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' b e e.'i>i .^ q;i,\ 



I 



HatiiaSr CollEBe liiitatB 




N 



? 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT nC], 

■(A 



uf^^. 



a 



OF THS 







Board of Commissioners 



OF 



PUBLIC CHARITIES 



OF THE 



STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA, 



TO WHICH IS APPBNDED THE 



REPORT OF THE GENERAL AGENT AND SECRETARY, 



ALSO, 



THE STATISTICAL REPORT 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEGISUTORE, JANUARY, 1880. 



/ 
HARRISBURG: 

LANE 8. HART, STATE PRINTER 

1880. 



^^^^^^%\ 




'IZ'^'^'. /' -^'^(M /s.' 'it'tu-i 




Legsilatiye Document. 



No. 5. 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THB 




of Ciissioiiers of Pnllic t 



d 



111 




OF THE STATE OP PENNSYLVANIA, 



FOB 1879. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD, 



PRESIDENT, 

MAHLON a DICKINSON. 



QESERAL AQENT AND SECRETARY^ 

DILLER LUTHER, M, D. 



PRESENT MEMBERS OP THE BOARD. 



Datb op 

Original 

Appoimtmbnt. 


Name. 


Post Offioe Addbess. 

• 


Term 
Expires. 


December 1, 1870, 
December 1, 1871, 
December 1, 1872, 
December 1, 1872, 
November 1, 1876, 
September 20, 1878 
January 28, 1879, 


Hieater Clymer, . . 
William Bakewell, . 
George Bullock, . . . 
Amoa C. Noyea, . . . 
Mahlon H. DickiriRon, 
Thomaa fieaver, . . . 
Jamea S. Biddle, . . . 


Reading, Berks county, . . 
Pittsburgh. Allegheny oo., . 
Conshohocken, Montg'ry oo.. 
West port, Clinton county, . 
Philadelphia, Phila. county, 
Danville, Montour county, . 
Philadelphia, Phila. county. 


Dec. 1, 1880. 
Dec. 1, 1883. 
Dec. 1, 1888. 
Dec. 1,1881. 
May 1, 1881. 
Dec. 1, 1883. 
Dec. 1, 1884. 



ii Board of Public Charities. f No. 5 , 



CONTENTS. 



Paob. 

Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Public Charities, 1-16 

Extracts from minutes of the Board, 16-17 

Annual Report of the General Agent, 19-130 

State institutions^ 25--46 

Institutions aided by the State, 47-52 

Charitable institutions supported by contributions from benevolent citizens, . 53-55 

County alms-houses. Jails, and correctional institutions, 56-130 

Statistical tables and concurrent deductions, 131-338 

Appendix, 839^439 

Poor laws, • 339-376 

Financial statements, 393-403 

Acts of Assembly and opinions of Attorneys General, 377-390 

Rules and by-laws of the Board, 391-392 

Statement of expenses of the Board, 392 

County deductions, 404-421 

Out-door relief, 423-437 

Ohio Reform School vs. The Pennsylvania Reform School, 438,439 



Leg. Doc.] Index. iii 



GENERAL INDEX. 



A L M8-HOU8B8, 2 1 . 

Adams oounty, jail, 56 ; alm^-house, 57. 

AllegheDv county, Jail, 67 ; County Home, 58 ; Allegheny City Home, 59 ; Pitts- 
burgh Farm, 60; work-house, 6L. 

Beavbr county, Jail, 62; alms-hou^e, 62,63. 

Bedford county, Jail, 64 ; alme-house, 64,65. 

Berks county, jail, 65,66; alms-house, 66-69. 

Blair county, jail, 63 ; alms-house, 64. 

Blind, institution for, 51. 

Bucks countj', jail, 1-4 ; jail and alms-house, 69-74. 

Butler county, jail, 8,9,76. 

Cambria county, jail, 76 ; alms-house, 77. 
Carbon county, jail, 75 ; alms-house, 75,76. 
Chester county, jail, 77,78 ; alms-house, 78,79. 
County Insane asylums, 9,10. 
Cumberland county jail, 80,81; alms-house, 81-84. 
Crawford county, jail, 84; alms-house, 84,85. 

Dauphin county, jail, 88; alms-house, 88,89. 
Delaware county, jaU, 86,87 ; alms-house, 87,88. 
Deaf and dumb, institutions for, 49-51. 
Decade, the first, 13-15. 
Defective classes, 20. 

Erie county, jail, 89,90; alms-house, 90. 

Febble-minded children, 48,49. 
Fayette county, jail, 91 ; alms-house, 91 ,92. 
Franklin county, jail, 6-8, 92,93; alms-house, 93,94. 

Greene county, Jail, 94,96; alms-house, 96. 

Hospitals, Insane, Harrisburg, 84,35; Danville, 35,36; Warren, 13,37,38; Norris- 

town, 12,38-41; Dixmont, 41^3. 
Hospitals, general, Wilkes-Barre, 63; Lackawanna, 53,54; Harrisburg, 54; Twelfth 

Ward, Pittsburgh, 56; injured persons of anthracite coal region, 43. 
House of Refuge, 47,48. 
Huntingdon county, jail, 95 ; alms-house, 96. 

Indigent Insane, 20. 
Indiana county, jail, 96. 

Lebanon county, jail, 4-6,99-101. 
Lehigh coimty, jail, 101 ; alms-house, 101 , 102. 
Lackawanna county, jail, 103; Hillside farm, 103,104. 

Luzerne county, jail, 104 ; Central poor-house district, 105 ; Lackawanna poor-house 
district, 105,106. 

Mercer county, Jail, 106,107; alm»-house, 107,108. 



iv Index. [No. 6, 

Mifliin ooonty, jail, 108; alms-house, 108,109. 
Montgomery oounty, jail, 109,110; alms-house, 110-112. 
Montour oounty, jail, 112,113; alms-house, 118. 

NoBTHUMBERLAND COUNTY, jail, 114 ; aims-house, 115. 
Northampton oounty, jail, 115 ; alms-house, 116. 

OUT-DOOB BELIEF, 22,28. 

Penitentiaries, Eastern, 25-27, 31 ; Western, 27-31 ; Middle, 82-84. 
Philadelphia oounty, Moyamensing prison, 117; house of oorreotion, 117,118; alms- 
house, 119,120. 
Pike oounty, jail, 128. 

Refobh bchool, 43-46. 

State institutions, 19,20. 

Somerset oounty, jail, 120,121; alms-house, 121. 

Schuylkill county, jail, 122; alms-house, 122,128. 

Vagbancy, 23,24. 

Venango oounty, jail, 123; alms-house, 123,124. 

Washington county, jail, 124; alms-house, 124,125. 
Warren oounty, jail, 125 ; alms-house, 126. 
Westmoreland ooanty, jail, 126,127; alms-house, 127. 
Wyoming oounty, j all, 127. 
Wayne oounty, jail, 127 ; alms-house, 127. 

YoBK COUNTY, jail, 128; alms-house, 129,130. 



Leg. Doc.] Index. 



STATISTICAL INDEX 



Alms-booaea, 810-319; Jlnancial statement^ 320,821. 

Blind, 300-809. 

Criminal oourt prooeedings, 182-150. 

Criminals executed in Pennsylvania, 151. 

Convicts and prisoners, 152,153. 

Comity prisons and work-houses, 185-199 ; financial statement , 200,201. 

Deaf and dumb, 285-299. 

Feeble-minded children, 274-284. 

Hospitals and dispensaries, 836-338. 

Insane hospitals, 228-273. 

Out-door relief, 322-329. 

Penitentiaries, 154-184. 

Reformatories, 202-219. 

Township poor, 330-335. . 

Unfortunate and indigent classes, 220-224. 

Vagrants, 225-227. 



VI Indsx. [No. 5, 



APPENDIX INDEX. 



Aot8 of Ansembly, 377-390. 

County deductions, 404-420 ; expenditure 9ummary of all institutions, including out- 
door relief and township poor, 421. 
Financial statements, 393-403. 
Out-door relief, 423-437. 
Oliio Reform school, <&c., 438,439. 
Poor laws, 339-376. 

Rules and by-laws of the Board, 391,392. 
Statement of expenses of the Board, 392. 



Lbgislativs Documents. No. 5, 



REPORT. 



Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 
Board of Public Charities, 
Harrisburg, January i, 1880, 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Bepreaejitativea of the General 

Assembly of Pennsylvania : 

In compliance with the act of Assembly, the Board of Public Charities 
submit to your honorable bodies the following report of their proceedings 
during the past year, together with that of the General Agent and Secre- 
tary, with the usual statistical information compiled from statements made 
to the Board by the institutions which come under their supervision. 

The past year has been one of unusual activity with the commissioners 
and officers of the department. 

Dr. Diller Luther, the General Agent and Secretary of the Board, accom- 
panied frequently by one or more of the commissioners of charities, has, 
in the discharge of his extensive and important duties, visited a large num- 
ber of the institutions supported wholly, or partly by the State, as well as 
those which are under the care of the various counties, and also those under 
private management, which come under the supervision of the Board of 
Charities ; and we express with confidence, the conviction that these visits 
have resulted beneficially to the institutions, and to the Commonwealth. 

Bucks County Jail. 

The Board, from actual observation, has been, for some years past, im- 
pressed with the importance and necessity of having better arranged and 
more secure -jails erected in the counties of Bucks, Lebanon, and Franklin ; 
and having frequently, in their annual reports to the Legislature, called at- 
tention to this subject, without producing any good result, therefore deemed 
it advisable again to make a thorough inspection of these jails, and to pre- 
sent a special report of their condition to the president judges of the judi- 
cial districts in which they are located, with the request that the report be 
brought to the attention of the next grand jury of the county. Accord- 
ingly, the President and the Secretary of the Board addressed the following 
1— B. P. Char. 



2 Board op Public Cha&itiss. [No. 5, 

communication to the president judge of the Seventh judicial district, in 
relation to the jail of Bucks county: 

To the Honorable Richard Watson^ President Judge of the Seventh Judi- 
cial District of Pennsylvania: 

The Board of Public Charities of the State of Pennsylvania, in the pros- 
ecution of their official duties, visited the jail of Bucks county, on the 13th 
instant, for the purpose of inspection; and, after careful examination, are 
of the opinion that the building at present used as a jail is, from its great 
age, bad condition, and want of the conveniences and appliances now in 
common use, and considered necessary in the modem jails of this State, 
unfit for the purpose, and should be replaced as si)eedily as practicable by 
a substantial building, in which offenders against person and property may 
be securely held, and the discipline established by the laws of the Common- 
wealth, properly enforced. 

Such is the insecure condition of this jail that persons arrested on mere 
suspicion of crime, and who may, when tried, be found innocent, are heavily 
ironed and manacled to prevent escape, thus unnecessarily and unjustly in- 
flicting an indignity and severe punishment on innocent persons, which 
could have been avoided had the county prepared a proper jail for their 
detention. We also found that the means of communicating with persons 
on the outside of the walls is easy, and that the prisoners avail themselves 
of the opportunity thus offered, which must result disadvantageously to 
the prison. 

The over-crowded condition of the cells renders it impossible to enforce 
discipline, and is the cause of much promiscuous and most improper asso- 
ciation, and of great demoralization amongst the prisoners. 

We are satisfied that no good can be effected in this jail while in its 
present condition, and entertain the hope that the proper authorities of the 
county may adopt such measures as will lead to the erection of a jail where 
persons not yet convicted may be securely held, without the necessity of 
chaining them to the floors of their cells, and where those convicted may 
find that kind of proper discipline, and degree of comfort, and cleanliness, 
which the laws of our State accord, even to the convicted felon, and which 
the enlightened and humane sentiment of the people of this Commonwealth 
everywhere demands. 

The condition of the Bucks county jail has for a long time claimed the 
attention of the Board of Public Charities, as the following extracts from 
some of their annual reports made to the Legislature will show. As far 
back as 1870, their report says : " This county is greatly in need of a new 
prison, constructed on the plan of separate labor. Its population would 
justify the erection and operation of such a prison, while it would prove 
beneficial to the morals, health, and comfort of the convicts, as well as a 
pecuniary saving to the taxpayers. 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 3 

*^ It is to be hoped that the intelligent citizens of this county will soon 
inaugurate a movement in favor of such a laudable improvement." 

Again, in their report for 1874, they say : " This ancient structure re- 
mains without any changes or improvements. Substantially built in the 
first instance, it was arranged in the style of the early jails — ^for mere 
lock-up purposes — when commitments were seldom made, and the necessary 
care and protection were easily exercised. The interior is suffered to fall 
into decay, rendering it unfit for the confinement of convicts. Prisoners 
are permitted to associate in all of the apartments, separation, in its pres- 
ent insecure state, being out of the question. 

" The general condition of jails thus kept is in every instance bad. Re- 
formatory influences cannot be exercised, and the result of the commingling 
of all sorts of characters cannot fail to be prejudicial, thus making prisons 
of this character, schools of vice, instead of strictly penal and correc- 
tional." 

In their report for 1876 they say : " With the exception of a little more 
order, and such benefit as the application of a white-wash brush can effect, 
no changes or improvements have been made in this architectural model 
of a by-gone age. It is used, as stated in former reports, for the detention 
of the untried, or persons charged with crime. It is hardly fit for that 
purpose, as is obvious from the fact that six escapes have occurred since 
eJanuary l^st. There seems to be no present intention to make any other 
provision for the criminal classes in this county ; they are apparently con- 
tent to pay for the custody and maintenance of their convicts in the East- 
em Penitentiary." 

In 1877, the board reports to the Legislature " that this old structure re- 
mains, without any change or improvement. It is very fully occupied — 
from fifty to sixty prisoners are confined in it at the present time, a major- 
ity of them being vagrants. Twenty of this class, consisting of men and 
women, occupied one room. They slept on the floor, and were literally 
packed. Their appearance and condition was that of the lowest kind. 
Eleven were kept in another small room, and ten in the adjoining one. Of 
the seven cells or apartments, only one was considered safe. An attempt 
to escape from one of these was recently made, which would have proved 
successful, if military aid had not been applied for. 

" The practice in this county is to commit convicts of both long and 
short terms to the Eastern Penitentiary, the jail being entirely unflt for 
their custody. This prison no longer answers the purpose for which it was 
established. To all intents and purposes it is a ruin, and is unworthy of 
this wealthy county." 

The above extracts are made in order that the honorable court may be 
informed as to the condition of the jail for the past nine years, and that 
during this time the Board of Public Charities has been calling the atten- 
tion of the citizens of Bucks county to the &ct of its utter unfitness for 
the purposes of a jail, and urging the erection of a building more suitable 



4 Board of Publio Cha&itieb. [No. 5, 

for the detention and reformation of the convicted, and one that would 
reflect credit on the county. 

All of which is most respectfully submitted. 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 

President 
DiLLER Luther, M. D., 

Secretary and General Agent, 

Philadelphia, August 18^ 1879. 

As requested, his honor Judge Watson laid the above communication 
before the grand inquest of Bucks county for September sessions of 1879, 
who, in their presentment, said : 

" We indorse the report of the Board of Public Charities in regard to 
the jail being unfit for the purpose for which it is intended ; but in the 
present financial condition of the county, we do not feel at liberty to re- 
commend the building of a new one. 

*' We advise the commissioners to place some protection over the win- 
dows next the court-house, to prevent communication from the outside." 

The grand inquest for said county, for the December sessions of 1879, 
say, in their presentment to the court : 

" That we have visited the public buildings, and found the jail in as 
cleanly and good condition as it is possible for it to be, taking into con- 
sideration the building and its crowded condition ; and we recommend that 
as soon as the finances of the county will permit, the commissioners build 
a new jail, which will better answer the purpose of * justice and mercy.' " 

From these indications we are led to hope that our efforts in this quar- 
ter will, ere long, be crowned with success. 

Lebanon County Joll. 

On the 7th of August, Commissioners Clymer, Biddle, Dickinson, and 
General Agent Luther, visited the jail of Lebanon county, situated in the 
town of Lebanon, and found it to be in every way unsuitable for the pur- 
pose ; and in order that a knowledge of its condition might be brought be- 
fore the authorities of the county, the following letter was addressed to 
the president judge of the Twelfth judicial district : 

To the Honorable Robert M. Henderson^ Judge of the Twelfth Judicial 

District: 

The undersigned officers and members of the Board of Public Charities, 
in the prosecution of their official duty, visited the jail of Lebanon county 
on the 7th instant, for the purpose of inspecting its- condition, and more 
especially its fitness and capacity for the safe confinement of as large a 
number of prisoners as your officers sometimes report to our Board as be- 
ing confined therein. 

The jail contains fourteen small apartments ; six on the lower tier and 
eight on the upper. One of these is used for a sitting-room, and another 



Lbg. Doo.] Board of Public Chabities. 5 

for water-closet conveniences. The supply of water being insufficient, and 
the arrangements for drainage being very defective, the room is not used 
at this time for that purpose. 

There being but twelve rooms or cells for the confinement of prisoners, 
which have numbered at times as many as seventy, averaging almost six to 
each cell, discipline cannot be enforced, disorder necessarily' occurs, and 
as there is but one cell (which is iron clad) that has any appearance of 
security, this promiscuous association of the prisoners affords opportunity 
for planning escape, and carrying their plans into execution. 

At the time of our visit we found the cell doors wide open, and twenty- 
six prisoners, tried and untried, six of them under sentence of death, occu- 
pying the cells, the corridor, and yard attached to the building, according 
to their fancy, and no appearance of the discipline so necessary in an insti- 
tution of this kind. The female prisoners are placed in one or more of 
the cells of the.same block, before and after trial ; and in order to prevent, 
as far as possible, objectionable verbal communication with the male pris- 
oners, it is found necessary to keep the doors of the cells occupied by the 
female prisoners closed at all times, which is a matter of no small hygienic 
difficulty, when it is remembered how very imperfect are the ventilating 
and drainage' facilities in all parts of this decayed and badly arranged 
building. 

From the facts above stated, it must be obvious to all that nothing short 
of a new building, of sufficient size to hold the prisoners safely, and sepa- 
rately, furnished with the modern appliances which are now deemed neces- 
sary in order to enforce the discipline established by the laws of the Com- 
monwealth, can remedy the evils arising from this badly appointed jail. 

The system of prison management which is always found to prevail in 
jails, which are like that of Lebanon county, wholly unfit in every particu- 
lar for the safe keeping and reformation of the convict, is calling forth from 
christian philanthropists an earnest and persistent demand for reformation. 
It is not only disgraceful, but a body-and-soul-destroying system. Here it 
is that lessons in profanity and immorality are given and received ; here 
new plots for future mischief are discussed, and the dark ways of vice and 
dissipation are explained and presented in attractive forms. Under an utter 
absence of occupation, what else can be expected ? Employment in such 
a jail is, of course, out of the question. Moral and religious instruction is 
neglected. Prison rules and regulations, excepting what merely relates to 
food and shelter, are not prescribed, or if they are, cannot be enforced. 
Need surprise be expressed that prisons thus arranged and conducted have 
no terrors for the evil doer ? Is it not obvious that they must, in almost 
every instance, be mere schools of vice, where the prisoner is sheltered, fed, 
and clothed for a time, without the privation of any comfort, or privilege, 
that may not be easily borne, soon again to be a transgressor, and to be 
returned to society a worse man than when he entered the jail ? 

The jail was built at a period when the population of the county was 



6 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5 , 

comparatively small, and had but few criminals to provide for. It has long 
since ceased to be a secure place for the safe keeping of the dangerous of- 
fenders, and we have no hesitation in saying that it aflfords little or no pro- 
tection to society against a repetition of crime by this evil disposed class. 
Frequently the penalties for crime, for the want of a suitable building, can- 
not be executed, and the well-meant ends of justice are thus defeated. 

The necessity of providing larger and more suitable accommodations for 
the constantly increasing wants of the judicial district, can no longer be 
disregarded; and we trust, that the county authorities will be fully awak- 
ened to its importance, and that county buildings commensurate in all re- 
spects to present wants, and of such a character as will reflect credit upon 
the citizens of one of the most fertile, wealthy j and beautiful counties of 
the Commonwealth, may be erected at the earliest possible period. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 
President Board of Public Charities, 

DiLLEB LUTHEE, M. D., 

Secretary and General Agent. 
Harrisbubg, August 16^ 1879. 

In accordance with a request of the Board of Public Charities, the judge, 
in charging the grand inquest at the next term of the court, laid the com- 
munication before them for their inquiry and action. The board has not, 
as yet, been informed of the result of their deliberations, but are satisfied 
that as the attention of the citizens and authorities of the county has been 
called to the subject, they will not rest imtil they have provided for their 
criminals a place where they can be securely held, and properly cared for. 

Franklin County Jftll. 

On the 3d day of September, 18T9, Commissioner Biddle and General 
Agent Doctor Luther visited the jail at Chambersburg, Franklin county, 
and were so much impressed with the bad condition of the building and its 
surroundings, that they addressed the following communication to the 
Honorable D. Watson Rowe, president judge of the Thirty-ninth judicial 
district, who had already called the attention of the grand jury, then in 
session, to the subject : 

Harrisburq, September P, 1879. 

To the Honorable D. Watson Rowe^ President Judge of the Thirty-ninth 

District : 

Dear Sir : Upon an official inspection of the Franklin county jail, made 
by the undersigned this day, the necessity for providing accommodations 
of a proper character, and to a sufficient extent, for the criminal class, be- 
came, if possible, more apparent than at any former period. In no one 
particular is it adequate to present wants and necessities. Built at a period 
when but few criminals had to be immured, it has long ceased to be a safe 



L£a. Doc.] Board of Public Chabiti£& 7 

place for the confiaement of the constantly augmenting numbers of dan- 
gerous oflTenders. The protection of property and life, the preservation of 
peace and order, the success of the ends of justice, demand that the county 
authorities should provide for necessities which can no longer be disre- 
garded, and which require immediate attention. 

The details of our inspection will be fully presented in our report to the 
Legislature, but our attention having been called to your charge to the 
grand Jury, in which you very fully present the whole case, in every word 
of which we fully concur, under a hope that a statement of our observa- 
tions might be of some service in promoting favorable action upon the sub- 
ject, we have deemed it our duty to address this communication to you. 

Very respectfully. 

Your ob't servants, 

DiLLER Luther, 
Oeneral Agent Board of Public Oharitiea. 

James S. Biddle, 
Gommisaioner. 

As requested by the committee of the Board of Public Charities, the 
communication addressed to Judge Rowe was laid before the grand jury 
for the September term of the court, and immediate consideration was 
given to the subject by them, which resulted in a recommendation " that 
the present building be repaired, altered, and improved, and the whole of 
it be devoted to the purposes of a prison." 

At the regular December term of the court, J. D. Ludwig, Esq., on the 
part of the commissioners of Franklin county, presented a petition asking 
that the grand jury approve of (with the concurrence of the court) a plan 
set forth in the petition for the construction of an addition to the present 
county jail building, which, in the opinion of the petitioners, would be 
much more suitable for the purposes of a prison than the plan recommended 
by the grand jury of the September term. His Honor Judge Rowe called 
the grand jury before him, and strongly recommended the erection of an 
addition to the jail, approving the plan of structure submitted by the 
county commissioners. 

The grand jury, after due consideration, through their foreman, presented 
the following report : 

To the Honorable D. Watson Rowe^ President Jtidge of the several courts 

in and for the county of Franklin : 

"We have inspected the county jail, and find it in as cleanly condition as 
it can be kept, in its present arrangement, but do consider it insecure and 
insufficient to meet the present demands, and we do strongly recommend 
the erection of an additional building, on the plan as set forth in the peti- 
tion of our county commissioners, believing it will meet the present wants 
of the people, and be a saving to the taxpayers of the county." 

It will be seen by these proceedings of the county authorities, that a 



8 BoA&D OF Public Charities. [No. 5 , 

lively interest has been awakened in Franklin, on the subject of an addi- 
tional building to their jail, where the prisoners may be securely held, and 
properly disciplined; and in all probability the Board of Public Charities 
may, in their next annual report, be able to say that Franklin county has 
done its duty in this matter. 

Batler County Jail. 

On the 2tth of October, commissioners Biddle and Dickinson visited tke 
jail of Butler county, which is situate in the town of Butler. The condi- 
tion of this building, on inspection, was found to be so bad that it was im^ 
possible for the officers in charge to maintain a proper degree of order and 
discipline. 

The commissioners sought and obtained an interview with His Honor, 
Judge McJunkin, who resides in the town, and represented the condition 
of affairs at the jail as they had found them, and it was deemed advisable, 
in order to bring the subject properly before the authorities and citizens of 
the county, that the Board of Public Charities should communicate, in 
writing, their views in regard to the jail, with whatever recommendations 
they might have to suggest, to the judge of the judicial district in which 
the county is located, and that he should be requested to submit the same 
to the grand inquest, at the next session of the county court, which was 
accordingly done, as follows : 

Board of Public Charities, 
Office of Executive Committee, 1224 Chestnut Street, 

Philadelphia, November 26^ 1879. 

To the Honorable Ebenezer McJunkin, President Judge of the Seventeenth 

Judicial District : 

On the 27th day of October last, a committee of the Board of Public 
Charities of the State of Pennsylvania visited the jail of Butler county, 
for the purpose of inquiry and inspection, and, after careful examination, 
feel it to be our duty to lay before the honorable court of common pleas 
of said coimty, a statement of the condition of the jail at the time of vis- 
itation. 

The commissioners of charities, who made the inspection, found that 
there is no complete separation of the sexes, the only barrier between them 
being an iron grating partition, constructed with bars set four inches apart, 
through the openings of which the vilest offenses against decency and 
morality are committed by the male and female prisoners, and all efforts 
on the part of the sheriff and jailors to prevent these demoralizing prac- 
tices have thus far proved imavailing. The commissioners, judging from 
what they saw, and from the testimony of the officers in charge, together 
with information obtained from some of the better class of prisoners con- 
fined there, who were questioned in regard to this matter, believe that noth- 
ing but a radical change in the interior arrangement of the present build- 



Leq. Doc.] Board of Public Chabities. 9 

ing, or the erection of an addition, for which there seems to be ample 
space on the prison lot, will prevent a continuance of these baneful prac- 
tices, which, to the knowledge of the Board of Charities, have long ex- 
isted, and to which the attention of some of the former county officials has 
been frequently called by the agent and visiting commissioners of this Board. 

The prisoners complained of great suffering for the want of proper ven- 
tilation, and the atmosphere of the cells and corridor was found to be un- 
wholesome, and prejudicial to the health of the inmates. This is a matter 
that seems to call for immediate attention. 

The committee also found that the custom of indiscriminate visiting, long 
prevailing in this jail, has actually become detrimental to the good order 
and discipline of the place, and a great annoyance to the resident keepers 
of the jail. All persons, who from curiosity, or for the purpose of visiting 
their criminal friends confined therein, from long custom, claim the right 
to make these visits whenever they feel inclined to do so ; and as many of 
these belong to the criminal class, no good can come from these unrestricted 
visits, but great injury must result to the discipline of the institution, and 
the effect be demoralizing upon the prisoners. 

We would respectfully suggest that hereafter no visitors be admitted 

without permits granted by the judges of the court or the commissioners 

of the county, except the prisoners' legal advisers, or those whom the law 

recognizes as authorized visitors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 

President. 
DiLLER Luther, M. D., 

Secretary and General Agent. 

CooBty Insane Aiylnois. 

The attention of the Board has been drawn to the consideration of thfe 
subject of keeping the insane poor in county almshouses, in consequence 
of some of the large and more populous counties of the State having made 
provision for this class of their patients, in buildings adjoining the alms- 
houses and under the management of the directors of the poor, with the 
view of withdrawing all their patients from the State institutions, and 
keeping those that may hereafter become a charge upon the county in their 
own asylums. This action on the part of county authorities may be laud- 
able as a matter of economy, (which appears to be the only reason as- 
signed,) and, perhaps, may not result injuriously to that large number of 
chronic or incurable cases, which require only careful and intelligent su- 
per vison on the part qf the attendants having charge of them ; but for re- 
cent or acute cases, where there is reason to believe that the patient may 
be benefited, perhaps restored, by carefiil attention and skillful medical 
treatment, we are satisfied that it is better to place him in one of the State 
insane asylums, where he will have the benefit of the best medical treat- 
ment, and the use and advantage of all the modem hospital appliances. 



10 BOABD OP Public Charities. [No. 5, 

In some of the county insane asylums recently visited, the commission- 
ers found abuses existing which seemed to be entirely the result of igno- 
rances on the part of the directors of the poor, and the officers and attend- 
ants of the institutions. 

In some instances, when attention was called to these abuses, they were 
corrected at once, and they may not occur again, until there is a change in 
the management, (which is frequent,) when, in all probability, things will 
relapse into their previous condition, because of the introduction of new 
and untrained officers and assistants. This will always be the case while 
the county asylums are subject to such frequent changes in their manage- 
ment. 

The commissioners visited the insane department of the almshouse of 
Cumberland county in December last, and found two of the inmates chained 
to the floor of their cells — one of them only because the asylum was not 
supplied with the ordinary apparatus for restraining him ; the other, be- 
cause the attendants, who were recently appointed, had been informed that 
he was violent and, at times, dangerous. 

This patient was entirely nude, and had not worn clothing, we were in- 
formed, for many years. The room in which he was confined was filthy in 
the extreme, and he was, in consequence of the fear of his attendants, en- 
tirely neglected. The commissioners, on examining the books of the in- 
stitution, discovered that his expenses, amounting to as much as would be 
charged in a State asylum, were regularly paid ; and, upon further inquiry, 
discovered that ample provision had been made for his support by his de- 
ceased parents ; and that he was not a pauper, and should not be kept in 
an institution intended only for those unable to support themselves. 

The commissioners, in view of the great wrong that was being infiicted 
upon this unfortunate man, believed it to be their duty, under the act of 
Assembly, to have him removed to one of the State asylums, where he 
could receive proper treatment, and directed the officers of the board to 
make application to the president judge of the Ninth judicial district for a 
decree to that effect, which they did, as follows : 

Habrisburg, December 8^ 1879, 

To the Hon. M. C. Hermon, 

President Judge of the Ninth Judicial District : 

Whereas, Under the provisions of a supplement to an act to create a 
Board of Public Charities, approved the 7th day of May, A. D. 18U, which 
sets forth or declares that, "whenever the Board of Public Charities shall 
be satisfied, or have good reason to believe that any insane person in any 
county or district poor-house, or in the care of any person under the direc- 
tion of the poor directors of any district, cannot there receive proper treat- 
ment and care, or is probably curable, said boai-d, or their representatives 
in the proper county, shall make application to the president judge of the 
proper county, in term time, or at chambers, setting forth that such insane 



Leg. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 11 

person cannot receive proper care aiyi treatment, or is probably curable; 
and said judge shall, if the statements alleged are sustained by afiidavit of 
petitioners, make decree, that the officers in charge of such person transfer 
him or her to one of the hospitals for the insane receiving aid from the 
State, where such person shall be received and maintained in the manner 
prescribed by law, at the expense of the district from which such person is 
transferred ; such expenses to be recovered by such district from such per- 
sons as may be liable, by existing laws, for the support of such insane 
person: 

Therefore^ In discharge of the duty imposed in section second of said 
supplement, the Board of Public Charities hereby make application to the 
Honorable Martin C. Hermon, president judge, to make a decree that the 
officers in charge of the Cumberland county poor-house %hall^ without 
delay, transfer to the State Hospital for the Insane at Harrisburg, Joseph 
Smith, a lunatic, now an inmate of said poor-house. 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 
President Board of Public Charities, 
DiLLER Luther, M. D., 

Secretary and General Agent, 

Subsequently, Commissioners Biddle and Dickinson made the necessary 
affidavit, and forwarded the same, with the petition, to the Honorable Martin 
C. Herman, president judge of the Ninth judicial district, as follows : 

We, the undersigned, depose that Joseph Smith, aged fifty-seven, an 
insane person, has been an inmate of the Cumberland county poor-house 
since the 25th of December, 1869 ; that during most, if not all, of that time, 
he has been kept chained to the floor of his cell, and not permitted to leave 
it for air and exercise ; that he is allowed for a great part of his tiine to re- 
main in a state of nudity in his cell, which is foul, and unfit for habitation, 
the walls being sprinkled with human ordure. 

They further depose and say, that the arrangements, the attendance, and 
the appliances for the care of cases, such as that of said Smith, in the Cum- 
berland county poor-house, are such that he " cannot there receive proper 
treatment," (act of Assembly May T, 1874, section three,) and that he 
ought, in our judgment, to be immediately removed to the State Hospital 
for the Insane, at Harrisburg. 

CUy and county of Philadelphia^ 88 : 

On the 4th day of December, A. D. 1879, personally appeared before me, 
a magistrate of the peace, Mahlon H. Dickinson and James S. Biddle, 
Esquires, Commissioners of the Board of Public Charities, who being duly 
sworn or affirmed, according to law, say that the above is correct and true, 
to the best of their knowledge and belief. 

(Signed,) Mahlon H. Dickinson, 

James S. Biddle. 
[l. s.] Robert R. Smith, Magistrate. 

December 4, 1879. 



12 BoABD OF Public Chabities. [No. 5, 

In consequence of this application ^ decree was made requiring the di- 
rectors of the poor to remove the patient to the State insane asylum at 
Harrisburg, which was accordingly done, and immediately upon his recep- 
tion in that institution, he was properly clothed, and placed in the ward 
appropriated to patients of this class, where he is at this time, enjoying 
freedom from chains, and the liberty of the airing yards, corridors, and 
sitting-rooms, and is wearing his clothes, perhrps for the first time for five 
or more years, and requiring no more than the ordinary care bestowed 
upon other patients in the same ward ; showing conclusively that he was 
not receiving at the poor-house the kind of treatment his case required. 
This is a further proof, if any more were necessary, that there are cases of 
insanity that cannot be properly treated in county poor-houses, where the 
physicians are not experienced in the treatment of the disease, and where 
there are no competent, trained nurses and attendants to take charge of 
them. These requisites are only to be found in the well organized insane 
asylums. 

Insane Hocpital at Koriiitoiirn. 

The commissioners charged with the erection of a State Hospital for the 
Insane of the Southeastern District of Pennsylvania, embracing the city 
of Philadelphia and the counties of Bucks, Montgomery, Delaware, Chester, 
Northampton, and Lehigh, have announced that they have almost com- 
pleted the duties devolved upon them by the act of Assembly of May 5, 
1876, and are making arrangements for the transfer, in February next, of 
the asylum buildings to the custody of the board of trustees appointed as 
required by section eighth of the aforesaid act, to be known by the name 
and style of '* The Trustees of the State Hospital for the Insane of the 
Southeastern District of Pennsylvania." 

This board consists of thirteen members, five of whom are appointed by 
the Governor, from the State at large, two by the councils of the city of 
Philadelphia, and one by the county commissioners of each of the other 
counties embraced in the southeastern district, who are " to serve without 
compensation, and to manage and direct the concerns of the institution, 
and make all necessary by-laws and regulations not inconsistent with the 
Constitution of the Commonwealth. 

The following named gentlemen have been appointed trustees, and will 
receive the building from the commissioners, on its completion : 

By the Governor — Hon, John F, Hartranft^ Samuel M, Bines^ Thomas 
R. Brown, James Boyd^ and B, K. Jamison, 

By the city of Philadelphia — George W, Simons and Israel Fleish- 
man. 

By county commissioners — Dr, Oeorge P. Kern, Northampton ; Dr, E, 
Q, Martin, Lehigh; Addison May, Chester; W, D. H, Serrill, Delaware; 
Charles H, Stinson, Montgomery; and Ear man Yerkes, Bucks. 



Leq. Doo.] Board or Public Chasities. 13 

State iBMae Hoipltal mt Warren. 

The State Insane Hospital, located in the town of Warren, Warren county, 
now in course of erection, was commenced early in the spring of 1874, 
under 4;he Bupervision of a commission appointed by Governor Hartranfb, 
consisting of Doctor William Corson, General James A. Beaver, and Doc- 
tor John Cur wen, and is intended for the insane of the counties of Erie, 
Crawford, Mercer, Venango, Warren, McKean, Elk, Forest, Cameron, and 
Clarion. This building would have been completed and opened for the 
reception of patients long before this time, but the work has been greatly 
retarded for want of money sufficient to push it forward. The Legislature 
has appropriated, in all, eight hundred and forty-five thousand ($845,000) 
dollars, for this hospital, but the payments have been very irregular, and 
one hundred and sixty-two thousand ($162,000) dollars of the amounts ap- 
propriated for 1878 and 1879 are still unpaid, while of the amount drawn, 
fifty thousand ($50,000) dollars are in Governor's warrants, which were 
used as collaterals, to raise money to pay accumulated bills, of 1878, and 
are still unpaid. 

Had the commissioners been able to obtain the money appropriated by 
the Legislature, the hospital would now be in full use, and the district for 
which it is designed would have had its insane poor comfortably lodged in 
an institution, which is certainly unsurpassed by any structure in the coun- 
try for its substantial character, and its perfect adaptation to the purposes 
for which it has been erected. The State has sustained very considerable 
loss, in the cost as well as in the delay of its completion, in consequence 
of the inability of the commission to avail itself of the low prices that 
have ruled during the last few years, and of the great advantages of cash 
purchases. In justice to the commissioners, who have discharged their ex- 
tremely difficult duties with great credit to themselves, and to the highest 
possible advantage of the State, as well as on account of the vital import- 
ance of a speedy completion and occupation of the Warren hospital, this 
Board would express the hope that strenuous efforts will be made to make 
the appropriations of the Legislature available at the earliest possible date. 

The First Deeade. 

Ten years have now passed since the Board of Public Charities was or- 
ganized and began the work assigned it by the Legislature. The commis- 
sioners, in their efforts to discharge the duties that devolved upon them 
under the act of Assembly, soon discovered that in many of the institu- 
tions which were made subject to their supervision and inspection, they 
could find no reliable or satisfactor}'^ recorded information of the financial, 
or general condition of the institutions. In others, where the officers or 
managers had made efforts to keep the records of their proceedings, there 
was a great want of uniformity and system in them, which made them 
almost, if not entirely, valueless. From this want of reliable statistical 
information, the Board of Public Charities was unable to furnish the Leg- 
islature with a satisfactory report of the nature and extent of crime and 



14 BoABD OF Public Charities. [No. 5, 

pauperism in the Commonwealth, and of the management of these institu- 
tions. 

The commissioners were soon brought to realize the fact that they had 
great responsibilities placed upon them by the act of Assembly, which they 
could not satisfactorily discharge without having further authority, and, in 
order that their hands might be strengthened, they sought for, and obtained 
from the Legislature, the enactment of such laws as were necessary to 
carry out the object of their appointment. 

By authority of these laws, the commissioners prepared for the use of 
the institutions a uniform system for keeping their records and accounts, 
and required them to adopt the forms thus presented. The result of this 
has been to enable the institutions to keep their books and records with 
perfect uniformity, and, when required, to forward to this Board informa- 
tion that may be desired without difficulty, and of an accordant and intel- 
ligible character. 

The past ten years form an era in the history of the penal, reformatory, 
and charitable institutions of Pennsylvania which may be contemplated by 
the Legislature and by this Board with great satisfaction. Much that 
might have been accomplished by more zealous and systematic efforts 
doubtless yet remains to be done, but, were it possible to present a com- 
prehensive and comparative view of these various classes of institutions 
as they existed ten years ago, and as they now present themselves, it could 
probably be shown that no where in this country has so great and so gen- 
eral advance been made in the whole diversified field of administration by 
which any State deals with the various classes that conte under its care, as 
has been made in Pennsylvania, since the decade now closed began. The 
history of the Board of Public Charities has been one of almost uniform 
experience in this respect, and there is scarcely a public institution of any 
kind within the borders of the State, that has not been in greater or less 
degree benefited by its official contact with the State, eflTected through the 
visitations, inspections, advice, encouragement, counsel, and, where need 
has been, admonition or censure of the Commonwealth's officers. In the 
earlier work of the Board of Public Charities, its purposes and efforts were 
very generally misimderstood. It had to encounter in some institutions 
great ignorance, and, in others, deep-rooted prejudice. In some of the 
county institutions grave abuses had grown up under an entire immunity 
from all official inspection, until, in not a few of them, conditions existed 
incredible to all but those who made themselves personally acquainted with 
them. To deal with such abuses, whose exposure invariably excited the 
indignant displeasure of the neighborhood in which they existed, was 
neither an easy nor a pleasant task. But it is gratifying to look back to the 
numerous instances in which this Board has been called on to deal with 
such abuses, and to be able to record the uniform result which has fol- 
lowed. In every instance now recalled, prejudice and opposition have 
yielded to the influences that have been brought to bear upon them, and 



Jjeo. Dog.] Boabd of Public Ghabities. 15 

those who were once foremost in denouncing the efforts of the officers of 
the State as unwarrantable intrusions, and their representations of existing 
abuses as gross exaggerations, if not actual fictions, have frequently been 
found equally ready to acknowledge the value of the services rendered 
through this Board, and proud of the reforms which have been wrought in 
institutions formerly so far behind the lowest standards of any modem 
civilization. Many counties, which, ten years ago, were conspicuous for the 
wretched conditions of their jails and almshouses, are to-day equally con- 
spicuous for the admirable provisions that they have made for both their 
criminal and destitute classes. 

But it has not only been in the eradicating of gross abuses in institu- 
tional management, during the past ten years, that th'e Commonwealth has 
cause for congratulation. Throughout the whole line of institutions, there 
has been a most notable improvement. Among nearly all of them there 
was for a time a prejudice, often rising to scarce concealed hostility toward 
the State's policy of supervisfon and inspection. The Board of Public 
Charities encountered this, perhaps not unnatural feeling, on all sides, and 
at every step. Many years of absolute seclusion from all external super- 
vision had produced the natural results. While the general tone of many 
very important institutions, had insensibly deteriorated under the influence 
which the long routine visitation of their own officers produces among the 
very best of them, the indisposition and perhaps inability to recognize the 
advantage, or propriety of the outside and disinterested inspection of the 
State, became proportionately stronger. The experience of the Board of 
Public Charities has been as gratifying in its relation to these classes of 
institutions, as in regard to the county institutions. As it became under- 
stood that the purposes, and the methods of the Board were directed toward 
a kindly and helpful cooperation with all that tended to the advancement 
of the best interests of the various institutions, and that the inspections of 
the State's officers were more and more useful in enabling individual man- 
agements to become acquainted with both the necessities for improvements 
and the best methods of effecting them, while the Board afforded to such 
institutions, as needed it, a safe and reliable means of communication with 
the State government ; prejudice and hostility gave place to confidence and 
respect, and it may safely be asserted, without improper self-commendation, 
that there is scarcely an important public institution within the State, whose 
condition has not been directly improved as a result of the operations of 
the Board of Public Charities. 

In a retrospect of the first decade of this Board's existence, it may not be 
uninteresting, briefly, to call the attention of the Legislature to its economic 
aspect. Many hundreds of thousands have been saved to the treasury of 
the State by the supervision exercised, under the law, upon the mass of 
applications annually made to the Legislature for appropriations. Many 
more would annually be saved, were successive Legislatures to avail them- 
selves more systematically of the opportunity thus afforded of informing 



16 Board of Public Charities. [No. 6, 

themselves of the merits of these applications. Bat even with a very im- 
perfect use of the Board's duty in this particular, the saving to the State has 
£&r exceeded the small cost at which it has been sustained. 

The Board of Public Charities entei*s upon its second decade, conscious 
of the magnitude of the work yet before it. It is a work which will always 
need to be done, so long as crime and ignorance and misery exist in the 
Commonwealth. The Board is conscious of the need for constant diligence, 
for impartial fidelity, and for a fearless discharge of duties, often laborious 
and distasteful, but which all past experience warrants it in believing, will 
result in lasting benefit to the people of the State. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 

FresidenL 

Heisteb Clymer, 
William Bakewell, 
George Bullock, 
Amos C. Notes, 
Thomas Beaver, 
James S. Biddle, 

Gommisisioners. 

Tke following is a statement of the official business transacted at meetings 

held by the Board during the year : 

March 6, 1819. James S. Biddle, Esq., presented his commission as 
member of this Board, in place of Francis Wells, Esq., resigned. 

Dr. Luther, General Agent, presented a report on the work performed 
during the past year. 

Francis Wells', Esq., resignation was presented by the President of the 
Board. 

A committee, consisting of Messrs. Biddle, Beaver, and Bakewell were 
appointed to revise the by-laws of the Board. 

Dr. Luther was reelected General Agent. 

Mahlon H. Dickinson was reelected President of the Board. 

June 5, 1879. The committed appointed to revise the rules made their 
report, which was adopted. 

Dr. Luther, General Agent, presented a report of the work performed by 
him to May 31, 1879. 

Mr. Biddle offered a resolution, which was adopted, requesting the oflS- 
cials of the Miflflin county alms-house to make returns to this Board. 

On motion of Mr. Bakewell, Messrs. Biddle and Bullock were appointed 
a committee to audit the accounts of the President and General Agent. 

July 25, 1879. The President appointed for the eastern district execu- 
tive committee Messrs. Biddle, Bullock, and Clymer; for the western dis- 
trict, Messrs. Bakewell and Noyes. Messrs. Biddle, Bakewell, and Bullock 
were appointed a committee to assist in preparing the annual report. 



LSG. Doc.] BOAAD OF l^UBLIG CHARITIES. IT 

September 2, 1879. The General Agent presented statements respecting 
the jails of Bucks and Lebanon counties, and of the alms-house of Mont- 
gomery county. 

The General Agent presented a financial statement of his receipts and 
expenditures. 

On motion of Mr. Biddle, the General Agent was directed to confer with 
the authorities of the Montour county jail, and of the Danville and Mahon- 
ing district poor-house, relative to the inadequacy of the buildings. 

December 2, 1879. James S. Biddle, Esq., presented his commission, 
dating from December 1, 1S79, and until the adjournment of the next ses- 
sion of the Senate of Pennsylvania. 

Communications from the officials of Montgomery county prison respect- 
ing the action of this Board in behalf of securing the pardon of a convict 
confined in said prison. The Board declines taking part in these efforts, 
under the conviction that such interference would be improper. 

A report from the local committee appointed by this Board, from the 
Montgomery county alms-house, was presented, and the same referred to 
the General Agent for inquiry. 

December 3, 1879. An application was made by this Board to the presi- 
dent judge of the Ninth judicial district, asking that Joseph Smith, an 
insane man confined in the Cumberland county alms-house, be removed to 
the State Lunatic Hospital at Harrisburg. 

A communication was received from the New York Board of State 
Charities, enclosing resolutions adopted by that Board, ^' relating to the 
sending of blind, crippled, lunatic, and other infirm paupers, by cities or 
towns, from different governments of Europe, to the United States." 

It is hereby resolved, in reply to the aforesaid communication, as an ex- 
pression of its accord with said resolutions of the New York State Board 
of Charities, that this Board will cooperate in any efforts that may be made 
to secure from Congress and the State Department such action as may be 
necessary to remedy the evils complained of. 



2— B. P. Char. 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 19 



REPORT 



OF 



DILLER LDTHER, M. D., GENERAL AGENT AND SECRETARY, 

FOR 1879. 



To the Board of State Commissioners of Public Charities : 

Gentlemen : The General Agent and Secretarj', in compliance with the 
statute, respectfully submits the tenth annual report : 

During the past year, a large number of institutions in the different sec- 
tions of the State have been reviewed and examined. In the performance 
of this duty, I have been accompanied very frequently by some of the 
commissioners, from whom I have received much valuable aid. Special 
investigations into the methods of administration pursued in county and 
State institutions have been made. Errors In the systems upon which pub- 
lic charity is dispensed in the various poor districts of the State have been 
pointed out, resulting very often in the adoption of other modes by which 
a more careful and judicious expenditure of the public funds, and other 
favorable changes have been secured. 

The. state Inatitntlont. 

The attention of the Legislature for the last three years has been given 
to the necessity of providing additional building accommodations for the 
criminal class. 

An enlargement of the Eastern Penitentiary was authorized by which 
its cell accommodations have been increased from five hundred and eighty 
(580) to seven hundred and thirty-two (782) cells. 

An act has also been passed and approved by the Governor providing 
for the building of a third penitentiary called the middle penitentiary, a 
site for which has been selected at Huntingdon, and for which building oper- 
ations have been commenced. 

By the authority of an act approved June 12, A. D. 1879, the inspectors 
of the Western Penitentiary have commenced to erect a new State prison 



20 BoABD OF Public Charities. [No. 5, 

on the property formerly owned by the Western Reform School in the 
Ninth ward of Allegheny city, but now transferred to the Western Peni- 
tentiary, which is designed to have a capacity of twelve hundred and eighty 
cells. 

When these additional penitentiaries shall be completed, sufficient accom- 
modations will have been provided to afford separate cells for at least 
twenty-two hundred convicts. The present number in the Eastern and 
Western Penitentiaries is nineteen hundred and eight. 

As new prisons have been built in some counties, and additions to old 
ones made in others, with a view to the retention of their long and short 
term convicts, the number of transfers to State prisons will probably 
rather diminish than increase. 

Stale Hospllali for the Indigent Inmne. 

Hospitals for the care and treatment of this unfortunate class have been 
provided to a large extent. When the Warren and South-eastern hospitals, 
which are approaching completion, are ready for the reception of patients, 
sufficient accommodations will have been provided for thirty-two hundred 
and fifty (3260) patients. The present number maintained in the State 
asylums, including Dixmont, is about fifteen hundred. Six hundred of the 
inmates of the insane department of the Philadelphia alms-house will proba- 
bly be transferred to State institutions, making the entire present insane 
population to be supported in State hospitals twenty-one hundred, (2100), 
and leaving unoccupied wards for eleven hundred and fifty of such as may 
be transferred from other alms-houses, and those retained by friends. 

The DefectiTe CIsMes. 

Institutions for the care and training of the deaf and dumb, the blind 
and feeble-minded children, have been established by incorporated associa- 
tions with aid from the State, and been in successful operation for many 

years. 

The State pays a fixed per capita rate for the maintenance of a certain 
number of the indigent of each class, and has made annual appropriations 

for the purpose. 

Two hundred and seventy-eight pupils were maintained in the Deaf and 
Dumb Institution in Philadelphia, at $260 each per annum, in 1879. In 
addition to these, one hundred receive care and training in the Western 
Institution, located near Pittsburgh. The aggregate number of this class, 
in the State, is about two thousand. Not over one fouith are maintained 
in institutions or by public authorities. 

It is estimated that there are at least twenty-^two hundred blind persons 
living in the State. The State grant to the institution for the blind in 
Philadelphia, in 1879, was $43,500 for one hundred and forty-five pupils at 
$300 each. An increase of fifteen has been made in the number of State 
pupils. About one sixth are provided for in institutions for the blind, alms- 
houses, or by township authorities. 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charitie& 21 

The number of feeble-minded children m untamed in fche institute estab- 
lished at Media, Delaware county, has been increased to double the former 
number. The cost per capita for the lesser number was $230 per annum. 
The present per capita cost is $200. 

The number of the idiotic class, in the State, according to reports made 
to this Board, is estimated at not less than twenty-five hundred. 

Almi-Hoaaet. 

There are sixty alms-houses in the State, thirty-three of which are county, 
each providing accommodation for all the poor of a county, and twenty- 
seven local or district alms-houses, being for the indigent of a single bor- 
ough, township, city, or for several boroughs or townships. 

The whole number of inmates of all classes, in these institutions, (ex- 
cluding the insane in the Philadelphia alms-house), was at the beginning of 
the year October 1, 1877, nine thousand nine hundred and ninety-seven; 
admitted during the year eleven thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, 
making a population of twenty-one thousand seven hundred and ninety- 
four. There were discharged during the year twelve thousand three hun- 
dred and six, leaving at the end of the year, September 30, 1878, resident 
in the alms-houses nine thousand four hundred and eighty-eight. 

The admissions of eleven thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, as 
compared with the prcAdous year, shows a decrease of thirty hundred and 
ninety-one, or 20.76 per cent. The number discharged, twelve thousand 
three hundred and six, was seventeen hundred and seventy-three, or 12.59 
per cent, less than during the preceding year. 

Of the eleven thousand seven l^undred and ninsty-seven admitted, sixty- 
two hundred and sixty-six were adult males, thirty-three hundred and fifteen 
were adult females, making a total of ninety-five hundred and eighty-one, 
or 81.21 per cent, less than during the preceding year, therefore four fifths 
of the admissions were adults, and but twenty-4;wo hundred and sixteen, 
or 18.79 per cent., were children. 

The aggregate number resident in the sixty alms-houses, (excluding the 
insane of Blockley Alms-house, Philadelphia,) on September 80, 1878, was 
ninety-four hundred and eighty-eight, being a decrease of five hundred and 
nine, or five per cent, at corresponding date of previous year. 

The number of men, women, and children in the above classes, is as follow : 
Males, sane, seven thousand seven hundred and sixty ; insane, thirteen hun- 
dred and seven ; idiotic, one hundred and seventy-five ; blind, one hundred 
and eighty-four ; deaf, sixty-two. 

The expenditures in connection with the poor for the year 1878, for indoor 
support, $1,183,076 70; for outdoor relief, $518,127 55. Total, $1,701,- 
204 25. 

The condition of the county poor-houses throughout the State, is fully 
set forth in a subsequent part of this report, so that further details here 
concerning them are deemed unnecessary. It is considered important, 
however, to direct attention to some facts connected with their manage- 



22 Board op Public Chabitiecl [No. 5, 

ment, and also to refer to some changes or improvements which have been 
recommended for adoption. 

In view of the fact that a large amount of the pauperism which seeks re- 
lief in alms-houses, may be prevented by appropriate and timely measures, 
by which the evil may be reduced and its financial burdens lessened, we 
advise that the admissions to poor-houses be guarded by the most strin- 
gent rules and regulations. It is shown in the reports of this Board that 
over forty-two per cent, of the admissions into the alms-houses of the State, 
were able bodied, children over sixteen years of age being included. This 
fact must excite surprise, and shows the necessity of observing greater care 
in this important matter. We owe no debt to fraud or idleness ; neither 
policy, humanity, or christianitj" require us to harbor or succor this class. 
In each of our poor-houses will be found a proportion of the debased and 
idle who utterly refuse to work, and prey upon the community either by 
beggary or crime. 

It is shown by the reports of this Board, also, that one sixth of the en- 
tire permanent population of our alms-houses are children. We advise that 
they be provided for by private agencies, with encouragement and co-oper- 
ation from the counties and the State, in homes or asylums now in oper- 
ation, or in others which may established for the purpose. This class, if 
permitted to grow up in idleness, poverty, ignorance, and vice, fill our alms- 
houses and prisons, and depredate upon our agricultural districts in the 
form of that modem pest, the tramp. 

There are numerous orphan asylums and homes for friendless children 
in different parts of the State. The value of these institutions as a part 
of our system of public benevolence, cannot well be over estimated. " It 
should be added that in but few, if any of these asylums, are the charges 
for the care and training of such children greater than the average cost of 
maintenance in the county poor-house." The work, wholly gratuitous, is 
usually performed by committees composed of ladies, and the prosecution 
of the trust involves a large amount of labor. 

This Board urge upon the Legislature prompt and effective action to 
provide for the care and training of this neglected class. 

Oat-Door Belief. 

As large numbers of persons naturally idle and improvident have been 
trained and educated for the poor-house, by out door relief carelessly and 
prodigally administered, it should be guarded by stringent rules and reg- 
ulations, in order that its beneficient objects may be constantly realized. 
It is not always easy to distinguish between worthy and unworthy appli- 
cants. Aid is often withheld when it should be granted, and it is frequently 
given when it should be withheld. 

It is important, therefore, in redncing out-door relief, that cruelty be 
guarded against. It is shown in the report of this Board for 1878, page 
281, of the twenty-one thousand one hundred and ninety in receipt of out 
door relief for the quarter ending September 30, 1878, nine thousand four 



Leg. Doc.] Board op Public Chabitibs. 23 

hundred and fifty-seven, or forty-four and sixty-three hundredths per cent., 
were children under sixteen years of age. All children over sixteen years 
of age are counted as adults in alms-house computations. 

Out door relief, therefore, sefems to be a necessary part of a pauper sys- 
tem. Support of some kind and to some extent outside of alms-houses, 
and at their homes may be considered both wise and humane. The occa- 
sions for it may be briefly indicated in preference to a transfer to the alms- 
house. 

1. To prevent the breaking up of families, and the increase of pauperism. 
The death of the father may leave the family destitute. Removal to an 
alms-house breaks up the home and its associations. Timely out-door re- 
lief preserves these ties and the family together until the older children are 
able to earn money for the common support. 

2. Sickness of the head of a family, want of work in a hard winter, or 
some other calamity, may create the same necessity and justify the same 
relief. The hardship of refusing public aid to an industrious family, stricken 
down by some sudden misfortune, other than in a part of a room in an 
alms-house, is felt by all. 

Out-door relief in the cases already referred to, as well as in some others, 
is commended, because it is calculated to keep pauperism temporary rather 
than make it p>ermailent. On the other hand, out-door relief, while nomin- 
ally occasional and temporary, is apt to become, in a large proportion of 
cases, permanent. The tendency to abuse is confessed, but with proper 
precaution may be kept within bounds, or entirely defeated. 

Vagraaey. 

This continues to grow in magnitude. Until a recent period the alms- 
houses and jails were visited by these roving idlers in large numbers. The 
annual reports of county commissioners show that a large portion of the 
expenditures for these institutions were made of amounts paid for their 
keeping and maintenance. And but a small part of the annoyance and ex- 
pense of vagrancy is represented in the reports of these establishments. 

When not seeking relief in the one or undergoing confinement in the 
other, they are a pest to the general public ; — their whole lives being spent 
in gaining a livelihood from organized institutions or private individuals, 
without being willing to render an equivalent in labor. The pressure of 
the evil has long been felt, and at various times has led to the adoption 
of various remedies for relief. 

The act passed by the General Assembly, in 1876, authorizing the erec- 
tion of work-houses in connection with alms-houses, in which labor might 
be enforced, it was hoped might be eflfective. It worked well in a few coun- 
ties in which the law was vigorously enforced. In consequence of the time 
and expense required to make arrests and committals, the law was never 
enforced by citizens. It need not, therefore, be a matter of surprise that 
whilst the evil was somewhat diminished in alms-houses, it should have 
been greatly increased among quiet country homes. Where the law was 



24 



Board of Public Cha&itie& 



[No. 6 , 



enforced, the evil was partially remedied ; it was increased where it was 
not enforced. 

But what was defective in the act of 1876 has been remedied by the law 
of 1879. It provides for more summary arfests and longer terms of im- 
prisonment. During the brief period in which it has been in operation, 
wherever it has been enforced it has done more to expel from within the 
borders of the State the whole army of these traveling vagabonds than had 
been effected by any measure previously devised. 



LsG. Doc.] Board of Public CHA&iTiEfiL V5 



THE STATE INSTITUTIOI^^S. 



These consist of the Eastern Penitentiary, the Western Penitentiary, 
the Middle Penitentiary, (now being built,) Lunatic Hospital at Harris- 
burg, Hospital for the Insane at Danville, Hospital for the Insane at War- 
ren, State Hospital for the Insane of the South-eastern district, the Wes- 
tern Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane at Dixmont, (not strictly a State 
institution,) the Western Reform School at Morganza, and the Anthracite 
Hospital, for which a site has been selected. 

Baalern PeBltoaClary. 

June 24, 1879, visited with Messrs. Dickinson, Bullock, Biddle. 

The whole number of prisoners received into the Eastern State Peniten- 
tiary for the year 1879, was 487, viz : 420 white males, 5 white females, 
69 colored males, 3 colored females. 

The total population for 1879, was 1,574, and the average for the year 
was 1,075. 

The whole number discharged during the year was 457, viz: 388 by 
commutation law, 20 by pardon, 14 died, 19 time out, 14 by order of court, 
1 insolvent law, 1 suicide. 

The number remaining in prison December 31, 1879, was 1,117, viz : 985 
white males, 10 white females, 119 colored males, 3 colored females. 

In the last annual report of this penitentiary, we are favored with a 
statement of the individual characteristics of the prisoners, which to all 
engaged in prison management are of great practical importance. 

" The object in their publication is to show who are convicted of crime, 
and sentenced to the institution; their individual characteristics; their 
physical, moral, and mental conditions ; the training they have received ; 
the circumstances and surroundings to which they have been subjected ; 
their mental education and trade instruction; the parental government 
extended to them in their youth ; with other causes and influences which 
tend to and are developed in offenses for which they are subjected to pun- 
ishment. Among the most striking facts thus brought out, are those bear- 
ing upon the relations of education, industrial training, and previous re- 
formatory or penal treatment to the ultimate crime condition. Of the 487 
admissions in 1879, only 193 are rated as '^illiterate," 390 had attended 
public schools, while 82 had never attended any school*. On the other 
hand, only 60 (of the 487 admissions) convicts have served an apprentice- 
ship to any trade, 70 had served out terms in the county prison, 19 in the 
House of Refuge, and 19 in prisons in other counties of the State. Only 



26 Board op Public Chabities. fNo. 5, 

four mechanics who had been fully taught their respective trades are to be 

found among these nearly 500 convicts of 1879. These, and indeed the 

whole of this well-digested mass of statistics, aflford much matter for 

thoughtful study, and are the best ground-work for intelligent work in fu- 
ture prison reform." 

" The position assumed that the character of convicts as described should 
be understood before they are subjected to crime punishment for the crime 
cause of the oflTenses they have severally committed, must be admitted to 
be correct, nor can it l»e seriously asserted that one method of punishment, 
one general application of a universal treatment of convicts during incar- 
ceration, is either philosophic or reasonable, if punishment is intended for 
the individual, and to be other than incarceration, at some labor selected 
for him as best suited to his apparent physical condition." 

It is conceded that labor should be performed by prisoners under pun- 
ishment. But labor is not always the only element in punishment. It is 
an important incident, but not the exclusive and only means of applying 
the penalty for crime. The laws of Pennsylvania actually require provision 
to be made for the labor of convicts, whether in the State penitentiaries or 
in the county prisons ; and although the labor for which provision is made 
by the law is enforced labor, even that, whether with solitary or social con- 
finement, is unspeakably better than sheer idleness, both for body and 
mind, for the morals and future prospects of the convicts. 

It is not proposed in this report to enter upon the question whether labor 
should be performed in cells or in common work-shops, in individual sep- 
aration or in association. This might bring up the whole vexed question 
between the separate and congregate systems of penitentiary discipline; 
nor is it necessary, for reformatory labor can be appropriately combined 
with both. 

Nor is this the proper place to consider the merits or demerits of the 
different methods of conducting convict labor, as they are maintained by 
the advocates of the diffferent systems in the two State prisons at this time. 

The argument against contract labor in the report before us, is presented 
in strong terms. Maintaining the cardinal doctrine that the convict him- 
self is the prime object of attention, it is assei*ted that under the working 
of contract labor, the convict is the last to be considered, the first question 
(under the self-supporting theory) being the partnership in his labor be- 
tween the State and the contractor, and the next, the contractor's manage- 
ment and control of his purchased labor. That congregate contract labor 
degrades the convict by his constant association with convicts under a dis- 
cipline of mere force. That he works not as a punishment, but to pay a 
profit to the partners who own him, and that men thus worked come out 
of prison more at war with society than before, and ready to make society 
pay for what it has made out of them. 

The advantages derived from the individual treatment system are urged, 
claiming that its value consists in the ability to apply it to each individual 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Chabities. 27 

separately, and as it is discovered his case requires, whether corrective, 
remedial, punitive, or reformatory. Dealing as it does with individuals, 
the appliance of the method is a personal act as between the custodian and 
the convict. 

All the new corridors, three in number, have been completed, and the 
extension of the third block finished. One hundred and fifty-two addi- 
tional cells have been thereby gained. 

The light, water, soil, drainage, ventilation, and heating in these blocks, 
are believed to be in advance of those in any like institution in Europe, 
and certainly in the United States. 

The size of the cells has been enlarged in the new buildings, being eight 
feet wide, twenty feet long and fourteen feet high. Two sky-lights in the 
roof, the new blocks being one story high only,) ventilating pipes, water 
closet, fresh water, steam heating and gas pipes in every cell, give to the 
prisoner light and air, which, with the other conveniences, are made agents 
in preparing him for whatever reformatory influence his individual case 
needs. 

The inspectors have paid earnest attention to improvements in cell struc- 
tures, with a view that the moral character of the convict might be stimu- 
lated by cleanliness, order, abundant room, and light. The prisoner can 
work in these cells with entire satisfaction both to himself and his overseer. 

WMtern 8tote Penitentiary. 

October 20, 1879. Visited with Commissioners Dickinson, Bakewell, 
Biddle. 

The number of convicts remaining in the State penitentiary for the west- 
em district, October 20, 1879, was 791. Two hundred and sixteen (216) of 
them have been removed to the building at Riverside, recently owned and 
occupied by the Western Reform School, and which, by the act of Assem- 
bly, passed 14 May, 1878, is made to be a constituent part of the Western 
Penitentiary. 

In the second section of said act, the sum of one hundred thousand dol- 
lars was specifically appropriated to the Western Penitentiary, for the pur- 
pose of enabling the inspectors to construct suitable buildings for said 
prison, on the lands aforesaid. Formal possession of the reform school 
premises was taken on the 30th day of September, A. D. 1878. 

An efficient force was soon put to work, tearing down decayed buildings 
and unsightly walls, thoroughly repairing obstructed and defective sewer- 
age, and refitting, cleaning, and renovating apartments, cellars, and vaults, 
and improving the structures generally. 

The first detachment of prisoners was sent to it the 27th of November, 
1878. As the work of preparing the apartments in the old cell block pro- 
gressed, additional sets were sent down, from time to time, till the whole 
number, at date of inspection, had reached 216. 

After the alterations and repairs were completed, sufiScient cell room was 
provided for 250 prisoners. Gas, water, and steam have been carried over 



28 BoABD OP Public Chariti£& [No. 5, 

all the premises. Gas is placed in every cell, to be used at night, to sup- 
plement the vigilance of the guards, by absolute knowledge of all under 
their charge. ** We have every building, says Warden Wright, needed for 
a temporary prison, and several excellent buildings for shops. Some ma- 
chinery has been procured for the machine-shop, and a blacksmith-shop, 
with five fires, run by blast, to manufacture iron work for the new prison. 
A building, 30X100 feet, has been altered into a work-shop, for the manu- 
facture of chains by contract. 

One hundred and twenty-nine (129) men were on the pay-roll of this 
apartment, at 40 cents per diem each. 

Nineteen men are employed in the link-shop. These are included in the 
120. Thirteen men in another, upon work for the new prison. Twelve in 
a tin-shop, for a contractor. 

A carpenter-shop has also been prepared, to make window-frames and 
other necessary work for the new buildings. 

A school-room, a hospital department, and chapel, have also been ar- 
ranged. Deputy Warden Hugh S. McEean has been selected to take charge 
of the new enterprise. 

About $20,000 of the first appropriation has been expended in fitting up 
the Riverside prison for the reception of prisoners, and putting in and ad- 
Justing machinery to employ the convicts.* 

Both prisons are under one management, but in constant communication 
by the use of a telephone. Warden Wright remains at the old prison, 
where the largest number of prisoners and chief responsibility continue. 

Mr. Nevin,the president, in his annual report to the board of inspectors, 
avows the principle that the prisoner must earn his living. " We have too 
much sympathy," he says, " with the honest mechanic outside, who has 
never transgressed the laws, to ask him to divide the hard earned profits 
of his daily toil, to support in idleness his inconsiderate fellow mortal, who, 
by the commission of crime, has forfeited his liberty and fallen into prison, 
and yet this prisoner must live. We may take his freedom, but we may 
not take his life. If he is to live, he must be fed and clothed. Who, then, 
is to provide this food and these clothes ? They must come from the out- 
side of the prison wall if they are not earned within." " Convicts," he adds, 
** must be producers as well as consumers ; and why should they not ? they 
have health, strength, sinew, and muscle, and all the faculties of sound men, 
and, more than all, are willing to work. And yet, there is no work they 
can do, which does not come directly or indirectly, more or less, in conflict 
with outside labor. But our country is large and elastic, and in this con- 
trast, prison labor, all told, is scarcely felt in competition." 

It is under such convictions firmly and honestly entertained, that a sys- 

*Up to Deoember 31, 1879, there was : 

** Expended for alterations of oells and buildings to be used for temporary prison, 
<* additions to shops, new engine, tools, and fixtures of a permanent oharaoter, 
**W6,907 51." 



Lbq. Doc.] Board of Public CHAaiTiBS. 29 

tern of congregate labor has been established and conducted with pecuniary 
success. A statement jf the operations of the penitentiary for 1 878, shows, 
that after deducting the profits made by the labor of prisoners, the per diem 
charge for each man against the counties represented, was only four cents a 
day. A still more favorable result was expected for 1879, a statement of 
which has not yet appeared. 

Riv«raSd« Bolldlng— New Penitentiary. 

October 21, 1879. Visited with Commissioners DicKinson, Bakewell, 
Biddle, and Warden Wright. 

The foregoing refers to the old penitentiary in Allegheny City, and what 
has been done at Riverside to aJter and prepare the old buildings for tem- 
porary use for prison purposes. We must now notice the new building 
which has been commenced and is in progress. 

The authority to erect a new penitentiary to take the place of the old 
one in Allegheny City, is derived from the act of the General Assembly, 
approved June 12, 1878. It is as follows : 

** The inspectors of the same are hereby authorized and empowered to 
use the aforesaid buildings and grounds, or any part thereof, for keeping 
and employing any number or all the convicts that are now or that may be 
hereafter inmates of the Western State Penitentiary, with a view to the 
removal of all the present penitentiary buildings from the western park 
grounds in Allegheny, and their re-construction and occupancy by the 
Western State Penitentiary on the new premises in the Ninth ward in Alle- 
gheny City." 

The prison building will have a fVontage of 1 ,025 feet, facing the Ohio 
river, and will be subdivided as follows : The rotunda or guard-house 90 X 90 
feet from out to out, octagonal in shape, located in the centre with a wing 
or cell-house 62X46^ feet on each side of same. The administrative resi- 
dences will be placed directly in front of the former. 

There will be a wing 62X120 feet extending from rear guard-house, and 
at right angles with the wings aforesaid. At the rear of this wing will be 
placed another parallel with main prison, 60X150 feet. This will be used 
for kitchen, bakery, store and warerooms. It will be two stories high at 
each end. We forbear further details. 

Each wing or cell-block will contain 540 cells 5X8X8^ feet high in the 
clear, and 100 cells 7X8X8^ feet high, making a total of 640 cells in each 
wing, or 1 ,280 in all. There will be five tiers of cells. 

The foundations and cellar walls have been laid, and part of the heavy 
masonry has been built about six feet above the ground. 

In the report already referred to, an exhibit is presented, which indicates 
the progress which has been effected in respect to the question of cost in 
the last five years. The amount paid by counties, for the support of pris- 
oners, in 1874, was 13^ cents per day, to 10 cents in 1875, 8 cents in 1876, 
6 cents in 1877, and 4 cents in 1878. 



30 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

If what is termed the ^^ repair and labor squad," who cook, bake, sew, 
clean, wash, and mend, also run engines, attend boilers, manufacture the 
clothing used in the prison, &c., are included, it may be stated that the 
entire population outside of the hospital department are employed in vari- 
ous branches of useful industry. 

The mode of conducting the labor of the prisoners continues the same 
in the respective penitentiaries of the State. In the Western the prisoners 
work in association in shops, on State account, and by contract labor. In 
the Eastern Penitentiary the labor and the product are exclusively on State 
account, and is performed in cells, except in special cases. 

The convict in the Western Penitentiary is allowed the value of all the 
work he does above his allotted task. In the Eastern Penitentiarv he re- 
ceives one half of his overwork — the other half being credited to the re- 
spective counties from whence he was received. 

The work in the contract shops is carried on under the supervision of 
janitors appointed by the prison authorities, a foreman for every shop, and 
a general foreman, both of whom are appointed by the contractor. Delin- 
quencies or failures to perform the allotted task, are reported to the prison 
officers, to whom alone belongs the right to designate and inflict the pun- 
ishment. 

The comparative merits of the two opposite systems of conducting con- 
vict labor in ^tate prisons is undergoing much discussion and investigation. 
Whether the introduction of the contract system mvLj not be influenced to 
an improper extent by a desire to realize a maximum of profit — giving rise 
to tasks that may be excessive, resulting in a multiplication of punishments 
and frequently some of unusual severity; or whether the object in estab- 
lishing it should be reformatory and remunerative, or reformatory only, 
without regard to profit, are questions about which very difierent opinions 
are entertained. This is not the time or occasion, nor have I a desire to 
pursue the subject any further than merely to cite some facts which are 
closely connected with it, and may assist any eflforts that may be made to 
arrive at correct conclusions upon some of the points above referred to. 

One relates to the comparative cost of conducting these institutions un- 
der the two systems, and the other to the extent to which punishments are 
inflicted. 

BxpeaditorM. 

The expenditures for the year (excluding appropriations by the State, 
and gratuities paid to discharged convicts) were for the following purposes : 



Lbg. Doc] 



Board op Public Charities. 



31 



Maintenance. 



Provision, 

Clothuiff, eto., 

Fuel and light, 

Medicine, eto., 

Incidentals, 

Repairs, 

Wslges, 

Honse and cell famiture, . 
Manufacturing implements, 

etc., 

Profit and loss for stock and 

manufacturing purposes. 
Manufacturing losses, . . . 

Total, excluding appropria- 
tions by State, 

Salaries paid by State, . . . 



Total expenditures, . . 

Ckxit per capita^ witli sal- 
aries^ 

Of which the State paid for 
salaries, 

Labor, with profit on manu- 
facturing credited to coun- 
ties, 

Leavinff deficiency of sup- 
port by labor of convicts. 



Eastern 
Penitentiary. 



$49,299 
11,170 
11,816 
2,089 
4,699 
8,271 
6,677 
1,098 

21 

5,655 
1,729 



196,529 
38,000 



$184,529 



*87 

82 
61 



25 

87 
58 



$181 



181 



49 
78 
17 
81 
84 
05 
58 
74 

87 

58 

41 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



67 
00 



67 



70 



$88,157 
10,161 
4,114 
1,874 
4,428 
2,448 
1,094 
188 

867 



$62,760 
85,000 



$97,760 



70 



15 
52 
74 
28 
80 
88 
72 
85 

17 



Aggregate. 



01 
00 



01 



$87,456 
21,382 
15,930 
8,968 
9,123 
5,714 
6,772 
1,232 

879 

5,655 
1,729 



$159,289 
73,000 



$232,289 



■ • 


■ • 


$124 


1 
38 


• • 


• • 


$44 


56 


• • 


■ • 


$40 


18 


58 


44 


• • 


• • 


48 


83 


21 


83 


• • 

124 


'33 


44 


55 



$128 



128 



64 
25 
91 
54 
64 
88 
25 
09 

04 

53 
41 



68 
00 



68 



56 



56 



The extent to which paniBhment is inflicted in the two State prisons is 
shown by the following table : 

Panliihiiiettta. 

The number of different prisoners pnnished, kind of punishment, and 
the number of times inflicted, so far as the same is presented in the reports 
of these institutions, is exhibited thus : 



Kind of Punishment. 



Handcuff or irons, 

Dark or punlBhment cells, . 

Number of meals stopped, . 

Number of meals of bread 
and water, excluding tbose 
In dark cells, 

Otber punishments, . . . . 



Eastern Penitentiary. 



No.of 


No.of different prisoners. 


times. 


Males. 


Females 


ToUl. 












t 




8 


168 

• • • ■ 


168 
40 




16t 
40 



Western Penitentiary. 



No.of 
times. 



No. of different prisoners. 




NoTB.— Other punishments are simply those of a trivial natare, suoh as deprivation 
of yard exercise, eto. 

A very wide difference, both in the number and kind of punishments which 
were inflicted under the systems of management pursued in these prisons. 



32 BoABD OF Public Chabitiss. [No. 5, 

will be noticed. In the Eastern, the dark cell, which Is regarded as suffi- 
cient to subdue the most refractory characters, was resorted to only three 
(3) times ; a bread and water diet being all that was required in almost 
every case. The whole number of punishments in a population not ex- 
ceeding 1,519 was 196, or 13 per cent. 

In the Western Penitentiary, on the other hand, handcuffs or irons were 
used on 43 different prisoners at 53 different times. One hundred and fifty- 
nine (159) prisoners were confined in dark cells at 204 different times. 
Meals were stopped on 68 prisoners, at 234 different times. Total number 
of prisoners punished was 300. Total number of times was 581, in a pop- 
ulation of 1,128, or 26.60 per cent, on the whole number. 

The causes for the great disparity which is thus revealed, must be con- 
nected with the mode in which the labor of the convicts is conducted, and is 
attributed to failures to perform the prescribed tasks, either as to the man- 
ner or the extent of the requirements. 

It will be noticed, also, that frequently these punishments are severe. 
One of these consists in placing handcuffs on the prisoner, and fastening the 
handcuffs to a ring, (the Joliet ring,) which is fixed in the wall some dis- 
tance above the ordinary height of a man. Thus secured in a dark cell, 
and put upon bread and water diet, the offender is compelled to remain 
during the working hours of each day in a posture most severely taxing 
human endurance. This punishment is sometimes continued for several 
days in succession, and is commonly resorted to where complaints are made 
by contractors that prisoners have not, or wiU not, complete the allotted 
task. At the time of our visit two prisoners were undergoing this very 
severe ordeal until they should engage to accomplish tasks which are pos- 
sibly beyond their power to perform. 

This is the only institution in Pennsylvania, of which we have a knowl- 
edge, that tolerates this barbarous mode of punishment for offences of any 
kind, and it is questionable whether it can be justified by any of its advo- 
cates and defenders as a punishment proper to be inflicted upon the crimi- 
nal who may offend, or simply fail to give satisfaction to, a contractor or 
his agents. 

The comparative extent to which re-committals occur in the two peni- 
tentiaries may be seen to most advantage by referring to the exhibit in the 
report of this Board for 1878. (See page 132.) 

Middle Penitentiary. 

October 8, 1879. 

The bill approved June 12, 1879, appropriated one hundred thousand 
dollars for the purpose of purchasing a site and erecting thereon the peni- 
tentiary for aforesaid district. 

In pursuance thereof, a site was selected at Huntingdon. The grounds 
are located about a mile west of that borough, on the right hand side of 
the Juniata river, traveling eastward. They comprise thirty-three and a 
quarter acres, most of which front on the river bank. Only fourteen acres 



LsQ. Doc.] Board of Public Chabities. 38 

of the site were purchased, the balance having been contributed by the 
people of this section. The actual expense to the State for the site was 
$6,624.' 

It is designed to locate the building a little distance back from the river, 
with the front towards the stream and the railroad. The grounds about 
the prison will comprise thirty acres. 

The site of the reservoir which is to furnish water is located half a mile 
back of the prison site, and comprises three and a quarter acres. On the 
site are three springs, which send out a large volume of pure' water. The 
reservoir is completed. It was built by W. W. Morrison, of Lock Haven, 
whose contract price was $5,450. His contract included the excavation, 
making the embankments, and laying three thousand three hundred feet 
of eight inch pipe, which now conducts water to the prison site for the 
convenience of the stone masons at work there. The capacity of the 
basin is nine hundred and sixty thousand gallons, and the fall of water to 
the site is twenty-six feet. 

Work has been commenced on the foundation for the walls to inclose the 
prison-yard. The foundations are to be ten feet in width, and varying in 
depth, according to the nature of the land — probably from six to fifteen 
feet. 

The four sides will each be six hundred and eighty feet, eighteen feet 
high, and will be eight feet in width at the surface of the ground, and di- 
minishing to two feet at the top. They will be built of squared sandstone, 
though the sides exposed to view will not be dressed. 

The contractor for the foundations, Mr. John D. Kelly, of Renovo, has 
at this time a considerable number of men at work. His contract price is 
$2 45 per cubic yard, and the total cost of his work will be about $37,000. 
For this sum, he also builds a large sewer, from the grounds to the river, 
and builds the foundations for two offices for the prison. 

A small part of the foundations for the yard wall has already been com- 
pleted, but Mr. Kelly will not be able to finish his contract before the close 
of next summer. 

The four comers of the walls will be surmounted by towers, standing 
eight feet above the walls, and twenty-six feet above the surface of the 
ground. 

The PrlMHi Proper. 

^' The commissioners have not yet decided upon a detailed plan for the 
prison proper, though they have determined that the structure shall con- 
tain two hundred and fifty cells, that the front shall be built of dressed 
sandstone, and tliat in the centre there shall be a tower rising two hundred 
and forty feet above the ground. Within this tower will be built a reser- 
voir, which will be kept constantly filled with water, for protection against 
fire. Of course, this building will be occupied by the officers. There is 
no necessity for haste in deciding upon the details of the structure, since 
3— B. P. Chab. 



84 Board or Public Chabitib& [No. 5, 

the coininission havB't the money, at present, to rush the work through to 
eompletion, and havn't very bright prospects either for getting the fimds 
soon. They calculate that the cost of the reservoir, foundation, sewers and 
other preliminary work of that sort will reach $60,000. The sum of $100,000 
was appropriated by the last Legislature, and with the balance of $40,000, 
they expect to build one section of the yard walls next summer, and fix up 
odd ends. This they wish to do, in order that contractors may have a 
sample, showing them exactly what is wanted, when the time comes for let- 
ting the contracts to complete the work." 

Visited July and September 2, 1819, with Commissioners Dickinson and 
Biddle. 

During the last three years, extensive repairs and improvements have 
been made in this building, by which it has been greatly benefited. The 
changes in the wards, by which a largely increased supply of air and light 
is furnished, are shown to be of great value and importance. The dining- 
rooms are enlarged, brightened up, and present a comfortable appearance. 
Other apartments which had suffered from long continued use have been 
re-arranged, and are greatly improved. The fioors, doors, window frames, 
and in some wards the old plastering, have been removed and have been 
replaced with new ones, and the walls covered with entirely new coats or 
coverings. New ftimiture has also been introduced into most of the wards, 
and many articles of comfort have been added, of a useftil and homelike 
character, which impart a greatly improved appearance to the different 
apartments. The airing grounds, which have been improved by erecting 
pavilions in the centres in place of the side sheds, are now made attractive 
and afford pleasant shelter from heat and rain. 

The improvements made in the wards during the year have been with 
the view of providing greater security in case of fire to those parts of the 
hospital which were considered most deficient in that particular ; and for 
that purpose the iron stairway leading up to the wards in the male and 
female sides was extended up, so as to afford easy means of egress from 
the large room in the fourth story. 

By this means every ward is now provided with abundant means of 
escape in case of fire. 

The painting of the walls and wood work has been continued in those 
wards which have not heretofore been painted, and also some other parts 
of the wards which needed that care to make them accord with the work 
heretofore done. 

In the kitchen, where repairs and additional cooking conveniences were 
required, the old floors have been removed and a floor of slate tile, laid on 
^rick arches resting on iron beams, has been substituted. 

Large tea and coffee urns, made of copper and lined with block tin, have 
been placed in both kitchens, and also the latest improved cooking ranges, 
thus facilitating the labor of that department, and in a more satisfactory 
and economical manner. 



Leo. Doc.] Boabd of Public CHARiTiEa 35 

A large copper boiler has been procured in which rice and articles of 
that kind can be cooked much better than heretofore. 

In the centre building, all the rooms in the fourth story have been reno- 
vated and re-arranged, by dividing the rooms to make them mofe conven- 
ient and give eight instead of six, and replastering and refitting them. 

The main parlors, on each side of the front entrance, have also been re- 
arranged, and much improved. 

The labors of the trustees and officers of this institution, by which so 
much has been accomplished to promote the comfort and welfare of those 
committed to their charge, cannot be too highly commended. Many other 
improvements, calculated to add to the comfort and pleasure of the patients, 
and promote the efficiency of other departments of the hospital, have been 
made, and others are in contemplation. 

Evening entertainments continue to be provided, as in former years. 
Exhibitions of the magic-lantern are given regularly to the whole house- 
hold. 

Three evenings in each week are occupied with these exhibitions, with 
scenes in' ever}- part of the world, with descriptions to make them inter- 
esting. 

For the other evenings, readings ; lectures, with experiments ; concerts, 
with such other amusements as could be had, were steadily given. 

A room has been arranged in the basement for practicing scroll work in 
its various departments for female patients. 

The number of patients admitted for the year ending September 80, 
1879, was 147. The number discharged during the same period was 147, 
of whom 29 were restored ; 31, improved ; 58, stationary ; and 27 died. 

Average number in the hospital, 425.50. The number in the hospital 
September 30, 1879, was 426. 

By reference to the account of the treasurer, it will be seen that the re- 
ceipts from all sources for the ordinary expenses during the year have been 
$99,678 68, and the payments on the same account have been $89,672 49, 
making an average weekly cost per patient of $3 71. 

For the improvements contemplated in the institution, the receipts, in- 
cluding a balance on hand at the last year, were $17,965 15 ; and the pay- 
ments, $5,259 82. For detailed financial statement, sec Appendix. 

State Uoipttal for thfe Insane, DftOviUe. 

Visited July 20, 1879, with Commisaiojaers Biddle an<^ Beaver. 

The female wing is fully completed, and six of the twelve wards are oc- 
cupied by one hundred and eighty-seven patients. 

Upon the completion of the additional wards, the patients were trans- 
ferred from old jnto new ones, a practice which cannot always be pursued, 
but which is advisable whenever the accommodations will admit of it, as 
very decided sanitary benefits must be obtained from it. 

On the male side, eight wards are occupied, averaging from thirty-one to 
thirty-two each, or two hundred and fifty -one in all. 



36 BoABD OF Public Charitie& [No. 5, 

The hospital having eight or ten vacant wards, the necessity for crowd- 
ing them with cases of the most opposite character has not yet occurred, 
making such a classification of patients as is most desirable entirely prac- 
ticable. A proper use has been made of these advantages, and such dis- 
criminations as experience and thorough knowledge of the best methods 
suggest receive careful attention. 

Much judgment has been displayed in the provision which has been made 
in the structural arrangements of this building, for the wants and necessi- 
ties of the disturbed class for whose benefit it is designed. The entire 
structure will compare favorably with others which have been erected within 
the last ten years, in this and other States. This remark applies especially 
to that part of the female wing, which was finished in 1878 ; improvements 
to facilitate the household care of great value having been introduced. 

The importance of exercise to the patients in the open grounds receives 
proper recognition. Some of the inmates engage in household and out- 
door work, under the direction and care of attendants. For the more de- 
teriorated classes, especially such as cannot be entrusted with full personal 
liberty without restraint of some kind, spacious airing grounds have been 
inclosed for the inmates of both wings, which are provided with seats and 
pavilions for shelter from heat and rain. 

These improvements, including the extension of the female wing with the 
repairs which have been made, and additional furniture for the new wards, 
have been paid for out of the appropriation. 

A new barn and farmer's residence, with all the necessary outbuildings, 
complete in every respect, have been built, and are also fully paid for. 

A very satisfactory statement of the work of the year is exhibited. 

At the beginning of the year the number of patients was 360. The ad- 
missions were 211; the discharges were 127, leaving the number under 
treatment on the 9th October, 1879, 444, or 84 more than at the beginning 
of the year. Of those discharged, 33 were considered restored ; 24 im- 
proved ; 44 stationary, and 26 died. The daily average was 398.26, or an 
increase of 58.2 1 over the previous year. 

Of those in the hospital at the end of the year, 10.59 per xjent. were 
supported by friends, and 89.41 per cent, by public authorities. 

The receipts of the hospital, from all sources, were $75,034 68. The ex- 
penditures were $74,552 33. The average cost of each patient, for main- 
tenance, for the year, was $187 20, or $3 60 per week. 

On building account the receipts from the State were $21,250, and from 
other sources, $160 10. Total, $21,410 10, which has been expended. 

The institution is under the care of a competent medical staflT, and has 
the benefit of a faithful and attentive board of managers. 

State HosplUl for the Insaae, Warrev, Pa. 

Visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 
In consequence of the inability of the Treasury Department to furnish 
the means needed to pay for the material required and the wages of the 



Leo. Doc] Board of Public Chabitie& 87 

men, the commissioners were not able to commence work early in the spring. 
This has caused some delay in the early completion of the building, which 
it was hoped might be accomplished. 

The extreme wing on each side, and the rooms in the rear centre, have all 
received the first coat of plaster. The boilers for heating the hospital were 
placed in position early in the season ; but owing to the delay in delivering 
the main pipe and various fittings required, steam could not be generated, 
so as to warm those parts of the wards, under which some of the radiators 
had been placed. The desire of the commissioners has been that a large 
number of radiators might delivered at an early day, so that sufficient heat 
might be obtained for the extreme wings on each side and the rear centre, 
and for other parts of the hospital, so as to prevent injury from the cold. 

The large fans for the ventilation of the hospital, and the engines to drive 
the fans, have been placed in position. 

The brick arches, between the iron beams, have been placed in the greater 
part of the building. 

The gas pipe has also been placed in all parts of the building. It is 
earnestly desired, say the commissioners, that the radiators and heating 
fixtures may be promptly delivered, so that, by heating it, certain kinds of 
work may be carried forward during the winter. 

The laundry department has been prepared for the machinery, which, it 
is hoped, can be placed in it early in the spring. 

The kitchen is ready for the ranges and all the other fixtures which are 
needed for that department. 

The fixtures of the bake-house are also on hand, to be put in place at the 
proper time. 

All the doors for the rooms of the rear, centre, and the extreme wards, 
on each side, are made and ready to be hung. 

The reservoirs, for the supply of water to the hospital, have been built 
and properly finished. 

The gas-works will be arranged in the same building with the water-works. 

All the drain-pipe, from every part of the building, has been put in, and 
connected with the main sewer, and all the pipe for the conveyance of 
water to different parts of the hospital has also been placed where required. 

It was the hope of the commissioners to have had the hospital ready for 
the reception of patients in the month of October ; but, owing to the delays 
mentioned, it has been impossible for them to carry out their plans, but 
they now hope the means will be provided, so that they may have it in 
readiness for the reception of patients early in the coming summer. 

The superintendent of construction, under date of February 3, 1880, 
writes as follows : 

" In consequence of the State not furnishing the funds, the progress of 
the work has been much retarded. From January 1, 1879, to July 8, 1879, 
no money was received. From that date to February, 1880, we have re- 
ceived $77,200 for wages and materials, much of which was for material 



88 BoABD OP Public Charities. [No, 6 , 

purchased previously. We have paid bills and pay-rolls to the amount of 
$78,282 15, and at this date there are two months' wages due the men, and 
about $25,000 for material, and a balance due the Phoenix Iron Company 
for years. From this, you can perceive that the opening of this institution 
will not take place as early as was expected, nor will be finished for the 
amount of money that it should have been built for. I have to pay four 
times the cost of material that I paid six months since on some articles, 
and nearly all material. At this season I should know what I could do the 
next, but cannot rely on getting the funds. 

At this time the work cannot go on. Some of the best men are leav- 
ing, as they cannot afford to work without their pay. We have about 
thirt3'-five men employed, and are in a condition to employ one hundred 
and fifty. 

(Signed) John Sunderland, 

Superintendent, " 

» 

To M. H. Dickinson, 

President Board Public Charities. 

Htole HMpttol for the Ibmim Soath-eMteni Dtotrict of PeaaaylvABU, at Norrtotowa, 

July 22, 1879. Revisited with Commissioners Dickinson, Bullock, and 
Biddle. 

This hospital district is composed of the city and county of Philadel- 
phia, and the counties of Bucks, Montgomery, Delaware, Chester, North- 
ampton, and Lehigh. 

An act approved May 5, A. D. 1876, authorized the Governor to appoint 
ten commissioners to select a site and build a hospital for the care and 
treatment of the insane of the aforesaid district. 

Section two provides that said commissioners shaU adopt such plan for said 
hospital as shall involve an expenditure, exclusive of the land, not over 
eight hundred dollars per inmate, when completed and ready for occupancy. 

Section five of the act referred to ftirther authorizes the commissioners, 
with the advice and consent of the Governor and Board of Public Chari- 
ties, to fix salary of superintendent of construction, and of such other 
persons as they may think it necessary to employ ; and also provides " that 
the total expense of said buildings and grounds shall not exceed six hun- 
dred thousand dollars.'' 

Section six — ^to purchase the land and make necessary preparations for the 
erection of the buildings, the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars were ap- 
propriated. 

An act approved April 20, A. D. 1877, provides for an appropriation of 
five hundred and seventy-five thousahd dollars ($575,000) for the purchase 
of land, construction of buildings, and the payment of the necessary ex- 
penses incurred in carrying out the provisions of the act to select a site, 
and the erection of buildings, as cited in the first named act. 

An act approved June 11, A. D. 1879, appropriates $38,000 to furnish. 



LcQ. Dog.] Boabd of Public CHABinBa 81 

equip, and insure the State Hospital for the Southeastern District, and the 
fiirther sum of $30,000 for maintenance for the year 1880. 

The original plan provided for an administrative building, eight ward 
buildings, and two workshops,. Failing to obtain an additional appropriation 
at the last session of the Legislature, some changes and omissions have been 
made in it. Apprehending that the improvements could not be completed 
according to the plan which had been adopted, for the amount which was 
fixed in the act. as the limit of cost, it was intended to finish the eight ward 
buildings and the work-shops, and omit the central administrative building 
to some future time ; but upon fiirther consideration it was deemed best to 
dispense with ward building No. 1, for violent cases, and the two work- 
shops, and to construct the administrative building without expensive arch- 
itectural adornments, or unduly large or costly administrative accommo- 
dations. 

In order that no inconvenience may result fVom the omission to provide 
work shops, it is designed to convert some of the spacious apartments in 
the basements, of which there are many, into use for that purpose. These 
are largely above ground, and are sufficiently lighted to perform work of 
almost any kind. 

The omission of ward No. 1 fbr active cases is a matter of more serious 
importance, but is probably remedied by increasing the number of dormi- 
tories for the mild cases, so that a larger number of single rooms may be 
reserved for active or violent patients. The progress made in the erection 
of the different buildings at the time of the present inspection, was as fol- 
lows: 

Ward No. 1 — ,For active cases — omitted. 

Ward No. 2— Finished. 

Ward No. 3 — Far advanced towards completion. 

Ward No. 4 — Completed. • 

Ward No. 6 — Under roof. 

Ward No. 6 — Under roof, and floors laid. 

Ward No. 7. — Under roof; will be finished by September 1, 1819. 

Ward No. 8 — Two thirds up ; will be under roof soon. 

The engine and boiler-house has been completed. The laundry and re- 
ceiving room, for clothes, which are large and well arranged, are also com- 
pleted. 

An elevator for conveying clothes from the laundry on the first fioor to 
drying room on the second, is finished. The distributing-room, adjoining 
the drying-room, is finished. 

The ironing-room, well planned and arranged, is far advanced towards 
completion. Under the laundry, a work-shop fbr the engineer has been 
completed. 

The stack, 92 feet high, is considered well constructed. 

The arrangement for forced ventilation, as proposed in the plan which 
was adopted, is not to be carried out at present, which must also be con- 



40 Board op Public Chabitie& [No. 5, 

sidered an omission, though the ducts within the buildings have been com- 
pleted. It will, therefore, be necessary to depend very largely upon natural 
means for ventilation. 

The kitchen contains a bakery of large capacity. Store-rooms for vege- 
tables and provisions are fitted up adjoining it. A dining-room is fitted 
up in this part of the lower floor for employes. In the second story over 
the kitchen, apartments are arranged for sleeping-rooms for the employes. 

The basements in the ward buildings will be arranged for offices for the 
steward, attendants, and store and warerooms. 

A chapel, fifty-five by eight/-five feet, is also provided. The wards will 
be arranged with reception-rooms, offices, and for such other purposes as 
are usual in buildings of this kind. 

The attics in all the ward buildings are unfinished. They are neither 
floored nor plastered, and are to remain in this state till the}' be needed. 

The covered ways connecting the basements of the ward buildings are 
of brick, and remain in their rough state. It is intended to whitewash 
them, but the work is to be left for patients. 

The stair-cases at both ^ds of the ward buildings are fire-proof. 

The floors, doors, and window-frames are made of good yellow pine, and 
present a very fair appearance. The windows will have iron bars on the 
outside. Large transoms are placed over the doors ; small mouldings in- 
stead of wash-boards on the floors. The heat registers are placed near the 
ceiling, the ventilating registers near the floor. Open spaces at bottom of 
doors are left to assist ventilation — a very simple and economical arrange- 
ment, but one that may contribute somewhat to effect the object. 

There are four large dormitories and fourteen single rooms in each ward. 
The dormitories are twenty-flve by forty feet. Single rooms are eight by 
eleven feet. Ceilings twelve feet. 

Transverse sections are nineteen by twenty-flve feet. The transverse 
halls, with stairs for convenient access for officers at the centre. There are 
stair-cases at both ends for the inmates, which are four feet wide, and are 
fire-proof. 

The basements are from three to four feet under ground. The fioors are 
cemented. 

The foundation walls of the administration building were commenced, and 
nearly completed. 

The foregoing is a statement of the plan in which the hospital buildings 
are being erected, and the progress which has been made towards their 
completion, as they appeared to the members of the State Board, on the 
22d of July, 1879, the time of their inspection. 

In a communication addressed to the president of this Board, by H. M. 
Howe, treasurer, and W. H. Miller, chairman of the building committee, 
they report as follows : 

'' The seven ward buildings are nearly completed, there remaining to be 
done only some finishing up in carpenter work, oiling, slate finish, and 
general jobbing and cleaning up. 



Leo. Doc] Boa&d op Public Charities. 41 

" The administration building is under roof, plastered with two coats 
throughout, and nearly half of the white coat on. 

'^ In the supply buildings, three boilers are set, and the others partly so. 
The machinery is being put in place, there remaining to be done only some 
carpenter work, oiling, and finishing touches. 

" It is now simply a question of a few weeks getting the buildings com- 
pleted." 

(Signed,) H. M. Howe, 

Treasurer. 
W. H. Miller, 

Chairman Building Committee. 
January^ 1880. 

The total amount of expenditures to January 15, 1880, was $4t5,062 25. 
In addition to this sum, owing to the difficulty arising from the failure of 
prompt payments by the State, the commissioners issued obligations for 
$50,988 84, to insure an early completion of the buildings, the said obliga- 
tions to be paid from first moneys received from warrants issued by the 
State Treasurer. 

(For detailed financial statement, see Appendix.) 

Weitom P«nBiylT«nitt Hospital for the Insane, DIxmont, Allegheny Ooonty. 

Visited June 14, 18?9. Also, October 19 and 20, 1879, with Commis- 
sioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The wards of this institution are crowded beyond any former period. 
Six hundred and twenty patients are provided for at this time. The 
unusual number is to be ascribed to the fact that the Pittsburgh Home 
has found it necessary to transfer nearly all their insane during the period 
required for the new building, which is in course of erection at that place. 
When completed, the hospital will be relieved to the extent of one hundred 
and twenty-eight patients, many of whom will be transferred to the above 
named home. 

To provide the additional accommodations required, it has been found 
necessary to convert sitting-rooms into dormitories, and rooms, hitherto 
having but one bed, to have two and three. 

Notwithstanding this disturbance of the system of management usually 
pursued at this establishment, no marked change in the general order and 
condition throughout the various apartments was perceptible. A high 
standard of care continues to be maintained. By means of a well devised 
system of management, faithfully and diligently observed, and enforced by 
officers appointed to the several divisions, a successful administration, 
which is so difficult of attainment in institutions of this class, is rendered 
comparatively easy. 

The patients receive the usual care and attention, as is indicated by their 
appearance. Comfortably clad, cleanly in person and apparel, with every 
desirable comfort and convenience in the corridors and sleeping apartments, 
a large personal liberty in the wards and exercise grounds, a plentiful diet, 



43 BoABB OF Public Chabitibb. [No. 6 , 

and the constant presence and care of intelligent and well trained attend- 
ants, which never fail to be productive of the best results. 

The diet list is unusually liberal, both in meat, vegetables, and fruit. The 
meats are varied. Strawberries, raised upon the grounds, were seen upon 
their tables, with sugar and milk. Milk and tea are daily supplied. 

The medical care and treatment continues to be faithfully and diligently 
pursued. An additional medical assistant has been employed, a necessity 
which arises from the largely increased number of inmates. 

The revenues derived from the large number of inmates during the past 
year have been more than sufficient to pay the current expenses, so that no 
special inconvenience will be suffered from the loss of the appropriation 
for 1879-80. 

* By a statement of the treasurer, the receipts and expenditures are given 
as follows : 

To Balance, October 15, 1878, $15,966 6T 

Earnings of Hospital during the year, 107,442 48 

Balance due the Treasurer, 2,624 55 



$126,033 70 



CR. 

By warrants drawn by Executive Committee on Treasurer, 

for salaries and wages, $30,938 22 

General Expenses, * 75,449 04 

Permanent improvements, labor on grounds, grading, ex- 
cavating, etc., 19,590 60 

Outstanding warrants of last year, paid, 55 84 



$126,033 70 



No portion of the State appropriation approved May 16, 1878, has been 
paid during the fiscal year. 

It should be known that the money for a large portion of the expendi- 
tures on the various improvements which were made, was derived from 
other sources thin appropriations from the State. The State appropriated 
$30,000 for salaries, wages, and support of the hospital, and $1,000 for in- 
surance; total appropriation for 1878. The revenue derived from pay 
patients, and for the indigent class paid by counties, amounted to $107,- 
442 48. 

The improvements made to some extent, during the year, must have been 
with money received from these sources. The improvements consisted of 

the following : 

A boiler-house begun in the previous, completed in this year. 
The laundry altered and improved. 

*fV>r detailed statement, see Appendix. 



Leo. Doc] 



Board or Pubuo Cha&itie& 



43 



Machinery furnished for the laundry. 

Trenches deep and extensive, to drain the disturbed ground, a road 
through the adjacent farms towards the city, ditching, filling, water pipes, 
. culverts, foundations, &c., $19,590 60. 



Admlnlc 



id Dlachargea. 



Admission^s and Discharobs, 1878. 

1 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Namber in honne, September 30, 1878, 

Admitted from September SO, 1878, to September 80^ 1879, . 


332 
139 


267 
120 


699 
269 


l\)tal number under treatment 


471 


3»r 


868 









Average number during the year. 
Highest number during the year, . 
Lowest number during the year, . 



Total admission sinoe 1866, 
Discharged since 1866, . . 



Total nnmber in hospital at end of hospital year, 



844 
356 
328 



2,173 



266 
277 
250 



1,738 



609 
682 
578 



8,911 
3,802 



609 



UMplUl for Injured Peraoas of the AnthraciCe Goal Region. 

The counties included in this hospital district are Schuylkill, Carbon^ 
Dauphin, Northumberland, and Columbia. 

An act approved June 11, 1879, requires the Governor to appoint six 
commissioners to select a site and build a hospital for injured persons, to 
be located in the anthracite coal region embracing the counties above 
named. 

Section four of said act provides that the commissioners shall adopt such 
plan for said hospital as shall involve an expenditure, exclusive of the 
land, of not over sixty thousand dollars when completed : Provided^ That 
that the plan of the building shall be approved by the Board of Public 
Charities : And provided farther^ That the land before provided for shall 
be donated. 

Section nine provides that the hospital shall be specially devoted to the re- 
ception, care and treatment of injured persons, and that, in the order of 
admission, the indigent class shall have precedence over paying patients. 

After a thorough examination of numerous localities in the counties 
composing the hospital district, the commissioners selected a site near 
Ashland, in Schuylkill county, an ample quantity of land having been do- 
nated for the purpose. An architect has been appointed for the purpose 
of preparing the drawings of a plan for the building, with a view to an 
early commencement of the work. 

Western Reform Sehool, M^rfanso. 

October 22, 1879, with Commissioners Dickinson, Bakewell, and Biddle. 
A brief sketch of the later history of this institution, its aims and 



44 Board of Public Chabitieb. [No. 5 , 

methods of management seems to be required at this time. The object in 
the institution is to arrest youth in the commencement of their criminal 
course. The juvenile offender is taken away from the sphere where he 
moves only to corrupt and be corrupted, and placed where he will be sub- 
jected to different treatment and training, where demoralization is more 
carefully guarded against and where such principles and habits are sought 
to be established as will tend to make him an honest and valuable member 
of society. Its aims are noble and >wrorthy of support from all good men. 

After the removal of the school to its present location, a change in the 
system of care and treatment was commenced. It was supposed that the 
object and intent of the work could be more successfully prosecuted by 
establishing separate family homes for the children committed to their care ; 
that a thorough classification might be more faithfully created and per- 
fected, and the management, discipline, and education of the inmates con- 
ducted more in accordance with domestic home training. In pursuance of 
this plan, the children were to be divided into families of fifty each. The 
families are to occupy a separate house with separate ofllcers. Every fam- 
ily building is to have a separate dormitory, school-room, dining-room, and 
play ground. Buildings have accordingly been erected and properly ar- 
ranged, and have been occupied since the removal. There are four family 
buildings for boys and one for girls, and one central administrative build- 
ing. 

The change from cell separation to open dormitories, from seclusion after 
the hours of labor, and the meals, (which were taken in a common dining- 
room,) to association in the dormitory and school-room, dining-room, and 
play ground, was very great, and the result of the experiment was anxi- 
ously looked for. 

With this brief outline of its origin, it becomes important that the re- 
sult of the experiment, so far as it has been made, should be accurately 
known. The institution conducted upon this plan at Lancaster, Ohio, from 
what we can learn of it, is entirely successful ; the only difference in the 
plans of the two schools being that boys only are admitted in the Ohio 

school. 

A strong and abiding confidence in the correctness of the system is en- 
tertained by the gentlemen connected with the management of the Morganza 
school, and little or no doubt is felt that it can be successfully conducted. 

It is not to be denied, however, that the plan of the organization in sev- 
eral respects is defective, and some errors which ma^^ readily be corrected, 
interfere with efladent care and management. One of these consists in the 
attempt to include both sexes in the benefit of its reformatory work. So 
far the necessary sexual separateness under this plan has been found to 
be not only diflacult but impracticable, and the remedy for this is not to 
admit both, but, if the act of Assembly requires it, to receive females in a 
building to be rented for the purpose in some other locality, distant from 
Morganza. 



Lbo. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 45 

The large building now occupied by the girls, about forty-one in number, 
(which is the uniform annual proportion,) with its dormitories having a 
capacity for one hundred beds, kitchen, laundry, store and ware-houses, 
and corps of teachers, may be converted into a home for boys, and the girls 
may then be cared for in a rented house, at much less expense and with 
much better prospects for successful training. 

Nor have the benefits derived from a regular system of employment been 
realized. Much of the work of the farm is not adapted to half grown boys. 
Roads and ornamental work on the lawns is the work at which they have 
been mostly engaged. The heavy work of the farm is performed by hired 
men. Five are engaged for the purpose. 

Nor have any satisfactory evidences been presented that reformatory 
measures and influences have as yet resulted in any marked benefits. The 
necessary safeguards to prevent the evil consequences which are so apt to 
occur from congregating fifty vicious and corrupt boys in open dormitories, 
have not, it is to be apprehended, been provided, and little or no success 
in this direction, from what we can learn, has been attained. 

DifTiculties of this kind may occur from the want of supervision, and 
possibly from a defective system of management. The former must not 
only be vigilant, but be accompanied with the strength imparted by au- 
thority to act, and with adequate police arrangements. 

I have no wish to reflect injuriously upon the enterprise now under notice, 
and am by no means prepared to subscribe to the opinion which is fre- 
quentlj' expressed, that the only benefit which has been realized from it, is 
the school instruction, and that beyond that, no such advantages are to be 
expected from it as to justify the large expenditures which have been made 
to establish it. On the other hand, I am inclined to believe that much of 
the disappointment experienced thus far, may be attributed to causes already 
glanced at, and to the injury which never fails to occur from association in 
utter idleness at all hours of the day and night. The remiedies for these 
are both simple and practicable — a well regulated system of remunerative 
labor and proper limits and guardianship over the unrestricted intercourse 
indulged in by the boys in the buildings and in the grounds. 

The tailor and shoe shops might be enlarged with small expense, so that 
instead of only eight or ten boys being employed at those trades, there 
might be many thus engaged, so that all the shoes and clothing for the in- 
mates might be made by them. 

It is too late to regret that an institution that requires so much supervi- 
sion as this, should be located in a neighborhood so distant from the city 
of Pittsburgh where a majority of the managers reside. The site is, in all 
respects, an admirable one, but the school may suffer from the want of care- 
ful supervision on the part of those who are appointed to act as its guar- 
dians, in consequence of its remoteness from the larger centres of popula- 
tion. 



46 Board of Public Chabitibb. [No. 5, 

The number of inmates September 30, 18T9, was 812; or 2T1 boys, 41 
girla ; 41 were colored. 

The following is a statement of assets and liabilities as reported to this 
Board : 

Pbnnbtlvania Reform School, 
Pittsburgh, September SOj 1879. 

STATEMSNT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES. 

Real estate at Morganza, 503 acres, cost $88,621 20 

Buildings and improvements, 434,439 32 

Balance of State appropriation uncollected, 252,664 72 

Accounts due the school, T,317 78 

Western State penitentiary, 19,000 00 

Cash in hand of treasurer, 5 , 934 27 

$807,977 29 

LIABIUTIES. 

Mortgage debt falls due Julj 1,1880, $60,000 00 

Bonded debt due August 1, 1878, 30,00000 

Bondeddebt due February 1, 1879, 26,000 00 

Bonded debt due August 1, 1879, 10,000 00 

Bonded debt falls due February 1, lb80, 9,000 00 

Bondeddebt falls due May 1, 1885, 45,000 00 

Accounts payable, 4,110 03 

Bills payable, (time accounts,) 92,000 00 

Balance of assets over liabilities, 531,467 26 

$807,577 29 



LxQ. Doo.] Board of Publio Charxtibs. 4T 



INSTITUTIONS NOT UNDER STATE CONTROL. 



For the sapport and care of the defective and delinquent classes. State 
aid extended to the indigent class. 

These consist of the institutions for the blind, deaf and dumb, feeble 
minded children, and the House of Refuge at Philadelphia. 

Hoiue of Refuge, Philadelphia. 

June 26, 1879, visited, with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The population of this reformatory at the time of the inspection was 
264 boys and 86 girls in the white, and 138 boys and 60 girls in the col- 
ored department ; a total of 548, which is a decrease of ten on the previous 
inspection. 

The industries of the House of Refuge, which are largely relied on for 
the success of the reformatory work, are being actively pursued. Two 
hundred and forty-eight boys were eniployed in the brush, hosiery, wicker- 
work, chair seats, and pocket-book shops. As an incentive to industry, 
ten cents on every dollar is allowed. The labor of the boys is let to a con- 
tractor at twenty cents a day. For* the boys in the pocket-book depart- 
ment the contractor pays thirteen cents a day. 

The smaller boys sleep in open dormitories. Iron bedsteads j with com- 
fortable beds, are provided. The larger boys are lodged in cell blocks. 
The block contains sixty cells in the two tiers. The doors to these cells 
are not locked, which is a change on what was the usage formerly. They 
are under the care of a watchman at night. 

Another cell block for older boys contains four tiers, and has sixty-nine 
cells. The doors in this section are locked at night. 

The business departments receive much attention, and have been much 
improved. A reduction in the cost for clothing has been effected — from 
$5,000 to $2,500. A suit is given to each boy when he is discharged. 

A perfect system for conducting the store, containing supplies of all 
kinds, in the basement is established, which gives entire satisfaction to the 
managers. 

A similar system is observed in the girls* department — open dormitories 
for the younger girls, cell blocks for the larger ones. These apai-tments 
are comfortably furnished. 

The girls assist in making the clothing for the institution, and in house 
work. A large number are engaged in knitting stockings. 

The colored department is also admirably organized, and successfully 
conducted. 

The labor of the boys is also let to a contractor — some by the piece, and 



48 Board of Public CHABinsa [No. 5, 

some at seventeen cents a day. The girls are engaged in household work, 
and in the sewing-room, with the sewing-machine, on tailor work. Little 
difficulty is experienced in getting places for girls. 

The household condition is kept up to an excellent standard, and the 
management generally is commendable. 

A comfortable infirmary is provided. Well-arranged school-rooms are 
found in both departments. 

The chapel is well furnished and arranged. Services are conducted reg- 
ularly every Sabbath. 

Libraries, with a good supply of books, are provided. Evening enter- 
tainments are frequently given. 

The officers of this institution are harmoniously at work in every good 
endeavor to promote the physical, mental, and moral welfare of the children 
committed to their care. 



July 28, 1879. Tisited with Commissioners Dickinson, Bullock, and 
Biddle. 

The valuable service in behalf of a very severely afflicted class, rendered 
at this institute, grows larger, and with the benefits derived from experience 
in the use of its methods for their care and instruction, its usefulness be- 
comes more and more apparent. 

The system of care is especially kind and considerate. Benefits and im- 
provement of a very marked kind are realized. The constant presence 
and unremitting attention of intelligent and well-trained lady attendants 
contribute largely towards a successful administration. 

Much has been done in this country, as well as in Europe, to improve 
the condition of this class of unfortunates. To what extent the means which 
have been made use of to correct deformities by overcoming irregularities 
in the action of the muscular system, how undue action in the one is checked 
by exciting the antagonizing power of another, and how dormant mental 
faculties may be developed by appropriate modes of teaching, how articu- 
lation and utterance are improved, how unbroken gloom and wretchedness 
are dispelled for comparative content and happiness, can only be properly 
appreciated by personal observation. 

Some additional improvements have been made, with a view to better 
care of the children and still greater success in the training of the habits 
of the pupils. 

The intention to provide accommodations for asylum cases has been post- 
poned, on account of the refusal of the last Legislature to grant twent3'-five 
thousand dollars towards a building for the purpose. 

It is feared that the benevolence which dictates this measure is not fully 
understood. It may be sufficiently explained, by stating briefly, that it is 
designed for a class of feeble minded, whose condition is of so low a grade 
as to admit of no improvement, and who after the expiration of the terms 



Leo. Doc] Board of Public Chakities. 49 

iSt which they have been received must be returned to friends or guardi- 
ans. It frequently happens, on account of removals by death or otherwise, 
that there are no friends or guardians to whose care they can be committed, 
and must therefore be transferred to the overseera of the poor districts of 
which they are residents. No adequate provision is made for them in the 
county alms-houses. Almost universally they deteriorate rapidly and sink 
into the lowest forms of mere animal life. This is a wrong and a hardship 
which demand prompt attention. No stronger claim upon private or public 
benevolence can be presented. 

fosiitaltoii for the Deftf aad Dumb, Phil Adel phi*. 

Visited by Messrs. Dickinson, Biddle, and Luther, December lY, 1819, 
and by Messrs. Dickinson and Biddle, January 28, 1880. 

This institution was found in very good order, and in one respect has 
undergone a great improvement since last year. The whole building is 
now heated by steam, and in place of forty-four fires there are but tliree in 
the house. The apparatus thus far has worked successfully, and in the 
laundry alone has made a saving of $750 a year in wages. 

There are 176 male and 143 female pupils, 3 of whom are colored ; male 
teachers, 12, female teachers, 7. Of these, one male and two female teach- 
ers are deaf mutes. The literary branches are the same as in former years, 
the classes being arranged so as to number about twenty each. A large 
discretion seems to be allowed to the teachers in the adoption of different 
methods of instruction. These, however, it is presumed, are all subject to 
the approval of the principal. Articulation continues to receive increased 
attention, as many as seventy pupils being now under instruction. The 
Commissioners were much interested in the teachmg of a class in this 
branch by Miss Garrett. 

Thirty-two boys are engaged in shoe making, and supply all the boys' 
shoes required by the institution. The same number of boys are taught 
tailoring. It is deemed one of the principles of the system adopted here 
that the teaching of trades is entirely a secondary and subsidiary consid- 
eration, and that the intellectual training is the chief aim of the institution. 
The reason given for this is that deaf mutes may readily acquire trades in 
the ordinary way after leaving the school, since they are not (like the 
blind, for instance,) disqualified from entering the various workshops, but 
may be there instructed like other yoimg people. 

A class in lithography promises remarkably well, one or two of the pu- 
pils exhibiting decided ability. 

There is no punishment by confinement in cells ; but flogging is allowed 
to be inflicted by the principal or by his order. 

The dormitories are in good condition and fairly ventilated. The open- 
ings for this purpose are not, however, kept in good working order, and 
their use, perhaps, is not fully understood. In the class rooms the win- 
dows were generally open for ventilation. This in mid-winter indicates 
some error in the system or some misunderstanding of it. 
4 B. P. Chae. 



50 Board of Public CHARiTiEa [No. 5, 

The wash-room of the boys is susceptible of considerable improvemem, 
and the water closet, or rather the privy, of the boys, needs an entire re- 
arrangement. 

During the last year it was discovered that in the two new extensions of 
the building the roofs have, in some way, been improperly framed, or im- 
properly connected with the walls. These last, in consequence, had begun 
to spread outwards, threatening serious disaster to the building and danger 
to the inmates. An arrangement of iron braces and clamps has been ap- 
plied to obviate this defect, and it is hoped that it may prove effective. 

