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Full text of "Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers to the Secretary of War for the Year ..."

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1 ' ■ f^l 



yJ^-^'-zr 



COSGK35SS, I HOUSE OF KEPRESENTATIVES. J Bx, Doo. I, 
i Sex^wM. i ( pt. 2, vol. II. . 



I 



ANNUAL REPOKT 



1 



HIEF OF ENGINEERS, 

XTKITED STATES ABMT. 



SECRETARY OF WAR, 
\ 



4 



THE YEAR 1892. 



IS FOUR PARTS AND ATLA8. 



* PART III. 



WASHtSGTON: 

OOVEENMENT PRINTING OFFIOB. 

1892. 



CONTENTS. 

[AliihBlcttr^ imi.'i nil] 1>.' ].. mill lit Ili.'MKlul t«.'h fuirl.) 

I'AKT I. 
OFKKMKM I'F THIC Cnurs itF MNGINKKKS. 
L'»>, cliiiucctt, ami ili^lrilmlioii [•roftirirs <ir<-or|>s. :i; i)l)in>rs (Irliiclieit, 4. 
FOIiTIFlrATIOX.'^. 

<•I■RIATI••^^ ANl. .*l.l."T.MK.NTr*, ItnHtoll ITnillor. Mil-^H.. 1: Nf^T Yoik ll;ir1...r. \. 

B; \VuKhiiij;t'iti. J). ('.. T; II:iiDpt4iti U-kuU. V.l., »aii Kriii^rhcn. Hnrlidr. fill., 
liug •:»H(:in:itvK. rt; Hill's fur rortiJkiiliuiis, !>. 

I'liOTErnoN (IF SITK OF FOUT MAfl.M.'A. XKW V'ltK. 

rir .HMM.K ni c-.u-r. luv r. Kim^jms, c.ini's -i r:s..iM.i ir- IJ 

WAi.i.AM' i:MriANKSii:xi' AT havius [si.and. m:\v vm.'K i[ai;i;(ii;, 

111- . ii.m;i.i •,! {■•.!.. 11, r. II,,i->i..n. C.m-^ i.i J^iiisi i:i> Ti 

>i;a walls at (;(i\ r.i;Mii;s islvM). m:\v X'Hik ii \e,'i:<ii;. 
hi: .■ini:.,r oi (\,r.. 1i, c, II.msi'.n, C"i:i>- or i:s..im i i; - t:: 

I 11 i-i;'iri:(,Ti(i\. watki; sui'I'lv. and si:\vlkai;i: ,-\,-il\i at vit-i 
mom;(»k. va. 

i,y cii.Mi'.J: -t M.vi. (in-. K. L. l;. Ham-. C-.ui- ..i I'.N'.im ; i;-.... 11 

i.'Ki'AH,' AMI ri;i:sKi;vAi'iiiN m' rniii \l\i,'iiin, i- i.ihujia. 

IIV'HU^ill ..1 >Li.l, .1. C. Mil.l.i.];\. ( .ii:i- ,,i lls^.iSMt:- 1.^ 

■imati> in" Ai'ri;tii'i;i\TrMN.-; I'm; i-.>i:ririi .^'I■|M^^ i;i:',ii ii;i;ii mi; 
i^in! '^ii ir, 

iiiK iiiiAi.'H or i:m;[m:i;i;s. 

itiixii'. IT; :iiMl'tiiiiL:il<liilI.-^.il'iiii'i i~. 1^. 

1ST t'l- wiLLK'fs i'(ijNi-, m;\v hh;k.— iNi I r.n >r\n> lvcim:):!; 

S( ll<inl.._HArTALHi\ (IT r.NClNLIM.'S. ■ I.M ;EM.i;i; I'lM'nT. 
■fcii; IS ...M\i.,M., Lir.ur. ( m.. \V. I;, Kis.i. ( ..i;i- m I.m.im ri:> - 

t «|- Will.l'. r.iiiif. |-iiil.-l StMli-s Kii;;iiiiii >. I I. l!.iIlMh..ii..r l-;ii;;ilii-i'vs, Kii- 

ine.v I>.'1...|. l;l; >I:iltiiii'iil ..nuuil-, <-iiiiiiit.-, SK 




ENr.iNRBRS— 

I Inlet, N'. Y., Cuianie Bay, N. Y., 96; 8hecp»Lnd Bay, N. Y., 99; 
\ M. ¥. and H. J., 100: obamiel lietnceu Stateu Isltind and New J«i- 
■■•■atF River.K. J., 102; Eliza brthltivpr, N. J., 103; Kaliwaj- Blver, N. 

■ Blvar, N.J., lot; Sontb River.N. J., 105; Ke^ort Harbor, N. J., ^106; 
^:ntk,ti.J., 107: ShoalHarborandeoiDptouCiyek, S. J., gimlrfelinn 

2^106; ManMqnan BTver, N. J., 100. 

OF ILkj. C. W. BATifOKi>, Corps of Knoinbbiw— 



nUoioi^ 



AKlnii HaAvb Dal., 130; ieo barbor at New Castle, Dri., Appoqniniiiiuink 

I'. I»<-].. ^mftm^Sim, Del., 131; Uiopillioi) Creek, Del., 123; Bnudkllu 

. , I SI., iu land, waterway Atiin ChhicetengaB Boy.Va., tti l>elawftre Bay at nr 

l<e\..J23i Sitaquebaiina Biver above ana belciw HaiTodeOiMce, Md., 

I^iver, Hd., 124; Elk Bivcr, Md., 129; Fairlen Cnwk, Md., Cbeater 

T'liu Cnmpton to .tones Lcitiding, 126; CboptaHk KiTer,Hd., Caui- 

I .1. yd., 137; Wicomico River, Md., 12«; Hanokiu River, "Hd., Onan- 

: I'r. Vs., 139; harbor at Cape Charles Cit7, Vs., aitd approaebea by 

Liiifi) Ink t, 130; lemoving auiikea veseela or craft abatmeting or eudaogerlng 

^tiuii. eiaBiiuationa ai^ snTveys, 131. 

K iiiAliiiK OF Col, Wiujah P. Craighiij., Cokps of EKatKEXRs— 
x'li Iiivci aod cliaiuiel to Baltimore, Hd., 132; Jaiuea River, Va., 131. 

II < \}m:..i. or MA.r. Ckahles K. I,. IJ. Daviw, Ci.nr« ok K.SfiiM-Kiis- 

l.i . [ ^it WaBhiiiEton, D. C. 136; Pototn.ir River lit Mount \'crnou, Vii„ 

r.:n, Creelf, \ii., 139; Ai|iiia Creek, Vii., IW; biiibor at Jlrrtim rtay, 

II. Md., NMuiiiiCnM..k. Vs., Ul; I'otnxpi.t Hiver,Md..l.l2: Kappabaii- 

' ltL> r , Vii.. VrLaiiH (rrcek, V»., 143; York Itivpr, Vn, II I ; Msttnj.oni KIvct. 

., ItS; I'amiiukcy River, Va. ' — ''■ ' ' '" 



E- LlKI 



. Edw. Burnt, Coi 



, lUlwofNorfnlk, and its apiiroarbca, Vb., 

I BXVuited HtalcB (Xorfolk) iiavy-yiir.1 bet' 

Wi Ufinipton Creek mill Bar, Vii 

|hw,VB., 161; AppoinatKiK Hiver, Vii., 

K*^ to Albemarle ^^imnd, S. ('., thruiigli 

" audN. C.,153. 

ion OF MAJ. W. S. STAMriX, 



117; aiipriiafh to Norfolk lliirlmr.iMd 

WI1 Lniiibort I'uintiiml F..rt Norfolk, 

id River, Vii., IW; Clii-'kalion.iiiv 

iti-r ront.- from Norfolk 1 Ijirlior, 

k ^oiiiul, 1132; North Laudjiig 



, X. C. 



K-i, — " .u>flr. Va., l.*>J; Rnanoke River, N. C, l.Vi; I'liHqiu.lfHik Riv 
r jMl[«yi Crci-k, N. C. l-W; Oi-racokr Injet. N. C, Fii-liinK fro.k, H. V., ir>7 
■ jMind Tar Rivor, N. V., Ciwteiituiii <!n-ck, N. C 15M; Trent Hiver, N. C ISI; 
i (leiigi; River, N. C, 160; inlaud wiiturwuy between NewberiK' and lleHiifort.N. C, 
I h^''*' Brnufiirl, N. C, 161; inland wiiterwii}- biilncen Ile.-iiifort Harbor nnd 
—"*' Hiver, N. C 162; inluiid watcinfiv betwiseii New Hiver mid SwaiiHboro 
C.,Kew River. 1 



163; North Knet (Cape Fear) River. K. C, Illmk River, 
ver, N. C, above Wilmiiinton. CJape Fear River, N. C, 
I. 1(k'i; Lorkwooda Follv Iliver N. C, UiT; Yadkin River, 



'^ 



1 




CONTENTS. 

[Alpbalwtlnil imivi « ill In- luiui.l iit IJi.s pi>.L .,1 r/4 



\KT I. 
DIIICKKS OF ; COUPS OF ENfilNFKRS. 

I, chBUg:eB, au>l ■ti>ilriliiitioii ulticcrB of I'Orjis, S; onicvis Uil 
K( iiTIl OSS. 

,.5; WiwhiDgtor 

PROTECTION OP SITB OF FORT NIAGARA, NEW VORE. 

rHAllGE (IF CAPT. T)\S C. KlN(iM*\-. CCRl'S OF Enuinkkiis 13 

SEA WALL AND EMBANKllEKT AT TiAVIDS ISLAND, NEW YORK HARBOTi. 

K C'llJSRGK OF C'OL. D. C. HOCSTOS, COBPS OV ENfilSEEItS 12 

SEA WALLS AT GOVERNORS ISLAND, NEW YORK HARIIOR. 
In TDK ciiARGi: or Col. D. C. Houston, Conps of Enuinf.kcs 13 



ItK TIIK CHARGE OF MAJ. ClIAfl. E. L. B. DAVIS, COllPS W EyuI.NRLlISS 

BEPAIR AND PRESERVATION OF FORT MARION, FLORIDA. 
I tif TMK ciiARC.K ny Maj. J. C. MAi.iJinv, Coups of Escisekhs 



rriTftios uf Boon!. 



THE BOARD OF EN0INEER8. 

of reports rpiniereil. Hi; personal inspect 



IK COMMABD, LiRDT. Col. W. R. King, Cqm-h op ENGiNBuits— 
loX WiIl«U Foln^ United Slatci Kngiiiccr Sibool, Uattnlioa of Eiiglneen, En- 
ffiirjif^ct, n; •Utement tff fa nilsi-nBti mates, 20, 



COSTESTR. 



BIVEB AXD HAliBOR IMI'ROVFJ(ZNTB. 



1 



Gkhekal n'*TEHEXT,nti^Ha,Tm«i:i| i.f orrrLs, nlaUliHlimrnt of tuulw 
namiDstioD of bfUa for bridgca, eoAittKritun i,T l>ri(l;:at smo* niivif[»lilt i 
■rfidractionB to naTipttimi, 21; M«b|>an<-y uid iiijuij of public nolle*, en 
diruJoM, Sonlh Pawef &e l li Mt »ip;ii Rttrr, ntn »nd nKnloticua lor I 



ATUNTIC COAST AM) GUI.F OP ilKXICO. 
Ik thf cbabgb of Ijbct. Cou Vwrr.it C. HaiXis <;om^ of ENGUiKiti»-~i 

St Croix Bivrt. Mr.. 23; LubM: Channel. «t-., Moonilin Bar, it«., Ptf«uii|' 
Mr., 2J; Namganjciit Biver. Meu, Lnrakimter rroin Mount Peoerl ts tWi 
Islauil. Me.,25; Baipdnn Rirer. M>-..L>A: tVnolMtcui UJTer. Ue., ST; Betb) 
bnr. Mr., Camdni H>rbor.MF.[39; Ifockport Hii(bor,M«'..K»(-klamt Harbv 
38; Krunrbrc Eiver. Me.. 90; Hana^pkct Biver. Wp,, 31; Portlaiitt UailMl 
»2; cbannrl in Back Cove. pBTtlaoil. Mr.. 33: Sara Rivrr. »«.,»: Keun 
Kii-rr. Me., York Harbor, H«., S; t'ortauiutitb narbur. N. II., Df^Umf 
N. H., 36; CocheroBirer, S.H.,Sr; liatbwr of rpfuKr at UttJ.- IlMbor.S.l 
ir craft obaltifttng or niuutigurJTigiuivigation^va 

In tbk cuarcx of Likct. Cou 8. H. Maxkfieij>. Coups or ExoiKicens-^ 

Krirbnr>-port Harbor, Maaa., UerrioMc River, Mnu.. 10; Pnnon Rirar, M« 

' IpHwich Rivrr, Mm*., barborofnnige, Snndy Itiiy, Cape Ann, Uboi., i3;0lai 

Harbor.MasB., 43; Manrbratcr Harbor, Mnu., Sakni Harbor, MascU; IJpl 

bor, Ha»., 45; WiDtbtoii Harbor, Miihh.. BimI'mi HiirWr, Mnw.. 4«; W*] 

Kjvrr, Uaas., Hingham Harbor, Haan.. ig; Ai-itiiate Ilurbor, )Imb., tA: liy 

Harbor, Maw., Wrllfleet Harbor, M=i*i.. 50; I'rt ' - ' '' 

liam Uorbur, Mass., 51. 

OK Capt. W. H. Bkbt, ( ..IIS..K 



Ilnrbor of rofiige nt Hfaunla, Man., 63; harbor at refbs* at HantMlwk 
Marthas Vini>van1 iunrr baibor at K<lgBrtoirn,Haaa.j03: Vineyard Bavaol 
Mow., Wnreliani Harbor, Maaa., 54 ; Sew Bedford Harbor, HaM» GS; m 
Harbor, Maw. 36; Tauntnti Kiver, Mass., 57; Fawtacket KiTer, K, I^j'BBi] 
(teller River and Narm^niiinelt Bay, R. I., remoFal of Qntn JaafcaC BboaE 
doiirc Rirer, K. I., al); Gre«nwicb Say, R. I., eore and iratetway ataxH 
HarlHii' Island, K. I.. 60; Niiir]>art Hartior, B. I., 61; barbor of ivAica af 
.TiuHlb. R. I.. U3; harbor of refiiffo at Block blandr B, I,, 8S; Pawntatk 
1{. I. mill ('oiin., 64 ; Lurbor of rciiige at Stoniugtmi, Conn,, nuBOvtiw itaM 
neit or vnitt obstructing or eudnngering navigation, fl5; azamviaUaa* a|| 
vr.v«,fi6. 

In THK ciiARciK okCoi_D. C. Houstom, Corps of £iiaiNKKKft— ' 

tlystie Itivrr. Ciitin.. Tlniuim Riror. Conn., 67; Conneoticut Kivor, Vhm mkt 
\i)*; lliick lolinxl Hurlmr. Conn,, 70; Clinton Harbor, Conn.yNew HWrcirS 
Conn.. 71; breakwater at New Haven, Cons., 72; Mllfbrd HarMrLC^^i^ 
tonie Itiver. Conn.. 7.*!; DriitRcport Harbor, Conn., 74; Black Bock HacbM^i 
Nnrwiilk llnrbiir, Conn.. 75; Wilsous FoUit Hnrbor, Conn., live H)I* SbH 
b..r. Conn., 7(i: Klamronl Harbor, Conn., Port Chestw Hnrbor, N. Y., 77:"^ 
itiunt H)ir1«>r. S. Y., Trt; Kebii llarlinr, Kpw Roebdle, N. Y., Eaat Cbertar J 
N v., 7)1; Grcininnl llarlw, N, Y., harbor at Port Jeffenion Inlet, H.l 
Hiiiitiii"t..n Uiirl.nr. N. Y.. HI ; (Jlen <'ovc Harbor. N. Y., Hnsbing Bar, K. ' 
Patihn;;iie Itiver, N. Y., Hr,.\vnB Creek, Sayville, N. Y., W- 

In nrKriiAimi'. Ill I-ii:ri. ('m.. ('. I- Ciii.i.HHriK, CciRPe okEngikkkhs— 

HiiiIhoii Kiver. X. V. ft : hiubur at Saiifiirlieji, N. Y., S6; harbor at Bondoat, 
87; Wni'l'inKer Creek. N, Y., Harlem Kiver, N. Y., 88; East Bivw and H^ 
K V <M; Niutcuvn Creek, N, Y., !tl; HitttGnuilk Channel, New- York B 
{fj; CowaniiH l!av. X. Y.. 9^; Ne» York ]fHrl.or, N. Y., 95; BarttRD Bu; 
HG; reiiii'viit;; Hiiiikeu venKi-ts ur erull obstruetiug or endan^riug navtgBBI 



k}IIGSESS > HOUSE OF EEPRE8EKTATIVE8, { Ex. Boc. U ' 
Bemnon. i j pt.a,vol.li: 



AMNUAL REPORT 

OF THB 

IHIEF OF ENGINEERS,] 

UNITED STATES ABMT. 



SECRETARY OF WAR, 

I THE YEAR 1892. 



L 



IS FOUR PABT6 AND ATtAS. 



PART III. 



WASHLNGTOK; 
GOTERNMEJir PRINTING OFFIOB. 



'■ 4' 



- /S^. 







f\ 




>lSrTENTS. 



I PART I. .' '■ 

'C .- OVFICEKa OP THB CORPB OF EKQINBEfiB. ' 

RpCian% olMiqtiB, MiadUritaHaB'ofiAMnafMTiWiS; olBc«n detaebad^l. 

fe; FOBTIFICATIOira. 

rifMl'l*" nmrn akd AixonmiTB, Barton Hkrbor, Hms., 4; Not York Harbor, K. 
E ir, S; WMUngtaa, D. C, T; Haapton Boad^ T*., 8«i FrweUoo, Harbor, Cn}., 
Kf ^'*»»| r caMMMtM, B; iltM flir fintiflmUoiu, 9. 

C* PBOTBcnOS OF SITE OF FOST NUOABA, NEW YORK. 

■ Ik TiiE CHABGE OF Capt. Dak C. Kinoman, Conra of Enuisekrs 12 

BEA WALL ASD EMBAXKMKKTAT DAVIDS ISLAND, KKW YOKK nARlJOK. 

Ix -niK CHAH«E OP Cou D, C. lIoUBTOS, Coups ok Escisbrhr 13 

SEA WALLS AT flOVEBXORS ISLAND, NEW YORK HARROR. 

Ix iiiK ciiABOE OF Col. D. C. nofsroN, Coiii-fl of Es'oishrks 13 

BEACH PBOTECTION, WATER SUPPLY, AND SEWERAOK SYSTEM AT FORT 
MONROE. VA. 

Jx TiiK CHARGE OF Maj. C'haa. E. L. B. Davis, Cuitrs mk EMiiNKKRS 11 

BEPAIR AXD PHE8ERVATI0N OF FORT MARIOK. FLOR[DA. 

ISI TMB CIIAKOK OF MaJ. J. C. HaI.LRRV, CoRPS OF KxdINKKttS 13 

ESTIMATES OF APPROPK1ATIOX8 FOR I'ORTIFK'ATIOXp' REQriRKD FOR 
lMP3-'94 15 

THE BOAR!) OF KXfllSEERS. 



K - CoxSTITl'TiON of Boanl, aiimmary of reports rcudertil, IG; }>prH(>iial hiB{ioctto 
'- ' iDkdfl, IT; additiouBl iliiticB of mem be I'm, IK 



r 



rOST OF WU,LETa POINT, NEW YORK.— l!XITEU STATES ENtilXKKE 
SCTHOOL,— BATTALION OF ENGTSEERS.-EXfi INKER DKl'OT. 



OwrtCKK IK coxMAint, Likot. Col. W. B. King, Com-s of KNO.rNKKiw— 
pMt »f WiUcta Point, United States Ent;1iircr S<!b«ol, Itnttiitlun of EiigincEni, E»- 
jlntrr Pepot, U| rtatement tff fands, estituaton, 20, 



Vf 



II 



COSTUklft. 



BIVEB AXD HJUU(« ixrs0vxxi3m. 



Oexckal statzvcxt. 
Clean iaatiMi of bill* for btid^OL 
olictnieliaiM to narijeiatiMi. 21: 
diTutoBSr Tfonth Fm» of the 
of canaU. 22. 



i^fny af paUie w<afe% cag 




ATLAXnC COAST AXD GIXF OF MEXICO. 



IV THE CHARGE OF LlEUT. COL. PETEE C. KmMSS^ CCWn OE £HGIX 



St. Croix Riv<^. Me.. 23; I.ob«c ChaRBcL Me.. Moosabee Bar. Me., Pie^aaBtl 
Me., 24; Nairagao^nis Biver. Me^ Uvakwater from Moant Deoert «a Poni 
iKlaud, M<>.,25: KaKadnce River. Me., 26: PnmbMot Biver. Me., 27; BeHM 
bor, Me., Camden Harbor. Me.. 28: Rockport Harbor, Me.. Boekland HarboiJ 
29; Keunebee River. Me.. 90: Harrasveket Biver. Me., 31: Fartlaiid. UarbaTji 
:{2; channel in Back Cove, t^rtland. Me.. 33: 8aeo River. Me., 34: Keai 
River, Me., York Harlior, Me., 35; Portamoath Harbor, N. H., BetbuDy 
N. H., 36; Cocheco River. X. H..37; harbor of refhee at Little Uarbar, N.; 
removing sunken vessels or craft obatmeiing or endangerlDg navigation, 
tiouti and sun'evs, 39. 

1i 

In THE cuAnoE OF Lieut. Col. S. M. Maxjifield, Cobps of EHonnEEU— | 



Kewbnryport HnHior, 3faaH., Merrimae River, Mass.. 10; Powow River, 
• Ipswich River, Mass., bnr1>or of refnge, Sandy Bav, Cape Ann, Maaa., 42; GHooi 
Ilarbor, Mass., 43; Manchester Harbor, Mass., Salem Harbor, Mass., 44; J^^, 
bor, Mass., 45; Winthrop Harbor, Mass., Boston Harbor, Maas., 46: w^yi 
Uivf% Mass., Hingham llartM>r, Mass., 48: Scitnate Harbor, Maaa., 4lO: Fm| 
Harbor, Mass., Welltlect Harbor, Mass., 60; Provincetown Harbor, MaaSi J 
liam Harbor, Mass., 51. -' 

'I 

In the CHAJtOK OF Capt. W. H. Hixdt, Corps of Enginexrh— 

Hnrbor of refuge at HyauuiS; Mass., 52; harbor of refuge at Nantucket, 1 
Marthas Vinoyurd iuiier harbor at Edgurtown, Mass., 53; vineyard Haven Ha 
MasM., Wareliaui Hnrbor, Mass., 54; New Bedford Harbor. Mass., 55; W«i 
Harbor, Maw, 545; Tauutou River, Mass., 57; Tawtucket Kiver, R, I..-58:'P 
douce Hivor and XniTagauKett Bay, R. I., removal of Green Jacket Slioal, f 
<lonro Kivcr, K. I., 59; Greenwich Bay, R. I., <-ovo aijd waterway near Co 
Harbor Island, K. I., 60; Newport Harlmr, R. I., 61; harbor of refuge at 1 
•ludith, It. I., 62; harbor of refnge at Block Island, B. I., 63; Pawcatuck I 
li. I. and (!onn., 64 ; harbor of refnge at Stonington, Conu., removing sonkev 
Hols or cratt obstructing or eudnngeriug navigatiou, 65 ; examjjiationa Ukd 
veys, 6t5. 

In tiik ciiAmJK of Col. D, C. Houston, Cokps of £nginkers— 

Mystir River. Conn., TliauiCH River. (;onn.,"67; Connecticut River, Mass. andO 
«W; Puck Inland Harbor, Conn., 70; Clinton Harbor, Conn., New Haven Ha 




lluutin-ton IhirlMM. \. Y SI; (ilcn Cove Harbor, N. Y., Fliislnng Bav, K 
I'atcliounc IxiMT. >. 1.. ItrowMH CnM'k. Sayvillt', N. Y.. Ki. * 

In line riiviaii i»i Ijkii. ('«»!.. (i. L. (iii.i.KsriF. Coki-s ok K.\<;im.:i:ks— 



. Y 



r^ Ojin. TiioMJtA 1.. Cawky. Coui's iir Exi 



iW; -r 

r, V. II 
1U6; ' 



mi- -i 

un- d 

'•y 1 



MjapiiiniM Inlfit, S. v., ('"■i"r-i" H'n . V V •.<": Slicrp»|i(^-' K^jy, J,", V., JO; ^ 

.Indnr KiS, X. T. nml N N I'hi,- . |. ,, ,., i '..■■,,,, smicii Iii .ml N>w J»r- 

■M. 101) Pmiuc Ri«r. N i ■ . : . , I,, ilfflj ray Blv«, V. 

.>.,RiritMltJ*«r, K.J.. ii'i - ■■ '' Kr\pnrt -jt, N. J.,-106; 

VatMlruiCTwIt.N. J.. In"., -I,.. >i H..i J..-r ,ir..| ■ ..r'ii,r,.i, CI*l^k, J., tjbrewkbary 

to'M.K.J.,l«; MamiMiuuii iiis,-., >, J,, !(.!>. 

h (H^ I'liitiuiK Of Maj. C. W. Raviuonp, Cospa or Ehwskbrs— 

|| Inaniffivi-r Ph. ainl>'- J., 110; linrbor botwueo Philwlelpbia Hu., und Ciunden, 
^ J., 113: tkliujlkill IHver Pa.. 113; ioe harbor «t Marciu Howk, Pa., 114; iPo 
r'.iiBt bfnJ iif Delaware llay, Del., couHtmitiim of iron jiier in LtnUwnm Bay, 
!>ii UVM, l>o).. 113; Delaware Bruiknnter, Del., 116; UaiK-orns River, N.J, ,117: '' 
UUwaf CTAok, N. J., ll»<; Slaarice Ilivir, N. J., removing Minkeii ve*M>lii <>r craft 
'li>ir«Dlld|| la riid-in^criug navigation, eiuminalion, II'J. i 

Iv Hf riuncK »r Wiuj**t F. Sjiitii, I'niteu Rtati.s Aowni, MA.ir<R .u Enqi- 
^tl^s, t*. S. Ahmv, Bktu«(I»— 

t^<iuvn;lon Unrbur, Del., 120; iti- Irn "■■■■[ -r N. ■■ i.'-n. i ■■ I , \ n i.iiiiinrilt ' 

i:"rt, 1)*1.. Sniyrua Hiver, Del., i, ■ ■ . '. ...(clldlii I 

INiFi, IM,, iiiLtnd waterwaj' rruiii I ' ■■ i. '. ■ I' i\ iitor I 

v.rlrfwM. DH., 123; Siwiiuthaiiiiii Kim i -.-'■•■ I'm ii. ■■■ . , ,,>■..,.. i ,, ;,,., .Mil., U 
^Ml]| &,M- Kiver. Md.. 134; Elk liis.-i. .\i4.. ii;.; I'...i;.-' i m . ;.. il.i., UI.e.lvr | 
'■■'n, Hd.. (>UR> Crumpton to Jonos LiiDilijig, t2G; Cliui'Unk Ki^ui', Mil., Catii' ' 

ip.lM Hariior. Md.. 127; Wicomico River, Md., 12*t; Mlowkin River, Md.. Oiiun- 
■L llartior, Va.. 129; bHibnr at Cape Cbarlca Cily. Vh., ami nMi 
'liiDlnD Intel, 130; removing siiuken vnauU or rroft obslrucling or miilani^eriiig 
n'vijniiDu, iT![BinitiationH and siirveye, 131. 

If IMK CIHRHi; OF C'H.. WlI.UAM P. CUAIGIIII.I,, CllltPS OF KMilNKK.Ifi— 

I'llil^io IfivL-r nud diauiiel ti> Ballimore, Md., 132; James Hiver, Vs., VM. 

I' IM lIlABlil'. IIF MAJ. CHAIItBS E. L, B. DaVIS, CORPS or EHUIKKKBH— 

tatmiiv River ut WMhington. D. C, 136: Potomae River at Mmiut Vernon, Va.. 
1»; OwiKinan Creek, vs., 139; Aiinia Creek, Va., 110; liarbor at Hrpton liny, 
InHiardten-o. Md., T>oniini Creeli, Va.,141; Potnxeut Itivor, Md.. 142; Ram.ghau- 
nwliBiier, Va., Urbana Creek, Va., 143; York Biver, Vn, 144; MattuiioBi Kiver, 
^■^ IJS; Pamnukcy River, Va^ exominalionfi and anrveyH, Uti, 

'""MiiAnes OF LiKVT. Enw, Bunn, Cours ok Enginkiihs— 

'i>'(>uiDf Norfolk, and its approaehes, Vo., 117; ap]iruaeh to Norfolk Harbor anil 
inrlniied Stnlrs (Norfolk) navy-yard lietweoii l^nibert Point and Fort Norfolk, 
1'!': Hampton Creek and Bai\ V«., Nrin«eniond River, V.i., I-tO; Cliic-knlioniiny 
n'lMjVii., 151; ArpomattoK River, Va., inland water roiitefioinNorfolk KarlKir, 
' I'l la Albemarle Sound, N. C, tliroiigu Currituck Sound, 152; North Landing 
Ki"r.Va,,attdN. C, IW. 

'' "IK crrAncK of Maj, W. p. ,Stantos, Cokps of Enoiskeks— 

' "I I lion River, Va.. 154; Roanoke River. N. C, 15.'i; Pnaqnotank River, N. C, 

ll|■U^s iriik. N.C, l.W; Oenwoke lujct, N. C, PixliinK Creek, N.C, 157; Pnm- 

['■■ ■■•:'■-■ i:;..., \. ('., Cnuteutnia Creek, N.C..1.Wi Trcnmivor.N.C., 1511; 

^'■' " ■ '■■■I. inland with'rway between Newberue and Hitanrorl, N. <'., 

1^' ^ ( ., IGI; julBDii waterway between Hciiufort Harbor .ind 

•» River, N. C, 182; Inland waterwtiy between New River and Swanaboro, 

■C, New River, N. C, 163; North East <Cape Fear) River. N. C, lllaek River, 

C, 161; Cape Fear River, N. C, above Wilmington. Capo Fear River, N. C, 

Wdbelow Wilmington, l«i; Lock woods Folly River N. C, 167; Vwlkiii River, 

:., harbor M GeorfEotown, 8. C, 168; Wiiiynw Ba.v. ». C., removing ennken 

-Mi M cnA obatra'cting «c cnAa(^;e^iug aavit;atioD,169. 



IV CONTENTS. 

In tue chargk of Capt. Frederic V. Abbot, Corps of Engineers^ 

Wjicrnmaw Kiver, N. C. and S. C, Tjiuibcr River, X. C. and S. C, 170; Little Pedi 
Kiver, S. C. (inat Ttdcp Kivrr, 8. C. Clark River, IS. C, Minpo Creek, S. C, 17] 
Saute.^ River. S. ('., Wateree River, S. C.', 172; Coiijraree River, S. C, Ckarleftlo 
Harbor. S. ('., 173: Ashley River, 8. C., WapiMM) Cut, S. C, Edi«to River, 8. C 
171; Salkaliafehie ]{iver, 8. C, l{eaufr»rt River, 8. C, removing sunken veSHels 4 
craft ohstriu'tinji or endangering navigation, 175. 

In Till-: cuAmiK of Capt. O. M. Cautkh, Coups ok Enoineers — 

« 

Savannah Ilarhor, CJa., 17o; Savannah River, (in., 176; Darien Harbor, Ga., AJti 
niaha River, (ia., 177; ^>eniiee River, (la., Oeinulgee River, Ga., 178; Branswic 
Ilarhor, (ia., .l«'kyl Creek. Ga., 17!>; Cnniherlund Sonnd, (ia. and Fla., reiDovii 
sunken vev^els or era ft onstrueting or endangering navigation, 180; exaininaiioi 
and Burveys, 181. 

In the c'iiai:ok of Ma.i. J. C. Mallerv, C(m:ps of Engineers — 

St. Johns River. Fla., 182; Orklawaha River, Fla., 183; Volusia Bar, Fla., 184; ha 
hor at iSt. Augustine, Fla., 18.">; northwest entrance, Key West Harbor, I'la., 18 
(■aloosahatehee Riv<*r, Fla.. ehannel of Charlotte harbor and Fease Creek, Fli 
187; Sarasota Hay. Fla., Manatee River. Fhi., 188; Tampa Hay, Fla., 180; With] 
eooehee Iwiver, Fla., 190; harhor at Cedar Keys. Fla., .Suwan^e River, Fla., 191. 

In the riiAR<;r <»f Capt. Piiiup M. Pjiice, Cokps of Kngixeeus — 

Ai)alarhie<da Bay, Fla., 192; Apalaohie<da River, Fla., 193; Flint River, Ga., 19 
Chattahooehee River, (ia.aud Ala., 195; Lagrange Bayou and Holmes River, Fli 
19(); Choetawhatehee River, Fla. and Ala., 197; harbor at Fcnsacola, Fla., IS 
Kseanibia and Coneeuh riv«Ts, Fla. and Ala., 199; Alabama River, Ala., 200; T< 
lapoosa River, Ala., 201; Coosa River, Ga. and Ala., 202; -operating oud care 
eanals and other works of navigation on Coo.'ta River, Ga. a-iid Ala., CnhabaKiTi 
Ala., 204. 

In tin: cnAitGK of Mai. A. N. Damhf.ll, ('oups of Engineers — 

Mobile Harbor, Ala., r.hiek Warrior River, Ala., from Tusealoosa to Daniela Crei 
20(1; Wjiirior and Tonibigliee rivers, Ala. and Miss., 207; Noxubee River, Mil 
Fasragoula River, Miss., 210; Chi<-kasahay liiver, Blnft' Creek, Mis8., Leaf Kiv 
Miss., 211; harbor at IJil()xi. Miss., IVarl River, Sliss.. below .laeksou, 212; P*. 
Ri vtr. Mi.-s., brt\\ een .Jackson and Carthage. 213; Fearl River, Miss., between £d 
burg and Carthage, Bognc Chitt(», La., 214. 

In the ( maimjI': oi Mai. ,Iami:s B. Qiinn, Corps of I^ngineer.s — 

Inspection of t lie iiuproveiuent of tlu* .South Pass of the MiB8i.ssip])i River, Chefiiii> 
River, and Ho^u** Falia, I^a., 21.5; Tiekfaw River and its tributaries, La., 2 
Amite River and I?ayou Man(ha<", La., Hav<ui Lafourche, La., 217; Bayou Tel 
bonne. La., B.iyou i'lafjueinine, La.. 218; Bayon Courtableau, La., 219; Uaj 
Tcehe. La.,inoMth and j»aNs«.'.s of Cabasien River. La., 220; harbor at 8abiue Pn 
Tex., 221; S.ibine bMver, 'r»»x.. Xeche.s KMver, Tex., 222; removing sunken vesself 
eraft obstructing or eiulangeriug navigation, examination, 223. 

In Tin: riiAKiii: <»i Capi. ,Fnii\ Mii.i.is. Coups ok K\(;ixeehs — 

Setiirin;; mouth of I>a\ou rhMjurniiue, I,a.. iVoni I'nrtlier caving, 2211; remov, 
sunken \e.sv»ls oi- < r;ift «»l>stru<ting or einlaugeiiug navigation in MissiH8i]>]>i Ri 
lielow New ( Mhaiis. \r,\., TJ\. 

In Tiir. I iiAmii: oi Mv.i. CuAiri.i.s.L Ai.m:n. Coi:i'< «»r Kn<;im:kr.s — 

Kutrauee to (Jalvi-.ston JhiilMn. Tex.. 2lM ; sliip eliannel in (Jjilveston Bay, Tex.. 2 
Tiiuit\ L'iver, '[v\., -J-Ji'*: Crdar ri:iy«Mi, Tex., hullalo Bayon, Tex., harbor at £ 
zos .Santiago, Tex., 2l.'7; exauiinatimis and surv«'y, 228. 



1 



wkstkhn rivers. 

L% TBT. cn*BnK fff Cii-r. J. II. Willard, Cimsw ki- HMiiKKKcn— 

Rnl KiT«r, L«. and Ark.. 229; B«l IJIvct nhove KiiHou, Ai-k.. 230; Ounrlilfa 
lllftrii rivn«, Atk. and Im., 231; Iln.Tou O'ArbniiDo, I/i., Ilnyuii Rnrtliuloniiiir. 
And Atk.. ZB; Uayon Bn-nf, I.n.,T«iiBtiii River mill ll.ivnii Mmim. J.n.. -za-. Iin 
Hondeiruy nml VI.UI. La., Big IWotk KivM, MUs., >" : lr-,>.. H-- -^ M - 

r.bnULiikc,MI«i..Tulkbo.lrlir!eRivpr.Misii..:ffl(5: m. . i. ■ \^ ~. . 

Hjyoa. Mw>.. SS7; Big RtwillowcT Itiver, Missa Hj- i ! 

lVrk*d Hour Itiver, T«nu., vraler-guiif!*H ou MisMv , , 

uibiitarim, 339; mirvey of Cyiirt-sii Bnyuu iiml tin- l.ik. ■••:■,•..:■. > ^ 

■imI SbtPYrpurt. La.. 'JU>. 

Is ttiit l'Uaucr or Capi, n. S. Taueh, Cunp.i or Es.iisKxiis— 

[C*iDA(lne olivtrnelioiiB in Arkansas Kiver, Ark«nssH Rivi-r. ^41 ; Foiiri'lii.' Lc V 
tirrr, Ark., I'etit Jenti River, Aik.,243i While Kiver, Ark., ('n<lit' Kimr. Ark., IMW ] 
l.i(ilo Ui-d Uifcr Ark.. Ulack Kivu, Ark. nnil Uo., 245; Bluik Kiv«T, Mu,, }<vl 
I'lsDcis Ulver, Ark., 246; St. Frauds RiTer, Mo„ Littla Uivoi;, Mt>., «xn»iliiDUMM 
oud •orroy, 247. . ' ' 

I\ T«»: cnAKGK OF M*j. A. M. UiixrR, Coups of ExciXKRitft— 

Rrmotii)); ma^ aad wrci'ka front Hiastitsippi Riv 
ifeo obio und lUinoiB river*, 349: hnrlior at gt. 
Mo., (.tvigF River, Mo., 251; Kaibuskia Blver, 111.. -J^i. 

Ts THB aiARAE OF Ma,i. a. Uacsknkii:, Cokps of ExOlXKKlIB— 



IX THR CIIARGR OP MaJ. W. A. JONKH, COttpa OP KKIil-VERIta— 

Miviuinpi Rivvr above -Fulls of SI. Aiitlionv, Minn., 256; rcaerroirH at liGiiii iviitcr» - 
or Hiwiaipiit River, 2ST; Cbippewa Elver, inrlndine Yellow UnlikD. ^ViK , 
£6; St. Croix Btver, Wis. 'and Minn.. £3»; Uinueeotn River, 3tiiiii., 2G0; R«I 
ttrrn uf llie North, MiDii. niid N. Dak., gxugiuc UiMiiAHippi Kiv«r at or wisu 
St. P«il, Minn., 2S1; einininatioii and survey, 2«3. 

In THB CnAROR OF Capt. Chas. F. PoWBLt., CoRPS OF EKniMitKns — 



r LiKL'T. Col. Hesjit M. Rodrrt, Cobps c 



Tenuinap Hirer above Cbatlanoogn. Tenn,. and l>clow B«e 'I'nv SlioalH, Ala., 200^ 
HiiwauM RivM', Teiin., SOT; Frencli Broad River, Tenn., aC3; ClimU River, IVun., 
iBB; CiimLerland Rifcr, T«Dn. and Ky., 270; C'aliev Fork River, Tenn., U72; 8ontIi 
FctkitrCiiiub^'land River, Ky., 373. 

W. GoKTRALS, Coups of ExciiNEKns— 




', "F Maj. Amos Sticknkv, Corps of Ekoin-kkiis — 

>; uprrutijiif anas I'outi on Obio River, operntini; niiil cnre nf Pavln 
^i Dam, Ohio River, 277; movable daui in Oliio River Iwlow nioiitli of I!«'avi-r 
fnr, Pa. UunoDgabeU River, .W. Va. and Fn., 278; oiierutiiij; and enrcofliK'kN 
^Jbaa Bo*. 8 and 0, MononRnLela River, pnrchase of liK'k and ilnni No. 7. Mo- 
jHpAcIa River, porrliaM of lork and dnm Ko, 6, ftlonnntcnlicln River, <'lieut 
J'Mr. Va., 2TO; AUegbaiiy River, Pa., datn nt Hcrr IslniKl, Allegheny River, 
'^XO; IcaliarliaBt month of Mnakiagiini River, Ohio, njiora ting and eaiv of 
SPM lock at month of HDahingDm River. Ohio, UnHkingiim Rtver, Ohio, 
^rVnUng awl can of tocka and (lama on Hi»kint;uio River, Ohio, 282. 



▼I ' CORTEim. 



In the chabok of Lieut. Col. O. J. Ltdbcckb. Cobps or 

Falte of the Ohio RiTer, Loauville, Kr., IndhuiA Chate^FalUioCtbeOhto lXtn£j 
opermtingand care of LoaisTille and Portlimd CanaL Ky., Wahaah fiivor. ImL^ 
Dl., 28i; White River, Ind., 2K. 

In TIIE CHARGE OF CuL. tClLLlAAi P. CRAIGBIU, GORPS OF EMOIMKSW— 

Great Kanawha Riv«-r, W. Va., 286; operatiug and eare of loeka and dnm or 
Kanawha River, W. Va.. Elk River, W. Va., 287: Ganley River, W. ya..S88il 
River. Va. and W. Va., 289. .3 

IX THE CUAItUE OF MaJ. D. W. LoCKWOOD, COBPS OF EXQlXEUtt— 

Trade water River, Ky.. opera tin/; awl keeiiing in repair loeks and daniR( 
Barren rivt-n. Ky., 290; Rough River, Ky,, Kentneky RiTCTy Ky., 291: opi 
and keeping in repair lock a and danui on Kentucky River, Ky., Lieklng 
Ky.. between Fanner)* and Went Liberty. 292; Big Sandy River, W. Va. aBi' 
Levi8a Fork. Big San<ly River. Ky.. 298; Tag Fork, Big Sandy Rlrer, W. Va^i 
Ky.,Giiyando(te River, W. Va..2HI; Little Kanawha River, W. Va., opnal 
keeping in repair the loek andtlani on Little Kanawha River, W. Va., BRek 
River, W. Va., 2a5. 

LAKE HARBORS AND RIVERS. 

In the charuk of Capt. W. L. Fisk. Cores of Exoxnebrs — 

Harbor at Grand Maraiti. Minn., harbor at Agate Bay, Minn., 296; harbor 4 
luth. Minn.. 297; harlmr at Superior Bay and St. Louis Bay, Wis., 28B';; 
ne6«ita Point, at $u|>erior. Wis., harbor at A:»hland, Wis., harbor at Ontiflfl 
Mich.. 299: Ea^rle Hari>or, Mich., harbor at Marquette, Mich., 300; harbor of i 
at Grand Marais, Mich., 901 ; examination and survey, 902. 

Ix THE charge of Maj. .Tames F. Grboory, Corps of Ekgixkrrs— 

Portage Lake and I^ke Su))erior canaK across Keweenaw Point, Mi6h^3Q9; 
iHtiqiie Harbor, Mich.. Cedar River Harbor, Mich.. 903: Menominee Harhor, ! 
and Wis.. Menomiuee River, Mich, and Wis.. 901; Oconto Harbor^ Wia^^ .1 
saukeo Harbor, Wis., 805: Green Bay Harbor, Wis., harbor of refuge atentif 
of Sturgeon Bay Canal. Wis.. 3(H>: Abna|>ee Harbor, Wis., 307; Kewanne6 
b<>r. Wis., TwoKiveis Harbor, Win.. 308: ManitowiH^ Harbor, Wis., Sheba 
Harbor, Wis.. 30i»; Port Washington Harbor, Wis.. 310; harbor of refnge at 
waiiktH) Bay. Wis., Milwaukee Harbor, Wu*,. 311: Racine Harbor, Wis., Ki 
Harbor. Wis., 312: Waukejjan Harl>or, 111.. 3VU Fox River, Wis.. 314; O] 
and care of links and dams on Fox River. Wis., 315. 



Is the ciiARiSE OK CArx. W. L. Marsiiai.u Corps of Engineers— 

Chicago HarlHir, 111.. 315: Caliunct Harbor. III.. 316: Calumet River, 111. and ll 
317; Illinois Kivcr, 111., 318: ttpcrating and care of Lagrange IjocV and Dafla/n 

IIOIS 



7; Illinois Kivcr, 111., 318: operating and care of Lagrange IjocV and DaiOf l| 
lis River, 111., 319; Illinois a lul Mississippi Canal. 33l>. . * 

In the CHAltOK OK Ma,I. Wn.IJAM Lt DI.OW, C<»RP8 OK ENlilNEERS— - V 

Petoskcy Harbor, Mich.. 31*1 : Charlevoix Harbor and entrance to Pine Lake, lAffi 
Frankfort Harbor, Miih., 322: harbor o\' n^fuge at Portage Lake, Mich., MaiiM 
Harb«»r. Mich.. ;^J3: l.iulin^toii Harbor, Mich., Pcntwater Harbor, Mich., i! 
White Kivor Hnrhor. Mith., Mu»kcj;»»n Harbor. Mich..;t>5: Grand Haven Haibl 
Mich., :tH»: llolhiiul Harbor. Mirh.. ;12T; San::atm-k Harb<^r, Mich.. Sonth Hav 
Harbor. Mirh.,:ii\s; St.JoMph Harbor, Mirh.. :52*»: St., b^seph Kivcr. Mich., Mid 
gall City Harbor, liul.. ;v50: oXiiiiiiiKition aiitl >urvcy. X^l. 

Ix THK niAinjK or Coi . (>. M. \\t\\ CoiiP'* ok Kni;inkh{s— 



^•1 
o,»^., ij.ii.M.t v.i lofujjo at Saiul lUarli. lake Hnn»ii. Miili,, IvT: lUack River 

l»ort Huroii. Mich., mouth o{' Hlark Kivor, Mich., :i:^»; St. (lair Flats i'aiial.Micl 

340; operating and ran' ot' M. Ihiir Flats I'anal. Mith.. riinton Kivcr. Mich., 31 

Grossc Pointo Channel. Mirh.. 312: Kouge lxi\ei\ Mioh.. IVtroit Kivcr. Mich., S4 

removing sunkeu vessels or rraft ol»structing or eudangcriiig navigation, 344. 



r 



CONTENTS. VII 



bniK CHARGE OF LiF.rT. CoL. Jauku a. S-MiTif. C'oKi'S OF Kn<?inki:i:-< — 

yimmeHarltor, Mich.. :U4; 'ruliMln II:irlini\ (iliio, :ijr»; Port Cliuton Ihirlmr. Ohio, 
^]tL«iky (*ity Hurhm-. f)hio, 'illi; ^iiiidiisky Jiivcr, Ohio, iliiroii Ilarhor, Ohio, 
M7; VrnuiI]iou Hurlmr. Ohio, 3-lS: Hhick Rivor Jlarbor. Ohio, ('hrvrJaiMl Ilnrhor, 
Ubiti. Ml*: Faiqiort Harbor. Ohio. :i'>0; Ashtabuhi Harbor, Ohio, :sr)l : miiovintr 
SDukfn ve!«fU'li» or craft obstnirtiii^ or «Miihiiigrriiij; iiuvi<{ati()n. cxHiniiiatioiiH aiiil 

b nV. CIlABiiK f»K Ma.I. K. H. KriKNKK, (.'OKI'S OF KX«JINKKI{S — 

. £rir HsrlMtr. Pa., 352; ])rrH«'rvatioii ami iirotcctioii of itciiiiiKiiIa at I^ri*.*((iiH* ThIo, 
yj» Hnrliur. Pa., lliiiilhirk Harbor, \. Y., ^^{; liuttalu Harbor. N. V., :r>i: Toua- 
[ yuhU Harbor and Niagara K*iv<'r, N. V.. Wilson Harbor. N. V., Xm: ( >h-ott Harbor, 
L K.Y.|Oak Orchard Harbor, N. y.,!i'>(i: cxaiuiiiatiou and survev, IdT. 

IxTBKruAKiiK OF CaiT. Dan ('. KiNtiMAN, C«»i{i'S ov Knoinki:i{s — 

■ Ckriottc Harbor, X. Y.. STiT; l*iiHiu'y%'ilb* Harbor, N. Y., liarbur at (in-at Sodiis Bay, 
.V.Y.,3ro<; harlior at Litth* sSodiiu Bnv, N. Y.,bT»lJ: Ohwcj^o Harbor, N. Y..JHK); har- 
fwntSai'ketts Harbor, X. Y., :«»!. 

I> THK fHAUiiK OK Ma.1. M. U. AhAMs, (Wiups «»K K.\<:ixi:i:iis — 

SlvuN bi'tweoii Sistor Islands and ('roKKovor Li^^ht) St. I.awrfn<o Kiver, X. Y., Oj(- 
ilrbhlMir;; Harbor. X. Y.. 1^2; break\vat«T at Koutse Point. La kt* C'bainjdain. X. Y., 
iinrtki Cliazv Rivi-r. X. Y., brt'akwatir at Gordon l^indin^;, Lako ('hani]>lain, Vt., 
W; Pbitshnr;; Harbor, X. Y., Hnrlini^ton Harbor, Vt.. :UM; Otter C'ret-k, Vt., 
TieoufK-ro;ra RivtT. X. Y., Narrows of Lake C'hani}dain, N. Y. and Vt., iUTi. 

PACIFIC COAST. 
Is TiiF, ciiAiaiK OF Col. ii, H.Mendkll, Coicrs of ExtiiNEKUri — 
CHikUnd Harbor, Cal., 3*r». 

Is Tin: rnAUiji; of Linrr. C<»i-. W. H. H. Bi:xyai'ki>, Coiirs df E.voinf.krs — 

Xap:i Rivi-r. Cal . linlwood Cn-jk. Cal.. :*»J7: San l.nis Obi>iM) Harbor. Cal.. AVilniing- 
t««ii iljrl'nr. (al., 'M'lS; San Oi<';;«» Harbor, Cal., 'M\): cxaiiiiiiation. 'MO. 

In iiJK CHAi.MiK «n- Ma.f. AV. H. Hktkk, Coi:i*s ok Kn(;im:i i:> — 

>3ij .Inaijriin Ifivj-r. Cal.. ilTO; Mokeluinnr liiver. Cal., Sarraiiimto and Ffatlier 
i:v.'rH, C.il., A'J: I'ctalnnia Cni-k. Cal.. Htimbohlt Ilarbt.r and i5a.v. Cal.. :;7:J. 

In nil. 1 HAUi.K or Cai-t. Thomas W. Svmons, Coi:i»s <»f Kn(;im:i:i:^— 

(.'•Nl'iiilr Kiver. ^)rej:oi), .'i7r»: (>ntraiic<- and harbor at Co«>s Hay, Orf;4oii. o7»): I'minpia 
Rixtrr, Mr«i:on. 1^77; nnnitli of Sinslaw Hivor. <)re«j«>u, harbor at Va(iuina Hay, 



. >*iioqnalniie rivrrs. Wash., 'M[i\ examinations and siirvi'xs, IJSl. 
Is THK cHAi:iiK oK Ma,i. TiioMAs H. HANhniiiY, Coiti'^ oK Kn«;in m:s — 

Montij oiCiihinibia b'ivcr. On*;;on and Wash.. .'isr»: conslnK tii»n nt* canal at the Cas- 
(»«ii-ii ('i)Iiinibi.-i HIvcr, Orc«;oii. :iXS: (\dnnibia and Low* r \\ illaniritc i i\ ii.n IkIow 
P'Ttluml. Orc^^nn. :{^!»; Williamcttc L'ivcr above Portland. Orc;;(iii, ."'.M ; (tn\lit/ 
IfiN^T, W'aNh., :>lrj; Yonn;;H and Klasknine risers, <)rr;;nn, ^au^m;; waleis ofCo- 
hniibia lii\er, nrcgon and Wa.sh.. examinations iind surveys, IJl'll. 

6CPKHVISIOX OK THK HAIMJoK or NKW VoKK I^IK"* 

MISSISSIPPI RIVEK COMMISSION .'AG 

MLSSOriH IflVKU COMMISSION Si«7 

HARHOK LINKS '^'Jl 



"^ 



Vin COXTEXTS. 



Fivo Mile River Harbor. Conn., Now York Hnrbor nnd its adjacent wstcTS^ AtteM 

River at WaHbin^rton, I). ('., 'MiH: Sontb Hrancli of Klixabcth River at jutt-^ 

Nort'dilk, \n.f San Pudro, \Vi]niin<|:ton Harbor, Cnl., Snu Diego Harbor and aoM 

>vatcrs. (*a]., Olyinpia Harbor, Vanconvor Harbor, and BeUlDjrUam Bay, Wa 

AVillaniettr Kivor at Porthuid, On'jjon, 31W>, 

BIMP(;iN(J NAVKiAMM-: WATKRS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

(I) Hri<l|j:c of <ity of Snoboniisb. AVaeb., nrross Snobomisb River, (2) bridgeaf 1 
b*y Street liailway Company across Ihnvaniihb River, iu Nertion 29, towadl^ 
noitli. ran<;e I ea\t, Wasbin^ton, (3) bridsrc of Cberry Island Marsh Coa^ 
across Brandy wine Creek at Wilniinj^ton, Ihil., (4) bridjre of Clatsop Gmi 
Ore^ron, across WnlluKki Itiver, (Ti) brid^'cs ofSnoboniisb, 8k3-konusli and Spsl 
Railway and Trans]tortation Conijiany across Snobomisb River, in nect{on'32,tf 
8bip 2\) nortb. r:in;::e o east. Wa>bin*>ton, and across Ebey Slougb, in sedlt 
township L'S north, ran^jo 7t east, Wjishinpfton, 400; (6) bridge of Litclifield,l 
rollton and Western Railroad Company acnisH Illinois River between CoImibI 
and Kampsvilb>, 111., (7) brid;;e of Nasbville, Chattanooga and St. LonisRalli 
('omjiany across TennesHco River at Jidnisonville, Tenn., (8) bridge of IJ 
County,' Wasiiiu^ton, across Cowlitz River at Toleilo, (9) bridge of Nav^ 
Railroad Company across Shrcwsbnry River at Higblund Beacli, N. J., (10}lMi 
of Delaware l^ailroad Com])any across Christiana River, Newcastle County, B 
101 ; ( 11; bri(1;(e ot'LimestoneConnty, Ala.. ncro.sA Elk River at Elk River MilUiyJ 
bridge of board ot ]>ark commissioners of Boston, Mass., acroM» navigable VI 
way between I>oat<»n an<l Castlo Island, (13) bridge of Oregouian Railroad 
pany across Vamhill Riv(>r. near Lafayette, Oregon, (14) bridge of Ocenn Spil 
Bridge Coni]>:)ny across main cliMnnel of Fort Bayon at Ocean Springs, Mis>.|| 
lindge of Lake Shori5 and Michigan Sonlheru Railway Conifiany acroes Hi 
River at Hnron. (Hiio, (1(») brid;;eof Milwankce, Lake Shore and Weatem Saib 
Com]iany a«"ross Sin-hoygaii River at Sheboygan, Wis., (17) bridge of city di, 
bany, Ongon, across Wiilanntte River, 402; (18) bridge of Sonth Twenty-Mi 
Street Bridge Comj)any across Monongabela River at I'ittsbnrg, Pa., (19) bri 
orSii])erior Belt Lin^' and Terminal Railway (^onipany across St. Louis Kirer,1 
consin and Minnesota, (20) bridge of Nortb River Bridge Company across Hal 
RiviT at New York (.'ity, (21 ) bridge of Lake Shore and Michigan Southern R 
way Comi)any a<Toss S;nidusky Bay, Ohio. (22) bridge of Chicago, MilwU 
and St. i'anl I»aihvay Company across Portage Canal near Portage City, ^ 
iXi} l»rid;;e of city oi' ()^ljkt)sli. Wis., across Fox River. 40.S; (24) bridge of < 
of Manitnwoe, Wis., across Manitowoc River, (2")) bridge of Wulikiak 
County, Wasli., a<io.ss Alger Sbnigh, (2(>) bridge of MilwaukeCt Lake 81 
and WestiTii Railway Company aeross Wcdf Iviver at New London, Wis., ( 
hridgi- id" riymnnth Jind Banifslable counties. Mass., across Cohasset Xaw 
hetween toNMH of Warcham and Ihmrne, {2S) bridge of Cliicago, Milwaa 
and St. I'anl Railway Com|)any across Cliii)pewa River near Red Cellar, W 
('2!>i hrid^'e nf Kenton Connty and Campbell (-onnty Bridge Company ad 
Lirkini: K'ivir between New]»ort and (Covington, Ky., (30) bridge of Ski 
County, Wa^li., at TOSS SwinomJNh Slough, 401 ; (81) bri<lge of Wasbington 1 
(.'licsapeaKe I'leaeh Rail way (.'om])any aeross Patuxent River at Mount Calvert, H 
i'.i'J) bridj^c (d" Wa^liinuton and .\rlington Railway Company across Potomac IU 
at the '• rinej- Sistiis" near Washington. 1). C. (lilJ) bridge of Leavenworth J 
Platte Count \ l»i id;ie C(Mnj)an\ a<ross Missouri River at J-eavcnwortli, Knnfl., I 
luidge of Wanen (niiuty. Miss.. aer(»ss Big Black River at Baldwin Ferry, I 
hrid^e of Sagadahoc County, .Me., across Atkins Bay, Kennebec River at Phil 
burir. (lUlj liridge of chelialis County, Wash., across Cbehaliw River at tboEll 
Rillle. 10.1; (M7) teiu]»orary and ])ernianent bridges of New York Central atidH 
.son liiver b'ailroad Coiujiany across llarlem River at New York City, (38) brirtg 
Land ;iihI li'iv« t Imiunveiiient Company of KNerett across Sncdiomish Rivera! E' 
ett. Wa^h.. .:;;») luido,. tjf ijty of Chica;;**. 111., aeross West Fork of South lira 
of (■hira;i(» Ki\er. (1(1) tenipoiary fncithridgi' of Messrs. Hugh N.Camp nnd D 
Seylnl aeross Marhiii River at New Ynrk City. (41 ) temporary bridge of citj 
New \i)ik a« rnsN ilarl»ni h'iver. ( liM hridg*' of (he Macon, Dublin and Savan 
Railriiad C»ini]»any a«ross <)<innl;:ee K'iver at Mae<»n, (ia.. 100, (43) bridge of tl 
of Mill»ridLre, Me.. a<rnss Narranuagns River. (II) l»ridge of t-nited Railn»ad 
Wa^]iiri;;ton aen-ss South Arm <»f Willa]>a b'nt-r. Wa.sh., (45) bridge of citj 
Biistnii, Mass.. aeio^s CJiarles River, ( ijj^ hri<l«::e of Jacksonville, Tampa anil 1 
West Railway ComiJany aerci-^.s St. .lolins K*i\er at Butfalo JilulL Pla.. (47) bri 
of iJalve.ston County, lex., acrosvi West Bay, (4S) bridge of Skagit Connty, Wa 
across Skagit River at Mount Vernon. ( llh hriilge of Cincinnati and Covinj 
Rapid Transit Bridge Company across Ohio Ri\er between Coviu4j;ton, Ky.| 



i.Ofcla, iaO) tiHdffc of Bt. Paul. MlniimpnliN huiI MHiifloba Ral]irn.v 
|*a<nm Snnliuiniiili lUvar ni'ur t^niilioaiUh Cil), Wtihh,, ioT: (nil <<i'ic1|^- 
fbcoy Itriiljrr (oiiiiiriHy ucruM Alleelii>uy Uhn at I'llt-Liira. i'li.. likai 

i|\V I ■ ! I i .MKii 1 , \\'iiBb..a<MutuiKi>'>kB«rk River -il r i-rS "..!■ i.-i.l-;u 

u.., ■.\ , ;, , iivruMiNoDkiuKk RivnrHt Lyu.li i . ■ , ,.i M- 

jii.' I. ■■. ■••!{ I'uimiauy aeruBs Tiir Rivi-r .j( . :■ ^ i v.i 

'f K .1 i: ^. • lir;;:iii l(»i|w!l.» ('iHT)iiniij' acrriM.i !■. i f. . i i , i .. , . 1 1.. 

\\. '..L.. i.-i ■■• liip-'c-n Itri.ii-- Coiupnny :ilh..-- iL>.i„:..Mi;!L.iiv 

iBoiion.l'i ' ill I 'i. ii-.i:- r^iiiity, WiiBli., iiLruv. MiJiili H)i>, 

W.botwi^'ii I ■■ ■ . i .., ■■■-; iTrftj liridge of Woil>!lii;l'ii., .\l- 

honilltoiit:' \ ■ ■ il ■::-.■■. I <>iii]iiiuy arruM tliinliii;: Cnck ni 

(rlB, Vi... ; . iifv, Ti%., a.toiii Iliuim.j. Huioii 

"■"'■■"■ I'- ■.-■I.:.: "ii ^i.ii, •cmMWiiiaiiiRiiti 



I Kewnunec, Wis., ([QJ hrhlj;* at i^ity o 

iljte uf city of MJlwniikvc, Win., arroik - ^ ■ 

•( city of Ihilolh, Minu., acnisa canal nt i-iitrancr »f Uiilutli ifMrlxT, 410. 

BRIDUES OBSTKHCTING NAVIGATION. 

J WiiljTP ^irroBii K<'iilucliy Itivcr nt Fraukf"rl. Ky., lU 

''.. I ..-.SI. JoBHpli River, .Mi.' i 

■"!■■■ 1 I. V. (.',, (5i liicliway ItrhL . 

ni :: Ml|i;l1 HffllM Newtown Id 

iiv:i\ I.I lil^. 1,11'. cfiSiiiniwii Hivw nl nm-,.ri : \\ i , 
frerk :.t (;:iiiia..n. N. .1., (8) tJiUfiwI bri.lL'c !ici-..s^ Com 
, Wasli.. (10) railiiond1iriilK«ai'roBallii(r:ilo Hiiynn lit 1' 
J liriil^ri acniM DuSiilo Kayuii nt Hniialoii, Tux., 41^. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 
WASHINGTON AQUEDUCT. 
' LiKCT. Col. Gforqe H, Eluot, Conps of EsoixETtns — 



■AR<iB OP Cou O. II. EnNST, Major, Corps of Enoi.vkrrh iiS 

tBVEV OF THE NORTHERN AND N0ETHWE8TERN LAKES. 

uwl ilistribiition of charta' snrrey of St. Horys River from Wliito KIbIi Dny 
u licht-lioiiHe, 410; HlioalK off PeUa Spit liglit-UoiiBe ami Littles Point, 
ria, wuverly Shoal, L:ike Erie, sIioaU in St. Laurence River, it iacliivrtrca 
ara River, aiirvey of lake front at Chiciifio, 111., RIack Creek Sbiinl, Luke 
, 430; pstiinatea, 421 ; nntcr levolH, fli. 



V U*J. Wiu.iAM A. JON-KS, Conrn oi' Esci 
MILITARY AND OTHER MAPS.. 



k 



<-^.., 



X CONTENTS. 



RECONNAISSANCES AND EXPLORATIONS. 

Offickrs on duty at headquarters of military departuieuts, operations in Den 
uient of tbo Missouri, Dopartnicut of tho Columbia, Department of tho Fu 
Department of California, 424. * 

ESTIMATKS FOR AMOUNTS REQUIRED FOR SURVEYS AND RECONNi 
SANCES IN MILITARY DEPARTMENTS, AND FOR MAPS, INCLUSlVBj 

WAR MAPS :j 

■1 

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS. "^ 

Officers in charj^e of divisions, 425. J 



»> 



STATEMENT SHOWING RANK AND DUTIES OF OFFICERS OF THE COJ 
OF ENGINEERS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 18«2.; 



FOIiTIFIOATlONS, KTO. 
APPENDIX No. I. 

REPORT OF CAPT. DAN C. KINGMAN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS, j 

PiuvriXTiox of site of Fort Niagara, N. Y., 453. 

* • 

APPENDIX No. 2. : 

REPORT OF COL. D. C. HOl'STON, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvkmkn'ts. — Sea wall and enihanknuMit at Davids Island, New York Haf' 
457; .s«'a walls nn (iovonioi-s Island, New York Harbor, 4G1. 

APPENDIX No. 3. 

REPORT OF MA.T. CHA.S. K. L. B. DAVIS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS, 

Impiiovkmknts. — Hcarh protection at Fort Monroe. Ya., 465; water snpply at J 
Monroe, Va., 467; sewerage system at Fort Monroe, Va., 468. 

APPENDIX No. 4. 

REPORT OF MAJ. J. C. MALLERY. CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
RKrAiK and prewrvation of Fort Marion, St. Augnstiiie, Fla., 471. 

APPENDIX Xo. 5. 

RKPORT OF MKIT. COL. W. R. KING, CORl'S OF KNGINEERS. 

Post ol' \Vill<ts Point. N. Y., I7i>; Tinted States Engineer School, 474; Battalioi 
Kn^iiiotrs, 47.'i; l'.ii«^iiieer depot. 47i); exjxiiments, 481 ; statement of fnnds, 4 
new appropriations. 4^:^; estimates, 4Si. Api>endi\es: A, i)r()»iframnieof stndy I 
in.stnutioii lor winter season. 484 ; B, instnietion of enliste<l men in niecliani 
tra<les,4S7; (', i)n»<;ranniie of study and instrmtion for Huninier season, 487^ 
te.st8 of stone, 490; K, tests of wire roi>o, 19L 



CONTEXTS. 



XI 



EIVERS AND HARHUKS, ETC. 

APPENDIX A. 

R£P<»ET OF LlEl'T. COL. PKTKK C. HAINS. CORPS OF KN<;LNI:KI£S. 

iurtujVKMKN rs. — St. Croix. Kivi>r. Me.. 494 : Liilit-r (iiaiincl. Mp., 4J»."h Mtios.-ilite liar, 
Me.,4t*6: Ph-asniit Ri\er. Me.. 4H8; Narni'^uajLjus Riwr, Me..4l»?<; bivakwatei IVom 




Fortlajii!. Mi-.. 5'J»»; Siiro River. Mo., ."»2l; K«Mnif)Miiik River, Me.. ."124: Vork Hai- 
Uor. M»-.. r»,rH-. PortMiitMitli Harbor, N. H., ."i^T: Bellamy River, \. H.. .*i28; C'oehe.u 
River. N. H., .VJll; harbor <»f reliij;e at Little llarbur, N. H., ri31 ; removing; 
ruiiikeii ves'»i.-U or «-rut't t>b}it-riu'tin<; or eiiilaii^eriii^ navigation, WX^. 
E\AMiv\in»Ns AM> SntVEY.s. — I'enobsrot River. Me.. TiSi; Kenncbee River. Me., 
from Watc-rviUe to <«traiiibnat wbarf at Augusta, 54 L 

APPENDIX n. 

KKPoRr t»K LIKrr. (M>L. S. M. MANSFIKLl), CORPS OF KNiiLNKKRS. 

luputivi: MKX'i^. — Nc'wbiiryport Harbor, Mass., ."iSl ; Merriniai: River, Ma>f<.. r>.Vl ; 
Pn'AtV.v Kiv»-r. Mass.. ."k)|J; Ijwwieh Ri\er. Ma?*.s., .'mT; harbor of refuge, San«l\ r»a\ . 
(■jqM- Ann. M:iHs.. 5.^: (Jbmce.ster Ihirbor, Ma.M.«t.. 5i)tJ; Manehe.ster Harbor. Ma-^^s.. 
j*>.-*: Salem Harbor, Mass., 570; Lyiiu Harbor. Muss., 572; Winthrop Harbor. Ma>s., 
mX: Ho^ti»n Harbrir. MasH. ."w.^: Weymouth River, Mass.. ;V<i; Hingliam Harbor. 
Ml-**.. -'!*."•: Seituate Harbor. .\Ius.s., ."iHii: ]'lymoiith Harlmr. Mass., .V<S; Wellllfet 
IIiii^.M. M;i^^.. ."I'l ; i'rovjncetowu Harbor, Mas>., 51KJ: ('hatbani Harbiir, Ma«.s., 

APPENDIX r. 

Ri:r«»RT «»r capt. \v. h. iuxuv. corps of kn(;im:i:rs. 

1^1' i: •% i.M».N r>. — Harbor of rrfnge at Hyaimi<. Ma>s.. 51*?^; barbt)r of ii'lnix** at 
N .Msf k'-t, M;i.S"'.. liHi: Martlia-S \ineyanl. inner liarbor at I'.<l«j:arti»\vn. .\IasH., \\\vj.\ 
Vii..-\,4ril H.iMii Harbor, Mass.. liiU ; Warehaiii Harbor. M.i>s.. i»n7: New iiiMlfoid 
Km-ior. M:i6^. .•;!«•: \V»^>fiMirt Harbor. Ma>'i.. JJIJ: Taunton K*iv»r. Ma-»s., Hi:?: i'aw- 
Tii. ki;t River. \\. I., ♦)!♦>; ]'n»viil.Mi<'e River ami Narra^ansett liay. R. I.. iil«; i»-- 
■■UM'.:»1 ••: lirtM-n .Faik<-t Slioal. Piovi(b-nee River. R. I.. H21 ; ( Jr«M«nN\ i«li ii.iy. W. I.. 
\yL\\ I ov. a!nl w.iter way ni*ar ('oa>t«*r ]Iar))or Isbind. R. L. \\1\\ Niwikort Hai 
■'-'".. l;. I. t;j.'»: liarbor of n-fiiL-e jil l*oint .Iiulilli. R. I., bl'S; harbor nf i«.fn;:«- at 
li'.o- K Is!:i:i<l, R. I,. <'►:•»: I*a'.vratn<:k Rivi-r. R. I. and Conn.. il:>!»; liarboidf n-fuiie 
•t Srni.iij;^to:i. Comi.. i»M"»: removin;^ sunken vt-^seli or eraft olistriniini; oi- i-n- 
'lAtii. 1 lui: in\ ii;iiTioii, uriT. 
Ij^v vMi^Aii'iN-* a.Mj .<i i:vi.v>. — Mrnein-'ha Ui^bt. Mans.. (112: C.-inainisit CIi;iiim«I, 
Ml.*?.. li'-VAe-Mi the i>*]aiHls of Ciittvbnnk ami .Na-^liawena. »»lo. 



AIM»EN1)IX I). 

Ri:i'«>Rr np coi.. H. ('. HorsToN. CORPS OF r.N<iiNr:i:b*s. 

Imi'K.iv j.Mi \i-. — Mvstir River, Ct»nn.. J»5(»: Th.imes RJNt-r. Cmm.. «»."»2: C.Mnn'rti- 
'■':i Ki.'-r. Ma-s. ami Conn.. »J,'»«»: liarhor of rrt'nii<' at Durk Nland Haiboi. Cimii., \\y\\\ 
' i:.::"!! HulHir. Colin.. (U!7: New Haven Harbiu", Conn., •U)i*<; brfakwati-r^ at N«'a 
ll;iv»::i. Coim.. »i7:5; Millni«l Harbor. Conn., «)77: Honsatonic K*i\er. Cinifi.. •■•^<'; 
l»i-:'i^'L|n,rt H.irbnr, Conn . ♦>s."'»: P.lark Rork Harbor, Ci»nn., Jls'.i; Noiwalk Haiboi. 
^ "Jill.. iHC; liarlinr at Wilsons Point. C«»nn., »»!•."»; Five-Mile Ri\ei Ibnbor, ( •»nn.. 
**7: .<r;inifoi(| Harbor. Conn., (*,««!: i*ort Cluster Harbor, \. V., 702: Karebmont 
H;irli.»r. N. V.. 1\\\\ Kebo Harbor. New KNuln-lb-. N. V.. 7<mJ: Ka-t Chester Cn-tk. \. 
V.,7iw; (;i,.iMiport Harbor, \. v., 711 : Port .letb-rson Harbor, N. Y., 71:5: Hnntinuiou 
HtW. \. Y.. 717: (ilenCove Harbt.r, X. V.. 72o; Flushing I5av. N. Y.,722; Patrbngue 
'<».;r.\. v., 724 : Hrowns Cnek, Say\ ille, N. Y., 727. 

if.*KBou LiNK5i. — Five-Mile iiiver Harbi»r. Conn., 730. 




.APPESDK B. 

REPORT OF I-IECT. COL. O. L. GILLESPIElCORPS OF EXGIKBE] 

iNrkovKMKXTS.— HnilHui Kivtv.N.Y;,m; hK^wrotB 
at RmiiIouI. S. Y.. 773; W«|>piii|[w Crerk, If, T„ T^**-" 
RiV(TauaiIclUi«h-,N.Y,.nT; Iiewl«wii Cr * 

Nmt Ynrk Ilariwr. 814 ; liovwina B^j, Red H- . _ 

thaBBcUN>w York Harbor, X.Y„8IT; New York E , ^ 

N..I..IIXI: RtDuTing Minkva vmeki at erkft obatmotine iir4> 
tinn,KM . , . 

ExAMiNAtiiiK Axn SrKVET.— For cual from JamaiM Baj to I 
X.Y..(U«. 

HAitBttR Links.— Xi'ir Ynrk Harbor and ita adjacent water*, tU9. 

APPESOrX F. 

RF.P»»RT OF CAPT. THOS. L.' CASEY, CORPS OF ESGIN'EKRS. ■ 

iMPRiiVKMKXTji.— !^im]u<nrM)n* Intrt. X. Y.,863; Caiiar«i« Baj, \. Y-WHi; ^ 
lieaaitay. X. Y., Wd: AnUur Kill. X. Y. andH. J.,8Ba; ciaiiii<-l betwopiil 
IkImuI anil Xf «r J^rwA-. rCI : Poaxair Kim, N. J.,8T3i EliKnl>« ' "* " 
RNhnay KivM.N. J..te«>: Karitaii Riv«r. X. J.,W1; Snntii Kiv 
piirtHarlHir.N..l..t«U: Mattawaa Crtvk. X. ,)., 8M; Sfaoal Ihi 
n»ek.N..I..»«i; 5Ut*««boi>- Riwr.X. J^eW; Uanaaqiui) Kiv 

APPENDIX O. 

KF.r<'>HT OF M-U. C. W. KAY^OXD, CORPS OF EXGIXEEBS.'! 



1- harliir »t hMil M'TVIairapp tlar. drl., Si 

ILiv, iipar l^vM, Itrl.. <<il ; Dtlawarv Breakwater, B 

L.kVi; .Mloway l'iwk.N.,l..iW(: Mauript- Rivw.W. i 
(■ttsi-lM or rmO )>li*triii'iinx iv roilaii;ceriii([ navigation, 1 
>rliiir)>oriifrofup>ii<'aTiii%>»lliof Urlaware Bay, HI. 

APPKXniX IL 



iiMTMrsrs,— WilmiiiulKii H.irlHT. lVl..!Mti: in- harhor al Xftw I 
: .V|<|H>.iuitiuiiiiii)). Rivi'T. IV1.. itrxt: Smyrna Rirrr, Del., 961; ." 
I.. !>.V>-. Itritiilkilii Ki\<T. IVI.. ;C>r>: infanit waterway Ron C 

III IV'l;(H;in- |t;i\. at or iii-nT U'Wf.-, Del., AX: SfiMarJianna BiTC 
,.u ll.iM-i)vi;rin'. Mil.. !^«i: XiTTh r.:i«i Ktv.t. Ma..»{7; EIkRir«r,| 



Cl...,.'^ 



u.kin II 



,-i\ M.l. 



. M.l ,!'T< 



,973: 
. . 977; 



,,. lliv;,' a. ».r.i..-. M.i. 

r ,\ i: r 1 1 . 
ArrrM>i\ i. 
r 1 Kvi.inn.i . corn's of F.NGiXF.t:RS. 

•I .111.1 .ii) I'-.o'i t» lUliimiiTv.Mtl.. !(«»: JaneaB 



i 



C0XTEKT8. 



ZIII 



APPENDIX J. 

lEPORT OF MAJ. CHARLES K. L. B. DAVIS, CORPS OK EXCilXEKKS. 

lOVEMKNT?*. — IVitoiii.'K* RiviT Jit W.isli ill jitiiu. !).('., in:{<»; I*.»toiii;ir KiviT ai Mt. 
^mnn. Vs»., la-W: ()iTrM(iiaii Cr»vk, Va.. lo:Ji»; Aniiia ('r«M'k, Va.. 1012: h:irlM»r a! 
vtnu B.iy', Md., Irtl"!; Xomiiii ('P*ck, Va.. 10I7; Pafiixcnt Riv«»r, .\M.. hiVJ: K'.-ij,. 
luiiiTiiii-k River. Va.. 10.V>; rrhaiia Cn't-k. Va.. !(».'» J; Vork RiNrr. Va., IiThj: Mat- 
|Mmi RivtT. Vn„ lOofi: Pa]iiiiiik«\v Ri\ rr. Va.. KVil'. 

MiVATioN:* AM> ScuvEYs, — Ka«*li'!n Hraiidi III' INitDiiiar RiviT CAiiacostia Rivitj. 
til: Potomac; Uiwr, V;i. nml M«l.. liH'»: lor luv:ik\vat«T t«» I'lu'in liarUiU- of ri'rii«;M 
l.>iinh.-ivi*n Bay. in-ar (.'apo H«*iiry. Va., I'lTH. 
:Bor. LiNr>. — Aiiacostia River at Wasliiijjjtim. D. C, K'Tl). 

APPENDIX K. 

KKPoirr «>F LIKIT. Ef)\V. lU.'RR. CnlM'S OK KXCilNKKFiS. 

RtiVKMKVTf*. — narl»»r dt'Norfiilk ami it^ a|»proa«'ln"*. Va.. Hi>ir>: approarh to \nr- 
lik H.ir^'ir and th*- Knit'-d Stat**?* navy-yard at Nnrlolk, \'a.. Uix'.i: Haiiipton 
rifk awd Bar. Va.. 1<K»: Naiisi'in>>iid liivur. Va.. 11>1M»: Cliifkalioininy Ii'ivri", Va., 
e«l: .\ppitiiiaTr<»x Riv»T, Va.. UfXi; iiilaml watt^r roiiti' fnnii Nnrfnlk HarlMir. Va.. 
f Al*uMiiarl»' Stiiind. N. C throii«fh rniTitiirk Sniiiid. HUM: Nortii I^aiidin!; Ifivi-r, 
a. and \. «'., H>9»k 
ui5'»K Li\i>. — Soiifli Hrani'li ulKlizaltrMi Rivi-r at iiavy-yanl. Nort'nlk, Va., 10I»7. 

APPKXDIX L. 

KKPORT OK M\J. W. S. STANTON. (.OlfPS OK KNCilNKKliS. 

r-i'M'Mrs I-.— St:iiiiit'»ii IJivrr. V:i., Kr.in; K'oimok.' KMvtT, N. ('., lin:',: r;i^.|iiii. 
Mill: U ■■ . T, \. «'.. nil : M.M-k. \N ('KM-k. N. «'., lli:5: t )rr;ir..ki- Inl.i. N. C. 111.'.: 
Y\'\: j,_M Mil.. N. r.. HIT: l';milii «» .mhI lar K'iviT. N. ('., 1 1 1*<: rnninit iii:i ( M < K. 
N i , llj:;: ri.:ir Kiv.r. N. C. llLTi: VniN.- Kiv.-r. N. <'.. 11L»<): inl.nni wjiin \\ :i\ 

■■-.v \#.w |;.ru-.i!i.l I5:Miiti.it. N'.C. ll.U: Ii:nl.ni- at lIiMiiinit. N.c.. n::T: isi- 

l.i\''. V iTir-A.r.- h. t .vi-rii Il-Miitor: ll.iilmr ainl Nrw li'iviT. N. i'.. 1111: waiii w .ly 

•■• \' \v K'ivi'] Mini **\\;his!miiii. N.C. lll»i: Nrw 1,'iviT. N.C. lll!»: Nnitli 

Ki«: t n... j-,..,. . \i\s,.r, N.C. ll.'.J: i'.l.nk h'iv.r. N. C. lir.l : Cm p.- I'.-ir i;i\ri. N. 
' '''•■■• 'A il:ii!ii:;rnii. Jl'i-*; TMpc !'• ar K'ivtT, N". ( .. Mt ami iM-inw WilniiiiLriiMi. 
\'*'»: I.' . k'AtH.iN Kolly L'iv«-r. N. (J.. 1177: Va»l)iin Ii*i\ri. N. C. ll.*^l: Inn inn- mI 
'i ■ 'Fj* !ii-.\:.. >.{'.. ll'^U: \Vin.\M\v Hay, S. ("., 11>H: r<ino\in;; ^unkrn vih>.|s nr 
•r i:* ■ii'-'::ii riUi^ "iv «.Mid:ni;;i I ini^ iim\ i;;Mt ion. lliM. 

aimm:m)IX m. 

kki'«>i:j nr iwr. kim:ih:i:i(' v. Ardwrr. coim's ok knuiniikk's. 

Lmi!. -'. ■ M! NI-,— \\ a, caiM.r.v KM vrr. \. < '. Mhd S. ('.. 1 i:»r>; Ijimln-i K*:'.«m. \. C. MMil 
••*? ' A'.'.O: LiiTl. IV.l.r llivfv. >. ('.. IL'OI: Cn-at I'.-d.-r \:\mv. s. C. 12«»;:: ( laik 
'■••I.V r ij(,.;. Mhii^,, Ci. ,k, S. ('.. l-*'"<: SM'it'-.' K'utM. >. ('.. IJll: Waiirii- 
K-*'-. ^.r.. r_'] I ; r.,iii:aitM' K'iv.T. >.('.. rJ17: IiuiImu- at rii.iilisiun. S. i .. Il'1'.«: 
■V>:ii.'. Ni.. :. S. «■.. |-Jl':i: WMjip.i.i ( •iii. >.('.. IlMI : i:.li-i«» Ixiv.-i-.S. {'.. \'j:v:,; Sal 
t.»:iiN"!.». I.'; v.T. >.('.. li'.;:.; l;.Miir.»il K'lvir. S.C. r..' ;s; nMno-.in-^ siiiikm v.-.>^<U 
•>r « : it' ti'.i^nni't iiii: or imlauii'-rin;! na viualinn. iL'p). 

APPKNDIX N. 



!:;:i''WM •»)' cArr. o. m. cAurKR. coiips of i:N(;i\i:i:i:s. 

\y---'.-'-- n \ I -.— <a\anM.ih II iil»or. <;a.. \'J\:\: SMvannali l«*i\ rr. < la.. TJ.VJ: D.niru 
H-.:-..r i..|,. 1J.".7: Ali mialia K'ivfr. <;a..lj(il: < ».-on«'i' Ki\ n. (Jm.. rjil".: < ». miil^, .. 
)i-'"'. '.I.. 1271: Il::ui-.\\i«k H:nl»i»r. (ia.. lL'7s: .li«kyl Cr.-.-k. i.a.. \Js.\; ('iiimImi 
•■'•■;'! *»•.;.■!. t; !. au'i I'la.. 12>t»: ri-nio\inL; •^lmk^■^ \i-.N^N.ir riatl i»It^i rmi inu •»!• 
••'•'i*'.,'- liii'i !:avii;aii.»n. 12!»2. 

E^^M:\ \ i |i,s>i \\I» Si i:\i,\»i. — Iii-ii«lr miitf iM'twcm holmy mimI So[h:Io. <;a.. iL'iM : 
"«Ni;,. i,,:it,. iM'two.Mi SavauuMli, < Ja.. aiil KiMnamliua. I'i.i.. 1:J'»:»: iJinu-wirk Oiitrr 
*'■*», 'Jit., 1.127. 




APPBUDIS O. 

BliPOBT OP HAJ. J. C. HALLBRV, CORPS OF £lfGINEEBS. 

IMPKOVKMKHT8.— 8t.iohallUver,FU.,lSW; Oiihlawalia Rivor, FlB.,13d8; i 
liar, FIa„ 13GU; St. Aufnatina BacbM, Fla^ 1371; nurthwvKl ciitrunu-, KM 
Harbor, Fla., I3T4; GaloouhatoIiM BlvWi tU., isrj; channi-l uf Chsrlottfrl 
and rmae Creek, VU., 1S79; SarMoU BKT,Fla., 1383; M«u»tM —- - '"'^ 
Tampa May, i'U., 1386; WithUootjelwe lUwr, Fla., ir" ' " 
I'la., 13S3; Suwanei: Rivet, Ha., 1393. 

APPBTTDIX P. 

REPORT OF CAPT. PHILIP M. PBICE, CORPS OF SSQJM 

Improvkmehts. — ApoIactiicolaBay, Fla., 1397; ApalaoIiioolalUrw,] 
(tirer, Oa.. 1402: Chattahoochee Sirer, Oa. nnd Ala., IMS; IaQQ 
|[»liiie!( Riv«T, FU..1407; Choctawhatchoe River, Fla. and Ala., 1 
I'eiisocula, Fla., 1412; ERcamhia and Conecnli TirerB, Fla.audAla., 1 
Kiver, Ala., 1418; Tullapooia River, Ala., 1422; Cdom Rirer, U*. r 
(iperatinff uiid naro of canaU and other workfl of navigation o~ " 
and Ala., 1431; Cahnlin River, Ala., 1432. 

APPENDIX Q. 

REPORT OF MAJ. A. N. DAMRELL, CORPS OF ENOINi 

iMPitOVKHKNTS. — Mobile Harbor, Ala., 1436; DInck WarrSor River, Ala.,] 
cnluiMa to DanielH Creek, 1440; Warrior aiiil ToiubiKben rivers, Ala -.M 
1444; NoKobou Rivrr, Miss., 1452; FaicaRiNilA Kivor, Miss., I453:'r^ 
Kiver, Mifw., 1450; Blnff Creek, Misa., 1457; l.tof Rivrr, Mi»., r*" 
Bilnsi Bay, MisB., 1468; l>eaTlRiV(T,Miu.,bo1«>v J^.kBoD, UliO; Pa 
butwivii Jnoksoii and Carthage, l4iB3; Pearl Kiver, Mtw., between I 
Carthage, 1465; Bugiie Chitto', La.. 1466. 

APPENDIX R. ': 

REI>ORT OF MAJ. JAMES B. QtllNN, CORPS OF KNGINEBSS. ' 

iNaPECTiON ur the iuipruveiuout "f the Suntb Pans of the MiHlaaippi River,] 

APPENDIX S. 
REPORT OF MAJ. JAMES B. QUINN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS., 

iMi-itDVKMKNix.— Chefimute Kiver and Bogiie Kiilin. Im., Ufll ; Tiohfaw Klvi 
itn tributariua, ]•»., 1481; Amite Rivnr andliayon Manuhuc, La., 1485; Bn 
F<mrchn, La., 1487; Bayun Terrebonne, ti*., 1490; Bayon PlaqDemiifQ, lA, 
Bnvnn Cortablcun, Ln., 1500; Bavim Tecfai-, La., 1S03; mouth and itai 
l^alojiHieii River, La.. 1.104; harlrar at Subini- Viuvs, Tex., 1506; Sabine Rivet, 
1510; Nei^biw Rivor. Tex., l.^ll ; romoviiig aiitikcn vt-si^clH or craft obstrnct 
ciiilniiKiThi^ navisatiuii, 15III. 

ExAMiNATION.—)S.-ibiii<' Rivrr b<>twei>ii SabiiK' Lnke ami SiKlclutbii BlnlT, Tea., 

API'ENDIX T. 

REI'ORT OF LIEUT. JOHN .MlLl.iS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Impkovbmknts.— SpniriiiK month of Unyoa PlmiiieniiTie, l.:i., fiimi fiirtlier oi 
1;)17; removing eiinkcu vesselii or crrtlt obittTiictini; or emlaiigi-riiig unvigat 
Hi88iiHii]>pi River below Kew Orleans Harbor, La., 1521. 



CONTEXTS. 



XV 



APPENDIX U. 

REPORT OF MAJ. CIIAS. J. ALLEN, (X)UI»S OK KXCilNKKKS. 

•R».»VEMKNr>. — ^Entmitce to Galveston Harbor, Tox.. I.'i2:{: shin rh.iiiiiel in Gal- 
«->ton B;*y, Tex., loS'J; Trinity Kiver. Tex., ir»H>; Crdar l?:iy<.n. T«-x.. 151:^; Ruf- 
iilit B:iyou, Tex.. 1.'^I8: barbor ut Brazftn Santiago. Tex.. 15jf{. 
IMISKTIONS ANi» SlKVKY.— Braziw Kiv«M', Tox., finin its nimith to \Vae<», 1.'555; 
^e<>t Oahestoii Bay from Christmas Point, TfX., l.'>f>:j. 

APPKNDIX V. 



RKI'OKT OF CAPT. J. H. WILLAKI). COKPS OK KMUNKKKS. 



lUyon 

MiU. 
River. 

Ui., 1' 




. lHti>: wattT ;;au<LC(VN on .^Iissi^.sip]li lkiv»?r and its ]irii)(ri|>al trihiitaries, UHui; 
r »»f (.'yi»r».'ss liayon and thr lak«*H bet\v«M'n ,I«-tfrr:*on, T»'X., and Shiv\«'jMHt, 



APPENDIX W. 



KKl'.>IM' OF (APr. H. S. TABEU, COHIVS OF ENcMNFFH.S. 

1frm\ J \iKvr«i.— IJiriuuvin^ <d»stnirtloiis in Arkan'jas KiviT, !07vJ: Arkjiii.-irifs Kivi-r. 
K.T'i: r..!!i. lit- L" F.*vr«» Ri\vi. Ark., UV^i: P.-tif .Fr.iii Kiv.r. Ark.. H\^J: Whin- 
Ki%»-i. Ark.. Itivi: Cinh.- i;i\.T, Ark.. liJ'^T; Littl.- KS.-d liivrr. Ark.. n;'<7: Blu'-k 
Riv.'i. Aik. an. I M-.., l»;^M: I51a<k JiiN.-r. .M.i., lUtU : St. Francis Kiv.-r. Aik.. 1»>.«;J; 
St. Vr.! .].- i::%*:. Mm., w;im ; Littli- Ki\.'r. Mo., UJJH;. 

;x.\m:n.uI'»n a.m» .SI'i:vj:v. — At rhinndon and the lowtT Whito r^iv<T. Ark.. hi'M. 



APPKNDiX X. 

r:n*. »»M' <»f ma.i. a. m. millei;, coiiin of kn(;im:i:k.s. 

yi- ::.t\ KM! Ni-. — l%«'jnii\ iij;; Mia^^s and wrrrks fnnii Mi>siM>ii»pi KiviT. 17'»."t: Mi^.'iis- 
-ii' I- Ki.'. • '•. b 'r\\<r«n th'.' ( Hii«» and Illinois livns. ITl.S; li:nlM»r at St. L<»ui^. >!•». 
iT;r; u - '.uMb- Kivi-r, ^Io.. 17^{'.l; 0.s;i;re Rivrr. Mn.. 171- : Kuska-^kia K'ivrr. ill., 
1TI.">. 

APPKNDIX Y. 

i:i:i''>ur nr ma.i. a. mackexzu:, cnin's nv fn(;ini:i:!;s. 

Ivr;: 'vrMiN i>. — * ►j);TatiMii siia*^ bnaf> anl «liv lir** bi»at> on I'ppi'i Mi.Nsi»ippi j'i\ i-r. 
171*; ^li•' N-ijppi l,*iv«T. b*t\MM'!i Di^s .Moiu«»s KipidM and nioiifli ot" I]|in<ii-> lii\»-r. 
17fi»'; l».s M'lini"* i;:if»il.H, .NriHvii.-H.sijijij liivrr. 1772; opi-rarijiLj .ind r;ir«- "'l" h<'s Ni.»inri 
Kiyn l:n(."iu:ii and diy dock, 177S: Missis.si[ipi Ifivrr lu.'twi.MMi Minn«M polls and Prs 
Mo.iji «« l,*.ipid«.. 1771'. 





CONTKNT.S. XVII 

JVPPENDIX (r G. 

OF MAJ. I>. W. LOCKWOOD, COHVS oF KNCilNKKKS. 



ber River, Ky., 2073; op«friiriii^aii(l krcjiiii;; in n*|t;iirl<ii'k.s 
iOnen and Barren riversi. Ky.. 2074; Kf>ii;;Ii Uivcr. Ky.. 2<isi: Kin- 
I^Sj^2Q63; opera ting; and koopinj; in repair lotks mikI fl.uiis <iil Kimi- 
l^b^2091; Licit in J5 Kiver, Ky., 1»et\v<'eii l-'arim-rs .iinl \\ i'<,t hilit-rty, 
W&Kivery W. Va. aud Ky.. 20f»'S; Levisii l*<»ik at' liii; >iMily IiiM-r, 
(te Fork of Big Sandy River, \V. Va. and Ky., 21«K<; (>uyniHl<i{ii' liiv- 
I'^Sll; Ltittle Kana^rha Kiver. W. Va , 2114; optTutiii;; am] krepin*; in 
l;wd dam on XtitUe Kanawha River, \V. Va., 2117; HuckliaiiiKUi Rivir, 

APPENDIX H U. 

BIPOBT OP CAPT. W. L. FISK, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

OnB. — ^Harbor at Grand Maniid. Minn., 2121 ; hnrlMir at A^ate Hay. Minn., 
ter at Dulutb, Minn., 2126; harlmr at Siipt'fior ]{:ty and St. r.<Mii<4 Hay, 
8; Minnesota Pcnnt, at Sii]»«rior. Wis.. 2137: hariiDr at Aslilund. Wis., 
MKatOntonason, Mi(:h..2i:i9; Ka;;Ie Harbor. Mirh.. iMU; inirlMirat .Mar- 
Oeh.J'SI^: harbor of refuse at (trand Marais. Mitli., 2ll.'>. 
Av AVD SCiiVEY. — 8t>. LoiiiH River. Minn, and Wis., from (irassy I'oint, in 
iJtKj, to Fond da Lac, 21 18. 

APPENDIX 1 I. 
IFOBT OF MAJ. JAMES F. GREGORY, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

ifBDm» — Porta;^ Lake and Lake Snpr^rior canals acrosn Kcwennaw Point, 

(.•ttW; Maniittifpie Harlxtr. Mich, 2170; C<>dai' Rivor Harlxtr, Midi.. 2172; 

jdllee llarhor. Mirli and Wis., 2173; Mi'inmiiin'o River. Mi<h. :iinl Wi>.. L'17."); 

10 Harbi*r, Wi-*.. 2177: Pen^aiikn- Urnhor. Wis., lM7I>; <in»-n iJjiy Ii:ir>M»r, 

fjpiBO; harhor of ri'tni^i* at CTitnuK-e of .Stur^i^'on Hay (.'.nial, \\i»... 21SJ: 

Mb Har bur, WiM., 218-1; KirwainuM- ifailior, W i.>., 21>''7: Two liivi-r- Ilinbor, 

^tl89; Manitowoc Harbor, Wis., 21111: .Slioboy^ian Harbor, Wi-.. 21!M ; Port 

pfall^n Harbor. Wis.. 21JH.>: liarbor of pfuj;*' at Milwaiike** llav. Win.. lM!i!<; 

jlskee Harbor, Wis., i22f)l ; Rapine Harbor, Wis., l.'i*04: iOnosliaH.ubnr, Wis., 

I Waake^an Harbor, 111., 22W; Vox Kiv«M', Wis., 22K>; optMatini; and care of 

taad daui.H on Fox River, Wis., 2222. 

a[mm:ni)IX j j. 

REPORT OF CAPT. W. L. MARSHALL, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

ji^rEMENT.**.— (*lii«'aj;o Harbor, 111., 2237: Caliinnt Harbor, HI., 22l.'>; (.'ahinict 
Ir, flL ami In«l.. 22tf*: Illinois Kiv«r. 1 1 1 . . 22.')r> ; ojH-ratinLC jin«l tan- ni L.i 
ifie Lo<:k and Dam, IlIin<M.s River, Ill.,22lU; IllinuiH and Mississippi Canal, 

u 

APPENDIX K K. 

REPORT OF MA.L WILLIAM LUDLOW. CORPS OF ENcHNEERS. 

>VE.MF-N'T>. — Petofikey Harbor, Mi<'b., 231 1; (.'liarlcvoix Harbor and rntriUHM- to 
BLakl^ Mi«li.. 2315;' Frankfort Harbor. Mirb., 231S; harbor of n-fn^rf at Pori- 
Lak<\ Mich., 2:J2<.);ManistfO Harbor, Mirb., 2322; Lndinj;ton Harbor. Mirb., 
J; Pentwati'r Harbor. Midi., 232«; Whito River Harb<.r. Mi<-b.. 23:;i ; Mn<k«- 
Harbor. Mirh.. 23;j;{; Grand Ha\eii Harlun-, Mi<h., 2310; Holland Harbor, 
h., 2'.14S: Sau;;atn<.'k Harbor, Mich., 23."i«); Soutli Ha\on Harbor, Mirb., 2:m3; 
JoAeph Harbor, Mich., 2:557; St. .Joseph Riv^-r, Mich., 23ri3: MiHii-an City Har- 

, Ind., 2'.;Gr>. 

rofAllMS AND Su II VKY.— Grand River, Mich., belovT Grand Rapids, 2309. 

ESG 92 II 



""^M 



APPENDIX LL. 

REPOBT OF COL. O. M. PM!, CORPS OF BNO] 

iHPKOVicMRNTe.— St. Marya Biver, Vitih. 
CMial,Mich.,2128; riry dook«tSt.Har 

net, St.Hni7H River, Micfa„2443; luu _. 

Thander Baj, Uioh., 21!H); Thunder Bkv River, Uiol 
Hioli., 2453: Saginaw River, Hich., SIM; liulKti of 
HRTon, Mirb., •2i*U; Black Rlv«r, at PtXTt BuWL 1 
River, Mich.. 2171; St. Clair Flata CuaL Uleh., iO. 
Clair Flatfl Canal. Uirli, 24'ni: Clinton BlTBr, lUoh, Wii: 

Hioli., 2478; RoQge River, Mioh., 2480; Detioi^ Blrar, 

■aaken vesaela or oraft atwtmotiiig at tndaiigeriiig iWTigMiaii, m 

APPENDIX M M. 
' REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. JASED A. gMITH, CORPS OF SSait 

iHrRDVitMRNTS.— MimToeH«rbar,Micli., 34SS; Toledo Harbor, Ohio, 3197: Po| 
toD Harbor,01uu,3494;Saii(liuky City Harbor. Ohio. 2ia^; Snnduakj Bjvn 
34!l7;UiiionIIarW,Ohio,2498; Vermillion iljLrbor,Oliiu^2500; muck Bin 
bor, Ohio, 2501 ; Clnveliuid Harbor, Ohio. 25at ; Fuirport r]»rb»r, Olilo, 2036} . 
liiila Harbor, OLin, SiOB ; removiug eonken vee^els ur crail otiatruoUng or Ul 
(Tin)t navigatiou, 2510. 

ICxAMiXATiONB AND SUKVXT8.— Onuid Hivef, Ohio, faetw«eii I 
mouth,25Il;Cotuie&nt Harbor, Ohio, 3515. 




APPENDIX K N. 
REPOBT OF MAJ. E. H. BUFFNER, CORPS OF BNQmEER& - 

iMPKovrMKNTS. — Erie Harbor, Pa., 2532; prwwrvation and nrot(ic(if.n of Pt 
late PeiiinHiita, Erie Harbor, Pa..2S2S; Dunkirk llar)>oT,N.Y.. 3.527; Buffilf 
boT, N. Y., ■£■<■£>; Tonawnndii Harlwr ami Niagara River, N. Y., 2633; VfT ^ 
lior.N.Y., 25:il; Okol.t Harbor, N.y.,2536; Oiik Orchard Harbor, N.Y., 

ExAHiMATiuN AND SuBVKY.— Port Day, Hbov<> NiagHra I'Mt, N. T., S8S9. 

APPENDIX O O. 

REPORT OF CAPT. DAN C. KINGMAN, CORPS OF 

iMrnnvrMRNTM.— Ilurbor at Charlotte, N. T., 2551; bubor ai PnltiM7TfI]ii.t 
:;5.'i7; iiarlior at Great Sodiis Bav.N. Y., 25(M; harbor at Little Sodiu Be^l 
2572; harbor at OBwego,N.Y., 2581; harbor at Sacketta Harbor, N. Y,, SU&' 

APPENDIX PP. -1 

REPORT OF MAJ. M. B. ADAMS, CORPS OF ENQINBEBS. ^ 

n Sister InlnntU nnd CroHsover Lif;bt, St. Lkwi 



don Lanilin];. Ijitki-Clii 
ton Harbor, Vt., 260il: 
Xorrows of Lake Cliai 



., aj(M; GreatChaxy Kivit, N. Y., 2605: break nator at 
ampliiin, Vt.,2liOI>; PlattMmrE Harbor, N. Y., 2007; Bar 
; UtlPf Croek, Vt„ 2612: Tiiond«roca River. N. Y., 1 
inplain, N. Y. and Vt., 2GH. 



APPENDIX QQ. 
REPORT OF COL. G. H. MEN'DELI,, CORPS OF EKGINEEES, 
lilPUDVWiKST.— Oiikhind lUrl.or, fal., 2til7. 



" •i»-f-»-;r*^T: 






APPENDIX BB. ■ 
f OF UEUT. OOZi. W. H. H. BENTAUSD, CORPS OF/SNOINEESS. 

.-rHap# . Blv«r, CaL, flttSi^ Eedwood Greek, Gal., 96BS; San Lois 
^_. Wnwingtoff Harbor, Oat, 262B; Sim Blego Harbor, 

haibfltf cnBaoillie ooaat betwaoQ P^nti Dum aaA 

BfMtt^ OaL, 9838; San Diego Hacbor aad a^Uacenft 




i' * • 






jLBVIGNblX B& . 

SEPOBT OF iCAJ. Inr H. ioAUBB, G0BF8 OF ElTOIMSEBa. 



*:■••• -r ' ■ " ■ . • '" ■ ^ 



loamdft BiYW, OaL* 9845? Uokarvm^ Uvw/Oal., aSBlj^ tee^ 
IT ztreeny G#L» 8852} PMaUmia GraelCi OaL, i865i Hninbaldi 
•r aad Baif » CaL, SBM, 

APPBKDEC TX, 

BFOBT OF GIFT. THOMAA W. StltOira, 0D8P8 OF BHQIHS«B& 

HnvsmDRS.— Ooqoille Bhrerj dnegwi, 86^ antraaoe to Cooa Baj, OregOD, 
Biammis BSrary Oiegqii, 889; aMmtb of Binaiair SiTinr/Oregoii^ 2081; en-' 
^.to TaqiiioA tiagr, Oi«goii(,98M^ TU Iaaao oh Bay and Bar. Qrraon, 2701; en- 
{}8o hmcbor at Hehalem Bav, OieglBi, 8708; Upper Colmnbu ana BualcrTiven, 
a and WaalL, SaWiColnmUa Klvw betveen lUBad of Book Island Bapids and 
€ PHflBfe BiHpida, Wa<L, 8716; Cbflludla Btrer, Waeh.. 8786; Skagit, Stilla- 
ill, Nookeaek, Snoihooiisiiy and Snoiinalmie rivers, Wasn., 3720. 
jusTA-noNS AMD SURVEYS.— Oljmpia Harbor, Waeh., 2739; Tillamook Bay 
■or^Oroj^on, 2742; Swinomish Sloaffh, Waeb, 2752; ship canal to connect Lakf^s 
y WaahiugioQ, and Samamish, with Faget Sound, Wash., 2762. 
UH>a 1«1KKS.— Olympia Harbor, Van cony or Harbor, and Bellingham Bay, 
^2794. 

APPENDEK UXT. 

REPOBT OP MAJ. THOS. H. HANDBURY, CORPS OP ENGINEERS. 

lb 

^TKiCEKTa.— Moutb of Colnmbia Riyer, Oregon and Wash., 2808; caiiul at the 
sadeo, Colombia River, Oregon, 2819; Colnmbia and lower Willamt^tte rivers 
fw Portland, Oregon, 2829: WUlamette River above Portland, On*^uii, 2835; 
rlitz River, Waeh., 2837; xonngs and Klasknine rivers, Oregon, 2830; ganging 
BBS of Colombia Riyer, Oregon and Wash., 2839. 

PTATIONS AXD ScBVEYS.— Willamette River, Oregon, at Clackamas Ka]>i(l8, 
iloLaod, and Corvallis,2840; lower Willamette and Colnmbia rivers, Ijblow 
daod, Oregon, 2850; Columbia River, near Vancouyer, Wash., 2865. 
0fB Lakes. — ^Portland Harbor, Oregon^ 2869. 

■ 

APPENDIX V V. 

KEPORT OF CAPT. FREDERICK ROGERS, UNITED STATES NAVY. 

KVisioy of the harbor of New York, 2879; correspondence relatiugto diiiiiping 
•Uaat oir Sandy Hook, 2882. 



APriiNOIX w w. 
EEPDBT OP THE MISSISSIPPI KrVES tXlMMISSION. 

C. B. CoMSTOCK, Colonel, Corpa «>f ^ngiunoni. Bvt. Brig. Goi)., U. S. A.. 
Charlkh B. Suteb, Li«nteiuuit-CnlonQl, CarpN of Engiucm. TI. S. A. 

■ M^»r„Co™ of EnrinoBw, Coloa<-l. V. k A. j IIkxhv L. WHlrmo. . 

CoaatBudQiMMleflcSarTer; B.M. IIakhod, Robkkt B. TavUiR, iiu<I HBHItri 
CoiRMitnofurt. 

Aknuai. Hepoht fob FiBCAL Y«AK KNi)i!<a Junk 30, 1892, 2887. 

Appendix I.— Beportof Lieut. Col. Charles B, Suter, Corps of Eq^iic«t8, 
of Amee Cravaaae, Haroh 10, 18B1, 29(13. 

Appkhdix 3.— Report of Lieut. CM. Cbarlf« R. Buter, Corps of Engioeeta, Oi 

' of flood travel on lower Hiuiaiippi River, 2906. ^ 

Appendix 3.— Report of C»pt. B. W. EooB«l«r, Corps of E-aguieers, on sun-ey lA 
ootmah Bocks, 291S. 
* APPKNitix4. — Report of C»pt.Car! F. PHlfrpy, Corps of EngineFTs, itecreiMf 
flisaippi Rivec CominitiiaD, IBM : (A) rrportnf A^iHrAnt EugineecCbas. W-i 
ftrt on secondar; triangolation from K'uoknk t'l IVrr. lyniiisit, Inwa, et«.,2DS! 
report of Aulstant Engineer O. W. l''i>L');;iiHiin mi IihIiI work nnd redaotfoo a 
else levels fhtm St PauLIfinii., to Sav:tiinn, III., He, 2946; (C) nport of J 
ant EnginMr Jm. A. Paige on pn'ciau ]uv<^1h from Duluih to St. Panl, MlniL 
307i; (D) leportof AMlBtantBnginaerF. B. Ualthj on topogrspbicnl and S 
graphical fleld work ftom Altou, IIL, t« Hauiiibal,Mo.. 3106; (E) report of.' 
ant Engliieer A. T. Morrow on eaTin^ hanks nnd condition of mivty mnric 
Cairo, III., to I>oiwlda(H)TUle,Lft., 3109; (F) Tsport of'AasiBiant EngjaMt 
Ockerson on oaTlnsbBoka mm Cairo to DoDaldsoiiyille. etc., 3110; (H> <1ift. 
ineasnremenls on Mlsaisslppi, Ohio, nnd Atvlinlfilnys rivers, and RTcvama tu d. 
flow meaanrementa, 1891, 3118; (I) love waters ot'ISSl 8iirpu»ing fortnor rnt 
3144. 

Appendix 5.— Report of Capt. B. W. RocBsler, Corps of Eiiginesrg, on opnratj 
llrst and aecona districts, S14S; (A) roport if usstPitAnt oiiKinepr AnX' ■'' K*) 
operations at Flnm Point Beadi. 1)153; (IM rqiort of uwiHtant anginoxfl 
liees on operations in Hopsflold KimicI. Arlc., SlRl : (C) report of a^ii^ant Mil 
C. W. WtnrteTnnt on repaits to plrint, 3»i3; aliBlmetn of bids, tiaSneialst-" "^ 
et<'.. 3165. M 

Ai-1-kniiix 6.— Report of Capt. C. JloD. Townseml, Corps of EDgiu«erB,ouapiaJ 
in third district, 3170. 

Ai-i-KNiiix 7.— Report of Llent. John Mlllis, Corns of Engineora, on oparatifl 
fuarth district, 3207. 

APPENDIX XX. 

REPORT OF THE MISSOURI COUUISSKW. 

Cdas. R. Suter, Lientenant-Colonel, Corps of Engineers, U. B. A., 
Hackknzie, Unjnr, Corps of Engineers, U.S.A.; O. H. EKirs]^, M^or, Catfi 
Enginiurs, (.'olouel. U.S.A.: Oakland C. Broadbxad and B. B. Bkuis, {;:■■[ 
■ioHfr*. 

Anm;ai. Reiwkt for Fiscal Year ekdinq Junb 30, 1892, 3261. 

Appk.viiix a. — Annnul report of the Socratarf Missonri River CMumlMion, 



'^ 



t., Sm); (3) annual report of Mr. A. II. Blatsdell, assistant engineer, SSTtii 

i:i\ rciM.rtorUr.J.A.Sedilon, assiltimt engiupor, 3273. 

;i«\ 1!.— Annnal reports iif Mr. Charles F.Potter, division engineer, X 



APPENDIX Y Y. 

BRIDGING NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Report of Board of Engiitonrs on proposed bridge of oity of Dulath, Minn., ^n 
caiml KtcMtrjiiir'i'orDiiliitb Harbor, 3315; report of Board of Enginevrsoopropoi 
iilKuH of city tif Portland, Oregon, across Willamette River at Bnmside ■ 
iiiglit-Quim' -■- ■ """" 



Knigiit-Quiuiby alreets, 3323. 



CONTENTS. XXI 

APPENDIX Z Z. 

>CCUPAXCY OF AXI> INJUEY TO PUBLIC WORKS BY CORPORATIONS AND 

INDIVIDUALS. 



I) ReptiRT of Oapt. Thouias L. Cai*ey, Corjis of Eii^^iiiotTj*, XMl; (2) report of Col. 
WilHani P. CraijrluH, Corps of Enj^iiutrs, XU'2: (H; report of MaJ. Charlrs E. L. B. 
lhivi«, CorpA of Kii^iiieers, 334i; (l) reiMUt of MaJ. William Lmllow, Corps of Eii- 
jimeen. :{M4; (5) report of Col. O. M. I'oe, Corps of Eiigiuei^nj, Jiy45; (li) report of 
Capt. Dau C. Kingman, Corps of Eiigiiieert*, '^iiA^. 



APPENDIX AAA. 

REPORT OF I.IEUT. COL. GEORGE H. ELLIOT, CORPS OK ENGINEERS. 

WAJ-HiN^iH^N Aqi.'EUUCT, 3349; water supply, Distriet of Columbia, 33^H>; iiirn-aMing 
tht^ water bupplv of Washiugton, D. C.,3381; erection of lisliways at Great Fulls, 
33*2. 

APPENDIX B B B. 

REPORT OF COL. Q. H. ERNST, UNITED STATES ARMY. 

Isif*novrMKNT mill care of public baildings and grounds in the District of Columbia, 
Wuj<Uiu;^ton Moiiuiiieut, 3385. 

APPENDIX COG. 

SVKVEY OF THE NORTHERN AM) NORTHWESTERN LAKES. 

J^^i I-: of "jrJiblislifd «'li;irts ot the iioitlji'vu and iiorthwcst«»rn lakos. and snrviys in:u1i* 
It»r rh*.- piiriMw*' of k'M'piTit; tln\s<" rliarts n]> tn date, lilOT: snr\ ry of \Vav»il\ >ln»;il. 
l.;i'r<' llri**. ^UlM : unrvey of Kliuals in St. Lawrcut*^ liiver, N. Y., (1 ) IImsKi'II Slmal. 
S;-'.': I lit shiuils nt-nr Crossover Litic'it. 312J»; lesnivcy of the lake fnmt at Chi<:i;:n. 
:;4 JT : siirv«.-y of HIa<k Oeek Slioal.l.ake Ontario, 3128; annual wat^^-ievel «ui sch 
ot the imrtlierii and northwestern lakes, :i429. 

APPENDIX D D D. 

REPORT OF M.VJ. WILLIAM A. JONES. CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
I Viv-s7 mcTiov and impidvenieut of roads and bridges in the Yc;llo\viit<»ne XatiiniMl 

APPENDIX E E E. 

KXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS IN MILITARY DKrARTMrXTS. 

Er.roKi «if I-ieiit, Cassiu8E.rJillette,f!ori>sor engineers, eni^inei-r r)l1i(rr, on «>pei.it "mns 
in I>»^-p;ir;iiMMit (»f the Missouri, 3157; rej)ort of Maj.Tnlly M<!CreM. I'ifth Ariilhiy, 
ri<-T i:i-r '-niriniMT «>ni<'er, on operations iu Department of th»* (*olnrnhi:i. lU.")."^; iiimit. 
t'i « '.ijit. (.'ii.irh'S A. Word^Mi, Se\-i-nth Infantry, ae tin u: <ingineer otVnri, on npcra- 
Tiit!.>- in I>« j»artni»^nt of the Platte, 3159; rei>ort of Lieut. Cliarh'^ (I. Lyiii.in. ser- 
tr.i'i */;i»;iIiy. in cbargi- of office, on operations iu Departnu^nt of California, :5tr>!). 

I. \\VS AFFECTING THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS, FIFTY-SECOND CONGIM.SS, 

FIRST SESSION, 1891-92 -H'.l 




APPENDIXES 



4 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, 

nNITED STATES ABUT. 

I 

' (CONTINUED.) 



•v . • 



-. * 









* 



, -•^- 



APPENDIX D D. 



toTEMUNT OF OHIO, MONONGAHELA, CHEAT, ALLEGHEHT, AND 

MUSKINliUM RIV£li8. 



rOSr OF MAJOR AMOS STICKNET, C0BP8 OF EyOINESRS, OFFICER TN 
MAMf^E, FOR THE FISCAL YEAH ENDING JUNE SO, 289g, WiTM OTEEB 
WSUMESTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 

IMPBOYEHENTS. 



Aio River. • 

>peratin^ snaj; \»oat8 on Ohio River. 
>per-.itin|^ autl care t>l* Duvih Inland 

I>aiu, Ohio Kiver, n«?Jir Pittsburg, 

l»enns> Ivauiii. 
|foval>l«* ilaiu in Ohio Kiver ))<fh>w 

mouth of Bt-aver Ifiver, iViinsyl- 

vaiiia. 
IfoDoiij^ahela River. West Virginia 

and IViiiisylvanin. 
>per:itiii^ aud rare oi' LoekH i\m\ Dnins 

N«*«*. ^^ :>i>d 9. Monongahehi Kivor. 
phirchuMi^ <»l'L.o<k and l>ani N(». 7, Mo- 

ut»iij;ahola HiNcr. 



8. Pnrchase of Lock and Dam No. 6, 

Monongahela Kivcr. 

9. Cheat Kiver, West Virginia. 

10. Allegheny River, PennHvlvauia. 

11. Dam at Ilerr Island, Allegheny Kiver, 

near Pittsbarg, Penn«ylvama. 

12. Ice harbor at mouth of Muskingum 

Kiver, Ohio. 

13. Operating and care of ice-harbor lock 

atuiouth of Muskingum Kiver,Ohio. 

14. Muskingum Kiver, Ohio. 

15. Operat iug and care of locks and dams 

on Muskingum Kiver, Ohio. 



United States Enginekr Office, 

Citicinnati, Oliio^ July 76', isO.Q. 

Gkneral : I have the honor to transmit herewith the annual reiH)rt.s 
I the workH under my charge for the fiscal year ending June 30, 181)2. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Amos Stickney, 
Major of Ungineers. 
Bri^. Gon. Thomas L. Casey, 

Chief of EmjineevHy U. 8, A. ,. • 

1059 



:pi 



1 • 



• .ill 




.PfENT>lX D D — BEroRT OP MAJOR STICKHET. 19CI 

llotted, au<l various iacideutal expenses which were nut eon- 
at tbe time the allotments were made. 
>wiiig works were in progress during tlie year: 
lww«. J>aeia and Nifrills iilandti, 5 mile» below Pittgburg^. — At 
ling (if the fiscal year som« minor repairs, eoiiHUtiiig of repav- 
;ranttnK the slo|>ej« of tlie daiu, wert being niajle. Tlieso re- 
e €«Hn'l''tt'l August 13. 1«U. 

