 


















1.60 
.44 


1.57 
.44 










79.36 
19.50 


79.36 
19.50 
























































430.06 
506.12 


417.06 
505.12 




161.25 
189. 79 


156.38 
189.42 


38.75 
47.50 


31.25 
47.50 
















































* 










































729.34 

129.74 

89.00 


724.34 
129.74 

87.00 


273.50 
48.65 
33.37 


271.63 
48.65 
32.62 


20.00 
7.00 
2.00 


18.00 
7.00 
2.00 


























85.56 
107.20 


85.56 
106.20 


32.08 
40.19 


32.08 
39.82 












36.00 


36.00 














255.60 
595.54 


240.00 
584.54 


95.85 
223.32 


84.53 
219.20 












120.55 


120.55 




































































12,254.87 


12,057.03 


1,196.86 


1,173.19 


3,810.65 


3,779.45 


135.60 


134.43 


74.72 


2,320.57 


2.320.57 










86.29 


85.99 


876.38 


175.84 , 175.34 


::::::::::::i::::::::::: 


86.80 


86.80 





336 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit &.— Shouting, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved ; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Titles. 



Arkansas, eastern— Ct'd 

P. D. Learning 

Fred. E. Johnson 

John T. Bnrris 

John McClure, jr 

J.G.Botsford | do 

J. P. Huddleston Field deputy 

William Hudson do 



Office deputy. 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Ed. Jefferson . . 
R.D.Suddeth.. 
Cyrus Johnson 

Jack Grayson . 

J. N.Bromley .. 



Total 



do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 



Periods. 



Arkansas, western : 
Solomon F. Stahl . . . 
W. C. Chynoweth. .. 

J. R. Hammond 

A. S. Eshelman 

Merritt C. Mechem. 
Samuel Allender . . . 
L. A. Armistead — 

James Baker 

John H. Brown 



M.Carlton 

James Daniel 

Sam Gibson 

Geo. F. Hammack 

J. P. Hinchee 

H.B.Holman 

David Jacobs 

Jesse S. Lunsford 

F.M.Stroud 

Thomas H.Tate-. 
J.G.Bickley 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy 

do 

.... do 

do 



Wm.King .... 
Jack Grayson 



Total. 



do 
.do 
do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 



California, northern: 

John H. Shine 

Anthony L. Farish... 
George H. Burnham. 

Henry M. Moffitt 

Sheldon P. Monckton. 
Richard De Lancie... 

Edward A. Morse 

J. A. Littlefield 

Charlotte A. Schrage. 

C. C.Crowley 

T. S. Catlett 

Jno. E. Donovan 



D. W. Prazer.... 
Charles H. Hurt. 



Jno. C. Linne 

Daniel McSweeney. 



Geo. W. Rager. 
M. E. Ramsey 



T. B. Walker. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 



Fiscal year 

Apr. 16, 1900, to June 80, 1900 

Fiscal year 

....do 

July 1,1899, to Apr. 15, 1900 

Oath, June 14,1897 

Oath, Jan. 15, 1900 

Oath, June 5, 1899 

Oath, Oct. 14, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 20, 1897; service termina- 
ted Oct. 14, 1899. ' 

Oath, Oct. 9, 1899; service termina- 
ted Jan. 16, 1900. 

Oath, Nov. 4, 1898; service termina- 
ted Jan. 15, 1900. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



11,500.00 

260.55 

1,200.00 

1,200.00 

949.45 



Fiscal year 

....do 

....do 

Oct. 16, 1899, to June 80, 1900 

July 1,1899, to Sept. 30, 1899 

Special; no compensation 

Oath, July 7, 1899. 

Oath, Nov. 22, 1897 

Oath, Apr. 19, 1900; service termina- 
ted June 7, 1900. 

Oath, June 14, 1897 

Oath, May 1,1899 

Oath, Dec. 19, 1899 

Oath, June 10, 1897 

Oath, Nov. 8, 1897 

Oath, June 12, 1897 

Oath, July 7, 1899 

Oath, June 9, 1897 

Oath, June 16,1897 

Oath, Apr. 18, 1900 

Oath, June 9, 1897; service termina- 
ted Dec. 12, 1899. 

Oath, Sept. 7, 1897; service termina- 
ted Feb. 28, 1900. 

Oath, Oct. 9, 1899; service terminated 
Jan. 16, 1900. 



do 

do 

.....do 

do 

Clerk 

Field deputy. 

.....do 

do 



do 

Special field dep- 
uty. 
Field deputy 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

July 1,1899, to May 31,1900 

Fiscal year 

June 1, 1900, to June 80, 1900 

Nov. 16, 1899. to June 30, 1900 

July 1, 1899, to Oct 31, 1899 

Fiscal year...! 

Oath. June 3, 1898; special 

Special; no compensation 

Oath, June 9, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Special; no compensation 

Oath, June 15, 1898; special 



10,900.00 



5,000.00 

2,500.00 

1,600.00 

425.59 

150.00 



9,675.59 



do 

.do 
.do 

.do 



Oath, June 22, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, June 9, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, June 16, 1898 

Oath, June 18, 1898; without com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Sept. 6, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 



4,000.00 

2,500.00 

1,500.00 

1,284.60 

1,400.00 

115.40 

658.46 

334.20 

840.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTOENEY-GENERA L. 



Feea. 


EipeasoB 




Earned. 


Payable. 


travel. 


Otbur expedite*. 


rVrke of 


Plaimec]. 


AlHj.TM.-I'll 


Claimed. 


proved 


Claimed 


pF"vpil 


Claimed 


profed 


dniHialt. 


(792.09 

3,ni!' :{| 
omi.Wl 
1.1M4.17 
1.. ■.'!,:: i;: 
744.32 
158. 02 
571.20 


J463.28 
235 23 

3. (£■*).:» 
900.90 
1.07+.W 
1.301. S3 
™I9. 08 
153. 113 

247^32 






J.- a 8ii 

4lll . * 
1.047. 8.1 

m. ts 

SB 10. 81 
285. 15 
91.1(1 
11.88 

in. I'm 

38.80 


jssn ai 

401 -H 
1,647 hS 
037 46 
060 81 
228 16 
01 TO 
11 86 
100 6li 
87 80 
















































£H7. 73 
55*. ^ 
115. 31 
12$, 44 
186.00 


•!'iii.:;7 
Ml. 70 

-ti'iiiil 






































»" 


445.00 


338. TB 


333.80 


n.Ts 


71.35 


























186.29 


jj.-i5.09 


J87li 88 


IE!. 411 
18.011 
20.40 
13.60 


2,480.44 

an M 

i. ..i 
44. 88 
1S.50 






£16.90 


31600 
983. Bl 


35 2.5 


35 26 


431.04 
















207. 18 
14.116 


mm 

14.06 














































1ST. HI 
88. SO 

1,874.50 
:B7. 95 

1.44:1.72 
351. Hi 

i.iu 50 
:i.;jou.sl 


167 84 
88 80 

1,880 SO 
.07 95 

1 . 443. 73 
351.16 

1,111.50 

3,300.51 


118. ST 
86.66 

1. 406.88 

sstti 

1.083.79 
:»C.:i7 
Bid 113 

2.4K.M2 


iis ar 

88.66 

1.886. SB 

Stt 44 

l,n*3.71> 
:,isi.h; 

833. 08 
2,483.13 


».T8 
864 T6 

:c 1'. 

1.111. Ill 
w.m 

113.05 
321 .73 


to 76 

.60 

284 re 

52.15 
150 In 

SO 31) 
1X9 68 
321. TO 






















































1.071.88 
530.38 
13.18 
633.00 

m m 

00,74 


1,1171. 88 

sv.su 

18.18 
827.8a 

£73.84 

06.74 


mi. <hi 

307. 70 
9,88 
474.78 

EGt.ea 

60.05 


pic Mil 
397. 7!l 
0.88 
470.89 

304.62 

60.06 


rse.iio 

:l 50 
61.00 

33.26 

59.01 


'.- 

'38.65 
50,01 












































13. 881. so 












3,5. 85 


86.36 


431.04 


5,862.86 

63. w 

1 . 8.(8. -j] 

2.301. »i 

823. * 

«os 
420 a 
shot 


5 ,,... M 

.-..■ :■! 

1,313 si 

8,31.1 •■! 

823.38 

i J* 

ai'w 






871.86 
1*1 30 
726 B 
374 tt 
4W 30 
9.70 
289 iir. 
BB.6D 


871 86 
140.30 
T26 2M 
374. 85 
199 30 
0.70 
£80 06 
82 60 


368 20 


386 30 


2.661.18. 
















































































































































14 00 


14.00 


10.60 


10. SO 


30.86 


80.86 














39.01 


so. si 
















a. » 


30.38 


94-50 


w.Sn 

















































338 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S.—Shoicing, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



California, n'th'n— C't'd. 
J. L. Walton 



Jno. McLean 

Henry McCollough . . . 
Robert S. Browne.... 
William C. Bennett.. 

A. L. Stephens 

Joseph Enloe 

J. P.Barrett 

Levi P. Evans 

Jno. Burmingham, jr. 



Total. 



California, southern : 
Henry Z. Osborne 
H. T. Christian . . . 
G.F.McCulloch .. 
W.H.Auble 



Robert S. Browne 
Harlow Gilbert. . . 



R.S. Hatch 

Charles J. Oswald. 

H.J.Place 

W.H.Puleston... 

James A. Cook 

E.J.Boust 



Total. 



Colorado : 

Dewey C. Bailey 

Mel vin Edwards 

Everett S. Chapman . 
Benjamin M. Borland 

William Crocker 

Edwin H.Davis 

Edward C. De Sellem. 
Oliver P. Wiggins 



Edward G. Jefferds 



Total. 



■Connecticut: 

Edson S. Bishop. 
Philip E. Bowen . 
John H. Clarke . . 

H.R.Wood 

W.J.Burns 



Total. 



Delaware: 

John C. Short 

William G.Mahaffy 
James H. Clark 



Total. 



District of Columbia: 

Aulick Palmer 

William B. Robison. 

Buchanan Beale 

Brooke M. Baker 

V. H. McCormick 

George Lower ee 

Patrick P. Cusick .... 
Thomas P. Cook 



Titles. 



Field deputy 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 
do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 



.do 

.do 

.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 

do 



do 
.do 

.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 
Office deputy 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



Periods. 



Service terminated Feb. 8, 1900; spe- 
cial; no compensation. 
do 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
-do 
do 
do 
.do 



Fiscal year 

do 

do ... 

Oath, Sept. 16, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, July 5, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Apr. 12, 1900; special; to serve 
one subpoena. 

Oath, Apr. 17, 1899 

Oath, Nov. 11, 1899 

Oath, Nov. 26, 1898 

Oath, Dec. 11, 1899; May 2, 1900 

Oath, Nov. 7, 1898 

Oath, Oct. 21, 1898; service termi- 
nated Dec. 10, 1899 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$12,632.66 



Fiscal year 

do 

Nov. 20, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

July 1,1899, to Nov. 19, 1899 

Oath, July 1,1898 

Oath, July 1,1898 

Oath, Dec. 11, 1899 

Oath, July 2, 1898; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Sept. 22, 1899; service termi- 
nated Oct. 20, 1899; appointed for 
30 days. 



Fiscal year , 

.....do 

Oath, Dec. 15,1898 

Oath, Sept. 24, 1898 

Oath, May 26, 1900; special 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Feb. 12, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 

Fiscal year 

do 



3,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,200.00 



6,000.00 



4,000.00 

2,000.00 

368.52 

231.48 



6,600.00 



2,000.00 
1,000.00 



3,000.00 



2,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 



4,000.00 



5,500.00 
2,750.00 
2,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,400.00 
421.64 
1,100.00 
1,100.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



339 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

<wii Tt;** fVvp 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


deposit. 








• 






























































































































































































$11,066.47 


$11,064 47 


$31.88 


$30.88 


$2,617.78 


$2,617.78 


$268.20 


$268.20 


$2,651.43 


1,069.08 

432.92 

1,520.97 


1,069.08 

432.92 

1,520.97 






57.40 

96.05 

616. 15 


57.40 

95.80 

616.15 


141.50 


141.50 


814.31 














































.50 


.50 






24.40 


24.40 


















120.18 

143.56 

26.80 

3.50 

350.28 


120.18 

143.56 

26.80 

3.50 

349.68 


90.14 
107.68 

20.11 

2.63 

262.71 


90.14 
107.68 

20.11 

2.63 

262.25 


18.25 
33.55 
12.20 
11.10 
206.70 


18.25 
27.55 
11.30 
10.60 
199.75 






































3,667.79 


3,667.19 


483.27 


482.81 


1,075.80 


1,061.20 


141.50 


141.50 


814.31 


1,289.72 

167.41 

179.00 

70.50 

2,371.68 

2,417.49 


1,272.06 

152.41 

171.00 

70.50 

2,236.48 

2,088.71 






753.41 

33.46 

64.35 

43.15 

245.10 

189.40 


718.34 

24.00 

64.25 

43.15 

228.95 

172.85 


25.66 

22.86 


25.66 
22.86 


2,099.84 






















1,778.70 
1,813.12 


1,500.00 
1,500.00 






































103.08 


101.08 


77.31 


75.81 


1.35 


1.35 














6,598.78 


6,092.24 


3,669.13 


3,075.81 


1,330.21 


1,252.89 


48.52 


48.52 


2,099.84 


1,843.76 
401.12 
370.27 
248.01 


1,333.25 
357.32 
353.71 
240.35 






94.92 

98.95 

3.75 

7.00 


94.42 

98.95 

2.50 

7.00 






968.86 












277.69 
185.99 


263.22 
180.25 






































2,863.16 


2,284.63 


463.68 


443.47 


204.62 


202.87 






968.86 








1,531.01 


1,531.01 






16.50 


52.50 


135.88 


99.88 


370.46 








326.24 


326.24 


. 




49.55 


49.30 


20.50 


20.50 










1,857.25 


1,857.25 






66.05 


101.80 


156.38 


120.38 


370.46 








3,550.91 

747.77 
258.33* 


3,550.91 

747.77 
258.33* 










2,623.78 


2,623.78 


4,688.07 








































2,466.00 
14.50 
1,641.631 
905.69 


2,466.00 
14.50 
1,641.531 
905.69 



























































340 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Showing \ by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Dist. of Columbia— C't'd. 
James W Springman 

John S. Lacey 

W. Jesse Roberts 

William A. Wilkerson 

Edgar L. Turner 

J. S. B. Hartsock 

M.S.Parmer 

William T. Garrison. . 

Omar G. Stutter 

Frederick A. Kraft. . . 

Lee Ross 

Clarence R. Wilson... 

E.L.Cornelius 

Henry Johnson 



Titles. 



Office deputy. 
do 



Total 



Florida, northern: 

Thomas F. McGowin . . 

Herman Wolf 

C. Armstrong 

J. L. Behymer 

T. S. Watts 

R. P. Wharton 

L. Wiselogel 

James C. Stewart ... 



C. F. Adkison .. 
James Atkinson 



Elisha Walker. 



Total. 



Florida, southern: 

John F. Horr 

Percy C. Stickney 

Fred'k W. Johnson. .. 
Katharine Pillsbury . . 

William Cox 

Cicero G. Chandler... 
Jno. McS. Cameron . . 
Edward M. McCook.. 
W. H. McCormick.... 



Delmer E. Peacock. 

John L. Pherigo 

Frank A. Root 

Jno. R. Williams. .. 



Total 



Georgia, northern: 

W. H. Johnson 

James H. Rinard 

William C. Thomas . . 

Theodore D. Irish 

* R. A. Bailey 

E. L. Bergstrom 

C. F. Brown 

W. L. Cape 

T. W. Craigs 

Boon Crawford 

J. W. Crawford 

J. A. Downs 

Thomas R. Glenn 

J. W.Godfrey 

Jno. D. Goode 

Dennis M. Grizzle 

R. M. Gudger 

J. B. Johnson 

J. C. Johnson 



do 

do 

do 

do 

.... do 

do 

do 

do 

.... do 

do 

do 

Special deputy 



Periods. 



Fiscal year 

do 

Oct. 10, 1899, to June 30, 1900. 

Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

.... do 

Oct. 11, 1899, to June 30. 1900 

Fiscal year 

July 1, 1899, to Sept. 30, 1899. 
July 1, 1899, to Oct. 9, 1899 » . 
July 1, 1899, to Feb. 5, 1900 . . 
Paid by District 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

do 

do 



.do 
.db. 
do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 

do 



.do 
.do 
do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



Fiscal year 

do 

Oath, May 7, 1900 

Oath, Feb. 3, 1899 

Oath, Feb. 1, 1899 

Oath, May 17, 1899 

Oath, Feb. 2, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 18, 1899: service termi- 
nated Jan. 23, 1900. 

Oath, Oct. 10, 1899; service termi- 
nated Oct. 12, 1899; special. 

Oath, Feb. 21, 1899; service termi- 
nated Oct. 25, 1900. 

Oath, Feb. 13, 1899; service termi- 
nated May 2, 1900. 



Fiscal year 

do 

....do 

....do 

Oath, June 1, 1898; special 

Oath, May 26, 1898; special 

Oath, May 26, 1898: special 

Oath, Nov. 23,1898 

Oath, Jan. 7, 1899; during sickness of 
McCook. 

Oath, July 1, 1899, 

Oath, Apr. 6, 1899 

Oath, July 20, 1898 

Oath, May 31, 1899 



Fiscal year 

do 

.—.do 

....do 

Oath, July 3, 1897. 
Oath, Oct. 28, 1899. 
Oath, Jan. 4, 1898.. 
Oath, July 3,1897. 
Oath, July 2, 1897. 
Oath, Oct. 28, 1899. 
Oath, July 6, 1897. 
Oath, July 5,1897. 
Oath, Oct. 19, 1899. 
Oath July 12,1897 



Oath, Oct. 5,1897.. 
Oath, Apr. 12, 1898 
Oath, July 9, 1897. 
Oath, Dec. 1, 1897. . 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



,100.00 

,000.00 

725.54 

,000.00 

,000.00 

,000.00 

,000.00 

,000.00 

650.56 

900.00 

225.00 

233.62 

659.98 



26,566.34 



3,000.00 
1,275.00 



4,275.00 



3,000.00 

1,200.00 

600.00 

600.00 



5,400.00 



5,000.00 
2,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,800.00 



1 Not paid for period from Sept. 8 to Sept. 22, inclusive. 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY- GENERAL. 





Fa 


» 




Expenses. 




Earned. 


P.„M.. 


SnbslBtence »ad 
travel. 


oth., ™™. 


US 


Claimed. 


Apprnvnrl 


««* 




fHttimprt 


n£&d 


Vi,.- ' 


A <'., 

proved. 


frpwit 


(101.084 

•Ui. IK: 
:!7>> Si, 
1. -,(.; .->:;, 
1.112.2) 

.-:'.! Hi; 
■I.V.Sii 

■11;'. i"j 

mi in 
22. -Jtii 
17. SO 

203.334 


















870 
1 H 


.11. 
















































188.67 


168.67 




































68 

nso 

141 
SI 

1 


l> 

... 
... 
-i 
-" 




















































































































m.oo-.-i; 


11. - ■ 






88.67 


68.67 


<■_■ .;. .- 


pKCk 


H BW f. 


287.21 
17H. 37 
21.08 

:H>j.0S 
l.ipl.22 
(llii (.12 
1*1-. UK 

iaa.se 


MT* 






546.88 

IAS 1H 

la. si> 
at. to 

mi «i 
ih3 :; 

811 50 
63.76 


645.06 

15ft. 70 
18 55 
77 90 
101.00 
186 27 
80.50 
57.00 


19 21 


18 21 




1IJ 

■.:"■ 


-'. 

IV- 








116.26 
258 48 
817. M 
457 50 
881 88 
148.94 


116.28 
188 0) 
MXl *! 
440 83 
6.10 49 
ISO. 48 




















687.52 

NTe.ra 






















- 








189.10 
48.66 


120 


08.81 
36.40 


38. 40 


H.36 

8.00 


13.86 

6.00 








48.60 














:!..«!!'.;: 


3.51U.M5 


3, 511 -,V 


2.3HU15 


1.233 97 


1.2-11 32 


19. SI 


12.21 


632.74 


mis 


1.418.78 
180 43 
188 86 
44.88 







40.40 

p. OS 

:«lfn. 
88.50 


467.611 
438 ill 

88.60 


17.83 


17138 


1.048.82 


















































































l.mu 

1.618 IB 

A.-...- 

115. :« 

258.10 


1.874 m 

1.576.40 

an.oo 
iiij.au 

250.17 


1.044.10 

JM.W 

80. SI 
193.12 


i.mo.sb 

1. 181.81 

\m ;, 

80 S3 
187.62 


144.67 

121 60 

21.80 


132. m 

121.50 
a. so 


























55.80 


18 80 


























17.33 


17.38 


1.046.82 


2,150.1b 

S«l . II.". 
31.SU 


2,150. IB 
H21. H5 
31.50 






COB 

. ■,-,.;. si 
20. 3D 


400 
666.86 
28.80 


T7.0TI 


77 00 


212. SJ 






















848.90 


830.88 


486.71 


473.13 


88.08 


38.73 














353. (Hi 
1.157. 20 
1,502 32 


1 . is:! iti 
i. rye. ;b 


4111. St 
807.03 
1,104.23 


410 23 
8l.iT. !ti 

(,iu.n 


114. -1 

18:,.;.-, 

100 75 
0.28 
10 85 

r,o so 

72. It 
Hi'. 50 
IT3.-Bj 

l3ii. :b> 

09 1.40 
ldl in 


113 31 
1h6 75 
IHO 75 
028 
10 65 
SOSii 
72 44 

IDS SO 
172 X. 
137 f. 
180 40 
Oil 111 


























440.(18 
400. 7B 

8115.111 
l.:miii 
l.—' iti 
) . 1-V0 :t" 
Mil. HI 
H5I . 52 
1 .(50.80 


UK 78 

SliVCII 

1. mm. lit 
1,221 53 

1.1S7.8S 

r.ni so 

851.52 
l,ir,i.;m 


\m. 07 

(ill). 42 

inn. 12 

OHi. 51 
8BB.7S 
405 59 
dtrt. IU( 


sti. w 

jno.ii: 

001. 12 
1175. 12 
(HO. 14 
W: 11 

nr,. -,o 
i.-a-.ni 

























































342 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Exhibits.— Showing, by districts, tlie salaries paid toUnited States marshals, their 
compensation payable oat of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 





Titlea. 






Halarloa. 


Dixirii'tH mnl claims. 


Ferlnda. 


Mm ~]i;ii'.. 


Georgia northern -<"*t*d. 


Flrlil (trinity 


. •:',! 

•>-.: 

• <*■ 

Oatl 

• w 

Oat 

• >.., 

IIHI 

Oat 






























































do 

... do 






t !. \-Sstn] 


















H.N. Ayers 




nat.-d Hfpt. ID. )I*0 
i*tb. .Inn. IT. I-W wrv.™ teruil- 

nal.it nit IB.littS. 
tiatii July ' \*K: nervt™ terml- 

uaXe-iU-et U. ihw. 

i»tb. r.l, i*. Isw,; ™tv..;.. Utiiii 
•ml-.! May 17, 1W0. 






S.H.Galloway 


do 









■ \S 


taj May BU. liWW. 
















>l '. 








(if'i-i.-i.'i. southern: 


Ft. 




3.600.00 
I JIIOO 
1. HI) III 


li'i-iiarrl DA.ivk- 











Field deputy 


■■-.* 

us- 
da* 
















































do 

do . 


ih.i 
d> 
■',.• 

I>M- 

da* 

or,* 

- la! 


. Mar 3ti. iwu; eueowj for 2 














A.M. Whlteky 


.... d.> 

do 












.■ -.; ■ .:..■! r 






















B.IIU.IKl 








Idaho; 


fat 




S. UW.nD 

-ii>i>. 

1.JW0.W 




■ .. ;<:• v !■ •; i::y 
■:•■■■ -:-,... 
Field deputy 






















ii.mim 








mi 4ohy° r A, , D ™ T 


n™ 




s.wn w 
s.imn ■» 
>■ 

I.SUU l« 
1.30O.IU 

1 son hi 

l.-iip-il 

mm :■. 
«». rii 

840. TO 
1 000.00 

I mini 

1 Jill .HI 

«ffWI 




i ■..»■: ..».■■.■...■!■ ,li 

Office deputy 
















































lo 




do 

... do 


::::: 




















■ ■*• 






....do 


h.Fob i. WW: eporial i:oi ..mpiT. 
inn 


W.J. King 





REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



343 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earnedand 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \* 
proved. 


deposit. 