By an unfortunate error of some kind, the act of Assembly making an 
appropriation for this institution for the two years ending March 1, 1881, 
was not perfected. This has caused serious embarrassment to the finances, 
and has necessitated the borrowing of mone^' to carry on the school. In 
fact, the managers have deemed it necessary to solicit funds from the ben- 
evolent by a circular appeal. 

It is a serious reflection upon our Commonwealth that for two years it 
is expected that the pupils of the State shall be educated without one dol- 
lar of contribution from her treasur}'. It cannot be doubted, however, 
that at as early a day as possible the proper appropriation will be made, 
and the loss of interest be restored by the Legislature. 

Weslem PeuaylvaBla Inadtntloii for the InvtrncClon ol the Deaf and Dumb, 

Visited October 25, 1879, with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The buildings now occupied for this school are located at Turtle creek 
station, on the Pennsylvania railroad, about twelve miles east of Pittsburgh. 

The property, which has been rented for one year with the privilege of 
five, consists of thirty-seven acres of land, and twt) ordinary dwelling-honses 
immediately adjoining each other ; one is a two-story brick, and the other 
a two-story frame. These buildings are supposed to have accommodations 
for one himdred pupils. 

A careful examination of the reports of the institution shows a large in- 
crease in the attendance. During the year ending July 1, 18T8, seventy- 
seven children were received ; forty-five boys and thirty-two girls. There 
was an average attendance of sixty-eight pupils, being an increase of seventy 
per centum over the preceding year. The children were from thirteen 
different counties. For the current year, there has been an enrollment of 
ninety-seven pupils, eighty four of whom represent fifteen different coun- 
ties. At the date of our official visit, the number who had applied for ad- 
mission, was one hundred and five, including those then present. Of these, 
about ninety-five were expected to become annual pupils. 

The administration of the affairs of the institution are under the imme- 
diate supervision of the executive committee of the board. John H. Logan, 
the acting principal, and Mrs. Logan, the matron, reside in the brick dwell- 
ing, and, with the assistant matron and instructors, are active and earnest 
in the duties of instruction and the general care over every thing connected 
with the comfort and welfare of the inmates. 



Lxo. Doo.] Board op Public Chartties. 51 

^ John G. Brown, D. D., is the president of the institution. From the 
very beginning he has taken a deep interest in the school and its work. It 
is to his steady and persistent efforts that this good work is very largely 
indebted for its success. He has labored on for years amidst discourage, 
ments and trials, asking and receiving no compensation. 

Thus far, the institution has been conducted under very serious disad- 
vantages. The building accommodations are by no means what they should 
be. To provide for the wants of the constantly increasing number of ap- 
plicants, it has become necessary that measures be taken for the erection 
of suitable buildings. A first step- for this purpose has been taken. Mr. 
James Kelly, of Wilkins township, generously donated ten acres of valu- 
able land, and subscriptions to the amount of $21,800 have been obtained 
towards the erection of buildings. It is hoped that efforts to obtain addi- 
tional contributions will be made, so that the highest standard of efficiency 
and usefulness may be attained. 

The State appropriates a certain per capita rate for the tuition and main- 
tenance of indigent pupils. 

, At present there are six classes having an average of fourteen pupils to 
each. The actual number in each class ranges f^om ten to sixteen. Owing 
to the great amount of individual attention required by the deaf and dumb, 
it is undesirable, says the principal, to have more than ten to twelve in any 
one class. Much better results are secured with small classes than with 
large. 

The working of the institution is satisfactory. The instruction of the 
pupils has been thorough, and their industry and progress, commendable. 

The ordinary methods are employed. Some of the pupils have been 
taught in vocal utterance, with encouraging results. 

InMtlalloii for th« iBstruetloii of the Ullnd, Philadelphia. 

Visited December 11, 1879, with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The general condition of the house at the time of our visit was, in the 
main, satisfactory. The corridors of the new addition on the male side 
were, however, very untidy, nor was it possible, except at the cost of much 
time, to examine all the rooms of this wing, for the reason that they 
seemed closed to the principal himself. The grounds attached to the in- 
stitution used for exercise by the pupils were in an entirely neglected and 
unsightly condition. 

The method of instruction, and the branches taught, are the same as those 
given in former reports. We must again emphasize the importance of a 
subject referred to last year, namely, the disadvantage of employing too 
large a number of blind persons as teachers of the blind. It would seem 
that the employment of blind persons as monitors is even more objec- 
tionable. It cannot be doubted that the pupils here are not sufficiently 
under the observation of seeing teachers and monitors. It is impossible 
that discipline and good order can be properly maintained by officers who 
lack the sense of sight. 



5^ 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



The reports of the institntion are defective, so fer as the proper exhibit 
of the number of pupils is concerned. The custom is to report in tabular 
form the number of inmates^ including those engaged in teaching. From 
a report to this Board we find it stated that on October 1, 1878, there were 
supported by the " institution and services rendered as instructors," thirty- 
nine blind persons. The number on September 30, 1879, is given as twenty- 
seven. Perhaps the form of statement used was meant to include those 
supported in the '* Home " department. 

An exaniination, however, of the last printed report shows that (28) 
twenty-eight blind teachers and monitors were employed, exclusive of the 
home inmates ; and in point of fact it may be said that there are no seeing 
monitors^ male or female^ in an institution where both sexes of pupils are 
under one roof, and ought to be constantly under supervision. 

The delay in the payment of the State appropriation has caused great 
inconvenience to the institution, and has involved the necessity of using 
more than $20,000 of invested funds, which must eventually be replaced. 

A proper exhibit is lacking from this institution of the expenditure of 
the special appropriation of $6,000 by the act of Assembly of May 13, 
1876, for fire escapes, gymnasium, and some increase of teaching appli- 
ances. It is made the duty of this Board to make inquiry as to the ex- 
penditure of such appropriations. We are informed by the principal, 
verbally, that $800 or $900 of this fund is still in hand, no gymnasium 
having been built. We have, however, no reply to our written request for 
information from the board of managers. 



Leq. Doa] Board of Public Charities. 58 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS ORGANIZED BY 
ASSOCIATIONS OR INDIVIDUALS, MAINLY 
SUPPORTED BY CONTRIBUTIONS OBTAINED 
BY THEIR EFFORTS. 



WIlkM-Barrd HonpiUl. 

September 19, 1879. Visited with Doctor Mayer and Mr. Biddle. 

A large amount of valuable service is performed. The medical and sur- 
gical wards are spacious and well arranged, and have a capacity for a con- 
siderable number of patients. The furniture, appliances, instruments, 
and general equipment are of the most approved kind. The number 
of patients treated in the institution is increasing, whilst the dispens- 
ary service forms a large and constantly augmenting part of the benevo- 
lent work in which the citizens connected with its management are en- 
gaged. First male ward, with fourteen beds, had eleven occupied. The 
female ward on the opposite side not in use at present time. A female 
ward on the second story, with nine beds, some of which were occupied. 
There are twenty-six patients i» all at this time. The dispensary service 
amounts to from forty to fifty per month. Medical service and medicine 
are supplied gratuitously. The central ward for men had three cases of 
typhoid fever under treatment. A lying-in ward and children's ward were 
on the second floor. 

The demands upon the institution have been steadily on the increase, as 
the following statement will show : 
Patients admitted from October, 1872 to January 1, 1873, ... 25 

Patients for the year 1873, 73 

Patients for the year 1874, .' . . 103 

Patients for the year 1876, 116 

Patients for the year 1876, 176 

Patients for the year 1877, (no report), 

The annual expenditures for the support of the hospital are about $6,300. 
Nearly one half of this sum has been received from private contributors^ 
pay patients ; and the remainder from State appropriations. 

The State has always manifested its appreciation of its service by grant- 
ing it liberal aid. In 1874, it appropriated $5,000 ; in 1876, $25,000, to aid 
in the erection of a building; $10,000 in 1878 ; and $10,000 in 1879. 

LftCliawaDBa Hospital, Srranton. 

September 14, 1879. 

This hospital was established in 1872. A large amount of service has 
been rendered through its agency for the benefit of those who required assist- 
ance and support. 



5i BoABD OP Public Charities. [No. 5, 

Its benevolent work, as appears from the records of the institution, is 
steadily growing in extent and efficiency. A comparative statement of its 
operations from 1815 to 1878 shows the following : 

In patients — Surgical cases in I8Tf», . 43 ' 

Medical cases in 1876, 42 

Out patients — Medical cases in 1875, 480 

Total, 665 

In patients — Surgical cases in 18761,, 77 

Medical cases in 1876, 84 

Out patients — In 1876, 635 

Total, 642 

In patients — Surgical cases in 1877, 42 

Medical cases in 1877, 47 

Outpatients — Medical cases in 1877, 621 

Total, . . . 710 

In patients — Surgical, 1878, 62 

Out patients — Medical, 82 

Dispensary patients treated and furnished with medicines free 

of charge during the year, 2,185 

Total, 2,329 

Patients remaining in hospital April 1, 1878, 12 

Patients admitted during year ending April 1, 1878, .... 138 

Patients treated during the year, 150 

Patients discharged during the yoar, 144 

Patients remaining April 1, 1878, 6 

150 

A synopsis of the treasurer's report shows that the current expenses 
amount to about $6,000 per annum. About one half of this sum has been 
received from poor districts for pay patients, sundry pay patients, private 
contributors, and the other half from the State. 

Liberal appropriations have been made by the Legislature for its aid and 
support, having granted $10,000 for 1873, 1874, 1876, 1878, each year. 

Harrlsbarg HMpital. 

September 2, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

Valuable service continues to be rendered at this institution. Its bene- 
fits extend to all classes of unfortunates. Its operations are in no sense 
local. Its doors are open for all who need assistance, without regard to 
race, creed, or aativity. 



Leg. Doc.] Boabd op Public Charities. 55 

Since August 5, 1873, to February 9, 1879, seven hundred and eighty- 
one patients (781) were submitted to treatment on regular applications, of 
which to the last named date 773 were discharged, leaving eight patients 
in the hospital. 

Of the localities from which these patients came, only 115 were from 
Dauphin county, 257 were from twenty-eight other counties in the State, 
168 from other States, from foreign countries 248, three imknown nativity. 
It is obvious that the benefits of this charity are more general and wide 
spread than is usual. It is founded on a basis of broad humanity and is 
conducted in a spirit of liberality that will compare favorably with others. 

Its service is increasing and though the house accommodations are of 
considerable extent, some enlargement is needed to be able to provide for 
the relief of all who apply for admission. The number of medical and sur- 
gical cases in so central a point, intersected by so many railroads, must, 
of course, be numerous. 

It receives support from directors of the poor under a contract ; from 
pay patients, beds maintained by several corporations, but principally from 
private contributors. 

It is an enterprise that deserves support. 

Twelfllh Ward HospiUil or the General Hospital In PittobarKh. 

October 21, 1879, visited, with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The records of this charity show that a large service in behalf of the 
sick, injured, and helpless has been rendered during the year ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1879. 

Patients in the hospital September 30, 1878, 106; since admitted, 636, 
making the number under treatment during the year 742. Of these, 637 
were discharged. Remaining in the hospital September 30, 1879, 105. 

This hospital is arranged in the best manner, and is thoroughly furnished 
and equipped. All the wards, medical and surgical ; the bath ; and closet 
apartments all, are in good order and condition. The heating, ventilating, 
and water supply arrangements are of the best kind. 

The arrangement of the building is exceedingly well adapted to the pur- 
pose to which it is applied. 

It is well conducted, and is kept in excellent order. 

It has the benefit of an endowment of $200,383 71. The earnings of the 
hospital for the year from pay patients was $3,445 98. The income from 
its investments must be about $14,000. The State appropriation of $15,000, 
made b}^ the session of 1877, for repairs, has been fully paid. 



\ 



56 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



COUNTY ALMS-HOUSKS, JAILS, AND CORREC- 
TIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 



The system of management in the county alms-houses is undergoing 
changes and steady improvement. The confinement and mechanical re- 
straint of the chronic insane, in a great measure, are discontinued. More 
attention is paid to the importance of classifying the inmates. So far as 
house accommodations will admit, children are kept more separate, and 
adult inmates are distributed with greater regard to considerations of per- 
sonal and mental comfort. The constant association of the worthy poor 
with the immoral and profane receives attention, and is guarded against as 
far as is possible. 

Employment of a light and useful kind in the house, the gardens, and 
fields, is much more enjoined. Very many of the inmates, though incapa- 
ble of continuous labor, are thus made to contribute, in some degree, to- 
wards the cost of their own support. 

Little if anything can be said favorably of the jail system of the State. 
In twenty-two counties prisons of modern approved plans have been erected, 
adapted in every respect to carry out a proper system of prison discipline. 
Some of these are well conducted. Convicts are separately confined. In- 
dustries have been established. In a few instances the work is con- 
conducted separately, though generally it is in association — ^that is to say, 
two or more convicts are employed in the larger cells, and sometimes more 
in a large room designed for the purpose. Thorough discipline is enforced 
in some, but by no means in all. 

In man}' other counties the imperfect old structures continue in use. 
Little or no improvement has been made in the manner of conducting these. 
Prisoners of all classes associate promiscuously in all the apartments. No 
attempt is made to remedy these evils, because the prisons do not admit of 
executing the appropriate discipline. It is true that these jails are used 
mainly for the detention of the untried. In twenty of the counties having 
jails of this kind, the practice is to commit the short term convicts to the 
Allegheny county work-house, and those of longer terms to the Western 
Penitentiary. In this respect the jail S5\stem of the western part of the 
State is peculiar, and probably accounts for their patient endurance of the 
present jail buildings ; the idea being that they are good enough for lock- 
up purposes. 

ADAMH COUNTY. 
JaII. 

September 4, 1819, with Commissioner Biddle. 

This jail presents a favorable appearance, and for one of its class is well 
conducted. The average number of prisoners being small, it is not to be 



Leo. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 67 

expected that employment of a remunerative kind can be established, nor 
can a regular system of prison discipline be enforced. 

It contained seven short-term prisoners at the time of our visit. There 
are thirteen cells. The jail is in a good condition, and is kept in good 
order. 

The benefit of religious instruction continues to be given by Miss Harper, 
on the Sabbath day. 

Poor-Hoiup. 

September 4, 1879, with Commissioner Biddle. 

An improvement has been made from which much benefit has been de- 
rived. It consists in the new building which has been erected for the in- 
sane, by which the over crowded condition of the main house has been 
much relieved, and better care of the insane been rendered practicable. 

A commodious and well-arranged building has been put up at a short 
distance from the poor-house proper, in which suitable accommodations are 
provided for the proper care and treatment of that afflicted class, and by 
which their sad condition has been much ameliorated. Several of the num- 
ber who were supposed to be violent and dangerous, and who for years were 
strictly confined, are now in the enjoyment of a large personal liberty in 
the building and grounds enclosed for their benefit, and are so improved 
in appearance as to make recognition difficult. They were formerly caged 
in very small outside cells, as if they were dangerous — ^a mistaken idea so 
frequently entertained of the insane — but under better systems of care are 
always shown to be entirely passive and harmless. 

There are thirty apartments in this hospital, besides a dining and sitting- 
room at the end of the hall. It has the bath, wash-stands, and the water- 
closet conveniences, and is heated from the cellar. 

The benefit of a lady attendant, the daughter of the steward, is given to 
it, under whose active and dilligent care the house and its occupants are 
kept in most excellent order. 

By these additional accommodations, the old building is sufficiently re- 
lieved to afford ample accommodations for other classes of inmates, and 
especially for those capable of rendering assistance in the general house- 
hold and farm work. 

The sick, infirm, disabled, and women with children, continue to be cared 
for in the infirmary, in which good order is preserved and the utmost at- 
tention and care are bestowed. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 1879, 65; of whom 21 are insane, 4 
idiotic, 2 blind, 1 deaf and dumb: 6 are children; 26 are hospital cases. 
Eighteen men and women assist in the work of the house and farm. 

ALLEOIIBIVY COUIVTY. 
Jail. 

October 18, 187*', visited with Commissioner Dickinson. 
The number of prisoners confined in this jail on Septeml)er 30, 1878, was 
147. On the 18th October, 1879, there were 94. Fourteen of the latter 



68 Board op Public Gharitie& [No. 5, 

were females. Sixty-two of the entire number were charged with criminal 
offenses ; many for disorderly conduct. Some had been tried and w^ere 
serving out short sentences. This class are confined in cells. The imtried 
congregate in the corridor, and occupy cells, generally, two in each. 

The opposite side of the prison is divided into two apartments, one for 
vagrants, one for criminal cases. 

The jail presents a much better appearance than when last visited. Several 
coats of paint have improved it. The general condition is much better. All 
the cells are iron clad. Those on the second tier are well lighted, and from 
being less occupied, are kept in the better order. The lower cells are small 
and dark. 

The practice in this county is, to commit convicts almost entirely to the 
penitentiary and the work-house. Without these advantages, it is not to be 
supposed, for a moment, that the citizens of this county would tolerate the 
continued use of a building so inconvenient uncomfortable, and so unfavor- 
able to a good sanitary condition. 

Allegheny CJoanty Home. 

October 23, 18T9, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The improvements commenced last summer have been completed, by which 
additional room has been gained in the front main building. A laundry 
and wash-house with the requisite conveniences, which were much needed, 
have also been provided. The engine and boiler-house are nearly completed. 

This homelike looking building has received the benefit of *' much new 
work and repairs." Changes have been made in its internal arrangement 
from which decided benefits have been derived. To relieve the crowded 
condition of the male hospital department, an additional ward for convales- 
cents has been prepared. 

The dormitories are light and spacious and comfortably furnished. The 
aged and infirm receive the utmost care and attention. The children are 
carefully dealt with ; they are kept separate to a large extent, have a dining- 
room of their own, and receive instruction daily in a school kept for the 
purpose. • 

The home is kept in good order, and the care and attention exercised 
over the different classes of inmates by the steward and his family, resem- 
bles that of heads of families over their own households. During the dinner 
hour, 34 children were seated at their table, under the care of attendants ; 
32 women at theirs. 

The entire pauper population of the house is 2T0, viz : 159 males, 58 
females, 40 boys, 13 girls. Besides these, 81 insane are supported at Dix- 
mont hospital, the board of managers entertaining the opinion " that if 
there is any likelihood of a cure or even a betterment in their condition, 
that is the place for the purpose, it having all the accommodations and ap- 
pliances for their treatment which an alms-house has not." But the benevo- 
lent work performed at this institution does not stop here, at least $3,000 
are appropriated towards the relief of out door paupers in actual distress. 



Lbg. Dcic.] BoABD OF Ptjbuc Chabities. 59 

The affairs of the institution are carefully and eeonomieally managed ; 
the farm is made productive with the labor of inmates. The whole amoimt 
of net expenditure for the year ending December 31, 1878, was $18,449 83 ; 
the cost per year, was $tO 42 ; cost per week, $1 35^; per day, 19^ cents. 

The poor tax levied for the year 18 TO, was three fourths of one mill. 

Allrg^heny City Hone. 

October 24, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The number of inmates remaining in this home December 26, 1877, was 
222 ; number admitted since, was 386 ; total admissions during the year, 
608. Number for year ending December, 1878, was 260, of whom 67 were 
in the insane department. The average number supported during that year, 
was 237^; average yearly cost per inmate, $88 32 ; average weekly cost, 
$1 67. The increase in cost, per capita, compared with 1877, was occasioned 
by loss of crop, by flood, purchase of additional stock, &c. 

The accident referred to, doubtless explains, in part, why the cost, per 
capita, is not lower, because, with the extent to which the labor of the in- 
mates is utilized at this establishment, and the very admirable system of 
management which is carried out, a lower rate might reasonably be expected. 
A more satisfactory explanation is found, there is reason to believe, in the 
higher standard of care upon which the institution is conducted. A refer- 
ence to the reports of the managers, shows that the insane are retained, to 
a large extent, and placed under the care of trained attendants, who are 
paid, one for male and one for female departments, at salaries of $480 each. 

Under a sense of what is due to friendless and children, $1,715 08, or 
more, is paid for boarding them in the Home of the Friendless Orphan Asy- 
lum and Pennsylvania Training School. Three children are at the soldiers' 
orphan school at Dunbar Camp, near Uniontown,at $150 per year, and $115 
for each of the other two. Sixteen insane are at Dixmont, but part of this 
item of expense is returned. For farm implements and farm stock, an ex- 
penditure of over $7,000 was made, &c. The expenditure for out-door re- 
4ief was $7,688 44. 

During the year, many valuable improvements and repairs in the home 
and on the farm have been made with the labor of the inmates. A new 
bam was commenced, and will be completed this season. The stone-work 
and all the work has been done by the inmates. Much labor has also been 
expended upon the farm. Drains and sewers, with a large amount of stone 
under-drains, have been made, by which mucn land that was worthless has 
been reclaimed. Tramp labor has also been made useflil. Over ten acres 
of woodland have been cleared, mostly by tramps. The tramps assisted 
during the year 1878 were 783. They worked 2,500 hours, reduced to days 
259. " Every vagrant that applies for aid at the home is compelled to labor 
for the same, cutting wood or breaking stone two hours for a meal, four 
hours for supper and lodgings and breakfast. Previous to the adoption of 
this labor test, which is the only true way to solve the tramp problem, they 
had ten to fifteen, often twenty-five, and on several occasions as many as 



BO Board op Public Charities. [No. 5, 

Beventy-five to stop over night. They now have only three and a half on an 
average per night." 

The success with which thi« home is conducted is maintained. The ad- 
ministrative apartments are in perfect order. The medical and insane wards 
are in excellent condition. The patients themselves are clean, well clad, 
and receive excellent care. The neatly-fumished chapel, the library, and 
comfortable reading-room must not be forgotten. Fortunate, indeed, is 
that man or that woman, when overtaken by misfortune, if he or she is sub- 
jected to the necessity of resorting to the poor-house, can find their way 
into one like this, in which so much is done for their comfort and welfare. 

PlCtoborgh City Farm, for the City of Pittsburgh. 

October 25, 18Y9, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Riddle. 

The repairs and improvements made in the original house within the last 
two years, by which its appearance and condition were so much benefited, 
was noticed in the report of 18*78. Since that time, two new structures 
have been added, one for the insane and another, which is also of consider- 
able magnitude, for a kitchen, laundry, drying-room, and bakery. Both of 
these buildings are of brick ; the former three, the latter two stories high. 
The hospital is arranged according to modern approved plans. It will have 
every convenience of heat and water, and all the appliances which are 
needed for the care and treatment of the insane. The fioors are divided 
into single and associate rooms, in which from one hundred and twenty-five 
to one hundred and fifty patients ma}' be accommodated. 

The second building is located immediately in the rear of the main build- 
ing with which it communicates by a covered way, and by which it will 
have convenient access with the dining-room in the former. It is provided 
with suitable conveniences, is well arranged, and will doubtless be of great 
service in the housekeeping operations. A new gas-house has also been 
erected. 

With these improvements and additions and a thorough equipment, it 
will be entirely practicable to provide in the best manner for the numerous, 
persons who, from misfortune, are compelled to resort to it for assistance 
and relief. 

Upon the completion of the hospital for the insane, since the visit of the 
commissioners, part of the 128 cases which has been transferred to Dix- 
mont, were returned to the hospital. In November, 64 were brought back, 
six became private patients of Dixmont, eight were removed by friends, one 
died, and those committed by courtsyet remain, numbering forty-nine. 

The intention of the managers in the erection of this department, is to 
provide adequate accommodations for the chronic and incurable class of 
insane. It will be under the care of an assistant superintendent, and will 
have the benefit of the services and treatment of the resident physician of 
the home. 

The home is generally very fully occupied by the dependent classes of 
the district, requiring for their care very extensive accommodations, and a 



Leq. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 61 

thorough administrative system. How much has been done within the last 
few years to provide for the former, has already been stated. The efficient 
manner in which it is conducted is fully attested by the excellent order 
which appears in all the apartments of the establishment, and by what has 
been accomplished foi* the comfort and welfare of the inmates. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 18t9, 348. Sane, 185; insane, 158; 
idiotic, 1; blind, 2; deaf and dumb, 2; children included inrthe above, 
74. Seventy males and 49 females are reported as engaging in various 
kinds of outdoor and indoor work. 

AUeghepy C«a«ty Work-Home. 

October 24, 1879, visited with Commissioners Biddle and Dickinson. 

The managers of this institution continue to carry on the work entrusted 
to them, if possible, more successfully than in previous years. 

The financial statement for the year ending December 31, 1878, shows a 
surplus of earnings over expenditures to the amount of $20,057 92 : 

The gross earnings for the year J 878 were $70,534 95 

Expenses for all purposes, 50,477 03 

Balance, $20,057 92 



The profits realized from the labor of the inmates were sufficient to pay 
all the expense of conducting it ; so that drafts on the counties for aid were 
not required. 

The receipts for labor, for year ending December 31, 1879, in con- 
sequence of a want of orders for barrels, were $47,616 79, which was a large 
decrease of the amount received in 1878. The expenses of the institution 
were $50,874 43, making the net cost to the counties $3,257 64 ; but this 
may also be considered a fevorable result. The number of persons com- 
mitted to the work-house from January 1, 1878, to December 31, 1878, were 
2,154; viz: 1,747 males and 407 females. In the same period 1,919 were 
discharged by expiration of sentence ; by commutation, 89 ; by order of 
court, 38 ; by Governor's pardon, 8; by escape, 6 ; died, 11 ; and 1 was re- 
moved to the pest-house, leaving in confinement, at the last named period, 
537, or 455 males and 82 females. 

The daily average was 87 larger than in the previous year. 

The labor is performed under the immediate oversight and direction of 
the prison authorities, not by the intervention and control of contractors. 
The principle is recognized that labor should be performed imdcr the eye 
and control of responsible parties, who have no selfish ends to accomplish 
by it, and who will take a humane and personal interest in the welfare and 
amendment of the convicts ; not the present profit of the labor, but its 
bearing upon the future good of the laborer is the absorbing concern. 

The value of remunerative industry is claimed to be an efiective agency 
in reforming men who fall into evil ways and enter upon a life of crime. 



62 BOABD OF PUBUC CHARITIES. [No. 5, 

The principle is also maintained by the president in his report to the 
board of managers, ^^ That as the unfortunate men and women who are in- 
carcerated in our prisons must be clothed and fed, they should be required 
to work for their support, instead of being supported by others who are 
guilty of no crime." 

Such are the effects of the good discipline established in this institution, 
that little or no difficulty has occurred in its government. The necessity 
for severe punishment seldom occurs. 

Chapel services are conducted every Sunday. The bible class exercises 
are held at from one to two o'clock in the afternoon. The chaplain reports 
that the religious exercises, together with Bible readings and explanations, 
held later in the day, in the chapel of the female prison, for the benefit of 
that class of prisoners, are always well attended. Order is strictly observed, 
and it is believed their meetings are not in vain. Intemperance and pros- 
titution are the two great sins which have smitten and cursed this class of 
prisoners. 

BEAVER COUNT!. 

Jail. « 

Visited October 27, 1819. 

This jail is properly built and arranged. It admits of enforcing a proper 
system of prison discipline. But different system of management is pursued. 
It is kept merely as a place of detention till after trial. Short term con- 
victs are committed to the work-house, and those of longer terms to the 
St^te prison. 

Under a practice of this kind, it is useless to talk about remunerative em- 
ployment, or such order in the different apartments as is practicable 
with convicts of longer terms, because they can be trained to habits of order 
and cleanliness. In this respect, and especially in what relates to the deter- 
ring effect of what is termed by the law " solitary confinement at hard labor," 
our coimty jail system is an utter failure. The kind of life passed by crimi- 
nals in these prisons, has no terrors whatever to evil doers. It exercises no 
correcting or reformatory influence. On the other hand the bad become 
more so by idleness and constant association with the vicious and debased 
during all the hours of the day and night. 

Present number of prisoners 15, of whom 6 have been tried. One female 
prisoner. * 

Poor-Hovse. 

October 27, 1819. 

The present steward and his wife have shown great activity and earnest- • 
ness in bringing up this establishment to a good standard of efficiency. A 
careful inspection of all parts of this institution revealed a verj'- satisfac- 
tory condition in the household care and in the comfort and welfare of the 



Leg. Doc.] Boabd of Public Charities. 63 

inmates. Both the new and sach parts of the old building as are used, have 
a greatly improved appearance. The rooms on the women's side of the 
house are in a very comfortable state, and are maintained in good order. 

The sitting-rooms, store-rooms, bath-rooms, &c., exhibit good ord^i'. 
What is here stated, applies also to the apartments, though not in the same 
degree, in which the men are accommodated. Part of the inmates are very 
difficult of care. Of the seventy-three now in the home, seventeen are 
children, and twenty-two of the whole number are moderately insane or 
feeble-minded. So large a proportion being helpless, renders cleanliness 
and thorough order very difficult. Nevertheless, no just complaint can be 
made. 

Fifteen insane are supported in State hospitals. A careful economy is 
practiced. Ovtt door relief is reduced. The farm is made more and more 
productive. The labor of inmates is utilized to some extent, and the work 
of the house and other departments is becoming thoroughly systemized. 

September 30, 1819. Inmates, 77, of whom 45 are sane, 24 insane, 3 
idiotic, 3 blind, 2 deaf and dumb ; 21 are children. 

Twenty-four males and 1*1 females assist in the work of the house and 
farm. 

Expenditures. 

For the year 1879, for "alms-house, $6,789 02 

Paid for out door relief, 2,367 00 

$9,156 02 
Deduct receipts, 656 02 

Net cost to county, $8,500 00 

The sum of $2,413 for support of insane in State hospital, is included in 
the above. 

BLAIR COUNTY. 
Jail. 

October 11, 1879. 

This prison presents a favorable appearance. It is built according to 
Haviland's plan, and is adapted to a proper system of prison discipline. 
All the conveniences which are needed for persons constantly confined, 
are provided. The drainage and water supply arrangements, afford the 
utmost satisfaction. 

The system of management pursued, indicates a stricter regard for prison 
rules than is common in some sections of the State. Convicts are kept 
separate. The untried are not so strictly dealt with. 

There are 28 cells, and 21 prisoners. Religious services are held occa- 
sionally. Convicts over one year are not kept. With the exception of the 
care of their cells, there is no employment for prisoners. 



64 BoABD OF Public Chabitie& [No. 5, 

Poor-Honae. 

Much has been done, and very successfully done, to bring up this insti- 
tution to its present very excellent standard. The interior has received a 
general overhauling, and has been much improved. 

The apartments for the insane have been re-arranged, and now afford very 
comfortable accommodations. New floors, new partitions, and new bedding 
have been supplied. A special apartment in a very desirable part of the 
insane department, has been prepared for Mary O. Neal, who is now fallen 
into a state of hopeless dementia. The insane maintained in the State 
asylum, have been re-transferred to the poor-house, where comfortable apart- 
ments have been prepared for them. Other apartments have been improved, 
giving to the whole establishment a bright and greatly improved appearance. 

To facilitate the housekeeping duties, a new building has b^en put up, con- 
taining a kitchen, bake-room, washing apartment, and bath-room. 

It gives me much pleasure to make a favorable report of the condition 
and management. Much credit is due to Mr. and Mrs. Shenfeldt, the stew- 
ard and his wife, for their untiring efforts to effect the improvement which 
has been noticed. 

September 30, 18T9. Present number of inmates 77, of whom 53 are 
sane, 21 insane, 4 blind, 9 are children, 39 natives, 13 foreigners. 

Twenty-three males are employed in general outrdoor work, 12 females 
in general house work ; 17 males and 16 females are disabled. 

BEDFORD COUNTY. 
Jail. 

October 9, 1879. 

This prison continues to be kept merely to detain prisoners until after 
trial. In no respect is it suitably arranged for the confinement of convicts 
or dangerous offenders. Except during court terms, it has few inmates. 
Four are held at this time, who, during the entire day, are found in what 
is used as a sitting and dining-room. 

The apartments in which prisoners are confined are located on the first 
and second floors ; four on the first, and two, with the room above named, 
on the second. There are two doors to each cell, with ventilating and heat 
registers. The opposite end of the prison is fitted up for females, and 
contains the requisite conveniences. 

The jail is surrounded by a high wall. The drainage arrangement, from 
the building into a vault outside, thence to a sewer, is said to be satisfactory. 

The sheriff lives in the jail. He is allowed 50 cents a day for each pris- 
oner. The jail is in much better order than was seen at former inspections. 

Poor-Honae. 

Inmates, 113, of whom 22 or one fifth of the entire population are chil- 
dren, and 15 are insane. 

This county home, which was erected in 1872, is well arranged. Every 
comfort and convenience are afforded for • the care and treatment of the 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 65 

helpless and infirm. In that part of it occupied by the insane, it has suffered 
considerable injury. This class are placed in apartments at the end of the 
third story, and are of a very low grade ; some of them being violent and 
destructive. The rooms they occupy are by no means in a favorable con- 
dition. The floors and plastering are saturated with offensive effluvia, and 
unless attention to necessary purification and repairs is given, will involve 
in time heavy expense. 

The proper remedy for the difficulty, is in a better system of care under 
the constant attention of an attendant, or the erection of a separate build- 
ing or annex with a covered way into it for water closet and other conve- 
niences adapted to their disturbed conditions. In order to protect well- 
constructed and arranged buildings, a resort to this plan has been found 
necessary in other counties. There seems to be an urgent necessity for it 
here. The insane themselves would be benefited by it, and the steward 
would be able to preserve a much better standard of household care. It 
is a mistake to confine the insane. They receive much benefit from outside 
air and exercise, and should be permitted to enjoy it. To a very large ex- 
tent they are harmless. It is a mistake to deal with them as if they were 
dangerous. Their violence, if there be SLuy such, consists very generally in 
mere clamor and tearing their clothes in pieces. This does not justifj' re- 
straint with iron manacles and incarceration in dungeon like cells. A simple 
and effective remedy for this is found in the use of modern restraint fix- 
tures, which are made of leather. 

September 30, 1879. Inmates, 104; sane, 88; insane, II; 3 idiotic, 1 
blind, 1 deaf and dumb; 21 included in the above, are children. 

Expenditures for the year for alms-house, $t,697 93 

Paid for out door relief, 2,077 84 

Total of alms-honse and out-door relief, I>9,675 77 

Deduct receipts, 8 70 

Net cost to county, $9,667 07 

BBRR9 COUNTY. 

JaU. 

August 6, 1879, visited with Commissioners Clymer, Dickinson, and 
Biddle. 

Upon an inspection of this prison made this day, no material changes of 
any kind were observed. A correct system of conducting it having been 
established in\he beginning, a policy in strict accordance with approved 
prison rules and regulations is steadily pursued. 

In the convict section, those who have been tried and convicted, are serv- 
ing out their sentences with regular employment or labor, weaving and 
shoemaking being the trades. . To some extent these trades are permitted 
to be carried on by prisoners in association — two and three being thus em_ 
ployed in the same cell — but are lodged and fed separately. 
5— B. P. Char. 



66 _ BoABD OP Public Charities. [No. 5, 

The untried short term prisoners and vagrants are placed in the original 
part of the jail. Occasional employment is given to these, such as the nec- 
essary housekeeping duties afford, and other light work, as cutting rags 
for carpets, &c. 

The benefit of religious services are given to them with considerable reg- 
ularity, and some additions have been made to a library which contains a 
very tolerable supply of good reading matter. 

Dr. L. D. B. Kuhn, the physician of the prison, in his annual report, 
states that " the sanitary condition of the Jail has been kept up to a respectable 
standard, and the general health has been good ; and adds this significant 
fact, that the exceptions were mainly dependent on poverty and previous 
vicious living, as well as moral depression during confinement, generally 
yielding to cheerfulness, as soon as they were allowed to go to work^ 

At the date of the present writing, January 8, 1880, there are 94 pris- 
ontrs, as follows : 45 in the old, 37 in the convict section, besides 12 vagrants, 
who are also in the first part of the prison. 

Poor-Hoaae. 

August 6, 1379, visited, with Commissioners Clymer, Dickinson, and 
Biddle. 

The four spacious buildings in which the large pauper population of this 
CDunty are maintained, were sufficiently described in the report of 1878. 
(See page 72.) 

The original poor-house was erected in 1824. Previous to that time the 
township system prevailed. The male and female hospital departments 
w^ere built in 1831-1832, and a large additional building, with accommoda- 
tions for from 250 to 300 inmates, was finished in 1875. 

A very large number of the dependent classes are provided for by this 
county. In some years the population in the alms-house runs up as high 
as 700, and is seldom less than 600. In the most populous counties several 
establishments are provided for the purpose. Philadelphia city and county 
has four alms-houses ; Allegheny county has three, and Luzerne has six. 
In Berks county but one institution has been established, and the provision 
for house accommodations and of landed estate is commensurate with the 
extent of the wants and necessities for the large number of destitute and 
helpless persons who resort to it for relief. 

It Would be interesting to know the ratio of increase which occurs in the 
pauper population which has received institutional care in the different 
counties, with a view to trace the causes of differences in its ^xtent, if there 
be any such, from an early period down to the present time ; but I have to 
regret that the necessary data is not at my command. For that part of the 
time, however, which dates from 1869, when the act creating a Board of 
Public Charities became a law, we have the statistics which supplies the 
desired information. A reference to those of the two counties of Berks 
and Lancaster will answer my present purpose : 



Leg. Doc.] Boabd of Public Charities. fit 

Statement exhibiting the ayeraqe number of paupers remaining in the 
Berks county poor-house for successive years, commencing with year 
ending June 30^ 1870 ; also the net cost for the support of the alms- 
house j including the amount paid for out-door relief: 

Years. No. of inmates. ^motcnf expended. 
1870, 302, 138,000 00 

1872| '.','.'.',. '.3Sll (inolading^,207 64 for improvement,) !!!!.!! 31*, 391 04 

1873, 311, (including 16,201 39 for receipts,) 26,262 97 

1874 855, (including 13,268 42 for receipts,) 37,02180 

1876, 471, 46,096 60 

1876, 490, (including $3,629 72 for receipts,) 66,233 67 

1877, 644, (including $4,437 85 for receipts,) 64,564 05 

1878, 621, (including $3,687 40 for receipts,) . 51,803 12 

1879, 622, (including $8,328 35 for receipts,) 51,359 87 

Statement exhibiting the average number of paupers remaining in the 
Lancaster county poor-house for successive years^ commencing with 
year 1871^ no return having been made for 1870 ; also^ the net cost of 
the support of the alms-house^ including the amount paid for outdoor 

relief: 

Tears. No. of inmates. - Amount expended, 

1871, 285, $24,000 00 

1872, 298, (including $2,840 13 for receipts.) 24,437 60 

1873, i72, (including $3,222 77 for receipts,) 87,196 60 

1874, 820, (including $6,706 82 for receipts,) 37,246 91 

1875, 853, (including $5,951 77 for receipts,) ♦121,877 33 

1876, 891, (including $4,627 64 for receipts,) *55,775 28 

1877, 420, (including $4,656 39 for receipts,) 88,092 85 

1878, 434, (including $7,090 45 for receipts,) 35,285 03 

1879, 499, (ineluding $5,781 66 for receipts,) 32,303 52 

The population of Berks county at tte last census was 106,693. 

The population of Lancaster county at the last census was 121,840. 

The average per cent, of increase on the number supported in the Berks 
county alms-house was 45 per cent.; and the average per cent, increase on 
the cost of maintenance was 1 1 per cent. 

The average per cent, of increase on the number supported in the Lan- 
caster county alms-house was 28 per cent. ; and the average per cent, in- 
crease on the cost of maintenance was 30 per cent., excluding the cost of 
building a new almshouse. 

It will be noticed from the foregoing statement, that the increase in the 
population of the Berks county alms-house for the first five years of the 
period named, taking the first year as the basis, was It. 55 per cent., whilst 
that in the Lancaster alms-house for the same time, was 23.86 per cent. 

In the next five years, taking the sixth year as the basis, the increase was 
at the rate of 32.06 per cent, in the first, and 27.37 per cent, in the second. 

The increase of the dependent class in Lancaster county seems to have 
been at a uniform rate, and conforms to the natural increase of population 
in the district. In Berks county, the ratio is not thus limited, but is in- 
fluenced by causes of various kinds, and which afford a sufificient ex- 
planation why the increase should be larger in the one than in the other. 
To satisfy the mind of the reader upon this point, it might be sufficient to 

* Includes cost of new buUdlng. 



68 Board of Public Charities. [No. 6, 

refer to a single one of the facts above alluded to, viz : That the population 
in Lancaster is almost exclusively agricultural, whilst that of Berks is 
manufacturing, mining, and agricultural. The latter suffer greatest injury 
in periods of business panic and depression, which, if long continued, com- 
pel thousands to resort to the alms-houses and to a vagrant life for the 
necessaries of life. 

Another of the causes of difference, consists in the fact that a much 
larger proportion of the population in the Lancaster county alms-house are 
foreigners, who, being without the advantage of family, homes, and friends, 
are obliged to seek relief in this way. Much of the destitution and distress 
among natives caused by want of employment, are relieved by friends and 
relatives. If the poverty of the latter was not thus relieved in this coun- 
ty, the population of the alms-house would be larger, and the ratio of ad- 
missions, compared to the population of the county, would be similar to 
that in the alms-house of Berks county. But other causes operate in pro- 
ducing differences in the extent to which pauperism occurs, and is made 
permanent. 

The systems of management pursued have much to do with the question 
why the ratio of pauperism should be much larger in one district than in 
another; and these should be carefully examined, because erroneous sys- 
tems may be changed and better ones substituted. Out-door relief may be 
granted largely in the one. It may be dispensed very sparingly in the 
other. In Berks, in 1879, it was $8,051 13. In Lancaster it did not exceed 
$1,873 50. 

The policy pursued in relation to the care of children, who constitute so 
large a part of the population of our county charities, also differs very widely. 
In Berks they are retained to a very large extent. In Lancaster, after they 
become over four or six years of age, they are transferred to the Home for 
Friendless and Destitute Children, located near the city of Lancaster, where 
they are educated and trained for usefulness, until places can be obtained for 
them. An api^ropriation is made annually by the county commissioners, 
with the approval of the court, for their support as long as they remain 
there. The effect of this mode of dealing may be shown by the following 
comparative statement : 

Number of Children in Berks 
County Alms-Eouae, 



Number of Children in Lancaster 
Aims-House, 



1874, 
1875, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 



27 


1874, 


83 


1876, 


44 


1876, 


33 


1877, 


44 


1878, 


86 


1879, 



60 

71 

82 

106 

119 

102 



The mode of dealing with vagrancy should also be brought into view in 
considering the subject, in order to show to what extent the annual expen- 
ditures may be materially affected, favorably or otherwise. 



• 



Leg. Doc.] Boabd of Public Chabities. 69 

The Lancaster almB-house being directly on the route usually traveled 
by these itinerant beggars, was, until few years ago, visited by from 60 to 
90 daily for food and shelter. The Berks county alms-house was also very 
largely visited by them. Under the act passed by the Legislature, 1876, 
authorizing the erection of inexpensive work-houses, a plan was adopted 
by which a system of compulsory labor has been carried on for the last 
three years at the Lancaster county alms-house for this class ; the effect 
of which has been that the number of callers has been growing less and 
less, until very few continue to appear. 

In Berks they continue to receive aid, as usual, as a gratuity, without 
any system by which they can be made to render service in return, and, as 
a consequence, little or no abatement of the nuisance has occurred. Tramps 
for the year in Berks, 2,771, in Lancaster, 1,079. 

Comparative statements of the details connected with the mode of con- 
ducting these county homes, of the large amount of relief for human want 
and suffering which they afford when properly administered, and of the 
errors, abuses, and misapplied appropriations, which, under careless and 
incompetent management, never fail to occur, may be useful in suggesting 
suitable reforms in the mangement, and to incite to greater attention and 
more earnest efforts to correct whatever may be wrong or defective in policy 
or administration. 

Inmates remaining in the house, September 30, 1879, as follows : 530, of 
whom 102 are children; 138 are reported as being insance; 15 idiotic; 7 
blind ; 3 deaf and dumb ; 303 are natives j 227 are foreigners. Tramps 
during the quarter, 556. 
Expenses during the year ending September 30, 1879 : 

Total for alms-houses, $46,637 09 

Paid for outdoor relief, 8,051 13 

$54,688 22 
Deduct receipts, 3,328 35 

Net cost to county, $51,359 8T 

One hundred and ten males and 47 females are reported as assisting in 
the general work of house, gardens, and farm. 

BUCKS COUNTY. 

Jail and Almt-Hoiue. 

August 13, 1879, with Commissioner Dickinson. 

Some injury occurred to an outside wing of this prison from fire, during 
the past summer. It was promptly repaired, and it continues to be used 
as heretofore. As no measures had been taken to provide a building suit- 
able for the purposes of a jail, the following communications addressed to 
the president judge of the court on the urgent want of proper prison ac- 
commodations are fully presented. I insert them as part of the report of 
this Board, including also what pertains to the condition of the alms-house. 



TO Board of Pcbuc CHARiTiEa [No. 6, 

Poor-Honae. 

It is proper to add some particulars connected with the alms-house, which 
are not referred to in the papers which are subjoined. 

The present number of inmates in it is 234, which includes 110 patients 
in the hospital. December IT, 1878, the entire population was 280 ; 177 
were maintained in the main building, and 109 in the hospital. 

Some changes and improvements have been made in the poor-house 
proper, bj which still better management is facilitated. A change in the 
location of the school, which was urged in former visits, has been made. 
The kitchen has been enlarged, which affords sufficient space for a dining- 
room for women and children. The men dine in the basement. A separate 
room for colored women and children is also provided, and separate stair 
cases to upper stories. The house is well kept, notwithstanding it is old and 
much decayed. It was built in 1809, and from being constantly and largely 
occupied, requires frequent repairs and renewals. 

The hospital is a building of later date, and is in a good state of repair. 
It continues to have the services of Mr. Cornell as superintendent, by whom 
it is well conducted. Oases of great suffering and distress here arrest at- 
tention. Four cases of palsy were noticed. 1 he female so sadly deformed 
as to be unable to enjoy the recumbent posture, continues in the same bent 
up posture which she has occupied for the last eleven years. These suffer- 
ers are kindly and humanely dealt with. 

The products of the farm are made to contribute largely towards the 
support of the inmates. In order to utilize the labor of the inmates to a 
greater extent, the cultivation of tobacco has been commenced. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 1879, viz : 228, of whom 1 13 are sane 
47 insane, idiotic 1, blind 1, deaf and dumb, 2 ; 28 children ; 74, including 
the insane, are hospital cases. Number of tramps during the quarter, 468. 
38 men, 29 females, assist in the general work. 

Financial statement not received. 

Communication from the Board of Charities concerning the Bucks 

County Jail, 

To the Hon. Richard Watson, 

President Judge ^ Seventh District^ Pennsylvania : 

The Board of Public Charities of the State of Pennsylvania, in the pros- 
ecution of their official duties, visited the jail of Bucks county on the 13th 
instant, for the purpose of inspection; and, after careful examination and 
inquiry, are of the opinion that the building at present used as a jail is, from 
its great age, bad condition, and want of the conveniences and appliances 
now in common use, and considered necessary in the modem jails of this 
State, unfit for the purpose, and should be replaced as speedily as practicable 
by a substantial building, in which offenders against person and property 
may be securely held, and the discipline established by the laws of the Com- 
monwealth properly enforced. 



Lbq. Doc.] Board op Public Charities. 7 1 

Such is the insecure condition of this jail that pei*sons arrested on mere 
suspicion of crime, and who may, when tried, be found innocent, are heavily 
ironed and manacled to prevent escape, thus unnecessarily and unjustly in- 
flicting an indignity and severe punishment on innocent persons, which 
could have been avoided, had the county prepared a proper jail for their 
detention. We also found that the means of communicating with persons 
on the outside of the walls is easy, and that the prisoners avail themselves 
of the opportunity thus offered, which must result disadvantageously to 
the prison. 

The overcrowded condition of the cells renders it impossible to enforce 
discipline, and is the cause of much promiscuous and most improper asso- 
cialion, and of great demoralization amongst the prisoners. 

We are satisfied that no good can be eflected in this jail while in its pres- 
ent condition, and entertain the hope that the proper authorities of the 
county may adopt such measures as will lead to the erection of a jail where 
persons not 3-et convicted may be securely held, without the necessity of 
chaining them to the floors of their cells, and where those convicted may 
find that kind of proper discipline and degree of comfort and cleanliness 
which the laws of our State accord, even to the convicted felon, and which 
the enlightened and humane sentiment of the people of this Commonwealth 
everywhere demands. 

The condition of the Bucks county jail has for a long time claimed the 
attention of the Board of State Charities, as the following extracts from 
some of their annual reports made to the Legislature will show. As far 
back as 1ST their report saj's : " This county is greatly in need of a new 
prison, constructed on the plan of separate labor. Its population would 
justify the erection and operation of such a prison, while it would prove 
beneficial to the morals, health, and comfort of the convicts, as well as a 
pecuniary saving to the tax-payers. 

" It is to be hoped that the intelligent citizens of this county will soon 
inaugurate a movement in favor of such a laudable improvement.*' 

Again, in their report for 1874, they say : " This ancient structure remains 
without any changes or improvements. Substantial!}'' built in the first in- 
stance, it was arranged in the style of the early jails — for mere lock-up 
purposes — when commitments were seldom made, and the necessary care 
and protection were easily exercised. The interior is suffered to fall into 
decay, rendering it unfit for the confinement of convicts. Prisoners are 
permitted to associate in all of the apartments, separation in its present in- 
secure state being out of the question. 

" The general condition of jails thus kept is in every instance bad. Re- 
formatory influences cannot be exercised, and the result of commingling 
all sorts of characters cannot fail to be prejudicial, thus making prisons of 
this character schools of vice, instead of strictly penal and correctional." 

In their report for 1876 they say : " With the exception of a little more 
order and such benefit as the application of a white- wash brush can effect, 



T2 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

no cbangeB or improvements have been made in this architectural model of 
a bygone age. It is used, as stated in former reports, for the detention of 
the untried, or persons charged with crime. It is hardly lit for that pur- 
pose, as is ob\'ious from the fact that six escapes have occurred since Jan- 
uary last. There seems to be no present intention to make any other pro- 
vision for the criminal classes in this county. They are apparently content 
to pay for the custody and maintenance of their convicts in the Eastern 
Penitentiary." 

In 1877 the board reports to the Legislature, " That this old structure 
remains without any change or improvement. It is very fully occupied — 
from fifty to sixty prisoners are confined in it at the present time, a majority 
of them being vagrants. Twenty of this class, consisting of men and 
women, occupied one room. They slept on the floor, and were literally 
packed. Their appearance and condition was that of the lowest kind. 
Eleven were kept in another small room, and ten in the adjoining one. Of 
the seven cells or apartments only one was considered safe. An attempt 
to escape from one of these was recently made, which would have proved 
successful if military aid had not been applied for. 

" The practice in this county is to commit convicts of both long and short 
terms to the Eastern Penitentiary, the jail being entirely unfit for their cus- 
tody. This prison no longer answers the purpose for which it was estab- 
lished. To all intents and purposes it is a ruin, and is unworthy of this 
wealthy county." 

The above extracts are n^ade in order that the honorable court may be 
informed as to the condition of the jail for the past nine 3'ears, and that dur- 
ing this time the Board of Public Charities has been calling the attention of 
the citizens of Bucks county to the fact of its utter unfitness for the pur- 
poses of a jail, and urging the erection of a building more suitable for the 
detention and reformation of the convicted, and one that would reflect 
credit on the county. 

All of which is most respectfully submitted. 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 

President. 
DiLLER Luther, 
Secretary and General Agent. 

Philadelphia, August 18, 1879. 



Alms-House — Petition of Directors. 

To the Hon. Richard Watson, President and only Judge of the Court of 
Quarter Sesaions in and for the county of Bucks : 

The undersigned directors of the poor and house of employment for said 
county, respectfully report : 

That in consequence of the failure of the sources from which a supply 
of water has been obtained for the institution, great inconvenience and 



Leg. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 73 

much suffering has been felt by the inmates during the summer season, for 
the want of a supply of water for hospital and alms-house purposes. 

The board, seeing the necessity of seeking a supply from some other source, 
employed an engineer, who, with several experts, made an examination of 
the farm, the present mode of supply, and the water in the Neshaminy dur- 
ing the summer months, and in their opinion it was not fit for domestic 
uses, and that it would require a heavy outlay of money for pumps and 
steam connections to force the water into the buildings. They, therefore, 
were of the opinion that the cheapest, best, and surest method to obtain a 
full supply of water for all seasons of the year, was by means of an artesian 
well. 

The directors invited the committee of the Board of Charities of the county 
to meet them for the purpose of examining the several plans submitted for 
obtaining a better supply of water, who, after examination of the said plans 
and cost of each one, gave it as their opinion that the best and cheapest 
means to obtain, a full supply of water, was by digging an artesian well. 

We also represent that there is a great need for some additional improve- 
ment being made on the farm, to enable us to preserve the property of the 
coimty from injury by exposure. 

In consequence of there not being sufficient buildings for the storage of 
the wagons, carts, and farming implements, they have to remain uncovered 
and exposed to the weather during all seasons of the year. 

And the board further represents that, in consequence of the increased 
number of persons admitted in the hospital, the room occupied in that 
building for a school had to be vacated for hospital uses. There being no 
room in any other building large enough for the acccommodation of the 
children, (some forty in number.) A school-house is needed to enable the 
board to carry out the object of the school laws. 

We also represent that there is needed for the welfare of the stock, an 
over-shoot to one of the barns. 

Aijd we further represent that, in consequence of the failure of the New- 
town Insurance Companj^, the policy of insurance for $10,000 on the hos- 
pital building was sunk and canceled. 

The Board hereby respectfully petition for an appropriation to complete 
the following improvements, estimates of the cost having been obtained : 

Digging and completing an artesian well, $1,100 

Building a two-story wagon-house, ... 1,100 

Building a school-house, . . 1,500 

Building an over-shoot to bam, 275 

Procuring an additional insurance on hospital building, 400 

Total, $4,975 

Your petitioners therefore respectfully ask that this petition may be laid 
before the grand inquest for the said county, in order that the said grand 
inquest may take such action in the premises as to them may seem proper. 



T4 BoABD OF Public Charities. [No. 5, 

And your petitionee flirther ask that your honor will also approve of the 
recommendations herein contained, in order that your petitioners may re- 
ceive from the county commissioners the necessary funds to carry into 
effect the improvements specified herein. And we will ever pray, &c. 

Joseph F. Nicholas, 
James D. Wilson, 

William Kinset. 
Bucks County Alms-House, September i, 1879. 

The undersigned, committee of the Board of Charities for the count}', re- 
spectfully represent that in compliance with an invitation from the directors 
of the poor to visit the alms-house and make an examination of the present 
mode of water supply, and also the necessity for having built a wagon-house, 
a school-house, and over-shoot to the barn, do report that we made an exami- 
nation of the matters specified in the above petition, and in our judgment 
there is a necessity for all the objects and improvements petitioned for by the 
board of directors, and we unite with them in asking the grand inquest and 
the honorable court to grant the prayer of the petitioners. 

Respectfully, 

Thomas W. Trego, 
D. W. McNair, 
John Wildman. 

Report of the Orand Jury. 

To the Honorable^ the Judge of the Court of Quarter Sessions of the 

Peace in and for the county of Bucks: 

The grand inquest of said county, for September sessions, 18t9, respect- 
fully reports : 

That they have had before them forty bills, of which they have found 
twenty-three true bills and seventeen not true. 

We have visited the public buildings and find them in a neat and clean 
condition. We endorse the report of the Board of Public Charities in re- 
gard to the jail being unfit for the purpose for which it is intended, but in 
the present financial condition of the county, we do not feel at liberty to 
recommend the building of a new one. We advise the commissioners to 
place some protection over the windows next to the court-house, to prevent 
communication from the outside. We recommend the commissioners to 
grant the appropriation asked for by the directors of the poor and house of 
employment for the purpose of digging an artesian well, building a wagon- 
house, school-house, and paying the premium on the additional insurance 
asked for; and we flirther advise the commissioners, as soon as practicable, 
to pay the outstanding debts against the alms-house, amounting to about 
twelve thousand dollars, ($12,000,) now drawing interest at six per cent. 
We agree to the report of the jury on Neshaminy bridge, at Bridgewater. 

KoBERT W. Rogers, 
Attest— George Dean, Foreman. 

Secretary. 



Leg. Doa] Boaed of Pubuc Charities. 75 

BVTLBR COUNTY. 

JaII. 

This jail, situated in the town of Butler, was visited and inspected on 
October 27, by Commissioners Biddle and Dickinson. There were eight 
(8) prisoners, all males, and all held for costs. This jail is of the iron cage 
kind, introduced into the northern part of this State some years ago, and 
which have invariably proved unsatisfactory. There are twenty (20) cells 
on the two floors, four of which are assigned to the female prisoners, there 
being nothing but an iron open work fence or guard to separate the sexes. 
The commissioners were informed by keepers and prisoners, that constant 
communication, verbal and otherwise, is kept up between them. Complaint 
was made by the sheriff and his family, who reside in the building, that 
from a long-established custom, indiscriminate \'lsiting at all times was per- 
mitted, much to the annoyance of the officers, and to the discipline of the 
jail. In September last, there was a violent outbreak of disorder among 
the prisoners, and a general destruction of the water-closet bowls, and other 
furniture of the jail. The ventilation is also bad, and some of the prison- 
ers are suffering in consequence. The general condition of this jail as to 
its construction, arrangement of cells, and want of proper discipline, was^ 
so bad that the commissioners deemed it advisable to call upon the presi- 
dent judge of the judicial district in which it is located, and thus have the 
matter, through him, brought before the grand jury at the next term of 
court, which was accordingly done ; and we trust that the authorities of 
the county will adopt measures to correct the evils that surround the jail. 

CARBO.^ COUNTY. 

Jail. 

Visited with Commissioner Biddle. 

This prison deservedly maintains a high rank among those in the State 
that are best conducted. So far as good household c^re and a strict observ- 
ance of ordinary prison rules and regulations ai^ concerned, few or none 
surpass it. It is kept in thorough order. The association of all classes of 
criminals and all kinds of characters is not permitted. Separation is en- 
forced to a large extent. 

It is, however, not entirely free from errors in the method of government 
adopted by the inspectors. Employment is not provided, reading matter 
is not supplied, and religious services are seldom conducted for their benefit 
in the jail. The neglect to provide employment, mental and physical, always 
results in injury to the prisoners, and is certain to cause confusion and dis- 
order in the jail. It is true that it is difficult to devise a system of remu- 
nerative labor in jails in which the number of prisoners is so small. Occu- 
pation of some kind, such as sewing rags and weaving, might, however, be 
introduced, with advantage to the prisoners, and without the danger of 
incurring any pecuniary loss. 

Three prisoners are confined : 2 tried, 1 untried. 

Middle Coal Field Poor Dlslrlct. 

September II, 1819, with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 



76 Board op Public CHARiTiEa [No. 5, 

The iDmates of this well-conducted institution continue to receive kind 
and faithful attention from the steward and his family, and from the board 
of directors, who devote to its administration much time and attention. 

It is kept in excellent order and condition, and is conducted with a sincere 
desire to neglect no effort nor refuse to make any reasonable provision, in 
order to preserve the best of care and treatment for those who resort to it 
for assistance. 

Main Building. — Here the working class, male and female, a nursery, 
school-room, and the steward and his family are accommodated with apart- 
ments. The pharmacy, office for directors, and sleeping apartments for the 
latter are also on the first floor of this building. All parts of this house 
are in good order. 

The Hospital. — The insane and the sick receive care and treatment here. 
Some improvements have been made during the past year. Gas has been 
introduced. Better cooking arrangements have been made. It is heated 
by steam. Water is introduced into all parts of it. 

Twenty-seven insane and seven epileptic cases constitute part of its pop- 
ulation. The infirm, sick, and disabled have comfortable rooms on the 
second story. These afflicted classes have the benefit of the utmost care, 
and every necessary comfort. Their rooms are well furnished, and thor- 
oughly clean. The bath-room and water-closets are conveniently located, 
and are kept in good condition. The third and fourth stories are also occu- 
pied with other classes of patients. They have good rooms, comfortable 
beds, and good order is preserved. 

A separate building has been prepared for tramps, who do not neglect 
to mak^ occasional calls. 

All departments of this establishment, the farm, gardens, and buildings 
are maintained in thorough order. Whilst so much is doing to promote 
the comfort of the inmates, very careful attention is paid at the same time 
to carry out a rigid system of economy. A three-mill tax is sufficient, 
under good management, for the support of the house and out-door paupers. 
The tax was reduced from ten mills to five mills. The present reduction is 
from five mills to three mills. 

September 30, 1819. Inmates remaining in the alms-house, 164, of these, 
36 are children, 37 are insane, 4 blind, t3 are hospital cases ; 67 are natives, 
97 foreigners. During July, August, and September 40 tramps applied for 
relief. 

For expenditures see statistical tables. 

('aMbria county. 

Jail. 

October 14, 1879. 

This is a Haviland jail, substantially built, and well arranged. It is 
similar in style and capacity to that in Blair county, and contains the same 
number of cells. It is adapted to the separate system. In the report of 
1877, it was represented to be in good order. Its present condition is di- 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. TT 

rectly the reverse. It now presents a most forlorn appearance. The fifteen 
prisoners now confined do not seem to have any particular apartments al- 
lotted to them. They occupy all parts of the jail; but, during the day, are 
congregated promiscuously in the corridor. The jail has suffered much from 
the want of ordinary repairs. The want of attention and the general ne- 
glect everywhere visible, and total absence of all disciplinary management 
are plainly shown, in consequence of which, a spectacle of confusion and 
disorder is presented, which is calculated to amuse the beholder, if he 
did not lose sight of the fact that these institutions are designed to be not 
only penal, but correctional. Where are the prison inspectors and county 
commissioners ? Their attention to this prison is much needed. 

Poor^Houe. 

In the management of this establishment we witness evidences of faithful 
and efficient efforts and attention. With a valuable experience, and the 
requisite qualifications, Mr. Lilly, the steward, by means of a thorough 
system, seems to have little difficulty in preserving an excellent standard 
of care in all departments of this estate. He may not have, and, indeed, 
has not the benefit of modem improvements and conveniences to the largest 
extent ; but he makes the most of such as he has, and in no part of the 
building will you find a single case of hardship or neglect — nowhere, from 
the basement to the attic, will the evidences of a want of attention to the 
utmost order and cleanliness be noticed. 

Present number of inmates, TO ; which is a slight increase. They are 
classified as follows : Sane, 46 ; insane, 23. Five of the total number are 

children — 2 white; 3 colored. In addition to these, 14 insane are main- 
tained in the State hospital. 

A material reduction in the house expenses for the year has been ef- 
fected. Attention is given to the importance of utilizing the labor of in- 
mates. Only one hired man is employed. 
The alms-house expenses, including $1,989 45 paid for insane in 

State hospital, were, $6,t38 90 

Add what was paid for out-door relief, 4,568 03 

$11,306 93 
Deduct receipts, 99 18 

Net cost to county, $11,207 75 

• - . 

CHESTER COIJl\TV. 

Jail. 

Visited and inspected on the 11th November, 1879, by Commissioners 
Biddle and Dickinson. 

This jail was first occupied in 1840, and is under the management of a 
board of inspectors appointed by the court and commissioners of the county. 
Washington Hacker is the executive officer or warden, and is appointed 
annually by the inspectors. He has held the position for the past six years. 



78 Board of Public Charities. [No. 6, 

There are sixty cells, each one being supplied with water, and warmth 
from the furnace, which is located in the building, and the ventilation, which 
is very good, is obtained from the same furnace. 

At the time the commission visited the jail there were fifty inmates, 
forty-six of whom were convicted, and four awaiting trial. Four of the 
convicted were females. 

Persons convicted in this county are kept in this jail, except those con- 
victed of murder in the second degree or manslaughter. They are sent to 
the eastern penitentiary. The prisoners are kept separate as far as possi- 
ble. When the number exceeds sixty, there must necessarily be more 
than one, in some of the cells. 

All the domestic duties of the jail are performed by the inmates. The 
number of prisoners at work weaving carpet and check, making boots and 
shoes, caning chair seats, making brooms, and manufacturing clothing for 
the use of the prisoners, averages thirty-five, and the profits of their labor 
for the year ending October 1, 1879, were two thousand five hundred dol- 
lars, ($2,500.) 

The prisoners are given over work, and some of those under sentence 
for a term of years, have accumulated quite a sum of money which is held 
for them until they are discharged. 

The only mode of punishment practiced in the institution, is the darkened 
cell and bread and water diet. At the time of visitation, but one prisoner 
was undergoing punishment. 

The health of the prisoners is remarkably good, and no case of sickness 
existed at this time. 

The discipline and sanitary condition of this jail are remarkably good, and 
will compare favorably with &ny other in the State. This may be attributed 
to the fact that it is governed by a board of inspectors, who are selected 
for that position by the county authorities, from amongst the best class of 
citizens, and who engage zealously in the work, and select for the executive 
officer a suitable person, and retain him as long as he faithfully discharges 
his duties. 

Poor-Houae. 

Visited November 30. 1879. 

The population of this institution varies very little, seldom exceeding 
310. The present number is 300, one fifth, or 60, being children. About 
32 of the latter attend a school, which is conducted in one of the apartments 
of the main edifice. Thirty-five are of the insane class. These consist of 
the various grades of insanity. All are of the chronic and incurable kind. 
They are kept in apartments at the ends of the corridors on each story, and 
partly in the hospital erected for the purpose several years ago. The con- 
dition of the patients and apartments bears testimony of good care. 

The general condition , is, if possible, more than usually favorable. Clean- 
liness and good order are observed throughout. Some changes have oc- 
cured. Until quite recently, this was one of the places that was largely 
visited by tramps. Seventy-five were entertained in a single night. 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 79 

Not more than an average of five make their appearance now. Nor are 
they to be seen at homes in the country. To the long term sentences au- 
thorized in Mr. Rhoads' supplement to the tramp law of 1876, is doubtless 
to be ascribed this wonderful change, and partly, also, to the revival of 
business. Under a close and rigid system of care and management, by 
which this institution is governed, very little out-door relief is granted — 
the whole amount for the year not exceeding $300 or $400. Probably to 
this policy is to be ascribed the unusually large proportion of children, who, 
with their mothers, are transferred to the home. 

The annual expenses are about the same. The farm products are the 
usual average. Two hundred and sixty acres of land are worked with 
three hired men. When opportunities occur, able-bodied men and women 
are hired out to families in the neighborhood ; the former at fifty the latter 
at forty cents a day. It firequeutly happens that permanent places are thus 
obtained for them. 

The children remain, to a great extent, under the care and tuition of Miss 
Kinsey, the teacher, who, to an aptness for her calling, unites a quality not 
always found, but without which no considerable success must be expected. 
I mean a special fondness for those of tender years placed under her care. 
The children are carefully instructed and trained. Their minds and per- 
sonal habits rec3ive the benefit of affectionate attention and care. 

The room in which the school is conducted, though sufficiently spacious, 
is by no means a desirable one. Instead of being front of the main cor- 
ridor, with light and cheerful surroundings, it is upon the opposite side, the 
only windows to which look out on the buildings and grounds in the rear, 
where scenes of a sad and forbidding character are presented. The atten- 
tion of the directors is respectfully called to it, with a hope that a room 
with sufficient light, requisite ventilation, and pleasant surroundings, will 
be selected. 

Neither is the fVimiture of the room in keeping with the standard of care 
pursued in this department in other respects. The desks and benches 
belong to a by-gon3 age. They are placed against the walls, which is ob- 
jectionable, for reasons which will readily occur to the reader. The intro- 
duction into our schools of the modern school desks has been instrumental 
in preventing deformities and other injuries which occur very often from 
sitting for hours in erect and cramped positions in school-rooms. Desks 
with properly arranged seats can now be supplied at very moderate prices. 
Maps, the black-board, and a small library, are already provided, but the 
school will not be complete without the former, and when introduced in a 
properly located room, will contribute much to give it an attractive appear- 
ance. 

The inmates remaining in the house September 30, 1879, were 293, as fol- 
lows : 232 adults, 61 children ; and are returned as to their mental condition 
as follows : 233 sane, 41 insane, 17 idiotic, and blind, 1 ; deaf and dumb, 1. 

Of the 61 children, 3D attend school; 43 are under seven years of age. 



80 BoAKD OF Public Charities. [No. 5 , 

Twenty-five of the inmates engage in house-work. Forty-five work on 
the farm and in quarries located near the alms-house, and also in work to 
some extent for farmers in the neighborhood. 

See statistical table for receipts and expenditures. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

Jail. 

Visited September 4, 1879, with Commissioner Biddle. 

A very decided change has occurred in the system of management here- 
tofore pursued in this prison. Situated on the direct route traveled by 
tramps on their journey from the east towards the Shenandoah valley, in 
Virginia, these " general tourists " were committed into it by thousands^ 
especially during the time when the old fee bill statutes relating to their com- 
mittal, maintenance, and discharge were in force. Whilst the perquisites 
under those laws lasted, the prison accommodatiojis were monopolized by 
them, by which the special purpose for which the prison was designed was 
defeated. Convicts and persons charged with crime, committed by the court, 
had to be crowded in a small number of cells, in violation of a good system 
of prison care and discipline. These abuses practiced in this and other coun- 
ties were attaining great magnitude, not only occasioning heavy and un- 
necessary burdens, but threatening expensive enlargements in the buildings 
in which they were to be confined. When public attention became awakened 
to the subject, it culminated in the passage of the " tramp law " of 187 9, which 
provides for more summary arrests and longer terms of imprisonment than 
those imposed in the vagrant act of lb76. What was defective in the act of 
1876 has been remedied by the law of 1879. During the brief period in which 
it has been in operation, it has done more to uproot the growing evil than all 
that had been attempted previousl3\ It was the work of Hon. A. M. Rhoads, 
a citizen of Cumberland county, who drew up the bill, and, against much 
opposition, secured its passage through both branches of the Legislature. 
He is entitled to the thanks of the public. 

In order that tax-payers may be able to form a correct knowledge of the 
pecuniary benefit which is realized from this bill, I subjoin the following 
statement, showing the amount paid to D. H. Gill, sheriff of Cumberland 
county, for the keeping and maintainajice of ^^ tramps " in the months of 
September, October, November, and December, in the years 1878 and 1879, 
respectively : 

1878. 1879. 

September, |226 SO 952 00 

October, 666 00 106 60 

November, 1,701 00 122 00 

December, 2,569 01 214 50 

15,162 81 1495 00 

Thus showing a difierence in favor of the county, in the space of four 
months, of $4,668 31. 
The appearance of the jail now is entirely changed. Instead of being 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 81 

overcrowded, it is comparatively vacant. A day after our visit, September 
4, seven convicts were transferred to the eastern penitentiary, and two 
juvenile delinquents to the House of Refuge, leaving very few occupants. 
Upon a re-visit, December 18, a few months subsequently, I found all the 
cells but two on the first floor vacant. These were occupied by vagrants 
and several peraons committed for disorderly conduct, not exceeding seven 
in all. 

The untried and convicts are kept on the second tier, numbering not over 
six or eight in all. 

With a population so largely reduced, there can be no»difficulty in giving 
a separate cell (there being thirty-six) for each prisoner, thereby the Penn- 
sylvania system of prison discipline may be carried out, and the jail always 
kept up to a high standard of care and efficiency. 

Poor-Hoase. 

September 4, 1879, visited, with Commissioner Biddle. 

The number of inmates maintained in this institution at this time is one 
hundred and twenty-eight. The ordinary pauper class occupy apartments in 
what is termed the poor-house, and others, the sick, injured, and insane, are 
provided for in the hospital, which is a separate and more modem building. 
The large stone mansion adjoining the first, and communicating with it, is 
occupied by the steward and family exclusively. 

The brick addition, above referred to, was erected in 1833, and was, 
doubtless, sufficient for the necessities of that period ; but is by no means 
suitably arranged, nor is it provided with such conveniences as are essential 
for the proper care of the increased number of the helpless and infirm who 
require aid at the present time, and consequently does not present an or- 
derly and comfortable appearance. 

Difficulty seems to be experienced in finding suitable places for the various 
persons who are received into it. The colored people occupy two rooms 
in the basement, which certainly do not look inviting. Aged females, and 
those who assist in the house work, have rooms on the first story. Child- 
ren, with their mothers or attendants, are also placed here. 

From two to six beds are placed in each room. A sitting-room, some- 
what comfortable in appearance, is. also provided on this floor, and is re- 
sorted to by the inmates during the day. The furniture in these apart- 
ments, including the bedding, is much worn, and presents a very forlorn . 
appearance. The building is warmed by heaters placed in the cellar. 

A better division of rooms is made on the second story. They look 
more desirable, but are seldom occupied. 

The kitchen is in the basement. It is not well arranged, and is scantily 
supplied with cooking facilities. It needs a thorough over-hauling and 
much improvement. Males and females dine in the same apartment in the 
basement, but at different tables. The baking is done in a separate stone 
building, which is located sufficiently near. 

The sick, infirm, feeble-minded, and insane constitute more than one half 
6— B. P. Char, 



82 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

of the entire population. These are received into the hospital and infirm- 
ary. This building was erected in 1868 and 1869. It is four stories high, 
including the basement, which is above ground. It is well arranged, and 
has most of the modem improvements. A hall runs each way through the 
basement and other stories, with a stair-case in the center, constructed 
partly of iron. It is provided with a cooking-range in the basement. Water 

m 

is pumped from the creek into tanks on the third story. Bath-rooms and 
water-closets are placed in both wings on each story, where hot and cold 
water is provided. 

The three uppei stories are occupied as follows : The infirmary cases oc- 
cupy the first. Invalid females, and such as are able to render some assist- 
ance occupy the entire second. The-male insane are kept in the north wing 
of the third. The apartments in the opposite wing on this floor, not taken 
up with water tanks and for store-rooms, are occupied by females, one of 
whom is blind, and two are of the feeble-minded class. 

The wings on the upper stories are separated by iron-barred doors, an 
arrangement which is favorable to ventilation and light, but for obvious 
reasons, is objectionable when the opposite wings are occupied by males 
and females. This building, though well constructed and arranged, I regret 
to find in a condition that is by no means favorable. It has sufifered much 
for the want of timely repairs, which is to be regretted, as it may justly 
be considered among the best of its class in the State. Neither the apart- 
ments nor the patients are kept up to a good standard of care and condi- 
tion. 

The insane wards are especially bad. The attention of the oflScers had 
been called to the necessity of making better provision in previous reports 
of this Board. In the report of 1876, page 59, it is stated, respecting them, 
'* two nude patients were moving to and fro in the corridor of their ward. 
One was confined and chained to the floor of her cell, in the female ward, 
who was also naked, and in an exceedingly filthy state." There were seven 
cases in the male ward in a very neglected condition. Modern restraint 
fixtures, instead of chains for those who destroy their clothing and are other- 
wise destructive, and the benefit of the bath and out-door exercise, were 
advised to be used. In 1877, some improvement was noticed. The man 
(Smith) who at the former visit was entirely nude, now keeps dressed, and his 
chains have been removed ; other restraint appliances having been substi- 
tuted. But two others (males) were confined in one room, who, at the time, 
were also entirely nude, and in a very neglected condition. It was stated 
that these, at times, were dressed and taken out. 

A colored man occupied one of the cells in this ward. He was admitted 
September 26, 1876. 

Visited December 5, 1879, with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The condition of the persons occupying the ward above referred to is now 
as follows : It will be observed that the improvement noticed in 1877, was 
temporary, and that the present condition, if possible, is worse than any 
that preceeded it. 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 83 

Joseph Smith, the first ease named, was admitted December 25, 1869, aged 
forty-seven, was confined to his cell and chained to the floor, is filthy, and 
when excited, noisy. A bag of straw was his only bed, and his cell was 
rendered unfit for occupation by being bedaubed with human odure. 

The colored man, (Stackfield,) now chained by the ankle to the floor, is 
constantly confined. His apartment is in a very bad state. Modem re- 
straint appliances have not been used, and for five months past, he is not 
permitted the liberty of the corridor. The apartment which he occupies, 
is in a very filthy condition. 

There are 28 cases of all grades in the male and female wards. Some 
are much deteriorated, and are run down into the lowest forms of mere ani- 
mal life. One of the female insane, who was seen at former visit in a very 
deplorable condition, died September t, 1879. 

The Board visited the insane department of the alms-house on the 3d 
December, 1879, and after careful inquiry into the cases of Joseph Smith 
and Samuel Stackfield, who are Chained to the floor of their cells, were of 
the opinion that the condition of the latter might be greatly improved by 
releasing him from his chains, and substituting therefor suitable restraints 
for his hands and feet, if deemed necessary, which will admit of his having 
the benefit of the fresh air in the corridor and yard; and recommended 
that the restraints used in all well regulated hospitals be procured for his 
benefit. , 

The case of Joseph Smith is one of a more serious character, and the 
Board were convinced, from personal examination and the testimony 
of the physician and officers of the institution, that he could not, from the 
violent nature of his disease, be properly restrained and treated in the alms- 
house hospital, and that it was imperatively necessary that he should be 
placed in the care of skilled physicians and trained nurses, whose experi- 
ence fits them to properly treat such cases, and therefore resolved to make 
an application to the president judge of the judicial district, in accordance 
with the act of Assembly approved March 7, 1874, asking that a decree be 
made that the directors of the poor of Cumberland county shall transfer 
Joseph Smith, an insane man, now in the poor-house of said county, to the 
State asylum at Harrisburg. A communication was also sent to the di- 
rectors of the poor-house notifying them of the proposed action of the 
Board of Public Charities. 

Application was accordingly made to Judge Herman to make decree that 
the said Joseph Smith, in charge of the said directors of the poor of Cum- 
berland county, shall be removed to the State asylum at Harrisburg. 

A communication was received from the board of directors acknowledg- 
ing the receipt of the resolution passed by this Board, and expressing their 
entire willingness to carry out its recommendations, looking to the transfer 
of Smith to the State hospital as soon as possible, and to carry out the 
recommendations touching Stackfield^s case. 

Judge Herman promptly granted the decree to transfer. Smith was 



84 Board op Public Chabities. [No. 5, 

removed immediately thereafter, and bas been received into the asylum 
at Harrisburg, where, under the vigilant, care of trained attendants, he has 
the freedom of the corridor, wears his [;lothe8, and is free from physical re- 
straint of any kind. 

Inmates remaining in the alms-hotise September 30, 1819, wei-e 194 : of 
whom 23 are children; U9 sane, 12 insane, 1 idiotie, 2 blind. Tramps — 
8, July; 79, August ; 30, September. . 

The able-bodied, male and female, are employed on the farm and in the 
house. 

Expenses for the year ending September 30, 1879 : 

Total for alms-house, $21,444 46 

Paid for outdoor relief, 3,471 00 



$24,916 46 

CRAWFORD COCniTV 

Jail. 

Visited October 31, 1879. 

This is an old prison of singular style and arrangement. There is an 
upper and lower story. It has the appearance of strength, the masonry 
being massive, and yet it is not sutliciontly strong to prevent escapes. It 
is used principally for detaining persons charged with crime. Convicts are 
sent to the work-house and penitentiary ; Juvenile offendeH to the West- 
em Reform School. 

Its general ajipearance is not ehanged, though the household eare is better. 
Prisoners associate during the day, two occupy one cell at night. Meals are 
taken at a common table. Some reading matter is supplied by the sheriff, 
and occasional religious services are held by the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Present number of prisoners, 15. One female, occupied a room on the 
second story, the only access to which is from the exterior. 

The sheriff boards at $3 50 per week, each. About one half of the pris- 
oners were held for costs. The rest were committed by justices for vag- 
rancy, drunkenness, and petty larcenies. 

PHr-luMH'. 

October 31, 1879, visited with Mr. Kern, county commissioner. 

■■'or the want of sullicient room, this otherwise comfortable home pre- 
,fd at the preceding official visit, a somewhat disordered appearance. 
; report of 1877, page 67.) Efforts are now making to correct this 
culty,at least to some extent, A small building, a one-story frame, 
:;h is to be enlarged, has been erected, with a capacity of eight patients. 
ir cases of a low grade occupy apartments there now. It should l>e eu- 
ed sufficiently to accommodate at least twenty of the helpless class, 
rcby a better classiflcation and greater order and purity can be pre- 
ed in the main buildiug. Some plans to ensure better ventilation have 
1 udoi)ted, but are very imixsrfect, and little bencHt it is to be feared will 



LiEG. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 85 

be derived from them. Some relief may be expected from the additional 
accommodations, so far as the care of other inmates in the main building 
are concerned. In addition to this, the repairs to the apartments which 
have suffered so much injury should not be delayed. 

A considerable increase in the number of inmates has occurred. Present 
number, 103 ; 59 males, 42 females ; 6 are boys, 4 girls ; 2 females insane, 
16 males insane ; 3 blind ; idiotic, 7. This enumeration shows how largely 
the population are helpless and dependent. Mr. Buel, the newly elected 
steward, and his wife, are doing what they can under great difficulties and 
embarrassments. 

The casual visitor, as well as an officer appointed to make the closest 
scrutiny, cannot fail to be impressed with the general management 
and the kindness shown to the inmates. . The table is supplied with coffee 
or tea for breakfast and supper, and dinner if wanted. Milk is also given 
to all who prefer it, besides meat and vegetables. 

This establishment is conducted with the utmost economy. A consider- 
able reduction in the annual expenses has been effected. Out-door relief 
has been cut down from $11,000 to $5,000. A very careful supervision 
over its affairs is exercised by the county commissioners who govern it. 
The farm receives much attention and is made very productive. But one 
hired man is allowed. The farm consists of 225 acres. It produces 2200 
bushels com, 280 bushels wheat, 900 bushels oats, 1125 bushels potatoes, 
buckwheat, 92 bushels, and an unusually large quantity of fruit and vege- 
tables. 

September 30, 1879. Inmates, 102 ; 56 are considered sane, 34 insane, 
5 idiotic, 6 blind, 1 deaf and dumb; 9 are children, 61 are natives, 41 for- 
eigners. Twenty-five males and females assist in the general work. 

Expenses for the year ending December 31^ 1879. 

Maintenance, $2,796 49 

Salaries, wages, labor, 2,016 10 

Fuel and light, 656 11 

Clothing, : 1,328 09 

Insane in State hospital, 4^741 44 

Repairs, . . . .* 1,607 67 

Other expenses, 2,427 96 

Total for almshouse, $15,573 86 

Paid for out-door relief, 6,735 57 

$22,309 43 
Deduct receipts, 2,585 82 

Net cost to county, $19,723 61 



86 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

1 dblawarb county. 

Jail. 

Visited on the 28th of November, by Commissioners Biddle and Dickin- 
son, accompanied by Doctor Isaac N. Kerlin, superintendent of the Penn- 
S3'lvania Training School. 

This jail is situate at Media, the county seat, and is under the manage- 
ment of a board of inspectors, composed of the following named gentle- 
men, viz: George Broomall, president ; Joseph G. Cummings, secretary; 
John McMullin ; William Lewis ; and William Williams, who are appointed 
by the court and county commissioners. 

The capacity has been increased within the last two years to the extent 
of thirty-eight cells, making in all seventy for the prisoners, exclusive of 
those used for bath, hospital, and store-rooms ; and there are at this date 
seventy-five prisoners confined in the seventy cells, twenty-five of which 
are untried. Sixteen are colored. No females. 

The separate or Pennsylvania system is observed as far as possible, and 
the prisoners are kept in their cells, except when detailed to clean the cor- 
ridors or similar service in other parts of the building, and no one is per- 
mitted in the yard for the purpose of airing or exercise. 

The inspectors hold meetings monthly at the prison, and make general 
examination into the condition thereof, and one inspector, at least, is re- 
quired to make weekly visits for the same purpose. 

Promiscuous visiting is not permitted, and visitors are required .to have 
permission from one inspector to visit the jail. Those who desire an in- 
terview with a prisoner must obtain an order for that purpose, signed by 
two of the inspectors. This is a wise arrangement, and should be universal 
throughout the Commonwealth. 

The warden furnishes food for the prisoners, for which the county com- 
missioners pay him twenty cents per dievi for each one. 

All of the prisoners are employed in the following industries, viz : Broom- 
making ; cutting carpet rags ; sewing carpet rags ; caning chair seats ; and 
weaving carpet, for which they have' seven looms. The labor is not con 
tracted out, but the material is purchased, and manufactured into goods, 
which are sold from the prison store-room by the warden. 

The building is warmed by steam from a boiler in the basement, and the 
ventilation seems to be perfect, and the health of the prisoners good. 

One of the larger cells is fitted up for a hospital, which is supplied with 
all the appliances for properly treating the sick. 

Religious services are held every fortnight, and frequent visits are made 
by some of the ladies of the vicinity, who distribute moral and religious 
books and tracts among the prisoners. 

The prison is also furnished with a small library, which is not in good 
condition. The books require re-binding, and a new supply of reading 
matter is desirable, and will, no doubt, be furnished by the citizens of the 
county when this want becomes known to them. 



Leg. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 87 

The punishment for a violation of the prison rules is the darkened cell 
and a diet of bread and water. The punishment for an attempt to escape 
is attaching a peculiarly formed iron instrument, weighing fourteen pounds, 
to the ankle, which, while the prisoner remains still in his cell, does not weigh 
upon the limb, but, if he attempts to walk, the whole weight comes upon 
the leg. The instrument has seldom been used. 

J. Morgan Baker, the warden of the jail, is entitled to much praise for 
the excellent appearance of the building, and for the good order maintained 
among the prisonei's, all of whom seemed to perform their allotted work 
with cheerfulness. The condition of this prison is far above the average 
county jail, and is but another proof, if any were wanted, of the propriety 
and necessity of having all similar institutions placed under the government 
of a board of inspectors. 

DELAWARE COUNTY. 
Poor-Houae. 

Yisited on the 28th of November by Commissioner Biddle and Dickin- 
son, accompanied by Doctor Isaac N. Kerlin, superintendent of the train- 
ing school. 

James M. Smith is the superintendent, and Doctor Fussell attending 
physician. 

The number of inmates at the time of visitation was 154 — 83 males, 54 
females, IT children. Twenty-six of the males insane or idiotic. Twenty- 
-six of the females are either insane or idiotic. Fifteen of the children are 
taught by a teacher employed for the purpose, in a building near the alms- 
house. 

All the buildings are well arranged and in general good condition. Some 
of the bath-rooms and water-closets require repairs and closer inspection 
on the part of the attendants. 

The interior of the house is so arranged that with ordinary care entire 
separation can be maintained. * 

The farm attached to the institution embraces one hundred and two 
acres of land, and affords employment for many of the inmates, by whom, 
under the supervision of a salaried overseer, the work is done. 

The general hospital wards of the alms-house proper, for both male and 
female, were in good order, and are well suplied with the appliances neces- 
sary for hospital service. The out wards, where the able-bodied inmates 
are quartered, were furnished with a full supply of clean and comfortable 
bedding, and the inmates clad with seasonable clothing. The diet, which 
was of a wholesome kind, was well prepared and abundant in quantity. 
No complaint was heard from this class of the inmates. 

The building used as an insane hospital, which is located some distance 
from the alms-house, is a modern structure, and well arranged for the treat- 
ment of this class of patients, but is very much crowded. The wing occu- 
pied by female patients was designed to accommodate, at most, nineteen 
patients, but twenty-six were found there at the time the commissioners 



88 Board op Public Charities. [No. 5, 

made their visit. One woman was tied to the wall for want of proper kind 
of restraints. Two others were under restraint. The sanitary condition 
of this division was good. 

The division occupied by male patients, was not in good sanitary condi- 
tion, and the water-closets, which are not well located, were found to emit 
unpleasant and unwholesome odors, which, with a proper degree of care, 
could have been avoided. One patient was chained to the floor of his cell, 
and others locked up, which, in almost every instance, would not have been 
necessary, had the proper kind of restraining apparatus been supplied by 
the directors of the poor. 

Altogether, the commissioners were not favorably impressed with the 
condition and management of the insane inmates of this institution, and 
the officers in charge were evidently ignorant of, or unskilled in the duty 
and care of insane patients. Reform in this division of the alms-house is 
greatly needed. 

The grounds and airing-yards attached to the insane division, are admir- 
ably arrranged with pavilions and seats for the use of the patients in pleas- 
ant weather. 

DAUPHI^f COCIVTY. 

Jail. 

July 10, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

To provide for the necessity of larger prison accommodations in this 
county, an extension has been made at the rear end of the jail, by which 
the number of cells has been increased from forty to fiftj^-two. Some re- 
lief has been afltorded for the over-crowded condition which generally oc- 
curs in it. It is designed for certain classes for whose custody the usual 
strength and security are not deemed essential. There are two and three 
bunks in each cell ; an arrangement that cannot be regarded to conform 
with present views of a proper system of prison economy, but is deemed 
sufficient for the vagrant class, for whom it is more especially intended. 
Two prisoners held for trial who occupied cells in it, recently effected an 
escape by enlarging the register space near the ceiling, and cutting thence 
to and through the roof. 

There are, at present, 60 prisoners. Short-term prisoners and persons 
awaiting trial only are kept. With the exception of the care of their sev- 
eral apartments, the prisoners are unemployed. Mr. Hoffman, the warden, 
has a due regard to the importance of compelling the observance of prison 
rules an4 regulations, and, so far as is in his power, enforces them. The 
jail is in good order. 

Poor-Hoaae. 

July 11, 1879. This place is occupied to its fullest capacity. To provide 
accommodations to a sufficient extent, for some years past, has been a mat- 
ter of no little difficulty, which has been remedied only by crowding the 
different apartments beyond their proper measure with beds. Wherever 
rooms, large enough for two beds, have four, with at least double that num- 



Leo. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 89 

ber of occupants, with no storage furniture for clothing and other articles ; 
much disorder and confusion will unavoidably occur, and which no degree 
of attention and care can well prevent. With larger sleeping accommoda- 
tions, the great impediment in the way of the highest standard of house- 
hold care and condition would be removed. 

The directors and officers have not been insensible to these defects and 
to the necessity of some improvements and enlargement, especially in the 
hospital department, which was badly adapted to the purpose for which it 
was used, and which presented a very unfavorable appearance from the de- 
cav and disorder in which it had been suffered to fall. An addition has 
been made to the rear of the hospital, by which twelve additional rooms 
have been gained, and which are designed for the most aptive cases of the 
insane. 

New floors and doors, better bath and water-closet arrangements, with 
general renewals and repairs, have been made, by which the general condi- 
tion has been much improved, and a better distribution or classification of 
the inmates of some of the wards of the hospital been rendered practicable. 

Present number of inmates, 182, of whom 34 are insane, and 30 children. 
An increase of ten in the number of insane occurred, above what it was in 
1877, which, it is presumed, is caused by the transfer of that or a' larger 
number from the State asylum. 

The total expenses for alms-house for the year, $23,540 38 

Paid for outdoor relief, .... 10,517 06 



$34,057 44 



ERIE CX)UNTY. 
Jail. 

Visited October 20, 1879. 

This prison, as stated in former reports, is built and arranged after the* 
iron cage plan, for which a preference seems to be entertained in this sec- 
tion of the State. Whatever advantages may be claimed for jails of this 
kind on the ground of security, little or nothing can be said in their favor 
for carrying out a system of prison discipline which requires the seclusion 
of prisoners. The architectural arrangement does not admit of such sepa- 
ration as to prevent objectionable verbal communication, nor the constant 
association in the cells and corridors during all the hours of the day and 
night of the cnminal class, a practice that is held to be very unfavorable 
to thorough prison discipline. It is entirely useless to expect a favorable 
condition in the prison care and management under such circumstances ; 
reformatory efforts and influences are scarcely thought of ; cleanliness and 
good order seem to be impossible. The best that can be done for female 
prisoners in the way of separation inthis prison is to place them in an apart- 
ment on the third tier, as remote as possible from tho8.e occupied by males. 
But this does not prevent verbal communication, a privilege seldom or 
never allowed in well-regulated systems of prison discipline. 



90 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

In extenuation of the careless manner in whicli some of these jails are 
conducted, the fact must be stated that they are merely used as places of 
detention of persons charged with crime until after trial. Very short 
term convicts only are kept. Convicts, with sentences over three months, 
are committed to the Western Penitentiary or Allegheny County Work- 
House. This is contrary to the custom pursued in many other counties, 
in which l^oth long and short term convicts are kept, and where a rigid 
system of prison discipline is faithfully carried out. 

Sixteen persons are held at this time, which is a large decrease on the 
number in jail at the same time the preceding year — only four were tried, 
ten were waiting trial. The sheriff conducts the prison, and boards the 
prisoners at a fixed rate. The defective drainage has been partially, but not 
entirely, corrected. 

Almi-Hoase. 

The utmost care and attention continue to be exercised in the manage- 
ment of this institution. The aged and infirm, the sick and helpless, the 
feeble-minded and insane receive kind and faithful care and treatment. So 
far as the accommodations in the buildings and the extent to which such 
conven^encies as are essential for those who are incapable of self-cure are 
provided, no help or comfort is withheld, and no efforts are spared to en- 
sure a comfortable condition for all the inmates. 

With the benefit of a large experience on the part of the intelligent and 
fully qualffied superintendent, Mr. Griffin, and the active and diligent suj^er- 
vision of the board of directors, every guarantee is afforded for an efficient 
administration of all the departments. 

A reduction in the house expenses for 1878, of about $10,000 was effected, 
and a still further saving is expected to be made in those of 1879. The 
expenses for 1878, were $29,900, which included the support of the insane 
at Dixmont, amounting to $2,063, and $6,000 paid for out-door relief. 
Large reductions in the item of out-door relief, here as well as in other 
counties, under a system of better care and scrutiny into the merits of ap- 
plicants are being made. The managing boards are also directing atten- 
tion to a reduction of the expenditures incurred for the support of the in- 
sane in State hospitals, and with this intention have withdrawn some of 
the old, incurable, and harmless cases. I will not undertake to say to what 
extent, if any, these transfers into the county home should be made, if 
made at all. It is a matter which should be very carefully considered, be- 
cause in many instances such changes will be sure to result in wrong and 
hardships to the patients which could not be justified by the question of 
economy alone. Whilst a reduction in the annual expenses has been ef- 
fected it is not to b© supposed that the higher aims and purposes for which 
these institutions have been established have been disregarded. The num- 
ber of the destitute and dependent who are received into the house is as 
large or larger than it was at this time in the preceding year. The table is 
as well supplied, the household care, the sleeping apartments, shelter and 



Leg. Doc] ' Board of Public Charities. 91 

raiment, all are kept up to their usual good standard. Under skillful man- 
agement the labor of the inmates for house and farm work has been realized 
to an unusual extent. Only one hired man is employed for the farm which 
is quite large. All the garments used by the inmates are made up in the 
house; all the cutting for which is done by Mrs. Griflfln, the wife of the 
superintendent. Nearly all the new shoes are made by inmates, and all the 
repairing. Only seven hand& or assistants are paid, viz : A farmer, baker, 
engineer, assistant to Mrs. Griffin, an attendant for the male insane depart- 
ment, a female attendant, and assistant attendant for female insane depart- 
ment. 

The present number of inmates is 240. The cost per week for each is 
about $1 30. 

FAYBTTB (BOUNTY. 
Jail. 

October 11, 1879. The prison is located in the rear of the court-house, 
on an eminence that is highly favorable to ventilation and drainage. The 
front is built of brick, the rear, which is the prison part, is of heavy stone. 
It is in the style of the Erie prison. A cage of heavy iron bars incloses 
the cells, which, with the floors, are lined with boiler plate-iron ; an arrange- 
ment that is calculated to insure strength and security. The male prison- 
ers are confined in this part of the prison. Besides this, immediately east 
of it and communicating with it, in the temporary frame building, cells are 
prepared for female prisoners. 

The prison is provided with water for bath and wash-stands, a heater in 
the cellar, and other conveniences. 

The jail admits of carrying out a good system of prison discipline, but 
it is not observed. Its appearance is by no means what it should be. For 
the want of paint and thorough household care, the cells, floors, the iron 
work, walls and ceilings present a very unfavorable aspect, whereas, with 
the benefit of these, it might be much improved and made bright and 
cheerful. 

There were seven prisoners. All convicts over three months are sent to 
the work-house and penitentiary. 

Poor-Hooae. 

The number of the dependent and disabled who are compeled to seek as- 
sistance in the alms-house in this county, is large and is augmenting. Two 
buildings are provided for the purpose. The old building or poor-house 
proper, in which the destitute class are maintained, and the hospital, where 
the sick, injured, and insane receive care and treatment. The former has 
suffered much in its appearance, from its being so largely occupied. It 
presents a very disorderly appearance. The furniture is much worn, es- 
pecially the bedding. The inmates, from want of sufficient room or prop- 
erly arranged rooms, are huddled together without regard to any system of 
classification whatever. Old women, women with their children, the simple 



92 Board of Public Charities. [No 5, 

minded and epileptics occupy the same rooms or those adjoining, each pre- 
senting such scenes of confusion and disorder as may readily be conceived. 

The colored class, men, women, and children, have beds in what were 
formerly cells in the basement. An adjoining room is occupied b^^^ a man, 
wife, and child. A blind man, also, has an abode here. A more cheerless 
and neglected looking place can nowhere be seen. 

Much of the trouble arises from the want of system in the manner of 
conducting it. The household care is decidedly bad, as is shown by the 
disorder ever^^ where apparent. But habits of order and cleanliness can be 
established, and will be observed if earnestly enjoined. 

A better condition continues to be maintained in the hospital. About 
one fourth of the, entire population is under treatment here. Better house- 
hold care is observed. At this time, there are 36 cases under care and 
treatment. The total number of inmates is about 145. 

September 30, 1879. Inmates, 148, of these 106 are classified as being 
sane, 33 insane, 6 idiotic, 3 blind ; 39 hospital cases, 38 are children. The 
able bodied of both sexes are required to assist in the general work. 

Tramps seldom make their appearance. 

For expenditures see statistical tables. 

PRAKKLIN C}OUNTY. 
Jail. 

Visited with Commissioner Biddle, September 3, 1879. 

This prison was found in its usual condition. Neither repairs nor im- 
provements of any kind have been made. Thirty prisoners were kept in the 
ten cells on the first and second fioors. A few of this number are tramps, 
one is a convict, the rest are awaiting trial. From four to five are kept in 
each cell. All, the tried and untried, the novice in crime, and the old of- 
fender are in constant association in the corridors and cells. Where a 
lax system of discipline like this prevails, the jail becomes to the vicious 
and debased a place for social enjoyment rather than of punishment. Noth- 
ing can or is done to prevent corrupting influences, nor the formation of 
associations within it, which increase the temptations of a convict after 
discharge, and tend to a criminal life. 

The building has been suffered to fall into a very disordered condition, 
and is much decayed. It was defective in its plan and construction from 
the beginning. It is useless to expect a proper system of prison discipline 
to be carried out in jails thus arranged. 

Escapes are easily effected, and can be prevented by personal vigilance 
only ; the building itself affording little or no protection. 

In order to awaken attention to the urgent necessity for suitable prison 
accommodations for the criminal class in this important county, the under- 
signed addressed a communication on the subject to the Honorable D. W. 
Rowe, President Judge of the Judicial District, which is inserted and made 
part of this report to the Legislature : 



Leg. Doc.] Board op Public Charities. 93 

Harrisburq, Pa., September 5, 1879. 
Honorable D. W. Rowe, President Judge : 

Dear Sir : Upon an official inspection of the Franklin county jail, made 
by the undersigned this day, the necessity for providing accommodations 
of a proper character and to a sufficient extent for the criminal class, be- 
came, if possible, more apparent than at any former period. In no one par- 
ticular is it adequate to present wants and necessities. Built at a period 
when but few criminals had to be immured, it has long ceased to be a safe 
place for the confinement of the constantly augmenting numbers of danger- 
ous oflfenders. The protection of property and life, the ends of justice, alike 
demand that the county authorities should provide for necessities which 
can no longer be disregarded and which require immediate attention. 

The details of our inspection will be presented in our report to the 
Legislature, but our attention having been called to your charge to the 
grand jury, in which you very fully present the whole case, in every word 
of which we concur, under a hope that a statement of our observations 
might be of some service in promoting favorable action upon the subject, 
we have deemed it our duty to address this communication to you. 
Yery respectfully, your obedient servants, 

DiLLER Luther, 
General Agent Board of Public Charities. 

James S. Biddle, 
Commissioner. 

The grand jury, in answer to the charge of the court, recommended that 
the present building be repaired, altered, and improved, and that the whole 
of it be devoted to the purposes of a prison. 

The plan of remodeling the old prison was rejected by the court, which 
has resulted in a determination on the part of the county, commissioners to 
prepare a building which will be ample in its capacity, and in other respects 
be suitable for the purpose. 

In a communication from the visiting local committee we are informed 
that " our commissioners do not intend to reconstruct the present jail, but 
to erect a new building at the rear of it, and adjoining it. This building 
will be two stories high, and will contain twent}^ cells. It will be con- 
structed upon the mo&it approved style, and with all necessary comforts and 



conveniences." 



Poor-HouM. 



September 3, 1879, with Commissioner Biddle. 

The largest part of the pauper class are maintained in the large brick 
building, which was erected for the purpose. Generally it is fully occu- 
pied. The labor class have comfortable apartments in the large stone man- 
sion, in which the steward and his family reside. 

What may be accomplished by active and diligent efforts, notwithstand- 
ing t^e want of conveniences and favorable arrangements, may be seen 



94 Board of Public Chabities. [No. 6, 

here. Under the care and attention of Mr. and Mrs. Middour, the steward 
and his lady, a good condition is observed generally through the house- 
No efforts seem to be spared to preserve good order and cleanliness. The 
afflicted and disabled evidently receive considerate attention and care. 

The apartments for the insane have been much improved. Airing grounds 
have been enclosed for their benefit. A large liberty is permitted. Few 
or none are strictly confined, which is an entire change in what was the 
practice four or five years ago. • Waggaman, who occupied one of the very 
cells in the wing of this hospital for over twenty-five years, and who was 
released at my instance in 1873, after enjoying the liberty of outside air and 
exercise for a brief period, was missing. He died one week before our visit. 

The present accommodations for the insane are by no means sufficient 
There are forty-two cases to be cared for, some of a very low grade, re- 
quiring untiring attention in order to preserve the requisite order and 
cleanliness. The benefit of faithful attendants is given to them. But a 
larger provision for these dependents should not be longer deferred. 

A new barn has been built. The farm consists of two hundred and nine 
acres, of which one hundred and seventy-five are under cultivation. Large 
products are realized from it. Only one hired man is allowed. No hired 
assistance is required for the household duties. 

A letter which has been received from the local visiting committee, since 
the above was written, communicates the following gratifying intelligence : 

" The directors of the poor will put up a residence for the steward in 
front of the present buildings — connected with them by covered corridors. 
Both the present houses will be given up to the inmates. The west end 
of the brick building will be occupied by the insane, who will have ample 
room and suitable accommodations." 

September 30, 1879. 

One hundred and sixty-two inmates; 125 sane, 32 insane, 34 are child- 
ren, 4 blind, 22 hospital cases; 115 are natives, 47 are foreigners. Only 
19 tramps applied for relief during the last three months. Twenty-two 
males engage in farm work, tailor, and shoe work. The females assist in 
the housekeeping work, and in making up the clothing for inmates. 

Expenditures for alms-house, $8,903 32 

Paid for outdoor relief, 7,610 98 



$16,514 30 

GRBBNB CX>U.\TY. 
Jail. 

October 17, 1879. 

The hope that a more suitable building for the prison wants of this county 
would be pj*ovided has not yet been realized. It has not been disturbed, 
either in its external or interior arrangement, in the least degree. It seems 
to be cherished as an architectural relic of a bygone age. The dust and 
mould of the ages have settled upon it. Its dark and dismal aparttnents. 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 96 

its heavy lainbering doors, with their creaking hinges, its dungeon-like cells, 
into which the light of heaven cannot penetrate, its steep stone steps, wind- 
ing and disjointed, by which you ascend to the loft, where two iron cages 
are placed to confine those who have the misfortune to make them their 
abiding place — all these remain as they were seen in the previous inspec- 
tions. 

Fortunately, there were no human tenants to divide the occupancy with 
the rats and vermin with which it is infested. Convicts are not permitted 
to remain in it after trial ; but, with a commendable philanthropy, are or- 
dered by the court to the Allegheny county work-house, or to the peniten- 
tiary, where far more desirable quarters can be obtained. 

I can only repeat the language of a former report. It is totally unfit for 
prison purposes, and that the county authorities owe it to themselves, to a 
faithful execution of the sentence of the law, and to the honor and majesty 
of the county, to provide such prison accommodations as are in accordance 
with modem views, and calculated to secure the safe keeping of dangerous 
offenders. 

Poor-Honte. 

October 17, 18Y9. 

The diflSculties encountered in conducting this institution, noticed in 
former reports, in a great measure continue. Some relief for over-crowded 
apartments has been obtained by preparing a room on the attic of the main 
building with eight double-beds, where sixteen of the inmates are now 
lodged. Some of the rooms on the lower floors continue to be occupied by 
males and females, care being taken as far as possible to select the nearest 
kindred, such as husband and wife, or brother and sister, where the ne- 
cessity occurs to have the rooms thus occupied. Still more sleeping room 
might be obtained by arranging another room on the opposite side of the 
attic, to which it is hoped the directors will give attention. 

Fortunately, under circumstances of such serious embarrassment, the 
helpless and dependent inmates enjoy the benefit of officers so intelligent 
and humane as are Mr. Adams and his wife, who continue to serve the in- 
stitution as steward and matron. 

The number of inmates on September 30, 1878, was 88, as follows : Males, 
34; females, 36; children, 16 ; 2 colored; 10 sane; 16 insane; 5 blind; 1 
deaf and dumb. 

See statistical table for expenditures. 

HCNTINGDON COUNTY. 

Jail. 

Octobers, 1879. 

An extension has been made to the old prison by which eight additional 
cells have been provided. A very pressing want has thereby been supplied, 
at least for some time. The building, though small, is made secure. The 
cells are seven by nine feet, eleven feet in height. Those on the second tier 
are iron clad ; have a register in each for ventilation, and are heated by a 



96 ^ Board of Public Charities. [No. 5 , 

stove placed in the hall, there being but one door to the cells, which are 
iron barred. 

In addition to this improvement, a small two-story brick house has been 
erected in the jail yard, which is designed as a wash-house, and for other 
housekeeping purposes. 

Fourteen persons were confined, as follows : One convict ; nine untried, 
and four lunatics, who are kept in the apartments of the old part of the 
prison until the new poor-house will be ready for their return, the old one 
from whence they were received having been destroyed by fire. 

AlnM-HouBc. 

A new building to supply the place of the old one, which was destroyed 
by fire in the early part of this year, is under way, and is far advanced to- 
wards completion. It is expected to be ready for occupation by the end 
of the season. 

The new house will be arranged like the former one, with some additional 
improvements, and conveniences. Water will now be introduced into all 
parts of the house. Better accommodations will be provided for the insane ; 
the different floors will be divided up in such a way as to admit of a better 
classification of the inmates, an object too frequently overlooked, and the 
importance of which is too frequently disregarded. 

These improvements were made under the act of 1879, which authorizes 
directors of the poor to repair and re-build poor-houses destroyed by fire, 
subject only to approval of the county commissioners. 

The paupers are maintained at present in an old frame house formerly 
the farm house, and a temporary building put up for the purpose. 

September 30, 1879, number of inmates seventy-three, of whom sixty-five 
are considered sane, seven insane, and one idiotic. Seventeen are children. 
Thirteen of the inmates assist in the general work. 

INDIANA COUNTY. 
JaII. 

October 14, 1879. 

We have nothing to report of this edifice excepting that it is " the same 
old jail," and is as bad as it well can be. 

Seven rooms are used for prisoners on the first and second fioors ; of 
course it is useless to expect, where the prison arrangement is so imperfect, 
that any separation of the different classes of prisoners should be attempted. 
The males, the tried and untried, are kept in one room, and the females in 
the other. At date of visit, there were three prisoners, one man and two 
females. One was insane and is temporarily detained, one is charged with 
malicious mischief, and a third for forgery. 

The jail part of this dwelling is much decayed and very insecure. 



Lao. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 97 

LAWRB]«CB rOVNTY. 

Jail. 

Tisited November I, 1879. 

This jail has been built within the last two years. It is an iron cage, with 
some departures from the general plan, which may be regarded as improve- 
ments. A better method for separation of the sexes is adopted than is 
found in prisons of this style. The bath and water-closet arrangement, 
so important for persons constantly confined, are also arranged in a better 
maimer. 

It contains eleven cells or apartments, with an estimated capacity, by con- 
gregating prisoners, of twenty-nine. The cells for females, four in' number, 
are on the opposite side of those occupied by males, and are furnished 
in a very proper manner. It has the appearance of strength and security. 
Eleven prisoners were in custody at the date of my visit. 

The New CMtle Poor Dtotiict. 

November 1, 1879. 

The dwelling which has been used to maintain the poor of this district 
was destroyed by fire, on the 14th of October, 1879. It contained twelve 
Inmates at the time, all of whom escaped without injury. They are pro- 
vided for in some out-buildings which were saved. A temporary kitchen 
has been built. The property was insured for $4,000. Preparations are 
made to erect another in the same locality, and to urge it forward to com- 
pletion with the utmost dispatch. 

The report of inmates remaining at the end of the year, and of the an- 
nual expenses have not been received in time. An itemized statement may 
be seen in the statistical table, which follows this. 

LANCASTBR COUNTY. 
Jail. 

July 11, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

This prison, in all respects may be considered to have a just claim to be 
ranked among the best in the State. 

Special attention continues to be given to the importance of employ- 
ment as a reformatory and economic measure. Greater diversity in trades 
than is usual is to be observed. These consist of shoes, chair seats, net- 
ting, baskets, bagging, brooms, wicker-work, carpets, and segars. The 
workmanship is of the best kind, and the articled made, besides finding a 
ready sale, contribute materially towards the payment of the expense of 
conducting the jail. 

The jail is much crowded at this time, so that strict separation, and the 
highest standard of order are rendered difficult. One hundred and seventy- 
two prisoners, viz : one hundred and forty-five convicts, and twenty-seven 
untried, are maintained. The necessity of placing two, in some instances, 
in a single cell is therefore unreasonable. The vagrant class are kept in the 
addition erected in 1877, where work-shops and some sleeping apartments 
are also provided. 

7— B. P. Char. 



98 Board of Public Chariti£8. [No. 5, 

Po«r*iIo«ae. 

July 11, 18t9. With Commissioiiers Dickinson and Biddle. 

The buildings in which the dependent class of this county are maintained, 
are of the best kind, both with respect to their arrangement, and the extent 
to which accommodations are provided. The new poor-house contains every 
modem improvement and convenience, and may be referred to as a model 
for other counties in which similar structures may be required. About 
one half of the pauper population of this district are maintained in this 
building. The present number is two hundred and ten. They consist of 
the aged, crippled, and, to some extent, of the working class. The differ- 
ent apartments are in good order, and the various duties connected with 
its management are faithfully performed by the superintendent, Mr. Brock. 

Infirmary, — The sick and injured are maintained in this department. 
Bright and comfortable medical and surgical wards are arranged for these 
classes, in which the benefit of excellent medical and ordinary care and 
treatment are given to them. The present number of occupants is forty- 
two. 

Insane Hospital. — The infirmary and hospital are connected by a cov- 
ered corridor, and are under the care of B. F. Cox, a very competent and 
faithful superintendent. There are in this department 117 cases. The 
benefit of the improved system of treatment for the insane are enjoyed to 
the fullest extent. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 1879, 441, of whom 145 are natives, 
296 foreigners, 117 insane, (part of whom are pay patients,) 6 idiotic, 3 
blind, 1 deaf and dumb. Tramps during the quarter, 109. 

Fort3'-five males and 35 females assist in the general work of the house 
and grounds ; 17 of the men are engaged in the work of the farm ; 3 shoe- 
makers, 2 tailors, 1 carpenter, 1 blacksmith, 21 in quarrying and breaking 
stone. 

Expenses for the year ending December 31, 1879. 

Maintenance, $18,411 56 

Salaries, wages, and labor, 4,546 16 

Fuel and light, 4,210 17 

Clothing, 3,346 28 

Insane in State hospital, None. 

.Repairs, None. 

Extraordinary expenses, 466 13 

Other expenses, 5,233 37 



Total for alms-house, $36,213 67 

Paid for out-door relief, 1,873 52 



$38,087 17 
Deduct receipts, (excluding tax receipts,) 5,781 65 

Net cost to county, $32,805 52 



Lbq. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 99 

lbbanon couivty. 

Jail. 

August 6, 181 9. Visited with Commissioners Clymer, Dickinson, and 
Biddle. 

Upon a re-visit to this prison by a committee of the board, it was found 
to be occupied much beyond its proper capacity. Twenty-six prisoners, 
some of them charged with crime of the highest grade, were crowded into 
twelve cells or apartments, in every respect unfit for their safe and proper 
custody. The necessity for providing larger and more suitable accommo- 
dations for the increasing wants of this district was, if possible, made more 
apparent than ever before, which led the committee to address a communi- 
cation to the president judge of the judicial district, in which the subject is 
fully presented, and which is made part of this report. 

Harrisburg, August 5, 1879. 
Honorable Robert M. Henderson, Judge Twelfth Judicial District : 

The undersigned officers and members of the State Board of Public 
Charities, in the prosecution of their official duty, visited the jail of Leba- 
non county on the 7th instant, for the purpose of inspecting its condition, 
and more especially its fitness and capacity for the safe confinement of as 
large a number of prisoners as your officers sometimes report to our board 
as being detained therein. 

The jail contains fourteen small apartments ; six on the lower tier, and 
eight on the upper. One of these is used for a sitting-room, and another 
for water-closet conveniences. The supply of water being insufficient, and 
the arrangements for drainage being defective, the room is not used at this 
time for that purpose. 

There being but twelve rooms or cells for the confinement of prisoners, 
which have numbered at times as many as seventy, averaging almost six to 
each cell, descipline cannot be enforced, and disorder necessarily occurs ; 
and as there is but one cell, (which is iron-clad,) that has any appearance 
of security, this promiscuous association of the prisoners affords oppor- 
tunity for planning and executing new schemes of mischief. 

At the time of our visit we found the cell doors wide open, and twenty 
six prisoners, tried and untried, six of them under sentence of death, occu- 
pying the cells, the corridor, and yard attached to the building, according 
to their inclinations without any appearance of the discipline so necessary 
in an institution of this kind. The female prisoners are placed in one or 
more of the cells of the same block before and after trial, and in order to 
prevent as far is possible objectionable verbal communication with the male 
prisoners, it is found necessary to keep the doors, occupied by the female 
prisoners, closed at all times, which is a matter of no small hygienic diffi- 
culty, when it is remembered how very imperfect are the ventilating and 
drainage facilities in all parts of this decayed and badly arranged building. 

From the facts above stated, it must be obvious to all that nothing short 



100 BoABD OP Public Chabiti£& [No. 5, 

of a new building, of sufficient size to hold the prisoners safely and sepa- 
rately, furnished with the modem appliances which are now deemed nec- 
essary in order to enforce the discipline established by the laws of the Com- 
monwealth, can remedy the evils arising from this badly appointed jail. 

The system of prison management, which is always found to prevail in 
jails which, like that of Lebanon county, are wholly unfit in every particu- 
lar for the safe keeping and reformation of the convict, is calling forth from 
Christian philanthropists an earnest and persistent demand for reformation. 
It is not only disgraceful, but a body and soul destroying system. Here 
it is that lessons in profanity and immorality are given and received ; here 
new plots for future mischief are discussed ; and the dark ways of vice and 
dissipation are explained and presented in attractive forms. Under an ut- 
ter absence of occupation, what else can be expected ? Employment in 
such a jail is, of course, out of the question. Moral and religious instruc- 
tion is neglected. Prison rules and regulations, excepting what merely re- 
lates to food and shelter, are not prescribed, or, if they are, cannot be en- 
forced. Need surprise be expressed that prisons thus arranged and con- 
ducted have no terrors for the evil-doer ? Is it not obvious that they must, 
in almost every instance, be mere schools of vice, where the prisoner is 
sheltered, fed, and clothed for a time, without the privation of any comfort 
or privilege that may not be easily borne, soon again to be a transgressor, 
and to be returned to society a worse man then when he entered the jail ? 

This jail was built at a period when the population of the county was 
comparatively small, and had but few criminals to provide for. It has long 
since ceased to be a fit place for the safe keeping of dangerous offenders, 
and we have no hesitation in saying that it affords little or no protection to 
society against a repetition of crime by this evil disposed class. Too fre- 
quently the penalties for crime*, for the want of a suitable building, cannot 
ce executed, and the well meant ends of justice are thus defeated. 

The necessity for providing larger and more suitable accommodations, 
for the constantly increasing wants of this judicial district can no longer 
be disregarded, and we trust that the county authorities will be duly awak- 
ened to its importance, and that county buildings, commensurate in all re- 
spects to present wants, and of such a character as will reflect credit upon 
the citizens of one of the most fertile, wealthy, and beautiful of all the 
counties of the Commonwealth, may be erected at the earliest possible 
period. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Mahlon H. Dickinson, 
President Board of Public Charities, 

DiLLER LUTHEB, M. D., 

Secretary and General AgenL 

Poor-ltoiue. 

August 6, 1879. 

No changes are noticed. It continues to be conducted in the usual way. 