I Marirtta I»land, 108 mi7of below Pillnhurg. — This dam was 
\ iu Dcfi-nilter, 18(K). During tlie winter of 18!W-''JI some 
ran doQu to the paving and filling of tlie downstream >Jvpe. 
•ffintiiiig of the liiical year this damage was bemg repaired. 
: w»M doueT>ybire4] labor and wan completed Octol>er21, ISQl. 
t foot f}f Marietta Igltind, 171 milen below I'itttburg. — ITnder 
datwi i'>l>ruary 14, 1891, with J. C. Graliam. The object tif 

is to hold the wat«r coining down the right band 4!hut« of 
Island aud pievent it fiiim spr('a4liug until after it haa patiaet] 
i!>tta Wbaill It was originally built in 184J, and w:ui repairetl 
ndetl iu 1875. It wiis in good condititm, but owiug to the in- 
leight given to the dam at the hea<l nf the inland it watt neees- 
^se the dike to the same height in order to cut off tli« cnxiK 

Work wiw commenced July (i, IWitl, and completed ttetolter 

it lii-ail of lilrHiitrrha^rtt Ulaiid, lli'i wti/tw /wfo/r I'ltlxbiirff. — 
onti:i<-l d;irf.| IVlmiaryU, 1891, with UirUnnls.m vS; Mojii-oe. 
M-t •'( ri'builiiiii^' this dam (origiuiilly iMUstnicl.^ii iji l>'41i. 
ul lii-rii ;;i:i(Iii^l!I> woI'U dowu, was to .-rinl iiiiKc wiUvr lio^^ u 
pabiL- channel "U tlie Ohio Hide of the island and to iui prove 
at the foot. Work wa» progrejwitig at the beginning of tlie fis- 
, »nd the dara was completed l>o(!«mb«p 28, 18tfl. 
( Eijihl Mile IxUiitif, i'.'ii; niilrit betoir Pittuburg. — Under eontract 
ebruary 'J, 188(1, with John J. Shipinaii. The objectof the dike 
ipen the watt-r on Hie bar at the foot of Eight Mile Island. 
o high water the contraet<>r failed to complete the dike within 
specitied, aud on the recommendation of the oflicer in chaige 
tract was extended to December 31, i8iU. Work coinmeneed 
15, and the dike was completed Xovember Ut, 18!ll. 
i( (.'alluma, 471 niilen below Pittsburg. — Under contriu^t dated 
y9, 18111, with John J. Mhipman. The obje<;t of this dike is to 
en and widen tlie channel by cutting off the narrow and erouke«l 
down tlie right-hand shore, and thus compel the river to make 
nd more conmiodious cbatiiiel across the present bar. Work on 
! was piogressing at the beginning of the liscal year and was 
ed Uecend»er !», 1891. 

it loirerbiir at Kiniiij} Sun, ■'>02 miles below PiftKburg. — Under 
t dated February 9, 1891, with John J. Shipmaii. Tlie object of 
e is U) inijirovc the lower bar at Kising Sun, which, siuco the 
ment of the upper bar, has been the chief sticking place be- 
iinciiiuati and Louisville. Work on this dike was progressing 
)eginning of the liscal year au<I was completed November 25, 

it if ailixoa, Indiana, 552 mileH below Pitlxhurti. — Uiidcrcontracts 
februiiry !>, 1889, and February 14, 18!ll, with William Kirk. 
istriictioii of this dike was onlered by Congress, and its object 
prove the harbor of Madison by decpeuingthe water on the flat 
ir that lies along the whole front of the city. Work on this 
la nrogressing at the beginning of the fiscal year and coutinne(' 



;f, i iHJi I I i.-i- • ■ 
•' l»l»'!' • " !<•••.,■■■ f « 
• ■n||i||ii-'.»« i! \. . . 

•>•.♦:.'. V. '11 II .! . 

«ilVn<-! .11 •i.M. •.. «• ' ■•. 

To .Illih* 1. 1V».'. .:.:,. 



•» . I 



■ \r.tl I'luliliu .1: ".M. 

.r .M:i\ '.:.;. I^M. •.■..'. 

olii|iirf I •! I >iM I-:; I.- I. 

i Ililrl ruMI : ;m : i, :• .." 
•lllllH'lircil .1 ll!\ I). . •.-• 



''iffshi't'ff. - riir { i . • 1 -. : .! 
• »lij«'<'t oT : 1j'>. .\ lU i • - M 
. ill JiM'Ul ll<»iiiS. •• («• ! 'I. 
■o Ifivrr. rmw fo: ?•:.!. •_■ ..' ■ 
Tlir f\lii!«»iu|j «. • ••• . : 
»I, with .liiill) .Inj • .••, I . 

r by t hi- ^'fHiir.M' ■ . - i.- . 

I ol' ?ii;iri|'!:il juil »:•: :. .:- • - 

» 'hi<*r«»r i]!..ii'«ri . i\ • ' \ .. 

••vith th<'< ii-Mi. !!■<!, « '•• .1 •• ..'• 
• iiv Ibr a t':iii in « <••;•••,••. •: 



T-nrj 



l\H\[ UKVoUr OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

BIG HOCKING KIA-ER. 

Thi>i rix or onttMs tho Oliio at .a \mi\t 107 miles below Pittsburg: ai 
11 inilos Inflow l^arkoislmrjj:. The work of improving navigatjoin 
I Ins jiiivain is puiil tor out of the atipniiiriation for the impnivemeiit 
tlu' IMmo Kixrr, and it therefore appears under that heading. Theo 
Mvt lo be attained is t4i permit Ohio Kiver steaml>uat.s to aseend: 
r»K»l\ ilie, ■» niiU's alH»ve tin* m<mtli, during high and medium stages 
ilie OUuK taking advantage- of tht^ barkwater. 

Ihis work was nn(hM* the immediate supervision of Lieut. CaAsiasi 
i;illeiie, i'orpsof Kn*iineers, V. S. Army, nntH April IL*, 1892. Bin 
lii.u Muie Mr. Kdmnnil Mm^ser, assistant engineer, has had immedyui 
>u|Hn isit»n of the work. 

on.KVTiONS DIKING THE FISCAL YEAR. 

y\ \ n:\rr i kom rkpokt of mk. eikmind mokskit.) 

rh. ^vtulv oi iniiuoxiii;;: iiuviifutioii on tins Ktrcaiii between Uh laoiitli nnd Qoi 
\\\W. • umIin .»>m»v«\ h\ n'liiovin;; ro^ks and nnagn from tho chanuel, was vontiAii 
«tu\i'>s tho iuiMiih«« i»t' .h\\\ and August and closed September 1, 1891, UBeyerytU 
titd l»»vn »l.M»«- lor wln»h iliriv wasan.Y nrccHMity. 

The tollow uin; is a summary of the work done: 

s».»>,» wm.o\*aI ciiliic yurdi.. • 

I .. ,,.i.,.M'd niimlier.t 4 

(I, ii m',!.**!"''^*'' * "•" --.------.-----uO.... - 

J- .?,■■! i\»-» ^ ti Miuu.d do.... 

vv.ieK or »Mno KIVKU DKKIHJKS DriUNif THE TALENDAE YEAR C 
^^^ 1S9I. 

iMiiN \\o\K li.i^ *»»'<*»» under the immediate charge of Mr. K. J. Garpe) 

orKKATioxs. 

I \nj\i r IKOM i:i:r<nM or mi:, i:. j. caimtntku.) 

• . . 1, iMiund 111 ^^lMl^ r iniartors at tin- inoiitli of th«» MnHkin^um Riv 
\ I.. ..!» .^' .^"^ ^^^^^ ^^ j^^^^ ^j^^^ ftynm/o was M'lit to thi* Moiwnij^ahola liiwT to work : 

* ^' '** ' '' I ^,, .1 sho nMiiainitl ilirn- until April \ when sln^ r««turned t<i i*iU 

1 .. \. \'' *• *' \,,j „p uuiil I'HiH'd l»y tlio Ohio and tho rest of the fleet for the w 

r . .k. V III 1 1 I I . . . -. . . 



on. 

t4»I 

inari 



' ' '\' " , ,, ^]^,^ in.iiu rni«inr>: a <-naimt* iium pimiiiivi: mi frictic 

V -i..^ x%..'» .O'ln.; . l«'« I 
1 I . . i I . 1 1 II 



• 1 I • 



.' '"'u "!}i'o III ■V'"'' iinpnnrd -oarin^r for lioistin^Mhe forwanl spui 

■^ ■• '* ♦'*' I jniiMT p.dr: nrw riank shaft and tittiuffsfor thiMuai 

' **' ') ,' Ii.i III ini . iii-iin - :«im1 rapstan .'n^iiiM's: friction clutch f< 

^^ ' ■ ■ ' '.' ,,,,..- i.M lu'i-t.iiu ih." i.'ixNard spnds by hand; ti viw 

■ . , .,, I u.i. !um-...! at ihr ritt.Nlnirj,' wharl, two i 

' '" i.,,,i.m- li. I -i.i««* .I'l.l r.M.r >o hadly as tomM'cssital 

, .,, ii,, ,11 Hm- .U^HMcTion of oni' tlrod^e, and po 

/\!'i."ix''i.l..l ,.nh l.\ pioii.]»t and intrlli.i^rnt action of il 

^ ^ ■ ."•" I i...:i nti.n:: ..:... liino. a nwtal shapcr. an emoi 

' ".. ;, I. l.N .i •....!. N.'.ii.:.! «niii'"' :|«hW to the co: 

.",.„., ......1, n.M .s..,h.toud,'xp.-ndunn.torth0 8ei 

■ ^ ■ :^ \ll;\l ;,,l,„.,, „,..,.„., shop MUs I.n an amonntahno* 

.,.,, ,..,.uoi M ..nd.o;oit.n that they conM not h 

"' ^^••' ' , , , ^,^ ,,,.iv ].ivpar«'d troni whi.' 



■hiDuel a »i]iik<.-ii coiil fl;it. vhiib th<' imtnis iil't.'Vnnnls r^tJMtl ;iiK^ mnnii-il. 
■Ua Itikt, 171 miU^ fiffuiF J'itl-bHrfi.—MOr Uii- dam uirow tlMt Wi-xt Vir;(iiiiii 
I at tLe hirad of Muiitttit Uinail nua Ti'lmilt. il was I'lnitiil Hint llin iii(-r<-uH-<l 

of wu^r un the Ohin niite I'aiiiicil a •Iiiii^.'itihih rrnsx i-iivri'iit iivit tjio lim-rr 

be riiirnp dike at tin; tiiot iif llio Uliinil, imrtiiiilurlv diiririf; a r'w <if tlu- 
eum. Alx'Ut 500 fiMit of tbtt lower fiid iit' rln' ulil dike uaH ilKnlnr^ iiinovcd 
tredges. which ot the iuim« time <1iik ott' n |>iin iif tli<-Kriiv<'l bnr nt Iho dik.-. 
tion uindcliilvITlulUHiid July 2Tto3n: Iikkw rock, ixtmnihi.' viirdii,Kr:<^'<''. 
cubic ynnla. Tlie dTedges also removed 171 piltfH, 1 iiKiMHint wrei;li, and II) 
1 uiaifs wei;;biiif; J6.1 tona. 

Ua, Ohio,I70imila Moit rHltlmrg. — Darinjca rise of the river, which stojiped 
nu at Mnrietta Vike. the ilredgea were employed to remove the shore hiir nt 
Itnod inrliue just aboTe the J-'ourth Street Whnrf at -Miirictla. Mnlerinl 
[ from thiM bar vas dumped at the foot af the iHluodto Ktop teaks at lhi.< new 
min proeeaHotuoDstTiictiOD. Ezcavalioo made July 25 to'Jft: iinrd elnv and 
^^393 cubiu .rarila. 

ajfBlfnneTliaviKtt Iilani, ISSmiUtbtloio FitUbiirg, — J illy 30 thedreilKes etuppped 
raveling to tear up nad remove &om the cliaiinci one wreck of coal liarjio. 
•f BUinterhatiKtt Iiland, ISSi MiU* Mote Filtubary.—K hot eouaiHlin); of imd- 
me and hard gruvel, on the Ohio sbon^ ahovo the liM'atiim of the old (like, 
idged off. The removal of this har, which dpflecled tlie I'lirrelit townril the 
m1 below the islanil, has materislly facilitated the pasnaci' of tows in lioth 
in>, and hy pcnnittinf; the current to follow the axis of tho river will Irtid 
I open a ;!Oi>d Uiw-water channel. Excavatiou made July 31 to Aiigimt :M : 
c stone, 5.703 cubic yards; hard ([ravel, 17,107 cnbio yards. Thero was alsu 
1 from the channel 1 nnSR weighing 3.1 tons. 

>/ BtrniitrhaKtell Itlaxd, 188i miJa below PUliburg. — The drcdgPH eomplftwl tht- 
lof the old dike on the Ohio shore, on which they hail bi'vn previoiislv em- 
in 1RK9 and 1890, until stopped by high water. Kxenvntinn made .Tuly'3l to 

3: loose rock It^I.O cnbic yards. 

Bar, Slgi miU$ btlovi PiH«fr«rj.-<Whils traveling the dredges n-iimved rmm 
nnel at this place, August 20, 1 anag weighing la tons. 

ttt Bipplt, g40\ milu below ntuburg. — A wrei'ked coal barge was broken ii|i 
wved from the channel at this place Angnst 21. 

Iidian Creek, abote A'ete Bickmond, Obio,HH nileK below PilMurg. — liming 
Iter, whifh prevented the dredges ftom working at Nine Mile Itar. they re- 
the creek bar at this point, which had been Aredgwl off in IKrtO, but had again 
It into the river. The work straightened the obuniiel and widened it 145 li-et. 
tion made Angnst25to September 16: gravel, etc.. 16,119.1 cuhie yanls; 
"niiuved, 1 coal dat; snag letiioved, 1, weighing 2.5 t«iiR. 
Jfiie Creik Bar, 45i\ niUt btlow PUUb»Tr/. — Kinemile nnd Teiiniile creekH, »n 




£ Jorifc^ «■■»«« ,. 



4»,.., I 

«i mtBtrrf wict 4a 

« ra-ue ^» MMM «!•.,.. j 

do.... il 






nPPENDIX D D — fiEPOET OP SL\JOR STICKNET. 
[^ DRKDGES OUT OF rOMMISSIOX. 



inMT K, 156.i8 

innal repaire B,oro.>« 

s(>liopbUlB, nisUiiala, cto.} 4.(>3S.7)< 

irtaloMt of repnin JI,6tJ.<U 



COST OF WOKK, tKCLUDlNG A 



8.757. 1.1 

875.71 

1,313.67 



D 1891 36,371. *0 

COST PKB VKrr. 



Location and detcriplion o/tcork. 



,u.. 


1 

!!f 

lii 
nm 

IBS 

KB 

ato 

MS 

415 

1 


IhllB, 1891. 


Q 


1? 

il 


1 


^1 






...ilo 

...rt.i 

■::t ::;:;:: 
*.S".;:::- 

Sppl.JJpl.. 

soiii'.'-fii't!! 


1 

1 

iS* 

M 

w 




































lOJlftl 




tOliia) Bv. onUida or Foiutb »U\rt 




1 




1 












I 


8.1 










I 


la- 




Eipi'lr 

nu L'lwk liu- iKt'w Kir>imond.01ilo)-. 




' 








,i 


rs 






































> 










A» 




ml « 


r 















"*■-«. 



'- ' -^ \; K.^r 



-" t- 






■ • * -■ 



y i 



f.- -; 



HABBOB I,1NBB. 



ntX D D HKPORT or MAJUIt KlICIiSEY. 

id, « cnl>ip yanU of ro.-k. 
1, W unbic ynr(i« of ruck and aome anagg, 
—1, wreck of uoal haul. 

ENCROACaMENTS. 

r places along the banks of the river where na' 
I of encroafhnii*nts, esaiuiiiatiotis were iiiiuli;, 
B stopped from depositing waste material ia the 
i wlio have been engaged in the buHine«K of i 
1 of the nver, have been iu the habit of leaviQs 
lerefiise of their digging operations, lying in ♦ 
'y of Brunot Island. In November their opera.! 
') navigation that it was necessary to hav 
ilien the ease eaine t« trial Ihe mcinberx 
ided guilty. The court inipuNL>d-a fine of 
I, on t^e piincipals, aud suspended sentence ii 

nnaCion has been received at varioui:; times that eerf; 

Ebe Ohio River ww* (Innijiing material info the rive 

Investigations have liteii maiU', and wherever tb 

into the river iiiti'ifiTnl witli inivigntiiin, or wp 
ta the chHijni'i of tin' i'i\<T. Ilir matltT has beun i 
litotes dnitrict atturni-y lor liis ai-iioii. 

Vtlie provisions of section 12 of the river and harbor ih.u< >- 

' 19, 1890, three boards of engineer officers were convened by uid 
if Engineers, under the authority of the Secretaiy of War, to ron- 
md repoit ii|wn the subject of barlwir liui-s at Pittsburg, Pa., 
ing, W. Va., ami (Jincinnati, Ohid. Tln-si' biniids had niLH-tiLiKS 
commended the making of ciircliil surveys a ml nuLjisihi' llie llirce 
ies, and theofticei- iu charge of t lie niLJn Kivcr liii|)1civi niciit rc- 
Inslructions to have the work dune anil piiid for fnnii tlio apprn- 
n for the Ohio Rivi-r. Tlu' liflil work has br-i-n tinixhed and a 
net of the work on the maps, but this latter work was suspended 
Mmt of the lack of funds for completion. 

BBIDGES OVEB THK OHIO RIVER. 

big the past fiscal year this uftice has had supervision of the 
ID of the following bridges, viz : 

SI of WheeUng Bridge Company, at Wheeling, W. Va., 90 miles 
ttsburg. This bridge was completed in October, 1891, in full 
aace with the plans approved by the Secretary of War. 
[ge of West Virginia and Iroutoii KailHfad Company, at Kenova, 
I,, 313 miles below Pittsburg. It is believed that this bridge 
sen completed within the last few days, but this oflic-e has not 
BQ notified of its completion by the builders of the bridge. 
Ige of the Central Bridge Company, between Newport and Cin- 
'66 miles below Pittsburg. This bridge was completed iu 
r, 1891, in full accordance with the plans approved by the 
-.of War. 
b92 124 



jy^ ^ a m^ -IB: <wx tw casDCECfis, i;. s. army. 
tow ^Tfltr rfffME. KaMtt. mi l«««r QfeiB. 






: **** 


k*.rt«i*i 


B«wn^ 


TMr 


H 


vs- 


BlifcM. 


i 


,^ 


.^ 




#1-*L 


























































a 


UlU 




, 




























































-. « 


^ 


""»" 


"TI — "Zl 






-^»-. L^ 



a 









Irp. 



liNlUX r> II BEPOKT OP SIAJOtt STir.'KNKY. 1971 

Ule gnugr. — Thu ztrro ol' this gaiij.'*) is at the low wiit^T line. 
I of 2 feet ci .rrcspoiitl to alioiit .i toi?t in th« channel, and read- 
I feet eorresiMHiii to alnnit 6 feet in the t-liiinneL 



Pndhr j ^^'' 



OPBBATIOn OP DRAWS IS HIGH BBIIKiBS. 

ere are no low drawbridges ou the Ohio River; the general Ohio 
r bridge law re<iuire8 that all biid^^s shall have a height of nt 
4(1 ft'et above high water, and, Kinve large stenmboate renniiHMiiore 
40 t«ct, it itt aliM provided that all bridges below the Cincinnati 
leuston Bridge i^hiul have' a draw for use in higli wfttei*, unless they 
a I'li-ariuiw i)f at least 5.S feet abnve high wdter. There are thnc 
w;iu-r di:iw;, on tlie Ohii. Ifiv.T, but llie diaw in thii Oiiio I-'alls 
ge, at Louisville, is exeeptionally located, and no record of its 
atioii is kept. 

;porta from the two other draws have been roeeived. Owing to the 
rable stage of water in the river these draws were not opt;rated 
ng the fiscal year. 

STOPPAGE OF KATiaATION BY ICE. 

le past winter was a very mild one, and assuming, as heretofore, . 
the conditiou of affairs at Oiiiciunati is a fair average for the whole 
r, I have to reiwrt that the navigation of the Ohio Uiver was not 
ited by ice during the past fiscal year. 

LOSSES BY COLLISION WITH BRIDGES. 

In following tables show the losses sustained by the commerce of 
Ohio Kiver during ttie past fiscal year by colUsiou with the x)iers of 
Igcs grossing the Ohio Biver. 

KENoVA BRIDGE." 



Xlc. 


Owner. 


.s.™.,«,t. 


Loes. 


Amount. 








»«700 00 


a,im 


s'sTra.lfp'rc?^.::::-. :::::;::: 


J.CRiBbw 


4poidl)oal<i 


lO.IHH.llO 

















Hi... 



1972 UKl'OKT OK TIIK CHIKK OF ENCINEKKS, U. S. ARMY. 



(:«»VIN«iT(>X AND CINCINXATI KAILKOAD BKIIX^E.' 



Pal«. 


Ownrr. 




Stf.iiiibiiat. 


Loss. 

1 


Amom 




Pn vliiii"*l\ rt'|M>rtril . 

W.ll. ItloWII >ii|IS. .. 

T..t;»l 




UK 


Miiy irj. l&W 


C'lMllrs r>M(«n 


Barg«) (lamu^cd... 

1 




1 








1 






HKNDKKSON BRIlHJK.t 








I'n-N i'lii-Iv n'|Mirt«'«i . 
W. 11 . nn»wii Ninj*. . . 

Total 




1 


118. 4i 
2.0i 


IV*-. 7,1^^1 


Alii'o lJn»wn 


1 coal boat 




30. sa 














CAIRO BlIIDGE.* 








rri'viiiuMlv r«']M»rloil . 
S. S. i'rniiip \ (.'u 

\V. 11. Ilrown Siiiiri... 

Total 








♦9.M 

4,301 

2.4S 


Jan. -JCIKIJ-J 
¥vh. IS, ijtW 




Smoky City 

Mtiriiier 


1 rual boiit, 1 

lijiri:*', 1 flat. 
1 bariro 






r 


^ •#««• ^<i ........... 






I 


15.991 




i 









LoitHt'H I'll rollixion with (Hilo Jiircr bridges to June '^0, 1S!)J. 



Covington niul Ciiicinunti 
railromlHridj^re $13,300 

Cinoiiiiiati Southern ]« nil road 

Rri<lj:t' 9,812 



Uravor \\r\i\iro $r.«. 010. (K) 

Sti-ulinivilh' 151 i*!;:.' IH). 3(>8. (K) 

Wlii'rliii^ aiul Marlins rnry 

Wr'ulin^ i», SOO. 00 

Mollairo Brul^jo rjiJ.57JJ.OO I Ohio Falls nri<l;:o 80,X)0 

IVirkrr.Mhiir^ Hridj;** 7'J. i»7T. (H) Kentucky and Indiana Rrid.v:^ 'It, 767, 

Foint lMoa8aut Hridj^i' i». ttlKi.OO ' Cairo Hrid«rf ir>,99ft 

Ki'uova llriiljr** ls.7(M).(H) HondorHon i$ridi;e L»0,520 

Nf\> port ami Ciiu iiMi.it i \i\i\ 

r»»ad i;ritl.i;«* II.1m7.(>» Total (i2\^^^ 

KSTIMATK. 

Tho follow iiu: osiinuno m:ul»' by my inedeeossoi^ Lioiit. Col. Wilbj 
v.. Morrill, in lo^ l.i^i ;iiuin;M rrp»»rt. of tho amount of money tliat slioi 
V nvP^'^U*^'*""*'*^ ''* * *'^*'* '*' ^''** majiiiitmloof the Ohio and with 
larj:v ami valuabK* .\ * tMiunmo, is ropoatoil: 

'^m,\ 

11,: 

■ K \. r J<)J 

2<U 

".: :?(),( 

■ ■■• , ■ ^ . . '. il;. iini I i»nt ir.;;« nrifs I>5,( 



} oi\ ibniis .i\\»l »\.Kr-. 
l>.,viv l<*l;nu\ 1^»"'' 






7<HI,; 

^,1 ,,m «-»\;«''. ■'■ "."i lVi\.^ !>laiHl ]>am is oom])o.^ 
"'' .. , . I.-,' P IN N Nl.tml and .i^S.oniMor oxteu 

\* !. \\\\' l«Kk. Kxperionoo, att 

•\x' :\.kv. won' ivqiiiiotl to ma 

, ... \ t ^::: Mtrd tnr. ami it bocaii 

.0 • IVtN--^ Ulaml. Thev wo 

;■• < i '-x :lu* lab'U'inir loivo (hi 

.. ; .^k '■•.■.•.\'»i:i:r> are nn loiig- 

^ . .. ^ ' i'.'^x :lio lork is urgont 

« . * X • . . ■. n:..|^i < v^t the river the 

^- * > N :i;i':iuu-^ h>st betb 

■ ; ■ .* ■ :' ::\rr. 



\\ • 



, NVN 



APPEHDIX D D — REPORT OP MA.TOR STICKNEY. 1!]73 

Money statement. 

l,1>MlnHMiine3cpend(td..., fSn.OSl.lO 

>pertT. 243.71 

317. 300. SI 
892,unaiiiit expended iliiring flacal year 259, 1H.37 

92, balance iiOL-xpiMidwI - C>8,18&U 

92, oDteUuidhig liabiUUes *&.15H. 99 

92,ftmotuit coveiod bj nncompli'tnl toalriKts 16,381. 13 

2*, 491. 12 

62, bklanoe availalile , 33,1S(IC.!U 

tpliioptiatolby nut apjirai-ed July 13, 1892 360,000.00 

tvailable fur fiscaJ year ending J uuo 30. 1893 393,693.39 

it tbat can be prnBUbl.v expeade'Un llHcal yOBT aniling J line 30, 1894 eOO, DOD. 00 
tted in compli.iact) witb reqnir>.>iui'Ut» of secCionuS of rivec and 
■<it acta of ltkS6 and 1867. 



of propoviU for riprapping leeet at SkaieiiMtoifn, lU., opened Scplembtr I, !s:it 



!<»» mid Mdnu oC bidder. 


ITi. 


',!S 


ASK«E«»o. 


«Shd.(.St ChMl K« 


5S 













Mt awanleil U> Jamiw .Shoi't aud oiiMiiited under dut« of i^epteinbor 2^, I 



I 



!o/oo-(™.[,/c<r 


impror'itig Ohio Ricer made during lli 
SO, 1S9:J. 


fitcal year 


ending June. 


■t^Co. 


Wwkofin.pnivein«nt. 


VMaatooa- 
tract. 


TooTpl™. 


art 




Sept. 23, 1891 


.,.,„,,« 





OHIO RIVKR COMMERCE. 

Titb the commercial statistics, nbicb are given farther on in this 
it isdtemed pertinent, interesting, and valuable to give tbefoUowitigextiactM 
e iMt amiaal report of the aupermtendent Of the Cincinnati Cliiimbcr of 

recoTtls forl889-'90 showed a largo gain in river business over previous years 
« a ppriud, and this increase was maintained during 1890-'91 in both freJKlit 
nenger traffic. It is to be noted that this enlargement of volume of riviT 
t* was dae more to an increased movement uf mauufactures than of pro- 
iSre being some deficiencies in cropsin the valley region. Soutbern product!), 
ig sngar, molas«efl, cotton, etc., contribatod a liberal volnme of freight. 

revival of river commerce necessitated enlargement of transportation facili- 
d daring the year two steamers were rebnilt for the Cincinnati, rortamuiith 
meroy trade, two for the Cincinnati and Loniaville Mail Lino, and one new 
■ built and one pnrchaacil for the Memphis and Cincinnati Packet Company ; 
iree lines being practically under one management. 
lb the additions mentioned, the equipment inthese linos was bettor than pre- 

duriiig a period of six years, embracing seventeen boats, with a capacity of 
OBI, and representing about half of the tonnage en|;aged in the Ciueinnati 

nere were daily departurea (excepting Sundays) to Pomeroy. PottHmouth, 
i LoaiiTiUe^ asd iatermediate points, and two departures weekly to 






1974 REI'ORT '>F THE CHIEF. OP KHGISKEE8, V. 8. ARUt. 

"The I'Utxbiirg anil Ciucinnftti Paokot C^uipaoy, n-ithnn^nipinent of sii •tcN 
cm, moilc ilnily dniutrttuoa, except Wwlaeailays. Tbe toDDagi< in Uiis tniduis 



of gomlB frnin }'itul>urg otiil toner Oliici hniiDew; alBoUKT movemeot ornngw. ni 
iMsea, eto., tram ttie South, thtise produetH Bhoning tbe largmt volnme in aoj y^ 



"Tbu liucB luentioaed eniliniiw the most im] 
tnrmts at Cinrinnftti. The KniiHwha Pai?ki*t 
Tlie Chilo Pochel madu lUily trips. There ' 



^;|be: 



ortunt p.tit of river tran«p<irt>tiiMi§ 
.iuH miMle weeldy trips lo Ctuxln*-' 
rere tri-weekly depnrtiires to F 






t for r 



l>iisinaAiihasbeeDioaatUI»etory, folluwine two vcars of liDprminf 
r trn asportation iDt«restJ>, that expci-istions have hircn gTMtlf 
confidentl.v lookup for. ' 



cuuriLsed, and a furtlier ruvival ii .... 
lsr{{<^ uK-rense ia pauenget traffic the paat 
intMita to he miule ia the building of new a 
fort of Uio traveling pablio. Ths pnniumi 
fsvoruWy witli river uavigatit 

"Willi 1S»-'91 there has be„ 
raovement of steamers in the C... 
rBBpe*t being <inile exceptional I) 
iTintiioation by the largest Hte - 

Bliort interroptinns in the Pitt 
rer^nlod at Cincinnuti daring 
termptions to stoikuiera from ic 
only alight delays in the upp« 
eiiinati during the your waa B 
few days' ruterrnption to triifTi^, ,.., _ 
or loss of river tiansportatiou,"' " 

Coal fhipi 
[Fnraltbtd b) — 



iut«rruptioii la B 
; the record ia tt 



o years has uc«uuoncil dceiilcd in 
nmers for the accomtnodatioii ai 
■ '" the Cliiciiuiatj trndt now on 

M years of little it 
s from low w 

ineroy and Lonisville, nnd with b 
is trades. Tbe lowest stage of <nl 
it 5 inches. There have been aoi 
. lim, at tliie port and hehnr,« 
lest stage of water recorded atQ 
u K'oliniary STi, wliii-b occaalaoei 
■dwith teriona diuuaga to propH 



'inhurg, Pa, 



July 

ui'Uilwr 

NoiTmbtr.. 
liMiBobor -- 



C.oniaroHri! labJe iboiping caal ihipmntla from PilUbvrg ^Hring Ike riflM jreitn mt 

Dictiuher SJ, ISOI. ■• ^ 



SiS 



APPEKDIK D a — REpOW OF MAJOR STKIorEy. 
Comtntrrf paming Daxi* Iilatti Data in ISOl. 



is.&ai us 






g,4iij3».iH i.aaT 1 



B, 3»s 1 1, tr.i. ■a» 



•f CxBfinnati for Ihe ytar ndinf Augunt SI, 



ni<l«. 




a. 


TViUl, 


AniDle*. 




2&. 


T^l. 




T*w. 


1.<1T 

« 

1.9S1 

109 

«a 

«IW 

708 

2» 

S,7SS 

87 

:J 

IM 
a,8!17 

tm 

2.(65 


T» 

'1 

810 
I.IM 
1,0M 
l.MII 

4.3S2 

1,978 
T.WtS 

T.WB 
1,5« 

B.73T 


LUkt: 


n>M. 


•jm 
M 

.i 

M.1W 
_U.tD8 

Ml 
1,MJ 

m 

lU 

S,UT 

W7 

>^ 

i.OTo 

3«e 
w 


Tml. 










iOTS 












3W 


X 




IM 








'^ 










ail 














308 


S3.MT 




IW 












1;'.S 

8.3«S 
1.BI1 






ou 










|sssu 


a 358 




































Seed, tlover uul 1 iniolli j- 






















^ 




















tab 
wo 
































MS 












??S^"^:.^™:::::: 


1^ 






4.3M 






878 








■wl'i'J^ni.dli^W™ 

























PEKt>lX D D RETOUT OF MAJOR STlCKSEY. 

ComLmtrcf pajtiiiKj Jlaiii lalaud Ham in JSPl. 



Wf 








Tolnl 


f 


¥ 


1 


|i 


! 




1 


% 


Freight. 


f 


.V*. 


Tmni. St. 
16.STO *1S 




Ho. 


r^. 


. SB 


I,3W 


Sr™ 










4W 

i 




"i'iiu' 


an 1 

M| 17,300 




t — 


"iibi' 


ti 


I, ITS, tin 
Eiioa 


,cs 


is:r.;;:::::: 


-SB 


Sz:-.v:z: 


" 




M 










im 


1B.«» 






8,038 





















Bircr eoMwierce of Cincimwll /or 


rAe year FixIiN; Jugui 


( SI, 1S91. 




Id-. 


to- 
wlpta. 


Bhii- 


■iv*u. 


Anidea. 


nripU. 


SWp- 


Tm^ 


i - T«u. 


Tom. 

SI 

■•s 

3,4!KI 

m 

1.317 

7M 
&B- 

ZS 

s 

a,7B8 

l,n=i 
3,fi*l 

2.067 
10.B6a 


204 

,^ 

3.M8 

'711 

1 

),54a 

24,«1S 


L«»l: 


Tam. 


2« 
7M 

t.tH 

*s 

W] 

1,S21 
M 

K 

wn 

lU 

17« 
IB) 

'S 
«« 

ii 


n««. 








a 075 






IBS 






UD 




US 








f-""e- ^ 




IS 






18 














IS 

MM 

111,028 
93 

Ml 


f-S 




UB 






Outs 






J: MS 

57 

13, a« 
on 

T48 






il7B 




&,-::::::::;:.:: 










SS. ;;;.-.-.;■-::::■ 




















gj;,„„..,..„ ,, 






,s 






Tiif\!r«'.v.'.'.'.'.'' v.'.'.' '.'.'.' 










48? 




192 






IT» 















v"gtaw»,-^r.«." ;:::;; 


?J 






^ 






»,aT3 


WHiky 




















IHj" 




t 







1976 KKPulfT OF THE C'lUKF OF ENOINF.KRa, D. 8. ASUT. 
Arrivatu unJ ikpartUTfi of »leaako9i* at Uc^i^i'l of CinoinNOfj, Otiie. 



FiltabnrE... 
iHberporUr, 



PilUbuW 

LDiitaiUle 

NiswUtlnKiiu... 



IS to 20 
UtoU 



(VhIi, ChnU, 



Comparalire Mlalement of 



patting Ihefalh of Ike Ohio Eittr by eanal ii 






•^ APPEKDIX DD — HEPORT OF MAJOR STICKNET, 1977 

CommcrDr of Ohiu iliret^ 1891. 



SS* 



hal nolHl 



Pittalitue to CidTO . , 



T.lLBija 



i. IWuHlitU - . 

ILBiTiw .... 

ibBairud 

MUtF. AJloi... 
MmtK 



CipitolCtly.. 



inciDoari&Lnulitvilli 
i^ FneaboDO Co.---.- 



loha Towboat Co 

IdAOo 

■ad Ohio Timiuqwrla- 



Wfacelio)! to Clnriniuul 
Kntn Buck Ui Uuivlu 
UarieMa (n Furkershiiri 



■ban fo L«dxvin> ,.. 
i««af la Hidillvpan . . . 



Letut to GaUip61i> . 
TktzDnvij to CuTO 



roMtPlHH 

POlDt Pk«» 
PfdntPluu 



ItoLoulavltn .. 

tfoOlTD 

: lo ClDoimiBii .• 



OilUpuUaULoiiteTUIa 

Criwd Cin-to IrODton. 

ProolartlUe to PnrUniaiiih . . 
Gn^anllolte to Goal llroTS .-. 

Ban^StoD IS Ironton 

Ajhlanil to PoztAmontli , . 

AiblwidtoClooiniwU 

Fortanonlfa toRotne 

~ M«78y1U8 



Majivilla to Auf^oAta- 

ChwlHlton B«r lo Covlogtou . 

Cfaflo (o ClDcbinul 

BUInvflleloDesIcnKtliiKFirlorr 
Connj IhIauiI landing to ■'>>-'-i«- 



LIB, IM 



11 

1,MD 










"{^^ 


^MI 




4.500 


IBo'Sw 












isa.w» 


si.aa» 
























)0,s.m 


T.SM 


:i,iKM 


hIio 


ii.iiue 


« 


i«i:><iu 


l.SOi> 


]».m 


i»™o 


IS, TO* 


sa 


m,'M 






e.Mu 




'"■S 


127,208 



a ^Vanaw lo UkdlMO, and ti 



M 





Til.' riv-r 



DDa. 

OPEB-VTiyti SSAC. Bi>ATS vW OHTO I 

u.t iKiiU.r -M't <•( :^'infmlft 19. ISSft. nrntmhwd thi 



■::^ :;^-' nniitirrmpml work of op«r 

.■ -*i.i.ir,jn..u ..1 thr Chief or EajLMi 
rvvi;ii-i[i.>ii tn'ia tiin* to timi- apnn Oii 
mj> l-t neiTsjrr (.> <lo such worfe,! 
»um ot iwrniy-fiTf ihoiLsapil dollua; 
I i>I' said «i[w use shall aeconipanj tk 



APPKNDIX DD REPORT OP MAJOR .STTCKXKY. l!»7l» 

J* pmposr of the abovo law was iVnstiale*! duriii;,^ the hitti-r pait 
V raUMular year ISIH anil the lirst half of tho rahMular yi*ar isDl', 
to the fact that, in addition to the usual annual n*pairs/a hattei y 
ew boilers and some betterments to tin* siniy; boat E. A. Woodruff 
umed two thirds of the money allow4Ml for op4*ratin^ expenses of 
L»oat f*»r aVhole ytnir. 

le above-mentioned work was contracted for in May, ISOl, and was 
ave l^eeii completed and paid for out of the fuu4ls available for tlie 
il year enduig June 30, 1891, but in consequence of unavoidable 
ys in the delivery of material to the contractors, these several jobs 
? not completed until the latter part of August, 1891, necessitating 
[uents for the work which, including pay of crew and amounting to 
773.70, had to be taken from funds available for the tisral year end- 
June 30, 1892, which left only $9,L>L'C.30 topay the current expenses 
he snag boat and the outside exiienilitures for the year, 
rter deducting the outside expenditun\s and the cost of taking care 
lie snag boat during the -winter months from the balance on hand, 
considering the monthly expenses of the snag boat in commission, 
c-i-ame evident that the boat could not be kept in commission later 
I November 30, 1891. Tlie snag boat was therefore ordered put in 
tcr (juarters, in the mouth of the Kentucky River, not later than 
ember 1, 1891, where she was compelled to remain until the appro- 
ition for the next liscal year should become available. 
1 submitting the annual report of the Ohio Kiver snag boat £. A. 
oflrvff\ it has been deemed best to continue the praiti4'e of report- 
the operations of the lx>at by calendar years, as by this means the 
f>rt ot eacli season's work is i)resented by itself, while if the report 
lade for the lisi-al year it must necessarily include parts of two sea- 
s' work, which is less satisfa4»torv. It is evidentlv necessarv, how- 
r, in vii^w of thr limit to annual expenditures, to rei)ort the hittiT 
ri<r.j] vi^ais. Tin* pres<*nt report of operations is tor tlie cah'n<hn- 
I 1>'.M, ;inil tlie reiMUt of expen<litures 4-overs tlie liseal vtMir from 
y 1, 1-ilM. tn Jiiiie;;o, 18I)L>. 

'\\v WMik ot' tlie rniled States snag boat E, A. Woodruff has been 
ki the sniM-i visi(>n otTapt. W. II. (-liristian. 

OPKK.VTIoNS. 
.ixn:vri ri;<.»M iifK kki'ort <>k capiain w. h. riiui-iiAX/) 

r- 1 ii:..I. iji.ln^ h«:r :nmii:il vi']»:iirs at ('iiifinn;iti. tin* liiittMl St.iN's kiimj:; li(i;it 
.!. 11,1 .■'/•./ ^^ Im'i^mii b«T M'axtM'f* \v«irk oil Tlu'<>liin Ijivri" t»n iIp- xtli day ni' Scpti-iii- 
. l** •! : "In- iii'^««iMl<-«l tli»" riv( r as far as ( 'iilluin l>;»r ami i<-iik>\ ril p.-nt «»|' a .«,t«'.iiii 
* .'iiiii tl.ii«- «'M.il-l»ai L{<' wn-iks ami r*rv«;n siiair> Tnnii tin* n«*\v <lianin-l in;nli- on t 1m' 
1^1. ■ I- \ - <!•• oi iln- lis ri" l»v t]n- (lik«^ iciriitlv liuilt at that. iMiint. < >ti tin* 1 Itli ot' 
vri... : -1;.- ,!-:< f'inl«-il tin- ri\*r as far a> Wlu'clin'j. W. \'a.. andthfii, iM'inir pj,.. 
:i«li.^lo\\ \\ »t«T antl a (alliuvT i ivt-r fioiii luocrcilinix to rittslmr;^. woilvtd li^r 
. '! I Ml -Ti'aiii to I'liiif Islainl. »>S| inih-s Im-Iow rittslmri:. aniviie^ at tliat ]>l.i»i' 
V.»-,. iuImt I'J. KNtiiriiiiii: slu' ran up stri-atn to \viiit<T «|iiartrr«» in llic. month of 
K'^tiliji hv li'i\ «r. whrri- sli** wt-nt out ot" ••oinmi'^sioii on tlM'27lli ot' Novmihrr. 
Kvwiz th'" -hi»rt working siM-^orj thi- l\'tn,tliit(y r«'inov(Ml \'i'.* snaLr>i. i» sti-anihoat 
rk^. L'i roal boat-i, har;:ts. ami llat>, 1 hrirk hoat. I modrl har^r... i f,.rr\ hn:ii 
, 11 F'" k-. I ma*i«* of ]»U(hlinL^ >tom'. :\ l.w^r pi«M'«-s of iron w n-rkam' ot thi- < In-sa 
k- a-i't <»hio Railway hriiliii' at Cinrinnali. (onsi^h'rahh- tinuMs a^ s]M-nl in ilrai^- 
r-AJlli ]j«iok and r-h:iin o\« r wpM-ks noarl> ro\rml witii «'arih ami inlnrakini^ 
I ru.-t iif -iml ami j:ra\tl hars to as>isl. s«oniinn. Total «listam'i' tnivrir.l timing 
^:la«•^.^l ■i*.ir*l,*»1Nimil<"i. 

mimjl: Thf im»sr (lan;;«rou«< ohstrnrtions n'movc-*! may hr mi-nti«imMl two larir<* 
,« :i( thi- loot of Eijibtmih- Islan«l: two in front of I'nntorvillr. (Hiio; thr»M- in 
t of npiier eiid of Irouton, Ohio} ilw stoaiahout Sail City iu front, of (Jutletts- 




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DD3. 

:-:ri>:;:;- i -lyN^VLVAVu. 

V . ■ ■ :^'^- •'- .-r- :-:.t- :— ?-^:i;i:<:- >::>rvivon of Mr. Wn 

V . . VN ^\yN^.v v*:^ : >v* «2,a 

vs^ '• .5 • ."■^- -^ H" 

, X vv *•• > v:V:':-^^ H8I 

VN :: xv • . o - ^" ^^« 



J> D— KBPOBT OP MAJOR 8TICKNEY. 1981 

^ doeeof fhe last fiscal year the dam was up, ha^iig beefi raised 

ImSO^ISOL The maneavers during theyear were as follows: 

'w^\ljafwenA the d«iB| July S. 

Baiaed the dem, Jolj vk 

IiDwered the dam, July 24. 
"^ Baiaed the dun, Aiu^t 10. 

liOfwered the dein. Angnat 34. 

Baieed the dam, September 2. 
. JLaweied the dam, HoTember 24, 

Baiaed the dam, Jane 90. 

kfliie end of the year the dam was up. 

OPKRAnONS DTJBnffa THE FISCAI. YEAB. 

(BXTBACr VBOM THX BSPORT OV MR. WILUAM XASTIK.) 



Ai. — The lower nol, in the leoaaa of the lower lock figite, whloh ahowed eTidenoe 
■JMwIng at tlie eleae of the laat fiaeal year, came im entirely in September, and 
a ■MMftth of October, when the atase of water waa at ita loweet, it waa renewed 

laQ of heSTler aeetion. To do thia required doaing the receaa by a eofliuv 

romping oat the incloeore. 

rail ftt Into a rabbet in a 8i-ineh timber which reated on the maaonrr, 
atUa rail, which waa three-qaarter hj 6 inchea| came oif, the lock gate wheda 
Mo and through the timber and were aoon running on the atone maaonry, whUJi 
j|S| imdiaa lower tlian the track level atrained the gate and made it run Terr 
Z A naw ateelrail, 3 byll inchea, waaaubatitutedlbr the old riul aadtheSf-inch 

raiaedfl~ 



■d pumi 
eldiai] 



V and waa raiaed above the roush maaonry aarlace one-quarter of an indi 

thua bringing the new rail to the proper leveL 

period Si putUnff in the new rail, between the 12ih and 19th of Ooto- 

of water waa ao low that the boata could not run, ao no interference 

^ waa caoaed by having the lock cloeed for the period atated. At 12;60 

aa the morning of the 18th of September, the paaaenger ateamer Courdr de- 
' — xmn faito the lock under full head and, craahing into the lower lock gi^ ' 
■» hm) upper chord of the gate tmaa, the top rail, one of the vertical iKwta, ana 
large oak timber to which the lock gate chain is attached. The captain and 

I of the boat were arrested and the boat HWled. At the hearing Irefore the 
lad States Commissioners the oflirers of the boat were charged with wilful care- 
BiM, hut for lack of siifticient t^^stimony to prove the charge they were (lisniisaed. 
thbel agaiii:«t tlie l>ont has not jitt been disposed of. 

trtice pump. — The contract for building a new service pump to replace the old 
, fnr use in Kupplyin;; wat4;r for the tanks for operating the lock-filling and dtn- 
Iging valves, was let Au^^ust 8 to The Hall Steam Pnmp Company, of Allegheny 
ff Pa. The design of the pump was prepared in this office, and dated May 19, 

V old pnmp was of the vertical piston class, and was poorly a<la]>ted to the work 
had to perform, having U} work against a head of (>5 feet. The new pump is of 
iplonger class, of more substantial build, and better adapted to the work. It is 
Ipleteil but not yet erected, as the high water interfered before t-lie work was corn- 
led. 

hiftekfiie. — Th«* drift chute constructed through the lower wall of the lower back 
ereeess perfonii^ a jjreat service in freeing the recess of all drift which is natu- 
It drawn into it hy the operation of the lock-discharging valves. Hy its use the 
ft it quickly passed 1h'1c»w the lock and out of the way. I ho)>e next year to have 
iailar plan carried out in respect to the rec<^s8 of the upper gate, as at the lattt^r 
Mthe greatest annoyance is experienced from this cause. 

hme ta land vcall invtosurr. — About 25 cubic ^ards of large stoncr left over from 
aoostructiou of the War-trap piers and which had been stored in the laud lock 

II inrlosure, wen* tt^moved and deposited in the river bod below the bear trap, 
aadding to the prot<iction of the river bed at this point. 

Urablr dam. — < )n the evening of the 8th of August, 1891, we hegan to raise the 
I. Fourteen wickets next to tho river wall wore raised, when operations were 
pended until the next morning. On the outer wicket a red signal light was 
Dedto warn uavigat^irs. The towboat Xellie FFaftoa, ascending at 10:15 p. m., 
h atow of empty barges, ran into those wickets and knocked four of them down. 
esaminatioD showed that foor wicket boxes, three cross heads, three quoins, and 
a wicket-box bolts were broken and the horsoa badly bent. The excuse the officers 
fte boat gave waa that they did not see the signal light. This accident delayed 
faialng of the dam, as the repairs of the damage done rei^uired two days' time. 



k^. 



• " ■ . ' 







* tk 



1984 REPORT OP TttE CaiEP OF ESGISEEES, P. 8. ARHT. 

Id 0(itub(ir tlii> rivet wua ul. n very luw aln■:l:^ and dihd}' of the lercls »f M 
bad woriTiiliKkiui oil ilr> 1:Lti'l, lli-' xt^ii:!' or tuv water iwrmHttDK tka w»Aia| 

rlviir. TtiMiii IpvelH 1»'iiim t.i \ - n itTi.< wcni lulratitotvd Toi tb»ao«adiiip 

■uuU'il by tlin map of M.ihIi j1 :iIiiim un'TitioQed. . 

Thn liiiiil iipi'-iiMBTy im rli<> i'imi-Ihh liiai nf lUe lock and kbatmAiit ni a 

l.y iHintliiiw iifliM- .iiiiili Liini,. 'I'll.' ti-ai't on th^ S'Hth aide oT the riiwt^ 

tiOlwtmollMi Ill I".: Ill il.s np|ir»n«lies. containing six MX>e>, via p« 

from Mr, ,1.1^1 < I ii.it on tbe BDnth Bide, coDlaining 3.1£ meFB^lNj 

to UlM f)«ii\ 1 1 , aud waa oontrolleil by K boanl of diiscMi 

hDnnI nil" I i n.-mbly nf Mnroh 39, I^l.nnd b.r its tRmsMl 



lii> dill iiftlie ll(>nvi>r Diim. ua Itxed l><r the diBtrram of the 
<>iii iliivin tu Mmit^umHryH Itlund, dutcil Ftbriiar; 34, 

I'll Ii.llmi^Ut uft tie foundation were inude on the sih 

Iried i^xi'i'|)t nt a few puiutn, the strata in al 

III I hkkn.eHti. The uiuteriiil passed thrangb eae 
< t II le, H (lurk shHle resembling coal, and some indi 

M<ik nreiiuntniotfon wan l>^ir'>a with a Bni»l1 forre un Um 

Niu and c^HUl•lleet£oll1^g the luad of the aite and erertiiil 

.i|>lilcpuriM«ei<. 

[ the uDiinVnetiim of thu luck will bo well advanced dull 



il")ii'ii Mliitimcnt. 



Amimiit uvulUble for flmuU year cmtlftiK June 30, 18113 . 



Ainuiiut thai diui be prulltAbbr axpotided iu flacal year ending Jime30, 
m« 

Bnhmitteil In c<>ni)itiiiii<'i> with rui|Uiri-menta uf BocliouB 2 uf river and 
harhor ai>ta of ItWti aud IH(>7. 



DD 5. 
IMI'KOVKMlON'r i>K : 



Sl,>l,m,-Hl ../ Ihf .,mo>,itl i,Hd lUilc of nil "f; 

.InnelO, 1R72 «?>, tK« I Mnri-h :t, Jkhi 

MurehS, 1873 Of, IKN) AiiE.mt :?, l«f: 

,I.inH23, 1K74 L-S, 0(MI ' July 5, IKHI . 

March 3. 1875 ay, (KM) Ausiist r>, IMW 

.liinn 18,1878 25,(KI0 j August 11, isj 

Mareh3, 1879 24, (KM) 

June 14,1880 25,000 I Total . 



ii)86 ARPORT OP THE CHIBP OP BNGINEeRS, TI. B. ABHT. 
No. 9 dWlns It 

Hoath. 









Ml. TO 
23i.\S 

STS.ao 



TftkhiH tU« uvenKO uf lli» tuttJs giv^n in tlie Hbovc tabtea wo Tiud Utat H 
niirua dulina 1801 un I1j*> 11 niUm ol' the Mouougahela Hiver irbfcU. ii 
Ii« United tTutM li m followa : 
l'<Hi« of frclBht a 



.1 '..i'kU ; 



iiiM uniihurHi 



ToMl . 



It.lU 

S,3«9 

so,4n 

«S,2W 



Tlie Moiiongabela River, from Morgnntowii. W. Va.. to its monl 
Pittsbiiip, is caiiali7.e<l by iiiue lot-ks mid (Iliius, of wliirli tlie first 8t 
oouutiiig Iroin Pittslniig, are tlie property of tbe Moiiungaliela Na' 






AfTBSODC O D — HEPORT OF MAJOR STICKNEY. 1987 

npaDy. and tlie eicJilli and niutli are tlie property of the UDitetl 

The oigbtli dam i» 88,15 miles above Pittsburg, and Morgan- I 

Jie bead i>i' the slackwater, is 102.IC luilp* trom the same. It ' 
herefore, be stated that 14 miles of this river is under tli« rllrect 
1 of the United States and 88 miles is under a private corpora- 

foUuniug m a statement of date and amoiitit of all nllotmenb* 
8 work: 

5, lew tl.uuo 

Iwrl, 1881 4 000 

»et3,l«M j,Sno 

Npraft 1>S1 SIN> 

1*6 - 100 

,IS« I.IWO 

,1S»- - 1,300 

I,1W7 -- 1.1(K1 

18*7 _ 11,000 

. 1*8 a„:mi 

r27. 1S88 3.000 

,1*8 l.iSO 

r7, 18S9 I.SOfi 

b«8,l»S9 l,a» 

1,1890 12,300 

I»l - H3M 

ibtT 35, 1889, tjtam approvriafiau Tor exHtniiiutiuue, •tirvnji, and Mo* 
ttciMof liven and barlwrs 4,(1UU 

■K,tna 
; only stoiipa^t' to navigation thrinit^hoiit the year was on iu-«!ottiit 
aud high water during a few days in inidwiutei. 
swork ha» been under the immediate Bii]>crviHiciti of Mr. Philip 
v HSKistant engineer, and the information rehiting to the upeva- 
of the year is eoiituiiii'd in his report. 

OPEBATIONS DI'BINCi THE FI8CAX YKAB. 



(extract fbou report or mr. phiui' golay.) 

D th<> aprine of 1X90 fho aprouR of bulh ditmH wi-re injured b; floods, 
)f (-uDtinuea bigli wnt«r it wuh i mpoRHJ ble to n^puir titciii diiriDg tht 
r has been a little mure favorable for such work, and repairs wet 



LOCK AKD DAU NO. 8, MOLTH OF DIJHK4ni> CRtKK. 



._. . t extended across the 
.. . ._. . ._^ . ., , ._. . eifopt tbo one on the up- 
side whirl) was bold' ID place by theslieet piling apiked to it. Also a, few 
f of the apron SBbBtriicture were I'arried nwuy. 

tioual unrbomKe wan given to the toe of tlie upron of the uniujured parts; 
of tlir middle part, the apron sheeting wna removed and the apron rupiiireil 
ilt Dp -JO ini:h'-s higher. The apron Hlieeting was then replnced, and, togt-ther 
u adiiueiit roiirse of sheutiiig, was secunJv bolted down. On lU't-onnt oi' the 
te .It nhii I) the low-v>'Hl«r Beosou came and its Hhurt diiiatiun, furtlier n'pairs 
.ot lie iiiHile; and Uw wiirk of repluning and bolting down the upjipr uonrses 
tine and ptitlins Iraneatk was postponed until a wore fovorable time. The 
f the dtiiii was tbtis left, and still remains, elevated ti< sach a height m to 
>o<>I Xi>. 8. dnring low water, to xtnnd abont 1 foot above norma} pool level- 
close of tepairs, and as a iiiotcctiim to the iiprou <•( the dam REftinst the re- 
— ' - ■ ■• ■ asaiust the lower face 

uuination, these atoneft 




roachiog on the rivet hare bad Ihf effect of causing alatost ui 
■ of eacroncbiueutit ill general. NuttvULBMnding ifaj*. buweTcr. K 
'" w uevessat}- in order to maintaiu » penuonent obedietkce to th» 



[ht, anil stationery ,, .. 

tg •»■([■ and other obatnlotiiHu 

ii B, lepaire, etc. : 

min tarbjoeraceB 

iwiug tnrbiae race* 

k motecUaa below lock 

^ W"'ly utoi^K" slietl ., 

Mag lock git«s and Imildinut 

•nj repairs to operating maclunerj 

Ik II, lefiaira. etc: 

tuUiiiK lot-k.beeper'a diroUIugs, cuiied away by flood, 1888.. 

ton jipron of dam . 

tOiiuK K'^ud" wall 

■hig iliini 

nilciu); storage shed 

tinfjeuciea 



OiAl.. 



jnlkp- 



00 B.TW.U L9,N7.98 1,1M.<I 



«rcial rtaliatica are attacheil to the 



r [he iuiiiwuient of UoDooga- 



D D 7, 

TTBCHASE OK LOCK AKD OAM NO. 7, MOSOKGATIELA RIVER. 

dose of tlie last fiscal year the case of the United States vs. 

igahela Xavigation Company, io the matter of the condem- 

ickand Dam No. 7, was set to be heard on appealat the No- 

nf th« circnit court of the United States for the western 

nia. 



: mPBOVEHENT OF CHEAT BIVEB, WEST TIBGINIA. 

\tm and luffbor act of September 19, 1890, contained an appro- 
.'«r 413,000 for the improvement of Cheat Biver. This is the 
Hapriation ever made for this river. 

^Mt of tiie improvement was to make this river navigable for 
[8, s-i as ti> I'liii;^' oat the immense sapplies of timber foond in 
in t'orestson tlif Oheat Biver and its tribataries. Initsnatoral 
■ it was impijssilile to bring down rafts, and a large percentage 
HIM logs was sti-iinded among tlie rocks and left there to decay. 
Ungh part of the river commeucea about 3 miles below Bowles- 
d terminates at Beaver Hole, 18 miles above the mouth, where 
r emerges li-oiu Zjanrel Bidge. The total length of oitHcalt 
30 miles. 

riginal project for the improvement of the river was the removal 
K>vk obstruction i^ as interfered with the free passage of logs on 
foot stage of ^Y■.^,te^. At the snggestioii of Inmbermen and 
iit«rest«d ill the improvement of this river, an additional proj- 
iidopt«d of making a low-wat«r channol from uear Bowlesburg 
ExJTra- to which logs coold be floated ou a rise of from 2 to 3 

rork has been under the immediate supervision of Mr, Philip 
Assistant Engineer. 

KKPOBT OF 0FEBATI0N3 FOR THE FISCAL TEAR. 
(EZTBACT VROM RErOKT OF MB. PUIUP GOLAY.) 



...a part of bejitenibcr, 1891, the work w a« proBet'iited witU a virw 
h rock obstnictionB as interfored with the passBK" of loose Io;;b when 
■am n to 8 foet occui. To thia end. 10,058 riihic yanlH of rock oliBtmrtioii 
■Indkiul the river vaa put in fair couilitiun a» {at down onUreenlslunil, 'Mi 
Inr KowlMburg. 

ttk* monlh of September, 1891, liimbennen urged thnt a Inw-watur I'hnnnel 
WnMd it, be made. About thia time, alau, Uol. Merrill piiiil a visit tu thr) 
jinli fftrrr aad Morgnntoivn uffice, aoil alter discussing the hiiMccI with 
Mttlea iutareHteil iu the iBiprovemont of ChP^t Kiver, hu dirccttia ttint thu 
H InmbermeD be adnpted. Aoconlingly abont the latter piirt of i^eplembur, 
i* «w e of nrorkniea with torilBandniiiteriul were sent again to thenpper cnil 
tujtDV part of the river, about 2 niilea below Row Iks I > urn, ""'1 working 
I, blasted in the low-water ch»iinel 3,789 cubii- yiirilx of rock, clearing 
ptl •o that logH can be driven on from 2 to 3 feet risen down to a puiiit « 
Irnr BowleebnrK- Tile total nntnher of mibio yards of roc-k o1.»triii'ti"ii 
■IreiuoTed, «r leveled dowu, in 13,tMT. 

BttaiuiliHiuj conld be advanta^'eoiinly expended ill reiiiuvin)( more rock ob- 

■•--SjOOO oabio jards between I'ringl" Itun and Green Island, mostly in low- 

li,Mid7,000ctiMoyard8of channel and shore recks, between Green Isbiiiil 

•fllaaiL iMkiiUE a total of lO.OCM) cubic yards of roik obsiinctiou y.'t. 

^ MMt«d. Qnide cribs should aliio be constructed at the liradH of 



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ci.j7 Itecembfr 31, 1891. 





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I :;i:«- nf allappropii 

- moi 

-- 25.W 

>•* 3HW 

i«iiw 

> : <*::ii:ioii of lo* 

. :.T;i4t Thewat«r 

' »■ l-r". ...!• thisprojef^ 






^SrftSttnX T> flS^HSPM* OF major STIt'KNEr. 



b«t Ctitfiim, Pa.. W9 «»« aboM Pituburg. —Daiing the paat winter m 
Oamagedpkit nf tbemill dam ni^rosa the river alUorrdoit, therebv iujnrine 
B» riieetiiig of tbe Joe rliute, trbicL ia t>n.ilt at the h>wer Hide of it. It & 
beMpaiisran rtnilily be mule at acotitnol excwr]iii);970. 
C^nptanltr Inlaa't. !04 mile* abom PHUburg.—Tliin ilaui, wbich nt Ihe close 
'B«c*] year had l>«pti iiearl; fitiisbeil, wua completed. Its length ia334f«et, 
— ISfret.aiid bright above low water Sfeet. Au abiitmeut fur thepro- 



..feet, B.U.. SLfiSG 



I 



..do.. 



S^« 



«ftabar and materials in th« entire work waaK,503.06. 

~ ~ e denized to confine the wnler theretofore waating down the inland 
tMlueinx tile navijiablc depth of the water on the very shallow bar 
t» the c)i(iuiicl on the ri^ht. No actual toondinf^ were made, but the 
A experience of timlHtr and IntDbeniien show be;ond a dunbt that there 



H riiic« ita completion th<- shipmeald from above that point have doubled. 
Bat prMentix in Kood condition. 

ifl Sidotrji, 157 mi7m aboFt PilltliKrg. — The dam designed to improjre Hielcor; 
Vaa enfinally located aonHu the left or main channel, at the head of Greene 
ttw inletition having been to make the right chnte the channel for naviga- 

Wheneverytbingnas in resulineas for commencing i te construction eeriuuii ub- 
iwweoSertMlbyBnuieloc*! tiiuheniien, whoctainiedthst theerei^ion of a dam 
the left chnte at the beail of Greene Island would greatly impair the naefiil- 
tbeir timber landiugH ou that sideof the river opposite the foot of the island. 
I^a the pfmibility of damagins the tandinga a survey above and below the 
' Greene bland was made, ana the location of the dam changed to a point 
tvile farther down, and ao as to rroei th^ right ohnte at the head of the lower 

The dam here wn.9 iltnicned to conSne the water below a 3-foijt Htage, about 
ranhs ■•( K-bii-h driri.'il inio the right chute nt tliia point, iulo the left or 
1 channel, and to cut out tlie channel bar opposite. Work was commeneed 
ODBtruction about August 1, and the stmoture completed on October 14. The 
built on a nharp curve, runuitig from the right bank around the head of the 

ItB leugth is 730 feet, width at base 18 feet, and height from 6 to 7 feet ; the 
m of a S-foot ntage of water. An abutment 40 feet long at the root and one 
lead of the island 50 feet long were built, and the outer side of the island 
otected with heavy riprap stone. The structure ia reported as being in good 

econstrucliou of this work the following quantities of material were expended, 

mber feet.B.M.. 68,526 

^klouilwr do..., 56,684 

olla pounds.- 8,022 

do.... 285 

cubic yarda.. 2,170 

Ltion made do 180 

wet of raalei'ial and labor wan Ki,B23.49. 

improvement also has been productive of excellent resnlte, and whereas 
J Bipplc h:iil always been dreaded on ai'connt of ita ehallnwnoaa, caused by 
ler apreadiii^ over so niiich territor)', now, acconliug to the reports of navi- 

the dilliculiies and dangers heretofore oxiatiug have entirely disappeared. 
«I PitkoU, 143 milet above Pitliburg.— The constTactiou of this dam had been 
nceil at the close of the last fiscal year. Under favorable oonditiona the work 
shed along rapidly and the sttncture finished in Septouiber. It extends from 
; bank down to the high bar, formerly Pithole lalanil, a distance of 1,132 feet. 
th at base is IS feet, and JUt height the level of a 3-foot stage. An abutment 
long and 10 feet high was built at the root to protect the bank. 
•ttJect of this improvement was to atop the waste of water down the left 
irkich almoet e<inaled the How down the right, and tbiin increase the uavi- 
b^tb of the water in the channeL This has been accompllahed, fnlly a fbot 



.# 



1994 ai bp THK t'HiRp or imeiNKERs, tj. s. abmt. 

In depth havine be«uiaildc(l to theohannelBtitS-foot atagn. No diuukgeluu occurred 
to thu vork nince ita completioa. 

The foUowing ia a Btabiment of the qaantltioa at inMerM uipnadod In tlis con* 
•truetion or tbc ilam nnd abutment: 

Oaklumlior feet, B.M.. IM.aM- 

Hemlock lumber do H,(M 

Drift lioIt« poanda.. 11,300 

Spikca do.... 325 

Stone cubic yards.. 3,400 

ExoaTatlon made do 880 

The cOHt of materials and labor na« $8,075.76. 

Dikr at lied Bank, 64 milu aboee Pi llRbur jr.— Although cue of the most extensirn lea 
gorfrea tueu iu many yeant in the All eebeoj' swept over tlila dikoln February of the 
post winter, yet tlio ilBtitaKe to It ia slight, not eicefliiiK the displacement of a few 
■qnarui of uaving. It in estimated thai $40 n-ill make the rcpeirK. 

itam at fiieholton ttlaiid, 37 milet abin>e Pitlibiirji. — This work wsn put In good re- 
pair in the seosuD of 1891 by replacing abont u aquare of paving which hud waahed 
out. DurinK the paaC n-iuter the Parker ice ^orge damaged some of the paving. 
The uei'easnry repairs, it is estimated, can be made for $30. 

Z>ain at Siznila lita»i. — This itructnre has remained in good condition. 



Btmoval a/ bar at foot of Pitholt RippU. — This work was couiiuunwod but not carried 
to cumpletiou, owing to the lateness of the season ; 500 eubio yarile of rock were re- 

Rtmoval of rock and olhvr oMrvelionii Mo>r Eitlanniag. — A number of dangerous 
roclwand nuajrs had made their appennmre on the lower portion of the river, and in 
October a suiall force was put to work rem»viiig them. The party operati^d trotii 
Klttanuing to I'ittsbiirg, a distance of 45 mil«a, making the following removals of 
ohs tractions, viz; 



KlMMmlne 

CoglDjfl iMtnd 

H«d of Sou Inlud .. 
NleheUotu Isliuid — 
White Bock 

Tueetiun IhI^A 

Bnll Greek 

Lo^uiA Lofidina ...... 

FeuitoeDmUe laUnd . . 



At the close of the last flspnl year most of the lending parties encroaching on the 
navigable capacity of the riverhnd liuen rentriiined, eittiBr by injunction, or by stipu- 
iatiuDa in which they agreed to stop deposit tug waste mateilal over the linnJu, peitd- 
ing the establishment of harbor Hues. DnriuK the year, however, navigattos had 
frei|nent occasion to report parties enjjaged in sFling materiiLl into the stream. These 
ciiHi» were promptly investigated, and the giiilty parties wure notified to atop their im- 
Inwful practices, which in every case t.li(>y did. thua obviatiiifEthcnooessity of taking 

Navigators have heretofore frc'iueullj cipeiieuced grout iueouviiniouce on iiceoDtit 
of huge piles of coarse gravel formed in the harbor by parties digK'^K ns">^ from the 
river bed, and last senHun the operatious of one company I)ecnme so oTiJeotiotiabIa 
that an int'orniation was made a(;ainst them and their employes. At the hearinethey 
were indicted and held for trial at court. Snbscitucntly they removed the piles of 
jSravci. Members and employes of u driidge comjiaQy were prosecuted for obstroct- 
ing the cliaunel at the Union Bridge. After being indicted tliey removed all the 
material put iu. These <'aaea have not yet been tried. 

The removal of large quantities of rocks. soaKs. and other nhstniitious from the 
bed of the river, and the erection of low damsaiid dikes, shutting otfdu|>li(ate chutes 
and contracting the channel where spreail over large areas, have resulted in great 
good to the general trade, and much more work of the same nature remains to be 



l>^fiKpi>KT Of MA/OS HTICKHBr. 1995 

nlicf and tmtvty of navigation. The moat importMit improrement Out 
*m thm AUegbenjr, hoverer, and irhich sfaanld noelTe seiioiu couidanb- 
iImmIiiii of ataok watar, at least u iu np aa Soda Worka, 20 nilai aboT* 
TUmvmtttt AaAUogbms y»at,v is rmpidlf bnUding ap with milla and 
italtlMaMiiita ef other fcuda, wliicb demand and dawrre &olUtiM be 

Maneg statemetit. 
*a,a».M 

MtW, aoMKittt «xp«nd«d dnring fltoal year l^tn.TS 

Uj 1. IWS, b«I«>ee anesperadad ..s 1,0B.1B 

Mi],ieee,oatatukdiDKQabilttiM 10.00 

htr 1, 1892, balBBoe available LUft.lS 

iwutappropTtabadbyaotapproTed July 13,1893. ..; SB^OO&OO 

Aauont kTailable for fiscal year ending jDoe 80, 189S S^ISfeU 

^IjDoaiitlhatcaabaprDlltablrespendedinflBcalyeH'asdlMJiUMSOtlfiH S^OOaOO 
^hmittfd in eomplianoa with reqairement* of McUona S of rirec and 
I kubot acta of 1866 and 1807. 



iplete atatlatioa of tha eommarca of tlia 
Eucnjr luvBi^ vwuik h> >i« wmwwivu coiiaitioin and the fbottbat tbonianoiaooid 
J kept anywhere. It ie, therefbn, impoMibl? to state whetti^ there haa or hw 
lit liem an increaae in the tonnage over that of the pFarloiis Vear. The looal harbor 
noB^ exc««d8 that of 1600 by 361,023 tons, moat of whloh la attxibnUble to an 
Ktram in the tra^le. 

Re following is a atatenient of the principal eoidnieioial moreaunta en the river 
Wng the ealeadar year 1801: 



AitlclH. 


QoMHty-l AiUctas. 


Qunrtitr. 




■w. 

IS 




not. 
















1!.«3] 






















**'*S 
















.S^SJ? 














400, T» 







PMKn^en carried, 5,650. 

In addition to the above, the follotving is a statement of the priocipal commorcial 
I in the Allegheny Harbor at Pittsburg : 



Artlolo. 


Qujmtiy. | ArOolee. 


Qn«tltr. 








^Tom 
















16;B70 
























i ™" 










-_ OT.M 

^ 35.00 

_ 3&,W 

lOT.W 

" '" «r AOr^e^r CStj. •• vtav tke UiMi on the righl baul 

■UitfcrtteMHMlcBBBdsatiMofCt i>D ooDdition ttud 

aka«U be a — i-itla mb. etUtoa to tbe same effevt wm 

^ irfPirteburg, &i>intb| 

df CiiMfiK. ■ raa tte Eugmeers* Society a|l 
■», !■ all thi inas Ike reAsoo alleged for A^ 

wmg that the da» be a —Table wthefew tLat the height et 

fcadi ia the Alfc g bea j Kner toub nb tacnaacd by a fixed dam. 

The qaeHioa of tlw la a iiuaiJ cha va« referred to Uie Secretsra 
of War br tte Ctaef of Jtagii**— », : aa ^ptenber 29, 1690, it w$^ 
ankred Ukat the dam at H«r lalato< e nade a moTabie one. Tfa^ 
ehaaga ia 4euga oercsntaCed a earn atdtng rhaa^ in tbe esdinat«(| 
eaetofttevwk: tbeeetiBBtelar&. ^ ^went design is 9^1)0.000. 

It wae s^iposed that after this aethja there woold be no Airtbe^ 
eaose for d^j, but a aaaiber eCiipariaB ovuers on tbe lefl or Pitts- 
borg eide of the river, to vhoa do aUowMioe for damages had been 
made, for the reason that the proposed look vas to be oat-^ide of the 
hijih-wAter line, brought soit m tbe circait c*>ort of the FiiHed Stales 
foT'coiDix;DS3tioti. The casc was placed in tbe hauds of the CmUti 
States anomey for the Testem district of Pennsylvania, where it still 
remains, 

Tbe Davig Ii<laud Dam |m>oI gives permanent navigation on about -J 
miles of the lower portion of the Allegheny, and daring the ealentlar 
year 1^91 the local commercial morements od that part of the river 
amounted to more than jQO.OOO tons. 

The legal qae^tions which stand in the way of the onmniencement of 
this im[>ortant work ishoiild be ^ttled. aud it is hoped that some action 
will be taken at an early day by those having the matter in charge. 

This work has been under the immediate supervision of Mr. J. W. 
Arras, As^iiitant Engineer. 



Sfoneg ttatftHfHt. 



\ 



Jnlyl, IMl. balance nncxpendrd - #70,618.38 

June 30, 1892, amouiit eipeaded ilar rug fiscal year 1,951.3^ 

jTily 1, 1892, bnlanreaneiiipnaeil W.eSfi.S 

Aiuuuiititi.[.ropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 40.000.0 

Amoniit available for lUral year endinR Jnne 30, 1893 108,696.8 

{Ainonnt fr«tiinat*-il> reqniruil for comi.letion of existing project 184,600.01 
Aij)<iil[itlli:it.r'anl,ei,rolitablyexiieiirl<?(lii)Iisca1vearciiiliDgJuii«30,lg»4 200,000.01 
Siibuiitu-il in compJiiiiice with leuiUTeiuenta o} bt— '— ^ • ' -* 
horbur acta of 1866 imd 1867. 




- -T^CLri^^r,. '-■ -.- V 



gSUMSa B »^>>HBFOBT OF MAJOB miCKJSE J. 1997 

D D za. 

■ 

' BSE HARBOR AT MOUTH OP ICDSKINGnM RIYRR, OHIO. 

BeiM karbor is Uie lower pool of fhe Mnakingnm Biver. which has* 
IHoBiled by the elaek-wator dam at Marietta, and the omect of the 
ric Dder oooflidemtifm ia to Imfld a paasway throagfa this dam, of 
lite as win permit Ohio BiTer packets and coal fleets to take 
^Ihom lee in tide pobL The passway in qnestion consists of a 
jaBefcy wfaicli, oiwins to tihe local conditions controlling the only 
pJillB site^ was bnflt with independent axes of entrance sand eodt, 
SM^ between tlieBe aaras being Uo W. This involTed the neccs- 
SfiiitaDnc Um lock ehaaiber at both mds so as to permit Ikxrts 
IMS disactioii wUIb in flie lock. Tlie plan of the look chamber 
inSne abmewbat like^ an honrglas^ the lock being narrowest in 
yUle. The mAzimimn rectangle which can be passed tiiron^ the 
ksB a length of 965 Ihet and a width ct 8fr Ihet The watt has 
iim mognmm ofaioe 1880, but has been kept back 1^ inadequate 
HjilBtiDna mad flie oeeasional absence of any q^propriation. The 
ii now nearly flniahed and is in nse. 

IS iilowing in ft atatement of the amoont and date of all q;>propri- 
the work: 



iTlSSO 501,000 

ilmsi.. 80^000 

■HlISBB 40^000 

%mi fio^ooo 



AngnitfSLlSSS $87, 

Angntlll, 1S8S SO^OOO 

SeptMBber 1% ISBO 80,000 



Totrf 827,600 

kia work was under the immediate snp^rvision of Lieat. Cassins E. 
Btte, Corps of Engineers, XT. 8. Army, nntQ April 20, 1892. Since 
;time Mr. Edmund Moeser, Assistant Engineer, has had immediate 
wision of the work. 

OPSBATIONS DURINa THE FISCAL YEAB. 
(SZTRACT FBOM RBPORT OF MB. EDMUKD MOXSKR.) 

i fhe beginning of the year the masonry of the river wall was complete ; the 
I wall waa complete with the exception of 155 feet, which waa 12 feet above the 
BT miter sill. Work was carried on withoat interruption ; the masonry of the 
I van waa finished, being abont 1,100 yards, the hollow quoins set, and the 
BT gatee bnilt and placed in position. 

contntct waa made with the Griffith and Wedge Company, Zancsville, Ohio, for 
iron work, consisting of mud valves, turbine culvert valves, head gates for inill 
if machinery for operating lower gates, and all machinery for operating valves. 
under- water iron work was all placed as soon as finished, so that the lock was 
ly for use December 1, 1891. 

wo tboiiHand two hundred and eighty-seven cubic yards of mud was taken from 
lotk chamber and filled into the old mill race on the lock lot. 
he lock will not be available for Ohio River boats until a draw is placed in tlio 
tiBKiTc and Ohio Southwestern Railroad Bridge just below it. No move has been 
b bj the railroad company towards changing tlie bridge. 

Money statement 

f 1, 1891^ balsnee unexpended $20,114.29 

m 90, 1860, amount expended during fiscal year. .^ 20, 063. 51 

y 1, 1882^ baUuice unexpended 60.78 



ilLl't;Kr OF TH£ i__- 



'«. 



- ■ ■^ T fc » • 



i- jil'.€St 



-i :i^ niiiul^ ric«!«. 



^ N itM Slid %A\?*m 
bj«ld-r 



J ; 



S 



» ■■ .'Mn*-*tilW ''b.- UW ». •" ' •• »■ *. ."" ." •. ' > H 'I 9C 35 I 

.A;r.N-l I'M**. A '•• - i 

.-••J :.»ii.nliUi . . 4 r * ;»' . " ■• ■ ••_ "- -■ .- - ., ^? r^ 
\ '.I KUinU Mjm liii**- 

'. ♦^ H»i. *»!««ni I'liuip "* 

.A I iVrVt'lltTMld 

- ■ III.:. i»h:o...l».lW ' *Mt n.'" .*. 7 <! i': • k * K >f X* 

... •». 'lO :« 9.»0 14 to 2. HO 7 539 r- :'.■' !■ SI l-S !*.« . 



• . ; tx'.n i'harg<i for pattrniii. li'v 
.ft : A We*lge Co., and executed August 29, 18S<1. 



»^ - •.. .• : • •;'*t'fiwf/ let Hathor Lock at monlh of 
I • I . » • /is*!/ fiear ending June SO, 1S9S, 



".LTTv-trnjent. 



Date. ; Toex] 



\ . ... » ■ rk for Ice HarlH»r Livk Au-:. 29. 1891 Dec. 1 



, t,^ ..'a. -Kii 10 the report fur oinTatiug aud care of 






D D 13. 

- VKHOR LOCK AT MOITII OF MUS! 
> ::\ F.K.OHIO. 

.*:o l><Mrinber JO. 1S91, for the oi)€ 



■ 'V »iinKM'\isiini of Lifiit. CiLssiu: 
'<'vnnv, until AprillH). ISIL'. Si 
' -t.uit' engineer, has had immed 



VS 



-,,..:.•. 1. 1891. 



/ 



/ 




DDI4. 

IMPROVEMENT OF MUSKINGUM RITEH. OHIO. 

Tiis reiwrt is liiiiitiil to work carried on under tbc uppropriation of 
gntt 11. l>i.SS. for till- ct til struct ion of ;i luck at TavlorMvtlle mid the 
natnictioD of the lock at Zaaesville, Ohio, of (102,000. 
Ua work van under the immediate supervision of Lieut. Cassias E. 
lette, Corps of Engineers, U. 8. Army, until April 20, 1892. Since 
i time Mr. Edmund Moeser, assistant engiueer, has had immediate 
rrision of the work. 



OPERATIONS FOB THE PIBOAL YEAR. 



t. BDMUND 



■ work of opening out the channel below new Lock Ko. 9 waa coniplet«d. Th«r« 
w • well -(If lined channel runniiig from the lower end of the new lock on the 
Inde of the river, downstream, nnd dnally acrouthe river tc near themontli of 
Cnek, 2,000 feet below new Lock No. 9. The excavation eitfliiiJed over a dia- 
)«f S(IO ft^t. The brttoin of this excavation is on a Itivel 2 fe«t below tLetou 
• lower niit^r atll of the lock. The remainder of the distance to Salt Creek will 



ledTat a cost of 80 cmita p«i yard for rock excavation and 31^ cents per yard for 

i«xcavHtion. 

• coping of the new lock waa repainted, balanced counter weighta were added 

H mai^liiiicry for operating the vylindrical valvea, and the lower gatea were 

■I but are not yet placed. 

■ balance of the money expended at tbiu place dnrinR the year waa for plant 

Vterial which are on hand and which are to he lued in ^e oonatmction of » 



g crib at the head of the n 



T lock. 



. ^.1-- 0¥ EXOnO-ERS, U. S. ARMY. 
--" ' ^■'' ■" '^*^ appropriation relating to the m 

. .:: " -T ..f rhf \iriTiity to asrortain the fet 
• «T. ,: :!:»> l.^k in another liu-atioii. 1 
-- • . . i • ory dilapitlatwl iM>ijdition,butc 

•• ' '" t-v iT the gates. 

••..-.- ■ It rr-. ri for operating and care of locks f 



15,517; 

snt. 
i£^i47.; 



:*• :_ 



.3 



^- ->. IaM> ox MUSKINGUM BIYfll 



:.»- - r ::r -n;' -.ini ami date of all appropd 



■ .. > T : i 



. ^ ■ : - :si:. alioTted $155.20aOI 

\ -•>::". WM. allotted. 39,980l« 

\ r- • . r 1'.". l'i;»l, allotted. 1, 300.01 

.:.T \>;'l. allotted... 12,24l.M 

: :a' 1,043,9».« 

. - . • :■•: Weak. The reeonstructiOB 

. ^- r •"..' Vr^iiiiiinjr of the fiscal year, 

: 1 o: III ks >'os. 2 aod 5 was com- 

«* ". :r rompU'ted, and minor repairs 

-i: <:Il'i. where the bottom wonld 

. :. :.< pliueil nt equal depths below 

: ...'it- unifonn. >i» that all locks 

:::tiv, and erii>iH in width and 

Vi. :i:^ <»!' the silN at a iinitbrm 

• . xW Tiavi.uai'ie depth of the 

./••r ni.n'niaim'd. By raising 

\. hi Hi water line has been 

■ -.-nn'red by the closhi? of 
^ V.n'il with the t>penin;r of 

^ , .f Lieut. Cassius K.Gil- 
, -^ lU Sinee that lime 
\ \d immediate super- 



ncft, leauling to the mill below the Ice Harlior L<»cky wah excavated back of 
vaD of thelock and the material thus excavateil utted in filliug the old 



loontof stone fill and about 100 feet of gravel backing is all that is re-* 
li to eonplete thin dam. 

iamd JDm Ao. 2f DeroU. — ^Tbe repairs at this place were limite<l to such work as 
llbteiewitlioatmakinzitlast longer than the work at other points and thereby 
ffteopeninff of through navigation. The project for reconstmction included 
■MTal of the old fonndation timbers under floor of lock chamber, as the lock 
to be lonnded on rock/ making the lower miter sill of stone, and the inaer- 
id valTes in walls at lower gate recess. After the cofferdams were finished 
iteied, unTeetigmtion dereloped the fact that the lock was not on rock, bat 
b en » toogh red cby orerlying a red rock. Owinff to the lateness of the season 
rifge of ^lan was neeeosary ; tlie lower miter sill was Duilt of timber, and the mud 
■ «0n omitted. The loek was eloeed for repairs July 20, 1891, and reopened to 
prittfli January 22. 1802. 

• fBllairiBg waa the work aocompliahed : Built new upper and lower gates and 
r dDb; aix alide ralvea were placed in the two lower gates. Put iir upper miter 
wWk ftninr cnlTerta. Inserted cylindrical filling valves in head of old lock 
K Itatand 117 liset of loelurall 3.2 feet, to make guard of lock standard height. 
%0mtk il lepaln to Ikoe oroldloek walls and stopped all leaks with concrete. 
mi. OTit nma and filled tpaeea between old foonoation timbers' witH concrete. 
H timber floor of loek ehamber. A crib breakwater, 9 feet by 9 feet by 180 feet, 
ppt OB the baak below the lock in order to break the eddy oansed by dam and 
waD. 

lie xmpmtn to dam. The lower apron of the dam had raised, letting out the 
> filliBC; Aa apron waa forced bacK into place and fiMtened down with anehor 
IB feet long. The bolts penetrate the rock underlying the soft foundation of 
ma for a distance of 6 and 7 feet. The dam was Tenl]<^ with stone where neces- 
tmd llie lower apron was sheeted with new timber for a distance of 480 feet. 
eaasidete the repairs at this place the following work remains to be done : To 
late raising of lock walla, to build a small guiduig crib below the river wall, 
tt iioli eorer plates over cylindrical valve machinery, and to put in place lock 
■a and new gate-operating machines. About 170 yards of masonry remains to 

Dam No, 3, LowelL — This lock has been open to naviffation througKout 
. The section of needle dam across the nead of the lock was operated 
ry, and the lower end of the canal kept in good navi^ble condition. 
not as yet been an opportunity of testing the practicability of keeping 
mer end of the canal clear by this method, but a recent sudden flood in Cats 
^ whieh empties into the canal near )he upper end, has put out into the canal 
(▼7 hmr of sand and gravel, and a test is to oe made on this bar as soon as the 




fc^lMl^^rt.— At tbe close of last yeur tbr rfpuiiKon iliU link 
i^ m UM eofferdMna had not yet been rriuoved. These were nut 
Ml Ae w«ck <m Che ditin wm coiDpl<-t«il. mid tin- lock «-»• not 
lUtilNoTembec. A drymMOury niill nan Itiiih i^Diiuedini; I lie 
MlHidWBll witii the high ground, and now gatc-operftlinx niii<'liiiii'H 
ifidttnoit the lock wafis. 

tMrim was pmhed a* rapidly na the materiaU roiiM be deliTered. 
^nWl^ wftii the ex<»ption of a short, plei-i^ ]mt iu last s«iuu>u. The 
iim was raiaed 4 feet higher than that of the aid dam, in order to 
■I eonditkniB for which new Locks No*. 8 and 9 were dreigued. The 
'Ud^ laazpaeted toeanae a deposit at the font of the dam, and bv 
^Mnliiiieillaliilj balow the dam add to its stability. 

Btwaabntlt atthe rigbt end of the dam, and the embaukinetit 
w Ugk graand, waa laiaed to the height i>f the new ababneut 
■talMa Hmm BftTod. 

Iff Bm St. 9, nffbnviU*.— A« the new lock at TaylorsvillecaD not lie made 
*^^atewiaplae0din the oonnty bridge J mt l>elowit, all naTigation at 

' — " *■ the tiA lateral canal and lock. In anticipation of the 

Udog waa done tu the cannl, and the time reiinirnl fitr 

'bMlti«ttt>iS9lBe»ha( not been shortened. 

iLi-_i 'teialied 3 fbet taprodnce the normal c" "" -- '-- 



tmm§ tiatt mm* imralMA a fcat topi 
llMkB^SwaadMigiMd. IfthUweredo 



mid lieof Immediate l>ene- 



mlf0.1O,Zgneuitte. — H Inm' repaire were mtvde to the dam. 



• iHge anonnt of mud which accnmnlates in the chamber 
■ MP gMi midedng them dilBealt of pperatinn. The middle and npper 
I Tcry- poor aondltton. They shonld be rebuilt at an early day. 



., edging obannel and removing enaga and 

iAoMpoiiitB betwven HMlett* and Eogleport. 

far new damp Mows have been pMpwea and the timbers for building 

amgb* and atned at UoConselnfUe. 

rifitnrt H*iiMrT Ftya waa engaged ingeneral towing between Looks Nim. 

tgtat tha dndf« m* done by the hiiwd eteamboat Lijuit Catiel. 



ill I M: 



- ■■: : .• ri 
• • •. : i'l-.ti' 

* . ". ". '.v.r!'! «•?.. 

■ ' : ^ t1i. •. 

• •• •• ^. •:! to ri_ 

. \ . /.«/.. 
I L.'. k N<i. . 
• '.' c^^ siih • 

« 

i :.• oM laitci 
. il.f ro»k i: 

"', I«'^* *'Y pool. 

•. i :iM»'liti«Ml : 

• • rt'«i«n«iT: • 
t" Xhv lork 

-\t ISO am' 

■ *. l"«» 't brl«.- 
.'. oi L'lfvl • 



• • ■.t".>vin«Mit ]r.' 

• .••.■ :".. .I'oltimtit . 
. : -^ :".: Tit \i tin* a'- 

;"\: : ^:w rfji.iirs v. 

-.:'%. .i:i«l tin* iMitirc • 

* .\\v ot 1 OH 1. 'I 

•:: till that of fori- 
x-..»j,' i«ji ilu» ll*iors p' 
.. t:!Ml»« r^ forniiiiL: 
• ...im.il iiiiil'OiH ar« 
>• ii. !!.;•' ot* wat«-i 
. ; tlif -»iou»' tilling 

1 1» rompl«*t«' th«- 
w ills w nil roiirl. 
5i.i« Ikih < jspoii tl 
o:' thf • it'^I !•» t' 

/...I '. .<««/ Pant 
\\ •.{> ilu- woik y» • 
1 ■••.!■ l:ni«l wall a: 
li.iiii ami lai"^*' 1- 
:-'mmI ill \u;;ii»«5 
ojHiatiiiir iiiarli. 
1 «iii. I.o.k la«i 
It.- ]nit in pla«'» ' 

111 llir fall o! 
tin* roj'k ]m1<i\v 

riir i:.0 tVi'l • 
•sI«»)M- ilaiii. til-- 



III 


1 iiiidc 


rof tlr- 




A 


::iii 


.li;!:i • • 


t 


!"» 


liiiiHln tl 1' 




y 


1. ». 


tntii /' 


« 


. • 


..1 ; 


,]• 1 ^«'«'' 




, ■ 


.■ I. 


ivM. 1" 




. 


1 • • 


•j.-r \v ■ 


• 


• 


1 * 


ii.i'llf 

.NrU 


• 


. 


1 . 1 
1 • ! *" 


. 1 firi 
1 1 . • « 



I, Ii> WnllaCF, 132. It aiifwios Imm Ihi' cviil.-iit-i' iliar m 
" I'ltlfle the df renilaiitH li:«l ui> I'lniiU with wliirli to 
iiftt niid«rth«atatiitcH»f (iliiu. tlii-y. aHeomiiii»>>i<ii- 
bridge pnrposra M thi-ir March iir .lnii« M-uixiii in 
,nld IiE coUc^'liMc unl )»-»•».- th<- Jdlli of l)<-<-<-i.ili<'r 
{ipean from the eviilfni'i' lh»t thi' dufi-nchiiil> :i|i- 
tbem to niise the fiiudn with wliicb tn maki- th<- 
appUcation failed, and tliv dtifciiiliiiitii iiitriKliiriMl 
ilie co«t of the required i:liiiii>ri.- will vxci-eil tbo sum 
lanied by witueaBW for the <>avfruiiient. The de- 
Ohio, rmn not expend in cuimtniirlin):, nltiTiti);. or 
jMtM of $10,000 without Hpvc-iol aiithorily fniin ilie 
Mbmiltiiig tba nm« to a vote of the {wonlv iif the eonnt.v nt 
~~ ' tli^Tf was no ([buhsI election nller ihi- Hei-vioeof notiM, 
u& the Biat Uonilay of April and the l^tatt eleetioti 
"—^ HMMlaj of Noveuilier. The tint of tbeac dales 
_ dw. lami was after tbe limit prearrlbvd hy rho 
Jtbority in tlie tuatter exi-eplin^ rh county I'oin- 
Ifkod todnw upon and noniitbonlyof law toiiu'iir 
-'r buIivUiuI reitpitiiiiihility. It would l>i> luaui- 
_ ■ topiOMAd without the authority of loi-at law 
frttpiiio their own naponalbility, to iuoiir tbeeipenses involveil in 
Un rcqairnd cluaiifea, wlwtlMr the r4Mt would have been leNH or luoi'p thnu 
The aatiet- w3.i nut reauMiablet and, therefore, if upou no other gnmiiil, tha 
uul be Ml luidc. 

I vuiit qnflatiou. and that which goea to the root of the mattc)', i* whelbcr 
kMitha puwnr toiuurerDpon tbe W'cnttoT^of Wartho antboritv att('ui|iled 
ftmd by tbr ait. Eu •soordance with it« tenus, whenev<T hi' buB codiI 
brilefc that u brid^t is aa unniaaonable obHtrnctioo to navijpilion he ik to 
• to tbe puticfl owaiug or aootrolliuc tbe same, after firHt Kivtui; thetii 
I iiMlwliiiiilj iiiliiihini)T. to make bucIi alteratiouo as be may ■peoify.aiid 
f flulnra nr niftiaal to malf* ''-- — i-i.:- _ __..i.i- »: — *i_.... — i.. 




e within a ruMHinable time they 



itdMfi 



» oi ■ iiiuucmBaDor, anu iiie aevtvutty iiiifcj uii-ori i-uu iiiBfriiiii.iini oi 
linp. Tbe powetoitho Secretary dcpendsuponbia having ndJndjreU 
fa an obstraotiim ^nd hiH aitjudicatiou is made final and roucluijivo. 



, . __. The qneetioD is oue of fact, or a mixed qnestion of low 

nd U eaa not be detennined by n court without a jury nnlexa the defend- 
itn. It waa hdd in Grant rl. Raymond, 6 Puters, 242, Chicf-.luxrii'e Mar- 
«DeIn( tbe AeeMau, tliat tbe Seuretary of StAte of the United BtiiteH is 
ber im whom, ouder tbo Countitntion, jndiclal iiower can be vi'sttHl. In 
St» Swrnbuy bad Rime throu|;b with tbe form of reinauinz a patent fonm 
. It y teoe that there was not then any Htntiitc aiithorticiiii; a reinKue. 



r. S. AKMT. . I 



Hdj kBd bull* wlufl 

LkMd witUa what til 




1^1 1^^ 1^1 M 



. ■atkehMdaf thaw 

taftt*. Am hMk IW feid «f 

■ ■ t tin f>i«iliiil 11 ■ 

Aelntefc TWncklarfhaeti 

•nlwJilKnrtwM. BMtilbi 
•fC- 







JhAl^iM Btar JMOTj^«iw(ai^4^ JP, 1 



MV I.WM Mar 



Uuiis. ZaanTiUe... 



^ r xMpMw 

? »rt4iKb«llHS ... 

5*aa*jBBB(*. 

. Mini, tUtvte 



I'S 

Lin 





»• 




S; MS Kf 


iiS 








. . llav 1. IKW 1 Utf 












Sji. 


I"* 




i'S 









AflTSt'lX It O itKPOKT OF MAJOH STICKNEY. 2007 

■ merr leaiei /<Jr ifni-txAing April 30, W95— ConUnuisl. 



H Lc«M. 


3HhJ«rt. 




AuBtml 


K«b«te 




IhTTirtii 


Walerpovcr. 


s 


11 

IMJ.Off 

114: M 

loaioo 
ao,ivi 


•157.73 

Bin 


•S:!? 




|Btfc.'«lort Brvll>«» '".; ."^ i ^ ".'---".- - 


...di> 

...dn •. 

^l 










a 

1W.S8 
IM.TO 
M.IS 
lit. Ml 

as. 15 

Wl.M 




Water pnwer 


n,ono 

Ul 
a, 039 


4.W 
6.10 


STtJumixr 








-. du 
















.- i\: 










iMl.T4 














^,1,„, 


-■!<• 




*»».« 


S^sSarr' ::::;::::: 


■■ ij]; • 


t,n« 


Kn.81 

278. <W 










































( 







'Huuch Id pnnj^L 10 ninof 4'5" mtll^loiMa. 
tKi»ach to propel I& run.,r4t' BiMIMonm. 
1 LiBiie t«ul£md to Utiakingum L'ann Compwif , N 
1 TsiM At* ;«wi> in advuce. 



£it{RMt«/0rjt«Ml fMr AtdiBp Ju« A7, JSSS. 



Lock and Dsm No. 1 

\jtrV. auil iPam No. 2 

L<..k ami najiiNo.3 

L-H-fc and Dam N"o.4 

iMri. aii.i Ham No.5 

Lo<^k aod flam No.6 

Lock and Daqi Ko.7 

Lock and Dam^o.S 

Lock and Diun No. 9 

Lock and Dun Xo. 10 

Bent, foeligae, and w:itcT. 

Eepai re to steamer Vcija 

BvpsiiB to quarter boat 

Opeivting ntcanier Vega eight li 
Bailding two ubw dnmp scowh . 



5,01)1) 
55, 423 



V»:'r« V. hti'r 



• • , ..•■•« .1 I'l ill. I , 



-^^ ■ -I. 



>» ••l.^-.t tMV. 



MO U. lSi>-J. 



1/. »; 



• V 



-| • . * r ••llf.-r. :i|„l i, j., ,,j„.,j . 
^ 7 J • . — • iii\nJviii|i an iii\|. 

^^- 1 1 LN' litn- tli». S«?i rotai". 
^ 1 1 •■ J»ii<l;:i- is ;iii ohstrii. • 

., X i *l t'«'- ••lily «|iir.stion> : — 

1 1 X • • .*!»*»». ^^lli«•ll lu. is ai,- *::.• 

J , - 1 itlaiits havo ouiii]>]i« .: 

Tii tJ«>^ «.»>«• flu* briuL*' •' ^V* 

^ X r It;"'" 1 ouiity. liy \ i~ • 

. 1 ^fct uiv ui" Mai-rh i'S. l- 

• »l *'.«'. >inte l.s:i?< ami 

, --Tit i«»l of tin- Stare If- . -. j 

t« 1A» ••! Jil.trk-xvattT n;i^ 1 

; » ^ T In- St.llO Ol* (»lliii T.. . -. J 

/ , e- Xl'T'*! <t(i\fMlllloilt I. 

^ ? r* • X «■ •i.Hil luidtfr. on 

^ .«i ;.«!>«) raiMMl the loc. ■ • 
^^ .» t«r aboxc. Sonic -I f 
* * e • »i»'«l '"I" n-quiiiiiw : 
^ » ^ . iv» to t-rc* t or aiith- 
,^_^ -w 1 4;atioii isooiifftli 

J ' -:..«• to ai t upon tl 

' ^ 1 ..IK Ti-.iis shoiiKl III " "' 

7."-. _ : :.♦.'.. Iplna. S Wal " . ' " 

^■^ J^ . t :an.!. lUdiu It. . . . 

, ^ - : . ••■; J^i«* UfiuTal - * - 

* ,.i « .i > xxhrthrrCf - -'- 

' .'. r 1-* !Tvm>os to tJ. 

^. •!> t\ir tliiH i«.' •• ' 






.•!.*• to OVpif.ss -"^ 

'■ t::t u»in. ■ . ji: 

x« :v::i t :i:;ai|.. ^-^ 






4. 



: D D REPOKT OK SIAJOK STICKSEV: 2(J( 

il ^tcpmte* incnrred on Maikiitgum Biver, tic. — Coutiuued. 
LUCE ASV DAU So. 1. 



tm^ u^,. 


M.Wri.1. 


SoppH«. 


Bntuiil 


ToUl, 


^LL .,„ .. 


lis 


•IT.Si 
111. OB 


11 


M 


Hbv. '.- 


::::::::: s.45iw 


pp- - *«?*" 




'■'^-.tt 


















"■""" 


810.82 


"*** 




B 







LOCK AND DA.it No. £. 



L 


9U9.U 


iu.m 


46.19 

i&tu 


R.ia 1 


n. nil. 81 

1.TM.W 
i.TaS.M 






Er:::;::;:::::-:::: 




















%oa 
































* 


Il,«»-M 


''"■" 


m.n 


IMH 1 


11.M.M 





E AND DAM Ro. 8. 



•188.70 >«7.I7 tZ3.S3 «S1.0( 
















LOCK AND DAM No. i 





•'!:S> "Slli "iSlS 




























' 


1 



LOCK AND DAM No. B 



1 


101. M 

Tri.w 

1.1W,# 










1 *1.0»,T5 


M.'t7 

21T.9S 
38, M 








!S::S 

H5.0U 














~ 


: 1 ''SJ-U 






11.3* 








8,00 




















1 "■^■" 


S,««i.02 


:ii8.72 


3oa.oo 


si,wo.ie 



2008 KEPOUT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. AHMY. 

Detailed etatement of expenses incurred on Muskingum Biver under the appropriation for 
operating and care of oanats and other works of navigation, for the fiscal year ending 
June SOf 18S2, 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 



July- 

Augiut ... 
Septvoiber 
Oc.'t4»l>er . . . 
N(>v«iii1ier 
I>ee«fniber. 
Janiury .. 
F^bniaW . 
Mank.... 

April 

May 

Jane 



Tutal 



July 

AujjTiwt — 
iSDpteiulier. 
l)ctub«r . . . 
November. 
December. 
Jan nary... 
Febmary.. 

March 

April 

May 

Jane 



Month. 



Salaries. 



Lock-koep- 
watchman. 



$530.00 
530.00 
530.00 
530.00 



150.00 
410. 00 
380.00 



380.00 



$504.00 
449.00 
449.00 
414. 17 
504.00 
406.50 
534.00 
579.00 
579.00 
524.00 
524.00 
449.00 



Plant. 



First coat. 



Bepain. 



$517. 16 

332.79 

1. 412. 31 

118.45 

307.97 

.95 

2.80 

107.28 

.50 

2.10 



$14t.44 

126.71 

13&U 

128. n 

10. M 



1st 



3,440.00 5.915.67 



2.802.31 i 



HXM 



Month. 



iugs. ^"PP"*"Iportatioii. 



$74.08 



I. 



$152. 8a 

30. rj 

42.:i4 

49.40 

5.54 

8.58 

7.99 



$127 



34.18 

20.95 

1.00 

1.20 



.01 

11.25 

10. 25 

10. 8U 

13. 15 

.00 

.50 

14.60 

.25 

.25 



MiiMvIla- 
neuus. 

72.53 

127.71 

12&e6 

109.18 

105.41 

41.28 

110.68 

72.15 

50.51 

33.18 



TotaL 



$2, 
I. 
1 
1. 



1, 
1. 



3S7.11 
553.01 
706l74 
STUn 
ftS6.7t 
SS2.04 
736^57 
221. 5C 
U6a.S 

5&8.U 
8^.S» 



Total ; 74.08 



354. 76 j 188. 66 1, l.'0. 86 i If 482.70 



VNITED STATES DREIK;E MALTA. 



July 

Aui^iHt . . . 
Septemlier 
(K-tober — 
Novniibor 

Ajiril 

May 

June 



Total 



Month. 



SalairifH. ^1"\^' Siiiiplies., Koiwiro. TowlKiat.; Total. 



$532. 10 
5 0. 45 
590.45 
604.75 
550. 25 
481. 77 
2:{9.47 
112.00 



3, 655. 24 



$126.74 i 
;i4.10 
6.30 



107.14 



$185.51 


54.80 


47.90 


0.45 , 


:t8, 36 


84.0(» 


25.00 ' 


2.50 


457. 52 



$125.96 $1,220.00 



8.96 



80.21 
57.90 



620.00 
600.00 
6iW.OO 
600.00 
460.00 
240.00 



$2.IM.31 
1.383.31 
L2U.0 
L 314 41 
L246.U 

i,u^n 

114.56 



273.03:4,300.00- 8,812.98 



rNITKI) STATES STEAMER VEGA. 



.Inly 

AncuHt . . . 

St'ptrmlKT 

(>ot«>l»fr . . . 

l>t'<»*nilMT . 
Jnuuarv... 



Total 



Month. 



Salarios. Kiinipmont. Snppliei*. 



:v.2. .'»<) 



1,770.05 



¥^. 50 



&80 




$:i2. 44 

:w. 75 

:t.90 

.54 

68.45 

1.50 

LIO 

15&88 



$19.05 
21.60 



2.78 
100 



TotaL 



$48101 

407. « 



2010 REl'URT OF TUE lUlEF Of KNGI.XEEKS, 0. 

LOCK ANDllAUKca. 


B.— ConTi 


lue 


Munth. 


I.>)wr. 


Uat«rUl. 


8uppli«. 


B«tH.d 


■1 
1 


_ , 


11 


1.7M.M 


*130.3B 
6.81 

»-o 












30. m 














4!u 

434.W 
















HIM 




















„,^«, ,»»..» 1 „.„ 


401.60 


* 




lX)CKANDDAMNo.T. 1 




S.N0.77 i,12S,B7 
0.117.47 li.Sg8,» 

j,Dai.» wii.ii 


»07.7fl 


4&00 
18.09 
17.110 

as.eo 


1 








87. M 












189. on 

102.30 






























RIO 


















i9.7B7.ns itSM-M, ao.41 


Ma.Tft 


■♦ 




LO 


CK ASDHAll KO.8. 




( 




1.749! li) 

1 BIT. 33 
31&52 
34. DO 

. m.sj 
s!u 


t3,»».z9 ' tag. 33 


fzoi.n 

S7.M 

4sg!ra 

M«,!0 

31.00 


1 






'■SStl! 

!iM.7a 




























1.(6 






















17,SDe.6J 




1,4B1.B7 


n. 

























12.00 

B32.37 

2.x 
SI!. 73 




















•UO.GS 
»U. 77 










ti.3fi 




». 


























I,3M.g2 


MM. 70 


1.35 




X 








TJ^lCKASa DAM. Ka. 10. 



,.., 


40'1.02 
Ml! £3 


03. D» 

n.to 


*1.75 


•147. DO 














1, 




I.«0 

ic>,7a 


i:-^' 






















'■^S' 


1.00 


































l.332.U\ BSI,71 


'■"{ '"-" 


s. 





r 



AI-i'K-\I)IX U ti- 



SlTll 



. ti*-*» 



.twatOmStLt ai.BW.« 

'Laidn»K<Ka U.lliTl 

'tiadDHBKa.* R.«a.l3 

■ ■u4IkBB»» Z9,0W.Ui 



I- iiK MAJUIi fiTICKNEY. L'OII 
AKV. 

l-ofli Hud DsuiNilS (W, M« M 

1.00k ud liwiiN'o.7 si.KI W 

Luck and Dull Ho.n XI, SJxta 

Look and Dam No, V. ; I, M2.M 

Lock and Dam Kd. ID »,»*.« 

Total ai4,T«7.» 



M«iM (talnwnl aail cot( 0/ ^^dyinj on rite Jfufjtin^iim Hirer tmder Itu appropriaHon 
frr oftratim^ and cart oftanaUanH ofhrr irarks 0/ naHgalion,/or thefiieat ytar enii- 
•f Jvie 30, IS9S, ta irif ; 



UNITKD SXATK8 DREDGE MALTA. 



DM.. 


tocUIj. 


MaterliU* eiM.itMd. 


TbUI 






GraTtl, -■ > ■■•■■ "t^atweenu... 

OmveL atlSeanU... 
GraTPl. tlS.raili -.. 

GnivH,' Btllmnli!! 


•I, ODD. 30 






-Zi-.- 


teSiffa::::;. 


■sl 
















Gnwl' toj^..ali7c™u,. 


l.»W-J! 








■J' 






















KrCenHlrrillD 








tiravri, 'Ot.atUoeata.. 




















Unvri, -■. i.i aito^^M>«aia.. 


























i 




Orara wnd. uid mad, 480 cubto yardu, at IS nnta .... 

Wr«.l<«11*0!nl,»tfM - 

(inivrl, sand. utu1 mud. t,SDOcu]|Io yanla, at II] i-riilii 


T2W1 


r 


°^:;::::;:;;;::::;: 


JM.IM 




Gravel. UDd. and mod, 316} vubla ;ards, itt IS iwntii . . . 








IS,!)-! 





















' 



0/ Wmt'Mfl""! Kirfr dMrimj Ihf Jiarni gear ending Jtine S'l, ISBS. 



Mouth. 


b^S." 


B.rg«, 


MlK.1- 


Total- 


t 




i 


.!! 


31 


10 
















g::::::::;::;::::;::::::::::::::::::::::::::;;::::::: 


ul 




XI 


n 


IN 


43t 











LOCK NO 


Z. 














X3 




51 
IW 


W 






















'11-.1 




304 


«. 


» 


«2 


w 









: DD — ^BEPOET OF MAJOR BTICKNEY. 2013 

■ Birer during tht ^ti-al gear eHding Jane SO, JS3J— Couliiiued. 
LOCK So. B. 



^k MmOM, 


bo.1..' 


E«g«- 




^^F 


ao 




■ 1 s 














M 

85 

M 














I 


f i s 

« a « 

• IM IM 






K. 








K* 






I 



^K~ 








i 

H 
1S» 






«8 






t 


M 










« 










M 




11 


i 








W 




1 








» 


" 


» 


•" 




■ 







M 






r, 






101 












J 








i 




























1 














I 




















721 


21 















SUM MART. 





BlMtn- 


B.rg», 


Uniwui 


ToUl. 


lock- 


^ 


201 
<«! 
IM 

Sis 


«1 
80 

38 


■3 

21 

IB 


M§ 
IW 

225 
.17! 














































■j,;h<,^ ni 


337 













x:*, i^ 



312 RK1»0RT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEi!.!^.., 

iommeroe of MuMkin^um Biver during the Jitcal year en(fin§ June 30, 

LOCK NO. 8. 



July... 

AnKUst 

September 

Ofrtotxtr 

November 

Deeeiuber 

Ftobmary 

Mwoh 

April 

li4y 

Jane 



Iffonth. 




LOCK NO. 4. 




Total. 



40 

28 
13 
14 

ao 



12 
14 
20 
31 
41 



239 



44 

20 
28 
29 
18 
3 

rt\ 

9 

11 
14 



188 



LOCK No. 6. 



July... 
Aujnut 
May.... 
June . . . 



Total. 



18 
19 
31 
42 



110 



10 
8 
6 
9 



« 



LOCK No. 6. 



October... 
NoTomber 
I>ecen»lM»r . 

April 

May 

June 



Total. 



10 



8 

9 

32 

43 



102 



LOCK No. 7. 



20 




LOUISVILLE, KEN- 

'priatioa are deigned 

of the Ohio via the 

L-n large met its ut tho 

abuve tlifi locks at tlio 

2015 



2014 BBPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF £NGINEEBS| U. S. ARMY. 

LUt $ko¥fing amount of otUo^mU iUm$ of freight amd the mimder ,of ptuBongon oani§i 
on ihe MmsAngwm River hetweem Julig 1, 1891, anS June SO, 1892, 



ArtldM. 



PMwnrai 

Gfloenu merehandlse. 
Coal. 



....tons. 
do.. 



Livestock do.. 

OH do. 

Wheat do., 

Gom... do.. 



Amomit. 



AriielM. 



81,868 Wool tons, 

6,000 Lumber do.. 

8,845 !, Brick do.. 

246 i Hav do., 

7,121 I' Salt 4 do.. 

62U ij Potatoes do.. 

i."4 ; 



Anomtk' 



7.80? 

Ml 

4»f7 



The above statement of the comineroe of the Muskingum River is complete^ hut Jt 
onlj for part of the fiscal srear, as the locks were shut off for repairs and theie i^ftl^ 
na Ihioogh navigation until May 6^ 1892. 



» ■ 



2016 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U« 8. ARMY. 

lower end, in sach nutnner as to form capadonB basins, or harbors, si 
tliose points. 

Tlie project for the enlargement at the head of the canal was inaago- 
rate<l in 1883, an(^ modified in 1890, as recommended in the report o^ 
the Board of Engineers, dated January 28, 1890. The general widlll 
of the canal before enlargement was 90 feet: when the w<vk is ooin3 
pleted, as shown on the sketch submitted herewith, the width Ibr i 
length of 2,400 feet will be from 210 to 325 feet; immediately to tfifl 
eastward of this enlargement of the canal proper a basin about 9B6 
i^eet wide and 2,200 feet long will be constructed, which will be dosid 
by a bear-trap structure 800 feet long on the west and by a ooncvel)| 
dam 2,800 feet long on the north. The execution of this pr^eot tA 
quires, as its principal features, the excavation of about 325,670 cahn 
yards of solid rock and 270,000 cubic yards of earth; the constmetiQi 
of about 5,200 linear feet of new canid wall and masonry dams, oontaifti 
ing in all about 26,000 cubic yards of masonry, and the removal d 
alK^ut 6,200 linear feet of old canal wall, dikes, and timber dams. 

The work completed prior to June 30, 1891, comprised 124,027 cabid 
yards of rock excavation, 197,769 cubic yards eaitth excavatioDi aoi^ 
10,307 cubic yards of masonry in new canal wall. 

Operations for the past fiscal year were commenced July 21,-189(|j 
when the river had fallen to a stage sufficiently low to permit the aitl 
of excavation to be cleared of water, by pumping and the erection <d 
temi>orary dam, and the active work of excavation was begun July 9ft 
It was continued until November 23, with a temporary suspensioa ftoli 
August 28 to September 7 on account of high watcnr. Up to Augoat St 
the work was carried on by day only, but after resuming in Septeflubsi 
a night force was also organized, and was continued during the fs 
mainder of the working season. No masonry was laid on this jiortioii 
of the work during the year, operations being limited to earth and rod 
excavation ; but preparations for completing the new canal wall dnrin| 
the ensuiH^season were commenced June 15, 1892. The amounts exesk 
vated during the year were 15,299 cubic yards earth and 42,856 cubic 
yards rock, an average of 650 cubic yards daily during the workini 
jwriod. A considerable jwrtion of the area remaining to be excavated 
has been drilled ready for blasting. 

For blasting the rock in place 9,624 holes, aggregating 49,642 feet ii 
length, and 18,,S02 blcnk holes, aggregating 13,772 feet, for breaking tiu 
bla«te(l rock, were drilled during the season; 29,567 pounds of dynamitl 
and 875 pounds of black iwwder were used tor blasting. 

The total work done to June 30, 1892, is as follows: Earth excava 
tion, LM3,0(W cubic yards; rock excavation, 166,882 cubic yards; masonrj 
in canal wall, 10,:i07.r) (;ubic yards. 




yards, and the n^noval of about (),200 linear feet of old wall, dikes, anc 

dams. 

The other portion of the improvement, viz, the canal enlargemem 
above the locks, has been carried on in accordance with the projed 
authorized in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1887, th^ 
])urposr bein^^ to construct at that point a basin wherein boats may h\ 
and tows may be propel ly formed, before or after pa^ssing the locks 
without interfering^ with navigation tlirough the canal. The work ap 
l>niximately estimated as necessary t(» this inid was the excavation o 
about rJ4,(HH) cubic yards t»f earth, i;5,0(K) cubic yards of rook, the con 



iPPENDlX E E REPORT OF LIEUT, COL. LYDELKIiR. 2017 

-^: ruction of about 5,200 cubic yiirds of miisoury wall, and th« remuvnl 
1 .iioO feet of old canal wall on tlie north side. The result will be a 
• ill at the lower end of the canal 1,500 feet long, with a width vary. 

I- fntm 210 t.> 250 feet. 

At the clone of the flscal year ending Jmie 30, 1801, there had been 
•lUT^tv-atiHl 133.617 cubic yards of eartii, 14,581 cubic yards of rock. aiMl 

l.lH*f> cubic yai-ds of inasom-y had been laid in the new wall, 
»>\«'-raIioiiR for the fiscal year jnst closed were commenced ciirly in 

I'llv. 1891, j»nd carried on with but little interruption nntil November 

-". when high water and cold weather caused a suspension for the 
iiiier; they were resonied May 14, 1802, and continaed nntil .innc 7, 
i.t'Q temporarily snspended because of lack of available funds. Pn)g- 

re^w was in the highest degree satisfactory, and for this fact git-at. 
^■ilit 11* due to the energy and skill of the assistant engineer, Mr. H. 

i:. .lones, in imoiediate char""; for it was through his exceptional 

. jjuiity that the work receivi the full benefit of ah nnasually favor- 
/■!■■ season. He is entitled t^ chis official recognition of his valimble 



riie ri'sults acromplisbed di 

e^inli t-xcavated. 3.3(>4,B cubic , 

f»ida of masonry placed in ue 

t potwy dry ntonc wall laid. Ii 

«er« removed from the old cai 



g the year were 11,700 cubic yanJs of 
Is of rock excavated, and 3,704.7 cubic 
wall, besides 195 cubic yards of tem- 
dditiou about 1,670 cubic yards of rock 
wall. 



Bill little work is required I complete this portion of the improve- 
K-nt, being the removal of wl -eumins of the old canal wall, the ex- 

iv^tion of the underlying n and the construction of a length of 
i:k<uI so feet of the new canal n«J, It is anticipated that all this will 
readily be accomplished during the ensuing working season. 

Tbe amount expended under appropriations for improving the Falls 
iif the Ohio River at Ixiuisville, Ky., to .Juno 30, 18i)i;, was *t!l!l,079.43, 
nf which sum Jl-1-,22.'5.CU was expended during tbe psist liscid year, in- 
rlndiug liabilities outstanding .Inly 1, 1802. The estimated cost of 
completing tbe improvements contemplated by the present project is 
W10,(M«.Sy. 