$685.80 

1,003.40 

729.94 

684.31 

1,635.85 

724.94 

668.74 

904.40 

1,373.96 


$685.80 

1,003.40 

* 729.94 

680.31 

1,623.05 

724.94 

668.74 

903.90 

1,371.96 


$514.34 
752.53 
547.44 
513.21 

1,226.87 
543.70 
501.55 
678.51 

1,030.46 


$514.34 
752.53 
547.44 
510.21 

1,217.27 
543.70 
501.55 
677.91 

1,018.98 


$74.49 

115.16 

72.25 

168.81 

381.43 

78.75 

86.27 

99.72 

. 158.10 


$74.49 

114.66 

72.25 

166.32 

381.43 

78.75 

86.27 

99.72 

158.10 












, 


















































1,221.86 
101.84 

470.84 

382.02 

518.50 


1,221.86 
101.84 

470.84 

382.02 

518.50 


916.38 
76.37 

353.12 

286.51 

388.86 


916.38 
76.37 

353.12* 

286.51 

388.86 


154.15 
13.30 

34.48 

42.25 

55.51 


154.15 
12.40 

34.48 

42.25 

55.51 














































60.00 


60.00 


" 




















26,473.02 


26,429.62 


17,528.36 


17,484.11 


3,908.57 

* 


3,899.93 


$77.00 


$77.00 


$212.21 


1,823.58 
214.48 
600.99 


1,823.23 

214.48 
600.39 






310.31 
351.84 

178.38 


310.31 
351.84 
178.38 


23.10 


23.10 


875.64 




























623.20 
1,706.53 


613.80 
1,704.03 


467.40 
1,279.91 


460.35 
1,278.03 


317.01 
739.37 


300.39 
722.23 




















765.52 


764.52 


574.15 


573.40 


249.93 


241.13 


I 


























• 


14.54 

1,269.89 

1,985.27 

396.56 

1,186.81 


14.54 

1,267.39 

1,900.77 

396.56 

1,174.65 


10.90 

952.41 

1,488.96 

297.42 

890.10 


10.90 

950.54 

1,405.77 

297.42 

880.97 


1.37 

383.13 

753.99 

48.26 

199.57 

142.00 
74.25 


1.37 

374.60 
686.95 

48.26 
195.57 

142.00 
74.25 


































































10,587.37 


10,474.36 


5,961.25 


5,857.38 


3,749.41 


3,627.28 


23.10 


23.10 


875.64 


1,082.63 
1,093.75 
1,129.91 


1,082.63 
1,093.75 
1,129.91 






2,044.05 
990.35 
635.30 


2,030.55 
981.60 
626.80 


43.29 


43.16 








• 








































3,306.29 


3,306.29 






3,669.70 


3,638.95 


43.29 


43.16 


964.36 








2,140.31 

1,312.84 
814.52 
878.47 

1,025.54 
252.18 
152.96 
782.53 
272.46 
469.67 
621.46 
106.87 
95.02 

2,166.99 
195.24 


2,140.31 

1,300.54 
807.56 
873.53 

1,024.42 
252.18 
136.86 
781.95 
272.46 
461.45 
618.66 
105.81 
94.96 

2,137.70 
194.74 










344.88 


341.63 

• 


2,692.49 






197.34 

132.79 

114.93 

200.31 

25.64 

66.23 

66.89 

88.49 

38.29 

60.55 

12.47 

7.01 

477.82 

7.65 


193.08 

132.34 

114.93 

200.31 

25.64 

66.23 

66.09 

88.49 

38.29 

60.55 

12.47 

7.01 

472.33 

7.65 
























































































































.40 









































344 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Shouring, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Illinois northern— C't'd. 
James B. Nichols — 



J.D.G.Oglesby. 



Total. 



Illinois, southern: 
Charles P. Hitch . . 
Edward E. Watts . 
Charles E.Flinn.. 

John Edwards 

A.J.Babcock 

William L. Da vies. 

T.L.Dowell 

E.M.Eaton 

Peter Saup 

Archibald Spring . 
Harry Swimmer . . 

Miller Weir 

D.C.Williams 



Total. 



Indiana: 

S. E. Kercheval 

John E. Foley 

AlonzoBoyd 

George E. Branham 
Mrs. Mamie Baker . . 

Andrew Fite 

J.T.Peck 

EliasO. Rose 



Total. 



Indian Territory, north- 
ern: 

Leo E. Bennett 

Frank C. Hubbard ... 

E. L. Berry 

K.L.Bills 

C.H.Griswold 



G.S.White 

Russell Wiggins 

George D. Story 

John C. Dannenberg. . 

R. M.J. Shriver 

David Adams 

M. L. Alberty 

Gabe Beck 

J.L.Brown 

William Buckner 

H.Bussey 

E. F.Cochran 

James Colby 

George A. Davis 

Orlando Dobson 

Jacob Harrison 

Grant Johnson 

W.F.Jones 

N.M.Jones 

Geo. P. Lawson 

A.M. Lewis 

J.S.CTBrian 

Joseph Payne 

Bass Reeves 

J. C.C.Rogers 

W.E.Shipley 

W.N.Stannard 

Joseph Thompson 

P.Talbert 

Pies. C. Thompson 

A.J.Trail 



Titles. 



Field deputy 
do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

...do 

Field deputy 

do 

.....do 

do 

.-..do 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Stenographer 

Field deputy 

do 

.....do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Office deputy and 
stenographer. 

Office deputy 

do 

— .do 

do 

do 

Field deputy 

do 

....do 

—do 

do 

do 

do 

— .do 

....do 

— .do 

— .do 

—do 

—do 

— .do 

— .do 

— .do 

—do 

— do 

—do 

—do 

—do 

....do 

do 

—do 

—do 

....do 



Periods. 



Oath, Mar. 24, 1899; special, no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Apr. 23, 1900; special, no com- 
pensation. 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, July 6, 1897. 

do 

Oath, July 22, 1897 
Oath, July 6, 1897. 
Oath, July 21, 1897 
Oath, July 6, 1897. 
Oath, July 8, 1897. 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, Apr. 17, 1897 
Oath, Apr. 10, 1897 
Oath, May 6, 1897. 



Fiscal year 

do 

—do 

do 

do 



.do 



Sept. 16, 1899 to June 30, 1900 

Fiscal year 

do 

do 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Temporary appointment- .. 

Oath, Oct. 16, 1897 

Oath, Dec. 20, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Oath, Oct. 16,1897 

Oath, Mar. 15, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Oath, July 16. 1898. 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, Oct 25, 1897 

Oath, Oct. 16,1897 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Oath, Apr. 4, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

do 

do 

Oath, Jan. 16, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, Apr. 9, 1898 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$19,906.50 



4,500.00 

2,000.00 

1,200.00 

600.00 

600.00 

600.00 



9,500.00 



4,500.00 
2,000.00 
1,200.00 
1,000.00 
600.00 



9,900.00 



4,000.00 
2,500.00 
1.600.00 
1,200.00 
900.00 

900.00 
474.46 
900.00 
600.00 
600.00 



EEPOET OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



345 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap -* 
proved. 


deposit. 
























































$11,287.06 


$11,203.13 






$1,496.41 


$1,485.41 


$344.88 


$342.03 


$2,692.49 








2,051.80 

1,612.97 

605.45 

139.24 


2,012.13 

1,603.47 

605.55 

139.24 






55.86 
792.52 
339.01 

67.89 


55.86 
783.29 
335.21 

67.89 


83.03 


82.49 


2,573.47 














• 
























7.04 

2,648.32 

2,168.18 

17.92 

2,307.54 

9.12 
1,334.98 
2.382.26 


7.04 

2,635.74 

2,119.42 

17.92 

2,283.66 

9.12 
1,303.32 
2,372.10 






1.90 

46.03 

122.99 


1.90 

39.27 

117.99 








$1,986.23 
1,626.08 
13.44 
1,730.65 
6.84 
1,001.14 
1,786.69 


$1,974.94 

1,589.56 

13.44 

1,712.76 

6.84 

977.49 

1,757.90 




• 
















131.74 


129.99 














59.92 
60.77 


59.92 
59.82 




















15,284.82 


15,108.71 


8,151.02 


8,032.93 


1,678.63 


1,651.14 


83.03 


82.49 


2,573.47 


870.70 

233.05 

1,880.38 

1,928.36 


B70.70 

233.05 

1,880.38 

1,928.36 






30.40 

37.20 

1,322.98 

1,172.38 


30.40 

37.20 

1,321.98 

1,172.38 


121.60 


121.60 


1,574.80 






































409.68 

1,054.60 

630.90 


409.68 

1,054.60 

630.60 


307.25 
790.94 
473.16 


307.25 
790.94 
472.94 


62.26 

74.72 
84.71 


59.86 
72.62 
83.03 


























7,007.67 


7,007.37 


1,571.35 


1,571.13 


2,784.65 


2,777.47 


121.60 


121.60 


1,574.80 


3,372.48 
108.00 


3,372.48 
108.00 






3,798.55 

1,426.09 

471.74 

103.25 

1,665.70 

205.20 
221.65 
433.76 
24.75 
24.25 
217.65 


2,471.16 

1,426.09 

465.74 

103.25 

1,664.95 

203.70 
221.65 
433.76 
24.75 
24.25 
194.40 


1,940.41 


1,940.41 


1*542.72 
































344.10 
189.60 


334.10 
189.60 
































116.95 
25.00 
66.22 

922.83 


116.95 
25.00 
66.22 

905.93 
































692.11 


679.72 
































662.44 
1,217.10 


645.34 

1,195.80 


496.83 
912.83 


484.01 
896.85 


204.75 
207.75 


202.75 
205.75 




















705.16 
660.34 
29.54 
631.07 
533.79 
709.82 
855.33 


694.76 
651.34 
29.54 
627.23 
525.79 
709.82 
847.83 


528.87 
495.24 
22.16 
473.29 
400.34 
532.36 
641.48 


527.06 
488.49 
22.16 
470.41 
394.34 
532.36 
635.86 


114.25 
111.49 
4.50 
278.30 
83.25 
162.25 
174.50 


114.25 
111.49 
4.50 
275.55 
82.50 
162.25 
170.50 




































































713.20 
940.98 
883.74 
756.14 
1,715.35 
1,152.90 
610.78 


699.70 
892.83 
868.14 
742.66 
1,707.33 
1,147.36 
600.78 


534.88 
705.72 
662.79 
567.10 
1,286.51 
864.67 
458.07 


524.75 
669.61 
651.09 
557.00 
1,280.50 
860.52 
450.58 


■248.50 
407.93 
276.75 
205.25 
202.54 
339.75 
232.95 


248.25 
398.93 
276.25 
205.25 
201.54 
339.50 
232.57 


















































1,327.85 
1,177.54 
1,383.45 


1,324.05 
1,108.79 
1,372.45 


995.88 
883.14 


993.04 

831.58 


597.05 
370. 75 
498. 75 


595.55 
369.75 
494.88 














1,037.58 1 1,029.34 









REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 





Titles. 


^.. 


Salaries. 


Districts apd names. 


Marshals, 
clerks. 


lad. Tot .noTth"ii— Ct'd 


Field deputy 






















11.1,874. 46 








Indian TiTr(!i>ry,r»nlral 
Jaa|«>t r tlrnjiy 
Frank 8 dmjuug 
A A H:11;r.DHlny 


4.000 on 

a. -< 

1 *«i w 

i aj" in 
woo in 
• ■■■■ 

900.00 


(.Tilef nfflondepoty 






























Field deputy . . . 


















...do 
































(loth.i)cr ii.lnBK 

■ ■-■I. ^l,. ■ — - Hfrv:.« -j-rrn : «■ 
i.' . . -I i ■' oath. lit- - Ittr.i 










do 




















































do 


■rv ■ ■■••.■rr.i.i: . ■■! 
Jonol.lWW. 
























































Oath. M*y «. 1-W. serf ice terminated 
Aok 10. im. 

Oalh-. A|.r li. ItW. Sept ». ISW: 
- r,..- ;.■-:,..„■,.. \ - -.v S. l-Ui 






.to 










** 


• :■■; V.,, 1 Hi; BBTViit- l.-.-IDIII* 

•■••1 IW .11.1900 

mtvxi- -!.::■ ,1 i. 
Wlllh: Hi . 19011. 

Ou-r, Mni 1 1^9-. service termlua- 

.. | J'.. . .- |.... 

st-rv " r. Tiulut 
■..1 -Mir h. Il'li 








JamoB H TbompeoD 


, 




....do 












<i«-.!i A|.r 1 .--. servlen tannlna- 
t>'d Apr.SM.ltW. special. 












12.OOU.00 








Indian Territory, snoth- 


4.noono 

l. bll- III 

1.3 

1 »■! >l 

V 

900 00 

raooo 
1<K ti 
xc m 
w; 40 


kaj-ni t:d Hen . . 


UnU.fnlB.».i«poty 
































.. . do 

. .do... 

~> 1; If r Ltphl r . . . 

Field deputy . . 




K"y Bradford . .. 




.!..:> : >«■. :..N..v .». :hhu 














Job H. Bridges... 


...do 







REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



347 



deputies and clerks; their expenses , as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Pees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \* 
proved. 


deposit. 


$1,143.88 
131.34 


$1,127.38 
129.84 


$857.90 
98.50 


$845.53 
96.38 


$464.20 
23.60 


$464.20 
23.50 




















23,066.92 


22,767.04 


14,148.25 


13,921.18 


13,801.55 


812,413.41 


$1,940.41 


$1,940.41 


$1,542.72 


1,847.73 


1,847.73 






141.00 

1,586.45 

127.50 

1,540.85 

1,148.35 

415.67 

384.30 

26.65 

233.55 

44.25 

7.65 

574.30 

218.90 

344.10 

81.25 

44.30 

3.75 
90.50 


141.00 

1,585.20 

127.50 

1,540.85 

1,148.35 

410.67 

380.60 

26.20 

233.55 

44.25 

7.00 

573.80 

218.90 

344.10 

81.25 

44.30 

3.75 
90.50 


833.31 


824.83 


798.90 








26.35 

.60 

7.00 

140.58 

266.60 

387.25 

668.45 

377.50 

51.80 

1,479.97 

477.52 

942.64 

285.11 

574.94 

9.36 
288.62 


26.35 

.50 

7.00 

140.58 

266.60 

387.05 

664.95 

365.86 

51.80 

1,470.49 

476.02 

930.24 

285.11 

574.94 

9.36 
288.62 




















































290.43 
501.33 
283.13 
38.85 
1,109.98 
358.15 
706.97 
213.83 
431.21 

7.02 
216. 47 


290.28 
498.71 
274.40 
38.85 
1,102.87 
357.03 
697.67 
213.83 
431.21 

7.02 
216.47 










































































1,404.78 
970.03 
329.76 
193.76 
783.05 

1,530.24 
330.56 
159.16 


1,404.78 
942.93 
307.58 
193.76 

767.87 

1,524.54 

. 328.70 

158.66 


1,053.58 
727.52 
247.33 
145.32 

587.30 

1,147.69 
247.92 
119.37 


i, 049. 20 
707.19 
230.69 
145.32 
575.91 

1,143.41 
246.53 
119.00 


408.96 
171.30 
111.95 
73.00 
133.65 

701.17 
71.70 
53.25 


408.96 
165.55 
106.15 
73.00 
131.40 

692.92 
64.70 
53.25 
























































1,385.71 


1,263.63 


1,039.28 


1,022.71 


381.40 


367.30 














244.56 
112.50 

106.96 

820.72 
226.68 

41.28 

572.98 

663.58 

26.42 
17.90 


244.56 
112.50 

105.04 

803.86 
200.48 

41.28 
560.98 
643.58 

26.42 


183.43 

84.38 

81.72 

615.54 
170.01 

30.96 

429.73 

497.69 

19.82 
13.43 


183.43 

84.38 

78.78 

602.89 
150.36 

30.96 
420.73 
482.69 

19.82 


93.05 
9.50 

11.50 

356.07 
56.15 

16.50 

107.45 

259.45 

5.00 
.50 


91.05 
9.50 

11.50 

353.32 
56.15 

16.50 

104.75 

254.83 

5.00 










































































17,754.55 


17,424.35 


11,599.39 


11,422.34 


10,034.87 


9,967.60 


833.31 


824.83 


798.90 


5,534.45 
566.08 
182.93 
402.11 
329.28 
216.42 
460.51 
158.61 


5,316.46 
556.08 
182.93 
402.11 
329.28 
216.42 
450.51 
158.61 






2,145.19 

2,023.45 

879. 78 

128.35 

568.95 

12.90 

68.30 

32.20 


2,125.59 

2,010.41 

854.78 

128.35 

568.95 

12.90 

65.80 

32.20 


61.13 


56.39 


2,683.16 


















































































































458.02 
773.30 
932.38 


450.32 
764.22 
895.48 


343.53 
579.99 
699.30 


337.76 
573.18 
671.63 


168.00 
239.45 
619.95 


167.80 
234.20 
604.28 





















348 



REPORT CP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibits.— Showing, by districts, Vie salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Ind. Ter^south'rn— C't'd. 

Z. Brock 

Charles A. Burns 

Jno. F. Clemens 

Robert M. Cummings 

James B.Davis 

L. D. Dickerson 

Buck Garrett 

J. 8. Hammer, jr 

James R. Hutchins . . . 

T.E.Lilly 

Selden T. Lindsey 



Titles. 



Field deputy 
do 



Periods. 



C.Madsen 

W. E.McLemore 

Robert Neater 

Joseph A. Schrimsher 
George M. Stewart. . . 

Jno. A.Tucker 

Sam Harper 

N. W.Fisher 

Geo. W. Brown 



D. F. Fore 



Ben. C. Collins 

Thomas J. Covington. 
W. C. Everheart 



Total. 



Iowa, northern: 

Edward Knott 

Benjamin F. Bean 

Horace Poole 

Gustaf F. Gustafson. 

Michael h. Healy 

Jacob A. Tracey 

Ray Van Dervere 



Total. 



Iowa, southern: 

George M. Christian. 
Howard L Hedrick.. 

Jessie I. Christian 

Harry Fulton 

George W. McNaught 

W. A. Richards 

A.E.Willis 

Jno. McCormick 



.do 

.do. 

.do. 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

-do 

.do 

.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Clerk 

Field deputy 

.....do 

do 

do 



Oath, Jan. 10, 1900.. 
Oath, Jan. 29, 1898.. 

do 

Oath, Oct. 16, 1899.. 
Oath, Jan. 29, 1898.. 
Oath, June 23, 1898. 
Oath, Jan. 29, 1898.. 
do 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



Oath, Jan. 29. 1898 

Oath, Jan. 29, 1898; service termi- 
nated July 20, 1900. 

Oath, Mar. 8. 1898 

Oath, July 27, 1899 

Oath, June 23, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 6, 1900 

Oath, Jan. 29, 1898 

do 

Oath, July 17, 1899 

Oath, Jan. 10, 1900; declined 

Oath, Jan. 29, 1898; service termi- 
nated Jan. 6. 1900. 

Oath, Sept. 1, 1898; service termi- 
nated Sept. 1, 1899. 

Oath, Jan. 29, 1898; service termi- 
nated (?). 

Oath, Jan. 29, 1898; service termi- 
nated Sept. 30, 1899. 

Oath, Jan. 29, 1898; service termi- 
nated (?). 



R, C. Delmage. 
T.J.Parrott .. 



Total. 



Kansas: 

Wm. Edgar Sterne. 
Donald N. Willits.. 

J.E. Brown 

W. C. Mooney 

E. A. Prescott 

Fred. C. Trigg 



Total. 



Kentucky: 

A. D. James 

Thomas A. Mitchel. . 
Do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

do 

do 



.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 
Office deputy 



Fiscal year 

do 

.....do 

Oath, Oct. 2, 1899 

Oath, Mar. 31,1899 

Oath, Mar. 23, 1898 

Oath, July 19, 1898; service termi- 
nated Sept. 30, 1899. 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

Oath, Nov. 21, 1899 

Oath, Mar. 2, 1898 

Oath. Mar. 22, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 2, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 23, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. 1, 1899. 

Oath, Mar. 3, 1898; service termi- 
nated Jan. 1, 1900. 



Fiscal year 

do 

.... do 

Oath, Mar. 26,1898. 
Oath, Mar. 1,1898.. 
Oath, Feb. 19,1898. 



$13,922.82 



4,000.00 
1,600.00 
1,050.00 



6,550.00 



4,000.00 

2,000.00 

900.00 



6,900.00 



4,000.00 

1,529.69 

600.00 



Fiscal year 

Oct. 13, 1899, to June 30, 1900. 
July 1, 1899, to Oct. 12,1899... 



6,129.09 



5,000.00 

1,291.30 

423.91 



REPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



is claimed awl as approved; the. fees earnedand 



Pees. 




Esys 


MM 






Earned. 


Pay 


hie. 


STjhuisteoc* nri'l 
travel 


""-' 


*t ,;.-■. 


i.aJil to 
, t-rko'if 


I'liiitn.-tl. 


Vliprdvi'd. 


cuu„d. 


*4> 


( liLLiuial 


toJW 


'lalmed. 


i«£&d 


"°°^ 


J170. 20 

261.36 
1,511.60 
lis.-,. :;-. 

' 743 ri 

mi. 31 

553.13 

1,045. 90 

1.134.111 
1.306.n; 
1.17 1- 
(101.05 


Mas. 73 

am. (»* 
88?. u 1 
2*3. 7ii 

1.41«i. in 
WW. 75 

1,405.72 
725.01 
5911. 1111 

1.190. OH 
(81. S3 

1,017.91 

i . 12*. !>■; 

1. 230. 17 
131 . 4*1 

697.45 


(134. 40 

39". Si' 
Ml. HI 
213.25 

1.136.68 
7:m.;; 
l.nTn.™ 

5.57.(17 

-i.yv is 

414! 11 

1,450,60 
350.54 
1150.24 
103.11 
451.47 


$120.55 

375. 16" 

212'' ill 
1.117.i,ii 
7*1. 46 
1.1151 2U 
,54-1.. 'ij 
440. IB 
692.9s 

383. n 

1,436.45 

H37 it-, 
08.81 
448.11 


J134.25 

270.70 
113.75 

ISO. 50 
.1.", 1! 
4r.l 45 

225' .SO 
211.211 
8IH.3II 
39.80 

877.05 

101.05 
561. 1.", 
47. 36 
354.00 


|123 75 
;:. I.', 
:t>. T.-. 

tv> ■•. 

H8S95 
267 SO 
233 30 
311.70 
.594.75 
39.80 

863.50 
480 30 
■.7k ■« 
45 16 
361.76 








































































































72».«l 


71)7.58 


547.il 


532.20 


98. 06 


07 06 














30+.. 74 
38.79 
88,98 


203.54 
15.05 
33. BO 

130.76 


143.43 
31.80 
25.47 
IH. 33 


143.63 
11.30 
26.47 
07.33 


74.75 

4.00 
80.60 


73.76 
14.2ft 
4.00 
80.60 



























































I3.2S1.5H 


$61.13 


ts&aa 


-3. 963 16 


son. si 
903.07 


506.SH 






57. 80 
408.81 


fit. TO 


89.60 


80.36 


43180 


















1.557. 60 

2\'n:li i'ii 
liasa 


1, Oil. nil 

::"\n\ . v.; 
113.56 


1. 166.35 
1.501.73 

i..;.'.; id 


1.120.02 

1.16H. .Hi 

l.r.iUMHi 

85.17 


231.71 

25(1. In 
213.(15 

37.83 


334 05 
264 14 
21(1 4.1 
37.83 
































r,aa no 


n.ifir.ii* 










so. 60 


89.35 


131.80 


ntJB 

1*. IK 

4.00 

358.22 

l.iV «.>.!»! 

!SM. 76 

n.ea 
bos. as 

5.60 


SB.3 
4.00 

mi. on 

1.154. on 

1.070. 6(1 
(HH. 46 
77.98 






137.40 

lno.51 

111.47 
9.66 
.58.18 
57.03 

53.33 
L23 


127.38 

11L47 
H.Bfi 
51.83 

Ml. it! 

40. as 

1.28 
30.07 


08.110 


94.40 










a w. iiM 

1, 12.-i.7L 

1.. -.11.22 
718.58 
68.47 

156.04 

4.13 


26.-,. Ml 
1. I'll. 17 
1.M12.17 

1)61.31 
68.47 






























































r,.ms.:i.! 


5.7CS.2.1 


3. 628. SI 


I.;.;;!, in 


560. SI 


UB.1B 


06. (VI 


cj.ni 


m » 


1,1590.10 

231. .17 
211.;. 62 
1,631. Oil 
2.5('.I.UI 
3,230.01 


1,580.10 
78.75 

195. S2 

1 ■;;■".'■ 7 " 

£ 215.31 






770.33 

234.61 
Mi. 81 
12.511 

)&'- 15 


770.18 

237. 56 
SO 64 
10.60 

674 96 
81.40 


58.30 
.35 


55.39 

.25 


3,880.08 








1.375.04 
I, .>il.(i7 

(.336.30 


1.639.2* 
l.S'Si !>■ 

1,881.. Mi 






















s. --.in. res 


e,m is 


1,303.47 








58. .55 


55.04 


■:.i;-ii.iis 


3,441.03 
134.80 


3,441.02 
134.80 






55.50 


55.50 


108.30 


105.97 


1,833.33 









350 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Showing, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and Dames. 



Kentucky— Continued. 
Walter A. Blackburn. 

Melville C. James 

H or tense Horton 

J. A. Coleman 

Jno. D. Compton 

Lincoln Denton 

B. A. Puson 

Henry T. Gose 

James W. Huff 

FredN. Isbell 

Presley Jackson 

J. P. Justice 

Boyd Kelly 

M. W. LaRue 

Con McCarty 

E. B. Long 

John C. Morgan 

A. B. Patrick 

John B. Rogers 

W. T. Short 

George C. Thompson. 