LeQ. Doc.] BOABD OF PUBLIG ChARITIEB. 101 

A slight annual increase in the number of Inmates has occurred, there being 
160 at this time, 45 of whom are children, which is 35.04 per cent, of the 
whole population. To accommodate so many in the present building, much 
crowding has to be practiced. Every room contains as many beds as the 
space possibly admits of. 

But thorough care is exercised. The bedding is kept in good order, and 
is comfortable, the rooms are well furnished, and with the single exception 
of being improperly crowded, afford desirable lodgings for their occupants. 
The rooms are warmed by stoves, a source of danger, which sooner or later 
will have to be corrected. The inmates are well clad. All have the benefit 
of a well supplied table. 

The children are taught in a separate building, and have the benefit of a 
paid teacher. 

The sanitary condition is favorable. At this time the hospital depart- 
ment is without sick occupants. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 18T9. Total, 173, as follows: 152 
sane, 12 insane, 1 idiotic, 8 bliiid, 37 children. During the quarter ending 
September 30, 1 1 7 tramps sought relief. No return of the number employed. 

Financial statement not received in time for this report. See statistical 
table. 

LEHIGH COUNTY. 
Jail. 

Visited August 24, 1879. 

This is considered one of the best of our county prisons. It is admirably 
located and is believed to have been well and securely built. 

An escape has been made during the past year which has induced doubts 
of tlie correctness of the opinion herrtofore entertained of its strength. 
Such improvements will doubtless be made as will make it entirely secure. 

It is provided with all the conveniences that are deemed essential in jails 
in which a proper system of prison discipline is conducted. There are forty- 
five well arranged cells, forty of which may at all times be used for the con- 
finement of prisoners or whenever seclusion or safety demand it. 

The facility with which verbal communication may be carried on by pris- 
oners occupying adjoining cells, which is apt to occur in all the jails, is com- 
plained of by the ofl3cers of the one now under notice as requiring a remedy. 

Employment has been introduced to a larger extent. The labor of the 
prisoners is hired to a contractor ten cents per day for first sixty days, fifteen 
cents for the next six months, and twenty cents for the following year. 
The warden boards the prisoners at twenty-two cents a day each. There 
are forty prisoners at this time, about two thirds are convicts. 

Poor-House. 

Visited August 23, 1879. 

This institution continues to be well conducted. 

There are at this time 305 inmates, of whom 80 or nearly one fourth are 
children. The latter constitute a large percentage of the entire alms-house 
population, not only here but in other similar institutions, and causes no 
little embarrassment in the management. To prevent the evil consequences 



102 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

resulting from indiscriminate association with adult paupers, is an object 
that should always be kept in view in every well-conducted establishment 
of the kind. The visitor to the one under notice cannot fail to be gratified 
at observing the pains that are taken in this respect. Children have a sepa- 
rate dining table. A building has been erected in a lot, at a small distance 
from the main edifice, for the smaller children, where they are kept during 
the day, under the care of careful attendants. 

The new hospital addition is finished and occupied. It is designed for 
the insane, and sick and infirm of all classes. It has a capacity for 300 in- 
mates. It is heated by steam, and has an abundant water supply for all 
parts of it. A new engine with engine-house for pumping water and other 
purposes, form part of the improvements for the year. 

The practice of this institution, with the additional accommodations which 
have been provided for the future, will be to set a limit to the expenditures for 
out-door relief, a source of much abuse, as it is generally granted. Under 
the rule which has been established, a reduction of the annual cost for the 
past year, amounting to nearly $8,000 has been effected. But a wise dis- 
crimination continues to be exercised. Two feeble-minded and helpless 
adults are partially supported in their own families. The small contribu- 
of one dollar each per week affords sufiScient assistance to enable them to 
remain imder their mother's care in her own home. The arrangement is 
perfectly satisfactory, and is an example which may be profitably followed 
by others. 

The effect of restricting this mode of .dispensing relief has resulted, fre- 
quently, on the part of families declining a residence in the house which is 
proffered to them, and is the means of exciting successful efforts for self- 
support. Will not this be the case very generally, ^here the system is es- 
tablished, and not too rigidly but judiciously carried out ? 

I might enlarge upon what is done at this place for the comfort and wel- 
fare of the indigent and unfortunate, and allude to their comfortably fur- 
nished apartments, the thorough order and cleanliness everywhere strictly 
observed, the kind, diligent, and eflScient care of Mr. Josiah Heninger, the 
steward, and his family, in the discharge of their numerous duties ; but these 
have been fully detailed in former reports, and I therefore refrain what 
must be a repetition of what has previously been stated. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 1879, 288 ; of which 233 are clasr.ified 
as sane, 37 insane, 14 blind, 4 deaf and dumb, 65 are hospital cases ; 134 
are adult males, 72 adult females, 82 children ; 96 males and 53 females as- 
sist in the work of the house and farm. 

The total expenses for the alms-house for the year, $16,274 05 

For out-door relief, 3,166 68 

Total alms-house and out-door relief, $19,440 735 

Deduct receipts, (excluding tax receipts,) 360 8 

Net cost to county, $19,079 V8 



Lbq. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 103 

LACKAWAIflVA fXlUNTY. 

Jail. 

September 19, 1879, visited with commissioner Biddle. 

Temporary buildings are occupied in this new county for the courts and 
for prison purposes. Cells have been arranged in a rented building for the 
detention of the criminal class. Twenty-six prisoners were confined at the 
time of our visit ; S3 on the first and second stories, and 3 on the third. 

Water conveniences are introduced into each cell on the first and second 
stories. The cells are made somewhat secure, but are not deemed suffi- 
ciently so. The constant presence of a watchman is required. 

The prison is conducted by a warden who was appointed by the inspectors 
The warden boards the prisoners at twenty-five cents per day each. 

HllliMe PArn, formely Provldeace Poor-Houae lor the Poor of the City of Scranton and Towa- 

•iilp of Newton, 

September 17, 1879, visited with Commissioner Biddle. 

This attractive looking home, and the complete manner in which it has 
been built and arranged for the poor of the district, was sufficiently noticed 
in the report of 1878, page 86. 

It is no vain spirit of boasting, that the gentlemen connected with the 
management, remark " the average narrow gauge poor director, whose ideas 
of pauper life run to rickety shanties, miserable cells, fenced in by white- 
washed walls, through which the winter winds howl dismally, a warning to 
those without, and a misery to those within, would be fairly staggered by 
the elegance of the place. And no wonder. The popular idea of a poor- 
house, is a place of persecution and desolation — where those who stumble 
under life's burden, may drag out a weary existence, and die as soon as pos- 
sible." 

* 

Hillside farm is no such place. Despair is not written on its gates, and 
those who enter, may not leave all hope behind. The new building is a 
solid brick structure of imposing appearance, 50X100 feet, and four stories 
high. It is heated throughout with steam, is well ventilated, and has hot 
and cold water on every floor. The heating apparatus, a Nason tubular 
end boiler, is located in the sub-cellar. The basement is finely lighted, 
high, and airy, and contains a large dining-room neatly and substantially 
furnished. The room is 40X70 feet. Adjoining this isl a large kitchen 30 
feet square, with pantries, vegetable cellar, and store-rooms generally for 
suplies. The kitchen has a French range, of the Duparquet & Hout pat- 
tern, such as is used in the principal hotels, and everything is kept in splendid 
order. , 

The first fioor has an ample hall, reception-room, and a cosy superin- 
tendent's office. Adjoining the superintendent's office is a well supplied 
medical department, and the remaining portion of this fioor is occupied 
with fifteen sleeping-rooms, closets, bath-rooms, &c., all indicating the 
the truth of the adage, ^^ cleanliness is next godliness." The sleeping-rooms 
are each furnished with four single iron bedsteads, neatly supplied with 



104 BoABD OF Public Chabities. [Xo. 5, 

sheets, pillows, &c.,and in each room there are four chairs, a mirror, stand, 
and other necessary articles. 

The second floor contains seventeen sleeping apartments, closets, bath- 
tubs, &c. 

The third floor consists of a large dormitory, that will accommodate from 
flfty to one hundred persons in case of emergency, and the entire building 
is estimated to have a capacity for caring for two hundred and fifty in- 
mates. 

The building is surrounded by ample porches which commard a hand- 
some view of the valley. The grounds have been put in handsome trim by 
the labor of the inmates under the direction of Mr. Boice, the superin- 
tendent. This building is designed principally for females. 

To secure an ample supply of water at all times, water works have been 
erected and water forced from a sparkling stream a mile distant by aid of 
wind-mill to a reservoir with a capacity of eighteen hundred barrels. 

There are one hundred and forty-seven and a half acres in the farm, which 
is worked with two hired men with the aid of the inmates. 

The entire cost of these fine improvements is only $18,000. 

The number of inmates September lY, 1879, 99 ; of whom 97 were adults, 
and 2 children, 60 were males, 38 females, the latter occupied rooms in the 
new house. The males are accommodated in the old original poor-house, 
which has undergone considerable change and improvement. 

The insane, of whom there are considerable number, are cared for in the 
two frame buildings termed the hospital. The intention is to remove it 
and erect a new one, in all respects more suitable than the present one. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 1880, 103, as follows : 70 sane, 30 in- 
sane, 3 blind; 60 arc males, 43 females; 21 are natives, 82 foreigners; 22 
males assist in the farm work ; 9 females in house work. 

LCZBRNE COU.\TY. 

Jan. 

September 19, 1879, re-visited, with Commissioner Biddle. 

The organization of the new county of Lackawanna out of part of Luzerne 
has relieved this prison of a large portion of its usual population. August 
30, 1878, it contained ninety-two prisoners. September 19, 1879, it con- 
tained thirty-four. The jail is provided with seventj^-two cells, a suflScient 
number probably to aflbrd a separate cell for all the convicts and that por- 
tion of the untried charged with crime of the highest grade. 

The importance of giving attention in the manner of conducting it is by 
no means overlooked. Convicts are separately confined, and are placed in 
one wing. The untried occupy the left wing, the cells in which generally 
contain two beds, and are occupied by two or more prisoners. Many cells 
are unoccupied. The cell block being in the centre, with the cells arranged 
back to back, gave rise to the necessity of employing forced ventilation. 
The jail is in fine order and condition. The inside solid door having been 
removed, sutlicient light is now admitted into the cells to make it possible 



Lbq. Dog.] Board of Public Charities. 105 

to carry on work of a simple kind, such as weaving, sewing carpet rags, 
Ac. The corridors have recently been painted in bright colors, which gives 
to them a cheerfUl appearance. 

Ceatral Poor-HooM District. 

Visited September 18, 1879, with Commissioner Biddle. 

The district is composed of Wilkes-Barre borough and township, Kings- 
ton borough, Newport, Hanover, Plains, and Plymouth townships. 

The necessity for providing larger accommodations for the pauper class 
of this district has at last resulted in the erection of a new building, near 
the site upon which the old poor-house is still standing. The objections 
which were made against the propriety of making the property in question 
a permanent place for the care of the indigent and infirm were believed to 
be unanswerable, but the board of directors, into whose hands this import- 
ant trust was committed, under the conflict of opinion which arose upon 
the subject, decided upon the place above referred to. 

The new building is of considerable size. It is built of brick, is rea- 
sonably well arranged, and contains modern improvements. It is estimated^ 
to have a capacity for sixty inmates, and the design is to use it for females 
only. The men remain in the old building. The latter has undergone slight 
repairs and improvements, particularly in the basement, with a view to fit 
it for occupancy. The kitchen and dining-room has been improved. Water 
for a bath-tub has been introduced. Men, women, and children still oc- 
cupy rooms in it. The insane were kept in several apartments, which did 
not by any means appear to have received much attention. One case, a 
man closely confined, was seen in a very forlorn condition, and the odor 
emanating from his cell could not be endured for a moment. Much might 
be done to better his condition, and render his apartment less revolting. 

It is the intention of the directors to have the insane at the Danville hos- 
pital brought back as soon as the new building is fully completed. Whether 
this will be wise, admits of much question. It should be carefully consid- 
ered before deciding upon the course just named. Those who have given 
attention to the subject, and from the knowledge derived from a large ex- 
perience, have no hesitation in saying that it is better, both on the ground 
of humanity and economy, not to retain the old and incurable, as well as 
the recent insane in the county homes, for the reason that the necessary 
' care and attention cannot be given to them. 

Inmates remaining September 30, 18*79, as follows : 55 ; 3 are insane, 2 
blind. There are 1 1 children included in the above. Those that are old 
enough, attend the township school. Seventeen were natives, 38 foreigners. 
Tramps do not frequent it. 

LAckawanna Poor-House Dlitrlot. 

September 18, 18t9, visited with Commissioner Biddle. 
Composed of Pittston borough, Jenkins, Pittston, and Lackawanna town- 
ships. 
This place is greatly changed and much improved. Under the efficient 



106 Board of Pubuc Chabitibs. [No. 5, 

management of Mr. Rosencratz and Mr. Boven, directors, a new poor-house 
has been erected which contains every desirable improvement and conve- 

It is 40X80, and, including the basement, is four stories high. The first 
floor is arranged for administrative purposes. The second floor contains 
nine rooms, the third thirteen, and the fourth ten, which are arranged for the 
different classes of 'inmates. Cold and warm water have been conducted 
through all the stories. It is warmed by heaters placed in the basement. It 
is finished with closets for clothing in the sleeping-rooms. The basement 
is provided with housekeeping conveniences — store-rooms for meats and 
vegetables, a dumb waiter, laundry-room, bath-rooms, &c. 

The dwelling, heretofore occupied by the superintendent, has been ar- 
ranged for the care and treatment of the insane. Nine of this class are 
cared for at this time. The lowest grade of cases are lodged in another 
building, where they receive such care as their deteriorated condition re- 
quires. 

All these improvements have been made, including a line of water pipes, 
fW>m a spring to a reservoir for a distance of 3,435 feet, at a cost not ex- 
ceeding 111,000. 

The estimated capacity of the building is one hundred. One hundred 
acres of land is connected with it, are cultivated and made highly pro- 
ductive. 

Total number of inmates remaining September 30, 1879, 16; 2 are in- 
sane ; 2 are idiotic ; 5 are children. 

£x}}ensea/or year ending May SO, 1879. 

Total amount expended, $16,443 46 

In order to ascertain the amount expended for the support 
of the alms-house, the following deductions should be made : 
Amount paid to maintain insane in State hospital, |1,356 45 
Extraoi-dinary expenses, building, clearing land, and 

fltmisbing house, 2,853 63 

Out-door relief, 3,626 44 

; receipt from farm, Ac, 786 89 

mount of deductions, 8,623 41 

Expenses for alms-house, $7,830 05 

MBRVER COUNTY. 
Jail. 

xA November 1, 1879. 

interior of this prison presents a greatly improved appearance. A 
nt number of cells are arranged on each side of a spacious corridor 
penal wants of the district. The floors are of wood laid upon iron 
the sides and ceilings of the cells being of that material also. Out- 



Leg. Doc.] Board op Public Charities. lOT 

side of the main corridor, and separated iVom it by a heavy wall, an iron 
stairway conducts you to another set of comfortable apartments, which are 
designed for female prisoners. One of them is used for bathing purposes, 
and is situated immediately over one for a similar purpose on the first 
story for male prisoners. 

The jail is well arranged and securely built, but had suffered in appear- 
ance from neglect to paint the interior walls. Several coats of paint have 
been given to it with most decided benefit. This has led to other changes, 
which contribute to a more favorable condition generally. The sky-lights, 
which were made stationarj', have been made movable, by which more light 
and better ventilation have been procured. The defective drainage, to 
which attention was called in former reports, has been corrected and is now 
reported as being satisfactory. 

It contained six prisoners, four convicts having been transferred the pre- 
vious week. 

The practice respecting convicts, which is general in this section of the 
State, prevails here. All persons tried and convicted of crime, having sen- 
tences over one year, are sent to the Western Penitentiary. 

Prisoners congregate during the day, but are kept separate during the 
night. 

The sheriff boards prisoners at forty cents per day. It gives me pleas- 
ure to report a decided improvement in the general condition of this prison. 

Poor-Houfte. 

Visited November 1, 1879. 

This establishment, which has always been classed among those which 
are the most faulty and imperfect, has also undergone considerable change 
and improvement. The present steward and his wife, with good and honest 
purposes and the most indomitable will, have been engaged in giving the 
decayed old structure a general overhauling, new floors in some of the 
apartments have been laid, the badly damaged walls and ceilings have been 
re-plastered, wood work has been painted, the whitewash brush has been 
freely applied, the huge cracks in the side walls which grew dangerously 
wider and wider, and which were held together by iron rods, have been 
closed, and now present an appearance of safety. 

Bfut better still other changes have been made by which better care of 
the inmates is rendered practicable. The insane who occupied small apart- 
ments, divided by board partitions, have been transferred partly into a small 
addition near the kitchen, which has been erected recently, and to other 
buildings connected with the main edifice, which is in every respect wiser 
and better. Those who are able to exercise self care and protect themselves 
in the event of fire or other accidents, are now assigned to these rooms. The 
aged were accommodated in improved apartments in the old house. The 
kitchen and dining-rooms present a good appearance. 

Part of the pauper population occupy rooms in a two-story frame build- 
ing located near the main building. The worst cases are accommodated in 



108 Board op Public Chabiti£& [No. 5, 

it. A large room on the first 8tory is occupied as a sitting or day-room, by 
which the work of preserving good order in the principal building is ren- 
dered easier. 

There are eighty inmates, of whom four only are children. Generally 
the inmates are of a kind that are careless in their habits and are difficult 
'of management. For the want of sufficient conveniencies their appearance 
does not denote such a nice regard for cleanliness as is desirable in these 
homes. « 

A very severe economy is practiced in the management. The farm con- 
sists of one hundred and twelve acres, one hired man is allowed, and two 
girls are paid to assist Mrs. Cubbison, the matron. The steward is al- 
lowed $450. 

Six insane are supported at Dixmont, and a slight increase of expense 
for out door relief has occurred. It is certainly gratifying to observe the 
improved appearance presented, both of the house and grounds. The farm 
yielded during the present year one thousand bushels corn, four hundred 
and fifty bushels oats, three hundred bushels potatoes, and a large amount 
of fruit and vegetables. 

Inmates remaining in the alms-house September 30, 1879, 80, of whom 28 
are insane, 7 idiotic, 2 blind, 1 deaf and dumb ; 8 of the entire population 
are children; 59 are natives; 21 foreigners. Few or no tramps frequent it. 
Fifteen of the males render assistance in farm work, and 10 females in house 
work. 

, MIFFLIN COUNTY. 

JaU. 

Visited October 8, 1879. 

This is one of the jails of a former period. It is defective in strength 
and security, and is not provided with such conveniencies as are essential 
to effective ventilation and drainage. 

It by no means presents a favorable appearance, caused, to some extent, 
by th(5 constant association in cells and elsewhere, which is now permitted. 
Of the eight prisoners, one was tried. Two children were allowed to be 
with their parents in jail, which should not be permitted, except under very 
special circumstances. 

There are twenty cells, which are sufficient to confine prisoners separately, 
by which the prison heretofore has been kept in good order. 

Religious services are conducted at times by the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Poor-Houiie. 

A change in the management has been made. Kobert M. Gilmore has 
been elected steward. He and his wife are evidently sensible of the diffi- 
culties which interfere with a good standard of care. Water has to be car- 
ried by hand, from a single pump and a cistern, the supply from which is 
not at all times sufficient. The house accommodations bfeing very limited 
and imperfect, the proper separation is rendered practicable to a partial ex- 
tent only, notwithstanding some gross abuses have been in some degree 



Leo. Doc.] Board of Public Charitie& 109 

corrected. With the exception of several hospital cases, the men are made 
to occupy rooms in the attic, which are plastered, and of good size. The 
females, who form the larger part of the population of the house, are ac- 
commodated in apartments on the first and second stories. The old fur- 
niture, so worn and forbidding in its appearance, remains, but looks cleaner 
and in better condition. These apartments, however, cannot be kept in 
order so long as that continues to be used, and we respectAiUy advise the di- 
rectors to destroy it, and substitute new. 

There are 47 inmates. During the winter there were 69, who were pro- 
vided for in some way in a building whose capacity is not over 30. Four 
and six double beds are placed in the different rooms, there being nine in 
all on the two first stories. The attic contains three rooms, and have nine 
beds. Ten men at present occupy them. The inmates, generally, are of 
low grade. A considerable number are feeble-minded, some are simple and 
incapable of the ordinary personal care. There are five children. 

The property is much out of repair, and needs attention from the direc- 
tors. It is not adapted to the purpose to which it is applied. The farm 
consists of 200 acres of land of excellent quality, which is unnecessarily 
large, and requires for its proper care an undue share of the time and atten- 
tion of the steward and his family. 

Some improvement in the condition of the house and of the inmates have 
been effected. The inmates are distributed with better judgment and dis- 
cretion, more cleanliness and better order are to be observed in the apart- 
ments. It is hoped Mr. Gilmore will continue his well-meant efforts to ac- 
complish still greater improvement. But the day is near when larger and 
better accommodations must be provided for the constantly increasing num- 
ber of the dependent classes, who will apply for admission to this institu- 
tion, and it, will be for the directors to decide whether to sell the present 
valuable estate, and re-build, or renew and enlarge prei^ent buildings, and 
select another possessing the advantages required for the use for which it 
may be designed. 

September 30, 1879. Inmates 40, which is a considerable decrease. 
Thirty-two are sane, 7 insane, 1 idiotic, 11 are children. No report of the 
number employed. 

MOIWTGOMBRY COVNTY. 

Jail. 

July 22, 1879. This prison was visited this day in company with Com- 
missioners Dickinson, Bullock, and Biddle. 

It was found in its usual good order. A strict system of prison disci- 
pline, owing to the want of room, is not practicable to the fullest extent. 
Forty-seven prisoners were lodged in thirty-nine cells. In numerous in- 
stances, two prisoners are placed in one cell ; but as far as is practicable, at- 
tention is given to the observance of prison rules and regulations, and to 
what is considered essential to the proper mode of dealing with the law 
breaker. 



110 Board op Public Charitie& [No. 5, 

To a large extent, the untried are kept in the first tier. Long term con- 
victs occupy one side on the second tier. Employment is enjoined on all this 
class, and they occupy separate cells. An apartment at the east end of the 
prison is used as a shop for cutting and preparing material for shoes, where 
a few of the convicts work in association. Tramps are not permitted to 
occupy cells in the jail, but occupy a building in the jail-yard which was 
erected for the purpose. 

Mr. Schall, the present warden, is entitled to credit for the manner in 
which he discharges his duties. 

The system of purchasing supplies by the inspectors, seems to be entirely 
satisfactory. The per capita cost has been reduced. It has led to a discon- 
tinuance of the abuse of committals practiced by magistrates of the vagrant 
class, for whom a high per diem rate for board has been paid in many of the 
counties of the State. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 
Poor-Hoiue. 

Visited August 26, 18T9. 

This county home for the support of the poor and unfortunate has been 
fully described in former reports. The estate is in every respect a very fine 
one. The main building is modern in style and arrangement, and is eligibly 
located. In addition to the main building there is a two-story stone house 
for the insane, and a similar one at some distance from it for the sick and 
injured, the main edifice being used for the strictly pauper class, including 
men, women, and children. 

The monthly average of inmates in 18T8, was 350f|. The number main- 
tained at the time of my visit was 260, which is a less monthly rate than 
for any month in the previous year. The house expenses for 1818 were 
$21,095 03, which was at the rate per capita of $60 11^, or $1 16J per week. 
To this amount must be added $10,734 00 paid for out-door relief, and 
$866 50 for the cost of maintaining some of the insane at the Harrisburg 
asylum. Total amount of expenditures for 1878, $34,574 83. The value 
of the labor by the inmates was estimated at $2,500. 

The farm consists of two hundred and ninety-eight acres, of which two 
hundred acres are in a high state of cultivation. Over eleven hundred 
bushels of wheat and nearly all the potatoes that were wanted, besides other 
crops and vegetables, were raised in large quantities in the year above 
named. The real estate is in good order, and the general appearance and 
condition bear testimony of diligent care and attention. 

With the exception of a few cases, the insane receive excellent care and 
treatment. They are cared for by paid attendants in a separate building, 
as already stated. 

The cooking is done by steam. The table is well supplied. Bibles and 
some other reading matter are provided. The separation of sexes is suffi- 
cienty guarded. Under the vigilant and careful system of management 
which is pursued by the managers and officers, there is reason to believe 
that a very considerable reduction in the annual expenditures will be effected. 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. Ill 

Some errors in the House Management which should be corrected. — 
The attention of the directors was called to these in a communication which 
I addressed to them, from which I extract the following : 

*^ First. The different apartments in the main building do not present so 
favorable an appearance as they are capable of, owing, as it is believed, to 
two causes, viz : In i)ermitting the inmates, who are able-bodied, to loiter 
in their rooms during the day ; and from the want of places for articles of 
wear. The latter, for the want of closets or drawers, are laying about on 
the floors and beds, and give the rooms a very disorderly appearance. 
Cheap chests, closets, or bureaus are the remedies to correct carelessness 
in this respect, and enforcing proper habits of cleanliness and order upon 
the occupants of the rooms. 

'' Second. The surface drain, commencing near the engine-house, which is 
used for carrying off the contents of chamber vessels into the low grounds 
of the field beyond it, is highly objectionable, and should be promptly cor- 
rected. A good sanitary condition must not be expected where this mode 
of carrying off offensive discharges is in use. An effective and economical 
remedy will be found in placing under ground terra-cotta pipes of ample 
diameter, with a constant flow of water through them to the point of dis- 
tribution. 

" Third. In the basement of the infirmary, I find two cases of insanity, 
in which the treatment, for the want of the proper appliances, is wrong, and 
inflicts hardship, which might be avoided. Among the insane in the apart- 
ments in the basement, I find the well-known case of Jerry Moore, a colored 
man, who has been under care and treatment at this alms-house for a num- 
ber of years. Formerly he occupied a room in the small stone building 
which is used for the insane exclusively, with the exception of a few 
apartments in the basement. His condition there was somewhat improved, 
after he received the benefit of out-door air and exercise, which was given 
after airing grounds had been inclosed. Why he was transferred to 
the basement of the infirmary, I have not learned, but presume it was for 
want of suflftcient room. In his present location, he is constantly confined. 
The reason assigned for which is that at times he is quarrelsome and some- 
what violent, but generally he is quiet and passive. It is very obvious to 
any one who will examine into his condition that there is no sufficient rea- 
son for depriving him of the benefit of air and exercise. It was stated he 
resisted being taken out. He ought to be led out under the care of an at- 
tendant, and, if necessary, which I do not deem probable, to protect others 
from a disposition to strike, which it was alleged he manifests, a cheap and 
effective remedy may be found in the restraint fixtures now in use for the 
purpose. He is rapidly passing into a state of helpless dementia, and will 
not long survive. 

" Fourth. What is stated above applies with equal force to the case of 
Robert McKean, who occupies a cell near Moore's. He also should have 
the benefit of air and exercise on the grounds daily. There is no sufficient 
reason for depriving him of this benefit." 



112 Board of PtJBLic Charities. [No. 5, 

September 80, 1879, inmates remaining in the alms-house at this time, 
270, of whom 27 are children; 215 are sane, 37 insane, 12 feeble-minded; 
blind, 3 ; deaf and dumb, 3 ; 43 hospital cases. 

Twenty-eight tramps received aid during the quarter ending September 
30, 1879. 

Forty-one men assist in the work — 20 in farm work ; 14 in stone quarries ; 
8 stone masons ; 1 tailor ; 2 shoemakers ; and 10 women in household work. 

Expenses for the year ending December 31^ 1879. 

For alms-house, $21,766 74 

Paid for out-door relief, 7,872 12 

$29,638 86 
Deduct receipts, (excluding tax receipts,) 2,289 53 

Net cost to county, $27,34983 

The item for $1 ,260 02, included in the alms-house expense, was paid for 
the maintenance of insane in the State hospital. 

MONTOUR COUNTY. 
Jail. 

July 21, 1879, visited with Commissioners Beaver and Biddle. 

This prison, with the exception of a slight change of one of the windows 
with a view to greater security, has undergone no improvement. It is en- 
tirely destitute of such arrangements as are required for persons constantly 
confined. In jails of this kind, a strict execution of the sentence of the 
law upon persons convicted of crime, viz : " solitary confinement at hard 
labor," is never carried out. The consequence is that no attempt is made 
to enforce the ordinarj- rules of prison discipline. The prisoners associate 
in the prison and outside of it, and are permitted a degree of personal lib- 
erty differing little from those who are innocent of crime. The mode of 
dealing with the habitual law-breaker in many of the old jails of our State, 
so far as discipline and pimishment are concerned, has in fact become a 
subject of jest and ridicule by the public and the convict himself. The 
condition of a criminal in these prisons is by no means one of hardship. 
Few or no privations are endured. He associates freely with his fellows 
in all parts of the building and jail inclosures, and not unfrequently with 
the families of the oflScers by whom the prison is conducted. Few or no 
privileges are withheld, nor tasks- imposed. He lives in idleness, and is at 
liberty to amuse himself as best he can. It is scarcely necessary to say, 
jail life of this kind can have no deterring effect. , 

There can be no sufiicient excuse for the long continued neglect to pro- 
vide suitable buildings for the criminal class. The ends of justice are too 
often defeated in consequence of this want. The peace and good order of 
society, the protection of property and life, demand that the prisons in the 



Leo. Doc.] Board op Public Charities. 118 

different counties should be so built and arranged as to render practicable 
the fulfillment of the law in the strictest manner. 

In this county, the necessity for making such provision is very urgent. 

The prison contains four rooms, two on the first floor and two on the 
second. These are used for prison purposes. Dangerous convicts can be 
secured only by chaining to the floor, and a diligent personal vigilance on 
the part of the keeper. 

There were two prisoners, one a boy, charged with assault with intent 
to commit a rape. 

Occasionally one year convicts are kept. 

DaoTllle and Mfthoning Poor Dittriet, 

July 20, 18V9, visited with Commissioners Beaver, Biddle, and Mr. 
Russel, president of the State Hospital, Danville, Pennsylvania, and Mr. 
Chalfant. . 

The buildings in use for the maintenance of the dependent classes for 
the above district, having been described in former reports, further descrip- 
tion is rendered unnecessar3\ 

The females are accommodated in apartments which are arranged in what 
originally was the farmer's residence. Twelve in number occupied rooms* 
on the first and second stories of this humble dwelling. Generally they 
are capable of self care. The males are provided for in the two-story frame 
erected several years ago, and which is better adapted to the purpose One 
female, who is insane, occupies a small apartment on the first floor, in close 
proximity to those occupied by the males. I was unable to learn any suffi- 
cient reason why she should be thus isolated, and be so far removed from 
the care and sympathy of her own sex. It is a hardship, which doubtless 
admits of being remedied. Attention was called to it, and the necessity of 
more suitable accommodations urged. 

In the general management, it is evident that the real estate receives the 
principal attention, the care of the different classes of inmates, practi- 
cally , at least, being regarded of minor importance. The general household 
condition cannot be favorably mentioned. Carelessness and disorder were 
everywhere visible. There is much room for improvement. The attention 
of the directors is required, in order that a better system of care for the 
inmates may be established, and better household care observed. 

The present population is as follows : 12 males, 12 females ; 24 in all, of 
whom 5 arc children, 2 idiots, 1 blind, 2 males, insane, 2 females insane. 

The farm is under good cultivation, and 3'^ields abundantly. The steward 
is paid $200 per annum, with a living for himself and family. He is allowed 
a hired man for eight months in each year, and a girl for the whole year. 

September 30, 1879. Inmates remaining, 25; of whom 4 are children, 
2 insane, 3 idiotic, I blind, 8 are infirmary cases. The able-bodied are em- 
ployed in farm and house work. Relief was granted during the quarter to 
13 tramps. 

8— B. P. Char. 



114 Board op Public Charities. [No. 5, 

Expenses for 1879. 

For alms-house, $2,984 63 

Paid for out-door relief, 681 37 

$3,666 00 
Deduct receipts, , 135 75 



Net cost to district, $3,530 25 

NORTHUMBBRLAft'D COUNTY. 
Jail. 

Visited July 31, 1879, with Mr. Biddle. 

In providing for the largely increasing prison wants of this county , the com- 
missioners wisely, as we think, in considering the question of what would 
be a sufficient capacity for a new jail, did not confine their vision to what 
would be required for the present or the near future, but adopted a plan 
which would save the tax-payers the necessity from any further expendi- 
tures for the same purpose for many years to come. 

• The jail has a capacity' of ninety-two cells on the first and second tiers 
in the two corridors, which extend obliquely backwards from the front, and 
if necessity should ever require, a similar number may be fitted up in the 
basement, which is arranged for the purpose, but remains in an unfinished 
state. 

The jail is well planned, and substantially built, having all the appliances 
and conveniencies deemed essential in buildings erected for the care and 
treatment of the criminal class. There is ample room for the separate con- 
finement of convicts and the introduction of a well-regulated system of re- 
munerative employment. Prison rules and regulations may, without diflTi- 
culty, be enforced, and measures of a reformatorj- character be beneficially 
carried out. 

Up to the present time a general system of profitable labor has not been 
introduced, which is assigned as the reason why forty convicts from this 
district have not yet been transferred from the Eastern Penitentiary. Strict 
orders have been given by the president judge of the district upon the sub- 
ject, the intention being to keep all their convicts of short and long terms 
in the county prison. 

The commissioners purchase supplies and pay the warden a moderate 
salary for conducting the jail. The building is heated by steam. Approved 
water-closet hoppers, with basins for water, the latter discharging into the 
hoppers, are placed in each cell. A room with bath tub is provided on each 
tier. A jur}' room, for juries sitting in murder cases, with six double beds, 
is provided on the second story over the dwelling part of the jail, which is 
arran<Ted in a verv comfortable manner, for the accommodation of the war- 
den. The extreme ends of the corridors are arranged in such a manner as 
to make them suitable for infirmaries. At present the one on the first floor 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 115 

is occupied as a place for making paper bags, which thus far is the only 
occupation — two prisoners being thus engaged. 

Of the 19 prisoners now confined, 14 have been tried. Two, now under 
sentence of death for the murder of Hesser, occupy adjoining cells. One 
escape has occurred. He passed through the horizontal window, but was 
again arrested. Another in the same cell, at the same time, stuck fast, in 
the attempt, and was with difficulty extricated. 

Shamokia Poor-llou»«. 

July 31, 1879, visited with Commissioner Biddle. 

The propert}^ for the care of the poor of this district, consists of one 
hundred and eighteen acres of land and two buildings. One being the 
dwelling of the owner from whom it was purchased, the other also of 
brick, and two stories high, was erected for the special use to which it is 
now applied. 

The females and children are provided for in the main building. The 
men in one latterl}' built. In addition to these houses, a small tenement 
has been erected for tramps. A spring of good water is near the main 
house. 

Most of the land is under cultivation. The establishment is conducted 
in the ordinary wa}'. A disposition is manifested on the part of the stew- 
ard and his wife, to do all in their power for the comfort and welfare of the 
inmates. The management admits of improvement, which, with the knowl- 
edge derived from experience, no doubt, will be made. 

The benevolence of the district is not confined to those who are inmates. 
Out-door relief is dispensed to some extent to the destitute who cannot be 
removed to the house. 

The arrangement for the care and maintenance of this establishment, is 
as follows: $1,000 per year are paid to the steward, with the products of 
the farm. 

Of the 32 inmates under care at this time, 3 were children, and 3 were 
insane. 

Expenses for 1879, $7,001 76 

Paid for out-door relief, 4,053 06 

$11,054 82 
Deduct receipts, 189 50 

Net cost to township and borough, $10,865 32 

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY. 

Visited August 27, 1879. 

Prisoners, 76. The entire number of cells, 52 ; 47 are used to confine 
convicts and persons awaiting trial. During the winter months 85 prisoners 
are frequentl}^ kept. The cell accommodations are of course insufficient, 



116 Board of Public Charities. [No. 6, 

unless in violation of the Pennsylvania system of prison discipline, two or 
more are made to occupy one cell. At least fort}'' additional cells are re- 
quired to conduct the prison in accordance with the approved roles of 
prison economy. 

But so far as the cell accommodations will admit, separate confinement 
is enforced. Prisoners are not permitted to congregate. Employment is 
enjoined with a view to its reformatory effects. It was carried on under the 
contract system, with a satisfactory pecuniary result the last year. 

This prison is always found in good order, having in view the higher 
aims and purposes which are pursued in the better class of penal institu- 
tions. 

Religious services are conducted in the jail every Sunday afternoon, and 
some reading matter is supplied. 

Poer-IIoaae. 

Visited August 29, 1879. 

Two hundred and ninety-six inmates receive aid and support in the house 
at this time ; sixty-five or over one fourth being children. The import- 
ance of especial care, to guard the latter against the effects of evil associa- 
tions, is fully recognized. Forty-three are taught in school, which is a 
separate building. A play-room for the younger children is provided in 
. the same building, and their sleeping apartments are also in it. They are 
under the care of an attendant during the day and night. 

Infirmary. — This department is occupied beyond its proper capacity. 
With the exception of the difficulty arising from insufficient room, it is kept 
in excellent order. It is in charge of an attendant who is competent and 
faithful. The patients receive proper medical and ordinary care ; but more 
room is essential to comfort and classification. It is the intention to pro- 
vide additional accommodations, by an extention to the present buildiog 

Insane Department. — Notwithstanding the difficulty of preserving thor- 
ough cleanliness and order in apartments occupied by the insane, Mr. 
Kesler the attendant of the male wing, by means of constant attention and 
effort, manages to maintain all parts of the wing under his charge in ex- 
cellent condition. The rooms, floors, bedding, and water conveniences are 
found in good condition, and all parts of the building are kept in good re- 
pair. The patients themselves are well clad, look cleanly, enjoy the liberty 
of the corridors and airing grounds, and are evidently well cared for. 

The female wing has undergone some repairs of which it was much in 
need. The third floor is much improved. The second has also received 
the benefit of a renewal of plastering, floors, &c. 

The manner in which this large institution, including the real estate, is 
conducted, entitles it to very favorable notice. Careful and efficient man- 
agement is every where visible. Whilst no efforts are spared to render the 
aged, infirm, and disabled from whatever cause, entirely comfortable, a 
careful economy is observed throughout. 

Inmates September 30, 1879, 295. Of whom 234 are sane, 54 insane, 2 



*Leg. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 117 

blind, 5 deaf and dumb. Of the above population, 59 are children, 58 are 
hospital cases, 210 are natives, 85 are foreigners. 

The traveling tourists, the tramps , are becoming less numerous. Seventy- 
six males engage in the work of the farm and at trades^ such as tailors, 
shoemakers, an engineer, &c. The females render much assistance in the 
household work. 

PHILADKLPHIA. 
MoyameDatng Priaon. x 

June 24, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The whole number of prisoners was 834. Seven hundred and ten (710) 
were males, and 124 were females. Six hundred and fifty were convicts, 
184 were untried. 

Notwithstanding difficulties are encountered in the male wings from over- 
crowding, good order is preserved. Two and three prisoners occupy one 
cell. A literal fulfillment of the law is, of course, impracticable. On ac- 
count of inadequate cell accommodations and defective construction, im- 
prisonment, though called separate, is not so in reality, nor is it possible to 
prevent oral communications between the occupants of adjoining cells. In 
no prison in the State is the criminal class con2:regated to a greater extent, 
in violation of what is held to be important in prison discipline, and no 
where is the necessity for additional accommodations more urgent. 

A stricter separation is enjoined in the female department. All are em- 
« ployed — some in household work, and others, who constitute the large num- 
ber, in making garments for prisoners. The general condition here is ex- 
ceptionably good. A more rigid discipline i9 practiced, and reformatory 
efforts and influences are more faithfully and successfully used. 

The hospital department in the male block, which consists of several com- 
municating cells, has been enlarged by including several more. This is an 
improvement, but does not by any means yet afford the requisite light and 
ventilation for apartments so largely occupied for infirmary purposes. 

Hooae of Correetfon— Employment and ReformatloB. 

December 31, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

The tax paj^ers of the city and county of Philadelphia have reason to be 
satisfied with the five years' experience of the system of care for certain de- 
pendent classes as pursued at this institution. 

The committals to this establishment consist of vagrants, inebriates, 
street walkers, idle, disorderly, and incorrigible persons who are without 
employment, have no fixed places of abode, and lead disorderly and crimi- 
nal lives. 

That these classes in large numbers could be maintained and be made 
self supporting in a single institution, was believed to be practicable, pro- 
vided the building itself was suitably arranged, and the locJEility where it 
was erected aflforded abundant opportunities for remunerative employment. 

A careful examination of the annual exhibit which is made, shows a 



118 Board op Public Charities. [Xo. 5, 

steady progress in the work which has been undertaken, and that the insti- 
tution is approaching that standard of success which those who were instru- 
mental in establishing it claimed it was capable of. 

By means of a well organized system of guards, the men are worked in 
shops upon the farms, on the highways, and in quarries, whilst at night they 
are separately confined in the cell blocks. Under a management of this 
kind little difficulty is experienced in maintaining good order and thorough 
discipline. 

Labor is utilized to the largest possible extent. As soon after the ad- 
mission as their condition will admit, both males and females are put to 
work, especial care being taken in every instance to place the inmate at the 
emploj'ment for which he or she is best fitted. Employment is found for 
all, and while they remain under the cai^ of the institution habits of indus- 
try, to a certain extent, are formed. Frequently a thorough reformation is 
wrought in persons who, under a different system of treatment, would have 
been worthless burdens upon society. 

Of the average number of inmates, viz : 1,152 during the year ending 
December 31 , 1878, there were employed in labor, indispensable, but with no 
cash value, 1,116 ; the remaining 36 were in the hospital department and in 
punishment cells, there being T of the latter. The report, which has not yet 
been received for 1879, is understood to be still more favorable. 

The following statement giving the number of inmates each year since 
1878, and the amount of the annual appropriation possesses more than usual 
interest, and should be carefully examined. 

Statement. 

Inmates. Appropriation. 

1874, 3,734, $314,808 15 

1875, 4,805, 372,838 00 

1876, • • • 8,074, 338,620 00 

1877, 7,523, 291,310 00 

1878, 7,032, 202,267 00 

1879, 7,032, 175,938 81 

The dailj' average number of inmates for 1879 was 999. The number dis- 
charged, was 5809, leaving 1223 at the end of the year. During the year 
$15,108 44 were expended in permanent improvements ; 14,332^ day's work 
had been done on roads, and 9,634^ day's work upon the meadow bank, at 
the mouth of the Schuylkill, by male inmates ; $6,273 60 had been received 
f jr men's labor, and the sale of produce, material, &c. The entire earnings 
of the men in the various industrial departments in the house, amounted to 
$16,635 45. Including the estimated value of labor on permanent improve- 
ments, highways, public roads, meadow bank, &c., the entire amount of 
earnings are estimated at $126,393 60. 

But the benefits of the institution are not confined to economic work. 
Religious instruction is faithfully imparted by the moral instructor, in a 



Leo. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 119 

well-arranged chapel, by religious conversation ; by prayer, and by Bible 
class instructions, many, doubtless, have profited and improved. 

A medical depaitment is also organized, and is placed on a very good 
footing. Much valuable service is rendered by the visiting and resident 
physicians of the house, and much suffering is relieved. 

An ophthalmic surgeon has also been appointed during the last year. 

Philadelphia Alma-Uoose. 

Visited and inspected June 20, 18T9, accompanied by commissioners 
Biddle and Dickinson. 

General Hospital, Male Department. — Found to be much improved 
since the last visit of the commissioners. The floors have, in part, been re- 
newed and painted, and further improvement is going forward. 

The water-closets and bath-tubs, with the apartments they occupy, have 
been put in good order since the Board of Charities called the attention of 
the board of guardians to them last year. 

Several valuable additions have recently been made to the usual hospital 
appliances, the most important of which is the construction of an elevator, 
which is used for transferring patients from the lower to the upper wards, 
in place of carrying them on stretchers up the stair-way. 

Female Department. — The general condition of the wards was found to 
be good. Although some improvement has been made in the water-closets 
and bath-tubs since complaint was made one year ago by the Commissioners 
of Charities of their bad condition, there still remains much to be done in 
order to place them on a good sanitary footing. 

The floors of some of the wards are greatly in need of repairs, being 
much eaten by the rats, which abound there to the great annoyance of the 
patients. The attention of the hospital warden was called to this evil, and 
he promised to have it amended. 

Insane Department. — The insane wards contained, on the date of visita- 
tion, 1,008 patients, viz : 473 males, and 535 females ; being an increase of 4 
patients since our visit on October 31, 1878. 

The weather being pleasant, most of the patients were in the airing-yards. 

The interior of the hospital proper bore evidences of good management. 
The beds and bedding were clean and comfortable, and the sanitarj' con- 
dition of all the wards, for so large a population, was excellent. The pa- 
vilions, consisting of a range (»f wooden sheds which adjoin the hospital, 
and which were erected as a temporary expedient to relieve the crowded 
wards of the main building until permanent quarters should be provided 
elsewhere, were found to be in as good order as can be expected for such 
cheap and hastily erected shelters. There is danger to be apprehended in 
these pavilions from fire, which, should it occur, would in all probability 
destroy the whole range in a few minutes, as, from the nature of the mate- 
rial used, together with the plan of construction, it would be impossible to 
save them. In consequence of the threatened danger to the inmates of 
these sheds, the Board of Charities intended to present this matter to the 



120 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

councils of the city, but as there is a prospect of an early organization and 
opening of the new insane asylum, erected by the State, for the South- 
Eastem district, at Xorristown, the patients now confined in these pavil- 
ions can be provided for in that institution. The Commissioners who in- 
spected this department in 181 8 found ** many of the inmates barefoot, and 
without sufficient clothing. The diet was also insufficient." This, upon 
close inquiry, was found to be remedied, as the appropriation, at the time 
of our visit, was ample to purchase all that was required for the comfort 
and support of the inmates of the hospital. The water-closets and bath- 
rooms, of which much complaint was heard on our last visit, were found to 
be in good order, having been repaired or renewed, and the old zinc floor 
replaced by asphalt, which renders them clean and wholesome. 

There has been a decided improvement in this department in the past 
year, and with sufficient means at hand, further improvement will be made 
during the coming year. Doctor Richardson, the superintendent, contem- 
plates several important changes, and should have the support of councils 
and the board of guardians in his efforts to make this department a credit 
to the city of Philadelphia. 

Children's Asylum. — The asylum for children is in the eastern part of 
the general hospital, and entirel}"^ separated from the alms-house out-wards. 
The children are taught reading, writing, and arithmetic, and were, at the 
time of the visitation, cleanly dressed and apparentl}' well provided for by 
their teachers and nurses. 

Out-Wards. — In the out wards are quartered all the inmates who do not 
require hospital treatment. Very many of them are aged or crippled, and 
not able to work. These are provided with rooms in what are termed old 
men's or old women's asylums, and receive more care, and better diet than 
the able-bodied inmates, who are generally there from the effects of de- 
bauchery or chronic laziness. 

Conncted with the out- wards is a work-shop or manufactor}^, where those 
able to work are employed at making shoes, weaving, blacksmithing, carpen- 
try, and various other industries, the profits from which amount annually 
to several thousand dollars. 

The inmates who work, have a ward known as the workingmen's ward, 
and they are furnished with better diet than those who are idle, and have 
other privileges as a reward for their industry and good behavior. 

The water-closets in the yard of the out-wards, were not in cleanly con- 
dition ; but the appearance of the entire establishment was creditable to the 
managers, considering the great number and character of the inmates who 
find a shelter there. 

bOMBRABT COU.\TY. 

Jail, 

Visited October 10, 1819. 

The peculiar arrangement for the criminal class in this county has been 
noticed in former reports. It has two tiers of cells, ten in all. About eight 



Leg. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 121 

may be used for the confinement of prisoners. One is used for storage pur- 
poses, and one for water-closet conveniences. The partitions between cells 
are made with walnut boards, which are lined with boiler plate iron. They 
have single doors, except one, which, for greater security, has two. Very 
little light can be admitted into the lower cells. The upper ones are in all 
respects the most desirable. 

The jail is kept for lock-up purposes, the higher and better aims and pur- 
poses which are held to be of the first importance in the manner of con- 
ducting penal institutions, not being regarded. The prison does not, by 
any means, present an inviting appearance, and I am lauXih mistaken if bet- 
ter prison arrangements will not be demanded ere long. There were eight 
prisoners ; four tried, four untried. 

Poor-Houiie. 

The present condition of this establishment is by no means favorable. 
The officers who have charge of it, do not seem to recognize the improved 
methpds of care for the different classes by whom these institutions are oc- 
cupied. This is especially true with regard to the insane and other defec- 
tive inmates. What is deemed essential in the present day in their manage- 
ment, to a very large extent, is disregarded. 

The sexes mingle in the building and outside of it, apparently without 
any restrictions, from which very deplorable consequences never fail to oc- 
cur. 

In the insane department feeble minded men and women are seen in as- 
sociation, in some instances, occupying apartments opposite each other, 
by which objectionable communication may be kept up between them. 
In one of the departments of the insane four insane men are partly nude. 
They were strictly confined and lying in straw, which was saturated with 
human urine, a scene that was too repulsive to be looked on for a single 
moment. 

A want of good order and of an intelligent appreciation of what is de- 
manded by the claims of humanity, appear in all parts of the establishment. 

And yet the house is by no means destitute in conveniences. The halls 
are wide and the rooms are of good size. The building is home-like, spa- 
cious, and reasonably commodious. The fault is not to be ascribed to de- 
ficiency in that respect, but rather to the want of a proper system of man- 
agement. 

In order that the condition of this poor-house may be brought to a better 
standard, we advise, very respectfully, thorough changes in the method of 
dealing with the different classes of inmates. 

We advise that the buildings and grounds surrounding them be so ar- 
ranged as to ensure entire separation between the sexes. 

That all the insane be permitted to enjoy outside air and exercise, in 
yards enclosed for the purpose. It is a mistake to suppose that they are 
dangerous. Their violence, if there be an}'^ such, almost always consists in 
noisy expression and tearing their clothes. This does not justify chains 



IS3 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

and incarceration in filthy cells. The remedies for violence are modem re- 
straint lixf.ires, which are made of leatber and which can be worn without 
injury or inconvenience. 

We advise a re-distiibution of the inmates. They are not judiciously lo- 
cated. Those that require little looking after may have lodgings in dis- 
tant parts of the house, whilst the helpless and dependent must be in apart- 
ments with the necessary conveniences at convenient distauces. 

More household order, neatness, and cleanliness will contribute much to 
improve the general appearance. 

BUHUVLHILL CUGKTY. 

Jail. 

August 1, 1819, visited with Commissioners Clymer, Dickinson, and Bid- 
die. 

The provision made for the care and custody of the criminal class in 
this county, both as to character and extent, are very complete. The new 
section containing eighty-six additional cells, constructed and arranged in 
the most appropriate manner, affords ample accommodations for present 
wants. Thorough separation may now be enforced. Discipline in strict 
accordance with the best systems of prison economy, may without diffi- 
culty be carried out, and a favorable condition always be preserved. 

The jail is in good order and is well conducted. The tried and untried 
are employed, llemunerative labor is carried on. Carpets, shoes, and other 
articles are made. To some extent prisoners labor in association during 
the day, but are separated at night. 

Care is taken to preserve a good sanitary condition. Hoppers and drain 
pipes are flushed twice a day. The apartments for female prisoners are 
located at the end of the new corridor, the entrance to which can only be 
made by passing all the way through the corridor. This is regarded as an 
error which may and probably will be corrected. Iron bedsteads of a 
proper pattern are used, which are fastened to the floor. The commission- 
ers purchase the supplies. 

t » » loijji^ visited, with Commissioners Clymer, Dickinson, and 

[o. — It is occupied by the steward and his family, and by the 
r those whose condition admits of their rendering assist- 
leral work of the house, the gardens, and the farm. The 
and children also occupy apartments in it. They receive 
otn the steward and his wife, who are diligent and faithful 
of their arduous duties. The very large population of these 
be provided for in this building, and, large as are the ac- 
;he necessity for crowding the rooms with beds is unavoid- 

FiTMENT. — The insane, both recent and chronic, are kept, 
[red cases receive care and treatment at this time. A sep- 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 123 

arate building is provided for the purpose. It contains about thirty-eight 
rooms. Good medical and asylum care is rendered. The physicians make 
daily visits. Paid attendants are employed. 

Infirmary. — Accommodations to a large extent are provided for the sick, 
iniured, f^nd disabled. Medical and surgical wards are arranged, with suit- 
able conveniences and comforts. Upwards of one hundred persons afflicted 
in various ways were under care and treatment. 

It gives me pleasure to speak favorably of the condition and management 
of this institution. It is one of the largest in the State, and the populr»tion 
to be provided is, next to the Philadelphia alms-house, numerically the 
largest. The cost of the alms-house and out-door relief for year ending 
September 30, 187 «, was 1 103,0 14 62, $60,246 62 of which were for out-door 
relief. The latter is dispensed to an extent that seems prodigal. The num- 
ber thus relieved was 3,433, consisting of 1,564 adults, 1,869 children. The 
amount thus expended constitutes an unusually large item, and is accounted 
for, doubtless, to some degree, if not fully, by the migratory character of 
the population, and the dangerous nature of the employment in which it is 
engaged. But it is liable here, as elsewhere, to great abuse, which can be 
prevented only by a rigid system of personal inspection and investigation. 

September 30, 1879, inmates remaining in alms-house at this date, viz : 
618, of whom 509 are classed as sane, 71 insane, 32 idiotic, 8 blind, 6 deaf 
and dumb. Fifty-two are children. Four men were blind, deaf, and dumb, 
and idiotic. Two hundred and thirty-three are natives, 385 foreigners. 
Sixty-three males and 66 females make themselves useful in all kinds of 
work. Thirty-six children attend school. Four hundred and seventy-eight 
tramps were relieved during the quarter. 

YEKAIVGO COti^TY. 

Jail. 

October 28, 1679, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 

Of the fifteen prisoners confined in this jail at this time, two only have 
been tried. The custom of sending convicts sentenced over one year to 
the penitentiary continues. The jail continues to be conducted in the way 
heretofore pursued. The prisoners congregate in the corridors, and are 
not strictly separated at night. Employment is not provided. Very prop- 
erly, thorough separation is made for females, by placing them in apart- 
ments fitted up for the purpose, on the third storj' of the dwelling paii; of 
the jail. 

One escape has occurred. There are nineteen cells. The sheriff conducts 
the prison, and is allowed forty cents per day for boarding each prisoner. 
The jail is in fair order. 

Poor-Hoaae. 

October 28, 1879, visited with Commissioners Dickinson and Biddle. 
Present number of inmates, 81 ; which is a considerable reduction. Of 
these 17 are children, which is a very large proportion, and 17 insane. 
This institution is governed by the count}' commissioners. Some changes 



124 Board of Pum.tc Charities. [No. 5, 

have been made m the officers. A new steward has been elected. Very 
decided evidences of improvement in the general condition are perceptible. 
The household care is better. The bath-rooms and water-closets referred 
to in the form3r report as baing in a very bad state, receive more care and 
attention. With the exception of the blurred appearance of the walls and 
ceilings throughout all parts of the house, (for the want of the occasional 
use of the whitewash brush,) favorable changes are to be observed. Two 
rooms on the first floor, one used as a hospital, the other as a men's sitting 
room, were noticed as being particularly bad in appearance, for want of a 
coat of whitewash or other coloring. Many rooms are unoccupied. Only 
one room on the third story is tenanted. 'AH the others are empty, and 
present a forlorn and neglected appearance. 

A rigid economy is practiced in the management. The work of the house 
and farm is performed, to a large extent, by the inmates. Two hired men 
are allowed in the summer, one in winter, one hired female as a cook. 

The establishment though improved, with the advantages and conve- 
niences which it possesses, admits of being worked up to a still better stand- 
ard. 

September 30, 1879. Inmates, 81, of whom 55 are sane, 15 insane, 8 
idiotic, blind, 2, deaf and dumb, 2. The inmates, both male and female, en- 
gage in the work of the house and farm. 

WA8Hi:VGTON COUNTV. 
Jail. 

Visited October 16, 1879. 

Prisoners 6, 1 of whom has been tried. 

The sj'stem of management heretofore pursued is continued. Both long 
and short term convicts are transferred to the work-house or penitentiary. 
The jail therefore is conducted with reference to mere custody until after 
trial. 

The i^pproved condition and appearance of the prison noticed in the 
former report is kept up. 

There is much to commend in this building. The arrangement for the 
diflcrent sexes is better than is usually found in the county jails. The 
apartments for females are so located as to render communication of any 
kind witii other prisoners entirely impossible. 

Abundant light is admitted. The heating and water arrangements are 
also now reported to be satisfactory. Employment is not provided. 

Ptfor-Hoofte. 

Visited October Ifi, 1879. 

A small increase in the number of inmates has occurred, the present 
number being 201. Some of the insane who have been supported at 
Dixmont have been re-transferred to the poor-house. Changes to correct 
errors in the building arrangements and improvements of various kinds 
in the interior and in the surrounding grounds have been made, and 
much benefit has been realized from them. The farm buildings have 



Leo. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 125 

been improved. A room on the second story of the granary is arranged for 
tramps, by which these unwelcome tourists are kept out of the main build- 
ing. A better water supply has been secured. 

In the arrangement of this house, every thing that is required to insure 
good order and the comfort of the inmates has been provided. Suitable 
apartments for the insane, medical wards for the sick, and other classes of 
inmates, the kitchen, laundry, and dining conveniences have been prepared, 
and are found in a very satisfactory condition. 

The water-closet arrangement for the insane is somewhat original in de- 
sign as to plan and location, but proves to be quite satisfactory. These 
apartments are in good order. The hospital apartments, bpth for men and 
women, deserve to be favorably mentioned. Large, airy, and cheerful-look- 
ing rooms have been selected for the purpose ; they are well and suitably 
furnished, and receive good care from the attendants who have charge of 
them. 

In the management of this county home every effort is made to maintain 
a good standard of care and condition. Much has been done since my last 
visit in repairs, additions, embellishments of the surrounding grounds, farm 
culture, and improvements generally to promote a successful management 
in all the departments. 

September 30, 1879. 

Inmates remaining at this date 200, of whom 145 are sane, 55 insane, 5 
blind, 1 deaf and dumb ; 38 are children ; 31 are hospital case ; 17 men en- 
gaged in general outside work, and 19 females in house work. 

WARRBK COUKTY. 
Jail. 

October 29, 1879, visited with Commissioner Biddle. 

The jail, though very small, is substantially built, and its interior ar- 
rangement is adapted to the separate or Pennsylvania system of prison 
discipline. There are twelve cells on the two tiers, which are arranged 
with two iron frames for hammocks in each. By placing two prisoners in 
each cell, it would consequently have a capacity for twenty-four. In addi- 
tion to these, two or three small rooms ai*e arranged on the third story of 
the dwelling part of the prison, for female prisoners. The water supply 
during the present season being insufficient, the drainage and cleansing 
operations have been much interfered with. 

Prisoners are permitted to associate in the corridor, and in the cells. 
Meals are taken in the corridor. Nor is there separation at night. This 
must be regarded as an error in the mode of conducting the jail, and which 
should certainly be corrected. An attempt to break through by removing 
the iron window frame, was made, which I understood was successful. 

Water is gathered into tanks from the roof for the bath-tubs and water- 
closets. For drinking and cooking purposes, a pump in the yard furnishes 
a sufficient supply. 

Only two prisoners were confined. 



126 Board op Public Charities. [No. 5, 

The RouM HMpltal or Warrea Cooaty AloM-Iioaie. 

October 29, 18T9, visited with Mr. Biddle. 

This institution, as stated in former reports to this Board, was estab- 
lished through the generosity of Henry R. Rouse. He bequeathed a large 
part of his estate in trust to the commissioners of Warren county, the one 
half interest of which was to be expended upon the county roads, and the 
other half for the benefit of the poor of said county. Upwards of $75,000 
is invested under the provisions of the will, the interest of which, with the 
productions of the farm, consisting of four hundred and three acres, two 
hundred of which are under cultivation, are nearly sufficient for the pur- 
pose. 

The benefits of the charity continue to be judiciously dispensed. The 
number of destitute provided for grows larger. There were 62 inmates, 
which is an increase of 22 over those maintained at the time of my preced- 
ing visit. In order to ensure efficient care and treatment, some improve- 
ments have been made. Steam heat has been introduced. A two-story 
brick house has been erected, the first story of which is designed for steam 
boilers, whilst the second will be arranged for sleeping apartments for cer- 
tain classes of the inmates. A new and spacious barn has also been built for 
the care of the stock, and storing the crops. An additional spring of water 
has been conducted into the basins, by which an adequate supply is now 
afforded. 

The necessity of better arrangements for a separation of the sexes in the 
grounds connected with the main building, to which the attention of the 
commissioners had been called, has not yet been acted on. Its importance 
is fully admitted, and the necessary changes are expected to be made dur- 
ing the present season. 

The distribution of the diflTerent classes of the inmates, the standard of 
care and efficiencj* of administration, compare favorably with what was 
observed in former j'ears. It is a bright, cheerful, and well conducted 
home, and no one who \isits it will come away without being impressed 
favorably with what is done here for the destitute and disabled. 

September 30, 1879. 

Inmates, 58 ; 40 are considered sane, 14 insane, 3 idiotic, 1 blind ; 11 are 
children. Eleven tramps called last quarter. No report of number of in- 
mates employed. 

WESTMORELAND COU.\TY. 
Jail. 

Visited October 15, 1879. 

For a description of this jail the reader is referred to the report of the 
General Agent for 1876, (page 113.) There is nothing to be said in its 
favor in any respect, as a suitable place for the confinement of human 
beings to whatever class or grade the}'' may belong. Witli the exception 
of its having received a coat of whitewash, it presents the same appearance. 
Nothing has been done to remedy the imperfections in the building, nor 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 12T 

have any measures been adopted to correct the defective drainage, which 
must sooner or later affect the sanitar}' condition of the occupants and those 
in the immediate vicinity. These and other difficulties interfere very 
largel}' with the success of any efforts that may be made by the keepers to 
preserve a respectable standard of care and household condition. 

There are twenty cells in the upper and lower tiers, besides three in the 
basement, which are never used. Water is not introduced into the cells. 
Prisoners congregate in the corridor and cells. To some extent convicts 
are kept. Present number of prisoners, 14, of whom 3 are tried. 

Poor-Home 

The buildings for the maintenance of the poor having been totally de- 
stroyed by fire, which occurred in the winter of 1879, arrangements have 
been made to erect others at the same place of sufficient capacity and with 
suitable conveniences. 

For the present, the inmates are provided for in temporary frame build- 
ings erected for the purpose. The insane class have been transferred to 
Dixmont hospital and Allegheny City home, where they will be main- 
tained until suitable apartments shall again be prepared for them at the 
county home. 

September 30, 1879, inmates 143. of whom 17 are children, 4 idiotic, 2 
blind men, 1 female. 

WYOMING COUi\TY. 
Jail. 

September 19, 1879, visited with Commissioner Biddle. 

Six spacious cells are pro\aded in the rear end of a two-story brick house, 
which looks like an ordinary dwelling. The jail is in fair order. Short 
term convicts only are kept. Water 1; on veniences are provided. Six pris- 
oners are confined at this time, all of whom have been tried. 

WAYNB COC.XTY. 

Jail. 

Visited September 20, 1879, with Commissioner Biddle. 

This small jjrison receives sufficient care, and good order is maintained. 
It seldom has more than five prisoners, generally not more than one or two. 
It is one story in height, and is securely built. 

Texas aad Honc«dalo Poor DIatrlet. 

Visited with Mr. Biddle and Director Cory. 

About 30 inmates are maintained at the present time. Twenty-one males, 
9 females ; 3 are insane, 1 is blind, one deaf and dumb. Three insane are 
supported in the State hospital. Good order is preserved, and much relief 
is afforded to the destitute of the district. 

The new building noticed in a former report, continues to be used as a 
hospital for the sick and insane. It is well arranged for the purpose. 
Jacob D, Dewitt, is the present steward. 



128 Board op Public Chaeities. [No. 5, 

pikb countv. 

Jail. 

Visited September 24, 1879, with Commissioner Biddle. 

The two apartments on the first floor of the old court-house, continue to 
be used for prison purposes. The building itself is substantially built, and, 
with a small outlay, might be suitably fixed up as a jail. 

The apartments above referred to, are wanting in security and such con- 
veniencies and arrangements as are required for the safe keeping of the 
criminal class. 

The prison wants of the county being very small, the county authorities 
manifest no disposition to make the necessary changes and improvements in 
the building, preferring to send both long and short term prisoners to the 
State prison. 

There were no prisoners at the time of our visit. Four persons charged 
with crime were out on bail at this' time. During the two years of the 
present sheriff, the highest number confined at one time was seven, and that 
was immediately preceding the court session. 

The prisoners are boarded by the sheriff at $2 50 per week, each. 

YORK COU.'VTY. 

Jail. 

September 4, 1879, visited with Commissioner Biddle. 

Usually, this prison is much crowded. The present number of prisoners 
does not exceed 33, and consists of 23 short term convicts and 10 tramps, 4 
are females, and 4 boys. The latter were committed f )r jumping upon rail- 
road trains, and were sentenced for ten and twenty days. The jail contains 
thirty-nine cells, which would be sufficient to afford a separate cell for each 
of the present prisoners. In the managemant of this, as well as many other 
county jails, the practice of strict separation of the different classes of 
criminals usually kept in them, is not deemed to be very important. They 
are allowed to associate in the c3rridor and in the cells, but are locked up 
at night. Daring all the hours of the day the}'' oceup}'' the lower corridor 
and the cells communicating with it, neither of which consequently present 
a favorable appearance. The upper tier is in all respects the most desirable. 

Little or nothing is done to counteract the baneful effects of uninter- 
rupted idleness. Employment is not provided, neither reading matter nor 
any other mode of profitable mental entertainment is supplied, with the ex- 
ception of Sunday, when religious services are conducted for their benefit. 

The prison is arranged for the separate system of prison discipline. 
Modern views in that respect not being carried out, the benefits afforded 
by the structural arrangement are not realized. It seems to be worse than 
folly if our county penal institutions are to be cDuducted in this careless 
manner, to incur the heavy expense for putting up buildings of that kind. 
A building with a single apartment, with enclosures sufficiently strong to 
prevent escapes, would answer the purpose, wherever that way of con- 
ducting them prevails. But as public sentiment becomes enlightened upon 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Chabitie& 129 

the improTed sy stems of dealing with the criminal class, the necessity will 
occur for a more rigid compliance with the requirements of law — ^the sep- 
arate confinement, at hard labor, of persons found guilty of crime. 

Poor»hooM. 

Present number of inmates, 185. The inmates of this fine county home 
are accommodated in the main building, which is the original poor-house, 
and the spacious four-story brick building, which is used as an infirmary 
for the sick and injured, and for the care and treatment of the insane. The 
working class, consisting of males and females who are capable of assisting 
in the work of the home, gardens, and farm, are received into the first- 
named, in which valuable changes and improvements have been made, and 
from which very decided benefits have been derived. 

The larger portion of the entire population, constituting nearly two 
thirds of it, are maintained in the hospital, a building that is well arranged 
for the various classes for whose benefit it is designed. 

The basement, which is largely above ground, and being very spacious, 
is used for various purposes. Apartments are set aside for lodging tramps. 
The colored class have sleeping apartments here. A dining-room is pro- 
vided for all who can come to their meals. The kitchen and laundry apart- 
ments are seen at the opposite end. It is on this floor that the work for 
cooking, washing, the heating arrangements, &c.,is carried on, and it there- 
fore must not be expected at all times to present a very inviting appear- 
ance. 

On the first floor, above the basement, a chapel is provided, in which 
services are conducted every Sabbath. The floors and walls have received 
several coats of paint since my last visit, by which their appearance has 
been much improved. This floor is divided into single and associate 
rooms — some of the latter being sufficiently large for three and seven beds. 
The afflicted classes are located here. The aged, some of the chronic in- 
sane, the blind, the sick, and disabled are accommodated in both wings, 
there being one for males and one for females, with small dining-rooms, 
with every other necessary convenience. • 

The medical Wards are prepared on the third story. Very large rooms, 
facing front, admitting of being made light and cheerful, are well-arranged 
for the purpose. The male ward has six beds at this time. They are with- 
out occupants. The bedding, furniture, floors — all, indeed — ^were found in 
good order. The female ward was also found in a favorable condition, and 
had only three beds. 

The other apartments, Tj^ith their occupants suflfering under various ail- 
ments of body and mind, were found in fair condition. About one hun- 
dred and sixty of the inmates are accommodated in the hospital at this 
time. 

The benefit of paid attendants for the male and female wards is also en- 
joyed. 

The inmates are provided with what is necessary for their comfort and 
9— B. P. Char. 



130 Board of Public Chabities. [No. 5, 

welfare, and receive from the steward and his wife fisdthful care and atten- 
tion. 

Strict confinement of the insane is not practiced. A large liberty in the 
house and grounds is permitted to all who are not violent or destructive, 
and do not wander away. For the latter, and /or them only^ yards or air- 
ing grounds are enclosed, a discrimination that is wise and humane, as many 
of this class require no such restriction. The privilege of the corridors 
is allowed to many, with little or no guardianship of any kind. 

The number of inmates remaining in the house September 30, 1 879, was as 
follows : 191 ; or 110 males, 48 females, white ; colored, 6 males, 6 females. 
Adults, no ; 21 children. One hundred and thirty-five natives, 56 foreign- 
ers. Forty-two were insane, 2 idiotic. Tramps relieved, July, 16 ; August, 
8 ; and September, 13. 

Sixteen men are employed in farm work, 19 females house work, 5 men 
stone quarries, 6 nurses and assistants ; gardners' department, 2 ; mechan- 
ics, 3. 

The total alms-house expenses were, $22,772 67 

Paid for out-door relief, 3,386 29 

Total alms-house and out-door relief, $26,158 96 

Deduct receipts, 1,197 60 

Net cost to county, $24,961 36 



Lbg. Doc.] Boabd of Public Chabiti£& 181 



STATISTICS 



FOB 



1879 



The statistical report is sub-divided into two parts : The first comprising 
criminal statistics ; the second, statistics of the unfortunate and indigent 
classes. 

Criminal Statistics are classified as follows : Proceedings of Criminal 
Courts^ as pre^ented in the returns of their prothonotaries or clerks; 
Convicts and Prisoners^ in penitentiaries, county prisons, work-house, and 
house of correction; Juvenile Delinquents^ in the reformatories of the 
State. 

Statistics of the Unfortunate and Indigent Classes^ viz : Inmates in 
hospitals for insane, training school for feeble minded children, institutions 
for deaf and dumb, for instruction of blind, alms-houses, outdoor relief in 
alms-house districts, township poor, etc. 



182 



BoASD OF Public Ohasitiie& 



I No. 6, 



CRIMINAL STATISTICS. 



CEIMINAL COURT PROCEEDINGS. 

An analysis of the returns of prothonotaries or clerks of criminal courts 
for the year ending September 30, 18T9, shows the criminal proceedings of 
grand juries, as compared with the preceding year, have decreased, and 
court proceedings decreased, thus : 

CompartooB of CrlnlMil SUIIitlci of 1879 with 1979. 



Grand Jubt and Coubt PBocEBDiifOB. 



Orand Jury Proeeedinga, 

Number of persons charged with orizne, . . 
Number of bills laid before grand Jury, . . 
Number of bills returned as true bills, . . 
Number of bills returned ignored, .... 

Cfourt Proceedings* 

Number of bills tried, 

Number of acquittals, 

Number of oonviotions, 

iJJwaibeT of nolle proaequieSf 

Number plead guilty to indictment, . . . . 
Amount of recognizances forfeited, .... 







Decrease 


1878. 


1879. 


over 
1878. 


20,604 


18,360 


2,244 


17,056 


14,675 


2,asi 


12,886 


10,978 


1,406 


4,784 


3,742 


992 


8,773 


7,482 


1,291 


6,239 


4,323 


916 


8,456 


8,417 


39 


962 


1,258 


•296 


2,085 


1,707 


378 


1121,750 


$188,300 


•166,550 



Per cent 
of de- 



10.90 
13.96 
11.36 
20.95 



14.72 

17.48 

1.13 

•80.77 

18.13 

•$54.65 



* Increase. 



It will be observed there was a decrefise in the number of persons 
charged with crime of 2,244, or 10.90 per cent. ; bills laid before the grand 
jury of 2,381, or 13.96 per cent.; of true bills, 1,408, or 11.36 per cent.; 
and of ignored bills, 992, or 20.95 per cent. 

The court proceedings show a decrease in bills tried of 1,291, or 14.72 
per cent.; acquittals, 916, or 17.48 per cent.; convictions, 39, or 1.18 per 
cent. ; plead guilty to indictment, 378, or 18.13 per cent. ; there was an in- 
crease in the number of nolle prosequies of 296, or 30.77 per cent. ; and in 
the amount of recognizances forfeited an increase of $66,550. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



138 



CoMitiM wk«re CoBTletloBt IwTe lacr«Mwi tai 19Y9 orer 1878. 




COUNTISS. 



Allegheny, . 
Armstrong, . 
Berks, . . . 
Bucks, . . . 
l^&rbon, . . 
Clinton, . 
Cumberland, 
Fayette, . . 
Forest, . . . 
Greene, . . 
Huntingdon, 
Jefferson, . . 
Juniata, . . 



a 


C 


s 


o 


•2* 


Soo 


-6 So 


i& 


Convi 
1 




814 


73 


49 


3 


154 


20 


67 


13 


15 


5 


11 


2 


56 


17 


28 


6 


6 


8 


11 


1 


10 


5 


31 


20 


12 


9 



Lancaster, . . 
Lebanon, . 
livoomlng, . 
McKean, . . 
Monroe, . . . 
Montgomery, 
Northampton, 
Philadelphia, 
Washingfton, . 
York, .... 

Total, . . . 



a 



2,822 



o 



00 

So 






98 


7 


64 


19 


47 


2 


52 


20 


9 


2 


66 


11 


146 


82 


987 


108 


70 


61 


89 


10 



488 



The convictions in the above twenty-three counties were 2,322 during 
1879 ; an increase of 438, or 23.25 per cent, more than the preceding year. 



BOABD Of PdBUC OHABITIEa, [No. &, 

« wfaera UdaiMiOM ksTe iedruMd !■ 1N», u napuel «llh 1978. 



COOMTIBS. 


ii 

1 


1 


OOUMTIBS. 


k 






18 
13 
13 
29 
48 
21 
13 
1 
11 
88 
8S 
21 
18 
«1 
53 
12 
38 

18 
H 


9 
3 
5 
8 

7 
38 
28 

4 
10 
50 
16 

4 
21 
14 

7 
14 
22 

2 
16 


Lnaeme, 38 » 

l.aakBwanaa, 65 j 


lOS 
31 
16 
3 
44 
13 
5 
■60 
4 
6 
2 
6 
4 
26 
10 
6 
6S 
2 

1,057 








Bedford, 


















Northumborlind,^ 






















Snyder 
















Susquehanna, 

Venango, 

Wayne, 

Wyomlog, 




















PrankUn, 

Indiana, 


u 

3 









The Dumber of convictions in the above forty counties were 1,051 in 
1819 ; a decrease of 411, or 31.09 per cent., as compared with 1818. 

In additiOD to the foregoing, there were four counties in which the num- 
ber of convictions, in 1819, exactly equaled those of 1818, viz : Columbia, 
33 ; Fultou 4 ; Potter, I ; and Union, 8 convictions. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



135 



Offei 



Ibr wblcb Oonvletrd. 



The offenses of which the 3,417 prisoners were convicted, are as follows s 



Offenses. \ Number. 

Abortion, 6 

Adultery, <fto 81 

Aggravated aasault, 5 

Arson, 10 

AsBault, 4 

Aaaanlt and battery, 608 

Aaaault to kill, 80 

Assaalt to rob, 16 

Asaault to steal, 7 

Assault to oomiuit rape, 85 

Bawdy-house, 28 

Bigamy, 7 

Burglary, <feo., 224 

Carrying concealed weapons, ... 44 

Common scold, 7 

Conspiraoy*, 28 



Counterfeiting, 

Cruelty to children and animals. 

Cutting timber trees, 

Deserting family, <fcc, 

Disorderly house. 

Disorderly, breach of peace, . . . 
Disturbing religious meeting, . . 

Embezzlement, 

Escape, 

False pretense, 

Forgery, 

Fornication, <feo., 

Gaming-house, dto., 

Highway robbery, 

Horse stealing 

Illegal voting, 



5 



8 

20 
26 
60 

5 
44 

8 

47 

47 

285 

11 

1 
21 

2 



Offenses, Number. 

Indecency, 6 

Larceny, <fcc., 1,080 



Libel, 

Lottery, . . . . . 

Malicious mischief, . . . 

Manslaughter, 

Mayhem, 

Misdemeanors, 

Murder, first degree, . . 
Murder, second degree, . . 

Nuisance 

Perjury, . . 

Passing counterfeit money, 
Pointing fire-anns, . . . . 

Rape, & , 

Receiving stolen goods, . . 
Rescuing prisoner, . . . . 
Resisting ot&cer, <&o., . . 

Riot 

Robbery, 

Seduction, . . 

Shooting to kill, Ao., . . . 

Sodomy, . . 

Surety of peace, 

Threats, 

Violation of election law, . 
Violation of fish law, . . . 
Violation of f^ame law, . . 
Violation of liquor law, . . 



■ • • 



5 

10 

66 

12 

2 

07 

14 

5 

12 

15 

5 

8 

21 

54 

8 

10 

04 

46 

6 

4 

1 

8 

1 

2 

8 

2 

80 



Total, 8,417 



Daring the year 1879, the convictions for the several offenses above men- 
tioned amounted to 3,417 ; a decrease of 39 on the year previous. As is 
usual, larceny constitutes the chief offense, being more than one fourth of 
the whole number. 



136 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6, 



TABLE A.~AB8TRACrr OP REPORTS BY PROTHON 



Statement of the criminal business of courts in the several counties of the 
her of hills laid hefore the several grand juries^ number of hills returned 
quittals^ convictions nolle prosequies entered^ number plead guilty to 



Courts and Counties. 



1. Adams, . . . , 

2. AUegheuy, . , 
8. Armstrong, . . 

4. Beaver, . . . . 

5. Bedford, . . , 

6. Berks, . . . . 

7. Blair 

8. Bradford, . . . 

9. Buoks, . . . . 

10. Butler, . . . . 

11. Cafiibiia, . . , 

12. Cameron, . . 

13. Carbon, . . . , 

14. Centre, . . . 

15. Chester, ^ . , 

16. Clarion, . . . 

17. Clearfield, . 

18. Clinton, . . . 

19. Columbia, . 

20. Crawford, . . 

21. Cumberland, 

22. Dauphin, . . 

23. Delaware, . 

24. Elk, .... 

25. Erie, .... 

26. Fayette, . . 

27. Forest, . . . 

28. Franklin, . . 

29. Fulton, . . . 

30. Greene, . . . 

81. Huntingdon, 

82. Indiana, . . 

83. Jefferson, . . 

84. Juniata, . . 
35. Lackawanna, 

86. Lancaster, . 

87. Lawrence, . 

88. Lebanon, . . 

89. Lehigh, . . . 

40. Luzerne, . . 

41. Lycoming, . 

42. MoKean, . . 

43. Mercer, . , . 

44. Mifflhi, . . . 

45. Monroe, . . 

46. Montgomery, 

47. Montour, . . 

48. Northampton, 



n 






^ 


Grand Jury 


jjj 






m 

1 


1 


9r returned as 
bills. 


er of pe 
orime. 


ills laid 
d Jury. 


'S5 


'^ B 


^ 9 


11 






^ 


^ 


% 


68 


54 


44 


1,156 


968 


669 


205 


165 


106 


127 


96 


71 


54 


26 


18 


650 


418 


341 


142 


113 


82 


158 


79 


69 


179 


128 


96 


224 


208 


140 


81 


64 


61 


11 


6 


6 


72 


68 


60 


117 


74 


61 


198 


188 


161 


286 


172 


109 


169 


104 


74 


84 


71 


• 46 


80 


! 58 


39 


let 


143 


124 


269 


187 


112 


462 


293 


221 


188 


170 


121 


21 


28 


25 


249 


140 


121 


131 


108 


69 


17 


18 


13 


269 


155 


101 


53 


13 


11 


78 


50 


28 


139 


71 


62 


92 


43 


32 


126 


73 


68 


55 


34 


22 


428 


274 


182 


583 


455 


890 


66 


! 51 


81 


140 


182 


106 


244 


222 


178 


703 


532 


289 


300 


109 


199 


446 


299 


187 


105 


74 


67 


52 


46 


88 


38 


26 


17 


313 


890 


820 


21 


19 


18 


325 


242 


202 



Lbq. Doc.] 



Board of Public CHABiTisa 



18? 



OTARIB8 OB CI.BRK8 OP CRIMINAL COURTS. 



Commonwealth^ showing the number of persons charged unth crime^ num- 
as true bills, number ignored ; also, number of bills tried, number of ac- 
indictment, number and amount of recognizances forfeited. 



Procbeoinqs. 



^ 



•2 2 



9 

801 

13 

84 

7 
94 
30 
20 
32 
62 
18 

1 

8 
13 
37 
48 
80 
24 
19 
19 
82 
94 
46 

6 
19 
41 

• • 

54 

2 

22 

9 

11 

18 

12 

90 

65 

20 

24 

44 

248 

56 

121 

6 

8 

7 

70 

5 

40 



P^o 



CODBT PbOOBBDINGB. 



1 



OQ 

o 

u 

o 

Xi 

a 



7 
388 

68 
17 
12 

182 
27 
43 
66 
40 
18 
8 
28 
27 

128 
59 
87 
19 
28 
42 
58 

116 

109 
21 
46 
48 
11 
66 
5 

' 16 
17 
17 
28 
24 

107 

281 
25 
84 

180 

159 
29 
84 
40 
24 
12 

125 
7 

182 



rf 


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i 


3 




i 


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8 

o 




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u 


u . 


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9 


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9 


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Jz; 


^ 


^ 


20 


18 


2 


176 


814 


51 


41 


49 


22 


5 


12 


9 


5 


13 


24 


86 


154 


1 


25 


29 


19 


19 


43 


88 


61 


57 


16 


86 


21 


8 


24 


13 


8 


2 


1 


1 


19 


15 


1 


15 


13 


2 


43 


83 


5 


51 


35 


29 


19 


21 


9 


15 


11 


2 


5 


23 


9 


82 


18 


6 


41 


56 


8 


57 


61 


25 


56 


53 


9 


4 


12 


2 


86 


88 


50 


27 


28 


16 


1 


6 


1 


15 


68 


151 


5 


4 


7 


6 


11 


18 


11 


10 


48 


16 


6 


22 


27 


81 


2 


12 


12 


15 


85 


65 


70 


141 


98 


85 


18 


18 


10 


28 


54 


9 


65 


94 


12 


103 


38 


85 


41 


47 


82 


41 


52 


60 


24 


81 


15 


8 


15 


1 


14 


9 


8 


61 


66 


43 


6 


8 


1 


65 


146 


8 



a 



II 



10 

95 

2 

2 

12 

18 

22 

7 

21 

20 



16 

11 

15 

10 

21 

9 

7 

19 

37 

41 

20 

1 

23 

10 



14 

1 

8 

24 

8 

10 

2 

16 

74 

1 

24 

36 

67 

48 

19 

4 

6 

4 

60 

1 



Rbcoonizances 
Forfeited. 



I 



114 
8 
1 
2 
48 
19 
2 



a 

.1 

< 



6 
1 



6 

8 

17 



18 

53 

4 



6 



2 
1 



2 
17 

i 



1 
41 
1 
2 
2 

' 1 
16 



9168,850 00 

' 100 I 00 

300 00 

16,200 . 00 



1,900 
500 



00 
00 



7,650 00 

700 i 00 

8,500 00 



500 



19,700 
1,500 



1,250 



1,000 I 00 



700 



500 



2,500 

14,800 

600 

500 

700 

"aod 

5,000 



00 



6J5rf* 00 



00 
00 

• • 

00 



00 



00 



1,600 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 






1 

2 
8 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
82 
83 
34 
36 
86 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 



138 



Board of Public Charitie& 



[No. 5, 

TABLE A> 



Grand Juby 



C0UBT8 AND Counties. 



49. Nortbiimberland, 
60. Perry, .... 
51. Philadelphia, . . 

62. Pike, 

63. Potter, .... 

64. SohuylkUl, . . . 

65. Snyder, .... 

66. Somerset, .... 

67. Sullivan, .... 

68. Susquehanna, . 

69. Tloffa, 

60. Union, 

61. Venango, .... 

62. Warren, .... 

63. Washington, . . 

64. Wayne, ... 

65. Westmoreland, . 

66. Wyoming, . . . 

67. York, 



Total, 




10,978 



■^|^^.lr* 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



139 



Pbooeedinqs. 


COUBT Pboobedings. 


Rbcoonizancbs 

FOBFBITED. 




ip 


1 


1 


• 

3 


4 

> 


1 


b 














1 


g 


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d 




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s 

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JZi 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


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1 


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47 


■ • • B 


72 


49 


44 


6 


12 


1100 


00 


49 


5 








27 


11 


13 


24 


6 


• ■ • 


a • ■ 


• • 


50 


1,208 








8,909 


2,298 


987 


2 


677 


• • ■ • 


81,800 


00 


51 


5 








7 


3 


5 


5 


8 


8 


1,800 


00 


52 


8 








3 


2 


1 


5 


3 


• • • 






53 


84 








112 

8 

18 


50 

4 

14 


60 
4 
5 


10 
8 

48 


50 
8 
8 








54 


10 








55 


8 


• • • 


• • • 




56 


2 








4 
6 


5 
26 


2 
9 


13 

6 


1 
4 


I 






57 


42 


200 


00 


58 


22 








8 


3 


4 


3 


6 


28 


18,300 


00 


59 


4 








10 
49 


7 
19 


8 
26 


1 
24 


2 
18 








60 


27 


5 


1,100 


00 


61 


5 








9 


10 


10 


8 


4 


8 


1,000 


00 


62 


28 








26 
10 


81 
10 


70 
5 


84 
9 


17 
2 






00 


63 


18 


1 


200 


64 


27 








65 


27 


53 


34 


6 


2 


800 


00 


65 


9 








2 
97 


1 
40 


2 
89 


6 
12 


10 
9 








66 


165 


25 






67 








00 




3,742 


• • • • 


7,482 


4,328 


8,417 


1,258 


1,707 


467 


9188,300 





140 BoABD OF Public Cbakitibb. [No. 5, 

TABLE B^AMTOAUT OP BBPOBTS BV PKOTHIM 

Statement of offentei of which persoria were charged upon commitment, 
which persong were tned, acquitted, 



JjBG. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Charitib& 



Ul 



OTARIB8 OR CLERKS OF CRIMINAL COURTS. 



with the result of the proceedings of grand jury ; aleo^ the offenses for 
or convicted^ etc.^ at court 



Pbocsedinos. 

1 




Court Pbooeedings. 




Reooonizancbs 
Forfeited. 

• 


•mm 

o 


a 

i 

^1 


■8 


• 

1 

! 

«M 

o 


1 

i 

o 


1 

Hi* 
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8 


1 

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% 






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red. 


II 


1 




1^ 




1^ 




1 


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1 




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1 


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1 


1 

2 


1 

7 
1 

1 
88 






1 

• • • • 




\ 






2 


1 
1 

1 
7 


6 


4 


















1 
25 














35 


31 


• • • ■ 


19 


4 


$2,100 


00 


7 


" *8 
14 
10 


7 

27 

8 

8 

1,975 


2 

14 

4 

3 

1,214 


5 

10 

4 


• • • • 

12 

• • • • 


' * '2 
5 
2 








18 








17 
















1,218 


884 


698 


294 


215 


51 


18,500 


00 


78 


125 


238 


181 


89 


87 


68 


5 


8,400 


00 






18 
14 
47 
28 


2 
8 

8 

4 


16 

7 

85 

28 


• • • • 

12 
4 

■ • • • 


8 

8 

18 

10 








8 


5 
12 
17 














00 


8 


7 


5,500 




2 


12 


5 


7 


« • m 


2 














00 


42 


49*' 


• • • • 
295 


59 


224 


17 


' 'l89 


5 


2,700 


7 


2 


12 


9 






2 




















42 


28 


98 


48 


44 


5 


25 


7 


1,500 


00 






P 
65 


2 
80 


7 
28 


• • • « 
10 


2 

19 








25 


12 


5 


8,500 


00 


1 


1 


8 


3 


5 


. • . ■ 


2 








1 


2 


14 
5 


5 

1 


9 
8 


• • . • 

• » • • 


5 

1 




1 


2 


1 


200 


00 


21 


12 


7 

89 
58 


5 

8 

24 


• • • • 
29 
26 


2 
8 
4 








00 
00 




18 
19 


8 


' '1,200 
8,500 


18 


10 


2 


7 


102 


21 


69 


29 


55 


12 


4,525 


00 


. a • • 


1 


5 


• • ■ • 


5 


• • ■ • 


2 


1 


500 


00 


28 


19 


70 


22 


44 


9 


87 


14 


4,800 


00 


7 


1 
12 


8 

88 

12 

112 


5 
80 

8 
61 






p 


1 . . . . 






88 


• • • ■ 

8 
47 


7 

• « ■ • 

8 






I • • 

> * • • • < ' 




3 

28 








18 


18 


25 


8,400 


00 


81 


7 

1 


8 

84 


8 
80 














19 


47 


12 


21 


12 


8,925 


00 


7 


2 ; 


1 


1 


• • • • 


• • • , 


• • ■ • 


8 


1,550 


00 


64 


19' 


294 


25 


285 


28 


174 


29 


21,125 00 


8 


» • • • 


19 


2 


11 


4 


2 


4 


7,900 


00 




• • • • 

• • ■ • 


2 
81 


1 

7 


1 
21 




. . . . 1 








8 


5 


10 


io 


4,500 


00 


1 


• • • • 
■ • « • 


4 
9 


1 

1 


2 
6 













1 


• • • • 


'1 


• • • 


• • • • • 


• • 


1 


1 

' '699 


1 
2,428 


1 
1,980 


. 






1 






1,480 


1,030 


594 


590 


197 


28,475 


00 


2 


• • • • 
• • • 


8 
11 


2 
3 














8 


5 


1 


* *1 

1 


* * ' 1 


200 


00 



u 

9 

£1 



1 

2 
8 
4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
81 
82 
33 
34 
35 
36 
87 
38 
89 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



BoAKD OP Public Ghabitieb. 



[No. 5, 





1 

if 


Gramd Joky 


Owtxusaa. 




a 

Is 




18 
MS 

at 

8 

see 

81 
45 
1* 

49 

91 

69 
128 

24 
lU 

lai 

17 

12 
128 

10 

8 
688 


13 

469 

ao 

7 

sso 

9 
S7 
12 
2 
41 
2 
6 
S 
4 
84 
2 
3 
68 
110 
6 
31 
96 

m 

12 

10 
104 

675 


















274 






68. Murder, seoond degree, 


8 






61. Obstruoting legal prooees, 

63. ObstruatinguaeoftralnB, 




64. Peddling without Uoense, 


3 














































77. Sending threateniag letters, 


1 






80. Sodomy, 




























87. VioliUion of game law, 

88. ViolaUon of Bquor l»w, 


4 
S28 












18,360 


14,675 


10,978 





Lbq. Doc.] 



Board of Public Chabities. 



143 



0«Btte«ed. 



Pbockbdingb. 




GOUBT PROOE1EDINGH9. 




Rbooqnizancbb 
fobfbited. 




Jf 


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1500 


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51 


119 


81 


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124 


66 


14 


25 


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52 


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58 


1 


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4 
184 


74 


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54 


99 


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56 


7 


14 


5 


6 


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57 


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58 










59 


6 


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60 






1 
2 
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1 
48 
















61 


1 




1 


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62 




5 




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68 












64 


14 


2 


' ' 29 


15 


12 


8 


8 


1,500 


00 


65 






1 

3 

41 
















66 






14 


8 
21 


* 5 


1 
9 


■ ' 2 


• • . . 
500 


00 


67 


18 


8 


68 


21 


5 


69 

4 

16 

96 


10 


54 
8 

10 
94 


7 


21 


5 


2,500 


00 


69 
70 


2 




2 


2 
54 








71 




2 


1,000 


00 


72 


17 


4 


98 
8 
] 

1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
18 


41 


46 
6 


5 


18 
1 






78 


1 








74 










75 




















76 




















77 




















78 


1 




2 
' '8 


4 
1 
8 


1 


1 








79 


1 






00 


80 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1,500 


81 


1 


' ' 1 


1 




1 












82 


2 












88 


1 


















84 


1 


M 


8 

5 

8 

321 


1 

1 

1 

215 


2 

3 

2 

89 












86 


1 




1 








86 


1 








87 


210 


20 


12 


12 


9,000 


00 


88 
















12 


81,800 


00 
00 


89 




' ' ** * 














8,742 


1,545 


7,482 


4,828 


8,417 


1,258 


1,707 


467 


9188,800 





BoABs OF Public Chakitibs. 



[No-S, 



F REPORTS BY PROTHAnS 



NATttBB or OrFBRBI rOB WHICH C<umcTU>. 






a.I>1stDrnliiKtellgl 

b! Bacupe, 

V. roTgtsrj. .... 

W. OunlDg boaH, M 
n. Highway robben 
Jl. HorwiMillDR, 



Lug. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



145 



TARIE8 OR CLERKS OP CRIMINAL COLRT8. 



eauntieSf during the year ending September 80, 1879, a^ reported to the Board of 
or clerks of the various criminal courts. 



COUBTfl AND COUITTIXS. 



i 

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a a 

• a 
■ • 
a a 

28 

1 


i 



1 
"2 

1 
2 

6 


• 


M 

S 

a • 
a a 

9 

a a 
a a 
a a 
a a 
■ a 
a a 

8 

a a 

1 

• . 

2 

a a 
a a 

m m 

1 

a • 

6 
2 

2 

a a 

18 

a a 
a a 

2 

a a 
a a 

4 

2 

a a 
a a 
a a 
a a 
a a 
a a 
a • 
a a 
a • 
a 

6 

a a 
• > 
a a 

4 

a 
a a 
a • 

"2 

68 


i 


1 

1 

'2 
4 


• 

e 

• ' ! 

•{ 
1 

1 

■ '. 

1 
"2 

8 

• • 

1 

1 
U 


• 
d 

•0 

M 

B 





ta 

i 
i 

8 

1 

; ; 
2 

• • 
1 

1 
10 


1 

a a 

• a 

• a 

2 

* 

'2 
1 

1 
6 


• 

e 



1 

V 

1 
1 

'6 

'5 
8 
8 

a a 
a a 

11 

a • 

1 
81 


if 

1 



a • 

a a 
a a 

*2 

• • 
8 
8 

4 

• a 

12 


• 

a 

3 

1 

2 
8 

4 
6 
6 
7 


* 1 




» • 

1 


8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
10 








20 
21 
22 
28 
M 


' 1 

1 

* ' i 


1 


I 
2 

• • 


26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
81 
82 
88 
34 
85 
86 
87 
88 
88 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
46 
46 
47 






1 


• ' a ■ 

• a 

• « a 

1 

. . 1 . . 
1 


48 
49 
60 
51 
52 
68 
54 


18 


• • 

1 


1 
15 


1 

a ■ 
a a 
a a 

1 

• a 

• * 

28 


1 

1 • • 

1 

18 

1 


56 

66 
67 
68 
; 58 
00 
61 



10— B. P. Char. 



146 Board op Public Charities. 








[No. 5, 

TABLE C- 




OOUBTB ▲in> ComiTXBS. 


Natubx of Offbhss fob which Conyiotbd. 

• 


4 

a 

1 

4 
M 

3 


• 

u 
S 

s 

• • 


& 


• 

g 
1 


• 
% 


• 

i 

H 


■ • 


■ 

B 

s 

A 


• 

s 

o 


• 

I 

1 

• • 


• 

d 

i 

i 


f A f%^\i.#4/%vi .....«•■■>«••■••■• 


• • 


la ADOrilOllf • •••• 

9 AHiitlArv Ati* ....... ..•••■•••••••• 


1 










1 


• • 




1 


% A fVfV^^^^^AtfV MASAIll^ ..■■••■«■ 




t 


•• A|{grATMkCU KSMlull) 

4 A rarkn .......••■••••■•••••••••• 




• • 

• • 




10 


18 

2 


12 


1 

• 

14 
1 


14 
6 

1 
2 


• • 


B • 


S. Assault, 

4 AKsanlt^ An<1 Vk«.ttPPV ......■.••••••••••• 


• 

It 

1 


• • 

1 


7 AA8a.nlL to kill 


• • 


fi A aaanlfr tt\ mil ...........■••• ••••■• 


A • • • 


















■ • ■ 


V« AS8»UtIi« fcO BVf3»Lf •• ••••«• 

10. Assanlt, to commit rape, 

11 TlBiv<1ir ItAnaA .......•■•.•••••••.•• 


1 


• • 


1 


1 




1 


*8 


1 1 


LM% OBWUjr IIWUBW, ,,,....«•••••••••••••••••• 








iz. Digarayt 


1 

• ■ 


10 


8 
1 

2 


1 


9 


8 

1 


1 


1 


4 1 


14. Carrying concealed weapons, 


^ :: 


fa Orknanlpfif'V ......... ..•■•••••••••••.• 




^ 


19 fVktintAi*f»lt Inar ......••.•••••••• 




. . 1 . ■ 


ta 0«nai*w »o nhll<1f*nn •.nil B.ntinM.1a ........ ... 






1 . . 


Ul, V^ruCIvy fcO ciiinirw" •uu •uiiii»*»| •• ....•..• 












1 
1 

4 


4 

4 

• • 

• ■ 

4 

A ■ 

1 


1 

1 
1 


• ■ 1 


Iv. C>uiting iimDerirees, 

n 1 lABortl n or fWnillv. etfi.. ••.- 


2 


12 




8 

1 


8 

7 

1 

8 

1 

1 

12 


X ' 


91 ma/\iFf1orlv hiiiiAP ............•...•.•..•• 




4Q Ttla/ivHArlv tirojLrh nf np&p.e 




1 1 . . 


VB T^latiii>h1niv i>All<plrkna mfopllnof. ................ 




9£ ITinhPKzlAinent. 










CK V*<**.i%A ...........•.•••••• ••«.•••. 






B0, J]aBOa}/Cf ..»...•••.••••••■•••■ 

•■ ITbIbi' nr^teiiHA. .....••■.••* 


1 

1 
8 




1 
1 


1 
9 




97 TpM'atkwv ...........•.••••••••••• . 




« 


n. Fornication, etc., 


1 


OV, \XA>IIII<K IIVUIIC^ VbV>., ...................... 


















•1 nrkrn** At«*Allnir. 








8 






■ • 




. . 1 . . 






• • • • 


M TnrippAncv. • 








16 

• • 

1 

• • 


29 
8 


' i 
1 


> • 

6 

• • 

1 


'9 
'8 


a • • • 


ftA Ti&rr>pnT. ^lA.. • .••• 


18 

1 


•16 


4 


6 6 


Si T.thel 


■ ■ * * 




• ■ 




f7. Malicious mischief, 


8 












Mr. inayneui, 

40. Misdemeanors, 

M Miirdpr first deirree. 


19 






■ « 

6 

• • 




1 
1 

1 

1 

• ■ 


« • 

• • 

1 
1 

• • 

8 

• • 


2 

1 
'2 






A Miipflpr APRond decree. .••... 


1 






' 


41 NiilAAnm -.•• 




MA PpiHiirv ...... -...-.-,. 














44. 5crjufy, . . . • 

AC I'Aaainr PAiinterfelt moneT. 








■ 






AA Prklntlnff flre-ftriiiB 






AT KAnA. etc. • ' 








1 


8 


1 
1 




AA. 'Rn<*plvlnir ntAlAll ffuods. 






An VAa^iilnir t%t*lft#mP1* ......... ....... 






W. llcBCUing priBUUcr, ... • 

CA Rpaiaiinir officer, etc.. 








• • 




• • 


• • 


'2 

6 


'2 




U Riot ... 














2 


8 


■ • 


■ • 




Kft Ap/1 iiofrlfin ....................... 








&A A#ifl#%vnv .......... .......... 






















4t. ooaumy, ...••• 

JUL Anrpfev nf nPAce ■.••..... 








* 


8 


■ 


• • 








■H BIwinMntf tn kill 










E7 'Pliroat.* ....... .........>...... .. 




















Bf. A iirvttbs, ......-••■.. ................ .. 

CO VInlntlon nf Alpptfon IaIT. ...... 




















■a Vinlatlnikof AaIi l&w. 


2 




• • 




■ • 


• ■ 








AA 'VIrklttf lrk*« i\t (ranrtA lnOT. ..... .............. 


• 




ei. violation or liquor law, 


1 
65 


8 

96 


18 


• • 

M 


1 
94 


2 

88 


2 

47 


1 
SB 


6 

1 

81 


* 

■ 

u 



Leg. Doc] 

C^oatfaioed. 



Board of Public Chabities. 



14t 



CODUTS AND COUKTIKS. 



« 

a 

o 
be 



S i 

p 
e 





o 



a a 
o o 



2 
1 



1 I 



U 



a 



2 

1 
6 



OS 



a 
o 

A 

a 



•a 

s 

U 

I' 

s 



o e 



&4 



28 



• ■ 



S 

1 



45 

■ 

4 

• • 

1 



9 :146 



10 



'ii 



2 



« 



44 



X3 

Z 

•a 

.J 



4 
2 

2 

• ■ 

229 
42 
4 
6 
7 
11 
1 

U 

20 

5 

8 



16 



24 

W 

20 

17 

1 

• • 

1 
2 
4 
878 
1 
7 

20 
4 
2 

21 
1 
1 



5 
14 

2 
8 
1 
7 
1 



IS 98T 






O 
PL4 



3 

o 



0) 

a 



12 

4 



1 
2 

• 

2 
1 

8 

■ 

1 
1 



80 



<~ it 

hi I S 

fi , = 

O 9 

CO ' OD 



a 

a 

A 

2. 1 •• 



a 

o 

a 
P 



o 

i 




V 





O 



.a 



S 



4 
2 



1 
2 



2 



28 



8 



10 



TO 



J 

« 

o 

►« to 

m 4) 



^ 



• • 

18 
1 



1 
8 



10 
8 



12 



68 



a 



o 1 M 



o 
H 



6 



8 
1 



2 



16 



1 
1 



8 



80 



6 
81 

5 
10 

4 

608 

80 

16 

7 
85 
28 

7 

224 

44 

7 
28 

5 

9 

8 
29 



1,080 

5 

10 

66 

12 

2 

97 

14 

5 

12 

15 

5 

8 

21 

M 

8 

10 

94 

46 

6 

1 

8 

4 

1 

2 

8 

2 

80 

8,417 



9 

a 

IT, 

1 
2 

8 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 



69 

5 

44 

8 

47 

47 

285 

11 

1 
21 

2 

6 I 88 



21 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
81 



84 

86 
86 
87 
88 

89 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
46 
46 
47 
48 
49 
GO 
51 
62 
68 
64 
66 
66 
67 
68 
69 
60 
61 



[So- 6, 



BoABD OP Public Charitieb. 

TABLE D.-Slalonenl of Ike BbhIbm tt fMmlaal CmH>. 

littiDgB of all the courts (except in Sullivan county) 

r,and the figures in the columns of months indicate the first, second, 

r fourth Monday of the month in which the sittings begin. 



COUHTIEB. 


t 




4 

J 
2 

' i 

'2 
1 

'2 


t 

-s 

2 
3 

'a 
2 

2 


i 

i 

■; 

1 

■5 

'4 

2 
's 
'4 

■ ■ 

'4 

'4 

1 

s 

"1' 

4 


a> 


>-> 


1 

< 


1 


1 


1 
1 


( 




4 










. . ' 3 






■ ■[■, 








: : 


















1 

4 










2 i ! ! ■ ] 
- - ' * '2 

. . 8 ! 

^' 

3 1.. 3 
1 1 . . ' 2 

ll::!:: 
::i'lT' 

.... 2 

il::';: 












2 










8 
8 
4 

4 
4 
2 


3 

i 

i 
1 

'2 

8 

'2 

' 1 
8 

'2 

I 

2 

4 


: : 
















d. 


















2 
8 






, 




4 


':'■ 
3 
























2 
2 








;don. 


J 
















'a 




3 

1 
2 

'4 

■3 

4 

'2 
'2 




;^' 


.. 


'2 

'4 

1 






1 

8 
4 

'2 
2 


























1 


nery 

ipton, 

aWland. 

phia," ::....:: . 


\ 


1 
3 
2 


fii 


1 





















Lbq. Doc] 



BoABD OF Public Chabities. 



149 



TABLE D-C<ntlBae4. 



COUNTISB. 



Somerset, . . . 
Sullivan, . . . 
Sosquehanna, . 

Tioea, 

Union, ... 
Venango, . . . 
Warren, . . . 
Washington, . 
Wayne, . . . 
Westmoreland, 
Wyoming, . . 
York, 



•-9 



2 
4 



8 

2 



u 

n 

9 



*4 



1 
1 






1 

2 



=3 

u 

< 



3 
2 



I 



♦4 

■ • 

1 
3 



3 
1 
2 



►» 

3 



< 



2 
4 

4 

■ 

8 

« 

4 
8 



9 

a 

9 
9 



♦4 
3 

• • 

1 
1 



u 

9 
Xi 



I 'I 
I ^ 

O 9 



2 

• 

2 

4 



*3 

8 
1 
1 



2 
3 



*Ttte«da7. 



Board of Public Chaeitieb. 

ProabraaUrlea, ar Link* at Orlnlaal Coorte. 



[No. 5, 



AUegbeny, 
Armstrong, 
Beaver, . . 
Bedford, . 
Berks, . . 
Blair, . . . 
Bradford, . 
Bucks, . . 
Butler. . . 
Cambria, . 
Cameron, . 

Centre, . . 
Chester, , 
Clarion, . 
Clearfield, 
Clinton, . 
Colnmbla, 
Crawford, 
Cumberland, 
Daupliln, 
Delaware, 
Elk, . . 
Brie, . 
Fayette, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, . 

Greene, 

Hnntingd< 

Indiana, 

JefTerson, 

Juniata, 

Lackawanna, 

LanoMter, 

Ifiwrenoe, 

Lebiuion, . 

Xiehlgh, . . 

Luzerne, . 

Lyoomlng, 

MoKean, . 

Mereer, . , 

Mifflin, . . 

Monroe, , 

Montgomery, 



mberland, 
Iphia, 



J. L. Pitlenhnrff, 
A.H, Rowand. jr., 

A. H. 8UU 

C. A. Orimu, . . . 
H. D. Tate. . . , 
Kphralin Dunkel, . 
Jamen P. Stewart, . 
Geo. W. Blaokman, 
John Roberta, . . 
W. A. Wriglit, . . . 
C. F. OCoimeil, . . 
J. H. Frank, . . 
Thomas Kemerer, . 
J. C. Harper, . . . 
Pierce Hooiws, 
W. W. Greenland, . 

Eli Bloom, 

G. W. Bat«helor, . 
Wm. Kriokbaum, . 
Cliarles T.Shaw, . 
John Shead'er, . . , 
Thomas G. Fox, . . 
Isaaa Johnston, . . 
Fred. Schoening, . 
F. H. Conee. . . 
Joseph M. (felevee, 
Justis Shawkey, . . 
V. T. Haulman, . , 
R. A. McDonald, . 
J. O, (iarvan, , . 

A. P. nfcElwane, . 
A.C.Boyle. . . . 
T K. HflstinKH, . . 
George Reynolds, . 
J. R. Thomaa, . . 

B. P. W. Urban, . , 
A. Hutton, .... 
E. M. Ehur, - . . , 
Jolm P. Goundie, . 
David S Williimis, 
William FoUmer, . 
J. B. Brawley. , . . 
L. A. MoCruinb, . . 
William S. Nettle, . 
A.B-Shafer, . . . 

i^.f 



-I- 



W. M. Gearhart, . . 
W. J. Snyder, . , 

David Mickev. . 
William R. Leeds, 
John C. Westbrook, 
O. G. Crosby, . . . 
O. J. Aregobd, , . 
Jeremiah ('rouse, , 
H. F. Sehell, , . 
Henrv Van Rtter, . 
W. *. Sfmrell, . . 
Robert C Cox, . . . 
C. H. Hassenplug, . 



Charles Menner, . 
J. W. Wilson, . . 
ZihaLott, . . . . 
W. A. Thompson, 



Oettvaburg, . . 
Pittsburgh, . . 
Kittanning, . . 
Reaver, .... 

Bedford 

Reading, . . . 
HolUdavshiirg, 
Towsixfa, . . 
Dovlestown, . . 
Buller. .... 
ICbenshurg, . 

Maiich Chunk, . 
Rellefonte. . . . 

West Chester, . 
Clarion. . . . 
Clearfield. . . . 
Lock Haven, . 
Bloomsburg. . 
Meadvlile, . . . 
Carlisle, .... 
Ilarrishunc, . . 

Media 

Rldgway, . . . 

Erie, 

Uriontowii, . . 
Tionesta, . . . 
Chambersburg, 
M cCon D el 1 sh u rg, 
Waynesburg, . 
Huntingdon, . . 

Brookville, . . 
Mifflintowu, . . 
Scranton, . . . 

Iisnoaster, , . . 
New Castle, . . 
Lebanon, . . . 
Allenlown, . . 
Wllkea-Barre, , 
Williauisport, . 
Smeth port, . . 
Mercer, .... 
Lewlstown, . . 
Strondsburg, . 
Norrlstown, . . 
Dimville, . . . 



Sunbury, . . . 
New Bloomfleld, 
Fhlladelpbla, . 

Milford, 
Couderaport, , . 
Potlsville, . . . 

Middlebu^, . . 
Somerset, . . . 

I.aporte 

Montrose, . . . 



Franklin, , . , 

Warren 

Wasliinirton, . , 
Honesdale, . , 
Greeiishni^, . . 
Tun k bannock, , 
York, 



Clerk of C/Ourts, 
Clerk of Quar. Sees., Jtc. 
Prothonotary, ttc. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Prothonotary, Ao. 
Clerk of Quar. Sess., 4o. 
Proihonotary, Ac. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Clerk of Quar. Seas., Ac 
Clerk of Quar. Seas., Ac. 
Prothonotary, Ao. 
Prothonotaiy, Ao. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Prothonotary, *o. 
Proihonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac. 
Prothonotan', Ao. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Clerk of Courts, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ao. 
Prothc)notary. Ac. 
Clerk of Quar. Sess., Ac 
Protlionotary, Ao. 
Protlionotary. Ac 
Clerk of Cuurtn. 
Prothonotary, fta. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Protiionotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Clerk of Conrt«. 
Clerk of Quar. Sesa., &ts. 
Prothonotary, Ao. 
Clerk ofQuar. 8ess., Ac 
Clerk of Quar. Sess. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Proihonotary, Ac 
ProthonotarV, Ae, 
Clerk of Courts. Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac. 
Protlionotary, Ao. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Protlionotary, Ac 
(Uerk of Quar. Sess., Ao. 
Protlionotary, Ao. 
Prothonobirv, Ao. 
Clerk of Quar. Sess. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Protlionotary, Ac. 
Clerk of Courts. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac. 
Prothonotary, Ao. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Prothonotary, Ac 
ProthonotarV, Ao. 
Clerk of Courts. 
ProthonotarV, Ac 
Clerk or Courta. 
Prothonotary, Ac 
Clerk of Courts. 



Leo. Doc] Boabd of Pubuc Chabities. 151 

CrlBlaBb ExMoM In PeBMjhaBlB. 

By the act of 1T18, treason, murder, robbery, burglary, rape, crime 
against nature, malicious mischief, maiming, manslaughter by stabbing, and 
arson, were made capital crimes; by subsequent acts, counterfeiting bills 
of credit, or the current coin, were added, and the crime of arson extended 
to include certain public buildings. All these crimes were capital until 
November 1, 1786. 

By the act of September 15, 1T86, robbery, burglary, and crime against 
nature, were made punishable by servitude at hard labor, etc. 

By the act of April 22, 1794, the punishment by death, except for mur- 
der in the first degree, was abolished. 

The following statement will exhibit the number of criminale executed 
within the Commonwealth of Pennayluania from 1778 to 1879, both inclu- 
nve — a period of (10$) one hundred and two years : 



Ykab 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


< 


III 

111 

D 


s 
O 


1 


1778, . 


1 

6 


2 
1 
2 


1 

"l 
1 
1 


2 
2 
6 

5 
2 












8 


2 












mi' 


1 










17SS,. 


2 






2 

1 














1 
2 






































> 


> 




1 


2 






1 
1 
















1 










1795. . 
1787.. 
















1798, , 






































!Z' 






































































































































































































1829, . 
1830 . 

lesa 




















183.%. 

iste, . 








: ? : 









































































Whole number eioouted, 



UH. Prevloiifexecntliinairereal 



153 



BoAJiD OF Public Cuabities. 



fNo. 5, 



TLe reader will remember that after April 2i, 1794, as we have stated, 
executions were only for murder in the first degree. For the number of 
executions reported from 1834 to 1819, we are indebted to the courtesy of 
the Honorable Secretary of the Commonwealth. 



STATISTICS OF CONVICTS AND PBISONEES. 



The population or the number of criminal classes on September 30, 1 8T 9 
in penitentiaries, county jails, work-house, and bouse of correction, of all 
classes, — convicts summarily convicted by justices of peace, &c., or other- 
wise in prison for payment of fines and costs by court, or awaiting trial, — 
.was 4,duO, being a decrease of 1,226 or 20.01 per cent, on number at cor- 
responding date of previous year. The number in each of the several in- 
stitutions, was as follows : 





1 
1 

1 










ss."- 


"™o 


;F 


1 


Criminal 

Clabbes. 


•? 


S 


i 


} 


1 


i. 


3 


ill 

ft 


i 

9 

! 

< 


i 


Sept. 30, 18T8, . 
Sept. 30, 1879, 


1,764 
1,861 


1,277 


377 
150 


3,318 
3,049 


468 

249 


61 
8H 


1,534 

760 


2,W8 
1,313 


19 
82 


741 
506 


S,]3S 
l,»W) 


Dec. Sept. 30, 79 


•97 


239 


137 


269 


214 


•363 


784 


735 


•18 


233 


1,236 


Perot-ordeor'ee. 


•5.6 


18.7 


46.9 


8.1 


16.2 


•515.7 


51.1 


3S.7 


■68.4 


ai.7 


20.0 



im that there was a decrease in convicts of 369, or 8-1 per 
.red with number at corresponding date of previous year — 
!ing in the county prisoiiB and work-house ; on the contrary, 
increase in the penitentiaries of 9T. The decrease in the 

was 239, and in work-house 127. Of those summarily con- 
as a decrease in the county prisons of 214, and 784 in the 
ction ; on the contrary, there was an increase in the work- 
bus making the total decrease of those summarily convicted, 
ir. 
vise in prison for the payment of fines, costs, Ac, by court, 

222, as compared with the previous year. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



153 



OonvJcta. 



The number of males and femilea, and their increase or decrease in 
the penal institutions^ as compared with the previous year^ is presented 
thus: 





SEX OP CONVICTS IN CONFINEMENT. 






TB. 


CONVIOTS. 


Peniten- 
tiaries. 


County 
priaons. 


Work- 
house. 


ACruxvjiiurik 




i 
1 


§ 


i 

1,207 
961 


s 
-a 
s 

& 

70 
77 


1 
1 

249 
145 


1 

r® 


1 


s 
1 


3 


September 30, 1878, .... 
September 30, 1879, .... 


1,742 
1,837 


22 
24 


28 
5 


3,198 
2,943 


120 
106 


3,318 
3,049 


Decrease Sept. 80, 1879, . . 
Per cent, of decrease, . . . 


*95 
•6.5 


•4 
»19.0 


246 
20.4 


*7 
*10.0 


104 
41.8 


23 

82.1 


255 
8.0 


14 
11.7 


269 
8.1 



•Increase. 

It will be observed that in the penitentiaries the male convicts increased 
95, and the females increased 4. In the county prisons the males decreased 
246, and the females increased t. In work-house the males decreased 104, 
and the females 23. In the aggregate of this class, there has been a de- 
crease of 269, or 8.1 per cent.; or males 255, or 8.0 per cent., females 14, 
or ll.t per cent. 

The whole number of convicts, 3,049, is in proportion to the population 
of the State, as one to every 1,328 inhabitants. 



154 



BoABD OP Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



STATISTICS OF PENITENTIARIES. 



The revenue of these institutions is derived from appropriations b}*^ the 
State ; labor of convicts ; profits of manufacturing ; United States, for sup- 
porting their prisoners, and from counties, for deficiency of support by the 
labor of their convicts. 

State Appropriation. 

The State grant to these institutions for 1879, was $297,425, viz : for 
salaries $73,925 ; $1,000 for books and stationery for convicts; $1,500 for 
repairs; $200,000 for the erection of new buildings, and $21,000 for the 
payment of bonds. 



PUBFOSES. 