The following st^itistics of traffic and commerce indicate the exten- 
sive river tonnage directly interested in the substantial and compleb.'. 
impirovement of the Palls of the Ohio. They show a traffic of 7,03!) 
boats passing this t>oint during the past fiscal year, carrying 2,172,001 
Ions of &eight. The annual average for the past eleven years is 7,0-5 
boat», with about 2,500,000 tons of freight. Of coal alone the amount 
parsing the falls to points below during the past six years has averaged 
1.731,^ tons annually. 

■via Louiavitle and Portland Canal and 



E 



Kindt of vHKl.. 


1«82-'W. 


'"°- 


ToUirarlly«n, 




its 


Tuvi. 

u.20i.m 


5, ifli 


iwliis 

1.811,723 


'a 

a.4w 


Tm: 




















M 


















w.aai 


20,»5,«ra 

















' — DMt 11 7«ar8: Qoftto, 7,025; tons, 2,067,638. 



•^ 




u.iea 


»1 












^ 




*.ra 
















i,-m 


tu 






m,(m 





i,ni«ij u.tii 



Anniu] •rera^ duing pMt six reaza, S:33&.133 too*. 

fieporte of B. B. Jones and G. W. Shav. assistant eogineers, c 
tainiiig details of opctations in tlior respecttre charges, ure herew 
sabisitted. 

JfoMy 



JoIfL 1892, baluce anexpendnd 44,96! 

Jnly ll 1893, oiiUlAoding hkbilitira 4,04; 



Amonnt kTulable for fiaokl j«M ending Jnne 30, 1893 100, 99 

r Amoiint (e8tim>ted} reqairad for complstion of sziatinK project 550, OOC 

J Aiiiaiuittliatcanb«proGt>bl.vexpendedmflHcaIje»rendiDgJaiie30,18M 300^ OOC 
I Submitted in comptiutoe with Teqniremenlfl of •eetdon 3 of river and 
I haiboiMU of 1866 and 1867. 



KEPORT OP MB. R. R. JONES. ASSISTANT V.: 

LociSViiXE, Ky., Jtint so, 1S9. 
CoixiNEL: I hare the honor to Bnbiuit the fullowiog report of operations for 

[iroriDB Falls of Ohio Kiver at LoiiiBvillp. Kv., enlarging canal uaain at heai 
ocks, for the fiscal year ending June 30, ISf.': " 



UPBOviNo Wixis a 



> RIVXB, Eh-LAROEMBtfT Or B 



Cofftrdan at dry dock, pitr, eto. — A. cofferdam was constructed parallel to : 
about 30 I'eet distant from the old pier, separating dry dock from canal. This i 
was 16 feet high and about 400 feet in length, and behind this protection the c 
strnctioD of wnll between dr; dock and basin was ciuried on. 

laofmateiial was carried on fioiu tbo pit until November 30, tb«] 



The 



I APPEIfDIX E E — BEPOBT OF LIEUT. COL. LTDECKER. 2019 

■U htiag renovMl on cars b; tb« holstiDe engine and mclioB und by carta. Tbft 
Mr »«* oii^j. only toward the olose of the Beaaoii's work for removal of part of 
etiatadv bauk, uudurlbe prulectionof which tbe work htid been heretofore i^arriod 
. Tbepit waJtallowed to till November 20, and afti>rttiat ther«!;iilnrcanftliireilgt:'M 
•c nni>l»y'^,i wheneTst the etft^ of water penuitt«<l, in tlio rtunoral of old wall 
i Ihe e*rtii bai^kinx bl^bi□d samv. 

IJMMlwB- — The fnlluwjiig material has been excavatoil from the ooniuieiiceinent 
Ihiworfc to the close of the preaent fiscal ;ear: Earth, 111,593 cubic vurda; ruck, 
mS evbic j»td»; total, 159,3»7.6 cnbic yards. 

If lltia total of 159,337.6 eabic janla there were Bicav>it<<d dnriuj; tJie fiscal year: 
lilt, U.TiBDcabic yards; rock, 3,364.6 cable yards; total, 15.1^.6 cahtc yard*. 
WRBDTalof wbatTcEQaius of the old canal wait will be done with ilredges. The 
k ■lirtnr tlia wall will be blasted under water and also removed with dredKca. 
bv eaaol mill. — The work of building new canal wall was carried on duriag the 
MB of 1891 up to November '2, anil was reeumed May U, 1802, and oarried on at 
■Tala wbea«ver the stage of water permitted U]> lo Jnne 7, 1892. 
luiaig the avaaon of 18^1 the work was couduuted in the pit by means of derricks 

a VB2 the wbik was done by nieauB of a derrick boat, m the old canal wall waa 

that time partly remoTed. 

'^ wall is now completed excepting the short curve JuiniDK the unw wall tn pier 

d of ueir locks. This will be done ouder the nrutection □/ a emull cofferdam to 

aa ^l i u ctad as Boon as the waler fiLlls snllleieotly. 

IkBiot*! qnastity of maeonry laid from the commencemeut of work to the oliMe 

ncnte foundation 168.30 

•oary 6,413.98 

I wail IM.20 

T<rt^ 5,807.38 

M tfae total quantity of masonry reported — vie, about 6,807.38 — there was laid 
nag the fiscal year ending June 30, 1893: 

Cubic yanla. 

aowt* r-mndation 61.00 

mrarv 3, (M:i. GM 

7«ii!.- 19-1.20 

Total 3,898.88 

Ibe &cilitiea for handling and laying stone, more particularly the traveler iised 
wiiwtiiii lion of double wall between dry dock and basin, proved admirable. The 
■H nsed in construction of this wall weighed from 8,500 to 10,000 pouud.<(, the 
■dw* being 10 feet long, and they were handled quickly and securely. 

KXCAVATION FOR NEW CANAL WALL AT HEAIt OF CANAL. 



Work was commenced June 15, 1892, the water then for the first time being low 
■Dugh to permit the prosecution of the work described. 
Tlie material excavated was as follows: 

CnbIc rudi. 

teth. 1,424 

•Merock 107 

Total 1,531 

nil work was mostly done in theaetghborhoodof the Fourteenth Street Railroad 
tndse, ami was for the purpose of connecting the end of the new canal wall dh now 
oiltvitb the oldcanal wall, about 706 feet west and south of the north drawpieis of 
he bridge in qnestion. 

Vary re«pectfnllT, your obedient servant, 

B. K. JOSKS, 

jlMisJanl Ungintcr. 
Usot. Col. G. J. Lydecker, 

C«rpt of Emgi»eert, O. 8. A. 



2020 IIKPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGrNEERB, U. S. ARMY. 
R8P0KT OF MR. Q. IV. SH. 



p^; 



LolJls^lLtG, ET., Jvm« SO, IM 

COI.ONBT,; I have tlie bouor to anbinit the fullowing' report of operiitions on 
iirciviug fnllB of llie Ohio River at Louisville, Ky., enlftrgin^ the head nf the Lc 
villi? unci I'urUiiitd Caiml for tlie fiseul ytija eudine June 30, iS92. 

Tliii work uf eDlui)inii{; the head of the LouiBviTle and Portland Cnnal was bl 
ill 1S85. and WHS let by coutrnct in three eectioDS. Sectiun 1 vas completei 
Novpiiibcr. IBMi, nnil the i^ontrautii for nections 3 and 3 e^tpired DecembeT 31, 1 
Thr work niw Binr^liceiiciircledoaffitb hired labor, and that of liAt sMtBoii dir«i 
inuiiily to liinHhiri); sectiuas 2 mid 3, Work od aectinn 4, an a^lditioDal area a 
orBwiiim 3, was oomineni'Bil cluring tlio last Beasoo. Tim umlurial removed i 
Histed priui'igiHlty of soliil rock, ranging from 3 to G faet deep, the grade beiuxl 
uf the caunl boitom. ' 

Th"re wan also removed a, coDsiderablo quantity of earth, rnnd, and d«f)OBit •! 
aci.'iiiiiiil»k« during hieh water. 

Tlie ni'iiKiJii of 183i-'93 was particularly favorable for work, eicavatiou having] 
i«arrir.-il on t'ur niuuLy days. Preparations for beginning work were completed oati 
July, lint high watiir lulerfercd with pumping until July 21. Steani drillBl 

fint in opovation on the 26th and excavation comuienceil on the STth of July. A 
B the river auHpended goueral work from August 28 to September 7. Exc«v|l 
was reonmud on the latter date and contluned until November '£S at noon, bC wI 
time the river flooded the incloaure aud work was Bnspended for the senaon. i 
It U estimated that the following quantities were exoitvated and removed dS 
the teMcm: KaTth,^nud, loose rock, etc., 15,299 cubic yitnlfi; solid rock (mcut 
in plaeo), 42,e&5.49 cuhio yards. 

ft«gil)ntng with September 14 an additional force of men wae employed at n) 
The innloiiire was iUuminatod with gasoline torches ami the exfuvvated iuat< 
loaded into dump cars. It is eBtimatod that the night force excavated and lo| 
Into r.ars 8,448 oiibia yards of solid rock, vrhic^ >raa removed by 632 train^, 
tying 11,882 care, averaging abont seven-tenths of a aubic yard per car, moasuH 

Two 13<litch centrifugal pumps were used in pumping out the excavated are*, 
InakagK through the guidins dike ftnd old canal wall waa centrolled by tempo 
narth dams, which carried t£e water around the edge of the inclosure into thsi 
north of the improvement. The upper part of the giildiug dike was repairod 
pavi'd with Biflne taken from the escavated muterial. 

The following Btateineut i^howa approiimateiy the work done to Jnno 30, 1 
Earth nxt'nvation, 21», 0^.06 cubic yards, of which 15,299 cubic yards werv rera( 
in tbosensou I89t-'92; rock excavation, 166,882.40 cubic yards, of which 42,S 
enbic yards were removed in season 1891-'92i masonry in new oanal wall laid to 
of fiscal year, 10,307.66 cubic yards. 

There remains to be done the following : Earth exenvatioo, 53,000 cubic va 
rock excavation, 158,787 cubic yarda; masonry in canal wall, 6,013 cubic yarda 
mnving old oonal wall, 7,500 cubic yarils; removing part of dam and guiding t 
2,B00 linnar feet; building concrete dam, 4,822 cubic yards; building bear-trap et 
turo, SDO linear feet; slope revetment and wall on south side of the canal bi 
Ten^ street, 2,300 cubic yards ; and the constrnctioo of 4 guide piers or cribs a 
the north lino of the improvement above Tenth street. 

llnrnwith \» «i:bmitted a sketch showing progress of work to Juno 30, 1892. 
Very rcBjioctftilly, your obedient servant, 

Cranvillr W. Sitaw, 
■ AnittoMt Enginti 

l.iont. Col. 0, ,1. 1,yi>EcaF,it, 

Cortw of EnginMTt, U. S. A. 



E E2. 

TMPBOVKMENT OK INDIANA CIIUTK, PALLS OF THE OHIO EIVEH 

Tlio liuliuna (jlmte iH tUo main river ehaimel over tlie Falls of 
Ohio; orijiiniilly voiy crookort. filled witli daiig'crons rocky poiiit» ] 
jei'tiiiK from the sides and bottom and with swift cliaiifting curre 
it was available for navigation by skilled pilots only when the river 
aliove a stage of abont 11 feet ou the gunge of the Louisville and P 
land Canal. Prior to 1800 some work had been done towards its 
provemoiit by blasting out tlie most dangerous points whereby 



r 

■^iPPEXDIX E K RFPORT OF LtKIT. rOI.. LYDKrKHH. 20:21 

'tf BAvigation was iiicreasefJ, but the chaunel was not tlieieby 
*rattiible for bea%'y tratBc at Hta^eti of water luat^iUiIly iower 
iAt stated above. On the 28th of Jaimarj-, 1890, a project, hav- 
it6 object tbe radical improvement of the channel so as tt make 
r navigable at all stages above 8 feet on the canal gauge, was 
auded by a Board of Engineers aft«r close study of the i|ucs- 
d this project was approved by the Chief of Engineers, Jan- 
, I89W. (See Keport of Chief of Engineers for 1890, pages 2L'I7 
I It oontempiates the better conceutration in thifj channel of 
iAsigg the falls by tbe ereetion of gtiiding dikes and the nx- 
1 of rtx-k within the limits of proposed channel to a designated 
;be improved channel is designeil to have a least width of itH} 
h a clear depth of not less thau 8 feet at its lowest navigable 
The principal items of work in tbe execution of this project are 
ivattou of about 60,000 cubic yards of solid rock, tbe constiiic- 
kbont 3,700 linear feet of stone dikes, and of a concrete wall 
long. Tbe project contemplates, ultimately, some modi&ca- 
he preseot system of dams at tbe head of tbe falls when these 
e replaced by permanent straetores, but tbe details of sucb 
tion have not yet been dei-ided. 

itions during the past year were limited to raising the old 
dike — 675 feet long on the north side of the chute at its en- 
-2 feet, the first 50 feet constituting the pier head being raised 
igher, or 11 feet in all ; the cross dam, connecting this dike with 
iana shore, was rebnilt above tbe water line, and some minor 
were made to the balance of the cross dam. About 72,900 feet 
r oak timber and 344 cubic yards stone filling were applied to 
{pairs. Tbe stage of water did not permit any rock excavation, 
e apphances available, until October 5, when the work was 
iced by baud-drilling; on the 9th the steam drilling scow be- 
to the Louisville and Portland Canal was put on the work, and 
3nR were continued until November 17, when a rise in the river 
ed a suspension for the season. The results accomplished during 
irt period were 3,163 holes, aggregating 6,474 linear feet, drilled 
t ; 673 holes, aggregating 2,592 linear feet drilled by steam drills ; 
? out in all about 1,474 cubic yards of rock, using for this pur- 
825 pounds dynamite. This is tbe only work no far done in 
g out the present project, no suitable plant for the work in view 
been procured, while all operations have been i-estrtcted to short 
of dead low water, and to tbe primitive and espensivo metho<l 
l-drilling. It is proposed to procure proper nia<'hinery tor earry- 
die work in the future, and make provision for operations during 
nary low water, at least. 

relief which this improvement is designed to afford tbe heavy 
e— especially of coal — passing the falls, is a matter of high ini- 
je. A coal tow in reaching this point frequently contains twelve 
;n boats and barges carrying about 320,000 bushels (about 1,21G 
Tcoal, bound for points on the Ohio and Mississippi between liere 
!W Orleans; under existing conditions these tows, when unable to 
1 the Indiana Chute, must be broken on arrival at this point, 
through the Louisville and Portland Canal and locks in sections, 
eu again consolidated before continuing their journey to desti- 
; all this imposes great delay and expense on this trallic, and not 
nently it happens thatj when a rise in tbe river has brought nu- 
i tows down to this point, the later arrivals after iinally passing 
kfi find the river too low to continue their journey, and are corn- 
fa) lie ov^ indeflnitely, sometimes for an entire season. Au im- 



.... j:x,,;vrri:>. r. ?:. AHMY. 

: " ^iitf sill li ,i : .^TiditioD of iilTairs is qj 
:: .. j,iviii;; Ik*!- ii; i]HrT;ikeu. it should Ul 

I.: :.,: I his rt\H)n and tht- i-eport in reladdl 

-. • ' r:.ui«: Canal slmw That dniin;: the pastye|i 

.. . — 1 :ii*- Falls of tlie ( >Lio. olvhirh 1,232.998 tonij 

- - .; - •.••'.titur to TransiT tlir««ni!li the oanal. Wift 

V. ■ —uieiir nowmidfironsiileratioii it is liigU^ 

.: ht.-r J Vf^nr in si iruiticanT percentage, of ft| 

•- -: cT :-- any such delay, xi^hile <reneral 

... •- -T'-evril from the Mockadc frequently 
« • .. T'-r"-. T:it* Total traftic thirmgh the 

. . "^ •: n..rj<.j Kiats. cArrying 1.6LU5S6 tons 

^ ■ - ..."- -rLj, thf Indiana Chute included 1,' 

•1* r^.^'i': :«»Tal ]»assinf; by canal and ri 

. • '. .- : :r-:jbT. Tlie average for the 

:. ;. ii>. -rii LMKiT.toS tons of freight 

. - ; - - -. ^il by the Boai-d of Engineeil 

-:• . ' f .tVaiZable for the purpose wttl 

r • .- :'-:•'. :y the river and harbor actjj 

^-*M ■ ... ^-- : >-:.\iM». a tot^il to JnneSlfc 

..: >.: r rrnlrl --n the ]»resent project tj 

.' _> 7.- jr.ivu:.T fSTimatetl l»elow for tU 

- .., ^ ' ■-. - -T'-i *'n iLe idea that the river and 

•-^>^s ~:*-i appn"»]»iiate for the work 

. . r.. .-- ! ..:■<:." .»]»: T^iaiation be not made the 

, ...„ T • ■--■<• . i^lv iTioreased in order that the 



^ . . ', ^ • • 



•. ::T-.r .r.r j'veii bfl«»w. and the report 
r^ _._ .i.rr.:;.i:e charge of this improve- 



$48,885.30 

LM.361.44 

27.5-'3.76 

14.€S 

i'7,:>«V.18 

3:i.(XK).oo 

- 62,:»c»y.i3 

■ *-~:^; v:---' ri ;"»", 219.58 

^ :.. :> J 01" rivt-r aud 



« . 



. ^^. . »N VN- ::nkvr. 



.^^ 



^v;-. ■ K KV.. Ju)it v.. ISO*. 

^ T :■■■•. "I i']»irati«»n? oij im- 
■^ . .:'. yt ;ir endin;; .hiiif 30, 

■ ^ ■ - -'-w c^VuVuiQ dike at the 

T ::.^1.": Haii.l Kerf. Fifty 

^ ■ • - • ; to K'f. 31 to s«Tvo a» » 

^ ■ - : !l.e dike, 524^^, leet, wa« 



..: *:orehoiise at the locks, the 



APPEWDII E E — REPORT OP LIEIT. COL. LTDECKEH. 2023 

iKk«f rai»in|; Ihe ilikc liHgaaon S«pt«mb«r 21, 1S91. In remavioK tbe old di-vkin^ 
jfte gaid^ pier it wan roand that Ihe timbera above low water with rottco, 
it«nsl was tinbatituted. In the remainder of the dike tbe new tiiiibera 
. , 1 OD top of tbe old stractiire, care bein); takeo to remove Rnch M wer« 

jl to ba defe^^ivt. CoirectionB in all^meDt were made aad the new work Slied 
ft MDoe bikra fioiu the vicinity aud Ironi tho excitvation od Right Hand Reef. 
i> and of tbe gaide-pier was covered with three-eighths inch boiler irou as a 
a agMnat iiM- and drift. The work od tbe dike waa completed on N'ovem- 

■ totfae crosB dam and abntmenta t^uDiiated id rt>plaoiuK defeetise tim1>en 
KklDg: in rebuilding the south abntmeDt of the middle chute, and placing 
n ttaw fliiti'hea for the movable dam; iD the construction of a crib abnlment 
alifc««ad of the dam. north of the Indiana Chate, and in tebatldin^ that portioa of 
Ifcr rtam Amm iminediiitely north of tbe Indiana Chnte. 

ExrsTMion to thechute wsniUrected to tlieright-hnud reef and to Home projections 
^M( ttie IdKcT end of tbe gniding dike. On October 2, tlie river having fallen to a 
wtrfcing rt»xp. a breakwater wan placed nt tbe lower end of the gniding dike and 
haarf drillitig was begun on the 5th. On the 9th the drill boat belonging to the 
nmal wan placed in tht ihnte near the lower end of tb« reef and the boiler utllinod 
te lirillin^ by «team. .Sti-am drilling won continued iiutit tbe 29th, at which time 
ii: the exposed portions of the reef had been ilrilled. Blastlug on this part of ths 
rmf wan i-ommenced on October H and continued until November IT, on which dat« 
1 nw' in the river compi^Ilcd a BOiipension of work for the soacon. Material removed 
liotn the reef was pQed northof the lineorimprovemeot. and it ia proposed to utiU»o 
|«ii irf it in the new wall which is to extend from the bridge naBtwardly along the 
•■rth line of improvement. Daring the Reason tlierp were drilled 3,H3ti holes, rang- 
iaf fiom 1 to r- feet deep. It is estimated that 3,iilS cubic yards of solid rock were 
Us«i«d, of which 763 were removed. Tools and appliances were stored at the locks 
■t tlW) «od of tbe season . 

Torj respectfull}', yoor obedient serve 



GbaSVh.lk W. Sii, 



i( Eaginerr. 



Fia Iniliitna Ck»U,for fitcat year 





I,.. 


„~a. 


So. 


T„„„ge. 


-^ 


J 
























8W,832 




1.W0 





I; deKendiDK, 285. 



f-'- 


nmeroi pairing FaiU o/(he Okio Sira; t 
ending Jitnt SO, 139S. 


la JnrfiaHO Vh 


.U:MJUval s'Gr 


r ArtlBlH. 


Torn,. 


Anio>«. 


Tons. 


|»- 


iffi.310 
1,0H 

S79 

'Si 

33a 


Iron 


7W 




Mit.^fllsii<« 






JS.MO 
















Sagu and n 

StavM ud 
Total. 

























































■b> ttjmtmtm, 7,U 



;ni>:2 i;i 1 1^\:"\ *)]' Tin: « ! 



I 

1 lir -1 i!i-!ii-s n(Tiimp;r 
In I'ni* l.iHiisvillr ami Por- 
1.."! ...'.^'^ i..ii-««t*rc»:il p.:s-. 
\N «!i' Nll'tjr. 1 t'» t 1m' «li'!;r. 

ilic <•(»: i:»!c: ..)!i «»t" tin* ill. 

■ 

)>i(>!»iii»i'.' t li.ii noiit'. or • 
«o:il li.iili'- \x«>mM l»t* * 
thiniijli I In- cjiiimI woi 
t:ihIi-!iiMl h\ tlh' l:ir.ir«- 
(liiilrin" ti:«' l«:i^l \'v\\v ^ 
ri«'i,L:lil : tliMt ]>Ji»in.:: 
JMKii- wilii .V»LM*jr» I 
7.'.k;«.» l^.^;^t•^. with -.1 ' 
»-l<\»ii \r:irs is anil!" 

Thr r>t!iii:»tiMl (•«• 
\v:i< .'^i:^.(n«M»7: • 
sj;».^<).l:0. ami tl= 
;H»I»I<>\»'<1 St'ptnir 

Jiinr :;n. lsi>-j. w: 
\r:ii riidin;;' 'ini«- 
hailjor lull ih»v 

s;;:i.(MM». If it > 
rstJJiiatr l«»r \>'' 
iiiipioM-mt'iit !' 
A vi:it<'im'ii- 
ol (.. W .Shav 
iin'iit. i^ ai»|»<' 



--. -ir- 

■ v..:i>ii 

•I ititi 
-- -raui 

•••jJial 
-•: :lit 

• -•: It li^ 

: •"it'll 

. -. .iiul 

■X.»l I, 

•■ -i 'in- 

. 'M-ijial 

• ".••Ji oj' 
. ' <i^<*N 

. •: tliir 

• ••■■ 






w 



k'I 



\ii<"'.!lit :il»j 
\ii iMiiil :iv. 

• "*« 1 1 • • : ■ • : 1 ; • 



...... r 



...I • r!:«I 




opportunity offered. Its object is to secure 

B by striking iigainst projwtiiig points tliiit 

] lower courses of tbe caiial wiill ami on tlie 

rock. This work slioald hit cuntiuiied uiiti] :iH 

m removed. 

SEW MACillNE SHOP. 



tag of Febraary 12, 18112, the old frsinie bitildiiig wbich 

e and boiler house and inacliiui' shop was totally 

:anse of which remains a complete mystei'y. 

■ fireproof xtnicture, was iiiimcdiitteiy under- 

e elose of the fiscal year baa been nearly completed. 

ft of the new gtmcture are of stone masonry and tbe roof <tf 
The destroyed building was surrounded by othrrs 
iableebarai-ter,viz; Theblacksmith shop, carpenter shop, 
n sboreliouBes, all of which were saved only by the greatest ex- 
■ liad there been any wind they nnist have been completely de- 
u These buildings should be reeonstrncted in masonry as op- 
ity ofl'ors. 

flEW WIHDING ENGINE. 

- i-ii(;ine was purchased and put in position in January, 1802, and 
I . lii'iJHi:^! in a small masonry building. It ia used for handbug 
ilj'ir iiassage through the locks, and their lockages are very 
1 1. ilituTed aud expedited thereby. 

GENEKAL KEPAIES. 

ConxJderoble repairs were made to the towboat; they included raising 

ir mini tioa»e fimi" feet; extending the cabin forward, thereby adding 

')i uecded room to the cabin accommodation; building a new 

' and phictng new canvas deck and roof covering. New canvas 



>()'}[ \{\.Y •* »1^'^ •»! 



oi'i i:\n\^ 



AM» TAI 



,i,M c.h^»y a n-nlar 
I lorUlKiiKls, 1 bnc! 

t\\,M.li«-fs- onr 111 . 

InrU lu-.i-ttT, ami 1 1 

,.^.„„l^ of day an(i 

,.<i>tant I'M-k ma-' 

,,„h pro] >rr that Ip- 

loatlopt tliiscoiii. 

l)uriii.ir tlicpasi 

rloMMl li'» (^i^y^ ^'^ 
tli(' liH'ks diiiinj;- : 

riir 4'ar<' <>*' fh 
(III- ilir iinnuMlia: 
,,r all inipn^vcMii 
..jKiatioiis <Iurii 

boats, ami bail'- 
macliiiK' -^bop v 



_ T 

1 



This M'rvi(M= 
iinat. and is a 
«'N>ai\ \'or rh';- 
|Hi>ii> 1)1 niu«i 

• •••iisid«*ral>h* 
ilrpih. 'fho : 
v, a^ nO.mCj CI- 
I ioii to t his. 
'mill \]\o »»hl 

• oii'^li in'ti'd • 
liaiii. nixh'i 

!!.i!<-i i.ii ha' 



111 


!«' «'Ol|- 


< . , . • • » 

. • • • < I : 1 


«•<! ill. 


'. 1 !J 


ijinl i' 


1 ■ I 

1 • • 


< •.•.{li- 


• 


a -I;!. 

'••ivi. 


• 


• "Is . 


, 1 


.!('-: 


' 


• • • 1 



•'.V lti( 

•':»vi 



'Lf fi 
■••r.r ; 
:.*" 1 

■ v»-a 






ill 

' -. » 
• •• f 

'". -i-^d ihat 
:. "I'rlj»- o 

•• td. 'hnf ;, 

•if»- i.'ifhidi.^ 
• •* t'ld lofk 
•:'» Ii.id ro ] 
* ' :.v.i \vli«. 
". • '.»:'. wa 
• I'l baihi 

'.itini' St 'J 

... 1 : 1 
• • • . » ' 'i I 

. ■ • I < 

. : rh( 



• lii' 



I ■ 

■ ' I 

•• I • ' 

■' ' I ■. • 



I 'ii 



i ■«! 



!'4 



. E B — REPORT OP LIEUT. COL. LfDECKER. 2027 

I xtfttetnents of oxpeiidituTes aud commerce od the canal are 
, and the report of R. R. Jones, assistant engineer,charged 
e of tbe canal, is transmitted herewith. 

it for opcraUng and care of Ike Louitrille and Parlland Canal far tke 
filcni gear tndaig Junt 30, ISSS. 

•I66.M 

aB.ou 

*5a« 

wand ^f^oral ndministrntion S. 9TS.53 

tl and locks 40,593.85 

IgUig , lfl,W9.M 

' Total 66,069.95 

RlUti'V^*° I""'' ^fvtt 1, ISif. 75 

"mlascaiutl wall uid rock b«low 1,673.76 

Itag »ew middle gates , 5,U3.66 

iWiadtitg engine ],09B.U 

Aggregate 7^979.26 

it (•/ erpendilarft far operating and eart of LoHinilU and Forlland Canal for 

the Jiacol year mding Jhiii< SO. tSiH. 
d eenernl odmitiistratian : 

*4.9I0.O3 

I14.OT 

9B2.*2 

Total .' 5,S78.Ba 

aaadloeka: ~" 

, Jtotor 21,687.16 

AqipUo 3.«X).ei 

B^iiBiuid eitra labor ID. 306. 06 

Total - 40,593.85 

' SndBiDg: 

L^ior 10,445.67 

BnppliM 4,.T44.ai 

Bepain 3,709.70 

Total 18,4W.58 

Grand total - - "65,0697!© 

Be^uilding two mud Bcona _ 1,155.75 

Ttianning ranal wiiU aodrodi lielow l,573.7t) 

BiuMiagiieK middle gates 5,153.68 

Kew iriiidiug engine 1,026, 14 

Aggn^gate - . - ^3, 979. 26 



L 



ihttraeU of propBiati for f«mi>kittg and delictriag forage at the Louitrille and Porllaad 
Carnal rtcrired in responne to the adrtrtinement dated April fJ, 1S9S, and opened iIayS6, 
tSSS, bf Lieut. Col. G. J. Lgdei-ker, C017111 of Engineert, 

QoMitily (1) Bill of I (2) 



..bnflhfila.. 



is&Si 



B, fi. Cob tieo.BeckiiT 



irurhBIulKNiiTeiKlit. 



■«i. 



l?'»iM'? icKi»<>KT or I in: 

n:nposi:i) \V(h;k i 

In :i(l(liti(Hi to tin* rci' 
(>|K'r;itinn of the <';in;il, i* 

olil I'M'ks. to IrVl't tlh***:- 

lorks up to the onliiinn 

ill tlic :(p)H'o;i(li to the Id 
In r<-|>l:i!M» tlif old <ir<Ml . 
tin- old iiii<:iri' l>iid;,^('*. 
()tlH4* itrms ol' propi»> 
allotiiMMils. arc <-oiitaii. 
In relation to rlic : 
tinn'. I would siatt* tli. 
newly ina<U' I'arllnMi • 
cannl bv rarli rcrurrl. 

■ 

TIh' old <lr(*d;;:c (N«. 
and is k<'pt in servic 
work is very small. 
is >ucli tlnif it can I 
ill!:". ;ind to that cnr 
diaulir <lrcd.in«' to 
connection I woul«i 
my h'ttcr of Apri 
at the hca<l of tin 
tlic canal, witli a 
suit aide hvdrauli 

« 

The estimate f- 
hiuhwav l)ri<]<4:c . 
of which w<Te re 

« 

in addition, an :; 
This is a woode 
r< 'enforced fron. 
it Tna.vbe(Mune '- 
lor any hut tin- 

« 

inii l>oth hridi 
arate contraci 

Theestiniaf 
etc.. anci for « 
the ie<piircii5- 
make soini* e* 
in,us an<l l<*ii- 

The total « 
year entlin;: 

li«irnl:ir l\>vrr 
I'aiim IjiImh". 
(i«in'r;»l ivp-.' 
^li<^■^'linn^•oli 
\«'\N .lin.inl •_■ 

liiliiiiiiii;: .•! I 
( <'?ll)»lr: illLi 
^.'•I'O 1«'\ iM Ii 
Iii'«M 1\ <\( ;i\ .' ■ 
l^iWIinr:'; «•;■ 
I \Ifli«!ii.L; I 

' "lit :i.L:< i\i'''.' 



V 



»•«• 



I i.i ll:!".. Ill • 

I 

• it- t.i;:- :■ 

'II . -I . 
i ii< .ii:«:; r .1 ■ 




►BT OF LIEUT. OOL. LYDECKEK. 



JUW MtOPLZ GATES. 



'■\ Aariafs Ihe irMon of 1891 anil wpre allowed to remain. 
Ii wiktnr RMtaoD occiiire<l in thr^ spriiig. when tli^y wnn 
'S-f. 1^2, iiiDot^ thiit time they have been Suatiug in 
niirh a time as will leaat interfere with navl^tion. 

ASD OUT SODB, MIDDLE OATB COW^MS, 

Kpvaitd the guy rods iiMd to (ttay the HiiapensioD colnmns had 
>in the maaimry, la which tliey wtre em bedded to a depth of 
')-l«m of anchorage hiu been put in. coDsistintEof bam 3} inrbM 
fOfeet down into the toiiarmry of toei walls. IIiobc nnchNM, si* 
more than the old Hyslem), were plac«d in holm drilled ttarongh 
depth named, and ceuieated thereiu with JCnglish Porllaud 

nrhnr ban have atuut be;ida 2 inehe^ larger in diameter than 
e upper ends haye carefully forged eyes thraash whicih paM 
H diameter, t. ith croaa bam, connecting with the gays, wbiok 

■yatcm uf UDvboruee ras successfully completed without interferjiig 
of the gnt«s and hmc perfectly firm and secure. 

rspaibs to lock qatbs. 

V nade to the nppe ddle, and lower gates of the new locks aa o»- 
_Jed, Sine cast-iron liota. or valves, were replaced and three bear- 
e wn pat in place. nc replacempnt of the latter na.s a veiy troabla- 

ion, involvine the nso of a partly siibmerced dock, in which the mm 

A nnmbet of the truss rods were also replacea when broken, 

PAJNTINO. 

« banaee and portions of tilie gates and iron work were painted. 

TRIMMIMO CAXAL WALL. 

Lrkia work was contiuued during the year whenever thn water was mifficiently low. 

1 for snch work is necesnarily very short, as tlin most trouhli^soiiie ledges 

d daring a very low stage of water in the river, and then lor but a 

n preceding years, vis, by 



Sepftira were mode to the Soorine and stringers of bridge at new locks and tem- 
|MTsry rniair* to lower chord of bridge at old locks. 

Tlie biM received for construction of a new iron drawbridge at new locks having 
\nm oiiMttafactory, all bids were r^ected, and a new opening of bids will become 



The old wooden drawbridge at old locks is in a very insecure conditiou, and the 
temporary repairs alluded to above will only saCBce to carry the bridge along for a 
few months, within which time a new stnietiire should be erected. 



A fire, which oecnrred on the evening of February 13, destroyed the frame build- 

inc <i>e4 for boiler and engine honse and machine shop. The origin of the flre was 

uninown. The city fire department and the regular canal force, with our own fire 

apparainsj sncceeded in confiniBE the flro to the huilding in which it originated. 

Toe building wbj. entirely dotitroyed, and the Bbaftiug, pulleys, and niachiiiery more 

M Ims ifijurpd. The work uf rebuilding in stone was i!oumtenced within n short 

time aft«r the (ire. and the engine and boiler houses are now completed. The entire 

'*acture will be in shape like two Ls joined together — the boiler and fnel rooms, IS 

4^ cnn'titnling one L; the machine shop, 26 by 50, another I^ and the twonniteil 

h* • * room, 14 by 18. The fnel roonLS are rendered fireproof by brick arches 

en T-i^chiron I-beams. The exhaust fan, for conveying shavings from 



iiO'JS KKI'OI.'T OF THE CHIEF OP KXriFM' 

. thniract of propoHoU for furnUhing coal rcc^v^ in re:<i 
April '^'jj IS'jJt and oj/ened May 26, 1802, by Lieut, Col. f- 
in'i:ra» 



-!»'• 



Kiiiil itt'voj.]. 

lii-Mt I'itlNiiitriu; foal UikvIm** 

Sim Mild |ii»ii| l*ilt^liiir<^ r.oal il> 

Oliio ];ivii-or Kuiiii\\ Im coal •! 

A iillirurilr i«t<K iMKil .....1 

A iitlirurito iiiiL coal •. 

Total 

* Aci*-«i>tod. t 



J 




AhMtravt of fmtpoaah for removing old and er** 
t.ouinvilh' and Portland Canal, receired in rrvi " 
/S!i:J,and opened May 10, 1S9S, by Lieui. Col. 



No. 



Name of bidtlw. 



I r«iUHlo nrUliEtt Co.* 

'J ; Wimfiiixiii llriilpi* Hnd Irtm Vo 




(iruiil WtlkinM 
Kill): IlridKO Co 



*1iifurniaLii^ 
AU prop«»«al» nH'ouiim'udo«l for r«\i««'tioii, ]irir^* 



^ 



REI\>Br Oft* MIL R. R. 



CoiONKi.: I hAT^ t ho honor tosiil* 
r:iro ot'tho l.oui.4viUo »iul IVurtlaml 



DRK 



The ruit^si SCiittN» ton IkmI and t 
niii<l tnnu tho ^'Ati.^1 and ^ipprxmc .^ 
roiuoval ot* tho oW vAitAl wjiH iiii^ 
KH'k:». The »iou<« n:i:K (;ikru out 
used for backing uv ch^* u^'w wall. 



The I ' lut Oil Si a I •*-* to v» Uvi t Wm^ 
\\\v \a*MU o\t*"iU'*l sorwjr*l uniif^ " 

>".,:'■; ct*v..r:A'. rt»VA:r> lo maL'iir> 






.•►t 




'Dt.iiEH. 2031 



;ADIANA and ILLINOIS. 

'f late yearH beeu carried on 

ippltcable to improvements 

li. Gxceptiiig the congtruv- 

lf:i|iid». iieai' Mount Oarmel, 

rli.- s:iiLif nature. With the 

i-k Liiiil (I.irii.()[>eration8woald 

.|t|pr'i]iii:Liinns in one for the 

1 iiTiiivig^ihlc low-water chan- 

■y to cxcaviUvchannela through 

■ate the flow by ]no|ierly located 

■"" points, and to clear the 



B past year was on the 

ginning of the year the 

I, had been about com- 

ii. During the past fiscal 

lecared in poxitions, gates 

1 and graded behind the 

.he work of <;on8trui^tion re- 
jck in working order besides 
x>£ the gates. 

bnilding the west abutment of 
iiul, the material naving been ilcltvt'ri;d, the work 
.:>jamienced September iio and completed November 

11 the lock during the year comprised the laying of 

•>f masonry; 4,67« cabic yards earth were hauled and 

Hj the lock wall, and 1,5.54 cubic yards of mud and 

(lom the lock chamber. The total masonry in the lock 

I I, ds, and the whole work is of a most substantial and 

(iL-lion. Work on the abutment of the dam comprised 

-11 cubic yards of earth, laying 655 cubic yards of masonry, 

.;:]>; 1,100 cubic yards of earth against the abutment. 

^11 to this permanent work at Mount (Jarmel the snag boat 

bd was employed up to December 1 in removing snaga 

■ft poiiit and the mouth of the river, principally in the vicin- 

BBm, New Harmony, Little Chain, and Black's Out-ofiF. At 

■fed points the accumulation of snags was such as to estab- 

Btote blockade. The crib dike at Little Chain was repaired 

frith stone; 429 snags, weighing in all l,T8litons, were re- 

She result of this work has been to materially improve the 

eondition of this portion of the river; but there remains a 

' nhnuls, where, at low water, a navifrable depth of only 16 

iw> exists. The worst place is at New Harmony, where, 

*"nction of a dam which formerly closed the <;ut ofl' at that 

»nnel depth has been reduced to 12 inches at low water, 

<nt 2A feet, as was the case when the river was held to a 

Ihe reconstruction of the dam is of great importance, 



H to put 

'•ering apparat 
II preparations 



2030 REPORT OP TUB CHIEF Ofc' BKGINEEB'- ^ 

plaEing mill til fuel room, is located directly above Ihit i'" 
boiler and eii^^iue rootiia is entirely of iron, both tniBHi"^ 

Tlieroofof miichiue shop ff ill have corrugntoil-iron oo 
Tlii^ tloore IhroiigLxiit nre of i/oucrete. TLo stone luprl 
wnw tftken ii]i by tbi- ilrndKes from olil canitl walls nii'i 

A iii'w staiiouary enijiuB waa purchasedj and sIho ji 
fiiniiHliing power to tliu pluuing mill. Tbia shaftiu^^ 
30 feet lung. 



Tlie tituber and iron work has boen purchased 
old laiid NoowB. Tliedo boata hare lieon pulled 
work of reliuildiug rommcnced. 

Tbo tire, wliich disabled the engine 
the ilnwHiii); of liinibiT, but this oauae of delBf 
Very rcsiitutfully, your obadiBQt " - --* 



OOMMKBCUI. 
Statement of vaitU paiied througk (k« 



TuHlt. ■ 






■ 
































Total 














Lock>e*9, 3,000. 



Slalrmtnt of coini 


ntrce patted throne 
tiear' 


Artiilci. 


Cold 


li;;^:"::;::::::;:;:;;::::;;::;:- " 









"**'^ 




:-. LYDECKER. 203.S 

■it'Iy throiiju^h the lock walls 
lotiing are of cast iron and of 

tif each gate is opened and shut 
bat this will be amply Kufficiciit. 

Cubic yanU. 

1,411' 

0,(W<» 

' M'k 7 ^.{2 

.! 'ock .* 4!(>7»1 

^ $7,X7o 

..^^ miter sill were bolted down to the b«Ml 
iJ^ ftet long. 

^y' ^a^ment was furnished by the Ronioii:i 
gi ^}"eoDteao(ed for being delivered l>y Oito- 

l^ddiiurof ttorehonse for cement and tools had 

^■* au received the work of excavation for 
Ror. 

!^ fai going to the bed rock on ncroimt of ((ui<'k - 

^'Oek. A amall cofferdam was loimd necessary. 

j^^'^y increased. Work was begun September 25 

"f^^ wall 10 fSset thick at the bottom, 7 feet at the 
Jj^^l at right angle to the dam proponed, line of 
'JiL ^^S^^ o^ proposed dam, the face of remainder 
' with OQiirry-face masonry. 
Mpvtuning to the abntment: 

Cubic vardn. 
• ->--•..... ^V) 

V; 1,520 

'JeUnd abntment 1,10<) 




. inclading inspection $7, 229. 1 1 

.^' masonry, iuciudiug excavation, supplies, fuel, 

i cement 2, 965. is 

10,191.29 

ubic yard for laying stone, inclndin;^ all oxpouMes 

REMOVAL OF SXAGS. 

?h the project the snag boat Richard Ford was employed in remov- 
of snags between Mount Cariuel and the uioutti of the river. 
- snags were removed between Grayville and N'«w H.irniony, but 
number were removed at Little Chain and Hlaek's (.'ut-otl', wb<Tr 
'gs had accumulated to such an extent as to shut oil' the channel 
i hcHC places were almost entirely cleane<l out. During some two 
river was at the very lowest sta«i:e the r.rew of the 8na;c-lK>;it was 
-.iiring and building new cribs in the <like at I.ittb* Chain and remov- 
vards of loose rmtk which had rolled into the cbute. 
-.It rctamedinto winter quarters on DecenibiT 1st, r«*ui;iining at Mount 
June 25th, when »he was sent to Vincennes to rt*iuovo snags on tbo 
■ r above Vincennes. 
done by the snag-boat was as ftdlows: 

-nags removed and destroyed 42l» 

' >nag!» removed and destroyed tons . . 1, 786 

; days repairing cribs at Little Chain 10 

CONDITION OF THE RIVER. 

inoval of anaga dnring last season has undoubtedly b(>en of great benefit to 
gstion, bnt nevertheless, the river, at very low \vat»*r. is not practicable for 
ftwing over 15 to 18 inches of water, except in a few places where deep pools 
eiveeii ahoals. 



OllT OF LIEUT. COL. LVUECKHO. "2035 
r.MflM Fi>u>fHiui,/orfiicalyrarfutingJuai3&,lg9l- 



mr^ 


T(». 


•"«,— 


mP\-' ■ 


_^ 


^aauj H 


















B0.88S 












aiacf and bfUnr Fxmcennv. 


^K* Tan. 


Too*. 


A,pjj^,„ 


^^^^^^^' 




l(H,M 


l,&73.Mft.lM 
Ml. lUT. DO 







tSlPROTEKEVT'! ABOTE VTWOtNNFS 

^ Uae inteDtfiQ it tU< beginning of the ye<tr to cIpat a number 

t ttam ihis 'HA tion of tbt, n\ er, bnt it vat* lixind impracticable 

f iitiibtVili. <iiTangemcQtB fordoingthe nork. Tlie snagging 

1 by tliK Government was totally nii serviceable, »ud iw» 

' r doing the work conld beobtaiued from private parties 

aa ^ as a rosalt no work was done. 

t <H the year the snag boat Kkkard Ford, whicli 

) lower river during ttiu last s&asou of operationn, 

sinea, and will be kept at work above that point 

ingBeason. In the meantime a new hull for the steamer 

:oC6A8 of conatmotioa and will be fitted for Buagging 

n completed it will be an easy matter, with the two boats, 

iMtire river clear of auags with annual appro priiitioua of 

i for the operation ofeat^h boat. 

I removal of snagu an additional esi>enditnre of about 

IvoaJd be of great benefit to navigation on thift section; it is 

~ _ * 5 chanaelB through the woratshoals, the cunritmrtinn 

B proper concentration of flow, and for shore protw:tioii in 

1 this section for the past fiscal year is reported at 
B of freight, valued at about * l,2,">tVH)0. 
't herewith report of O. L. Petitdidier, assii»tant engineer, 
■ i statistics gathered by him. 

the opinion expressed in the first part of this report, I 

e consideration to the propriety of making a single appro- 

f t(MI,000 for "improving the Wabash Itiver, Indiana and 

"(br the year ending Jnue 30, 1894, in lieu of separate appro- 

laof t4U,(KW and 9^,(100 for improvements t'efoicVincenues and 

Incennes, respectively. 

Money ittatement. 

BBl, b»l>iice Dueipeuiicil $5,742.26 

, oipendod diiriug fiBcal year 974.28 

!, baUlU'u nneipeuaed 4,767.98 

I, onMbunling liabilities 4*0.00 

(, b«lani^ arftilable 4.327.98 

lated by act approved July 13, H<*i 5,000.00 

eforfi<ii:aljearondLugJiuiB3u, Itiyj ■■.. 9,327.98 



I 



2 r REPOHT OF THE CHUCK OF ENGi 

The iForst tnip«><liiaeiit ta navigation outside of the Qcujd 
mel u*nt Nen Harmony, where a crnt-oS', at one tine sbnt off 
half of the wBt«r of Iho niaiu river, -which foiild fonnerly beni 
liy liont» drnwinjt 24 to 30 inches of water, is now ImpassAhT 
stoEC bj boaM drawing 12 inchea. 

The portion of river thnB deprived of navigation is 12 mileg 

As Ibe island which is now between the cnt-iilT and the maid 
higll water and is oompoHed nf a naudy soil of very looite njilM 
poaaible to devise any sort i>f plosting for the cnt-off' which woul i 
season, and this in the present enlarj^nl size of tht> rut-off wool' 

At Oragrille Bend Cut-Off. — Where an examination was madp 
levee hnilt by the United States is still iu good order, while thi 
oomplished what was expected of them. At this place the ba> 
knd it is probable that some additional work of protection will 

\rand Rapidi. — Near Mount Carmel, 111., where the greater 
<eSt can of oourse be expected imtil the improvement, con - 
- completed. 

ia all in all, at very low nrater, navi^tion ia snapended, ]>•' 

nilt by the United Stat™ are necosHadly inefficient, but ■ 

in tJiD river seems either to diminish or tlie reefs seem to I 

flow watar, which grow longer aji the drainage of the t! 

■feet. 

PROJECT. 

saent fiscal yeu it is coiitempluled to complete tlw 

'nmoval of snngK. should any new Aippropriatit 

. •. ible during the pr<>aent liHcal year, it would bs 

J ii he timber for dam to be delivered during next ' 

jrou so Fonld quarry during the prcjieut aumtner aom^ 

..one which will be ucedeil for the dam. This atoiM oa 

B transported during the high water of IBSS, Mtd { 

d no delay wonld lie experienced in the oonatnis 

hntment already bnilt are nteleas notil after con 

'Ith the commercial statistius of the river ImI 

i< tics of tha whole river, for the past six years. • 

' .„ Iu ^ase In the tonnage has taken place while thaf 

learly doubled ; this ilini^ren re being due 



tntai tunniige. 

The inoreano oi rouunerct! in 
the last three months. 

Very respectfidly submitted. 
Yonr obedient servant. 






prtiinipolly due to the h 






Bame, 


Kind. 


?,t!P ??K 


to 


^Tn.^^^M'''-^:.::. 


TowbMl 




















































U7 


38S 










CumbecUndandlbu'gB 










SU-mwIiPol... 
Sidewheel.... 


W 


BO 


Peukisbaw sod 1 huge 


^ 









2036- REPOET OF THK CHIEF OF ENOrNEERS, U. S. ABMT. 

it (eBtimated) required for completion of exiatin^ project |i 

lttIlBt(^sIlbep^ofitsb1y eip«iideit in fiscal year etKlingJuiieSO, 1894' "J 
.... , \, V.,. . ,fgj_., ___».., _, . 



KKPORt OF MB. O. U PETITUIDIKR, ASSIHTAMT KNOINKKK. 

Mount Car.'jei., III., Jm 

Colongl: I have the honor to anbmit the foUowmg report apon the Ik 
of the 'Wabash River above Vlnoennettduring the HksI ;oar etkdIngJr 

The plan of operations contemplated at begiuQinK of flaoal vea 

removal of nnmerons «naga which were obatractiug the ohannel In 
and Terro Haute, » distance of 90 miles. 

As the Bteumer Oeito, which had been need formerly in towing tl 
l>ecome entirely uDAerTlceablu, an effort was mode to aecnro the I 
"boat to take its place, bnt owing to unacceptable rentrictions pnt M 
of tow boat the offer could iiot be accepted. 
' It woa dcWriiiined to build a uew hnll and fit it np with u 
Mid the aoag scow, thus giving ue a more manageable single bi 
the necessity of employing a double crew as formerly. 

In coutiniintion of tills plan the necessary timber was ordered earl; fl 
of 1892, anil work was begun as soon as stage of water woa such a ' 
low bank which was to be used ae a shipyard. 

The long- con ttnuocl bigb water of the spring of 1892, lasting ueady ti.,^ 
having delayed thebniUlingof newhull until it was found that the newu, 
lie prevented tmin passing over the Qranil Hapids near Mount CormerS 
"water set in. the snag boat Rfekard Ford was sent np to Vincenncs. onl 
<lat« in raodiucfis for the work of removing snags between Tinooiiut* fl 

Comtition o/ricer. — The condition of the river remains nnchaagei] 
report, the snags still forming at low water a very great obstraotion M 

The commerce is still considerable, and, HswUlbeseenb^ theeo 

liere appcnded,shows averydccided increaseoverthe previonsyMT. ' 
due to the long- con tinned high water of this spring, which has bi — * 
to navigftHon. 

/Voice f.— During the present fiscal year it is intended to resume K 
tions iiud push work vigorously until funds on hand are exbauBted. 

1 forvracd hurcwitU tal)iiliir Htat-tmeuta nhon-iug amount of freight H 
part of tliP river during the past fiuual year, 

Very respectfully submitted. 
Your obedient servant, 

0. L. P«TlB 



COMMKIICIAL 8TAHSTICB. 



•.•I 



i3fi 






•_,-•.. 



xiniHtA 



4181. uuo 

71. 145 

137. !»ri»» 

256. a.-t<i 

93. irm 
174, UUO 



Wng Jnnf 



4- 



E I 



'■H. 

?l6ton. 



'.NT • • 



IT.' . 

A . « • 



1.'; 



< ! I .• 



2038 EEPOKT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGDJEEES, V. S. AT 

KSFOKT OF MR. O. I.. PETITDIAtKIl, ASSISTANT SVOOIKXE' 

MousT Carmel, III,, J< 

Colokkl: I hnve the honor to preaent the following report of wor 
White River, Indiana, during the llscal year endine June ^0, 1S92: 

The work intended to be done at the beginninE of the fiscLiI year oot 
completion of iiuproveinent at Kellys Ripple andremoval of suagB £KMt 

Owing to the very low Nta^ of water prevailing on the Wabaah Rlv 
whole summer, it vua found impraotieable to tnke the saag boat JitcAa 
which It hod li60U intended to remove Bnags, up to White River, bo t 
done wna fonQoed to oooipletisg the imi)roveinent at Eellyn Ripple. 

The work done at this place naa conuiBted of the construction of * 
,150 tact long, 10 fftet wide, and 5 feet high, from the hea-l of the sotti.. 
leit bauk of river; the Widening uf eutranve of ohnte for a distance Of 
rebuilding for a distance of 240 feet, of the north dike, which'liadB' 



1 append the foliowiag data in regard to the work done : 

Lioew feet of lora used 

Linear feet of dnftbolts nsed . 



'Cubic yards of stone filling nsed 
Approximat«cost of work 



Work was hegnn on July 16 and continned until ita completion, Ow) '^ 
The improvement, as completed, is now of groat asaiBtance to nftvig^l 
Condition of river. — With the eicej)tion ol Kellya Ripple, when-t' -,^^ 
ment has been Domploted, the condition of the river is no better thftja i ^^1 
year; numeions anags render navigation ditlicult and diingerouB, wbl | 

the caving and cuttiog of benka hrings in fresh obstruction a ; sucbaplH ^ 

Eddy, throe-foartha of a mile above SeokerB, where a row of piling whi 
driven to protect the bank ia now by roaaon of BucceSBivooroiiiun behind il 
die of the channel, and the obatrnction most complained of by steambo 
The bridge at Rod)];erii is attll ouprovided with a draw, but no <!o 
been heard in regard to it, there lieing no niivigstion in thin portion of 
Frojecl. — It is intended during the present year to resume the toiiu' 
and obstrnotiouB as soon as practicable, and until the present Aind* ' 
exhausted. 

Should any additional fnnds become available during the present flB<' 
work of snagging could be oontinned through the whole season. 

d commercial statistics for the preseut fiscal year, also oompAr 
" e years previous. It will be seen that there hua been qnitt 
'oe of the river ; this has been mainly due to the favorable 
ir>^uring the last three months. 



[ append conu 
s for the five 






Very respectfully submitted. 
Your obedient servant. 



coMHBRciAL sTATisnce. 

Slalemml of commerce, JFWie Siver, Indiana, flteal year ending June St 



Loga uid loraber, liDoted ai 
TotlU 



2042 HEPOHT OF THE CHIEF OF ENOINEERS, V. S. ARM?. 

Locks 7 aad 8 were completed in 1802, as well as parte of the foiiiid 
tiona of dams 7 and 8. When these two locks and dama are added 
the finished works there will be a vpry greiit gain in the availability f 
navigation at all seasons on the river. 

Mr. A. M. Scott has continued to exorcise the local charge is b 
usnal etUcieDt manner. Hih report, which is appended, treub) iu dett 
of the operations of the year. 

As the improvement of the river has progressed the conimerc« ou 1 
notably the shipment of coal, has greatly increased. 

The telephone line has been maintained between the central office ; 
CharleMon and the locks, and it is used by night aa well as by da 
being found indispensable for the proper oversight and direction of tJ 
operations, as well of construction and of maintenance. 

A gauge-reader has been kept at Kanawha Falls, near which pis 
the Gauley Joins the ifew to form the Kanawha Kiver; and another i 
Hint&n, where the Greenbrier empties into the I^ew River. The ooi 
pensation of these men is less than $10 a month each. They send 
the central oMce daily reports, by postal ciirds, of the stage of the riV' 
at their respective stations and by telegraph when there is a rapid rie 
These reports are necessary as warnings to the central office in Charle 
ton, in order that such maneuvers of dams, etc., may be had in time ; 
the height and duratioa of the freshets may require. 

For perfect security a similar station should be occupied at eoo 
point on the Upper Gauley, and perhaps also on the Klk. 

The following are the amounts and dates of appropriations for ii 
proving Great Kanawha River, West Vii-ginia: 

March 3, 1873 $25. 000. 00 I Auguat 2. 1882 $200,000. 

June 23, 1871 25,000.00 .Inlj- 5. 1884 200,000. 

March 3, 1875 300,000.00 I AiiKnst r,, 188G I87,60a' 

August U. 1876 270,000.00 | .A.iiBiist ll,18»8 350, OOft 

June 18, 1878 222,000.00 , Sei.trmlier 19, 1890 300.000. 

March3,1879 150.000.00 

June 14, 1880 200,000.00 Total 2,629,600. 

March3, 1881 200,000.00 I 

DNrrBD States Enginbbr Oitiob, 

ISaUimore. Mil., Januarys, ISBt, 

OKNRitAL: The estimate for thp project for the improvement of the Greut Kanaw 
by thu method of lot:ks auil movable dams was yrepored in 1ST5, BeTentef>n years »{ 

Severai cirouniHtnDues seem to make the present a suitable time for its Hoal re 
siou. A revised estimate is therefore submitted below. One teasoQ Why this I 
not been done sooner van the hope that in the project for the Ohio it miKlit be kno* 
whether it was lllce]; a dam would be buitt below the mouth of the Kanawha ut 
enougli to raise the wat«r to snch a distance aa to influence the location of tbeda' 
in the Kanawha uear its moutb and thus perhaps save the expense of one uite in I 
Kanawha. 

In a letter of Heptemhar 2S. 1891, from Col. Merrill he Hays: "I would theroft 
advise you to mate your location oa the Oreat Kanawha liiver without reeard 
what may be done on the Ohio." 

The original e^timiite amounted to M.000,000. The appropriations since ha 
amounted to $2,579,500. 

This would leave a sum of $1,500,000 to ba still provided if the original eatimi 
were adhLTud to, l>ut, reaa<inn have arisen for tliaugiug it. la four or Ave years 
btcorac upparent (h.it the ujipiTdamof the series estim a tud for would not be n«o 
sary, as tlio cownicri'e aliove the pool of No. 2wooid not Juatify so lar^eaneipen' 
tnre as the occupation of Site 1 would have required. 

When the original estimate was made it was necessarily founded on French dra 
lugs and experience, ns a nioviible dam of the Clianoino type had not been built 
America. The knowledge of the river since gained by our own experience andmi 
detailed surveys than the hurried ones upon which the first estimatea were based I 
also been great. We have thus beeu enabled to rearrange the locations of the aii 



APPEKDIX T T — fiEPOET OP COL. CBAIflHILL. 2043 ^ 

I 

'pied and to omit another of the twelve locks tuid dams nriirinaUTjnv- 

For tbeae ooiuudetatioiis tho entunate wm rednoed b; 1600,000 in ^8. 
mat »«1ced toi in Oie last Annaal Bejiurt for contpletioD of the nork in 
Btfiiiiiial iiiiii of Ma Mies was 9670.000. The folluiring levised e«tliDal« wm laMly 
^^ viut gteftt e»re by Mi. A. M. Scott, the resident eDginoer at CharJ^tou : 

__. ; pfianc« with ;oni instructions 1 have the honor to anlnntt bo- 

n aatimste far eompletiog the Great Kanawha alaek-water improveniviii to the 
k of tlie rivo: 

kand D&m No. 9, complete, notincIodiDg inspeotion, engiovering, 

jwoaaa, etc 1320,000 

^jMdDataNo. 10^ complete, notinclndinginspeetioti, engineering, 

I* cxpeniMs, etc - ■ .- 3SS, XXXt 

kud Dam Ko. 11, complete, inclDdingporehaAe of aitcv not inclad- 

' >, engineering, office eninnsee, etc 485, 000 

It naaiTC<d to complete looks and dama Voa. 7 and 8, ic addition to 

7 now available 15.000 

JitUraal lock hoDses at lock* Noe. 3, 3, 1, 6, 6, 7. and 8, sixteen 

■ in all la, 000 

gtai pooU at beads of stioa ..r 1 pproaches 30,000 

1,187,000 
MtiOD, enghieeting. geii^ru it ezpenaes. and incidentals, 10 

T«tal 1,306,700 

le MMt of No. II over 9 or 10, "itl icr locks and dam* on the river. 

tiT to the ereater width ( ■' 11 (being troth 100 to 210 feet 

a at the otber nitee). hut epth of fonndations. The 

Piock at II and in that vicinity ' low-water loark, and the 

I will average frum 6 t( ., l. / sills than at any of the 

It Bites, increasing materially tl , • nasoor;, concrete, excavation, 

of ooffeidaoiB. 

submitted is tended ■• » 'fall estimate,' and it is believed the . 

e* completed worlci< will be made to fall below it. It niu tbonglit 
'er, to make the eejimal« targe eaongh to cover oonsiderablo ancec- ■ 
lavoidaMv rrtnnected with snrth works. 
■"dei- Wm. p. Chaigiiill, 

"Corps af Enginttrt." 

ne MM of what has been done is confliderably greater than it would have been 
if tbr work bad not been protracted through bo many years iniitead of being en- 
ttidy finiihed in three, as it might have been had money been avnilable. The whole 
■oik rtnild bsvobeen done in tSe'same time as at each site, and three yean is a fall 
tDowsDoe of time for any site. 

MoRover, the size of the locks has been increased by proper authority beyond 
«kat w^M originally proposed. 

Tock is nearly completed at sites 7 »nd 8. The completion of No. 8 marks an 
uiMoally impottaut step io the impiovetnent of this nver, which has been a suo- 
»•• from the commercial aa well as the engineering point of view. 

WImd the dun of No. S is Unished, boalH can at all times come as low as its pool 
i-M % harbor, and when there are often within reach of the back water of the Ohio 
i^ :ls &eshet« which may be in progress when the Kannwha is not. 

I'luler sQcii circnmstances the coal, etc., from the Kanawha may at once pusaovar 
ILe ncimpioved lower part of that river and down the Ohio to a market at Cincinnati 
toA ihr other great cltiea on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers and their dependencies 
kj «ater and rail. 

Konover, shonld the backwater from the Ohio not come fully to the pool of Dam 

I t, it ii thought it may at times be supplemented by uaing the water of pool 8 ii.nd 

olhm above it to flush the portion of the Kannwh.-k below 8 sufficiently to enable 

Lhom u» reai.'h the Ohio at some Htages when such movement would otherwiBa be im- 
~**^)ri^ vlwa there would be a boating atage in the Ohio and not in the Kanawha. 



APPENDIX F F. 



ffEOTTMEKT OF GREAT KANAWHA, ELK. AND GAtH-ET RIVERS, WE8T 
TBUISIA, AND OF NEW RIVEK, VIRGINIA AND WEST VIHGINIA. 



I UfOSTOF COL. WM.P.CRAIGBILL,CORPS OF ENGINEERS, OFFICER IN 
CBAKGK. for tee fiscal tear ending JUNE so, IS&i, WITH OTMBB 
OOCEMENTS EELATJSG TO THE WORKS. 

QtPEOTEMENTS. 



«•! Kioftwhn River, Wtat Virginia. ; 
- Operatisg and csre of locks and dama 
on Great K&n>wba Siver, West Vir- 



I. New Kivei, virginift oud WMt V 



(For letter of transmittal see Appeudix L) 



F F 1. 

IMPROVEMENT OF GREAT KANAWHA RIVER, WEST VIRGINIA. 

The object of the improvement haa been to give a deptli ol'iiot less 
than 6 feet all tlie year round throngliont the wbole river, 96 miles. 
The means are locks and dams. The lucks are about 30(1 by 50 feet. 
above Charleston, and nbout 340 by 55 feet below. The following ta- 
ble shows the present condition: 



(. iriuvm hi mika Innn Cbuleg- 

tOD. 


Stflsofdun. 


Coffl- 
plel«l 


RcniorkH. 


1 1 atBdiM .hor. 






In 










."".■"•.:::::: 





































Tiro more sites will require to be occupied below No. 9. Some dredg- 
ig is also necessary in some of the pools, nn well as the occasional 
Btoval of soags and rocks. 

20*1 



I'M 1«; i;i r<ii;i i.r rm. < iiii.k <»« 

• 1:m:. .1 •..'. l.i-.M '.!':• •'.!>•. 1 - .;i ■» « :i «'.i [••:•• l'-''^ 
j". I""-'' I!. :• i •. •»" my r«» i iiii-^|»rir'*. iln* i- 
.•.'.■.I'! ••• 111. * :.• •••II 5» 'f l«'!i:;{ li •. :«iiii )■> -.■•: 

I.*. •:•!»•»:• • fi.,i • .!!••» I" iii:hI«' IpTi' r«> til- • 
III :i;i::i.'- .ii il-'. !m4 '. nni «!.iiii." Iiiii«»' • 

|ill •: «. t li ).!.••!'. I ! !:«i';l .l}»iM"«l !•> ill* ' • 

I i'.' I'. -.I .11 : .i'ii»"« I'ltiT*'*! ti» iii\ir- 
p.i:i -. ll :i< !::•'• i; «••:!. rihiiiMiiinn. pts: 
v. -i! \ I •. : .i !i ::,:! t« I l:il«» i\'«*l»l 1 In* ilMti> 
n-vi,.'-: !»• 'In I i.il ■li Sr.ilt^ iili'l l'!a« r<' 
r In- |ii i I • ..'ni ii.i\ iii» iit-» on t lii-^ •■••iiti.': 

< •rnMiisi^ .ii;«! ( •••.n isi;: .sit«* 

rr:h ill--, in rntit n'.jiin. .'ilJ.linS linoMi !• 
S!;im: ii.ii:^ :ii loHtTiIani. !>l.>70 \*'v\ . I> !• 
I 'il'!!- i:« « oli'f iil:nii. 7. 15«»1 <nl»ir yaii! . 
I'.\-- i\ :i! i(»!i. • <»:iiiinnj, isi.'linliiiLC 'Irfl::: 
l.\.-::\ It 'I. l..:i|.i p.i!;. '.\M0\ r\\\t'\r y 
l,\. ix.ri.Hi. ink. II i;il»ir yanls. a' • 
r.»i.l».iir. Mf Ml. 1 l.«':;i i-nhii' \anl>i. :»' 
I'lnMli'.^. L'j; •uiiir \.'ir«l>. at *!.'»•• 

< III •.•:,• ri., ♦io<» r!;l»i4- v.ir«ls, at •:■» 

til-,. H'h' ImIiiw I;.-i'. .Mill. L'.Ti:» « iiJii- 
r..i! lv:ri'.r nia-»ii;ir'. . r».L'L'l ri«l»ii- yaii! 
I.'ih1» r-H «• ni.i«*i»iii v. L'.OIT rnliii- n.!. 
lN»nii»l rUf iii.i^iiniy. l.s:;i; riilii- 
<H: sioiji-. !»!j^li li.i)ii:iiiMtMl iiHiuT"' 
Sii;. -.'i:!: .:'.., ;.:ini>. at -fl^... 

•/I ••ii". r*' ll! '»!•• \ aMl*>, .ii r"J'» 

< ••:'i'v. :i77 i mI'Ii v. ml-, .ii "rL'.'i 
SliMK" i Ilini; III riili'. iimliT jmnI'- 
l.'i|»i..j». .-.atiil iiL-H »-i|. l.lJvy ,ii!ii 
I'lVMi'i. 1.171 <iil»ii- \aiiU. at +."• 
Tiniliii- in )it'i nian«*iit i-nn-^tniri i. ■• 
\\i>\' Iiolrv. ii»-,l'-ii in ir.a^oniy. I 

\ ni'in' .... 

I Ii« 1' ■ • !»:i ll n «»r att:n-1n 
r.i-r«' .'■ LC'^. |» '•'•' i»i.;l'"-. iaildi*' 
- !.<•■'• ' T.». I In' in. IV L:.t« ^ . till* 
ni .;i !• • .ini! sIj-' n.ilr>. Iniilt :i!i- 
fi'.**'"' ni'.Ixinii rin^ •■n-i of tlu' 

-I- ■.•.:•-'". 



/.,.._.,,.,.•., ^j s ,.,.,1 .'lll^.tlll'lf, 

, ji ,. ;:'.,.•.! -I :!i r 1 1: \ i»': |»a :;••.•" 
!>'•:. • ::.-. .n- ':-o rni!\ -i 
• ■: ! ■ I .• .■' I 'I'i. \i». 7 ill!*'. 
« »••• : 8 ■•■•.•:.••'._: f !•!■ \ I •• . 
»! •• t I . ■ !•! !i'! iii"i«, ! Ih* |otr • 
. ' « • • I .' • ' ''.1 

! ■ •• ! :"M I ' f « niii 

• • • .: •. \M . 

• . •• "I.-.. • 
■ ■ I I- . • 



I ■ • I 



I,ONEL CKAIGnrLL. 





35,000 
1(^600 
B,938 
1,76S 



iai7 t<» 



and miu<e it d 

e of stono !•■... 

■kai SSO yard* of this w 
lite, tbo n-at ^>eiilt; eitbar 
Milow the <lam. Ttit; work 
Lre<l litbur and teamit. The 
1,210 fe«t iiDd on the 



(LcwBtcd ft 



uioiith of 



_ irin, oMiatei 

sIllD n 

cmat nt thu dn 

enisbud ill li 
Chnrleston.) 

rkine order dnriiiK the y«ir. Locking wm Huapended 
Tbe cuiniueree through the look was us follows: 

bUHhRls.. l,79l>,l)00 
H!,(KJ<1 
7, 1 la 



mt^ m.- 


p^^l 


produe 


e, etc. 


, by steniii boats. .ill) 








E::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::ao:::: 


It:::.:: do.... 




fc;:::::{:::::;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::do:::: 



to the ordinary repuirs iilmot the iTork», S30 onbio yardi 
rnrniriiig aud esti^udiuK the riprappitig below the lock 
of thin, nhieli wem taken from the bar below the diiiu, 

the old quarry neiir th<! «ile. About 600 yarde of old ri 



.J8 yards of earth ii_.. 

t look bauds nBRisteil by hi 
r eztendB dowiistre 



ling the banlcB. The wnrk wua 
ireA labor. The riprap on the 
kud on tlm look side 1,-2V2 feet 



■^ movable dams with their locks wore in good working order 

^■^riag the year. As usual a good deal was done at each lock 

regDlar hamis, in keeping the works in order. The most 

in mentioned below liniler tliat liead. A brief accotmt of 

he movable dams here foUowsi • 



^ 



204S KKPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

DAM KO. 8. 

Work on the contract for bnilding the foundations and masonry of this mon 
dam (Hce Re]>ort of Chi«f of Engineers for isyi, page 2419) waa directed mainl 
bnilding the foundations for part oT navigation pass, building the shore abnt- 




lirst section of cofferdam for the navigatioii" 
ng 150 feet of it next to the lock, was completed so that thfe pnmps * 
started July 9. 1891. Excavation inside the cofferdam began July 13. The Wm< 
of ditches in the bed rock for the anchorage disks and anchor bolts of the wr 
sill and service bridge was begun J uly liO. These trenches are about 8 feet deen, 
rook was generally seamy and carried a good deal of water, and some difllcnl^ 
met with in keei)ing the trenches pumjied out. The placing of the disks and Mi< 
rods in the trene.hes and concreting around them Avas begun August 15, but oil 
mainly to the small force employed by the contractor was not completed nntil^ 
1st of October. The laying of masonry in the pass cofferdam was b^nn Octr 
8. Operations inside the coffer were stopped November 13 by a rise in tnexiwr^ 
nothing more was done on that part of the work last year. When stopped for." 
ter the condition of the work on this first section was about as follows : Th» « 
ago wiw in and concreted around; the upper or bridge sill was set; the fbanc 
course under the outer downstream wall was about two-thirds set; the nu^ 
cretin^ between the top of the rock and bottom of timbers was nearly finiahfldj 
bed sticks were all placed, and sixteen of the main longitudinal timbers **** 
The work insiile this section of cofferdam should have been finished laat ■• 
wiMild have been with(mt difficulty if the contractor had made proper 
ke])t a reasonable force ('mployed. He was carrying on the lock contrafOt^ 
at tlu^ same time, and seemed unable, or rather unwilling, to keep men and plu^ 
ficient to earry on both works nroiHirly. . 

Shore abutment. —The shore abutment was built last season. Exoavation xor 
gan August I?,, 1891, and the last piece of coping was set September 25. SoPi^ ^ 
culty was met with in mifking the excavation for the abutment. It is loostMS- 
back inUy the bank, and the last V2 or 13 feet in depth (except about 8 feet of gr 
on ton of the rock ) was tine sand, with a good deal of water running in it^ The 
caved badly, and it was found advisable to pnt in curbing, andtwonHmaaof tl 
and sheet i>iling were put in clear ariMiud the pit before tne rock was reaohed. 
loose stone and earth filling back of the abutment— the stone being against thf 
of the wall and leading to an opening in the lower win^ — and the puddle abti 
upper wing wtTe put in. and the bank riprapped immediately back of the oi' 
Ut a height :V2 t'eet above low water. The bank in its unfinished condition f| 
winter tlo<»ils well and has surt'ered no damage of any importance- The gran 
ri]»ra]>]Mng ot' the bank on this side will be completed as soon as tlie letair 
below the abutment is plactHl. 

ll'ork thh /»♦ <!*(»«.— Operations on and within the first section of the coV 
the pass have been a yn^at deal hindered so far this season by high watt* r 
on the cofferdam, whieh w:ui ix>nsiderably damaged during the winter, v 
May 4, 1892. The pumps were starte^l May 12 and excavation inside btgn 
tlay . AlH>ut 1 , 075 rubic y a rds of material — aand, gravely fine coaly etc.— \' 
the work in the cotVer dam. deposited by floods during the winter and •^ 
e«)irerdam was tlooded May lV by a rise in the river and pumped out :■ 
inside was resumed J une 14, andhas been in progress since thrau Uub: 
again bv water the foundations inside this ni»t section of ^fer, ™1'' 
iiig of the lixed irons, wicket and treetle boxes, hnrieiSL slidea. sill \ 
W oompK^ted about July 1,\ when the end bulkhead will bebuUt(:i.- 
Paul 7\ the lorleniam HMuoved. and the building of the eeeoiid s<»t:' 

M^lUnah ;>rf j.,zr»<f.— The contractor ha» nearly aU of the dinien 
sill>. 1 oruers. \^\vt recess stone, etc.. WHiuiwd for the work, ainl 
tlu- ro, U aiul noinrod face out and on hand. HestUl lacks ali.. 
ot vo, k :iml vv»iiito.l ta»e. but the iiuarrio* ai* tumineont w- 
,^^.^ tor ^lo:..^ Considerable tumble has been and is vfT 
>"..Ml»:r ii::'.lM- lor th.' Nxii-kei sill, box sMfat*. etc, fcir th»- : 
-■..•./.;; .i;..i iluTvis like'.vto Ih» no material^ delay onaceoi ■ 
:1 .-: till- ;o-.:n,i.iT:onsar.d masv^uryof Dam ^o.^wlU becus.- 

IKON WORK r^>R MOVABIi PARTS • 

" . / . • .■ .'/.;..■;;.,;. ^,„: Jit^a June ^ 



2or,i 



Total. 



.l-H 



:,•>.» 


I«. 


.•'>14.»"««> 


'Mil 




l»i UJM 


1 .INI 


2. 


:;ii :-► 

.".•I '.ml 


. m 




3."il 


1.5X0 




2. :.:i 


75 




117 






1. 1'j-. 



n Wcilll :iih1 i]r- 

1' iiml a now .sill 

. rliJM ('i>iiii4.M-tiiiii 

• ••••s of tli<* wt'irrt 

lias Immii iiirmtly 

S>y l*a.'*ti'!iiii;r t!i«< 

"•t-irnii hiIIh. 

'.' u|> and rr]>la(-c(l 

tliiH wt'ir an* now 

."s fnun month of 

.'lindiT of ili<» tinio, 
ill- ilani nnd iUt" rom- 



'• iiLirkB. 



»• 



I \ ';■... 



1 ■ • : 



I • • 



1..- .: 



:l 



-.S . . ! : S 



..III' ' i 1 \ , 

• • !i • " 



1 1 



•■.!.• i! I I • '•• !•-•?: ill 

• •."••. •••:.' I •>'••. I :: i V 

j.. .• M.. . : ' . : i.M'i. ;il. 



i I I ! •. I \ 



». !• 



1 1. : I' t ill |m\\ 



■ I.-. . \ 

Jill I,. «: -.1 A 1' . I < ii i-L >!i<Mi. < »;i < )« in'iH r 



2050 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ABHT. 

J.iidt JVo. 4. — Movable dam, finisbed in 1880. Located 71 milee from tlM 
of the riTer and 16 mikR aliovo CharleBtou. 

TLt^dnmnosup 150 iIuyH ilurijij; tlie yoar ancl iIo'iTn the remainder of the tl 

■wuB diiwn 12 doyH to niiike ni].;iirB nnil thu rest of Iho time on account of J 

ButMcient fltngos of wnter. The luaneuverH of tlio liom and some of the ^ 

e at No. i are given in the following talilea : 




Prumintiit rfpairi at Xo. 4. — Owin)c to trouble with the ehortcsed t 
the lijt'k Hiili>, it wns still furtliir reiliireil in length laat fiillandX 
Hliiiuting liiirtirx [nil in, Ii-aviiig U of the wirkots on thnt seetloniofl 
the bar. Tbin filiort bftr got off tlio ifuides iLud badly bent og ' ""^ 
hnd, on the » liolt-, luadi' ho much tronblc that it waa deoided ti 
\t'bii'b was dune iu .liiuu. It tviU not be ]jut baok. The n_ 
hniterit on tlie luck Boction will be replui^ed daring low water 1l 
— •»■ pattcTii. There nro atill 13 wickets on the jiie- — «— — 

on tlireti i>f tbe look gates Uatv 

beiugbuiUyiipriiyed. TiieHe giitoB are now twelve yeonold. 
oci'UHiiinitl small n'|>aira, to laat several years yet. 

Lock So. 5.— Movable dam, finished in 1880. Located 68 B 
nnd 10 miles above Uliarli'ston. 

Tile ilniii wnn ko]it up 1«2 days dming the yeai. The O,^ 
mpOTtutit iteiiiB of comiiiori.'e at No. 5 an given Inl 



Maiifiivi-ra of dam. 


Dale. 


Time 


Mid 


, 






*. m. 




















11 30 




Tire. horn.. 














lHwlllbi.rai.»,l3. 


UStl 


■ 


About: 

tripi 


U'y-n-fl 


U.^.V...1..T R 




T 


- if III — 










































Jiuiiii4Bnill5.... 


18 30 







.L. 205:5 



KIVF.i:. W KST 
l»AM Nn. 7. 



^M the ()hii)iM)2 

M.'itioii «»r \fw 

iiinc liidjrfaiHl 

'in'iit Kanawha 

\fwniui(iault»y, 

:'» thi* Kanawha 

• thf fntit nt' the 

•hf sh«M"«*, isl»."».i.'5 

pnitih'. Plat*' 1. 

.• riv«?r(l»5i niih-.s« 

;h<- lirMt Vt niih-s. 

'•in th<^ foot of rhi< 

i-r ; from th«- foot 

" U»^inih;H fall 21 

:I<'S. l(i fi'i't : from 

•• moMt f>f thi* fall 

ipplfHi, tho uaturul 

till* Hh>|>i' hcconu's 

- nMhicfdand linullv 

■••whUTH an«l jjravi-l. 
• ith. It isnmhrlaiil 

• low h)\v-wuti'rniark. 

TheliankH an> from 
i'<|iii>ut mixtn]-«>s and 

• of tin* riviT and 10 

• IimI risi' at CIi.m I«'.st«»ii 

• •• ln"h-\v.it«M l!ii«* ill 

• • i'lM-trtl l»y l>a« K \\ :it» r 
-.1 -."» niih'S aluiVf. .is 

:-. lln'< diin iif Ft hiii.ii \ . 
^-i vi-ial niiii'** nlM»\ i-. ;i-* 



. .t, 

7 Ii.l»* Im-iMI toUnd iHt'A lliTr 

• fliMt '»it«'; «-\<r|ii .1- 111 

• ■ Ml" tin* I i\ fV. ;i!nl el I !:•■ 

ii.itural low \N -It* I •!• i*: ii 

: in inan> |d:HT.-. i - ^Im-w m 

- •»rii:iii;ill\ Imt .i U'w inli- 

• 1 1 a Inndid «:in'H' Mj- ".i. ::! 

•' livt-r. ri.it* 1 , ai. ! i!." n i: 

li inli. ;i-N t\,-^, I ; I.I d f' 1 ' I ' • 1 "M. 

•al, I'lii- lulli 1 lit -I 1 .•.■: :..ii 
• «• nia \ !••• Miaiji In I i I I.. 
••I'T im l'*?!. I' _' ♦•-'■ ; !••: I'-T ■. 
. Tart *_'. |i.i^« I'"...; l«»! I^TT. |i 1.^. .■* 

!i»' v\\i\ I'ni liiii.-niii •• f a •:• < A !t !i 
'! ills txaii'jf ua- • >-t al»]:-li«M 'ii 
; l»\ rhr I iiiird "^i i;««. I: s -..it tn 
iIm' <ir«'al Kaiiawi'-" !•< I"'.v < l:ailt ^ 

'. nl<liiial\ l<j\\ \\al<!. I ':• i'\tl'Iin' 

• A tin' /i-ln, 

• •■••III 1 till ? In- dilii 1 1 :■ t i^.ii. .:<• 1 i.nl ill:;- 
:■ iiM«!r :ii 111 iii..i { iiaii'-«:"n. All I'M 
•i nt' II i- I'i ■ '1 ; 1 1 •• ■ I ««' •■ - !i- i«l>- i i-t 

I i I s 1 ! , I . I . . . ' I i ! ^ I ' . 1 1 ■ . I I • i I ' ", . < I 1 1 : •_; I • 

inv\ '.'• a : I ; .■'•.. 1 1 ^i I . I iJ • ' ii ' •:• t- i-i |h| 

.'^« L'.!'!-' « '!''.«■ I«' ':" I -•■"•lid: ;ia!!^« :i.',"», 

^.•d!'»: '.:.!:'•:' »I.^'- •.:■•!. a:.:" l-'.T:-;-: i^aiim* 

■ li •!.;• L'^.T'.'^: ^..11.:. ! 1. 1", dis. ii.i- -. IV.IJo; 

• .._'.«■,•>. ,ii~, liaij. 11^,J:«1: -.hi.;i- ill. •."..',>. liai;,^o 

l«: I .]i'. idilr. «iiil\ is iv]iiiiil«'l li»-lrWllh. 



t OF COLONEL CRAIQHILL. 

1^ width anil from l'S5 to 300 l',.et in l<-i<zl.)i ," 
Id in till! clear uDil fruiEi 300 1» 3U feet loii); 
» liiiilt, the lirat boluW I'harlestoti, it w:ui 
ita the cnaX truUi, pattiualarly Ur^-sixed 
pf the locki below Cbarleatun 53 feet wide 
The coal linrgoa are froiii 24 to 26 
ar^ .fiui^...^ ir. paas four biirj(i«at 

rnn, aa before stated, iolSTG, Progn^s 
I each lock and diim arc abowu on the 
EStnreij and lUmeniiionH of eooh work, i» 




Inrf down,— The cummerciul cftect of the looks and 
IffiiinrliB, and the additional bcUi^Hlfl to result fniiii 

£« mouth of the river are ahonn in gomo dotail in 
MH tot 1887. poffe 1921. etc.. and hy oommeroUl 
M, «nd will he lint brietiv refcrrod to horc. 
leted in 18B0; No. a in ItWL'; No. H in IMKtJ, uml No. 
( by rivet for the year .n.liiig Jime, IXhI, hb* 385,148 
and in 1891 the river sliiintn-nf whn l,n:w,t54 tuus. 
ines above the hoail of tin; CliarK'.->tiiii iiubl (the Kite 
lid they wisro sondinj; nut iiUofjother not to exceed 
now 17 iiiiups iilinve No. ."i hhiiipinK by river. The 
ir last year was.">lii.O'JO hiiih. It ih evident too that 
this part of ih.- valley i« but s uniall part of what it 
ke hnMincss ih Ih'Iiik iui-roased nuil new mines opened 



id about 901) barges engaged in the r< 






I' h.ii 



:iscd anil in still iu 
I of liiisr-'ltaiiooue I 
61,000 ton«. Thi-re 



iMUTieit about 41.1 

, La«t year they 

if Itiem lii-ios loeai onaiH. 

linnati, I'ittaburg, Gallipol 

TUB MOVABLE DAMS, 



■Cha. . ._ .,.,.,. _ _ 

ley art' all like Dam No. 7, illufltcateil and duacribod 
■e .■oiiiiil.iiil and put in nperatiun in 1880 and wore 
action willi staoh-watur improvement hitilt iu Auier- 
ims. N»D.7aud8aTo now building; both a: 
ipl.-t<'il ilnrin^' the ]in'ai-nt Hoason, IH92. 
on th>- Great Kanawha, thu number of, and tiin< 
inibi!!' of days the dams are kept 
" " ' -•■ 'in the. 



B well 



I (lull 



I iiiiH I 



e fully described it 
I tho who' 



rapidly luanuiivured (in thcHu respouta Pam No. 6 and 



2056 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, IT. S. ARMY. 

ran up to Caniielton, in good Htagen of wat-or, pjencrnlly " winding '' through the 
tipper HhoalH. AftiT the railrond whh Iniilt st-oanihoats seldom went ahove the foot 
of Paint (-reek 8hoal (now the nite of Lock 3), and in low or even mediam fltagei 
there was but little done by river above the Charleston pool. 

In reference to coal shipments fVoni the u^]>cr river: Locks Xos. 4 and 5, thefixst 
built on the river, were completed and j>ut m operation in 1880. At this time then 
were but two mines above the sit-e of No. 5 shi])])ing by river, and they were doing 
but little, 8hi]»ping altogether not to exceed 8,00() tons per jear. Several attempto 
ha<l been made to ship coal from above the foot of I'aiiit Creek Shoal, at Canneltoiii. 
Armstrong Creek, etc., but owing to the risks and uncertainties of navigation thie 
had been entirely abandoned l>efore the slack-water improvement began. The im- 
mediate practical effect on commerce of the building of looks and dams in this pftrt 
of the river will be referred to farthtT on. 

IMPKOVEMEKT BY LOCKS AND DAMS. 

The first appropriation for the imjirovemcnt of the river by locks and dams wes 
made by Congress in March, 1875. Col. (then Major) William P.Craighilly the engi- 
neer officer in charge of the river, in a project for the expenditure of this appropiuk- 
tion, dated Anril 30, 1875 (Report of Chief of Engineers, 1875, page 90), says: "The 
system of locks and dams may be considered as anbrding the most reliable naviga- 
tion at all seasons of the year; and, as the ordinary construction is open to the ob- 
jection of delaying boats and breaking np tows, the adoption of movable damsaeeme 
the best expedient available.'* • • « "These will furnish an unobstructed naTi- 

gation dnring such times as the river will give sufficient depth of wat^-r, which wiU 
e not less than six months in each year. Fhe system has not been fairly tested in, 
this country, but its long successful use in France would seem to supply the defli- 
ciency and justify its adoption under such favorable conditions as are round on th» 
Kanawha.'' 

" The profile represents approximately the position and height of the movmUe 
dams, the lifts of which, vary from 6 to 8 feet up to Paint Creek Shoal. Above tloiA 
point the fall is greater,*and it may be Ijetter that the movable dam system be 9fim 
applied to it, but that the rise be overcome by three locks of 15 feet lift each." . 

un this ]>roject a Board of Engineers, consisting of Lieut. Col. H. G. Wrigfa^ 
Majs. Craighill and Poe, made a report to the Chief of Engineers, under date of] 
25, 1875 (Annual Report for 1875, page 94). The following is an extract from iBA 
report of the Board : 

*' To meet the necessities of such economical tranHportiition a depth ofatleirii'7 
feet water should be secured at all times. This, as stated by Major Craighill in hto 
report ofAjtril SO last, may be obtained in three ways: By a system ot looke and 
pertnaneut dams; by a system of locks and movable dams, and by a combination cf 
the two; that is, by locks and movable dams from the mouth of the river to aaoi^ 
tain point, with locks and permanent dams above." 

« > # * • * • . 

" They there fore recommend that movable dams be adopted from tlie monlii «| 
the river to Paint ('reek, the first permanent <lam being at tills point," etc. 

This report wns ap])roved by the Chief of Engineers and the lock and dam a^Ha. 
5 and the lock at No. 1 were ])ut under contract, and the work on them begun in '* ' 
course of a few montlis. 

The fixed damn, liJlSy and numher of. — The first project as stated above 



plated three fixed dams of 15 feet lift each above the foot of Paint Creek Shoal cttBf* 
ing the improvement to the foot of Kanawha Falls. It was afterwards 'deeOMdat* 
visiible to change the ])lan by reducing the lifts of the fixed dams to 12 fiMt^ aaft 
Locks and Dams Noh. 2 and 3 have been so built, the No. 2 pool reaching to the Ibtfi 
of Loii]> Creek Shoal, as shown on the profile. This is nejurly or quite to the upper 
line of tlie lu'fit coal de])()sit (m the Great Kanawha (being about where the Lower 
Coal niea8ur(>s rnn ont nnd the thick top sandstone of the Conglomerate eerilto 
appears), and it is ]>ropos(»(l not to continue the im])rovemcnt further upstream unML 
the ]<><*ks and dams are ail completed Ix'low. The reduction in the lirts wiU .mahe 
two more tixcd dams mccssary if the slack water is cari'ied to the foot of thelU]% 
making four in all instead ol'three as (irst ])r<>posed. It may be added that the 
peiience at N<». L' an«l 'A, particularly in re^^ard to the scour of the banks below i 
works, has fully .justified the change of plan and shown that the height adl 
(for maximum ll'-foot lifts) is as great as either of these dams should haW 
built. 

Itetaih'd drawiu<;s of Lo4-k and Dam No. '2, uniform with thoiO of N9»T'^ 
are now uinler way for publication by the department. * ^ 



m . K 



APPF.NT>1X. V S"— 



-REPORT OF COLONEL 



-Ut -.r fhf locka. — Tlie firnt prcjiTt ami c-irii^i' -'. 
.Uiiu-nHioQB nf ntiout 4K t-u 5U fret in wiilth ntf'. It--. 
wknsliov*- CUivrtfsn.ti !>i-« ») fiK't u-i'lv in tli-rl'»: -- 
■em qn-ius.. IWCoro l.o<-k N... 6 wiw li.iilt. the : :^- 
nuurd, in or<l>^T to "btstti!!' ufriinimoilute thf ■,■"»'. Iiv. 
Wl- in llie lower river, to bnild nil of the lock* V-'. 
l(» rtur an.l 342 f^-ft loiip; lielwren qQoiiiN. The ^-.s.: 
atniiriinA alioiit 130 foot loiig. Tin' locks art .l-s.r-^ 
MDItbT■:<^ LinrccH nnd. a tovfl)oat. 

^ Wilding ot tlie locks and dsiian wns beciin, k« W: r- 
■litnrtfttf. relative Ic.catioTiB, liftr*. t.t<-., of each la. c t 
|nUi, TtiB. with Boino otlw-r important foatnres luJ — : 
Aftpteuiii lb*s ioUo^ving table: 



\ 



Ivcngth Df dan. 



I Lock d; 



I *•««■ 





ToUl. 


CI 
«i 


ri. 


^' 


1 ««.'»,. 


#■«(. 


'1^ 


/^ 


('"'MsT'Jio 

1 SM MS 
1 -M» . 310 


Ml 






:r: 



! im. KUltrin Well. 
I I P-"'- I 

I f M*. I *V«- iW(. 



CMM*reiaI rff«cl# o/ (ft" 'o'-t" inrf rf'iffl 
liW first iiuitt oil tLc (in^iit Kaiiiiwlio 
W>lniuf{ till 
htbpoTtof 






. to Ih.^ 



illiof th<rr 

r. J..; 



nuiitii--) in latt'T Ainiiiul ItejiorlH. nn<l nil 

Uaniti N.IK. 1 »ni| 5 won- I'omi'letHl in I>m>: No . 
lia IwT. TLc sliipnii-nt. of i-iial by river for tii* ;.■•■■■ 
ti«M. It ban inrveuH«il Bteailily, atulin Irflil tbr r.--- 
In Iwu thi-rn wfTe but two niini-x iiltovp lU- ;.rt. 



ml tlicv 
now 17 



ml iiboilt !X"i I.Mj^, „^^ 



of Lock '•') riliipiiiug 
IDOO toiiH Iter yvur. 
tDipDt of tliB'i': 17 mi 
Ilw (irirs«iit outimt ol 
viU b«uiime, ."ui the c 
illib.'iiiae. 
Tliere nre now 21 t 

Tbf ordinary frciulit and piiasttiiKur traffl' > i,. 
»pi<ii.v. In ir^i tlK^^Hc liiKitH lartii-d ubum j: „ 
■uniijudise, fnrm iir-iduii>, utc;. L.ai»t ynartb'-i .^ 
■inruarkclH in tliR It^iIp. fit-oof them \inaz '»» 
[■^"Mton and above, to Cinoinuati, I'itt«l.orjE : 

xaE MovABtt ^ta, 
The moTable (lams are of tho Chanolne ^.-l^ . 
i^f:^- n.". «'^;:."^'", ^""t"" tl.„y are ail ^iLj; 

fet ^::::iJvzt^t ir.™ ;i;x^j^^- 

ol«« Ji«7 
„r.i"'' "" '"mlili-ti-il dnrt, 

,..,..... -.a.'jji;**' ,■'■■«'"'' ""ttsOrwiV 

Wrf op.-mn-.,a^ «Urt „"'*"* ""■* "''I". UM 
Sqmtlfthe Vbief ™aiiilainiui{, ete, ^T 




2058 RBPOfiT of THE CBlEf OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

tboHe uow niiilor ■.■■mulriitliiiii linvc toii«i<k>rabl« mivjiiilayu over ILosi lirst I'liill 
the ozjiaDse of upcrHtiim mid mHinlcnaiioe is liiit little il' any more tliaii with iill 
daiue, und tbe.v prtive liijilily natiBrnut<iry to the river iitlurestB. 

Adraalagef orerfixvd dam*. — Tlio movftbit) dams are kept nii nheneTM Hiure is u 
water enuugh in the river for coal-bo»t navigation anil down at other tiiOM. The 
advanlAgea over the ordinary fiieil diuiis for a oommerue anil river like the Qttf 
Kanawha are decided, furnishing the benefit* of the uanal alack watvr without t 
moat serious ilrawbaokv. With lixed dams everything inustpnuH through the locki 
with them navigation is entirety suspended, tou,wheu the rii'er is ni^nr or above tl 
top of Ulo lock walls. With movable dams the locks are oul.v used when the di 
charge of the river is so small as to make them nereeaary. At all other times thf 
are &wiij ptnctically on the river bottom, out of the way, affording iiuDlislnicl* 
open niivigatioii. Tbis is uf great ailvantage to utl claastiB of comnit<ir<', :iii<l ie pa 
tioularly so with .coal, truiisiiortcd as it is, and (-inpty barged returncil, in '' Ih-etg 
of large barges. More liarges oau, of couree, bo taken by a towbitiit., noil luurh lis 
tor time made by all kinds of craft in " <ipen rivei," when there is waicr euoitgb fi 
such navigation, thim when the stage or disuliarge conipela the use of the locks. 

The movable idnms being down iu high water, there is comparatively little difl 
culty in protei'ting the bunks about thfe wurks from saour. In this respect they hwt 
coDBidtrnble sdvantnge, too, over the fixed, dsma. 

Modlficjilioaii, onil of apfraling, fto. — Kxporieni'e with the daoia baa naturally anj 
geated improveinentR, BDdNo.6, thetaat one completed, haa considerable advuiitagt 
aver those llrat built In atreugtii and durability of coiiHt ruction, facilities tor rnpf 
maneuvering, and cost of operation and maintenance. Dain« 7 and S have beeu m1| 
fnrtlier Improved in some of their details. 

No. 6 has b«^n in operation over five years. The average cost of operating aa 
mointainiDg the look and duiii has been tSi^lo per year. This covers wages, »UV 
plies, repairs, Incluiliug consideruble nddltion to the riprap])liig, and all ejipiuuk 
couneeted with the work. The entir^i nost during the live years of repairs on Ui 
dam proper and un all of its apparutns, tnclndlng paints, oneof theprinoipal it«mi 
has been soinetbing leaa than 9250, or Jtn average of fSO gier year. 

Thisdamisputiipbyfonrortivemcnin ftomaeveu to twelvehonra; IheosnttJ tio 
is about eight hours. It ia lownred with the nauie force in about two houw. P 
material difficulty bus ever been met with in any of the luaiieuvers at No. B. 

Four men are employed regularly at oaob work, tte same as at tJie fixed <Uins. I 
raising and lowering the dama one or two extra men nre ofleu hired. 

ManeuveiiHg the damn. — The operation of raising and lowering the dams ia KMie 
ally nuderatood, or will be inferred from the dniwings, hut may oe briefly d*acnte 
a« follows : In raising the pass the bridge is lirat put up trestle by trL-stlo (thoy * 
connectwl by cbaina aa shown), hegiuuing at the lock. As thotrHatlw comonp, «i. 
with theni the uprona that make the walk, the rnils forming the counectinastt 
winch track are placed. In rnisiug the trestles the wincb (Plate 10) ia lued » 
meana of the small top crane and sUeave. After the bridge ia np tUe vrieketaa 
pulled np one by one witli the winch and wicket chains until the props drop ni 
the hurter seats. The wickets are not erected or " righted " as fast as puHed np h 
left "on the awing" («■ taicKfe), that is. with the horae erect, the end of the prop 
the hurter seat and the wicket in a horizontal position at the top of the horsa. 
this position the water passes freely under the wicket- J f righted as fastaspnll 
up, the hciHi of water becomes so great that the last wickets can not be Bafcly nn 
died with the wioi^h. .f fter being pot ou the awing clear across, they nr© "" '" 
idly righted ; this is done with the driim and brake ou the winch and wioket dia 
the butt of the wicket being held against the pressure of the wat*r and let nguii 
the siU without ahook. In lowering the pass the wickets are puUe.l upstrwili' 
fevr iuohea with the winch by a simple line and grab connection at the top of ' 
wicket. Thia carries the foot of the prop out of the seat into the deacending t!ii 
nol of the hurter, wheu the grab is disengaged and the wicket fitUa. Aflor t 
wickets are lowered the bridge is put down. The maneuvers briefly described all' 
refer pailiioJ^iilv to llic navigation pasc The weir is maneuvered on th« aa 
geucrnl pliii. I.i.f Um" i .-m n ii-kcts lieing smaller than tlloseof the paea, they owi 
raiBi'd -■! '■■■■.■ .i, iliB ^wing, or righted with full head whenever dW"- 

Thciii-Li ■.■! «li,>ii ihpdjim isiip isgovemedbv theHtageordiachn^ 

of ih. II, . ,, «|iolly or i.artlvraisedasi'eijuired toregolatB thuBOrl. 

of the I \ IM-. ^ i' 1^.-1. tor reasons given above, is never lowB taa OT JIgm 

Tekphem- line, c^diji «(■((«. etc. — Concert of action is nocessr" 
dams anil regulating the pooln, and the diH'erent works are c*' 
and with the ccnlrnl ofUce at C'harlestoii by telephone. "" 
Kanawha Palla to give noliee of tiood'., anil daily c""^' 
telegraph when nciessary, is had with Uiuton at t* 
miles above the Falls. 



o 



.1 



.«*r 
it 

rho 

I'lllW 
.IH of 

• eiul 

llllMit 

P.'illy 

• ular 

I «"m- 
•11 and 

• lilt hy 
.•s. It 
. work 
V inms 
rh*' ap- 

iVi't at 

■iH) i-iiliii". 

i\ ati«>ii, 

liiiir. J^""^* 

.»rv. -J.-JT" 

yards :ii 
•«•; ri|n'ii». 

JNM) liiii«:ii 

ft r>. M. at 



'to is a^ tol- 





iVAO 




ilii'A 


■ « 


S(HI 


18. 


215 


5. 


rifi(» 


IL', 


7( M » 


2, 


, :r»o 


I 


.:;•'(» 



flGH,r)2.5 



no. o<r> 
ru.orj 

'Mo, GiJi) 



"TIE HE." ••¥ F.X<J[NKKRS, U. S. ARMt. 



,^. IT. r 


.. to /..<.! <, 


f 'hoal or Irdgf, Ihf. 


a«rf /«» 




aim Ik^ qaa<Klils a» 




g the rh-iii 


./ iH yianUs laftr 


. i- f«. 


lit Vonnlg, 


II'. la., ISSt. 






Ftn. ct,.)idtC.gdt.c.»dM,yt. yB.]piit. fro.'. 



3 il': 



? -.2 



i ?: 







" 


" 












t 


•^1* 




7, -■ 




«SI:::: 






5 


"Si ' 


3 












E» 1 10 1 10 


*S5-*'" 




112 


"""]""" 


,ws .... 


























wo .... 

100 .... 



, WB8T VIIWINIA. 



?*■ v^- 




.„,.. 




u'ber. 


Pmdii.-.'. 


fn.M 


W»r- 


«« ■! 




rn.m 
K*,aio 




J, 121 

».m 


36 


(i^xM 


l.K-J 


>»"t 


loo.oou 




0,M7 


IW 


RIM 





i(i,/rom /Hty I, IS91, to .'»■» f , IS92— 





. 5,319.200 


tlo.. 


. aei. 170 


..nuiiilxT 






. lll.(X» 




9,537 






<1".. 


9.fiMl 


.lu.. 


. 8,083 



.Un'ENDIX FF REPORT OF COLONEL CRAIGHII-I,. 2l)7l 



FF5, 

mpUOVEMENT OP NEW RIVER, VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA. 

TbtTf liaa l>eea no work on tbis river in the year ending June 30, 18! 
TIjb followinji are tbe amounts and dates of uitproiiriatioui^ for i 
I proving New Kiver, Virginia and We^t Virginia: 

Aojpiiit U. 1876 $15.0«) 

JuueW, 1H7S 15,000 

M»rcb3. 1879 13. 000 

Jimp U. IW(0 21,000 

ajinrJi S. 1881 31,000 



Total 112,000 



Mattes niotiiiient. 

JbJj 1, 1891, baJance Dnespendiid »2,S41.79 

Jiljl. 1892, balADoe aucipeuiled 2.3*1.79 

I Amount ^psttmated) TMiii)ri>>l fur <^»[niilDti«n uf exiRting project 1S9,000.00 

f SabmittMl ID ci>nipliaii(« with rvquiroiueuts of seotiuus 3 of tivor and 
t btiboi act* of Iti60 and UI67. 



APPENDIX G G. 



iPEOTEMENT OP CEBTAIS KIVEB3 IN KKNTOCKT OTD WEST VIBGINIA. 



tKPOBT OP MAJOB D. W. LOCKWOOD, CORPS OF BXQINEEBS, OFFICER 
IS CBABGB, FOB THE FISCAL YEAR ENDISO JUNE SO, 139!!, WITH 
OTB.EB DOCUilElfTS BELATIHG TO THE WORKS. 

IMPBOTEMENTS. 



L Trsidewater Rivei, Eentaoky . 

2. Ope'iating and keeping in repair locks 

aod liams on Green aad Barren riv- 

eiB, EcDtQck]'. 

5. RoDgb Biver, Kentncky, 

4. Kemtuckj- Eiver, Kentucky. 

6. OporatiDg aod keeping in repair lochs 

Aud d&ma on Kentucky Biver, Ken- 

6. Licking River, Eentacky, between 
, Fanners and West Liberty. 

Jr Kie Sand; Biver, Wasl Tirginia and 
r Eentnoky. 



8. Leviaa Fork of Big Buidf River, Ken- 

tnoky. 
fl. Tug Fork of Big Bundv River, West 

Virginia and Kentaoky. 

10. Guyandotte River^ Weat Virijinia, 

11, Little Kanawha Bivor, West Virginia, 
13, Opemting and keeping in repair tbe 

lot^k and dam on Little Kanawha 
Hivor, Weal -Virginia. 
13. Buckhannon Biver, West Virginia. 



United States Engineer Office, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, July 8, 1892. 
General: I have the honor to trauwmit herewith, in duylieate, tha 
amiiiiil reports on the works under my ehiir^e at the close of the flsual 
year ending June 30, 1892. 

First Lient. William L. Sibert, Corps of En(;;ineers, has been on duty 
under the directiou of this office throughout the year. 
Very respectfolly, your obedient aer^-aut, 

D. W, LoCKWOOD, 

Major o/ Engineers. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas L. Oakby, 

Chief 0/ Engineers, U. S. A. 



UFEOTEUENT OF TBADEWATEB BIVEB, KENTnCKT. 

^ Tradeiratar ie a tribntary of the Ohio and empties into it 79 
™^l>elow Evansville, Ind, 

. '^'^ project lor the improvement , adopted in 1881, contemplated orig- 
"""ytbe removal of obatructioim, such aa bars, snags, etc., bo as to 

2073 



2064 EEPOKT or THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

FF3. 
IMPEOVEMEKT OF ELK RIVER, WEST VIRGINIA. 

Between Jnly 1 and 11 a small party eonfinned the work in progroaa 
June 30, 1S91, at and near Jarretts and Porter shoals, which are, re- 
8i»ectiv6ly, 12 and 7 miles from the nioutli of the river. Twenty-tbreo 
stings and sunken tree»! were taken out and cnt up, and a number of 
lemiitig trees cnt dowu or the projectiug limbs removed. A towitath 
was also made high up along the blnff at Porter Shoal, and two riag- 
boatfi were put in for use in winding boats through the shoal. 

idome other work was done in July, Angnst, aud September belov 
Clay Court- House, at Yankee Dam, Big Laurelj Big King, Little Spread, 
' Queen, aud Porter shoals, in building, repainng, and modifying eli^e 
walls and dikte and removing rocks. 

• In the stretch between the 34 aud 38 mUes abpve Sutton, which is itself 
300 miles from the mouth of tlie river, a nnmber of shoals were worked 
over which had been left in November, 18S8. The princii)al operation 
was the removal by blasting of about i,500 cubic yai-ds of large rock 
to facilitate the movement of much lumber to market in the shaiie of 
oose logs. Above Sutton there is no boating or rafting of any conse- 
luence, but below there is a considerable movement of rafts aud sepa- 
rate logs of valuable timber, raib'oad ties, and sawed! lumber in rafts, 
all downstream, and of push-boats with merchandise upstream. 

The operations of the United States on the river have greatly im- 

ved it for the kind of uavigation on it. There are still several mill 

IS which are unreasonable obstructious to uavigation. They have 

Lfoao reported as such to the proxier authorities in compliance with the 

law. 

The following are the amounts and dates of aprojiriations for im- 
proving Elk Kiver, West Virginia: 

June 18, 1878 «5,000 1 Augnst 11, 1888 t3,0f» 

Juuel4, 1880 5,000 Seiiteiiiber 19, 1890 2,500 

MarchS. 1881 5,000 i ' 

A.nguBt2, 1882 2,000 Total Zi.OOO 

Augnste, 188G 1,500 | 

Moneg statement. 



Aniouut availublo fur fiscal year ending .Juno 30, 1893 

tAiiiotmtthat fail lieiirotltulili,'e)ipeii.1o-! in fist-nl Tear ending June 30, 1894 
2 Sul'uiitted in cuuipllaiiue witU ruquirt-inents of Bections 2 of tirer and 
( hurbor aote of 1866 and 1867, 



. fiCOTT, IIK8IDKNT BNQINEER. J 

rSITZD SlATKS ENGINKKK OFPICK, 

Charletlon-Eanaviha. W. Va., Daetn^itr IS, 1891. 
Coloniel: I hftve tbe lionor to anbinit llie following report of opeiktloiu bIdo 
July 1 on the improvement nf Elk Kiver, M'eet Virginia. 



APPENDIX FP — REPORT OP COLONEL CRArGHILL. 2065 



Will) thr rsrr^t'tion *■'» few dojV work early in July, npitr the mouth of *bp rivor 

•I nmorinf! suazs, etc. (in couttnontion of that roporkxl f»r the year entUnit. Inly 1, 

I 1(91), work was tlim-te<t to blaatiuc u rliaoDel for lopt thruush tho Urge loiwe rock 

|_Klhe sboals id thu upper rirer near WobatnT, Court-Hbiise, anuio bnllilinj, mpairinir. 



)K IN THE CPPBR KTVEK. 

IkiB woTkimiRbegnnS«ptembt>rlw[thB hicea forcennder Mr. W. A. Port«r, orer- 
S miln bnlow Aililinnn (Webstor Unnrt-Hoam), where it was left Novembtr 24, 
iWB. (Beport of Chief of Engincew for 1883. pagn 1956, etc.) The weather andrtagu 
sr«il«r wora favorable and tho work went on without interniptioa mitil stoppod. 
OeliibOT 21, •• stated above. Tliis, with the exceptinti of Home work at Mill liun utid 
Canac Tree Shoala, left nnfinishwi, owinj; to high sfagcB of wal«r iu 18S8, bninKht 
tkfwotfc np to Addison, being all that was contemplated this w^aaoii id this part of 



r with the fuuda at hand. 

Tbt uun«a and location of the she 
vwt at each ore given iu the follow 

IV diataticva are given from Sil 
""' n ia 100 milea from the mouth < 







eclsd with the 
1 former table. 







Hol« 




"■ 




■oil 
bl«U 


Ulipn«i. 


























a 




"l 












•■ a 
















»t 








gk 


IS 


M 


'iS 



Tbere ia > l*n(« quantity of line timber on tho Upper Elk. and all of the work ilone 
by tb« GovemiueiiC on tliia part of the Btream bw been t^i aHHist in driviiiK niid flo.tt- 
' l^looae Itrgo. OwinK to tlie charaotor of the stream above Sutton no rnfting or 
p^h-bostiDg in done above that point. 

A* in 1888, And described iu the report referred to. the work in this part of tho river 
emsialAd in blaatin;; awaj the woint rocks on the shoaU to make a narrow chaiint'l, 
gmarnliy about 25 feet wide, for logs to run in. 

On mrMt of tbe HhoaU worked on tho naMaee could be mode wider to ndvanlago 
by more bLaating, und ia several placea anort ilikas and dnins would be naeful in keep- 
^1^ logs oat of Lnul lodging-places in pockets and behind inlands. 

WORK BELOW CLAV COUBT-HOOaB. 

Tht» irorh waa done by hired labor in Jnly, AugiiHt, and September. Mr. Leslie 

Pl^mi M pilot and lumberman of Braxton County, was the overseer nn the most of 

d^ vork. It'coniiitodprincipally, anatatod above, in building, repitirinf;, and chang* 

L MX rhai« -walla and clikea and removing rock on the moat troublesome shoals. The 

I — and location of theshoala itnd a brief des< ription of what wan done at each 

■ ken- follnirn: 

■-- •■bbI-, T;.m Sh.inl (in miles from month of rivpr and 7 miles below Clay Conrt- 

^n). — Three riprap dikes were built, two at the head and one near the foot of 

■boal, to concMitrate and iliract the water in lop and rafting stages. In addition, 

_n timr or tow-head and a piece of an old liike were taken out on tbe right, near 

)„i^ odfthe ahoal, the bar buinK reiliiee<l bv Ixiree scrnpers. 

■wmt BBi oaUo yards of atone were used in'huilding the dikes, nil of which wera 
I on the shoal and mostly out of the raaing channel. Material moved 

9 M uid old Aiko, about 210 yards. 
—130 



20G6 KEPOBT OP THE OHIEt' OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

Big Laurel Shoal (37 mites from mouth of river).— Built n limber tind »t<ine Aa: 
at hiMti; of slioitl out f^oiii 1i>n. shore, punt hi'4id of Mantl, S!U fnet Idiic. T feet wi^ 
on bottom, niid nliout 3 feet hl(!li. Alan repaired mid HtrfnKthened uti old dike on tf 
right shore; 1,170 linear feet of round tiiuhorBnd about 415 oiibiojftrcls of newstoc 
vera uHe<l in the dnm and dike. 

ISw Sing Skoal (31 inilps from month <if river). — Built a timber and atone ilam a 
head of ehoal 265 feet long, 9 feet wide nt base and 6 feet at top, and 5 feet hisl 
from right linnk t« islanil. Material need in dam, 3,960 linear feet of round timb< 
and aboat 255 cnliie yards of stone. 



of rafts and boats at certain stances of waoer, nnd was change<l at the reqneet i 
several of the beat pilots. Abont 3G5 cubic y urda of atone were handled in movin 
andleufitheniuir the wall. 

LitlU Spread Sio(iH27miloii (Vora mouth of rivi'r). — Bnilt a timber and stonodikftoi 
from the left shore to hold up the wiitor on the slioal and keep rafts from riinniE 
iiito the bank. The dike in 4-10 feet loni, 8 feet wide at baae, 6 feet at top, and 4 fo 
high. In building it 3,65Q linear feet of round timber and 337 onbio yards of atoi 

Qkbhh 5AoaI (25 miles from month of river). — Moved farther to left and rebuilt 
psrt nf the old riprop wall on left to improve the channel for rafts and boats ; move 

and placed alMint 530 cnbie yards of stone. 

Porttr Shoal (7 miles from month of river). — The work done here consigtcd in bloa 
ing or breaking up with sledge aaud removing a number of lar^e rucka from lilong tl 
left bank that wore qniti' an obstruction to raft-s and steamboata. ]>BrlirulHrly, tl 
latter, in high stages of water. The rook di«poaud uf oggregaUiii about UO'cub 

BBMOVIKO SN*Oa, KTC. 

The small party engaged in May and Juno in removing obatrnctians below Qne* 
Shoal, in tbe'intereat ni;uuly of sleaniltoat navigation, nadeaeribed In thi^iuAt Aunn^ 
Beport, continued operfttions until Jnly 11, when it was diabauded. The work do> 
by this party in Jnly was at and near Jarretta and PortiT shoalc Twenty-fhn 
anaga and Hiinken troea were taken ont and cut up and a number ot leaning treea « 

. ._ .1 . — (__.! — ii_., I jjj [iddition, a 'Mowpafh" waa made hig 

ingbulls put in for use in winding boat 



down or tlie projecting limbs removed. 
up along the bloif bniik at Porter and t>~ 






COMMERCIAL STATlSTICa. 



C<yiniiieri:ial »laUgiiot for Elk Biver, Weft rirginit 



F/tr.B.U.\ 



APPENDIX FF ^POBT OP COLONEL ClUIGHILL. 2067 

^ iBuk«<l increase in tbi* OTHjiiit of liimTMT will ho nolic.>.l. Thp 4-1,400 000 
^Of Innilier is divided in kind aliont ae follown; Poplar, 33,000,000: white dak 
; bemlook. 1,500,000; ths rpst being iimiiily walnnt and anh, ' 

triiuit of seniTHi lawrhaudJso and product' carried on tbe rivwr in estiinat^^d 
tims, inkkiDg the total for tbe year, with ihe timber product* u above, 



F F 4. 

ntPBOVEMKNT OF GAULEY RIVER, WEST VIRGTNTA- 
llhe Rinall amoniit of money available for this river was expended iu 
3tW, Augwt, and Sei)teiul>cr, ^^91. The itnflnishtxl ciiiiiinelK made in 
l-Wtlirough the sboala within 7 miles of Gauley Bridye were dcared 
I rtirks and some new training walls were built for them. The chan- 
[.'I for l»iar«, ao feet wide and ■' deep at low water, waa completed 
I ii. itie fitiit »f tbe Little Itongl miles. 

I A rbunuel 30 feel wide was iuie through the Litlle Koiighn by 

I Uudug oat large bowlik'rs, tl . being to fa<.'iUl;ite the downward 

I Borement nf logs. 

I Til* foi-midable obstrnction »« the Big Roughs was also at- 

I (Kked by blasting the large t: ■ ich form it. 

I Tbn total number of cubie 3' removed was3,l?i4, and 0,380 

I ifoear fe<'t of walls were bnilt, 

The H-ork of the year has hi 1 of c-ansiitg the movement of 

' nnch bH.-al freight by boats w otherwise have beeu hauled 

\iy tfaniK at greater cost tn tb i ..........y. 

The taUtiv'mg letter explains Uacii : 

Unitbd Statrs Exoinkbr Otfick, 

Balltmon, Md., Man ■". -'*'"- 
GwSKJtAJ.: In the money BtatemeDt in the luit annuai report, u 11 tier Iho licnd of 
dflrnlffj KiTsr, Wcat Virginia, tho follow ine is fuund ; "Amount (itstiiunteil) required 
tar wMspletioii of exittinK project. M,000.''^ 

Tlw prt^Act undelr wLk'ti CniigrtiM has given two aiipi'oiiriatiunfl contaiued two 
he*da, tiZt ^^ improTenient from tlie mouth of the river to the Roughs fur lintenui 
B»TlKBtioil, yiO.OOO. an<t for tbe improvomont nf tlio Ron);h!i, und ubove, KiS.OOD; 
total, «T5.000. See Annnn) Report for 1888, Part 3 page 1762. Thu appropriiit inna 
up to tbiB time have been, August 11, I8»<H, and September 19, 1890, each $3,000, 
aiBODtittng to Se,0OO. 

Work waa firat begun on the portion Ijelow the Rongbs, of whieh the coRt waa 
ei>t|inated to be $10,01)0, and when 94,000 was Htalfil a year aeo to be the balance 
eeiiuut^ for Dompjetion of existing project it wils undcrstoodto refer to th.tt por- 
tion of the river. The statement ahoiihl have read "Amount (estimated) roi|nired 
for completion of exiatjug project bolow thp Rouglis, $4,DU0," anil that it did uut so 
read «>0 m^ fault. 

In preparing the Annnal Report for the current liacal year doubt now nrisos as to 
vliat aaionnt should be Htutedas that " required for completion of existing projeet." 
The orii^inul estimate was ^o,000 for tbci two items as explained above, anil I re- 
quest aathority It use this total in tho money statement after deducting appioprio- 
tanu made prior to June 30, 1S93. 