J. Howard Wilson 

Lawrence Yonts 

P. L Page 



Titles. 



Office deputy. 

do 

do 

Field deputy . 
do 



James M. Blair 
W. H.Power ... 



Thomas S. Salyer. 
Mose Dixon 



Elijah G. Howard 
J. D. Keel 



Total 



Louisiana, eastern: 
Charles Fontelieu .. 

Felix Bien venu 

T.LGalbreth 

Joseph H. Patin 



Total. 



Louisiana, western: 

J.M.Martin 

Alex. H. Bernstein. . . 
W.C.Farrington.... 

D. S. A. Harmon 

Nathan L. Stewart. . 
Dan.W.Childers.... 

LeeMcAlpin 

J. H. Crawford 

H.E.Estorge 

B.D.Loper 

Lemuel Gustine 

Alex. H. Bernstein... 
R. L. Brig man 



W.C.Farrington... 

D. S.A.Harmon 

Nathan L. Stewart. 

Lee McAlpin 

Leonce Jacobs 



.-do. 

—do. 

..do 

..do 

...do. 

...do 

...do. 

...do. 

..do. 

...do 

..do 

..do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 



Periods. 



...do 
...do 



do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 



Total. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Marshal 

Chief office deputy 
Field deputy 



Fiscal year 

do 

... .do 

Oath, Oct. 17, 1898. 

Oath, Aug. 6, 1897 

Oath, Mar. 21, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 28, 1899 

Oath, May 11, 1899 

Oath, May 12, 1900 

Oath, Apr. 16, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 12,1898 

Oath, June 4, 1900 

Oath, Apr. 13,1900 

Oath, July 14. 1897 

Oath, July 9, 1897 

Oath, May 1,1900 

Oath, Apr. 19, 1899 

Oath, Aug. 1.1S99 

Oath, Apr. 13,1899 

Oath, Aug. 31,1897 

Oath, July 19. 1897 

Oath, Sept. 16,1899 

Oath, June 7, 1900 

Oath, July 12, 1897; service termi 
natedMay 1,1900. 

Oath, Jan. 2,1899; service terminated 

Oath, Aug. 18. 1898; service termi- 
nated Aug. 1, 1899. 

Oath, July 12. 1897; service termi- 
nated Aug. 1, 1899. 

Oath, June 27, 1898; service termi- 
nated Jan. 1, 1900. 

Oath, Aug. 1, 1899; service termi- 
nated Apr. 15, 1900. 

Oath, Aug. 1, 1899: service termi- 
nated June 1, 1900. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$1,500.00 
1,200.00 
1,000.00 



Fiscal year 

.....do 

.....do 

do 



do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



July 1,1899, to Jan. 18, 1900 

do 

Oath, Nov. 22, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 2, 1897 

Oath, July 2, 1897 

Oath, Jan. 10, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 6, 1897 

Oath, Mar. 5, 1898 

Oath, Sept. 22, 1897 

Oath, Dec. 10, 1897 -. 

Jan. 19, 1900, to June 30, 1900 

do 

Oath, Feb. 15, 1900; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Jan. 20, 1900 

Oath, Jan. 22, 1900 

Oath, Jan. 20, 1900 

Oath, Jan. 25, 1900 

Oath, June 15, 1900 



10,415.21 



3,000.00 
1,500.00 
1,067.20 
1,000.00 



16,567.20 



1,375.00 
660.00 



1,125.00 
540.00 



3,700.00 



1 Account for June quarter not rendered when this exhibit was prepared. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY- GENERAL. 





Feee. 




Expenses. 




Earned. 


Payable. 


Suljsist 


nconnn Other expenses. 


].:,;.: 1.. 


Claimed. 


A,„r„* 


"-- 


Ap 


»" 


proved. 


dnimwl 


,mved 


"""■"- 


f 164. 60 

775. Hi 

as*, w 

941. 75 

KB. 44 

an. 7s 

1,171 .ft* 
1 . !»W. 2* 

70. 58 
3,i.Hti.im 
1,311. Hi 

12.02 
257.12 
1-rM-r.. <M' 

■aw,. ',:■ 
m. "I 

1.'03M5 

i , :;<.:■. st; 

l.:H7.57 

1, W.i. ID 

313.33 

17.40 

257.34 
21.6S 

m. 94 
i4i). n 

1,220.20 


(itM.mi 

768.00 






t8i.no 

377. St 
25. 75 

105.04 

53. or, 
40.33 
82. 12 

15.1.37 
38. 63 

132.52 
70.35 

20 15 
131.20 
;jsk.:S' 
2.25 
Hlii. r.n 

12(1.80 

111.30 
180.12 

loo.oi 

18.9.1 
1.25 
58.25 

3.00 
10.10 

10.25 

35.50 
34.40 


nun 

371.21 
2.5. 75 

104.04 
53.05 
12.08 
82. 12 

m. 83 
131.20 

70 35 
4.50 

19.40 
132. 15 

"H. 23 
154. 25 
125 55 

84.05 
184.87 
108.01 

18.95 
1.25 

53.25 

3.00 
10. If) 

10.25 

35.50 
SB, S3 




























■vj. 13 

273! 78 

i, -t7i.ua 
i . :n:i. w 

75. 58 
1,000.08 

1,000.00 
12.lt! 
257. 12 

LOIS. VI 

oui.ou 

53.04 

l.fUri.ljr) 
1,040.11 
1.277. li> 
I . :m. 57 
1. i3o.os 

201. 53 
17.40 
257.28 

21.52 
78.73 

1,219.70 


STOf). 5"' 

liar.im 

20V si 

1 . loi. 71 

' m'.ti 

1.7.11. w 
083. 28 
8.01 
192.84 

78 1. Ill 

747. 42 
89.78 

783. 00 

782. :i5 

052. 43 

'nn'.i-ii 
2)11.24 
13.05 
198.00 

a'.u 

193.45 
105.54 
51S. 74 
915. 14 


Shshi 8.-, 

625. HI 

2115.33 

l,p£1.71 

1.351.10 

57.43 

1..V-0.H.HJ 

081.78 

ma! 84 

7113. 5,1 
745.58 
30. 78 
750. 97 
780. iff 
957. 75 
l.lWl.HN 
854.81 
218.0+ 
13.05 
192,911 

mil 

57. M 
128.40 
106. 51 
424.29 










































































































































































::t. .<■:■:. :;:\ 


22. so; oi 


I7.,H71.2!. 


14.IStl.21 


2.731.17 


8,178.60 


$100.20 


jiu5.ni 


il.'Wl. 22 


1,063.75 

582. 58 

Ta+.io 
rata 


1. 06S. 78 
668.14 
764181 
572.41 






.GO 
49 SO 
82.85 
309. 20 


GO 
40-04 
82.86 
3H2 •:. 


70 
.04 


80 






















11 


11 










3,014.53 


:m 11 






IK2 ..-. 


175 -I 


.88 


74 










86.84 
221.. 50 
183.03 


l>i -' 
147 84 






7 80 

ii&ao 

39.20 


7.30 
35 55 


















137.70 


110.40 














101.64 


M. 14 


78.23 


64.61 


16.60 


915 














T.BO 


7.80 


isa 


SM 


18 25 


19.25 














12.20 
11. 00 

157. 1*1 
209. SO 


12.20 
11.00 
157.91 
180.00 


sjS 


8.15 
825 


3.00 

58 

55 215 

110.65 

51.26 
12. 20 
41.41 
50.75 


3 iir 

Gin 

10H.85 

36.40 
9 10 

40.91 
38.00 














2.21 


2,21 


















106.65 
18.06 

1 D7. 33 
£9.84 


104.00 

m. !t.i 

29.84 


7B.9fl 
13.55 
80.41 
22.38 


78.87 
13.51 

BO. IS 
Si. 38 


















































1 . ■-■' 1 1. :.'i ■ 


I.O.l'l :■:! 


433. 51 


:iu;s. 12 


518. Hi 


411.41 


2.21 


■J. 21 


3ii8. 18 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 





Titles. 


Periods- 


Salaries. 


Districts and names. 


office dep- 


■^ 


Marshal 


F1*»l ear 


ti.ono.Ki 

i t- ••' 
1 an ill 
1.100(10 




Oile'nfflr-ndfipnty 






















? annul 








Maryland: 

William F. Airey 


8. 500. 00 

l.HOIKl 
413 90 

1 mi Ol 
«/. U 

wa io 


Chip* uflli-e .".epyty 
■i' ■ : l-.i' 














do 

... do 

Field deputy .. 








John E. Curley 












William Chri™.i::,«-r 
































do 

. .do 


■ iiiih «.-i .: 11 :-ii; servlro terml- 




JamesMSt 




















:.w 70 








Massachusetts: 

CharioBK IHrl.im .. 


6,000.00 

L'.OUJ HI 
1 VI, 111 
1 Willi 

l.ao.oo 


Ch 10 f ofH en depu t y 






















Held deputy 












11.500 00 








Michigan, eastern: 


1.000.00 

I.4UI III 

1 Jl. .1. 

m> on 




( -tn. ■ f-.lt! :.>■!.■;.!:( v 
Office depot y 




CassiusF.Taylur .. 


|j° 
































7.000 00 








MiehiRan, western: 


3.000.00 

i. jui nn 

600 00 




Chief <> ff.ee lepu-.y 






















•■> 731 00 








Minnesota: 


5. 000 no 

oonno 

000.00 

wn on 
aoo.oo 




OtUel office deputy 




Timothy J. rtbi-hac 










Office depotyanrt 

«t«ni .graph er. 
Field deputy 


























■ ■Ml.. Mar 1- >■"■. "..rrtce t^rm! 
r.aied Deo. 31. 1iW». 








3.000.00 

BK.HI 
Kill III 

900.00 


Stephen J. Ploha 
Timothy J. Sbeehan . 
Charles A. Nimocks 


Chief nine depot y 


.. ..do 




do 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



353 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

fWTlTt.H ffYP 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap -* 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


deposit. 


$1,728.48 

71.84 

1.214.24 

730.61 


$1,728.48 

71.84 

1,214.24 

728.11 






$24.05 

27.05 

940.10 

456.34 


$24.05 

27.05 

938.10 

450.59 


$262.95 

7.50 

5.00 

92.50 


$230.89 

7.50 

5.00 

92.50 


$683.78 
























3,745.17 


3,742.67 






1,447.54 


1,439.79 


367.95 


335.89 


683.78 








1,584.10 

1.70 

383.44 

722.65 

413.94 

127.12 

245.04 

100.27 

63.71 

53.90 

172.32 

6.00 

36.00 

4.90 

5.32 
68.50 


1,583.90 

1.70 

381.44 

722.65 

413.94 

117.12 

245.04 

100.27 

63.71 

53.70 

172.12 

6.00 

36.00 

4.90 

5.32 
58.50 










10.50 


10.50 


1,198.54 
















51.02 

32.31 

25.55 

3.58 

5.15 

4.65 

3.50 

.25 

2.90 

10.50 

4.00 

2.75 


51.02 

32.31 

25.55 

3.58 

5.15 

4.65 

3.50 

.25 

2.90 

10.50 

4.00 

2.75 












52.50 


52.50 
























12.50 
12.50 


12.50 
13.50 




$75. 19 

47.76 

40.42 

129.22 

4.50 

26.98 

3.66 

3.99 
43.85 


$75.19 
47.76 

40.27 
129.07 

4.50 
26.98 

3.(36 

3.99 

43.85 










































14.00 


14.00 














3,978.91 


3,966.31 


375.57 


375. 27 


160.16 


160.16 


88.00 


88. 0T) 


1,198.54 


3,125.29 

874.81 

115.92 

1,973.05 

1,959.07 


3,119.29 

874. 81 

115.92 

1,973.05 

1,959.07 






332.45 
481.93 
4.15 
306.73 
421.43 


332.45 

481.24 

4.15 

306.73 

420.93 


246.83 


246.83 
.31 


3,140.97 






















i - - - — 
I 








































8,048.14 


8,042.14 






1,546.69 


1,545.50 


246.83 


247.14 


3,140.97 










1,627.55 
112.35 

1,880.06 
527.98 
184.94 
107.96 
248.55 


1,627.55 
112.35 

1,880.08 
488.06 
181.88 
107.96 
246.55 






18.11 

21.17 

109.56 

289.92 

19.00 

7.91 

169.55 


18.11 

20.42 

109.56 

264.99 

12.72 

6.41 

167. 75 


25. 35 25. 35 


2,244.66 




















l 




138.70 

80.96 

186.41 


136.40 

80.96 

184.91 


i 
















25.35 


25.35 




4,689.41 


4,644.43 


406.07 


402.27 


635.22 


599.96 


2,244.66 


1,513.85 

938.35 

77.60 

431.11 


1,513.85 

938.35 

77.60 

431.11 






158.15 

684.47 

65.99 

525.63 

1,434.24 


158. 15 

684.47 

65.99 

525.63 


54.40 


54.40 


930.99 




































2,960.91 


2,960.91 






1,434.24 


54.40 


54. 40 


930.99 








855.86 
355.56 
826.69 
1,156.70 
328.38 

545.12 
227.32 
232.10 
802.74 

1,310.74 
490.10 
830.60 
583.21 


855.86 
355.56 
826.69 
1,156.70 
328.38 

545.12 
215.32 
232.10 
802.24 

1,310.74 
490.10 
830.60 
583.21 






74.08 

24.04 

119.84 

142.42 

52.08 

340.50 


74.08 

24.04 

119.84 

142.36 

52.08 

338.75 


110.08 


109.67 


1,058.06 






































408.84 
170. 49 
174.08 
603.05 


408.84 
161.49 
174.08 
601.67 














25.00 
214.75 

48.25 

32.50 

155.82 

94.20 


20.00 
213.25 

48.25 

32.50 

155.82 

94.20 












107.25 


107.25 


672.87 





























H. Doc. 9 



-23 



354 



REPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Shot/ring, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Minnesota— Continued. 
William G. Bunde.. 



Robert Morrison 

Paul Sharvy 

E. L. Warren 

Frank W. Tufts . 



Total. 



Mississippi northern: 

Alex. J. Cooke 

J. W.Cooke 

Do 

J. A. Toler 

Joe R. Alcorn 



E. D. Anderson. 
L.M. Elliott—.. 

S.M. Howry 

A. Z. T. Johnson 
W.D. McMillan. 



Hugh Montgomery 
J. D. Roach 



G.P.Rye. 

J. B. Scott 

J. R. Thrasher 
T.J.Wilks... . 
Ben A. Alcorn 
C. J. Norris ... 



George M. Buchanan. 
John w . Cooke 



J. A. Toler 

D.A.Adams 

Ben. A. Alcorn 

Jno.O. Askew 

M.L. Brewer 

A. Z. T. Johnson 

W.D. McMillan 

Hugh Montgomery. 

C.J. Norris 

G. P. Rye 

J. R. Thrasher 



R. J. Warren 
N. M. Bynum 



George M. Buchanan. 

John W. Cooke 

Ben. A. Alcorn 

John O. Askew 

M.L. Brewer 

N. M. Bynum 

A. Z. T. Johnson 



W.D. McMillan 

Hugh Montgomery. 
G.P.Rye 



R.J.Warren. 
Total 



Titles. 



Office deputy and 
stenographer. 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

do 



Marshal 

do 

Chief office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



_ 3 .do 



.do 
.do 



-do 
.do 
.do 



.do.. 

.do.. 

do.. 



Marshal. .. 

Chief office deputy 



Field deputy 
do 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

do 

do 



.do 

.do. 

.do 

.CO 



Periods. 



Jan. 1 to June 30, 1900. 



Oath, Jan. 1,1900 

do 

....do 

Oath, Jan. 2, 1900 



service 



service 



July 1,1899, to July 30, 1809... 

Aug. 1,1899, to Oct. 1,1899 

July 1 to July 29, 1809 

Aug. 2 to Oct. 1, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 26, 1899; service 

nated .July 30, 1899. 
Oath, Apr. 27, 1897; service 

nated July 30, 1899. 
Oath, Sept. 7, 1897; service 

nated July 30, 1899. 
Oath, Dec. 18, 1897; service 

nated July 30, 1899, 
Oath, May 1, 1899; 

nated Oct. 1,1899. 
Oath, Feb. 27,1899; 

nated Oct. 1, 1899. 

. — -do 

Oath, Mar. 22, 1898; service 

nated July 30, 1899; special. 
Oath, Feb. 24, 1899; service 

nated Oct. 1,1899. 
Oath, Feb. 24, 1899; service 

nated July 30, 1899. 
Oath, Feb. 28, 1899; service 

nated Oct. 1, 1899. 
Oath, Aug. 20, 1898; service 

nated July 30, 1899. 
Oath, Sept. 7, 1899; service 

nated Oct. 1, 1899, 
Oath, Aug. 14, 1899; service 

nated Oct. 1, 1899. 

Oct. 2, 1899, to Jan. 23, 1900 

do 



termi- 
termi- 
termi- 
termi- 
termi- 
termi- 



termi 
termi 
termi 
termi 
termi 
termi 
termi 



Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oath, 
Oct 
Oath, 



Oct. 13, 1899; temporary 

Oct.9,1899; Nov.8,1899 

Nov.2,1899 

Oct. 11, 1899; temporary 

Oct. 2,1899; temporary 

Oct. 2, 1899; Nov. 16, 1899 

Oct. 2, 1899; temporary 

Oct.2,1899; Nov.6,1899 

Oct.2,1899; Oct.31,1899 

Oct. 2, 1890; service terminated 

,24,1899. 

Nov.1,1899 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$300.00 



10,000.00 



244.57 

506.45 

94.57 

198.89 



933.52 
373.40 



Jan. 24, 1900, to June 30,1900 

do 

Oath, Mar. 5, 1900 

Oath, Mar. 13, 1900 

Oath, Mar. 11, 1900 

Oath, Mar. 13, 1900 

Oath, Mar. 12, 1900; service termi - 
nated Apr. 5, 1900. 

Oath, Mar. 14, 1900 

Oath, May 21, 1900... 

Oath, Mar. 11, 1900; service termi- 
nated May 21, 1900. 



1,308.33 
523.33 



4,182.06 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



355 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit , for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 





Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 
paid to 

clerks of 
courts for 

deposit. 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved . 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


$462.56 

893.26 

458.81 

1,926.22 

1,386.78 


$462.56 

876.06 

431.31 

1,925.72 

1,386.78 






$125.59 

413.25 

7.50 

427.75 

299.62 


$125.59 

413.25 

7.50 

427.75 

299.62 








$669.93 

344.11 

1,444.66 

1,040.08 


$657.03 

323.48 

1,444.28 

1,000.00 

4,770.87 






























• 


13,672 75 


13,615.05 


4,854.24 


2,597.19 


2,588.88 


$217.33 


$216.92 


$1,730.93 














10.78 


9.72 


33.55 
























15.25 

9.15 
.96 


15.25 

9.15 

.96 








14.20 
31.72 


14.20 
31.72 












23.79 


23.79 


















































133.59 

76.28 

171.62 
17.50 

288.62 


123.39 

75.80 

171.50 
17.00 

278.28 


100.19 

57.21 

128.71 
13.12 

216.46 


92.54 

56.85 

128.62 
12.75 

208.71 


18.75 

7.00 

32.05 
6.60 

73.75 


18.75 

7.00 

31.30 
6.60 

69.75 




















. 


















167.32 


162.82 


125.49 


122.12 


23.49 


23.24 














38.34 

95.56 

310.05 
26.67 


37.86 

93.84 

310.05 


28.75 
71.67 


28.39 
70.38 


5.00 

21.50 

24.40 

34.20 

4.75 

.40 

17.50 

24.56 

138.50 

31.30 

21.00 

58.30 

31.95 

218.80 

2.25 

15.10 
29.02 

23.00 
55.25 
29.05 
57.36 
103.61 
94.95 
62.75 

9.85 

7.55 

236.05 

35.75 


5.00 

21.50 

24.40 

34.20 

4.75 

.40 

17.50 

24.56 

138.50 

30.25 

21.00 

57.05 

28.70 

217.55 

.75 

14.60 
26.35 

23.00 
54.30 
25.68 
52.20 
95.11 
92.70 
35.40 

5.85 

6.30 

196.13 

32.75 














10.66 


10.16 


25.25 




















47.50 
133.94 

57.40 
234.44 
427.43 
307.74 
287.54 
172.62 
399.64 
236.40 

98.90 
263.50 

442.65 
1.50 
404.76 
252.38 
204.00 
830.60 
532.64 

218.20 

17.66 

834.73 

245.22 


47. 50 
126.98 

57.04 
232.64 
427.43 
290.82 
287.54 
172.62 
391.82 
200.90 

97.10 
258.54 

460.65 
1.50 
403.20 
237.68 
176.08 
781.30 
402.62 

218.20 

17.66 

700.37 

241.52 


35.62 
100.45 

43.05 
175.83 
320.57 
230.80 
215.65 
129.46 
299.73 
177.30 

74.16 
197.62 


35.62 
95.23 
42.78 
174.48 
320.57 
218.11 
215.65 
129.46 
293.87 
150.67 

72.82 
193.90 


























• 
















































10.35 


9.61 


34.60 








303.57 

189.28 
153.00 
622.95 
399.48 

163.64 

13.25 

626.04 

183.92 


302.40 
178.26 
131.31 
585.98 
301.97 

163.64 

13.25 

525.27 

181. 15 


































* 




























8,022.86 


7,548.17 


5,420.76 


5,070.54 


1,580.70 


1,468.48 


31.79 


29.49 


93.40 



35G 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Showing, by districts, the salaries paid to United Slates marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Mississippi, southern: 
Frederick W. Collins. 

Walter A. Collins 

W. O. Ligon 

Thomas S. Easterling 

R. O.Edwards 

John F. Williams 

J. D. Minot 



Total. 



Missouri, eastern: 

Louis C. Bohle 

Walter W. Nail 

Edward J. Brennan. . 
Edmund J. Watson . . 

John Crocker 

William L. Dougherty 

James W. Lay 

Wm. H. Osmer 

C. O. Eames... 

J. B. Nichols 

Geo. Straszer 

O. K. Wheeler 

F. W. Worheide 

Jno. L. Kennedy 



Total. 



Missouri, western: 

Edward R. Durham . . 

C.C.Colt 

Harry E. Kirk 

W.S.McCaull 

Joseph Huffman 

Thomas H. McKenna. 

James R. Means 

Henry C. Miller 

Jno. E. Morrison 

Samuel L. Potts 

R.M.Ray 

J. M. Swanely, jr 

Geo. F. Wilkerson 

Edwin D. Kirk 



Total. 



Montana : 

Joseph P. Woolman . . 
Samuel K. McDowell 

Samuel Jackson 

David Meiklejohn ... 

Michael H. Wall 

Do 



David Meiklejohn. 

Samuel Jackson . . . 
George Whittaker 



Total. 



Nebraska: 

George H. Thummel 

Jno. Nicholson 

Henry A. Homan 

Charles W. Pearsall. 

T. L. Ackerman 



James Allan 
A. S.Cooley. 



Titles. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

.....do 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do. 

Field deputy 

do 



.do 
do 
.do, 
do 
do 
do 
.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

do 

....do 

.....do 

do 

....do 

.....do 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy 



.do 

.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Office deputy and 

stenographer. 
Field deputy 



do 
.do 



Periods. 



Fiscal year 

do 

Oath, Feb. 10, 1888 

do 

do 

do 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

Sept. 1,1899, to June 30, 1900 

Oath, May 3, 1900; special 

Oath, Apr .,18,1898 

Oath, Feb. 14, 1899; special 

Oath, Aug. 6, 1898 

Oath, July 16, 1898 ; special 

do 

Oath, Sept. 5, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 4, 1900; special 

Oath, July 16, 1898 ; special 

Oath, Apr. 18, 1898; service termi- 
nated Sept. 5, 1899. 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

Oath, Apr. 24, 1900; special 
Oath, Julv 1,1898 

do..: 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, Apr. 29, 1899; special 
do 

Oath, Sept. 9, 1898; special 

Oath, July 1,1898 

Oath, Apr. 29, 1899; special 



Fiscal year 

do 

Aug. 8, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

do 

Aug. 14, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

Oath, May 26, 1898; service termi- 
nated Aug. 3, 1899. 

Oath, May 27, 1898; service termi- 
nated Aug. 3, 1899. 

do 

Oath, Mar. 16, 1899; special 



July 1, 1899, to Oct. 31, 1899. 

do 

do 

do 



Oath, Apr. 26, 1897; service termi- 
nated Oct. 31, 1899. 

Oath, Mar. 31, 1897; service termi- 
nated Oct. 31, 1899. 

Oath, Dec. 6, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. 31, 1899. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$3,000.00 
1,200.00 



4,200.00 



4,000.00 

1,800.00 

1,200.00 

997.80 



7,997.80 



4,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,200.00 



7,000.00 



3,500.00 
1,800.00 
1,076.06 
807.10 
1,056.50 



8,239.66 



1,169.80 
501.40 
401.10 
401.10 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



357 



deputies and clerks; their expenses , as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900— Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amonnts 
paid to 
clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \* 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap ^ 
proved. 


deposit. 