Salaries of officers, 

Books and stationery for prisoners. 

Repairs, 

Erection of new buildings, . . . . 
Payment of bonds, 



Eastern 
Penitentiary. 



938,925 ' 00 

500 1 00 

1,500 ; 00 



Total, 



$40,025 I 00 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



$85,000 
600 

200,000 
21,000 



$256,500 



00 
00 

00 
00 



00 



Aggregate. 



$73,025 
1,000 
1,500 

200,000 
21,000 



$297,425 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



00 



The Legislature also continued the usual gratuities to discharged con- 
victs, i. e., to those residing within fifty miles of the penitentiary from 
which discharged, each five dollars ; over fifty miles, the sum of ten dollars 
each. 

In addition to the appropriations received from the State in the pre- 
vious year, ($204,750,) there were, from the following sources received, 
$159,289 68, to wit : 



Eastern Penitentiary. 




Western Penitentiary. 


Oonviot labor, 


$32,899 


86 

86 

81 
67 


Convict labor and profits, . 
Contract labor, .... 
U. S., for sup port of convicts, 
Steam power and rent, . 
Sale of gas tar, barrels, etc.. 

Total credit to counties, . . 

Deficiency of support by la- 
bor of convicts, paid by 
counties 


$5,150 

38,097 

, 5,644 

' 1 ,643 

1,391 

1 $51, 827 
' 10,932 


95 
72 
00 
83 
57 


Total credit to counties. . . 

Deticiency of support by lar 
bor of convicts, (of which 
counties paid $55,988 85,) . 


$32,899 
63,629 


57 
44 


Total, 


$96,529 


Total, 


$62,760 


01 



Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



155 



The amount received from the United States, for maintenance of their 
convicts in the Eastern Penitentiary, is added to the working capital of 
that institution. On the contrary, in the Western Penitentiary, the sum 
received is credited to the counties. 



tadnalrlea. 



The system of labor in these institutions continues the same as stated in 
the previous reports. In Western Penitentiary, on State account, and by 
contract labor ; In Eastern Penitentiary, exclusively on State account. 

T?ie annexed statement will exhibit the values of these industries : 



Eastern Penitentiary. 



Shoemaking, inolading labor 

and loss. . ^. 17,940 12 

Cane- work, including labor and 

Waroflt, ... 2,832 70 
easing, including labor and 

profit, 4,885 56 

Wood-work, including labor and 

profit, 565 52 

Cigar-making, including labor 

and profit, 3,084 72 

Tailoring, including labor and 

profit, 644 51 

Smith-work, 114 08 

Jobbing, convict labor, . . . 1,493 70 
Baking, cooking, etc., convict 

labor, 1,315 50 

Incidental, convict labor, . . . 839 18 

Clothing, convict labor, . . 806 20 
Fuel, making fires, etc, convict 

labor, 372 CO 

Medical department, convict la- 
bor, 93 00 

Wool-picking, labor and profit, 9()4 57 

Stable- work, convict labor, . . 85 50 

New cells, convict labor, . . . 2,80170 

Extension, convict labor, . . 3,898 20 

Women's shoes, labor and loss, 207 05 

32,947 41 
Tinsmithing, loss, .... |14 80 

Garden, loss, 32 75 

47 55 

Total labor, with losses, . . . $32,899 86 



Western Penitentiary. 



On State AccounU 
Weaving, including profit and 

labor, $1,635 05 

Cigar-making, with profit and la^ 

bor, ... 2,749 60 

Shoe<making, with profit and la- 
bor, 766 30 

Total State account, .... 5,150 95 

Contract Labor, 

Shoe shops 133,556 71 

Broom shops, .... 3,609 46 
Tin shop, 1,031 55 

Earning on contracts, . . . . 38,097 72 



Total profits, with labor, . . $43,248 67 



156 



BoABD OF Public Chasities. 



[No. 6, 





^o. 




"** 55 




<5»* 




gi 00 




*? 5^ 




^ O 




e'^ 




s*^ 




« 








«,^ 




'-§ s 




? 5i 




-S ?i 




••* -.» 








•^^ 








West 
878, 
abor. 




^ ^^ 




"2 »- *" 




si « ••» 


















^•5| 






^ 




aa 


S'S§ 




< 


O '-^ 


i 

^ 


onne 
their 
unty 


s 




u 


ntie^ 
we € 
ach 


s 




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§1^ 






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^ '^ s 




eo ^ •^ 




^ ^ V 




W ^ >^ 




^ V. 1^ 




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^ V. ^ 






**■» •« ^ 








mount cha 
upport by 
and aver a 

* 




e «o ^ 




2*^0 




rd <>^pC» 








Z & '*, 




HM ?5 to 




s<S.-g 




B ^' 







» 



M 
M 

» 
h 

OQ 

H 



H 

H 

M 

is 

09 



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^q ^joddiw JO ^oaap 
-yap Suieq 'sananoo 
o; pdSJvqo )auoiay 



gS8gSSaS55;SS§§8SSS8 






s 



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00 
O 

M 
> 

is 
o 



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ueqamn eSuaAy 



ueqinna eioq^ 



N »-• i-i e« -^ Oil ^ ^ 'flt »2S 3 CO so » ■* 10 

«►_ . 

fc «o « »H 00 1^ QO od'oTco eo^hTci**©"-^ 00 

c<i A o US eo CO >-< CO 10 r^ CO op 00 o> 04 «p CO Ob CO 

gooQOeoeoO'H'^cQooAaiiHioeog ' ^ 

fc-oic*i ^ eo ^ CO 90 'H 1-1 eo p^ ^ US r^ 



3S 

H 
H 

D 
O 










•JoqB[ 
iCq ;joddns JO iCouap 
-pap Sufaq Wpunoo 
o; pe&xvqo ;unouay 



ioioQOoOGOQOcibaor«tHeOcoQoadK^i-4 0co 



i-H CO 



h- 

■^ 



'^rHe^ioadioeO'^eoiHioeo 



O^CO fHiH^^O? »H 



* joqvt ptAaoQ 



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eo 



OQ 

M 

o 



'pa^oddns 
8iC«p JO jaquinx 



o^^ db ^jo QO^s^oeoeoc^OitcoottovaD'H 
eo OS •-T'^ «c'c<rco oTfH bTaTeo r^s^^oTi-r^© CO 

04 »H tH eO'^ rH 



'jaqinnn aSuiaAy 



coot-tf-d-Hosoh-Or-iQco^ooeoeoroio 



uaqainu ayoqj^ 



C0>^iOtQ0»C^S000S0^-Hi-ie0OC4t>-^^O 

^ "<«' o» ph 1-1 ^ lO oiS oS -^ C4 f- f^ -v -^ 



CD 

M 

P 
O 




Leo. Doc] 



Board or Public Charities!. 



I ST 



«eoloQ c4 u) u5 C3 ^ r* X cQ CO 



ot<»oao^i-Ht«aft^mtOQoo»Oft 




e lO S us CO C4 O) M t» CC >A O) 



o>OQ(M^eeoo-^^QOco^^ 
OOXC9>-*oaeQtceoeQcO'«co-^ 
^eoio eo 80 «-( lo c<i "<< Ob eo 1-^ O) 



OeOf-icOCOOt»e4^0COU30<-i 


QOO 


00 


j5«co •-^tg^ggo.gs 


00 00 


1 


t:sa«22<^ss^ssgs 


1,100 
68 


1,168 



o 



5Jf 

B 



^•3 






OC A d 



O 01 



OS S 



12 IS 



n?St^!s»SS^<ooo 



S3 



iOO^C4QOCideOO*~'ACQ 

^icQ<baai-4ii5cjcpabiQ 



n 



1^ 



OQ CD k>* 



3SSS$S 



$$ 



SB 



'^^^ 



s 



00 



eo^eoto 



00 

CO 



COiOCiCO 



oacoJit-. 



S! 



C(|tOr-l lO d f-^ « •-• O 



s 






iH O "^ CO ^ ® C<1 CO Ol l>^ ^^ 

c©i>I"^'"^»-«>coO"<«'r^"<*<t- 



IS 



CO 



ggooo^cNgjcioogcog 



^ ft 




o Pi 






158 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



Bxpendttares. 

Valuing the stock on hand^ D^icember 31^ 1878, at f68^4i ^^s ^« P^^ state- 
ment^ the expenditures for the year^ (excluding appropriations by the 
Stale^ and gratuities paid to discharged convicts,) were f 159^9 68 ^ for 
the following purposes : 



Maintenance. 



Provision, 

Clothingf etc., 

Fuel and ligtit, 

Medicine, etc., 

Incidentals, 

Repairs, 

Wages, 

House and cell furniture, . 
Manufacturing implements, 

etc., 

Profit and loss for stock, and 

manufacturing purposes, 
Manufacturing losses, . . . 

Total, excluding appropri- 
ations by State, .... 
Salaries paid by State, . . . 

Total expenditures .... 

Cost per capita, with salaries. 

Of wnich the State paid for 
salaries, . . .... 

Labor, with profit on manu- 
facturing, credited to coun-| 
ties, 

Leaving deficiency of sup- 
port by labor of convicts. 



Eastern 
Penitentiary. 



$49,299 
11,170 
11,816 
2,089 
4,699 
8,271 
6,677 
1,098 

21 

6,655 
1,729 



196,529 
38,000 



$134,529 



49 
73 
17 
31 
84 
05 
53 
74 

87 

53 
41 



67 
00 



67 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



$38,157 
10,161 
4,114 
1,874 
4,423 
2,443 
1,094 
133 

357 



$62,760 
35,000 



$97,760 



15 
52 
74 
23 
80 
33 
72 
85 

17 



01 
00 



01 







$131 


70 






$124 


33 






$128 


$87 


25 






$44 


56 






$40 


18 




32 


87 






58 


44 






43 


as 




61 


58 


$131 


70 


21 


33 


$124 


83 


44 


55 


$128 



Aggegate. 



$87,456 
21,332 
15,930 
3,963 
9,123 
5,714 
6,772 
1,232 

379 

5,655 
1,729 



$159,289 
73,000 



64 
25 
91 
54 
64 
88 
25 
09 

04 

53 

41 



68 
00 



$232,289 68 



56 



66 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



159 



Ofllcrra. 



Their number^ and salary paid to each. 



Eastern Penitbntiart. 



Warden, with apartments, . . $2,600 00 

Physician, with apartments, . . 1,500 00 

Moral Instractor, 1,500 00 

Clerk, 1,600 00 

Assistant clerk, 1,200 00 

Principal overseer, and apart- 
ments, 1,300 00 

Teacher, 400 00 

Gate-keeper, .... ... 1,100 00 

Sunerintendentof cordwaining, 1,200 00 

Superintendent of weaving, . . 1,200 00 

One overseer, 1 ,200 00 

One overseer, 1,100 00 

Five overpeers, $1,050 each, . . 5,250 00 

Three overseers, $1,000 each, . . 8,000 00 

Five overseers, $900 each, . . . 4,500 00 

Eight overseers, $800 each, . . 6,400 00 

One overseer, (female,) . . 520 00 

Nine watchmen, $650 each, . . 5,850 00 

Attendant on sick, 625 00 

Baker, 900 00 

Driver, 675 00 

Carpenter, 939 00 

Librarian, etc., 525 00 

Total, 144,884 00 



Western Penitentiary. 



Warden, with apartments, . . $2,500 00 

Physician, 1,200 00 

Chaplain, with apartments, . . 1,500 00 

Cleric, 1,500 00 

Deputy Warden, 1,500 00 

Assistant Deputy Warden, . 1,000 00 

Teacher, 900 00 

Gate-keeper, 750 00 

Steward, 1,000 00 

Enfflneer, 1,000 00 

Assis^nt engineer, 850 00 

Superintendent of dgar shop, . 1 ,000 00 

General overseer, 750 00 

Six overseers, $850 each, ... 6,10000 

Nine guards, $800 each. . . 7,200 00 

Five night-watchmen, $750 each, 3 ,750 00 

Eight dayguard», $700 each, . 5,600 00 
Sixteen day and night guards, 

$600 each, ... .... 9,60000 

One overseer, gas works, . . . 600 00 
One superintendent machine- 
shop, 780 00 

One foreman, blacksmith, . . 624 00 



Total, $48,704 00 



160 



Board op Publto Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



Penooal Property. 



The estimated value of personal property^ dbc, on hand^ December Sl^ 

1878^ was as follows : 



Stock, Ao. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Stock in weaving department, . 
Do. shoe do. 

cigar do. 

cane do. 

chair do. 

smith do. 

womens* shoes do. 
Provisions and supplies, .... 
Clothing, beds, shoes for convicts. 

Coal 

Medicines, 

Tools and utensils, 

Furniture, 

Horses, wagons, <fco., ...<.. 
Incidentals, 



Eastern 




Penitentiary. 


$1,212 


59 


19,829 


15 


2,542 


99 


949 


12 


439 


00 


836 


10 


2,765 


68 


1,078 


58 


8,188 


61 


3,045 


00 


883 


07 


196 


84 


998 


74 


975 


00 


1,184 


34 

71 

1 


944,059 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



Aggregate. 



1792 

96 

8,883 



4,788 

3,093 

249 

259 

4,847 
1,375 



$21,285 



OS 
00 
69 



12 
44 
50 
90 
44 
07 



24 



$2,004 

19,425 

11,376 

949 

439 

836 

2,755 

5.816 

11,276 

8,294 

642 

5,044 

2,373 

975 

1,184 



$68,344 



67 
15 
68 
12 
00 
10 
68 
70 

a5 

50 
97 
28 
81 
00 
34 



95 



AdaluiOB of ConTlcta. 

The number of convicts in the penitentiaries at beginning of the year, 
October, 1, 1878, was 1 ,764 ; to which were added during the year, 883 ; an 
increase of 46, or 55 per cent, on the commitments of the preceding year. 
Number discharged, 786 ; leaving on September 30, 1879, in confinement, 
1 ,861 ; an increase of 97, or 5.5 per cent, on the number at the correspond- 
ing date of previous year, an increase of 97 in the Eastern Penitentiary, 
and no change of number in the Western Penitentiary. 



^ 


Eastern 
Penitentiary. 


Western 
Penitentiary. 


Eastern and Western 
Combined. 


Movement op 
Population. 


White. 


Cord. 


• 


White. 


Col'd. 


■ 


White. 


CoPd. 




• 

-a 


• 

m 

B 


1 


s 
a 


• 

• 


. 

V 

a 

Em 


i 

-3 
3 


8 

i 

En 




• 

s 

-s 
a 


1 


• 


• 

3 


October 1, 1878, there 
were. 


8S0 
4S7 


8 

4 

12 

4 

8 


122 

72 


8 
8 
6 

■ • 

6 


983 

686 

1,619 
488 


689 
828 


10 
6 

16 

7 


61 
18 


1 

■ • 

1 

• 

1 


781 
847 


1,689 
780 


18 

10 

26 
11 

17 


208 
90 


4 
8 
7 

• • 

7 


1,764 


Committed daring 
the year, . . 


888 


Population, . . . 
Discharged In year, 


1,807 
880 


194 
65 


1,012 
808 


99 
82 


1,128 
847 


2,819 
688 


298 
87 


2,647 

786 


Bem'g Sept. 80, 1879, 


927 


189 


1,080 


704 


9 


67 


781 1,681 


206 


1,861 



As compared with the preceding year, the commitments of white males 
increased 41, white females, 1 ; colored males increased 1, and colored fe- 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabittks. 



161 



males, 3. Discharges of white males decreased TO, white females increased 
7 ; colored males increased 9, and colored females decreased 3. 

ATerag« Namber. 

The average number of convicts in the respective penitentiaries for nine 

years past^ is as follows : 



Teabs. 



Eastern Penitentiary, 
Average number. 






E 






3 



Western Penitentiary, iPenitentiaries combined, 
Average number. . Average number. 



a 



'I 



3 





3 



1871, 
1872, 
1873, 
1874, 
1875, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 





600.0 


29.0 


629.0 


355.0 


29.5 


384.5 


956.0 


58.5 




591 .7 


18.5 


610.2 


394.6 


29.5 


424.1 


983.3 


48.0 




684.7 


13.8 


598.5 


394.9 


27.8 


422.7 


979.6 


41.6 




615.0 


19.1 


634.1 


399.1 


27.4 


426.5 


1,014.1 


46.5 




699.6 


20.2 


719.8 


477.8 


31.3 


509.1 


1,177.4 


51.5 




834.1 


32.0 


866.1 


601.8 


35.5 


637.3 


1,435.9 


67.5 




956.9 


66.0 


1,012.9 


674.8 


40.1 


714.9 


1,631.7 


96.1 




957.0 


66.0 


1,023.0 


748.8 


38.0 


786.8 


1,675.8 


104.0 


• m 


1,013.0 


62.0 


1,075.0 


743.0 


41.1 


784.1 


1,756.0 


103.1 



1, 013 .6 
1,084.3 
1,021.2 
1.060.6 
1.228.9 
1,503.4 
1,727.8 
1,779.8 
1,859.1 



:39c 



[Note.— Ttie average number is for the financial year of the penitentiaries, January 
1 to December 31, and not for the current year of the Board of Public Charities.] 



1 1 -^B. P. Char. 



162 



Board op Public Charities, 



[No. 5, 



RctmnmitineBto. 

Of the 883 convicts received, 672, or t6.l per cent:, three fourths, were 
sentenced for the first time to these penitentiaries; 96, or 10.8 per cent., 
had been previously imprisoned elsewhere; and 116, or 13.1 per cent, of 
the admissions, were of those who had been subjected to imprisonment in 
no other penal institutions. 

The number of convictions and re-convictions into the respective peniten- 
tiaries^ is exhibited in the following statement : 





Eastern 
Penitentiary. 


Western 
Penitentiary. 


Recap ITU lation. 




W. 


C. 


1 
1 

t i 

1 


W. 


C. 


1 


W. 


c. 






1 


i 
s 


i ] 


i 


s 

03 

s 

r® 


i 

1 


i 

c 


i 
1 


i 
-a 
a 


i 
1 


1 
Em 


• 

3 


First conviction, .... 

2d convlot*n, 1st here, 
3d do. 1st do. 
4tli do. Ist do. 
8th do. 1st do. 


328 

39 
3 

• • 

1 
59 
14 
5 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 

• • 

129 
457 


4 


41 : 

15 
4 

1 


5,376 

. 54 

7 

1 

1 

. 67 

. 16 

. 5 

2 

3 

2 

1 

1 

• » ■ 

. 160 
5 536 


276 
6 

• ■ 
• 

29 
2 
6 
1 
3 

• • 
• 

1 
48 

323 


6 
1 

1 
6 


16 
*2 

2 
18 


• 

• 


296 

e! 

• ■ 

. . 

32 i 
2 
6> 

1 
3 

• » 


603 

1 
45 
3 

• 

1 

88 

16 

11 

3 

6 

2 

1 

1 


9 
1 

1 
10 


57 

15 
4 
1 

• ■ 

10 
2 

• • 

• • 

1 

• 

• ■ 

• • 

33^ 
90 


3 

• 

3 


672 

60 
7 
1 
1 


2d do. 2d do. 
3d do. 2d do. 
8d do. 3d do. 




8 
2 


99 
18 
11 


4th do. 3d do. 






3 


4th do. 4th do. 
6th do. 4th do. 




1 


6 

9. 


6th do. 4th do. 






1 


8th do. 7th do. 






1 


8th do. 3d do. 
Number reoommittod, 

Total admissions, . . 


■ • 

4 


• • 

31 
72 ; 


1 
51 

347 1 

1 


1 
177 

frso 


1 
211 

883 



Of the 636 received in the Eastern Penitentiary, 376, or 70.2 per cent., 

were convicted and sentenced for the first time to this institution ; 85, or 

'15.9 per cent., had previously been imprisoned elsewhere; 76, or 13.9 per 

cent., were re-admissions of convicts who had never been imprisoned in 

any other penal institution. . Total recommitments, 160, or 29.8 per cent. 

Of the 347 admitted in the Western Penitentiar}-, 296, or 85.3 per cent, 
were for the first time convicted and sentenced to this institution ; 10, or 
2.9 per cent., had served a prior sentence elsewhere; and 41, or 11.8 per 
cent., were reconvictions of those who had experienced no other kind of 
confinement. Total recommitments 61, or 14.7 per cent. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Pubuc Charities. 



168 



CoaatiM wiMre Oonvlctedl. 

The 883 convicts sentenced to the penitentiaries were received from the following 

counties : 



Eastern Pjbnitbntiart. 



COUNTIES. 



2 



o 



Adams, 

Bradford, 

Baoks, 

Carbon, 

Chester, 

Columbia, 

Cumberland, . . . . 

Dauphin, 

Franklin, 

Lackawanna, . . . . 

Liebanon, 

Lehigh, 

Luzerne, 

Lycoming, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, . . . . 
Northampton, . . 

North umoerland, . . 

Perry. 

Phlladeiphia, . . . . 

Pike, 

Schuylkill, 

Husquehanna, . . . . 

Tioga, 

Wyoming 

York, 

U. S. district court, . 



Tbtal, 



7 
17 
26 

9 

2 

4 

10 
19 
14 
1» 
14 

9 

7 
10 

8 
11 

1 

7 

6 
211 

2 I 

1 

2 

4 

2 
22 
28 



1 
8 



6 
8 
6 
1 
1 



3 



Western Penitentiary. 



COUNTIES. 





i 


% 


^ 


^ 


a 



36 



7 

18 

34 

9 

4 

4 

16 

27 

20 

14 

15 

9 

8 

10 

3 

16 

1 

7 

6 

247 

2 

1 

2 

4 

2 

22 

SO 



461 



76 



636 



Allegheny, . . . . . 

Armstrong, 

Beaver 

Bedford, 

Blair, 

Butler, 

Cambria, 

Cameron, 

Centre, 

Clarion, 

Clearfield, 

Clinton, 

Crawford, 

Elk, 

Erie, 

Fayette, 

Forest, 

Fulton, 

Greene, 

Huntingdon, . . . . 

Indiana, 

JeflTerson, 

Juniata, 

Lawrence, 

McKean, 

Meroer, 

Mifflin, 

Potter, 

Somerset, 

Venango, 

Warren, 

Washing^n, 

Westmoreland, . . . 
U. S. district court, . 

Total, 



78 

8 

2 

4 

9 
IS 

6 

1 

4 
13 
17 

3 
12 

2 
10 
13 

2 

1 

1 

9 

1 
11 

1 

12 
24 

8 

4 

1 

8 
14 

7 

4 I 

9 ' 
23 



9 

1 



2 
1 



329 



8 



18 



a 



87 
9 
2 
4 
9 

la 

5. 
1 
4 

19- 

17 
8 

18 
2 

11 

18 
2 
1 
1 
9 
1 

11 
1 

14 

25 
8 
4 
1 
8 

14 
7 
7 
9 

23 



347 



It will be observed that 247, or 46.1 per cent., of the convicts received hi the Eastern 
Penitentiary, were from Philadelphia county; of the Western Penitentiary, 87, or 26.1 
per cent., were from Allegheny county. 

Color and Sex. 

Of the 883 committed, Y90 were white, and 93 colored. As regards the sex, 
780, or 88.33 per cent., were white males ; 10, or 1.13 per cent., white females ; 
90, or 10.20 per cent., colored males ; and 3, or .34 per cent., colored females. 

Of the convicts received, 5, or 0.56 per cent., were under 16 years of age ; 
60, or 6.66 per cent., between 16 and 18 ; 102, or 11.55 per cent., between 18 
and 21 ; 275, or 31.14 per cent., between 21 and 25 ; 178, or 20.16 per cent., 
from 26 to 30 ; and 273, or 30.92 per cent., were 31 and upwards. It will 
be observed that 432, or 48.92 per cent., nearly one half of the convicts, 
were 25 years of age and under. 



BoAKD OF Public CeARiTiBa. 



[So. 5, 



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Leo. Doc] 



Board of Public CHARiTiEa 



165 



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166 



BOABB OF PUBUC CHARinE& 



[No. 5 , 



The average age of convicts admitted into the respective penitentiaries^ is 

presented thus: 



Average Aqe. 


FiAAtem 
Penitentiary. 


Western 
Penitentiary. 


Penitentiaries 
combined. 


General average i^, 

Average age of minors, 

Do. do. adults, 

Do. do. V8, property, .... 

Do. do. vs. persons, .... 


27.4 years. 
19.2 do. 
29.2 do. 
27.8 do. 

29.5 do. 


27.5 years. 
19.2 do. 
29.0 do. 

27.6 do. 
29.8 do. 


27.3 yeare. 
19.2 do. 
29.1 do. 
27.7 do. 
29.7 do. 



Nativity. 

Three fifths, 548, or 62.06 per cent., were natives of Pennsylvania ; one 
fourth, 187, or 21.18 per cent., were born in other American States ; 40, or 
4.53 per cent., in Ireland ; 45, or 5.09 per cent., in Germany ; 30, or 3.40 
per cent., in England ; and 33, or 3.74 per cent., in other foreign countries- 
The proportion of American to foreign bom, was as 72 to 12 ; with native 
bom, crimes against property predominated : on the contrary, the largest 
proportion of foreign bom were convicted of crimes against persons. 

ParenUl Relations, 

Three fifths, 564, or 63.87 per cent., of the convicts had both parents 
living when they were sixteen years of age ; 74, or 8.38 per cent., had lost 
both parents before that age ; 154, or 17.44 per cent., had mother only 
living, and 91, or 10.31 per cent., had only their father living when they 
were sixteen yeara of age. 

Schools, etc. 

More than four fifths, 744, or 84.82 per cent., of the received convicts, 
had attended public school — average age on leaving 12.4 years; 8, or 0.91 
per cent., attended private school — average age on leaving 12.9 years; the 
general average age on leaving was 12.7 years of all who had attended school. 
There were 126, or 14.27 per cent., of the convicts admitted, who had not at- 
tended any school. 



Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Ghabities. 



167 



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Board of Public Chabitibs. 



[No. 5, 



:jjh 



Jill i 6-=. -11511^ a 



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Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



169 



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BoABD OF Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



i 

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Leq. Doc] 



Board of Pubug Charities. 



in 



InduatrlAl it«lAtlon». 

Nine tenths, 739, or 83.70 per cent., of the convicts had never been ap- 
prenticed to any trade or occupation ; 23, or 2.60 per cent., had been ap- 
prenticed, but absconded before expiration of their term ; 93, or 10.53 per 
cent., were apprenticed and served until 21 years of age ; and 28, or 3.17 
per cent., had not been apprenticed, but had served four or more years, to 
obtain a knowledge of some handicraft. 

OceapatloB. 

The pursuits, be/ore conviction, of the 88S convicts committed to the peni- 

tentiarie^j were as follows : 



Occupations. 



Agents, .... 
Bakers, .... 
Baskei-inaker, 
Bankers, ... 
Barbers, . . 
Bar tenders, . 
Blacksmiths, . 
Boatmen, ... 
Brewer, ... 
Broom-maker, 
Book-keepers, , 
Bookbinders, . , 
Brakesmen, . 
Bricklayers, . , 
Brush-makers, 
Builders, ... 
Butchers, . . . 
Cabinet-makers, 
Carpenters, 
Cigar-makers, 
Clerks, ... 
Clergyman, . 
Constable, . . 
Contractor, 
Conve3ranoer8, 
Coolcs, . . . 
Dealers, . . . 
Druggist, . . 
Drivers, . . . 
Dyers, .... 
Engineers, . . 
Firemen, . . . 
Farmers, . . . . 
Qas-fltters, 
Glass-blowers, 
Hatter, .... 



e| 

ft® 



• • • • 



• • • 



12 
4 
1 
1 
7 
5 
6 
3 



4 

2 
7 
4 
2 
2 
8 
2 
8 
7 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 



9 
2 
7 
8 
80 
8 



el 

is 



6 
2 

■ 

1 
6 
2 

4 

• 

1 
1 
2 
2 
5 
8 
1 
8 
2 
8 
7 
2 
5 



1 
4 
2 
1 
10 

• • 

5 

5 

24 

4 



I 



18 
6 
1 
2 

13 
7 

10 
8 
1 
1 
6 
4 

12 
7 
3 
6 
5 
5 

15 
9 

18 
1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
6 
1 

19 
2 

12 
8 

64 
7 
8 
1 



Occupations. 



• a • 



• • • 



Hostlers, . . 
Hotel-keepers, 
Hucksters, 
Idlers, . . . 
Laborers, . . 
Lawyer, . . 
Lumbermen, 
Machinists, . 
Masons, . . . 
Miners, . . . 
Moulders, . . 
Musician, . . 
Nail-cutters, . 
Nurse, . . . 
Painters, . . 
Peddlers, . . 
Physicians, . 
Porters, . . . 
Printers, . . 
Publisher, . . 
Puddlers, . . 
Sailors, . . . 
Salesmen, . . 
Saddler, . . 
Seamstress, . 
Servants, . . 
Shoemakers, 

Showmen, 

stone-cutters, . . . 
Tinsmiths, . . . . 

Thieves, 

Waiters, 

Watermen, . . . . 



Total, 



. . • 




4 

8 

8 

79 

176 



8 
8 
2 
12 
3 
1 



12 
4 
1 
3 
2 
1 
3 
8 
4 
1 
2 
6 

15 
1 
2 
2 
5 

10 
5 



536 




3 



• • • 

10 
135 
1 
6 
2 
1 

14 



2 
1 
8 
4 
1 



4 
7 
2 



4 
8 
1 
2 



4 

4 



847 



I 



7 
4 
8 



311 
1 
9 
5 
8 

26 
8 
1 
2 
1 

20 
8 
2 
7 
2 
1 
7 

15 
6 
1 
2 

10 

23 
2 
4 
3 
6 

14 
9 



883 



172 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

Habits. 

One third, 269, or 30.46 per cent., of the convicts were abstinents, (did 
not use malt or spirituous liquors ;) 406, or 45.98 per cent., nearly one half 
used them moderately, but not to excess ; 208, or 23.56 per cent., were 
habitually intemperate. 

Cfvll CondltloD. 

Nearly three fifths, 492, or 55.72 per cent., had never been married ; 343, 
or 38.84 per cent., were married; and 48, or 5.44 per cent., widowed. 
Crimes against property predominated with the unmarried men ; on the 
contrary, crimes against persons, with the married. 

Married Men. 

There were 216 married men, with 579 children. 

Married Women. 

There were 3 married women, with 10 children. 

widowers. 

There were 28 widowers, with 54 children. 

Army or Navy. 

There were only 67, or 7.59 per cent., of the convicts received, who had 
served in the army or navy ; 816, or 92.41 per cent., did not serve in either. 

Crimes. 

Of the 8^*3 convicts sentenced to the penitentiaries, 749, or 84.82 per 
cent., were for crimes against property, and 134, or 15.18 per cent., against 
persons. 

Of the convicts received in the Eastern Penitentiary, the proportion 
committed for crimes against property, were to those against persons, as 
60 to 10 ; in the Western Penitentiary, as 40 to 10. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



173 



The annexed statement will exhibit the specific crimes for which the 883 
convicts were convicted, classified into crimes against property, and crimes 
against persons. 



Offeitses aoainst 
Fbopbbtt. 



Arson, 

Burglary, 

Burglary and laroeny, 

Robbery, 

Aesault and battery, to 
steal, 

Laroeny, <&»., ... 

Laroeny and receiving 
stolen goods, .... 

Horsestealing, . . . . 

Felony, Aa, ... 

Reoeiving stolen goods, 

Embezzlement, . . . 

Cvounterfeiting, .... 

Passing oounterfeit 
money. .... 

Having in possession 
oounterfeit money, . 

Forgery, 

Stealing from, or tamp- 
ering with mails, . . 

Conspiraoy, 

Misdemeanor, .... 

Aiding prisoners to 
oape, 



Total against property, 465 



iSfl 



9 
64 
82 
31 

3 
193 

82 

9 

6 

17 

4 
4 

21 

3 
16 

7 

8 

12 



I 



d 
> a 



12 
89 
12 
20 

2 
82 

26 

12 

4 

6 

8 

12 

16 

4 
15 

3 

2 

13 



284 



1 



21 

103 

44 

51 

5 
275 

58 
21 

9 
23 

7 
16 

87 

7 
31 

10 

5 

25 



749 



Offekses against 
Persons. 



Murder, first degree. 

Murder, seoond de- 
gree, 

Manslaughter, . . . 

Assault and battery, 
to kill, 

Riot, <to., 

Rape, 

Assault and battery, 
to commit rape, . . 

Abortion, <fco., .... 

Seduction, ... 

Incestuous adultery, 

Incestuous fornication 

Bigamy, 

Sodomy, Ac, .... 

Perjury, 

Assault and battery, . 



Total against persons, 
1 Total against property, 



Total committed, . 



• 


• 


b 


el 


£^ 


Is 


Is 


1 = 


^S 


9 


P 


^ 


... 


2 


10 


8 


11 


5 


6 


5 


7 


5 


6 


4 


7 


6 


2 


1 


1 


1 


• « • 


1 


1 


... 


5 


4 


• • • 


1 


4 


5 


10 


17 


71 


63 


465 


284 


536 


847 



3 



18 
16 

11 

12 

9 

18 
3 
2 
1 
1 
9 
1 
9 

27 



134 
749 



888 



MentencM. 



The aggregate sentences of the 883 convicts, was 2,403 years, 5 months, 
12 days, and 2 sentenced for life, or an average sentence of 2 years, 8 months, 
20 days; the previous year it was 2 years, 9 months, 28 days. 

The average sentence of convicts received in the Eastern Penitentiary, 
excluding the 2 for life, was 2 years, 7 months, IT days; in the preceding 
year, it was 2 years, 7 months, 18 days. 

Of those received in the Western Penitentiary, the average sentence was 
2 years, 10 months, 15 days ; in the previous year, it was 3 years, 16 days. 

The average sentence of those convicted of crimes against property, was 

2 years, 6 months, 20 days ; in the preceding year it was 2 years, 8 months, 
6 days. 

The average sentence of those convicted of crimes against persons, was 

3 years, 8 months, 19 days ; in the preceding year, it was 3 years, 10 months, 
6 days. , 

Of those committed to the Eastern Penitentiary, the average sentence 
for crimes against property, was 2 years, 6 months, 8 days ; in the pre- 
ceding year, it was 2 years, 4 months, 9 days. 



174 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Of those committed to the Weatem Penitentiarj, the average sentence 
'or crimes against property, was 9 years, 7 months, 1 days; in the preceding 
ear, it was 8 years, 10 days. 

Of those committed to the Eastern Penitentiary, the average sentence 
or crimes gainst persons, was 3 years, 4 months, 16 days, excluding the 
; for murder, first degree, sentenced for life; in the preceding year, it was 

years, 2 months, 17 days. 

Of those committed to the Western Penitentiary, the average sentence 
or crimes against persons, was 4 years, 1 month, 5 days ; in the preoediDg 
ear, it was 3 years, 2 months, 15 days. 



Of the 883 convicts received, 616, or 69.76 per cent., were admitted in 
good, and 267, or 30.24 per cent., in impaired physical health. 



Nearly all the convicts were in good mental health when received, the 

records showing only 17, or 1,93 per cent., in impaired health on reception. 

CoKtfew AdnltMl. 

The annexed statement exhibits the various characteristics, etc., of the 
convicts received in the respective penitentiaries, classified into convicted 
of " crimes against property," and " crimes against persons," thus : 





Eastern 
Pbnitentiaby. 


Western 
Pehitentiart. 


1 
Rbcapitulation 




CONVICTED 




CONVICTED 




CON\ 


oTKn 






DP CRIMES 










ihes 




CHAKACTEItlSTICe, &0, 


AOAINHT 




AOAIN8T 




AOAINST 






465 


P 


t 
2 
a, 

284 


P 


t 
1 


1 


^ 




« 


68A 


63 


847 


& 


^ 


Number received 


71 


749 


13) 


68} 


























63 
















White fenwlen 






















68 







12 


6 






16 




Colored females, 


H 


. . . 




. . . 


■ ■ 


■ 




. . , 










S 








b 




6 




28 


» 


26 


21 


8 




44 


6 


60 




M 


10 




33 


5 
















171 




21 


104 


242 


33 


275 




87 


11 


98 








148 


30 




and upwards, . . 


187 


35 






16 


101 


228 


50 


273 


'ii,.. . . . 


283 


81 


314 


211 


23 


234 


m 


64 


M8 




107 


15 


122 


47 


18 


65 




33 


187 




18 
18 
J6 
23 


11 
10 

2 
2 


29 
28 
18 
26 


8 
lU 
3 


6 

g 

2 
6 


11 
17 
12 

8 


S(8 
26 

26 
26 


17 

le 

4 
7 






45 




30 


eigneia, 


83 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



175 



Eastern 
Penitentiary. 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



REOAPITTJIiATION 



Charaotbribtios, <fec. 



Parental Belations : 

Parents living, 

Psarenta dead, 

Mother living, 

Father living, 

Civil Condition : 

Sn8l«. 

Married, 

Widowfed, 

Habits : 

Abetinents, 

Moderate drinkers, .... 
Intemperate, 

Industrial : 

Unapprenticed 

Apprenticed, and left, . . 
Apprenticed, and served 

timeout, . . . 

Not apprenticed, but served 

four years, 

Education : 

Illiterate, 

Read and write, ..... 

Schools : 
Attended public, ..... 

Attended private, 

Did not go, 

Army or Navy : 

Served, 

Did not, 



CONVICTED 

OF CRIMES 

AGAINST 



CON^^OTBD 

OF CRIMES 

AOAINST 



61 
70 
13 



Physical Health: 

Good, 

Impaired, 

Mental Health : 

Good, 

Impaired, 




3 



564 
74 

154 
91 



492 
843 

48 



81 
17 






- — - -m 


74 


13 


891 


58 


889 


53 


5 


• • • 


71 


18 


10 


4 


455 


67 


334 


61 


131 


20 



12 


269 


25 


406 


97 


208 


106 


739 


6 


23 


12 


98 



11 ' 



28 



68 



467 
8 



69 



99 


23 


1 

: 122 


660 


111 


761 


641 


108 


749 


8 


■ • • 


8 


100 


26 


126 


51 


16 


67 


698 


118 


816 


■ 

620 


96 


616 


229 


88 


287 


786 


131 


866 


14 


3 


17 



176 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



If y for the purpose of comparing the sex, color^ age^ nativity^ and varioui 
social^ morale educational^ industrial^ mental, and physical condition^ 
(Bc.y of convicts committed for crimes against property, with those for 
crimes against persons^ we represent the number received from each 
class of crimes, and their various characteristics, by 100, we will obtain 
the following results : 



Convicts Rbcsiyxd. 



EA8TKBK 

Penitbntiaby. 



Proportion 
per cent, 
ot crimes 
agalnat 



Wkstkhn 
Pknitkntiabt. 



Number received, 
Color and Sex : 

White males, 

White females, . 

Colored males, . 

Colored females, 
Affes : 

Under 16, 

16, and under 16, 

18, and under M, . 



21, and nnder 26, 

U, and under 9t« 

80 years, and upwards, 

yativity : 

Pennsylvania, 

Other United States, 

Ireland, 

Germany, 

England, 

Other foreigners, 

Parental Relations : 

Parents living, 

Parents dead, 

Mother living, 

Father living, 

Oivil Condition : 

Single, 

Married, 

Widowed, 

Habits : 

Ahstlnenta 

Moderate drinkers, 

Intemperate, 

Industrial : 

Unapprentlced, 

Apprenticed and left, 

Apprenticed and served time out, 
Notapprenticed,hutservcd4yeurs, 

Education : 

Illiterate, 

Read and write, 

Schools : 

Attended public, 

Attended private, 

Did not go, 

Army or Navy : 

Served, 

Did not, 

Physical Health : 

Good 

Impaired, 

Mental Health : 

Good, 

Impaired, 




Pbnttkntiajuis 
combxnmd. 



Proportion 
per cent, 
of crimes 
against 



I 



I 



• 




X 


• 


«• 


• 


». 


B 


Si 


o 


Pk 


• 


o 


u 


h 


« 


&4 


P4 



44.8 
14.4 I 
24.7 ' 
14.1 



100. 

88.8 

1.8 

10.0 

.4 

.7 

6.9 

11.6 

32.8 

19.7 
29.8 

68.0 
;0.5 

8.0 

8.5 

8.5 

8.5 

67.2 

7.0 
16.1 

9.7 

66.0 

86.4 

4.7 

81.3 
50.9 
14.8 

84.5 

2.4 
10.9 

2.2 

18.2 
86.8 

85.6 

1.0 

18.4 

6.9 
08.1 

60.4 

80.6 ' 28.8 



100. 
88.8 



11.2 



4.6 
11.1 
24.7 
22.4 
87.3 

40.8 I 
24.7 ' 
12.7 I 
14.1 I 
3.0 I 
5.2 I 



88.0 

52.2 

9.8 

9.6 
18.7 
72.8 

79.1 
8.8 
8.9 
8.2 

17.1 
88.9 

80.6 

• • • 

19.4 

12.0 
88.0 



71.7 I 



e 

P4 



100. 



08.1 I 
1.9 i 



97.8 
2.2 



88.2 

1.2 

10.2 

.4 

.5 
5.6 
11.5 
81.0 
20.0 
81.4 

61.0 
21.8 
4.6 
5.0 
8.4 
8.8 

64.0 

8.8 

17.4 

10.8 

5S.7 

38.9 

5.4 

80.4 
46.0 
28.6 

88.8 
2.6 

10.5 
8.1 

18.8 
88.8 

81.9 

.9 

14.2 

7.6 
92.4 

69.8 
80.2 

98.0 
2.0 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board op Public Chabities. 



PunUhmenU. 



177 



The number of different prisoners punished^ kind of punishment^ and 
number of times inflicted^ so far as the same is presented in the reports 
of these institutions^ is exhibited th us : 





Eastern 
Penitentiary. 


Western 
Penitentiary. 


Kind of Punishment. 


i 
a 

o 

• 

1 


Number of differ- 
ent prisoners. 


i 
a 

• 


Number of differ- 
ent prisoners. 




i 
1 


1 

1 Females. 


i_ 


i 
1 


i 

a 


i 


Handcnifb or irons, 






53 
204 
234 

90 


43 

150 
68 

30 


• • • 
• ■ 

■ • « 

• • • 


43 


Dark or punishment cells, .... 




3 


■ • • 


3 


159 


KoDiber of meals stopped, . . . 




68 


Number of meals of bread and 
water, (excluding those in dark 
cells,) 

Other punishments, 


158 


153 

40 
1 


• • • 

• • • 


153 
40 


30 









Tobacco and Liquor. 

No liquors, either malt or spirituous, are furnished convicts in these in- 
stitutions, except upon order of the physician. Their total cost during the 
year was $470 76, viz : Eastern Penitentiary, $325 25 ; Western Peniten- 
tiary, $145 51. Tobacco is allowed to convicts in the Eastern Penitenti- 
ary, by order of the physician, and when purchased by the prisoners, or 
sent to them by their friends ; in the Western Penitentiary, it is issued 
under authority of act of April 16, 1866. Amount expended for it during 
the year was $2,055 14, viz : Eastern Penitentiary, $1,116 78; Western 
Penitentiary, $938 36. 

Overwork. 

As an auxiliary to discipline, and to promote habits of industry and 
economy, a system of overwork has been established in each of these peni- 
tentiaries. In the Eastern Penitentiary, the convict is allowed only ope 
half of all work performed over his allotted task — ^the other half being 
credited to the respective county from which he was received ; while in the 
Western Penitentiary, the convict receives the full value of all overwork 
made. The aggregate amount earned, or credited to the convicts during 
the year, was $6,558 32, an increase of $1,264 17 on the preceding year. 



12- -B. P. Char. 



178 



BoA&D OF Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



Eastern Psnitsntiaby. 


Western Penitentiary. 




Number 


I 
1 




Number 




Indubtbiss. 


of 


Amount. 


Industries. 


of 


Amount. 




prisoners. 




1 

Shoemaking, . . 
Broom-making, . 


prisoners. 


1 


Sboemaking, . . 


171 


92,386 


61 


183 


1 
$1,928 


05 


Weavinj?, .... 


76 


708 


49 


41 


478 


67 


Cigar making, . . 
W^dwork, . . . 


54 


698 


31 


Tinsmithing, . . . 


5 


52 


07 


12 


66 


08 


General work, . . 


1 


25 


00 


Clothing, .... 


9 


18 


95 










Women's shoes, . 


4 


18 


61 










Cane work, . . . 


2 


13 


90 






- 




I'ailoring, .... 


7 


155 


50 






1 




Wool ploking, . . 


2 


2 


08 










Incidental expen- 
















ses, 


2 


6 


00 
53 


Total, 




1 




Total, .... 


339 ' 

1 


i 94,074 


230 


$2,483 

1 

1 


79 



Convict Population. 

The population of the penitentiaries for the year ending September 30, 
1879, was 2,319 white, 293 colored males; 28 white, 7 colored females; 
total, 2,647. 



Health. 



The number of cases of sickness^ dtc.^ treated each quarter of the year in 

the respective penitentiaries^ was as follows: 





Eastebn 
Penitentiary. 


Western 
Penitentiary. 


Gases of Sickness. 


TREATED DURING THE 
QUARTER ENDINO — 


TREATED DURING THE 
QUARTER ENDING — 




90 




9 

Ha 


a, 
m 


. 
09 

i 

• 

67 

159 

2 

3 


eo 

1 

55 

165 

5 

• • • 


9 




Infirmary cases, or severe illness. 

Slight indisposition, 

Insanity 


11 

39 

12 

1 


3 
95 
10 

5 


1 

113 

2 

2 


11 

74 

9 

5 


63 

217 

6 

2 


54 

472 

6 


Died, \ 


8 






Total treated, 

• 


68 


113 


118 


99 


221 


225 


288 


585 


Greatest number siok at one time, 




20 


43 


46 


11 


29 


23 


27 


26 



Lbg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charitie& 



179 



The number of cases of illness^ cfec, under medical treatmsnt^ on Septem- 
ber SOj 1879j was 69^ to wit : 



Eastern Penitentiary. 



Hiiy fever, 1 

Hemoptysis, 2 

Herpes, 2 

Influenza, 1 

Insane, 1 

Iritis, 2 

Lumbriooides, 4 

Masturl^ation, ' . . 1 

Malarial, 6 

Neuralgia, 1 

Pnenmonia, 2 

Phthisis, 6 

Presbyopia, 2 

Ulcer of pubis, 2 

Ulcer of leg, 2 

Syphilis 2 

Stricture of urethra, 2 

Varicocle, 1 

PeritoniUs, 2 

Total, 42 



Western Penitentiary. 



Asthma, 2 

Abscess, 2 

Dvsentery, 1 

Chronic ulcer of leg, 1 

Epileptic convulsions, 2 

General debility, 2 

Hemorrhage of lungs, 1 

I Hemorrhage of gums, 1 

i Insane, 1 

Nervous debility, 1 

' Pulmonary consumption, 2 

; Rheumatism, acute, I 



Total, 17 



CoBTlcit Dftchargrd during the Year. 

The convict population for the j'ear was 2/. 47, of which number there 
were 786, or 29.f)9 per cent., discharged, viz : 688 white, 87 colored males; 
11 white females. 



The follovcing statement will exhibit how they were discharged^ and the 

number remaining at the end 'of year : 





Eastern 


Western 


Penitentiaries 


^ 


Penitentiary. 


Penitentiary. 


Combined. 




White. 


Ck>lored. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. Colored. 




How DlSCHARQED. 
















• 




i 




i 




i 




i 




i 




i 


. 




i 
IS 

1,307 


12 


-a 
IS 

194 


-3 

a 

6 


i 

1 


08 

1 

16 


i 
I 

99 


s 

1 


i 
1 

2,819 


1 

28 


8 

298 


-a 

3 

7 


i 


Penitentiarj'^ populat'n. 


1,012 


2,647 


Discharged by commu- 
tation law, 






821 


4 


51 




242 


7 


80 




568 


11 


81 




655 


Pardoned, 


29 


• ^ 


1 




45 




• • 




74 




1 




76 


Expiration of sentence, 


16 


• ■ 


• • 




7 




■ • 




22 




• • 




22 


Order of court, .... 


7 


• » 


■ 




5 




• 




12 




• • 




12 


Died, 


8 


• • 


8 




8 




2 




16 




5 




21 


Escaped 










1 
808 


7 


82 


• ■ 


1 




• • 

87 


' 


1 


-VM«j^r>/i>, , 


1 


55 


■ 




Total discharge, . . 


880 


4 


688 


11 


. . 786 


Remaining Septem- 


























ber 80, 1879, . . . 


927 


8 


139 


6 


704 


9 C7 


1 


1,631 


17 


206 


7 


1,861 



180 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Of the population, 2,64*7, there were 666, or 24.^6 per cent., (563 white, 
81 colored males ; 11 white females,) discharged under commutation law; 
75, or 2.83 per cent., were pardoned, (t4 white and 1 colored male;) 22, or 
0.83 per cent., all white males, by expiration of sentence; 12, or 0.45 per 
cent., (white males,) by order of court ; 21, or 0.79 per cent., (16 white, 5 
colored males,) died ; and 1, or 0.04 per cent., escaped. 

ladnsCriefl. 

The trades taught^ or occupations of 786 convicts during their imprison- 
ment^ were as follows : 



Occupations, Ac. 



Barber, . . . . 
Broom-making, 
Cane work, . . 
Gigar.makJiig, . 
Cooking, . . . . 

Idle, 

Janitor, . . . . 
Jobbing, . . . . 
Library work, . 
Nursing, . . . 
Sewing, . . . . 
Shoemaking, 
Tailoring, . . . 
Tin work, . . . 
Wash-house, . . 
Weaving, . . . 
Wood work, . . 
Wool-picking, . 



Eabtbbn 
Penitbntiabt 



Wkstbrn 
Penitentiary 



2 



99 
83 



78 



48 
1 



Total discharged, . . . 



4 

101 

1 

2 



41 
19 
17 



884 



1 
I 



9 
8 



10 



• • ■ 



21 



55 



5 

MM 



55 



61 
6 

52 
8 

48 
8 
2 
7 

67 



4 
4 
8 



815 



o 
u 

O 

o 



1 

4 



4 
8 
8 

1 

7 



8 



82 



Rboapitulation. 



5 



55 

89 

94 

6 

180 

3 

96 

4 

2 

11 

168 

1 

6 

4 

44 

19 

17 



699 



O 



1 

4 
9 
7 
8 

18 
1 

14 



• • • 



29 



• . . * 



1 
5 



• • • 



87 



& 



1 

59 

48 

101 

9 

143 

4 

110 

4 

2 

11 

197 

1 

6 

5 

49 

19 

17 



786 



Leg. Doc] 



Board op Public Charities. 



181 



Time Served. 



The actual time served in the penitentiaries^ by the 786 discharged con* 

victs^ is presented in the following statement : 



Time Ssryed. 



Under 1 year, . . . . 

1, and under 2 years, 

2, do. 8 do*, 
do. 4 do. 
do. 5 do. 
do. 6 do. 
do. 7 do. 
do. 8 do. 
do. 9 do. 
do. 10 do. 
do. 11 do. 



8, 

4, 
5, 
6, 

7, 

8. 

9, 
10, 



Total discharged, . 



Eastsbn 
Pknitbntiahy. 


White. 


i 

1 


i 


i 

'5 


89 




166 

73 

16 

11 

6 

7 

1 


4 


88 
8 
5 
2 

1 
1 


3 






6 






2 








4 




380 


55 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



White. 



'^ 

S 



74 

124 

64 

16 

8 

4 

7 

5 

2 

3 

1 



808 



i 



9 



6 
1 



% 

o 

6 



19 
9 
2 
1 
1 



32 



REGAFITUIiATION. 



White. 



163 

290 

187 

82 

19 

10 

14 

6 

5 

9 

8 



688 



i 



g 



10 

1 



11 



a 

•6 



57 
17 
7 
3 
2 
1 



87 



3 



168 

367 

155 

89 

22 

12 

15 

6 

5 

9 

3 



786 



It will be observed of the T86 discharged, about one fifth, 163, or 20.T4 
per cent., served less than one year's imprisonment ; 35Y, or 46.42 per cent., 
from one to two years ; 155, or 19.72 per cent., from two to three years ; 39, 
or 4.96 per cent., ftom three to four years ; 22, or 2.80 per cent., from four 
to five years ; 12, or 1.63 per cent., five to six years ; 16, or 1.91 per cent., 
six to seven years ; 6, or 0.76 per cent., seven to eight years ; 6, or 0.64 
per cent., eight to nine years; 9, or 1.14 per cent., nine to ten years ; and 
3, or 0.38 per cent., ten to eleven years. 





Average Time Served by Convicts Discharged. 


How Discharged. 


Eastern Penitentiary. 


Western Penitentiary. 




No. 

80 

15 

7 

11 


Time Served. 


No. 

279 
45 

7 
5 

10 

1 

347 


Time Served. 


Commutation law, . . . 

Pardoned, 

Expiration of sentence, 

Order of oourt, 

Died 

£jBoaDed. 


1 year, 11 moe., 15 days. 
1 do. 10 do. 21 do. 

1 do. 7 do. 18 do. 

2 do. 1 do. 9 do. 
2 do. 5 do. 25 do. 


1 year, 10 mos., 25 days. 
1 do. 11 do. 18 do. 

1 do. 4 do. 20 do. 

9 do. do. 

2 do. 2 do. 14 do. 
2 do. 11 do. 2 do. 


.&.a»jw^w%ai, . 


439 






Total, eto., 


1 do. 11 do. 25 do. 


2 do. 2 do. 15 do. 



Board of Pdblic Cbabities. 



[No. 6, 



In regard to the cumber of times the discharged convicts have been sub- 
jected to punishment during their imprisonment, we have returns fVom the 
Western Penitentiary, from which we learn of the 347 discharged from that 
institution, 86, or 24.50 per cent, had been nnder punishment ; being a de- 
crease, or difference of 5.20 per cent., as compared with the punishments of 
discharged prisoners of the previous year. 



The color and mx, alac 


numbir of times puniahed, ia exhibited thue: 


TllCBB 
PUNISHBD. 


11 


11 


i 


1 


Pu«isH.o. 1 ^1 


SI 


^1 


On*. 

Two, 

Three 

F..ur, 

Five, 

Six, 


S7 

n 

9 

g 

5 

1 


"l 


89 
15 

9 
8 
5 
3 


89 
80 

27 

an 

25 
12 


Seven. . , . . , 4 

Nine - . 

Eleven, . .; I 
Tblrleeo, - - . i 1 
Tweaty-eeven, • • ■ 


"l 
1 


J as 
1 ; 9 
1 , 11 

1 IS 

1 n 27 


Total 79 


7 


-ii ^ 



The education received during the imprisonment of the convicts dis- 
charged was, according to the reports, as follows : 10 white and 8 col- 
ored males learned to write ; ^ white and SO colored males learned to 
read and write. 





Eastkrm 
Pknitbmtiaby. 


Westbrm 
Pkhitbntiabt. 


RKCAPITtTLATIOn 


BOnOATIOEI ACQUIBBD 
IN FRI80N. 


t 

1 


1 




i 


i 
1 




1 


t 

1 






i 


1 


5 


i 


i 

10 
48 


1 


i 










10 
16 


8 
9 


18 

27 


8 
30 




Read imd Write, 


30 


21 


51 


78 


Total, 


80 


21 


61 


28 


17 


« 


68 


S8 


Be 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabities. 



183 



PhyslMl Health. 

Of the 786 diaekargedj 7i0f or 91.60 per cent., were in good^ and 66, or S.40per eent,, 

in impaired physical health. 



cjoiiOB AND Sex. 


Eastern 
Penitentiary 


Western 
Penitentiary 


Recapitulation. 




Good. 


Imp*d. 


Good. 


Imp'd. 1 


Good. 


Imp-d. 


TbtaL 


White males, 

White females, 

Ck>lored males, 


35d 

4 
45 


21 

■ • • • 

10 


281 

6 

25 


27 
1 

7 i 


640 
10 
70 


48 

1 

17 


688 
11 
87 


Tbtal, 


408 


81 


312 


35 i 

I 


720 


66 


786 



Of the 439 discharged from the Eastern Penitenti;. y, 408, or 92.94 per 
cent., were in good, and 31, or 7.06 per cent., in impaired health. 

Of the 347 discharged from'the Western Penitentiary, 312, or 8^.91 per 
cent., were in good, and 35, or 10.09 per cent., in impaired health. 



MenUl Coa4iltoa. 



Of the mental condition of discharged convicts, 768, or 95.80 per cent,, vtere in 
good, and SS^or 4.S0per cent,, in impaired mental condition. 



Color and Sex. 


Eastern 
Penitentiary 


> V\ ESTERN 

1 Penitentiary 


Recapitulation. 




Good. 

365 

4 

51 


Imp*d. 


Good. 


Imp'd. 


Good. 

668 
10 
80 


Imp'd. 


Total. 


White males, 

White females, 

Colored males, 


15 

• • • • 

4 


208 

4 


10 
1 
8 


25 
1 

7 


688 
11 

87 


'R)tal, 


420 


19 


333 

1 


14 


753 


33 


786 



The mental condition of the 439 discharged from the Eastern Peniten- 
tiary, was 420, or 95.67 per cent., in good, and 19, or 4.33 per cent., in im- 
paired mental health. 

Of the 347 discharged from the Western Penitentiary, 333, or 95.68 per 
cent., were in good, and 14, or 4.32 per cent., in impaired mental health. 



184 



Board op Public Chakities. 



[No. 5, 



RematnlDic at the ead of Year. 



The number of convicts in confinement in the penitentiaries on September 
30, 1879, was 1^61, viz : 1,648 white, or 88.56 per cent. ; 21S colored^ 
11.45 per cent. 



Color and Sex. 



Eastebn 
Pbnitkntiary. 



• 

u 

9 
£1 

B 

5Z5 



White males, . . 
White females, . 
Colored males, . 
Colored females, 

Total, . . . 



927 
8 

139 
6 



1,080 



8 

u 

Oh 



85.84 
.74 

12.87 
.55 



Wbstbrn 
Pbnitkntiary. 



Recapitula- 
tion. 



u 

o 

£i 

B 



704 

9 

67 

1 



100.00 I 781 



d 

8 
9 



90.04 

1.15 

8.68 

.13 



100.00 



9 
£i 

B 



1,631 
17 

206 

7 



1,861 



a 
9 

u 

0^ 



87.64 
.91 

11.07 
.38 



100.00 



Enployment. 

0/ the lj861 convicts remaining in the penitentiaries at the end of the year, 
September SO, 1879, the following statement will exhibit their employ- 
ment : 



Occupation. 



Broom-making, 

Cane-work, . 

Chair-making, 

Chain-making, 

Cigar-making, 

Cordwaining, 

Idle, . . . 

Jobbing, . 

Learners, 

Sewing, . 

Sick, . . 

Smith-work, 

Tin-work, 

Weaving, 

Total, 



Eastern 
Penitentiary. 



i 



130 



44 
263 
326 
141 

84 

• • 

17 



60 
1,066 



08 

B 
9 



14 



14 



Western 
Penitentiary. 



-^ 

S 



52 



• • • • 



117 
31 

333 
30 

132 



11 
37 
12 
16 

771 



i 



9 



10 



10 



Recapitulation. 



52 

130 

1 

117 

76 
596 
356 
273 

84 

• • • 

28 
37 
12 
76 

1,837 



9 



24 



24 



3 



52 

130 

1 

117 

76 

596 

856 

273 

84 

24 

28 

37 

12 

76 

1,861 



Leo, Doc.] 



BoASD OF Public Charitieb. 



COUNTY PRISONS AND WORK-HOUSES. 

These comprise sixty-Bix county jails, a work-house, and house of cor- 
rection. 

The following slaliatics relate to the inmates of these institutions during 
the past year : 



Hove KENT of Crininai. Ci.abbbb. 


i 

1 




00 


I 




s 


10 

676 


2,048 
36,008 






i8,ise 




Population, or whole number, 


4,091 

2,903 


695 
663 


38,114 
36,801 


13,879 








1,188 


82 


•1,313 


606 



M beld w wlinvM. 



Jf to the above be added the 1J101 convicts in the penitentiaries, it loilj 
make a lolat, of alt criviinal classes, of 4^00 on September SO, 1879, as 

follows : 



C LASH IFI CAT ION. 




Number. 


Peroent. 


Cnnvieta in .- 




1,861 

1,188 






1,038 

160 




















3,049 

1,318 

32 
606 






249 
314 

750 




















38.79 


















4,000 











186 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

It will be observed that of the 4,900 prisoners in confinement on Sep- 
tember 30, ISI^, 3,049, or 62.23 per cent., more than three fifths, were con- 
victs ; 1,313, or 26.79 per cent., rather more than one fourth, were prisoners 
summarily convicted by justices of peace ; 32, or 0.66 per cent., prisoners 
under sentence of court for payment of fine, costs, &c. ; and 506, or 10.33 
per cent., were prisoners awaiting trial for criminal offenses. 

Of the 3,049 convicts, 1,S61, or 61.03 per cent., more than three fifths, 
were confined in the State penitentiaries ; 1 ,038, or 34.04 per cent., in county 
jails; and 150, or 4.93 per cent., in work-house at Allegheny. 

Of the 1,313 under summary conviction, 249, or 18.96 per cent., were in 
county jails ; 314, or 23.92 per cent., in work-house ; T50, or 57.12 per cent, 
in house of correction, Philadelphia. 

Oonnltted for Trial, 4te. 

The number of prisoners (excluding convicts) in county prisons, work- 
house, and house of correction, on October 1, 1878, was 2,808, viz: 

Summarily convicted, i. 6., under sentence of justices of peace, . 2,048 
Under sentence of court for payment of fine, costs, &c., ... 19 

Awaiting trial, 741 

Total, excluding convicts, on October 1, 1878, 2,808 

Committed during the year, viz : 

For trial, 13,138 

Summarily, by justices of peace, 36,066 

Total commitments, 49,204 

Population of the year, • 52,012 

How disposed of: 

By court, sentenced to penitentiaries, 883 

Do. do. county jails, 2,308 

Do. do. work-house, 229 

Do. do. reformatories, 113 

Do. do. payment of fine, costs, &c., 676 

Do. do. be hanged, 10 

4,219 

Discharged by expiration of sentence, 24,942 

Do. by magistrate, or power committing, .... 8,724 

Do. by inspectors, 5,691 

Do. at court, 2,323 

Do, by commutation law, 1,656 

Do. on bail for appearance at court, 952 

Do. by judges, .... 109 

Do. on bail for magistrate's hearing, 28 

Do. on payment of fine, costs, &c., 663 ' 

Do. by escape, 259 

Do. on fiabecLS corpuSj 185 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Chabities. 



187 



Discharged by district attorney, . . 
Do. by removal to alms-house, 

as insane, 

by insolvent law, .... 
under two-term rule, . . 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Died, 

Not stated how discharged, 



81 
1 

11 

29 
3 

44 
231 



Total discharged, 60,161 



Number remaining September 30, 1879, excluding convicts, 1 ,851 

To wit : 



TTnder sentence of court for payment of fine, costs, <feo., . . 
Under sentence of Justices of peace, sumoiarlly convicted, 
Awaiting trial, 



Total, 




Per cent. 



1.78 
70.93 
27.84 

100.00 



OommltmeiiU. 

I 

Of the 49fiOJi, prisoners committed^ viz : IS, 138 for trial, 36fi66 summar- 
ily hy justices of peace, their sex and color were as follows : 



Sbx and Color. 


Committed for 
Trial. 


Summarily Com- 
mitted. 


AOrmEQATB. 




1 
Number. Percent. 

1 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


White males, 

White females, .... 
Colored males, .... 
Colored females, . . . 


10,859 

1,059 

992 

228 


82.66 
8.06 
7.55 
1.73 


28,322 

6,188 

1,069 

487 


78.53 

17.16 

2.96 

1.35 


39,181 
7,247 
2,061 

716 


79.68 

14,72 

4.19 

1.46 




18,1S8 


100.00 


86,066 


100.00 


49,204 


100.00 



To the 13,138 prisoners committed for trial, should be added 741, who 
were awaiting trial from the preceding year, making a total of 13,8T9 pris- 
oners; all of whom were disposed of, with the exception of 606, who 
remained awaiting trial at the end of the year, September 30, 1879 ; a 
decrease of 235, or 31.T1 per cent., on number at corresponding date of 
previous year. 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



The sex and color of those awaiting trial were : 



[No. 5, 



. 462 II Total colored _64 

> were county, and 10 were United States 



lencement of the year, October 1, 1878, there were 1^54 con- 
lunty prisons and work-house ; to these were added during 
making a population of 4,091, a decrease of 477, or 10.44 per 
imber of convicts during preceding year. 



Convict Population in 
3NB AND Work-House. 


Males. 




In oonnt7 prisaoB, .... 
In work-houae, 


1,207 
249 


1,466 

2,844 

3,800 

2,664 
1,106 


70 
28 


' 1,277 

! '277 

98 ,' 

,12,808 
\ 229 

193 ; 

2S1 1 

■2,547 
1 356 

209 i 

1 1,038 

'1 150 

82 ' 




igofyear 

oountv prisons, 

work-houae, 


2,129 
215 


179 
14 

172 
37 

77 
6 


1,664 


during; the year, . . 

on oi oounty prisons and 

( County prlBOns, .... 
' } Work-house, 


2,37S 

319 


2,617 
4,091 




961 
145 


2,908 


nounty prlBons, 

work-house. 


J September 30, 1879, . . . 




l,lg8 



onvict " is restricted to those who have been " tried and con- 
" and sentenced to serve a " term of imprisonment," it there- 
nclude those committed to county jails and work-house, in 
nent of fine or costs, enter bail for good behavior, give se. 
tenance of family, &o. 

g statistics relate to the convict? sentenced to county jails 
e during the year. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board op Public Charitibs. 



189 



CbaraderliCics, dke. 



Of 2fi37 convicta sentenced to county jails and work-house during the 
year beginning October i, 187S, compared with those of previous year. 



Ghabacteristicb, Sm. 



Number reoeived, 

Color and sex : 

White males, 

White females, 

Colored males, 

Colored females, 

Ages: 

Under 16 years, 

16 to 18 years, 

18 to 21 years, 

21 to 25 years, 

25 to 80 years, 

80 years and upward, 

Not stated, 

Nativity: 

Pennsylvania, 

Other Americans, 

Ireland, 

Germany, 

England, 

Other foreigners, 

Not stated, 

Convictions : 

First conviction, 

Second conviction, 

Tiiird conviction, 

Fourth conviction, 

Fifth conviction, 

Sixth conviction 

Seventh conviction, 

Eighth conviction, 

Ninth conviction, 

Tenth conviction, and upwards, 
Not stated, 

Parental relations : 

Parents living, 

Parents dead, 

Father living 

Mother living, . 

Not stated, 

Civil condition : 

Single 

Married, 

Widowed, 

Not statea, 

HabiU: 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinkers, 

Occasionally intemperate, . . . 

Intemperate, 

Not stated, 



Commitments of 


Compared with 


1879. 


1878. 


i 


• 
a 


• 


is 




i 


s 


Is 


i 


b 


is 


^ 


ft® 


P 


p ^ 


2,537 


100.00 


649 


20.87 


2,016 


79.46 


615 


23.87 


145 


5J2 


16 


9.94 


828 


12.93 ; 


24 


6.81 


48 


1 89 1 
1.64 


♦6 


♦11.90 


89 


6 


1.33 


94 


8.94 


71 


43.03 


827 


13.71 


171 


34.34 


523 


21.94 


203 


27.96 


498 


20.89 


27 


5.14 


903 


87.88 


79 


8.04 


158 


1 
1 

58.58 


92 




1,244 


880 


23.39 


588 


25.82 


130 


18.10 


209 


9.00 


84 


28.67 


150 


6.46 


37 


19.78 


62 


2.67 


48 


40.95 


69 


2.97 


80 


30.33 


215 


73.18 


♦55 




1,500 


402 


21.13 


805 


14.87 


63 


17.12 


114 


5.56 


28 


16.79 


67 


8.27 


♦4 


♦6.35 


25 


1.22 


14 


85.89 


15 


.73, 


6 


28.57 


14 


.68 


♦2 


♦18.33 


7 


.34 


*2 


♦40.00 


1 


.05 


1 


50.00 


8 


.15 


♦1 


♦50.00 


486 




149 




1,801 


60.17 


417 


24.27 


287 


10.97 


34 


12.40 


195 


9.02 


86 


30.60 


429 


19.84 


87 


16.86 


875 


1 


22 




1,212 


66.19 


486 


28.62 


860 


89.87 


174 


16.88 


85 


8.94 


8 


8.60 


880 




*19 




442 


19.91 


149 


25.21 


919 


41 .40 1 


264 


22.31 


449 


20.22 


226 


88.33 


410 


18.47 


41 


9.09 


817 




♦31 





190 



Board of Publio Chabitie& 



fNo. 5, 



Chmraclerlflllea, dcc—Comlnaed. 



Characteristics, Ac. 



Industrial : 

Not bound, 

Bound, and left, 

Bound, and served, 

Not bound, but served four years, .... 
Not stated, 

JSduealion : 

Illiterate, 

Read only, 

Read and write, 

Superior education, 

Not stated, 

Schools : 

Attended publio school, 

Attended private school, 

Attended both public and private schools, 

Did not go to school, 

Not stated, 

Average age on leaving school, 

Army or navy : 

Served in army or navy, 

In neither, 

Not stated, 

Sequenced : 

To separate labor, 

Otherwise sentenced, 

Not stated, 



Commitments of 
1879. 



u 

9 

Xi 

B 



1,404 

40 

569 

13 

511 



4i 

S 

hi 

Oh 



69.80 

1.97 

28.09 

.64 



218 

434 

1,561 

6 

318 



1,868 

80 

23 

210 

356 

14 y . 6 mo. 



411 
1,379 

747 



1,263 
405 
869 



9.82 

19.56 

70.35 

.27 



85.65 
3.67 
1.05 
9.63 



23.00 
77.00 



75.72 
24.28 



Compared with 

1878. 






219 
261 
♦18 
162 
35 



67 

73 

247 

286 

•24 



419 

120 

47 

55 

8 



81 
579 
»11 



290 
140 
219 






18.49 
86.71 
•3.27 
92.12 



23.50 
14.89 
13.66 
97.94 



18.32 
60.00 
67.14 
20.76 



16.46 
29.57 



18.67 
25.68 



* Increase. 

The convicts committed to these institutions, compared with the pre- 
vious year, have decreased 649, or 20.37 per cent. Of the 2,637 comicts, 
2,808, or 90.1*7 per cent., were sentenced to county jails, and 229, or 9.03 
per cent., to Allegheny county work-house. Convicts sentenced to the 
county jails in the past year decreased 559, or 19.49 per cent.; and those 
to the work-house decreased IjO, or 28.21 per cent. 

Color and 8ez. 

Of the 2,537 convicts, 2,016, or 79.46 per cent, were white males; 145, or 
5.72 per cent, were white females; 328, or 12.93 per cent, colored males, 
and 48, or l.b9 per cent, colored females. The white males decreased 615, 
or 23.37 per cent.; white females 16, or 9.94 per cent.; the colored males 
decreased 24, or 6.81 per cent., and the colored females increased 6, or 11.90 
per cent. 

Of the known ages, 460, or 19.29 per cent., were minors ; 1,924, or 80.71 
per cent., were adults. Minors decreased 248, or 35.02 percent.; adults 
decreased 309, or 13.83 per cent. 



Leg. Doc] Boakd of Public Charities. 191 

NatlTlty. 

More than one half, 1,244, or 53.68 per cent., were natives of Pennsyl- 
vania; 5b8, or 25.32 per cent., were bom in other American States ; and 
490, or 21.10 per cent., were foreign bom. 

CoBfldioiw. 

Nearly three fourths, 1 500, or 73.13 per cent., were convicted for the 
first time, while 551, or 26.87 per cent., had been previously convicted. 
The number on first conviction decreased 402, or 21.13 per cent.; those 
who had been previously convicted decreased 98, or 15.10 per cent. 

Parestal Relallona. 

More than one half, 1,301, or 60.17 per cent., had both parents living 
when they were sixteen years of age ; 237, or 10.97 per cent., had lost both 
parents ; 624, or 28.86 per cent., had lost either father or mother at that 
age. Those having both parents living decreased 417, or 24.27 per cent. ; 
whole orphans decreased 34, or 12.40 per cent. ; half orphans, thosQ who 
had lost either father or mother, decreased 173, or 21. 70 per cent. 

civil €>>Ddltioii. 

More than one half, 1,212, or 56.19 per cent., had never married ; 860, or 
39.87 per cent., were married ; and 85, or 3.94 per cent., were widowed. 
The unmarried decreased 486, or 28.62 per cent. ; the married, 174, or 16.88 
per cent. ; and the widowed, 8, or 8.60 per cent. 

Habits. 

About one fifth, 442, or 19.91 per cent., were abstinents, i. 6., did not use 
malt or spiritous liquors ; 919, or 41.40 per cent., used them moderately ; 
449, or 20.22 per cent., were occasionally intemperate ; and 410, or 18.47 
per cent., were intemperate. Abstinents decreased 149, or 25.21 per cent. ; 
moderate drinkers decreased 264, or 22.31 per cent.; those occasionally 
intemperate, 226, or 33.33 per cent. ; and intemperate, 41, or 9.09 per cent. 

Indoatrlal Relations. 

More than one half, 1,404, or 69.30 per cent., were unapprenticed ; 569, 
or 28.09 per ceat., had been apprenticed, and served until twenty-one years 
of age; 40, or 1.97 per cent., were apprenticed, but left before they were 
twenty-one ; and 13, or .64 per cent., had not been apprenticed, but served 
four or more years at a trade. Those who had been apprenticed, but left 
before expiration of term, decreased 261, or 86.71 per cent. ; the unappren- 
ticed decreased 219, or 13.49 per cent. ; those bound, and served until 
twenty-one years of age, increased 18, or 3.27 per cent. ; those not bound, 
but who served four years and upwards, decreased 152, or 92.12 per cent. 

Bdncatlon. 

There were 218, or 9.82 per cent., illiterate — unable to read or write ; 
434, or 19.56 per cent., could read only; 1,561, or 70.35 per cent., could 
read and write ; and but 6, or .27 per cent., were reported as having re- 



192 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6, 



ceived a superior education. The number able to read and write decreased 
247, or 13.66 per cent. ; the illiterate decreased 67, or 23.50 per cent. ; those 
who could read only decreased 73, or 14.39 per cent. ; and those returned 
as having received a superior education decreased 286, or 97.94 per cent. 

School!. 

More than three fourths, 1,868, or 85.65 per cent., had attended public 
schools ; 80, or 3.67 per cent., had attended private schools ; 23, or 1.05 
per cent., both public and private schools ; and 210, or 9.63 per cent., had 
not attended any school. Those who attended public school decreased 419, 
or 18.32 per cent. ; attended private school, 120, or 60.00 per cent. ; did not 
go to school, 55, or 20.75 per cent. The number who had attended both 
public and private schools decreased 47, or 67.14 per cent. The average 
age on leaving school was fourteen years and six months. 

Army and Notj. 

There were 411, or 23.00 per cent., had served in the army or navy ; and 
1,379, or 77.00 per cent., had not served in either. Those who had served 
decreased 81, or 16.46 per cent. ; those who had not served, 579, or 29.57 
per cent. 

Sentamced. 

About three fourths, 1,263, or 75.72 per cent., were sentenced to separate 
labor, and 405, or 24.28 per cent., were otherwise sentenced. The number 
of convicts sentenced to separate labor decreased 290, or 18.67 per cent. ; 
those otherwise sentenced decreased 140, or 25.68 per cent. 



Lbq. Doc] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



193 



CmitIcIs Diacharged frooi f^oanty Jails aad Work-hoi 

The convict population of the county jails and work-house during the 
year ending September 80, 1879, was 4,091 ; of whom, 3,800, or 92.89 per 
cent., were males, and 291, or 7.11 per cent., were females. There were dis- 
charged 2,903, or 70.96 of the population ; or of the sexes separately, 2,694, 
or 70.91 per cent., of the male, and 209, or 71.47 per cent., of the female 
population. 



How Discharged. 



Expiration of aentenoe, .... 

Gommatation law, 

Pardoned, 

Escaped, 

Died 

Removal to alms-house — insane, 

Order of oourt, 

Hanged, 

Kot stated, 

Total disoliarged, 



Number. 



2,903 



Per oent. on 
oonviot pop- 
ulation. 



2,244 


54.86 


434 


10.61 


25 


.61 


7 


.17 


7 


.17 


B 


.14 


77 


1.89 


5 


.12 


98 


2.89 



70.96 



It will be observed that the benefit of the commutation law was extended 
to 434 convicts, who received an abatement or allowance of 21,998 days, or 
an average of 50 days each on their original sentence. 



Sex, Color, aad Aicaa. . 

Of the SfiOS convicts discharged^ the sex^ color ^ and ages are exhibited as 

follows : 



Sex and Color. 



White males, . . . 

Wliite females, . . 

Colored males, . . 

Colored females, . 

Total, 



u 

i 


u 

81.74 
5.99 

11.06 
1.21 


2,373 

174 

321 

35 


2,903 


100.00 



AOES. 



Under 16 

16 to 18 

18 to 21, 

21 to 25, 

25 to 30 

30 years and upwards, 
Not stated, 

Total, 




a 



1.47 
3.46 
14.21 
22.64 
22.21 
86.01 



100.00 



IS— B. P. Char. 



194 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 

TtaM Benred, mm4 Health im DtocliMse. 



[No. 5, 



T?ie time served in prison^ also, the physical and mental health on dis- 
charge, is presented thus : 



Time Served. 



Under 1 year, . . . . , 

1 to 2 years, . . . . , 

2 to 3 years, . . . . , 
8 to 4 years, ... 

4 to 5 years, . . . . . 
6 to 6 years, .... 

6 to 7 years, . . . . , 

7 to 10 years, 

10 years and upwards, 
Kot stated, 

Total, 



• 


• 


u 


■t* 


a 


i 


¥• 


u 


P 


9 


^ 


88.89 


2,891 


245 


9.06 


49 


1.82 


15 


.55 







4 


.16 







1 


.08 







198 




2,908 


100.00 



Health. 



Physical : 
GNxKl, . . . 
Impaired, . 
Not stated, . 

Total, . . 

Menial : 
Good, . . . 
Impaired, . 
Not stated, . 

Total,. . 



hi 



1,947 
450 
506 



2,906 



2,810 

27 

566 



2,903 



8 

lU 



81.23 
18.77 



100.00 



98.85 
1.15 



100.00 



It will be observed that nearly nine tenths of the 2,903 convicts served 
less than one year. The physical health of more than three fifths was good, 
and the mental health of nearly all whose condition was known at time of 
discharge. 

Weight OB fNtcharge. 

Of the convicts discharged, 1,975 were weighed on admission and dis- 
charge, of which number 1,315, or 66.5T per cent., two thirds, increased in 
weight daring imprisonment; 435, or 22.03 per cent., decreased, and 225, 
or 11.39 per cent., remained stationary, neither gaining nor losing weight 
during their imprisonment. 

SlekMM. 

The aggregate number of days' sickness of the discharged convicts was 
17,205, or an average of 5| days for each convict discharged. 

Overwork. 

Of the discharged convicts, 144 earned, during their imprisonment, 
$2,597- 11, or an average of $18 08 each. 



Leo. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Chabitieb. 



195 



Hie occupation or employment of the BfiOS convicts discharged^ during 

their imprisonment^ is reported as follows : 



OOCUPATIOHS. 


Number. 


Occupations. 


Number. 


Bakers and oooks, 

Barbers, 


88 

10 
2 
5 

18 
9 
129 
5 
1 
9 

18 

126 

4 

2 


Nurses, 

S^^-makers, 


2 
6 


Basket-makers, 

Blacksmiths, 


Sewing, 


94 


Shoe-makers, 

Servants, 


115 


Broom-makers, 

Carpenters, 


11 


Tailors, 


2 


Coopers, 


Teamsters, 

Tinsmiths, 


2 


Engineers, 


1 


Hostlers, 


Upholsterers, 


2 


Jobbers and runners, 

Knitters, 

Laborers, 


Vvasher-women, . 

Weavers, 

No oocapatlon, 

Not stated, 


18 

76 

218 


JLanndrir, 


1,990 


Machin&ts, 











RemaiBliiff mX %h» eB4 of year. 

The number of convicts remaining in confinement on September 30, 1879, 
in the county jails and work-house was 1^188, as follows: 



CouNTT Jails and Work-House. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


County Jails, 

Alleeheny work-house 


961 
145 


77 
5 


1,088 
150 






Total oonyiots in county Jails and work-house, . . 


1,106 


82 


1,188 



In addition to the 1,188 convicts in county Jails and work-house, there 
were 1,861 in the penitentiaries at the same date, as foUows : 



Penitentiaries. 



Western Penitentiary, 
Eastern Penitentiary, . 



Total convicts in penitentiaries. 



Males. 



771 
1,066 



1,837 



Females. 



10 
14 



24 



Total. 



781 
1,080 



1,861 



The above make a total of 3,049 convicts remaining in confinement on 
S^tember 80, 1879, to wit: In county jails, 1,038; in work-house, 150, 
penitentiaries, 1,861. 



\ 



196 



BoABD OF Public Chabitie& 



[No. 5, 



StateTnent exhibiting the number of convicta ; also prisoners aioait 



1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
28. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
80. 
81. 
82. 

33. 
84. 
35. 
86. 
37. 
88. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
60. 
51. 
52. 
53. 



Prisons, Ao. 



Adams oonnty prison,* 

Allegheny oouiity prison, 

Allegheny oounty work-honse 

Allegheny oounty— Western PeuitenUary, 
Armstrong oounty prison, ........ 

Beaver oounty pnaon, 

Bedford oonnty prison, 

Berks oounty pnson, 

Blair oounty prison. 

Bradford oounty prison, 

Bucks oounty prison, 

Butler oounty prison, .- . 

Cambria oounty prison, 

Cameron oounty prison, 

Carhop oounty prison, 

Centre oounty prison, 

Chester oonnty prison, 

Clarion oounty prison, 

Clearfield oounty prison, 

Clinton oounty prison, 

Columbia oounty prison, 

Crawford oounty prison, 

Cumberland oounty prison, . 

Dauphin oounty prison, 

Delaware oounty prison, 

Elk oounty prison, 

Erie oounty prison, 

Fayette oounty prison, 

Forest oounty prison, 

Franldin oounty prison, 

Fulton oounty prison, 

Greene oounty prison, 

Huntingdon oounty prison, 

Indiana oounty prison, 

Jefferson oounty prison, 

Juniata oounty prison, 

Lancaster oounty prison, 

Lawrence oounty prison, 

Lebanon oounty prison, 

Lehigh oounty pnson, 

Luzerne county prison, 

Lyooming county prison, 

McKean oounty prison, 

Mercer county prison, 

Miiflin oounty prison, 

Monroe county prison, 

Montgomery oounty prison, 

Montour oounty prison, 

Northampton oounty prison^ 

Northumberland oounty prison, 

Perry oounty prison, 

Philadelphia oounty prison, 

Philadelphia oounty— House of Correction, 



No. OF CONYIOTS RkXAIN- 

ING iir Prison on 
Sept. 80, 1879. 



i 



8 

18 

146 

771 



1 

1 

84 

4 
4 
5 



1 

1 

84 



1 
2 
2 
4 
8 
42 
60 
I 
1 
8 



12 
1 



1 

78 



6 

21 

18 

6 

4 

8 

1 

2 

80 

1 

49 

4 

2 

481 



i 
-a 

a 



1 

6 
10 



2 



9 



1 
1 



8 
1 



46 



3 



14 
160 
781 



1 

1 

84 

4 
6 
6 



1 

1 

86 



1 
2 
2 
4 
8 
47 
60 
1 
1 
8 



12 
1 



2 



1 
87 



6 
21 
18 

6 

4 

4 

2 

2 
83 

1 
60 

4 

2 

477 



Lko. Doc] Boabd or Pdbuc Charjtiks. 197 

ing trial, aummarity convicted, Ac, in prison on September SO, 1879. 



1 

h 




If 

\ 




1 


'in' 

SL4 
























8 










■ V 


i" 












s 




6 












V 


■ 8 

4 
37 

7 




1 


1 












8 




































M 




28 












S 


6 
8 
10 
SO 
10 
4 
























8 












2 






1 
































1 
8 










































7 

4 
















2 








4 




116 
7» 


U7 




108 


97 


17 





isi 



198 



Board of Publio Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Prisons, Ac 



M. Philadelphia ooanty— Eastern Penitentiary, 

66. Pike county prison, , 

96. Potter eoanty prison, 

57. Sohoylkill ooanty prison, 

66. Snyder oounty prison, 

60. Somerset oounty prison, 

60. Sullivan oounty prison, 

01. Susquehanna oounty prison, 

62. Tioga oounty prison, 

68. Union oounty prison, 

64. Venango oounty prison, , 

66. Warren oounty prison, , 

66. Washington oounty prison, 

67. Wayne oounty prison, 

66. Westmoreland oounty prison, , 

69. Wyoming oounty prison, 

70. Yorlc oounty prison, 



Total, 



Number of Convicts Rb- 

MAiNiNO IN Prison on 

Srft. 80, 1879. 



i 



1,066 



1 
89 



8 



8 

8 
2 

8 



- 4 
4 

2,943 



i 
I 



14 



6 



106 



3 



1,060 



1 
45 



8 
8 

2 

8 



4 
4 

8,049 



LsQ. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



199 



o 
d 



1^ 



£ 






Remaining on September 80, 1878, awaiting Tbial. 



^ 



> 
8 



I 



OQ 



e 

a 






I 






BBX AND COLOR. 



WHITE. 



i^ 






COLORED. 



i 



i 
1 



■a 

••A 
a 

1 



6. 

& 

d 

s 

d* 

•s - 

§^ 



1,060 



54 
55 
56. 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
68 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 



7 
8 



1,818 



6 



4 

1 

4 



• • • 
■ • • 

• • • 



4 
1 

4 



2 
8 
4 
1 
8 



• • • 



2 
8 
2 
1 
8 



. • . 



14 



10 



6 



4 

1 
4 



2 
8 
4 
1 
8 



14 



496 



10 



408 



49 



41 



18 



506 



1 

60 

8 

7 
1 
7 
4 
2 

11 
8 
4 
1 
8 
4 

20 



4,900 



200 Board of Public Chabitieb. [No. 5, 

8T%TBMB3ir of amoaat expenitfd for inalBCeBftiice of CToanCy 



1. 
2. 
t, 

4. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
U. 
IS. 
IS. 
14. 
16. 
M. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
». 

n. 



17. 

». 

«). 

U. 

tt. 

88.. 

84. 

88. 

86. 

87. 

8S. 

89. 

40. 

41. 

48. 

48. 

44. 

45. 

46. 

47. 

48. 

48. 

80. 

81. 

88. 

88. 

84. 

88. 

86. 

•7. 

66. 

89. 

80. 

61. 

•8. 

68. 

64. 

6S. 

66. 

67. 

68. 



Frisoxb, Ac. 



Adams coonty prUoD, 

Allegheny county prison, 

Allegheny county work-house, 

Armstrong county prison, 

Beaver county prison, 

Bedford county prison, 

Berks county prison, 

Blair county prison, 

Bradford county prison, 

Bucks county prison, 

Butler county prison, 

Cambria county prison, 

Cameron county prison, 

Carbon county prison, 

Centre county prison, 

Chester county prison, 

Clarion coonty prison, 

Clearfield county prison, «... 

Clinton county prison, 

Columbia county prison, 

Crawford county prison, 

Cumberland county prison, 

Dauphin county prison, 

Delaware county prison, 

Elk county prison, 

Erie county prison, 

Fayette county prison, 

Forest county prison, 

Franklin county prison, 

Fulton county prison, 

Greene county prison, 

Huntingdon county prison, 

Indiana connty prison, 

Jefferson county prison, 

Juniata county prison, 

Lancaster connty prison, 

Lawrence county prison, 

Lebanon connty prison, 

Lebtgh county priaon, 

Luserne county pnson, 

Lycoming county prison, 

McKean county prison, 

Mercer county prison, 

Mifflin connty prison, 

Monroe county prison, 

Montgomery county prison, 

Montour county prison , 

Nitrthampton county prison, 

Northumberland county prison, 

Perry county prison, 

Philadelphia county prison, 

Phlladelphiacounty house of correction, . . . 

Pike county prison, 

Potter connty prison, 

Schuylkill county prison, 

Snyder county prison, 

Somerset county prison, 

Sullivan county prison, 

Susquehanna county prison, 

Tioga connty prison, 

Union county prison, 

Venango county prison, 

Warren county prison, 

Washington county prison, 

Wayne county prison, 

Westmoreland county prison, 

Wyoming county prison, 

York county prison, , 



Total, 



Mainten- 
ance. 



♦1,146 
8,887 

18,846 
1,917 
1,976 
1,483 
6,647 
8,018 
8,006 
6,481 
2,186 
1,087 



1,800 
1,178 
1,286 
1,809 
1,784 



616 

4,194 

14,781 

6,988 

4,117 



8,164 
1,071 

ao 

6,188 



672 
1,000 

766 

866 
1,666 
9,889 
18,149 
6,048 
6,478 
8,874 
4,014 
8,09S 
1,678 
1,141 

804 
1,888 



4,089 

2,708 

1,101 

61,189 

59,908 

146 

90 

6,289 

i,in 

1,019 

74 

1,819 

t9S4 



8,886 

824 

1,808 



1,010 
894 

12,804 



|286,876 



11 
40 
91 
70 
80 
88 
06 



88 
98 

00 
80 
21 
70 
49 
00 
16 
79 
86 
16 
40 
89 
61 
16 
60 
85 
02 
60 
00 
89 
20 
IB 
88 
88 
76 
19 
64 
96 
04 
60 
50 
06 
62 
86 
04 
40 
60 
91 
08 
20 
86 
87 
14 
86 
00 
11 
61 
70 
40 
70 
84 
76 
16 
80 
80 



Salaries, 
wages, Ac. 



4,S 
11,046 



4,688 


47 






780 
800 
668 


00 
00 
80 


880 


00 


4,608 
100 


27 
00 

• • 



lfl7 

• • 

500 

1,060 
1,184 



100 
111 



720 



681 
160 



66 

168 
6,170 



668 

1,786 
6,887 



00 
20 
12 
00 
00 



40 

* • 

00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
76 



00 



00 
00 

20 
00 
00 



468 

219 
20 



4,788 
846 

8,816 

1,198 

807 

81,140 

48,486 



56 

8,808 



800 



90 
16 
00 



48 
96 
46 
50 
26 
00 
96 



00 
76 
50 



18 



fl68,8tt 



00 
89 



Fuel and 
ll^ht. 



06 



160 00 



60 
100 

45 




50 



09 



6,601 
ll,9tt 



80 


08 


688 


14 


89 


04 


844 


67 


86 


00 


110 


00 



#44,477 I ta 



* Includes clothing, repairs, 3tc, 

t Includes transportation. 

i Includes fteel, lights, wages, Ao. 



Lkq. Doc] Boakd of 

Jalla, Ac, ftr Iha yw tSt*, mat Hr whal | 



Public Coabitibs. 



C1.M„. 


Rqnlr,. 


TrmD.i»r- 


Othat 


ailHiiiH. 














¥i 


,«» 


« 


<o 


;„ 


It, 

1 
S 

i,<m 

1.0M 


M 

a 

17 

eo 

M 
17 

n 

» 

«i 

«7 






II 

l,tM 

ts 

"1 

til 

HO 
•.JM 

1,111 
III 

1171 
U.1U 

II 

17* 

i.;io 

ts 

iItij 

«,M 

uslni 

10, nt 


S 

17 

W 
« 
IB 
17 

a 

>i 

00 
M 

to 

« 
71 
M 

M 

M 
>7 

01 

« 

M 

70 

11 

17 

M 

01 

H 
B 

n 
n 

71 


, 


47 

"•S 

' ' ' ' W 


Oi 

« 

0! 

00 


8:S 


» 


» 


» 

m 

Ml 

s« 

n 


» 

V 

3» 

u 

08 

w 
n 

00 
M 
00 

in 

» 
a 

H 

n 


IN 

« 

no 
111 

' ' ' « 
M 


M 

00 

Oi 
00 
00 

■ 




u! 


s 

I 

« 

M 






J 


m 


t(,MI 


M 


ij 










^•Sf 
































» 


K 

4,ni 

«s 

no 

m 

w 
«t 


N 
H 

: 


















(,«! 


01 






IN 

IM 


M 
U 

« 


l,Mt:a 












" JJ 


i.ai 

17.101 

1 

M> 

■■s 
a 

■.OM 

■ts 

ID,OW 
ll)l« 

i 

ni 

1,177 

IS 

1.0N 

i.<n 

0,101 

1,461 
•U 

M.ai 


n 
» 

N 
71 
H 

■ 
10 
H 

n 

« 

70 

17 

u 

00 

M 

N 
M 

» 

u 

Bl 
01 

» 

K 

n 

M 

n 

01 






"] 










i,B7aiu 


to 

' 'l',«l 


00 


a 










lis 
w 

R 


00 

« 

Oi 
K 

oo 

a 






u 

M 

K 

s 

u 






















000 

Id 


00 

K 
M 




































1 

u 

Ml 
»1 


00 

n 

0* 

w 

w 

s 










' ' ' '« 

in 
ii,ia 


K 
















IB 

urn 


H 


n 


am 


W 


» 








■m 


M 

» 

« 

m 

n 

•> 

m 


m 


H 

00 




00 


' 'i.m 


n 


M 




S 


01 
















M 
00 






M 

in 


M 

n 
n 
«• 

n 
«o 

» 


H 


17 
00 


i,m 








m 


iviio 
iM,m 


00 




a 


« 


00 
10 


as 


n 

m 

10 

M 
M 


m 


*fl« 


u 


a 




UI 


«t 








iw 


w 

n 

M 

n 
« 

en 

M 


14, Off 


° 


11.M1 


n 




' ' im 


H 






















n 
no 

MO 
10* 


H 

00 

m 

M 
00 


" 


M 




























00 






1,101 •) 

MO ;7l 

l,4U N 






















IM 


M 
10 

n 








• 


nr 


to 






J 


l.«M 














71 




tn,w 


" 


l*7« 


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l»^7« 


M 


t«4.M 





20S 



BoABD OF Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



STATISTICS OF REFOEMATORIES. 



The reformatories comprise the House of Refhge, in Philadelphia, and 
Pennsylvania Reform School, at Morganza, Washinton county. 

ApptvprlattfMiB by State. 

The Legislature at its last session appropriated $42,500 to the House of 
Refligefor 1879, and $42,500 for 1880. The Reform School had appro- 
priated $135,734 96 for 1879 and 1880. 

BxpeBAtarea. 

The disbursements for the year are reported to be as follows : 



For what Purposes. 



Salaries and supplies, . . . . 
Temporary loans, maintenance, 

Interest, 

Improvements, interest, etc., . . 



■ « V • 



l\>tal expenditures. 



House of 
Refuge. 



$104,884 

19,000 

115 



9124,000 



85 
00 
29 



14 



Reform 
School. 



$49,030 


24 






102,010 


42 



$151,040 



66 



Total. 



$153,915 

19,000 

115 

102,010 



$275,040 



09 
00 
29 
42 

80 



Coat of M*lnt0BABe0. 

The cost of maintaining inmatei in the r^omuUoriee^ bated upon amouni esepended for talariee 

and euppliee, ie stated thus: 



RS FOR M ATORIE8. 


Salaries and 
supplies. 


Annual cost, 
per capita. 


Labor per 
capita. 


Net coat per 
capita. 


House of Refuge, .... 
Reform School, 


$104,884 
49,C80 


85 
24 

09 


$186 
157 


14 

84 

88 


$22 


95 


$168 
157 


19 
84 






81 




a\>tai, 


$158,915 


$176 


$14 


$161 


52 



LlaMlltlM. 

The indebtedness of these institutions in the returns reeeived is presented in the following state- 
ment. 



Indbbtednbss. 



Loan on new bailding for girls, 

Interest on same, June 15 to October 1, 1879, 

Temporary loans for maintenance, 

Mortgage debt due July 1, 1880, 

fionded debt, 

Accounts payable, 

Bills pa3rable, (time warrants,) 



Total indebtedness, 



House of 
RefUge. 



$20,000 

850 

27,000 



$47,850 



00 
00 
00 



00 



Reform 
School. 



$80,000 

120,000 

4,110 

92,400 



$276,510 



00 
00 
03 
00 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Ghabitis& 



803 



The managers of the House of Refuge pay six per cent, per annum on 
their loan of $20,000 for new building for white girls. The managers of 
the Reform School pay six per cent, per annum on $60,000, and six per 
cent, (gold) per annum on $45,000, and eight per cent, per annum on 
$75,000. 

Jovealle Dellnqaento. 

The number of juvenile delinquents r^ident in the reformatories on 
September 30, 18t9, was 869, being an increase of 5, or 0.58 per cent, on 
the number at corresponding date of previous year. 

The number in each institution, with their sex, was as follows: 



• 


Reformatories. 


A e^Lt 






JUVKNILB DsiilNQUBNTS. 


HOUSEOF RBFUOB. 


REFORM SCHOOL. 


AQiiMJBiKtJk.Liam 




• 


5 


1 


1 


• 




1 


1 

687 
700 


i 


• 

1 


aeptemberSO, | JfJI; ; ; 


485 
480 


182 
127 


667 
657 


252 
270 


45 
42 


2ff7 
812 


177 
169 


864 
869 


Decrease, 

Per oent. of decrease, . . . 


5 
1.16 


5 
3.79 


10 
1.76 


♦18 
•7.14 


8 
6.66 


♦15 
*5.05 


♦18 
♦1.89 


8 
4.62 


♦5 
♦0.58 



'Increase. 

The decrease in the House of Refuge was 10, or 1.76 per cent. ; on the 
contrary, in the Reform School there was an increase of 15, or 5.05 
per cent. The boys in the Refuge decreased 5, or 1.15 per (^ent., and the 
girls 5, or 3.79 per cent. In the Reform School the boys increased 18, or 
7.14 per cent., and the girls decreased 3, or 6.66 per cent. 

If the white and colored delinquents are separately examined^ the de- 
crease will he found to exist among the white children. 





Sex and Color of Delinquents. 


A t^t 






Juvenile Delinquents. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


AAh * H jfiUAxis. 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Septembers©. J }^^' ' ' 


541 
623 


126 
111 


667 
684 


146 
177 


51 
58 


197 
285 


687 
700 


177 
169 


864 

m9 


Decrease, 


18 
8.82 


15 
11.90 


88 

4.95 

1 


♦81 
♦21.28 

1 


♦7 
♦18.78 


♦88 
♦19.29 


♦18 
♦1.89 


8 
4.52 


♦5 


Per cent, of decrease, . . . 


♦0.68 



* Increase, 

We here learn that the white delinquents decreased 33, or 4.95 per cent.' 
while the colored increased 38, or 19.29. 



204 



Board of Public Chabitie& 



fNo. 5 



Averafe Naoiber. 

The average number resident in the reformatories, for the year ending 
September 30, 1879, was 874; an increase of 70, or 8.7 per cent., on the 
number of preceding year. Of the average number, 636 were white, 161 

» 

colored boys ; 121 white, 56 colored girls. 





WHITE 


• 


OOIiOBBD. 


AOOBEOATB. 


Refobhatobies. 


rf 

s 


Girls. 


. 


1 


1 


• 

3 


1 


• 

s 


• 

1 


House of Refuge, 

Reform School 


298 
248 


90 
81 


883 

274 


185 
26 


46 
10 


181* 
86 


428 
269 


186 
41 


564 
810 


Total, 


586 


121 


657 


161 


56 


217 


697 


177 


874 







The average number in the House of Refuge was 564, an increase of 30, 
or 5.6 per cent. ; in Reform School, 310, or an increase of 40, or 14.8 per 
cent., on number of previous year. 

MoYemeat of Popalatloa. 

Statement exhibiting number of juvenile delinquents resident in the re- 
formatories at beginning of year, number of each sex committed^ re- 
committed, and discharged during the year ; also, number remaining at 
end of year, September 30^ 1879. 



Movement op Population. 


white. 


OOLOBBD. 


Total. 
















Boys.. 


Girln. 


Boys. 


Gh-ls. 




rk«*«K«- 1 ttrra ^ lu House of RefUge, . 


813 
228 




91 
85 




128 
24 




40 
10 




6ff7 
297 




Total at beginnh 


ag of year, 

To Refuge, 

Recommitted, .... 


174 
40 


541 


45 
11 


126 


50 
5 


147 


21 
8 


50 




864 


Ck)mmitted dur- 


lV)tai, ..;.... 


2L4 




66 




55 




24 




849 




ing the year, 1 


To Reform Sohool, . . 
Recommitted, .... 


106 
6 




20 
2 




15 

• 




5 

1 




i 






. Total, 


111 




22 




15 




6 




154 




Total admitted during year, 




825 




78 




70 




80 




503 


Population, or yv 
Disoharged, . . 


hole number, 

From Refuge, .... 
From Reform School, 


241 
102 


866 


68 
25 


204 


84 
6 


217 


14 

8 


80 




1,867 




^ Total disoharged, . 




848 




98 




40 




22 




498 


Number remaining September 30, 1879, 




523 




111 




177 




58 




869 


Remaining, . . < 


' In Refage, 

In Reform School, . . 


286 
287 




77 
84 




144 
83 




50 
8 










I Total 




528 




111 




177 




58 




869 



liBO. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Gharitixs. 



205 



Of the 864 resident at beginning of year, 667, or 77.20 per cent., were 
white, and 197, or 22.80 per cent., colored children; to these were added 
503, of which 408, or 80.12 per cent., were white ; 100, or 19.88 per cent., 
colored. Of the number (503) admitted, 67, or 13.3 per cent., were re-ad- 
missions; or 14.4 per cent., of white, and 9.0 per cent., colored children 
admitted. 

The population of the year was 1,367, of which number, 1,070, or 78.27 
per cent., were white; 297, or 21.73 per cent., colored delinquents. 

The number resident in the reformatories on September 30, 1879, was 
869, viz : 634, or 72.96 per cent., white, and 235, or 27.04 per cent., colored. 

Javealle Deltaiqaeiita Ainttted. 

The number of juvenile delinquente of each Bex and color ^ admitted dur- 
ing the year to the respective reformatories^ was as follows : 





HousB OF Refuob. 


Reform School. 




Admissiohb. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


. 




1 


1 


1 


u 

5 


1 


3 


1 


1 


< 


Ck>nimitted, 

Returned by master, . . . 
Retnmed Yolmitarily, . . 
Returned, having eeoaped, 
Arrested and returned. 


174 

8 

8 

8 

26 


45 
6 
2 


50 
8 

• . • 


21 
2 
1 


106 
1 
2 


20 
1 

1 


15 


5 


486 
21 




1 


10 
8 


8 






2 








31 


Returned, left master. . . 


2 










2 




















Total admitted, . . . 


214 


56 


55 


24 


111 


22 


15 


6 


503 



Of the 503 admitted, 436, or 86.68 per cent., were committed for the first 
time ; and 67, or 13.32 per cent., were re-admissions. If the institutions 
be considered separately, we find of the '349 admitted to the Refuge, 59, or 
16.90 per cent., were re-admissions, the white in proportion to the colored, 
as 12 to 2. Of the 154 admitted to the Reform School, 8, or 5.20 per cent., 
were re-admissions, the white in proportion to the colored delinquents, as 
7 to 1. 



206 



Board of Public Chakities. 



[No. 5, 



The period of absence^ from the instUutione^ of the 67 children who were 

re-admitted^ is presented thus : 





House oi 


■ Refuoe. 


Refobm School. 




Period of Abbencb. 


WHITE. 


OOLOBKD. 


WHITE. 


OOI^OBED. 


s 


■ 


1 


i 


1 




1 


1 


1 


3 
o 


< 


Lem than 8 months, . . . 

8 to 6 months, 

6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 3 vears. 


16 
7 
7 
8 


7 

. 2 

1 

1 


2 
1 


1 

1 










26 


• • • 

2 
2 

1 


1 

1 






12 




1 


12 


2 


• • • 


IS 








1 


3 to 4 years, 


2 






1 








8 
















Total re-admitted, . . 


40 


11 


6 


8 


5 


2 


• • • 


1 


67 



Nearly one half, or 26 of the re-admitted, were absent less than 3 months; 
12, from 3 to 6 months ; 12, from 6 to 12 months ; 13, from 1 to 2 years ; 
1, from 2 to 3 3'ears ; and 3, from 8 to 4 years. 



AgM. 



The ages of the 4,S6 children committed^ are classified as follows: 





House of Refuge. 


Reform Sohool. 




Ages. 


WHITE. 


colored. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 






1 


• 
OD 

3 
o 


1 


•IH 


1 


1 


<£ 

1 


t 

WW* 

O 


1 

1 

< 


Under 7 years, 






1 

16 

11 

18 

9 

• • • 










1 


7 and under 9 years, . . . 
9 and under 11 years, . . . 
11 and under 18 years, . . 
18 and under 15 years, . . 
15 and under 20 years, . . 
20 years and upwards, . . 


5 
25 
44 

47 
58 

■ ■ 


■ • ■ 

8 
20 
17 

• • • 


• • • 

9 
4 
6 
2 

■ ■ • 


9 

8 
16 
88 

40 

. « 


• • • 

1 

8 

5 

11 

• • • 


2 

5 
5 
8 

• • • 

• « • 


■ • • 

■ • • 

1 

1 
3 


16 

64 

92 

128 

185 

• • • 


Total committed, . . . 


174 


45 


50 


21 


106 


20 


1 15 


5 


436 


Averase ase, 

Age or oldest, 

Age of youngest, 


18.2 

17.8 

7.0 


14.8 
18.0 
11.0 


12.0 

17.0 

7.0 


12.0 

15.0 

9.0 


18.8 

19.0 

7.0 


14.6 
18.0 
10.0 


11.0 

14.0 

8.0 


14.2 
16.0 
11.0 


13.1 

16.8 

8.7 



Of the children committed there were 1 under 7 years of age ; 1 6 be- 
tween 7 and 9 years of age; 64 between 9 and 11 years; 92 between 11 
and 13 years; 128 between 13 and 15 years; and 135 between 15 and 20 
years of age. 



Leq. Dcm3.] 



Board of Public Charitie& 



SOT 



The general average age was 18.1 years ; average age of the oldest chil- 
dren received, 16.8 years ; the youngest, 8.7 years. 

Nativity. 

The birth place of the juvenile delinquentB commuted^ is presented in the 

next atatement. 





House of Refuge. 


Rbfobm SOHdOL. 




Whebe Bobn. 


WHITE. 


GOLOBEB. 


WHITE. 


OOLOBBD. 


• 


■ 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 




1 


• 

1 


< 


Pennsylvania, 

New York, 

New Jersey, 

Maryland, 

OoiOa * .>«... 


187 

10 

7 

3 

• • • 


80 
2 

2 
8 

1 
1 


86 
2 
2 

4 


10 

■ • ■ 


84 
2 


12 


12 


2 


828 
16 
11 


2 






1 


1 


14 


4 




5 


Rhoae Island 












1 


Connecticut 


1 
1 

1 

. . • 














1 


Delaware, 


■ • • 
• • 

1 


1 
8 


8 

1 






. 




5 


Virginia, 

District of Columbia, . . 
Alabama, 






1 




6 






1 


1 












1 








1 


1 








2 


Tenneeee, 










1 




1 


Illinois, 


1 












1 




















Americans, 


161 


40 


49 


17 


91 


12 


15 


3 


888 


Canada, 




1 

1 




■ • • 


1 
2 
4 

1 








2 


Bnirland 


2 
6 
8 








5 


©•■"•■■k-, 

(*^rT»mnv 






1 

• ■ 

1 






11 


Scotland. 












4 


Wales, 








1 


Italy, 


1 
1 


• 












1 


Ireland, ......... 


1 












■ • ■ 


2 


West Indies, 


1 

• • • 










• 


1 


Unknown, 




2 


4 


7 


6 




2 


21 








Foreigners, 


13 


5 


1 


4 


16 


8 


• 


2 


48 



208 



Board of Public Charitie& 



[No. 6, 



Of the 436 children committed, 388 were Americans, 27 of foreign birth, 
and 21 whose birth-place was unknown. 

PareaUl WLelmdam. 

Statement exhibiting the parental relatione of the children commiUed :■ 



■ 


House oi 


1* Refuge. 


Reform School. 

1 


1 


PABENTAii Relations. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


1 

1 


r 


1 


i 

§ 




1 

O 

8 
4 

• » • 

9 


1 


S 


1 


OB 

S 


Parents living, 

Parents dead, 

Father living, 

Mother living, 


66 
28 
45 
45 


9 

8 

17 

11 


17 

18 

6 

14 


44 

1 11 
82 
19 


8 
4 
6 
2 


5 
8 
5 
2 


2 

• * ■ 

3 

• • • 


149 

71 

114 

102 


Total oommltted, .... 


174 


45 


50 


21 


106 


20 


15 


5 


486 



More than one third, 149, had both parents living; 71 had lost both 
parents ; 114 had only father living ; and 102 had mother only living. 



PAreBtAffe. 

Uie nationality of the fathers of the children committed is exhibited in 

the following statement : 





House of Refuge. 


Reform School. 




Nationality. 

• 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


1 

< 




1 


1 

o 


05 








1 


• 

m 

•FN 

o 


American, 

English, 

Oerman. ......... 


49 
12 
38 
68 
6 
1 


8 
4 
6 
21 
2 
4 


50 


21 


47 

2 

28 

28 

1 


6 
2 
7 
4 
1 


15 


5 


201 
20 










79 


Irish. 










121 


Other foreigners, .... 
Unknown 










10 










5 


















Total, 


174 


45 


50 


21 


106 


20 


15 


5 


436 







Nearly one half, 201, were of American parentage; 121, Irish; 79, Ger- 
man ; 20, English ; 10, from othep foreign countries ; and 5, whose parent- 
age was unknown. 



Lbq. Doa] 



Board of Public Charities. 



209 



The education of the delinquents token commiUed^ is presented in the next 

statement^ thus: 



Eduoation. 



Illiterate 

Spell only, 

Read imperfectly, 

Read well, 

Read and write imperfectly, 
Read and write well, . . . 
Read, write, and cipher, . . 

Total committed, . . . 



House of 


Reform 


A n 


^ vkis^t. A 


Refuqe. 


School. 


JLQ 


uBBOA 


• 




S 


i 


s 


1 


•^ 
JS 


o 

»5 


2 


o 

•5J 


M4 
A 


5 


^ 


6 


^ 


5 


62 


a 


34 


82 


18 


3 


85 


47 


12 


6 


3 


53 


IS 


47 


8 


85 


7 


82 


IS 


2 


• ■ 


• • • 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


88 


7 


26 


3 


64 


10 


6 


• • « 


4 


• ■ • 


10 


• • • 


45 


12 


37 


4 


82 


16 


219 


71 


126 


20 


345 


91 



I 



87 
68 
97 
2 
74 
10 
98 



436 



Of the 436 children committed, 87 were illiterate, 68 could spell only, 97 
read poorly, 2 read well, 74 could read and write imperfectly, 10 could read 
and write well, and 98 could read, write, and cipher. 

Of the 290 committed to the Refuge, 125, or 43.10 per cent., nearly one 
half, were illiterate. 

Of the 146 committed to the Reform School, 30, or 20.55 per cent., were 
without education. 



14— B. P. Char. 



Board of Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 

Exhibiting the average age and education of the delinqunnte a» committed 
to the House of Be/uge/rom the several counties : 





"" 


»D AVEBAOB AGE, 


EO 




ION 


ON 


ADH 


IBBI 


ON. 






Boyt 


OlrlB. 


1 
I 

1 

1 
1 

' i 


§ 

1 


1 


1 
1 

2 


1 

K 
s 

1 

2 
2 

'l 
1 

'a 
1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 




Counties. 


1 
•A 


i 


1 

1 
r, 


i 




Adams, 

Berks, 


2 
8 

4 
I 
1 








8 


1 

1 

1 
1 

42 


■ ■ 


2 
1 

; 

32 

i 




















1 
1 

2 


















Daupblii, 

tAokawanna, 

L^Sb^' 


a 

1 

8 
2 
8 
1 
3 
2 
139 




l\ 










2 




Lycmlng. 

NorthHinpton, . . . 


















25 


I 
41 


27 j' 6 




Philadeluhla 




36 
2 




173 




1 

1 






Wyoming, 




Total of white, . . 


174 

1 
2 
2 

44 


13 3 

9.0 

15.0 

le.o 

17.0 

11.0 


45 


14.8 


1 

2 

1 


47 


47 


2 


38l 6 


45 


210 






' 1 


8 


'l 

1 
6 




: : 

12 




















S,':--\: 


1 
20 


11.0 




12.0 


28 
32 


11 


64 


of oolored, . 


SO 
224 


12.0 
12.0 


21 
66 


12.0 


13 


8 
65 


2 


7 
45 


e 


12 
67 


71 


d colored com- 


12.0 


66 


69 


2S0 



Lbo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Chabities. 



211 



Comty fl«atepii«Ht. 

Exhibiting the average age and education of the delinquents as committed 

to the Reform School from the several counties : 





BBPORM SOHOOIi. 




BEX AND AYERAGB AGE. 


EDUCATION ON ADMISSION. 






Boys. 


Girls. 


■ 
• 

15 

■ • 

1 


• 

§ 

9 

3 

• 

2 

1 


• 

1 

9 

E 

i 

22 

1 

• 
■ 

1 
4 

■ ■ 

2 
1 
3 
1 

• • 

• ■ 

35 

6 

1 
1 

7 
42 


. 
^^ 

1 

• 

• • 
1 ■ 

• 


• 

>> 

u 

s. 

s 

9 

g 

14 

.2 

1 
1 

• ■ 

4 
1 

• 
• 

1 

1 

1 

26 
8 

• • 

• • 

8 
29 


■ 

1 

9 

I 

4 
4 

• • 

• • 

• « 

4 


U 
9 

ja 

•s 
a 

1 

26 

■ • 

1 

• • 

• • 

4 
2 
1 

• • 

2 

• ■ 

1 

• • 

37 

4 

• 

■ • 

•4 
41 




Counties. 


• 

9 

a 


1 

9 

9 

> 

< 


• 

u 

9 

Xi 

a 


i 

9 

e 

9 

14.7 
13.0 

• • 


■ 

a 

i 

i 


Allegheny, 

Armstrong, 

Beuver, 

Butler, 

Clarion, . 


78 
3 
4 
2 
1 
7 
8 
8 
1 
4 
1 
2 
2 


18.2 
15.0 
10.8 
12.5 
16.0 
13.8 
14.3 
137 
12.0 
15.0 
14.0 
13.3 
12.0 


11 

• • • 

1 


84 
8 
5 
2 


Crawford, 

Erie, 

Favette, 


6 


15.4 

• • • 


1 

• • 




18 


Je^erson, 










T*»wrenoe, 

McKean, 

Venango, 

Washington, 


2 


13.5 

a • 

• • • 


• • 

• • 

1 

18 

2 
1 

• • 

3 
21 


6 
2 

• 

1 
3 

9 


2 








Total of white, . . 


106 


13.3 


20 


14.6 


126 


Allegheny, 

CrawtbrdI 


11 
2 
2 


11.6 

9.0 

10.0 


6 


14.2 


16 
2 


Washington, 


• • • 


• ■ 


2 


Total of colored, . 


15 


11.0 


5 


14.2 


20 


White and colored com- 
mitted, 


121 


12.2 


25 


14.8 


126 



212 



BoAKD OF Public CHARiriEa 



[No. 6, 



How C«ainiltte4. 

The 436 children were committed to the ReformcUories by the following 

authorities : 





House of Refuge. 


Reform School. 




Committed. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


Aggregate. 




1 


i 
—•* 
o 

10 
85 


1 


Girls. 


1 


1 


o8 


Girls. 


Byoourts, 

By magistrates, 


71 
103 


11 
89 


1 
20 


20 
88 








1 

' 113 


20 


15 


5 


823 


Total oominitted, .... 


174 


45 


50 


21 


106 


20 


15 


5 


436 



Of the children committed to the House of Refuge, 93, or 82.07 per 
cent., were by courts ; 197, or 67.93 per cent., by magistrates. To Reform 
School, 20, or 13.70 per cent., by courts; and 126, or 86.30 per cent., by 
magistrates. 

OlTei 



The offenses for 


which committed 


are as follows: 








House of 


> Refuge. 


Reform Schooi*. 




Offenses. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


WHITE. 


colored. 


i 

-< 




1 


o 


1 


S 


1 


1 


1 


1 

s 


Inoorrigibility, 

Larceny 


77 
68 
82 
4 
2 
1 
6 


26 
4 

7 


20 

9 

21 


18 

• • 

8 


46 
17 


12 


11 


8 


213 
88 


Vagrancy, 

Fehmious entry, 

Assault and battery, . . . 

Burglary, 

Connnitred for a home. . . 








68 


16 


4 


1 




25 








2 
















1 
















5 


Prostitution 


8 














8 


jjaroeny and reoeiving stol- 
en (roods. 








1 
1 

1 

1 

23 








1 


Malicious mischief. .... 










1 


Forirerv, 
















1 


Manslausrhter 
















1 


Vicious conduct 










4 


8 


2 


82 














Total committed, .... 