Very leapectfnlly, your obedient servant, 

Wm. p. Cbatghill, 
ColoHtl, Corp> of EiigiHeer$, 
Brig. Gen. TnoMAS L. Casky, 
1 C\itf of Engintffi, U.S.A. 

The following are the amonnt^i and dates of appropriations for im- 
oving Gauley River, West Virginia: 

EOMtll. I8S8 $3,000.00 

itniibct 19, 1890 3,000.00 

T»U1 .--- 6,000.00 



20G8 REPOET OF THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. AHMY. 

Money staiement. 

July 1, 1801, balance nneijiendod $2,938,91 

July 30, 1893, amount expended during fiscal year \ 2, S56. 2 

July 1, 1892, balance nneipendBd 82. (B 

Amonnt uppropriat<-d by act approved Jnly 13, 1892 3,000.01 

Amount avnilahlis for fiscal year ending Juno 30, 1893 3,082.61 

(Amonnt (eatiniAted) required for completion of exi.itinE; jiroleot 66,000.01 
AmnunttbatcaiihupcotitablyoipendudiuliaculyeareniliugJuneSO, 1894 K^OOO.OI 
Submitted in cutnpliance witb raqniremenl-a of aeutionsSof river and 
harbor acts of IseK and 1867. 



BKPORT OF MR. WILLIAM PBOCTOB SMITO, ASSISTANT HWnNBXB, 

Baltimork, Md., lfoi<eiiib«r IB, 1S91. 

Colonrl: I have tbe lionor to report tlie following opemtionBontlieiiuptDv-emou 
of Oanley Rivt>r, West Virginia, for the sesscm of imi. 

The livei being vory low in May it wax tlioiight advisable to atari the work, aoi 
Mioordtnely everything wns mode reail^* by tlie ]at of June, wlien ruiuB set In wbio] 
kept the river up nutil the 39th, at wliit-h tiuie work wna bogiio and fontinned nn 
til the 32d of ^p timber. 

It waa found (liat tlie ebaiiuela made in 1890 needed clearing ont an'l that nddl 
tional wing wall» were deainkble; ao work waa tjegun on them, beginning at tho Bi| 
Creek, 11 luiloa abuve the mouth of the riror, and extended to and tbTOugh Mill Shoal 
71 oulea above the aamo point, from which were removed 712 cubic yiirda of looni 
aand und 12 cnbic yards of aolld rock, and 1,001 linear feet of main and wing walk 
were bnilt; 

Owing to the large amount of work abitolntely reiinired in tbia part of the river 
the project for tho Bcason could not be corriert imt in full. 

The new work liegau at Humphreys Shoal, H miles altove the month of the Ganley 
and channels wore made tbrongh the shoals left last season, as far as the bead of Mu. 
Shoal, 71 m ilea shove the initiafpoint ; ftom which pluceto Sugar Creek, (i}miles for 
tber up the river, the work was entirely now durinK the fw«son. 

The combined width of the shonla in tho whole dietanc« of the new work amonntj 
to 8,623 feet, oovcriiijj a river space of 7i miles, from which were removed 857 onbif 

Jords of loose and l.tiOS cnbic yards of solid rock, with which were built 6,976 Uneai 
pet of main and wing walla. 

The wing walls were built of loose stone, borrowed from points near by, mixec 
with brush nnd gravel and sand when the 1att«r conld be procnred. 

The total nraount of looio rook for the «eason ivus 1,569 cubic yards; of solid toeh 
1,615 cubio yards; in a^, 3,184 cubic yanls. 

The walls vary in width from 3 feet to 10 feet, and in height from I foot to 6 feet 
and amonnt to 6,98(1 IVct in length. 

The oombineil widths of shoals amnuDt to 14,137 feet, or nearly 21 niiles. 

Tho total fall ovor t1m shoals nnd lodges from the montn of the river to the heac 
of tho Big Houghs, 13.4 miles, is 79.8 feet, and tho entire fall of tho river betweec 
those pniots i^an be but little more, although the levels were not taken. 

At Tritts Shoal, 91 miles above the mouth of the siver, two chimnelH were made 
one long and curved for extreme low water, the other short and atmight for water ai 
and above zero. 

The batenu channel, 30 feet wide and 2 feet deep at ioro or ordinary low water, 
was completrcd to the foot of the Little Roughs, 12| miles, on the 8th of August, and 
there the force was rourganizeil, put in camj), and set at work at that point, Littlt 
Eontihs, by blanthigoutthe larjje bowlders (or floating logs, through which was mad( 
achauuerGOOfect long and 30 fuel wide, reiiuiriug Ihe removal of 30 rocks, con tainiuf 
310 cubic yiirils. Tim Little RiiuHbs, UN shown on the tracing of map accompanyinp 
this repiirt. \k tiir. bi'^iuiiiuu of the " Soughs" of Uauley, which extend from thii 
point np tho rivur fur a itiatnnce of 26 miles, as mentioned in vour report Dccemhei 
26, 18«7, pny.i ITtil, .\iipriidlx U D 6 of the Annual Keport- of tlieChief of EngineeM, 
U.S. Army, fur IHSM, iiixl tlie nhoiil called Big Roughs, on the same map, is thefourtli 

This c<>UL|>lelcd. till' for 



APPENDIX GG REPOKT OF MAJOR LOCKWOOD. 2079 

(imilr rriA*.— Cnnstinrted 'ipper anil lowor Riiiilo rriba. Tjipi-r river crib ia 200 
k»t loDg, 34 fcft bich. lu'i 15 fret niile. I'|>pfr lund crili in 100 ri'Pt hnig. 13 teet 
ir>ilf,aiid iOfwt bigb. Lvwcr rivt-r euWc crili i« III) foet long,34 frtitliiK&, "ml it» 
txu width is 13 feet. Loni-r tatid cribiH 550 I'ert Iouk; 250 feet of It is %i foet high, 
Uxl a» ft«l i>f it is 15f<*thiKb. Totnl cubit; yards of rnb work btiill, 13,4^. 

B^airt to lock. — Pninped out louk and rejiiureiJ gnti'd, plucin)' tofxr new tujti* lu 
MKh Imrn gate. Cut iluwii reciwH for lower gat« in old luud nrall ho m to make tt 
?iniral. Cut rFct««eH in waIIm to receive giite caatinga when gatoH were openeU. 
iMgtheoed ladders and cleaued out lutik pit. Mad*^ inur^ cleuraiici? uDdnr lowM 
ulw hi picking off stoue foraiiug bottom of look. Rebolttd lower miter MUa. 

Unaal wirk. — Drove 29 plies and capped same, fonnii;^ fendur nluntf islanil abovo 

" ecearinry atone and pared 6T5 B<iuai« yards uf bank. Moved 

sarth in gradinE bank. Boilt up viu^ walls of look wi an to 
ii^d« of bank. DmlgetT oft' point abov» entntni'u to lock, anU drove 
brtK-fli-e pilds around thin point for a funder, 

Ib.B.O.Lcnuond.asaiatant engineer, uat in local obnrge at this lock. 

S^tm to daa.—EmaoytA old shi-eting froia dam; rebuilt an 80-foot aeotioa of 
towrtsl'ipr and placed new nhootiDK on daiu throughout. Replaced all miuing stone 
is dam. CuustriKUd and snnk a crib 90 feet long, 16 feet wide, and 22 feet deep, so 
•atafons an apron hvlow the dam next to the abutment and at the same timi^ tilling 
■ holn waabrd unt tirlow dam, endangering same. The sheeting has bottii torn 'in 
this crib during Ihe winter, evidently due to a head canseil by leak nnder dam from 

Oniivrilu. — Con«tnifti-d and rppaired. i^iide criba above «id below loek. Lower 
'wd ^di! f rib is 3Tf> feet long, srenige width 12 feet, and 30 feet high, rp^ier land 
Bbis 110 feet Ion", 18 feet high, and 15 feet wide, l-'ppi'i river crib rebuilt Irom 
Met n]>. £.'0 r*«t Jung, 10 feet wide, and 10 feet high. Total unbio yards in guide 
lilit,5,W7. 
fl«sfra( (TOTit. — Constructed rotaiiiing crib along mill race, ViO onbie yards, ^jilit 
In wd laid lOS nqnare yards of paving. Kepointed eoping of land wall oE lock. 
I raudnew gate-operating apparatus in jiosition, Drcvlged entrances to look. 
Hi. George N. Bratt was iu local charge at this loeK. 

LOCK so. 7, HARREN RJVKR. 

GraAnl bnnk, (Jnarrifrd and laid WVI signare yards of paving; cnt, hauled, and net 
l,l%iiqiiaiH yards of sod. Set out shade tteea and cleaned np premiseii. Pliteed500 
*iMc yiuiti of sawdust behind dam. 



•Wl ime. — Lock No. 1, Greeu Kivcr: Rpmoved 5,631 Mibio yards of material and 
'"ii|!*frcrm luek pit and Hntrani^of to lock. 
IwiiSo. 2, Green Kivcr; Removed 6,200 cnbio yards of material fromeiitriineca to 

K^^wk Xn. 3, Green River: Rcmoveil 12,975 eiihie yiirils of material in prepiiritig 
HMilions for KoiAe cribs and in cleaning out lock cntrnnresand pit. Tore np unit 
MjtTtd^OOOIinearfiMituf old (Tib timber. Dredged and blasted olTreuLiinN nf old 
HK >all and euffentam to low-watpr level. Ilredged a channel across river so as 
HVivm ttuDefrom ledge below danj. 

W LwtNo. 4. r:recn River: Removed 2,1120 rubio yards of material from e 
|<t)wk. 

f j^"!^'! rort.— Dredged ofi 
I Wri^nl off bar at mouth of 
"iiM dredge. 



fl'D"iv«l 1 .0*3 suagH from channel of river; cut 252 trees and deailenod 220. Pulled 
""Wil rt'Oioreil coflirUara at Ko. 1, RrePU Kiver. Pnll<'<i one dnnip si^ow out on 
fi- Did all toning reiiiiiretl on tireen and Darren Rivers. Towed a dredge from 
Carmel, III., to Catlett«burg, K j. Total miles run 8,773. 
Very reapectfulty, your obedient wTvant, 

Wm. L. Sibkut, 
Firil Limlenant of EaijinetrM. 
.D. W. LoCKWOOD, 
0»rf*^S*fi»tan, U.S. A. 



2070 RKmUT OP THE tJHIEl' OF EXGIXRERS, Lf. S. ARM*. ■> 

'Tatit thmeing Ihr rfi»/iinoM Jrom Oavlen BriAgr, T, Fn.,.lo foot o/ ftvial or IcAgr, Iheir 
Imglh, and diffurfnce »/ Irrfl brlirrKn Amd amf /oot of >ane; alio Ihe guanlilg and 
Quality nf naterlal eicaratfii in waking and iniproriug the rhaauel inflai^i/ IliPtr,^ 
Wmt Firgiuia, from ill /muth to Sugar Creek, in Fagette Vannls, IF. Va.. 1831. 



VuaooCihoal. 


1 

g 

H 
SI 

» 

in 

31 


j 


i 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


J-micUoiioC Sf^ ud GftUloy 


Jfifa). 

SI 

P 

1 

G 
10 

IS 

1! 

li 

13l 


JVel. 

•too 

IW 

we 

4IHI 
SM 

118 

'Is 

143 
IW 

1 

680 

i 

wo 

ao* 

m> 

MM 
MM 


IWl. 


Oi-gd. 


Cfjri, 


(J.»4r 


yg. 


Yo. 


Ait. 


JTo. 


JM. 


|i«>^WeCm*lmag« 


1-J 




































H 
18 

75 

IAS 

«3 
8 

•9 

43 


SIO 

i'iiii' 


24 

IS 

76 

w 
a 

N 

43 
HI 
KM 

lis 

124 

tio 

1,»0 








































3D 


















8 


8 


1« 
















248 






T^t;.>nll<>CTHk8h<«1 


i 


i 




S 




130 


















* 


* 








B7 
178 

•■s 

348 

"soo' 

IDO 




























» 


» 












li 


1^ 




































70 


M 


» 






















gfCt:;:::;:::::::::::: 


152 


150 


Bl 


«IG 








u, laT 




l.fllB 


3,184 


371 





















;k, west viRomiA. 



IwrnidliigJimegO- 


B.wk>g. 


Ltnnbef. 


»™. 


liinber. 


Ptodiice, 
etc. 


tlBUlBy. 


Mm- 
cIuukIIjw 




ftrt. 
ttM^4i)a 

UJM,80D 
384,700 


8.535,300 

i.tlii.600 
4,701,300 


177,400 
S7*,aKI 


7,121 

Is 


M 
80 


IWa. 

i»;43« 


nn*. 












100,000 









Tbia commerce is carried on with four Luteanx and four flatboata, drawing abuat 

18 inohes of wfttvr ami of 18 tons capacity each, 

CemBiereial ilallilici/or (iaiilcn Hirer, JTMf Firainia,/rom Julg 1, 1S91, to June 1, 1S3S— 
elerenlh montlis. 

Ltimbec feet.. 6,249,200 

Saw logs do.... 261,170 

Staves number.. 1,200,000 

Sbinjilca do.... 111,000 

Total timhpriii tons.. 9,627 

Pruilute, vU-* do.... 103 

Total from tiiiiiliy do 9,630 

Total to Giiuley do.... 8,083 



APPENDIX PF EEPORT OP COLONEL CRAIGHII-r,. 



■2071 



FF5. 

I51PROVEHENT OF NEW RIVER, yISGINIA AND WEST VIKGISIA. 

Tbere bas liceo no work on this river in the year ending; June 30, 1892. 
The following ai-e tbe amounts and dates of appropriations for ini- 
I ptoYiug Sew Kiver, Virginia and West Virginia: 

AnguM 14, UTS $15,000 

JnualB, UTS 15,000 

llarcli a, 1S79 12,00(1 

Jnn«It 1880 24,000 

lUndtS^lSn 24,000 



ToUl 112,000 



Monty nUitement. 



Jolj 1, 1801, tt*Uii<!e anexpended — 
Jo}; I, 1893, bnlanc« noexpended — 
I AmoQiit (aitimatod) reKjidrwi for v 



k 




GG4- 
■BOVKMKNT OV KENTUCKY RIVKR, KKNTIJCKY. 

. ^iclcy Itiver is jv tributary of tbe Ohio, imd empties inh* it 
»n, Ky., abont mtdwiiy between Ciucinuati, Ohio, and Louis- 
Bent project for the iiujiroveraeiit of tlie river was adopted in 
>bjoct bciiiK to repair the five locks and 'dnms btiilt by the 
r^nturky. and cxteiid slackwater navigation for » draft of 
pe constmcHou of additiouiU locks ^lud dams to BtiattyvUIe, a 
f Sdl miles from tlie moiiMi of the river. 

WORK DONE DURING THE TEAR. 

I. a, — AVork on this lock was commenced April 27, 1891, by 
g for lock walls, and oil l)eeembcr2 the fii'St boat waa Iw^ked 
The coflerdum iui'lofting' tlie lock site consisted in the main 
rpiles joined by strinfrers and wale piecea, against which a 
w of shi^et piles was driven, tlie whole being backed insidB 
ith gravi'l put in position by dredges. The lower return t 
nk was left open at first, »o that excitvation of the inc'i 
I bfi effe<rtetl by the dredges. Afterwards the low r 
le bank was constriictwl, the inclosed area pumped 
ti to tlic rock made by shoveling, wheeling out fhi 
g it out with derricks. Allhongh the coffer wa8flo< i ^ 

,ng the sea-ioti, it held wdl, leaked very little, and ausn^red 
|xuio. 

onstmction of the lock and abutment, the following quanti- 
nc, etc., wore put in place: 





Cuhir 


Cnbio 




tax 


M 







































iiensions of the lock are as follows: Length of walls, 249 feet, 
chamber betweou hollow quoins, 1S5 feot. Width of chamber, 
liift-, 14 leet 2^ inches. 

sU the stone was on band when the work commenced. 
WDStriietion of the dam the lower step is a crib filled with 
wding down to the rock and reaching ftom the abutment to 
wall of the lock. The portion of the dam extending upstream 
[;Jowej- st«p is crib work, resting ou V6'.i piles, and is also tilled 
'^ The upiier breast of" the dam is protecttid by a duuble iiiw 
g exteoding down to the roek, and will bo bax;ked with 

imctioD of the dam the following material was used: 

" "mber, 291,217 feet, B. M., sheathing, 16,361 cubic 

! yards fascines, and 10,949 cubic yards sand, 



— HEI'ORT ur MAJOR I.OC 

3ie river, iiiul al tin- t;iiiti(> tinu 
png and doing yf.Ncijit work tin 
a precicnt boat eim not do the wiii 



SfromTabler JL Cognr 

Money slatemeiit. 



noo,ooo 

1(»,000 

22»,li00 
Kill, tXW 
IKf, 500 

iMj,ono 

180.000 
l,!MT.500 



kibble fur Oscul ;esr otiiUng June 30, 1893 ISl.HM. 13 

KHlimatod) TeqQurM for coiiipletiaii uf exiHtiag project 
ttmi can b« profitably ospenae<l la BscbI year snilui^ 

1 coin |iHa net- willi requirtiiiitjilAof eeulious 2 orrive: 



S21.000.00 
500,000,00 



United States ENr.iNEEii Offite, 
t'Tankforl, Kg., Julg 1, Jti 
\i I reBpeotroUy snliiiiit the following report on tho improvciiiuiil ci 
Binir, Kentucky, for the Aacal year Biidiug June 30, i>Si)2 : 



j^^Bej^'ascsvating for slmtment May 16. Complpled (•xca\nli[iK Jut 
"'■ ' ' — '6 5. C'ompli-liMl settingstone Julj :;. Sot7ciibk- yuii 



K 



it) of eopiDK on return wiii^ iiitit liiink. Tho return w.-^ 

J 6 iachea by stepping linok G feet 5 iucheB ftom face at abulineot 
S inches in leng:tli,riBO 15 inchea each. 



1 axoavating for fouoflation April 27. Coraplptoil eircaTatioii June 

•tone for fotmdatiim July 6. Ciimpleteil founclutinn July Ut!, 

foe lock walls July 27. Comploteil sotting stciue Ootulier -'1, 

iver-lock wall, 2iVl feet. 



i I '• 



-. ... ■" 



■ ■ ". •. 



k ' 



1 - 



.- Ik '■" 



1 1:1 



AfPKNUlX OG REPORT OF MAJOR h(iC.K.\ »(il), 20S7 

,-. ■■'■ -' rin-iru.-ioil oril. l^^ iV.-t wi.lB. 18 feet hijjli, in.il SS) Rvt I. ma from tin* 

i'.-'iii !■• I1i*< rolferilaiii ; Kuiik «iun« with ripniii st'iiiu tiMnliil vnck. 
' 1.1 (tie r»lli>n-iiig aiuoiint of tjutlier: 

■T i.irrm l:i by 13 m«he» by 10 feet ftWt) 

_- j.ipces 12 by 12 inches by 16 feet 139,776 

> i>iM>CBl3by ISinchM by 20 feet 148,320 

■ pwM ii by 12 ini-hes by 24 feet liW,9l2 

Ti pwM-en 12 by 13 inches by 30 feet 61,580 

- liieres 13 by 12 inches by 32 feet 157,473 

-I eao,«so 

- .-.I'Jhiajt. — ifiiiked the followini; oak !>iit'aHiiii|; im •Um: 



I !^f.— I'bed thi- follix 



|t^6inehea... 
t trSinubea... 
It^Uiiiohcs.. 
I fay Ifi )noh<rs . 
I liy 2t inchra . 



n*M;— rtu-ed iS,3in i-nhic ynrds S ciilije fe«t of riprap Bt«ni< in urilibing. 
Itoefcnj.— Hlnced liJ,!t'l1lDii1iii'y»rasof Hand, olny, anil gravel, »nd 3,3% cnbicyw 

tu>cmr> Iwhiiid ilnni. 



Btraralivii. — Reni>>ve'l liy picktu);, shoveling, nheeliog. and hoisting, 2.&S6 cubio 
uds of euud, clar, earth, nnil grnvul bi Holid nick for foaudatiiui. 
nihf .— DT'ivh 32 piles, ^icKreKxt'os ^^ liaear feet. 
Tuthti /old. — Laid thu fiillowiug iimoiint of timber; 

F«l. It, U. 

HpieoM 6bv laini-hoaby 16 feet 1.632 

SpiM«al2by 12 im-beti bv 16 feel, 35,3a« 

pietM 13 by 12 iiirhi* bv 20 feet 41, a«) 

UEluenw 131iy 13 iiicbra bV 24 feet 3M,(I80 

»I»t«-es 12 br 12 iuihes by 30 fe.t 7.200 

KpifcM 12 by 12 inches hj 32 feet 17,0tH 

RipiccM. 141,984 
'^IIm.— irwd the following nimilirr of spikim : 

Jby 12iDi-hes 60 

iby IfliiirhcA 1,028 

Uy 24 inches 11* 



—Placed 846 cnbic ynrda of riprap gtoue in ocibblng. 
f, — Plneed behind nail 212 rul>ic yards of riprap stone. 
tion ofvMtl. — Une hundred nnil fiii'ty-tliree by 18 feet. 



■TcM««, — Removed by picking, shoveling, wheeling, and IioiBting, 3,477 enbio 
'Mud, elsy, earth, and gravel. BlaatedieS cubic yards of solid rock fur fuun- 
» feet wide. 



•'> "IXt! |1 .1|...rll-f.l<-<', 'iaflIT\ 

••••■■JL li. I...k «;,;!-. I'i.::-'-rir« 
■ :nMl .1,,, k-iuM-Ur: I--:li'l"'. 





I-.. ( ,„:.ri.l T..iin-K'" 

■■t --.iw ill iM.-ili.-i,. I'ri 
l!-.ll..l:,11In.M.I*llili.. 
■11-, .,-r.-,-,,.. :.ii<l1.o.miii 

! ii-.„. ,r.-,tl.-.iuiH.siii".i 

'■ /.tut: <;,i/..._HlT«*'il 
l'"k wall.. I'l;Hf.l "1' 
'"" i,M-..lir.lnl.ti"i 

■'IH'-'i li.',7Jacu!.icj-iiril- 




■•^■:>^;.ii,.K ■!"»■■ i:i 








'" '-'.i;!!. ;ii„| i-. ■ 




'^■j-r -i>..M(.!-'.ii,i.^;' 




'""■ "'"'vHii);:. iiiu. 




1 ,.,1..^. j_XV7 1m,. _ 



■'iiiibor Iroiii rivrr 

■i, IJ. M. , €»f 1h'w«mI 

^»', removed »aiiK' to 

|tlatf<>rin from roMVr- 

Cjtiueral work about 



ciiiber 14, 1891, to talce the 
■ latter had her boiU'TH re- 

liemoved with HrranerH from 
iidoi for dredge trardf derrick 
'K-k. 

. BOAT. 

1 1 and other material for the works. 

•i foandatioiia in river lor <Ierrick.s, 

ug cofferdam fh>m upper and lowtT 

•« walls; handled comcut and riprap 

'•iiud look and dam. 

•liEIIOAT WARD. 

■deed the following amount of matrrial: 

(. clay, gravel, and stone; for dnin, iM).niu 

lork entrances, 12,72!) cubic yards of Hand. 

'pper handle, and replaced saine witli mw ; 

iuones. 

lite: 1 dlpperi 1 dipper handle, 1 spud, 2 axm 

• mg wheel, 1 jnnction band, 1 lever, 1 jnini]) 

IK} broke backing chain eleven times, lioiMtin^ 

BOAT WILLIK. 

dredged the following amount of material: Krir 
:indy cday, and gravel | for dam, 8.G77 cubir yanls 
k entrancen, 500 cubic vurds of sand, da v. and 




^— *i.5 Jn» 


■ », las;. 


I 


». 


UM. UK 


If 


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«Moii ol' tbpse locks and daius lu 
Hiitt* or )csH i-rippled condition, tbe 
yiil !i[i(l lite look gates autl u{ierat- 
iiHf<l iibsiiliilf removal or extensive 

*ht}y rebnilt, tlie otliers neuilir so. 
toi'ks liave l>eeii ooOKtrucled, ami lh« 
'viits prot(x't«ii by timber ciibbiiig to 

■♦■biyni built, tbe areas in rear of the 
ltd the groniMJR giaded, sown «itli ^nuss 

iind Dam No, 6, slack-wnter navigation 
.^'bi(^il is 121 miles above the mouth of 

Uimeral ropaire bave been made to the 
ttng torn off by dritl, and placing baeking 
*Mi) leaks, etc. 

iDflkn bave consisted in replaeing defective 
by putting in new blocks and aruiH. When 
.0 been dr^gedj so aa to afford imvigation 
lie lower miter sille, and tbe guide and pro- 
tiices have bei^n kept in rex>air. 
<« from snags by the United States snag boat 
belonging to the general ijnprovement of 
A large part of the time oi>einted under thu 
. operating and care of canals, etc., applied 
u'ky. lu her present condition this boat is 

mw'B dwelling is required at Lock No 2, 



^^BmUX GG— REPORT OP MAJOR 

^^HkHMtf^ KjpfTiMA innMrm' in prenerring and mat 
^^Bk KMlatJcg Biier, Kentucky, improctd bg lockt a 


-ocKwooD. 2093 

laining narifftilion on that 
iu2 dan*, «lo.— ContiDutil. 




Lock No. B. 


I«.kMo.». 


SalBTlM. 


.niln* 


[ing™t 


ToUl. 


stiuia 




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188. ea 
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181.H 




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l.M 
14. *T 


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1. IM.I2 


7B.11 1 3,570.8* 


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1. 


ibUk. 


UBilBt SUt«. uuie b.al Keotoeky ud 

■uuunti Fullm. 


U-iWS 


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11 
701.05 

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Ml, 00 

7w.;is 

1,831?. 72 


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323. W 
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SUMMARY. 




I»,"12«. IT 

■iiii 

1,448.10 
*g.WB,40 


-~ ? K>-Dt(tiiky River, Ken tDCkj 
K-^lockj- RWer.KRilnckr 














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MiJOR LOCKWOOD. 



off by drift; respiked old BlitatliinR; r 



eithtT lock lintrancp, 
iper'xlwi'lliii;;: rrpHirpil and repainted lork 
""'" ■ ' " "la preuiiiM; remoraddrin 

— ^ .. .^ ._. J kt tbis lock exoopt fur 

•utinHfrgtiil oIi'Vi-Q <luyH iluring the year. 

irfl 23, upjmr ffniin' toaiiing 21 feet, law«r gangv 

yuiiyu reading 5 feet, upper gauge 



>', tli'MitUiug: n-|)ULn-d iii>ii 
-<[.ik<^d l,I8t4 fwt U. M. <>;i 
I'll :ini| renaiiil'-il Iwk n'^lr 
9 iiuii wullt; To)iuiri'il tuiil I 
li wall; liullt. feiiuu itt 



rnctlve step ibeathlng and re- 
-lopo of daiD. 
- Iiparhiiif! on face of wall, 
rid uperatioe iroiia; lemovpd 
iHO; atoppnd leak in dam; re- 
nd lit preuiiu^i; whiteH-aaliod 

■ Itard dradgeil 1,010 ciiliic jiinK nf sand and mud from nppet 

.,.*! ttam thelorb pit,300uiil)ii'.v^iril4, and from Uie lower entraaoe, 

ta^iaiid iwd lunil. 

, .._ I>. — Tljure tune no misiH'iisiou uf uavigatioii at this look except for 

r ibirtnic tU» yr>ai. The Int'k walU wore Hulruinged tkirteen daje. 

JlMt «rM«T occurTul April 2*2, appur gBU(;u ruudiiig 32.3 feet, lower ganxe 

Sit WMM oeciiITMl Oatobet 17, iippu- gauge reading 1.8 feut, lower gauge 
JtlM. 

f l»» }1>VN har. — TbI.i bur had abonlisd ho hiuXly during thi- paat year that it 
'vdgiiig. 'ITie dn^ilRo ll'aril han dr<'<lKod. in defii>'iiiiiK and widruinK the 
*"" cnbia yurils uf ourtli. nnii<), uiid F^ravel. uu<l removed some iu Smiip 



•—To atop leak thnitiKh the duni, :C7T oiiliii; yiirilH of stone and ciny and 20 
if bnuh were placed liuhind OS boi-king. K«8|>ik>'<loldHtops]itiuthiug; removed 
iitt pieces and THpIui:e(l tinmo with new iiak Hhcuthiiig. 

.fenrr'* rfwelliiin.— Completed cons Inii'Tion uf new ilwelliDt; for lock-kucpcr; 
I ana built brick walks nroiind dwelling; constnictwl 1 tool boaac. 
ialinirl'.~ToTe down old dwelling niiA iitili/(<cl material in building wdIIcm 
King OovcrDment land. Painted lui-k gaten undoHDittaut luck-kevper'ii dwell- 
HHtved drift fr^m liick entrance and loi'k walli'. 

nt remark: — Navigntiou was suspended lifti-cu days on account of hi);1i water 
Hteen days on nrcoinit of low water, eunseil by the conatrui'tion of Ijurk No. 
leaka in the dam ax Luck No. 5. I'be entire river wan nliut utl' from l>elnw 
lo, 8 for a perintl of tweiity-e!);bl days at the driest Keasoii of tliu year, when 
de wal«r was being vuidcd from the upper river, the lower river In-ing depund- 
a small branches nnd springs to maintain the pool, while pool No. ti waa Hll- 
< This will acroiint fur all the low g:inge rcndings at all the lookn. 
towest gange reuling ooourred October IS, upper >;aiige rddineO. lOfout, lower 
leadiag 4.90 feel. The bighe^it H-at<>t occurred April 22, the upper gauge 
(St,GO feet, the lower gauge reading ^{S.oO fi.'«t. 



iloek waa in operating coQ<litton fur n:ivi^iitiiin yovonibcr 21, 1S9I. Fur lack 
liUie lower shore and river guide whIIh, as well ns tliu upper river gniilu wall, 
Ht eonstrncted. 

kf liebinA the loek wall, grading nnil pnvin^ the bank, and ciinnl iiu'ting luck- 
ft dwelllDg wore ftUo ouiiltei). A xuRliiuul <jnn)|tit,v of becking waa not 



^amis GO — BEroicT of hajok 


LOTKWOoa 2097 


BiMM Siwtmrkt JEtttr, Sfiitwdrj,firttml 


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^ect for tfae improvement of tlus river iras appnne<] by tiie 
of Wv nnder date of September 20. 188Sv Mtd pn'i idea far 

t ooaga, detached rock&, and bowlders, with a vin-'t lu tm- 
nr- water navigation and rafting. 

Blow of tbe last fiscal year a wtn-king party, which had com- 
ork at West Liberty. May 15, had wached BlackwatCT Creek, 
>elow. During the balam.e "f tiie •'ea*)D. wtiicb clo-^ Sep^ 
, the work of improveineni was carried to Farmers, aod the 
[linent obstmetiiniB removed m- lessened in de^Tee. The ;;en- 
each season has bHrii to atlbrd a-^ much relief as possible in 
of general improvement of the river iMtween Farmi-rs and 
■erty, a distance of 68 miles, and tin- small appropriatiou't 
eit impossible to thoronglily complete the work ju ant* l'>- 

the fiscal year ending June 30. 1^-'. the foll'.wing wort was 



TCT, under the present iiniject. is not susceptibli- of [it-nniioent 
aent, for the reason that such ohstrui-tions as sna;:-. leaning 
mpB, etc., are liable to occur artt-r caih hi;:h wat«:r. 

lal estimate of the cost of this iniprovemeitt wa? hl'S^i 
'les of river between Farmers and West Litwrt y, and it 14 
1 that of the balance yet uiiaii|<roi>riated if-JjOUt* Ijc appro- 
^ fiscal year ending Jane 'M, 18i)i, 



I-. 1 



':-T v:i:-,:>":A * 



> t;- " -: hl.'i :ln Til;. ! 
"^ ^ .-^ Z.'.;x, 'u:»il Ihi- V] 

• -• •: V. ;t1. xWIat 



^^ APPESOrS REPORT OP MAJOR LOCKWOOD. 2099 

K daring low water, and thus alTord advantai^es for mining coal 
^H other location for a single lock could give. 
Ktbe f.'^lose of the last liscal year the lock n-as completed and 
Hbed, a part — W feet — of thcpermiinentdamhudbeenconstracted, 
^Ke timber for the remainder hiui been contra4;ted for and partly 
H|«d. The abutment bad already been built. The constnictioD of 
^H dam wa8 opposed by the timber and sluppiiig interests, and 
^■dateof May 20, 1891, a Board of Kn^neer (Officers was coiisti- 
H^ to consider and report upon the subject of the dam to be built 
HlBig Sandy Rirer." 

Hki final report, the Board recommended the Hnbstitation of a nee- 
^■gn in place of a tixed diim, the clear height of tlie pool formed by 
^Se 13 feet above the sill of the Xarigahle Paas. 
Bute length of the Navigable PiUWi should be sufficient to accom- 
Kle the commerce that may nf<e it, and at» Che trausportation of tim- 
Bjy rafting is the principal industry as yet developed on the river, 
Hfiss should evidently be long enough to pass nifte of the ordinary 
^KnrtJcnlarly as rafting is carried on at stages as low as 6 feet. 
Bpaidenttions of etrouomy with regard to construction and opera- 
^pequire that the pass should be as short as possible, consistent 
^raie requirements of commerce. The circumstances of the case 
HjV to require that the pass should be about 130 feet long. 
Hfletermining the elevation of the Mill o( the pass, the general prin- 
^Hiat it, the sill, must not be an obstruction to navigation, should 
^n; in other words there must be as much depth on it, as boats 
Hwiy to it. This consideration would fix its clcvatiop at least as 
^h^Uie highest shoals. 

^■tb ^e look was planned the elevation of it« lower miter sill was 
^Bilt9 inches below the then accepted low water. Since then there 
Bpflications ttiat the low-water surface at Tjonisa is higher than it 
■formerly. This is i-videmcd by the gauge rciidings in conTitctiun 
■ttbe general condition of the river at the present lowest stagi-s, and 
■&ct that a part of the old steamboat landing at lx>nisa, which was 
pseily out of the water at lowest stages, i!« now and has been for a 
■iberof years, submerged at the lowest water, I'usli-boat naviga- 
II which is efi'ectivcwithadrattof 9 inches, forms a fairly good pi-ac- 
■1 standard of compari^nn for determining the relation between low- 
Elbiges of different years. 

■nBLting that the reading of the lowest water is greater now than it 
■Tin former years, an explanation for it may be found, itossibly, in 
■ftet that since the commenceincjit of the construction ot the lock 
M has been a great change iTt the conilition of aSairs at and near the 
Kof theh>ck, due to the partial obsliuit inn of the natural w-aterway; 
ft whether the change in low-wiilcr Icvrl \\\\l cunliiine to exist as it 
W is, increase or diminish, can b^nilly !"■ st;itvd delinit<-ly, although 
glast would appear to be the tiiii-.t iiiilikriy to ofcur, 
Aonld there be no further chacii;!-, it wmilil bi- safe, taking into ac- 
Kt the gauge rea<Iings daring thi' Inw «attT srasun, to place the sill 
ke pass one foot above the lnwi-r miter sill ol'llic l.ick. 
mke needles forming the dam, pii.ss, and w.ii. are t.i lie supported by 
■ 'e fa^esties, with an escapement which will allow tiic escape of all 
eedles between adjacent trestles at one time, thus doing away 
the slow and laborious method of taking out each needle sepa- 
ls and estimates of coat of the dam and its acceusoricu will be 
i^ed at an early date. 



iMnj uKvnur OK the chief of exgixeee?. r. ^. Anirr. 

sitv nf Louisji is a imivablo dam of nw-dl#-s snpiK.n*^ ].v trtstles. ih 
m-.niiiiM.|i,|s the substitution of that tyj* for the tx^i damiioiri 
niuiM* nf const run ion. The ostiiuntoti cost of cxinstrni rij..^ iLemoTil* 
.l:iMi prnpiised IS *!»;MKM», and, as thm- are oi.1v *i:jnni ,7^ hand stA 
uhlr u*r the tixrd ilaiii, a liirtli«T approi.iiatii.n of *7<;(iwi will ti 
lu-t ess.n V if the views of the Uoaid aiv to !m- carrit^ out. 

I I'lKur in the reeoininendatinns of the l^^ard and rm»mmeDd tUk 
: ' rt>.!r N- tiimsmittiMl to thr SjK-akerof the Uunse t.f Keiireseiilfr 
: 'I- : : :!:.■ inroiiuatitin of thr Coniinitti-e on Kivers aud HArbuik 
^ t :\ iv>iHti!ull\, yuur obetlii-nt M-rvant. 

Thus. Limolx Casey. 
Bng.aen,,iliitfofEngintm. 



\ 



• » . . 



I X 



^ .^. i- > V- OV.^ ry v»rrit'KKS OF THE COKPS OP EXOnfEEES OH i 

: .\ -.> yiv mm>v kivke. m:ak luiissa, kextcckt. ! 

^'OVE>IBEB 10.1891. i 

: > iAix: !•: l>!*^*vi s I if the Ciirps of Eiipneer:?, eonslj-^ 
«:■ .*:■■. r> Nv. i:, ::i'm y*iui uttice. !Mayl*lL 1.S91, '^toeoB-; 
-.*•:. :".t >./:';t-^t t'f rhf dam to be built iu the fijf; 
. ;. !•- .::si, Ky.. L;iVf the ht»iu»r to submit fiualreport^- 

• *: ■ •. ^ • -t ■..:':. ■: ' :<'^; . a ? ; d wa s u niler oonstnietioiu rf 

::.<■■ :^:; ::v ::»':: ^^as ^oin«: on the subjectof | 

■- : '.-• K «,::^: ':t"i;ni?e of a coiiiixmnieatioD j 

>. . ■ > >!:-. K. Nidi, of Iii»n ton, Ohio, 

V •.■;.'■.. I St::.:ti»r m* tlie Se4Tctary of 

^ - . t. ::■ :; A>as iiiadf to tlie tyiH'of - 

T •. .? ■■. > i\].:i>mmI lor a •• wicket dum 

:.■' .-.:'. 1 :i. ;;:r^i WHS made **tohave 

. ; : V ■-*.::„ x^irli tlir work.'' Tlii!* 

•,-.::.;•■ : . . ■ : I ] 1 ri k n t I ^y this Boai il. 

- .: . .■ .' - :: :. :ri:aid to the kind of 
■ • ■ ^' • . " 

-,. ■?:. :.t I'oaiil ass«*mbhMiat 

'. ; -. .V..: ii. :iir iifxt dav at 10 

>« . : .■.•". :":.'. >'..'t!i.» :i: *»i jnnties in in- 

^ . ; >:.•.■..:.. \ •':' the iixe<l dam, 

;-; : ,". ■ V 1 .i- i3;iin. an<l otliers 

: : . \. . ':/»:;. '«• vx'Ui]»]ftion. 

■ -".:*. t ; :t -*!:. t ; J r i \-es from 

. : ..:. ! ::< t«»iks, as 

- -> >. ".;::.:> witli tin* 

■• "!.: I'- .•::.! wjs im- 

:.. " ^^ :>>>:•:;. Tliose 

. • .::.■ \> ::. ix].ie>siiirr 

.^'»'..» ■i.l::. L'f ii.i.'Vablt'. 

• ■ :.?'» . 

, .., : .1 .1 '..r • ! cLf lalt- 



i 



«Rf 



■APTEltolX OG — BEPOHT OF MAJOR LOCK WOOD. 2103 

be aselens, and for tlie Rame reason tlio r-xit from tlie lo«k 
ill so till in witli »aiid aa to prevent the pitssins of mfts even 
i great part of the rafting Htagf^. 

opposes! to tlie change of type desire the work to be c.irried on 
esent authorised, t>ecause — 

le dam now under eonstmction can be eomplet^d and made 
« at an earlier period than a dam of the ctiauj^ed ty|io can be 

lie Bystem of fixed dams will cost less than a system of movable 
od consequently the river will be sooner improved with the 
: appropriations made for the work. 

MTties dissent froui the parties opposed in regard to the appre- 
H of serious evils inherent to the fixed type when applied to the 
idy River. 

this rei>ort, and returned with the original case, are a number 
unnications iu which parties in interest ha vi> ixinussi-d viiiws 

sides of the question at issue and to whicli iitiinlion isiiivitiil. 
Brst dam, while one in a series of similar f;f imtiires, is spMl;illy 
d, in advance of the conHtruction of others in tlie m'Hcs, to pni- 
tool forthe harboring of loaded barges dunii;; low water, niese 
i,a not get out of the pool during low watt'i hicause of the lack 
;h below the lock and out to tho Ohio River, A rise from 
ler river must then be awaited. The rises t'nim the upi^r river 
arge nnmberR of rafts, and it would then c<ime sibout thiit th» 
ccnmulated in this harboring pool and the arriving raftfi would 
eeking passage through the lock during tlu'se periodo of high 

To what extent this demand would tax tlii' capaeit.v <>f the lock 
bin periods of time can not be determined tVoin any data now at 
To assume how many barges would be harbored in the pool at 
; time would be mere guesswork. Tnfonnation in regard to the 
■ of rafts aiTiving jier hour lor any defined period is very iu- 
', Attention is invited to the following tabular statement: 

Timher oulpul of Big Sandg Hirer, 18SS-'30. 



Icfwt. 


N,.,«i,f.rf,r 
Vumbrrnf dnv. riv.T 
Lc>rl;iiEV>f wwtatrnlt- 
H.QUU uubii' tnK Ktagi' at 


Et'itiHrka. 


SJOOO 


•90 






■K.KU 




5 


Record liu< hnlf ytar .luly ; nn rvcoril for flfll half jHir. 
Kftor,l f..r flr.( \,M j-c»r qi.I, , no mcord for Issl tiBlFyoal. 



lock is large enough to take two rafts at one lockage, and it is 
d that three lockages at least could be made in one hour. The 
ifavorable year for the lock would have been 1887, when 1,211 
V. of rafls would have been required in sixty-ttve days, or less 
renty lockages per day. No otlier year for which the reconl is 
te would have re(iutred as great an average as ten lockages per 
ring the rafting stages. There is no doubt that the lock could 



.iU 



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-■• n^.M- .,L :• riff (j..7y,Ti|. 
••''* '"" '!".::.:: :. >Lr»:T iLT^-n 

■ -*" ■ " • '••J-3' t Tjj- III, 

:.-■•.. ,l: . > >. ir iLjr i j;^.- 

■- •'■- • '. .I»^ II. . 

: •.^■■' ■•->«•.,■■■. .,!.> ai 

- • ■ 1 ■— - w ■ ' . ~ "• 

'«k ■■■■•. its. TT 



APPBtmiX GG ^EEPOET OF MA,TOR LOCKWOOD. 2105 

lx>ruiinMl wlicthiT there has bpcn anydci>iisit of siiiirl to iiitcr- 
|ti Gip pmnacigf tlinmj^Ii the loi-k. If sm-h be fouiul, tlie d(!iM>Kit 
'Tini>ved iintl the lock put in perttTt coiidiUon lor iisi' before the 

1 be cIo8e«l. Thus utivigation will nut be pi-eveiitcil for an iu- 

tctit-al use of a movable dam, aa indeed of any dam, involves 
^ of water to cover the leakage throngh it whencloscid; other- 
Bmaintenanoe of the i>ool to its nontial or even to a iisehil level 
"mpractii-able. Measurements of tlie discharge ot tlie river at 
Brying from 16.2 feet on the gauge down to 1.0S foet on the 
■ve bwD made, and a tahuhUion of these ineasuienionts is in- 
['witti this report. In a ^vieket dam the spaces between the 
fc mt i inches wide. Under the conditir>n8 at Louisa the dis- 
) through one of these spaces at low water would bf about 52^ 
feet i»t'r second if the wickets were as high as at Dam So. 5, 
Kanawha Kiver. 

e assume a weir with wickets S feet high, the dtschargi? through 
aoe would be about 24J cubic feet per second. If wickets be 4 
om center to cent^^r tlutiughout, this leakage through the spaces 
>t of pass would be about 13 cubic feet, and per foot of weir would 
rat S cubic feet per second. Assuming for the Louisii, dam 124 
r the i>a.ss and 17fi for the weir, their would be re<iuired about 
:rabic feet per second to supply this leakage; that is, an amount 
to the discharge of the stream at the guage reivding of 5 feet, ot 
rhat over, 
spaoes between the wickets, however, are covered at need by 
ings called joint covers, laid eomerwise upon them. An actual 
jeoce with » discharge measurement on the Great Kanawha River 
Vea. the following data: There are 62 wickets in the puss and 53 
(weir. Those in the pass are 1.1 feet vertical licight from the sill 
top of the wieket, and inclined at sm angle of 15JO; similarly 
on the woir are 5 feet high, and inclined at an angle of 12°, The 
below the dam stood l.(i4 feet above the sill of the jtass. The 
ras maintained at fltteen-hiiiidredtlis of a foot below the tops of 
eketa. Under these conditions the discharge thi-ough each space 
en the wickets of the pass vjfould be nearly 52 cubic feet per sec- 
ond through each space lietweeu the wickets on the weir about 12 
feet; that is, it would require 3,8fi0 cubic feet per second to sup- 
e leakage tlirough these spacer of Dam n. .Toint covers had been 
I over 00 of the spaces in the [kiss, and over 21 spaces oti the weir, 
ischarge of the stream was measured below the dam and found to 
)Ht 1,130 cubic feet per second. This measurement was taken 
the Kik River, and assuming the discharge of that trilmtary as 
1 30 cnliic feet, the bahince of 1,100 cubic fe«t maiutiiiued the pool 
b5 to the level and under the conditions stated; that is, thispar- 
vering H'duced the amount nwessary to maintain the ih>«1 to 30 
nt of that necessary to supply the dist^harge tlnoiigh all the si»aces 
avered. There were 2 spaces in the pass and 32 on the weir 
ered. The estimated discharge through these spaces was about 
:bic feet |)er second, leaving liI2 cubic feet as the leakage through 
iut-covere*l portion of the dam, and between the wickets and the 
fthat portion not joint covered. Omitting consideration for the 
if the leakage under the wickets having no joint covers, the leakage 
(b the joint-covered portion of the dam wonid be less than 1 3 cubic 
w foot of the aggregate length of the joint-covered portions of the 
weir. But the leakage nuder the wickets is not to be ueg- 



li 

\\ 

1. 






1 
II 

(I 

1; 
\ 
\ 
1 



ii 

ft 
< 

ti 



.sH 



* 



JAPPENIHX GG — EEPOKT OF MAJOE LOCKWOOD. 2107 

1 gnfflce to maiiituiu the pool to a useftil height. This juldi- 
', io the opinion of the Board, t» easily feasible. 

1 that the lowest gauge readiug so far reached this yoar 

Iticb measaremeitt of discharge has been made is not so lov 
1 recorded iu past years; the low water of 1883 was 1.23 
K. How much less the discharges were in the lower recorded 
t past years can not be ascertained or even estimated. There 
■Atiotis that the bottom of the stieam has tilled somewhat with 
these latter years, and a resnit of this filling would he that 
Boliiuge wonld correspond to higher gauge reading. So that, 
the gitage reading has been aa much lower as stated, it do<.-s 
e Uiat the discbarge lias been correspondingly low. The tabu- 
I the g<ange record indicates an obiitt>r!ttton of the lesser tTHuge 
i aa thne progresses; such would a^rtually result from filling of 
t»n. 

fbll and careliil consideration of all the elements determining 
m, the Board are of opinion that the best type of dam for tlm 
4mi3a is a needle dam, and they recommend thesnbstitation of 
efor the fixed dam. Itisfurtherrecommended that the height 
am from the sill of the pass to the normal level of the pool be 
13 feet, and that the dam be built across the river ojiposite I be 
I of the lock as is done in our practice, leaving all other details 
nught out by the oflicer in charge. 

eedle dam for the site near Louisa will cost somewhat less thtw 
t dam. - 

'9 tlie recouimendatinii wa.s made by the oflicer in charge to 
fised dam, with a view of ultimately- turning the fixed dams 
i-able ones. Since that time exi)ericnee has been had in this 

with the ol}eratiuR and action tif uiovable dams, and the Board 
pinion that the trial now made should be with that kind of 

this report are inclosed a numljer of letters and papers ad- 
to the Board, and a list of them is also herewith, 
ated cost of constructing a movable dam of needles, sujiported 
ties, Poiree system, on Bi^ Sandy River, near Louisa, Ky,: 
»le pass, 125 feet; weir, 175 feet; vertical height of needles of 

feetj of weir, 8 feet. 

PASS AND WEIB. 
■to: 

. Bill, 223.75 cable Y«r<ls, at $20 t-l,47r..on 

tTBHtle elMie, I02.5c<ibic vurris, at $16 l.(lll).(X) 

»d stone, 83a cnl.ic varcls, ut *7 ."., S73. W 

igBtoue, 313 cubic vaTiU, nl*10 3. ir.(i. 00 

rete stone, 2,688 cubic yar.lB, at *7 IK, 81H. 110 

ght-iroii liu-rods. etc., 13.2IX) pniiii<U. Ht4 ei-iil9 .-|2K. (Xl 

iron iiiiclior", ll.iKX) p..iiinl«, m 4 .cnla... 44(1. (X) 

Iej..iir[iiil-U.xe9, 17,iK;:.i»iiiii,t!', at 7 ecu Is 1,233. 7.'> 

.nuts 3i>i).00 

36,4.55.75 

kbutracnt: 

ig, 79 cubic vanls, at $16 1.264.00 

ry faco ntoue, 241 cubir vardi, at $8 1. ii2X. 00 

r«d stone, 341 cubic yanis, at *7 2, 3K7. 1)0 

iWE atone, 1,169 cable yaidB, ut $5,50 '. 6,429.60 

12, 008. 50 



. *. ---LJ 



■ 1 ■ ■■ ^, 






^•^.m. '^^Z. * * * 



i-T :'-f 






C' 



APPENDIX GG BEPOET OF MAJOE LOCKW^OD. 2109 

lines have been opened at ami near Peach Orchard, and Qiute 
B shipment are made by rail bt Ashlaad, on the Ohio, where 
in barges for transportation down that river. Could coal be 
oat by water from Oie mJuea the ontput of coal would be largely 

Tk on this Btream can only be done to txlvantage during low- 
was September 10, when the working panicji were sent out. 
ork of previous years has removed the must imtiortant obstnn;- 
that daring the past season it was only iiL'tessary to clear ont 
lat had become obstructed by material washed in during the 
g high waters, and take oat such obBtructiuiis as logs, stumps 
rs that are always found in the chanuel ^I'tei a riue, 
UowiBg is a summary of the season's work : 



Work. 


Cdbie 


Numbtr. 


tsse 




no 
i.no 














3M 





























ream under the present project is incapable of permanent im- 
iit, as the obstructions to navigation, such as snags, stumps, logs, 
liable to re-form at any time and an annual appropriation of 
,500 is needed to keep it clear. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

880 ^ «3,BC0 



Money statement. 



Taiiable for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.. 

that en 

*d in comphs 

r acU uf 1866 aud 1S6T. 



1, i:ti.<K) 


2, 500. 00 


2,51(1.86 


a, 500. (X) 



ug Fork is the eastern of the two forks which unite at the town 
A, 2C miles from the Ohio, to form the Big Sandy River. It 
the southwest corner of West Virginia and flows towards the 



" •- I li i « 



-. ■_; ^• 



. —I 



..: "I 



« 



r 



APPENDIX OG ^BEPOET OF MAJOR LOCKWOOD. 2111 

» bas beeu no chsinge iu tbe situation s^) Car as I cun det«riuiiip, 

th&t tbe obstructions Lave been incrcitsed. 

iitreaiii is incapable of i>ermaueut improvement, as the obstrnc- 

tmed by logs, »ii»gs, et«., are liable to i-e-form at any time, and 

annual nppropriation 1» needed to keep it free. 

ollowing is a fiainm»ry of work done during the past fiscal year : 

kMntovei] oobic vsrda. 80 

A removed do 2,147 

moved nniiiber,. 393 

M<r«d ilo 3B3 

WDOved (Ill 350 

iped do 192 

APPROPBIATIONS. 

1880 .". $2,500 

1881 , 2,000 

,1882 5,000 

«4 5,000 

, 1886 3,750 

or 19, 1890 2,500 

Ul 20,750 

Money statement. 

ni, balance unexpended fl.431,6T 

1892, Amoiuit expended dnring Ascsilfeftr 1,270.33 

993, tudaace noexpended ^ 151.34 

882, oatetanding liabilities 40. 55 

883, taUnoe avfcUable 110.79 

appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 2.500.00 

availalili) for fiscal jeiireuiliiig ,111110 .W, 18!I3 2. 1110.79 

it thatcan be profitably c:(pendpdinri»cftl,vearen(liiig.lnno30,lftl)4 2,500.00 
lleii in compiiancu with mmiremuuts of sectiona 2 sf rivtT aud 
or acta of 1866 and 1867. 



IMPROVEMENT OP GUYANDOTTE RIVER, WEST VIRGINIA. 

Guyandotte River rises in the south western part of West Vfr- 
mA, flowing in a northwesterly (liret-tioii, empties into the Ohio 
s above the mouth of the Big Sandy and 3!) miles below the 
of the Great Kanawha. 

project for the improvement was adopted in 1878, and oonteni- 
the obtaining of a clear channel with a width of 3() feet and a 
■pth of 18 inches dnring five months of the year by the removal 
8, Knags, and other obstnietions. This river was practically 
before work commenced, except during rises of considerable 

stream was once improved by the Stat* of Virginia by the con- 
m of six locks and dams. The locks were constructed of timber, 
a matter of course, after a time, the charges for repairs, ren- 



2112 RKPORT CF THE CHIEF OF ENGISEEBit, O. S, ABJtT. 

dor«d iH'teiwary by llic imtiiml ilecny of the wood, bcramc vrrjrg 
itiul ft little riirlliri' Hiting tho Ky&tem was abandonnl, and "''wil 
formerly .oMttitiiti-d ii useful imprnvt-iiwnt now Ifcraiw obfftracOT 
The oI<i i<nk* iiixl itniim Tit^re ctirrieil away in part from tine tan 
by rtiHiils, .-.0 lliiii wlipii the first report on this nver was made Iflf 1 
William i:. M.-irill Jii IST5 most of them had bc*n partially washed bt 
but tho rium«iiri>iit^ si ill constitiitwl the wornt oWmction o« theH 

ThWf are twi> millihima — 'Pecks, 7 niilei) I»pIow Lt^an, and I 
l!)mil(>8 below I'crkrt — that still conStitiitfjierioaKobstmctioiisO 
pilioii. mid hine bi-en reported to th« Department as ! 
authui'it> l'i>r their coiititruction in the first plaee was based ■_ 
peiinil fn>ui the ein'uit (^ourt. and their continnanre has beeoftfl 
Bluu■«^ and eou^tjiut damage to the river iuterests. 

The w ink in previonn yiiira has been to out passage w^s fi 
the old (lams where reiiiiirecl, make channels throagrh the i 
for puali bi>»t«, and remove such obstr ions as rocks, suags, eb 
logs, I'tc, evisling in the ehannel, ,he river as would rate 
with r;tniii« lit iiriltiiiiry and low raiuiig stajres. Daring the] 
yettr till' work dime has been with a view to assisting the ranni"' 
raits. The Mieain is iiiitqtjible of permanent improvement, aa tJ 
etrnetiouK in the r1i:i>iricl. smli as tre<-s, snags, logs, etc., ate lia 
re-form. The Ntreiitn ii|> tn I^i;;iul, a disbince of 81^ miles, ttasantf 
age fall of abont L'l; mi<'!ii-s in tIik miU>. 

For di-ttiils ronriinin;,' the woik iittoulion is invited to the n 
Assistant I'^ngineer 11. F, Thomas, attached hereto. 



.ImiPlS, 1R7B »2,000 I .IiUj 5, ISSl •.... 

MHri-hS, 18TU 1,000 \ Anmist 11. ISSS- 
Jnim H. IKSO 3.000 I B-'pU-mbL-r 10. 18! 

MarchS. IHiltl 3,500 I 

Au^uijt2, 1883 2.000 ' Totul ..... 



Moiici/ Kiiitin 



)VBd July 13,1893-... 
Amount arnilnble Tor Uhi^bI yuar ruiling .Tuun 30, 1893 .. 

SAmuimttiintoi 
Siiliiiiittcil in L._, -- 

I h;irbor acts of 1S66 avX 11*67. 



* Made available by act of August 5, 1886. 



r APPESOrr OG — ^BEPOKT OF MAJOR LOCKWOOD. 2113 

^iToriciiitC aa they went. At Fish Trap Shual a liirirn rot^k naa taken oul; ' 
w which w«a in the chnte. The point of the Imr was nut off and a slip on 
Iwnk waa removed. At Keiberls Bend, 7 miles nbove Liiean. s portioK 

Knt or Clojtls Island and a h^ry rock slip nu the eaitt side of rhe river 
Ted, fnrming a moat usefol uaA vicellent pieire of work. The point of a 
IT 1*^ cat offat LawBons Mlil, -wh4>re the river makeB a ahorl bend. A luge 
k takea out of the main channel at I-cgan and three more near Kin); Shoal. 
Ms were nrmoTcd at Dry Island and also three at KiliK. Some rocka were 
Isbont 5 mil«« billow Big Hart Creek. A Kreat many (R'«)t, atumps, sna^, 
B« remove all along the river from KioK^ Shoal Ui Kogers Dam, a diHtanuo 
De*. At Barbonrsville a very bad piece of rivor was found and conaidemble 
■• done there, bnt thp appropriatimi wa« eihaustr<d withont coniplcrting the 
■DCDt- There is a roi'ky island and also a rook bar that on^^lit to be removBd, 
lie in a bend of the river and at certain stagee of wat«i are a great and don- 
>lMtTiM:ti«n. A detailed statement of work done ia below : 

<ek resnoTed onbio yards.. 434 

o«k r«i»«T«d do.^. ^280 

Bnio««d 15 



[atenoTad 300 

d with boats miles.. 173* 

ip]9j«d (anrage) 10 

ivpronienMoto made by the United tttat«« on this atreHn have been of great 
to Ibe people uf that section, and it is eatininted that the ntitpnt of tiinher 
■Hj iDCieued this year. A small steamboat now plitv the river, and if the 
meat would remove the damn tn the lower itart of the stream* there ia nothing 
in steam navigation to within 7 miles of Logan, or a diatance of 73 miles. Of 
tiii-rei are other obstructions in thn bed of the river and overiianging timber 
i[iu*t be removed befor■^ navigation cmi be an entire xnccess, bnt the principal 
o l>e done is to secure the removal of the dams heretofore reported as obBtrnc- 
navigation. I thiuk that further appropriation fur the Ouyandotte River 
bf BiaJe for that purpose solely until toe removal of all dams is effected. R. 
able condnct«d the work, 
ectfnllv Bubmittwl. 

B. F. Thomas. 
AuitUinl Engineer . 

D. W. IX>CKWOOD, 

CiNnKnori, Ohio. 



COMMERCtAL 8TAT1BTICB, 

mrof fiufandolte Biver, Wttt Virginia, for thtfitcal gmr ending .lime SO. 1: 



Lilt a/ boatg pttfing oa Gugandotle River, Weit Virgi»ia 



Stmt. 


Cfaarmctsr. 


Leppb. 


nnadlli. P<Tlh. TouiiHgo. 




FtH. 


FtrL 1 Fttl. 




1 



no 93 ^133 



\ _ 1 

2114 UCPURT OF THi: CHIEF OF EKtlLNEEHS, U. S. AKMV. 
I 

GG II. 

IMPEOVKMEXT OF UTTLE KASAWHA RIVER, WEST VIHGlMIi 

The Littk- Kaanttha drains the central poitiim of West Vifj 
risjne in L'pslmr County; it« courso is a little nurtU of west 
oini>tie«into tbe Ohitf at PMrkerwbuigjits total leugtli is atx 
uiil«is. 

The Little Kiiiiawlia Navigation Comiiauy owns and operat«8< 
locks iLiiii 4l;tiiisi>i) tlii.s rivet', whioh fm-nislislnck watei'Uavigatioil. 
the oil l< I u]< to -A iH)iiit Two miles above the village orBuruiDgSpri 
wliei'i) (lie United Stales lock is located, but tlie service of tUS 
tem itt very poor, owing to the dilapitated conditiou of both loobH 
daniM; breaks and washonts are of &equeul 0(.vurrence during 
water, and tbe iutermptiou to navigation iu^couseqaence 
and harassing. 

Tlie present {froject for the improvement of this river, adopt! 
1876 and modifieit in 1880, contemplates the construction of a lock: 
dam to extend slack -water navigation for a dratt of 4 feet a diali 
12 miles above the point reached by the navigation company, 
improvement of the natural channel of the upper river by the 
of obstriHrtions, etc., for a distance of SU miles, the objei^t of t1 
being to obtain a cbatinol of a mintmnm width of 40 feet with 
of 2 feet for at least four mouths in each year. 

During the past fiscal year the lock aud dam were com] 
such an extent that tbe lock wan ot>eucd to navigation Di 
1S91. It was found im^wsstble to i^timplete the hacking of 
before the winter set in, and this work was deferred until ; 
spring Hoods. The backing of the dam is now in progress and 
('(>ni|iletf(l in a short time. As alwnys happens wheie properJ 
iHit put iu ill itilvauw!, the banks just below 
r ]i;ivi' washed considerably, but not to a dan^ 
iiil>)<'li<)ii of the lower shore guide wall and placing 
ahiii iiicDt will effectually secui-e the banks against ' 

III' work done during tbc. past year iittentiou ia iiivitfll 
the report of AnsiHt:mt Eugiueer It. F. Tlioma«, appended heretih'. 

Al'PMOriUATIO.NS. 

Aiiitniit. N.IMTH, *7,300 I AiiRUHtS, 1886 

JiiiK' IS, \X1X IS, (XX) AilKiiBt n, 1888 

Miin-li;!, 1S7H .-- 1B,(>I>0 .Spi,t..|iil)i-rl«, 1890 .... 

.run- H, l«»*l 15, (Ml 

Miir.-liil, li«l iO.tm ToUil ---■ 

Aii([iiMt i, IH82 31,1X10 I 

Moiiqi utiitcmenl. 



prot. 
hikI 

tent. 


<l>ii 
'1' 


wuhI 


"i; 



iiilv 1, |H'.y. MilMii'" iiue«P^"l\»^ 

iiilj' I. INiW, .lutstoiuilng fiflHlitiM , 



July I, 
Julj 



- ■ .": :\\v spat'o Lthiutl the lock 
^ ■..•■\: month, as the colli 'wt-arht^- 
*■ . : .::Min;: tho protortioTi crih*i i 

•^ "^^.ts liono in .Sf'ptembpr, ami 
:. . ■ -^ * .M»J. in lillin;; the cribs. Tl: 
- ^ :r;iii>l>orTi'd in rars <lnwn 

.^ ■ : :z:- "v^orks. At the start thf 
: « 1 v:/::irry. hut owing to th< 

■^ -■ • : V li the ^ronnd without 
«♦ ',■ -^ T" • ~ "i»v, line up the empties. 
% • V ; V-'. IT :;^e ti^p of the incline. 
•^ ■» .- » '•'. '■ ;ry well. Now that ap 
..•■:. > >■ :■■ .Vi^in stone from a qui 

• -. .! :<- «'^ 7 '>• V i-iie? without pnmj 

- -. .^:- ■« -sa- ' :.r- * v. .i^ ross the lock jus 

^ - > r ■ ^ o T ' -^f? ofiise. When put 

^^•. '' - I •«.."!• » • '-• :.ji'.i a mile below] 

«-c.-,-v -.. .-"...' •': '. vk ihnmberan 

- r-:.: ' - :J.: :o::i:rete was tal 



^ ^ ^t--.r. -^i* :•' r ci IS adjacent sa 

.^ *:-.- -j.m. - • lir-^ tl.e s**asor 

. . ,. ■* :;v . ». V "« L* •■•'-! pe*l nu 

. . ^ - : r.is- *• T l: ■.'.:*«; ly. Thi 

- • « ^ ••. i" iTt'i bv !uen i 

• ■ ■ - » 

. . >* ^ - .- : . >. '<;■>•' I'unr^ 

» ■ -■«•-.■.' ■''*""?^'-i '''•^'- 1 
^ ■* ^ * -■ - >J-Z.^ t 





, 


r^ 


1 


r 


i. 


_;*: 


<^ 




"N 




♦• 


■■ 




*-•* 


• 

-1 


^ 


■a« 


1 


■ ■ 


k 


:r«.TrfKir 




-BfeKmt OF liAJCm LOCKTVOwj. 



iniMb}. 



m ineaarvtiienco and cipeiise aa trnll a< 
d ta rnMir tb« FnlMtine Lock, boluuf-i 
lb}. Tilt* Bu rrduceil Uio w;iU'T tli:it 1 

T«D Ih«ae tiad to be tied tip stinie ilisli 

mM. in harniiT^ to its destioation. At tii 
tt was very tiring to lu^n as weU ns exppi 
ItUByou-tliecoutrsct ftir timber for damn 



<-liiV wan nkiiHC'l I'J llir< rlr;iw- 
to'llKi I.Utl" KnltawliH N'livi- 

HKUlll IciIuIh Ol'sllllK- I'llIlM ll.l 

!■ Imlow wlion m«-<M iiiid tlm 

t tlicr IiMiglll of whi'i-liug WU 

„. _. tilled, and tiinbiT fur iLecrilis 

T.W.Moore., the coutraetor, forniBhcil 117,66(1 buiud ti 
Htor. Smith JL Co. also fnrnJBheti soniu titulMir fur prcitn'tiun critiH. 
■ w«n (kmifthed hy Pattin, Hall &. Pattin, of MarietU, Ohio, 
rttmOy tMhadtUed. 

a. F. TUOMAB, 
Auitta»t Jfnj IMI 

t. W. 1.0CKKfK>l>. 

Cmrpf •/ £i»jr>BCf<ra, T. 5. J. 



8TAT18TICB. 
AiKor, ITcrt Virgioin, fur fi'oat ijfar andln^ Jii*« 50, iSSB, 



ArtJriH. 


,.» 


mi. 


ism. 




1, IDU 
8,540 

31, WO 
70,000 
a7,<150 

KOM 


ia.yi7 
sa.e7T 

68,T0» 




r:7 


11 

uioob 




I«,U6 


I»,6M^ 









Li»t of boatt plgiHg on Little Kanattiha Riifr, West Tinjlnia. 





N^. 


i Ltugth. 


I.«.U„. 


Lh'ptli. 








Fm<. 


F«(. 


*■"'•„ 
2:0 




1!!^ (^k<t) 










TO 


Sli,« 




15:1 






a.o 









k aud Dam 'So. 6 of the Little Kauawha River were ,so fur ad- 
d towards altimate completion that tUe lock w,t.-i opened to iiavi- 
1 December 2, 1891, and ha.s since that tini« been continuously 
ted, with the exception of a short time during June, when it was 
I to readjoBt the lower gate.s tn the miter .sill and pat new screens 
» nhamber openings of tlie lower cnlverts. 

terable damage was done to the dam dnring the winter by 
i and ties going over it and pouniling oft' the sheeting of the 
>, bat as the companies or Arms <:u((aged in running logs in 



2118 RrponT OP THE cimip op E:?fmip,ERa, tt. r. abict. 

this mannur have [mt in iKMtma above the lotik, it in hoped that ( 
will be no ta'oiible from this source in the fiitiu-p. I 

Allotnieiit for yiiar ending •Tane 30, 1S92, fli-'^iOO. 



porlio* 0/ the tAUlr KanittDha Hinar, Twl Virginia, in^roted by Uok and 

fiical year mding Jvtte '" """ 



vigatio* i 



UoDthi. 


S>1*Hm. 


tAborand 


prusog. 


^ 
« 


.89,. 


11)5.00 
•5. DO 

te.«a 

95.00 






i 


1893. 




1 




^:::::::::;::::::--:::--::::::::;::::::::;:: 


jatas 










S:::::;-::;:::::::: :: 






iis.oa 




















ig.10 













nBPORT OF MR. B. y. THOMAS, ASSIBTANT 

LonisA, Ky,, JuneSO, i 
Majob: Loekinj' was licgnn on tho LUUn Knnnwha Eiver, at Lock No. S, If 
eembor 2 loat, ana nothini; lias ocFnrred to iatorfera with naTigAtjoii ainw 
except a short (ttoppngo to repair aleak between the lowergatesaiid miter bUI 
inft the ^enent lunnth. The lock has been in fine woikiug cooditiun ever au 
was opened to navigation. While the approaehes to tliu lock wero being madet 
Aft^ir the CDinnletion of the daui, some of the timber tirma operating on tlM 
becaniv fcarftil that navi);Btiou tbroii<;h the lock would not be opened epeedi^ 
madeuo |iri?|>aratiouB for holding their timhcT in the upper pool, but allowed 
esrape over the dam. This wns continued for several weeks after navigatioi 
estubliahed and aasuri'd, and tlio dam was greatly injnretlby the loose lof^ andi 
tiei iiciunilint; the decking or floor. The lower step of the dam hits been parti; 
lied away and ueart; all looseneil, and the entire lower fhce of the work has 
dntnagoil more or leas. For the past two or three months but few logs ban 
OTCT tne dam, and the locknge or rafts has greatly increased in conseanence. 
construction of this dam has lengthened tbe navigable river about 12 inilM 
boats run regularly to t'reston at the moutli of the Wast Fork. This U of 
benefit, not only tn people living in tbe vicinity of tlio pool, bnt also to those 
pying the nppor part of the valley, as it brings the head of navigation much c 

The intention originally was to employ but one lock tender, as is done on tho 
below owned by the Little Kanawlia Navigation Company, and with tbia ide 
one lock house was built. The greatly increased business of tbe river, partial 
in timber and cross-ties, wbieh is always grentest nt the upper lock, made I* 
essary to employ an additional lock tender, and it will be to the interest of the U 
States to erect another dwelling tbia season for bis use. 

No damage of consequence has resulted lo the lock. Two wicket screens 
torn olf duTiiii; the high water of the winter nud spring, but canned neither i 
veuience nor delay to navigation. 

The river bank below tbe abutment bus wiished nwny considerably, and it i 
be best to protiict it with riprap Itefori- anrdlier winter. Below the lock thei 






erosion of tho Innif, b 
and tbe probabilities a 
inacenc property. 
Kcspectfidly submitted. 



icd l;ir 



ilhoni 



nongh t. 
ililge ■ ■ 



n the 




mix a a — ^rehtrt of ha.ior lockwood. 2119 

■ »■ Little Kaaawia Birer, W«( Virginia, /or Jiipal year ending Jititt SO, 
197 



liuiM>ua 



I and flats 146 

1.1115 

laneoQs 62 

• and flats passing 3,913 

ttex of lockagflB.. 3,671 



GG13. 

JVEMEST OP BOCKHANNON RIVER, WERT VIRGDnA. 

't for the improvement of this stream, approved in 1884, is 
that portion of the rivei' between the Tliree Forks and tli© 
khannon, a distance of 24^ ndles. Tlie obBtructions consist 
and bowlders, some of which are estimated to contain 5UU 

it called for a channel 30 feet wide. 

ion River is a tributiiry of the Tygart Valley, and rising rti 

stem part of Bandolph Connty, W. Va., flows a little east 

,il it empties in the Tygart Valley River in Barbour Connty. 

o<-'e from the Three Forks to the month is 47j miles, and the 

of the stream is aboat 57 miles. 

e past fiscal year work was commenced during the last 

ifnst, and continued so long as the bnlauce of funds available 

mt. , 

. large bowlders were removed, containing in all 3,;110 cubic 

me, and 136 trees and 25 logs were taken from drifts and 

onal appropriation is required for this work. 

APPBOPRtATIONS. 

$I,SOO.OO 

- 1.500.0(1 

8 1,500.IK> 

1890 1,000.00 

5,500.00 

Money statement. 

(lance nneipemled $1,027.40 

imoiint expended duTin<' fiscal yc:ir 1. 010. 18 

ilanco uneTpended 17.22 

1 throngh lock sdhjil-dcIciI si^ dnvH nii aucoiiiit uf high water, aadneveu 
look gate. 



r 



APPENDIX H H. 



IMPKOVEMEXT OF HAKBOHS ON I.AKK SltPEHIOE. 



DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 



IMPROVEMENTS. 



1. Harbor at Grand Maraia, Miiinuata. 
3. Harbor at Agiit<> Ray. MinnMOtn. 
Sl Harbor at Uulath, Minnt^ota. 
(. Harbor at Supcrioi' Hay imd St. Loiiia 

Bay, WiBc^iuiii. 
5. 31iim«eota Point at Superior, Wiacou- 



6. Hivrl-or ut ABhluml, Wisoonsin. 

7. Harbor at Ontumignn, Michigan. 
S. Kngle Harbor, Midiiguu. 

9. Harbor at Marquette, Michigan. 
10. Hurbor of refuge at Uraud Mftraia, 
Hk-faJKau. 



EXAMINATION AND SURVEY. 



United States Enoineeb Office, 

Duluth, Minn., July 1, 1S92. 
OeMEBAL: I have the honor to trEiiismit lierewith aanual reports 
upon works of river and harbor improvement at proseiit in my charge 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1S92. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. FiSK, 
Captain, Corps vf Euginecrg. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas L. Casey^ 

Chief of Engineers, if. 8. A. 



-IMPROVEMENT OF HARBOR AT GRAND MARAIS, MINNESOTA. 

On the north shore of Lake Superior there are very few luralilies 

I irhcre safe anchorage for vessels can be found, and Grand Alarais 

I (Aers the only harbor of refuge daring storms between Agate Hay and 

I Pigeon Kiver, the international boundary, a distance of 120 miles. It 

■ i« not yet a shipping port of much importance, but it is so near the 

I rich iron ore deposits of the Termillion Range that it is probable a 

lilroad will soon be built to connect it with them. 

The apitroved project of 1879 is to build two breakwater piers, each 

^feet long, from the east and^weat points of the bay, or one pier 700 

' long from the east point, and dredge an anchorage area of about 

MTMi tn a depth of at least 16 feet, alt at an estimated cost of 

■i I. 

2121 



2122 REPORT OF TliR CHIEF OF ENGIN-EEES, U. S. ARMY. 

The object of this work ia to pnjvide a Liu-bor for jmrposes of refuge I 
aud coiuiiierce, which it has fulty accomplishetl as far as completed. [ 

Theimproveinent of thehaiiKffCflmiiieiiced iu 1880; at the present I 
time the length of completed breakwater is 350 feet, or one-half of tlje f 
whole, and the 16-foot anchorage is 2L,5 acres in extent, or a litUe J 
more tlian fonr-flfths of that contemplated hy the original project. \ 

"the anchorage is compact in shape and fairly well protected, but 
this space ia not of siifBcient size to permit more than one or two vf«- 
sels to manenver with safety. The harbor is so small its entire are.), 
61 acres, should be utilized. To do this in the be^t manner would re 
quire 600 feet extension of the breakwater, and additional dredgiug to 
the amount of about 450,000 cubic yards. The extension of the hteaii- 
water would cost about $100 per foot, or $50,000; the additional 
dredging, at the present contract price of 30 cents per yard, would eflst 
about ^90,000 more, which, with 10 pei' cent for contitigencies, wouW 
make a total of $154,000 to complete this excellent harbor. The origi- 
nal estimate of the cost of improving this harbor was 8139,669.40, lint 
coDtemi>!ated protecting and dredging only a part of it. j 

During the yeai' small repairs were made to the breakwater, wliicfc i 
is in gci'id condition. I 

The rontract under way at the dat« of the last annual report w*5 ' 
completed the following August, 70,850.9 yiirds having been dredge^ 
during the fiscal year just closed, or a t^ital under the contract c* 
100,780 yards. 

This work ia ia the oollection distrirt nf Diiliitlt, Minn. Diiluth, Hinn U Ox" 
neaceat port of ntil.ry. The nenrent liglit-houBn is siliiutril uii Iho (jrcnkwater a-V 
Oriuid Maruid. 

Abilracl of appropriatiotit for i»tpi>riiij harbor at Grand ifarait, Sfiftn. 



y act or Congreaa — 

Approved MsjcU 1,1879 flO,000 

Approved Juiif U, 1«S0 10,000 

Ai.i)rovBd Miircb 'A, IJWl 20, 000 

Pasaed AugiiBt 2, 1 HK^ 20, 000 

Approved J nly r., ! 884 10, 000 



Bt act of Congreaa — 

Approved Anf^at 5, 1886 $10, 000 

PoBBOil AiieiiBlll. 1888 15,000 

Approvi'd September 19, 1890 22.3at 



KSTIMATFS. 

iiililetp tliP. 



Moti^ atateiHent. 



Amount JiviiilaTile for fiscal your ending Jiuko 30 1893 11,466.:'9 

f Amount (I'stiiiuited) teqiiireil Ttir i'omni„tinn ,.r (Mtiatinir nririect 13,319.40 

I Aumiiul t!liflt mn be proiltably i-'^p.'.,.b.!i inJur^f /^,it .-mfiu'^^lntie 30, 1S3^ IW. 000. 00 
1 .Siibijiitt-'d m '■"^Pl!""™ ,";*'■ '■'■'ilUrou.euia „;■ stcti""" 'i uf river ftn« , 

( harbor lu'ts nl IHIMi and 1«07. "i 1 

•Tl,o hnlnncp iinexpsortcil .riilyl7^^p~^~-_^^;lir7;^^ for l89l i* 1 

*22,88S.&i; the diliereuce, *33.33, .s "mnul.?" .?><"«%D«-'^ '^ vl.vtlief No. 1, item I,J 
Ibiirth qriiirtcr, 1891, "'9!il|<' ^ 



^ 



2124 REPORT OP THE CnTF.V OF ENGTSEERR, IT. S. AROT. 

haiitiliiii; dC tiicTrliniiilliDv. 'the i-oDimrnv sihid grvw nut of all \tn\ 
tion Id llic "i/v. ol* llic 1i:ii*liiir, uiiil fur Uiv Kccurity t>f tills i-oiuinen' 
wan iii'i'>'s>iiL',\ 111 siipplriiii'iit tlie iiatnral pi'ot«{-tiuii by artificiiU tua 

Tlir ii |iiin'\ ed iiiojett of 1887 is to construct two breakvatt-r pii-n 
a liiH' ijn\;Lni,- wicJi otlit-r lioui the eastern aud western poiutii of 
bay, l*j III' 1,(MHI fe^^t.aDd900 feet long, respectively, leaving an open 
of 1,'^U feet betwt-en their extremities and inclosing an tavA oS 
acres. 

Tlii> iiriginal estimate of cost was $313,000, which was increased 
1244, '-'IIS ill Annual Report of 1887 on account of higher prices. 

The iiUJect is to protect ehippiug at the wharves which other* 
would lif grejitly exposed. Work was commenced in 1887 on the I 

Sier, wliicL, includiug 200 feet built under the contract in progrea 
ate (>{' la.st aiiuual report, is now T50 feet in length, leaving 250 1 
to bn built to complete it, while nothing Las been done on then 
pier; 1 111 \ work is theretijre a little more than one-third done, but 
remiiinitiji two-thirds will cost eonaiderably more than twic« what 
alreiidy beuu oxpcudeil, for the reason that it is in much' deeper wa 

TliL'ie is not yet perfect security from sonthwe-st storms for ve« 
lyin^; al the inerchftudise dock, but it is no longer neceasary to le 
the harbor and seek security elsewhere. The ftivorable resxilts »lM 
obtained with the portion of the breakwater now built are macbgra 
than anti<'ipat«<l, iind emphasize the advisability of speedily comp 
ing the icinainder of the projected piers. 

During the past winter the Dulutb and Iron Bange Bailroad pot 
thinl large ore dock, which it is now extending to about double 
capai'itv originally intended, and will stH>u {lut in two more, mat 
five ill all. 

T« |ii'<itert vcHHels at these new docks as much as possible, the i 
worK sliiinlil be done on the west iiier, and in order to give good b 
ter tlir I'ntiiv '.>IH) feet of it stiould be completed; this wonid costal 
$i;{lf.uui>. ami thin [uufnint foiild be profitjibly expended duriag 
year. 

The Iron Kunge is the only railroad using this harbor as a shipi 
point, and the business of the place has heretofore been entirely ' 
sidiary to the ii-ou-ote interests of the Vermillion Bange, but the 
inense quantities of excellent iron ore recently developed in the ; 
Hube Bange bid fair to be quite as important as the former and 
likely to seek an outlet through Agate Bay. Of iron ore alone tl 
were shipped from this port daring the season of 1891, 1,000,052 
tons. 

Acnte Buy (known locally ad Two HarWrs) is in thn iMiIloction diatrict ot 
llltb.Milili., which is algu the uearuat port ol' ontry. 'Hiu ncureat light-Lou 
eitiiiited uu tliu uiiat point, Agate Buy, Miiiui'sotii. 

Jbtlruvl uf approprialiuHs for improring harbor at Aijute Hag, MiHHeiota. 

By att of CinntccHS ; 

Approved Angnat 5, 1886 i'J2,~r 

Pftssed AllKust 11, IBHS 15, C* 

Approved Scptombvr 19, IS'JO lifi, 

Total IK>,5 



Aiiioiiiit oxpended under approved p 
Balance availahle July 1, ISB 



^fPENDIX n n — KEPORT OP CAITAIN FISK. 



itreqiiiriHltocomplttD the iin{irov«in><iit $181,708.00 

It required aniiuidly for iirmeivjog tuiil iiiointaf nhifC whnn 
tqveiuent is completed 2,000.1X1 

Muneg lift tew eni. 

Ijrl, lS91,halaoco nnojtppiKlwl - SStl,2H.Sl 

wSf>, l)i?J, niuonnt BXpuiiilcd iniivg liscal jttar 35, liSi.HO 

. 1. 1892. bulaDC« unexpended _ 1, 11B.41 

■nut uppropriftted by net opprovwl July 18, 1892 30,000.00 

"iml ikviiluble for BmaI year euduig Juni- M, 1893 3t. 1IS.4I 

jiioniit (eatimatnl) required fiir complistion of exJBtinK project 151, TOR. 00 

jnoantthatcanbeprofitahlyrmpoir'--"-"— ■' — ■-— « — f-ieSO.lHJW 133,0(10.00 
luhiuittBil in compliiiiiri' with rwii _ ., . i /iver wid 

latWr aela of ItHA) aiiri inifi. 



rnurfa airiPtu)! anil tb 



fc 


1 v-^^l. 


E«t1n»l«l 


i„™«. 


k1 


::;::;:;! H 


























Kj».»B '>, ,„„ 


;;:.■;.. U.K* 


B";.-™,.™ 


!; ,^ 










ft 







Bftifitt and ikiiimcnlt, 



Tmt. 






Tulal. 


S ::::: 


3M.2SS 

BM,K1S 
two, 053 


Tom, 

lu.gni 

8U,3B3 


r™.. 













EnHmaled milntoffirightnedTedamd whipped. {Kxclutive of ore.) 



. 212,(1110 
. 322.000 

. 246,000 



« uuw liiiQli'oftniiiBpurtiitiuu tratiiblisiuol hist jciir, 




■Dr *• ttttM- VB^rtk vT ifa» « 
VHeiteTHE>»a*kiAtea4rpA m Ute- tmni ^ mUs Vi 
TW JHetC ^*iA wf I «hii6 iW; vfl ■•> kB«« t» br rrfeaili all 



5» vwk his bcca Afac apaa ihe huiwr basa doing tte nor, 
»» ii»W4<MBn af nfcwlias tave bw htarJ. TUs b»n ^IknoM 1» 
IvBKt «luT« it >Aifc^ tb«^ aev dkjuuKl euLs: of Rkc- r>-iDT. jl< bonu 

f*rirlyal>I,^ !•«* ibaD a liilf doz^c trxc«ptji«i all vesyrfs lioond to 1 
i^UfM-riitttliij! heasftohAy^ coiD«inthn>ti<:hihei-auaI iiD<.]]>a&>^ thit 
ltjj« l/ai^id aud the new ehannel over to the \^>>i Sui>erior wha 
At 1<«»*I 4!75,UV0 coald be profitably eii«ri;d«i id tiiis Torkdimo] 

BICE POCi'T CHAXXEL. 

'I 111- iliiiltciuu fur tlK- new thaiiiLtl i-;isi oi Kir, I'l.im \iMsooninie 
Jii i-W.i, tun an Lin; fiiiidw aJloted werv uot siiflitit-iit [.. ^-iv,' ;i iia\-ij 
. liiii.iK'l HhokkIi, it was not carried bevuiid the ,.1.1 ,iiki.-. Whei 
iivK iiikI liiiilior !ut .,fl>j'JOwaBpa!;seil tlio»|K'(ii(i;: ..r tliisehaiine 
I'.iinid'ii'Jl "if hiicli ini[M(i*laiii:<' that aiiUmiitv was ;;i\t'ii by tlii' ^ 
hir V '.I Win t>. i-ouliiiiii; the iIiod^'iTiji ii|h>]i "tlic i,rmi ..r iiie 1S.<!I 
li{i< I Milli.iiil loNiiiK tin- liiiii' nei-essary to adv.Tlis,. i.n acw l(i,|s, 
\i\i iiijii'i'iiii'iil. Ill lliat fll'ciit waH entei-vd into willi W illiauis, UpUy 




APPENDIX H H-^EEPOKT OF CAPTAIN FISK. 2127 



1 forraur oouti'iictors. The act of Congress waa sigued on tlie 

B of St' !> tern tier, and dredging was begun on the -4th. When work 

bntped for the i^asou eufflcient had beeu done to permit the passage 

f Wge boats with carelul handling by tugs. 

\n examination of the channel made juiit before the breaking ap of 

ii f in Apii], 18S1, showed that it had held nuexpectedly well, but 

.t least width between 15-foot curves of only 45 feet. Work was 

:nedon the 28th of that month, as soon as the ice would permit, 

' ' haniiel carefiilly triniiiied nji and widened, until when the funds 

■ ■ <':diausted, May 2S, it had a least width of about 110 feet between 

"ii[ curves. An examination made during last winter after a full 

- i-'Hi's use of this ehatinel showed surprisingly good results, the least 

"ulili l>et«i-<-n I.J foot curves being iH) feet at two points while the 

»urs-i.- «i'lili rliiiiTiKliout Wfts 125 feet. The length of tliis ehannells 

Ifi mil.-. Tlic imsiiit pvojcet "■'"■' for a width in this channel of 200 

fwi. hut in my (>]iTni(iu it shoul ■ at leitet 400 feet to safely and con- 

M(ii.'utly aceommotlate thetraEB r pHseiug throngh it. Thecuatom- 

b.iii-c reeords show 1,010 arriva iiepartures of vessels from West 

.^iii"Tior during the season of aggregate registci-ed tonnage 

bfijig 3,064,40^, of which over! utuaedthischannel. Inaddi- 

ijoa it is aaedbynuftieroua tugs, witli large rafts of logs in tow, 

and the large ferryboats make in both directions. It is 

;it {'resent by far the most impi the htubor improvement 

■'< ihe head of the Iake«, and be profitably exxieuded 

n|Tiii it during the next fiseal yi 

liio estimated cost of the 20 1 was 4119,552, of which 

(iM.nut) has already been allottt i,552 to complete. 

HOETH-SHOBE CUAMNBX, BT. LOUIS BAY. 

With the ¥40,000 allotted for tliis channel from the appropriation 
made August 11, UW8, a channel of such width as could be made iit a 
sJaglecut of a dredge was dng between the deep water at Eiee Point aud 
Uiit at Grassy Point. Though it had a dejith of 14 feet throughout its 
itDgth. its width was not sufficient to render it safely practicable for 
vcispl;* of ordinary size. Important manufacturing industries are now 
''«-itoI at Grassy Point, aud the obliteration of this insignificant chan- 
11.1 by neglect wonld work a great injury to these important interests 
iiiid to the commerce deiwudent upon them. Aside from tliis, it is a 
iiatter of considerable economy to complete such channels as soon as 
possible, and thus avoid expensive redredging. The river and harbor 
wi of September I'J, 1800. gave |itiO,00(t for the continuation of this 
wrk. Dredging was begun under the new' contract May 28, 1801, and 
toiupleted on the 17th of October, when this channel had tliroughout 
»»idth of at least 100 feet, and the mills at West Duluth had begun ship- 
piiig lumber tlirong'h it. An examination made throngh the ice during 
Itot winter showed the channel to be holding well, as it wits in pructi- 
(ally the same condition as when work stopped. 

lie estimated cost of this channel is ?lfi3,000. There therefore re- 
Bains to be supplied $6.'{,000, which amount could be moat advantage- 
ly expended during the next year. 

PARK POINT CHANNEL. 

btiig has beea dtnie to this proposed cliauuoL 



21 28 RKl'UKT OF TUK CIUEF OK ENGINKKBB, L". f», AHMV. 
HARBOR LmES. 

tji^vcral iii»tuiice.s of illegal duiiipiiig af diedgingft in tLe harbor 
fell were reported to United States disti-iet attui-iioy for Uiime^ 
under the proviwoiis of tlie last river aud harbor bill. The off« 
plead guilty aud a noniiniil tiiio was imirased. 8iiict> tlint time no ot 
cases Gave bee.ii detected, 

KUBTHEE IMPEOVEMEMTS. 

Ill view of the increased depth adopted for the uewlock at Satilti 
Msirie and couuectiug hike channels, it becomes necessary to subni 
revised estimate of the cost of the approved project for this harbf 
order that the ueccssary depths may bo available here by the timei 
are iu the lower lake channels. 

The appi-oved project ealls for an aiicborag:^ ai'ca inside the es 
3,i:(i0 feet lonjr by l.iw feet wide; a channel east of Kice Point 200 
wide: a t.]i;iriiiel L!IIO feet wide along the north shore of St. JjOuiBl 
front Kice Puiu! U> the deep water of St. Lonis Kiver at Grassy P* 
and a ehauitel iiloug the J,li40 feet of Minnesota Point dock luie U 
est the canal. At present the aiioltorage area has a depth of 16 
throughout; the Kice Point channel is 100 feet wide- between Iff-: 
carves; the channel along the north tihore of St. Louis Bay is also 
feet wide between 15foot euiTCa; and nothing has been done (m 
Minnesota Point (Park Point) chaonel. , 

With 21 feet in running channeltt the harbor and itfl cliauaels sht 
have a depth of not less than 22 feet in order that deep laden vefwel 
starting and stopping shall not throw up troublesome lumps with t 
wheels, and on this basis the foilowiug amounts mast be tlredged, 

(1> Canal. 12,258 cubic v-inls, at IR ucLits M,8S 

(2; Hnrtiur or Hiicharngf area, 847,(il7 cubic varda, at 15 (wiiitf 137,1* 

(Zl Rice PoiDt cbnniiel (2(X)f»ot vide lH^tweDQ ^-foot onrves), iU,^l ciibio 

yards, atl5r*>iU 8%« 

(4) Minnesota (Park) Point cbiinusl (200fo«t nide between 22-foot cnrves), 

343,211 cabic yards, at 15 cent* .'. 61,« 

(5) St. Louis Barcbniiucl (200 feet wide between 33-foot corves), '^SU 

cubic yardi., at 18 cents - 136,4S 

3,405;iBl cubic yanla 383, g 

ContingeuciBS, 10 per cent - - St^X 

Total 42%' 

Bei]uired to complete project as it now exists (16-foot ilcpths J 234,1 

Increase 19T,« 

It wUl probably be necessary to dump most or all of the dred 
m!it<'rial in the lake, iind on acconnt of the long tow the St. Lotus 
work will cost more than the rest. 

Of the above items (1), the gi'eattsr part of (li), and (3)niaybec]ai 
as urgent, while (5) can probably be done gradually, as its nse for 
present is almost entirely by lumber vessels, which will not require 
maximum depth; (4) is not necessary at present-, although it may t 
a short time. 

The St. Irf)nis Kiver iibove Grassy Point luts a depth of over 10 
for several miles and 8 feet to FoihI dn Lav, Station. Four or five 
can be carried up to the font of the lapids, fnim which point up 
river hiis a fall of about Uim !t'it in less than 7 miles. The ntilizB 



3 



TOX H H — ^BEPOBT OP CAPTAIN FISK. 2129 

i water power lias aIreB<ly been commeDc^d, the first 
i at Thomson, being now about completed and piving a head 
t it appears that a deep navigable ehaimel to Fond da Lac 
J tlie sBCceaa of any euterpriseit in this locality, 
titnatetl cost of a channel 100 fe«t wide and 16 feet deep &om 
/Point to the deep pool near Fond du Lac is $Ilii,832.S8 (see 
ii« report of survey of 3t, Lonis Eiver herewith),' and 950,000 
il be profitably expended on it during next year. 

COSDITION OF WOBK. 

The ctma! piers are in fairly good condition, bat need extensive le- 
■irt, p«krticn]arly the euiierstructwre. The entire work will eventually 
noiie to be replaced with more darable material. 

The rilling depths in theportionaof the harbor dredged by the United 
■Mw are: 

Veui. 

BwwU. 17 

hike inner biuinoT harbor lA 

ll«liHitiel on nortli shore of StLoab 1 r W 

■ WW th»nii*l (Miat of Bid- Point 16 

lt4»iit»^ of reran) mm dnfioiu. 

Foi canal piers 135,000 

FftTilie Rice Point Cliaoii«l loaooo 

Fat KoTlh Shore Channel, 6t. Lonia 
Yat cnlftrKentent uid development < 
I'or St, Lcnit Biver abovn Grassj P 

TMal 313,000 

Thu work is in the collection district of Dnlnth, Hinn., -which is also the port of 
%U?. Tile nearefit li);1it-honse is Rititat«d on the onter end of the south pier of tlio 
^nlli Cuiid aail a ran);u light is located on the inner end of the aiuno pier. 

Ahtltafi oj upipriiprtnftoiu /or improcin^ Aorfcer at Z>uIutA, J/innfsufo. 

vf Mtt of Consress approved^ — 

March ^1S71 WO, 000.00 

JonelO, IST^ 50,000.00 

UtoUedfroni act pBHsed March3.1ST3 36,019.30 

l|^ let of Consreas approved — 

I J<uie23, lfr;4. 10,000.00 

IU«h 3,1875 35,000.00 

, Avast 14,1676 15,000.00 

JnielS, 1878 30,000.00 

HncbS, IKTfl 25,000,00 

June U, 1880 25,000.00 

March 3, 1891 40,000.00 

b act of CoDgrFW puaed Angost 2, 1882 45, 000, 00 

J srt of CoOKTMs approred — 

Jnl5 5, 18M 45,000,00 

Anput5, 1886 - .56,250.00 

I* act of Cotierriu passed Augnat II, 1888 80,000.00 

^Mtof Congreas approved Septcuiber 19, 1890 100,000.00 

TBUl 653,299.20 

ifaUowiBr Btatement flhowB the manner in which the appropriations 
d *^ ed. The amount expended under the different classes 

■^^pendix H H 11. 



T OP THE HRTEr OF BNOnTERI^ P. 8. 4S»»i 

ot - iS tlie cost uf souuflings, supeiinteudeuce, biiojiiDg^ 

001 ■ 

ToUl ■maiut ._ cuded lo June 30, 1899: 

Bmiiltwiitc. tUO, 

Cunnl picra, uk 77, 

Dredniug U7, 




July 1, 1892, balajice unejpai 

July 1, 1892, outsUndiug liabilitirs 

July 1, 1893, axaonnt ogvered by — 



. 131, Tli 



Amonnt availaUe for flsD&l year ending Jiiue 3( 

f Amount (eBlimnted) rnqiiired for completion of eiiatm^ proioct 133,0 
AuionntthatcanboprofitalilyeitpendeainfiBcalyeareniliugJnueSO, 18iH 313,^ 
harbor autB of 1»66 ai 



Abitract ofproponah rrceireiJ for coiutniclitiii u proteclio 
Dvlullt, Minn., opened June U, ISSS, at 


crib and repairt to ee 
D«Mk, ifiiiH. 


Mlpl 


W«. 


Nmiioiiiidi..W™.orbM<l<ir. 




For ri>ii«ira 

"■St- 


Tot 

'S:! 

10.: 

IK 




AiidrawJ Wenwll rnuidE,piUs Mltl 


MIMA 


2.1i-A'.0O 

B,«w.Da 






I 


518 

300 












Wllliiun fi. Uai'lH and Peto P.Ferguiwn, llululli, Minn . - 















s Oioeie trith the npproTi 



iPPENDIX U H BEPOET OF CAPTAIN 1 



CK-MMEKCIAL S 

Jrrtritli ttHd flearanivr of reWfJ* al DaJul^, Minn., for 1S90 and I 





ISM. 


- ISOl. 


; 


Arrt- 
■nla. 


^. 


tDtd. 


Ta==.g«. 


Arri- 


Clnir- 


TdUL 


TimiiaK*, 




■•s 


1,116 


307 


J,66<.tW) 


1.291 


1.301 


'S 














l.V» 


I. aw 


2,531 


a.j<u,s5i 


l.M 






r^ 






' 





. JSSO a 


Hli WSi. 




Y-r: 


Te«»l>. 


T™-..se. 


At( 

mm 




JS 


a, 74a as* 














m 


sCT.in 






■ 



JXiicipaJ (lomnific rommoditiM ranted and skipped by lake, . 



Ton*. 

f.Cial 778,382 

rUme sud cement 45,994 

UmeaodbiiiMinf stiine.. 33,S13 

Skit 21,741 

Oenw*! meicbondlse 210, 174 



T«Ul 1,150,203 



Oats and mm 

Lanibor 

QcdcibI meroliHii(li>w 









Y«r. 


C«l- 


Floar. 


Tew, C«.]. 


— 




mooo 

738,000 
1.041,000 


91. 8M 

iISToJ 
m:o3B 


188ft 1.435,000 

IM* , 1.043,0110 


m.s> 








■"" i ™" 













Tile Storage oapacity of Duliilh elevator BjBtem is 21,300,000 buBhela, iind thnt of 
Shilntb elevators prupor 13.650,000 busholB, The folluwing tuble girea tlm mceipta 
and ^ipnients of wheat for tw«ntj--oDe yeiirs. 



T«. 


E«.ipM. 


SblpmcsU. 


ToUl. 1 


Tear. 


KeceLpU. 


Sl,ip^,eot.. 


ToUL 


Z^gD«. 


1.I44.M2 

ualwo 

«1,W» 

*^ 


,,sri« 


Iteu 

2,202,611 1 

9*7 tm 

K3 2.17 
844 1W7 

1 0119 64- 

7u8.jr 

378 Ml 
1«.,BS1 


IdT- 


54 002 

I3B17 

r 224 
W444 

27 048 
U7D3 


T-inu. 
43. MO 

4i;2B3 

47,405 
M,»l 

Id, US 


"ss 




s 

42 

34e 

137 
90 


1m 

63J 

«T 
OM 




















• *«■ 


ai 



mt o! wLeat at thu liesU or Ui« Ulu (IhilulU tni Sopatior oo 



■■IP 



L r. &. .uanr. 



I^HOT^^B** 










^m ^^x :«a<s 



g^ 



HH4. 

IMIVOVmCTT or nASSr^K AT-J-ptKIoR BAT 1N1» sT. LWI5 BAT, WIS- 

TiMi ttal(ir»l f(ia»nel «fflo«ting SopeniT Bjy *itU Lakr Superior is 
«l Um- •/niili^mi <-itr>-mjt> nf Saperiur B».v. It wV onginall.volxjtnicMd 
hy -liiriKij: !«»»•. niili K^-an-el; 9 fret of water ovvr them, to renwdy 
Witli'li lJi>-''iri/j'iin.,rHTi|M-nw.prerion9 tolSt^lii*t iiijcl«$i>iue dtteiupts 
Ul (»ti!» "<.»k, »Iii.;li WM i^nbseqnenlly takfii in liaiid by Uie rnit««l 
MhilcHHfxl tiH- Imi.rovcniMitscwutiniiMl uutU tlif i.tfrsha^nsaohcdau 

i««Kt<'KHr*i icriKrii .,r5,eso aet. 
Wlitsu Uic Jiu|ir<>vvjueiit was coBuieiiced 12 leet d«ptii in tlie chaimel 



APPENDIX 11 H — ItEPOfVr OK CAVTAn ITBK. 2133 

n* motcftwi Wflld a nfr tP meet tiie reqiiireiaeBts of the largest reiwelM. 
Ehis df^ith bas been iiusreMed and maintained far some tim« at 17 i^t, 
■nd at BO diatantdiqr will hove to be stUI ftirther increased to 22 feet. 
the oib ^en ivldeb define Ods cbannel are in most part l>adly cou- 
dknai m itlie preamt depffi of 17 feet, they liaving been intended 
ari^sally ftrnot over 12 feet A ftart^er increase in the deptU of ttie 
duMinel maypoB^blymalEe it necessary to replace them withbetter- 
pn^NMtiooea stmctoreB. 

In the meantime the soperatmohLres -will bitre to be exteusively re- 
paired. In &c^ extensive repairs are urgently needed now, but the 
•15,000 held in reserve for this piupose is not safely safficient to meet 
lliedanukgea liable to result fi*om a single severe storm. It is in reality 
n emergeneir ftind, and nntU something more is in sight can not be 
pn^ierlyiuedin making general repairs. It isintheinterestof economy 
aa matters stand at present to postpone all general repairs to the latest 
Boment pending the consideration of the subject of reconstrncUon, but 
tt ii hoped that the greater portion of the present snbstmctnre cribs 
laa be retained. In any event it vill be necessary to maintain a re- 
Kcve fttnd fer repairs of all kinds until t^e general repairs are com- 
pleted. At present this should not be less than tl5,000. 
'-' The ahore on the Wisconsin side is advancing rapidly, and soon the 
widwhidi drifts arooud the end of the Wisconsin pier will necesfd- 
: tate the extension of this pier. If this extension is to provide ibr 22 
feet d^th it will cost 930,600. 

CHANNEL IN SCPERIOB BAT, 

The channel in Superior Bay has uoitber the ilireiitiioss imr width to 

permit vessels to resich Connor Point sjifWy without the ussistam-t; nf -a 

tag or local pilot, thnufjli its condition has been vastly iinpiiiM'd in tlic 

. I«8tfew years. It"* present condition is koo<1, bnt vessels biiiiiiil for 

Wert Superior will not use it so long i& the shorter and much easier 

i tOQte through Dulnth Caual is in good condition. It is used consider- 

' »blj, however, by rafts, and should not be allowed to deteriorate. 

In order that vessels may navigate this channel iit all tiniea safely it 

« egsential tiiat it be widened and straightened oon-sideiably. 

During the next year |5(t,000 could be Mivantageously expended in 
Mntinnatiou of this work. 

QUEBEC DOCK CHANXEI.. 

So work was done on this channel during (he year. 

THE NEMAD.H BIVKR. 

The commerce on the Jteniadji River is increasing, owing to the loca- 
tion upon its banks of sawmills and brickkilns which depeiul upon the 
fwater transportation it affords to get their pro<lucts to market. 

The bar at its mouth is a serionu obsti'uction and was dredged dur- 
ing last year, but will probably require redredgiug each year after the 
s^ng floods to maintain a serviceable cbannel ; tliis will require about 
|i5,000 annaally. 

CHANNEL ALONG TTTSCONSIN DOCK LINE, ST. LOITS BAT, 

The pMJected channel between Connor Point and Grassy Point along 
the West Saperlor dock line will be about 12,600 teet in length; of this 



-►.. » ■ -• :M-*! it-n.-i ii'i-'-r.-iL ri'i- rue new look a 

I ., -.'t. : ::^ ;,ii- iiUillhi^. ■'■ [> n eves. Sill* V tO SI 

^^ ^-'4: .• . "t •■< 'i i»^ UMT') ♦mI |.iL"i»M.T tV»r this ha 



... ■**^>*;." .»i'i:is luf.' ^e .i'.*ii!;ii.'le here as soon 



t 
I 



»rx.''»i*»l^" ■'n«^"'ieiL :i»r maintaining j 
-..— i!^ »frv:-— .1 iii'ii 1 ■ annuel ^31 X) teetw: 
T.. ..'ii ift" vui? Pull :"ie«*nn:y piistNemad 




s: 




:^' 



i^i 



■«t Hf l * B 5 pcwtwrt 1341 






b«r.«iW.*«r. »ak,>.- •«,»«, 









Other gnin tfiM i 

Flour lASeO; 

Wool LOW I Total. 

Koceipto: 

C«l 

Sng«r 

G«n«ral merchuidiae 

Total 

Total receipt* Bud tbipiDeDta 



APPENDIX H H — REfORT Of t'AITAlN FI6K. 2137 

Cvmjiamlira tiatmtemt it/ rtvoiyU Ami tAJfiniriits /«r S ymr*. 











t-». 


T-U. 




V™»ta. 


Tnn- 


Is 

Mi 




m 

4113 


119. B9 l(W8 


1.2M 

















H H s. 
ISIPROVEMEST OF MISTfESOTA POINT, AT SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN, 

Tbe approved projent for this improvement cxlnBisted in building 
abunt 1,(KI0 feet of sivnd fence near the old li^ht -hoase on the southern 
titrerjiity of the point to catch the drifting sand and prevent itt* blow- 
ing over into the Superior Channel, which is very close to the shore of 
the [loiiit in this vicinity, and about 200 feet at a low and iianow |)art 
if IW {loint, known as "The Openingv" about 'J milen north of tbe old 
tKtrance, to form a haiik which would prevent the lake from rutliiig 
[iirmifrh into the bay during storms. 

The fences were built iicoording to the plans publislied in llonse Kx. 
Roi\ No. 51, Fifly-flrst Congress, lirst session. 

Work was begun by tbe contractors shortly before the oiieniog of 
iiavifpition and complete*! during the season of 1H91. 

TbiBwotk it in the colt^ctino iliHtrirt of Dnlath, Minn. Tlio nearest li^lit-lioii-icia 
■hMled on the outer enU ut north pier of the Snperior entry. 

Money statement. 

Jnlc 1.1891. balance nuezpended $308.41 

Jnu'f 311, l^J. iimoaDt expended (luring liseal year Sii.'I!) 

Jol]' 1,1892, Valance miexyeniled 40.92 

* *■ H H 6. 

IMPROVEMENT OF HARIloR AT ASHLANl). WISCONSIN. 

The southern end of Chequamegon Bay fonns the harbor of Ashland, 
ind as the length of the bay is considerable it was necessary to pro- 
*ct the wharves from the waves to enable vessels to use them at all 
ameH. The approved project is for tl* eonstmction of a pile, slab, and 
■ock breakwater 8,0(K) feet long, dredging a channel of the necessary 
leptb along the dock line, and closing the breach in Cheqnamegon 
Point with a bnish and stone dike. 

The breakwater consists of three rows of piling filled in with slabs 
irhich iU'e held in plaoi- by large rock ballawt, Thci coustractioii seems 
lomewbat light, considering the ice in the bay, but bus so far answered 



i R IP THE CiriEP OP ENQINEF.BS, U. S. JlRVT. 

ttie piirpos" 'ntl^', with tiie great rc'Coniiin*iKl»( ion that it i« 

cJieap, 0O81 , uer Irtat »ea»oir» contract only t'JoAtH iiw nuiuing; 

at) agniiiftt nmmt 1140 pw toot for the usual lorm of crib breaker 
coDstnicted in abbut tho same duptli of water. 

In 188» a length of 4,650 feet was built, of wbi<di 50 feet was m 
quently carried away. Tliider laet season's wiutract 1,080 feeti 
added to it ; its total Icnf^th now 5.HM) teet, and the breach in Cba 
me{^n Point vua i-IomkI by a bniHli and stone dike 4,200 feet long., 
addition to the new work icpairti to the old jtortion were luadetO) 
amonntof •SJSS. These were rendered necessary by the »ettla 
of the slab filling and the shifting of considerable of the ballast, iri 
was apparently of too small size. 

The breakwater is still of insofficient length to give protection to 
tho wharves of the city, but its ioQuence in diminishing the torbnlei 
of tbi) waters of the harbor i* -"-"--"- apparent. To bniid tbi] 
tnaining 2,320 fi-ot of the bre itimated at present contzl 

prices, will cost $94,000, indn™ )le necessary repairs andtt 

tingencies. 

A harbor line has been e^t ' the city, but there is ii4t 

uniformity of depth along it. channel 200 feet wide aaii 

feet deep along thi!> dock lino t- lO cubic yards of material 4 

have to be excavated. This v im» 3,500, provided no rock is^ 
countered. 

In ortler to give access to the w'l" for vessels drawing the 

depth that the new lock at Sanit S ie is expected to give, a cl 

nel not less than 'MX) feet wid^, depth of 22 feet, should 

dredged along the dock lino by the ^i he new lock is completed,r 
to that end work should be begun soun. 

This chaunel will rexjuire the removal of 903,497 cubic yards ot- 
tertal, and at 18 cents per yard would cost Slti2,G29,46; adding 18 
cent for contingenL-ies mnkes the total estimated cost of this 
$178,892.40. 

The principal sliipmenta from Ashland are iron ore and lumber. 

There is an iron furnace and general machine shop in operation 
it is presumed that the other enterprises whicli are expected to 1( 
here will materially increase the shipments of maniifactui'ed articles 
general merchandise. 

There has been expended during the year just closed $59,< 
and the total amount expended under approved project to date 
$137,138.07. 

KBCOM MKSDATIONS. 

For2,320feet. pxt/'iminn to the brcakwaUT '^^^ 

FoT repairs aiul coDtingeaeiee M,OB 

For dredging "" 



theportof entrv; neorest light-hon 
ofcWir--- 




Tliis work it 
ortofent . , 
lOiiBBmegou Bay. 

Abs&acl of appioprialioiit for improtiug haibor al Ashland, Wis. 

»)■ att of Conin-pssapprov.icl August -S 1886 J22,500 

Uy net of Coiigross of August 11, 1888 60, 000 

l!,v act of Congress approved Septembor I!*, \v\W 60,000 

Total 142,5pB 



DIX H H KEl'iJlir ur CAl'TAl.N FISK. 2139 

JToMir itatewient. 

LtBBUJhmtmnaauamxpmami ^ $64, 763.30 

il^Un, anemit B^Mded dning flMwl ymr 69,40a8T 

I, UO^ b»bDW BMspended 6,361.33 

■A BVprapKiMtod bj Ht ■pprored Jnlr 1% 189a 4I^0C».00 

■A anflaUeflwIlHalTMr ending Judo 90, 1893 BO.SSLSS 

HvA f— llwhiil) itiiiiitiiiil fi>T«ODplstionof exlatiiiicprojtH.'I 142,500.00 

Htta*tk^MabeproiublT«xp«iiidadfnflKwl7eaTen<rniKJtuie3(^lKU 14^500.00 
npuMic* wiUmquinntnita ofaectuHM^of lirar and 



comatKciAL BTATuenca. 
JrrtoaJa mmi sImi-mm* itf teutiU at AMand, Wi»., far liro yeora. 



,„ 


Knmtier. 


T»na.C^ 


■ 
















m 








FrXmcipal arlieJe' of mj 


orl and import f»y tSOt. 
liuportH : 

Sail....!."'.!!!'."!!!!!!'.!! 

Firobrirk, lir.' i:l,.y 

Total 

Total receipts unci Hhijiiii«iita . 
1 and ahipniiuli for fire j.iim. 


560,480 




r StoiM.. bi.n.liag 938, 420 

Lumber 401,904 

Uth 9,750 

\ Sbinglefl 2, DOO 


8,254 
'326 


571,283 


ToUl 2,646,^9 

Vimparatirc alalfment of rccrip 


3,217,641 

1,401,454 
1,357,473 








2,816,924 




Arriralt inJ vtearauai of retiria fur Jire yiam. 














:::: 'im 


m :::::;:::::::::: 4:099 









HH 7. 
lUPROTEUENT OF HARBOR AT ONTONAGON, MICHIGAN. 

In 1887 tlie Ontonagon River, which forniH tlie harbor, had fairly 
Imp mter in i^ b^itsmoaUi wad obstructed by a bar which had but 



2140 RKTORT OF TnT. CHTEF OF ENOPiEEIW, C. S. ABMT. 

7 ff*t depth over it. Thepmjoct adopted then forth* harbor ito 
wan tn build parallrl pi«r« prctiecting into the lake on either ddei 
river's moath. Ibf expectation being that the ciirwut of the rirar: 
have BnflicipDt force to maintaia a depth between the piers of 1 
ur roorc. This ex|teclation has not been fully realized, altbooi 
pieini are ncurly of the iHwtposed leugth, the e^^ pier being 3^ 
in length and the west pier 2,675 fwt. 

It appears tbiit the river during the tiesbets m heavily charged 
sAatU and the bar at the entrance forms a^ fiutt as the pteis m 
tended. The channel which the river is able to maintain thraoi 
bar is shifting and uncertain. 

UntesH the piers can be speedily extended into de^^p water, t 
owing to the gradual &Iope of the lake bottom and consequent 
expense, is hardly practicable, it does not appear advisable to 
ibe pier work any farther at present. The improvement of ibe li 
can probably be more economically pnrsued by tlredging a ch 
tbronj;h tbe bar each year. 

The portion of the piers composed of piling is very nmch da 
and needs replacing. This will cost tI6,60(). The dredging wil 
about <10.0(I0 Honually. 

Tbe remaining 150 fe*t of eop^rsCmctore on the west pier wai 
pleted in August last nnd^ the contract in progress at tbe date 
last aunnal report. 

The amount expende<l daring the year was #9,585.39. 

The total cost of the improvement to June 30, 1891, iras $302,1 

As a result of the impi-uvement there was a channel with leastl 
of 16 feet, but it is likely to shoal again. j 

This wutIc is in the njllm^ion ilistriot of Superior, Mich, ; nearest port oC 
Marqnetle, Mich. A. litfht in •hown ou the ant«ir end of tht< weat pier at OnM 

Abalrofl o/ appropriaiioai for improTia} barber at Onlonagow, IBA, ■ 

By »rt i>l* CoticfresB — M 

Apiirovoil March 2, 1SG7 M 

Approved Jaly 7, 1870 j 

Approved Jnue 23. 1871 - ..'I 

Approved HnrchS, 1875 i 

Apjirovod August H, 1876 , 

Approved Jane 18,1878 ' 

Approved Mart-h ^ 1879 - - 

Approved Jane U, 1880 

Approved March 3, 1881 , 

Puaed AnguBt 3, 1882 - 

Approved Jnlv 5, 1884 ' 

Approved August S, 1886 

Piuwed Aiigiietll. 1888 

Approved September 19, 1890 

Total , I 

KXI'ENDlTL'ltES. 

odote $306, 

1, 

E«tlinAl4>iI amount required aDunnlly for preai'rviu;; uikI in^iiuiiiining 

(dmlging) 10, 

Kstluiated amannt reqnired for repairing piers 15, 




AFPENDIX H U — KEi'uKI' Or CAPTAIN HSK 

Money statement. 

Litdanoe nnexpended * 

V, amoont expQ!id«l diuiag fiscKl jeur 

Itifi, balance nuexpeniled 

kppcoptiated by ai't appruvcd July 13, 18S3 

srailable for fiscal jear eudiag Jime 30, 1893 

it (estiinaUd) Toquiied fur compledoD of exiHtiUK project 

it that can be pruD tabty expended ia lisuitt year en^ng June 30, 1 
U*A in compliance with requiremeuU of sectionB 2 of river 
lu acts of laee and 1S67. 



COUMEHCIAL STATISTICS, ONTOSAOOM, 



Airivali anil etrarante* of cetaeU, 



Prineipal articles o/ mport and impurt. 



ArtiolM. 


™. 


lasa. 




lis 


■-^^ 


























47 












































3,277 


a.79S 







H H8. 

niPBOVEMENT OF EAGLE HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

harbor was improved in order to form one of the harbors of ref- 
' this Bbore of Lake Superior, the entrance to the email bay 

aac« nitezpended July 1, 1S91, as shown in Annual Report for 1891, is 
he diffennoo, •53.87, ia amonnt credited to this appropriutioii on account 
B by Hat .Charlea E. L. B. Davio, Corpg of Eugineers, U. 3. Army, aa per 
tamoi T : Asditoc'a (MBce, Norembw 12, 1691. 



• • ■ 



. • •- « 



■ ■• if "• * 

.. • p '• ' 

-.-••lis* 

" a. 

v; ■ -=•' 






» 



\ 



XL, 



\! 



^ % 



X* 



vv,- 



I'TAIN t'I6K. 