$577.91 
47.18 
3,422.64 
1,706.24 
3,181.22 
2, 194. 54 
4.24 


$577.91 
41.18 
3,415.29 
1,687.60 
3,173.22 
2,193.64 
4.00 






$195.40 
334.56 
563.46 
230.80 
211.61 
109.10 
1.00 


$194.40 
333.56 
559.96 
226.80 
211.61 
107.85 


$20.52 


$20.50 


$864.90 








$2,500.00 

1,279.67 

2,385.91 

1,500.00 

3.18 


$2,500.00 
1,265.70 
2,379.91 
1,500.00 




























•• • 














11,133.97 


11,092.84 


7,668.76 


7,645.61 


1,645.93 


1,634.18 


20.52 


20.50 


864.90 


3,710.97 
608.36 
376.32 
763.06 


3,699.07 
608.36 
375.02 
762.20 






454.40 
387.19 
177.47 
186.41 


454.40 
385.14 
177.47 
185.66 


123.37 


123.35 


2,024.10 






































501.87 


496.45 


376.40 


372.33 

• 


49.01 


49.01 














2,953.84 


2,933.88 


2,215.37 


1,907.69 


204.19 


203.19 
































681.38 


681.26 


511.02 


510.93 


80.08 


79.58 
































215.96 


209.98 


161.97 


157.48 


36.00 


36.00 














9,811.76 


9,766.22 


3,264.76 


2,948.43 


1,574.75 


1,570.45 


123.37 


123.35 


2,024.10 


2,146.19 
158.46 
270.04 


1,927.31 
152.46 

268.04 






214.90 

81.80 

114.10 


214.90 

81.80 

114.10 


130.56 


130.56 


1,314.12 




























1,245.00 
1,398.14 
2,179.35 
988.42 
2,081.04 


1,222.84 
1,380.26 
2,159.80 
983.00 
2,039.39 


933.75 
1,048.61 
1,634.52 

741.33 
1,560.78 


917.11 
1,035.19 
1,619.84 

737.26 
1,529.53 


142.70 
86.85 
71.95 
35.90 

80.85 


140.70 
86.85 
66.45 
35.90 

75.85 










































































1,102.26 


1,099.60 


826.70 


824.69 


65.15 


64.30 














• 


















11,568.90 


11,232.70 


6,745.69 


6,636.62 


894.20 


880.85 


130.56 


130.56 


1,314.12 


1,506.44 
110.50 

1,203.88 
543.66 

1,149.60 
343.26 

492.20 

77.50 


1,506.44 
110.50 

1,203.88 
543.66 

1,149.60 
343.26 

477.90 

66.50 






170.20 
599.40 

1,396.96 
294.10 

1,502.25 
83.95 

42.10 

119.65 


170.20 
583.05 

1,392.61 
294.10 

1,495.75 
77.85 

40.10 

82.80 


77.54 


66.47 


1,267.08 






































257.43 

369.07 

58.11 


257.43 

258.15 

49.86 


































4,208.61 










5,426.94 


5,401.74 


684.61 


565.44 


4,136.46 


77.54 


66.47 


1 ; 267.08 


357.18 
108.70 
194.44 
459.89 

616.58 

1,193.40 

160.10 


357.18 
108.70 
194.44 
459.89 

616.58 

1,193.40 

156.62 






45.65 
29.37 

56.89 
72.29 

69.00 

276.85 

14.00 


45.65 
29.37 
53.89 
72.19 

50.25 

158.55 

14.00 


40.23 


40.23 


555.82 




























549.86 
895 04 
120.07 


462.43 
601.60 
117.46 



























REPORT OF THE ATTOBNEY-GESEBAL. 











Periods. 


Salaries. 


Districts and names. 


Titles. 


Marshals, 

utie'n.snd 


Nebraska. Continued 


Field deputy 


Oath. Apr 1, 1B0T: serr.ee terml 

i,,v.iO,t :i].l*M9 
■-,■• A at M l-v:. HPriics term! 

imtrtlDtt .11.ICW: spe-iai. 
t)a(|j. Li™ :::. Irf-r wrttos torrcl 

nated Oct ill. ]«W: speclaL 
n-;!, Ami 1. l*wr -.. a-« urn:i 

■wtodov :j|. IhhO special. 












lo 
do 
do 

lo 
do 
















[ r.ai.-i, ii: : ,| .-.'■ - ■,.. :»'. 








naU'il (lit 31. 1"»H. ■.pedal, 
fiatli. Juuc SS,im r-.-r 1 1™> terml- 

uat-nitk-l :il.1i*». 
Oatb. Aaa 31 I" 1 ". »■; ^" t»rnj; 
rnil-ilifft .'ILIUM. 












bura. 




,'1- -i 
101 11) 








Henry A Soman. . . . 


Dffln duputy 

Field deputy 




umD. N<v l-i. i"wi. «.-rvir- t<-rmi 

1i»V.I TW3i.l»w 
Oath. Dbc 1. IW*. w.rvl™ wrml 

iiat.d ]>... .il.l&99. 
d.th. N..v M IxwS w ,rv1ra> brml 

:iv.-l [im.- .tl.lH9B. 






Wm.M.Neabit 






i.renoo 

750 00 
.'■Mo ro 
500 M 
WOlfi 








Henry A M- ■ ..■ 








.1" 

rift 
li 
do 














Jam.* Walling . 


Fie 


eputy .... 


tiiitli li.i' 1. 1-"*'. net vi<a- t- rii.l 






















■I.. 
































l.aeA.78 










M*- 




2.N.IU0 
].»-! 00 


H J liumjibruye .. . 






FleM d.ipnty 
do 


ObiIi, N..v si I/-W B orv|.» iKtt: 

natcdu™- :«, IHft. 
'irtih. 'k T. l-w. »er> ice term! 

nated Dec SI. 1R9B. 












.!.:■■) on 
l.m.-fl 

471 12 

633.24 

mas 


New ■■:,-,;.::.:, 


M„b, 














MarsbAl . . n 

Chief "ft! . deputy 














I'.nOO ■>' 








New Jersey: 


Mar*]u 
I'M.-f. 
. .. do 




8,1100 00 
1-1 !•■ 

:.iw in 

900 00 




t .-.■ .If yu-; 
























I.. 
tin 












































New Mexico: 


1 !i\ ■ 






4,000 00 
1 "«jni 
I.JII0U 
900.00 




11.-..I i.-j:lf> 






p w n»ii 




\f 




do 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



359 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900— Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amonnts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


deposit. 


$263.74 


$263.74 


$197.80 


$197.80 


$12.00 


$8.00 
























• 




















> 










































41.16 

925.92 

354.96 

40.26 

108.92 

314.58 

286.04 

32.50 

1,077.16 

344.74 

• 1,018.92 

1,410.92 

1,173.60 

62.22 


41.16 

861.62 

338.92 

40.26 

108.92 

310.04 

286.04 

32.50 

1,077.16 
335.74 
1,018.92 
1,339.42 
1,136.12 
62.22 


30.87 
694.43 


30.87 
587.13 


1.00 
93.50 










81.30 








$21.29 


$21.29 


$308.65 






•11.08 

47.75 

5.90 


11.08 

47.75 
5.90 














235.93 
214.53 
.24.38 


199.77 

126.40 

24.38 
























102.25 
269.66 
410.66 
652.00 
472.19 
6.60 


102.25 
269.66 
385.41 
618.86 
470.42 
6.60 


78.06 


78.06 


1,012.61 







































46.67 


10. ou 






















































































10,545.93 


10,339.59. 


3,009.58 


2,a57.84 


2,648.64 


2,431.13 


139.58 


139.58 


1,877.08 


2,292.63 

1,106.72 

85.22 

210.30 


2,216.34 
1,053.12 

85.. 22 

210.30 






593.05 

575.80 

26.00 

2.00 


581.05 

563.30 

18.00 

2.00 


4.79 


4.69 


959.42 








63.92 
157. 73 


63.92 
101.90 




i 
















3,694.87 


3,564.98 


221.65 


165.82 


1,196.85 


1,164.35 


4.79 


4.69 


959.42 


588.18 
754.38 
346.87 
558.81 


572.31 
727.76 
346.87 
516.72 






81.20 
142.75 

21.45 
100.82 


72.43 

142.75 

21.45 

100.82 


2.21 


2.21 


193.07 












.90 


.90 


81.03 


















2,248.24 


2,163.66 






346.22 


337.45 


3.11 


3.11 


274.10 








1,623.02 


1,223.35 






273.84 1 273.84 
i 


100.27 


100.27 


1,787.58 








707.68 
119.26 
603.84 
764.70 
• 394.18 


692.22 
499.26 
601.64 
761.10 

388.78 






375.37 I 371.57 
22.03 22.03 


















452.87 
573.52 
295.62 


451.22 

570.82 
291.57 








19.08 
• 4.00 


19.08 
4.00 




























■ 








4,212.68 


4,166.35 


1,322.01 


1,313,61 


694.32 


690.52 


100.27 


100.27 


1,787.58 


4,292.19 
2,155.02 
1,733.02 
2,220.68 


3,596.62 
1,896.15 
1,543.96 
1,621.12 






1,440.05 
1,132.50 
1,143.30 
1,324,15 


1,164.35 
1,043.50 
1,060.55 
1,169.20 


216.89 


215.65 


146.00 





























i- 



REPOET OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 





Titles. 


Periods. 


Salaries. 


Districts and names. 


office dep- 


New Me lice — Cont'd 


Qffloe deputy. . 

Meld deputy '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 




»I.1j ki 








Oath No. <■ 1«.T: wrvira. termi- 
nated Nov 10. 1M0 






















e.aJ7 J) 




cbtet office deputy 
Office deputy 




New York, northern; 
Wm. R.Coic;ir--:i 


van :u 




Henry LFtw.l ... 






Norriu M.i -.inuinii . 






Field deputy 


Oath. July s:. ivji.. wirvice termi 

ira.->. .11 1 .-1. iiw. wn> l.'ni-. 
tm.-iMunt.S5, 1U0O 






P D Condon 




Howard Conklm* . 




Oalh. July £!. 18WN. service termi 

tiv.-d.l-::.!-: !■-*■ 
.w.h. JuK -. :-»• — ril.-.- :.t:»- 

nao-it JuouaMWU 




du 










do 


Oath. July 20, ISHH. Hrrkn termi- 

:.»f.t. eas. itm. 

<)a:h July -'i. Imw. Mini' tnraii 

ui-»'M'jnoS.\ 1900. 














Wilbur J. Man ley ... 


do 


tia-.h, .1 j.j 1- 1-..-. service termi- 
nated June 7. 19UI 
1 lath. JuK i: l-its. service tormf- 
jiavrt Ji.^alW 
.p,.il U,< ■ ■ servic -e-.-ni 
..»•...! .'i;i»2i. IWfl 
o«th Auk . I«» <u.rv'j-c -er.-n: 
nated Jnrw £.. 1900. 
oath, .i-.i.v ■-■: IMi- service term 1 ■ 
nHtsMl.hin.iS. 1900 

' "..'...l.l'.in.. ..]■*'•■ 

cat.-d *«(>:' «. 1B99* 
Oath :>■•■■ '. ls«9. wrvliw termi' 

r.at.-; Jim-M. IwHi 
<>»'h Jar: 1- IWii. .-.-v;.- frml- 

:. '■■ : l.i- 25, 19UU. 














do 

do 

do,..; 
































10,454.32 








New York (new), north- 


8HB9 
20.00 
18 t9 




Cbi.jf office deputy 
















1U5 17 








New York, western. 


wait 

27.47 
18 48 
12 35 
8.24 


Henry L.Piuwttt 


■ .-...■; ffl ■....-■. ,-, 














office deputy and 

■.In: .. tfrajdinr 




































1*1. at 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



361 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

COTI l*t".Q ffYf 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap ^ 
proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \, 
proved. 


deposit. 


$278.68 
753.22 


$262.37 

585.78 


< 




$173. 95 
321.25 


$173.95 
232.10 






















• 




























































11,432.81 


9,506.00 






5,535.20 


4,843.65 


$216.89 


$215.65 


$146.00 






838.82 
57.50 
330.86 
430.40 
48.20 
115.88 
214.80 

104.65 

527.38 
1,500.73 

98.16 

724.91 
787.16 

90.36 


824.22 
55.50 
254.66 
430.40 
48.20 
115.88 
214.50 

104. 15 

524.38 

1,498.73 

96.16 

723.49 
777.16 

87.94 






306.58 
111.57 
254.66 
103.40 
41.56 
175.33 
6.77 

10.86 

26.02 
62.12 


305.58 
111. 57 
253.41 
103.40 
41.56 
174.33 
6.77 

9.86 

26.02 
62.12 


135.16 


134.28 


535.71 
















































$161. 12 

78.51 

395.55 
1,125.56 

73.63 

543.70 
590.38 

67.79 


$160.89 

78.13 

393.30 
1,124.05 

72.13 

542.62 

582.88 

65.97 
































140.42 
31.00 

8.09 


137.17 
31.00 

7.84 


























2,890.98 

185.94 

164.48 

600.02 

892.41 

403.46 

52.60 

19.24 

8.08 


2,870.68 
177.64 
155.64 
596.40 
871.41 
402.96 
51.10 


2,168.23 

139.47 

123.37 

450.03 

669.31 

302.60 

39.45 

14.43 

6.06 


1,799.74 
133.24 
116.74 
447.31 
653.56 
302.23 
38.33 


386.09 
38.32 

6.24 
31.20 
12.26 
22.97 
12.25 

9.42 


386.35 
36.67 

5.55 
30.12 

6.54 
22.97 
12.00 








.80 


.80 




































8.08 


6.06 




















11,087.02 


10,889.28 


6,949.19 


6,517.18 


1,797.13 


1,770.83 


135.96 


135.08 


535.71 






















































































































33.90 


30.90 


2.51 


2.51 














6.06 
85.66 


6.06 
85.66 




















33.26 


33.25 


















67.58 

29.74 

75.40 

1.00 


66.26 

27.88 

73.48 

1.00 


50.69 

22.31 

56.55 

.75 


49.70 
20.91 
55.11 


4.12 


4.12 














12.77 
2.00 


12.77 
2.00 






















265.44 


260.34 


130.30 


125.72 


86.04 


83.04 


2.51 


2.51 












362 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Showing, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



New York, eastern: 

Charles J. Haubert . . . 
William H. Caldwell . 

John E. Thome 

John Heydinger, jr. . 
Henry R. Evarts 



Total. 



New York, southern: 

William Henkel 

Denis Shea 

Abram Adler 

John J. Ankner 

Frederick Bartels... 
Friedrich Bernhard. 

J.B. Bostwick 

Michael Beake 

William Churchill... 

Frank H.Daly 

JohnE. Dowley 

Robert Gardiner 

John Gebhard 

George W. Herrman 

Geo. H.Holmes 

John Kannengieser . 
James P. Kelker 
George D. Knight ... 

Joseph J. Kumb 

John E. McAviney. .. 

J.G.McCarty 

John Noon 

William Rabe 

John A. Stewart 

Peter M. Kopp 

George Schroeder... 

Joseph F.Cook 

David R . Poinier 

Michael Kopp 

Emilie E. Dixon 

Amy Welde 



Titles. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 



Total. 



North Carolina, eastern: 
Henry C. Docker y ... 

JohnT. Sharp 

Henry F. Brown 

Palo A. Mitchell 

Charles A. Banks 

James B. Barnett 

T. O. Bunting 

Jno. B. Dupree 

J. M. Hammock 

J. S. Herring 

Council Meares 

David A. Moore 

James A. McNeil 

A. D. Morisey 

J. C. Parish 

J.W.Perkins 

Wm. M. Richardson.. 

L. H. Stogner 

Albert F. Surles 

C. A.Wallace 

Herman L. Wooten . . 
Lewis W. Mangum . . . 

K.W. Merritt 

R. B. Blackledge 

Henry C. Reese 



Total. 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Stenographer 
do.... 



Periods. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



Fiscal year...'. $4,000.00 

do 1,800.00 

do 1,000.00 

do 1,000.00 

do ! 1,000.00 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

May 1, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 

Fiscal year 

do 



.do 
do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 

do 



do 

do. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do 

do. 

do 

do. 

do. 

do 

do. 

do. 



May 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 

Fiscal year 

do 



.do 

.do 

do 

.do 



Apr. 12 to May 3,1900 

Fiscal year 

July 1, 1899, to Apr. 6, 1900. . . 
Feb. 19, 1900, to Apr. 6, 1900. . . 
July 1, 1899, to Apr. 30, 1900 . . 
July 1, 1899, to Fel>. 9, 1900. . . . 
Apr. 12, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 

Fiscal year 

do 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

May 24, 1900, to June 30, 1900 ... 

Oath, Jan. 11,1899 

Oath, Feb. 4.1898 

Oath, Feb. 11, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 28, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 19,1898 

Oath, Feb. 1, 1899 

Oath, Mar. 1, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 7, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 1,1898 

Oath, Jan. 25, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 22, 1898 

Oath, Aug. 2, 1899 

Oath, Feb. 22, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 11,1898 

Oath, Feb. 2,1898 

Oath, Apr. 10, 1898 

Oath, June 7, 1900 

Oath, June 14, 1900 

Oath, Apr. 15, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 2, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 3, 1898; May 31, 1900. 



8,800.00 



5, 
2, 



1, 

I: 



l, 

1, 
1, 
1, 

2, 



1, 



000.00 
750.00 
720.00 
108.95 
000.00 
250.00 
000.00 
500.00 
650.00 
650.00 
800.00 
650.00 
650.00 
720.00 
500.00 

96.41 
650.00 
000.00 
650.00 
720.00 
000.00 
650.00 

39.29 
000.00 
496.43 

82.94 
541.05 
397.20 
142.88 
000.00 
750.00 



29,165.15 



4,000.00 

1,600.00 

1,200.00 

93.98 



6,893.98 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 





Fo 


s. 




KX..M - 




Ear 


nod. 


Pay 


ble. 


Suhbisteute and 
travel. 


Other erpenw*R 


|,.U,i f- 

■Trrk* or 


Claimed. 


A„„,«. 


Cl*n»a. 


r£&d 


Claimed 


*2L. 

provwl. 


Claimed 


,,&-. 


il.'TH^I- 


H, 403.93 

mi. ir, 

409.07 


(1,403.93 

uvi. 00 

787.(13 
IS. 31 
481.01 






t.. ■■ 

297 77 

.00 

33.48 


" '(382. J9' 

307.77 
3843 


11,390 W 


(1.191.35 


11.00S.A4 










































3.iiS-(',.37 


3.13.0 ,10 






1W 1W 


,j~ '■ 


i.sbo.so 


l.M 25 


1.002 04 


19. 94 
124. (IS 
874.49 
84.45 
(KB. J) 
l,fi(8t.:M 
3111. *1 
■'.W5.5H 

554. 03 

270. 05 
551.30 

i'.l'l ' 7"- 

rw.ie 

1. (is (4. No 
7S2. 48 
078.31 

1.518,87 

117.84 
88.00 
22.34 

664. 110 

30!48 
65*. Si 


2.165.37 
tft-U 
10 94 
124 03 
78E 75 
73X0 

■■I 1 ." 

005.74 

WI.W 

2. 40* 15 

sue. as 
wa tn 

MOM 

sifitn 

931 73 

58.02 
1 k: -» 
: -\ a- 

663 31 

1.49M.OI1 

Ilo. 64 
K3.00 
£. :i 

616.00 

187 a 

».m 

682 34 






1.50 


,., 


530.84 


000.84 


7,079.77 




















848 

130.10 


3.45 
130.10 














































07.95 


07. 95 






















4 IS 

&15 
7.95 


4. IS 
18 

a. oe 

8.15 
7.95 


























































Z 40 
4*8,80 
30 84 

-.1 .-.. 
.121 1- 
P 
30 00 


3.40 
438.80 
30.74 
54.50 
334.18 
39.43 
30 60 


















































































38 HI 


30.81 
4.90 




























144 is 


14a W 


















57. (H 


57 04 


































































17. 1.15.3!' 


10, mi. u 






1.334. so 


1,333.35 


uKi.si 


000.64 


;.■■■.■■.;■. 


1,363.10 
80.00 

aso.oo 
a. 00 

I2L H8 
352.30 
530.38 
505.83 


1,313.09 

3w!i.in 

8, 00 

141.00 
431.48 
241 i. 30 
537.50 
493.13 






358.88 

If (Mil 

i;w.i;i 
3.45 

43 10 
93.15 
38.71 

101.50 
65.30 


ssa.as 

!.*■ 43 
8.45 
36.10 
01 15 
>22 
OB 00 
64 55 


IB. 81 


ia.« 






























310. 50 

J81P.23 

379.37 


fi1.-5.s3 

1(10.1:1 
184. K7 

;«!.',. .;;■ 

360.85 




I- 11* 








76 OU 


75.00 


















,W4. 8s 

]. 1110.08 

753. 31 
J. 23 1.05 

i'.7(i. 00 
21. ue 
3u.au 
33. ih 

l.OIJO.10 
43.08 
130.38 


37(1. OS 
312. :»i 

•(so! 03 

Win" 
714.70 
1.333.33. 

WM 

30.30 
33.04 

i.0iii.,v: 

130!S8 


292.25 
387. 22 

:m. t'm 
760.01 

SOS. (is 

712. SB 

BKfi 

50!1: oil 

l«i73 
35. 33 
1.2411. HI 
31.50 
07. 7B 


284. 75 
381.21 
381.54 
717. 47 
MS. 73 

Ir 1 ':" 

LllCUi7 

49.5. in 

10.35 
19.73 
35.23 

1, lil.O.HO 
31.50 
07.70 


40. 50 

-,i. 25 

l-M.'w 
125 70 
130. 8.5 
93. 05 
99. (15 
78. 90 
1.00 
17.50 
6.50 
370. 3(1 

1LO0 


40 60 

'.11 . 

07 50 

O7.K0 
123.71 
125 811 

97^ 06 
71.06 

1 00 
17.60 

6.50 
365.80 

7.35 
10.60 





























































£0.10 


6.00 


















C.'.;»i::.ll 


13.505. 3o 


h, 332. 73 








U1.04 


11*1.32 


1,383.00 



364 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Showing, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



North Carolina, western: 

James M. Millikan 

Theodore E. McCrary 

James M. Baley 

James A. Logan 

Joseph T. Millikan 

P.D.Atwell 

J.L.Blackburn 

Jack Blalock 

T. L. Brim 

A.P.Brown 

A.C.Bryan 

C.E.Carter 

J. M. Chambers 

E.A.Cooper 

B.L.Cox.: 

Geo. A. Daniely 

E.N.Elliott 

H.G.Foster 

J.S.Free 

I.H.D.Gillispie 

Alberto. Griffin 

B. N. Hampton 

R.T.Harris 

W.P.Harris 

T.C. Israel 

W.H.Jarrett 

J.C.Jenkins 

J. S. Justice 

William M. King .... 

V.A.Long 

R. L. Patterson 

W. J. Patterson 

Geo.H.Priddy 

D.C. Ragan 

W.K.Ray 

Enoch Rech tor, jr ... 

Henry C. Reese 

T. L. Robertson 



William P. Rose . 
Thomas A. Royal. 

Vance Scoggin 

J. S. Shearer 

T. V.Shope 

T. A. Silver 

John L. Sloop 

Hiram Tipton 

W.J. West 

H.E.Whitmire... 
J. H. Bradshaw ... 



W.H.Greer 

D.B.Wilson 

W. J. Alexander . . 

H.R.Loyd 

J. M. Worley 

W. C. Mendenhall 
Levi Gheen 



Total. 



Titles. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy 

do 



North Dakota: 

John E. Haggart 

David B. Shotwell... 

Nehemiah Davis 

Fred. W. Schindler .. 

Frank Donnelly 

Wm. J. Hurst 

Jno. R. Mears 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
-do 
-do 
.do 
.do 
-do 
-do 
-do 
-do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
-do 
.do, 
.do 
-do 
.do 
.do. 
.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do. 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do. 

.do. 

.do 

.do. 

.do. 

-do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do. 

.do. 

-do 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 

do 

do 



Periods. 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, Jan. 7. 1898 

Oath, Jan. 30,1899 

Oath, Nov. 29, 1899 

Oath, May 29, 1897 

Oath, Apr. 22, 1897 

Oath, May 3, 1897 

Oath, June 7, 1897 

Oath, Jan. 13, 1899 

Oath, May 10, 1897 

Oath, May 1,1897 

Oath, Apr. 5, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 16, 1900 

Oath, Jan. 27, 1900 

Oath, June 14,1897 

Oath, May 3, 1897 

Oath, Feb. 14, 1898 

Oath, July 5, 1897 

Oath, May 5, 1897 

Oath, May 15, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 27, 1897. 

Oath, May 5, 1887 

Oath, Apr. 10 to Apr. 17, 1897 

Oath, Apr. 24, 1897 

Oath, June 2, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 26, 1897 

Oath, Apr. 24, 1897 

Oath, May 10, 1897 

Oath, June 14, 1897 

Oath, May 25, 1897 

Oath, Apr. 5, 1900 

Oath, Feb. 24, 1899 

Oath, Feb. 3, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 24, 1899; service termi- 
nated Aug. 2, 1899. 