174 


45 


60 


21 


106 


20 


15 


5 


486 



Of the 436 committed, it will be observed that nearly one half, or 218' 
were for incorrigibility ; 84 for larceny ; 63 for vagrancy ; 32 for vicious 
conduct ; 25 for felonious entry. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



218 



Juveatle D<illMf aeBt Popnlacloa. 

SUOement e^hibUing the population of eaek sex and color, in the respective reform^ 

atories: 





Population op Juvenile Dblinqubnts in 

Repormatobies. 




Refobmatobibs. 


WHITE. 


COLO BED. 


o 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 

1 


< 


House of Reruge, 

Reform Sohoul, 


627 
889 


147 
67 


674 
896 


178 
89 


64 
16 


242 
55 


916 
451 


Total, 


866 


201 1.U70 


217 


80 1 207 1 


1,367 






»-- - 




i 



From the above it will be seen, that of the po{)ulation 1,367, nearly two 
thirds, 916, were in the House of Refuge, and 45 i in Reform School. 

Health. 

Statement exhibiting the character and number of diseaseSf dtc, treated during the 

year : • 





House of Housb. 


1 
Rkforh School. i 




DIBXASXS, ±0. 


WHITX. 


COLOItJBD. 


WUITE. 


COLORED. , 

1 


i 

1£ 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. Girls.' 

1 




Practnreft. •• 


6 
U 

u 

10 

% 

4 
3 
» 
11 
6 
2 
S 
6 

4 
6 


















ODhiliilinla. 




s 

4 


1 












C!iitn.ne(»iifl ttffisctloD. ..■..•«.. 


12 










Influenxa. 










OruhilU 


















ErvMlitfliM. 


















Cystltlft 

Clilllii and fever. 


































DlM!H«t*ii iif c ir. .......•■.■. 


















Trnholtl fever. 


















I>l^ea4i*4l briila. - • . 








2 






, 




Epilepsy, 

Bconchitlsand pneomonla, 

TtfimllitU 
































1 












Uernli, 












Philitfllii Dalmoiialls 




4 


1 

1 


'• • 










Ab^ceflHi, 












Oonciiaiiloii. 
















Conire^tluD of liver 


















Tilarrli(B:i. 








8 




2 






Gastrltld 








Hvctroct'lc. 


















Fever. Intermtttcnt 


















Otftrrhost. .. • 


















Pilar VII iritis. ..• 






1 
ft 
1 












Bcroflula. «•... 






4 


• ■ • 








TTlcertf. 














IVouiids. •••.. 
















Heurt UUense 


















Fever. tviiliuUI. 








22 


6 




1 




Tvniiol'l itiieaiiionla. 










5 

4 






Acute rliriiiniitltfin. . . . • 


















Brliclit^s dUense. 










1 
1 










BvDhklltlcciius.. 










S 
6 

1 








Goiit»rrli<Ba. • 
















Oulnsv. 










4 








^H>U«J^ -*************** 
















Total csasea. 


IfiB 


■ ■ • • 


47 


11 


62 


U 


2 


1 


2M 







Board of Public Chakities. 



[No. 5, 



The/ollominffttatemetiltiiiU exhibit the percentage 6/ tiekntt* in thepopulalio 
average mtmber of each r^ftrmatory separately, thut : 





1 


< a 


CABBB op SlCKMEBB. 


Bbporuatokies. 


Number. 


Per cent, on 


KT'ge No. 


House of Reflige, . . . 
Reform School 


916 
461 


664 
310 


213 
81 


2S.2S 
17.96 


S7.77 

26.1S 


Total, Ac. 


1,867 


874 


294 


2I.G1 


3.1.61 



Of the 1,367 delinquents in the reformatories, 14, or 1.03 per cent, died. 
On average number, the ratio of mortality was 1.6i) per cent 

The number o/deatht, leith their proportion to population, and average number i« 
each inatitution is presented ae followe : 



IUformatorib*. 


Population. 


Averafte 
number. 


Number Per oent. on Per cent. on 


Hoiuw of Reftige, . . . 
RBlbrm Suhool, .' . . . 


916 
451 


664 
SIO 


10 1.09 

4 1 .89 


1.77 
1.30 


Total.Ao., 


1,867 


874 


14 1 1.03 1 1.60 



The 14 deceased were 6 white boys, I nhite girl, 2 colored boys, and I 
colored girl in the Refuge ; and 1 white boy, 2 white girls, 1 colored l>oy 
in the Reform School. 

Caiuca ar Dcatli. 
z and color of deceased delinquents, is presented 
as /oUov>s : 



le of fatal result, with the a 





1 


. HOITSB O 


Kevvqb. 


Rkfobm School. 




CAUHB Of 

Fatal Result. 


WHITE. 


co„.». 


WHITE. 


COL. 


Time In 
Institution^ 




1 


i 




i 


4 

5 


1 




•I 














1 


2 




2yeara. 

4 y'rs, 6 mofc 

2 y'n, 10 moa 


i pulmonalis. 




3 


1 








*. 


























4 y'rs, « moa. 


S'sasi 
























' 






















IB 


6 




' 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 y'r^ 2 moa. 



Lbq. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



215 



Traics or OrcapaHoBi. 

The employment of the Juvenile definquents during their residence in the reformato- 
ries was as follows: 





UOUSB OF Rbfugr. 


Reform SoHooii. 




Industries. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


WHITE. 


COIiORED. 


a 




i8 

1 


3 


1 


• 


5 
9 




oS 

1 


• 
CO 

e 


1 

< 


Bakinir, 


6 














1 

11 


Blaoksinithlnff, 










1 




10 


Broom and brash-making, 
Caninj^ oliHirs, 


194 
65 








194 
















'65 


Doinestio work 


87 

' Vo 


15 

8 

26 

28 

• • . 
4 


28 

• • • 

• • • 


49 
45 
88 


18 


6 
' 6 


5 


158 


Oardening and farminf^, . 
Knitting, (hosiery shop,) 
Match-hox making, . . . 


4 

187 


52 

827 

28 


Se'winjf, 




80 

' io 


86 


• ■ • 

12 
21 


24 




5 


95 


Shoe-making 

Tailoring, 


8 
16 


19 








47 


Toy watvh-niaking, . . . 


66 
8 
7 










66 


Stockinir flnlshinflr, .... 
















8 


Painting 






• • • 










7 


Florist work, 








4 

2 

19 

185 








4 


Messengers, .... 
















2 


Miscellaneous, hospital. eto. 
















19 


Improvement of grounds, 
etc, . . 










20 


26 

• • • 


• • • 

6 


161 


Laundrv work, 










26 


Unem ployed, attending 
school, 


62 


« • • 


26 






88 
















Total population, . . 


527 


147 


178 


64 


389 


57 


89 


16 


1,867 



Vslne or Labor. 

The following statement will exhibit the receipts from labor of inmates in each sepa^ 

rate reformatory : 



Years. 



1874, 
1675, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 



Total, 



Receipts' from Laror of Inmates 



1 

House of Refuge. 


188,103 


1 
77 


29,474 


87 


12,291 


52 


5,274 


07 


10,001 


97 


12,948 


64 ! 

84 


1103,091 



Reform SohooL 



$4,060 

2,130 

500 



00 
50 
00 



16,690 50 



Total. 



137,165 
81,605 
12,791 
5,274 
10,001 
12,948 



1109,782 



77 
87 
52 
01 

«f 
64 

84 



In the Reform School at Morganza no provision has as yet been made 
for special manufacturing ; the only articles made during the year were the 
wearing apparel for inmates. The larger part of the boys were employed 
during the summer at farm work, and grading grounds around the several 
buildings. 



816 



Board of Public Chariti£& 



[No. 5, 



Javealle Deltaqaents DlMkarg e4. 

Of the population in these refornuUories^ 1^67 ^ there were^ during the 

year J 498 difscharged, as follows : 





House of 


Refuge. 


Reform School. 




How Discharged. 


WHITE. 


COT.ORED. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


. 

1 

< 




»7 

8 
176 


• 

C5 


1 


u 


1 


MM 


1 


OB 

3 


Indentured, 


22 

1 
40 


12 

1 
18 


9 

• • • 

3 








80 


Returned to oourt or mag- 
istrate, .... 


1 








11 


Returned to friends, . . . 








232 


On age, . 


3 
1 
3 

16 
64 

1 
13 








8 


By examining Judges, . . 
As unfit subjeots, 


9 


2 


1 
1 


1 

• • • 


1 

8 




2 


17 
7 


On parule. 








1 
5 

V ■ ■ 

• • • 


17 


Definitely 

Died, 


8 

6 


• t • 

1 


4 
2 


1 


19 
2 

• • • 


4 

I 
1 


99 
14 


Escaped, 


14 


Removed to liospital, . . . 


2 


2 






4 
















Total disoliarged, .... 


241 


68 


34 


14 


102 


25 


6 


8 


498 



lodeatnred. 

The following statement will exhibit the pursuits or occupations of the 
persons to whom the 80 children^ i. e., 37 white^ 12 colored hoys ; 2% 
white^ 9 colored girls, were indentured : 



Occupations. 



Baker, 

Blacksmith, . . . 
Book-keeper, . . 
Carpenter, . . . 
Carriage builders. 
City homes, . . . 
Druggists, .... 
Farmers, .... 
Oas engineer, . . 

Grocers, 

Housewifery, . . 
Manufacturers, . 
Paper-hanger, . . 

Pickler, 

Tailor, 

Tinsmith, .... 
Shipping agent, . 

Waiters, 

WeaveiB, .... 

Total, 



House of Refuge. 



WHITE. 



COLORED. 



BO 



1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

21 



2 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 



87 



u 

3 



2 
2 
1 

14 
1 
1 



• • • 



22 



I 



OB 

I" 



1 
1 
1 
1 

4 
2 
2 
35 
1 
2 



2 II 

1 'l 
111 

'2 
59" 



6 



6 



12 



oS 

O 



• • • 



9 



9 



•^ 
g 



6 



9 



6 



21 



I 



1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 

41 
1 
2 
9 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
2 

80 



LiSQ. Doc] 



Board of Public GnARiTisa 



ait 



There were 367 discharged from the House of Refuge, of which number 
80, or 22.41 per cent., were indentured. The per cent., or number of each 
sex discharged indentured, is shown as follows : 



Shx and Colob. 



White boy«, , 

White girls, 

Total white, . . . . , 

Colored boys, , 

Colored girls, 

Total colored, . . . . 
Total white and colored, 



House of Repuqe. 



Number 
discharged. 



241 
68 



309 



34 
14 



48 



357 



Per cent, of 

discharged 

indentured. 



15 35 
3-i.85 



25.90 



35.80 
64.29 



48.75 



22.41 



School StaCliiCic*, 



Statement exhibiting the number of e^ch sex and color in attendance at 
beginning of year, number added to the roll during the year, school 
population ; also, number discharged from, and remaining in attend- 
ance, or on school roll, at the end of year : 





House op Refuge. 


Reform Sohool. 




Movement op 
Population. 


WHITE. 


colored. 


WHITE. 


colored. 


, 


1 


1 

CD 


1 


i 




C3 


1 




1 


Namber on October 1, 1878, 
Admitted duriDg year, . . 


313 
214 


91 
56 


123 
55 


40 
24 


228 
111 


35 
22 


24 
15 


10 
6 


864 
503 


School population 

Discharged from school, . 


527 
241 


147 
70 


178 
31 


64 

14 


339 
102 


57 
28 


39 
6 


16 
8 


1,367 
498 


Number on school roll 
September 80, 1879, . 


286 


77 


144 


50 


287 


34 


33 


8 


869 



218 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



B4iMfttlOB iMi BeeepCiMi And Dfaieh«rje. 

The following statement toill exhibit the education on reception and dis- 
charge of S69 children^ who were discharged from the House of Refuge 
during th^ year : 





TOTAL 


• 


UOUSB OF BBFirOB. 


1 








XDDCATIOV ON DISCHAROm. 


[\xrAL. 


Education on 

RBCKPTlOlf. 


Illiterate. 


Readonly. 


Read and 

write. 


1 Superior 
education. 




• 




i 
1 


• 

1 


i 


1 

o 

■5 


• 

2 


Colored. 


i 


• 

1 

o 

6 


• 

S 

1 


1 

6 




• 

•a 
o 

5 


• 

o 
H 


* 

*niltprete 

Bead only, .... 
Reiid and write. . . 


87 

87 

186 

2 


19 
14 

8 
7 


10.' 

101 < 

la 

9 

889, 

1 


17 


4 


■ • • 

12 


2 

• • ■ 


70 

75 

185 

• ■ 


4 

10 

2 


• • • 

■ ■ 

• • ■ 

2 


9 
4 
6 
7 


87 

87 

185 

2 


19 
14 

8 
7 


108 
101 






141 


Superior educHtlon, 


• 


• • • 


• « • 


. . . 1 


9 


Total discharged. 


Sll 


48 


17 

1 


4 


12 


1 
1 


! 280 

1 


16 


2 28 


811 


48 


880 



We here learn that of the 359 discharged from the House of Refuge, 106 
were illiterate on reception, 21 on discharge ; lOL on admission read only, 
and on discharge 14 ; 143 when admitted could read and write, and on dis- 
charge 29d ; 9 had a superior education when admitted, and on discharge 
there were 23 who had an education superior to reading and writing. 



Th£ following statemsnt will exhibit the education on reception and dis- 
charge of 139 children^ who were discharged from the Reform School 
during the year : 





TOTAL 


• 


Reform School. 


TOTAL 






KDUCATIOH ON DIBCHABGR. 


• 


Eddcattok on 

RSCKFTION. 


Illiterate. 


R«&ii nniv B^^^ and 
Readonly. ^,,^^ 


So perl or 
education. 








■ 

1 

5 


■ 

a 


• 

2 


i 

o 

a 


• 

2 


Colored. 


• 

2 
2 


1 

e 


■ 

2 
2 


• 

1 

e 

5 


• 

2 

2 


• 

1 

e 

s 


i 


nilterate 


17 
89 
57 
18 


8 
5 
6 

• 


20 
44 

62 
IS 


10 


1 




1 


7 
27 
62 

• 


2 
2 

6 

• 






17 
89 
67 
IS 


S 
5 
6 

■ • ■ 


9D 


Read only 

Read and write. . . 


12 


8 






44 






5 
18 


• • • 


AS 


Superior education, 


• • • 


. . . 

1 


• • m 


■ ■ • 


IS 


Total discharged. 


las 


18 

1 


189 


10 


12 8 


88 


9 


18 


• • • 


126 


IS 


ISO 



Lia. Doc.] 



Board of Pubuc Chabitibs. 



219 



Of the 189 discharged from the Refoim School, 20 were illiterate on re- 
ception, and 11 on discharge ; 44 could read only on reception, and 15 on 
discharge ; 62 could read and write when admitted, and 57 on discharge ; 
13, on i:eception, had a superior education, and 18 on discharge. 



Coaallea. 



The number of inmates in the reformatories at the end of the year, 
September 30^ 1879, was 869, who were received from the following 
counties ; 



Counties. 



Adams, . 
Berks, . 
Blair, . . 
Bucks, . 
Chester, 
Columbia, 
Cum be I land, 
Dauphin, . 
Franklin, . 
LaokHWHnna, 
Lan caster, 

LehiMlit • • 
Luzerne, . 
Lycoming. 
Mont)<«>mery, 
Montour, . . 
Northampton, 
Nort li u m uerland, 
Philadelphia, 
SohuylkUl, . 
Susquehanna, 
Wayne, . . . 
York, .... 



House of Refuge. 



WHITE 






8 
8 
6 
1 
1 



6 

> • 

1 
12 
8 
8 
6 
2 
1 
5 
4 
218 
2 
1 
1 
2 



Total in Refuge, . 286 



QB 



8 



1 
2 



8 
1 



3 

M 

4 



col'd. 



I 



1 
8 

5 

5 
2 



4 
2 



115 
1 



77 141 






45 



50 



o 
H 



3 

11 
6 
2 
6 
5 
2 

11 
2 
1 

22 
8 

11 

12 
4 
1 

.? 

427 
7 
1 
1 
7 



567 



Counties. 



Allegheny, . 

Armntrong, 

Beaver, 

Bedford, 

Butler, . 

Cambria, 

Clarion, 

Crawford, 

Elk, . . 

Erie, . . 

Fayette, 

Greene, 

Jetferson, 

Lnwrenoe, 

MoKean, . 

Mercer, . 

Venango, 

Washington, 

Westmoreland, 



Reform School. 



white. 



I 



141 
12 
12 

• • 

8 
1 
4 

20 
1 

10 
6 
1 
1 
7 
2 
1 
8 

10 
2 



Total Reform Soh., 287 



OD 



19 

• 

1 
1 
1 



84 



Total Refuge, . . 286 77 

sir 111 

I 



col'd. 



00 

I" 



19 
1 



1 
8 



33 

144 



OR 

u 
O 

8 



8 
50 



177 



58 



3 



187 

12 

18 

2 



29 
1 



2 
2 
4 

18 
2 



312 
557 



220 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



STATISTICS OF THE UNFORTUNATE AND 

INDIGENT CLASSES. 



These comprise Hospitals for the Insane, Training School for Feeble- 
minded Children, Institutions for the Deaf and Dumb, Institution for the 
Instruction of the Blind, Alms-houses, Out-door relief in alms-house dis- 
tricts, Township poor, etc. The information we haA'e here tabulated in 
reference to these various classes, relates to their age, sex, color, etc., etc. 

The aggregate number of the defective classes maintained in institutions, 
or aided by authorities, making reports to the Board of Public Charities, 
on fSeptember 30, 1879, was 82,425, being a decrease of 5,366, or 1 4.20 per 
cent., on number at corresponding date of preceding 3'ear. This decrease 
is largely of the pauper or indigent class. 

Bnmmarjf of the fJafortaaaCe aB4 iBilseiit CI 



Whkrx Maintained. 



Insane and Idiotic : 
In State llotipitnls iit HarrlBhurg, Danville, and Dlzmont, 

Vrlendtt* Anyliiin, tMilladelphla, 

I'ennsylvHiiU Hovpltai, FhllaUelphla, 

PblU'lelplila i1(»8i»lCal, *. . 

TrainlnK School for Fceble-Mlndcd Children, 

*Alni8-houBH(i, 

IMalntiihied by outdoor relief, 

tMalntalued by townshlpB, 



Total Insane and Idiotic, ^ 

Da/ and Datnh : 
Institution for l^eafand nnrob, Phlladelplila, 
Institution for Doaf and Duuib, Pittsburgh, . 

*Alm8-houses. 

Maintained by townships, 



Total of deaf and dumb. 
Blind : 
Institution for Blind, . . . 

*Aluis-liouses, 

Maintained by townships, . 



TotAl of blind 

Paupert^ etc. : 

*In alms-houses, 

Rccelvlujc outdoor relief, . 
Becelvlng towuship relief. 



Total of paupers, 
Aggregate, . , 



1 

a 




. 




i 


^ 


«5 


^ 


o 
8 

v4 


C- 


> 


«il 


o-r 


o 


e 


1.8 


3 


• 

•** 


it 




6* 


s 


o 





a 

M 




1,479 


94 


8.80 


83 


16 


(5.80 


4M 


S9 


$8.17 


962 


S«9 


§2.87 


8!6 


ti 


9.72 


1,7116 


281 


19.84 


95 


16 


S.26 


260 


68 


28.71 


0,680 


487 


8.82 


SI9 


$6 


S1.8S 


85 


86 


100.00 


61 


SI 


S1.81 


88 


9 


89.18 


497 


67 


tl.22 


800 


SI6 


$6.86 


178 


S6 


$8.26 


62 


16 


44.44 


480 


«6 


Sl.t6 


7.885 


$875 


$4.88 


16,885 


S5,:7il 


$27.86 


8,8S6 


286 


8.61 


26.108 


kS,886 


18.40 


88,428 


16,888 


$14.20 



* NOTB.— In the number remaining In alms-houses at the end of the year, there were 4 men returned 
as Insane, deaf and dumb. an<l blind; therefore 8 should be deducted from the number (9,69i) above. 
In order thit the correct number remtlnlnir (O.K82) may be obtained. 

t Township poor Is for number remalnlnjr M%rch 81, i878. 

i Outdoor relief Is during the quarter endlug September 89, 1879. 

S Decrease. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



221 



•ii4 Mloclc. 



Hiere has been an increase in this class of 4^7^ or 8,82 per cent.^ as comr 

pared with the number of previous year. 



Insane and Idiotic. 



On September^, 1878, there were 
On September 80, 1879, there were 



Increase, 

Per oent. of increase. 



Males. 


Females. 


2,566 
2,785 


2,387 
2,605 


219 
8.63 


218 
9.13 



Total. 



4,958 
6,890 



487 

8.82 



Deaf and Dttink. 



In this class there has been an increase of 87, or 21,22 per cent,, as may 

be seen in the following statement: 



Deaf and Dumb. 



On September 80, 1878, there were 
On September 30, 1879, there were 



Increase, 

Per cent, of increase. 



Males. 



286 
280 



- 44 
18.65 



Females. 



174 
217 



T6tal. 



410 

497 



43 
24.71 



87 
21.22 



Blind. 



There has been a decrease of 5, or 1,15 per cent,, in this class of defectives^ 

as is here exhibited : 



BlilND. 



On September 80, 1878, there were 
On September 30, 1879, there were 



Becrease, 

Per cent, of decrease. 



Males. 


Females. 


271 
262 


164 
168 


9 
3.82 


•4 
•2.44 



Total. 



486 
430 



6 
1.15 



* Increase. 
Panpera and Indigent. 

The paupers and indigent classes (excluding the Jnsane, idiotic, deaf and 
dumb and blind, which have already been enumerated in their respective 
classes,) numbered on September 30, 1879, 26,108. being a decrease of 
5,885, or 18.40 per cent., on number at corresponding date of previous 
year. 



222 



BoABD OP Public Charttie& 



[No. 5 , 



The pauper clasSj viz : Inmates of almshouses, have decreased 375, or 
4,96 per cent., as is exhibited in the folhwing statement : 



Paupers. 


1 

ADULTS. 


• 

1 

o 


• 

9 

I 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1 

< 


September 30, 1878, there were, 
September 30, IS79, there were. 


3,9fi8 
8,614 


2,833 
2,8; 9 


6,801 
5,903 


1,459 
1,392 


7,760 
7,885 


Decrease, 


854 
8.92 


*46 
*2.00 


80S 
4.89 


67 
4.60 


875 


Per cent, of decrease, 

• 


4.83 



* Inorease. 

The decrease in adult paupers was 308, or 4.89 per cent. The children 
decreased 67, or 4.60 per cent. 

Onidoor Heller in Alns-beiiM Dtolrlcts. 

The number of persons receiving outdoor relief during quarter ending 

September 30, 1879, in districts connected with alms-houses, was 15,335, 
being a decrease of 5,776, on number at corresponding period of previous 
year. 

The causes of destitution of this class of persons we have classified under 

the following general heads : 



Causes of Destitution. 



From old age, 

Death,ab8eiice. or destitution of husband or father. 

Temporary sickness or want of work, 

Single women receiving relief, 



Total, 



1879. 



8,821 

7,206 

4,678 

130 



15,385 



Decrease 
on 1878. 



876 

2,427 

2,893 

80 



5,776 



Per cent, 
of decrease. 



10.17 
2.^.20 
88.20 
88.10 



27.86 



It will be observed that there was a decrease during the past year in all 
the causes of destitution. 

Of the number destitute on account of ^^old age, or permanent disability, ^^ 
the adults decreased 20S, and the children dependent decreased 173, as 
exhibited by the following statement: 



— ■ 

Dbstitution caused by old 


ADULTS. 


Children 
dependent. 


i 


AOE, OR permanent 
DISABILITY. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


< 


During the quarter ending Sep- 
tember 80, 1878, there were 

Daring the quarter ending Sep- 
tember 80, 1879, there were . 


1,110 
1,056 


1,745 
1,596 


2,855 
2,652 


842 
669 


8,697 
8,821 


Decrease, . . 

Per cent, of decrease, .... 


54 

4.86 


149 
8.54 


203 ! 
7.11 


178 
20.55 


876 
10.17 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



223 



Of the number J 7^06^ relieved on account of^^decUh, absence^ or desertion 
of husband^ or father^'* the wives^ Sc, dependent in thie class on male 
heads of families decreased 2fiS3 ; and the children decreased S94^ as 
is thus shovm : 



Destitution caused by death, absence, or 
desertion of husband or father. 



During the quarter ending September 80, 1878, 
there were .... 

During the quarter ending September 30, 1879, 
there were 

Decrease, 

Per cent, of decrease, 



Wives, &a 



4,594 
2,561 



2,083 
44.25 



Children 
dependent. 



6,039 
4,645 



894 
7.81 



Total. 



9,638 
7,206 



2,427 
25.20 



Of the 4fi78 whose destitution was caused by temporary sickness^ or want 
of work in male heads of families, also of single men^ there were 1,378 
men, with lfi71 wives and 2^229 children dependent upon them. As 
compared with the previous year^ there was a decrease of 766 men ; a 
decrease of 794 on the number of wives, and a decrease of l^SJ^S on the 
children, as shown in the following statement : 



Destitution causkd by tem- 
porary SICKNESS, or want 


ADULTS. 


Children 

dependent. 

1 
1 


• 

1 


OF work of male HEADS OF 
FAMILIES, AND SINGLE MEN. 


Men. 


Wives. 


Total. 




During the quarter ending Sep- 
tember 30, liJ78, there were . . 

During the quarter ending Sep- 
tember 80, 1879, there were . . 


2,134 
1,878 


1,865 
1,071 


8,999 
2,449 


8,572 
2,229 


7,671 
4,678 


Decrease, 

Per cent, of decrease, .... 


756 
85.88 


794 
42.67 


1,550 
38.76 


1,343 
37.60 


2,893 
38.20 



An analysis of the cause of destitution in the 1,378 males relieved shows 
that 445 were destitute on account of their own sickness ; 223, on account 
of sickness of a member of their family, or a funeral ; and 110, from want 
of work. 



224 



Board of Public Ghabitiss. 



[No. 5, 



The «■«!• Vft 

Receiving outdoor relief in districts connected with alms-Jumses numbered 
ISO^ being a decrease of 80^ on number at corresponding date of pre- 
vious year : 



SlNOI<B WOMBN RELI£^'ED. 


FEMALES. 


TotaL 


White. 


Colored. 


During the quarter endiog September 80, 1878, there 

were, ... 

During the quarter ending September 80, 1879, there 

were, 


200* 
119 


10 
11 


210 
180 






Decrease, 


81 
40.50 


♦1 
♦10.00 


80 


Per cent, of decrease. 


88.10 







* Increase. 

The white females decreased 81, or 40.50 per cent., and the colored fe- 
males increased 1, or 10.00 per cent. 

TowBsblp Relief. 

Another class of indigent persons are those relieved in counties, town- 
ships, and boroughs where no almshouses are established ; this system of 
assistance being designated " township relief." 

^8 compared with the previous year^ this class has increased 266^ or 8M 
^ per cent,^ thus : 



Township Relief. 


ADULTS. 


1 

a 

1.089 
1,298 


■ 

1 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


g 

< 


March 81, 1878, there were, . . . 
March 31, 1879, there were, . . . 


964 
1,003 


1,069 
1,087 


2,083 
2,090 


3,122 
8,388 


Increase 


89 
4.04 


18 
1.08 


57 
2.80 


209 
19.20 


268 


Per cent, of increase, 


8.52 



The adults increased 57, or 2.80 per cent.; children increased 209, or 
19.20 per cent. 



Leo. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabiti£& 



225 



YAGEAIiTTS. 



The preceding Bummary of the " Unfortunate and Indigent Classes," 
does not include the vagrants assisted in alms-houses, or by out-door- re- 
lief. This class of persons should not be enumerated with the deserving 
poor, those who, through age or misfortune, are unable to maintain them- 
selves. 

The number relieved in each quarter of the past year^ as compiled from 
the returns made to the Board of Public Charities^ was as follows : 



Vagrants Rb- 
lievkd during the 
Quarter Ending— 



December 31, 1878, . 
March 31, 1879, . . . 
June 30, 1879, . . 
September 30, 1879, 

Total, Ac., . . . 



AliMS-HOUSES. 



i 



25.048 

38,583 

13,202 

3,689 



80,522 



i 
-a 



1,123 

1,503 

705 

292 



Out-door 
Relief. 



•a 



1,934 

1,524 

733 

303 



3,623 



4,494 



1^ 



146 
63 
71 
61 





um- 
ious 




c s: 








a 




(B<*-4 




a o >: 


— < 


£ ^ S 


1 


h 2 «> 


H 


fi 


28,251 


6,134 


41,673 


1,051 


14,711 


3,808 


4,345 


9,369 



6 

o 



8 



P4 



17.84 

2.46 

20.56 

68.31 



341 88,980 



20,362 



18.62 



Of the total number 88,980, 85,016, or 95.55 per cent., were males, and 
3,964, or 4.45 per cent., females. Of those relieved in alms-houses, 95.69 
per cent, were males, and 4.31 per cent, females. Of those by out-door re- 
lief, 92.95 per cent, were males, and 7.05 per cent, females. The number 
of vagrants decreased 20,362, or 18.62 per cent., on number of preceding 
year. 

The number of lodgings furnished to vagrants during the respective 

quarters, is shown in the following statement : 



Lodgings Furnished Vagrants 

during the quarters 

Ending — 



December 31, 1878, 
March 31, 1879, . . 
June 30, 1879, 
September 30, 1879, 

Total, <&c., . . . 



i 


db 

-1 

O 


1 


Decreaseon num- 
ber of previous 
year. 


23,471 

38,223 

13,234 

4.100 


3,268 
634 
762 
808 


26,739 

3S,857 

13,996 

4,408 


5,919 

4,612 

3,819 

10,136 


79,028 


4,972 


84,0G0 


24,486 



6 









18.12 
10.60 
21.43 
69.69 



22.57 



15— B. P. Char. 



126 Board of Public CoARiTiEa [No 5, 

The number of lodgings furnished decreased 24,486, or 22.5t pet cent., 
)n number of previous jear. 

Of the 88,980 vagrants relieved, 84,000, or 94.40 per cent., were furnished 
)ne nigbt's lodging. This is a decrease on number of previous year, when 
19.21 per cent, of the number relieved obtained a night's lodging. 



Then 



mber of meale supplied to vagrants or tramps during the several 
quarters of the year, was as follows: 



Mkalb FL'RNIBHED Vaorakts 

SVRINU THE Qt;.lBTEBS 

Endinu— 


1 

13 


1 

r 


f 


1 


•1 


Dewmber31,1878, 


61,229 
I0.'301 


5,280 
391 
706 
522 


66,509 
89 999 
84,734 
10,823 


11,680 
12,069 

11 609 
21,323 


H,W 






Sepleaiber 30, 1879 


66-33 




196,106 


e,899 


202.066 


66,680 









From the above, we leam that 202,065 meals were given to 88,980 va- 
grantB or tramps — about two meals to each. The number of meals ftir- 
nishpd decreased 56,680, or 21.90 per cent., on number of preceding year. 

The foregoing statement of vagrants, does not include lodgers in station- 
houses of cities, of which we have no returns, or vagrants assisted under 
the township system of relief. 

The number in receipt of relief at midnight on (he last day in each quar- 
X ter, was as follows : 





In alms- 
houseR. 


reUef. 


Total. 




828 
867 
70 
18 


49 

4 








JuneSO, 1879, ! 

September 30, 1879, 


70 

IB 



The whole number remaining on September 30, 1879, was 18, which is a 
)f 160, or 89.88 per cent,, on number in receipt of relief at mid- 
temberSO, 1818. 



Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



22Y 



RaoapitaUtlon of the DefectlTe CI 



Where Maintained. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, 

State Hospital, Dlxmont, 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Ae^lum, Philadelnhia, . . . 
Pennsylvania Hosi>ital, Philadelphia, 

Philadelphia Hospital, 

Institutions for deaf and dumb, . . . 

Institution for blind, 

Training School for feeble minded, . 

Alms-houses, 

Maintained by outdoor relief, . . . . 
Maintained by township relief, . . . 



Total, 



Classification. 



s 



S 2 



426 
609 
444 
86 
406 
982 



316 

1,766 

95 

260 



6,890 






404 
61 



S2 



497 






200 
178 



62 



430 



d • 
©.sP 



7,385 

15,335 

3,388 



26,108 



The annexed statistical data relates to each of the above classes of de- 
fective and indigent persons. 



228 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



HOSPITALS FOE THE mSANE. 



The following statistics relate to the State Lunatic Hospital, at Harris- 
burg ; Western Peuns}' Ivania Hospital, at Dixmont ; State Hospital, at 
Danville ; Friends' Asylum, at Frankford ; Pennsylvania Hospital, at 
Philadelphia ; and the Philadelphia Hospital. The first three named re- 
ceive annual appropriations from the Commonwealth, and are designated 
as State Hospitals ; the next two are supported by receipts from patients, 
and interest on invested funds ; and the last named is a department of 
Blockley alms-house, the expenses of which are defrayed by the city of 
Philadelphia. 

Htate Appropriations. 

The Slate grant to the hospitals at Harrisburg^ * Dixmont j and Danville^ 
at its last session, aggregated %6l^60 for the year 1879, and for the 
following purposes : 



Purposes. 



Maintenance, 

Repaiis and improvements, 
Furnishing new wards, . . 
Insurance, 



Total, 



State Hospital, 
Uarrisburg. 



125,000 
6,000 



$31,000 



State Hospital, 
Danville. 



120,000 



• • • • 



9,450 
1,000 



Total. 



$45,000 
6,000 
9,450 
1,000 



130,450 



161,450 



t The hoapital at Dizmout did not get any appropriation. 

In addition to the above, the Legislature appropriated, for the State 
Hospital at Warren, the sum of $170,000, for the following purposes : To 
complete the building and prepare it for the reception of patients, $125,000 ; 
furniture for the first year, $30,000 ; support for the first year, $16,000. 
The sum of $53,000 was granted to the State Hospital at Norristown, for 
the following purposes : Furnishing, insuring, and equipping, $33,000 ; 
maintenance for the year 1880, $20,000. 

IVaoiea of Superlntendtrnta of Uoapltala for Inaane. 



Hospitals. 


Location. 


Superintendent. 


State Lunatic Hospital, 

Western Pennsylvania Hospital, 

State Hospital, 

Friends' Asylum 

Pennsylvania Hospital, 

Philadeipbia Hospital, 


Harrisburg, .... 
Dixmont, .... 

Danville, 

Frankford, Phila., . 
Pliihidelphia, . . . 
Philadelphia, . . . 


John Cur wen, M. D. 
Joseph A. Reed, M. D. 
S. S. Sohultz, M. D. 
John C. Hall, M. D. 
Thomas S. Klrkbride, M. D. 
D. D. Richardson, M. D. 

» — — _ 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



229 



Capacity of HocpltaU. 

Statement when opened, acres of land connected with each, present 

capacity : 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, . . 
Western Penn'a Hosp., Dixmont 
State Hospital, Danville, . . . 
Friends' Asylum, Phila., . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Phila., 
Philacfelphia Hospital, .... 



Total, 



When 
opened 



18.51 
1856 
1872 
1817 
1841 
1803 



Acres 
of land. 



139 
373 
2($0 
83 
113 
none. 



968 



Paksent Capacity. 



' Males. 


Females. 


TotAl. 


200 


200 


400 


200 


200 


400 


1 350 


350 


700 


45 


45 


90 


250 


250 


500 


383 


383 


766 


1,428 

1 


1,428 


2,856 



Valae of Property, dke. 

The real estate, including buildings, personal property, funds, and invest' 
mentSj are estimated to be worth, f 3^201,464 S9^ thus : 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital. Hardsburg, 
Western Hospital, Dixmout, 
State Hospital, Danville, . . 
Friends' Asylum, Phila.,. . 
Penn'a Hospital, Phila., . . 
Philadelphia Hospital, . . . 



Real estate, 
inoluding 
buildings. 



$357,700 


00 


931,959 


37 


683,605 


02 


210,000 


00 


800,000 


00 


Included 


in 


alms-hoa 


se. 



Personal 
property. 



125,500 00 
In real est. 
46,950 00 
10,000 00 
60,000 00 
In. in a 1ms 
house. 



Funds 
and invest- 
ments. 



II 

i; 



Total. 



Not a ny. 

Not alny. 
Not a ny 
125,750 
50,000 
Not a 



Total, 



2,983,264 




$383,200 
931,959 
730,555 
245,750 
910,000 



00 $75,750 




00 
37 
02 
00 
00 



The Philadelphia Hospital being a department of the alms-house, the es- 
timated value of the land, buildings, etc., is not kept separate, but included 
with the latter institution. 



BOAKD OF PUBUC CHARITIES. ■ 



[No. 5, 



!ii 



! 


s s s 1 


g i i j 


sas^s 1 : : ! 




ll»i : : ': 


ii'-'- : : , 


1 

a 

■a 

J 

1 


s 


:::: s s ! 


S 


, . . . K g 1 


isrsa :s| : : i 




s- :- : : , 
: : : : s a^' 


1 


::::si 1 




es : : : : i 


3 






.... 2 S 1 


^ :s... : : q 


:sss- : : : 1 




i" 
II 


Indigent patient^ 

PrivaW patients, 

Otiier Bouroes 

Form produce, 

Reoelpta, 

Total 



Leo. Doc.] Boabd op Public Charities. 231 

The aggregate receipts at Friends' Asylum for the past year were 
$43,365 23. The receipts from patients at Pennsylvania Hospital were 
$192,920. The receipts at the Philadelphia Hospital, which supports indi- 
gent patients only, was $2,908 60. 

BzpeDdllBreB. 

The disbursements of the three State Hospitals were as follows : 



For what Purposes. 


State Hospital, Har- 
risburg. 


* 

Western Hospital, 
Dixmont. 


State Hospital, T>an- 
vifle. 


• 

bo 
< 


Salaries, wages, labor, . . 
Provisions and sapplies, . 

Fuel and light, 

Clotiiing, etc., 

Furniture, bedding, etc.. 

Medicine, 

Ordinary repairs, ... 
Traveling expenses, . . . 
Other expenses, 


126,214 

30,850 

6,824 

4,519 

5,404 

953 

1,267 

540 

6,597 


51 
39 
44 
47 
06 
15 
96 
62 
89 


930,938 
42,818 
9,019 
5,440 
6,654 
1,952 
3,405 
1,463 
6,097 


22 
55 
97 
24 
98 
34 
63 
45 
09 

47 


922,187 

20,330 

8,626 

4,246 

3,353 

1,327 

908 

1,082 

12,490 


60 
55 
47 
14 
61 
02 
00 
58 
36 

33 


979,340 

93,999 

23,970 

14,205 

15,412 

4,232 

5,581 

3,086 

24,185 


33 

49 
88 
85 
65 
51 
59 
65 
34 


Current expenditures, 
Ijand, 


181,672 
4,000 

9,239 


49 
00 

32 


9107,790 


974,552 


9264,015 
4,000 

14,602 
14,227 


29 
00 


Buildings and improve- 
ments ... 


5,362 
14,227 


70 
90 

07 






02 


Miscellaneous expenses, . 


• • • • 


33 
35 

68 


90 






81 
02 
83 




Total expenditures, . 

Cash on hand September 

30, 1879, 


994,911 
22,730 


$127,381 


974,552 
482 


9296,845 
23,212 


21 
37 






07 






9117,641 


9127,381 


975,034 


9320,057 


58 



The expenditures at Friends' Asylum were $41,600 72 for all purposes ; 
at the Pennsylvania Hospital, $188,852 ; at Philadelphia Hospital, $114,- 
302 50 ; only indigent patients are maintained in this institution. 



232 



Board of Public CHARiTiEa 



[No. 5 , 



Ca&t of Malaleiiaaee. 

The annual and weekly cost of maintenance is presented in the next state- 
ment , thus : 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, 

Western Hospital, Dixniont, 

State Hospital, Danville 

Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . . . ». 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, . 
Philadelphia Hospital, 

Total, etc., 



1 

Expenditures 

1^ • i_ 


1 




on which 
cost of main- 
tenance is 


Cost per ' 

annum. ' 

1 


' Cost per 

week. 

1 


based. 




1 
1 


181,672 


49 


$192 


1 
85 


$8 


71 


107,790 


47 


177 


00 


1 3 


40 


74,652 


33 


187 


19 


3 


60 


41,600 


72 


478 


17 


9 


19 


188,852 


00 


457 


27 


, 8 


80 


114,302 


60 
51 


114 


57 

88 i 

1 


1 2 


20 


1608,770 


$207 


4 

1 


00 



The average daily number in the Harrisburg Hospital was 423.5 ; in 
Dixmont, 609 ; in Danville, 398.2 ; in Friends' Asylum, 87 ; in Pennsyl- 
vania, 413 ; in Philadelphia Hospital, 99T.8. 



Leo. Doc] 



BoAKD OF Public Charities. , 

Xl) "^ ^ 



lit 



E S- * 






fa s 

M § V 1 

I ill 
I s S ^ 






"3 »* S> 



ill 



S- 222S22 



5 I 33od« 
222222 






■i: 
'■ii '■ 



sis 

ifi 



SMS 

sis 

oaPoo 



234 



BoABD OF Public Chariti£& 



[No. 5, 



HOSPITALS 

Exhibiting the number resident at beginning of year ; number admitted^ 

ing at close 



MOYSMSNT OF POPULATION. 



In hospital October 1, 1878, 

Admitted during the year, 

First admlsflion, 

Second admission, 

Third admission, 

Fourth admission, 

Fifth admission, and upwards, 

Population or number treated, 

Discharged— recovered, ......... 

Discharged— Improved, 

Discharged— stationary, 

Discharged— died, 

Discharged— not Insane, 

Total discharged, 

Per cent, on number recovered, 

Per cent, on number died 

Per cent, on average number recovered, 
Per cent, on average number died, . . 
Number remaining September 80, 1879, . 

Average number of the year, 

Highest number at any time, 

Lowest number at any time, 



Stats Lunatic 
Hospital. 



S 



208 
74 
68 

B 
1 



16 
10 
28 
19 



TO 
6.8 
7.0 
7.1 
9.0 
212 
211.2 
220 
207 



-2 

a 

9 



I 

Wkstern Pbxnstl.- 
YANiA Hospital. 



S 

o 



-a 



218 

78 

61 

7 

4 

1 

• • 

291 
14 
21 
82 
10 



77 
4.8 
8.4 
6.6 
4.7 
214 
212.8 
214 
207 



428 

147 

124 

16 

6 

1 

1 

873 

29 

81 

66 



147 
6.1 
6.1 
6.9 
6.9 
426 
.5 
484 
414 



189 

117 

14 

7 

1 

471 
82 

36 
16 
86 



s 



121 
7.0 
7.6 
9.8 
10.6 
SGO 
844 
865 



287 

120 

92 

21 

6 

1 

1 

887 

87 

80 

21 

20 






128 
9.6 
6.2 

14.0 
7.6 
2M 
266 

277 
250 



12 

2 
1 



89 



8.0 

6.6 

11.2 

9.2 



578 



Pkriod of Absence of Re-advittxd. 



Less than one year, . . . . 

One to two years, 

Two to three years, . . . . 
Three to four years, . . . . 
Four years, and upwards, 



Total re-admitted, 



8 
8 



1 

4 



11 



6 
8 



4 
12 



8 
6 



1 
8 



6 
6 

4 
4 
8 



10 
6 
7 
8 
S 



16 
10 
11 

7 
6 



SO 



Leg. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



235 



FOR I1V8ANB. 

re-admitted, discharged, died, etc., during the year ; also, number remain- 
of year. 



St ATX Hospital f 


Frisnds^ 


Pennsylvania 


Phil ADSL PHI A 




Daxvillx. 


Abylum. 


Hospital. 


Hospital. 


XbJCUr 


VX^&A \JAdJk.A 


x\ja» 




s 






• 


1 


1 
1 


• 






3 






m 

s 




S 

13 


i 

ht 


1 


1 


a 


• 

1 


• 

0) 

-a 


-a 

1 


• 

3 


1 


§ 


• 

a 

j2 


1 


-a 

1 


a 


221 


189 


860 


43 


48 


91 


199 


216 


415 


480 


681 


1,011 


1,488 


1,419 


2,902 


127 


87 


211 


19 


12 


8t 


116 


89 


204 


89 


99 


188 


m 


480 


1,040 


J07 


76 


ltd 


15 


12 


27 


85 


71 


166 


74 


84 


158 


461 


896 


867 


17 


11 


28 


8 


• • • 


8 


14 


IS 


27 


12 


16 


27 


69 


87 


186 








1 


• • • 


1 


8 

4 

9 

814 


5 

• ■ • • 

• • * • 

806 


8 

4 

9 

619 


2 

1 


• • ■ 

• ■ • 

• ■ • 

680 


2 

1 

1,109 


14 

6 

10 

2,048 


14 
2 
1 

1,899 


28 








8 






. . . . 1 








11 


845 


226 


671 


62 


60 


122 


3,942 


23 


10 


88 


7 


6 


18 


44 


47 


91 


11 


18 


29 


188 


182 


264 


17 


7 


24 


6 


4 


9 


80 


26 


86 


21 


17 


88 


118 


124 


242 


80 


14 


44 


6 


8 


8 


16 


12 


28 


5 


1 


6 


100 


88 


188 


22. 


4 


26 


4 


2 


6 


22 

1 


17 


89 


ra 


70 

1 

107 


148 

1 
217 


176 

• ■ • • 

826 


128 

1 
488 


2B0 
1 


92 


85 


127 


a 


16 


' 86' 


'll2 


101 


218 


no 


989 


6.7 


4.4 


6.8 


11.8 


10.0 10.7 


14.0 


16.4 


16.0 


2.0 


8.0 


2.4 


6.4 


7.0 


6.7 


6.4 


1.8 


4.5 


6.6 


8.8 5.0 


7.0 


6.6 


6.8 


12.8 


11.1 


12.0 


8.6 


6.6 


7.4 


9.8 


6.1 


8.8 


16.8 


18.6 


15.0 


21.7 


22.8 


22.0 


2.4 


8.4 


8.0 


8.8 


9.3 


9.0 


9.4 


2.4 


6.5 


9.8 


4.5 


7.0 


10.9 


8.0 


9.5 


16.6 


18. S 


14.8 


11.7 


8.6 


10.2 


258 


191 


444 


41 


45 


86 


202 


204 


406 


469 


S28 


982 


1,517 


1.486 


2,968 


285 


168.2 


808.2 


48 


44 


87 


202 


211 


418 


470 627.8 


9V7.8 


1,606.2 


1,428.8 


2,928.5 


254 


192 


446 


45 


46 


91 


214 


219 


488 


481 


680 


1,020 


1,669 


1,487 


8,066 


216 


140 


865 


40 


41 


81 


191 


202 


898 1 

1 


457 


621 


978 


1,488 


1,861 


2,799 



8 


/• 

" 


U 


2 


• • • 


2 


17 
4 
2 
1 
6 


8 
8 

1 

2 

10 


19 
7 
8 
8 

16 








86 
18 
11 
18 
20 


20 
19 
11 
8 
27 


66 


1 


5 
2 

4 
4 


5 
2 
2 
6 


10 

4 

6 

10 


37 


3 








38 


2 
8 


1 

■ ■ ■ 


• • • 

1 


1 
1 


21 

47 


17 


28 


8 


1 


4 


80 


18 


48 


U 


15 


80 


08 


86 


188 



t_ 



236 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



PATlBIVrS ADMITTED. 
MovemeDl of Popalailon. 

The number of patients in the hospitals at beginning of year, was 2,902, 
to which were added during the year, 1,040.; an increase of lOT on admis- 
sions of preWous year. Number discharged, 989 — leaving 2,953 patients 
resident in the hospitals on September 30, 1819; an increase of 51 on num- 
ber at corresponding date of previous year. 



In hospitals at beginning of year, Octo- 
ber 1, 1878, 

Admitted durint^: year : 

First admission, 

Seoond admission, 

Third admission, 

Fourth admission, 

Fitth, and upwards, 



Total admitted, 



Population, or number treated. 
Discharged— Recovered. . . . 

Improved, . . . 

Stationary, . . . 

Died 

Not insane, . . . 



Total discharged, 

Remaining September 30, 1879, 



Males. 



1,483 



461 

69 

14 

6 

10 



560 



132 
118 
100 
176 



2,043 



526 



1,517 



Females. 



896 

67 

14 

2 

1 



132 

124 

83 

123 

1 



1,419 



480 



1,899 




Total. 



2,902 



1,040 



3,942 



989 



2,953 



Compared with the admissions of the previous year, the males increased 
58, females 49. The discharges were 136 less than the preceding year, viz : 
Males, T2 ; females, 64. 

Arerac® Nomber. 

The average number of patients during the j^ear was 2,928.5, being a 
decrease of 15.8 on the preceding year. 





AVEBAOE NUMBER TREATED. 


a 


^ 








• 




atiei 
ear. 


3^2 












i5 










■•4 


(^>. 


h% 


HOSFITAIiS. 




i 




rtioni 
cent. 




of de 
h hoe 




Males 


a 


• 

1 


Propo 
per 

1 


Deere 
ove 


JO S 

Si 


State Hospital, Harrisburg, . 


211.2 


212.3 


423.6 


14.46 


9.8 


2.26 


Western Hospital, Dixmont, 
State Hospital, Dan\ille, . . 


344 


265 


609 


20.80 


*50.0 


«9.00 


235 


163.2 


398.2 


13.60 


»57.7 


•16.94 


Friends' Asylum, Phila., . . 


43 


44 


87 


2.97 


♦1.0 


*.12 


Pennsylvania Hospital, Phila. 
Philadelphia Hospital, . . . 


202 


211 


413 


14.10 


*1.0 


♦.02 


470 


527.8 


997.8 


34.07 


115.7 


10.39 


Total, 


1,505.2 


1,423.3 


2,928.5 


100.00 


15.8 


.54 



* Increase. 



Leo. Doc] 



Board op Public Charities. 



237 



As the above institutions can comfortably accommodate 2,856 patients, 
it will be observed that the average number of patients treated during the 
year exceeded the capacity of the hospitals by 12.5. 





Population, ob Number Treated. 


Hospitals. 


-a 


Per cent, on each 
hospital. 


i 


Per cent, on each 
hospital. 


1 


Proportional per 
cent, of the year. 


State Hospital, Harrisburg, .... 
Western Hospital, Dixmont, . . . 
State Hospital, Danville, . . . 
Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, 

Philadelphia Hospital, 


282 

471 

345 

62 

314 

669 


49.21 
64.90 
60.42 
60. b9 

60.73 
47.46 


291 

387 

4226 

60 

305 
630 


60.79 
45.10 
39.58 
49.11 

49.27 
52.54 


673 
858 
671 
122 

619 
1,199 


14.54 

21.77 

14.48 

3.09 

16.70 
30.42 


Total treated, 


2,043 


61.83 


1,899 


48.17 


3,942 


100.00 



The maximum and viin^'mum number of patients during the past year in 
the respective hospitals^ loith the per cent, of patients in excess of hos- 
pital capacity^ is presented as follows : 





Capacity of hos- 
pitals. 


Maximum. 


Minimum. 


Hospitals. 


Males. 

• 


1 


3 


207 

328 
215 

40 

191 
457 


a 


• 

1 


State Hospital, Harrisburg 
Western Hospital, Dix- 
mont 


400 

400 
700 ! 

90 ' 

600 
766 


1 

220 

•355 
254 

45 

214 

481 


214 

277 
192 

46 

219 
639 


434 

632 
446 

91 

433 
1,020 


207 

250 
140 

41 

202 
621 


414 

678 


State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Asylum, Phila- 
delphia, 

Pennsylvania Hospital, 
Philadelphia, . 

Philadelphia Hospital, . . 


355 
81 

393 

978 


Tbtal, 


2,856 


1,569 

1 


1,4»7 


8,056 


1,438 

1 


1,361 


2,799 



We here leam that the maximum of the year was 3,056 patients, or 200 
in excess of capacities. The minimum number of patients was 2,799, or 67 
less than is there accommodation for. 



238 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



AdmlMloBS. 

Statement exhibiting the number of patients of each sex admitted during 
the year ending September SOy 1879^ into the respective hospitaLs. 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, 

Western Hospital, Dixmont, .... 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Hospital, 

Total admissions, 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


74 


73 


147 


139 


120 


259 


124 


87 


211 


19 


12 


31 


115 


89 


204 


89 


99 


188 


. 560 


480 


1,040 



Proportion 
per cent, of 
the year. 

14.14 
24.90 
20.29 
2.98 
19.61 
18.08 

100.00 



Re-WnilMlons. 

Of the IfiJ^O patients admitted into the respective hospitals^ 183^ or 17,60 
per cent.y were re^admissions^ or relapsed cases. 



Relapsed Cases. 



Seoond admission, first relapse, 

Third admission, seoond relapse, .... 
Fourth admission, third relapse, .... 
Fifth admission, and upwards, fourth re- 
lapse, <feo., 

Number of relapsed oases, 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


69 


67 


136 


14 


14 


28 


6 


2 


8 


10 


1 


11 


99 


84 


183 



Proportion 
per cent, of 
the year. 



74.32 

15.30 

4.37 

6.01 

100.00 



The number of relapsed cases^ with their percentage on number of patients 
admitted into the respective hospitals, is presented thus : 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, 

Western Hospital, Dixmont, .... 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Hospital 

Total relapsed oases, <feo., .... 



oS 



1 



1 



147 

259 

211 

31 

204 

188 



1,040 



16 
85 
28 
8 
27 
27 



136 



relapsed cases. 



t 

QQ 



6 
12 



I 
8 
2 



28 






1 
2 



4 
1 



8 






1 
1 



9 



11 



3 



23 
50 

28 

4 

48 

30 



183 



as 
« ft' 



o 



!§ 

(D OB 

9i 



1 



15.64 
19.30 
13.27 
12.90 
23.53 
16.00 



17.60 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



239 



Period 4^ Absence. 



SUUement exhibiting the period of absence in relapsed cases^ between the 
discharge and return of the patient to the hospital : 





PERIOD OF ABSENCE OF RELAPSED CASES. 




















TOTAL OF 






1 




1 




1 




1 


4 years 
and up-' 

WRrHsL 1 


RELAPSED 




Under 


lto2 


2to3 


8to4 


CASES. 




1 year. 


years. 


years. 


years. 




Hospitals. 




"i 
























s 




i 




i 


1 

1 


s 




i 






1 

8 


B 
5 


i 
-a 

8 


a 

3 


i 
-a 

• • 


9 

Cm 

• ■ 


i 

1 
1 


'3 

1 

■ • 


s 

4 


'3 
S 

Pm 
4 


i 
11 


'3 

s 

12 


1 


State Hospital, Harrisbnrg 


28 


Western Hospital, Dix- 




























mont, 


6 


10 


5 


6 


4 


7 


4 


3 


8 


8 


22 


28 


50 


State Hospital, Danville, 


8 


8 


1 


8 


8 


1 


2 


1 


8 


8 


17 


11 


28 


Friends' Asylum, Phila- 




























delphia, 


2 


V • 


• ■ 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


• • 


• • 


1 


3 


1 


4 


Pennsylvania Hospital, 


















1 










Philadelphia, 

Philadelphia Hospital, . 


17 


2 


4 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 


6 


10 


80 


18 


48 


• • 

86 


• • 

20 


5 

18 


5 


2 


2 
11 


4 
18 


2 
8 


4 

20 


6 

27 


15 
98 


15 
85 


80 


Total relapsed oases, . 


19 


11 


188 



Of the 183 relapsed cases, 56 were absent less than one year; 37, from 
one to two years; 22, from two to three years; 21, from three to four 
years ; and 47, for four years and upwards. 



Residence. 

Of the patients admitted into the respective hospitals^ the following state- 

ment will indicate their places of residence: 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, 

Western Hospital, Dixmont, 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Hospital, 

Total admitted, 



PLACES OF RESIDENCE. 


i 


•c:^ 




§ 


^1 


i 






n 


« 5 


•s 


s 


58 


u 

O 


147 
255 


o 


^ 






4 


• • • ■ 


211 
25 






6 


• • ■ • 


172 


27 


5 


188 










098 


87 


5 



I 



147 
259 
211 
31 
204 
188 



1,040 



240 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



The birth places of the patients admitted were a^ follows : 



• 


ADMISSIONS IN ] 


BACH 


HOSPITAL. 




AOOBEGATE. 






i 


A 
1 

Wg 
S 

OQ 

165 


• 

a 

> 
a 


mm 


i 

S.SS 


• 

3 










Nativity. 


bate Hospital, 
burg. 


3 

a* 
8 


riends' Asylun 
delphia. 


ennsvlvania H 
Philadelph 


O 

3 


i 
•a 


i 

"oS 

s 

0) 


3 


8 

u 
o 




QQ 


QQ 


1^ 
20 


cu 


(li 


330 


Pm 


H 


Ah 


Pennsylvania, . . . 


119 


114 


111 


63 


262 


592 


58.85 


Other Americans, 


6 


23 


17 


5 


29 


21 


51 


49 


100 


9.94 


England, 

Ireland, 


3 


5 


6 


1 


13 


6 


14 


20 


34 


3.88 


14 


31 


25 


2 


29 


57 


82 


76 


158 


15.70 


Germany, 


6 


24 


12 


1 


11 


29 


42 


41 


83 


825 


Other foreigners, . . 


■ • • 


11 


8 


2 


11 


7 


26 


13 


39 


S.88 


Not stated, 






29 






5 


15 


19 


84 
















Total admitted, . 


147 


259 


211 


31 
25 


204 


188 


560 


480 


1,040 


100.00 


Americans, 


124 


188 


181 


140 


84 


381 


311 


692 


68.79 


Foreigners, 


23 


71 


51 


6 


64 


99 


164 


150 


314 


31.21 


Unknown 






29 






5 


15 


19 


34 
















^otal, 


147 


259 


211 


31 


201 


188 


560 


480 


1,040 


100.00 



Of the known nativity, two thirds, or 692, were American, and 314 for- 
eign bom. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



241 



OceopattoDs. 

The occupcUionB of male )[)atieni8 received into the respective hospitals 

during the year^ were as follows : 



OCOUPATIOXS. 




Actor, 

AgentB, 

Bakers, 

Bankers, 

Barber, 

Blacksmiths, 

Boatman, 

Boat-builder, 

Bricklayer, 

Broshmaker, 

Broker, 

Builder, 

Butcher, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Carpenters, 

Cigar-makers, 

Civil engineers, 

Clersymen, 

Clerks, 

Coachmaker, 

Confectioners, 

i^onyeyancer, 

Currier, 

Drivers, 

Drovers, 

Engineer, 

Engraver, 

Farmers, 

Fireman, 

Qardeneni, 

Oas-fitter, 

Glass-blowers, 

Gilder, 

Grocers, 

Hair-spinner, 

Hatters, 

Harness-makers, 

Hotel keepers. 

Hostler, 

Laborers, 

Landlords, 

Lawyers, 

Locksmith, 

Manufacturers, 

Masons, . 

Machinists, 

Merchants, 

Millers, 

Miners, 

Moulders, 



16 ^B. P. Char. 



242 



Board of Pubug Charities. 



[No. 5, 



OrcnpAtioBJi.— Conttaoed. 



Occupations. 



Newsboy, 

No occupation, . . . 
Oil producer, . . . . 
Paper-hangers, . . . 

Painters, 

Pattern-makers, . . 

Peddlers, 

Physicians, 

Planter, 

Plasterers, 

Plumbers, 

Printers, 

Puddlers 

Sailors, 

Shoemakers, . . . . 

Soldier, 

Spar-maker, . . . . 
Stone-cutters, . . . 

Students, 

Superintendent, . . 

vTauors, 

Tinsmiths, 

Teachers, 

Telegraph operator, 

Waiter, 

Weavers, 

Wheelwright, . . . 
Wood-carver, . . . 
Unknown, 



Total males. 



ADMISSIONS IN BACH HOSPITAL. 



K 
1 

8 

CD 



8 
1 
1 



3 

Mm 

h 

si 
P 



8 

■** 
QQ 



7 
1 



8 
1 
1 
1 



9 



1 
1 



1 
8 



1 
2 

I 

1 



1 

7 
2 



8 
1 
1 



1 
1 



li 
1 



1 
1 



4 

16 



l-H -m 

•bo's 



1 
1 



I 



ii 



23 



1 
1 



8 



• • « 



I 
7 
I 



. I 



1 
3 



'2'a 

2A 



1 

7 



74 ; 189 I 124 i • 19 



115 



3 



I 
1 



1 

7 



1 
1 

• 

I 
I 

4 



89 



I 

55 
1 
2 
8 
2 
2 
8 
1 
2 
2 
2 
7 
7 
IS 
1 
1 
3 
10 
2 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 

11 

1 

1 

20 



560 






Lbq. Doc.] 



Board of Pubuo Chabities. 

Oeeapalion*. 

Of female paHents admitted. 



248 



Occupations. 



DomestioB, 

Dreaunakers, 

Factory ffirls, 

Gold leaf Gutter, 

House-keepers, 

Milliner, 

No ooeupauon, 

SeamstresBes, 

Shoebinder, 

Tailoresses, 

Teachers, 

Wool-workers, 

Unknown, 

Daughters of Carpenters, . . . 
Clergymen, . . . 

Clerks, 

Farmers, 

Hotel-keeper, . . 
Laborers, . . . . 

Machinist, . . . . 

Manufacturers, . . 
Mechanics, . . . 
Merchants, . . . 
Painter, ...... 

Physician, . . . . 

Printer, 

Professional men, 
Waterman, . . . 

Wiyes of Blacksmiths, 

Brickmakers, . . . . 
Broommaker, . . . . 

Butcher, 

Carpenters, 

Carriagemaker, . . . 

Captain, 

Cooper, 

Coachman, 

Conveyancer, . . . . 
Confectioner, . . . . 

Conductor, 

Contractor, 

Clergymen, 

Clerks, 

Farmers, 

File-cutter, 

Gardener, 

Jailor, 

Lawyers, 

Laborers, 

Machinists, 

Manufacturers, . . . . 



■ • • 



admissions in each hospital. 



S8 

s 
•S.S 

o 



1 

2 



2 



6 



1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 



Q 

a 

•iH 
^^ 

"a 



6 
1 



14 



5 
1 

15 
1 



1 
2 
5 



8 
8 



11 



I 



n 

QQ 



28 



3 

4 



2 
1 



4 
16 



5 
1 
1 



1 
1 



4 
1 



14 
1 



s 

d 



1 
1 



1 
3 



2 
2 



3 



c ® 

s 

On 



1 
1 

2 



2 
1 
8 

• 

8 
1 



1 
1 
2 



3 



1 
1 



1 
1 
2 
3 

4 



3 
5 



3 

OD 

O 

.2 

l-H 

'S 

j:i 



80 



13 

4 



• • • 



■ ■ • 



• • • 



3 



113 
5 
2 
2 

11 
1 

32 

10 
1 
2 
9 
2 

20 
2 
1 
1 

21 
1 
6 
1 
3 
3 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
6 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 

23 
1 
1 
1 
3 

52 
2 
1 



BOAKD OF PUBLIO ChABITIKS. 



[No. 6, 





ASSIBStONa IN BACH HOBPITAL. |l 


OoonPATioHS. 


f 




1 


i 
1 

1 


1 

n 

is 

1 


Ii; 

.s 
$■ 1' 






15 


... 


7 
■ 1 

1 


. .11 16 




3 

1 








Mlnera, 


■ 1 » 










1 






1 






































2 

1 










1 




























1 






1 


















1 1 
1 




































1 
1 








1 














1 












Farmere,' 


■■l 


2 1 . . . 


!■ ? 


































' 














No oooupatloD 

Plasterer. . 


28 


: 


4 . . 

1 


!j . 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



245 



How 0>miiiitte4. 

The lyOJ^O patients reoeived were committed to the respective hospitals by 

the following authorities : 





■ 


Br WHOM 


Committed. 






Hospitals. 


1 1 

KHIK.DS. -c!;rp"o^i. 


1 

BY COURT. 1 


1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

B 
7\ 

78 
69 
45 
81 
204 


Pi 


1 

1 

24 

115 

46 


Per oent. 
to each 
hospital. 


1 


Per cent, 
to eaoh 
hospital. 


Total. 


State Hospital, Harrisburg, . . . 
Western Hospital, Dixmont, . . 
State Hospital, Danville, . . 
Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Phila., . 
Philadelphia Hospital, 


58.03 

26.64 

21.33 

100.00 

100.00 ' 


16.83 
44.40 
21.80 


45 

75 

120 


1 

30.61 
28.96 
56.87 

1 


147 

250 

2U 

81 










204 


188 


100.00 
85.86 






188 














Total admitted, 


427 


41.06 


878 


240 


^.08 


1,040 



Of the 1,040 patients received, 427, or 41.06 per cent., were committed 
by friends; 373, or 36.86 per cent., by overseers, etc., of poor; and 240, 
or 23.08 per cent., by courts. 

How Supported. 

The patients admitted into the respective hospitals were maintained by 

authorities^ as follows : 







How Supported. 






Tf HR'PTTA T.R 


BY FRIENDS. 


BY PUBLIC 1 
AUTHORITIES 


BY HOSPITAL. 


• 

1 




Number. 


Per cent, 
on eaoh 
hospital. 


i 


Per oent. 
on each 
hospital. 


Number. 


Per cent, 
on each 
* hospital. 


Total. 


State Hospital, Harrisburg, . . . 
Western Hospital, Dixiuont, . . 
State Hospital, Danville, .... 
Friends' Asylam, Philadelphia, . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Phila., . 
Philadelphia Hospital, 


80 
60 
42 
81 
151 


54.42 
26.64 
19.91 
100.00 
74.02 


67 
190 
169 


45.58 
78.86 
80.09 






147 






259 






211 






81 






58 

• • 


25.98 

• • • ■ 


204 


'l88 


100.00 


18& 










Total admitted, 


878 


36.87 


614 


59.04 


53 


5.09 


1,049- 



Of the 1,040 patients admitted, 373, or 35.87 per cent., were supported 
by friends ; 614, or 59.04 per cent., by public authorities ; and 53, or 5 09 
per cent., by hospital authorities. 



246 



Board of Public Chabities. 



[No. 6, 



In view of the legislative provision in the establishment of the State 
hospitals, (the first three named,) that indigent insane should, in the order 
of admission, have precedence of the rich, or paying patients, it is important 
to inquire as to the relative number of each class admitted into the respective 
hospitals. For this purpose, if we represent the number of patients ad- 
mitted into each hospital by 100, we shall obtain the following i-esults : 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrtsburg, 

Western Hospital, Dixmont, 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends* Asylum, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, . . 
Philadelphia Hospital, 



PBOPOBTION OF PUBLIC TO PRITATB PATIBVTS RBCBITID 
IN BACH HOSPITAL DUKINO 1875, l^d, li(77, 1^8, ABD 1S7>. 




1878. 



• 




, V 


• 


' *i 


o ' 


« 




v4 


.o 


u 


s 


Ok 


Pn 


1 
1 60 


40 1 


1 SI 


69 


! 27 


72 


1 100 


. . . 


I 80.6 


19.5 



100 



isn. 



> 


2 


u 


9 


^ 


P< 


65 


45 


V 


71 


20 


8D 


100 




7S 


% 


. - . 


100 



Civil OODditlOB. 



The conjugal relations of the patients admitted during the year^ with the 

number of each sexj is as follows : 







CIVIL CONDITION. 






1 

' AGC 

1 
1 






• 


SIMGLB. 


MABRIBD. 


1 
WIDOWBD 


UNKNOWN 


^BBOAxB. 


HOSPITALS. 


• 

41 
66 
49 
4 
69 
41 


1 
£ 

29 
89 
26 
6 
29 
47 


■ 

1 

29 
71 
68 
16 
61 
86 

264 


1 

a 

97 
71 
17 
6 
46 
80 


• 

s 

4 
2 
7 

• • ■ 

6 
18 


3 

"a 

g 
« 

7 
10 
16 

1 
16 

» 


■ 


» 


! s 
! ^ 
74 

189 
124 

19 
115 

89 


t 

i 

78 
120 
87 
12 
89 
09 


• 

3 




State Hospital, Harrisburg 

Western Hospital, Dlxxnont, .... 

State Hospital, Danville 

Friends* Asylum, Philadelphia, . . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Hospital, 


147 






2S9 


16 


' 9 


2U 
81 






2N 


• • • 


' "2 


186 


Total admitted 


960 


174 


226 ! 


81 


"i 


16 


11: 

1 


600 


480 


1,040 




1 


1 





Lbo. Doa] 



BoABD Of Public Charities. 



ITie age» of patients wjActi admitted into the respective koapitah, are pre- 
sented in the following statement : 





AI.«,.IO>,..,<AC.HO.„TAL. | „,.„„.. 




s 


1 


i 


pT 


*^ 


* 














HJ\ 


MS. 


X 










A.OES OK ADM I8BION 


11 

II 


s^ 
^ 


f 


1 


1 


6. 


W 


27 


«S 


i 


Under 20 yeara. . . . 


7 


16 


IB 




fl.4fl 


aOtoSOyeart,. . . . 






















21 


76 


is 






140 


111 


260 




« to 60 yea™,. . . . 




65 


















22 


28 


27 






66 




124 


12.59 




4 


14 


9 
















n 


2 


4 






11 


14 


26 


2.» 


Unknown 






39 






22 


17 






Total admitted, . . 


147 


269 


211 


SL 


204 1S8 


560 


480 


1,040 


100. 00 



The lai^st number admitted were between 30 and 40 years of age ; 
next, between 20 and 30; 40 to 60; &0 to 60; in the order as above. 
The ages of patients at time of attack is exhibited in the next statement^thva : 









..-,„.„,. „.„H „.,„... 




„». 


».„ 








3 

a. 


1 


S 


^t 


1 










ASES ON Attack. 


If 

II 




1 


^'1 


3 


|i 


i 


1 


1 


1 


Congenital, 




7 


4 


I 




6 


17 


1,88 




























































21 


74 


48 
















































16 


24 


24 


B 














60 to 70 years. 






4 






































































, 




147 


2S9 


211 


Si 


304 


188 


660 


- 


- 


100.00 



From the above we learn that the laigest number were attacked between 
20 and 30 years ; next number, betw^sn 30 and 40 ; and 40 to 50, in the 
order above. 



248 BoABD OF Public Chabitigb. 

The form of insanity 



[No. 5, 



Foim dT Minul Dbwut. 

ni/ested by the patients on admitsion, ts pre- 
sented thus : 











... 


„,OK 


.TO„OHeO.P„... 




^o........ 


Form of Disbasb. 


A 

1 

V 


i 

Q 

3 

I'i 

E 
S 

s 


1 

H 

X 

1 


1 

P 


1 
If 

Is 

1 




i 

-a 

E 


j 




1 


Mania, aoute, 


34 


eo 


109 


15 


61 


44 


IflO 


163 


853 


33.94 












68 








15 






149 


14.33 










6 


e 


9 




2 


Iti 






41 


3.94 














5 


2 


19 




■i\ 


7 


28 












64 


75 


44 




63 


II 






268 


25.77 










15 




13 


S 


23 


7*1 


RJ 


7T 


128 
















3 












17 


I.«3 


ParaaiB. . . . 








2 


8 


6 




» 




31 


I 


82 


S08 




1 




2 




1 


13 


14 

MO 


10 


34 


2.31 


Total admitWd, 








147 


m 


211 


31 


20t 


188 


480 


1,040 


100.00 



Mania, in some of its forms, presented itself in 543 cases, or more than 
one half of the patients received ; monomania esisted in 28 cases ; melan- 
cholia, in 268; dementia, in 138; paresis existed in 32; imhecility and 
idiocy, in 24 cases. 



Statement exhibiting the number of patients admitted who had complica- 
tions in connection with their peculiar form of mental malady i 





„„...w,x.„ 


«„.,o.,.o„.. ii 


.„„™„.. 




1 




& 
H 




' 


ill 








Co HP LI CATIONS EXIST- 








f* 












ING IN Patients Ad- 


3> 




1^ 


u 




K 










i° 




«■<: 


<^ 










P'.' 


1 


1 




■^ 


!?l 


1 


i 




SH fbral 


12 
S 






2 




|| 


3 
10 


1 


jn|l ' 




10 




16 SI 


41 27.51 




,! 


6 


2 
2 






17 ;i 22 


7 
























■ ■ 


7 










3 
















1^ hoomplicatfonB, 


M 


44 


18 


3 


... 50 103 


" 


149 1 JO0.0O 


i 





















Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



249 



Of the 1,040 patients admitted, 149 had complications, the males to a 
much greater extent than the females. Of the 149 complications, 14 had 
disease of brain; 41 had epilepsy; 29 homicidal tendencies; 12 had 
paralysis ; 46 suicidal tendencies ; and 7 were congenital. 

CauM of Inuuiitf . 

The causes of insanity^ classified as " Moral or Mental " and " Physical 
Causes^" are presented in the following statement : 



Physical Causes. 



Ainenorrhoea, . 
Apoplexy, . . . 
Braib, disease of, 
Bum, . . . 

Change of life, . 
Child-birth, . . 
Congenital, . . 
Convulsions, 
Dissipation, . . 
Epilepsy, . . . 
Excesses, . . . 
Exposure, . . . 

Fall, 

Fever, typhoid. 
Heart disease, . 
Hereditary, . . 

Idiocy, 

Ill health, . . . 
Injury to head. 
Intemperance, . 
Lactation, . . . 
Onanism, . . . 
Opium eating, . 
Over-work, . . . 
Over-study, . . 
Pregnancy, . . 
Puerperal, . . . 
Scarlatina, . . . 
bunstroice, . . . 
Syphilis, .... 



Total physical causes, 



-^ 
S 



1 
8 
1 



2 
1 
7 
24 
4 
1 
1 



16 
8 
85 
10 
59 



7 
2 

27 
2 



2 

10 

6 



s 



224 



4 

1 



14 
5 



8 
1 
9 

62 
4 
4 
1 

• 

1 
6 
1 
1 
81 
2 



157 



1 



4 
2 
3 
1 

14 
5 
2 
1 
7 

81 
4 
1 
1 
8 
1 

25 
8 

97 

14 

63 
1 
7 
3 

83 
8 
1 

31 
4 

10 
6 



881 



Moral Causes. 



Anxiety, .... 
Bereavement, . 
Domestic trouble 
Disappointment, 
Dread of poverty 
Excesses, 
Excitement, 
Fear, . . . 
Fright, . . . 
Grief, . . . 
Homesickness, 
Jealousy, 
Loss of money, 
Loss of friends, 
IjOss of property. 
Love, .... 
Nostalgia, . 
Pecuniary difficulties, 
Religious excitement, 
Spiritualism, .... 

Trouble, 

Want of employment, 



Total moral causes, 
Total physical causes. 

Total assigned causes, 
UnassignMi, 

Number admitted, . 



n 



6 
2 

10 
2 
1 

20 
5 



8 
6 



1 
4 
1 
4 



7 
6 
1 
23 
4 



106 
224 



830 
230 



560 



S 

9 



10 

• • 

19 
7 



6 
2 

15 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
2 
6 
1 

80 



110 
157 



267 
218 



i 



16 
2 

29 
9 
1 

22 
5 
6 
5 

21 
1 
2 
5 
4 
5 
2 
1 
9 

12 
2 

53 
4 



216 
881 



597 
448 



480 



1,040 



250 Board of Public CEABtTiE& [No. 5, 

The assigned caiteea of the patients receivedin the regpecHve hospitals, clas- 
sified as physical or moral, is presented in the folloaing statement : 





Cadsbs of 


IMBANIT*. 


TOT 


AL OF Aa- 

BD CAITBIU. 1 






.HTBIC... 


MORAL. 




HoariTAU. 


1 

2 


1 
1 


1 

31 
01 
26 
12 
11 
22 


i 1 
I ' 

35.64 ' 
40.02 : 
83.33 

42.85 1 
32.26 ' 
41.60 


39 
12G 
45 

17 
76 
28 


1 


i! 


1 


State Hoepltal, BarriBburg, . 
Western HoapiWl, Diimont, 
State Hospital, Danville, . . 
PrieudB' Aaylani, PhUa^ . . 

Philadelphia Hospital, . , . . 


m 

S2 
81 


M.38 
69.38 
66.67 

57.15 
67.72 
68J50 


48 
00 
83 

51 
25 


87 1 
224 

78 j 
28 ' 

127 

681 


60 
S5 
133 
8 
77 

m 


Total, 


374 


62.65 


22S 


.7.85 


830 


267 


507 


448 



Statement exhibiting the number of each sex admitted according to the 
months of the year: 



October, .... 
November, . , . 
I>«ceiaber, , . , 

January 

February, .... 

Maroh, 

April 

Miy 

jtti"^! '.'.'.'.'. 

August, 

September, , . . 

Total admitted. 







«8 IN EACH 


*«"•" 


*•" 




AOOBBOATK. 




A 


^- 


^ 


i, 


M 


J. 










s 






ll-S 


^ 










f 


Sg 


3. 


r- 


-! 


•i . 










|5 




il 




1 
1 


1 


1 


i 


i 
1 


„ 


ifl 


15 


1 


13 


17 


41 


85 


76 


7Jtl 


10 


20 


16 




9 


14 


86 


33 


68 


6.54 


8 


19 


16 




21 


18 




42 


78 


7J0 




22 


20 


2 


11 


6 


41 






7.11 


9 


19 


17 


1 


17 


13 


89 


87 


76 


7.81 


13 


36 




. 4 








49 






13 


19 


16 


2 


22 




46 


37 


83 


7.98 


16 


21 


16 


4 


16 


24 


57 


8» 


06 






16 


30 


3 


14 




50 




97 


0.33 


13 


18 


19 


4 


21 


22 


61 


46 


97 


9.38 


15 


28 


12 


6 


24 


14 


68 


45 


98 


9.42 


U 


22 


20 


3 


16 


15 


61 


37 


88 


6.46 


147 


269 


- 


31 


204 


18S 


m 


480 


1,040 


-" 



The maximum admiseions, 292, occurred in summer ; the minimum, 228, 
in winter. In the epring there were 288 admisaioDS, and in the autumn, 
233. 



XiBG. Doc.] 



Board of Public Chabities. 



251 



IVvaiber of Attack. 

The number of cUtack in the patients received^ is stated thus : 



Attack. 



First, . . 
Second, . 
Third, . . 
Fourth, . . 
Fifth, . . . 
Sixth, . . 
Seventh, . 
Eighth, . . 
Tenth, . . 
Unknown, 



Total admitted, 



ADMISSIONS IN KACH HOSPITAL. 



I* 

I 

so 



117 

18 

10 

2 



147 



I 

i 



^ 



179 
47 
17 
5 
8 
2 
1 



1 
4 



259 



Q 

a . 

iS 9 
00 



187 

25 

7 

1 



41 



211 



c 



27 
8 
1 



81 



S a 
■252 



145 

29 

14 

7 



2 
8 
8 
1 



204 



r 

175 
9 
1 
8 



188 



AGHRBOATE. 



s 
-a 



420 
78 
25 
8 
1 
2 
8 
2 



26 



560 



i 








1 


1 


& 


& 


860 


780 


58 


181 


25 


50 


10 


18 


2 


8 


2 


4 


1 


4 


1 


8 


2 


2 


19 


45 


480 


1,040 



a 
S 

0^ 



78.39 

18.17 

5.08 

1.81 

.30 

.40 

.40 

.80 

.20 



100.00 



Of the known attacks, 780 had not previously saffered i^om the disease ; 
131 were^admitted on second attack; 50 on third attack; 18 on fourth 
attack, and 16 on fifth attack, and upwards. 



252 



Board op Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



Duration of DImwm Before AdmlMloB. 

Of the patients admitted into the respective hospitals, the duration of their 
disease prior to their reception is presented^ as follows : 





1 

ADMISSIONS IN EACH HOSPITAL. , 

1 


t 


AOaREGATE 


» 




db 


1 


1 

6 




•• 

1 


• 

12 












k 


d 


eS 




• ■■4 


■*^ 










Duration. 


State Hospital, Har 
burg. 


Western Hospital, ] 
mont. 


State Hospital, D 
ville. 


Friends* Asylum, 
Philadelphia. 


Pennsylvania Hosp 
Philadelphia. 


1 
Philadelphia Hospi 


1 

6 


1 

2 


3 




CoiiGrenital 






4 


8 




Under 3 months, . . . 


30 


79 


87 


10 


85 


32 1 


141 


132 


273 




3 to 6 months, . . . 


28 


40 


19 


5 


27 


7 


,70 


56 


126 




6 to 12 months, . . . 


30 


89 


27 


2 


20 


10 


1 66 


62 


128 




1 to 2 years, 


12 


81 


22 


5 


34 


13 


; 68 


49 


117 




2 to 3 years, 


14 


17 


10 


2 


12 


9 


38 
19 


26 


64 




3 to 4 years, 


8 


9 


11 


• • ■ 


5 


4 


18 


87 




4 to 6 years, 


2 


6 


9 


2 


8 


4 


14 


12 


26 




5 to 10 years, 


12 


20 


16 


8 


13 


9 ' 


40 


33 


78 




10 to 15 years, 


4 


4 


8 


2 


2 


• • •! 


9 


6 


15 




15 to 20 years, 


2 


3 


2 


• • • 


1 


4 


7 


5 


12 




20 to 30 years, 


2 


4 


2 


« • • 


2 


3 


6 


7 


13 




30 years and upwards, . 
Unknown 


3 


7 


1 






1 


8 


9 


12 








48 






88 


173 
{560 


68 

480 


»^136 
















Total admitted, . . . 


147 


259 


211 


31 


204 


Ids 


1,040 





Patiento Discliari^. 

Of the population, 3,942, or number of patients under treatment during 
the year, viz : 2,043 males, 1,899 females, there were 989 or 25.10 per cent, 
discharged. 

Their condition^ on discharge, is exhibited as follows : 





CONDITION ON DI80HABQE. 




















AOOBBOATN. 




Re- 


Im- 


Unim- 


Died. 


Not In- 




Hospitals. 


Stored. 


proved. 


proved. 


sane. 








i 




i 




i 




i 




s 




i 






i 

15 


a 

14 


i 
1 

10 


B 

r® 

21 


i 

26 


'3 
B 

32 


i 

19 


10 


i 


"3 

a 


1 

70 


-3 

1 

77 


1. 


State Hospital, Harrisburg, 


147 


Western Hospital, Dixmont, 


32 


37 


35 


50 


18 


21 


86 


20 






121 


128 


249 


State Hospital, Danville, . 


23 


10 


17 


7 


30 


14 


22 


4 






92 


35 


127 


Friends' Asylum, Phllad'a, 


7 


6 


5 


4 


5 


8 


4 


2 






21 


15 


116 


Penn'a Hospital, Philad'a, 


44 


47 


80 


25 


16 


12 


22 


17 






112 


101 


218 


Philadelphia Hospital, . . 


11 


18 


21 


17 


5 


1 


78 


70 




1 


110 


107 


217 


T6tal disoharged, .... 


132 


132 


118 


124 


100 


83 


176 


128 


. . 1 


526 


468 


989 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



253 



Of the 989 patients discharged, 264 were restored ; 242 were improved ; 
183 iinimproved; 299 died ; and 1 was found not insane. 





DISCHARGED FROM EACH HOSPITAL. 




\aOREOATE. 




Months. 


State Hospital, Har- 
risburg. 


Western Hospital, 
Dixmont. 


State Hospital, Dan- 

^ ville. 


Friends' Asylum, 
03 Philadelphia. 


Pennsylvania Hos- 
^ pital, Philadelphia. 


i 

24 


Males. 


S 

a 

40 


Total. 


Per cent. 


October, 


13 


22 


57 


97 


9.81 


November, .... 


15 


20 


9 


5 


15 


16 


37 


43 


80 


8.09 


December, 


18 


16 


11 


2 


21 


8 


31 


40 


71 


7.18 


January, 


4 


15 


10 


5 


15 


13 


32 


30 


62 


6.27 


February, 


8 


19 


6 


• • • 


20 


17 


41 


29 


70 


7.08 


March, 


11 


28 


16 


2 


14 


26 


62 


35 


97 


9.81 


April, 


14 


28 


7 


3 


16 


5 


32 


41 


73 


7.38 


May, 


9 


26 


9 


• • • 


16 


18 


42 


36 


78 


7.88 


June, 


17 


19 


10 


2 


21 


28 


43 


54 


97 


9.81 


Jnly, 


23 


19 


6 


5 


24 


21 


58 


40 


98 


9.91 


August, 


11 


19 


19 


8 


15 


21 


61 


42 


93 


9.40 


September, .... 


9 


18 


10 


1 


15 


20 


40 


33 


73 


7.38 


Total discharged, . 


147 


249 


127 


36 


213 


217 


526 


463 


989 


100.00 



The greatest number of discharges, 288, occurred during summer ; the 
next highest, 250, during autumn ; 248 in spring ; and 203 during the 
winter. 



RecoTeriea dartnft the Year. 



0/ the 989 patients discharged during the year^ £64 were reported as dis- 
charged recovered, as exhibited by the following statement : 



HOSPITATjS. 


1 
Population. 


Average num- 
ber. 


29 
69 
33 
13 
91 
29 


PER GENT. RESTORED 
IN EACH HOSPITAL ON 




Popula- 
tion. 


Average 
number. 


■ 

State Hospital, Harrisburg, .... 
Western Hospital, Dixmont, . . . 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Asfvlum, Philadelphia, . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, PhJla., . . 
Philadelphia Hospital, 


673 
858 
571 
122 
619 
1,109 


423.6 
609 
398.2 
87 
413 
99r.8 


5.06 
8.04 
5.78 
10.65 
14.70 
2.42 


6.85 
11.33 

8.29 
15.00 
22.03 

8.00 


Total treated and restored, . . . 


3,942 


2,928.5 


264 


6.70 


9.01 



The largest number restored, in proportion to either the whole or aver- 
age number of patients treated, was in Pennsylvpnia Hospital, Philadel- 



S54 Board or Public Chabities. [No. 5, 

phia i next in Friends' Aaylum, Philadelphia, Weatern HoBpitsl, State Hoa- 
pital, Danville, State Hospital, Uarrisburg, and Philadelphia Hospital, in 
the order named. 



The restored are classified, according to age when attacked, ag follows: 



Under 20 yean, . 
20 to 30 years, . 
80 to 40 years, , . 
40 to 60 years, . . 
60 to 60 years, . . 
60 to 70 yeara, . . 
TO years and up, 
Un known, . . . 



1 

II 
1 


3 


1 


k 

si 
|S 


5 


T 


- 

i 

1 


1 


1 






7 




e 


? 


20 


8 


28 


10.88 




SO 


26 




44 


60 


94 


86.43 




16 


22 








60 


28. as 




14 


28 




23 


33 


55 


21.32 




a 


10 
2 




12 

2 
6 


6 

1 

■ 1 


17 
2 
2 

e 


6-59 

.77 
.77 


wa 


69 


83 


^:'i. 


."- 


182 


132 


284 jlOO.OO 



DnratlMi bebre Tnwlin 



Of the restored patients, the duration of their disease before treatment o 
admission into hospitals, is thtis stated: 





BEOUVXBIES IN ^ACH BOBPITAL. 


„,..»„,. 




1 


s 


|- 


K 


h 


^ 














P 


n 

li 












DlSBASB BBPORB 




-J . 


s-z 












ADUiaaiON. 


1 


f 


1 


i 


ii 
■a 

i 


1 


1 


1 


.J 

i 
I. 










» 


13 


77 




149 


59.36 






























6 




12 




26 


10.S6 






























4 

1 




e 

1 

2 




S 
6 
6 


3.18 
2.39 
2.00 












s 


11 




18 














11 1 29 


182 


132 


264 


100.00 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Pubug Ghabities. 



255 



Of the patients whose duration of disease was known, over one half, or 
149 had the disease less than three months ; 44 had the disease firom three 
to six months ; in 26 eases it had existed from six to twelve months ; 13, 
firom one to two years; 8, from two to three years; and in 11 cases the 
disease had existed for three years and upwards. 

Period of Treatment. 

T?ie patients restored had been under treatment for the following periods: 









RBOOVERIBS IN EACH HOSPITAL. 




AGGREGATE 


t 




i 


1 


1 


•> 


il 


i 












a 


a 


& 


3 A 


W'S, 


w 










Duration op 


If 

QQ 




state Hospital, 
vlfie. 


Friends' Asy 
Philadelphj 


Pennsylvania 
pital, PhUadel 


ri • 










Treatment. 


Western B 
Dixmo 


PhUadel phii 
pital 


i 
•a 


i 
s 


Total. 


i 
1 


Under 1 month, 










1 

• • • 


• • • 
8 


3 
12 


1 
1 


5 
11 


• a • 

8 


5 
19 


1.90 


1 to 2 months, . . 




2 


1 


7.20 


2 to 3 months, . 






6 


7 


5 


4 


17 


2 


20 


21 


41 


16.53 


3 to 4 months, . 






4 


12 


4 


• • • 


17 


• • • 


19 


18 


37 


14.00 


4 to 6 months, . , 






8 


10 


4 


1 


11 


1 


12 


18 


30 


11.36 


5 to 6 months, . , 






8 


4 


4 


1 


6 


• • > 


11 


7 


18 


6.81 


6 to 9 months, . , 






4 


13 


5 


1 


11 


1 


17 


18 


35 


13.26 


9 to 12 montiis, . 






2 


12 


8 


1 


6 


4 


14 


14 


28 


10.60 


12 to 15 months, , 






• ■ • 


5 


8 


• • • 


4 


4 


7 


9 


16 


6.06 


15 to 18 months, . 






■ • • 


1 


1 


• • • 


1 


3 


3 


8 


6 


2.27 


18 to 24 months, . 






• • ■ 


• • • 


• ■ • 


2 


2 


5 


2 


7 


9 


3.41 


2 years and up, . 






5 


4 


8 


• • • 


1 


7 


11 


9 


20 


7.60 


Total restored. 




> ■ 


29 


69 


83 


18 


91 


29 


182 


182 


264 


100.00 



From the above we learn that 65 were restored in the first three months 
of hospital treatment; 85 were restored in three to six months' treatment; 
35 were six to nine months' under treatment ; 28 were under treatment 
from nine to twelve months; 31 were treated from one to two years ; and 
20 were under treatment for two years and upwards. 



256 



Board op Public Charities. 



[No. 6 , 



Whole Dnmtloa of DiMaie. 

The whole duration of disease from beginning of attack of those restored^ 

is presented thus : 







RECOVERIES IN EACH 1 


SOSPITAL. 


4 


AOORE 


,GATB. 






^ 


3 


1 


a 


ii 


^ 










» 


•9^ 


P 




W a 


W 










Whole Duration. 


pqT: 
1 

1 


Western Hos 
Dixmout. 


1 . 

^ 9 

QQ 

1 


9 

00,^5 

Is 

8 




•2d 

•a.3 
© ^ 

• • • 


i 

rA 
11 


1 

1 


• 

1 


•*> 
c 

8 


Under 3 months, . . 


1 


14 


9 


20 


7.87 


S to 6 months, . . 




8 


16 


6 


4 


27 


2 


81 


32 


63 


24.80 


6 to 9 months, . , 




6 


16 


5 


2 


20 


2 


26 


25 


51 


20.08 


9 to 12 months, . 




2 


10 


2 


1 


8 


10 


10 


23 


33 


13.00 


1 to 2 years, . . 




5 


19 


8 


• • • 


15 


4 


24 


27 


51 


20.08 


2 to 8 years, . . 




2 


4 


■ • • 


2 


5 


7 


11 


9 


20 


7.87 


3 to 6 years, . . 
6 years, and up, , 
Unknown. . . . 




4 


2 


2 


• • • 


2 


1 


5 


6 


11 


4.33 




1 


1 








8 


6 




5 


1.97 








9 


' 1 


• • 


• • • 


9 


1 


10 












Total restored, 


» • 


29 


69 


83 


13 


91 


29 


182 


182 


264 


100.00 



Of the 254 restored, whose whole duration of disease was known, in 20 
it had existed for less than three months ; in 63 the disease had existed 
from three to six months ; in 51 cases, from six to nine months ; in 83 it 
had existed from nine to twelvemonths; in 51 eases, from one to two 
years; in 20 cases, from two to three years ; in 11, from three to six years; 
and in 5 cases the disease had existed six years, and upwards. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



25Y 



Form of DIseaae. 

The form of insanity manifested on admissions by the patients restored^ 

was as follows: 





RECOVERIES IN EACH HOSPITAL. 


AQQRBOATB. 


Form of Diseass. 


State Hospital, Har- 
risburg. 


Western Hospital, 
Dixmont. 


State Hospital, Dan- 
ville. 


Friends' Asylum, 
Philadelphia. 


Pennsylvania Hospi- 
tal, Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia Ho». 
pical. 


i 


& 

31 

45 

7 

7 
34 

1 
7 


• 

56 
99 
13 

7 
64 

8 
17 


Per cent. 


Mania 






ne. 




25 

54 

6 

• • • 

30 

7 

10 


21.21 


Mania, acute, .... 
Mania, chronic, . . . 
Mania, paerperal, . 
Melancholia, .... 
Monomania 


9 

4 

4 

12 


51 

8 


22 


5 


• • • 


. . . 
12 

1 
3 

1 

• • • 

12 


87.50 
4.92 








2.65 


10 


11 


7 


23 
8 
4 


24.24 
3.03 


Dementia, 


• . . 






1 


6.46 




... 








Total restored, . . 


29 


69 


33 


13 


91 


29 


132 


132 


264 


100.00 



Two-thirds, 175, of the patients restored had mania in some of its forms ; 
64 had melancholia ; 8 had monomania ; 17 had dementia. 



17— B. P. Char. 



258 



/ 



Board of Public CHARiTiEa 

Caowt of losanlly. 



[No. 5 , 



The causes of mental derangement in the patients restored^ were assigned 

by friends^ as follows : 



Physical Causes. 



Child-birth, 

Di8si|)ation, 

Disordered menstrua- 
tion, 

Exposure, 

Fall, 

Hereditary, 

Ill-health 

Injury to head, .... 
Intemperance, . . . . 

Over- work, 

Parturition, 

Pregnancy, 

Pueri)eral, 

Sunstrolce, 

Hvphilid, 

X^terine, 

Venery, 

Total physical causes, 



'a 



1 
1 

3 
12 

8 

21 

6 



59' 



s 







o 
23 
1 
2 
8 
1 
2 
13 



1 
1 
1 
8 

35 
9 

23 
9 
1 
2 

13 
5 
1 
8 
1 




MOBAL CaUSKS. 


i 
1 


1 
'3 

B 

5 
3 

8 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 

• • 
■ • 

3 

1 

• • • 


Total. 

1 


Anxiety^ 

Disappomtment, . . 


5 


10 
3 


1 Domestic trouble, . . 

Excesses, 

Excitement, 

Fright, 

Grief, 

Lk)hs of friends, • . . . 


1 
5 
1 
2 
2 


9 
6 
3 

4 
6 
1 


Ijosa of property, . . 
Pecuniary troubles, . 
Religious excitement, 

Troubles, 

Want of employment. 

Total moral causes, . 
Total physical causes, 

Total assigned causes, 
Unassigned, .... 

Numt)er restored. 


2 
3 
3 
6 

1 


2 
3 
A 

7 
1 


31 
59 


30 
65 


61 
124 


90 
42 


95 
87 


185 
79 


132 


132 


264 



Mortality In HotplCalt for lOMiBe. 



Of the population, 3,942, there were 299, or T.6 per cent., died, viz : 176 
males, 123 females. 

The rate of mortality in the population^ also of average number of patients 

in the respective hospitals j is shown as follows: 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, . 
Western Hospital, Dixmont, 
State Hospital, Danville, . . 
Friends Asylum, Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Phila., 
Philadelphia Hospital, .... 



Total treated and died. 



s 
o 



9 



673 
858 
571 
122 
619 
1,199 



8,912 





«M 


9 ih 


. 


^9 




© a 






^ 


423.5 


29 


609 


56 


398.2 


26 


87 


6 


413 


39 


997.8 


143 


2,928.5 


299 



PER CRNT. DIED IN 
EACH HOSPITAL ON— 



Population. 



5.1 
*6.6 
4.6 
5.0 
6.3 
12.0 



7.6 



Average 
number. 



6.8 
9.2 
6.6 
7.0 
9.4 
14.3 



10.2 



As stated above, the ratio of mortality upon the population, or the total 
number treated, was 7.6 per cent. ; on the average number of patients, the 
rate of mortality was 10.2 per cent. 



Lkq. Doc,] 

The period of residence i 



Board of Public Crabities. 



the hoepitala of the deceased patients is thus 
exhibited : 







BE«0 


rPiT,B«X8 


DECBA 


«»■ 




AOORBaATE 




Period of 
Rmidbnob. 


1 

II 
1 

2 

2 
1 
2 
.2 


% 

ft 
s 

3 

8 

18 

'e 

6 
2 


1 

1 


a 

n 

i 


It 


f 


^ 


1 




1 

1 


Under 1 month, 

1 to 2 months, . 

2 to 4 months,. 
4 to 6 months, . 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . . 

2 to4 years, . . 
4U>6years,. . 
SloByeam, . . 
etoWyOttrs, . 






4 
3 

e 
1 

6 
3 


1 
"i 


8 
1 
4 
7 


12 
8 
7 
6 
9 

IB 

18 
12 
3 
18 


17 

8 
15 
18 
12 
29 
81 
20 

4 

10 


17 
10 

22 
12 
10 


34 
11 

25 

15 
48 
63 
32 
21 
6 
24 


11.37 
3.68 

8.36 
7.69 


1 

2 


8 

' '4 

1 
4 


16.05 
17.72 


1 

. . . 


' 1 


7.02 

2.68 




1 
















Total died. 






2S 


56 


26 


a 


S9 


143 


176 


123 


299 1 100.00 



Here we learn of the 399 deatha, 34 occurred during the first month of 
admission; II had resided inf he hospitals from one to two months ; 25 from 
two to four months; S3 from four to six months; 16 fi-om six to twelve 
months ; 48 from one to two years ; 53 from two to four years ; SSI from 
four to six years ; 8t from six to eight years ; 8 from eight to ten years ; 
34 from ton to twenty years ; and & for twenty years and over. 



BoAKs .OF Public Chabities. [No. 5, 

The ages of Ike deceased patients is thus exhibited ; 







P„,C 


...„ 


P„,. 


MT9. 






oatb 






1 


■4 




1} 




1 










Aqe at Deoease. 


1^ 

n 

1 


f 


is 


1 


i 

■s 

1 


^ 


i 


1 


1 

1 


Uuder20yeara.. . . 


1 










10 


9 


3 


12 


4.01 


£0 to 30 years, . 




7 


8 






fi 


1!4 


28 


20 


48 


i6.oa 


30 to 40 years, . 




5 












80 


31 










S 


11 






6 


89 


38 


27 


66 


21.74 


50 to 60 yesre, . 




S 


H 










31 


26 


66 


18.73 


60 to 70 years, . 
























TO yeaia aad up, 




S 


G 






6 


8 


14 


IB 


27 


9.03 




29 


60 


26 




39 


143 


178 


123 


299 


100.00 



Of the deceased patients, the smallest number died between sixty and 
seventy years of age ; the largest number between thirty and forty years 
of f^. 



The forms of insamtif, as manifested on admission of the patients, since 
deceased. 





,„...o 


P PATIENTS DECEA 


.„. 


AOaRBOATB. 




1 


i 

i 


i 


H 




i 










Forms. 


'ij. 




1^ 


1 




s ■ 












f 






ti 
f 


J j 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 
1 












16 


■■6' 


11 

13 


6 
9 


16 
23 




Mania, acute 


4 


4 


7 


2 


7.BB 




8 


27 


8 


1 






m 






19.78 




8 




1 






































Dementia, sentle, . . 






















9 


14 


7 


2 


4 


S i 


82 


9 


41 


18.71 


























1 


4 


a 


I 




ao, 


2fi 


4 


29 


9.70 






































Total deceased, . . 


29 


GO 


20 


e 


89 


i» 


176 


128 


399 


100.00 



Lko. Doc] Board of Public Charities. Sfil 

Mania waa manifested in the several forma specified in 119 cases of the 
deceased patients, on admission; dementia and dementia eeniie in 109; 
melanchoiia lias developed in 41 ; paresis in 29 ; and imbecility in 1 case. 



The duration of insaniti/ in the deceased patienlg is exhibited in the next 
atatementftkus: 







SOUBBR o 


„„.,.„. 


DECEASES. 


.«»..„„.. 




i 


1 


i 


F 


*.s 


* 
















X4 














Do RATI OS. 


^1 


1 




4 

•03 




1 


J 


s 


■^ 


t 




^ 


S 


i 


b 


a^ 


a 


h 


S 


& 


Under S months, . . 




3 


3 


1 


7 


1 






17 


9.2S 






















4.92 


6 to 12 moDthB, 






5 


4 


2 


5 




11 




17 


9.29 










8 


1 


7 


8 


16 




22 


12.02 


























3 to 4 vears, 

4 to 5 years, 






2 


3 

1 




I 

2 


7 
8 


10 
8 




17 
9 


9.29 
492 


5 In 10 vears, 






H 


2 


2 


3 


5 


19 


14 


33 


18.03 


10to20ve8rs, . . 


3 


10 


I 




3 


5 


11 




22 


12.02 




2 




2 






2 


7 


6 


12 


6.68 








S 






111 


70 


46 


116 
















Toua deceased, . . 


29 


60 











Of the 183 whose duration of insanity was known, S3 had the disease 
less than one year ; 13 from one to five years ; 33 from tive to ten years ; 
S2 from ten to twenty years ; and 13 for twenty years and over. 



262 



Board of Public Chabitie8. 



[No. 5 , 



Cmmm of Death. 



Hie diseases^ etc., which terminated with fatal result to the 299 patients j 

were as follows : 



Diseases, etc. 



Abscess of neck, . . 

Acute mania, exhaus- 
tion of, . . 

Acute melancholia, ex- 
haustion of, .... 

Appoplexy, .... 

Asthenia, 

Asthenia, senile, . . 

Brain, disease of, . . 

Bright 'h disease, . . 

Bronchitis, 

Cerebritus, 

Chronic insanity, ex- 
haustion of, . . 

Chronic mania, exhaus- 
tion of, .... 

Chronic melancholia, 
exhaustion of, . . 

Consumption, . . . 

Dysentery, 

Epilepsy, . . . 

Epileptic convulsions. 

Gangrene, senile, . . . 

Heart, disease of, . . . 

Hernia, strangulated, . 

Inanition, 





i 


3 


o 


^ 


• • • 


1 


5 


10 


7 


1 


11 


9 


3 


6 


2 


10 


18 


7 


3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


• V • 


1 


• • • 


11 


7 


1 


• • • 


9 


8 


4 




9 


4 


3 


1 


1 




6 


6 


• « • 


1 


1 


2 



3 



15 

8 

20 

9 

12 

25 

6 

3 

1 



18 

1 , 
17 ! 

4 
13 

4 

1 
12 

1 

3 



DiBEASBB, ETC. 



Iniussusoeption, . . 
Liver, oirrhoasis of, . 
Ijungs, disease of, . . 
Manui, puerperal, . . 

Marasmus, 

Old age, 

Paralysis, 

Paresis, 

Peritonitis, 

Plithisis, 

Pneumonia, 

Rectum, cancer of, . . 

Scorbutis, 

Septicaemia, 

Spinal Botlening, . . 
Stomach, disease of, . 
Stomach, uloer of, . . 
Strangulation, acci- 
dental, 

vSuioide, 

Uterus, cancer of, . . 

Total deceased, . . . 



I 



27 

28 



176 



B 

[Z4 / 



1 

• • 

1 

• • 

6 
29 

■ • 

1 
1 
1 
2 



1 
2 



123 



3 



1 
1 
8 

1 
1 
2 
3 

33 
1 

57 
4 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
2 
2 



299 



Of the 299 deaths, 57 were caused by phthisis, being nearly one fifth of 
the whole number ; 33 from paresis ; 25 from disease of brain ; 20 from 
appoplexy; 18 from exhaustion of chronic mania; IT from consumption; 
15 from exhaustion of acute mania; 13 from epilepsy; 12 from senile as- 
thenia, and the same number from heart disease. 



Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



263 



RemabilBii In the HoapitoU. 

Statement of the number of resident patients in the respective hospitals at 

the end of the year^ September 30^ 1879. 



BE 



Hospitals. 



Htate Hospital, Harrisburg, 

Western Hospital, Dlxmont, 

State Hospital, Danville, 

Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, .... 
Pennsvlyania Hospital, Philadelphia, . 
Philadelphia Hospital, 

Total remaining, September 30, 1879, 



8 

-a 

212 
350 
253 
41 
202 
459 


i 
s 


• 

r 

426 
609 
444 
86 
406 
982 


214 
259 
191 
45 
204 
523 


1,517 


1,436 


2,958 



s 
8 

Ok 



14.42 
20.62 
15.04 
2.91 
13.75 
33.26 

100.00 



How Supported. 

Of the resident patients^ the following statement toill exhibit thie number 
maintained by public authorities and by self or friends^ in each hospital: 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, , 
Western Hospital, Dixmont, 
State Hospital, Danville, 



Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Hospital, 

Total September 30, 1879, .... 



ii 



BY WHOM SUPPORTED. 






219 
612 
397 

♦58 

982 



2,168 



5^ 

^ a 



207 
97 
47 
86 

358 



Percent, on No, 
supported in 
each hospital. 



5 






426 
609 
444 

86 
406 
982 



51.41 
84.07 
89.41 

■ • • • 

13.05 
100.00 



790 



2,953 73.25 



Q0£ 



48.59 
15.93 
10.59 
100.00 
86.95 



28.75 



* By funds of hospital. 

Of the 1,479 patients residing in the State hospitals, (first three named,) 
more than three fourths, 1,128, were maintained by public authorities, and 
361 , by self of friends. This is a slight improvement on the preceding year 
when the proportion of public to private patients was as T 5 to 25. 



2S4 BoABD OF Public CnARiTiES. [Xo. 5, 

P«fK>4 or H«Men». 

The resident patients in the kospilals on September SO, 1879, were classi- 
fied, according to their residence, as/ollowa : 





m 


IIBER 


INK 


CH H 


sr 


" 


"• 




AOOB 


8ATB 








S 


1. 


r 


i 


^i 


T" 












a 


B 


=1 


s 










Resided OE. 


It 
II 

l_ 


I| 


li 

S3 
S 


=5 


Is 


It 


3 


X 


1 


i 


Under 1 montb, . . 




20 


20 


4 




13 


38 


S3 


89 


2.71 


I to 2monthB, . , 






9 


5 






12 


25 


28 


S3 


2 


08 


2 to Smontha, , . 






Ifi 


4 






S 


23 


33 


66 


2 


20 


8 to 4 months, . . 




n 


29 


2 






4 


35 


33 


68 


2 


«7 


4 to e montha, . . 




IT 


13 








22 


34 


31 


85 


2 




5 (o 8 monlhs, . . 




12 




1 






18 


25 


18 


41 


1 


0t 


6 to B months; . , 




33 


41 


1 






27 


69 




123 


4 


83 


9 to 12 monllia, . . 




29 


33 


1 






3S 


54 


61 


115 


4 


51 


12 La t5 iiionthB, . , 




32 


21 


6 






38 


53 


59 


112 


4 


40 


15 to 18 months, . . 




20 


le 


1 






4 


2(1 


£3 


49 


1 


92 


18 to 24 moiUlia, . . 


30 




2« 


2 






13 


70 


44 


114 


4 


48 


2 to Syeare,. . . . 


31 


70 


39 


3 






128 


151 


118 


289 


10 


5« 


3 to 6 years, .... 


52 


77 


04 


S 






173 


199 


175 


374 


14 


69 


5 to 10 vears, .... 


85 


133 


111 


18 






24 1 


312 


279 


591 


23 


20 


10 to 15 years, .... 


45 


43 




2 






113 




104 


203 


7 


97 


15 to 20 years, . . . . 




22 




8 






75 




72 


131 


5 


14 


20 years, and over, . 




9 




20 






56 


45 


89 


114 




48 












'406 




202 


201 


408 
















Total, 


420 


609 


444 


86 


406 


982 


1,517 


1,436 


2,953 


100.00 



It will be observed that of the 2,54T patients whose residence was known, 
only 118 had been less tlian three months in the hospitals ; 174 had resided 
from three to six months ; 238 IVom sis to twelve months ; 275 fVora one 
to two years ; 645 from two to five years ; 591 from five to ten years ; and 
448 had been residents in the hospitals for ton years, and upwards. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



265 



Ponns of iBMUilty. 

The forms of disease manifested by the resident patients, are thus exhibited : 



Form of Dibkasr. 



Mania, . - 

Mania, acute, .... 
Mania, ohronlo, . . . 
Mania, epileptic, . . 
Mania, puerperal, . . 
Melancholia, .... 
Melancliolia, acute, . 
Melancholia, chronic. 
Monomania, .... 

Dementia, 

Dementia, senile, . . 

Imbecility, 

General paralysis, . . 
Unassigned, 



Total, 



NUMBER IN EACH HOSPITAL. 



3 



8JD 
S 



02 



19 

116 

25 

5 



12 
88 
8 
1S9 
6 
5 
3 



426 



3 

cu 

trjS 

5Q 



87 

319 

81 

9 



28 
98 

7 
23 

2 
21 

9 



609 



I 

d 

a 
s 



212 

72 

12 

8 

61 



12 
44 

3 
16 

4 



444 



5a8 

o 



35 






14 



4 I • • • 
32 . . . 



86 



406 



406 












44 

125 

129 

1 

12 
12 

2 

547 

22 

82 

6 



982 



16 
178 
384 
121 

• • 

40 
28 

103 
22 

317 
20 
64 
22 

202 



1,617 



AaORBOATE. 






19 

184 

278 

76 

23 

85 

19 

95 

11 

468 

18 

61 

204 



1,436 



I 



85 
312 
662 
197 

23 

75 

47 
198 

33 
785 

33 
125 

22 
406 



2,953 



d 

8 



1.38 

12.25 

26.00 

7.73 

.90 

2.94 

1.85 

7.77 

1.29 

30.82 

1.29 

4.91 

.87 



100.00 



Of the 2,547 patients whose disease was known, nearly one half, 1229, 
had mania in some of its forms ; 320 had melancholia in some of its forms; 
33 had monomania ; 818 had dementia; 125 were imbeciles; and 22 had 
paralysis. 



266 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Duration of Disease Before AdmlaaioB. 

Of the resident patients^ the following statement will exhibit the duration 
of their disease before admission into the respective hospitals. 



Duration Before 
Admission. 



Congenital, . . . 

Under 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 6 years, . 
6 to 10 years, 

10 years and over. 
Unknown, . . . 



Total remaining, 



NUMBER IN EACH HOSPITAL. 



m 

cud 



64 
79 
50 
77 
96 
36 
24 



426 



i 


t 

1 


3 


•^ 


Hospi 
mont. 


ospita] 
ville. 


E 


JI2 


0) 






1 


^ 


02 


21 


13 


107 


38 


65 


27 


61 


33 


89 


47 


113 


83 


83 


59 


58 


53 


12 


91 


609 


444 






iS 



Si 



MS 

a 



2 






14 






3 






7 






13 






17 






16 






14 




• • 


406 


86 


4 


06 



5 

a 

I 

Hi 



8 
26 
15 
14 
19 
39 
22 
15 
824 



982 



AOOBEGATE. 



I 



22 
134 

95 

89 
132 
187 
100 

82 
676 



9 
S 

9 



22 
115 

9i 

76 
113 
161 
116 

82 
657 



1,517 



1,436 



3 



44 

249 
189 
165 
245 
348 
216 
164 
1,333 



o 



2.72 
15.37 
11.67 
10.19 
15.12 
21.48 
13.33 
10.12 



2,953 



100.00 



Of the number whose duration of disease was known, 44 eases were con- 
genital ; in 249 cases, the disease had existed less than three months ; in 189, 
from three to six months ; in 165, from six to twelve months ; in 245, from 
one to two years ; in 348, from two to five years ; in 216, from five to ten 
years ; in 164, for ten years and upwards, and in 1,333 cases the duration 
was unknown. 



Lbg. Doc] 



Board op Public Charities. 



267 



Protpe<t of RcaloratloB. 

Of the resident patients, the number probably curable and incur able^ is 

indicated as follows : 





1 

NUMBER IN BACH HOSPITAL. 


1 


AOORBOATE. 




m 




1 


1 


ti 


Si 












Probabilities. 


ite Hospital, 
risburg. 


X o 

B 
a M 

|i5 


±e Hospital, 
vilie. 


l?2 


98 —4 

i| 


iladelpbia 
pital. 


1 

s 


i 
1 


3 


9 

u 


• 


53 


97 


OQ 


1^ 


fifl 


66 


137 


118 


& 




Curable, 


34 


5 


• A ■ 


255 


10.00 


Incurablef 


373 


512 


410 


81 


• ■ 


916 


1,178 


1,114 2,292 


90.00 


l^ot stated, 










406 


• • • 


202 


204 406 

1 
















Remaining, . . 


426 


609 


444 


86 


406 


982 


1,517 


1,436 2,953 


100.00 



Of the 2,953 patients in the hospitals on September 30, 1879, the above 
table shows the probabilities of the number curable and incurable at that 
date of 2,547, of which number, 255, or 10 per cent, were supposed to be 
curable, and 2,292, or 9 per cent, incurable. 

The extent to which the hospitals are occupied with chronic or incurable 
insane, also, the proportion in each hospital supposed to be curable, is 
presented as follows : 



Hospitals. 



State Hospital, Harrisburg, 

Western Hospital, Dixmont, .... 

State Hospital, Danville 

Friends' Asylum, Philadelphia, . . . 
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Hospital, 



Total remaining, 



CURABLE. 



i 



27 

52 

19 

3 



86 



137 






26 

45 

15 

2 



30 



118 



INCURABLE 


be 






B 






a 






'3 










3 






O 






M 




s 




i 

3 


1 


B 


;^ 


^ 


426 


185 


188 


298 


214 


609 


234 


176 


444 


88 


43 


86 
406 
982 


'428 


493 


1,178 


1,114 


2,953 



PER CENT. 

IN EACH 
HOSPITAL. 



d 



12.44 

15.98 

8.21 

6.00 

6.72 



g 

d 
o 



87.56 
84.07 
91.79 
94.00 

93.28 



10.00 



90.00 



268 Board op Public Chaeitibs. [No. 5, 

CoBpllcattcB*. 

Of the 2,953 patients resideni at Iheenio/tke year, 349, or 11.61 per cent., 
had complications existing in connection with their insanity. 





"TlTHCO^S 


MCAToyr 


i^ ■ 




.«,...„.. 




^ 


^ 


s 




3 


^ 






!i 


Complications. 


a 


1 


'H 


|i 


li 








'l 




II 


|| 


P 




si 


1 




* 


ii 




31 


1 

2a 


3 


1 


s 


1 


iS 




1 


BpUeptio, 


25 




m 


ISl 


80 


211 


7.1* 


























19 


19 










27 


S8 


60 








- 




Total with oompll- 












catlons, 


6T 


76 




• 















RclBllTM luau. 

The only information we have on this interesting subject, was received 
from the Western Ho^ipital, Dixmont, the State Hospitat, Danville, Friends' 
Asylum, Fltiladelphiu, and the Philadelphia Hospital. 



liBG. Doc] 



BoABD OP Public Charities. 



269 





WESTERN 
HOSPITAL, 
DIXHONT. 


STATE 
HOSl'ITAL, 
DANVILLE. 


FRIENDS^ 

ASYLUM, 

rUlLAD'A. 


PHILADEL- 1 

PHIA 
HOSPITAL. 


RECAPITULATION. 


In SAKE 
RBLATIOM8. 


• 

s 

"3 

8 
12 
18 
11 

14 
9 

4 
7 


• 

i 


i 


• 

• 
B 

V 


(ft 

-a 


• 

< 

a 

V 1 
PE| 1 


• 

IB 

V 

-a 


i 

"3 
§ 


• 

s 

8 

28 
20 
20 
21 
17 

6 
12 

5 


i 

"3 

i 


■ 

3 


BotH parents, . . . 
On fkther^B stde . . 


4 

10 
9 
9 
7 
6 
8 
6 


• • • • 

8 
6 
8 
5 
8 
2 
8 
6 


10 


t 




6 

18 

24 

18 

7 

11 

8 

7 

8 


8 








4 
5 

4 

» • « • 

1 


41 


On mother^s side. 
Mother lusane,. . . 
leather ina&ni*. . . . 


• • ■ « 
■ • « • 


• • ■ 1 

1 


44 
88 

28 


Brother insane, . . 
Brother anil sister. 




1 


• • • ' 1 

• • • • 


28 

9 


Cousins insane, . . 
Sisters insane. . . . 




1 

• • ■ • 


....... 

• • • • , A 
m • • • • 


1 
4 


19 
18 












78 


68 


48 


26 


2 


8 


9 


19 


127 


101 


228 



In the above hospitals, there were 2,121 patients on September 30, 1879, 
of which number 228, or 10.75 per cent, had insane relatives. 

lodigent Insane. 