•214:) 



o for tlie conmiencenieiit of this extension in the river 
f August 11, 1888. 

idw tliia approprintiriji waB for 180 feet extension of 

nit after getting all the cinbankmeut and cribs in place ■ 

rere carried awAy by a severe storm, leaving ae the 

JfMoson'a work 180 feet of emtiankmeut niid one crib 60 

Considerable damage was also done to the remainder 

i gpec'tdation as to the integrity of tlie riprap fonnda- 

lation made through the ifc, and since, proves that it 

Fromthisit appearsthat where there are no detlect- 

TQctionareaebing toorabove thesurfaceof the water 

B exerted by the waves at 14 feet depth, 

B breakwater ie in an exposed place, and it is nae- 

ry on work upon it during the stormy seasons of 

not, however, appear to be any necessity for alter- 

ustntctioD materially, for where the cribs and super- 

led the pier is safficientJy strong. As a precantiou 

ing, however, the cribs should be decked over with 

<n as filled with rock, as otherwise the rock is Unble 

/ the waves and the stability of the crib destroyed. 

dose in those cases hke Marquette, where the cribs 

i ssbstautial riprap foundation, aa there would be but 

" e ballast to escape, and even if some did escape the 

lid not be affected, and therefore the stability of the 

e would be preserved, 

' 1 progress at date of last annual report was for 120 

grk uid superstriR-tiire on the 120 feet of embankment, 

e cribs were taken by the storm, and 120 feet of entirely 

kOkmeatj cribs, and superstructure, making a total ex- 

r of 240 feet. The remaining 700 feet of extension 

[, and the estimated cost at last contract prices is 

^ Oicies, etc., »9,800; a total of $107,800. In addition, 

8 than tl5,000 will be required for repairs to old work 

dof construction. 

are of the portion of the breakwater commenced in 
i in 1875 has been extensively repaired, but is never- 
B secure ih is to be desired. Much of the timber has already 
BKveral years longer than the nsual life of timber in this 
"le time is short, if it has not ah-eady anived, when tliis 
est be repla(;e(l by more permanent material. 
r& concrete superstructure was prepared, and was ap- 
y 27, 1890. This super.'itructure is estimated to cost 
f which sum 8100,000 could be expended judiciously in 

r lines were established by the honorable Secretary of War in 
)0, and a reconsideration of the subject occurred upon the 
Ittiie Dalnth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway Company. 
tioD of the honorable Secretary of War upon this new mo- 
1 company extended the ore dock, as prayed for in the 
k' not advised as to the final action upon the railroad com- 
jj bat no cum]>laiots tirim interested citizens of Mar 
|[avners or masters of vessels visiting this port have so 
I regarding those extensions beyond the harbor lines, 




"■■iiai.M" 




iAiM»wir*-llaul»4)na«lni4bcMn>le«Mnarcia(iBcpri>}<«i 375, HK 
ANwmHlUiat<Mik-Mo<It«MTripe»df.iIinfanlfcuMi^Jiiw»,l(Bt 333, MK 
NntMHlHwl In «>.M»[iwn» miti, nriaiioacaM atitttiamM 3 of nro ud 
Mwhor*rla<iC M»Mid isn. 



1 



■-■«, »l*B((lErTT. MICfilGAX. 







2Vi5 



Importe: - toh. 

C«tl 14fLM0 

UmMtoue 1.057- 

Buidatona 2,8G7 

Lombu 3,4TC 

Briok J^OBT 

G«oeral nwiabandiM 90^000 



178,036 




lluB* fasva boon no n 



r linw of tranqtortation MteblUwd. 



H H lo. 

lOVKMF.NT or HARBOR OK BEFUGE AT GRAND MARAIf!. MIUHIOAS. 

The barbor of Grand Maraiu, Mitibigan, wan only HOx^aHible for vessels 
iwing lesa than 9 feet. Oni;e wiMiiQ the bay, there is ample depth to 
itthe largest vessels. As a harbor of refuge it is of preHciug impor- 
M to the ahipping uavigating the Lahes in this viciuity, as the niauy 
leki in this iieighborhoo<l bear witness. 

Ihe project for the iinprovetnent of this harlwr was adopted in IRSI, 

~^ haa for its object the creation of a safe entrance into the bay for 

Nbofthe largest size. Tbe entrance chitiinel ii^ to be nbont 300 

liu width, protected by crib piers on eitlier side. Thu west pier it* 

r ],40S feet long, incIudlDg IW) feet of pile dike, and the east pier is 

feet long, including 100 feet of pile dike. 

A channd 150 feet wide and 17 feet deep was dredged out bet'.veeii 

~ piers in ISSy. As the aaud was piled up between the |>ierH nt tlm 

■rendfi to the height of the superstructures, it was not Knp|H)i:ed 

i the dredged channel wonld remain open, hut it was believed liiat 

k the waves and currents might level tbe sand belweeu the piere 

ohhterate tbe channel uo accessions of sand were anticipated. An 

nination was uiadeiu Juno, 1800, and, compared with the survey 

Bade ill ISStS, showed cousirlerable change. Tlie sand had been leveled 

Bid distributed over a rather larger area than was uxpwted, and, al- 

lOBgh no tu:c«Bsion of sand appears to have occnrred, the diaracter i»f 

be bar and the condition of the shore at the inner ends of the piiM-s 

nmld indicate that a large qoantity of sand had been washed into tbe 

buinel and afterwards washed oat. 

■NO 92 ISH 



■«f 




•«»L ir.ii TOra 




iii-r> T-*rp JbiMu^ "ill? -SRsaHni; 



Tvssck iiKkm^ si 
Lpirm;; -ihtr-cr^cxn^ ^l^ *aa] iMBOMMiiLaii'kikVTii^c lnwn left i 

T -» Mtm^iitH-.^ -lati^ -r^rr Mrtirrunx w ^a* ip«»t«i£ pcypK-c -Iff 

r>!r.:4. . •.. •^ iti'i^i '} Tie ■i--?'^: iait •Wijt-c ^ ^i^ iftksc pcff. 1 

• f - ! ;.'-!: j-^i * ri-l Z r >-- -f-'I ii;r ":#* o.1%^rK>:«L ' .'ir Trfll pre 

* „ . i/* .'.•^•. : ... iV- Li?:»»: I" 2 -■"^^" "' - "*'i "*- *3-'^ «'*<'*^:itiiil. 

;vskA- ;- * ••*•;' --' :•-• ■* ^ *^- - --■ »^ t''.*rn* >«ri « >;ii*i»rleut i 
f.f -r.i.'f-: ,;. -;.- b..ir ".-=-1 V k» i • I."!!* •'. fc> ':Ii•^ v»;>>*:tr> eriia^rii in 
'i :''.\^:**.;t:A I *■■—-'-£ 'liL* :t ~- ill L ~v' '.•e- I»>c^ ir^rr •.'bcaiQiaj: a 
i'/ftoie ' r;;*r*r.':l :r.*o ir '>^f..r*=- •■ - i.irN-r "Vi-cM c-Ljkia. •■^iit^r ilistiiK 

A ,'»>f#pT.A?''^ .' 3 

4 //* tf tu. i of afffffOffftnt io0Jt for i mj> .-.-••*. -; ':.•»*. -.-■-' r j- »-"« - -► - ? ' r r aa i . Vo r iii*. J 

A j»f.;o,«-r| ./i.ri': W. l"^* ^ 

A j'f»r'»/"i M*r/ h .'{, 1 '•''I 

!';».■<*/) AhjCixj 2. I''>'J 

Apj»ro*' H Jul , .*f, l**.-^! 

A j»(ii'f'. ''^1 An/n-f ."i. M^^'i 

(H A»i(cn«^MI, !''>''< */. 

Ap|nov«'/| H«'|it« mil' r !'♦, 1^'» ' 



'I' 



iotiil 



r 




APPENDIX H H — REl'OET OF CATrAlS FI3K. 2147 

Money itUUemcnt. 

lantMMMoiHi^nidttZ^....... .;..„........' «ti(^^e9.!» 

9, lliwl. ■■ I ■ I ji II ml II it iliiilii HiiiiiI Jim 45, 737. X 

, UB% iMlwwa mwDeaded 4,64LM 

I, ins, bklMiw ■valUble ^ 4,622.Ti 

nt appropitotad by M>t ■pprored July 19, IMS 30,000.00 

jit AralUbla fcr flaoal rMW •ndlns JiiD« 8(^ 1893 81,0I3>74 

Mont (Mtbnatod) raqnlnd for oompletlon of axiatine project 1V», 790. 00 

MrttlMteaab«pnftUblTmpend«ainflacal7eH-eii(liaKJiiiui30,1804 100^000. 00 
bMitWd in MtmpllMicA with reqoimnMita of sMtioiu 2 of livw uid 
ivbor Mb of 18M and 1867. 



COMMKRCUL STATISTICS. 
ArriraU a*i 6Uarmtem ffVMuUat Grtmd MaraU, Mieh, 





Vm«],. 


. .^. .. .._ 


>;uD>lH'r.'-|'uDnt.Ee. 


■Ht 












m w.m 





Principal articlet of erpnrl aud import. 



Im porta — Cou t i n ii e 
Coal 

(Sencritl niurrli: 
MiaculUncoMH 



Total 1,3D6 



R*e^pU and thipmenli for tire yean. 



be li&luiico ooexpended Jnly 1, 18!)1, lu slionn in Aiuiiuil ){d|«ivI I'nr 1h.')1, is 
41.15. Tbe (lifTereDCA, (28.06. is amottnt creilited to tliix iivi>rupi'i;iti(<u iiu uo- 
I of fuel drawn 1lyH^J. Cbariea G. Ij. B,Dayi», Corps of EiiKiuucm. U. S, Army, 
rtraiuferMttl«nMBt&ioiii Third Auditor's OIHoe, Xovember 12, 1891. 



IX. ir n — nt:n.)t;r i.k .-m'Tain i-'iSK. 2149 

iy tJiesv interests are beiiiR ostablialied .iIotih St. Loafs Bay 
Fter t4i Fou(i (lA LtiL-, and it is piobalile tUat Inug before any con- 
"b itroffT'^s c-ftu be made towards inipi-oviog the channels of ap- 
»y water tlie necessity for tli«in will lie presaiuy, 
f opinion it is not too early t« miiku the Burvt-ys and examina- 
nuireil for the preparation of a i^enwrul project for improving St. 
■ " r upon a scale adequate to meet the pifispecfciTe demands of 

jfH.e that St. Louis River, from Grassy Point, in St. LoniB Bay, 
iBotu, to Fond dii Lac, is worthy of improvement by the General 
mmt'ut. iinil I rfnuiimccid that the witiiin jirojeft for its snrvey ' 

' — "-a be approved. 

O. M. PoB, 
OoIoimI, Oorva of Engineert, 
Engineer, Sorikwest Divinoft. 



B cor «T. hova lakd ihpbovxmxht courAKT of dulutr, hmkesota. 

DULDTH, HiKy., Septatber tS, ISBO. 
SSib; In th« mftttv of % pnlimlnaiy anrTej of the St. Lonia BiTsr from 



t pnlimlnaiy a 

r Frint to Fond da lae, ana 41ie demuu_ __ , 

■(ofthaBame, it inajr be of uaistuica to TOO to know something of tho in- 
ia anS pnipoaea of the land companiea who are now engat[ed In developing 
nparuw on eald lirer. 



% Ij«>nU Land Company, which I repTesent, owns 2,600 aores on the WiMon- 
le, comprising sectionB U, 15, 22, and 23, and lota in front of said spi'tiuns on 
iver in townuiip 48 iiortb, I'unge 15 west. Dougliix Cuuiity, nlHiut 2\ miles 



Ihe St. Louis w.itcrpower. Onr capiUl stock is f 1,000,000, ?(>IK),(K)0 ufw 
«d in tiiese lanils. Tiia balanca of the stuck is lo be sulil and tin- r»nu <jii> 
1 therefor used fi)i the duvotopiug of the same. We buve iiln-ady snld 250,0(10 
old tlie thiLince reiuly for sale when we neeil the mouuy. The Ci.ijh recoivi'd 
this stork and also fniin the sale of lots, su fur ns limy be ucctrHsiiry, will be 
br becurint; uianiifartiiriiig plants, riiilroads, improving imr wiitor Imul, and 
sneral developing of our town site. The Duluth nnil Southern Unilrii.'ul, n. new 

will have its terraiwils. p;ir slii)))s, etc., npoii our town site, and will run iu a 
erlj direction, intersoilin}; the Xurtlieni Fni-ilii', the Giciit Nortbrrn, tliu Soo, 
I nimiber of otiiEi roads ill its course to Minni'iiiiolis and Ht. Paul, Ri'd Wing, 
ome miles further south. 

rioeers have nheady cuuimenred the survey of this road, and over 17 miles nre 
It nnder contract to be built within this year. Tiic Northern Pnoilic is also 
yinf! II ronte to reach the river at this point. From tliis point to St. I'aiil will 
ne 'iO miles shorter than any other roud now connecting St. Paul with tlic 
of the lakes. The effect of coii);re)i;atiuf[ tlioHO dilferent systemit of roads at 
wint miiBt of necessity establish » lai'tre system of coal docks, grain elevators, 
Bg millx, et^. 

have already secured a flouring mill with a capacity of ham 6,000 to 7,000 
la ■ ilay. that nill c:uiiitiii-iice putting its foniidalions in within the next ten or 
n days. AIho soiue six ur seven mitnufactiiriiig plants, encli of whicli i.t a licavy 
it-pr>"luoer. We purjioHe contiuning to indui-e nianufucturinK phmtH loestali- 
hein^i-lves n]ioij «ur towu-sito, iiud«x]>cct to cHtahliithheroa large mtiuufnctnr- 
Jwn ill II vi-ry lirief time. The cliief reiisui) for locating inannfiictiirips at thin 

li on iicconiit of il.s nearness to tho fulls of the St. Louis River, with its iilmost 
1*0*1 ill le Kiiiiply of power. A company has ulre.tily biren foniiod , with neapltnl 
,600,000, to purchase tiiis water iiowerof .lay (^ook anil hin ossnelatRS and luime- 
ly ciiminen'o dev<']o|iiug the same by a series of dums that will profliicciil lenst 
) horsepower. This power will bo used to generate vlectrielty, wllicll will bo 
mitted (o tlie siauiiraeluring plants, nliich ai'c liHiatod snlUcicnlly ncax to i-en- 
tfeasil'lc. The eUeet ul' the development of this water power niiifltneoessiirily 
ebnihliiig of large iiiaiiiifactnriiig iiuliTstrics aloug the line of the navigalds 
MS of the river, all of which must of nectissity lie very much handicapped 
Oey can ohtain the heneflt of hike uavigutiuii. 

laure detailed statement of our gilans will be of assistance to yon I ehall be 
■■I to lender it at yonr sungcHtiou, 

Very trnly, A. C, One, 

General Manager, St. LoaitLatii and IntproceMenl Conpang. 
LJamxs B. ttuarv. 







i 

« TXi^vs*:!* of JmlgiDK wrf iwj 
i-r^-^T IViitt h> Fond dn Lm. 

.■•<3-.r4S)R' lis«'v ornniiad mC 
' luv and Rirrr. and mU (rf nUt 
,-^^vrmT indn«tiy to be bnllt >■ ' 
v'oiriis Tanit in ii«<'riona U and. 

^ :.>^n»hip 4ti. raiifre 15, St 






Dtbe 



.i.TuVxsi i>iv>»l«-w;>v ln.ir :-■ MllaiiJiki-e.'lVtri'it, and 
i'~.s. iV .'tlirt Un.i -.j-.vj.u'sriffrrivd toaretbe 

ivM.'h bM J.tVV j.-rr«.vt' lar..! .-.i <ofti.>uAl>. 3. 4. 9. 1& 
St. I.oi!i« v«;i:iiv. \l:w.» . a-s.l rh.> St. lAinia I^nd 
-.■ u..;i* 14 jtxul Ij. i.', ;.'». iS-i:- in thiii^las I'oniity, 

Mily M>.-iitvil iiuliioTri(>« tthii'U nit! bmiii farllilim for 

ni tU« LasT and siiii>i>iiij; j-.ii't ui' the pt^dncts East 



i»h»lfof iUoSt. iHOTiisBayLandCompftaj and tho Irtiiiton Lnoct Compiitiy «■■ 
iKftiUy l^inMt thai in uinkiag yniu ruport to tbe Wut Di-partiiionl r'>u n\<-i>iii- 
|«it «Iij>t>c^Tiatioi> for ilred^ing and impruviiii! H»ld St. i<Auia Bu.v jiiid lUri-I «f 
siirj- nud advisiililti. 

By E. L. Emekv, 

Managrr. 
St. Louib Bay LanT) Compxmv, 
By C. E. LovEiT A. Co., 



I 



ITnited States Enoiseer Office^ 

Dnivth, Minn., JVoi-mfcrt- 10, ISHl. 
^ESEiiAL: 1 liiivp rtie Uoiiyr to smtimit the followiug rc["nt on tlie 
tvey of "St, Lnitis Kiver fi'om Grassy Point, in St. Louis Bay, to. 
ind liu hav, or tbe State line between Minnesota and Wisi-on.sjn.^ 
Chepreliniitiary examinadoii was made by Maj. James li. Quinn,' 
;« of Engineers, who reported the river wortliy of imiJi-ovemeM' 
i«4;oni in ended an allotment of $3,400 to make a eomplete survey of 
iiortion under consideration. Tlte amount allowed, lio\ve\'er, waa 
¥60U, and witli this it has only be^n possible to check up a survey 
Ide in lS84-'85, as described in the report of Assistant Engineer J. 
Iparling, herewith, to which reference is made for details. 
Ihe port ion of the river susceptible of improvement terminates about 
■ile above Fond du Lac, the village being 14J miles by water above 
if Grassy Point Railroad bridge, and SOJ miles from the Diiluth Canal 
Wbout Ij miles above Fond du Lac is the foot of the Dalles, which ex- 
fl«i4 abont i miles np the river, and in which the fall is 480 feet. 

From the natnial pool at the boom just below Fond dn La« down t« 
Oraggy Point there is practicaJly slackwater, and as the river carries 
■ttip or no sediment any improvements made wonld be practically pcr- 
■aanent. As will be seen £rom the chart,* this part of the river cou- 
littB of a succession of long, deep pools (nsaally with 18 feet or more 
«f water in them) separated by comparatively short bars, with mini- 
rtim depths of 7^ to 12 feet over them, so the amount of excavation 
Hcess&ry to make a channel the entire distance 100 feet wide at bottom 
fed 16 feet deep, including 8 per cent increase in volume for scow 
teuurement, is but 410,265 cnbic yards. The character of the mate- 
tt to be excavated could not be accurately determined, as the small sum 
lindlable for the survey would not permit of making borings, but from 
it best available information it is believed to be sand covered with 
tud in the lower part,mnDing into clay covered withiuud in the upper 
■rt of the portion of the river considered. The disposal of the drcdg- 
ig« would be somewhat difficult, as it would probably be neocssary to 
nr to the lake for a dumping ground or rehandle it. However, as 
redging has been done this year iu St. Louis Bay for 14 cents, prob- 
jly 25 cents per cubic yard would be a fair estimate, and at this tignre 
teeoet of the work would be as tbllows: 

OLSBcabie Tarda, At a&centa *10i;,566.23 

■■tUg««icifw, etc., 10 pw Mnt 10,256.63 

^ ToUI -...-. 112,»22.88 



1 




firrvv.f it*ST. Looi* KT«r 




BOtntDINOS. 

mkiu cluniiel at the rivnr 1)''ginnlng at a pnliit (ni«rli(>d A an 

^ Pojut mill priH'M<<UiiK uji to lUriMi.fniirtbs mile atiuve lliu viUtin 

t, tilts b«iiiK n littlo nItoTc tin: foot of tliu tapUla, Aail an (av up aj il 

_ b of this niiun rivei- vhtuiaol is 13 milea. SoiitifUugs w«ro ulso luaile : 
e Moondsr; obuiDeU, also Ditvigaljle, and separutud ironi the main cha„ 
Soitudiu^ are plotted Me taken, cuiTectinfc uulj' for nrror of lead 
3 iM redin:t.lon made to any pailii;u]3r plane or etHj^e. 

rwne tiBt at Suw Didutli on A^ril 7, with its Koro iit surfttci) of tbe water, 
gB miule tlicreaftcr on days in whifih work wa« doue. This gaiigo was 
■m1 irilh > beurh ninik on a large elm tree near a eawmitl (lu abown no the 
» z«ro of gauge beiuc 5.169 feet belon the bench inatk. This bench mark 
UilieliMl by the St. Louis Railwuy Compuny and St. Loiiia and Superior 
B Bailway Company, nud is 503.83 feet above their dntiiin plane. This 
|»ii« haa not been referred to Luke Snperiur nor to nny known elevation bb 
'Shu Leam. The Kaii(,'e reAdiuga may be of nse in comparing subsequent aar- 
h tliis one. 

ling ate (he datoa on which ■oiuidings were made, and the readings of 
W H«« Unluth uud ul Oulntli : 



l+Ual 



-a Mm; — 1* beloir m 



I-ttatioo of j»niirtlii){». 



Id Lac. Samiiliiigi lakcu fiui 




NorlLpMl gjilo oa Olh. 



I 

I 



111 inm Ihe linen for April 
U.Oiu.d .O.lT.ttliiehlro 



■ Idcr Ukrly fnjm wliiit I obserri 



UoDft] Kknge re«dtiiga may be fonnd in the fiold-uotea sounding hook. 
Valatb gaoge is in Dulntb Harbor, near the canal, ita zero at the plnne of 
Aieh is a low-water stage of the lake and harbor, but nut extreme low witter. 
«M of 1873 is eoi.2 feet above aea level, and the moan level of the lake is 
ftet abova sea level, 
ba time of setting the new Duluth gnage, April 7, 1691, I made this memnran- 

V Cooper, at ITaw Dnlntb, who seems to be a bailder or contractor and ia now 
(fai>aawinlU,fa)l]am«tliattheriver has not risen any yet thisspriug.oxi^eptmK 
Mneent heavy northeaster when the water backed up aud roso 1 foot, and 
*^ down ag^n ; that the water is considered to be now at al>out tliu lowest 
< M evar geti^ antl thai it has been known to reach a point T feet higher 

a boOB no rain yet to speak of; the snow is thawing gradually for the 
.dOOB-^t tmdajra qnito rapidly, and conHiderablo n ' — ""' 






H fi— ^SPOBT OP CAPTAm PI8R 2155 

rn naEkhiKm'a angles us I remeasnred show a tolerable ajVTeement. Thaso 
tdid aot oibly for testing them, but in order to oontirm the identity ot 
iPsftinidL 

[H-tb eu m tf uU ng my additions to Parkinson's triangnlation I fonnd it neeea> 
iBpnte hlitrianffles from the line A ^— A 5 to line A 20^ A 22 (this being 
»afeeni on tiie nver)^ takinf^ the angles. ont from his field notes on aeconni 
fcHrfnaom's computation beinglost. I also eompnted the azimnths and 
te of his stations and mine. These computations are in Triangnlatioay an 
|» hook. 

nmlatlon stations platted on the map of this surrey (excepting A ^ ^nd 
1 uw A 8% which falls outside of sheet 1, are markeid by iron gas pips^ 
lye in nnmber. Each pipe is \\ inches in external diameter, 8 feet long^ 
\ mmnnt at lower end, and driven vertically into the ground, so as to laave 
r4 fitches projecting above the surface. Further description of the stations 
in the field notes oi this survey. 

idc of measuring the angles, marklnff the stations with iron monuments, 
is the triftngles, azimutl^, and coormnates, and plotting the stations was 



TOPOORAPHT. 

od ift a note on sheet 1, the results of this survey are mapped with black 
le eertain portions of the map which it was impossible to cover by this snr- 
idcof ftuidji,have been copied in sienna color, from the last previous survey, 
iaVy Parkinson in 1884-'85y already referred to. 

illiod of mapping has been as follows: The results of the present survey 
t au^pped on mounted drawing paper, which map is to be retained at this 
its hieomplet« state, and additions made to it later if desired. A copjr of 
ibtax made with black ink on tracing linen, sheets 1 and 2 (these forming 
desined for transmittal to Washini^n). These sheets were then placed 
iPwIdnson's map of 1894-'85, adjust^ into position by means of the trian- 
•tations common to the two maps, and the copy made in sienna color of 
ons desired to be added. In Joining common portions of shore line and 
Unes of the two surveys, discrepancies were found, as might be expected; 
sa very small, usually not large, but occasionally large, esnecially in the case 
lore of swamps, which rise but little above the water. Here a difference in 
> of the river for the two siin-evR would give different positions for the shore 
weover. tlu* survey <»f 1884-'85 wns made in the wiuter, and during at least 
r portion of that survey the hiiow was deep, as I know, and this would 
^ke it hard to toll tlio position of some portions of the swamp line, and thus 
je of error. Wherever a disdHpancj' was found in copying from Parkin- 
p the line of his map was hent aside for several hundred feet, usually back 
point of meeting, so%s to join on the line of the present survey, the latter 
jj ciianjied in any case. Tlie i>resent survey as a rule located the shore line 
tely adjoin in;[^ the main cliannel, and of all channels in which soundings 
de. The i)ortion below Now Duluth was located mainly by cross-sectioning 
e at time of making the soundings. Other topogra])hy by stadia, angles, 
ning or taping. Some points were located by computed triangles. 
urvt;y located instmmeutally section comers and subdivision corners, 
n in number. These have a small circle drawn around them on the map. 
t of thes«' were found marked by stone monuments, a few of them by woo<len 
id one by an iron monument. The permanent monuments established and 
it st^itions an«l at s^H-tion comers will be valuable hereafttT in laying out 
States improvements of the channels or in establishing harbor Hut's; in 
public and ]»rivate improvements that may be made and addiug same to 
», or in making di'tached surveys of localiti«ts on the river: and in enabling 
drveys at any tiiue to he compared with this and with Parkinson's. 
wns of West Dulutli, New Duluth, Ironton, and St. I^ouis have sprunj^ up 
since Parkinson's survey. These, and thatof Fond du Lac, havebeen ma])ped 
ing iiistrumentally one or more street or block corners and the direction of 
and the tilling ont the renjaininjj streets (as far as deemed l>est) froiu re- 
late or other maps and plats considere<l authentic. Much of the outer por- 
West Dulnth and of the plat of St. Louis, and to a less extent of Ihe plats 
im and Fond du Lac have been omitted for want of room or otlur j»;ood 
For tilling out the streets of West Duluth Roe's Atlas was made use of, 
mapping the car works, blast furnace, and woolen mills. With this ex- 
all the buildings and docks shown on the map were located instvumentally, 
9tk of locating shore line and other topography was by Assistant Dever. 



— «. -V- 
J -■ : 






APPENDIX 1 1. 



OVISMCNT OF PORTAGE LAKE AND LAKE SUPERIOR CANALS, 
3BOa8 KEWEENAW POINT, MICHIGii^, OF HARBORS ON WESTERN 
iOBS OF LAKE MICHIQAN NORTH OFCHICAGO, ILLINOIS, AND OF 
XK AHD HENOMINEE RIVERS, WISCONSIN. 



>mT OF M4J0B JAMES F. GREGORY, CORPS OF BNQINBERS, OFFI- 
SB IN CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL TEAR ENDING JUNE SO, 189S, 
TETH. OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 

DCPROVBMENTS. 



iDTte^ Lake and Lake Soperior ca- 
nalAyaeross Keweenaw Point, Miehi- 
ianLstiqiie Harbor, Michipiu. 

?edar Kiver Hurluir, Michigan. 

ienoioinee Harbor, Michigan and 
Wiaconsin. 

Ifenoniinee River, Michigan and Wis- 
ronsin. 

X'onto Harbor, Wisconsin. 

['eusaukee Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Sreen Bay Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Elarbor of refnge ut entrance of Stur- 
geon Bay Canal, Wisconsin. 

Umapee Harbor, Wisconsin. 



U. Kewannee Harbor, Wisconsin. 

12. Two Rivers Harbor, Wisconsin. 

13. Manitowoc Harbor, Wisconsin. 

14. Sheboygan Harbor, Wisconsin. 

15. Fort \Vashington Harbor, Wisconsin. 

16. Harbor of refuge at Milwaukee Bay, 
Wisconsin. 

17. Milwaukee Harbor, Wisconsin. 

18. Racine Harbor, Wisconsin. 

19. Kenosha Harbor, Wisconsin. 

20. Waukegan Harbor, Hlinois. 

21. Fox River, Wisconsin. 

22. Operating and care of locks and dams 
on Fox River, Wisconsin. 



United States, Engineer Office, 

Milwaukee^ Wis.^ July <S, 1892, 

General: I have the honor to transmit herewith annual report for 
works of river and harbor improvement in my charge for the fiscal 
r ending June 30, 1892. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

James F. Oregoby, 

Major of Engineers. 
Mg. Gen. Thomas L. Casey, 

ChU^ of Engineers J U. 8^ A. 

2157 



. t*^ _1-, 'r-:- __^ * ' 




I it— BfiPOBT OP MAJOB GREGOBY. 2169 

%-mXkm from Lake Superior, on the northwest side of Keweenaw 

KmihwaTd, receivine from the east the overflow of Torch Lake. 

L4ii|^ <tf both lakes'iB amme for all parposes of oommerce, present and 
LTXlMy dxain, by Portage Kiver into Keweenaw Bay, the great reentrant 
tti» promontcny and the sonthem shore of Lake Superior. The original 
L^osM be earried throogh Portage Biver into the lake was from 3 to 5 feet. 
UadBptb on many interior rivers large expenditures are annually made by 



*<*W" 



["flioiighton mtb the chief shipping ports of the eopper industry. They 

MMb other on Portage Lake, about 10 miles from Lake Superior. Wlien 
jjHiitiaf tbe mines had reached such a point as to render the demand for in- 
B^ifclMof commiMiication Imperative, tne country was upon the eve of civil 
#idk waa inaugurated and nas been 'completed without assistance from 
IGoveniment. 

mk of eatting a ship canal through the rid^e of sand and hanlpan separat- 
ihead of Portage Lake from Lake Superior was also formed during the 
iMspaay was incorporated for the purpose. Thd present canal has re- 
rvMioDai ehanges in organisation, which will beconsidered more in detail 
tsXTeneral Government has aided this part of the work by appropriating 
«• of public lands. Ko other assitttauce was received from tne General 
A or from the State of Michigan. 

ro improvements, although owned by peparate corporations, are now 
ooAtrolled by the same individuals. 

impoftamm of Portage Lake Boute, — Before going into details respecting 
Tf pTieoeot condition, and present vidue or this waterway, its nationu 
f will be considered from two points of view : That of interstate com- 
tkftt of eopper production. ^ 

» tommeroe> — ^The records of the Sanlt Ste. Marie Canal afford precise data 
1 to Judge of the extent and nature of the commerce of Lake Superior. 
tuff flgnies exhibit the freight which has passed through the canal dur- 
tCvB years: 



Tears. 



BegtiitAred 
toimage. 



2,092,521 
2,408.083 
2, (142, 259 
2.9^7.837 . 

y, (>;{:>, 937 i 



Aotiial 
freight. 



1,567.741 
2. 02<). 521 
2, 267, 105 
2, 874. .V»7 
3, 2,'»G. 028 



M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, in bis reports for intervening years, 
> following statistics of registered tonnage and Jietual freight 
hrough the St. Marys Falls Canal from 1S8G to 1890, inclusive: 



Yrara. 


toimage. 


Artiial 
freight. 


• 


3, 529, 184 
4, 38i<. 691 
4,741,976 
7,890,004 
8,4r>4,435 


3.701.014 




4, 882. 8()2 




5.581, 10'.» 


ft 

• •••*""*•■•••""•*•*"•• * *■ 


8, 2^S. 5*«0 
9,041,213 



B few ports on the northern shore of Lake Superior at which our vessel. s 
liable to tra«le. They naturally hug the southeru shore, on which nro sit- 
Mntere of the iron, copper, and lumber iuflustrios; where are iin]>ort<'.il 
applies of coal, lime, buililiug materials, marhinery. provisions, and sii]»- 
^•ry kind, and where are exported iron, copper, an<l lumber. At Dnluth 
ior City the export* of grain and imports of every kind needed to dev<li»i» 
gion opened by the Northern PaciGc and other railroads swell the trartie 
naooA and increafiing iigures given al)ove. Keweenaw Point, as already 
• £ir ont into the lake and obstructs this natural route of trade, 
be prevatling BtoruM of the Lake Superior region are from the nortliAvest 
HfK. The natural rente of commerce near the southern side lies, thero- 
[i^Kmt ittt whole extent along a lee shore. Paring the summer montha 




Yi* 



t-n- 



• •■I 



•REPORT OP MAJOR GREGORY. 21(11 



lu^eii brought to bear upon the eoinpiiny to itMlurc the 

:.ill were mliicecl by nearly 50 per cent helow what ihey 

^irii-e 1863. The demand now is that the tolLi aliall he iv< 

. Jj.ii the waterway shall be iiirthi-r eularijed. Xoin'ofthe 

.<j>%* hold auy interest in the eurporatiun, and we are iutornied 

....« (iwned entirely by perMms nonresidents in thedi8tri<t. 

..;/• <.iinci/. Railway^ aud Iron Company. — The opening ol" Porta^jo 

I" ijuproveuient of Portage Kiver, to vesseln navigating Lako 

.. 11 U* go within a trifle over 2 miles uf Lake Superior on the 

>\ Point. The advantage whieh wuu Id accrue from making the 

. • from the east side to the west side of Keweenaw Point was 

volved the construction of an artiticial canal 2 miles long, 

iX Hh eutrauce irom Lake Superior. The expense of such a wurk 

"?iina of the persons immediately int<*rested in the local trade of 

f the beneflta to result from it would ho national rather than hN-al, 

• to be expected from the tolls would ]>rohably not pay interest upou 

. I many years. 

• entitled the Portage Lake and L;ike Superior Ship Canal Company 

'luder the State laws of 1864, its articles of agreement being lileil 

■ 4ki-y of state of Michigan July 15, 186-1. By a joint resolution of the 

■ :.itiire dated January 21, 1865. Congress was asked to aid the eriter- 

. It' uf land. The Minnesota legislature passed a resolution to the rtanie 

IM, 1865. Congress responded by granting to the State of Mii-hi^an, 

' iitved March 3^ 1865, 200.000 acres of land. By act approved Manh 

i.iuda were conferred by tiio State upon the above-mentioned eorpora- 

'-nin eimditionB. A plan of construction was then atlopred, which was 

. . r than had at first been contemplated. Additional aid was sought 

-■ •is by the governor and Representatives of Michigan. The legislatures 

PI and Nov York passed resolutions February 27, 1866, asking Congress 

•enterprise. A nnmoer of cities also sent in petitions to the same efl'ect. 

. jain responded by granting 200,000 additional acres of land by act ap- 

ilv 3^ 1806. 

ol was to be 13 feet deep and 100 feet wide and to be provided with a break- 
iCa Lake Superior end. For several vears operations were limited to survey- 
round, proOTiing machinery, and the exploration of lands to be selected 
grant. The original surveys and plans were made by Mr. I. y. Greene, 
or the State. It was not until 1868 that the work of excavation was actu- 
Hf and at the end of that year only a few thousand yards ha<l been e\c:i- 
h the spring of 1869 the work w:as resumed with great activity, and was 
; pushed during that and the following year. Mr. .John H. lM»rst4T snp«T- 
Oreene as engineer for the State June 1, iSCA). In 1871 1 he work was cinii:! r- 
r want of fands, and made unsatisfactory progress. The title of tlii> cimh- 
aIt«Tedto Lake Superior Ship Canal Railroad and Iron Company, in thi^ 
rompany failed, and a receiver was appointe<l by tlie United st:ti«'s rircuir 
MLenigiKn with authority to borrow money lor tlie purp<»se of eoniph'tini,^ 

The work advanced slowly during the two foUowiuLC years. 

of Congress making the first grant of laud required that tin* works siionld 

»ted by March 3, 1867. The act making the second granr extenth'd this t ini'* 

n, or to March 3, 1870. Tlie time was subsequently ext«'n<le<l to Mar«-h .'>, 

^nin to March 3, 1873, and finally to Diceuiher 1, LS73. On the ixrh of 

I8i3, the State engineer, Mr. Forster, certitied that tlio works wrr»> eoni- 

soffdingtolaw. andonthe 29th of November, 1873, the governor of Michigan 

Lhat the works were built ac<;ording to law, hut that tin- title to the lamls 

eh they were situated being vested in the oftieers of the eoni])any as indi- 

indnot in the company itself, he did not couHider the works eonipletiMl in 

m with the act of Congress. It was not until June 25, Iblo, that the Onv- 

re his final certificate that the works were completed, tlie (hday hrin;; 

ftbib transfer of legal title required by him. Technirally, therefore, th<' 

se completed in 1875, but as a matter of fact they were (>on)plete<l iu 1^<7:>. 

18T7, after protracted litigation, the property was sold nnder deerer of 

». It was purchased by Messrs. Mann and \Vils(m, for tlie houdhiddiMs 

[tors of the old company, who organized the present company, iimler the 

%M Superior Ship Caual, Railroad, and Iron Com]>any. The <'onsid<'r:ition 

>i in the deed to Mann and Wilson was $870^000. In the de(>d from tln-m to 

<>mpany the consideration was $100, sub)e<'t to )>rior incumhrances amount - 

"96,386 and accrued interest at 10 per cent. The present ('om])any had no 

with t-he old company. 

> I, independently of the lands attaching tliereto, h:is not ]ivovi'<l a tinan- 
The income from the tolls has J )ecn alnLi»8t wholly expended in keep* 
■air. 

J 92 136 




2168 

eiseBCOiintered aft 

. . , bn.re beeu luaile 
tliiy )i4a been inado 
navoliiteiipiirchiiteil 
tbtiu, ua Kt Torth in 

A\<-s,Ui a depth of 
rruM ia 100 riMTl, 
maintiviniDg liM) feet nearly 
i) tntvnrscK u tiwatiipy le^iiiu, 
rgameut. Tll^■ nurUicm half 
tauanick ao.imii aod « range 
itoropping near Lake Soperiiir. 

it consiuts of a front row of 
', eapiied a fow inchta above 
g; a row nf unefaor piles ie 
row by timlipr bracee. Tho 
■pa are often dcrayed and tlia 
ipoeition. Tlir? saperintetid- 
ffioretliB route traveEeeaHund 
Suable ahcet ijillng ahould be 
oked the piles are preeaed out 
" ""■ '" Btoi-ms MM off the 

■9 the cftnol ia fucmed by two 
irhiclihavo ri'sittted-theatorm 
rid»t<-d ill 187.^. Thehardpaa 
MMU uf matlii'd adTantage fn 
' fiwt lonii, nre of timber and 
■t till) abure line, widentog 
eptli at the diite of oor siiirey 
1 too during the >Tlntet ia said 
anliue, wEU'li t«udatacauae 
(~agof BBudarouuil tbeends of 



_ Banal, aafe for lai 

rin ll»!«pniiK 



' veHBcIs il 



v....... that in tbn great uontn'iint miil 

I directly in the lino of tbu canul, nut u 

I plaeo it ia a matter of vital iiu]>ortniu'0 
A report upon the siibieet by M;«. II. M. 
in Senate Ex, Doc. No. 32, Forty-siith 

of September 19, 1890, provided: 
And continuing tbe \s»G and iiavi- 
"" for eaoh of the present mid tlio 

; lint in the peoding river and 

mproviiig the water coininmiioaiiini 

Brior, from Keweenaw Bay to ^ako 

L, for B navigable depth of 1<> feet 

*^ the bottom and Ibrrepairs to exist- 

cks. The present works consist of 
seson Lake Superior and Keweenaw 
Ij dredged eiits smd (■li;iinielway8; 
Bvigatiou, aa herei>ft(.'r described. 




^' -- - tT :lr: *^r lietTTf en 
r '^i •:::■ z ri:: tL.-e, there 1 
• ■ --: '-^c 'I-irli uf iral 
-"■-■-- '^" : ti.r canals, I 

- ■■- " ■'••-:: li'iieer H 

-'• ' _;^ —----«'-: "f the wal 

- - . ~: :^ a- in thedq 

^ :_.-.:- : '.^ iwt havi 

- -- • ■>'>!. rLehistbai 
"". . . : i-r :»> ^tt oat; il 

-- " - >:.v*rt:. iLe chui 

- . : . - '. •a". • hariie, » 

. ± r t'».»r the woi! 

■ -■ - - "•■►■:. :Vr theetf 

■ ... I. ■: '.raining ft 

: : riie river | 

, 1. : - T _ I f the Tppi 

■ - ■ ■ :'\Li:iourtftfc 

-■ -:v. Miob. li 

-- • ^ : r: ii! h)rt 

. - •: "■:. tLr lerui 

- • . . •• I'lesei 
• ' 1: .I'i'iline 

■ ■ —I' .■ rive 

^ -.■n'vi.'S 

, - -.- : -'• aiii 

' -r-ii' aut 

■ ••■■ «:'>Sin 
^ * . .: Lll> il 

■ ■ -.: ■W'fi 

- '-.-:. .ivail 
. : I»-.:iith, 

■ 

- ■ " > :r-i-i 

- ■ ■ ; .i::i.'t.i 

- 

... ill 



• :. 



'' «. 1\- Srl 



/ 




APPEKDIX I 1 KBPOKT OF MAJOR RREOOBT. 2165 



: ea«ta side of the cliannel in abont 12 fi-et c>r water. As tliese 
Ml to b« of i^reat a9»i.«taDc« to vessels in innkiitc tlw ofaanoels at 
> iN)int«. tJiey trera left in pla<!e tiiitil the cltMe of niivigatiou. 
rly in May, 1802, soandinfrs were again taken iit the Lake Superior 
uac«. whii-ti showed that a bar hail formed between the oater 
of tfae pier« aud outside for a distaiii-e of 300 feet, with only from 
1 1^ feet of water on-line with the center of the eamtl, where there 
18 feet -at the close of navigation last season, 
nder agreemeut with Mr. Jiiines I'rvor, of Honghtoii, Mich., drcdg- 
na b^nn May 16 and flaished Jane 1, 1892^^384 cabic yard« of 
Kial beinK removed, at a cost of 25 cents per yard. 
Us opened a chana^ aboat 60 feet wide and 17 fbet to 18 feet in 
b of watw cmtaide and about 15 feet between the piers. 
.■nmD unoont of dred^ng (inclnded in abore-stated amoaut) was 
Bintiutcfaannel, opposite the light-hooae, which gave relief at a 

Ltroobleflome point. 
i flinds beingezhaasted Airther dredging was sospended. 
brftor lUet inF^tage Lake. — For abont 7 miles of Portage Lake, in 
Tldnity of Booghton and Hancock, hu'bor lines on each side were 
Miabed ^ the Board of Engineers constitnted by Special Orders, 
,40^ 1880, httadqaarters Corps of Engineers, in oooordauce with act 
Ctagrees approved Jnne 20, 1890. 

!be lepwt of t^e Board was dated December 11, 18d0, and received 
iip^oval of the Assistant Secretary of Wu- Jannar>- 5, 1891. 
BieBe harbor lines were estiiblished to prevent encroachments on th« 
innel of Portage Lake by the various copper-mining comjiauie» 
eee Btamp mills were locate<I on the border of the lake. 
li praseiit the Franklin and the Atlantic are the only companicii that 
mp their 8tami> refuse into the lake. They are erecting bnlklieads 
prevent the refnso getting into the channel, and their dnuip.s arc 
«ely watched to see that they do not encroa^'h on the harbor lines, 
rveys and soundings are made from time to time to tllusttatc the 
iitition of the banka. 

Jopper smelting works that dump alag and cinders, electric-light 
nts that dump ashes, and all other establishments that are likely t4i 
Kprefiise into the lake have been faniished with printed circulars 
rtaioing the laws of Congress applying to such cases and have been 
rned not to infringe them. 

Mm and regulations. — A new set of rules and rcgnlations foi' the 
ligation of the canals were prepared and receivwl the approval of the 
xnable the Secretary of War, April 5, 1892. They have been printed 
[distributed, and no objections on the ]>avt of those who use the 
nls have been made to their enforcement, excejtt in the case of some 
lesentative Inmbetmeu in regard to one of the provisions of Unle 5, 
ich directs that "rafts shall be made up with higs parallel to emh 
er,in the direction of raft lengths, secured and held closely together 
freqnent cross sticks, chains, or cables." These Iiinibermen think it 
irdship and an unnecessary expense to them to be obliged to nmke 
their rafts as described in the rules. It appears to me both rea»<m- 
s and necessary that rafts should be so made up that tiiey will not 
mvenience general navigation more than is neeessury and do as 
e damage to the canal banks as possible, and th:it to aci-ommodatt; 
w conditiona the logs should be parallel to each other and not 
•ly boomed. Li order, however, that the matter may receive proper 
nderation npon Bofficient data, I directed Lieut. U. E, Waterman, 



.1 : !.« I 

I : .|<i ■ 

• .. I I ■' • HH 
I". I I. I'M ! 

! • !,i ; inll 

. • •••- I.- 

• • ". •• 



N 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^^^Hfat and tb« two ti J.s by a tcli^gniph <vir(-. 


^^^^^^^^■Itae T>uL uu about c-vr.ry2A loet. VVben ttllul tho 
^^^^^^^^VJUl of the lugii ill thcflA opuraUuna are paahi^d in 

^^^^^^^B «)it«d to forui a run or half nift, as thojr r.U 

^^^^^HbplADfld by rope ptobs 1in<>8. "A" lines, as thev ore colled, 
^^^^B|tf|t*»K acTosi the raft. All those linoa are afaown on the 

^^^HEnod by a SpBDish wiodlAi^. One pole ia held vcrtioal, while 
^^^^K|MSd in the rope, as xli.iwn in Pi's. 3. The slack is theu 
^^^^^4 when titfht enough the wmdlaM ia simply laid flat. Tliti 
^^^BbUiiir, bat ehonid not ride, or there in dnn^er of thiHr slip- 
^^^^^B^ steuner is attached to tho rear by three Udah and push** 

^^^^Hb& of the above inethnda in the PottAge Lake Cannla is eon- 
^^^■toftl dilBculty is with the stit)' booui. It ie all risht iiuidu 
^^^■hSopenor, in n Htorm, iiuthiuK Beema to bold tw veil as u Ioobd 

^^H|^with the BtifT boom .-w above described would not rxcefd 
■KgOe present seaaon. 


r (Xnwr. 


Fe0t,aU. 






7,000, MO 

lis 

liuuo.oou 

S,U1«,OUO 
*,«K).MK] 


' -« 




















^feo. 









[i*t inclnde Uie amonnta which may be towed through the Upper Canal, 
robably be small. 

noted, howeveor, that the difScnlties in iiHing this method are mtirb 
<D case of rafts boond up Portage River than those bound down. The 
BM a atiff boom through the river and niu their togs into a loose one at 
•I CTOitsin^ KeweenaiW Bay, but to roveme the operation requires the 
>f the raft lu KewecHSiW Bay, which might be a serious matter. 
B visit to Houghton I rciiind that Mr. Hebard and Mr. Funke were mak- 
OTt to cduform to the rule, though not employing the stiff boom. Their 
de np of u series of short striugs, one iu fruiit of the other. Eiich string 
) the four sides by eight doom sticks loosely connected, thus forming a 
1 30 feet ou each Hide. Tliis square ia closely filled with logs laid par- 
ry nearly prcsnrveM its Klj;ipe, and would seem a fair compromise if one 

towed np Portagp Kivcr. however, by Mr. Gregory nre nothing but sack 
few cross lines, and oiiittitnte a serious obstruction. I wonld recom- 
e 1>e ^otitit^d that he mii^t make more of au eObrt to conform to the rules. 
row line at each Joint of the boom sticks would accomplisli the result. 
« thene can only be used successfully by arranging the log.'« in lines, all 
ne another. 

lion. 1 would recommend no changes in the rules relating to rafting for 
They sbonld be given a Eair trial by all the owners, as they are unques- 
thc bcnpfit of the canals, 
napcctfully, yont obedieut servant, 

H. E. Watkrman, 
Firit Litut. of Bngineerl. 
E8 F. Ghecobt, 
0»rf of EHgiH«ert, V. 8. A. 



• Ul i^y THi: ruiEF OF EViilXEER.S, U. R. ARMY. 



■•<i 



■.., H"* ht-i' v m ai'propriatuin fvr prr/ferration of Porta^ 
^»f»»tt - . :t !:.. .Vi'Aii/aii. ac( of Stptrmbtr 19, ISttO. 



T- 



Fr»r what paid. 



An 



i Ma; «'^** E I- r. T-fi*^ 

.: .-l.. 

» K:r*t Li*at E F. • i."»«m;:ii 

4 If. A Mart... - 

i lVt.T PnaieAc ... 

Ti r Maver A •. ■■ - 

^ «;.A.SIirr 

i Tikul MuDdor 

•I S-Slolt 

'0 Hilvd m» 

I IViwForwul . 

' ■_• Allwrt u. TraTrtL-: 

■ .< J iiin«*§ l*ryoT 

• I I . B. Stnrpi« , 

■.". \vmuui».I>in?lKrtT A i. ;• v 

t* K A. IV>u8b».«K«»t 

KT»t I wut. H. >- ^^ at*^nu.Ui 



.!o 



• V lVT#r 

* -trry. l'^»•■•• 
■^- >.>^Mt ... 

^ '» ». ■ 

.. « 'li'ii' 



• \.. 



J" 



I 



M;l-.iee , 

do 

-do 

'I rsiri line exjMTi**?.. 

K--i'iiril:iii: divfU 

i;iiii viiiTi* 

w." vices 



til" 
d.i 



«^.r'-v»"'« August, l-l'l 

"^:i.:;iiTiiTv 

■ 

1;.. J..r.' 

< •:*.if ri-iil 

l»rx-l;;:Ti2 

K\jir^.-!» rliargo.% 

Miie;ij:e 

do 

I.:ibor 

StoiM*. ok* 

J'iiiiUT 

Jl(dti(.rtc 

Kojio. t'li- 

Stat iom-ry 

dn 

Otliw rent 

Scrviifc 

Hire ol tug 

Sf rvifo«. Svptfiiibt- r. l.-l»l 

SiTvi<"«i*. I'ti" 

Mileap- 

i:iil.-.s .ixiil if;;ul;it ii>n« 

I»K>k!t 

Milo.iCi* 

><TVir«S 

. ..ll.. 

. ..!.. 

t '■*.t" iiiil 

V. 



3.1 



• >kL 



: t'-.,: . . 



M:-aj 



- i* •..i„ 1 -.Ni; 






APPESmX I I — BKPORT OF U_UoK Gltl^GORy. 



5<.-«f 


To«h 


■upuld. 




Fnwh* 


p.^. 


|A»on^ 


IS 
17 












SSfSf ■■■ 




::::: J§ 


LbSiiio.*Co 
8. MoU- 




:;«::' 




















c"Tt^^ " 


















.. ..1 









[sciAL flTATi9Ttce ros trb caiaxdab tkab bmdino uacKunKB 31, 1891. 

tion district, Superior, Mich, i iieareBt port of entry, HonRhroB, Mi.'h. There 
(-b'>aee aail natee- lights at each eDtrnuce to the cnnal. Kange lights are 
I at the head ufportage Kircr, aud a nf ogle Ught on the outer end of the 

jkt the Portage Lake eotraDce to tho upper cauaJ. 

tj)e charge of the canals waa aaaumed liy the Uait^l Stltt«e tolls were col- 
id complete commernial BtatisticH were recorded. Siuce lolli wore nholiHhed 
ction of ststistirs has beeii more dlffli'slt. 
of blnnlm t'nr ninkiiis rppnrti 



. Mat 



distribiit 



icos of the caiiaifl. The ntatintica ro]>urt«d billow are only for the months of 
er, October, and November, 1S91, and are those furniaheA by veaael agents, 
lers, and others, and are probably vithin the limit of boBincBa done during 



Bound up. 


Namb». 


„2... 


Bound dairn. 


^-u■ob.^. 


N«i 




"^M 


a'.^ 




m\ 

















Bonn 


... 




Ket tons. 


Boti 


d.i«wn. 




Ne 


..n,. 








48,748 
l,4»" 










?nnti 




















































gC:;::::;: 














number.. 










nhnnrtl-.- 












r..| 






" 







m 



2] OF THE CHIEF OF EK0INEBH8, U. B. ASMT. 

The foUoninu iciltiU liuM nf Mfaiavt* need lti« causia iliiciDJE the • 
1891 : 

Lnkf MieliiKBD and Lak« SujiiMior TnUiait C<>iiipwi]r, CbicBso, 111 

Lnkp t*upprii>r Tmnsit Coiupiuiv. BulTiilo, N. Y 

Ward's Idaroit Line. Detrutl, .Mit& ; 

Ward's Luko Superior Line, Di-tnvit, MtoL 

The principal lines ot st^aiuOTn toi the MkMw of 1883 are as follow*: 

LakeMIobi^an and Lake KupoHor Trunsit Company, Cliicu|j;o, III ,'3 

Laks SuneriDT Transit Company. SuS'bId,^. Y 3 

Ward's Lake Sunerior Line, Detroit, Hicn -^ 

Crest^eut Line, Detroit, Mich 

Union Transit Com puny, Bairalo, N. T 



hnr^iee an'l sailing TCMaeliJuing thn ei , „ - 

(tone by tu^ U>wine rnfts of logs ariii "" ' — J)d aeovrs with wooU and InmheM 
is now arrsu!;ud so Ibat all <.f the abt ,. i oun be roportwi rogulnrly, auda 
uftcr complete reports of sUtistics mi t Hitod. 



IMPROVEME^•T OF MAKISTIQUE HABBOH, MICmGAN. 

Object. — To swure a navigable channel from Lake Mi(^hi][:aii into \ 
mmitli of tbe Manintiqiie River, where the harbor of MmiistiqnA 
situated. 

Project, — The orijrinal pmject, adopted id 1880, provided liir tbeeti 
Tution of about 2t),(K)(t cnbic yards of material to coniplctf a chaunetj 
feet wide and lii tfeet deep between the piers coustnutiil liy lucnl end 
prise at the mouth of the Mimistiqne Iliver. 

Present works, — No construction work was done by tho United Stri 
Govcniiuent. Tlie piers were built and are still owned by private p( 
ties. 

Depth of water, — Originally there was a depth of 7 feet, which *l 
increased to 10 feet before any appropriation had been made by t 
Government. A survey made May 12, J89:!, showed at tliat ditfl 
cltaonel between the piera of navigable width with a dejtth of 13 fe 
The outer bar was not elearly deflne^l, but the ruling depth over it ( 
ptsared to be about II feet. Dredging by i)rivate enterprise was 
progress, increasing the depth of watci' over the outer bar. 

Operatiom diiriiui the fiscal year. — There weie no operations dnri 
the (iscal year ending June 30, 1892. 

Remarks and rcoommeniiatiotu. — ^The only work by the United St* 
at this harbor lias been the removal of 11,780 eiibic yards of mater 
in 18S0, under a contract with the Ohicago Lumbering Companv. 

In October, 18S0, a survey of tlie harbor Mliowed that the d'ireeti 
of the piers lay across the natural channel. The eomjiany which h 
built the |)ieis, and bad also the contract for dre<lging, found it ncc 
nary at thi.s time to renew alfout 330 feet of the west pier which b 
been wa«lied away. The superintendent of the company was notif 
by the oilieer in charge, Maj, H. M. Kobert, that the pier lines woi 
have to Lie rectilied to conform to the natural ehaniii'l. The couipii 
deelined to comply with this demand, and their confiuct, which 1 
been extended from December, 1880, to June 1, 1881, was anuuU 




- IMTKHDIZ n-r-BBPOftT OP MAJOR GREGORY. 2171 

ipB hflEve been no operations at this harbor since, and no money is 
b9 tor. its improvement. 

ctmi (MO Report of Cbief of Engineera, 1880, page ld31) $6^000 

AFPBOPRIATIOlfS. 

JnneU, 1880 15,000 

Macebd, 1»81 1,000 

Total...... 6,000 

Money statement 

r.1, 1891. balance iraexpemled $2,600.76 

1 90^ 18^ amoant ex])eii(led dming fiscal year 31.96 

' ly i8B2y balanee unexpended » 2,569.40 



MCKAL STATISTICS FOB THB OATJKQOAB TXAB KimiNa DXOBMBBR 31, 1891. 



[FnmialMd liy Mr. J. D. Mmrnaemn, aeoretery Chicago Lumbering ComiMny.] 

feme of harbor, ManUtique^ Mich. ; ooUeotion diatriot, Superior, Mioh. ; nearest 
tVhonae, PoTerty Island, Michigan. 

Arrivals and departuret ofvunU. 






Dencription. 


Arrlralfl. 


Departnrea. 




Kmnber. 


Tonnage. 


Namber. 


Tonnage. 


j^ 


367 
• 299 


139. 1'ii 


367 


13f> 7r^3 


A 


83. Tt^'J 20H 83. 7«fl 








223,542 


ToUI 


666 


22:J, 542 


G(H) 











Principal orHoles of export and import 



Beer.. 
Cattle, 
ilah.. 
Flour. 
Hides. 



Tons. 

23 

8 

838 

13 

17 

honand Kti-t'l 14,265 

Lath 4,271 

lime and eminent 62 

Lumber 158,646 

Merchandliie, gciu^ral 102 

ffliiogles 1,130 

Pickets 2,775 



Total 182,150 

T^Dtsl approximate valae, $1,718,960. 

iports: 

Agricnl tnral implements 17 

Apples 86 

Beans : 29 

Beer 147 

Brick 80 

Batter v.. 49 

CUOm 68 



Imports — Continued. Tons. 

Cheese 6 

Coal and coke 2,000 



Com 

Eggs 

Flour 

Furniture 

Hay 

Hogs 

Iron and .stool 

Cement 

Morchandise, j^iMicral . . 

Mill Htutis.... 

Oats 

Oil 

Phister. land , 

Pork and bfcl" 

Potatoes 

8alt 

Sheep 

Staves 

WagoiiR and carriages 



31 

27 
360 

30 
320 

31 
967 
174 
3, 528 
.1K7 
Uu 

2m 

6 

163 

23 

585 

3 

190 

11 



Total 10,146 

Total approximate value, $343,484. 



hCI 



1 - - .- - 



211 OF TnE CHIEK Of ENGI>"EEKfi, L". S. ABM». 

Illl'ltO KUEKT OF CEDAB BIVEB HARBOB, HICHIGAK. 

Object. — To aectire a navigable cbannel from Green Bay tnb^ 
River, whwe tbp harbor of Cedar Itiver is located. 

Project. — ^Thir original project, adoiited in 18S3, provided for 
Btmction of two parallel piers 200 feet apart, eitendiiig from the. 
of Cedar River to the 10-foot contour in Oreeb Bay, and droj 
channel between them 14 feet deep; also removing an outer d 
dredging to a depth of 15 feet, 

A moftiflcation of this project, approved in 1884. provided i 
tinuing the piers in a direct line with the part already built, inatlj 
at an angle, sa originally propoaed. 

Present work*. — I'ile piers '=-^-1 — '*h sheet piling: (1} E-.ist pier 
feet in length, 16 fi-et wid pier, 301 feet in length, Id 

■wide. All were built in II -^ id are in good condition. 

Depth of iratfr. — Originaiiy 8 i. feet, obstnn^ted by a 3-fo«l 

in front of the mouth. 

A Borvey ma<le May li, 1892, >d a t-hannel 20 feet wide, 

deep, and 10 feet deep with a i width of W feet. Dredj 
private enteriirise to improve the mnel was in progress. 

Operations during the ^fiscal ycAf,— -There have been no oj 
during the flacal year ending June 3", 1892. 

Rtmark* and recommen'iations. — M irk was suspended at thia 
in November, 188.'>, and has not beeii re^nraed by the United 
since that date. It is reported that some dred^ng was done ' 
Tate enterprise in 1891 and 181)3. 

In view of the small amount of commerce likely to be benefits 
its completion, no appropriation for continuing the improvemeol 
been recommended since 1885. 
Original e8timal^^ (MPe Report of Cbi<>f of EngincerB, 1882, page 2121)... «! 

ApmopRiATiosa. 
Act of— 

AiiKUsl 2. 1883 W 

JulyS,l»«4 : ! 



Miiitri/ xliifrnieitt. 



July 1, 1802, baltiui-o iiuexpendod . 



AiiioHiit (pstimnteil) rcqiiircil for cmiiplntinn nl' .; 
SulmiittiiiiiLi poLiiiiliiiui'c witli rocniiroments of b 
liorboi uctB of 18136 mid ItHJT. 



COMMEItCUL STATISTCCS FOR THK CALKNI 
jFunilalied by Mr. JeueSp*ldlng. piw 



Fappenihx ! !- — iii;i'i'i;r .ii-- majok i;riEi;oi;v. 
Jrtirali avtl il'pari»m of vcneli. 



At. 


T^(. 


D.p«t.,r«. 


Niunbor. 


TomiiW^ 


Xiinber. 


TonnottF. 


3IE 


wiuou 


SOD 


ni.ano 
»,gwi 



iVfnrtpal i)rH«I(a (/ eeport and import. 

Imporl »— Con tiu iicd . 

Cattle ; 

Coal und rokf 

te:::;::;::;;::::;: 

Hay 

Hcpi 

Lime and GflmBnt 

MercliandUe, Eeuartil.. 

Millatnfe 

Oats.,., 













U-Ugnph 
foe*.... 


aos 

3.MiS 






■ilroad... 


U.nw 








Tftlue, $630,000. 









Oil-- 

Pork anil bf.t. . 

Potatoes 

Proviaions 

Salt 



value, $150,000. 



EMENT OF MENOMINEE HARBOR, MICHIGAN AND WISCONSIN. 

— To secure a navigable cliaunel fixnu Green Bay into the 
lee Hivcr, wliere the harbor of Menominee is situated. 
f. — The original project adopted iu 1871 provided for the tx)n- 
I of two parallel piers 400 feet apart, extending from the mouth 
ver to the 15-foot contour in Green Bay, and dredging a chaii- 
een them 14 feet de«p. In 1874 it was decided to exteud the 
Uie 10-foot contour. 

i Kork. — (1) North pier, 1,854 feet in length, consisting of 585 
ab pier, 20 feet wide; 609 feet of pile pier, 481 feet of the siimo 
i width of 14 feet, and 128 feet a width of 18 feet; 6G0 feet of 
) feet with a width of 20 feet, and 50 feet with a width of 24 feet. 
h pier, 2,710 feet in length, consisting of 1,900 feet of pile pier, 
t having a width of 14 feet and 96 feet a width of 18 teet, and 
of cribs 20 feet wide, 

le piers were built iu 1871-1874, and the cribs 1870-18*1. The 
i ill good condition. The north pile pier was rebuilt above tlic 
leiu IS.S9, iiud is iii gixidti'iiiditiun. Tlie older part of the south 

is ntucL decayed, and it «hould be icbiiilt above the water lino. 

of wafer.— Originally 4 feet. The Llianuel now is 200 feet wide 
set deep the full length of the harbur piers. 
tionn during the JUcci ytior. — Dredging by hired labor and the 
nited states dredges Nos. 1 and 2, resulted in the formation of 



!l «ll,llll|t j ...♦»• .^ - 

Ml ilii- M. :...:. ... .:. 

nuilr III] il,,. •., . 

^l""\v (iiiir ill tL. -"- ' ' 
.nl\;iiuriU MiMi V. - . 

tin- •-ii;ihhi-] liiji::.. " 

itMM IJMHMintai ,v..- \ 
ti«!;i\. A siM'tioii i.j • ^ 

•liiiiin.mMl hy :i iif^i.e:."":- 
An ;i|»|irn|iii;,r;i,:,,.i\; 

Hff.lril to ilii.> pi,.,.. 



ABirt:*^ 






ff • 



'It*p. extoi 

. . -■ i'ri.iteil, 
" . :'A J;i'maiyj. 

-- ~.i>r line vil 

- r^7 Itrt iraS 

'* Liiiiifrl tace 
^ -a.r rLerepaiisi 



Aft 111-. 

Ma.h :j. 1^71 






•I'lin- Ii». I»«7l' 

M:inii :{, 1^7:; .... 




J.in- j:;. ih7i 

.M:ir.lj a. 1>7:) 

A«iL'ii-t M. 1>T»; 


1 


.fiili • 1^. Is7s 


1 


M.;. :. :;. 1>7'.» 








.l/oi.» f/ »•*.-•, 



'.■ '-xr-:.-!' ■! ■ ■ ■: ■■ 



1 

2H( 






.T<&1 



1^-4 15,0*1 



... J 



^- yv:-^:; Y"v : i-n:^i v : :•• ■. i:vi>rn ol. 1S91. 



- ■:. ■::-::.■:. ^':T:fii'ir. Mi-L.: iw 



I^pl:r::^■«. 



•■■t 



ml 



I 

i 





Coal aodcoke 5,53S 

Flonr (ttM) 

Hay in. Olio 

LiiLiHiinil ceinrnt-- S«0 

M[!rfh»Tidl«B. j;»ii-ral (1,000 

Millituffs 10,6(10 

Oata lai 

Posts, feoM BIS 

Salt 900 

SUme 7,000 

Wood 17,600 



Totttl . 



a, mi 



a. YlfAlt KSDI\« DRCK.MUK.Jt 31, 18111. 
[yamlsbMl by Mr. K. I-imiibtrg. fleimti cullerrlor of oantnina.J 
_rbor, Marinette, Wis.; cuUection district, Milnaukeu, Wis.; nrareat 
a nortb piet-boiwl, MuuoaiiDi^e, Mich. 

Jrrii^If and dejiarlurt* of tattU. 



DaaiitUau. 


Artlv»l«. 


Drp.O«r«. 


Ktm.l«r, 


ToBlUgB. 


NiuoUor. TaDlugo. 




5M 


m.TTl 


=»[ ■!..« 










1.077 


m.iin 


1,080 1 ieT,aM 





iVtneipdl articlf of export and import. 



vaA coke. 



Ton.. 

S, 100 

, ai3) 

, 14.492i 

i«r 412,500 

■ 3,0(M 

«8 6,412 

.lelpgraph 42,500 

9,500 



5,234 

doan,i>D'l Miiiiln 3,100 

loics 180,000 

;1m 12,300 



a] 709,736 

pptoiunat« Talu>'.$4,0(»,000. 



Apples 

Urick 

liutfer 

Flonr 

Hay 

Miirchanrtiw, gpiipr 

Mill stuffs 

Ottta 



Oil.. 

Peas 

Pork and bi->'f .- 

Pot.iloe* - 

Salt 

Saw logs 

Wood".'."'.'.'.'.".'. 



Total B3, 124 



>TEMEffT OF MENOMINEE ElVEH, MICHIQAN AND WISCONSIN. 

i — ^Tb6 formatinn of a chaitrel of Ilavigilbll^ wiilth, 1*'. iVet deep, 
1 Bay to N. Ludiugtoii Oomjuiny's mill, JL.iiiiicttc, Wis., a 
aboat 2 miles. 

The original project approved October 2, 1890, for the 
of »54,UW) appropriated by act of September 19, 1890, was 
tiwnnoi 200 feet wide and 16 feet deep, from Green Bay 
* as for |ts available funds would admit. 



•;.■ :?•';-!:- lip rlus«-d fnr the S4i;i«K>u. ^\ 

::*.. > >Til: in jtrttgress. Under this 

. 'vTial v-^Tr reiDi'ved during the ilsea 

^ •' S4T'4. riK- oj^e iff United States dred^ 

^ ^ i^^-> c ibii;r4C*i&] were resoved from tiie 

^' ^--iL .^rirt: 9b.lSXL Dredge iSTo. 2 w: 

^ ^''t^ Iii«d£ie Xo. 1 WM workmg 

^ hvt riiTT-ihMe ef maleruito in opoi 

-• «> *«iA0Tm«L^nie faBstton of ft < 

^i' <o tit'C *c' En giii a a' s Beport larl 

* ^ .- - - .^ H.' -^siiiftlc- ji^jtdmte Ike vpparSV 

.■•»■.■ •■ 

V ^ >an^r^ udem ISdSnA 18 

■ "▼^-^ -- '*v.. :-.-.»; >«• -X ^^. .'ir* Xf. Sl». 

Jr,-: V- 

,^uN :,/. .s.<: 

!l4<j;»k .« . 



^APPEKPIX II — REPORT OP HAJOB GBEOOBT. . 2177 

wtod) r^oirod for FOtDpletionofe^tting protect* $1(L000.0U 

■ of 1866 uid lljGT. 



B rOS TBX CALSKDAB TBAX msnTQ 



moncBX^ 31, 1891. 



mPROVEMENT OF OCONTO HARBOR, WISCOHgm. 

ii eeonre a Bavigable channel from Oreen Bay np the Oconto 
a city of Oconto. 
—The ori^nal project, adppted in 1882, provided for the 
^ of a channel 100 feet n-ide and 8 feet dee^ by extending the 
f bnilt by the city to the 10 foot oontonr lo Green Bay, and 
' '^BftTcen the iners and np the river to Bection Street Bridge, 
M ot aboat 2 miles, the piers to be paiallel to each other and 

I wortcf.^1) North pier, 1,603 feet lon^, 20 feet wide. For 
l-tlie piles are 5 feet aparl; for the remaining 503 feetthe piles 
t apart on the channel Hide, and 2 feet apart on the outer side, 
It Iwing provide'l with wale timbers, cross-ties, and tie rods. 
Hng is composed of slabs and edgings ballasted with sand. (2) 
pier, 2,151 feet long, 20 feet wide. For 1,850 feet the piles are 5 
art ; the remaining 351 feet is close piling. The tilling is onni- 
yf slabs and edgings ballasted with sand, except the oater ;t01 
htch is cavere<l with 2 feet thickness of stone. (3) The outer side 
KMitU pier, beginning 300 feet from the outer end for a distance 
feet, is protected from ice pressure by a line of close piling, 
shoreward for a distance of 850 feet by riprap. (4) Additional 
;y is given to 1,850 feet of the south pier by a line of piles on the 
il side 3 feet apart, provided with wale timbers, eross tiew, and 
»-Tods at intervals of 9 feet. 
'k of water. — Originally 2 feet, increased to 3^ feet by local enter- 

at of the sonndings taken in May, 1892, shows the governing 
tt the harbor entrance to beaboat TJfeet, and in the river as far 
^ies Mill to be abont 6$ feet. 

'otions during the fiscal year. — By hired labor and pnri!hase nf 
rIs in open market, the north pier, Which was seriously damaged 
Mhet in April, ISdl, was repaired by driving aline of piles along 
lanel face for a length of T50 feet. The i)ilfs were di-iven 3 feet 
Voni center to center, and provided with wales and binders. 
wrlm and reeommetidations. — In order to maintain a depth of S 
' water, periodical dredging will be necessary. The piers, being 
nl eharacter, will require frequent repairs. 



»92 ^137 



* For Uftlnteuiuicu of uLanuel, 



. » - • i' •, -r. _ 

21 «8 BsroBT OF THE CHiBF OT ammam^ v. & 

Fur ttftinteMM0 and pmaetTiftfam ft b «itfaMte< fhai 
W Miiid iMr Ike ImaI ywr ending Jue 80^ UML 

AmopmunonL 

j »a> \ we> : 

A^«*t a ««•. 

,*^ vk — 

Ki> *, isdi. , 

^ •^fc'^^k *^i^^ '^w ^^^^W ^^^Wi ^^WB* 



' *■! 



--• % 






MiMWiW 



,Sm( «^ tiW a^Hft /Mr 






\ vK't^ «M |«Macxia«k 









\ N 



«M ;»«««•. it 






|6l« 



Ln 



"'. \ ^ ^ 



» .^v tx -x 






\ 



'I ;^ 



"lik : 3tf wft Vi^r 



V ■•*•■ jift^^.m^;-,^ 



f. ^.\ 









■J* 



liS? 



J 



f^rPSSDO: ri EEPOET OP MAJOR GREGOEy. 



- 


Frineipal arliela o 


f export and import. 
ErportB— Continued : 

Butter 


Tom. 














•Droad -. 


1,400 


Flonc 

Hay 

Lime and c«nMt 

Oil 

Sftwlog* 

Stone 

Wood 

Total 


if 

73.000 
2,800 
1.000 










80.518 







I I 7- 
niPEOVEMENT OF PENSAUKEE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

— To secure a navigable channel from Green Bay into the Pen- 
liver. 

t. — Theoriguial project, adopted in 1883, provides for continnin^ 
er, which had been bnilt by private enterprise, until it should 
e 10-foot conttior in Green Bay, and dre<lging a channel nuuth 
1 depth of 10 feet and width of 100 feet, connecting the deep 
the river with the deep water in the bay. 
t works. — (1) A slab pier, l,.^iOO feet long and 20 feet wide, 
,h slabs and edgings and ballasted with sand and stone. It 
t in 1883 and repaired in 1885 and 1S91. (2) One thouHand nix 
feet of slab pier, bnilt by private enterprise, was nearly all 
d by a storm in 188.'>. The deatructiou of this work left the 
if the pier built by the United States a detached work. 
of water. — Originally 2 feet ; increased by private enterprise to 
) 9 feet for a width of 30 feet. The deatructiou of the portion 
ier bnilt by private enterprise by the storm of October, 1885, 
in restoring the channel to about its original condition, 
-ey made in May, 1890, showed the governing depth to be 2.8 feet. 
lUms during the fiscal year. — By hired labor and purchase of 
8 in open mar ke^ about 600 linear feet of the west end of the 
naged by fire in September, 1891, were repaired in October and 
er, 1891. 

■ks and reoommendationa. — For the preservation of the existing 
is estimated that $1,000 will be needed for the fiscal year end- 
i ,30, 1894. 

1 fiirther improvement of this harbor be deemed necessary it is 
that the modified project submitted in report dated Feburary 
he estimated cost of which is $8,800, would be all that is needed. 
ivals or departures of vessels were reported at this harbor for 
idar year ending December 31, 1891. Several boats are engaged 
g, and it is claimed that this business would materially increase 
iter at the harbor entrance was deepened, 
coat (seeBeportof Chief of Engineers, 1883, page 1662) K0,000 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

It 2,1882 •10,000 

1,1884 5,000 

d , 16,000 



:..F 



IV 






•' F. 



. • > 

: '■ i" 

' ' A'-M 
■ > ,!.I»' 

. • . . Jli 

• ,| ', - , ,.. .-. . - 't^\ 

. ■ . . • . • . . 1.^ - 

■."*■.•■■.■ > . :• I-* ]\-\^' 



' :..•• h '.'(•' in 






" .:n f»]!..f :! . ^.•• 



\ 



'. .: r.:^ 




W OF MAJOB GREGORY. 



2181 



- 'J4, 1892, and Buspended June 20, 1892, resulting in 

. • * : n bic yards of material. 

rammendaHontM — ^For continuing work ou the 16-foot 

A luuiled that 926,000 ean be profitably expended during 

V uding June 30, 1S^4. and for the pre^rvation and niain- 

: : v; existing works $5,000 will be needed for the same period. 

.i<4t of the pTojeeft adopted in 1S81 (see Report of Chief of 

«. 1S81, page 30W} $135,000.00 

MWt for a channel 16 feet deep, subinitted Febrnary 13, 1892. 91, 915. 00 

APPROPRIATIONS. 



leAlSfiS 

ri:h2,18G7 

V 23, ISeS (allotted) . 
fil 10, 1889 (aUotted) 

jlLlSTO 

coha^lSn 

Mtb3Ll878 

ia&]874 

lafc 1^1375 

gwftl^UTO 

l^lfltlTO 



$90,500 
45,000 
17,500 
44,550 
17,500 
17,500 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
H,000 
5,000 



Act of— 

March 3, 1879 $4,000 

JoneU, 188C ^000 

March3, 1881 5,000 

August 2, 1882 20,000 

July 5, 1884 10,000 

AugU8t5, 1886 7,000 

August 11, 1888 10,000 

September 19, 1890* 10,000 

July 13,1892 25,000 



ToUl 322,550 



Money statement. 



Ml, balanee onozpendeil $10,224.80 

^IW; aauNint expended daring fiscal year 6,395.75 



IflM; balance unexpended 3,829.05 

feappropriatedby act approved July 13, 1892 25,000.00 



fc avaUable for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 28, X2[K 05 



mt (estimated) required for completion of existiug project 71, 915. (N) 

mt that can be profitably expended in tiscal yearonain); June^O. 1891 'M), 0(K). (M) 
dUed in compliance with requirements of i^ectioim 2 of rivor and 
rbor acta of 1805 and X867. 



'■^T'^^ STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR YEAK END /NO DECEMBER 31, 1891. 
[Fumiahed by Mr. Cfaas. Bulang, deputy coUeotor of cuatomH.] 

■ af harbor, Green Bay, Wisconsin; collection district, Milwaukee, Wis.; 
iBfht honae, Grassy Island, Wisconsin. 

ArrivalB aad departures of vessels. 



■ 


DwoiiptioD. 


' Ariivaltt. 


Depa 

Number. 

1 


rturcM. 
Tonnage. 

157. 535 




' Ktunber. 

t 


Tonnage. 


1 


157. 271 
49,079 


431 


tb.»«..* 




i 262 


271 48. 545 








1 


M.. 


897 


2l»e, 350 


702 


206. 080 







figores show that a larger class of vessoLs than formerly is being em- 

^Im Gvaen Bay trade. Thus, while there were 14 less arrivals in 1891 than 
» toniuup waa 81,558 tons greater. There were 42 less departures in 1891 
N^ bvl«»taiiiuige waa 33J55 tons greater. 



-nooo I 



-^T -1. -r- . 



a 



nf 

*« 



1 






■••li.*— 



.— ;- r -^::: i-Si^yy.. ^r-^.^ ^"^ 




••• 



*■•• 



•?« 



»j*. 



T^ 1. . • 






-•ti. 



- i* U'CV CINl/ filMf (»f flow tl PM»f" V«*- 



**ff: 



• T T, arm^ u- ^ \ 



»♦ 



> ^ -■•■• 



N . 



.<• *» 



x».. 



■^ •ke«~ 






V . -^i 



2190 



« r or THE CHIEF OP ENGISEEHS, XT. S. Al 



.Hi? 



Remarkt i revoMiMfndatioiu. — The steam tu^ at tbiB 1 
employed iii b fishing trade »nd tovrage of ratts from tbe I 
end of Lake k-liigan and Green Bay, therefore they are not i 
for towing xailiiig vwiseL* seeking entrance into the harboi 
whfin the wind is unfavorable they are obliged to " beat" in 
iM'ing shoal near the shore ends of llie liarbor piers, they a 
touch bottom when well inside the harbor entrance. It Willi 
be desirable to dredge the i-hanne] 12 feet deep the full width 
the piers. This would require she removal of about 39,000 en." 
of material. 

For the formation of a wider channel, maintenance of the a 
rebuilding decayed saperstmcture, an appropriation of $12,000: 
mended for the fiscal year ending Jole 30, 1894. 
EatlmBted ooat (m« BepoK «f Chief of EDgineers, 1871, page 123) ... 



ArPRO PKU.TI0NB. 



March 3, 1871 (CS.OOO 

June 10, 1873 25,000 

MttTcliS, 1873 25,000 

Jtine23, 1874 15,000 

Maroh3.18T6 IB, 000 

Angnst It, 1876 6,000 

Juii(.18, 1878 10,000 

M«rnh3. 1879 20,000 

JuneU, 1880 20,000 



March 8, 1881 . 
August 2. 1882. 
Julys, 1884 ... 
Aui!U8t 11, 1888 
September 19, 1 
July 13, 1893.. 



Total . 



Money xtatement. 



Jnlf 1, 1891, balance 



Amount iirailahle for Gxro] yearttncling June 30. 1893 

I Amount (estimated) roqnired for completinn of existing project . 

J Amount tbat oan Ira pro litably expended io flsoal yenrendiug jiuie30, 1894 
J Submitted in complinnce with roijuirDmeuta of seotioua Sof river t,ad 
I barbor miM of 1866 and 1867. 



COMMKRCIAL STATISTICS FOR THR CALENDAR YEAR ENMIfO DKCSMBKR SI, 
[Furalalicd by Ur. R. E. UaiUs.niftfor.) 



Arrivali and departaraa of re»»el». 





]>D*r-npU<>n. 


Arrive.. 


Doparto 




Niuobar. 


TonnmgB. 


Number. 


Tn 




S3 


IRKS 


»3 

as 
















>U 




>u 











1.^. 



i 

I 



• H* 



— J 



^— - '^^ .ns:>-^: -r .«•• ir^r .«: 'r"-:»* >♦ 






• " 












•J. 



• *: 



r ■ 
\ 



% t 



* «-i. ir-r I'.'—." ■• -."IT":' "Z lii 

>.- ... ' Ia -^ (* 1^ . _ 



V 



u •" 



t •• 



.1. 



1 ■»• 



I 



--- :.:•! :: ; 



" - "• ^ ' ■*- »ii, • .■ ■ " T i ."i . 






k(» T - . • •. 



a. I I ^BEPOKT OF MAJOR OBEGOET. 2193 

^.i t»*t 0/ tame in place under t^Hlrat-l dalti Dtfemier IS, 1S90. 
n amd Gtvrge Cooper, □/ J/anitmivic, (Fit., for rebulldlHf atove Ikt 
■"- 1 of (A« norlh pier at Manileieoc Harbor, (f iicvntin. 



i f I ' 



CUL nrATi0ncs roB twk calksdab txar ku 

[Furnished by Ur. FredsHck Sehnetl*. in 



i DKCKUOER 31, 18JI1. 



JrriraU and d^artHret of cMfcI*. 



Frimvipol arOelet of export and import (iarJw oiiJjr). 



^toral implementa. - 



toaa and vei^tablea - . 



»pi>r 
,.50.1. — 



Ezporto — Continued. 

Vfmgoaa and corriogM .. 

Wh«Rt 

Wool 



Totol 72.0691 



v%\\ie or export*, S3,5 






17* 

Coalandcoko 129,380 

Iron and tteol 502| 

Lath Ig5t 

Leather 461 

Lime and cement 145 

Lnmber 6, 000 

ilorohandiae (genetal) 30, 000 

Plaster, laud 600 

Salt 2,670 

San log* 13.500 

Stone 3,500 

Wood... 10,000 

Totri 186,547* 

0. 000 ; total approximate value of im- 



ni;r<ii!r ok TiiK chiiif ok f.n<itnf.kks, i;. 



IMPROVEMENT OF SHEBOYGAN HAHBOR, WISCOKSIS. 

Oltject. — ^To secure a navigable chaunel from Iviike Michigaii ; 
Sheboygan River, vrbere the harbor of Sheboygan is fiitnated. 

Pr<yV(7.— The projt't-t i'or the improvement of this harbor wa* 
in 1852, and had for itM objeet the formation of a I::^-fnot cbai 
trauee to the mouth of the Sheboygan River. This was modi 
1873 so lis to aectire a deeper channel by farther pier exteiiiai,, 
droilging. Both projects were completed within their estimated' 
and a channel was fonned 100 feet wide-, with a depth of in to *" 
between the piers. A survey made inlSSO showed a depth of h 
12 feet between the piers and on the outer bar. The existing 
was adopted in 1881, its object bei"" to deepen the channel s 
ther by extending tlie piers to tu^ 20-foot eonfoiir ia the li 
dredging to a depth of 18 feet between, their outer ends, the di 
ere»gii)g tn 14 feet at the shore line. 

Present irrrrks. — Pile and crib piers ■ (i) North pier, 2,270 fei 
coinx)Ofled of 900 feet of pile and cril er, built by the ('ity, from , 
feet wide; 1,320 feet of cribs 20 fet. ride, and 50 feet of criba 
wide. (2) South pier, 2,387 feet long, composed of 780 feet of ' 
cribjiier, built by the city, from 12 to 20 feet wide; 132 feet of; _ 
20 feet wide, 1,425 feet of cribs 20 feet wide, and 50 feet of crihil 
wide} built 1852"'01. About 850 feet of the north pier and 900 
the sontb pier built, since 1871, arc good condition, the cribs 
been sunk on a stone or pile fount on. Previous to 1871 thoy 
sunk on the natural lake bottom, composed of shifting sand, 
tlieni to settle very unevenly. 

Ih-iilli iif water. — Originally 4 feet. A survey completed A^_ 
l,S!i;j,Hliowefl the governing dejrth of water in the channel on tha(< 
(o be ftbtiut 13.7 feet. 

(tperations during the fiscal year. — Under contract dated DeOd 
13, ISilO, with Messrs. Truman and Cooper, of Manitowoc, the I 
pier was extended 150 feet by tJie construction of three cribs, ew 
feet long, 20 feet wide, and 20^ feet high, including supersbiW 
Tlii-sc cribs were sunk upon tbundations consisting of 24 piles for 
crib, i.ut off 13]^ feet below the established datum plane. Work u 
this contract was completed October 20, 1891, 

Drcdguig by hired labor and the use of United States Dredge % 
for the improvement of the channel, was begun June 26, 1891, aol 
progress at the beginning of the fiscal year. It was continued I 
August 15, 1891, when the work was closed and the dredge transft 
t^i Port Washington, The dredging resulted in the formation ' 
channel 16 feet deep with a width of 90 feet for about two-thirda ofl 
leugtli and 60 feet wide for the remainder ; 17,030 cubic yardM 
niateriiil were removed during the flscal year. i 

lUmiirkM and recommendations. — A channel of less than 16 feetdi 
not niict the present requirements of the commerce of tliis harbor. | 
yi.,ii.,.|i,..i ii> .i.'t.ili to less thim 14 feet this season, with no funds aif 
■.ill' ■ ■■ .-.^ lias been the source of much annoyance and 

siTKiiis idss to sl)ii)])iTS and others interested in navigation. 

.Sevei;il vt 'ist-ls laden with coal for this port, after vainly atteir 
to enter the harbor, have been obliged to seek other ports to diw 
tlieir I'urgoes; and steamers plying the we*t shore of LakeMic' 
and advertising to stop here daily, have been obliged to pass in i 




i 



BKPOttT OF MAJOR GREGORY. 



2195 



iOuMit stopping) thoceb^ oansing serioaa loss and great an< 
» owners of Teuds, ahmpers, consignees, passeng^^, and 
n more or less ooncemed. 

m a pprop r iation be made Ibr the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 
propoeed to expend it in pier extension and snch dredging 
mas may be necessarr for tiie maintenance of the channel and 
n appvopriation of 967,000 is recommended. 

It fuA of the pnMnt prq|eo^ Adopted in 1881 (see Report of 
IMO^puenOI)^..^ 
le Beport 




{ 



of Ghiof of Snsinaenp 1884, page 1866). 



$150,000 
46,000 



d --- 196^000 



APPBOPBlATIOlfB. 



It 80,1868 

K, 1864 (allottod). 

Siaos 

i£l867 1. 

10^1809 (allotted). 

ILISTO 

hAlSTl.^ , 

1^1813 

9B.1874 

i%1875 

It 14^ ISIS 



$10^000.00 
10,000.00 
47,508.91 
8,000.00 
14,850.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
18,000.00 
10,000.00 

lo^ooaoo 

1^000.00 
^000.00 



Aet 



June 18, 1878 $4^000.00 

Mtfoh^lSTO 3,000.00 

Jnne 14, 1880 7,000.00 

Msroh8,1881 25,000.00 

Anga8t2, 1882 80,000.00 

Jn^5, 1884 28,000.00 

Angn8t5,1886 15,000.00 

AngQft 11, 1888 15,000.00 

September 19, 1800 15,000.00 

July 13, 1892 25^000.00 

Total , 843,448.91 



JIfoiMy #tot0meftt 

&balaiiee unexpended $12,525.43 
I; amonnt expended dnring fiscal year 12,392.75 

92, balance unexpended i:^2. tJH 

ppropriatedby act approved July 13,1892 25,000.00 

Tailable for fiscal year ending J une 30, 1893 25, 132. 68 



\ (estimated) required for completion of existing project 42, 000. 00 

t tbat can beprofitably expended in fiscal year endiug J une 30, 1894 42, 000. 00 
UA in compliance witb requirements of sections 2 of river and 
ir acta of 1866 and 1867. 



UeHaU U9ed and eo$i of $atM in place for extending the north pier 150 feet hy S 
K^SOhjffOhy gO^feet, at Sheboygan Harbor y Wie,^ under contract dated be- 
e5, 1890, wOh Horatio Truman ana George Cooper, of Mamtowocy JVis. 



Artiolee. 



r, D by 12 inches and 12 by ISinclies feetB.M.. 

mher. 12 by 12 inches and 12 by 18 inches do 

,t1nr 12 inches do 

1 piles niiiiilwr . . 

jHiund A . . 




MB spikes 



.Uu. 

. . do . . . 

.cord 8. 



Quantity. 


Price. 


iW,856 


$25. 00 


92, 952 


22. (K) 


9,240 


18. (K) 


72 


11.50 


12.685 


.03 


3,6WA 


.04 


282 


.04 


636<\, 


0.50 



Amonnt. 



rJ, 471. 40 

2. 044. 94 

im. 32 

82H. IK) 

:tbO. 55 

147.77 

11.28 

4. 134.tt5 

10.184.91 



JboC^fffJO.' 



* OF BXGl.\EER»«, I', i^. AUI 

■■ CimtMS TZaK KNDDiO DXCENS 

Vk.- ri*iFHi[i dtftrict. 31ilw>akcB. 



»*(twi) 

OMi KDd cokft . . 
Smfty (ranlca . 






I I 15. 

IMFBOrKMEXT OF FOBT WASHISGTOS HASBOB, WISCONSE 

Obtjert. — To se4-oi« a aavi^bte rhannri rntnuira from Lake M] 
tn a small artiflcial harbor fomiMl bv excaratuig tro iDterior 001 
basins. 

Projtrt. — The original project for the improreBient of this hart 
adojited in 1869. and provided far the bnildinj; of two paraUe 
pstendiiig from the shore line to 10 feft of w»ter in the lake, s 
i-xcavation «if a basin (J(*() feet Ion? by :S.tO feet wide inside of th' 
line. Id 1870 a deflection of about 10 defri^ees to the imuthwa 
made in the direction of the piers, this being considered a nion 
able db-ectioD for their alignment. In ISTiJ a fiiitlier niodificf 
the plan was made by excavating a second basin to tbe northnu 
nearly at right angles to the first basin, and extending the piers 
14-foot contonr in the lake. This doubled the available area 
harbor and reduced the height of the entering waves very mat 

This is the project now being carried out. Tlip two interior 
have a combined area ol about 5j acres and area to be dredg 



:=,4 ~ - ~ - ' 



f**; ■*•■■.' • .. - 

JMpisSDEl t X — BEPOBT OF ICAJOlEt GREGORY. 2197 

IS iMty niQi ft ohannel of the same depth oonnecting them 
bktt, lae dtannel indosed between two piers 160 feet apart 
iSuig oat to 14 lidet of water. 

' wcrkMs — (1) North pier, 030 fbet long, composed of 370 feet 
.4 feet wide; 600 fbet^ 20 ftet wide, and 50 feet. 24 feet wide. 
i pier 1^226 feet kmg, eompoaed of 370 feet of cribs 14 feet 
I feet 20 liMit wide, and 406 feet of pile revetmeut. The piers 
It 1871-*1887, and are in good condition, with the exception 
near feet of saperstraotoro, boilt in 1871, which is mncu de- 
d reqnireB renewal 

9f water. — The original depth of water at the month of Sank 
m about one feot. Soundings taken in May, 1892, indicated a 
spth iu the entrance channdTof 10^ feet. 
HonM during the fi$edl year.— By hired labor and the use of 
Hates Dredge No. 2, 14,300 cubic yards of material were removed 
B entrance channel and basins. Dredging was suspended 

16, 1891, and the dredge transferred to Mencmionee, Mich. 
Dooids of stone were transferred from the shore end of the piers 
lor hoftda and used for refilling and riprap where undue setUe- 
doecurred. 

riEi amd reoommendalifm$. — ^The north pier was built the fbll 
ontemplated in 1887. It is proposed to complete the south pier 
iding it 100 feet as soon as rands are appropriated. 
September, 1890, to May, 1892, there was a deposit in thechan- 

basins of about 7,000 cnbio yards of material, reducing the 
r water in the entrance channel about 1{ feet. The removal of 
1,000 cabie yards of material is necessary to maintain the re- 
lepth of water in the channel and basins. Three hundred and 
linear feet of the shore end of each pier, built in 1871, have seen 
>ne years' service. The superstructure of this portion of the 

badly decayed and should be rebuilt above the water line. 
[mated eost of the dredging and rebuilding 640 linear feet of 
•ueture is $10,000. 

d an appropriation be made for the fiscal year endinp: June .'^), 
is contemplated to expend it for di'edging, and rebuilding; abovt* 
sr line the shore ends of the north and south piers. An appro- 

of $16,500 is recommended. 

▲PPRCtf KI ATIONS. 

Act of— 



IL1870 $15,000 

hS, 1871 15,000 

10, 1872 15,000 

li3, 1873 15,000 

23, 1874 10,000 

b 3, 1875 10,000 

*tl4, 1876 8,000 

1S» 1878 6,000 

h 3, 1879 7,500 

14, 1880 20,000 



MarchS, 1881 $17,000 

August 2, 1882 17,000 

July 5, 1884 10,0(K) 

August 5, 1886 5, 000 

August 11, 1888 5,000 

September 19, 1890 3, 0(K) 

July 13, 1892 6,500 

Total 184,000 



Money statement. 

01, balance unexpended $3, 034. 70 

ISftZ, amount ez]>ended during fiscal year 2, 901. 34 

Wif balance unexpended l*^* ^ 

^iropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 6,500.00 

kvailable for flseal year ending June 30, 1893 6,633.:^ 




¥. 



J ■ \ ■ - ■ 

4IBF0BT OF ILMOB QREGORT. 2199 

11x6. 
OF BEFU6E AT MILWAUKEE BAT, WISCONSIK. 

rtri— Tte proYide a secnie anchorage for vessels engaged in the 
I oommBKoe of fhe li^es, by inclosing the northern section of 
Ipkiee Bay wifhin a breakwater, fiirmed of timber crtb work, placed 
aptk vpoa a fimndation of stone. 

iflL-^lie project was adopted in 1881 and provided for the con- 
^ of a breakwater, the north arm of which commences at a dis- 
if abodt 600 feet from the north shore of the bay, in a depth of 8 

jttreetimi is 8. 25o 19^ E. and its length 2,450 feet From this 
ike directkni of fhe main arm of the breakwater is changed to 8. 
P. fiir the proposed distance of 5,200 feet^ with an opening of 400 
Ufee dlstfluioe of 1,000 ISset firom the angle, to provide a fiur- weather 
heeand eodt for vessels. 

wmd «09r&9. — The north arm of the breakwater is completed. The 
)w|1ir>i1j section of it, 600 feet in length, is oomprilsed of 6 cribs, 
no feet long and 20 feet wide, and the remaining 1,860 feet of 37 
f eaeh 50 £eet long by 24 feet wide. 

B dimensioiis of l^e cribs forming the main arm to the northward 
e opening are 50 feet by 24 feet by 22J^ feet^ with the exception of 
STo. 62, which is next to or immecQately northward of the opening 
1 100 feet long by 24 feet wide by 22^ feet high, over the whole of 
k saperstmctore has be^i baUt to a height of 6 feet above datnm. 
rm crilm, numbered firom 63 to 69 inclusive, each of dimensions 
ly 24 by 22| feet, have been sank to the southward of the o^n- 
wer 400 feet of which superstmctnre has been built, 
e total length of substructure built is 4,150 feet, ux)on which 3,8/>0 
*f superstructure has been built. 

pih of icater. — ^The slope of the lake bed from the northern end of 
•reakwater to the angle formed by the north and main iirms is 0.87 
to 100 feet, the angle crib being set in 29.4 feet of water. The 
ige depth of water on the line of section of main arm to the south- 
of the opening is 34.6 feet. 

erations during the fiscal year, — Under the contract made with 
itopher H. Starke, dated December 13, 1890, Crib No. 62 was sunk 
e northward of the opening for fair-weather exit, and Crib No. 6G' 
tnult to a height of 18j^ feet and sunk upon the foundation iiix>n 
h the overturned Crib No. 66 was first placed. Cribs Nos. 67, 08, 
39 were built and sunk in their respective i)08itions and covered 
a decking of plank of 4 inches in thickness and 8 inches in width. 
9>erture8 between planks being about 1^ inches wide. A simihir 
ing of plank was spiked on the superstructure built under this 
ract over Cribs Nos. 63, 64, 65, and 66 to a height of 6 feet above 
m, the length of the substructure under the (contract being 500 
iind of sui)erstructure 525 feet. 

le scow Dunham has been reengaged to serve as light-sliip at the 
ti end of the breakwater, under a new agreement made with her 
IT, in accordance with the terms of advertisement and sepecifica- 

w 

wutrks and reoommendaeton^.— On the 13th of May last, soundings 

taken around cribs Nos. 62 to 69 inclusive, a plat of which shows 

bat very slight changes have been made in their foundations dur- 

he past winter. The superstructure has suffered no material dam- 



•22^0 liiii'i.Ki or THL CHiKr or e>g:>"zi:e-. r. -. irmt. 

age. either fix»m >ea ■»! it.e. which is evidcL.c\: thuc no storri' «»f ni 
Severity have oecurrt-d. 

The •^hofr aciTetiiiiis whuh have lorzue^ m the northern rrctioB 
hiutmr are hirjif, their >nj»rrfi«.ial area r-^inj: '..•.••s- a*'*»ar 15 aiTei 
triit. The aiichorajfe ar«M out'-ideMf the ct>:.toar liar of 1^ feet li 
what diiiiiiii«*he«h The iimjei-T adoptt^i l»y rLe B«:<krd «.>t' EnginMI 
Hiitiue«i l»y SiH-4.ial Oriier> No. 3i*. X'^i-'^irr^ph -. Headquartciti 
ul Eii;:iiii-er«*. dateii April 7. 1n>1. was as follows: 

t-* : ^.rtv.-. n Th- Vz-i'i-'i^J oi The bre«kwa;«r ^nd i^« &&:re. to be cIoMdhi 
.: : in-: :-r\- T-.ir^ . -:^ 

Fr«>m ihr iai»;dity with which the shore a-H^nrti-:*!!* have fonnel 
n«'W ro:iHid»-!e«i desirable t*» clo^k- the s]»a<"e l«erwe^ii the nortlNI 
..! the l»:tMkwat»r aiiti ihe shore, leaving an «>i"en:L:: i»f alioutJ 

.t! "Lf I'le^-Mt eli«l "t The t»2vakwaT<-r I'»r the pa^'v.i^e aiid aceOH 

•:»■:. ■•:' -iiiiall l>Mts. A row *.*f >herT i»i::a^. reeLiSVo-e*! by mail 
•■-■I . I'.il*!-. wi.uM etfei-t this, at a i-ms: n»»t exce^iiL^ *L2 pern 
; • :. ^r a :..':al eipeuditure of alKiut W-.-i*.*. 

v^-.; ■»: $1«1 

%k^^ ....a _■■■•-■■■■--•••-■■■•■-•■--■- >.. ....•> ^^H 

. .^ , ■ >.V i^* •t...ii 

55 

■ <vv 70 

•-■ .- :?^ 2: 

lo 



c»o 



f - . » 



r*. 



■ I 



APPKXOtX i I — ^BEFOBT OF UAJOB GREOOBY. 2201 

II 17. 

OVEUEST OF MILWAUKEE HABBOB, WISCONfflN. 

, 3 Becom n naTigable i-haniiel fi-um Lake Michigan into tke 

e River, wllil^b is the interior harbor of Milwaukee. 

r-Tfae origtiuil project adopted in 1852 provided for thefor- 

ft'efaauD^ 260 feet wide aud 12 feet deep, by dred^ug aotoas 

-^ ' ■ \ oTerlapped the month of the Milwaukee Bivei at the 

10 feet to the northward of its original outlet, and by the 

t parallel piers of crib work, each 1,120 feet in length, for 

t of the sides of the channel thns formed. In 1868 an 

ha piers became necessary fbr the requirements of com- 

tder a continnation of the original project both the north 

98 were extended 600 feet into the lake to 18 fleet depth 

ks. — The entire length of the channel betveen the piers 
rt ; its width at the outer end baa been increased through the 
tling of cribs to 284 feet. 

1 of each of the 1,120-fuot sections of piers first built is 20 
e pier extensions of COO feet in length are 26 feet wide, exoept- 
' ST beads, wliich are each 30 fieet wide and SO feet long, pro- 
ft bulkhead of piles and oak timbers. 

Lctnre of the inner section of the north pier for 1,052.6 

_th by 20 feet in width, is of qnarry-foced dry stone 

B side walls being 4 feet thick. Between these walls for a 

3 feet the fiUing is of gttme packed with gravel, and c«v- 

__ I large paving stones of 9 indies in thickness. The filling 
._B w^ls for the remainiug 389.6 taet is of packed stone, with a 
tyex of concrete pavement of inches in thickness. Piles for the 
Btionof the pierM havti Won driven along the channel faces. Tl»! 
Btmcture over the pier extensions of the tiUO feet was built in 1 all 
872. In 1887 the superstrncture of the 600 feet extension of the 
pier was i^ut down aud rebuilt. In 1889 the snperstructuie of 
)^ of the outer nectionof the south pier was cut down and i'ebnilt. 
>tA of icater, — Soundings were taken between the piers and in 
Michigan beyond the extremities of pietS on the 4th day of May, 
a plat of which shows that since similar soundings wore taken in 
mber, 1891,a deposit ofaboutO.Bfeetof material has been made in 
ihannel between piers, leaving a depth of waterway of 17 feet. 
Ueof tbe pier extiemities the water is fully 18 feet deep below the 
K plane. 

tratiuHt during the fineal year. — Pro^Kisals were opened on the 
day of July, 1891, for dredging the channel between the jiiers to 
pth of 18 feet and for a width of 162 feet. Mr. Christopher U. 
ktfs bid for doing the work at 18 cents per cubic yaitl was the 
at offer received, and a contract was made with him on July '29, 
, under which 25,896 cable yards of inateiial were removed fnun 
ihanuel. Ten and three-fourths cordsof stone were purchased aud 
id in the north pier in places where the concrete covering had been 
wed by the waves. 

markt and recommendations. — In the report of Jane 30, 1889, the 
■ of this harbor were stated in detail. The deterioration of the 
I from wear and climate has been steadUy progressing since that 
. In 1879 it was estimated that an average yearly expenditiwe of 
no voald be required for the maintenance of this harbor. Since 



K^3n>tS I I REPORT OP MAJOE OHEOC l.. i3 

L STATlBTICfl FOR TH« CA^t-BHDAB TKAB RNI>INO DRCKM8KB 31, ISfll. 

ftrbor, MUwaokM!. Wi».; L-oUectioa distrbt, Hilnaukee, WU.; Dwtnwt 
y, Hitivaukee, Wis. ; unoDnt of n^venue collected during the year «3SS,- 


i 


Aninla. 






JTg. flnu. 


*■». 






!,U« 372.120 iwi 












' 1 ' ' 







lowing (jKtracln tnki>u from 
Bmerc« fur tbe liacal year ei 
bnie of tbe leading Mrticleti 
it tiie year : 



l.bc ATiiinal report uf tbe secretary of tbe cbam- 
iding April 4, 1893, show liie receipl« anil eliip- 
' the tuubor and city of Milwau- 



irpoete 12,3J 

«« (Wiiwcmsia) 6, 4£ 

lb; lake) l,O0S,ffi 

<l™r«n) M9,3i 

1 3^5* 



Sbipmnnt* ; 

Butter--'."-'-.-""----" 

Coal 

Corn 

I'lai-Beed 

Flour 

Hides 

Hogs 

LMd 

Ltunber 

Lath 

Malt 

Meat (bulk) 

Mill stntfa 

Oat« 

Pork, beet, hama, shonld- 

era, und middlon 

Pig iron 

Potatoea 

Salt 

Shtngles 

Wheat 



Total 1,871, 992i 



amber of manufacturing establishmpnts in tlie city of Milwaukee is 3,258. 
iber of personB employed in these eatabliabniBntB ia 55,890. The capital in- 
in mannfactures ia $80,506,500, The value of prodiiftts during the yean 
,886. Two new lines of ateaniers have been estalilialiod, connecting with 
line* on the east shore of Lake Micbigan. one of whith connects with St. 
**'->h., the other with the railroad linea at Buiitim Harbor 
iapeodent lines of steamerv plying ai 
■mei* Along the weet shore. 



- ' ■ ■ p 

tj: -•«.: '•'' ••" -— • ^*-' ^ - :*-i?^ n -it? i'^r.rii .: vji 

,^- Til II > *■*' '•^'^ i*^x hz*i !•• "»-rc T'lit?. riit? aocih 
nf?r rui» .-uumi^ ">' t^* :t*r:jT-: _::. loi- :«L4:iii:ria -a^iii 







■-'»* -ll ■ 1 '■■ -mi. 



APPESUtX I ! ^REPORT OP MA.TOH GREGORY. 



2205 



remove^^i in its accomplistiiuent was 14,273 cubic yards. 

contract made with lUe-ssre. Truman and Coopei', of date 
13. 1890, for extending the south pier into latte Michignii for 
of 200 feet, by construetiug 4 cribs, ea«^h uf dimenitionit TiO 
<i feet, and isiiikiug tlmra ou a foundation of pilua, the npeoi* 
ras completed and a continuous supersti^vtnre bnitt ovtr 
neight of 6 feet above datum, before tlic iOth of October, 

and rccommnidatitms. — Until both piers ar^i extended farther 
kke, a freqnent use of the dredge will be necessary. The 
itore of the weetem section of the north pier 200 feet in 
12 feet in width, and 635 feet of if« middle section of 20 feet in 
1 a dilapidated condition, as is also 310 feet in length of the 
:ture of the west end of the south pier. The damage to the 
; outer end of the north pier, caused by the collision of the 
Hty of Lttdington, of the Cloodrich Transportation Company, 
miiig of the 20th of December, 1891, is of a serious charactei', 

of the expense and difficulty incurred in repairing structures 
ifi-actnred below the water surface. The broken timbers uf 
will have to be removed and replaced by new material t« a 
1 or more feet below datum. 

f the piers should be extended 300 feet. In 1880 it was esti 
at an average yearly expenditure of $8,000 would be recjiyred 
aintenance of this harbor. Since that time the t^tal sum of 
ttions made has been $63,500, of which $21,000 has been ap- 

pier ejttension, so that the average yearly expenditure for 
knee of channel and repairs to piers ha^^ been but $3,541.66 per 

the i>afit twelve years. This amount is inadeqaate to the 
loce of the harbor as is apparent from its present condition. 

APPROPRIATIOHS. 



ik, mi.'-".'.".'.'.'.''. lO^ooo 



23,187*.... 

13,1875... 
K 14,1676.. 



10,000 
10,000 
8,000 



March 3, 1S79 
June 14, 1880. 
March 3, 1881. 
Augiiot 3, 



JnlT6,l&4 

AngnatS, 1836 

ADgHBt 11, 1888 

September 19, 1890 . . 
July 13, 1892 



6,000 
6,000 
6.000 
7,000 
7,000 
10,000 
10,000 
17,500 
25,000 

289,785 



Money statement. 



Tulable for fiao»l year ending Jane 30, 1893 

(fwttmated) reqnired for oompletion of existing project ._, 

afttcanb(iprofiUbIy«xpe>D<lediDfl8cal;earemUDgJune30,18»4 39,500.00 
ad tn compliance with Teqnixementa of sections 2 of liver and 




Iki- 






{ 

t 
i 

I 



i4 
it 

I 

I 



3*J 



•I- 1 %i 

• ft 

iiAizitaibi 

• htrdge. 

A plat ( 
ufuler favi 
' iin enter r 



^ ■» . 



OF MAJOR CREGORT. 2207 

I I 19. 

fcpSOTElC£NT>>F KBNOSHA. HAHBOR, WISCOIfsni. 

I Hecore a navigable chaunel fioiu Lake'Michjgan into tb« 
an at the inoiiUi of Pike Greek, upon vhioh tiie city tud 
moeha nre »itaated. 

lie original project for the improvement of tbiB harbor, 
X53, iTflK to secare & chanDel 12 feet deep from 12 feet of 
j« ^Uchigan to the interior banin or bayoa by the cooBtmc- 
I placed parallel to each otber aud 160 feet apart, and by 
Ikweeo them. Id 1866 a modification of the original project 
I ocder to proTide a navigable channel 15 feet in depth. 
nodiiication or extension of the project was made in 1^89, 
''ed for the exteiiMon of the north pier 300 feet and of the 
ttfeet. 

rjts. — ^Tbe north pier is 1,600 feet long. Ita inner or 
tion, vhich was built either by i)rivate parties or the city of 
t of pile work, 365 feet iu length, iiad is 12 feet iride. Thead- 
'lOn to the eastward, bnilt ander the original project of 1852, 
ffk 610 feet long and IS feet wide. The extension of this 
(66 is 625 feet long, 350 feet of wbich is 30 feet wide. The 
ia 950 feet long and 20 feet wide, commencing at the shore 
(tending into the lake. The north pier extends 270 feet 
i the lake than the south pier. 

voter. — ^The natnral depth of water at Hbe month of Pike 
1^ it watt Improved changed with each recnrring easterly 
[lO Ibiiii 2or 3 feet could be depended upon at the entrance. 
tdoae nnder the project furnished a channel of from 9 to 
^ between the piers, 
na of the pierB since 1866, together with periodical (lie<ig- 
«My provided a channel about 12 feet in depth, but ni 
intalD a greater depth of water trequeut dredging has been 

E«f Boondings which were taken at this harbor in April, ISIVJ, 
in available depth of bat 12J feet of water in the ehannol. A 
ank in mid-channel has but 12 feet of water over it. An oxten- 
postt of sand has been made since dredging was done in .Inne, 
To restore the channel to a depth of 15 teet and wiilth of 80 feet 
jnire the removal of about 15,0(H) tubic yards of material, scow 
em^it. 

sontoor line of 13 feet extends 200 feet beyond the outer end of 
th pier, and the bank to the sontli\v:ird of the harbor entrance 
t6Wfeet outside the eastern extreniityof the south pier. Under 
inditionn it is improbable that u I'liiitinel of greater depth than 
\2i feet of water can be maintained, except by a constant use of 
dge. 

atu/tu during thefigcal year. — At the close of the fiscal year end- 
ue 30. 1891, the three cribs which were built under the contra<-t 
rith Messrs. Truman & Cooper, of date Decemlwrr 13, 1890, for 
ing the soutli pier 15*> IVct, were Hiiiik in position. The Huper- 
m was subsequently built and supplied with stone ballast and 
1 with a decking of 3-inch plank. The contract was closed July 
L An agreement was entered into with Mr. S. O. Dixou on 
.iW2, fiir restoring the channel to 15 feet in depth and 80 feet in 
1^ it! whole lengui, at a cost of ISJ cents per cubic yard of uul- 





AtTl*«l,. 


nfjatiuTM, 




10S 


w 

i^:^ 


jtb. r»H,. 






3N U.SHg 









rmporM — (Joiid'iniEd. Tunn. 

UH™ • IK 

Lath 303,5 

Lumber (bard nntl Koft) ^3,750 

PunohyM ,. 

I'Uos lai 

Posto (fimcp) 328 

Shinslos - 4S0 

Slalw 300 

Stona - 5,a08 

Wood 3.750 




2205 



'KOTEMENT OF WAUKEQAN HARBOR, ILLINOIS. 

a provide a shelter for the ]iri)te*tioii of vessels engaged in 
B of the laty of Wiiukegau. 

1 1852 ao !ipproi»riiitioii of $15,000 wju* made for tlie " iin- 
f tlic h;irbor and breakwater at Waiikegait, 111." The 
I was a breakwater parallel to the shore io 20 feet of water. 
) by 25 feet, was placed iii position, but was carried away 
I the work theu abaiidoDed. In 1872 an examiDation and 
I, as I'Allod for by the river and harbor a«t of that year, 
niteraplated a breakwater in 21 fe«t of water. Ko action 
a tide report. 

Bter of the improvement of this harbor is somewhat dif- 

Miat of other points on the Great Lakes. Most of the 

8 hare consisted in deepening the mouths of streams emp- 

e Jake, bat at Waukegan there is only a creek emptying 

i, and it is of no imitortance for harbor porposes. 

mt project was a^lopted in 1880, its intention being t^ con- 

r basin of sullicieut capacity to meet the requirements 

3il tnid'' by iinlusiTi;; a portion of Lake Michigan within piers 

! '<{ |iili. wiirl;. ;nni ;iii entrance channel between piers from . 

'.l^UiU «i uiittii in Lake Alichigan to the basin; the channel 

. to be excavated by dredging to the depth of 1^ feet. 

VOrfa.— The length of the north pier is 1,651.6 feet; the 

^^MOtlt pier is 1,226.9 feet, making a total length of pier 

**ft«f Th^nortb pier, which incloses the basin, is com- 

1 Wi tiu flnt of which runs easterly from inside the 

b 1879 for a distance of 345 i«Bt into the lake. 



^ 



I ■ciY/irr '/r tub chiep of EKoncEEas, v. s. au 

'rUim •M'*um \m i-^m\tr\mA of a Mngle row of 11' by 12 incb ttm 
p\\f*, tK^uUnvM Ml III* niiKle or »ii(«r cud fur a lengtii of U 
imb |'ll<-« lirtvtfi at. a i|mtaiic« of V2 Ivct from the trout row,!! 
mnuf Ih'Iiik Itlliil wltti nUiuK ballast;. 

11ii. licit '»«rtli.ii (if pil« work, I't fwt wide, runs in a sontl 
f)iiii tni II ilUliiiK-f i.f .'WO.H fwt t« till! rhannc! angle. 

'I'l •>{ fx'.tl'fii iif 10 frt'l, ill widMi. wliich ruus in a son 

illri'i'll'in I'll- II iIikIiiii'U <»f ri:i,'(.R feet from tUo chanopt mi| 
iii'lNnl •'!' Iivo I'i'KH 111' (-loitcly di'ivi3u wliito o,tk pile^ divlAg 
IliniH l>v "••"•< r«vvp><lrlvi>ti at dittouues of abont 32 feetafi 
' ii<ti-il wHU .1 Ihili |>tii<> iiimik. imd flllodwith ston»i h^lmift . 



I'J li'i'l 11 



ihilil 



Tli» i>iili>r MCi'lliiii. of in fiH-t in width and 3»^ (tet inli 

Mnii'li>il III lilt' Numc mannor as the imwcdmi; i 

III lliii lllti* of lh(> wnitli p'"' *hfs tM&lAnw bc^««« % 

'I'liK Mitith |>U'r Ik built i |>rotongatktt of tb« faed 

•hbM>I Mndti>»ii(ilm>t it tj- of Waakr^M. 1W^ 

it('ltii<« |>itM, Ut>.:l fi^, is • fvAotrntm^vsmmtn 

(t) ttlHi<>MHt\>n» C' t\v V2 tin ro 1«' l>S fir«t« «^ dwc 

^AwrwMMty » iiM4M« t^ T JWifci r ^n TTtnl hlii. i. 
tM)M^ mmI »ttft<(id *» d» «aln vMtk faJt ^^i , 

^fWvM vw^r^fliiK fMHv VIMS -^BKVB vmSv ^Mbm^bi ^B 4 

>'<Mt«».4 M)A >tnl»iivi V. i^ VaMh* 
j( >^ ^ t" *•».*««. ^hr num.- 'Jw^'SiM 





*-77*1F 






VHDIX 1 I ^REPORT OP MAJOB GREGORY. 2211 

yr more than 1,300 feet to the eastward of the line of 

ondings taken at this harbor in April^ 1892, shows that 
mel of 7 feet in depth near the north pier is available for 
it draft. 

iurhig the fiscal year.— ^t the close of the fiscal year end- 
1891, six sections of pUe work, each 32 feet long, being 
agtb, liad be^i completed in extension of the north pier, 
ag done by hired labor and the purchase of materials inT 
. Subsequently sis: more sections, forming an additional 
» running feet, were bml^ making a total length of exten- 
orth pier of 392 feet, under the provisions of the river and 
r September 19, 1890, which appropriated $35,000 for the 
t of Waukegan Harbor. This extension was completed on 
' of August 1891, when the pile-driver was transferred 
*th to the south pier for its further extension. Work was 
1 the south pier until November 11, 1891, at which date 202 
', of extension had been built, and the pile-driver laid up 
for the winter. 

1 fences have been constructed for the purpose of arresting 
A of the beach to the northward of the harbor from being 
the chimnel and basin. One of these is 176 feet lon^ and 
S8 feet. While they have not completely checked the drift, 
ntity of sand has been retained xkjH>n the beach through 
mentality which otherwise would have been carried into the 

i received and opened on March 16, 1892, in answer to ad ver- 
February 15, 1892, inviting proiK)sals from contractors for 
the entrance channel and harbor basin to a uniform dopth 
elow datum. The bid of tlie Green Bay Dredge and ViW 
ipany was the lowest ofler mad<*, and a contract was nia<lo 
>mpany on the 23d day of March, 1802, to dredge and remove 
5 yards of material at 13j| cents per cubic yard, the work to 
Hi on or before October 31, 1802. 
te 9,714.6 cubic yards of materijil have been removed unchT 

3t. 

and recommendations. — The satisfactory manner in which the 
to the piers were made during the working season of 1801, 
rming a total length of 504 running feet, with one pile-driver 
f nine men, was partly due to the preparations which were 
ig the winter of 1800 and 1801 by the i)iirchase and delivery 
d, but chiefly to the systematic work done by the overseer 
w of men. 

k) cords of stone are needed alongside the piers as ripra]>, 
the deficiency caused through a settlement of that material 
ition. 

x>k for a large increase in the commerce and maiiufa(ttures 
an is very encouraging, and, in consequence, the value of 
has been greatly enhanced. The facilities rendered by the 
rbor are not considered by the citizens of the place as being 
SO the requirements of the growing demands; in view of 
fcition was circulated among the business men for signature 
past winter, and addressed to the honorable the Secretary 
dug that an ample appropriation be made f(U' extending the 
b to the depth of JL6 feet of water in Lake Michigan. A 
fcthis subject was called for, and made by me, dated February 



VM 



Arritat* atii deparfuTn «/ rmeli. 





