(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report - Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh"

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



I 




uuioijr 



73 

PL 
V'l 



C 




V 



^ ' 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



TO THE BOARD OP TRUSTEES 



Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 



To January 31, 1897. 



1897. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. COMMITTEES, AND OFFICERS, - 3 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 4 

LIBRARIAN'S ANNUAL REPORT, 7 

PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS. RECEIVED AT THE 

LIBRARY, - . . 16 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY, 19 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BUILDING, 28 

REPORT OF THE MANAGER OF MUSIC HALL, - - 30 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR'S REPORT, 3^ 

FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT, . - . - . 34 

TREASURER'S REPORT, 35 

AUDITORS' REPORT. 36 



The composition for this report was done on our own 
linotype machine in the Library building. 









BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

W. N. FREW, President. 
ROBERT PITCAIRN, Fice President, 
J. F. HUDSON, Secretary.. /'•■-. 
H. C FRICK. Treasurer. 

R. H. DOUGLAS, T. G. McCLURE, 

E. M. FERGUSON, DR W. H. McKELVY, 

HON. H. P. FORD, W. A. MAGEE, 

G. L. HOLLIDAY, A. W. MELLON, 

J. McM. KING, H. K. PORTER, 

G. A. MACBETH, S. D. WARMCASTLE. 

DAVID McCARGO, . Dr J. P. STERRETT, 



COMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATION OF LIBRARY. 

G. A. MACBETH, Chairman, DR W. H. McKELVY, 

R. H. DOUGLAS. 



COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

> G. L. HOLLIDAY, Chairman, J. F. HUDSON, 

: H. C FI^ICK. 



COMMITTEE ON MUSIC HALL. 

r 

W. A. MAGEE. Chairman, ' H. K. PORTER, 

S. D. WARMCASTLE. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, CAfltrmflM, E. M. FERGU50N, 

HON. H. P. FORD. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

A. W. MELLON, Chairman, 
T. G. McCLURE. 



LIBRARY OFFICERS. 

E. H. ANDERSON, Librarian. 

W. R. WATSON, Assistant Librarian. 

MISS H. ST.B. brooks, Chief Cataloguer. 

MISS E. M: WILLARD, Reference Librarian. 

MISS M. F. MACRUM, Chief of the Loan Department. 

MISS E. L. BARNES. Chief of the Order Department. 






REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: 

Gentlemen:— It is with pleasure that I am able to report to you t 
successful completion of the first full year of the existence of the instit 
tion under your charge. It has, in the influence exerted, the work it h 
accomplished, the enthusiasm with which it has been received and t 
measure of approval its operation has met with, exceeded all anticipatioi 

An earnest effort has been made to conduct it on purely popular lin 
and we may feel justified in believing that it has become such an intere 
ing part of the life of th« city, that its future is fully secured and will 
generously provided for. 

The reports of the various committees, presented herewith, will furn 
in detail the year's record of the institution for your information. It 
therefore, unnecessary for me to refer to it in any but a general way. 
is sufficient to assure you that no opportunity has been lost sight of 
which its helpful influences may be made broader and more far reachii 
and it is the desire of those in charge to have every citizen of Pittsbui 
feci and take pride in his part ownership. In this connection. I will 
peat what I have said on other occasions, that the Board will gladly lis 
to any reasnoable criticism or any suggestion as to the methods of m 
agement. The Library is operated solely in the interest of the peoi 
and to retain its popularity must be conducted largely in accordance v 
the wishes of those who support it. 

Allow me again to call the attention of the Board and the people 
Pittsburgh to the present crying need of the Library. I refer to the 1 
of books on mechanical and scientific subjects. The city has been gei 
ous in the financial support rendered, and we have no right to expect 
institution, in the first eighteen months of its existence, to become f 
equipped in all branches, but can we not hope that some plan may be 
vised by which the praiseworthy demands of students in chemistry, m< 
lurgy, electricity and mechanics shall be met. and the efforts of their 
ventive brains encouraged? We proudly point to Pittsburgh as one of 
great workshops of the world, and when we are enabled to place on 
shelves the scientific literature that should be there, we can. soone 
later, claim the the home of another Bessemer or Edison. Our wea 
citizens can raise no more enduring monument to themselves thai 
placing under your control, by gift or bequest, a sum of money w 
shall endow a department of this character. 

A special committee of the Board, known as the Committee on In^ 
ments, has been placed in charge of all trust funds, and has so well r 
aged the bequest of $17,000, left by the late J. D. Bernd, that not only 
the interest furnished a large number of books for the departmei 
architecture, but the principal, which now amounts to $19,000, is seci 
invested, and yields an annual income of $950. 

It is fitting that the thanks of the Board should be extended tc 
many generous friends whose thoughtfulness has enriched the Lih 



daring the year. They can feel sure that their acts have been appreciated , 
that their donations of books and manuscripts are well cared for and are 
conferring a benefit on the reading public, impossible while on private 
shelves. 

During the past year the Art Galleries have been, in accordance with 
your instructions, under the control of the Fine Arts Committee of the 
Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Fine Arts and Museum Collection 
Fund. A loan collection of oil paintings, kindly contributed by residents 
of Pittsburgh, has filled the walls, and in November and December a 
competitive exhibition was gotten together which attracted works of art 
by living painters from all the art centres of this country and Europe. 
No admission fee has ever been charged. The Museum Committee of the 
same board has occupied the Museum rooms on the second floor of the 
science wing, the galleries above them and a laboratory in the basement, 
and has greatly interested and instructed the public by the valuable col- 
lections exhibited. The Art Students* League has made use of two rooms 
in the basement. It is hoped that this organization, which has the oppor- 
tunity of doing such great work, may not fail to make its influence felt in 
the community, and may grow rapidly in power and numbers. 

The Academy of Science and Art has been in possession of the Lecture 
Rooms in the science wing and, under its auspices and subject to its ap- 
proval, a large number of free lectures have been given on literary, scien- 
tific and historical subjects. 

The City of Pittsburgh appropriated for the use of the Board, during 
the fiscal year beginning February ist, 1897, the sum of $65,000. This 
money has been paid to the Treasurer of the Board, and, with a cash bal- 
ance of $1,153.21 remaining out of the receipts of last year, makes a total 
available of $66,153.21. Your Executive Committee, acting under the pro- 
visions of the By-Laws, has distributed this sum as follows: — 

Maintenance of Library $26,577.00 

Maintenance of Building 19,413.60 

Maintenance of Music Hall i ,500.00 

To repay Board of Trustees, Carnegie Fine Arts and Museum 

Collection Fund, money advanced 5,000.00 

Contingent Fund 5.000.00 

For purchase of books 8,662.61 

It is interesting to know that, taking as a basis the recent census of the 
city by the Department of Public Safety, showing a population of 290,000. 
it has cost the citizens of Pittsburgh 22 cents each per annum to maintain 
the Library Building. For this expenditure opportunity has been given 
to attend eighty organ recitals by the first concert organist of the world, 
six lectures on musical subjects, of viewing the magnificent exhibitions of 
oil paintings and the very interesting museum collections, of using the 
28,000 volumes in the Library, the 233 periodicals and 54 newspapers. 
and of listening to the large number of valuable lectures on history, litera- 
ture and science. At the usual rates charged a reasonable use of all these 
opportunities would necessitate an expenditure of from $60 to $100. 

The erection of the Branch Library Buildings has progressed as rapidly 
as deemed advisable by the Building Committee. Bids will very shortly 
be solicited for the erection of the 17th ward structure. 

In conclusion, permit me to state, that it gives me great pleasure to 
certify to the personal interest taken in the institution by all your ap- 
pointees and those employed under them. I am fully convinced that every 
citizen of Pittsburgh feels a pardonable pride and pleasure in the always 
attractive condition of the building, and I am not bestowing unmerited 



praise when I say that, from first to last, in the building, library and 
music hall departments, all have given enthusiastically of their time and 
ability in an effort to satisfy every reasonable demand. I wish in this 
public way to acknowledge the uniformly courteous treatment received 
by visitors, as evidenced by the total absence, of complaint and the num- 
erous expressions of commendation. 

Respectfully, 

W. N. FREW, President, 



LIBRARIAN'S ANNUAL REPORT. 



April 20, 1897. 
To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to present my report for the first statistical year of the 
Library's work, ending January 31, 1897. 

Since it has been decided to make the Library year coincide with the city 
fiscal year, it will be necessary to repeat in this report some of the facts re- 
corded in the report submitted April 21, 1896. When that report was made 
the Library had been in active operation only four and two-thirds months, 
and though it was called the first annual report, it was not properly so 
called. The city fiscal year runs from February i to January 31. The 
Library iwras Opened to the public and in active operation only two 
and two-thirds months, therefore, before the beginning of the last 
fiscal year. Hence it has been deemed best to make this report cover 
the fourteen and two-thirds months from November 11, 1895, to January 
31, 1897, each subsequent report to cover only the twelve months of the 
city fiscal year. 

On February i, 1897, the Library contained 26,859 volumes and 
over 3,000 pamphlets. Of these, 10,558 volumes were in the circulating 
department, and the remaining volumes and all the pamphlets were in the 
reference department. It should be understood, however, that the books on 
the open shelves in the Children's room, and all the volumes which are the 
bibliographical tools of the librarian and his assistants, in the office 
and catalogue room, are credited to the reference collection. Further- 
more, 9.600 volumes which have come to the Library as gifts, includ- 
ing over 3,500 United States government publications, are in this de- 
partment. As stated in our report last year, many of these books are 
rare, and valuable for future use. But most of them are not such as to be 
in active demand now. So the practical working collection in the refer- 
ence department is considerably less than that in the circulating depart- 
ment. These figures represent the condition of the Library at the end 
of the period covered by this report. Of course, the average number 
of volumes in the various departments during that period was consid- 
erably less. 

The following tables show the use of the Library for the fourteen 
and two-thirds months from the time it was opened to readers. 
November 11, 1895, to Janaury 31, 1897. 



8 



TABLE I.— USE OF THE LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 





• 


1 

1 
1 




v 






(/i 




• 


:d 




(A 

ID 


c 


1 

1 


a> 


a; 


1 


B 


^ 1 

^ 1 





*o 1 


X 


Ck^ 



Visitors to Reading Rooms 



November, 1895. 6,100 

December 8,017 

January, 1896. . . 9,080 

February 9,182 

March 9.613 

April 8,209 

May 7,520 

June 9,210 

July 9,286 

August 9.668 

September 8,925 

October 10,565 

November 11,436 

December 11,141 

January, 1897.... 10.639 



Total 138,591 



593 

1,149 
1,802 

955 
1,130 
1,097 

826 

823 

873 
1,207 
1,010 
1,224 

1.403 
1,431 
1 73 1 

I '7.254 
039.311 
"56^ 



T 



u 

c 

u 

Pi 



•a 

'u 

Pu 




a 
a 



1.240 2,016 2,287 

1,495 2,944 2,967 

• 1,744 3.016 3,258 

f 1,055 f 2.901 C2,i02 2,127 

1.376 3.051 2.248 2,672 

1,249 2,474 2.124 3.532 

914 2.247 1,856 2.34s 

1,055 2.072 1,774 2.34? 

1,177 2.236 1,920 2,12; 

1,458 3.024 2,396 2,22i 

1,066 2,913 2.056 2.08 

1.258 3,363 2,504 3.13 

1,440 4.562 3,527 2,80 

1,367 4.218 3,712 2,97 

1.380 3.735 2,604 2,4^ 



19.274 44772 28.823 39.31 



a 17,254 represents the number of volumes called for at the Rcrercn* 
Of the volumes used from the open shelves in the Reference room 
account could be kept; but 39,311 is a conservative estimate, made a 
noting the use made of these volumes during days of average attendance. 

b The statistics for the Periodical and Children's reading rooi 
estimated. The visitors to these rooms are counted for one week in 
The figures thus obtained are used as a basis for making the estimate 
month. 

c The Children's reading room was not opened till February 1, i89< 
time the children used the Reference and Periodical rooms in commo 
When a room was provided especially tor the children, the attendance 
ence and Periodical re cms was in consequence decreased. 



TABLE 2.— USE OF BOOKS BY CLASSES. 



Circulation. 



Reference. 




General Wo^ks 

Philosophy , 

Religion 

Sociology * • 

Philology 

Natural Science . « . . . 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel & Description 
Biography 



2.443 

1,117 

2,029 

3,570 

241 

3.384 

2,590 

2,162 

8,856 

6.634 

6,796 

6.911 

Fiction (adult & juvenile) 91,858 



Total 138.591 



1.76 

.8 

1.46 

2.^8 

.17 
2.44 
1.87 

1.57 
6.39 
4.79 
4.9 
4.99 
66.28 



100.00 



3.904 
256 

391 
1,172 

no 

872 

1,460 

1,892 

1,279 
2,611 

664 
1,860 

783 
17,254 
39^3 1 1 
56.565" 



22.62 
1.48 
2.26 

6.79 
.63 

5.05 

8.46 
10.96 

7.41 
15.13 

3.89 
10.78 

4-54 



100.00 



TABLE 3— MISCELLANEOUS FIGURES. 



bo 

c 

'5 -^ 

s ^ 

• *■ 



Days open 376 

Average daily circulation 368+ 

Highest circulation, Jan. 2, '97. 861 
Lowest circulation,Sept. 29. '96. 166 

Borrowers* cards issued 9.946 






441 



I .a 6 

' .2 o 

Pu 



441 



C rf 

2 o 
u 



9- o 
g o 

t Pi 



364 376 



It will be seen from these figures that the total number of books issued 
for home use was 138.591. The average number of volumes in the circu- 
lating department during the period covered by this report, was about 
8.500. In other words, the entire stock in this department was circulated 
more than sixteen times in fourteen and two-thirds months, or more 
than once each month. Manifestly a borrower will usually find any 
particular book which he seeks **aut.** This is the great drawback in 
this department. We urge borrowers to put on their call slips several 
books in the order of preference. But it is difficult to persuade the eager 
borrower, who haj sent jn a call for any one of a dozen books, that not 
one of them is in. We d6 not claim that the machinery of this depart- 



10 

ment is absolutely infallible. But we have carefully investigated such 
complaints as have come to uS, and \ve are sure that very seldom has 
a book been reported "out" when it was not. With 9,946 registered 
borrowers, about one for every volume, it is natural that many should 
become discouraged and allow their cards to fall into disuse. The onl) 
remedy is more books. So far the total circulation has been limited solelj 
by the number of books we have for the purpose. We could easily 
double the circulatfon, if we had the necessary books. 

Of even greater importance than quantity is the quality of circulation 
We desire to call attention to the fact that our percentage of fiction i 
considerably less than the average in this country and in England, whil 
the percentage in other classes is proportionately greater. We do nc 
mean to imply that the reading of fiction is to be condemnec 
But it should be gratifying to know that the quality of 013 
.circulation takx^s high rank in comparison with that of other publi 
libraries. One thing which has contributed to this result is the fact thj 
attractive reading lists, upon subjects of present intere-st^^ or upon lin< 
of general culture, have been compiled arid posted from time to tin 
upon the bulletin boards opposite the delivery desk. 

We are glad to be able to report a steady growth in the use of tl 
reference department. Figures give an inadequate idea of the importa 
work done here. The amount of accurate information supplied 
enquirers, the substantial encouragement to serious study offered 1 
this department, cannot be represented by figures. The amount of wo 
done through the mails is considerable. Requests for information abo 
books and subjects of all sorts are received almost daily through t 
mails, not only from our own citizens, but from all over Weste 
Pennsylvania, and even from as far as California: If the Library c 
supply the desired information, it is always cheerfully given. An i 
portant part of the work of this department is the compilation of li 
of books and magazine articles bearing upon subjects which are bei 
studied by classes in .schools and by clubs in this vicinity. These li 
are constantly used and appreciated, one class coming to the Libr; 
regularly each week to study the books and articles referred to in th 
lists. It should be noted, furthermore, that, owing to the intensely c 
weather which prevailed here last January, though the figures shov 
slight decrease: in all the other departments for that month, those ir 
eating the use of the reference department show an increase. 

There are now nearly one thousand volumes upon the open shel 
in the reference room. These, consisting of dictionaries, encyclope< 
and other general reference works, are acciessible to all who care 
use them. Since we are constantly adding to this free-to-hai^d collect 
and since the present shelves are almost full, it will be necessary to 
in more shelving during the present year. Eventually we hope to Y 
shelving around the entire room, containing a good working refer< 
collection which may be used freely, without ady restrictions further t 
that the books must not be taken from the room. In order to put 
entire reference collection as much as possible at the service of tl 
who wish to use it for serious study, we have been issuing shelf pen 
which are good for one y^ar and entitle the holder to free access to 
shelves in the book wing. These permits are not designed for the 
of the merely curious, but are gladly issued to responsible persons 
desire to examine the contents of the Library on any subject. 

Of course it is not to be expected that so young a library sb 
have an adequate collection of books upon any subject or in any de 
ment. But it seems to be assumed that we should have as compb 



r 



II 

collection as possible of books and periodicals bearing upon the technical 
and natural sciences. Such a collection would certainly be appropriate 
and exceedingly useful in this community. We have bought as many such 
works as our funds seemed to justify; but unfortunately books of this 
kind are expensive. The most useful are complete sets of scientific 
journals and proceedings of scientific societies; and these are the very 
books that arc hardest to find and require the largest outlay of money. 
Several Pittsburgh manufacturers have kindly turned over to the Library 
large collections of the files of technical journals which had accumulated 
in their offices, and these have proved to be of great use to us. But 
the most urgent need of the reference department is a special fund to be 
used in building up as rapidly as possible a technical and scientific 
collection commensurate with the needs of the greatest manufacturing 
center in the United States. As adding authority to what I have said, 
1 beg leave to quote from some letters received from men who are 
eminent in this community in various branches of natural and technical 
science. Prof. Keeler, head of the Allegheny Observatory, and president 
of the Pittsburgh Academy of Science and Art, writes as follows: "It 
is evident to any one who looks over the catalogue of the Carnegie 
Library that the present collection of books is principally intended to 
satisfy the needs of the great public; it is eminently proper that this 
should be so, and the collection is certainly an excellent one for its 
purpose. But the main object of the Library having been duly consid- 
ered, would it not be almost equally desirable to satisfy the needs of 
students? I have in mind students of science, though recognizing the 
equal claims of others. It can hardly be doubted that we shall have a 
constantly increasing number of persons who wish for a deeper knowl- 
edge of scientific subjects than can be obtained from popular treatises. 
and it is to be hoped that the work of the Academy of Science will 
create a demand for the higher scientific literature. I believe that a good 
collection of the classic works of science, and of the principal scientific 
journals (the great original sources of information) would be of the 
greatest value to the community. It would also add to the dignity of 
the Library. Further, I am not aware that a collection of books and 
journals of the kind mentioned* above is to be found in any public library 
between Philadelphia and Chicago. Unfortunately, such works are 
expensive; on the other hand, they are never out of date, and their money 

value increases with time If you see your way to carrying 

out this idea, I beg to assure you of my hearty sympathy and co-opera- 
tion. I shall be glad to furnish lists and to give you any other assistance 
in my power." Mr John A. Brashear, who is himself a good illustration 
of what scientific books may do for a man, says, **I read with much 
pleasure the monthly reports of the good work you are doing at the 
Library, and I think I can appreciate the value of that which you are 
doing in your circulating department. It seems to me, however, that 
you ought to have a first class reference library at the very earliest date, 
and this library ought to cover a large field in the way of science, 
technics, liberal arts, etc. Such a library you will no doubt remember 

Mr Phipps presented to our institution in Allegheny In 

the line of technical w6rks, this library has been particularly valuable, 
for, go into this reference room when you will, you will find artisans 
and professional men with their memorandum books, consulting the 
various works and putting down data of value in their business, which, 
perhaps, cannot be found outside of this library. Pittsburgh needs such 
a library even more than we do, as it has its thousands of mechanics 
and artisans who are longing for information of a character that cannot 



12 

be purchased by them individually. I know, too, that this is 
Carnegie's wish, for I have talked with him on the subject, and 
hope you will find enough good friends of the Library who will 
hold of and successfully carry out the plan suggested." Mr Georg 
Clapp, secretary of the Pittsburgh Academy of Science and Art, 
has a business interest in technical science and a personal intere 
natural science, writes, "There is one branch of literature 
has been very largely neglected in the libraries of this city, and to \ 
particular attention should be paid in the Carnegie Library; I ref 
scientific books which are, in many cases, too expensive to be purcl 
by private individuals. At the present time students have a very lii 
number of books of this class to refer to and these are scattered thi 
several libraries, the Carnegie and Phipps alcoves in the Mercantil 
Allegheny Carnegie libraries, and the libraries of the Engii 
Botanical and Microscopical Societies. What we need in Pittsl 
is a complete reference library, covering all branches of the art! 
sciences, a library where students in any branch may be able to get 
of the literature on the subject. Such a library cannot be pure 
all at once, no matter what funds you may have at your disposal, as 
of the books are out of print and very rare and can only be picked 
second hand. In order to secure these you should have a special 
placed at your disposal so that the minute the book is offered yo 
send for it at once, often by telegraph, in order to secure it, as yo 
find that many other libraries with such a fund, or private indivi 
are constantly on the watch for the very books you are most at 
to obtain." Mr L. B. Still well, one of the most prominent ele 
engineers in this country, writes as follows: "In compliance witt 
request for a statement of my views concerning the desirabil 
securing and maintaining in your Library a carefully selecte< 
reasonably complete collection of current periodicals, reports < 
leading electrical societies of America and Europe and standard 
of reference, I would advise as follows: — Electricity is not mei 
coming science' — it has come. Its practical applications are inter 
with the everyday life of the community. At the same time, its 
bilities, as compared with what has thus far been accomplished, 
great that no man to-day can prescribe their limits. The predo 
bent of that part of the reading public of Pittsburgh, which re 
learn, is in the direction of applied science — the practical appl 
of scientific principles to everyday needs. We have in Pitt 
hundreds, possibly thousands, of young men and boys anxious tc 
and in a special degree interested in electricity. To my p 
knowledge many of them avail themselves of every opportunity to 
information on this subject. A suitable library of periodicals and 
of reference would be eagerly studied by these young men with 
to themselves and to the community. Such a library should 
not only the ordinary elementary books and periodicals deal in 
practical applications, but should also have as complete a collec 
practicable of the more advanced scientific works. Among tho 
would naturally avail themselves of the opportunity offered some 
undoubtedly be qualified to pursue advanced study, and it 
be remembered that the library which assists in the evolutio 
Clerk Maxwell or a Joseph Henry is accomplishing no less 
community at large than the library which educates a hundred 
workmen. Do not think I mean to disparage the more elemental 
and the training of artisans — far from it, but I think that in : 
to the books ordinarily found in our libraries it is particularly d 



13 

that the Pittsburgh Library should contain also books of reference 
suitable to advanced study." Prof. R. A. Fessenden, professor of 
electrical engineering in the Western University of Pennsylvania, writes, 
"I learn with deep regret that the sum of money available for the purchase 
of books has not been sufficient to permit of your obtaining the scientific 
reference works which would form so desirable an addition to the 
Carnegie Library. I had hoped that, even though there was not enough 
money to get a tolerably complete set, there might be enough to permit 
of your obtaining the list which, at your suggestion, I sent you as 
containing the more, important and indispensable references made use 
of in my profession. Though this list contains but a small fraction of 
the works which are desirable, even after leaving out those not of 
practical use, yet they would be of the utmost value to technical and 
scientific workers here, and I trust that some way will be found by which 
they may be secured. At present it is necessary to send to New York 
or Philadelphia when I wish to consult writers whose works are not 
in my own library, and this, besides being quite expensive, is not 
satisfactory; and though I mention myself, I am only one of a large 
number similarly situated. A knowledge of precedent is as necessary in 
engineering as in law, and from a purely commercial standpoint such 
a library would be a good investment for Pittsburgh. If Pittsburgh 
is to keep its supremacy in the lines it has made its own, it must depend 
in the future, even more than in the past, on brains and skill and 
knowledge, for its natural advantages are no longer so supreme as they 
were. The English have seen their industries and manufactures pass 
one by one into the hands of the technically educated German, till now 
the last Board of Trade report shows that even the shipping trade is 
going. I believe that if the facts were known which Mr Mundella, the 
president of the English Board of Trade, brings forward to show that 
this decline is due solely and entirely to neglect of technical education 
and scientific interests in England, the business men here would 
appreciate, (as no doubt many of them do now), the advantages of such 
a library. I earnestly trust that you may be able to secure such a 
library for Pittsburgh." 

By reference to Table No. i it will be seen that the total number of 
persons who have used the four reading rooms in the Library during 
the period covered by this report was 132,232. These figures represent 
the number who have read and studied in these rooms; sight-scers have 
not been counted. Adding, then, to this total the number of books issued 
from the circulating department, we have a grand total of 270,823 
persons who have used tjje Library for the purpose of reading and 
study, a number almost equal to the entire population of Pittsburgh. 

A list of the periodicals, 2^3 in number, received and on file in the 
Periodical room, and of the newspapers, 54 in number, received and on 
file in the Newspaper room, is appended to this report. 

We now come to a subject of the greatest importance. No provision 
was made for a separate children's department in the planning of our 
Library building. The Trustees, however, early saw the need of such a 
department, and on February i, 1896, one of the rooms formerly used 
for periodicals was turned into a Children's reading room. All the 
juvenile periodicals were put in this room, together with about 300 
selected volumes. The result was that 28,823 children used this room 
during the first year of its existence. On busy afternoons and evening*; 
the room has frequently been so crowded that it was necessary to seat 
dozens of boys on the floor and on benches in the delivery lobby 
adjoining. If this can be done in inadequate quarters and with no 



supervision, what might be accomplished in suitable quarters v 
competent assistants in charge! The idea of a separate children's 
partment has so taken hold of the library world that no public libi 
can any longer claim to be up with the times without this impor 
feature. The libraries of Boston, Buffalo, Brooklyn, Denver and o 
cities have recently provided such departments, and their populs 
and usefulness have been fully demonstrated. No part of a pi 
library's work brings bigger returns. If we could put all our juv< 
books in one large room, where the children could get at them u 
proper supervision, and where they could also be .issued for home 
we should receive the thanks of the children and older people as 
It would relieve the pressure at the delivery desk during busy h 
and save grown people a great deal of annoyance. During the 
year the Library has been issuing large quantities of books to 
of the teachers in the public schools for the use of their pupils, 
is also being done for Kingsley House. All such work could be 
much better through a children's department, such as we are outli 
The estimate of expenditures for this year, Which was submittei 
January and approved by the Executive Committee of the Boj 
Trustees, provides for the necessary assistants for such a depart 
In short, the present Children's room is cramped and unsuitable 
is needed for periodicals, as originally intended. We have the 
and can have the necessary attendants. All we lack is a suitable 
provided with tables, chairs and shelves. 

Some time ago the Board of Trustees decided to devote the i 
from the Bernd fund to a collection of books on architecture and t 
tion. We have already collected about 300 volumes, many of tl 
great beauty and value. It is proposed to put these volumes in « 
by themselves, as soon as practicable, where drawing tables r 
provided for the use of students of the architectural arts. It 
intention to make this collection of educational value to the pub 
of professional value to the architect. As soon as it is large en< 
justify it we shall print a special catalogue of the collection. 

The number of persons regularly employed in the Library, 
the greater part of the period covered by this report, was nineteer 
comprise the following: — A librarian, an assistant librarian, a r 
librarian, a chief cataloguer and three assistant cataloguers, a 
the order department, a stenographer, a superintendent of the cit 
department with four assistants and four runners, and an atten 
the Newspaper room. 

No catalogue of the Library has been issued since the firs 
was ready at the opening. In April, 1896, however, we began 
monthly bulletins of additions to the Library, in editions of io,oc 
These were placed, for free distribution, not only in the Library 
but also at about sixty regular distributing points covering t 
city. Several of the earlier numbers are out of print. We 
making arrangements which will enable us to do this Nvork b 
cheaper. These bulletins are printed, like the catalogue, by th< 
process, and the slugs are kept and filed in alphabetical place \ 
used in printing the catalogue and previous bulletins; so >ve 
at any time to print a new edition of the catalogue at the cos 
and presswork only. We hope to print a new edition next fall. 
more we expect to print next winter annotated lists of bo< 
Library on special subjects, such as the mechanic arts and ma 
of this region. American history, etc. We are convinced that 



15 

with a brief note after each title explaining what is covered by the book 
and its value in the opinion of experts, would be vastly more useful than 
any mere catalogue. 

During November and December of last year we held an exhibition of 
books and MSS. in one of the rooms across the corridor from the 
Reference room. Some of the exhibits were the property of the Library; 
but most of them were generously lent or presented by friends of the 
Library. A small catalogue was printed as a guide to this exhibition. 

From its organization to the end of the period covered by this report 
the Library received as gifts 9,600 volumes and 3,005 pamphlets. A list 
of donors with the number of books and pamphlets griven is appended 
to this report. Many of these books are of great and permanent value. 
Since the report of a year ago the Library has received one gift which 
we cannot pass by without particular mention. In December last the 
Exchange National Bank of Pittsburgh presented to the Library the 
large collection of bound newspapers which the Bank had been collecting 
for many years. They number over six hundred bound volumes of the 
great dailies of New York and Pittsburgh, from the first half of the 
century to date. The collection is invaluable. On account of the size 
of the volumes, as well as the size of our collection, it was decided to 
provide special shelving for our newspapers; and the upper story of the 
book wing is now being fitted up for this purpose. 

Since the close of the period covered by this report the Library has 
received as a gift the valuable medical collection of the late Dr Andrew 
Fleming, numbering nearly a thousand volumes. The importance of 
the gift is our excuse for mentioning here what properly belongs to 
the next annual report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. H. ANDERSON, Librarian. 



i6 

PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS RECEIVED AT 

LIBRARY.* 



On File in the Periodical Roam. 



Academy (London). d 

d Advocate of Peace. 
d Aluminum World. 

American Anthropologist. 

American Architect and Building 
News. d 

American Catholic Quarterly 
Review. 

American Chemical Journal. 

American Engineer, Car Builder, 
and Railroad Journal. 

American Historical Review. 

American History Leaflets. 
d American Jewess. 

American Journal of Psychology, rf 

American Journal of Science. d 

American Journal of Sociology, d 

American Machinist. d 

d American Manufacturer & Iron d 

World. d 

American Naturalist. d 

Analyst (London). d 

Annals of the American Academy rf 
of Political and Social Science. 

Antiquary (London). 

Architect (London). 

Architectural Record. 

Architecture (London). d 

Architecture and Building. 

Arena. 

Argonaut. 

Art Amateur. 

Astrophysical Journal. 

Athenaeum (London). 

Atlantic Monthly. 

Auk. 

Babyhood. d 

Babyland. 
d Baptist Home Mission Monthly. 
d Baptist Missionary Magazine. 

Blackwood's Edinburgh Maga- 
zine. 

Book Buyer. 

Book News. d 

Book Reviews. 

Bookman. 

Bookseller (London). 



Boston Stamp-Book. 
Brick Builder, 
British Architect (London) 
Builder (London). 
Building News (London). 
Bulletin of the American Ir 

Steel Association. 
Carpentry and Building. 
Cassier's Magazine. 
Century Magazine. 
Chamber's Journal (Londc 
Chautauquan. 
Chemical News (London) 
Chemiker-Zeitung (Cothei 
Christian Reformer. 
Christian Register. 
Christian Science Journal. 
Christian Statesman. 
Church at Home and Abr< 
Church News. 
Churchman. 
Citizen. 

Coal and Coke. 
Collector. 
Colliery Engineci 
Commercial and Financis 

Chronicle. 
Congressional Record. 
Contemporary Review (] 
Cosmopolis (London). 
Cosmopolitan. 
Critic. 

Cumulative Index to Per 
Current Literature. 
Cyclopedic Review of 
History. 

Daily Stamp Item. 

Dial. 

Eclectic Magazine. 

Edinburgh Review (Lt 

Education. 

Educational Review. 

Electrical Engineer. 

Electrical Journal. 

Electrical World. 

Electrician (London). 

Engineer (London). 



• This list does not include various library bulletins which arc 
exchanges. 

d. preceding the name of a periodical, indicates that it is donated. 



17 



Engineering (London). 
Engineering and Mining Journal. 
Engineering Magazine. 
Engineering News and American 

Railway Journal. 
Engineering Record. 
English Historical Review 

(London). 
English Illustrated Magazine 

(London). 
European Architecture. 
Fliegende Blatter (Berlin). 
d Forest Leaves. 

Fortnightly Review (London). 



Library (London). 

Library Journal. 

Life. 

Lippincott's Magazine. 

Literary Digest. 

Literary News. 

Literary World. 

Littell's Living Age. 

Little Men and Women. 

London, Edinburgh and Dublin 
Philosophical Magazine (Lon- 
don). 

London Quarterly Review 

zine (London). 

ine. 

azine (London). 



ERRATUM. 



Scientific American Supplement to foot of 
page 17 should follow Scientific American, 8th 
line, 2d column, page 18. The list of those "On 
File in the Newspaper Room" should begin with 
Allegheny Herald. 



Stamp-News. 
Librairie Fran- 



d Home Monthly d 

Horseless Age. 

Ibis (London). 

Illustrated London News. 

Independent. 

Inland Architect. 

Iron Age. 

Ironmonger (London). 
d Jewish Criterion. d 

Journal of Education. 

Journal of the American Chemi- 
cal Society. 

Journal of the Chemical Society rf 
(London). d 

Journal of the Franklin Institute, d 

Journal of the Society of Chemi- d 
cal Industry (London). 
d Journal of the Western Society 
of Engineers. d 

Judge. 
d Kindergarten News. 
d Kingsley House Record. 

Ladies' Home Journal. 
d Legislative Record. 
d Ladies' Journal. 

L.A.W.Bulletin and Good Roads, d 

Lend a Hand. 



, Pennsylvania 

•tes and Queries. 
H. 
d. 
iviiAsiuiidi ^ XVV.V1VW of the World. 
Monthly Bulletin of the Bureau 

of American Republics. 
Municipal Affairs. 
Scientific American Supplement. 
Scientific American, Building 

Edition. 
Scottish Review (London). 
Scribners* Magazine. 
Smith College Monthly. 
Spectator (London). 
Street-Railway Journal. 
Sunday School Times. 
Temperance Tribune. 
Tidings. 
Tin and Teme. 
University Courier, University 

of Pennsylvania. 
Western Electrician. 
Western University Courant. 
Westminster Review. 
Whist. 
Wochentliches Verzeichnis 

(Leipzig). 
Woman's Journal. 
Munsey's Magazine. 
Woman's Missionary Magazine. 
Youth's Companion. 



i8 



On File in the Newspaper Room. 



Music 

Musical Courier. 

Nation. • 

National Geographical Magazine. 
National Review. (London). 
Nature (London). 
Nautilus. 

New Book List (London). 
New England Historical and d 
Genealogical Register. d 

New England Magazine. 
New Review (London.) 
New World. d 

Nineteenth Century (London). 
North American Review. 
Notes and Queries (London). 
Observer. 
d Official Gazette of the Patent d 

Office. 
Osprey. d 

Outing. 

Outlook. d 

Overland Monthly. d 

d Painting and Decorating. 
Pall Mall Magazine (London). d 
Paving and Municipal Engi- d 
neering. d 

Pedagogical Seminary. d 

Pennsylvania Magazine of His- 
tory and Biography. d 
d Philatelic Advocate. 
d Pittsburg Medical Review. 

d Pittsburgh Bulletin. d 

Political Science Quarterly. 

Popular Astronomy. 

Popular Science Monthly. 

Portfolio (London). 
d Pratt Institute Monthly. 

Public Libraries. 

Public Opinion. 

Publications of the Genealogical 
Society of Pennsylvania. 

Publishers' Circular (London). d 

Publishers' Weekly . d 

Puck. d 

Quarterly Journal of Economics, d 

Quarterly Review. d 

Railroad Gazette. d 

Railway Review. d 

Rand-McNally Official Railway d 

Guide. d 

d Reader. d 

Reliquary (London). d 



Review of Reviews. 

Revue Bleue (Paris). 

Revue des Deux Mondes (Paris) 

Saint Nicholas. 

Saturday Review (London). 

School Journal. 

Science. 

Scientific American. 

Allegheny Herald. 

American. 

Atlanta Constitution. 

Berliner Tageblatt. 

Bossburg Journal. 

Boston Evening Transcript. 

Boston Herald. 

Chicago Tribune. 

Chicago Times-Herald. 

Christian Cynosure. 

Cincinnati Commercial Tribune 
Cleveland Citizen. 
Cleveland Leader. 
Clipper, Pittsburgh. 
Commoner and Glass Worl 

Pittsburgh. 
East Ender. 
Elizabeth Herald. 
Freiheit's Freund, Pittsburgh. 
Galveston Semi- Weekly News. 
Glasgow Mail. 
Kuryer Polski. 
London Times. 
Louisville Courier Journal. 

National Glass Budget, Pittsbu 
New Orleans Picayune. 
New York Evening Post. 
New York Herald. 
New York Sun. 
New York Tribune. 
Oil City Derrick. 
Paris Figaro. 
Philadelphia Press. 
Philadelphia Times. 
Pittsburgh Catholic. 
Pittsburgh Christian Advocat 
Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegr 

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazel 
Pittsburg Daily News. 
Pittsburg Dispatch. 
Pittsburg Leader. 
Pittsburg Life. 
Pittsburg Post. 
Pittsburg Press. 
Pittsburg Times. 



19 

d Pittsburger Volksblatt. South Pittsburger. 

d Pocatello Tribune. d Svenska Veckobladet. 

d Presbyterian Banner. d Superior Leader. 

San Francisco Chronicle. Washington Post. 
d Sokol. 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY.* 



From its Organisation to February 1, 1897. 

Givers 517 

Volumes 9,600 

Pamphlets 3,005 

Vols. Pams. 

Academy of Science and Art, Pittsburgh 2 .; 

Agnew, Mrs 5 

Albree, Joseph 2 

Allegheny Observatory 2 

American Iron and Steel Association 5 i 

American Swedenborgian Publication Society 23 

Anderson, E. H 6 3 

Anderson, Geo. H 2 

Anonymous 8 199 

Archer, Frederic i 

Argentine Republic 7 

Aschmann, F. T i 

Astronomical Society of the Pacific i 

Ayer, William C i 

Babcock & Wilcox Co 5 

Bakewell, B. G i 

Barber, Edwin A. i 

Barclay, Mrs Sarah Jane 5 

Barnes, Rev. L. C 3 

Barnes, Phinehas 2 

Barton, Miss Clara. (American National Red Cross.) i 

Barton, Dr J. H Files of periodicals and 10 

Batsford, B. T., London i 

Batten. Dr John M 2 

Becker, Mrs M.J 2 

Benney, Miss Sevilla F i 

Bermingham, C i 

Berry, George A 2 

Bertin, Georges, Paris 2 

Bigelow, E. T 4 

Bigham, Rev. John, Greencastle, Ind i 

Billquist, T. E 2 

Bisscll, John 65 4 

Blagden. Silliman, Boston, Mass i 

• The periodicals and newspapers which are received regularly at the Library as 
gifts are marked with a d in the list immediately preceding this. 



I- 20 

Vols. Pan 

Blaine, Mrs E. (Veech) 4 

Bolton, Mrs Sarah K., Cleveland, O i 

Booth & Flinn Files of periodicals 

Borland, E .C i 

Boston Public Library i 

Bouton, J. W., New York i 

Brockett, A. H 2 

Brockhaus, F. A., Leipzig 40 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library 

Brooks, Miss H. St. B 26 

Brown, Isaac B., Harrisburg One map 

Brown, M i 

Brown, Thomas S 123 

Brown University 

Bruce, David D 12 

Bruce, Wallace 4 

Bryn Mawr College 

Buffalo Library 

Burrows, Charles A 

Burton, C. M., Detroit, Mich 

Cambridge Public Library 

Carlisle, James D 8 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny. (Public Documents from 

their duplicate collection.) 344 

Carnegie Free Library, Braddock. (Public Documents from 

their duplicate collection, and others.) 52 

Carnegie Steel Co Files of periodicals and 3 

Chamber of Commerce, Pittsburgh i 

Chantrell, Miss Grace 2 

Chess, H. B 5 

Chicago Board of Trade, G. F. Stone, Secretary i 

Church, Mr S. H 2 

Cincinnati Journal of Natural Science. File of Periodical. 

Clapp, Charles E Z^ 

Clapp, D. C 24 

Clapp, Geo. H Odd numbers of periodicals and 26 

Clarke, Robert, & Co., Cincinnati 2 

Cleveland Public Library 2 

Coles, Dr J. A i 

College of Charleston 

Colliery Engineer Co., Scranton, Pa i 

Collingwood, William Pamphlets and MSS 

Collins, H. E 19 

Collins, Mrs Jane S 3 

Colorado State Agricultural College 

Colorado State Treasurer i 

Columbia University, New York 17 

Corcoran Gallery of Art 

Cornell University, Andrew D. White Library 2 

Corwin, D. P i 

Cory, Miss H. E i 

Craig. Isaac 2 

Crocker, Mrs R. C 10 

Cunningham, Charles R i 

Curtis & Co.. Boston 



2t 

Vols. Pams. 

Dalzell, J. Willis i 

Dartmouth College i 

Day, B. S i 

Day, W. C , 2 

Deats, H. E 2 10 

Deming, J. L 9 

Denniston, G. F 17 

Denniston, Mrs G. F i 

Denny, Miss M. W., & Spring. Mrs 2,^4 

Denver Public Library i 

Diffenbacher, J. F 3 

Drew Theological Seminary 17 

Drexel Institute. Philadelphia, Pa 2 18 

Duff, Mrs Anna i 

Eastman, William R 2 

Eaton, Dr P. G 2 

Eau Claire (Wisconsin) Public Library i 

Egleston, Dr Thomas. New York i 

Ehrmann, Geo. A i 

Einstein, D. C i 

Ellwood, J. K 8 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore i 

Exchange National Bank of Pittsburgh 638 

Expanded Metal Construction Co i 

Fairman, Charles M 4 

Ferguson, John M i 

Field, Dr Henry M 6 

Field Columbian Museum 12 

Flack, J. B II I 

Fleishman, S. L 2 

Fleming, Dr Andrew 6 

Flinn, Hon. William 7 

Foerster, Ad. M File of a periodical and 27 

Ford, Hon. H. P 30 

Foster, Edward, New Orleans Fourteen Newspapers. 

1837-42 

Fourth Avenue Baptist Church 7 

French, H. P 4 

Frick, H. C I 

"Friend" 3 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 

Fulton, Mrs H. W Two newspapers and i 

Ganss, H. C i 

Garratt, Henry 2 

Gill, John U., Harrisburg, Pa 19 

Godfrey, Miss L. B 

Gore. R. S i 

Gosnell, R. E., Victoria. B. C i 13 

Graff, H. H One Newspaper. 1787 

Graham, Charles i 7» 

, Gray, Col. J. H 4 

Greenland. J. W 2 

Gosnell, R. E i 13 

Griffith, W. E.; Washington, D. C 1 

Guessel, F. C. D 2 



22 

Vols. Pan 

Gusky, Mrs J. M 2 

Guttcnberg, Prof. Gustave 16 

Hall, C. N I 

Hamlin, A. C i 

Handy, James O 

Hannan, Mrs C i 

Harding, Mrs L. M MSS. vols 4 

Harper, John A Old bank scrip 

Harris, W. J i 

Hartford Public Library 2 

Hartman, J i 

Hartrick, Mrs M. B i 

Harvard University i 

Hauptmann, F. D i 

Hawley Down Draft Furnace Co., Chicago 

Heine Safety Boiler Co i 

Heinrichs, E. H 

Heinz H. J 43 sketches 

Helena (Mont.) Public Library 

Henrici, J. F 25 

Hessin, Mrs J. B One rare newspaper 

Hinkley, Mrs C. M 3 

Hitchler, Theresa i 

Hodges, E. P 5 

Holland, Dr W. J i 

Homeopathic Medical Society i 

Hornaday, W. T., Buffalo, N. Y '. 4 

Home, Drxbin One Hawthorne autograph 

Huff, Mrs C. C I 

Hughes, Alexander 2 

Hulmes, G. H 2 

Hunt, Capt. A. E 

Illinois State Historical Society i 

Immigration Restriction League, Boston 

International Deep Water-ways Association 6 

Ironmonger, London i 

Irvin, James i 

Jack, Mrs A. S 24 

James, Prof. E. J 

Jeypore, Maharajah of 6 

Jenkinson, A. M i 

Johnston, J. B 5 

Jones, H. T 2 

Jones, Trevor i 

Jones, W. L 36 

Journal of Commerce and Commercial Bulletin, N. Y 

Kaye, H. G i 

Keeler, Prof. J. E Files of astronomical periodicals 

Keith. Col. A. H 2 

Keith, Charles P i 

Kelly, J. N i 

King. Mrs Alexander 140 

Kingsbury, J. A i 

Kurniker, Max W 

Lafayette College 



23 

Vols. Pams. 

Lafferty, Hon. S. M 3 

Lambing, Rev. A. A i i 

Langncr, E i 

Lanna, Adelbert, Ritter von, Prague 2 

Latham, J. C. J 4 

Lawrence, W. W 13 

Lazarus Miss Clara File of a periodical 

Lecky, Mrs R. H 133 22 

Lee. Alexander Y 23 maps, 2 photographs and 4 2 

Legislative Assembly (Victoria, B. C.,) Library i 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University i 

Lewis J. L 1,189 historical MSS. with 24 frames for 

same, and case for 14 volumes of early imprint, and. . . . 100 38 

Lincoln, W. E ' i 

Lippincott, Mrs J. C i 

Litchfield. Gen. A. C Autograph copy of "America" 

and 2 

Long, Henry M 20 

Los Angelos Public Library 1 

Lothrop, Miss M. P i 

Lowe, Major 6 

Luckey, George J 4 3 

Lyon, James B 13 

Macbeth, Geo. A 17 

McCandless, Miss M. E 22 7 

McCleland, Rev. H. T 1 

McCormick. Cyrus H i i 

McCrca. James Files of periodicals, and 17 

McCreary, James S i 

McElroy, John H 2 

McFarlane, George L 2 

McGonniglc, Robert 22 27 

McGowan, Dr Wm. D., Ligonier, Pa. . . .One bronze figure ... 

McKee, Mrs Samuel 8 

Macrum, Miss Mary F 26 

Maculler, Parker & Co., Boston i 

Maiden Public Library i 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library i 

Marrietta College Library 2 6 

Marthens, John F File of a periodical, and 9 1 

Mason, Mrs Wm. L 1 

Masonic Library Association of Allegheny county 3 

Mays. H. W i 

Mechanics National Bank i 

Megrew, George i 

Mellor. C. C Files of periodicals and 7^0 185 

Mellor, Miss L. P i75 i 

Metcalf. William 8 

Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York 2 12 

Miller, C. Hunter i 

Miller, Reuben i 

Miller, Mrs Reuben 8 

Miller, Thomas M 8 

Milwaukee Public Library i 4 

Minneapolis, City of i 



M 



Vols. Pair 



Minneapolis Public Library 

Monroe, Wm. S., California, Pa 

Morrison, Hew, Edinburgh 

Morton, Major Howard 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass 

National Academy of Design, New York 

National Fremonters' Association 

New Bedford (Mass.) Public Library 

New Haven Public Library 

New London Public Library 

New York Fisheries, Game and Forest Commission 

New York Reform Club 

Newberry Library. Chicago 111 

Northrop, Mrs M. S Files of periodicals and.. 

Oakley, Mrs J. M 

Oberlin College 

Ohio State Library 

Park Bros 

Parkhill, Mrs William, Brownsville, Pa 

Patterson, Burd S 

Peabody Museum, Cambridge, Mass 

Pears, Harry P 

Pearson, George 

Pcnnsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pcnnsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 
Pennsylvan 



2 
2 
2 
I 



I 
I 
I 
2 



I 
I 

25- 

33 

45 



2 

6 



ia Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia 

ia, Adjutant General 

ia, Auditor General 

ia. Banking Commissioners 

ia, Board of Commi.ssioners of Public Charities. 

ia. Board of Health 

College for Women 

ia. Commissioner of Soldiers' Orphan Schools. . 

ia, Commissioner of Fisheries 

ia, Department of Agriculture 

ia. Department of the Interior 

ia. Factory Inspectors 

ia Hospital 

la. Insurance Commissioner 

ia. Public Printer 

ia Railroad Company 

ia. State Asylum for the Insane 

ia State College 

ia. State Librarian 

ia, State Treasurer 

ia, Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Peoria Public Library 

Pernim, H. M., Detroit, Mich 

Pflaum. Magnus 

Philadelphia Free Library 

Philadelphia Times 

Philipps. G. M.. Westchester, Pa 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 

Pittsburgh. Department of Public Safety 

Pittsburgh Orchestra 

Pittsburg Post 

Pittsburg Press 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 

2 

46 
2 
I 
2 
I 
I 



4 
2 

1 
I 



I 

3 
1 



I 
2 
1 



138 
1 



25 

Vols. Pams. 

Pittsburgh Printing Co 3 

Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory Files of periodicals 

Pittsburg Times Files of periodicals, and 38 358 

Piatt, Franklin i 

Polk, R. L., & Co I 

Porter, H. K 65 866 

Potts, J. L I 

Princeton University i 

Providence Athenaeum i 

Publishers* Weekly i 

Quincy, Mrs W. C : . . . 11 

Quinon, Stephen One framed drawing, and 19 

Radebaugh, D. W i 

Radebaugh, Reed 2 

Reed, Mrs Colin McF 11 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y 

Roberts, J. B 1 

Rollins, Mrs A. W i 

Rossell, R. T i 

Rowell, J. C I 

Sabin, Joseph 9 

St. Joseph (Mo.) Public Library 2 

Salem Public Library 2 i 

San Diego Public Library i 

Sanford, Miss L. G i 

Sanford, Orlin M 2 

San Francisco Free Public Library i 3 

Savage, Mrs Kate 2 

Scaife, Oliver P 2 

Schwartz, J. E 54 

Scott, Prof. F. N., Ann Arbor, Mich 

Scranton Public Library i 

Searcy, J. T 2 

Searight, James A., Uniontown, Pa i 

Sharpe, Reuben 8 

Shiffler Bridge Co Files of periodicals and 18 

Smith, Lee S i 

Smith, P. F. (for the G. A. R.) 14 1 

Smith College 1 

Societe Zoologique de France i 

Society of Friends, Joseph Hall, Ag'u Philadelphia. P 34 >^ 

Sodon, Albert J i 1 

Sound Money League of Pennsylvania 22 

Spielman. J. G i 

Spratt. Rev. G. M., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Stephenson, James i 

Stevenson, W. M 3 

Stokes, A. P r 

Stone, Frederick D 

Stoy, Miss Kate, Greensburg, Pa 22 

Sturgis, O. J I 

Sturtevant Prelinnean Library. St. Louis 

Sutro Library, San Francisco 

Swank, J. M ' 

T-Square Club, Philadelphia 



26 

Vols. ] 

Taylor, Ralph 

Thompson, Wm. R i 

University of Chicago 

University of Minnesota 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of the State of New York 

Updike, Mrs H. S., in the name of Thomas Bowdoin Up- 
dike 12 

Valentine, B. B 2 

Van Voorhis, J. S i 

Vassar College 

Verner, A. J 28 

Very, Prof. F. V 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind 

Walker, Miss M. E i 

Wallace, Mrs C. H 2 

Warner, Dr Lucien C i 

Warren, Dr B. H 

Watson, Mrs Ellen M 2 

Watson, Wm. R 

Webster, Beveridge 3 

Weeks, Joseph D 94 

Weil, Mrs W i 

Weldin, J. R., & Co i 

Wellesley College 

Welshons, G. H i 

West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station 

Western Univeristy of Pennsylvania 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co Files of periodicals, 

and 

Westinghouse Machine Co 

Weyman, B. F 310 

Whitehead, A. C i 

Whitehead, Rt. Rev. Cortlandt 48 

Wiicox, J. F 2 

Williams, J. H 3 

Williams, Mrs L. J., Hempstead, L. 1 2 

Williams College 

Wilmington Institute Free Library 

Wilson, Erasmus i 

Wilson, J. A 32 

Wilson, Mrs L. B 35 

Winslow, Dr W. H 3 

Wisconsin State Historical Society i 

Wisconsin State Library 

Wolverhampton (England) Free Library 

Woodbridge, G. M., Marietta, O 

Woods, Charles L 

Woods, Edward A 

Wurts, A. J File of a periodical, and 

Yale University 

Young, Col. J. J., Collection of 14 

United States Government. (Most of them transferred with 
depository rights from the Pittsburgh Library Asso- 
ciation.) 3.471 



27 



Subscriberes to the fund for the purchase of the Carl Merz Musical 
Library, 1,190 volumes, as follows: 



Mrs Wm. Thaw 
H. C. Frick 

E. M. Hukill 
Robert Pitcaim 
Chiles -C }ltUqr 
Henricks Music Co. 
Frank F. Nicola 
Mrs J. W Paul 
Charles Davis Carter 
Ross W. Drum 

F. W. McKee 
Ethelbert Paul Nevin 
S. L. Fleischman 
Carl. Retter 

W. B. Edwards 

Thco. Salmon 

J. D. Bemd 

W. L. Scaife 

John Gemert 

R. C. Oehihlcr 

Toerge Bros. 

Carl Maeder 

Oscar H. Rosenbaiim 

Elmer L. White 

D. P. Black 

Alec M. J. 

Miss M. L. Davison 

Andrew Carnegie 



Mrs J. M. Gusky 
John B. Jackson 
J. W. Paul 
S. Hamilton 
Thoma^ C. Jenkins 
Charles C. Scaife 
Miss M. L. Davison 
C. B. Shea 
Members of the Mozart 

Club 
A. M. Foerster 
Thomas C. Lazear 
William Loeffler 
Beveridge VVebster 
Joseph H. Git tings 
H. W. Armstrong 
J. Kaufmann & Bro. 
H. Holdship 

E. A. Wood 

F. W. Gerdes 
W. V. Dermitt 
Edwin "^W. Smith 
F. J. Bussman 
John C. Slack 

J. G. Bennett 
A. T. Rowand 
T. C. Ewart 
S. Floersheim 



Charles J. Clarke 
James B. Scott 
D. Herbert Hostetter 
J- M. Schoon maker 
,H. K: Porter 
P. Zimmerman 
William Mullins 
Mrs C. L. Magee 
H. Kleber & Bro. 
Allan C Kerr 
Leo Oehmler 
W. E. Schmertz, Jr. 
J. M. Hoffman & Co. 
Lechner & Schoenber- 

S. Ewart 

Edward Jay Allen 
George Kappel 
Leonard Wales 
M. L. Myers 
G. R. Broadberry 

D. M. Bullock 
F. Bechtd 
William M. Watson 
William Holmes 
Thomas F .Kirk 

E. C. Hefney 
J. W. B. 



Subscribers to fund raised by George F. Denniston, to purchase a Saur 
Bible, and a lot of historical MSS., as follows: 



C. B. Shea 

George H. Gapp 

George A. Macbeth 

J. Willis Daltcll 

John B. Jackson 

W. N. Frew 

C. C. Mellor 

Hon. W. G. Hawkins. 

H. C Frick 

C. L. Magee 



Reuben Miller 
Thomas H. Lane 
Park Painter 
J. L; Lewis 
Charles E. Speer 
J. .F. Wilcox 
B. F. Weyman 
John Caldwell 
John G. Holmes 
W. G McCandless 



John Walker 

J. Scott Ferguson 

Rev. J. J. McTighe 

J. W. Paul 

H. S. A. Stewart 

J. J. Booth 

J. E. Schwartz 

John H. Ricketson 

Dr W. J. Holland 



Gifts began to arrivfe at the Library before systematic arrangements 
were completed for recording them, and consequently some names may 
be omitted- W> shall be glad if any donors who do not find their names 
in this list will inform us of the fact. 



28 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOtLOlM 



Pittsburgh, Pa., April lo. 
To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds: 

Gentlemen: — In submitting a report for the past fiscal 
I desire among other things to call your attention to ^ 
items, as shown in the Treasurer's report, of the expenditures 
department. It is well known to all who have had experience 
erection of building^ of any kind, that when specifications are 
and contracts are drawn up, it is next to impossible to embody ir 
specifications or contracts all that is necessary to complete or e 
building. It matters not how great the interest of him or them 
whose direction it is being erected, there will be times as the 
progresses when the best interests of the owners will be ser> 
spending money for some additional improvements. And afte 
finished 2^ld occupied it must be properly furnished and equippe 
the necessary facilities to do the work of the several departments, 
will in a manner explain what use was made of the $18,927.92 
charged to the "contingent fund." Of this amount it will be r 
bered that there are several large items of expense, among whi< 
balance of $16,004.73 paid on electric light plant, $600 for wire « 
for the windows, $254.75 paid building contractor for a num 
improvements made during the year, and $660 for ventilating th< 
story of the science wing. The balance is made up of smaller an 
but equally as important and necessary as those mentioned. In re 
to the item of $660 and in explanation of why the third story 
science wing was not equipped with the necessary ventilating ap] 
at the time of the erection of the building, it may be of interest t 
that these rooms were originally an attic, and while the buildir 
being erected the building committee concluded to convert this 
wise useless space into rooms, with a view to ventilating then 
if they might be needed. This proved to be a happy thought 
part of the committee as, owing to the rapid growth of the M 
they found it necessary to make use of them within a year aft 
opening of the building. This gave an additional floor space t 
department of nearly 6,000 square feet. The total expenditures, as 
are $36,942.53. The actual running expenses were $18,014.61. The 2 
of estimate for the year was $18,200. This leaves a surplus of $iJ 

One of the principal cares or duties of tne department is heating 
ing and ventilating the building. The amount of space to be heat 
ventilated is 1,694,643 cubic feet and the number of lights is 3.34 
<io this, it will be seen that by charging the several amounts that 
be charged to this work, required an expenditure of $5,421.47. 
includes the wages of the engineers and fireman, all repairs and si 
fuel, removing ashes, electric lamps and globes, and artificial gas coi 



29 

after the light plant closed down each night. While we have no way 
of determining accnrately, or separating the cost of lighting irom that of 
heating and ventilating, yet we believe that sixty per cent of this amount, or 
$3,252,885^ charged to lighting, and forty per cent, or $2,168.58^ charged 
to heating and ventilating, would be an approximate estimate. This would 
be an average cost of a little less than $1.00 per year for each light and 
about $1.28 for each 1,000 cubic feet of space heated and ventilated. It 
may be of further interest to say that while the heating and ventilating 
apparatus, together with engines, dynamos and electric wiring, represents 
an outlay of over $60,000, yet the cost for repairs has been comparatively 
small. The Treasurer's report will show that $71.43 was the amount 
charged for this purpose. I desire to say that owing to our method of 
classifying our accounts, some small permanent improvements were 
entered under the head of '"repairs," that should have been charged to 
the ''contingent fund," and that the total for actual repairs did not exceed 
$20, the only item charged to electric light plant being 55 cents to replace 
one broken bolt. 

That the building has been popular with the people is evident from 
the large attendance to all parts of it; and notwithstanding the crowds 
that have at times visited it, frequently numbering as many as 15,000 
in one day, it has suffered little from abuse or wear. I would, however, 
recommend the following improvements for this year: That a system of 
drains be put outside the cellar walls at the places necessary to prevent 
water from coming through. This water is evidently from springs, and 
while there is no immediate danger, yet I would suggest that action be 
taken as early as possible. I would also ask that permission be given 
to purchase and erect the necessary apparatus to recieive the water 
condensation from steam traps, piping, drips, &c., and return it to boilers. 
This I would recommend as a matter of economy in fuel and water, and 
to prevent injury to the sewer piping underneath the building. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM. 

Superintendent of Building. 



30 



1. » 



REPORT OF MANAGER €F MUSIC HALL 



' ' Pittsburgh, Pa., April i6, 18 

To the Committee m Music ^H all: ' '' 



Gentlemen:— I have tfifei ft6^\j?r*'W make report of the operatior 
Carnegie Music Hall for the fiscalyeai- endhig January 31st, 1897. 

, . M^ Hall , ., , 

During the year the hall has been occupied as follows: 

Afternoon. Evei 

Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 20 2( 

(Two seasons of concerts.) j . 

Art Society, $50 rate ; • • : • • •;• i • • K 

Mozart Club, $50 fate. . . .* '. *...:... . .,'.. . . :: 

Charity and educational, $75 rate i 

Charity and educational, $ibo rate K 

Conventions at educational rates. 4 : 

Star Course, $150 rate [ 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175. 11 

Entertainments paying full rate, $125 i 

Total pay entertainments, times 26 6,' 

Free Organ Recitals. 

The regular free organ recitals by Frederic Archer, established \ 
the Hall was opened, have been continued weekly, on Friday aftern 
and Saturday evenings, until the Board of Trustees determined to ch 
the Friday afternoon recitals to Sunday afternoons, the first Sui 
recital date being December 13th. No recitals were, however, g 
during the months of July, August and September, and the usual re 
was omitted on May 30th, being Decoration Day, and on October 
when the Hall was occupied by the Convention of the St. Andr 
Brotherhood, while an extra recital was given on January ist. 
total list of recitals for the year is as follows: Friday afternoon, 
Saturday evening, 39; Sunday afternoon, 8. 

On the evenings of June 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th, and October 24th, 
usual organ recital was preceded by a lecture by Mr. Archer, when 
following named subjects were treated by him on the dates nai 
respectively: History of the Organ, The Modern Organ, Nati 
Music and its Characteristics, Popular Music of the Past and Pre: 
and Dance Music. These lectures were not only unique in the ed 
tional life of Pittsburgh, but the large audiences that attended t 
proved the plan to be wise and popular. 



31 

An actual i:ount of the .attendance at the £ree- organ recitals has been 
made sincethe fall season began, on October 2nd and 3rd, with this result: 

Saturday evenings, (iS) i3,9^ 

Average (774J 

Friday afternoons, (9) 2,576 

Average '....: ....'..' (274) 

Sunday afternoons, (8, includes i ^ very stormy, 500) .* * 15,706 

Average (1,962) 

Using these averages for the total, number of recitjals, we have 

31 Friday afternoons ^ 8,494 v 

39 Saturday evenings 30,186 

8 Sunday afternoons. 15,700 

54»38o 

But from careful estimates- of the attendance at the recitals, from 
February to June, inclusive, that Mr. Archer has furnished, it appears 
that during this time the audiences at both the Friday afternoon and 
Saturday evening recitals were somewhat larger than at those given later 
in the season, where an actual count of the attendance was made. Having 
Mr. Archer's estimates in mind, and the record of actual attendance, 
as above stated, it is safe to say that from the time of opening the Hall 
to the end of the last fiscal year, fully 80,000 persons have attended the 
free organ recftals. 

In this connection, permit me to point out the enormous increase in 
attendance because of the change of the afternoon recitals from Friday 
to Stmday. 

Other Free Entertainments. 

By agreement with the Mozart Club, in return for services rendered, 
said club was entitled to the free use of Carnegie Music Hall for choral 
concerts during the musical ^ season of 1895-96. On March 27th and 
May 14th, the Hall was assigned to the Mozart Club under this agreement. 

On the evening of Tuesday, September ist, the Hall was used by the 
Museum Committee, operating under Mr Carnegie's special endowment, 
for a lecture by Prof. F. W. Putnam, of Harvard University, for which 
use I have not as yet been instructed to collect rent. 

Total Use of Hall During Year. 

Afternoon. Evening. 

Pay Entertainments 26 63 

Free Organ Recitals 39 39 

Other free uses 3 

65 105 

In General. 

The general use of the Hall on Sunday was confined to one afternoon, 
under the auspices of the St. Andrew's Brotherhood, and one afternoon 
meeting in aid of the Armenian cause. 

The organ earned $50 during the year, having been used but twice 
where a charge was made. 

During the year but one contract for the use of the Hall has been 
broken. This was signed by a resident of Pittsburgh, who represented 
that he wished to organize an entertainment to benefit a local charity. 
Although helped by your manager in every possible way, such as frequent 
changing of dates, your manager finally reported the contract as broken. 



32 

The literary propaganda sent out by your manager includes an a 
tive circular, issued in November, and sent generally throughot] 
country, the advertising of the Hall for a short period in the le 
music journal of the country, and the issue of the organ souver 
the occasion of the one hundredth free recital. This souvenir, 
was prepared under the direction of Mr. Archer, contained an alph 
cal list of all the compositions played by him at one hundred re 
the specifications of the Carnegie Music Hall organ, and a brief 
ductory statement by Mr. Archer of a retrospective and pro 
character. This souvenir, a neat pamphlet of fifty-three pages, wa 
to leading musical people and organizations, as well as represer 
literary publications in this country and in Europe. 

In the local field your manager has endeavored to promote the in 
of the Hall in such a way that it should become constantly more pc 
The helpful attitude of the Pittsburgh newspapers towards the Ca 
Library institution in general is a factor in making more efficie 
work of your manager. 

The correspondence of your manager is at all times directed t< 
points, persons and organizations as would appear to furnish bt 
for the Hall, and with the growing interest in musical art in Pitts 
which must in a measure be seen in a general artistic advance h 
is safe to predict a more frequent use of the Hall in the future t 
the past. 

As to the employees of the Hall under the direction of your ms 
the ushers and doorkeepers, the year has marked most satis 
conduct on their part and a polite service lo the public, the re 
which seems to give an atmosphere to Carnegie Music Hall not 
elsewhere. 

Very respectfully, 

G. H. WILSON, Mar 



33 



•t 

4 



MUSICAL DIRECTOR'S REPORT. 



Pittsburgh} March 30. 1807-. 
To ike Committee on Music Hall: 

Gentleaien: — As a matter of record, I beg leave to report to you that 
on the 31st of January, 1897, ^ gave my losth Free Organ Recital ia 
Carnegie Music Hall, Pittsburgh. 

In the course of the series, I have introduced 875 compositions, repre- 
senting 263 composers of all nationalities. The total number of persons, 
present at the performances here referred to has reached nearly 80,000. 

My musical lectures given during the year 1896 were also very 
successful, and I have received many letters from those who attended 
them, acknowledging in warm terms, their helpfulness. 

The Sunday recitals have abundantly realized expectations, attracting 
on each occasion an average audience of 2,000, largely made up of the 
people for whose benefit they have been established — vi», the wage 
workers. I am more than satisfied with the artistic results thus far 
achieved, and the consequent growth of refined musical taste in the 
community. 

The organ is now in satisfactory condition, and the work of keeping 
it in good order is conscientiously executed by Messrs. Farrand & 
Votey's representative, at a cost of $500 per annum. I send herewith 
a copy of the Souvenir book issued on the i6th of January, 1897, which 
contains detailed particulars of my recitals to that date. 

Yours truly, 

FREDERIC ARCHER, Musical Director. 



34 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



IV. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Your Committee on Investments and Finance respectfully report that 
the investment of the Bernd Fund in a first mortgage on the property 
on the comer of Diamond street and Cherry Alley, known as the Kuhn 
Law Building, »a& reported to you by Finance Committee March 15th, 
189s, was paid (in accordance with its terms) October 20th, 1896, requir- 
ing a reinvestment of same, and after consultation with our President 
and Treasurer, and on the advice of T. Mellon & Sons, Bankers, the 
Committee on Investments and Finance purchased for the credit oi 
Bernd Fund nineteen first mortgage, five per cent, gold loan of 1890 
bonds of the Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake Erie Railroad Co., of thi 
par value of $1,000 each, principal due 1940, interest payable April is 
and October ist of each year, and numbered 900, 1075-6-7-8-9, 1890-1-2- 
1841-2-3-4-5, 2310, 2878-9 and 2880 as follows: 

Jan. 4, Paid for 3 P. & S. bonds at 95 $ 2,853. 

Jan. 4, Paid for 10 P. & S. bonds at 95 J4 9.537- 

Jan. 5, Paid for 5 P. & S. bonds at 95J/1 4,781 

Jan. 5, Exchange charges on 18 bonds 3 

Jan. 14, I P. & S. bond at 99 and commission 991 

Exchange charges 



$18,16 
(The April, 1897, coupons are attached to bonds.) 

Bonds are registered by the Central Trust Company of New Yor 
Registrar, and are considered by all as good and safe, and tnakii 
permanent investment of the Bernd bequest of $19,000 at 5 per 
interest on which, with the amount still in hands of the Treasur< 
considered sufficient for the carrying on of the Bernd project. 

We take pleasure in stating that T. Mellon & Sons, Bankers, cent 
the five per cent interest on the moneys received on account o 
payment of. the mortgage, from the date of the payment until the r 
was reinvested in the bonds named and not charging any comm 
on purchase of bonds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chnir 



35 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Condensed statement of H. C. Frick, Treasurer, for the year ending 
January 31, 1897: 

Revenue. 

Appropriation, City of Pittsburgh $65,000.00 

Interest on bank balances 320.15 

Loan from the Carnegie Fine Arts and Museum 

Collection Fund 5,000.00 

Rentals of Music Hall 7,19975 

Library collections, fine.s, etc 95557 

$78,475.47 

Disposition. 

(Vouchers 404^2 to 993 inclusive.) 
Building. 
Maintenance of building, operating labor, 

running expenses, etc $18,014.61 

Electric light plant 18.739.83 

Incidental expenses 509. 12 

$37,263.56 

Library. 

Maintenance of Library, operating labor, 

running expense, etc $16,623.59 

Purchase of books 13.246.15 

Incidental expenses 1 12.50 

$29,982.24 ' 

Music Hall. 

Maintenance of Music Hall, operaing 
labor, running expense, etc $7,703.92 

Other disbursements. 

Cash advanced J. D. Bernd Fund $ 433-41 

Jan. 1896 vouchers paid in Feb.. 1896, and 

incidental expenses 1.939. 13 

^$ 2.372.54 

Cash balance at T. Mellon & Sons* Bank, Jan. 31. 1897 $ M53 2I 



36 



J. D. BERND FUND. 

Revenue. 

Interest; Kuhn mortgage $ 1,385.02 

Interest; daily balances 203.36 

$ 1,588.38 

Proceeds of Kuhn mortgage 17,34309 

$18,931-47 

Disposition. 

Purchase of books $ 1,196.93 

Purchase of bonds 18,167.95 

$19,364.88 

Excess of disbursements over revenues $ 433.41 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



W. N. Frew, Esq., Presideftt: 

We, the undersigned Committee on Audit, beg to report that we have 
examined and audited the accounts of receipts and expenditures, as shown 
in the Annual Report of the Treasurer, which covers all the financial 
accounts in connection with the affairs of the Library, including the 
accounts relating to the Bernd Fund, and that we find the same correct, 
with proper vouchers for all expenditures, and the balances, as therein 
stated. Also, that the securities purchased for the Bernd Fund, nineteen 
bonds of $1,000 each of the Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake Erie R. R. 
arc in the custody of the Finance Committee, as required. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. W. MELLON, 
THOS. G. McCLURE. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORTS 



To THE Board of Trustees 



CARNEGIE UBnimV OF PinSBURGH 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1898. 



1898. 

A. ■ 



i 



LINOTYPE PROCESS. 



CONTENTS. 

Report of the President, ---__- 7 
Report of the Committee on Administration of the 

Library, --.. ... 10 

Report of the Librarian, 13 

Gifts to the Library, 23 

Periodicals and Newspapers Received, - - - 36 

Report of the Superintendent of the Building, - 42 

Report of the Manager of the Music Hall, - - - 46 

Report of the Musical Director, - - - - - . 50 

Report of the Finance Committee, - . - - 52 

Report of the Auditors, 53 

Report of the Treasurer, 54 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Presidem, W. N. FREW, 
Secretary, J. F. HUDSON, 
Treasurer, H. C. FRICK. 

HON. H. P. FORD, H. K. PORTER, 

JOHN S. LAMBIE, GEORGE A. MACBETH, 

J. GUY McCANDLESS, E. M. FERGUSON, 

W. H. McKELVY, ROBERT PITCAIRN, 

THOMAS G. McCLURE, W. N. FREW, 

JOHN McM. KING, A. W. MELLON, 

W. A. MAGEE, H. C FRICK, 

R. H. DOUGLAS, DAVID McCARGO, 

J. P. STERRETT, J. F. HUDSON. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman, E. M. FERGUSON, 

HON. H. P. FORD. 

COMMITTEE ON MUSIC HALL. 

W. A. MAGEE, Chairman, H. K. PORTER, 

JOHN McM. KING. 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

THOMAS G. McCLURE, Chairman, J. F HUDSON, 

H. C FRICK. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, Chairman, W. H. McKELVY, 

R. H. DOUGLAS. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 
A. W. MELLON, Chairman, JOHN S. LAMBIE. 

LIBRARIAN. 

E. H. ANDERSON. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to transmit herewith the 
annual reports of the various committees of the Board, which 
will furnish in detail the record of the past year of the insti- 
tution placed under your charge. They will demonstrate that 
all departments have been successfully and economically 
operated and are accomplishing the work for which they 
were intended in a most satisfactory manner. The Library 
has been meeting the approval of the public more fully each 
month. The Music Hall enjoys a large and increasing 
patronage and the free organ recitals are recognized as a 
most interesting and instructive feature of the life of the 
city. The building has been well maintained, is always 
cleanly and attractive, and in itself exerts an educational in- 
fluence of no small importance. 

The rooms in the building not otherwise made use of 
have been occupied as heretofore by the Art and Science 
departments of the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Fine 
Arts and Museum Collection Fund and the Art Students' 
League, the small hall having been used for the meetings of 
the various learned societies of the city and for the giving 
of scientific and literary lectures. 

The installation of the branch library system is now 
thoroughly under way. The Lawrenceville building, liberally 
stocked with books and periodicals, will be open for public 
use on May ist. The erection of the West End building 



was begun about March 15th, and the plans for the Eleventh 
ward structure are nearly ready for bids. By April ist, 1899, 
three branches will be in operation, and within the following 
year all the buildings, for which locations have been provided, 
will be completed and in use. The plans have been pre- 
pared after a careful study of the systems in operation in 
other cities, and are believed to combine the most modem 
and useful features of district library construction. 

It is my very agreeable duty to again acknowledge the 
generosity of Mr Carnegie, who has given to the Library 
the sum of $10,000 to be expended in the purchase of pub- 
lications bearing on the various branches of technical science. 
This will form the nucleus of a collection that will prove 
of inestimable value to students of the sciences intimately 
connected with the industries of the community. 

It is but fitting to acknowledge with sincere appreciation 

the cordial co-operation extended by the executive and 

legislative branches of the City government, as evidenced 

by the generous appropriations made for the maintenance 

of the Library. Such support calls for the approval of the 

public spirited people of this community and will beyond 

question result in placing Pittsburgh's g^eat educational 
institution on a par with those of her sister cities. 

The City ot Pittsburgh appropriated for the maintenance 
of the main and Lawrenceville branch libraries for the year 
beginning February ist, 1898, the sum of $90,000. This 
added to a balance remaining in the appropriations for the 
various departments at the close of the last fiscal year of 
$835.19 makes a total available for the present year of 
$90,835.19. 

In accordance with the provisions of the By Laws the 
Executive Committee has apportioned this sum as follows : — 

Maintenance of buildings $ 21,555.60 

Maintenance of Library 26,284.00 

Maintenance of Music Hall 1,500.00 

For purchase of books 35,000.00 

Contingent fund 6,495.59 

8 



I am happy to refer to the pleasant relations existing 
between myself and the various committees of the Board 
and to certify to the fidelity and capability displayed by. the 
heads of departments and those serving under them. No 
reasonable complaints have been made of any lack of 
courtesy or efficiency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, President. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
ADMINISTRATION OF THE 

LIBRARY. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

The Committee on Administration of the Library take 
pleasure in reporting the second year's operations of the 
Library and herewith submit, as most of it, the Librarian's 
detailed report, with annexed statistical tables and list of 
donors. The financial part of the operations of the Library 
being kept together with other departments in a very com- 
plete and systematic manner, we refer you to the Treasurer's 
report. 

It has been the constant endeavor of your committee 

to perfect a method in the administration of the Library 
which would render the books most available for use; and in 

order to accomplish this, the monthly list of additions has 

been distributed freely, and a complete catalogue printed 

on cards and arranged in alphabetical order in cases of 

drawers has been prepared. These cards are much more 

than the usual so-called "card catalogues" of libraries, having 

printed under the titles of the books a condensed description 

of contents sufficient to make known the character of a book 

to one not acquainted with it, and also to correct or make 
plain a misleading or obscure title — so that under the present 

facilities given, any one acquainted with either an author's 

name or a subject can by a few moments' easy examination 

of the cards become acquainted with the general contents of 

the books. The preparation of this catalogue has required 

considerable skill and g^eat diligence on the part of our 

library force for some months. It became evident a year ago 

lO 



that much of the type must be made over, and this has been 
done with the linotype machine in an entirely satisfactory and 
economical manner, both as to the appearance of the printing 
and quality of type. So, in short, we have with our own 
library equipment made the entire descriptive catalogue for 
the main library, one for Lawrenceville, ready for the opening 
of that branch, and have the type set ready for a catalogue 
in book form when the proper time comes to send it to press. 
We have no doubt this work will not only be of great present 
value, but save much expense in the future, as the same work 
can be carried on as accessions of books are made — a work 
almost impossible to accomplish after an accumulation, but 
which at least doubles the use of books. 

During the year the library of the Iron City Microscopi- 
cal Society was acquired, which makes the collection in this 
branch of science very complete. 

Shelving for additional books in the Reference room has 
been doubled in the past year, and the sixth floor of the book 
wing has been adapted and contains about i,ooo bound 
volumes of back numbers of newspapers, a very valuable fund 
for reference, and often used. 

In the last report some stress was laid on the importance 
of the department for children. It has been our endeavor 
to take care of this department as well as circumstances 
would permit, and you will note in the Librarian's report the 
increase in attendance, which has forced us to provide more 
fully by a slight change, pending the opening of branches, 
which may detract somewhat from the attendance at the 
main building. We await with considerable interest the 
provisions made for children in the Lawrenceville branch. 

About 400 volumes have been selected and purchased 
with the income from the J. D. Bernd fund. Great care is 
necessary in the selection of books in this department, and 
considerable time elapses between the order and arrival of 
certain ones. Some works, ordered a year ago, are not yet 
received. Additional accommodations will be required for 
such books as these in the near future. 

II 



We take great pleasure in emphasizing and acknowledg- 
ing Mr Carnegie's further gift of $10,000 for the purchase 
of technical books, which are much needed, and before the 
year is over will be highly appreciated by many. 

We also wish to acknowledge the kind and valuable 
services of Mr Geo. Parker, formerly United States consul 
at Birmingham, England, he having furnished us lists of 
books and information at no little labor and trouble to him- 
self and value to us. 

Very respectfully, 

Geo. A. Macbeth, Chairman. 



12 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees : 

I have the honor to present my report of the work of 
the Library for the second statistical year, ending January 

3i» 1898. 

On February i, 1898, there were in the Library 36,748 
volumes and 3,944 pamphlets, not including the duplicate 
collection numbering 1,546 volumes and 622 pamphlets, 
nearly all of which were gifts. There were added during the 
year 9,859 volumes and 944 pamphlets. Of the 36,748 
volumes in the Library 30,726 were classifed and catalogued, 
at the close of the period covered by this report, with 14,423 
volumes in the Circulating department and 16,303 in the 
Reference department. Of the remaining 6,012 volumes, 
about 4,000 are U. S. Government publications, which are 
on the shelves in the Reference department, but have not 
yet been embodied in our general catalogue because the 
catalogue issued by the Government serves for the present. 
The other 2,000 uncatalogued volumes were in progress in 
the catalogue room, having arrived too late to get through 
before the end of the Library year. 

CIRCULATION. 

The number of volumes issued in the Circulating de- 
partment was 119,962, an increase of 4,565 over the previous 
year. The percentage of fiction issued was 65, the other 35 
per cent being distributed among the other classes of litera- 

13 



ture. The fiction was nearly one per cent less than for the 
previous year, and from 5 to lo per cent less than the average 
for free circulating libraries in the United States. This shows* 
as stated in our report last year, that the quality of the circula- 
tion in this library takes high rank. 

The number of registered borrowers in this department^ 
at the close of the Library year, was 12,835. Taking the last 
35 registered, as a fair sample, and typical of the whole num- 
ber, we find that 17 were ladies, boys and girls, and the 
remaining 18 registered their occupations as follows: two 
teachers, two clerks, two civil engineers, one stenographer, 
one engineer, one letter carrier, one g^as inspector, one fore- 
man, one meter-finisher, one compositor, one mechanical 
engineer, one shipping derk, one laborer, one bookkeeper, 
and one iron worker. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes used in the Reference depart- 
ment was 68,702, an increase of 22,232. The number of 
readers was 17,397, an increase of 2,602. It will be seen from 
these figures that each reader consults, on the average, four 
volumes. Any one who has observed the piles of books 
daily placed on the reading tables, before each reader, will 
readily understand this. The amount of serious study in this 
department is most gratifying. The Reference librarian 
keeps a daily record of the subjects upon which readers have 
sought as full information as the Library can give. This 
list of subjects does not include the requests for specific 
books or facts where the reader himself knows what he 
wants and where it is to be found. As illustrating the 
character of the information sought, I will give here merely 
a selection from over a hundred subjects upon which the 
Reference librarian has sought out the resources of the 
Library, for the last two weeks of the year. These 
two weeks were not different from any other two 
weeks, but are taken as typical. Some of the sub- 
jects were: — Colorado River (navigability, etc.), Spain in 

14 



recent times, First crusade, Government ownership of tele- 
graph, Star-Spangled banner (author, occasion of writing, 
etc.), Wireless telegraphy. Tin (manufacture, chemistry, etc.), 
Bank of the United States (arguments for and against), 
Isabella of Poland, Greek costume, Red Cross Society, In- 
ternational peace congress. Boiler incrustation. School 
system in Pennsylvania (what it is, and history of it), Pictures 
by early Italian artists. Decoration of modem houses. 
Furniture of the ancient Greeks, Symptoms of iodine poison- 
ing, Silvering mirrors. What were the earliest alphabets? 
Why was not Latin spoken as generally in Britain as in other 
Roman provinces? Coloring lantern slides. Flying machines, 
Confucianism, Alternating currents. 

READING ROOMS. 

The number of persons who used the Periodical room 
Juring the year was 40,967, an increase of 4,171. Three 
hundred and four periodicals are received regularly and kept 
on file in this room. This number will be considerably in- 
creased during the present year, especially in scientific and 
technical lines. There are 43 newspapers on file in the News- 
paper room, and the number of readers during the year v/as 
26,864, 21 decrease of 3,987. This is the only department 
of the Library which does not show a substantial gain over 
the previous year. 

The attendance in the Children's reading room during 
the year was 32,421, an increase of 3,598. Nearly 400 selected 
volumes are kept on the shelves in this room, as well as the 
files of the juvenile periodicals. Arrangements are now 
being made to increase the facilities for the work in this 
department, and special attention will be given to it, also, in 
the branch libraries. 

The total number of volumes used in the Circulating and 
Reference departments was 188,664, an increase of 26,799. 
The total number of persons using the reading rooms wa? 
117,649, an increase of 6,384. That the work of the Library 
is still growing rapidly is indicated by the figures for last 

IS 



month (March), though it does not belong to the period 
covered by this report. These figures were the largest in the 
history of the Library. 

CATALOGUES. 

Two duplicates of the official card catalogue are now 
being rapidly printed on cards and placed in the new card 
cabinets in the lobby of the Circulating department and in the 
Reference room. In a short time there will be two complete, 
up-to-date card catalogues, on the dictionary plan, conven- 
iently situated for the use of the public. Many of the titles 
in these catalogues are followed by descriptive notes intended 
to give some idea of the contents of the work and its impor- 
tance in its particular field. It is the intention to annotate 
other titles as fast as the time at our disposal will permit. To 
make or compile these notes requires a great deal of careful 
worlj, and it cannot all be done at once. 

The Monthly Bulletin of the Library has been continued 
during the year, and at a very small extra expense, being 
printed from the same linotype slugs, or lines, that were used 
in printing the cards mentioned above. The primary object 
of these monthly bulletins is to inform the public promptly 
what books have been added to the Library; they are not 
to be considered as catalogues. To ascertain what books 
are in the I-ibrary, one of the card catalogues should be 
consulted. 

As appropriate to the summer season, when lighter 
literature is in demand, a catalogue of the English prose 
fiction contained in the Library will be ready for the public 
by April 30th. This catalogue will be issued in book form, 
printed from linotype slugs which have already been used 
on the cards and monthly bulletins. 

Early in May a catalogue of the J. D. Bemd Department 
of Architecture will be issued, in pamphlet form. The archi- 
tectural exhibition which will be held in the Art Galleries 
during the month of May, makes this a peculiarly appropriate 
time to issue the first catalogue of this collection. 

16 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY. 

It is gratifying to be able to report that there has been 
no cessation in gifts to the Library during the past year. 
Our records show that 375 donors gave 2,572 volumes and 
1,519 pamphlets, during the period covered by this report. 
To the present time, more than 12,000 volumes and about 
4,000 pamphlets have come to the Library as gifts. Nearly 
all of those which were not duplicates have gone into the 
Reference department, because they were not such as were 
likely to be in demand for circulation. Hence, though our 
figures show more volumes in the Reference than in the 
Circulating department, the fact is that more volumes have 
been bought for the Circulating than for the Reference 
department. 

The most important gift of the year was that of the 
medical library of the late Dr Andrew Fleming, g^ven by 
Mrs Fleming in the name of her husband. This library 
numbers nearly a thousand volumes and pamphlets, many 
of them of great value. Another valuable collection of 
medical books came from Drs James R. and Alexander M. 
Speer. 

While not falling within the period covered by this 
report, we cannot refrain from mentioning Mr Carnegie's 
munificent gift to the Library of $10,000 to purchase books 
for a reference collection pertaining to the technical arts and 
sciences, with special reference to this region. The impor- 
tance of such a collection in this community was set forth in 
my last annual report, and Mr Carnegie has made it possible 

for us to begin on it at once. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

The first of the series of branch libraries provided for 
by Mr Carnegie, the Lawrenceville Branch, will probably be 
opened to the public the first week in May. About 5,000 
volumes have been purchased and are now nearly ready for 
the shelves. The classifying and cataloguing has been done 

17 



at the Central Library, and a complete card catalogue will 
go to the branch, with the books. 

The West End Branch is now being built, and the plans 
for the Wylie Avenue Branch are drawn. It is probable, 
therefore, that, besides the substantial additions which we 
hope to make to the collection at the Central Library, it will 
be necessary to purchase books, during the present year, for 
two more oranch libraries. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. H. Anderson, Librarian. 

April 12, 1898. 



18 



TABLE I.— USE OF THE LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



• 






Visitors to Reading Rooms. 




i 

9 


<n 

S 

e 


8 

e 


( 

• 

1 


CO 

6i 


• 

a 

C9 






4> 


>> 


4> 


•0 


z 


a 






E 


u 


Mm 


•g 




en 


*« 







4> 


V 


S 


J3 


V 







S 


Pi 


« 


Oh 

•0 


u 

•0 


2; 


H 


1897 
















Feb. . . 


10.157 


1.778 


1.493 


3.967 


2,628 


3.055 


".143 


Mar.. . 


10,972 


1.934 


1.517 


3.657 3.070 


3.226 


1 1,470 


Apr. . . 


9.370 


1.874 


1. 3 18 


3.234 


2.589 


2.965 


10,106 


May. . 


8.485 


1,656 


1.333 


3.017 


2,0? I 


2.359 


8,730 


June . . 


8.519 


i»336 


1,169 


2,466 


2,201 


1.522 


7,358 


JuJy- . 


8,942 


1,266 


1,088 


1.596 


1,220 


1,061 


4,965 


Aug.. 


9.345 


1.657 


1,360 


2,968 


2,520 


1.394 


8,242 


Sept. . 


9,212 


1,410 


1.3" 


3,293 


2,330 


1,236 


8,170 


Oct.. . 


10,439 


1.933 


1,670 


3,517 


2,396 


1.933 


9,516 


Nov. . 


".403 


1,854 


1,765 


4.383 


3.204 


2.157 


11,509 


Dec. . . 


11,194 


1,684 


1.587 


4.277 


4,026 


2,540' 


12,430 


1898 
















Jan . . . 


11,924 


1.887 


1,786 


4.592 


4,216 


3.416 


14,010 






020,269 












119,962 


48,433 


17.397 


40,967 


32,421 


26,864 




Total 


68,702 


117,649 



a This aoa69 represents the number of Yolumes called for at the Reference 
desk only. Of the Yolomes used from the open shelves in the Reference room no 
•ccttrate account could be kept; but 48,433 is a conservative estimate, made after 
carefully noting the use made of these volumes during days of average attendance. 
It should be noted that the shelf capacity in the Reference room, and the number of 
books for free-to>hand use, was doubled on Oct. ai, 1897. 

h The statistics for the Periodical and Children's reading rooms are partly 
estimated. The visitors to these rooms are counted for one week in each month. 
The figures thus obtained are used as a basis for making the estimate for the whole 
month. 



19 



TABLE 2.— USE OF BOOKS BY CLASSES. 



Circulation. 



General Works . . . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology , 

Philology 

Natural Science . . , 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel and Descrip- 
tion 

Biography 

Fiction (adult and 
juvenile) 



CO 



o 



2,736 

1.233 

1. 93 1 
2,760 

259 

3.257 

2,449 

2,365 
7.631 

5.602 

5,651 
5.359 

78,729 



bo 
a 

c 
u 

Oh 



2.28 
1.03 
I.61 
2.30 
.22 
2.72 
2.04 
1.97 

6.36 
4.67 

4.76 

4-47 
6563 



Reference. 



CO 

I 



O 



Total 



1 19,962 



100.00 



3.528 

369 

645 
1,283 

304 
1,306 

2,126 

2.335 
2,281 

2,539 

989 
1,826 

738 
20,269 
48.433 
68,702 



V 

bo 

c 
w 

Oh 



17.41 
1.82 

319 
6.33 

1.50 
6.44 

10.49 

11.52 

11.25 

12.53 

4.88 
9.00 

364 



100.00 



20 



TABLE 3.— NUMBER OF VOLUMES CLASSIFIED AND CATA- 
LOGUED TO FEBRUARY i. 1898, ARRANGED 

BY CLASSES. 



CLASS. 



General Works 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Usetul Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel and Description 

Biography 

Fiction (adult and ju- 
venile) 



Total 



bo 

c 

o 



c 

E 

t 

a 
Q 



112 
240 
700 
•823 
62 
796 

597 

497 
1,666 

1,364 
889 

1,578 
fr 5.099 



14,423 



c 



u 

c 



4.441 
109 

340 

1.043 
128 

1,289 

2,502 

2,176 

696 

1,553 

693 
1,002 

331 



16,303 



Total. 



4,553 

349 
1,040 

1,866 

190 

2,085 

3,099 

2,673 
2,362 

2,917 

1,582 
2,580 

5,430 



30,726 



a ladmlM is$ volume* in The J. D. Bemd Depertmcnt of Arehiteeture, 

aad abont tsoo in the Hen uid Mellor mntic colteetion*. 

1^ Indnde* «4 voltunes ol fiction in foreign langoage*. 



21 



TABLE 4.— COMPARISON OF FIGURES SHOWING USE OF 

THE LIBRARY FOR 1896 AND 1897. 



\ 





1896. 


1897. 


Volumes issued for home use 

Volumes issued for reference use . . . 


115.397 
46,470 


1 19,962 
68,702 


Total 


161,867 


188,664 



Visitors to Reading Rooms. 

Reference 

Periodical 

Children's 

Newspaper 

Total 



>ms. 


14.795 
36,796 

28,823 
30.851 


17.397 
40,967 

32.421 
26,864 










*^> ^^ ~ 




1 1 1 ,265 


117,649 



22 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY. 

From February i, 1897, to February i, 1898. 

Givers 375 

Volumes 2,572 

Pamphlets 1,519 

Vols. Pams. 

Abel, Mrs Joseph 10 

Academy of Science and Art, Pittsburgh 2 

Agnew, Hon. Daniel, Beaver, Pa 8 

Alabama Geological Survey, Montgomery, Ala i 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa i 

Allegheny General Hospital i 

American Philatelic Association 4 .... 

American Type Founders' Co., Pittsburgh 2 .... 

Anderson, Mr E.H.... Files of periodicals, 

and I 18 

Anderson, Mrs E. H 7 .... 

Anonymous 4 67 

Armor, Mr W. C, Harrisburg, Pa i 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae, Pittsburgh 

Branch 2 

Baker, Mr George H., Columbia University 

Library, New York i 

Baker, Mr S. C, Altoona, Pa 10 .... 

Bakewell, Mr B. G 2 

Barbour, Mr George H i 

Barnes, Rev. Lemuel C i i 

Barnes, Mr Phinehas, Dansville, N. Y i 

Barton, Mr Philip Price .... Files of periodicals, 

and I 

Beatty, Mr John W 4 

Beck, Hon. James M., Philadelphia, Pa 3 

Bell, Mr Thos. W., Oakmont, Pa i 

Bigham, Rev. John, Greencastle, Ind i 

Binns, Mr Edward H 10 .... 

23 



Vols. Pams. 

Birmingham (Eng.), City of 28 23 

Birmingham (Eng.) Free Libraries Committee . 5 39 

Borland, Dr E. B i 

Boston and Maine Railroad, Boston, Mass 4 

Boston College, Class of Philosophy, 1897, Bos- 
ton, Mass I 

Boston Merchants' Association, Boston, Mass i 

Boston Public Library 25 

Boston Transit Commission, Boston, Mass .... 3 .... 

Bouligny, M'lle Lea M., Chevy Chase, Md i 

Breck, Mr E. Y . . . . Autograph letter, Confeder- 
ate money and piece of flag 

Brooks, Miss H. St. B i i 

Brown, Rev. John G i i 

Brown, Mr N. G 5 .... 

Brown University, Providence, R. I i 

Biyn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa i 

Buchanan, Mr Harris i 5 

Buffalo, City of i 

Buffalo Public Library 4 

Bureau of Mines, Victoria, B. C i 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library i 

Canada, Department of the Interior, Ottawa, 

Canada i 

Carbon Steel Co ... . Files of periodicals 

Card, Mr W. W 10 

Carnegie, Mr Andrew 24 

Carnegie Art Galleries 2 

Carnegie Fine Arts and Museum Fund 10 

Carnegie Museum 3 18 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa 2 

Carnegie Free Library, Braddock, Pa i .... 

Carnegie Public Library, Ayr, Scotland i 

Carnegie Steel Co 4 8 

Chamber of Commerce i 

24 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. 
Chamber of Commerce, through Col. T. P. 

Roberts i i 

Chamber of Commerce, Provisional Committee, 

Lake Erie and Ohio River Ship Canal 6 

Chamberlin, Mrs A. E., Boston, Mass i 

Channing, Dr Walter, Brookline, Mass i 

Chapman, Prof. T. J., Ingram, Pa 2 .... 

Charles, Rev. G., Tarentum, Pa i .... 

Chicago Academy of Sciences 21 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History, Cincin- 
nati, O I 

Civil Service Commission, Chicago, 111 i .... 

Qapp, Mr D. C . . . . Files of periodicals, and ... 7 .... 
Clapp, Mr George H . . . . Files of periodicals, 

one map, and 11 180 

Cleveland Board of Education i 

Clowes, Mrs J. A 5 

Collingwood, Mr Wm., Swissvale, Pa One 

picture 

Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 

Pa I 

Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station, Fort 

Collins, Colo 5 

Colorado Bureau of Mines, Denver, Colo i 

Colorado State Treasurer, Denver, Colo i 

Columbia University, New York 2 

Committee on the Stephen Girard Statue, Phila- 
delphia, Pa I 

Commoner and Glassworker .... Files of peri- 
odicals 

Conner, Mr P. S. P., Rowlandsville, Md i 

Corwin, Mr D. P i 

Cory, Miss H. Elizabeth 

Crumrine, Mr Boyd i 

Daly, Dr Wm. H Files of periodicals, and 14 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H i 

25 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. 

Dashiell, Mr G. F 8 

Denniston, Mr CJeorge F . . . . Files of periodi- 
cals, and II 7 

Detroit Public Library i 

Detweiler, Mrs J. S 2 .... 

Detweiler, Mrs J. S. (in the name of Mr Benj. 

Parke, Harrisburg, Pa.) 6 7 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J 2 

Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Eakin, Mr J. A i .... 

Eames, Mr A. H i .... 

Eaton, Dr Percival J i 

Eau Claire (Wis.) Public Library i 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md i 

Farmer, A. D. & Son, New York City i .... 

Fides, Sister M., Academy of Our Lady of 

Mercy, Pittsburgh 2 .... 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111 8 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, — Sunday 

School I .... 

Flack, Mr J. B 4 i 

Fleeson, Mr Thos. B., Qaremont, Pa i 

Fleishman, Mr S. L i 2 

Fleming, Mrs Andrew, (in the name of Dr An- 
drew Fleming) .... Files of periodicals, 

fifty-eight plates, and 910 98 

Flynn, Mr W. J., Erie, Pa i 

Fourth Avenue Baptist Church i 

Fowler, Hon. Chas. N., Washington, D. C i 

Franklin and Marshall College, Alumni Associa- 
tion, Lancaster, Pa i 

Frick, Mr H. C 3 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa i 

Gerwig, Mr G. W 27 

Gleason, Mrs Mary J i .... 

Goldberg, Mr Louis i .... 

26 



Vols. Pams. 

Gratz College Library, Philadelphia, Pa i .... 

Gray, Col. Jos. H 56 

Gross. Mr E. F i i 

Guille-AIles Library, Guernsey, Eng i 

Haight & Freese, New York City 2 

Hamilton, Mr John, Department of Agriculture, 

Harrisburg, Pa i 

Hartford Public Library i 

Hayes, Mr Rutherford P., Columbus, O i 

Henry, Mr Thomas, New Brighton, Pa 274 i 

Hodges, Mr E. P i 

Holland, Dr W. J 10 

Howard Memorial Library, New Orleans, 

La ... . Mardi Gras Newspapers 

Huff, Dr C. C, Homestead, Pa Files of peri- 
odicals, and 16 .... 

Hunter, Mrs Jos. R 40 .... 

Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, 

III I 

Immigration Restriction League, Boston, Mass 4 

Indiana Geological Survey, Indianapolis, Ind . . 6 .... 