The number of indigent insane remaining in the hospitals at the end of 
the year 1874, was 1,855 ; at the close of 1876, they increased to 1,955 ; at 
the end of 1876, to 2,051 ; at the end of 1877, to 2,221 ; at the end of 1878, 
to 2,053 ; and on September 30, 1879, they aggregated 2,107. 



270 



Board op Public Charities. 



[Xo. 5 , 



The following statement exhibits the several counties maintaining them^ 

to wit : 



Counties Main- 
taining [NDl- 


STATE Hos- 
pital, I 
Hakrisburq 

1 


Westeun 
Hospital, 

DiXHONT. 


State Hos- 
pital, 
Danville. 


Philadel- 

PUIA 

Hospital. 


Aggbsgatk. 


OKNT Insane IN 
Hospitals. 


• 


■ 

1 

a 


■ 

s 


1 

S 
« 


• 

1 


■ 

i 


• 


■ 

• 

€ 


• 

s 

-a 


1' 


3 


AllejrhenT, .... 




1 

149 1 106 

8 1 8 

16 1 2 










I 

15 

4 


IQS 

4 
* 

2 

7 

• • ■ ■ 

• • • > 

• • • 

10 

2 

11 

V 

10 
a 

666 

2 


^ 


Armstrong,". . . . 


' ' 1 ! ! ! ! 


.... 








jj 


Beaver, 




1 

8 








19 


Bedford, . . . . 


4 








s 


Berks, 










2 


Blair, 


2 


. ' \ . 








1 

2 
' 9 

9 

1 J2 

9 

6 

10 

1 fl 
1 

1 6 
1 
1 

i 26 

1 1 
1 8 
1 2 
' 2 
1 4 
' 6 
1 2 
' 6 


5 


Bradford, 


1 


... 1 . . . 


■ • ij "7I 




19 


Buckfi, 


1 


. . . . ' 


' . . . . 1 - . - . 


1 






1 


Butler, 


1 


1 " 

1 . . . . 


> • . 1 


1 






28 


Cauibrla, 

Carbon, 


... t . . . . 
. . . . 1 . . . . 1 


1 • • ■ ■ 

2 


■ • • 


1 • • • 1 • • • 1 


14 

2 


Centre, 


...'... 1 






1 9 


" 10 


1 .... ' - - - . 


19 


Chester, 


9 1 12' 

3 ' 

* * * * 1 










21 


Clarion, 


10 


2 




... i| . . . . 

.... 1 1 - - • - 





14 


Clearfield, 


1 ' 9 
1 10 


8 1 
12 
6 




12 


Clinton, 


; : : :i: : : : 






1 




17 


Columbia, 


....!.... 






1 • • 

|. . . . 


1 

• • > • 


16 


Crawford, 




6 


18' 


19 


Cumberland, . . . 


1 1 2' 
5 ' B 






' ' ' '\ 


8 


Daupbin, ..... 








....''---- 




11 


Delaware, 


1 


1 






• > • • 




1 1 


1 


Elk, 


. ^ . . 1 


1 
25 

1 
8 


2i 
16 1 

1 

1 






1 


s 


Eric, ., 


1 1 

• ■ • • • • ' 

1 1 




. . .,,. . . . 




4i 


Fayette, 




... It... 




2 


Forest, 




1 




... 1 I ... . 




4 


Franklin, 


2 

2 


'"W 




1 1 




9 


Fulton, 








1 1 




8 


Greene, 


1 


4 


2 




.... II ... . 




A 


Huntingdon, . . . 


6 


6 I 




.... 1 1 ... . 




11 


Indiana, 


2 
5 






.... 1 1 ... • 




2 


Jefferson, 






■ '2 

1 




.... 1 1 ... . 




7 


Juniata, 




2; 




1 1 


. ... 1 


2 


Lackawanna, . . . 






1 


1 20 


24 


1 


.... 1 

1 


20 
2 

2 
1 ^^ 

1 6 

1 3 

1 16 

1 8 

1 6 

! 4 

19 

4 

8 

M6 


44 


Lancaster, 


2 


1 i 




. . . .1 


1 • • • • 


... .1 


8 


Lawrence, 


12 


10 






t • • • • 

1 




22 


Lebanon, 


2 

1 


2| 






1. . . . 




4 


Luzerne, 






1' ' 80 

1 ■ 6 


27 
11 


1 




68 


Lycoming, .... 












16 


McKeau, 




" "l| 


8 
16 


2 
10 






6 


Mercer, 












25 


Mlflllu, 


8 

• ■ • • 


2l 

• • • 1 










6 


Monroe, 


• • • ■ 




6 

4 


2 
6 






7 


Montour, 






10 


Montgomery, . . . 


10 
4 

■ • ■ • 

86 


16 

1 1 
7 
17 










14 


Northampton, . . 














6 


North u m berland, 






6 
60 


1 
28 

1 
2 






14 


Philadelphia, . . . 






1 450 


623 


1,111 
1 


Pike, 






Potter, 










1 • • • • 
1 


i * ' * ■ 


. . . .j|. . . . 


2 


Schuylkill, 


12 


14; 






|. . . . 

1 . . . . 


1 • • • • 


■ • • '1 


12 

1 
1 9 
1 7 
1 8 
7 
6 
, 4 
1 6 
1 8 

! 9 

4 


26 


Sullivan, 






1 
9 
7 
8 


1 

6 

18 

1 




. . . .| 


2 


Susquehanna, . . . 












. . . .| 


15 


Tioga, 


. 










.... 1 
1 


90 


Union, 


.... 








r • * • 




4 


VcnanKo, .... 






7 
6 
4 


4 
4 
6 


i. . . . 




11 


Washington, . . . 










1 • . . . 




10 


AVarren, 






1 . . . 








9 


Wayne, * 






1 ^ 


■'4 






9 


Westmoreland, . . 






8 


2 


1 ■ ' * • 




5 


Wyoming, 






1 9 


4 


1 . . . . 
1 . . . . 




18 


York, 


4 


* ' ' 2 






1 . , , , 




6 


















Total, 


119 


100 

1 


802 


*" 


1 231 


166 


460 


628 

1 


],U1 


986 


2,107 



XiEG. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 271 

There were, in addition to the foregoing, 2,107 indigent patients, 53 free 
patients, viz : 16 males, 37 females, in the Pennsylvania Hospital, making 
a total of 2,160, or 1,127 males 1,033 females, being an increase of 57 on 
the previous year. 

MBCHAx^lCAL RESTRAI!VT8. 
State Hovpltal, Uarrlaborg. 

Four men and eight women, with the sleeves or wristlets, to prevent 
destruction of clothing or personal injury, were placed under restraint 
during the past year ; and the time varied from a few hours to several 
weeks, as in cases of threatened personal injury at night. 

ftUte Hospital, Dixmont. 

No record is kept of patients placed under restraint. It is only used 
when impossible to control b}^ any other means, and removed as soon as 
patient is well enough. 

State Hoapltaly DanTiile. 

No record is kept of patients placed under restraint. Yesterday there 
was one male secluded both morning and afternoon. There were six males 
restrained during the morning, and seven during the afternoon. There 
were three females secluded during the forenoon, and four in the after- 
noon. 

Friend** Atylani, Philadelphia. 

There is no restraint employed, except the occasional use of bed straps 
for violent patients, and the occasional use of camisoles for destructive 
patients. 

Peniwylvaiila Hoapltal, Philadelphia. 

Occasionally a patient is confined in bed by mechanical means, this 
method being better than holding the patient by attendants. On an average, 
probably two patients have their hands confined to prevent them tearing 
their clothes off. . 

Philadelphia Hoapltal. 

We keep no account of persons restrained. We use very little of it. 

LABOR OF PATIE.\'T8. 

The number of patients employed in doing the ordinary work about the 
hospitals, the kind of work, its value, and to what credited. 

Slate Hospital, Harrlabnrg. 

The exact number of patients engaged in performing ordinary work, 
cannot be given ; but including the work done in wards, it would vary at 
difiTerent times from one third to one sixth of the whole number. 

State Hospital, Dixmont. 

More than fifty patients are daily employed working on the farm and 
garden, in the laundry and kitchen ; many others are engaged in sewing, 



272 Board of Public Charities. [No. 6, 

and assisting in various kinds of work, but of whose services no record is 
kept. 

State Hoipltal, DanTllla. 

The patients are employed on the farm, garden, kitchen, housework, me- 
chanical operations, laundry sewing-room, etc. No estimate is made of 
the labor. 

PrleB4*a Asylam, Philadelphia. 

The male patients, when they feel so inclined, do such light work as as- 
sisting in the care of the grounds. Some of the female patients engage in 
needle work. None of this labor has any pecuniary value attached to it. 

PennsylTattla Hospital, Philadelphia. 

A few of the patients work in the garden from time to time. 

Philadelphia Hoapltal. 

The patients are employed daily in doing general house-work. 

' LIBRARIES. 
State HoaplUl, Harrlsbarg. 

There are about 1200 volumes in the library,generally of a miscellaneous 
character. We hope to increase the number of books during the next 
year. The books are much used. 

State Hospital, DIxmont. 

The female wards- have three small libraries, composed of books gener- 
ally to be found in ordinary libraries. There is also a library connected 
with the male wards. The books are considerably used. Yery many of 
them are nearly worn out. 

State Hospital, DaiiTllle. 

There are 400 volumes in the library. The books used being of the or- 
dinary kind, and are more used by the men, than by the women. 

Prlend's Asylum, Philadelphia. 

We have from four to five hundred volumes — History, biography, travels, 
etc. No novels. The patients use the library quite freely. 

PennsylTanta Hospital, Philadelphia. 

There are about 4,000 volumes in the library, consisting of works of fic- 
tion, travels, histories, biographies, magazines, etc. The male patients and 
their attendants took out during the year 1300 volumes. On the table in 
the reading-room of every ward are bound volumes of illustrated papers. 
These are looked over, and read by the most demented patients. 

Philadelphia Hospital. 

« 

Our books are very much like Sunday School books, and are much used. 



Leq. Dog.] Boa&d of Public Charities. 273 

occupations and amv8bmbnts. 

HUte Hospital, Hanrtobarg. 

The patients are provided with readings, lectures, magic lantern exhibi- 
tions, games of various kinds, and everj'thing at which they can be induced 
to engage. 

Bute Hospital. DUmoDl. 

Magic lantern exhibitions, concerts, theatricals, calisthenics, billiards, 
bagatelle, checkers, backgammon, dominoes, chess, musical instruments, 
evening parties, croquet, walking, and riding. 

Slate Hospital, Danville. 

Biding, walking out, games in wards and outside, muslQ in chapel, lec- 
tures, reading, and stereopticon views. There is a thirty minutes' enter- 
tainment in the chapel, during six months of the year, three evenings in 
the week. 

Friend*! Asylum, Philadelphia. 

The male patients have out-door work on farm and pleasure grounds, and 
the females have needle-work, etc. There afe lectures and parties for both 
sexes. 

• PennsylTanla Hospital, Philadelphia. 

For nine months in the year, there is an entertainment six nights in the 
week, in the lecture-room, consisting of stereopticon exhibitions, concerts, 
readings, and occasionally lectures. At each department there is a work- 
shop for scroll sawing, etc. During the summer, at the male department, 
cricket games are played two or three afternoons every week. At both 
departments are billiard tables and bowling alleys. 

Philadelphia, Hospital. 

The patients have dancing, concerts, magic lantern, etc. 



18— B. P. Cbar. 



274 



BOABD OF PCBLIO CHARITIES. 



[No. 5, 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR FEEBLE-MINDED 

CHILDREN. 



This inBtitution continues to be in a flourishing condition, and is an- 
nually increasing in its power to do good. The Legislature, at its last 
session, appropriated $40,000 for the maintenance and training of 200 
feeble-minded children of the Commonwealth. 

Capacity. 

This institution can comfortably accommodate 180 pupils, viz : 100 boys, 
80 girls. 

Valae of Property. 

Estimated value of real estate, including buildings, $200,000 ; funds and 
investments, $66,471 25, viz ; free fund, $18,072 67; asylum fund, $1,474 ; 
John M. Sharpless' legacy, $51,924 58. There are one hundred and thirty 
acres of land connected with the institution. 

Receipts Mid Bxpenditnres. 

The receipts for the year were $63,237 19, including a balance from for- 
mer year of $1,121 19. Expenditures for the same period, $63,143 95, 
thua : • 



REOEIPTSw 



Cash at beginning ofyear in bank, .... 
From Pennsylvania State pupils, 

Pennsylvania soldiers' orphans, . . 

City of Pliiladelphia pupils, .... 

New Jersey State pupils, 

Private pupils, 

Free fund, 

Delaware oounty fu^d, 

Stiarpless legacy, 

Provident Life and Trust Company, 

Interest and premium, 

Donation, 

Notes discounted, 



.Total receipts) 



15,769 

172 

8,600 

12,434 

16,990 

1,042 

100 

2,940 

2,271 

31 

10 

16,753 



48 
50 
00 
47 
81 
50 
00 
00 
10 
75 
00 
89 



91,121 



62,116 



$63,237 



19 



00 
19 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



2*75 



EXPBNDITURBS. 



Salaries and wages, 

Household expenses, . 

Construction, 

SharplesB legacy, 

Media Water Company, 

Insurance, 

Notes, . . 

Deposit in Provident Life and Trust Company, 



Total expenditures, 

Balance, September SO, 1879, due institution, 



$18,626 

29,126 

4,102 

928 

600 

67 

11,000 

8,807 



41 
84 
48 
22 
00 
60 
00 
60 



168,148 
98 



168,287 



95 
24 

19 



Cost of MBlnlenaaee. 

The average cost per capita for the year, was $175 87, or a weekly cost 
of $3 38. 

AdmlMlom. 

The number in the institution at the beginning of the year, October 1 , 
1878, was 288 : admitted during the year, 60, being a decrease of 12 on the 
admissions of the previous year ; number discharged, 32 ; leaving in the 
school 316 at the end of the year, September 30, 1879, an increase of 28 
on number at corresponding date of previous year. 



MOVEHESTT OF PoPUIjATION. 



State of Pennsylvania, wholiv, . 
State of Pennsylvania, partially, 

State of New Jersey, 

State of Delaware, 

Soldiers' orphan fund, 

City of Philadelphia, 

Parents or guardians, 

Free fund, 

By institution, 



Total beginning of year, Ootober 1, 1878, 
Admitted daring the year, on 

First admission, 

Seoond admisBion, 



Total admitted, 



Population of the year, . . 
Discharged daring the year, 



Kemaining September 30, 1879, 



Boys. 



79 

7 

27 



8 
44 

2 
12 



40 
3 



179 



43 

222 
23 



199 



Girls. 



50 
8 

18 
1 
1 
8 

17 
2 
4 



16 
1 



109 



17 

126 
9 



117 



Total. 



129 

15 

45 

1 

1 

16 

61 

4 

16 



56 
4 



288 



60 



848 
82 



816 



Be-AdflilMloiM. 

Of the 60 admitted, 4, or 6.66 per cent., were re-admissions, viz : 3 boys,. 
I girl. 



276 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6, 



The 60 children admitted^ were received from the following counties^ be- 
ing their place of residence : 



GouNTiEB OF Pennsylvania 



Alleffheny, . . . 
Bnuuord, .... 

Baokfl, 

Carbon, 

Centre, 

Chester, 

Dauphin, . . 

Delaware, . . . 

Erie, 

Hantingdon, . . 

Juniata, 

LaoliAwanna, . . 

Lancaster, . . . 

Mercer, 

Mifflin, 

Montgomery, . . 

Northampton, 

Northumberland, 

Phihidelphia, . . 

Schuylkill, . . . 

Westmoreland, . 



Total of Pennsylvania, 



i 
(g 



8 

1 



1 
2 



1 
2 
1 
8 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
11 
4 
1 



88 



O 



Counties of otheb States. 



Jefferson, Indiana, . . . 
Baltimore, Marvland, . 
Camden, New Jersey, . 
Essex, New Jersey, . . 
Mercer, New Jersey, . . 
Monmouth, New Jersey, 
Somerset, New Jersey, . 
Warren, New Jersey, . 



I 



s 



1 
1 



1 
1 

5 

1 



Total of other States. . . 
Total of Pennsylvania, . 



12 I N^umber admitted, 



1 
1 



1 
1 



6 

88 



43 



5 
12 



17 



Of the 60 admitted, 50, or 83.34 per cent, five sixth of the whole num- 
ber, were residents of Pennsylvania, and 10, or 16.66 per cent, of other 
States. 

Of the 60 pupils, 43 were boys, and 17 were girls. The general average 

age on admission, was 13 years. Six were between 4 and T years of age ; 

.eight were between 7 and 10 years; thirty-two were between 10 and 15 

years ; thirteen were between 15 and 20 years ; and one female was 21 years 

of age, and upwards. 

Order of Birth. 

The next statement will exhibit the order of birth of the children received. 



Order of Birth. 


1 


o 

7 
1 
8 

• • • 

2 
1 

• ■ 


3 

24 
6 
4 

1 
5 
2 
1 

1 


First, . . . 
€eoond, . , 
Third. . . 
Fourth, . , 
Firth, . . 
Sixth, . . . 
Sevenfh, . . 






17 
6 

1 
1 
3 

1 
1 



Order of Birth. 



Eighth, 
Ninth, . 
Tenth, . 



Total known, 
Unknown, . . 



Number admitted, . 



I 



It 

o 



1 
1 



3 



1 
1 
1 



80 
18 



48 



16 
1 

17 



46 
14 



60 



Of those whose order of birth was known, 24 were first bom ; 6, second ; 
4, third; 1, fourth; 5, fifth ; 2, sixth; and 1, each, seventh, eighth, ninth, 
and tenth bom. 



Lbq. Doc] 



Board op Public Charities. 



277 



09 
O 

99 



I I 

li 

Q 

•S 

65 



ss 


•WOX 


S' 

1 


teaoMM^ 


9^ 


Sa 




|2 




■ t» 


■wo 


r^ 


*< 


• 


KO 




1 1 




•< 


•fXofr 


9 


"•aa 


1 : 

■ 
i>hI 


9 : 








a 


e«iHOD« 


5!* 


1 
1 




'jUk.ouiia£i 




F^ 




^ 


• ^M r4 * 


^ ' 




3 


•19A9J %9\iMoa JO avianbag 




• • 


• 
• 




M 


*H iH 


«H r4 


1 


s 


'll«j mo^j apijq JO nofSBnoaoo 




• • 




' 


a 

B 

Of 






• • ■ 




'8a\x^99% 9« 8iiO{8[nAttoo 


M 


• • • 

• ■ « 


• 
• 




•e 


• 1H ^ ' 




MM 


' 


? 


■amasip dnia^^I 


1 




k 






< 




1 




" -1 




r IMBKCZLITY. 




'Xoavjai n\ »» fdiuls 8arii)OOs., 


M 


M 






'aonijniJtid |« p«3q oi Xanfaj 


*H 


1 .:- 

1 




IH 




'oonvigaS ai i)|a«9tt| 


M 


• ^ 


'»^ • 


1 *■ 






ivujdtvd pav i^airav i«uja)«]i[ 












*aon«)0a8 VL\ s0ani[O|fl piaja^vif 


tH 


• M 


1 • 


t^ 




o 








. . . 1 


• 


M 


g 


' aon«1«9J> Jiuijnp joq^omo^ ^^oqg 


M 


• • • 


N^ 




s 






• • • 




•aon«l 


•H 


w^ • 




M • 


1 


as 

1 


-S3)t Saijnp pas a taaJioiivuaincua 










• 




M 


r^ w^ 






i-l M 




'0)aai«<I JO %u\T% ogiaadg 










I 




< 














1 

t 


-uf pm aondmnsaoo nniiaj««i 


<-4 


• • 

• • 








C4 


• »H w^ 




*^ M 




g 


'Xtaiiqanf mn^Jivd 




• < 






1 
1 



9i 






• * 








t» 


1 M 'iO 




^M 


1 
1 


8 


•ItllpaqaiT muajiva 




; . 








M 


• -IH-H • 


M ' 






■9)aajtd aa«9Uf puv aivpqani 






• 
• 




lO 


*1HM IH ' 


^1H 






'Doajvd JO itiiniQ^P rK)l*^(U 




• 




1 

1 
1 


• 

s 

5 

H 

s 

td 

H 

o 




*• • • ■ 

i- ■ ■ 












1 


H 


-r "5 ■ * ■ 














« 


^ 5 • • . 


1 














§ 1 • • • •.- 








f 


1 














1 5«-saaT> 


H 


1 

1 


o t 


B ^ o Q o o 9 




, 






;« 




1 ^ 


ISI 


« 


IC 


1 II 



2T8 



Board of Public Ghariti£& 



[No. 5, 



Of the 60 admitted, the causes of imbecility were ascertained of 42, (29 
boys, 13 girls,) of which 26, or 61.90 per cent., (18 boys 8 girls,) were at- 
tributed to hereditary transmission, i. e., congenital ; in 16, or 38.10 per 
cent., (11 boys, 5 girls,) their imbecility was assigned to causes subsequent 
to birth. 

Of the 26 cases due to hereditary causes, 7, or nearly one third, was at- 
tributed to parental imbecility ; 5 cases were attributed to physical de- 
bility of parents ; 3 from shock to mother during gestation ; and 2 to each 
of the following causes : Inebriate and insane parents, parental inebriety, 
specific taint of parents, and maternal anxiety, and paternal insanity in 
gestation. Of the 16 cases of acquired imbecility, 5 were due to in&ntile 
diseases, and 4 to sequelae of scarlet fever. 

Their age on admission was, of 6, (3 boys, 3 girls,) between four and 
seven years ; 8, (6 boys, 2 girls,) between seven and ten years ; 32, (22 
boys, 10 girls,) between ten and fifteen years ; 13, (12 boys, 1 girl,) be- 
tween fifteen and twenty years ; and 1, a girl, twenty-one years of age, and 
upwards, when admitted. 

Physical and MeaUl Healih of Pareato. 

The following statement will exhibit the deviation from ordinary mental 
condition and bodily health of the parents of the children received dur- 
ing the year : 



Parents. 



Consumptive, with average 
intelligence, 

GoDBumptive, inebriate, and 
weak-minded, 

Conaumptive and weak- 
minded, ... 

Consumptive and inebriate, 

Inebriate, .... 

Epileptio, of average intel- 
ligence, . 

Poor physique and low in- 
telligence, 

Poor physique and highly 
emotional, 

Poor physique and good in- 



telliffenoe, 
Dn^ 



Poor physique and insane, 
Poor physique and inebriate, 





1 
f 


tal. 




1 


& 


4 




8 


1 




2 


1 




2 


1 


■ • 


1 


2 




8 


• . 




1 


5 


8 


18 


1 


4 


5 


3 


2 


4 


1 


• • 


1 


1 


• • 


1 



Parents. 



Weak-minded inebriate, . . 

Grood health and weak- 
minded, 

Grood health and inebriate, . 

Gk>od health and highly 
emotional, 

Good ileal th and marked ec- 
centricities, 

Good health and intelli- 
gence, but violent migraine 

Average health and intelli- 
gence, 

Superior health and intelli- 
gence, ... 

Constitutional taint, but su- 
perior Intelligence, . . . 






Known condition, 
Unknown, .... 



Total, 



2 
1 



8 
2 
1 



38 
22 

60 



£ 

o 



1 
1 
1 

10 
1 
1 



39 
21 

60 



a 

c 



4 

1 

1 

3 

1 

18 

3 

2 

77 
<iJ 

120 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



2t9 



Physical C^ondltioB, dkr. 

The following statement will exhibit some of the sensorial and functional 
anomalies^ vices of constitution and habit, and disorders of volition, so 
common wtth the feeble minded : 



Conditions. 



StrabiflmuB, .... 
Defective sight, . . 
Defective hearing, . . 

Mutes, 

Semi-mutes, .... 
Imperfect speech, . . 

Paralytic, 

Choreic, 

Epileptic, 

Unable to walls, . . . 
Imperfect gait, . . . 
Imperfect prehension, 



t 


1 


& 




5 


5 


8 




2 


1 


8 


1 


6 


4 


22 


6 


7 


S 


7 


4 


8 


2 




1 
8 


18 


8 


6 



Conditions. 



Deformities of face. 
Deformities of body, 
Deformities of limbs, 
Microcephalic head, 
Hydrocephalic, . . 
Masticate improperly, 
Offensive habits, . . 
Addicted to tobacco. 
Eats garbage, . . . 



00 

o 



2 
1 
1 
8 
1 
4 
2 



Deceaaedl Parenls. 

There were (18 fathers, 16 mothers,) parents of the children received, 
deceased. The cause of fatal result, so far as known, is presented in the 
next statement : 



Caubb of Fatal Rbsult. 



Apoplexy 

Accidental, 

Consumption, 

Consumption and alcoholism, 

Heart disease, 

Pneumonia, 



u 

9 



1 

1 

8 

1 
1 
1 



9 



S 



6 






1 
1 

9 
1 
1 
1 



Cause of Fatal Result. 



Small pox, . . . 
Suicide, .... 
Typhoid fever, . 
Unknown causes. 

Total, 



9 



1 
1 
1 

7 



18 



9 



^ 



1 

8 



15 



3 



1 
1 

2 
15 

38 



Popnlatlon of lutltatioB. 

The population of the institution for the year ending September 30, 1879, 
was 348, viz : 222 boys, 126 girls. 

Necrology. 

Six deaths occurred during the year, equal to 1.72 per cent., on the pop- 
ulation, or a in?.le mortality of 1.80 per cent., female, 1.59 per cent., of their 
respective pc pulation. 



280 



Board of Public Chabities. 



[No. 6 , 



The next stcUement exhibits their sex, age, period of residence in the insii- 

tution ; also^ causes offaial result : 



Cause of Fatal Result. 



Consumption and epilepsy, 

Cerebritus, 

Erysipelas, 

Hemorrhage of bowels, . . 
Tubercular menlngitus, . . 
Phthisis pulmonaris, . . . 



Total, eto., 







• 








9 






• 


"eS 


• 


< 




« 
b 


5 


85 


1 


• ■ ■ 


16 


• ■ • 


1 




14 


1 


• • • 




86 


1 


• ■ • 




13 


• • ■ 


1 




18 


1 


■ • • 




22 


4 


2 


6 



3 Time IN Instttutiok. 



15 years, 8 months. 
8 years, 11 months. 

I year, 6 months. 

II years, 5 months. 

8 years, 7 months. 

9 years. 

8 years, 4 mos., 5 days. 



The average age at decease was 22 years ; average residence in institu- 
tion, 8 years, 4 months, 5 days. 



Indostrlcs. 



The annexed statement will show the branches of industry^ etc,^ taught^ 

with the number employed at each branch : 



Trades, Ao. 



Mattress making, 

Caning, 

Shoe making, 

Farm and garden work, . . . 
Bakery, 



Boys. Grirls. 



5 
8 
8 

8 
5 



Trades, <&c. 



Laundrv, . 
Domestic duties, 
Grading, &o., . . 



Total, 



Boys.'OirlB. 



9 
11 
25 



69 



11 
24 



85 



Diicharced Inmates. 

Of the 348 comprising the population of the year, f222 boys, 126 girls,) 
32 were discharged, viz : 23 boys, 9 girls. 

Their period of residence in the institution^ and the manner of discharge, 

is shown as follows : 





TIMS SSEYXD IN IKSTITUTIOIT. 


ITUHBSB 


How DISCHABOKD. 


Under 
lyear. 


2yrB. 


Syrs. 

S 3 


7yrf. 


1 
eyrs. 


12yrB. 


16 yrs. 


DISCUAK*D 

1 

1 




• 

m 
>, 

O 

n 


■ 




• 

o 


• 

• 

mm 

s 


1 


• 




• 
Ml 


• 

• 


• 


• 



• 

• 
o 


• 
OB 

3 


• 

1 o 
1^ 


« 


• 

1 


Sent home, 


6 


1 


4 


■ • 

1 

• • 

1 

■ • 


1 

• 
2 

> 
■ 

S 


. . 1 

• 


2 

• 

1 

■ • 

1 8 

1 

1 


2l 

• « 

• ■ 

1 

• • 

8 


• • 

1 

• 

1 

• • 

2 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• ■ 


• * 

• • 

1 

• ■ 

1 


1 ' 

• 

1 

■ • 
• • 1 

— 1 

2 


• • 
• 

1 




IS 
1 

4 
4 

i 

23 


4 

1 

2 

2 

■ • 

9 


17 


Removed to trade or labor, . . 
Died 


1 


1 


• 

1 

• • 




KlODAd ...«•■••••«•• 


1 
S 


2 








Totol discharged, 


1 


• • 


S 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Chabitie& 



281 



Of the population, 348, there were 82, or 9.20 per cent., discharged, or 
10.36 per cent, of male, and 7.14 per cent, of female population. 

Of the 32 discharged, (23 boys, 9 girls,) 10 residod less than a year in 
the institution ; T, two years ; 3, five years ; 6, seven years ; 2, nine years ; 
3, twelve years ; and 1 resided sixteen years in the institution. 

The average period of residence of the 32 discharged was four years 
eight months. 

MenUl Condition. 

Statement ^hibiting the mental condition of those discharged, i. e„ their 
mental condition on reception, with the result of treatment or training. 





CONDITION ON DISCHAROE. 








Condition on Admis- 
sion. 


Unim- 
proved. 


Improved. 


Greatly Im- 
proved. 


NT7MBER DIB- 
GHABOBD. 




1 


a! 

1 


1 

1 
' . . . 


o 

8 


1 


1 

1 

• • 

8 

• • • 


1 


• 

00 

O 
6 

• • ■ 

4 

• • ■ 


1 


Idiotic, .... 

Insane, 


1 


1 


2 
2 
7 
1 


4 

2 

16 

1 


9 
2 


Imbeoile, 


1 


• • ^ 


8 


1 


20 


EiOoentrio 


1 














Total, 


2 


1 


9 

I 


4 


12 


4 


28 


9 


82 







We learn from the above table, that 16, or one half of those discharged 
were greatly improved by treatment ; 13 were improved by the training 
undergone in the institution ; and only 3 did not improve to any extent. 

Of the 9 idiotic on reception, 3 were greatly improved, 4 were improved, 
and 2 were unimproved. Of the 2 insane on admission, both were greatly 
improved on discharge. Of the 20 imbecile on reception, 10 were greatly 
improved when discharged, 9 were improved, and 1 was unimproved. 
The 1 marked eccentric on reception, was greatly improved when dis- 
charged. 



282 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6 , 



Physical CondltlOB. 

The physical condition of the children on reception and discharge, wa^ as 

follows : 





( 

UN 
PRO^ 


IJondition on Discharge. 


NUMBER 


Condition on Admission. 


IM- 


IMPR 

1 

2 
3 
1 

• • ■ 

1 
1 
4 


1 

OVED. 


GREATLY 
IMPROVED. 


DISCHARGED. 




oc 

1* 


OJ 

."3 
o 


00 

s 

• ■ 

2 


Boys. 


• 
OD 

— ^ 

5 

■ • • 
m m 

1 

• • • 

1 

• • • 

■ • 


I. 

I 2 

8 
1 
8 

' 4 
1 

4 


p 
00 

O 


1 


Feeble, 






• • 

2 
2 
2 
2 

• ■ • 

1 


2 


Sorofaions, 

Sorofalous and paralyzed , 
Sorofulous and epileptic, . 
Sorofiilous and choreic, . . 
£pileptic and paralyzed, . 


2 

• 

. . . 
1 


• * > 

1 
1 

• • • 


10 
3 


2 
1 

• • 

1 


2 
2 

■ • • 

■ • ■ 


5 
6 

1 


Healthy, 






5 


^■»-w»«*v»»^ 1 .••••.«• 








Total discharged, : . . 


3 


2 


12 


6 


7 


2> 

1 


28 

1 


9 


82 



We here learn that of the 32 discharged, only 5 were unimproved in their 
physical condition ; 18 had been improved physically, and that 9 had been 
greatly improved. One third, or 10 of the discharged, were scrofulous on 
admission. 

Reinakklng at end- of Ye«r. 

The number of the children in the institution on September SO, 1879, was 
316, viz : 199 boys, 117 girls, maintained as follows : 



How Supported. 



State of Pennsylvania, wholly, . 
State of Pennsylvania, partially, 

State of New Jersey, 

State of Delaware, 

Soldiers' orphan fund, 

City of Philadelphia 

Parents or g^uardians, 

Free fund, 

By institution, 



Total remaining September 30, 1879, 



Boys. 



106 

4 

26 



11 

38 

4 

10 



199 



Girls. 



46 
4 

23 
1 
2 
5 

17 
2 

17 



117 



Total. 



152 
8 

49 
1 
2 

16 

55 
6 

27 



316 



Preaeot Condltloii. 

The benefit derived by the children remaining in the institution^ from 

education or training, is presented thus : 



Condition. 



Improved by treatment or training. 

Stationary, . 

Deteriorating through age or disease, 

Number remaining, 



Boys. 


Girls. 


160 
20 
19 


73 
26 
18 



199 



117 



Total. 



288 
46 
87 



816 



LiBG. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabitie& 



283 



It will be observed by the above table that of the 316 resident in the 
institution at the end of the year, 233 of the children have improved under 
training and treatment of the school ; 46 remain stationary ; and 37 have 
deteriorated through age or disease. 

ClaMilleatioii. 

The 316 children remaining in the institiUion on September 30^ 1879^ 
were, at 10 A. M. of that day^ distributed as follows: 



School K In schools, 

Department. ( In training classes, . . . 

C Shops, 

Muniiftl Grading, road-making, Ac, 

I Domestic duties, 

Custodial i In asylum, 

Department. ( In nursery, 

Total, September 30, 1879, 



Boys. 



80 

18 

16 

25 

8 

9 

10 

32 

6 



199 



Girls. 



44 
17 



11 

25 

4 

16 



117 



Total. 



124 
80 
16 
25 
8 
20 
35 
36 
22 



316 



The children engaged in the manual department in the morning, attend 
afternoon school. An evening school is also formed for the benefit of those 
who have not received full attention from the teachers through the day 
8D that of the whole number, there are daily under the influence of the 
strictly educational department, 161 boys, 97 girls. 

state Benellelartos. 

Of the 316 children in the school on September 30, 1879^ there were 170 
maintained by the State of Pennsylvania^ from the following counties : 



COUNTIBB. 



Adams, . . 
Allegheny, 

Beaver, . . 

Bedford, . . 

Berks, . . . 

Blair, . . 

Bradford, . 

Bucks, . . . 

Cambria, . . 

Cafbon, . . 

Chester, . . 

Clarion, . . 

Clearfield, . 

Clinton, . . 

Columbia, . 

Crawford, . 

Dauphin, . . 

Delaware, . 
Erie, .... 

Franklin, . 
Huntingdon, 

Indiana, . . 

Juniata, . . 



I 



1 
10 



2 
2 
1 
1 
6 



2 
1 
1 
3 
6 
4 
8 
1 
2 

.8 



O 



3 
1 
1 

• 

1 
2 
1 
1 



4 
1 



I 



1 

13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
6 
8 
4 
1 
2 
1 
3 



COUNTIBS. 



Lackawanna, . . . . 

Lancaster, 

Lehigh, 

Luzerne, 

Lvcoming, 

Mercer, 

Mifflin, 

Montgomery, . . . . 

Northampton 

NorthuniDerland, . . 
Philadelphia, . . . . 

Potter, 

Schuylkill, 

Somerset, 

Siuaquehanna, .... 

Tioga, 

Wayne, 

Westmoreland, . . . 
York, 

Totalon State fund, . 






6 



2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
33 



6 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



112 



3 



2 

• 

1 
1 
1 



8 
2 

25 
1 
1 

• 

1 
1 



58 



3 



8 
4 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
5 
3 
1 
58 
1 
6 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 



170 



284 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

One third of the State beneficiaries, 68, were received from Philadelphia 
county ; 13 from Allegheny county ; 8 each from Delaware and Lackawanna 
counties ; 6 each from Chester and Schuylkill counties. The largest num- 
ber of boys was received from Philadelphia, next largest from Allegheny. 
The largest number of girls was received from Philadelphia, the next larg- 
est from Delaware. 

There are at present six lists on which children are admitted to this in- 
stitution, viz : 

I. PrlTAte List. 

Children may be received on this list from any place in or out of our 
State, on payment, quarterly in advance, of such sums as may be agreed 
upon, the rates being determined by the amount of care the case requires, 
the extra accommodations given, and the ability of parents or guardians 
to pay. 

II. State Fund of PeDiWf ItadUi. 

Appropriated for the support of 200 children of the Commonwealth, for 
a period of not more than seven years, apportioned, as nearly as possible, 
among the legislative districts, according to representation. It is desirable 
to take on this fimd, improvable cases only^ or those who may return to 
the community at least self-helpful, if not self-supporting. 

Written and satisfactory testimony, that the applicant on this list is poor 
and a deserving recipient of the States bounty, must be given by known 
residents of the county or neighborhood. 

Persons who are able to support their children in part only, can receive 
such aid from the State fhnd, as will make up ftill support. 

III. State Fond of New Jersey. 

Appropriated for the support of poor children of that State, or for par- 
tial aid of such persons of only moderate circumstances, as are unable to 
pay full cost of maintenance. 

The same steps are required as in the preceding instance, with the addi- 
tion of a letter of approval addressed to the Governor of New Jersey by 
the undersigned, accompanied by the affidavit of freeholders that the appli- 
cant is deserving, when if satisfactory, a warrant to admit is issued by the 
Governor, and upon it the child is received into the institution. The blank 
for the freeholders' affidavit, is famished by the institution. 

IV. Bute Fond of Delaware. 

Appropriated for the support of two children from each county of that 
State ; the order for admission, after the preliminaries, as defined in the first 
instance, is granted by the district judges. 

V. city or PhUadelphla Fmid. 

Applied to cases received from the " Children's Home " of the Philadel- 
phia alms-house, or by special permit through the committee appointed by 
the city of Philadelphia. 

TI. Free Fund. 

Devoted exclusively to the entire or partial maintenance in the institution, 
of such feeble minded persons as may be selected by the superintendent and 
committee on admission, and whose support is not otherwise provided for. 



LiBG. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



285 



INSTITUTION FOR DEAF ANI> DUMB. 



Capacity. 

This institution can comfortable accommoc^ate 350 pupils, or 175 of each 



Value of Property. 

The estimated value of real estate, including buildings occupied by the 
institution, is $500,000; other real estate bequeathed, $35,000; personal 
property, including invested legacies, scholarships, library, furniture, etc., 
$150,000. 

Beeelpia aad ExpeDdltorea. 

The receipts for the year were $140,832 15, including a balance from 
former year of $418 67; expendituresforsame period, $125,658 86, leaving 
a balance due the institution, in the treasurer's hands, of $15,173 29. 



Receipts. 



Cash on hand at beginning of year, 

From State of Penn^lvanla, ibr indigent pupils, . . . 

State of New Jersey, for indigent pupils, .... 

State of Delaware, for indigent pupils 

Guardians of poor, oity of Philadelphia, for indi- 
gent pupils, 

Pav pupils, 

John Wrient scholarship fund, 

Crozier soholarship, Nos. 1 and 2, . . .... 

John Farnum scholarship, Nos. 1 and 2, .... 

Interest, contributions, and life subscriptions, . . 

Jones' estate, . . 

Parents and guardians, for transportation, .... 

Legacy of (Charlotte M. Eckfeldt, 

Sale of old materials, 

United States four and one half per cent, loan sold, 
Philadelphia six per cent, loan sold, 



Total receipts, 



$49,963 
6,606 
1,080 

540 

2,590 

240 

400 

625 

6,829 

1,542 

514 

250 

205 

85,000 

10,875 

24,150 



79 
94 
00 

00 
15 
00 
00 
56 
83 
56 
41 
00 
24 
00 
00 
00 



Total. 



$418 



140,418 



1140,832 



67 



48 
15 



286 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Expenditures. 



Family expenses, provisions, <feo., 

Material for clothing, shoes, furniture, <feo., . . . 

Salaries, 

Wages and labor, 

Incidentals, including transportation of pupils, 

Repairs, ordinary, 

Repairs, account of steam heating and cooking, . 

Interest on loans, 

Loans, . 

Property, 4112 Spruce street, 



Total expenditures, 

Balance, September 80, 1879, due the institution, 



124,222 

6,772 

80,676 

6,385 

1,009 

. 2,762 

10,000 

1,029 

41,000 

1,861 



11 
19 
51 
27 
28 
62 
00 
75 
00 
18 



Total. 



$125,658 
15,178 



1140,832 



86 
29 

15 



MAlatenance. 

The average cost per capita was $260, or a weekly cost of $5. 

AdmlMloB of Poplli. 

The number of pupils in the institution at commencement of the year, 
October 1, 1818, was 325 ; admitted during the year, 35, a decrease of 25, 
or 41.67 per cent., on the admissions of the previous year; number dis- 
charged. 41, leaving in the institution 319 at the end of the year, Septem- 
ber 30, 1879, a decrease of 6, or 1.85 per cent, on the number at corre- 
sponding date of previous year. 



Movement op Population. 



State of Pennsy^lvania, 
State of New Jersey, . 
State of Delaware, . . 
City of Philadelpliia, . 

Scholarsliip, 

Friends. 



7 



Institution, 



Total, October 1, 1878, 

Admitted during the year—no re-admissions, . 



Population of tlie year, . . 
Discharged daring the year, 



Remaining September 80, 1879, 



Boys. 



170 

17 

3 

1 



8 



194 
7 



201 
25 



176 



Girls. 



116 



181 
28 



159 
16 



148 



Total. 



286 
24 
4 
2 
1 
7 
1 



825 
85 



360 
41 



819 



Average Nomber. 

The average number of pupils for the year was 319, being an increase ot 
4 over the former year. 

Re- AdmlMlont. 

There were no re-admissions during the year. 



Leo. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabitie& 



28T 



CoDBttes, 



The 86 new pupih were received from the following counties, i. e., their 

place of residence : 



countiks op 
Pennsylvania. 



Berks, . . . 
Bradford, . . 
Centre, . . . 
Clinton, . . . 
Columbia, 
Cumberland, 
Dauphin, . . 
Delaware, . . 

Elk 

Lackawanna, 
Lancaster, . 
Lebanon, . . 
Lehigh, . . . 
Luzerne, . . 
Lycoming, . 
Mifflin, . . . 
Montgomery, 
Northampton, 
Philadelphia, 
Schuylkill, . 
Suaqaehanaa, 
Sulliyan, . . 
York, . . . 



Total of Pennsylvania, 



I 



1 
1 



1 
1 



1 

1 

7 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



2 
1 
1 

8 
1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
1 
1 

8 



Counties of 
OTHER States. 



Camden, New Jersey, 
Ocean, New Jersey, . 



26 



Total of other States, . . 



I" 






1 
1 



288 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Caues of DeafneM. 



Of the new pupils admitted, the next statement will exhibit the number of 
congenital mutes, cause of deafness in others^ age when hearing was 
lost ; als ), age when admitted, and by whom supported : 





CAUSE OP DEAFNESS. 

• 


NEW PUPILS 
ADMITTED. 


Characteristics, Ac., of 
those admitted. 


3 

1 
1 

10 
10 


• 

a 
t 

4 

• • 


I 

a 

i 


. 

9 

1 

o 


Disease of brain or 
ears. 


a2 

1 
_2 


o 

M 


i 
1 

6 

■ 

3 
2 

• • 

• • 

• • 

2 
2 

1 

4 

1 

• 

1 
4 


s 

7 
8 

• • 

2 

2 

• ■ 

• • 

■ • 

6 

1 

■ • 

6 

• * 

1 

7 

• • 


O 
28 

7 
3 
9 
6 
2 
1 

1 

18 
3 
6 

26 
2 

1 

• • 

28 


1 

1 


New pupils admitted, 


1 

7 2 

• ■ 1 • • 

1 


4 


35 


Age when deafness occurred : 
Ooncrenital ^ . - - 


■ ■ • 


• • ■ 


10 


Under one vear 


3 


1. and under 8 vears 




2 

1 


2 ' ; * 

6 1 2 


2 

• 

2 


2 

• • 

• • 

• • 

2 
2 


■ • • 

■ • • 


11 


8. and under 5 vears, 




8 


5. and under 7 vears, 




2 


7, and under 10 years, 


1 

7 
1 

1 

8 


1 

• 

2 

• • 

2 
4 

• 

• • 

• • 

4 


• 

7 

• 

7 

• • 

2 
6 


• • 

2 

• • 

2 

• • 

1 
1 


1 


Age when admitted : 

6 years, 

10,*^and under 12 years, 

12, and under 16 years, 

16, and under 20 years, 


• ■ ■ 

8 

1 

• • • 


• • • 

• • • 


I 
24 

4 
6 


How supported : 

State of Pennsylvania, 

State of New Jersey, 


3 
1 




31 
2 


Institution, 


2 

3 

7 






2 


Sez: 
Bovs 






7 


Girls, 


4 


2 




28 







It will be observed that 10, or 28.57 per cent., (3 boys, T girls,) were con- 
genital mutes ; 25, or T 1.43 per cent., (4 boys, 21 girls,) became deaf from 
disease. 

The age when dea&ess occurred, excluding the congenital, were of 3 
girls, under one year ; 11, (2 boys, 9 girls,) one, and under three years ; 8, 
(2 boys, 6 girls,) three, and under five years ; 2 girls, five, and under seven 
years ; and 1 girl, seven, and under ten years. 

Of those who became deaf by disease, the largest numbers occured when 
they were one and under three years of age, and three and under five years 
respectively ; the next highest under one year, five, and seven years, seven 
and ten years, and in the order named. 

As regards the age when admitted, 24, or 68.5T per cent., (6 boys, 18 
girls,) were ten and under twelve years of age ; 6, or 17.14 per cent., all 
girls, were fifteen and under twenty years ; 4, or 11.43 per cent., (I boy, 8 
girls,) were twelve and under fifteen years ; and 1, or 2.86 per cent., a girl, 
was six years of age. 



Leo. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 289 

More than four fifths, 31, or 88.57 per cent., (6 boys, 25 girls,) of the 
pupils admitted, were supported by the State of Pennsylvania, 2, (girls,) 
by the State of New Jersey, and 2, (1 boy, 1 girl,) by the institution. 

Hereditary Tendeaciea. 

From information furnished on this important subject, we learn that four 
of the families from which the pupils were received, contained more than 
one deaf mute, viz : 

One family contained 4 deaf mutes. 

One family contained 3 deaf mutes. 

Two families, each contained 2 deaf mutes. 

Relationship before Marriage. 

In one case the parents are said to have been reUted, but the degree of 
relationship is not given. There are three deaf children in the family, one 
boy and two girls. 

In one case the parents were second cousins. The daughter lost her 
hearing at 10 years of age, by scarlet fever. 

Parents Dear Mates. 

Not any of the parents of those received were deaf mutes. 

RelatlTes who are Deaf Mates. 

One of the girls who was bofn deaf, has a nephew, (a sister's son,) deal 
and dumb. 



1J_B. P. Char. 



290 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



CO 



O 

00 



£ 
s 



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t 

o 

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8 



CO 
'A 



rnox 



n 



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eMier4M«(^V 



•«IJ10 



C4 



»•**• 



*^^ s 



t^ t'tOtO *MWr4M 



'SlOfI 



•3IJOJL 



M 



M 



'vauitianbsng 



OS 

o 

a 

CO 
H 



O 



•IlMl^nqog 



•vmdiopvnnj 



^XjamoJt^aoK 



'uivm 



'Soiinooiq 



ei 



'9TU9Zn*J 



•n«iuaa 



•Qotivqaq 



'vuaviiviiav^ 



« 



•^la 



iiTqdnva 



'puviJfiqinno 



'viqamioo 



•ao^nno 



'ao^taio 



*9Jinao 



•pjojpvjfl 



•9J119Q 



'•mvpv 



5 



s 



I 



w 

&4 



■P. 

S?5 



o 



M 



00 1H 



M 



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«S «( 



4> O' 



mo 



I 

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a P 

a 

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♦r-5-5-5 



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5 5t «» 5^ * g • S S 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



291 



Of the natives of Pennsylvania, the boys were in proportion to the girls 
as 17 to 83. It will be observed that 4 were bora in Philadelphia county ; 
3 in Luzerne ; 2 were born in Lycoming ; and the same number in York 
and Lackawanna ; and of the remaining counties, 1 was born in each. 

About one third, 10, or 84.50 per cent., were congenital mutes ; of the 
remaining 19 who became deaf after birth, 4 were under one year of age 
when deafness occurred ; 8 were between one and three ; 6 were between 
three and live ; 1 was between five and seven, and 1 was ten years of age. 

Over seven eighths, 27, or 93.10 per cent., are maintained by Pennsyl- 
vania, and 2 are maintained by the institution. 

Of the natives of Pennsylvania, 10, (3 boys, 7 girls,) were congenital 
mutes ; 3 girls from scarlet fever ; 5 girls from spotted fever ; 1 boy from 
typhoid fever ; 8 girls from diseased brain or ears ; 2 girls from measles ; 
1 girl from inflammation of lungs ; and I boy, 3 girls from sickness. 

PopnUtloo of the InstHaUon. 

The population of this institution for the year ending September 30, 
1879, was 360, viz : 201 boys, 159 girls. 

Necrology. 

Not any of the pupils died during the year, either in the institution or 
elsewhere. 



Heal|h. 

The pupils have enjoyed their usual good health. No epidemic prevailed 
during the year. The diseases, etc., treated were as follows : 



Aboesaofear, * 3 

Bronobitis, 3 

Bruise, 1 

Burned hand, 1 

Chorea, 1 

Conjunctivitis, 86 

Contusion of finger, ......... 1 

Diarrhoea, 2 

Erysipelas, 1 

Fainting, 2 

Festered foot, 1 

Fraotnre of radius, 1 

Headache, 9 

Hoemoliysis, 2 

Indigestion, 28 

Inflammation of toe, 1 

Intermittent fever, 1 

Malaria, 2 



Menorrhagia, 2 

Muscular rheumatism, 2 

Necrosis of arm, l 

Paralysis, 2 

Phimosis, l 

Photophobia, 1 

Pneumonia, 4 

Quinsy, 8 

Rhus poisoning, l 

Scald, I 

Simple fever, 2 

Sore throat, 28 

Sprained ankle, 1 

Tonsilitis, 81 

Typhoid fever, I 

Total oases, .172 



These 172 cases treated all recovered. 



BOAKD or PtTBUC CHARIT1B& 



[No. 5, 



During the year instruction was given to 78boye, viz: 35 at ehoemaking, 
35 at taitorinii;, and 8 at lit^ogitiphy. The estinutted value of work done 
is a9 followa : 

Shoe shop — Value of material and Ubor for new work and re- 
pairing, $1,180 00 

Tailor shop — Value of material and labor, 1,923 55 

Sewing by the girls — Value of material and labor, 2,270 10 

Total, $5,3T3 65 

The ariiicles manufactured are all used in the institution, and the manu- 
facturing is carried on by the institution. 
All the girls are taught sewing in its various branches. 

There are 16 classes, not including those in articulation and drawing, 
with an average of 20 pupils to each class. 



There are about 40 boys and 35 girls, vrho have daily lessons in articula- 
tion; and while some of them have seemed to be deriving but httle benefit, 
a number have made remarkable progress in speaking and reading the lips. 
Ubrmtj- 

The number of volumes in the institution, accessible to the teachers and 
pupils, is about 5,000. There are books on almost all subjects in science 
and literature, many of them adapted to the young. The pupils are en- 
couraged and aided to improve themselves by reading. The girls have a 
reading club, and the boys a literary and debating dociety. 

ParU> Dtorfc*T«f 4. 

Of the 360, (201 boys, 159 girls,) constituting the population of this in- 
stitution, there were 41 discharged, viz : 25 boys, 16 giris. 

T^c annexed statement will exhibit their period of residence in the insti- 
tution, and how discharged. 

































NUMBU 


How UlSCHABaU). 


1 


J 


1 


. 


i 


1 


i 


6r 
1 


1 


S 


s 


7jn. 




i 


f 


3 






















.• 


.' 


-■ 




:■ 


» 


■: 






T 


J 


.'. 


_\ 






.* 


• 


.' 


It 


ToUldl«h.rg.d 


• 


' 


' 






• 


• 


' 


' 


• 


* 




• 


!1 


M 


a 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



293 



There were 41, or 11.40 per cent., discharged fi*om the population, con- 
sisting of 360 pupils. There were 6.95 per cent., of the boys, and 4.45 per 
cent., of the girls discharged. 

Of the 41 discharged, the largest number 10, (9 boys, 1 girl,) served each 
5 years ; 10, (4 boys, 6 girls,) each 6 years ; the next largest number 6, (5 
boys, 1 girl,) served each 2 years ; 6, (all girls,) each 8 years ; 3 boys served 
7 years each ; 2 boys, each under 1 year ; 2 girls, each 4 years ; and 1 boy, 
2 years. 

The average time served by those discharged was 6 years 6 days ; boys, 
4 years 3 months 6 days; girls, 6 years 2 months 8 days ; of the 19 who 
served their time out, their average residence was 6 years 9 months 14 
days; or boys, 6 years 5 months 4 days; girls t years. The 19 removed 
by parents, served an average time in the institution of 3 years 8 months 
16 days; or boys 3 years 10 months 12 days; girls 3 years 9 months 
The 3 removed for incapacity, 2 boys served less than 1 year, and 1 boy, 2 
years. * ^ 

BdaeattoB on ReceptloB aad Discharge. 

Statement exhibiting the education on reception and discharge of the 41 

pupils. 





BDUGATION ON DISOHAROB. 








Eduoatton on Rbcef- 

TION. 


Little 

knowledge 

of language. 


Imperfeot 
knowledge 
oflanguage, 
geography, 
arithmetJo, 
<fco. 


Gk>od knowl- 
edge of lan- 
guage, ge- 
ography, 
arithmetio, 
<&c. 


Number Dis- 
charged. 




• 
OQ 

8 
2 




1 


02 

o 

8 

1 


1 


S 

o 

10 

1 


• 
00 . 

18 

7 


Urn 

o 

14 
2 


1 


Ignorant of language, . . 
Could talk some, 


1 

• « • 


4 

1 


11 
4 


82 
9 


Total, 


5 


1 


5 


4 


15 


11 


25 


16 


41 







Of the pupils discharged, 32, or T8.05 per cent., were ignorant of language 
on reception, and only 9, or 21.95 per cent., could talk some. Of their at- 
tainments on discharge, as shown above, 6, or 14.63 per cent., had but little 
knowledge of language; 9, or 21.95 per cent., had imperfect knowledge of 
language and the various branches taught ; 26, or 63.42 per cent., had, when 
discharged, a good knowledge of language, geography, arithmetic, &c. 

It will be observed of the 32 pupils, (18 boys, 14 girls,) who, on admission, 
were ignorant of language, 4, (3 boys, 1 girl,) acquired a little knowledge 
of language, 7, (4 boys, 3 girls,) obtained an imperfect knowledge of the 
various branches taught, and 21, (11 boys, 10 girls,) acquired a good knowl- 
edge of language, geography, arithmetic, &c. Of the 9, (7 boys, 2 girls,) 



294 



Board of Pubuc Charitie& 



[No. 5, 



who on reception could talk some, 2, (boys,) acquired a little knowledge, 2, 
(1 boy, 1 girl,) improved in knowledge, and 6, (4 boys, 1 girl,) had a good 
knowledge of language, geography, &c. 

l*rMp«ct for Helf-Bapport. 

The trades taught the 41 discharged pupils during their residence in the 
institution^ is presented in the next statement ; alsOj their prospect for 
self-support : 





Prospect for 


Self-support. 


Number Dis- 


Tbades or Occupations 

Taught in thb 

Institution. 


poor. 


NOT GOOD. 


VERY OOOD. 


charged. 




1 




1 


u 


s 


id 

o 

m • • 

• • • 

14 

• • • 


1 


o 


3 


RhopmnlcinflT • . 


• 






10 
5 

■ • ■ 

6 


10 
5 

• • • 

10 


• • • 

• ■ 

16 

• • • 


10 


Tailoriiiir 










5 


T^rpsRinHkincp. 86win(F. 6t0«. 








2 


16 


"Kfi trsido. 


4 


• • 




10 










Number discharged, . . 


4 






2 


21 


14 


25 


16 


41 









It will be observed that the prospect for self-support of 35, or 86.3Y per 
cent., (21 boys, 14 girls,) was very good; leaving but 6, or 14.63 per cent.* 
(4 boys, 2 girls,) whose prospects for self-support are not good. 

RemalnliiK mt the end of Year. 

The number of pupils residing in the institution on September 30, 1879y 
was 319^ viz : 176 boys, 1^3 girls ^ maintained as follows: 



How Supported. 



State of PennsylvaDia, 
State of New Jersey, . 
State of Delaware, . . 
City of PliHadelphia, . 

Institution, 

Scholarship 

Parents or friends, . . 



Total remaining September 80, 1879, 



• 


• 


tt 


00 


b 


'i^ 


s 


3 


155 


127 


15 


9 


3 


• • 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 
8 


1 


176 


143 



1 



282 
24 
8 
2 
8 
1 
4 



819 



More than seven eighths, 282, or 88.40 per cent., were supported by the 
State of Pennsylvania; 24, or T.62 percent, by New Jersey ; 4, or 1.26 per 
cent, by parents or Mends ; 3, or .94 per cent, by Delaware ; 3, or .94 per 
cent, by the institution ; 2, or .63 per cent, by the city of Philadelphia; 1, 
or .31 per cent, by the John Wright scholarship. 



Lbq. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabiti£& 



295 



Ap|>licatloii«. 

On the 3d of September, 1819, the day on which the school opened, there 
were 25 suitable applicants, (all boys,) wait ing for admission, but for whom 
there was no room. These boys i^ide in the following counties, viz : 

Northumberland, 1 



Berks, 8 

Centre, 2 

Danphin, 1 

liaokawanna, 8 

Lancaster, 1 

Luzerne, 2 

Lyooming, 1 

Montgomery, 1 

Kortbampton, 1 



Philadelphia, 5 

Schuylkill, 1 

Tioga, 1 

Union, 1 

York, 1 

Total, 26 



State Beocllclariei. 



The 282 pupils in the institution on September SO, 1879^ supported by the 
State of Pennsylvania^ were from the following counties : 



Counties. 



Allegheny, , 
Armstrong, . 
Beaver, . . . 
Bedford, . . . 
Berks, . . . . 

Blair 

Bradford, . . 
Bucks, . . . . 
Cambria, . . 
Cameron, . . 
Carbon, . . . 
Centre, . . . 
Chester, . . . 
Clarion, . . . 
Clinton, . . . 
Columbia, . . 
Crawford, . . 
Cumberland, 
Dauphin, . . 
Delaware, . . 

Elk, 

Erie, . . . . 
Forest, . . . 
Franklin, . . 
Huntingdon, 
Juniata, . . . 
Lackawanna, 
Lancaster, . . 
Lawrence, . . 



Boys. 



4 
2 
2 
1 
6 
3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
1 



1 

3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 



1 
3 
12 
7 
1 



Girls. Total. 



• ■ • 



2 
1 



2 
2 

• 

4 
1 

• 

1 
1 



2 

13 

3 

1 



6 
2 
2 
1 

12 
3 
6 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
1 
4 

•2 
8 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
5 

25 

10 
2 



Counties. 



Lebanon, 

Lehigh, 

Luzerne 

Lyooming, 

MoKean, 

Mercer, 

Mifflin, 

Monroe 

Montgomery, . . . . 

Montour, 

Northampton, . . . . 
Northumberland, . . 

Perry, 

Philadelphia, . . . . 

Potter, 

SchuA'lkill, 

Snyder, 

Somerset, 

Sullivan, 

Susquehanna, . . . . 

Tioga, 

Union, 

W^ashington, ..... 

Wayne, 

Westmoreland, . . . 

Wyoming, 

York 

Total on State fund, 



Boys. 



5 
4 
2 



2 
1 



43 

1 
7 



2 
1 
5 



5 
1 
1 
5 



155 



I 
Girls. TotaL 



4 
1 

7 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 

1 

3 

1 

2 

23 

. . • 

10 

2 

2 

V • • 

2 
2 

• • • 

I 

• • • 

1 

• • • 

7 



4 
6 

11 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 
7 
1 
5 
2 
2 

06 
1 

17 
2 
4 
1 
7 
2 
2 
1 
6 
2 
1 

12 



127 



282 



296 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6, 



WESTERIf PBl^NSYLVANIA INSTITUTION FOR 

DEAF AND DUMB. 



The Legislature at its last session appropriated the sum of $12,960 for 
the education and maintenance of 80 State pupils, from January 1, 1879, 
to July 1, 1879 ; for the education and maintenance of 90 State pupils for 
the year ending July 1, 1880, $22,950; and for the education and main- 
tenance of 90 State pupils for the year ending July 1, 1881, the sum of 
$22,950 ; and for additional furniture and repairs, $800. 

Capacity. 

This institution can accommodate 100 pupils. There are now 97 pupils 
on the rolls. 

Valae of Property. 

The estimated value of real estate is $20,000 ; personal property, includ- 
ng funds, library, furniture, etc., $24,653 80. 

Rccelpta and Ezpendltorea. 

The receipts for the year were $16,510 75, including a balance from for- 
mer year of $48 18 ; expenditures for the same period, $16,804 53. 



Receipts. 



Cash on hand at banning of year, . 

Value of farm produce 

From pupils, board and tuition, . . 

Rent of Wilkinsburg property, 

Donation for library, 

Loans, 

All other sources, 



Total receipts, 



^10 

435 

200 

30 

15,445 

142 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
67- 



Total. 



tiS 



16,462 



116,510 



18 



57 
75 



Expenditures. 



Family expenses, provisions, <feo., 

Salaries, 

Wages and labor, 

Rent, 

Incidentals, including transportation and traveling ex- 
penses, 

Repairs, 

Interest paid on borrowed money for current expenses, 

Total expenditures, 



eS,506 

5,179 

1,282 

800 

85 
250 
200 



77 
10 
87 
00 

19 
60 
00 



Total, 



$16,304 



53 



LiBO. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabiti£S. 



297 



or M atntenuice. 

The average cost per capita was $196, or a weekly cost of $4 6t, (forty- 
two school weeks in the year.) 

' AimiMton of Popllt. 

On the 25th day of June, 1879, at which time the pupils were sent home 
for vacation, 89 were received, viz : 67 boys, 32 girls. These children are 
from fifteen counties of the State, as is shown in the following table : 



Allegheny, . . 
Armstrong, . . 
Beaver, .... 
Butler, .... 
Cambria, . . . 
Clarion, . . . 
Crawford, . . . 

Fayette 

fVanklin, . . . 
Indiana, . . . 
Lawrence, . . 
Mercser, .... 
Warren,. . . . 
Washington, . 
Westmoreland, 



Total, 



COUNTIBS. 



Boys. 



2 
1 
2 
4 



57 



Girls. 



14 
2 
1 
3 

• • 

2 

• 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



32 



Total. 



51 
8 
2 
4 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
8 
1 
6 
4 



89 



How Supported. 

Of these 89 pupils, Y3 were supported entirely by the State ; 16 were 
partly supported by parents ; and 1 was entirely supported by parents. 

Averftfe xVamber. 

The average number of pupils for the year was 80, which is 12 more than 
the average of the previous year. 

IVew Pupils. 

The following statement will exhibit the counties from which the IS new 

pupils were received : 



Counties. 



Allegheny, 
Armstrong, 
Beaver, . . 
Butler, . . 
Clarion, , 
Franklin, . 
Venango, 

Total, . 



I 



1 
1 
1 
1 

9 



CD 



2 
2 



• • • 



3 



5 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

18 



298 



Board op Public Charities. 



[No. 6 , 



There were 5 boys and 1 girl discharged during the year. Two boys who 
had been under instruction three years were discharged on account of de- 
ficient intellect. . Three other boys and 1 girl were returned to parents. 

Prospect for Self-support. 

Two of the boys discharged have a very poor prospect for self-support. 
Three boys and 1 girl have a very good prospect. Two of the boys were 
under instruction three years, 1 less than a year, and the girl a few months. 
All had gained a knowledge of language equal to the average, for the time 
they were under instructions. 

Canaea of Deatnew. 

Of the new pupils admitted^ the next statement will exhibit the number of 
congeiiital mutes, cause of deafness in others^ age when hearing was 
lost J age when admitted, and the relationship of parents^ deaf mule rela- 
tives^ etc. 



u 

s 

9 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 



Cause op Deafness. 



Congenital, . . . 
Congenital, .. . . 
Congenital, . . . 
CongeniUil, . . . 
Congenital, . . . 
Brain disease, . . 
Brain fever, . . . 
Brain fever, . . . 
Hiokness, . . . . 

Scrofula, 

Catarrhal fever, . 
Rheumatic fever, 
Unknown, . . . 



Relationship of Parents, De^mute 
Relatives, etc. 



Deficient in intellect, 
Parents first cousins, * 



Parents first cousins, .. 
Parents second cousins. 
Parents cousins, . . . 






16 
10 

7 
11 

8 
13 
10 
12 
20 
14 
19 
11 



c 5 . 

-O 

< • 



l\ years, 
1 year, . 
li years, 
3J years, 
9 year«, 
1{ years, 
9 years, 



•3 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

i 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



It will be observed that 5 were congenital mutes, and 7 became deaf from 
disease. 

The age when deafiiess occurred, excluding the congenital, were : 4 un- 
der three years of age ; 1 three years six months old ; and 2 were nine 
years of age. 

As regards the age when admitted, 2 were between seven and eight 
years ; 5 were between ten and twelve ; 2 were between twelve and four- 
teen ; 1 was sixteen years ; and 2 were between nineteen and twenty years 
of age. 

Health. 

The general health of the institution has been good. There were not any 
cases of serious illness among the pupils during the year. 

Artlcalaltoa. 

Articulation is still taught to the most promising pupils. Fifteen are 
now under instruction, and the progress of most is encouraging. 



Leq. Dog.] Board of Public Chabities. 299 



The number of classes has been 6, under as many instructors. The ave- 
rage number in each class has been 14. 

Teaching of Tradea. 

No arragement has yet been made, oWing to the want of accommodation 
and means, for the teaching of trades. 

Library. 

There are about 50 volumes in the library. A few juvenile books have 
been added dunng the year. 

Antioaementa. 

Amusement has been provided for the pupils at very little expense. • This 
is secured by various games, such as chess, checkers, bows and arrows for 
archery practice. 

BulMloga, dkc. 

The buildings have received some improvements and alterations during 
the year. As the quarters of this institution are only temporary, it is not 
deemed prudent to expend any more money than can possibly be helped. 
The present buildings are a very poor substitute for a regularly well planned 
institution As to the need of a large institution in Western Penns}- Ivania. 
there can be no question. To erect substantial and commodious buildings 
for the accommodation of 200 pupils need not cost an extravagant sum. 

fUttvber RemalnlDg. 

On September 30, 1879, there were present 56 boys and 29 girls, or 85 
pupils from 16 counties of the State. 



800 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6 , 



IIS^STITUTIOI!^ FOR IlfSTRUCTION OF THE 

BLIND. 



The State grant to this institution for the year 1879 was $43,500 for the 
maintenance and instruction of 145 pupils. 

Capacity. 

This institution can comfortably accommodate 204 pupils, viz : 120 boys, 
84 girls. 

Value of Property. 

Estimated value of real estate, including buildings, (cost $157,806 20,) 
$180,000. The institution occupies about 2]^ acres of land. Value of per- 
sonal property, $22,000. Funds and investments, $92,186. 

Rcceipia and Bxpendltarea. 

The net receipts for the year were $62,216 29 ; net expenditures, 
$57,690 34; balance remaining September 30, 1879, $4,525 95. 

Heceipts, 



Sales of merchandise, 

Wednesday exhibitions, 

Income from Birch legacy, 

General income, 

Private pupils, 

Pennsylvania State pupils, 

New Jersey State pupils, 

Delaware State pupils 

Legacy of Pennell Smith, 

Investments Sold, 

Total receipts, 

Expenditures. 

Household, 

Manufactures, . 

Instruction, . 

Outfits to graduates, 

Miscellaneous, 

Temporary loans paid, 

Balance September 30, 1879, .... 



17,714 


62 


378 


91 


6,042 


03 


175 


67 


1,685 


00 1 


21,760 


00 


2,923 


83 ,' 


626 


00 1 


1,000 


00 


♦20,121 


33 j 


t 

$32,576 


1 
41 


9,731 


90 


10,002 


12 


865 


00 


915 


10 


3,649 


81 


4,525 


95 

1 





162,216 



29 



162,216 



29 



* These investuiento were sold because of unpaid appropriations by State. 

Coat of Maintenance. 

The average cost, per capita, was $295 85, or a weekly cost of $5 69. 

Admlsalon of Pupils. 

The number of pupils in the institution at beginning of year, October 1 , 
1878, was 215 ; admitted during the year, 21, a decrease of 18 on admission 
of previous yeicw; number discharged, 36, leaving in institution on Seph 
tember 30, 1879, the end of year, 200 — a decrease of 15, as compared with 
the preceding year at same date; 



Leg. Doc.] 



BoABB OF Public Chabities. 



301 



Movement op Population. 



State of Penni^lyania, 

State of New Jersey, 

State of Delaware, 

Friends, 

Friends and institution, 

Institution and services rendered as teaohers, <fco., 
Institution, 



Total at beginning of vear, 

Admitted during year, nrst admission, . 
Admitted during year, second admission. 



Total admitted, 



Population of the year, . . . 
Discharged during the year. 



Remaining September 30, 1879, 



Boys. 



92 

11 

1 



4 

18 

6 



10 



131 



10 



141 
22 



119 



Girls. 



53 
2 
1 
2 
1 

21 
4 



10 
1 



84 



11 



Total. 



145 
13 
2 
2 
6 
39 
9 



95 
14 



81 



20 
1 



216 



21 



236 
36 



200 



As compared with the preceding year, the boys admitted were 16 less, 
and the girls 2 less. 

ATerage IVamb«r. 

The average number of pupils in the institution for the year was 195, 
viz : 116 boys, and 19 girls. Average number of State beneficiaries for the 
year, 145. 

Re-AdmiMioiis. 

Of the 21 pupils received, only 1, a girl, was re-admitted. 

Cyoantlm. 

The 21 pupils admitted were received from the following counties: 



Counties. 



Allegheny, . 
Bradford, . . 
Delaware, . . 

Erie 

Lawrence, . . 
Laze me, . . . 
Northampton, 
PhiladelphU, 
Schuylkill, . . 
Tioga, .... 
Weetmoreland, 



Total of Pennsylvania, . . . 



Boys. 



2 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 



9 



QirlB. 



1 
1 



4 
1 
1 



9 



Counties op Other 
States. 



Cumberland, New Jersey, 
Kent, Delaware, . . . . , 



Total of other States, . . 
Total of Pennsylvania, . 

N«w pupils admitted, . . 
Re-admission from N. J., 



Total, 



Boys. 



• • • 



1 
9 



10 



10 



Qirls. 



1 
9 



10 
1 



11 



All the new pupils admitted, 20 in number, resided in Pennsylvania. 

Sex and Ag«. 

Of the 20 new pupils admitted, 10 were boys and 10 girls. The general 
average age on admission was 20.2 years ; 8 were between 10 and 12 years ; 
3 between 12 and 15 ; 6 between 15 and 20 ; and 8 were 20 years of age and 
upwards. 



BoASD OF Public Charities. 



[No. 6, 



;g 



s| 






111 

Hi 

if 

II 









III 



Leg. Doc.] Boabd of Public Charities. 803 

Of the new pupils admitted whose cause of blindness was known, 2, (a 
boy and a girl,) was congenital ; 6, (3 boys, 3 girls,) became blind from 
disease ; and in 7, (5 boys, 2 girls,) blindness was the result of accident. 

The age when blindness occurred, (excluding the girl and boy, as con- 
genital,) was as follows : 3, (1 boy, 2 girls,) were under 1 year of age ; 2, 
(1 boy, 1 girl,) from three to five years of age ; 1, (a girl,) from five to seven 
years ; 1, (a boy,) from seven to ten years ; 3, (all boys,) from ten to fifteen 
years ; 6, (3 boys, 3 girls,) fifteen years, and upwards ; and in 2 (girls) the 
ages were unknown. 

Of those admitted, 3, (all boys,) were between ten and twelve years; 
3, (1 boy, 2 girls,) were between twelve and fifteen years; 6, (1 boy, 
5 girls,) were between fifteen and twenty years ; 8, (6 boys, 3 girls,) were 
twenty years of age, and upwards. 

Eighteen, (9 boys, 9 girls,) were supported by the State of Pennsyl- 
vania; 1, (a girl,) by the State of New Jersey; and 1, (a boy,) by the 
State of Delaware. 

Decease Parent*. 

No reliable information has been furnished in regard .to the decease of 
the parents of the pupils admitted. 

Ueredltary Tendendea, etc. 

There were not any hereditary tendencies on the part of pupils received 
during the year. 

Parents Blind. 

Not any of the pupils received had blind parents. 

RelatlTea Blind. 

Not any of the pupils received had relatives who were blind. 



304 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



[No 5, 



NatlTes of PenosylvaBla. 

Of the f^O new pupils admitted^ 13 were natives of Pennsylvania^ and the 
following statement exhibits the counties where born^ age when blindness 
occurred J age when admitted ; also, sex^ cause of blindness^ and by whom 
supported : 



1 


COUNTIES WHERE BORN. 


TOTAL OF 

NATIVJB 

BORN. 


Characteristics op Native 
Born Admitted. 


• 

P 

xi 
< 

2 

1 


• 

1 

PQ 
1 

• 


• 

1 
1 


i 

08 
Q 

1 

• • 

1 


• 

1 

« • 

1 


■a 

1 
1 

• • 

1 

■ ■ 

• • 

• * 

• • 

• • 

• a 


• 

^^ 

9 

W4 

P^ 
4 

• • 

4 

1 

1 

• • 
• 

2 

• • 

• • 

2 

• • 

2 
4 

1 

• • 

• • 

1 

• • 

2 


. 

1 

• • 

• • 

• B 
■ • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• ■ 

• • 
• 

« • 

• • 


• 

OD 

S 

5 
5 

• ■ 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i- -L 

3 

• • 

• * 

2 
5 

1 

• • 

1 
2 
1 

• • 


of 

u 

_»_ 
8 

• • 

8 

1 
1 

1 
2 
8 

• • 

1 
2 
3 
2 

8 

1 
2 

■ ■ 

2 

• • 

3 


3 


Natives of Pennsvlvania, . . 

Sex: 
Bovs ". 


13 
5 


Girls, 

Age when blindness occurred : 
Congenital, ... 1 


8 
2 


Under 1 year, 




1 

• 

• • 

• • 
• 

I 


• • 

• ■ 

1 

• • 
• 

• • 


• 

• • 
• 

1 

• ■ 

• • 


' 1 

• ■ 


2 


6, and under 7 years, 

10, and under 15 years, 

15 vears and upwards, 

UnlLnown, 

Age when admitted : 

10, and under 12 years, 

12, and under 15 years, 


• • 

2 
1 

• • 

2 


1 
3 
4 

1 

4 
2 


15, and under 20 years, 

20 years and upwards, 


1 


• • 


■ • 

1 
. 1 


1 

» ■ 

I 


.1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


8 

4 


How supported : 
State of Pennsylvania, 

Cause of blindness : 
Conirenital, 


3 


1 


13 
2 


Scarlet fever 


1 


• • 

1 

• 


• m 

• • 

1 


* 1 


1 

• • 

• • 

• • 


2 


Intiamrnation, 


1 


Accident, 


2 


4 


Bilious fever, 


1 


Unknown, 






3 













Of the 13 pupils, natives of Pennsylvania, 4 were bom in Philadelphia 
county ; 3 in Allegheny county ; and 1 in each of the other counties 
named. 

Two were congenital blind ; and of the 1 1 who became blind subsequent 
to birth, 2 were under 1 year of age when blindness occurred ; 1 was be- 
tween five and seven years of age ; 3 were between ten and fifteen years ; 
4 were fifteen years of age, and upwards ; and 1 whose age was unknown 
when blindness occurred. 

In regard to age when admitted, 4 were between ten and twelve years 
of age ; 2 were between twelve and fifteen years ; 3 were between fifteen 
and twenty years ; and 4 were twenty years, and upward, when admitted. 

All the native-born admitted are sustained by the State of Pennsylvania. 



Leg. Doc] 



BoABD OP Public Charities. 



305 



Of the cause of blindness, 2 were congenital blind ; 2, (both girls,) from 
scarlet fever; I, (a boy,) from inflammation; 4, (2 boys, 2 girls,) from ac- 
cident ; I7 (a boy,) from bilious fever; and 3 girls from unknown causes. 

PopalaMon of lotCitatlon. 

The population of this institution for the year ending September 30, 
1879, was 236, viz : 141 boys, 95 girls. 



Heallb. 

There was but one case protracted illness during the year, and that was 
on the part of a blind teacher. 

!Ve«rolofty. 

]N^ot any deaths occurred in the institution during the year. 

TradM Taoght. 

The following statement exhibits the number of pupils instructed in the 

several branches of industry : 



Trades, Ac, Tauoht. 



Brush making, . 
Broom making, . 
Mattress work, . 
CarpAt weaving, 
Cane seating, . . 







Boys. 


Girls. 


10 




3L 




5 




9 




23 


8 



Tradks, <feo., Taught. 



Hand and machine sewing, . 
Knitting and crooheting, . . 

Bead work, 

Indian basket work, .... 



I 
Boys. Oirls. 



40 
82 
20 
16 



Value of Labor. 

The value of the articles manufactured during the year is estimated at 
$5,745 94; these articles are disposed of at the institution store, on the 
premises. 

VAmmtm, 

There are twenty -three branches taught in ninety-four classes^ and thefol- 
lirwing statement exhibits the number of pupils in each branch, and the 
studies pursued : 



Studies. 



Aljg^bra, 

Ariihmetio, 

Grammar, 

Physical geography, . . 

U.8 history, 

Natural history, . . . . 
Familiar science, . . . . 
Pronounce r and detlner, 

Mensuration, 

Rhetoric. 

English literature, . . . 
Anatomy, 



Boys. 



8 
63 
40 
10 
33 
30 
14 
8 
9 
10 
16 
14 



Girls. 



Studies. 



S Geography, 
44 History, . . 
34 Dictionary, 
4 Etymology, 
Spelling, . 
I Maps. . . . 
Printing, . 
i Writing, . 
:. Calisthenics, 
I, Reading, . . 
Physics, . . 



Boys. 



48 
13 
24 
11 
49 
16 
10 
12 



40 
12 



Girls. 



25 
25 
21 
29 
77 
27 
8 
36 
38 
39 



20— B. P. Char. 



306 



Board of Public CHAaiTiEa 



[No. 5, 



Library. 

There are about 950 books in the library, composed largely of books of 
reference, and manj' others in raised letters, which are in constant use. 

PuplU Dlacbarged. 

Of the 236 pupils, (141 boys, 95 girls,) comprising the population of the 
institution, there were 36 discharged, viz ; 22 boys, 14 girls. 

The next statement will exhibit their period of residence in the institution^ 

and how discharged : 







TIME SEBVED IN 


INSTITUTION. 


1 
1 


NUMBER 


How Discharged. 


lyr. 

• 


2yrs. 


4yrs. 

i 

1 


5yr8. 


8yrs. 


Over 

Syrs. 


< DISCU'OD. 

1 




•a 
IS 

1 

2 


1 

CD 

Em 

. . . 
1 


s 

-a 


8 


• 

'3 

<" 

s 
13 


i 

■ • « 


• 

"3 
^ 

12 
6 
2 
1 
1 

22 

1 
1 


i 

•3 

s 

13 
1 

• • 

• • 
■ « 

14 


i 


Time out, 


2 

1 


1 


25 


Dismissed, 


3 


7 


Sent home by request, . 


1 


• • 


• « 


1 


2 


Sickness, 


1 






. . *» 


I 


Incapaoity, 






1 


. . r 


• • 

8 


• • 

13 


■ ■ ■ 


1 












Total discharged, . . 


4 


3 


1 


4 


2 


1 
1 


36 



Of the 236, the entire population of the year, 36, were discharged, with 
an average residence in the institution of 6 years. The 22 males discharged, 
resided in the institution an average period of 6 years ; the 14 females, 7 
years 6 months 26 days. 

Twenty-five (12 males, 13 females) were discharged by expiration of 
time ; 7 (6 males, 1 female) were dismissed ; 2 (males) were sent home 
by request ; 1 (male) on account of sickness ; and 1 (male) was discharged 
for incapacity. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabitie& 



307 



Bducatkm on Reception and DUeharge. 

SlcUemerU of the education of the 36 discharged pupils on receptiort and 

on discharge. 







Education 


ON Discharge. 




• 










'I 






NUMBER 








• 


• 




DISCHARQED. 




POOB. 


MODERATE.,' FAIR. 


GOOD. 


1 


Education on 




1 






Rbcbption. 




1 


i ' 


t l 


i 




i 






i 

4 


1 


-a , 
§ 

1 


i 
1 

7 


Femal 


Males. 


Femal 


i 


08 

a 

11 


Total. 


Not any, 


6 


2 


5 


14 


25 


Mo<ierate 




a 


... 1 3 


1,2 


2 


8 


s 


11 








T6tal, 


1 


4 


1 i 10 

1 1 


6 4 


7 

< 


22 


14 


36 



It will be observed that of the 36 pupils discharged, 25, on reception, 
tion, had no education, and 11 had a moderate training. 

On discharge, 4 had a poor education ; 5 a moderate ; 16 a fair ; and 11 
had a good education. 

Of the 25 pupils who, on admission, had not any education, 4 obtained 
a poor, 2 a moderate, 12 a fair, and T a good education ; and of the 11 who, 
on admission, had a moderate education, 3 did not improve, 4 acquired a 
fair training, and 4 a good education. 

Prospect of 8eir-8apporlk 

The trades J or occupations^ etc.^ taught the pupils discharged^ with their 
prospect of self-support^ is exhibited as follows-: 





Prospect of Sblf-Support. 


NUMBER 


Trades, or Occupa- 
tions, ETC., taught 


POOR. 


doubt- 
ful. 


MODERATE. ' FAIR. 

t 


GOOD. 

• 
1 

i " 

1 

1 

! ■ • ■ 

1 


DISCHARGED. 


DISCHARGED 
PUPILS. 


i 
;^ 

2 


Females. 


• 

OD 
0) 

r* 

pE4 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


Females. 


i 

8 
2 


00 

Qi 

a 

o 

• • 

• • 


s 

7 
3 
1 
1 

10 
22 


i 

1 

■ • 
• • 

■ * 

10 

4 

14 


1 


Broom-ma :£ing and 
cane-seating, . . 

Broom-making and oar- 
pet-weavlng, .... 

Broom-making and 
mattress-makinir. . . 




• • • 

• « • 


7 


• 


« • • • 


8 
1 


Tjiterature, knitting, 
sewing, 




1 
1 


2 

1 


7 
2 






• 


u 


Musio, tuning, and lit- 
erature, 


7 
9 


1 
6 


1 


2 


14 


• ' 






1 


1 




Total, 


2 


2 


4 


1 


8 

1 


36 



308 



Board of Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



Of the above 36 pupils discharged, it will be observM that 11 had but a 
poof prospect of self-support; 2 doubtful, 13 moderate, 7 fair, and 3 had 
a good prospect. 

RemalnlBg at the end of fear. 

The numbeY of pupils resident in the institution at the end of the year, 
September 30^ 1879^ was 200^ viz : 1^1 males, 79 females^ supported as 
follows : 



How Supported. 



State of Pennsylvania, *. . . . 

Sta»e of New Jerseyt 

State of Delaware, 

InHiitution, . 

Institution and friends 

Institution and services rendered as teachers, 

Total remaining September 30, 1879, . . 





• 




00 




o 


s 


i 


^•^ 


<* 


1 




92 


63 


6 


4 


2 


1 


2 


7 


3 


3 


Id 


11 


121 


79 



s 



145 

10 

3 

9 

6 

27 



200 



Of the 200 pupils remaining at the end of the year, 146 were supported 
by State of Pennsylvania ; 10 by State of New Jersey ; 3 by State of Del- 
aware ; 9 b}'^ the institution ; 6 by the institution and friends, and 27 by 
the institution and their own services as assistant instructors, etc. 

ApplIcatloBB. 

There were 42 suitable applications for admission on the State fund^ on 
September 30, 1879^ from the following counties : 



COUNTIJBS. 



Allegheny, 
Bradford, . 
Bucks, . . 
Cambria, . 
Carbon, . . 
Chester, . . 
Crawford, . 
Delaware, . 
Erie, . . . 



3 



3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Counties. 



Franklin, . . . 
Huntingdon, . . 
LHckawanna, . . 
Luzerne, .... 
Northumberland, 
PhiUdelphio, . . 
Schuylkill, . . . 
Washington, . . 

Total, .... 



3 



1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

21 

2 

1 



42 



Of the above 42 applications for admission, 26 were males and 16 were 
females. 



Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



309 



State Benefldarles. 



The 146 pupils supported by the State of Pennsylvania on September SOj 

1879^ were from the following counties: 



Counties. 



Allegheny, . 
Beaver, . . . 
Berks, . . . 
Blair, .... 
Brailford, . . 
Buoks, . . 
Cameron, . 
Cambria, . . 
Carbon, . . 
Chester, . . 
Clarion, . . 
ClearHeld, . 
Clinton, . . 
Crawford, . 
Cumberland, 
Dauphin, . . 
Delaware, . 
Erie, .... 
Fayette, . . 
Greene, . . . 



4) 



9 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



9 
^ 



4 
2 

« 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



1 
1 
1 



3 



13 



\^ 

8 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 



Counties. 



Lackawanna, .... 

1 1 1 Tjancaster, 

5 ' Lebanon, 

Lehigh, 

Luzerne, 

Mercer, 

Mifflin, 

Montgomery, . . . . 

Montour, 

Northumberland, . . 

Philadelphia, . . . . 

Schuylkill, 

SuHqiiehanna, . . . . 

TiogH, 

Wayne, 

Westmoreland, . . . 

York, 



Total, 



I 



8 



4 

2 



2 
1 



38 
4 
2 



1 
1 
1 



92 



a 



1 
1 
1 
2 

• 

1 



1 

26 
1 

• • 

2 



53 



-3 



8 

1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
64 
5 
2 
2 
1 
1 
8 



145 



Of the 145 pupils supported by the State of Pennsylvania, nearly one half 
64, or 44.14 per cent., were from Philadelphia county ; 13, or 9.00 per cent., 
from Allegheny; 6, or 4.14 per cent., from Luzerne; 5, or 8.45 per cent., 
each, from Berks and Schuylkill counties. The largest number of bo^'S, 
also of girls, were received from Philadelphia, Allegheny, Berks, and 
Schuylkill counties, in the order named. 

The Home for the Blind. 

This Home is connected with the institution for the education of the 
blind, and is intended for the adult blind, who partly support themselves 
by labor. The Home is not self-supporting. The males earn from $15 to 
$25 per month, and the females from $30 to $45 per month. Each inmate 
pays $4 to $5 a month towards their board, and the balance is used by 
them for clothing. 

It is proposed to have the Home subside, as not coming within the spe- 
cial object of this institution — the instruction of the blind. 

Since the establishment of the Industrial Home for Blind Women, in 
West Philadelphia, this department has not received any inmates. 

There are at present 2 males and 7 females in the Home. The males are 
employed at brush making, and the females at Indian basket work, cane- 
seating, plain and machine sewing, &c. 



310 



BoABD OF Public Chabities. 



[No. 5 , 



ALMS-HOUSES. 



There are 60 alms-houses in this State, 33 of which are county institu- 
tions, each providing accommodation for all the poor of a county, and 2t 
of which are local or district alms-houses, being for the indigent of a single 
borough, township, city, or for several boroughs or townships. Two of this 
latter class, viz : " Susquehanna Depot and Oakland Township Asylum for 
the Poor," and " Coal Township Poor-house," have reported to the Board 
of Public Charities for the first time during the year 18T9. Likewise, re- 
ports have been received from Mifflin county alms-house during this year, 
they being the first that have been sent from that institution for six years. 
In order that a proper comparison may be mr.de between the annual state- 
ment for 18T8 and that for 1879, the three alms-houses that were not re- 
ported last year, will be considered separately. The aggregate of inmates, 
therefore, of all the -alms-houses, except these three, (excluding the insane 
in Philadelphia Blockley alms-house, which have been fully treated of in 
connection with hospitals for the insane,) was, at the beginning of the year, 
October 1, 1878, 9,488. To these were added during the year 10,822, making 
a population of 20,310. There were discharged during the year 10,998, 
leaving at the end of the year, September 30, 1879, resident in the alms- 
houses, 9,312, thus : 



Movement of Population. 



ADULTS. 



G 
1^ 



October 1, 1878, there were, 4,825 

Admitted during the year, | 5,690 

Population, ; 10,515 

Disoharjced during the year j 5,951 

Remaining September 30, ^879, ' 4,564 




a 



7,970 
8,878 
16,848 
8,980 
7,868 



c 
o 

o 



1,518 
1,944 
8,462 
2,018 
1,444 



& 

Q 

< 

9,488 
10,822 
20,310 
10,998 

9,312 



The population, 20,310, was 1,484, or 6.80 per cent., less than the num- 
ber of previous year. The adults decreased 1,186, or 6.58 per cent.; the 
children, 298, or 7.93 per cent. The admissions, 10,822, compared with the 
previous year, have decreased 975, or 8.26 per cent.; the adults, 703, or 7.34 
per cent. ; the children, 272, or 12.27 per cent. The number discharged, 
10,993, was 1 ,308, or 10.62 per cent., less than during the preceding year ; the 
adults decreased 1,084, or 10.70 per cent. ; the children, 224,or 9.99 per cent. 

Of the 10,822 admitted, 5,690, or 62.58 per cent., were men; 3,188, or 
29.46 per cent., were women. Over four fifths of the number admitted, 



Leg. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



311 



therefore, were adults, and only 1,944, or 17.96 per cent., were children. 
Four hundred and six of the children were bom in the alms-houses; 174 
white, 24 colored boys ; 175 white and 33 colored girls. Of the adults ad- 
mitted, (8,878,) 280, or 3.15 per cent., had at some time been in jail ; and 
400, or 4.51 per cent., had visited houses of ill-fame ; 912, or 8.43 per cent., 
of the whole number admitted, (10,822,) were hospital cases. 

CbaracteristlcB of Adults Admitted. 

The following statement will exhibit the classificition of adults on admis- 
sion. 



Charactebistics. 



Adults admitted, . . . 

Classification : 

Sane, 

Insane, 

Idiotio, 

Blind, ... 

Deaf and dumb, .... 
Not stated, 

Residents : 
or alnis-hooise distriot, . 
Of other districts, . . . 
Not stated, 

Civil condition : 

Single, 

Married, 

Widowed, 

Not stated, 

Education : 

Illiterate, 

Gould write their names, 
Not stated, 

Nativity : 
Pennsylyanians, . . . 
Other Americans, . . . 

Germans, 

Irish 

English, 

Welsh, 

Scotch, 

French, 

Other foreigners, .... 
Not stated, 

Physical condition : 

Able-bodied, 

Notable-bodied, .... 
Not stated, 

Habits : 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinkers, . . 
Intemperate, ... 
Not stated, 



ADMISSIONS IN 1879. 



Number. 



Propor- 
tion per 
cent. 



8,878 



7,828 

913 

125 

47 

9 

56 



6,724 

2,000 

64 



4,206 

2,439 

2,167 

66 



2,224 

3,488 
8,166 



3,566 

962 

1,037 

2,411 

851 

116 

96 

41 

163 

J35 

8,788 

4,821 

269 



1,358 
1,960 
1,006 
4,554 



100.00 



88.73 

9.22 

1.42 

.53 

.10 



76.29 
23.71 



47.73 
27.68 
24.59 



38.94 
61.06 



■ • • 



40.79 

11.00 

11.86 

27.58 

4.01 

1.33 

1.10 

.47 

1.86 



44.00 
56.00 



31.41 
45.33 
23.26 



COMPABED WITH 

1878. 



Decrease. 



703 



815 

♦234 

♦31 

4 

19 

180 



Per cent, 
of de- 
crease. 



7.34 



9.20 
*40.41 
♦32.98 

7.84 
67.86 



446 
125 
132 



6.22 
5.64 



416 


9.00 


97 


3.82 


179 


7.63 


11 




— 




119 


5.0S 


260 


6.94 


324 




2 


.06 


♦108 


♦11.99 


85 


7.58 


416 


14.72 


89 


20 23 


14 


10.77 


43 


30.94 


13 


24.07 


61 


27.23 


83 




442 


10.45 


208 


4.14 


53 


— 


♦152 


♦12.60 


175 


8.11 


800 


22.97 


380 





* Increase. 



312 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



DiMtharged froin AlMs-Hoai 

The population of the alms-houses during the year ending September 30, 
18T9, was 20,310, of which number 10,998, or 54.15 per cent., were dis- 
charged. Of the adults, ( 1 6,S48,) there were 8,980, or 53.30 per cent. ; and 
of the children, (3,462,) there were 2,018, or 58.29 per cent., discharged 
during the year. The proportion of men and women discharged from their 
respective populations, w^ as 57 is to 48. 

The following statement will exhibit how the 10^998 inmates were dis- 
charged : 



How Discharged. 



Discharged, 
Eloped, . . 
Died; . . . . 
Removed, . 
Indentured, 
Adopted, . . 



Total difloharged. 



ADULTS. 






4,243 
713 
881 
114» 



5,951 



9 

B 
o 



2,168 
286 
465 
110 






6,411 
999 

1,346 
224 



CHILD'N. 



S to 






3,0i9 



8,980 



1,220 
136 
275 
131 
214 
42 



, 2,018 



7,681 

1,135 

1,621 

355 

214 

42 



10,998 



a 
o 



o 






hi 
04 



87.57 
5.59 
7.98 
1.75 
1.06 
.21 



54.16 



It will be seen that 7,^31, or 37.57 per cent., of the population were dis- 
charged ; 1,135, or 5.59 per cent., eloped ; 1,621, or 7.98 per cent, died, and 

855, or 1.75 per cent., were removed. 

Remalntuff la Almt-Houiies at end of Year. 

The aggregate number resident in the 57 alms-houses, (excluding the in- 
sane of Blockley alms-house, Philadelphia,) on September 30, lb 79, was 
9,312, being a decrease of 176, or 1.85 per cent., on the number at corre- 
sponding date of previous year. 



Leg. Doc] 



BoAKD OF Public Charities. 



313 



The number remaining were classified thus : 



Classification. 



Sane, ... 
Insane and idiotic, 
Blind, . . 

Deaf and dumb, . 



Total of classification. 



Total of inmates, 



,.80 

3 a 



7,326 

1,755 

178 

61 



Compared with 
S E PTE as B K R 30, 1878. 



P 



431 

*273 

6 

1 



r: o c 

pu no 



5.59 

♦18.42 

3.26 

1.61 



9,:j20 
8 



19,312 



176 



1.85 



♦ Increase. 

t Of this number, 4 men were blind* deaf, dumb, and tdlotic. ThRrefore, 8 h^ve been deducted 
fk'om the Slim or ihe above figures, to obtain the whole numberof Inmates remaiulng In the alms-bouses 
on September 30, 1879. 

The number of men^ women, and children in each of the above classes^ is 

indicated thus: 



Classification. 


1878. 


1879. 


• 

o 
176 


Per cent, of 
deoiease. 


Number of all classes, 


9,488 


9,312 

3,591 
2,3)7 
1,378 


1.85 


iSane : 
Men, 


3,968 
2,333 
1,459 


377 

*24 
81 


9.50 


Women, 


♦1.03 


Children, 


5.56 






Total of sane, 


7,760 

715 

714 

53 


7,326 


434 


5.59 


Insane and idiotic : 

Men, 

Women, 


846 

854 

55 


.*13l 

*140 

*2 


♦18.32 
♦19.61 


Children, 


♦3.77 






Total insane and idiotic, 


1,482 

112 

69 

8 


1,755 


♦273 


♦18.42 






Bli7id: 
Men, 


104 
66 

8 


8 
3 


7.14 


Women, 


4.35 


Children 


♦166.67 


, "•' --.--. 




Total of blind, 


184 


178 


6 


3.26 






Deaf and dumb : 
Men 


80 

29 

8 


81 

27 

3 


♦1 
2 


♦3.38 


Women, 

Children, 


6.90 






Total of deaf and dumb 


63 


61 


1 


1.61 






* Increase. 











314 



Board of Public CHARiTiEa 



[No. 6, 



Ages of Children in tlie flrcy-aeTen Aima-Honaec. 

Statement exhibiting the ages of the 1^444 children remaining in the alms- 
houses on September SO^ 1879 : 



Under 7 years, . . . 
7 and under 10 yeara, 
10 and under 16 5'^ears, 

Total ohildren, . 




Per cent. 



56.23 
27.77 
16.00 

100.00 



It will be observed that nearly three fifths of the children, (812, or 5fi.23 
per cent.,) were under 7 years of age; over one fourth, (401, or 27.77 per 
cent.,) were 7 and under 10 years of age; and 231, or 16 per cent., were 
10 and under 16 years of age. All persons over 16 are enumerated as 
adults. 

Of the 1,444 children, 497, or 34.42 per cent., attended day school ; 312, 
or 21.68 per cent., attended Sunday school. In those alms-houses in which 
the children were instructed, there were 18 teachers, of which number 6 
were paupers. Of the whole number of children, (1,444,) 235, or 16.27 
per cent., were illegitimate. 

The following tables will show the movement and the characteristics of 
the population of the three alms-houses from which no returns were re- 
ceived last year. 



Movement of Population. 



Remaining before reports were made, 
Admitted during the year, 

Population, 

Discliarged during the year, .... 

Remaining September 30, 1879, . 



ADULTS. 



1^ 



o 



22 
16 



27 
18 



3S 
13 



45 

14 



-4.* 



49 
34 



83 

27 






.C 

;::> 



I 

< 



17 
15 



66 
49 



32 

18 



115 
45 



25 



31 



56 



14 



70 



Of the 49 admitted, 16, or 32.65 per cent., were men; 18, or 36.74 per 
cent., were women, and 15, or 30.61 per cent., were children. Four of the 
children, viz : 2 white boys, 1 white girl, and 1 colored boy, were bom in 
the alms-houses. 

Of the 34 adults, 1 had at some time been in jail, and 2 had visited 
houses of ill-fame 

Three of the whole number admitted were hospital cases. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



315 



CharacCertotlca of AdalCs Admitted. 

The number admitted were classified thus : 



CUARAOTERISTICS. 



Adalts admitted, . 

Classification : 

Sane, 

Insane, . . . . . 
Blind, 



Resideiifs : 
Ofalmg-house district, 
Of other districts, . . 

Cfivil condition : 

Single, 

Married, 

Widowed, 



Educati >n ; 

Illiterate, . 

Gould write their names, 
Not stated, 



Nativity : 
Pennsylvanians, . . . 
Other Americans, . . . 

Irish, 

English, 

Welsh 

Other foreigners, . . . 

Physical condition : 

Able-bodied 

Notable-bodied, . . . 
Not stated, 



Habits : 
Abstinents, . . . . 
Moderate drinkers, 
Intemperate, . . . 
Not stated, . . . . 



• . • 



ADMISSIONS IN 

1879. 



Number 



34 



82 
1 
1 



32 

2 



22 

8 
4 



21 

10 

3 



22 
2 
7 
1 
1 
1 



12 

21 

1 



10 
8 
5 

11 



Propor- 
tion per 
cent. 



100.00 



94.12 
2.94 
2.94 



94.12 
5.88 



64.71 
23.53 
11.76 



67.74 
82.26 



64.71 
5.88 

20.59 
2.94 
2.94 
2.94 



86.36 
63.64 



43.48 
84.78 
21.74 



316 



Board of Public Chabiti£& 



[No. 5 , 



Dtecharged fh»m AIHM-bouMS. 

The population of the three institutions not reported last year was, as 
reported for the 3'ear ending September 30, 1879, 1 15, of which number 45, 
or 39.13 per cent., were discharged. There were 27, or 32.53 per cent, of 
the adults, and 18, or f)6.25 per cent., of the children discharged during 
the year. The proportion of men and women discharged from their re- 
spective populations was as 34 is to 31. 

The following statement will show how the inmates were discharged: 





ADULTS 


. 


i 

.0 




Whole number 
discharged. 


on . 
Lon. 


How DiSCHABOED. 


• 

a 
9 

13 


• 

a 
9 

i 

18 
1 


1 


Per cent, 
popuiati 


Discharged 


26 

1 


8 

• ■ ■ 

8 
2 


31 
1 
8 
2 


29.56 


Died, . . 


.87 


Removed 




6.96 


Adopted 




■ 


■ • • 


1.74 








Total discharged, 


13 


14 


27 


18 


45 


38.18 



It will be observed that 34, or 29.56 per cent., were discharged ; 1, or .87 
per cent., died, and 8, or 6.96 per cent., were removed. 

Remsinlog In Alma-HouMs at end of Year. 

TJie number remaining in the three alms-houses 07i September 30^ 1879^ 

was 70, They were classified thus : 



Clabsificatiok. 



Men, . . . 
Women, , 
Children, 

Total, 





• 

9 


<5 


§ 




1 


s 


s 




23 


2 


■ * • 


22 


8 


1 


14 










69 


10 


1 



s 



25 
81 

14 



70 



Leg. Doc.J 



Board of Public Charities. 



317 



Ageff of Children. 

Statement showing the ages of the children remaining on September 30, 
1879 J in the three alms-houses not reported last year : 



Aqes. 



Per cent. 



Under 7 years of age, 
10 and under 16, . . . 



Total ohlldren, 




100.00 



Of the 14 children, 7 attended day school, and 2 attended Sunday school. 
There were 6 illegitimate children. 



318 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



AXiUB'^ouBea^^Statement exhibiting the number of paupers of all classes remaining 

5SS femaleSf) in Blockley alms-house^ Philadelphia^ 



ALH6-H0178I8. 



1. 

2. 

s. 

4. 

ft. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
IS. 
14. 
lA. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 

ao. 

21. 
22. 
22. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
80. 
31. 
32. 
88. 
84. 
85. 
36. 
87. 
86. 
89. 
•40. 
41. 
42. 
48. 
41. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
46. 
49. 
fiO. 
51. 
62. 
68. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
56. 
69. 
60. 



Adams county alms-house, 

Allegheny county home, 

Allegheny city poor-house, 

Allegheny couuty— Pittsburgh city farm, 

Beaver county alms-house, 

Bedford county alms-house, 

Berks county alms-house, . 

Blair county alms-house, 

Bucks county alms-house, 

Cambria county alms-house, 

Carbon county— Middle Coal Field poor-house, 

Chester couuty alms-house, ... 

Clinton county— Luck Haven poor-house, 

Columbia county — Bloom poor-house, 

Columbia county —Centralla poor-house, 

Crawford county alms-house, 

Cumberland county alms-house, 

Dauphin county alms-hou.se, 

Delaware county alms-house, 

Erie couut3' alms-house, 

Fayette county alms-house, 

Franklin county lilms-house, 

Greene county alms-house, 

Huntingdon county ^Inis-house, 

Lackawannacounty—Blakely poor-house, 

Lackawanna county— Carboudale City poor-house, . . 

Lackawanna couuty— Bcranton poor-house, 

Lackawannacounty—N. Luzerne poor-house, 

Lackawanna county— Kansom poor-house, 

Lancaster county alms-house, ... 

Lawrence county— New Castle poor-house, 

Lebanon county alms-house, 

Lehigh couuty alms-house, 

Luxerne county— Central poor-house, 

Lycoming couuty— WllUamsport city poor-house, . . . 

Mercer'counly alms-house, 

Mlfnin county alms-house, 

Montgomery county alms-house, 

Montourcounty- lianvllle and Mahoning poor-house, . . 

Moutouroounty— Valley Township poor-house, 

Northampton county alms-house, 

Northumberland county— Coal Township poor-house, . . 

Perry county alms-house, 

Philadelphia— Blockley alms-house, 

Philadelphia— Koxboro^ poor-house, 

Philadelphia- Gcrmantown poor-house, 

Philadelphia— Oxford and Lower Dublin poor-house, * . 

Schuylkill couuty alms-house, 

Somerset county alms-house, 

Susquehannacounty— Auburn and Rush asylum, . . . . 
Susqut'hanna county— Montrose and Brldgcwater asylum, 

Susquehanna county— New Mllford asylum, ^. 

Susquehanna Depot and Oakland township poor asylum, 

Tioga county alms-house, 

Venango county alms-house, 

Warren county alms-house, 

Washington county alms-house, 

Wayne county alms-house, 

Westmoreland county alms-house, 

York county alms-house, 



ToUI, 




*0f this number, 4 men were blind, deaf, dumb, and idiotic. 



Leo. Doc] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



319 



in alms-houses, September SO, 1879y excluding the 9SS insane patients, {459 males, and 
who are treated of in statistics o/ hospitals for insane. 



INSANE AND 
IDIOTIC. 


BLIND. 


DSAF AND 
DUMB. 


NATIVITY 


• 


H08PITAT. CASKS. 




Men. 


S 

S 

o 


• 

a 
t 
2 


« 

o 


■ 

s 

e 
o 


1 
1 


S 


V 

a 

o 


• 

t 

2 

a 


• 

s 


S 

« 

a 

1 


• 


• 

B 


• 


w 

s 




• 

t 

2 

6 


t 


13 
17 
81 
88 


12 
10 
68 
76 


• • • 

8 

• • • 


• • • 

4 
1 
2 
8 

■ • • 

8 
8 

• » 

2 

2 

1 


2 

1 
1 

■ • • 


• ■ ■ 

1 


■ ■ • 

1 
1 
2 

1 

• ■ 

2 


1 

• 

4 

• ■ 

1 
1 
1 


• • ■ 
• • 

a • 

« • • 


60 
120 
120 

• • ■ 

70 

• • • 

808 
67 

101 
43 

67 

■ ■ • « 

2 

9 

22 

61 

172 

16U 

87 

105 

110 

115 


15 
180 
128 

• • ■ "y 

' ' izi 

20 

127 

a7 

97 

* ■ ' '4 

27 
41 
22 
88 
62 
129 
88 
47 


* 'M8 


16 

19 

7 


11 

18 
26 




1 
2 
8 
4 


11 


18 , 8 

8 1.. 
77 4 
18 1. . 
25 1 
18 . . . 


1 

.... 

46 


89 


'5 


6 


6 

72 

8 


1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
2 

• ■ 


' 1 


6 
7 
8 


22 
10 






2 . . 


• • • • 


62 


22 


1 


9 
10 


12 
21 


16 
80 

. • • 


• • « 

7 


a » • 

1 


• ■ • 


' '288 


88 


86 




11 
12 












18 


4 














. 


• « • t 


• a • • 


■ ■ • 




14 


2 


*2 

22 

4 














16 


16 
9 


1 


2 
2 
1 


8 


1 




1 




• ■ • • 


■ ■ ■ t 


• • 




16 
17 


18 


14 - - - 






1 
1 






• . • • • 

"88 


7 
8 
82 
17 
6 
2 


3 

11 

28 

20 

9 

8 


' i 

8 

2 

7 


18 


21 


86 

29 
21 












19 


80 
18 


2 


1 
1 
2 
2 


8 
2 

1 
8 




2 




20 
21 


16 
12 


16 2 
14 . . . 

8 1 

1 






1 




22 
28 


4 




63 


10 
8 
6 

62 


24 












: : : 1 : : : ! 


' 








26 


: : : : : ,: : :i 








1 * • • 






; 1 


• « • • 


« ■ • • 


■ • ■ 


... 1 
1 


,26 

27 
1 28 


15 


16 


8 








' • ' 1 - ' - 1 


21 


2 


2 
7 
49 
1 
4 










• ••!--- 


16 
45 

' ' 178 








11 


8 


8 
2 


• • • 










146 
4 


298 
8 


• ■ ■ 

16 

• « • • 

8 

88 


27 

• • • 

6 
19 


: . ^ 


71 
1 


1 


1 






:::!,8o 

. . 81 


9 




6 

8 

1 




1 
8 








2 82 


16 
1 


18 8 
2 - - - 


2 


2 


■ ■ • 


188 

17 

6 

60 


100 
88 

7 
21 


8 


83 
'84 

1 ^ 




7 
81 
















• 




19 
1 


• • 1 


'' 'l 
1 








1 




" ' 40 

270 

25 


■ • • • 


• 
• • • 




'86 
87 


18 




8 

1 . . . 






8 










19 
6 


24 
8 




88 


2 


8 
















%9 












8 
210 


8 

86 


40 


26 

1 


28 
2 

14 




1 






2 


2 


1 


* * 27 


40 


18 




41 
42 


12 


1 














82 


2 






1 


48 
, 44 






25 


22 




8 


4 




1,822 

11 

60 

168 

• • • • « 

77 
16 

• • • ■ 

6 










1 
14 
















45 


6 


























46 




























47 


16 


86 18 1 
1 



4 

2 


4 
1 




4 
1 


' 1 


2 


288 


886 


• • • ■ 


■ • • 




48 
49 
















60 








1 










4 


1 


• • • • 


• • 




61 


2 


2 

* 












» 


• • • t 


62 






. . . 














2 


1 








68 


6 


8 . . 

9 8 
9 I - 


2 
2 

1 
4 
2 
2 
1 












67 
81 
68 

200 

a • • . 








64 


10 


« ■ ■ 




1 


1 














66 


8 






■ • • 

14 

1 


• • ■ 

17 
8 


• • • 


66 


82 


28 

8 

18 

22 


• • ■ 

• ■ ■ 

• • • 

8 


1 




1 
2 
2 






i. . . . 




67 


2 






7 

97 

185 


14 
46 

66 


68 


28 


1 
1 




1 




60 


21 




6 


1 


1 


60 




" ' - 1 






... 1 . - 1 


' "1 




848 


868 


86 


104 


66 8 


81 


27 


8 


8,041 


2,871 


8,970 J 


800 


886 


29' 

1 



320 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 



FINANCIAL BTATEMBlfT ezhibiting amount expended for 



Alms-Housk Districts. 



1. 

2. 

8. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 

la. 

H. 
16. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 



27. 
28. 
29. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
88. 
34. 
85. 

86. 
87. 

88. 



40. 

41. 
42. 

48. 
44. 
46. 
46. 
47. 

48. 
40. 
GO. 

61. 

62. 
68. 

64. 

65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
60. 
60. 



Adams county alma-houm;, 

Alhghfuy cuitnty hoiue 

Alle^lieuy city puor-huuse, 

Ailcgheuy couuiy— city farm, Pittsburgh, 

Heaver county aluis-huuse 

Bedford county aluiii-liouse, 

Uerkji couuiy aim -house, 

Blair county aliiis-houoc, 

Bucks couuty aluib-house, 

Cauibrlii county alms-house, 

Carbon co.—.VllddleCoal-Fleld poor-house 

Chester county alms-house, . . 

Clinton county— Lock Kaven poor-house, 

Columbia county— Bloom poor>house, 

Columbia county— Centralla poor-house, 

Crawford county alms-house, 

Cumberland county alms-houses, 

Dauphin county aliiib-house, ....... 

Delaware county alms-house, . * 

Erie CO uuty alms-house, 

Fayette county alms-house, 

Fruuklln cuunty alms-house, 

Ureeue county alms-house, 

Huntingdon county alms-house, 

Lackawanna county —Blakely poor-house 

Lackawanna county— Carbondale City 
po<»r-hout»e, 

Lackawanna CO. —Scranton poor-house, . 

Lackawanna co.— N.Luzerne poor-house, 

Lai'kawHUua CO. — Uansom poor-house, . 

L:incaster county alms-house, .... 

Lawrence co. — New Ca«ile poor-bouse, . 

Lebanon county aluib-house, 

Lehigh county alms-house 

Luzerne county — Central poor-house, • .. 

Lycoming county— VVIIUamsport city 
poor-bouse, 

Mercer couuiy alms-house, 

Mllflln county alms-house, 

Montgomery county alms-house, 

Montour county— Danville and Mahoning 
poor-house, ■ • 

Montour county— Valley Township poor- 
house, 

Northampton county alms-house, .... 

l>(orthumberland county— Coal Township 
poor-house, . . 

Perry county alms-houae, 

Philadelphia— Blockley alms-house, . . . 

Philadelphia— Koxboro^ poor-house, . . . 

Phila«ielphla— Uermantown poor-house, 

Phila<iel|jhla— Oxford and Lower Dublin 
poor-house. . . 

Schuylkill county alms-house, 

Somerset county alms-house, .... 

Susquehanna county— Auburn and Rush 
asylum, . . 

Susquehanna CO.— Montrose and Bridge- 
water asylum, ■ ■ ■ 

SuBqu< hanna county— N. Mllford asylum, 

Subquehanna Depot and Oakland Town- 
ship poor asylum, 

Tioga couuty alms-house, 

Venango county alms-iiouse, 

Warren county alms-house 

Waahlngton county alms-house, .... 

\Vayne county alms-house, 

Westmoreland couuty alms-house, . . . 

York couuty alms-house, 



ALMS-HOUSES- FOR WHAT 



Mainte- 
nance. 



Total, 



(2,464 

8,031 

18,7S8 

12,290 

1,011 

2, TOO 

27,660 

8,691 

7,060 

2,808 

6, .''OS 

11,611 

80O 

845 

2,l(i6 

2,796 

8,016 

7,974 

8,880 

7,998 

7,607 

4,060 

2,072 

6,126 

282 

626 
7,8» 

460 

1,960 

18,411 

601 
3,914 
7,367 
4,612 

1,446 

2,843 

2,606 

16,1^5 

1,280 

806 
7,624 

1,865 

1,147 

282,776 

8U0 

•3,527 

1,405 

18,879 

8,489 

188 

281 
1,086 

808 
1,208 
2,66i 
2,144 
5.710 
4,852 
7,420 
6,644 



41 
21 I 
44 
49 
31 I 
94 

66 
77 ' 
63 
86, 
86 
00 
4» I 
65 I 

46 
12 
98 I 
85 
63 
921 
04 
00 I 
83 I 

00 
18 
91 
84 
56 
71 
99 
86 
88 

87 
18 
80 
62 

81 

60 
70 

86 
64 

82 
00 
68 

88 

87 

87 

60 

88 
00 



16 
60 
67 
67 
63 
90 
47 



Salaries, i 

wages, I 

and labor. 




•2,0f9 

4,256 

7,215 

10,998 

1,653 

l,b04 

6,79U 

1,178 

8,888 

1,069 

3,254 

8,966 

246 

700 

1,150 

2,016 

8,000 

4,728 

2,475 

6,551 

1,66S 

l,b90 

949 

800 

2U0 

6^ 
8,691 

671 
1,969 
4,646 

857 
1,700 
8,134 
1,744 

41 
1,261 
8,141 
2,186 

426 

85 
8,274 

1,290 

967 

66,882 

50 

1,426 

1,477 
6,790 
1,442 

662 

648 
446 



1,840 
1,2(« 
1,686 
2,782 
882 
8,6^9 
1,882 



69 197,876 



08 

67 I 

00 

77 

80 

00 

401 

29l 

78 

60' 

66 

32 

00 ! 

00 
00 ; 
10' 
00 

68; 

15 

83 

98 

78, 

23 I 

00 

00 ! 

00 : 

50 
00 

2j; 

16 
20, 

00 i 

20 

00 

26 

20 I 
45 I 
00 

82 

00 
70 

89 
07 
66 
00 
00 

90 
87 
62 

76 

00 
00 

81 
04 
22 
76 
70 
76 
09 
46 



Fuel and 
light. 



I 



1600 

977 
1,516 
2,290 

au6 

700 

2,226 

285 

1,761 

146 

768 

1,862 

2U0 

126 

140 

656 

1,500 

1,472 

l,Oil 

1,646 

213 

640 

196 

225 



277 

• ft • 

61 

156 

4,210 

89 

876 

1,865 

121 

75 

869 

645 

1,144 

96 



1,091 

178 

665 

81,819 

60 

888 

178 

1,285 

44 



20 
6 

10 
126 
676 

76 



161 
1,847 



65 

00 
7$ 
17 
60 
69 
49 
87 

00 
68 
67 
69 

87 



66 

88 

00 
62 
00 
67 

60 
18 
00 

60 

CO 
24 

00 
26 
66 
63 



780 I 42 
80 60 



72 68,419 



02 
65 

84 



Clothing, 



00 

10 

65 

83 

00 

85 

62 

18 

66 

09 

83 

60 

00 

26 

00 

11 

00 I 

46|'i 

57 ' 

76 

9i 

61 

66 

OO 



|8I0 

8,685 

2.290 

8,818 

20$ 

665 

4,985 

928 

1,907 

86 

1,716 

2,666 

100 

65 

265 

1,828 

1,000 

1,606 

768 

400 

2,6» 

866 

690 

600 

28 

148 

« • • * 

181 
874 

8,846 

122 

2,186 

1,708 

669 

68 

800 

291 

1,260 

196 

67 
1,814 

82 

260 

24,096 

110 



686 

8,864 

816 

128 

00 
60 

80 



707 
491 

1,270 
174 
817 

4,144 



88,880 



Hospitals 
for Insane 



22 
64 
29 
28 
06 
28 
86 
21 
00 
60 
08 
62 
00 
40 
00 
09 
00 
00 
06 
75 
63 
•4 
81 

dty 

60 

84 

SO 
05 
28 
40 
18 
86 
41 

89 
12 

88 
U2 

76 

00 
96 

63 
00 
66 
00 



09 
00 

00 

00 
7S 

00 
60 
71 
81 
61 
47 
23 
28 



114.879 84 
, 2,888 48 
, 16,511 
I 2,418 
611 
836 
2,219 
828 
1,989 
131 
8,94J 



04 
00 
79 
96 
«8 
56 
45 
80 
58 



218 

550 

4,741 



80 
00 
44 



2,6M, ^ 
166 90 



2,480 



96 



804 S7 

616 M 

2S0 00 

70O 00 



471 
4,600 



45 

98 



1,836 ; 45 



418 

831 

7,861 

607 

1,458 

416 

900 

779 



698 



165 
2,642 

1,090 
858 



876 



10 
58 



00 
48 
48 

41 



97 



25 

60 

01 
04 



50 



170 00 

148 ' 75 
8,109 ' 69 
1,857 78 
1,672 55 
2,859 ; 48 

498 70 
8,881 08 



81 



97,716 



11 



* Clothing Included. 