Oath, Mar. 4, 1889 

Oath, May 25, 1897 

Oath, Sept. 6, 1899 

Oath, May 6, 1897 

Oath, May 5, 1897 

Oath, Apr. 24, 1897 

Oath, Mar. 11, 1898, to May 19, 1900 

Oath, June 2, 1899 

Oath, Jan. 22, 1900 

Oath, May 3, 1897 

Oath, May 6, 1897; service termi- 
nated Feb. 19, 1900. 

Oath, May 27, 1899: service termi- 
nated Dec. 26, 1899. 

Oath, June 2, 1898; service termi- 
nated Nov. 27, 1899. 

Oath, May 10, 1897; service termi- 
nated Jan. 26, 1900. 

Oath, June 14 to Apr. 3, 1899; service 
terminated Apr. 7, 1900. 

Oath, May 22, 1897; service termi- 
nated May 7. 1900. 

Oath, Mar. 2, 1899; service termi- 
nated Jan. 18, 1900. 

Oath, June 23, 1900 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$4,500.00 

2,000.00 

1,500.00 

1,200.00 

900.00 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

Oath, May 23, 1900. 
Oath, Jan. 29, 1898. 
Oath, Apr. 15, 1898 



10,100.00 



4,000.00 

1,800.00 

900.00 

1,200.00 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNET-GENEBAL. 



Fees, 


Expend. 




Earned. 


Pnyablo. 


Suh..i.-ouii,.-eaud 


Other expenses. 


■Snf 


•** 


iP ,™». 


Claimed. 


n&d 


Claimed. 


pro?ed 


Cluiinoil. 


proved 


Julmsit. 


$1,700.51 
330.57 

ei.ss 

255 83 

S«i. 36 

923 71 
:;oti. 36 
876. 7:] 
259 :s>t 
3o3 (K 
1,035.15 
191.84 
1123.91 

71.47 

205. hi 

685.60 

321 . 71! 
311.04 
B89.B8 


ji.7<«'..55 

11. IN) 

S3. 98 

299. 91 
51.92 
354. 43 

399. 30 

155 :m 

91(1.02 
305 35 

259 3u 
303.03 
1.033 si 
inn. :n 
333.41 
71.47 
300. 9ti 
007.03 
319. Sii 
309. 01 
880.08 






18. 65 
159.25 
177.45 
231 116 
23.711 
91.10 
18.50 
79. 90 
37.00 
06. 25 
38. 90 
33.311 
131 . 30 
03. 115 
56. 80 
11.50 
18.2-5 
133.4(1 
48. 25 
21.05 
110.25 


159 25 
175 0.-1 

aaio5 
a. 70 

91 10 
16 50 

70.90 
37.00 
85 76 
2b. OD 
22 5 ■ 

- fl 
11 50 
18 25 

114. a. 

in y> 

9)91 
106.65 


1386 30 


put! ■»■ 


1443.33 
































511*1 . 86 

437. (11 
110.60 
1192. 80 
374. 75 
657.54 
194.48 
337. 35 
770. :« 
143. as 

342 18 
33.30 
154. n 

341 '. 2ti 
311.37 
887.46 


S1S*| si, 
HO 60 
■':! '"} 
194' 10 
237. 26 
774. 30 
1 (3. 70 

'si r,;i 

l.VI. 73 
50". 72 

203^ 2:'' 

bco. on 









































































































.".11. 7<1 

1.1)15.39 
513.23 

771. W 
87.13 
41-76 


34:1. 01 

1.137.1!) 

767^ 56 
B7.18 
41.76 


408. 30 
851.45 
384. HI 
584. ^ 
85.38 
31.33 


407. 69 

HIS ill 

676 ! 00 

iti. ;» 
31.33 


(8.35 

76.1FH 
48.75 
110.36 
13. 76 
IS. 16 


7(170 
48.75 
110.36 
13.78 
19.15 












































571.78 

:.fJ7! J + 
21.00 
672.68 


KM. 78 
3*1.84 
005.63 
327.14 
16. Ml 
661.98 


131 07 

294. 93 
461. 88 

15^76 
504.49 


436.(18 
280. 37 
454. 13 

346. ill 

13.38 
199.24 


56. 70 
351.611 
Ml. '3-5 
43.76 
B.25 
85.95 


55 70 
R9 50 
91. £5 

43.75 
3. 36 
85.05 






























































(192.02 
471. IT, 

481148 
■11(1. -1! 

!>::,. as 
75. OB 

123. I.'.S 

303. 38 
111! 08 
178.18 


602.02 

473. or, 

782. I1H 
473. 48 
410.34 
506. 98 
75.09 
122. <JM 
393. 48 
253. ml 

lu.oe 

178.16 


Ikv tii 

591.13 
300. ill 
307.71 
431.44 
50.30 
316.99 
■J^K. W, 

190. :h 
306.30 

133.88 


519.45 
354. 4" 

6H7.00 
355. W 
307.71 
435. 23 
56.30 
310. 99 
319. 30 
189. 78 
308.30 


50.75 
14.76 

93. 75 
19 25 

8i'si 

w.ou 

31. 75 
34 35 
46.75 

29.80 


50.75 
44 7b 
92 76 
19 35 
34 05 
83.06 

ii on 

38 16 

24.25 
46.25 

39. Ml 






































































179.04 
237.70 
23.72 
205.87 


178.94 
2.36, 70 


134.37 
103.27 


134. eo 

108.62 

IBB. 03 


3D. SO 
31.30 
4.00 
23.28 


30.50 
31.30 

23.25 






















































21. 131). 33 


31.348. mi 


14. 431. HI 


M.81B.M 


3.IHI3.18 


O.UI5.3: 


388.30 1 388.9) 


413.32 


a. 993. 04 

37!!. 7ti 
1.850.17 
5,(79.11 


8,993.04 

678. 7(1 
1.834.11 
6,431.00 






1.310.31 

175 14 

1.13!. 05 

3. [Wi. 36 


1.340. 21 

171 64 

1.073 IV. 
2 381125 


62.39 


53.30 















.38 


.88 


















1.075.61 


SB. 37 


1(38. 3.1 


350. 119 


311 04 















REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 





Titles. 


Periods. 


Salaries. 


Districts Bud names. 


office dep- 
utiea, and 


North Dakota- Cont'd 


Field drpnty . ... 






James Ryan 


Oath. JaL *. I 1 **. -v-fi— rprm: 
nntnl Apr. 1U. 1UQU. 








r.wow 








OWi>, northern: 

M A f-ciallny 

Harry K. Young 


i.ooo.on 

i.HYllII 
&K6B 

1.120 W 
840 00 


( ;.:nf i. 3i.-.. (1.. ;■-..: y 
Office depoty 






John J Ko"ley 
















86.01 
7WL39 
■•■'■■ 








Joan J. Kooloy 

Junes M^Bnuly 


.... do 

Field dwpnt] 

.... do 




Oath. Mar n KW •..-rvl,:.- writ: 
Lat-ii ' "•' -. 1899. 
















do.. 












E. E Rogorw 


do 






































<is.th.Mat 11. li!M>; special: Uu cum- 

perusal ion 
iiHth. Apr : iw. »iwi-)al. uu tin 

pousatlon. 








A U Uon»h 
























ustL. A ue 7, 1WT. spH.'ial: uu i .<m 
penaatlon 












9.734 «• 








Ohio, e. mi hern: 
v'lman J. Faftln 


(.000 00 
l:.l au 

:.«* 4--i 
i.i.o ;o 

..-<■! Kl 
4.VJ00 

«woo 

sMOu 
696.9 

4S0 00 
WOOD 


LTiiefi .men deputy 










Office deputy... . 










.. ..lo... 

...do 
























James Parley 


dr. 

HteQutrraijW . . . 
Flfld deputy ..... 


























L2.sw.;» 










5. oon on 
a.iM. hi 

l.IBJCl Wl 
Uli.W 

i.anou 
mom 

995.80 




Chief <. 01. -...[..pnty 










■— *° 








K V HI linmiMre ■ 












Field deputy 


































Laander T. Shookey . 






























J A. Trotter 


do 







REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 




Earned. 


Payable. 


Sulraistoace and 


Other expenses. 


,-h'i^":' 


CltiiiiitMl. 


A]>|, ]',.,* '-.1 


Otaim-d. | ^fa 


Claimed 


proved, 


( 'luimi'il 


pro^d 


deposit. 


1129.93 


$130.1*3 


US. 73 


148.73 


{36.50 


t£8.50 












































J53.67 


$53.67 


in.-i. 7a 


1.868.(7 
617.10 
167.63 

1.177 *t 
869.93 


1.888 47 
SIT 00 
167 52 






25.35 
641.53 
121. KJ. 
888 w 
183.31 


35.35 
541 511 
121.83 
will W3 


314.30 


313.61 


3. 1H 67 










































39.11 

tsuao 
t:i si 

810 60 


ft.lt 
489 30 
471. SI 






7.15 

m.n 
lift mi 

33.70 


330 78 
110 00 
31.(0 




























690.BO 


673.28 














































































































































































































































































































fi,l!N.lli 


5.175.51 


SU0.U0 


'.-1 38 


8, 311.95 


l.:.liK.iiT. 


211. LW 


313. 51 


S, 144.07 


5, 007. DO 
19L46 

i. 377.5*1 

1.830. 1" 
ili'i'. ;j8 
X.7. "5 
3.12 


A, OUT. 00 
9 00 
Ul. « 

i.arr.w 

!. 14111 40 

sa *> 

H67.05 
313 






1.185.95 


1.171 60 


IIS, 39 


113. OS 


1.989.60 






■jr. 35 
387.19 

i .;- : ■ 
.71 :«i 
lou in 

llO'fi 
133 10 
3S 10 


36.36 
387 I'j 
1.3ai> -'.■ 

31.30 
109.10 
110 05 
183 '■• 

33 M 

88. 65 



























































14.1. IT 

MB. 46 


MS. 17 

269.48 
































1,477.00 


1 -1 i. 


1.107 HO 


1. CHS. 11 


885.66 


SS 15 








































Li.7ij8.51 


:i. nwi. im 


113.3',! 


lis.on 


1.0SI.I10 


1,551.60 

«:. «s 

iW. 33 
900.10 
264.87 


1,S61-B0 

552. l!3 
088. 33 
900.10 
361.(7 






730,31 

l.ltjll.-fii 

■(.->.->. :i5 

418.(17 
UB.G3 


730.53 
1 i.m m 
4.56 06 
ll- 07 
118.03 


387.32 


387.33 


353 17 












16 


.16 






























300.03 


378.03 






165.37 


155. fir 


















1, 477. IS 

sor.. .v; 

l."l!l.,-,!< 
5UV34 
53k. 38 
TilS.-KI 

551.32 


l.nw.a 

375 43 

1*30. 87 
405. 95 

520. 2» 


1,108.28 

281.64 
764.70 
378. 93 
403.71 
531 37 
41S. 74 
7B.45 


31.;. 57 
717.07 
371.% 
3114.71 
534 01 
413. 77 
67.15 


HIS. 17 
ISO. 83 
413.71 
; 17:1. 40 
till. 31 
173. 04 
351.78 
I Si. Ill 


67.' 33 

189 83 
3TB 10 
883 78 

•29.99 
UttlC 
IV 7- 

133 31 

























































368 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Shouting, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and- amounts 



Districts and names. 



Oklahoma— Continued. 

J.S.Walton 

Warren V. Willing- 
ham. 
J.H.Wilson 



N. M. Douglass. 

F.E.Smith 

Dan. W.Jones .. 



Total. 



Oregon: 

Zoetb Houser 

Preston A. Worthing- 
ton. 

J. A. Wilson 

S. L. Morse 

A. A. Roberts 

Nat. H.Lane 



Total. 



Pennsylvania, eastern: 

James B. Reilly 

Thomas Marple 

Abram B. Myers 

James P. Reilly 

Solomon Foster 

Michael P. Bolan... 



William J. Burns 

Schuyler A. Donnella 
Thomas R. McManus. 

John E. Murphy 

JohnE. Wilke 

John B. Robinson 

Thomas Marple 

Abram B. Myers 

Joseph H. Huddell ... 



Total. 



Pennsylvania, western: 
Frederick C. Leonard 

Joe H. Irons 

James W.Snyder 

BertBeatty 

W.S.Blair 

Frank Campbell 

Chas.Hall 

GuyC. Hollon 

Clark Lowry 

Alexander McBeth. . . 

Jno.L.Roe 

Joseph C. Stewart 

W. L. S. Thompson . . . 
Hutson S. Williams . . 



S. A. Bacharach. 



Total. 



Rhode Island: 

James S. McCabe.. 

John J.Devoe 

Jno. E. Eendrick . . 
Richmond J. Stone 



Total. 



Titles. 



Field deputy 
do 



do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 



Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy. 



Periods. 



Oath, Feb. 10 to Mar. 7, 1866 
Oath, Oct. 5, 1899 



Oath, Apr. 28, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. 1. 1899. 

Oath, Feb. 10,11,1898; service termi- 
nated July 4, 1899. 

Oath, Feb. 14, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. —,1899. 

Oath, Feb. 12. 1898; service termi- 
nated May 1, 1900. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy 



.....do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Marshal 

Office deputy 



Fiscal year 
do 



.do 
do 
do 



Oath, May 8, 1899; special 



July 1,1899, to Apr. 80, 1900 

do 

do 

Mar. 1,1900, to Apr. 16, 1900 

July 1,1899, to Feb. 28, 1900 

Oath, Apr. 17. 1899; service termi- 
nated April 30, 1900; special; no 
compensation. 

do 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 



May 1 , 1900, to June 30, 1900 . 

do 

.....do 

do 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

Oath, Feb. 28, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 20, 1898 

Oath, Aug. 28, 1899 

Oath, July 24, 1899 

Oath, July 6, 1899 

do 

Oath, Apr. 23, 1900 

Oath, Feb. 4, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 17, 1898 

do 

Oath, July 2, 1898; service terminated 

July 3, 1899. 
Oath, Jan. 3, 1899; service terminated 

July 1,1899. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$11,800.-00 



July 1, 1899, to June 20, 1900 .. 

do 

June 21, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 
do 



4,000.00 
2,000.00 

1,500.00 
1,200.00 
1,200.00 



9,900.00 



3,829.70 

1,664.80 

1,248.60 

166.05 

796.70 



670.80 
835.20 
261.40 
201.10 



8,663.85 



4,000.00 
1,600.00 
1,200.00 



6,800.00 



1,945.09 

778.06 

54.91 

21.94 



2,800.00 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



369 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year i00#— Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


deposit. 


$908.80 
399.57 

.6.00 


$900.80 
399.57 

6.00 


$681.59 
299.67 

4.50 


$675.60 
299.67 

4.50 


$362.76 
111.45 

6.62 


$347.06 
110.95 

6.31 


























40.00 
19.50 


40.00 
19.50 


30.00 

14.62 


30.00 
14.62 


22.00 
17.82 


22.00 
17.82 




















10,850.60 


10,696.62 


4,944.06 


4,845.33 


6,493.83 


6,361.17 


$287.67 


$287.67 


$252.47 


4,309,44 
185.08 

1,783.62 
2,265.57 
2,083.26 


4,272.88 
134.42 

1,719.02 
2,235.33 
2,069.34 






117.45 
33.40 

467.35 
1,054.57 
1,003.45 


116.95 
33.40 

467.35 
1,047.05 
1,003.45 


102.78 


102.78 


1,288.55 


































































10,626.97 


10,430.99 






2,676.22 


2,668.20 


102.78 


102.78 


1,288.55 








2,326.38 
558.23 
2,171.00 
1,105.08 
1,456.67 


2,166.27 
558.03 
2,138.14 
1,105.08 
1,431.63 










564.11 


548.75 


2,235.11 






11.67 
308.09 
530.14 
359.31 


11.67 
307.89 
529.38 
358.17 








.20 


.40 
.34 
.28 














.28 




































































































344.28 

74.80 
396.56 
400.78 


344.28 

74.80 
396.56 
400.78 














373.12 






.60 
64.72 
80.60 


.60 
64.72 
80.60 






































8,833.78 


8,615.57 






1,355.13 


1,353.03 


564.59 


549.77 


2,608.23 








2,058.27 
808.84 
637.86 

17.50 
164.64 
234.68 

19.58 

154.70 

1,106.69 

16.50 
221.16 
329.48 

21.72 


1,772.44 
974.22 
636.74 

17.50 
164.64 
234.68 

19.58 

154.70 

1,096.15 

16.50 
210.18 
329.48 

21.72 






191.09 

167.00 

119. 14 

8.39 

19.55 

39.59 

11.62 

15.36 

75.45 

6.35 

27.15 

56.40 

16.85 


191.09 

167.00 

119.14 

5.51 

15.68 

39.59 

11.62 

15.36 

66.43 

6.35 

27.15 

47.77 

13.65 


9.81 


9.81 


1,203.12 


















13.13 
123.50 
176.02 

14.69 
116.03 
830.02 

12.38 
165.88 
247.12 

16.29 


13.13 
123.50 
176.02 

14.69 
116.03 
822.12 

12.38 
157.65 
247.12 

16.29 






































































































5,791.62 


5,648.53 


1,715.06 


1,698.93 


753.94 


726.34 


9.81 


9.81 


1,203.12 


2,107.53 

160.69 

53.12 

26.34 


2,060.43 

155.85 

53.12 

23.94 






118.81 
46.83 


102.66 
36.32 


45.00 


45.00 


505.48 














7.72 


) 


3.80 


3.80 



















2,347.68 


2,293.34 





169.44 


142.78 


45.00 


45.00 


513.20 



H. Doc. 9 24 



370 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit S. — Shotting, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



South Carolina: 

Lawson D. Melton — 

Virgil P Clayton 

James R. Davidson. . 

C.M.Graham. 

E. Brooks Sligh 

C.H.Alexander 

James C. Alexander. 

J.W.Bates 

W.H.Bouton 

P.M.Butler 

C.A.Carson 

W.B.F.Corbin 

John M. Dansby 

James R. Davidson. . 

Jordan H. Dean 

R.H.Dobson 

M.C.Durham 

H.F.Floyd 

Geo. W. Hoesh 

W. H. Hubbard 

Jno. Latham 



Titles. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy 

do 



Periods. 



...do 

...do 

...do. 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Daniel Mann ! do 

...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 
...do 

...do 

...do 



J. T. McKinney . . . 
James H. McLane 

Henry Mew 

J.F.Miller 

A.A.Phillips 

F.M.Prickett 

J. W. Reece 

W.B.Rowell 

W. F. Swaringen . 
J.T.Thornton.... 

R.Webster 

R.J. McCaslan 



Troy Ruf us Langston 
J.H.Grady 



Total 



South Dakota: 

Edward .G. Kennedy. 

Jerry Carle ton 

Arthur H. Gipson 

J. P. Belding 

D. D. Collins 

Geo. A. Ludlow 

R. H. Somers 



Samuel Strayer do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 

do 

.do 



Total. 



Tennessee, eastern: 

R. W. Austin ... 

Millard F. Caldwell . . 

Allen G. Mathews 

Murphy L. Anderson. 

Allen G. Mathews 

Luther M. Parker 

M. L. Anderson 



Jas. T. Beckner 

John A. Baughard . 

Jno. W. Cates 

J. M. Dowell 

J. W. Justice 

M. F. Maples 

Charles W. McCall 

James A. Nave 

Charles Ross 

W.H.Smith 



James A. Thompson. 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

do 

Field deputy 



.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do, 

.do. 

.do 

.do. 

.do. 

.do 

.do 

.do 



Fiscal year 

do 

July 1,1899, to Oct. 13, 1899 

Oct. 14, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

Fiscal year 

Oath, Apr. 2, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 19, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 1, 1898 

do 

Oath, Apr. 14,1900 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Oath, Apr. 5, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 5, 1900 

Oath, Feb. 19, 1900 

Oath, Feb. 16, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 1, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 2, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 1, 1898 

Oath, May 17, 1900 

Oath, Apr. 2, 1898 

do 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Oath, Oct. 28, 1898 

Oath, May 29, 1899 

Oath, Apr. 4, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 1, 1898 

Oath, June 20, 1899 

Oath, June 13. 1899 

Oath, Apr. 1, 1898 

Oath, Oct. 31, 1899 

Oath, July 16, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 1,1898 

Oath, Apr. 8, 1898 

Oath, Apr. 5, 1898; service terminated 

Jan. 22, 1900. 
Oath, Apr. 4, 1899; service terminated 

Apr. 6, 1900. 
Oath, May 9, 1898; service terminated 

Apr. 9, 1900. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$4,500.00 

2,000.00 

342.39 

857.61 

1,200.00 



8,900.00 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

Oath, Jan. 2, 1898.. 
Oath, May 25, 1898. 
Oath. Jan. 12, 1898. 
Oath, Jan. 13, 1898. 
Oath, Jan. 14, 1898. 



4,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,200.00 



7,000.00 



Fiscal year 

do 

July 1,1899, to Jan. 31, 1900 

Feb. 1,1900, to Mar. 31, 1900 

Apr. 2, 1900, to June 30, 1900 

Fiscal year 

Oath, Aug. 23, 1897; service termi- 
nated Jan. 31, 1900; reappointed 
Apr. 9, 1900. 

Oath, Feb. 9, 1900 

Oath, Feb. 17, 1900 

Oath, Aug. 24, 1897 

Oath, June 24, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 20, 1899 

Oath, Jan. 18, 1900 

Oath, Aug. 12, 1898 

Oath, Nov. 5, 1898 

Oath, Aug. 24, 1897 

Oath, Oct. 16, 1899; special for one 
service. 

Oath, Dec. 15, 1899 



4,000.00 
1,200.00 
527.50 
147.50 
222.50 
900.00 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 



371 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

CViTlTtR foi* 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


deposit. 


$66.08 

50.58 

20.00 

11.00 

113.60 

58.56 

492.80 

105.78 

40.22 

.50 

447.08 

771.42 

54.86 

57.20 

62.82 

99.50 

424.52 

199.30 


$66.08 

50.58 

20.00 

11.00 

113.60 

58.56 

490.80 

105.78 

40.22 

.50 

438.98 

770.42 

54.86 

57.20 

62.82 

99.50 

422.98 

199.30 










$14.63 


$14.63 


$309.89 






$115.45 

8.40 

92.40 

1,117.17 

J. 50 

60.00 

1.50 


$115.45 

6.90 

92.40 

1,106.97 

1.50 

52.50 

1.50 


































|43.92 

369.60 

79.32 

30.16 

.37 

335.29 

578.56 

41.14 

42.90 

47.11 

74.62 

318.38 

149.47 


$43.92 

368.10 

79.32 

30.16 

.37 

328.42 

577.81 

41.14 

42.90 

47.11 

74.62 

317.23 

149. 47 


























1.50 
47.10 
45.35 

6.40 
12.00 


1.50 
45.80 
38.35 

6.40 
12.00 






































4.00 

8.00 

26.50 


4.00 

8.00 

20.50 


























327.18 
- 107.93 


316.48 
105.63 


245.37 

80.93 


237.35 
79.21 


71.00 
10.00 


69.75 
10.00 




















769. 10 
272.74 
155.04 
402.72 
394.50 
345.26 
207.46 
176. 10 
53.22 
51.41 
197.40 


769.10 
272.74 
155.04 
402.72 
394.00 
337.56 
207.46 
173. 76 
53.22 
43.41 
197.40 


576.82 
204.55 
116.27 
302.03 
295.87 
258.93 
155.58 
132.06 
39.90 
38.55 
148.05 


576.82 
204.55 
116.27 
302.03 
295.50 
253.16 
155.58 
130.31 
39.90 
32.55 
148.05 


60.85 
50.40 

3.25 
13.50 

2.50 
59.70 

2.50 
22.00 

2.25 

3.00 
43.25 


60.85 
48.40 

3.25 
13.50 

2.00 
59.70 

2.50 
22.00 

2.25 

3.00 
43.25 












































■ 
















1 


286.88 
343.36 


284.88 
343.36 


215. 15 
257.51 


213. 65 
257.51 


36.50 
33.75 


21.50 
33.25 




1 




1 

1 






7, 166. 12 


7,119.94 


5,178.41 


5,143.01 


1,961.72 


1,908.97 


14.63 


14.63 


309.89 


1,289.01 

121.06 

97.56 

1,825.18 

1,987.27 

1.325.64 

713.64 

766.84 


1,389.01 

1,065.73 

149. 16 

1,820.42 

1,949.59 

1,315.10 

709.38 

754.32 






429.50 
778.37 
255.00 
154.00 
83.57 
131.55 
988.25 
314.50 


429.00 
778.37 
255.00 
151.00 
73.87 
127.55 
979.75 
305.00 


100.83 


100.50 


561.95 








......... .. 

1,368.89 

1,490.45 

994.24 

535.23 

575. 12 


. _. ...... 

1.365.33 

1,462.19 

986.33 

532 03 

565.73 




1 




1 




















98.50 


98.50 






8,126.20 


9.152.71 


4,963.93 


4,911.61 


3,134.74 


3,099.54 


199.33 


199.00 


561.95 


601.52 


572.52 


I 


63.80 


63.80 


63.02 


61.00 


261.98 








90.50 
9.00 


90.50 
9.00 






130.77 
1.00 


130.77 


! 