Indianapolis Public Library 2 

Industrial Press 2 

Ingram, Mr J. K., Dublin, Ireland i 

Iowa Agricultural College Experiment Station i 

"Iron Age," New York City i 

Iron City Microscopical Society 7 5 40 

"Ironmonger," London, Eng i 

Jenkinson, Mr A. M i 

Jillson, Prof. B. C . . . . Files of periodicals 

Johnston, Mr Wm. G i 

Jones, Mr Thomas, Jr i 

Jones, Mr Wm. L i 

Jordan, Mr John W., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Kansas State Agricultural College i 

Keith, Col. A. H 8 

27 



• • • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • 



• • • • 



• • • 



Vols. Pams. 
Keller, Mr E. E., Edgewood, Pa Files of 

periodicals, and 6 

Kennedy, Hon. John M i 

Kieffer, Mr John B., Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege, Lancaster, Pa 2 

King, Mr Horatio C, Brooklyn, N. Y i \ 

Kingsley House Association 2 i 

Ktrtland, Mr A. P Files of periodicals, and 5 

Koenig, Dr Adolph 7 > 

Krauth, Mr C. P Files of periodicals, and ... 17 4 

Kunits, Mr Luigi von 72 

Lambing, Rev. A. A i 

Landis, Hon. Chas. B., Delphi, Ind i 

Lane, Mr Frederick .... File of a periodical, 

and 3 

Latham, Mr R. S 2 

Lauder, Mrs George 18 

Lawrence, Mr W. W 42 

Layton Art Gallery, Milwaukee, Wis 1 

Lee, Mr Alex. Y., Swissvale, Pa. . . .Two maps, 

and 3 

Lemcke & Buechner, New York City i .... 

Lewis, Mr J. L 2 

Lewisham Public Libraries, London, Eng i .... 

Library Association of Australasia, Sydney, 

Australia 2 

Library Association of Washington City i 

Library of the Legislative Assembly, Victoria, 

B. C I 13 

Lithgow Library and Reading Room, Augusta, 

Maine i 

Little, Brown & Co., Boston, Mass i 

Loef fler, Mrs Wm Files of periodicals 

London Public Library, London, Ontario i 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library i 

Luckey, Mr George J i 

28 



.... 



Vols. Pams. 
McQelland, Rev. H. T. . . .Files of periodicals, 

and 19 .... 

McCormick Harvesting Machine Co., Chicago, 

111 I .... 

Macfarlane, Mr I. G 2 . . . . 

McGaw, Mr Elmer B . . . . File of a periodical 

McGonnigle, Mr Rob't D i 

McMichael, Mr Paul S i .... 

Magee, Mr C. L 27 i 

Magee, Judge Christopher 2 i 

Maine Genealogical Society, Portland, Maine i 

Manchester, City Library of. Manchester, N. H i 

Manning, Maxwell & Moore i .... 

Marquand, Mr Henry, New York City 2 

Mattem, Mr Edwin L 67 .... 

Mechanics Institute, San Francisco, Cal i 

Meginess, Mr John F., Williamsport, Pa 2 

Mellor, Mr C. C . . . . Files of periodicals, and ... 83 84 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York i 

Milholland, Mrs J. B 13 

Miller, Mr Reuben 15 

Milligan, Rev. J. L i 

Milne, Mr J. M., Worthington, O 

Morton, Maj. Howard i 

Munn & Co., New York City 2 

Munro, Dr Dana C, Philadelphia, Pa 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass 

New Haven Free Public Library 

New London (Conn.) Public Library 

New York Civil Service Reform Association 

New York Free Circulating Library 

New York Public Library 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y i 

New York Zoological Society 

Newark Free Public Library, Newark, N. J 

Nineteenth Century Qub, New York City 

29 



.... 



. * . • 



.... 



.... 



Vols. Pams. 



Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 

Oakley, Mrs John M 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, O 

Ohio State Library Commission, Columbus, O . 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Cor- 

vallis, Oregon 



• • • • 



Page & Co 3 

Parsons, J. R., Miller, Lewis, & Steward, J. F., 

Chicago, 111 I 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 

Pennsylvania, Adjutant General i 

Pennsylvania, Department of Agriculture 

Pennsylvania, Auditor General 2 

Pennsylvania Bankers' Association, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 2 

Pennsylvania, Board of Health i 

Pennsylvania College for Women 

Pennsylvania, Commission of Soldiers' Orphan 

Schools I 

Pennsylvania, Commissioners of Banking 2 

Pennsylvania, Commissioners of Fisheries i 

Pennsylvania, Commissioners of the Sinking 

Fund I 

Pennsylvania, Factory Inspectors i 

Pennsylvania, General Assembly 3 

Pennsylvania, Inspector of Coal Mines i 

Pennsylvania, Insurance Commissioner 2 

Pennsylvania, Department of Internal Affairs . . 3 

Pennsylvania, Senate Library .... One map 

Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania State College i 

Pennsylvania, State Librarian 2 

Pennsylvania, State Treasurer i 



I 
2 



• • • • 



30 



Vols. Pams. 
Pennsylvania, Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion I .... 

Peona (111.) Public Library i 

Ptlaum, Mr Magnus, Edgewood, Pa 4 4 

Philadelphia Free Library i 

Philadelphia Times i 

Philips, Mr George M., West Chester, Pa i 

Physio-Medical College of Indiana, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind I 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association i 

Pittsburgh College of Pharmacy i 

Pittsburgh Post i i 

Pittsburgh Printing Co 4 

Pittsburgh, Department of Public Safety 2 

Pittsburgh Reduction Co ... . Files of periodi- 
cals, and 5 15 

Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory Files of 

periodicals, and 19 

Pope, Mr J. William 13 2 

Porter, Mr H. K 32 47 

Potter, Mr Alfred M., Boston, Mass i .... 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library 

Quaritch, Mr Bernard, London, Eng 

Quinon, Mr Stephen .... Files of periodicals, 

and I 14 

Rainey, Mr C. T. . . . One map 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y i 

Ritchie, Mr John, Librarian, Boston Scientific 

Society i 

Roberts, Mr John H....Two newspapers « 
(Commercial Gazette Anniversary num- 

oers. ^. ...... ......... •.....••.....• .... 

Robinson, Mrs John F., Sewickley, Pa i 



. • . • 



31 



Vols. Pams. 

Russell, Mr E. H 6 .... 

St. Giles Public Library, London, Eng 2 

St. Joseph (Mo.) Free Public Library 6 

St. Louis Mercantile Association, St. Louis, 

Mo I 

St. Louis (Mo.) Public Library 2 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library 3 

Sanford, Miss Laura G., Erie, Pa i .... 

San Francisco Free Public Library i 

Saunders, Mr E. G 2 i 

Sawyer, Mrs M. E . . . . Files of periodicals 

Scaife, Mr Wm. L i 

Schmertz, Mrs W. E 24 .... 

Schwartz, Mr J. E 2 .... 

Schwartz, Mr J. L i 

Scranton Public Library i 

Seattle (Wash.), City of. Public Library De- 
partment I 

Secretary, Old Third Ward School Reunion .... i 

Sellers, Mr Edwin Jaquett, Philadelphia, Pa i 

Shea, Mr C. B . . . . One plan and picture, and ... 140 13 

Sheldon, Mr W. L., St. Louis, Mo i ..... 

Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, Boston, Mass .1 

Silas Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn 2 

Smiley, Hon. Albert K., Lake Mohonk House, 

Ulster Co., N. Y i 

Smith, Mr A. W i 

Smith, Edward, & Co., New York City i 

Smith, Mr Franklin W., Saratoga Springs, 

N. Y I 

Smith, Mr H. H i 

Smith, Col. Norman M 16 .... 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. . . . 23 19 

Sodon, Mr A. J i i 

Somerville Public Library 2 

32 



Vols. Pams. 
Sons of the American Revolution, District of 

Columbia Society, Washington, D. C i 

Southworth, Mr George C. S., Salem, O i 

Speer, Drs Jas. R. and Alex. M . . . . Odd num- 
bers of periodicals, and 135 49 

Spiller, Margaret i 

Standard Underground Cable Co 2 .... 

Stechert, Mr Gustav E., New York City 2 

Steel, Mr W. G., Portland, Oregon i .... 

Sullivan, Mr Louis H., Chicago, 111 i 

Swank, Mr James M., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Syracuse Central Library i 

Teacher's College, New York City i .... 

Thaw, Mr Wm., Estate of 2 .... 

Thurston, Mr Lorrin A., Washington, D. C i 

Tifft, Mr Wrilson S., Buffalo, N. Y i .... 

Towie Manufacturing Co., Springfield, Mass. . . i .... 

Tyson, Mr James, Philadelphia, Pa i .... 

United Presbyterian Board of Publication 15 5 

United States, Bureau of American Republics . . 2 i 

United States, Bureau of Ethnology i .... 

United States, Civil Service Commission 2 2 

United States, Commission of Fish and Fish- 
eries I 

United States Engineers' Office, Pittsburgh i 

United States Government .... Twenty-four 

blue prints, and 131 141 

United States Government, through Hon. John 

Dalzell Fifty-three maps, and i 11 

United States, Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Education 3 

United States, Department of the Interior, 

Geological Survey 3 

United States, Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion I .... 

United States, Librarian of Congress i .... 

33 



Vols. Pams. 



United States, Department of State, Library 

United States, War Department, Chickamauga 

and Chattanooga Park Commission 

University of Chicago 

University of Minnesota 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of the City of New York 

University of the State of New York 

University of Wisconsin 

University of Wisconsin, Library 

Vassar College 

Venn, Mr Theo. J., Chicago, 111 i 

Waggoner, Mr R. E 4 

Walker, Dr R. L., Carnegie, Pa 6 

Washington and Jefferson College 2 

Watson, Mr Wm. Richard 

Weeks, Mrs Jos. D . . . . Files of periodicals, and. 18 

Weldin, J. R. & Co ... . Files of periodicals 

Wellesley College 

Wells, Mr Chas. F 2 

Westinghouse Electric and Mfg. Co i 

Westinghouse Machine Co 

Weyman, Mr B. F 2 

White, Mr Wm., Jr 3 

Whitehead, Rt. Rev. Cortlandt .... Files of peri- 
odicals, and 35 

Whitney & Stephenson i 

Willard, Miss E. M 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute 

Wilson, Mrs L. B 10 

Winner, Mr Willard E., Kansas City, Mo i 

Winthrop, Mr Robert C, Jr., Boston, Mass. ... i 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission 

Wisconsin State Historical Society 

Wolverhampton (Eng.) Free Library Commit- 
tee 



22 



17 



30 



34 



Vols. Pams. 

Women's Rest Tour Association, Boston, Mass i 

Wood, Mr Joseph Files of periodicals 

Woodbury, Mr J. P., Boston, Mass i 

Wright, Mr Edward S i 

Yale University i 

Subscribers to a fund raised by Mr George F. Denniston, 
to purchase a volume of the engfravings of the Society of 
American Wood Eng^ravers, as follows : 

Mr George H. Qapp, Mr George A. Macbeth, 

Mr John Caldwell, Mr C. C. Mellor, 

Mr W. N. Frew, Mr Robert Pitcaim, 

Mr H. C. Frick, Mr C B. Shea, 

Mr John G. Holmes, Mr H. S. A. Stewart, 

Mr John B. Jackson, Mr H. H. Westinghouse, 

Mr J. L. Lewis, Mr B. F. We)rman. 



35 



PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS RECEIVED 

AT THE LIBRARY.* 
On File in the Periodical Room. 



Academy (London). 
d Aluminum World. 

American Agriculturist. 

American Amateur Pho- 
togfrapher. 

American Anthropologist. 

American Architect and 
Building News. 

American Catholic Quar- 
terly Review. 

American Chemical Jour- 
nal. 

American Colonial Tracts. 

American Electrician. 

American Engineer, Car 
Builder, and Railroad 
Journal. 

American Historical Re- 
view. 
d American Jewess. 
d American Journal of Arch- 
aeology. 

American Journal of Psy- 
chology. 

American Journal of 
Science. 

American Journal of So- 
ciology. 

American Kitchen Maga- 
zine. 

American Machinist. 
d American Manufacturer & 
Iron World. 

American Microscopical 
Journal. 



American Naturalist. 

Analyst (London). 

Annals of the American 
Academy of Political 
and Social Science. 

Antiquary (London). 

Appleton's Popular Science 
Monthly. 

Architect and Contract 
Reporter (London). 

Architectural Record. 

Architectural Review. 

Architecture (London). 

Architecture and Building. 

Arena. 

Argonaut. 

Art Amateur. 

Art et Decoration (Lon- 
don). 

Art Journal (London). 

Art Student. 

Association of Engineer- 
ing Societies. 

Astrophysical Journal. 

Athenaeum (London). 

Atlantic Monthly. 

Auk. 
d Ave Maria. 

Babyhood. 

Babvland. 
d Baptist Home Mission 

Monthly. 
d Baptist Missionary Maga- 
zine. 

Birds. 



* This list does not indade vmrioas libnur bulletins which are received as 
exchanges. 

dt preceding the name of a periodical, indicates that it is donated. 



36 



Blackwood's Edinburgh 

Magazine. 
Book Buyer. 
Book News. 
Book Reviews. 
Bookman. 

Bookseller (London). 
d Boston Stamp-Book. 
Brick Builder. 
British Architect (L o n- 

don). 
Brochure Series of Archi- 
tectural Illustrations. 
Builder (London). 
Building News (London). 
d Bulletin of the American 
Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion. 
d Bulletin of Bibliog^phy. 
Carpentry and Building. 
Cassier's Magazine. 
Century Magazine. 
Chambers's Edinburgh 

Journal (London). 
Charities Review. 
Chautauquan. 
Chemical News (London). 
Chemiker - Zeitung f Coe- 

then). 
Child Garden. 
d Christian Cynosure. 
d Christian Register. 
d Christian Science Journal. 
d Christian Statesman. 
d Church at Home and 

abroad. 
d Church News. 
d Churchman. 
d Citizen. 

Oay Record. 
d Coal and Coke. 

Commercial and Financial 
Chronicle. 



d Congressional Record. 

Contemporary Review 
(London). 
d Cornell Magazine. 

Comhill Magazine (Lon- 
don). 

Cosmopolis (London). 

Cosmopolitan. 

Critic. 

Cumulative Index of Peri- 
odicals. 

Current Literature. 

Cyclopedic Review of Cur- 
rent History. 

Deutsche Rundschau (Ber- 
Un). 

Dial. 

Digest of Physical Tests. 

Dingler's Poljrtechnic Jour- 
nal. 

Eclectic Magazine of For- 
eign Literature. 

Edinburgh Review (Lon- 
don). 

Education. 

Educational Review. 

Electrical Engineer. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Electrical Review (Ameri- 
can). 

Electrical Review (London). 

Electrical World. 

Electrician (London). 

Elektrotechnische Z e i t - 
schrift (London). 

Engineer (London). 

Engineering (London). 

Engineering and Mining 
Journal. 

Engineering Magazine. 

Engineering News and 
American Railway Jour- 
nal. 



37 



Engineering Record. 

English Cat^ogue of d 
Books. 

English Historical Review 
(London). 

English Illustrated Maga- 
zine (London). 

European Architecture. 

Fliegende Blatter (Berlin), d 

Fortnightly Review (Lon- d 
don). 

Forum. 

Frank Leslie's Popular 
Monthly. 

Gartenlaube (Berlin). 

Gentleman's Magazine 
(London). 

Good Government. 

Good Housekeeping. 

Great Round World. 

Hardwicke's Science Gos- 
sip (London). 

Harper's Bazar. 

Harper's Magazine. d 

Harper's Round Table. 

Harper's Weekly. 
d High School Journal, 
Pittsburgh. d 

Home Market Bulletin. d 
d Home Monthly. 

Home Study for Building d 
Trades. 

Home Study for Electrical 
cal Workers. 

Home Study for Machin- 
ists, Steam Engineers, 
etc. 

Home Study Magazine. 

Horseless Age. 

House Beautiful. d 

Ibis (London). 

Illlustrated American. 

Illustrated London News. 



Independent. 

Index. 

Inland Architect. 

Inland Printer. 

Institution of Mechanical 
Engineers. 

Iron Age. 

Ironmonger (London). 

Jerseyman. 

Jewish Criterion. 

Journal of Education. 

Journal of the American 
Chemical Society. 

Journal of the Chemical 
Society (London). 

Journal of the Franklin 
Institute. 

Journal of Morphology. 

Journal of the Royal Mi- 
croscopical Society. 

Journal of the Society of 
Chemical Industry (Lon- 
don). 

Journal of the Western So- 
ciety of Engineers. 

Judge. 

Kindergarten Magazine. 

Kindergarten Review. 

Kingsley House Record. 

Ladies' Home Journal. 

Legislative Record. 

Leslie's Illustrated Weekly. 

L. A. W. Bulletin and 
Good Roads. 

Library (London). 

Library Journal. 

Life. 

Lippincott's Mag^ine. 

Literary Digest. 

Literary News. 

Literary World. 

Literature (London). 

Littell's Living Age. 



38 



Little Folks. 

Little Men and Women. 

Locomotive Engineering. 

London, Edinburgh and 
Dublin Philosophical 
Magazine (London). 

London Quarteriy Review 
(London). 

Long^man's Magazine 
(London). 

McGure's Magazine. 

Macmillan's Magazine 

(London). 

Magazine of Art. 

Meehan's Monthly. 
d Mekeel's Weekly Stamp- 
News. 

Memorial de la Librairie 
Francaise (Paris). 

Metallog^phist. 

Midland Monthly . 

Mind. 

Mines and Minerals. 
d Mining Bulletin, Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 

Miscellaneous Notes and 
Queries, Manchester, N. 
H. 

Missionary Herald. 

Missionary Review of the 
Worid. 

Modem Art 

Monist. 
d Monthly Bulletin of the 
Bureau of American Re- 
publics. 

Municipal Af^rs. 

Municipal Engineering. 

Munsey's Magazine. 

Music 

Musical Gmrier. 

Musical Times. 

Nation. 



National Geography Maga- 
zine. 

National Review (London). 

Nature (London). 

Nautilus. 

New Book List (London). 
d New Earth. 

New England Historical 
& Genealogical Register. 

New England Magazine. 

New Worid. 

New York Engineer. 

Nineteenth Century (Lon- 
don). 

North American Review. 

Notes and Queries (Lon- 
don). 

Official Gazette of the Pat- 
ent Office. 

"Old Northwest" Genea- 
logical Quarterly. 

Open Church. 

Osprey. 

Outing. 

Outlook (New York). 

Outlook (London). 

Overland Monthly. 
d Painting and Decorating. 

Pall Mall Magazine (Lon- 
don). 

Pedagogical Seminary. 

Pennsylvania Magazine of 
History and Biography. 
d Pennsylvania Medical 
Journal. 

Philatelic Advocate. 

Photo-American. 

Photogfraphic Times. 
d Pittsburgh Banker. 
d Pittsburgh Bulletin. 

Pittsburgh Official Mail, 
Steamboat and Railroad 
Guide. 



39 



Political Science Quarterly. Saturday Review (Lon- 

Popular Astronomy. don). 

Popular Science Monthly, d School Herald. 

Popular Science News. School Journal. 

Portfolio (London). Science. 

Practical Process Worker. Scientific American. 
d Pratt Institute Monthly. Scientific American Build- 
d Presbjrterian Banner. ing Edition. 
d Presbyterian Messenger. Scientific American Sup- 
Proceedings of Engineers' plement. 
Qub of Philadelphia. d Scotch. 

Public Libraries. Scottish Review. 

Public Opinion. Scribner's Magazine. 

d Public Ownership Review, d Smith College Monthly. 

Public School Journal. rf Sound Currency. 

Publications of the Genea- Spectator (London), 
logical Society of Penn- d Spirit of Missions, 

sylvania. Stahl und Eisen. 

Publishers' Circular (Lon- d Stowell's Petroleum Re- 
don), porter. 

Publishers' Weekly. Street-Railway Journal. 

Puck. Studio (London). 

Punch (London). Sunday School Times. 

Quarterly Journal of Eco- d Tidings, 

nomics. d Tin and Teme. 

Quarterly Review. d Vassar Miscellany. 

Railroad Gazette. Western Electrician. 

Railway Master Mechanic, d Western University Cour- 

Railway Review. ant. 

Rand-McNally Official Westminster Review. 

Railway Guide. Whist. 

d Reader. Woechentliches Verzeich- 

Reliquary (London). nis (Leipzig). 

Review of Reviews. d Woman's Home Missions. 

Revue Bleue (Paris). Woman's Journal. 

Revue des Deux Mondes d Woman's Missionary 

(Paris). Magazine. 

d Rose Technic. Youth's Companion. 

d Saint Andrew's Cross. Zoological Bulletin. 

Saint Nicholas. 



40 



On File in the Newspaper Roam. 

d Allegheny Herald. New York Sun. 

d American. New York Tribune. 

Atlanta Constitution. Oil City Derrick. 

Berliner Tageblatt. Paris Figaro. 

Boston Evening Trans- Philadelphia Press, 

cript. Philadelphia Times. 

Boston Herald. d Pittsburgh Catholic. 

Chicago Tribune. d Pittsburgh Christian Ad- 
Chicago Times-Herald. vocate. 

Cincinnati Commercial d Pittsburgh Chronicle Tele- 
Tribune, gr^ctph. 

Qeveland Leader. d Pittsburgh Commercial 

d Qipper, Pittsburgh. Gazette. 

d Commoner and Glass d Pittsburg Daily News. 

Worker, Pittsburgh. d Pittsburg Dispatch. 

d Elizabeth Herald. d Pittsburg Leader. 

d Freiheit's Freund, Pitts- d Pittsburgh Life, 

burgh. d Pittsburg Post. 

Glasgow Mail. d Pittsburg Press. 

London Times. d Pittsburg Times. 

Louisville Courier Journal, d Pittsburger Volksblatt. 

d National Glass Budget, San Francisco Chronicle. 

Pittsburgh. d Svenska Veckobladet. 

New Orleans Picayune. d Superior Leader. 

New York Evening Post. Washington Post. 

New York Herald. 



41 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF THE BUILDING. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., April 12, 1898. 
To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds : 

Gentlemen : — It is a matter of pleasure for mc to be able 
to state to you that I believe the building to be now better 
equipped and better adapted for the various uses for wbkh 
it is intended, and, aside from some comparatively inexpen- 
sive repairs to be made, practically in as good condition as 
when it opened for the first time. The improvements that 
have been made by your approval and direction, the added 
expense necessary to perfect the facilities of operation, will 
be of valuable assistance, and aid very materially in the suc- 
cessful and economical administration of the affairs of the 
department. And I wish to say that, while the amount ex- 
pended for repairs has been comparatively small, the building 
has not been neglected. It has been my experience that 
repairs are necessary immediately upon occupancy, and with 
this in mind, we have endeavored to keep the building, .as 
far as possible, constantly in good condition. In reference 
to this you will please note in estimate submitted for this 
year, a small increase in this item. It is expected with this 
increase to take the necessary care of the Lawrenceville 

4^ 



branch, as well as make some needed repairs in the main 
building; principally retouching paint work, decorations, etc. 
It will be my purpose, if it meets with yotur approval, to 
continue in this manner, making these repairs from time to 
time as the necessity for them arises, trying to keep the cost 
about the $Bme each year. By this means we will not only 
maintain the building in an attractive condition at all times, 
but keep the cost at a minimum by preventing the wear be- 
coming so great as to necessitate a much larger outlay in 
proportion. 

The improvements recommended in my report a year 
ago as deserving of special attention have been made, ex- 
cepting a part of the work of drainage. Owing to other 
matters interfering this was delayed until late in the season, 
and the cold weather prevented a completion. That which 
was done, however, was in the parts of the building most 
seriously effected. I desire to say that it has given entire 
satisfaction, removing all dampness from the walls where 
drains were placed, making it possible to occupy the rooms 
without danger of injury to health. The improvement in 
the arrangements for returning the water of condensation 
to the boilers, as suggested at that time, has been completed. 
In this our expectations have been fulfilled, and a saving of 
water and fuel has resulted. In addition the danger of injury 
to sewer piping has been much lessened, if not entirely 
removed. 

In the matter of expense for operating the machinery de- 
partment, the figures for the past year show that each light 
cost $1.02 1-3, and that the heating and ventilating of the 
building was done at a cost of $1.31 per 1,000 cubic feet of 
space. As compared with the figures given in my last annual 
report, this is an increase of 2 1-3 cents on each light, and 3 
cents on each 1,000 cubic feet of space heated and ventilated. 
In explanation of this I would say that more work has been 
done this year than before, additional lights have been 
added and a larger number used, and, owing to the business 
done, it was necessary to bum them longer. I may state also, 

43 



that during the summer months we found it necessary to oper- 
ate the electric plant all day, to furnish power for the printing 
department, while heretofore the plant remained idle a 
greater part of the day during that period. The great saving 
effected, however, by the introduction of printing machinery 
in the Library department more than compensated for the 
small increase in the cost of power. 

Your action in establishing a rental for the Lecture hall 
has proved to be a satisfactory arrangement, and is being 
taken advantage of by the various charitable and educational 
societies that desire a convenient and suitable hall at a 
nominal rent. It is appreciated by the people, as it gives 
them a hall centrally located, comfortable in its appoint- 
ments, and of easy access from the residence portion of the 
city. It is admirably adapted for lecture purposes, and, 
situated as it is, under the same roof, a visit to the Library, 
Art Gallery or Museum can always be made a part of the 
evening's entertainment. The question of renting the hall 
not having been decided until late in the year, and it not 
being generally known that it could be rented, up to January 
31st there were but six nights that it was used, for which 
rent was collected. Since then, however, the demand has 
been g^reater, and the income derived is assuming gjratifying 
proportions, a proper return of which is being made to the 
Treasurer. In reference to the matter as a source of revenue, 
we realize that while it may be desirable to have an income 
to assist in meeting the expense necessary for the mainte- 
nance of the building, we believe we anticipate your wishes 
in exercising extreme caution in the selection of tenants, 
and by restricting the entertainments to those of a kind and 
character that will be in keeping with the dignity of the in- 
stitution. 

In conclusion I desire to say that it affords me pleasure 
to make acknowledgment of the courtesies extended in 
various instances by the park authorities and the officers and 
men of the several city departments. While our wants have 
not been many, yet the immediate attention given our re- 

44 



quests, and the promptness with which they have been met. 
have been matters of special pleasure, and are duly appre- 
ciated by the head of this department. 

Very respectfully, 

Chas. R. Cunningham, SupU. of Building. 



45 



REPORT OF THE MANAGER OF THE 

MUSIC HALL. 

Pittsburgh, April i8th, 1898. 

To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of Carnegie Music Hall for the year ending 

January 31st, 1898. 

PAY ENTERTAINMENTS. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 

Afternoon. Evening. 
Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate (one season 

of concerts) 10 10 

Art Society, $50 rate 8 

Mozart Club, $50 rate 5 

Apollo Club, $100 rate 3 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, $75 

rate i 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, $100 

rate 17 

Conventions at educational rates, $75 4 

Star Course entertainments, $150 rate 8 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 10 

15 61 

FREE ORGAN RECITALS. 

The free organ recitals by Frederic Archer, established 
when the hall was opened, have been continued weekly on 

46 



Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons, no recitals having 
been g^ven, however, on two legal holidays, December 25th, 
1897, and January ist, 1898, nor during the months of July, 
August and September, 1897. 

The total number of recitals during the year was : 

Afternoon 39 

Evening 37 

On the evenings of March 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th, April 
3rd and April loth, Mr Archer delivered his second series 
of lectures under the general subject "The Great Masters 
of Music," sub-divided respectively as follows: Handel, 
Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Mendelssohn. These 
lectures were each illustrated with a short list of pianoforte 
compositions played by Mr Archer, and occupied the first 
half of the program; the second half consisting of organ 
transcriptions. 

The lectures were perhaps more popular, as evidenced 
by the attendance, than those of the previous year, and their 
educational value cannot be over-estimated. 

An actual count was made of the attendance at the free 
organ recitals during the year, with the following result : 

Attendance. Average. 

Saturday evenings, 37 17,084 462 

Sunday afternoons, 39 64,837 1,663 

These figures speak plainly the appreciation on the part 
of the public of the Sunday afternoon free organ recital. 

FREE USE OF HALL. 

Founders' Day of Carnegie Library was celebrated in 
Carnegie Music Hall on the afternoon of Wednesday, No- 
vember 3rd. 

TOTAL USE OF HALL DURING THE YEAR. 

Afternoon. Evening. 

Pay entertainments 15 61 

Free Organ recitals 39 37 

Miscellaneous i 

55 98 

47 



IN GENERAL. 

The use of the Hall on Sunday, apart from the organ 
recitals, was confined to one afternoon, the occasion being 
a union service of the German Lutheran churches of this 
vicinity. 

The organ earned $125 during the year, having been 
used five times. 

During the year all contracts made with the manager 
for the use of the hall were kept, and there are no rentals 
uncollected. 

During the year ending January 31st, 1897, the pay 
entertainments in the hall numbered 26 in the afternoon and 
63 in the evening; those for the year ending January 31st, 
1898, numbered 15 in the afternoon and 61 in the evening. 
I may say in this connection that during the year ending 
January 31st, 1897, the hall received the income of two sets 
of concerts by the Pittsburgh Orchestra, each consisting of 
10 afternoon and 10 evening concerts, while during last year 
the receipts of but one set are recorded. Notwithstanding 
this difference in the number of times the hall was occupied 
the receipts from rentals for last year exceeded those of the 
year before by $350, the gain being principally in the in- 
creased use of the hall by local charity, philanthropic and 
educational institutions. 

It seems to me your committee should feel gratified 
at the continued esteem in which the hall is held by all classes 
of our local public, while it is an undisputed fact that the 
existence of Carnegie Music Hall has been perhaps the most 
important factor in developing musical taste in this city 
during the last two years. 

I have again to acknowledge the helpful attitude of the 
Pittsburgh newspapers towards all the work centering in 
the Music Hall, and to report that the service of all atten- 
dants under my direction — namely, the ushers and door- 
keepers, has been most satisfactory. 

48 



As an instance of the increased business that may be 

expected in the future I append herewith a statement of the 

rentals received for the months of February and March, 1897, 
and 1898: 

1897. 1898. 

February $ 350 $1,100 

March 525 1,025 

Very respectfully, 

G. H. Wilson, Manager. 



49 



REPORT OF THE MUSICAL DIRECTOR. 



To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen : — I beg leave to report that on the 30th of 
January, 1898, I gave my i8ist organ recital in Carnegie 
Music Hall, Pittsburgh. Seventy-six of them were given 
since January 31, 1897. During the fiscal year ending on 
the first named date I have played 706 compositions, repre- 
senting 239 composers of varied nationality and illustrative 
of the progress of the art of music during the last three 
centuries. The total number present at these 76 recitals was 
81,921 — an average of 1,078 on each occasion. During the 
previous year 78 recitals were g^ven and 54,380 persons at- 
tended — ^representing an average of only 695. These sta- 
tistics show an average increase of 383 persons at each 
recital g^ven during the past year. The last series of musical 
lectures aroused general interest amongst music students, 
as well as the general public, resulting in large and appre- 
ciative audiences. 

The popularity of the Sunday recitals is now a matter 
beyond question, as on many occasions it has been found 
impossible to accommodate the enormous crowds desiring 
admission. The demeanor of all those present on these oc- 
casions is invariably of the most exemplary character, and 
their evident enjoyment of the music affords gratifying proof 
of the educational and moral value of this department of our 

SO 



art work. Indeed, I cannot but feel that the widespread and 
real growth of musical taste in Pittsburgh since the advent 
of these recitals is largely attributable to them. 

When I commenced my duties I expressed my determi- 
nation to maintain a high standard of taste, and while freely 
introducing works of every school, I have rigidly excluded 
compositions of vulgar or low class type. It was feared by 
many earnest and sincere well wishers that such a course 
would be fatal to the popularity of the recitals, and I was 
repeatedly urged to change my plans and substitute so-called 
"popular music of the day." Satisfied that the course I had 
mapped out would succeed — ^for appreciation of that which 
is highest and best is but the natural result of habit and op- 
portunity — I persevered, and "proved my case." The re- 
citals are now fulfilling their legitimate mission and aiding 
in the realization of Mr Carnegie's hopes in connection with 
the educational value of the Carnegie Institute. 

The alterations made in the organ were satisfactorily 
carried out, and the instrument is now in excellent condition. 

I send herewith a copy of the 200th recital souvenir 
book, containing details of my work up to date. 

Yours truly, 

Frederic Archer, Musical Director, 



51 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE* 

Pittsburgh, Pa., April 14th, 1898. 
IV . N. Frew, Esq,, President: 

Your Committee on Investment and Finance respect- 
fully report that there is no change from their last annual 
report; that they have in their possession the nineteen first 
mortgage five per cent gold-loan of 1890 bonds of the 
Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake Erie Railroad Company, of 
the par value of $1,000 each, being the investment of the 
Bemd fund. These bonds, together with the deeds for the 
properties purchased for branch libraries — ^namely, from 
William Schutte et ux., Twenty-sixth ward property; Ira 
M. Burchfield et ux.. Twenty-third ward property; from 
Frank Lemoyne, and William G. Sawyer, and Harry P. Ford 
et ux., Thomas H. McCartan et al., and George D. Edwards, 
Eleventh ward property; Joseph M. Taylor and Emma 
Taylor et al, Thirty-sixth ward property, and the Washing- 
ton Sub-District School to City of Pittsburgh property; are 
deposited in Box 7106 Fidelity Title and Trust Co. vaults. 

The coupons of bonds have been regularly handed over 
to the Treasurer, for which we have his receipt. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robt. Pitcaim, Chairman. 



52 



REPORT OF THE AUDITORS. 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir : — ^The Committee on Audit begs to report that 
it has examined the annual statement of the Treasurer for 
the year ending January 31st, 1898, and examined and com- 
pared therewith the Treasurer's accounts and vouchers and 
verified the same as to the funds on hand and in other re- 
spects, and that it finds the report and all matters relating 
thereto correct as stated; and further, that it has examined 
the accounts of the Committee on Investment and Finance, 
finding the same correct, and the investments of the Com- 
mittee on account of the Bernd Fund, being nineteen first 
mortgage 5 per cent gold loan of 1890 bonds of the Pitts- 
burgh, Shenango & Lake Erie Railroad Company of $1,000 
each, in the depository box of the Committee; also with same 
the deeds of the properties purchased for branch libraries, 
etc., as stated in the Committee's report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. W. Mellon, Chairman. 



53 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

Condensed statement of H. C. Frick, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31st, 1898. 

Revenue. 

Balance on hand $ 1,153.21 

Appropriation, City of Pittsburgh .... 65,000.00 

Reimbursement from J. D. Bemd Fund 43341 

Rentals of Music Hall 7,121.47 

Library collections, covering fines, etc . 820.25 

Rentals of Lecture Hall 60.00 

Contribution to the Carl Merz Fund. . 100.00 
Interest on daily balances at T. Mellon 

& Sons' bank 483.43 

$75,17177 

Disposition. 

For approved vouchers, Nos. 994 to 

1706 inclusive. 
Building. 

Operating labor, repairs 
and running expense. . .$23,154.06 
Library. 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense .. . 23,586.80 
Books purchased. 

Central Library 12,737.69 

Lawrenceville branch 1,168.34 

54 



Music HalL 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense . . . 8,356.09 
Accounting department, 

running expense 37-6o 

Executive department, 

running expense 46.00 

Total expense 55*180.55 

Cash advanced Chas. R« Cunningham, 

Supt, for a petty cash fund 150.00 

Payment of loan of the Carnegie Fine 

Arts and Museum Collection Fund 5,000.00 

$74^36.58 
Balance on hand at T. Mellon & Sons' 

bank 935-19 

^$75.17177 



55 



J. D. BERND FUND. 



Revenue. 



Interest on Pittsburgh, Shenango & 

Lake Erie Railroad bonds $ 950.00 

Interest on daily balances at T. Mellon 

& Sons' bank 5.82 

-$ 955.82 

Disposition. 

For approved vouchers Nos. 1490^, 
1606, 1609, 1625, 1660 and 1661. 

Books purchased 414.61 

Payment to Carnegie Library of Pitts- 
burgh, covering books purchased 
out of the City funds prior to Janu- 
ary 31st, 1897 433.41 . 

$ 848.02 
Balance on hand at T. Mellon & Sons' 

bank 107.80 

-$ 955.82 



56 



I 



> 



^ |. M 

THIRD ANNUAL REPORTS 



(^^0^ UH£> 



To THE Board of Trustees 



CtRIIEGIE LmRV OF PinSBURGH 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1899. 



1899. 



CONTENTS. 

Pmge 

Report of the President, 5 

Report of the Committee on Administration of the 

Library, 8 

Report of the Librarian, 10 

Report of the Chief of the Children's Department, - 21 

Statistical Tables, 32 

Gifts to the Library, - - - - - -41 

Report of the Superintendent of Buildings, - - 56 

Report of the Manager of Music Hall, - - - - 59 

Report of the Musical Director, 62 

Report of the Finance Committee, 64 

Report of the Auditors, 65 

Report of the Treasurer, 66 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, - - - Frontispiece 

Facing Page 

Lawrenccvillc Branch, 8 

Lawrence ville Branch — Detail of Entrance, - - 14 

Home Library Group— 13th Street, - - - 22 

Home Library Group (Colored) — Soho Hill, - 26 

Home Library Group (Hebrew) — Penn Avenue, - 30 

Lawrenceville Branch — Interior, from front, - - 38 

Lawrenceville, Branch — Interior, from stack room, 42 

West End Branch, 46 

West End Branch — Interior, 50 

Wylie Avenue Branch, 54 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



President, W. N. FREW, 
Vice President, ROBERT PITCAIRN, 
Secretory, J. F. HUDSON. 
Treasurer, H. C. FRICK. 



R. H. DOUGLAS, 
E. M. FERGUSON. 
HON. H. P. FORD, 
W. N. FREW, 
H. C. FRICK, 
J. F. HUDSON, 
JOHN McM. KING, 
JOHN S. LAMBIE, 
GEORGE A. MACBETH, 



J. GUY McCANDLESS, 
DAVID McCARGO, 
THOMAS G. McCLURE, 
W. H. McKELVY, 
W. A. MAGEE, 
A. W. MELLON, 
ROBERT PITCAIRN, 
H. K. PORTER, 
J. P. STERRETT. 



PINANCB COMMITTEE. 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman, E. M. FERGUSON, 

HON. H. P. FORD. 

COMMITTEE ON MUSIC HALL. 

W. A. MAGEE. Chairman, H. K. PORTER, 

JOHN McM. KING. 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

THOMAS G. McCLURE, Chairman, J. F. HUDSON. 

H. C. FRICK. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, Chairman, W. H. McKELVY, 

R. H. DOUGLAS. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

A. W. MELLON, Chairman, JOHN S. LAMBIE. 

OPPICERS. 

EDWIN H. ANDERSON, FREDERIC ARCHER. 

Librarian, Mtisical Director, 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM, GEO. H. WILSON, 

Sup't. of Buildings, Manager of Music Hall. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT, 



To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

Gentlemen: — The reports of the various departments 
under your control for the year ending January 31st, 1899, 
\\\\\ be found to possess much interest. The influence and 
work of the Librarj' have been greatly extended, and as far 
as one can judge by indications and expressions, the institu- 
tion is more than ever respected and esteemed by the people 
of the City. The branch library system has been inaugurated 
during the year, and from the start proved a most gratifying 
success. Two branch buildings are now in operation, and it 
is hoped that on February ist, 1900, five will be in use. 

The home library department is a new departure and 
seems to be doing an excellent work. The assistance ren- 
dered to the public schools also should be noticed with ap- 
proval, while in general the attention paid to the children and 
younger readers cannot but produce the most satisfactory 
results. All branches of the library show a large growth 
during the year. It affords me pleasure to refer to the enter- 
prise and energy displayed by the librarian and assistants, 
which assuredly will secure for the City a live, up-to-date in- 
stitution, carried on in accordance with the most improved 
methods of library administration. 

The Music Hall has been conducted in a dignified and 
successful way, and has for the year been self-supporting, the 
result being that the splendid organ recitals by Mr Archer, 
that seem to lose none of their popularity, have been provided 
for the people without any expense whatever. 

5 



The building has been maintained with the care that has 
characterized its management since the opening and is in 
thorough repair. The various committees of the Board have 
united in producing a well earned success, and the institution 
has been liberally cared for by the City. The Municipal 
Government appropriated for the maintenance of the build- 
ings and support of the Library for the year ending January 

31st, 1900, the sum of $104,000.00 

There remained in the contingent fund from the 

year ending January 31st, 1899 1,121.34 

And in the Music Hall fund 1,584.08 

Total $106,705.42 

Your executive committee, in accordance with the By 
Laws, divided this sum as follows : 

Maintenance of the Library $72,000.00 

Maintenance of buildings 27,100.00 

Music Hall contingent fund 1,500.00 

Contingent fund 6,105.42 

It g^ves me pleasure to present to the Board a letter just 
received from Mr Carnegie, containing a proposition bearing 
on the proposed extension of the Library building. I will 
ask the Board to take action in regard to the matters referred 
to in it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, President, 



The letter referred to in the above report was as follows : 

14th April, 1899. 

W, N. Frew J Esq,, President Board of Trustees y Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear Sir : — After our conference this morning I beg to 
say that if the Trustees upon investigation decide that the 
best plan is to go forward with the additions as proposed in 

6 



the drawings, which seem to me admirably designed to meet 
the case, I undertake to furnish the necessary funds up to 
one million seven hundred fifty thousand dollars ($1,750,000). 
which is the estimated cost of the work. 

You will notice that the proposed extension will bring 
the building to Mawhinney street. It would seem advisable 
for the city, when it is condemning ground, to embrace some 
distance beyond that street, because if the past history of the 
Institute proves anything, it is that continual growth is the 
law of its being. The proposed extension may suffice for ten 
years, but in all probability other additions will be necessary 
by that time. So much the better for the Institute, so much 
the better for Pittsburgh, if that be the case, and so much 
the better for 

Very truly yours, 

Andrew Carnegie. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
ADMINISTRATION OF THE 

LIBRARY. 

1 8th April, 1899. 
To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

We submit herewith as our Annual Report the fully de- 
tailed report of the Librarian, which embraces a special report 
from the Chief of the Children's department. 

We take pleasure in si>ecially mentioning a few things 
which are given in fuller detail in the Librarian's report. 
The first of these is the cataloguing. Stated in a summary 
way, we have catalogued and placed on the shelves about 
22,500 volumes in the past year, which with two or three 
exceptions in the very largest libraries, is unprecedented, and 
when taken in connection with the quality of our cataloguing, 
is to be commended as rather remarkable work. It is to be 
noted that our card catalogue is much more than a mere list, 
being descriptive, and, as intimated in last year's report, is not 
surpassed anywhere. 

Next we wish to make further acknowledgment of Mr 
Carnegie's munificence during the last year, in inviting the 
Librarian to examine the book markets in Europe, at his 
expense, besides the gift of $10,000 for a technical collection, 
mentioned in our report of last year. The committee wishes 
to express its thanks to other donors, also. You will see by 
the Librarian's report that 416 persons have made contribu- 
tions. 

8 



Third, the use of the branch libraries has exceeded all 
expectations; even those who were residents of Lawrenceville 
and the West End had not the most remote idea of the large 
use which has developed, and so far, it is to be noted that the 
buildings provided for the two branches already established 
are none too large. 

The next subject we feel called upon to emphasize is the 
Children's department. The report of the chief of this de- 
partment is worthy of the most careful consideration, and we 
have thought well to place it before the Board of Trustees 
and the public, in the present form, both for historical reasons 
and in view of the fact that it will be absolutely necessary to 
provide for and further extend this branch of the library work. 
We have adopted the most advanced methods in the world 
and they are meeting with unbounded success, and should by 
all means be encouraged in every possible way. There is no 
room for doubt as to its value to the public, not only for the 
present, but for time to come, and it is making friends for 
the Library. A room for young folks was not included in the 
plan of the present Central building, and the whole operation 
and use of the building has been determined by experiment 
and experience. We find the room now in use altogether 
inadequate. The attendance has been as high as 250 in one 
afternoon, when seats are provided for only 32, and this 
attendance undoubtedly will increase. 

Very respectfully, 

Geo. A. Macbeth, Chairman, 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees : 

I have the honor to preseent my report of the work of 
the Library for the third statistical year, ending January 31, 
1899. 

On February i, 1899, there were in the Central Library 
and branches, both catalogued and uncatalogued, 68,485 
volumes and 5,321 pamphlets. Of these, 28,041 volumes and 
1 ,377 pamphlets were added during the year. (Tables i and 
2, page 32.) 

The number of volumes in the Central Library and 
branches, on the shelves and ready for use February i, 1899, 
was 57,597. Of these, 47,189 were in the Central Library, 
7,099 in the Lawrenceville branch, and 3,309 in the West 
End branch. (Table 3, p. 33.) 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes classified and catalogued during 
the year covered by this report was 22,429, of which 12,130 
were for the Central Library, 6,784 for the Lawrenceville 
branch, 3,309 for the West End branch, and 206 for the 
Wylie Avenue branch, which will be opened June ist. (Table 

4, p. 34.) 

The work of printing a card catalogue, in our own Print- 
ing department, was completed January last, and hereafter 
will be kept up to date. There are now three complete, 
printed, dictionary card catalogues in the Central Library, 

10 



one in the Reference room on the second floor, a second in 
the delivery lobby on the first floor, and a third, the official 
catalogue, in the catalogue room. Card catalogues, on the 
same plan, were also prepared and printed for the Lawrence- 
ville and West End branches, and a catalogue for the Wylic 
Avenue branch is now being made, and will be complete 
and in place when this branch is opened to the public. 

The Monthly Bulletin has been continued during the 
year. The composition for this costs the Library nothing, 
since it is printed from the same linotype slugs that are used 
in printing the cards for the catalogue. From these same 
slugs were also printed last spring a catalogue of the English 
prose fiction contained in the Library, and a catalogue of 
the J. D. Bemd Department of Architecture. Now that the 
slugs for the entire catalogue are filed away in class order, 
it will be possible to issue, from time to time, lists of books 
on special subjects, or finding lists, by classes, of the books 
in the Library, at little additional expense. 

CIRCULATION. 

The number of volumes issued during the year in the 
Circulating department at the Central Library and at the 
Lawrenceville branch was 175,931, an increase of 55,969, or 
47 per cent, over the previous year. Of these, 128,946 were 
issued at the Central Library, and 46,985 at the Lawrence- 
ville branch. This branch was not opened till May 11, 1898: 
and the figures for it given in this report cover a period of 
only eight and two-thirds months, not an entire year, as in 
the case of the Central Library. (Tables 5-10, p. 35-40.) 

The number of registered borrowers, at the close of the 
Library year, was 17,934. The number added during the 
year was 5,099, of which 2,609 were registered from the 
Lawrenceville branch. 

The use of books in the Circulating department has been 
stimulated, both at the Central Library and the Lawrenceville 
branch, by placing on the bulletin boards attractive lists of 

II 



books on the subjects of the University Extension lectures, 
which have been given at the Central and Branch lecture 
rooms during the winter. Many other lists on subjects of 
special interest at the time, with pictures to illustrate and 

make them more attractive, have been bulletined in this way, 
with a consequent increase in the demand for the books to 
which attention has thus been called. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes used in the Reference depart- 
ment at the Central Library was 95,078, an increase of 26,376 
over the previous year. The number of readers was 17,807, 
an increase of 410. More books were used because we had 
more of them and because what we had were rendered more 
accessible. The shelf capacity in the Reference room was 
doubled during the year, and now 3,000 of the books in 
greatest demand are on open shelves in this room. The 
greater the number of volumes to which readers are given 
free access, the greater the use of books of which no accurate 
account can be kept, and the smaller the proportion of books 
called for from the book wing. (Table 6, p. 36.) 

Though there was a small increase in the number of 
readers in the Reference room during the year, fewer people 
used the room during the spring and summer than during 
the corresponding months of 1897. This was due to the ex- 
citement caused by the Spanish-American war, which acted 
as a deterrent from serious study. Since September, how- 
ever, there has been a great increase in the use of this depart- 
ment. 

The Reference librarian reports that three classes of 

readers form a large majority of those who use the room: 
members of literary clubs, men who are seeking information 
in technical arts and sciences, and pupils of the city schools, 
especially the high schools. 

A good deal of reference work was done at the Law- 
renceville branch during the year; but it is impossible to keep 

12 



any account of the number of books used for this purpose at 
branch libraries, because readers have free access to the 
shelves and consult the books at will. 

READING ROOMS. 

The total number of persons who used the reading rooms 
of the Central Library and Lawrenceville branch was 192,- 
515, an increase of 74,866 over the previous year. The 
number using the reading rooms at the Central Library was 
129,853, at the Lawrenceville branch 62,662, not including 
visitors to the branch newspaper room, of which no account 
is kept. (Tables 6 and 8, p. 36 and 38.) 

Summarizing the statistics given above, we find that 
271,009 volumes were used during the year, not including 
the reference use at the branch, nor in the Children's room 
at the Central, of which no account was kept. It is safe to 
say. that, altogether, fully 300,000 volumes were used, by 
about the same number of persons. 

While not falling within the period covered by this re- 
port, it is gratifying to know that the use of the Library con- 
tinues to grow, as is evidenced by the fact that the circulation 
of last month (March) was by far the greatest in the history 
of the Library. Nearly 29,000 volumes were sent into the 
homes of the people in that one month. 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Many important gifts have come to the Library during 
the year. The list given on page 41, of this report, shows 
that 416 persons or institutions gave 2,253 volumes, 1,867 
pamphlets, and 8,466 numbers of unbound periodicals. 
Many of these were duplicates and do not, therefore, figure 

in table 2, page 32. 

Mr Carnegie's gift of $10,000 to purchase books for a 
reference collection on the technical arts and sciences, was 
mentioned in the last annual report, but properly belongs to 
this report. Upon the advice of the technical experts of 
this community it was decided to devote this fund to the 

13 



purchase of sets of technical periodicals and transactions of 
scientific societies. About fifty of the most important of 
these have been secured, and half the fund is still on hand. 
Other sets have been ordered for nearly a year, but so many 
of them are out of print and are so scarce that it requires time 
as well as money to get them. 

Another important gift was that of Mr Henry Kirke 
Porter, of a set of Stevens' "Facsimiles of Manuscripts in 
European Archives relating to America, 1773-1783." This 
set of 25 volumes cost $500, and is the most valuable work on 
American history in the Library. 

Of the first importance were the gifts of the patent 
publications of the British, French, Belgian and Swiss gov- 
ernments. These were presented by the respective European 
governments. The magnitude of these gifts will be under- 
stood when we say that the British patent publications alone, 
when property bound, will number about 5,000 volumes. 
Our thanks are due primarily to the Comptroller General of 
the British Patent Office, to the French Minister of Com- 
merce and Director of the French Patent Office, and to the 
same officers of the Belgian and Swiss governments. We are 
also under great obligations, for assistance, to Mr B. F. 
Stevens, U. S. Dispatch Agent at London ; to His Excellency, 
General Horace Porter, U. S. Ambassador at Paris, and to 
the Secretary of the Embassy, Mr Henry Vignaud; to His 
Excellency, Hon. Bellamy Storer, U. S. Minister at Brussels; 
and to His Excellency, Hon. John G. A. Leishman, U. S. 
Minister to Switzerland. Our thanks are also due, for valua- 
ble assistance in this matter, to Ex-Secretary Day of the U. S. 
Department of State, to Hon. C. H. Duell, U. S. Commis- 
sioner of Patents, to Senator M. S. Quay and to the Hon. 
John Dalzell. 

LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH. 

The Lawrenceville branch was opened with appropriate 
ceremonies on the evening of May 10, 1898, and the next 

14 



LAWKKXCEVILLE BRANCH— DilT.ML ()[■" [■ NTKANi. I'., 



morning the issue of books began. There were about 5,000 
volumes on the shelves, which number was increased to 7,099 
before the close of the period covered by this report. The 
work of this branch has been most satisfactory, going far be- 
beyond our most sanguine expectations. (Tables 8 and 9, 
p. 38 and 39.) 

Floor plans of this branch are printed herewith. In the 
preparation of these plans, the problem was not only to pro- 
vide for a stack room wi^h a capacity of 20,000 volumes, a de- 




1 y)ih 



riRST rLOORPLAN 
LA^^mCHCOAUJC BRANCn. CARNCOC LIBRARY OF PITTSBvmaM. 

ALOCN AMD fUKlOf^ AftChlTCCTS. 

livery desk, a general reading room, and a children's room on 
one floor, and on a lot 90 feet front by 80 feet deep; it was 
further required that every part of this floor should be visible 
from the delivery desk, providing complete supervision of 
the whole, so that free access to the shelves could be given 
to the public. It should be explained that not all of the 

IS 



ground space was available for building, because the lot is 
situated on the side of a hill with the high ground in the 
rear. It was, therefore, necessary to sacrifice some floor space 
in order to secure sufficient light. 

The plans will show how the requirements have been 
met. The general reading room and the children's room are 
on either side of the lobby reached by the main entrance. 
The circular delivery desk is in the midst of things, with the 
card catalogue case built into the rear of it and facing out- 
ward. Back of it is a semicircular stack room, with the centre 
of the semicircle coinciding with the centre of the delivery 
desk. The ten book stacks are radii of this semicircle; and the 
partitions separating the general reading room and children's 
room from the delivery lobby and stack room are glass. 
From the delivery desk, therefore, the assistants in charge 
command a view of the entire floor. This is the distinctive 
feature of these plans. Heretofore, where the public has had 
free access to the shelves, it has been necessary to dispense 
with this corhplete supervision and arrange the stacks in the 
ordinary way, or secure such supervision by shelving only the 
walls of the room (as at our West End branch), thus sacrific- 
ing shelf capacity. In the Lawrenceville branch every person 
on the first floor can be seen from the central desk without 
special effort on the part of the assistants. 

This branch being operated on the free access plan, the 
doors C and D, on either side of the delivery lobby, are closed, 
and the entrance to the stack room is through the registering 
turnstile F, which works in only one direction, and thence 
to the reading rooms through the doors A and B. The exit 
from all parts is through the turnstile E, which also works 
in only one direction. By making it necessary for every one 
to pass out by the delivery desk through this turnstile, the 
temptation to carry a book away without having it charged 
is reduced to a minimum, especially since no one can feel sure 
that he has escaped observation at any time during his visit. 
The ten stacks in the stack room have a capacity of about 
25,000 volumes, which may be doubled by superimposing ten 
more stacks of the same size and connecting them with 

16 



balconies. This, however, we think will never be necessary. 
The capacity of the wall shelving in the children's room is 
about 4,000 volumes, with a like capacity in the general read- 
ing room, very little of which will ever be needed. The total 
shelf capacity of the first floor, therefore, is about 33,000 
volumes, which may be increased to 58,000 by adding an- 
other story to the stacks. 




BASEMENT PLAN 
L^WWENCEVILLC BRANCH . CARNCCIC LIBRARY OF PITTSEfvTiCH. 

ALDCN AND HAMUDW ARCHITECTS. 



^ — «^*b %^\%^m 



The basement contains a newspaper room, a work room 
for unpacking, repairing, etc., a boiler room, and an audi- 
torium for university extension and other popular educational 
lectures. This auditorium has a seating capacity of 500. 

The general reading room has nine 3x5 tables, with 
seats for 50 or 60 people. In this room are the current 
periodicals, in a rack, and a small collection of reference 
books. 

17 



The children's room also contains nine 3x5 tables 
graduated in height to the various sizes of children. The 
chairs are also of various heights and sizes. Sixty children 
may be comfortably seated in this room at one time. All the 
wall space, to a height of about 5 feet, is occupied by shelves, 
and the juvenile books are kept in, and issued from, this room. 
The children, therefore, have a room to themselves, and need 
not go into any other part of the building. 

WEST END BRANCH. 

The West End branch was dedicated on the evening of 
January 31, 1899, and was in full operation from February i, 
the first day of the current statistical year. While its two 
and one half months' work does not fall within the period 
covered by this report, it will be proper to state that its 




FIRST FLOOR PLAN 
WEST END BRANCH. CARNCQE LIBRARY OF PITT5BV/RGM, 
ALDCN AND hARLCW ARCHITECTS. 

18 



success, from the beginning, has been overwhelming. The 
seating capacity of the reading rooms is tested almost daily. 
The floor plan of this branch, printed herewith, sufficient- 
ly indicates the arrangement. It was necessary to make this 
building smaller and less expensive than the Lawrenceville 
branch, so the apsidal stack room was dispensed with, and 
the main floor is simply a large room without partitions. The 
central desk is similar to that at Lawrenceville, and the de- 
livery lobby is cut off from the children's room and the gen- 
eral reading room, by railings. The walls are shelved around 
the entire room. The books and periodicals for adults are 

placed in one end, and the juvenile books and periodicals in 
the other. The tables and chairs in the children's end of the 
large room are of various heights, as at the Lawrenceville 
branch. Back of the delivery desk is an alcove, i6 x 14 feet, 
for reference books. By this arrangement complete super- 
vision from the central desk is secured, but at a sacrifice of 
shelf capacity. 

WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH. 

The Wylie Avenue branch is now nearing completion, 
and will be opened to the public about June i, 1899. Its 
plan is similar to that of the Lawrenceville branch, the 
general reading room and the children's room each being 
one-third larger that at Lawrenceville. 

MT. WASHINGTON AND HAZELWOOD BRANCHES. 

The plans for the Mt. Washington and Hazelwood 
branches are drawn, and the buildings will be erected during 
the present year. The money has been appropriated to stock 
them with books, and we hope to open them to the public 
about February i, 1900. Five of the seven branches to be 
provided by Mr Carnegie, will then be in operation. 

CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT. 

. One of the most important and distinctive features of the 
work during the past year was the organization and exten- 
sion of the work with children. Realizing the great impor- 
tance of this work, it was decided to constitute a distinct 

19 




20 



Children's department of the Library, and place in charge of 
it some one who had made a special study of such work. 
Miss F. J. Olcott took charge of this department in April, 
1898, and since then has been engaged in organizing and 
developing this phase of the Library's work. This includes 
the supervision of the Central and branch children's rooms, 
the work with the schools, and the installation of Home 
Libraries, begun during the year. Because of the significance 
of this special work and its interesting developments 
during the year, as well as because it is new to this com- 
munity, I have asked the chief of this department to make a 
special report to me, which I append herewith, and to which 
I call your especial attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin H. Anderson, Librarian. 
April 12, 1899. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF THE CHILDREN'S 

DEPARTMENT. 

To the Librarian : , 

CHILDREN'S ROOMS. 

Until April, 1898, no arrangements were made for the 
genera] supervision of the work with children. On the open- 
ing of the branch libraries, with fully equipped children's 
rooms, it became necessary to systematize the work and 
organize a separate department for this purpose. 

At present we have, besides the Children's reading room 

at the Central Library, a children's room at the Lawrencevillc 

branch, opened May 11, 1898, and one in the West End 

branch, opened February ist, 1899. The work in the West 

End branch, however, does not fall within the period covered 

by this report. 

21 



Central Library. — Little attempt has been made to direct 
the reading of the children who visit the Central Library. 
Existing circumstances make it impossible. The present 
Children's room is merely a makeshift, being a part of the 
Periodical room, and a thoroughfare from the Catalogue 
room to the book wing. After school hours the room is usu- 
ally overcrowded. On a recent Sunday afternoon, when the 
Library was open only four hours, over 250 children visited 
the room. Since the tables seat only 32 children, many of 
them either left the Library or went over into the Periodical 
room. On Sunday afternoons the children often sit in rows 
on the floors in the Children's room and in the loan lobbv. 
Besides this, the ventilation is bad, since the room is a reser- 
voir for the exhausted air from the Catalogue room on one 
side and the loan lobby on the other, and is most devitalizing 
to growing boys and girls who spend whole afternoons here. 

All juvenile books for circulation are shelved in the book 
wing, and are inaccessible. The children select their books 
through the bulletined lists and use the 600 carefully selected 
books in the Children's reading room as a catalogue. The 
disadvantages of the use of the general catalogue by the chil- 
dren are illustrated daily. One boy who wanted to read 
something besides fiction walked off with Mrs Oliphant's 
"Annals of a publishing house" under his arm; happily he was 
discovered in time, and given an interesting book of travel 
instead, and is now a constant reader, coming to the Chil- 
dren's room for suggestions before drawing his books. 
Little children carry home adult books, are disgusted, return 
them, and leave their cards. Since they cannot examine the 
books until they are charged, they are frequently disap- 
pointed, and the parents criticise the books their children 
take from the Library. It is not possible for the loan desk 
attendants, at busy times, to examine the books and question 
the children. 

The only remedy is a room where the children can 
examine the books at the shelves, with an attendant in charge 
who has a thorough knowledjsre of the contents of the books, 

22 



and who can sympathize with the children and guide them in 
their selections according to their individual needs; and last 
but not least, where the air of the room can be kept fresh and 
pure. 

In the Children's reading room a new book case has been 
placed, and 200 volumes added. This reading room library 
forms the nucleus of a reference library for the use of the 
teachers and school children. It attracts the children in 
crowds to the room to read, and as said before, serves as a 
catalogue to the best juvenile literature in the stacks. 

One of the most encouraging features of the year is the 
interest the mothers show in their children's reading. It has 
been necessary to set aside Wednesday of each week as a 
mothers* day. Lists of best books on various subjects and 

adapted to the various grades in the schools have been col- 
lected from the libraries where children's work is specialized, 

and are on file at the Central Library. The mothers may use 
these, or consult the children's librarian. 

LawrencevUle Branch, — ^The large room to the right, at 
the Lawrenceville branch, has been set apart for the children. 
Here their books are shelved on low wall cases, having a 
capacity of 4,000 volumes. The room is fitted with tables and 
chairs of two sizes, so as to accommodate both large and 
small children; and shelves full of picture books are near the 
low tables. 

A large bulletin board is used for lists of good books, 
mounted pictures, and holiday exhibits. Small bulletin 
boards and picture frames are on the low cases. The pictures 
in the small picture frames are changed often, and illustrate 
the lists of books on the small bulletin boards. 

Too much stress cannot be laid upon the importance of 
training for an attendant in charge of a branch children's 

room. She should be not merely a guardian of the books 
and a disciplinarian ; she should be a sympathetic guide. The 
child comes to the Library through choice, he comes for 
mental recreation, and he comes for help. The attendant 1? 

23 



in a most delicate position. She should be a teacher in the 
strongest sense, and yet the sympathetic confidante of every 
child who visits the Library. The very fact that he comes 
voluntarily opens his heart — but what tact, what powers of 
sympathy and discrimination are necessary to subtly lead and 
guide and yet not violate this confidence ! She needs all these 
qualities, supplemented by a good school education, a deep, 
but cheerful sense of responsibility, and a real spirit of com- 
radeship with the children. 

In training the children's attendants for branch libraries, 
written questions are given, the answers to which require .t 
careful examination of the juvenile literature on the shelves. 
The constant reading of children's books has been encour- 
aged, since a ready knowledge of their contents and suitability 
to different ages and dispositions, is indispensable. A child's 
confidence is doubled, if the book is just what he wants; 
so it is necessary to read the books from the standpoint of the 
child, as well as critically. 

During the coming year this work will be further devel- 
oped, and besides the regular supervision of the children's 
rooms a monthly class of the children's librarians will 
be held at the Central Library for the discussion of methods 
for improving the service and for the study of the work as 
carried on and developed in other libraries. 

WORK WITH THE SCHOOLS. 

The National Education Association has recently issued 
an important circular on the relation of public libraries and 
public schools. A few of their statements seem most perti- 
nent in view of the present co-operation of the Carnegie 
Library and the schools of Pittsburgh. In this circular it is 
stated that, "There should be most cordial relations between 
the school and the library. The librarian should know the 
school and its work, in a general way, as a very important 
part of his work, just as the teacher should know the library 
and its methods as a part of her work . . . The children should 

24 



have free access to the library shelves. The community 
should be led to regard the library as a necessary part of a 
system of public education, just as essential as the common 
school. If it is the duty of the state to see that its 
citizens know how to read, it is certainly none the less its 
duty to see that they are so trained that the ability to read will 
be a blessing rather than a curse. A free public library is 
the adult's common school. Pupils should know what a 
library is, what it contains and how to use it. A child can 
no more be wisely left to get his knowledge and taste for 
literature by himself than to get his mathematical or scientific 
training in the same way. Children must be trained to use 
the library as they are trained to do other things. Pupils 
should learn to read with economy of time by making use 
of page headings, tables of contents, reviews, Poole's Index, 
card catalogues and other helps. The destiny of a child is 
not affected by the ability to read, but by the use he makes of 
that ability . . . The school trains for a few years, the library 
for a lifetime . . . The ability to read is merely a means to an 
end.'* 

In accordance with these principles many of the large 
libraries have carried on work with the schools for years, and 
the schools, in return, are most enthusiastic in their co-opera- 
tion. All this points steadily to the growing importance of 
closer relations between the library and the school, if the 
library wishes to keep pace with the needs of modern edu- 
cation. 

Until December, 1898, the teachers and principals of 
schools within the city limits of Pittsburgh were allowed to 
draw a limited number of volumes for class use. These books 
were drawn directly from the shelves of our circulating de- 
partment, and charged on schoolroom cards. This system 
was not satisfactory. Teachers complained that the books 
most wanted were never in and that they were forced to take 
others which were not so suitable; while on the other hand 
the regular borrowers were deprived of the use of books 

25 



drawn by the schools, for several months at a time, and the 
attendants at the loan desk were frequently required to find 
and charge a large number of books, while the teacher and 
a crowd of impatient borrowers waited at the desk. 

In December a decided change was made. The school 
room cards were withdrawn, and the teachers themselves 
were restricted to six books, only one of which could be 
fiction, to be drawn on their personal cards from the general 
stock, and subject to the ordinary regulations and fines. 
Thus are fully met the wants of teachers who have sudden 
calls to illustrate lectures or lessons, or who need books not 
ordinarily used in class room work. 

For use in the schools themselves a collection has been 
made of duplicates of the best books in general circulation. 
They are most carefully selected to meet the wants of the 
different grades, from kindergarten to high school. Teachers, 
authorities on special topics, and graded lists from other 
libraries and schools have been consulted. Especial attention 
has been paid to editions and illustrations. The aim is to 
provide the teacher with needful supplementary reading, and 
surround the children with time-honored literature, and the 
best modem juvenile books. 

A simple charging system has been devised to enable 
the teacher to keep track of books loaned for home use. 
When a request comes to the Central Library for school 

duplicates the principal of the school in question is consulted, 
and the class rooms are usually visited. The books are then 
selected with reference to the ages and conditions of the 
children. 

This is the trial year. Statistics which will give a fair 
idea of the success and usefulness of this work cannot be given 
until July, and will be incorporated in next year's report. It 
is enough to say that so far it has been impossible to satisfy 
the demand for school duplicates; that the reports from the 
28 schools, to which books have already been sent, up to the 
date of this report, are continually asking for more, and that 

26 



since January ist, over 30 principals, teachers and school 
directors have visited the Children's department for advice on 
the selection of books for the schools. We have also received 
a great many letters from teachers and others interested, ex- 
pressing grateful appreciation of this phase of the Library's 
work. 

These school duplicates will not lie idle during the 
summer months. Arrangements have been made with the 
Civic Club of Allegheny County to use them in connection 
with the summer playgrounds of Pittsburgh. 

HOME LIBRARIES. 

A wellTknown sociologist says of social reform that the 
greatest success lies in working with the children. • If the 
children of the present generation are led and taught in the 
right direction, the coming generation of men and women 
will unconsciously tend in that direction, and the evolution of 
reform will be natural and unforced. What greater influence 

is there over the mind and character of a child than the ideal 

* 

he strives to follow? Nothing creates ideals sooner than 
books. How tremendous then is the responsibility which the 
public library assumes, when it attempts to guide the reading 
of the thousands of children in a large city. 

Now the question arises, how shall we reach all the chil- 
dren of this large city? The work of the Children's rooms 
in the Central Library and branches reaches comparativelv 
few. The co-operation of the schools with the library covers 
much ground; still there are many children who never go 
beyond their text-books, or who leave school in childhood. 

One solution of the problem is the idea which originated 
with Mr Charles W. Birtwell, Secretarv of the Boston Chil- 
dren's Aid Society, in this natural and simple way: "I had 
been connected with the Children's Aid Society but a short 
time," says Mr Birtwell, "when many avenues of work 
opened up before me, and it was quite perplexing: to see 
how to make my relations to the various children T 
became acquainted with real and vital. Among other things 

27 



the children ought to have the benefit of good reading and 
become lovers of good books ... A little bookcase was 
designed. It was made of white wood, stained cherry, . with 
a glass door and Yale lock. It contained a shelf for fifteen 
books, and above that another for juvenile periodicals. The 
whole thing, carefully designed and neatly made, was simple 
and yet pleasing to the eye. I asked my little friend Rosa at 
the North End, Barbara over in South Boston, and Giovanni 
at the South End, if they would like little libraries in their 
homes, of which they should be the librarians, and from which 
their playmates or workmates might draw books, the supply 
to be replenished from time to time. They welcomed the 
idea heartily, and with me set about choosing tfte boys and 
girls of their respective neighborhoods who were to form the 
library groups." 

Thus originated what is known as the Home Library 
system. Since its establishment in 1887, this scheme has 
been thoroughly tested in Boston and elsewhere, usually in 
connection with charitable organizations and women's clubs. 
Strange to say the libraries have been the last to realize what 
opportunities are here opened, and that there is no more 
legitimate work for the public library. 

For some time this Library has contemplated the adop- 
tion of the Home Library schem^ as a part of its work with 
the children. We began in July,^with a gift of four libraries, 
and before February ist, 1899, eleven other ^braries were 
given. 

Twenty-five dollars purchases a small bookcase of white 
wood, stained cherry, with glass doors and a lock, covers 
the price of 17 books, and a year's subscription to St. 
Nicholas, Youth's Companion, and a child's newspaper. 

It is no small task to select 17 good books for boys and 
girls from ten to fifteen years of age, with varied tastes; yet 
as each librarv must be different from the others, and must 
represent the best of juvenile literature, a great deal of time 
is spent in the selection, according to the following principles * 

28 



First. The best children's literature, in the most attractive 
editions, should be provided. 

Second. The tx>oks should be strictly non-sectarian. 

Third. There should be a certain number of books for 
boys only, the same number for girls, and several which both 
will read, and one for the mothers. 

A little catalogue is printed, made as attractive as possi- 
ble, with poems and notes. The donor usually selects a 
TtSLtne for the library, and this name is painted in large letters 
on the front of the case. 

The organization of a group depends largely on the part 
of the city in which it is to be started. Names of bright chil- 
dren who will make reliable librarians are suggested by 
clergymen, charitable organizations, and, in our work in the 
Penn avenue district, by Kingsley House. 

A group is started, after a volunteer visitor is found. A 
case is placed in the home of an enthusiastic little librarian; 
the child is asked to invite nine of her special friends, boys and 
girls, to meet about the bookcase. On the day appointed one 
of the children's librarians from the Central Library, or, more 
often, a volunteer visitor, meets the group and makes the 
hour pass so pleasantly that the children are eager for the 
next meeting. The books are given out, and the case is then 
locked and not opened until the following week. When the 
children have read all the books, the case is exchanged for 
another, and after being cleaned and the books freshened, 
it passes on to another group. 

The group work admits of indefinite expansion, accord- 
ing to the calls the children make on the visitor, or the 
visitor's ability to draw them out. For successful work it is 
necessary to interest the mothers also. The meetings are 
weekly, for an hour or longer, during which games, such as 
authors, dissected pictures, etc., are popular. The visitor 
reads, talks, and plays with the children, and draws them on 
to talk of the books they have read and encourages them to 

read more. 

29 



The reports at the monthly meetings of the volunteer 
visitors at the Central Library are most encouraging. These 
monthly meetings give the work a unity, and the discussions 
and exchange of experiences solve many difficulties. It also 
keeps up the enthusiasm of the visitors. 

We have deviated from the original plans as carried out 
in the Boston Home Libraries. In order to keep the children 
in touch with each other, we have formed the groups into one 
organized body, called the **Camegie Home Library 
League." This is a modification of the Cleveland Library 
League and the Boston Home Libraries. Each member wears 
a badge — ^an open book of white metal, silver plated, with the 
words "Carnegie Home Library League" inscribed across its 
pages. The little leaguer feels a pride in his group, but the 
badge causes a feeling of good fellowship towards the mem- 
bers of other groups. The work has been slow but sure. We 
have been feeling our way to the best method to lay a solid 
foundation for work in the future. 

The following is a list of the donors up to the present 

time, with the names of the Home Libraries they have given : 

Mrs W. A. Herron, Library No. i. Ruth Edwards Library. 

Miss M. L. Jackson, Library No. 2. Margaret Scully Library. 

Mrs Charles J. Clarke, Library No. 3. Winifred Clarke 
Library. 

Mrs E. A. Woods, Library No. 4. Marjory Woods Library. 
Accompanied by framed photograph. 

Mrs William Thaw, Library No. 5. The Lyndhurst Library. 

Mrs W. W. Card, Library No. 6. Ruth Card Library. 

Mrs D. H. Hostetter, Library No. 7. Frederick and Herbert 
Hostetter Library. 

A friend of the children, Library No. 8. John James Audu- 
bon Library. Accompanied by a photograph and a brief 
life of the great naturalist, gifts of his granddaughter. 
Miss M. L. Audubon, Salem, N. Y. 

Mrs George B. Edwards, Library No. 9. Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow Library. 

30 



Mrs Emmett Queen, Library No. lo. James Morley Queen 

Library. 
Mr. E. H. Jennings, Library No. 1 1. Not yet named. 
Mrs William Frew, Library No. 12. Margarita Frew Library. 

Accompanied by framed photograph. 
Mrs William Flinn, Library No. 13. Mary Flinn Library. 

Accompanied by framed photograph. 
Hon. William Flinn, Library No. 14. Edith Flinn Library. 

Accompanied by framed photograph. 
Mrs J. R. McGinley, Library No. 15. Marian and Lois 

McGinley Library. 

The names of the volunteer visitors are as follows : Miss 
Elizabeth J. Bennett, Miss Anna B. Craig, Miss Mary M. 
Disque, Miss Louise Edwards, Miss Amy Fownes, Mi.ss 
Isabelle McClung, Miss S. H. Morris. 

The children's thanks are due to these large hearted citi- 
zens of Pittsburgh, who have given them their little libraries, 
and lasl, but by no means least, to the volunteer visitors, who 
have put aside their own pleasures to give time and thought 
to the pleasure and education of the children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frances Jenkins Olcott, 

Chief of the Children's DcpU. 

April 10, 1899. 



31 



TABLE I. 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES AND PAMPHLETS IN THE LIBRARY. 

JANUARY 31,1899. 



Volumes. 



4> 

o 

u 

PQ 



4J 

MM 

•a 

PQ 



Central Library. . 39,976 12,882 
L'ville Branch . . . 7,293 ! 65 
W. End Branch . . 3,383 9 

Wy. Ave. Branch 4,876 1 i 

Total 55>528; 12,957 



Pamphlets. ! Total. 



9^ 

42 

u 

a 
PQ 



167 

3 

3 
I 

174 



'a 

PQ 



ffi 

B 

9 
> 



5,14452,858; 

i; 7,358: 

2: 3.392; 

' 4.877' 

5,14768,485; 



a, 
E 



5»3ii 

4 

5 
I 

5,321 



TABLE 2. 

NUMBER OF VOLUMES AND PAMPHLETS ADDED TO THE 

LIBRARY, FEBRUARY i. 1898, TO JANUARY 31. 1899. 



Central Library . . 
L'ville Branch. . . . 
W. End Branch. . 
Wy. Ave. Branch. 

Total 



Volumes. 



4> 

u 
PQ 



14,312 
3,614 

3,383 
4,87^ 

26,185 



p5 



1,798 
48: 

9 

i! 



Pamphlets. Total 



4> 

u 

PQ 



132 

3 

3 
I 



1,856! 139 



be 
PQ 



1,235 
I 

2 

1,238 



B 

3 

"o 

> 



16,110 
3,662 

3,392 
4,877 

28,041 



a 
B 

PL. 



1,367 

4 

S 
I 

1,377 



3^ 






* 



(\ 















•'• 



••* 



• 4 






• •• 






r 

V 



* • 



< 



I 



< 

m 

Cz) 

fa 
w 

t/i 

D 

O 
fa 

>^ 
Q 
< 

en 

Cz] 

u 

< 



< 



H 

'Z 

(z] 

U 

(z] 

H 



en 
(z] 

IS 
D 
»-) 
O 
> 

fa 

o 
o 



73 1 .T'vo vo 10 a\ a\ "^.tP 5? v^vo 



: en 

113 
o 

•o 

c 

10 



Hi 



HH fO 



fOiOiOOv^O 000 t^ 

"' _ to t^OO iO 

t^ HH t^ PO On 

«K «S *^ ««^ #\ 



CI CI T^vo o 00 

Tt 10 fO '^ '^ 



v^: I tN CI 

\Pi\in 



^vo OvvO tovO O O vO ON 10 
VO i-i t^H-ioOOO tnioostoov 

On "^ 



^ CI '^ 



loX On 

CI •-• H^ 



fO 



iqo 00 Qnoo CI 
vO CO On po HH 






^ _ . OnOO On ir> OnOQ hi lOOO 
ONpohh l^iO'^is.QNO On lN*X 

»-<vO hhvO CI O hT 5n In. On fOfO 



I c 

I OS 

I'd 
I c 
1 'W 



O 



O lovo 

10 fO Tf 



S-vo 
On ^ 



tp ir> On CI t^ fOOO ON 
CI « fO ro d ro d 






!^ 



COCI t^coci 1-* QvOvO On 






^O 



12 2 SI ^ S3 ^^ CI w is, ON ON 

•-* CI HH CO fO CI fO CI 



4> 



,Oci^cicOTfcii-.v5t^Tt 1^0 
'H cT 



sr 



'^ CI H-i fo 10 '^ O tovO On On 

d d d lOfOw Tt^^tOCOCI 



•"r o'^P^^r ONOO Tf ^00 Ttoo low 

> u OnCO t^"-" io^hVO tOd Is^ON"^ 

hJCJl ^-"^ cociH-ivOts. fovo NO 



to. 



u ' o 

lid' 



ON 
CI 

to 



to ro Is* 10 On OvoO to fO t^OO •-• 00 
OnO cOlS^tN(» O •-^^vpS 



•-• d 



CI VO O fo - 
fO li^ CO ^ 



fO CI 



, to 

O 00 COON 

•k v^ ». » 

rOVO •-• CO 



ivO 
CO 
CI 

to 



O VO d •-• Q 00 «-« 
CI CO ON tONO CO tN 
HH to lO *-< to M iO( 



M vo 



00 CO 
00 Om 



CO 



•-• CI Tt d l-l M 



\^ J?.?> ^-^ OV H-i »> lO "^ CO t^ toou 

I ^ 2s^ S>^ ^ •^ ^ 00 J:J 00 CO o\oo 

<0 0\ o M OnOO m 00 >H ON Tt CO 



1 I 



I I 



en 
en 

< 

u 



CO 

O 



•a 
a 
o 






CO 



< 



o ^ ^ oj _; 

C o'Ei o 'o a*S 

o pii « (^ PLi z ;d 



CO 



u 
3 






.2 

a 
*c 

a 

CO 

Q 



^ . .2 g O tJ 

33 



c/};dpq 



.•^ 1 



8 ^ 



a 



i 



9 



g 



V 

- s 

c ^ 

8 o 

ex «^ 

A 

1 = 
£.2 

a < 









o 

> 



I 



a 

9 



a** « S 

a - « 

IS; 



I 






§ J 






•3 - g 

a ua js 

to fr* :s 

^ o . 

« e 

^ 2 









TABLE 4. 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES CATALOGUED, FEBRUARY i, 1898, 

TO JANUARY 31. i899- 






12,130 



^ 






6,784 



t 









3 






C 




"H J= 


0/ 

> ^ 






^ c 






ylie 
Bra 


• 

3 


^ 


^ 





3.309 1 


206 


22,4 



34 



TABLE 5. 

CONSOUDATED STATISTICS OF USE OF CENTRAL 

LIBRARY AND LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH FOR 1898. 



CLASS. 



Circulation By Classes. 



c 
U 



General Works. . j 2,506 

Philosophy j 1,168 

Religion 1,940 

Sociology j 2,664 



Philology 

Natural Science . 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel & Descrip- 
tion 

Biography 

Fiction (adult & 
juvenile) 

Total Circula- 
tion 



233 
3»iio 

2,321 

2,711 

6,900 

5.849 

5.076 

4,552 

89,916 



e2 



3,571 

1,3" 
2,277 

3,859 
288 

4,138 

3,049 
3,383 
9,039 
8,749 

6,527 
6,336 



33,488 I 123,404 



■4-* 
C 
4> 
U 

I1 



2.02 

•75 
1.29 

2.19 
.16 

2-35 
1-73 
1-93 
S-U 
4.98 

371 
3-6i 

70.14 
100.00 



128,946 46,985 i 175,931 
Reference use, at Central Library only. 95,078 

Grand total of volumes used 271,009 

Visitors to Reading Rooms : 

Central Library 129,853 

Lawrenceville branch t62,662 

Total 192,5 1 5 

'Opened to the public May ii, iSge. Theu ttMiitict, therefore, cover * period 
of tH montbi. initead of a year, for this braacb. 

tThetc figtirei do not include viiiton to tbe braacb new.papcr room, ol 
wbidi no account !• kept. 

35 



TABLE 6. 
CENTRAL LIBRARY— USE OF THE LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 





• 


to 


Visitors to Reading Rooms. 




• 


13 


CA 


1 1 

V 




0) 


^■^ 




u 


^0 


c 


a 




3 


C 


c 


-5 




S ^ 




g 


V 

u 
4> 


V 

u 




c 


12 


to ] ^ 









Pi 




U 






1898. 




* 


Feb. . . 


11,421 


2.567 


1,808 


4.605 


2,742 


2,225 


11,380 


Mar. . . 


12,072 


2,148 


1,819 


4,262 


3.265 


2,494 


11,840 


Apr. . . 


11.339 


2,063 


1570 


3.767 


2,801 


2,281 


10,419 


May. . . 


8,816 


1,686 


I.3I9 


3.520 


2,495 


2,205 


9.539 


June. . . 


8,651 


1. 34 1 


953 


2,877 


2,751 


1.057 


7.638 


July. . . 


9,198 


1. 183 


1,096 


1,864 


1,502 


1,484 


5,946 


Aug. . . 


9,926 


1.467 


1,258 


3,468 


3,014 


1,429 


9,169 


Sept. . . 


9.546 


1,698 


1,308 


3,786 


2,863 


1,116 9,073 


Oct. . . 


10,760 


2,032 


1-556 


4,101 


2,905 


1,493 10,055 


Nov. . . 


12,165 


2.333 


1.836 


5,106 


4,126 


1,936 13,004 


Dec. . . 


11,921 


2,192 


1,599 


4,988 


5.157 


2,599 H.343 


1899. 






} 

I 










Jan . . . 


13,131 


2,683 
*23,393 


1 1.685 


5.357 


7.532 


2,873 


17.447 












71.685 


* 










Total . 


128,946 


95.078 


1 17,807 


47.701 


41.153 


23,192 


129,853 



*This 23,393 represents the number of books brought from the book wing only. 
Of the volumes used from the open shelves in the Reference room no accurate 
account could be kept; but 71,685 is a conservative estimate, made after care- 
fully noting the use made of these volumes during the days of average attendance. 
The shelf capacity in the Reference room was greatly increased during the year, and 
the literature in most demand in this department has been taken from the book wing, 
and placed upon these shelves. The number of books called for from the book wing, 
therefore, indicates only a small proportion of the work done in this department. 

tThe statistics for the Periodical and Children's reading rooms are, of necessity, 
estimated. The figures given are obtained from occasional counting, which is used 
as a basis for making the estimate for each month. 



36 



TABLE 7. 
CENTRAL LIBRARY— USE OF BOOKS BY CLASSES. 



Circulation. 



Reference. 



^ E 

£ o 

s > 
:2; 



General Works . . . 2,506 

Philosophy 1,168 

Religion 1,940 

Sociology 2,664 

Philology 233 

Natural Science . . 3, 1 10 

Useful Arts 2,32 1 

Fine Arts 2,711 

Literature 6,900 

History 5,849 

Travel & Descrip- 
tion 5,076 

Biography 4,552 

Fiction (adult & ' 

juvenile) 89,016 

Total 128,946 



0^ 
0^ 



L94 

.91 

2.06 

.18 

2.41 
l8o 
2.10 

5-35 
4.54 

3-94 
3-53 

6973 



100.00 






4,208 

325 
1,075 

1,105 
233 

1.694 

3»62i 
3,026 
2412 : 
2,086 i 

1,018 
1,466 

1,124 

23^393 
71,685 

95,078 



4> 



17.99 

1.39 
4.6c 

4.72 

•99 

7.24 

1547 
12.94 

10.31 
8.92 

4-35 
6.27 

4.81 



100.00 



17 



TABLE 8. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH-USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1898. 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 

1899. 
January. . 

Total . . . 




Visitors to Reading Rooms. 



Adult. 


• 

a 

2 

u 

3,816 


Total. 


1.635 


5.451 


2,099 


4,346 


6,445 


1,678 


4,122 


5,800 


1,692 


4,487 


6,179 


1,527 


3,923 


5.450 


2,151 


5,264 


7,415 


2,713 


9,089 


11,802 


2,192 


4,166 


6.358 


2,571 


5,191 


7,762 


8,258 


44,404 


62,662 



opened to the public May 11, 1898. Thete statistics, therefore, cover a period 
of Sa months, instead of a year, for this branch. 

These figures do not include the number of books used for reference nor the 
visitors to the branch newspaper room, of which no account is kept. 



38 



TABLE g. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— CIRCULATION OF BOOKS BY 

CLASSES. 



CLASS. 



General Works . . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science. 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel & Descrip- 
tion 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 




Total. 







• 


^M 


• 


a> 


o 




bo 


u 




C 
4> 


^^ 


o 


U 


s 


> 




2 




0- 



1,065 

143 

337 

1.195; 

55 i 
1,028 

728 

672 

2.139 
2.900 



2-30; 1. 45 1 

3.04 1,784 



1.036! 3-57 
1,237 4.27 

20,089 69.28 13,399! 74.49 ;33.4«8 
28,998 1 100.00 ' 1 7,987 1 100.00 46,985 



2.26 

•31 

•71 

2.54 

•13 
2.1 1 

1-54 
J. 44 

4-55 
6.29 

308 

3-77 
7ij27 

100.00 



39 



TABLE ID. 
COMPARISON OF FIGURES SHOWING USE OF THE 

LIBRARY FOR 1896, 1897 AND 1898. 





1896 


1S97 


1898 


Volumes issued for home use 

♦Volumes issued for reference use . . 


115.397 
46,470 


119,962 
68,702 


175.931 
95.078 


Total 


161,867 


188,664 


271,009 





Visitors to Reading Rooms .1111,2651117,6491192,515 

^Central Library only. No account was kept of reference use at branch libraries, 
nor in the Children's room at the Central. 



40 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY, 

From February i, 1898, to February i, 1899. 

Givers 416 

Volumes 2,253 

Pamphlets 1,867 

Numbers 8,466 

Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Alden, Mr F. E. ... 15 phqtographs 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa i .... 

Allegheny County Workhouse, Hoboken, 

Pa I 

Allegheny (Pa.) Theological Seminary i .... 

American Gas Furnace Co., New York City 6 . . . . 

American Iron and Steel Association, Phila- 
delphia, Pa I 

American Manufacturer and Iron World, 

Pittsburgh 282 39 12 

American Society for the Extension of Uni- 
versity Teaching, Philadelphia, Pa ... . 2 

American Unitarian Association, Boston, 

Mass 15 I 

Amherst (Mass.) College i 

Anderson, Mr Edwin H 39 .... 

Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary i .... 

Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary, 

Alumni Association 2 

Anonymous. . . . One map, and i 15 24 

Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago, 

111 I .... 

Atlanta (Georgia) University i 

Audubon, Miss M.R., Salem, N. Y. . . .One 

photograph, and i .... 

Baker & Taylor Co., New York City i 

Bakewell, Mr B. G 20 

Bakewell & Bakewell 78 

41 



.... 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Balch, Mr Thos. Willing, Philadelphia, Pa. i 

Baldwin, Mr J. H 32 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, 

Pa 2 9 

Baltimore (Md.) Charity Organization So- 
ciety 25 I 

Bancroft Publishing Co., New York City i 

Barnard College, New York City i .... 

Barnes, Rev. Lemuel Call .... One auto- 
graph letter and i 

Barnes, Mr Phinehas, Edgewood Park, Pa . i 

Barr, Mr Albert J 14 

Barr, Miss Mary A., Edgewood Park, Pa. . 75 

Barrett, Father Richard, C. P . . . . Subscrip- 
tion to "Truth" for one year 

Batsford, Mr B. T. London, England 2 . . . . 

Belgium — Department of Commerce, Brus- 

sells, Belgium 16 

Bell, Mr Clart, New York City i 3 

Bergman, Mr J. S i .... 

Berry, Mr George A i .... 

Birmingham (England) Free Libraries 

Committee i .... 

Birmingham (England) Treasurer's Depart- 
ment I 2 

Boston (Mass.) Associated Charities of 27 .... 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 2 ... 

Boston (Mass.) Public School Art League i . . . . 

Boston (Mass.) Transit Commission i 

Boston (Mass.) University i .... 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine i .... 

Bowdoin College r Library, Brunswick, 

Maine 8 .... 

British Columbia, Minister of Mines, Vic- 
toria, B. C r I .... 

Brobst, Mr S. B 2 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library i .... 

42 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Association for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor 22 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Bureau of Charities 17 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Library Association 2 

Brooks, Miss H. St.B 8 

Brown & Sharpe Manufacturing Co., 

Providence, R. I i 

Brown University, Providence, R. I i 

Bryn Mawr (Pa.) College i 

Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa 2 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Charity Organization 

Society 18 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Express i 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Library 5 

Burleigh, Mrs E. B. and Miss Rosamund . . 2 . . . . 34 
Caldicott, Mr Cecil H . . . . One African 

newspaper 

Caldwell, Mr John, Edgewood Park, Pa. . . i 

Cambria Iron Company, Philadelphia, Pa . i 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library i .... 

Canada — Department of Agriculture, Ot- 
tawa, Canada i .... 

Canada — Department of the Interior, Ot- 
tawa, Canada i 

Carborundum Company, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y 6 . . . . 

Card, Mr W. W i 4 24 

Carhart, Prof. Daniel, Allegheny, Pa 2 

Carnegie, Mr Andrew. .. .$10,000 to be 

used for a reference technical collection 

Carnegie Art Galleries i 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa 172 3 

Carnegie Institute 8 

Carnegie Museum i 

Carnegie Public Library, Ayr, Scotland i 

Carnegie Steel Co., Limited i .... 

43 



.... 



.... 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Carnegie Steel Co., Limited, London, Eng- 
land I 

Case School of Applied Science, Qeveland, 

Ohio 2 

* 

Cassidy, Mrs W. H 20 .... 

Channing, Dr Walter, Brookline, Mass 3 

Chase, Mr Walter G., Boston, Mass 2 

Chicago (111.) Board of Trade i .... 

Chicago (111.) — Bureau of Associated 

Charities 4 

Chicago (111.) College of- Law i 

Chicago (111.) — Department of Public 

Works I 

Chicago (111.) Public Library i 

Christian Woman's Board of Missions, In- 
dianapolis, Ind 36 

Christy, Mr George H., Sewickley, Pa. . . . 51 .... 

Cincinnati (Ohio), Associated Charities of 7 

• Cincinnati (Ohio) Museum Association i 

Cincinnati (Ohio) Society of Natural 

History i 

Civic Club of Philadelphia, Pa. i . . . . 

Qapp, Mr D. C 5 380 

Clapp, Mr George H 6 45 19 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass 2 

Cleveland (Ohio) Board of Education i 

Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library i .... 

Cole, Mr George Watson, New York City i 

Colliery Engineer Company, Scranton, Pa . i . . . . 

Colorado — Bureau of Mines, Denver, Col 2 

Colorado^State Agricultural College, ex- 
periment station, Fort Collins, Col 11 

Colorado — State Treasurer, Denver, Col . . i . . . . 

Columbia University, New York City 3 2 

Concord (N. H.) Public Library i 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y i 

Cornell University Library, Ithaca, N. Y i 

44 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Crescent Steel Co 3 3 

Cunningham, Mr Chas. R One map 

Daily Outlook, Santa Monica, Cal i .... 

Dalzell, Hon. John 5 i 

Darlington, Mrs Mary C i 

Daume, Mr Edward F 2 

Davis & Warde i 

Davison, Mr G. S. See Wilkins, Mr Wm. G. 

Day, Mr Albert A., Brooklyn, N. Y i 

Da)rton (Ohio) Library Board 2 .... 

Da)rton (Ohio) Public Library and Museum .... 2 

Deats, Mr H. E., Flemington, N. J 3 

Dempsey, Mr H. L., Stillwater, R. 1 2 12 

Denniston, Mr George F 5 

Denver (Col.)Charity Organization Society .... 8 . . . . 

Detroit, (Mich.) Library Commission i .... 

Dexter, Miss Mary, Cincinnati, Ohio i 

Dodge, Mr P. T., New York City i 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N.J i . . . . 

Duck, Mr George F 259 

Eames, Mr A. H i 

Eames, Mr Wilberforce, New York City i 

Edinburgh (Scotland) Public Library 3 6 

Elderkin, Mr W. W i .... 

Elkins, Mr Wm. L., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 2 

Erie (Pa.) Public Library i 

Farren, Mr H. H . . . . ms. election returns 

of Crawford County, Pa., 1800 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111 5 

Finney, Mr Chas. D. A 2 

First Church of Christ, Scientist — Reading 

Room 4 .... 

Flack, Mr J. B . . . . One map, and 13 i 

Fleishman, Mrs S. L., Allegheny, Pa 2 

Fleming, Mrs Andrew, Allegheny, Pa i 

Flint, Mr Wm. Parker 5 90 

45 



• • . • 



. • • • 



.... 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Foerster, Mr Adolph M i 

Foote, Mr Allen Ripley, Takoma Park, Dis- 
trict of Columbia 2 

Ford, Franklin and Albert 5 

Foster, Miss Eleanor H 8 .... 

Fourth Avqnue Baptist Church i i 

Fradenburgh, Mr J. N., Clarion, Pa 3 

France — Ministere du Commerce et de 

rindustrie, Paris, France 127 

Franklin & Marshall College Alumni Asso- 
ciation, Lancaster, Pa i 

General Electric Co., Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Gill, MrS. E i .... 

Glens Falls (N. Y.) Public School 2 

Gray, Mr Edward McQueen, Florence, 

New Mexico 2 

Great Britain — Patent Office, London, 
Eng. . . .Complete set of publications 
as far as in print 

Green, Dr Samuel A., Boston, Mass 

Gresley, Mr W. S., Erie, Pa 

Halpin, Mr Wm. R i . . 

Hamilton (Canada) Public Library 

Hampton Institute* Hampton, Va 

Hartford, (Conn.) Public Library 

Hartford (Conn.) Theological Seminary 

Hartley House, New York City 

Harvard College Library, Cambridge, Mass .... 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass .... 2 

Hay, Dr George 2 676 

Henderson, Hon. David B., Washington, 

D. C I .... 

Herron, Mr Walter C 14 

Highley, Mr Frank M., Philadelphia, Pa. . i 

Holland, Dr W. J 2 .... 

Holmes, Mr Wm. C i 

Home Market Club, Boston, Mass 30 10 

46 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Hord, Rev. Arnold Harris, Philadelphia, Pa i 

Howard, Col. Hartley 7 

Hunter, Mrs Jos. R 14 

Hunter, Rev. S. A i 

Illinois Steel Co., Chicago, 111 i 

Imbrie, Mr A. M 22 

Immigration Restriction League, Boston, 

Mass 2 

Indianapolis (Ind.), Charity Organization 

Society 10 

Indianapolis (Ind.) Mohetary Convention . i . . . . 

Iron City Microscopical Society i .... 

Jacobs, Mr J. Warren, Waynesburg, Pa i 

James Blackstone Memorial Library, Bran- 
ford, Conn I .... 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md i 

Jones, Mr W. L 4 

Jones & Laughlins, Limited i .... 

Jordan, Mr John W., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Kay, Mr James I i 

Keller, Mr E. E. Edgewood Park, Pa 20 524 

Kelly, Mr J. M . . . . One map 

King, Gen. Horatio C, Brooklyn, N. Y i .... 

Kingsley House Association 217 

Kirk, Mr Arthur i 

Kleber, Messrs H. & Bro i .... 

Krauth, Mr C. P 20 254 1722 

I>ake Mohonk (N. Y.) Arbitration Con- 
ference I 

Lambing, Rev. A. A 2 .... 

Langley, Mr S. P., Washington, D. C i 

Lawrence, W. W. & Co i .... 

Leishman, Hon. J. G. A., U. S. Minister to 

Switzerland 25 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Stan- 
ford University, Cal i .... 

Lewis, Mr John L Two maps, and. ... 13 

47 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Libbie Glass Co., Toledo, Ohio i 

Library of the Legislative Assembly, Vic- 
toria, B. C 3 .... 

Link-Belt Machinery Co., Chicago, 111 2 . . . • 

Lord & Thomas, Chicago, 111 i 

Lorenz, Mr Wm. McKee 2 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library i .... 

Lothrop, Miss Mary P 2 

Louden, Miss M. G 6 

Lowry, Mr David 4 

Lunkenheimer Company, Cincinnati, O ...... . i .... 

Luty, Mr B. E. V 95 

McAdie, Mr Alexander, San Francisco, Cal 5 . . • . 

Macbeth, Mr George A . . . . Two etchings 

McCandless, Mr E. V 16 

McCollum, Mr Jas. P 2 

McCurdy, Dr Stewart Le Roy i 

McEwen, Mrs J. A., Wilkinsburg, Pa 3 

McFarren, Mr S. J 685 

McGonnigle, Mr R. D 19 

McKee, Mrs Samuel 6 . . . . 

Maiden (Mass.) Public Library 3 .... 

Manchester (N. H.) Citv Library i ... 

Marthens, Mr John F . . . . Ten mss. docu- 
ments and I 15 .... 

Maryland — Commission to complete and 

publish records and history of soldiers, 

sailors and marines accredited to the 

State of Maryland during the Civil 

War, Baltimore, Md 2 

Masonic Library Association of Allegheny 

County 10 

Massachusetts — Bureau of Statistics of 

Labor 5 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

Boston, Mass i . . . . 

Massachusetts, State Library of 2 . . . . 

. 48 



I 
I 

48 



8 



Vols. Pams. 

Matthews, George E. & Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 2 

Mechanics Institute, San Francisco, Cal i 

Mellor, Mr C. C, Edgewood Park, Pa 

One daguerreotype, and 2 7 

Mercantile Library Association, New York 

City 2 

Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, 

Pa 

Mergenthaler, Ott & Co., Baltimore, Md 

Metcalf, Mr Wm 22 

Miller, Mrs Reuben 19 

Missouri Bureau of Labor, Jefferson .City, 

Mo I 

Missouri Geological Survey, Jefferson City, 

Mo 7 

Morris, Mrs A. S 10 

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, 

Mass 

Muir, Mr Henry D i 

Mumford, A. W. & Co., Chicago, 111 i 

Murdock, Mrs Alexander ! . . i 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass 

Mustin, Mr W. I . . . . One newspaper 

(March 4, 1849) , . . . 