Leo. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



321 



support of alms-houses ; also, of outdoor reliefs for the past year: 



PURPOSES EXPBNDKD. 



Bepalra. 



|900 

2,aM 



800 

1S5 

2,986 

209 

827 



fl7 
04 
98 



00 
60 
S7 
97 
21 
17 
664 ' 69 



980 


92 


no 


00 


1,225 


00 


UO 


00 


1,607 


67 


1,000 


00 


661 


66 


900 


69 


1,210 


71 


496 


48 


264 


12 


12 


88 


4,600 


00 


626 


00 




All other 
expemea. 



1647 

9,805 

1,407 

61,605 

100 



944 

2,864 



85 
40 
80 
70 
66 



81 
86 



19t 
4,889 

1,841 



291 



78 
81 

96 



216 

1,614 

6B0 

465 
660 



00 
81 
25 

71 
00 



♦1,085 
7,688 
2,108 

16,996 
800 
1,069 
1,860 
1,418 
6,608 
167 



8,000 



00 



2,099 
290 
464 
278 



12 
61 
44 
90 



06 



676 ; 74 



105 
164 

20O 



11 
706 



02 
65 

Ob 

46 

88 



76 00 

160 ' 77 
4,811 ! 86 



401 
1,000 



I 



2,861 
466 



68 
18 



82 

621 

2,8M 

1,168 
167 

l,0r 17 902 

6,850 I 00 1,849 

86 46 . . . . 

96 ! 94 1 1 1,502 

420 81 



44 

00 



966 

887 
16,8M 88 

174 I 10 
26 46 



67 , 80 
466 I 49 



1» 



858 

778 



84 
92 
66 



108 


60 


86 
26 


60 
00 


• • 

162 


■ • 

18 


7,661 


• • 

01 



147 

860 

4,140 

• ■ ■ 

167 

2,656 
180 
604 



125 



99 
75 
00 

80 

42 
86 
06 



48 



2,917 
68 



91 
95 



1,264 I 67 

224 ! i8 ! 



62,908 



69 14 

289 66 

6,108 I 02 



60 



00 



6,181 . 90 



S7 ii 96,608 



81 
69 
07 
68 
80 
87 
06 
72 
66 
66 



Total. 



98 
1,868 

2,496 

681 

9,091 

40 

1,091 

1,647 

10,285 

1,126 



1, 



1,947 


98 


2,786 


82 


■ • • • 


• • 


105 


00 


2,427 


96 


8,929 


00 


4,68i 


70 


8,742 


19 


1,287 


42 


881 


81 



84 

79 
00 



11 
20 

61 
87 
65 
80 
28 
91 



68 



287 

457 

2,062 



16 



9,629 



18 

87 

08 
40 
80 
00 
14 

77 
46 
98 

86 

81 



65 
49 



67 I 118,448 



00 
64 



|7«ao6 

5^078 

88,280 

94,010 

6,780 

7,567 

48,687 

12,136 

21,962 

6,788 

16,286 

27,681 

946 

8,640 

6,065 

16,673 

21,444 

28,540 

12,486 

28,680 

18,509 

8,908 

5,016 

18,8)0 

1,639 

2,478 
21,880 

1,214 
12,817 
36, '218 

2,602 

6,918 
16,274 
2D,8vv 

2,868 

8,648 

7,608 

21,966 



Expenses 
for out- 
door relief 



Total of 

alms-hoase 

and 

out'loor 

relief. 



70 
66 
11 

W| 
02 

73 

09 

U 

66 , 

90 

16 

35 

00 

», 

65 I 

86 

46 

88 

49 

90 

02 

32 

25 

00 

83 

60 
57 
80 
02 
67 
56 
10 
05 
22 







12,601 


00 


8,774 


60| 


8,671 


96l 


10,142 


66 


1 2.867 


00 


2,077 


84 


8,061 


13 


2,425 


14 



Receipts. 



4,568 
067 
l,fi78 
2,290 
2,241 
665 
6,783 
3,471 
10,517 
2,965 
6,197 
6,063 
7,610 
1,280 
4,000 
4,026 



Iv 
5,228 
189 
8,626 
1,878 
3,622 
6,867 
3,166 
6,795 



49 17,736 

83 6,936 

47 I 6,642 

74 , 7,872 



2,964 63 



17,441 

7,001 

4,206 

434,106 

899 

9,263 

9,896 

41,862 

8,070 

2,682 

1,249 
1,733 

1,444 

7,761 
14,181 
13,62) 
16,880 

6,069 
22,845 
22,772 



86 

42 

76 
86 
29 
35 

87 

I 
53 

79 

44 

61 

I 

67 
00 

64 

14 
48 
92 
57 
01 
79 
67 



681 

96 
4,550 

4,063 
1,667 
49,991 
1,890 
4,896 

4,185 

60,919 

2,812 



850 
810 



06 
16 
06 
63 
16 

74 
24 
71 

00 

71 
00 



83 1,281,227 



648 25 
8,676 I GO 
8,144 ' 49 
1,154 I 86 
2,874 I 65 



800 
8,506 
3,886 



00 
81 
29 



94 822,752 



75 



»9,997 

68,858 

41,902 

104, 152 

9,166 

9,675 

64,688 

14,661 

21,962 

11,806 

17,272 

29,811 

3,286 

6,882 

6,751 

22,809 

24,916 

34,057 

15,891 

2d, 828 

18,682 

16,514 

6.296 

17,800 

6,6M 

3,864 
80,104 

1,408 
16,448 
36,087 

6,224 
16,606 
19,440 
2i,794 

20,100 
16,699 
18,145 
29,688 



01 
48 

27 

94 

75 

60 

57 ! 

00 

06 

80 

60 

68 

96 

16 

00 

80 

I 

16 

97 , 

36 

44 

60 

18 

85 

68 

71 

72 
14 
61 
12 

87 

51 

30 21,991 72 



79 ] 

" 
07! 

75 

02 

67 

22 

25 

66 I 

93 

601 

62 ' 

94, 

61 

16 , 
48 ; 
46 
44 
29 
SO 
65 
80 
40 
00 
13 

75' 
64 

66 

17 I 
74 
95 
76 
98 

21 
97 
06 
86 



|682 
1,646 
6,204 
3,061 

666 

8 

8,388 

630 

3,228 

99 

622 
3,104 

1,367 

2,68% 
24,065 

2,738 
2,622 



3,666 00 
721 36 



11,064 

6,876 

464.096 

2,793 

14,160 

13,591 
92,782 
10,888 

2,757 



82 
01 
87 
8) 
OJ 

27 
08 
16 

61 



1,600 
2,043 ! 00 



2,092 
11,484 
17,275 
14,780 
18,905 

6,860 
30.654 
26,158 



79 

74 
96 
78 
12 
01 
60 
93 



28 
98 
230 30 



16 
21 
06 
85 
02 
TO 
35 
27 
04 
18 
67 
20 

41 



Net cost of 
alms-house 
aud outdoor 
relief. 



270 

1,000 

200 



47 
750 
786 
6,781 
618 
607 
860 
107 

960 

418 

1,086 

2,289 

135 

138 

2,116 



40 
00 
00 



75 

561 

89 

65 

46 

82 

85 

84 

66 

00 
94 
63 

76 

00 
06 



189 50 
on I 90 
2,095 ' 22 
127 , 81 
79i 49 



6.750 
2,061 


41 
90 


688 


21 


497 


80 



1,613,980 69 



96 I 00 

824 52 

616 87 

1,842 13 
5,880 



1,830 
1,197 



32 
60 



19,365 
62,207 
35,696 
101,088 
6,500 
9,666 
61.850 
13,901 
18,734 
11,207 
16,750 
26,207 
3,286 
4,515 
5,761 
19,723 
850 
34,067 
12,653 
26,206 
18,462 
16,6'4 
6,02} 
16,300 
6,436 

3,864 

30,056 

614 

16,658 

32,306 

6,611 
15,198 
19,079 
26,617 

19,139 
15,186 
12,108 
27,349 

3,630 

663 

19,875 

10,865 

5,106' 

482,(01 

2,671 

13,866 

7,830 
90,720 
10,391 



61 

07 

01 

00 

00 

87 

87 

98 

62 

75 

02 

42 

94 

20 

15 

61 

00 

44 

01 

57 

85 

30 

00 

00 

13 

75 
79 
10 
67 
62 
29 
61 
88 
69 

66 
97 
14 
83 



8S 

66 

32 
11 
15 
54 
51 

86 
13 
16 



1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

29 

21 



21 
25 

26 
27 
26 
29 
80 
31 
82 
88 
34 

35 
36 
37 



2,074 . 36 

1,102 ' 56 
1,947 00 



1,868 
10,818 
15,031 

8,930 
18.205 

4,S3J 
30,854 
24,961 



27 
87 
83 
49 
12 
69 
60 
36 



96,690 I 39 1,516,290 I 30 



4) 
41 

42 
43 

44 
45 

46 

47 
46 
49 

60 

51 
62 

63 
64 
55 

r6 
57 
66 
69 
60 



2t.-B. P. Char. 



322 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



OUT-DOOE RELIEF— ALMS-HOUSE DISTBICTS. 



The aggregate of all classes in receipt of out-door relief in alms-house 
districts during the quarter ending September 30, 18T9, was 15,430. 

A comparison with the number in the several classes in 1879^ with those of 

the preceding year, is exhibited as follows : 



Causes of Destitution. 



Old age, 

Death /absence, or desertion of husband or father, 

Temporary sickness or want of work, 

Single woman in receipt of relief, 

Insane and idiotic, 

Total, 



1879. 



3,821 

7,206 

4,678 

130 

95 



Decrease 
on 1878. 



15,430 



876 

2,427 

2,893 

80 

•16 



6,760 



Per cent, 
of de- 
crease. 



10.17 
25.20 
3'^.20 
88.10 
•20.25 



27.18 



* Increase. 

Of the 15,430 relieved, 2,479, or 16.07 per cent, were men; 5,398, or 
34.98 per cent, were women; and 7,553, or 48.95 per cent, were children 
under 16 years of age. All persons over 16 years of age are counted and 
considered as adults. 

Statistics of the 7^877 adults receiving relief 



Chabactebistics, &q. 



Number of adults, . . . 

Age: 

16, and under 20 years, . 

20, and under 30 years, . 

80, and under 40 years, . 

40, and under 10 years, . 

5'», and under 60 years, . 

60, and under 70 years, . 

70, and under 80 years, . 

80, and under 90 years, . 

90, and under 100 years, 
100 years and upwards, . 
•Not stated, 

Residence : 
Of relief district, .... 

Non-residents, 

Not stated, 

Civil condition : 

Single 

Married, 

Widowed, 

Not stated, 



No. 



7,877 



Per ct. 



100.00 



109 


1.44 


802 


10.58 


1,686 


22.23 


1,608 


21.21 


1,165 


15.36 


975 


12.86 


843 


11.11 


316 


4.17 


65 


.86 


14 


.18 


294 





Chabactebtstics, <tc. 



7,441 
140 
296 



98.15 
1.85 



744 
8,791 
2,989 

853 



9.89 
50.88 
89.73 



Education : 
Illiterate, ....... 

Could readonly, . . . . 

Could write some, . . 
Not stated, 

Habits: 

Abstinents 

Moderate drinkers, . . 
Intemperate, ... 
Not stated, 

Nativity : 
Natives of relief district, 
Otlier Penns^lvanians, . 
Other Amerfoans, . . . 

Germany, 

Ireland, 

England, , 

Wales, 

Scotland, 

France, 

Other foreigners, .... 
Not stated, 



No. 


Per ct. 


2,624 


85.80 


1,166 


15.90 


3,541 


48.30 


546 




4,530 


78.23 


1,107 


19.11 


154 


2.67 


2,086 




2,568 


34.01 


825 


10.92 


775 


10.26. 


972 


12.87 


1,678 


22.22 


327 


4.33 


162 


2.15 


107 


1.42 


28 


.37 


110 


1.46 


825 





Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



323 



ChlMren In Receipt of 0«t-4oor Relief. 

The number of children in receipt of out-door relief, was 7,553, being a 
decrease of 1 ,904 on number at corresponding date of previous year. The 
children comprised 48.95 per cent., nearly one half of the whole number 
(15,430) receiving out-door relief. 

Their ages, with the number who attended day school and Sunday school ; 
also, the number who were illegitimate, are thus exhibited: 



Ages. 



Under 7 years, . . . . 

7 and under 10 years, 

10 and under 16 years. 

Not stated, 



Total children. 





BEX. 




Attended pub- 
lic school. 


Attended Sun- 
day school. 


Boys. 


Girls, 


Total. 


1,366 

1,157 

868 


1,470 
1,257 
1,084 


2,836 

2,414 

1,952 

351 


619 

1,260 

845 

4,829 


780 

1,110 

830 

4,883 






3,391 


3,811 


7,653 


7,553 


7,658 



I '^ 

P Qp 



27 

16 

5 



48 



Of the known ages of the children, 2,836 were under t years of age; 
2,414 were 7 and under 10 years of age, and 1,952 were between 10 and 16 
years of age. 

Attended Day School. 

Of the 7,553 children, 2,724 are reported as attending day school, of 
which number 619 were under 7 3'ears of age ; 1,260 were 7 and under 10. 
and 845 were 10 and under 16 years. 

Attended Sunday School. 

The number who attended Sunday school was 2,670, or 730 under 7 years 
of age; 1,110 were 7 and under 10, and 830 were between 10 and 16 years 
of age. 

llleKttimate Children. 

The returns show only 48 of the children to be illegitimate. 



> 



824 



Board of Public Coabitieb. 



[No. 6 , 



r 



Statement exhibiting ike number of all classes of persons receiving out- 
door relief during qiuirter ending September SO, 1879^ in districts con- 
nected with alms-houses^ and causes of destitution. 



GliAaSIFICATIOir OF OUTBIDB POOB. 



1. Men, . . 

2. Women, 
S. Children, 



Total outside poor, 



Section A. — Deatiiution caused by old age or 

disability, 

1. Men, 

2. Women, 

8. Children dependent, 



Total of Section A, 



Section B.— Destitution caused by death, absence, 
or desertion of husband, or father. 

1. Widows, 

Children dependent, 



2. Unmarried mothers, 
Children dependent, 

3. Wives of prisoners, . 
Children aependent. 



4. Wives of soldiers and sailors, 
Children dependent, .... 



5. Wives deserted by husbands, 
Children dependent, .... 



6. Orphan children, . 
Total of Section B, 



Section C. — Destitution caused by temporary sick- 
ness, or want of work of male heads of families 
or single men, 

1. Adult males, ou account of sickness, 

2. Adult males, family siclcness, etc., 

8. Adult males, for want of work, 

Families dependent on 1, 2, 8, | Q^\i^^n 



Total of Section C, 

Section D — Single Women, 



1. White, 

2. Colored, 



Total of Section D, 

Section K.— Insane and Idiotic, 



1. Men, . . 

2. Women, 
8. Children, 



Total of Section E, . . . 
Aggregate of out-door relief, 



2,010 
3,504 



66 
90 



72 
173 



22 

28 



401 
771 



445 

228 

710 

1,071 

2,229 



119 
11 



45 
40 
10 



No. 



2,470 
5,898 
7,558 



15,430 



1,056 

1,596 

669 



3,321 



5,514 

146 

245 

50 



1,172 
79 



7,206 



4,678 



95 



15,480 



Per cent, on 
totals. 



• • • 



• ■ . a 



180 . . 



85.73^ 
.95 
1.59 
.82 



7.60 

.51 j 



16.07 
48. d5 



100.00 



21.52 



46.70 



80.82 



.84 



.62 



100.00 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabities. 



325 



flMttoa A.— DeatltHttoB emnmd by OM Ags, ^r PtormanMit DlMblllty. 

There were 3,321 relieved under this section, or 21.52 per cent, of the 
whole number, 15,430. 

Of the adults, 1,056 were men, 1,596 were women, 669 children depend- 
ent. 

Statement exhibiting the age^ residents^ or non-reaidenta of relief districts j 

nativity J edttcation^and habits of the adults : 



ADuiiTs IN Section A. 


»: 

B 

p 

2,652 


Per cent. 


Adults in Section A. 


u 

9 

1 

1,030 
390 

1»063 
169 


• 

i 


Number, 


100.00 


JEducation : 

Illiterate, 

Could read only, .... 
Could write name, . . . 
Not stated, 

1 Hahita : 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinkers, . . . 

Intemperate, 

Not stated, 

Nativity: 
Natives of relief district. 
Other Pen nsvlvanians, . 
Other Americans, . . . 

Germany, 

1 Ireland 

England, 




Affea : 
16, and under 20 years, . . 
20, and under 30 years, . . 
80, and under 40 years, . . 
40, and under 50 years, . . 
50, and under 60 years, . . 
60, and under 70 years, . . 
70, and under 80 years, . . 
80, and under 90 years, • . 
90. and under 100 years, . 


31 

98 

172 

328 

899 

655 

620 

232 

49 

11 

57 


1.20 

8.70 

6.63 

12.65 

. 15.38 

25.25 

23.91 

8.96 1 

1.89 

.43 

1 


41.49 
15.70 
42.81 

« 


1,467 
389 
118 

683 


74.50 

19.76 

6.74 


100, years and upwards, . 
Not stated, 


1,129 

293 

258 

232 

456 

92 

54 

26 

8 

49 

55 


43.47 


Besidents: 
or relief district, .... 

Non-residents, 

Not stated, 


2,501 

46 

105 


98.19 
1.81 


11.28 
9.98 
8.98 

17.66 
8.54 


Civil condition : 
Sinsle 


362 

1,145 

849 

296 


15.37 


Wales, 

Scotland 


2.08 
1.00 


Married, 

Widowed, 

Not stated, 

• 


48.60 
36.03 


France, 

Other foreigners, .... 

; Not stated, 

1 


.81 

1.89 



SectloB B.—DMtttadon eanaed by Deatli, Abteace, or Deaertloii of HiubaBd or Father. 

The aggregate number relieved under this section was 7,206, or 46.70 
per cent., of the whole number receiving out-door relief. The number in 
this section as compared with the previous year has decreased 2,427. 

The annexed statement exhibits the classes of persons relieved under this 

section : 



Cf asses : 
Widows, , - 


2,010 
3,504 


5,514 
146 
245 


Classes : 
Wives of soldiers, . . . 
Children dependent, . . 

Wives deserted by hus- 
bands, 

Children dependent, . . 

Orphan children 


22 

28 




Children dependent, . 


• 

• 

» • 

• 


60 


Unmarried mothers. 
Children dependent, . 


56 
90 


401 
771 


Wives of prisoners, . . 
Children deoendent. . 


72 
178 


1,172 
79 






Total of section B. . . 






• 




7,206 











326 



Board of Public Chabitie& 



[No. 5, 



Statistics of 2^61 


women 


relieved under Section B : 




• 
Adults in Section B. 


• 

a 

3 


d 

s 

Oh 

joo^qo 

1.42 

10.16 

29.68 

28.22 

15.30 1 

7.59 

5.41 

1.74 

.36 

.12 

97.98 
2.02 


• 

Adults in Sbgtion B. 


• 

9 

JO 

B 

3 

55 


a 
S 

u 

ft® 


Namber, 

Ages : 

16, and under 20, ... 
20, and under 30, . . . 
30, and under 40, . . . 


2,561 

36 
267 
751 
714 
387 
192 
137 

44 
9 
3 

31 

2,871 

49 

141 


Education : 

Illiterate, 

Could readonly, . . . . 
Could write names, . . 
Not stated, 

Habits: 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinkers, . . 

Intemperate, 

Not stated, 

Nativity: 
Natives of relief district, 
Other Pennsylvanians, . 
Other Americans, . . . 

Germany, 

Ireland, 

England, 

Wales, 

Scotland, 

Francfe, 

Other foreigners, . . . . 
Not stated, 


874 

416 

1,115 

156 


36.34 
17.30 
46.36 


40, and under 50, ... 
50, and under 60, ... 
60, and under 70, ... 
70, and under 80, . . 
80, and under 90, . . . 


1,679 

283 

12 

707 


85.17 

14.19 

.64 


90, and under 100, . . . 
100 years and upwards, . 
Notbtated, 

BeAxdentM: 
Of relief districts, .... 

Nou-rosidents, 

Not^tated, 


688 

294 

226 

323 

649 

130 

60 

46 

14 

30 

101 


27.97 

11.95 

9.19 

13.13 

26.89 

5.28 

2.44 

1.87 


Civil condition : 
Sinirle, 


64 

491 

2,006 


2.50 
19.17 
78.38 


Married, 

Widowed, 


.57 
1.21 



BecctoB C.-DesUtntion eaated by Temporary HIclmeM, or Want of Work of Male Heaii of 

Famtllea aa4 Siaffle Mea. 

There were 4,678 relieved under this section, or 30.32 per cent, of the 
whole number. 



Cl«ASSBS. 



Adult males relieved, on account of sickness, 

Adult males relieved, on account of family sickness or funerals. 
Adult males relieved, on account of want of work, 



Families depending on the preceding, J ohij^en 



1,071 
2,229 



Total of Section 0, 



445 
228 
710 



3,300 



4,678 



Characteristics of the 2,449 adults in this section, viz : 1,378 males, 1,071 
wives. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Pubug Chabities. 



827 



Adults in Section C. 



Number, 

Ages : 
16, and under 20, . . . 
20, and under 80, . . . 
80, and under 40, . . . 
40, and under 50, . . . 
50, and under 60, . . 
60, and under 70, . . . 
70, and under 80, . . . 
80, and under 90, . . . 
90, and under 100, . . . 
100 years and upwards. 
Not stated, 



Resifle.nts: 
Of relief district, 
Non-renidents, . 
Not stated, . . , 



Civil condition : 
Single, .... 
Married, .... 
Widowed, . . . 
Not stated, . . . 






2,449 



81 


1.88 


414 


18.88 


712 


31 .61 


525 


28.31 


855 


15.77 


105 


4.66 


72 


8.20 


82 


1.42 


6 


.27 


197 




2,871 


98.26 


42 


1.74 


86 




145 


6.00 


2,142 


8S.66 


129 


5.34 


83 





a 
8 

U 



100.00 



Adults in Section C. 



JS^ucation : 

Illiterate, 

Could read only, . . . 
Could write name, . . 
Not stated, 

Habits : 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinlsers, 
Intemperate, .... 
Not stated, ..:... 

Nativity : 
Natives of district, . . 
Other Pennsylvanians, 
Other. Americans, . . 

Germany, 

Ireland 

England, 

Wales, 

Scotland, 

France. 

Other foreigners, . . . 
Not stated, 



9 

Xi 



629 

8'i8 

1,291 

201 



1,356 

450 

28 

615 



623 

219 

279 

405 

555 

101 

48 

84 

5 

81 

149 



a 

s 

u 

o 

04 



27.99 
14.59 
67.42 



73.94 

24.54 

1.52 



27.08 

9.52 

12.13 

17.61 

24.13 

4.40 

2.09 

1.48 

.22 

1.34 



Section D.— Single Women In Receipt of Out-door Relief. 

The number of destitute women relieved under this section was 130, or 
0.84 per cent, of the whole number receiving ont-door relief. 

Their calory ages^ and other characteristics ^ were as follows : 



Aduj^ts in Section D. 



NuD^ber, .... 

Oof or : 

White, 

Colored, .... 

Ages : 
16, and under 20, 
20, and under 30, 
80, and under 40, 
40, and under 50, 
50, and under 60, 
60, and under 70, 
70, and under 80, 
80, and under 90, 
90, and under 100, 
Not stated, . . . 

Mesidents : 
or reUef district, 
Non-residents, . 
Not stated, . . . 



9 

s 



ISO 



119 
11 



9 

19 

27 

25 

12 

18 

12 

6 

1 

1 



124 
3 
3 



u 



100.00 



91.54 

8.46 



6.98 
14.78 
20.93 
19.39 

9.30 
13.94 

9.30 

4.65 
.78 



97.64 
2.36 



Adults in Section D. 



Education: 

Illiterate, 

Could readonly, . . . 
Could write name, . . 
Not stated, 

Hahifs : 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinkers, . 

Intemperate. 

Not stated, 

Nativity : 
Natives of district, . . 
Other Pennsylvanians, 
Other Americans, . . 

Germany, 

Ireland, 

England, 

Scotland, 

Not stated 



h4 

9 

a 



37 

28 

61 

4 



86 
8 

41 



77 

9 

10 

11 

18 

2 

1 

7 



•1^ 
a 

8 

0>< 



29.37 
22.22 
48.41 



96.68 
8.37 



62.60 
7.32 
8.13 
8.94 

10.57 

1.62 

.82 



328 



Board of Public GHABiTiEa 



[No. 5, 



Section B ^Inuuie Penou mod Idloto ReltoTed oat of Hoopltai, dke , %j Oat-domr rellof tai Alow- 

Uouw District. 

There were 95, or .62 per cent, of the whole number (15,430,) in receipt 
of out-door relief compared with the preceding year ; the number in this 
section has iuceeased 16. 

Characteristics^ doc,^ of those relieved in Section E. 



Adults in Section E. 


Number. 


§ 

100.00 

2.69 

18.20 

31.17 

• 20.78 

15.58 

6.50 

2.59 

2.59 


Adults in Section E. 


i 

1 

54 

4 

11 

16 


a 

s 


Number, 


85 


• 

Education : 

Illiterate, 

Could read only, 

Could write name, .... 
Not stated, 

Habits : 

Abstinents, 

Moderate drinkers, . . . 

Intemperate, 

Not stated, . 

Nativity: 

Of relief district, 

Other Pennsylvanians, . . 
Other Americans, .... 

Germany, 

Ireland, 


9mf\ tf'ktftt 


Ages : 

16, and under 20, 

20, and under 80, 

80, and under 40, 


2 

14 

24 

16 

12 

5 

2 

2 

o 


78.26 

5.80 

16.94 


40, and under 60, 

60, and under 60, 

60, and under 70, 

70, and under 80, 

80, and under 90, 


42 
2 
1 

40 


93.88 
4.45 
2.22 


Not stated, 


8 


61 

10 

2 

1 
5 
2 
1 
13 




Residents: 

Of relief districts, 

Not stated, 


74 
11 


100.00 


70.88 

13.89 

2.78 


Civil condition : 

ftincvla 


48 

13 

6 

24 


70.50 

21.31 

8.19 


1.39 
6.94 


C7lU|^lo, .......... 

Married, 


England, 

France, 


2.78 


Widowed, 

Not stated, 


1.89 


Not stated, 


« 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Pxtblic Chaeitie& 



339 



Statement of indigent persons receiving out-door relief during quarter 

ending September 30^ 1879 : 



Alms-Housb Dibtbiots. 



1. Adams county alms-house, 

2. Allegheny county home, 

3. Allegheny City poor-house, 

4. Allegheny county — Pittsburgh Farm, 

5. Beaver county alms-house, 

6. Bedfqrd county alms-bouse, . . *. 

7. Berks county alms-house, 

8. Blair county alms-house, 

10. Cambria county alms-house, 

11. Carbon oounty^Coalfield poor-house, 

12. Chester county alms-house, ... 

13. Clinton county— Lock Haven poor-house, 

14. Columbia county — Blcx>m poor-house, 

15. Columbia county— Centralia poor-house, 

16. Crawford county alms-house, 

17. Cumberland countv alms-house, 

19. Delaware county alms-house, 

20. Erie county alms-house, .' 

21. Fayette county alms-house, 

22. Franklin county alms-house, 

23. Greene county alms-house, 

24. Huntingdon county alms-house, 

25. Lackawanna county— Blakely poor-house, 

26. Lackawanna county — Carbondale poor-house, 

27. Lackawanna county— Hillside Farm, 

29. Lackawanna county — Ransom alms-house, 

30. Lancaster county alms-house, 

32. L^anon county alms-house, 

33. Lenigh county alms-house, 

34. Luzerne county — Central poor-house, 

35. Lycoming county — Williamsport poor-house, 

36. Mercer county alms-house, 

37. Mitnin county alms-house, 

38. Montgomery county alms-house, 

89. Montour county— Danville and Mahoning poor-bouse, . 

40. Montour county — Valley township poor-house, 

41. Northampton county alms-house 

42. Nortbumoerland county — Coal township poor-house, . . 

43. Perry county alms-house, 

44. Philadelphia oounty—Blockley alms-house, 

45. Philadelphia county — Roxboro* i>oor-house, .. . i . . . 

46. Philadelphia county — German town, 

47. Philadelphia county— Oxford and L. Dublin poor-house, 

48. Schuylkill county alms-house, 

49. Somerset county alms-house, 

50. Susquehanna county— Auburn and Rush asylum, . . . 

51. Susquehnnna county— Montrose and Bridgewater asylum 

52. Susquehanna county— New Milford asylum, 

53. Tioga county alms-house, 

55. Warren county — Rouse hospital, 

56. Washington county alms-house, 

58. Westmoreland county alms-house, 

59. York county alms-house, 

Total, 





• 




a 


• 

s 


t 


^H 


•o 





zi 


fS 


A 


< 


o 


148 


81 


17 


15 


• 119 


201 


83 


60 


15 


9 


81 


73 


343 


209 


60 


58 


46 


43 


14 


10 


22 


. . • . 


5 


6 


14 


32 


25 


40 


76 


57 


166 


48 


31 


21 


134 


243 


51 


28 


177 


79 


4 


• • ■ 


156 


250 


63 


93 


10 


7 


73 


191 


92 


147 


114 


• • • ■ 


256 


96 


78 


80 


18 


36 


145 


242 


188 


172 


80 


• • • • 


198 


•50 


15 


1 


6 


• ■ a . 


17 


23 


52 


75 


43 


• • • • 


3,780 


3,861 


10 


7 


60 


65 


21 


11 


598 


620 


81 


23 


16 


11 


4 


• • ■ 


4 


6 


21 


44 


9 


• • • ■ 


13 


■ • ■ ■ 


49 


75 


86 


55 


7,877 


7,553 



I 



229 

32 

820 

93 

24 

154 

552 

118 

89 

24 

22 

10 

46 

65 

183 

214 

52 

377 

79 

266 

4 

406 

156 

17 

264 

230 

114 

852 

153 

54 

387 

305 

80 

248 

16 

6 

40 

127 

48 

7,641 

17 

125 

32 

1,218 

104 

27 

4 

10 

65 

9 

13 

124 

141 

15,430 



830 BoABD OF Public Ohabities. [No. 5, 



TOWNSHIP POOR. 



This class consists of indigent persons relieved in boroughs and town- 
ships in which no alms-houses exist. There are twenty-one entire counties 
in which alms-houses have not been erected, and in ten other counties only 
local alms-houses are established for certain boroughs, cities, and town- 
ships. 

STATISTICS OF TOWNSHIP POOR. 

The expenditures for all purposes connected with the relief of township 
poor, for the past year, were $249,389 59, being an increase of $29,885 50, 
or 13.61 per cent., over the preceding year. The net cost of relief (deduct- 
ing receipts) was $246,745 02. 

Bxp«iiditares. 

For what purpose : 

Paid to justices of the peace, and for other legal expenses, . $5,401 47 

Paid to overseers for their services, 18,156 58 

Paid for medicine and medical attendance,. . ... 13,386 27 

Paid for board, clothing, and temporary relief, 200,553 03 

Paid for support of insane in hospitals, 2,376 79 

Paid for transportation, 4,277 30 

Funeral expenses, 569 13 

Other expenses, (not specified,) 4,669 02 



Total, $249,389 59 

Receipts, 2,644 57 



Net cost of relief, $246,745 02 

Weekly f/ost. 

The average weekly cost per capita, so far as oould be ascertained, was 
$1 99. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Chabitieb. 



831 



Namber RelieTed. 

The aggregate number of all classes supported or relieved was SJ846^ being 
a decrease of 742^ or 12.39 per cent.^ on number of previous year : the 
males decreased SSI, or 11.83 per cent. ; the females^ 391, or 12.93 per 
cent^ thus : 



Years. 



1877, 

1878, 

Decrease, 

Per oent. of decrease, 



NUMBER RELIEVED. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


2,966 
2,615 


3,022 
2,631 


5,988 
5,246 


851 
11.83 


391 
12.98 


742 
12.39 



Average Namber. 

The average number maintained during the ^'^ear, so far as could be as- 
certained from the returns, was 3,516, viz : 1,713 white males, 1,748 white 
females ; 26 colored males and 29 colored females. 



Relieved for the flrst Cime. 



7%« number of indigent persons who received relief for the first time dur' 
ing the year^ shows a decrease of 158, or 8.74 P^^^ cent. The decrease is 
greater with the males than with the females^ thus : 



Years. 


XUMBER RELIEVED. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


IgTT 


981 
836 


876 
813 


1,807 


1878 


1,649 






Deorease 


95 
10.20 


68 
7.19 


158 


"Per centf. of deoreaiw. - . . - » t 


8.74 







332 



Board of Publig Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



ResMence, Natfrity, and Bdacatton. 

The following statement shows how many of the whole number relieved 
had a legal settlement in the district where relief was granted; alsOj 
the number of non-residents^ with the nativity and education of all such 
persons : 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Decrease. 


Per ct. of 
decrease. 


Whole number relieved, .... 
Number relieved for the first time 


2,615 
836 


2,631 

813 


5,246 
1,649 


742 
158 


12.52 

8.74 


Settlement : 
Residents of relief districts, . . . 

Non-residents, 

Not stated, 


1,782 
296 
537 


1,834 
265 
682 


3,616 
561 

1,069 



2.818 

834 

2,099 


548 

65 

129 


13.16 
10.38 
10.76 


Nativity :. 
Native-born, 


1,391 

191 

1,033 


■ 

1,422 

143 

1,066 


541 

1,180 

•979 


16.13 


Foreign-born, 


77.93 


Not stated, 


•87.41 


Education : 

Unable to read or write, 

Could write their names, .... 
Not stated, 


475 

697 

1,443 


582 

623 

1,426 


1,067 
1,820 

2,869 


793 

646 

*697 


42.86 

32.85 

•32.09 







* Inorease. 

Of the whole number, 5,246, relieved, the males and females were in 
nearly equal proportions. 

In the known settlement of persons relieved, 3.616, or 86.57 per cent., 
were residents, and 561, or 13.43 per cent., non-residents of the districts 
in which relief was granted. Of the residents of the districts, the males 
and females were nearly in the same proportion. Of the non-residents, 
the males were to the females as to 52 to 47. 

Of the known nativity, 2,813, or 89.39 per cent., were native-bom, and 
334, or 10.61 per cent., were foreign-born. The native-bom females were 
to the males as 50 is to 49 ; on the contrary, the foreign-born men were to 
the women as 57 to 43. 

In regard to the known education, 1,057, or 44.47 per cent., were unable 
to read or write, and 1,320, or 55,53 per cent., could write their names. 
The illiterate females were to the males as 55 to 45. Of those who could 
write their names, the males were to the. females as 52 to 47. 



Leo. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Chabitie& 



333 



ClaariJIcAtlMi. 



The classification of indigent persons partially aided or supported under 

the ** township system^" is exhibited as follows : 



GliASSIFIOATTOlT. 



Intemperate, 

Insane, 

Idiotic, 

Blind, 

Deaf and dumb* 

Children under 16 years of age, 
All others, 

Total, 



NUMBER BELIEVED. 



i 
I 



247 

126 

77 

40 

9 

910 

1,206 



m 

9 



« 
^ 



74 
98 
64 
28 
15 
855 
1,502 



2,615 



2,681 



I 



821 

t224 

141 

68 

24 

1,766 

2,708 



5,246 






fife. 



*87 
♦40 
*32 
♦16 
8 
144 
770 



742 



6 

si 

u 
Oh 



♦37.18 

♦21.74 

♦29.36 

♦34.04 

1.11 

7.54 

22.14 



12.39 



'3 

|8 



6.12 

4.27 

2.69 

1.20 

.46 

83.64 

51.62 



100.00 



• Increase. 

t Of the 224 Insane, 25 were maintained by townships at State hospitals, leaving a balance of 190 ; this 
nnmber compared with that of preceding year, (ISS,) shows an increase of 47, or 24.S4 per cent. 

Of the whole number relieved, there were only 321, or 6.12 per cent, re- 
ported as intemperate, males being in proportion to females as 19 to 6. 
The increase in this class over number in preceding year is 87, or 37.18 
per cent. 

The number of insane maintained by the townships was 224, or 4.27 per 
cent., the males to the females as 55 is to 43. Of the 224 insane, 25 were 
kept at State hospitals, viz : 13 males, and 12 females. 

The idiotic numbered 141, or 2.69 per cent. ; the males and females be- 
ing in about equal proportions ; there has been an increase in this class of 
32, or 29.36 per cent, on preceding year. 

There were 63, or 1.20 per cent, blind, 40 males, and 23 females. Com- 
pared with previous year, this class has increased 16, or 34.04 per cent. 

Of the whole number relieved, 24, or .46 per cent., were deaf and dumb ; 
nearly twice as many females as males. This class has decreased 8, or 1.11 
per cent. 

Children sixteen years of age and over are considered as adults. The 
number under sixteen was, (as far as could be ascertained,) 1,765, or 33.64 
per cent., one third of the whole number relieved. The boys were in pro- 
portion to the girls, as 17 to 16 ; the children decreased, on number of pre- 
vious year, 144, or 7.54 per cent. The remaining, comprising '* all others," 
numbered 2,708, or 51.62 per cent., more than one half of the whole num- 
ber relieved, females being to males as 5 to 4. The decrease in this class 
was 770, or 22.14 per cent. 

Of the 1,765 children relieved, 198, or 11.22 per cent, were known to be 
illegitimate, of whom 106 were boys, and 92 girls. Of the women (1,776,) 
receiving township relief, 87, or 4.89 per cent., were known to have led an 
immoral life. 



334 



Board of Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



In addition to the 5,246 indigent persons relieved under the township 
system, 2,874 tramps were reported. 

Dbcharged. 

Of the whole number^ 5^246^ relieved during the year, there were 1^4^9, or 

t8.98 per cent,, discharged^ as follows: 



How Discharged. 


Males. 


Females, 


Total. 


Per cent. 

on number 

relieved. 


Died, 


156 
80 

500 
48 


130 
20 

562 
43 


286 

50 

1,062 

91 


5.45 


Bound out, 


.96 


Discharged, 


20.24 


Absoonded, 


1.78 






Total, 


784 


765 


1,489 


28.88 







From the above we learn that 286, or 5.45 per cent., of the number re- 
lieved, died ; 50, or .96 per cent, were bound out — or of the total children 
assisted, 2.83 per cent.; 1,062, or 20.24 per cent., were discharged, or the 
relief discontinued ; and 91, or 1.73 per cent., absconded from the relieving 
oflScers. 

RemalnlDg at the end of Year. 

There were at the end of the year, 3,757 persons in receipt of township 
relief, viz: 176 insane, 109 idiotic, 52 blind, 32 deaf and dumb, and 2,090 
indigent and sane ; total, 3,757 — being an increase of 374, or 11.05 per cent., 
on number at corresponding date of previous j-ear. 

The number remaining^ was classified as follows : 



Classification. 



Children under 16 years of age, 

Insane, 

Idiotic, 

Blind, 

Deaf and dumb, 

All others, 

Total, 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


663 


635 


1,298 


03 


83 


176 


60 


49 


109 


84 


18 


52 


14 


18 


32 


1,003 


1,087 


2,090 


1,867 


1,890 


8,757 



Per cent. 



84.55 

4.68 

2.90 

1.88 

.85 

55.64 



100.00 



Of the 3,757 remaining, 1,867 or 49.69 per cent., were males, and 1,890, 
or 50.31 por cent., were females. The children under 16 years of age num- 
bered 1,298, or 34.55 per cent., more than one third of the whole number, 
the boys to the girls as 51 to 49. 

The insane numbered 176, or 4.68 per cent., the males to the females as 
8 to 7. 

There were 109, or 2.90 per cent., idiotic, the males in excess of the fe- 
males as 11 to 9. 

The blind numbered 52, or 1.38 per cent., the males to females as 13 to 7. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



335 



There were 32, or .85 per cent., deaf and dumb, females to males as 9 to 7. 

All others, not included in the foregoing classes, numbered 2,090, or 
55.64 per cent., being more than one half of the whole number remaining, 
the females in proportion to the males as 52 to 47. 

Conpared with the Pr«cedlDS Year. 

The following statement will show the number of each class rem^iining^ 
with the increase in number and per cent, at corresponding date of pre- 
vious year : 



CliASSIFIOATION. 



Children under 16 years of age. 

Insane, 

Idiotic, 

Blind, 

Deaf and dumb, 

All others, . . . - 

Total, 



gd 




0|>- 




.S ^ 


• 


s-- 


1 


'a? 


1 


i^ 


i 


&< 




1,298 


209 


176 


49 


109 


34 


62 


16 


32 


9 


2,090 


57 


8,757 


374 



i 



c 5 
Pi 



19.19 
38.58 
45.38 
44.44 
39.13 
2.80 

11.05 



There has been an increase in all the classes. Children under 16 years 
of age increased 209, or 19.19 per cent., and all others, excluding the insane, 
idiotic, blind, and deaf and dumb, increased 57, or 2.80 per cent. Of the 
176 insane, 23 were supported in the State hospitals, namely : 11. males and 
12 females, leaving 153, which compared with number of preceding year, 
shows an increase of 53, or 53.00 per cent. ; the idiotic increased 34, or 
45.^3 per cent. ; the deaf and dumb 9, or 89.13 per cent., and the blind 16, 
or 44.44 per cent. 



886 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



k 

g 

o 



00 






O 
«o 

2! ^ 

& h 

S '5^ 

•J ^ 



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Leg. Doc.] Board of Pxjblic Chabitiss. 339 



APPENDIX. 



GENERAL POOR LAWS. 



We are indebted to the kindness of John R. Miller, Esquire, of Carlisle, 
the attorney of the Cumberland county poor-house, for a compilation of 
the general laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania relating to the 
poor, and a digest of the decisions of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 
relating to the same subject, which were collected and published by him, in 
book form, in 1877. 

Such laws only as are of general application, including the tramp laws of 
1876 and 1879, will be inserted in this place. 

The decisions of the Supreme Court are brought down to the end of the 
year 1877. It is to be regretted that any others that may have been made 
since that time are not included in the digest, but sufficient time has not 
been afforded for the work. 

The want of a compilation of these laws has been a cause of much trouble^ 
and inconvenience to the officers engaged in conducting the county alms- 
houses in the State for a long time past. 

By the use which we are allowed to make of this publication, these dif- 
ficulties may in some degree be removed. Mr. Miller is entitled to the 
thanks of this Board, and of all the officers connected with the management 
of the institutions referred to, for a service that is not only wholly gratu- 
itous, but specially valuable in view of the necessities to which we have- 
alluded. 

The following are the general laws of the Commonwealth in relation to. 
the poor : 

I. RELIEF AND SMPLOTMENT OF THE POOR. 

1. Overseers to provide relief. 

2. And employment. 
8. On the roads. 

4. To provide subsistence for those unable to work. 

5. To relieve persons not having a settlement, until removal. 

6. No person to be entered on poor-book, without order of two j ustioes. 

7. May contraot for support and employment of the poor. 

8. To bind poor children apprentices. 

9. Definition of term **distriot." 

II. OF SETTLEMENTS. 

10. How settlement may be gained. 

11. Settlement of married women. 

12. Illegitimate children. 



340 - Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

18. Where township is divided. 

14. Housekeepers to give notioe of reoeption of transient paupers. 

15. Penalty for neglect. 

16. How enforced. 

17. Penalty for bringing paupers from another State. 

III. OF ORDERS OF REMOVAL. 

18. Proceedings to remove paupers. 

19. Wife not to be separated from husband. 

20. Penalty for refusing to receive pauper so removed. 

21. Parties may appeal from order of removal. 

22. Remedy where order of removal is refused. 

23. District accepting pauper under an order of removal, to be liable for costs. 

IV. OF THE APPEAL. 

24. Costs on appeals. 

25. How recoverable. 

26. From overseers. 

V. OF THE PERSONS LIARLE FOR THE SUPPORT OF OTHERS. 

27. Parents, drc, to be liable for the support of children. 

28. Persons bringing negro servants from another State, to be liable for their support 

29. Masters of slaves to be liable. 

VI. DESERTION. 

30. Proceedings wliere a man deserts his wife or children, (to. 

31. Surety to be given for appearance. 

82. Jurisdiction of the quarter sensions. 

83. Proceedings in case of desertion. 

34. Courts to make orders for relief. Defendant to be committed in default. 

35. Costs. Parties to be witnesses. 

36. Backing of warrants. 

37. When parties committed for desertion may be discharged from arrest. 

VII. DUTIES OF OVERSEERS. 

38. How expenses of relieving paupers out of tlieir places of settlement to be recovered. 
89. To recover property of paupers. 

40. Accounts to be settled annually. 

41. Penalty for neglect of duty by overseers. 

42. Gifts and devises to poor to vest in overseers. 

43. Suits against overseers. Double costs to be recovered. 

VIII. FINES AND PENALTIES. 

44. Justices receiving fines to make record thereof. To deliver transcript to consta- 
ble, and pay to overseers on demand. 

45. Penalty for neglect. 

46. Overseers to demand and recover such fines from Justices. 

47. Clerks of courts to deliver notice of fines imposed to constable. 

48. Constables to deliver transcripts and certificates to overseers. 

49. Sherifis to pay over fines to overseers. Penalty for neglect. 

50. Unexpended balances to be paid to supervisors. 

51. How fines and penalties to be recoverable. 

52. Parties may appeal. 

I. Relief and Employment of the Poor. 

L It shall be the duty of the overseers of every di8trict,(a) from time 
to time, to provide, as is hereinafter directed, for every poor person within 

(a) Each township annually to elect two overseers; act 28 February, 1835, § 9; see 
tit. " Township Otticers," 17. They are a corporation by act 9 March, 1771, § 16. 1 Sm. 
338. See Overseers vs. Kline, 9 Penn. St. R. 219. They are not Jointly liable for money 
collected by each other in their official capacity. Huling vs. Overseers, 3 W. <fc S. 367. 



Leo. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 341 

tbe district, having a settlement therein, who shall apply to them for re- 
Uef.(a) 

2. If such poor person be able to work, but cannot find employment, it 
shall be the duty of the overseers to provide work for him according to his 
ability ; and, for this purpose, they shall procure suitable places and a suffi- 
cient stock of materials. 

3. It shall be lawful for the overseers of any district, with the concurrence 
and under the directions of the supervisors of the township,, to employ 
such poor person, being a male of sufficient ability, in opening or repairing 
any road or highway within the district. 

4. If such poor person, by reason of age, disease, infirmity, or other dis- 
ability, be unable to work, it shall be the duty of the overseers to provide 
him with the necessary means of subsistence. 

6. It shall also be the duty of the overseers of every district to furnish 
relief to every poor person within the district, not having a settlement 
therein, who shall apply to theitt for relief, until such person can be removed 
to the place of his settlement. (6) 

6. No person shall be entered on the poor book of any district, or re- 
ceive relief from any overseers, before such person, or some one in his be- 
half, shall have procured an order(c) from two magistrates of the county 
for the same ;(d) and in case any overseer shall enter in the proper book, 
or relieve such poor person, without an order, he sh^ll forfeit a sum equal 
to the amount or value given, unless such entry or relief shall be approved 
of by two magistrates as aforesaid. (e) 

(a) And to pay the fUneral expenses of such destitute person, after his deoease. 
Directors of the Poor vs, Wallace, S W. <fc S. 94. It is an indictable offense to sell the 
keepins: of paupers to the lowest bidder. Milton vs. Williamaport, 9 Penn. St. R. 48-9. 

(5) They are bound to maintain every person within their districts, not having a 
settlement therein, who shall apply to them for relief, untU he can be removed to the 
place of his last settlement; and if, in an attempt so to remove him, he be left in a 
township not legally chargeable with his support, he may be returned to the township 
where he Arst became cliargeable. Kelly vs. Union, W. A S. 535. Milton vs, WiUiams- 
port, 9 Penn. St. R. 46. 

(c) In cases of emergency, relief must precede the order of maintenance, and the 
township would be liable without such order. Roxborongh vs. Bunn, 12 S. A R. 292. 
Milton vs. Williamsport, 9 Penn. St. R. 47. A ph3rMician may recover for medical ser- 
vices rendered to a pauper, in case of emergency, without a previous order of relief, 
if such order be subsequently obtained. Westmoreland County vs. Marry, 32 Penn. 
St. R. 178. And an order obtained two years afterwards is not too late. Cnester 
Ck>anty vs. Worthington, 38 Penn. St. R. 160. No appeal lies from an order of main- 
tenance. Lampiter vs. Lancaster, 2 Y. 164. Tioga vs. Lawrence, 2 W. 43. By act 25 
January, 1853, this section is repealed as to the cities of Pittsburgh and Allegheny ; and 
the guardians and directors of tbe poor in said cities are authorized to relieve without 
an order. P. L. 12. 

(d) Orders for relief may be made by a single Justice, in the counties of North- 
ampton, SchnylkUl and Somerset, by act of 4 March, 1850. P. L. 122. 

(c) By acts 30 April, 1856, P. L. 330, and 6 March, 1860, P. L. 113, no order of relief, 
may be granted in Washington, Greene, Fayette, and Bradford counties until proof is 
made, to the satisfaction of the Justices, by the oaths of two reputable citizens of the 
proper county, that such person is entitled to the relief prayed for ; and the names of 
the said citizens are to be set forth in the order granted by the Justices. 



342 BoABD OF Public Chabitie& [No. 5, 

7. It shall be lawful for the overseers of every district to contract with 
any person (a) for a house or lodging, for keeping, maintaining, or employ- 
ing such poor persons of the district as shall be adjudged proper objects 
of relief, and there to keep, maintain, and employ such poor persons, and 
to receive the benefit of their work and labor, for and towards their main- 
tenance and support ; and if any poor person shall refuse to be kept and 
employed in such house, he shall not be entitled to receive relief from the 
overseers during such refusal. 

8. It shall be lawful for the overseers of every district, with the appro- 
bation and consent of two or more magistrates of the same county ,(6) to 
put out as apprentices, all poor children whose parents are dead, or by the 
said magistrates, found to be unable to maintain them,(c) so as that the time 
or term of years of such apprenticeship, if a male, do expire at or before 
the age of twenty-one years, and if a female, at or before the age of 
eighteen years. 

9. The word ^^ district " in this act shall be construed and taken to mean 
"township," and "borough," and every other territorial or municipal 
division, in and for which officers charged with the relief and support of 
the poor are directed or authorized by law to be chosen ;{d) but nothing 
in this act contained shall be taken to repeal or otherwise interfere with 
any special provision made by law for any city, county, township, borough, 
or other territorial or municipal divisions. 

II. Of Settlements. 

10. A settlement may be gained in any district :(e) 

I. By any person who shall come to inhabit in the same, and who shall, 
for himself, and on his own account, execute any public office, being legally 
placed therein, during one whole year. 

(a) By act 15 April, 1845, § 20, the overseers of York oounty are forbidden to sell 
any provisions of their own raising, to the alms-hoose and hospital of said oounty, un- 
der a penalty of 9100. P. L. 470. 

(6) The assent of the parent is not necessary ; nor that the infant should join in the 
indenture. Commonwealth vs, Jones, 8 S. dk R. 158. By the forty-sixth section of the 
act of 18 June, 1836, the directors of the poor in Washington oounty may bind, with- 
out approbation of the two justices. And so may those of Delaware oounty, by ad 1 
March, 1867. P. L. 319. 

(e) If there be grand parents of sufficient ability to miintain the children, a bind- 
ing by the overseers is void. Ex parte Whiting, 16 Pitts. L. J. 272. 

(d) Where a pauper was chargeable to a township which was divided, it was held 
that the overseers of the township which maintained hitn after the division, might 
maintain aaaumpsit against the other township for a ratable proportion of the expense. 
Korth Whiteliall vs. South Whitehall, 3 S. <fe R. 117. And see Hopewell vs. Inde- 
pendence, 12 Penn. St. R. 92. 

(e) The place of settlement of the father is that of the children until the latter 
acquire a new settlement. Lewis vs. Turbut, 15 Penn. St. R. 145. Toby vs. Madison, 
44 Ibid. 60. Nippenose vs. Jersey Shore, 48 Ibid. 402. Burrell vs. Pittsburgh, 62 
Ibid. 472. An idiot a nativitate can acquire no settlement. Shippen vs. Oaines, 17 
Penn. St. R. 88. See Upper Milford vs. Lower Macungie, 8 Wh. 71. 



Leq. Dou] Board of Public Charities. 843 

II. By any such person who shall be charged with and pay his propor 
tion of any public taxes or levies, for two years successively. (o) » 

III. By any person who shall, bona fide^ take a leaBe(6) of any real es- 
tate, of the yearly value of ten dollars, (c) and shall dwell upon the same 
for one whole year ,((2) and pay the said rent.(e) 

IV. By any person who shall become seized of any freehold estate within 
such district, and who shall dwell upon the same for one whole year.(^) 

V. By any unmarried person, not having a child, who shall be lawfully 
bound or hired as a servant, within such district, and shall continue in such 
service during one whole year. (A) 

VI. By any person who shall be duly bound an apprentice by indenture, 
and shall inhabit in the district, with his master or mistress, for one whole 
year. 

VII. By any indented servant, legally and directly imported from 
Europe into this Commonwear:h, who shall serve for the space of siicty 
days in the district into which he shall first come: Provided^ That if 
such servant shall afterwards duly serve, in any other district, for the space 
of twelve months, either with his first employer or his assignee, he shall 
obtain a legal settlement in such other district, (t) 

(a) Payment of an United States tax;^ is not sufficient. Bucks County vs. Brier 
Greek Township, 10 8. A R. 170. But a county tax is within the act. Bucks County 
vs. Philadeiphia, 5 S. ifr R. 417. And it need not be a personal tax. Toby vs. Pine, 19 
Pitts. L. J. 78. 

(6) Such lease need not be in writing. Beaver vs. Hartley, 11 Penn. St. R. 254. A 
widow, by leasing property, may acquire a settlement. Burrell vs. Pittsburgh, 62 
Penn. St. R. 472. 

(e) Increased to ten pounds, in Philadelphia, by act 25 May, 1840. P. L. 513.; 

(d) The fraction of a day is not to be regarded in the omputation. Regiua vs. St. 
Mary, 1 Ellis ct Bl. 81G. See Lenox vs. Nicholson, 8 Luz. Leg. Obs. 310. 

(e) Payment by a surety is sufficient. Butler vs. Sugarloaf, 6 Penn. St. R. 262. 
And such payment need not be in money ; it may be in labor, or otherwise, if of the 
value of 910 per annum. Beaver vs. Hartley, 11 Penn. St. R. 254. 

(g) A pauper gains a settlement by contracting for a lot, under a yearly rent- 
charge, and building and residing thereon, though he obtain no deed for it. Repub- 
lica vs. Caernarvon, 2 Y. 51. 

(A) It is not necessary that the hiring, but only that the service, should be for a 
year. Heidleberg vs. Lynn, 5 Wh. 430. Byberry vs. Oxford and Lower Dublin, 2 
Ash. 9. But the service must be by virtue of a hiring; service alone, without hiring, 
will not gain a settlement. Lewistown vs. Granville, 5 Penn. St. R. 233. To consti- 
tute a hiring, the consideration need not be paid in money. Brier Creek vs. Mount 
Pleasant, 8 W. 431. See Tioqri vs. Lawrence, 2 Ibid. 43. Reading vs. Cumree, 5 Binn. 
81. But a contract that onb sajII provide a shop, loom, and tackle, and the other shall 
perform the labor of weaving, and that each shall receive one iialf of the prohts, con- 
stitutes a partnership, and not a hiring, within the statute. Gregg vs. Half-Moon, 2 
W. 842. See Montour vs. Chillisquaqua, 1 Leg. Gaz. 42. 

(i) An indented servant gains a settlement where he first serves sixty days, either 
with the master to whom he was indentured, or with his assignee; and it is of no con- 
sequence that the assignment is voidable by the servant, provided he perform his ser- 
vice under it. Although the assignment may be absolutely void, yet a service per- 
formed to the assignee in one township, with the consent of the master in another, is 
a service with the master in the township of the assignee, and obtains a settlement 
there. Reading vs. Cumree, 5 Binn. 86. 



344 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

VIII. By any mariner coming into this Commonwealth, and by any 
other health}' person coming directly from a foreign country into the same, 
if such mariner or other person shall reside for the space of twelve mouths 
in the district in which he shall first settle and reside. 

11. Every married woman shall be deemed, during coverture, and after 
her husband ^s death, to be settled in the place where he was last settled ;(a) 
but if he shall have no known settlement,(6) then she shall be deemed, 
whether he be living or dead, to be settled in the place where she was last 
settled before her marriage. 

12. Every illegitimate child shall be deemed to be settled in the place 
where the mother was legally settled at the time of the birth of such 
child.(c) 

13. If the last place of settlement of any person who shall have become 
chargeable, shall be in any township which shall have been divided by the 
authority of the laws, such person shall be supported by that township 
within the territory of which he resided at the time of gaining such settle- 
ment, (d) 

14. It shall be the duty of every housekeeper who shall receive into his 
house any person who has not gained a legal settlement in some part of 
this Commonwealth, (all mariners coming into this Commonwealth, and 
every other healthy person coming from a foreign country immediately 
into this Commonwealth, only excepted,) within ten days after receiving 
such person, to give notice thereof, in writing, to the overseer of the proper 
district, (e) 

15. If any housekeeper shall fail to give notice as aforesaid, and if the 
person so received shall become poor and unable to maintain himself, and 
cannot be removed to the place of his last legal settlement in any other 
State, if any such he hath, such housekeeper shall be obliged to provide for 
and maintain such poor person ; and in case of the death of such poor per- 
son, without leaving wherewithal to defray the expense of his funeral, such 

(a) She will not lose her husb&nd's settlement by a divorce. Buffalo va. White- 
deer, 15 Penn. St. R. 182-4. And though she has a legal settlement in the township 
where her husband was settled at the time of his death, this does not prevent her from 
acquiring a new settlement by her own act, after his decease. Mlfiiin vs. Elizabeth, 
18 Penn. St. R. 17. 

(&) An order removing a married woman to the place where she was last leg illy 
settled before her marriage is not defective because it omits to state that her husband 
had no known legal settlement ; the court will not presume that he had any such set- 
tlement. Reading vs. Cumree, 5 Binn. 81. 

(c) See Nippenoee va. Jersey Shore, 48 Penn. St. R. 402. Lower Augusta v^.Selins- 
grove, 64 Ibid. 166. 

(d) The settlement of the father is that of the child, until the latter acquires a new 
one; and if the township in which the father was settled be divided after his death, 
the place of settlement of the child is in the township in the territory of which the 
Mher resided at his death. Lewis va. Turbut, 15 Penn. St. R. 145. And that territory 
is to maintain the pauper, whether he had been chargeable to the parent township or 
not. Hopewell va. Independence, 12 Penn. St. K. 92. See North Whitehall va. South 
Whitehall, 3 S.&R. 117. 

(e) See RoxboiX)Ugh va. Bunn, 12 S. & R. 292-4. 



Leg. Doc] Boabd of Public CnABiTiE& 345 

housekeeper shall pay the overseers so much as they shall reasonably ex- 
pend for such purpose. 

16. If such housekeeper shall refuse to pay the charges aforesaid, the 
OTerseers shall assess upon him the amount necessary to maintain such poor 
person, weekly, or such sum as shall be necessary to pay such funeral 
charges, and shall have power to collect the same by warrant of distress; 
but if such delinquent shall have no goods or chattels liable to distress, he 
may be committed to jail, there to remain until he shall have paid the same, 
or shall be otherwise legally discharged. 

IT. If any person shall brjng, or cause to be brought, any poor person 
from any place without this Commonwealth to any place within it, where 
such person was not last legally settled, and there leave, or attempt to leave, 
such person, he shall forfeit and pay the sum of seventy-five dollars for 
every such poor person, to be sued for and recovered by the overseers of 
the district into which such poor person may have been brought, and, more- 
over, shall be obliged to convey such poor person out of the Commonwealth, 
or support him at his own expense. 

III. Of Orders of Removal. 

18. On complaint made by the overseers of any district to one of the 
magistrates of the same county, (a) it shall be lawful for the said magistrate, 
with any other magistrate of the county, where any person has or is likely 
to become chargeable to such district into which he shall come, by their 
warrant or order,(6) directed to such overseers, to remove such person, at 
the expense of the district, to the city, district, or place where he was last 
legally 8ettled,((i) whether in or out of Penn8ylvania,(c) unless such person 

(a) Justices of the peace are incompetent, on the ground of interest, to grant an 
order of removal from their own township. Upper Dublin va. Germantown, 2 Dall. 
213, 8. c. 1 Y. 250. Washington v«. Beaver, S W. A S. 648. MoVeytown V8, Union, 5 
Ibid. 434. The aldermen of Pittsburgh have authority to grant orders of removal. 
St. Clair vs. Moon, 6 W. <fe S. 522. A township cannot be made chargeable with the 
expense of maintaining a pauper otherwise than by the previous order of two Justices. 
Overseers va. Baker's Executors, 2 W. 280. 

(6) The order must state that the complaint was m^de by the overseers, and an ad- 
judication that the pauper was likely to become chargeable. Dromer va. West Han- 
over, 1 Y. 366. But it need not set forth the evidence. Fallowtield va. Marlborough, 
1 Dall. 28. And no intendment will be made against the order. Reading v«. Cumree, 
5 Binn. 81. The pauper himself is not a party. West Buflkloe va. Walker, 7 W. 173. 
But he cannot be removed whilst so ill that his life will be endangered by it. Kelly 
va. Union, 5 W. A S. 536. 

(c) See Toby va. Madison, 44 Penn. St. R. 60. 

(d) A pauper cannot be removed, except to his last place of legal settlement. Jor- 
dan va. Mount Pleasant, 10 Pitts. L. J. 115. It* an unmarried indented female servant 
become pregnant, and be removed by her mistress into another township, for the pur- 
pose of lying in, the expenses of which the mtstreas is able and agrees to pay, the over- 
seers of that township may, notwithstanding, before the birth of the child, remove her 
to the place of her last legal settlement. Philadel phia va. Bristol, 6 S. <fc R. 562. Where 
children under the age of seven years are sent to the place of their mother's settlement 
for nurture, the expense of their maintenance is to be borne by the place from which 
they are removed, and not by that to which they are sent. Bucks County va. Philadel- 



346 Board op Public Charitib& [No. 6, 

shall give sufficient security to indemnify such district to which he is likely 
to become chargeable as aforesaid. 

19. Provided, That it shall not be lawful, by virtue of any order of re- 
moval, to separate any wife from her husband. 

20. It shall be the duty of the guardians or overseers of the city or dis- 
trict to which such poor person may be removed, by warrant or order as 
aforesaid, to receive such poor person, and if any such guardian or over- 
seer shall refuse or neglect so to do, he shall forfeit, for every such offense, 
the sum of twenty dollars, to be recovered as hereinafter provided, and ap- 
plied to the use of the poor of the district from which such poor person 
may be removed as aforesaid.(a) 

21. Provided always, That any person aggrieved by any such order of 
removal may appeal (6) to the next court of quarter sessions ,(c) for the 
county from which such poor person may be removed, and not elsewhere; 
and if there be any defect of form in such order ,({i) the said court shall 
cause the same to be amended ,(«) without cost to the party, and after such 
amendment, if the same be necessary, shall proceed to hear and determine 
the cause upon its truth and merits ; (g) but no such cause shall be proceeded 

phia, 1 S. <fc R. 887. The settlement of a pauper oan only be decided by two Justioee, 
or in a oourt of quarter sessions, on appeal. It cannot be collaterally determined in 
an action before a single Justice, or in a oourt of law. Point vs. Lyoomlrg, 2 R. 28. 
An order of removal, followed by an ineffectual attempt to appeal, after the time has 
elapsed for that purpose, is conclusive evidence of his place of settlement, in a subse- 
quent proceeding for that purpose. In such case it is most proper to proceed on the 
first order of removal. Westmoreland County vs. Ck>nemaugh, 34 Peiin. St. R. 231. 
See Sugarloaf vs. Schuylkill County, 44 Penn. St. R. 481. Schuylkill vs, Moutour, 
Ibid. 484. 

(a) See Sugarloaf v«. Schuylkill County, 44 Penn. St. R. 481. 

(6) If the justices have no jurisdiction, an appeal does not lie. St. Clair vs. Moon, 
6 W. A S. 522. No appeal lies from an order vacating one or two justices for the re- 
moval of a pauper. Bradford vs. Groshen, 57 Penn. St. R. 495. 

(e) The appeal must be taken to tlie next court, whether notice of the order were 
given or not. Sugar Creek vs. Washington, 62 Penn. St. R. 479. See Chescter County 
vs. Malony, 64 Ibid. 144. Northampton County vs. Limestone. 68 Ibid. 886. 

(d) An informality in the proceedings of the justices cannot be taken advantage of 
after an appeal and decision on the merits. Tioga vs. Lawrence, 2 W. 48. The quarter 
sessions is to decide on the merits, without regard to defects in the order Reading vs. 
Cumree, 5 Binn. 81. 

(e) This is to receive a liberal construction. Cumberland vs. Jefferson, 25 Penn. 
St. R. 463. 

iff) It must be decided on legal evidence. West Buflfaloe vs. Walker, 7 W. 171. 
Walker vs. West Buifaloe, 11 Penn. St. R. 97. The order may be confirmed in part, 
and quashed in part. Bucks County vs. Philadelphia, 1 S.&K. 387. An order con- 
firmed is conclusive against the appellant in fkvor of all the world ; an order discharged 
is conclusive between the parties litigant ; an order quashed is conclusive on neither. 
West Bufialoe vs. Walker, 8 Penn. St. R. 177. Walker vs. West Buffiiloe, 11 Ibid. 95. 
The decision is conclusive upon a new township subsequently created by a division of 
one of them. Gibson vs. Nicholson, 2 S. & R. 422. On a cei'tiorari the Supreme Court 
is confined to a revision of the regularity of the proceedings. South Huntingdon vs. 
East Huntingdon, 7 W. 527-9. Shipp^n vs. Gaines, 17 Penn. St. R. 88. Westmoreland 
County vs. Conemaugh, 84 Ibid. 281. Bradford vs. Goshen, 57 Ibid. 495. Plunkett*8 
Creek vs. Fairfield, 58 Ibid. 209. There is no mode by w^hich the facts can be legitimately 



Leq. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 347 

in, UBless reasonable notice shall have been given, by tlie party appellant, 
to the overseers of the district from which the removal shall have been 
made, the reasonableness of which notice shall be determined by the said 
court, at the session to which the appeal may be made ; and if it shall ap- 
pear to them that reasonable notice was not given, they shall adjourn the 
appeal to their next session, and then determine the same. 

22. If any magistrate shall refuse to grant a warrant or order of removal 
as aforesaid, it shall be lawful for the overseers aggrieved by such refusal, 
to appeal to the next court of quarter sessions of the county in which such 
magistrate resides, who shall thereupon hear and finally determine the 
same. 

23. It is the true intent and meaning of the existing laws of this Com- 
monwealth, that the district, so accepting said poor persOii, shall be liable 
to the district removing said poor person, for costs and charges, in the 
same manner and to the same extent that they would have been had the 
case been determined against said district, by the court of quarter sessions, 
upon an appeal from said order of removal. 

IV. Op the Appeal. 

24. For the more effectual preventing of vexatious removals and friv- 
olous appeals, the court of quarter sessions, upon every appeal in a case of 
settlement, or upon proof being made before them of notice thereof, as 
aforesaid, (though the appeal be not afterwards prosecuted,) shall, at the 
same session, order to the party in whose behalf such appeal shall be de- 
termined, (a) or to whom such notice did appear to have been given, such 
costs and charges as the said court shall consider reasonable and just, to 
be paid by the overseers or other persons against whom such appeal shall 
be determined, or by the person that gave such notice. And if the court 
shall determine in favor of the appellant, that such poor person was unduly 
removed, they shall, at the same session, on demand, award to such appel- 
lant so much money as shall appear to them to have been reasonably paid 
by the city or district appellant towards the relief of such poor person, 
between the time of such undue removal and the determination of such 
appeal, with costs, as aforesaid. 

25. If any person ordered to pay costs or charges as aforesaid, other than 
overseers as aforesaid, shall live out of the jurisdiction of such court, it 
shall be the duty of any magistrate of the county in which such person 
shall reside, on request to him made, and on the production of a copy of 
such order, certified under the seal of such court, to issue his warrant to 
levy the same by distress ; and if no sufficient distress can be had, to com- 

before that court. Derry v8. Brown, 13 Penn. St. R. 890. And, therefore, no appeal 
lies. Mimin vs. Elizabeth, 18 Penn. St. R. 17. Mauch Chunk va, Nesoopeok, 21 Ibid. 46. 

(a) Where the order is in part con firmed, and in part quashed, neither party is en- 
titled to costs. Berks Ck)unty va. Philadelphia, 1 S. it R. 387. And if the order be 
quashed for want of jurisdiction in the justices, it is error to make any decree as to the 
costs. St. Clair va. Moon, 6 W. <fe S. 522. 



348 Board bs' Public Charitie& [No. 6, 

mit such party to the common jail, there to remain without bail or main- 
prise, until such costs or money be paid* or until he be otherwise legally 
discharged. 

26. If any overseer be ordered to pay costs or charges as aforesaid, and 
the township liable therefor be out of the jurisdiction of such court, it shall 
be the duty of the court of quarter sessions of the county in which such 
township is situate, on request to them made, and on the production of a 
copy of such order, certified under the seal of the court making the same, 
to compel payment of such costs and charges, according to law. 

V. Of the persons liable for the support of others. 

27. The father and grandfather,(a) and the mother(6) and grandmother, 
and the children and grandchildren of every poor person not able to work, 
shall, at their own charge, being of sufficient ability, relieve and maintain 
such poor person, at such rate as the court of quarter sessions of the county 
where such poor person resides, shall order and direct, on pain of forfeiting 
a sum not exceeding twenty dollars for every month they shall fail therein, 
which shall be levied by the process of the said court, and applied to the 
relief and maintenance of such poor person. (c) 

28. If any person shall bring or cause to be brought into this Common- 
wealth any black or colored indented servant, such person, his or her heirs, 
executors, administrators, and assigns, shall respectively be liable to the 
guardians or overseers of the city or district to which such black or col- 
ored person shall become chargeable, for such necessary expenses as such 
guardians or overseers may be put to for his or her maintenance, support, 
and interment, together with the costs thereon. 

29. Every person in whom the ownership or right to the service of any 
negro or mulatto slave shall be vested, shall be liable to the overseers of 
the district in which (such) negro or mulatto shall become chargeable, for 
all expenses which such overseers may be put to for the maintenance, sup- 
port and interment of such negro or mulatto, with the costs thereon. 

(a) See Guardians V8. Smith, 6 Penn L. J. 433, as to the liability of a grandfather 
whilst the father is living. And see Seibart's Appeal, 19 Penn St. R. 56 Dufifey, v«. 
Duffey, 44 Ibid. 300. 

(6) The liability of a surviving mother, if of sufficient ability for the support of her 
minor children, is oo-extensive with that of a father. Burrell vs. Pittsburgh, 62 Pemi, 
St. R. 472. 

(c) This does not relieve the township from their liability. Kelly vs. Union, 5 W. 
& S. 536. By act of 15 April, 1857, the courts of quarter sessions are invested with Ju- 
risdiction to make orders and decrees, under this section, either upon the petition of 
the overseers of the poor, or of any other person or persons having an interest in the 
support of such poor person or persons ; and either with or without an order of relief 
having been ftrst obtained. P. L. 191. And see Wertz vs. Blair county, 66 Penn. 
St. R. 18. 



Leg. Doc.] Board op Public Charities. 349 

YI. Desertion. 

30. If any man shall separate himself from his wife, (a) without reason- 
able cause,(6) or shall desert his children, or if any woman shall desert 
her children, leaving them a charge upon the district,(c) in any such case 
it shall be lawful for any two(d) magistrates of the county, upon complaint 
made by the overseera of the district ,(e) to issue their warrant (y) to such 
overseers, therein authorizing them to take and seize so much(^) of the 
goods and chattels, (i) and receive so much of the rents and profits of the 
real estate of such man or woman, as, in the judgment of the said magis- 
trates, shall be sufficient to provide for such wife, and to maintain and 
bring up such children, which sum or amount shall be specified in such 
warrant; but if sufficient real or personal estate cannot be found ,(y) then 
to take the body of such man (or woman) and bring him (or her) before 
such magistrates, at a time to be specified in such warrant. 

31. It shall be lawful for such magistrate ,(^) on the return of such war- 
rant, to require security from such man or woman for his or her appear- 
ance at the next court of quarter sessions of the count v,(Z) there to abide 

(a) The wife, in such case, is a (x^mpetent witness to prove the marriage. Guardi- 
ans vs, Nathans, 2 Brewst. 149. A husband who, by cruel usage, compels his wife to 
withdraw from his habitation, is liable to proceedings for desertion. Directors vs, 
Mercer, 2 Penn. L. J. R. 75. 

(6) The reasonable cause which relieves a husband from a warrant, is only such as 
will relievo him Irom the legal duty of maintenance ; and he can only be relieved 
from the maintenance of his wife, for reasons or causes that would entitle him to a 
divorce. Sterling vs. Commonwealth, 2 Gr. 162. Commonwealth vs, Shafer, 1 Luz. 
Leg. Reg. 22. 

(c) It is not necessary that a wife and child should be declared paupers, in due 
form of law, to authorize proceedings against the husband for maintenance. Sterling 
vs. Commonwealth, 2 Gr. 162. 

(d) Proceedings may be had before one magistrate, in Philadelphia, by act 14 April, 
1853, § 8. P. li. 418. 

(e) The complaint must be made by the overseers, not by the wife. Common- 
wealth vs. Nathans, 2 Penn. St. R. 138. Worrell's Case, 61 Ibid. 105. Overseers i;«. 
Smith, 2 S. (fc R. 363. Commonwealth vs. Hill, 2 Bro. 212^ The proceedings may be 
instituted on an information made by a single overseer. Sterling vs. Commonwealth, 
2 Gr. 162. See iv/ra 33. 

(g) the law considers such desertion as an olfense. Commonwealth vs. Keeper of 
the Jail, 4 S. & R. 506. And the defenddnt is not entitled to notice previously to the 
seizure of his property. Overseers vs. Smith, 2 S. & R. 333. 

(h) The warrant must direct how much is to be seizad. Guardians vs, Picard, 1 S. 
& R. 230. 

(t) This does not include *'choaes In action," which are not liable to seizure under 
the warrant; but a lease for years is a chattel real, and may be seized. Sterlhig vs. 
Commonwealth, 2 Gr. 162. See act 1 April, 1870, as to Schuylkill county. P. L. 777. 

(j) To justify a warrant of arrest, it must appeir that sufficient real or pers3nal 
estate of the defendant could not be found Commonwealth vs. Nathans, 2 Penn. St. 
R. 142. Worrell's Case, 61 Ibid. 105. See Guardians vs. Nathans, 3 Penn. L. J. R. 139. 

(A;) The right to hold to bail given to one magistrate is auxiliary to the proceedings 
before two Justices. Commonwealth vs. Nathans, 2 Penn. St. R. 139. 

(0 In Philadelphia, one judge may act in desertion cases, by act 26 March, 1864. 
P. L. 173. 



350 Board op Public Charities. [No. 5, 

the order of the court ; and for want of such security, to commit such per- 
son to the jail of the county. 

32. The warrant aforesaid shall be returned to the next court of quar- 
ter sessions of the county, (a) when it shall be lawful for the said court to 
make an order ,(6) for the payment of such sums as they shall think reason- 
sonable, for the purpose aforesaid', and therein authorizing the overseers to 
dispose of the goods and chattels aforesaid(c) by sale or otherwise, and to 
collect and receive the rents and profits aforesaid, or so much of either as, in 
the judgment of the court, shall be sufficient for the purpose aforesaid ;(d) 
but if there be no real or personal estate, it shall be lawful for the court to 
commit such person to the jail of the county, there to remain until he or 
she comply with such order, give security for the performance thereof, or 
be discharged by due course of law.(e) 

33. In addition to the remedies now provided by law,(gf) if any husband 
or father, being within the limits of this Commonwealth, (A) has or here- 
after shall separate himself from his wife, or from his children, or from his 
wife and children, without reasonable cause, or shall neglect to maintain 
his wife or children, it shall be lawful for any alderman, justice of the 

(a) By act of 9 April, 1872, the aldermen of Philadelphia are required to make 
monthly returns to the city solicitor. P. L. 1004. 

(6) The defendant has a right to prove that he had not deserted his wife, but she 
had deserted him. Overseers va. Smith, 2 S. <!k R. 303. The decree does not affect the 
right of creditors. Thomas v«. MoCready, 5 S. <& R. 387. The proceedings are subject 
to the revision of the Supreme Court, on certiorari. Overseers va. Smith, 2 S. & R. 
363. But not until after Unal decree. Commonwealth va. Nathans, 5 Penn. St. R. 
124. Such decree is not affected by a subsequent discharge under the insolvent laws, 
which will only apply to payments then due. Newhouse va. Commonwealth, 5 Wh. 
82. 

(c) It is error for the quarter sessions, upon the hearing of a defendant who was 
bound over to answer a charge of deserting his wife, to order payment of a weekly 
sum for the support of his wife, and a further weekly sum for the support of his child ; 
the order must be limited to the original charge. Anthony's Appeal, 3 Pitts. L. J. 
420. It is too late, after hearing on the merits, to set aside the warrant for a mere de- 
fect of form. Sterling va. Commonwealth, 2 Or. 162. 

(d) They cannot order the sale of stock held by the wife as administratrix. Guard- 
ians va. Roberts, 5 S. & R. 112. 

(6) The act of 31 March, 1812, 5 Sm. 393, relating to the city of Philadelphia, <fec., is 
not hereby repealed. Guardians va. Nathans, 3 Penn. L. J. R. 139. Commonwealth 
va. Nathans, 2 Penn. St. R. 138. And see act 11 April, 1848, relating to the*oity of 
Pittsburgh. P. L. 532. 

(g) See act 26 March, 1846, as to Philadelphia county, P. L. 173; acts 3 May, 1864, 
P. L. 694, and 4 March, 1865, P. L. 272, as to Berks county ; act 22 March, 1876, as to 
Allegheny county, P. L. 557 ; act 4 April, 1866, as to Lehigh and Greene counties, P. 
L. 511 ; acts 27 February, 1867, P. L. 271, and 15 April, 1869, P. L. 75, as to Lancaster, 
Crawford, Erie, York, Delaware, and Potter counties; act 27 February, 1867, as to 
Lawrence and Luzerne counties, P. L. 280 ; and act 1 April, 1870, as to Schuylkill 
county, P. L. 777. 

(A) To confer Jurisdiction, the act of desertion must have been committed within 
the State. JEx parte Bailey, 27 Leg. Int. 399. Demott va. Commonwealth, 64 Penn. 
St. R. 302. 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 851 

peace, or magistrate of this Commonwealth, (a) upon information made be- 
fore him, under oath or affirmation, by his wife or children,(6) or either of 
them, or by any other person or persons, to issue his warrant to the sheriff, 
or to any constable, for the arrest of the person against whom the in- 
formation shall be made as aforesaid, and bind him over, with one sufficient 
surety, to appear at the next court of quarter sessions, there to answer the 
said charge of desertion. 

34. The information, proceedings thereon, and warrant shall be returned 
to the next court of quarter sessions, when it shall be lawful for said court, 
after hearing, to order the person against whom complaint has been made, 
being of sufficient ability, to pay such sum as said court shall think reason- 
able and proper, for the comfortable support and maintenance of the said 
wife or children, or both, not exceeding one hundred dollars per month,(c) 
and to commit such person to the county prison, there to remain until he 
comply with such order, or give security, by one or more sureties, to the 
Commonwealth, and in such sum as the court shall direct for the com- 
pliance therewith. 

35. The costs of all proceedings by virtue of this act shall be the same 
as are now allowed by law in cases of surety of the peace, to be imposed 
in like manner ; and all proceedings shall be in the name of the Common- 
wealth ; and any wife, so deserted, shall be a competent witness on the 
part of the Commonwealth, and the husband shall also be a competent wit- 
ness. 

36. Should any such person abscond, remove, or be found in any other 
county of the Commonwealth than the one 'in which said warrant issued, 
he may be arrested therein, by the said warrant being backed by any 
alderman or justice of the peace of the county in which such person may 
be found, as is now provided for backing warrants by the third section of 
the act of the 31st of March, 1860. 

37. Whenever the court of quarter sessions of any county in the Com- 
monwealth shall, under the second section of the act to which this is a 
supplement, commit the person complained of to the county prison, there 
to remain until he comply with their order, or give security, Ac, it shall 
be lawful for the said court, at any time after three months, if they shall be 
satisfied of the inability of such person to comply with the said order, and 
give such security, to discharge him from imprisonment. 

(a) The Jarisciiotion is not oonfined to the court of the county where the defendant 
has his residence. Keller vs. Commonwealth, 29 Leg. Int. 348. s. c. 4 Leg. Gaz. 349. 

(6) If the father be really able and willing to maintain his children at home, he is 
entitled to their custody. Commonwealth va. Demott, 7 Phila. 624. s. c. 64 Penn. St. 
R. 302. See Commonwealth V8, Jones, 1 Luz. Leg. Reg. 46. Keller vs. Common- 
wealth, 29 Leg. Int. 848. 

(e) The act is confined to a provision for future maintenance. Keller vs. Common- 
wealth, 29 Leg. Int. 348. 



352 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

YII. Duties of Oy£RSEER& 

38. If any person shall come out of any city or district in this Com- 
monwealth into any other district, and shall happen to fall 8ick,(a) or die, 
before he has gained a settlement therein, so that he cannot be removed, 
the overseers of such district shall, as soon as conveniently may be, give 
notice to the guardians or overseers of the city or district where such per- 
son had last gained a settlement, or to one of them, of the name, circum- 
stances, and condition of such poor person ; and if the guardians or over- 
seers to whom such notice shall be given, shall neglect or refuse to pay the 
moneys expended for the use of such poor person, and to take order for 
relieving and maintaining him, or in case of his death before such notice 
could be given, shall, on request made, neglect or refuse to pay the moneys 
expended in maintaining and burying such poor person ; in every such 
case it shall be the duty of the court of quarter sessions of the county 
where such poor person was last settled, upon complaint to them made, to 
compel payment by such guardians or overseers, of all such sums of money 
as were necessarily expended for such purpose, in the manner directed by 
law in the case of a judgment obtained against overseers.(6) 

39. It shall be lawful for the directors of the poor of any county, and 
for the overseers of any district, as the case may be, in which any person 
shall have become chargeable, to sue for and recover any real or personal 
estate belonging to such person, and to sell, or otherwise dispose of, the 
personal property, and to collect and receive the rents and profits of the 
real estate, and to apply the proceeds, or so much thereof as may be neces- 
sary, to defray the expenses incurred in the support and funeral of such 
person ; and if any balance shall remain, the same shall be paid over to the 
legal representatives of such person, after his death, upon demand made 
and security being given to indemnify such directors or overseers from the 
claims of all other persons. 

40. It shall be the duty of the directors of the poor of the several coun- 
ties in which poor-houses are or may be erected, once in every year, after 
the accounts shall have been audited and settled, to make out a full and 
correct statement of their receipts and expenditures for the preceding year, 
together with a statement of the number of the poor persons supported, 
specifying their sex, age, or infirmity, if any, and of the profits arising 
from all farms under their directions ; and it shall be the duty of such 
directors, annually in the month of March, to publish such accounts and 
statement, at least twice, in two or more newspapers printed in such 

(a) If a person suddenly fall slok, and, after an order for his relief, die, the town- 
ship of his legal settlement is liable for the expenses of his maintenance and burial. 
South Huntingdon vs. East Huntingdon, 7 W. 527. The township where a person, 
not havmg any legal settlement in the State, first becomes disabled by a hurt, is liable 
for his maintenance. Versailles vs. Mitliin, 10 W. 360. 

(b) The remedy hereby given must be pursued ; an action of assumpsit will not lie 
in the common pleas. Chester County vs. Malany, 64 Penn. St. R. 144. Delaware vs. 
Greenwood, 66 Ibid. 63. 



Leo. Dog.] Boabd of Pxtblig Charitie& 353 

county, the expense of which shall be paid out of the county treasury, and 
forthwith transmit a copy of such accounts and statement to the Governor, 
to be by him transmitted to the Legislature : Provided^ That the accounts 
of the guardians for the relief and employment of ^he poor of the city of 
Philadelphia, the district of Southwark, and the townships of the Northern 
Liberties and Penn, shall be audited at the alms-house of said corporation, 
in the township of Blockley, in Philadelphia county. 

41. If any overseer shall neglect or refuse to perform any duty enjoined 
upon him by law, and not otherwise proAided for, he shall be liable to an 
indictment for a misdemeanor, and shall be punished by a fine, uot exceed- 
ing one hundred dollars, at the discretion of the court, to be recovered by 
the process thereof. 

42. All gifts, grants, devices, and bequests, hereafter to be made, or any 
houses, lands, tenements, rents, goods, chattels, sum or sums of money, not 
exceeding in the whole, including all gifts, grants, devices, and bequests 
heretofore made, the yearly value of five hundred pounds, to the poor of 
any borough or township within this province, (except the townships(a) 
as before excepted,) or to any other person or persons, for their use, by 
deed, or by the last will or testament of any person or persons, or otherwise 
howsoever, shall be good and available in law, and shall pass such houses, 
lands, tenements, rents, goods, and chattels to the overseers of the poor of 
such borough or township, for the use of their poor respectively. 

43. If any action shall be brought against any overseer, or other per- 
son, who, in his aid and by his command, shall do anything concerning his 
office, he may plead the general issue, and give this act and any special 
matter in evidence ; and if the plaintiff shall fail in his action, discontinue 
the same, or become non-suit, he shall pay double costs. 

YIII. FiNE^ AND Penalties. 

44. It shall be the duty of every justice who shall, by virtue of any law 
of this Commonwealth, receive any fine, penalty, or forfeiture appropriated 
by law for the use of the poor, forthwith to enter at length on his docket, 
the name of the person convicted, the ofiense committed, the amount of 
such fine, penalty, or forfeiture, and the time when the same was paid, and 
forthwith to deliver a correct transcript of such entry to a constable of the 
township; and such justice shall, on demand, pay over the same to the 
overseers of the poor lawfully entitled thereto ; and shall annuall}', if re- 
quired, exhibit his docket to the inspection of the township auditors. 

45. If any justice shall wilfully neglect or refuse to perform the duties 
enjoined on him as aforesaid, touching any fine, penalty, or forfeiture ap- 
propriated to the use of the poor, he shall, on conviction thereof in the 
court of quarter sessions of the proper county, be deemed guilty of a mis- 
demeanor in office, and fined, for the use of the poor of the township in 



(o) The exoepted townships are Moyamensing, Passyunk, and Northern Liberties, 
in the oounty of Philadelphia. See § 4 of this act. 

23 P. B. Char. 



354 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

which he shall reside, any sum not exceeding twenty dollars ; and if he shall 
be convicted of neglecting or refusing to pay over, on demand, to the proper 
overseers, any money which he shall have received as aforesaid, he shall be 
fined, over and above the last mentioned sum, any sum not exceeding double 
the amount which he shall have received as aforesaid ; which sums shall be 
recovered by process of said court. 

46. It shall be the duty of the overseers of every district, to demand 
from every justice the amount of any fine, penalty, or forfeiture that may 
have been received by him for the use of the poor, and if the same be not 
paid to them, within twenty days, to proceed to recover the same by suit 
against such Justice, in the manner that debts of the like amount are or may 
be by law recoverable. 

47. It shall be the duty of the clerk of every court by whom any fine 
shall be imposed, which by law is to be appropriated, in whole or in part, 
to the use of the poor, forthwith to deliver a written notice of the same to 
a constable living in or near the township in which the person fined resides ; 
for which service such clerk shall receive the sum of twenty-five cents from 
the proper overseers, and no more. 

48. It shall be the duty of the constable to whom any transcript or cer- 
tificate shall be delivered by a justice of the peace or clerk of the court as 
aforesaid, under a penalty of ten dollars, to be recovered before any other 
justice of the proper county, to deliver such transcript or certificate to one 
of the overseers of the district to which such fine, penalty, or forfeiture 
belongs ; and for such service such constable shall be entitled to receive 
from such overseers the sum of twenty-five cents, and no more. 

49. It shall be the duty of every sheriff who shall have received any fine, 
penalty, or forfeiture which by law may be appropriated to the use of the 
poor, to pay the same, on demand, to the proper overseers ; and if he shall 
fail to do so, within ten days after demand, he shall, on conviction thereof 
in the court of quarter sessions of the proper county, be fined and pay to 
the use of the poor of the proper district, any sum not exceeding double 
the amount received by him, to be recovered by the process of the said 
court. 

50. In all cases where there are no poor persons supported at the expense 
of a district, or where they shall remain in the hands of the overseers, at 
the end of the year, an unexpended balance, arising from fines, penalties, 
or forfeitures received for the use of the poor, it shall be the duty of the 
overseers to pay all such fines, penalties, and forfeitures as may have been 
received by them, and such unexpended balance, to the supervisors of the 
highways, to be applied to the repairs of the publlo roads in such district, 
unless the township auditors shall judge it necessary that the whole or part 
thereof should be retained as a fund for the use of the poor. 

51. The several fines, forfeitures, and penalties, and other sums of money 
imposed or directed to be paid by this act, and not herein directed to be 
otherwise recovered, shall be levied and recovered by distress and sale of 



Leg. Doc] Boa&d of Public Chabitiss. 355 

the goods and chattels of the delinquent or offender, by warrant, under the 
hand and seal of any one magistrate of the city or county where such delin- 
quent or offender dwells, or where such goods and chattels may be found ; 
and after satisfaction made of such fines, forfeitures, and penalties, and 
sums of money, together with the legal charges, on the recovery thereof, 
the overplus, if any, shall be returned to the owner of such goods and chat- 
tels, his executors, or administrators. 

52. If any person shall be aggrieved by the judgment of any one or 
more magistrates, in pursuance of this act, he may appeal to the next court 
of quarter sessions for the county in which such magistrates reside, (except 
in cases hereinbefore specially provided for,) whose decision, in all such 
cases, shall be final and conclusive. 



AN ACT 

To provide for the support out of the county treasury of the siok and injured poor 
when under treatment in hospitals, in oertain cities and boroughs. 

Sec. 1. Be it enacted^ dbc,^ That it shall be lawful for the managers or 
trustees of any hospital for the cure of the sick and injured which is now 
or may hereafter be established and duly incorporated, in any city or 
borough of this Commonwealth containing a population of not less than 
twenty thousand inhabitants, to make requisitions quarterly, upon the 
commissioners of the county in which such hospital may be situated, for 
the support of such poor patients under treatment in such hospital as are 
unable to pay for their treatment, for which requisitions the said commis- 
sioners shall grant oMers upon the treasurer of the county, who shall pay 
the same to the treasurer of such hospital. 

Sec. 2. That the sum be allowed for the support and treatment of any 
poor patient shall not exceed one dollar per day, nor shall a greater amount 
than five thousand dollars be paid out of the county treasury to any such 
hospital in any one year. 

Sec. 3. That such hospital shall not be under the control of or owned' 
by any religious sect or denomination, but shall be open for the reception 
and treatment of sick and injured citizens of Pennsylvania, without regard 
to creed, sex or race, and a report of its operations shall be made to the 
board of public charities of this Commonwealth at such times and in such 
manner as the said board may require. • 

Sec. 4. That this act shall not apply to any hospital which has an endow- 
ment fund exceeding five thousand dollars per annum or other means*, of 
support, except voluntary contributions and pay from patients under treat- 
ment, nor to any hospital unless it and the land appurtenant to it are 
owned in fee simple by the corporation and are free from incumbrance. 

Sec. 5. That when any sick or injured person shall be received into any 
such hospital, being indigent and unable to pay for his or her proper medi- 



356 BoAR]> OF Public Chabitie& [No. 5, 

cal or surgical treatment, and who has no legal settlement in the coanty in 
which said hospital is or may be situated, it shall be the duty of the man- 
agers or trustees of said hospital to notify the directors or overseers of 
the poor of the said county, who shall thereupon notify the directors or over- 
seers of the poor of the county or township in which such sick or injured 
person has a legal settlement, and they shall be liable for all reasonable 
charges incurred for the care of said patient not exceeding one dollar per 
day : Provided^ That when any such poor person shall be received into 
any such hospital who has not a legal settlement in the poor district in 
which such hospital shall be situate, notice that such person is under treat- 
ment in such hospital shall be given to the overseers of the poor of the 
county or district in which such poor person has a legal settlement, within 
thirty days after he or she shall be received into such hospital, or the said 
county or district shall not be liable to pay for more than thirty days' 
treatment in any such hospital ; and the overseers of the poor of the dis- 
trict in which poor person shall have a legal settlement shall have the right 
to take every such person from any such hospital to their own district for 
treatment and support if they shall see fit. 
Approved 21st May, 1874. 



AN ACT 

'ITe provide for the erection of a poor-iiouae, and for the support of the poor in the 

several counties of the commonwealth. 

Wecereas, It is the duty of society to make provisions for the comfort- 
able maintenance of those upon whom fortune has frowned who are found 
to be destitute and void of means of support ; therefore, 

Sec. I. Be it enacted^ dhc,^ That the county commissioners of the several 

• counties of the Commonwealth may select such real estate as they may 

• deem necessary for the accommodation of the poor of their respective 
counties, and shall submit such, with selection, together the terms and con- 
ditions upon which such real estate can be purchased in fee simple, to the 
court of quarter sessions in and for the proper county, ^nd if the same 
shall be appproved by said court, the county commissioners shall take a con- 
veyance thereof in the name and for the use of corporation mentioned in 
the fourth section of this act ; and they shall certify the proceedings therein 
under their hands and seals *to the clerk of the court of quarter sessions of 
such x5ounty, and the same shall be entered at length upon the records of 
such court. 

Sec. 2. That at the next general election to be held after the purchase of 
the real estate as provided for in the first section of this act, the qualified 
electors of such county shall elect three reputable citizens of the said 
county ±6 be directors of the " Home for the Destitute " of said county ; 
said election shaU be conducted under the general election laws of the 
Commonwealth in every respect, and the said directors shall meet at the 



Leg. Doc.] Board op Public Chabitie& 35t 

court-house in the respective counties on the first day of December follow- 
ing their election, and divide themselves, by lot, into three classes, the place 
of the first to be vacated at the expiration of the first year, of the second 
at the expiration of the second year, that of the third at the end of the 
third year, so that those who shall be chosen after the first election and in 
the mode above described may serve for three years, and one third shall 
be chosen annually thereafter. 

Sec. 3. That every director elected in the manner aforesaid, or appointed 
as directed by the twelfth section of this act shall, within ten days after he 
is notified of his said election or appointment, and before he enters upon 
the duties of the said office, take an oath or affirmation as prescribed by 
article seven, section one of the constitution ; and in case of neglect or 
refusal to take the said oath or affirmation he shall forfeit and pay the sum 
of ten dollars for the use of the poor of said county, which fine shall be 
recovered by said directors for the time being as similar debts are by law 
recoverable ; and the directors qualified as aforesaid, are hereby authorized 
to administer oaths or affirmations where it shall be necessary in relation 
to the duties of said office. 

Sec. 4. That the said directors shall forever hereafter, in name and in 
&ct, be a body politic and corporation in law to all intents and purposes 
whatsoever relative to the poor of said county, and shall have perpetual 
succession, and may sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded by the name, 
style and title of " The Directors of a Home for the Destitute of the county 

of , " and by that name shall and may receive, take and hold any, 

lands, tenements and hereditaments not exceeding the yearly value of eight 
thousand dollars, and any goods and chattels of the gift, alienation or 
bequest of any person or persons whatsoever for the benefit of the poor 
aforesaid ; to take and hold any lands and tenements within their coimty, 
in fee simple or otherwise, under the supervision of court as aforesaid, as 
may be donated to them by deed or otherwise, and dispose of the same as 
deemed conducive to the comfort of the inmates ; to provide all things ne- 
cessary for the lodging, maintenance and employment of said persons ; and 
the said directors shall have power to employ and at pleasure remove a 
steward or stewards, a matron or matrons, physician or physicians, surgeon 
or surgeons, and all other attendants that may be necessary for the said 
destitute persons respectively, and to bind out apprentices so that such 
apprenticeship may expire, if males, at or before the age of twenty-one, if 
females, at or before the age of eighteen years : Provided^ That no child 
be boimd out for a longer time than until he arrives at the age of eighteen 
years, unless he be bound out to a trade other than a farmer : Provided 
alsoy That no child shall be apprenticed without the limits of the State ; 
and the said directors are hereby empowered to use one common seal in 
all business relating to said corporation, and the same at their pleasure to 
alter and renew. 

Sec 5. That the said directors, as soon as may be, after their election 



358 Board of Pubuo Chabitie& [No. 5, 

and orgation as nizaaforesaid, and annually thereafter, shall make an esti- 
mate of the yearly cost of maintaining said establishment and furnish said 
estimate to the county commissioners, who shall add the same to their 
yearly estimate preparatory to levying their tax for the coming year, and 
they shall from time to time, make such suggestions to the county commis* 
sioners, as they may deem necessary, as to keep the improvements or alter- 
ations that may be required to pace with the necessities of the occasion, 
and the commissioners aforesaid shall make such changes and improve- 
ments as they deem necessary ; and for the purposes of this act the com- 
missioners aforesaid are hereby authorized to procure a loan, for which 
they may pay interest not exceeding six per centum, if they deem it best 
to do so, said loan not to exceed three fourths of the amount necessarry 
for the purchase of said property and the erection of the necessary build- 
ings ; said loan to be gradually reduced and to be entirely canceled within 
five years. 

Seo. 6. That the amount necessary to defray the annual expenses of the 
" Home for the Destitute " shall be paid over to the county treasurer, and 
by him paid out on warrants drawn on him by the county commissioners, 
upon orders presented to them signed by the president of the board of 
directors, and countersigned by the secretary, and to which the seal of the 
corporation shall be attached ; and it shall be the duty of the county com- 
missioners to keep the accounts of the " Home for the Destitute '' in a set 
of books to be provided for that purpose, and said accounts shall be audi- 
ted by the county auditors at the same time the other accounts of the 
county are audited by them, and to publish annually a detailed statement 
of the receipts and expenditures of said " Home for the Destitute " at the 
same time and in the same manner the annual county statement is pub- 
lished ; and the Judges of the several courts of the said county, and the 
ministers of the Gospel of the different denominations, shall, ex-officio, be 
visitors of said institution, and shall have the privilege at all reasonable 
time, to visit and examine the condition of the same, including the books 
of said institution, in whcih shall be kept an account of all expenses of the 
same as also of all the receipts of the same, as well as those derived from 
the county treasury as the productions of the farm and the industry of its 
inmates, as also whatever gifts or bequests they may have received from 
whatever source the same may have been derived. 

Sec. 7. That as soon as the said building shall have been erected or pur- 
chased, and all necessary accommodations provided therein, notice shall be 
given to the overseers of the poor in the various districts of said county, 
requiring them forthwith to bring the poor of their respective districts to 
said " Home for the Destitute," which order the overseers are required to 
comply with or otherwise forfeit the cost of all future maintenance, except 
where by sickness or any other sufficient cause, any poor person cannot be 
removed, in which case the overseers shall represent the same to the neai> 
est Justice of the peace, who being satisfied of the truth thereof, shall 



Leg. Doc] Boabd of Public Chakitibs. 359 

certify the same to the said directors, and at the same time issue an order 
under his hand and seal to the said overseers directing them to maintain 
such poor person until he or she may be in a situation to be removed, and 
then to remove the said person and deliver him or her to the steward or 
keeper of said home, together with said order, and the charge and expense 
shall be paid by the said directors. 

Sec. 8. That the said directors shall, from time to time, receive, provide 
for and employ, according to the true intent, and meaning of this act, all 
such indigent persons as shall be entitled to relief or shall have gained a 
legal settlement in the said county, and shall be sent there by an order or 
warrant for that purpose under the hands and seal of two justices of the 
peace of said county, directed to any constable of the same county or to 
the overseers of the proper district or of any district in any other county 
in this commonwealth ; and the said directors are hereby authorized when 
they shall deem it proper and convenient to do so, to administer relief to 
any person in need of assistance or to permit any person or persons to be 
maintained elsewhere : Provided^ That their expense in any case does not 
exceed that for which they could be maintained in the said home. 

Sec. 9. That the said directors or a majority of them shall be a quorum 
for the transaction of business, and shall have full power to make and 
ordain such ordinances, rules and regulations as they shall think proper, 
convenient and necessary for the government, control and support of said 
home and of the revenues thereunto belonging and of all such persons as 
shall come under their cognizance : Provided^ That the same be not repug- 
nant to this or any other of the laws of this state or of the United States : 
And provided further^ That the same shall not have any force or effect 
until they shall have been submitted to the court of quarter session for 
the time being of said county and shall have received the approval of the 
same. 

Sec. iO. That a quorum of said directors shall and they are hereby en- 
joined and required to meet at the said home at least once in every month 
and visit the apartments and see that the inmates are comfortably sup- 
ported, and hear all complaints, and redress, or cause to be redressed, all 
grievances that may happen by the neglect or misconduct of any person 
or persons in their employment or otherwise. 

Sec. 11. The annual salary of the said directors shall be one hundred 
dollars each. 

Sec. 12. That in case of any vacancy by death, resignation or otherwise 
of any of the said directors, the court of sessions quarter of the respective 
county shall fill such vacancy until the next general election. 

Sec. 13. That all claims and demands existing at the time of this act 
being carried into effect shall have full force and effect as fully as if this 
act had not been passed, and when the same may have been fully adjusted 
and settled, all moneys remaining in the hands of the overseers, as well as 
the uncollected taxes levied for the support of the poor in the several dis- 



860 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

tricts in said county, shall be paid over to the supervisors of the high- 
ways of said county to be by. them added to the road fund and applied as 
road tax is by law applied ill said county. 

Sec. 14. That as soon as the poor of said county shall have been re- 
moved to the home of said county and the outstanding taxes collected and 
paid over the office of overseeers of the poor thereafter shall be abolished. 

Sec. 15. That all fines, forfeitures or bequests for the use of the poor 
shall be payable to the county treasury for the use of said home, and the 
directors are hereby authorized to demand and receive the same and in the 
name of said corporation may bring suit for the recovery of all money 
belonging to said institution, to plead and be impleaded in all matters of 
law and equity and to prosecute all such suits to final judgment, and the 
money so recovered shall be paid into the county treasury and shall be ap- 
plied in liquidation of the debts of the institution and the support of its 
inmates. 

Sec. 16. That the provisions of this act shall not apply to any county 
or district that has already within it a county or district poor-house or 
houses under any special law, nor to any county or district unless the same 
be accepted by a majority of the voters of such county or district at an 
election for that purpose to be ordered by the court of quarter sessions of 
the proper county : Provided^ That the directors of the poor may erect 
and maintain two houses for the destitute in any county containing a 
population of over (60,000) fifty thousand inhabitants and (600) six hun- 
dred square miles. 

Sec. 17. That whenever the county commissioners of any county see 
proper, from any cause whatsoever, not to comply with the requirements 
of this act, any four or more townships of any county, through a commis- 
sioner appointed by the poor overseers of each township, can proceed to 
procure real estate as provided by the first section of this act : Provided^ 
That in all cases it shall be necessary for the majority of the commission 
to concur in all acts before the court shall take cognizance of the same : 
And provided further J That district poor-houses shall be governed by all 
the provisions of this act the same as county poor-houses, except as far as 
relates to the appointment of commissioners by the poor overseers forming 
the aforesaid district. 

Sec 18. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act are hereby 
repealed. 

Approved 8th May, 1876. 

Note. — Special attention is oalled to ttie sixteenth seotion of this act, and attention 
direoted to the act of 24tli of Maroli, 1877, a supplement to this act, but regulated under 
the provision of the sixteenth section of this act. 



Leo. Doc.] Boabd of Public Charities. 361 

A SUPPLEMENT 

To an act, entitled "An act relating to the support and employment of the poor,'' ap- 
proved the thirteenth day of June, Anno Domini eighteen hundred and thirty-six. 

Sec. 1. Be it enacted^ d:c., That it shall be lawful for the directors of the 
poor of any count}', and for the overseers of any district, as the case may 
be, to make leases for a term of years of the real estate of anj' pauper, and 
receive the rents, issues, and profits thereof, and apply the proceeds, or so 
ihuch thereof as may be necessary, to defray the expenses incurred in the 
support and. funeral of such pauper, and the balance or residue thereof shall 
be paid to the legal representatives of such pauper, after his or her death, 
upon indemnity being made to such directors or overseers to secure ttem 
from the claims of all other persons ; and after the payment of the claims 
of such directors or overseers, the rents, issues, and profits arising under 
such lease, shall be payable to the legal representatives of such pauper. 

Sec. 2. That all such leases heretofore made by any directors or overseers, 
for a term not exceeding twenty years from the date thereof, when pos- 
session has been taken thereunder, shall be good and valid as though made 
subsequent to and under this act, and the proceeds thereof shall be payable 
as provided in the preceding section ; and if the said real estate leased shall 
escheat to the Commonwealth, the same shall remain subject to the lease 
during its continuance. 

Approved, 4th April, 187Y. 



AN ACT 
To define and suppress vagrancy. 

Sec. 1. Be it enacted^ <^c., That the following described persons are 
hereby declared to be vagrants : 

I. All persons who shall unlawfliUy return into any district whence they 
have been legally removed, without bringing a certificate from the proper 
authorities of the city or district to which they belong, stating that they 
have a settlement therein. 

II. All persons who shall refuse to perform the work which shall be 
allotted to them by the ovei seers of the poor, as provided by the act of 
June thirteenth, one thousand eight hundred and thirt3'-six, entitled ^^An 
act relating to the support and employment of the poor." 

III. All persons going about from door to door or placing themselves 
in streets, highways, or other roads, to beg or gather alms, and all other 
persons wandering abroad and begging who have no fixed place of residence 
in the township, ward, or borough in which the vagrant is arrested. 

IV. All persons who shall come from any place without this Common- 
wealth to any place within it, and shall be found loitering or residing there- 
in, and shall follow no labor, trade, occupation, or business, and have no 



362 Board of Public Chabitie& [^o. 5, 

visible means of subsistence, and can give no reasonable account of them- 
selves or their business in such place. 

Seo. '2. If any person shall be found offending in any township or place 
against this act, it shall and may be lawful for any constable or police 
officer of such township or place, and he is hereby enjoined and required, 
on notice thereof given him by any of the inhabitants thereof, or without 
such notice on his own view, to apprehend and convey or cause to be con- 
veyed such person to a justice of the peace or other committing magistrate 
of the county, who shall examine such person and shall commit him, being 
thereof legally convicted before him, on his own view or by the confession 
of such offenders, or by the oath or affirmation of one or more creditable 
witnesses, to labor upon any county farm or upon the roads and highways 
of any city, township, or borough, or in any house of correction, poor- 
house, work-house, or common jail, for a term of not less than thirty days 
and not exceeding six months, and shall forthwith commit him to the cus- 
tody of the steward, keeper, or superintendent of such county farm, house 
of correction, poor-house, work-house, or common jail, or to the super- 
vi visors or street commissioners, and overseers of the poor of the respective 
county, city, borough, or township wherein such person shall be found, as 
in his judgment shall be deemed most expedient ; the said justice of the 
peace or committing magistrate in every case of conviction, shall make up 
and sign a record of conviction, annexing thereto the names and records 
of the different witnesses examined before him, and shall, by warrant, under 
hand, commit such person as aforesaid : Provided^ Anj' person or persons 
who shall conceive him, her, or themselves aggrieved by any act, judgment, 
or determination of &ny justice of the peace or alderman in and concerning 
the execution of this act, may appeal to the present or next general quar- 
ter sessions of the city or county, giving reasonable notice thereof, whose 
orders thereupon shall be final. 

Sec. 3. That it shall be the duty of the custodian or custodians of any 
such vagrant to make active efforts to provide work for every vagrant com- 
mitted under this act, and not disqualified by sickness, old age, causuality ; 
and whenever labor cannot be provided in the place to which any vagrant 
is committed, it shall be lawful for such custodian or custodians, and it is 
hereby declared to be his or their duty, with the approval of the board of 
directors, overseers, guardians, or commissioners of the poor, as the case 
may be, to contract with the proper authorities of any such township, bor- 
ough, city, county, or other persons, to do any work or labor outside the 
place of commitment ; in all cases the work or labor shall be suited to the 
proper discipline, health, and capacity of such vagrant, and he shall be fed 
and clothed in a manner suited to the work engaged in and the condition 
of the season ; and when any vagrant is committed under the provisions 
of this act to the custody of the supervisors or street commissioners and 
overseers of the poor of any township, borough, city, or county, it shall be 
their duty to provide for him comfortable lodging or quarters, either in a 



Lbq. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. 363 

station-house or other building ; the violation or neglect of any of the pro- 
Tisions of this section shall be deemed to be a misdemeanor, and the person 
8o offending, on conviction thereof in the proper court, shall be sentenced 
to undergo an imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months, and to 
pay a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars, either or both, in the discre- 
tion of the court. 

Sec. 4. If any person not being in the county, township, or place in which 
he usually lives, or has his home, shall apply to any director, overseer, 
guardian, or commissioner of the poor of any county, city, borough, town- 
ship, or district, stating that he is desirous to return to his home, but is 
poor, and has not the means to do so, the said director, overseer, guardian 
or commissioner of may employ, or let out, such person to labor at some 
suitable place, to be by them selected, and at such wages as shall seem to 
them just, and when, in the opinion of said director, overseer, guardian, or 
commissioner of the poor, such poor person shall have earned a sufficient 
sum, said director, overseer, guai*dian, or commissioner of the poor shall, 
with the money so earned, and with such additions thereto from the treas- 
ury of the county, city, borough, township, or district as they may think 
reasonable, cause such person to be returned to his home, whether in this 
State, or elsewhere : Provided, That the expense shall not exceed twenty 
dollars. 

Seo. 5. That the custodian or custodians of such vagrant may, at discre- 
tion, discharge such vagrant at any time within the term of commitment, 
upon not less than ten days good behavior, or upon satisfactory security 
that he shall not become a charge upon the public within one year from 
the date of such discharge. 

Sec. 6. That the county commissioners of every county in which there 
shall not be sufficient provision for the safe custody of persons committed 
under this act, upon the recommendation of a grand jury of the county, 
and approval of the court, are hereby empowered and required to make 
suitable provisions by buildings or enclosures : Provided, That the expense 
of the same shall not exceed the amount fixed by the grand jury. 

Sec. 7. That for each arrest, hearing, or commitment made under this 
act there shall be paid out of the county treasury to the committing mag- 
istrate, and officer making such arrest or commitment, and the same fees 
and mileage, as now provided by law for like services in other cases of ar- 
rest, hearing, and commitment ; and no such person shall be detained be- 
yond the term of his commitment by reason of his inability to pay the 
costs of his arrest, hearing, and commitment, but shall forthwith be dis- 
charged by the officer in whose custody he may be ; any willful refusal to 
make such arrest on the part of any constable or police officer shall subject 
him to a penalty of ten dollars, to be collected as penalties are by law col- 
lectible, and shall be paid into the poor fund of the district in which the 
officer resides. 

Sec. 8. That all poor-houses, alms-houses, and other places provided for 



364 Board of Public Chabitis& [No. 5, 

the keeping of the poor, are hereby declared to be work-houses for the 
purpose of this act, and it is hereby made the duty of the custodians of 
such buildings to provide work for such vagrants, and to compel them to 
w^ork therein, when able, not less than six hours per day. 

Sec. 9. That the custodian of any vagrant, upon his discharge, and at his 
request, shall give him a certificate of discharge, which shall exempt him 
from an}' farther arrest for vagrancy for a period of five days, upon condi- 
tion that he shall forthwith leave the county wherein confined, and the said 
custodian is hereby authorized to give, in his discretion, to such discharged 
vagrant a reasonable sum of money out of his earnings, or out of the 
treasury of the township, borough, city, or county, to defray his expenses 
in leaving the county, as aforesaid. 

Sec. 10. That all acts or parts of acts inconsistent herewith, be and the 
same are hereby repealed. 

Approved, 8th May, 1876. 



AN ACT 

To define and punish tramps. 

Sec. 1. Be it enacted^ &c.^ That any person going about from place to 
place begging, asking, or subsisting upon charity, and for the purpose of 
acquiring money or a living, and who shall have no fixed place of residence 
or lawful occupation in the county or city in which he shall be arrested, shall 
be taken and deemed to be a tramp, and guilty of a misdemeanor, and on 
conviction, shall be sentenced to undergo an imprisonment by separate and 
solitary confinement at labor, in the county jail or work-house, for not more 
than twelve months, in the discretion of the court : Provided^ That if any 
person so arrested can prove by satisfactory evidence, that he does not make 
a practice of going about begging or subsisting upon alms, for the purpose 
aforesaid, in the manner above set forth, he shall not be deemed guilty of 
the offense hereinbefore described, and upon such proof shall be discharged 
from arrest, either by the magistrate before whom he is committed, or by 
the court upon hearing of the case, upon writ of habeas corpus. 

Sec. 2. Any tramp who shall enter any dwelling-house against the will, 
or without the permission of the owner or occupant thereof, or shall kindle 
any fire in the highway, or on the land of another, without the owner's con- 
sent, or shall be found carrying any fire-arms or other dangerous weapon, 
with intent unlawfully to do injury to, or intimidate any other person, which 
intent may be inferred by the jury trying the case, from the facts that the 
defendant is a tramp and so armed, or shall do, or threaten to do any in- 
jury not amounting to a felony, to any person, or to the real or personal 
estate of another, shall, upon conviction, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and shall be sentenced to undergo an imprisonment by separate or solitary 
confinement at labor, for a period not exceeding three yeai's. 



Leq. Dog.] Boabd of Publio Charitiss. 365 

Sec. 3. Any act of beggary or vagrancy by any person described by the 
first section of this act, shall be prima fckde evidence that the person com- 
mitting the same is a tramp within the meaning of this act, subject to the 
proviso contained in section one of this act. 

Sec. 4. Any person upon view of any offense described in this act, may 
apprehend the offender and take him before a justice of the peace or alder- 
man, whose duty it shall be, after hearing the evidence, to discharge or to 
commit the prisoner for trial, as in the case of other misdemeanors. 

Sbc. 6. This act shall not apply to any female, or minor under the age of 
sixteen years, nor to any blind, deaf, or dumb person, nor shall it be appli- 
cable to any maimed or crippled person, who is unable to perform manual 
labor. 

Sec. 6. This act shall take effect on and after August fifteenth, one thou- 
sand eight hundred and seventy-nine, and all acts or parts of acts inconsist- 
ent herewith, are hereby repealed. 

Approved the 30th day of April, A. D. 1879. 

HENRY M. HOYT, 
Oovemor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania* 



866 BoABD OF PrBuc Ghabities. [No. 5, 



DIGEST OF THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME 

COURT. 



I. Liability for the support of the poor. 
II. Settlements. 

III. Orders of removal. ^ 

IV. Appeals. 

V. Orders of filiation. 
YI. Bastardy Bonds. 
VII. Desertion. 
VIII. Authority of overseers. 
IX. Accounts. 

I. Liability for the Support of the Poor. 

1. The overseers of a township are bound to maintain every poor person 
within their district, not having a settlement therein, who shall apply to 
them for relief, until he can be removed to the place of his last settlement ; 
if they leave him in an intermediate township, not legaUy chargeable, he 
may be returned to them, by an order of removal. Kelly vs. Union, 5 W.. 
& S. 535. 

2. The township where a pauper first becomes chargeable, is liable to 
maintain him, until duly removed to his place of settlement, under an 
order. Milton vs. Williamsport, 9 Penn. St. 46. 

3. Where children under seven years of age are sent to the place of 
their mother's settlement for nurture^ the expense of their maintenance 
is to be born by the place from which they are removed ; and in such case, 
the order need not specify the age to which they are to be supported ; that 
is fixed by the statue. Bucks vs. Philadelphia, 1 S. & K. 387. 