. i^..u. 


DPHUtoIm. 


h=== 


'k 


30,811 


So. 
M 


SO, til 






aui 


E 13 










Frfaetpal ariioUto/ export aui^impoTl. 

Imports — Con ti n u ed. 

Furuitaro 

Hidt^B 

lAme luiil rcuipnt . . 
Lath 



:.... 


Tata. 






fc't-^- :::::.:: 


500 


V:::".:':'":'.: ''. lai 


tnn,uuIbltii<U.. 


400 


wafkt 


.. 73,00(1 








176 















Mnlt X£ 

MTi^LiMKliHe (genural) 3S,000 

Oil ffT5 

Pork and hppf l.aX) 

PobW ( fonc..) 11* 

Potntww 1»N) 

Salt.: _ _. 7«> 

Shingli'i! BOD 

TicB (railcoad) 700 

Wire-work proilncia 75,001) 

Wood ■. 10,000 

Zinc ore ^650 

Tutiil 309,4611 



IMPBOVEMENT OF FOX RIVER, WISCONSIN. 

—Originally to secure ft cbeap route of water traiiHportatioii 
Mississippi Eiver to the Great Laken and Atlantic seaboard, 
ovement of the Wiaconsiu River having been abandoned, the 
■bject is to obtain a navigable channel, as far as existing works 
oit, from Portage, on the Wisconsin Itiver, to the harbor of 
ly, a distance of 160 miles. 

. — The original project called for slacfe-watcr navigation on 
Biver by means of locks and dams as part of the through 
tation route. The present moditted project is that reeom- 
by the Board of Engineers of May 14, 1886, and is to deepen 
Biver by rock excavation and dredging from Jlontello to (ireeu 
}-feet depth and from' Portage to Montello to 4 feet depth ; to 
e river channels to lOU feet throughout; to deepen the channel 
De I'ere and Green Bay; to dredge the channel in the Neeniih 
lid to remove the bar at the mouth of the Fond du Lac River. 
t workx. — The present works are as follows: 






Hfiniifif nftiiement. 



. _ IUICXIl«l)I«ll ^-. 

inni L>xiionil«(i diuing flaoal year.. 



'xpundnd... 
•iMliitg liabilitiM.. 






[»l.Io 

kgr net Kjipruvod July trt. 1892 . . 

yor ondfug Jiiue 30, IH^S. 



ilcd) miiiSrod for completion of exiiilhi^'projttct 

il>epn>tltal>lj-iispBadediiitim:alye*ren(liu|i;Jiiue3( 
mnliBiKw witli ri!((nirementa of aecUona 2 of rivu.. 
~ UG6 ikii<l 18bT. 






%. BAMUKL WlllTKEV. AHSISTANT KKOnTKBK. 

United St'atks Fux Hivkr Imi-ri 



II OrnoR, 



.the honor to ittlniiit tfaefolloniu;: ' ' .'U^ on t!. ix 

I, ftT>m Piirlape tnOropa Bay. f'Tii- iJi: .Iiiud3<>, .0.-.L'. 

b«7ear coDniated priittupBlly iu 1'^.. , .^ , ■„■■[ t lira ugh thn 

[B riTer outlet of Dupcn Luck, in i:u:;.)i:^liu^ lIu- gii;trd-Katc« kt 
mpleting by dreilgiiig of a 6-foot c'liiLtiiK-l iii X\i<- Xt-unah River and 
fih)m Scutt Stroet Bridge at Fond du Lac to the 7-fout tiirve in I-ake 
redgiiig the channel nt Grignon Rapids (lower Fox), in oomplHiiig 
• acovH, and iiiaking n^pairBof Dredgi> Xu. 3, 

E'ox the iviiter liei'iiiue bo tow (luring thc^ month of Beptember. 1891, 
laM of bouts were oldigr'il tn lav up for the remainder of the aoMon. 
closed by ieu November 17, l«SII, and resumed April 10, 1892. 

Foi bouts drnwiiijr 5 fwt, of water rould ran from tireen Bay to 
Hint Auf;""* '■ I'*'", « ii'ii 111*' ! Ill Hi ftC Nei'nah. Meuasha, Apptetoii, 

ii'i 'li "'■ -■ ■■ '.^ llin crests pf this dnms th»t tbero 

'ci I i it times tliere van a depth of but 6 

Tini ' iiM'k. Kavigatiou WAS clOACil by Ice 

ill I .... 

onlline of worit <loi]i' :it. tliL' diltcrent points between rnrtnge and 
IT sppiiratf hettiliugn, viz: " Iraproviiif; Fox Rivir." and "Improv- 
iconsin rivers, Wiacousiii," is rc-aiiectluUj- submitted. 



redging channrl throngh rocjt bar at river nntlel of De Fere Lock. — The 

iug a chiinnel 7ii fret wide and 4r>0 feet long, tbroui^h the ledge of 

r outlet of the lock, .was begun in November, 1891. 

lant wa.v put in j;riiid rcjinir, placed nu » bcow .indbonsod in. Drill- 

couimeiirvd on DpcemlwT 3 jind corii]iletcd Fubriiary 10. One thon- 

tv-Hve li.'Jrs, '1 iiiihcH in diameti-r, were drilled t» « depth of about 

EMt. Tb.- (utal deptb orbolt-H drilled waB4,227 feet. 

was tltti il out, :ind on February 19, 18tK>, eommenced the removal of 

ikerl nt the l«fr. Hide of the channel, and as th.it»ideof the channel 
ice whero tlie rock cuulil Iw dnmned, ii large iiortinn of it hail tu lie 
e dredge. The rock in of n eooil quality of limestime suitable for 
il banks, etc. One thnnsand one hnndrt^il and ten cubic yards of 
, were drt'dged from » point just below tlio lower end of ohanuel, 

■cows, towe<l to det'p water iu the liver by the tug General G. K. 
mped. Tlie dredging of the channel wa^ carried to a depth of 4 to 

the level of tha top of the lower miter aill of the lock. The work 
tUy 3, 1892. 



-T i; 



T ■ ~- — 



■^ _ 



.;.----i, -i. 






« ..- 



• »^ "-:'- .:n»-r i;i":-:Jf. -^Tj-i 
•..'-- ^'^ *:i»- 1 tZ liiji.-'T^ilT >v 

- : • ^ •~:~-=r iriiT *»'ii"w<. t 
. 1 ■■•1:1 ---I fi t.i»r i» «:i .: ."i'.v. 



* -M 7 "L 






-. ^- •* ».• -^ _'■ "^ » ri r*L rr ill • •■vVr 4 r.^ 2! 

*■. , - ^ .• * •. *»,i * i»**i "j :•- .i-k^"*c ^••i xVr nej 

.-,.... v-^ ; . ■ '» ■ •'■ .: ▼-.•!!-•- A -ii^TAa^v of 3 

. ii%'-\^- i"*« -- -i^ >rt r-ni: •" 



■ ' 1 



: • ■ , » 



t - - I. . i 






:.* var^'.s «■ 



2232 REPORT OF THE CHIEP OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 
Litlo/boaU HaBigalhig Fox Biver, itlKMH Fertage and Grrtn Bay, IFu., Jn^l 



lu^ljlii:;:;; 



AEii«C.(toj» 

D,W,C.dy liugl*... 

■W.W.NBii-ftuJOl..., 



D.W.Lftboya B)t 
Oaliknh (t u t 
ThM.Mi«iir t("G) 
M- UruiwUe (luie*l 



KhI Vm (tBo-u) 
Nt>Hbaucr (irint 
UurKK (Uoniinc B< It: 
BarRe(HBrlE) 
BafBC (U H Ciuly 
BatgK [IdiI tu g mu 

Barm So 1 U 
Barge Kb a[ 
BH-gBN. ay 



A'HNltn- 0/ Inrln^tt nn Fbj! ijjprr, HI* 



* , y&r- (&• mJmAm' fHW BSJ. 



K.. 


I^Fk. 


S: 


So. 


""■ 




r 


M3 

1 
1 


■ja 

■iT 




























!■■ ■■;;■'■;■■■', '.■:■!„,■;:::::::::;::'.: 


WUiWli.icr ■ 

Purt«aoCity - ... 


i^ 



















I I 22. 

OrKUATING ANDCARK OF I.OCKri A.\I) HAMS OX FOX RIVER, WISCON 

iiiiiif; tlie I'xi.stiiiji (Ii'])tU of naviga 
I I'liuals: lor ri'|)atrs to meehaiiicai' 
stnutiiiii.s 11i;it liiive ln'i'ii coin plr led ami in use, l)nt ufterwarii iuji 
li.v liiKiil iir otlicrwi.sc; I'ln- cuiicut vcjiairs to old locka and darns 
luck liiiTisi-s, and \\n- (tick ti'iidiirs'scrvii-i's, have been paid from till 
dflJTiite a|>iiropiiati(ni llir "(iperatinfjraiid careofeanalsand otlierwi 
or navigation" provided by iseetion 4 ol' river and liarbor avt of Jul 
1,SS-1. 

In aecordauee ivitli tliis seetion an itemized statement of the 
peuditutoa is appended Lcieivitli. 



T**":! •- ." •" 



II — BEPORT OP MAJOR GREGORY. 2223 

during the last fiscal year has consisted principally in 
ifetog the cbannel of the apper Fox Biver and in making repaiis of 
^"^ " ~ », lock houses, locks, dams, and canal banks. 

of the work, attention is in\ated to the appended report 
It Engmeer Samael Whitney. 

Money statement. 

JSBlf iMdaBce nncxpended $63,91)8.29 

JSn, amoant expended daring fiscal year 55,981).U8 

^^IHB, balance nnezpended 8,008.31 

• itsUnding Uabilitioe 6,176.96 



balaneeaTailable 1,831.35 

aOotled fofr expenditore in fiscal year cnilhig J iinu 30, 181)3 40, 000. 00 

aT«ilable for fiscal year ending Jane 30, 1893 , 41,831.35 



r 

I . BXPOBT or MB. SAlfUXL WHTrNET, ASSISTANT ENGINEER. 



f 



United States Fox River Improvement, Engineer Office, 

09kk4>9hf Wu,y June ,'K/, 1S02, 

j: I bave tbe bonor to submit tbe following report of operations iiiider the 

<if "Operating and care of canals and other works of navigation on the Fox 

^ for the fiscal year ending Jane SO, 1892. 

_tk doring the year consisted principally in dredging the channel of the Upper 

ttver; in making repairs of boats, dredges, lock houses, and in making moi- 

il lepatrs of locks, dams, and canal banks* 

Plflr* Lodt, — Four cords of loose rock were removed ftom the lock chamber by 
aad a band dredge. 

Fere Canal Bankt, — A revetment wall of cement masonry, 46 feot in lon^i^th and 
jfieet in height, wan built to sustain a portion of the lut't bank of Iho cnnal iniinc- 
lltely above the lock. The slope of the bank was raised to a levol ot' the to)> of the 

with 340 cubic yards of clay, and the canal face of the bank for a distance of 

fret above the head of lock riprappcd with 10 cordH of stone brought from tiie 

k. cot below the lock. 

'Itoek hoMse at De Pere. — The old wooden foundation walls, which were badly do- 

hpd, were replaced by masonry walls, the roof reshingled, a new floor laid in the 

iuar, new stairs built tc» cellar and loft, front room replastered and ])apered. a ]iorch 

inlt st the front of house, two new doors were fitted and hung in pla<>e; a footwalk 

lit from the front to rear of house, and the woodwork of bouse, both inside and 

jiaiuted two coats. A new vault was made for the outhouse, and the outliouse 

m gfMNi repair. 

I* tiltU Ktinknuna Lock. — Four solid timber gates were made, the old gates taken out, 
NLtcs and gate hangings taken otTand litted to tbe gates, and the gates hung in ])lace. 
\:LttiU Knukiiuna Dtim. — ^No repairs were needed during the year. 
^Bapid Crothr Lock, — The u]»per right gate having been knocked (►tl' it« step by a 

king l>oat, the gat«^ was taken out, the step replaced and the gate reining, flight 

lirB were made to hangings of the other gates. 

ijn'if Cro<:hc Dam, — Four hundred and eighty-live cubic yards of clay were wbceb'd 
^Jthe bank of the river and ]»laced to repair the embankment at the rear of tlio 
njlit abutment that had been cut away by water passing through the sluice way ; 
M to prevent farther damage the foot of the embankment was well riprajtped with 
Pl0Drds of large stone boated from the quarry at Kaukauna. 
' Kamkanita fifth Lock, — The upper left gate was removed, one of the valve rods re- 

e»d, and the gate replaced. New racks were put on the valve rods of the upper 
tgate. 
Kawamna Fomrih Lock. — ^The valve chains of the platform valves were repaired. 
Kmukamna Third Lock, — Slight repairs were made to the valve chains. 
jBswiravaa Second I^oeX:.-— Eight new iron rollers were put in pla::e under the gate 




Kmmkanma jPIrt* Zocfc.— During the winter of 1891-92, four new 8(did timber gates 

■mmade, and early in the spring the old gates were removed from the lock to the 

~ bank; the valvos^ gate nanj^gs^ etc., were taken ofif, fitted to the now gates 






I 1 KEPOBT OF MUOE GHEGOEY. 2225 

Third £«<-Jk.—Th«baaw was moToI from ih>>Iu>»il of lh«' lock 
place noac tbe fool of Ui« second lork ; a cvIUr built nitdpr tha 
wly rlapboanlcd ; spotch bailtstlb« fiontsiile, Mud (be outside 

iMion Todn of tlie lon-er I«ft g*te vere repkitvd «nd tim- 

, — Mo Mijmin i«qniT«iL 

'"'iTemdra ireremBile to the hoisting chaiiuof tbealoiG* |;U««. 
•wi^Jurr UOt. swaabout at tlio rear uflhe left Hbutuput wus 
ife jBida Mcbty UDatvd fiom a dtodged bank 2 Bulr« alwiTe lbs 
' — kIb of graT«l boated ftwn Btriin wm pbifpd nluog ttw- rtvi-t 
_.. A break unilrmeatb th«dain, at ii ]>»xiit iionr tbe ri^t ■but- 
Al^ nuking 90 brosb mata. 10 incfaFB by i (etthy 10 feet with 10 
A plaeinfc mer the mala 1.337 onbiv j atiia r>f day uid grarel. A 
twtuD remoxed from Ib« apron and Ibe n-^xbuiit uudprni-atli apron 
eoidn of vtonfs 17 cords of vfair.li nere bonloit from Ufuaslia and 13 
vita. E<«T«Dlv«n brt'kra apron planks wnv replaml bj new pUnk. 
BBS, the drawbridge over the navi^blv puNi «a« pntiiel]' rwulll and 
EOalB. All of ttte iHWtA Hod vsItcb in tbe slniro way nndet the liti>l|^ 
I, new piwtH and valvw frameit and pot in plaits, and low plare* in tli» 
edam were filled witb IWRobiejanliiof icTav^I, eowpleliug lheTV]>:t<r>>, 
built of piles and timber on qaicksatid foiin<lati<>n, and nueda fre<(iient 
vest ita being entire); waahed away. 

E- — Fonr gated, bnilt nl Oahkoah intbeapcingof IKIl, were takoii to thn 
following and biini; in place of the old oiiea. Fonr new rapstun pint' 
tlilt,,new gate spart were made, and faur new tripod cnpHtnns. for 
the gKtea, net in plaee, completing the repairs, 

(frriufe).— Unring the montha of Augnitt and September. 1891, low 
dattt wcT»ral8eil t«tbe original bi-ight of dam b;plArtnt!3T3hruahniiitd 
>f Moon; and the shore protertion ut the enda nf dnio rcuairud witli48 
Mll5eor>l.i>fBtone. 
, — No repairs neodt<d. 
BvKja. — The kitchen floor wiu painted one coat nod the caves iip»ut 

Loek. — The fence around lock site waa pnt in good repniri 

Lode Bout — No rapnira needed. 

Dom (br<tih). — Low placw iu the dam were repaired with \5H bru<h 



>ance of 3Sl feet. Two rows of fih-i w.t.' dvivii rit n distaiu'« .if Vi 
le piles in the front row wo™ (Iriviin :it iliHt^iiiti'H <if H fci-t, :mil those 
>w 16 feet from ce[it«m. A wale, 10 inchpg in diuinntrr, waa plared ulon^ 
' tbe back row of piloa below ttie water surface ; through the \v»le nnd 



the fiiriher lavin;; into Hie river of the hiijher portion of tlin nand bank 
head of White River Lock au.l right end of dam. pilcH were drivni at, 
■ feet from eenteta; l>etwcen the row of piles ami the faee nf the hunk, 
ahoat6f««t, brush niatn warii plaeed and covcrpcl with stone. Thii 
mk wa» then graded to a proper slope and riprappi-d with stouo. Thu 
lection is 531 feet. 



jsh bad been cut, 1,01^ m 
ta HUDlc In place. 
«*. — No rt'paira required. 
Kit Home. — No repairs needed. 

■ Zoclt. — No repairs newdnrl. 

■ IakU Houie. — No rspiiirs neeilpd. 
■i>arN. — No repairs made, 

\m, — Ko [ppaira made. 

dk.~-A t-Dtn^iiar was made and placert. 

-I>rwl^o No. 5 comuieiiecd the work of si 
i6 cubic yards of material have been t 




vc:--Wi'* 






I I — ^REPORT OP MAJOR GREGORY. 2227 



bb y4(^-A liTolcea plank in tbe bottom of the hnll was replaced by a new 
ItlnKfrt spud guides rebolted to hull, the old dipper handle repaired, and 
hitt* xmmidj for the iron work. A new door was put on the dipper and ti^e 
Cb repftlzed *nd reriyeted in place. 

ry "VAB eleaned and pnt together, the outside of cabin and the tin 
one ooftl^ oompleting the repairs. The dredge was pnt in conunlB- 



mm Ofjom No» !• — ^The scow was hauled out in May, 1892; eleven graving 

Fn iSbm Jbottom^ side fenders and pocket door hinc:68 repaired ; two new 

■ilBBfttfeed and spiked in place, and the seams at the lower end of the pocket 

ijA. bolii nkea were recalked, completing repairs. 

)lpM» ScowB. — ^The rakes and the top sides of the two center dump soows were 

ftBB&g the month of May, 1892. 

HM^— ^Tlie oonstmction of five scows, 16 by 15 by 3 feet, to be used as tenders 

ftApBdms, was commenced in May, 1892, and at the date of this report three 

P^nai&oiit half built and the framework of the other two commenced. 

DRXDQING UPPER FOX RIVKR. 

Mfaw No. 4. — Tbe work of rebuilding the dredge having been completed on 
of Jolyy 1891, she was put in commission on the same date and employed 
k eloae of the season in dredging bars between Omro and the Berlin Bridge, 
r«y Tis: From a bar opposite the mouth of Waukau Creek 8,137 cubic yards 
rial irere removed; bar 5 miles below £ureka Lock, 11,015 yards: bar at 
Eielcs Bend, 4,258 yards ; two bars near the village of Eureka, 8,883 yards ; bar 
iower end of cut-off below Eureka I..O€k, 4,6^ yards: bar at Sacramento, 
idiBy and bar one-half mile below Berlin Bridge, 4,419 yards. The dredge 
ad irork November 16, and was towed to Eureka Lock and laid up for the 



April 21, 1892, at the point where it was suspended in Xovom- 
edbie yards of sand and gravel were removed, completing the work of 
1^ a channel through the bar. On May 30 the dredge was towed to a point 3 
love Berlin Look by the steamer Fot, where the removal of a bar was com- 
id by the end of the fiscal year 5,282 cubic yards of sand had been removed. 
of cubic yards of material removed by the dredge during the tiscal 



fwige No. 5. — Dredge No. 5 continued the work of dredging bars }>(>twoon 
!o and a point one niilo below White Kiver Lock, and removed niat^-rial an 
, ▼!», from bars between Grand Kiver Lock and the lioad of Lake Apuek- 
,448 cubic yards ; from bars between the j»oint where Median Creek enters 
K Biver and the head of Princeton Lock, 10,11)1 vardH; bar at the lower end 
ecton Lock, 1,301 yards: bar one and a half miles below Princeton LojU, 
ards; bar one and a half miles below Princeton Hridge, 5,740 yards; bar I^ 
hove White River Lock, 5,fK)l yards; bar below White River I.ock, 12,115 
Work was suspended at White River Lock on Nov. 27 and the dredge laid np 
winter. 

diedge was put in good repair during the winter, and dredging resnmed 

r, 18tf2; 4,669 cubic yards of sanrl w^ere removed, completing the dredginjx of 

i«l through the bar below White River Lock. ()n the Stli of May the dnMlj^o 

wed by the Boneohel to a point about 4 miles above Princeton Look, where 

S50 cubic yards of scattering bowlders were removed from the channel of the 

The work was completed oh the 17th of the month, and on the following day 

ftdge was towed by tbe lioscohel to Montello; i),7J>'l cubic yards of saml were 

id from the bar just below the lock by the 2d of .June, and the dre<lge then 

above the lock and ecunmenced the work of 8trenj:;thening tlie levee at the 

Buffalo Lake; 3,45G eubie yards of sand and mud were tak<-n from the bed of 

ce and placcMl on the levee. 

1 number of yards removed from bars during the year, 81,561. 
i number of yards placed on the levee, 3, 15H. 

h^^e 2io, 7. — August 2.5, 181>1, Dredge No. 7 was transferred from Fond dn Lao 
vat the eutrauco of Fox River into Lake Bnttes des Morts. A cut 1,1)42 feet 
|th and 30 feet in width was made through the bar, from whieh 9,231 cubic 
•f sand were removed. The work was completed on the 10th of September, 
I the following day the dredge was towed back to Fond du Ijac. 
bg the month of April, 1892, the dredge was imt in good repair, and on the 
f we month was toweii from Oshkosh to Preaclrers Ben<l to widen the channel 
|h the bar at that place; 8,45<> cubic yards of clay were removed from the 
III which work having been completed on May 14 the dredge moved np to a 
Afw Omro and took out 4,020 cubic yards of sund. The dredge was then lowed 






■ APPESTHS 1 t — ^EErOBT OF UaJoR GEEOOKV. 2229 

M f&rjiiiial ^ear tmdins June SO, 1S!I1, efc,— Continued. 



tir^^ttramA, g*wh*irwif Look- - 



,fU Cnch* Lock... 
•pU CoKlil: Duu- . 



Fiftli L«vcl 



rantanm Third Lock... . 



l.pplet(ni FoQHh Level 

Applfton CKOiklBinks 

Ddi hoiue, ApphiliiDThlnlLlMk--. 



llau of BxpesM. Anauit. Total. 



Lalairanil Iransponit 



Ltbor 

UitniBl*... 



[ukwuu First Lock 






w>k IWBM, Eimk FlrU Lock 








tJIUBClml«Ci™bin«ll.«ct.L.Yrf 








Look 


^_, „,^„ 


Ipplcwn Fmrth LoFk 



UsteriAl*.. 



Maltrlols... 
UatnrlaU ,. 



ipplFlon Second Idtel _, io 

AppJrlon'Fif.! Lock J MatiTtal.... 



Leak... 
Look.... 



ua.iE 

1U.TS 
17. W 



>«.« :^ 



1,T»S,I» 






Dnt I I — EEIHJhT OF SUJOE GREOOHy. 



2231 



To -l™ i-ii. 


For ,l,.-,l p-ij. 


Aiui>i.i.t 








^•(thh"?"": '-"^"T' :::::': 








fvSl 




















pwiw^ww- 


J'.l'-J'l'. .u- 


14.7* 






^M 












































































































































Bg2S?ffl«Sd' 




it.oa 


B^^Hiwok"'.::::::::;::::::!.::: 


.... ilo 








?/iS\!H?"7v- 






-"'I'i..,,,.,, 


11. « 


















v;;",',;;;;^\,-,;,,;, ■ 




^S|r-;; : 






















■ ■ ;j;; 


as.00 


\\?. '" ' 


is.oo 


















\\]\ ■- ■- 




^"W^eWilink^^ 






































i\ffiE^:;i;;L; :. 






















































ifciiw::::;:;:::...:::: 


fSi^.f^"'^""'--^-- :::".::::::: 


LM 



I . 



.- — - • 



■'• .-•: 



x: 



1 ( .1 . -^ 1 

I*, i: .•■-- >.-.-. 

ir l.», ,.• '.u.."-.-.- ■■. ■ 

IV A;.;. #-'..-. M w : 

1^ A f. • • 

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■•■ ' W I: V. :... .. ; 

■ I , \\ ilii.iit. K ' • _ ■ 

■ I I h.iiii- r.i'M 

••. j |l I' ^lltilof! 

■ii ( 'iiiiN •-■ l.iiiiii''-r ' '•■ ■ - 

-, I Oi'tliili CiMik 

■ . Ml Im u/U \- « lawt ■••: 
II I ( \ I'lrk 

,1 \\ illi-iiii ll.iiiiii riii.iii 
I Vn >i 't SuiiiiKi' 

I • II .1 A (ill !••» 
I |» III IMM- 
, ■«< nil \ I -ill' ( 'o . 

•. '... M !■ Ml 

V '. \ I'lili I 'Mil I 

. ;■ ■■ iiMi 

\ t.|-.l..i 
\\ ■. U 
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, « ■ ".M.- .Ill 



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I 



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.1-. .. 

<lo .. . 

. ..d.i .. 

. ..«!.. .. . 

do -. 

.1.. ... 
. . do .... 
\\'<>iiii 

r.i>:ii >i'i'.' ". •■'• 

I mii^'i 1 . «■'«■ 

I»i Ml i>i''.!-. « '•' 
I . ...I 

I 
I 

; : . •■■ 1. i • 




APPESDIS 1 I — REPORT OF MAJOE OREGOEr. 2233 

lUmUrd utatfmeat of tzpfntea, elf. — CoDtiuued. 






























3oii«*l»ngMliu,liiuil«l -.- 


Bolto — 


SSZ-&.:::.::.:: 


Ajriices 






a?li£:^::::; 




GoUIleb Jahnka 


-::::l::::::::; :::::: ::-:::: 


Jarry PsrkiDiiuii 

nichaRlE.Kioe.... 


....ilo 

-.-.lo 


ll^i-^-SS^ 


-•!.. 




....-■do-.- ^ 


■«lflt..,. 





IX I 1 — REPOEt Of UAJOE GKEGOkf. 

i?mn»( !>/ rtprntei, etc.— CiiJttinne<i. 



2285 



f- To whom paid. 


Ftonrhstpaid. 


Amount. 


j. 




f».N 


SSiLB^lLtr 






aLi.w 
i».i« 

!iS,IW 
35.00 

2s.ua 
SB,™ 


I^a^li."" 


do 




^::::a:: 


:::::;|;;:;:. .■ .:.:::,::;::::::. 


■lZ'«ipg...r™...,.. :::-::.::::;. 


S,34 

3.M 


Sssrfsx:^^'- 






CS 


















*''S:S 










^-S^S"'- 








ano.oQ 




ii.oo 


















«i.ao 


Oot&*bJidni1ce .!" 










^jl;^^^- 




W.TS 




Siunnel WUtnev. 

HmFoTgaikdo 

Kireliior Inm Worlu, 

. JuM* F. Gniguiy . 



APPENDIX J J. 



• OF CHICAGO AND CAI.UMRT HARBORS, ILLtNOIS; OP 
VER. ILLINOIS ANU INDIANA; AND OF ILLINOIS SIVEI^ 
tIKOlS AND MISSISSiri'I CANAL. 



CAPTAly ll: L. MAIISHALL, CORPS OF ENGINEER8, OFFICES 
fS, JtOR THE FISCAL YEAR ESDISG JUXE SO, ISSS, WITH 
tCUMElfTS HELATIA'G TO THE fTOIlKS. 

iSIPEOVEMENTS. 

Ixrr, lIliDoin. I 5. Opf-ruliug itnd rareof LaGTangeLook 
rbOT, niinoH. :id(I Dnui. Illinois Kiver, tlUuots. 

ver, Illinois »iid Iiiilianii. R. llUnoiii and MisaiHaippi Canal. 

— Illinois. I 



f United States Ekginebb Ofpiob, 

Ckirago, III., August 18, 1893. 
LL; I have the lionor to tnuismit herewith annual repnrtn 
worka in my ehiirge for tlie fiscal .year ending June 30, 1802. 

ry resi)e4't fully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. Marshall, 



en. Thomas h. Casey, 
Chief of EMjineers, U. K A. ■ 



Captain, Corps of Engineers. 



JJi- 

mPEOVEMENT OF CHICAGO HARBOR, ILLINOIS. 

«ent project was atlopted in 1870 and modified in 1878, and 
ites — 

formation of an out«r harbor or basin by inclosing a portion 
[icbigan juBt south of and adjoining the entrance totlterivor, 
nrpose of increasing the harbor facilities of Chicago and t« 
f to the overcrowded river. 

coDBtruction of an exterior breakwater of crib work filled with 

nAe the outer harbor and north of the entrance to Chicago 

p water, to shelter the entrance to Chicago River (which 

le harbor of Chicago) and the outer harbor from northerly 

3237 



— BEPOBT OF CAPTAIM MARSHALL. 2239 

-'.■^42.5 lineal' fe«t of superstmotuie 6 feet in 
:.pt 8 feet in height were coni|iIet<?(I at the close 

>■• the north pier of Chicago Harbor and the 

m! ita f etarn, 5,SW.3 linear feet, are in tinu order 

rmt Engineer Liljencrantz herewith gives the 

Milter, ontet harbor, and the sonth pier at the 
ivi'rareiu bad condition and now require renewal. 
*.— Tilts work 18 8ituat4?<l 1 mile northeiist of the 
■ 1 IT, the oDtriincfl to which it covers from northerly 
"I iu length. 
~|l«ri liegnn in 1881 and completed in 1890. The 
p)(it the outer 1,200 linear If'et, is of crib work 30 
b the natural I " Ji iu water varying from 18 to 
^imter 1,200 Urn :et are built upon a st^me foun- 
bntur an«werB tl ..arpoBe Ibr whieli it ban been 
«>«lne as Ibrnun Kafe harbor of refuge daring 
e atfording » i tered entrancre to the harbor of 
11 parties iu ed in the commerce of this 

r no woi AB done u^wn this bre^wat«r, 

T to rent *"*ie siiperstructure over tlm^o- 

r ^at piuii tn oatlmate is herewith »ub- 

( Sitw. — The vgo River constitutes the inner 

1 it has hither en enstomary to periodiciilly 

(lying between e bridge nearest the lake aiul 

)r at the pier lietius. The last dredging was done 

Wi date no further drt'dgiiig lias been necCKsary, and 



OON OF FUNDS NOW ON HAND, AND TnOSE ASKED 
B FISCAL YEAR ENDINU JUNE 30, 1893. 

B liand will be ap])litd to the Bur\'ey of Chicago Uar- 
npleted works, the harbors ireatiil thereby, and the 

The fiinds a^ked for are to be applied a^ follows: 

Krer and harbor bill now i>ending, to the completion 

' Xt as far as advisable and to renewing superstmu- 

( of the South Pier, Chicago Harbor entrance, and 

EttdftlieMontherly breakwater, outer basin, and $80,000 

LctureH over 3,140 linear feet exterior breakwater 
^tiering and contingent expenses. 

Monep utatement, 

ATknex'pmavl $!i6,003.2n 

'" — sanded dnriii^lJBral.veiir 01,303.43 

"iinleii 1. eo!l. 77 

aliiUtios IW.Tti 

1- 1,425.01 

pproTetl July 13, 18!IL' 7S!,000.00 

sndilig J uiie -Ji), 1»U3 73, 425. 01 



IPPESDIX J J— REPORT OF CAPTAIN MAR.SHALL. 2241 

Trrtv 10 b.v 12 incliM by 28 feet. 

1 placi-d l>*'twe«Q tho eross-ties in .jitvtapoaitiou U< ilio 'ids walta aiiU in 

« coireHpondiDg to tfae end walli< of tliv iiO-fotit I'rllitiiir the milwlnicttire, 

HTured to tbe croM-ties in Munc munner an the timbeni uiv in the side 

'imniug solid wull«. 

miiniUE wpf* made >•( 10 by 13 inch tiiuher. They were placed IwtiVMpii 

«, niuaine coutlDriouHly througb the IrngUi of the wnrk. with 16 inoliea 

BO plaeotl as lo come betwRen two tit«, and with drifl-bnlta jinwing 

two parM of the srarf and the tie below. 

r *>iiiiiming piece*. — BefoTe placing tbe lint or lowest croas-tieit it wu 
aoA that the lop of Hip tie of the HiibstrTicture was in the aame plane u« 
ts siile timbers, leiiviiig thtu an iuciifBcient space for the bottoni longl- 
prorirled by tbe plans. These Mure tht^refote omittml and short blocu 
in their placv« andfT the bottom ties. Owint; to irregular Mttliog oftbe 
t in moat plarM), wedge-sbaped sticslca hail to bo resorted to fhsqaently to 
iznnlal l>earinK for th*' new work. All these and other pieces required 
iMt eSerts of irregDlarities of the old work were coouted under this head, 
olt« were of Tonnd iron, 1^ inchea in diameter. Thirty- two-inch bolta 
1 the aide timbers and suJid cross walls; 20-inch bolls in tieo and longi- 
1 partly in the top tiiuberH of side and cross wulls. 

eking consisted m (j by 10 inch timbers laid lengthwise and spiked with 
,,)rmn^t-in>D apikes to the ties. 

ends, most subjected to the process of decay, were protected by 3 b.v 12 
Bnlced down croaswise, covering the jointa. 

HiJiHf.— The new work was filled to within 3 feet of the top, which was 
suflBcient for safety now. since these works are priitect«d against north- 
by the exterior break wuter. 

le pTOKresa of the work Htime removes! from tlie old work was transferred 
d portions and thus n<i new Htoue was requited for tlte part— the northorly 

easterly breakwater — which was first comjileted, uud the north pinr, 
finished last, reqnired tlie greatest amount of new stone. 
* the east«rly end of the north pier and the westeriyfcml of the " return," 

places had for a nnmber of years bean in a deplornble courtitiou, ftotti 
latainml by vessels rnnn in g into them, these places were sarroundeit liy 

ronaieting of single closely ilriven rows of piles, held together with WHI- 
m either side of ^e piles and screw holta through both, and attaicheil to 

means of I^-inch iron tie-rods. 

«ure was lillrd with atoue, and riprap wawjilaced outside the piles locoiin- 

theprcHBiireofthentone tilling, fhinipwof Tpiles in 6ucb,hold losetli.r liy 

and 2 roiiudsof irondr.nl«c chain, were plnceilus addiliomil pnilcctinn 

pier he^krls just described and around the north end of the caHtcrly brcak- 
,ch cloni]i, whcu constructed, was surrounded by riprap to within IH l'i>et 
ir surface. 
OD to work done under the terms of the contraot some materiiils wen' hir- 

•ecnred in the work nnder a special verbal agreement, vii^. 10.34H feet I), 
iber, 10 tumbnckles, and 3 pile.t of special length, 2 bciuK 44 feet each 
rd 43 feet long. 

timber was used for waling pieces in the pier heads and <br Hnnbbing posts 
h pier. The tumbucklee were nstal on the tie-nids in the pier heads, and 

the clumps. 

jng was done during the year and none is required for the present. 
1 of the «ort». — The easterly breakwater and tbe north iiior, as well as the 
'eet of the southerly breakwater, whicli wei^e rebuilt in 1«89, are now in 
tion. Iki are (he pier heads and most of the clum]is of ]>iles linilt during 
One of the latter, ht the end of the north ]>ior, has been lirokeu up, pre- 
t some vesxel having run into it. 

frequently found n very strong current at the diffircnt i)ier ends, whii-h, 
wn claim, makes their boats at such times uninauHgealile. This is the 
ble excuse for the many collisions of this kind in times jiast, and tbe pro- 
ilt during the year were much needed and arc .if considerable value aa 

h pier is in eitremely bad condition. Tbe greater part of the limliers in 
rnctare are rotten and numerous pieces even detached from the main work 
ow the stone Dlling to issue forth int" the river chaniiel. The crilis of thia 
snnk in 1869 and 1870 and the superatruoture was built in the latter year, 
nlingly fully 22 years old. Considering i Is age it has held out well, no 
teeonnt of not being, like the brcakwaWrs, exposed to severe winds. 

y breakwater was bnilt in 1879 to 1880. This work is 3.000 feet in 
pwb the effect of sontherly or aontheasterly gales and of general decay 
I 141 



APPENIIIX J J HEI'OKT OP CAPTAIN MAHSHALL. 224') 

COMMKRCIAL STATTSTltS. 

,t of revenue collected al ueiireet port of t-utry (CliJtngo) during fiscal year, 
B.17. 

.drritaU and clearancea ofcetatU duritig the ytar, port of Chicago. 



i.-az ■ 3.M1,HSS 



flo. Tom. 



8.9IW 4,T<e.MT ft.lM 



BacafU and ihipment* bg tak» during ealmdar gtar 1891. 



«ud iron 










ur. salt and 


"ngw 




ctal 



80,871 

ia,590 

2.510 

2,748.219 

133,032 

26,441 

6,613 

281,956 



4,545,3: 



Slki]iuients ; 

Flojir 

r.raln 3, 

Lnril 

MeaU 



Oil and oil ooke 

Hay 

MiacellnneonB mArnhftndjM 



173,160 
061,251 
31,463 
3,038 
70,028 
1»,106 



Total 2,609,427 



J J 2. 

IMPROVEMENT OK CALUMET HAKBOB, ILLINOIS. 

object of this work is to provide a dee[> entrance to Calumet 
And the port of South Chicago, 111. 

. is effected in the usual manner by dredging a channel and pru- 
f the dredged area by parallel piers, 300 feet apiirt, projecting into 
is from the river's mouth. 

COMDITION OP THE WORK JUNE 30, 1892. 

^ was begun on this harbor in 1870, and at the beginning of the 

MHT 2,020 linear feet of the south pioi, and 3,640 linear feet of the 

■er I^d been coustructetl, whicli completed tht: existing project 

Sb pier work is concerned, but the south piershimld be]>rolonged 

■ to protect the channel from drilling sands. 

feoonnt of the present argent necessity for maintaining the 

p^Mdy done, the Huperstructure of the piers being rotten over an 

~ ~'30Xi linear feet and in bad condition over WHI feet in mldi- 

imate herewith submitted is entirely for maititenance, and 

no'fiirther extension of piers at the present time. 

id harbor act of September 10, 1890, a]>propriated $20,000 

'"d at the beginning of the fisciil year work was in prog- 

with W. A. McUilli!§ & Co., of Soath Ghica.go, 111^ 



VITEXUIX J J^-BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN HAUkHAIJ.. 



an— oJmn- 


Ni.l.ire<.f«tt.tnu.t. 


l>»ti-. 


To inpirc. 


CoBtnct 

enundedla— 


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DivdKing SO.OM i-uliic >uil* 


Deo. 10. ISM 


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d Ootolier 16, 1S91. 



^bOBT OF MK. O. A. H. LIIJBNPRASTZ. AeSISTANT KNGINXSR. 

F United Statks Enuincrr Offick, 

■■ C*t<«tflo, 111., June SO, 18Si. 

'. T hare the honor to sntniit huiuwilli a report of operations in Calumet 
I(u>i4. daring the fineal year eiidiug .Inne 30, 1892. 

W. A. McGUlis & Co., uf South Chicago, 111., dated Derember 10, 1890.{Bt 

131 cenlt pec cubic yard. 

id^t the coDtract commenced on the 2Tth of Aprii, IKil. and was com-' 

lie 10th of October followiufi;. 

I bef;iaiiiDK of the tiscal yeoi', 57,^0 onhic yards of material vreni reinored 

iBiinel. which, together with the 29,087 onbie yuitls reuiovcd diiniig the 

i.-^\ 37 to Jane M. 1891, or in all 87,017 cubic yanis, uoustitutfd tlie t<ital 

iiMterial ilndged nuder the contract. 

t was done with the cuutractors dipper drod^ A. B. Sletton, a ativng and 

iftchine, with a dipper of 2i cnbic yards capauily. It wns built two yeara 

1 Hnif de»ote<i to this coutract was 13fl,8 working days ..f 10 hours cnob, 

Mse 1,298 hours, 1,02'! honrs 20 iniuntes were spent In actual work, tlio 
3 hoUTB 40 minutes represeutiug timu lent on account uf ivpairs to p[:iut, 
n, »&d other causes. The proportion of time utilized and time lost to 
lie time is accordingly: 

. Hon™. i'«rceiit, 

tual work , l,024i= 78.92 

273i= 21.08 

I»blB time 1, 298 = IOC, 00 

age daily work amounted to 87,017-1- 129.8^670.4 cubic yards. 

<f 97.017 cnbic yanU hating been dredged in 1,024^ hours of "actual 

Ijcated a capacity of this dredgo of 84.05 cubic yards per hour, or 849.5 

■ per day of 10 hours of uninti'rrupted work. 

Tact should have expired on the Slst of August, 1891, but an extoneinn of 

> 30th of November of tlie same year, was, iit tbo rHiiuest of the contrac- 

*r dati'd August 31, granted by the Chief of Engineers, V. 8. Army, on 

August, 1891. 

inelbas now, as indiratMl on a map respectfully submitted herewith, n 

.t leant IT feet below the United states harbor datum, and a width of 

w llllniiis Steel Company's slip eastward to Lake Michigiui, periodical 
lOB been done by the St«el Com|>auy, at their own expense, to secure a 
t deep chaanel for the heavily laden ore vessels entering the olip at their 

. WM dune during the year, for want of funds, lo llie westerly ends of tho 
bat this is very much ueedcd. NeitLcr was ituy now wurk done lu ei- 
tlie south pier, as per project heretofore siiliniitt«{l. 

( of the pieri. — The stone hlling placed in the luiter, more exposed portions 
( «n m 1888 is yet in very good condition, having settled but slightly. 



,1 .I^EKl-ORT or CAITAIN MARSILtLL. 2251 

|the app^u^-ed dix^k Jiiivei liAve been dredged out and the 
!0ved,anditi»niidei'»tood tliftttlit-ejectmeiit Hiiithas been 

» specifications to tlie contmctK heretofore made it has 
t the material to bo eiieoiintered is iniid, navd, and clay. 
ing progressed, however, the clay hecami' more nnd.more, 
til finally it became bo hard as apparently to reqaire 
rite removal. Solid rock, apparently part of a narrow reef 
(e cliannel, was also eucouutered. After repeated vain bA- 
remove this mateiial, a supplementary agreement was mside 
892, by authority of the Secretary of W'ar, by which the 
Teemeut was modified so far as to reqiuie tlie cuutraetJ)r» to 
le dre<t geabic material only, within the proposed channel way. 
I supplementary agreement a section of the channel 650 feet 
8 not excavated to the full nidth and depth, bnt there is a 
feet ill depth at Bhoalest and narrowest point. SO feet id 
f^nainder of the 20U-foot wide channel bein;? from 11 to 16 
Wki as shown upon the map accompanying this report. Tfala 
inmcient for all present requirement^^ of navigation on this 
tor probably many years in the future. The amount of hard- 
jck so far revealed ie too omall to justify special apphances 
t& for its removal, and in the fnrthei- prosecution of the work 
Ivisuble to continue the dredging of all dredgeable mat«rial, 
ely define the hardpan and rock within the proposed ehau- 
rtber materis^ requiring blasting be discovered contracts may 
nsed upon definitely known nrnterinl and definite quantities, 
elieved that the rock and hardpan is of gi-eat extent, but it 
Ivantageons to the work to uncover it by dredging than to 
I locate the limits of probably small areas of hard materiiil 
ive borings indefinitely multiplied over such an extent of 
It will be re<:ommended, therefore, that future contracts shall 
dre4lgeable material, or such that may be removed without 
, until a sutlicient amount of hard material to Justify apeclal 
1 for its removal is discovered, or'it is definitely ascertained 
mount now in sight covers all such material to be removed, 
irovement of this river is atteuded by a gratifyingincrease in 
srceof the port of South Chicago and by the rapid increase of 
iring and shipping interests along its borders, and the influ- 
'ork demanding either a radical widening and deepening of 
other entrances to) Chicago Hiver, which constitutes the inner 
Chicago, or a diminution of its conunerce by water, seem to 
still more rapid development of the uses of Calumet Harbor 
for commerce by water. 

eral previous years the returns of the collector of customs 
ated an annual increase in the tonnage of the port of South 
r about 30 per cent per annum. During the past fiscal year 
ms indicate an increase of 47 per cent in tonnage,-but only 
tOT cent in the number of arrivals and departures of vessels, 
ffly indicates the value and effe(4 of the increased depth of 
novided in the harbor and river, especially by increasing the 
raft of vessels trading here. Much of this increane, however, 
lie great improvements in plant and otherwise of the Illinois 
pany's works near the nmuth of the Calumet and to the con- 
of tbeir own harbor north of the entrance to the Calumet 
■'hich increased facilities for handling ores shipped by wat«r 
ained. 



?E?n>IS J J-^BEPOBT OF 'CAPTAIS MAK8HALL. 2253 

lel, czc}nsiT« of supcrintomtciiRii ttnd all iiii'iilcQUl ex[>eu>iM, wna 
kinf; ua average i.'UBt per milo of $44,197.42. 

der the last contract baa proved a, very improfituble one for the coa- 
r cni iicL'otuit of the lonae, aliistj.v matifriiij from the iiiHrrthea iii^JHoeut 
ruBliing into cocnpleted soctious of thlisnlll^ reqiiiriug repeatwl rtredg- 
« plAce, freqaeutlf two and three tiines lifter hiivitig been eompleti-il 
Mu partly by the interference of one A. X. VVeateii^ani, who bruilght 
le contrai'toTS et al, for trexptisB on his alle/iied property, a great por- 
was loi'at^d in the natural river bed and roven'd by 12 feet of water at 
;».Be of the river. 

t orawbaek, however, was tbe enoonntering of a stretch of bardpui 
places, nnderlyiag rock, which was found in tbe uoiEhborhood of One 
twelfth street and for a' diatanco of 800 feet nlooif tbe channel. For 
Tof this distance, the northerly half, the hard pan reached acroas the 
he channel, diminiabing gradually in extent sonthward, 
1 was struck at an average depth of 12 feet hetow tbe United States 
, underlying rock being found in patches, rather irregnlar both in 
Itb. 

;t«iTS labored faithfully with the removal of the faardpan, applying 
that could be devised and applii^d to either the elevator or the dii>- 
igaged in this work, but with tbe most diHOooragitig reenlte. 'I'be 
both of thnte dredges wus rejieatedly broken. bdiI iniiuh moni tinio 
■riud apont iu repair nf muchmery than in doing actual work, until 
itractors asked, in a lett-er dat*Ml May 5, 1892. to be relieved from re- 
<ck and hardpan found in the section oovered by the cuntrnct, whieh 
nint«d by tbe honorable tbe Secretary of War on tbe 4th of June fol- 

tiou of the bottjnn of the river, to ascertain as near as practicable the 
k and bardpan to l>e found within the limits of the area contracted fur, 
^pril by Mr. Paul Helnze. overseer. 

Lcated the existence of 1,332 culiic yards of rock and 14,459 cubic yurda 
The hardpan wns extremely hard to penetral-e with the pointed steel 
he purposo, aud it was only with the utmost exertions that it could be 
id. 

[MtiTely low pric« at which the dredging was done. 12^ cents pei oubio 
le difflcnlties encountered b^ the contractors felt all the more, 
relieved of the removal of rock and hardpan, the contractors have 
in excavating tbe overlying strata of uiitd, t<iind, nud ctuy. Kveii this 
a expensive. Tbe elevator dretlge did tbe {greater part of this work, 
pan being impenetrable by tbe spud of that dredge, around which it 
1 working, it was found necessary to make use of the dipper dredge 
upose of holding it in position while working. 

ising the strength of and otherwise modifying various parts of the 
;e, as has been i>om time to time suggested by the experience of two 
g, this dredge has done very good work. 

anately impoiwible, howovcr, to present any data indicating its actual 
the following reasons; 

idgee have worked at times alternately, nt other times simultaneously, 
«ction of the river. The material removed hon been measured "in 
t in scows, in which latter case, if used, the work doue by each dredge 
len estimateil separately. 

laterial rnnning into a completed portion of the channel to a very great 
9ce«Bitated (1) the redredging of such portion on some occasions as 
>o three times, the dredge thus Imndliug tbe same material several 
I the dredging to a depth of geuemlly not loss than 2 feet below that 
le contract, t-o wake sure of leaving the reiiiiircd depth at the coinple- 
ion reported for eianiinalion. Besiiles these reasons it may also be 
eqnently, after tbe m.iterial along tbe sides of the projected channel 
Dved by the elevator ilredgc, tbe dipper dredge was employe<l iu trans- 
aterial from tbe center of the channel to tbe excavated truiiobes on the 
' it waa afterwards rehandleil by the former dredge, which, by means 
veyor aiid a powerful stream of water, would remove it far enough be- 
inel lines to prevent its returijing into tbe completed chauuel. 
Ehe experience of the last year, it is reasonable to expect that no snch 
Iredgln^ in this river will be obtained as has been heretofore, unless 
I provision is made in the next specifications, which will hold the con- 
rao excessive lose, should rock aud hardpan I>e encountered again, 
*• "-rt [jrobable according to apjiearances, still must be (and certainty 
I wiU be) considered as possible. 



C J I — ^REPOKT OP CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 2255 

COUMKRCIAL STATISTICS. 

r aiid harbor are bo closely voan 
_tJ statiBtice are given iu tbis plao 
I'tlarbor. There is pratticnUv no ntiviK^tiuu uu tae 
' wi'ver, dB (he river channel is d 
Ihe river will develop Teryfast. 



J J 4. 

lOVEMENT OF ILLINOIS BIVER, ILLINOIS. 

t of tliis iiiipravement is to ftimist a throug)! route 
hy water fi-om the sonthera end of Lake Michigau to 
BVer, of aafficient capacity lor ita navij^atioii by the 
" ■ isippi Biver steamboats tbat van reach the m»ntli 

is Uiat have beea adopted for the locks to meet this re- 



now under execution is for the impinvement of the lower 
'^t}as roate, extending from the mouth of Copperas Creek to 
* i Kiver, a diBtance of 137 miles. Another setrtion of the 
in lengtli, from the month of Copperas Greek to La Salle, 
fproved l)y the State of Illinois by the eonatriiction of two 
tliuns, one at Copperas Ci-eek and om- at Heury, III. 
lis latter section the State still collects tolls, the United States 
iriof; accepted the conditions imposed by the a*'.t of cession of 
B tegislatnre, which conditions are such as to deprive the works 
le i^ile demandiug a great expenditure by the United States 
mt for works to be substituted therefor. 

Wgard to this subject reference is made to the Annual iie^wrt 
lief of Engineers for 18fi9, page 2121, et sctj'iUiir. 
the act of Congress of August 11, 18SS. surveys and separate 
I hare been ma<le, based upon low-water depths of 8 and 14 
Wrying the improvement from La Salle to Lake Michigan via 
^ and Ilesplaines Rivers, and a cut across the Chicago divide, 
tb section there is a fall in water surfaces, Lake Michigan being 
it, of about HI feet. 

tqrt upon this survey and estimatt-s has been piintcd as House 
Jffo. 2W, Fifty-first Congress, first session, and is also published 
innal Report of the Chief of Engineers for ISHU, page l!41!l aiid 
[ pages. 

lurveys and estimates have also been made by the trustees of 

iry district of Chieagf>. organized under laws of the State of 

tting aeapacious channel linryiug a large discliarge from 

^1 the Illinois l{i\er lur drainage and sanitary pur- 

f the Chief uf Engineers, U, 8. Army, for the 

reports and estimates of engineers acting 

" of Chicago, and lati'r under tlic trustees of 

eago, relating to this matter will be found. 



"■» I ..' 

I .. 

inn 

• i li'Ii . 
.'••I ih, 

I I,. . 
ii. . ,| I. 



from 



"APPENDIX J J — BEPORT OF CAPTAIN MiESHALL. 



Twelve thousand five hundred uiibie yardrt of material were 

the appmaches to tlie lock. The completiou of thi« lock 

the tonnage X)aBging this point, even with a Ict>» iinmber of 

EMttipittille. — The remainder of the mnd overlj'ing the founda- 
^IHStedinlii' J wn^reinoved, i.e., 9,U0U cubic yards; making in 
lAal^ yards of deposit removed since 18>i3. Tre.-«tles 1,170 
l«lgth for stone travelers for laying the lock walls were 
Also trestles for tramway track for delivering stone at 
Mils J.260 linear feet in length were constructed. 

of^masonry began Septf-raber 5, 1891, and was prosecuted 
ir 30, 18!)!. A greater part of^ the time work was prose- 
> And night in laying masonry. Ten thousand one hnndred 
■flT«-cabic yards of masonry were laid in the lock walls, com- 
L and lower conrnes of the lock. The toundatiou (pile, 
, and grillage) for the almtnient of the dam was coustrueted 
a^tmeut laid to a height of 10 feet above the foundatioo. 
thousand four hnudred and seventy-nine cubic yards of 
. dredged above and below the lock pit. One thousand 
Lred and tttty-four cubic yards of cut stone were purchiised 
Itract, of which l&'i cubic yards have been delivered at the 
6,015 cubic yards of rubble stouB for the dam were purchased 
rered. 

. titK timber, iron and steel for the lock gates and manea- 
ff of the lock ha^ been contracted for. Also, one- third of the 
1^ the dam, but none of this material has yet been delivered. 
knt bas been kept iu repair as well as tuay be, but it is nearly 
~'^''~ as far as floating plant is concerned. The appropriations 
have been so small and made at such intervals that the 
I decayed, but not worn out, before the work tor which it wiis 
i. e., the dredging and channel work, has been more than 

B Uie dredging required can be done a compIet« new diedging 
ptst be purchased as far as hulls of floating plant is concerned, 
nior part of the machinery ia good. 

p been necessary to begin the construction of new dump scows, 
lirbich is practically completed aud the other under way. Six 
rill also have to be built before the dam can be cnnstructu'd. 
Ver daring the past spring, and until uow, has attaiueii and 
at an unusually high stage, above all stages recorded since 
lie water still remains above the banks aud nearly daily rains 
in hope of a speedy decline. 

PaOPOBED APPLIOATIOS OF FUHDS NOW ON HAND. 

Wts on hand will be expended in completing the lock masonry, 
fioor, and lock gates, and purchasing the material for the dam. 



ilv the funds asked for herein to the completion 
('Lock, and to dredgingthe river between the 
"Eiver, and as far as jiriictiiMblc the pools 
Qrange aud Kauipsville. 



Hill time a 

.: -n>|» in ml 

.1 uiin ot'tlmiF 

tSitriD^'B Aiul 

<<lr;ict liaKiii't 

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\ . Biaiuard 



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IT OP OAlTAI>f MAItSHALl,. '^'261 

River, infm-ei: 



hInEruid<I(UTeriiigatli> 

iiiiitf Wn.vn puiiuiLf in 
Hi linn for lock XK<<X' 

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T BN 111 NICK R. 



1Initei> Status Knuiskbr Offjcb, 

KanpsfiUe. til.. Jnne SO, IS9?. 

nor to submit the foUowine repcirt of uporatjoos fcir iin- 

t!i« y.«ir eliding Juue 30, 1893. 

>-' ::miiiug at tb(^ Hseal year alioitt 9.(100 cubic yunls uf 

' . i)ii' luiiuiliiliioii. AfttT ri^iiinvlM); 1.350 cul)io yiirilx 

i' ot'tba coO'erdam wus cloeed iind llic witter puiupwl 

:i I ■!< svjill BJtos W1I8 then rciiiovorl. A |)»rt of Uiis wm 

. L[ till.' c'lflerrtnm. The m<»t of it, Uowovi^r, wtm whueloil 

irab hiixi-B, ftnd liuisted out«i(le. Abont 1,050 onbio ynrilx 

After tbe walls wore fiartially iip'abtiiit 3,000 cubic ynrds. 



^jrpilwandMshQelpilBa werailiiTBD. 8ixt«eD piles and 
i opening in the cofferdnm, 228 piles for tbe traveler imd 

■ for B derrich snpport. Tlipn; whm built 1,170 lineiir feet 
lnf{ tbe lock walls »Dd 1,261) linear fe<'t uf niilr..iL<l trcstk* 

RIs At tho etciue pile Iti of tbr old I'lin pili'H nav ceiiluccd by 
- lliubara. 
I •■^l nf milroiwl trsok with tbfi necpBMiiry a» itfbeH wi-re liiii) I'roiLi 
tm •rails for the delivery of stimo at the work. 
BkJuuidrMl and twenty-six Bqaare yards of the I'otiiidation wcru 
Wt ooDprete varying irom O.I foot t(i 0.25 foot in thtckiieHB. 
Silnc the walls wiis beznn September 5. 1891, and oontiuiieil iinlil 
^(U me "L" ounrse, making tbe wallit 20 feet and 3 incbpsbigb, was 
\ miter sLIIb and tbi> breaat wall, except the coping' of tlie 
Miteinber 29 nijtil November 18 the work was carried ou 
ll. Night work on the walls was atiipped at tbis limn iiu 
. utber at nigbt- During this time, 4,610 cubic yards of 
If of backing (tone wore set. 
~t broken stone were used for concrete In Ulling the JolnlR 

B OTcrhead travelers were nsed, iitli- over each wall and 
Two derricks with a stemn hoist handled tho backing 
ad track about 10 feet above tbe foundation runs along 
..,J] for itH entire length, tbe stone being brought down on rurs 
ii irberu it belonid iu the wall. It was uiiIo»iled hy the traveli'r 
131 to be QHod when needed. 

■a Mrriod on by thr aid of nine Wells ]ii;]its of 1,300 candle iiowcr 
le these lights bumnd tbey iiveragi-il 2 barrels of coal oil r>ni'h 



and ninaty-oue pieces of quarry stone for the r 
-•-*- -*l»«n a batter of 3 inches ■ " ' ' '" 
Is mcnttlng was made n 



r wall n 



o position. 
K abore and below the lock was begun and continued 
. .p,^tiBie no dredging has been done because of hisb water, 
MtWHouried on day and night, from tbe 20ih to tha 



I dk.d|«^. above i 



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etpersecuud.. U.653 


jy 

















KEI'OKT OF UAFl'AIK MAK?|iHALI.. 




BeadiHg* c/ Ike lower gauge at Cojiperiu Creak Loek, , 
I rUn« of refurf nti- : 'r<>]> »r lovror miter till. ) 



J«n. Ftb. lUr. Apr, 
Frrt. \ F'H. ' r,ti. ' Fi'i. 



Mnj-,]juu8.[ J,ilj. 



• V 

•1 






4 



% 
i 






V 



P^NDIX 3 J — BEPOET 

Beadlngi a/ Pu- gaag 

[Plane of leTveiiM 


OF CAPTAIN MAHS 

at K<.«.iwi'i»e Lock. 


H.\LL 


2269 


-■ 


:Ff>b. 


Hai. 


April. 


M.y. 


JnliD. 


Jul,. 


Aug. 


Sept. 
F,>t. 

'.ti 
.45 

:^ 

.so 

.90 

:» 

.10 

lio 

,10 


Oot Ko.. 


IXw. 


ii 

1.36 

; ii 

.so 


I 
1 


•r. 

Kl 
13 

M 

SO 

!l 

W 

n 

87 

«fi 

M> 
IT 


^.■lo 

*.-/; 

*.2S 

its 

US 

t| 

.VIM 
3.1U 

a. 10 

B.B8 
7.81 
7.67 

i 


8:72 

a. 83 

g.M 
H.Dg 

9:«T 


law 

i»:li 

0.20 
6.W 

e.33 

6.II7 


F«<, 

a. 98 

a. 117 

3.W 
3.U 

j.a 

5.W 

a! 87 

IS 

4. S3 
*.17 

i.vi 

3. JO 

3.;t 

4.28 
4.B7 

S.03 


4.W 

a.w 

8.S& 
9,»0 

3. no 
a. SI 

Is 

1:7a 


Fnf- 

s 

1.05 

3.3S 
S.3S 
3.M 
3.W 

a.ss 

.77 


F 


i 

M 

1 

IS 


Fvt- 

— .a 

— .■10 

— '.«$ 
.m 

lot 

1 

i46 

LSS 

■i 


FHt. 

1.10 

!is 

.30 
'.Si 

:sfi 

1 

.85 

iw 

OS 

10s 
3.03 

100 

t.in 


. .78 
. .78 


: 




I1.S7 «,W| 4.t8 
4.!5 


1.06 .OS 
1.03 1 


'.M 


■ '-"l ^:" 


i.l8| 10.2S 8.30 1 4.W 


..«,| L«| OS 


"•■"I "'1 '■" 



STATISTICS. 



i departuret of Kleitmivalt and ftai'ffcs al .S'(. Loiiia, Mo,, 



Hivtb. 


Arr 


,.,.. 


es'- 


Uo 


.». 


Arrival. 
2. 

! 

115 


]>|.iir. 




























22 
,11 


ii 



































laljib aiMf thipmenti, in fan*, via /"inoia Eiver, at St. Loiiia, Mo., ISOt. 



iU 


Dtb. 


lRc..irt„ 


^^^.. 






-., 


875 
























'EXDIX J J REPORT OF CAPTAIN MABSHiLL. 



2271 



ik in narrow railway oattiugs, where dispiisal of raahfrial in ilifBcoIt, is 
done at 70 to 90 cents per yard. 

now beiDg iiuarried at Lemant for iS per cord of 13,000 pounds, or 100 
•olid. TtiiH is at the raw of M cents per yard. It is deli vereil on board 

LOB per yard and has actually been delivered in this city for 11.62 p«r)>u;d, 

m wharveA on the Uieoissippi River is actually delivered on board ba^«s 
75 c«nta pei loose yard for quarries on the banks of rii-ers. 
, JLni>tt«rdaiii Canal of Hollnii'l (18(^76} 31,000,000 yards of miitvrial wero 
S an average rate of about i cents nor yard. 
St. PetetaburgCiuial(I878-'(«) 63,000,000 j-BTda were moved for abnatS cents 

ft. Lawtenct- baa b^ru despened uvcr n length of 40 miles bi^lwen Hootreal 

lebee, from a depth ut lOJ fe^t to 2T) feet; material ctay. fiand, hardpan 

m, and autue ledge rock. Aggregate cent for lost ten years vrerk, 13 cents 

L The clay baa been down at from 3 to fl ceiil« per yaru. 

■eerds of iteverul dred^s on harbor works in Eorojie and Anstrivliu gives taUa 

1 4 to 6 ctoits per yard in free material and at Americxn prices. 

ijafceErie and Ohio River ship citual couiinlssiotiers nf Pbuusylvuiiiii recently 

id on a canal 100 miles lon^ from Coniieant on Luke Erie Ui Beuver on the 

har. Total excavation i3,S82,in ynrds. at «iH.666,4»5, or an av^nige of 20 

or yard fur all ulusses of materiiil. Much of the work was eBtiimitod at 13 

llanctiester 8hip Canal involves lT,2riO,000 Tflrds. one-sixth of wltith is rock. 

osl of canal complete, >30,OW,000. Leas than half this a 

it the Sgures are not reported. 

[Sorth Sea (Bolstein) Canal involves b7,000,000 yards of 

Mt ia «atimated at $39,000,000. Ho iletuils •« tn cost of e 

ma harbor work in the UniMd Static is being iloae at 10 I 

ISea. 

nbnnation available indicates that with special machinery and fiitl preparft- 

i« work can be doue ae eheaply as similar work has ever been done, or well 

:he prices of the Hering Comm—"'"" "'- ir^ '•-'•f-' f"- 

idging, sdid T5 cents for rook. 



cavstiuD, and the 
Scents in limited 



1, 15 centa for cjay, 2 



HcU.— Channel /rum Aihiand a 



Ci-olly 
inminuu). 


WidLb. 


Ilepth. 


Grille 
per mile. 


E«.v.U„». 


B^rM^.' 


















































































(M.IIW 


IBOj W 


6.00 





* HeziuE Commif 

t wi -'^ ■■ - 



BTluE Comm 



* of rock, 75 cent-R ; liavd material, 30 cents; clay 15 cents. All the eatintates 

tie on the snuiv basiH jik to prices ]ier yard. 

reen Ashland avenue and Lockport, right of wuv, bridging, ;iiid niisoi'llaneoiis 

Id te,000,OOU to caeli of the foregoing estimates for the totiil. One million may 

od for passing the volume of water from Lockport to Lake Jnliet. 

w Joliet the eutire value of lundi-d pro|>erty throngbout the lllinnie Valley is 

ted at less than $3,000,000. Any damage from overflow will bo but a fnictiou 

Ql be noticed that a chiiiiuel 10 feet ileep fur either310,000 or 300,000 oiible feet 
a expenflive than one 11 feet deep. It will alwi be noticeil that a cUunuel to 
IDO,€(JO cubic feet and 21.fi fei-t deep is cheaper than a channel 18 feet deep and 



it the lower end of the channi'l. 

imnnrMnu of ehanuel ran iiiilv In- ti.l.l iiftev full horiugslisve been made. 
•Hat Uio llering chauud, with a width of WO feut, cost littla 



2272 KEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ESGrSEERS, P. 8. ABHT. 

more limn (h-- WortlH-n-NcTloii cbHnnel witha width of 180 tent. ThitMl 
invol^ r- iiiun- rotk thau is sinee found to csisl aud is nopordiiiBly liigh. 

Thi> iM.iiiiit rbBimel ia not likvly t(>exc««d these r«tiinate«, oh tbeartmda 
less tlian tbat aBsuniixl. 

By ri»iT|>iirLii);lhv •iiiaatitira with thetotkl for the Maachester Cuinl, snate M 
oiitnick' liiiiil of cMit iniiy tw obtaiui-iL That work inToWes u vast lunoaiit at 
inXi hrliiuiD^. and loi-kfl. Joiil in gnmtei than a chnuncl 25 fiwt deep caniiid iJ 
Lake Jolivt, complelc with looks and revetment. 

4. CAPACITY FDR DILCTIOK OF SKWA08. 

The ln'st resitlta of iui e>tti(n>tion up to the time the l»w wna pnased p1ii««d tl 
liition :il 20,0(X) oiiblc feot for i>ach 100.000 inhabitints, as nocded fiir a siuiltW] 
ditioli. :>iiil the ptol>nl>U> jiopulatiou at 3,000,000 in 25 jtMirs. 

Duriiij; (he pnsl seaauu tbo canal parried aboot 50,000 eiibio ftol per mlotta 
I>ei«i:ilii'i List. Tbe iinjount nf orf^nic matter parried out by tlif* canal at tta 
was al>['iit LTiO tuns pi>[ day. This was not tar f^oni (bo anionnt goine inl4> tb*l 
Purk [iKmi> lit that tlnii.-. and \rit» probably less than out>-funrth of tSo total m 
vBBtf' |iroiliiipd by the city ax aawi an not be deflnili'ly known u 

Hauit:i I \ survey ii carried over the '. 

It DiiL\ bi' Htatod that if all th« ae-^gar' •" cily n-aa made tribntHry to&a 
hefor.- ilir-.iiiipoBitioii bad set in, then o v .of 200.01X1 cnbip feet per -'- 
ont of rli(- city would Dot improve the c m nnw foiiiHl to oxiat in U 

The ]>[»\ isions of the Inw ilo not reqii ecewflrv ililotion, and it BuW ba 

to pn.ividu the full amount of 600,000 en\.,^ .„ .. Teoai the IwKiuninj-. 

No-enj;lin:er of this Board, nor of any jire> mis iDVCNtigntiiiu»,linv« 

opinion that the dilntion mfutioncd in not rei dred for a sanitftTV pnndition. I 
engineer has said that with this diliitiou, the llinoie River wonid be fit to d 



Aaaunie that the assessed valimtinn for 1891 will bi?r220,000,000,andtbattha1 
tion increase at the rate of 5 per oeiit each year, which is certainly a eonserv] 
estimate, at the f:nd of tpn years the valuatioD wonld be $341,293,000. Thi»« 
penuit u bond issue of about tl7 ,000,000 in ten years were it not limited in the 

to S15AN>n,0(KD. 

If thi'No lionda nre iasned at Iherate of 91,500,000per year forten years, w< 
ttitf nl' finnlinn of mip-lialf (if 1 per cent ia applied, then the total realii^ dt 
tbe ti't V !■■- (>'■■!! iwvulo ;i.,i| tHxatiuu wuulil (le J25,535, 000 after paying intetol 
rt'iitl' ..■, ■..■■!- I - I. .i .: 111.- i-iii- of 1 per cent. 

If ( i-i iire retired cnch year bv monev from the tax 

thou '11 years will be less, or abunt»20.000,000to $22,001 

!ii'<'i>r" '.' ii'Mi. 'I .i-hiii!.!. , ..I tlic nnunal iuueaaDd the fiscal policy whiohn 

It t- nrU ui>t to li>M> itijiht of other Hourc'H of rovenuo which may Iw madei 
alilo..ri ;i liiiiadrnngB policy. 

1. .•<|niLjit assessment will be avuilablfl fur luteriil channels which tcmb » 
terril'>i y. unil perhiipa to a limited extent on the nmio rbiMinel. 

2. 1 'i'<>|>r'rly values may lie created by applyiug the muteriiil excavated. Th) 
siliiiil V III' l.irttt resources are coTered in this. 

3. ( ii>>|ii'i'a.tiiiii ou the part of the United States. This seems to have beou 1 
SijTht III. 

•1. Tlu- .l..,l,-!iL'.-!niil "-^it-rpnwer will be Bonrces of revenue iu time, thougli I 

It i iii'l au economical channel for drainaee which U ' 

nlsd !' I. iiTid Ihe United States should be williuf! to pnil 

thi.s .' ... u.iTinel which il« offlcera have estimated and mo 

A ]i .'ilil l)c possiMp under this law, and relief ciiu neva 

li:ia s . ■ . ■ . . f.-r inning. 

Till ; . . ily ia a iioccasily, and w oil -considered ' 



thf only one practicable and witbA 
nust be solved ur this city mM 



[■iuuali put from twciity-ftvc to thirty mil 
direct revenue in (.■outoruBd, the capital i^ 
I richly repaid. 



APPENDIX J J ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 2273 

has put the same amonnt in ber park system since l'<6i).-an(l has not tVIt 
ft, nor does she begmdge the exi»emlitiire. 
city expends aboat twenty-tivi* million each year for nil purpose's, iuclndini; 
— 7 for special assessments. (S^^e last citv report.) This is as much as it 
be necessary to raise ander this law antl i» .spread over a term of years. 
Lering the snms spent by other cities for public works, the sanitary project 
the eost ought not to be regarded as serious. 



OF COMSCITTEE ON ENGINEERING TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE SANITARY 
DISTRICT OF CHICAGO, Sl'BMlTl'KD JANUARY 9, 18112. 

:ex: On December 12, 1891 (page 298 of proceedings), your honorable 
inatmcted the engineering committee as follows: 

jM^wd^That the engineering committee W instnicted to carefully examine the 

of the engineering department and any proposed plan of operations and make 

rywommendations as will expedite the beginning of actual construction upon 

-^ channel between Chicago and .Toliett and secure the com])letion of the en- 

lel at the earliest date and 9rith the gn^atest economy, and that said com- 

leport as soon as practicable. '- 

maolation calls for a comprehensive review of the work of the district and 
inlation of a policy for the consideration of the board. The conuuittet' has 
ftdl nae of the time at its disposal, and now submits a general report^ re- 
^ detailed recommendations for further consideration. 

committee haa consulted maps, dia^ams, and reports, conferred with the 
tanglneer, heard experts apon the I'elative cost of rock excavation under water 
hydry quarrying and listened to the objections offered to the Chicago end of 
^ nmte aa adopted, on behalf of the several railway corporations intiTested. In 
llition, each member has used every opportunity to inform himself upon the matter 
I hand. 

FAST POLICY OF THE BOARD. 

t 

9r«iEr committee can not ascertain from the records or bv personal inquiry that 
■ action of the board has been guided heretofore by a definite ]ioIicy or a specific 
va of operations. If so, it was not a matter of gem>ral information. 
iFhe foll4*wing have appeared to the committ^H* : 

(1) The estimates of the engineer contemplated fixed brid«j;osthrouixln)iit the rnnto 
Isn Chicago to Lockport. The requirement of swing brid^^es and a iiavi<L;:abe <liaii- 
il was one not anticipated by the railways, as appeared in the hearings l>v the <oin- 
dttee. 

(2) The channel of a rapacity of 600,000 cubic feet per minute thrnuj^li ilie rock 
Bgiiu ^t •*^**?« when the law requires that it should begin at Willow JSpriniT!^. •"> miles 
fearer Chirago. CS-e section 23 in regard to "territory with a r<»eky sti atinn.*'» 

(3) The dimensions of the channel, its depth at the starting point, and its ;;iade. 
^not matters of otlicial record, nor are the works projiosrd for tin* de\«'lopnient: 
f water power Ixdow Lockport. In fact tliere are no proper reeorcls ^vhi^•h in«li( ate 
be plans of the board. So far as the eoniniittee <'an infer, one toot only is allowed 
Of tall in a distance of 7 miles from the lak(» through the river to the stork yards, 
■hi the grades are relatively much less than tlios«' adoi>te«l bv Messrs. Wortlnn and 
»ewton. It is extremely doubtful if the channel as designed will pass nuister nnder 
iQction 27 «>f the law. 

(4) Every engineer of the board has suggested that work should begin on the roek 
^ between Sag and Lockport, as the completion cd' this section requires the longest 
tie and is a measure of the period when the entire work maybe made availahle. 
hltciment^ have been made which led to the inference that con<lenination proeetMl- 
bgs here would require one year. It has been ascertained that they ean he eoni- 
lieted for iiructical purposes in sixty days. 

(5) The attention of the Board was largely concentrated on the work )>et\veen the 
ttock yards and the Desplaines River at Summit, a section that would liave been 
*leles9 for several years until the remainder of the work could he ;^oni]>lete<l. It was 
blended to erect pumping works at Corwith, and it is interred that pumping works 
^nt also to be erectea at Summit to throw wati.T into the Desplaines River, a ]»ur- 
P«e certainly conf niry to the spirit of the law. The roi)ort of t he engineering eoni- 
*itt*-e. July'll, 1891 (page 1K)1 of proceedings), seems to (rontenqilate this seeti(»n as 
*k« only work prior to 1«»3. 

Theabijve, and all that has come t4» the attention <»!' the eoniniittee, is in hannony 
*itii the following : 

Thai the work immediately contemidated was a channel by the most direct roiito 
^the South Fork to the Desplaines River, near the Ogdcn-Weutwortb Dam, the 

B2ia 92 143 



I 

■ > 

.» 

I. '' 

I!M\ 
It ! 

1 Si 1 



EXDH J J ^BEPORT OF CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 2275 

w«en Chiragn mv\ Loclmort is cTtxM'il nt i^ijclit potiits liy ten distiiirt 
; to BIX corporal ionH, and seven of tUfiUi puiiit^ sr« within this llrM 
MMtte f '' Kailnuf is crossed four times, tbnw cioBsings of the mntn 
Uui tbio.1t of their Inrgit yard nt Corwith. 
•alected there will be railway croHSiugs, and th« onmberof theac on 

■ can not be redncod bi'low wsvMi liiiiHi crosaing at four points, to 
nine at six pniutR. 

Qtb cost of Uifl llrst 9 uiiliM uf rewible rontiw will not greatly dif- 
ference in cost of ri^ht uf way will probnlily bo far less tban tbe 
itW fill roilirar (Inntu^'s. ho this factor beeoiries of prime iniportane«s 
p ba ovtwtgbM by cuusiitt-rationa wliirb portiun to tbe elUcisnoy of 

tM finds that the railways are not dispo«ud in any way to nocdlmwly 
■oA. TliAy regard a drawbrid^^e as u, serirmN inMtrr and insist that 
liUtfttI not b« tuinecesaarily introdnpud in their lines nn<l that thvy Iw 
ltlo■ib1■^. at niiialt poiiite as to oceision tbe miuiiiiuiu of ineonveBionue. 
dipud hmi been ohniaulvriiod a» one that inflietit the luaximum po<«i- 
pk batwcuu the waters of the Chiuaco River anil Sninmit. At Corwith 
n the threat of the maiii fard of the Santa Feiyetem, the oanul, and 
BrtbT«e rxilway linen, all ma short iliat'anre. TbeHitoation iscapnlile 
irstuiii. Tlie tjauta l''e Uoilnuy cotild be relocated for 5 niilea to the 
ntpoeed channel between Carn-ith and Snmoiit, tbna avoidini; two 
ItDga, but the position of tbe yanli and Junctions would unt m mn- 
ad. It is claimed tbnt tlio value of this yard would be destroyed and 

otbal locality nec«Mitnted, tbe entire eost of whieb wnald fall upnu 
tUns in !1«elf sUt«d at ever »l,50l) 000. Tbisfitnation may beavolded 
Ji route to thu suDth. uf tbe yards, by the Illinois and Michigan Cnoal, 
n north of the caiial. 

' si Wwrtem STeniie and Thirty-ninth street ia only less senons. Here 
d the traclia of the Northern Pacltir (not yet lafd), the Panliandle, 
Tntila Company leading to their railway yant. It is a waitiiij- noint 

bridgea would serionsly ttiiibarriMH thii bnainwis to the stock yardH, as 
IW operated. The sitnation is capable of soniEi omnlioration, bnt nnt 
it redneing tbe point la the status of tbe niaio linen withont radiciil 
;. This may be possible, bnt the aitnation most bo met in any rente 
iFork. 

lopted was probably the must available flroui tbe Sonth Fork to tbe 
mniit, for the iiurjiose of punipiug wurku at tliu lunul iTowliig and at 
1 River, and was not iiiti^nditd for navigation. It ot'rtiiinly conld not 
« objectionably located for the latter puqiose. It in HuggcHted by the 

■ that the Wast Fork, to the junction point near Crawford avenne, 
laedas the navigable coanection with the Chipau;o Hi ver, but no record 
ion is fonnd in any report or propuediug, and this view is not in liar- 
B ee-timates for fixed bridges over the entire ronte and with the chan- 
itm ewried through to the SJintb Fork. 

inestion of a route at this end should be reconsidered. The coniitmc- 



mination of the basis of railway coaipeneation is likely to be a mntl-er 

gation. 

lot, however, the only criterion. Within llniilsof cost, considerations 

I to the ediciency of the channel and iM adaptation to future ai.-eds 

ivem. Some of these may ho Mtate<l without furUier argument at this 

unci should effectively remove the sewage withrmt eiponslve adjnni'ta 
■ which rei) 11 ire large eipondituresfor ojiorHtioa and uiaintennnce, thus 
Bcieucy depond«ot on the wbinix of an annual appropriation bill. 
n should contemplate the easy development of tlio water supply iu 
lapacity of the Cuicngo River when the occasion therefor shall arine, 
ed by the law. 

Utions should be avoided wlJch will in any way tnilit-at* against the 

ptaent of a navigable route from the lokis tn tlif Mi^^i.^siiipl, or the 

if a deep"Wat«r harbor. While these are iii>l i- n - im,:! ill -.■■ly ]ii-nd- 

Dot be ignored. The only feasible tine fui :i ' .i< n tbe 

awrence and that of the Mississippi in li,\ i' ■ m .'Ic, nnd 

■l waterway in this generation is tlin^n ■'•• , i "I this 

is Direct we may confidently enlist till' . I :'> I.I mm I ii<i iil stiites 

I" decp-bnrbnr iiuestion ni;iy be beat iiiid iim-l, ibi;i|il> Holvwl 

hn iiistriot when the ocpunion tlierefor may arUf. 

not been given to tbe Chicago end of tbe rout«, and for 




CAPTADf MAIWHALL. 2277 



be Miactent for prewnt unisiileriition. The B»rk in tlii- r-Tiii-ui:i. 
ceitain it«iii, liiit certainly fl.VUO.IXMI will ^i^ailv ln-tti-r tin' htrraiu 
th«diatxict ami fur uavigiittiin. 

«ft, bondk, and opecial aiMt-wtiiii-iitK not Jc^t tLnu ^-'O.OW.OII* niriv Ii« 
B,aoCliere is no presuat re^uoii to hii]i|iu>u- thiit llie r<t«>iiirrei< »ij| iw 



lin woilcs ontlia«d are cniupK'ti'il, ui 
pmoieaBiTely, wittiouti-ntertaiiiiri;;. 
■dplui ia now properly tnatDreil. 



BECOlf M BND ATI dXa . 



littoe haa Oie bonor to Ti-*cainiiii;nil as fulloirg : 

itx the roate (Fom Sug to Li>uk|iort at uuve ami prepare plans for pro- 

— lefnnnsiuface wat«r, with a vitn- to liegiiiuiUK nork i>d tliiN Hectiun 



■t piMiticable date, 
ddenrtiaii of 



tbfl adopted line on the {;r<iUDil. It kIiohKI lii- |ia'«ailile to wliiiit a ni-w 
np^» plans fur tlia Ranie in sixty to uiuf ly ila;r4, uiiil actually bv|;iii 
M. SamoivDT iiToporty can lie arquireil Iiy tlint tr 



Mfhe lontu where neiesMry lielweeii Willow S|iriiit;!i nntl :^i);, with a 
inning work tills seaaoii. This may Lk ilouc in niity tii iiiucty duyH attt-r 
deport aectioQ. 

id«Tthe whole qucattOD of route l^iu Chi<:ai;(i tn Willow Spriuga, in Mis 
■«(itiu«ds anil the TVfiiiii«iut'iiti> fur Tutiire devel<i[iiiii-iit. 

fiiracTtaal construction on tbin section should I>e made not liit<;r than 
ait of 1893. 

dditr the Tonte and the truatmeiit if tlio jiruliloni below I.oclipi>rI. 
I hei* ta»j reqaire one year. Work need not Ix.'Cin until csriy in I^'ft'i. 
he plana may be matured iu iiarmouy with suine gilan fur nurifratinn with 
ipention. 

»imudLiiunst-ubeni.'t t.lin>u«h tNr fhi.'^i-,, i;jv.t :is «....ii f^^ ).r:..-ii';i!.l,-. 
itmcturiNt nud luoili ligation in dnrk litu- nuiy rotil'oriii tn :i ;:<'iii'i;il ))Iaii. 
will doubtless ciKi|H3rat» iu iJiis jiuIliv ,-r) lai- ,i^ ir li;i..< Mccjt..iiJii in .li;iJ 
reiinthe iutcn-nts uf uavit:atii>u. Tli>r work will In; t'lMniii.'ni^irv :md 
e some tedious litii{alion.iiiiil auv oiiiioLiuniiv f'li- eoii-.-etiiijt ll»- liii-i -.a 
lould be availed of. The lurgeciiart of tin- w.irk. howevr. inii> \« |...st- 
Id Snani'ial coiisiderationa rendi-r thin ex]H'dii-nt. 

iiaittee is pentuailed that nvvry eiierjcy hhiiuhl lii> lii'nt tu hceiiri! ihi' a<'liial 
of work butwui>n .Saj; and I.oi-kpnti. and that iniMiitiuii' evi-rv other inii. 
•hoilld Im: subsidiary. Al'ti-i this is bi-i;iiu i)iu|ih'. liiijr will li.' ;.v ailotih; 
refnl cons iilerat inn of olher Keitioiiri ul' thi' l-oiiK'. »ithi>iit di-Iiivlii^ ili.- 

of the wiirk as a whole. Wean.' n]w i»T~)iii.t,"l that xiiih a iuuim- will 
'BGOiuces of the district to the Ik-*! mlviiola^i'. 

CusCLVsroN. 

tt some current misconceptions, ^^lu^ cunnuittce wonld iiilrl flu- folh.wiiiij 
upon the chnracter nl' thi- (irojcit as :i wlioli: ; 

iMlnliuii of the Huiiiinrv proMi-iu was ail"|iti'il b.-iviu^ii; it has miirli tlia 
ivolrollitth'oT nothing tiiiuiaintenauc<'auai>)H'ratioti.aii.l had .-.dlat.ral 
I as a wiiicrway, 

oapai'ity was ttxed by two cnusidoratlunM : (id Th:it the i-haiiiiil ^bl•1llll 
le uecesKiiry dilution to nialntaiii a !iaiiil.:irv •onditiuii foi tlit- iiiiilialdo 
population durinc tliir tiuii> lor whieh tlx' liuoils an- i.-.Mi.'d, ..r ntilil llio 
a for. (*) Tb«titBhouhlbu!iai'i|ii»lc, iu<oniooiti..ii «i(li „ih.i- works, 
•now and rain water in HchhI'^, and tlmsprevtm i.jotaioioatioiiof tin- lako 

not pmrtif^ahle, on account of ■■st-i'ss.ivc co--l, lo laak.- a .liaiiiod ihai will 

nuiiiite volume uf wafer Riid at the i-aoie lioie l.i- uiniaiisialilv. This i« 
ly the physical cuiiiUtiouH. .\ iliajiiicl llovwoi; ai a liish viloriiy ro- 
.Ifb jjrade, tbns incrunsiiiK the depth of ro.:k-.iiltiii;; at thi- Iium'v ''iid. 
■iinel will ho unstable in the clay. 

the ro<|uired capacity a deep cbnimel is less eo^-lly than ii wiil-- oui'. It is 
et to lew variation in flow, bv chanjies iu lh<^ luv.d of liiu lake, by ll"'"l«, 

> and it is more eaaity rftKulat.-d at the h.w.T etui on a.-. nt of l.«.s tall. 

M the substantial considevatioie. which ilet' rminiid the iiies.-ni K"ii"ral 
llined in the law. rortuiiat.lv. all these ion.l it iousaie iil«i in the luterwit 
don. The only incident for aclual tiavijiatiun is proper cailwaj aud high- 



2278 HEPOB'i OP THE CHIEt OP ENGINKEHS, V. S ASOPt. 



flst.iireil aftiir Icmj; r.uii«Sii"r 



I, ami lii4'x)ilicit iif ita T>ni 



qneation these pro' 

oonlance witL their fall spirit. 

Very respectfully Bolinutted. 



Tlte honorable the Board or Trustees of t 



tbisT tbHU to carry tbc-m oi 



Lyman E. Ciiolkt, 

WlLUAM BOLUENWKCK, 

John J. Altpktkk, 

Conmilltx OH Engiit i i ri ag , 
s Sanitary District of CHiCiUiO. 



Chicago, Februarf 17, tSSt 
busrd passed an on1«r lU foDow*: 
Liistnict'ed to anbniit, aa nnau n* ( 
^olI Si(K ttiid Loekport, with oonip 
tlie relative cost of the sererul 1 
n said estiinatea all oi>llat«T>1 « 

■« make a proper preliminary iM* 
II ta iiamed that will {Klmit of ti» 
I sauitory district law iuvulviw * 
to imiirove, for tfae paasa^of <nl| 
.ockportto the upper baaln at Jit 
; the muin ohtumel betwea* Si 



the upper . 
Dhtumel betwea* Saci 
I tbe extent of anlinutl 



n Spriogs mid theiipper liMii 
the whole dwtnnce, bfts«d m 






^ trpOD' 



QKNTLKMRrf : Ou January 16 j^ou 

" ll»*otrpd, Tliat the chief euKini 
ticable, nlternative locations for the i _ . 
tive I'Btiinatea iu anfliuient detail to de 
th»t may be considered, and that he ] 
and damanes. 

In complyinE with this order i*. !■ fruini- 
and estimate lor nlteniato linuB 
method of treatmunt and bo tot 
sideration of the work which w-. ■«. -■- 
the Deaplaines Kivct from aomo poi 
and that whidi will be uecessary in 
Willow Spriogs. I kiave henoenxvet 
alternative locution B for therontebet... 
oomparative eotiuiatcH for qnaiitittM a.u.. . 

moat economical chaimel of unif<irm dentb. Witbis tbuao limits ia comprii 
oil the ruck excavation ou tha line or the proposed main drainage channel ft 
ChicnKO to the upper basin. 

Each of the several lines considered in the ('ouipnrntive estimates have rewiTI 
siuiilai trentiuent. and the estimates ore baaed npou the same method of worldn 
except so fur aa dilFereiices of location compel vanatious. 

There are three distinct rout«« from Willow Springs to Loekport and fonr froiu I 
point above Lemont to Loekport covered by these eHtunstes, At or abunt Loctp'<(l 
all four litios merge into one. These vaiioiis lines are shown upon tho accomiiMf* 
ing map, which is made in two sectioas, the estiniHtes being K'vun in Appendiib 
The iifth line shown on the map is considered wholly as resards a different m'*' 
of treatment and receives aeparalo consideration hereinafter. 

Line Ha. 1 fuUuivs thi' location made by Mr, William E. Worthen to a point abnijU 
Loekport, wljcre there is a dullecttoQ into a line common to all mutes. This liwifl 
situated almost entirely on the north and wast side of the Desplaines River, stritiB^ 
the river only at a very few pninta. 

■ ■ ^" . 2 is on the 1 

n line at Lookpor.. „ 

with a HAtisfnotory argument. 

LineNo.Siit ancwlueation tbro 



8 possible it lies on the soufliaB 

or and the Illinois and Mi(^his< 

few places, but inHiu-hainuitiWI 

ation tho river channel may 1^ 

' 'ili. It involves a new location of the Cbicagb 

. distance of 22,200 feet, 6,000 feet of which W 

. iiir the jmrpose of improving their line, leaf 

li the route ho ado[itcd. 

itbur new locations; tlic former following line Ko> 
e Li'iiiont, where it divi'rges, rroHsing the Ulinnii 
and Michigan Canal iniK.hulf mile bidow Ijuinout, and ngain croHsing the cand 
aliout 1 mile ahoib Li>ok)>oi:t. lliis lini- iiivolrcs a shifting of thi' tracks of the 
Chicago nnil Alton Ruilioad near Komco, for ii ilistuiicc of 4,000 ieirt, niid either tbi 
abandunineiit of the Illinois and Michigan Canal below the lirst criiwing, tft UM 
carrviiig of that canal acrose the uevr channel in duuiOB, with a waivor of the navl' 
gahility of the latter. 



Canal. It aeceflearily iriwsc^l.i'nils 
that with a ciinii>,iiM'''i I- ■■i>!' ■ 

changed HO sji tn i'i.'' ' ' 

Santa Fo and Calii' 

company is now n .. 

ing Ifi.l'OO feet tu lie riiuii<;t><l aUuui 

Line No. 4 and N'.. I A a 

IV point nearly 1+ 



AJ*Pi3JDlS J J — REPOftT Oh- OAl^AIN MAHSHAl.I.. 227f) 

^. KB vatintion oT line 4 lyi'i^t I'ttWepu tliu twii eniinl criissiliKH. ll dues not 
W«TiillIy from tlie l.ittvr. 

Jfe. B, »» hi'n>t»ruro »tnt«<), is oouiiiilon'il wliollj' wil.li rcforpiii* to a iHfl'orciil 
tot nC lb« project fioin that piiipoBiiil for lineti I, 2, 3, unit i, Tbi>> iljiron'nva 
" ent U ilescribed in anotlier place. TUiH line Btorts at Willow Springn, 
t «ilb line 2, slid' (ton tin up» in that line a diHtnncc of 7,000 fn't. Ilii-nco In 
. coiitsn to tbc west line <if 6pi'Ti»ii 14, beliiw Shk Juni^tiuii, cJosNiii}; tliu lUi- 
I HiditgHD Cniinl on tlic na.y. 'ii miles below Willow SprliiKH. Tlicnoe the 
leeta nurtUward into tbc Lciiiixit tiinKOQt of the preaunt canal (iroilnced: 
__ h foUowB the btMX of till' oiiiial v^iAt IjRmnnt, anil coutinuna in >l stritit;tit 
B to till! Borneo pi>iut, which it rounils witli an iiany ciirvo. (Li'nce takinR n 
Jbt cuoriMi to Dam No. i,at the lower end nf the upper hiiitiii nt Jiilri't. It fol- 
1n cloee to liuo 4, east of the canal, and passes east of the win' mill at l.iwkport. 
14 DD'Ier tho bridfso of the Elicin, Jolicl aud HtiHtefn KnilruJil. From Willow 

ege to Dam No. L there are hat two oorTes, the whole distanee being; aci^oui- 
wl hy tliti'p tangents. 
!!(» artpf U'rtiof tbia liuewilliovolvHther'Constmctionof the preaentcaiinl in three 
WttODs H^grega ng a total A xta ce 26 KK feet. It involves two canal croHsiiiKH. 
cha fpahChafct JkFadalf mia Kailroad fur one-half mile, andB 
coaatru n h h aR Alton a d B Louis Hailruad in two nectiona agffr<v 
1*1 B d b raolL L ko No. 4, it necciigitatos the nhnnrton- 

mat h gan Ca a or ho carrying of the annie acruM tlie pto- 

V Ui b d b d nos, almost the whole of the Desplainea 

i t( be available for oanal ronstructiun. 

lu Ui due A, for tbc tlrst four lines that of tho 

estate approximately Ihu number of acrna. 
rt^ni 8 all variution that there is between the 

respectively, which is sliKhtly less thaiv 



■ oent. 

~ lilt «if way &c 

1 from floods n Ih Deapl 
'o reuonm tm 1. Th 



d with ((lacial drift, as it generally is 
.__ . Spnofa to Lenioot, the I!1ch of the rock. &oni which tho eatiinatcs 
iile are not ahsolntely reliable, owing to the incompleteneafi of tlie borings, and 
lis unreliability exists pro ti ably to a greater extent with linue 3 and 4 than 
itlier of the others, 
i.ibly the snrer and more conclusive way to arrive at a decision relative to 



,H by a process of exclusion. 



< OF 3 AND 



Comparing Mo. 3 and No. 4 it is seen that tin- < --: i i 1 1 <'<l '■■,■: i<l' i l.i' i i : i ii lUio is 
B71,TK greater than the former; the estimalf.l .... ■ '.. iiTs, 

Ku. 4 for a part of il« length has some n<h:^ <i-nre to 

mtid.i of the Dvsplaines iiiver, hnt on tho otbi'i Ij,:ii'. i- ■ i "-' ' \- >i:: n^r from 

ticMnthof thelineforsi'veraliiiilcs. It is al»> l.ituii i. < i -Luu>i. U >. .;i i<'i|nire, 
J anler to prevent damagne byoverllow, thecuiidimiintioii ol'4:;.iac:r(-i of Liad more 
ihaa Sa. 3. It nroases the canal twicfl, which will he an obslriu'tioii in working, 
tad iuvolvcs the raising, oamtilicated quustinnB with the ciinal ci.nuiii.-sioinTB, since 
■•canal will either have to be abandoned or carried in lliimea acrrjuKthenewehan- 
M. The estimates are based on tho piopoHition to abandon the canal, as to carry it 
laow the cbaDnvls in Humes wiinid defeat tho purpose of the plan. 
Plln this comparison it shonld be borne in mind that the donbt which oxixts as to 
n T«lat)ve quantities for some of the lines does not axint as between these two, for 
Mieaaon that throughout that portion of thuir length where they follow diObrnit 
pQf* surveys of the surface of the rock and of the eroond have bcrn carefully 



_ . .B only in tho section common to each that the profile of the rock if 
Mcaably reliable. Hence, as between these two lines, I have nohcaitstion in pro-' 

COMPARISON OP 2 AND 3. 

e liii«B Nob. 3 and 3 It is seen that omitting right of way No. 3 is ap- 
■« nbnaper than No. a, and that it is l,li(IO feet shorter. It is also 
n the matter of Uouda, and is likely to be Ichm sul>jcct to water 
■ the river. During the construction of 
w bed for a cousiderabtu part of the way, 




Tb« luuU whicb it wUl be 

IM Hm I hr aes MPM. aiTtng 

telMtw largely Id tvror of lino 8. 



Tlw «Wh1hi1ui> rSMhed tagudin; Um muita of the S. _ 
• ■- • - Miiritilvof the Ri&nDcrof tniitlngtbeprolilei] 

■" ■■ -' — '-■■''r'"rt. 



iMWis of colDpleti 

i<^ fa<-t th»t all tl 

to aU, itUi hM 



•«!,ra' 



WwM« luh> «>&•' «■ l.'KVpiiit, Ihi' plan belon- Seing 

IvUri^v •!>»>" >>iS"'fr"' fofaiiy treatment tL»t may be e;jven. 

tiMt lltriv »i4v be * full iiuilenit)in<liiiff uf what toia fitm ia, anil its merlM, 
tt M iwvwuml «'tlh Iwu uttwi itroJectH tbat li»ve hpretofore bec-n jiTopoMd, m 
(W MMCth ''■>' aWul 'JS:.Ql)0 Trot lyiuK l)Ptwr«n tb« end of the 18-foot cbmnnel, ' 
mj,t-it ^s ttK> Utw VhW Kntitnocr, mul the upmr busin. 

^ftun't, Mr. VVMtlhiw'o |iUnwit» to routlDiietho luain channel with •■ 
■A.^.. ^hu,^ Itw Uuo tWiKn i>u the niai>. to a point opp*wite the nnper b>aiii,ai 
MM IMPMlb"- » aHi » M U< )>»« tb rx>ii>:h .loliet by means of > 2t-foot steel ^ 
fc«B«SAW<Ww«>Wrt>ttWlw«lltw«i to ew»Y» iulo the upper bMin flndtb 

-w t (hjw tW ("jwin tli'wn imimiveil to the proper capacity. If this pU 

ir„ , "> .„. iw Wl^'l i« l»k'' l''^el would W maiotaiiied as Ar u the opp«t 
i3i2i«hi*V*ltv *»J .-vtvllcot .b'vphipuient of water power secured. On the » 
St«iVMv*l^rv' »w^W »w llw his** I'''*' i-ati*!. and nearly parallel therewi 
5^» ht '» wv« *>*lw* i« '*>•■ r**''"'^ '•'^ *"'' "■*■ "PP*' *'=»'° t« "ft as a taU r 
— TZ^ -_.t MwiOM ilw- "d.-*. aoA by building: thnv dams, which wiUI 



tSt^jryr^"-'"'"'^' '■TOrpi7SV';;uVd"^iiw;rf"a' i«ij"ntiii»i^ 

5g5XX*t VW -rtWil »vt*u>iv.- *v.»*idiaty e*iial« would not fivt • fall 

2£Cv.SiV»-.^>W>» ^«^». •■■»■ t-:iV&*tw^le^ UTvfn.n,» point W 
•IIP jf^^^^^jV^ ,j^, ^^:^, ^';,. . ,x .ill--*: i.ra*4>y':!:i*ni.haiitiM 



J- > l*xil ■■'^ S finl a!--ve dit 
j.ci >3A.i| .-*fl-in«= pip* «lni< 







WU^ l» ^t->» J«>-3 



SNDIX J J — EEPOBT OP CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 




fitly [merely t] anBeestive ; it L'jin iicrt Ih.' workul oiil propori j id clcluil 
-ry covpreil by it Ena Itcen survuyi'.il. 
aid be naJd Ibat in thiN mattor of thit ti>rmin»l, Ik-Ihw Lucktiurt, thM'e 
» nrhicb canLe made in thepliin, uid probably will bo made on I'uUei 
I itt premature t« euter iut<j oere. 
^. . . a nf the oist of covering this streteli of 23,000 feet, by eocb of the tlireo 
llama deectilHHl ia given in Appendix U. 

Kbt of wuy requiml t'lir planH 1 and 3 is the Bame, tboiish it is impossible 
Eow mucli it is witbont cousideriug the qnratlon with relereuue to Ilie legal 
t t:lie diatriet to water power created by it. Finn 2 does uot reqnire ho mncb 
About fi70 oereB. 

KX^ite at the resulta in AppoDdie«B A anil B, it will be noticed that 11,000,000 
asto ts oBtlmated as being nauled at 7 cents per cnbii.' yard, aod tbut 3,000,000 
trda of rock are allowed at a redncud price, and credit given it in Appenilix 
3. 

«Mat« «nteTS into the bank that continea the watur bolow Lockport, into a 
T tlie Elgir, .loliet andEoatem Railroad, and imo spoil banks west oftho pro- 
■ti&I:. thus raising tbe land and limitinic the apread of the water. 
tbo rate of 7 cents per cubiu yard, dne to the haul of the material from the 
Una to the place of deposit, it should be said that it has boeu arrived at by 
latougli iDvestigatious and estimates made by Assistiint Knginoiir H. B. Alex. 
U»a resnlts of whicli are embodied in a report from Mi. ^xander, which I 

I hBieivitli as Appendix C. 

, nite is sbo'n'n to be the diffc^renDe in cost between wasting the material tuljii- 

II tbe line of the cunal, and hunlius it into banks an average diBtance- of 10 
fall ■Uowanoi' being made for cost of track, equipment and operation. In re- 
» the eost of the r rail it should be said that the mere building of the roadbed 
■A tnwlc and ballaat is a part of the excavatiou of the camil, material from the 
«1 being useil to bnild the bank for the road. Siioh a bank, or something its 
■lent, is ne<x-ssary to protect the excavation from the floods In the river, so 
lbs banh servos a donhle pnrpose. 

■ allowance of 10 lents per cubic yard on 3,000,000 oobic yards of rock is baaed 
n Uieiiry that if all but this amount of tho best iiuolity of rock is permanently 
Wd nf IVuio the first, that contractors will be tound, who in making bills will 
It laJie of onuing this stone, take the work at a very low price. 

■B are large qnantitiea, running into hundreds of thousands of yards,' of Just 
■tone i{iiarTied and sold every year in and about Chicago, and tJiere seems little 
t that the reason why this waste rock has berotofure been considered of no im- 
OCe arises I'rniii tbo itDliicuHo iiunntity whic^ll iiiigbt lielong to a groat number oF 
osuid thereby beeouiu valueluiH from its vary pleuti^tlneSH. 

■ iacidental advanCnges which will be derived and the ultiiuate prohtn which 
be re*8oi)sblyv*xi)ected to accrue from cnrrjing ont this plan, run up into mil- 
of dollars. Some of these may be snmmeii up as follows: 

By permanently disposing of all but about 3.000,000 yards of roek, this amount 
as heretofore stated, be of value, and the contractor, who may owu it after the 
is done, can dispose of it at remunerative prices, for ballast, for crib work, and 
le masonry; and will donbt less in anbrnitting a proposition do so with this in 
.making allowances to the benefit of the saniUiry district. On the other hand, 
I whole amtiiint of rock is wasted, it will have little or no value to auyone, aa 
urket will be glutted with cheap stone. 

k» far aa possible, it xhuuld bo tlio policy of tbo sanitary district to ao dispose of 
rated material as to leave the bunks clear of spoil. Much value will accrue tA 
tgbt of way for the canal if it is hept clear, of waste banks ; but if it is euciim- 
I with a chain of monntaina on each side, its value will be almost destroyed. 
Imndred feet of right of way clear will be of more value than 800 feet cumbered 
■poU. 

By carrying out the proposed plan below Lockport a channul of full depth will 
4mde<l 4 miles fnrthi^r, and whatever the dej^th of the waterway whlidi the 
id states (iovemment may build to the Missismppi Kivor, Iheao 4 miles will be 
tot beueilt, and, in deuling with CougresB, as thesanitary district will ultimately 
iibnulil recf^ive recognition to the finuucial beiieftt of the district, 
nus plan furnishes means for tbo complete control and meusiircraent of the 

■ whirb paasca down the river at all times, and will donbtlcss prove of great 

nreventtng actual damages in theriverbelowin the tiiup of excessive floods, 
I'mlarly In fnmisbiug a check by which claims for fictitious damages may 

rryJDK out this plan the sanitary district will owu the best mill sites, and 
' ateadlMt and most reliable water power in the Northwest. 
"" *"rf, which wiU generally obtaiu 300,000 cubic feet per minnto, will 
w power, and with ©X),000 cubic feet per minute it will fuinisb 



SEPGBT OF TBE 






H:n.-4 



<» 



' ' * I 1 




tr.fi. Aiott. 



•t5 



•r •1SMD0L wUA ew»teluad 
^ win wmfHaXim alTfUDIVWNL 
oTfitttoteU. It 



of «hk Baa by two 

.1 TW ■>!» rfc i Mfl pi »P « win twi— i» rtayqfat •bpy tt» lammi 

wiBWbvih. BelM tluw pMM the chMMl win 

will W cMkdKtad M the l»w«r bMbi ti the ^BMMt snoMr eonrirteBt Witt I 
:? F^nlM teaks wiD he hwilt e— «■ ndi aUim •£ the Hue below 
iC of the caaeL aaA ai Cw J ba a ae a peiat jaek above the EMb, 
SailiMd Bri4|!e. Ihentt^fwin eadiaaetwebaakteniinf Ihej 

fMoe. Ai this pwfttwaMeftaawe aadoMlraUiBg gate* wiU be provMbd^v- 
nehaaks <^ the rhaaad wOl be earned nte a htigfttaiS leet abovef 
Thi» Brthiid win eMeaiplMh to a rmm^ktnhh exlnt the eane eade 
b V the ^Ua brre«nfc«e d escribed, aad which ie iarladed ia the fotiiaeha 

W4ck WM <«alT Wfoa aa this tiae a fcw d^ys weOp aad eethe icsolte an nell 
to jdfM s ik« ^'oa^loaoH of tfM icfert m aoT V^ ttat can not be Mopeily < 
Vt iht ts^jietxin^ coeaaittee le a part of the wai b, it ie tfaonght beet to i 
W>»o^ <^etko ia it» pieeeat ■tegr, aad let Ihe aew data gototheenginenriMi 
iJ:>« ci:r< t aa^ be <oaT«7«d br that coHidttee to the Boaid, nthev thaa ti (' 

L*r «nfk. 

Tz-illT nbsltaed, ^ ^ 

BSKBEEITB W] 

TVhi»v>nbSe theBOAKDorTfersRaBOVTHBSjanrAKrllinBiCTOV 



• 



v^-vk- t ms v a'*'^' chief enginkebf to thk board op tbu8txb8 of 

<an::aV\ ^>:k:ct of Chicago, submhtkd may 4, 1882. 



vix:\\ .X \ • N 



« ^ 



X >*:^ 



■ X 



,y. 



Chicago, May i, JSXU 

\[\ .■-.■:•.-.•-.;•..:% Mtiv* of April 2l\ relative to a board of consnll 
'. V.-"" -,",.; f^> lu^ with the diivction firom yoar honorable bo 
.l.'-'i': Th'i'-vxi w^lar meeting the specific jtoints which an* 

.^ .. .^ .'• ^ vvh* UaHv construed, contomplato that all isaaee shall to 
"' ^/ V " :.: ;^-.I.. 2 -^^f.^rJ: the appointment of a board of experts; bntil 
*: "' "' . - - • ;;'^: ... .^ ;^ ^ f„ll^ wiihin the powers of yoor board W 
' ' ''^ *':..'?■- . ';.::^',.iV^^, tv which von may see fit to prescribe, the reqiie« 
s kV*.v *\.- - - •..•.. ... ,V4...„J i: would he upon broad grounds rather than a 

. » ... • •- i- ,■ w:;b iho rules. . . 

* V:':'-^- Vv;-.,::;;:V.^<s:sV.:::tt,^ no issues had ari«^^ 

^^ ■ V; ;;; . ^ :;. . • .v, ^.^.o^ ,ri»*"^^» »* pn^sent^^l m the light of the bidj , 

\ \*V ; : \..\\ ■ i ■; 1-.:h .V .is indulged ihut by the rhoice of engineers jI 

^'^' ' '^ .:: : ..'. ;: ; ■...., V-^.-^idc^rthrSubjiH-t inall its bearings, It migW 1 



"-.NXx 






X. ■ \» 



' l . . : ■ , jor, \\.v\ oiist. it isi not impossible to state toe 

•n ■ \ , " vx r. -.M^ iti d o:i xhnt- ]»ri>jH>sition». and a compariHon 

vv '\ V • -r^ .lu.mi- tan illTollil^Mlt]y l>e madr. 

' X . ; , ..>: ot t x.avat'.ii-.: and lonj^trnriing the main chan- 

".xx >• :■• > ',» :!:• -.nMur l»;isiM :it .lolut. waiving the right of 

;' . •!.:, V ^r. -^r i» l;i:iv« [V small iiiiportamv. 

,., . ,, . ' V. :^. ^-.v; of »\,a\at:n-. iMit in order to W coniparahls 

• ; '"' ' ' .K "" .^, »•. ,ir iM'.»o and of the tran>iHirtation of aliont two- 

r * ' r ' : ,:, ::^ :;:;. •...: VuumT; add,Hl. The d..termination of this addl- 

! . .V I'.'v.l V'.V •.•.»»•• »m*. **^> * omUiMon of your chief tngineer relative thereto 

^. »xx'» ;Ax*x\ U» \V*V0V MUIX**'"^*^'^^'*^'- 



XX *x 



XX 
XX ', 



• .-J 



'■ APt>BNDtX J 3 — RfiPOUt ^P CAPTATN MARSHALL. 228ii 

Bilittn 3" will i;iv<' thui'OHt nf iiicuviif.iiiK and (linposiiij; of « piirt, ami only 
kHiv in>k'riii1 rciiiin-d t" bn rxruvntpcl tii fiimiali » rliiuinot fnr waIit l<) 
w hattio- A tailrai'i?. boidc 5 miliw in Imctli, will Itavi.'' to Iw locatul and ez- 
MVh»re ftbsll tliii) rii(» be, imd hgw luncli wUl it rust to exonvate it f Theae 
ftrteot points which your engineer can hardly hop« to detormine in auoh * 
Warn to Iw efttinrBctory to all. 
fK, lh>- witrk, if iiorriMl nnt in acoordauce with the pruposed plan imder rither 



iU nltiioati!!)- dBVPlon a watir power kliovti Joliet of ftdl 
ntaau power, wnlch will be utterly loet iindur ProuuBitiou 3, Will aiioh a 
paw•^T haTe any Talne, and if eii, bow tuiirli f And should it be conaidered. at 



vith the work of the saiiitatj- district, however BmaU its cost and 
mt frrmt its mine f 

tarrpng out the work under either Propoeition 1 or 3, b very largo portion 
ibanlu at the rhannel will he kept clear of spoil, while ahaolnti'ly none will 
ft (muiciuubcrod under Propnsitidu '2. Does any valno attach to this uunsld- 

■viable ohanncl under propositions 1 and "3 wiU extend witJi deep water 5 . 
btthprthnii under pToposition 2. Hiioh a channel, or itaoqiiivalent, is a neces- 
« the navigation of the Despliiines and Illinois rivers, and without it the 
jr being exjitnded by the United States GoTernnient on th« Uontiei>iii Canikl nnd 
tpTovemetit of the Illinois Hiver wiU lie utierly thrown away. Should this re- 
any consideration in rftrryisgont this work! 

■old it be shown that sach a contribution t« tlie work which the Oovernraent 
ihanil can be rosHlii at a nominal cost — work which wonUl coat the Government. 
ri«l ont inde]>eDd6ntly, many times what it would cost the sanltjiry district if 
in connecl-iou with the main exeaTation — ^may it not be worthy of un eD'ort to 
e GoTeromeiit cotiperation to the extent of the extra cost! And uii^lit not a 
agh comtidrralion of all these nnestJons by a properly constituted hoard of 
.eent be the initiatory stop to such cvidperutionf 

tSFarc mere hints as to the sond wliicb may come out of such a hoard if wisely 
n. Bnt ill view of the fart thattho SJiiiitary district is ciigng^d In a n-ork wblch 
mildly is contributing imtnetisely towtird tlio project of a waterway which the 
Runeni 4b expanding money upon, may it nut bu the propuv time to tuke a step 
It may lead to reonlls greatly to the liiianciul benefit of the sanitury district t 
II profoandly imprra^ with the inqiortance of the questions which must lie 
ed an«r the bills are reoeired on the Mh of .Inne — qnestions which it may ap- 
will affect the interests of the sanitary tlistrict to tbe amonnt of several inilHous 
liars — and t believe that the only safe way to iipproacb tliciu is in the manuur 
Mtrd. .Should your liouorahle boaril reach tlie same cuDidatiion, then I tliink 
ill nusettk'd (inostious connected with tbe work bolow Willow Springs, coming 
IU the domain of the ctipnnering department, should be referred to snch board 
your chief engineer slirdl have made a rejiort upon the same. 
what, as it ecems to mo, would be conducive to greater expedition and tiettec 
ta, tbe consulting engineers might act with the chief engineer in making a 

spec t full J submitted. 

BKNKXRITE WlLLlAMH, 

Chief Engineer. 
ahonorable the Board ajf Trustees of tub S.^kitauy Distkict of CuicAGa. 



CiitCAGO. June 7, 1892. 
compliance with the order of your honor* 

, _., __. .8 follows: 

._, That the chief eDglticer ia hereby directed to make comparative and 
MtimatM of three alternative routes (one of wliich sliall be the Illinois 
igMiCMiat) between the waters af the Chicago Kirer ftt Ashland aveiiue 
'W Springs road, and that tbe route already located be coiieidcreil 
'tfa £he Mid roataa; and that the estimate on each line include Htr 
IT. •^ivrr" iliHiUigoa, and all su|ip]cmeutul worlcs ucccssury to make the 



r 

APPENDIX J J — REPOET OP CAPTAIN MAK8HALL. 2285 

id Snminit, for thn purpose of a nnifonn compnrison. tTit> went line has heea 
Mkoli ouw. The footiDgB of the eatimatoa for tiie various lines begiu as fol- 


S DaiTipMonofllno. 


iZ. 


ITO.-000 
euhlo fest 
p«>Dh.D(e. 


IchUMM 


o,aai,BM 
7,Bos.»»a 

9, MO. MB 

8. 436.851 

9,itTaiM 


H, US. 07(1 
7,TH0,Oia 

ii;3m:708 


IthUneNttS.-.. 












I cbungin, bridgea, anil snpple mental works west of Ashland ttvomie, on the 

inBriRht of way, or the relative injury tolrailroftdproparty. whith is not ans- 
■oifefttiiuiite; nor do tlioy give iiny infonuatlou as to whiub location will best 
epreseut and fittuie saaitary needs of the city, nor which ono will be cheitp. 

the foUowing hend^: (1) Facility and expedition with whU^li the rBSpeotive 
rard. 



■timalce take cogniz.auce of the relative difllcnity of execating the work, as 
t it iiossiblu to 'do so, in tile inattor of qnantitiea and coat per cubiu yard ; lint 
ow nothing sis to tUu time rBqiiitnd to civrry out the work on tiu^ sovoral 
They are based upon the theory that to the west lino of section 7, near Sum- 
each ronte, respectively, the excavated material will be removed by scows or 
and dumped into the lake, either as filling where needed along tlio shore or 
nt in deep watr as to be no obstruction. This method of disposing of tlie 
il ia reeommended because it is believed to be but little if any more expensive 
• process of spoiling the waste, unless the spoiling can be done over a large 



lended because it is believed to be but little if any more oxpensivi 

f spoiling the waste, unless the spoiling can be don '- 

yby means of hydraulic dredges, and because land that may Co 

fiOOto $1I>,000 per acre will have too great a value after a navigable chaunol 



'e been cut through it to be uHcd as dnmp grounds. 
a of the Ogden Ditch routes, the canal route, and the South Fork and canal 
u be worked in this manner witli about equal facility as to time and ex- 
•f transportation, the necessity of constructing and usiog a lock at the 
lata the canal about offsetting- what will lie, at first, the less commodious 
lof theO^den Ditch. On either of these routes with the right of way Becuriiil 
Monsble time, and an adequate plant, the work can be prosecuted witli snf- 
npidity to insure its completion by the time the rock cut below Willow 

ther side of the two remaining routes having their initial point in the South 
Wticnlarly the sontbern one, much slower progreas must be made because 
luore material to be removed for an equal distance, and no channel exists to 
to access to tbe work. Again, to provide temporary crossings fur milronds 
^ways will t>e more difficult on these lines tlian in the case of Ute tirst font 

B>t«rial to be excavated on the Ogclon Ditch routes, barring tlic rock at 
■ Bvenufl on route No. 2, can lie more easily handled than on any other. It 
aid. however, that tlio weight wliicli iit attJiched to the variiition in the 
the material, and the difi'ercnco of the ninnncr in which thn work will 
loue on tbe severul lines, liuds expression in the rates usd<1 in the eatt- 
Mneloaion !■ that tbe work can be executed in less time after the light 



■f cBl^ WnnaxEKita, n. s. armt. 