: 








J 




71.78 
984.24 

74.' 74 
470.97 
335.02 
180.44 
293.76 
324.50 
•663.10 
323.72 


71.78 
917.36 

74.76 
457.61 
311.59 
178.44 
290.72 
319.56 
652.36 
318.2a 
438.70 
5. 50 

29.58 


738.21 

56.06 
353.24 
251.28 

135. :u 

230.33 
243 3: 
497. 33 
:>A2 HO 
:W4. 5<> 
4.13 

1 22. Ill 


667.93 

56.06 
343. 19 
233.68 
133.83 
218.04 
239.66 
489.26 
23S. 71 

:w».o~ 

4.13 
22. 19 


212.44 
182.48 

6.75 

95.46 

104.56 

6.00 

15.25 

59.25 

257.63 

22.50 

66.24 


212.44 
169.43 

6.75 
88.29 
87.79 

5.75 
11.75 
56.50 
246.53 
22.50 
61.24 


1 




1 












) 










1 


1 " 














446. 10 








r>. no 

29.58 






2.50 


1 

1 2. 50 


1 



372 BBPOBT OF THE ATTORNEY -GENERAL. 

Exhibits. — Shoimng, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, an claimed and as approved; and amounts 





Titles. 


^ 


Salaries. 


Districts and names. 


Marshals, 
office dep- 
utiea^nd 


j m"h varnell'. 


Field deputy 










J.J, Webuot 

W H Whitehead 

(- A Williams 


.... do.... 

do 

.... do 


Hotr.N... I.!**. -i*-'ia :f..r..tiM.'.av 














J WBUU "" n 


...do 


null. A .(.• it. !■«?. service urml- 

i...t.-l S..v «.18W. 
uatl. Ail- «. liw:. wrv:«. wmi 

t.u;c.l D"-- In. WW 
Hath, tvi 1" I-**: *rv,f- t.-rml 

• «I.J [>'• X9.1HHI. 

■ ■ ;. \."i wtvi.m term! 

ilttlh I ■' .'. l"f-. htv!. o t'.Tinl 
cate.1 Mar. 31. 1900 














..do 

do 

....do 




David Faroe 

Geo, W Hnffrldn" . . 












|fl WK ,-*i 










4, quo on 

l..'Oi ill 
BOO. 00 


John K Pattoo 


(."blofoffl ™ deputy 
FIH.idei.nty .... 
















































































do 






























— ■ *> 






















do 

d<> 


o„-h ifar ;;"., im-. —r..::.- '.Mr.. 

W..IN.JI .;.■.■!■•■ 
Oath. Jan i W»: ~.rv, n . -.tit' 

:.»'s-.l fi";.l .MK99 
()a-.h Ayr H. 1<W; wruw '.-n*,: 

ni'j"l Oct 4.18H0 
































Tenowsnn. western: 


Marshal 


Fiscal year 


4.000.00 

L,<mao 


Th- .:*.:: ii»Bw..r 


Co wf ..flics deputy 
Office deputy 
Field deputy 


J" 












Hoory P. Gaines.. .. 






.... do 
















■m:I Mi.y l:<.linw Hpm:ial. mi rw 
pensatlon 






do 














do 


oath, Jan 2* I 1 -!* - -rv:.r» •..■r:^. 
nated Jan. 1. ■ ■ ■ 












Texas, northern: 

George H. Green 






3,000.00 

:.n».(D 

1.1110.(1) 

60. m 


Chief office <Ib|.u t y 
Office deputy . 
Stenograph'' r . . 
Field deputy 
















Whit Dryden 


(lath 1".' .11.1*10 





REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GKNEBAL. 



373 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap- 
proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


deposit. 




















$690.62 


$672.80 


$517.98 


$504.60 


$135.20 


$131.30 














97.42 

37.10 

315.83 

2.78 


94.30 

34.76 

317.47 

2.78 


73.07 

27.84 

237.89 

2.09 


70.72 

26.08 

238.10 

2.09 


29.85 
11.00 
91.40 


28.85 
11.00 

89.89 




































42.44 

32.50 

210.58 

11.04 


42.44 

32.50 

206.28 

11.04 


31.84 

24.38 

157.95 

8.28 


31.84' 

24.38 

134.12 

8.28 


7.05 


6.80 














22.00 
2.75 


21.25 
2.75 




















6,344.78 


6,154.69 


4,180.20 


4,015.96 


1,525.88 


1,457.88 


$63.02 


$61.00 


$261.98 


1,147.55 

8.00 

62.00 

13.16 

1,057.34 

348.70 

246.78 

363.26 

43.78 

846.24 


1,110.55 

8.00 

62.00 

13. 16 

1,042.34 

347.30 

245.28 

363.02 

43.78 

826.90 






165.27 
5.11 
8.83 
2.00 

169.33 
79.60 
14.50 

152.95 
7.00 

203.85 


165.27 
5.11 
8.83 
2.00 

163.79 
79.60 
14.50 

150.60 
7.00 

203.85 


109.51 


109.51 


585.07 


















9.87 
793.00 
261.52 
185.10 
272.44 
32.84 
634.67 


987.00 
782.05 
260.47 
183.96 
272.26 
32.84 
620.17 


















































56.28 
55.62 
109.02 
420.20 
218.16 
52.00 
200.74 
761.46 
336.66 


56.28 
55.62 
107.88 
419. 10 
213.38 
52.00 
200 26 
758.46 
334.98 


42.21 

41.72 

81.76 

315.16 

163.48 

38.99 

150.56 

571.10 

252.49 


42.21 

41.72 

80.91 

314.33 

160.03 

38.99 

150.19 

568.84 

251.22 


5.75 

5.50 

29.00 

76.00 

16.75 

9.00 

19.50 

185.25 

91.25 


5.75 

5.50 

29.00 

75.00 

12.75 

9.00 

19.50 

183.25 

85.25 
















































































































109.51 




6,346.95 


6,260.29 


3,846.91 


3,810.06 


1,246.44 


1,125.55 


109.51 


585.07 


2,445.74 
166.12 
614. 19 
300.08 
394.84 
167. 78 
674.95 
331.13 


2, 104. 74 
166.36 
607.69 
299.72 
393.46 
164.26 
669.06 
327.69 






332.72 

117.62 

244.20 

45.00 

52.60 

68.92 

105.15 

38.10 


325.37 

103.83 

244.10 

45.00 

52.60 

66.20 

103.75 

38.10 


31.26 


30.96 


324.29 


















225.05 
296.13 
125.82 
506.22 
248.34 


224.78 
293.22 
123.19 
501.79 
245.76 








































591. 18 
118.26 
147.44 


574.42 
116.96 
132.84 


443.40 

88.70 

110.58 


430.80 
87.72 
99.62 


86.50 
11.25 
29.40 


85.75 
11.25 
29.40 



























5,951.71 


5,557.20 


2,044.24 


2,006.88 


1,131.46 


1,105.35 


31.26 


30.96 


324.29 


1,392.12 
234.00 
535.36 


1,392.12 
198.00 
457.36 






895.05 

52.24 

961.97 


884.95 

50.44 

959.62 


97.99 


97.89 


2,603.55 


| 




1 








j 








1,994.59 
2,281.30 


1,919.33 
2,217.71 


1,476.63 
1,710.99 


1,456.53 
1,663.31 


208.75 
90.25 


206.45 
85.95 















374 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



EXHIBIT S.— Showing, by districts, the salaries paid to United States niarslials, their 
compensation payable out of said fees , as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Texas, northern— C't'd. 

D. R. Hodges 

Ralph O. Rector.... 
Robert M. Warden. 



Total. 



Titles. 



Periods. 



Salaries. 



Field deputy 

do 

do 



Texas, eastern: 

John Grant 

JohnB. Walter 

A. I. Sutherland 

Barton L. Richards. 

WillC. Bernard 

P. H. Gaines 

J. W. Butler 

R. Brunazzi 



John Crocker. 



E. T. Dorough 

W.P. Harris 

Edward McKenna. 

A. J. Tucker 

W. D. Waters 

O. K. Wheeler 

J. W.Wood 

B. C. Ingram 



Oath, Dec. 31, 1898. 

do 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy . 

Office deputy 

do 

Stenographer 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 



.do 



....do 
....do 

do 

._..do 
....do 

do 

....do 
do 



Fiscal year 

do 

...do 

Mar. 15, 1900, to June 30, 1900 

Fiscal year 

July 1, 1899, to Mar. 14, 1900 

Oath, Apr. 2, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 21, 1900; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Mar. 5, 1900; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Mar. 10, 1898 



MA r «?h * O a t 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



$5,560.00 



5,000.00 
2,500.00 
1,800.00 
475.58 
900.00 
1,124.42 



J. W. McKee 



J. M. Chancellor. 

J. W. Hoover 

R. B. Mitchell... 
J. M. Reynolds . . 

Jim. Taylor 

J. K. Warren 

G. C.Gibson 



C. L. Kilgore . . 
Wm. T. Smith. 
B.C.Ingram... 
J. S. Watson... 



Total. 



Texas, western: 

Geo L. Siebrecht. 
Z. G. Schermack.. 

W. M. Hanson 

Jno. M. Haynes .. 
H. R. Hillebrand . 
John E. Kennerly 
F. H. Lancaster .. 
Robt. W. McMillan. 

J. A. Poole 

Chas. B. Sheridan 

K. H. Merrem 



do 

.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



Oath, Mar. 17, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 16, 1898 

Oath, Dec. 16, 1898 

Oath, Mar. 10, 1900 

Oath, Nov. 14, 1898 

Oath Feb. 20, 1900; special; no com- 
pensation. 

Oath, Mar. 14, 1898; service termi- 
nated May 22, 1900. 

do 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Field deputy 

do 



do. 
do. 
.do. 
do. 
do 



Oath, Mar. 16, 1898; service termi- 
nated May 22, 1900. 

Oath, Dec. 1, 1898; service termi- 
nated May 22, 1900. 

Oath, Jan. 16, 1900; service termi- 
nated Mar. 15, 1900. 

Oath, Mar. 14, 1898; service termi- 
nated Sept. 25, 1899. 

Oath, Apr. 4, 1898; guard for prison 
van, at $2 per diem. 



Al. Musgrove 

R. M. Dowe ! do 

Tom Crawford do 

Trinidad San Miguel. do 




J. Y. Leavell : do... 

Jno. C. Evins i do ... 



Fiscal year 

do 

Oath, Feb. 4, 1898 

Oath, Feb. 2, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 31,1898 

Oath, Apr. 24, 1899 

Oath, Jan. 28, 1898 

Oath, Jan. 31, 1900 

Oath, Apr.13,1900 

Oath, Dec. 5, 1898; service terminated 
Apr. 13, 1900. 

Oath, July 24, 1899; service termi- 
nated Apr. 5, 1900. 

Oath, Feb. 7, 1900: service terminated 
Feb. 15, 1900; special. 

Oath, Dec. 16, 1899; service termi- 
nated Jan 31, 1900. 

Oath, Oct. 12, 1899; service termi- 
nated Oct 17, 1899; special. 

Oath, July 16, 1898; service termi- 
nated Aug. 30, 1899. 



11,800.00 



4,000.00 
2,500.00 



Tetal. 



Oath, Mar. 26, 1900; service termi- 
nated Mar. 27, 1900; special. 



6,500.00 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



375 



deputies and clerks; their expenses, as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


deposit. 


$182.94 
1,441.22 
2,303.03 


$180.94 
1,433.22 
2,199.63 


$137.22 
1,080.92 
1,702.20 


$135.72 
1,074.92 
1,649.75 


$52.80 
165.00 
199.20 


$52.80 
141.42 
179.95 


























10,364.56 


9,998.31 


6,107.96 


5,980.23 


2,625.26 


2,561.58 


$97.99 


$97.89 


$2,003.55 


1,099.36 

710.36 

280.77 

19.57 


1,099.36 

710.36 

280.77 

19.57 


• 




693.15 

452.87 

121.15 

62.20 


677.80 

444.47 

119.45 

62.20 


68.50 


67.92 


2,381.28 






































231.67 
897.37 


231.67 
897.37 






210.43 
99.50 


209.08 
99.50 








673.01 


673.01 
































1,631.24 
533.69 


1,601.72 
533.69 


1,223.43 

400.26 


1,166.44 
400.26 


177.70 
74.90 


172.20 
72.75 




















4.00 
189.13 


4.00 
186.17 


3.00 
141.84 


3.00 
139.62 


30.00 
32.25 


30.00 
32.00 




















682.70 


678. 18 


512.01 


506.62 


236.75 


234.90 














1,117.04 


1,116.04 


837.77 


837.02 


118.40 


113.40 














68.32 

52.00 

339.00 

121.96 

7.50 

174.42 

84.48 

1.50 

86.02 


68.32 

52.00 

339.00 

121.96 

7.50 

174.42 

84.48 

1.50 

86.02 


51.23 
38.99 

254.24 

91.46 

5.62 

130.77 

63.35 

1.13 

64.51 


51.23 
38.99 

254.24 

91.46 

5.62 

130.77 

65.35 

1.13 

64.51 


109.30 
349.35 
187.95 
191.80 
46.95 
70.75 

124.10 

8.80 
23.50 


104.53 
344.60 
186.45 
180.05 
46.95 
70.75 

123.35 

8.80 
23.50 
















































































8,332.10 


8,294.10 


4,492.62 


4,429.27 


3,421.80 


3,356.73 


68.50 


67.92 


2,381.28 


1,815.32 
131.38 

1,890.54 
550.96 
803.25 
515.65 

1,658.37 

400.04 

59.76 

548.44 

1,276.52 

l.OQ 

25.00 

.50 

# 

17.50 

38.50 
3.86 


1,814.82 
131.38 

1,791.64 
538.96 
785.10 
498.69 

1,650.71 

381.04 

59.76 

510.74 

1,252.40 

1.00 

25.00 

.50 

17.50 

36.50 
3.86 






547.32 
119.25 
864.95 

12.00 
377.25 

16.30 

364.25 

9.50 

76.25 
194.20 

121.25 


547.32 
118.60 
861.45 
5.50 
358.43 

15.70 

337.50 

9.50 

76.25 
1S7.80 

91.90 


77.32 


75.50 


1,141.17 








1,333.05 
413.21 
602.44 
386.72 

1,243.76 

300.03 

44.82 

411.33 

1,076.91 


1,297.29 
404.21 
588.83 
374.25 

1,238.09 

285.78 

44.82 

383.06 

939.90 






























































18.74 

.38 

13.12 

28.87 


18.74 

.38 

13.12 

27.37 












6.20 


6.20 
















































9,736.59 


9,499.60 


5,873.38 


5,615.84 


2, 708. 72 


2,616.15 


77.32 


75.50 


1,141.17 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 





Titles. 






Salaries. 


Districts and names. 


Periods 


office dep- 


Utah: 




iiw 




%<'••■•'■■ 

3 

i.ajo.oo 




CbiefofOcedepnty 




JohnK Hardy 

Joseph E Hall. . 
















fl.Tm.no 










Pis 

CIS- 

Oat 




K.sn uo 

!■>■«■ 




chief ..Aire deputy 
Field deputy 


























3. 600.00 




Marsha] 

Chief office deputy 

Offlre deputy . . 






Fl- 
oat 




■ ■■ ■! 

1 rm in 
lai ro 








h, May 1. 1WJ0, toJooeSu, 1K»... 


Robert w Bailey . . . 


Field deputy 


O&l 

not 




h. Nov 16, ]«*>: wrvleet. terml 
ted April 33. isoo. 




































&.2u«t 




Marshal 






Fi- 




• .•»••• 
i.6fB.mi 
i »: «• 
1.000. HO 




1 ■ 1 ■•!:■.!■, :•■ 
Office deputy 

Field deputy 








R Rmmeti «■-:.■ 
W. B. Adlngton 


nal 
Oat 
Oai 

• <*: 
<•-: 
Oat 

Clftt 
Oa: 


lo 






















■■■ |j° 














.... do 

do 


























































Jno l>. Rollers 




Oat 












J I) Shniflebariwr 










Oat 


















































naVrd Feb I.HlUa 
',.:! M.r.l l-w- s.rr;cetyrmliial^d 

:'■•"" A 't 4. IW: snrvt™. terml 

i.i'Ii W.lv >. I---; eervnu tnrini 

l-i-.'.l A'JK IJ.1H90 

iu.tr. F.I. S.'. ,w servi.o tanni- 

in'.-mt 1.1K99. 

Oath, .lone 4, 1CS»; eervii.> terml- 

i..-.. .1 A il- -" l-W 
nalh. F-1. 17. IiW. servine terml 

i':.''"i."y.. y > 'ikm' service terml- 

..-.:■ I M(ivM.M 
Unth Xny -J: i-«-. eervl.i- tern.:. 

i^icdJulySo,;8»9. 










.. . do 

do 








Alters 






....du 




















7, 801. 70 











REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



377 



deputies and clerks; their expenses* as claimed and as approved; the fees earned and 
paid to clerks of United States courts for deposit, for the fiscal year 1900 — Cont'd. 



Fees. 


Expenses. 


Amounts 

paid to 

clerks of 

courts for 


Earned. 


Payable. 


Subsistence and 
travel. 


Other expenses. 


Claimed. 


Approved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


proved. 


Claimed. 


Ap \, 
proved. 


deposit. 


$572.08 

509.13 

43.82 

15.50 

12.22 


$572.08 

484.96 

43.82 

15.50 

8.00 






$42.00 

.491.65 

88.70 

85.10 

64.25 


$42.00 

491.65 

88.70 

83.10 


$112. 19 


$96.19 


'$218.25 


















$11.62 
6.00 


$11.62 
6.00 








48.75 














1,152.75 


1,124.36 


17.62 


.17.62 


771.70 


754.20 


112. 19 


96.19 


218.25 


921.02 

275.07 

1,524.84 

574.86 


837.27 

218.45 

1,473.74 

569.32 






325.07 

115.22 

.50 

120.85 


315.95 

114.57 

.50 

117. 10 


67.79 


67.58 


528.38 








1,139.06 
431.16 


1,105.30 
427.00 




















3,295.79 


3,098.78 


1,570.22 


1,532.30 


561.64 


548.12 


67.79 


67.58 


528.38 


1,874.94 


1,874.94 






640.03 


622.38 


50.53 


50.19 


1,499.08 








38.00 

5.00 

248.92 

328.22 

282.94 

3.02 

1,883.25 


38.00 

5.00 

213.34 

328.22 

265.74 

3.02 

1,833.57 






96.15 

219.80 

33.35 

20.70 

22.31 


96.15 

219.80 

33.35 

15.95 

19.61 


















186.69 
246.19 

212.20 

2.27 

1,412.44 


160.01 
246.17 

199.30 

2.27 

1,375.19 


























187.32 


185.92 














4,664.29 


4,561.83 


2,059.79 


1,982.94 


1,219.66 


1,193.16 


50.53 


50.19 


1,499.08 


1,201.74 


1,201.74 






159.35 

140.00 

131.54 

83.85 

90.30 

54.90 

7.00 

85.80 

603.95 

130.67 

5.00 

54.25 

159.40 

14.50 

165.05 

46.50 

33.55 

49.45 

66.37 

5.60 

27.75 

85.04 

41.50 

6.00 

38.50 

40.00 

15.55 

9.00 


158.60 

139.85 

131.04 

82.89 

87.75 

54.90 

7.00 

84.50 

583.55 

130.67 

1.00 

53.65 

159.15 

14.50 

165.05 

45.50 

33.55 

46.70 

65.87 

5.60 

27.75 

79.09 

41.50 

6.00 

38.50 

40.00 

15.55 

9.00 


18.64 
.69 


18.64 
.69 


619.71 








8.00 
2.00 

1,173.59 
588.11 
212.12 

1,115.34 
925.24 
656.53 
140.21 
175.41 
789.63 
169.76 
347.71 
493.22 
528.95 
752.30 
711.82 
347.98 
267.24 
944.38 
932.94 
87.12 
693.82 
659.86 
235.44 

105.26 


8.00 
2.00 

1,163.95 
564.25 
208.62 

1,107.16 
917. 74 
656.53 
140.21 
175.41 
778.83 
169.76 
345.71 
492.74 
519.25 
747.10 
711.82 
347.98 
267.24 
940.66 
931.98 
82.12 
693.82 
659.86 
232.96 

98.06 


















880.19 
441.07 
159.08 
836.50 
693.92 
492.38 
105.15 
131.54 
592.22 
127.31 
260.77 
369.90 
396.70 
564.20 
533.85 
260.98 
200.42 
708.27 
699.69 
65.34 
520.35 
494.88 
176.57 

78.94 


872.96 
423.18 
156.46 
830.39 
688.30 
492.38 
105.15 
131.54 
584.12 
127.31 
259.27 
369.54 
389.43 
560.30 
533.85 
260.98 
200.42 
705.49 
698.97 
61.59 
520.35 
494.88 
174.71 

73.54 
























































• 
















































































• 




























208.26 
10.70 

339.72 
35.06 


174.26 
10.70 

339.72 
35.06 


156.19 

8.02 

254.78 

26.29 


130.69 

8.02 

254.78 

26.29 


• 
12.75 

1.00 

26.00 

11.45 


12.25 
1.00 

26.00 
9.95 


















































14,859.46 


14,725.24 


10,235.50 


10,134.89 


2,401.57 


2,361.91 


19.33 


19.33 


619.71 



378 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



Exhibit ^.Showing, by districts, the salaries paid to United States marshals, their 
compensation payable out of said fees, as claimed and as approved; and amounts 



Districts and names. 



Titles. 



Washington: 

C.W.Ide 

Frank L. Crosby; 

A.L.Dilley 

Ira S. Davisson . . 

George L.Ide 

H. W.Tyler 

John Stringer ... 
Felix M.Pugh... 

D.T.Welch 

I. N. Arment 

Ernest L. Scott. . 



Total. 



West Virginia: 

J. K. Thompson 

B.L.Priddie 

Wilton Randolph 

Chas. M. Shrewsbury. 
Edward S. Aleshire . . 

Jno. P.Austin 

Wm. G.Baldwin 

W.C. Bartram 

Jno. W. Booth 

D. W. Cunningham. . . 

Alvin Harper 

W.G. Hickel 

A.C.Hufford 

D.R.Jackson 

C.W.Law 

W.C. McGregor 

James R. Menen 

Jno. T. Paulding 

Granville Stout 

A.J.Young 

OscarC. Miller 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 



Periods. 



....do 

...do 

....do 

do 

do 

do 

Stenographer 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 

Field deputy 

do 



Total. 



do 

....do 
....do 
....do 
....do 
....do 
....do 
...do 
.-.do 
....do 
....do 
....do 
....do 
....do 



Wisconsin, eastern : 

Thomas B. Reid 

Albion Johnson 

Edward H. Glantz . . . 
Walter N. Durbin . . . 
Joseph P. Delaney . 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

do 



Total. 



Wisconsin, western : 

W. H. Canon 

George W. Levis . 
Frank P. Meehan. 
Charles Lewiston 
George W. Levis . 
William T. Pugh . 
Frank P. Meehan . 
John Langdon 



Total 



Wyoming: 

Frank A. Hadsell 

Joseph A. Breckons. . 

Paul Bailey 

Joseph Lefors 

James G. Morrison. . . 

Richard Morse 

John A. McDermott. . 

Thomas J. Carr 



Total. 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

do 

Sept. 2, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

Fiscal year 

do 

do 

July 1, 1899, to Dec. 31 , 1899 . 
July 1, 1899, to Aug. 31, 1899. 
Jan. 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900 . 



Fiscal year 

do 

do 

July 10, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

July 1,1899, to July 9, 1899 

Oath, July 12, 1897 

Special 

Oath, July 1.1897 

Oath, Aug. 27, 1897 

Oath, July 1,1897 

Oath, July 17, 1897 

Oath, July 1,1897 

Oath, May 24, 1899 

Oath, July 5, 1897 

Oath, July 1,1897 

Oath, April 6, 1900 

Oath, Dec. 9, 1897; special 

Oath, Nov. 5, 1897 

Oath, July 1,1897 

Oath, Aug. 26, 1897 

Oath, Nov. 12, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. 7, 1899. 



Salaries. 



Marshals, 
office dep- 
uties, and 
clerks. 



Fiscal year 

do 

Nov. 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900 
Fiscal year 

July 1, 1899, to Oct. 31, 1899 . 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

Office deputy 

do 

Field deputy 



Marshal 

Chief office deputy 

do 

Office deputy 

Field deputy 



.do 
.do 
.do 



July 1, 1899, to Feb. 11, 1900 . . 

do 

do 

Feb. 12, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 
Feb. 12, 1900, to May 9, 1900 . . 
May 10, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 
Feb. 12, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 
Oath, Mar. 23, 1900, special.. . 



Fiscal year 

July 1, 1899, to Jan. 31, 1900 

Feb. 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

Oct. 16, 1899, to June 30, 1900 

Oath, Oct. 17, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. 28, 1899. 

Oath, Oct. 27, 1898; service termi- 
nated Aug. 24, 1899. 

Oath, Sept. 30, 1898; service termi- 
nated Oct. 28, 1899. 

Oath, Jan. 30, 1899; service termi- 
nated Oct. 28, 1899. 