National Congress of Mothers, Washing- 
ton, D. C 

New Bedford (Mass.) Free Public Library 

New Haven (Conn.) Free Public Library 

New Jersey — Department of Factory and 

Workshop Inspection, Trenton, N. J 

New London (Conn.) Public Library 

New South Wales, Public Library, Sydney, 

N. S. W 

New York (N. Y.) Association for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor 3 

New York (N. Y.) Charity Organization 

Society i 

49 



Nos. 



5 
I 

I 

I 
I 



24 



14 



148 



511 



Vols. Pams. Nos 

New York (N. Y.) Free Circulating Library i 

New York (N. Y.) University i 

New York (N. Y.) Zoological Society i 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y . . . i 36 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 2 

Niagara Falls (N. Y.) Public Library i 

North Carolina — Department of Agricul- 
ture, Raleigh, N. C i 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 i 

Oberlin (Ohio) College i 

Olcott, Miss F. J I 

Olmstead, Mr Dwight Hinckley, New York 

City 2 

Omaha (Neb.) Public Library i 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Corvallis, Oregon 6 

Paisley, Mr Samuel T i .... 

Pearson, Mr George 109 

Pencoyd Iron Works, Philadelphia, Pa . . . i .... 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania — Auditor General i .... 

Pennsylvania College for Women 3 

Pennsylvania Geological Survey 2 

Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadel- 
phia, Pa I 

Pennsylvania — Department of Internal Af- 
fairs, Bureau of Mines i .... 

Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revo- 
lution, Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania State College, State College, 

Pa 3 .... 

Peoria (111.) Public Library i 

Perry Mason & Co., Boston, Mass i 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Commercial Museum i 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Free Library i 

Phillips, Prof. Francis C, Allegheny, Pa 2 

50 



• • 



• • • -% 



I-: 

• * * 









I03 



Vols. Pams. Nos 

Phillips, Mr Wm. B 2 2 

Pinkerton, Mr S. S i 

Pittsburgh Amateur Photographers' So- 
ciety I .... 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association i 

Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce i .... 

Pittsburgh Chapter, American Institute of 

Architects 2 

Pittsburgh — Department of Public Safety . i 

Pittsburgh Medical Library Association i 

Pittsburgh Printing Co 2 

Popp, Miss Anna i .... 

Porter, Mr Henry Kirke 32 58 

Portland (Oregon) City Board of Charities 7 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y i 

Press Publishing Co 3 

Princeton (N. J.) University 2 

Probasco, Mr W. M i .... 

Protestant Episcopal Church, Domestic and 
Foreign Missionary Society, New 

York City i 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum i .... 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library 2 

Queensland (Australia) — Department of 

Mines 2 

Quincy (111.) Free Public Library i 

Quinon, Mr Stephen J 25 

Ranck, Mr Samuel H., Baltimore, Md i 

Rennsselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, 

N. Y 3 

Reyman, Mr Otto C i 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y i i 

Rice, Mr George i .... 

Richards, Mr Chas. R., New York City i 

Richardson, W. A., Estate of the late i .... 

Roycroft Shop, East Aurora, N. Y i .... 

Russell, Mr E. H 143 

51 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• a • • 



Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J i .... 

Sahm, Mr W. K. T 152 

St. Giles Public Library, London, England i 

St. Louis (Mo.) Public (Free) Library 2 

St. Paul (Minn.) Associated Charities 5 

S Jem, (Mass.) Public Library i 

San Francisco (Cal.) Free Public Library. 2 

Sargent & Co., New York City i 

Schellenberg, Mr F. C 

Schurman, Dr J. G., Ithaca, N. Y i .... 

Schwartz, Mr J. L . . . . Eleven documents, 

deeds, mss., and 8 .... 

Scranton (Pa.) Public Library i 

Sellers, Mr Edwin Jaquett, Philadelphia, Pa i 

Smith, Mr Chas. Porter, Wilkinsburg, Pa . . i . . . . 33 

Smith, Mr H. H . . . . Manuscript notes 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass 2 .... 

Society for the Promotion of Engineering 

Education, Durham, N. H i .... 

Society of Naval Architects and Marine 

Engineers, New York City 2 

Sons of Delaware of Philadelphia, Philadel- 
phia, Pa I 

Springfield (111.) Public Library 3 

Springfield (Mass.) City Library Associa- 
tion 13 

Stechert, Gustav E., New York City 2 . . . . 

Stelzner, Mr C. B i 

Stevenson, Mr Jas E i .... 

Sturtevant, B. F. Co., Jamaica Plain Sta- 
tion, Boston, Mass i .... 

Swank, Mr James M., Philadelphia, Pa 2 i 

Thompson, Mr Richard H 3 

Thomson, Mr John, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Thuma, Mr Robert F i 

Thurston Preparatory School i 

Toronto (Ontario) Public Library i 



.... 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 
Towle Manufacturing Co., Newburyport, 

Conn I 

Tribune Association, New York City i .... 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn i .... 

Tufts College (Mass.) 4 .... 

Twentieth Century Club, Boston, Mass 7 . . . . 

Union Theological Seminary, New York 

City I .... 

United States Government, Washington, 

D. C 611 141 

United States Government, through Hon. 

John Dalzell, Washington, D. C i 

United States — Department of Agriculture 4 172 
United States — Department of Agriculture, 

Weather Bureau 6 

United States — Civil Service Commission. 3 2 

United States — Geological Survey 2 4 

United States — Geological Survey, through 

Hon. John Dalzell .... Ninety-four 

maps, and 2,^ 

United States — Department of the Interior. 11 18 
United States — Department of the Interior, 

through Hon. John Dalzell 18 .... 

United States — Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Education 4 18 

United States — Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission 2 .... 

United States-^Department of Labor 12 

United States — Marine Hospital Service i 

United States National Academy of 

Science i 

United States National Museum 2 .... 

United States — Navy Department 2 10 

United States — Smithsonian Institution. . . 2 12 

United States — Department of State 4 29 

United States — Department of State, 

Library i 

53 



.... 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

United States Supreme Court i . 

United States — ^Treasury Department 2 15 . 

United States — Treasury Department, 

through Hon. John Dalzell i . 

United States — Treasury Department, 

Bureau of Statistics i . 

United States — ^War Department 28 17. 

Universal Brotherhood, Lodge No. 56, 

Pittsburgh i 

University of California 2 . 

University of Chicago i , 

University of Michigan i 

University of Minnesota i 

University of Nebraska i 

University of Pennsylvania i 18 

University of the State of New York 27 21 

University of Vermont i 

University of Wisconsin 5 

Vassar College 3 

Vermont — Board of Library Commission- 
ers, Burlington, Vt i 

Walker, Dr R. L., Carnegie, Pa 2 .... 

Waring, Mr R. N., Tyrone, Pa i .... 

Warner, Mr George E., Minneapolis, Minn i 

Washington and Jefferson College i 

Washington and Lee University 2 

Washington Heights Free Library, New 

York City i 

Watson, Mr Wm. Richard 10 

Wattles, Mr F. Gorton i 

Wellesley College i 

Western Pennsylvania Institution for the 

Blind I 

Western Reserve University, Cleveland, O 2 

Western Theological Seminary Library, 

Allegheny, Pa 34 17 2165 

54 






• • • • • • 

t •-• • • 

» • • • 



• • • 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 
Western University of Pennsylvania, Alle- 
gheny, Pa 2 . • . . 

Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing 

Co * • .... o .••. 

Westminster College, New Wilmington, 

Pa 2 • . . . 

Whitehead, Mr A. C 2 

Whitehead, Rt. Rev. Cortlandt i 39 i 

Wilkms, Mr Wm. G. and Mr G. S. Davison 355 

Willard, Miss E. M i ... 

Williams College, Williamstown, Mass i 

Wills, Mr W. H., Wilkinsburg, Pa 34 • • • 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute i 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute Free Library i 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission, 

Madison, Wis 3 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madi- 
son, Wis 3 .... 

Wolverhampton (England) Free Library 

Committee i .... 

Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Wood, Mr Joseph i 

Woods, Mr Edward A., Sewickley, Pa 2 

Woodside, Rev Nevin i 

Worcester (Mass.) Polytechnic Institute i 

Worthington, Mr Henry R 18 

Yale University i 



.... 



.... 



55 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF BUILDINGS. 



To the Committee on Buildings atid Grounds : 

Gentlemen : — I again, at the expiration of another year, 
submit a brief report of the operation of the buildings en- 
trusted to my care. It gives me pleasure to say that, aided by 
your continued co-operation and assistance in meeting the ob- 
ligations required of me, I am able to report the buildings in 
good condition. In the buildings proper, prompt attention 
has been given to repairs when needed. The furniture, carpets, 
and house equipment generally, are in good condition, and 
the engines, boilers and electrical apparatus are practically 
the same as when installed. At present no expensive repairs 
are contemplated or needed. 

At the Lawrenceville branch library all outside improve- 
ments have been made. A substantial iron fence has been 
built at the ends and rear of the building, and the grounds 
graded and sodded, making the structure present a handsome 
and creditable appearance. 

As the question of expense for lighting, heating and 
ventilating is always an important and interesting one, I again 
submit the amount expended at the Main building for that 
purpose. The total cost for the year was $6,192.60. This 
amount divided as before — ^that is, forty per cent of the whole 
for heating and ventilating, and sixty per cent for lighting, 
shows that it cost a little more than $1.31 to heat and venti- 
late each 1,000 cubic feet of space, and that the expense for 

56 



lighting was $i.0354 per lamp. In comparison with the 
figures given in my report a year ago, it will be seen that the 
cost for heating and ventilating is the same, while there is 
an increase of one cent per year on each lamp. It may be 
of further interest to state in connection with the above, that, 
during the year, apparatus was erected to heat and exhaust 
the air out of rooms, the cubic contents of which are more 
than 60,000 feet; that over one hundred additional lights were 
added ; that the Art Gallery remamed open a greater part of 
the year; and that the Music Hall, in which there are 1,073 
lights, was used twenty-five times more than in the preceding 
year. 

The lecture rooms continue to be popular. During the 
year there were thirty-two free lectures and musical recitals 
given, to which the public were invited, and thirty-eight 
lectures, to which an admission was charged, and a rental 
collected as follows : 

6 evenings at $10.00 $ 60.00 

21 evenings at 12.50 262.50 

4 evenings at 15.00 60.00 

1 evening at 17.50 i7-50 

2 evenings at 20.00 40.00 

4 afternoons at 10.00 40.00 

$480.00 

In the hall at the Lawrenceville branch there were no 
free lectures given. Six lectures were given by the Univer- 
sity Extension Society, for which a rental of $12.50 per night 
was charged, or $75.00 for the series. This added to $480.00 
collected at the Main building, makes a total of $555.00 in 
rentals. The number of times the rooms have been used, 
the interest taken, and the good attendance at both pay and 
free entertainments, shows that they have taken their place as 
an educational part of the institution. 

A matter of deep concern for all interested is the great 
need of more room in the several departments of the Main 
Library building. During the first year there were many un- 
occupied rooms of which apparently no use could be made. 

57 



These have all been taken for work rooms in connection with 
the departments, or for exhibition purposes. In some in- 
stances a large room has been divided by partitions, in others 
partitions have been removed that the best possible use might 
be made of the space. To relieve the situation, during the 
past year the unfinished part of the third story was utilized. 
Fireproof partitions were built, shelving put up, and, that the 
place might be made habitable, a heating and ventilating out- 
fit was installed. The Art Students' League that had occupied 
apartments in the basement, was assigned to a part of this 
space, the rooms vacated by them being taken by the Museum 
for a laboratory and department of preparation. This branch 
of the Museum service had, up until this time, been much 
hampered in its work, owing to the crowded condition of 
its rooms. The Architectural Club was also given a place 
on the third floor, the remaining nooks and comers being 
made use of for storage. The only encouragement for per- 
manent relief is the prospective addition to the building. 
This is being anxiously awaited. 

Very respectfully, 

Chas. R. Cunningham, Sup't. of Buildings. 
April 15th, 1899. 



58 



REPORT OP THE MANAGER OP 

MUSIC HALL. 

Pittsburgh, April 12, 1899. 

To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of the Music Hall for the year ending: January 
31st, 1899. 

PAY ENTERTAINMENTS. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 

Forenoon Evening, 
or Afternoon. 

Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 10 10 

Art Society, $50 rate 8 

Mozart Club, $50 rate 7 

Apollo Club, $100 rate 3 

Charity, Philanthropic, and Educational, 

$75 rate 3 9 

Charity, Philanthropic and Educational, 

$100 rate 22 

Conventions at educational rates, $75 ... 10 

Star Course entertainments, $150 rate 3 

Entertainments paying full rate, $125 .. . i 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 12 

24 74 

Total income from rentals as above $8,575.00 

Use of organ, 5 times at $25 125.00 

$8,700.00 
Expenditures for the hall for the year were $8,615.92 

59 



Included in the expenses of operating Carnegie Music 
Hall is the salary of the Musical director, of the Manager of 
the Hall, the ushers and doorkeepers and all the expenses 
connected with the free organ recitals. 

Free organ recitals by Frederic Archer, established when 
the Hall was opened, have been continued weekly on Satur- 
day evenings and Sunday afternoons. No recitals, however, 
were given during the summer months of July, August and 
September, as heretofore. 

Afternoon. Evening. 

The total number of recitals during the 

year was 39 39 

FREE USE OF HALL. 

Annual commencement exercises of Pittsburgh High 
School were celebrated on the evening of June 23d. 

Founder's Day was celebrated on the afternoon of Thurs- 
day, November 3d. 

TOTAL USE OF HALL DURING THE YEAR. 

Forenoon Evening, 
or Afternoon. 

Pay entertainments ^24 74 

Free organ recitals 39 39 

Miscellaneous i i 

64 114 

IN GENERAL. 

The Hall was not used on Sundays except for organ 

recitals. 

During the year all the contracts made with the Manager 
for the use of the Hall were kept, and there are no rentals 
uncollected. 

The pay entertainments of the year ending January 31st, 

1898, numbered fifteen in the afternoon and sixty-one in the 

evening. 

6a 



The total receipts for the year just ended compared with 
those of the year before show an increase of $1,500.00. 

I have to report excellent and satisfactory service from 

attendants under my direction — namely, the doorkeepers and 

ushers. 

Very respectfully, 

George H. Wilson, Manager, 



61 



REPORT OF THE MUSICAL DIRECTOR. 

April 14, 1899. 

To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen: — It affords me very great pleasure to be 
enabled to report the entire success of the Saturday and 
Sunday organ recitals given in the Music Hall. The in- 
creased attendance and enthusiasm displayed by those present 
on each occasion afford satisfactory proof that the object in 
view — cultivation and extension of musical taste amongst 
the people at large — is being thoroughly accomplished. 
Moreover, the large number of regular attendants, represent- 
ative of the music students of the city, many of whom have 
been present at every recital yet given, demonstrates beyond 
a doubt that the educational opportunities thus afforded them 
are recognized and appreciated. 

On Sundays the crowd is so great that hundreds are 
frequently unable to gain admission. 

In order to stimulate the interest aroused I have pre- 
sented programmes of the most diversified character, and 
have introduced all new compositions worthy of attention, 
as soon as published. 

During the year ending January 31, 1899, I g^^t 78 
recitals, in the course of which 682 compositions, representa- 
tive of all schools and nationalities, both ancient and modem, 
were played. Of these 336 were specially written for the or- 
gan, and 346 were transcriptions of works of varied character, 
orchestral and otherwise. In this list were included 228 works 

62 



not to be found in the records of previous seasons, and many 
of them were absolutely new and given for the first time in 
this country. 

The number of auditors during this period amounted to 
75,017. The unusually inclement weather reduced the atten- 
dance at 21 recitals to 4,692 (an average of about 223), but 
on the remaining 57 dates a total number of 70,325 were pres- 
ent, representing an average of 1,232 on each occasion. 

In order to afford an idea of the musical field explored 
since I commenced my duties I may, perhaps, be allowed to 
mention that in the programmes of 259 recitals ending Jan- 
uary 29 of the present year, are no less than 1983 composi- 
tions, 980 original organ works, and 1,003 transcriptions. 

I have found also that the insertion of brief analytical 
and biographical notes in each programme (constituting in 
their entirety a miniature musical encyclopaedia) has been a 
feature of special value. 

The publication of souvenir books on the occasion of 
each hundredth performance, containing a detailed list of 
music given, has served to extend the influence of the work 
in progress here, far and wide, as the numerous applications 
by mail for copies, addressed from all parts of this country 
and Europe, emphatically prove. 

My annual series of musical lectures (with illustrations 
on both organ and piano) given in April and May of last year, 
were attended by a large number of interested auditors. 

The organ remains in excellent condition, and is well 
cared for by the representative of the builders. 

Respectfully yours, 

Frederic Archer, Musical Director, 



63 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., March 31, 1899. 
W. N, Frew, Esq,, President: 

Your Committee on Investment and Finance respect- 
fully report that there is no change from their last annual 
report; that they have in their possession the nineteen first 
mortgage, five per cent, gold-loan of 1890, bonds of the 
Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake Erie Railroad Company, of 
the par value of $1,000 each, being the investment of the 
Bemd fund. These bonds, together with the deeds of the 
properties purchased for branch libraries — namely, from 
William Schutte et ux., 26th ward property; Ira M. Burch- 
field et ux., 23d ward property; Frank Le Moyne and 
William G. Sawyer, and Harry P. Ford et ux., Thomas Mc- 
Cartan et al., and George D. Edwards, nth ward property; 
Joseph M. Taylor and Emma Taylor et al., 36th ward prop- . 
erty, and the Washington Sub-district school of the City of 
Pittsburgh property; are deposited in Box 7106 Fidelity Title 
and Trust Company vaults. 

The coupons of bonds have been regularly handed over 
to the Treasurer, for which we have his receipt. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robt. Pitcairn, Chairman, 



64 



REPORT OF THE AUDITORS. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., April 17th, 1899. 

IV, N. Frew J Esq,, President: 

The Committee on Audit begs to report that it has 
examined the annual statement of the Treasurer for the year 
ending January 31st, 1899, and examined and compared 
therewith the Treasurer's accounts and vouchers and verified 
the same as to the funds on hand and in other respects, and 
that it finds the statement and all matters relating thereto 
correct as stated; and further, that it has examined the ac- 
counts of the Committee on Investment and Finance, finding 
the same correct, and the investments of the Committee on 
account of the Bemd fund (being the same securities reported 
at last annual meeting), together with the title papers, are in 
the custody of the Finance Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. W. Mellon, Chairman, 



65 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

Condensed statement of H. C. Frick, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31st, 1899. 

Reventie, 

Surplus from last year $ 935.19 

Appropriation from City of Pittsburgh. 90,000.00 
Contributions : 

Andrew Carnegie $10,000.00 

H. K. Porter 497-37 

10,49737 

Home Library fund: 

Contributions from sundry persons. 225.00 

Rentals of Music Hall 8,700.00 

Rentals of Lecture Hall 555-00 

Library collections: 

Central Library $ 892.43 

Lawrenceville branch . . . 87.29 

979.72 

Interest on daily bank balances 993-94 

$1 12,886.22 

Disposition. 

For approved vouchers, Nos. 1707 to 
2612 inclusive: 
Central Library, 
Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense $25,494.45 

Library department. 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 25,820.94 

Books purchased 18,713.56 

66 



Music Hall department. 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 8,615.92 

Accounting department. 

Operating labor and running ex- 
pense 292.42 

Executive department. 

Running expense 176.35 

Lawrenceville Branch. 
Building department. 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 2,338.29 

Library department. 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 2,298.59 

Books purchased 6,513.84 

West End Branch. 
Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 233.54 

Library department. 

Operating labor and running ex- 
pense 258.88 

Books purchased 3,681.82 

Wylie Avenue Branch. 
Library department. 

Running expense 20.20 

Books purchased 4,899.63 

Funds. 
Carnegie fund: Books purchased. . . . 4,064.28 
Home Library fund. 

Running expense 40. 1 1 

Books purchased ^77-77 

H. K. Porter fund : Books purchased 49737 

$104,137.96 

Surplus $ 8,748.26 

67 



J. D. BERND FUND. 

Condensed statement of H. C. Frick, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31st, 1899. 

Revenue, 

Surplus from last year $107.80 

Interest on Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake 

Erie Railroad bonds 950.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 5.12 

— $1,062.92 

Disposition, 

Books purchased $ 722.38 



Surplus $340.54 



68 



Fourth Annual Reports 



To the Board of Trustees 



of the 



Carnegie Library of Pittsbtirgh 



For the Year Ending January 3J, 1900. 



J 900. 



SI 

31 



Fourth Annual Reports 

To the Board of Trustees 
of the 

Gimegie Library of Pittsbttrgh 

For the Year Ending January 31, 1900. 



1900. 



Fourth Annual Reports 

To the Board of Trustees 
of the 

Gimegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 31, 1900. 



1900. 



Board of Trustees* 



President, W. N. FREW, 
Vice President, ROBERT PITCAIRN, 
Secretary, J. F. HUDSON, 
Treasurer, H. C. FRICK. 

HON. W. J. DIEHL, J. GUY McCANDLESS, 

R. H. DOUGLAS, DAVID McCARGO, 

E. M. FERGUSON, THOMAS G. McCLURE, 

W. N. FREW, W. H. McKELVY, 

H. C. FRICK, W. A. MAGEE, 

J. F. HUDSON, A. W. MELLON, 

♦JOHN McM. KING, ROBERT PITCAIRN, 

JOHN S. LAMBIE, H. K. PORTER. 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, J. P. STERRETT. 

Finance Committee* 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman, E. M. FERGUSON, 

HON. W. J. DIEHL. 

G)mmhtee on Music HalL 
W. A. MAGEE, Chairman, H. K. PORTER, 

♦JOHN McM. KING. 

Committtt on Buildings and Gtounds* 

tTHOMAS G. McCLURE, Chairman, J. F. HUDSON. 

H. C. FRICK. 

G»nmittee on Dbrary* 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, Chairman, W. H. McKELVY, 

R. H. DOUGLAS. 

Auditing G>mmittee* 
A. W. MELLON, Chairman, JOHN S. LAMBIE. 

Executive Staff* 

EDWIN H. ANDERSON, FREDERIC ARCHER, 

Ubrarian, Director of Music, 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM, GEO. H. WILSON. 

Sup't. of Buildings, Manager of Music Hall 

*I>ied June, 1899. 

fRetigned December, 1899, and succeeded by J. Guy MeCandlest. 



Content s* 



Page. 

Frontispiece. 

Report of the President, 5 

Report of the Committee on Administration of the 

Library, ---- 8 

Report of the Librarian, 9 

Statistical Tables, 24 

Gifts to the Library, -- 44 

Report of the Superintendent of Buildine^s, - - 60 

Report of the Manager of Music Hall, - - - - 63 

Report of the Director of Music, 66 

Report of the Finance Committee, 68 

Report of the Treasurer, -- 69 

Report of the Auditing Committee, 72 



Report of the President* 



To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to transmit the reports 
of the heads of the various departments of the institution 
under your charge for the year ending January 31st, 1900. 
They all indicate a very satisfactory condition. 

The work of the Library has grown in amount and im- 
portance because of the largely increased use made of it by 
the people. Three branch libraries are now in operation and 
have proved successful far beyond anticipation. Two more 
will be installed before the first of July next. 

All the buildings are in a good state of repair, and have 
been maintained by the Superintendent in an exceptionally 
clean and attractive condition. 

The receipts of the Music Hall have not been as large 
as for the previous year and a call on the emergency fund 
set aside for that department of the institution was neces- 
sitated. 

The free organ recitals and lectures of Mr Archer seem 
to grow in popularity with the years, the average attendance 
being 200 larger than during any previous season. 

We are again indebted to Mr Carnegie for a continuance 
of his generosity. He has duplicated his donation of the 
year before by giving the sum of $10,000 for an extension 

5 



of the technical collection of books. This collection is rapidly 
assuming importance, and is proving of great assistance to 
the scientific section of the community. 

After the last annual meeting of your Board, at which 
the offer of $1,750,000 by Mr Carnegie for an enlargement 
of the Carnegie Library building was accepted, the heads 
of departments came to the conclusion that even more space 
than provided in the plans then submitted would in the near 
future be needed. Accordingly, acting under instructions 
from Mr Carnegie the plans were much enlarged and a first 
study, prepared under the instruction of the Building Com- 
mittee by Messrs Alden & Harlow, was laid before Mr Car- 
negie during the past week and approved by him. The plans 
were also approved on architectural grounds by Mr Walter 
Cook of the firm of Babb, Cook & Willard, New York, an 
architect of experience, impartiality and high standing in his 
profession, who had been recommended by Mr R. S. Peabody, 
President of the American Institute of Architects, as one 
specially well fitted to act as expert adviser to the Building 
Committee. The Committee has also endorsed the work of 
the architects and the plans will to-day be laid before your 
Board. The estimated cost of the completed structure is 
$3,600,000. This amount Mr Carnegie has agreed to pro- 
vide. His belief is that for the time being, sufficient addi- 
tional space will be secured by the expenditure of the $1,750,- 
000, now to the credit of the Board. The superb generosity 
of Mr Carnegie in providing such a magnificent home for 
art, science and literature will assuredly be productive of the 
greatest results, and it is scarcely an exaggeration to say 
that the institution when completed will not have its equal. 

The City of Pittsburgh, with the progressive spirit that 
has from the first characterized its treatment of the institu- 
tion, has appropriated for the maintenance of the buildings 
and the support of the Library for the year ending January 

31st, 1901, the sum of $126,000.00 

Balance in contingent fund .70 

Total $126,000.70 

6 



Your executive committee, in accordance with the By- 
Laws, has apportioned this as follows : — 

Maintenance of Library $89,000.00 

Maintenance of buildings 31,500.00 

Music Hall emergency fund 1,500.00 

Contingent fund 4,000.70 

It affords me great pleasure to again certify to the faith- 
ful and successful work of all entrusted with the executive 
control of the institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, 

President. 



Report of the Committee on Administration of 

the Library* 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

We herewith submit as our annual report the very full 
and detailed report of the Librarian, which is so full and 
complete that we have nothing further to add, unless it be 
to make the general statement that the Library is growing 
with each month of its existence, and to note the enormous 
increase in circulation during the past year, which was nearly 
double that of the year before. The growth in all depart- 
ments seems to be perfectly normal, steady and permanent. 

Geo. A. Macbeth, 

Chairman. 



8 



Report of the Li 



To the Library Coftwiittee of the Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to present my report of the work of the 
Library for the fourth statistical year, ending January 31, 
1900. 

On February i, 1900, there were in the Central Library 
and branches, both catalogued and uncatalogued, 96,172 
volumes and 6,243 pamphlets. There were added during the 
year 29,113 volumes and 2,074 pamphlets. After deducting 
the volumes worn out and withdrawn, or sent to the collec- 
tion of duplicates, and the duplicate pamphlets and those 
bound into volumes, there was a net gain of 27,687 volumes 
and 922 pamphlets. (See Table i, following.) 

The number of catalogued volumes in the Central 
Library and branches at the close of the year was 92,779. 
Of these, 64,059 were in the Central Library, 9,249 in the 
Lawrenceville branch, 5, 188 in the West End branch, and 
8,094 in the Wylie Avenue branch. All these were on the 
shelves and ready for use. The remaining 6,189 volumes 
were packed in cases, ready to be sent to the Mount Wash- 
ington and Hazelwood branches as soon as the buildings 
were prepared to receive them. (Table 2, following.) 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes classified and catalogued during 

9 



the year was 37,731, of which 19,164 were for the Central 
Library, including school duplicates, home libraries and 
books purchased from the Carnegie fund, 2,457 ^^^ ^^e 
Lavvrenceville branch, 1,887 ^^r the West End branch, 8,034 
for the Wylie Avenue branch, 3,058 for the Mount Washing- 
ton branch, and 3,131 for the Hazelwood branch. When it is 
remembered that this includes making three complete dic- 
tionary card catalogues for the Central Library, with an- 
notations for many of the titles, and a similar catalogue for its 
own collection at each branch, the mag^nitude of the work 
may be understood. These unprecedented results are due 
first to the efficiency of the staff in this department, including 
only nine people, and second to the linotype method of print- 
ing the cards. (Table 3, following.) 

During the year our collection of 900 volumes of bound 
newspapers was catalogued, and nearly all arrears in cata- 
loguing were made up, with the exception of about 3,000 
volumes of United States public documents. These docu- 
ments are, however, so arranged on the shelves as to be 
readily accessible and are in constant use. We therefore 
began the current year on a much better footing with regard 
to the work in hand than at the beginning of any year 
heretofore. 

An author catalogue of our 6,243 pamphlets has been 
made and the pamphlets themselves have been classified and 
put in boxes on the shelves with the books in the Reference 
department, an arrangement which seems to be entirely 
satisfactory. All important pamphlets are bound and treated 
as books. 

CIRCULATION. 

The number of volumes sent into the homes of the 
people during the year from the Central Library and branches 
was 345,590, an increase of 169,659, or 96.44 per cent, over 
the previous year. Of these, 176,378 were issued at the 
Central Library, 74,224 at the Lawrenceville branch, 30,477 
at the West End branch, and 64,511 at the Wylie Avenue 
branch. The latter branch, however, was not opened till 

lo 



June 1st, and its figures cover a period of only eight months 
instead of a year. If the Wylie Avenue branch had been in 
operation a full year its circulation would have reached loo,- 
ooo volumes. (Tables 4, 5, 6 and 15, following.) 

While there were 345,590 volumes circulated during the 
year, the average number of volumes on hand for this pur- 
pose was about 42,000; so that our entire lending stock was 
turned over 8.2 times in twelve months. 

The number of registered borrowers at the close of the 
period covered by this report was 27,2^7. The number 
added during the year was 9,303, of which 2,620 were regis- 
tered at the Central Library, 1,601 at the Lawrence ville 
branch, 1,442 at the West End branch, and 3,640 at the Wylie 
Avenue branch. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

The number of volumes used in the Reference depart- 
ment at the Central Library was 118,354, an increase of 
23,276 over the previous year. The number of readers was 
21,770, an increase of 3,963. (Tables 7 and 8, following.) The 
number of books at present on the shelves in the Reference 
room, to which every one has free access, is 3,119. The total 
number of volumes in the Reference department is 34,212, 
of which 7,351 were added during the year. Some of the 
most noteworthy additions were the following : — 

Audsley's Ornamental arts of Japan. 4v. 

Bate's English pre-Raphaelite painters ; their associates and 

successors. 
Bates & Guild's English country houses. 
Bell's Rembrandt van Rijn and his work. 
Cellini's Treatises on goldsmithing and sculpture. 
Chamberlain's Universities and their sons. 4v. 
Chefs-d'oeuvre de I'art au XIXe si^cle. 5v. 
Child's English and Scottish popular ballads. 5v. 
Choisy*s Histoire de I'architecture. 2v. 
Cook's Art and artists of our time. 3v. 
Crowe & Cavalcaselle's History of painting in Italy. 3v. 
Gailhabaud's Monuments anciens et modernes. 4v. 
Gazette des beaux-arts; full set. 81 v. 

II 



Hanley & Theobald's Conchologia indica. 

King's Handbook to cathedrals of England. 6v. 

Michaud's Biographic universelle. 45v. 

Michel's Rembrandt; his life, his work and his time. 2v. * 

Michel's Rubens; his life, his work and his time. 2v. 

Nolhac's Marie Antoinette, the queen. 

Nordenskiold's Facsimile-atlas to early history of cartography. 

Ongania's L'architettura e la scultura del rinascimento in Venezia. 

2V. 

Ongania's Basilica di San Marco, igv. 
Ongania's Streets and canals in Venice. 2v. 
Palast-architektur von ober-Italien und Toscana. 2v. 
Palestine exploration fund. Publications. 50V. 
Pennell's Lithography and lithographers. 

Perkins' Italian sculptors; a history of sculpture in northern, south- 
em and eastern Italy. 
Perkins' Tuscan sculptors; their lives, works and times. 
Rowe's French wood carvings from the national museums. 
Shakespeare quarto fac-similes. 44V. 
Sheldon's Recent ideals of American art. 
Sowerby's English botany; or coloured figures of British plants. 

13V. 
Stephens' Sketch of life and works of Alma Tadema. 
Strack's Baudenkmaeler Roms. 
Strack's Ziegelbauwerke in Italien. 
Street's Brick and marble in the middle ages; notes of tours in 

northern Italy. 
Wallis' Egyptian ceramic art. 
Waring's The arts connected with architecture. 

The works on architecture and decoration in this list 
were purchased from the Bernd fund. The list, however, 
contains only a few of the more important accessions during 
the year, and does not include any of the sets of technical 
periodicals and proceedings and transactions of scientific 
societies, purchased from the Carnegie fund. A complete 
list of these, however, has been prepared and will be issued in 
pamphlet form in about two weeks. 

Annotated reference lists have been posted in the Refer- 
ence room from time to time, upon subjects of special local 
interest and on topics of the day. A full list on the artists 

12 



represented in the fall exhibition in the Art Gallery, compiled 
by the Reference Librarian and included in the Catalogue 
of the Exhibition, brought many people to us who wished to 
learn more about the work of the artists. 

A series of reference lists has been appearing in the 
Monthly Bulletin of the Library, on contemporary authors. 
Beginning last May these lists have covered the following 
subjects: American novelists, English novelists, Foreign 
novelists and dramatists, English and American poets, Essay- 
ists and critics, and Historians. These lists have proved so 
useful that they will be continued throughout the year, in- 
cluding Painters, Musicians, Actors, Scientists, and others. 

The staff in this department has also compiled reference 
lists for the principal literary clubs of the city and vicinity. 
These have been not merely lists of books on the general 
subjects for the year, but have consisted of specific references 
on the subject of each paper, amounting sometimes to forty 
or fifty brief lists for one club. All these lists are filed and 
often used in other connections. 

Besides these lists, the assistants in this department have 
made various indexes, the most important and useful being 
a title index, on slips of paper, to the poetry collections in the 
Library. This index now covers 43 volumes of collected 
poetry, and is being constantly increased. 

The picture collection, made up of some of the Perry 
pictures and of illustrations cut from old magazines, and 
mounted on heavy gray paper, now numbers 5,692. Of 
these, 2,986 on painting, architecture, and travel, were 
mounted and arranged by the assistants in the Reference 
department, and this collection is especially strong in repro- 
ductions of great paintings, both by the old masters and 
modem artists. The remaining 2,706 consist entirely of por- 
traits, mounted and arranged by the assistants in the Loan 
department. The whole collection is useful for reference in 
the Library, and parts of it are frequently lent to schools and 
study clubs. 

A room in the basement has been fitted with temporary 
shelves for the Specifications and Drawings of the British 

^3 



Patents, and the whole set, covering the period from 1617 to 
the present time, has been made available for use; so that 
we are now able to satisfy all requests made for them, 
except for occasional numbers which are out of print. Ar- 
rangements have been made for binding the entire set during 
the current year. 

For some time there has been an urgent need in the 
Reference department for an assistant thoroughly versed in 
the industrial arts and sciences. The Library already has a 
large collection of literature bearing upon the industries and 
technical needs of this region, and the Carnegie fund is 
enabling us to make rapid and important additions to it. 
For the effective handling of this literature the Library has 
been fortunate in securing the services of a gentleman who 
is a graduate of one of the best technical schools of this coun- 
try, and whose technical education has been supplemented 
by experience in our own city. He began his duties in the 
Reference department, April, 1900. 

There has been a larger increase in the use of the Refer- 
ence department during the period covered by this report 
than can be shown by figures. The requests for information 
by letter and telephone, for instance, are more frequent, and 
the Library serves in this way many people both in the city 
and the surrounding country, who do not increase the fig- 
ures in our records. 

Last May we put into operation a new system for the 
selection of books for purchase, which has proved so satis- 
factory that we give here a brief description of it. Twelve 
members of the staff read and index the book reviews in 38 
periodicals, which are selected to cover the new books in all 
classes. An index card is filled out for each review, giving, 
besides the author and title of the book reviewed, the date, 
publisher and price, a reference to the date and page of the 
periodical in which the review was found, and a brief note 
consisting of a quotation from the review, or a resume of it 
These cards serve as a guide in selecting books, and the file 
is afterward found most useful to the annotators and to the 
Order and Reference departments. The work of indexing 

14 



lakes only a small amount of time and gives the indexers a 
fair knowledge of the current literature; so the new plan 
serves several purposes besides the one for which it was pri- 
marily intended. 

READING ROOMS. 

The total number of persons who used the reading 
rooms of the Central Library and branches was 420,608, an 
increase of 228,093, or 118 per cent, over the previous year. 
The number using the reading rooms at the Central Library 
was 146,662, at the Lawrenceville branch 86,753, ^^ ^^^ West 
End branch 64,463, and at the Wylie Avenue branch 122,730 
for the eight months it was open. (Tables 7, 9, 11 and 13, 
following.) 

At the Central Library the Reference room was used 
by 21,770, the Periodical room by 57,241, the Children's 
reading room by 41,250, and the Newspaper room by 26,401, 
a substantial increase everywhere except in the Children's 
reading room. The attendance in this room was scarcely 
more than the previous year, owing to the fact that it is not 
really a Children's room, but only a reading room, with 
cramped quarters and inadequate facilities even for this mod- 
est function. A suitable room is, however, to be provided 
when the plans for the extension of the building are carried 
out. '; 

Summarizing the figures given above we find that over 
600,000 books and magazines were used during the year in 
the Central Library and branches, by about the same number 
of persons. 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY. 

The Library received during the year gifts from 459 
persons or institutions, amounting to 2,836 volumes, 2,037 
pamphlets, and 8,799 numbers of unbound periodicals. The 
most important was a New Year's gift from Mr Carnegie of 
another $10,000 to purchase books for our reference collec- 
tion on the technical arts and sciences. The original $10,000 
which Mr Carnegie gave for this purpose was about ex- 

15 



hausted, and he generously placed a similar amount at our 
disposal, so that the purchase of literature so peculiarly valu- 
able to this community might continue. 

The entire library of the American Philatelic Associa- 
tion, a national organization, was permanently deposited in 
the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh during the year. The 
collection now numbers some 200 volumes, and the Associa- 
tion undertakes to make it as complete as possible, while the 
Library undertakes to catalogue and care for it. 

A list of the givers and their gifts, for the year, follows 
this report. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

Great progress has been made during the year in the 
development of our branch library system. Three branches 
are now in operation, and the success of all of them has been 
prodigious. The Mount Washington and Hazelwood 
branches are nearing completion and will be opened to 
the public about June ist. The books, catalogues, etc., are 
now ready and will be placed in position as soon as the build- 
ings are ready to receive them. 

LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH. 

The Lawrenceville branch has had a most prosperous 
year, with a circulation of 74,224 volumes and an attendance 
of 86,753 persons. Of the total circulation, 45,276 volumes 
were for adults and 28,948 for children. Of the number of 
books and magazines used in the buildings of this and the 
other branches no accurate account could be kept. The 
number was large, but can only be estimated roughly. 
(Tables 9 and 10, following.) 

WEST END BRANCH. 

The West End branch was opened on February i, 1899, 
and the figures given, therefore, are for a complete year. Of 
the 30,477 volumes issued for home use, 17,235 were adult 
books and 13,242 were juvenile. Of the 64,463 persons who 
used the library, 23,817 were adults and 40,646 were chil- 

16 



dren. For a small branch, serving a district that is estimated 
to have a population of only ten or twelve thousand, this 
record is, we believe, most creditable. (Tables ii and 12, 
following.) 

WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH. 

The Wylie Avenue branch was opened with appropriate 
ceremonies on the evening of June ist, 1899, and was ready 
for regular business the following morning. For this branch, 
therefore, this report covers a period of only eight months. 
Its success has been literally overwhelming. There are fre- 
quently so many people in the building that it is difficult to 
manage the crowds and carry on the necessary business at 
the same time. Of the 64,511 volumes issued for home use 
during these eight months, 36,841 were adult books and 
27,670 were juvenile. Of the 122,730 persons who used the 
library, 25,907 were adults and 96,823 were children. We 
had counted on one assistant being able to manage the chil- 
dren's room, but found that two were necessary, and they 
have their hands full. If the branch had been open a full 
year, there would have been an attendance of 150,000 chil- 
dren in this one room. (Tables 13 and 14, following.) 

CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT. 

The opening of two new branch children's rooms during 
the year, and the overwhelming number of children who 
crowded these rooms at the three branches, have shown the 
necessity for assistants specially trained to deal with chil- 
dren. After experimenting with a trained kindergartner in 
our work with the Home Libraries and in the summer play- 
grounds, we came to the conclusion that kindergartners were 
best adapted to the work in our children's rooms. And while 
we are not in any sense running a kindergarten, we have four 
trained kindergartners in our children's rooms, while a fifth 
has charge of our Home Libraries. All of them are from the 
Kindergarten Training School of this city, to which institu- 
tion we are under great obligation for assistance in this de- 
partment of the Library's work. 

17 



Special attention has been given to picture bulletins in 
the four children's rooms now included in our system, and we 
find that the reading of the children can be directed to a great 
extent, if these bulletins are skilfully and attractively made. 
Under the bulletin boards are shelves on which we place 
books on the subjects bulletined, and we find that these 
shelves have to be constantly replenished. 

In comparing the statistics of the juvenile attendance at 
the three branches with the juvenile circulation, we find that 
the attendance was about three times the circulatioh. This 
is due to the fact that applications for borrowers' cards, for 
children under fourteen, must be signed by parents or guar- 
dians in the presence of a library assistant. Many of the 
parents have either no time or no inclination to come to the 
library to sign for their children, and the latter have often 
entreated the assistants in charge of the children's rooms to 
go to their homes and get the parent's signature. From this 
has developed a system of home registration, the assistants 
at each branch having a regular morning for visiting the 
homes of the parents and getting their signatures to their 
children's applications. This plan is rapidly reducing the 
disparity between the juvenile attendance and the juvenile 
circulation. 

STORY HOUR. 

Soon after the opening of the West End branch, a story 
hour was set apart for the children during which the assistants 
in charge told stories drawn from classic literature. Each 
story is told with the deliberate intention of exciting interest 
in some special subject — history, nature, etc. The curiosity 
of the child being aroused, he is led to pursue the subject on 
his own account. The story hour proved so successful at the 
West End branch that it has been extended to the other 
branches and to the Central Library. The stories are told 
once or twice each week, and so far we have had an average 
attendance of 95 at each story hour. During the current 
year we shall have a definite program which will be carried 
out at the Central Library and branches simultaneously. 

18 



WORK WITH THE SCHOOLS. 

The collection of school duplicates now numbers about 
5,000 volumes, and the distribution of these is under the 
supervision of a special assistant. During the period covered 
by this report 3,172 volumes were sent to thirty-three schools 
and institutions. The circulation amounted to 31,049 vol- 
umes for the year. At the present time the entire collection 
is in active use in the various schools of the city. 

The most encouraging feature of this work is the en- 
thusiasm with which it has been taken up by the Superinten- 
dent, principals, and teachers of the public schools. Early in 
the present school year a committee of the Principals Asso- 
ciation was appointed to confer with your Librarian and his 
assistants, for the purpose of evolving a definite plan of co- 
operation between the Library and the schools. The result is 
that the school principals and the Library are now working in 
conjunction on a carefully selected and graded list of good 
literature for the use of the school pupils. We expect to print 
this list in a special pamphlet during the summer, and by the 
beginning of the next school year we shall have the books 
and the graded list as a basis for systematic work. We desire 
to express our appreciation of the work of the Principals 
Association in its efforts to make the scheme a success. Its 
committees have spared no labor in preparing and grading 
lists of books which their experience has shown can be used 
to the best advantage. 

SUMMER PLAYGROUNDS. 

During the summer, arrangements were made with the 
Civic Qub of Allegheny County and the Small Parks Asso- 
ciation, whereby a part of our school duplicate collection 
might be in use daring the summer vacation. We sent 700 
books to five summer playgrounds, in charge of a kinder- 
gartner who had had previous experience in these same play- 
grounds. During the six weeks the books were thus used 
the circulation amounted to 1,600. It is a significant fact 
that after the playgrounds closed the children asked for 
library cards. We are planning to carry on this work more 
extensively and systematically during the coming summer. 

19 



HOME LIBRARIES. 

Our experience with Home Libraries (described in the 
last Annual Report) soon showed us that it was necessary 
to have one assistant whose entire time should be devoted to 
this work. In July a Supervisor of Home Libraries was ap- 
pointed, one whose three years in the Pittsburgh Kindergar- 
ten Training School, supplemented by experience in the free 
kindergartens and summer playgrounds of the city, espe- 
cially qualified her for this work. We now have 21 Home 
Libraries, 20 volunteer visitors, and a membership of 200 
children. 

The volunteer friendly visitors for the year were : Miss 
Josephine Babst, Miss Lena Bellnap, Miss Elizabeth J. Ben- 
nett, Miss Grace Bostwick, Miss Anna B. Craig, Miss Mary 
M. Disque, Miss Amy Fownes, Miss Mabel Fulton, Mrs M. 
M. Garland, Miss Jessie Ke)rt, Miss Florence B. Lanahan, 
Miss Kate Lowe, Miss Isabelle McQung, Miss Jean Miller, 
Miss S. H. Morris, Miss Carrie Powelson, Mr James Lee 
Rankin, Jr., Miss Frances Reahard, Miss May Rogers and 
Miss Carrie E. Vandersaal. 

Of the 21 Home Libraries, one, the George D. Macbeth 
Library, was sent to the Paris Exhibition at the request 
of the American Library Association. The others are scat- 
tered over the city in districts not reached by the Central 
Library nor by any of the branches now in operation. P ol- 
lowing is a list of the little librarians, with two exceptions, 
and the addresses at which the libraries now are : 

Carrie Smith, 17 Emmett Street 

Howard McElvany, 97 Twenty-first Street. 

Blanch Greenwood, 118 Twenty-fifth Street. 

Mary Shea, 59 Thirteenth Street. 

Marie Sweeney, 10 12 Bingham Street, S. S. 

Wiloughby Bainbridge, Twenty-fourth and Sarah 

Streets, S. S. 
Theresa Nolte, 17 Logan Street. 
Paul De Lo, 1006 Wylie Avenue. 
Janie Roy, 141 4 Bedford Avenue. 

20 



♦Mrs M. M. Garland, 24 Maple Avenue. 
Katie Mitchell, 53 Third Street. 
Mrs W. B. Dickson, 329 Hancock Street. 
Isabelle Thomas, 620 Everett Street, Negley Run. 
Manuel Epstein, 120 Elm Street. 

Marie Sullivan, 544 Painter's Row, West Carson Street. 
Margaret Shenkle, 19 Singer's Row, West Carson 
Street. 

Walter Schmid, 330 Liberty Avenue. 

Howard Foster, comer Millvale and Dauphin Streets. 

May McCuean, 43 Acorn Street. 

John Finn, Boston and Beelan Streets. 

The list of donors of Home Libraries to date, with the 
numbers and names of the libraries is as follows: 

Mrs W. A. Herron, Library No. i. Ruth Edwards 
Library. 

Miss M. L. Jackson, Library No. 2. Margaret Scully 
Library. 

Mrs Charles J. Garke, Library No. 3. Winifred Qarke 
Library. 

Mrs E. A. Woods, Library No. 4. Marjory Woods 

Library. 
Mrs William Thaw, Library No. 5. The Lyndhurst 

Library. 

Mrs W. W. Card, Library No. 6. Ruth Card Library. 
Mrs D. H. Hostetter, Library No. 7. Frederick and 
Herbert Hostetter Library. 

A friend of the children, Library No. 8. John James 
Audubon Library. Accompanied by a photograph 
and a brief life of the great naturalist, gifts of his 
granddaughter. Miss M. L. Audubon, Salem, N. Y. 

Mrs George B. Edwards, Library No. 9. Henry Wads- 
worth Longfellow Library. 

Mrs Emmett Queen, Library No. 10. James Morley 
Queen Library. 

*Ib this CM« it teemed adritable to place the librair in the home of tiM visitor. 

21 



Mr E. H. Jennings, Library No. ii. Katharine Jen- 
nings Library. 
Mrs William Frew, Library No. 12. Margarita Frew 

Library. 
Mrs William Flinn, Library No. 13. Mary Flinn 

Library. 
Hon. William Flinn, Library No. 14. Edith Flinn 

Library. 
Mrs J. R. McGinley, Library No. 15. Marian and Lois 

McGinley Library. 
Mr D. H. Wallace, Library No. 16. Louis Agassiz 

Library. 
Mr George A. Macbeth, Library No. 17. George D. 

Macbeth Library. 
Miss Mary E. Gusky, Library No. 18. Eva Gusky 

Library. 
Mr S. W. Vandersaal, Library No. 19. The Lucy 

Library. 
Pittsburgh Sorosis Club, Library No. 20. Pittsburgh 

Sorosis Gub Library. 
Mrs C. L. Magee, Library No. 21. Seallem Library. 

To these donors, to the friendly visitors, and to the little 
librarians, our grateful thanks are due. No statistics will 
show the important work these little traveling libraries are 
doing. We can place all we can get where they will be ap- 
preciated; but we find it best to proceed slowly, so that the 
work may be kept well in hand. 

In conclusion I wish to pay a deserved tribute to the 
heads of departments and members of the staff. Their intelli- 
gence, industry, and devotion to the interests of the Library 
are beyond all praise. Whatever success the Library has 
achieved is due, in large part, to their trained ability and 
esprit de corps. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin H. Anderson, 

April 14, 1900. Librarian. 

22 









•sauinioyv 




•ISfS-s 


ii^?i 


'1 


« 








JO iBiox pueio 


u^iric^ |^cS»«00 fx^ 


•i: 










«N. 


1 






■ureo 13^1 






s 


■313 '103 dna 




r? " 


-8 a'" ^ 


< 




01 }U3S 'ino luoj^ 


w 


— >-■ 


g 


j 








■ftsa 


« t«l "too <^. 1 


. 




00 ^O 


« 


'IBJOX 


?!*«>."- '^ 


b. 






2 " " 


r;^ <S « M fO (0| 0. 






S 


^S5R^*'^|^ 


n 




■a 


•W!0 -^a 




tn ts. 


3 

hi 


■3SBii3jnj Xg 


mn 


SrtsSlll, 


X 
E- 

- 5 




<_ 




00 x « 


2'-'""'^":!J 




uoday 


53-8=. 


^I^^M 


% 


ii 






ISBT IB JsquinN 


^"^ 




S 






























i 






























a 






























z 






























< 






























a 






























s 






























o 
















c 


^ 




1 


( 






pi 

h] 
ffi 

S 

z 








e 
] 


1 
(J 






» 


1 

IJ 

a 

(2 


t 

i 


•s 

c 

1 
& 

1 


1 

< 

1 


1 

1 

s 


J 

i 


s 

2 








■sismdiuej 
JO iBjox pireJO 




? 

5 






^0" 


D'-M M 








•ureo vn 


1 


|22?=2 


1 




« 


■3;a '-103 -dna 
o) )U3S 'punog 


5 


MOO m-i-w « 


~. 




1 

g 

1 


i 


inoj. 




§§!:■ ??:?;? 


1 




■s 

1 


U!0 "fa 


! 






■asEqojnd Xg 


« 


00 1- >- « — — 


" 




■Modsa 


2 


M .^lOM 


10 








Id 




i 


1 

1 




ll 
il 




C 

1 

1 

1 
* 


1 

■c 

s. 
i 


1 

i 

< 

.i 


J3 ■ 

li 

'^ i 

si 


2 






TABLE 2. 

NUMBER OF VOLUMES IN THE CENTRAL LIBRARY AND 

BRANCHES READY FOR USE, FEBRUARY i, 1900. 



CLASS. 



General Works 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

IT. S. Public Documents 
Home Libraries 

Total 



Central Library. 



Circulating. 






3 

38 

56 

396 

3 
692 

96 

80 

372 
480 

267 

500 

2.17s 



5,158 



c 
B 

bo 4) 

Pi " 



c 
o 



68 

450 
1,289 

1,427 
98 

1,454 
1,239 
1,044 
2,825 

2,341 
1,630 

2,496 
7,987 



24,348 



4) 
U 

B 

u 
4> 



pa 



7,107 

158 
1,092 

2,909 

198 

4,031 
6,006 

3,133 
1,109 

2,375 

1,318 

1,360 

416 

*3,ooo 



34,212 



o 



7,178 
646 

2,437 
4,732 

299 
6,177 

7.341 

4,257 
4,306 

5,196 

3,215 
4,356 

10,578 
*3,ooo 

341 



64,059 



*Tlie8e U. S. public documents while not catalogued, properly speaking, are 
on the shelves and in constant use. 



26 



TABLE 2— Continued. 



LVaie Branch. 



CLASS. 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

U. S. Pub. Doc, 
Home Libraries 

~ Total 7 r.r.TT 



be 

c 
3 

U 



28 

IIS 
244 

453 

19 

451 
280 

212 

816 

862 

515 

833 

3.579 



u 

c 

u 

pa 



313 

2 

32 
33 
23 
64 

47 
19 
94 
61 

80 
48 
26 



o 
H 



341 
117 

276 

486 

42 
515 

327 
231 

910 

923 

595 
881 

3.605 



8,4071 8421 9,249 



W. End Branch. 



(w 

c 

•X! 

3 

u 



5 

49 

69 

268 

II 

314 
184 

119 
507 
481 

352 

485 
1,962 



4,806 



4> 
U 

C 

U 

pa 



91 

18 
12 
18 
20 

72 

7 

66 

15 

35 
18 

10 



•4-* 

o 

H 



96 

49 

87 
280 

29 

334 
256 

126 

573 
496 

387 

503 
1,972 



382 i 5,188 



27 



TABLE 2—C(mH9m€d. 



CLASS. 



General Works 
Philosophy . . . . 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 
Useful Arts . - . 

Fine Arts 

History 

Literature 

Travel 

Biography .... 

Fiction 

U. S. Pub. Doc . 
Home Libraries 



Total 



W. Ave. Branch. 



bo 

c 



4 
io6 
240 

455 

404 

239 
200 

812 

779 

510 

758 

3.115 



7,641 



4) 
U 

C 
V 

u 

V 

on 



64 
2 

25 
16 

23 

29 
26 

10 

71 
27 
39 
27 
94 



453 



O 



68 
108 

265 

471 
42 

433 
265 

210 

883 

806 

549 

785 

3.209 



8,094 



Grand Totals. 



bo 

c 

3 
O 



108 
1,898 

2,999 
150 

3,315 
2,038 

1,655 

5,332 

4,943 

3,274 

5,072 

18,818 



50,360 






on 



7.575 
162 

1,167 

2,970 

262 

4,144 
6,151 
3,169 

1,340 
2,478 

1,472 

1,453 

546 

3,000 



35,889 



o 



7,683 
920 

3,065 

5,969 
412 

7,459 
8,189 

4,824 

6,672 

7,421 
4,746 

6,525 

19.364 
3,000 

341 



86,590 



TABLE 3. 

NUMBER OF VOLUMES CATALOGUED, FEBRUARY i, 1899. 

TO JANUARY 31, 1900. 

For Central Library 19,164 

Lawrenceville Branch 2,457 

West End Branch 1,887 

Wylie Avenue Branch 8,034 

Mt. Washington Branch 3.058 

Hazelwood Branch 3,131 

Total 37,731 

28 



m 

u 

< 

pq 
Q 

< 
< 

l-H 

55 

U 

^ O 



2 



C/) 
(x) 

(/) 

u 

pq 

Jz; 

O 

;3 

U 
P< 



O 
>^ 
< 

s 
s 

D 



'9Sc;U9DJ9J 






w 



w 



CO •-• •-< lOlO CO CO 



s 



8 



8 



•I^ox 



vp mvO ts. Q CO •-• W w TfoO 01 -^ 
Qn O Tf O "^ tN O\00 00 O to W CO 



VO W CO On 



O tniooo O W COVO 



m 

to 

CO 



•3AV X^V* 



irj •-• On 
00 ro ^ 



NO »-• vO 
O tNOO ^ 00' VO 

ON Tf r^oo ^ 



lO ^<0 W VO Tf 

O tnOQ QQ 



in Tf Tf 



ro '^ W M 



5 



V? 



TU3 M 



00 O i-tOO 
»-• CO ON »-• 

On »-••-• On 




a 



HI vo 

o 



On tx 



o 



'm\i. 



0\fO"^M COM M ^TfTfrOTfi-i 
H4 \0 ►H M tv. t^ t^ eOOO O ro •-• C^ 
►H C< 00 00 •-• ro O rommmvo 



CI 



•-< ci»-ifHTfTrc«c« 



O 



CI 
CI 



'I«j;u33 



00 00 rovO vQmci »-• mONcoci O 
"^t^O O On»-« Oncoiohh Tfroto 
O ro ON "^ CI Tf m Tfoo O to O Tf 

CO ^ hH Tf VO CO COOO OnvO tN O 



00 

CO 

vO 



(A 



CO 

O 



4^ 
■n CO 



0^ O 

CVS 



O o rt ^ <* 

*Soo o ^5 



c 
o 






oi)*43 



iJ o -c ^ ^ .5 .ti -2 S .2 .a 



c3 

O 



U 

o 






1 

a 



•S 

o 
o 

8 






9 
A 

V 



6 

I 



29 



< 



X 

U 

< 
PQ 
P 

< 



PQ 



H 

ux 
u 

o 

(Zl 

X 
H 

o 

s 

>^ 

PQ 

o 
>^ 

u 




vO CO to CO CI Ti-00 01 -^ On O O 
Ix OWO C|iOl>^i-iOOOOvOON 00 



•^npv 



•-•00 "-• w^t^i-^OO fO"^. Ci ^ 

•-<»-<O0txON'-'<^O0i»-'«^ 
rO'^^^J^*'^ CO'-' f-^vO ^C 

*k«v 9\ ^ ^*. m*^ ms 9^ ^ ^ ^ 



l^iox 



00 00 <N irjvO ^o t^vO vO vp '-' 

00 mts^M •-< 0\^^ ^ csvO c>< 

cs "^ 'H X w^ ^ ^O »r>0 On O 

rJ-00 lOfOCH •-< M •-< rj-t^co 



03 

u 

4-* 

C 

U 



ajiuaAnf 



M ON o o 
On O to 01 
l^ OnOO vO 

•v ^ ^ •» 

rj- ts^ lO '^ 



ON CO ^ «0 lO 01 CO 
On ttOO O •-< 01 l^ 

#v #^ •* », •^ •s ^ 

CO o< <o o< -^vo o< 



•;inpv 



\Q Oncs ir;ON"^cOO^"^0IQ 
On'^OI O ►-'vn o t^tN*'^ON 

rN O rN Ovori o\or On O •-• O 



01 



iomoioow^ooo ONONi^tN^ 00 100 

corJ-HHi-HfOfO'^OIt^rJ-t^ On!'^ 
•tJ-iOhnONOI'^OI^^OIOO •"« On 

0|OIOI^-^OiO<0<^-<OifOOi fOOO 

01 



01 NO 
NO t 01 



00 ;qo 



ON 

o 

01 



NO 

s 

ON 



CO 

NO 



CO 

00 

00 
lo 



01 
lO 

CO 



lO 

On 

oo' 



b . • • -^ 

I ^ . : : : "S 6 

fe § < S 3,^< c/} O 



o 



s 

o 



6 

u 

Q 



03 

C 
cd 



03 

O 



30 



0) 
O 

H 

-a 

c 

cd 

u 

o 




> 

< 



1 



< 



c 

CO 



O On "H" OnOO On O txOO •-< vO "-• 
fOOO <^ O w^vO ts. m O 00 "-I CH 



cOTj-roCHOOOO ^ O^ 
CH COOC -^00 xni'^ 0\^* 

•» •> •\ •- •» •> _•■ •* _• 

ONtNOsONONt^O -^o 




rj- •-< lo "^ »0 t^vO Cs tJ- •-' HI 
0<0001vOOI^'-<'-''-'C'^i-i 



w^vo Tt- fOVO IN^ txOO 



O 



CO •-• 



•Rox 



M m lo c^ r^ Tt IT) 

-^ rj- •-< CO Q VO O 
►H tN -^ CH ON 01 00 

»^ #v ». ^ r*. ^ pv 

VO tN t^ t^ t^ OnOO 



•3lIU3Anf 



•-• Is^ CO ON ►"• O vO 
HH vO "^ ^ ^^ t^OQ 
~ ' ON CO C^vO 



ON Tf CH 

•• Ws •» • 



CO fO <o 



•;inpv 



►H 00 01 ^vO ^ On 
fO ^s. tN On »0 On '-I 
Ci M •-• Ci iTi M ^ 

w »k #> ^ ^ *^ »> 

fO "^ -^ "^ "^ »^ "^ 



l^^ox 



d O VO 1^ 01 (M O 
rj- '^ CS VO O 01 01 



t^ CO lo O 

On ^ <*0 Tf 

' On 



vO lovb 00 tNOvONf-* >^M On 

^V •^ ^v ^> •» ,v •^ .. •■ •« •» 



•^jiusAnf 



•;inpv 



COVO »-• fOCSVOOO'-' ^►-i 01 
ro "^ mvO "-• CI "^01 Qn t^ t> 
rJ-OO fOO O »-« "-I <0 "^ tN^vO 



cd 






On 

01 

00 



CO 

c 

00 



CM"? 



8 



VO 



CO o 

AC 



o 



CN| 



00 

NO 
CO 



00 



CO 



o 

CO 



O Ovt^O On ONt^ l^ '^vo vO "2 
CI vO M 00 NO t^ t^OO O '^ CH <o 

•>. a^ », ^ •» •> •• 



CO 



8 

of 



CO 



CO 



«i^ "^^iS §'3 5 «ij,2ij 
te S < S »H,»H,< w O 55 Q 



6^ 6 6 

2i o s; <B 



Cd 

3 

cd 



cd 

o 



3» 



U 

P 

< 
< 

PQ 



< 

< 
o 

c/) 

:5 

u 
>^ 

PQ 

o 
>^ 

8 

u 



n3 

C 

W 

CO 



*> 
o 

c 



U 



'I^^ox 



00 O MOOtOU^M ^ 
^rOON»-« row O tx 




On CI 



O 
CI 






•sjiu^Anf 



In M M vO 



O tx »o -^ Ov »H eopQ 
COOO moo 50 N W On 
Tf i-i 10 ON <0 "^ N 

o\ 



o 

CO 



CI 
CO 



*^inpV 



M On O CI 10 u^ "^ tN.vO 
OCICIOfOONMMO 
t^MiHCI NNCO'^ 



On On t>^ M 
CO t^vo CO 
O \0 ^s CO 



to 

CO 



'I^^OJL 



ON CpTf M 
l-H VO M CI 

•-• CI 00 00 



COCI CI Tf'^'^rO'^M 

t^ tx ts^ COOO O CO •-< ^ 

•-• CO O CO m to lOvO 



CI 



IH Cll-ll-ITi-TfCICI 



O 
10 






•aijusAnf 



00 •-• 00 op 
v3 i-i 00 NO 



C>l N 



00 ON^ i-i tN^ O CI O 
i-i On*-" •-• "^iovoci 
d ^ CO CI tovc ts. O 



M 100 
CI CI 



•;inpv 



10 10 M lOts^ 
NO CI to 10 



^ COOO CO t^ «0 CI i-H 
10 l^ •-< ts^ 1000 ^ Q 
On •-< t^ •-• OnoO t^NO 

11 CO CI •-• "^ On 

CI 



NO 
CI 

10 



'l^^ox 



00 00 

O 



^vgvgjOC 
CO ON 



rj- CI 



f to On CO CI O 
CK CO to •-< ^ CO 10 
Tf to -^00 O tr> O -^ 



<v^ 1-4 IH rt* VO CO COOO 



0\N0. N.O 
CI 



00 
tx 

CO 

VO 



'9[IU3Anf 



"-• coOnOnihvo QOn 
ts. -^00 On m COOO On 
NO CI CI ~ " 



COM to ts. 



N 



V y^ w.K to KcxD'Nq 
O 'OcoOO On O^nO *^ 

CO •-• fo "-• CI Q 



•;inpv 



ts. to rj- l^ to On d 

OO^^OOOtNM.. 

CO ^NO 'H CI CO d O 
d •-• M CI CO CO CONO 




10 HH 

to COOO 



tOTf Tf 



Ov 



CO 

00 

00 
to 

"to 

ON 



c/) 

< 

U 



en 



O 









o 

c 
'S 



CO 



<u 



^^, 



cd 



o o o o 13 1! 



cd 

o 



32 



1 


■Pioj. 




8 
8 




-^ ■ -^ ■ 4 ■ fovd ci to-: 

IS, 


i 


■linpv 




i 






1 
1 


■l«foi 


•o" pT « d> o" in tnco o « fovo in 


■aiiuaAnf 


«" in m -"-(foo" fOTpi-'loo" 


•ippv 

! 




1 


•[E»OX 


y 

. 3tt. 


in 

1 



TABLE 7. 
USE OF THE CENTRAL LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1899. 



February 
March . . 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 



January 



1900. 



Total 118,19s 



Home Use. 


• 

*•> 
3 


ji 

'5 

V 

> 


-a 



< 


»J 


H 


9.496 


4.792 


14,288 


10,549 


7,909 


18,458 


9»322 


S.850 


15.172 


9,205 


4,620 


13,825 


8,519 


3,997 


12,516 


9,064 


2,431 


11,495 


8,703 


3.834 


12,537 


9.479 


2.037 


11,516 


10,474 


4.152 


14,626 


11,742 


6,224 


17,966 


10,290 


2,731 


13.021 


11,352 


9,606 


20,958 


118,19s 


58.183 


176,378 



u 

c 

Pi 



2,887 
2,741 

2,533 

2,499 
1,792 

2,216 

2,062 

2,520 

2,776 

3,451 
2,630 

3,167 



♦31,274 
87,080 

118,354 



*Thi8 31,374 represents the number of books brought from the book wing only. 
Of the volumes used from the open shelves in the Reference room no accurate ac- 
count could be kept; but 87,060 is a conservative estimate, made after carefully 
noting the use made of these volumes during the days of average attendance. 



34 



TABLE y^Cantinued. 



1899. 



February . . , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September . 
October . . . 
November. 
December. . 
1900. 
January 

Total 



Visitors to Reading Rooms. 



(J 


• 




(0 

•> 

c 


• 




a 







CO 

> 


•a 


•is 


a> 


Xi 


^ 


4^ 


Pi 


& 








H 


1,721 


5.400 


3.084 


2,908 


13.113 


2,056 


5.057 


3.607 


3.039 


13.759 


1,925 


4,562 


3.143 


2,214 


11,844 


1.756 


4,315 


2.837 


1,670 


10,578 


1. 459 


3.672 


3.093 


1,407 


9.631 


1.370 


2,659 


1.847 


1.739 


7.615 


1,460 


4.263 


3,356 


1,547 


10,626 


1.655 


4,581 


3.205 


1,619 


11,060 


1.936 


4.896 


3.247 


2,151 


12,230 


2,609 


5.901 


4.468 


2,841 


J 5.819 


1.837 


5.783 


4.499 


2.713 


14.832 


1,986 


6,152 
57.241 


4,864 


2,553 


15.555 


21,770 


41.250 


26,401 


146,662 



tThe ttatistict for the Periodictl and Children's reading rooms are, of neces- 
sity, estimated. The figures given are obtained from occasional counting, which is 
used as a basis for making the estimate for each month. 



35 



o6 



< 



CO 

t/i 
< 

u 

>^ 

PQ 
c/) 

O 
O 
PQ 

(£< 
O 






(/3 

< 

PQ 



H4 

< 



c 
Pi 



cd 
O 



o 

cd 

u 



Si 

c 

> 

3 



3 



PL, 



CO 

> 



PL, 



CO 

> 



PL, 



CO 

> 



Oh 



CO 

> 



-^vO ts* to -^ ts. O QnOO vO <OVO to 

vd •-< fo lo i-I cKod ^ d t>^ "^ VO rf 



8 
8 



VO O fOtOioOi TfO fOfOt-i C^l Q 
►H to 0< O lO «0 CH lOOO fO -^ Q VO 
O *^0 tNiCOOMN.l^i-< ro lOOO fO 

lO !-••-• MtOfOtO0<MMl-l 




fOOO 00 Ots^^rj-vocj i-i ^ OsOs 
t^ l^ O to»-ivO O OnO Mt^ONM 



•-t »^ d 



CO (N M iO to CO rOOO 



00 00 ^vO vO toc>l M toON<*OM O 
tol^O O 0\ f^ 0\ roiTi t-^ TffOto 
O to On Tf M -^ to rJ-00 O to O Tt 

* ts^ O 



^ I-, H^ <^ VO ro rooO OvvO 



to ts^ O to M 

Hi O to On O 0< VO 
• •••••• 



M lO ON CH 

VO W 



ON ON M 

ts. fOvO 



CO 



to 



POVO 



CO -^ d\ 



M CO On ON 
ts* "^00 ON 
VO CS CH 



VO O On CO f to ts. 
fOOO On ts^ tr 
O CO cooo On 0\ 



tOtNCO 



to 



CO 



M CO •-• 01 O 



, ,^ w^ TfvO CH t^ i-i ONVO CO 00 
M col^WOO l^iOONO^OO^ 



CH covO X 

o 



^ HH l-H l-l 



CJ P| 01 lO 



to 

-^ CO CO N^ 

VO 



ts^ lO -^ tX to ON 01 

00 f^ ^ O 00 t^ •-< 
CO ^vO •-< 01 CO (M 

^ HI HH 01 CO CO ^VO 




to cooo 

^n rt rt 0\ 



10 
10 

< 

u 



CO 



-a 

W-i 

a; 

a 
O 



o 

CO 



C 
O 



4> 

u 
C 

CO 



O 



CO 



u 
3 



cd 
u 



O 



o 'So.o o S ^ 7J 
.-s '-i: 'o -^ tJ <^ c 

^ a> o •^ Ji5 li? -5 --t i-s ,- — •- 



^2 CO 



> 
cd 



Cd g 

O u 



to 

CO 

00 



8 



00 

CO 

VO 



8 



CO 
00 

to 



8 
8 



to 

ON 
00 



Cd 

O 



36 



TABLE 9. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1899. 



February . . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October . . , 
November . 
December . 
1900. 
January . . . 



4.3" 
4,418 

3,58x 

3.375 

3.297 

3.3" 

3.138 
3.103 

3.625 
4,412 

4.033 

4.672 
Total I45.276 



Home Use. 



s 

< 



c 

V 

> 

3 



2.435 

2.545 
2,112 

1,918 

2.235 

2.433 
2,040 

1,729 

2,179 

3.247 
2,877 

3.^98 



2 
o 



6,746 

6,963 
5.693 
5.293 
5.532 
5.744 
5. 1 78 
4.832 
5.804 

7.659 
6,910 

7.870 
28,948 74,224 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms. 



s 



2.794 
2,992 

2,584 
2,082 

1.723 
1,626 

1,508 

2.055 
2.532 
2.643 
2,440 

3,097 



28,076 



K 

1> 



8 



5,395 
5.483 
4,189 

3.440 
3.896 

4.097 
3,610 

3.787 
4.865 
7,062 

5.935 
6,918 



58.677 



5 
o 



8,189 

8,475 

6.773 
5.522 

5.619 

5.723 
5.1 18 

5.842 

7.397 

9.705 

8.375 

10,015 



86,753 



These figures do not indade the number of books used for reference, nor the 
visitors to the branch news^Miper room, of which no iccotmt is kept 



37 



TABLE ID. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS. 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science. 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography , 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult. 



45,276 



( 



bo 
cd 

c 

o 

u 

V 
PL, 



1. 16 

1.22 

.16 

2.II 

2.59 

1.59 
7.01 

6.S3 
4.16 

3.89 

6537 

100.00 



Juvenile. 


Tol 




& 




CO 


a 


tn 


a> 


<M 


4> 


g 




E 


9 





s 





4> 





> 


pL, 


> 


468 


1.62 


2,119 


II 


.04 


263 


288 


•99 


814 


1,268 


438 


1,821 
73 


1,218 


4.21 


2,172 


199 


.69 


1.372 


316 


1.09 


1,034 


1,211 


4.18 


4,384 


1.547 


5-34 


4,504 


650 


2.25 


2,533 


752 


2.60 


2,514 


21,020 


72.61 


50,621 


28,948 


100.00 


74,224 



0) 

bo 
cd 

•4-t 

c 

<J 

u 

V 
PL, 



2.8s 

.35 
1. 10 

2.45 
.10 

2.93 

1.85 

1-39 

591 
6.07 

341 

3-39 
68.20 

100.00 



38 



TABLE II. 
WEST END BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1899. 



February 
March . . . 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . . 
November , 
December . 
1900. 
January. . . 



Total 



Home Use. 



3 



1,433 
1,846 

1,351 
1,063 

1,012 

1,126 

1,148 

1,321 
1,491 

1,771 
1,672 



C 

> 

9 



1,209 
1.694 

1.275 
804 

690 

796 

772 

876 

1,042 

1,464 

1,268 



2,001 1,352 



17.235' 13.242 



O 



2,642 

3.540 
2,626 
1,867 
1,702 
1,922 
1,920 

2,197 

2,533 

3.235 
2,940 

3.353 



30.477 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms. 



s 

< 



3.699 

3.564 
2,274 

1,648 

1.195 

1,261 

1,222 

1.593 
1.568 

1,980 

1,810 

_2,003 

23,817 



CO 

c 

W-i 

U 



6,763 
5.420 
3.061 
1,822 

1.567 

1,594 
1.836 

2,782 

3.394 
4.332 
3.667 

4,408 



40,646 



o 



10,462 
8,984 

5.335 
3.470 
2,762 

2.855 

3.058 

4,375 
4,962 

6,312 

5.477 

6,411 
64.463 



These figures do not indnde the number of books used for referen ce, nor the 
Tisitors to the branch newsxMper room, of which no aooonnt is kept 



39 



TABLE 13. 
WEST END BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS. 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult. 



S 
> 



701 
T29 
120 
202 

35 

29s 
214 

317 
1,406 

1,039 

679 

767 

11,331 



17,235 



bo 

c 

PL, 



4.07 

.75 
.70 

LI7 

.20 

I.7I 

1.24 

1.84 

8.16 

6.03 

3-94 

4.45 

_6574 

100.00 



Juvenile. 



CO 

B 
> 



217 
I 

71 
716 

430 

87 

155 

584 

939 

321 

423 
9,298 



13.242 



bo 

(9 

•4-» 

c 

V 

u 
u 



1.64 
.01 

•54 
5-41 

3-25 
.66 

1.17 

4.41 
7.09 

2.42 

319 
70.21 



lOO.CK) 



Total. 



CO 

s 

s 
"o 
> 



918 
130 
191 
918 

35 

725 
301 

472 

1,990 

1,978 

1,000 

1,190 

20,629 



30,477 



bO 

(9 

c 

u 

V 

Hi 



3.01 

•43 

.63 

301 
.11 

2.38 

.99 

1.55 

6.53 

6.49 
328 

390 
67.69 



100.00 



40 



TABLE 13. 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 





Home Use. 


1899. 


• 

•0 
< 


Juvenile. 


* 

•4-» 

e2 


une 


3,231 
4,278 
4,172 

4.293 
4,556 
5.294 
5,"9 

5,«98 


2,911 

3,467 

3,243 

2,939 

3,351 

3,970 
3,686 

4,103 


6,142 

7,745 
7,415 
7,232 

7.907 
9,264 

8,805 
10,001 


/uiy 

August 

September 

October 

November .... 
December .... 

1900. 
January 


Total 


36,841 


27,670 64.511 



Visitors to Reading 


Rooms. 




• 
CO 

c 

4) 




3 


2 


3 


T3 


js 





< 


13.356 


H 


3.988 


17.344 


2,954 


9,823 


12,777 


2,898 


8,521 


11,419 


2,598 


9.644 


12,242 


3,153 


13.550 


16,703 


3,175 


12.798 


15.973 


2,636 


12,953 


15.589 


4,505 


16,178 


20,683 


25.907! 96.823 


122,730 



Opened to the public June i, 1899. These statittict, therefore, cover a period 
of 8 months, instead of a year, for this branch. 

These figures do not include the number of books used for reference, nor the 
visitors to the branch newspaper room, of which no account is kept 



41 



TABLE 14. 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES 



CLASS. 



General Works . . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science. 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

"total 



Adult. 


Juvenile. 


T01 




V 




oi 






t)£ 




bo 




tn 


rt 


CO 


C3 


cn 


4) 


-*-» 


V 


■4-* 


a> 


S 


C 


r* 

•* 




e 


s 


u 

t . 


D 




9 















> 


PL. 


> 

148 


cu 


> 

851 


703 


I.9I 


•53 


304 


.83 


10 


.04 


314 


294 


.80 


204 


•74 


498 


475 


1.29 


1,427 


5-i6 


1,902 


76 


.21 






76 


702 


1.90 


779 


2.82 


1,481 


573 


1.55 


143 


•52 


716 


588 


1.60 


297 


1.07 


885 


2,743 


7-44 


920 


332 


3,663 


2,645 


7.18 


1,858 


6.71 


4,503 


1,675 


4.55 


777 


2.81 


2,452 


1.730 


4.69 


756 


2.73 


2,486 


24,333 


66.05 


20,351 
27,670 


73-55 
100.00 


44,684 
64,511 


36,841 


100.00 



bo 

c 

u 

u 



1.32 

•49 

'77 

2^5 

.12 
2.30 
I. II 

1.37 
5.68 

6.98 

3.80 

3.85 
69.2 6 

100.00 



42 



< 

PQ 

H 

(£< 
O 

O 

pLi 

o 

H 

u 

(/3 
(/3 



PQ 
< 






(/3 

a: 
o 
>^ 

PQ 

O 

H 
< 

13 
U 

CK5 



> 

pLi 

o 
u 



'l^^ox 



On On' 

l-H CO 

CO lO 

M 11 



01 



\0 fO ON 

On Ov lO 

•> >« ». 

On to lo 

•-< H-l CO 



•iref 




•< — ^ ^ 

H-i On M 



•D^a 



On\o ^^ 
'^•. O ^^ 

HH •^ l-l <*0 



O I? 



•AON 



8VO 
£2 



•PO 



•;d3S 



•;snSnv 



•Xinf 



•9unf 



•Xbj^ 



•ludv 



•qDJBj^ 



•q^j 



0^ 



O ^ 01 

n CvoO 
.-H t-" CO 



to 

vC 
lO 



o\oo o 

fOco tN 

o o o 

^ i-i CO 



q\ tt to N.| 

HH 01 




cRoo f^ 



cs 



O On HH M 
HH t^ "^ On 
CH tooo 00^ 
(500 of \n 



O moo *'^, 
to "^ rx On 



r^oo 



o o 



8^ 



l^ CO Qn 
d CO CO '=^ 

^ •» •< • 

00 On ►H co; 



CO M C^l »-• 

^ tN t^vo 

VO On O On 

0\0 01 00 

1 t-l fs 



0< 1^ ^ VO 
00 "^01 t> 

ON O M CO' 
•-I i-i 01 




43 



Gifts to the library* 



From February i, 1899, to February i, igoo. 

Givers 460 

Volumes 2,839 

Pamphlets 2,043 

Numbers 8,797 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, 

Pa I 

Academy of Science and Art 164 

Acklin, Mr George W i .... 

Aguilar Free Library Society, New York 

City I 

Alabama Geological Survey, Montgomery, 

Ala 2 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa i 

Allegheny County Workhouse 3 

AUyn, Dr G. W '. . 8 .... 

American Humane Association i 

American-Irish Historical Society i 

American Iron and Steel Association 2 

American Library Association i i 

American Philatelic Association 172 

American School of Osteopathy i 

American Society for the Extension of Uni- 
versity Teaching i 5 

American Swedenborgian Society 2 .... 

Anatolia College, Marsovan, Turkey i 

Anderson, Mr Edwin H i 9 

Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary. . . 10 i 

Anonymous 27 

Anti-Imperialist League 23 

Art Metal Construction Company One 

map. 

44 



• • • • 



Voli. Pams. Nofl. 

Associated Charities of Boston (Mass.) i 

Atlanta (Ga.) Local Committee, American 

Library Association i 

Atlanta (Ga.) University 3 

Balch, Mr Thomas Willing, Philadelphia, 

Pa I . . . . 

Baltimore (Md.) City Library 2 .... 

Banta, Mr Theodore M, New York City ... i . . . . 
Barbe, Mr Waitman, Morgantown, W. 

Va I .... 

Barnes, Rev. L. C 14 

Beezer, Mr Michael J i 

Bellman, Miss Bertha L 2 .... 

Bennett College, Chicago, 111 i 

Bethune, Rev. C. J. S., Port Hope, Ontario, 

Canada 2 

Bingham, Mrs George 52 .... 

Birmingham (England) Free Libraries 

Committee i 

Bissell, Mr John 

Bolton, Mrs Sarah Knowles, Cleveland, O i 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 8 

Boston (Mass.) Transit Commission 2 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me 3 

Brawn, Mr Julius 2 .... 

Brockton (N. Y.) Public Library i 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library i 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Association for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor 2 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Bureau of Charities 3 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library i 

Brown University, Providence, R. I i 

Buchanan, Mr James I . . . . One map 

Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa i 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Charity Organization 

Society 3 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Library i 

45 



174 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Vols. Pami. Nos. 

Bureau of American Republics, Washing- 
ton, D. C I . 

Calderhead, Mr J. H., Helena, Montana i . 

Cambria Free Library, Johnstown, Pa 2 . 

Cambria Iron Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 9 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library 2 . 

Card, Mr W. W 3 2 20 

Carlisle, Mr Jas. D 708 

Carnegie, Mr Andrew $10,000 for a 

Reference Technical Collection, and . . 49 2 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa . . . 3 

Carnegie Institute 10 5 

Carnegie Institute — Department of Fine 

Arts I 

Carnegie Museum 9 

Carnegie Public Library, Ayr, Scotland i 

Carnegie Steel Company, Limited 5 

Case School of Applied Science, Qeveland, 

Ohio I 

Chambers, Mr John S., Jr . . . . File of a peri- 
odical 

Chicago (111.) Board of Trade i 

Chicago (111.) — Civil Service Commission. . 2 

Chicago (111.) — Department of Public 

Works I 

Chicago (111.) Educational Commission i .... 

Chicago (111.) Philatelic Society i .... 

Chicago (111.) Public Library i .... 

Children of Shalam, Trustee. Donna Ana, 

New Mexico i 4 .... 

Christian Science Publishing Co., Boston, 

Mass I .... 

Christian Social Union, Boston, Mass 42 

Cincinnati (O.) Museum Association i .... 

Cincinnati (O.) Public Library 26 ... . 

Civic Club of Philadelphia, Pa 2 .... 

Clapp, Mr D. C i 

46 



. . . • 



Volt. Pams. No«. 

Qapp, Mr George H 31 91 

Clark, Mr F. H., Valparaiso, Indiana 2 . . . . 

Clarke, Mrs Chas. J 2 

Qayton, Hon. H. D.; M. C, Washington, 

D.C I 

Cleveland (O.) Board of Education i 

Cleveland (O.) Public Library 7 

Cole, Mr George Watson i 

Colliery Engineer Company, Scranton, Pa . i . . . . 

Collingwood, Mr Wm 2 lithographs, i 

map, I broadside, and 2 

Colonial Dames of America i 

Colorado— Bureau of Mines 2 4 

Colorado State Agricultural College 5 

Columbia University, New York City i .... 

Cook, Mr Charles i 

Cope, Mr Gilbert, West Chester, Pa i 

Cornell University — ^Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station 22 148 

Cornell University — College of Agriculture .... i .... 
Crocker-Wheeler Electric Company, New 

York City 10 .... 

Dalzell, Hon. John. . . .Two sets of maps, 

and I 9 

Dampman, Mr John B i 

Dampman, Miss M. C 2 . .•. 

Darlington, Mr Harry One picture 

Davis & Warde i 

Dawson, Mr G. M., Ottawa, Canada i .... 

Dayton (O.) Public Library and Museum 2 

De Land, Mr Fred 2 4 

Denniston, Mr George F 2 

Depew, Hon. Chauncey M., New York 

City I 

Donehoo, Rev. E. R 16 22 

Drape, Mr Jas. W One map and one 

picture 

47 



...» 



. . . • 



.... 



.... 



VoIb. Pams. Not. 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J . . . . 3 . . . . 

Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa 3 

Duckwall, Mr E. W i 

Dundee (Scotland) Free Library Commis- 
sion I .... 

Eaton, Dr Percival J 54 

Eau Qaire (Wis.) Public Library i 

Elliott, Miss Agnes M 4 .... 

Elmendorf, Mr H. L., Buffalo, N. Y i 

Elwell, Mr Tallmadge, Minneapolis, Minn. 

One photograph 

Emmet, Dr Thomas Addis, New York City i 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md i 

Erie (Pa.) Public Library 2 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 31 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111 6 

Filtration Commission, Pittsburgh 10 .... 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Reading 

Room 10 

Flack, Mr J. B 6 2 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt i 

Ford, Mr H. P 2 

Ford, Mr Henry J 2 

Fourth Avenue Baptist Church i .... 

Friends' Free Library and Reading Room, 

Germantown, Pa i 

Fuller, Mr Ira C, Brookville, Pa i 

General Electric Company, Schenectady, 

N. Y 5 

General Federation of Women's Clubs i 

German Library Association i 

Gleason Mrs M.J 5 .... 

Gresley, Mr W. S., Erie, Pa i 

Griest, Hon. W. P., Harrisburg, Pa 11 

Gunton Institute, New York City 32 

Guthrie, Mrs C. J i 

48 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Vols. Pains. Nos. 

Guthrie, Dr K. S., Oaklyn, N. J i 

Haight & Company, Toronto, Canada 2 

Halpin, Mr Wm. R i .... 

Hamill, Miss Evelyn i 

Hangartner, Rev. U 2 

Hartford (Conn.) Public Library i 

Hartford (Conn.) Theological Seminary i 

Hartman, Mr G. C 3 108 

Hartman, Mr Joseph 13 16 238 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass i .... 

Harvard University Library, Cambridge, 

Mass I 

Hauser, Mrs J. G., Delaware, Ohio 2 

Heath, Dr George F., Monroe, Mich 48 

Henrici, Mr Jacob Miscellaneous 

Henry, Mr. Thomas, New Brighton, Pa. . . 4 

Herring, Mr G. G One picture 

Herriott, Mr Thomas 3 

Hewitt, Mrs Charles T 2 .... 278 

Hirsch, Mr J. E i .... 

Holland, Dr W. J. . .53 Miscellaneous, and i 12 38 

Holland Society, New York City 13 

Howard Memorial Library, New Orleans, 

Louisiana 2 

Hubbard, Mr Elbert, East Aurora, N. Y 2 

Hughes, Mr W. R., Birmingham, England. i 2 

Hunter, Mr Jos. H 8 

lesi, Mrs M. Forest de 23 i 

Illinois State Historical Library, Spring- 
field, 111 I 

Illinois State Historical Society, Spring- 
field, 111 2 

Interstate Commerce Commission i .... 

Iowa Geological Survey i 

Iowa Masonic Library i 

Iron City Microscopical Society i .... 

Jackson, Mr John B i 

• 49 



.... 



.... 



.... 



78 



Vols. Ptms. Not. 

James . Prendergast Free Library, James- 
town, N. Y I .... 

Jennings, Mr I. James i 

Jillson, Mrs B. C. . . . i6o Maps, and 196 32 187 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111 .... 2 

Bookplates, and 4 

Johnson, Dr E. S v . . . i 

Johnson, Mr S. H 

Jordan, Mr J. W., Philadelphia, Pa 9 

Jordan, Mr Wm. George, New York City . i i 

Kaercher Drug Company i .... 

Keefer, Mr T. C, Royal Society of Canada, 

Ottawa, Canada i 

Keuffel & Esser Company, New York 3 

Kingsbury, Mr Samuel S., Baltimore, Md i 

Kingsley House Association i 

Koenig, Dr Adolph 10 

Krauth, Mrs C. P 6 45 2800 

Kumiker, Mr Max W i 

Kyle, Miss F. C i 

Lafayette College, Easton, Pa i 61 339 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Palo 

Alto, Cal I 

Lewis, Mr J. L 10 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111 i 

Library of the District of Columbia i 

Library of the Legislative Assembly, Vic- 
toria, B. C. . . .5 Maps, and i 2 

Lindsay, Mr Hugh 2 .... 

Lindsay, Mr Reese 10 .... 

Litchfield, Dr Lawrence i 58 

London (Ontario) Public Library i 

Long, Mrs Andrew 2 .... 

Long Island Historical Society i 3 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library 2 

Lothrop, Miss Alice B i 

Luff, Mr John N., New York City i 

50 



167 



Vols. Pamt. Not. 

McCandless, Mr E. V i 

McClelland, Dr Henry T i 

McCrea, Mr James 7 9 

Macdonald, Mr Arthur, Washington, D.C 4 

McEwen, Heirs of Mr Jas. M . . . . Unbound 

newspapers, and 181 .... 

Macfarlane, Hon. George L 3 .... 

McGonnigle, Mr R. D 28 2 

Macpherson, Mrs i .... 

Maine State Board of Health i .... 

Maiden (Mass.) Public Library i 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library Trustees i 

Mangan, Mrs , . . . i .... 

Marthens, Mr A., Denver, Col i .... 

Marthens, Mr John F 59 19 

Maryland — Commission to complete and 

publish records and history of soldiers, 

sailors and marines accredited to the 

State of Maryland during the Civil 

War, Baltimore, Md 2 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Mechanics Institute, San Francisco, Cal 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library 

Mellor, Mr C. C 6 

Melville, Mr George W., Washington, D. C .... 
Mercantile Library Association, New York 

City 

Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, 

Pa 

Mercersburg (Pa.) Academy 

Merchants* Exchange, St. Louis, Mo 

Metcalf, Mr William 2 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 

City 14 

Michigan Agricultural College Experiment 

Station 

Michigan State Board of Health 40 

51 



I 

I 

I 

13 6 

3 ... 
I 

I . . .. 

I 

I 

13 .... 

22 

196 



• • • • 



• • • • 



VoIb. Pams. Nob. 

Michigan State Library i 

Millener, Dr Frederick H., Buffalo, N.Y.. i 

Miller, Mr Henry A i 

Miller, Miss Luella i 

Miller, Mr Reuben 14 8 

Miller, Mrs William S 198 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Public Library i 

Miss Hickok's School, Morristown, N. J . . 
Missouri Botanical Gardens, St. Louis, Mo. 

Missouri Geological Survey 

Monroe, Mr Will Seymour, Westfield, 

Mass 

Morgan, Mr G. O ; 2 

Morrow, Mr E. S 9 

Mount, Mr Thomas 6 

Mount Vernon (N. Y.) Public Library ... i 

MuUer, Mrs Emilia 6 

National Academy of Sciences, Washing- 
ton, D. C 

National Arts Qub, New York City 

National Congress of Mothers 

National Education Association 

National Electric Light Association 18 

Nebraska — Bureau of Labor i 

New Bedford (Mass.) Public Library 

New Haven (Conn.) Free Public Library 

New Jersey Geological Survey i 

New London (Conn.) Public Library 

New South Wales — Government Printer, 

Sidney, N.S.W 2 

New South Wales Public Library, Sidney, 

N. S. W I 

New York (N. Y.) Board of Education .... 2 
New York (N. Y.) Charity Organization 

Society 57 

New York (N. Y.) Free Circulating Library i . . . . 

52 



^ . • • • 

I 

I 

1 

38 .... 

3 .... 

2 .... 

I 

I .. .. 

I 

I 

3 .... 

I 

I 



Vols. Puns. Not. 



• • • • 



New York (N. Y.) School Board for the 
Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx 

NewYork (N. Y.) Society Library 

New York State Library i 

New York State University Extension De- 
partment 

New York (N. Y.) University 

New York (N. Y.) University Library 

New York (N. Y.) Zoological Society i 

Newark (N. J.) Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 

Norman, Mr Lionel, Boston, Mass 

Northampton (Mass.) Public Library Com- 
mittee 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 

Oberlin (Ohio) College Library 

Ohio State Board of Health i 

Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio .... 

Olcott, Miss F. J I 

Oldshue, Mr Louis L i 

Ontario— Minister of Education 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station 

Orr, Mr Owen C i 

Orth, Mrs M. J 8 

O'Shea, Rev. D. J i 

Page, Mrs George S 

Page, Mr Oliver Ormsby 

Parrish, Mr Samuel L., New York City. . . 

Parvin, Mr T. S., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Pennsylvania — Agriculture, Department of 

Pennsylvania — Auditor - General 

Pennsylvania — Banks and Banking, De- 
partment of 

Pennsylvania — Forestry, Commissioner of . 

Pennsylvania — Health and Vital Statistics, 
Board of 

Pennsylvania — Insurance, Commissioner of 

53 



I 
I 

2 

5 

2 

3 
I 

2 

2 



2 
I 
I 

9 

2 
2 

' • 

4 
I 

I 

I 
I 
I 



• • . • 



I 

2 



68 



VoIb. Pmms. Nog. 

Pennsylvania — State Library 28 2J 

Pennsylvania — ^Treasury, Department of . . 2 . . . . 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania Baptist Education Society i 

Pennsylvania Prison Society i 

Pennsylvania Society, Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution i i 

Pennsylvania State College i 

Pennsylvania State College, School of 

Mines 17 

Perry, Mr Alfred Tyler, Hartford, Conn i 

Peters, Messrs W. R. & J. P i 

Pflaum, Mr Magnus i .... 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Commercial Museum 3 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Free Library i 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Times i 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 2 

Pittsburgh Central Board of Education 7 

Pittsburgh Central High School 171 6 

Pittsburgh Christadelphian Ecclesia 2 . . . . 

Pittsburgh Press 2 

Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory 3 1282 

Porter, Mr Henry Kirke 5 73 23 

Portsmouth (Eng.) Local Committee for 
the British Medical Association Meet- 
ing, 1899 I 

Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn, 

N. Y 

Praxman, Miss Ida i 

Princeton University i 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum 

Providence (R. I.) High School 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library 

Providence (R. I.) Record Commissioners. i 

Queen & Company, Philadelphia, Pa 12 

54 



2 

I 
I 
I 



VoIb. Pams. Not. 

Quincy (111.) Free Public Library i 

Quinon, Mr Stephen i document, 5 

posters, and 10 21 

Ranck, Mr Samuel H., Baltimore, Md i 

Reed, Miss Elizabeth Sturgis 149 .... 

Reed, Mrs J. A 2 .... 

Reilly, Mr John A i .... 

Re)molds Library, Rochester, N. Y i 

Rogers, Miss A. E 82 

Ronbroke Press, Los Angeles, Cal 2 

Russell, Mr E. H i 324 

Rynearson, Mr Edward 44 50 

Saint Giles Public Library, London, Eng- 
land I 

St. Joseph (Mo.) Free Public Library i 

St. Louis (Mo.) Architectural Qub i 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library 3 

San Francisco (Cal.) Free Public Library 2 

Saunders, Mr E. G 2 .... 

Schwartz, Mr J. E 2 .... 

Scranton (Pa.) Public Library 2 

Sears, Mr Cyrus, Harpster, Ohio i 

Sellers, Mr Edwin Jaquett, Philadelphia, 

Pa I . . . . 

Shattuck School for Boys, Faribault, Minn 2 

Shea, Mr C. B . . . . One broadside 

Sheridan, Messrs T. W. & C. B., New York 

City I 

Shiras, Mr George, III .... 3 pictures 

Silas Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn 3 . . . . 

Slocum, Mr F. L 48 604 

Small, Dr E. H i 

Smiley, Hon. Albert M., Lake Mohonk, 

Ulster, Co., N. Y 3 

Smith, Dr J. N 2 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass ] 



• • . • 



55 



Vols. Pams. NO0. 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

4 Maps, and » 6 7 

Social Reform Union, Alhambra, Cal 9 4 

Society for Checking the Abuses of Public 

Advertising, England 5 8 

Society of Naval Architects & Marine En- 
gineers 2 I 

Society of the Sons of the Revolution i 

Solberg, Mr Thorwald, Washington, D. C 3 

Sons of Delaware of Philadelphia, Pa i 

Southern Workman, Hampton, Va i 

Springfield (Mass.) City Library i i 

Sproull, Mr Lyman H., Cripple Creek, Colo 2 

Stechert, Mr Gustav E., New York City. . . i 

Stelzner, Mr C. B i picture, and 50 

Stevenson, Mr Wm M 2 

Stifel, Mrs Louise . . / 18 .... 

Stoney, Mr R. J., Jr i 

Sturtevant Engine Company, Boston, Mass i 5 
Subsistence Committee of Pittsburgh and 

Allegheny during the Civil War i 

ms. book and reports 

Sullivan & Cromwell, New York City 4 

Suydam, Rev. J. Howard, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 
4 mss. on the Devries portrait and i 

picture of Washington 

Swank, Mr J. M., Philadelphia, Pa 

Swift, Mr Morrison I., Los Angeles, Cal 

Taylor, Mr C. R, Philadelphia, Pa 

Thaw, Mr Benjamin i 

Thurgood, Mrs C. L i 

Thurston Preparatory School 

Tiffany Glass & Decorating Co., New York 

City 

Toledo (O.) Produce Exchange 

Trans-Mississippi & International Exhibi- 
tion, Omaha, Neb 

56 



I 

1 

5 .... 

2 

6 . . . . 
I 



VoIb. Pamt. Not. 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn i 

Tufts College, Maiden, Mass i 

Union Presbyterian Missionary Society of 

Pittsburgh and Allegheny 8 

Union Theological Seminary, New York 

City I 

United States Government 138 9 

United States Government, through Hon. 

John Dalzell i 

United States — Civil Service Commission. i i 

United States — ^Agriculture, Department of 7 105 2 
United States — Geological survey, through 

Hon. John Dalzell .... 79 maps 

United States — Government Printing 

Office I 

United States — Interior, Department of the 

255 Maps, and 7 7 11 

United States — ^Justice, Department of ... . i .... 

United States — Labor, Department of i 

United States — Library of Congress i 2 

United States — National Museum 3 2 

United States — Navy Department i 14 

United States — Navy Department, through 

Hon. John Dalzell i .... 

United States— Patent Office i 

United States — Post Office Department i 

United States — State, Department of 6 25 

United States — ^Treasury Department 7 45 

United States — ^War Department 4 26 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal i 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111 2 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich i 

University of Michigan Library, Ann Ar- 
bor, Mich I 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 

Minn i .... 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb i 

57 



Vols. Pams. Not. 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 

Pa 7 4 

University of the State of New York, Al- 
bany, N. Y I 8 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt i .... 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis 3 

Utley, Mrs E. H 405 22 413 

Vassar College Library, Poughkeepsie, 

N. Y . . . . 3 book plates, and i 

Virginia Female Institute, Staunton, Va 2 

Wade, Mr Isaac E i .... 

Wade, Maj. Wm., Oakmont, Pa i 

Waggoner, Mr Russell E i .... 

Wagner Electric Manufacturing Company, 

St. Louis, Mo 32 

Walker, Dr R. L., Carnegie, Pa 4 . . . . 8 

Ward, Miss Mary 2 .... 

Warner, Mr George E., Minneapolis, Minn. 2 3 

Warvelle, Mr George W., Chicago, 111 3 

Washington & Lee University, Lexington, 

Va I 

Washington Heights Free Library, New 

York City i 

Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society i 2 

Watson, Mr Wm. Richard 2 

Weber, Mr Gustav A .... 24 maps 

Weldin, J. R. & Company 10 .... 

Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass i 

Welsh, Mr H. M 5 .... 

Western Penitentiary 3 

Western Reserve University, Cleveland, O 3 

Western University of Pennsylvania i 

Westinghouse, Mr George 2 

Westinghouse Airbrake Company 6 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 

Company 34 

Westinghouse Machine Co 2 

58 



Volt. Pams. Nob. 

Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa ... . i .... 

Whitehead, Rt. Rev. Cortlandt 24 76 

Whittemore Mantel Company, St. Louis, 

Mo I 

Willard, Miss E. M 10 

Wilmington (Del) Institute Free Library 2 

Wilson, Miss E. S 4 .... 

Wilson, Mr H. W., Minneapolis, Minn i 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission .... 

18 miscellaneous, and i 21 

Wisconsin Geological & Natural History 

Survey i 2 

Wisconsin State Historical Society 7 8 

Wisconsin State Superintendent of Educa- 
tion II 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, 

Methodist Protestant Church i 10 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Woods, Mr Edward A., Sewickley, Pa 475 18 22 

Wortman, Dr Jacob L., New Haven, Conn. i .... 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 2 



59 



Report of the Superintendent of Buildings. 



To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds : 

Gentlemen : — It is a matter of pleasure for me to be able 
to again report the buildings and their furnishings, together 
with the mechanical equipment of each, in thorough repair. 
At the Central Library building the attendance in the 
several departments has been larger than during any previous 
year. While this is decidedly gratifying, yet it is none the less 
true that the wear on the buildings and furniture is corre- 
spondingly increased, and they have suffered from unavoida- 
ble abuse. That these abuses may not become permanent 
injuries, special effort has been made; the parts affected are 
immediately cared for, cleaned, repaired or decorated, as the 
case may require, with the result that we can safely say that 
everything is practically in the same condition as when the 
building opened for the first time. 

During the year an electric light plant w^as installed at 
the Lawrenceville branch, making it possible to light the 
building entirely by electric light instead of by gas and elec- 
tricity as before. In the matter of economy a considerable 
saving has been effected, in addition to which the house is 
better lighted and more easily kept clean. The heat arising 
from so many burners was also an objectionable feature of 

60 



gas lighting, especially during the summer months. Alto- 
gether the results have been so satisfactory that it has been 
decided to equip the Hazelwood building, now nearing com- 
pletion, with a similar outfit. 

As will be seen by the Treasurer's report, the expense 
for maintenance and repairs is approximately the same as for 
the preceding year, the additional amount estimated for the 
year 1899 being intended to meet the cost of operating the 
West End and Wylie Avenue branches. 

The Lecture Hall at the Central building continues to 
grow in favor. During the year there were fifty-nine lectures 
and entertainments given that were free to the people, being 
an increase of twenty-six over last year. 

There were thirty-four lectures given for which a rental 
was charged as follows: — 

25 evenings at $12.50. $312.50 

2 evenings at 17.50 35-oo 

I evening at 25.00 25.00 

I evening at 20.00 20.00 

5 afternoons at 10.00 50.00 

Total $442.50 

In the hall at Lawrenceville there were four lectures 
given at $12.50 per night, making a total of $492.50 collected 
in rentals. 

I note with pleasure how much more easily the great 
crowds are controlled now than they were during the earlier 
history of the institution. This is particularly noticeable 
during the annual fall exhibition. While but two additional 
guards are added now, heretofore it was found necessary at 
this time to engage four, or more, to preserve order and pre- 
vent injury to the exhibits. I have no reason to believe that 
the people were intentionally disorderly, or that they con- 
templated any injury to the property of the institution; it 
was apparently through thoughtlessness that any irregulari- 
ties were committed. The younger element showed a dis- 
position at times to be boisterous, but a mild rebuke by an 
attendant was usually all that was necessary to prevent a 

61 



repetition of the offence. The danger of injury to paintings, 
statuary or other exhibits occurred only when the crowd was 
unusually large, but at such times it required the utmost vigi- 
lance on the part of the guards to prevent accidents. 

Now, however, the people themselves seem to under- 
stand the situation, and exercise care without having to be 
told to do so, by their actions and example co-operating 
with the officers of the institution in protecting that in which 
they have come to realize they have a personal interest, and 
in many things an ownership. 

The same conditions exist in reference to the Music 
Hall at the free organ recitals. Not unfrequently the crowd 
is so large it cannot be accommodated even with standing 
room. Those that are compelled to remain outside, do so 
good-naturedly, and are always willing to wait until enough 
have vacated the hall to insure sufficient room. They follow 
the directions of the officers and attendants as to the manner 
of ingress and egress, so that confusion or a panic is almost 
impossible. That none were offended by the methods adopted 
to bring about the result is evidenced by the lack of complaint 
and the continued large attendance. 

Very respectfully, 

Chas. R. Cunningham, 

April 14, 1900. Superintendent of Buildings. 



62 



Report of the Manager of Music Hall. 



To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of the Music Hall for the year ending January 
31st, 1900. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 

PAY ENTERTAINMENTS. 

Forenoon Erening 

or Afternoon 

Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 12 12 

Art Society, $50 rate 11 

Mozart Qub, $50 rate 5 

Apollo Qub, $100 rate 3 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, 

$75 rate i 4 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, 

$100 rate 15 

Conventions, at educational rates, $75 ... 7 i 
Entertainments paying full rate, $125. . . i 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 10 



21 61 

Total income from rentals as above $6,650.00 

Use of organ, 6 times at $25 150.00 

$6,800.00 
Expenditures for the Hall for the year were . . . $8,360. 1 7 

63 



Free organ recitals by Frederic Archer, established when 
the Hall was opened, have been continued weekly on Satur- 
day evenings and Sunday afternoons. No recitals, however, 
were given during the months of July, August and Septem- 
ber, and they were suspended during the month of March 
because of an accident to Mr Archer. 

Afternoon Evening 

The total number of organ recitals dur- 
ing the year was 34 34 

FREE USE OF HALL. 

The annual commencement of the Pittsburgh High 
School, evening of June 29th. 

Founder's Day, Carnegie Institute, afternoon of No- 
vember 2nd. 

Pittsburgh Teachers' Institute, afternoon of Decem- 
ber 1st. 

Pittsburgh Teachers' Institute, afternoon of Decem- 
ber 2nd. 

Museum Department of Carnegie Institute, evening of 
December 19th. 

TOTAL USE OF HALL DURING THE YEAR. 

Forenoon Erening 

or Afternoon 

Pay entertainments 21 61 

Free organ recitals 34 34 

Miscellaneous 3 2 

58 97 

IN GENERAL. 

The Hall was not used on Sunday except for the organ 
recitals. 

During the year all contracts made with the Manager 
for the use of the Hall were kept, and there are no rentals 
uncollected. 

There was a falling off in receipts from the total of last 
year of $1,775, accounted for by the giving up of the Star 

64 



Course of entertainments that had been a source of income 
at the Hall for two years, and the additional fact that the Hall 
benefited during the year ending January 31st, 1899, by more 
conventions or series engagements than was the case during 
the year covered by this report. 

The use of the Hall by local societies was greater during 
the present year than ever before, and for the year to come 
engagements already entered show that there will be a still 
further increase, while from miscellaneous sources there are 
a greater number of advance engagements. 

I have to report satisfactory service from the door- 
keepers and ushers under my direction. 

Very respectfully, 

G. H. Wilson, 

Manager. 



6s 



Report of the Director of Music. 



To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen: — I have great pleasure in submitting my 
report for the fiscal year ending January 31st, 1900. During 
this period I have given 71 bi-weekly organ recitals, seven 
less in number than the previous year, owing to an unfortu- 
nate accident of which I was the victim in March last. The 
number of persons according to official record was 74,000, 
showing an average attendance of 1,430 for each occasion. 

The remarkable increase in the popularity of these re- 
citals revealed by reference to the results of past seasons, 
is a source of very great gratification to me, as the growth 
of public interest has not been spasmodic or evanescent, but 
obviously the outcome of an evolutionary process indicative 
of a real progress in the work of musical education. In this 
connection the following abstract of actual "returns" be- 
comes eloquent with its own significance : — 

Ayrengt attendance 
at each recital 

Season ending January 31st, 1897 695 

Season ending January 31st, 1898 1,078 

Season ending January 31st, 1899 1,232 

Season ending January 31st, 1900 1,430 

66 



This result has been obtained by strictly legitimate 
means, and in conformity with the dignified mission of art. 
The organ alone has been employed and no extraneous or 
sensational methods have been resorted to. 

The music student, the regular attendants and the gen- 
eral public alike, have, by their exemplary demeanor on all 
occasions, afforded unquestionable evidence of their keen 
appreciation of the opportunities of self culture provided for 
them through the medium of the "Free Organ Recitals/' 
The highest number present on a single occasion was 3,500, 
(Sunday, November 12th, 1899) although almost as great a 
number has attended at other times. 

During the series of 71 recitals here referred to, I have 
introduced 623 compositions representative of all periods and 
nationalities, 217 of which were either absolutely new or pre- 
viously unheard here. The number of works specially written 
for the organ amounted to 298, and the remaining 310 were 
transcriptions of orchestral or other compositions of varied 
type. 

During the entire series of 329 recitals, 2,771 carefully 
selected examples of the creative ability of highly esteemed 
composers were heard by audiences collectively numbering 
304,136. This is a statistical fact that has no parallel either 
in this country or in Europe. 

In April and May, 1899, I delivered my annual series of 
musical lectures with organ and piano illustrations, on the 
followine^ subjects : — 

1. Franz Schubert. 

2. Weber. 

3. The Organ — ^its Structure and early History. 
3. Modem Organs, Composers and Players. 

5. Music Makers and Composers. 

6. Robert Schumann. 

The attendance was gratifyingly large and the audiences 
were highly appreciative. 

The customary souvenir book issued at the 300th re- 
cital, of which I forward a copy in order to afford more de- 
tailed information, awakened wide spread attention, and from 

67 



letters received I am pleased to learn that these records of the 
work accomplished at Carnegie Library, in my department, 
are exercising a stimulative influence in other cities, which 
w ill doubtless be productive of good results. 

Respectfully yours, 

Frederic Archer, 

March 7, 1900. Director of Music. 



Report of the Finance G>mniittee. 



IV . N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Your Finance Committee respectfully reports that there 
is no change from their last annual report; that they have 
in their possession the nineteen first mortgage, five per cent, 
gold-loan of 1890, bonds of the Pittsburgh, Shenango & 
Lake Erie Railroad Company, of the par value of one thou- 
sand dollars each, being the investment of the Bemd Fund. 
These bonds, together with the deeds for the properties pur- 
chased for branch libraries — namely, from William Schutte 
et ux., 26th ward property; Ira M. Burchfield et ux., 23d 
ward property; Frank Le Moyne, and William G. Sawyer, 
and Harry P. Ford et ux., Thomas McCartan et al., and 
George D. Edwards, nth ward property; Joseph M. Taylor 
and Emma Taylor et al., 36th ward property, and the Wash- 
ington Sub District School to City of Pittsburgh property; 
are deposited in Box 7106 Fidelity Title and Tnist Co. vaults. 

The coupons of bonds have been regularly handed over 
to the Treasurer, for which we have his receipt. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Pitcaim, 

April 14, 1900. Chairman. 

68 



J 



Report of the Treasurer* 



Condensed statement of H. C. Frick, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31st, 1900. 

Revenue, 

Surplus from last year $ 8,748.26 

Appropriation from City of Pitts- 
burgh 104,000.00 

Contributions : 

Andrew Carnegie $10,000.00 

McConway & Torley Co 300.00 

10,300.00 

Contribution to the Merz Fund .22 

Home Library Fund : 

Contributions from various persons 275.00 

Music Hall Rentals 6,800.00 

Lecture Hall Rentals 492.50 

Library collections : 

Central Library $ 1,088.74 

Lawrenceville branch . . 184.05 

West End branch 90.18 

Wylie Ave. branch I5i-i3 

1,514.10 

Interest on daily bank balances 914.18 

$133,044.26 

69 



Disposition. 

For approved vouchers, Nos. 2613 to 
3504 inclusive : 

Central Library. 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $ 25,481.31 

Library department. 

Operating labor and 
running expense. ...$31,560.88 

Amount advanced E. H. 
Anderson, Librarian, 
for petty cash fund. . . 350.00 

Books purchased 16,177.74 

48,088.62 

Music Hall department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense 8,360.17 

Accounting department 

Operating labor and running ex- 
pense 222.00 

Executive department. 

Running expense 6.00 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

Lazvrenceville, 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 

ning expense 5i35i.66 

Library department. 
Operating labor and 
running expense .... $ 3,244.68 

Books purchased 2,513.58 

5758.26 

West End. 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 

ning expense 1,608.58 

Library department. 
Operating labor and 

running expense . . . .$ 2,487.01 
Books purchased 2,309.32 

4,796.33 

70 



Wylie Ave. 

Building department 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense 1,860.26 

Library department. 
Operating labor and 

running expense $ 2,666.77 

Books purchased 4,064.53 

6,731.30 

Ml Washington, 

Library department. 

Running expense $ 54«34 

Books purchased 3»990-7o 

4,04504 

Hazelwood. 

Library department. 

Running expense $ 57-30 

Books purchased 3,99340 

4,050.70 

Trusts. 

Carnegie Fund. 

Books purchased 5*230.57 

Merz Fund. 

Books purchased 100.22 

Home Library Fund. 

Furniture and running 
expense $ 89.11 

Books purchased 258.28 

347-39 

122,038.41 

Surplus $ 1 1,005 85 

Surplus is made up of the following 
balances : 

Balance of contributions from An- 
drew Carnegie, not yet expended $10,705.15 

Balance of contributions from Mc- 
Conway and Torley Company, 
not yet expended 300.00 

Balance of City appropriation .70 

1 1 ,005.85 

71 



J« D« Bemd Fund. 

Condensed statement of H. C. Frick, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31st, 1900. 

Revenue. 

Surplus from last year $ 340.54 

Interest on Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake 

Erie bonds 950.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 10.28 

^$1 ,300.82 

Disposition. 

Books purchased $1,266.46 

Surplus $ 34.36 



J^J^J^J^J^J^ 



Report of the Auditing Gmimittee. 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir: — ^The Committee on Audit respectfully re- 
ports that it has examined the annual statement of the Treas- 
urer for the year ending January 31, 1900, and examined and 
compared therewith the Treasurer's accounts and vouchers, 
and verified the same as to funds on hand and in other re- 
spects, and finds that the said annual statement and all mat- 
ters relating thereto are correct as stated. 

Very respectfully, 

John S. Lambie. 

April 17, 1900. 

72 



. ' Fifth Annual Reparts 
To the Board of Trustees 
of the 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 3», 1901 



190J 



gl 






Fifth Annual Reports 

To the Board of Trustees 

otthe 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 3J, J90J 



J90J 



Board of Trustees 

W. N. FREW, President 
ROBERT PITCAIRN, Vice President 
J. F. HUDSON, Secretary 
C M. SCHWAB, Treasurer 

JAMES M. CLARK DAVID McCARGO 

HON. W. J. DIEHL W. H. McKELVY 

R. H. DOUGLAS W. A. MAGEE 

K M. FERGUSON A. W. MELLON 

W. N. FREW W. L MUSTIN 

J. F. HUDSON ROBERT PITCAIRN 

JOHN S. LAMBIE H. K. PORTER 

GEORGE A. MACBETH C. M. SCHWAB 

J. GUY McCANDLESS J. P. STERRETT 

Rnance G>fxunfttee 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman E. M. FERGUSON 

HON. W. J. DIEHL 

G>mmittce on Music Hall 

W. A. MAGEE, Chairman H. K. PORTER 

J. P. STERRETT 

G>fxunfttee on Buildings and Grounds 

J. GUY McCANDLESS, Chairman J. F. HUDSON 

C. M. SCHWAB 

G>mmittce on librarf 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, Chairman W. H. McKELVY 

R. H. DOUGLAS 

Auditing G>mmittce 

A. W. MELLON, Chairman JOHN S. LAMBIE 

Executive Staff 

EDWIN H. ANDERSON, FREDERIC ARCHER, 

Librarian Director of Music 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM, GEO. H. WILSON, 

Supt. of Buildings Manager of Music Hall 



Contents 

Page 

Report of the President 7 

Report of the Committee on Administration of the Li- 
brary 9 

Report of the Librarian lo 

Statistical Tables 32 

Gifts to the Library 49 

Report of the Superintendent of Buildings - - - - 70 
Report of the Manager of Music Hall - - - - - 71 

Report of the Director of Music 73 

Report of the Finance Committee 75 

Report of the Treasurer - -.- - - - - -76 

Report of the Auditing Committee 79 



Illustrations 

Wylie Avenue Branch-i-Children's Room - Frontispiece 

Facing Page 

Mount Washington Branch — Exterior - - - 8 
Hazelwood Branch — Exterior ----- 16 
Hazelwood Branch — Delivery Lobby - - - 24 
Hazelwood Branch — General Reading Room - - 32 
Hazelwood Branch — Children's Room, from front - 40 
Hazelwood Branch — Children's Room, from rear - 48 
Hazelwood Branch — Children's Room, showing fold- 
ing wash basin --- 56 

Page 

Mount Washington Branch — First floor plan - - - 20 

Mount Washington Branch — Basement plan - - - 22 

Hazelwood Branch — First floor plan ----- 23 

Hazelwood Branch — Basement plan - - - - - 24 



Report of the President* 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to transmit the annual 
reports of the various departments of the institution placed 
under your control, for the year ending January 31, 1901. 
The record is one of encouraging progress and continued 
growth and expansion. The branch library system has been 
enlarged during the year by the opening of the Mount Wash- 
ington and Hazelwood buildings which have proved as suc- 
cessful as those previously placed in operation. But two re- 
main to be erected, one in Birmingham, the other in the East 
End. 

The quantity and especially the quality of the work be- 
ing done by the officials of both the Central and branch libra- 
ries is highly commendable. Successful efforts are being 
made to bring all the youth of the city under the influence of 
the Library. I cannot speak too highly of the conscientious 
and intelligent endeavor on the part of the librarians and their 
assistants to reach and interest this most important part of 
our population. 

The buildings are all in good condition and have never 
been allowed to get out of repair. 

The free organ recitals of Mr. Frederic Archer continue 
to interest greatly and instruct the people, the Music Hall, 
especially during the Sunday afternoon recitals, being gener- 
ally crowded by orderly and sympathetic audiences. 

Your Building Committee is ready to proceed with the 
proposed addition to the Library building as instructed at 
your last meeting. At the present time, although condem- 
nation proceedings have been instituted, the city has not ob- 
tained possession of the ground and the Committee feels it 
would, under the circumstances, be injudicious to enter into 
a contract with an architect, making the Board liable for the 
expenditure of a large sum of money in commissions. 

The balance remaining in the various appropriations on 
March i, 1901, amounted to $2,898.93. 

There was appropriated by the City of Pittsburgh for 
the fiscal year ending February 28, 1902 $126,000.00. 



Your Executive Committee, in accordance with the by- 
laws, has apportioned this as follows : — 

Maintenance of the Library $89,000.00 

Maintenance of buildings and grounds 33,000.00 

Music Hall emergency fund 1,500.00 

Contingent fund 5»398.93 

I desire again to express my appreciation of the cordial 
co-operation on the part of all the members of the Board in 
the work entrusted to us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, 

President. 



8 






• •• 



••• 









; ••• 



» • 



Report of the G>mmittee on Administration of 

the Library* 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : 

Gentlemen : — We have the honor to submit herewith the 
fifth annual report of the Librarian containing comparative 
tables of circulation, and showing growth, accessions of 
books, and operation in detail in all departments. 

The Mount Washington branch was opened on May 31, 
1900, and the Hazelwood branch on August 16, 1900, with 
suitable ceremonies and addresses, in the presence of large 
audiences. 

These two branch libraries have been entirely satisfac- 
tory as to buildings and operation, and furnish additional evi- 
dence of the success of the branch system, notwithstanding 
the exhibit of a decrease in circulation and attendance at the 
West End branch, which is easily accounted for. However, 
it is to be said that this branch very much exceeds at present 
the greatest expectations of those best acquainted with the 
population for which it is intended, and we look for a contin- 
uance of its usefulness. 

It has been the plan of your committee to make as avail- 
able as possible the books on our shelves, or in other words, 
to make it easy to get books and information about books. 
To this end the entire library force has been in accord at all 
times and we note with a great deal of pleasure not only the 
continued increase in circulation in general, but also the large 
circulation per book. 

It is also a source of gratification that the number of do- 
nors increases, being 416 in the third annual report, 459 in 
the fourth and 560 in the present report. 

The tabulation of registered borrowers by occupations 
is to be noted. Stated briefly, of the 9,800 persons who reg- 
istered occupations for themselves, 7,000 were employees, or, 
in other words, persons who would probably have been forced 
to go without books, had it not been for the Library. 

The Librarian lays stress on the crowded conditions at 
the Central Library, and we take pleasure in emphasizing 
this, as it goes to prove the remarkable growth of the library 
movement in our city. Whereas a few years ago our present 
quarters seemed most spacious, we now feel the necessity for 
much more room, a need that will not be less pressing in the 
future. 

Very respectfully, 

Geo. A. Macbeth, 

Chairman, 



Report of the Li 

To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees : 

I have the honor to present my report of the work of the 
Library for the fifth statistical year, ending January 31, 1901. 

On February i, 1901, there were in the Central Library 
and branches, both catalogued and uncatalogued, 122,481 
volumes and 8,45 1 pamphlets. There were added during the 
year 28,342 volumes and 3,550 pamphlets. After deducting 
the volumes worn out and withdrawn, or sent to the collec- 
tion of duplicates, and the duplicate pamphlets and those 
bound into volumes, there was a net g^in of 26,309 volumes 
and 2,208 pamphlets. (See Table i, following.) 

The number of classified and catalogued volumes on the 
shelves and ready for use at the Central Library and branches 
at the close of the year was 1 18,068. Of these, 77,467 were in 
the Central Library (including the school duplicate collection 
and home libraries), 11,203 in the Lawrenceville branch, 
6,791 in the West End branch, 10,726 in the Wylie Avenue 
branch, 6,021 in the Mount Washington branch, and 5,860 in 
the Hazelwood branch. The difference between this total 
and that of the preceding paragraph represents 1,056 volumes 
of public documents sent to the attic, as explained below, and 
3,357 volumes received and entered in the accession books 
too late to be catalogued. The difference between this total 
and that of the paragraph which follows, 4,655, represents the 
number of volumes worn out, destroyed or withdrawn, from 
the opening of the Library in November, 1895, to the close of 
the period covered by this report. (Tables i, 2 and 3, fol- 
lowing.) 

During the year 4,101 volumes were bound, 6,871 re- 
bound, and 859 repaired, in the bindery located in our build- 
ing. The total number of volumes worn out, destroyed or 
withdrawn during the same period was 1,407. 

Gitalogfue Department 

The total number of volumes classified and catalogued 
to the close of the year, for the Central Library and branches, 
was 122,723. Of these, 80,566 were for the Central Library, 
1 1 ,783 for the Lawrenceville branch, 6,997 for the West End 

10 



branch, 11,278 for the Wylie Avenue branch, 6,161 for the 
Mount Washington branch, and 5,983 for the HazelwooJ 
branch. (Table 3, following.) 

The number of volumes classified and catalogued during 
the year was 31,610, of which 18,560 were for the Central Li- 
brary (including additions to the duplicate collection for 
schools, to the home libraries, and books purchased from the 
Carnegie and Bernd funds), 2,301 for the Lawrenceville 
branch, 1,801 for the West End branch, 3,038 for the Wylie 
Avenue branch, 3,058 for the Mount Washington branch, 
and 2,852 for the Hazelwood branch. These figures give 
but a faint idea of the amount of work done in this depart- 
ment. As in former years, it includes keeping up to date 
three complete, printed, dictionary card catalogues for the 
Central Library, with descriptive or critical notes for many of 
the titles, and a similar catalogue for its own collection at 
each branch. (Table 3, following.) 

United States Public Doctiments* 

Our sheep-bound set of United States public documents 
is now as fully catalogued as their use seems to require. Ev- 
ery volume which consists of one document only has been 
classified and catalogued fully, taking its place, according to 
subject, with the other books in the reference collection. 
Other volumes of this set to the number of 1,056, exact dupli- 
cates of cloth-bound volumes already catalogued, have been 
stored in one of the attic rooms, because there was not room 
for them on the shelves in the book wing. They can be re- 
turned to their places as soon as the contemplated additions 
to the book wing are completed. 

After taking from the sheep-bound set the two classes of 
documents mentioned above, there remain 1,232 volumes 
made up of two or more documents each. These stand on 
the shelves in the order of the numbers assigned them in the 
"Document checklist" issued by the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments at Washington. Articles of special value to this com- 
munity have been analyzed, or brought out in the catalogue, 
in all volumes which are not alreadv indexed in the various 
Government catalogues. This seems to be all we should do, 
at present, to make these books available, since it is probable 
that the Government will sometime undertake the cata- 
loguing of documents not included in the present indexes. 
In order that any volumes issued as a part of the sheep-bound 
set, but not shelved with this set in our Library, may be read- 
ily found by one who knows the Government number only, a 
checklist has been made, giving opposite the Goverment 

II 



number, the call number of every volume shelved elsewhere. 

During the year copy has been prepared by the Cata- 
logue department for a selected, annotated Hst of readable 
biographies, including about lOO titles. This will be printed 
soon, and its usefulness tested. If it proves useful to the pub- 
lic, other lists of like character for other classes of literature, 
will be prepared by this department. 

In addition to its own legitimate work, the Catalogue 
department gave during the year to other departments 2,123 
hours, equivalent to the full time of one assistant. This pro- 
vides agreeable change for the cataloguer, but may well be 
taken into account in an estimate of the work done during the 
year. 

Grculation* 

The number of volumes sent into the homes of the peo- 
ple during the year from the Central Library and branches 
was 428,686, an increase of 83,096, or 24 per cent, over the 
previous year. Of these, 181,844 were issued from the Cen- 
tral Library, 77,691 from the Lawrenceville branch, 28,920 
from the West End branch, 94,349 from the Wylie Avenue 
branch, 27,337 from the Mount Washington branch (open 
for eight months only), and 18,545 from the Hazelwood 
branch (open for five and one-half months only). 

Though the figures show that there were 75,291 volumes 
in the Loan departments on February i, 1901, the average 
number on hand for circulation during the whole year was 
about 62,000. Our lending stock, therefore, was turned over 
seven times in twelve months. (Tables 4, 5, 6 and 19, follow- 
ing-) 

While not falling within the period covered by this re- 
port, it is gratifying to know that the use of the Library con- 
tinues to grow, as is evidenced by the fact that the circulation 
of last month (March) was the greatest in the history of the 
Library, 52,647 volumes being issued in that one month. 

The number of borrowers registered to February i, 
1901, was 35,681. The number added during the year was 
8,444, of which 2,558 were registered at the Central Library, 
1,187 from the Lawrenceville branch, 352 from the West End 
branch, 1,712 from the Wylie Avenue branch, 1,497 from the 
Mount Washington branch, and 1,138 from the Hazelwood 
branch. Because of change of residence, etc., 773 borrowers' 
cards were cancelled during the year. 

Who Use the Library? 

We are often asked what classes of people avail them- 
selves of the opportunities offered by the Library; whether 



12 



the so-called working classes use it to any considerable ex- 
tent. We are glad that we can give these questions a cate- 
gorical answer. Every applicant for a borrower's card who 
has a specific occupation, is required to record it on his appli- 
cation blank. The occupation g^ven is written opposite his 
or her name in the registration book. It is comparatively 
easy, therefore, to gather accurate statistics concerning the 
occupations of a large number of our borrowers. Of course 
the great majority of borrowers are women and children, es- 
pecially the latter, who have no specific occupations, but con- 
stitute the families of those who have. 

Of the 35,681 borrowers registered from the opening of 
the Library in November, 1895, ^o the close of the period 
covered by this report, 9,826, or 27J per cent., recorded 
specific occupations for themselves. The number of occupa- 
tions given was over 600. It is impracticable to g^ve here a 
complete list of these; grouped together under twelve gen- 
eral heads they are as follows : — 

Bookkeepers, clerks, stenog^raphers, and the like 2,520 

Iron and steel workers, railway employees, and workers 

at the various trades 2,317 

Electricians, chemists, draughtsmen, engineers, mer- 
cantile agents, etc 1,310 

Teachers 1,002 

Laborers, domestic servants, and the like 861 

Merchants, manufacturers, bankers and brokers 495 

Physicians, surgeons and dentists 211 

Clergymen and other religious workers 206 

Lawyers 201 

Artists, architects and musicians 201 

Newspaper men 105 

Miscellaneous 397 

Total 9,^" 

These figures are interesting in themselves; but a closer 
and more detailed examination of the statistics reveals the 
fact that 71 per cent of the total number are employees in the 
various industrial and mercantile establishments of the city, 
not including managers and superintendents. 

It should be remembered that the total number of regis- 
tered borrowers does not by any means represent all the bor- 
rowers. It is a common practice for a whole family to use 
one or two cards. Moreover during the past year about 
45,000 volumes were issued through the schools, the home 
libraries, and other agencies where borrowers' cards are not 
required; and the privileges of the reference and reading 
rooms are absolutely free to any one, without the use of a 
card. 

13 



Reference Depdrtment* 

The year has shown a steady growth in the use of the 
Reference department at the Central Library, the number of 
readers during the year being 22,718 and the number of 
books used 125,034 as against 21,770 readers and 118,354 
books the previous year. (Tables 7 and 8, following.) The 
number of books on the shelves in the Reference room is now 
3,405, and only the limited shelf capacity of the room pre- 
vents our placing many more books where the public can 
have direct access to them. A valuable addition to the room 
during the year is a large globe, 30 inches in diameter, which 
embodies the latest geographical discoveries and political 
changes. 

The total number of volumes in the Reference depart- 
ment on February i, 1901, was 39,354, of which 5,142 were 
added during the year. The increase is not so large as the 
previous year because we have found it better to put in the 
Loan department many of the new books which were former- 
ly placed on the Reference shelves. By this change in policy 
the books are practically available in both departments. 

Some of the most important additions to the Reference 
department during the year are the following : — 

Armstrong's Sir Joshua Reynolds. 

Audslcy's Ornamental arts of Japan. 2v. 

Barrie's Army and navy of the United States. 2v. 

Biddle's History of the expedition under the command of 
Lewis and Clark, 1804-06; ed. by Elliott Coues. 4v. 

Cust's Anthony Van Dyck. 

Dohme's Kunst und Kiinstler. 

Giraud's Les arts du m6tal. 

Gower's Sir Thomas Lawrence. 

Hakluyt Society's Publications. 105 v. 

Historic English interiors. 

Jones' Illustrations of the nests and eggs of birds of Ohio, 
with text 2v. 

Kutschmann's Meisterwerke saracenisch-normannischer 
Kunst in Sicilien und Unteritalien. 

Lang's Prince Charles Edward. 

McClellan's Anatomy in its relation to art 

Mantz's Francois Boucher, Lemoyne, et Natoire. 

Mathews' Renaissance under the Valois. 

Middleton & Garden's Ornamental details of the Italian re- 
naissance. 

Mumford's Oriental rugs. 

Poynter's National gallery, v. 1-3. 

Radisics' Ghefs-d'oeuvre d'art de la Hongrie. 

14 



Rooscs* Fifty masterpieces of Anthony Van Dyck. 
Turner's Liber studiorum. 2v. 
Wickhoff s Roman art 

The series of reference lists on Contemporary Biogra- 
phy, beg^n last year, has been completed in twelve numbers 
of the Monthly Bulletin, the subjects during the year being 
Painters, Musicians, Actors, Scientists, explorers and invent- 
ors, Statesmen and warriors, and Sovereigns and rulers. The 
usefulness of these lists has been appreciated by other libra- 
ries, as is shown by requests for extra copies of them ; and they 
are in such constant use here that we have decided to bring 
them down to date by the addition of references to the most 
recent articles, and republish them in pamphlet form. The 
reference assistants have also prepared complete reference 
lists for eight club programs, and occasional lists for five 
more, and compiled for the Art Gallery catalogue of the fall 
exhibition a reference list on the artists represented, besides 
the University Extension lists and others of current interest 
which have been posted on the bulletin board. The index to 
volumes of collected poems has been increased by the inclu- 
sion of 23 more volumes, making 66 volumes in all. 

In October some of the finer illustrated books of the Li- 
brary were placed on exhibition in the large Lecture room. 
About 180 books were laid out on tables where any one could 
sit and look them through at leisure, and during the four 
afternoons and evenings of the exhibition 637 people availed 
themselves of the opportunity, most of them staying several 
hours and many coming back for the third and fourth time. 
It proved a revelation to many people of the beautiful and 
artistic volumes which are stowed away on our shelves, and a 
list of the books which were exhibited has been in frequent 
use during the year as a guide to the fine illustrated books in 
the Library. It is hoped that the exhibition can be repeated 
every year until we have a large rgom where such books can 
be permanently kept in sight, to remind visitors of their ex- 
istence. 

This winter the Reference Librarian has given a series of 
talks on books to the assistants in the Reference and Loan 
departments. The histories of the United States, France and 
Germany have been considered, comparisons drawn between 
histories of the same period, and their usefulness to the 
student or the general reader discussed. These will be fol- 
lowed during the spring and summer by talks on out-door 
books, essays and general literature. There is no doubt that 
such discussions stimulate the interest and enthusiasm of the 
assistants, and we expect the public to profit by increased 
efficiency in the service. The Library is under great obliga- 

15 



tions to the Reference Librarian, who in addition to the oner- 
ous and important duties of her position gladly volunteered 
to undertake this extra work. 

In the last report mention was made of the addition to 
the staff of this department of an assistant specially equipped 
for the effective handling of the literature of technology. The 
experience of one year has shown that his advice and assist- 
ance are of great value to the Library, not only in the per- 
sonal help given to the electricians, chemists, engineers, and 
mechanics who consult the reference books, but also in the 
selection of technical books, the arrangement of the patent 
collection and the indexing of scientific periodicals. The In- 
dex to current periodicals which the Engineering Magazine 
publishes every month has been clipped, and each item pasted 
on a separate card and filed alphabetically under the proper 
subject heading; so that we now have an index in one alpha- 
bet giving about 14,000 references to 153 leading scientific 
periodicals covering the period from January, 1899, to the 
present time. In May, 1900, we published a "List of the Pub- 
lications of Scientific Societies and the Periodicals on Pure 
and Applied Science in the Reference Department." Since 
that time the following sets have been bought from the 
special fund provided by Mr Carnegie for that purpose : — 

American institute of electrical engineers. Transactions, 

1884-97. 
American society of naval engineers. Journal, 1889-date. 

Annales des mines, 1795-1897. 

Berg- und hiittenmannische Zeitung, 1885-97. 

Berlin, Konigliche Akademie der Wissenschaften. Abhand- 

lungen, 1804-date. 
Electric power, 1889-96. 
English mechanic, 1865-97. 

Incorporated gas institute. Transactions, 1893-date. 
Incorporated institution of gas engfineers. Transactions, 

1891-date. 
Journal fiir praktische Chemie, 1834-97. 
Locomotive, 1880-date. 
Monatshefte fiir Chemie, 1880-date. 
Moniteur scientifique, 1857-date. 
Practical mechanic and engrineer's magazine, 1842-47. 
Royal society of Edinburgh. Transactions, 1783-date. 
Sanitary institute of Great Britain. Transactions, 1879-date. 
Society d'cncouragement pour Tindustrie nationale. Bulletin,. 

1801-date. 
Society of engineers. Transactions, 1860-date. 
Vienna, Verein fiir die Forderung des Local- und Strassen- 

bahnwesens. Mittheilungen, 1893-date. 
Vierteljahresschrift uber die Fortschritte auf dem Gebiete der 

16 



Chemic der Nahrungs- und Genussniittcl, 1887-date. 
Wiedemann's Annalen der Physik, 1790-date. 
Zeitschrift fiir Spiritusindustrie, 1878-97. 

Architectural Photosfraphs* 

There was also added to this department during the year 
a collection of fine photographs illustrating the architecture 
of various countries. It consists at present of 600 pictures, 
about eight by ten inches in size, of buildings in France, 
Italy and England. Photographs from Egypt, Greece, Spain 
and Germany, are now being mounted and prepared for use, 
and other countries will be represented later. Not only gen- 
eral views, exterior and interior, but also separate photo- 
graphs of interesting details are included, the number of pic- 
tures to each building being, of course, in proportion to its 
importance and interest. Notre Dame in Paris, for example, 
is illustrated by six, the Duomo in Florence by fourteen, the 
Cathedral at Milan by eighteen. An index is in preparation, 
which gives in each case the name of the building illustrated, 
mentions the architectural style which it represents, calls at- 
tention to any remarkable feature of it, and gives references 
to the best articles or books on the subject. The photo- 
graphs may be taken from the Library for the use of classes 
and clubs. 

Reading Roonuu 

The total number of persons who used the reading 
rooms of the Central Library and branches was 491,851, an 
increase of 71,243 over the previous year. The number using 
the reading rooms at the Central Library was 1 50,897, at the 
Lawrenceville branch 94,730, at the West End branch 49,448, 
at the Wylie Avenue branch 126,416, at the Mount Washing- 
ton branch (open eight months only) 37,525, and at the 
Hazelwood branch (open five and one-half months only) 
32,835. (Tables 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17, following.) 

At the Central Library the Reference room was used, as 
before stated, by 22,718, the Periodical room by 66,893, ^^^ 
Children's room by 36,567, and the Newspaper room by 
24,719, a total gain of 4,235. The gains, however, were in 
the Reference and Periodical rooms, the Children's room and 
the Newspaper room both showing losses, which are ex- 
plained in other parts of this report. 

It is impossible to keep accurate account of the number 
of books and magazines used in the library buildings; but 
summarizing the figures given above we find that certainly 
over 800,000 were used in the buildings or issued from them, 
and it is probable the figure was nearer one million. 

17 



Gifts to the Library* 

The Library received during the year g^fts from 560 
persons or institutions, amounting to 3,829 volumes, 4,555 
pamphlets, and 6,552 numbers of unbound periodicals. One 
of the notable gifts of the year was the private library of the 
late Joseph D. Weeks, which was presented by his widow. 
The collection, which is especially strong in technical litera- 
ture, consists of 939 volumes, 1,852 pamphlets, and 355 num- 
bers of unbound periodicals. 

Upon the opening of the Mount Washington branch, the 
entire collection of the Mount Washington Free Reading 
Room, including 1,265 volumes and 842 numbers of maga- 
zines, was turned over to us. All of these that could be used 
to advantage at the Mount Washington branch were sent 
there, the others being placed on the shelves of the Central 
Library. 

A list of the givers and their gifts, for the year, follows 
this report. 

Branch Libraries* 

Five of the seven branch libraries provided for by Mr 
Carnegie are now in operation. Two new ones were opened 
during the year, one at Mount Washington and one in Ha- 
zelwood. These branch libraries are well known to the resi- 
dents of the districts which they serve; but we wish it were 
possible to start the residents of other parts of the city on a 
tour of inspection. In many respects they are better ar- 
ranged and equipped than the Central Library. The public 
have free access to the shelves, where they can select their 
own books, examine as many as they like, and gain a personal 
knowledge, which no catalogue can give, of thousands of 
volumes in a carefully selected collection. 

The librarian of each of these branches had the advan- 
tage of special training and experience in library work before 
assuming the duties of her present position. They are indus- 
trious and resourceful, and are constantly on the alert to de- 
vise new schemes for carrying the mission of the book to the 
people in the districts served by their branches. They have 
organized study clubs of boys, g^rls, young men, and young 
women, which meet in one of the basement rooms of the 
branch library with which they are affiliated. The branch 
librarians supervise the work of these clubs, help them with 
their programs and courses of study, and make lists of books 
on the subjects to be discussed. 

18 



Lawrenceyille Branch* 

The home circulation of the Lawrenceville branch was 
77*69 1, an increase of 3,467 over the previous year. Pictures, 
mounted on cardboard, to the number of 1,140 were also 
issued. The number of persons who used the two reading 
rooms was 94,730, an increase of 7,977 over the previous 
year. It is impossible to keep any statistics of the number of 
books and magazines used in the reading rooms of this and 
the other branches. A great deal of important reference 
work is done at all of them, but of course no figures can 
be given to indicate the amount. (Tables 9 and 10, follow- 
ing.) 

West End Branch* 

At the West End branch 28,920 volumes were issued for 
home use, 1,557 l^ss than the previous year. The visitors to 
the reading rooms numbered 49,448, or 15,015 less than the 
previous year. For the first time in the history of the Library 
the opening of a new branch has affected the use of one al- 
ready in existence. A great many residents ot the Mount 
Washington district had been using the West End branch, 
which they could reach by means of a convenient street-car 
service. Of course they transferred their allegiance to the 
Mount Washington branch as soon as it was opened. In jus- 
tice to the Librarian of the West End branch the fact should 
be emphasized that this was the sole cause of the decrease in 
its use. It is peculiarly situated in a narrow valley between 
immense hills, and we believe that the population in conven- 
ient reach of it is less than 7,000. The circulation, therefore, 
was over seven times the total population served by the 
branch, a record not approached by any other branch, nor by 
the Central Library. (Tables 11 and 12, following.) 

Wylie Avenue Branch* 

During the year there were issued from the Wylie Ave- 
nue branch for home use 94,349 volumes, an increase over the 
previous year of 29,838. The number of persons who used 
the reading rooms was 126,416, an increase of 3,686 over the 
previous year. It should be remembered, however, that this 
branch was open only eight months during the previous year. 
Mounted pictures were issued to the number of 491. 

The problem at the Wylie Avenue branch is not so much 
to get more people to use it, as to handle effectively the 
crowds which come on afternoons and evenings. Be- 
tween three and six in the afternoon and between seven 

19 



and nine o'clock in the evening the capacity of the building 
is frequently tested. There is plenty of room at other times 
of the day; but we often feel at the hours mentioned that the 
building is not large enough. (Tables 13 and 14, following.) 

Mount Washington Branch* 

The Mount Washington branch was dedicated on the 
evening of May 31, 1900, and was opened to the public the 
following morning. The statistics for this branch, therefore, 
cover a period of eight months only. During this time there 
were circulated 27,337 volumes. The visitors to the reading 
rooms numbered 37,525. (Tables 15 and 16, following.) 

Floor plans and a front view of this branch are printed 
herewith. The building is modelled on the plan of the West 




e=t 



MTV\*\aHINCTON 



ririSl FLOOR PLAN 
BRANCH. CARNEae LIBRARY OF PTTTSeVRGH. 
ALOCN ANaHARLCW ARCAlTCCTd. 



End branch, except that glass partitions separate the general 
reading room and the children's room from the delivery 
lobby. By this means a greater degree of quiet is insured in 
the different parts of the building. The general fittings of 
this branch library are an improvement on those of the first 
three branches. The details of drawers, lockers, periodical 
racks, etc. have been carefully worked out to facilitate the 
routine work and economize space. There is no stack room,. 



20 



but an alcove for reference books, with a capacity of 2,000 
volumes, extends from the rear of the delivery lobby, while 
the circulating collection for adults is shelved around the 
walls of the general reading room, and the juvenile literature 
around the walls of the children's room. 

The turnstiles have been improved in several details, the 
entrance turnstile (marked F on the floor plan) having a 
frictional attachment which insures more accurate registering 
of the number of visitors The exit turnstile (marked E) is 
fitted with a locking attachment, which is released by press- 
ing a pedal located just where the charging assistant stands 
within the delivery desk. 

The delivery desk is octagonal instead of circular in form 
and is more satisfactory than the older style. On the inside 
it is titted at the front with shelves for returned books, at one 
side with drawers for the shelf list, which is kept on cards, and 
at the other side with drawers for borrowers' applications 
and cards. The case of drawers containing the card cata- 
logue is built into the rear of the desk and faces outward, so 
that it is readily accessible to borrowers. The assistants with- 
in the delivery desk command a complete view of the entire 
floor. The library, therefore, can well be left in the charge 
of one assistant during hours when the attendance is small. 
The greatest economy in administration is thus attained. 

The general reading room is provided with two corticine 
bulletin boards, brown in tone to harmonize with the beauti- 
ful oak woodwork. These are built into the walls above the 
steam radiators. The rack for current periodicals is also 
built into the wall. There arc seats for 64 persons, at eight 
tables of ordinary height (30 inches), and 56 inches long by 
39 inches wide. Near the entrance to the room is an attend- 
ant's desk, specially constructed and of the same general di- 
mensions as the tables. This room has a shelf capacity of 
5,200 volumes, the bookcases, except that under the glass 
partition, being seven shelves high. Above the shelves, the 
walls are hung with large framed photographs. 

The location of this branch on the left bank of the Mo- 
nongahela, on a bluff between 400 and 500 feet high, over- 
looking the city and commanding a fine view of the junction 
of the Monongahela and Alleghany rivers, makes peculiarly 
appropriate here the excellent oil painting of William Pitt, 
Earl of Chatham, which hangs on the wall in the general 
reading room. Underneath this portrait, in large letters is 
the following quotation from Bancroft's "History of the 
United States of America :" 

"As the banners of England floated over the waters, the 

21 



place, at the suggestion of Forbes, was with one voice called 
Pittsburg. It is the most enduring monument to William 
Pitt. America raised to his name statues that have been 
wrongfully broken, and granite piles of which not one stone 
remains upon another; but, long as the Monongahela and 
the Alleghany shall flow to form the Ohio, long as the Eng- 
lish tongue shall be the language of freedom in the boundless 
valley which their waters traverse, his name shall stand in- 
scribed on the gateway of the West." 

For the sake of symmetry, the shelving in the children's 
room is carried to the same height as in the general reading 




KrVy*xa4INCT0N 



BASEMENT PLAN 
BRANCH. CARNEGIE LIBRARY.OEJTCTaOyROM. 
ALDCN AND HARLGW: ARCHITECTS. 



room. The highest shelves would be of course out of the 
children's reach. The two upper shelves of each section, 
therefore, are concealed by a corticine panel framed in oak. 
These panels together form a bulletin frieze extending 
around the room. This makes an excellent background for 
small framed pictures hung within easy reach of the children's 
eyes; or, it may be used for a picture catalogue of the books 
on the shelves underneath. There are also two large corti- 
cine bulletin boards, built into the walls above the low radia- 
tors. Under the glass partition are low shelves and drawers 
for mounted pictures. The shelf capacity of this room is 
3,800 volumes. The tables, of the same superficial area as 



22 



those in the general reading room, are of three heights, 28, 26 
and 22 inches, with chairs to correspond, 17, 16 and 14 inches 
high, respectively. The room contains also an attendant's 
desk, similar to that in the general reading room. 

What is probably an innovation in children's rooms, is a 
small cabinet wash basin, compact in form, which folds 
against the wall behind closed doors, when not in use. The 
children's librarian thus has an opportunity to encourage 
cleanliness, and in some cases actually to teach boys and g^rls 
to wash their hands and faces. Besides the moral effect up- 
on the children, this is of decided physical advantage to the 
books. 

The basement contains a boiler room, coal vault, jani- 
tor's room, store room, work room and a small auditorium, 
or lecture room, in which are held the meetings of study 
clubs, etc. 

Haselwooci Branch* 

The Hazelwood branch was dedicated on the evening of 
August 16, 1900, and was open for regular business the fol- 




nwnr rtoofiPLAN 

HAZELWOOD BRANCH CARNCCC UBRAWY Of PnTaBV/fVSMa 
ALOCN A»o tiAittxw AftcnrrccTd. 

lowing morning. The statistics for this branch, therefore, 

23 



represent the work of only five and one-half months. In this 
short time 18,545 volumes were circulated, and the reading 
rooms were used by 32,835 persons. (Tables 17 and 18, fol- 
lowing.) 

Floor plans, exterior and interior views of this branch 
are printed herewith. The general plan is similar to that of 
the Mount Washington branch, a comparison of the floor 
plans of the two branches clearly revealing the differences. 
The delivery lobby at Hazelwood is wider, the seating capaci- 
ty one third greater, and there is shelf room for more books. 
Living quarters for the janitor are provided in a half story 




BAa£>AENT PLAN 
MAZtLWOOD BfiWCrt. CARNEOE LIBRARY OP PITTaBS/RCH. 
ALOCN AND HAmjClAr ARCHITLCT^ 



above the main floor. Like the Lawrenceville branch, the 
one at Hazelwood is provided with a direct-connected gas 
engine and dynamo, and is lighted throughout by means of 
its own electric plant. 



24 



> *- ••• 



« 
fc 



b • 



The fittings of the Mount Washington and Hazelwood 
branches are much alike. Both libraries are decorated with 
fine framed photographs and plaster casts, those in the chil- 
dren's rooms being reproductions of such really good works 
of art as appeal to the childish nature. Among the casts are 
the Winged Victory, Bologna's Flying Mercury, Delia Rob- 
bia's Singing Boys, etc. 

The Hazelwood branch stands on a lot that extends 
from one street to another of a different level. Hence it was 
possible to have the building front on the upper street and 
have on the lower street a ground level entrance for an audi- 
torium. The auditorium, semicircular in form, seats about 
500 persons, and is, as indicated above, on the basement floor 
with reference to the main library floor, but on the ground 
floor with reference to the rear street entrance. The possi- 
ble future enlargement of the library was considered in plan- 
ning the size and shape of the auditorium and locating its 
windows. With the present arrangement it will not be diffi- 
cult, when further shelf space is required, to construct above 
the auditorium a semicircular stack room with radial stacks, 
as at our Lawrenceville and Wylie Avenue branches. 

At all our branches we have provided for free access to 
the shelves, with complete supervision from a central desk. 
As far as we know, there are only two ways of securing this 
desirable combination : one, by means of wall shelving in an 
open room with no partitions, or with glass partitions sepa- 
rating the several departments; the other, by means of a semi- 
circular, or polygonal, stack room, with book stacks radiating 
from the center of- the delivery desk. Our West End branch 
(without partitions) and our Mount Washington and Hazel- 
wood branches (with glass partitions) are illustrations of the 
first, or simpler, plan. Our Lawrenceville and Wylie Ave- 
nue branches (described in our third annual report) are illus- 
trations of the radial stack plan. This plan provides much 
greater shelf capacity, but costs more to build. 

Children's Dq>artment 

The juvenile circulation for the year, including that from 
the children's rooms of the Central Library and branches, and 
through the home libraries and the schools, was 160,061, an 
increase of 32,018 over the previous year. The attendance in 
the children's rooms was 269,956, an increase of 32,560. The 
Sunday attendance alone was over 20,000, which is signifi- 
cant when we consider that the loan departments are closed 
on that day and the children come for quiet reading only. 
Over 2,000 new juvenile borrowers were registered during 
the year. Of these 713 were secured by visiting the homes ^ ' 

25 



children whose parents were unable to come to the Li- 
brary to sign the required blank. The statistics of registra- 
tion, however, do not include the children who have joined 
home library groups, nor those to whom books are issued 
from the collections sent to the city schools. 

Children's Rooms* 

Since the opening of the Mount Washington and Hazel- 
wood branches during the summer, the Library has had six 
children's rooms, each under the direction of a special chil- 
dren's librarian. The children's rooms at the two branches 
mentioned above represent, in equipment and arrangement, 
our nearest approach to the ideal children's room. We wish 
again to call attention to the fact that the room for children 
at the Central Library, being a temporary expedient, misrep- 
resents our work in this direction. 

During the early part of the year, both the use of the 
children's room at the Central Library and the juvenile circu- 
lation fell off alarmingly and the fiction percentage rose 
steadily. The cause of this was that the children could not 
examine the books before they were charged on their cards. 
In October we made an experiment; we removed the refer- 
ence collection from the few shelves in the children's reading 
room and put in its place all the juvenile non-fiction books 
and a good selection of juvenile fiction. These books are 
charged in the children's room at the desk of the children's 
librarian, but other books of fiction must be called for in the 
usual way by call slip at the general loan desk. As a result 
the figures since October show a marked increase both in 
attendance and circulation, and a decrease in the fiction per- 
centage. 

Story Hour* 

During the year systematic preparation was made for the 
weekly story hour. An outline of sixteen stories from the 
Iliad and Odyssey was prepared, and the stories told simulta- 
neously at the Central Library and branches. The children's 
librarians attended seven lectures on Homer, given at the 
Central Library for our Training Class, an account of which 
appears in another part of this report. These lectures were 
designed solely to arouse a literary interest in the Homeric 
epics and serve as inspiration, the story tellers later adapting 
the stories to the capacity of children. Books bearing on the 
subject, that is, stories from Greek mythology and Homer, 
were placed on special "story hour" shelves, and, as a result 
of the interest aroused by the story telling, were circulated 

26 



2,05 1 times. At present a picture exhibit illustrating Homer 
stories is being prepared under the direction of the Librarian 
of the Hazelwood branch and will be exhibited in turn at the 
Central Library and branches. Our story hour attendance 
from November i, 1900 to April i, 1901, was 5,285. 

Work with the Schools. 

During the year 3,130 volumes were added to the collec- 
tion of duplicates for the use of schools, making a total of 
8,453. ^^^ average number of books available for use during 
the year was, however, only about 6,000. The total circula- 
tion through the schools was 39,138, an increase of 8,089 over 
the previous year. In addition to books, over 1,300 pictures 
were loaned for school work. Since the beginning of the 
present school year, fifty-one educational institutions have 
been supplied with books, each school issuing books to pupils 
in the way best suited to its own work and methods. 

Gitalogfue of Books for the Use of Schools. 

In December, 1900, we published a "Graded and An- 
notated Catalogue of Books in the Carnegie Library of Pitts- 
burgh for the Use of the City Schools." As stated in our last 
report, this catalogue is the result of co-operation between 
the Principals Association and your Librarian and his assist- 
ants. An edition of 2,000 copies was printed, of which about 
1,000 were presented to the schools of the city, one being 
given to each school room and one to each principal and 
assistant principal. The remaining copies are being sold to 
defray the expenses of publication. The catalogue has been 
favorably noticed in library and educational journals, and we 
have received orders from all parts of the country. It is inter- 
esting to note that one order came from St. Petersburg, Rus- 
sia, and one from Sapporo, Japan. 

By means of the catalogue our work with the city 
schools has become better organized and is now reduced to 
system. Immediately upon its publication the shelves of our 
school duplicate collection were swept clean, and we have 
since been unable to supply the demand for books listed in the 
catalogue. With the cordial co-operation of the Principals 
Association and the Superintendent of Public Instruction, we 
hope to make it increasingly difficult for a child to go through 
the Pittsburgh schools without a taste for good literature. 

Summer Playgfrounds* 

During July and August, 1900, we sent books to seven 
of the city playgrounds and supplied the Franklin vacation 

27 



school with reference books and mounted pictures. The play- 
grounds were open six weeks and the circulation of books 
was 1,828, the collections being in charge of assistants from 
the Central Library and the Lawrenceville and West End 
branches. 

We did not lose the children after the six weeks in the 
playgrounds were over, for many of them transferred their 
cards to the branch libraries or became members of book 
clubs and home library groups. 

Home Libraries* 

The work of the home libraries during the past year has 
been slowly but steadily growing. The circulation for the 
year was 2,754, almost doubling last year's record. Not only 
have the kindergartners and school teachers proved most 
helpful in assisting us to find homes for the libraries, but the 
interested children themselves, wishing others to enjoy their 
advantages, have formed new groups. It often happens that 
a member moves to a new district and there becomes the cen- 
ter of another group. 

Most of the home libraries are scattered over the city in 
districts not reached by the Central Library nor by any of the 
branches now in operation. In a few cases, however, the 
branch librarians have helped establish home library groups 
in their districts in order that children who are disinclined to 
enter the branches may acquire a taste for reading and so be 
drawn into the children's rooms. 

The following addresses of some of the homes in which 
the libraries are placed will suggest to any citizen of Pitts- 
burgh the nature of the work : — Negley Run ; Boston & Bee- 
Ian Streets (Soho); Mulberry Alley; Park's Row, 30th Street; 
Singer's Row, West Carson Street; Painter's Row, West Car- 
son Street; 13th Street & Penn Avenue; Second & Sylvan 
Avenues. 

The following nationalities are represented in the 
groups : — Hungarian, Italian, Welsh, Swedish, Hebrew 
(German, Russian and Polish), German, Negro, Irish, Eng- 
lish and American. 

In some of the districts it is difficult to find a suit- 
able home for the library, and it is just those districts which 
are most in need of its influence. In such cases the group 
meets in the neighborhood school house and is called a club, 
the meeting often being in the evening to accommodate boys 
who work during the day. The department also sends books 
to boys' or girls' clubs already organized in the city. It is 

28 



hoped this phase of the work may become a permanent feat- 
ure. The clubs which are centers for these libraries are : — 

Club. In charge. 

Franklin School Club, Miss Gertrude Sackett. 

Kingsley Social Club, Kingsley House. 

Ralston School Club, Miss Jean MacLachlan and 

Miss Lide Packer. 
Sylvan Ave. School Club, Home Library Supervisor. 
Duquesne School Club, Home Library Supervisor. 

At date of this report we have 26 home libraries, 21 visit- 
ors, and a membership of 401 children in the groups and the 
clubs organized by the supervisor. 

The volunteer friendly visitors who have served during 
the year are : — 

Miss Josephine Babst, Miss Lena Bellnap, Miss Eliza- 
beth Bennett, Miss Marion D. Cameron, *Miss Jessie Carson, 
Mrs H. G. Cooper, Miss Anna B. Craig, Miss Mary M. 
Disque, Miss Jean Donnel, Miss Amy Fownes, Mrs M. M. 
Garland, Miss Mary Gilson, *Miss Gertrude Guthrie, Miss 
Anna Herron, Miss Jessie Keyt, Miss Louisa Wilson Knox, 
Miss Florence Lanahan, Miss Edith Lewis, Miss Kate Lowe, 
Miss Alice Haven Lowry, Miss Jean MacLachlan, Mrs A. A. 
McCarty, Miss Isabelle McClung, Mr Walter McKean, Miss 
S. H. Morris, Miss Lide Packer, Miss Susan Pool, *Miss 
Carrie Powelson, Mrs David Rankin, Mr James Lee Rankin, 
Miss Lois Rankin, Miss Frances Reahard, Miss Florence 
Rebbeck, *Miss Lillian Rode, Miss Margaret Rogers, Miss 
May Rogers, Miss Ida Shields, Miss Lillian Smith, Miss Car- 
olyn Vandersaal. 

The list of donors of new home libraries to date, with the 
numbers and names of the libraries is as follows : — 

Mr James I. Buchanan, Library No. 22. The Shakes- 
peare Library. 

Pittsburgh Sorosis Club, Library No. 23. Eliza D. Arm- 
strong Library. 

Thurston Preparatory School, Library No. 24. Thurs- 
ton School Library. 

Mrs Charles C. Mellor, Library No. 25. Charles Stanley 
Mellor Library. 

Mrs Charles C. Mellor, Library No. 26. Gertrude Mel- 
lor Library. 

Traimnsr Qass for Children's Librarians* 

The work with children in this Library has gjown so rap- 
idly that we soon found it impossible to give the necessary 

'Members of the Training Class for Children's Librarians. 

29 



time and attention to the training of an assistant who came to 
us without previous experience in such work. We made an 
experiment by appointing assistants who had studied in 
the Pittsburgh and Allegheny Kindergarten College. The 
young women were trained workers with children, original 
and resourceful ; but they lacked knowledge of technical libra- 
ry work and children's literature. The opening of new branch 
libraries and the prospect of a new Children's room at the 
Central Library, with the inevitable growth of the work with 
the schools and home libraries, made it necessary for us to 
plan for a corps of trained and experienced workers in this 
particular field. With this object in view, we started on Oc- 
tober I, 1900, a training class for children's librarians, ar- 
rangements having been made with the Kindergarten Col- 
lege for co-operation. We had about fifteen applicants for 
admission to this class, five of whom were admitted for the 
first year. The course is planned to cover two years of lec- 
tures and apprentice work, great stress being laid on appren- 
tice work under supervision. 

During the first year the school has more than support- 
ed itself. The fee of $50 for each student has fully covered 
the cost of lectures by persons not on the library staff. The 
time given to the class by members of the staff was offset by 
the apprentice work of the students. The influence on the 
children's librarians has been most beneficial. The respon- 
sibility of guidance resting on them has quickened their in- 
terest and encouraged further study on their own part. The 
children's librarians have also had an opportunity to attend 
many of the lectures designed for the class, especially those 
on story telling, literature and library economy. 

The heads of departments at the Central Library and the 
branch librarians render invaluable assistance by giving lec- 
tures on subjects which pertain to the work of their respect- 
ive departments. The students in the class also receive a 
large part of their practical training under the direction of 
the branch librarians. 

Oowded Q>nclitions at the Central Library* 

In conclusion I wish to call your attention to the crowd- 
ed condition of things in the Central Library building. Every 
department is reduced to temporary expedients to tide over 
the time till the proposed extension is complete. The book 
stacks are so crowded that we have been compelled to send 
more than one thousand volumes of Government documents 
to the attic, to make room for more important books. Our 
set of British patents is stored in the basement in what was 

30 



once a part of the Newspaper room. Another portion of this 
room was taken during the year for a bookbindery. The re- 
sult of these encroachments is that the room is now wholly 
inadequate to the needs of our newspaper readers and the at- 
tendance is on the decrease. 

The Children's room, as explained above, is too small 
and not at all adapted to the purpose for which it is used. It 
is a makeshift, and gives a wrong impression of our work with 
children. The Periodical room now has five racks containing 
about 500 current periodicals. It has a seating capacity of 
thirty-two ! Hardly a week passes that we do not search the 
building for available space. I would earnestly urge upon 
your committee the necessity for speedy relief. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin H. Anderson, 

Librarian. 
April 12, 1901. 



31 



2 = 






* 



uz 



SSSIsSIStlllall 1 



is S &JS M lA T W rn » fj ft & 



O^O'tfOP'ir^SiiSFjCiPjt^ 



jsss.ass'S's.^s 



s^a-SaS^S^vXt j 



O ^^^ v^l;^ SpIO 2*S*Sv 







TABLE 3. 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES CATALOGUED, FEBRUARY i, igoo, 

TO JANUARY 31, 1901. 

For Central Library 18,560 

Lawrenceville Branch 2,301 

West End Branch 1,801 

Wylic Avenue Branch 3*038 

Mt Washington Branch 3.058 

Hazelwood Branch 2,853 

Total 31,610 



35 



< 



< 

H 

u 

o 

(z) (/) {Z3 
.J < 

U 



< 



< 

O 

H 
< 

u 
u 

b 
O 

>^ 
< 



o^^naojaj 



• ••••••■••••a 



8 



F^oi 



pooMiazBHl 



•qsBAV -W* 



•aAV -^M 



Pn3 'M 



ainA.T 



|Bj;ua3 



c/) 

C/) 

< 



<5 c^ lO tf r^ t^odvcf «o ^ t^ rv 

M M C4 N M M<g 



00 



"^ « ih ^ rrj PO rrj a> lOOO rrj 



M « M 


m 


OO ^ O^ 


;?; 


•% 




N 


00 


M 


M 



MM M 00 






o>oo po « r> ^i" ^ -"i-HP ^ 



M M cT 



% 

NMMSO>OrOPOCi , ^ 

so O^ 






ICO 00 
O «0 



OVM «n o> 



od 



»O00 fO ^ M m -^f vO Q> O M Q t^ r M 



N -^00 ^ 



tlMM^^NNfO 






SiOt^M(nMMiOMrr)6>*n^l T^ 
m lo fo '^ c N -^ o vo CO o t^ ^ 

n^M^i^ r^rOfOO o»so r^ O ' M 

M <*» ■ CO 



(0 

M 

u 

o 

u 

a 

o 






0) 

p 
o 



09 



(0 



0) 






ai0^c/)Pui2;Dbi-)XHPQb 



o 
H 



1 

2* »* 



V Si 

«•• *•• 

e o 

^^ 
OO 



36 



09 

-a 

H 

3 

u 

o 






pa 






a 
o 

ti 

.S 

.a 



o 



F;oi 



00 0> «ooo Q « 3. ^ o* "'^ JiS" 

fO 5" 5oO t^ O «n N O O>00 ''^ 

00 M N r^OQOQ t** 1^ «0 rrj lO « 



^0 



dfnidAnf 



OQ M r^OtMOO O^M QOO ro\Q 

»o p m c^ -^ <o t> ^vo M 00 00 

M p. O^ « 00 -^O M <^sO 00 t^ 

mso N o o^ o^oo c^ o r^oo m 

MMMM MMMN 

* 



^PPV 



80000 ONO^^Nvp n^^Mi 
^00 CO t^ ^ ^o o -^ a>vD 
M lo^ moo « *C M ir> N o»' 

«T^ O^ t^OO 00 00 O ^^O >p Q> 



-^^ 



PPi 



oiindAnf 



M lO **i o> o> t^ 



^PPV 



0> M M O ^ 



F^OX 



vOMMQ'ONi-'O 
»n t^ N O>00 rrjoO O 
O « fOOO N SO t^ M 



ofinaAnf 



vo o>oo 00 vo po r^ »n 
r^ M 00 M »n o^oo M 



;ppv 



00 mtnr^w 

t^ O^OOO o 



0> ^»n 
<o o>oo 

M O fO 

M M N M « ef « cf 



I 



0) 






0) 



0)^ M<, 



K.-M O » « fl 



bS ;^S)"S.5 






S3 

a 

OS 



v8 






r^ ^ t> m o^ «o »n 

#» •• ^ * •k I ^ 

M CO -^ "^ "^ , 00 



«8' 



m 



M N N N M 



CO 



O 



m 

00 

SO 






M 
O 

i. 

B 



a 



o 
o 



V 



m 

V 

a 

8 
B 

9 

I 

6 

•SI 

Pi 



38 



M 

X 
U 

< 

PQ 

Q 
< 

< 

PQ 



PQ 



H 
25 
M 
U 

O 
(/) 

t/i 
< 

U 

>^ 

O 

H 
< 

D 
U 
OS 

u 



0) 

d 
a 

> 



a 

0) 



J) 

> 

o 

a 

I 



a 
O 



F^oi 



aUndATif 



^PPV 



F^OX 



d|in9ATif 



mpw 



FPX 



a[inaAnf 



^tipv 



F^oX 



dfindAnf 



M^PV 



c/) 

< 






M M N 



C« M M\ONO fOfO^ 



M M M OQ 



m ^^ 00 00 M in>0 

». ^ » *» » ». 

M M N M M lO 



,^ MM ^»ON « t^ 



0> C< 00 Q> M N ^ fO rp S t^ Q 
•^ ro M CI »nNO fnqo 00 O m ^ 



« 



M 9t 



M M-^ ^MNOOOO^'^M 



t^MMN ««^MNO^r«.M 



« 









J M Q t^ 

N M M ^"^N N rn 






«o 



O^ M M M O O 



00 <^ ^NO o M M m (OO vo o 

M MMMfONMMfO 

CO 



OQtnt^MlOM MlDMCO 



a uithfO-H^QNCi'^ONO 

t>.vo «»nwNONt^fOM 

rOMM"<1- t^fO«00 OvvO t^ 



fOQ\«n 



CO 



CO 



•^«oONOMt*»Nm »ovo so »n t^ 
(O M m m »oob m ^ w t^ gj w 
mvo so N N^^WsOsO M *ot^ 

Wmmn eoco«Ot^ ^ ^-^ 0> 







^ 



fO 



so 



I 



?i« 



m 

fO 






5- 



8i"8 



CO 



m 
00 



N SO N 00 "Oinso -^fomoo 00 

N -^ « fOQ N 



M 

o 

0* 



o 
H 



39 



q 



CO 

I 

I 



PQ 
< 






o 
to 

.s 



F^oi 



9{ni9Anf 



^PPV 



p^oi 



9|ni9Anf 



^PPV 



moi 



9^n9Anf 



^PPV 



FPX 



9|in9Anf 



;ppv 






8 

8 



ft"8SSSg8!?^'8.??!?<g 



8 
8 



Ry?«£-!J38?S"SS^p:$' 8 



• • • • 



C4MMM MNMr^'^fOfOC^ 

NO 



i 



»0 N S* & 8nn& 0«N0 S N O 
0> rrj lO O PO 1^00 NO *0 ■^ t^ C> 

M M ei M M MOb 






i 



rn fo«0 <^ M M M g\ M M Qvoo «n 
« Win i^Mwr*«»Mio r*«»*o 






'S 

5 



g» 5 in »o in 6 m'oO ro «^ m ro m 

MM M 00 



!P^»Oe.«-«00 rot^M fOM 
O ^-^tnropi w mfOM M 






m C^00 M O '^vO vO »0 M M M M 
W C^N O N Q l>»00 MQQOO roO> 



NN ONM roOOd M M <^0«C4 
^ fOO fO«COfOM cOOQ M 

M<?j MMM^mM^cr 



in 



00 O^GO 
CO 



M w ^00 -^fOino 



9 



SQOvOnOM t^O POO^M N r><s 

»n M N vo m fo«n t^ ^O^M t^ 



MOO 






M M ro 



tVVO M 00 ON 

ro M N «n t^ 



P SO M 



m 

o 



I 



rOWNMQ-H-fSMNNMM 

MMc^ «NfOMi>*ini^6 






en 

< 




J. 

5 f« 03 



Oouo<c/)fiu2:D(x4SM]H 



rt g 
O U 



O 

H 



40 



*-^ w- 






X 
H 

o 

•I 

♦J ^ 
m *-^ 
<< 

H « 
H 

U 

X 
H 

(Z4 

O 
M 

ID 



(0 

a 
8 

.3 



0^ 



2 

.2 
> 



F^ox 



» w •> » ^^ » ^ » ». » ^ • 



1= 



jddBdsMdfi^ 



»« 









s.aojpnqD 






MOOC 









poipoudj 



M in t^ o> ^ rp o> :f M ^ rj 









oonajdjd^ 



o» wi m N m rooo M 00 m coso 
0> O 00 K -^ rO -^vO W ^0 O fO 



H N 



« M N « 



00 

M 

0* 



98Q 93adJ9p^ 



NO "^^^CO N M Q w Qj^^W 

M M c< »o o M po ^ <n «noo i^ 



<s 



;^s; 



MOO 



0) 

S 
o 

X 



moL 



OiOO 00 POmOvSoO QM fO Q» 

NO r* m mvo do O t^ in m oo ^ 

t^ 0>vO nrj M O O O^ N t^OO <n 

MMMMMMM MMMd 



d^noAnf 



^00 CO fOrOM ^POt^OQ^ 



? 

t^ 



^PPV 



5" ^ O ^ § NO »n "^vo ^ m 5" 
0^^0 MOOvO m 0^f^C^ t^«lO 

O M O 00 00 00 C^OO O O M N 



I 




V4 



W Ui 






P ^ o ^ ^ d 
- "-^o o « 9 



m 



I 



00 






M 

o 



o 
H 




41 



U 

O 
O 

PQ 

00 (Z4 

W ^ 
PQ ifi 



t 



I 

OS 
< 

PQ 

< 

OS 

H 

u 



0) 

u 

a 
S 

OS 



3 

o 
H 



p 



0) 

a 



9 






09 

'o 

> 



r^ nrj O Q ^ M n^ O t^ -^ N CO m 
CO «o Jn in M inoo ej « t^ O i^ 



lON^J-QfONvQN a»>0 -^qp M 

M VO M N M ThO O *nOO NO O VO 



m M « 



n^m-^'ON M « M 



MOO 



8 
8 






u a 



0> 

'o 

> 



. a 



> 






o 

> 



t>M ^o^POMvovo<o ^r»»»nM 
o o^N -^M o mo*o o»n^<n 

• •••••••••••• 

N MN '^NNiOmrO "^Vg 






rOM N "^ 



t>. «1 fO O 0^^0 t^ O 



fO^ C> N N vp M vp NO POOO 0> M 

On a>NO OOoooo w M^ mo 



fO NO 



NO 



N so N do m »nvo -^ rr 



N 



fO 



00 r^ro onq 
fO«nco 

-- »- ** ^ ^ 

« -^N c*10 



«nvo o>QNO^'or>.ONO ^^ o\o\ 

M fO POOO M O^OO vO ^ 0> »OvO CT> 

• ••••••••••• 



s 



S«n o vo M i>» N m mvo vo »n r^ 
*^ \n\n pooo M Q N CO r^ o> N 

mvO vO N W ■^•^NNOvO M rrii>» 



c/) 
c/) 

o 



CO 
M 

u 
o 



a 









fa 




OQLiQic/ia.ZDb»JSH»b. 



8 
8 



I 



00 



8 



00 



8 
8 



M 

o 



3 

o 
H 



42 



TABLE 9. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1900 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September ... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1901 

Total 



Home Use 


f 




.•a 






a 

1 


1 


< 


g 


H 


4.450 


3.076 


7.526 


5»099 


3.345 


8,444 


3»8i9 


2.384 


6,203 


3.362 


1.920 


5.282 


3.384 


1.973 


5.357 


3,365 


1.939 


5.304 


3.273 


1,816 


5.089 


3,317 


1.463 


4.780 


4.212 


2,187 


6,399 


4.654 


2,850 


7.504 


4.678 


2,850 


7.528 


5.380 


2,895 


8,275 


' 48,993 


28,698 


77.691 



Visitors to Reading 
Room 




34,274 60,456 94.730 



TABLE ID. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— ORCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 
Fiction 



General Works... 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science.. 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 



Adult 


Juvenile 




P 




0) 


09 


0S 


8 


SP 


0) 


♦- 


«rf 


a 


fl 




a 


c 


u 


c^ 


V 


c 





{3 






u 


^t^ 


lL 





s 





s 


> 


CU 


> 


dm 


1. 871 


3.82 


364 


1.27 


414 


.84 


24 


.08 


454 


.93 


399 
826 


1.39 


608 


1.24 


2.88 


70 


.14: 


I 


.01 


1.054 


2.15; 


1.239 


4.32 


1,223 


2.50, 


331 


1.15 


1,105 


2.25 


531 


1.85 


3.517 


7.18 


1.382 


4.81 


2.370 


4.84 


1.630 


5.68 


1,661 


3.39 


830 


2.89 


1,600 


3.27 


940 


3.28 


33.046 


67.45 


20,201 
28,698 


70.39 
100.00 


48,993 


100.00 



Total 



8 



O 
> 



2,235 

438 
853 

1.434 

71 
2,293 

1.554 
1,6361 

4.899; 
4.000, 

2,491 
2,540' 

53.247: 



Sf 

a 



2.88 

.56 
1. 10 
1.84 

•09 

2.95 
2.00 

2.11 

6.30 

5.15 
3.21 
3.27 

68.54 



77,691 ' 100.00 



43 



TABLE II. 
WEST END BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1900 



February 

March , 

April 

MsLy 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November. 

December 

January, 1901 

Total 



Home Use 


Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 




rS 






CO 




-3 


i 


•a 


3 


M 

^ 


"3 


•d 


3 


,0 


•d 


M 





< 




H 


< 





H 


2,053 


1,605 


3,658 


2,154 


4,402 


6,556 


2. 141 


1.449 


3,590 


2,169 


4.092 


6,261 


1,461 


1,017 


2,478 


1,628 


2,409 


4.037 


1,387 


773 


2,160 


1,495 


2,134 


3,629 


1,067 


589 


1,656 


1,064 


1,462 


2.526 


1,077 


794 


1 '»®Z' 


1,112 


1.352 


2,464 


1,080 


702 


1,782 


1,078 


1,490 


2,568 


1,160 


526 


1,686 


1,179 


1.757 


2,936 


1,257 


664 


1 1,921 


1,399 


2.424 


3.823 


1,483 


1.048 


2,531 


1,585 


3,079 


4.664 


1,542 


1,028 


2.570 


1,680 


3,045 


4.725 


1,853 


1. 164 


3,017 


1,936 


3,323 


5.259 


17,561 


".359 


28,920 


18,479 


30,969 


49.448 



TABLE 12. 
WEST END BRANCH—CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



Juvenile 



s 



o 

> 



770 
143 

172 

278 

29 
289 
252 
406 

1. 199 
695 
496 

706 
12,126 



17.561 



to 

a 

a 

0U 



4.38 
.81 

.98 
1.58 

.17 
1.65 

1.44 

2.31 

6.83 

3.96 

2.82 

4.02 

69.05 



00 



o 

> 



150 

6 
160 
440 

462 
no 
228 
884 
888 
406 
411 

7.214 



9 
to 

a 

a 



100.00II 11,359 



1.32 

.05 
1.41 
3.88 

4.07 

•97 
2.01 

7.78 
7.82 

3-57 
3.62 

63-50 
100.00 



Total 



s 



o 
> 



920 
149 

332 

718 

29 

751 
362 

634 
2,083 

1.583 
902 

1,117 
19.340 



28,920 



to 

a 

u 

u 

PU 



3.18 

.52 

I.I5 
2.48 

.10 

2.60 

1.25 

2.20 

7.20 

5-47 

3.12 

3.86 

66.87 



100.00 



44 



TABLE 13. 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1900 



Home Use 



3 
< 



February 5»653 

March. 5.666 

April 4.108 

May 3.946 

June 4.028 

uly 4.065 

August 3.869 

September 4.011 

October 4.767 

November I 5.051 

December j 5.120 

January, 1901 j 5.740 

Total i 56,024 



0) 

a 

> 




3.828 
3.767 

3.075 
2,917 

2,972 

2,748 

2,594 

2,097 

2,724 
3,882 

3.930 

3.791 



38,325 






9.481 

9.433 
7.183 
6,863 
7.000 
6,813 

6,463 
6,108 

7.491 
8,9331 
9.0501 

9.531' 

1 

94,3491 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



•3 
< 



3.200 

3.004 

2,413 
2,245 

1.965 
1,625 

1,320 

1.5 

2, 

2,571 
2,158 
2,481 




26.875 



m 

a 

I 

o 



9.875 

".444 
7.410 

6,834 

7.345 
6,691 

5.201 
6,055 
8,433 
10,793 
9.732 
9.728 



99.541 



-a 
e2 



13,075 

14.448 

9.823 

9.079 
9.310 

8,316 

6,521 

7.650 

10,731 

13.364 
11,890 

12,209 
126,416 



TABLE 14. 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



General Works 

Philosophy 

Religion.... 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



Juvenile 




Total 



loaoo 



1 


0) 


1 


tc 


s 


1 


B 


0) 


M 


a 


1 


« 


1 
1 


fiu 


;; 1.673 


1.78 


548 


.58 


1 1.257 


1-33 


2,499 


2.65 


88 


.09 


2,639 


2.80 


1.323 


1.40 


1,676 


1.78 


6,645 


7.04 


6.446 


6.83 


3.147 


3-34 


3.663 


3.88 


62,745 


66.50 


' 94*349 


loaoo 



45 



TABLE IS. 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS 



1900 



Home Use 



3 

< 



June 
uly 

August 

September ... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1901 

Total 



1,780 

i»952 
2,034 
1,872 
2,029 

2,139 
2,094 

2,385 



16,285 



0) 



1,276 

1,319 
1,288 

1,018 

1,256 

i»493 
1,687 

1,715 



11.052 



o 
H 



3.056 

3.271 
3,322 
2,890 
3,285 
3.632 
3.781 
4,100 



27.337 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



3 
< 



3,020 
1,966 
1,888 

1,834 
2,071 

1.933 
1,940 
1,916 



16,568 



g 

o 



4.305 
2,234 
2,006 

1,769 

2,333 
2,902 

2,880 

2,528 



20,957 



o 
H 



7.325 
4.200 

3,894 
3,603 

4,404 

4,835 
4,820 

4,444 



37.525 



TABLE 16. 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



s 



o 
> 



464 
133 
152 
292 
21 
260 
264 
352 
1,191 
752 
592 

791 
11,021 



to 
a 

^-» 

a 

o 

u 



2.85 
.82 

•93 
1.79 

.13 
1.60 

1.62 

2.16 

7.31 
4.62 

3.63 

4.86 

67.68 



16,2851 100.00 



Juvenile 



CO 

0) 



o 

> 



104 

5 
144 

361 

337 
106 

241 
548 
739 
340 
376 
7.751 



11,052 



0) 

be 

o 
u 

0) 



•94 

.05 

1.30 

3.26 

3-05 
.96 

2.18 

4.96 
6.69 
3.08 
3-40 
70.13 



loaoo 



Total 



00 

0) 



o 

> 



568 

138 

296 

653 

21 

597 
370 

593 

1,739 
1,491 

932 

1,167 

18,772 



27,337 



9i 

be 

a 



2.08 

.51 
1.08 

2.39 
.08 

2.18 

1.35 
2.17 

6.36 

5-45 

3-41 
4.27 

68.67 



loaoo 



46 



TABLE 17. 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1900 



August 17 — ^31 
September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1901 

Total 



Home Use 


Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 


^i* 
3 


a 


tal 


^i* 

2 


CO 

a 
£ 
2 




'O 


g 


,0 ! 


•5 


M 





< 


^ 


H 


< 





H 


449 


168 


617 


1,267 


1,722 


2,989 


1. 401 


593 


1,994' 


2.376 


3,201 


5,577 


2,011 


1,396 


3,407, 


2,352 


4,428 


6,780 


2,230 


1,973 


4,203 


1,761 


4,868 


6,629 
5,708 


2ti74 


1,905 


4,079 


1,759 


3,949 


2,480 


1,765 


4,245 


1,854 


3,298 


5,152 


10,745 


7,800 


18,545 


11,369 


21,466 


32,835 



TABLE 18. 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works., 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology , 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts , 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 


Juvenile 




P 




0) 


C0 


s 

a 


CO 
0) 


a 


c 


0) 


Q 


9) 


JJ 





3 


U 


^1^ 


u 


»^ 


u 





0) 





« 


> 


dm 


> 


Pu 


383 


3.57 


42 


.54 


97 


.90 


2 


.03 


89 


.83 


139 


1.78 

3.86 


200 


1.86 


301 


23 


.21 


3 


.04 


174 


1.62 


230 


2.95 


250 


2.33 


126 


I.6I 


206 


1.92 


180 


2.31 


884 


8.23 


431 


5.53 


470 


4.37 


5" 


6.55 


347 


3.23 


234 


3.00 


543 


5.05 


289 


3.70 


7,079 


65.88 


5,312 


68.10 


10,745 


100.00 


7»8oo 


100.00 



Total 



o 
> 



425 

99 

228 

501 
26 

404 
376 
386 

1,315 
981 

581 
832 

12,391 



a 

o 



2.29 

.53 
1.23 

2.70 

.14 

2.18 

2.03 

2.08 

7.09 
5.29 

3.13 

4.49 
66.82 



i8»545' 100.00 



47 



s s 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Gifts to the library* 

From February /, ipoo, to February j, ipoi. 

Givers 560 

Volumes 3,829 

Pamphlets 4,555 

Numbers 6,552 

Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Abbott, Dr Samuel W., Boston, Mass i 

Academy of Science and Art 8 

Adamson, Mr F. G., Chicago, 111 i 

Agnew, Miss Sarah i 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa i 

Allegheny County Workhouse, Hoboken, 

Pa I 

Allen, Col. Edward Jay 2 

Allen, Mr Wm. H., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Allerton, Mr Samuel Waters, Chicago, 111 . i 

AUyn, Dr George W i 

American Agriculturist Library, Spring- 
field, Mass I 

American Anti-Imperialist League 6 . . . . 

American Book Company, New York, 

N. Y . . . . One circular 

American Historical Association i 

American Humane Association 2 

American Institute of Architects 

American Iron and Steel Association i 

American Philatelic Association 7 i 

American School of Osteopathy, Kirksville, 

Mo I 

American Society for the Extension of Uni- 
versity Teaching 9 

American Union League Society i .... 

Amherst College, Amherst^ Mass 2 

Anderson, Mr Edwin H 50 ... . 

Anderson, Mr J. D., representing Silver, 

Burdette and Company 8 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, 

Mass I 

Angell, Dr James B., Ann Arbor, Mich i 

Anonymous 10 11 21 

Ashbridge, Hon. Samuel H., Philadelphia, 

Pa I 

49 



• • • • 



.... 



. . • • 



• • a • 



• • • • 



• . • • 



• . • • 



... a 



.... 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Volt. Pams. Nos 

Associated Charities of Boston, (Mass.) i 

Associated Charities of Cincinnati, (Ohio.) 2 i 

Associated Charities of St. Paul, (Minn.) 2 

Atherton, Mr Geo. W., State College, Pa 2 

Atlantic Coast Line i .... 

Austin, Mr Shirley P 78 

Baker, Mr J. A., Fall River, Mass Col- 
lection of samples of the cotton indus- 
try 

Balch, Mr Edwin Swift, Philadelphia, Pa. . i 

Balch, Mr Thomas Willing, Philadelphia, 

Pa I .... 

Balken, Mr Edward D 28 

Ballard, Mr Harlan H., Pittsfield, Mass i 

Baltimore (Md.) — Mayor's office i 

Barnes, Dr Lemuel Call 4 

Barr, Mr Wm. C. Jr One newspaper, 

1827 

Beezer Brothers 43 .... 

Bellman, Miss Bertha L i 

Bennett College of Eclectic Medicine and 

Surgery, Chicago, 111 i 

Bergman, Mr J. S 13 

Bibliotheque de Y Universite Royale de 

Norvege, Christiania, Norway i .... 

Birmingham (England) — Free Libraries 

Committee i 

Birmingham, (Eng.) Treasurer of the City 

of I 2 

Bissell. Mr John 8 49 

Boardman, Miss Alice, Columbus, O i 

Bollmeier, Mr Fred i .... 

Bolton, Prof. H. Carrington, Washington, 

D. C I 42 

Bom, Mr John i 

Boston (Mass.) Athenaeum 2 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 2 

Boston (Mass.) Transit Commission i 

Boston (Mass.) University 2 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me i 

Brocton (Mass.) Public Library i 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library 2 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library i 

Brooks, Mr John i 

Brown Hoisting Machinery Company, 

Qeveland, O i 

50 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Brown, Mr Edward Osgood, Chicago, 111 i ... 

Brown University, Providence, R. I i ... 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa i ... 

Buchanan, Mr James I . . . . Five maps 

Buck, Hon. A. E., Tokio, Japan i 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Library 3 ... 

Buffington, Hon. Joseph i ... 

Burgoyne, Mr Arthur J i 

Burton, Hon. Theodore E., Washington, 

D. C 2 ... 

California League of Republican Clubs, 

General Convention Committee i ... 

Callaghan and Company, Chicago, 111 i ... 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library i ... 

Cambridge (Mass.) School Committee i . . . 

Canada — Geological Survey .... Three 

maps, and 7 3 ... 

Card, Mr W. W 3 2 

Carleton College, Northfield, Minn i ... 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa i ... 

Carnegie Institute 11 ... 

Carnegie Library, Atlanta, Ga i ... 

Carnegie Museum 6 

Carnegie Public Library, Ayr, Scotland i 

Carnegie Steel Company 6 .... 

Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, 

Ohio I 

Century Company, New York, N. Y . . . . Six 

posters 

Chambers, Mr John S. Jr., Allegheny, Pa 43 

Chandler, Hon. W. E., Washington, D. C. . 

Chantler, Miss Bertha May i .... 

Chautauqua Assembly 2 

Chicago (111.) Academy of Sciences i 

Chicago (111.) Board of Education i 

Chicago (111.) Civil Service Commission . . i 

Chicago (111.) College of Law i 

Chicago (111.) Institute i 

Chicago (111.) Philatelic Association 2 

Chicago (111.) Public Library i 

Church, Mr W. L 4 634 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 

.... Subscription to newspaper 3 

Churchill, Mr L. A i 

Cincinnati (O.) — Commissioner of Water- 
Works 



.... 



.... 



.... 



.... m0 .... 



.... 



.... 



.... 



.... 



.... . • 



SI 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Volt. Pams. Nos. 

Cincinnati (O.) Museum Association i8 

Citizens' Free Library, Halifax, N. S i 

Civic Club of Philadelphia, (Pa.) 3 

Clark, Dr Chas. C P., New York, N. Y. . . i . . . . 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass i 

Qarke & Davies, London, Eng 2 

Qay, Mr Wm., Chicago, 111 4 

Cleveland (O.) Public Library Board 2 

Coal Smoke Abatement Society, London, 

Eng 2 

Colorado^Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion 6 

Colorado — Bureau of Mines 3 

Colorado Society of Sons of the Revolu- 
tion I 

Columbia University, New York, N. Y i 2 

Conant, Mr Wm. Cowper, New York, 

N. Y I . . . . 

Concord (N. H.) Public Library i 

Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Conn. 2 

Cooke, Mr A. W., Rochester, N. Y i 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y 2 

Cornell University — College of Agricul- 
ture, Ithaca, N. Y 11 8 

Cornell University Library, Ithaca, N. Y. . i 2 

Cossitt Library, Memphis, Tenn 3 

Craft, Mrs Chas. C, Crafton, Pa 160 

Craig, Mr Alexander, Chicago, 111 i 

Crane, Mr Walter, Braddock, Pa i 

Crunden, Mr Frederick M., St. Louis, Mo i 

Cust, Dr R. N., London, Eng i 

Daly, Dr Wm. H 4 542 450 

Daniels and Fisher Company, Denver, Col 2 . . . . 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H 4 

Deats, Mr H. E., Flemington, N. J i i 

Democratic Congressional Committee, 

Washington, D. C i 

Democratic National Committee, Washing- 
ton, D. C 6 

Depew, Hon. Chauncey M., New York, 

N. Y I 

Detroit (Mich.) Public Library 11 3 

Dickson, Mr James E., Swissvale, Pa 3 . . . . 

Dodds, Mr Wm. M i 

Doughty, Mr Fred., Saginaw, Mich 

52 



.... 



.... 



.... 



.... 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



2 
2 



• • • • 



Vols. Funt. Not. 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, 

N. J 2 ... 

Eaton, Dr Percival J i ... 

Eddy, Mr H. H i 

Edwards, Miss Fredericka 

Electric Fireproofing Company, New 

York, N. Y 

Emmet, Dr Thomas Addis, New York, 

N. Y 

Engineer Publishing Company, Qeveland, 

Ohio 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 

Erie (Pa.) Public Library 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadel- 
phia, Pa I 35 

Farmer, Prof. James Eugene, Concord, 

N. H 

Fessenden, Prof. Reginald A., Rock Point, 

Md 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111 . . . 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Reading 

Room 2 .... 

Fisher, Miss Kate, Year's subscription to 

"Saturday Evening Post" 

Flood, T. H. and Co., Chicago, 111 i 

Foerster, Mr Ad. M 4 

Ford, Mr Henry Jones i 

Foster, Mrs Frances E 25 .... 

Fourth Avenue Baptist Church i .... 

France — Ministere du Commerce, de Tln- 

dustrie et des Colonies 9 .... 

Franklin and Marshall College, Alumni As- 
sociation 

Eraser and Chalmers, Messrs., Chicago, 111. 
Friends' Book Store, Philadelphia, Pa ... . 
Friends' Free Library and Reading Room, 

Germantown, Pa i 

Frye, Mr Alexis Everett, Havana, Cuba ... i . . . . 

Fuller, Mr Ira C, Brookville, Pa 2 .... 

Fullerton, Mr Alexander, New York, N. Y i 

Gangloff , Dr Chas. L 60 

General Electric Company, Schenectady, 

N. Y 12 .... 

Gilmore, Mr R. L., McKee's Rocks, Pa. . . i 

Good Government, New York, N. Y 11 

Grand Army of the Republic 19 ... . 



2 
2 
2 



S3 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 



14 



• • • • 



I 
I 
I 



25 



• • • • 



Grand Army of the Republic, Department 

of Pennsylvania 

Grand Army of the Republic, Department 

of Pennsylvania, Duquesne Post, No. 

259 

Green, Mr Morris A 

Guthrie, Mrs C. J 

Haggerty, Mr Charles .• 

Hamilton (Ontario) Public Library 

Handy, Mr James Otis .... Seven maps, 

and 18 242 475 

Harper Brothers, Publishers, New York, 

N. Y 

Harrison, Mr Jos. L., as agent of "A. L. A." 
Exhibit at Paris Exposition, 1900. ... 
Four broadsides, and 117 

Hartford (Conn.) Public Library i 

Hartford (Conn.) Steam Boiler Inspection 
and Insurance Company, Year's Sub- 
scription to "Locomotive" 

Hartford (Conn.) Theological Seminary 2 

Hartman, Mr Ernest 7 .... 10 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. ... 2 i 

Harvard University Library, Cambridge, 

Mass 2 

Haskell, Mr Frank W., Niagara Falls, N. Y 2 

Haverhill (Mass.) Public Library i .... 

Heath, Dr George F., Monroe, Mich 24 

Heffern, Rev. A. D i 

Heginbottam Free Library, Ashton-under- 

Lyne, England 

Hennessey, Miss Nelly i 

Henricot, Mr P 2 

Henry, Mr Thomas, New Brighton, Pa. . . 2 

Herriott, Mr Thomas 2 

Herron, Mr Walter C 

Hewitt, Mr Edward G., Brooklyn, N. Y 

Hill, Mr F. Stanhope, Boston, Mass i 

Hirsch, Mr I. E i 

Hodge, Prof. C. F., Worcester, Mass 24 

Hoe, Robert H. & Co., New York, N. Y. 

.... Fifty-six plates, and i .... 

Holland, Dr W. J Miscellany, and .... i 47 105 

Holland Society of New York, (N. Y.) i 

Houghton, Mifflin and Company, Boston, 



.... 



.... 



. • . « 



. • . • 



8 



.... 



.... 



54 



53 



Vols. Pamt. Not. 

Mass .... One hundred and twenty- 
eight plates 

Howard Association, London, Eng ii 

Howard Memorial Library, New Orleans, 

La I .... 

Hoyt, Mr Frank W., New York, N. Y 

Huse, Mr Hiram A i i 

lams, Rev. CM 3 

Illinois — Bureau of Labor Statistics i .... 

Illinois — State Board of Arbitration 2 2 

Illinois State Historical Library, Spring- 
field, 111 3 .... 

Illinois State Library School, Champaign, 

111 I 

Imhoff, Miss Ono M., Newark, N. Y 2 

Indiana — Bureau of Statistics i .... 

Indiana — Department of Geology & Natu- 
ral Resources 3 

Indianapolis (Ind.) Public Library i 

Indianapolis (Ind.) Water Company i 

Iowa Geological Survey i 

Jacobi, Dr Abraham, New York, N. Y i 

Jacobs, Mr Charles 2 .... 

Jacobs, Miss Pansy i .... 

James Prendergast Free Library, James- 
town, N. Y I 

Jenkins, Mr Howard M., Philadelphia, Pa. i 

Jenkins, Mr J. W i .... 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111 3 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md 2 

Johnson, Mr Brigham, Des Moines, Iowa. i 

Jones, Mrs John i .... 

Jone% Dr M. O., Allegheny, Pa t68 i 

Jones, Dr N. E., Circleville, Ohio i .... 

Jordan, Mr John W., Philadelphia, Pa 37 

Keeler, Prof. James E 3 

Keller, Mrs Abraham .... One broadside 

(Declaration of War, June 25, 1812.) 

Keller, Mr E. E., Edgewood Park, Pa 16 2 

Keuffel & Esser Company, New York, 

N. Y I . . . . 

Krupp'sche Bucherhalle, Essen, Germany 2 . . . . 

Lancaster (Mass.), Town Library of i 

Lamed, Mr J. N., Buffalo, N. Y i 

Latham, Mrs R. S 84 

Lavely, Mr Henry A 5 

55 



I 



6 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Vols. Pamt. Nos. 

Lehigh University, Ithaca, N. Y 3 

Leishman, Hon. J. G. A., Beme, Switzer- 
land 2 

Leisser, Mr Martin B., School of Design for 

Women 7 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Stan- 
ford University, Cal i 

Levine, Miss Celia i 

Lewis, Mr J, L . . . . Three manuscript docu- 
ments (Two framed.) 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111 i 

Lick Observatory, Mt. Hamilton, Cal i i 

Lightfoot, Mr F i 

Lindsay, Miss Jane 3 

Litchfield, Dr Lawrence 194 

Littauer, Mr J., Munich, Germany 6 

Liverpool (England) Free Public Library i 

Locke, Mr C. E i 

London (England) Library 9 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Chamber of Commerce i i 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library 2 

Love, Mr James, Camden, N. J i 

Lowell (Mass.) City Library .... One 

broadside 

Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona ... i 

Ludwig, Miss .... One portfolio of prints, 

and 393 

Lyon, Mr W. T i .... 

Macbeth, Mr George A i 

McCandless, Major Wm. G 8 

McClelland, Dr Henry T i 

McConway & Torley Co 14 

McCormick, Messrs. Cyrus H. and Harold 

F I 

McCreery, Mr James R 21 2 

McDonald, Mr A. F i 

Macfarren, Mr Samuel 116 

McGaw, Mr Elmer B i 

McKee, Mrs Samuel 15 

McLoughlin Brothers, New York, N. Y. . 12 .... 
Madison (Wis.) Free Library .... Two leaf- 
lets 

Maiden (Mass.), City of i 

Maiden (Mass.) Public Library i 

Manchester (N. H.), City Library of i 

56 



.... 



.... 



. • . • 



1^ 

w 









• • « 



* * 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Vols. Funt. Not. 

Manchester (England) Public Free Libra- 
ries I 

Marble, Mr Manton, London, Eng i .... 

Marthens, Mr John F i .... 

Maryland Casualty Company ^ i 

Maryland Geological Survey Six maps, 

and 4 .... 

Massachusetts — Bureau of Statistics of La- 
bor 7 I 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Bos- 
ton, Mass I 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

Boston, Mass 2 

Massachusetts — State Board of Health ... i . . . . 

Maury, Mr Dabney H., Peoria, 111 4 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library i 

Mellon, Mr J. A., Tampa, Florida i 

Mellor, Mr C. C, Edgewood Park, Pa. . . . 14 65 7 

Mercantile Library, New York, N. Y i 

Mercantile Library Association, St. Louis, 

Mo 3 

Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, 

Pa I 

Merchants' Association, New York, N. Y i 

Mercy Hospital i 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 

N. Y 2 

Michigan — Commissioner of Mineral Sta- 
tistics I .... 

Michigan — Geological Survey 3 .... 

Michigan — State Board of Health i 3 

Miller, Mr Henry A i 

Miller, Mr J. Kerwin, Parnassus, Pa 15 .... 

Miller, Mr Thomas N i .... 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Library 3 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Public Library i 2 

Minnesota — Chief Fire Warden 5 .... 

Minnesota — Geological and Natural Histo- 
ry Survey 14 14 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo. 11 

Missouri Geological Survey 2 .... 

Missouri Society of Sons of the American 

Revolution i .... 

Monaco, Signor Domenico, Naples, Italy i 

Moses, Mr Adolph, Chicago, 111 i 

57 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, 

Mass I 

Mt. Washington Free Reading Room 

One map, and 1265 842 

Muller, Frederik and Company, Amster- 
dam, Holland i 



Murdoch, Mrs Alexander 2 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass i 

Mutual Life Insurance Company of New 

York (N Y^ i 

Myers, Mr S. A i 

National Cash Register Company, Dayton, 

Ohio 14 

National Direct Legislation League 

National Education Association i 

National Slavonic Society i 

Naya, Mr C, Venice, Italy 2 

Nelson, Mr R. S., Birmingham, Ala 

Neumont, Miss Kate 3 .... 