■ aifcafi iiBtiliiTT|iliiii rinl Ill ia 



^^^■M*^ X^«*«i*K^aWa *wt«tUw«>T between AnliUndfl 

« ^^i» ^-H* ^ ta« ^tat fc' <%^ Hw^ iiM Xo. 1 . u i 1 ia dMna 

-- ■- ■- — ■ "— " *— — ^^ aMnlE««BfJ«4«l7tlie riparian ilgh 




. ^__ . . k tk* nultoMl ri^ts 

^^ra^teaaMW^AkaMa-^M*:^^**! tb> Mtinaled coat of Oei^ 




1 Ifaa eMttb Fork ntid t«n«1 U 
•Bf tat«» !<■** wia«. Thmi 
b* Baled berr. Tlioiv w not, ■ 
ti>«laflf ptefritnlover SI -■ --' 
dnwd, rnorpt (bat wi 
rwo to ibwl until. 

* tea vHb UiP coDSent of tM'fl 
L«itUa the timitx of tbe rnnal ~ 
Am*1 tigibt of wBjt ahiUI bil 
plBtMaaf bpsinnine nrnraa] 
> MM af Ik* »T.t^ «« that. a-. _ 
[ >— ifc t tbal Ibe coat of tfcOV 
]■*■ IK»U li>M. 



„ ^ tW haiMtnir of btidgei^ inlerlMUrf 
TliMc >wnM»l in tbe ■gjnwali- for MM 

tVAn )V«-k. cwMTiMo.! ..„ |8»,» 

vV*wt«»--4. WWteS^*, - im«* 

^'MiknwM , ,., (ea.9* 

SwM&l>c«.*W>V*Ml«AAM«ai „ l,ft6.W 

«NWBtt I'Wl a>U «mI MMa - l,047.Mi 

S«MbrM4.««*r -, m.M 

Aa ft w tmrnm n kM to i*»* ttw tb* »bwi« f):«»« alt thr •dvantnsn' »Bd <lim^ 
•<M M^ i« '■b>«* <— w M« »»r ftm utm •rw — ulbft. frum • nilmaa HtHndpoint, tW 
Mkavmx cii»> — m a te wkliUtod hf aArb nibnad or fTOop "f mtlnndi. vp** 
ntoty- 

rtMM AMvt TarA a^ IVwaat ftoy«iy.- CUm#* «m4 AVrftfru Farifif, yUl'hm. 
Om immtm oad .'4. !•■«,— TW — !■ OwCt aftbHO ruaila. I^icg in aiUurmt vaA l>i>* 
■IM >{«■«. Mw rf\<«H4 t7 aU iW T««ta« 1« afxtat thr aamr luaanrr, rniiurini; lor fx^ 
» ris-trwk awiiu: bT«4c* nr tto r^miutVat. TV- i>|:Urai IHlcb linpa nlniif croai ibi« 
«bT«v Ibarr Mr «m« kvv^ bn^lcin. Ww^a lb* coaaviqiiciitial Atax'xge* nod fuUilM 
tMfrWM la tbr iwmlt>( r<wi|iiaeM« iitll be \rm along Oedpii Ditrli Ihan ani i>l)>* 
ivatir^ It afcMiUl^ «td. bniifvrr. that »■ jrt-l tbnn am ttnl ffm vcMijvlB psBsing t^* 
Wfstrm »>, I'*' Ui-.i'.o--, lii.l i;i.»;-hvuM w main dnunan rliannvl tiikoaomfnll* 
nwU I ■ '.- uv not likrlv tn roaiiiri> umtorinlly. 

All -.Tiib »\>rk fUikr tbr L'uiaii Stork Yxriix inl 

Trail- ■ ■ itinrt a« lo irndpf rfamiiceiiifnt ii*rr«8»rj 

^*""''> '■ ,irr>iigT'iin'nt it is belici-ed. tlint no penuanrti 

iiynrj i«....iu .■•■ uvu.- i.. iiu>f lants. 

<t(,-.w.i. VriJtws .tod .V,.r(*ri ■; (Aioi^n. .■iijadi Ff and r«li/iiniin,— The main Um 
of ih.-si'ri-a.ls w-iil.l Iv ('n«si-il Iwtw.i-ti Ki-.1tU> arennr iiml Siuiiniit by theORde 
l>it.li liii.'. »uil Hs »,.w l>HNit"l l.y th.- ,;>i„ii linp, half wav l>ftw,-pn A»lili>nil avenn 
unit \\ e»tiTU iivi'iiiii'. Thi> r:iiial lii"' ;ils.i ,ros«rii the )>T»iii'li niail of the Ckiragi 
Siiiita tV :huI I'niifoniiii Kuiln-ii,v t'"tii],;,iiv at the throat of the Cocirith jarda 1 
such a luaimor aa to bo ezlteiurty diunagiug. 



PPEKniX J J REPOBT OF CAPTAIN MAK3IIALL. 22S7 

I T>it<;l» lino also crosses tlio Sanhi IV lir;ini?li Irftoks north of Cnnvitli, 
ninnner )ia to be jMrtkit1ii['I\ ,,'.i,,';,,i Ji, 

1 th.i»»o ot»etacles m the w^ij '■! I ' . . if - [iroposedto rhtinjitH tho 

bhpse tw^o Toiula from theic ]••'-■ ■ ■ . . i..-.iiig eastward, kcpping 

of the canal and crowing (h<' ^ < '>i tuemxiposed cntrnnoe 

drainage obannel. the nuw liriilji' ii^-ni.' Hk' Si>iitli Fork ttina bvoom- 
Ifeute for tlie uue uow iu iiMi, iiiul suviu^ nui' lirirlfie to tliesu runds. Tn 
he crossing at the tLront of the 8;iuta Fe yar^ it in pro)ii.iec<i t« rcniiivti 
« tJie nortu i>f the miiin line, extending from Corwitli to the Westeni lu- 
, and to dispenie with the present yftnls. 

til Fork and Q^den Ditch line erotiaeB the Stknta Fe at the thmAt of the 
L cnta through property bsyond in Biich n maaiior us to preveut a removal 
ic as propoaed for the tranal line. It aliio otnaaus the muin line in tiro pltwes 
kching Summit. 

kth Fork auil canal line and the Snnth Fork line cross theae yards in snch a 
» to damage them iwi iierioitsly tlint it is oonnidiirpd neceosary Ui provide for 
oral in the same way oa pTdpoiuxl for the onnii! lini-. It may he said that 
varioDs rhaDjTMi miulc as iirop'ised, tlie Ogdi'ii l>itob ruut« is the only one 
in affect the C'hiciiEci, MiJdiaou iv"' «-— «-rii liiiilway. Iii tliia cnne, liaw< 

injury done woiil.i be HerioiiM, oi f, ... „ .-iidii^nl change in tlie aliKnmont, 
tinn; curvoB for a straifclit track, i rell ss introducing a swiiif; bridue. 
Ciku Dit«h rentes aud th(N South irk and Ogden Ditch route are the only 
ich reallv danisge the Santa Fe Ku'iCDad, except in ''.rossing the old Gri^d 
raDcU, tiie latter rente heing bo rttinuus ia llH ofl'ecti h« tu praitticnlly bu- 

l>htt)!toi(r. 

J proptMed ebaugi! tlie Santa Fe system as a -whole will be Diateviully bene- 

the adtiptinn of the canul rmite. 

ro. Alton and 81. iout*.— This mail '« criwaed only by the three Sfnith Fork 

Id tbM>e eaiies the cmssijig it ane ' >o acTieiisly inlerfero with the ali^- 

nd ia very objectionalile. The ahi f the trnciia in tlii? manner prejectell 

?anal lino would do this read no i bnt, on the other hand, wenld nlti- 

p^atly tienelit It In a bnsinesa wa 

fa and IfrtUnt Indiana Belt. — All I routes ari«3 thi» touil in sahstRntially 

e uanner. leavinj^ nothing t« murl prefuroni^e for one route over an[>theT, 

ihat the Ogden mtoh lino comefi ai, a bed point In the grade of the mad. 

to and Calumrt TamfH«(. — The roMd is erossed in the eame inaimur and at the 

we by all the lines. 

unary of the riiilroail bridjtea between Aahluud avenue nud Willow Sprin)^ 

nrieiif routes after Ihe proposed ehauKCS hiive been miide is givini ill lliu foi- 
tabli.-: 





KimP nr n.nl«. 


tnan»i. 


Ogden IHtcb, 1 


Coual. 


South F«rk 


Sciuth Fcrk ^.. ... 


«k Y.nig 


Booble track , 
FoorttMk.... 




Double track . 
F«~r.r«.k.... 


1)0 bl I k 11. 1.1 . V 


81itr«k 


Foui.(ra<.k.... 




Four U'Bck. 




Donblo track . 










tSr. 




Twn donblo 
Double track- 








Slnglo truck-. 


SlDjjlctnwk.. 


Singlotrnck-. 

Double trafk.. 
.....lo 


Single truck. 


s^z-^ 


Uoable track . 


Double trwk 


.....lo 















■Inaion of the railroad problem it may lie xaid that the indireet damages 
taliOQte" arc at a minimum, while on the " Simth Folk mid Ogden Ditch 
re at a r^^Wiun and next to prohibitory, so fur as the Chicugo, Santa 
iunia R ' is otmoetaed. 



2288 HEPORT OF THE CHIEF OP ENOIKEERS, V. S. ARMY. ' 

d.— VALua OF ACQDUtBD pnopEarv. 

The numbctr of feut of available irutec front which, on the linbs tuid rifrfats ef wM 
ua proposed, vrill belonK to the sanitary iliBtriut between AslJaDtl avrniie snd ^ 
vest line of section T, tatR side of Siimmit, and to whi<:h point it is proposed t« keq 
the biraka free of spoil, not incliiiliug platted stroetii, railroad eroBBtugi, etc., atit tl 
follows : 

OgdenDilch, liiioNo, 1 71, M 

OgdenDitch,lLneNo.3 BT.M 

Canal lino TO.SB 

Sooth Fork and OgdeD Ditch line 73, TM 

South Fork nnd Caniil line ll.m 

South Fork line e&,»B 

From this it is seen that there will be but litOe diJTerenco in the value of ilt<^ j^ 
quired property if tlie wide right of way lie taken on the canal line; bnt NlotiilL) it 
be narrowed to 460 feut its valuu ou this line would probably bo reduced as mutb il 
76 per cent. 



I!4 



A comparison of the vurlons olenieDt^ coming under the Hrst four heads alTorl! 
the ohoite of a route ruudere it uppati>nt thai, if nothing else wen; to bo l»fci>ii :■ 
cunsideratioQ, tlie choice would iaevitalily fall upon the canal. Uuder tliis V 
however, other considerations may affect the proljlem, Lutbcftireenteriug api>ii i 
it should be promised that, so far as supplemental works east'of Aohland av<>tii' 
conconicd, there ore practically but two routes, the group consisting of IL'. < 
Ogileii Ditch roiitcH and the canal route constituting one and the three Soutli I <>'i- 
mntJ^s auother; and, since all but the caual route from the first group and all but iim 
Sunth Fork and aaoal tonM from the latter have been eliminated, oor fnrtlirr lU' 
quiriea ore coaiM^med wholly with tbeae two routes us affected by the works nn 'f- 
sary to rimder the main channel fully effective. 

It is essential to inquire into the sanitary cuiidition and capacity of the CiiK':') 
River and its branches and to reach on nnderxtimdin^ of the provisions which « iil 
bo iiucessary to meet local sanitary needs when the eity shall have grown l-i smli 
uiaguitnde as to tas the full-tiiae chauncl as reiinirod by the aanitiicy Uislrlel \nv,. 

1 

SA^'ITARY RBqi;iUBMKNTS. 

Wliitliever rnntj" may be adopted for the main cL.iiini'], lln- mnin river m 
south branch will fwul the direct effect of the current created theroliy, thoujth 
the route leadinc from the South Fork will have a direct ortV(.it upon this fllthii. 
alt stagnant po'ils. The canal route would produce no natural cnireiit thrfialth 
tiDlesH supplemented with au inlet channel from tlie lake counectiog with the SmI 
Fork through which n flow of water can be establisbcd. In lien of tbis. resorlmd 
be had to intercepting scvrera and a llnshinK conduit with pumping; works. 

" ' ' ' " '' ' ■ nonduit I2feet in diameter would Tieretinirrf 



To do the work tliorouKlily a 

the oondnit and inf*rcpptiiiK .. . . ^ _^ 

niiip. Thfi iulcrceptitig scwits would collect all tho sewage south of TUirty-iiti 



the oondnit and inf*rcpptiiig aewcrs being located as shown on the accompanviij 



directly into the nondtiit. In addition to tlio i 
be such Mi to proviile fur a change of wntiir i 
four bnurs. 
Inthe Appendix M nn osliiimic of flu' cost t 



dilution of the i 

To detormino tl 

be, directly or I 

Thepopuliitii 



^'-tbod now il 

linueil, bnt Ij 
an open cha^ 



APPENDIX J J — REPORT OP CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 



2289 





18S0. 


■seso- 


. 


as 


































1,204,000 






' 



course impossible to preilict with 
;oiiliuuiiiation will occnr from i 
oat present indicutioua it ia Hsfu t 
trica will remain wbcru they «re. 
und thiH, wi ia wull knowii, 



the 



at wliiit points in the 

oihcr than that of population, 
B that the at-ock ;urda and pack- 
\ they muy nut be tranofer^d. to 

gieat auuice of river pollatif 



le facta it appears thitt 300,006 cubiu feet pet minute, ortbereabonts, will 
fot dilution in the South Brunch of the tlver, with even a less relaldve 
ban that apeaified in the saaiitary distriut luw. 

OAPAOITT or TBS GRiaAGO BITBB. 

t gnide to the amount of watttr wliioh it is possilile to dniw thiuiigh the 
CivQt and its hraucbes, either in \tn pmaent condition ot with modi filiations, 
1 by gauging of the river made duriu;r tlie late Huod from May 6 lo May 
id aimilur nneii mode by the DruiniLge and Wal«r Supply Commission of 
D February, 1887. From these meiumremeiita it was fonud that the maxi- 



Eighteenth street and the lattar at Kedzie a 
cimnni discharge thtou);h the North Branah oocurreil May 5. 1893. and from 
. HI., Slid probably amounted to 200,000 ouhio feet per minute. The dia- 
: the time meaanrement waa made, 11:30 a. m. of the 6th, was 1»4,000 
. per minute. For the 1887 flood the maxiinnm was 125,000 cubic feet per 
I Feburary 10, the former measured at Clyboum plaoo and the latter at 
ille. 

idmum discharge from the main river waa, approximately, aa follows (nomo 
I being made for water that reached the river below tlie point of meaKnru- 
D May 6, 1892, 584,000 cubic foot per minute au<l on Feburary 10, 1887, 



Stacb. 


DisU... 


IT 


■SKs: 


L.8ix.««th.tr«t 


FhI. 
B.2O0 
5,800 


oiflS 


Fat- 



















Deities which obtained at various places on the South Branch on Alay G, at 
. flood, when 420,000 cubic foot of water per minute was flowiut;, ranged 
fbet per second in the wider scitiona of the riverto 5.18 feet pur second 
lie cofferdam of the West Division Street Railway Company near to Van 
set ; and for 300,000 cubic feet diHrbiirgu per minute the velocities at the 
e* were 1,% anil Il.Ul feet jier aecoiid resjiectively. 

ximnm <liecharge through' the luain river was, as above given, Jipproxi- 
1,000 cubic feet ]>er minute, iiud o<.-<^urre<l on May 6 from II ;30 a. m. to 5 p. 
; which time the average total fall from Lake street to the mouth, a <\ie- 
,300 feet, was 1.02 feet, or 0. Ml per 1,000. 

■"' obscorvations and other information, I conclude that to preserve safe 
93 1« 



2290 BEPORT OF THE CIUEP OF EH0INEER8, U. 8. AfiVT. 

and ciwy nnvigntlon of tbe rliiragu River Ui« velocity nlioiild noit ezc*Mt H i 
UouT, Of 2.2 fwt por secund. 

To f^t 300,000 i-nbir feet per Biionte Utniiivh the South Branch of Uie lii 
this limit of valority vriU require mnterUl I'Sangog. North of Sixteentb Bt 
Hipt >t briilj;«s, it can be ucvniupliiilieil b.v ili<epeTiuig the rivor l4> 17 ' ~ 
nkrrowFSt plBcea and to a lew dt-pth in tbe wiiler )ilae«B. At ull bri<lEe 
Aibuns, JftckBun. nnil Folk ^treetii, and M IbeWieroonD Central Kailrunobiiill 
be aecoiiipliBhed liy di^inning Ui 18feet. At Adams and Jackson streota it mH 
by opfnin); new passaf(t« for water nest of tbe center pilars. At roUcStreot: 
\t iMnni.ain ('^ntisl Railnuut utw bridjjes will Iw requireil, or boqio rotUokl ■ 



tiunfi gi\ing an iurreaae in tbe water paeoitges. Snnlh of Sixteenth b 
neceeeaiy to resort to a more ^uenu widening, deepening, and redockijif 
riveT on one Hide and tbe building of new biid^os. 

In tbe Hveut of the adoption of the South Fork and Canal roiit« tliia genenl' 
iug niiut Ini carried to Tbirtj'fiflb street ami tbo deepeninf; made cleat ""^ 
tbe entrance to the main channel. 

To past 600,000 cubic feet per rainute tbrongh the river all thebridgM' . _ 
to bu rebuilt or uddiliounl paasngrti provided around their abutments, tin 
river deepenotl and perhaps widened in p._^s. and the Soiitb Branch Uuv* 
radicallf widened and deepened. Such an unileitakiuK would be formidable: 
only l)e justified ae n lust resort or on the grunuds of a necedsary harbor il 
ment alter every other avHilal>Ie menus of securing auch an intpravementilu 
boen shown to be impracticable and unattainable. 

ADDITIONAL SUPCLT OV WATRB. 

Tlie qnestion of securing an inlet for an additional 300,000 cahio feet of wi, 
minute may be coDsiilered wholly with reference to sanitary reqniremeuth 
lateral Itenelits and advantages in this vay of unproved navigntion, eiilargM 
facilities, and tbe possible relief from the downtown bridge iiniBanoe Wiag |^ 
or all of these things may be taken into aconuut and that iM>lutioli of thV] 
predicted which will moat inure to the general gooil, not only of CbicAga ill 
corporate capaoities as city and laiiitvy district, but to the people of Um Si 
the United Statea. 

n'liile it may not bn the province of the sanitary district, slticlly ^r— 
make anv proviiioiis fur navigation other than that rendered oblifiiitory by _ 
tc provide tiarI>or facilities for the city of Chicago, it ilofs neeui ni>t only witi 

fruviiice, but at K'UHt monilly biniliii^ npnn it, so lung nstbc-ir problems are po 
nr a HO lilt ion and nil niiitlurH ]jrotiii!iinK thereto are in a formntive stage, to 
the work in litnul u^ to render cuTiiieriiliini between it and other governmental (H 
pOHsiblu ill '-iiii,vMi>; nut KupidDineiitnl works, as only by ani-h eoiiperattoa ua 
Hible to si'i'iiif III'- ix'^t Hiiiiitary. Rnniidal, and coiistrnctiTe reanlts. Workinc 
thin theory 1 sbnll discuss tbe qnestion^ of Kiipidcmi'iil.id chiuiuels nududelain 
relation to the two routes under uoiiniil<'i i' ":i I'l iTi< m .In clLitiiiiul, from twos 
l>oints: (a) Strictly from the iiarron< -i i< : <<i ^ ii'w. i-onliiK-d to tlieMOQ 

tarj- district OS sm-^. (ft) Wlthrefci :■ -i -.mitiirv, i omiuorcinl, ««fl 

piiliticnl iuten'st uf Ihifi comiiinnity nn'i t l,ii'i;>*. ' J 

obli«jir-i ■ rli i'ork fnmW 

the uld town of Luke iiud ihv Biuiihuru part uf iljdu J>:uk. Hot omitting' iw| 
because of the omission of the Bontlioni part of thi* city froni the sanitary diBliMj 
we have to consider nndor Ihitt head only the cbeiipetit possible wav of ohtuiniiil 
BOO.OIKl cubic feet of water per iiiiiiiil<- fimi] Uu- liiCc nml the best loention of iW 

main chnunel wst i>(' \ -M.n ■! ,n !■■ m" i pi ii !■■ :1m' like inlet. 

Aa linn atrenily 1 ' ' ■ -i g :)00,(K)0 oabic feet !>■ 

iiiiuiiti' through I'" ■■ ' I. -' t ciin be made at a eoS 

iiarntividy HniiiH ■•..-•• i miiiuti> can bn nht«in« 



Tiie South Branch, south of Sixteeiilli 



city of Chicagu in confnintoil with the ciiiiiui<'r<-iul ititiiatioii uf huviiiLr at low 
i harbor tUat will bnrtlj admit vpsarls drawing U feet ii(" water. Tlie prts- 
rbor ia too narrow, too Bhailow, aii<l ton tovtimus to nilmit tha clue of vetwels 
an fut taking t« tbeniBelvcg the rarTyiuu traile of the lakon. VcKaeU Dearir 
t long and that now cany from 2,000 to 3,000 toDs. with pi%:4eDt harbor facil- 
id depthi of channels at the Ht. Clair Kiver Caiinl aod tlif Lime Kilos, would 
led to 18 to 20 feet draft and carry from 3,000 to 5,000 toun if sufficient depth 
ailable. The shallow ploceB thronghont the lake« and the Sanlt Rte Marie 
ire bfing inipri.v.-d uiiil rlcopfiica l.y tlio lliiitoii Slater. (Jovemmeat lo 21 feet. 
[hifi work is '■ouiplot.-ii, whith will be done in a few yeiira, Chicago's commer- 
^leatK will bl^ serionsly tlireulpiied if u uiorii adequate harbor is not provided. 
y cheapi^r lake fVoiKlit rates prevail between Uiiliitli and liuB'alo on both grain 
>1 than iK'tneen Cfaivago and Bnflalo, notwithst-auding 111 miles greater di»- 

Diiliith and the noeeHsity of paating the'Sault Lock. 

11, tbe United Statj« Government is committed tu tm)>ri>viHl navigation of the 

1 Kiver, by reason of the money already expended tberviiii, and tuat which is 
being vxpendHl upon the Ilenni'pin Ciinal. The scioitury district channel will, 
bly, be the most impnrtnnt link in this chain of waterways, and Government 
ts will demauil a Rnituble lake connection. 

third considertitinn ie fnnud in the nrgeut need of relieving street traffic in 
itntl part of tbe city ftom tlfo incubus of movable bridge*. The injury that 
rid^tn are to biiainew iotereata is beyond compntation and too evident to need 
linn a mention here. 

rving, aa I do, that these coniii derations will, by the tim>^ tlie main channel i« 
ted from Ashland avenne to Joliet, force the rncognitiuii of the necessity of 
irbor eutTauccB, it is impossible t^ consider ua &nnl nny ]ilan for a new inlet 
le laike lo the rivhr except one th lit will answer the thi-<^i--roId puri)ose of suui- 

a harlmr entrance, and au oailet for what I believe will become a great in- 
aterway. Henoe we have to inquire which of the twii rentes under consid- 
I is beat CBlcnlaled to Jit itny posaiblu locution for siicli a channel. If the 
d from the lake should conuet^t witb tile South Bruicli mirth of Brid^port, or 

the rivpF itself be deepened and widened tUroughoiit so as to give ample 
ty Cor all purposes, then the "canal ronto" will obTicmsly be the best that can 

he other hand, should the new channel enter the Sonth fork at its sonthem 
ity. then the "canal route" would not connect so directly with the lake as 
loath Fork and canal route," but it would cost no more to pass the water 
rard tlian southward throngh the Snath Fork to tbe main cnanncl, and in 
BUM the intercepting s;st«m and Huohins cimdnit would be dispensed with. 
oald be said thai, on the theory herein aiTvanced, the Ctiicago Harbor will be- 
Im> tenuinna of lidce eommerce on the one hand, and uf river and inland corn- 
on the olher, and not ii mere «bnrt i-ul for vessels piusaiog from the lakes to 



2292 REPOET OF THE CHIEP OP BNOnfEERS, O. 8. ARMY. . 

My cotuliuinit then is Ibat tkera is bal littla ehoir« between llie t*r« rosM 
the inniii dnino^ ebajmel wcat of Ashland BTenae, bb far aa any p»9sit>lec«iiii^ 
niUi Lake Uichigaa is concFioed, and aa every oth-^r conaitlemtion potQti ■ 
"CAual rouM" as the pntbiable one, I bdieTs there can be no doubt abMi 
AdvUability of adopting it. i 

The reasons foi this conclaNon may be briefly rerapittilat*>d as followB: 

(1) On a like basis as to right of way it it sbowa to be $I,(E>8.90I oheaper tha) 
ncort cheape8t[ont«, tiDrl by sacrifleingcertaia pitispcctive advantages in tlievj 
dockasf it may be niadt> $1,963,901 cheaper than the next cheapest poseible rasfi 

(2) W<*k c»a be begun on it immediatdy, quite likel; sariug a mil y«ir iaj 

(3) With the changes proposed it is open to len objection from a railroad ■ 
point than any other route; j 

(4) Should ^upplementnl works to supply water to the main channel be tm 
out in accordance with the narrowest Te-inir^mejkts, it is locatdd in the liestpo^ 
to command the situation. On Ibe other hand, should they be projected OM 
hmodest linea, it stiU meets the sitnalion a« fully as any other location. ] 

FLOOD WATBKS. 

In order that the estimates for the main cbanoel between Ashland aTenai| 
Willow Springs may cover all collateral works, it is neceesiiry to deal wilK 
flood-water qncation and its relation to the waia channel. This involves a nout 
ationof(l) the sanit-tryonestlon of Chicaco as affected by floods; (2) thedispsS 
of the Des Pl.iines and Cbiougo rivers flood wnters. i 

(Ij The prot«<:tion of Chicago's water sDpply from sewage poUution is by M 
most important phnse of tbe sanitary quc«tton. The greater or leas dtlntioQ M 
aewago, so long as it is confiaed to the Chicago Biver or to the msjo draimiee (^ 
is to the people of this city of little momi^nt compared to the importaaoe of^ufl 
aewnge. evou iu siiioll quantitioB nut of the Inkn. The reafous for this are'tod 

Esble, too well kniiwu liml ackuowlcilgnl to ncocl stating here. Hence, fitni 
iceptiou of the project for the sniiitatjuo of the city via the Doa Plaineaandni 
rivers until uow, every lair miud that has iotvlligPDtly approached the anhjeal 
recognized that the prevention of oil flood-water discharge Irom the Chioago ■ 
into the lake is a nne qua non of the plau. < 

^3) Owing to the reuitions which the npper Dea Plolnes River, nhen in floo^ 
tains to tbe Chicai^o River, and the oocnpnncy of the lower Dea Flaines RiTerVK 
with the main druinage caoal, the plans of the t^bicago Drainage and Water Sd 
Cominiasiou provide.l thai the flood water from OO aquttre milea of tbe Dee PI* 
Valley aud from 120 sijuare miles of t)ie N'orib Brnuili of the Chicago River m 
be turned t^ Lake Michigan through cnt-ofi' channels nncontHininated withse* 
thereby redneing the floiKl volnme from tb» combined, catchment basins of tha 
TivetB,of which 400 squnreiuileH would remain, to such proportions that a ohamil 
the oapacity proposed, vii, 600,000 cubic feet per minate, would prevent an ootl 
from toe Chicago River into the lake. Ity such an arrangement the Dea Pll 
River could bo tuken inio tbe main dniinnee channel at Summit with impnnity. 

This method was then, in the aliaenr- -' "■ ' '-' *■■-■- "- --— ' 

gnlnedof tht> Des Plainea and lUinois r 
pliabing the end in view. 

The lurther study which has been given to the aahjcct in connection with Uk 
tail location of the mnin drainage channel baa convinced me that a cheaper sod 
haps equally safe method in to call into service the combined capacity of tha 
Pluiiies River imd tbe main drainage cbanuel beyond Summit to carry oS tbe fli 
of the Des Plaines and Chicago rivers. 

During tbe late flood of May 6 there was a maximum of 606,000 cabio feat 
minute posHcd through the Dea Plainer River below Riverside, and on Fehrasrj 
18ST, a maximum of 620,000 cubic feet per minute. On April 21. 18S1, the wat« 
tho place where these rai'asnrenienta ivi>rr nisde rcnehed 1.4 feet greater height, w 
indicated u disclinrgu of KIO.OOO cubic feet |>er minute. Of this amount at least 
third, and perhaps a grt-:itor proportion, paascd down the Des Plaines River bi 
Summit. Hy the removal of a few obstructions, and a little forcing by raising 
height of floods slit<ht1v at Summit, there serins no reason to donbt that the 
Plaines River itself can bo nmdo to carry 400.000 cubic feet perminiite from Sm 
down, leuving almnt the same qnautity to be taken into the uiniu drainnge rba 
at Summit. If this can be dime without setting the water toward the Inke at 
point iu the Chicago River, then the flood watiTs will iiave been jiroTided fbr m 
as famishing a channel for them HcroKs tlio divide is concerned. 

The wat>-n>ho<l of tho North llr.inch of tbe Cbicn>:o River comprises 173 se 
miles, and other portions of the river, including the South Fork, the West 1 



ei, me surplus nooa waters oi ine j^es riaiiies itiver. me coiuDinea 

of the Des Plaines River and the maiu drainage channel when in flood, 
I lake at mean height, will be upwards of 1,200,000 cubic feet per minute. 
ot prepared to say, finally, that it will be permissible to turn Much an amount 
inw) tne Des Plaines River below Joliet, a more extended investigation and 
ti study of the problem being first necessary. The following facts and con- 
>iia, however, seem to indicate the practicability of such a thing. .*■ 

5 the May flood, which was unusually heavy along the river above Joliet, 
saed through Joliet approximately 625,000 cubic feet per miuute; this ex- 
cnrred, however, more than twenty-four hours before the Upper Des Plaines 
its maximum. At Morris the maximum discharge of the Illinois River, as 
led by gauglngs made by the Engineering Department on May 6, was 4,416,- 
feet per minute, and it occurred the same day that the Upper Des Plaines 
nit WBB at its highest, showing that at this place the maximun was due to 
(iirces\>f supply than the Upper Des Plaines. From La«alle to the mouth, 
r st flood times spreads out to such wide proportions that the maximum dis- 
•t Gfrafkon was not attained until about May 23, sevent'een days later than at 

Owinff to the equalizing tendency which these facts exhibit as the regimen 
ilinois River, it seems evident that the floods from the Des Plaines River 
immit toe not likely to affect extreme floods in the Illinois River other than 
inging 'Uiem ; the akdditional amount of wat>er which may be added by the 
linage ohannel and the upper Des Plaines in the manner described having 
e if any effect. Hence, I believe it may safelv be said that whatever dam- 
me in the Illinois .Valley by water discharged irom the sanitary district chan- 

oocnr at intermediate stages with nothing more than the normal flow of 
[Uige channel combined with medium floods in the Illinois River. But even 
.treme floods of the Illinois River should be slightly increased, it should be 
Bred that, after land has been overflowed, to add a few inches more or less to 
nBemnbent water would do no harm ; it is the first flood that does the damage. 

eootideration is that the modifications of the river that will be necessary to 
the nonntd flow of the drainage channel will be sufficient to prevent any 
of extreme flood heights, even with the floods of the Upper Des Plaines added. 
in providii^^ for mean and fire<|uently recurring conditions the maximum 
equently recurring conditions will be amply met. 

^ it is still ail open question, I think the probabilities are all in favor of the 
iposed being equally safe and cheaper than any northern diversion as a means 
BD^ng a flow of the Chicago River to the lake, the money which such a di- 
wonldcoet being better applied in down-river improvements and modifica- 
[i can also be much more expeditiously put into operation. By the time of 
plAion of the main drainage channel conditions may have been created, in 
ner proposed, thatr will effectually put a stop to the contamination of Lake 
n tiuou^ the Chioago River, 
hiitever subseauent investigations may show relative to this matter, there is 



^*** "■^~» ** "« CHIKP or ENOI-VEERS, r. 8. ARKt 
—S^Hmmln Oy4n IHh*, Limt Xo. I. 



«.'.«w,sao 

^167,400 

330. (WD 

Union Slopk TsnUaod 

a jt'ottbtfTB Pacific, PittB- 

^ l-ni^'si^k T^V Md '"' "" 

_- »^ Sortlwm P»pij(c, Pitt,. 

iJrSL""*-?J- 109.0M 

CbCBgo, 8anta Fe 

--- 1*6.000 

Ohtcagasnd Wwt- 
. •-; 122,000 

«*, CluMgo and Cali- 

- 1(6,000 




$5rf^55WtJ 






1,841,760 

1. 31 U, 040 

250,000 



3^*0 



JJs- 



'^ ttv^A -'V W>»(6t£:at j^9nff«M»L« for ^opetatiiig and caro of etu 
*i*v. ^K-K'. *\t<v vt ^Axtgifj****.* •« ]»n>T»d«l bj- section 4 of the r 
*»A Vfc vXs. •.(! X -»^ *. ISS*^ 1^ La Grange Lock has been open 
••v^ V-^ i. v^mJ; i!»;'a^ iW {^ fcnU y*«r. 

i.s^.V'i'* v* *!>•*'** «y* iMx^3*fJ tw pn^wU^J l>y steam haveb 
J*(».^-,^v (vw :iv>>i^«*s. *V«(!S(m«>f«tlyth*k)ckages for the past v 

tis ^■i.*,*»ivv W^v^v*. .>f vv*JS»fe [K»ss*in: the lock was tripled »Iui 
iSw v^^«^ ^*^"*'^* * i««^*.V>A' ^fx-OMK* in siw of vessels. 

IV'''^ >atv >*«M »t;iiiw* ;\-*\*a»i »«* «ade to lock gates and road 
»-iv ,*^ .".wivsi, ».•* NvN;\\*\v< ^\««strtwted above the Io<'k: 212 lin 
Svi s^; \v*\\»»<.-** ^s* i«**^- ».«:'. *\-*v 4>wsmu'te<l aloDg the land ab 
)W «4t|:<fttt\v (\' iW \st,. .«»vt aU tHiiUtinjTi' and niMx) and ii-oti n 
»NHt: :W &.V*. U'^'l *vit t>.«ut<'*l, 

TW Wk Sm\>\ «Ii«« »oi «4(£^v«t itt *»|>erat>ng the lork, were kep 
itvwk itt »-\Mis»t»oliii^ th* >v\w»H^»!*- Stadiug and improving 
fitvHitKi^. «»4 tvtMttrittS, p«iutia£, »(*•- '«»*■ appointmeuta of the lod 



r ; 

i.-API*fiNDlX J J — HKPORT OF CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 2295 

moiuit t'Xt»t'iHJc(l diiriij{;; the yfiivr was 4.'*.W4.l>6, a detaile<I state- 
wbirh, iu )i(x-ord»i]ce with the act of July 5, ISSl, in hercwit)i. 
Kii-t by Assistant Engineer C. V, UviUDurd, hereto attached, gives 
ed acromit of all work done at thin lock duiing the year ending 
1, 1892. 

I duriuff the fitcal year ending June SO, 1S9S, from Ike indeJiiiiU appropriation 
fratiwg and tare of canaU and other icorka of Haeigativn," in operating andjfcwp- 
vpair Ihe La Grange iMi-k on the Iltlnoit Bicer, 

of look-teinden and watdunen •3,929.9S 

of ez«wB of dredge and tender 6ST. 17 

dxedgeaJtd tender 387.75 



BnpplioB for lighting look 25.84 

to pomp dredge 270.31 

ii«OUB repkira to plant — 

or 13.50 

arial* 3S.61 

92.18 

igml pump 755.00 

outfit for dredge 14. 'JO 

lint, «t«., for rep^rs to look gates iiOl. 112 

1 Car lock pnmpa 23,90 

epile revetments aboTe and beluw look: 

«r «129.U 

lerialm ; 118.69 

547.73 

', rabblestone, piles, uiddiift bolts for bnilding ioe (irib 734i.76 

tine ice, labor 135.35 

telephone 31.25 

ag expenses 64.68 

and express clurgea 14.33 

otal 8,001.06 

Money statement. 

1891, balance nnoipeuded (reported ..utstaniliiig June 30, IK91) ., «S34.47 
, 1891, allotment 10,000.00 

10,831.47 

, 1892, amount expended dnring Sacal year 8,004.06 

1892, balance nneipened 2,830.41 

1892, outstanding liabilitioH 238.00 

1892, balance ftvailable 2,592.41 



BEPORT OF MR. C. V. BRAINARD, ASSISTANT EXGINREH. 

Unitei> States ENoi.vKEit Office, 

Kampiinlle, III., Junt 30, 1.193. 
UR: I have the honor to sabmit report for thu operating anil care of La- 
Lock, lUinoiM Biver, for the year ending June 30, 1892. 

■K the year 218 lockagoA were made, uxchiHiveof boats on this work ami Hkllts. 
Uie high water the post spring 81 Hteajnbontt passed ovt^r the dam, wliii-h, 
« the number of locka)^. luakes 299. Thin hIiowb a ilcrrease of 91 as cmti- 
rith the Aurue clanH of bouts latit year.. This in due to the <>xtremt- low water 
tmber, Oi:tf>K-r. and November, rlariiig which time llie mnan stage of wiiler 
SfeelasagainHl. 1.50 fi'pt above low water in 1890 dnriuK the same mouths. 
Iver wan closwl'liy ice during the month of January. During the uionUis of 
MT- January, tud ir'ebruar}-, except fur a few days in January, the lock force 




t i I ■ J |iii Jj iM!lite»«* | i l i b . 



M taw «M WldM tiw taid wd af Oa iMk ■ 









WW WM Mka » tattMgr Ufto dmigi Oa (atamM to Oil 
-n-^ ^■^' -•■^^~"— ^— rtiTiltrt MilathiiiiiiiiBMliiMil 

J— «M^»Arf*t ■ II li i^alwfc. 

■^— /■■><■ w i^wM «K At MM mit t£ Ac nm Wk« tbe du 






wall IKHIMi MJ 

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aatpatmng La Grange Lork during Ihe gear tndiag June 30, 18aS 


2297 


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Puani thtoiiijh U'li look. 


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toniuisi!. 


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«6l75 
300. <M 

10.00 


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ILLINOIS AND MISSISSIPPI CANAL. 

]ject of thia improvement is to furnish a navigable waterway 
jte Michigan to the Mississippi Kiver at the mouth of Eoek 
i ooimection with the npi>er Illinois Biver, and the proposed 
I waterway alonji the present line of the Illinois and Michigan 

.ver and harbor act of September It), 18iH), contained the first 
iatioD for beginning the construction of this canal, 
reference to this work it is to be said that various aurveys of 
; routes &om the great bend of the Illinois Itiver to the Missis- 
ver at or above the mouth of liock River have been made: In 

P. Low (Report Chief of Kngineers, 1871, page 303); in 1882, 
lenyaurd (Report Chief of Engineeis, 1883, page 1757), and in 
ijor Handbury (Report Chief of Engineers, 1886, page 1707). 

was also a report upon this canal by a Board of Engineers in 
ier the provisions of the river and harbor act of August, 1886 

Chief of Engineers, 1887, page 2123). All of the local engi- 
nd the Board of Engineers of 1887, for engineering reasons, 
eferred and reeommeded the Marais d'Osier route, but for com- 
reasons the Chiefs of Engineers, Generals Newton and Duane, 

Secretaries of War preferred the Rock Island route, and that 
w been finally adopted. 

led plans and estimates based entirely upon preliminary snr- 
ider the act of August 11, 1888, were prepared and submitted 
;re8B June 21, 1890, the report of which location, plans, and 
» (without maps and drawings) were submitted June 21, 1890, 
bUshed as House Ex, Doc. No, 316, Fifty-first Congress, first 

report was the basis evidently of subsequent appropriations, 
r the requirements of the act of September 19, 1890, it was 
ended by this office and ajtproved by the Chief of Engineers, 
reasons given in the report of the Chief of Engineers, 1891, page 
At work upon this Improvement should begin at the mouth of 
' and that the appropriation be expended at that point. 



.-. 1 - '. • • I 

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t. . t *'t l> : 

1". • !••. 

A': !«•« ]••■ 
'.'W w.iin - 

•. ;.-. \\\ I- 

. • '•• » I.»J • 

' ' • 1 » ; ■ » ; • \ ' • 



I • ■ ir. NX .1* 
«.• ■ . ■•.;• Ix 

: t\ • ' . ■ III* 
... •■• . I'MI ! 

• '.. .iw t: . 
• .o. .1 i: iiu *\ :t 

■ \, V W • 

• '. . - '"X «- 
. . . •• ' . I . 



DIX J J — REPORT 01* CAPTAIN MARSUALt. 2299 

^'enumeriitiou, amaug works of navi;;iitiuii I'eqiiii'^d i'or 
ffif act of September 19, 1890, of "luifiges" to be ojii- 
(^fnfeired by the Uaited Htatt^H. 

'^ iTovisions of the river and Imrbor a^^t of July 5, 1884, 
f «D indeUDite approprmtioii for tlie " operation aud 
i otlier works of navigation." 

ted investigation the Secretary of War decided that 

fioi t^e United Statea he was not niitlionzed to ent«r 

iemeut, and directed that the laudu of thia railroad 

uoned for the purposes of the canal. 

Mt ajmlictttioD by the diutiict attorney for the northern 

ds tnat the baKis of condemnation be specified, i. e., 

,Br of bridge to be constructed by the railroad company, 

^Bwing, a» well as other descrijitioD, be indicates), it 

)? the Secretary of War iu effect that the general laws 

jes in the river aud harbor act of Scptomber 19, 1890, 

TApplied in tliiei cuse and that lie was not authorized 

JKB what bridg'e would be pexmittt'd to be constructed 

iLoret the canal by the railroad cominniy. 

"pAn came up before the United States district court at 

, 1892, bat as no basis of condemnattoo of a right of 

mblic highway, except an unconditional crossing by a 

te at the wat«r suri'acc, and 7 feet deep, or 14 feet be- 

Itte tracks of the railroad, couhl be pn-sented under the 

"jcretaryof War by the United Statt's, the court eon- 

1^ and intimated that until the United States officers 

Mis of joint user over the joint eroding that the ease 

tely continued, or that the jury woiihl be instructed 

B ftirard for tlie laud and damage!^ at the full value of the 

i and Peoria Railroad, less the proved vahu- of their lands 

' f for other purposes than as a public ciirriei between Kock 

The case thus stood at the <lose of the tiseal year, 

i harbor bill x>endiug at the close of the fiscal year end- 

1^ 1892, contains a provision that speeitically defines the 

ment or condemnation in all such cases, and if jtassed will 

Se otherwise insurmountable obstacle to the constniction of 

I Indicated by the niling of the Secretary of War aud the atti- 

B United States district court for the northern district of Illi- 

i which court all condemnation suits will be tried. 

PEOPOSED APPLICATION OF FUNDS ON HAND. 

Plds DOW on hand will be ap]>lied t^* the payment of expenses 
J with the legal proceedings in acquiring rifiiit of way around 
fr rapids of liock River, near its month, and to purchasing the 
y plant, and constructing the works of navigation in the vicin- 
m1 rapids. 

.' APPLICATION OP FUNDS TiBQUIRKI) FOB THK FISCAL YEAK 
BHDING JTTiSE 3U, 1S'J4. 

tolled, if appropriated, to the definite location 

ed route, to the fixing of landmarlis, and to 

ona of lands required for rights of way; to 

and towards the constriietion of the canal 

•ion along the line as far as may be deter- 



^APPENDIX J J — REPOBT OF CAPTAIN STARSUALL. 

Y LOCK PIT AKD TOUNIUTION UKIK 37, 


2301 


If ukB and *ild»M of bidder. 


SMtim»k 


HMoriid. 


Total!. 




Ua,a92.«i 

8:«».M 

n,<nt.Ti 


(11. 731 M 

■KIS 


ili 


mwJ. Whilney, Uuck laluul. III.* 








•LowstUddar. 
LOCK Pn AND FOUNSAXION, LOCK 39. 


Kimo ud iddrtu of blddtr. 


BMthwork. 


Matarlil. 


ToUl*, 




a.m.tii 

«,6W.0O 


tia,ew.Di> 

9,g25.« 

itmiw 


•1*,»M.30 
13.4SO.M 

i3,aai.as 


nrwA KtclaraBon.rwlBramtli.Olilo- 








•Lowotbld. 

LOCK PIT AND FOCNDATIOff. OIJABD LOCK. 


Sane and »ddr™ of bidder. 


Eutliwork. 


Roek, 


ToM.. 




»3.1OT.S2 

a.e8g.oii 

4. Ml. 18 
a, 1188. 00 


13,410.00 
a. 706, 00 


SI 


SV'SS'!S-iL&"i™ 


miMiBichflrdMii.Poruniooth.Ohlo ^ 


>^s?^s 










•LowMlblddm. 











BEPORT OF M 



„ WHEELER, ASSISTANT BNGINEER. 



United States Enginekk Office, 

Mitim, III., June SO, I89S. 
tain : I have, the honor to submit the following report upon the work on the 
it and MisaUaippi Canal, ander my oim immodiate Bupervisioii, for the tiscal 
vdiug June 30, 1892: 

fce beginning of the year the force was inaiuly occupied in preparing plats ro- 
; to right of way and in continuing survey of Kock River. Plata ot proposed 
Bg of Kuck Island and Peoria Railway wure drawn, and general infurniation in 
Ito ownership of lands compiled for use of UDite<l Sttites district attorney. 
•f witnesses were prepared and evidence given in suit for condemnation of 

iniTTey of Rock River was carried np to the month of Green River, bnt above 
« Bridge no topographical work was done on either bank. The notes of the 
f between Carrs Island and Moline Itrldge were platted, the map completed 
need. 

Monnoissanco of the Feeder litio was made and an alternative rout* snrA-eyed 
wmsiD line in the vicinity of Wjauut, 

Mremeuts of seven bridges over Rock River wore taken and eat i mates made of 
i raising four of them to give greater clearance at high water. 
■iei of measurementH ol' the discbarge of the noveral channel.* of Rock River 
► water were made in tjeptumber, 1891, The method of monBurcnient was by 
■* 'lid rod floats, the water b«ing too ahallow to permit the une of a current 
compKiwing this report ia a table giving the rcsullJi for the stream as meaS' 
Cuts uland, where all of the watei- tiowa in one channel. 
-n^Uoa] inrvey of the Mississippi Biver in the vicinity of the month of 
'■a-made In 8eptomb«r, and B map made showing depths at low water. 



r 



fmr J J — REPOHT OF CAPTAIN MARSHALL. ■ 2303 

ewith a coimiiittee representing;, the Bnsiaess Men's 
of Ko<-k Island. 

TtKxm the Boai-d met at Milan, HI., iu accord ii nee with the 
of the or(ler,and alao e.xaniined on the groundtlieso-called 
out*" fi>r the canal, "^(fllim proved to bean inconvenient 
le incetinfis of the Board; consequently, uulliority was 
I <>ffice of the Chief of Engineers to hold the diibseqaent 
Bock Inland, which was dulyg^'anted. 
(OD of Tuesday, September 8, wna devoted to the ezsmina- 
*« relating ta the dnties assigned the Itoiird, :uid to fiirther 
committee of the Uock Island Business Men's .V.SBOciation, 
rnonn to an inspection of the depression east of the ridge 
ettifers Blough, where it has been proposed t« locate a 
) harbor and accomodation of boats while laid up or vbile 
niusferrint! cargoes. It is also claimed that i\ hasin at thia 
Ecessary adjunct to the transfer of freight finm land to 
lortation. 

(Titten invitations were extended to the Bu^itiess Men'» 
of the cities of Bock Island, of Davenport, and of Moline, 
W. H, Gest, J. T. Itobinson, esq., and to th^ Seaia Brothers, 
[itationin newspapers, to the public generally, to meet the 
1 rooms of the fir^t-named organization, on Wednesdaythe 
pnrpose of pnblicly discussing the questions involved. 
3 day of Wednesday was occupied in sueli iliscassios; 
"6 freely invited and everyone present was not; only per- 
[press bis views but encouraged to do so. ICock Island 
ort were represented at this public meeting, but, so far as 
ned, Moline took no notice of the invitation, 
lay, September 10, the Board proceeded to Milan, 111., and 
e entire extent of the so-called "Soutbeni route," from its 
ntrance into the Mississijipi River at the principal mouth 
er. 

time until the date of adjournment, Septeiiilfer 12, 1891, 
as engaged in considering the matters committed to them, 
un Friday some time was allotted to an interview with the 
■ners of property situated along the line of the Northern 
lade oral ofl'ers as to the prices they would be willing to 
ght of way. 

DESCKIPTION OF THE LOWER REACH OP ROCK RIVEE. 

about 3 miles from the Mississijipi, and Just above the 
lOwer Rapids, Bock River divi<les into two channels, which 
ssissippi through separate nioullis. Tlie lesser ebaunel, is 
mth Slougb, and joins the )nssi.ssippi about 2 miles l>e- 
[ion of the i)riiiciital Mfreanis. The low-water discharge of 
as measured for the Board on September 4, 1891, is about 
at of Rock River. 

loutb Slough and the larger braii<h of IJoi-k River lies Big 

ral square miles in extent, parts of which are overllowed tit 

¥om a few inches to 10 feet or more in depth. The ceii- 

this island, howevei'. i-nibraee a very considerable area 

^ ground above liigh water, and the greater part of the 

ricnltural purposes. 

^"^•"id, the foot of which marks the downstream 
Non which causes the lower rapids, the maiTi 



■fcutiifaJ br ami bttHL Tnrkef Mm 
this ehannel i ' 
4,(H)0 fe«t ai 

I branvh of Bock S 
,. kMatberiglit bank of tbefffi 
E «f Oe Mk, B» Pvttijej' Inland, a IrwDg 
; to ien^li, and aSDf 
d from th* B9 
e or less, ihm 
I af ft*v is naafefa, dvpeudin^ upon tli« nU 
sticcc tt wttis m tt» tw« stretB; fc ro g is tuwaid the Mis^B^ 
wkeamr Bock Knis H Ae Mi'Wt aad in tbe nnitrBry ditvctioo whi 




iiiiMliwil ■! ■■ iil M Hi l^eeecl 



may be said that 1 
Binatlis. nr.i <.f which, i 
cfaannels lurm a delta I 
mnd mkmg the bank of the ] 



K Ask amf ptoper location oC the 



ifnusas «f the IKpwi aad MiMMBfppI Oaml, at the Misstssimi in 
of the detta dMmbed, vooU C(mp)7 vidi the reqairements of tie i 
of September 19^ ISSOi, -wUtb dtrerts that the western termimis be " 
the moath of Boek Brw' 

ConsidenDg the law in tte tt^t of the plans and estimates snbmittt 
to C««ifress nnder date of Jnoe S7. 1890 (Hoase Ei. Doc. No. I 
Fifty-fit^ Conp-e^s. first seesioti). and npoo irhii-h tbi» item in tbeal 
of September 19, 1S9«>. was pn>hablj- bailed, the Biiard is of the opinic 
that only tb«- {iriiieiiia! mouth <»f lUx'k River was ointemplated bytb 
aft referred W. In this the Itoard is r^ostaiued by the opinion of Si 
Gest, as expres^*d at tbe public bearing. Moreover, the Board is ( 
the opinion that, whether the prindpal oHmth of Rtiofc River wt 
espeeially oonteniplafed by the set or not, it is the best for the pn 
poi^, becan^ it is easier of approach by Mississippi Biver boats Uiil 
any other, has as good depth of water as any other, and, at sufltcied) 
stages of water, adBTurds a seeore harbor (under the lee of Pettift 
liilaiid), and that it should therefore be accepted as the month prt 
scribed by the law, nnless it should appe.ir that commercial eondituXIl 
require the establishment of the tenuinns at another point, or ehooll 
no controlling reason to divert it therefrom become apparent. 

tNOEPTIOS OP THE SOUTHEEK BOUTE. 

The "location, plans, and estimates," prepared nnder the directic*! 
of the Sfcietary uf War, in accordance with the act of August 11. 1888(1 
jinivirlfd for attaining the terniitiiis by passing around the lower rajad"! 
of llock l!i\cr by cau.il and slackwater navigation along the northerltj 

fiilOIV. ' 

The iliiiiis pertaining to this route were indi<'ated at the lower endflf 
VandnitU Island and extended across all arms of Bock Biver. Th9 
canjil ]M>i'tion of this route terminated near the foot of-Turkey Island^ 
thence to the mouth of K<ick Biver it was proposed to improve th* 
open river by wing dams and rcBuitJug scour. 

The memoir, or report, accompanying these plans (House Ex. Doa 



APPENDIX J J ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 23()5 

ly Pifty-first Congress, first session, page 4) states with reference to 



Burly in the progress of tlie present inTestigatiou it wan seen that tlio ])rl^vion8 
rr^ys • • * were not in safficient detail to allow definito and iinal plans. 

RThen the work is definitely undertaken the vicinity of thirt lino niU8t be further 
■■dnedy to better, if possible, the location uhown upon the maps. ^ * « 

After the passage of the act further exaiuinations were made, as sug- 
ntod in the report, and the fact was then revealed that the ])hin, 
ifMTed to above, for passing the lower rapids of Kock J^'ver re<|nired 
jjidiflcation to the extent that the diinis across the south arm of Rock 
tver most be placed at the head of the rapids instead of at the foot, 
vindicated, and still later it became doubtful if the proposed im[)rove- 
lent of the last reach of Rock River would prove successful on account 
(the apparent small discharge. 

Then, still farther examination discloses a practicable route upon the 
nath side of Rock River that wa« thought to possess marked advan- 
over the improvement as planned ahmg the north bank. This 
ite wa8 therefore recommended by Capt. Marshall, under date of 
?h 19, 1891, and it was formally approved by the Secretary of War 
h 25, 1891. 
As^far as known to the Board, the location, x)lans, and estimates 
mpanying the executive document above refened to (No. 429) 
never formally approved by the Secretary of War, and if that be 
case, it may be said that the only part of the liock Island route for 
Illinois and Mississippi Canal (wliich was designated by him as the 
to be followed in preparing plans and estimates under the act of 
jUgast 1 1, 1888) that has been definitely located with the formal ap 
Innral of the Secretary of War is the so-called "Southern route '^ 
Inmnd the lower rapids of Rock River, terminating '* at tlie mouth of 
wk River,'' as prescribed and directed by the act of September 10, 

uoo. 

With reference to the improvement of the lower rai)i<ls of Koelc 
.Bhrer, it appears that as early as J 807 a canal terminating at tlie Miss- 
inippi River south of Soutli Slougli, near tlie lower end of Ivock Hiver 
Delta, wa^s suggested by Gen. J. JI. Wilson in his rei>ort on the sur- 
^ of Rock River. Again, in LSS."), wlien snrveys of this locality for 
"tte Hennepin Canal were in progress, under the direction of Maj. 
W. H. n. Benyaurd, Corps of Engineers, under the jn'ovisions of tlie 
river and harbor act of August l', 18.s*j, Assistant Engineer (1. A.M. 
Ujeucrantz, in a hotter dated October 2S, 18S5, mentioiu'd the fa<*t that 
tke south bank of Rf)ck River was more favorable than the north bank 
fetUe c(mstructi(m of the canal in the following language: 

What i« the objection to runiiinjj the rannl iii<«> Missi^siiipi liivcr south of tho 
■•uihof Kock niverf * * * 

The>;roiin<l soutli a]>]»eai'N, from iu(li<ations on tlw ])rint«Ml maps, to be lowtT and 
■«• favor:ible than north of Kock ITivrr, to wluj'li l(;tt«*r MaJ. Jimyaurd rrpli«'d 
^d«rdate of October 30, 1KK5, jih t'oUows: 

The eiirv4?y imide under direction of (icn. J. II. Wilson, in isr»7, demonstrates 
wfoartibility of rnnniii^ a canal to the Mississipj)i below the mouth of Kork IJivcr, 
Jjttanthe law anthori/in^ the pn'seiit survey re<|uires the canal to terminat«' on the 
■Msifciippi at or above Kock Island^ it is not decmcjl advisable or n«.*cessary to <'on- 
■Werauvtiiing below Kock Kivcr. 

The suitability of the south shore for tin* location of this ])!irt ol' the 
^al, therefore, was recognized before 1SIM>, but the terms of th(». laws 
•Bderwhich the surveys were made, upon which were based the detailed 
ioc^ons, plans, and estimates submitted to Congress, June 27,181)0 

IBNO 92 145 



k. . 



.esiK"^) is tLe mmw jis siiliniitted to CoiigrcHrt by the Sewe- 
''ar June 27, IH'M <H, R. Kx. Do*'. 429), and tlie second is the 
ffoved by tlie Secretary of War March 25, 1891. 
1; of Oongieas of September 19, 1890, appropriating money for 
ing the coustructioii of the Illinois and Mississippi Oanal, 
for • • • "a caual to connect the lUiuoiB Eiver, near tlie 
lennepin, with the Mississippi River at the mouth of Eock 

b requires in the canal a depth of 7 feet, and provides for the 
don of ■ • " " guard giit*3, waste weirs, locks, lock 
asiiis, bridges, an<l all other erections, and fixtures that may 
lary for safe and coiiveiiieut navigation of said canal." 
tars &om the wording of the law and from previous discus- 
he Buliject that the primary object to be attained isthennit- 
practjcable water route the nnvigable waters of the Illinois 
issippi rivers (as part of a through route of transportation 
Oreat Lakes to the Mississipi>i Kiver), furnished with all ad- 
id structures that may be nci-pssary for the proper manage- 
erating and control of the work itself, and for handling the 
that may be subserved by the improvement, 
jectious urged against the route as ap]>roved by the Secretary 
(arch 25, 1S91, andstatementsinfavorof aline along the north 
Rack River, in the vicinity of its mouth, by the Hon. W. H. 
the document rcferreil to the Board, and by the committee of 
Islaud liusineas Men's Associiition, are: 

The line has been located by Congress along the north bank 

Biver, and can not be changed by the Secretary of War. 

I. That the terminus on the sinith side is not accessible to rall- 

anis, and Mississippi boats, but that a terminns on the north 

luld be easily acxjeasible to the citizens of Rock 

venport, and would permit the construction of a 

ter level adjacent to the canal, which basin, with 

Her facilities for elevators and other appliances 

.ui between land and water trausnortations. ensilv 



X'PPElJDra J J — HEPOBT OF CAPTAIN MARSHALL. 2309 

> apou some line in connection with the basin jaat named (to 
■neted ujKin the low depressiou in the uiainhiud north of Tnr- 
A)t an<l with an eutmnce into the MimsiHsiiipi north of Petti- 
d or by way of a eaual constmutod througli the island. 
Bdy stated by the Board, tlie low-water discharge of Bock 
slumve of South Slougli (1,500 to 1,650 cubic feet par second), 
t to maiutain a practiciible chaTinel for such navigation as 
bed from the foot of Turkey Island to the month of Bock 
^h moving eands, by the aid of wing dams. If the north 
Biver be followed, therefore, the canal must be carried to 
i River. This must be done either by con tinning the sec* 
lelow Scar's Catial at the same level as now contemplated, 
, at high water (in which case the baain dcsireil by Bock 
Td be of variable level), or by carrying the level of the upper 
■8 practically the same as extreme high water in the Mis- 
Biver, from Sear's Canal to that river. 

p plan would add to the cost of the northern line by the 
if oOHt of the excavation of the canal and basin over that of 
jj dama below the foot of Turkey Island. 
Boond plan would require au embankment above high water, in 
.of Bock Biver and on Turkey Island, from Sear's Canal to the 
ibn before meutioned or a canal cut in the plat«aa from Sear's 
9 tlie low ground named; an embankment around the proposed 
the coDStnu^tJOD of a short section of canal from the basin to the 
f[^ Biver, with a lock of 17-foot lift to enter the Mississippi 
iBtead of a l<K-k of 8.5-foot lift as now designed. The lock at 
Jaaal would still be required as a gu:u'd lock and to enable 
~ Ue Bock Siver at high stages of water in that stream, all of 
idifications would add still more to the cost of the northern 
1 would the hrst mentioned. 

COST OF THE TWO ROUTES. 

'Board has considered the estimates, made by Assistant Engineer 
irin his report to Oapt. MarshiUl on routes, dated March 7, 1891, 
1 routes. 

dsiTe irf cost of rights of way, which must always be an iincer- 
leut when voluntary purclia-fes are impractii-able, these esti- 



CkTor ofiwuitli line 65,525 

rwarding these estimates dipt. Marshall gave it as his opiuion 
fllfie they iudicated approximately the relative cost of the two 
yet tliey are too low by fully 20 per cent, 
estimates as thus indicated by Capt. Marshall (exclusive of rights 
and legal expenses connected with acquiring the necessary 
^..) for the t«)D8truction of the canal are: 

icm line $550, 8K 

•'BOttthern line 78,629 

estimates it is to be nuderstood that all costs of rights 
mdemnation, and damages to propeiiy must be 



API'EXDIX J J — REPOfeT OF CAPtAlN MAHSIIALL. 2311 

n Dft nal iiloiig the southern route vuiikl l>e easier of a^'i'ttss to tcaini* 
^i»S fi"'" tl'"^ south side of Kofik Itivor than if tlio cuiinl were 
Uong the northern route; tlitit the only railitKul now iiotaally 
KiB4ick Kiver below the head of the Lowi^r Uapids vroiniien the 
'i-roote, and may therefore be suiiposcd to liavt^ equal focili- 
B8 (o either; that railroads of the fnture can nut pass liock 
r the heail of the Ijower Rajiids without crossing any eanal 
f may he located along thin reacli of tlie rivor; that any rail- 
wsiiig the Mississippi within a eompiii-iitively sliort distance 
Ihe month of ICoclt River would ha\'e more niady tu^ceKH to a 
^tslilished along the noi-thern route, but such a road could rejteh 
Jfaonth of liock Birer either by the tracks of the present rail- 
%T by the t:«u.struetion of an independent bridge and an sddi- 
i»I Imgth of trai:k not exceeding 2 miles. 

lilt the city of Hnek Ii^land exista and it remains to discuss the quos- 
I whether the beiiedts which it would denve from a location of the 
iirii torminiis of the canal on the northern side of lEock [liver are 
irh a character ih would justify on the part of the United States 
:'.i]ly the sai-rilii-e of the advantages Of the soutliern roi]t« at the 
« ciseof the iLppropriatiousmade for this public imxirovement. 
lie beni-fits ri-fened t« may be summed np as follows: (1) Tlie city 
lid have more eitsy access to the canal and its terminus both for 
rus and ruilnmds. (2) Any traffic arising from the transfer of 
gh(6 fi'om cauiil lioats bo Mississippi Uiver craft, or vice versa, and 
li tlH} storage of boats in the basiu would fall to the citizens of liock 
iDd. 

t see.ms Uy the Board tliat the im1 vantages in the first case, so for as 
iTis are i^ncenied, can only be secured at the disadvantage of teams 
I h would desire to reach the caiml from the southward of Rwii 
i-r; and the latliT are, in proportion to their number, entitled to 
ill eonsi deration with the former. In ve^'ard to raiboads, it is he- 
ed that if the freight to he carried sliall warnnit the constiuetioii of 

I e thnn the one now crossing all hues which have been projiosed for 
canal, the controlling corjiorations will not delay in tniihllug them. 

II t-ase. transfers to any conshlerable extent become necessary lit or 
IT the western termhius of the canal there wuuld be some local 
At to the business men of Kock Island, acting as the interuiediaries. 
^an argument frequently used by thetulvoeiites of the construction 
dw canal by the General (lovernment was that freight could be 
ried throQgh it to and from all ngiper ^li;<sisMJ|>pi Kiver ji'iiiits witli- 
linnsfer, with great resulting benefit to the people of the country 
Itvardand corthwaid of Koek ishuul; tli;it isto say.tluit the canal 
tobe simply a part of an extended comhineil eanal and river naviga- 
B adapted to Missmsippi barges and bonis, the termini of which sys- 
I of navigation are not nixni the line of the canal. 
Jndoabtedly, if a hasia at thi- western tenninus of the canal section 
tUa aystem were to become a storage place tor a large tinnd>er of 
rii, with their crews, a cxnisiderable profit would be derived fiomthe 
l^iM required for subsisteuc^ of crews, rei)air of boiits, etc. Xo 
mate of thia profit is practicahle, biit it is very doubtful if it would 
r apprazlmate the oxi)e«^tat ions of the advocates of the noilliern 
ite. 

Ffae artuena of Bock Island have devoted much time and money in 
I'ocating thaconstraction of the canal and they naturally seek some 
[im ftirbotii. In this the Board is in entire sympathy with them, and 
my anffloieilt reason could be found for recommending the location 



APPENDIX K K. 



>r MSJOB WILLTAM LUDl.nw, CORPS OF EJTOrNEERS, BTT. 
■OL., U. 8. A., OFFICER IS CBA R(!E, FOR THE FISCAL TEAR END- 
VSO, ISBt, WITH OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 

EMPEOVEMEMTS. 



Harbor, Hiohigan. 
ii Harbor apil entrance to 

ake, Hic')iij;nn. 

t Harbor, MicliiKiin. 

>f refuK"' at Turtiifjo Lake, 

Harbor, MiHiignn. 
n Harbor, Mii'bi;:aii. 

T Harbor. Michiu^in. 
Ter Harbiir, Miclii|:;;in. 



9. MnskeKOn Harbor, MicbiKaa. 

10. Grand Haven Harbor, Michigan. 

11. HollHnd (Black Lake) Harbor, Mich- 
is. Saiiitiitiirk Hiirbor, Midiican. 

13. Soulli li:iv..n Ihirbor, Mii'lii,;au. 
U. St..Iowpb H:irbnr.Mirhiiriin: 
ir.. St..li«ciill Hivur, Mii-lii^'iin. 
lU. Mi.Uij-iin Citv Harbor, Indiana. 



EXAMINATION AND SURVEY. 



17. Grand liiver, MicLig 



■United States Esgtkeeb Office, 

Detroit, Mhh., July 11, 18U3. 
H: I have the honor to submit herc^witli the annual reports 
t the works of river and liarhor imi)ro\ emeut iu my cliargo 
e&l year ending Jane 30, 1892. 
jiectfnlly, 

William Lttolow, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

ISvt. Lieut. Col, Tf. S. A. 
thomar L. Casey, 

a f of Engineers, U. 8. A. 

2313 



r 

P'API'KNDIX K K — EEPORT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 
Money statement. 
iriated b j act spprored Septembec 19, 18IK) 



il>bIefor6Bcal joarHiiduigJnoeSO, 1893 35,000.00 

Iftted) rcqnircil for complttioD of likntLing pier piojecl. .. 35,000.1X1 

M(>anliei)ri>lltiil)t^expeiitk'<lii)Iltu;HlyBitreniViiicJiine^U, 18M 36,000.00 
Efa) tMmuuAnce with requireiuentB ofsectiouBU of rivor slid 



improvements at this harbor iDrlude the loirer channel leading 
le Michigan into Itoiiiid Lake and the upper thanuel leailing 
and Lake into Pine Lake. 

resent projeet, adopted iu 1868 and revised in 1876 and 1884, 
tS-foot navigation, 100 to 150 I'eet wi<Ie in the lower channel 
let wide in the upper channel. 

^ef clinnnel is prat«cteii on the north side by ^02 linear feet 
■k bnilt by the United States, 4ti',i linear feet of eiib work 
IP lot^l authorities previous to 1873, aud 945 linear fuet of 
revetment built by the United States, with a timber frame 
feet long covering the gap between ttie trib work and the 
oty overlapping the latter about 30 feet. Tlie total length of 
I reyetment is 1.7l!4 linear feet, iind the projection of the pier 
the prettent shore is about 740 feet. 

rojection on the south side consists of 401 linear feet of crib 
d, with the 50-foot wing at tlie Round Lake end, of I,r>-'{8 linear 
|pae piling and plank-beam revetment. The tiital length of this 
^3,029 linear feet, and its projeetion beyond the present shore 
Wfeet. 

;>per channel is pi-oteeted on the north side by a ]>ile revet- 

i-feet long and on the south side by a similar revetment 366 

[. Both revetments are tilled with brush and stone ballast. 

fedging done in May and .lune,l.S91, was instrumental in main- 

ft navigable dejjth of water uiLtJl rln- fud of the wason, but 

fB made March 30, 189L', slmwcd :t d.'ptli ol' liut. 10 feet near 

ttt the outer pier and throu;;li tin' ii)i|p.'r I'lLiiirji'I. 

ACreose in depth is partly owin^' to tlie extraordinary low lake 

■fffincipally to the insufficient projection of the piers and the 

nvatore of the older parts of the piers and revetments. A 

Kde on March .SO, 1892, sboweil a depth of but 10 feet in Lake 

8" 170 feet in advann' of the South Pier, the shoal extending . 

's tlie cutraiice, anil, altlioii<;li the present project provides 

I of ll>(» liiifar ti'.-i I., tin- Suiith I'ier (the North Pier al- 

"''xrted length), it is evident that a further extension 

d, if even a 12-foot navigation is to be maintained. 

»"Te,. 470 linear feet of the North Pier was built 

. to 1873, when the Government took charge 



231G BICrOET OP the chief of KNCnrEEBS, U. 8. AEMT. 

of (111' iiiiprovi'inciit. This work is a erib structure, rudely IraiK 
pla< I'll oil tilt) natural bottom, aud, ns ii result, extends ouljr to i, 
feet Ih'Iow tlii> ^vater surface. It has beea repaired aud relillMll 
stoiii' I'liiiti time to tinie^ but ia now fast disintefn^tia^. IthasM 
been posi^ible Ui dredge close up to it, beeanse it would bare I 
QDdeniiiued tUercby and consequently wrecked. 

Large quaittUiett of saod find tlieir way tbrongli it into the cbu 
at every blow, audit iRiuiixMisilileto prevent this so long »s thepn^ 
work remains. 

The original project contemplated its removal and the snltstiti) 
ofa more serviceable and durable structure, aod tilt' time for thisclA 
is close at hand. 

The revetments of the lower channel are of a t«m]»orary nd 
The L'hannt'l is narrow, with high sand banks on each side, andib; 
necessary to resort to rapid construction in order to ho!d the tM 
while tlio channel was making. 

The portion above water is rapidly decayingj and particularly 
soutli ii'vetrnent, owing to its expoBe<l iwsitiou with resiitwt to coUk 
ve8si.-ls, is in great ne^ of strengthening and repairing. Both M 
meiits should be rebuilt above the water surfiwe and provided wil 
double row of sheet piling and anchor piles in rear. 

Owing to the fact that the north revetment has never beenl 
completed, stopping at the lake side of the highway bridge that sj 
the entrance, and the bank above the bridge has been built outi 
slabs as wtiarfage for the sawmill, tlie north dmw of the bridg 
not naogable and passage is conhaed to the south draw. This ma 
has not ri-<(ivicl sjiecial attention since the south draw seems, so 

adti, I i' ' ' iiimerceof tlieport,and nocompiaintsof obstnict 

h;n 1 il. It may be well, however, to note these coudil 

foi' 

Tin; nvftiiiinis of the upper channel are also in need of extenaio 
reach into I'in.- Lake. 

The operations during the fiscal year consisted in generally « 
hauling aud repairing the revetments of the lower channel. Thcbn 
ca|is an<l guard timbers were renewed, additional piles were drivi 
strengthen tlie works, and the gap between north pier and reved 
at whore line was filled with brush fascines, loaded with large b 
picked np on the beach. 

A ptTnianciit benchmark was established on top of the water 1 
at iiortlieast lorncr of the opera-house block and connected by d 
cate hivels with the United States gauge, and a carefnl series of w 
gauge readings w.ts <'omnienced .June 1, 1802, to continue througl 
months of June, .Inly, and August for the purpose of obtaining 
for adjusting the zeni of the gauge to a uuit'orm level with the ga 
at the other harlMirs. 

The bridge of the Chicago and North Michigan Raihoad across 
lower i-ud nl' I'ine Lake has been completed and is found to he \w 
anil Iiiiilt ill acrordance with the plans approved by the Seer eta 
War iiml.T ihitc of Septcmb*T 4, IJSStl. 

The (lovernniciit dredge Siii/inair is now on the way to the harb 
dcejien the entrance and both channels. 

Tlie present winking balance is $:i,300, about half of which wi 
reqnired to pay for dredging and the remainder will be held for r 
repairs. 

For 1894 the estimate is, for two cribs in the south pier, to com 



APPENDIX K K — REFOET GF MAJOR LUDLOW. 



2317 



otding to the present project, $9,500; rebuilding 500 l'i>it of inner 
f north pier, *15,00(ti sheet piling 2,450 linear feut oi' iil^mk-beain 
tni'tit, t l'2,5O0 ; aud extending the revetmentii of the tipper channel 
linear feet,. $7,200, The total cost of these items, witli ^,000 for 
eriug daring two seasons and 10 per cent for cotitiugencies, ia 
KM. 

I harbor ia incl ml cd In tlieMicLisoit caUootion dlRtiiot, Hiehigftn. Tbenearest 

If entry ia Gniiid Hnvcn, Mich. 

> ligbt-bousc cfttnlilisliiiient uisijituiaa n flftb-orilur lij^ht (>ii tlie uortb pier. 

Appnrpiialwnt for impraplng liarbor at Charltioiz, JficA. 



. itilO,000 

. 12.000 

. it, 000 

. 10,000 

- 10.000 

. 10,000 

. 10, IMO 



Augusts, 1886 »10,000 

August 11. IKMR 12,500 

Rnplember 19, 1890 9,000 

Total 103,600 



it 14, 1876 

1&1S78 

jS,W7» 

H.1880 

is, 1881 

»t 2.1883 

S,I8S* 

nul e8tImat«^d coat of irork, 1868, as arnvnilml in I8T6 nud 1884 .... «186,OOO.0O 
■■- auiwitnt appropriated frotii 1868 to and inrluilinx act uf SHiitcui- 

19, ISyO 102,500.00 

e aiDoaob,eipendedto JuiieSO, 1892 ;>.... 99,944.24 

ifone^ atement. 



int sVBilabIa for fiscal fear ending June 30, 1893 

want (estimated) reqnired for completion of existiiiK projet 
KHiiitlJiatC(ilib«profit*bljrBipendediufiacalyeiir«uili[in Jim 
bioitted in campliauce with requlremeuts of aectiuuH 2 of I 
lubor acts of la66 and 1867. 



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IMPROVEMENT OK Fi 



[iT HARBOK, MICHIGAN. 



in 186(i and amended in I'M 
ide and 12 feet deep, prolj 



The project for this harbo- ■ 
1879, provides for a channel 
by piers and revetments. 

The original facilities for navigation previous to the comnieucfl 
of the improvement by the Government in 18()6 consisted in a dq 
70 or SO feet wide, with a depth of 3 to 4 fei^t. These conditions 
been greatly improved and at the present time, with the help of i 
sional dredging, a depth of 10 to 12 feet is maintained. 

The survey made March, 1892, shows tluit the Ultbot contour tt 
lake is nbont 'i'M feet in advance of the end of the north pier, luU 
consequence of this insufficient development, frequent dredging i 
qnii-ed ti> maintain the needed depth at the entrance. The depth m 
the outlying bar wsia found this spring to be 11 feet, but the 15 
contour ia immediately beyond, about iliO feet outside of the pn 
end of the south pier, and thence outwards the lake deepens n^ 
the offshore contour swinging boklly iu towards the land. 

It is evident that the piers shouhl be built out to at Jeast the IS 
enrve, but the pier deve]oi)nient provided for by the present pn 
viz, 300 feet on the north pier and 100 feet on the south pier, foil 
feet short of this on the north and 400 feet on the south pier. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year the avaihible depth at th 
trance was 10 feet and on the 21st of July the Government dredge 
tMflio. aiTive4l to prepare better wat<'r. Tlie channel wiia dre 
throughout, 70 feet wide, from Lnke Michigan to about shore line, 
40 feet wide fi-om there to Lake Ans Hecs Scies, and 14 feet deep, 
quantity of sand removed was 22,770 cubic yards. The dredging 
completed August 20, 1891. 

During the remainder of 1891 no further difticulty was encouni 
by the vessels frequenting the harbor, but at the opening of na- 
tion this spring a depth of only U feet was found on the bar in 
(rf the entrance, and the shoal overlapping the end of the north 



• ■/• .•."■■■■ 
APFE9D1X KK — ^REPORT OP MA.rOR LUDLOW. 2319 



considerably on the channol between the piers. 
the end of the fisoal year, however, there was a navigable 
of 13 feet, in great part due to the rise in the lake level. 
required material for making some minor repairs to the piers 
ivetaients, and for sheet piling the latter to make them sand tight, 
;'been purebased^ and this work will be done as soon as the land 
can be spai'ed for use at this harbor. 
permanent bench mark was established at the northwest corner 
water-works building, on top of the water table and connecte<l 
iplicate levels with the U. S. gauge, and a careful series of water- 
readings was commenced June 1, 1892, to be continued through 
Lths of June, July, and August^ for the jmrj^ose of obtaining 
^:finr adjusting the zero of the gauge to a unifonn level with the 
at tiie other harbors. 
present working balance is about $4,400, with which it is pro- 
to sheet-pile the revetments, make some minor repairs t^ the 
ig works, and to pay for the necessary dredging restore the en- 
channel to the required width and depth. 
Rie Toledo, Ann Arbor, and North Michigan Railway proposes mak- 
' Frankfort a terminus for the establishment of a new trans-lake 
•by means of a system of steam ferries for transportation of cars 
it breaking bulk. The exiieriment is one of great importance 
its success would be a notable event in the development of lake 

18M the following estimate is submitted : 

e^Hoplete the present project by adding 300 linear feet of crib work 

noirt^ pier, $28,500; and 100 linear feet of crib work to the south 

912,000; for additional repairs, $2,000; and for two seasons 

iging, $5,000, which, with 10 i>er cent for contingencies, makes 

.000. 

Ught-honao ee»ta1)liHhment maintains a Rixth-order Hjrl»t uoar the end of the 
pier, and the Life-Saving Service »Htatiou at the iuiier end. 
R hsrbor is included in the Michigan collectiou district, Michigan. Tlie nearest 
of entry is Grand Haven. ^ 

^Impropriations for iiiqiroring harbor at Frankfort, Mich. 



UticA ^'^ies * 

J«ne23,lH66 $88,5-U.OO 

]Utc]i2,1X67 10,000.00 

July 25, 1868 10,000.00 

April 10,1S«J) 29,31«.8.5 

" Jnlyll, n<r0 10,000.00 

']Ufch3,1871 10,000.00 

:fort, Mich.: 

June 10, 1872 10,000.00 

, .IfMvh 3, 1873 10,000.00 

► June 23, 1871.. t 10.000.00 

r -lUrch 3« 1875 10,000.00 

L Angnst U, 1876 3,000.00 

IlKhial estimated cost of work in 1866, as amended iu 1868, 1879, and 

ama $329,r)55.85 

MMa amoantappropriated from 1866 to and including act of KSeptember 

19,1890 , 273,659.85 

■MNmt eorered into the Treasnry (Report 1871, page 133) 5, 721. .50 

|M» anomit ea^peaded to Jane 30, 1892 , 263,511.86 



Frtinkfort, Mich.: 

Jnnel8, 1878 $8,8(H).00 

March 3, 1S79 4, (NM). 00 

June 11, 1H80 r>,(X)0.()0 

Maicli 3, 1881 10, (MM). 00 

An;:nst 2, 1882 V>, (XM).()0 

July .5,1884 .5. 000. (H) 

August 5, 18X6 7. 000. (K) 

August 11, 1888 S.rMKl.OO 

September 19, 1890 10, 000. 00 

Total 273,659,85 



2320 RKP Of THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, n. S. JJEMI. 

Money tintem^ni. 

July 1, 1801. Iialpji- niipiiwndBd , 

Jiuii'SU, UWJ, nmui.ut uii»in<l«il daring fiM^alJ(»n^ _. 

.Tilly 1, 1S92, bulunco nnupuDdod ,;, 

July 1, 1S92, uutatniidiuK IiubilltiM 

July 1, 18B2, balriiice dvailiiblt- 

Amoiuit ^l>T[>|iriiitiHl by utl ApproTcd July 13, 1882 

Amoiuit ftvalluble fot (Lscal year ending JnneSO, 1893 _. 

(Ainoiiiit(eBtiniiit«d) roquirud (broom pletion nf oxi8ti>iKT>Toj(!et 
Anioun ttlint canbenrofiMbly cxiK-mled inliBcalyearondiuKJ noe 30, I8H 
SuIimJttcd iu ciMupliiuioQ witli re^nireDionta of Routioue 3 of iivcc*ii& 
harbor acta of 1M)6 »ud 1867. 



COMMERCIAL B 



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KK 4. 

IMrnOVr.MENT of HAHROK of REITOE at PORTAGF. lake, MIC 

Tho ollitial i)i-o.je<t adopted in l.STil and modified in 18S(>-'S 
maku tills a Iiarbor of reftific with a cliannel 370 feet mde and 
deej), protected by piers and revetments. 

The north pier consists of l,i;40 linear feet of pile work fllU 
edgiups, and 151 t'^ct of crib worl£, and projects 550 feet beye 
present shore liue. 



■ APPWrnX K K-^HEPOBT OF MAJOB LUDLOW. 2321 

jatli pier \» a pMe aud edging Rtmctiue 1,38() feet long, and pro- 
> feet beyood the j)re8e(it shore line. 

ited in the previous Anmial Keport, tlie revetments aie in u 
condition. On the north aide the superstruetnie tiniliers have 
>taUj- disappesured, or are made unseivieeable by tlie fniliiie of 
s-tiej4; tbefilliDg has waslied out for a leu^bof sonie4lKl liiieiir 
■ing the sea a clean sweep through the work andHlling tlit-elmtL- 
1 saud from the beach and banks, and the pitenof the sidf walls 
i considerable stretch pushed out of position to such an extent 
iy are useless. The outer h^f of the south pier is almost as 
d, in (thort, almost the whole pile work 'should be rennived and 
I by more substantial structures. 

B the present pile piers and revetments, if they were in seivice- 
iditiou, would be of some benefit, they would not of them.'^elves 
a navigable de]>th of water in the channel. At present the 10- 
■ve in the lake passes nearly 2150 feet (lutside of the end of the 
ier. 

ilings made in May, 1893, showed a narrow and crooked chan- 
I less than 7 feet water b<^tween the piers, and the Government 
Sui/inaw was sent to improve the navigation. The dredge ar- * 
1 June 3. and to June 29 completed a cut 40 feet wide and 13 
p fi-om lake to lake, removing L'0,2S4 <;ubic yards, 
rtempt has been made to expend any part of the available bal- 
the credit of the havbor on repaii's to the revetments, for it 
lave been so much money wanted, inasmuch as nothing but rad- 
itment will make them nsefnl. i 

inanent bench mark was established and connected by duplicate 
rith the United States gange, and a scries of accurate water- 
codings waa commencedJniio 1, 1892, to be rontinned through 
iths of June, July, sind August for the purpose of obtaining data 
isting the zero of the gaujje to a uniform level with the gauges 
ither harbors. 

iresent working balance of $4,100 will be used in keeping the 
e {lartially accessible by dredging, and to do such repairing as 
i cable. 

itbstanding this exhibit it still remains, as stilted in the reports 
last two years, that the natural conditions at Portiigo Lake, its 
txpanse, ample depth, anil central position in the dangerous 
F 50 mile* between I'oint Betsey and Little I'oint Sable, justiiy 
•pose of the original project, and warrant renewed reeommen- 
that this project be carried out. 

rbor of refuge is needled in this locality, as tbere is no safe shel- 
anchorage in westerly gales between Ludiugton and South 

0. 

894 the recommendations of the previous Annual Iteport are 
i, viz, for 4 cribs, 200 feet, on north pier, $20,000; for 7 cribs, 
;, on south pier, 933,000 (these constructions being in each case 
f of the projected crib piers); for rebuilding 1,240 linear feetof 
th pier, $38,000; sheet piHng and filling, $6,000, and for drcdg- 
000. The total of these, with allowance for contingencies, etc., 
,000. 

ght-HonM Estalilubment han recently coimtnipted a fourth-ordor light-houne 
end of tlie north pier, upon tlie only poclidn of the harhor works capable of 
« it. 
•riuvr isiaolDded in the Hicbigan collection district, Michigan. The nearest^ 

ia Grand Hftven, Mich. 

9Z ^1« 



2322 BKPORT OP THE CHIEF OK ENGIKEEBS, V. ». AKMIT. 

Approprlnlianii for harbor uf rffitgr. al Forlage Lake, ilidiijai 

Much 3, t«T9 JI0.00O I Aiij^Htn. 1886. 

Jnoel4, IKXO 10.000 i Angnat II, IScB 

Marsha 1>W1 10.000 Septamber IB, 1890 

ADiTOBt:;. IWi 25,000 ' 

July 5, 18W 12,500 



:S, tl. ». AKUtr. I 

Atke, ilichija: B^ 

i:::::::::::::::::^M 

1890 M 



Total KM,! 

OriKin"! eHtimatoil cost iif work, 1879, us am en (led in IfW iSfUM 

Whole •luotint npprapriat«d IVom 1889 to aod iDclndinE act of Scpl«m- 

iwri'j. iwyo la^flM 

Whole amount erpeniled to Jnne 30, 1802 KhW 

It li»H be«ii impractieablt) to obtain commercial statistic fi>r 
Lake Harbor. 

Moik'v ittntement 



July 1, 1892, balaucea 

i Amount ((■al.imntmi) . , 

Am'tiintthat<!iiubpiirotHulil,VBXpondHdiQHacaIv<uuen<lJnf(Jiuie30,18M l%ntt< 
giibiuitt«il )u raiDjilianoH with reqiiireui«iit» of seotions i of rivuc and 
huhor acta of 1SG6 and 1867. 



K K 5- 

IMPROVEMENT OF MANISTEE HARBOR. MICHIGAN. 

The project of ISfili, mtMlifled in 1870. 1874, and 1890, provides fiir 
channel of iia\'igable widtb aud 15 fe4?t deep, extemliug from La* 
Mtehigau to Manistee Lake, and protected at tbo entrance by |iM 
aud revetments, Witb tbe eribs placed dnring tlie ueasiiu of IStl ' 
piers and revetments bave tbe following development: 

Nurtb pier, 1,;!.j1 linear feet crib work a:;d 1,304 feet of pilereveV 
ment. It projects 850 feet beyond present sbore line. 

South pier, 1,199 linear feet cribwork aud 490 feet pile revetuieal 
It projects 650 feet beyond present ahore line. 

At the beginning of' the fiscal year a eontnict wa« in force with C I 
Starke to coniplett- the dredging of the river to Manistee lAkei) al 
this work was completed August 28. Before leaving the dredge wCl 
again over the work of tlie previous season so that at the end of A' 
gust there was a through chainicl "iD A^ct wide ami 15 feet deep fWtl 
hike to lake, the width bcirit; iiuicascd In 7.', \',;-i at the bend opiHwit 
C'anlh'ld & Wheeler's sawmill iiml lo I mi Ted iit Ihc entrance. .ThentM 
terial removed during the liM;il vcai iii'Msuicd 40.781 cubic yai^ 
Aiicxamiiiali.uL made in M;iv. ISii2, shnunl ()i;il thcdciitb in therivarf 
was dicriiiiislinl tu L'i Icrl.Mitli 1.'. Icrl :ir ]]„■ cnlrance. wlir.-]i. howeveri 
may be hmkcil u|"m as \ ci y guml when the Iihih; lcucIics i.f iiiipr.itecteO 
bank alonp tbi' ri\er ami the yii'iit nnmbfL- of vt.-aaels of all ikize»U8ill| 
the navigation arc taken iuto cuiLsidcratiou, < 



APPENDIX K K — REPORT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 2323 

rie depth at the entrance will cmitinii(! to be unreliabli' until the 
sra shall have been built out to their projected length, whiih requires 

additiou of 350 feet to each pier, 
Xhe contract with George W. Crouter for the conatnufion of four 
it>B on the north pier, which wa« under way at the connneiicomeiit of 
-ft fiscal year, was completed in September, 1891. The cribs were 
Kh 50 feet long, 24 feet wide, and with the KniM-rBtnictgre 22 feet 8 
Khen high. They rest on a pile funudatiun at a depth of 16 feet 3 inches 
«low the zero of the gauge, the piles penetrating from 15 to 17 feet 
Kto the bottom. The top of the snperstructure is at the same level as 
fcat of the adjacent old work, vi». feet 5 inches above zem of gauge, 
W the onter end the new work is protected by a stnurture of guard 
^P8 and horizontal waling timbers, tilling the spar* between the end 
torus, and a mooring post is built into each crib. Tlio cribs were fllled 
Hth tttone and decked over. The actual additiou to the length of the 
ier by the four cribs is 202 linear feet. 

Before final acceptance of the work it was examined by a diver and 
nmd to be satisfactory. 

The north revetment being in a tumble-dow^l condition, thi' part from 
tation 3+24 to the life-saving station, a. distance of T(j4 linear feet, 
■as cut down to the water sui-face and rebuilt with four courses of 
pperstmctiire. The old filling was taken out and the suitiible portion 
iplaced in a substantial mauner in the work, reaching a.s high as the 
mer cross-ties and ballasted with old stone. The sink and water boles 
long the rear of the work due to seepsige and subsidence were filled 
p with the old filling. 

A passage 8 feet wide for the ligh t-beejier's boat was prepared through 
le new work at Station 7+61 to 7+69. 

The upiier i>art of the north pier, Station 14+90- to 15+50, a distance 
r 60 feet, where the side wnlls were crumbling away anil the filling 
iposed to the danger of Mlidtng into the channel, wan rc|iaired, the 
rojwting part of the square crib in the south pier (Station 6+10 to 
+ 46) waR repaired and decked, and a plank walk was laid on south 
ier Ixom the inner end to the fog-horn house, a distance of HOC fwt. 

All the above repairs were maile by day labor and purchiiNed mate- 
ill], commencing the work in September, ISOl, and coiuph'ting it in 
'line, 1892, operations having been suspended dnrinn the winter 
Duntbs. 

A permanent bench mark was established and connected by dujili- 
ate levels with the United State-s gauge, and a series of a<'itnate water- 
gange readings was commenced June 1, 1892, to bo continni'd through 
Hie months of -Tune, July, and August for the purpose of obtaining 
hta for adjusting the zero of the gauge to a uniform level with the 
puge» at the other harbors. 

At the present time the existing works are in the following coudi- 
linn: 

Sorth pier. — The revetment from the inner end to Station 3+24, a dis- 

anoe of 390 feet, is in urgent need of new superstructure. The north 

evetment is exceptionally exposwJ to wear and tear, the jailing ves- 

A frequenting the harbor being in the habit of tying u|i here daring 

"Weather on the lake or while waiting for a cargo. The part 

bation 3+34 to the life-saving station, a distance of 704 feet, has 

en rebuilt, and the rest should be repaired likewise as soon 

-jible to prevent it from being totally wrecked. 

tart fitora the life sailiig station to 12+38, a length of 130 feet, 

ht^ t.rpnted in the same mauuer. Uak snubbing po»ts should be 



2324 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARIH. 

Bentrcd to the mar wall at distances of 50 feet alonff this wlioleirt! 
to ket^t vesseln fi'um making fast ta the croas-tien, which ia one of B 
luiiin taiiseti of the early ruin of the stnit;hire. 

The unrth pier from Station 13+38 ttt IS+S.'J, a distjiiice of 6i5 ft 
is now mure than 20 years old, and the part above water, altlnni 
]>a li-hi'd iind re)iatred from time to time, is in urgent need of retniilditi 
II is niriliiinaUy giviogaway in places, and it is getting more andsf^ 
(lilliciilt to repair it, as the old timber is too rotten to bold a bi^t. X( 
ol' tlm niiKs ties are rotten and broken. 

The pai't fi-om Station 18+8.'l to the outer end, a distance of 60$ ft 
18 In good condition, but needs some additional dUing in thenewcd 
and somi" stone riprap along the foot of the lake wall to prevent itsJ 
ing nndcrmiTiffl. This shoold he done before another winter. 

South piir.—Thv iimcr end eonsist^i of some 4!KI linear feet of ^ 
i-evenii.iiL liuilt til 1874 and lf*7ij. Tins workis occupied by the CanftE 
nn<l WhcrliT IjiiMilier Company a» a hiniber wharf, uml inconseqttoi 
of age and liard usage is oom]>letely wret'kcd. It seems no l<fflj 
r^paole of carrying the load phiced on it and threatens to cave mto I 
ehannul. If coutinned as a part of the lumber yard the eompanyn 
pro)»orly be called upon to rebuild it. 

Th(? south pier Ij-om Station to 6 + i6, 046 linear feet, is crib w 
built previous to 1872. At it« inner end it is breaking down, bat t 
remainder is i^titl in tolerably fair eoudition, and will stand some yet 
yet. Fiom 6 + 40 to the outer cud, 451 linear feet, the pier is 
good («)nditiou. 

With the present working balance of $4,800 it is proposed to p 
chase about 160 cords of stone for refilling the end of north pier an 
riprapjiing the foot of the lake wall, to make minor i-epairs, and h) fl 
serve the rest for dredging the entrauce when necessary. 

The recommendation for 18(14 is as follows : For seven cribs, 350 fe 
on the nwth pier; and Hcven cribs, 350 feet, on the south pier, to co 
pjete the present project, $84,000; for repairing 645 linear feet of uort 
pier, ^li,450 ; for repairing 500 linear feet of north revetment, $3,600, an 
ibr two seasons' dredging in the harbor, $4,000; which, with contia 
gencies, make $110,000. 

Tbe LiKlit-HoiiaeEatHbliBhrnent mftmtains n si<(tb-cirder light nndsteatn fog ■!£<■' 
OD tlin BDutli pitit, and the Life-Savmg SoTvice has a ntatiou near the inner tnd' 
tho north iiiiT. 

This hurbor in incliiilE'd in the Miohignn collcctiou district, MichigAu. TlieDUt* 
jiurt of pntry ii Granil Haven, Mich. 

Appropriaiioni for improving harbor al MimiMce, Mieh. 

March 2, 1867 JBO.OflO I June 4. 188(1 «l),l 

Julyll,1870 20,000 

MiirchS. IHTl 9,000 

June 10, WTa 10.000 

MiinOi 3. 1W73 10,000 

JtiiirL':!, IST4 10.000 

M;.rrli X IfiTf. a-i.OOO 

A»;,-iiHl II, T87ti 11.000 

.IniiH IS, 1M7H ir>,000 

March 3, 1«7S1 10,000 






Harrh 3, iiwi 

AugTiBt 2, iS»i 

Julys. IRW .»,»i 

A ugust 5, 1»<S6 10. «• 

August 11, 18f« 10,«W 

SeplcmbtT lit, 1890 oftOW 

Total 298,W 



Orlginiil csltDiutvd cost of \rorkB, 1866, aa anM^nclod iti 1871, 1873, and 

1H75, 18.00. iinil 1892 $4O8,000.W 

Whole, nnioimt aiipropriatod from 18(i6 to anil incliKlbig act nf Seiiteraber _. 

V\\»m 298,O0ftt" 

Whole anionnt expcQded to Juuo 30, 1892 29*^,1:69.31 



APPENDIX K K — REPORT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 



Money statement. 



J«i« 1. 1893, balunce available 1,820.1 

AiKiuot appropriatiMl by act approvedJiily 13, 1892 50,000.0 

■AniiiHnt available for flacal year eudiug Juiio 30, IRBS 51,820.1 



i JiuuDut (»itiDiat«ii) renuiied for coni|iletiou of oxisttllg project 25, 0( 

J Ajuutuittbatcikitbo[irDlitablyujqieii'le(lmllM-alytMir<milingJune30,18Sl 60, 0( 
1 Snbmitted in compliance wiili roqiiiremento tf* -—*;•—- ■> "' -■ — — ■-' 
1 hatbor acu of 1866 acid 1867. 



COUMKRCIAI. STATlSnCS, MANISTItH HARHOR, MlCOlOm, 

Entrancet anil cUaTaHcc*. 



Numbiir. ,Sl','„';','"J' Tonni 



Beetipti and ikipmeaU iy vuul, 1891.' 



Artlclca nodred. 



a' 


M.. 

tarceU.. 


M» 


1= 


ia,ai 


^ 


t..M.. 






)J«iiiuJi*B".!!JI. 



Wood 

ToUJ... 



m itMenunla flmiibed by tiha ooUMtor of ■» 



V • - 




iiJi 



s 



* 



1 

h 



.-t 




fcr a ckaud M> to 2B0 ftak « 
aaaiwttoMiite. 




■f flnbvi&i 



kdi« 



The devdopsMBt of tke 

Soith ptar oouisto iif MB 

IMS aad 1«ML Ami imdeeta 9« *at hnMa 
itataMT end it comieeli wifli as «U dUb i 
exMBM^aikl Mw in a tndri 
Boatli pier €Oiwirti of 807 

And of 1^4 lineer feet of ctib vwk, boat . 
extends along the entire channel flat Pere . 
Michigan and prqjeete into the latter I.IWtiot 

Considerable portlona of the preacnt ipob me varr dfl ^ 
newal above the water line, partiedslr Ae nart of waft 
Station 5+88 to 12+S6^a distnnee of M6 feet Aenik fltaaDlMi 

sonth vide il67 feet long, and the soalh orib walk ikeni SMtasii 
U+23, 8S6 linear feet 1 

The mentioned psrts of flie north pier espeeisl^ «e ianni^ 
pairs in conseqnenoe of serioos mbtanons ty«Jlifiag %uwii s| 
nnderminin^ action of steamers. 

The remaining stmctuies are in good condition anien^nad 
additional stone ballast and riprap anmnd "Out outer ends «f ft 
pios. 

The dredging by Government plMit, which was under w^r tf d 
ginning of tiie flrtcal year, was continaed till Jnly ISiK l«r idikiii 
cbauuel IH fet't deep and 40 feet wide, exteuding from lai^e to lab 
been excavated. 

The (lovenimeiit dredge returned to the harbor e^aly th Xow 
but the season was too far advanced to allow of mucli worL Bi<« 
the worst portion of the channel was again deeix-ned. and no it 
WAS experienced by the vessels fre^iueuting the hailKir doriBj 
winter on account of insufficient water. 

Tlie guantitv of sand removed during the year was ll».v»* • 
vanis. The available depth when 8ur\'eyed in ApriL ISfti wasl 
To be nowheiv less than 14.6 feet, the lake level bemg U fet^t Ww 
zon> plane, ^. ^ ^.,. ^ , 

In onler to remove anv doubts regardmg the stabibty of the 
plm^i in o\t<'nsion of the two piers during 18S9 and is9ii, the ftf 
lions i^tvw* ajfain examinwi bv a diver in September. 1S9L and no ft 
.•l»j^no^^ di^vvewd. During the winter the dredge SagnKiH: rrt 
s»o>: r^M^:N TO wikbincry. etc., as were needed to phu^ her m d^n- 
fK *\^rv,^ ^^^ASk*:;V work. 



^* 



\ -w iu^>s^i : \'^>.>- ?t;Ark waseswblished and cimnt-ctt^i by duj 
\ V . fc K ^ .-^s: Sr^:<^ ;^iuge. The bench mark i> on >T4»n 
\x \ * -^^-^^ ivA^ :^v of pump-house of water woi ts, 
N .. . K ^^ V , c \hc s^uit-. A series of accurate waier- 

lo K* ixuiUnm-d duniii: June, 






\V" 



** 



"^ ^ ,^ <NN:A:r.::v?: *l»*ta tor adjustinj: rht- 1 



s 






*s 



V\ -V '^J^' 'AtV* 



.;Ov^tt < • 






^ 1* ) ;.)< c*^,:^:^ at the oTh«-r harbor 
K \*:«*vv j^i^i^ July 1 t3.HH» for < 

^ -.*» •A*?***^:^; K^uHding above 



S«MNM^ 



^ 




»r-9.-^-7:»e!sr: np ?5:«r*.-Tsx iaisc&k 






■ APPEHDB K K — KEPOBT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 2329 

■A lengtli, tlie intended depth of 12 feet can not be uaint:uiied 
^pKwifiatfd dredging, and t)ii» i» caused partly by the inefUcieiicy 
Ksbore revetments tu exclntle tlie sand, and partly by tlie ad- 
Hnjie shore line since the prnject wns made. 
HMfbot curve of Lake Michigan is aboat eveu with the present 
Be south pier, and tbo 15-foot cui-ve is 400 feet farther out. It 
Bit that the piers are in need of additional length if the pro- 
^Ritli of 12 feet is to be maintained betweeu them, 
■mrable portions of the piers and revetments, trora age and ac- 
Mave beeome inoperative in excluding the sand coming ttova 
■A and banks, and are in urgent need of repairs, 
uwrtb pier crib work from Station l+fil to 3+50 and the pile 
nom 3+50 to 6+72, a total length of 521 feet, and the south pier 
'ork from Station to 6+19, a length of 619 feet, are now more 
20 years old and should be rebuilt above the water line. The 
Bide revetment has been been rebuilt during recent years, aa 
y as the funds permitted, 725 linear feet, St:Htion 0+19 to 13+41 
g received new superstructure, but the inner end from Station 
I to 17+ 61, a length of 417 feet, still remains to be treated in the 
manner. lu addition most of this pile work needs sheet piling 
the rear to make it sand tight. 

1 250 t^t of railroad bulkhead at the inner end of the south revet- 
is in a tamble-down condition; the piles are decayed; it is quite 
i of filling, and large quantities of s;md are sucked throu^ it 
be channel by the action of passing vessels. 
: inner end of the north revetment has been wrecked by collisions 
eeds reb nil ding. 

the beginning of the fiscal year the available depth of water in 
liannel was 10 feet, and Augnst 18 the Government dredge Far- 
comiiR'nced improving tlie waterway, cnniplcting this work Octo- 
During this time a 50-foot channel 14 feet deep was dredged 
Pentwat«r Lake to Lake Michigan, removing therefrom material 
I amount of 15,395 cubic yards. 

further trouble was experienced during the year, but soundings 
April 11, 1892, showed that the channel had again filled up, a 
li of aboat 600 feet near the shore line having barely 10 feet of 
; It is intended to send a drtnige to this harbor as soon as prac- 
e. 

s repairs of the south revetment, which were under way on July 
ne completed November 30, the work having been suspended dur- 
ro and a half months of this time, to utilize the services of the over- 
m the improvement of the St. Josepli River. The repaired por- 
ixtends from Station 8+88 to 13+44, a distance of 456 feet. The 
wexe sawed oflF, and a new sui>erstructure four ctnirses high in front 
wo, courses high in rear with cross-tics 8 feet apart, built on top; 
Id filling was overhauled to below the water line and new edgings 
tone placed in the work. 

plank walk was laid over the .south revetment for a length of 

ftet to connect with the eievate<l walk to the pier light. 

>ennanent bench mark was established on top of a large bowlder 

•Hng from the foundation of the Sands & Maxwell furuiture faetory, 

•nthwest comer, and connected by duplicate levels with the 

*'ates gange, and a series of accurate water-gauge readings 

■enced June 1, to be continued through June, July, and 

• thci purpose of obtaining data for adjusting the zero of the 

'"••m level with the gauges at the other harbora 



2330 ItEI'ORT OF THE CHIEK OF EXGJNEERti, V. S. AEUY. 

It ispmpnsod t'>use the baltince available July 1 (92,40(1) foin^drei 
iug the i'iilr:ni(>(' aud tor miuor repairs. 

TLe Dreds of the harbor Lave l)«eii uatliiied above. To meti tb 
requirenK'iit^, tlic followiiif; estimate is Knbmittcd: For 4 cribs for sn 
pier (to i;oiiiplcte the pre^wnt pnijecf), #24,000; for rebuilding aihl 
water ami relllliiijtc 521 feot of north pier, 019 feet of south pier and* 
feet of Sfiuth revetmeiit, 1,557 feet in all, $15,570; for nheet piling U 
feet of ninth pier and revetment aud 78(1 feet of south revetm^ 
total of l,S;tO feet, $5,400; and for dredging, 93,000; which, viOi. 
estimate fov contingencies, makes 953,000. 

asixth-otdec light, and llii> Life-S« 



The light-lioilHt. establifibtnenC lun 
Service a Htuiion on tile north pier. 
' Thin bailiuria inoltidodiii the Michigan collcetion district, Hie hi g; 



(irnnd Haven ^ 



Approjiriallont for improfing kjirhor al Peiittnater, Micb. 

March 2, IMT $56,000 

ApraiO,lS69 IT.teO 

July 11, WTO 10,000 

March 3, 1871 10, OOO 

Jiinc 10, 1B72 30,000 

March3, ItiTS 20,000 

Angnst H. 187G 10.000 

Jimel8,lK;8 10,000 

March3,l«79 6,000 



Harchy, ISat Ifl 

Aii^Ht 2, 11^ Id 

jMly5,18Sl 15 

AuguHl ii, 1886 10 

Aiigiul II. 188S 8 

geptembar IS, 1K90 I 



Total 

Original ttitiiuatcd oa«t of the wotk, 1866, amaoded in ISTS, lasi, and 



1892.. 



Whole amuiiiit ap|ir«prlat«tl froin 1866 to and iDclnding n«t of SepMm- 

ber 19, IHitl v 

Whole amouut expended to Jnuc 30, 1893 



Moneg statement 



Julvl, 11*91. balance unexncuded 

June 30. ]»92. aiuount expended dnrhic ti 


rnVvear! 






r.81 
5,3a 


J11I.V 1 
Jiilyl 


1893, bill 
lBy2, outs 

1892. bala 
It iipproi.r 

It availabi 

unt (i.:.ti» 
uiitlhiitci 
uitti'd ill 
rbor acts 


nc!o unexiH'ndrd 










^ 24,00 
W,00 




ate<l bj uct appi 

e for fiscal year f 

itud) rcquirod fo 
il»>profitaldye\ 

1' Itm and 186T. 


oved July 13.1ND2 

ndiug JuiioSO, 18. 

■ couiidctioii of 6 
tended iu fiscal. vc 






h 


is tins project 

rendinKJiine30,llj»( 
Mstious 2 of river and 




CO. 


MKROAL STATISl 




T^ATE^ 


unnon, michioan. 








L'»( 


anccs a, 


il cUaraii 


r*.. 







Yo.r. 


1 ■■"II'*''-!. 1 ^"" 


Fi..l.v,.a,. 


1 1 










CaknrtHrjvur; 





















APPBSDIS K K REPORT OP MAJOR LQDLOW. 2331 

Jlcofiptt and i>hipmmli by riKlfl, ISOl,' 



ArUolaa noalTsd. 


qnuiiir. 


t™. 


AilielMahlppMl. 


IJUBnHiy. 


Tom. 






Iftfl 


I' 1 nomlKii 


■^■13 


1,M0 






1I-. 
















1 if,,, "-i^^>%^^ 


m 




^^-^ ^"JS- 


1*.851 


r^ 






!(„ !C^,k;.\\;;\::^;jij:: 


•OS, MO 
8.887 






low 

SOD 








&"™" '»^- 








!*'"«-: nunii™.. 


IvS 




















TUl 








..» 


















„...tfa 


■m*L«l b:f D. C. Wickhani,of rontwaler 


Micb. 





DdPBOVEMENT OF WHITE RIVEB (LAKE) HAKBOR, MICHTO.VN. 

The present project ie for a 12-foot navigation 200 feet widp, and prn- 
ited by piers and revetments, between Lake MicliigEbib and White 
kke. 

The north pier is a pile structure filled with edgings and stone, 
U5 feet long, and projectiDg about 350 feet beyond the present shore 
le. 

The south pier consists of 356 feet of crib work at its outer cnil, and 
1,408 feet of pile pier and reyetment. It projects about iWd feet, be- 
DU the present shore liue. 

Althmigh the project contemplates a channel with a navigable deptii 
12 feet, it has not been po8,>*ible to attain this object, except for short 
irioils of time by means of re|icated dredging, for the reason thiit the 
BTs are not suihciently extended and the inshore revetments are not 
nd tight. 

Vi'itl2 reference to the existing project, the north pier still needs 350 
et and the south pier 200 feet of crib work to complete them. 
The north pier at present reaches only to the S-foot curve in the lake, 
»d even aller its completion will fall some 300 feet short of the 15-foot 
irve, while the south pier after the addition of the proposed 200 feet 
ill probably be long enough for a considerable time to come. It is 
rtdent that large quantities of sand find their way into the channel 
Win the North Beach around the end of north pier, and the latter 
bould lie extended as soon as possible. Although 'on general prin- 
4ile(i the extension of the north pier requires the first attention, the 
id of the noiith pier is in a somewhat niiatabJe condition. The end 
(ibis slowly bnt st«adily sinking inio the bottom, and at least one 
honld be added to the pier at the lir.st opportunity to hold the 

liderable portions of both piers and revetments have bceitre- 

^Mire water during the last few years, but there still reniaiiiH 310 

hof th rAVAtment (Station 7+40 to 10+50) and 'Mil linear 

n work (Station 3+56 to 7+^) which are now 



sand tight as pif 
d material for thisl 
land driver was a 
t needed at othai 
loiuiitil now. j 
rk will be pasbed 



2332 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OP ENGINEEBS, V. 8. ABSIT. 

23 ycrtrn old, ami reqtiirt* new siiperstructuie and filling. TUe 
tionei) pt>rti(m of uortli iiior particularly is iu urgent need of attend 
as tho auperstmcttire timbers are nearly gone and tbe lilling br 
washed out ]>eriuitA the sand ti'om the rear to wash into the cbin 
Part of the sonth-Bidu crib work also needs repairs very badlv.fl 
oiaUy the oriba (StaUou 2+55 to 3+05 and 0+50 to l+OO) whieh^ 
lost part of their lake wall. 

In order to make the pile structures as nearly sand tight as [ 
cable, they innst be sheet-pileil along the rear^ and material for thjai 
pose is now on hand at the harbor. A special land i" 
last year for this kind of work, bntas it was llrst ne ' 
bors it coulil not be made available for this harbor u 

Operations hare now been begun and the work ^ 
rapidly aa rircumHtanees will permit. 

Soniidings made March 21 showeil an available depth of only I 
10 feet at the entrance over a distauce of some 400 feet and it it 
tended to send one of the Government dredges to tliis liarbor -iA 
first opiKirtunity. 

A [HTmanent bonc;h mark was established on the doorsill, eonthi 
of the light-house, and connected by duplicate levels with the Vt 
Status tfaugo. Its elevation is 20.83 feet above the zero. A serifl 
accurate water-gauge rea<lings was commenced June 1, tJ) be contJi 
through June, July, and August, for the pnrpo-se of obtaining iaSt 
a^usting the eero of the gauge to a uniform level with the gangj 
the other harbors. jj 

Tte balalice of 811,400, available July 1, will pay for the w:ork,| 
under way, of sliet't piling part of the north and south pile st^iobl 
forbiiiM:i _ ii iii : -[ini'ture on north revetment from Station ?( 
to lO+.ii ,1 1, for repairing the south-side crib work,i 

for thu i: — ^...^ .. ,,i,.inl this season. 

The aniiMiiit tli;it can be pniHtably expended during the next j 
is: For building five new cribs on north pier, !i23, 750, and four! 
cribs on south pier (to complete the project), J24,000; for 367 lin 
feet new^ superstructure and filling on south pier, $3,670; for si' 
piluig 1,000 additional feet of north and south revetments, f 3,000; ; 
for dredging, S3,000, which, witli 10 per cent lor contingencies, na 
$03,000. 

Tbn Lit;ht-Houso EBt.-ihlishmciit mnintniiin a fimrlli -order SnHhin;; coast Ugt 
tlio shore and a sUth-onlcr liiirbor lifbt oQ the Bouth piiT. Thv Life-Siiving Set 
has II Htation on thi> mirth pier. 

This liarlinr ia iiirhideil in the Miuhigiin collection aisttict, MieUigau. Thet 
est port of entry ia (iriiuil Unvvn, Jii.li, 

Jjiproprialionafor improving harbor at While River, JUlch. 

Marph2, l«fi7 $.17,000 ] March 3, 1879 f, 

April 10, IKIiU 4l,r.ri0 .hnie U, IKKII ; 

July 10, 1H70 I'd, 000 Miirrli 3, IHRl : 

Miiri-h:(, 1K7I y(],OO0 Aii-iisl 2. 1k(<2 . V. 

Jim.- 10, 1H7L' lO.OlHl .liilv.-., l|.«t '.,;. II 



June 18, 1B7H yj.tm \ 'Int.il 2!- 

Ori(;i[iiil.'iiliiniiti'il cost of work, Igfifi. ami-na.'.l in 1N73. IKfil.ninl 18!)2.. «137.S 
Whole aiiuinntapiiniiniiili'd, KSWi, to ami incliKliiis ui'tof MfpIcniLer l!t, 

IWMJ 274,5 

Wliolu auiount expended to Juub 3o, is'jj ^ j 



APPENDIX K K — BEPOHT OF MAJOH LUDLUW. z3i>3 
Money statement. 

891, baliince une:cpended $18,117.94 

18SO, amount t-iptiinled during fiscal your 6,432.12 

892. bolance imexjienilfKt 11,635.82 

1893, ontBtandiuK UabilUioa 196.92 

1893, bnlmice arailnblo 11,439.90 

appropriated by act appro vedjnly 13,1892 5,000.00 

, availableforfiscalyenremling JniieSO, 1893 16,439.90 

nt (Mtimated) required for i:iimpIetion of existiiis pniject 43,225.00 

nttibatcanbeprolitably expended in fiaoalj-enreiidiugJiiiuiSO. mH 58,000.00 
littod in corapliaiico with requiroioeuti of scttious 2of river aud 
boc acta of 1866 and 1867. 



COMXERCIAl. 



1, WEUTE KIVER BAKBOn, MICRIOAIT. 

EHlraHeea and charancta. 



1^. 


H^ber, 


culk'^" 


To...g.. 


^ 


i;«*i 

1,M8 

i 


msisfi 




















1«,MT 


TJfl 





























Recnptt and ihlpmenti by I'Mfels, 1S91.' 



jtltim nwclTud. 


IJumntltj, 


Ton.. 


Artld™ >bipl«d. 


Qnantlt;. Tous. 






S 


II to 




ao 






Lumb^ f«t,B.M-. 


fillB 


35, Wl 




31.346 








bKTeH.. 


Wood aiiui>"k --.'.'.'. . .torde! ! 


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'Conpllad (mm tUtcmeut furnlibed by Cbe oollector of ciutom*. 



K K g. 

IMPROVEMENT OF MUSKEGON HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

. official project adopted in 1866 and amended in 1880 and 1889, 
kgain revised iu 1S92, provides for a navigation 15 feet deei>, 
en piera 300 feet apart at the entrance and about ISO feet at the 

ry 25, 1S92, a B{>ecial report waa sabmitted to the Chief of En- 



2334 BEPOKT, OF THE CHIEF OP ENODIEERS, V. fi." AfiHT. 

Ciuisci-R, sotting forth the contUlion and nctds of the liarbor, and d 
iug with (li^tailed estJuiates nieasnres n-quired for the constniction 
DiaiiiteiiaiKTfl of a relialtlp Ifl-fimt navigation. The report eslimnta 
an exteiiRion nf both piers 8(Hi feet to reach tb« 'M foot contour in 
lake; for dredging from hvke to lake, with titiaanel width of TJfert 
dt-'pth of 18 feet, and for i-evetting both banks from th^ inner end of 
pier to Muskegciu Lake. Tlie total estimate for thia work is SifiU, 
and recommendation WHS nia<li' for appropriation of $150,000 to 8 
two seasons' work. A copy of this report is herewitli for inoorporsl 

The north pier, hh now existing, conBista of 800 linear feet of 
work, parallel with and distant from sooth pier 300 feet; of3ii<J.6B 
feet of crib work built in I891-'92, eonneeting the outer )>ortionri 
pier at an angle with the interior [lortion, in order to close the 1 
existing gap iu the north pier; of 322 linear ieet of old crib ' 
and 3il2 Unmr feet of pile work parallel with the south pier, »t a 
tance of 180 ieet. It projects about 000 feet beyond the present i 
line. The former end crib, which had been undermined and torn I 
from the rest of the work in 18S9, has been removed and is now \ 
contnu^t to be replaced, together with one additional crib, which! 
been considered necessary to add in order to insure the stability! 
restored old crib. 

The sonth pier consists of SOO linear feet of crib work and 380 1 
feet of pile work, and projects abont 020 feot beyond the pre.sent 
line. 

Both piers are in good condition, with the exception of the iun« 
feet of the north-side crib work, which is now from 22 to 24 yew 
and needs rebuilding above the water line, and the north-sidi 
work, which is somewhat unstable, in consequence of undcrminiDj 
needs an lulditioniil row of piles along the channel wall and ot^er i 
re])airs. Besides, there is some additional stone needed to refli 
crib work and to riprap the end of the south pier. 