4. Where a township is divided, a pauper previously chargeable, is to be 
maintained by the new townshtp, pro rata; and an action lies by one 
against the other, for contribution. Whitehall vs. Whitehall. 3 S. & R. 
117. It seems, that this rule is changed by the act of 1836. Monroe vs. 
Durell, 2 Clark, 100. 

5. If a healthy stranger, who meets with an accident ,which renders his 
removal impossible, be received into the plaintiflfs house and taken care of, 
at the desire of the overseers, who employ a physician to attend him, the 
township is liable for his board, and other reasonable expenses, without an 
order of maintenance : and the plaintifTs right to recover is not affected by 
his omission to give notice that he has such person in his house ; nor by 
the fact that the pauper's name is not entered on the books of the town- 
ship. Roxborough vs. Bunn, 12 S. & R. 292. 

6. If a person having no legal settlement be disabled by an accident, 
the quarter session has jurisdiction to compel the overseers of the poor of 



Leo. Doc.] Board op Public Pharities. 36T 

the township in which the accident occurred) to defray the expenses of his 
maintenance in another township, into which the injured pauper had been 
carried. Versailles vs. Mifflin, 10 Watts, 360. 

7. If a person fall suddenly sick, and, after an order of relief, die, the 
township of his legal settlement is liable for the expenses of his mainte- 
nance and burial, though the OTCi'seers had no notice until after the death. 
Huntingdon vs. Huntingdon, 7 Watts, 627. 

8. Where an illegitimate child, who has a legal settlement within the 
State, is injured in another township, and removed to a third, the overseers 
of which provide for her, under an order of relief, they cannot recover the 
amount expended from the township in which the injury was sustained ; the 
remedy is exclusively against the township in which the pauper had a legal 
settlement. Nippenose vs. Jersey Shore, 48 Penn. St. 402. S. P. Marion 
vs. Spring, 50 Ibid. 308. 

9. The overseers are liable for relief furnished in an emergency, provided 
an order of approval be obtained within a reasonable time thereafter ; two 
years held not to be too late. — Chester County vs. Worthington, 38 Penn. 
St. 150. 

10. In an action upon a promise to support one who became a pauper, 
the order of relief must be proved. Thornburry vs. Directors, 12 S. & R. 
110. 

11. A municipal corporation is not liable in assumpsit ^ to a grandmother, 
for boarding her minor grandchildren, who were a city charge, except on 
an express contract. Salsburry vs. Philadelphia, 44 Penn. St. 303 — s. c. 4 
Leg. & Ins. Rep. 59. 

12. A township can not be made liable for the support of a pauper, 
otherwise than by the previous order of two justices. Overseers vs. Baker, 
2 Watts, 280. 

13. Directors of the poor are liable for the funeral expenses of a pauper, 
upon the order of two justices, made after the burial. Directors vs. Wal- 
lace, 8 W. & S. 94. 

14. In case of emergencj'^, the directors of the poor may furnish relief, 
before obtaining an order, and the district will be bound. Directors vs. 
Davis, 2 Pitts. 36. 

15. Where a physician is called upon, in a case of emergency, to attend 
a person found badly frozen, whose life is endangered, and who is subse- 
quently declared a pauper, an action at common law will lie against the 
directors of the poor for his services ; in such case, the jurisdiction of the 
quarter sessions, is not exclusive. Directors vs. Malany, 64 Penn. St. 144. 

16. The district in which a pauper, whose legal settlement is unknown, 
becomes insane, and entitled to relief, is liable for his support. Venango 
vs. Brookville, 21 Pitts. L. J. 134. 

17. Where a pauper is taken sick, in a place in which he has no legal set- 
tlement, the district is liable for his support, until his last place of legal 
settlement is discovered. Moreland vs. Benton, 3 W. N. C. 20. 



368 Board of Public Charitie8. [Ko. 5, 

18. The oyerseers are liable for the maintainance of a lunatic, directed 
by the court to be sent to the State lunatic asylum ; they must look to his 
relatives for reimbursment, if he have any who are liable for his support. 
Franklin V8. State Hospital, 30 Penn. St. 522. 

19. The county is primarily liable for the expenses of a lunatic in the 
State asylum, which the proper poor district must refund, with a right over 
against the relatives of the lunatic. Augusta vs. Northumberland County, 
3t Penn. St. 143. Erisman vs. Directors 47 Ibid. 609. Ex parte Blewitt, 
32 Leg. Int. 336 ; s. c. 4 Luz. L. Reg. 243. 

20. Where an insane pauper is committed to the State asj'lum, the coimty 
cannot recover against the poor district, in the absence of an adjudication 
of settlement, and notice to the authorities of the district. Danville Dis- 
trict V8. Montour County, 75 Penn. St. 35. 

21. The courts have power to direct an insane pauper to be sent to the 
State lunatic hospital, at the expense of the county, with a right to reim- 
bursement by the proper district, on proof of a settlement therein ; but in 
case of a mere resident insane pauper, without settlement, the county can- 
not recover against the poor district. Ex parte Blewitt, 32 Leg. Int. 336 j 
s. c. 4 Luz. L. Reg. 243. 

22. The adjudication of the pauper's legal settlement, need not be made 
at the time of the commitment ; it may be had subsequently. Ibid. 

23. Where an order for the removal of an insane pauper is disobeyed, 
but no appeal is taken, the overseers of the district from which he is re- 
moved, may recover their expenditures for maintaining him. Sugarloaf vs. 
Schuylkill County, 44 Penn. St. 481. See Renova vs. Half-Moon, 78 Ibid- 
301. 

24. If the directors of the poor pay the expenses of maintaining ^ adult 
insane pauper, in the State lunatic asylum, they may recover the amount 
expended from the father of the pauper, if of sufficient ability, though 
there were no order of relief; but the exclusive jurisdiction is in the quar- 
ter sessions ; an action at common law will not lie. Wertz vs. Blair County, 
66 Penn. St. 18. Delaware vs. Greenwood, Ibid. 63. 

25. If a man take into his house a stranger, who has received an injury 
in an adjoining township, he cannot recover the expenses incurred, from 
the overseers of his own township. Overseers of Milford vs. McCoy, 2 G. 
& W. 432. 

26. Assumpsit will lie, by one poor district against another, for the main- 
tenance of a pauper belonging to the latter district. Danville District vs. 
Montour County, 75 Penn. St. 35, overruling Delaware vs. Greenwood, 7 
Phila. 669. 

27. One who has received the services of a negro, as a reputed slave, is 
liable to the township for her support, if she become chargeable. Over- 
seers of Baldwin vs. Kline, 9 Penn. St. 217. 

28. A grandfather is liable for the support of his destitute grandchildren ; 
and therefore, he cannot recover the expense from the estate of their de- 



Lbq. Doc.] Board of Public Chabitibs. 369 

ceased father, unless on proof of an express contract. Duflfy vs. DuflTj, 44 
Penn. St. 399. 

29. The grandfather of poor and destitute children is liable for their sup- 
port ; the father being out of the jurisdiction of the court. Guardians V8. 
Smith, 4 Clark, 60. 

30. If a husband, by cruel usage, compel his wife to withdraw from co- 
habitation, an order of maintenance may be made, on the application of 
the directors of the poor, notwithstanding the lapse of twenty years from 
the separation ; and the court will not regard an offer to receive her back, 
unless convinced that it is made in good faith. Directors vs. Mercer, 2 
Clark, 15. 

31. Where there is sufficient property, a person ordered to support a 
pauper, cannot be imprisoned. Jones vs. Commonwealth, 2 Phila. 291. 

II. Settlements. 

32. The settlement of a pauper cannot be determined in a collateral ac- 
tion before a single justice. Point Township vs. Lycoming Township, 2 
Rawle, 26. 

33. Upon the division of a township, the settlement of a pauper follows 
the teiTitory in which he resided at the time of gaining it, whether he had 
been charged to the parent township or not. Hopewell vs. Independence, 
12 Penn. St. -92. 

34. Where a township is divided, the settlement of a son is that of his 
father at the time of his decease; the place of settlement of the father is 
that of the son, until he acquires a new one. Lewis vs. Turbut, 16 Penn. 
St. 145. Fermanah vs. Walker, 4 Clark 32 ; affirmed by the Supreme Court. 

35. A change of territorial regulation does not affect a settlement begun 
by renting a residence. Wilkes-Barre vs. Dallas, 3 Am. L. J. 69. . 

36. The settlement of a pauper is the place of his birth, until he acquires 
another. Toby vs. Madison, 44 Penn. St. 60. Wayne vs. Jersey Shore, 1 
W. N. C. 341. 

37. The legal settlement of an idiot a nativitate follows that of his father. 
Shippen vs. Gaines, 17 Penn. St. 38. 

38. The settlement of a bastard is that of its mother at the time of its 
birth ; it does not follow a subsequent Change of settlement on the part of 
the parent. Crossley vs. Demott, 2 Leg. Opin. 161. 

39. If a mother, after the death of the father, acquire a new settlement, 
it becomes that of her minor children. Burrel vs. Pittsburgh, 62 Penn St. 

472. 

40. Under what circumstances a settlement by birth is regained. Mil- 
ford vs. Macungie, 3 Whart. 71. 

41. The settlement of an emancipated son does not follow that of his 
father, on the latter's change of residence. Washington vs. Beaver, 8 W. 

& S. 648. 

42. A female, by marriage, acquires her husband's settlement, if he has 

24— B. P. Chab. 



3t0 Board of Public Ohaaities. [No. 5, 

one ; which she does not lose by divorce a vinculis, Baffaloe vs. White- 
deer, 15 Penn. St. 182. 

43. Where a son, living with his fkther, has gained a settlement in the 
township of his residence, if he subsequently separate from his father, and 
provide for himself, and the father remove to another township, the son, 
by living with his father in the latter township for a less time than is re- 
quired for a legal settlement, does not acquire a settlement therein by rela- 
tion to his father. Toby vs. Madison, 44 Penn. St. 60. y 

44. A slave has a settlement in the township where his master resides, 
which is bound, in the first instance, to support him. Forks vs. Catawissa, 
3 Binn. 22. 

45. A slave, defectively registered, but who continues in his master's 
service, gains a settlement in the township of his master's residence. Fur- 
geson vs, Buffaloe, 6 S. & R. 103. 

46.' An indented servant gains a settlement where he first serves sixty 
days, either with the master to whom he was indented or with his assignees ; 
and this, though the assignment be voidable, or even void. Reading vs. 
Cumree, 5 Binn. 81. 

47. A servant gains a settlement in the district where his master re 
sides, though part of his service be performed in another district. Mon- 
tour vs. Chillisquaqua, 1 Leg. Gaz. 42. 

48. To gain a settlement by hiring for a year, it is not necessary' that the 
consideration should be paid in money. Briar Creek vs. Mt. Pleasant, 8 
Watts, 431. 

49. Under the act of 1836, it is not necessary there should have been a 
contract for service for a year, to gain a settlement ; it is sufficient, if there 
have been a service for a year, under one or more contracts ; a temporary 
absence,- with the leave of the master, does not break the continuity of the 
service. Hidleberg vs. Lynn, 5 Wharton, 430. By berry vs. Oxford, 3 
Ash. 9. 

50. An unmarried woman, without child, does not gain a settlement by 
service, unless there be a contract of hiring, express or implied. Lewis- 
town vs. Granville, 5 Penn. St. 283. 

51. Where one who is not a relation, and not an object of charity, but 
able to earn wages, is employed in the service of another, the law implies a 
contract of hiring, so to confer a settlement. Moreland vs. Davidson, 71 
Penn. St. 371. 

52. The rendering of service, under a contract of hiring, so as to gain a 
settlement, may be proved by the acts or declarations of the parties. Tioga 
vs. Lawrence, 2 Watts, 43. 

53. Under the act of 1771, an uncertificated freeholder, who refused to 
indemnify the township, on demand, did not gain a settlement. Forks vs. 
Easton, 2 Wharton, 405. 

54. Parol evidence of a freehold is admissible, on a question of settle- 
ment. Commonwealth vs. Jennings, 1 Bro. 197. 



Leo. Doc.] Board of Public Charities. ^11 

55. A pauper gains a settlement by contracting for a town lot under a 
yearly ground rent, building thereon, and residence, though he never re- 
ceived a deed. Republica vs. Caernarvon to^Tiship, 2 Yeates, 51. 

56. A devise upon condition subsequent, not performed, does not vest such 
an estate as will confer a settlement upon the devisee. Lewisburg vs. Au- 
gusta, 3 W. A S. 65. 

57. Payment of rent by a surety is sufficient to confer a settlement. "But- 
ler vs. Sugar-Loaf, 6 Penn. St. 262. Sunbury vs. Dauphin, 1 Am. L. J. 
11. 

58. A settlement is gained by the occupation of a dwelling-houst of the 
yearly value of ten dollars, for one whole year, under a parole agreement, 
though the rent be payable in labor or otherwise. Beaver vs. Hartley, 11 
Penn. St. 254. 

59. A pauper gains a settlement, by a residence in one or more tenements 
for a year, and during that time paying ten dollars in rent. It is not ne- 
cessary he should have all he contracted for. Allegheny City vs. Allegheny 
Township, 14 Penn. St. 138. 

60. A pauper gains a settlement by renting for less than a year, and hold- 
ing over. Lenox vs. Nicholson, 3 Luz. L. Obs. 310. 

61 . If a wife rent a residence for a bnsband who is incapable, it is deemed 
his act. Wilkes-Barre vs. Dallas, 3 Am. L. J. 59. 

62. A pauper gains a settlement by the payment of taxes for two suc- 
cessive years, though not a personal tax ; and it matters not by whom the 
tax was paid, so that he was liable for it. Toby vs. Pine, 19 Pitts. L. J. 
73. 

63. A settlement may be gained by the payment of a county tax only. 
Bucks County vs. Guardians of Philadelphia, 5 S. 4& R. 417. 

64. But not by the payment of a United States tax. Directors of Bucks 
County vs. Brier Creek, 10 S. & R. 179. 

65. What is sufficient evidence of residence in payment of taxes, on a 
question of settlement. Salem vs. Huntington, 5 Luz. L. Reg. 260. 

66. A widow cannot acquire a settlement by the payment of taxes as- 
sessed to her deceased husband. Crossley vs. Demott, 2 Leg. Leg. Opin. 
161. 

III. Orders of Removal. 

67. In contro verses between contending townships, the jurisdiction is 
exclusively in the quarter sessions. Delaware vs. Greenwood, 66 Penn. St. 
63. 

68. A pauper is only removable to his last place of legal settlement* 
Jordan vs. Mt. Pleasant, 10 Pitts. L. J. 115. 

69. When an unmarried indented female servant becomes pregnant, and 
is sent by her mistress into another township for the purpose of lying in, 
the expenses of which the mistress is able and agrees to pay, the servant 
may, nevertheless, before the birth of the child, be removed to the place of 
her legal settlement. Guardians of the Poor vs. Bristol, 6 S. & R. 562. 



372 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

70. An order of removal may be made, without previous notice; the 
mode of correction is by appeal. Bradford Vi. Rearing, 27 Penn. St. 275. 

71. An order of removal must show that complaint was made to the 
overseers of the township removing, and an adjudication that the pauper 
was likely to become chargeable. Dromore vs. West Hanover, 1 Yates, 366. 

72. It need not appear on the face of an order of removal, that there was 
an examination of the pauper, or of any other person. Fallowfield vs, Mal- 
bore, 1 Dal. 28. 

73. An order removing a married woman to her maiden settlement is not 
defective, because it omits to state that her husband had no known legal 
settlement. The court will not presume that he had such settlement. Red- 
ding V8. Comeree, 5 Binn. 81. 

74. After an appeal, and decision on the merits, advantage cannot be 
taken of an informality in the proceedings of the justices. Tioga vs. Law- 
rence, 2 Watts, 43. 

76. An order of removal unappealed from, is conclusive of the question 
of settlement. Sugar-loaf v«. Schuylkill County, 44 Penn. St. 481. Direc- 
tors of Schuj'lkill vs. Montour, Ibid. 484. Renovo vs. Half-Moon, 78 Ibid. 
301. 

76. An order of removal, followed by notice, and an ineffectual attempt 
to appeal, is conclusive of the question of settlement. Westmoreland vs, 
Conemaugh, 34 Penn. St. 231. 

77. Where an order of removal is quashed, on appeal, it is not conclusive 
upon either party on the question of settlement. West Buffaloe vrf. Walker, 
8 Penn. St. 177. Toby vs. Madison, 44 Ibid. 60. 

78. The quashing of an order of removal does not prevent a proceeding 
dis novo ; but the decree is final, afe to an order of restitution. Walker vs. 
West Buffaloe, 1 1 Penn. St. 95. ! 

79. Where the pauper is accepted, under an order of removal, and no ap- 
peal taken, the costs and charges are not recoverable from the accepting 
district. Schuylkill vs. Montour, 44 Penn. St. 484. Renovo vs. Half-Moon, 
78, Ibid. 301. 

IV. Appeals. 

80. No appeal lies to the sessions, from an order of maintenance. Lamp- 
iter vs. Lancaster, 2 Yeates, 164. 

81. No appeal lies from a decree of the quarter session, on a question of 
settlement. Mifflin vs. Elizabeth, 18 Penn. St. 17. 

82. No appeal lies from an order vacating an order of removal ; and a 
certiorari brings up nothing but the record. Bradford vs. Goshen, 57 
Penn. St. 495. 

83. An appeal may be taken from an order of removal, by application to 
the quarter sessions, and notice to the appellee ; no proceedings before the 
justices by whom the order was granted, and required by statute. North- 
ampton County vs. Limestone, 68 Penn. St. 386. 



liBo. Doc.] Board op Public Chariti£& 3 

84. An appeal not taken to the next court, is void ; the officers have no 
power to waive the requirements of the law. Su^ar Creek vs. Washing- 
ton, 62 Penn. St. 479. Coal Field V8. White Haven, 6 Luz. L. Reg. 124. 

85. An appeal will be dismissed, if not lodged to the next session after 
the removal. Oxford vs. Guardians of the Poor, 2 Bro. 253. 

86. On an appeal from an order of removal, the sessions decides accord- 
ing to the merits, without regard to defects in the order. Reading vs^ 
Cumree, 5 Binn. 81. 

87. On an appeal from an order of removal, the case is before the courts 
on the merits, and the parties have a right to a final decision. Plunketts 
Creek vs. Fairlield, 58 Penn. St. 209. 

88. On an appeal from an order of removal, the court may in part quash 
the order, and in part confirm it. Bucks vs. Phila., 1 S. & R. 387. 

89. But in such case neither party is entitled to cost. Ibid. 

90. If an appeal from an order of removal be quashed, for want of juris- 
diction in the justices, it is error to make an order as to the costs. St. 
Clare vs. Moon, 6 W. &. S. 622. 

91. An appeal from a decree, respecting the expenses of keeping a pau- 
per, will not be quashed, on the ground that a certiorari is the proper 
remedy ; the application not having been made, at the term to which the 
appeal was filed. Walker vs. West Buflaloe, 11 Penn. St. 95. 

92. If an order of removal be defective, in omitting to state that the per- 
son had or was likely to become chargeable, it may be amended, on appeal ; 
a prior order of relief is conclusive of the fact. Cumberland vs. Jefilerson, 
25 Penn. St. 463. 

V. Orders op Filiation. 

93. Where the poof are supported by the county at large, an order to 
indemnify a particular borough or township, is erroneous. Dorsey vs. 
Commonwealth, 8 S. R. 261. 

94. On a conviction of bastardy, the uniform practice has been to make 
an allowance for lying-in expenses, and a gross sum for the support of the 
child, from its birth to the time of judgment ; and where the person who 
has borne these expenses is dead, the money will be awarded to his repre- 
sentatives. Sheflfer vs. Rempublicum, 3 Yeates, 39. 

95. The court may decree the money for maintenance, to be paid either 
to the mother, or to some other person for her use. Commonwealth vs. 
Strayer, 43 Penn. St. 61. 

96. The time during which the putative father of a bastard shall be 
ordered to maintain it, is within the discretion of the sessions. Addis vs. 
Commonwealth, 4 Binn. 541. 

97. The court may require the defendant to give security for the per- 
formance of the sentence, except as to the fine and costs. Goddard vs. 
Commonwelth, 6 S. & R. 282. 

93. One who subsequently marries the prosecutrix, cannot release the 



374 Board op Public Chabities. [No. 5, 

order for the maintenance of the child. Philips vs. Commonwealth, 18 
Penn. St. 116. 

VI. Bastabdt Bonds. 

99. What is a valid condition in a bastardy bond. Hellings vs. Directors 
of the Poor, 15 Penn. St. 409. 

100. A putative father cannot relieve himself from the obligation of a 
bastardy bond, by an offer to take and support the child. Directors of the 
poor V8. Dungan, 64 Penn. St. 402. 

101. Payment of the penalty of a bastardy bond to the guardians of the 
poor, discharges the surety, though the money came from the principaL 
Phila. V8. Baxter, 6 Phila. 630. 

VII. Desertion. 

102. Justices have jurisdiction, where a man deserts his wife, though 
she have no children ; and the township may proceed, by seizure, without 
the wife's consent. Overseers vs. Smith, 2 S. & R. 363. 

103. It is not necessary that the defendant should have notice, previously 
to the seizure of his property ; nor that he should be bound over to the 
sessions, or process issued to bring him m. Ibid. 

104. It is competent for the defendant to prove that he did not desert 
his wife, but that she deserted him. Ibid. 

105. A husband cannot be bound over for desertion, on complaint of the 
wife alone. Commonwealth vs. Hill, 2 Brown 212. 

106. The authority given to two aldermen, by the act of 1812, (5 Sm. L. 
393,) to determine the amount of property to be taken under a warrant of 
seizure, cannot be delegated to the guardians of the poor. Guardians vs. 
Picaid, 1 S. & R. 239. 

107. The circuit courts had no appellant jurisdiction in cases of deser- 
tion. McKee's Case, 1 P. & W. 4^9. 

108. A complaint for desertion must be made by the guardians of the 
poor, and before two magistrates ; the right given to one justice to hold 
to bail, auxiliary to the proceedings l>efore two. Commonwealth vs. Na- 
thans, 2 Penn. St. 138. Worrell's Case, 61 Ibid. 105. Commonwealth vs. 
Boggs, 1 Phila. 385. 

109. Under act of 1836, proceedings for desertion may be instituted on 
the information of a single director of the poor. Sterling v«. Common- 
wealth, 2 Grant, 162. 

110. It is not necessary that the wife and children should be declared 
paupers, to found proceedings for desertion. Ibid. 

111. It is only such cases as will entitle the husband to a divorce, as 
will relieve him from the obligation of maintenance. Ibid. Common- 
wealth vs. Sheafer, 1 Luz. L. Reg. 221. 

112. The court may make an order for maintenance, though the parties 
have separated by agreement, if the wife has no adequate means of sup- 
port. Commonwealth vs. Orth, 1 Leg. Opin. 189. 



Leo. Doc] Board of Public Chabitiis. 875 

113. A wife who will not live in the home provided by her husband, 
cannot sue him for desertion. Commonwealth vs. Jones, 1 Luz. L. Reg. 46. 

114. Under proceedings for desertion, the husband's choses in action 
cannot be seized on the justice's warrant ; but a chattel real may be seized. 
Sterling vs. Commonwealth, 2 Grant, 162. 

On the hearing of a charge for desertion, the court will not make an 
order for the support of a child, not embraced in the original complaint. 
Anthony's Appeal, 2 Phila. 156. 

116. On an arrest for desertion, under the act of 13 April, 1867, (P. L. 
78,) the binding over must be to the court of the county from whence the 
warrant issued. Demott vs. Commonwealth, 64 Penn. St. 302. Common- 
wealth vs. Demott, Ibid. 305 n. ; s. c. 7 Phila. 624. Keller vs. Common- 
wealth, 71 Penn. St. 413. 

117. It is only for want of sufficient property liable to seizure, that the 
husband can be arrested and held to bail. Worrell's Case, 61 Penn. St. 
105. Act 13 April, 1867. P. L. 78. 

118. If the father be willing to take and support his children, he is enti- 
tled to their custody, and cannot be compelled to pay another for their 
support. Keller vs. Commonwealth, 71 Penn. St. 413. 

119. The discharge- of a father from commitment for desertion, on a 
habeas corpus, does not prevent a decree for the support of the child, in 
the same proceedings. Demott vs. Commonwealth, 64 Penn. St. 302. 

120. Our courts have no jurisdiction where the husband's domicil is in 
another State, and the act of desertion took place in a third one. Com- 
monwealth vs. Baily, 1 Leg. Gaz. R. 87 ; s. c. 8 Phila. 485. 

121. To enable the guardians of the poor to institute proceedings for 
desertion on the complaint of the wife, she must have a settlement within 
the district, which she cannot have if the husband be domiciled in another 
State ; to enable the wife to proceed, under the act of 1867, the act of de- 
sertion must have been committed within the State. Ibid. 

VIII. Authority op OvERSfeERs. 

12^. Overseers may sue by that title, as a quasi corporation. Overseers 
vs. Kline, 9 Penn. St. 217. 

123. Overseers have no power to levy and assess a tax for a past indebt- 
edness. D. and II. Canal Company vs. Higgins, 2 Luz. L. Reg. 171. 

IX. Accounts. 

124. Overseers are not jointly liable for moneys collected by each other; 
otherwise, if they be jointly charged by the auditors, and acquiesce in the 
settlement. Huling vs. Lewistown, 3 W. S. 367. 

125. A bond given to A & B, who were directors of the poor, may be 
sued in their names for the use of the directors of the poor, though they 
constituted a body corporated. Greenfield vs. Yates, 2. R. 157. 



376 Board op Public CHARiTiBa [No. 6, 

Miscellaneous. 

126. A county poor-house is not taxable for school purposes by the 
school directors of the township wherein it is situated. Directors vs. Man- 
heim Township, 6 Wright, 21. 

127. The relations of a pauper mentioned in the 28th section of act of 
June 13, 1836, are compelled, under the act of April 15, 1857, to maintain 
him with or without an order of relief having been maintained. Wertz vs. 
Blair County, 16 Smith, 18. 

128. Directors of the poor are authorized and required to pay funeral 
expenses of a destitute person upon the order of two justices granted after 
the death and burial of such person. Directors va, Wallace, 8 W. & S. 94. 



LiBQ. Doc] Board op Pitblic Charities. 37 1 



ACTS OF ASSEMBLY AND OPINIONS OF ATTOR- 
NEYS GENERAL RELATIVE TO THE BOARD 
OF PUBLIC CHARITIES. 



An aot to create a Board of Fablio Charities. 

Section I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met^ and it is 
hereby enacted by the authority of the same^ That the Governor, with the 
advice and consent of the Senate, shall, as soon as practicable after the 
passage of this act, appoint five commissioners, who, together with the Gen- 
eral Agent and Secretary hereinafter mentioned, shall constitute a Board of 
Public Charities ; one of the persons so appointed shall hold office for one 
year, one for two years, one for three years, one for four years, and one for 
five years, unless sooner removed ; appointments to fill vacancies caused by 
death, resignation, or removal before the expiration of terms, may be made 
for the residue of such terms, by the Governor, subject to the consent of 
the Senate, and all appointments to fill vacancies caused by expiration of 
terms shall be made in the same manner, and shall be for the period of five 
years each. 

Section 2. The commissioners, before entering upon their duties, shall, 
respectively^ take and subscribe the oath required of other State officers, 
which shall be filed in the office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, who 
is hereby authorized and directed to administer said oath ; they shall have 
power to elect a president out of their own number, to appoint a General 
Agent and Secretary, and to adopt such regulations for the transaction of 
the business of the Board and the management of its afiairs as they may 
deem expedient. 

Section 3. The said Board shall be provided with a suitable room in the 
State capitol, in which it shall hold its meetings, and it shall meet therein 
at least once in every three months ; the. time for such regular meetings to 

be fixed at the time of its organization ; the commissioners shall receive 
no compensation for their services but their actual traveling and other ne- 
cessary expenses, which shall be paid by the State Treasurer, upon the cer- 
tificate of the Auditor General. 

Section 4. The General Agent and Secretary of the Board of Public Char- 
ities shall hold his office for three years, unless sooner removed ; he shall be 
a member of the board ex officio^ and it shall be his duty, subject to the con- 
trol and direction of said board, to keep a correct record of its proceedings, 



3t8 Board of Public Charitieb. [No. 5, 

perform such clerical services as it may require, oversee and conduct its out- 
door business, visit all charitable and correctional institutions in the State 
at least once in each year, except as hereinafter provided, and as much 
ofbener as the Board may direct, examine the returns of the several cities, 
counties, wards, boroughs, and townships in relation to the support of 
paupers therein, and in relation to births, deaths, and marriages ; and he 
shall prepare a series of interrogatories, with the necessary accompan3ing 
blanks, to the several institutions of charity, reform, and correction in the 
State, and to those having charge of -the poor in the several counties thereof, 
or any sub-division of the same, with a view to illustrate, in his annual re- 
port, the causes and best treatment of pauperism, crime, disease, and in- 
sanity ; he shall also arrange and publish in his said report all desirable 
information concerning the industrial and material interests of the Com- 
monwealth, bearing upon these subjects, and shall have free access to all 
reports and returns now required by law to be made ; and he may also pro- 
pose such general investigations as he may think best for the approval of 
the Board. He shall be paid annually the sum of three thousand dollars 
and his actual traveling expenses. 

Section 5. The said commissioners shall have full power, either by 
themselves or the General Agent, at all times, to look into and examine 
the condition of all charitable, reformatory^, or correctional institutions 
within the State, financially and otherwise, to inquire and examine into 
their methods of instruction, the government and management of their in- 
mates, the official conduct of trustees, directors, and other officers and 
emploj'^s of the same, the condition of the buildings, grounds, and other 
property connected therewith, and into all other matters pertaining to their 
usefulness and good management ; and for these purposes they shall have 
free access to the grounds, buildings, and all books and papers relating to 
said institutions ; and all persons now or hereafter connected with the 
same are hereby directed and required to give such information and afford 
such facilities for inspection as the said commissioners may require ; and 
any neglect or refusal on the part of any officer or person connected with 
such institution to comply with any of the requirements of this act, shall 
subject the offender to a penalty of one hundred dollars, to be sued for and 
collected by^ the General Agent, in the name of the Board. 

Section 6. The said commissioners, by themselves, or their General 
Agent, are hereby authorized and required, at least once in each year, to 
visit all the charitable and correctional institutions of the State receiving 
State aid, and ascertain whether the moneys appropriated for their aid are 
or have been economically and judiciously expended ; whether the objects 
of the several institutions are accomplished ; whether the laws in relation 
to them are fully complied with ; whether all parts of the State are equally 
benefited by them, and the various other matters referred to in the fifth 
section of this act ; and in their annual report to the Legislature, to em- 
body the result of their investigations, together with such other informa- 
tion and recommendations as they may deem proper. 



Leg. Doc.] Board of Public Chabitibs. 379 

Sbction 7. The said Board shall also require their General Agent, at least 
once in every two years, to visit and examine into the condition of each of 
the city and county jails or prisons and alms or poor-houses, and shall pos- 
sess all the powers relative thereto, mentioned in the fifth section of this 
act, and shall report to the Legislature the result of the examination, in 
connection with the annual report authorized by this act. 

Section 8. It shall be the duty of all persons having charge or oversight 
over the poor in any city or county of this State, or in any sub-division 
thereof, and all persons having charge or control of county jails or prisons 
or work-houses, and of all other persons having charge or control over any 
other charitable, reformatory, or correctional institution, not now by law 
required to make an annual report of the condition of the same, to make 
report, annually, to the said General Agent, at such time and in such manner 
as he shall prescribe, of such facts and statements concerning the same as 
he may require ; and all charitable, reformatory, and correctional institu- 
tions now required by law to make annual reports, shall hereafter make and 
transmit the same to the said General Agent on or before the first day of 
January in each year ; and all such institutions now receiving or that may 
hereafter desire to receive State aid, shall annually give notice to the said 
General Agent, on or before the first day of November in each year, of the 
amount of any application for State aid they may propose to make, and of 
the several purposes to which such aid, if granted, is to be applied. 

Section 9. Whenever any such institution shall thus give notice of ask- 
ing for State aid, the General Agent shall inquire carefully into the ground 
of such request, the purpose or purposes for which the aid is asked, the 
amount which will be required, and into any matters connected therewith ; 
and in the annual report the result of such inquiries shall be given, to- 
gether with the opinions and conclusions of the board thereon. 

Section 10. The several members of said Board are each hereby author- 
ized to administer oaths in examining any person or persons, relative to 
any matters connected with the inquiries authorized by this act. ^ 

Section 1 1 . No member of said Board shall be interested directly or 
indirectly in any contract for building, repairing, or furnishing any insti- 
tution, which by this act they or any one of them are authorized to visit 
or inspect ; nor shall any trustee or other officer of any of the institutions 
embraced in this act, be eligible to the office of commissioner or Genera^ 
Agent hereby created. 

Section 12. The Board of Public Charities shall annually prepare and 
print, for the use Qf the Legislature, a full and complete report of all their 
doings during the year preceding, stating fully in detail all expenses in- 
curred, all officers and agents employed, with a report of the General Agent 
and Secretary, embracing all the respective proceedings and expenses dur- 
ing the year, and showing the actual condition of all charitable and cor- 
rectional institutions within* the State, with such suggestions as the Board 
may deem necessary and pertinent ; and the said General Agent and Secre- 



380 Board of Public Charities. [No. 5, 

tary is hereby authorized to prepare the necessary blanks and forward the 
same, in good season, to all institutions from whom information or returns 
may be needed, and to require a prompt return of the same, with the blanks 
properly filled. 

Section 13. The said Board may at its discretion, if the General Agent 
shall be unable by press of duties to conduct the correspondence of the 
Board, appoint a corresponding secretary, at a salary not exceeding one 
thousand dollars per annum, who shall conduct the correspondence of the 
Board, and perform such other clerical duties as may be required of him. 

JOHN CLARK, 
Speaker of the House of EepresentcUives. 
WILMER WORTHINGTON, 
Speaker of the Senate. 

Approved — The twenty-fourth day of April, Anno Domini one thousand 

eight hundred and sixty-nine. 

JOHN W. GEARY. 



Aei or the 5th April, 1879. 

A SUPPLEMENT to an act, entitled "An act to create a Board of Public Charities/' 
approved the twenty-fourth day of April, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-nine. 

Section 1 . Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met^ and it is 
hereby enacted by the authority of the same^ That the statements required 
to be made by the inspectors, sheriff, or other persons having charge of 
any penitentiary or jail in this Commonwealth, under the provisions of 
the first section of the act approved the twenty-seventh day of Febru- 
ary, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, entitled '' An act re- 
quiring the inspectors of prisons, sheriffs, prothonotaries, and clerks of 
criminal courts, and others, to make annual returns to the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth, and for other purposes," shall hereafter be made to the 
Board of Public Charities of this Commonwealth ; and that it shall be the 
duty of the inspectors, sheriffs, or other persons having charge of any peni- 
t6ntiary or jail within this Commonwealth, to keep the records of the 
penitentiary or jail under their charge, after forms to be prepared for and 
furnished them by the said Board of Public Charities, so that the infor- 
mation and statistics intended to be obtained by said first section of the 
act of twenty-seventh of February, one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
seven, and such other information and statistics as the siaid Board of Pub- 
lic Charities may deem necessary, may be presented with accuracy and 
uniformity. 

Section 2. That it shall be the duty of the said inspectors, sheriffs, or other 
persons to make return of the statements required by the first section of 
this act, to the said Board of Public Charities, within ten days after the 
first day of January, April, July, and October in each year, if required by 



Leg. Doc] Board of Public Charities. 381 

said board ; and upon neglect or refusal to make statements in the manner 
and at the times required by this act, such inspector, sheriff, or other 
person, so neglecting or refusing, shall forfeit and pay a fine of not less 
than one hundred dollars, to be sued for and collected by the General Agent, 
in the name of the Board of Public Charities, for the use of the Common- 
wealth. 

Section 3. That it shall be the duty of the overseers and directors of 
the poor, or other person having charge of the poor in the several coun- 
ties, cities, boroughs, and townships of this Commonwealth, and of all 
directors and managers of charitable and correctional institutions of the 
Commonwealth receiving State aid, to keep their records after the manner 
and in the form to be prescribed by the Board of Public Charities, and to 
make returns thereof, to said board at such time as they may direct, and in 
default thereof, the person or persons so offending shall forfeit and paj*^ 
a fine of not less than one hundred dollars, to be sued for and collected by 
the General Agent, in the name of the Board of Public Charities, for the 
use of the Commonwealth. 

Section 4. That before any county prison or county alms-house shall be 
erected within this Commonwealth, the plan of construction of such prison or 
alms-house, drawn sufficiently in detail for clear comprehension thereof, shall 
be submitted by the commissioners of the county in which the same is to 
be built, to the Board of Public Charities, and shall be inspected and ap- 
proved by said board, and so certified by the secretary of said Board upon 
the plan, a copy of which shall be furnished by the commissioners at the 
time of their submitting the original as aforesaid, and shall be signed by 
the secretary of said Board, and shall be filed and remain in the oflfice of 
the Secretary of the Commonwealth, and that so much of the first section 
of the act of April eight, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, as re- 
quires the report of plans of county prisons to be made to and approved 
by the Secretary of the Commonwealth, be and the same is hereby re- 
pealed. 

Section 5. That the thirteenth section of the act to which this is a sup- 
plement, be and the same is hereby repealed ; and in lieu of the corre- 
sponding secretary thereby authorized to be appointed, the said Board of 
Public Charities may engage and employ such clerical assistance as they 
may require, the expense thereof not to exceed fifteen hundred dollars per 

annum. 

WILLIAM ELLIOTT, 

Speaker of the House of Representatives, 

JAMES S. RUTAN, 
Speaker of the Senate, 

Approved — The fifth day of April, Anno Domini one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy-two. 

JNO. W. GEARY. 



382 Board of Public CHARiTiEa [No. 5, 

Act or 9Ui of April, 187S. 

A SUPPLEMENT to an act to oreate a Board of Pablio Charities, approved the twen- 
ty-fourth day of April, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine. 

Section 1. Be it enacted^ dc, That any of the commissioners appointed 
under the provisions of an act entitled "An act to create a Board of Pub- 
lic Charities," approved the twenty-fourth day of April, Anno Domini one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, who has heretefore or hereafter 
shall refuse or neglect, for the space of six months, to discharge the duties 
of his ollice, and such failure has been duly certified by the president^or 
secretary of the Board to the Governor, he shall be deemed to have re- 
signed, and the Governor, by and with the advice and consent of the Sen- 
ate, shall appoint a commissioner for the unexpired term of the commis- 
sioner so removed. 

Section 2. That the Governor shall, by and with the advice and consent 
of the Senate, as soon as practicable after the passage of this act, appoint 
two additional commissioners, who, together with the five heretofore ap- 
pointed, and the General Agent and Secretary, shall constitute the Board 
of Public Charities ; one of those, thus appointed, to hold oflSce for the term 
of four years from the first day of December, Anno Domini one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy-two, and the other for the term of five years from 
the said first day of December, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred 
and seventy-two : Provided, That the president and any two members of 
the said Board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Approved— The 9th day of April, A. D. 1873. 

J. F HARTRANFT. 



Aet or 7th May, 1874. 

A SUPPLEMENT to the act to create a Board of Public Charities, approved the twen- 
ty-fourth day of April, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, 
authorizing and empowering said Board to appoint visitors, and to transfer certain 
insane persons from county institutions to State hospitals. 

Section 1. Be it enacted^ <0c.. That the said Board shall have power, by 
a resolution, to be entered on its minutes, subject to such terms and regu- 
lations as it may prescribe, to designate three or more persons in any 
county to act, without compensation, as visitors in said county of the sev- 
eral poor-houses and other institutions therein subject to the visitation of 
the Board, in aid of and as representatives of such Board ; and all public 
ofiScers and others in charge of such institutions shall admit to said insti- 
tutions all such persons so designated upon the production of a copy of 
such resolution, certified by the president or secretary of said Board, to 
visit, examine, and inspect the grounds and buildings of every such insti- 
tution and every part thereof, and all its hospital and other arrangements, 
and to have free access to all its inmates. Any public ofi9cer, superintend- 



Leq. Dog.] Board of Pubuc CHARiTiEa 888 

ent, or person in charge of any such institution, who shall refuse to admit 
any person so designated, or shall refuse to give said visitors all requisite 
fii.cilities for the examination and inspection herein provided for, shall be 
subject to a penalty of two hundred and fifty dollars for each such refusal, 
which penalty may be sued and recovered in the name of the people of the 
State, by the district attorney of the county in which such institution is 
situated, and the sum so recovered shall be paid into the treasury of the 
State. 

Section 2. Whenever the Board of Public Charities shall be satisfied or 
have good reason to believe that any insane person in any county or dis- 
trict alms-house, or in the care of any person under the direction of the 
poor directors of any district, cannot there receive proper care and treat- 
ment, or is properly curable, said Board, or their representatives i n the 
proper county, shall make application to the president judge of the proper 
county, in term time, or at chambers, setting forth that such insane per- 
son cannot receive proper care and treatment, or is probably curable ; and 
said judge shall, if the statements alleged are sustained by afiSdavit of 
petitionee, make decree that the officers in charge of such persons trans- 
fer him or her to one of the hospitals for the insane, receiving aid from 
the State, where such person shall be received and maintained in the man- 
ner provided by law, at the expense of the district from which such per- 
son is transferred, such expenses to be recovered by such district from 
such persons as may be liable by existing laws for the support of such in- 
sane person. 

Approved— The 1th day of May, A. D. 1874. 

J. F. HARTRANFT. 



OPIIVIO:V8 OV TUB ATTORNEY GENERAL 

On quealion of the powers of the Board to require ^^ returns*^ from various 
officials in charge of charitable^ reformatory^ and correctional institu- 
tions^ and other matters relating to the work of the Board. 

Commonwealth of "Pennsylvania, 

Office op Attorney General, 

Harrisburg, January S^ 1878, 
Honorable Wilmer Worthington, 

General Agent Board of Public Charities : 

Dear Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your com- 
munication, inclosing the following papers : 

1. Copy of resolutions adopted by the Board of Public Charities, De- 
cember 12, 1872, and questions to the Attorney General for his opinion. 

2. Letters from Thomas J. Davis, Esquire, solicitor of the board of in- 
spectors of Lancaster county, sherifiTs, prothonotaries, and keepers of 
prisons in the several counties. 



384 Board op Public Charities. [No. 5, 

i 

3. Copies of letters sent by the Board of Public Charities to the differ- 
ent county officers throughout the Commonwealth. 

4. Act of Assembly to create a Board of Public Charities, and supple- 
ment thereto. 

You request my opinion upon the following questions : 

1. "Whether the inspectors, sheriffs, or other persons having charge of 
any penitentiary or jail in this Commonwealth, are required to keep their 
records, and make returns to said Board of Public Charities ? 

2. " In case the officers having charge of these institutions refuse to keep 
these records, what steps should be taken by the Board of Public Charities? 

3. " Is the officer obliged to purchase his books wherein to keep these 
records, or should the same be supplied by the county commissioners? 

4. "Are the overseers and directors of the poor, and other persons hav- 
ing charge of the poor in the several cities, counties, boroughs, and town- 
ships of this Commonwealth, obliged to keep records and make returns to 
the Board of Public Charities ? 

6. "Whether the act of April 5, 18T2, is not constitutional in requiring 
the prothonotaries to make their returns to the Board of Public Charities, 
instead of to the Secretarv of the Commonwealth ? 

6. " Whether the objection made by certain officers of county prisons 
to make returns to the Board of Public Charities, on the ground that they 
were organized under a special act of Assembl}^ and therefore are not 
amenable to the provisions of the law creating the Board of Public Chari- 
ties, and the supplement thereto, is valid ? " 

In repl}^ I would state that I have made a careful examination of the 
act of Assembly, approved the 24th day of April, 1869, entitled "An act 
to create a Board of Public Charities," (P. L. 1869, p. 90,) and the supple- 
ment thereto, approved the 5th day of April, 1872, entitled "A supple- 
ment to an act, entitled *An act to create a Board of Public Charities,' 
approved," Ac, (P. L. 1872, p. 42.) Section eight of act approved 24th of 
April, 1869, (P. L. 1869, p. 92,) provides: "It shall be the duty of all 
persons having charge or oversight over the poor in any city or county of 
this State, or any sub-division thereof, and all persons having charge or 
control of county jails, or prisons, or work-houses, and of all other per- 
sons having charge or control over any other charitable, reformatory, or 
correctional institution not now by law required to make an annual report 
of the condition of the same, to make report annually to the said General 
Agent, at such time and in such manner as he shall prescribe, of such facts 
and statements concerning the same as he may require ; and all charitable, 
reformatory, and correctional institutions now required by law to make an- 
nual reports, shall hereafter make and transmit the same to the said Gen- 
eral Agent, on or before the first day of January in each year." 

Section one of the supplement, approved April 5, 1872, (P. L. 1872, p. 42,) 
provides : " That the statements required to be made by the inspectors, 
sheiiffs, or other persons having charge of any penitentiary or jail within 



Leg. Doc] Boabd op Public Charities. 885 

this Commonwealth, under the provisions of the iSrst section of the act, ap- 
proved the twenty-seventh day of February, one thousand eight hundred 
and forty-seven, entitled * An act requiring the inspectors of prisons, sheriffs, 
prothonotaries, and clerks of criminal courts, and others to make annual 
returns to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, and for other purposes,' 
shall hereafter be made to the Board of Public Charities of this Common- 
wealth ; and that it shall be the duty of the inspectors, sheriffs, or other 
persons having charge of any penitentiary or jail within this Commonwealth, 
to keep the records of the penitentiary or Jail under their charge, after 

■ 

forms to be prepared for, and furnished them by the said Board of Public 
Charities, so that the information and statistics intended to be obtained by 
the said first section of the act of twenty-seventh day of February, one 
thousand eight hundred and forty seven, and such other information and 
statistics as the said Board of Charities may deem necessary, may be pre- 
sented with accuracy and uniformity." 

Section two provides : " That it shall be the duty of said inspectors, 
sheriffs, or other persons, to make return of the statements required by 
the first section of this act to the said Board of Public Charities within 
ten days after the first day of January, April, July, and October in each 
year, if required by said board ; and uppn neglect or refusal to make 
statements in the manner, and at the time required by this act, such in- 
spector, sheriff, or other person so neglecting or refusing, shall forfeit and 
pay a fine of not less than one hundred dollars, to be sued for and collected 
by the General Agent in the name of the Board of Public Charities, for 
the use of the Commonwealth." 

Section three provides : " That it shall be the duty of the overseers and 
directors of the poor, or other persons having charge of the poor in the 
several counties, cities, boroughs, and townships of this Commonwealth, 
and of all directors and managers of charitable and correctional institu- 
tions of this Commonwealth receiving State aid, to keep their records 
after the manner and in the form to be prescribed by the Board of Public 
Charities, and to make return thereof to said board, at such time as they 
may direct ; and in default thereof, the person or persons so offending 
shall forfeit and pay a fine of not less than one hundred dollars, to be sued 
for and collected by the General Agent in the name of the Board of Pub- 
lic Charities, for the use of the Commonwealth." 

In the light of this legislation, I have arrived at the following conclusions : 

In answer to the first question, I am of the opinion that the oflacers 

mentioned therein are required by the act of Assembly to keep their records 

and make returns to the Board of Public Charities. 

In answer to the second question, I reply that if these officers refuse to 
keep their records, a writ of mandamus should be issued, compelling them 
to do so, and the punishment provided by law should be infiicted. 

In answer to the third question, I am of opinion that the officers are not 
26— B. P. Char. 



386 Board of Public CHABrnx& [No. 5, 

required to purchase their own books, but that the county commissionen 
should purchase them at the expense of the several counties. 

In answer to the fourth question,! would state that section three, of the 
supplement approved 5th April, 1872, requires them to keep their records 
after the manner and in the form prescribed by the Board of Public Char- 
ities, and in de&ult of doing so, a mandamus would lie. 

In answer to the fifth question, I am clearly of the opinion that the act 
of 5th April, 1872, is constitutional, and that the several prothonotaries in 
the several counties are required by the first section thereof to make their 
returns of the records, the same as other officers, to the Board of Public 
Charities, instead of to the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

In answer to the sixth question, I am of the opinion that all officers men- 
tioned in the act are amenable to the provisions of the law creating the 
Board of Public Charities, and the supplement thereto. 

I would advise that the Board of Public Charities notify all delinquents, 
and on neglect or refusal to keep the records and make returns to the 
Board, to proceed against them at once. 

The Board of Public Charities have, in my opinion, performed their duty 
in strict accordance with the statutes referred to, and have not miscon- 
strued the law. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. CARROLL BREWSTER, 

Attorney General. 



Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 
Office of Attorney General, 
Harrisburo, January 31^ 1873, 

Honorable George L. Harrison, 

President of the Board of Public Charities : 

Dear Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your com- 
munication, inclosing opinion of my predecessor in office, Honorable F. 
Carroll Brewster, dated January 3, 1873, in response to letter of the Gen- 
eral Agent of your Board, bearing date December 14, 1872, including reso- 
lutions of your Board, adopted December 12, 1872. 

In reply, I concur in the opinion of my honorable predecessor, with this 
qualification — ^that the county commissioners would only be liable to fur- 
nish or purchase the necessary books where the institution properly belongs 
to, or is under the control of the county. In the case of overseers and di- 
rectors of the poor, or other persons having charge of the poor of any 
cities, boroughs, and townships, that the respective cities, boroughs, or 
townships should supply the same, or the overseers, directors, or persons 
so in charge, at the expense of such city, borough, and township ; and the 
same rule applies to directors and managers of charitable and correctional 
institutions, unless owned or controlled by a county. 



Leq. Doc.] Board of Ptjblic Chabitieb. 38f 

Kegretting that absence will prevent my meeting you on Monday next, 
and trusting I may soon have that pleasure, 
I have the honor to l)e, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAML. E. DIMMICK, 
Attorney Oeneral. 



Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Boabd of Public Chabities, 

Office of Executive Committee, 
Philadelphia, March £^ 1876. 

Honorable Samuel E. Dimmick, Attorney General^ dec. : 

Deab Sib : I beg respectfully to ask your opinion upon the construction 
of the act of May 26, 1874, entitled " An act to provide for the appoint- 
ment of inspectors, &c.," (see P. L., page 228,) viz : As to whether the in^ 
spectors of the State Penitentiaries are authorized by said act to ignore 
this Board in making their annual reports ? I desire to say, that our con- 
cern in this matter is not based upon any apprehension of weakened in- 
fluence or authority, but solely on the conviction that the interests of the 
State and of the several classes of institutions would suffer by any depart- 
ure from the provisions of the law in this behalf, which established this 
Board. 

This act of April 24, 1869, (see P. L., page 90,) provides, by section 
eight, that all charitable, reformatory, and correctional institutions, now 
required by law to make annual reports, shall hereafter make and transmit 
the same to the General Agent of this Board. The Western Penitentiary 
has always obeyed this law, and its report recently issued, is made in com- 
pliance with its directions, the inspectors not interpreting the act of 1874 
to repeal the general law of 1869. All State institutions follow the same 
course. 

The president, however of the inspectors of the Eastern Penitentiary, 
addresses his present report to the Legislature alone, although previous re- 
ports from that institution have been addressed to the Legislature and tg 
this Board. The act of May 25, 1874, directs that the reports of the peni- 
tentiaries shall be made, as heretofore^ to the Legislature. Does not this 
mean through the Board of Public Charities; or, has the Legislature 
singled out two of the State institutions, to ignore the organ of communi- 
cation which it has established between itself and the State institutions, 
and receive the reports directly from these ? We trust that such an inter- 
pretation of the law is inadmissable, and that the system now in vogue, 
will not be disturbed by the exceptional view taken by a single institution. 

Very truly and respectfully, 

GEORGE L. HARRISON, 

President. 



888 Board of Public Ghabitdss. [No. 5, 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 
Office of Attorney General, 
Harrisburq, March 8, 1876. 

Samuel E. Dimmick, 

Attorney General. 
Lyman J). Gilrert, 

Deputy Attorney General. 
To Honorable George L. Harrison, 

President of the Board of Public Charities : 

Dear Sir : In reply to the question submitted by your letter of the 2d 
instant, whether the inspectors of the State Penitentiaries are authorized by 
the act of Maj^ 26, 1874, to ignore the Board of Public Charities in making 
their annual reports — and make the same directly to the Legislature ? 

Section eight, article one, of the act of April 23, 1829, entitled " A fur- 
ther supplement to an act to reform the penal laws of this Commonwealth," 
relating to inspectors and their duties, provides, inter alia, " they shall, on 
or before the 1st da}^ of January in every year, make a report in writing to 
the Legislature of the state of the penitentiaries." 

The act of February 23, 1847, makes it the duty of the inspectors or 
persons in charge of penitentiaries or jails to make a full statement, on or 
before the 1 st day of February of each year, in detail of the condition of 
such penitentiary or jail, as prescribed by said act, to the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth. 

And section five of said act provides, " that it shall be the duty of the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth, to cause abstracts to be made from all 
said reports, and to lay such abstracts before each branch of the Legisla- 
ture, on or before the 1st day of March, in each and every year. 

The act of April 24, 1869, creating the Board of Public Charities, (sec- 
tion eight,) makes it the duty of all persons having charge, inter alia, of 
reformatory or correctional institutions, to make annual reports to the 
General Agent of the Board of Public Charities in such manner as he shall 
prescribe, and that all such institutions, " now required by law to make an- 
nual reports, shall hereafter make and transmit the same to the said Gen- 
eral Agent on or before the 1st day of January in each year;" and section 
eight provides that the Board " shall annually prepare and print for the 
use of the Legislature, a full and complete report of all their doings * * 
and showing the actual condition of all charitable and correctional insti- 
tutions within the State, with such suggestions as the Board may deem 
necessary and pertinent, &c." 

By the act of April 5, 1872, the annual statements required by the act 
of February 27, 1847, to be made to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, is 
expressly directed thereafter to be made to the Board of Public Charities. 

Section seven of the act of April 23, 1829, provides for the appointment 
of inspectors by the judges of the Supreme Court. 

Article five, section twenty-one, of the new Constitution provides, inter 



Leg, Doc.] Board op Public Charities. 389 

alia^ " No duties shall be imposed by law upon the Supreme Court or any 
of the judges thereof, except such as are judicial, nor shall any judge 
thereof exercise any power of appointment, except as herein provided." I 
refer to the new Constitution, that the object as well as necessity of the 
act of May 25, 1874, may be more clearly manifest. 

The first point for consideration is : Does the act of February 27, 1847, 
supersede the provisions cited of the act of April 23, 1829, providing for 
the report of the inspectors to be made to the Legislature — operate as an 
implied repeal thereof. 

The act of 1847 contains a preamble, reciting : Whereas, It is desirable 
to obtain accurate information relative to the condition and expenses of 
the penitentiaries and prisons of this Commonwealth, and the costs of sup-> 
porting the criminal courts thereof" In its provisions it details, very 
fully, what the statements shall set forth, and provides that the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth, to whom it is to be transmitted, shall lay an 
abstract thereof before the Legislature. 

The act of 1829 simply required a report " of the state of the peniten- 
tiaries ;" the act of 1847, " a full statement in detail, of the condition of 
such penitentiary or jail during the year ending the 3 1st day of the pre- 
vious December," specifying, as before remarked, very fully the details. 

I am of the opinion the act of 1847 was intended to supersede the pro- 
visions of the act of 1820, as to the report provided thereby to be made, 
and its effect and operation is to repeal the same. 

If such be the operation of the act of 1847, then, at the date of the pas- 
sage of the act May 25, 1874, there was no law in force providing for the 
inspectors to report to the Legislature, otherwise than through the Board 
of Public Charities. 

That the views submitted of the act of May 25, 1874, may be more read- 
ily comprehended, I copy it, viz : " An act to provide for the appointment 
of inspectors of the State penitentiaries, as required by the twenty-first 
section of article five of the Constitution of this Commonwealth. Section 
1. Be it enacted^ dbc,^ That the Governor of this Commonwealth shall have 
and exercise all the power and authority to appoint inspectors of the State 
penitentiaries possessed and exercised by the judges of the Supreme Court, 
and said inspectors shall make report annually to the Legislature, as here- 
tofore required by law." 

It will be observed, the subject expressed in its title is the appointment 
of inspectors ; that after providing therefore, the act has this Airther pro- 
vision, " and said inspectors shall make report annually to the Legislature, 
as heretofore required by law." Whilst, perhaps, the provision quoted is 
not in conflict with section three, article three of the Constitution, I think it is 
in conflict with section six of said article, which provides that *' no law shall 
be revived, amended, or the provisions thereof extended or conferred by 
reference to its title only, but so much thereof as is revived, amended, ex- 
tended, or conferred, shall be reenacted and published at length." 



S90 Board of Public Chariti£& [No. 5, 

If the provisioDs of the act of 1829, providing for such report, were su- 
perseded by the act of 1847, or there was no law in force at the date of the 
enactment of the act of 1874, authorizing the inspectors to report directly 
to the Legislature, the act of 1874 conferred no such authority. Any 
prior laws providing therefor, and which were repealed or superseded by 
subsequent laws, could not ^^ be revived, amended, or the provisions thereof 
extended or conferred,'' in the manner attempted in the act of 1874. The 
constitutional provision cited prohibits it. 

If the provision in the act of 1874 is operative, it does not repeal the 
acts of 1847 and 1872 referred to. Its only effect would be to require a 
report to the Legislature, in addition to those required to be made to the 
Board of Public Charities. 

I am clear in the opinion that the inspectors of State penitentiaries are 
required by law to report to the Board of Public Charities ; and the pro- 
vision in the act of 1874, providijig for their making a rei>ort to the Leg- 
islature, conflicts with the Constitution, and is, therefore, void. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

SAMUEL E. DIMMICK, 
Attorney OenercU. 



Office of Attorney General, 
Harrisburg, Deceniber 20^ 1878. 

Dear Sir: Yours of the 14th instant is received. The board of mana- 
gers of the House of Refuge of Philadelphia may indenture juvenile de- 
linquents to citizens of other States, as well as to citizens of this State- 
-The managers of the Reform School of Allegheny county may indenture 
white juvenile delinquents committed to their custody to citizens residing 
in other States. The Northern Home for Friendless Children in Philadel- 
phia has the same right to indenture. In all these cases it must be with 
the consent of the inmates. 

The different institutions know their own chartered privileges, and it 
should be understood that, unless the right of indenturing outside of the 
State has been granted by special legislation, it does not exist, and the 
practice should, in all such cases be discontinued. 

Your truly, 

GEORGE LEAR. 
Hon. Francis Wells, Chairman Executive Committee^ Board of Public 

Charities, 



Lkq. Doc.] Boabd of Public CHABinsa 391 



RULES AND BY-LAWS. 



The following rules and by-laws for the government of this Board were 
adopted at a meeting held June 5, 1879 : 

I. Stated meetings of the Board shall be held at Harrisburg, on the first 
Tuesday of March, June, September, and December. 

II. The office of the General Agent shall be at the office of the Board, 
in the capitol, at Harrisburg, and shall be open at all times for the trans- 
action of the business of the commission. 

III. Special meetings may be called by the president, or by the Secre- 
tary, when requested in writing, by two commissioners, provided seven days' 
notice of such meeting shall be given to the members of the commission. 

lY. Two members shall constitute a quorum for visiting institutions. 
For the transaction of ordinary business, three members shall constitute 
a quorum. No official communication shall be addressed to the Governor 
or General Assembly, without the sanction of the Board, at least four com- 
missioners being present. 

y . At stated meetings the order of business shall be as follows : 

1st. Roll call. 

2d. Minutes of last meeting read and acted upon. 

3d. Reports from General Agent. 

4th. Reports from special committees. 

5th. Unfinished business. 

6th. New business. 

7th. Minutes of the meeting read and amended, if necessary. 

VI. At special meetings, the business for which they are called shall be 
first acted upon. 

VII. Motions or resolutions shall be reduced to writing, when requested 
by one of the commissioners. 

VIII. A vote may be re-considered at the same or next meeting, but not 
afterward, unless by unanimous consent. 

IX. Each member of the Board shall send to the General Agent a quar- 
terly report of his traveling or other necessary expenses, and the General 
Agent shall make, in writing, and submit to the president, a quarterly re- 
port of his expenses, and the president shall submit the same to the Board 
at their next meeting. 

X. The president shall appoint the following standing committees, viz : 
An executive committee of three commissioners for the eastern district, 

and also an executive committee of three members for the western district 
of the State. 



392 BoABD OF Public Chabiti£& [No. 5, 

A committee of three commissioners to assist in preparing the annual 
report. 

XI. These rules may be altered by a majority at a stated meeting of the 
Board, provided that one month's notice of the proposed alteration, shall 
be first given to each commissioner. 

XII. All communications or statements reflecting in any manner upon 
the character or administration of persons in charge of, or employed in any 
institution which, under the law, is subject to the supervision of the Board 
of Charities, must be made in writing, and attested by the signature of one 
or more respectable citizens. 

XIII. The general agent and secretary shall, on the first day of each 
month, hand to the president of the Board, a list of the visits made by him 
during the preceding month, and shall at each quarterly meeting of the 
commissioners, report in writing fViU details of his visits and other trans- 
actions in the work of the Board during the preceding quarter. 

The BxpevMs of the Board for the Year. 

Salary of the general agent and secretary, $2,000 00 

For the employment of necessary clerical aid, 2,600 00 

For actual traveling, and other necessary expenses of the com- 
missioners and general agent, 500 00 

For messenger, fuel, and cleaning oflflce, 200 00 

For postage, telegrams, express charges, and incidental expenses, 400 00 

Total, |5j700 00 



Lbq: Doc] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



393 



FITf A^CIAL STATEMENTS. 



BA8TBBN 8TATB PB^'ITBNTIARY. 

The Legislature, at its last session, appropriated the sum of $40,925 to 
this institution for 1879, as follows, viz : Salaries of officers, $38,925 ; re- 
pairs, $1 ,500 ; and books and stationery for the library, $500. 

R«celpl« and Bxpendlturefl. 

The receipts for the year were, $312,054 30; expenditures for same 
period, $30 j, 119 95; leaving a balance in favor of the institution of 
$6,934 35. 

Receipts, 



From State Treasurer, for salaries, 

State Treasurer, for repairs, 

State Treasurer, for library, .... 
State Treasurer, for discharged convicts, 
State Treasurer, for extension of cells, 

Sundrv counties, 

United States, ... 

Convict deposits, 

Cane-work, sales of goods, 

Cordwaining, 

Women's shoes, 

Ciffar-making, 

^Weaving, , 

Smith-work, , 

Stocking- weaving, 

Tailoring. , 

Wool-picking, , 

Wood-work, , 

Ltabor of convicts, 

Gain in manufacturing departments, . . 

Total, 




Expenditures, 



For extension of cells, 

Salaries, 

Repairs, 

Libraryr, 

Provisions, 

Clothing, 

Fuel,- 

Light, 

Shoes for convicts, .... 
Medical department, . . . 

Jobbing, 

Horse expenses, 

House and cell furniture, . 
Incidental expenses, . . . 
Manufacturing implements, 
Wages, 



$29,568 

40,387 

1,387 

220 

44,296 

12,713 

7,188 

6,556 

2,561 

2,824 

6,500 

923 

1,116 

5,164 

19 

6,486 



44 
24 
23 
67 
05 
11 
90 
87 
25 
36 
22 
71 
94 
46 
68 
47 



394 



BoABD OF Public Charitie& 



[No. 5, 



Szpendiiures — Ck>ntinaed. 



For Discharged oonviots, 

Cane-work material, 

C/ordwaining material, .... 
Women's shoes material, . . . 

Ci^r-making, 

"Weaving, 

Smith-work, 

Stocking-weaving, 

Tailoring, 

Wool-picking, 

Wood-work, 

Tinsmithing 

Over-work, (prisoner's orders,) 

Total expenditure, 

Balance, 



$2,670 


00 


5,002 


45 


63,455 


92 


13,290 


18 


28,951 


90 


11,785 


22 


206 


03 


2,685 


m 


687 


82 


594 


89 


4,335 


31 


189 


96 


8,399 


59 


$305,119 


95 


6,934 


35 



$312,054 



SO 



WESTERN STATE PEi\ITBNTIARY. 

The Legislature at its last session appropriated the sum of $256,500 to 
this institution for 18*79, as follows, viz : Salaries of officers, $35,000 ; books 
and stationery for prisoners, $500 ; for the payment of bonds, and interest 
on the same, $21,000 ; and for buildings, $200,000. The Legislature at its 
previous session granted $100,000 for buildings. 

Receipts and Bzpenditurea, 

The receipts for the year were $125,997 39; expenditures for same 
period, $113,631 47 ; leaving a balance in favor of the institution of $12,- 
365 92. 

Beceipts. 



From State Treasurer, for salaries, 

State Treasurer, for library, , 

State Treasurer, for disoharged oonviots. 

Convict labor, witli protits, 

Contract labor, 

United States, 

Steam power and rent, 

Sales of gas, tar, <to., 

Sundry counties, 

Total, 



143,750 

500 

8,030 

4,324 

55,462 

8,751 

2,240 

2,006 

10,982 



$125,997 



00 
00 
00 
82 
45 
75 
00 
48 
44 



In addition to the above, warrants from the State for $100,000 were re- 
ceived for the new buildings ; and also warrants for $21,000, with which to 
pay the House of Refuge bonds. 



Leg. Doc] 



BoABD OF Public Chabitiss. 



395 



Expenditures. 



For Salaries, 

Provision, 

Clothing and shoes, . . 
Beds and bedding, . . . 

Fuel 

Medical department, . . 

■ Furniture, 

Tools and utensils, . . . 

Water rent, 

Repairs, 

Wages, 

Printing, insurance, <fcc.. 

Profit and loss, 

Ckx)king kettles, <&o., . . 

Total expenditures, 
Balance, 



185,000 

40,412 

9,872 

1,504 

6,185 

1,187 

187 

127 

1,140 

1,816 

12,172 

8,619 

47 

456 




00 
81 
86 
94 
72 
49 
50 
87 
00 
17 
83 
74 
65 
39 

47 
92 

89 



In addition to the above, there was expended for alterations 
of cells and buildings, for temporary prison, addition to 
shops, Ac, $46,907 61 

Lots which had to be purchased to secure vacation, including 
attorneys' fees and court charges, 28,698 31 

Excavation and stone work on north wing, on account, . . 36,958 00 

Interest, architect's services and expenses,. . 4, til 07 

Total, $117,304 89 



8TATB LUNATIC HOSPITAL, HARRI8BURO. 

The Legislature, at its last session, appropriated the sum of $31,000 to 
this institution for 1879, as follows, namely : Maintenance, $25,000, repairs 
and improvements, $6,000. 

Keeeipti and BxpendUares. 

The receipts for the year were $117,641 83, including a balance from 
former year of $4,133 59 ; expenditures for same period, $94,911 81, leaving 
a balance in favor of the institution of $22,780 02. 

Beceipts. 



Cash on hand, October 1, 1878, 

Appropriation, 

Indigent patients, 

Private patients, 

Other sources, 



Receipts, 
T6tal, 



940,000 

37,208 

35,149 

1,150 



00 
61 
63 
10 



$4,183 



118,508 
1117,641 



59 



24 
83 



396 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



Expenditures. 



Salaries, wages, and labor, 
Provisions and supplies, . 

Fuel and light, 

Clothing, (fee, 

Furniture, bedding, <feo., . 

Medicine, 

Ordinary repairs, 

Traveling expenses, . . . 
Other expenses, 



Current expenditures, . . . . 

Land, 

Buildings and improvements, 



Total expenditure, 

Cash on hand, September 30, 1879, 



126,214 

80,850 

6,324 

4,519 

5,404 

953 

1,267 

540 

5,597 



181,672 
4,000 
9,239 



51 
39 
44 
47 
06 
15 
96 
62 
89 



49 
00 
82 



194,911 
22,730 



1117,641 



81 
92 

88 



WB8TBRN PBN!V8YLVAN1A HOSPITAL, DIXMOiliT. 

The Legislature, at its last session, did not make any appropriation to this 
institution for 1879. 



Receipts and Bxpendltores. 

The receipts for the year were $123,409 15, including a balance from 
former year of $15,966 67 ; expenditures for same period, $127,381 07. 

Beceipts. 



Gash on hand, October 1, 1878, 

Indigent patients, 

Private patients, 



Receipts, 
Total, 



181,399 
26,018 



07 
41 



$15,966 



107,442 



$128, 409 



67 

48 
15 



Expenditures. 



Salaries, wages, and labor. 
Provisions and supplies, . 
Fuel and light, ...... 

Clothing, &o., ...'... 
Furniture, bedding, <fec., . 

Medicine, 

Ordinary repairs, ..... 
Traveling expenses, . . . 
Other expenses, 



Current expenditure, 

Buildings and improvements, 
*Misoeiraneous expenses, . . 



Total expenditures, 



180,938 


22 




42,818 


55 




9,019 


97 




5,440 


24 




6,654 


98 




1,952 


34 




3,405 


63 




1,468 


45 




6,097 


09 
47 




1107,790 


5,362 


70 




14,227 


90 


1127,381 









07 



* MiBcellaneoas expenses consisted of Uborers wages for grading and ezoayatlng the grounds. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



397 



8TATB HOSPITAL, DANVILLE. 

The Legislature, at its last session, appropriated the sum of $30,450 to 
this institution for 1879, as follows, viz : Maintenance, $20,000 ; furnishing 
new wards, $9,450 ; insurance, $1,000. 

Receipt* and Bzpenditares. 

The receipts for the year were $75,034 68, including a balance from 
former year of $656 94 ; expenditures for same period, $74,552 33 ; leav- J 
ing a balance in favor of the institution of $482 35. " 



Beceipts. 



Cash on hand, October 1, 1878, 

Appropriation, 

Incfigent patients, 

Private patients, ....... 

Farm produoe, 



Receipts, 
Total, 



111,000 

63,681 

7,783 

1,962 



00 
67 
23 
94 



$666 



74,877 



176,034 



94 



74 
68 



Expenditures, 



Salaries, wages, and labor. 
Provisions and supplies, . 

Fuel and light, 

Clothing, <&c., 

Furniture, bedding, (fee., . 

Medicine, 

Ordinary repairs, 

Traveling expenses, . . . 
Other expenses, 



Current expenditure, 

Cash on hsoid, September 30, 1879, 



922,187 


60 




20,830 


66 




8,626 


47 




4,246 


14 




3,353 


61 




1,327 


.02 




908 


00 




1,082 


68 




12,490 


36 


174,662 

482 










1 


f76,034 



33 
36 

68 



htatb hospital at norri8town. 

State Hospital for the Insane, 
South-Eastern District op Pennsylvania, 
Office of Commission, Room 3, 1224 Chestnut St., 

Philadelphia, January 15, 1880. 
Hon. Mahlon H. Dickinson, 

President Board of Public Charities : 

Dear Sib : As required per act of May 5, 1876, section five, the hospital 
commission beg leave to report to the Board of Public Chanties the amount 
of money expended to date. 



898 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Expenditures. 



Purchase money of site, (92,322 anpaid,) 

Buildings and materials on hand, 

Sewerage, drain pipe, <fco., inoluding laying, 

Professional senrioes of architeots, engineers, <feo., 

Premium for oompetitive plan, and displaying same, 

Advertising for plans and proposals, 

Printing speoiiications, <fco., 

Survey of grounds, 

Legal expenses, making title, <feo., 

Traveling expenses of commission, 

Postage, telegrams, express charg^ Ao., 

Interest and Insurance, 

Incidental expenses of commission, rent of room, fuel, secretary's ser- 
vices, books, Ac., 

Plumbing, heating, <tc., 

Oas pipes, and la^nng, 

Coal for boilers, 

Total cash payments to date, 



$55,857 

369,740 

8,202 

15,500 

1,718 

887 

210 

269 

314 

918 

119 

803 

2,861 

15,976 

1,500 

232 



1475,062 



56 
27 
00 
42 
53 
50 
80 
21 
48 
10 
54 

49 
28 
00 
13 

25 



The commiBsion in addition to the above cash payments, have issued 

their obligations for $50,988 84, to ensure the energetic prosecution of 

the work ; the said obligations to be paid from the first moneys received 

from drafts upon the State treasury. 

H. M. Howe, 

Treasurer, 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Wm. H. Miller, 

Chairman of Building Gommittee. 

HOUSE OF REFUGE, PHILADELPHIA. 

The Legislature, at its last session, appropriated the sum of $42,500 for 
the support of the institution during 1879. 

Receipt! Avd Expendltnrfw. 

The receipts for the year were $124,982 84, including a balance from former 
year of $4,672 55 ; expenditures for the same period, $124,000 14, leaving 
a balance in favor of the institution of $982 70. 

Receipts, 



Cash on hand, October 1, 1878, 

State appropriation, one quarter, 

Citv of Philadelphia, 

Labor of inmates, 

Old material, membership, gas consumed by contractors, 

<tG., 

Temporary loans for maintenance, 



Total receipts. 
Total, . . . 



$8,750 
52,100 
12,948 

516 
46,000 



00 
00 
64 

65 
00 



$4,672 



120,310 



$124,982 



55 



29 

84 



Leg. Doc.1 



BoABD or Public Chabitibs. 



399 



Expendiiures. 



Salaries, wages, and labor, 

Provision and supplies, 

Clothing, inoluding shoes, 

Fuel and lights, 

Medicine and medioal supplies, . . . 
Furniture, beds, and bedding, .... 
Transportation and traveling expenses, 

Ordinary repairs, 

Expensesof trustees or managers, . . 

All other expenses, 

Temporary loans for maintenance, . . 
Interest on maintenance loans, .... 



Total expenditure, 

Cash on hand, September 80, 1879, 



941 
27 

8 
4 



8 

5 

4 

19 



,037 
,492 
,056 
,847 

28» 
,730 

590 
,272 
,431 
,134 
,000 

115 



72 
39 
67 
84 
24 
88 
31 
65 
15 
15 
00 
29 



1124,000 
982 



$124,982 



14 
70 

84 



Liabilities, 



Money borrowed in the erection of the buildings for the 

white girl's department, and not repaid, ... 

Interest on same, from June 15, to October 1, 1879, . . . 

Temporary loans for maintenance unpaid, 



Total, 



920,000 

350 

27,000 



00 
00 
00 



947,850 



00 



PBHriVSYLVANIA RBFORM SCHOOL, MORGANZA. 

The Legislature, at its last session, appropriated for 1879 and 1880, the 
sum of $39,200 for fhe payment of the salaries of officers and emi.loy^s ; 
also, the farther sum of $96,534 96, for the payment of permanent im- 
provements, interest on bonded debt, interest on temporary loans and 
bonded debt falling dae in 1880. 



Recelpis and lfispMi4ltai 

The receipts for the year ivere $156,974 93, including a balance from 
former year of $872 04; expenditures for the same period, $151,040 66; 
leaving a balance in favor of the institution of $5,934 27. 

JReceipts. 



Gash on hand, November 28, 1878, 

State appropriation, 

Sundry counties, 

Farm products, 

Railway overcharges, 

Temporary loans, 

Returned warrants, 



Total receipts, 
Total, . . . 



935,000 

29,722 

818 

93 

90,000 

468 



00 
18 
73 
02 
00 
86 



9872 



156,102 



9156,974 



04 



89 
98 



J 



400 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



Expenditures. 



Maintenance, 

Salaries of ofticere and employes, 

Interest, bonded debt, improvements, farm expenses, eto. 



Total expenditares, 

Gash on hand September SO, 1879, 



$30)703 

18,327 

102,010 



05 
19 
42 



f 161 ,040 
5,934 



f 156, 974 



66 
27 

93 



8tatem«Bt of Aaseta and LiabillllM. 

Assets. 



Real estate, Morgan za, 503 aores, . . , 
Buildings and improvements, . . . . 
Balance of appropriation uncollected. 

Accounts due tlie school, 

Western State Penitentiary, 

Cash in hands of treasurer, , 



Total, 



188,621 
439,439 
252,664 

2,317 
19,000 

5,934 



20 
32 
72 
78 
00 
27 



1807,977 



29 



Liabilities. 



Mortgage debt, 

Bonded debt, 

Accounts payable, 

Bills payable, (time warrants,) 



Total, 

Assets over liabilities. 



160,000 

120,000 

4,110 

92,400 



00 
00 
03 

00 



$276,510 



$531,467 



OS 
26 



Note.— Mortgage debt falls due July 1, 1880, . . 
Bonded debt falls due as follows, viz : 
August 1, 1878, 8 per cent, bonds, .... 
February 1, 1879, 8 per cent, bonds, . . . 
August 1, 1879, 8 per cent, bonds, .... 
February 1, 1880, 8 per cent, bonds, . . . 
May 14, 1885, 6 per cent, bonds, in gold, . 



$60,000 00 

80,000 00 
26,000 00 
10,000 00 
9,000 00 
45,000 00 



Total, $180,000 00 



September 30^ 1879. 



Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



401 



TRAININU SCHOOL FOR FBBBLS-MIlfDBD CHILDRBN. 

The Legislature at its last session appropriated the sum of $40,000 for 
the maintenance an& training of 200 feeble-minded children of the Com- 
monwealth, for the year 1879. 

Beealpta aad Bxpenditaret. 

The receipts for the year were $63,837 19, including a balance from for- 
mer year of $1,121 19; expenditures for the same period, $63,143 95; 
leaving a balance in favor of the institution of $93 24. 

Beceipts. 



Cash on hand October 1, 187S, 
Pennsylvania State pupils, 



Pennsylvania soldiers' orphans, 
City of Philadelphia pupils, . . . . 

New Jersey State pupils, 

Private pupils, 

Freeftind, 

Delaware county fund, 

Sharpless legacy, 

Provident Life and Trust Company, 

Interest and premium, 

Donation, 

l^otes discounted, 



Total receipts, 
Total, . . . . 



95,769 

172 

8,600 

12,434 

16,990 

1,042 

100 

2,940 

2,271 

31 

10 

16,753 



48 
50 
00 
47 
81 
50 
00 
00 
10 
76 
00 
89 



11,121 



62,116 



963,287 



19 



00 



Expenditures. 



Salaries and wages, 

Household expenses, 

Construction, 

Sharplees legacy, 

Medui Water Company, 

Insurance, 

Notes, 

Deposit in Provident Trust Company, 



Total expenditure, 

Cash on hand September 30, 1879, 



918,626 

29,126 

4,102 

923 

500 

67 

11,000 

8,807 



41 
84 
48 
22 
00 
50 
00 
50 



968,148 
93 



963,237 



95 
24 

19 



INSTITUTION FOR DBAK AND DUMB, FHILADBLPHIA. 

The Legislature at its last session did not make any appropriation to 
this institution for 1879. 

The receipts for the year were $140,832 15, including a balance from 
former year of $418 67 ; expenditures for same period, $125,658 86; leav- 
ing a balance in favor of the institution of $15,178 29. 

26— B. P. Char. 



408 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 6, 



Beceipi8. 



Cash OD hand October 1, 1878, 

State of Pennsylvania, for indigent pnpils, . . 
State of New /ersey, for indigent pupils, . . . 
State of Delaware, for indigent pupils. . . . . 
Guardians of poor, oity of Philadelphia, . . . 

Pay pupils, 

John ^ right, soholarship fund, 

Crozier soholarship, Noe. 1 and 2, 

John Farnum scholarship, Nos. 1 and 2, . . . 
Interest, contributions, and life subsoriptiohs, 
Jones' estate, .... . . . . 

Parents and guardians, for transportation, . . 

Legacy of Charlotte M. Eckfeldt, 

Sale of old materials, <fco., 

Loans, . . 

United States 4| per cent, loan, sold, 

Philadelphia 6 per cent, loan, sold, 



I'otal receipts, 



Total, 



$19,968 

6,606 

1,060 

540 

2,690 

240 

400 

625 

6,829 

1,542 

514 

250 

205 

85,000 

10,875 

24,150 



79 
94 
00 
00 
15 
00 
00 
56 
88 
56 
41 
00 
24 
00 
00 
00 



^18 



140,413 



67 



$140,832 



48 
15 



Expenditures. 



FamilT expenses, provisions, etc., 

Material for clothing, shoes, ftimiture, etc., . . 

Salaries, 

Waees and labor, 

Incldentais, including transportation of pupils, 

Ord^ary repairs, 

Repairs, account of steam heating and cooking, 

Interest on loans, , 

Loans, 

Property, 4112 Spruce street, 



Total expenditures, 

Cash on hand September 80, 1879, 



$24,222 
6,772 

80,676 

'6,885 
1,009 
2,752 

10,000 
1,029 

41,000 
1,861 



11 
19 
51 
27 
28 
62 
00 
75 
00 
18 



$125,658 
15,178 



$140,832 



86 



15 



WESTERN PENN8YLVANIA INSTITUTION FOR DEAF AND DUME. 

The Legislature, at its last session, appropriated, for the year 1879, the 
sum of $12,960 for the education and maintenance of 80 State pupils from 
January 1, 1879, to July 1, 1879 ; for the education and maintenance of 90 
State pupils for the year ending July 1, 1880, $22,950. 

Receipt* aad Ezpendllnret. 

The receipts for the year were $16,510 75, including a balance from 
former year of $4» 18 ; expenditures for same period, $16,304 53. 

.Beceipts. 



Cash on band October 1, 187H, . 
Value of farm prodnoe, .... 

Pay pupils^ 

Rent of Wilkinsburg property. 

Donation for library, 

Loans, 

All other sources, 



Total receipts, 
Total, . . . , 



$210 


00 


435 


00 


200 


00 


80 


00 


15,445 


00 


142 


57 



$48 



16,462 



$16,510 



18 



57 
75 



L»Q. Doc] 



BOABD OF PUBLIO ChABITIES. 



403 



Expenditures. 



Family expenses, proyftdons, <to., 

Salaries, 

Wages andlabor, 

Rent, 

Transportation and traveling, 

Repairs, 

Interest on borrowed money for current expenses, . . . 



Total expenditure, 



$8,506 


77 


5,179 


10 


1,282 


87 


800 


00 


85 


19 


260 


00 


200 


00 



916,804 



58 



CfSTITUTIOn FOR INSTRUCTION OP THB BUND, PHILADELPHIA. 

The State grant to this institution for the year 1879, was $43^00 for the 
maintenance and instruction of 145 pupils. 

The receipts for the year were $62,21 6 29 ; expenditures for same period 
$5?, 690 34 ; leaving a balance in favor of the institution of $4,525 95. 

Receipta. 



Sales of merchandise, . . . 
Wednesday exhibitions, . 
Inoome from Biroh legacy, 
Gtoneral inoome, . ... 

I*rivate pupils, 

PennffjriVania State pupils. 
New Jersey State pupils, . 
Delaware State pupils, . . 
Legacy of Pennell Smith, . 
Investments sold,* . . . . 



Total receipts, 



$7,714 

878 

6,042 

175 

1,586 

21,750 

2,9^ 

5^ 

1,000 

20,121 



52 
91 
08 
67 
00 
00 
88 
00 
00 
83 



962,216 



* Tbese InyMtments were told because of the unpaid appropriations by the State. 



Expenditures. 



Household, 

Manufactures, 

Instruction, 

Outlits to graduates, 

Miscellaneous, , 

Temporary' loans paid, .... 

Total expenditure, .... 
Balance September 80, 1879, 



182,576 


41 




9,781 


90 




10,062 


12 




855 


00 




915 


10 




8,549 


81 
84 




957,690 


4,525 


95 


962,216 





29 



404 



Board of Pubuc Charities. 



[No. 5, 



COMPAEATIYE COUNTY DEDUCTIONS, 



The following statements exhibit the chief or leading pursuit of each 
county ; also, the names of institutions, the number remaining therein at 
the end of the year, the net expenditure, &c. The amounts paid for oat- 
door relief is included in the expenditure of alms-houses. 

ADAM8 COUNTY.-AsriculUiral. 

Population in 1870, 30,815. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . , 

Total, . . 



Number I ' Net expend- 
remaining. ' | iture. 




ALLBGHBinr COCNTY.-GoaI an^ IroM. 

Population In 1870, 262,204. 



Western State Penitentiary, . . 
Insane hospital, Dixmont, . . 

County prison, 

Work-house, 

County home, 

Allegheny poor-house, .... 

Pittsburgh farm, 

Institution for Deaf and Dumb, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



781 
609 

84 
464 
270 
248 
348 

85 



Net expend- 
iture. 



1118,631 

107,790 

7,981 

3,257 

52,207 

35,696 

101,089 

16,104 



2,889 9437,761 



47 
47 
96 
64 
07 
01 
90 
58 

05 



ARMSTHONO GOCNTY.-Coal and Iron. 

Population in 1870, 43,382. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


Conntv orison 


8 


13,694 


37 






Total 


8 


93,694 


37 


• 





There was also $21,543 05 paid for township relief. 



i "" 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board op Public CHABiTiEa 



405 



BBATBR COUNTY.--€kMl uii Iron. 

Population in 1870,36,148. 



CJonntv prison, 
Alms-house, . , 

Total, . . 



Number 
remaining. 



8 
77 



85 



Net expend- 
iture. 



18,086 
8,500 



111,586 



89 
00 



BEDFORD COUNTY.-Coal. 



Population in 1870, 29,635. 



County prison. 
Alms-house, . , 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


2 
104 


12,241 
9,666 


98 
87 


106 


f 11, 908 


85 



BBRR8 OOCNTV.-IroB mn4 Wool. 



Population in 1870, 106,701. 



County prison. 
Alms-house, . 

Total, . . 



Number 
remaining. 



70 
530 



600 



Net expend- 
iture. 



18,460 
51,859 



$59,820 



29 
87 

16 



BLAIR COUNTY.-CoAl aad Iron. 



Population in 1870,38,051. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . , 

Total, . . 



Number 
remaining. 



14 

77 



91 



Net expend- 
iture. 



94,719 
18,901 



118,621 



87 

98 



35 



406 



Board of Public Charitie& 



[No. 5, 



BRADFORD COITlfTY.-Aink!altiire. 

Population in 1870, 53,204. 



County prison, 
Total, . . . 



Nomber 
remaining. 



11 



Net expend- 
itnre. 



11 



13,276 



13,276 



22 
22 



There was also $25,172 47 paid for township relief. 



BUCKS COUNTY.-AsHcnltare. 

Population in 1870, 64,330. 



County prison, 
Alms-house, . 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


17 
228 


$10,029 
18,784 


11 
62 


245 


128,763 


78 



BUTLBR CWUNTY.-Agrlealtore. 

Population in 1870, 86,510. 



County prison, 
Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$4,059 



$4,069 



01 
01 



There was also $11,422 56 paid for township relief. 



CAMBRIA COUlVTT.-Coal u< Inm. 



Population in 1870, 36,569. 



County prison , 
Alms-Louse, . 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



14 
70 



84 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$8,684 
11,207 



$14,842 



78 

76 



48 



Lbg. Doc.] 



BOAED OF PUBLIG ChA&ITISS. 



407 



CAMBBON Gouirry-OMi. 

Population in ISTO, 4,273. 



€k>umy priaon, 
Total, . 



N'amber 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 



1887 



1337 



72 
72 



There was also $2,542 21 paid for township relief. 

CARBON OODNTY-MiidBC. 

Population in 1870, 28,144. 



Ck>tinty prison, 

Middle Coal Field poor-hooae, 



Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



1 
164 



165 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$2,327 
16,760 



$19,077 



87 
02 



There was also $6,527 46 paid for township relief. 

CBNTRB COUNTY-CmI aad Iraa. 

Population in 1870, 34,418. 



County prison, 
Total, . . 



Number 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$3,534 



$3,534 



44 
44 



There was also $16,880 94 paid for township relief. 



CHB8TBR COCNTY-Asrleoilore. 

Population in 1870, 77,805. 



Countv prison, 

Alms-nouae, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



53 
293 



346 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$7,795 
26,207 



$34,002 



06 
42 

48 



408 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



CLARION CX>IJXTY.^'^ 

Population in 18T0, 26,587. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


(^onntv prison. , . , , , . . 


5 


$8,362 


48 






Total 


5 


18,362 


43 





There was also $12,719 90 paid for township relief. 



CLEABFIBLD COVIVTY.-Coal. 

Population in 1870, 25,741. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County Drison. 


7 


$3,313 


00 






Total 


7 


$3,313 


00 







There was also $9,550 28 paid for township relief. 



CLINTON COUNTY.-Coal. 

Population in 1870, 23,211. 



County prison, 

Look Haven poor-house 

Tbtal, 

There was also $7,133 63 paid for township relief. 

COLUMBIA COUNTY.-MiBiiig. 

Population in 1870, 28,766. 



Number 
remaining. 



2 

6 



S 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$1,251 
3,286 



$4,488 



84 
94 

78 



County prison, . . . 
Bloom poor-house, . 
Centraha poor-house. 



Number 
remaining. 



3 

9 

49 



Total, 



61 



Net expend- 
iture. 




There was also $7,792 92 paid for township relief. 



Leo. Dog.] Boabd of Publio Chabiti£& 

CmAWFOBD C»I)NTY.~A«ricaltare. 

Population in 18T0, 63,832. 



409 



County prison, 
Alms-nonae, . , 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



9 
102 



111 



Net expend- 
iture. 



15,777 
19,723 



125,500 



10 
61 

71 



(TVMBBRLAND COUIfTY.-Agricaltare. 

Population in 1870, 43,912. 



County prison, 
ALmfr-house, . , 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



21 
194 



215 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$17,618 
850 



^18,868 



26 
00 

26 



DAUPHlIf COVNTY.-Agrfealtare. 

Population in 18t0, 60,740. 



State Liunatio Hospital, 
County prison, . . . . 
Alm»-noaae, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



426 

80 

189 



704 



Net expend- 
iture. 



181,672 
11,416 
34,057 



$127,144 



49 
04 
44 

97 



« DBLA WARE COUNTY.-Oottoa and Wool. 

Population in 1870, 39,403. 



County prison, 

Alms-house 

Training Scliool for Feeble Minded Children, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



68 
149 
316 



683 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$6,185 
12,653 
53,818 



$72,657 



87 
01 
21 

09 



410 



Board of Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



BLK COUNTY.-CoAl u4 Lamber. 

Population in 18T0, 8,488. 








• 


Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County priflon, 


2 


11,371 


75 






Total, 


2 


«1,S71 


75 







There was, also, $4,680 69 paid for township relief. 

BRIE COUirry.-AcHcnltwe. 

Population in 1870, 65,973. 



Count v prison, 
Alms-houae, . 

Total, . . , 



Number 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 




130,584 15 



PAYBTTB COU!VTY.-Ooal aM4 Iron. 

Population in 1870, 43,284. 



County prison, 
Alm»-house, . 

Total, . . , 



Number 
remaining. 



6 
148 



158 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$1,852 
18,462 



$20,114 



26 
S5 

61 



FORBflT COVNTY.-AgriciilUire. 

Population in 1870, 4,010. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County prison 




$540 


90 








Total, 




$540 


90 









There was, also, $1,146 06 paid for township relief. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Pxtblio Charities. 



411 



FBANKLm CXIUNTY.-AgrlMiltare. 

Population in 1870^ 45,365. 



County prison, 

Alms-house, * 

Total, . . . .* 



Number 
remaining. 



16 
162 



178 



Net expend- 
iture. 



18,484 
16,614 



59 
80 



124,998 



FULTON COUIVTY.~AffriciUtan. 

Population in 18T0, 9,360. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County nriaon 


1 


$875 


97 






'I\)tal, 


1 


1875 


97 







There was, also, $1,408 84 paid for township relief. 



UBBBNB COUNTY.-Africnltare. 

Population in 1870, 25,887. 



County prison, 
Alms-house, . 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



4 
88 



92 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$1,842 
6,025 



17,867 



60 
00 

60 



HUNTIIfQDOfV OOVNTT.-Coal and Iroa. 

Population in 1870, 31,251. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



4 
78 



77 



Net expend- 
iture. 



17,050 
16,300 



923,350 



00 
00 

00 



412 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



INDIANA COUNTY.-Asriadtiire. 

Population in 1870, 36,138. 



County prison, 
Total, . . 



Number 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$825 



1025 



64 



64 



There was also $10,679 29, pud for township relief. 

JBFPBRSON COI}NTY.-Agri«altara. 

Population in 1870,21,656. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County orison 


1 


1718 


49 






Total, 


1 


1718 


49 







There was also $7,407 42, paid for township relief. 



JUNIATA COCNTY.-Agrlcaltara. 

Population in 1870, 17,390. 



. 


Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County prison, 


5 


12,176 


51 






Total 


5 


12,176 


51 


* *^ 1 •••••••••••••«••••••••••• 





There was also $S,473 15, paid for township relief. 

LACKAWANNA COUNT Y.-Mlninff. 



* County prison. 

Blakely poor-house, 

Carbondale poor-house, . . 
Northern Luzerne poor-house, 

Ransom poor-house, 

Soranton poor-house, .... 



Total, 



Number 


Net expend- 


remaining. 


iture. 




8 


16,436 


13 


7 


3,864 


75 


16 


644 


10 


45 


15,656 


57 


108 


80,056 


79 


174 


155,658 

1 


34 



*The prison in this new county occupies temporary buildings, and the returns made for the year 
beginning October 1, 1879, will be found in the next annual report. 



There was also $3,160 26, paid for township relief. 



Leg. Doc.] Board op Public Charitdbs. 

LAIVCA8TBB COONTY.-AgrlMilmra. 

Population in 1870, 121,340. 



418 



Conntv prison, 
Alms-nouse, . 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



188 
441 



679 



Net expend- 
iture.* 



919,154 
82,805 



151,460 



98 
52 

45 



LAWRBNCB CX>UNTY.-Affrlciiltar«. 

Population in 1870, 27,298. 



County prison, .... 
New Castle poor-house, 



Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



6 
12 



18 



Net expend- 
iture. 



98,686 
5,611 



98,247 



70 
29 

99 



There was, also, $9,556 96 paid for township relief. 



LEBANON COUNTY.-Agrlrnlliire. 

Population in 1870, 34,096. 



County prison, 
Alms-iiouse, . 



• Total^ 



Number 
remaining. 



14 
173 



187 



Net expend- 
iture. 



98,380 
15,198 



923,578 



31 
68 

94 



LYCOMING COtNTY.-x^ 

Population in 1870, 47,626. 



County prison, 

Williamsport poor-house, 



Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



39 
13 



52 



Net expend- 
iture. 



96,298 
19,139 



00 
66 



925,432 66 



There was, also, $11,*I81 85 paid for township relief. 



4U 



Board of Pubuo Chabitie& 



[No. 5 , 



LEHIGH (XWllTY.-lMa. 

Population in IStO, bS^I^^. 



County prison, 
Alma-nouae, . 

Total, . . . 



Nmnber 
remaining. 



27 



816 



Net expend- 
iture. 



910,913 15 
19,079 88 



«29,99S 



OS 



L€ZBRIfB COUNTY.-Mliriiiff. 

Population in 1870, 160,915. 



? 



Coonty prison, . . 
CentraJl poor-hoase, 



Total, 



Nnmber 
remaining. 



89 
56 



94 



Net expend- 
iture. 



110,553 17 



26,687 



$37,240 



59 
73 



There was, also, $5,984 69 paid for township relief. 



McKBAN CX>UIVTY.-Agrlciiltare. 

Population in 1870, 8,825. 



• 


Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County prison, 


14 


$13,166 


11 






Total, 


14 


$13,166 

• 


11 







There was, also, $2,620 22 paid for township relief. 



MERCER COCNTY.-Coal mu4 Iroa. 

Population in 1870, 49,977. 



Number 
remaining. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . 

Total, . . . 



8 
80 

88 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$2,748 
16,186 

$17,985 



06 
97 

03 



Leg. Doc.1 



Board of Public Chabitibs. 



415 



MirFUN OOCNTY.-AffrlMUtara. 

Population in 1870, 17,508. 



Conntvpiiflon, 

Alm»-nou8e, 

Total, 



Number ' Netexpend- 



remainJng. 



2 
40 



42 



iture. 



91,780 
12,106 



48 
14 



$18,888 62 



MONROE €X>I7NTY.-Acrlcnllare. 

^pulation in 1870, 18,862. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


CJountv priaon 


8 


11,465 


08 






1\)tal, 


8 


$1,455 


08 







There was, also, $4,247 70 paid for township relief. 



MONTGOMERY €M)rNTY.-Agrl€alliir«. 

Population in 1870, 81,612. 



CJountv prison, > 

Alms-house, 

Insane hospital. 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 



41 
270 



811 



$5,845 
27,840 



$83,105 



85 
S3 



18 



MONTOUR COUNTY.-Agrienltare. 

Population in 1870, 15,344. 



Insane hospital, 

Ck>unty prison, 

Danville and Mahoning poor-house. 
Valley poor-house, 



Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



444 

1 

25 

6 



476 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$74,552 

1,170 

3,580 

583 



$70,886 



83 
72 
125 
86 

66 



There was, also, $2,927 53 paid for township relief. 



416 



Board op Public Charities. 



[No. 5 , 



NORTHAMPTOIf COONTY.-Inm. 

Population in I8t0, 61,432. 



County prison, 

Alms-nouse, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



67 
295 



»52 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$8,782 
19,875 



f28,657 



28 
66 

94 



NORTHCMBBRLAND COUIVTY.-Asricnltiire. 

Population in 18)0, 41,444. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . . 

Total, . . , 



Number 
remaining. 



10 
27 



37 



Net expend 
iture. 



$4,463 
10,865 



$15,328 



23 

82 

55 



There was, also, $13,436 11 paid for township relief. 



PERRY COUNTY.-Affricaltnre. 

Population in 1870, 25,447. 



County prison, 

Alms-house, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



2 

84 



86 



Net expend- 
iture. 



$1,681 35 
5,198 U 



$6,879 46 



PIKE COUNTY.-Agricaltnre. 

Population in 1870, 8,436. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


Countv orison 




$821 


61 








Total. 




$321 


61 









There was, also, $1,547 63 paid for township relief. 



Leg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



417 



POTTBB OOUI«TY.-Lnmker. 

Population in 1870, 11,265. 





Number 
remaiuing. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County prison, 


1 


^39 


36 






Ibtal, 


I 


$489 


36 







There was, also, $3,748 94 paid for township relief. 

PHILADELPHIA COUIYTY-Comnieroe and ManafactoriBC. 

Population in 1870, 674,022. 



Eastern State Penitentiary, 

County prison, 

House of oorreotion, 

Blookely alms-liouse, 

Roxboro' poor-house, , 

Germantown poor-tiouse 

Oxford and Lower Dublin poor-house, 

Biockley Insane Hospital, 

Pennsylvania Hospital for Insane, . . , 
Friends' Asylum, Frankford, .... 
Institution for Deaf and Dumb, . . . 

Institution for Blind, 

House of RefUge, 

Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



Net expend- 
iture. 



1,080 

750 

750 

1,822 

11 

50 

153 

982 

406 

86 

819 

200 

557 



7,166 



9189,594 

102,832 

49,545 

482,001 

2,671 

13,3% 

7,880 

114,302 

188,852 

41,600 

82,797 

57,690 

124,000 



91,407,096 



67 
82 
21 
15 
54 
54 
86 
50 
00 
72 
68 
34 
14 

17 



SCHUYLKILL COC.'VTY-Affricaltare. 

Population in 1870, 116,428. 



I Number 
remaining. 



County prison. 
Alms-house, . , 

Total, . . , 



SIVYDBR C^OVIVTY-Agrlraltara. 

Population in 1870, 15,506. 



Net expend- 
iture. 




County prison, 
Total, . . 



Number ' Net expend- 
remaining. Iture. 




91,337 91 
91 



91,387 



There was, also, $5,465 79 paid for township relief. 
27— B. P. Char. 



418 



Board op Public Chariti£& 



[No. 5, 



SOMBR8ET COUKTY.-Coal. 



Population in 1870, 28,226. 



County prison, 
AlmB-liouse, . 

Total, . . 




Number \ Net expend- 
remaining, j i iture. 



7 il $1,277 
77 I, 16,383 



20 
15 



SULLIVAN COUNTY.-Affriciiltare. 

Population in 1870, 6,191. 





Number 
remaining. 


1 

Net expend- 
iture. 


Countv DrisoUt 


1 


f91 85 




1 


Total, 


1 


$91 


85 







There was, also, $1,857 11 paid for township relief. 

BUSQUEHANNA COUNTY.— Agrlrallar«. 

Population in 1870, 37,523. 



County prison, 

Auburn and Rush asylum, . . . . 
Montrose and Bridgewater asylum, 

New Milford as^'lum, 

Uusqnebanna Depot, etc., 



Total, 



r 

Number 


'Net expend- 


remaining. 


iture. 


7 


1 

1 $2,299 


79 


16 


, 2,074 


36 


5 


1,102 


58 


6 


1,947 


00 


8 


1,568 


27 



37 ,1 $8,992 



00 



There was, also, $*',258 53 paid for township relief. 

TI<Ni»A <X)UNTY.-Agrfcaltiire. 

Population in 1870, 35,097. 



County prison, 
Alni»-hou8e, . 



Total, 



Number , Net expend- 
remaining. , iture. 



4 $1,428 44 
67 10,818 87 



71 $12,247 I 31 



Lbg. Doc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



419 



UNION COUlVTY.-AfcrlciilUire. 

Population in 1870, 15,565. 





Number 
remaining. 

2 


Net expend- 
iture. 


County prison, 


1805 


70 






Total, 


2 


«S05 


70 







There was, also, $5,153 paid for township relief. 



VBNANOO COUNTY.-Petroleum. 



Population in 1870, 47,925. 



County prison, 
Aims-house, . 

Total, . . 



Numjber 
i-emaining. 



11 
81 



92 



Net expend- 
iture. 



95,699 
15,983 



921,638 



60 
83 

33 



WAKRBN OOUNTY.~Lainlier. 



Population in 1870, 23,897. 



County prison, 

Alms-nouse, 

Insane hospital. 

Total, 

WASHINGTON COVNTY.-Coal. 

Population in 1870, 48,483. 



Number 
remaining. 



3 

58 



61 



Net expend- 
iture. 



11,477 
8,950 



910,427 



19 
49 



68 



County prison. 
Alms-house, . , 
Reform school. 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



4 
200 
312 



516 



Net expend- 
iture. 



16,563 

18,205 

151,040 



1175,808 



20 
12 
66 

98 



420 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



WAYNB OOIJIVTY.- 

Population in 1870,33,188. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . 

Total, . . . 



Number 
remaining. 



1 
21 



22 



Net expend- 
iture. 



1648 
4,588 



15,187 



76 
69 

45 



There was, also, $7,990 91 paid for township relief. 



WB8TMORBLAND CX>UNTY.~Co»l. 

Population in 1870, 58,719. 



Countv prison. 
Alms-house, . . 



Total, 



Number 
remaining. 



S 
143 



146 



Net expend- 
iture. 



91,455 
80,854 



932,310 



64 
60 

24 



WYOMING COUNTY.— Agricaitara. 

Population in 1870, 14,585. 





Number 
remaining. 


Net expend- 
iture. 


Countv prison 


4 


9613 


47 






Total, 


4 


9613 


47 







There was, also, $4,436 87 paid for township relief. 



YORK CX>UNTY.-Agri€snltar«. 

Population in 1870, 76,134. 



County prison, 
Alms-nouse, . . 



T6tal, 



Number 
remaining. 



20 
191 

211 



Net expend- 
iture. 



916,628 
24,961 

941,589 



55 
86 

91 



Leq. Doc.] Board of Ppbug CHARinE& 421 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES. 



Penitentiaries, $253,286 14 

Insane Hospitals, 608,770 51 

Training School for Feeble Minded, . . . 53,818 21 

Institution for Deaf and Dumb, 98,902 21 

Institution for the Blind, 57,690 34 

House of Refiige, 124,000 14 

Reform School, 151,040 66 

County Prisons, (Work-house and House of 

Correction,) 454,224 71 

Alms-houses, 1,192,537 55 

Out-door Relief, 322,752 75 

Township Poor, 246,745 02 

Total, $3,563,708 24 



Leg. Dog.] 



Board op Public Charitibs. 



423 



OUT-DOOR RELIEF— ALMS-HOUSE DISTRICTS. 



The number of all classes in receipt of out-door relief during the four 
quarters of the year ending September SO, 1879^ is exhibited asfolloips: 

[NOTB.— It will be observed that the aggregate of the four quarters has not been 
given, for the reason that it would not represent the number of people relieved during 
the year, many persons having received aid during each quarter of the year. The 
total of the four quarters, therefore, would be an overestimate of the number of in- 
digent persons in the State.] 



Causes of Destitution. 



Old age or permanent disability, 

Death, absence, or desertion of husband or father, 

Temporary sickness or want of work, 

Single women in receipt of relief, 

Insane and idiotic, 

Cause of destitution not stated, 

Total, 



bH 


6C» 


tc . 1 






din 

L879 


fl<H 


C-T 


c 1. 


O » 


©eo 


®o 


b CO 


^-^ 


^" 


5c3 


§1 


2§ 




0<< 


3*^ 


4,664 


6,149 


c^ 


8,428 


19,743 


22,400 


9,128 


16,707 


22,8S1 


6,694 


43S 


282 


153 


108 


100 


108 


741 






42,301 


60,821 


18,506 



.a ho 

0? 



3,876 

7,253 

4,712 

180 

95 



15,566 



*It will be observed, In regard to the ont-door relief for the quarter ending September 80, 1879, that 
there Is a discrepancy between thn statement as given above and that found In an earlier part of this 
report, page 322. It Is thus explained : During the year 1879, returns were received ftom several alms- 
houses that made no report to the Board of Public Charities dilrlng the previous year. In order, 
therefore, to make a proper comparison of the statistics of the year 1878, with those of the year 1879, It 
was necessary to omit from the statement for the quarter ending September 80, 1879, the account of such 
alms-houses as made no report during the quarter ending September 80, 1878. In order, however, that 
In the next annual report a proper comparison may be made between the statistics of 1879 and those 
of 1880, all the returns for the quarter ending September 80, 1879, are taken account of in the above 
statement. 

The number of adults in receipt of out-door relief during the four quar- 
ters of the year ending September 30, 1879, is represented thus : 18,772 
were relieved during the quarter ending December 31 ; 23,394 during the 
quarter ending March 31 ; 9,252 during the quarter ending June 30 ; end 
7 989 during the quarter ending September 30. 



424 



Board of Publtc Chabities. 



[No. 5 , 



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Leg. Doc] 



Board of Public Charities. 



425 






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426 



Board op Public Chabities. 



[No. 5, 



CHILDREN IN RBCBIPT 

All persons over sixteen years of age are oonsidered as adnlts. 
The number of ohildren in receipt of outdoor relief during tlie four quarters of the 
81, 1878; 27,427 for quarter ending March 31, 1879; 9,254 for quarter ending June 30, 

Their agea^ vnth the number who attended day school and Sunday 



AGX8. 



' n 



Under 7 yearSf .... 

7 and under 10 years, 

10 and under 16 years, 

Ages not stated, . . . 



Total for each quarter. 



QUABTKB ENDING DXCUCBIB 31, 1878. 



8,645 

S,888 

8,162 

167 



4,000 

4,205 

4,017 

200 



s 

o 



7,654 

7,588 

7,170 

867 



10,857 , 12,481 I 22,788 



•a 



1,970 
8,900 
8,702 



9,S60 



• ►» • 
••.2 ^ 

^93 <A 



1,601 
2,280 
1,712 



sag' 

a— 2 
s v,a 



46 
IS 
14 



6,588 



78 



QUABTEB Xin>IH6 



o 



4,586 

4,228 

3.968 

164 



12,806 



4,580 
4,002 
4,856 

185 






M, 



0,121 
0,180 
8,624 



Statement exhibiting the number of all classes of persons receiving outdoor relief 

with alm,s-houses^ and 



Classification of Outside Poob. 



1. Men, . . 

2. Women, . 
8. Children, 
Not stated, . 



Total outside poor, 

Section A.— Destitution caused by old ags^ or disability : 

1. Men, 

2. Women, 

8. Ohildren dependent, 



Total of section A, 

Section "!&,— Destitution caused by death, absence^ or deser- 
tion of husband or father: 

1. Widows, 

Children dependent, 



2. Unmarried mothers. 
Children dependent, 

8. Wives of prisoners. 
Children dependent. 



(jUABTEB ENDING DEC. 31. 18^. 



Number. 



Pr. ct. on Totals 



5,745 

18,027 

22,788 

741 

42,801 



1,260 
2,275 I 
1,080 , 



4,564 



5,701 
11,028 



4. Wives of soldiers and sailors. 
Children dependent, 



5. Wives deserted by husbands. 
Children dependent, 



6. Orphan children. 



Total of section B, 

Section C— Destitution caused by temporary sickness^ or 
want of work of male heads of families^ and single men : 

1. Adult males, on account of sickness, 

2. Adult males, family sickness, Ac, 

8. Adult males, for want of work. 



Families dependent on 1, 2, 8 1 chlTdJin, .* ! 



Total of section C, 

Section D.—Single Women : 

1. White, 

2. Colored, 



Total of section D, 

Section E.— /n#ane and Idiotic: 

1. Men, 

2. Women, 

8. Children, 



Total of section E, 
Not classified, . . 



Total for each quarter, 




16,729 



1» 



485 

I 
I 
} 

190 i 



2,111 
110 



10,748 



728 

479 

8,288 

8,608 

8,660 



405 ' 
88 



60 
44 

4 



16,707 



488 



108 
741 



42,801 



18.56 

80.80 

58.87 

1.75 



100.00 



10.79 



89.65 



.88 



1.02 



.47 



4.99 



> 46.67 



89.49 



1.04 



1.75 



100.00 



Leg. Doc] Board op Public Charities. 

of outdoor rblibp. 



427 



year ending September 80, 1879, was, respeotively, 22,788 for quarter ending December 
1879 ; and 7,577 for quarter ending September 30, 1879. 

school ; also, the number who were illegitimate, are thus exhibited : 



MABGH 81, 1879. 

1 


QCABTBR SlfDlKrO JCTNS 80, 1879. 


QUABTBB KNDING SXPTXMBBB 30, 1979. 


•a 

•SSI 


Attended 
Sunday 
school. 


Number of 

illegitimate 

children. 


n 


• 

• 

5 


• 

3 


Attended 
public 
school. 


Attended 
Sunday 
school. 


Number of 

illegitimate 

children. 


* 

• 
o 


• 
O 


■ 

1 


Attended 
public 
school. 


Attended 
Sunday 
school. 


Number of 

lUefrltlmate 

children. 


2,086 
4,666 
4,863 


2,127 
8,071 
2,464 


86 
28 
10 > 


1,649 

1,424 

1,138 

2M 


1,787| 8,886 
1,644 2,968 
1,888 2,611 

286 480 

1 


7M 

1,247 

904 


789 

1,093 

776 


88 1 
81 1 
80 


1,871 

1,161 

870 

168 


1,474 2,815 622 
1,262 2,425 1,266 
1,079 1,949 847 
180 358 


784 

1,116 

881 


80 

18 

6 
















1 




11,068 


7,062 78 


4,800 


4,964 9,264 


2,887 

1 


2,613 266 


,8,673 

1 


4,004 


7,677 


2,784 


2,681 


48 



during the four quarters of the year ending September SO, 1879, in districts connected 
causes of destitution. 



QUABTKB BXDING HaB. 31, '79. |l QUARTBBBNDINQ J UNB 30,^79. 



Number. 



Per cent, on 
Totals. 



Number. 




Per cent, on 
Totals. 

. . . . I 16.00 
• • . . 94.00 
. . . . I 60.06 



100.00 



18.49 



88.80 

.80 

1.64 

.48 



7.77 
.89 



QUABTBB ENDING SBPT 30, 1879. 



Number. 



2,044 
8,616 



2.518 
6,477 
7,577 



Pr. ot on Totals. 



15,667 



1,074 
1,683 



8,878 



16.14 
35.18 
48.68 



100.00 



^40.82 



80.77 



66 
91 



78 
173 



18 
26 



406 
771 



454 

226 

714 

1,076 

2,242 



119 
11 



.82 



• • • 

• • ■ 

• • • 



46 
41 
10 



18,506 I . . . . 



.60 



100.00 



6,560 

147 

246 

44 



1,177 
79 



85.71 

.94 

1.68 

.28 



7.57 
.61 



21.60 



7, 



4,712 



180 



96 



16,567 



> 46.60 



80.37 



.88 



100.00 



Board op Public Chabitie& 



[No. 5, 



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Board op Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



•0 

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*)U90 I9J 


100.00 


91.54 
8.46 


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8.50 


7.04 

12.67 

15.50 

25.35 

9.86 

15.50 

7.04 

4.93 

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97.97 
2.08 


81.30 
19.08 
49.62 

• • « • • 


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Quarter ending 
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87.23 
12.77 


5.82 

10.55 

24 00 

25.09 

11.27 

10.53 

5.82 

4.72 

2.20 


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Board of Public Charities. 



435 



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BoABD OF Public Chabitiss. 



[No. 6, 



36 



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Leg. Doc.] 



BoABD OF Public Charities. 



437 



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438 



Board of Public Charities. 



[No. 5, 



OHIO REFORM SCHOOL vs. THE PENNSYLVAMA 

REFORM SCHOOL. 



In order that some idea may be obtained of the amount of labor per- 
formed by the inmates in these institutions, the following extracts have 
been taken from the last annual reports, and for the year 1879 : 



OHIO REFORM SCHOOL. 
Farm and Shop Labor. 

The boys are detailed to work, 
either at farm or shop labor, one half 
of every working day. 

The brush shop employs 145 boys, 
and the business nets about $800 per 
month. 

The employ^ at the gas-house is 
assisted by an inmate, who thus 
learns the trade. They manufacture 
about 5,000 feet of gas daily, which 
is necessary for the uses of the insti- 
tution. 

The shoe shop employs 11 boys, 
who make all the shoes worn by the 
inmates of the farm. 

The washing and ironing is done 
by 8 boys, and consists of the cloth- 
ing worn by the inmates, officers, and 
employes. 

The bakery employs 3 boys. 

The machinist has 1 boy, who as- 
sists in the engine work. 

The carpenter shop employs 2 
boys, and they, with the carpenter, 
do all the repairing needed about the 
buildings, as well as repairing furni- 
ture and the wood-work of wagons. 

The blacksmith shop employs 1 in- 
mate. 

Wood-chopping, fitting land to 



PENIV8YLTAIVIA REFORM SCHOOL. 

Labor. 

There are now in this institution 
over 300 children. Among the more 
difficult and perplexing problems 
that one is called upon to solve, is 
that known as the " Labor Question." 
During the summer months there is 
no difficulty in finding employment 
of some kind for our boys — on the 
farm, and in the necessary improve- 
ment of the grounds ; but during the 
winter season much valuable time is 
lost, and the opportunities for prog- 
ress in discipline are measurably 
lessened by want of suitable em- 
ployment within doors. 

We do not claim that the labor of 
these boys will ever yield a large 
revenue, or become profitable as a 
purely business transaction, but their 
earnings, however small in compar- 
ison with their maintenance, would, 
at least, assist in reducing that ex- 
pense, and would further serve to en- 
courage them in the knowledge that 
they are not entirely dependent on 
others for support, nor yet merely 
pauper recipients of the food and 
clothing they require and consume. 

To make this labor wholly pro- 
ductive, and of any direct advr,ntage 



Leg. IToc.] 



Board of Public Charities. 



439 



till, repairing roads, and digging 
trenches employ 30 boys. 

Painting, glazing, and papering 
employ 3 boys. 

There are 6 boys learning teleg- 
raphy. They are taught and over- 
seen by an efficient operator, and are 
thus assisted in another method of 
earning a livelihood. 

There is a force of 6 boys at work 
in the green-house and on the lawns. 

About 10 trusty boys constitute a 
brass band. 

There are 9 inmates engaged in the 
making of cotton goods, and 8 em- 
ployed in the mending-room. 

Tailoring employs 22 boys, who 
make all the pantaloons and coats for 
the inmates, both for Sunday and 
week-day wear. 

The value of labor for the year was 
$8,055 14. 



to the school, financially, will require 
the introduction of some special 
mechanical industries, adapted to' the 
age and ability of our working force. 
This will necessitate the erection of 
a suitable building, one wing, pros- 
pectively of a larger structure, plain 
and substantial, and large enough to 
accommodate at least one hundred 
boys, in addition to our present force 
at work in tailoring and shoe shops. 

The sum of $972 has been received 
by the treasurer, for work done on 
the farm during the past year. T^is 
is the first and only compensation 
ever received for the large amount 
of labor done, either on the farm 
proper, or in the interest of the State, 
upon macadamized roadways, grad- 
ing and drainage of grounds, or on 
other general improvements. This 
work was commenced soon after the 
removal to Morganza, and has been 
continued regularly, except at short 
intervals during the winter, thus ex- 
tending over two, and now well into 
the third year. 

During the time specified, an ac- 
curate account has been kept of the 
number of hours each boy has 
labored. The work done in the in- 
terest of the State alone, computed 
in days of ten hours each, amounts, 
for the past year, to 4,750 days, 
which, at a very low rate of com- 
pensation per diem, represents the 
sum of $2,375 due the institution. 

The value of labor for the year was 
$2,375.