New Haven (Conn.), Free Public Library 

of I 

New Jersey — Geological Survey .... Eight 

maps, and 12 

New South Wales — Board for Internation- 
al Exchanges i . . . . 

New South Wales — Department of Mines 

and Agriculture, Geog^phical Survey 3 6 

New South Wales — Government Printing 

Office, Sydney, N. S. W i 

New S6uth Wales, Public Library of, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W I 

New York (N. Y.) — Department of Educa- 
tion 2 I 

New York (N. Y.) Free Circulating Libra- 
ry I 

New York (N. Y.) Free Lecture Course i 

New York Monuments Commission for the 
Battlefields of Gettysburg and Chatta- 
nooga 3 

New York (N. Y.) Public Library i 

New York (N. Y.)— School Board for the 
Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx 

New York State, Board of Railroad Com- 
missioners 

58 



347 



12 



...• A .••• 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

New York State College of Forestry, Itha- 
ca, N. Y 6 

New York — State Historian lo i 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. . . 15 38 10 
New York (N. Y.) University, School of 

Pedagogy i 

New York (N. Y.) Zoological Society i 

New Zealand — Registrar General i 

Newark (N. J.), Free Public Library of 2 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 i 

Northern Indiana Historical Society i 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 i 

Oakland (Cal.) Free Library, Trustees i 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, O 4 

Oberlin College Library, Oberlin, O 2 

Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio i 

Oil Well Supply Company i 

Oliphant, Mr F. H., Oil City, Pa One 

map 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Corvallis, Oregon 3 2 

Orth, Mrs M. J., Ben Avon, Pa 240 

O'Shea, Rev. D. J i 

Ottawa (Canada) Literary and Scientific 

Society i .... 

Page, Mr George S . . . . Miscellany, and 28 637 

Page, Mr Oliver Ormsby i 

Parker & Burton, Detroit, Mich i 

Patch, Mrs H. D i 

Pawtucket (R. I.) Free Public Library i 

Penfield, Mr Edward, New York, N. Y . . . . 

Thirty-three posters 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 

Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Pennsylvania, Commonwealth of, — Library 

Dep't, Harrisburg, Pa 47 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of In- 
dustrial Art, Philadelphia, Pa 3 

Pennsylvania Prison Society, Philadelphia, 

Pa I 

Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revo- 
lution I 2 

Pennsylvania — State Normal School, Indi- 
ana, Pa I 

59 



. • • • 



.... 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



I 
I 

3 
I 

I 



I 

4 



Volt. Pams. Not. 

Pennsylvania — Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, Harrisburg, Pa 3 . 

Peoria (111.) Public Library 

Perry Picture Co., Maiden, Mass 

Twelve pictures and descriptive cards 

Pflaum, Mr Magnus, Edgewood Park, Pa. 2 . 

Phelps, Mr Edward Bunnell, New York, 

N. Y 

Philadelphia (Pa.) City Institute 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Commercial Museum . . i 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Free Library 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Times 

Phillips, Mr W H i . 

Pierpoint, Mrs Albert E . . . . Subscription 

to a periodical, and i . 

Pittsburgh and Allegheny Free Kindergar- 
ten Association 

Pittsburgh Architectural Club 5 . 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 

Pittsburgh — Central Board of Education 

Pittsburgh, City of 10 . 

Pittsburgh Conservatory of Music 

Pittsburgh — Department of Public Safety 3 . 

Pittsburgh Exposition Society 

Pittsburgh Press 6 

Piatt, Mr John I., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Polk, R. L. and R. L. Dudley, Publishers . . i . . . . 

Pope, Mr J. William .... Three broadsides, 

and 

Porter, Mr H. K 4 26 

Portland (Ore.) Library Association i .... 

Potomac Steel Company 92 

Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn, 

NY I .... 

Presbyterian Board of Publication 2 . . . . 2 

Presbyterian Church, Board of Foreign 

Missions i .... 

Presbyterian Mission House, New York, 

NY 

Protestant Orphan Asylum, Allegheny, Pa 25 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum i 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library i 

Puget Sound Bureau of Information, Se- 
attle, Wash 

Quinon, Mr Stephen .... Picture, and .... 2 58 

60 



I 
I 
I 



8 
13 



20 



2 
42 



12 



• • • • 



Voli. Panif. Not. 

Reader. Mr Frank S., New Brighton, Pa. . i i 

Reading (Pa.) Public Library i 

Record Commissioners, Providence, R. I . . i .... 

Reform Club, New York, N. Y i 

Reinhart, Mr Albert G i 

Republican National Committee 75 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y i 

Rhode Island Normal School, Providence, 

R. I I 

Rickenbaugh, Mr Daniel 7 .... 

Riddle, Dr Matthew B., Allegheny, Pa i 

Robinson, Gen. Wm. A i .... 

Ronbroke Press, Los Angeles, Cal i .... 

Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, 

Indiana i 

Russell, Mr E. H 

Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J 2 

Rynearson, Prof. Edward 12 

Sahm, Dr Wm. K. T 519 

St. Giles Public Library, London, England i . . . . 

St. John, Rev. Chas. E., Boston, Mass 26 

St. Joseph (Mo.) Free Public Library 2 

St. Louis (Mo.) Architectural Qub i 

St. Louis (Mo.) Public Library i 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library i 

San Francisco (Cal.) Public Library i 

San Francisco (Cal.) Theological Seminary .... i 
Sanford, Mr P. B .... One genealogical 

document 

Schenectady (N. Y.) Free Public Library i 

Schwartz, Mr J. L One photograph, 

and 7 

Scott, Mrs William 86 

Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, N. Y. 

.... Six posters 

Seattle (Wash.) Public Library ^ 

See, Mr James W., Hamilton, Ohio i ..." 

Seward, Mr George F., New York, N. Y 

Shaw, Dr W. C 8 ... 

Sheib, Mr Chas. F., Jennerstown, Pa 

Newspaper (Jan. 4, 1800.) 

Sherrard, Rev. Thos. Johnson, Chambers- 
burg, Pa I 

Shields, Mr J. M One newspaper, 

March 2Sth, 1836 

61 



• • . . 



.... 



.... 



.... 



Voli. Pams. Nos. 

Singh, H. H. Raja Sir Amar, Saheb Baha- 
dur. Svinagar, Kashmir i 

Smith, Mr Denison B., Toledo, Ohio i .... 

Smith, Mr Edwin Z i .... 

Smith, Col. Norman M . . . . One hundred 

and ninety-one maps, and 127 .... i 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass .... i . . . . 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 3 i . . . . 

Society of Mayflower Descendants in Penn- 
sylvania I 

Society of Mayflower Descendants in the 

State of N. Y 2 

Society of the Army of the Cumberland ... 19 

South Side Hospital, Directors of the i .... 

Southbridge (Mass.) Library Committee i . . . . 

Sprague, Prof. H. B., East Orange, N. J i .... 

Springiield (Mass.) — City Library Associa- 
tion I .... 

Stark, Mr Coloman 13 

Starr Engineering Company, New York, 

N. Y 

Steams, Mr Fiank Preston, Philadelphia, 

Pa 5 

Stechert, Mr Gustav E., New York, N. Y. . 2 

Stevens, Mr B. F., London, England 4 

Stifiel, Mr Eli 11 

Stockbridge, Mr G. H i 

Stoney, Mr R. J., Jr i 

Stouffer, Mr John O i 

Sturtevant, B. P., Company, Boston, Mass. i 

Sunset Club, Chicago, 111 

Super, Dr Chas. W., Athens, O i 

Swank, Mr James M., Philadelphia, Pa. . . . i 
Tanaka, Mr I., Imperial Library, Tokio, 

Japan 

Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Compa- 
ny, Birmingham, Ala i 

Thurston Preparatory School 

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, 

New York, N. Y 

Tobin, Father F. L i 

Towle Manufacturing Company, Newbury- 

port, Mass i 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn 

Trump, Miss Isabell 4 

62 



I 
I 

I 
I 

I 

I 

I 
4 

I 



• • • • 



I 
169 

lOI 



2 

9 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Trustees of the Phoebe A. Hearst Architec- 
tural Plan, University of California, 
Berkeley, Cal i 

Tufts College, Medford, Mass 

Tugman and Company, Philadelphia, Pa . . i 

Union Theological Seminary, New York, 

N. Y 

United States — Department of Agriculture 8 

United States — Department of Agriculture, 

through Hon. John Dalzell 2 

United States — Bureau of American Eth- 
nology 

United States — Civil Service Commission 

United States Commission to the Paris Ex- 
position of 1900 

United States Government 295 

United States — Government printing office 

United States Government, through Hon. 
John Dalzell 

United States — Department of the Interi- 
or. .. . Ninety-five maps, four broad- 
sides, and 8 55 

United States — Department of the Interi- 
or, through Hon. John Dalzell 34 6 

United States — Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission 6 .... 

United States — Library of Congress 3 27 

United States — Director of the Mint, 

through Hon. John Dalzell 12 i 

United States — Naval Academy, Annapo- 
lis, Md 

United States — Navy Department i 

United States — Navy Department, Bureau 

of Construction and Repairs i 

United States — Navy Department, through 

Hon. John Dalzell i 

United States — Department of State 3 

United States — Department of State Li- 
brary 

United States — Treasury Department 9 

United States — Treasury Department, 

through Hon. John Dalzell 34 

United States — ^War Department 11 

United States — War Department, through 

Hon. John Dalzell 4 

University Geological Survey of Kansas ... 4 

63 



• . . • 



I 

8 



.... 



.... 



31 

I 
16 

7 
32 



173 



Volt. Pams. No8. 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal i 

University of Chicago, (111.) 3 

University of Illinois, Champaign, 111 i 

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 6 

University of Maine, Orono, Me i 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich 2 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 

Minn i i 

University of Montana, Missoula, Mont i 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb 7 

University of Nebraska, Library of, Lin- 
coln, Neb 2 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 

Pa 2 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. i .... 
University of the State of New York, Alba- 
ny, N. Y 5 I 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt i 

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash i 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis 6 

Valentine Museum, Richmond, Va i 

Vandergrift Land and Improvement Com- 
pany 2 

Vandersaal, Mr S. W 12 .... 

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y 2 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana i 

Wagner Electric Manufacturing Company, 

St. Louis, Mo 17 

Walker, Dr R. L., Carnegie, Pa 2 

Ward, Dr R. H., Troy, N. Y i 

Warner, Mr George E., Minneapolis, Minn 4 

Warner and Swasey, Messrs., Cleveland, 

Ohio I 

Warvelle, Mr George W. Chicago, 111 3 

Washington Heights Free Library, New 

York, N. Y I 

Watkins, Mr J. Elfreth, Washington, DC 2 

Watson, Mr Wm. Richard 4 

Weeks, Mrs Joseph D 939 1852 355 

Weldin, J. R. and Company 4 i 

Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass 2 

West Virginia — ^Agricultural Experiment 

Station, Morgantown, W. Va 16 

West Virginia Geological Survey, Morgan- 
town, W. Va I .... 

64 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Western Pennsylvania Institution for the 

Blind i 

Western Reserve University, Qeveland, 

Ohio i 

Western University of Pennsylvania, Alle- 
gheny, Pa I 

Westinghouse, Mr George 7 . . . . 

Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing 

Company 26 

Weyman, Mr B. Frank 114 4 

Wilcox, Mr William A., Scranton, Pa i 

Willadt, Mr Carl, Pforzheim, Germany ... i . . . . 

Willard, Miss E. M 6 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute Free Library i 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission, Mad- 
ison, Wis .... One book mark, one 
document (Governor's proclamation), 
and 2 

Wisconsin — State Historical Society, Mad- 
ison, Wis 2 

Wisconsin — State Supt. of schools, Madi- 
son, Wis 4 

Woman's Club, Chicago, 111 2 

Woman's Education Association, Boston, 

Mass 12 

Women's Clubs of Pittsburgh and Vicinity, 

Joint Committee i 

Women's Educational and Industrial Un- 
ion, Boston, Mass 2 

Wood, Wm. and Company, New York, 

N. Y 

Woods, Mr Edward A Five newspa- 
pers (181 5, 1826, 1848, 1850, 1852.) 6 

Yale Forest School, New Haven, Conn i 

Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wis. . i 12 

Young Men's Christian Association, Inter- 
national Committee, New York, N. Y. i . . . . 

Young Men's Civic Club i 

Zoe Publishing Company, San Diego, Cal 

Pertodkali and Newspapen Received as Gtfte* 

Advocate of Peace. 

Alleghenier und Pittsburger Sonntagsbote. 

Aluminum World. 

American. 

American Iron and Steel Association. Bulletin. 



American Journal of Philately. 

American Manufacturer and Iron World. 

American Society of Civil Engineers. Proceedings. 

Arbejderen. 

Assembly Herald. 

Ave Maria. 

Baptist Home Mission Monthly. 

Baptist Missionary Magazine. 

Biblia. 

Bossburg Journal. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Bureau of American Republics. Monthly Bulletin. 

Cambridge Encyclopedia. 

Charities. 

Chicago Banker. 

Christian Cynosure. 

Christian Register. 

Christian Science Journal. 

Christian Science Sentinel. 

Christian Social Union. Publications. 

Christian Statesman. 

Church News. 

Cleveland Citizen. 

C. M. B. A. News. 

Coal and Coke. 

Columbia University Quarterly. 

Commerce and Finance of the United States. Monthly 

Summary. 

Commerce of the Island of Cuba. Monthly Summary. 

Commerce of the Island of Porto Rico. Monthly Summary. 

Commerce of the Philippine Islands. Monthly Summary. 

Commoner and Glassworker. 

Congressional Record. 

Criterion. 

Denver Evening Post. 

Elizabeth Herald. 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania. Proceedings. 

The Era, Cornell University. 

Freedom. 

Freidenker, Milwaukee. 

Freiheits-Freund. 

Fresno Guide. 

Good Government. 

Herald of the Golden Age. 

High School Journal 

Home Mission Monthlv. 

66 



Home Monthly. 

Illustrated Official Journal. (Patents.) London. 

Index of Pittsburg Life. 

Indianapolis News. 

Jerseyman. 

Jewish Criterion. 

Kingsley House Record. 

Lafayette. 

L. A. W. Bulletin. 

The Library, Pittsburgh. 

Lietuvis. Philadelphia. 

Literary News. 

The Locomotive. 

Mekeel's Weekly Stamp News. 

Mining and Engfineering Review and Electrician. 

Modern Mexico. 

Money. 

Monthly Gazette of English Literature. Stechert. 

National Glass Budget. 

National Single Taxer. 

New Century. 

New Philosophy. 

New York Railroad Club. Official Proceedings. 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. 

Official Railway Guide of Pittsburgh. 

Oil City Derrick. 

Oil Era. Los Angeles. 

Pennsylvania Medical Journal. 

People. 

Philadelphia Press. 

Philatelic Advocate. 

Pittsburgh Banker. 

Pittsburgh Bulletin. 

Pittsburgh Catholic. 

Pittsburg Christian Advocate. 

Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. 

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette. 

Pittsburg Daily News. 

Pittsburg Dispatch. 

Pittsburg Leader. 

Pittsburg Neue Welt. 

Pittsburg Post. 

Pittsburg Press. 

Pittsburg Times. 

Pittsburger Volksblatt. 

Pratt Institute Monthly. 

Presbyterian Banner. 



Public. Chicago. 

Quiet Observer. 

Railroad Officials. Pocket List. 

Remarques. 

Rose Technic. 

Saint Andrew's Cross. 

Saturday Evening Post. Philadelphia. 

Smith College Monthly. 

Sound Currency. 

Sparks from the Crescent Anvil. 

Spirit of Missions. 

Stowell's Petroleum Reporter. 

Sunny South, Atlanta. 

Superior Leader. 

Svenska Amerikanska Posten. 

Svenska Veckobladet. 

Telephone Magazine. 

Theosophical Review. 

Tidings. 

Tin and Terne. 

Trade Marks Journal. London. 

Truth. 

United States, Department of Labor. Bulletin. 

United States Public Documents. Catalogue. 

Universal Brotherhood Path. 

University of Pennsylvania. University Bulletin. 

University of Tennessee Record. 

Vassar Miscellany. 

Venezuelan Herald. 

Weekly Philatelic Era. 

Western University Courant 

Woman's Home Missions. 

Women's Missionary Magazine. 

Libraries and other Institutions whose Publications are Received in Exchange*. 

Amherst College Library, Amherst, Mass. 
Boston Public Librafv, Boston, Mass. 
Brockton Public Library, Brockton, Mass. 
Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn. 
Brookline Public Library, Brookline, Mass. 
Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Buffalo Public Library, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Cambridge Public Library, Cambridge, Mass. 
Carnegie Library, Braddock, Pa. 
Carnegie Library, Homestead, Pa. 
Cincinnati Museum Association, Cincinnati, O. 
Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland, O. 

68 



Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 
Fitchburg Public Library, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Hartford Public Library, Hartford, Conn. 
Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Mo. 
Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Lowell City Library, Lowell, Mass. 
Maiden Public Library, Maiden, Mass. 
Manchester City Library, Manchester, N. H. 
Manchester Public Free Libraries, Manchester, England. 
Mechanics' Institute Library, San Francisco, Cal. 
Medford Public Library, Medford, Mass. 
Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Minneapolis Public Library, Minneapolis, Minn. 
New Bedford Free Public Library, New Bedford, Mass. 
New Haven Free Public Library, New Haven, Conn. 
New London Public Library, New London, Conn. 
New York Public Library, New York, N. Y. 
Newark Free Public Library, Newark, N. J. 
Omaha Public Library, Omaha, Neb. 
Osterhout Free Library, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Philadelphia Free Librar>% Philadelphia, Pa. 
Portland Public Library, Portland, Oregon. 
Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Providence Libraries, Providence, R. I. 
Quincy Free Public Library, Quincy, 111. 
Salem Public Library, Salem, Mass. 
San Francisco Free Public Library, San Francisco, Cal. 
Scranton Public Library, Scranton, Pa. 
Seattle Public Library, Seattle, Wash. 
Somerville Public Library, Somerville, Mass. 
Springfield City Library, Springfield, Mass. 
United States Department of Agriculture Library, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Warren County Library, Monmouth, 111. 
Westfield Atheneum, Westfield, Mass. 
Wisconsin Free Library Commission, Madison, Wis. 



69 



Report of the Superintendent of Buildings* 

To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds : 

Gentlemen : — I beg to submit a brief report of the condi- 
tion of the buildings and grounds entrusted to my care. 

The same effort has been made during the year as here- 
tofore to keep them in thorough repair. AH places showing 
signs of wear are immediately cared for, special pains being 
taken to preserve finish and decoration in their original con- 
dition. 

In the machinery department no accidents have oc- 
curred, no expensive repairs have been made and none are 
needed 

The Mount Washington and Hazelwood branches were 
opened May 31 and August 16, respectively. All work inci- 
dental to their completion and equipment has been done. 
The lots have been graded and sown in lawn seed, and where 
necessary, substantial iron fences have been erected. At 
these two buildings, together with the one in the West End, 
the grounds have been further improved by planting trees 
and shrubs. 

The light plant installed at the Hazelwood branch has 
proved to be entirely satisfactory, being economical in opera- 
tion, and giving superior service. 

It may be of interest to note that the aggregate attend- 
ance in the Music Hall for the year was 182,733 people. 

In the Lecture Hall there were eighty-forur free lectures 
and musical recitals given, and thirty-four for which rentals 
were collected as follows : 

30 evenings at $12.50 $37S.oo 

2 evenings at 20.00 40.00 

I evening at 25.00 25.00 

I afternoon at 10.00 10.00 

Total $450.00 

Very respectfully, 

Chas. R. Cunningham, 

Superintendent of Buildings. 
April 12, 1901. 

70 



Report of the Manager of Music Hall* 

To the Committee on Mt4sic Hall : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of the Music 4all for the year ending January 31, 
1901. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 

Pay Rntfftalniriiffftii 

Forenoon Evening 

or Afternoon 

Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 18 18 

Art Society, $50 rate 8 

Mozart Club, $50 rate 5 

Apollo Club, $100 rate 3 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, 

$75 rate 2 3 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, 

$100 rate 25 

Conventions, at educational rates, $75. . . 4 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 6 

24 68 

Total income from rentals as above $6,975.00 

Use of organ, one time 25.00 

$7,000.00 

Expenditures for the Hall for the year were. . .$8,540.09 

Free organ recitals by Frederic Archer, established when 
the Hal! was opened, have been continued weekly on Satur- 
day evenings and Sunday afternoons, and one special recital 
was given on New Year's Day. Six of the evening recitals 
were preceded by lectures by Mr Archer. No recitals, how- 
ever, were given during the months of July, August and Sep- 
tember. 

Afternoon Erening 

The total number of organ recitals dur- 
ing the year was 39 38 

FmUieolHalL 

The annual commencement of the Pittsburgh High 
School, evening of June 28. 

71 



Founder's Day, Carnegie Institute, afternoon of No- 
vember I. 

Pittsburgh Teachers' Institute, afternoons of December 
7 and 8 

Museum Department of Carnegie Institute, evening of 
December 17. 

Total Um of HaH During the Year. 

Forenoon Evening 

or Afternoon 

Pay entertainments . 24 68 

Free organ recitals 39 38 

Miscellaneous 3 2 

66 108 

In GeneraL 

The Hall was not used on Sunday except for organ re- 
citals. 

During the year all contracts made with the Manager 
were kept and there are no rentals uncollected. 

The total receipts show a slight total increase over last 
year. While the number of pay entertainments at the full 
rate was reduced, owing particularly to the increase in local 
musical attractions, for which the small rate of $50 is paid as 
rent, there was a large increase in the use of the Hall by local 
organizations having the special $100 rate. 

The prospect for the current year is that the Hall will be 
continued in use by the societies now looking upon it as a 
home, and there should be a further increase in its general 
use apart from that for musical purposes. 

I have to report satisfactory service from the attendants 
under my control, namely the doorkeepers and ushers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. H. Wilson, 

Manager. 
April 16, 1901. 



72 



Report of the Director of Music* 

To the Committee on Music Hall : 

Gentlemen : — It affords me much gratification to be able 
to report the ever increasing success of the bi-weekly organ 
recitals during the fiscal year ending January 31, 1901. 
Their educational value is now fully understood and appreci- 
ated, and the real growth of musical taste fostered by their 
aid, has been amply demonstrated by practical results. One 
significant proof of this fact is afforded by the numerous let- 
ters I receive requesting the insertion in forthcoming pro- 
grammes of certain compositions, the works named now be- 
ing of a far higher grade than those similarly asked for in pre- 
vious seasons. 

During the year I have given yy recitals which have 
been attended by upwards of 77,000 persons. The Sunday 
audiences invariably crowd the auditorium beyond its legiti- 
mate capacity. The largest attendance was on December 2, 
1900, when according to official record 3,000 persons were 
present. 

On Saturday evenings, when the programmes are chiefly 
made up of works essentially aesthetic in character, a large 
contingent of music students and organists are regularly 
present, the majority of whom have never missed one of these 
occasions. 

In order to develop the musical instincts of the people 
en masse, the adoption of a repertoire of diverse character is 
absolutely necessary, for by such means alone can universal 
interest be aroused and catholicity of taste promoted. My 
Sunday programmes are therefore constructed on this plan, 
altho all music of low or vulgar character is rigidly excluded. 

During the series of 77 recitals, I have played 632 com- 
positions, selected from the best products of every school of 
composition both ancient and modem, 152 of which were ab- 
solutely new or heard here for the first time. Of these works, 
298 were specially written for the instrument ; 272 were tran- 
scriptions of orchestral and miscellaneous productions, and 
62, overtures. 

In order to afford an idea of the unprecedented success 
of this department of educational usefulness of which Carne- 
gie Institute is the centre, it is only necessary to state that the 

7i 



entire series of 407 recitals to date, at which 2,823 musical 
compositions have been performed, have attracted upwards 
of 381,000 persons. 

This record has no parallel either in Europe or America. 

In April I delivered my annual course of six musical lec- 
tures, illustrated on both organ and piano, when I dealt with 
the following subjects: musical construction; musical culture; 
neglected composers; the growth of the opera; Wagner and 
his theories, and the music of the nations. 

I have also to report certain repairs and additions to the 
mechanical accessories of the organ in the Music Hall, in- 
volving a re-arrangement of the combination pedals, and the 
insertion of four new sj^ets of pneumatics, with necessary elec- 
trical connections, to replace the one set hitherto used to 
operate the manual pistons. Five years' wear and tear had 
rendered this one set (always overtaxed) inadequate for the 
fulfilment of its intended purpose. 

This work has been satisfactorily executed by the Votey 
Company at a cost of $400, an expenditure previously au- 
thorized by you. 

On January 5, when the 400th recital took place, the 
customary Souvenir Book was issued, a copy of which I send 
herewith to supplement the information contained in this re- 
port. 

Respectfully yours, 

Frederic Archer, 

Director of Music. 

April 10, 1901. 



74 



Report of the Finance G>mniittee* 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Your Finance Committee respectfully reports that there 
is no change from their last annual report; that they have in 
their possession the nineteen first mortg^age, five per cent, 
gold-loan of 1890, bonds of the Pittsburg, Shenango and 
Lake Erie Railroad Company, of the par value of one thou- 
sand dollars each, being the investment of the Bemd Fund. 
These bonds, together with the deeds for the properties pur- 
chased for branch libraries — namely, from William Schutte 
et ux,26th ward property; Ira M. Burchfield et ux., 23d 
ward property; Frank Le Moyne, and William G. Sawyer, 
and Harry P. Ford et ux., Thomas McCartan et al., and 
George D. Edwards, nth ward property; Joseph M. Taylor 
and Emma Taylor et al, 36th ward property, and the Wash- 
ington Sub District School to City of Pittsburgh property; 
are deposited in Box 7106 Fidelity Title and Trust Co. vaults. 

The coupons of bonds have been regularly handed over 
to the Treasurer, for which we have his receipt. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Pitcaim, 

Chairtnan. 
April 16, 1901. 



75 



Report of the Treasurer^ 

Condensed statement of C. M. Schwab, Treasurer, for 
the year ending January 31, 1901. 

Revenue* 

Surplus from last year $11,005.85 

Appropriation from City of Pitts- 
burgh 126,000.00 

Home Library Fund : 

Contributions from various persons 130.05 

Music Hall Rentals 7*070.75 

Lecture Hall Rentals 450.00 

Library collections : 

Central Library $1,179.06 

Lawrence ville branch . . . 208.91 

West End branch 101.23 

Wylie Avenue branch . . . 286.52 
Mt. Washington branch. . 57.76 
Hazelwood branch 36.88 

1,870.36 

Children's Librarians* Training Class 

Tuition fees 200.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 508.74 

Total revenue $147,235.75 

Disposftioiu 

For approved vouchers Nos. i and 
3,505 to 35 and 4,368 inclusive : 

Central Library* 

Building department. 
Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense $27,906.28 

Library department. 

Operating labor and 

running expense ....$36,246.74 
Machinery and furniture. 5,1 17.23 
Books purchased 17,982.65 

59,346.62 

76 



Music hall department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $ 8,540.09 

Accounting and treasury departments. 
Operating labor and running ex- • 

pense 402.25 

Executive department. 

Running expense 68.08 

Branch Libraries* 

Lawrenceville. 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $1,671.31 

Library department. 

Operating labor and run- 
ning expense $ 3,722.63 

Books purchased 2,663.85 

6,386.48 

West End. 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense 1,525.90 

Library department. 

Operating labor and 

running expense $ 2,644.74 

Books purchased 2,072.56 

4,717-30 

Wylie Avenue. 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense 1,951.81 

Library department. 
Operating labor and 

running expense $ 4,470.98 

Books purchased 3,452.01 

7,922.99 

Mount Washington. 

Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense 1,263.85 

Library department. 
Operating labor and 

running expense $ 2,207.60 

Books purchased 2,785.58 

4,99318 

77 



Haselwood. 
Building department. 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $ 1,219.73 

Library department. 

Operating labor and 
running expense ....$ 1,750.96 

Furniture 531-95 

Books purchased 2,689.39 

4,972.30 

Home Libraries. 

Furniture, repairs and run- 
ning expense $ 18867 

Books purchased 99-83 

288.50 

Trusti. 

Carnegie Fund. 

Books purchased 4,948.37 

Children's Libranans' Training Class 
Fund. 

Tuition fees 155.00 

138,280.04 

Surplus $ 8,955.71 

The surplus consists of the following 
balances : 

Balance of contribution from An- 
drew Carnegie, not yet expended, $5,756.78 

Contribution from McConway & 

Torley Co., not yet expended. . . 300.00 

Balance of Children's Librarians' 
Training Qass Fund, not yet 
expended 45.00 

Surplus over purchases and expenses 
of the Carnegie Library, exclu- 
sive of funds 2,853.93 

8,95571 

J* D* Bemd Fund* 

Condensed statement of C. M. Schwab, Treasurer, for 
the year ending January 31, 1901. 

Revenue* 

Surplus from last year $ 34.36 

Interest on Pittsburgh, Shenango & 

Lake Erie R. R. Co. bonds 950.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 7.66 

• $ 992.02 

78 



^%t tAt — 

LntpomOtU 

Books purchased 585.84 



Suq>lus $ 406.18 



Ji J^ Ji 



Report of the Auditing G>mmittee* 

W. N, Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir : — In the absence of the other member of the 
Auditing Committee, I have, through assistants, examined 
and checked the accounts of the Treasurer of the Carnegie 
Library, including the Bemd Fund, and find vouchers for all 
expenditures in regular form, and the accounts correct ac- 
cording to the report of the Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. W. Mellon, 

Chairman. 
April 16, 1 901. 



79 



Sixth Annual Reports 
To the Bpard <rf Trustees 



6( the 



Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 31, 1902 



J 902 



i] 



Sixth Annual Reports 

To the Boarcl o{ Trustees 

ol the 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 31, J902 



J 902 



b 
i 

f 



5 







a- 
r 






^ 



. \ 



I < 



16 



r 



> ' ' 



■f 



■♦ 






> . 



* 



\ 



r 



'' " ■* 



; . 



i 



i c 



* *• ' • 



/ ' 



15 



16 



^ 



u 



1 ' » 



/, 



.1 



i 



i ■ 



*^ 



•I 
1 



.! 




16 



16^ 



r 



Sixth Annual Reports 
To the Board of Trustees 



of die 



Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 31, 1902 



1902 



Board of Trustees 

W. N. FREW, President 
ROBERT PITCAIRN, Vice-president 
J. F. HUDSON, Secretary 
W. E. COREY, Treasurer 



HON. J. O.BROWN* 
JAMES M. CLARK 
W. E. COREY 
R. H. DOUGLAS 
E. M. FERGUSON 
W. N. FREW 
J. F. HUDSON 
JOHN S. LAMBIE 
MAX G. LESLIE* 

Finance GMXunfttee 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman 

HON. J. O. BROWN 



GEORGE A. MACBETH 
DAVID McCARGO* 
W. H. McKELVY 
W. A. MAGEE 
A. W. MELLON 
W. I. MUSTIN 
ROBERT PITCAIRN 
H. K. PORTER 
J. P. STERRETT 



E. M. FERGUSON 



G>mmfttee on Music Hall 

W. A. MAGEE, Chairman H. K. PORTER 

J. P. STERRETT 

Committee on Btiildingfs and Gtotmds 

MAX G. LESUE, Chairman J. F. HUDSON 

W. E. COREY 



Gunmitteeon Libraiy 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, Chairman 

R. H. DOUGLAS 



W. H. McKELVY 



Atiditingf G>mmittee 
A. W. MELLON, Chairman JOHN S. LAMBIE 

Ezectitiye Staff 



EDWIN H. ANDERSON, 

Librarian 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM, 

Supt. of Buildings 



FREDERIC ARCHER*, 

Director of Music 

GEO. H. WILSON, 

Manager of Music Hall 



^HoiL W. J. Diebl and Hon. A. M. Brown •enred for portions of the jear. 
*J. Guy McCandkM Mrred for a portion of the year. 



I 



Contents 

Map Showing the Activities of the Library - Frontispiece 

Page 

Report of the President --------7 

Report of the Committee on Administration of the Li- 
brary ----------- g 

Report of the Librarian - - - - - - - -10 

Library Staff ----------30 

Statistical Tables ---------33 

Gifts to the Library --------52 

Report of the Superintendent of Buildings - - - - 68 

Report of the Manager of Music Hall 69 

Report of the Finance Committee ------ 72 

Report of the Treasurer 74 

Report of the Auditing Committee ------ 78 



<* 



Report of the President 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: 

Gentlemen : — I transmit herewith the reports of the vari- 
ous Committees of the Board covering the administration of 
the library system during the fiscal year ending January 31, 
1902. From them you will learn that the results obtained 
have been fully as gratifying as heretofore. The five branches 
together with the Central Library have been in operation for 
the full year and seem to have given entire satisfaction in the 
various districts served by them. All the buildings and prop- 
erty under control of the Board are in excellent condition 
and repair. The cause of musical education suffered a serious 
loss in the death, on October 22 last, of the distinguished or- 
ganist and composer, Frederic Archer. Beginning Novem- 
ber 5, 1895, Mr. Archer gave nearly 500 free organ recitals in 
the Music Hall, the educational value of which can hardly be 
overestimated. The Committee on Music Hall was fortunate 
in being able to fill the vacancy in a most satisfactory manner, 
and with but slight delay. Mr. Edwin H. Lemare, organist 
of St. Margaret's, Westminster, London, was tendered the 
position and accepted it. His contract covers a period of five 
years from March i, 1902, terminable at any time by either 
party on six months notice. 

During the fall a strong demand came from the East End 
district for the erection of the branch library building planned 
for that section. The Board recognized the justice of the de- 
mand, and a piece of ground lying at the intersection of Lari- 
mer Avenue and Station Street, in the 19th ward, was selected 
by a Committee of the Board appointed to act with the 
librarian, and purchased for the sum of $36,000. Plans for 
the building have been prepared, and it is hoped that it may 
be placed under construction this spring and made ready for 
use in the first half of the year 1903. The building as pro- 
posed is much the largest of the branches, as the population 
to be served is double in number that of any other district, 

7 



and the cost of erection is therefore proportionally increased. 
Sufficient money did not remain in the building fund to meet 
this increase, but Mr. Carnegie has, with his accustomed gen- 
erosity, more than made up the deficiency, and with his as- 
sistance the building will be erected as planned. When this 
is done, the Upper South Side branch will be the only one of 
the system, as originally planned, remaining. The erection 
of this building has been delayed for the reason that the peo- 
ple are not satisfied with the site purchased by the Board, but 
wish it placed on the piece of ground at the intersection of 
Twenty-second and Carson streets, which the City has under- 
taken to convert into a public park or square. 

The City of Pittsburgh appropriated for the maintenance 
of the library system during the fiscal year beginning Febru- 
ary I, 1902, the sum of $131,000. At that date the balances 
remaining unexpended in the various funds amounted to 
$8,988.01, making a total of $139,988.01. In accordance with 
the provision of the by-laws your Executive Committee has 
appropriated the sum as follows : — 

Maintenance of library system $65,400.00 

Purchase of books 25,600.00 

Maintenance of buildings 33,000.00 

Music Hall emergency fund 1,500.00 

Contingent fund 14,488.01 

Great and annoying delay has been experienced in secur- 
ing the ground needed for the extension of the Central 
Library building. The property has been condemned, but 
three of the owners have filed bills in equity attacking the 
right of the City, under the circumstances as claimed, to insti- 
tute condemnation proceedings. A decision of the lower 
court has been obtained favorable to the City, and it is ear- 
nestly hoped that the litigation may be carried through the 
Supreme Court this spring, and the erection of this greatly 
needed improvement no longer retarded. 

It gives me pleasure to attest to the faithfulness and effi- 
cient work of the various heads of departments and those 

serving under their direction. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, 

President 

8 



Report of the Committee on Administration of 

the Library 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: 

Gentlemen: — We hereby submit as the report of the 
Library Committee the report of the Librarian, which is so 
full and complete that it leaves nothing to be added. We 
wish, however, to emphasize the fact shown in the statistics 
that there has been an improvement in the quality, and an in- 
crease in the quantity, of the circulation, while the staff have 
worked together in harmony toward most satisfactory results. 

• Very respectfully, 

Geo. A. Macbeth, 

Chairman. 



Report of the Librarian 

To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to present my report of the work of the 
Library for the sixth statistical year, ending January 31, 1902. 

On February i, 1902, there were in the Central Library 
and its five branches, both catalogued and uncatalogued, 
140,507 volumes and 8,863 pamphlets. There were added 
during the year 21,187 volumes and 1,937 pamphlets. After 
deducting the number of volumes worn out and withdrawn, 
or sent to the collection of duplicates, and the duplicate pam- 
phlets and those bound into volumes, there was a net gain of 
18,027 volumes and 412 pamphlets. (See Table i, following 
the text of this report.) 

The number of classified and catalogued volumes on the 
shelves and ready for use at the Central Library and branches 
at the close of the year was 138,278. Of these, 90,577 were 
in the Central Library (including the school duplicate collec- 
tion and the home libraries), 12,713 in the Lawrenceville 
branch, 8,026 in the West End branch, 12,093 in the Wylie 
Avenue branch, 7,530 in the Mount Washington branch, and 
7,339 in the Hazelwood branch. The difference between this 
total and that of the preceding paragraph represents 1,103 
volumes of U. S. public documents, which are duplicated in 
other forms on the reference shelves and which are stored in 
the attic for want of shelf room, and 1,126 volumes which 
were received at the close of the fiscal year, too late to be cat- 
alogued. (Tables i and 2.) 

During the year 2,441 volumes were worn out, destroyed 
or withdrawn, 5,226 volumes were bound, 6,551 rebound, 
and 346 repaired in the bindery. Of the total number bound, 
769 were British patents, consisting of 450 volumes of speci- 
fications and 319 of drawings. These drawings are mounted 
on muslin and for the most part bound flat, or unfolded, in 
oblong volumes. We are fortunate in having a special fund 
subscribed for binding our collection of British patents, and 

10 



the work is being thoroughly done. At the close of the year 
we had several hundred volumes sorted, arranged and await- 
ing the binder, who is pushing the work as rapidly as the 
capacity of his plant will permit. 

Catalogue Department 

The total number of volumes classified and catalogued to 
the close of the year, for the Central Library and branches, 
was 144,653. The difference between this total and that of 
the number on the shelves, 6,375, represents the number of 
volumes worn out, destroyed or withdrawn, and duplicates 
transferred and recatalogued, from the opening of the Libra- 
ry in November 1895 to the close of the period covered by 
this report. 

The number of volumes classified and catalogued during 
the year was 21,930. Of these, 13,149 were for the Central 
Library, including additions to the reference and loan collec- 
tions, to the duplicate collection for school use, to the home 
libraries, and books purchased from the Carnegie and Bemd 
funds. Of the remainder, 1,827 were for the Lawrenceville 
branch, 1,356 for the West End branch, 2,389 for the Wylie 
Avenue branch, 1,603 ^^r the Mount Washington branch, 
and 1,606 for the Hazelwood branch. (Table 3.) 

Special lists and Gttalogfues 

Early in January the List of 100 entertaining biog- 
raphies, mentioned in our last report, was issued. It was 
prepared under the direction of the chief cataloguer, the 
biographies being selected for their attractiveness from the 
standpoint of the general reader, and each title annotated 
with the intention of rousing interest in the book. The 
specific object of issuing the list was to ascertain if by such 
means the inveterate novel reader could be persuaded to read 
something else. It is too soon to tell whether it will accom- 
plish its purpose here. There can be no doubt, however, as 
to the interest in it elsewhere. We have been flooded vnth 
orders for it from all over the country. The first edition of 
1,000 copies was soon exhausted, and another edition of 
3,000 copies has been printed. One of the most widely read 
literary journals in the United States reprinted the list entire, 

II 



and paid it the compliment of special editorial commenda- 
tion. 

For the convenience of the public, and in addition to the 
regular dictionary card catalogue, special card catalogues 
have been prepared covering several classes of books. One 
is merely a card supplement to the printed Catalogue of 
English prose fiction, issued in pamphlet form in 1898. An- 
other is a catalogue of biography, arranged in groups under 
such headings as Artists, Musicians, Statesmen, etc. Special 
card lists of Science and Useful Arts have also been made at 
slight expense, hardly more than the cost of the card stock. 
These are what are called "classed catalogues," the cards be- 
ing arranged in the order in which the books are classified on 
the shelves. Other catalogues covering special subjects will 
be prepared as occasion requires or time permits. One on 
missions is now in progress and will probably be issued in 
pamphlet form. 

Beginning with October 12, 1901, we have issued each 
week, for free distribution at the Central Library and 
branches, a printed list of the books added during the week. 
Information concerning additions is thus given to the public 
more promptly but not so completely as in the regular 
Monthly Bulletin. 

G>mplete Catalogtie in Book Form 

We are preparing to issue during the current year a com- 
plete classed catalogue, in book form, of the entire contents 
of the Library. According to present estimates this cata- 
logue will comprise some three thousand pages, divided into 
two volumes. The cost of such an undertaking would be 
prohibitive, were it not for the fact that all the composition 
for it is now standing, in the form of linotype slugs which 
have been saved since we began to print our card catalogue 
and Monthly Bulletin. It was decided to print a .catalogue 
in book form for two reasons. First, there is constant inquiry 
for it on the part of the public. People want a catalogue that 
can be consulted in their own homes, at their offices and else- 
where. Second, there is a point at which the saving of com- 
position and the purchase and storage of type metal becomes 
a burden. Apparently we have reached that point. If we 

12 



print the proposed catalogue, we can melt down the standing 
metal, and use it again and again, saving only the composi- 
tion for future supplements. With the two complete, printed, 
dictionary card catalogues already provided for the public, 
and a classed catalogue in book form, in which all the books 
on a given subject and related subjects are grouped together, 
we shall be prepared to offer unusual advantages not only to 
the general reader but also to the special student. 

Grctiktion 

The number of volumes issued for home use during the 
year from the Central Library and branches was 488,126, an 
increase over the previous year of 59,440, or 12.18 per cent. 
There was a decrease in the circulation of fiction of nearly 
three per cent. 

Of the total circulation, 203,751 volumes were issued from 
the Central Library (139,755 from the Loan department 
proper, 59,630 through the schools, and 4,366 through the 
home libraries), 81,452 from the Lawrenceville branch, 27, 165 
from the West End branch, 91,933 from the Wylie Avenue 
branch, 42,244 from the Mount Washington branch, and 
41,581 from the Hazelwood branch. (Tables 4, 5, 6 and 21.) 

The number of borrowers registered to February i, 1902, 
was 42,182. The number added during the year was 6,501, 
of which 2,358 were registered at the Central Library, 1,067 
from the Lawrenceville branch, 259 from the West End 
branch, 1,258 from the Wylie Avenue branch, 629 from the 
Mount Washington branch, and 930 from the Hazelwood 
branch. Because of change of residence, etc., 327 borrowers* 
cards were cancelled during the year. Of course the total 
number of registered borrowers does not represent all the 
actual readers. Often a whole family use one or two cards, 
and the books drawn on these cards are read by nearly every 
member of the household. Moreover, a large number of the 
children in the schools, home libraries and clubs to which we 
send books, are not registered. 

Geogfraphical Distribtstion of Borrowers 

During the past two years the Superintendent of Circula- 
tion has kept a record of the number of borrowers registered 

13 



from each ward of the city. These facts are not only inter- 
esting in themselves, but may be of use in considering pres- 
ent and future needs. 

In order to make these facts intelligible, a map of the city 
showing the location of all the wards, accompanies this re- 
port as a frontispiece. This map has been prepared espe- 
cially to show in the most graphic manner the location and 
character of the various activities of the Library within the 
city limits, through the Central Library and its branches, the 
schools, home libraries and clubs. 

The records show that of the borrowers registered at the 
Central Library during the last two years, one third were 
from the 14th ward, the ward at its very doors. All the 
wards are represented except the 33d, 34th and 36th. After 
the 14th ward, the largest contributors are the 20th, 19th, 
2 1 St, 22d, 13th, 6th and 37th wards, in the order given. 

One half of the registrations at the Lawrenceville branch 
were from the 17th ward, in which the building stands, the 
i6th, i8th, 15th, 19th, 20th, 13th and 12th following in the 
order named. 

At the West End branch more than one half of the regis- 
trations were from the 36th ward, in which the branch is lo- 
cated, the rest being almost entirely from the 35th and 34th 
wards. It is a significant fact that during the past year this 
branch registered half as many non-residents (at $3 each) as 
the Central Library. This is explained by the fact that the 
West End branch stands near the extreme western limits of 
the city, and is therefore readily accessible to the adjacent 
boroughs, which should naturally be included, but are not, 
within the city limits. 

About one third of the registrations at the Wylie Avenue 
branch are from the nth ward, in which it is situated, while 
the 13th, 8th, 6th, 7th, 14th and 5th follow in about the 
order given. Three fourths of the wards in the city were 
more or less represented in the registrations at this branch. 

At the Mount Washington branch two thirds of the regis- 
tered borrowers live in the 32d ward, in which the branch is 
located, while next in order stand the 35th, 31st, 38th, 30th 
and 33d wards. 

The work of the Hazelwood branch is confined almost 

14 



entirely to the 23d ward, near the center of which it stands, 
only two other wards being represented, even slightly, 
among its registered borrowers. The 23d is*a very large 
ward, extending a distance of two miles from the southern 
border of Schenley Park to the Monongahela river, and in- 
cluding the districts called Greenfield, Hazelwood and Glen- 
wood. 

Summarizing the above facts, we find that while not a 
single ward fails to contribute some registered borrowers, 
there are twelve wards, of the entire thirty-eight, which con- 
tribute so few as to prove that they are practically beyond the 
reach of the Central Library or any of its five branches now 
in operation. These wards are the ist, 2d, 3d and 4th, 
which comprise the down-town district, extending from river 
to river, and from Try and Grant Streets on the east to the 
Point on the west; the 9th and loth wards, which join those 
just mentioned on the northeast, between the Pennsylvania 
railroad and the Allegheny river; and the 24th, 25th, 26th, 
27th, 28th and 29th wards, which comprise what is known as 
the South Side. This last district is to have a branch as soon 
as the people of the South Side can agree with the Board of 
Trustees on a suitable site. But as yet no provision has been 
made for that remarkable point of vantage, the down-town 
district. 

Reference Department 

The total number of volumes in the Reference depart- 
ment at the Central Library on February i, 1902, was 46,562, 
of which 7,208 were added during the year. The growth in 
the use of this department continues. The number of readers 
during the year was 25,872, and the number of books used 
135,582, an increase over the previous year of 3,154 readers 
and 10,548 books. (Tables 9 and 10.) 

There was also a great relative increase in the use of 
books treating of the various industrial arts, 21.62 per cent, 
of all the books consulted in the Reference department being 
of this nature, an increase over the previous year of over five 
per cent. This was due to the growing importance of our 
collection of the literature of technology, but still more to 
the fact that we have as a medium between the collection and 

15 



the public an assistant who, in addition to a good technical 
education, has had practical experience as a chemist and 
metallurgist in this region. Already his hands are more than 
full, and it is only a question of time before he will have to 
have an assistant. 

No better proof of the growth of the work in this depart- 
ment could be adduced than the fact that, whereas one assist- 
ant was formerly able to take entire charge of the Reference 
room, it now requires at busy times two, and sometimes 
three, assistants to answer questions and help readers in their 
researches. The telephone which was installed in this de- 
partment during the year increases the number of requests 
for information from those who live at some distance from 
the Library, and the increasing number of letters received 
shows that the Library extends the boundaries of its useful- 
ness far beyond the city limits. 

The reference lists on Contemporary Biography, men- 
tioneJl in our last report, are now completed and will be 
issued in pamphlet form within a month. Publication has 
been delayed both by the pressure of other work in the de- 
partment, and byHhe fact that it seemed best to take this op- 
portunity to enlarge the lists by the inclusion of many new 
names, as well as by the addition of later articles on the men 
already included. 

Current Periodicals Transferred to Reference Room 

The need of additional room for the bindery compelled us 
in July to remove the current newspapers from the basement 
to what was formerly the Periodical room, on the first floor. 
As this room was already overcrowded, all the periodicals, 
except about thirty of the most popular ones, were trans- 
ferred to the Reference room. This is not an ideal arrange- 
ment, either for the Reference room, the periodicals, or the 
newspapers. It is the best that can be made, however, under 
the present crowded conditions prevailing throughout the 
building. As a result of the change the seating capacity of 
the Reference room is often taxed to its utmost. 

Among the most important books added to the Reference 
department during the year are the following : — 

Allgemeinc deutschc Biographic. 4Sv. in 23. 

16 



Archives de la Commission des monuments historiques, 1855-72. 4v. 

Belcher & Macartney's Later renaissance architecture in England. 2v. 

Billings's Baronial and ecclesiastical antiquities of Scotland. 4v. 

Blanc's Histoire des peintres. 14V. in 12. 

Collot's Voyage dans TAmerique septentrionale. 3v. 

Dartein's £tude sur Tarchitecture lombarde. 2v. 

Edwards & Grandidier's Histoire physique naturelle et politique de 

Madagascar; oiseaux. 4v. in 5. 
Worthington C. Ford's George Washington. 2v. 
Gille's Versailles & les deux Trianons. 2v. 
Herz's La mosqu^e du Sultan Hassan au Caire. 
Hubsch's Die altchristlichen Kirchen. 2v. 
Institut de France. Memoires. i69p-date. 
Montrosier's Artistes modemes. 4v. 
Palladio's Architecture. 4v. in 2. 
Rayet's Monuments de Tart antique. 2v. 
Richardson's Studies from old English mansions. 4v. 
Sheldon's Artistic country seats. 
Society of dyers and colourists. Journal. 1885-date. 
Southern historical society's Papers. 27V. 
Spenser society's Publications. 53V. 
Sturgis's Dictionary of architecture. 3v. 
Texier & Pullan's Byzantine architecture. 
Zeitschrift fur physiologische Chemie. 1877-date. 



Reading Rooms 

The total number of persons who used the reading rooms 
of the Central Library and branches was 461,563, 30,288 less 
than the previous year. This decrease is more than accounted 
for at the Central Library alone, where the Periodical room 
had to be abolished early in July, as explained above, and 
where, as a consequence of the crowded condition of things, 
the seating capacity of every one of the reading rooms is in- 
sufficient. 

The number using the reading rooms at the Central 
Library was 1 14,843, of which 25,872 are credited to the Ref- 
erence room, 31,607 to the Periodical room during five 
months only, 32,260 to the Children's room, and 25,104 to 
the Newspaper room. 

The attendance at the branch reading rooms was 93,686 
at Lawrenceville, 40,695 at West End, 1 17,119 at Wylie Ave- 
nue, 44,682 at Mount Washington, and 50,538 at Hazel- 
wood. (Tables 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17 and 19.) 



17 



Gifts to the Libraiy 

There have been presented to the Library during the 
year, by 597 persons, firms or institutions, 2,230 volumes, 
2,070 pamphlets, 2,012 numbers of periodicals. There were 
few gifts of special value, and many of those received were 
found to be duplicates of volumes and pamphlets already in 
the Library. 

Branch Libraries 

The regular statistics of the branch libraries are given be- 
low under the names of the branches, but we wish to call at- 
tention here to two special features of this work, recently 
initiated by the branch librarians. 

On December 20, 1901, the librarian of the Hazelwood 
branch, feeling that there were still portions of her district not 
reached by the Library, established a deposit station in a drug 
store on Second Avenue near Greenfield Avenue, in the 23d 
ward, the owners having kindly offered the necessary space 
rent free. In this drug store was placed a collection of 1 50 
volumes from the branch library, and these books have been 
circulated every Friday evening from 6 130 to 9 130, the work 
being in charge of the staff of the branch. The success of this 
Greenfield deposit station has been so great that the librarian 
of the Hazelwood branch is preparing to open another de- 
posit station in Glenwood next fall. 

Since the close of the period covered by this report, a de- 
posit station has been started in the Momingside district by 
the librarian of the Lawrenceville branch. The free use of a 
room in the Momingside school was granted by the ward 
school board, and the deposit station was opened on March 
14, 1902, with a collection of about 160 books from the Law- 
renceville branch. The work has been carried on every Fri- 
day evening since with excellent results. 

Through the enthusiastic efforts of the branch librarians, 
one course of lectures each was given in the lecture rooms 
of the Hazelwood, Wylie Avenue and Mount Washington 
branches during the winter of 1901-02. The interest of the 
people was aroused, and now five University Extension cen- 

18 



ters have been formed in the districts served by our five 
branches. Each center expects to have at least two courses 
of lectures next winter, to be given, in most cases, in the 
branch library lecture rooms, and there seems every reason to 
expect that the undertaking will receive the hearty support of 
the people. 

LawfenceviIIe Branch 

At the close of the period covered by this report there 
were in the Lawrenceville branch 12,713 volumes, of which 
11,568 were for circulation and 1,145 ^^^ reference use. (Ta- 
ble 2.) 

During the year there were issued for home use 81,452 
volumes, of which 53,315 were books for adults and 28,137 
for children. There was an increase of 3,761 in the circula- 
tion, and a relative decrease in the fiction issued of 2.43 per 
cent. 

In the reading room for adults there was an attendance of 
33,436, and in the children's room of 60,250, making a total 
of 93,686, or 1,044 less than the previous year. (Tables 11 
and 12.) 

West End Branch 

There were in the West End branch at the close of the 
year 8,026 volumes, of which 7,370 were for circulation and 
656 for reference use. (Table 2.) 

The total circulation was 27,165, of which 17,118 were 
adult and 10,047 juvenile. The circulation was 1,755 ^^^ 
than the previous year, but the proportion of fiction circu- 
lated was also decreased one per cent. 

The number of visitors to the reading room for adults 
was 15,685, and to the children's room 25,010, making a total 
of 40,695, or 8,753 less than the previous year. (Tables 13 
and 14.) 

Wylie Aventse Branch 

At the close of the year the number of volumes in the 
Wylie Avenue branch was 12,093, ^^ which 11,331 were for 
circulation and 762 for reference use. (Table 2.) 

The number of volumes circulated was 91,933, of which 

19 



55i263 were adult books and 36,670 juvenile. The whole 
number circulated was 2,416 less than the previous year, but 
the proportion of fiction was also 3.4 per cent. less. 

There was an attendance in the adult reading room of 
27,532, and in the children's room of 89,587, a total of 
117,119, or 9,297 less than the previous year. (Tables 15 
and 16.) 



Mount Washington Branch 

There were 7,530 volumes in the Mount Washington 
branch at the close of the period covered by this report, of 
which 6,961 were for circulation and 569 for reference. (Ta- 
ble 2.) 

The total circulation was 42,244, of which 25,725 were 
books for adults and 16,519 books for children. There was 
an increase in the circulation over the previous year of 
14,907, and a decrease in the fiction percentage of 1.62. 

The number of visitors to the adult reading room was 
19,493, and to the children's room 25,189, a total of 44,682 
and an increase over the previous year of 7,157. (Tables 17 
and 18.) 

Hatdwood Branch 

The number of volumes in the Hazel wood branch at the 
end of the year was 7,339, of which 6,798 were for circulation 
and 541 for reference use. (Table 2.) 

The number of volumes circulated was 41,581, of which 
24,131 were adult books and 17,450 juvenile. There was an 
increase in the total circulation over the previous year of 
13*036, and a decrease of 2.47 per cent, in the proportion of 
fiction issued. 

The attendance in the adult reading room was 18,572, 
and in the children's room 31,966, a total of 50,538, being an 
increase over the previous year of 17,703. (Tables 19 and 20.) 

Qiildren's Department 

The statistics of this department show an increase in 
juvenile circulation and a decrease in children's room atten- 
dance. The total circulation, including that of the children's 
rooms of the Central Library and branches, and the circula- 

20 



I 



tion through the schools and home libraries, was 198,546, an 
increase of 38,485 over the previous year. The attendance 
in the children's rooms was 264,262, showing a loss of 5,694. 
During the year 1,834 juvenile borrowers have been regis- 
tered, 929 of these registrations having been secured by visit- 
ing the homes. (Tables 7 and 8.) 

Children's Rooms 

There has been an increase in the use of the books in the 
Children's room at the Central Library since October 1900, 
when the juvenile non-fiction was removed from the book- 
wing to the Children's room, and in one month the fiction 
percentage fell from 86 to 68. The fiction percentage for 
the past year is 66.16, as against 81 per cent, two years ago. 
In January 1902, all the juvenile fiction was transferred from 
the book-wing to the Children's room, which now contains, 
therefore, practically all the children's books in the Central 
Library. As the general delivery desk is too far away to 
make it practicable to have the juvenile books jcharged there, 
the charging is done at the desk of the Children's room as- 
sistant. This of course doubles her work, but we believe the 
immense advantage of having all the juvenile books shelved 
in the Children's room will compensate for the extra work 
entailed. 

At intervals throughout the year it has been necessary to 
add to the number of bookcases in the Children's room, and 
when the final removal of books took place, we were forced 
to use every available bit of wall space for book shelves. 
This has materially lessened the seating capacity of the room. 

The selection of children's books for the Library has 
lately become a serious question. Hitherto, after careful con- 
sideration we have selected and purchased the best books in 
both fiction and non-fiction. Now that our book collections 
are older and the children have read much, the question of 
selection has become more complicated. There are children 
who claim to have read many, if not all, of the books in the 
children's rooms, there are also children who have developed 
tastes which must be satisfied, yet guided. Moreover, when 
children are rapidly passing into the period of adolescence 
we have to meet an entirely new demand. They are wav- 

21 



ering between the use of the children's room and the adult 
library, and at this stage we must lead them from chil- 
dren's books to the best of adult literature. The problem is 
by no means a simple one, harder perhaps in the case of a 
growing girl than in that of a boy. Boy interests are varied 
and easily reached, but it is hard to know what is wholesome 
and at the same time attractive reading for the girls of thir- 
teen and fourteen who want morbid and sentimental stories. 
The staff of the Children's department and the students in 
our Training School for Children's Librarians are having 
many conferences on this subject, and the interchange of ex- 
periences, combined with the critical study of books, is doing 
much toward the solution of the problem. Meanwhile, the 
head of the department, cooperating with the librarians of 
the branches, has selected and placed on the children's shelves 
a collection of good books written for adults, but within the 
interest and comprehension of young people. These books 
are not kept separate, but are shelved with the juvenile vol- 
umes, so that the children who browse among them may 
come across them casually. This collection includes such 
books as Dana's Two years before the mast, Hale's Man with- 
out a country, Irving's Alhambra and Rip Van Winkle, Kings- 
ley's Westward ho, novels by Scott, Dickens and Cooper, 
and many other good works of fiction. There are also vol- 
umes of poetry, history, biography, travel and science, all 
written in a simple and direct manner. The result is that few 
of our young people pass from the children's room without 
having read some standard adult literature. For the past 
year the circulation of these books was 7,372 from our five 
branch children's rooms alone. 



Story Hotir and Readinsf 

In connection with the work of the children's rooms, we 
must not pass over the story hour nor its gradual evolution 
into reading circles for the young people who feel themselves 
too old to listen to stories. The Norse myths and the Nibel- 
ungenlied furnished material for the stories told this year to 
the children of ten or twelve, while the little children listened 
to old nursery favorites. The attendance at the story hours 
during the winter (to April i, 1902) was 7,384, an increase of 



23 



2,099 over last year, the Norse stories being more popular 
than the Greek legends told last year. 

The reading circles are informal gatherings of boys and 
girls who wish to listen to good stories read aloud, some- 
times by a branch librarian and sometimes by an assistant 
from the staff of the Children's department, or a Training 
School student. These reading circles have no organization, 
— a certain evening is appointed for the reading, and the 
young people drop in or not, just as they wish, promptness 
and good behavior being the only requisites for membership. 
We find that stories can be told to mixed groups of boys and 
girls under ten or twelve years of age, but that in reading 
aloud to older children it is necessary to separate the boys 
and girls into two distinct groups. Boys and girls differ so 
greatly in their interests that the same story rarely appeals 
to both. We have four reading circles, two at the Central 
Library, one for boys and one for girls, a boys' reading circle 
at Hazelwood and another at Lawrenceville. 

In commenting below on our work with schools, mention 
is made of the introduction of the story hour and reading cir- 
cles into the schools. The total attendance at the story hours 
and reading circles of the Central Library, the branch libra- 
ries and the schools, from November i, 1901 to April i, 1902, 
was 12,049. 

Work with Schools 

This past year we have supplied forty-five schools with 
books. (See frontispiece map.) To meet the increasing de- 
mand for books in the schools, the collection reserved for 
that purpose has been enlarged during the year until it now 
numbers 10,467 volumes, an increase of 2,014. The con- 
tinued demand for the books is gratifying, and an increase of 
over 30,000 in circulation shows that the use of the books has 
justified the addition to the collection. It is much more im- 
portant, however, to use to the utmost the books we now 
have, than to add indefinitely to their numbers. Three fac- 
tors, we think, will help us to attain the maximum of useful- 
ness, — the constantly increasing familiarity with the books 
on the part of the teachers, the story hour, and informal book 
talks. 

23 



Before the issue of our Graded and annotated catalogue of 
books for the use of the city schoolSy the principals either came 
to the Library and selected from the shelves the books they 
wanted, or left the choice entirely to us. In either case re- 
sults were not wholly satisfactory, since the principals could 
not take time to become entirely familiar with the books, nor 
could we know intimately the work and character of each 
school. Now, however, with the catalogue in the hands of 
every teacher, it is practicable for those best acquainted with 
the needs of each school to select carefully the greater num- 
ber of the books they receive. 

The total circulation for the year was 59,630. These 
books are taken home by the children and are often read by 
parents and older brothers and sisters. Thus the books cir- 
culated have a much larger field of usefulness than can be 
shown by figures. On this point several of the school princi- 
pals have spoken emphatically. Some of the collections sent 
to the schools are practically reference collections for class 
room use, and of this very important reference use no ade- 
quate record can be kept. 

A natural outgrowth of the story hour at the Library is 
the story hour at the schools, initiated this year. Eight of 
these story hours are now being carried on. As the stories 
are told after school hours, attendance is of course perfectly 
voluntary on the part of the children. It has, however, 
steadily increased during the winter months, the total at- 
tendance from the beginning of the school year to February 
I, 1902, being 3,500. The stories are selected with a view to 
both entertainment and literary culture. In the upper grades 
the tales of Troy and the Nibelungenlied have been told, as 
well as stories from modern history and literature. During 
the coming year we hope to' introduce the story hour, or 
reading club, into many other schools. This, with increased 
facilities for supplying the teachers with bulletins, material 
for reference work, etc., offers a fertile field of work capable 
of indefinite expansion. 

Home Libraries and Qubs 

During the past year we have had thirty home library 
groups and eleven library clubs, with a membership of 489 

24 



children in the groups and 206 in the clubs, a total enrollment 
of 695, an increase of 294 over last year. The number of 
volumes circulated among the groups was 3,078, among the 
clubs 1,451, giving a total of 4,537, nearly double that of the 
preceding year. This is due not only to the greater number 
of home libraries, but also to the increased reading capacity 
of the children who had been members of groups during pre- 
vious years. We also find that in the older groups a larger 
proportion of natural science, literature and history is read. 
Our records probably show less than two-thirds of the actual 
circulation, as a book frequently makes the entire circuit of 
the neighborhood before being returned to the library. One 
book was read in this way by ten different families. In order 
to protect the little readers, who bitterly complain that they 
have no opportunity to read their own books, special books 
for other members of the family are included in some home 
library cases, being known as mother's book, father's book 
and baby's book. These the children in turn proudly take to 
the waiting members of the family. By special request of a 
group of boys in a mill district, a case of books was sent for 
circulation among the night watchmen, who had been in the 
habit of borrowing the boys' books to such an extent that the 
boys themselves had little chance to read them. 

When, during a brisk five-minute's walk in a district a 
mile from any library, eight stores may be counted whose win- 
dows literally glare with the gaudily depicted scenes of 
crime and adventure portrayed on the covers of the Nick Car- 
ter, Jesse James, Nickel and similar magazines, we realize the 
necessity of competition. If we would have our boys* and 
gfirls grow up as citizens capable of governing and being 
governed, we must give them standards of life other than 
these lurid distortions. If the children can not, or will not, 
come to the books, the books, in the hands of a competent, 
sympathetic visitor, must go to the children. We strive 
to give the children whom the Central Library and its 
branches can not reach, good books, which will help to en- 
noble their lives, and a friend, companion and helper in the 
library visitor. Our clubs and circles have gradually crept 
into the most remote comers of the city, as well as the more 
central districts. They now extend from Momingside and 

25 



Negley Run in the east to Shenkle's Row in the west; and 
from Mulberry Alley to the South Side. (See frontispiece 
map.) 

Our clubs, of which we now have eleven, are becoming an 
important feature of the work. Often they are the outcome 
of the overcrowded condition of a district where it is impossi- 
ble to find a home at which the library group can meet, and 
yet from which comes the cry of the parents, "Can't you do 
something for our boys to keep them off the streets at 
night?" In some cases a room for club meetings has been 
obtained at a small monthly rental, while other clubs meet in 
school buildings, and one has a house of its own built by the 
boys themselves. One ward school board, deeming the libra- 
ry club an educational factor in the neighborhood, has fully 
equipped for its use a room in the school building, and has 
voted $80 a year for expenses of janitor service, heat and 
Ught. 

In some groups and clubs regular programs are prepared, 
different authors studied and thefr books drculated among 
the children. In others the time of the meeting is devoted 
to story telling, reading, music, sewing, manual training, 
games and gymnastics, our methods of procedure being en- 
tirely dependent on the character and needs of the children. 

Over $300, contributed by those interested in our work, 
has been expended during the year in equipping and support- 
ing club rooms, providing games, excursions to the Central 
Library and its branches, the Carnegie Museum, the Zoo at 
Highland Park and the Phipps Conservatory, and in giving 
Christmas trees and Christmas gifts to six groups and dubs. 
This does not include many little parties and excursions at 
which the children have been the guests of the friendly 
visitors, or towards which all have contributed. We are also 
indebted to the Toy Mission for books and games, dolls and 
other toys given at Christmas time. 

We wish to express our gratitude to the following fifty 
volunteer visitors, to whose enthusiastic and efficient service 
during the past year the success of this work is largely due : 

♦Miss Anna L. Bartholomew, Miss Alice L. Biggert, Miss 

'Students in the Traininc School for Children'B Librtriaat or wfihert of the 
Ubnxj staff. * 

26 






Anna Bray, Mr H. N. Brooks, Mrs H. C. Cooper, Miss Anna 
B. Craig, *Miss Edna M. Cullis, Miss Mary M. Disque, *Miss 
Cora K. Dunnells, *Miss Catherine Elston, Miss Amy Fownes, 
Mrs M. M. Garland, Miss Margaret Geiger, Miss Mary Gib- 
son, *Miss Alice G. Goddard, *Miss Josephine L. Gutman, 
♦Miss Florence J. Heaton, Miss Anna Herron, *Miss Louise 
Kennard, Miss Jessie Keyt, Miss Edith Lewis, *Miss Bessie 
Loughridge, Miss Kate Lowe, Mrs William McGarvey, Mr 
Walter McKean, Miss S. H. Morris, Miss Lide Packer, Mrs 
James Parker, Jr., Mrs J. M. Pierson, Mrs Mary H. A. Pitt- 
man, Miss Susan Pool, *Miss Annabelle Porter, Miss Carrie 
Powelson, *Miss Helen U. Price, Mrs David Rankin, Miss 
Lois Rankin, Miss Florence Rebbeck, *Miss Lilian Rod6, 
Miss A. E. Rogers, Miss Mary Rogers, Miss Ida Shields, Miss 
Edith Smith, *Miss Elva S. Smith, Miss Lillian Smith, *Miss 
Marie M. Smith, Miss Mary Smith, Miss Elizabeth S. Steven- 
son, *Miss Hannah Stuart, Miss Alice N. Wells, *Miss Mere- 
dyth Woodward. 

There is held each month at the Central Library a meet- 
ing of these visitors, at which reports are made of the work 
done in the different groups, plans for the next month's work 
suggested, and lists of helpful stories and books presented 
and discussed. Visitors are expected to call frequently upon 
the parents, to keep a record of group meetings, and to visit 
other groups and clubs. 

The list of donors of new home libraries during the year, 

with the numbers and names of the libraries, is as follows : — 

Mr James L Buchanan, Library No. 27. John Greenleaf 
Whittier Library. 

Twentieth Century Qub, Library No. 28. Twentieth 
Century Qub Library. 

Mrs George B. Gordon, Library No. 29. Katharine and 
William Gordon Library. 

Miss Mary L Laughlin, Library No. 30. Louisa M. Al- 
cott Library. 

SfimtTiff Putygfoufuh 

The work of supplying the summer playgrounds with 
books, begun as an experiment three years ago, was con- 

* Students is the Trainiaf School for Children's LibrtrUns or members of the 
librmry staff. 



tinued last summer as a part of the work of the Qiildren's 
department. During the initial summer five playgrounds 
were supplied, the total circulation being about i,6oo. In 
1900 the needs of seven playgrounds were met, with a result 
of 1,828 in circulation, while during the past year at nine 
playgrounds we circulated 3,637 volumes, and this during 
one day in each of six weeks. Last year at a joint meeting of 
the library workers and the kindergartners who had charge 
of the playgrounds, it was decided to set apart one day each 
week as "library day," and as many as 117 volumes have 
been issued in a single playground on that day. 

Tf aminsf School for Childfen^s Libtarians 

The Training School re-opened for its second year Sep- 
tember 31, 1901, under favorable conditions, with an enroll- 
ment of thirteen students. When the lecture course for the 
present year was planned, it was decided to lengthen the 
course in technical library subjects and in children's litera- 
ture, to make the course in psychology more practical, and to 
add to the curriculum the study of civic education and a brief 
course in the history of pedagogy. An experienced teacher 
was appointed in September as assistant director and special 
instructor, the members of the library staff continuing to 
give lectures relating to their special departments of library 
work. We have had additional lectures from librarians of 
other cities, as well as from specialists in other lines of work 
with children. 

We continue to lay great stress on the practical side of 
the course which requires each student to serve an appren- 
ticeship in each of our six children's rooms, to have charge 
of a home library group and a playground library, and to do 
some work every week for, or in, the city schools. 

The Training School is no longer an experiment It has 
proved itself a necessary factor in the growth of this depart- 
ment, and has given a new impetus to all phases of the work 
with children. 

Printing Department 

During the year the superintendent of the Printing de- 
partment overhauled the linotype and other machinery, and 

28 



they are now in perfect condition. Some mechanical addi- 
tions to the department were also made, and we now have a 
complete printing plant in which all our letter-press and re- 
lief-plate work is done. The last annual reports were 
printed, folded, stitched and covered in this department, and 
the present reports are likewise printed here. 

The current year will be the first complete year of work 
in this department since its reorganization about a year ago. 
We, therefore, postpone a full report of its operations till a 
year from now, when we shall be able to show its usefulness 
and great economy. 

On the following page appear the names of the heads of 

departments and members of the Library staff, to whom is 

largely due the credit for whatever success the Library has 

attained. I cannot close this report without expressing my 

own appreciation of their work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin H. Anderson, 

Librarian. 
April II, 1902. 



29 



Library Staff 

ADMINISTRATION 

Edwin H. Anderson -- Librarian 

Wm. Richard Watson Assistant Librarian 

Mabel A. Frothingham Librarian's Secretary 

Charity A. Amos Stenographer 



ORDER DEPARTMENT 

Helen B. Grade First Assistant^ 

Laura May Krepps Florence Armstrong 



CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT 

Henrietta St Barbe Brooks Chief Cataloguer 

May L. Prentiss First Assistant 

Marion A. Knight .-. Classifier 

Mary B. Lavely Susan A. Lavely 

Emma H. Walker Harriet D. McCarty 

Adelaide N. Martin 

PASTING AND MARKING 

Mary Shaw Grace Shaw 



REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 

Elisa May Willard ------. Reference Librarian 

Agnes M. Elliott First Assistant 

Martha C. Dampman Marguerite W. Bonnett 

John Bissell, Shelf Curator 
One page 

DIVISION OF TECHNOLOGY 

Harrison W. Craver --------- /n charge 

LOAN DEPARTMENT 

Mary F. Macrum ------- Chief of Department 

Jessie Welles ------ Superintendent of Circulation 

Alice M. V. Keams Winifred A. Riggs 

Nina P. Lincoln Maud Taylor 

Lucinda M. King Clara E. Howard 

Two pages 

^The Assistant Librmiian has charge of this department. 

30 



CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT 

Frances Jenkins Olcott ------ Chief of Department 

Bunella A.McQuistion- - - Children's Librarian at Central Library 

Emily A. Bcale* 

The names of the branch chfldren*B libiarians are given under the branches. 

WORK WITH SCHOOLS 

Mabel Stevenson Supervisor 

Ad^le G. Semple 

HOME LTBBABTES 

Gertrude Sackett - - Supervisor 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

William H. Schwarten ------- Superintendent 

Dorette Chase -------- Linotype Operator 

John Archer Lee Fleming 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Binding and Periodical Records, Supplies, Etc 

Alice B. Lothrop, In charge Harriet B. Hof ford 

William Russell 

Newspaper Room 
Sophia D. Maxwell In charge 

Messenger • 
Thomas F. Scott 

LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH 

H. Elizabeth Cory Branch Librarian 

Gertrude M. Blanchard, First As/t Jeannette B. Woods 
Esther Johnson Carrie M. Ziegler' 

Rose C. Pickering, Children's Librarian^ 

One page* 

WEST END BRANCH 

Charlotte D. Keith Branch Librarian 

Mary E. Mackey, First Assistant Martha A. Gibson 

Jeannette Van Horn, Children's Librarian 

One page 

^The assistant in the children's room at the Central Library works half time in the 
Lawrenccrille branch children's room. 
'On part time. 

31 



WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH 

Julia A. Hopkins - Branch Librarian 

Mary B. Gil son, First Assistant Margery L. Allison 

Agnes D. Smith Marie McGregor* 

Frances W. Quley, Children's Librarian 
Elizabeth B. Loughridge, Ass*t Children's Lib'n 

One page 

MOUNT WASHINGTON BRANCH 

Mabel Shryock --------- Branch Librarian 

Leonora Mackey, First Assistant Mabel L. Young 

£. Jean Ream One page* 

Caroline L. Koster, Children's Librarian 

HAZELWOOD BRANCH 

Charlotte E. Wallace ------- Branch Librarian 

Charlotte H: Davis, First Assistant Marion D. Cameron 
Alicia I.Anderson One page* 

Jessie M, Carson, Children's Librarian 



The faculty of the Training School for Children's Librarians consists 
of the Chief of the Children's department as director, Miss Meredyth 
Woodward, assistant director, and various members of the regular library 
staff. 

^On part time. 



32 



< 



I 



Pi 
< 






cu 
< 

en 

o 
> 

fa 

o 

u 
S 
2: 



CD 



o 



O 
> 

o 

u 






00 



M 
00 

od 



d 
d 



MOO «o«o 



od 



niBO ^^N 



I. 



^ 



^^^ 



d 



\u9i *panog 



I 



e* 









4) 



•8 



I^^ox 



d 



"^"^"^ 



S! 



WO ^9 



00 



d 



r^ 



M N Ct Ct M 



dSBqojnj 



i^ N M d N d r^ 



yodd^i )8Bq 



M 0\ 

00 



O 00 l^^M 

00 



00 



8dani|o^ 

F;0X pOBjr) 



rp CO «0 M «o 



H 



woo N r^r^ 






°I«0 ^»N 



00 O Qoo OS 
iH CO Q CO M 
N OS ^ m' ^ 



00 M 






»o os M r^ 



II 



s 

00 



•loo -dna 

O) )a98 JO 



SI" ^ 



^ fO M QS M M 



is 

be 



F^OX 



O Q M 00 vo m 

fOO Q POO* 
OsN 






M M M M M 



00 



M 



M]0 ^9 





5 lasBoojnj 












mo o> M «^ I 00 



lO M M M M 






ro 0> M 00 

m " 



0> M 00 ■^ 



1^ 



M o o o> «^ 

WCP M N M 



M 
M M M M M 



00 



)B J9quinf4 



»n fo m «^sp 

00 uo ^ i-t ^ I 

» «k #^ 

moo «0 



N oo O •'^ »^ Q^ 
4- ^ o moo $ 

O «v^ O* o* "H o 



00 



* * •« ^fc • 









h 

■a'S 

a (3 



to d : 

'§ll 
■ill 

u 8 V 
(AUCQ 






0) 

e 

o 
X 



I 

a 

U 

o 



: a 
• o 

d falo 



mm 

-5 g 5 8 >>^ 3 



•3 

s 

O 



33 



< 



< 

M 

O 

>^ 
P 

c/) 
M 

U 



a 



I^^OX 



O CO i^ t^o N fO in 51 Q5 2* po 



M -^ 



doadjapH 



M MM 



3np«pioJio 



^^^liJ-^s^^ilH^fla 



«n 

MM M ^ 






I«»ox 



00 o^ O^ <^ «o m cr> O oo qnoo <^ ►j 
M M ^ «n«ocoaoso «ooooo 



doadJdjdH 



N CO fO M inoo N 00 « l^ O^ 



3tn;«inojio 



«8^'?l^i,§;i5^sg^ 



a 

cd 

m) 



I^OX 






o «n*o o^ «^ Q^OQ t^ N a» o> O 

O 00 O '^ t^OO vO O 00 M Q M 



MM M ^ 



93a9JdJ9)I 






M M 



M M 



SupBinojTO 



Soo M «n m t*^ m tn 
m rf m M CO 00 cooo 



M cn>o v6 ^ ■^ 



ro<nvo o N 
30 M M g> a 
M M t>» O »r 



M M 



OH 

»n 

m^ 

M Tf 



^ 

£ 



-3 

a 

O 



I^^OX 






lOrO M 



_ __ 1^ O 0> r^OQ 04 fO M 00 vQ M Q> 

^ OH N 04 *o r^vo t^ M w moo m c* 



o 

M 



^ i*^ Oh o «nvo i*^ ^ «o m M 



donajap^ 



roi^O 



) «oco OHin Oh t>vo r^ o -^ 51 
"^ \ri\Q \p ^ «OHO M ^ M t>» o» 

^ M W ^vO 00 «0 O 00 vO N N 



N «n 



HO 00 fO M fO M M 



bfi 

3 

o 



anioH 



M M ION 



_ ^ «0 ro OH ^>0 
CON MHO ~ 



HO 



CO 



MM^ 



|ooqos 



CO M lovo ^ »n moo 

t>. OH OH M 00 VO 

M VO « M CO 



MM ^ Tj-ro 
OT OHOOO ? 






OH t^ »-< ^* »-' ►^ OhoO vO O 00 ^ «0 
\Or^QcON»ONvO TfiOMMQ 

M VO 04 O M O 00 moo M M Tf o 



M « 



N 



M M CO CO« CO O 
M 



C/3 

< 

m) 

o 



(0 



o 

a 

02 CO 



o 

o 

Q 



2 S o o o3^<-*i fc*^, rt flcS 

«^ oj o^ ed cn.a.t:'^ u.s.a • 
Oa,p^c/)QH^DbM]SHPQ(£4D 



CO 



HO 



CO, 



00 



HO 

»n 

HO 



CO 



CO 

M 



»n 

M 

M 



ml 



^1 



m! 



£ 



C 
Q 



O 
u 

c 



2*1! « 



00 
00 

CO 



at 

e 

► 



S 

e 



Oh • 
HI! 



34 



^ 

^ 



o 



I^OX 



dondjdjd^ 



O io«b mo do c^ lO coo do F> m m 

M M MM MM Mtrj 



> N « rrj fOO 00 O»00 m m c^ ^ m 

> « m ooo fOM «n« « m 



3np«inoji3 



m Tf t^ ino O p « 0*« ^ J^^ 



M rrj«n 



*0 rrj<nO^0O U">0O m 



■I 



1. 

a 



1 
I 



I^^OX 



"^NQOvOOO rOM N*0_^0*OVO 



e* 



ooadJdpH 



* 00 i^Qvoo r^«nt^i^51 N 



SnpBinojio 



O ^ O OHoo r^m«OM c^Noo ^ 
m o^do M M «noo i^ «n «o i^ M ^ 



e* 



§ 

.9 

J3 



mox 



s,r 



00 



II 



00 






O t>.moo M 

i^^fo MOO 

oOoo tn 



ooadJdpH 



S^ 



vo N o^ r^oo fo uo n m oq fo 



3m;«inojio 



«nfooooo o^vo M o^mm^Qoo 

^00 r^t>.M iot>*c^t^Moo w «n 

M ro ^ « N Ko m t^ m 



00 

00 



5}- 



t 

00 



0^ 
CO 



^ 

O 



o 
m 



»n 



•8. 




35 



TABLE 3. 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES CATALOGUED. 



Central Library 

Lawrenceville Branch 

West End Branch 

Wylie Avenue Branch 

Mount Washington Branch 
Hazelwood Branch 

Totals 



>» 




ousl 
rted 


-S 


Previ 
Repo 


Durii 
theY 


80,566 


13,149 


11,783 


1,827 


6,997 


1,356 


11,278 


2,389 


6,116 


1,603 


5,983 


1,606 


122,723 


21,930 



JO 

13 
H 



93,715 
13,610 

8.353 
13,667 

7,719 
7,589 



*The excess of this total over that of the volumes on the shelves at the close 
of the year represents the number of volumes worn out, destroyed or withdrawn, and 
duplicates transferred and recatalogued, from the openinff of the Library in November 
1895 to the close of the period covered by this report. 



36 



< 

a" 

u 

o 

CZ4 

'* c/} W 
c/) 

< 
U 



S^g 






PQ PQ 

2: 
o 

u 
p< 

u 

CZ4 

O 
>^ 






ddB^adOJdj 



I^^OX 



pOOM|9ZBH 



•qsBAV -W 



•aAV Xav 



Pna ^s^AV 



31RA.T 



IBJ^nao 



en 



• •••••••••••• 



M M M M row M « M 



St 



lovo o *o »n If) 



N M M M \p 



0^ Pp a> M 00 O «0 »O00 vO 00 O "^ 



O t>»oo vo M «o m <n 



w « •-• H 



« 



M m ^ o Tf -^oo "^ -^ CO r^ 



« 



M CO 



■ M 

^ M M rN.>o «o moo 



tfooo •<ft^ooo o t>.oooo o\»n 
N ro j^ "^ M rn O 00 rooO O Q\ 
M moo o covo N w 00 cSoo 



« M 




8 



vO 



VO "^ «o CO a» « Q cooo 00 i^ tN. o> M 

00 N « « «n "^ « >n M •* cooo «o oo 

^ c« m CO M tv ONoo N m tN. IN. u- 

•> •> * » « » ^ ^ 9 



CO 
CO 

M 



m 

M 



»noo vQ o c> moo 00 00 VO co ^ Q» 

O TJ-o^OH (ooooooooo coF*oo 
CO M NMMiococ<eico 


M 
00 


OOO W M MOO 00 00 00 CO coo 

tn M covo od* -^ "^ CO d r^ dioo 

MM N 
M 


M 

iQ 



OPHpi^cnaiZD(z4i-]XH0Q(z< 



o 
H 



37 



Is 



CO 

n 

o 
H 



O 



I^^oX 



9|ia9Anf 



M«PV 



•5 



1 

1-1 

pq 
< 



1 



I^^OX 



d|iadAnf 



^PPV 



I 



o 
2 



I^OX 



d|niOAnf 



^r^pv 



a 



ONNmOMrs.r^NMcoro 



Q NOO S 

so O c^o 







SR8 

0>H N 



8 



M met o Moovoo M a»m 

MMMMM MeiMM 



rf N r^ Q >0 ^ Q <OvO ^0 tv ^ 
«n00 « N cOOHinrOM m>o -^ 
Qt OO rO Q O^O 

w «ne* « « M M 



8"S'8 3"§ 



H rrjoo M 



t>t>*rOMOaQ <OfO 
■ ^« i^«n 






m rn 

00 OHO 



CO M 






M M M M 



•* •» * 

« « e* 



M lo Q in CO t> coco a> 
OHvo »nino o « O »o 



« « « N 



00 »o to r^ moo Q t* Q -^ O o 
lO N «o -^ •« q^.^- N o ^ r^ Q 
O «o o> «n o "voo vo m o C4 vo 



«nv5 <5 ^ « ^ O 00 »o«o N CO 



so ^OkM^^sp moo 00 



COv 
rOO 



C^C^eiCtMMHMNNCtN 




-I 

« : S fe "1 



M 

i 



8. 






M 

CO 

m 






CO 

M 



d 

"* 



M 

m 



m 
m 



o 



hi 

o 

.a 
-3 

a 

I 



is 



6 

•«« 

.9 

1-4 

I 

u 

d 

I 



n 
5 



to 

I 

S 
I 

• I 

K 



39 



c/) 

u 



Nd 



B 



0) 

a 



a 

CO 



0) 

o 

a 



a 

U 



l^oX 



d[nidAtif 



^PPV 



moX 



d|ni9Anf 



^r^pv 



mo± 



a[nidAnf 



^PPV 



l^oX 



9iTa9An[ 



^ItipV 



C/3 
< 
O 



M M fo N M M t^so tn coco 

in 



a>^ «oqD M »ovo o» ^ «o i^ N o> 
« r^O focovo o o ^<^o o 



N M 



M <0 M M 



en 



fooo o^ 
CO •^*o ch 



n »n M moo n m o* ooo 

»00m^>-ivOmWOh4 



M M M m (O 



""S 



00 <O00 -^ t^ O QO 



3"^ «o J* -(i- 

O M COOO 



O QO Q t^OO 00 0^ in 

M m o 00 pooo Q Q^ 

O rOvO N NOO O>00 



« M 



M 



o d «n Q w ^ m N « o* M 

MVO CO WOt^fOCOCT* 



»n 



Jt> M so 'T tJ- COOO Q< 0> c0*O t>- 



00 M M C4 



M w CO M miom 



«oao vo O O^ \nco 00 

0» N vQ CO «0 t^vO 00 

O "^ o^ O* moo 00 



VO CO 

o\oo 

00 CO 



CO 



M «MM«nCOC«NCO 

«n 



N o t>.vo r^ o> »o o> M lovo t^ CO 

•I CO H "^ CO covo Q> l^ ^ N »n 
•n "TfM ^comvovo o»S '^ 

Mm mm ^00 



COOO 0>"^«vO COOM^M t>. 

t>. ON ^00 »o CO CO M M c« mc 
mcoiot>» MiocoMMTfv 



^ 



M 



M M M 



<<t N M M m 

CO 



O^ CO -^ a> -^00 Tfvo t>H rooo 0^ t^ 
3"0Q fO M IN. N j^ o O H4 00 vO O 
OOO M M NOOOOOO ©00 COCOO 

«n M covo 00 Tf Tf CO o t>» o^oQ 

MM ^ 



"^M0QH4l«^M00O\DO»-'Ot* 

fOMN »OM M rs0<5 CON coo 
OMTf-^t OO^Oco^NMvO 



N 



M CO m M 



^o CO Tf g\ 



•ON 

M 

o 

•k » ^ «k 

COM M N 




lOMS 

NOOC 



M CO t^ O^ 
M 00 SO CO 
t>« CO M M 



i 



w-« ^— ^» w^ w^ "-■ •-■ "-■ 

CO CO COOO "^ ^ «O00 




v^ V 0«i3 ™ ia.a*MV^ l-K^H.S 



CO 
CO 

M 
OH 



vO 
CO 



CO 

in 
in 



m 

vO 









00 

M 
M 



m 

M 
00 



CO 



« 



m 

M 
CO 

CO 

m 



m 

f 



^ 



00 



N 



cd 
o 
H 



40 



to 

a 

o 
u 



to 

o 
H 

O 



•I 

It 



I 

1-1 

pq 
< 






moX 



9{ia9Anf 



^PPV 



F^OX 



d[ni9Anf 



^PPV 



F^ox 



dfinaAnf 



;ppv 






vp M ^ O^ fo ^qO t^ <n ri- ^ •* O 



_i. •••••••••••• 

COM M M N c< N t^^rrjfO^ 



«o rx t>. M in r»»^ invo vo fomm 
Tf fOvO ^ vO C^ O -^vO VO O M 

M M M M P») ^i M (( M 



»n o^ r^ lO ^ n -"^ t>-vo r^ m fo t>- 
!2 1:1 S. :^ «n<» »ft r^ w o> mvo vp 

fO COOO Ch CI fO O TfvO 00 o* 

MM M 



O 00 Q vQ M IT 
CO « 5 O^NOO 

N w vo »n«o M 



M CO POm 

M 



•OOOO O O^W NOO 

POvO PO m 5J vo ro 

00 t^ M lO O «0 M 

t^i^r^cnw o M fo 

M M M M O 



vo "^ «o po o> N Q moo oQ r^ i^ ON 
oonNN»OTi-^»nM^ rooo »n 
-^ « m po M t^ o>oo N m r^ t>. 



M 



N C« M 



MVO 



O\P0r»«OM Q ^^tN 5« 
COM OOO MOOvO 0> lOvO 
M piioo VO M PO OH N 



r^MOOOOOQ NVO o>v 
r^ M M CO ^vo m «nv 



^^l 



o 

M lO 



8 

« 

8 



8 

* 

8 



8 
8 



vO 



8, 



o> 



Ov 



00 



8^1 S>' 

PO I Tj- 



PO 



a 
o 

ti 
.s 



I^OX 



QH CO ot M 00 o »n pooo vo 00 o ^ 

00 vO "^VQ POmOOQ »OM t^PON 

t^ w "^ o o t>.oo vo M po m po 



N « M M 



^ 



9|ia9Anf 



M O PO M M M M POVO VO -^OO Tf 
0» M POOO NVO M t>-0>^txM 

M w«o vOMPOi^o»n«nTf 



^PPV 



00 POvO O t^ OH ^ o w 



00 po 

ION «^ 



M M 



fn»n M 

00 OH Ov 
VO 



C/3 

< 
o 




g. 



OH 
M 

VO 






O 

H 



41 



TABLE 7— Continued. 



CLASS 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Hazel wood 



o 
> 



139 

13 

307 
885 

II 

680 

164 

394 
952 
1,262 
668 
666 

11,309 



17.450 



0) 

to 

a 

A*' 



.80 

.07 

1.76 

5.07 
.06 

3.90 

.94 
2.26 

5.45 

7.23 

3.83 
3.82 

64.81 



100.00 



Grand Total 



o 

> 



3.355 
219 

3,317 
8,745 

9»4o2 

2,054 

3.177 
10,926 

14.197 
6,951 

8,463 
119.767 

190,707 



0) 

to 

a 

0) 



£ 



1.76 
.II 

1.74 

4.59 

.03 

4.97 
1.08 

1.67 

5.73 

7.44 
3.64 

4.44 
62.80 



100.00 



TABLE a 
ATTENDANCE IN THE CHILDREN'S ROOMS. 



1901 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uiy 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1902.. 



Total 



2.923 

3.414 
2,861 

2,595 
2,259 

1.664 

2, 

X, 

2,^2 

3. 
3,069 

3,077 




32,260 



6.175 
6,514 

3.196 
2.896 

3.003 
3.432 
5.494 
7.714 
6.436 
7,010 



60,250 



a 
I 



3,000 
2.983 

i!397 
986 

1.193 
1.247 
1,240 

2,024 

3.329 
2,781 
3,006 



25,010 









10,117 

11,086 

6,605 

6.483 
5.752 
4.052 

3.784 

5.242 

8,517 

10,038 

8,836 
9.075 



89.587 




2,286 
3.061 

2.385 

2,026 

1,806 

1.535 
X.543 
X.705 
2,223 

2.512 

2.037 
2,070 



25.189 



1 
I 

X 



3.490 

3.559 
2,600 

2,461 

X.697 
1.477 
1. 561 

X.951 
2.761 
4.080 

3.121 
3,208 



31.966 



•a 



27,991 
30.617 
20,771 
18,846 
15.696 
12,817 
13.227 
X5.528 

23.542 
31.50X 
26,280 
27.446 



'264,262 



*This doei not include all the children reached by the Library, lor the member- 
•hsp in home library groupa and clubt was 695, and the enroUment in the ichoola to 
which books are aent was J3»ai6. 



43 



c/) 
O 

J 

ovpq 



1-1 

< 



1-1 



H 
U 

H 

CZ4 

O 

CO 



CO 

s 

§ 

.a 

■s 



2 
o 

CO 

> 



l^^OX 



oQ\p g»mpnp ^Q mo «^n 



<0 ^CO M 
M M M M 



•>•»•» «b «k #k ^ «h 

O m ^ m r^ o^oo oo 



jddBdsAia^ 






N N 



« « N M 



8,n9jpnqD 



w^ -^ M lo a> -^ Q>oo rooo g> t^ 

N t-HO 0> «OVQ CO m N N v5 t> 

o> ^00 m M so O o* 000 o O 

•k *k #k •» «k «k «i 

N «0 W N N M c< 



00 
m 

•k » ^ ^ •» 



IBOipouaj 



I 



N «o o> r* 

vo r<» n M 
O VO vO CO 



vot^vouS.n sjadBdsAian'o; dn 
adAid mooj siqx 



doaajdjd^ 



N 00 00 Q^VO M moo 00 M OM^ 

C»«nNOQ M 0>»H MOO N fOM 

^ M O 00 VO O N M lO «0 "^00 

Mcf^MMMMNcTforrN 



98Q doaajdp^ 



M U-> Q M o Q 00 M o ^ 

"^ m « o »o <nvo "^ rx M 



O «o 

00 0> 



B 



ma» 



CO 

D 

a 

o 

X 



F^OX 



0> M M 

0^ 



8 



M M o^ ^ M t^oo r>. «O00 N vO 
ooo *no o^a»'^Q>N ro?<o 
&t PO l^ «0 M 0> ^00 o> «o o <o 

MMMMM mMmM 



9nnaAnf» 



Ocpa>Q 5>'OQ to mvo -^oo vp 

O H lO ro N roO ^vO O « fO fO 

o^ovo ^mc«NM t>.M a»o -^ 



;ppv 



o^oo N o^QoQ^^»n^^ o^"^T}- 
VQ »nvo o^o O^rON »r)NvO t> 

000000 COM t^a>0 woo wo 

H4 N O O^OO t^t>»00 M M O M 



a 



^ u 



M "M 



CO 

S 






^ 

-; 



3- 






CO 



I 



CO 



00 

m 



^£ ^ §'3 S3 Sr^ o <u 



00 

m 
m 

CO 






00 



M 



o 
H 



Si 

g| 
S S «i 

eg 

S O 4 

o mS 
— « 

*^ 3 S 

e X c 

S a 

► •« o 

•SaR. 



^l-«l 










S*" bS e« 
« o « 



44 



w 7\ 
S 55 

^ si 

3 
1-1 

H 

w 
u 



S 

i 



a 
o 

u 

o 






CO 

I 



O t^OQ inc* Tf« ''t'OtvM ^rrj 

M (4 M M 



8 
8 



moo M "^00 QOM-«r^QQ^l^ 

M 00 a>«n»oNmTffo5'5<o 5J 






00 

m 



1 


Per- 
cent. 


• 

eg 


a 

i 

r 


Per- 
cent. 


1 


•3 

< 


Per- 
cent. 


• 

JO 

> 



op W O* O CO «ooo O « M ro o m 



g^ ro ^ O^ -^OQ •'fvO t^ *ooo a» tN. 
^00 fO M t>.N "^O l> M 00 vO vO 
OOO M M ^4000000 Ooo«^ «o O 

•n M rrj\0 00 ^ -^ CO O t>» a»0Q 

MM N 



^ ^~^^^"N"'«~N~5~w~^17rfOt^oo~ 
fl ^Mr^MOMww cooo o* M »o 



M^ VOMMmt>*C0 



SMOQMt^Mood\bOMOt> 
M^iOMM^QOrONcoQ 

N ^>0 CO 'I* g 



« M CO 



m 



t>.^p op OHM COt^N mo N MOO 
^^^MNMMMMVO^ncO 

mmmci co<ncot>»coco •^ Jf 



mN V 

CO M 



OO r>^ t^vD vO M CO t> o* o 

so mMvfio Moo<o covp 

<0 WQOOOOO t^COM M^ 

N CO CO cooo ^ ^ moo 






CO 

u 

O 






u 

a 






nu. 



8 
8 






8 
8 



00 



8 



N 



o 
H 



.S 



Ji*^Ss? 



^1 



M •*»« C o ► 

•3 



•♦♦ •» 






45 



TABLE II. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1901 



February 

March 

April 

Nfay 

Tune 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1902 

Total 



Home Use 


Visitors to Rei 
Room 


'5 


1 


** 
** 


9 


CO 

a 

1 


•0 





•0 


.a 


< 




H 


< 





5.332 


3.053 


8,385 


3.283 


6,175 


5.465 


3.009 


8,474 


3.727 


6,514 


4.555 


2.369 


6.924 


3.077 


4.496 


4.391 


2,009 


6,400 


3.091 


3.884 


3.820 


1.975 


5.795 


2,490 


3.196 


3.809 


2,430 


6,239 


2,186 


2,896 


H^l 


1.541 


5.068 


2,199 


3.003 


3.838 


1.333 


5.171 


2,178 


3.432 


4.494 


2,187 


6.681 


2,623 


5.494 


4.952 


2,892 


7.844 


3,028 


7.714 


4.249 


2.649 


6,898 


2,642 


6,436 


4.883 
53.315 


2,690 


7.573 


2,912 


7.010 


28.137 


81,452 


33.436 


60,250 



-a 



9.458 
10.241 

7.573 

6.975 
5.686 

5.082 

5.202 

5.610 

8,117 
10.742 

9.078 
9.922 

93.686 



TABLE 12, 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



CO 
0) 



o 
> 



2,573. 

398 

549! 

784; 

52i 

1. 136; 

1.533 

1.319; 

4. "7 

2,221 

1.457 
1,680 

35.496 



cd 

a 

u 



4-83 

.75- 
1.03 

1-47, 
.10 

2.13 
2.87: 
2.47; 

7.72 

4.17 

2.73 

3.15 
66.58. 