4,000.00 

2,250.00 

1,500.00 

1,450.00 

828.80 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

1,500.00 

360.00 

168.40 

288.30 



14,845.50 



4,000.00 
1,800.00 
1,500.00 
1,170.65 
29.35 



8,500.00 



4,000.00 
1,800.00 

798.90 
1,200.00 

401. 10 



8,200.00 



2,466.62 
1,110.00 
739.97 
1,533.38 
432.81 
257.19 
460.03 



7,000.00 



3,500.00 
879.20 
620.80 
851.07 



5,851.07 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 





Fe 








Expend. 






B™a. 


Pay 


We. 


SubaiBteoceand 


Other 


ipeiiBea. 


tSerks of 


Claimed. 


\. ...,....-,.. 1 


flalmort 


Ap^ 


««- 


*!£, 'Claimed, 
proved. p-™ 1 "™- 


Ad- 


tlftlJUSll. 


il. 510.67 

■HIS. 5s 

:M3" ti 

ST.S r* 

Slu.ai 
l.-ni.li 
1. LI7il.it. 

rim. m 
«6. le 

118.73 


H. 510. 81 
49*. 58 

; i.ii n 

808 78 
1.651 4-'. 

insa- 

-'•4" 63 
rfrf IB 

ii". re 






*3.1- ■« 

i;«; an 

.Ml v. 
312 40 
.IM «-. 

ns.w 
lea. on 

392.06 
880 
SB, 80 


(388.49 
J j; '.'.■ 
St! 1' 
870it. 
219 29 
488 it) 
392 88 
630 
86.20 


1162.1.". 


1160.69 


.,..nn 


















































































































■.i.:>:, 


9 3> a 






3.KI1 f 


3. H31.li 


152. 15 


150. 59 


1.911.81 


1.887.02 
lSi.74 

us. so 

9.60 


i.soa.89 

58. 50 

9. so 






868. 45 
331 35 
:2ft III 
184. 60 


261.88 
388 a 

194 rti 


84 IK 


84 09 








































81.08 


4< is 


JBO.M 


I f 1 IS 


1 HI 


1 in 














m.t" 

2.353 27 

74. :« 

sjai. w 
2. an. 24 

Lis*.;* 

24a. 52 
11.80 


J. 484. 38 
162.72 

::. w. ei 

74 82 

_ 947. 68 

L 144 J 2 
343. 13 
11.80 


l.lOOH 
1% 46 

LOW 31 
65 73 

717.88 
1.833. is 
888.77 
188.39 
8.85 


1.077 SI 
132 04 
1.686.8) 

55 73 

i.tik-...^ 

8.W. III 
181.82 
8.81 


31 Ml 


31. .'m 














188.80 
880 
66.08 

■il'.-Ji, 

2.85 


13!' -11 
8-50 
68.00 

27:25 

its 


















































97.19 

774. H2 

i . H2. i;; 
34-90 


27.13 

734. 30 

I. HI 34 

34. SO 


20. :ci 

SBl.ll 

1.081. ft] 
28.17 


20. 33 

520.32 

I.IW.OO 

28.17 












8.70 
;s. 60 
9.05 


7.96 
35.63 

7.85 


























|:;.n:;.; 


L3.tiHj.7-t 


h. I.>i.hj 


7.818.75 


I.:u3. ui 


, . .-,.,. lift 


04.09 


81.89 


I.U7I.I2 


1.108.72 
- 721.118 
977.89 
814. 10 
881. DO 


1.378.66 
;n; 33 

B»are 

■0. in 

848.78 






119 89 
',r ~ 
222 94 
181.68 


82.99 

239 75 
3fHj. 88 
332. 94 
92,46 


38.54 


38.51 


16361 
































.35 


.35 










t.itii.Vr, 


4.179.88 






1. 131 Mi 


11:11 k'i 


38.89 


38.89 


tea, 54 


'ii'.viii; 
-.'. i.-.i.''.: 

S72.01 

510. 70 

lBli.64 

a, 357. 18 


1. 884. 28 
487. Ill 

2..H3 in 

789 24 

807. 8U 

196 M 

3, Aft] 76 






328. 2» 
102 90 
90.56 

30 99 

12922 

50 48 
1.080 17 


328 20 
102 40 
U43 85 

39 99 
128.89 

50 49 
1.080.17 


ft B3 


8.83 


387 "4 






















10 38 

n 


9.13 
96 






















































9,2.v>.5;l 


6,903 88 






£.874.61 


2.1173.11 


19.44 


18.50 


H8U.74 


1,870.47 
43.00 
840.18 
403.13 
94.00 


1.811.11ft 

840.16 
370.98 
94,00 






ass. SO 


328.60 


103.70 


98.70 














iT3 75 
318.80 


165.76 

.|. *ll 












8.00 






0.00 


9.00 
















13.96 


13.88 


» 


5 38 






































3,793.81 


2, Til. 18 


14.23 


H.» 


821.15 


§13. 15 


108.70 


98.78 


137.90 



REPORT OF THE ATTOKNEY-OENKRAL. 




REPORT OF THE ATTORNEYS 




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REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



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386 JiKi'OUT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

EXHIBIT U. — Report on bankruptcy matters. 

Department of Justice, November 19, 1900. 

The Attorney-General. 

Sir: The act of July 1, 1898, "establishing a uniform system of 
bankruptcy throughout the United States," the fourth law on this 
subject enacted by Congress, has now been in operation so far as its 
voluntary feature is concerned about two years and three months 
and the involuntary feature one year and eleven months. Sufficient 
time has elapsed, therefore, to give a fair idea of its practical opera- 
tion. 

To the end, therefore, that compliance might be had with sections 
53 and 54 of the law requiring an annual report from the Attorney- 
General, blanks for semiannual reports were sent to the clerks of the 
various courts of bankruptcy for their own use and for the use of the 
referees in their respective districts. Such reports have been received 
from the clerks of courts of every judicial district except the district 
of Alaska, the western district of Louisiana, and the eastern district of 
Virginia, who, for some unaccountable reason, have neglected to com- 
ply with the directions of this office in that respect. Reports have also 
been received from about 600 referees. While some of these reports 
are defective owing to the lack of uniformity in keeping records, they 
are sufficiently full to disclose much valuable information, and the 
result amply compensates for the great amount of labor incident to 
their tabulation, which, as heretofore, has been enormous. 

voluntary cases. 

As stated in the last report, advantage is being taken of the law by 
men of all classes and in all walks of life, and in every section of the 
country. 

The States showing the greatest number of petitions filed during the 
year are, viz: Illinois, with 2,707 petitions in the northern district and 
301 in the southern, making a total of 3,008 for the State; New York, 
with 1,031 in th§ northern district, 364 in the eastern, 1,290 in the 
southern, and 322 in the western, making a total for the State of 3,007; 
Iowa, with 497 in the northern district and 495 in the southern, mak- 
ing a total for the State of 992; Ohio, 428 in the northern district and 
429 in the southern, making a total for the State of 857; Minnesota, 
845; Pennsylvania, with 327 in the eastern district and 482 in the west- 
ern, making a total for the State of 809. 

The smallest number of voluntary petitions were filed in the follow- 
ing States; Nevada, 6; Delaware and Wyoming, 12 each; Idaho, 30; 
South Carolina, 37; Oklahoma, 39; Florida, 67, and Rhode Island, 68. 

The grand total of petitions filed in the United States for the period 
ending September 30, 1900, is 20,128, exclusive of those for the west- 
ern district of Louisiana, the district of Alaska, and for half of the 
year for the southern district of Georgia, New Jersey, the eastern dis- 
trict of North Carolina, the western district of Tennessee, and the 
eastern district of Virginia, from which semiannual reports were not 
received. 

From the clerks' reports it appears that of the voluntary petitions 
all were adjudicated bankrupt except 237, in which the petitions were 
dismissed, and that discharges were refused in 71 cases. Compositions 
were confirmed in 206 cases, 



( 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 387 

LIABILITIES AND ASSETS. 

The liabilities in 19,540 voluntary cases reported by the referees 
amounted to $264,979,152, while the total amount of assets scheduled 
in these cases was $33,098,771. 

The summary also discloses the fact that of the petitions filed, in 86 
cases the liabilities were less than $100; in 1,879 cases, between $100 
and $500; in 2,256 cases, between $500 and $1,000; in 7,861 cases, 
between $1,000 and $5,000; in 2,941 cases, between $5, 000 and $10,000; 
in 1,872 cases, between $10,000 and $20,000, and in 2,191 casqs, more 
than $20,000. These reports also show that in 11,107 cases assets were 
scheduled, while 7,917 petitioners had no assets. 

NATURE OF BUSINESS. 

The nature of the business in which the petitioning bankrupts were 
engaged, as disclosed by the summary of the referees' reports, is pro- 
portioned as follows: 2,057 were farmers, 7,516 wage earners, 4,592 
merchants, 361 manufacturers, 509 professional men, and 4,435 con- 
tractors, hotel keepers, and others of a miscellaneous character. 

INVOLUNTARY PETITIONS. 

During the past year the clerks' reports disclose that 1,810 petitions 
were filed, of which adjudications were made in all except 285 cases, 
which were refused and the petitions dismissed. Of the involuntary 
cases, 50 compositions were entered into by the bankrupts and their 
creditors, which were confirmed. 

LIABILITIES AND ASSETS. 

The liabilities involved in 1,242 cases upon which reports were made 
were $27,179,001, while the assets scheduled were $13,433,209. In 200 
cases no assets were scheduled, and in a number they were classed as 
unknown or nominal. 

NATURE OF BUSINESS. 

The petitions further show that of those adjudicated involuntary 
bankrupts 64 were wage-earners, 694 merchants, 102 manufacturers, 
9 professional men, 366 miscellaneous, and 7 farmers. While under 
the law a farmer or wage-earner can not be adjudicated an involun- 
tary bankrupt, it is quite probable that they were engaged in other 
callings at the time of the adjudication and the debts were incurred 
while employed in one of the excepted pursuits or otherwise. 

FEES AND EXPENSES. 

An effort has been made to obtain some definite data which would 
show the expenses incident to the prosecution of suits in bankruptcy, 
but owing to the fact that the record of some of the fees is kept by the 
clerk of the court and others by the referee, it has been extremely 
difficult, and the results are not entirely satisfactory. But, as was 
stated in the report for last year, it is quite evident that the expenses 
are reduced to a minimum, and, if anything, are in many cases inade- 
quate for the character of work required. This is particularly true 
with reference to the fee for the referee and trustee. The filing fee 
required to be deposited with the clerk of the court is $25, of which 
$10 is for the clerk, $10 for the referee, and $5 for the trustee. In 
2,301 cases this filing fee was not paid, but the petitions were filed in 
forma pauper is, while in 689 cases the fee was paid subsequently to 
the filing of the petition, out of after-acquired property or after-dis- 
covered assets, which is permitted under the rules promulgated by 
the Supreme Court. 



388 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

CASES CLOSED. 

Iii order that some more definite information might be obtained of 
the assets and liabilities than was disclosed by the petitions and 
schedules, the referees were required to furnish data of cases closed 
during the year. An examination of such data covering 12,339 cases 
shows total assets of $13,925,656, while the liabilities of the same 
were $177,090,513. 

THE PRACTICAL OPERATION OF THE LAW. 

During the past year there has been no material change in the busi- 
ness transacted from that in the year previous. The magnitude of 
the business under the voluntary feature of the law seems large, yet 
we are constrained to believe that a good percentage is made up of 
old insolvents and, unless business conditions materially change, a 
considerable decrease of suits of this character should shortly follow. 

There has been an increase of a little more than 300 petitions under 
the involuntary feature of the law which is quite significant in con- 
nection with the impression heretofore current that the law has fav- 
ored the debtor rather than the creditor. This demonstrates that the 
creditor interest is developing more confidence in the statute and is 
accordingly utilizing its provisions more freely than heretofore. From 
this increase, however, it should not be inferred that it is bearing 
unduly heavily upon the debtor, but merely that its advantages are 
being better understood by the creditor class. It may be safely said 
that the magnitude of this business, as here indicated, is not indica- 
tive that the country is any worse off than prior to the enactment of 
the Federal bankruptcy law, but merely that its equable and just fea- 
tures are being used in place of the more stringent and harsh meas- 
ures of the various State insolvent laws. 

The fact that the amount of assets distributed in the cases that 
have been closed approximates 8 per cent of the liabilities goes a long 
way to refute the oft-repeated saying that no assets are scheduled in 
these cases. As has been stated in previous reports, many of the 
present applicants for relief under the law are those of old insolvents 
and those against whom judgments have been kept alive, who are now 
seeking to obtain a fresh start in life. In many of the cases the assets 
are large, but the rate per cent of dividends is materially reduced by 
reason of the fact that there were 7,917 voluntary cases in which no 
assets were scheduled. 

Since the necessity of perfecting the law by amendatory legislation 
is a matter of common knowledge, we are constrained to reiterate the 
recommendations heretofore made, especially in one or two particulars, 
although such action may perhaps not be within our province. While 
it would doubtless not be well to urge any sweeping amendment, in 
my judgment Congress should give its attention to the provision cov- 
ered by section ' ' 57 g " of the law, which has been variously interpreted 
by the courts, the weight of the authority — included within which are 
two circuit courts of appeals — sustaining the position that payments 
on account made within four months must first be surrendered before 
the balance of the claim of the creditor to whom such payment has 
been made can be proved and allowed, which is meeting with almost 
universal disapproval on the part of the commercial community. 

Section 23 with reference to the jurisdiction of the courts over suits 
between the trustee and adverse claimants, the Supreme Court has 
recently held, restricts the trustee in bringing such actions to the State 
courts unless the defendant consents to its being brought in the Federal 



> 



fcEfcORtf OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 389 

court, thus substituting the slower machinery of the State court for that 
of the more expeditious methods provided by the Federal law. This 
should be amended so that the trustee may have the right to bring his 
suit originally in the Federal court without the consent of t He defendant. 

Section 14 of the law with reference to discharges should be amended 
so that a debtor will be prevented from repeatedly and fraudulently 
availing himself of its advantages, by placing some restriction upon 
the exercise of such right, such as requiring his assets to bear a cer- 
tain ratio to his liabilities upon each subsequent application, so that 
his original discharge may be granted without assets upon a proper 
showing, though, upon his second, third, or subsequent applications, 
his assets should be, say, 25, 50, or 75 per cent of his liabilities. This 
is far preferable to any hard and fixed rule refusing a second discharge 
to any unfortunate debtor within a fixed period, as has been variously 
suggested. 

While there are other amendments that might properly be suggested, 
these seem to us to be the most important and are creating the greatest 
discussion. 

In conclusion, we "may be permitted to reiterate what is a matter of 
common knowledge, that is, without doubt the law is meeting with 
uniform satisfaction. The only discontent that is evident arises from 
the same sources that originally opposed the enactment of the law. 
There can be no doubt that its equable provision, both as to the vol- 
untary and the involuntary features, is to the great advantage of the 
merchants of the country, but does militate to the disadvantage of a 
few immense establishments, who, with their net work of legal retain- 
ers throughout the country, are able to keep in touch with the finan- 
cial condition of their creditors and upon the first intimation of 
insolvency secure and protect themselves, often forcing the debtor 
into insolvency who may be but temporarily embarrassed, and which 
may now be avoided. The present law places everyone upon an 
equality. The small creditor as well as the large must share pari 
passu in the estate so that there is no longer that race of diligence in 
obtaining attachment and other proceedings. Outside of this, in this 
day of electricity and steam, which have brought the extremes of the 
country and its- newly acquired territories so closely together, the 
advice of counsel is no longer restricted to his particular county or 
State, but may be called for upon questions arising to-day in the 
Philippine Islands, to-morrow in Porto Rico, and the next day at New 
Orleans, and uniformity in laws has, therefore, become almost a 
necessity. The great legal organizations throughout our lands recog- 
nizing this fact are clamoring for the enactment of such legislation, and 
if for no other reason than this, the law is meeting a much-desired end. 

It is needless for me to recite the numerous resolutions on the part 
of the National Association of Credit Men and bar associations of 
note throughout our country in approbation of the law and as 
expressive of the favorable views of those most closely interested in 
its maintenance, since they are all matters of common history. 

Attached thereto are the following exhibits: 

Exhibit A is> a summary of reports from the clerks of the various 
courts of bankruptcy. 

Exhibit B is a summary of the reports of referees in voluntary cases. 

Exhibit C is a summary of the reports of referees in involuntary cases. 

Exhibit D is a summary of the reports of referees of cases closed 
during the year. 

Very respectfully, E. C. Brandenburg, 

In charge of bankruptcy matters. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY -G EN Eft A L. 




REPORT OF THE 



ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



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SUMMARY OP REFEREES' REPORTS— 



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REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



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35 
3 

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1 2 

7 

is e 

18 10 


3 


Iii-J-nr: Tnrrileiry. WDIbern 


4 .!!■> I» 
13 <" .- 17 

8 B.15lm 
32 43.381 'A 
80 344.396 If 

2 U.SU 31 


1 


36,431 78 

11'. I-'. ■_%• 
20 384 W 

3tn.-JC.5r. 

.-,!» 123 27 
7S.848.TH 






i 


i 




Kaunas 




1 


















8 988.710 31 
6 : !.-.■ 32 
88 -■■.-!■ 117 
8 »■■<-■ 34 


i 

5 

6 8 

13 
1 3 

IS S 

34 7 

8 
10 1 

5 


3 

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.188.213 40 

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1 :«i.|.(. :,- 
as lor. la 

BJ.7U2.37 
-«: j-ii 31 
1.400 51 

1.VI.H44 :•. 

iV -: ,/i 

227.133 K. 

411. IWH 89 
27* l.-J- i* 

«r.lMi73 

aot.ail iw 
1.072.044 8J 








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a 

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s 


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14.574 .-.. 

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24. U34 :■ 

115.0V . 

708.122 eg 






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New York . northern 

N,-w Y.;rk -.ulbt-rn 


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284.671 ii 

-■.s».u?7 

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.» iv. n. m 
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2! 1179 (2 
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28 710 78 
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j ;w ;j2 .17 
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11.788 04 

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ll.4» 60 
124. 107 89 

- 32S.B47 38 
mi. *u ill 

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130.002 78 














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17 


133.384 V. 
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EEPORT OF THE ATTORN EY-UENEEAL. 



districts, year ending September SO, 1900. 
INVOLUNTARY E 



J.lnbihtie*. 


DirtdeudB. 


Expenses- 


*KS»-| M— .-b-_ 


i 

! 


1 
i 

J 




™, 


i 

I 


Total. 


i 


t 

i 

1 


1 




1 


i 


1 


1 

1 

P. 


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1 


1 

i 


























6 








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1- 




.... 




2 
8 

■• 

22 

;i 

2 

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a 

i 
;i 

21 








l".IM 8* 
600.76 


7 


B,GKH 

(186.60 
146 ie 

1. Iff) 60 


i 

T 

7 














— 8 














«.m3B 


3 

7 






3 
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6.418 60 


1 


1. 114.13 


1 


1 


6 

6 

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3 
15 
4 


1 












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7 
3 

i 


2 
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■i 
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12 


H.23M38 
15.96! S3 


i 

8 


2.0K7 84 
683 OH 


S 
38 
8 
















1 


* 


11 




1* 










s 


33.463.48 


9 


8.0OA.II7 
120 10 


1 

7 








2 


6 












2. MM W 
JOB. 12 








1 


3 






3 48738 






















5 


> 

i 

2 
T 








IRK HI 
1.481 III 
167.41 

■- .1 

3.331 38 


2 

10 




' 
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7 
24 
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1 








8 
7 

7 

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1 


1 UN „ 

una 51 
a. »n .t; 
12.974 92 


6 






2 




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4 
8 

11 

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1 


3 

18 


1.1S2 02 


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3 

43 
7 

a 

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3 

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a 

37 

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8 

i 





1 
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6 
4 

22 
.. 
4 

11 
8 

£.• 

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a 
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s 

13 


7 


i 


{ 


63.383 .52 


3 


38.78 

914 411 

356 15 

522 18 

160. Ul 

MM 21 

47 52 

:.677 78 

' ■•■ 

1.838.70 


8 
6 

3 

^1 
2 

28 

4 
7 




H 


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1. 131 68 


3 
1 


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a 

3 
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1 
1 


3 
3 

V 


3 
II 


2.786.63 


1 


















1 
2 








Sn.etf, 7* 

7(4 W 

38. 147. 13 


11 


2 




* 




a 






8 


■■ 






























9.600.46 


2 


3,203.04 


U 




















i 

12 
3 
i 

1 
3 
39 

ie 

s 
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6 

9 

- 


(1 
31 
HI 


131.44 

, '<> Ml 

11. Ill- > 

i an -c 
11, MS. 9 

8. 400 63 


I 

1 
4 


801.17 
S.M7 '51 
303 00 
H68 63 
832 66 
2.074 60 


13 

1 
3 
6 




S2 

B 

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5 

: 

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20 

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4 


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T.B04 70 


« 

8 

1 


2. 132. 81 
2. ITU II 

272"7 
3,300 57 
1 l.-.l ill 
1.063 28 
1.878 12 


8 

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7 
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11 2 ... 










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7 
3 


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ia 

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18 






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12 . 


























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8.671. Li 


8 


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30 






> 


n 


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4 




4.666 32 


* 


605.06 


10 




















3 
1 
:l 

1 


1 
3 


I 
2 


1.114 48 
1.502 31 

u. owes 

6. 201.01 


3 


1. Hi* III 

461 77 
717 53 


i 


..... 


3 

13 
7 






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71... 








t 















REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY- GENERAL. 

Exhibit C— Grand total for Unitsd States, by 

SUMMARY OF REFEREES' REPORTS- 





J 
i 


A»». 


Liabilities. 


District. 


M 


4 
I* 


i* 
1 


i 

1 


1 
Total. ' § I 


| 
1 


i 


Vii-i,"ir;Lii.weHtern a 

Wnshiagton IB 


iu, rao. in 

!U,SiC!.tW 
14,(JUi.7(i 

ii;-.2>«s.s.iii 
:w, twi. 21 


it 
3 

B 






* 








a 








s 


i 


* 


177.738.81 . ... 




; 












T °" 




















1,242 


IU.4.T3, am. 4.1 


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m 


ve 


CT.m.001 3) g 


- 


■ 


f 





REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

district*, year ending September 30, 1900 — Continued, 
INVOLUNTARY BANKRUPTCY— Con tinned. 



Liabilities. Dividends. 


B,„.«. 


Adjudi. -li- 


Nutn™ of business. 


j 

f 

1 


i 




Total. 


i 


Total. 


i 


I 
1 

ft 


ft} 

I 


1 

2 


a 


i 
! 

1 

— 


1 

1 

s 

s 


i 

1 

1 


1 
1 
1 


1 


1 

a 










to 30 
l.aeo; 


3 

1 
I 




3 
11 

j 

J 












t 


3 


H. 017.06 


3 


l 


1 




3 


..!. 


* 


1 


3.WM.W 


* 








































































250 


2*1 


3fc 


-V.\l-. ■'.■ 


;th 


ra.iiH.ai 


■I'*! 


;? 


sit 


is 


7 


u 


.«i* |UB 


» 


sea 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



flimeii during year ending 



Calii-.nilu. s< 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of i ■■'■••■ 
Floi i I* northern . . 
Florida, southern . . 



Illinois, southern 



Indian T.rrir rv. m.r-.h.-r-n 
Indian Terri'iin . <«utral .*. 
Indian TVrnrnry. Bonltiero . 



r- ; ii 



Missouri, eastern 



■ fi-.r- 



NOV :■!.:;.[ ■■!!'■ ■■ 

New Jersey 

Sew M 

Nei-. ^..-k.■ 
New ^ ■■*. 
NewY f 



North Carolina, »■■« 

North Dakota 

Ohio, northern . . .. 
Ohio, turn tbern 



Pl'I] -> ..i:l.i. ww'jti: 



Texas, northern . 
Texas. eastern 
Texas, western . . 



Virif-.M*. eastvru 
Virvfula. western . 

WSsl.IMlfl.il . ... 



aUrJ.B13.6ft 

"£:»;; 7r.tj.4i 

i. -x;.;-;.i. n:; 
:i,im.tfto.:n 

-',3».i*i.;.i 

X.:ar,.:i<j 

!■!. VII. (U 

:»i.h.-ii.-,;t 
278,987.84 

av-'i.j.^.bb 



;i-i..iiv.i..-.7 
si! in;:V :.!■ 



m,!«ni.r.ii 
.'.;,"■].-> -■' 



■>.(,'■!. -(.-.;.'.r.:s 
SmiI.TiT;.!!) 
■VrMii. :;M.:m 



l.YI. 177 1.1 

ii.:i;ii.'.H'i.(ii 
r.'.lTl.Tl.i 11 

:ill!.ii|-,n..M 

iti"i.i:B.is 



Jil.fiSI n 
B5.J7-l.iil 

saa, ww. ■!;> 

42,111.38 



13.92S,aw.RZ I 177,090, 513.09 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 401 

Exhibit Y.— Report of the commission to revise and codify the crimi- 
nal ana penal laws of the United States. 

Washington, D. C, November 15, 1900. 