53.315 100.00 



Juvenile 



CO 



o 

> 



522 

30 

417 

1. 146 

7 

1.439 

335 
569 

1,691 

1.675 
926 

1,027 
18,353 



28.137 



0) 

a 



1.86 

.11 

1.48 

4.07 

.03 

5.11 
1. 19 

2.02 

6.01 

5.95 
3.29 

3.65 
65.23 



100.00 



Total - 




9 




he 


CO 


a 


9) 


•♦-» 


B 


a 

0) 










u 





« 


> 


cu 


3.095 


3.80 


428 


.53 


966 


1. 19 


1.930 


2.37 


59 


.07 


2.575 


3.16 


1,868 


2.29 


1,888 


2.32 


5.808 


7.13 


3.896 


4.78 


2,383 


2.93 


2,707 


3.32 


53.849 


66.11 


81,452 


100.00 



46 



TABLE 13. 
WEST END BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1901 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1902 

Total 



Home Use 



•3 

< 



1.795 

1.758 

1.459 
1,229 

1,177 
1,226 

1,170 

1,258 

1,300 

1,586 

1.3 
I, 




17,118 



a> 



> 




i,o8i 

1,156 

789 
568 

532 
692 

548 

442 

678 

1,260 

1,126 

1. 175 



10,047 



I 



2,876 

2.914 
2,248 

1,797 

1,709 
1,918 

1,718 

1,700 

2,058 

2,846 

2,522 

2,859 






27,165 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



•3 

< 



1,857 
1,768 

1,354 
1,114 

918 

979 
1,003 
1,110 
1,217 
1,517 

1,243 
1,605 



15,685 



(0 



I 

:0 

u 



3,000 

2,983 
1,824 

1,3 




1.193 
1,247 
1,240 

2,024 

3,329 
2,781 

3»oo6 



25,010 



•a 

o 



4,857 
4,751 
3,178 

2,5" 

1,904 
2.172 
2.250 

2,350 

3,241 
4,846 
4,024 
4,611 



40,695 



TABLE 14. 
WEST END BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



Juvenile 



(0 

9i 



O 
> 



874 
116 
162 

244 

42 

2:^0 




396 

1,192 

536 

566 

570 
11,904 



17* "8 



9i 

o 



5.II 

.68 

.95 

1.43 

.25 

1-34 
1.67 
2.31 
6.96 

3.13 
3-30 

3-33 
69.54 



o 
> 



174 

7 
176 

600 

5 
380 

52 

204 

1,095 

702 

322 

339 
5»99i 



100.00 10,047 





I 



1.73 
.07 

1.75 
5.97 

.05 
3.78 

.52 

2.03 

ia9o 

7.00 

3.20 

3.37 
59.63 

100.00 



Total 



o 
> 



1,048 

123 

338 

844 

47! 
610' 

338, 
6oO| 

2,287. 

'■iill 

909I 
17.895' 



a 
S 

u 

ft** 



3.86 

.45 
1.24 

3.11 

.17 
2.25 

1.24 

2.21 

8.42 

4.56 

3.27 

65.87 



27,165! loaoo 



47 



TABLE 15. 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1901 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1902. 



Home Use 



•3 

< 



5,764 
5*765 
4,942 
4,211 

3,722 
3,630 

3,567 
3,805 
4,770 
5,124 

4,589 
5,374 



Total 1 55,263 






3,851 
3,850 
2,912 

2,741 

2,453 
3,068 

2,109 

1.795 
3,331 
3,963 
3,231 
3,366 



36,670 



•a 

o 



9,615 

9,615, 

7.854' 

6,952' 

6,1751 
6,698: 

5,6761 
5,600 
8,101! 
9,087 
7,820 
8,740, 



91,933 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



9 
< 



2,576 
2,766 
2,289 

1,964 

1,564 
1,616 

1,472 
2,042 

2.359 
3,205 

2,794 
2,885 



27.532 



(0 

a 
S 



10,117 

11,086 

6,605 

6,483 
5,752 
4.052 

3.784 
5,242 

8,517 

10,038 

8,836 
9,075 



89.587 



•a 



12,693 

13.852 

8,894 

8,447 
7,316 
5.668 
5.256 
7.284 
10,876 

13.243 
11,630 

11,960 



117,119 



TABLE 16. 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



Adult 



CLASS 



General Works . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



09 
0) 

"o 

> 



1.873 

478 

649 
982 

85 

I, III 

1.045 
1,118 

5.362 
3.413 

2,129 
2,100 

34.918 



55.263 



0) 

'4-' 

o 

o 

u 



3-39' 

.87; 

1.17 . 

1.78 i 

•15! 

2.01 ' 

1.89, 

2.02 I 
9.701 

6.18 I 

3.85M 
3.801 
63.19 



Juvenile 



Total 



CO 
0) 

a 

"o 

> 



295 

48 

756 

2,082 

13 

1.351 

364 

697 

2,046 

3.032 
1,270 
1,623 

23.093 



100.00; ' 36,670 



'4-' 

o 

O 

Ui 



I F 



' I 



.80, 

.13 
2.06 , 

5.68. 

.04 . 

3.68 

.99 
1.90 , 

5-58 
8.27 

3-46 

4.43 
62.98 






o 

> 



2,168 
526 

1.405 
3,064 

98 

2,462 

1,409 

I.8I5 
7.408 

6,445 

3.399 

3.723 
58,011 



loaoo I 91,933 



o 

O 

u 



2.36 

•57 

1.53 

3-33 
.11 

2.68 

1.53 
1.97 

8.06 

7.01 

3.70 

4-05 
63.10 



100.00 



48 



TABLE 17. 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1901 



February.^ 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1902. 



Total 



Home Use 



9 
< 



2,464 
2,640 
2,291 
2,117 
1,840 

1*987 

1,765 

1.755 
2,102 

2,380 

2,038 

2,266 



25.725 



o 

> 




1,594 
1,685 
1.664 
1.430 
1,215 
1,441 

1,075 
867 

1,318 
1,664 

1,232 
1,334 



16,519 



o 



4,058 
4,325 
3,955 
3,547 
3,055 
3,428 
2,840 
2,622 
3,500 

4,044 
3,270 
3,600 



42,244' 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



•3 

< 



1,876 
2,138 
1.889 
1,750 

1,527 
1.278 

1,313 
1,466 
1,720 
1,690 
1,466 
1,380 



19.493 



a 



2,286 
3,061 

2,385 
2,026 

1,806 

1,535 
1,543 
1,705 
2,223 

2,512 

2,037 
2,070 



3 

o 



4,162 

5,199 

4,274 

3,776 

3,333 
2,813 

2,856 

3,171 
3,943 

4,202 

3,503 
3,450 



25,189 44,682 



TABLE la 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



Adult 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literatiire 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



a 
o 



6.21 



1.87, 
.14 
I.671 
2.II ' 
2.22 
7.32;; 
3.97 I 

3-24il 
3.70 
65.73 



Juvenile 





0) 


00 


Sf 


0) 





□ 


4) 


g 


u 


"o 


a 


> 


0. 







191 

10 

233 

581 

I 
621 

161 

313 
776 

1,096 

544 

578 
11,414 



1. 16 

.06 

1.41 

3.51 
.01 

3.76 

.97 
1.90 

4.70 
6.63 
3.29 
3.50 
69.10 



Total 



-- 1 



loaoo 16,5191 100.00 




49 



TABLE 19. 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1901 



February 

March 

April , 

May , 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1902 

Total 



Home Use 


Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 


^ 


1 
1 


3 


•3 


(0 

i 

2 

*»4 


3 


•0 


^ 


•0 


ja 





< 


^ 


H 


< 


u 


H 


2,310 


1,854 


4,164 


1,825 


3,490 


5.315 


2,406 


i»952 


4,358 


1,926 


3,559 


5.485 


2,168 


1,639 


3,807 


1,767 


2,600 


4,367 


1,913 


1,224 


3.137 


1,552 


2,461 


4,013 


1,657 


* 1,013 


2,670 


1,282 


1,697 


2,979 


1,504 


1,071 


2.575 


1,258 


1,477 


2.735 


1,554 


881 


2,435 


1,247 


1,561 


2,808 


1,632 


884 


2.516 


1,219 


1,951 


3,170 


2,078 


1,287 


3.365 


1,616 


2,761 


4,377 


2,235 


2,046 


4,281 


1,631 


4,080 


5.711 


2,081 


1,658 


3.739 


1,560 


3,121 


4.681 


2.593 


1,941 


4.534 


1,689 


3,208 


4.897 


24,131 


17,450 


41.581 


18,572 


31.966 


50.538 



TABLE 20. 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology , 

Philology 

Natiiral Science 

Useful Arts , 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 

Fiction 

Total 

■ 



Adult 



s 



o 

> 



1.347 
211 
218 
438 
48 
462 

556 

559 
1,866 

986 

869 

1,121 

15.450 



24.131 



0) 

to 
a 

'4-' 

ca 

o 
u 

0) 



5.58 

.87 

.90 

1.82 

.20 

I.91 

2.30 

2.32 

7.73 
4.09 

3.60 

4-65 
64.03 



100.00 



Juvenile 



(0 



o 

> 



139 

13 

307 

885 

II 

680 

164 

394 
952 
1,262 
668 
666 

11,309 



ca 

o 
u 



.80 

.07 

1.76 

5-07 
.06 

3.90 

.94 
2.26 

5-45 
7.23 

3.83 

3.82 

64.81 



17,4501 lOO.OOl 



Total 



CO 
9i 



O 
> 



1,486 
224 

525 
1.323 

59 
1,142 

720 

953 
2,818 

2,248 

1.537 

1.787 

26,759 



41.581 



0) 



u 



3.57 
.54 

1.26 

3.18 

.14 

2.75 

1.73 

2.29 

6.78 

5.41 
3.70 
4.30 

64>35 
100.00 



50 



a 

O 
O 

o 

H 
U 

CO 

sS 

CO 

H 

o 

s 



1 


«k » «k «k «k » » 

fom Ot »o»noQ GO 

« 2 2 D'^a.?. 

M M M ro ^ ^ 


1 


M M M 4>«n»n 


• 


s 3; |ti|<l*^ 

00 M M 00 w «n ro 

M M M Cn^^ 


• 


\0 M M O«00 rOM 


• 

o 
O 




Sept. 




^ 

< 


M tt « N 


1 


UhUf 


Jane 


2 -lis-' 

« moo 00 t^i^ 




Q «noo inoo M' 




00 ^M r0C4 N 



vO X t^ 



CO mei r>»nin 

«k * »k •» «. «k. 

o» O M moo Q 

•H M M cniO 



00 00 00 00 00 9^ cS 



51 



Gifts to the Lf 



From February i, 1901, to February i, 1902, 

This does not imeluds ths publications of Kbrariss and othsr instUniions which am 

recsived in exchange. 

Givers 597 

Volumes 2,230 

Pamphlets 2^)70 

Numbers 2,012 



Vols. Pahib. Not. 



Two 



Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. . 

Academy of Science and Art 

Adams, Mrs £. C 

Aguilar Free Library Society, New York, N. Y. 

Ains worth. Gen. F. C, Washington, D. C 

Alabama — Geological Survey, Montgomery, Ala. . 
maps, and 

Aliton, T. and Acklin, G. W. . . .One picture. . . . 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa 

Allegheny County Bible School Association 

Allegheny County Workhouse, Hoboken, Pa. .. . 

Allegheny Free Library, Allegheny, Pa 

Allyn, Dr G.W 

American Art Association, New York, N. Y.... 

American Bar Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

American Bridge Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 

American Bureau of Shipping, New York, N. Y 

American Cement Company, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

American Foundrymen Association 

American Free Trade League, Boston, Mass. .. . 

American Humane Association, Brookline, Mass 

American Institution of Mining Engineers 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American Laryngological Association, New York, N. Y, 

American Manufacturer and Iron World 

American Museum of Natural History, New York, N. Y 

American Philatelic Association, Flemington, N. J.... 

American Public Health Association, Columbus, O.... 

American Railway Association, New York, N. Y 

American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of- 
Way Association, Chicago, 111 

American Railway Master Mechanics' Association, Chi- 
cago, 111 

American Society for Extension of University Teach- 
ing, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Street Railway Association, Chicago, 111.... 



6 
I 



• • • « 



I 

4 

> • • 

I 

I 

12 



I 

3 
I 

I 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



14 
I 



2 
I 
I 



I 
I 
I 

4 
I 



X • • • • 



• • • • 



I 
19 



75 



52 



Anderson, Mr E.H 

Anderson, Mr J. D., representing Silver, Burdette and 
Company 

Anderson, Mr John, Jr., New York, N. Y 

Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary 

Andrews, Mr Samuel 

Anonymous 

Apprentices Library Q>mpany of Philadelphia, Pa 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae 

Association of Railway Superintendents of Bridges and 
Buildings, Concord, N. H 

Baker, Mr Ernest A., Derby, Eng 

Bakewell, Miss Martha P., Allegheny, Pa 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, Pa 

Bangor (Me.) Public Library 

Bangs & Co., New York, N. Y 

Barber, Mr Theo.M 

Barnes, Dr Lemuel Call 

Barton, Mr W. E., Oak Park, 111 

Bateman, Mr £. O., Calcutta, India 

Baum, Mrs Maud Gage, Chicago, 111 

Beer, Mr Wm., New Orleans, La 

Belgium — Commerce, Ministry of. Through Smith- 
sonian Institution 

Berea College, Berea, Ky 

Berry, Mr J. M., Millbury, Mass 

Birmingham (England)— City Treasurer 

Birmingham (England) Free Libraries 

Blatchley, Mr W. S., Indianapolis, Ind 

Boston (Mass.) — Street Department 

Boston (Mass.) — Water Commissioners 

Boston (Mass.) Associated Charities 

Boston (Mass.) Athenaeum 

Boston (Mass.) College of Practical Psychology 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 

Boston (Mass.) Rapid Transit Commission 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me 

Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Me 

Bowerman, Mr G. F., Wilmington, Del 

Bronson Library, Waterbury, (Tonn 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) — Charities, Bureau of 

Brookljrn (N. Y.) Association for Improving Condition 
of the Poor 

Brooks, Mr H. K., CHiicago, 111 

Brooks, Miss H. St B 

Brown, Mr Isaac B., Harrisburg, Pa. . . .Two maps 

Brown, Hon. J. G 

Brown, Rev. J. G 

Brown, Miss Jean Parkman, (Cambridge, Mass 

Brown, Mr W. H., CHiicago, 111 



Vols. Pams. Not. 
.... 35 ^ 



I 
8 



4 
I 



• • • • 



I 
I 



.... 



.... 



I 

3 
I 

I 



13 
I 

5 



10 

I 



3 
I 

I 

I 



I 
I 
I 

39 
I 

4 

3 
8 

3 

35 
I 

2 
I 



10 



13 



17 



53 



Vols. FunM. Not. 



Brown tJnivcrsity, Providence, R. I 

Bryn Mawr G>llege, Bryn Mawr, Pa 

Buchanan, Mr J. I ... . One map • 

Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa 

Buffalo (N.Y.) Public Library 

Burgoyne, Mr Arthur G 

Burlington (la.) Free Public Library 

Bums, Mrs Qara R., Allegheny, Pa 

Button, Qifford H 

Byllesby, Mrs Madison 

Cambria Steel Company, Philadelphia, Pa 

Cambridge (Mass.) — City (Council , 

(Cambridge (Mass.) — Superintendent of Schools 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library 

Campbell, Mr Jas. W 

Campbell, Rev. Thos. J., New York, N. Y 

Canada — ^Agriculture, Department of. Ottawa, Canada 

Canada — Geological Survey, Ottawa, Canada Four 

maps, and 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal, Canada 

C^proni, P. P., Boston, Mass 

Card, Mr W.W 

(3arleton (College, Northfield, Minn 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa 

(Carnegie Institute — Department of Fine Arts 

Carnegie Library, Atlanta, Ga 

(Carnegie Museum 

Carnegie Steel Company 

C^se School of Applied Science, Qeveland, O 

Centre College of Kentucky, Danville, Ky 

Century Company, New York, N. Y 

Chadwick, Mr F. E., Newport, R. I 

CHiandler, Miss Alice G., Lancaster, Mass 

Chapman, Dr M.J 

Chapman, Prof . T. J., Ingram, Pa 

Charity Organization Society of Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y. . 

Chicago (III.) — Commissioner of Public Works 

Cliicago (111.) Board of Trade 

Chicago (111.) Civil Service Commission 

Chi&go (III.) Library Qub 

Chicago (III.) Public Library 

Chickering and Sons, Boston, Mass 

Christian Science Reading Room 

Christy and Cliristy 

Cliurch, Mr S. H 

Church Library Association, Cambridge, Mass 

Cincinnati (O.) Associated (Charities 

Cincinnati (O.) Museum Association 

Cincinnati (O.) Public Library 

Civic Qub of Philadelphia, Pa 

Civil Service Reform Association, New York, N.Y. . . . 



• « • • 



I 
I 

2 



I 
I 
I 
I 



• . • . 



2 

7 



• • • • 



I 
6 
I 

3 



• • • • 



I 
8 

I 

2 
I 



6 
I 
I 
6 

I 

5 

» • 

I 
I 
I 
z 

2 



. . • . 
I 



I 

30 
z 

4 
z 

z 

z 

3 

14 
z 

2 



54 



Vols. 

Qapp, Mr D. C. . . .63 photographs, and 68 

Qapp, Mr G. H 

Qark, C. M., Publishing Company, Boston, Mass i 

Qark University, Worcester, Mass 

Qeveland (O.) Public Library 

G>lby, Mr Albert Ladd, South Bethlehem, Pa 

Cole, Mr G.W.,New York, N.Y..r 

Colorado — Agricultural Experiment Station, Fort Col- 
lins, Col 

Colorado — ^Agriculture, State Board of 

Colorado — Mines, Bureau of. Denver, Col i 

Colorado — State Treasurer, Denver, Col 

Columbia University, New York, N. Y 2 

Columbia University — ^Library, New York, N. Y 

Columbus (O.) Public School Library 

Commonwealth Company, New York, N. Y i 

Concord (N. H.) Public Library 

Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Conn i 

Codsumers' League of New York City, New York, 

N. Y 

Cornell College, Mt Vernon, la 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y 

Cornell University — College of Agriculture, Ithaca, N. Y 

Crane, Mr W., Braddock, Pa i 

Craver, Mr H.W 

Crowninshield, Mr B. B., Boston, Mass 

Cninden, Mr F. M., St. Louis, Mo 

Cunningham, Mr H.W., Boston, Mass 

Cussons, May and Company, Glen Allen, Va i 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H 

Davis, Mr H.M *. 31 

Davis, Dr Lewis E 

Davis, Dr Thos.D 

Dajrton (O.) Public Library 

Decker, Mr Omar S. . . .One map 

DeLand, Mr Fred 

DeLand, Mrs Fred i 

Denniston, Mr George F. . . .Two pictures, and 11 

Detroit (Mich.) Public Library 

Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa 

Diehl, Mr W. J. . . .Newspaper clippings 

District of Columbia — Education, Board of 4 

District of Columbia — Public Library of. Washing- 
ton, D. C 

Doane College, Crete, Neb 

Douglas, Mr Jas., New York, N. Y 

Dundee (Scotland) Free Libraries 

Eames, Mr A.H 

East St. Louis (Mo.) Public Library 

Eastern Maintenance-of-Way Association, Ware, Mass. .... 

Eau Cnairc (Wis.) Public Library 



Pimi. 

58 
S8 

.... 

2 
I 

2 
2 

7 
I 

4 
I 

2 
I 

2 

« • • • 

I 

6 

6 
I 

2 



I 
I 
z 
I 
I 



I 

2 



2 
I 



No*. 

306 
82 



.... 
.... 
.... 

49 

.... 

.... 
• . • . 

20 



16 



.... 



55 



• • • • 



Vols. Plims. Nos 

Edwards, Rev. Chas. E 

Emerson, Mr P. H., Hants, Eng 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 

Erie (Pa.) Public Library 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa 

Field, Marshall, Chicago, 111 2 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111* i 

Fisk Free and Public Library, New Orleans, La 

Flack, Mr J. B 11 

Flannagan, Mr T. W., Minneapolis, Minn i 31 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 

Flinn, Hon. Wm 6 

Ford, Franklin i 

Ford, Mr. Henry J i 

Foskett, Mrs H. J., Hoboken, N. J i 

Fourth Avenue Baptist Church 

France — Ministre du Commerce et de Tlndustrie 7 

Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa 

Franklin and Marshall College Alunmi Association, 

Lancaster, Pa 

Franks, Mr R. A., Sewickley, Pa 6 

Freiheits-Freund i 

Friends Free Library, Germantown, Pa 

Fritzsche Brothers, New York, N. Y 

Fulton, Dr H. D 

General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y 15 4 

Georgia — Geological Survey, Atlanta, Ga 4 i 5 

Germanischer Lloyd, Berlin, Germany i 

Gcrould, Mr Jas. Thaver, Columbia, Mo 

Gloversville (N. Y.) Public Library 

Greathouse, Mr M. C, Washington, D. C 

Green, Mr Samuel S., Worcester, Mass 

Guttenberg, Mrs Gustave 20 

Handy, Mr James Otis 6 

Harper, Mr F. P., New York, N.Y 

Hart, Mr Thomas N., Boston, Mass 

Hartford (Conn.) Public Library i 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass i 

Harvard University — Library, (Cambridge, Mass 

Hasting^, Mr Hugh, Albany, N. Y 2 

Haverhill (Mass.) Public Library 

Haynes, Mr Tilly, Boston, Mass i .... 

Heath, D.C, Boston, Mass 3 .... 

Heda Iron Works, Brooklyn, N. Y 13 .... 

Heinz, Mr H.J 6 .... 

Hessling, Mr Bruno, New York, N. Y i .... 

He3rwood, Mr John, Manchester, Eng i 

Higinbottom Free Library, Ashton-Under-Ljrne, Eng i 

Hiner, Mr Jos. W., Chicago, 111 i 

Hodkinson, Dr W. A 316 .... 

Hoem, Mr Ole i .... 

56 



• ••• •••• 



• • • 



• • 



• • 



• • • 



• • 



• • 



• • • « • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • • • 



• • • • 



• • • 



• • • • 



• • • 



• • • • • • 



• • • 



• • • • « • • 



• • • 



Vols. Funs. Not. 

Hogg, Mrs F.T 139 

Holbrook, Mr R. H., Allegheny, Pa 4 

Holland, Dr W.J 8 

Holland Society of New York, New York, N. Y i 

Hosmer, Mr Jas. K., Minneapolis, Minn i 

Hostetter, Mr Chas. M 2 .... 

Hough, Dr C. C, Homestead, Pa 2 .... 

Houghton, Mifflin and Company, Boston, Mass.... Six 

sets of plates 

Howey, Miss Laura £., Helena, Mont 19 

Hughes, Mrs Alexander i 

lies, Mr Geo.,New York, N. Y i 

Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, 111 2 

Illinois Young Men's Christian Associations, Chicago, 111. i .... 

Immigration Restriction League i 

Imperial South African Association, London, Eng 3 2 

Iowa — Geological Survey, Des Moines, la 2 

Iowa — State Normal School, Cedar Falls, la i 

Iowa — State University, Iowa City, la i 

Irvin, Mr Jas 6 

Japan — Finance, Minister of. Tokio, Japan I 

The Jesse Cornelius Company i 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111 i 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md 3 

Johnson, Mr W. K 264 

Jones, James 2 

Jones, Samuel i 

Jordan, Dr David Starr, Palo Alto, Cal i 

Kansas City (Mo.) Public Library I 

Kearney, Mr J. F i 

Keogh, Mr Andrew, New Haven, Conn i 

Kephart, Mr Horace, St. Louis, Mo i 

King, Mr Byron W i 

Kingsbury, Mr Jos. Addison i 

Kirshbaum, Mr W., St. Petersburg, Russia i 

Knopf, Dr S.A.,New York, N.Y i 

Knox College, Galesburg, 111 i 

Koethen, Mrs Lide W 8 

Die Krupp'sche Bucherhalle, Essen, Germany i 

Kummel, Mr H. B., State Geologist, Trenton, N. J i 

Kuttroff, Pickhardt and Company, New York, N.Y i 

Lake Mohonk (N. Y.) Conference On International Ar- 
bitration 2 

Lambing, Rev. A. A., Wilkinsburg, Pa i 

Lancaster (Mass.) Town Library i 

Langer, Mr Francis 24 

Lash, Mrs L.A 30 

Latham, Mr R. L., representing D. C. Heath & Co 38 23 

Lavely, Mr H. A i 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa i 

Lehman, Mr Geo. M 11 



... 



. . ... 



... .... 



. . 



. . 



.... .... 



. . 



.... 



.... .... 



.... .... 



.... .... 



.... 



.... 



.... 



• . .... 



. . 



. . 



.... 



.... .... 



.... 



.... .... 



. . ... 



. . 



.... .... 



.... 



.... 



57 



Leland Stanford Jr. University, Palo Alto, Gd 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111 

Libbie, C. F. and Company 

Lick Observatory, University of California, Mt Ham- 
ilton, Cal 

Litchfield, Dr Lawrence 

Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping, Lon- 
don, England 

London (Ontario) Public Library 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library 

Luxfer Prism Company, Chicago, 111 

Lytle, Mr J. J., Philadelphia, Pa 

McCarthy, Mrs A. A 

McConway and Torley Company 

McCreery, Mr J. R 

Macfarren, Mr Samuel 

McCjonnigle, Mr R. D 

McLure, Mrs Cornelia R 

McMinnville College, McMinnville, Oregon 

McPherson, Miss Alice ;. 

Maginnis, Mr Owen B., New York, N. Y 

Maiden (Mass.) Public Library 

Manchester (Eng.) Public Free Library 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library 

Mann, Mr W.J. 

Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md 

Massachusetts — Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Boston, 
Mass 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts — Education, Board of 

Massachusetts — State bureau of Labor 

Massachusetts — State Library, Boston, Mass 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. . 

Master Car and Locomotive Painters' Association, 

Kent, Ohio 

Mathiot, Dr E. B 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library 

Mellor, Mr C.C 

Mercantile Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa 

Merchants' Association, New York, N. Y 

Methodist Library, New York, N. Y 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N. Y 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Boston, Mass. 
Michigan — Health, State Board of. Lansing, Mich.... 
Michigan State Agricultural College, Agricultural Col- 
lege, Mich 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Library 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Public Library 

Minnesota — (geological and Natural History Survey, 
Minneapolis, Minn 



Vols. Plims. Not. 

.... X .*•• 
• ••• X ...a 



A ••.• •••• 



.... .... 



.... 



20 

I 



4 

2 



374 
14 



X .... 

• • • • o 

X .... 

.... I 

5 .... 

yo .... 

17 I 
z 232 

I I 

18 2 

.... X 

^ .... 

X .... 

.... X 

.... I 
I 

^ .... 

X .... 

2 .... 



9 

ID 

I • • 

I 

5 



I 

I 

II 

2 

16 

13 
I 
9 



191 



119 



• • • • 



S8 



• • • • 



• • • • 



• • • • 



I 
I 



36 

14 



• • • • 



I 
9 



Vols. Funs. Not. 

Minnesota — Public library commission, Minneapolis, 

Minn i •••• 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo i 

Montana Historical Library, Helena, Mont One map .... i 

Montclair (N.J.) Free Public Library .... i 

Moreau, Mr C. L., New York, N. Y i 

Morgan, Mr Chas. H., Worcester, Mass i 

Morgan, Mr George O 87 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass i .... 

Mt Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass 3 .... 

Mt Washington Free Reading Room i 

Muskingum College, New G>ncord, O i .... 

Myers, Mr Samuel A. . . .Two pictures 

National Education Association, Winona, Minn 

Nebraska, University of. Lincoln, Neb 

Neeb, Messrs T. and L 114 

New Bedford (Mass.) Free Public Library 

New Hampshire — State Bureau of Labor, Manches- 
ter, N. H 

New Haven (Conn.) Free Public Library 

New Jersey — Geological Survey, Trenton, N. J....One 

map, and i 

New London (Conn.) Public Library 

New South Wales — (Geological Survey, Sydney, N. S.W. 2 

New South Wales, Public Library of. Sydney, N. S.W 

New York — Railroad Commissioners, Board of. Al- 
bany, N. Y 

New York — State Library, Albany, N. Y 

New York (N. Y.), Borough of Manhattan — School 
Board 

New York (N. Y.) — Education, Department of i 

New York (N. Y.)— Health, Department of 1 

New York (N. Y.) — Street Qeaning Department 

New York (N. Y.) Free Circulating Library 

New York (N. Y.) Merchants Association i 

New York (N.Y.) Railroad Qub 

New York State C>>llege of Forestry, Ithaca, N. Y 

New York University, New York, N.Y 

New York (N.Y.) Zoological Society 

Newark (N.J.) Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, (Chicago, 111 

Newcomb, Dr Ja8.£.,New York, N.Y 

Newmyer, Mrs J. C i 

Niagara Falls (N.Y.) PubHc Library 

Nijhoff, Mr M., The Hague, Holland i 

Northwest Railway Qub, Minneapolis, Minn i 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 

Oberlin 0>llege, Oberlin, O 

Oberlin College — Library, Oberlin, O 

Ogilvie, J. S. Publishing Company, New York» N. Y. . . a 

Ohio State University, Columbus, O 



4 

2 

2 
II 

I 

3 

4 

2 

3 

X 
X 



X 

I 

4 
X 



.... 



59 



Vols. Pftms. Nos. 
I 



Pa 



Pennsylvania Baptist Education Society, Philadelphia, 
Pa 

Pennsylvania College for Women 

Pennsylvania Society, Sons of the Revolution, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 

Pennsylvania State College, State College, Pa 

Pflaum, Mr Magnus 

Phelps, Mr E. B., New York, N.Y 

Philadelphia (Pa.) City Institute 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Free Library 

Philosophical Society, Washington, D. C 

Pittsburgh — City Controller 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette 

Polk and Dudley 

Pol3rtechnic Drawer, Troy, N, Y 

Porter, Mr H.K 

Porter, Prof. J. M., Easton, Pa 

Potomac Steel Company 

Princeton University, Princeton, N. J 

Princeton University — Library, Princeton, N. J 

Protestant Episcopal CHiurch of the United States — Do- 
mestic and Foreign Missionary Society, New 
York, N. Y 

Providence (R. L) — Public Library 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum 

Public Libraries, CHiicago, 111 

Quinon, Mr Stephen. . . .One manuscript, and 

Railway Signaling Club, West Milwaukee, Wis 

Reading Public Library, Reading, Pa 

Reckitt, Mr C. C, Chicago, 111 

Remington, Mr Ed. P 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y 



• • • • 



Ohio Wcslejran University, Delaware, O 

Oliver, Mr George 130 • • • • 

O'Neill, Mr S. M., New York, N.Y 3 ... 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, Ore. .... 3 

Ottawa (Canada) Literary and Scientific Society i 

Page, Mr Oliver Ormsby 3 

Parvin, Mr N. R., Cedar Rapids, Iowa i 

Paterson (N. J.) Free Public Library 

Paul, Mr Jas. W., Charleston, W. Va i 

Pennsylvania — Commonwealth of. Harrisburg, Pa 20 

Pennsylvania — Industrial Reformatory, Huntingdon, Pa. .... 
Pennsylvania — Internal Affairs, Department of. Harris- 
burg, Pa 2 

Pennsylvania — Sinking Fund Commissioner, Harris- 
burg, Pa 6 

Pennsylvania — State Library, Harrisburg, Pa 41 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 



• • « • 



I 
26 



I 

I 



2 . 

2 



I 
I 

7 



I 
43 



28 



57 

24 
66 



2 

13 
I 

I 

15 
3 



• • • • 



60 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



• • • 



• • • • 



• • 



• • • • 



• • 



• • 



• • • 



• • 



• • • 



• • 



• • 



Vols. Pfcms. No*. 

Rhode Island Normal School, Providence, R.I i 

Roadmasters' Association of America, Sterling, 111 13 

Robbins, Mr Reginald C, Boston, Mass i 

Rod6, Mr G.W i 

Roll, Louis I 

Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind i 

The Roycroft Shop, East Aurora, N. Y i 

Rutgers G>llege, New Brunswick, N. J 3 

St Joseph (Mo.) — City clerk 2 

St Louis (Mo.) Public Free Library 20 

St Louis (Mo.) Railway Qub 31 

St Paul Associated Charities, Minn i 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library 2 

San Francisco (Cal.) Public Library i 

Sanford, Mr P. B One map, and 2 

Saward, Mr F. E., New York, N. Y i 

Scaife, Mr W. B 49 151 48 

Schimmet and Company, Leipzig, Cjermany i 9 

Schroeder, Mr A. T., Salt Lake City, Utah 2 

Schwartz, Mr J. L 34 .... 

Scott, Mr W., (Cambridge, Mass i 

Scott and Dieschbourg, New York, N. Y i 

Scranton (Pa.) Public Library 2 

Scribner's, Charles, Sons, New York, N. Y Two 

sets of colored plates 

Seehausen, Miss 6 .... 

Sellers, Mr E. J., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Semple, Miss Mary I. R., Wilkinsburg, Pa 332 .... 

Semple, Miss Mary P i .... 

Seward, Mr (jeo. F., New York, N. Y 2 

Shakspere Society of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa i 

Shaw, Dr Wm. (Tonnor 7 .... 

Shepard, Irwin, Winona, Minn i 

Sherwood Press, Elizabeth, N. J 2 

Shields, C. W., Princeton, N.J i 

Slattery, Mr Francis A., Crafton, Pa 4 

Smith, Mr A. Y i 

Smith, Mr Edwin Z 30 

Smith, Col. Norman M i 

Smith College. Northampton, Mass 2 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 14 8 i 

Society for Promotion of Engineering Education, Dur- 
ham, N. H I 

Society of the Army of the Cumberland, Washington, 

mJ* Vi^.. .•.*...■•.•.••.•..............•■■.... ...... 3 .... ..•• 

Somerville (Mass.) Public Library i 

Sonneberg, Mr W., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Sons of the American Revolution — Massachusetts So- 
ciety I 

Sons of the American Revolution — Pennsylvania Society i i 

Spencerian Pen Company, New York, N. Y i .... 



. . * • 



. . 



.... ...• 



... . . 



. . • 



. . . • 



. . 



• . • • 



.... 



61 



Spielman, Mr J. G 

Springfield (Mass.) City Library Association 

Stanton, Rev. W. A 

Stcchcrt, Mr G.E.,Ncw York, N.Y 

Stephenson, Mr Wm. F. H., Buffalo, N. Y 

Stevenson, Mr A. K 

Steward, Mr J. F., Chicago, 111 

Stoney, Mr R. J., Jr 

Sturtevant, B. F. Company, Boston, Mass 

Sunset Qub, Chicago, 111 

Swan, Mr Charles H., Jr 

Swank, Mr Jas. M., Philadelphia, P 

Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa 

Sweven, Mr Godfrey, New York, N. Y 

Syracuse (N. Y.) Public Library 

T Square Qub, Philadelphia, Pa 

Tanaka, Mr I., Tokyo, Japan 

Thiel College, Greenville, Pa , 

Thomson, Mr John, Philadelphia, Pa 

Thurston School, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Tomlinson, Miss A. R 

Traveling Engineers' Association, Elkhart, Ind 

Trenton (N. J.) Iron Company 

Tufts College, Tufts College, Mass 

Tumill, Mr S. M 

Twin City Philatelic Society 

Union Theological Seminary, New York, N. Y 

United Brethren — Society of. Bethlehem, Pa 

United States — ^Adjutant general 

United States — ^American Republics, Bureau of 

United States — Animal Industry, Bureau of 

United States — Bureau of Education 

United States — Bureau of Ethnology 

United States — Census . . . ' 

United States — Coast and Geodetic Survey 

United States — Department of Agriculture 

United States — Department of the Army 

United States — Department of the Interior 

United States — Department of the Navy 

United States — Department of State 

United States — Department of Treasury 

United States — Department of War 

United States — Geological Survey 

United States Government. . . .One atlas, and 

United States Government, through Mr Chas. Moore. . . 
United States Government, throu^ Hon. John Dalzell. . 

United States — Indian School Service 

United States — Internal Revenue 

United States — Interstate Commerce Commission 

United States — ^Library of Congress 

United States — Naval Intelligence Bureau 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

I I 
..... 33 



I 
I 



• a • • 



• . . • 



■ • . • 



2 
I 

2 



• • a • 

I 

• . • • 



I 

2 



6 
I 
6 
I 

2 

6 

3 

4 

215 

I 
3 



2 

4 



I 
I 



3 
I 



7 

4 

3 

SO 

» • • 

2 

38 
I 
I 
I 



10 

I 

"5 

• • • 

25 

2 
20 

6 

4 
6 

41 



I 

3 
I 

2 
I 



30 
24 



I 
13 



62 



VoU. 



College 



C 



United States — Superintendent of Documents 

United States Daughters, 1812 — Dolly Madison chapter 
University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. . 
University of California, Berkeley, Cal 

University of Chicago (111.) 

University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. 
University of Denver, Denver, Col... 
University of Illinois, Champaign, 111 

University of Maine, Orono, Me 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. . 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn 

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo 

University of Nashville — Peabody Normal 
Nashville, Tenn 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 
University of Pennsylvania — Exchange Bureau, Phila 
delphia. Pa 

University of Pennsylvania — Free Museum of 
Science, Philadelphia, Pa 

University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y 

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Cal. 

University of Texas, Austin, Tex 

University of the State of New York, Albany, 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt 

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va... 

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash 

University of West Virginia, Morgantown, W 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis 

University of Wooster, Wooster, O 

University Preparatory School, Ithaca, N. Y. . 

Van Marken, Mr J. C, Delft, Holland 

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Vermont — Board of Library Commissioners, 
Vt 



Art and 



N.Y.. 



Va... 



Rutland, 



Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Wade, Mr W., Oakmont, Pa 

Warvelle, Mr George W., Chicago, 111 
Washburn College, Topeka, Kansas . 
Washington Heights Free Library, New York, N. Y. 
Washington (D. C.) National Monument Society.... 
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo 

Watson, Mr Wm. R 

Watson and McQeave One map. 

Way, Mr John, Jr., Sewicklcy, Pa... 

Weaver, E. A., Philadelphia, Pa 

Webster, Mr B 

Wellesley College, vWellesley, Mass. 
Weslcyan University, Middletown, Conn 



Paina. 

2 

• • • • 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
2 
I 

3 

2 

I 



No*. 



I 
I 

IS 
8 



63 



Vols. Pams. Not. 



West Virginia — Chief Mine Inspector, Charleston, 
W. Va 

West Virginia University — Agricultural Experiment 
Station, Morgantown, W. Va 

West Virginia University Library, Morgantown, W. Va. 

Western Pennsylvania Exposition Society 

Western Pennsylvania Institution for the Blind 

Western Reserve University, Cleveland, O 

Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pa 

Western University of Pennsylvania, Allegheny, Pa. . . . 

Westinghouse, Mr George 

Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company. . . 

Westminster College, Westminster, Pa 

White, The S. S., Dental Manufacturing Company, 
Philadelphia, Pa 

Whitehead, Rt Rev. Cortlandt 

Willard, Miss E. M 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute 

Wilson College for Women, Chambersburg, Pa 

Wint, Mr Marvin A 

Winthrop (Mass.) Public Library 

Wisconsin — Education, State Superintendent of. Mad- 
ison, Wis 

Wisconsin — Superintendent of Public Instruction, Mad- 
ison, Wis 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission, Madison, Wis... 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis 

Wolf, Mr Samuel 

Woman's College, Baltimore, Md 

Women's Baptist Home Missionary Society, Chicago, 
111 

Woodward, Miss Meredyth 

Wright, Mr Edward S., Allegheny, Pa 

Yale and Towne Manufacturing Company, Stamford, 
Conn 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 

Yale University — Library, New Haven, Conn 

Yeates, Mr W. S., Atlanta, Ga 

Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, Williams 
Bay, Wis 

Young Men's (Christian Association of New York — Li- 
brary of. New York, N. Y 

Zoological Society of London, Eng 



I 

44 
I 



2 
2 



6 
I 
I 

2 
I 
I 
I 
I 

19 

I 



3 
I 

I 



• • a • 



2 

4 

2 



I 

I 
I 

I 

2 
I 
I 



I 
I 



Periodicals and Newspapers Received u Gifts 

Advocate of Peace. 

Alleghenier und Pittsburger Sonntagsbote. 

Aluminum World. 

American. 

American Iron and Steel Association. Bulletin. 



64 



American Journal of Philately. 

American Manufacturer and Iron World. 

American Society of Civil Engineers. Proceedings. 

American Trade. Philadelphia. 

Assembly Herald. 

Ave Maria. 

Banker. Pittsburgh. 

Baptist Home Mission Monthly. 

Baptist Missionary Magazine. 

Biblia. 

Blairsville G)llege Journal. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Bureau of American Republics. Monthly Bulletin. 

C. M. B. A. News. 

California Investor. Los Angeles. 

Chicago Banker. 

Chicago Statistics. 

Christian Cynosure. 

Christian Register. 

Christian Science Journal. 

Christian Science SentineL 

Christian Social Union. Publications. 

Christian Statesman. 

Church Calendar. 

Church News. 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History. Journal. 

Qeveland Citizen. 

Coal and Coke. 

Columbia University Quarterly. 

Commerce and Finance of the United States. Monthly Summary. 

Commerce of the Island of Cuba. Monthly Summary. 

Commerce of the Island of Porto Rico. Monthly Summary. 

Commerce of the Philippine Islands. Monthly Summary. 

Commoner and Glassworker. 

Congressional Record. 

Criterion. 

Denver Evening Post. ^ 

Elizabeth Herald. 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania. Proceedings. 

The Era. Cornell. 

Free Museum of Science and Art University of Pennsylvania. 

Freedom. 

Gazeta Pittsburgska. 

Good Government. 

Good Roads Magazine. 

Herald of the Golden Age. 

High School Journal. 

Home Mission Monthly. 

Illustrated Official Journal (Patents). London. 

Indianapolis News. 

Japan and America. 

Jewish Criterion. 

6s 



Kingsley House Record. 

Lafayette. 

Literary News. 

The Locomotive. 

Los Angeles Herald. 

Mekeel's Weekly Stamp News. 

Mining and Engineering Review and Electrician. 

Monthly Gazette of English Literature. 

National Glass Budget 

New York Railroad Qub. Official Proceedings. 

North- West Railway Qub. Official Proceedings. 

Official Railway Guide of Pittsburgh. 

Oil City Derrick. 

Oil, Copper, and Finance. 

Pennsylvania Medical Journal. 

Petroleum Reporter. 

Philadelphia Press. 

Pittsburgh Bulletin. 

Pittsburgh Catholic 

Pittsburg Christian Advocate. 

Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. 

Pittsburgh CcMnmercial Gazette. 

Pittsburg Dispatch. 

Pittsburgh Index. 

Pittsburg Leader. 

Pittsburg Neue Wdt 

Pittsburg Post 

Pittsburg Press. 

Pittsburgh Railway Qub. Proceedings. 

Pittsburg Times. 

Pratt Institute Monthly. 

Presbyterian Banner. 

El Progress. Mexico. 

The Public Chicago. 

Public Health Reports. United States Government 

Railroad Of Hdals. Pocket List 

Rarasek. Pittsburgh. 

Remarques. 

Repertoire Bibliographique de la Librairie Fran^aisc 

Rose Technic 

Saint Andrew's Cross. 

St. Louis Railway Qub. Proceedings. 

Smith College Monthly. 

Sound Currency. 

Spirit of Missions. 

Sunny South. Atlanta. 

Sunset 

Svenska Amerikanska Posten. 

Svenska Veckobladet 

Telephone Magazine 

Theosophical Review. 

Tidings. 

66 



Tin and Tcrnc 

Trade Marks Journal. London. 

Truth. 

United States, Department of Labor. Bulletin. 

United States Patent Office Gazette. 

United States Public Documents. Catalogue. 

Universal Brotherhood Path. 

University of Tennessee Record. 

Vassar Miscellany. 

Volksblatt und Freiheits-Freund. 

Weekly People. 

Weekly PhiUtdic Era. 

Western Mining Herald. Los Angeles. 

Western Society of Engineers. Journal. 

Western University G^urant. 

Wielkopolanin. Pittsburgh. 

Women's Missionary Magazine. 

Worker. 



^ 



Report of the Superintendent of Buildings 

To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds: 

Gentlemen : — I beg to report that the buildings, together 
with the machinery and electrical equipment, are in thorough 
repair. The telephone service has been much improved by 
the installation of the private branch exchange, authorized by 
you and opened September 1 1 . 

Our experience with gas engines as a power to drive elec- 
tric light generators has proved so satisfactory at the Law- 
renceville and Hazelwood branches, that I would recommend 
a similar outfit for the Wylie Avenue building. I would also 
advise placing duplicate rigs of the same type in the pro- 
posed East Liberty branch. The size of the building would 
warrant the installation of two separate outfits, which are 
necessary, moreover, in order that ventilating fans may be 
used. The large attendance at times, especially in the chil- 
dren's department, is such as to call for serious considera- 
tion of the matter of ventilation. While each branch erected 
is an improvement in this respect over the one preceding it, 
yet further improvement can be made by installing elec- 
trically driven apparatus. 

The lecture hall at the Central Library building was used 
114 times during the year, eighty of the entertainments being 
free and of educational interest to the public. No rental was 
charged. Thirty-four were either in the interest of organiza- 
tions or clubs, or an admission fee was charged. From these 
a rental was collected as follows : — 

25 evenings at $12.50 $312.50 

2 evenings at 25.00 50.00 

7 afternoons at 10.00 70.00 

$432.50 

Hazelwood Auditorium, — 

2 evenings at 15.00 30.00 

2 afternoons at 10.00 20.00 

50.00 

Total $482.50 

In letting the halls at the branch libraries the same rules 
govern as at the Central Library building. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chas. R. Cunningham, 

Superintendent of Buildings. 
April 14, 1902. 

68 



Report of the Man^^er of Music Hall 

To the Committee on Music Hall: 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of the Music Hall for the year ending January 31, 
1902. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 



Pay EoterUilfSfiiefitB 



Forenoon Evening 

or Afternoon 



Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 18 18 

Art Society, $50 rate 8 

Mozart Club, $50 rate 5 

Apollo Club, $100 rate 3 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, 

$75 rate i 12 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, 

$100 rate 19 

Conventions at educational rates, $75 4 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 6 

Entertainments paying full rate, $125 .... i 

24 71 

Total income from rentals as above $7,175.00 

Use of organ four times at $25 each 100.00 

Total $7,275.00 

Expenditures for the Hall for the year were $8,403.40 

Ffiee Organ RedUb 

The year witnessed the death of Frederic Archer, Organ- 
ist and Musical Director of Carnegie Institute from the time 
of its dedication. Mr. Archer's personal recitals during the fis- 
cal year numbered forty-four, and these were continuous from 
February 2 and 3 to June 29 and 30. At the resumption of 
the recitals in October, Mr. Archer's sickness was so serious 
that he did not take up the work at that time, nor did he ever 
again. A list follows of the organists who officiated during 
the fiscal year : 

69 



Aftemoon 

Frederic Archer 22 

E. J. Napier (At Mr. Archer's request) ... 3 

Edwin H. Lemare Candidate 

Walter E. Hall, Pittsburgh . . . 
Milton E. Pyne, Philadelphia . . 
W. K. Steiner, Pittsburgh .... 

J. Fred WoUe, Bethlehem 

E. J. Napier, Pittsburgh 

Chas. Galloway, St. Louis .... 

G. M. Dethier, New York 

C. E. Clemens, Qeveland 

Arthur Dunham, Chicago .... 

N. J. Corey, Detroit 

E. J. Napier By request of Committee 

W. K. Steiner . . " 



Evenins 
22 

3 



w 



»9 



» 



» 



» 



99 



99 



» 



99 



Total number of recitals during the 

year was 38 37 

Owing to the death of Frederic Archer there were no free 
organ recitals on the evening of Saturday, October 26, or the 
aftemoon of Sunday, October 2'jy 1901. 

There was no free organ recital on the evening of Satur- 
day, November 2. 

The organists who officiated as candidates came at the in- 
vitation of the Committee on Music Hall. The final decision 
as to Mr. Archer's successor was made on January 12 in favor 
of Mr. Edwin H. Lemare of London, England, to whom a 
contract for five years was given beginning in March, 1902. 
To fill out the interval between the time Mr. Archer's suc- 
cessor was appointed and the beginning of Mr. Lemare's 
term, two Pittsburgh organists were invited each to give three 
sets of Saturday evening and Sunday aftemoon recitals. 
Two of these sets were included in the fiscal year ending 
January 31, 1902, and were given as noted above by Messrs. 
Napier and Steiner of Pittsburgh. 

As noted above, Mr. E. J. Napier officiated for Mr. Ar- 
cher at his request at the first three sets of Saturday evening 
and Sunday aftemoon recitals in October. 

FfeeUKolHaU 

The annual commencement of the Pittsburgh High 
School, evening of June 2y. 

70 



Founder's Day, Carnegie Institute, afternoon of Novem- 
ber 7. 

Museum Department, Carnegie Institute, evening of De- 
cember 23. 

Total Uat of H«II Daring tfie Ymt 

Forenoon ETening 

or Afternoon 

Pay entertainments 24 71 

Free organ recitals 38 37 

Miscellaneous i 2 

63 no 

In General 

The Hall was not used on Sundays except for the organ 
recitals. 

During the year all contracts made with the Manager 
were kept and there are no rentals uncollected. 

The total receipts show a slight increase over the previous 
year, and the expenditures a slight reduction. 

The business of the Hall, it will be seen, is slightly on the 
increase, and as between pay entertainments and those repre- 
senting educational and philanthropic organizations it repre- 
sents about the same division as in the past two years. 

The promise for the current year indicates no particular 
change, and it may be said that the popularity of Carnegie 
Music Hall is certainly as great at the present time as it ever 
has been. 

I have to report satisfactory service from the doorkeepers 

and ushers who are under my charge. 

Respectfully, 

G. H. Wilson, 

Manager. 
April 14, 1902. 



71 



Report of the Finance G>mmittee 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Your Finance Committee respectfully reports that the 
only change from its last annual report is receipt of a first 
mortgage five per cent, gold bond of Youghiogheny-Monon- 
gahela Coal Company of the par value of one thousand dol- 
lars, due January i, 1901, together with a deed from Ann 
Baughman et al. to the City of Pittsburgh. So that we have 
now in our possession this one thousand dollar five per cent, 
gold bond of Youghiogheny-Monongahela Coal Company, 
together with the nineteen first mortgage five per cent, gold- 
loan of 1890 bonds of the Pittsburgh, Shenango and Lake 
Erie Railroad Company of the par value of one thousand dol- 
lars each, comprising the investment of the Bernd Fund, (the 
coupons of the above bonds, up to date, have been regularly 
handed over to our Treasurer and acknowledged); also the 
deeds for the properties purchased up to date for branch 
libraries, namely: — deed of Henry P. Ford et ux., George D. 
Edwards and Thomas H. McCartan et al. to the City of Pitts- 
burgh for nth ward property; two deeds from the Washing- 
ton Sub School District to the City of Pittsburgh for 17th 
ward property; deed of Ann Baughman etal. tothe City of 
Pittsburgh for 19th ward property; two deeds from Ira M, 
Burchfield et ux. et al. to the City of Pittsburgh for 23d ward 
property; deed of William Schutte et ux. to the City of Pitts- 
burgh for 26th ward property; deed of Frank Le Moyne to 
the City of Pittsburgh for 32d ward property; deed of Joseph 
M. Taylor et ux. et al., and Emma Taylor et al. to the City of 
Pittsburgh for 36th ward property. 

The above deeds have all been legally recorded in the 
Recorder's Office, Allegheny County, and together with the 
bonds, abstract of titles and other papers, are deposited in 
box 7106 Fidelity Title and Trust Company vaults. 

The purchase of the bond above referred to was made 
possible by the receipt of the sum of $705.45 in the final set- 

72 



tlement of the estate of the late J. D. Bemd, which had been 

placed to the credit of the Bemd fund. 

Finding it difficult to invest properly a sum less than one 

thousand dollars, we secured from the Treasurer (of moneys 

to the credit of Bemd Fund) the difference, and purchased 

the bond at par and accrued interest 

Respectfully, 

Robert Pitcaim, 

Chairman. 
April lo, 1902. 



73 



Report of the Treasurer 

Condensed statement of W. E. Corey, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31, 1902. 

Revenue 

Surplus from last year $ 8,955.71 

Appropriation from City of Pitts- 
burgh 126,000.00 

Contributions to Home Libraries • . . 150.00 

Music Hall rentals $7,225.00 

Half cost of ushers' uni- 
forms 84.00 

7,309.00 

Lecture Hall rentals 482.50 

Library petty receipts : 

Central Library 1,551.18 

Lawrenceville branch . . . 256.76 

West End branch 98.14 

Wylie Avenue branch. . . 302.55 
Mt. Washington branch . . 73-37 
Hazelwood branch 119.42 

2,401.42 

Training School for Children's Li- 
brarians. Tuition fees 900.00 

Fund for binding British patents. 

Donations 7,000.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 900.34 

Proceeds from sale of scrap 126.03 

Total revenue $154,225.00 

DfspOBftion 

For approved vouchers Nos. 36 and 
4,389 to 55 and 5,253 inclusive: 

Centnl Ubtatj 

Building department 
Operating labor, repairs 
and running expense $27,266.36 

Furniture, etc 701.83 

$27,968. 1 9 

74 



Library department 
Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense $38,811.19 
Machinery and furniture 3,121.15 

Books 14,682.49 

$56,614.83 

Music Hall department 
Operating labor, repairs and nm- 

ning expense $ 8,803.40 

Accounting and treasury departments 
Operating labor and running ex- 
pense 428.60 

Executive department 

Running expense 47-79 

Brafidi Ufararlci 

LawrenceTnlle 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense $ 1,766.76 
Furniture, etc 203.54 

— $ 1,970-30 

Library department 

Operating labor, repairs • 

and running expense 4,005.92 

Furniture, etc 27.33 

Books 2,427.80 

6,461.05 

West End 

Building department 
Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 1,346.13 
Furniture, etc 122.23 

1,468.36 

Library department 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 2,714.87 

Furniture, etc 10.72 

Books 1,857.91 

4,583.50 

Wylie Avenue 

Building department 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 1,951.30 

Furniture, etc 131.76 

2,083.06 

75 



Library department 
Operating labor, repairs 
and running expense $ 4,425.93 

Furniture, etc 203.03 

Books 2,924.55 

$ 7,553.51 

Mt, Washington 

Building department 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 1,212.17 

Furniture, etc 165.50 

1,377.67 

Library department 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 3,008.98 

Furniture, etc 248.33 

Books 2,124.39 

5,381.70 

Hazelwood 

Building department 
Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 1,313.66 

Furniture, etc 25.80 

: 1,339.46 

Library department 

Operating labor, repairs 

and running expense 3,083.58 

Furniture, etc 5I-50 

Books 2,191.37 

5,326.45 

Home Libraries 

Repairs .90 

Books purchased 330.03 

330.93 

Special Funds 

Training School for Children's Li- 
brarians 41 1.85 

Carnegie fund 

Books purchased 743.60 

Fund for binding British patents 

Binding 1,831.50 

134,725.75 



Surplus $ 19,499.25 

76 



The surplus consists of the following 
balances : 

Surplus over purchases and expenses 
of the Carnegie Library, exclu- 
sive of funds $ 9,017.57 

Balance of fund for binding British 

patents, not yet expended 5,468.50 

Balance of contribution from An- 
drew Carnegie, not yet expended 5,013.18 

$ 19,49925 

). D. Berad Fund 

Condensed statement of W. E. Corey, Treasurer, for the 
yearending January 31, 1902. 



Surplus from last year $ 406.18 

Interest on Pittsburgh, Shenango & 

Lake Erie R. R. Co. bonds 950.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 14.69 

Balance of the bequest of J. D. Bemd 705.45 

— $ 2,076.32 

Books purchased 1,010.08 

Youghiogheny-Monongahela Coal 

Company bond and interest. . . . 1,005.42 

2,015.50 

Surplus $ 60.82 



77 



Report of the Auditing G>mmittee 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir : — ^The Committee on Audit begs to report that 
it has examined the annual statement of the Treasurer for the 
year ending January 31, 1902, and examined and compared 
therewith the Treasurer's accounts and vouchers and verified 
the same as to the funds on hand, and that it finds the same, 
and all matters connected therewith, correct as stated. 

The accounts of the Committee on Investment and Fi- 
nance have also been examined and found correct. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. W. Mellon, 

Chairman. 
April 15, 1902. 



78 



1 
^ 



y 



I 



I 



k 



I 



I 

I 



f 



■ i 



. \ 



, < 



I K 



.' ' ^ 






f 



/ • V 



>. 



4- I 



't. r 



<- ■■ • 



I 



/, 






t. 



' ' *. - 



i ' 






■{ . 



I .■ 



^ 



<• 






■ . .■ "^ . 



y ■ 



, t 



i ■ 



». » 



1 



>y 



\ , 



( * ' 



Seventh Annual Reports 

To the Board of Trustees 
of the 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 

For the Year Ending January 3 J, J 903 



J 903 



Board of Trustees 



W. N. FREW, President 
ROBERT PITCAIRN, Vice-president 
J. F. HUDSON, Secretary 
W. E. COREY, Treasurer 

JAMES J. BOOTH GEORGE A. MACBETH 

HON. J. O. BROWN W. H. McKELVY 

W. E. COREY A. W. MELLON 

CHARLES S. CRAWFORD ROBERT PITCAIRN 

R. H. DOUGLAS H. K. PORTER 

E. M. FERGUSON HON. J. H. REED 

W. N. FREW • J. P. STERRETT 

J. F. HUDSON W. H. STEVENSON 

JOHN S. LAMBIE J. C. WASSON 



Finance 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman E. M. FERGUSON 

HON. J. O.BROWN 

Committee on Mtisfc Hall 

W. H. STEVENSON, Chairman H. K. PORTER 

J. P. STERRETT 



on Buildings and Grounds 

JAMES J. BOOTH, Chairman J. F. HUDSON 

W. E. COREY 

Gmimittee on Libf arjr 

GEORGE A. MACBETH, Chairman W. H. McKELVY 

R. H. DOUGLAS 

Auditing Gimmittee 
A. W. MELLON, Chairman JOHN S. LAMBIE 

Executive Staff 

EDWIN H. ANDERSON, EDWIN H. LEMARE, 

Librarian Director of Music 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM, GEO. H. WILSON, 

Supt, of Buildings and Grounds Manager of Music Hall 



Contents 

Page 

Libraries and Deposit Stations ------- 4 

Library Staff --- -.-5 

Publications of the Library 8 

Report of the President --------- 9 

Report of the Committee on Administration of the Li- 
brary ------- 10 

Report of the Librarian --------- 11 

Statistical tables -----28 

Gifts to the Library 48 

Report of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 63 

Report of the Manager of Music Hall ----- 65 

Report of the Finance Committee ------ 68 

Report of the Treasurer -------- 69 

Report of the Auditing Committee ------ 72 



Libiaries and Dqx)sit 



Centf al Library^ Schenky Park, Forbes Street 



Branch Lil 

Lawrenceville Branch, 279 Fisk Street 

West End Branch, Wabash and Neptune Streets 

Wylie Avenue Branch, Wylie Avenue at the head of Green Street 

Mount Washington Branch, 324 Grandview Avenue 

Hazelwood Branch, Monongahela Street near Hazelwood Avenue 



(it Stations 

Lecrone Bros. & Clark's drug store, Second and Greenfield Avenues 

Momingside School, Momingside Road 

Bartholomew Co.'s drug store, Washington and Allen Aves., South Side 

H. M. Thompson's drug store, 5424 Second Avenue 

Springfield School, Thirty- first and Small man Streets 

Logan School, Lydia Street 

Forbes School, Forbes and Stevenson Streets 

Bane School, head of Twenty-second Street Incline, South Side 

Brashear School, Holt Street, South Side 

Jefferson School, Monastery Avenue, South Side 

Brown's Station School, Brown's Station, Twenty-third Ward 

F. L. Urben's drug store, 21 31 Carson Street, South Side 

Ralston School, Penn Avenue and Fifteenth Street 

Monongahela Connecting Railroad Office, Second Ave. near Bates St. 

Kingsley House, Bedford Avenue and Fulton Street 

Carson Street near the Duquesne Incline, South Side 



Library Staff 

At the elo$$ of the period covered by this report 

ADMINISTRATION 

Edwin H. Anderson ----------- - Librarian 

Wm. Richard Watson --------- Assistant Librarian 

Mabel A. Frothingham - Librarian's Secretary &. Editor of Monthly Bulletin 
Charity A. Amos ------------- Stenographer 

ORDER DEPARTMENT 

Helen B. Grade First Assistant^ 

Jeannette B. Woods Florence Armstrong 



CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT 

Henrietta St. Barbe Brooks Chief Cataloguer 

May L. Prentiss ------.-- --- First Assistant 

Marion A. Knight ------------- Classifier 

Mary B. Lavely Susan A. Lavely 

Emma H. Walker Harriet D. McCarty 

Mabel L. Young 



PASTING AND MARKING 

Mary Shaw Grace Beatrice Shaw 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 

Elisa May Willard Reference Librarian 

Susan C. Crampton - .-.. First Assistant 

Martha C. Dampman Lucy D. Waterman 

John Henry Bissell, Shelf Curator 

One page 

DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY 
Harrison W. Craver -.-.---- Technology Librarian 

LOAN DEPARTMENT 

Jessie Welles - Superintendent of Circulation 

Mary F. Macnim -------- Readers' Advisory Librarian 

Frances N. Northrop ---- First Assistant 

Alice M. V. Keams --------- Registration Clerk 

Lucinda M. King* Maud Taylor 

Nina P. Lincoln Josephine Taber 

Two pages 

>The AsMStant librarian has charge of this department 

* Resigned in December, but permanent successor not appointed until after date o'' 
this report. 

5 



CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT 

Frances Jenkins Olcott Chief of Department 

Caroline Burnite First Assistant 

Elva S. Smith Cataloguer and Annotator 

CINTRAL UBRASY CHIUIBEN's SOOM^ 

* 

Ef fie Louise Power* Children's Ubrarian 

Emily A, Beale* One page 

WORK WITH SCHOOLS 

Mabel Stevenson Supervisor 

Adde G. Semple 

HOME LIBRASIES 

Gertrude Sackctt Supervisor 

EAST LIBEKTY CHIUIBEN'S KOOM 

EdnaM-Cullis Assistant in charge 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

William H. Schwarten Superintendent 

Richard Ross Linotype Operator 

John Archer Lee Fleming 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Binding and Pebiodical Records, Supfues, Etc 

Alice B. Lothrpp, Jn charge Harriet B. Hofford 

William RusseU 

Newspaper Room 
Sophia D. Maxwell In charge 

Messenger 

Thomas F. Scott 

LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH 

H. Elizabeth Cory Branch Librarian 

M. Gertrude Blanchard, First As/t Rose C Pickering 

Esther Johnson Carrie M. Ziegler* 

Marie M. Smith, Children's Librarian* 

One page* 

^The names of the branch children't librariani are ghren under the branches. 

'Bj a special arrangement for one year with the Cleveland PuUic Library, where 
she is diildren's librarian. 

*The assistant in the children's room at the Central Library works half time in the 
lAwrenoeviUe branch children's room. 

«On part time. 

6 



WEST END BRANCH 

Agnes M. Elliott ----- - Bratich Librarian 

Martha A. Gibson, First Assistant Annabdle Porter 

Helen U. Price, Children's Librarian 
One page 

WYUE AVENUE BRANCH 

Franklin F. Hopper ---------- Branch Librarian 

Qara E. Howard, First Assistant Margery L. Allison 

Agnes D. Smith Cora K. Dunndls 

Frances W. Quley, Children's Librarian 
Edith M. Smith, Assistant Children's Librarian 

One page 

MOUNT WASHINGTON BRANCH 

Mabel Shryock ----------- Branch Librarian 

Leonora Mackey, First Assistant Minnie E. Schade 

E. Jean Ream One page^ 

Josephine L. Gutman, Children's Librarian 

HAZELWOOD BRANCH 

Charlotte E. Wallace Branch Librarian 

Charlotte H. Davis, First Assistant Lilian Rod6 

Marion D. Cameron One page^ 

Jessie M. Carson, Children's Librarian 

^On part time. 



Publications of fhc Gun^^ie Library of IHttsburgfa 

Postpaid 

List op Subject Headings for Use in Dictionary Catalogues 
OF Children's Books. Prepared by Sadie Ames of the 
Cleveland Public Library. 1903. 58 pp. $-i5 

Contemporary Biography; References to Books and Maga- 
zine Articles on Prominent Men and Women of the Time. 
Compiled by Agnes M. Elliott. 1903. 171 pp. - - - - ^5 

References to material in this Library on 350 contemporary writers, 
painters, sculptors, musicians, actors, clergymen, scientists, states- 
men, sovereigns, social reformers, etc. 

Printed Catalogue Cards for Children's Books: an An- 
nouncement; Together with a List of 1,053 Children's 
Books Agreed upon by the Cleveland Public Library 
AND THE Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 1903. 30 pp. - - .02 

Reprinted from the Monthly BulUtin, January 1903, for the informa- 
tion of prospective buyers of the printed cards. The selection of books 
on the list was made with the utmost care and is based on the ex- 
perience of the two collaborating libraries. 

Some Information about the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 

1902. SI pp. -03 

An illustrated handbook for visitors, in pamphlet form. 

List of One Hundred Entertaining Biographies. 1902. 19 pp. - .02 

Fully annotated. 

Alphabetical Finding List of the Periodicals Received. Ed. 3. 

1901. 16 pp. .oa 

'^'BooKS ON Philately in the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 

1901. 7 pp. .02 

'^'Graded and Annotated Catalogue of Books for the Use of the 

City Schools. 1901. 317 pp. .60 

List of the Pubucations of Scientific Societies and the Period- 
icals ON Pure and Applied Science in the Reference Depart- 
ment. 1900. 19 pp. .03 

Catalogue of the J. D. Bernd Department of Architecture. 1898. 

33 pp. .03 

Catalogue of Engush Prose Fiction. 1898. 103 pp. - - - - .15 

Descriptive List of some Old Books and Mss., some Fine Editions 
AND Fine Bindings, and some Books on Printing, Exhibited 
Nov. 5-Dec. 31, 1896. 1896. 23 pp. .03 

♦Catalog of Books. 1895. 376 pp. .35 

A dictionary catalogue issued in time for the opening of the Library in 
1895, and representing the first 9,000 volumes catalogued. 

Annual Reports, ist-6th, 1895-1901 Free 

Monthly Bulletin. (Not published in August and September.) 

Subscription for a year ------ ^5 

Free at the Library. 



*Out of print. 

8 



Report of the President 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: 

Gentlemen: — ^The reports of the various committees of 
the Board and of the heads of departments, submitted here- 
with, will furnish you with full information in detail regarding 
the institution placed under your supervision, and covering 
the year ending January 31, 1903. It gives me pleasure to 
assure you in general that all departments have been well 
operated and are accomplishing excellent results. 

Mr Carnegie has again generously manifested his interest 
in the work of the institution by contributing five thousand 
dollars a year for the coming three years to provide lecturers 
and other aids to instruction for the Training School for 
Children's Librarians, conducted in this building, under the 
supervision of the Library staff. The thanks of the Board are 
due those members of the staff who have, without remunera- 
tion, given their time and labor to the building up of this 
important adjunct to the Library work. 

Mr Carnegie has also g^ven $150,000 for the erection of 
a branch library building in the East End on the ground pur- 
chased a year ago for the purpose. The contract has been 
let to the Henry Shenk Co. and the work is now in progress. 

The City of Pittsburgh appropriated for the maintenance 
of the Library system, for the fiscal year ending January 31, 
1904, the sum of $131,000. This with a balance of $12,586.1 1 
remaining from the last year makes a total available of $143,- 
586.11. Your Executive Committee has apportioned this 
amount as follows : 

Maintenance of Library and purchase of books $93,800.00 

Maintenance of buildings 35»900.oo 

Music Hall emergency fund 2,000.00 

Contingent fund 11,886.11 

I have pleasure in commending the heads of departments 

and those associated with them for the conscientious and able 

performance of their respective duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, 

President. 
9 



Report of the Committee on Administration of 

the Library 

To the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: 

Gentlemen: — ^The Library Committee respectfully sub- 
mits the printed report of the Librarian as its report, since it 
is so full and complete and with its tables of statistics covers 
the ground entirely. 

Very respectfully, 

Geo. A. Macbeth, 
April 21, 1903. Chairman. 



10 



Report of the Librarian 

To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to present my report of the work of the 
Library for the seventh statistical year, ending January 31, 

1903. 

For convenience the results of the year's work are briefly 

summarized as follows : 

Total number of volumes in Central Library and branches at 

end of year iS9t^S7 

Total number of volumes in lending collections at end of year. . 99*665 

Total circulation from the lending collections 5^*774 

Total number of books and magazines circulated^ and used in 

the reading rooms I»i0i4,659 

Total attendance in reading rooms 456,95^ 

On February i, 1903, there were in the Central Library 
and its five branches, both catalogued and uncatalogued, 
159,257 volumes and 9,854 pamphlets. There were added 
during the year 23,146 volumes and 1,351 pamphlets, there 
being a net gain of 18,750 volumes and 991 pamphlets after 
deducting the number worn out, withdrawn, etc. The total 
number of volumes added represents an average addition of 
about 2,000 volumes a month, or one volume every five 
minutes during working hours. (See Table i, following the 
text of this report) 

Of the 154,321 classified and catalogued volumes on the 
shelves and ready for use at the Central Library and branches 
at the close of the year, 101,133 were in the Central Library 
(including the school duplicates, home library books and 
those in the East Liberty children's room), 14,004 were in the 
Lawrenceville branch, 8,829 in the West End branch, 13,152 
in the Wylie Avenue branch, 8,621 in the Mount Washington 
branch and 8,582 in the Hazelwood branch. There were 
99,665 volumes in the lending collections at the Central and 
branch libraries and 54,656 in the reference collections. Of 
this latter number, 50,643 were in the Reference department 
at the Central Library and 4,013 in the branch reference col- 
lections. (Table 2.) 

II 



During the year 4,150 volumes were worn out, destroyed 
or withdrawn, 3,877 were bound, 8,405 rebound and 381 re- 
paired in the bindery. 

Qrculation 

During the year 522,774 volumes were issued for home 
use from the Central Library and branches, and through the 
schools, home libraries, deposit stations, etc. This repre- 
sents an increase over the previous year of 34,648, or 7. i per 
cent. Notwithstanding the increase in the volume of circu- 
lation, there was a further decrease in the circulation of fic- 
tion of I . I per cent. 

Of the total circulation, 217,224 volumes were issued 
from the Central Library (146,842 from the Library proper, 
63,505 through the schools, and 6,877 through the home 
libraries and reading clubs), 84,962 from the Lawrenceville 
branch, 29,024 from the West End branch, 85,341 from the 
Wylie Avenue branch, 41,794 from the Mount Washington 
branch, 49,550 from the Hazelwood branch and 14,879 from 
the East Liberty children's room. The last mentioned was 
opened in May 1902, and the figures, therefore, cover only 
three-quarters of a year. (Tables 4, 5, 6 and 22.) 

The accompanying diagram shoi-3 in the most graphic 
manner the growth of the lending stock and the increase in its 
use from the opening of the Library to the close of the period 
covered by this report. The line B indicates the increase in 
the number of volumes for circulation from 10,000 in 1896 to 
100,000 in 1902. The line A shows the growth of the circula- 
tion from 1 15,000 in 1896 to 522,774 in 1902. The divergence 
of these two lines, as we proceed from left to right, shows in 
the most striking manner that proper facilities for the dis- 
tribution of books are more important than large collections. 
Such facilities include a sufficient number of trained workers 
as well as a sufficient number of distributing points. The 
divergence of these lines, therefore, represents growth of ef- 
ficiency in service and increase in number of distributing 
points. 

Resfistration 

The number of borrowers registered from the opening of 
the Library in November 1895 to February i, 1903, was 51,- 

12 



Diagtam Showing: Growth of Gtculation and 

since Openmgf of library 



Stock 



Figutn at fight and left of dUgnm fcproent mnnber ol vobmci; at top and 

bottonif yean 

Line A repretenti growtii ol drculatiofi 
Line B f c prc K nt i growth of lendliig collection 




5ao,ooo 

500,000 

4S0,OOO 
460,000 
440«O00 
4ZO,000 

400.000 

3S0.00O 
360^000 
340»000 

32.0^000 
300^000 
Z90,000 

a6o,ooo 

240^000 

a^o.ooo 

2.00^00 

ISO^OOO 
l^OjOOO 
\40,000 
12.0,000 

V 00,000 

80^000 
e OjOoo 

40^600 

2.0^000 



13 



453- The number registered during the year was 9,271, of 
which 2,845 were registered at the Central Library, 1,609 
from the Lawrenceville branch, 361 from the West End 
branch, 1,574 from the Wylie Avenue branch, 765 from the 
Mount Washington branch, 1,025 from the Hazelwood 
branch, and 1,092 from the East Liberty children's room. 

Early in the year we decided that our list of registered 
borrowers should be overhauled, and the names of those who 
had died or removed from the city, dropped from the list 
In June we began to re-reg^ster the first 20,000 borrowers. 
At the close of the period covered by this report, 4,101 
"second series" cards had been issued. We estimate that at 
the end of the year assigned for the re-registration of this 
block of numbers, about one-third of the 20,000 will have 
re-registered. This is the percentage we were led to expect 
by the experience of other libraries. Many cards bearing the 
names of persons who have died or left the city have been 
canceled and hundreds of addresses corrected. 

dtalog^ue Department 

During the year 19,852 volumes were classified and cata- 
logued. Of these, 12,440 were for the Central Library, in- 
cluding additions to the duplicate collection for school use, 
to the home libraries and the East Liberty children's room. 
Of the remainder, 2,013 were for the Lawrenceville branchy 
1,024 for the West End branch, 1,584 for the Wylie Avenue 
branch, 1,259 ^^^ ^^^ Mount Washington branch and 1,532 
for the Hazelwood branch. (Table 3.) 

The Catalogue department received from the Printing de- 
partment during the year 81,821 cards. These cards were 
printed for 11,564 titles, which number includes not only 
new titles but also corrected titles, changed titles, etc. 

The various special card lists mentioned in last year's re- 
port have been kept up to date, and the issue of a weekly 
printed list of additions has been continued. Of the complete 
classified catalogue in book form, mentioned in our last re- 
port, 112 pages have been printed. These cover the first 
two classes of the decimal classification. The proof for the 
next class is in the hands of the printer and will soon be off 
the press. 

14 



The preparation of a list of maps and plans of Pittsburgh 
and vicinity was begun during the year. These maps are 
scattered through many books, and it is thought that such 
a list will be useful to students of local history. 

Reference Dq>artment 

The number of volumes in the Reference department on 
February i, 1903, was 50,643, of which 4,081 were added dur- 
ing the year. The use of the department continues to in- 
crease, the number of readers this year being 29,560 and the 
number of books consulted 143,505, which is 3,688 more 
readers and 7,923 more books than the year before. (Tables 
9 and 10.) 

Gontempof ary Bt ography Lists 

The reference lists on Contemporary Biography, en- 
larged and brought down to date from the lists previously 
published in the Monthly Bulletin, were issued during the 
year under the title. Contemporary biography; references to 
books and magazine articles on prominent men and women of 
the time. This is a pamphlet of 171 pages and contains refer- 
ences on about 350 men and women of the time. It was com- 
piled by the former first reference assistant and completed by 
her after she became librarian of the West End branch. 

Photograph G>IIection 

The photograph collection, which previously numbered 
865 photographs, has been enlarged by the addition of 516 
photographs of buildings in France and England, including 
many illustrations of architectural details of special value 
to architects and art students. In addition to the use of the 
photographs in the Library, 585 have been loaned during 
the year to clubs and classes. 

Ref efence Lists for Qubs 

The reference assistants have made detailed lists for 
twelve clubs. Since the average number of papers read before 
each club in a year is thirty-five, the total number of subjects 

IS 



on which lists have been made for these clubs is about 420. 
Several out-of-town clubs subscribe for non-resident readers' 
cards and send messengers in for the books, which are select- 
ed for them in each case by the reference assistants. Even 
clubs which are out of reach of our books, including one in 
Denison, Texas, and one in St. John, New Brunswick, send 
to us for reference lists. 

Loan Desk Assistanta^ Qass 

The Reference librarian has continued through the year, 
with the exception of the summer months, her weekly book 
talks with the loan desk assistants. This year the work has 
been on the weekly lists of new books added to the Library. 
Each week the members of the class go over the list together, 
look up reviews of the most important books, examine the 
books for themselves as they have opportunity, and each one 
reports in class on three or four books assigfned to her. 
Though but little time can be given to this work, it has been 
a satisfaction to everyone in the class to feel that she knows 
something more than the covers of the new books that she 
sees placed on the shelves every week. 

Among the important books added to the Reference de- 
partment during the year are the following: 

Armstrong's Turner. 

Bentlcy's miscellany. 64V. 

Conder's Landscape gardening in Japan. 2v. 

Cust's National portrait gallery. 2v. 

Davies's Frans Hals. 

Dublin university magazine. 96V. 

Emerson's Architecture and furniture of the Spanish colonies. 

G^lis-Didot's Peinturc decorative en France. 

Hain's Repertorium bibliog^aphicum; supplement. 3v. 

Harrisse's Description of works relating to America. 2v. 

Hartmann's Modern American sculpture. 

James's Account of an expedition to the Rocky Mountains. 3v. 

Konody's Art of Walter Crane. 

London society of antiquaries. Archaeologia. 1770-datc. 

Military service institution of the United States. Journal. 1880-datc. 

Nord^nskiold's Cliff dwellers. 

Osten's Bauwerke in der Lombardei. 

Plunkett's Sandro Botticelli. 

Potter's American monthly. V4-19. 

Revue des deux mondes. 1863-95. 

Rietstap's Armorial g^n^ral. 2v. 

16 



Rouycr's L'art architectural en France. 2v. 
Shakespeare. Facsimile of first folio, ed. by Sidney Lee. 
Sharpens Architectural parallels. 2v. in i. 



Dq>artment of Technology 

The growth and importance of the work in connection 
with the reference collection of the literature of technology 
made it seem advisable during the year to raise what was 
formerly a division of our work to the rank of a regular de- 
partment The head of the department is the expert adviser 
for the entire Library system with reference to technological 
literature, and his services are invaluable. 

Last year we reported a relative increase of 5 per cent, 
in the use of the literature of this class at the Central Library 
alone. During the year just closed there has been a further 
relative increase of about 2 per cent. Of the whole number 
of books used in the Reference department, those bearing 
upon the various industrial arts constituted 23.52 per cent. 

There is a constant improvement in the quality of the 
information sought in this department. More questions 
requiring a thorough knowledge of the engineering indus- 
tries of the vicinity arise, and the Library is more frequently 
called upon for assistance by practising engineers. In this 
work the telephone has proved a useful adjunct, enabling us 
to furnish information promptly. There has also been a 
considerable call upon our resources by persons living in 
other localities. 

All important new books and editions of standard treat- 
ises in English upon engineering and chemistry which have 
appeared during the year, together with the more important 
ones in French and German, have been purchased, thus keep- 
ing the department well supplied with the latest available 
knowledge along these lines. Attention has been paid to the 
demand for popular manuals treating of the rudiments of 
particular trades, and branches of technology. A special ef- 
fort has been made to collect literature relating to railways. 
The Library now receives the proceedings of all the im- 
portant railway clubs in the United States. 

During the year the certified set of the United States 
Patent Specifications and Drawings, numbering 601 volumes, 

17 



which was deposited with the United States district court for 
this district, was transferred to this Library, the transfer be- 
ing authorized by a special act of Congress. To Hon. Joseph 
Buffington, judge of the United States district court, for 
recommending the transfer, and to Hon. John Dalzell and 
Hon. Matthew Stanley Quay, for securing the passage of the 
act of Congress authorizing the transfer, the special thanks 
of the Library are due. This set is now on our shelves and 
in constant use. 

The Canadian Patent Office Record has been secured 
from 1880 to date. This contains abstracts of the patents and 
is the only printed record issued at present. 

The card index of engineering periodicals has been con- 
tinued and forms a useful supplement to the volumes of the 
Engineering index published by the Engineering Magazine, 
making available the most recent articles. 

Among the more important works added to this depart- 
ment during the year are the following : 

American society of heating and ventilating engineers. Trans- 
actions. 1895-date. 

New England water works association. Journal. 1886-date. 

Philadelphia academy of natural sciences. Proceedings. 1895- 
1902. V47-S4. 

Soci^t^ des ing^nieurs civils de France. M^moires et compte rendu 
des travaux. 1848-date. 

Bayerische Bierbrauer. (Zeitschrift fur gesammte Brauwesen.) 
1866-date. 

U€\ectTicii6. 17V. 

Gunsaulus's Modern engineering practice. lov. 

Jahresbericht uber die Fortschritte dcr Chemie. 1892-97. 

Reading Rooms 

The total number of persons using the reading rooms of 
the Central Library and branches during the year was 456,- 
952. Those using the reading rooms at the Central Library 
numbered 124,240, of whom 29,560 used the Reference room, 
37,270 the Children's room, and 57,410 the Newspaper room. 

The number using the branch library reading rooms was 
79,679 for the Lawrenceville branch, 38,542 for the West 
End branch, 101,610 for the Wylie Avenue branch, 39,570 
for the Mount Washington branch, 51,184 for the Hazel- 
wood branch and 22,127 for the East Liberty children's room. 
(Tables 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 and 21.) 

18 



Gifts 

There were presented to the Library during the year by 
561 persons, firms or institutions, 2,067 volumes, 1,920 
pamphlets and 1,455 numbers of periodicals. The most in- 
teresting gift was a collection of twenty-six autograph letters 
and documents pertaining to the early history of this region, 
presented by Mr Carnegie. These include eighteen auto- 
graph letters of George Croghan, dated from 1768 to 1774, 
and mostly written from Fort Pitt or Pittsburgh; a deed 
from John Frazier to George Croghan, 1769; one autograph 
letter of Thomas Cresap, 1771; a bond of George Croghan, 
1775; one autograph letter of Colonel George Morgan, 1776; 
two documents pertaining to the Indiana Company, 1778; 
the muster roll of Big Beaver Block House, 1793, and one 
autograph letter of Robert Fulton, dated New York, Jan- 
uary 25, 181 3, to David Cook of Pittsburgh, concerning an 
order for some boiler plates. 

Branch Libraries and Deposit Stations 

No new branch libraries were opened during the year 
covered by this report, but the plans have been completed 
and the contract let for an East Liberty branch library build- 
ing, to be located at the comer of Station Street and Lari- 
mer Avenue. During the current year we expect to pur- 
chase, classify and catalogue the books to stock this branch, 
which will probably be open to the public in March or April 
1904. 

The statistics for the five branch libraries in operation 
during the year arc given in detail in Tables 2 and 11-20, 
appended to this report. From these figures we find that 
the Lawrenceville branch made a gain in circulation over the 
previous year of 3,510 and reduced its relative circulation of 
fiction 2.44 per cent. The West End branch gained 1,859 
in circulation and reduced its relative circulation of fiction 
I -55 P^r C€"t. The Hazelwood branch made the largest 
gain in circulation, 7,969, and reduced its relative fiction cir- 
culation 1. 9 1 per cent. This substantial advance was due 
largely to the establishment and operation, by the branch 
librarian and her staff, of several deposit stations on the 

19 



outskirts of the district served by this branch. Though there 
was a slight loss in circulation at the Mount Washington 
branch, 450, the relative circulation of fiction was reduced 
3.13 per cent. 

At the Wvlie Avenue branch there was a loss in circula- 
tion of 6,592, and the relative circulation of fictipn was re- 
duced .56 per cent. L*ast year we reported a loss in circula- 
tion at this branch of 2,416. The circulation began to drop 
off in June 1901, and six months of the year covered by the 
last report showed a decrease. During the last two months 
of the year covered by this report there was a distinct gain 
over the same months of the previous year. Several causes 
have contributed to the loss in circulation at this branch. 
In the Wylie Avenue, or "Hill," district is the greatest con- 
gestion of population, and the storm center, as it were, of 
contagious diseases is near the Wylie Avenue branch. The 
smallpox epidemic has prevailed to a greater extent in this 
region than in any other and has undoubtedly affected the 
use of this branch library. Furthermore, the lighting of this 
building is entirely inadequate. The reading rooms are 
lighted by gas, which vitiates the air, makes a poor reading 
light and produces a generally dark and dingy appearance at 
night. The Superintendent of buildings is planning substan- 
tial improvements in the lighting facilities, and we are con- 
fident that the present defect will soon be remedied. 



at SUtfons 

One of the most important developments of our work 
during the past year was the establishment of ten new de- 
posit stations. As stated in our last report, the first deposit 
station was established in December 1901 by the Librarian of 
the Hazelwood branch, in the Greenfield district. During 
the year three others have been opened by this branch, one 
in the Glenwood district, one in the Logan school and one 
at Brown's Station. The Librarian of the Lawrenceville 
branch has opened, and with the assistance of her staff oper- 
ates, two deposit stations, one in the Momingside school 
and one in the Springfield school. A deposit station in the 
AUentown district has been established by the Librarian of 
the Mount Washington branch, and the Supervisor of our 

20 



Division of work with schools has opened stations in the 
Forbes, Bane, Brashear and Jefferson schools. Since the close 
of the period covered by this report, the librarians of the West 
End and Wylie Avenue branches have established deposit 
stations in important but neglected centers of population. 
During the year the eleven stations, only one of which was 
open the entire year, circulated 15,770 volumes. The greatest 
circulation was at the Momingside station, where 3,090 books 
were issued in a little over ten months. It should be re- 
membered that these stations are usually open only one after- 
noon or evening a week. 

A Down-Town Branch 

In my last report I called attention to the urgent need for 
a branch library in the down-town, or business, district. 
Until we have this, our branch library system can hardly be 
said to have had a fair start. I firmly believe that an adequate 
branch in this district would have doubled our circulation 
during the past year. In other cities the central library build- 
ings are at, or near, the centers of business. Pittsburgh is 
peculiar in that its business center is in one comer of the 
city. For this reason it was proper that our central building 
should be placed near the center of population instead of in 
the business center. It is all the more important, however, 
that its activities should be exhibited to the eye, and its 
privileges made convenient for the crowds of citizens in the 
district where the people "most do congregate." The army 
of clerks, stenographers and merchants who daily traverse 
the thoroughfares between Grant Street and the Point is in- 
adequately served, or not served at all, by our present library 
system. The strategic point is yet unoccupied. I would re- 
spectfully suggest that a site be secured for a down-town 
branch at the earliest opportunity. 

Children's Department 

During the year the circulation of juvenile books 
throughout the library system was 224,494, an increase over 
last year of 33,787, or 17.56 per cent. In addition, 14,090 
books not classified as juvenile were issued from the chil- 

31 



dren's rooms and through the schools, making a total circu- 
lation for the department of 238,584. The attendance in 
the children's rooms of the Central and branch libraries and 
the East Liberty children's room was 275,415. (Tables 7 
and 8.) 

An important change has been made within the year in 
the rules governing juvenile registration. Heretofore no 
child under fourteen could draw books from the Library un- 
less his parent or guardian signed an application blank in the 
presence of a library assistant. This rule has been suspended 
and the application blank is now sent to the parent by mail 
with a circular letter requesting him to sign the blank and 
return it by the child to the Library. About 4,000 children 
have taken out cards under this new rule. 

Story Hour and Readmgf Grcles 

The story hour has proved one of the best means of di- 
recting the children's reading, and its scope has been ex- 
tended in many ways this year. In the children's rooms the 
legends of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table 
have been told to the older boys and girls, while the younger 
children have listened to stories from Andersen, Grimm and 
Jacobs. Five reading circles for boys and girls too old to 
listen to the stories were conducted at the Central and branch 
libraries. Regular story hours were held in four schools 
(Allen, Beltzhoover, Fulton and Garfield), and story hours 
also formed part of the summer playground work. The 
total attendance at all these story hours and reading circles 
was 12,980. 

Work with Schools 

There w^re added this year to the school duplicate collec- 
tion 4,415 volumes, but the majority of these did not go into 
use until September and some not until January. During 
this school year fifty-three collections have been lent to fifty- 
one public schools and other educational institutions. The 
total book circulation for the fiscal year was 63,505, an in- 
crease of 3,875 over last year, while the picture circulation 
was 2,210. The fiction percentage was 55.66. (Table 7.) 

In November this division established four deposit sta- 

22 



tions in the Forbes, Bane, Brashear and Jefferson schools^ 
as has been mentioned in a previous section of this report. 

During the past summer collections of books were sent 
to ten playgrounds. The circulation was 5,315, an increase 
of 1 ,678 over last year. 

Home Libraries and Readlngf Qttbt 

This division has had under its supervision during the 
past year thirty home library groups and thirty-one reading 
clubs. Of the thirty home library groups reported last year, 
four are now organized as clubs and five have been disbanded, 
in most cases because the boys and girls had reached the 
age when they had to go to work. Nine new groups have 
been formed, so the work has progressed, in spite of the fact 
that the actual number of home library groups is the same 
as last year. 

Of the thirty-one reading clubs, twenty are scattered in 
different parts of the city, while eleven meet in the building 
where the East Liberty children's room is located, and draw 
their books from it. Many of the clubs are simply home 
library groups which do not meet in the children's homes 
but in school buildings, missions or club rooms. Nine of 
the clubs, however, consisting of older boys are organized on 
a purely club basis, having by-laws, weekly dues, etc. One 
of these clubs has furnished its own room with chairs, carpet 
and stove. 

Not including the eleven clubs that draw books from 
the East Liberty children's room, the statistics of which are 
given in another place, the book circulation for the year 
through home libraries and reading clubs was 6,877. (Table 

7.) 

Weekly meetings of the volunteer home library visitors 
have been held at the Central Library, and there have been 
monthly conferences of the young men and women in charge 
of the clubs. That the work has been a success is due to their 
unfailing enthusiasm and hard work. The list of home library 
visitors and club workers is as follows : 

Miss Florence Alrich, *Mi8s Gertrude £. Andrus, *Miss Helen G. 
Betterley, Miss Alice Biggert, Miss Anna Bray, *Miss Lillie C. Bryer, 

*SttMlenU in the Tnininff School for Chfldren't LibnrimniL 

2J 



♦Miss Dorothy E. Burrows, Mr Louis F. Chamberlain, Mr Stephen P. 
Cobb, ♦Miss Edna M. Cullis, Miss Anna Davis, Miss Mary S. Dickey, 
Miss Bertha C. Dolan, ♦Miss Cora K. Dunnells. Miss Harriet Eck, 
Miss Catharine Elston, Mr William P. Flint, ♦Miss Emma A. Floyd, 
♦Miss Alice G. Goddard, ♦Miss Josephine L. Gutman, ♦Miss Florence J. 
Heaton, ♦Miss Ruth G. Hopkins, Mr H. R. Hume, ♦Miss Harriet J. 
Imhoff, Mr W. A. Jordan, Mr D. G. Keeble, ♦Miss Louise Kennard, 
Miss Jessie Keyt, ♦Miss Grace A. Kingsbury, ♦Miss Minnie W. Lc 
C16ar, Miss Edith Lewis, Miss Olive Lewis, Miss Elizabeth B. Lough- 
ridge, Mrs William McGarvey, ♦Miss Adelaide L. Martin, Miss Frances 
Martin, Miss Nellie Mead, ♦Miss Lucy B. Moody, Miss Lida Packer, 
Mrs James Parker, jr., ♦Miss Amena Pendleton, Mrs Ernest Waller 
Pittman, ♦Miss Annabelle Porter, Miss A. E. Rogers, Miss W. F. 
Schmitz, Mr J. S. Scully, jr., ♦Miss Edith M. Smith, ♦Miss Elva S. 
Smith, ♦Miss Marie M. Smith, Miss Mary Smith, Mr W. D. Staples, 
♦Miss Hannah Stuart, Miss Carolyn E. Vandersaal, Mr John Walker, 
jr.. Miss Alice Wells, Mr Thomas Wharton. 

East Ubtrty Childfen^t Room 

In May 1902 we opened a small library and reading room 
for children in a building only a few blocks from the site 
of the proposed East Liberty branch, its special object being 
to prepare the way for the new branch library by creating a 
friendly feeling among the children of the neighborhood and 
by teaching them the proper care of books. At first the room 
was open only three times a week, but the children came in 
such crowds that it seemed best after a short time to open 
it every day. From May 10 to January 31 the room was used 
by 22,127 children, and 14,879 books were circulated. (Table 

21.) 

Other rooms in the building are used by eleven of the 
reading clubs which are under the supervision of our Division 
of home libraries and clubs. These clubs draw books from 
the reading room. 

The expenses of starting and carrying on this work have 
been met by the generous contributions of friends of our 
work with children, the Library having simply furnished the 
books and one assistant in charge of the reading room. 

Trainmsr School for Childfen's Librarians 

The Training School entered on its second year as a regu- 
lar school with an enrollment of eighteen students — ^three 
seniors, ten juniors, and five special students from the public 

'Students in the Training School for Children's Librarians. 

24 



libraries of Brooklyn; Qeveland; Rutherford, New Jersey; 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; and Wilmington, Delaware. 
During the year covered by this report eleven students of the 
Training School have been appointed to library positions 
here or elsewhere. 

Bfief Sunrey of the Five Yeafs^ Work of this Department 

Since the organization of this department five years ago, 
the various children's rooms have been used by 1,132,586 
children, and the department has issued for home use 769, 
615 volumes. There are now 122 places in the city where 
children may get books from the Library. There is some 
temptation to become sentimental and over-enthusiastic con- 
cerning the beneficent results of this work. It is likewise 
easy to be cynical and pessimistic with regard to it. Work 
with children in public libraries is too recent to enable us 
to show many tangible results in adults, since too few of 
the children who have had these special public library 
privileges have yet gjown to manhood or womanhood. We 
have carefully considered our ground, however, and resting 
on the testimony of the great educators from Plato to the 
present day, we cannot doubt the principle that good books 
will do more for man in his childhood and youth than at any 
other period of his career. Phillips Brooks said, "He who 
helps a child helps humanity with a distinctness, with an 
immediateness, which no other help given to human creatures 
in any other stage of their human life can possibly give 
again." Dr. William T. Harris, the United States Com- 
missioner of Education, has said, "Every case of vagabond- 
age has its root in some neglected child . . . Give me the 
child, the state shall have the man." The public schools of 
our country teach the children to read; they cannot teach 
them what to read. Knowing how to read, nothing can keep 
them from reading. We have plenty of evidence to show 
what sensational and injurious stuff they do read if better is 
not provided. Scattered throughout this city arc innumer- 
able small shops where the most debasing and sensational 
literature is daily sold to children. Is it not a wise expendi- 
ture of effort for a free public library to enter vigorously into 
competition with these purveyors and place within the reach 

25 



of every child of our city all the clean and wholesome liter- 
ature it can secure? 

Printing Dq>artment 

It seems fitting at this time to give a more detailed ac- 
count of the work of the Printing department than we have 
been able to give heretofore. It has been in operation on the 
present basis long enough for us to be able to show in figures 
what we save by having a printing plant in the Library build- 
ing. We now do all the printing for the Library, including 
not only catalogue cards, the Monthly Bulletin, etc., but also 
all the printed blank forms used in our work. The Superin- 
tendent of the department has made a careful comparison of 
the cost of printing when done by ourselves and the average 
commercial value of it when done outside. The commercial 
value of the work done during the year was about $6,000. 
The expenses of the department, including interest on the 
investment, salaries, paper stock, materials, etc. were $3,107. 
There was therefore a net saving in money of $2,893. 

Besides the economy there are many advantages in having 
our printing done in the Library building. While the work 
turned out is equal in quality to that of any other plant with 
the same facilities, we are not inconvenienced by running 
short of supplies. The paper stock and materials are selected 
with a view to the particular needs of the Library, and a 
special study is made of how to produce the best results with 
the material at hand. There is a great saving of time, and the 
convenience can hardly be overestimated. We are enabled 
to print innumerable lists, blank forms, etc. which we could 
not think of printing if we had not a printing plant in our 
own building. Many of these are printed at practically no 
cost at all, because they are put through at times when the 
machines which produce them would not be otherwise em- 
ployed. 

Output for the Year 

The output of this department is divided into three 
classes: first, printed catalogue cards; second, stationery, 
blank forms, circulars and general supplies; third, books and 
pamphlets, including the Monthly Bulletin, catalogues, etc. 

26 



The following list will give some idea of the work turned 
out during the year : 

Catalogue cards printed Si^^i 

Number of catalogue titles printed from (including reprints)... 11,564 
Miscellaneous supplies (pieces) 544t385 

Publications 

Na Copies No. P»cct 
Monthly Bulletin, 10 nos. 8"*. 392 pp 40,000 1,568,000 

Index. V.7. 8*. 21 pp 500 10,500 

Weekly List of Additions. 8* 2,118 S.000 

Training School for Children's Librarians — Circular. 

Illus. 8". 16 pp 2,000 32,000 

West End Study Club— Program. 32*. 24 pp 35 640 

Some Information about the Carnegie Library. Illus. 

8". 52 pp 2,000 104,000 

Sixth Annual Reports. Map in three colors. 8*. 80 pp.. 1,020 81,600 
Swedish Books in the Lawrenceville Branch. 8*. 

8 pp 500 4,000 

Polish Books in the Lawrenceville Branch. 8*. 

4 PP 500 2,000 

Tuesday Evening Study Club— Program. 12^. 32 pp.. 105 3,660 
Keystone State Library Association — Minutes. 8**. 

16 pp 300 48,000 

Keystone State Library Association — Program. I2*. 

4 pp 220 880 

Contemporary Biography. 8**. 171 pp 1,000 171,000 

Catalogue Cards for Children's Books; an Announce- 
ment. 8*". 32 pp 9,000 288,000 

Qassified Catalogue (7th sig. printed). 8**. 112 pp... 1,000 112,000 

Classified Catalogue pams. (loo's). 8*. 48 pp 1,050 50400 

Toul 61,348 2,481,880 

Summarizing the above, we find that the department 
printed during the year nearly 82,000 catalogue cards, over 
544,000 blank forms, etc. and over 61,000 copies of books 
and pamphlets, which contained nearly 2,500,000 pages. 
This does not include numerous lists, etc. which were not 
regularly printed, but of which proofs were taken on the web 
proof press. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation of the 
faithful and efficient work of the Library staff during the 
year. My special thanks are due to the heads of the various 
departments, who without exception have a lively sense of 
their responsibilities and duties, and from whose careful and 
accurate reports this report was largely compiled. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin H. Anderson, 

Librarian. 






1 

■s 

i 
i 

z 


JO 


a 

di 




=«-."! 


ni"0»»N 


r 


s. 


Sf^-T'? J 


aiBan^na oi 
lOM 'punog 


S" 


a 


o..„„ ^ 


8 
1 


pnoj. 


H 


^ 


s 


wio-ta 


1 


s 


s; 


nT 






»aodaa»"»a 
IB jaqmuN 


00 


s 


«=-""! 


1 


BaunnoA 

pHOlpDWrj 




■8. 

i 




nreO I'M 


iH""K 


1 


l??llll 


10D -dna 
o) )Das JO 
ino u»AV 


!fS 




fJSSS % 




moi 


||SS-g 


3 


Hill 


tra^a 


1 » 


? 


«,'°JffS J 


aSTtqajna 


||SK-| 


! 


l?|S| 1 


IBjaqomH 




s 
i 


iM| 








Central Ubrary 
General Stock... 

School Dup's 

Caroegie Fund .. 

Bemd Fund 

Schwartz Fund 
Home Libraries 




1 Ml 

2 *>-3 2 



< tA 

E- < 



1^ 
-I 

i 

I* 






I^OX 



donojdp^ 



w <> pooo gi K.%o « S 5 8» S» o* 
N t^ to o»«0 N «n moo o» i^ «n« «n 

N MSO M (O^OO N eiOO MOM 

M M MM MM MrO 



elP.MS>5$^g^M^;jSo 
N«ot^^OM«o«n'*«^in 



9apB|n3Ji3 



^ N O o^ »n <o o^vo 5? 00 00 3 Q» 

M m^o o ^ ^ o o»<o O^sO 

M *n 



1 



•5 

< 



l«V>X 



»n O ^ to ^25 Q »n uS t>. m m m 






donaiapH 



^^ N M M 00 o ^ ^99.^ fi ^ 
M CO toN m«o w 0^«n«no 

M M 



3up«inoji3 



00 ^^^ o»o^ o M o»«t^^ 

prj O M O M f?»vO tovp CO »n M O 
M N »n *nm moo t^ moo Ch 



a 
o 

.9 

CO 



p;oX 



Q mN i^ Qoo M 
M N ^ 



M 00 0Q«QvO Q» 

^ ^00 t^« o^M in 
«n «o «o o^oo u^o>o\ 



99n9J9J9H 



o\ M M cooo 00 g\^o>rno 
N «o « vo to N o^ •+ «n o M 



3upBpi0Ji3 



CO o^ M ^ 



M b N «n i^(» to M ^ 
%h to coco r*» «noo o» 



« 



eo 



•n 




00 

»n 

00 



3" 






-2 

00 



I 



«n 




30 



TABLE 3. 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES CATALOGUED. 



Central Library. 

Lawrenceville Branch 

West End Branch 

Wylie Avenue Branch 

Mount Washington Branch 
Hazelwood Branch 

Totals 



>« 




n 


^g 


Previ 
Repo 


Duiii 
theY 


93.715 


12.440 


13,610 


2.013 


8.353 


1.024 


13.667 


1.584 


•7,722 


1.259 


t7.586 


1.532 


144.653 


19.852 



^ 

^ 



106.155 
15.623 

9.377 

9. "8 
1 164.505 



*This number as given in last year's report was 7.719; it should have been 7,7219 
the number of volumes added during the year 1 901-1 90s being 1,606. not 1,603 m printed. 

fThis number as given in last year's report was 7,589; it should have been 7,586, 
the number of volumes added during the year 1901-190S being 1,603, not 1,606 as printed. 

IThe excess of this total over that of the volumes on the shelves at the close of 
the year represents the number of volumes worn out, destroyed or withdrawn, and 
duplicates transferred and recatalogued, from the opening of the Library in November 
1895 to the close of the period covered by this report. 



31 



♦ m "* 

t- >. s 



tr-'-^*««M 



1 "J i*B3 M t- O' 5 803 ^ ^S 









ai 



ili^' 



S13T3 X « c« s.a.ti-- 2. 2. a 



U K 



<0 

j2 



o 



r»»ox 



•k » » Vk ^^ «h 

^ ^ ^ fO «^ CO 



O t^o 3^ S" «n 

M MOO t>.«n^ 



dnuoAiif 



M e« cf m«n JrKX) O (ne« O^ 

8 ^"8 



O^OO O (O o <o o^ o^ 






»inpV 



M ^ fO tl N «0 Q^O M ^ ro 0» 

'"8'S'"8 8?8"S8"8'8"8^ 



2" 



I 



9[ni9An( 



w Q C> "^ O -^ d» t^ M 



M N 



■i 

I 



1 
i 



P^oX 






00 00 ^M 



d{ni9Anf 



N o««n 



^t^a>«n« M ^M COM inoQ 

OOKtOfOH fOM N « OOOM 



N row «n 



;ppv 



so o^o^o^t^«oo«n« t^t^^ 
fO'^N Ooooooo o « *n-^o\ 

«NN«MMMMCIMN« 



p^ox 



t^Mvo P.^«25 5is5^ 



mo 



9|m9Anf 



l5.l^^l«^a»S55 



;ppv 



woo t^rOOQ' 



m 

00 






M M M w « 



tf« 



§. 







I 



f 



00 



9, 









M 

00 



o 

M 



o 

o 
in 



o 
H 



I 



o 
► 

fs 

00 



1 1 

i ^ 

3 I 

5 I 



a 
.S 


s 


:s 


o 


9 




^ 


«i 




a 


U3 


»4 


9 

G 


1 


e 


d 


8 


1 




1 



^ i 

o g-'a 
X g-g 

SM , 



34 



a 



3 



s 



o 

CO 

en 



o 

H 



D 



S 

a 

5S 



•§ 
M 



a 



ctf 



-3 



l^ox 



ofnidAnf 



;ppv 



l^oi 



ofinoAnf 



^PPV 



P^OX 



0{ni9Anf 



^PPV 



l^oX 



dnodAUf 



^PPV 



en 

en 



5^8 8.^9,^5 RS«8.g. 



« 



H «n 



« M mo ^« m«o 



R*5i"ISHI?^5 



« 



« « M M g 



WiPHIM^H^ 



« 



^« M « « 
9f\ 






t« M MOO 



M<0 Q>tOM M O^t^^^M !0^ 



Qt M M ei 



e< H «nt^ to^S g_ 5poo 



M 



QW30 O w »0 M Q 9^ N ^00 

t<^ O cl ro<n«nMooao 



*0 M , N M 



«nfO 

00 






moo ^r\^ wso »nM mwo^'ON 
00 «n «n «n •-• <o o^o 

MM fO 



«n M CO ot 






N 



3'8>3-S>S?S;3tSSS' 



M O 



M «no (O ^o 



to 



^0 CSW l^« 00 M ^00 fO O 00 tr 

CO t<s otoo w t^o 00 t^ CO r>* o M 
fO ^ ro t^ ^ «o «n O 



COM M N 







Si 

eo 



I 



«o 






% 



\ 



fO M^ NMMsOtOMNl^^ 



I; 

M 

«o 



uo 
«o 



M 



«o 



«o 
«n 
«n 

eo 



I 



35 



•I 



3 

< 



I 

a 



mox 



9{nidAnf 



m?y 



I 
I 



P^ox 



9{nidAnf 



^PPV 




OfHIdAnf 



1 

X 



f;ox 



9|ia9Anf 



;itipv 



I 

a 



S 



Tb;ox 



9|ia9Anf 



;ppv 



CO 

< 
o 



• •••••••••••• 

»o M -sf «o ei M vo «n m -^ m 



• •••••••••••• 

M MQO ^ .MSOOtO 4-0 



4 •••••••••••• 

so 






so so MOb M M ^«OQ^ 



M «ON M « N 



pO"^r^inoo M trtOQiti »noo Q\ 
O in o> o\ »nso Q 9^ et <o M 5 



'^00 o M 



MM fO 



^ O^ CO Q^ 5f) 
»nt^fO*0 O 
O M «no^in 






M M O^ 






focncnio oo^c>>MMO^M 



M M O^ M ^ 
N M M O^ 



M Mm 



o^p o^M N mo 
in M MOO r^sovo 



«n 

M 



Mtnt>^0 O Q00C>>M00sO 0^00 
M fo t>«. ^vo Q t^CD »n CO M M «o 

O^ M tx -^ ^ 0^0 ** fO tx W O^ 



M M 



fOM *^ ^ 2j 



0»Om^^MmmO> O^'P O 
m m ^0 m m m m ^*0 m c*cq 
M *no\ o^ M ■v "^ «noo o> 



M 

so 
ro 



SO M M »n n* l>>sO O^OO 00 M fO 



M f^ 



vo N "^vQ o o>t^i>.^«nMaQ»n 
o^M MQ»n«nM t^'^POM M M 

M M -sf O^ 0> 1^00 l^ M M «n l^ 

_ .. Mik ^ •» ^ #« 



M 



M M M M 



fo «noQ M M «n r* if 00 00 «o m m 



cor^so 

so MOO 

0\N M 



^ «n «noo o» r* 



fovo r>oo *o «o 




55 o Sbo^ a£ « S P 



HCQh 



36 



8 

8 



8 
8 



8 
8 



M 
M 

»n 



I 

M 



t 



00 



o 
»n 
m 



»n 
»n 

M 



»n 

so 



I 



00 



so 



SO 
m 

M 



i 

o 
H 



I 

a 





I 






O 






I 



"I 



ii 

h 



TABLE y-^ontinued. 



CLASS 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel. 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Haselwood 



o 
> 



219 

10 

561 

It9i4 

14 
912 
221 
441 

1,469 

070 
980 

13.619 



22,755 



0) 

s 

o 



.96 

.04 
2.46 

8.41 

.06 

4.01 

.97 
1.94 

6.46 

6.68 

3.85 

4-31 

59.85 



100.00 



E. Liberty C. R. 



o 
> 



279 
42 

273 
1. 134 

519 
170 

249 
861 

782 

635 
640 

9.295 



14,879 



K 

a 
o 

o 



1.88 

.28 

1.83 

7.62 

3.49 
1. 14 

1.67 

5.79 
5.26 

4.27 

4-30 

62.47 



Grand Total 



100.00 



S 



^ 



4.263 

254 

4,197 

18,395 

58 

10,361 

2,203 

3,790 

14,389 
15,122 

7,535 
9,oz8 

134.909 



224,494 



g 



1.90 

•zi 

1.87 

8.19 

.03 

4.62 

.98 

1.69 

6.41 

6.73 

5.36 

4.02 

60.09 



100.00 



TABLE a 
ATTENDANCE IN THE CHILDREN'S ROOMS. 



1902 



Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 

Jane 
uly 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 

Total 



I 

a 

9) 

o 



3.214 

3.898 

3.824 
2,659 
2.505 
2,432 
2,876 
2,442 

3.539 

4.173 
2,851 

2,857 



37,270 



a 






5,461 
6,279 

4,907 

3,197 
2,061 

2.856 

3,028 

3,354 

4,457 

6,419 
5,562 

5,720 



54,201 



a 



2.591 
2,586 

z,86i 

1,123 
1,083 
1,050 

Z,002 

2,016 

3,058 

3,131 
2,897 

2,829 



25,227 



I 

5 



7,976 

8,410 

7.471 

5.563 
4,500 

3,597 
3,585 
5.071 
7.339 
10,587 
8,100 

7,789 



80,078 



I 



is 



1.582 
2,262 
2,019 
1,560 

1,531 
1,334 
1,409 
1,359 
2,475 
3,144 
2,010 

1,812 



22,497 



1 



2,664 

2,941 
2,336 
2,085 
1,540 
1,426 

1,789 
2,355 
4,172 

3,879 
4,352 
4,476 



3« 



M 



2.654 

2,374 

2,459 
2.183 

1.944 
3.294 
2.942 
2,283 

1.994 



34,0151 22,127 



•a 



23,488 
26,376 
22,418 
18,841 

16,494 

15,154 
15,87a 

18,541 
28,334 
34,275 
28,145 
27.477 



275.415 



38 



IS 

Hi 



33 



lis 

Is! 

M 
ill 



ill 
k 

111 

ill 

-^ 



as 



•« 


|8 


P!S?i| 






1 


> 




if 


»; 

3 


i 


I 


^i 




8 
1 


i 




^ 


i 


l§ 




I 


1 




s 


3 

3 


il 




8 


1 


s--.-«''s*«^3««J 


7 




< 

U 




li 


1 




n 


■1 






i 



Um 



TABLE II. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1902 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1903 



Total 



Home Use 



9 
< 



4,455 
5.051 
4.755 
4.13a 
3.595 
3.785 
4.143 

4.275 
4,602 

4.768 

4,716 

5.298 



'\ 53.575 



I 



2,250 
2.741 
2.453 
1.792 
1,601 
2,291 
1.838 

1.923 
2.752 
3,779 

3.899 
4.068 



31,387 



I 



6,705 
7,792 
7,208 

5,924 
5,196 
6,076 

5.981 
6,198 

7,354 

8,547 
8.615 

9.366 



84.962 



Visitors to Reading 
Room 



3 
< 



2,664 

3."7 
2,646 

2,238 

.643 
.486 

.514 

.695 

.864 

2,112 

2.099 
2,400 



25.478 



I 



5,461 
6,279 

4,907 

3,197 
2,961 

2.856 

3,028 

3,354 
4,457 
6,419 

5.562 
5,720 



54,201 



•a 



8.125 

9,396 

7,553 

5,435 
4,604 

4,342 

4,542 

5.049 
6.321 

8,531 
7,661 

8,120 



79,679 



TABLE 12. 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works . 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

NaturalScience 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel. 

Bio^phy 

Fiction 

ToUl 



Adult 



i 

> 



3,006 
412 

SI 

45 
952 
1,504 
1.450 
4.224 
2,018 
1.506 

1.745 
35.362 



53*575 



a 



5.61 

.77 

.95 

1.57 

.08 

1.78 

2.di 
2.71 
7.88 

3.77 

2.81 

3.26 

66.00 



100.00 



Juvenile 



o 
> 



31.387 



'^ 


2.55 
.12 


610 


1.94 


3.201 


10. 20 


3 


.01 


1.332 


X.08 


340 


569 


1.81 


2.132 


S:S 


i.«34 
858 


2.74 


936 


2.98 


18,735 


59.69 



100.00 



ToUl 



I 

o 
> 



3.805 

450 
1,119 

2.284 

1.844 
2,019 

6.356 

3.852 

2.364 
2,681 

54,097 



84.962 



V 



I 



4.48 

.53 
1.32 

4.76 
.06 

2.69 

2.17 

2.38 

7.48 

4.53 
2.78 

3.15 
63.67 



100.00 



41 



TABLE 13. 
WEST END BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1902 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December. 

January, 1903 

Total 



Home Use 



3 
< 



1.664 

1.549 
1,214 
1. 135 

I,2C^ 

1,238 
1.294 

1,482 

1.599 
1,530 
1,864 



17,276 



1 



1,078 
1.058 

869 
528 

493 
911 

444 

579 

1,105 

1.582 

1,491 
1,610 



11,748 



I 



2,580 
2,722 

2,418 

1,742 
1,628 
2,116 
1,682 

1,873 
2,587 
3.181 
3.021 

3.474 



29,024 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



-3 
< 



1.489 
1,668 

1,255 
935 
883 
829 

907 
1,011 

829 

970 

1,061 

1.478 



13,315 






2.591 
2.586 

z,86i 
1,123 
1,083 
1,050 
1,002 
2,016 
3,058 
3,131 
2,897 
2,829 



25,227 



e2 



4.080 
4.254 

3. "6 
2,058 
1,966 

1.879 
1,909 
3,027 
3.887 
4.101 

3.958 
4.307 



38.54a 



TABLE 14. 
WEST END BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Reli^on 

Sociology 

Philolojy 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biog[raphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



o 
> 



934 
no 

147 

295 

29 
210 

331 

377 

1.233 

469 
420 

637 
12.084 

17.276 






5-41 
.64 

.85 
1.71 

.17 
1.21 

1.91 

2.18 

7-14 
2.71 

2.43 

3-69 

69-95 

100.00 



Juvenile 



^ 



201 

6 

199 

1,493 

I 

461 

59 
217 

1,067 

714 

341 

405 

6,584 



a 

o 



II 



.7481 



I.71 

•05 
1.69 

12.71 

.01 

3-93 
.50 

1.85 
9.08 
6.08 
2.90 

3.45 
56.04 

100.00 



Total 



I 



1,135 
116 

346 

1,788 

30 

671 

390 
594 

2,30O| 

1,183 

761 

1,042 
18,668 

29,024] 



9 

I 



3.91 
.40 

I.19 

6.16 

.10 

2.31 

1-34 
2.05 

7.93 
4.(S 

X62 

3-59 
64*32 

loaoo 



TABLE IS. 
WYUE AVENUE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1902 



Febroary 

March. 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September ...< 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1903 

Total 



Home Use 



3 
< 



4.991 
5.686 

4.845 
3.748 
3.545 
3.519 
3.434 
3.685 
4.159 
4.4" 
4.347 
5.034 



51.405 



9 

a 

i 



3.034 
3.183 
2,810 
2, no 

1.955 
2,617 

1.714 
1,614 

2,190 

3.773 

4.399 

4.537 



33.936 



1 



8,025 
8,869 

7.655 
5.858 
5.500 
6,136 
5.148 
5.299 
6,349 
8.185 
8.746 
9.571 



85.341 



Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 



•3 
< 



a.453 
2,480 

x,8i8 

X.626 

1.497 
1.284 

1,224 
2,156 
1.769 
1,924 
1,516 

1.785 



21.532 



m 

a 



7.976 
8,410 

7.471 
5.563 
4.500 

3.597 

3.585 

5.071 

7.339 
10.587 

8.100 
7,789 



80,078 



o 
H 




101,610 



TABLE 16. 
WYUE AVENUE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works . 

Philosophy 

Reli^on 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arte 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



i 



2,090 

425 
495 
940 

71 

^3 

x,298 
1,062 
4.568 
2.588 

1,877 
2,190 

32,898 

51,405 



4.07 
.83 

i!83 
.14 
1.76 
2.52 
2.07 
8.88 

5-03 

3.65 

4.26 

64.00 

xoaoo 



Juvenile 



8 



^ 



337 

49 

2,981 

8 

1,682 

2,164 
2,097 
i,xo6 
1,237 
20,475 



•99 

.15 
2.16) 

8.78 

.02 

4.96! 
x.io! 

2*04 

6.38! 
6.i8< 
3.26! 

3-65 
6a33 l 

loaoo 



Total 



i 



2,427 

474 
1,229 

3,921 

2,585 
1,671 

1,755 
6,732 

4,685 

2,983 

3,427 

53,373 

8jiM£ 



1-44 

4-59 
.09 
3.03 
X.96 
2.06 

7.89 
5-49 
3*49 
4.0a 

62.54 
xoaoo 



43 



1 



TABLE 17. 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS. 



X902 



February.- 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1903. 



Total 



Home Use 


Visitors to Reading 
Rooms 


^ 


1 


1 


? 


09 

1 


•3 


•0 


g 





•d 


^ - 





< 


m* 


H 


< 


u 


H 


2,032 


1.142 


3.174 


1,201 


1.582 


2,783 


2,308 


1,410 


3.718 


1.702 


2,262 


3.964 


2,127 


1,440 


3.567 


1.567 


2,019 


3.586 


2,063 


1,107 


3.170 


1.346 


1.560 


2,906 


1.848 


1.097 
1,280 


2.945 


1,264 


I.53I 


2,795 


1,886 


3.166 


1,228 


1.334 


2.562 


1.857 


1.065 


2,922 


1,323 


1.409 


2.732 


1.995 


974 


2,969 


1.439 


1.359 


2.798 


2,427 


1.521 


3.948 


1.573 


2.475 


4.048 


2.504 


1.991 


4.495 


1,669 


3.144 


4.813 
3.2^ 


2,229 


1.547 


3.776 


1,268 


2,010 


2,400 


1.544 


3.944 


1.493 


1,812 


3.305 


25,676 


16,118 


i 41.794 


17.073 


22.497 


39.570 



TABLE la 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philoloey 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



o 

> 



1.963 
217 

186 

495 

48 

414 
580 

553 
1.836 

987 

758 

996 

16,643 



25,676 



0) 



a 

o 



7.65 

.85 

.72 

1.93 

.19 

1.61 

2.26 

2.15 

7.15 
3.84 

2.95 
3.88 

64.82 



100.00 



Juvenile 



o 
> 



233 

5 

228 

1,431 
2 

545 

137 

324 
908 

1,248 

453 
532 

10,072 



16,118 



0) 



a 

P4 



1-45 
•03 

8!^ 

.01 

3.38 

.85, 
2.01 1 

5.631 
7.74 

2.8l| 

3.30: 
62.49; 



loaool 



Total 



^ 



2,196 

222 

414 

1,926 

50 

959 

717 

877 

2,744 

2,235 

1,211 

1.528 

26,715 



41.794 



a 
& 



5.25 
.53 

•99 

4.61 

.12 
2.29 
1-72 
2.10 
6.56 

5-35 
2.90 

3.66 
63.92 



loaoo 



44 



TABLE ig. 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS. 



1902 



February 

March. , 

April , 

May 

June , 
uly 

August 

September ..., 

October 

November 

December , 

January, 1903 

Total 



Home Use 


Visitors to Rei 
Rooms 




■ ± 






m 

*> 


3 




"3 
43 


i 


ra 


•d 


g 





•0 


ja 


< 




H 


< 





2,316 


1,842 


4.158 


1.458 


2.664 


2.449 


1,779 


4,228 


1.722 


2,941 


2.279 


1.595 


3.874 


1.576 


2.336 


2.039 


1.352 


3.391 


1.395 


2.085 


1.877 


1,127 


3.004 


1.150 


1,540 


1,822 


1.315 


3.137 


1,112 


1,426 


1.858 


1,140 


2.998 


1.354 


1,789 


2,025 


1,218 


3.243 


1.449 


2,355 


2,232 


2,230 


4,462 


1.458 


4.172 


2.517 


3.013 


5.530 


1.594 


3.879 


2,447 


2,858 
3.286 


5.305 


1,275 


4.352 


2.934 


6,220 


1,626 


4.476 


26,795 


22,755 


49.550 


17.169 


34.015 



I 



4,122 
4.663 
3.912 
3.480 
2.690 
2.538 

3.143 
3,804 
5.630 

5.473 
5.627 
6,102 



51.184 



TABLE 20. 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES. 



CLASS 



General Works.. 

Philosophy 

Relij^on 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arte 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History < 

Travel 

Bioi^phy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



8 



o 

> 



1,692 
225 
216 
526 

46 

488 

757 
646 

1,082 

819 

840 

1,239 
17,319 

26,795 



s 



6.31 

.84 
.81 

1.96 

.17 
1.82 

2.83 

2.41 

7.40 

3.06 

3.13 

4.62 

64-64 

100.00 



Juvenile 



I 

o 
> 



219 

10 

561 

1.914 

14 
912 

221 

441 

1,469 

1,519 
876 

980 
13,619 

22,755 



I 



.96 

.04 

2.46 

8.41 

.06 

4.0X 

.97 
1.94 

6.46 

6.68 

3.85 

59-85 
100.00 



Total 



o 
> 



1.911 
235 
777 

2,440 
60 

1,400 
978 

1.087 

3,451 
2.338 
1,716 
2.219 

30.938 

49.550I 



f 

a 



3.86 

.47 
1.57 
4.92 

.12 

2.83 

1.97 
2.19 

6.97 

4-72 
3.46 

4.48 

62.44 

100.00 



45 



TABLE 21. 

EAST LIBERTY CHILDREN'S ROOM. 

(Circulates only juvenile books) 



Use by Months 



zgoa 



February 

March 

April , 

May , 

Tune 

July 

August 

September ... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1903 

Total 



§ 

I 

o 

o 



1,522 
2,207 
1,671 

1.445 
1,008 

1.544 
1.994 
1,774 
1,714 



14,879 



9 
o 

9 

o 
< 



2,654, 
2,3741 
2,459| 
2,183, 
1,944; 

3.294 
2,942 

2,283 

1,994 



Circulation by Classes 



Class 



22,127' 



General Works.... 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

NaturafScience .. 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



a 

> 



279 
42 

273 

1.134 

519 
170 

249 
861 

782 

635 
640 

9.295 



14,879 



& 



s 



X.88 

.28 

1.83 

7.63 

3.49 
1. 14 

1.67 

5.79 
5.26 

4.27 

4.30 

62.47 



100.00 



46 



en 



0) 



M M M rr> ^ ^ lO 



o o Choo M <o o «n 
M M M '^ m mvo 



* * 4( 



M M M (Tiyt^^n 




\0 M M O^OQ *!0 *i t^ 



-a 

a 
o 

a 
>k 

u 
O 

.9 

•s 






00 at 



s^ 



» » «> •> » • * ' 

croo !« 



I 




«k •% * «k ^ » ^ 



o 



a 
o 

•a 



« «noo 00 K r* <n «• 

u 
CO t^og CO o> o»; 3 

III 

m 0» m m m^ m m * 

00 0»« CON tl<l''« 



CON N M 0> t^^ 

i 



:9 



qo «nNF»minfO <^ 

M M ^\o foo (n,!* 



o5 00 00 00 00 o^ o^ cSi 



47 



Gifts to the library 

From February i, igo2, to February i, 1903. 

This dots not includt tks publications of libraries and othsr institutions which art 

rscsived in exchange. 

Givers 561 

Volumes 2,067 

Pamphlets if920 

Numbers i^55 

Voli. Pamt. Nos. 

Aberdeen (Scotland) Public Library i 

Abbott, Dr S. W., Boston, Mass i .... 

Academy of Science & Art i .... 

Aguilar Free Libraries, New York, N. Y 2 

Air-B rake Association, New York, N. Y i 

Alabama — Geological Survey, Montgomery, Ala i .... 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa i 

Allegheny County Workhouse, Hoboken, Pa i 

Allis-Chalmers Company, Chicago, 111 2 

American Free Trade League, Boston, Mass i 

American Humane Association, Providence, R. 1 6 

American-Irish Historical Society, Boston, Mass. . . i .... 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia i 

American Laryngological Association, New York. . i 

American Museum of Natural History, New York 2 

American Philatelic Association, Flemington, N. J.. . 3 i 
American Railway Engineering & Maintenance-of- 

Way Association, Chicago, 111 i i 

American Street Railway Association, Chicago, 111. . i .... 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass i 

Anderson, Mr E. H 2 .... 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Mass i 

Andrews, Mr W. L., New York, N. Y i 

Anonymous . . . . i map 19 25 

Anthony, Miss Susan B., Rochester, N. Y 20 10 

Appalachian National Park Association, Asheville, 

N. C I 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae, Williamstown, 

Mass I 

Association of Railway Superintendents of Bridges, 

Concord, N. H i 

Atherton, Mr G. W., State College, Pa i 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga i 

Balch, Mr E. S., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Balch, Mr T. W., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Bangor (Me.) Public Library i 

Barbour, Mr E. S., Lincoln, Neb i .... 

Barnard College, New York, N. Y i 

Barnes, Rev. L. C i 2 153 

Barnes, Mr Phinehas 6 

48 



Barr, Mr Peter, London, Eng 

Beatty, Mr J. W 

Beeler, Mr H. C, Cheyenne, Wyo 

Beer, Mr William, New Orleans, La 

Belgium — Industry & Labor, Minister of 

Benham, Mr W. M 

Berry, Ruby Estelle 

Biblioteca Nacional, Havana, Cuba 

Biddle, Miss, Monmouth, 111 

Biggert, Miss A. L 

Birmingham (England), City Treasurer 

Birmingham (England) Free Libraries 

Blaisdell, Mr T. C 

Bolton, Mrs S. K., East Cleveland, O 

Bonnett, Miss M. W 

Boston (Mass.) — Associated Charities 

Boston (Mass.) Athenaeum 

Boston (Mass.) Musical Bureau 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 

Boston (Mass.) Transit Commission 

Boston (Mass) University 

Bostwick, Mr A. E., New York, N. Y 

Boucard, M. Alphonse, Spring Vale, Isle of Wight, 
Eng 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me 

Breeze Publishing Co., Portland, Me 

Bridgeport (Conn.) Public Library 

British Columbia — Department of Mines, Victoria, 
B. C 

Brockton (Mass.) Public Library 

Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) — Charities, Bureau of 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library 

Brooks, Miss H. St. B 

Brown, Mr C. W., Syracuse, N. Y 

Brown, Dr J. G 

Brown & Sharpe Manufacturing Company, Provi- 
dence, R. I 

Brown University, Providence, R. I 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa 

Buckley, Mr E. R., Jefferson City, Mo 

Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Library 

Buffington, Judge Joseph 

Burt, Mr W. W., Edgewood Park, Pa 

California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, Cal. 

Cambria Free Library, Johnstown, Pa 

Cambridge (Mass.) — Superintendent of Schools... 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library 

Canada — Agriculture, Department of, Ottawa 



Vols. Pamt. Noc 

• * • * ^ 

• • • • 

3 • • « 

I 

I ] 



I 

7 



I 

X 

I 



• • * • 



• • • • 



• • . • 



i8 



I 
I 



• • • • 



I 

4 



ID 



6 

2 
I 

4 

2 
I 
I 



3 

2 

I 
I 

2 



I 
I 
I 
I 



49 



VoU. 

Canada — Geological survey, Ottawa, Canada . . i map 8 6 

Canada — Patent Office, Ottawa, Canada 23 2 

Canadian Railway Club, Montreal, Canada i 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal, 

Canada 5 

Card. Mr W.W i 8 

Carnegie, Mr Andrew, New York, N. Y 30 Mss, .... i 

Carnegie Institute 50 

Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C 2 

Carnegie Library, Homestead, Pa i 

Carnegie Library of Atlanta, Atlanta, Ga 2 

Carnegie Museum i 

Carnegie Public Library, Bradford, Pa 2 

Case School, Cleveland, O i 

Cedar Rapids (la.) Free Public Library i 

Central University of Kentucky, Danville, Ky i 

Chandler, Miss Alice G 11 

Charity Organization Society, Buffalo, N. Y i 

Chicago (111.) Academy of Sciences 7 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company, Chi- 
cago, 111 I .... 

Chicago (111.), Board of Trade i .... 

Chicago (111.) Municipal Library i 

Chicago (111.) Public Library 9 

Christian Science Reading Room i .... 

Church, Mr W. L., jr 2 

Cincinnati (O.) Public Library 5 

City Homes Association, Chicago, 111 i 

Civil Service Commission, Chicago, 111 i .... 

Clapp, Mr D. C 7 2 

Clapp, Mr G. H 41 

Qark University, Worcester, Mass 2 

Cleveland (O.) — Education, Board of i 

Cleveland (O.) Public Library i 

Cole, Mr G. W., New York, N. Y i 

Colonial Society of Pennsylvania i .... 

Colorado— Mines, Bureau of, Denver, Col 3 

Colorado Press Bureau of Information, Denver, Col i 

Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Col i 

Columbia University, New York, N. Y i 3 

Conway, Mr J. D 3 

Corey, Mr D. P., Maiden, Mass i .... 

Cornell College of Agriculture, Ithaca, N. Y i 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y i 

Crescent Democratic Club, Baltimore, Md i 

Crucible Steel Co. of America 7 .... 

Crunden, Mr F. M., St. Louis, Mo 27 

Cupples & Schoenhof, Boston, Mass i .... 

Curtis & Cameron, Boston, Mass i 

Dalzell, Hon. J. W., Washingrton, D. C 9 

Dana, Mr John Cotton, Newark, N. J i 

SO 



Pam. Nos. 



452 



Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H 

Daughters of American Revolution, Washington, 

D. C 

Dayton (O.) Public Library 

Deats, Mr H. £., Flemington, N. J 

Decker, Mr O. S 

Denniston, Mr George 

Detroit (Mich.) Public Library 

District of Columbia — Education, Board of 

Doane College, Crete, Neb , 

Doubleday & Page, New York, N. Y 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J 

Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa 

Drexel Institute Library School, Philadelphia, Pa.. 

Dryden, Mr J. F 

Dundee (Scotland) Free Libraries 

East St. Louis (111.) Public Library 

Eastern Manual Training Association, Allegheny, Pa. 

Eaton, Rev. T. N., McKeesport, Pa 

Eau Claire (Wis.) Public Library 

Engineering Data Bureau, Richmond, Va 

Engle, Mr G. B., jr., Chicago, 111 

English, Dr W. T 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 

Fairchild, Mrs S. C, Albany, N. Y 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa.. 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111 

Fisk Free & Public Library, New Orleans, La 

Fiske, Mr Willard 

Fitchburg (Mass.) Public Library 

Flack, Mr J.B . . . . i photograph 

Flanagan, Mr F. W., Minneapolis, Minn 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 

Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow, Vt 

Florida — Agriculture, Department of, Tallahassee, 

Fla 

Fort Wayne (Ind.) Public Library 

Free Museum of Science & Art, Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

Friends Free Library, Germantown, Pa 

Fulton, Dr H. D 

Furness, Mr W. H., 3d., Philadelphia, Pa 

Galbreath, Mr C. B., Columbus, O 

(Georgetown College, Georgetown, D. C 

(Georgetown Preparatory School, (Georgetown, D. C. 

Germany — Patent office, Berlin, Germany 

(Gerould, Mr James Thayer, Columbia, Mo 

Gibbons, Prof. Henry 

Gibbs, Judge M. W., Little Rock, Ark 

Gill, Mr John U., Harrisburg, Pa. . . .4 maps 

Gleason, Mrs M.J 

Gloversville (N. Y.) Free Library 



Vols. Pams. Not. 



I 
I 
I 

> . 

3 

2 

7 



16 



I 
I 



6 

I 

II 

9 



51 



• • • • 



Vols. Pains. Nos. 

Graham, Mrs Margaret 2 

Grand Rapids (Mich.) — Education, Board of 2 

Grant University, Chattanooga, Tenn i 

Gray, Mr W. G., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Green, Dr S. A., Boston, Mass 12 31 

Hall, Mr Christopher W., Minneapolis, Minn 2 

Hall, Mr R. C i 

Hampton ( Va.) Institute i 

Hartford (Conn.) Public Library i 

Hartford (Conn.) Theological Seminary i 

Harvard College Library, Cambridge, Mass 2 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass 3 

Harvey, Dr T. W., Orange, N. J i 

Hatcher, Mr J. B 99 

Haupt, Gen. H., Washington, D. C i .... 

Hauser, Mrs J. G i .... 

Havana Cigar Company, Lancaster, Pa i 

Haverhill (Mass.) Public Library i 

Hawkins, Mr R. M 4 .... 

Heginbottom Free Library, Ashton-under-Lyne, 

England i 

Henderson, Mr J. B., Brisbane, Queensland 3 

Henkels, Mr S. V., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Hermann, Mr Oscar i 

Herrmann, Edith i 

Herron, Mrs Wm. A 22 

Hewitt, Mr C. Tefft 27 

Hill, Mr F. P., Brooklyn, N. Y 3 

Hoar, Senator, Washington, D. C i 

Hoe, R. & Co., New York. N. Y i 

Hoff, Col. J. Van R., Washington, D. C 2 

Holland — American Line, New York, N. Y i 

Holland Society of New York, New York, N. Y i .... 

Holls, Mr Frederick W., Yonkers, N. Y i 

Holmes, Miss Eleanor 26 

Holyoke (Mass.) Public Library i 

Hostctter, Mr C. M 39 $ 

Huff, Dr C. C, Homestead, Pa 2 .... 

Hughitt, Mr Marvin, Chicago, 111 i 

Hunter, Rev. Robert, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Hyde, Mr J. H., New York, N. Y S .... 

lies, Mr George, New York, N. Y i 

Illinois — Arbitration, State Board of, Springfield, 111. 2 

Illinois — Labor Statistics, Bureau of, Springfield, 111. 3 .... 

Imbrie, Rev. D. R., Claremont, Pa i 

Imhoff, Miss O. M., Bloomfield, N. J i 

Immigration Restriction League, Boston, Mass 5 

Imperial Library of Japan, Tokyo, Japan 2 

Indiana — Statistics, Bureau of, Indianapolis, Ind... i .... 

Indianapolis (Ind.) Public Library i 

Iowa College, Grinnell, la i 

52 



Iowa — Geological Survey, Des Moines. la 

Iowa Railway Club, Des Moines, la 

Iowa — State Librarian, Des Moines, la 

Iron Age, New York, N. Y 

Jackson, Mr J. B 

Japan — Education, Department of 

Jay, Col. William, Katonah, N. Y 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md 

Johnston, Mrs Simon 

Jordan, Mrs J. W., Philadelphia, Pa 

Kansas City (Mo.) Public Library 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan 

Kansas, State Normal School, Emporia, Kan 

Keller, Mr E. E 

Kirtland, Mr Alfred P 

Krupp'sche Bucherhalle, Essen, Germany 

Lancaster (Mass.) Town Library 

Langdon, Mr S. M 

Lansing (Mich.) Public School Library 

Lapsley, Miss C. S 

Lawson, Mr Thomas, Boston, Mass 

Leary & Stuart, Philadelphia, Pa 

Legler, Mr H. E., Milwaukee, Wis 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa 

Leipziger, Dr H. M., New York, N. Y 

Leland Stanford, jr. University, Palo Alto, Cal .... 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111 

Lindsay, Mr D. E 

Lippincott, J. B. Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

Lippincott & McNeil 54 maps 

Liverpool Sclf-Propellcd Traffic Association, Liver- 
pool, Eng 

Loeffler, Mrs W 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library 

Lothrop, Miss A. B 

Louisiana — State Experiment Station, New Orleans, 
La 

Lubin. Mr David, New York, N. Y 

McClelland, Rev. H. C 

McConway & Torley Company 

Macfarren, Mr Samuel 

Macfarren, Mrs Samuel 

McGowan, Mr Robert, Steubenville, O 

McKee, Mr M. W 

Madison (Wis.) Free Library 

Magee, Mr W. M 

Manchester (Eng.) Public Free Libraries 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library 

Marthens, Mrs J. F., Aspinwall, Pa 

Martin, Mr E. J 



Vols. Pains. Not. 



I 
I 
I 



6 
I 
I 

IDS 



2 

3 



44 



10 



« • • • 



2 

6 



56 
6 



4 
3 

» • 

I 
I 

5 

2 



I 
6 



3 

2 

I 
I 



3 
37 



224 



•••• & .... 

• •*• ^ •••• 

• ••• ^ •••• 



3 

I 

6 

7 
I 

43 
I 

I 



225 



• « • « 



• • • • 



53 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 

Martin Shorthand Commercial School i .... 

Mason, Hon. W. E., Washington, D. C i .... 

Massachusetts — Education, Board of, Boston, Mass. i 

Massachusetts — Health, State Board of» Boston, 

Mass 3 2 

Massachusetts Highway Commission, Boston, Mass. i 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, 

Massachusetts — Labor Statistics, Bureau of, Boston, 

Mass 13 3 1 

Massachusetts — Park Commissioners* Board of, 

Boston, Mass i .... 

Massachusetts — Public Library Commission* Bos- 
ton, Mass I 3 

Massachusetts Single Tax League, Boston, Mass i 

Massachusetts State Library, Boston, Mass 4 

Master Car-Builder's Association, Chicago, 111 i i 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library i 

Mellor, Mr C. C . . . . i photograph S .... 

Merck & Company, New York, N. Y i 

Michigan — Health, State Board of, Lansing, Mich * i 15 

Mickley, Miss M. F., Washington, D. C i 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Public Library i 3 

Minnesota State Library Commission, Minneapolis, 

Minn 2 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo i .... 

Missouri — Geology & Mines, Bureau of, Rolla, Mo. i .... 

Missouri — Labor Bureau, Jefferson City, Mo 3 .... 

Mohonk Lake Arbitration Conference, Mohonk 

Lake, N. Y i 

Montana Historical Society, Helena, Mont i 

Montclair (N. J.) Public Library i 

Moorhead, Miss Theresa 7 .... 

Morris, Mr R. C, Cheyenne, Wyo i .... 

Morrow, Mr E. S 2 i 

Morton, Mr Alfred, Birmingham, Eng i 

Muller, F., Amsterdam, Holland i 

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D. C. . 4 5 
National Association of Manufacturers* Philadel- 
phia, Pa I 

National Civic Federation, New York, N. Y 2 

National Civil Service Reform Association, New 

York, N. Y I 

National Educational Association, Winona, Minn i 

National Electric Light Association, New York, 

N. Y I .... 

Nebraska Public Library Commission i 

New Haven (Conn.) Free Public Library i 

New Jersey—Geological Survey, Trenton, N.J.... 4 

New Jersey Library Association 2 

54 



New Jersey — Public Library Commission, Trenton, 

N.J 

New Jersey State Library, Trenton, N. J 

New South Wales — Inst'n for Deaf and Dumb, 

Sydney, N. S. W 

New South Wales — Mines & Agriculture, Dept of, 

Sydney, N. S. W 

New South Wales Public Library, Sydney, N. S. W. 
New South Wales — Statistician's Office, Sydney, N. 

S. W 

New York (state) — Historian, Albany, N. Y 

New York — State Library, Albany, N. Y 

New York — State Library School, Albany, N. Y . . . 
New York, University of the state of, Albany, N. Y. 

New York (N. Y.) — Education, Board of 

New York (N. Y.) Public Library 

New York (N. Y.) School of Applied Design 

for Women 

New York (N. Y.) — Tenement House Commission. . 

New York (N. Y.) Times 

New York (N. Y.) University 

New York (N. Y.) Zoological Society 

New York School of Journalism, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 
New York State College of Forestry, Ithaca, N. Y. . 
New Zealand — Registrar General, Wellington, N. Z. 

Newark (N.J.) Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 

Niagara Falls (N. Y.) Public Library 

Niedersheim, Mr Gustavo, Philadelphia, Pa 

Nirdlinger, Mr F. G. N., Philadelphia, Pa 

Nolen, Mr John, Philadelphia, Pa 

Norddeutscher Vereins, Hamburg, Germany 

North Carolina — Geological Survey, Chapel Hill, 

N. C 

North Dakota Agricultural College, Fargo, N. D.. 

Northwest Railway Club, Minneapolis, Minn 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 

Oakland (Cal.) Free Library and Reading Rooms. . . 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, O 

O'Carroll, Mr J. J., Chicago, 111 

Ogden, Mr J. Gordon 

Ohio State University, Columbus, O 

Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, O 

Omaha (Neb.) Public Library 

O'Neill, Mr S. M 

Ontario ((Canada) — Mines, Bureau of, Toronto, 

(Canada 

Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago, 111.... 
Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, 

Ore 

Osterhout Free Library, Wilkesbarre, Pa 



Vols. Pains. Not. 



I .. 



I 
I 

I 

5 
6 

• • 

II 
I 



I 

2 

3 



I 

2 
I 

8 



I 
I .. 



10 

6 

7 
I 

2 



I 

7 
I 

I 

6 

I 

I 

I 

I 



6 
I 

4 
I 

I 

2 
I 

3 



3 
I 



55 



Vols. PamB. Nos. 

Ottawa Literary & Scientific Society, Ottawa, Canada .... i 

Page. Mr G. S 65 9 

Parliamentary Library of Queensland, Brisbane, 

Queensland 3 .... 

Paterson (N. J.) Free Library i 

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 

X cl. .......................................... .... ^ 

Pennsylvania — Forestry, Division of 2 

Pennsylvania Museum, School of Industrial Art, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania — Poor & Charities, Director of i 

Pennsylvania Prison Society, Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg, Pa 32 .... 

Peoria (111.) Public Library i 

Perkins, Dr G. H., Burlington, Vt i .... 

Philadelphia City Institute i 

Philadelphia (Pa.) — Free Library of i 

Philosophical Society of Washington, Washington, 

DC 

Pittsburgh — City Controller 3 

Pittsburgh Conservatory of Music 2 

Pittsburgh— Public Works, Dep't of i 

Porter, Mr H. K 5 4 17 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y i 

Pratt Institute Library School, Brooklyn, N. Y 6 

Presbyterian Church in the United States 9 

Princeton University, Princeton, N. J i .... 

Protestant Episcopal church. Domestic & Foreign 

Missionary Society, New York, N. Y i 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum i 

Providence (R.I.) Public Library i 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind i 

Putnam's, G. P. Sons, New York, N. Y i 

Quinon, Mr Stephen i .... 

Railway Signaling Club, Chicago, 111 i 

Ranck, Mr S. H., Baltimore, Md i i 

Ratterman, Mr H. A., Cincinnati, O i 

Reader, Mr Frank S., New Brighton, Pa 2 

Reading (Pa.) Public Library i 

Rebbeck, Mr F. T i 

Reisf ar, Mr Chas 7 

Remington, Mr E. P i .... 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y i 

Rhode Island Normal School, Providence, R. I i 

Richards, Mr L. S., Marshfield Hills, Mass i .... 

Roadmasters & Maintenance-of-Way Association, 

Cedar Rapids, la 2 

Robins, Dr W. L., Washington, D. C 2 

Rockford (111.) Public Library i 

Rose Polytechnic Institution, Terre Haute, Ind i 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canada i .... 

56 



Vols. Pains. Not. 

Russell, Mr E. H 12 13 8 

Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J i 

Rynearson, Mr Edward i 

Sackett, Miss Gertrude, Meadville, Pa i .... 

Sahm, Dr W. K.T 6 .... 

St. Joseph (Mo.) Free Public Library i 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, St. Louis, 

Mo I 

St. Louis (Mo.) Public Library i .... 

St. Paul (Minn.), Associated Charities of 2 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library i 

Salzman, John 2 .... 

San Francisco (Cal.) Public Library i 

Schirmer, Mr (George, New York, N. Y i 

Schultz, Mr A. L i .... 

Scott, Mr Thomas F i 

Sergeant, Mr John A 32 .... 

Shady Side Academy i 

Shields, Mr J. M 17 i 22 

Simmons College for Women, Boston, Mass 2 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass 2 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 4 11 

Society for Checking Abuses of Public Advertising, 

Wimbledon Common, Surrey, Eng 2 

Somerville (Mass.) Public Library i 

Sons of the American Revolution, Penn'a. Society. . i .... 
Sons of the Revolution, Penn'a. Society, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 2 .... 

South Dakota — Geological Survey 2 

South Dakota School of Mines 3 

Southern & Southwestern Railway Qub, Atlanta, Ga i 

Spencer, Mrs Mary C, Lansing, Mich 11 

Springfield (Mass.), City Library Association i 

Stamm, Mr A. C, Harrisburg, Pa i 

Stearns, Miss L. E., Madison, Wis i 

Stechert, Mr G. E., New York, N. Y i .... 

Stevens, B. F. & Brown, London, England 6 

Stewart, Mr Douglas i 

Stewart, Miss Mary C, Waverly, N. Y 1 

Stoney, Mr R. J., jr i 

Swank, Mr James M., Philadelphia, Pa i i 

Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y i 

Taylor University, Upland, Ind i i 

Thurston Preparatory School i 

Traveling Engineers Association, Oswego, N. Y i 

Trenton Iron Company, Trenton, N. J a 

Tufts College, Tufts College, Mass 2 

Tuft's Library, Weymouth, Mass 2 

Turbett, Mrs E. C 31 

Twin City Philatelic Society i .... 

United States — Adjutant- General's Office 3 

57 



United States — Agriculturei Department of. .i atlas 
United States — Agriculture, Department of — Library. 

United States — Census Office 

United States — Civil Service Commission 

United States — Coast & Geodetic Survey 

United States — Construction and Repair 

United States — Documents, Superintendent of 

United States — Education, Bureau of 

United States — Education, Commissioners of 

United States — Engineer Corps 

United States — Entomology Division 

United States — Ethnologry, Bureau of 

United States — Experiment Stations Office 

United States — Foreign Markets 

United States — Forestry Division 

United States — Geological Survey 155 maps .... 

United States — Geological Survey, through Hon. 
John Dalzell 

United States — Government. . . . i map 

United States — Government, through Hon. John 
Dalzell *. 

United States — Insular Affairs, Division of. . . .1 map 

United States — Insular Affairs, Division of, through 

Hon. John Dalzell 

United States — Interior, Department of 

United States — Internal Revenue 

United States — Interstate Commerce Commission.. 

United States — Labor, Department of 

United States — Library of Congress 

United States — Marine Hospital Service 

United States — National Museum 

United States Naval Academy 

United States — Navy Department 

United States — Navy Department, through Hon. 
C— ^John Dalzell 

United States— Patent Office 

United States — Plant Industry, Bureau of 

United States — State, Department of 

United States — Surgeon General's Office 

United States — ^Treasury Department 

United States — ^War Department 

United States — ^Weather Bureau 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111 

University of Colorado, Boulder, Col 

University of Illinois, Urbana, 111 

University of Illinois, Library School, Champlain, 111. 

y niversity of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis,' Minn 



Vols. Pains. 
121 

.... ^ 

15 5 

J • • . . 

2 



4 

2 

I 



757 
ig2 



2 

2 

2 

I 



13 

3 
I 

13 



• • • • 



No*. 

53 

• • « • 

112 



8 



I 

13 
3 
9 

4 
61 

376 
7 

61 

I 
I 
I 
6 

5 

ID 

4 
I 

I 



.... 



6 
16 

I 
18 

I 

3 

2 

2 
I 

3 
6 

• • 
I 

5 



2 



58 



University of Minnesota, Library, Minneapolis, 

Minn 

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo 

University of Missouri, Library, Columbia, Mo 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. .. . 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa 

University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y 

University of Texas, Austin, Tex 

University of Texas — Mineral survey, Austin, Tex.. 

University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt 

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis 

Upson Walton Company, Cleveland, O 

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Vermont Library Commission, Montpelier, Vt 

Victoria, Public Library of, Melbourne, Victoria . . . 

Vogel, Mr B. F., Greensburg, Pa 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind 

Wadlin, Mr H. G., Boston, Mass 

Wardlaw, Mr G. A 

Warvelle, Mr G. W., Chicago, 111 

Washington — Geological Survey, Seattle, Wash . . . 
Washington & Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. . 

Watson, Mr W. R 

Wcsleyan University, Middletown, Conn 

West Virginia — Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Morgantown, W. Va 

West Virginia — Geological Survey, Morgantown, 

W. Va 

West Virginia — Mine Inspector, Charlestown,W.Va. 

Western Electric Company, New York, N. Y 

Western Pennsylvania Exposition Society 

Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pa 

Western University of Pennsylvania, Allegheny, Pa. 

Westinghouse, Mr George 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company. 

Whitehead, Rt Rev. Cortlandt 

Wilbur, Mr E. M., Meadville, Pa 

Wilkofsky, Rolla 

Willard, Miss E. M 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute 

Wint, Mr M. A....I map 

Winthrop (Mass.) Public Library 

Wisconsin — Education, State Superintendent of, 

Madison, Wis 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission, Madison, Wis. 

Wisconsin — Geological Survey. . . . lo maps 

Wisconsin — Public Instruction, Department of, 

Madison, Wis 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis. . 



Vols. Pains. Not. 



2 
4 

2 

4 

2 

12 

I 

I 

9 

2 
I 

5 
I 

I 

I 



I 
I 



5 

I 

I 
I 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

2 
I 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

8 



.... 



.... 

21 



I 
I 



2 

3 

2 

4 

2 



10 



59 



Vols. Pams. New. 
Woburn (Mass.) Public Library i .... 

Woman's College of Baltimore, Baltimore, Md i . . . , 

Woman's Education Association, Cambridge, Mass i . . . . 

Woods, Mr E. A., Se wickley, Pa 7 

Worcester County Law Library, Worcester, Mass i ... 

Worcester (Mass.) Poljrtechnic Institute i ... 

Wyoming Historical & Geological Society, Wilkes- 

barre, Pa 7 

Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company, New York, 

N. Y I I ... 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 3 

Young Men's Christian Association, Pittsburgh 2 ... 

Young Women's Christian Association, Pittsburgh .... i ... 

Pcrlodicali and Newi^pcn Recehred at Gtfti 

Advocate of Peace. 

Alleghenier und Pittsburger Sonntagsbote. 

American. 

American Art in Bronze and Iron. 

American Iron and Steel Association. Bulletin. 

American Journal of Philately. 

American Manufacturer and Iron World. 

American Society of Civil Engineers. Proceedings. 

Arboriculture. 

Architects and Builders Journal. 

Assembly Herald. 

Banker. 

Baptist Home Mission Monthly. 

Baptist Missionary Magazine. 

Biblia. 

Blairsville College Journal. 

Brown Alumni Monthly. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Bureau of American Republics. Monthly Bulletin. 

Canadian Manufacturer. 

Canadian Patent Office Record. 

Chicago Banker. 

Chicago Statistics. 

Christian Cynosure. 

Christian Register. 

Christian Science Journal. 

Christian Science Sentinel. 

Christian Social Union. Publications. 

Christian Statesman. 

Church Calendar. 

Church News. 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History. Journal. 

Coal and Coke. 

Columbia University Quarterly. 

Commerce and Finance of the United Sutes. Monthly Summary. 

60 



Commerce of the Island of Cuba. Monthly Summary- 
Commerce of the Island of Porto Rico. Monthly Summary. 
Commerce of the Philippine Islands. Monthly Summary. 
Commoner and Glassworker. 
Congressional Record. 
Cornell Era. 
Criterion. 
Elizabeth Herald. 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania. Proceedings. 
Free Museum of Science and Art University of Pennsylvania. 
Freedom. 

Gazeta Pittsburgska. 
Good Government 
Herald of the Golden Age. 
High School Journal. 
Home Mission Monthly. 
Humanity. 

Illustrated Official Journal (Patents). London. 
Indianapolis News. 
Japan and America. 
Jewish Criterion. 
Kingsley House Record. 
Lafayette. 
Literary News. 
The Locomotive. 
Los Angeles Herald. 
Mekeel's Weekly Stamp News. 
Metal Industry. 

Mining and Engineering Review and Electrician. 
Money. 

Monthly Gazette of English Literature. 
National Bulletin of Charities and Correction. 
National Glass Budget 
New York Philatelist. 

New York Railroad Club. Official Proceedings. 
North- West Railway Qub. Official Proceedings. 
Official Railway Guide of Pittsburgh. 
Ohio Valley Manufacturer. 
Oil City Derrick. 
Oil, Mining and Finance. 
Pennsylvania Medical Journal. 
Philadelphia Press. 
Pittsburgh Bulletin. 
Pittsburgh Catholic. 
Pittsburg Christian Advocate. 
Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. 
Pittsburg Dispatch. 
Pittsburgh Gazette. 
Pittsburgh Index. 
Pittsburg Leader. 
Pittsburg Neue Welt 
Pittsburg Post 

6i 



Pittsburg Press. 

Pittsburgh Railway Qub. Proceedings. 

Pittsburg Times. 

Popular Mechanics. 

Practical Engineer. 

Pratt Institute Monthly. 

Presbyterian Banner. 

Printers' Ink. 

The Public. 

Public Health Reports. United States Government. 

Railroad Officials. Pocket List. 

Rarasek. 

Remarques. 

Rose Technic. 

Saint Andrew's Cross. 

St. Louis Railway Club. Proceedings. 

Smith College Monthly. 

Sokol. 

Sound Currency. 

Southern and Southwestern Railway Club. 

Sparks from the Anvil. 

Spirit of Missions. 

Sunny South. 

Sunset. 

Svenska Amerikanska Posten. 

Svenska Veckobladet 

Telephone Magazine. 

Theosophical Review. 

Tidings. 

Trade Marks Journal. London. 

Truth. 

United States, Department of Labor. Bulletin. 

United States Patent Office Gazette. 

United States Public Documents. Catalogue. 

Universal Brotherhood Path. 

University of Tennessee Record. 

Vassar Miscellany. 

Volksblatt und Freiheits-Freund. 

Weekly People. 

Weekly Philatelic Era. 

Western Society of Engineers. Journal. 

Western University Courant. 

Wielkopolanin. 

Woman's Missionary Friend. 

Women's Missionary Magazine. 

Worker. 



62 



Report of the Superintendent of Buildings and 

Grounds 

To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds: 

Gentlemen: — I beg to report the buildings and their 
equipment in complete repair. No expense has been incurred 
in excess of the amount apportioned for the use of the depart- 
ment. 

During the months of August and September the three 
engines of the light plant at the Central Library building were 
overhauled at a cost of $232.56. Up until that time the total 
cost for repairs was $92.90. The plant was tested, and has 
been in operation since November i, 1895. The expense for 
repairs on the electric generators of the same plant is $21.28 
to date. 

In my report of a year ago I recommended a small electric 
light plant for the Wylie Avenue branch. I would respectfully 
urge that provision be made for its installation during the 
coming year. The satisfactory results obtained at two of 
the other branches from similar outfits is sufficient assurance 
of its success. 

During the year there were 112 entertainments given in 
the Lecture Hall of the Central Library building. Seventy- 
eight of these were given by the Academy of Science and Art 
and affiliated societies, and were free and of interest to the 
general public. No rental was charged. The remaining 
thirty-four were by organizations charging an admission fee, 
or by clubs using the hall exclusively in their own interests. 
From these a rental was collected as follows : 

22 evenings at $13.50 $^500 

7 evenings at $35.00 175.00 

5 evenings at $10.00 50.00 

$500.00 

Hazelwood Auditorium, — 

4 evenings at $15.00 60.00 

I afternoon at $7.50 7.50 

67.50 

Toul $567.50 

63 



There were six entertainments at the Lawrenceville 
branch, and six at the Hazelwood branch, for which no rental 
was charged. 

The aggregate attendance in Music Hall for the year was 

I9S»44S- 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. R. Cunningham, 

April 20, 1903. Sup't of Buildings and Grounds. 



64 



Report of the Manager of Music Hall 

To the Committee on Music Hall: 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of the Music Hall for the year ending January 31, 
1903. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 

Forenoon of 
Afternoon Erening 

Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 18 18 

Art Society, $50 rate 6 

Mozart Club, $50 rate 4 

Academy of Science and Art, $50 rate 2 

Apollo Club, $100 rate 3 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, $75 rate. ... 4 4 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, $100 rate 18 

Conventions at educational rates, $75 4 

Conventions at educational rates, $50 4 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 3 

Entertainments at $150 rate 4 

26 66 

Total income from rentals as above $6,735.00 

Use of organ 2 times at $25 each 50.00 

ToUl $6,77500 

Expenditures for the Hall for the year were $8428.57 

Ffitt Organ Rsdtali 

As noted in my report of April 14, 1902, Edwin H. Le- 
mare was on January 12, 1902, appointed Organist and Direc- 
tor of Music for a period of five years to begin with the month 
of March 1902. 

Mr Lemare began his duties on the first Saturday of 
March as per contract. Because of sickness in his family he 
was allowed to present substitute organists during part of 
May, June, October and part of November. 

The list of recitals given during the year and the organists 
is as follows : 

65 



Afternoon 

Edwin H. Lemare 21 21 

Walter E. Hall 11 la 

E. J. Napier 4 4 

W. K. Steiner 3 3 

Total number of recitals during the year 39 40 



FfMUieolHafl 

Sons of American Revolution Convention, evening of 
May 23. 

The annual commencement of the Pittsburgh High 
School, evening of June 26. 

Founder's Day, Carnegie Institute, afternoon of Novem- 
ber 6. 

Museum Department, Carnegie Institute, evening of De- 
cember 22. 

ToUl Uw of Hafl During the Year 

Forenoon or 
Afternoon ETeninc 

Pay entertainments 26 66 

Free organ recitals « 39 40 

Miscellaneous i 3 

66 109 

In General 

The Hall was not used on Sundays except for the org^n 
recitals. 

While the total number of times the Hall was used varies 
but little from the report of the previous year, the difference 
in the rentals collected is owing to the increased use at the 
$75 or $100 rate, and the decreased use at the full rate of $175. 

The reports of two years show that the business of the 
Hall remains about stationary. 

The decrease each year in the number of rentals at the 
$175 rate is owing to the fact that the Pittsburgh Orchestra 
and the Art Society, which have the privileged rate of $50, 
engage frequently as soloists such artists of commanding 
position as would otherwise be heard under their own auspices 
and would pay the larger rental. 

The increase in attendance at the organ recitals on Satur- 

66 



day evening, as well as Sunday afternoon, is an indication of 
appreciation by this public of the work of Mr Lemare. 

The promise for the current year at the Hall indicates the 
usual amount of business, although I am in correspondence 
with several parties in the hope that a number of conventions 
may be secured during the next nine months. 

I have to report satisfactory service from the doorkeepers 

and ushers under my charge. 

Respectfully, 

G. H. WUson, 

April 13, 1903. Manager. 



^ 



Report of the Finance G>mmittee 

IV. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir : — Your Finance Committee respectfully reports 
that the only change from its last annual report is the sale by 
the City of Pittsburgh of the William Schutte property in the 
26th ward which cancels and makes void the deed we re- 
ported in our last annual report as being in our possession. 

We have in our possession one five per cent, gold bond of 
Youghiogheny-Monongahela Coal Company of the par value 
of one thousand dollars due January i, 1907, and nineteen 
first mortgage five per cent, gold loan of 1890 bonds of the 
Pittsburgh, Shenango and Lake Erie Railroad Company of 
the par value of one thousand dollars each, comprising the 
investment of the Bemd fund, (the coupons of the above 
bonds, up to date, have been regularly handed over to our 
Treasurer, and I attach hereto his acknowledgement); also 
the deeds of the properties purchased up to date for branch 
libraries, namely :— deed of Henry P. Ford et ux., George D. 
Edwards and Thomas H. McCartan et al. to the City of 
Pittsburgh for nth ward property; two deeds from the Wash- 
ington Sub School District to the City of Pittsburgh for 17th 
ward property; deed of Ann Baughman et al. to the City of 
Pittsburgh for 19th ward property; two deeds from Ira M. 
Burchfield et ux. et al. to the City of Pittsburgh for 23d ward 
property; deed of Frank Le Moyne to the City of Pittsburgh 
for 32d ward property; deed of Joseph M. Taylor et ux. et al. 
and Emma Taylor et al. to the City of Pittsburgh for 36th 
ward property. 

The above deeds have all been legally recorded in the 
Recorder's Office, Allegheny County, and together with the 
bonds, abstracts of titles and other papers, are deposited in 
box 7106, Fidelity Title and Trust Company vaults. 

Respectfully, 

Robert Pitcaim, 
April 10, 1903. Chairman. 

68 



Report of the Treasurer 

Condensed statement of W. E. Corey, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31, 1903. 

Revenue 

Surplus from last year $ 19499.25 

Appropriation from City of Pittsburgh 131,000.00 

Contributions to Home Libraries 25.00 

Music HaH rentals 16,725.00 

Half cost of ushers' uniforms 36.00 

6,761.00 

Lecture Hall rentals 5»5i7-50 

Library petty receipts: 

Central Library $1,530.02 

Lawrenceville branch 304.15 

West End branch 122.02 

Wylie Avenue branch 280.69 

Mount Washington branch 95*32 

Hazelwood branch 166.61 

Books and papers sold 9.61 

Training School for Children's Librari- 
ans. Tuition fees, etc 1,062.50 

3,570.82 

Interest on daily bank balances 603.39 

Refunds 74.35 

Total revenue $162,051.31 

DispotftJon 

For approved vouchers Nos. 5,254 
to 6,219 inclusive. 

Gniral LOranr 

Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 
expense $28,715.79 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense $44,223.88 

Books i9>5B7-85 

63311.73 

69 



Music Hall department 
Operating labor, repairs and running expense. . . 8428.57 

Executive department 
Running expense 36.00 

Accounting and treasury departments 
Operating labor and running expense 426.05 

Brandi librarin 

LawrencevUie 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 
expense $ 1452.63 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense $ 4,077.06 

Books 2,668.21 

6,745.27 

Wi^End 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 
expense 1489.83 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 2,781.90 

Books If7i4.82 

4496.73 

Wylie Avenue 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 
expense , 1*552.92 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 4*533*26 

Books 2,252.51 

6,785.77 

Ml Washington 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 
expense 1*257.87 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 3*077.76 

Books 1,902.18 

4,979.94 

Haselwood 

Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 
expense 1*284.93 

70 



Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and running 

expense 3,342.78 

Books 3,055.00 

5,39778 

Homi Libraries 

Books 630.86 

Special Foods 

Training School for Children's Librarians $ 940.78 

Carnegie fund 

Books purchased 644.01 

Fund for binding British patents 

Binding 4f 149-30 

143,226.75 

Surplus $ 18324.56 

The surplus consists of the following 
balances : 

Surplus over purchases and expenses of the Car- 
negie Library, exclusive of funds $12398.61 

Balance of fund for binding British patents, not 
yet expended 1,413.97 

Balance of contribution from Andrew Carnegie, 

not yet expended 4,511.98 

'. $ 18324.56 

J* D* Bernd Fund 

Condensed statement of W. E. Corey, Treasurer, for the 
year ending January 31, 1903. 

RevviHM 

Surplus from last year $ 60.82 

Interest on Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake Erie R. 

R. Co. bonds 950.00 

Interest on Youghiogheny-Monongahela Coal Co. 

bond 75.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 1242 

$ i«8.24 

*^» ■^« 

For approved vouchers Nos. 56 to 
79 inclusive : 

Books purchased 447-03 

Surplus $ 651.21 

71 



Sch warto Fund 

Donation $300.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 2.60 

303.60 

DbporftfoQ 

For approved vouchers Nos. i 
and 2: 

Books purchased 3.85 



Surplus $ 297.85 



Report of the Auditing G>mtn2ttee 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir : — I beg to submit the enclosed report of Mr E. 
E. Beddoe of his examination of the books and annual state- 
ment in connection with the Carnegie Library for the year 
ending January 31, 1903. Mr Beddoe is an experienced ac- 
countant and the examination was placed in his hands for 
report to the Auditing Committee. 

I, therefore, submit this communication accompanied by 

Mr Beddoe's report as the report of the Auditing Committee, 

certifying to the statement of accounts as correct and in 

regular form. 

Yours respectfully, 

A. W. Mellon, 

March 28, 1903. Chairman. 



72 



, i 



t * 



< 



V * 



I \ 



\ 



' ,- -< 



* ' V 



i 



i > 



Eighth Annual Reports 



To the Board of Trustees 



of the 



\ Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 



For the Year Ending January 31, J904 



1904 



Contents 

Paffe 

Libraries and Deposit Stations 4 

Board of Trustees 5 

Library Staff 6 

Report of the President 9 

Report of the Committee on Administration of the 

Library ii 

Report of the Librarian 13 

Statistical Tables 31 

Gifts to the Library 51 

Publications of the Library 70 

Report of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 71 

Report of the Manager of Music Hall 72 

Report of the Finance Committee 75 

Report of the Auditing Committee 79 



Libraries and Deposit Stations 

Central Library, Schenley Park, Forbes Street 

Branch libraries 

Lawrenceville Branch, 279 Fisk Street 

West End Branch, Wabash and Neptune Streets 

Wylie Avenue Branch, Wylie Avenue at the head of Green Street 

Mount Washington Branch, 324 Grandview Avenue 

Hazelwood Branch, Monongahela Street near Hazelwood Avenue 



Deposit Stations 

Lecrone Bros. & Clark's drug store, Second and Greenfield Avenues 

Morningside School, Morningside Road 

73 Walter Avenue, South Side 

Glenwood School, Second Avenue near Allegheny Street 

Logan School, Lydia Street 

Forbes School, Forbes and Stevenson Streets 

Bane School, head of Twenty-second Street Incline, South Side 

Brashear School, Holt Street, South Side 

Jefferson School, Monastery Avenue, South Side 

Brown's Station School, Brown's Station, Twenty-third Ward 

F. L. Urben's drug store, 2131 Carson Street, South Side 

Ralston School, Penn Avenue and Fifteenth Street 

Kingsley House, Bedford Avenue and Fulton Street 

Carson Street near the Duquesne Incline, South Side 

St. Stephen's Parochial School, Second Avenue near Elizabeth Street 

Ward-Mackey Factory, Thirty-second Street & Pennsylvania Railroad 



Board of Trustees 

W. N. FREW, President 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Vice-president 

J. F. HUDSON, Secretary 

HON. JAMES H. REED,' Treasurer 

JAMES J. BOOTH JOHN S. LAMBIE* 

W. E. COREY GEO. A. MACBETH 

CHARLES S. CRAWFORD A. W. MELLON 

R. H. DOUGLAS ROBERT PITCAIRN 

E. M. FERGUSON HON. H. K. PORTER 

JOHN T. FOX HON. JAMES H. REED 

W. N. FREW J. P. STERRETT 

HON. WILLIAM B. HAYS W. H. STEVENSON 

J. F. HUDSON J. C. WASSON 

J. S. WIGHTMAN* 

Fmance CommHtee 

ROBERT PITCAIRN, Chairman E. M. FERGUSON 

HON. WILLIAM B. HAYS 

GMnmhtee on Music Hall 

W. H. STEVENSON, Chairman HON. H. K. PORTER 

J. P. STERRETT 

Commhtee on Buildings and Grounds 

JAMES J. BOOTH, Chairman J. F. HUDSON 

W. E. COREY 

Committee on Library 

GEO. A. MACBETH, Chairman JOHN T. FOX 

R. H. DOUGLAS 

Auditing Committee 

A. W. MELLON, Chairman JOHN S. LAMBI E« 

Ezecutive Staff 

EDWIN H. ANDERSON, EDWIN H. LEMARE, 

Librarian Director of Music 

CHAS. R. CUNNINGHAM. GEO. H. WILSON, 

Sup't of Buildings and Grounds Manager of Music Hall 

^W. £. Corey lenrcd for a portion of the year. 
* Deceased November 14, 1903. 
'Succeeded John S. Lambie, deceased. 



Library Staff 

At the clost of the period covered by this report 
ADMINISTRATION 

Edwin H. Anderson - Librarian 

Mabel A. Frothingham - Librarian's Sec'y & Editor of Library Publications 

Howard N. Shallenberger - Clerk 

Charity A. Amos --_.- Stenographer 

ORDER DEPARTMENT 

Franklin F. Hopper Chief of Department 

Helen B. Gracie -- First Assistant 

Jeannette B. Woods Helen M. Sands 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT 

Margaret Mann .-- Chief Cataloguer 

May L. Prentiss - First Assistant 

Marion A. Knight Classifier and Annotator 

Mary B. Lavely Mabel L. Young 

Emma H. Walker Irene Stewart 

Susan A. Lavely Amy C. Moon 

Harriet McCarty Cora E. Batten f elder 

Pasting and Marking 
Mary Shaw Grace Beatrice Shaw 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 

Elisa May Willard Reference Librarian 

Susan C. Crampton First Assistant 

Martha C. Dampman Marguerite W. Bonnett 

John Henry Bissell, Shelf Curator 
One page 

DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY 
Harrison W. Craver Technology Librarian 

LOAN DEPARTMENT 

Jessie Welles Superintendent of Circulation 

Mary F. Macrum ------- Reader/ Advisory Librarian 

Frances N. Northrop --------- First Assistant 

Alice M. V. Kcarns Registration Clerk 

Anne Rosenmuller Qara G. Hoffman 

Maud Taylor Lucy M. Cook 

Ethel Shaw Watts 
Three pages 

6 



CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT 

Frances Jenkins Olcott Chief of Department 

Caroline Burnite First Assistant 

Central Library Children's Room 

Helen U. Price Children's Librarian 

Emily A. Beale* Rosina C Gymer* 

One page 

Work with Schools 

Mabel Stevenson ----- Supervisor 

Harriet J. Imhoff 

Home Libraries 
Meredyth Woodward ---- Supervisor 

East Liberty Children's Room 

Jessie M. Carson --- ----/n charge 

Edna M. Whiteman' 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

William H. Schwarten Superintendent 

Richard B. Ross -- Linotype Operator 

Arthur D. Scott Job Pressman 

John Archer Elias Parry 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Binding and Periodical Records, Supplies, etc. 

Alice B. Lothrop, In charge Harriet B. Hofford 

William Russell 

Newspaper Room 
Sophia D. Maxwell ----/n charge 

Messenger 
Thomas F. Scott 

LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH 

H. Elizabeth Cory Branch Librarian 

M. Gertrude Blanchard, First As/t Rose C. Pickering 
M. Esther Johnson Carrie M. Ziegler 

Gertrude E. Andrus, Children's Librarian 
Ruth G. Hopkins, As/t Children's Librarian 

One page' 

'On part time. 

'On part time. By tpecbl ammgement for one year with the CleTeland Public 
Library. 

*By special arrangement for one year witb tbe Cleveland Public Library. 

7 



WEST END BRANCH 

Agnes M. Elliott Branch Librarian 

Martha A. Gibson, First As/i Mabel Rogers 

Lilian Rod6 One page 

Annabelle Porter, Children's Librarian 

WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH 

Robert S. Fletcher* Branch Librarian 

Qara E. Howard, First As/t Margery L. Allison 

Agnes D. Smith Emma A. Floyd 

Edith M. Smith, Children's Librarian 
Adelaide L. Martin, Ass't Children's Librarian 

One page 

MOUNT WASHINGTON BRANCH 

Mabel Shryock .-. Branch Librarian 

Leonora Mackey, First As/t Mary E. Mackey' 

Minnie E. Schade One page' 

Josephine L. Gutman, Children's Librarian 

HAZELWOOD BRANCH 

Charlotte E. Wallace --------- Branch Librarian 

Charlotte H. Davis, First Ass't Marion D. Cameron 

Alicia L Anderson One page' 

Lillie C Bryer, Children's Librarian 

Four of the people in this list are not on the regular pay-roll, but were 
employed in connection with the printing of catalogue cards for children's 
books. (Sit p.20,) 

^Appointed in November 1903; assumed dntles of positioii February t, 1904. 

■Substitute. 

>On part time. 



8 



Report of the President 

To the members of the Board of Trustees: 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to place before you the 
reports of the various committees of the Board and of the 
heads of departments, in which will be found a detailed record 
of the work done by the Library during the year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1904. 

It is gratifying to note, as appears in the report of the 
Librarian, a verv decided increase in the number of volumes 
circulated and an improvement in the quality, although the 
fiction percentage of this library has always compared favor- 
ably with that of like institutions both in this country and 
abroad. 

It gives me great pleasure to be able to emphasize the 
favorable comment on the staff made by the Librarian in his 
report. It is in but few public institutions that such a fine 
spirit, such earnestness and enthusiasm are shown, and it is 
but simple justice that the members of the staff should be 
made acquainted with the fact that their able and courteous 
efforts to serve the people of Pittsburgh well are recognized 
and appreciated. 

The work of the Library is continually and rapidly grow- 
ing in extent and importance. The home circulation item has 
expanded from less than 100,000 in 1896 to more than 600,- 
000 in 1903. More public schools are being served each year, 
the home libraries are being supervised and circulated, boys' 
and girls' clubs are being organized and directed, the research 
work in the Reference department, and the assistance, advice 
and information rendered inventors and scientific investiga- 
tors generally by the Department of technology arc growing 
in scope from day to day. 

It is hoped that the East End branch building started 
nearly a year ago, will be ready for occupancy about the 
middle of the present year. It will probably be the most per- 
fect example of a branch library building in the world. 

The City of Pittsburgh during the past year secured 



possession of the square of ground at the junction of 22d and 
Carson streets on the South Side and by ordinance gave to 
this Board the privilege of erecting on a part of it the South 
Side branch building. The plot of ground on 19th street 
formerly owned by the Board and which was sold in February 
1903 for $20,000, has been half paid for, the remaining two 
installments falling due in February 1905 and 1906. The 
balance of the mortgage can now be sold at the pleasure of 
the Board and in that case, adding the $20,000 thus obtained 
to the $40,000 originally set aside for this building, a fund of 
$60,000 will become immediately available. It would seem 
wise to begin the preparation of the plans. 

During the year, at the request of the Homewood Board 
of Trade and with the sanction of the Councils of the city, 
Mr Carnegie bought for the sum of $10,800 a plot of ground 
135 feet by 144 feet at the corner of Lang and Hamilton ave- 
nues, with the intention of having erected thereon at some 
time in the future another branch building. The title to the 
property was taken in his name and the money for the erec- 
tion of the building must come from him. 

The excavation for the foundation of the great extension 
to the main building was begun about November i, 1903, by 
the A. & S. Wilson Company, the lowest bidders. Although 
the work was to have been completed by February 15 of this 
year, it is still unfinished, the contractors having encountered 
unusually severe weather, which lasted continuously for four 
months. 

The Superintendent is to be complimented on his skill in 
maintaining the buildings in excellent condition. They are 
practically as good as new and in a fine state of cleanliness. 

The congratulations of the Board are due to the Manager 
of the Music Hall, for his success in renting the Hall to such 
advantage that all salaries and expenses in connection with it 
were paid and a net surplus of over $800 remained. 

Mr Lemare has continued his artistic and instructive 
organ recitals, which are adding greatly to the pleasure and 
musical education of the people. 

On January 31, 1904, the end of the fiscal year, there re- 
mained in the Treasury balances from the various appropria- 
tions aggregating $11,722.28. The City of Pittsburgh ap- 

10 



propriated for the year ending January 31, 1905, $i58,cxx), 
making a total for disbursement of $169,722.28. On March 
16 your Executive Committee met and in accordance with 
the provision of the by-laws apportioned this total as follows : 

Maintenance of Library system and purchase of books $115,500.00 

Maintenance of Library buildings and grounds 58,000.00 

Music Hall emergency fund 2,000.00 

Contingent fund 14,222.28 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. N. Frew, 
President. 



Report of the G>mmittee on Administration of 

the Library 

Mr W. N. Frew, President: 

Dear Sir : — We herewith submit as our annual report the 
report of the Librarian, since it is very complete and full in its 
information. We highly commend the efficiency of the staff. 
Although the increased business of the Library taxes to the 
utmost the working capacity of the staff, we have had many 
commendations of their work from those most competent to 
judge. 

We refer you to the Librarian's report for an account of 

the work in its various details. 

Yours truly, 

Geo. A. Macbeth, 

April 19, 1904. Chairman. 



II 



Report of the Librarian 

To the Library Committee of the Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to present my report of the work of the 
Library for the eighth statistical year, ending January 31, 
1904. 

As far as bare figures may indicate the results of the 
year's work, they may be briefly summarized as follows : 

Total number of volumes in Central Library and 
branches at end of year 180702 

Total number of volumes in lending collections at end 
of year ii3>940 

Total circulation from lending collections 607,442 

Total number of books and magazines circulated, and 

used in reading rooms 1,200,000 

Total attendance in reading rooms 453J70 

At the close of the year there were in the Central and 
branch libraries, both catalogued and uncatalogued, 180,702 
volumes and 11,021 pamphlets. There were added during 
the year 28,920 volumes and 1,832 pamphlets, resulting in a 
net gain of 21,445 volumes and 1,167 pamphlets, after de- 
ducting the number worn out, withdrawn, etc. {See Table 
/, following the text of this report.) 

The number of classified and catalogued volumes on the 
shelves and ready for use at the Central and branch libraries 
at the close of the year was as follows : 

Central Library 

Central Library proper 94*282 

School duplicate collection 14*078 

Home libraries and East Liberty children's 
room 2,931 111,291 

Branch libraries 

Lawrenceville branch 15415 

West End branch 10,396 

Wylie Avenue branch 15,208 

Mount Washington branch 10,175 

Hazelwood branch 10,521 61,715 

Total i73>oo6 

The difference between this total and the total number of 

13 



volumes in the Library buildings at the close of the year, con- 
sisted chiefly of over 5,000 volumes presented to us in Jan- 
uary, too late to be classified and catalogued before the end of 
the fiscal year. 

Of the total number of volumes ready for use at the close 
of the year, 113,940 were in the lending collections at the 
Central and branch libraries and 59,066 in the reference col- 
lections. Of this latter number 55,150 were in the Reference 
department at the Central Library and 3,916 in the branch 
reference collections. The number in the branch reference 
collections is 97 less than recorded in our last report, a fact 
explained by the transfer during the year of over 300 volumes 
from the reference to the lending collections. {Table 2.) 

During the year 7,475 volumes were worn out, destroyed, 
withdrawn or sent to the duplicate collection. There were 
4,421 volumes bound, 10,781 rebound and 735 repaired, all 
in the bindery in the Central Library building. As the col- 
lections grow older and their use increases, there is a marked 
increase in the number of volumes rebound and repaired each 
year. 

Qrculation 

The total home circulation, 607,442 volumes, represents 
an increase over the previous year of 84,668, or 16 per cent. 
There was a further decrease in the relative circulation of 
fiction of three per cent. 

The circulation through the Central and branch libraries 
was apportioned as follows : 

At Through 

Library Deposit Through 

Buildings Stations Schools Totals 

Central Library 168,796* 48,380 217,176 

Lawrenceville branch 86,044 6,567 11,389 104,000 

West End branch 32431 3,843 i»490 37764 

Wylie Avenue branch 91,016 6,516 14,108 111,640 

Mt. Washington branch 42,628 10,279 11,275 64,182 

Hazelwood branch 43,163 14,006 1,751 58,920 

East Liberty children's room.. 13,760 13,760 

Totals 477,838 41,211 88,393 60744a 

There were substantial gains at the Central Library and 
all the five branches, although the gain at the Central Library 

'Includes 9,527 volumes issued through home libraries and clubs. 

14 



Gtaphic Table t 

Flgttrei at top reprcseot yean; at leftt pcfccntago; at right, vohimct 

Line A ihowi grofwtii of lending coUectiont 
Line B sbowi growtii of drculatioQ 
Dotted line C tbowt fluctuatfooa of relative percentage of fiction circulated 




620,000 
600,000 
52)0,000 

560,000 
54-0,000 

520,000 

500,000 

480,000 

460,000 
440^000 

420^000 

400^000 

5So,ooo 
360^000 
340,000 
320,000 

3oo,ooo 
28o,ooo 

260,000 
240,000 
220,000 

2bo,ooo 
1 8o,ooo 
»6o,ooo 

<40,000 

1 2o,ooo 

100,000 

So^ooo 

60.0OO 
40,000 

2o,ooo 



15 



is not apparent in the figures given above, because the school 
circulation of each branch library district is this year credited 
to the branch serving the district, while heretofore all school 
circulation has been credited to the Central Library. {Tables 
4, 5, 6 and 22,) 

The accompanying graphic table i shows the growth of 
the lending stock, the increase in its use, and the fluctuations 
of the relative percentage of fiction issued, from the opening 



Gtaphic Table 2 

Figuret at right rtpteutA volumct 

The liflc ihowi fltictuationi of drculatloa of entire Ubiuj syiftein month by 

month, from left to right 



-I 
c 

m 
-J 



2 

-I 

o 



> 



3: 



o 



r 



> 

c 



^ 00 



CI 

3 
(I 

.-5 



O 

o 

o 

cr 
n 

n 



2 
c 

3 
cr 

o 

-$ 



c» 

3 

0" 























i 






















/ 






















/ 


















J 


\ 


/ 


















/ 


\ 


/ 


J 


L 














/ 


> 


f 


/ 


v 












j 


f 






/ 


\ 






• 






j 










\ 












/ 










\ 












/ 










1 


I 










/ 












\ 










/ 












\ 










/ 












\ 










/ 












\ 










/ 












} 


^ 








/ 














_s 




V 




/ 


















\ 




/ 


















JS 




f 


















y-i 









c 



l72,000 
10,O0O 

ezfioo 

64,ooo 

62,000 
feO^OOO 

5&,ooo 
S6,0OO 

s+,oao 
52,000 
SO.ooo 

48,000 

46 ,000 

44,000 
42,ooo 



40,000 
38, 000 
56^000 

34,000 
32^000 



16 



of the Library to the close of the period covered by this re- 
port. The line A shows the increase in the number of volumes 
in the loan collections from 10,558 in 1896 to 1 13,940 in 1903. 
The line B shows the growth of the circulation from 115,394 
in 1896 to 607,442 in 1903. As pointed out in the last report, 
the divergence of these lines graphically illustrates the growth 
in staff efficiency and number of distributing points. The 
dotted line C also shows the steady improvement in the qual- 
ity of the circulation since 1898. 

Graphic table 2 illustrates the fluctuations, month by 
month, of the circulation from the entire Library system dur- 
ing the year. The line falls during the hot months and rises 
abruptly with the coming of cooler weather. It falls again in 
December, the circulation in that month diminishing always 
on account of the holiday season. The circulation for the first 
half of January is also affected by the holidays. From that 
time on the circulation increases rapidly, reaching the maxi- 
mum usually in March. The line in the graphic table does 
not show this fluctuation exactly, since the figures for January 
include the home library circulation for the entire year, 9,527 
volumes, it being impossible to keep this record by months. 
The circulation for February 1904 was, however, over 72,000; 
so the general direction of the line is correct. (Table 5.) 

A significant fact in connection with the work of the Loan 
department of the Central Library is the great increase in the 
adult circulation of books bearing upon the arts and in- 
dustries of this region. There was an actual increase of 20 
per cent, over the previous year, while the gain for the last 
two years was 45 per cent. 

Rcgittrfttion 

The total number of borrowers registered from the open- 
ing of the Library in November 1895 to February i, 1904, 
was 61,356. The record of the registrations and re-reg^stra- 
tions during the year is as follows : 

Adult JuTenOe Total 

Original regristrations 5,001 4,902 9,903 

Re-registrations 3,587 300 3,887 

Totals 8,588 5,J02 13,790 

17 



While most of the clerical work of registering and re- 
registering borrowers is done at the Central Library, the 
registrations are secured through the following agencies, and 
in the proportions indicated by the figures following : 

Central Library 4.856 

Lawrenceville branch 2, 198 

West End branch 912 

Wylie Avenue branch 3»092 

Mount Washington branch i459 

Hazelwood branch i>004 

East Liberty children's room 269 

ToUl i3»790 

The re-registration of the first 20,000 borrowers, begun 
in June of the previous year, was closed on June i, 1903, and 
the re-registration of the next 10,000 was begun and is now 
in progress. After cancelling the cards of those borrowers 
who have failed to re-register, or have moved away, died, 
etc., amounting to 14,787 at the close of the period covered 
by this report, there remained 46,569 cards still available. 

Apptentke Qass 

In the fall of 1902 an apprentice class of four was formed 
to receive instruction in the methods in use in this Library pre- 
paratory to entering the Library service. The members of 
the class were applicants for positions who had successfully 
passed the required examination. The class was under the 
direction of the Superintendent of circulation. The members 
took the courses on technical library subjects in the Training 
School for Children's Librarians during the school year, and 
each gave the Library 500 hours of practical work in the 
various departments of the Central and branch libraries. 

The second apprentice class, consisting of eight members, 
beg^n work in October 1903, the examination of applicants 
having been held on September 26. The same methods are 
being pursued as last year, and the results seem to warrant 
the time and energy expended by the Superintendent of cir- 
culation, and the other heads of departments and assistants 
who aid in the training of these apprentices. 

18 



Gitalog:ue Dq)artment 

During the year there were classified and catalogued 26,- 
483 volumes, an increase of 6,631 over the previous year. 
These were for the Central and branch libraries, as follows : 

Central Library 

Central Library proper 10.056 

School duplicate collection 2,433 

Home libraries and East Liberty children's 
room 1,728 I4f2i7 

Branch libraries 

Lawrenceville branch 2,740 

West End branch 2,082 

Wylie Avenue branch 3,i54 

Mount Washington branch 2,241 

Hazel wood branch 2,049 12,266 

Total 26483 

These figures g^ve no adequate idea of the manifold ac- 
tivities of this department — the technical niceties, the unfail- 
ing accuracy and careful judgment required in classifying 
and cataloguing the thousands of volumes added yearly. 
(Table 3.) 

Oasscfied Ott^tloffuc 

The second part of the classified catalogue, covering the 
classes Philosophy and Religion and containing about 200 
pages, was completed during the year. For the convenience 
of readers it was decided to issue this and succeeding sections 
in pamphlet form as soon as printed, enough signatures being 
saved for an edition of 1,000 copies to appear later in book 
form. Part 3, Sociology and Philology, is just off the press. 
It contains over 300 pages. The printing of this catalogue 
has proved a tremendous undertaking and has added greatly 
to the work of the Catalogue and Printing departments. It 
is, however, being pushed as rapidly as possible, and part 4, 
Natural Science and Useful Arts, will probably be completed 
during the summer. The old classification for books on 
natural science and useful arts having proved inadequate, we 
have revised it, subdivided many classes, assigned places to 
new subjects and made other alterations, all of which changes 
will be incorporated in the forthcoming catalogue. 

19 



Pfinted Gttalosfue Gtrds for Childfen's Books 

The Cleveland Public Library and this Library are cooper- 
ating in the printing of catalogue cards for 1,053 children's 
books, the cataloguing being done by the Cleveland library, 
the printing by ourselves. The original intention was to print 
these cards simply for the two cooperating libraries. In Jan- 
uary 1903, however, the libraries issued a circular announcing 
that they were willing to print extra sets for libraries sub- 
scribing before printing was begun, these sets to be sold at 
a price sufficient to cover the additional expense of printing. 
A number of libraries took advantage of this offer, and the 
actual work of printing began in May. The number of cards 
printed up to February i, 1904, was 459,743, and we hope to 
finish the printing by July i. Each set will contain over 
10,000 cards, and the total number of cards printed will be 
about 930,000. 

Reference Department 

The number of volumes in the Reference department on 
February i, 1904, was 55,150, of which 4,507 were added dur- 
ing the year. The use of the Reference room continues to 
grow, as may be seen by the following comparative statistics : 

1903 1902 Gain 

No. of books used in Reference room. .157,309 143,505 i3»8o4 
No. of persons using Reference room . 33,064 29,560 3»504 

The statistics for the year are given in greater detail in 
tables 9 and 10, following the text of this report. 

A change in the hours of opening for holidays went into 
effect in November, and has been abundantly justified by the 
attendance on those days. On Thanksgiving day and New 
Year's day the Reference room was open from 9 a. m. until 
10 p. m. instead of from 2 to 6 p. m. as heretofore, with the 
result that more than twice as many readers visited the room 
as on the corresponding days of last year. This is extremely- 
satisfactory considering the fact that the change of hours had 
not yet become widely known. The Reference department is 
now open from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. every week-day except 
Christmas, Memorial day and the Fourth of July, when the 

20 



building is closed entirely, and Founder's day, when it is 
closed until the anniversary exercises are over. 

In order to be able to estimate the increase in the daily 
demands made upon assistants in the Reference room, a 
record is kept of the subjects on which information is asked. 
This record does not include the subjects for which the in- 
quirer is merely referred to the catalogue, but those cases in 
which some search for information is made by the reference 
assistants. The number of such questions during November 
was 369, the largest number on any one day of that month 
being 34. 

Since September a special effort has been made to call 
the attention of the frequenters of the room to our finely il- 
lustrated books by displaying them in turn on a special table 
reserved for that purpose. Every week or two the collection 
of books has been changed, to show the resources of the 
Library on different subjects. Some of the subjects illustrated 
were the Preraphaelites, Pottery, Furniture, Venice, Euro- 
pean art galleries. Illustrators, and Artists by periods. 

As our collection of photographs and other pictures be- 
comes better known, the use of them increases. This year, 
in addition to their use in the Reference room, of which no 
statistics are kept, 406 photographs and 2,297 other pictures 
have been loaned from the Reference department for use in 
clubs and classes. 

The evening reference assistant has continued to spend 
her spare moments on the poetry index mentioned in our 
fourth and fifth annual reports. This now covers no vol- 
umes of poetry collections. A list of references to all the 
material to be found in this Library on 148 living American 
artists was published in the Monthly Bulletin for May and 
June 1903. The usual bibliography was furnished for the 
catalogue of the fall exhibition in the Carnegie Art Galleries, 
and the bulletin board in the Reference room has been con- 
stantly supplied with the usual lists on current topics, notices 
of important new books and current magazine articles, Uni- 
versitv Extension lecture references, etc. 

Detailed reference lists have been prepared in advance 
for 13 study clubs, covering 640 topics in all. The prepara- 
tion of these lists requires much time, but the advantage both 

31 



to the clubs and to the Library justifies it. As the lists of 
previous years are preserved and indexed, the result is a col- 
lection of selected reference lists which are not only used 
again and again for different clubs, but for other purposes as 
well. Most of the club program committees make the 
Library their meeting place when making out their programs 
for the year. Here they have the benefit of a room to them- 
selves, and access to our collection of about 200 club pro- 
grams, as well as all the books they want. 

Among the important books added to the Reference de- 
partment during the year are the following : 

American Archaeological Expedition to Syria. Publications, pt-2. 
Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Journal. 

v.i-26. 
Bibliographical Society of London. Transactions, and Illustrated 

monographs. i6v. 
Baessler's Ancient Peruvian art. 4v. 
Baxter's Spanish colonial architecture in Mexico. lov. 
Berenson's Drawings of the Florentine painters. 2v. 
Brownson's quarterly review. 24V. 
Burk's History of Virginia. 4v. 
Dampier's Collection of voyages. 4v. 
Dobson's William Hogarth. 
English Dialect Society. Publications. 33V. 
Fontani's Viaggio pittorico della Toscana. 3v. 
Foster's Miniature painters, British and foreign. 2v. 
Harris's Fishes of North America, v.i. 
Holmes's Constable and his influence on landscape painting. 
Hooker & Jackson's Index Kewensis. 2v. 
Howard & Crisp's Visitation of England and Wales, v.i-io. 
Hoyt's Antiquarian researches. 
Modern language notes. 1886-date. 
Museum of foreign literature. 45V. 
Oldest map with the name America, by Waldseemiiller. 
Palustre's La renaissance en France. 3v. 
La Pr6fecture du Rhone; architecte, A. G. Louvier. 
Triggs's Formal gardens in England and Scotland. 3v. 
Woodward & Burnett's Treatise on heraldry. 2v. 
Work of John S. Sargent. 
Zeitschrift fur Bauwesen. i8si-date. 

Department oi Technology' 

The reference use of books upon the natural sciences and 
the industrial arts shows an increase of six per cent, over that 
of last year, and now approximates 32 per cent, of the whole 
number of books used in the Reference department. Of this 

22 



total the books on the industrial arts alone constitute 24.1 
per cent. (Table 10.) 

A considerable part of this increase is due to the collec- 
tion of patent records. The United States and English 
patents have been largely used, the French patents to a less 
extent. The set of United States patents obtained last year 
is complete from 1871, and still earlier patents are partially 
given in other publications. The English patents are now 
all bound with the exception of the drawings for 18 years 
and the specifications for four years. This work has pro- 
gressed more rapidly during the latter part of 1903 and will 
probably be completed in 1904. 

During the year the resources of the department have 
been increased by the addition, as heretofore, of all the im- 
portant new works in English and of selected French and 
German works bearing upon the industries of this region. 
Sets of a number of important periodicals have also been 
added. There are still, however, a gjeat many incomplete 
sets upon our shelves owing to the inability of the dealers to 
supply the lacking volumes. 

During the year the various card indexes have been kept 
up to date, and have daily proved of value. Assistance has 
been given to a number of libraries in other localities, and 
lists have been made for shop libraries for several local manu- 
facturing establishments. As mentioned in a previous section 
of this report, the classification for the books in this depart- 
ment has been entirely revised and many alterations made. 

Among the more important additions to the department 
during the year are the following works : 

American Pharmaceutical Association. Proceedings. 25V. 

Annales des ponts et chauss^es. 194V. 

L'ann^e scientifique et industrielle. 40V. 

Berzelius' Jahres-Bericht uber die Fortschritte der Chemie. 30V. 

Biedermann's Technisch-chemisches Jahrbuch. 2iv. 

Canadian patent office record. 7v. 

Cleveland Institution of Engineers. Proceedings. 32V. 

Colliery guardian and journal of the coal and iron trades. 20v. 

France. Description des machines et proc^d^s pour lesquels des 

brevets d'invention ont ^t^ pris. 44V. 
Glaser's Annalen fur Gewerbe und Bauwesen. 32V. 
Ice and refrigeration. 14V. 

Institution of Junior Engineers. Record of transactions. 11 v. 
International library of technology. 45V. 

23 



Midland Institute of Mining Engineers. Transactions, iiv. 
Poggendorff's Biographisch-litterarisches Handworterbuch zar 

Geschichtc der exacten Wissenschaften. 3v. 
Revue de m^canique. pv. 
Revue generate des chemins de fer. 50V. 
Veroffentlichen des kaiserlichen Gesundheitsamtes. 2iv. 
Zeitschrift des Osterreichischen Ingenieur- und Architckten- 

Verein. S4v. 

Qiildren^s Department 

The circulation of children's books during the past year 
shows a gain of 74,630 over the previous year, while the at- 
tendance in the children's rooms, 268,566, shows a decrease 
of 6,849. {^^^ tables 7 and 8.) The increase in the quantity 
and improvement in the quality of the work done in the chil- 
dren's rooms is due largely to the interest of the branch li- 
brarians and to the broad-minded way in which they have 
furthered the plans of their children's librarians. The statis- 
tics of circulation may be briefly tabulated as follows : 

Children's rooms 

Central Library 34,727 

Lawrenceville branch 36,560 

West End branch 15,058 

Mount Washington branch 17,461 

Wylie Avenue branch 43,478 

Hazelwood branch 18,012 

East Liberty children's room 12,849 178,145 

Deposit stations 29,349 

Schools 82,103 

Home libraries and reading clubs 9,527 

Total 299,124 

During the summer 11 playground deposit stations were 
conducted, the circulation being 6,986, an increase of 1,671 
over the previous year. In the tabulation above, the play- 
ground circulation is included in the circulation from the 
various children's rooms and through the schools. 

StoiT' Hotif and Readingf Gfcles 

During the past year 502 stories have been told to 1 7,034 
children at the Central and branch libraries and in some of 
the public schools. Miscellaneous stories were told in the* 
schools, but at the libraries the older children listened to a 

24 



connected series of stories about "Chariemagnc and his 
Paladins," and the younger children were told stories from 
Hans Christian Andersen. During the month of December 
the children's librarians and students in the Training School 
for Children's Librarians had the benefit of ten days' training 
in story telling under Miss Marie L. Shedlock, the well- 
known English story teller and lecturer on the art of telling 
stories to children. 

The Library issued during the year a pamphlet on "Story 
telling to children from Norse mythology and the Nibelun- 
genlied," embodying the results of our experience in telling 
these stories. 

Work with Schools 

The school duplicate collection numbered 14,078 volumes 
at the close of the period covered by this report. The total 
circulation from this collection, including the volumes not 
classified as children's books, was 88,393, ^^ increase of 24,- 
888 over the previous year. Fifty schools were supplied with 
books, three deposit stations were conducted, and 3,000 
mounted pictures were lent to the teachers. 

The schools were visited frequently, and several talks 
were given by members of the staff at teachers' meetings and 
similar gatherings. As a result of one of these talks, the 
teachers in several schools are telling the children stories from 
the Norse mythology, using as a handbook our pamphlet 
mentioned above. 

Late last spring several school principals were invited 
to bring their seventh or eighth grade classes to spend a 
morning at the Library. Since then five classes, containing 
altogether 138 girls and boys, have made such visits. On 
each occasion they were first given a general explanation of 
how books are placed in the Library, why there are call num- 
bers and card catalogues, what the former mean and how the 
latter are used, and were then taken to visit the various de- 
partments and given some practice in the use of the card 
catalogues. More classes are expected to visit the Library 
this spring. 

25 



Home libraries and Readingf Qubs 

During the past year 28 home library groups and 36 read- 
ing clubs have been conducted by the supervisor of home 
libraries. A large number of these were newly established 
or reorganized this year. The circulation was 9,527, not count- 
ing 193 volumes lent to the Lawrenceville branch and in- 
cluded in its circulation. 

During the year an unused school room in the Sylvan Ave- 
nue school was placed at our disposal by the school board, and 
$250 was given by the Jones & Laughlin Steel Company to 
fit it up as a club room. A piano lent by Mr C. C. Mellor 
adds greatly to its attractiveness. In this room six different 
reading clubs meet, the average membership of a club being* 
20. Two of these clubs are composed of boys who work in 
the mills. 