Sir: The commission to revise and codify the criminal and penal 
laws of the United States respectfully report as follows: 

With our annual report, bearing date November 10, 1899, we submitted 
a revision and codification of those chapters of the Revised Statutes 
which relate to the organization and jurisdiction of the courts of the 
United States. This was transmitted by you to Congress and referred 
to the Committees on the Judiciary. Owing to the pressure of more 
urgent matters, these committees did not find it practicable to enter 
upon an examination of the report, and in the Senate a motion was 
adopted that it be returned through you to the commission for the 
purpose of hearing suggestions from bar associations and others. 

In furtherance of this object we addressed a communication to the 
bar associations of the several States and a number of the principal 
cities of the Union, as follows : 

Washington, D. C, August 6, 1900. 

Dear Sir: An act of Congress approved March 3, 1899, provided that "It shall 
be the duty of the commission appointed to revise and codify the criminal and 
penal laws of the United States to revise and codify the laws concerning the 
jurisdiction and practice of the courts of the United States, including the judi- 
ciary act, the acts in amendment thereof and supplementary thereto, and all acts 
providing for the removal, appeal, and transfer of causes." 

In pursuance of this provision the commission reported to the Attorney-General, 
in December last, a revision of those chapters of the judiciary title concerning the 
organization and jurisdiction of the courts, which was printed as Senate docu- 
ment No. 49, and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. In March, on the 
motion of Senator Hoar, chairman of the committee, this report was returned to 
the commission. In explanation of this action Mr. Hoar said: 

" The commission made only a partial report. The American Bar Association 
and the Bar Association of Cincinnati and other associations have desired a hear- 
ing upon some matters connected with this report. The bar associations of sev- 
eral other cities, I think including St. Louis— at any rate including, 1 know, Phila- 
delphia and one or two others — Chicago— are taking steps with a view to appointing 
committees to be heard. It is absolutely out of the question that a subject which 
will occasion so much debate shall be dealt with by the Senate at the present ses- 
sion of Congress. * * * We think it best, therefore, that the commission shall 
hear these communications from the bar associations and make their report com- 
plete before the Senate shall take it up for action." 

This language indicates that the Committee on the Judiciary will not be dis- 
posed to grant hearings respecting the work of the commission after it shall have 
been reported. It is the purpose of this communication to direct attention to the 
importance of action by the oar associations of the Union in aid of the labors of 
the commission. The entire subject of the organization of the courts of the 
United States and their procedure is now open, and may not be again for many 
years. This consideration alone is sufficient to justify the expectation that the 
intelligence and experience of the bar will be enlisted in contributing to the per- 
fection of the work now in hand; and it is earnestly requested that your associa- 
tion will forward suggestions in this behalf; or the commission will be pleased to 
fix a date for a conference with any representatives of your association who may 
desire to be heard. As it is our desire to complete our labors at the earliest possi- 
ble date, we take the liberty of suggesting that you refer the matter to an appro- 
priate committee, or appoint a special committee for the purpose. 

Among the changes in the present statutes respecting United States courts that 
were embraced in the report submitted as mentioned, or have since been favora- 
bly considered by the commission, are the following: 

1. The consolidation of all original jurisdiction in the district courts. 

2. Provision for additional district judges in those districts where they will be 
needed to insure the prompt transaction of business. 

3. That the circuit courts be made the intermediate courts of review instead of 
the circuit courts of appeals. 

H. Doc. 9 26 



402 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

4. That the circuit courts shall consist of the Justice of the Supreme Court 
assigned to the circuit and two circuit judges or three circuit judges. 

5. That an additional circuit judge be appointed each for the first and fourth 
circuits, so that each circuit shall have three circuit judges. 

6. That the circuit judges be relieved of duties at nisi prius. 

7. That the salaries of judges be increased as follows: Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court, $15,500; associate justices, $15,000; circuit judges, $9,000; dis- 
trict judges, $7,500. 

8. A uniform system of appeals to the circuit courts and the Supreme Court of 
the United States from the courts of last resort in the Territories. 

A number of changes of minor importance have been drafted with a view to 
embodying them in the revision, and among these are provisions for the employ- 
ment of stenographers for the district courts, the service of venires by registered 
letter, an amendment to the laws relating to appeals in habeas corpus, etc. 

In addition to the above the abolition of the writ of error, simplification of 
forms of indictments, and the reform of chancery practice are questions upon 
which an expression of views is respectfully solicited. 

Yours, respectfully, A. C. Botkin. 

D. K. Watson. 
W. D. Bynum. 

The replies thus far received, while they show that the work of the 
commission does not fail to excite interest, are not prolific in answers 
to the specific matters upon which we especially requested an expres- 
sion of views or in suggestions of other changes in existing laws. 
This is presumably due in part to the activities of an absorbing polit- 
ical campaign, and we do not abandon the hope that the bar associa- 
tions and individual members of the profession will yet manifest a 
disposition to cooperate in the task which has been devolved upon this 
commission in relation to the organization and practice of our Federal 
courts. 

Since the submission of our previous report, which was limited to 
those chapters of the Revised Statutes which relate to the organization 
and jurisdiction of the courts of the United States, we have revised 
the remaining chapters of the judiciary title and also the one on extra- 
dition, which it is believed may more properly be taken up in this 
connection than separated, as it is in the present Revised Statutes. 
In the revision of chapter 18, entitled "Procedure," we are firmly 
convinced of the importance of changes of a somewhat radical nature. 
The United States is behind nearly all of the States, and notably of 
England and her colonies, in the reformation of the practice of its 
courts. A simple, and perhaps the best, expedient would be to con- 
form the practice of the United States courts in all respects to that of 
the States in which they are respectively held; but an obstacle to this 
is found in the decisions of the Supreme Court that the Constitution 
recognizes and establishes the distinction between law and equity as 
defined in that country from which we derive our knowledge of these 
principles. Nevertheless it is competent for Congress to introduce 
material reforms in the interest of convenience, simplicity, and uni- 
formity. We regard the embodiment of such reforms in the revision 
as the most important duty that has been devolved upon this commis- 
sion, and realize in a high degree the benefit and assistance we would 
receive from the opinions of the bench and bar. In the expectation 
that such expressions will soon be furnished, we have not deemed it 
desirable to conclude our labors on this subject for submission 
herewith. 

In embodying under the appropriate chapters the laws passed by 
the present Congress establishing courts for Porto Rico and Hawaii 
we have observed certain omissions or ambiguities, which it is to be 
feared may lead to embarrassment or more serious results. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 403 

Section 33 of the act " temporarily to provide revenues and a civil 
government for Porto Rico, and for other purposes," approved April 
12, 1900, confirms the authority of existing tribunals, which may be 
here designated as the Territorial courts. Section 34 establishes a dis- 
trict court with the jurisdiction of district and circuit courts of the 
United States, and provides "that the laws of the United States relat- 
ing to appeals, writs of error and certiorari, removal of causes, and 
other matters and proceedings as between the courts of the United 
States and the courts of the several States shall govern in such matters 
and proceedings as between the district court of the United States and 
the courts of Porto Rico." Section 35 is as follows: 

That writs of error and appeals from the final decisions of the supreme court of 
Porto Rico and the district court of the United States shall be allowed, and may 
be taken to the Supreme Court of the United States in the same manner and under 
the same regulations and in the same cases as from the supreme courts of the Ter- 
ritories of the United States; and such writs of error and appeal shall be allowed 
in all cases where the Constitution of the United States or a treaty thereof or an 
act of Congress is brought in question and a right claimed thereunder is denied, etc. 

There is no provision for appeals to the circuit court of appeals, 
and it would follow that in a large class of cases there would be no 
means of review whatever. This would be a manifest hardship, espe- 
cially in cases determined by the district court of the United States, 
which is presided over by a single judge. The concluding clause of 
the above seems to be a limitation upon the language preceding, and 
the effect would be to bar appeals in certain cases in which they are 
now allowed from the supreme courts of the Territories of the United 
States. 

Section 81 of an act "to provide a government for the Territory of 
Hawaii," approved April 30, 1900, provides that the judicial power of 
the Territory shall be vested in one supreme court, a circuit court, and 
in such inferior courts as the legislature may from time to time estab- 
lish. Section 86 establishes a district court with the jurisdiction of 
district and circuit courts of the United States, and provides as follows : 

Writs of error and appeals from said district court shall be had and allowed to 
the circuit court of appeals in the ninth judicial circuit in the same manner as 
writs of error and appeals are allowed from circuit courts to circuit courts of 
appeals as provided by law, and the laws of the United States relating to juries 
and jury trials shal be applicable to said district courts. The laws of the United 
States relating to appeals, writs of error, removal of causes, and other matters and 
proceedings as between the courts of the United States and the courts of the sev- 
eral States shall govern in such matters and proceedings as between the courts of 
the United SStates and the courts of the Territory of Hawaii. 

No express provision is found in the above authorizing appeals in 
any case from the district court to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, an omission which it is believed could not have been inten- 
tional. Neither is it certain that the language of the sentence last 
quoted confers any right of appeal from the supreme court of 
Hawaii to the circuit court of appeals or to the Supreme Court of the 
United States, and the act contains no other provision on the subject; 
yet it is scarcely to be presumed that Congress meant to deny to that 
Territory a right that is enjoyed by all others. 

In the revision which we will submit an effort will be made to reduce 
appeals and writs of error from the courts of all the Territories to the 
courts of the United States to a uniform system, which is now want- 
ing; but in the meantime we direct attention to the above matters, in 
the conviction that Congress may see fit to remedy the defects men- 
tioned without further delay. 



404 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

The revision and codification of the criminal and penal laws of the 
United States has been substantially completed, lacking only some 
additions to the marginal references to cases construing the text, and 
a final examination with a view to a more proportionate adjustment 
of penalties. A grave embarrassment was found in the progress of 
the work in a cause to which your attention has already been directed. 
In the titles relating to customs, internal revenue, pensions, and 
numerous others, penal provisions are found so connected with non- 
penal provisions that their separation is a task of great difficulty. 
Months of labor have been expended in this behalf, but it can not be 
said that the result is satisfactory. In a number of States all laws 
imposing penalties have been collected in a single code, and there 
are not wanting considerations in support of such an arrangement. 
This involves, however, corresponding changes in the non-penal stat- 
utes which would only be practicable by means of a general revision. 

During the first session of the present Congress a bill was intro- 
duced "to provide for the revision and codification of the permanent 
and general laws of the United States." This was considered by the 
Committee on the Revision of the Laws, who reported it favorably to 
the House of Representatives, and it unanimously passed that body. 
Upon being transmitted to the Senate it was referred to the Committee 
on Revision, and it is presumed that it will be reported by that com- 
mittee at an early day of the approaching session. 

The importance of the work proposed by the pending bill has been 
strongly impressed upon us in the course of our labors. The revision 
of the general and permanent laws of the United States, which was 
passed by Congress on the 22d day of June, 1874, embraced the 
statutes of the United States of a general and permanent nature in force 
on the 1st day of December, 1873. A second edition was published 
under the editorship of Hon. George S. Boutwell, which included laws 
of a general and permanent nature in force on the 4th of March, 1877. 
In the twenty-three years that have intervened there has been more 
general legislation enacted by Congress than during the entire preced- 
ing history of the Government under the Constitution. The conse- 
quent condition of the statutes is such that it is practically impossible 
for a layman to determine what the law is on any given subject, while 
to practitioners it is often a task of serious difficulty. Again, the stat- 
ute books are encumbered with a mass of provisions, some of which 
are obsolete or redundant, and others conflicting. It is a manifest 
desideratum that such provisions should be eliminated or reconciled. 

There are laws now in force providing for a revision of the criminal 
and penal laws, the laws relating to the organization, jurisdiction, and 
practice of the United States courts, and the laws concerning patents 
and copyrights, while a bill is pending for -a revision of the pension 
laws. It is respectfully submitted that a fragmentary revision must 
fail in the object to be sought, and can only serve to add further ele- 
ments of confusion to the present chaos of our statutory law. 

As the pending bill provides for the revision and codification of all 
general laws of the United States, its passage by Congress would 
materially affect our labors in the revision of the criminal and penal 
laws, notably as to the arrangement, and also in other important 
respects. We have deemed it expedient, therefore, to postpone tie 
completion and submission of the report, and pursue our work in other 
directions, in the expectation that Congress will soon manifest its will 
in the premises. 



REPORT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 405 

The revision of the criminal and penal laws of the United States 
was the purpose for which this commission was originally constituted. 
It has been delayed, first, by the act of Congress authorizing the com- 
mission to prepare a system of statutory laws for the district of Alaska, 
and second, by the act directing us to revise the laws relating to the 
organization, jurisdiction, and practice of United States courts. Each 
of these additional duties consumed considerable time, notwithstand- 
ing which the original work of the commission has been pressed for- 
ward with all possible diligence. In view of the fact that there will 
necessarily be a considerable interval before the result of our labors 
can become a law, we feel justified in calling attention to the follow- 
ing condition, to the end that Congress may, in the meantime, provide 
a remedy if it shall seo fit: 

Section 3 of the act of March 3, 1825, provided "that if any offense 
shall be committed in any of the places aforesaid, the punishment of 
which offense is not especially provided for by any law of the United 
States, such offense shall, upon conviction in any court of the United 
States having cognizance thereof, be liable to and receive the same 
punishment as the laws of the State in which such fort, dock yard, 
navy-yard, arsenal, armory, magazine, or other place ceded as afore- 
said is situated provide for the like offense when committed within 
the body of any county of such State." The terms "in any of the 
places aforesaid" and " ceded as aforesaid " referred to the first and 
second sections of the same act, which provide for the punishment of 
specific offenses against the laws of the United States when committed 
in any place or needful building of the United States the site whereof 
is ceded to and under the jurisdiction of the United States. 

In United States v. Paul (6 Peters, 141) the court held that the 
words "the same punishment as the laws of the State in which said 
fort," etc., "ceded as aforesaid is situated" are to be limited to the 
laws of the several States. in force at the time of the enactment of the 
statute. Following that decision the circuit court for the southern 
district of New York held, in United States v. Barney et al. (5 Blatch., 
294), that the law quoted was confined to offenses committed in places 
the sites whereof had been ceded to and were under the jurisdiction 
of the United States at the time of its enactment. This decision was 
rendered in February, 1866, and it was presumably in consequence of 
that decision that Congress passed the act of April 5, 1866, inserting 
the words "or may hereafter be" before the words "ceded to and 
under the jurisdiction," etc. The law just mentioned is section 5391 
of the Revised Statutes. 

Later, another infirmity was found in the act, in the fact that it did 
not apply to places over which jurisdiction had been retained by the 
United States, as in the case of many of the Indian and military res- 
ervations. This was sought to be cured by the act of July 7, 1898 (30 
Stat. L., 717), but in the act last mentioned the words "or may here- 
after be " are omitted. It follows that the section can not be invoked 
as to an offense committed in a place ceded to the United States since 
the date of that act. The suggestion is respectfully submitted that 
Congress may wisely supply this omission, which may serve to give 
immunity to crimes of a grave nature. 

The codes for the district of Alaska which were prepared by this 
commission, after having been considered by the two Houses of Con- 
gress, have been passed and received the approval of the President, 
the criminal code and the code of criminal procedure on the 3d of 



406 REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

March, 1899, and the civil code and the code of civil procedure oti the 
6th of June, 1900. Information from members of the bench and bar 
and other citizens of Alaska is to the effect that these codes have been 
found highly convenient and efficient in operation, and that few, if 
any, changes are deemed to be desirable. 

Hon. David B. Culberson, a member of this commission, died at his 
home in Jefferson, Tex., on the 9th of May, 1900. A minute of his life 
and public services was ordered to be entered upon the journal of the 
commission, as follows: 

That we learn with profound regret of the death of Hon. David B. 
Culberson, a member of this commission, which occurred at Jeffer- 
son, Tex., on the 9th of May, 1900. The deceased was born in Troup 
County, Ga., on the 29th of September, 1830. He was educated at 
Brown wood, in that State, and studied law under Chief Justice 
Chilton, of Alabama. In 1856 he removed to Texas, and in 1859 was 
elected a member of the legislature of that State. As a member of 
the convention of 1861 he voted against the ordinance for the secession 
of Texas. Later he entered the Confederate army, and was promoted 
to the rank of colonel of the Eighteenth Texas Infantry. In 1864 he 
was assigned to duty as adjutant-general of the State, and in the 
same year was again elected a member of the State legislature. In 
1874 he was chosen a Member of the Forty-fourth Congress, and 
served in pursuance of successive reelections to the close of the Fifty- 
fourth Congress, a period of twenty-two years. For six years he was 
chairman of the House Committee on the Judiciary. He was appointed 
a member of this commission at its first organization, and was serving 
in that capacity at the time of his death. His late associates enter 
this memorial on the journal in expression of their personal regard 
and of their high appreciation of his superior ability, his thorough 
and comprehensive learning, his nobility of character, and the invalu- 
able services that he contributed to the performance of the responsible 
duties visited upon the commission. 

Very respectfully, Alex. C. Botkin, 

David K. Watson, 
Wm. D. Bynum, 

Commissioners. 

Hon. John W. Griggs, 

Attorney -General of the United States. 



The exhibits are a part of this report. 

John W. Griggs, 
Attorney-General. 



INDEX. 



A. 

Page. 

A, Exhibit 66 

Addystone Pipe and Steel Co. v. The United States 5 

Adula, The 29 

Alcohol in the arts, rebate of tax 56 

Appeals in criminal cases 4 

Appropriations under control of Department, general statement 81 

Architect of Capitol, report of 255 

Atlanta, Ga., penitentiary 38 

Attorneys, United States, regular assistant 179 

Attorneys, United States, salaries of, and assistants and clerks 316 

Attorneys, United States, special assistant, list of 181 

B. 

B 1, Exhibit 68 

B2, Exhibit 70 

Bankruptcy matters, report on 386 

Benito Estenger, The 31 

Boske v. Comingore 20 

Bounty cases, naval 56 

Buena Ventura, The 25 

Building, new Department 34 

C. 

CI, Exhibit 72 

CarlosF. Roses, The 32 

Carter v. Roberts 16 

Circuit courts of appeals, cases docketed, disposed of, and pending 49 

Circuit and district courts of the United States: 

Civil suits to which the United States was a party, pending and termi- 
nated during the year 66 

Criminal prosecutions pending and terminated during year 68, 70 

Amount arising from judgments, fines, forfeitures, etc., during year. .. 72, 74, 76 
Number of civil suits to which the United States was not a party, com- 
menced and terminated during year 78 

Amount of judgments in civil suits to which United States was not a 

party during year 80 

Claims against District of Columbia \ 51 

Claims, Congressional and departmental cases 50, 51 

Claims, Court of, business of 34, 49 

Claims, Court of, proceedings under act giving circuit and district courts con- 
current jurisdiction with 53 

Claims, French spoliation 51 

Claims, Indian depredation 34, 57 

Clerks of courts, emoluments and office expenses 380 

Columbia, District of, claims against 51 

Columbia, District of, jail in 39, 250 

Commission to revise and codify the criminal and penal laws of the United 

States 39 

Contingent expenses, Department of Justice 108 

407 



408 INDEX. 

Pa«e. 

Court of appeals, District of Columbia, business of 49 

Court of Claims 34 

Court of Claims, cases specially mentioned 55 

Court of Claims, report of the Assistant Attorney-General in charge of the 

business of the Department in 49 

Court of Private Land Claims, report of United States attorney for 59 

Court, Supreme, business of 3 

Court, Supreme, important decisions 5 

Criminal appeals to Supreme Court 4 

Criminal and penal laws of the United States, revision of 39 

Criminal procedure, reform in 40 

Cruickshank v. Bidwell '. . . 15 

1). 

D, Exhibit 78,80 

Department building 34 

Depredations, Indian 34, 57 

Dewey v. The United States 23 

District courts of the United States. (See Circuit and district courts. ) 

District of Columbia, claims against 51 

District of Columbia, Girl's Reform School in 41, 239 

District of Columbia, jail * 39, 250 

District of Columbia, Reform School in 41, 230 

District of Columbia court of appeals, business of 49 

E. 

E, Exhibit 81 

Exhibits, list of 42 

Exhibit 1 49 

Exhibit 2 49 

Exhibit 3 57 

Exhibit 4 59 

Exhibit A 66 

Exhibit Bl 68 

Exhibit B 2 70 

Exhibit CI 72 

Exhibit D 78 

Exhibit D (supplement) 80 

Exhibit E 81 

Exhibit F 100 

Exhibit Fl 102 

Exhibit F 2 104 

Exhibit F 3 106 

Exhibit F 4 108 

Exhibit G 179 

Exhibit H 183 

Exhibit! 199 

Exhibit J 207 

Exhibit K 216 

Exhibit L 230 

Exhibit M 239 

Exhibit N 250 

Exhibit O - 255 

Exhibit P 256 

Exhibit Q 312 

Exhibit R 316 

Exhibits 330 

Exhibit T 380 

ExhibitT (summary) 380 

Exhibit U 386 

Exhibit V 401 

Ex parte Baez 16 

Expenses and salaries of United States marshals 332 

Expenses, contingent, Department of Justice 108 

Expenses of clerks of United States courts 380 



« 



INDEX. 409 

Page. 

Expenses of Federal courts 100,102,104,106 

Expenses of United States attorneys' offices 316 

F. 

F, Exhibit 100 

Fl, Exhibit 102 

F2, Exhibit 104 

F3, Exhibit 106 

F4, Exhibit 108 

Fidelity Trust and Safe Deposit Co. v. McLain 20 

Fitzpatrick v. United States 17 

Fort Leavenworth Penitentiary 36-216 

Fort Leavenworth Penitentiary, new 37-217 

French spoliation claims 51 

G. 

G, Exhibit 179 

Girls, Reform School for, District of Columbia 41-239 

Guido, The 25 

H. 

H, Exhibit 183 

High v. Coyne 19 

I. 

I, Exhibit 199 

Indian depredation claims 34 

Indian depredation claims, report of the assistant attorney-general in 

charge of 57 

Indians, Mission, report of special attorney for 312 

J. 

J, Exhibit 207 

Jail, District of Columbia 39 

Jail, District of Columbia, report of warden 250 

K. 

K, Exhibit 216 

Kansas Pacific Railway 35 

Knowlton v. Moore 18 

L. 

L, Exhibit 230 

La Abra Silver Mining Co. v. United States 7 

Land Claims, Court of Private 34 

Leovy v. United States 14 

Letter carriers' cases 55 

Librarian, report of 199 

Lola, The 26 

M. 

M, Exhibit 239 

McNeils Island, Washington, Penitentiary 38 

Marshals, their deputies and clerks, salaries and expenses of 330 

Motes v. United States 21 

Mission Indians, report of special attorney for 3X2 

Murdock v. Ward 20 

N. 

Naval bounty cases 56 

N, Exhibit 250 

Newfoundland, The 28 

H. Doc. 9 27 



410 INDEX. 

O. 

Page. 

O, Exhibit 255 

P. 

Panama, The 30 

Paquete, Habana, The 26 

Paraons, report of attorney in charge of 256 

P, Exhibit 256 

Pacific Railroad matters 35 

Pedro, The 23 

Penitentiary, Atlanta, Georgia 38 

Penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 36-216 

Penitentiary, McNeils Island, Washington 38 

Penitentiary, new, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 37-217 

Prisoners, United States 35-207 

Private Land Claims, Court of 34 

Report of the United States attorney for 59 

Prize cases 23 

Q. 

Q, Exhibit 312 

R. 

R, Exhibit 316 

Rebate of tax on alcohol 56 

Reform in criminal procedure.. ■ 40 

Reform School, District of Columbia 41 

Reform School, District of Columbia, report of trustees 230 

Reform School for Girls, District of Columbia 41 

Reform School for Girls, District of Columbia, report of trustees 239 

Revision of the criminal, and penal laws of the United States 39 

Rider v. United States 13 

S. 

S, Exhibit 330 

Salaries and expenses of United States marshals, their deputies and clerks. . 330 

Sherman v. United States 20 

Solicitor of the Treasury, report of 183 

Suits on Treasury transcripts, other than post-office cases 186 

Post-office suits 188 

Suits on custom-house bonds 189 

Suits for fines, penalties, and forfeitures under the customs-revenue and 

navigation laws 190 

Suits against collectors of customs and other Federal officers, including 

appeals from decisions of Board of General Appraisers 191 

Miscellaneous suits 192 

Summary of business arising from suits, etc 194 

Supreme Court, appeals from the Court of Claims 4-55 

Supreme Court, business of 3 

Supreme Court, important decisions in 5 

T. 

T, Exhibit 380 

U. 

U, Exhibit 386 

United States circuit and district courts. (See Circuit and district courts.) 

United States courts, emoluments and expenses of clerks of 380 

United States courts, expenses of, advances to marshals 100, 102, 104, 106 

United States district attorneys, assistants and special assistants to, names 
and compensation 179-181 



INDEX. 411 

Page. 

United States district attorneys, their assistants and clerks, salaries and 

expenses 316 

United States marshals, their deputies and clerks, salaries and expenses 330 

United States prisoners and prisons 35-207 

United States prisoners, detailed statistics 207 

United States v. The Bellingham Bay Boom Co 12 

United States v. Harris 15 

United States v. Mrs. Gue Lim 33 

United States v. The Northern Pacific Railroad Company 11 

United States v. The Oregon and California Railroad Company 10 

V. 

V, Exhibit 401 

W. 

Weilet al. v. United States 7 

o