We wish to express once more our gratitude to the volun- 
teer visitors who make this work possible. The following 
have served during the year : 

Miss Florence B. Alrich, Miss Lillic B. Beddoe,* Miss Alice L. 
Biggert, Miss Caroline Burnitc,' Miss Florence Coleman, Miss Sidney 
Colestock, Miss Jennie Corbett, Miss Eraelie Cowan, Miss Irene 
Cowan, Mrs H. P. Davis, Miss Mary Stewart Dickey, Miss Bertha C. 
Dolan, Miss Ida Josephine Duff,* Miss Margaret Edwards, Miss Lydia 
Elizabeth Fleming, Mr William P. Flint, Miss Ruth Gordon Gatch,' 
Miss Mary B. Gilson, Miss Mary A. Coding,* Miss Mabel E. Griffith,* 
Mrs Morgan W. Hall, Mrs S. M. Hamilton, Miss Margaret Hare, Miss 
Margaret D. Hargrave,* Miss Florence Janney Heaton," Miss Clara 
Wells Herbert," Miss Anne Houston, Miss Alice G. Howland,* Mr H. 
R. Hume, Miss Harriet J. Imhoff,* Mrs Herminie Ahl Johnson, Miss 
Helen W. Johnston, Mrs Ernest E. Jones, Mrs Frederic Sherlock Kel- 
logg, Miss Jessie Keyt, Miss Martha King, Miss Caroline Lauman, 
Miss Edith Lewis, Miss Olive Lewis, Miss Elizabeth B. Loughridge, 
Mrs Elizabeth McGarvey, Miss Birdie Mahaffey, Miss Frances DeF. 
Martin, Miss Nellie Mead, Miss Lydia Neill, Miss Nannie Oppcn- 
heimer. Miss Lida Packer, Miss Bertha R. Palmer, '\lrs James Parker, 
jr., Miss Martha R. Parsons, Miss Edith E. Patterson,* Miss Amena 
Pendleton,* Miss Venita Pendleton, Miss Anna Myra Petty, Miss Sara 
Pfeil, Mrs Ernest Waller Pittman, Miss Catherine Rogers, Miss May 
Rogers, Rev. D. Luther Roth, Miss Mary F. Smith, Mrs F. E. Stehlik, 
Miss Elizabeth Summerson, Mrs J. Ingersoll Tod, Miss Christine M. 
Tracy,* Miss Carolyn E. Vandersaal, Mrs Frank O. Van Gorder, Miss 
Alice N. Wells, Mr James Wiley, Mrs Rufus Wood, Miss Florence C. 
Wuerthelc, Mrs Luther K. Yoder, Mr Luther K. Yoder. 

^Deceased. 

* Students in the Training School for Children*! Librmriani or membert of the 
Library staff. •**•-' 

26 



Tf ammgf School for Chfldren^s libf anans 

At the last annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
the Library the President announced that Mr Carnegie had 
expressed g^eat interest in the Training School for Children's 
Librarians and asked to be permitted to contribute toward 
its maintenance $5,000 a year for the following three years. 
This generous gift has enabled the Training School to reduce 
its tuition fees and broaden the scope of the course by having 
a larger number of lectures by librarians and educators from 
other places. 

The Training School began its third year as a regularly 
organized school on October 12, 1903. In addition to \he 
regularly enrolled students, numbering 14 this year, 12 
Library apprentices have taken the courses on technical library 
subjects and nine children's librarians and four other mem- 
bers of the staff have each taken one or more courses in the 
Training School, during the period covered by this report. 

Printii^ Department 

The work of this department during the past year may be 
briefly summarized as follows: 

No. general catalogue cards printed 78,609 

No. catalogue titles from which these were printed 8,017 

No. children's catalogue cards printed 459.743 

No. catalogue titles from which these were printed 4*483 

Miscellaneous forms, blanks, etc. printed (pieces) 548,279 

Training School forms, blanks, etc. printed (pieces) 4r4^ 

Publications 

No. Copiet No. PUfct 

Monthly bulletin. 8**. lonos. (4,000 per issue.) 428 pp. .40,000 1,712,000 

Title-page, contents and index to vol.8. 8*. 31 pp. . . 500 15,500 

Weekly list of additions. 8* 3,120 8,550 

Training School for Children's Librarians — Circular. 

Illus. 8''. 12 pp 2,000 24,000 

Seventh annual reports. 8*. 72 pp 1,500 108,000 

West End Study Club — Program. 12'. 36 pp 160 5,760 

Tuesday Evening Study Club — Program. 12'. 25 pp.. 125 3,125 

Hazelwood Library Study Club — Program. 12**. 25 pp. . 100 2,500 

Young Men's Study Club— Program. 12*. 21 pp 100 2,100 

Keystone State Library Association — Circular. 8*. 

8 pp 5.000 40,000 

List of subject headings for use in dictionary cata- 
logues of children's books. 8**. 58 pp 1,200 69,600 

27 



Story telling to children from Norse mythology and the 

Nibelungenlied. Illus. S**. 48 pp 2,500 120,000 

Classified catalogue (8th to 27th sig.), p.i 13-430. 8*. 

318 pp 1,050 333»900 

Classified catalogue — Philosophy and Religion (pam- 
phlet form), p. 113-263. 8*. 151 pp. Completed... 1,075 162,325 
Index to above. 8**. 18 pp 1,075 . i9»35o 

Classified catalogue — Sociology and Philology (pam- 
phlet form), p.264-430. 8*^. 167 pp. Incomplete.. 1,500 264,000 

Totals 61,005 2,890,710 

The Superintendent of this department thinks there is 

urgent need of another linotype machine, if the increasing 

volume of work is to be promptly put through. Considering 
the present crowded conditions in the room occupied by this 

department, it seems unwise to try to do anything in this 

direction until we are ready to move all the machinery into 

new quarters. It is only fair to say, however, that the Printing 

department is operated under grtzt disadvantages, owing to 

the crowding referred to, as well as to the insufficient 

natural light. 

Reading Rooms 

The statistics of attendance in the various reading rooms 
are given fully in tables 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 and 21. Briefly- 
stated, the number of persons who used these rooms for read- 
ing and study was as follows : 

Central Library 

Reference room 33*064 

Reading room 65,333 

Children's room 37*3i4 i3S,7ii 

Lawrenceville branch 76,868 

West End branch proper 42,203 

Point Bridge reading room 5,541 47,744 

Wylie Avenue branch 86,771 

Mount Washington branch 40,405 

Hazel wood branch 49,334 

East Liberty children's room 16,337 

Total 453»i70 

These statistics probably fall a good deal below the facts, 
since the records are kept by the assistants who are working 
at the desks and who cannot be expected at busy times to 

28 



keep an absolutely accurate count of all the readers using the 
rooms. When the crowds are greatest is precisely the time 
when the least attention can be paid to keeping the count. 

Branch Libraries and Deposit Stations 

At the close of the period covered by this report there 
were in operation five branch libraries and i6 deposit sta- 
tions. Last year we reported five branch libraries and 1 1 de- 
posit stations. The East Liberty branch, which will be larger 
and better equipped than the older branches, is now building 
and will be opened during 1904. 

No strikingly new features mark the work of the branch 
libraries during this year, but the records show that the 
methods already in operation have met with increasing suc- 
cess. (Tables 2, 11-20,) 

As heretofore, the majority of the deposit stations have 
been operated by branch libraries; two by the Lawrenceville 
branch, one by the West End branch, three by the Wylie Ave- 
nue branch, two by the Mount Washington branch, five by 
the Hazelwood branch. The Division of work with schools 
had charge of three deposit stations and supplied the books 
for one station operated by the Hazelwood branch. 

I would respectfully call your attention again to the im- 
perative necessity of a branch library in the down-town dis- 
trict. I need not recapitulate here the arguments given in 
our last annual report. 

Gifts 

There were presented to the Library during the year by 
636 persons, firms or institutions, 6,433 volumes, 1,832 pam- 
phlets, 1,344 numbers of periodicals and 216 maps, manu- 

• 

scripts, etc. The largest single gift was the entire library of 
the German Library Association, of Pittsburgh, consisting of 
4,765 volumes, greatly strengthening our German collection. 
This year the Library has been making a special effort to 
complete its files of Pittsburgh official documents, and we 
wish here to express our appreciation of the kindness of the 
city officials and other citizens who have enabled us to add 
largely to this important collection, which is, however, still 
far from complete. 

29 



From the Bernd fund for books on architecture and decor- 
ation, 155 volumes were purchased during the year at a cost 
of $984.1 1. This collection now numbers 1,21 1 volumes, and 
we hope to add largely to it before the extension to the 
Central Library is completed, when we shall have space to 
exhibit it properly, and facilities to increase its usefulness. 

Several years ago Mr Carnegie gave the Library $20,000 
for the purchase of sets of technical and scientific periodicals 
and the publications of scientific societies. During the year 
$908.49 was expended from this fund for 705 volumes, leaving 
a balance of $3,732.19 at the close of the period covered by 
this report. 

A full list of Library donors for the year, with the number 
of volumes, pamphlets, etc. presented by each, is published 
in the appendix of this report. 

The Staff 

A list of the members of the staff is printed in another 
part of this report. I wish it were possible to convey to the 
members of the Board of Trustees an adequate idea of the 
enthusiasm, and solicitude for the best interests of the Library, 
which the heads of departments and their assistants bring 
to their work. At the Central Library and at the branches, 
under the helpful direction of the departmental chiefs, the 
assistants are constantly studying to improve the quality of 
their service to the public. Those assistants who work direct- 
ly with the public hold frequent conferences for the sole pur- 
pose of discussing how the efficiency of the service may be 
increased and how it may be made more satisfactory to the 
users of the Library. It is impracticable to make any very 
g^eat proportion of the public understand this; it would be 
unfortunate if it were not fully understood by the members of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin H. Anderson, 
April 14, 1904. Librarian. 



30 





n. 




Si 


a^rs-r- 


.P 




T«8^N 






"' 


















.3" 


1"^ 




^ 












inw -pcnog 




1 










3, 






a 




IBlOi 




1" 










































•0 


«!3-<a 




1- 






•n 


anqajnd 




«Bn[« n |»»,u 






< 


-ta 






p»™i«nd 





S9UI11IOA 

JO 
pJlOJpOBjr) j 



'(03 'dnp I 
ino oAOff^ 






; ? aii^ffl I f 









3 si pi I 

o 



If; -11 



m 

;■!■: 



■•Sl 






i i 



il I 






III 
III 



|1S 
-11 

M 

.si* 
■■s'sl 



j=lt 



1 1 

i ii 

1 ¥ 

im 
till 

I'll 

ml 
m 



TABLE 3 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES CATALOGUED 



Central Library 

Lawrencevilie branch. 

West End branch 

Wylie Avenue branch 

Moont Washington branch. 
Hazeiwood branch 



Total. 



S3 S 

.gt: 



*io6,i55 

15.623 
9.377 

15.251 
8.981 
9,118 




I 164.505 



♦14,217 

2,740 
2,082 

3.154 
2,241 

2,049 






26,483 



^120,372 

18,363 

",459 
18,405 

11,222 
11,167 



ti90,988 



'Includes school duplicates, home libraries, and books for the East Liberty dill- 
dren's room. 

fThe excess of this total over that of the volumes on the shelves at the close of the 
year represents the number of volumes worn out, destroyed or withdrawn, and duplicates 
transferred and recatalogued, from the opening of the Library in November 1895 to the 
close of the period covered by this report. 



34 


















2£5s S 



ZDih^SHMbu 



fl 



5| 
is 

111 



lis 

ill 

IP 

11 



(X] 

X 

• u 

< 

(Q 
Q 

< 

pes 
< 

< 

w b 

O 

(/) 

o 

n 

o 

I— I 

H 

< 

u 



s 



moX 



ofniaAnf 



;ppv 



moX 



a 

♦J 



ofnioAnf 



;ppv 



l«;ox 



9|in9Anf 



;ppv 



l«;ox 



is 

o 

u 



9|ia9Anf 



^PPV 



§ 



00 

in 






I fOOO CO M 5© 

0» »o ^ moo 
o» t^ t>.oo «n m o^ M M 



o^ r>» tnoo cx5 Q 00 



*ooo «o«nCT»r>'»OM *o«^t^ 



»noo -^t^mMvo «o«n^inM 
t>. d> W '♦OO <^ CO -♦ M N ^so 



mwOOOQvOmO^M'^s 
vO Qvo M o^HaospciQ tn 
MOONCOM 000^«oc 



t>.«n 

COOO ON 



MOO «<i:^ c?»oo 
mw r>.ooo«o t>. 

M M M M M 



?« M t"^ -^j- 

o»vo r>.r>. M 

t^ O «n M M 

N N M N 



^ Q q^oo ^ N o\ t^ M 00 



MlOCOMONMMt>« 

0» « POOO «0 H ^00 

•♦ O ON «n\o M o t^ 
d" cT di t^vd^ t^ «n in ON M d d 



r>.vo MOO 



M M M 



00 t^ 



•^"S-cJ-^ 






ro«n< 



o 



ON On M «0 m M \n t^vp vp <Ovp 

M ^ ON t^vo o vo tnoo 00 N 
in»n'^popnco<opovv^»o 



ON o O NO 00 «n t^oo »o «o O" 

&MMO^Ot^*-'OQ^ 
(00>OOOOOOMMC<M 



?l 



OOMt^tDfOMOMN^OO 
MMMMMMC^N 



« 



en 



^OO NGN moo ^ 

ONONcot>««o»noNO> 
nOmnmcoOnOOn 



\\0 M 

i>.dNi>.«nmN « M onm onoo 



»n Ncg 

« ON 



in N 00 NO vp O ON <«*• ir» O t>.sO 
00 M r>rOt^M t^NOO rONN 

ti Mvooovo ONr-oci M inM m 

•k » •» «h »* ^ ^ •» ^ ^ •» ^ 
M « O dN dNOO 00 ON W N M M 



I 



% 

00 









«n 
m 
m 

•> I 

ON 



00 



^ 



ON 

M 

m 

M 

m 



s 

in 



M 

M 






■8 




•H 

O 



Ob 



J 

.2 









a 



e 
o 
u 



8 
i 



a 
o 



u 
9 

"3 

a 

g 

e 

m 



I 

m 

I 

.9 

&*! 
s 

a 



36 



0» 

3 

O 

H 

1 


mox 


«no «n ^ m CO fo *o Jno ^o P. 


1 
1 


9[IlI9Anf 


00 « corN.o»^M r^^oooQ mvo 


M 

i 


u 

O 


»PPV 


t**Q»m« COM M M tN>Q^tN.O^ 


00 

t 



a 

u 

CO 

a 

M 
o 

'J 



(I) 



•I 

It 
to 



J5 



a 
o 

.9 
3 



o 
2 



mox 



o|niOAnf 



»PPV 



mox 



ofiaoAnf 



M^PV 



mox 



9no9Anf 



*PPV 



a 



O •-• CO Q 'O Q O^cO ^ lO >n ^ 



5nvo t** o» ^ ^00 00 o» CO M t** 
Q »^ 00 M vQ lo w coco » chob 



dp t^ t^^ «n o^vp insS 



M M M O^ 



^C^M C^o CON -^ ^vp 

o o» o CO e^ ^00 o» N « < 



lO M 

cooo 

00 M 

o mm^cocoM Mvovo «nvo 



^ M i^vo oot^»no O Mt^t^ 
o^oo «nt^MMMMmNooK 
M oo MVO »no M c^c^com 

•OCOWMMMMMfOCOfOCO 



O o ^ cooQ vo r« ^ ^ mo ^ e> 
M 0\ ro ^so »noo ^ t»* m ^ o m 
00 00 ^ M M o» t»»oo ^ «n ^vo M 



OOvOOOQ t^O^l^ Q^0O O *n 
Q CT» i^oo oQ Q^ N M o m moo 
0» CO d M o^co »nvo M M m m ! 

^o «n ^ CO ^ CO CO t^ r^vo vo 



N i^ N moo r^ «n CO ^ CO On o^ 
^t>»t^O «n^cow M Mvo '^ 

MCOMdMMMM^^COfO 



\0 on« '00*coON^»n«nMvo 
•^O I^O NM '^1^0 mcOO 

^<C ''t'M "^^M coo O O^M 

Cf « ef ««? cf « M Cf COCOM CO M 

CO 



°,S o « « 3 



^fc" 






.A 

o 

i 



§2 



9 U 



37 



i^Sll-s^^^SISll 












|1's§?l"'l'§.l3fla|| 



^^nCT*o ooSoo h« 3w* 



^¥FFsl¥M¥fF 



liii 






ii 
i! 

II 

I 



ll 

Si 



i1 

^ 

H 
II 

III 

! 



5 



a 

> 

< 






mox 



9|ni9Anf 



»l^PV 



en m e^oo m mvo so ^o oo ^ m m 



N MM «OM«o»»nco 



vO 



I 



-I 



ot M r>vo vp <P m ^ »o O^ 

O vo «d M 00 ^ ^ tnvo M 

mo t^m^M^o 

» •« 9^ » •« •« ^ 

MO w m moo w 



N 0| 

M 0> 



VO 

to 

00 



6 ro o>oo 00 5"a5 w »^oo 
00 «nvo M t^ o M m CO 01^ 



rOPO 
■^ M 



M M ^ N M M M 
CO 



i 



a 



l^^ox 



9|nx9Anf 



»PPV 



0^ u-> fOQO t^OMMl^OO»nN 

00 t^M M oofom^ 
r^» -^00 t^ -* o^ c» O 



M O^ N CO -^ 
M O t^ 



« M 



CO 



3- 



^ O^CQ PO^»n^'*M lOM mnO 
VO O>0Q t^MMQvOM^t^ 

m ^^ «n m <(fvo o» ^ ^00 



o» 



uo 

m 



»nvp m »n po m t*» ovo m m ^vo 



mdo « »n -^ 

OS M « 



CO 00 M ^lOlO M 

M CO 



00 



V 



u 

a 



F^ox 



9{ni9Anf 



»l^PV 



? 



^ in M mo N 

QMO (S vO t^Cg 



^ MOO 



N t^ »nin N NO 

Noo m CO o^ CO 
e^ O O mvo 

N « N e^mcocoN 

NO 



^ 

? 



I 



WOCOvO 

t^ 00 



o 0«n5! M o ov-^o^N 
30 00 M moo 00 M m«o 



CO 



« 



coco M M 00 



M 

CO 



m 



^ M » M O 

fom w covo 

N ^-^00 



CO 



M OnoQ m vO Q CO 
t^ « Ov O^ If 0^«0 

•> •> » ~ » » •• 
M M rO M M M "* 



m 






mox 



ofiudAnf 



»PPV 



I 



■li 



CON CO 



vo"m cioo "^vS 
0» com^ ^ M 



crv 



«nM CON 

M 



t^vo «n 



m o^m ^ 
00 vO -^Ov 

«k «h *k •« 

O^vOOO CO 
CO 



VO 



M 

N 



O 

M 
O 

* 



t-iQvOMQMMd c^o moo 

m m'C M o a>oQ CO CO CO CO m 

moo CO o»^ovmt^mM 



M ov 



00 



M mmM COM 
m 



■8 



^vo O t^vo 00 Q5!Ovo comM 
rOcOM C^-^W OvvOoo Mvb M ov 
^O^coO fnt^^OVM coo^Ove^ 



«OM « CO comcooo 



PO^N 

00 



s 




OaiP^cn(Li2D(x4i-)SHGQ(z4 



o 



38 



f 


w>x 




1 


BxraoAnf 




1 


IFPV 




8 


(2 

1 


pioi 




1 


©iniaAnr 






TinpV 




i 


1 


I"V>X 


i.«5l sn|^Rj||| 


BOTOAnf 


ft=?| Ǥ|H5| 


1 


nnpv 


ff!?-S !!SSSa?£|. 


! 


PIOX 




1 


onooAnf 


rsriHf|4|| 


«■ 

S 


nnpv 


f??|S'«gg|IS|| 


i 


* 

i 


moi 




i 


aimaAOf 






tppv 


"- "5 


S 




1 


["ii 


i 



§ 

to 

.a 

s 



S 



< 

>^ 



a 
H 

I 



1 

8 

I 



» 



C0 



oSv^aoojdj 



!C*2P?3 5t5! ff> fo e^ CO m Q* m^o 

MO^cnOOOOGOMO^O^ ^O 



69nm|0A 






«n «n »n fO pooo vo oq o^ ^vo 
r^^ «nt^MMQ\MrofO 
^o cnctvo o N COM fs. 



fO« M M e^ 



0Sb;TX09J9J 



M\o ^ MooiocncnM 



89nm|o^ 



^ mo c^m^^M^o^tn 

wo « M mrot) w N 
M en 



9dV)a93J9J 



2t »n m fO 5» !too « o^ ro O »n O 
GO omo^o OMOM M o^M ci«n 

• • • 

N M O 



• • • 



« « N WOO 



89nm|o^ 






«0^<^M »OM MVO 

t^HMQ«QM^C>. 

«n M ^sO 0^ ^ 'TOO 



a> 



odv^aoojoj 



•••••••■•■••a 

M M m ^ M M t^O CT) CO ^ 



89nm|o^ 



t^ GO 00 M looo 00 M m«b o 



t^ « 



en fO M M 



« 



9^)a99J9J 



vo b-w o Svo 



l^'VO in M M 00 N c> ^ 

«Ot^MOt«M»Ot^ 

« MM ^MMOOCOCOr^ 

M u^ 



mox 



s 



o 

> 



O M Ov 
M io«nv 
O «nc 

W M O* CO 



M 6 M M N t>.vo moo 

•^ 5 5^oQ CO <*TO CO m 

GO 0>^0>»ot>.inM 



in«n « CO M 



89UBJqi| 

9moH 



a^H^P »n in o^oo N ^ M « 

M MM mmmc^commvo 

» «> 

M m 



oBoq 



^M 5^ 
Mcd 



CO M ininM coin 



^3 

moo 



8 
8 



CO 
CO 



• 

8 



vO 

CO 

00 



8 
8 



m 
m 
m 



8 
8 



M 

CO 



m 



'^ 8 
8 



t 



M 

m 



00 

M 



I 
J 

9 
g 

'3 

1 



3 

s 

O 
••• 

o 



CO 

s 




o 

H 



40 



TABLE j-^ontinued 



Class 



General works... 

Philosophy < 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Naturalscience. 

Useful arts... 

Fine arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel. 

Bios[raphy 

Fiction 



Hazelwood 



Total. 



o 

> 



349 

7 

705 

3.923 

3 

1.405 

269 

589 
2,652 

2,026 

1,460 

1,240 

16.175 



30,803 



s 



East Lib. c. r. 



1.13 
.02 

2.29 

12.74 

.01 

4.56 
.87 
1.91 
8.61 
6.58 
4.74 
4.03 
52.51 



100.00 



s 

i 

o 
> 



371 
12 

178 

1.838 



107 
187 
1,056 
676 
356 

554 
7,070 



12,849 



I 



8 

u 



2.89 

•09 

1.38 

14.31 

3.46' 

.83 
1.46 

8.22 

5.26 

2.77 

4.31 
55.02 



100.00 



Grand total 



o 
> 



4.881 
202 

5.391 
42,740 

44 
12,525 

2,881 

5.554 
23.320 
18,091 

9,860 

10,988 

162,647 

299,124 



9 

a 



1.63 

.07 

1.80 

14.29 

.02 

4.19 

1.86 

7.79 
6.05 

3.30 

3.67 

54.37 



100.00 



TABLES 
ATTENDANCE IN THE CHILDREN'S ROOMS 



1903 



Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 

June 
uly 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 

ToUl 












1 


•s 


1 


1 


W 


? 


c 


S 


(S 


4 


^ 


3.145 


5.603 


2,607 


3.292 


5.315 


2,802 


3.014 


4.104 


1.847 


2.361 


2,006 


1.507 


2.542 


2,811 


1.647 


2.150 


2,632 


I,XOO 


2,447 


2,959 


I.33I 


2.104 


3.216 


1.790 


3.761 


4,656 


4.273 


5.468 


7.758 


3.947 


3.713 


6.478 


3.083 


3.317 


6.335 


3.129 


37.314 


54.773 


♦29,063 



< 



7.233 
8,260 

7.251 
5.362 

4.797 
2.873 
2.594 
3.336 

5.929 
7.986 

7.136 
7.776 



a 
o 



I 



5 « 



1,886 
2,271 

1.754 
1,890 

1.953 
1.713 
1.344 
X.425 
2.490 
2,819 
1,066 
1.867 



I 

a 

X 



4.173 

3,808 

2,615 

2.388 

2,217 

1.494 
1,467 
1.981 
3.296 
3.355 
2.557 
2.575 




1.718 
2,035 
1.912 
1,279 

727 
975 

1,189 
1,691 
1,726 
1,706 



(2 



26,365 
27.783 

22,497 

17,693 
16,694 

12,937 
12.938 
14.435 
25.594 
33.024 
26,659 
26,705 



*Thtt does not include the jnTenilc attendftncc, S,<4^ *t the Poiat Bridge reediof 
foom, which is opertted by the West End bimnch. 



41 



33 



M tJ -T tf ooS SaS M m « 



lt|i|S|5IS| 



ffS'S'SiXS'JS*? 






On O O ^ CO »n r*co in in 2 
Slo&S SSoo N M 8 3 



iHiltiaiisI 






■a ..3 

>Ji5 






III 

illl 
IsH" 

"if 











5&!?MK2 8SKS»S 







?. 


t'i 




§ 




i 


SsHHr??? 


SSMS 


g 


s 






""".♦= 


? 


M 






J 


aa^ss»s.sax?^s 


H 


^ 






IS 


" "" "•""'•""■S 


s 


& 


^ 


J«HsHw55lS 


*. 








# 




t- 




1 










2 


1 


il 


S-gfiSS^SS-Sff' 


sss 


1 


n 






^ 


i"^l=ll;TOKl:s? 


I 




(J 




5 




s 


^ 1 






£-?«S^!;S.&?fe«.?<?« 


s 

n 




1 


II 




I 

i 


3 






s 


n-N<^ «<i>n<o«> 4^'n'^^' 


« 








































1 




1 ilir 


tj 


i 










U KDCb^JXt 







IP 



II 

Jtj 
115 

Ill 

!|l 
"11 



TABLE II 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS 



1903 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1904 



Home use 


Visitors to reading 










rooms 




•«-> 
"S 




3 


3 


a 
S 


3 


•0 


g 





•0 


^ 





< 


^ 


H 


< 


u 


H 


5.029 


5.058 


10,087 


2,302 


5,603 


7.9Q5 


5.139 


4.867 


10.006 


2.643 


5.315 


7.958 


4.461 


5.000 


9.461 


2,260 


4.104 


6.364 


3.913 


3.295 


7,208 


1.571 


2,906 


4.477 


3,795 


2,696 


6,491 


1,446 


2.811 


4.257 


3.641 


3.384 


7,025 


1.366 


2,632 


3.998 


3,605 


2.328 


5,933 
5.581 


1,452 


2.959 


4,411 


3.637 


1.944 


1.330 


3,216 


4.546 


4.506 


5.133 


9.639 


1.707 


4,656 


6.363 
3,766 

8.441 


4.866 


6.245 


II. Ill 


2,008 


7.758 


4.803 


5.868 


10,671 


1.963 


6.478 


5.286 


5.501 


10,787 


2,047 


6.335 


8.38a 


52,681 


51.319 


*i04,ooo 


22,095 


54.773 


76,868 



*Of this total, 86,044 volumes were circulated from the Branch proper, 6,567 
through deposit stations and 11,389 through schools. 



TABLE 12 
LAWRENCEVILLE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES 



Class 



General works.. 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



o 
> 



3.234 
451 

60 
808 

1.731 
1,279 

3.928 

1. 931 
1,476 

1,920 

34.603 

52,681 



u 
u 



6.14 
.86 
.81 

1.58 
.11 

1.53 

3.29 

2.43 
7.46 

3.67 
2.80 

3.64 
65.68 

100.00 



Juvenile 



o 
> 



775 

43 
826 

7,890 

5 
2,162 

551 
820 

3.859 
3.124 

1,559 

1,672 

28,033 

51,319 



9 

to 



1.51 

.08 

1.61 

15.37 
.01 

4.21 

1.07 

1.60 

7.52 
6.09 

3.04 
3.26 

54.63 
100.00 



Total 



o 
> 



4,009 

494 

1.255 
8,721 

65 
2,970 
2,282 
2,099 

7.787 
5.055 
3.035 
3.592 
62,636 

104,000 



S 

I 



3.85 
.48 

I.2I 

8.38 

.06 

2.86 
2.19 
2.02 

7.49 
4.86 
2.92 

3.45 
60.23 

100.00 



44 



TABLE 13 
WEST END BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS 



1903 



February , 

March 

April 

May 

iane 
uly 

Augnst 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1904 



Home oaa 


Visitors to reading 










rooms 




•4-* 

1 


1 
i 


3 
,0 


1 


«0 

a 
1 


1 


< 


►-^ 


H 


< 





H 


1.647 


I.5I4 


3,i6i 


1,256 


2,607 


3.863 


1,601 


2,201 


3.802 


1,240 


2,802 


4.042 


I. 491 


1.769 


3.260 


1,084 


1,847 


2,931 


1,285 


1.033 


2.318 


851 


1.507 


2.358 


1,341 


849 


2,190 


^ 


1.647 


2,571 


1.324 


'X 


3.016 


1, 100 


1.905 


1,298 


2,081 


824 


1. 331 


2.155 


1,279 


790 


2,069 


916 


1.790 


2,706 


1,619 


2,062 


3.681 


1.3" 


4.273 


5.584 


1.783 


2,571 


4.354 


1.295 


3.947 


5.242 


1.699 


2,177 


3.876 


1,210 


3.083 


4.293 


1,842 


2.II4 


3.956 


1.424 


3.129 


4.553 


18,209 


19.555 


•37.764' 


13.140 


29,063 


t42.203 



*0f this total, 3a,43i volumes were circulated from the Branch proper* 3.843 
throufh deposit stations and 1,490 throufh schools. 

fDoes not include the attendance at the Point Bridge reading room, which was StS4i< 



TABLE 14 
WEST END BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES 



Class 



General works..... 

Philosophy 

Religion , 

Sociology , 

Philology , 

Natural science... 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Literature , 

History , 

Travel 

Bio^aphy , 

Fiction , 

Total 



Adult 



Juvenile 




18,209 



'9^??5 



100.00 



Total 



^ 



1,119 

95 
623 

4.738 

780 

471 
811 

2,717 

1.430 

936 

955 

23.042 



?7.7<^4 



2.96 

.25 

1.65 

12.55 

.12 
2.06 
1.25 
2.15 
7.19 

3.79 
2.48 

^SZ 
61.02 



loaoo 



45 



TABLE IS 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS 



1903 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1904. 



Total. 



Home use 



3 
< 



4.765 
4.948 
4.244 
3.477 
3.825 

3.341 
3.356 

3.423 
4.105 

4.234 
4.455 
4.631 



48,804 



a 





6.693 
6,822 

5.376 

3.579 
3.992 

4.795 
2.574 
2,158 
5.380 
7.280 

7.407 
6,780 






62,836 



11.458 

11.770 

9,620 

7.056 

7.817 
8,136 

5.930 

5.581 

9.485 

11.514 
11,862 

11,411 



^111640 



Visitors to reading 
rooms 



•3 
< 



1.700 

1.559 
1.354 
1,190 

1,117 

845 
1,116 

1,081 

1.363 
1.476 
1.691 
1.746 



16,238 



a 

u 

2 



7.233 
8,260 

7.251 
5.362 

4.797 
2,873 
2,594 
3.336 

5.929 
7.986 

7.136 

7.776 



70,533 



o 
H 



8,933 
9.819 

8.605 
6.553 
5.914 
3.718 
3.710 

4.417 

7,292 
9.462 

8,827 

9.522 



86,771 



*Of this total, 91,016 volumes were circulated from the Branch proper, 6,516 throu^ 
deposit stations and 14,108 through scho^s. 



TABLE 16 
WYLIE AVENUE BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES 



Class 



General works- 
Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

PhOology 

Natural science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



(0 



o 

> 



1.870 

503 

633 

1. 194 
86 

783 
1,040 

1,180 

4.523 
2.354 
1.382 
1.743 
31.513 



48,804 



0) 

a 

a 



3.83 
1.03 

1.30 

2.45 
.18 

1.60 

2.13 

2.42 

9.27 
4.82 

2.83 

3.57 

64-57 



Juvenile 



loaoo 



CO 



O 
> 



467 

69 
1,161 

10,667 

16 

2,786 

576 

1.445 

5.154 

3.465 
2,019 

2,412 
32,599 



62,836 



a 
-*■* 

a 
v 
o 

u 



.74 

.II 

1.85 

16.98 

•03 

4-43 
.92 

2.30 

8.20 

5.51 
3.21 

3.84 
51.88 



100.00 



Total 



CQ 
0) 

a 

S3 



2,337 
572 

1.794 
11,861 

102 

3.569 
1,616 
2,625 

9.677 
5.819 
3.401 

4.155 
64,112 



111,640 



u 



2.09 

•51 

I.6I 
10.62 

.09 

3-20 

1.45 
2.35 
8.67 

5.21 

3.0s 
3.72 

57.43 



100.00 



46 



TABLE 17 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— USE OF UBRARY BY MONTHS 



1903 



February.- 

March 

April..., 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1904. 



Total 



Home use 



•3 

< 



2,416 
2,66q 

2i478 
2,103 
2,429 

2,413 

2,149 

2.374 
3.005 

3.055 

2,931 
3,106 



31.128 



a 
> 





2,492 
3.727 
2,792 
2,085 

1.558 

2.477 

1.375 
1,243 

4,104 

4.103 

3.619 
3.479 



33.054 



3 
o 

H 



4.908 

6,396 
5.270 

4.188 
3.987 
4.890 

3.524 
3.617 
7.109 
7.158 
6,550 
6,585 



Visitors to reading 
rooms 



3 

< 



1,361 

1.579 

1.413 

1. 177 
1,464 

1.389 
1,280 

1.508 

1.599 
1,518 
1.382 

1.357 



*64,i82! 17,027 



CO 

a 

.a 



1,886 
2.271 

1.754 
1,890 

1.953 
1.713 
1.344 
1.425 
2,490 
2,819 
1,966 
1,867 



23.378 



o 
H 



3.247 
3.850 
3.167 
3.067 

3.417 
3.102 

2,624 
2.933 

^'337 
3.348 
3.224 



40.405 



*Of this toUl, 4J.6j8 volumes were circulated from the Branch proper, 10.379 
through deposit stations and 11.275 through schools. 



TABLE 18 
MT. WASHINGTON BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES 



Class 



General works... 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philolo£y 

Natural science. 

Useful arts... 

Fine arts... 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Bio^aphy 

Fiction 

Total 



Adult 



o 
> 



1.752 
266 
166 

514 
15 

518 
2,265 
1.084 

1.428 
21,111 



31.128 



a 

0) 



5-63 
.86 

•53 
1.651 

1.28 
2.58 
1.66 
7.28 

3.48 
2.59 

4.59 
67.82 



loaoo 



Juvenile 



8 



o 

> 



745 
II 

473 

4.073 

5 

1.353 

273 

618 

3.016 
2,298 

1,319 

1,134 

17.736 



33.054 



9 

a 



2.25 

•03 
1.43 

12.32 

.02 

4.09 

.83 
1.87 

9.13 

6.95 

3-99 

3-43 
53-66 



loaoo 



Total 



8 



^ 



2,497 

277 

639 

4.587 
20 

1,752 
1,076 

1,136 
5.281 
3.382 
2,126 
2,562 

38.847 



64,182 



I 






3.89 

•43 

•99 

7.15 
.03 

2.73 
1.68 
1.77 
8.23 

5-27 

3-31 

3-99 

6a53 



loaoo 



47 



TABLE 19 
HAZELWOOD BRANCH— USE OF LIBRARY BY MONTHS 



1903 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1904 



Total. 



Home use 



3 

< 



2,810 
2,896 

2.434 

2.143 
2,168 

1,956 

1,787 
1,844 

2.474 

2,555 
2,446 

2,604 



28,117 



I 

> 





3,194 
3,081 

2,657 
2,176 
1,618 

1,517 
1,015 
1,110 

3,750 
3,721 
3,387 
3,577 



30,803 



1 



6,004 

5,977 
5,091 

4,319 
3,786 

3,473 
2,802 

2,954 
6,224 

6,276 

5,833 
6,181 



^58,920 



Visitors to reading 
rooms 



53 
< 



1.642 
1.809 

1,413 
1,312 

1,484 
1,275 
1,173 
1,326 

1,515 
1,611 

1.411 
1,437 



17,408 



I 



4,173 
3,808 

2,615 

2,388 

2,217 

1,494 
1,467 
1,981 
3*296 
3,355 
2,557 
2,575 



31,926 



o 
H 



5.815 
5,617 
4,028 
3,700 

3.701 
2.769 
2,640 

3.307 
4,811 

4,966 

3.968 

4,012 



49.334 



*Of this total, 43,163 volumes were circulated from the Branch proper, 14,006 
through deposit stations and 1,751 through schools. 



TABLE 20 

HAZELWOOD BRANCH— CIRCULATION BY CLASSES 



Class 



Adult 



General works... 

Philosophy 

Relijgion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts... 

Literature 

History 

Travel 

Biography 

Fiction 

Total 



s 



o 
> 



1,784 
187 
178 

504 

25 

383 

793 

615 
2,025 

802 

873 
1,042 

18,906 



28,117 



tMO 

a 
u 



6.35 
.67 

.63 
1.79 

.09 
1.36 
2.82 
2.19 
7.20 

2.85 
3.10 

3-71 
67.24 



100.00 



Juvenile 



en 

s 

> 



349 

7 

705 

3.923 

3 

1,405 

269 

589 
2,652 

2,026 

1,460 

1,240 

16,175 



30,803 



tMO 

a 

u 



1.13 
.02 

2.29 

12.74 
.01 

4.56 
.87 
1.91 
8.61 
6.58 
4.74 
4.03 
52.51 



100.00 



Total 



CO 

o 



o 

> 



2,133 
194 

883 

4.427 

28 

1.788 

1,062 

1,204 

4.677 
2,828 

2,333 
2,282 

35.081 



58.920 



tkO 

a 



3.62 

•33 
1.50 

7.51 
.05 

3.04 
1.80 
2.04 

7.94 
4.80 

3.96 

3.87 

59»54 

loo.oa 



48 



a u 



on 

3 

fa 
o 

o 
2; 

o 

H 

(X] 

U 

in 
on 

8^ 

^< 

H 
55 
O 

• 2 

o 



:3 

B 

on 



> 

H 

o 

u 



t 



3 

o 
H 



a 

OS 









O 



en 



two 

< 



-3 



o 



>» 

a 

s 



Cu 



o 

IS 



fa 



^ 

V 

> 



M cno^o»«o^o m r- 

ro lO ^ lO «OQQ OO cf t> 
M M M <n ^ ^ «0«0 



I 



fO 
vO 



O^OO M o ^o «o c> 
m * * * 



O M M 



VO 







OO M MOO M xnrnrrtQ 
M M M (O ^ ^ «OvO 



i 

e 

o 

a 



gsO novo -^int^M « tj3 



M PO "^ «o «o<o 



vOro<Ot**OQ«-iM' 

«n -^vo 00 o o vo^ <o 

H M M POcrTV-^in, 



«k •* •k «h * ^ ^ ^, 

00 O»^«0t**t^>^ Ml 

M « « « «n po I 



o 



M 
■ ** 

' a 
\^ 
' o 



V 

2 



2.'.! 



00 «no»0 M 'i'J'^ 

M C4 (4 N POPO,*-' 



vo <i o 



'S3;'" 



:^lfi 



S 



O»a0 fOvOOQ M rOO> ! « 

M d w cn<o»o <s 



i o 



N «noo 00 t>» r* fO o g 

O«00 « «O0Q O O00i'-5 

M N ^ cncn^o 1^ 

"13 
il u 



8«noo tnco 
00 t^OO fO 
ur> ^ t^ O^oo 

r^od d Q t^ «ovd 

M ci N ' 



l;ll:r? 



to *o ^ ItI 



I 



Q> »0 0^ 
VO fO 0> 



O o> M «n ^ 

I^ PO 0> '(f vO fO _ 

POfO "^ -^ M VO l^ 
OOOtHfONNNM' 



PO M N M 0> t**^ t^ 
VO ON O 0^ N VO ^ vO , - 

M M ^ -^t* m "^vo Ija 



o 

M 

a 
••« 

•d 

S 

•d 
a 



« i^jMvpoo t^M g 

M M -^i-VO PO O PO 0> 

• "' ~ •»•.». » 

0» O w rr>00 O «0 w^ 
M M N no«o^m 



<»«<»«(» 8> 8^ 8« 8^1 









so 



to the 

From February j, igos, to February i, 1904 

Givers 636 

Volumes ^ 6a33 

Pamphlets *. 1,832 

Numbers i»344 

Miscellaneous gifts 216 



Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa 

Academy of Science and Art, Pittsburgh 

Aguilar Free Libraries, New York, N. Y 

Air-Brake Association, New York, N. Y 

Alabama — Geological Survey, Montgomery, Ala . . . 

Albree, Mr John, Swampscott, Mass 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa 

Allegheny County Teachers* Institute 

Ailing 8l Cory, Pittsburgh 

American Catholic Historical Society, Philadelphia. 

American Chemical Society 

American Free Trade League, Boston, Mass 

American Hebrew Association, New York, N. Y... 
American Institute of Architects, Washington, D. C. 
American Iron & Steel Association, Philadelphia... 
American Laryngological Association, New York.. 

American Library Association 

American Museum of Natural History, New York.. 

American Public Health Association 

American Railway Engineering & Maintenance-of- 

Way Association, Chicago, 111 

American Railway Master Mechanics' Association. . 
American Society for Extension of University 

Teaching, Philadelphia, Pa 

American Street Railway Association, Chicago, 111 . . 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass 

Amyot, Dr John A., Toronto, Ontario 

Anderson, Mr Benjamin F., Pittsburgh 

Anderson, Mr Edwin H., Pittsburgh 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Mass.... 

Andrews, Mr Samuel, Pittsburgh 

Anonymous 

Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa . . . 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, Boston, Mass... 
Association of Railway Superintendents of Bridges 

8c Buildings, Concord, N. H 

Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga 

Balch, Mr Thomas Willing, Philadelphia, Pa 

Balken, Mr Edward Duff, Pittsburgh 

Bangor (Me.) Public Library 

Barbour, Mr Erwin H., State Geologist, Lincoln, 

Nebraska 



Vols. Puns. Nos. 

• • • • A 

4 • • • • 



I 
I 
I 



I 
14 



I 

5 



7 

2 



• • • • 



• • • • 



2 

2 
3 

I 
I 



51 



Vob. Pams. Nos. 



Barnard College, New York, N. Y 

Barnes, Mr Phinehas, Pittsburgh 

Belgium — Minist^re de Tlndustrie et du Travail 

Bennett College of Eclectic Medicine & Surgery, 
Chicago, 111 

Biblioteca Nacional, Havana, Cuba 

Birmingham (England) Free Libraries 

Birmingham (England) Philatelic Society 

Bitting, Rev. W. C, New York, N. Y 

Bittinger, Miss Lucy, Sewickley, Pa. Five photos. . 

Black, Mr W. J., Chicago, 111 

Blackburn, Mr E. H., Bedford, Pa 

B*nai B'rith, Independent Order of, Pittsburgh 

Bonnett, Miss Marguerite W., Pittsburgh 

Boston (Mass.), Associated Charities 

Boston (Mass.) — Schoolhouse Department 

Boston (Mass.) Athenaeum 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 

Boston Book Company, Boston, Mass 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me 

Braga, Mr E. /r 

Breck, Mr E. Y., Pittsburgh 

Breitbarth, Mr C. H., Philadelphia, Pa 

Bristol (Conn.) Free Public Library 

British Columbia — Minister of Mines, Victoria, B. C. 

Brockton (Mass.) Public Library 

Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) — Bureau of Charities 

Brooklyn (N. Y.), Association for Improving the 
Condition of the Poor 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Institute of Arts and Sciences 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Institute of Arts and Sciences — 
Children's Museum Library 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library 

Brooks, Miss H. St. B., Wellesley College 

Brown, Mr Thomas Stephen, Pittsburgh 

Brown & Sharpe Manufacturing Company, Provi- 
dence, R. I 

Brown University, Providence, R. I 

Browne, Mr David L., Pittsburgh. One map 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa 

Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa 

Budington, Miss Margaret, Iowa City, la 

Buell, Mr H. A., Ingram, Pa 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Library 

Buffington, Hon. Joseph, Pittsburgh. One atlas... 

Burlington (Iowa) Free Public Library 

Burrows, Mr C. A., Aspinwall, Pa 

Burt, Mr W. N., Edgewood Park, Pa 



17 

I 

I 
2 



12 



I 
I 
I 

3 

2 
2 

I 

I 

» • 

I 
I 
2 

2 



I 
40 



• • • • 



3 

I 

• 

I 
I 

I 

I 



52 



Vols. Pami. Nos. 



8 



2 



California — State Board of Architects, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal 

Cambridge (Mass.) — School Committee 

Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library 

Canada — Department of Agriculture, Ottawa i 

Canada — Department of the Interior, Ottawa, 

Canada. Five maps 

Canada — Geological Survey, Ottawa, Canada 9 

Canadian Railway Club, Montreal, Canada 

Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, Montreal 

Canevin, Rt. Rev. Regis, Pittsburgh i 

Cape of Good Hope — Registrar-general, Cape Town 

Card, Mr William Warren, Pittsburgh i 

Cardiff (Wales) Free Libraries 2 

Carmack, Hon. E. W., Washington, D. C 

Carnegie, Mr Andrew, New York, N. Y 129 

Carnegie Free Library, Allegheny, Pa 

Carnegie Free Library, Braddock, Pa 

Carnegie Institute — Board of Trustees, Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Institute — Department of Fine Arts, Pitts- 
burgh 

Carnegie Institute — Museum, Pittsburgh 

Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C i 

Carnegie Library of Atlanta, Atlanta, Ga 

Carnegie Public Library, Ayr, Scotland 

Carnegie Public Library, Bradford, Pa. One map 

Carter, Mr Charles S., Milwaukee, Wis i 

Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, O 

Central University of Kentucky, Danville, Ky 

Century Association, New York, N. Y i 

Cesnola, Gen. L. P. di, New York, N. Y 5 

Channing, Dr Walter, Brookline, Mass 

Charity Organization Society, Buffalo, N. Y 

Chess, Mr Harvey B., Pittsburgh i 

Chester County Historical Society 

Chicago (111.) — Department of Finance i 

Chicago (111.), Board of Trade i 

Chicago (111.) Municipal Library 

Chicago (111.) Public Library 

Church, Mr Samuel Harden, Pittsburgh 

Church, Mr W. L., jr., Pittsburgh 

Cincinnati (O.), Associated Charities 

Cincinnati (O.) Museum Association 

Cincinnati (O.) Public Library 

Cincinnati (O.) Society of Natural History 

Civil Service Reform Association, Baltimore, Md.. 

Civil Service Reform Association of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, Pa 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass 

Cleveland (O.) — Board of Public Service 

Cleveland (O.) Public Library 



I 
I 
I 

I 

3 

3 

2 

I 

4 
2 

I 



10 



I 
I 

2 

• 

I 
I 



I 
I 



I 
8 
I 

• • 

I 

3 
z 

I 

4 

I 

2 
I 



53 



Vols. Pams. No«. 

Cleveland Institution of Engineers, Middlesborough, 

England 3 

Cling-surf ace Manufacturing Company, Buffalo 6 .... 

Cole, Mr F. T., Columbus, O i 

Collingivood, Mr David F., Pittsburgh i 

Colorado— Bureau of Mines, Denver, Col 2 .... 

Colorado State Agricultural College, Fort Collins 2 

Columbia University, New York, N. Y 3 

Columbian Council School, Pittsburgh i 

Columbus (0.)» Public School Library i 

Concrete Steel Engineering Company, New York i 

Consumers' League, New York, N. Y 3 

Copp, Mr Henry N., Washington, D. C i .... 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y i 

Cornell University — College of Agriculture, Ithaca 4 

Corthell, Mr Elmer L., New York, N. Y 2 

Coyle, Mr Reed B., Pittsburgh 12 

Craver, Mr Harrison W., Pittsburgh i 

Crisp, Mr Frederick Arthur, London, England i .... 

Crucible Steel Company of America, Pittsburgh 

Crumrine, Mr Boyd, Washington, Pa i 

Cunningham, Mr R. J., Pittsburgh i 

Curwensville (Pa.), High School Library 149 227 

Dalzell, Hon. John, Braddock, Pa 3 97 

Dambach, Mr C. O., Pittsburgh i 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H i 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Pittsburgh 

Chapter, through Mrs Samuel Ammon 4 .... 

Daytona (Fla.) Public Library i 

Deats, Mr H. E., Flemington, N. J 2 .... 

De Bussy, Mr J. H. , Amsterdam, Holland i 

Decatur (111.) Free Public Library , 4 

De Haan, Mrs Theodore, Pittsburgh 3 

DeLand, Mr Fred, Pittsburgh i i 4 

De Laval Separator Company, Albany, N. Y i 

Denver (Col.) Public Library 2 

Depew, Hon. Chauncey M., Washington, D. C 2 

Deseret News Book Store, Salt Lake City, Utah i 

Detroit (Mich.) Public Library i 

Dil worth, Mr Lawrence, Pittsburgh 70 

Doane College, Crete, Neb i 

Dodd, Mead & Co., New York, N. Y i 

Dodge, Mr William E., New York, N. Y. One 
original engraved steel plate used in the pro- 
duction of Audubon's great work on birds 

Douglass, Mr Earl, Pittsburgh 5 

Dow, Mr Arthur W., Brooklyn, N. Y. Two port- 
folios of prints 

Dr a vo, Mrs Horace G., Pittsburgh 36 .... 

Drew, B. L. & Co., New York, N. Y i 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J 2 

54 



Vols. Puns. Nos. 



Eau Claire (Wis.) Public Library 

Edgar, Mr T. B., St. Louis, Mo 

Elliott, Miss Agnes M., Pittsburgh 

Elston, Miss Catherine, Pittsburgh 

Emmons, Mr H. H., Alliance, O 

Engle, Mr G. B. /r., Chicago 111 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 

Erie (Pa.) Public Library 

Eschbach, Rev. E. R., Frederick, Md 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Fee, Mr Charles S., St. Paul, Minn 

Ferguson, Mrs K. J., Pittsburgh 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111 

Finsbury Public Libraries, London, England 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Pittsburgh 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 

Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow, Vt 

Ford, Hon. Henry P., Pittsburgh 

Fourth Avenue Baptist Church, Pittsburgh 

France — Minist^re des Affaires Etrangeres, Paris. .. 

Frances Shimer Academy, Mt. Carroll, 111 

Franklin & Marshall College, Alumni Association, 
Lancaster, Pa 

Franks, Mr R. A., Hoboken, N. J 

Freemasons — Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 

Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, Society of the. New 
York, N. Y 

Fulton, Dr Henry D., Pittsburgh 

Gable, Mr Morgan E., Pittsburgh 

Galesburg (111.) Free Public Library 

Georgia — Geological survey, Atlanta, Ga 

German Library Association, Pittsburgh 

Germanic Museum Association of Harvard Uni- 
versity, Cambridge, Mass 

Gibbons, Mr Henry, Philadelphia, Pa 

Gibson, Mr John, Pittsburgh. One manuscript 

Ginn & Company, Boston, Mass 

Gleim, Miss Mary Agnes, Pittsburgh 

Godard, Mr George S., Hartford, Conn. One ms. . . 

Goddard, Miss Alice G., Pittsburgh 

Golder, Mr Gottlieb, Pittsburgh 

Green Engineering Company, Chicago, 111 

Grinnell Academy, Grinnell, la 

Guthrie, Mr (George W., Pittsburgh 

Haines, Rev. C. W., Mt. Pleasant, Pa 

Hamburg ((Germany), Offentliche Bticherhalle 

Hamburg- American Line, New York, N. Y'. 

Hamilton, Mr Samuel, Braddock, Pa 

Hammon, Mr William H., Pittsburgh 



• • • • 



• • • • 



13 



z 

6 

• • . • 

I 

• • • • 

I 
z 
z 
z 
6 

• • • • 

8 
z 

• • • • 



ft • • • 



• • • • 



Z2 

2 



• • • • 



• • • ft 



14 
z 



• • • • 



• « • ft 

3 
4.765 



31 



2 
7 



I 

4 



• • • • 



z 

4 
z 

z 



ft ft • ft 



z 

2 
2 



55 



Hampton Normal 8c Agricultural Institute, Hamp- 
ton, Va 

Hanna, Mr T. A., Iron Mt, Mich 

Hardingham, Mr G. G. M., London, England 

Harper, Mr Francis P., New York, N. Y 

Harper Brothers, New York, N. Y 

Hartford (Conn.) Public Library 

Hartford (Conn.) Theological Seminary 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass 

Harvard University Library, Cambridge, Mass 

Hassler, Mr Edgar W., City Clerk, Pittsburgh. 

File of proposed ordinances and 

Hatcher, Mr John Bell, Pittsburgh 

Haverhill (Mass.) Public Library 

Hawaii — Board of Health, Honolulu, H. T 

Hawkins, Mr Robert M., Pittsburgh 

Heginbottom Free Library, Ashton-under-Lyne, 

England 

Hewes & Phillips Iron Works, Newark, N. J 

Hildebrand, Mr Harry D., Pittsburgh 

Hill, Hon. David J., Berne, Switzerland 

Hill, Mr William, Superintendent, Allegheny County 

Workhouse, Claremont, Pa 

Hoboken (N. J.) Free Public Library 

Holland, Dr Wiliam J., Pittsburgh 

Holland Society of New York, New York, N. Y 

Holmes, Miss Eleanor K., Pittsburgh 

Homewood Board of Trade, Pittsburgh 

Horner, Rev. Joseph, Pittsburgh 

Hunter, Mr Davidson, Pittsburgh 

Hyndman, Mr Nathan P., Pittsburgh. One atlas. .. 

Illinois — Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield 

Illinois — State Board of Arbitration, Spring^field 

Illinois Central Railroad Company, New York 

Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield, 111 

Imperial Library of Japan, Tokyo, Japan 

Indiana — Bureau of Statistics, Indianapolis, Ind 

Indiana — Geological Survey, Indianapolis, Ind 

International Kindergarten Union 

Iowa — Geological Survey, Des Moines, la 

Iowa College, Grinnell, la 

Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids, la 

Iowa Railway Club, Des Moines, la 

Jacob Tome Institute, Port Deposit, Md 

Jacobs, Mr J. W., Waynesburg, Pa 

Jennings, Mr Judson T., Duquesne, Pa 

Jersey City (N. J.) Free Public Library 

John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md 

Jordan, Mr John W., Philadelphia, Pa 

Julien, Rev. M. C, New Bedford, Mass 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 



I 

I 

I 



• • • • 



I 

I 

3 

I 
I 
I 
I 

2 

I 
I 

> • 

I 

> • 

I 

• • 

I 



I 

2 



I 
I 

2 
2 

8 
45 

2 

I 



I 
2 
I 
I 

8 

I 



• • « • 



4 
I 

2 

• • • 

I 

2 

4 
14 



135 



56 



Kansas Academy of Sciences, Topeka, Kan 

Kansas City (Mo.) Public Library 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan 

Kelly & Jones Company, Pittsburgh 

Kennard, Miss Beulah, Pittsburgh 

Kenyon College, Gambier, O 

Killikelly, Miss Sarah H., Pittsburgh 

Kingsley House Association, Pittsburgh 

Kittochtiny Historical Society, Chambersburg, Pa.. 

Kohl, Mr Paul, Chemnitz, Pa 

Konstanzer, Miss Gussie, Pittsburgh 

Kosis, Mr Jacob, Pittsburgh 

Krupp'sche Bucherhalle, Essen, Germany 

Lamb, Mr George H., Braddock, Pa 

Lancaster (Mass.) Town Library 

Lange, Mr D., St Paul, Minn 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa 

Lehman, Mr George M., Pittsburgh 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Stanford Uni- 
versity, Cal 

Leland Stanford Junior University Library, Stan- 
ford University, Cal 

Letchworth, Mr W. P., Portage, N. Y 

Lewis, Miss L. E., Sewickley, Pa 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111 

Libbey, Dr William, Princeton University, N.J 

Lick Observatory, Mt. Hamilton, Cal 

Lindsay (Ont.) Public Library 

Lombard, Mr Louis, Lugano, Switzerland 

London (Ont.) Public Library 

Los Angeles (Cal.) Public Library 

Loughridge, Miss Elizabeth B., Pittsburgh 

Lowell (Mass.) City Library 

Lynn (Mass.) Public Library 

McCandless, Mr Edward V., Pittsburgh. One atlas 

McCleave, Mr Johns, Pittsburgh 

McClurg, A. C. & Company, Chicago, 111 

McConway & Torley Company, Pittsburgh 

Macfarren, Mr Samuel J., Pittsburgh 

McGee, Dr Anita N., Washington, D. C 

McGonigle, Mr Robert J., Pittsburgh 

McKee, Mr Joseph A., Fayette City, Pa 

Macrum, Miss Mary F., Pittsburgh 

Madison (Wis.) Free Library 

Mahin Advertising Company, Chicago, III 

Maimonides Free Library, New York, N. Y 

Manchester (England) Public Free Libraries 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library 

Manitowoc (Wis.) Public Library 

Marshalltown (la.) Public Library 

Maryland — Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md 



VoU. 
II 



Pams. Nos. 



10 
I 



I 
3 



I 
I 



• • • • 



14 



36 
Z 

I 
I 



I 

8 
I 

5 
I 



2 
I 
I 

4 
I 

I 



• • • • 



I 

I 

• 

I 
I 

5 



I 
I 



5 
I 
I 
I 



106 



6 
I 



57 



Vols. Puns. Nos. 

Mason, Mr H. L., Cambridgeport, Mass i 

Massachusetts — Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Bos- 
ton, Mass I 6 

Massachusetts Civil Service Reform Association, 

Boston, Mass lo 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston 2 .... 

Massachusetts Single Tax League, Boston, Mass i 

Massachusetts State Federation of Women's Clubs 3 . 

Master Car & Locomotive Painters* Association, 

Kent, O I .... 

Matson, Dr Eugene F., Pittsburgh 21 .... i 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library i 

Mellor, Mr Charles C, Pittsburgh i 

Melvin, Mr William, Pittsburgh i 

Mercantile Library, New York, N. Y i 

Merchants' Association, New York, N. Y i 3 .... 

Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh i 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N. Y i .... 

Mexico— Instituto Geologico, Mexico, Mex 3 .... 

Michigan — Geological Survey, Lansing, Mich. One 

atlas 2 I 2 

Michigan — State Board of Health, Lansing, Mich. . i 4. 6 

Michigan Pioneer & Historical Society, Lansing 2 

Mietz, Mr August, New York, N. Y 2 .... 

Miller, Mrs Reuben, Pittsburgh 15 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Library i .... 

Minneapolis (Minn.) — Park Commissioners i 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Public Library 3 .... 

Minnesota — State Public Library Commission, Min- 
neapolis 2 .... 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minn i 

Missouri — Bureau of Geolog^y and Mines, Rolla, Mo i .... 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo i 

Mohonk Lake (N. Y.) Arbitration Conference i .... 

Montana — State Library, Helena, Mont i 

Montgomery, Mr Thomas L., Harrisburg, Pa i 

Montreal (Can.) Business Men's League i , 

Moody, Miss Lucy M., Beaver, Pa 2 

Moore, Mr C. B., Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Morrow, Mr E. S., Pittsburgh 24 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass i .... 

Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass 2 .... 

Muller, Miss Evelyn, Sewickley, Pa 4 

Murdock, Mrs Alexander, Pittsburgh 48 214 

Murphy, Mr E. J., Joliet, 111 i 

National Bulletin of Charities and Correction, Co- 
lumbus, O I 

National Civil Service Reform League, New York 6 .... 

National Educational Association, Winona, Wis 2 .... 

National Sound Money League, New York, N. Y . . i 

New Bedford (Mass.) Free Public Library i .... 

58 



New Brunswick (N. J.) Free Public Library 

New England Railroad Club, Boston, Mass 

New England Society of Pennsylvania, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 

New Hampshire — State Library, Concord, N. H. 
One atlas 

New Hampshire — State Library Commission 

New Jersey — Geological Survey, Trenton, N. J 

New Jersey — State Library, Trenton, N. J 

New London (Conn.) Public Library 

New Orleans (La.) — Sewerage & Water Board 

New Orleans (La.) Public Library 

New South Wales — Dept. of Mines 8c Agriculture, 
Sydney, N. S. W 

New South Wales Public Library, Sydney, N. S. W. 

New York (state) — Board of Charities, Albany, N. Y. 

New York (state) — Forest, Fish & Game Commis- 
sion, Albany, N. Y 

New York (state) — Historian, Albany, N. Y 

New York (state) — Library, Albany, N. Y 

New York (state) — Museum, Albany, N. Y 

New York (state) — University, Albany, N. Y 

New York (city) — Board of Education 

New York (city) — Bureau of Municipal Accounts. .. 

New York (city) Public Library 

New York University, New York, N. Y 

New York Zoological Society, New York, N. Y 

New Zealand — Registrar-general, Wellington, N. Z. 

Newark (N. J.) Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 

Newcastle School of Arts, Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
England 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne (England) Public Library... 

Norddeutscher Verein zur Ueberwachung von 
Dampfkesseln, Hamburg, Germany 

North Dakota — Geological Survey, Grand Forks... 

Northwest Railway Club, St. Paul, Minn 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 

Nye, Miss M. C, Marietta, O 

Oberlin College, Oberlin, O 

Oberlin College Library, Oberlin, O 

Oceanic Steamship Company, San Francisco, Cal.. 

Ohashi Public Library, Tokyo, Japan 

Ohio Society of New York, New York, N. Y 

Ontario^Department of Crown Lands, Toronto... 

Oregon State Agricultural College — Experiment Sta- 
tion, Corvallis, Ore 

Osterhout Free Library, Wilkes-Barr^, Pa 

Owen, Mr Thomas J., Montgomery, Ala 

Pacific Coast Railway Gub, San Francisco, Cal 

Parker & Burton, Detroit, Mich 



Vols. Puns. Nos. 

• • • • » 

• • • • Jl 



3 
I 

3 
I 



I 

7 
II 

12 

5 
I 



I 
4 



I 
I 



12 
28 

4 



I 
6 

4 

2 
I 



I 
I 

3 
I 

2 

3 

2 

• • • • 

2 
I 

• • • • 

3 
I 

I 

I 



59 



Vols. Pamt. Nos. 

Passavant Hospital, Pittsburgh 14 .... 

Patcrson (N.J.) Free Library i .... 

Patterson, Mr John H., Pittsburgh i 

Pennsylvania — Department of Agriculture, Harris- 
burg, Pa I 57 

Pennsylvania — Department of Agriculture, Division 

of Economic Zoology, Harrisburg, Pa i .... 

Pennsylvania — Free Library Commission, Harris- 
burg, Pa I 

Pennsylvania — Industrial Reformatory, Hunting- 
don, Pa I .... 

Pennsylvania — Secretary of the Commonwealth, 

Harrisburg, Pa 12 

Pennsylvania — State Library, Harrisburg, Pa 30 14 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadel- 
phia, Pa I .... 

Pennsylvania Forestry Association, Philadelphia 5 

Pennsylvania Museum & School of Industrial Art, 

Philadelphia, Pa i 

Pennsylvania Society of New York, New York, N. Y. i i .... 
Pennsylvania State College — Agriculture Experi- 
ment Station, State College, Pa 10 

Peoria (111.) Public Library i . . . . 

Perkins, Miss L. S. W., Concord, Mass i 

Peterson, Dr C. A., St. Louis, Mo i 

Pharmaceutical Review Publishing Company, Mil- 
waukee, Wis 2 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Commercial Museum i 3 .... 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Free Library i 

Philippine Islands — Civil Service Board, Manila 2 

Philosophical Society, Washington, D. C 2 .... 

Pillsbury, Mr A. E., Boston, Mass i 

Pinkert on, Mr Stanhope S., Pittsburgh 11 

Pittsburgh — Bureau of Health i 4 

Pittsburgh— City Clerk's Offiec 19 17 

Pittsburgh — City Controller i .... 

Pittsburgh — Department of Public Works 4 

Pittsburgh and Allegheny Free Kindergarten Asso- 
ciation 7 .... 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association i 

Pittsburgh, Chamber of Commerce 3 3 

Pittsburg Dispatch i 

Pittsburgh Hospital for Children i 

Plainfield (N. J.) Public Library i 

Plummer, Mrs Hannah A., Glencoe, 111 i 

Porter, Hon. Henry Kirke, Pittsburgh 6 10 2 

Porter, Mr R. P., Pittsburgh i 

Portland (Ore.), Library Association 2 

Potts, Mr Thomas Maxwell, Canonsburg, Pa i 

Power, Mr J. E., New York, N. Y i 

Presbyterian Hospital, Allegheny, Pa i 

60 



Vols. 
Princeton University, Princeton, N.J 

Providence (R.I.) — Record Commissioners i 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind 

Putnam, Dr Helen C, Providence, R. I 

Queen Colony, Corona, Cal 

Queen's Borough Library, New York, N. Y 

Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass 

Railway Club of Pittsburgh 

Railway Signaling Club, New York, N. Y 

Rardin, Mr J. K., Charleston, 111 

Reading (Pa.) Public Library 

Remington, Mr Edward P., Pittsburgh i 

Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y 

Rich, Mr W. W., New York, N. Y i 

Richards, Mr Lysander Salmon, Marshfield Hills, 

Mass I 

Richmond, Hon. A. B., Pittsburgh i 

Richmond Railroad Club, Richmond, Va 

Robins, Dr W. L., Washington, D. C 

Robinson, Rev. Thomas H., Allegheny, Pa i 

Roebling, Mrs Washington A., Trenton, N.J i 

Rogers, Mrs W. B., Boston, Mass i 

Ronaldson, Mr C. E., Philadelphia, Pa. Two book 

plates 

Rose Poljrtechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind 

Rosengarten, Mr Joseph G., Philadelphia, Pa 

Rupp, Mr George P., Philadelphia, Pa i 

Russell, Mr E. H., Pittsburgh 2 

Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J 

Rynearson, Mr Edward, Pittsburgh 

Sackett, Miss Gertrude, Pittsburgh 5 

Sadowski, Mrs Leon, Pittsburgh i 

St. John's General Hospital, Allegheny, Pa 

St. Louis (Mo.) Mercantile Library Association 

St. Paul (Minn.), Associated Charities 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library 

Saward, Mr F. E., New York, N. Y i 

Scheibler, Miss Julia, Pittsburgh 228 

Schimmel & Company, Miltitz, Germany 

School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia, Pa 

Schwartz, Mr J. L., Pittsburgh 8 

Scott, Mr Charles F., Pittsburgh 2 

Scott, Mr F. J., Toledo, O 

Scott, Mr W. D., Ottawa, Canada i 

Scranton (Pa.) Public Library i 

Seattle (Wash.) Public Library 

Shadyside Academy, Pittsburgh 

Shakespeare Society, Philadelphia, Pa 

Sharp, Miss Katharine L., Champaign, 111 2 

Shaw, Dr William C, Pittsburgh i 



Pains. 

2 

• • • • 

I 
I 

• • • • 

I 
I 

2 
I 

5 
I 

I 

• • • • 

2 
I 



Not. 



2 
2 



I 

3 



4 
I 

I 

I 



• • • • 



2 
2 

■ • 

4 
4 

2 
I 
I 
I 
I 



148 



61 



Shepherd, Mr Alexander B., Pittsburgh 

Sheppard, Mr George, Pittsburgh 

Silas Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn 

Simmons College for Women, Boston, Mass 

Skalweit, Mr Richard A., Pittsburgh 

Smith, Hon. Charles Emory, Philadelphia, Pa 

Smith, Mr J. C, New Orleans, La 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 

Society for the Promotion of Engineering Educa- 
tion 

Society of the Army of the Cumberland, Washing- 
ton, D. C 

Somerville (Mass.) Public Library 

Sons of the American Revolution, Pennsylvania 
Society, Pittsburgh 

Sons of the Revolution, Pennsylvania Society, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa 

Sotheran, Henry, & Company, London, England . . . 
Southern & Southwestern Railway Club, Atlanta, Ga. 

Sprague, Mr Homer B., Newton, Mass 

Springfield (Mass.), City Library Association 

Stafford, Dr Florence B., Pittsburgh 

Stanton, Rev. William A., D. D., Pittsburgh 

Stearns, Mr Frank Preston, Tufts College, Mass 

Stechert, G. E., New York, N. Y 

Stevenson, Mr William M., Allegheny, Pa. One 
manuscript 

Stoney, Mr Robert J., Pittsburgh 

Street Railway Journal, New York, N. Y 

Stuart & Company, Wollaston, Mass 

Swank, Mr James M., Philadelphia, Pa 

Swett, Mrs Vernon, Newton, Mass 

Syracuse (N. Y.) Public Library 

Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y 

Talmage, Mr J. E., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Taylor, Mr Albert, Pittsburgh 

Thaw, Mr Benjamin, Pittsburgh 

Thurgood, Mr W. C, Melbourne, Victoria 

Thurston, Mr H. F., Winnetka, 111 

Thurston Preparatory School, Pittsburgh 

Tioga Point Historical Society, Athens, Pa 

Tobin, Rev. F. L., Pittsburgh 

Traveling Engineers Association, Oswego, N. Y.. 

Trenton (N. J.) Free Public Library , 

Trenton Iron Company, Trenton, N. J 

Trinity Church Vestry, Pittsburgh 

Trinity College Library, Hartford, Conn 

Tufts College, Tufts College, Mass 

Tufts Library, Weymouth, Mass 



Vols. Pams. Nos. 
4 

M • • • • 

X • • • • 

• • • • £ 

X • • • • 

X • • • • 

• • • • X 

I 

4 4 



I 
I 



lO 

I 



• • • • 



I 
I 



I 
I 



I 

2 

4 
I 

3 

I 

15 



I 

7 
5 

' • 

I 

I 

2 



I 

2 

I 
I 



13 

2 
2 



597 



62 



I 


I 


2 


• • • • 


• 


I 


8 


U 


• 


8 


• 


I 


^S 


i8o 


2 


• • • • 


3 


lO 


8 


• • • • 



Vols. Puns. Nos. 
United Society of Boilermakers and Iron and Steel 

Shipbuilders, Newcastle-on-Tync, England 2 

United States — Bureau of Education 3 .... 

United States — Bureau of Insular Affairs 17 5 

United States — Bureau of Rolls and Library i 

United States — Census Office i 6 

United States — Census Office, through S. D. North . i .... 

United States — Copyright Office 3 i 

United States — Department of Agriculture 6 15 7 

United States — Department of Agriculture — Di- 
vision of Foreign Markets 

United States — Department of Agriculture — Li- 
brary 

United States — Department of Commerce and 

Labor 

United States — Department of Labor 

United States — Department of the Navy 

United States — Department of the Navy — Bureau of 

Construction and Repair 

United States — Department of State 

United States — Department of the Treasury 

United States — Geological Survey. 283 maps 

United States — Government. Five atlases 185 180 50 

United States — Interstate Commerce Commission.. 

United States — Library of Congress 

United States— Patent Office 

United States — Public Health & Marine Hospital 

Service 5 

United States — Weather Bureau 3 i 

United States Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md 

Universalist Publishing House, Boston, Mass i 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111 57 

University of Colorado, Boulder, Col 3 

University of Illinois, Champaign, 111 4 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn 4 

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo 2 

University of Missouri Library, Columbia, Mo i 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb i 

University of Nebraska — Agricultural Experiment 

Station, Lincoln, Neb 11 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C 4 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa 5 

University of Pennsylvania — Exchange Bureau, 

Philadelphia, Pa 16 

University of Rochester, Rochester. N. Y i 

University of St. Andrews Library, St. Andrews, 

Scotland 2 .... 

University of Texas, Austin, Texas i 

University of Texas — Mineral survey, Austin, Texas .... i 

University of Vermont Library, Burlington, Vt x 

Valentine Museum, Richmond, Va i 



Vols. Pami. Not. 

Vancouver (B. C), Board of Trade i 

Van Duzee, Mr Edward P., Buffalo, N. Y 4 

Vassar College Library, Poughkeepsie, N. Y i 

Vermont Historical Society, Montpelier, Vt 2 8 

Victoria — Public Library, Museums & National Gal- 
lery, Melbourne, Victoria i 

Voters' Civic League, Pittsburgh 5 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind 2 

Walker, Dr R. L. jr., Carnegie, Pa i 

Warder Public Library, Springfield, O i 

Warvelle, Mr G. W., Chicago, 111 2 

Washington, Mr Booker T., Tuskegee, Ala 18 

Washington (state) — Geological Survey, Seattle... i 

Washington (D. C), Public Library i 

Watson, Mrs Wm. Richard, Sacramento, Cal 2 .... 

Webster Free Library, New York, N. Y i 

Weil, Mrs A. Leo, Pittsburgh i 

Weinberger, Mr E., Homestead, Pa i 

Weldin, J. R. & Company, Pittsburgh 2 

Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass i 

Wells College, Aurora, N. Y i 

West, Mr Thomas D., Sharpsville, Pa 10 

West Virginia — Geological Survey, Morgantown i 

West Virginia University — Agricultural Experiment 

Station, Morgantown, W. Va 5 

Western Penitentiary of Pennsylvania, Allegheny 4 

Western Pennsylvania Exposition Society, Pitts- 
burgh I 

Western Pennsylvania Institution for Deaf and Dumb, 

Edgewood Park, Pa i 

Western Pennsylvania Institution for the Blind, 

Pittsburgh 4 

Westinghouse Companies — Publishing Department 13 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company, 

Pittsburgh 6 

Westinghouse Machine Company, East Pittsburgh 14 

Willard, Miss E. M., Pittsburgh i 14 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute Free Library 2 

Wirt, Mrs Louisa F., Hanover, Pa 3 

Wisconsin — Free Library Commission, Madison 8 

Wisconsin — Geological & Natural History Survey, 

Madison, Wis 4 

Wisconsin — State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, Madison, Wis 6 i 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wis . . i 4 

Woburn (Mass.) Public Library i 

Woman's Education Association, Cambridge, Mass i 

Woodward, Miss Meredyth, Pittsburgh i 

Worcester County Law Library, Worcester, Mass i 

Worcester (Mass.) Polytechnic Institute i 

Wycof f , Rev. C. W., Carnegie, Pa i 

64 



Voli. Paint. Not. 

Yagle Foundry & Machine Company, Pittsburgh 5 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 2 

Yamawaki, Mr Haruki, Tokyo, Japan i .... 

Ycates, Mr W. S., Atlanta, Ga i i 

Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wis 2 

Young, Mrs Robert J., Pittsburgh 8 .... 

Young Men's Christian Association, New York i 

Young Men's Christian Association, Pittsburgh 3 



PcriodScab and Newipi^eti Received as Gtfli or BxdtuLoga 

Nearly all of these were received as gifts or exchanges from the pmhUshers, or wer§ 
given anonymously. In all other cases the natnes of the donors are given. 

Advocate of Peace, Boston, Mass. 

Alleghenier und Pittsburger Sonntagsbote. 

American Art in Bronze and Iron, New York, N. Y. 

American Historical Magazine, Nashville, Tenn. 

American Iron and Steel Association, Philadelphia, Pa. Bulletin. 

American Manufacturer and Iron World, Pittsburgh. 

Architects and Builders Journal, Baltimore, Md. 

Assembly Herald, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Banker, Pittsburgh. 

Baptist Home Mission Monthly, New York, N. Y. 

Baptist Missionary Magazine, Boston, Mass. 

Biblia, Meriden, Conn. (Gift of Hon. H. K. Porter, Pittsburgh.) 

Blairsville College Journal, Blairsville, Pa. 

Boys and Girls, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Brown Alumni Monthly, Providence, R. I. 

Buddhism, Burma, India. 

Bulletin of Bibliography, Boston, Mass. 

Canada — Patent Office. Canadian Patent Office Record. 

Canadian Manufacturer, Toronto, Can. 

Canadian Railway Club, Montreal, Canada. Proceedings. 

Cat Journal, Palmyra, N. Y. (Gift of Mrs Fred DeLand, Pittsburgh.) 

Central Railway Club, New York, N. Y. Proceedings. 

Chicago Banker. 

Christian Cynosure, Chicago, 111. 

Christian Register, Boston, Mass. 

Christian Science Journal, Boston, Mass. 

Christian Science Sentinel, Boston, Mass. 

Christian Social Union, Boston, Mass. Publications. 

Christian Statesman, Pittsburgh. 

Church Calendar, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Church News, Pittsburgh. 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History. Journal. 

Cleveland Citizen. 

Qeveland Institution of Engineers, Middlesborough, £ng. Proceedings. 

Coal and Coke, Baltimore, Md. 

Coal Trade Bulletin, Pittsburgh. 

Columbia University Quarterly, New York, N. Y. 

Commoner and Glassworker, Pittsburgh. 

65 



Congressional Record, Washing^ton, D. C. 

Cornell Era, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Criterion, New York, N. Y. 

Electric Club Journal, Pittsburgh. 

Elizabeth Herald, Elizabeth, Pa. 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh. Proceedings. 

England — Patent Office. Illustrated Official Journal. 

England — Patent Office. Reports of Patent, Design and Trade Mark 
Cases. 

England — Patent Office. Trade Marks Journal. 

Epworth Herald, New York, N. Y. (Gift of Mr F. W. Main, Pittsburgh.) 

Farmers Voice and National Rural, Chicago, 111. 

Forest Leaves, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fresno Guide, Fresno, Cal. 

Gazeta Pittsburgska. 

Herald of the Golden Age, London, England. 

High School Journal, Pittsburgh. 

Home Mission Monthly, New York, N. Y. 

Hospital News, Homoeopathic Hospital, Pittsburgh. 

Housekeeper, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Humanity, Pittsburgh. 

Inlander, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

International Bureau of the American Republics, Washington, D. C. 
Monthly Bulletin. 

Iowa College News Letter, Grinnell, Iowa. 

Iowa Railway Club, Des Moines, Iowa. Proceedings. 

Japan and America, New York, N. Y. (Gift of Mr Thomas N. Miller, 
Pittsburgh.) 

Jewish Criterion, Pittsburgh. 

Jewish Post, Pittsburgh. 

Kingsley House Record, Pittsburgh. 

Labor, St. Louis, Mo. 

Literary News, New York, N. Y. 

Locomotive, Hartford, Conn. 

Los Angeles Herald. 

Lutheran, Lebanon & Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mekeel's Weekly Stamp News, New York, N. Y. 

Mexican Investor, Mexico, Mex. (Gift of Mr S.J. Macfarren, Pitts- 
burgh.) 

Mexican Journal of Commerce, Mexico, Mex. (Gift of Mr S. J. Mac- 
farren, Pittsburgh.) 

Mining and Engineering Review and Electrician, San Francisco, Cal. 

Money, Pittsburgh. 

Monthly Gazette of Current Literature, New York, N. Y. 

National Glass Budget, Pittsburgh. 

National Stockman, Pittsburgh. (Gift of Mr S. J. Macfarren, Pitts- 
burgh.) 

New Century Path, Point Loma, San Diego, Cal. 

New York (state) — Department of Health. Monthly Bulletin. 

New York Philatelist, Watcrtown, Mass. 

New York Railroad Club. Official Proceedings. 

New York Zoological Society. Bulletin. 

(lis 



North- West Railway Club, St. Paul, Minn. Official Proceedings. 
Official Railway Guide of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh. 

Ohio Valley Manufacturer, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Oil City Derrick, Oil City, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Medical Journal, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Philadelphia Press. 

Pittsburgh — Bureau of Health. Statement of Mortality. 

Pittsburgh Bulletin. 

Pittsburgh Catholic. 

Pittsburg Christian Advocate. 

Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. 

Pittsburg Dispatch. 

Pittsburgh Gazette. 

Pittsburgh Index. 

Pittsburg Leader. 

Pittsburg Neue Welt. 

Pittsburg Post. 

Pittsburg Press. 

Pittsburgh Railway Club. Proceedings. 

Pittsburg Times. 

Pittsburger Beobachter. 

Pocket List of Railroad Officials, New York, N. Y. 

Popular Mechanics, Chicago, 111. 

Practical Engineer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pratt Institute Monthly, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Presb3rterian Banner, Pittsburgh. 

Printers' Ink, New York, N. Y. 

Rarasek, Pittsburgh. 

Record, Pittsburgh. 

Remarques, Pittsburgh. 

Rose Technic, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Saint Andrew's Cross, New York, N. Y. 

St. Louis Railway Club. Proceedings. 

Sewickley Valley, Sewickley, Pa. 

Smith College Monthly, Northampton, Mast. 

Socialist Standard, Pittsburgh. 

Sound Currency, New York, N. Y. 

Southern and Southwestern Railway Club, Atlanta, Ga. Proceedings. 

Sparks from the Anvil, New York, N. Y. 

Spirit of Missions, New York, N. Y. 
:|r Sunny South, Atlanta, Ga. 

Sunset, San Francisco, Cal. 
.; Svenska Amerikanska Posten, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Svenska Veckobladet, McKeesport, Pa. 

Theosophical Review, Chicago, 111. 

Tidings, Chicago, 111. 
, ?; Truth, Nazareth, N. C. 

United Presbyterian, Pittsburgh. 

United Society of Boilermakers and Iron and Steel Shipbuilders, New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Monthly Report. 

United States — Bureau of Statistics. Monthly Summary of Commerce 
and Finance of United States. 






United States — Copyright Office. Catalogue of Title Entries of Books. 

United States — Department of Ag^icnlture — Division of Statistics. 
Crop Reporter. 

United States — Documents Office. Catalogue of United States Public 
Documents. 

United States — Insular Affairs Division. Monthly Summary of Com- 
merce of the Philippine Islands. 

United States — Office of Experiment Stations. Experiment Station 
Record. 

United States — Patent Office. Official Gazette. 

United States — Public Health & Marine-Hospital Service. Public 
Health Reports. 

University of Tennessee Record, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Vassar Miscellany, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Volksblatt und Freiheits-Freund, Pittsburgh* 

Volksfreund, Pittsburgh. 

Weekly People, New York, N. Y. 

Weekly Philatelic Era, Boston, Mass. 

West of Scotland Iron and Steel Institute, Glasgow, Scotland. Journal 
(Gift of Cleveland Institution of Engineers.) 

Western Mining Herald, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Western Press, Mercer, Pa. 

Western Society of Engineers, Chicago, 111. Journal. 

Western University Courant, Allegheny. 

Wielkopolanin, Pittsburgh. 

Woman's Missionary Friend, Boston, Mass. 

Women's Missionary Magazine, Xenia, O. 

Worker, New York, N. Y. 

LIbraflcs from wUdb Bolldios wtfe Rtettrtd u Glfii or Ricfianga 

Atlanta (Ga.) Carnegie Library. 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library. 

Braddock (Pa.) Carnegie Free Library. 

Brockton (Mass.) Public Library. 

Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn. 

Brookline (Mass.) Public Library. 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Institute of Arts and Sciences — Children's Museum 

Library. 
Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library. 
Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library. 
Cardiff and Penarth (Wales) Free Public Libraries. 
Cincinnati (O.) Public Library. 
Clark University Library, Worcester, Mass. 
Qeveland (O.) Public Library. 
Cossitt Library, Memphis, Tenn. 
Denver (Col.) Public Library. 
Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 
Fitchburg (Mass.) Public Library. 
Hartford (Conn.) Public Library. 
Haverhill (Mass.) Public Library. 
Holyoke (Mass.) Public Library. 

68 



■ "^ 

!**^ 



Homestead (Pa.) Carnegie Library. 

To'^va Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Jersey City (N.J.) Free Public Library. 

Joliet (111.) Public Library. 

Kansas City (Mo.) Public Library. 

r^os Angeles (Cal.) Public Library. 

Lo^well (Mass.) City Library. 

Maiden (Mass.) Public Library. 

Manchester (England) Public Free Libraries. 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library. 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library. 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Library. 

New Bedford (Mass.) Free Public Library. 

New Haven (Conn.) Free Public Library. 

New Orleans (La.) Public Library. 

New York (city) Public Library. 

Newark (N. J.) Free Public Library. 

Omaha (Neb.) Public Library. 

Osterhout Free Library, Wilkes-Barr6, Pa. 

Portland (Ore.) Library Association. 

Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum. 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library. 

St. Louis (Mo.) Public Library. 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library. 

San Francisco (Cal.) Public Library. 

Scranton (Pa.) Public Library. 

Somerville (Mass.) Public Library. 

Springfield (Mass.) City Library Associatioii. 

Waltham (Mass.) Public Library. 

Wilmington (Del.) Institute Free Library. 



69 



Pub&catioiis of the Ubrary now in 



Classifisd Catalogue of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh [to 
July i, 1902]. 
Part 2. Philosophy and Religion. 1903. 223 pp. - - - - $ .15 
Part 3. Soctology and Philology. 1904, 340 pp. - - - -25 

When completed the catalogue will be issued in book form. In the 
meantime, separate pamphlets of each part will be issued as soon as 
printed, with the exception of pt.i, General Works, which will not 
appear in pamphlet form. The parts listed above are now ready. 

Story Telling to Children from Norse Mythology and the 
nlbelungenued ; references to material on selected 
Stories, together with an Annotated Reading List. 15^3. 
48 pp. -- .20 

List of Subject Headings for Use in Dictionary Catalogues 
OF Children's Books. Prepared by Sadie Ames of the Cleve- 
land PuBUC Library. 1903. 58 pp. - - .15 

Contemporary Biography; References to Books and Magazine 
Articles on Prominent Men and Women of the Time. Com- 
piled by Agnes M. Elliott. 1903. 171 pp. - ^ 

References to material in this Library on 350 contemporary writers, 
painters, sculptors, musicians, actors, dergjrmen, scientists, states- 
men, sovereigns, social reformers, etc. 

Printed Catalogue Cards for Children's Books; an Announce- 
ment : Together with a List of 1,053 Children's Books Agreed 
UPON by the Cleveland Public Library and the Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburgh. 1903. 30 pp. ------ - .02 

Reprinted from the Monthly Bulletin, January 2903, for the informa- 
tion of prospective buyers of the printed cards. The selection of books 
on the list was made with the utmost care and is based on the ex- 
perience of the two collaborating libraries. 

Some Information about the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 

1902. 51pp. .03 

An illustrated handbook for visitors, in pamphlet form. 

List of One Hundred Entertaining Biographies. 1902. 19 pp. - - .02 

Fully annotated. 

Alphabehcal Finding List of the Periodicals Received. Ed. 3. 

1901. 16 pp. - .02 

Books on Philately in the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 

1901. 7 pp. *- .02 

List of the Pubucations of Scientific SociEnES and the Period- 
icals ON Pure and Applied Science in the Reference Depart- 
ment. 1900. 19 pp. - - .03 

Catalogue of the J. D. Bernd Department of Architecture. 189& 

33pp. -03 

Annual Reports^ ist-8th, 1895-1903 -- Free 

Except the 3d, which is out of print. 

Monthly Bulletin. (Not published in August and September.) 

Subscription for a year - ^5 

Free at the Library. 

70 



1 



Zl 



tn 






Report of the Superintendent of Buildings and 

Grounds 

To the Committee on Buildings and Grounds: 

Gentlemen : — I beg to report that the same care has been 
exercised during the year as heretofore in the matter of oper- 
ation and maintenance of buildings. All are in complete re- 
pair and were open each day as per their regular schedule. 

The electric light plant for the Wylie Avenue branch, 
authorized by you, is now in course of erection. 

During the year there were io8 entertainments given in 
the lecture hall at the main building, 1 1 at Hazelwood, 8 at 
Lawrenceville and i at Mt. Washington. 

Rentals were collected as follows; 

rffi Main lecture hall 
^^ 19 evenings at $12.50 $23750 

2 evenings at $25.00 50.00 

'^^ I afternoon at $15.00 15.00 $302.50 

^^ Hazelwood auditorium 

6 evenings at $15.00 $ 90.00 

3 evenings at $10.00 30.00 

tbc» 2 afternoons at $10.00 20.00 140.00 

rrstt^ Mt. Washington auditorium 

I evening at $10.00 10.00 

q^ ToUl $452.50 

The remainder being free and of interest to the public, no 
rental was charged. 

The aggregate attendance in Music Hall was 181,907. 
In the administration of the work incidental to the care and 
^ management of the buildings, it becomes necessary at times 

iDifiiif to confer with the heads of departments of the city govern- 

ment. It gives me pleasure to attest to their uniform courtesy 
% ^ and their willingness always to cooperate in bringing about 

results that will be to the best interests of the institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 
^ Chas. R. CunninfSfham, 

^ April 16, 1904. Sup't of Buildings and Grounds. 

71 









Report of the Manager of Music Hall 

IV. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

My dear Sir: — I have the honor to make report of the 
operations of the Music Hall for the year ending January 31, 
1904. 

During the year the Hall has been occupied as follows : 

Pay EoteHalomeati 

Forenoon or 
Afternoon Evenm^ 

Pittsburgh Orchestra, $50 rate 19 19 

The Art Society, $50 rate 7 

Mozart Club, $50 rate 4 

Apollo Club, $100 rate 3 

Academy of Science and Art, $50 rate 2 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, $75 rate 7 7 

Charity, philanthropic and educational, $100 rate 26 

Conventions at educational rates, $75 5 

Conventions at educational rates, $50 5 

Entertainments paying full rate, $175 4 

Entertainments at $150 rate 14 

36 88 

Total income from rentals as above $10,125.00 

Use of organ 3 times at $25 each 7S.oo 

Total $10,200.00 

Expenditures for the Hall for the year $ 9,411.75 

Free Organ Rccttali 

Edwin H. Lemare, appointed organist and director on 
January 12, 1902, gave the usual Saturday evening and Sun- 
day afternoon recitals, excepting during July, Augfust and 
September, the usual vacation period. 

Owing to sickness, Mr Walter E. Hall substituted for Mr 
Lemare on one Sunday afternoon and one Saturday evening 
during the year, and, as under his contract Mr Lemare is per- 
mitted to provide a substitute during June, Mr Wm. K. 
Steiner of Pittsburgh played at four Saturday evening and 
four Sunday afternoon June recitals. 

72 



kt . 



le list of recitals given during the year and the organists 
oUows: 

Saturday Sooday 

ETeninc Afternoon 

H. Lemare 34 35 

.- E. Hall I I 

. Steiner 4 4 

39 40 

FtmVmciib^HMA 

he annual commencement of the Pittsburgh High 

ol, evening of June 25. 

ounder's Day, Carnegie Institute, afternoon of Novem- 



^ . 



(useum Department, Carnegie Institute, evening of De- 
)cr 22. 

ToUl Ut ol Han Dttfiog tii0 Year 

Fortnoonor 
Afternoon Erening 

entertainments 36 88 

organ recitals 40 39 

use of hall i 2 

77 lap 

laGcoaral 

The Hall was not used on Sundays except for the organ 
tals. 

The gratifying financial result this year, the largest since 
Hall was opened, is due to the fact that several convention- 
anizations rented the Hall, and particularly that the mys- 
• play "Everyman" was secured for ten evenings and six 
moons. One of the evenings being for the benefit of a 
xl charity, the fixed rate for the Hall was $100, but the 
er nine evenings and six afternoons were rented at the 
ular rates, the total rent for the entire engagement being 
900. 

The rentals at the full entertainment rate of $175 were 
.r, one more than last year. As pointed out in my report 
a year ago this number remains small because of the fact 
it the Pittsburgh Orchestra and the Art Society, which 
/e the privileged rate of $50, frequently engage as soloists 

73 



such artists of commanding position as would otherwise be 
heard under their own auspices, and would pay the larger 
rental. 

I would recommend, beginning with the concert season of 
1904, that the Pittsburgh Orchestra, the Art Society, the 
Mozart Club and the Academy of Science and Art — ^the local 
organizations receiving the $50 rate — ^be asked to pay in ad- 
dition the actual cost of the service of ushers, doorkeepers and 
police attendants. Counting the expense of this service, the 
use of the light, to say nothing of wear and tear, it is my 
opinion that the organizations benefiting by the $50 rate are 
in fact receiving a donation. 

There has been a gratifying increase in the attendance at 
organ recitals Saturday evenings, while the attendance Sun- 
day afternoons has frequently taxed the capacity of Carnegie 
Music Hall. Mr Lemare's programs the past year have aver- 
aged a little more than an hour in duration and this fact I 
think has made the recitals more popular than before. 

The promise of business for the current year is excellent, 
but I would remind you that the alterations now going on at 
Carnegie Library building may lessen the business of the Hall, 
and that excess of receipts the past year, due to the "Every- 
man" engagement, may not again be duplicated. 

I have to report satisfactory service from the doorkeepers 
and ushers under my charge. 

Respectfully, 

G. W. Wilson, 
April 18, 1904. Manager^ 



E 
Januarj 
day aften. 
September, i 

Owing to Sa 
Lemare on one h 
during the year, ani- 
mitted to provide a » 
Steiner of Pittsburgh pla> 
four Sunday afternoon June 



'74 



Report of the Finance Committee 

W. N. Frew, Esq., President: 

Dear Sir : — ^Your Finance Committee respectfully reports 
no change from its last annual report. 

We have in our possession one five per cent, gold bond of 
Youghiogheny-Monongahela Coal Company of par value of 
one thousand dollars due January i, 1907, and nineteen first 
mortgage five per cent, gold loan of 1890 bonds of the Pitts- 
burgh, Shenango and Lake Erie Railroad Company of the 
par value of one thousand dollars each, comprising the invest- 
ment of the Bemd fund, (the coupons of the above bonds, up 
to date, have been regularly handed over to our Treasurer, 
and I attach hereto his acknowledgment); also the deeds of 
the properties purchased up to date for branch libraries, 
namely :— deed of Henry P. Ford et ux., George D. Edwards 
and Thomas H. McCartan et al. to the City of Pittsburgh for 
nth ward property; two deeds from the Washington Sub 
School District to the City of Pittsburgh for 17th ward prop- 
erty; deed of Ann Baughman et al. to the City of Pittsburgh 
for 19th ward property; two deeds from Ira M. Burchfield et 
ux. et al. to the City of Pittsburgh for 23d ward property; deed 
of Frank Lemoyne to the City of Pittsburgh for 32d ward 
property; deed of Joseph M. Taylor et ux. et al. and Emma 
Taylor et al. to the City of Pittsburgh for 36th ward property. 

The above deeds have all been legally recorded in the 
Recorder's Office, Allegheny County, and together with the 
bonds, abstracts of titles and other papers, are deposited in 
box 7,106, Fidelity Title and Trust Company vaults. 

Respectfully, 

Robert Pitcaim, 
April 19, 1904. Chairman. 



75 



Report of the Treasurer 

Condensed statement of James H. Reed, Treasurer, for 
the year ending January 31, 1904. 

Revenue 

Surplus from last year $ 18324.56 

Appropriation from City of Pittsburgh 131,000.00 

Music Hall rentals io,2oaoo 

Half cost of ushers' uniforms 6.00 

Lecture Hall rentals 536.50 

Telephone pay station commission 12.53 

Library petty receipts: 

Central Library $1,693.77 

Lawrenceville branch 313-97 j 

West End branch 142.63 

Wylie Avenue branch 404.86 

Mt Washington branch 170.31 

Hazelwood branch 180.51 

Papers sold 12.71 

Training School for Children's Li- 
brarians. Tuition fees, etc 498.37 3417.13 

Interest on daily bank balances 681.81 

Donation — Carnegie Steel Company — Fund for 

binding British patents 3,700.00 

Donation — ^Andrew Carnegie — ^Training School 

for Children's Librarians 5,000.00 

Refunds 1,587.55 $174,966.08 



Dfsbufsefnents 

For approved vouchers Nos. 6,220 
to 7,399 inclusive : 

Central Lfbrary 

Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $31,847.72 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $48,772.89 

Books 15,75744 64,530.33 



76 



Music Hall department , 

Operating labor, repairs and running expense. $11411.75 

Executive department 

Running expense 70.75 

Treasury department 

Operating labor and running expense 692.98 

Brandi LIfwafIci 

LatunnceviUe 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running expense. 2,170.73 

Library department 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $4^0541 

Books 2,372.86 7*178.27 

West End 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running expense. if490.35 

Library department 

Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense , $3»4S3*79 

Books 149949 4.983-28 

Wylie Avtnui 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running expense. 1,934.68 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $5406.02 

Books 241447 7*82049 

Mt, Washington 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running expense. 1424.27 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $3f3i4-5i 

Books 1.591.93 4.90644 

HoMilwood 
Building department 
Operating labor, repairs and running expense. i>549.6i 

Library department 
Operating labor, repairs and run- 
ning expense $3,578.62 

Books 1,689.65 5*268.27 

77 



SpedalFtfodf 

Training School for Children's Librarians $3,281.12 

Carnegie fund 

Books purchased 90849 

Fund for binding British patents 

Binding 4472-59 $IS5,942.I2 



Surplus $19,023.96 

The surplus consists of the following 
balances : 

Surplus over purchases and expenses of the 

Library, exclusive of funds $11,722.28 

Balance of Training School fund, not yet ex- 
pended 2,906.00 

Balance of Carnegie fund not yet expended 3>732.i9 

Balance of fund for binding British patents, not 

yet expended 66349 $19*023.96 

J« D« Bemd Fund 

Rcvenoe 

Surplus from last year $651.21 

Interest — Pittsburgh, Shenango & Lake Erie 

bond 950.00 

Interest — Youghiogheny-Monongahela Coal Co. 

bond 50.00 

Interest on daily bank balances 26.35 $1*677.56 

ObbufsemcntB 

For approved vouchers Nos. 80 to 
102 inclusive: 

Books purchased 984.11 

Surplus ^ $693*45 

Schwartz Fund 

Rcvenoe 

Surplus from last year $297.85 

Interest on daily bank balances 5.86 $303.71 

For approved vouchers Nos. 3 to 
14 inclusive: 

Books purchased 75«I2 

Surplus $228.59 

78 



Report of the Auditing Committee 

W. N. Frew, Esq,, President: 

Dear Sir: — I have to report that the books and annual 
statement in connection with the Carnegie Library of Pitts- 
burgh for the fiscal year ending January 31, 1904, have been 
fully audited, the work having been done for the Committee 
by Mr John Nelson, accountant, whose report of this date I 
hand you herewith, requesting that the same be considered as 
the report of the Auditing Committee. 

Yours very truly, 

A. W. Mellon, 
March 15, 1904. Chairman. 

Mr A, W. Mellon, Chairman Auditing Committee: 

Dear Sir : — I have examined the books and annual state- 
ment in connection with the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 
for the fiscal year ending January 31, 1904, and find that the 
receipts and disbursements have been properly accounted for. 

The accounts of cash for the three interests, namely, 
Library, Bemd and Schwartz funds, agree with the balances 
as shown January 31, 1904, in their respective accounts in 
Mellon National Bank. 

I have handled all the vouchers and found that in every 
instance they were properly authorized and that the receipt 
was duly signed by the person or company to whose order the 
voucher was drawn, and for the amount called for by the 
voucher. 

I have verified the carbon copy of the annual statement 
submitted to me and left it with Miss Weir with instructions 
to present same to you with the original. 

Very truly yours, 
March 14, 1904. Jno. Nelson. 



79