From the inner end of the Government works to Muskegon Lat 
channel banks are partly revetted with slabs. This work was dc 
former years by the occupants of the shore, but since the Innibei' 
have been removed they have receivt^ no care and are now fast b 
itig down. The project includes the substitution of new sheet pi 
vetments for the old slab docks, and the material for 1,000 linear f 
this work for the north side is now on hand. 

Contractor E. G. Cix)8by completed the removal of 316 linear f 
the inner north pier and the construction of the new crib work to 
the gap between the remaining portion of the old pier and the 
detached pier in October, 1891. The removal of the old piei 
efiected by blasting it out with dynamite and dredging up the d 
All the old stone tilling was saved au<l afterwards used again in th 
crib work. The latter consists of seven cribs, 20 feet wide, thi 
ciibs being IVamed to form close joints with the adjacent struc 
which they connect. The cribs rest on a pile foundation, and wil 
sui>erstrueture an* 20^ feet high. 

The total length of the new work is .129.0 feet on the channel 
2 ieet of which overlap the ]iorn« ol' the former detaehed piers 
both ends it is securely conne(rted with the old structures. It is 
with stone to the top and decked over. 

Gaylnrd & Wing, the contrjuitois for the raising and restorat 
the onter sunken crib of the north pier, having counnenced i 
o|H'rations June 29, continued their work iinder considerable di 
tics. They removed the stone lilliug by means of divers, aud i 



APPENDIX K K — KKPOBT OK MA.roE LUDLOW. 2335 

e^teinbcr had so far romiilefcd that iKirtion of the untlertakiiig 
rjoBtifled inattL-mpting to miso the ti-iii with ehniiis aiidjaik- 
jlned up on a spet^ially eoiisti-iK'ti'tl |ilatl'iirm of pilea and tim- 
dlmig exposure of the crib to the ell'i'tts of tho frequent and 
ibrms of the SRasoii had weakened it, however, to such degree 
iile<l to withstand the strain and tore apart just above the 
bottom. The two parta were then raised separately, towed to 
lebora^ in Mnske^n Lake, and left for the winter, 
tone removed trom the crib by the wintractors measured 153 
1 cords of which were placed in the old work as filling, wliich is 
eded, the remaining 81 cords being stored on top of tlie pier 
e us© in filling the restored erib. The 72 cords plaeed iu tlio 
! will be replai-ed by the contractors at -their own cost. They 
mitted to deposit it in the pier at their reqnest, as it hindered 
their operations, and were in consexjUeuce willing to repia^-e 
per cord, which is a much lower price tlian that at which 
lerial can.be bought here under ordinary cu'cnmstancert. An 
a uo possibility of their completing the work within the time 
, by the contract, the contractors requested an extension to 
1, 1892, and this was gianted by the Chief of Engineers, 
iprobability of the contractors comideting the work on the old 
jre August 1, 1S92, and the impracticability of having other 
ors carry on operations at the end of the pier at the same time, 
ently led to a recommendation to the Chief of Engineers to 
tlie Gaylord & Wing contract for restoration, by adding to it 
the construction of the additional crib to be placed outside of 
ired old one, and also to modify the first cx)ntr&ct in so fiu' as 
to the stone foundation, later developments showing that it 
sentirely practicable to replace the old crib on a pile founda- 
t insure more uniform work. This recommendation received 
■ova! of the Chief of Engineers, and a supplementary eontra^■t 
ng these provisions was concluded with Gaylord & Wing 
5, 1892, the work to be completed September 1, 18!)2. 
)ntractors resumed ojieratious under the mndilied contract M»y 
! upper i)art of the old crib was cut up, saving only the nnin- 
>SM-ties and the iron for use in the reconstrurtejl crib, A new 
ill was placed under the recovered lower portion, which was 
« restored by new timber blocking and bolting to a sound and 
orj' condition, and the crib entirely rebuilt fl-om the third course 
the suitable old and otherwise with new material. At the 
the fiscal year the structure had been completed to the twelfth 

mstruction of the new crib has progressed to imrlude the twen- 
u-se, which makes the crib rea<ly for sinking in its place when 
foundation shall have been preiuired. 

i beginning of the fiscal year the navigable depth in the har- 
from 15 to 1« feet at the entrance and between the piers. Soon 
I closing of the gap- in the north pier this commenced to show 
; on the entrance channel. The former gap had acted as a sort 
iway, the large body of water pouring through under the influ- 
lortherly gales assisting by its scouring effei^t in maintaining 
n navigable depth in tlie outer portion of the fairway. The 
of the closing structure, namely, the removal of the dangerous 
rrents at tbe entrance, had been fidly attained, but the channel 
perceptibly. At the end of Hepteudier the irj-foot depth had 
1 to 70 feet next to the south pier, and the remainder of tho 




r «r c aa u s u LKs i^- & abkt. ^ 

H»^"^ "nth iitilj- U feftwS 

depth of wat«r, u& 
tbeOi'vemmeDt did 

■■tliiBj fit for liredging, uidl 

xbvb«»i4I erf' tbis <1 reding td) 

IllCaad iW rwt ptiTfard very kd 

■» kaaAn^ sad ten cabif <Fardi i 

tk- «m! of ibc pier and 
SB«nl wirb tva object) 
M ^ <Jka«** it wtTt- posKible, of ths 
«;. ^ fciwvMe rxpn:tatJODS nbatl 
T* fmmn <wmtima\fly the pracdt'iU < 
^ aCt^lH, ami tWrvbf inMvti 
Ml tbr [MU-r of tliosp il 
puinns tUat the Gov 
a ([Tirstinu. Tbe del 
itra^l tiimaki^it. 
^ ftnvt diffimlty was ioin 

*i^ «»f<oit«ite^<«WaB>^ia4fcycti«j: v<f*<s«-ls: « number of 
mOt 0Mikri fa mt Am! «««■ ami «m with diffitolty reJci 
nn* «M a Al|A i£ aem* IS iMM «Ihf M the sualh pier. 

IWCwu— iM4wte»^W»** fc ij^M ^rect April 21, dng aci 
arfM><tww»ini4M >i i l J wy «»W lJ > U> n M, »ndtwnovedthc8 
■Amcm^ cW iadiii» aa y f irt iM >» 3^Ai4m L>k» ton depth of 16 
■ -- ■'■-- - : > ' -. V,, JL TW 4«SBtitT t>f nistt-rial ivmovt^ 

WL*u <s^w rju>is^ 

">! >ljy -> ;a^ >'-rii"'*-- w5:D*at »*»rt at the harbor eutratice' 
lie -loir iowu, »*- :'j;- ■,-:.>':'T;be (i.-_» ■^'"ffitrixc, breaking two sp 

Tlk d?v»:^t ■rjk? iitlj>*<i; T^;;: dji,vs n;akin^ reiwirs. 

A f^rnLAt.Tt; iv^r.vi. s^iri »*.* <-#t;»b'.:ihti.i on it)|> of the stone si 
it-r air^t T^mtLrtiy w;;-i;..'w .>:> !he eas; *i.!^- o! tlie lijrLt-honse, Its 
ViiZt-m i? y.43 iW: db>.-vr jer^* <t" ir.«i:;e. A serie-- of act-urate wi 
£an;:e readioj* w^* rt>:i;n>ir:n-<Aj June I. to bt- i-oniiiiued tbrouph J 
Juiv. and An^usMV«r the [>«ri>i*^ oti'rvi urins data lor the adjusti 
of the zero of :he sausre to a mitform lev*-! wiili the gauges at tlico 
bartwrs. 

I.'jfon completion of the work now ninler i-oiitraet both piers 
laek >«>0 feel of iheir full exieitsion ;K'ivi>ling to the revision of J 
ar?-. l!<92. 

TbereeomDieiidations for the fiM-al year l^iiiare: For32i linear 
new snperstniitnre. north pit-r, Statious :! + Itl tort + 3Jt. ?3,22(i; fe 
j>airiiig iiortb pile pier and revetniem, *7tHI: for refiUing both piers 
riprappiijgfiidof .-yiiitb pier,*1.5(Ni; for btiildliig I.INmi linear feet si 
|)ile revetment, norili >ide , timber and piU:i on liandj. Si'.WK); for : 
iidditional feet sheet-pile revetment il-'"*" »ii ea<!i side). $12,{MX) 
ti-n new cribs on the north pier and ten on the south j'ier. 8120,1(00 
for dredging. *4,000. wbieb, with per cent for contingencies, m 
*I.j«,IM)0. 

Tho I.iKlit-Hi.iiH.' Estnlilislimont maiiitsiiis a fimrth-oi-flBr fOast light on the 
ohijrc Hti'I n Kisth-orilir liarlmr li;;hl on tlio Boulh iiier. The Life-yavinE Servit 
nHfiitiiin on th<' iiorlh piiT 

'I1ii» liiirl"ir iH inrl>idi-il in tlic Michigan collei;tio[i district, Mii-'higau. The m 
port Iff entrj' in Grand Haven, Mich. 



APPENDIX K K- 

.<jiJir.,(ir»-fi«i.-./l" 



•RBPOBT OF MAJOR l.UDLOW. 



•MpruriHii hafbvr at JtfB»t(jr«« 



1881 20,000 ■ 

August 5, 1886 12, 600 

Anguftt 11, 1888 45, 000 

SeptemtKr 19, 1891) 5(^ 000 

Total 329,000 



i,1867 ^559,000 

,1870 10.000 

J,H7I - 15,000 

), IKK 10,000 

(, 1874 10,000 

3,1«75 K,000 

114,1876 15,000 

3,1879 5,000 

tlSSO 7.500 . 

il eatiniBlril tosi ol (li<- wiiik, ffiOfi, aiui-niliMl iii l^tiB, 1873, IMJl, 

1890, and 1892 *689, 000.00 

HmoDiiI aiipropHated friiin IKOfi to bikI including act of 8enti'm- 

9,1890 - 329,000.00 

amount expeiMlwl to Juuu 30, 1892 ■317,796.53 

• Moaey gtatcMKnt. 



1882, amaont corered by aDcanpl«t«il vontractH . . 



it STBiUble for fliical jesr ending June 30, 1893 

□ l>e proHtablf be expended in flecal yeur 



ant that ci 

1891 

aitted iu oomnllanoo with reqaiTemeuta of sections 2 
rbor Acta of 1866 and 1867. 



COMMEItCIAI. STATISTICS, MCSK Kl ION MAItltUll, ) 

Entraacti and clearonvrs. 







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tN„ T»j — 14: 












OW. <»EPS OP EITGIXEXS 

iiK^ KcGiXEEs Office, 
mtnA, JGA. Jamwry 35, ISi 
_ _ Mftnl' January 23,1 

P » ik» HW t l ooaditioii of Miuki 
?totL-<NH Vi.-^MpMt. *Mi to wImi ^ w ^JBiil br its improvement 
wKMM^sMvv'trf ~>;hh jicttK jJkiv A* cMiAftiM of ib« harbor at 
r-m-iij^iiv, iMKm. M tvanHMMiai^ vik. ShpMMbn. LSIW. and Noven 
-jiVt.. »^*>w 4kt •nnrtfct4fet jfc > wa imlhrirfi»g*ivtobedgdncttd 
-ic-«.*ba M -«w ^atx -«£&■* Wki« Ar kAriwr aero, constitnlidC 
iwc^wdwMM. -vw iiiliiniM -■^■dnrrff Mrt«» M 3 fcet on Uiel89Q: 

u ilWv >^->M » v?-j*M< Nw^ Awts lifiAt the pKrs> uid this deal 
Nife».^(«I M ^im-s >• Kx atoMaal «»«« artua dartog heavy gui 
bM JM sp< ' n^ TV »«TqptfM« Jtpt k is tte» dimmisbod at tiini 
11 ^A *^ "i^- in /T tmiM Vtttmm wan* ar nspractii-able for L^ 
xvswt; .4^ iiv /<^««7 takv Aiftfts. n« «fiml project for Mnsb 
^ifJsM ^'>c^■t MV« *c Mt venal MT^atiea of 1.1 ft«t, bot it is en 
A*; >.- >*^^tOlf ;h«s tv&at)^ tkn» f«imtf must b* mrered. 

I TVf pr<rs jifciWfcM kft«v Ark •xtcwaoti into the lake as to 
•he wrrrifirt- &« sa,-k itvipcb b«vviKl A* aetnal na\-igable depth i 
;>o<w; The .-haaurt wbMi &***. iikI to ailow forthe rise and fVdl ol 
sea atwl tih? s.-nJ .tf » beavr ^-¥ssri. Tliis wotild indiwite that the] 
^^h-flld rea.-h »r fei_it thv -JO-f-Mi iviir.-iir in orU« to he >iin' of hft^ 
!■> :"•■.- r c!^ar htr->t« u :ti,'m. ~ 

L* The fiiirway ivtwei^n the piers, and thenee iipwanl, should ^ 
<liMi::M to a depth siiffi.ieiit to aUow tor redaction of lake level be 
tlje zt-ro plane, And for the inevitable fiUing in of the dredged cha' 
whK^h follows disturbance of the bottom and ensues ftom the bi«al 
down of the channel walls and the iva^jHstiueiit of the bottom uiater, 



APPENDIX K K — REPORT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 2339 

t indicates (hedging to, say, 18 feet in order to be sure of securing 

r 16 fe«t. 

) In order to i)reveiit as far as may be ttie aciresa of loose material 

I the banks, these must be revetted throughout tbe length of the 

l^ed channel of entran<:e, as the action of currents, of waves, of 

3, and of passing vessels tends eonstantly to the erosion of the 

anel banks, the seepage of sand into the channel, and its deUvery 

t»e fairway. 

. complete statement of what is requu'ed for the thorough improve- 

It of Muskegon Harbor, in order that its navigation may be fiilly 

: properly adapted to the commercial requirements, must incladff 

Be items: 

L) Pier extension in such measure as is needful to create and protect 

lear 15-foot navigation. This, for the present, is assumed at abont 

fe^t, althongh it is by no means certain that ultimately the 25-foat 

tatour in the lake shoold not be reached, 

i^l) The dredging of the channel or fairway from lake to lake to a 

IJitb, say, of 18 feet, with a width of 75 feet. 

(3) The revetment of both banks, whenever unprotected, with as 

Miniuical a structure as will be substantial. For this purpose the 

Rowing estimates are made: 

(I) Pier extension. To enable both piers to reach the 20-foot contour 

the lake an extension of 800 feet is required for both. Estimating 

e cost of this work from the most recent and reliable data for similar 

Dditions, the cost per linear' foot will average $120. 

{2} To dredge a channel 75 I'eet wide and 18 feet deep fi:«m lake to 

te requires the handling of 54,000 cubic yards, which under contract 

H cost say 15 cents per cubic yard. 

(3) Tlie revetting of the naked banks involves covering some 5,600 

lear feet on the two banks, and the stnictnre proposed for this will 

Bt t6 per linear loot. The total estimate therefore is as follows : 

00 linear feet pier, at $120 S192, OOO 

BO cubic ^anls droilging, at 15 centH 8. 100 

OOIinear feet re " "^ 



Total - - 233.700 

ntiIlgeIll^i<^8, 11 percent -.. .- 26,300 

Aggregate -.. 260,000 

The funds in hand will sn&ice to bqild a single crib on the north pier 
tside of the damaged crib, which is under contract of restoration, 
d the total pier extension above noted of 800 feet on each pier is com- 
ical from what would be the onter ends of the two piers, supposing 
e work now under way and immediately in prospect to have been 
mpleted. There are at this time the materials for abont 1,000 linear 
it of revetment on the north pier under contract, and we have funds 
migh to build it. The present revetment estimate, thereftu-e, omits 
U from considoianou. The dredging estimate is compnti^d on the 
mw of the most recent survey. 

The estimate of $50,000 given in the annual report 18i)l, as the basis 

r aopropriations for the tiscal year 1892, was intended to cover 300 

:teiii>ion of pier, half on each side; 2,000 linear feet of revetment, 

■• each side, with an allowance for dre<lging and contingencies. 

r the system of biennial appropriations for rivers and harbors 

M rnvvailed of late years, the appropriations to be made at this 

•'""iTess must do duty for two years. In the case of Mns- 

tann'a work would be about as tbllows : Say 10 cribs fo* 




_i.TXS HAEIkr^ WCHIGAy. 



'> ';-:«v. n. Z'^ML aim iMir«i1r1 in 18S0aad 
ri-iioj^ ;"-Sn« iiMpbenr«<tfi piers and 



.Irt ^i:rCl^ ■.iT. ;■;•:■-.. 
lir "^> if*.' '-rrC iTilir:. 

TVr ;or-»ni: '••.-i--Trr.-T>.«r.> *::» »> xCJi'»~!.; 

«*- Ti* :,,.r:i ^-i^ :.•«> L-t-a; in-; -if <Tib toK «ad 2.123 lino 
'^ yS." ;->-; j.-,.^ r^vrfa»rtii. ri? a :.-ijI of il*7 linear fe«. pK^i 

!_»•• fr^ ■.•rT"E<i Tat J.tVMr:i.; 5i*H>: UOr. 

'>!j ;Ij^ ^-iTh -»1- lj?t"' i:E--jr ^'■rtri -tf rrib mortand 4^172 linei 
"f j.:ir i-*r.- a».l rvve;urrtii. a i--;J of -\477 linear fprt, projecting 
f*«;t ij^5"Lii tL<r jTtr5«:u; ih'-ft- linp. 

>'<» •liftii-rilty wis tiptrirm-eJ doriiig ihe pas« year by euteriDi 
•I'l'^itin;; v<-s.-<<r]rt. tti« availal'le deplii u^vt^r having beeu less tba 
fi-t:t Ij^f UMii ilie |,iers. aud 17 !■■ l'< fet't on the crossing of the 
Irar. aii'l iti>- pti-iiii)«rrs <>i' tlit- Jtetmii. (iraixl Hflven. aud Milw 
ii:u]v;ty iiiiidf regular tri|>- ;lin>ii;iliuni tlie winter. 

riif I'ln-rrin-tion <•]' <i iie« ciilis. :'• mi wuh ptvr, C)immen('«d d 
lit'- inifvimis liwiil yciir. iiiidn riiiilni'-t with E. (>. Crosby, wax 
|.li:l>-i| ill )>i-l..lnt, l«!n. Thf iiilis an- eucL ,'>4l ft-et Ion;:' ;ui(i ; 
MJrIc, ami Willi tin- siijurstiiiclHn- almiit l.*7 I'fet high iu tlic uort 
and alioiil L'!( li-.-t. Iiifh ii> iln- m.iuIi j.it'i . Ka^li i-iib rests on n fo 

I »r .HI pili-M. till- pMi-M |.i-iiirr;iiiii^' iVoiii i;( III lo IVet iii thf yi 

Till- ttiiik WHH tilled witli sudie t,i t|j,. t.,|i and di-cked over. A mi 
|.iiHl, viiui liuilt iJitf^eiMih <irib. 'I'l'u iVmndatioii piling of the new 



Aft^SDIX E K-^BEPORT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 2341 

aifned by a diver and fouod to be satisfactory, with afew slight 
)08, which were remedied by driving tlireo additiaual piles and 
E them andcr the eribs, to ascist the siime number of ori^nal 
ajeh had been found to projeet with i>artbf their diameter out- 

e liike bottom, which at the crib site had been 22 to 23 feet below 
ero of gauge previous to ptacin^ir the cribs, scoured ontftffcerwardB 
lepth of 27 to 28 feet at the oater end of tlic south pier, but no 
jhensious were entertained, as this was tlie greatest depth of 
ti there was any record, and the foundation piles, which are twelve 

iw naiuber under each crib than those under any crib placed here- 
e, still had a penetration of about 10 feet. However, the great 
I of December 4 and H threatened deatniction to the new work, 
irt of this under date of February 18, 18WU, is herewith. This gale 
h blew continously from thesouthwest with a maximum velocity of 
iles on the 4th and 49 miles ou tlie 5tli created a bend of water in 
lugle between the south pier and the boat^h, causing a powerfiil off- 
B current along the lake wall of the south pier and around its outer 
and scouring out the bottom to the unpre<'edeuted depth of 38 feet 
tf zero of gauge, underniining the fouutlation piles and letting 
cribs sink down. Measurements made after the cessation of the 
n showed that the amount of snbsideuoe at the outer end was 11 

while a lateral displacement had taken place at the same time, 
irds the south, to tlie extent of 11 feet at the lake end. 
le Buper.''tnicture timbers had been torn apart, there being gaps of 
:t in the second crib from the end, and smaller ones at other places, 
le stone filling does not appear to have moved much at first. On 
ember 6 a noticeable settling was apparent only in one pocket of 
1 of the two out«r cribs, both ou the lake side, although u subsequent 
r's examination disclosed large holes under the cribs. On Deeeni- 
14, one pocket of the outer crib had lost all its stone, two ]>ockets 
le second -crib were half empty, aurt nearly the whole lake side half 
le three new cribs bad experienced a perceptible settlement of its 
ig, while the tilling along the channel side underwent almost no 
ige. 

le piles ander the end crib, where the diver found the bottom acces- 
i, had disappeared. 

eps were immediately taken to strengthen the work temporarily, 
3 to hold it till spring, when permanent repairs were to be made, 
ttie pier secured by the addition of new crib work, Estra timbers 
) acrew-bolted over the gaps in the superstructure, long drift bolts 
hing down into the cribs proper were driven through the snper- 
etnre timbers, and a large quantity of stone was cast around the 

onter cribs. About 40 cords of stone were borrowed from Bt. 

ijfii Harbor, where it was in store withoutimmediate call for its use, 

tiie rest, about 80 cords, was taken from the inshore revetments. 

Qinptypocketofcrib3and the comer pockets of crib Swere refilled 

1 part of this stone. Since the beginning of January no further 

Ige in elevation or alignment has been noticed. 

■"- circumstances attending the accident to the crib work indi- 

.. .*veral defects in the general design of the cribs heretofore built, 

modified design was prepared for future use. The new plan 

*i -for a closed central compartment, of nearly half the total 

' of the crib, to hold the permanent load, and a narrower com- 

it OD each side, next to the side walls, with open bottoms to 



I 



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- T-.r£ > 3. :rf * --mLTifrt. "ir.t: 


- ■ : 


1 ..■ - .n-- I- 


-:,-i -Lliait .If hJ-n 1.W* i3»w 


T '.. 




^ >-j.-:!-a -aS". -uii :j.<s.i^ :c ki 


>■■- : 


: •- ■:;■• t-.-i. 


il ,c ^< TiTW t>c :r::Bv t:: 






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-■ 1^ ■•fa-'.ir~<:S- C" TJfi ^f-T^iI^S 






- > ■•-!« ■*-:: > 3- J-*''^ *' «>; 


■=' ... 


'\, '^.l'^. *" 


,---.-,i .-■ ir*":3»eK#!« ;c i: 


r-.iii -o.-,„j^--~_ 


-- -._-^iiii->S-'»«^ ■<^:*^' 


AiJ. 


- -! J._fi-. 


rir i--s:-i:»;2.r>:c=«; ;*re -^-as ":«:: 


>^a 1 




-^T.it^ S:--^« :ii" =»t- *?^* 


■» 'C^ 


Tlr *>;»-iI'l 




ii^~ii' 


:■"■ !.;▼. :•: 


*i»r- 


" -S ■■ .: -Ci" 


M><' 




. V^iT.^V Axl::i>b^:^^ 




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: :,:;.: .:ts --■:::•: l»e re-v 



APPENDIX K K KiiPOBT C>r ilAJOK LCDtCJW. 



■->3i3 



9 linear feot aud the suuth pier of SOU linear feet beyond that - 

E. contract. The cbatiges made iiiiee^tsiiry iu tlie general plivn 

t and foimdation, to pi-cveiit a vccunouce of the daugei-H like 

Blast wlntei', iuevitably ecbaace tbe co8t of the work, aud the 

» in view of their lo<«itioii far out in tlic lalse can not be buift 

n coniudered sufficient heretofore, 
itimate for the fisi-al year 1894 Ik therefore as follows: 800 
»t crib work to exteud both piers and i-oinplete tbe project, 
HH; 2,600 linear feet of shore revetment, $16,0(H); sand fencing, 
Itontiug, etc., 97,000 ; -2,300 linear fwet repairs of 6<mth revet- 
jl8,100; general repairs of existing works, $5,000; dredging 
H^wMch, with contiiigeuciea, makes $180,000. 



Ufe-Saving Surcice baa a etatioii ou the north pie 
harbor ia incluiled in Ihu Mirhtj^an volloutiou d 
is A port of entry . 

JpproprialioM for improoinj harbor at Qrtm4 Save*, MUh. 



30, 1852 (mouth of 

dBiver) $2,000.00 

2, 1867 (month of 

d Biver) 40, 000. 00 

1,1886 65,000.00 

0,1869 1,866.15 

I, 1870 10,000.00 

1870 (nUotuient) .... 500. 00 

3,1871 6,000.00 

1,1873 15,000.00 

3,1873 75,000.00 

1,1874 50,000.00 



Angnat 14, 1876 (15,000,00 

June 18,1*78 15,000.00 

March 3, 1879 9,000.00 

June U, 1880 50,000.00 

March 3, 1881 50,000,00 

AuEUSt 2,1882 40,000.00 

Jafy 5.1884 50,000.00 

August 5, 1886 30.000.00 

Angnst 11,1888 25,000.00 

September 19, 1890 75.000.00 



Total.. 



. 634,:W6. 1. 



il eMimateil coat of the work, 1866, amended in 1880, 1 

amount appropriated and allotted from 1852 to and iticli 

plember 19, 1890 

amount expended to Jane 30, 1892 



Money statement. 



1892, balance unexpended 20,1^.33 

1692, ontHtuudiug liabilities $t>'J8, \i'J 

1892, amount covered by uncompleted coutr:kuts 14,058.14 

— ~ 14,086.73 



t available for fiacal year ending June 30, 1893.. 

mt (e»tituuteil) required for completion of eiistii 
tuttbutcan )>e proti tably expended in llscalyeareu 
litted iu compliance with requiremeuts • 
rboT acts of 1866 «id 1867. 



llWPBSDra K K — ^BEPOHT OF MAJOB LUDLOW. 2345 

i^ prepotalt for r-itemlon anil repair of South Pifr, etc. — f until mo il. 



len[nBlie,B 
Hi. B. it.). 



te.W •2,1)00.01) f3.339.gl 

O.TS i.sn.jo iiK.s* 

7.SB l.BltM 2,a2B.JS 

T.40 l.g.W.DU' a.UB.M 

«.!» 2.iatL0O\ 3.BTS.B5 

17.00 «,SBO.0m 4,703.7* 

T.OOl 1.7W.oa' ZIST.I^I 

7,ixi; 1. Tso.no. a.i»7.ai 

T.DW 1,7(0.00. 3.08B.M 

ftWftrd«d to Meaara. Tniman & Cooper, and executed nnder daM of April 



-Daliy, UiMkcEon. Uich ■ . 

a,.&K\ut.mB 

■. * COn Gra>d Kulda. . 
1 »i Co., LndllurlflD, Ktob 
nTHu.ClHU-levoli.Uicb 

tb. LddlngtoB. Uiob 

iper.UuTtflVW.Wb... 
nu, Cbikrivvatx.Mlcli 



COMMERCIAL 



EniranCfS and clearaneet. 



Te»r. 


s™b.,. 


collected. 


ToBMga. 






•5.K1.81 

i,it».ai 


























1.40J.600 






KM.OM 









BeceipU and nhipme 



Jrx.: 

..do.... 
.--do... 



i< ftva ttalmsnta fBraiihadbj tlie collector of riutoi 



Tona. 








==,S 




»3,7ra 

1182 
l,Mt 




'ess 




21S 




3j'.m 




m 




7.«. 





Ht> 6y ffwf, Z^/.- 








Quality 


Toi,«. 


Ik«r l«rrol«.. 

Cempnt do.... 


100 


6 






Frail do.... 

Fi»h Iwrrel*.. 


wo' 


:m< 


Lnnib^.ufwtnJM-.":::: 


i8;fj9 


"i 










2.»i 








Sla.ve».'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'i!ar\oti\t.'. 


t.iliS 















III bj Col. R. C. DuryM. 



2346 REPORT OF THE CBBT €r 



V • - \ 1 



REPORT OP XUOR WILLUM 



A^ • •* L 1 - 



Uhited Si: 





Geiiebal: I hiiTe the honor to 
cations and form of advertiMaent for tte 
Grand Hs/ven Hiirbory Mietaigui, vitk 
approval. 

The steps in fhis direction voold ham 

been ior the damage to the onter thne critaa «f tte 
ntaence was made in the monthlf lepoit tat 
necessary to keep these cribs under 
order to feel sore that the limit of M OYC Me n i 
making arrangements fiv additional wotk. 
4 on Lake Michigan was of exceptional scrcriij. 
changes at nearly all the harbors on the 
ing heavily and oontinnonsly finnn the 
heavy sea at the eatranee and seltiRg in 
sand'in the lake bed. 

At Grand Haven, owing to the great profeetMB of the pier irt»i 
lake, a formidable soonring adiim was developed, dne to the 
of the water in the an^ between tihe mmA pier aad Aesiore 
whence it escaped in a powerfid cnmnt offUEore along the pier 
acitws itii outer end unthward. 

The erosion adjacent to the ]Her amoonted to lhmi5 fteS at aboal' . 
f««t from the end to 10 feet at its exticmitT. in fwse q pe n ee of vtsi 
the current cut nnder the three onter ciiba, leavinir the fimaditii 
piles exposed and hitting the cribs down by the inability of the pik 
to $a]*|K>rt tlieiij. 

It was at first feai'4*d that these three cribs^ which were built Is^ 
se:is<*ii and a.s wdl as any on the lake, were pnictically destroyed bol 
viihiii two or three wr^'ks after the storm the cribs seemed towael 
Their ultimate iiJoveni<*nt, the excess of depth adjaoent to them ^ 
yATily TvUlU'd, and observation by transit and level ihdicate that aper* 
manent iHi>ition has bf*f*n reached. 
Two ivsults ensue: 

1 It had bi*eu j»roj)oseil with the balance to the credit of the 2LppO' 
l^rwxK^ii t*' omtiniie <onsrnietion by building four new cribs, two on 
o«<h P^^'f- ^*"^ ^^^^ balance must be drawn upon to rebuild the sup^ 
5ir.^'tt:reor'the threi* damn;L^ed cribs, to restore the levd and integrity 
of th<^ work. It is estimated that these repairs will cost liet ween ?^U^ 
jHH? #MHV, nearly the <M»st of one 50-foot crib. 

Hk^ j\\ss:Mlities of construction at this time are therefore reduced 1 
tJiTW' v^'^5^ *^^^ ^^'^ ^^^^^ P^^r '^"^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ other. The constnictioiH 
a ^nfl^ ^'^^* '^^ *^^*' outei* end of ]>iers S4» exjwsed as at Grand Haven 
intxi"*^-^''"' tv^r the roasi»n that the pi'e<?autionary additions to an ec 
.^v "j^x sivu^ t:s s^irVry uniil lurther extension can ]»e made, i^^st alK»i 
^iv' xr, cvx^>ss v'*:" rV.,K of ;ui intt- rior crib, ami this ex|K*nse is wasted : 

are ma4ie. As it may l>e exi»e<-ted tb 

ide for Grand Haven, it 

outer crib for the nor 

this time to the addition of two cri' 



0- 



„^^>^* j^ *.^;*.;v-*^ '^^ t'le ]*iri are ma4le. As i 
' ^^ jij-<v>^tvr.,i::o:-.s \\ill presently l>e made 
Wcv^^:>f ,(.v«^,^v ;K:\:s.ib:o to deter the sin.iile 
r^ ^ :>»k5 ;>v v\s::s:nu uoii a: this tf 

'^ ^'l^r^w^c^^- «^5x :s.^Me to build t 



r; '^*-'*'*^. 



three new cribs on the south pit 
"!A^\;^^vA vM* tfev harN^r iudioates that the mean aotiou 
>ig**^^^^^^ ^ ^^ hArU>r ii^ tt'f^ly normal to the shore line, t 



ai 



APPENDIX K K BEPOBT OF MAJOE LUDLOW. 2347 

lie resultant actiou is directly tjhorewaid and that the best resalts 
mgittjon have been found when the outer ends of the two piers are 
pfearly abreast of each other. 

¥ile foondatioDS have in general been used for the e:iHterii Lake 
^sn harbors with good results but with occasional failure, as 
riy at Miukegon and Michigan City and recently at Grand Haven. 
M other hand, the rixirap tbuudatiou nsed elsewhere on the lake 
iae cases, as at Chicago, with satisfactory results, when tried two 
' B ago at Michigan City in connection with the outer breakwater 
It satisfactory, the weight of the cribs, etc., forcing the riprap 5 
iifl9et into the lake bed, and requiring subsequent raising on two 
|paB. Purthei'niore, alter two years of settlement, a hard northerly 
1^ at Michigan City last fall, was still found to affect the line and 
f the work. The recent experieuce with the Orau<I Haven cribs 
[ived conclusively that at so great a projection int^> the lake, 
1 to powerful currents and seas, a pile foundation alone is not 
!, while the Michigan City experience indicates Ihiit a riprap 
RUidation requires for ultimate icst an undue aud oncertitin period of 
me. 

It is, therefore, necossai-y in the Grand Haven case to combine the 
■TO methods, an<l, for the attainment of a reliable level as well as 
Bearitj' of construction, to use a tbundation of piles driven to proper 
*pth and to strengthen these aud prevent erosion of tlie hike bed by 
ttreL- use of riprap. 
The accompanying plans and specificaticms provide for thi-ae and for 
wiitber point in addition. If 100 linear feet of pier ani to be built 
UxTt does not seem to be any sound reason for not building a mgle 
tritj 100 feet long instead of two cribs of 50 feet each. 

Tile advantage of the single structure in point of strength being con- 
tinnnns at every course from the bottom up instcjid of being entirely 
*eiwrated below the superstructure would seem obviou;*, and there 
sboDld be gnine economy also perhaps. 

It is true that an attempt some years ago at one of the western har- 
bom bj sink a 100 foot crib was not entirely fortunate, but this, it is 
lielicvcd, was due to insufficient means of loading the ciib promptly, 
till- stone scows being of small dimensiona. The stone scows now in 
iXMin the lake are of large dimensions, capable of carrying 150 to 200 
fxnU of stone, aud the specifications provide that the crib shall be 
b;iil' filled within twelve hours and entirely so within twenty-four. 
"fliere is no reason to anticipate any difficulty in this (liri'ction, and 
|iiiiie that will offset the advantages of the single constnution, which, 
" is bi-lieved, will in the present case be found entirely mlvantageous. 
It is therefore proposed to contract fi)r a 100-foot crib, and in addi- 
tion to procure the material, timber, and stone necessary to rebuild 
^iil refill the superstructure of the damaged cribs. This work cannot 
veil be specified, and, as in similar cases, it is proposed to do the work 
by hin^ labor, contracting oidy for the delivery of the material. 

Shoold the project and specifications be approved, it is requested 
liiat the inclosed advertisement and accompanying letter to the chief 
slerk of the War Department be forwarded, and that authority be 
pven to print 2u0 copies of the specifications. 
Very respectfully, 

William Ludlow, 
Major, Corpg of Engineers, Bvt, JAtut. Col., U. IS. A, 
«. Gen- Thomas L. Casey, 

ief of Engineers, O. S^A. 




APPENDIX K K — REPORT OF \[A.IOR LUDLOW. 



2349 

%h beach and 304 feet on the soutli beach, with some 40 feet of 
1 teniae eu the back wall of the north pier at shore liae, to stop 
yiiig sand fivm blowing into tho waterway. 

lenuiinoiil bench mark wiis estabhshed on the stone foundation of 
ght-keepe.r's dwelling and connected by dnplicate levels with the 
sd States gauge. Its elevation is H.98 feet above the zero of the 
B. A series of acciuate water-gauge readings was commenced 
1, to be continned thnmgh June, J'llyJ and Augost, I'or the par 
of procuring data for the adjustment of the zero of the gaage to 
form level with the gauges at the other harbors, 
make the revetuieuts subserve their jiuriiose of excluding sand 
tiie channel they should be sheet pile<l, the north pier from Sta- 
5+10 to 12+60, or 750 feet, and the south pier from Station 5+50 
1+90, or 740 feet. Aa it may be iinpi)saibio to drive sheet piles 
g the rear of the works on account of the brush and driftwood 
i>m, it may be necessary t4) drive them along the face of the chaii- 
vall, aiul in that cai^e tliey must be protectee! by special ginard piles 
valing timbers. 

lie reuiaiuder of the north revetment from Station 16+21' to lii+50, 
28 linear feet, should he rebuilt above water, aud some minor re- 
gmade to the rest of the works. 

le available balance, July 1, is $2,100, and it is proposed to use this 
liedging and incidental repairs. 

>e estimate for the fiscal year 1894 is : Sheet piling, north and south 
tments, 1,492 linear feet, 97,460; general repairs of existing works, 
idiug new superstructure of 228 feet of north revetment, $6,000; 
ging chanuel, $3,00(1, which, with contingencies, makes $17,000. 
addition, provision should be made for further estennion of the 
I, for which purpose the project should be amended to reach the 
ot contour in the lake, 

< lAf-hl-Honaii EseablixbtiicLit mniiitiUiiD a liftli-'inlor liiirbor lij^lit. iiiiil ttjo Life- 
H Svrvii'v ti Hlation on tlio Hinith pii^r. 

K harbor is incliidi^il in Iho Mlrhiuioi (■olleutiuii diHli'it^l, Midygnii. The iieai- 
trt of entry ia Orand Havi'Ti, Micli. 

Appropriatiima for improrinij harbor at Black Lake, Hiehigaii. 



■t30, 1H52 






. $8,000.00 
. .tT., 615. 31 
. Til, 000. 00 
. 10,000.00 
. 10,000.00 
.. 10,000.00 
. 12, 000. 00 
. 15,000.00 


March 3, 1879 mOOO.OO 

JuneU, 1880 0,000.00 








11, 18T0.. 
b 3, 1871 . 
10, 1872.. 
b 3, 1873 . 
a3,l«74.. 


August 2, 1882 10.000.00 

JuLyS, 1884 15.000.00 

August 5, 1886 5,000.00 

Au(ru8tll, 1888 6,000.00 




lit 14, 1S76 






. 15.000.00 
.. 10.000.00 

tLe work, 1860 


Total 274, 61.''.- 31 


ul estimuled 


..<wt of 


aineuded in 1873. 1870, 1884, 


[•Muoaiit : 


PI' 


iprijite 


, ]»52, to aad 


nclniliiig «ct of Sept^mUer 19, 

274 615 31 




xpeiul..<I to .rune 30, 1882 

to SUIplUB filDd 




mt earrie<i 


1.19 




KKi2. 

>v' ivvsw* Kv i^*s :»»(«\*\-va»^Kt Tas ad<^tM) in IStHI and reriswl 
W Jts'* '•nK V N* |«n^i«rvd and nuuntaiiKd by drrfgiog at i 
kf W. C Wakk. «&n.. HoIlBiid. Hioh. 



for a permanent work to cnt across tliij* neck of land and make the improve- 
that point, but on account of the improvements already made at the present 
I of the river, Avhich are available, estimates for opening this channel were 
9, tiie expenditures being deemed too great. 

ly also be stated that an additional reasou for adhering to the 
^ river ehaniiel wa.s the fact that it had already a navigable 
►f about 8 feet, which encouraged the belief that it could be 
ed effectively to 12 feet- 
efforts to iini)rove the present entrance, however, by remodeling 
tending the existing revetments from the lake along the south 
f the river to above the bend and revetting the north bank at 
id and at the entrance proved unavailing. The revetment in 
id was repeatedly undermined, and the sands from t^e naked 
lorth of the harbor poured steadily into the channel under the 
of the northwest gales, and repeated dredging insured an en- 
depth of but 10 feet, and for short periods only. 
)S2 it was concluded that the depth of 8 feet then existing, and 
hich the draffc of water had varied little for many years, was 
ly sufficient for "the present and prospective commerce,'' and 
e appropriations should be applied merely to maint^ning the 
in their then existing condition. 

last appropriation was made for this harbor in August, 1888, 
rhich time the entrance has been kept partially open by the 
>nal service of a dredge. 

dredging of May, 1891, was instrumental in maintaining a toler- 
sivigable channel till the fall of the year, but in May, 1892, the 
depth on the bar, covering the entire width of the harbor, nearly 
fce the light-keeper's dwelling, was found to be only 3 feet; at the 
the piers the water was 6 feet deep^ and on the outlying bar 8 

steamers trading to Saugatuck and requiring from 7 to 8 feet of 
have been in the habit of scouring out a temporary channel with 
ropeller wheels, but it is evident that a channel obtained by such 
is but temporarj", as the sands are only removed from one place 



'i*'^ 











'•i^'.h KituaiUI ^ijvinaM w .*w JV^ ^^K 




>« Bitcal year ending Jaue 30, 1893 6,3St.'^ 

■M) raqaired foi completion .of exiatiug prajeot 30, 300. 00 ' 

BibDproflt«blfexpendedmli«oal}-e>ireiidiuj|iJniu>!»,18M 30,OQO.O0 
BompliftDoe witb reqnirementa i>r sections 8 of river and 



I, BAOBATCCK HARBOR, MIOIIl«AX. 
EHlraHoen anil rliMranttt, 



■ 


Xiunbcr. 


coUntML 


Tmbw'. 


is. 


300 

n 

178 


•SIS 




^" - 










•S^' 


(I, Olio 
130. oou 




















Artidw «ceiT«d. 



li.'lM jihlppeil. 



iMIodcin 

Mb. 

nhudlH. 



..Mfeet.RH .1 
him-lii.. 



SB , FUgl •III. 

in I Frnl(BnilvFp<tahIrs....il'i. 
JSO ]! yuTH nrodniai .ilo. 

n\ HouHholiI lEMldl 



■ CumpilM from aUt«iuniI fnminha) by TiroKn,. Grifllii £ Hanrj. 



KK13. 

IMI'ROVEMKXT Of SOITH HAVKN nARIIOlI, MICIIHI.W. 

■The official project, adopted in 1866 and modified in istlii, 1H72, and 
S88f provides for a chanDel 12 feet deep, IHO feet widv, and protet;led 
f piers and revetments at the entrance, and extending up Black Biver 
I uie highway bridge. 
The existing vort^ are as follows : 

Oa the DorQi dde: 256 feet crib work .12 feet nide, built in 1873 to 
174; 30 feet erib work 30 feet wide, built in 1871 ; 321 feet cvib work 20 
BUS 93— US 



, 9, isS^ 



2854 REI-DRT OV THE CIIIEF of CVatXREDS, ir. 9, 

fleet vtd&buUl inl8«I8»iidll^; 534 feet pile work bum UlSiMl 
feet plani boitm ix-vetliifut built 1X70. The total Irnctk u 1^ 
and thepuM- i-riijwla TOO fit-t bi-j-ond the i<rcseni itluiivliM. 

Od the siiulli Aiilu: M t'lx-t cribwurk ^ f<-et vidi'. built lt>!i^ 11 
crib work :W IV-tt wide, buill I«:i-.1S74; :i5'2 ft*t crib wart JiM 
bailtlSeS; ICHwtpiluwurk, buUt 1S7S, and S.» feel pliuklMia 
meot, built l)ST)s to 18f<2. Tli« tot^I length is 1.&53 fM>t, ua H 
prqjeotfl Sl'O t'uvt bcyoud tlie presotit ^honi tine. 

ThedpedsiuK. which waH iu progress at the brgtumtig (iTdl 
year, was lumiilii.-l August 4, 1S9!. giving a uhauuel 13fcrtdB 
GO feet wi>li-. illin^'ii ibuaHaiitl six handtvd and sercoly cnliil 
wen* Willi. Mil :iti.r -hily 1. At the opening of iiavi^tiou thisf 
oiitrniK'e m jn loiiiiil to have aguiii sboaled to 10 f«el, and tlie E 
ineiitrtred;.'!' rcoiK'ind thccliaiiiiel to a depth of J4 f^etaod* 
00 feet bet wecii >I;iy il and June 23. A few shoals iu tbe rirei 
therevetiiirnlN wimc iilso removwi, and the quantity digged dU 
i:),830 mibic yards. 

The ri'iMirs of the outer crib, north pier, were completed. Ql 
went driven uround the outer half of tiie crib and oomieeted b| 
of caiM and scrow bolts to the old timber wo^ and the nel 
Htnu'turu built up on the work thns stnmgthened. The ofi 
Mido wallH wore closed with vertical timbers and aca«w bcuta, : 
repaired work was filled with stone, (hie hundred liseac fM 
outer end of the mmth side pile work, at alKKe line, when it Jul 
the (M'ib work, wiva provided with a double row of sheet j^at 
phMW li»H always permitted large qoantities oC sand to mm! 
luto the clinniiet. Although it was notpoBsible todrive the Ai 
very deep, owing to the mass of brush and driftwood in the bo 
is Miuved that this ])iirt of the work is now practically sand ti 

The iioith i>i)c ri'vi-tmeiit. 524 feet long, wa« also doable she 
iilong the roiir Willi iiiid relilled with new brush, ballasted witt 
sttinf. Till- siiTdc ilitliciilty was eiicounttTi-d here in driving sh< 
lis oil Die. snulli sidi', bnl the indications are that the seepage 
tliriMigh tiie ri'vetiiiuiil lias been stopped. 

The ('.mivei'siiin iif tlie north plank beam into a sheet pile re' 
)ias lieen ediiniK'necd. Tlie work was eut down to 3 teet at 
water surface, and is to Im provided with anew cap over the frc 
and a wide sti-enk iilou^' the water line, additional piles aloug t 
wall, a double row of sheet piles to penetrate to not less thai 
below the water, and anchor piles lb feet in the reareonneci 
the fi'ont walls by iron tie rods. This part of the revetment is 
long, and it, is cxpeHed to complete the conversion during the i 
July. One Iniiidred and ninety-two linear teet of sand fence w 
on the north beach, and tin; vertical fence on the rear wall < 
pier was moved mit Ut tlie shore line, where it will do better 
TLe end wall of south pier was repaired. 

During tlie early spring the (iovernment pile-drivers and 
Htniction scow received newled repairs to lit them for the seasoi 

A pi'rmanent bench mark was established on top of brick ton 
at Hontliwest comer of Mr. IlalliMrk's house on tlie northeast e 
Michigan aveiiue and 8t.Jos4.-pb strt-el.and eonneeted by d 
levels with the United States gauge. If is 41. lit* feet above z 
series of accurate water gauge readings was couimeneed Jun( 
continued through June, July, and Au;;ust. tor the pnrpose of 
ing data for adi"^^ i^g the zero of the gauge to a uniform level i 
gauges at the other harbors. 




'BXDra K K — REPORT OF ilAJOB LCDLOff- 2656 



Ooi^lBtion of tlte repain now in piosteu ihe irarkB wSl 
iawmg oonditiaa: 73ie norfli pier, aluioa^b most of it is 
11 not need any repairs, except bobm oooaeional patchwork, 
royeara to come. - , 

300 feet of sooth pier is in a &ir state of preserratioQ, and 
I repairs in the immediate ftitnre, bat the 2D-fiDot crib work 
1 9 + 98 to 13 + 00, 362 linear fee^ which is now 24 yean oldf 
need of rebnilding above the water sarfiwe, as me timbor 
rotten and barely hangs together. As the best water ia 
is habitually dose to the soath pier, this part is particn- 
d to injury from passing vessels, and its repain shouU not 
my longer. 

9 are proposed at this time for the south plank beam revet- 
;he time is not bar distant when it will be necessary to 
t with anchor piles in the rear, and tie rods, and when that 
it may be found desirable to provide it with sheet piling, 
re now being made to the north revetment will hei^ m«- 
reserving the needed depth of water in the harbor, bat the 
d causes of the interferihg shoals win still exist nnimpaired. 
;he insufficient development of the piers, and the nnpro> 
ition of the north bank of Black Biver above the revet- 

nt piers do not project beyond the general 10-foot carve in 
i although there is usually a depth of U to 16 feet at the 
iers, a biir with sometimes not more thun 10 feet on its crest 
ross the entrance immediately beyond, and even after the 
ave attained their full length as intended by the present 
;h provides for an addition of 1.50 feet to the north pier and 
he south pier, they will fall some 300 feet short of reaching 
fepth in the lake. 

bank of Black Biver im in its natural state, although the 
s very close to it, and it is subject to erosion &om the cur- 
river, when in flood, and from the waves and auction of 
»els. It would seem to be the duty of the riparian owners 
?evet the bank, in order to assist in maiutaining the desired' 
igatioD. 

working balance of $900 it in proposed to complete the 
e north revetment, now under way. 

seal year 1894, the esti[nat« in as tbilows: For repairs to 
and general repairs, 95,000; for completing the existing 
iditional cribs, $42,000; for dredging, $3,000, which, with 
for contingencies, makes $55,000. 

iiiH> i>stAbtishEaeut maiiitniDS a flfth-cinler ligtit iin the Honth pier, aoH 
^ .SiTvicp a station on fho nortli pior, 

H iiii'ltiil'-(l ill tLe Micfaigan collectiou (lis tiict, Michigan. Thene&rcBt 
s Grand Haven, Mich. 

lyproprialioHtfor improving harbor at Uvulh Uaren, .Vicli. 

W3,O0O .InneU, 1880 »5,000 

10,00(1 March 31, 1881 5,000 

l.->, OOO Augnst 2, 1 882 10. 0011 

12,000 July 5, ISW 7.5(NI 

20. 000 AuguHt 5, 1886 5, OOO 

10,(100 August 11, 1888 10,000 

10,000 September 19, 1890 15,000 

J 10, 000 I - 1 

laOOO Total 201.000 

7,G0O I II - 



ur 



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^ . -I: ^ vrk. 1866. isne3iu~L li 1*9?. 1?T2. *zd 



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APPESDIS K E — BEPOKT OF MAJOE LUDIOW. ' 2557 
-■"*'' KK'i4. , ■ " 

mpsoTBHBirr of st. josbph babbob, hiohioait. 

fltiial project, adopted in 1S66 and modified in 1871 aod 1875, 
ore a ohaoDel of eotrance firom Lake Michigan into Bt Joaeph 
270 feet wide and 16 feet deep, protected by piera and revet- 
Thence to Benton Harbor it is deeigaed, as later anthorind 
to cany 13 feet throngh the Benton Hubor Oanal, wideniog 
inel to 100 feet. 

lannel entrance fivm Lake Michigan into St- Joseph Harbor is 
d on the north side by a pier consisting of 1S7 hnear feet of 
k, 30 to 24 feet vide, and built between the yeara 1875 and 
373 linear feet of old crib work bnilt previous to 1888, and of 
bf feet of pile revetment bnilt in 1886-'87, and on the south ^e 
near feet of pile pier bnilt 1867 to 1872, and of 313 linear feet 
ib work bnilt previoas to 1866. The inner end of the north 
it is connected with the shore and the new light-hoose depot 
1 by a pile wing 179 feet long. OChe north pier prcgeots 600 feet 
l^e present shore line and the south pier 540 f^t. 
rS feet of old crib work in the north pier has been main^ned 
B of repeated patehing, sustaining piles, tie rods, etc., for tba 
y^arH, bat the time has come when this Is no longer practiea- 
the work should be rebuilt above the water line, and as a con- 
e portion of the channel wall below the water has been lost, 
ing will have to be driven here to support the new superstruc- 

rebuild tbia worii in proper shape is estimated to cost to, 000. 
lling in t!ie north revetment has settled considerably, and 
to avoid the loss of the stone ballast and exclude the sand of 
i. behind &om the channel it should again be refilled with brusb. 
i estimated will cost *G00. Some minor rei>air8 to the other 

the north pier and to the south i»ier, whicli will not cost above 
rill pot the existing channel revetments at the entrance into 
»ir for some years to come. 

resent constractiontt are not suftieicnt, however, to maintain 
icted entrance depth, owing to their insufficient extension. Ju 
nal Report for 181)1 it is said: 

nmiilation of iftDd from the action oftUe winiiit und the cinrtuto U iwaiust 
pier, kud this hu now occasioned ban and hIiouIs of 10 feet beyond th« 
) north pier and overlapping to the southward uciu^ih the untriince. In 
inoy maiking the entrance, as cstabltBhcd this epriiig about 1,000 fent a 
Ii of weat from the end of the north pier, marks the siiuth end of a nhoiil 
ill tbcTs Ib but 13 feet of water. 

»nditiou8 at the entrance went from bad to worse until, in the 
>f 1891, a shoal with only 7 feet of water on it overlapped the 
lorth pier and projected nearly 100 feet in front of it into the 
Several vessels ran aground on it while trying to enter the 
but all escaped without serious damage, as the lake happened 
let at the time. 

luently this shoal was partially scoured out under the combined 
) of southwesterly gales and the river current, but the m»- 
'ere distributed farther out and added to the ridges extending 

1 north across the harbor entrance, raising tlie summit of the 
pbout 600 Geet beyond the end of north pier to 11 feet below 



IJu ■■;iil>i.-]*, lijc niiij]i.ii]y iiS-\-- 
'■'V.f I'll i|i-i-ii[iiil 01' tlje ir^a:;.^; 
••■iiuii li! lur Wdik lictwrtn i<t 
It^-'iih' obvious to tlie omiioa 
*u;i!i:. llie iilti^iiiiit in tLar liiiv 



- 'r*:? ii-s.'.-:.t. 



r n-r.uber ci'miiiimj." "f ihe r-.-.*; TrLTtr irtrr r ivt 

■:::i'< ia The lake mid ii> t.e:jr:2,:J j-,-.-!: :i j.-v.:*. 

>:: ... W.iii iht suiiiue i:i.vr:*ij. ».i-.t :..:.• eb-js 
::.>:-: I'T ihr river had its ncrxil tff,: :i: ? -..uriL 
::■. V';,V!t- drvth neail.r i:i 'he dirfvt p-rok-i^i-,.: 
..:: r :e*5 .liiliculty was eij-eiieT.f'.i: ari :'_« wu;:«r 

::■: >-:.r:> ;'u:> sjirin? liave t^wn o; =: -?uil Ti.:3:r; 

.: :r-:i-.<n*e aiinwiit* of siil hjT,- \^z. \-z-i--j:i. 

..::-.z% Line dejwsiTs weiv aiji? i-i :i^ : -,-j; ., 

:■.:: T^r TCii>ria^ vat a.;.:'^ j:..i ^ Te>>rl .\^; : -..; i 



Or' MAJOR LUDLOW. ■■■ 1009 ' 

mui extctit ttist tht-oa);tiout the greater part of itx length the 
Htoftii^L't deopiu it. In ttiisconditiou it itatiirallyiBiaoapable 
niuR thi.- puriwse fiir which Un was built, aud should in psrt be 
Bave wattiT aiid refilled. The plank beam if^votment is also in 
Kttown condition. There is an agreement with t^e n^lroad 
tfwbereby the compsiny is to remove this revettoetit and replace 
Btbstautial shevt-pilo struotiire abont 10 fe«t farther l)ack[ tiins 
K^ the canal the projected width of 100 feet. The railvay 
W^ if permitted to |Use the wing dam, slionld also rebcUd it as 
mir works extend. It is estimated that it will coat (6,000 to 
|(id refill the other part of the wing dam. ' 

umfuuing part of the north bank of the canal and tbe winding 
|3eaton Harbor are res'etted by the owneis, but most of these 
Kits are badly built and permit the soil trom behind to wash 
» eanaL The sooth bank has nothing that oan be called a re- ■ 
t^ bat the city of Benton Harbor has recently passed wdinanoes 
ig all riparian owners to properly bolkhead their fronts. , 

Iredging in progress at tbe commencement of the flsoal year was 
led antH Octo^r 28, 1891, and daring this time the winding 
t Benton Harbor and the canal were dredged thzonghoiit to a 
if 13 feet; tbe main channel iu the harbor below tbe canal was 
gd to 16 feet, as well as the shoal area between the railroad 
and the north revetment, aud a channel 50 feet wide and 17 to 
deep T.-as made across the bar between tbe ends of the piers. 
proach to the life-saving station back of north pier was also 
3d, and the shoal at the month of the Paw Paw in the canal hav< 
ppeared, tbin was again dredged out before the plant left for 
an City. 

Iredge Farquhar again arrived at the harbor on December 11, 
id, as already stated, was temporarily kept in commission iu the 
t to open a passage across the bar in frout of tbe entrance, 
ig the winter the Government plant was repaired, and on the 
April the dredge resumed oi>eration8 and again restored the 
;ion in the canal to a depth of 1.3 foet. The flood in the St. Jo- 
Iver, which set in early in Miij, made further dredging in tbe 
impossible ftir the time being, and the plant was sent to Sontb 
The total dredging during the year amounted to .57,520 cubic 

le present time much complaint is made regarding the navigation 
osc'pli Harbor, the high river having brought down large qaan 
r sand from above, and the available depth above the railroad 
is oidy 11 to 12 feet. The nervico of a dredge will be required 
soon as fiirther api>ropriutiou8 shall have been made, 
epairs of tbe north i-evetment, by re&Uiug with brash and stone, 
impleted in July, 1891, aud the effect became apparent at once, 
lore sand found its way through this work afterwards. A plank 
as laid over the revetment trom the inner end of the elevated 
'bich was rebuilt. 

incomplete portion of the suiwrstructure of the south pier was 
I. The gap in tbe end wall of the north pier, under the super- 
re, was closed with vertical timbers, placed with the hdp of a 
od end the crib filled with stone and decked. The end of the pier 
bsequently injured by one of tbe wteamers which ran agronnd 
of the shoals near it and broke off the end boms. The &mage 
taired with extra timbers and tie rods, and a washout at station 
) north pier was closed with plank aprons and stone ballasL 



I ■ - 



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TSOiyZERS^ r. B. ABIT. 



Ti*- i:' «^- «'': ^^*^ Mytit^n Ksflvw- baft cotUDeiKcd difdpi 
* . • .. U.I* S- '-^•'■ar^ if ^"jff. Tb*^- h^i^t bca maoh delsjtdbf 1 



fi I." i.i.: u- "u*^ 3i2caiT:«ib^. but rhey are doin; vtetlli 
■ .'■ !•• u'-Lj-tj: '- ^•^. i3«l ■*"— hav^t ri eomplec^d in Joly. 
t - •-■- ■-•'*". :«::"^i-a1* V ?*Hi»*»>!«i'X^mDlamr» against theCbici 



" — . : -^L i^'.-r f rrjije ic- aa •x>c»enieci«>a to rhebaita 

i.-..- ^ V w iir..i fci«t ^■?»^!»: i»*iT report sabounai under di 

- -n.. :•■:■ r^*i !!»i-ri ti.* -fsra': L::*ii^i on top of a bonding ina 

. . ^i. -.-iim T -^ht -^ tn»^r :€ ^jirh ^banu^^n: of thenOn 

. .- -*-i -^ rizo!-ac-^ IrVr-L* ■jrir'a :he Cnited Sli 

^- - "i •' "I- ;*i^« ?^- •- ' "^ -— ^ ■io.c.i for 'Le •i-i-ttsm 

'' m Vt-: T-.-3. The zac-ies^r ihert 



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TENDIX K K — REPOBT OF MA.JOK LUDLOW. . 2361 
^fo)leg statement. 

Lb<iliuir« nn^iiieDded tll.l02.U 

ilexpendei) diifiu); flaciU feat 9^831. 7S 

{^'balance <iuci]>eiided 1,280.91 

^oiitsIuDiiiiig liabilities 632.33 

|^IMWM«vftU»ble tU8.e8 

^proprUtod by Mrtqiproved July 13,1899* 60^000.00 

Vallable fi>r flieal rear eliding Jnue 3(^ 189S aC^61&fi8 

;a»tfluib«pTOfit«l>lTexpcaidedinflw»lyMTendiaBJnn«30,l^ 80,000.00 
tad. in eonplUuiae with requinmenta of wotioiu Z of river and 
C«otB«fl886 and 1881. 



STATUTICS, ST. JOSEPH HAKBOB, HICHIOAN. 

EittraHct* and d 



Yan. 


V^«&r. 


SSS. 


t™>^ 






"■SSS 

3U.fS 
































' 




* Of which #1,000 may beoxpuaded un St. Jubepb Kivvr. 



UJOK WlLLLUi UTBUIW, CORP 

Umtkc $TAT«S Ekoi 
JMkvit, JTkA., 

-. ..uiii|)iiun>-i- witli IVparttaent ia< 

-.1 uilifT A. irom Uie Huti 
1-1 Wai. rrlative to thi 
1 h [1.. Hkrlnir. I bog to 
i Li^tioQ the roBilitious < 
]!' i'itU0« of niticii solft 
. > il by uii-iiti!; of n>peat« 
ifisuital insvpectioits. 
I. [ill {mttly ia geueral 
ivigatiou, and partly ii 
; ltd t« ttutl the rctuedj 

^ .. ^a4 =--« thf) action (if the winds i 

4 >fe>< has nniv occuHloned bum 

r •aJ ovrjluppijif! to the Bouth' 

,_ _M leiiMii-, BA cstahlistied tliui 

^ a^ «^ uif th« nortb nlcr. marks 1 

M' «mi<rt. If the official or 

w* rxtrnuva u tltu M Uli 

Ac (ovtb luof ftir fatiin> o 

«*bfa til irxtdMl tbr eouUl 
«■ As wwth pier, maid »hvnt 

•rtteeUwioa the I 

it »s » ha. 



APPENDIX K K — HEPOET OF MAJOK LIQLOT. 2868 

ovement and the resulting formation of eTtecsin shoids have 
_atly expedited by tbe open n-intert4 of the past three yean, 
|ie northw&st gales free sweflp on the- Itike, and at this time an 
, ly ag^avated hy the abnortoal level of the lake, which is about 
jnrer even than the extraordhiary low water of one year ago. 
~)eiilt>s are shown in the accompanying tracing from ttieiikoirtre- 



pearlifT p;iri nfttic si-^hihi rhi- c/.m-sc i-nti-ring was nearly 

rttM-j^'eriirii' thi' miUr l.l;ii;k ,-ip,u- buoy abr.MSt. 

^ ft small Bhoal formed close to the end of the north pier, which 
W devdoped into tbe extensive areas inclosed within the 10-fi>ot 
r, iritii depths of 7^ and 8 feet npon them. At present this 
loa aoross the prolongation of both piers and has crowded the 
Se to the southward, toward the 10 j and LI foot shoal lying on 
la, the heavy gales in October having occasioned the rapid and 
Aomniiliitions. 

otmonstemedy is the westward extension of the north pier past 
iek tmoy to about the lotbot contour, a distance of some 1,200 
Ueh woold cost $100 per linear fiiot. 

ieve tiiia extennon to be indi spensable to tbe maintenance of the 
'i and that it shonld be provided for as early as practicable. As 
pflcaiy measures for the relief of navigation, I regret to ^y that 
r at none that I conld recommend or snggest at uiis time. Dor- 
t fidi uid winter months the lake is kept in a state of almost in- 
t agitation, sach as to make it impracticable to operate dipper 
18 on the bar, and such scanty work a» might be done by await- 

brief opiH)rtunity wonld be undone in an hoar or two. The 
tristion balance to the credit of the St. Joseph Harbor is but 
, andin any case it is manifestly hopeless for a dredge to contend 
T make any useful impression on such an accumulation as has been 
t up southward of the line of the north pier. 1 believe that the 
t conditions will probably become no worse, as the outliow of 
«r has a certain effect in conserving the channel, and in all prob- 

the lake will rise from heavy rains and continue to do so, so as 
e the level IJ feet above the present stage. 

Dwhile the channel has a navigable depth of 13 or 14 feet, which 
Bprove, and with judgment in selecting tbe best wat«r, it may 
He to be used in ordinary conditions. 
BespectfuU^, 

WiLLTAS Ludlow, 
Major, Corps of Bngiiieerg, 

Bvt. Lieut. Col., U. S. A. 
]. Gen. Thomab L. Casey, 

Cki^ of Engineerg, U. S. A. 



KK15. 

mPEOVEMENT OP ST. JOSEPH EFVEK, MCHIGAN. 

pnneGt of March, 1889, contemplates securing a depth of 3 to 4 
qpo St. Joseph to Berrien Springs, a distance of 25 miles, by the 
0f>f mi^ and bowlders and the construction of wingdams where 

ettloiu were resumed July 13, and continued till the end of Sep- 
ll vhen tkb available fiuids were exhausted. At Twin Springs 



OP THE OUIEF OF ENGPJEER-S IT. S. ASMT. 

I current was diverted iuto tliu rigbt-tiand 

WW )f a closing dam between tbe island and lie left' 

u'udf luiui < aiiiing dikR at the foot of the island wasrept^rd 
»ub8L>4)ii[-ntl.v »ii additional wing dam, 100 ft<et long, wusbnllti 
1 mile below to maintain a navigable channel across Ibc^boalC 
by the scour of the concentrated current above. A second du 
built at tb« head of Long Reach, 7 miles trom St. Joseph, Tbf ri 
very wide in this locality, and it is probable that iidditional ilmn 
he needed to insure a navigable depth. 

Farther down the river at lioyalton Island, noiue 3 miles ahoi 
Joseph, the navigation is affected by the stjvge of Lake Michigan, 1 
during the last fe,w yeiirs has been very low, and in the fall of the 
when the river earrie-s a rednced volume of water, the available'1 
in this locality is usnally smali. In order to ini[irove matters hj 
much as the limited means woiil'' "-""it, anumt>erof water-soake 
were arranged as a kind of dam ... the right-hand channel, 
left-hand channel was further conli at the foot of the isls 
dam of the same material. 

Before closing operations the enti b stretch of ri^'er from B 
Springs down was cleared of such sn. gs as still remained to ob 
th(t best watei'. Altogether 318 sn gs, 15 overhanging trees 
large bowlders were removed, and at he end of September an n 
rupted navigation of at least 3 feet was insured for the rest of t 
son. 

It is probable that these rude lAeu-mres of relief will not sot 
keep the river in good i-onditiou for a] y great length of time. Tli 
water channel will need to be restricted in a greater degree and 
^eater number of points, and snags will be brought down and lol 
in the channel at every high water. It is also probable that the H 
will need proteetion at several places to prevent erosion. Herefl 
the coHstnietioua liave been inexpensive, as the matv'riiils, such a*W 
and stone, cost only the labor of gathering them, and the necessarp 
mg of the plant was done gratuitously by Mr. Graham, the owS 
the river steamer. It is probable that infuturetliecost of similar^ 
will be incrensed, as the supply of suitable stone is now nearq 
hauat^d, and the required bmsb may soon have to be paid for. 

For further operations it is rc<'ouimendcd that an appropristiC 
$2,000 he made. , 

Appropriatiiina fur inijiroriHij .S'(. .Toteph Hirer, Miohigan, i 

AnguBtll,1888 - ttl 

Bejiteiiil^r 19, 1890 - .'... ^< 

Whole amoimt apprnjiriuteil, including act of $i?ploiul)er 19, 1890... %1 

Whole nmouiit eipendod to Jiiue 30, 1892 S,t 

Money utatetnent. 



»l,i 



July 1, 1892, balance nnespended' 

(AmoiiDt that can beproQtablyexpeuilediDfiacal^ 
i Snbiuitted in compliAUce with requirements of 
t haibor acts of 1866 and 1867. 

•The river and harbor act approved July 13, 1892, provides that 91,000 < 
•ppropriAtiou tat improTing St. Joseph Harbor may be ozpeiided on St. J 
ffirer. 



AJTENDIX E K — EEPOHT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 2865 

coMMEitcLii. STXTieTice, ar. johbph rivxr, 1881. 

{noliea, pl;iDg b«tw«en 8b JoMpfa 




QEPBOTEHENT OF UICEIOAN CITS' HABBOR, IHDUKA. 

B of this barbor oonsiBt of the improTement of Trail Gteek 
— -iB«e piers 100 feet apart and dredfpng the creek bed to 13 
%6 locfd'aathortties and owners attenimig to the bank revetting), 
--itating the "Inner Harbor." and of extenaive breakwater and 
'<i[i3tructiotta in the open lake, constituting the " Outer Harbor." 

CDTEB HABBOB. 

!^is lMrborr«xtnwit rrom Annnal Report A>r 18H0] conaUt* of severftl works eon- 
□clcil at difl^remt dates and deslgnea for tha pio^ction of the genorSil lake coin- 
w.e in virtr of the great development of the shipping indnntrieS and the expoted 

T\ti'iri of t.b<> barhor at the head of the Inke. 

-.ij - ■■ Outer Basin, "projected in 1870 and completoil in 1884, ih inclomtd on the 
t iiv ihf "e.iflt pier" (onginally 1,100 foet in lenpth, now rodnrwl by the advance 
•li" ".bore line to half that), on the north by the ■' lireakwiiter," 1.400 feet in 
eth. «J"<i on tie west by the outer 550 feet of the " west pipr," prolonged for 
M parpiifte. The entrance, 215 feet niile, comninn to the basm and the creek, is 
the noTthweat angle, fronting about north- northwest down th« lake, 
t vie a port of the project that the inclosed area of this " Outer Hnrbor " shoold 
4iedgpd to a depUi of 14 feet, fbmishiiig Bomo 10 ai-ren of protected anchorage, 
b Ihia has never been done, and if it were the boain wonld ntill he of no cnmmor- 
4TBliie whatever for the reoaon that tlie entrance, 215 feet, is too narrow for a 
!^lK>r of refuge and being directly oiien to the hi^aviost elor[ii!i on the lake, viz., 
■»e tmm the northwest cinadraut, aomits the neu l^eely into Ihi- basin. 
■rior to the cunipletioii of these stmctures It was foimd thiit the heavy nea, in con- 
l<tT»n with the powerful cnrreste sweeping wcHtwardly itcross the mouth, made 
1 --nlrancn citretnply huzardoiis, for which renwin a xpnr pier, locnlly termed the 
{Te.<kuale[ Pier,'' projn'.ting at right angles from the west, rnil of the breakwater 
>i>"[ northwardintotbe lake, wasileaigned in IHMO iind I'linipli'ted in 188!4. This 
^r hoA been fonnd of Ml*antaaa, bnt the inherent difScnll ii'ti of the Rituntion re- 
>j[i. There WBB,therDfore,iio''harhorDfrefuge"ti>rvi>x«e1:4 nffdlng ibelter Oom 
•! i-ioTtam ot the lake between Chicag^o and Ornud Hmen. nor. in i'nct, could the 
'filler Harbor" atHicbi^snCityAinuBhitito long nit thF> nnitinvardoiicnLng in the 
ki'<Tasi«tained.Mtbat,mlSS2,tbeproJect for thi-'' outer linnkuuter' wnaadopteil. 
i>rnii<,rmity with which work was begun Inut wnscui li.v tl]"<iiristi-nction of the tlrBi. 

""' ■ " " -• 1. - ^1. - . ^. - __. .. .|||| ^^c iiij. iip^. i,rpak water nhall 

iter i'ii'i', li'iLviiig that space open 

^ . , I fret to the niiglf in the work; 

e shore at an an);le of 135 dcgiveH, niid eiLteuding itnotber 

The report points out tbediBadvantageoftheproptiseddirpfitionofthe 
atet arm of the new breakwater, iipproachiiip; us it (loR-s with its outer 
ltd to within 600 feet from the then 18-f(iot curve, thus making any fa- 
■re extension of the. breakwater impra«' tit 'able, and n^comineuds a 
i|>dificatioD of the prpjeet so as to change the priipnsed alignment to 
^ Qeadf parallel with the shoreline. 

ta,aM% naoeiwwr oOodition of the ntilization of the large expend!- 



'^K >- ... - . - vts: 3>t-r* ii»i Tirr "t/A trjksx pier." Thi 
>•?•: >:o-.>-^ iLrjLi: r^^cLi j^irS' ^zA i»nly nt*d> a littl 
1..: :^ •■ :t:i*.t r n ^xc :c>ic-r. 'r^i the MUier 700 feet of 
7n*c .▼:.»: > i« ■ v rw-^i ij-inEi j^ts^r^ cJd. is quite goue. the < 
iji'-.j^ i:s::c»:'ir;»£ a *r«:fcl JMC be3ow llie water surfii 
rs-ss: T _ >.«;a j.iIji ▼. rxjes> s^^KidilT rebuilt. A portion 
^\iL>L :•* rziiK ^rd xT*:c. «i^<iriB|4KMiiioftlie project, bat a 
> r;«« L.-^«i. 2»> k TtT^zntta.i ix lit TOaimyiiance of the ent 
- ^.:«rV lotTi.c." jac » Ae M^fo« «inre in tiie^oaterb 
•r <;•: ^ ' : r 71*? :a:T^ ^3»i. n fk^vUbe lebnilt unless the **ga 
I: s ?^!C:7x.^r<^ ijjkT :3:a^ wu! cos^ #S.MlL 

TtK .v,c?iir».ai> ixr^ liie 3nnr have €onflisled in eon 
<::.«focrx}: :xr« % tmc :^ ^W ftit tf crib work in the oater 1 
r>r>«r vr :<> VYC^ TcjM>Ai «w a WttTT slme fauidBtion in 1^ 
>•:: A.wv ^'AT^c «:rf*ce« Whea wi«k was eommeneed oi 
s:r.v::*z:'i. .i :3>* *7-"-4: ^^ 1*^ *<y k** Partly settled 
%ot tv- 4 f;^-: :^C\''V wA5«r« inlicim^ a total sobsidenoe ii 
VTt.ot ..: f %^ r re«^. T^ smbigr jjed portion was leveled i 
vvvzr?^ >;;:^r<Tr:K«r>f ^^ti2t on lop. the apper ooorse havii 



:>,c. sTi: A>.v;:7 ^x? 3^: aSi^tip the harbor wwk The wock wa 
>%Nr-r AT.*.! %v^*iLe< oTer. the ead$ of the deck {dank being t 
^$»!y.\rYsl ▼::i >t7.'d:rL^ tal^ersw Daring the winter a mi 
TxK^'i. V :*.>? :o *f ex:eci of ±4 fret in the wor^ plaoe« as aac 
V^-vCs vxr. v:i?i^ If. 1^& In <«d«r to avoid soch exceasivi 
Tbe V rib vvck iri :he fsisxew with its attenduit extra cost 
ir.^:. :: i$ vo>rvi$^ n> {^m^ aU work i^ this class on a pfle 
di:Hi :o ^^n:n^ the 9Xn:cnizv br hcaTj stone rip rap against I 

^vafte re{>A:7!t anp iseed^ to the decking, which haa beoi 
aiAny ^xUce$ darx^r the pftst wiater. 

With the wxvkin^ balance of • 13.9DQ, available July 1, it 
to ivv" ^''^ '^ repairs of the old breakwater, which are now 

lor rt^jMirir.i: The d^^kin^ of the oater breakwater* partly n" 
ti-!i*>j: :r. the wes: pier, dre^l^ng for the maintenance of 



r 

Jppropriatioiu for hnproting harbar 


MAJUi; LUDLOW. 
at mchigan City, Ind. 


2367 


BiM. 


, h^^. lurb^ 


TOM. 


■ 




•sss 

JW.Ws.51t 








g 






(cLmnJ,ll.l(«»^-) 






-< »'■*' 


t^X^:::-.-:. 


■. .:. ,;:.:::! ^:'"-l:™ 


ii".' 


4U.IWI1.1KI 
W.noD.DU 

M.CNMi.m 

60,001). 00 


'"KJfi.oiio.oo" 


35,'000;00 

3!mii)!m 

|:S:S 

lis 






U::-.- ■.::..:;: 


l.STfi-UK 
B.MW.O0 
T, MM. 1)0 




m,moo| l»,37fi.oo| i.us.e^.M 



>r outer breakwAter, inclDding dredging of uiiter bftsin, 1S82.. 
MlMtimalM 1,001,4 



loaiit apptopriatod and allotted 1870, to 'and iiicladiug act of 

ber 19,1890 721,875.00 

want expended to Jnne 30, 1893 706, 588. 95 

Money statemenf. 



tvaUable ft»rfiBOftl year ending Jaue 30, 189:1 43,380.34 



t (Batiiaated) re^niied for oompleti 
iu>at can be profitably eipendnu in fisciil 
ted in compli '"" " 



of eiiRtiuc projert 24P, 013. 50 

. . ilj-earpi.din(;.luiiP30, 189.1 100,0«}.00 

with reqiiirenientnuf seutionD'J of river and 
u aota of 1866 and 1867. 

nlNBB HAKBOR. 

tTBilable depth having diminished to 13 feet at the entrance 
11 feet in some phices id the inner harbor, dn^ljiiiig was com- 
at the beginniog of Septeinlxr, 1801. mid by tlie cud uf the 
'0-foot channel 16 feet deep had been excitviitM fi-<>in tb.e bend 
tnner end of the Goveruinent revetment!* to tbc entrance, and 
ride and 15 feet deep from the bend to the Michigan Central 
fllmdge. 

bedginp plant .was thoroaghly overhauled and repaired dariug 

lar. ua oberatiMiB were resumed April 22, 18!t2. Between that 

mo S^ttib MttrBnoe has again been deepened to IS feet for 



XC OF THK CHXEf OF ENdSEEItS, U. t 

"* » of "0 feet, the sliool places in the Ulterior lu, 

u >D>iK)\ to a. depth of 15 IH't, and dredging has ] 

,«DHion o. ^he harbor at its inner tnd towards tlie niir- 

rtccordttni'e with the project. The qnnntity dredged c 
„an 84,803 cubic yards. 

Wit)] the workiut; balanee of t2,(lU0 nt the beginoiDg t. 
year it is proposed Ui maintain a 13-foot navigation and i 
the DXteoHion of the channel at itaup[>er end. 

To c^implete this worli will reqnire the removal of 1.35,0 _ 
at an I'Hliniii ted cost of 915,000, to which shoahl be addt 
and maintcnimce, ij(5,000. Total estimate with Kt jwr t 



OrlKlnul 
Whole - 

1880 

WtluU' Miioont expended 



inut BppropriflCed, 1870, tu '—' ■iclniiiug act of Septemlwr 1^ 

JnneSil, 1892 "IV."[\][\\ 

Movfy statfUKHt. 






, auliituuding liabilities.. 



Aniniiiit iivttilttl)I» for lUouI year ending Jnne 30, 1893.. 



i liarbiir net* of 1SB6 and 1867. 



COKHKHCIAL STATISTICS, MICBIGA^f CITV HARBOR. tXDIJUfA. 

Entrancta and nfeomwoe*. 



Calvuiiw vMu 

IHM 

• liW 



V,,;., 




QMHtily 


■■ 


(• 1 


to 








M'f'VB."M"' 


7s,«a 

ti.M4 








IM«U 


namhsr.. 




























1*U1 







ittl*U»T or MA.I11K LLUI/JW. 




K K 17. . 

' fflWllh Bmwb b. Ddc Sa. IM. nAj-Kn*! CuBRm 



Fnited Statbs Bnoinreb Ufpice, 

Dttroit, Hick., Xorember lii. I^'JO. 
BAi.: The preliinfiiaiy examination of Grand River, Micliigan, 
wnd BaiHdB to Oiand Hayen, called for by circular letter ot. 
wr SH), 1880, from tlie office of the Cliief of Engineerti, bas been 
nd in pnnnance of the reqainments of the act of Beptember 
. I beg to report that in my judgment tlie liver between the 
ted pointB ia "worthy of improvement" as a commercial 
'. ^Qie main ftcts apon whiob this opinion ik based arc p,\\eu 
■it at length in my report of March 22, 1890, a copy of which is 
sd for ineorporattoi herewith.* 

imaiy of the main pointe of this report and of other pai>ers uf 
nd relating thMeto is aa follows : 

the case of The Daiuel Ball (qnoted in 10 Wallace, oiJT; also tii 
Sop. Gt. DeciHiona, 60^ the United States Supreme Conrt du- 
le national ctiar»cter of tbe navigation us foUuwd : 

ml River, in Mirhinn, held tu be n □avig;i)>li- nul'-r ol' the rniml Scili'S 
luatb, ID Lake Uichigaii. to Granil Rapids, n iHaiiiii. <- of W iiiili-. Ii-iiiy h 
ipuble of ba'aring for that lUAtante a steiiuiiT cit* VJ'.i t-ia* l>rin1<'n. hnU'ii 
:li»ndiae and piuseugera, aud t'oriuiDg liy il^ .iuiiclitiii uith tliu liilii- :< ••m- 
[liway for commerce, both with other StaU'N iinil wilh fnn-iuii iiiuiilrlea. 

-reys and examinations of Grand Kivcr were aiitliori/ed bv tbe 
d liarbor acts of 1880, 1880, 1888, and 1800, iinil appi-i>i>i'i;itt<>ns 
ting $50,000 were made for ita improvement by the river innl 
ctBof 1881, 1882, and 1884. Congit-.s-s, theretVire, lias iei»eiiteilly 
«d the status and importance of the stream ns a uiiti<mal water 

[lowing my report of March 22, 180O, ami tlie luepaiatiun of a 
' the river from a new survey made by tlie Boanl ot Tra^e of 
iapids, The Board of Engineers in Si'w York.tn whicli the sub- 
9 referred by the Chief of Engineers, i-ei>oi'ted, iindei' date of 
!, 1890, that the river is "wortliy of imiirovement" and iniiy 
lened by tlredging so as to give li or S I'eet to (Jraiid l{a|>iilH; 
tlO feet or more, can be obtained by tlio sanie means, altlioutrb 
of a lock and movable dam inij£lit be more econonjieiil. Addi- 
iforinatiou as tt» the to|K)giapli,v and yeology oC Ibi: liver valley 
eedecl for the determination of this and oUier important qiies- 
copy of this reports and tlie accompanying letters from the 

»d; priotwl ill Anniinl Rn[i<irl Chirr ..f Kn;;iri<-..i-s tvn- IxW. piij^s a>7fi- 




•f Ttade. it i» endeot thai 
~ iS of the rivera 



tkra*«ittcMl esrre^ and nwmH 

adt.*m^m»dihmt the mtoidi 

B fennble to its iBpnnreaai 



rw»y. 
I B »h i«a ? me pnrtiEaOy trf 4 fat 



*TriM^ » i » wi^fc w Mrf w i H i the b«Bke fiw fbe gnatvryat 
■At^farmctmtmtrmmAw^aM^tmaiOBar fh»t4to6featJ 
to* '«MRT «h» Imv mi«mb «f Ae rinr. far noe-tuiir ita leiig 
ftadnVy MdwIikclrrdMdT&r dofe <tf ihe nppei purti«Dl 
BMiSwCMdHBMtteHlf. TWARAargFof theriveratlovi 
'«idra«Anifc.w siAaert i> III a dkamutl o( 8 to 10 feet < 

^ TWcM»i&c«idmt|r«acww4j«(Aanm-hi]]TpstigatioiiU(| 
AgfMa>Mg>t < iM- ■ aHl 4elawaatMD of the esteci to whin 

^ ■<;- rcpvt af XiMk 3S. UB*. 1 nfiDMtnd the cost of a tkuo] 
CSMBMIMB at •M>*> vttA Ac «m9^ made by the Grand Bq 
fwyi* »■« tt im t t >y a ha t tl.a>a I am b»w of opinitjii tlial. i 
t4jilV atlAiMt ftr Ika flarveT-. aO the infintiiatkio cecessaiy tvl 
faal ^MBn^BMan «f tha mMter caa be procored. iudiiding a piq 

Fm MBTvavac i«i < mt < tlwn- i? forwanled btfrfwjth a rednrtf 
inm tW tKge maf ^ dw Grand Ba^s saiy^y. showiag the uiainJ 
taR« of tfe« .111 — 
toe gwj tfaHr. 

WlUOAM Ll'DLOW, ' 

Jfmfmf, CWp« < EbfJaMn, Brt, Lient, Col, V. & i 
Bn^. G^ TsoxAS L. Caset. 

t^lv* • '^ Emmvil r. Ht. A. 
Tkren^ C«<L O. M. FVtf. Corps uT EnguiiM.'r&, Dit isioQ Engiiv 

U. S- EMiiSEER Office, 
Dttroit^ Xotcmbfr I/, ISf 
E^siwttully hir^ani*""!. 

As a n jvit of prvlimiiiary t>xaniiD:ition the«' jiapers seeui to in 
K (■\!i:iu>tiv<'. I luivf (lersi iu;\lly exsuuiiieil tlw river, as nfU i 
<>';iM K> iloiif ill oii^ d;iy. iiml i-i'iiiur in the opinion of Major Lud 
tl;,i! :t i> worthy ot" innin>v<-«n'iit, 

1 ih<ivr'"i> niTnitiioiu) lUai iii,-* iirojeit ami estimate for a survey 
ciiUii! lull ion Ik' ;ii>i»rvive<l, 

O. M. I'OE. 
Vol., Cvrpg of Etiffineerv, e(r., 
Enginter Sorthwest THt'uu. 

• (tmittnl ; )>ruit(.>J lu Senate Ex. Doc. Ko. 10^ FUty-tir^t Congrau. lint Ma 
tlMKinttd. 



^^^W^» 



uur JiiCLUiie^ lu tuut uiaucii tu iiuiiinir^ uciii^ ijjt; jui^i'ot ui nm wunu. 

» the enactuieiit of the inter«tat('-eoinnierc'o law, railroad freight ratcH to 
have be«ii largely increased, forcing onr nianufacturers in sharp and, in 
stances, ruinous competition with centers situated on our lakes and navi- 
ers, compelling some to remove their ])lantH to cities where water commu- 
rith Lake Michigan was had, and some to change their line of manufacture. 
»trie8, having their attention called to our city through its well-earned rep- 
1 the wood-working lines, have passed us by, needing cheap water trans- 
, at least for their raw material, and have located at lake ports. The hard- 
ber, of which we at present use 28,000,000 feet annually, becomes each year 
cult of access by railroad and the fine oak timber lands in Manistee, Ben- 
m^ Charlevoix, and other counties in northern Michigan are rapidly invaded 
acturers from Chicago, Milwaukee, Kenosha, Racine,'CheboygaD, and other 
mring cities sitaated on the opposite shore of Lake Michigan, and we, for 
of water commanicatiou, are powerless to claim our share of this wealth so 
ded for our future prosperity. 

iobbing trade with an investment of about $4,000,000 feels the need of low- 
oBpcnrtation to meet the favored oomx>etitors of Detroit, Chicago, and Mil- 

1 more jobbing houses to meet the demand of the rapidly growing towns 
m Michigan and of the upper peninsula. Capital for investment in snch 
« is ready, provided it can get their wares from the eastern markets and 
Im countries by an all- water route. 
SiTiids is a port of entry and we import direct. 

the manufacturing and commercial interest of Grand Rapids is growing, 
anding our many difficulties, is evidenced in the fact that the combined 
f onr railroads and one small river steamer for 1889 was 1,120,823 tons as 
88,000 tons for 1888, and the year's business from dat^i at hand to date will 
I a larger amount. 

laenger traffic for 1889 over these lines shows 309,226 persons in and out. 
uee are obtained by us from the official records furnished our board by the 
ompanies. 

future of our city will depend largely on such improvement of our river as 
it lake vessels to load and discharge freight at our port. Every business 
e city is alive to that project. The counties of Ottawa and of Kent, through 
resentatives, have indorsed this scheme by suitable resolutions presented to 

Rapidly growing northern and western Michigan and the upper peninsula 
ding on Grand Rapids for a market, and their newspapers nave seconded 
§ to that effect, llie jobbing interest, with but a small increase of capital, 
ised its sales from $12,489,500 in 1887 to nearly $16,000,000 in 1889, showing 
I anything else thegrowth of such sections of our State as look to Grand 
r their supplies, l^rd-wood timber lands being cleared becomes fine farm- 
and is taken up as fast as it is put on the market. Manufactories of various 






-.\jjJift^ u. S.1 



H. D. C. VAX 1^ 



: nxnnr gBASD RAFn 

t. wttk arc 
4 hf Ifevart of i$«!{>leinbiT]l 




t ««•» »«^AiB 4^ )■ k <if lake Erir and eoverii 
■fti^kfttf«BihB. *r ^Mfe of Gnnd River, 

— ^_ |p„ ^ e,,^ HaTMi. wiM 

■ kvWr «f re&g« br iCAMJi 
WMi n^i «lM>Vi^4w ••^tavr iMiiiiMfc wt tlw streau. 

«• *M,'«ui«wa«a>i iftcnxMip m r t B M af fafatUHA aMt industry, "b 
^•MlMC^ Mc«K*tAc^ teviMMk «mA llk» aatbeto at a^ voM. 

4;Kikirit>w* >wM^ite4i|i«te<iEBBBidiaf AvMlbthinsiiktlteliail 
«» k XfiM ^ lAw > |iyir wii ■>«".. «itt a l»« hark iff less deptfa at ti 

K * is-imfwed^trpnrtinible. tddeq 




F > tite «W«« •> «kHfc «h» V^lfaw* wT tfc« stnaa and it" val 
<k*tt «frMt4 ft VwnpiiM* «f ikr «SBStBC t »— gp «« **ti 'Mi tadlitiM. 

VWlMw^ ttei, ^dllCtttC kM>«MQi MAf ATM M <BB^BtU«\L 



w- it.? 


^: 


t .■: li:; :.-c- (> ir.!rt.. ladru with 


V. h'v : 


«i 


^ sitr 


t V .-iud esitiniiiiition o< 




.'^r 


tr>t>: 


.lit. s. ..ml 


.!> to tfaeh 



t of dredging with the. facilities for wiieli work tlien exi«tiTig 
!, and at 30 cents per cubic ynrd the estimate for an 8-t<>ot 
u by dredging and wing dams was iihoiit $7j<K000. 
iofMiircliS, 1381, approftriat^d SHM^K) toward an improve- 
he river; tiiat of Aujiust 2, 1882, ?l.'i,U(M); and that of July 5, 
1,000; wliieh sums were mostly expended in deepening thfs 
chea Uy dredging; but the contract cont was excessive, rang- 
(1 to 25 cents and 30 cents per cubic yard, and the net results 
eby correspondingly reduceil. 

bv noted, as indicating the uature uf the rivi-r hed and the 
iesof maintRiuing acUedged channel, thai the materials exca- 
1 deposited near the line of the improvemeut are still in place, 
lieequent act^ of Augusts, 1&S6, and Aiigtist 11, 1888, author- 
ler exam i nations, that of 1888 fur the first time declaring the 
' of iiavigalioD called tor, viz: "a channel of navigable wi<lth 
mum depth of 10 feet.'" 

■eference to this, ailei' personal inspection of the river and 
lamination of the records, maps, etc., 1 niiide report under 
jirch 22, IHW), from which the following is taken: 

I (Ut» of riH>oril a KenerAl view «i' the Hitiiiirian ran be had frnil Riim« 
td bocoiue ut'iilKiit. 

« been on the pnrt of tlie fiiminMciiil iutcreKls of Grand Kapiila a strong 
latiiinrd ttn<ti~avoT to sociire, if niicli :i thing lie po«Hih1i>, adeiiuntp wiiter 
" lil.h I.nkn Miehi^n, mil in ilie iilwence of the meana of forming a 



itioD of what i% prai!ticnbi«, their dnuands have gone b) the fnllevl lin 
ity. Orand Bniiiils hnu n^ipareutly giuig«d her navigntioD rai|aitiimenM 
le n>e(u»un.Mit hBTowiidovelupmentnnd conuneroiul stand i i^, nud innisbHl 
ror »hoiilil be oiiulu to fulfill tbem, nsls indiouttniln Major HarwooH's nriK* 
, where rvrcrpuci' in innde to tlie dcHtre for nii'nna of niuklng Bhiproenta of 
iMh produdta direst to Kiirape without breaking Imlk. In the (-oiime of 
ort nn thix Ihrrenie more obstiii'lfs than theiniukcimite cnimcilyiif Ontnd 



merciAl HtdtisticB fur the yeikr 1R8T Btate the nil tubtr of operatives in the 
M at 11.110. the capital employed at 4>l&,21H,'10l>, and Ilia valne of the »n- 
ct at 434,IM^,800. Such iudnHtrien uHtheeeirsn not wiwly be diaeoiiTUijod, 
diflvrHiiRe in r-oet between thiI and water A«ightfl — tlic latter avenging 
balf the former- -betuknu into account, the liniiKhl viiliie of water cvtniiin- 



^tPpExriix K K — RKi'tiur OF MAJOR t.Tm.ow-. i*377 

nt lowering of the bed of tlie cliiUirifl nt liio upper limits, due 
epeiiitig, tlie d»t\im sIoim-s beiii^ le.ss IIdiii Ii^ill' au incti to (he 
1 OniDdvdIe down, uiid about two-thirds of an inch to the mile 
kod Kiipide to Graudville. 

tit prites for material in the eistiinates are believed to ha fairly 
nd contingencies of 15 per cent are included in the ttitals. The 

item, of course, is the dredging, which isestimatjiit at lUcent*<. 
case of a project of this magnitude there should be no ditfl- 
loing the work within this lignre. The Government dredging 
rbora on the east txiast, with plant of »mall capacity and mov- 
point to point, averages less than ID cent«, and in one case a 
for 60,000 cubic y^rds was made at Portage Lake for that price. 

is a questiou of handling 3 or 4 milliou yards, the priue, if 
I means and a properly etjuipped plant ai-e aviiilnble, should 
id 7 or 8 cents. 
uei-al conclusions derivable &om the data now at hand may be 

follows : 

ttpen 10-foot channel of navigable width can be coustriicted 
3um the expenditme of which wwuld be warranted by the miig 
' the coDimercial interests concerueil and the eeouomtc value 
iproved navigation. 

coustniction of a dam in the stream in order to diminish the 
tf di'edging needed to secure a 10-foot navigation will not re- 

totAl cost of the project, and the objection thereto, viz, cost 
Lion and maintenance and interference with free movement of 
nd flow of water, as well as jmssible claims for land damageti, 
ODUterbalaiiced by any economic advautjiges. 

re«lnced cost of the 8-foot open channel is not sufficient to 
) restriction in navigation facilities. 

> probable that at some points permanent works in the bed of 
m may hereaft-er be found advisable to regulate the movement 
liter, and an allowance is made in the estimates for these con- 
s. 

videnf, however, that such permanent works should not be 
il the approximate corrected regimen of the river shall have 
il>lislicd, and i)rolonged observation and expiM-ience under the 
onditions of discbarge clearly prove their necessity nnd tndi- 
sites and methods to be adopted in building them. 

estimated cost of the three comparalivc iirojects is art follows: 

open 8-foot naviKnt.ion ^iC,:t, 150 

but navi>!!itiou witli lock and dam Ii7:i, BXO 

open 10- Coot nnvij^tion Gill, 5(10 

totals in each case include a snni of ^100,000 as a preliminmy 
for wing dams, et<;. it is entirely possible tiiat nnich of this 
be found unnecessary, but it is considered proper to iutroduie 

nmend the adoption of the last project and that an appropria- 
100,000 be made for beginning tlie work. 

iticable the total sum required should be jilaced at the dispo- 
the Engineer Department, to be drawn against in annual sums 
I be needed, in or<ler that the comjiletion of the work should 
led for without snHi>ension from liuik of fnnds, and contra<'.ts 
for the full amonnt of work to be done By this means costly 
dUld be avoided, and advantage could be taken to procure the 
nf « thoroughly equipped and elfectivo plant, under couditious 
economic aafl engineering results. 



J? dlipPEXDlX K K — ^R?U>ORT OF MAJOR LUDLOW. 2379 

|nm timm, tbe resnltn of which illfforcd Ronio-what. Before bepjinning th« 
heileforo, an adjii8te4l or uioMt ]>r<>b.'iblc value for the elcvatiouH of the 
iw detormiiied, niul thijse luoHt i>robabU> rb«v:i { ions iirtod. 
intti plane of reference in the surveys of 1^^84 niicl 1889 is 100 feet below the 
irtttrr table of Rindge, Bertsi-h & Co/s store, comer of Pearl nud Caiiipnii 
Itfliiid Rapids, the point taken bein^^ on the Pearl street side, 1 foot and 
him the Campau street side.'' All elevations iu tlie ])reHent survey have 
ipved to the same datum. The datum plane of relereuce for the city of Grand 
\ 70.08 feet higher than the above datum. 

n.— BORINGS. 

ingat the Fnlton Street Bridge, in Grand Rapids, borings were made in the '! 

I for about 32 miles. For the remaining 7 miles, to the mouth at Grand 

Dore than a 10-foot channel already exists, and no borings were necessary 

»rt of the river. Ninety-two borings *were made in all, decreasing in fre- '. 

io^vm TiTer. For the first 6 miles the average number of borings pi^r mile is 

the next 9 miles the average is three, and for the remaining 17 miles the 

is two per mile. 

»ring8 were made from a flatboat or raft 20 feet long by 10 feet wide and ' 

inches deep. The boat was provided with spuds at the comers for •' ^ 

g it and keeping it steady while at work. A well hole about 8 inches 
ras made in the middle of the boat for working the tools through. '^t 

ections, from 3 to 5 feet in length, of extra heavy 2-inch (internal diameter) 
»ing with strong couplings were procured. A strong steel annular shoe, 
larserin external diameter than the pipe and formed with a cutting edge, 
wed to the lower end of the lower section. On the upper end of the upper 
iraa screwed a strong steel driving-head. To make a t>oring the pipe was 
ertically through the well-hole in the boat and driven by sledges handled 
Aborers. The blows were transmitted to the steel head through a wooden 
mnd with iron rings and held in place. As the pipe descended nnder the 
r the blows, it was turned around by a pipe-wrencn. When occasion re- 
le head was unscrewed, another len|;th of pipe introduced, the head screwed 
p of the new length, and the driving continued. To withdraw the pipe a 
IT as placed on the boat with its top vertically over the well-hole. Power 
"ted through a windlass with ordinary wagon wheels attache<l for applying 
srer, and a 3-sheaved block and tackle for further multi]dying the hand force. 
this arrangement no serious difficulty was experienced in withdrawing the 
ipe. In most cases it was possible to drive the pipe to the desired depth 

withdrawing it in the process, but iu liurd material iu order to reach tho 
I depth it was Konictimes lound necessary after driving the pipe to refusal 
Iraw it, ivmove the material collected within the ]upe, replace it, drive 
id so on. Soinetinies the rer|uire<l dei>tli was reached liy introducing within 
ph pipe a smaller pipe with a drill attached, and the hole continued by 
Z the latter. A large number of specinn'iis of* material brought up in the 
ipe were preserved lor record. 

f*pths of the borings varj from 13 to ir» teet below water surface at tlu^ time 
re made, which was at a low stage of the river. As those iu tln^ upper part 
ver have a depth of lofm't, it will be seen that the borings give a knowledge 
iat4*ria1 underlying the river bed for about 10 feet below tlie wat<T level of 
chignn. At the time of making the borings their locations were determined 
urements to stakes on the shore or by ranges. A stake was also set with its 
Hit above water surface. Afterwards the locaticm and elevation of these 
rere deterniined by the statiia with ret'erence to jioiuts of the survey. The 
of the ]»orings, and the elevation of their hases, or ot" the ditlerent strata of 
I founxl, thus become known. 

im Shell Bar, :*> miles below Grand Rapids, very hard material was found at 
>elow water surface, and at 12 feet, or at an elevation of 5*>.(;, plaster rock 
ick. This rock does not extend for more than 1,(MH) feet in the direction of 
r, and as it is almost whcdly below any conteuiplat«'d dredging, and is a 
k, it is hardly worth noting. At no other ])lace Avas rock found. In the 
miles gravel and clay ]>redominate and below this sand. 

nt boring was made August 26, and the last on .September 23. For want of 
boat, the most of the borings in the upper reach were made near the shore, 
o place was especial pains taken to make the borings in the deepest water. 
teved that this does liot detract from the rel.'ability of the infornuitiou ob- 
roir them, as it is not likely that the <'liaracter of tllt^ material wcnihl change 
eet or BO either side of the channel. These borings have been plotted on 
i of the snrvey and a sectional representation of them has been prepared, 
ilch fnll information of the material met with in the be<l of the river may 
ned at a glance. 




1 rjKi^i'»i''V 



e^ENDIX K, K — KKPORT OF MAJOH I.UDI.OW. 
Jtecwrd of Ihe boringi — Cuutiuueii. 



ElevH- 




wuUir 


D«li.. 


Ak 




ae.a 


itepujs 


M.3 


iluvt' ^^ 


... 


Sei.1,1* 


... 


S-pl.i9 


Ot.g 


8..PI.U 


00.3 


8>1)V1V 


W.0 


il.pt. u 


W.0 


Sepl-M 


«D.O 


a.pt.i» 


n.Ts 


S«iil. 10 



!! t! 



71. 7M I ISS (L fiwn right 

7%(I18 lU n. Run ten 
hank. 

H.43a 124 ft. frgn loA 
bM>k. 

T5, >7I S«ar nldiibruuiel. 
n,H8 KiwIcAhiiDk. 



r ten 



ai.im KtsriuntM 



M.<ae Looted Ten. & 



sB.en IM ft. : 



Selit.ai Bl.lM N«iu-,uu[i-rbriilco 
plw Hi LuuimE. 

Si<]>t. 21 111,610 . Its n. Amn left 
S«|>L l!l K,3(» , «) 11. ftom riifiit 
Oi'pt. 21 I 07,(163 I LoruW iiKU- lulil- 



I 1110,31(1 I UO n. Tmtu rlslit 

I ira,TM : iw it. fRHn un 



tod, Add gruvrl ud 



■ 88. 6 ' Sppt. 22 ■ 



the soondings of this aectiou directly ii)»Mtream from the correspoudiiig 
lower section. 

ity of that portion of the stream lying between any two soundings on 
BCtionand tne corresponding two on th<* npper section was determined by 
Before dropping in a float it was so weii^hted as to ])ass down through 
I section with its lower end close to the river bed. The place for droj)- 
fltots was determined by stretching the wire across the river about 20 
file npper sounded section so a*» to bring the tags directly above the mid- 
aos determined by the corresponding down and up stream soundings. The 
tlien dropped at these tags from a small boat. The time at which each 
d the upper and lower sounded sections was taken to the nearest second. 
me observations the mean »rea and velocity per second of each 10- foot 
the river was determined, which multiplied together gave the discharge 
itlon. and the sum of these the total discbarge. The total discharge di- 
16 total area gives the mean velocity. From the care taken to have the 
li near the bottom, and from other considerations^ it has been thought 
J to wake an^ correction or deduction from the discharge as computetl 
Meired quantities. A temporary gauge for reference during the sounding 
bsonrationa was set and afterward referred to a permanent bench. 
et of setting the four posts on the bank was to preserve the exact loca- 
I ganged section in the hope that rises in the river would occur during 
It of the survey and enable new gaugings to be made at the same place 
I river stages/ for the purpose of comparison and more accurate detcr- 
i relative velocities and discharges due to different depths. 
) level and tape the form of the sounded sections from the water's edge to 
t the top of the bank was determined, so that a complete section of the 
een the tops of banks could be plotted, and the area and wetted perimeter 
^th could be computed. With this data such a section of the river bed 
stween tiie sounaed sections has been prepared at v^Msh of the places of 
ti. 

e of the river remained almost stationary during the survey, and no op- 
offered for further gauging. The slopes, velocity, and discharges, as 
iO aiccompanying table for other stages than that of the observation, must 
« taken as near approximations only. The result of gauging near Grand 
en in the first line of the table. 

oomparison of the conditions of Grand River with similar conditions in 
ra wnere gaugings have been made, we are led to select for the coefiicient 
as in Kutter's formula a value of 0.026. Substituting this value, the ob- 
an velocity and the hydraulic mean radius in that Ibrmula, and solving, 
10095 as the value of the slope. From the observed low water of 1889, the 
water surface in the 9,880 feet next above Grand\ille is 0.33 feet, giving a 
e of 0.0000334. Considering the fact that the wat^er surface at the time 



-■Ji" 



>)•* V'l* 



L.>M> l:i.l-.Ur ..K THK . UJKK OF KXGI.VKKKti, V. S. ABM 
.l..r.vcd fron, K„:...r-. .•..-..;... -hiobl. .t«^•„l',;tlihS.^:„'S 



M..., . ..1, ^ • . >I, .45. 

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?->^ APPENDIX K K — REPORT OF MA.TOR LUDLOW. 



2387 



PROFILE. 



jr ' 



sJr: 



Ij^ of the river from Grand RapidH to Grand Haven has been prepared alio w- 
lir-water anrface of November, 1889, wbich is nearly as low as that of 1891, 
I of the water at the time the son tidings were taken, the probable water 
^mch 1 foot riso on the Grand Rapids gange from a 75 to an 83 foot stage, 
D imd depth of borings, and a mean profile of the river bed averaged for 
lOOIeet. 

•Ions which this profile is made is shown on the maps, and« approximating 
It chanueli is the line along whigh it is thought the proposed improve- 
be made. A reduced profile of the entire river has also been made, 
the bottom of proposed dredging are also shown on these profileti. 

tiAUGK HEABINGg. 



I'veadiugB were taken at four places on the river from December 22. 1890, to 
]3» 1881, namely, at Grand Rapids, Grandville, Lamont. and Grand Haven, 
have been plotted on profile paper for convenience of comparison. 

amdprofilea of Grand Rirer, below Grand Bapid$, tubmittcd kereunih.* 

fr., 1^ A map of upper 12 miles of river. 
V 9. A map of miadle 12 miles of river. 
'''Mm A tracing of lower 15 miles of river. 

4* A tracing of reduced map and profile of river. 
^6. A profile of river. 
' C G«n^ reading. 
7. Sectiona of borings. 

^wing table shows the low- water (1889) slopes, total fall, and fall in inches 

of different ]M>rtions of the river. It wiU be seen from it that the fall from 

pida to Grandville, a distance of 6 miles, is 2.85 feet, or 5.73 inches per mile; 

Gnuidville to Lamont, a distance of 11.5 miles, it is 2.92 feet, or 3.05 inches 

,f and that from Lamont to Grand Haven, a distance of 21.f»4 miles, the fall 

loot, or 0.24 inch iter mile ; also that from Grand Haven to the month of 

a distance of 27.26 miles, the fall is only 1.04 feet, or 0.46 inch per 

_ 5.16 feet fall in the upper 12 miles. Any contemplated improvement 

ffore be principally concerned with these upper 12 miles. 

lAfw water {1889) ttJopes and total fall. 



Place. 



• Canal 
2_ 

5'.'.'. 

t. ...... 

5 




I s^ 



8 

9 

n 

12 

13 

U 

T 

1» 



.1 



u 

in 

IT 

VI 

I Hftvirn 



h 

OtB.U.19 



ha 



kll.lC.J. 



4, :;-jo 

13,442' 
16.956 
21, «i24 
31, r>U4 

:s2.fm 

3«,45y 

4:1. 7.ir» 
46. Hir> 
5<». •J9:» 

62, 57U 

77, XM 

&4.961. 

t^. 165 

92. 2:*5 

07, 3W, 

105. 105: 

110. 382' 

ll«.297i 

]26.0i^i! 

206,500 



74.47 
74. <« 
7;j.(U 
72. 42 
72.30 
71. y-'i 
71. W 
71.57 
71.01 
70.14 
70.04 
tW. 95 
09.70 
GO. 31 
Cy. IX 
OU. <M) 
Uri.K4 
W. 70 
68. 5J* 
6*1.50 
68.44; 
68.36 
6S.34 
68.27 



206, 50» 
02, 'StT*' 

02. 2:»r. 

02.570 
31,501 



■ 68.27; 
6K.70 
CH. 70 
60.31 
71.62- 



B. 3f . 

K.M.4 

H. M. 6 •••*. 

11. M.8 

B. M.t» 

15. M. 11 

B. M. 1.J 

B. M. 14 

B. M. T 

B.M.J 

B. M. 15 

B. M. [ 

B. M. S 

B.M.iI 

B. M. III......... 

B.M.iy 

B.M.VI 

B.M. VII 

B. M. lU Lamont 

(B.M.J.). 
Sand Crrok 

B. M.K.lH-uii<lvil]c; 
-..do j 

Foot of (iuTl<M>H I 

CHiiaL 



I 



4, 

ff, 

13. 

16. 

''1 
••*-t 

31. 

32. 

38, 

43, 

4<i. 

5.». 

55, 

6" 

i I. 

84. 

8-. 

Jrj. 

I»7. 
105. 
11". 
119. 

rjf.. 

13,5. 
92, 



2«>» 
442 
954) 
624 

5<»4 
«95 
45^^' 
«3o 
Hi5 
295 

570 
.530 
961 
HV. 

2:;5 
105 

3;*-_' 
297 

IH t 

3m5 
235 



72. 
71. 
71. 
71. 
71. 
70. 
70. 



39 
05 
62 
57 
ul 
14 



09. 95 
0'.». 7«» 
«;9. 31 
69. 18 
6!l. (Ml 
<iK K4 
OH. 70 
«•»><. .58 
i\>K. 5<i 
tW. 44' 
♦W. 30 
6i!».:j4 
6><. 29 
C8.7«» 



Differ- 
ence; of 

diH 
tance. 



4, 320 

3. 94" 
5. 1-2 
3,514 
4,668 

y.8>o 

1. 191 
5.7»W 

5, 2»<2 
3, 070 
3. 41N» 
5.341 

6, 9:m 
14,9fl<» 

7, 4:11 
3.204 

4. o7«» 
5. 151 
7.719 

5. 277 
8,915 
t>. 783 
9, 225 

114.205 



c s 



r « 



9!oi)C. 






.38 

.45 

1.22 

.».; 

.44 

• t 
• «> * 

.05 
..'»6 
.h7 
.10 
.«K» 
. 25 
..-{9 
.13 
.18 
.16 
.14 
.12 
.08 
.«»<} 
.08 
.<»2 
.05 
.43 



02. 57'> 60.31, 

02. .570 69. 31 

31.5»4 71.fi2| 

31,5j4 7i.02 

74.47 



143.9:m» 1.0* 
29, 065; . 39 
6<»,731| 2.92 
31,(»66| 2.31 
31,504 2. <» 



.000«»>!77 
.•^•1142 
. ouo2:{5 
.(N|.y><>85 

. i>^hHf94 

. CHI 0:^:1 
. •»OiN'42 
.0-N.iir97 

. <MK.'K47 
, 0iMii):{25 
. »M>.Mr_»6 
. 0<)'>O468 
. 0O«Mj5fr2 
, 0<iO«Ki87 
. 0(H»ii242 
.iMKi(>499 
. (HXM»:{44 
. O^XKf:::^ 
. iNM»oU)36 
.0<iiH>n:i7 

.04.NH>U819 

.0i>O0«i2*i5 
. 00000542 
.0O*M/«»:{703 

.0<»(»»»u7225 ' 
.00<KU3147 
. OOOI>480808 
. (MMH/743.58 
. 000<J004047 



I 



Jnx. 
5.56 
7.24 

14.89 
.54 
5. OtI 
2.<l9 
2. 66 
6.15 

10.44 
2.«Mi 
1.65 
2. 97 
3.5H 
.55 



1.53 

3.16 

2. 17 

1.48 

.f56 

.72 

.52 

.10 

.:m 

.24 



.46 

.83 
3.05 
4.71 
5.73 



•Not printed. 



-■Kjf 



23SS UKPUKT ... THK CHIEF OF KXfilXKKRS. I. s. .Ufflt. 
i;..r 111.- i.iirpoM.r,rsh..w;nK the ivlatio,. U^tTrefn .iCiintitv of diKkirail 



r-r 



/ 1.1 

/ n ; V • 



111 whii li a-41.d6. ; .- l.,sii:{J. au.! w^O.iHrigOTo 
r 111. an y..liicity. i-ih.- iiv.lraiilio mean radius 
• -Mil.. .>t sl..,M. »ii.l ii=.o,mM.-,iT Of rou-hm-ss of pcrimrt^r 
111 til.- taUlf f# IS l:ik»ii .i»2tJ «»= i I I inmrit^r. 

r-'«'i.m'.'" 'b:."..;'''''" '"" "" '''=*°"''' '• "■""""'^J »" ^'^ .ra...zuidal. 
O-aii;;!.. of iniliuatioii of tMe* to the hor'/.m 

A=.ariM. " 

/* wi-tt«Ml iuTiuu'tvr. 

llt'lll'L", 



ami 



tan tan o " 



tan 



Table to ti^rtrhihi ^ihnHfioHt^ o/thfiinul ^. /., ^■:,J. 



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. :. ■■: -•.:>, 'ill-.-. •/. i.Vum ;n tiu' T:»!i'r jn .PJ i-\. , ;,: ;} .. ; ,^. .Jj, 

. .' '.i"*I :':ill.' « .l"*r-* ./ '» J iM -Sixrl .,1^1" .it lilt- >,j|;.,. j,.",. , ;,i: ;i 

. ••' .:•.'>. xvliii h is l.-X> titl ;il'..»^ I- :hi- ^•\v.^\,^tl i ^m^, . 

\ V--:;:'.!::!:: ; .iH'..n':w"i _ L!.2l7«.^ JMi-ins ]i-i !:!:!.. nlji.-li i^•h 

^ . . • iir .r'.y J i:i.l'«» ;(:»"\i" (ir;iiniviili-. a »«-J<«ot rh.i:r-t! v.' 

. .'. ". ■.•.i^t .1 ^'.-i- oi 1'.;^ i»f! : ii" thi- ili^pih l«i- ;ii. r. li-* : i" 

. -^ . V. • ; *. r"., \\'.,;:li oM t]i'' ■•Nt'Mii i^ ii «i'.i« I l :■» 7> !r-t : in 

.:•'»•: ;;m4 ^\ ;.I' . > \'^ it-:. A::>»iti. ri»; i . .'" 

• . . : . r :■:•• I-uv,-: "J'.L'-i !:i '.• ■i. .ii;-: -,• "^^ v : iii.; ■: . 



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' • i *> : • ■:: '.^ri n i. h wn; " . 



x «« '^.'^- ■■■:' T- i:;.iv :■• ■•vi- •■.. V-. ^> .:^ 1!vtj:,iv5 
. ^ ..; "i: ■->. I:. .'::•:»-. I!.- ;... .:■.^^•.■. -r^.x 

.y ■ v.: . U ;s --.i.^.- ;;cil oil liiv. :j.i. ?. All- l 



-BKKiliT OF MAJOR L>IDLOW. 



2389 



\s np tbe left rliauuH to 
fihniincl. iinil tUi-ni'- tip thv luiil'lic k'tiuiinvl to the iimiii river cliaiiiit'1. 
ot this midiUe obuunol in nTiuiit 4,400 fpct. It already fans n miiximiim 
ire thui 10 feet thrimglioiit itu whole len^b, iinil a meaa ileiith of 10 trvt 
in -nidth iu the lower ^,700 feet, ami a mean depth of H feet for the Hituie 
)e upper 1,700 feet. The npper end ofthU channel should be widuaed 
tenecl. The eipenBa would beBuialland in fully covurt-d by theMtimutee. 
ig the iiiiddli< cbaDDel the line followa approxiuiiitdl,^ tbe BUHtiDi^ onv. 
kwa Boom" ba« been reinoved, sud all loe^iog inter^ta in tbe river aro 
nd. With tbe exception of tbe few hnaured feet at the head of the luid- 
1 mentioned above, a more than 10-foot chanoel already exists for B^ 
I Gland HavBD. Above this point ax far u!t the mouth of Baea Uiver, or 
Cher, a 7 to 8 toot channel eiiHt^. 
bat excepting at the tihoaliiigs an 
nel exiita to Urand U.ipids : 

tttmatt of lAe loooCion of ihoaliitgt and bain leilh ie«» than 4 /tri of iralw. 





Dutucu brinw 
























Gciuid UtpUb.. 


L*ne.h. 


««,ll,g. 


Loeatiun. 




B-eiMing. 


Enrt. 






nw. 




Fm. 


Fetl. 


























<sa 


3. a 




































18.500 




'■** 






mgn 


































aooD 


35(1 














































































































































































lUloo 


UA,4aO 






jDxtMawKwtKUKIvllU'. 






XT, 130 













•nd Haven to Grand villc, ab 
lannel ia O.OO00O7, or 0.1t.t.' 
B liver In the lower 27^ m 
ken at O.OOOOIl, or 0.6%w; 
r, aa obtained at tbe Kntigiii 
I wide on the Irattom uud i>i 
m tbe bottom ond aide h1< 
leterminod by tbe boriiiga. 



11 requirr; tbe removal of 
will cost 9400,000. 
redged channel wonld ton 
«pida abont 4.ti ftet at low 



>oat 33 mileR, tho slope aasnmed for a 10-foot 
J inch per milf, or about tbe meuu existing 
ilea. From (irandville to Grand Rapids t]i» 
inch per mile. For the low-water discharge 
i: above OrandvUle, tbe former gives a chau- 
le slopes of 3 to 1 and the latter a channel 90 
ipes of 2 to 1. From the natnre of the ma- 
lt is thoagbt that Ihene aide slopes will iu 
90 and 100 foot width of bottom and corrc- 
. »r« thought to be HUlticient. To dredge this 
,000,000 cubic yarils, which at 10 conts per 



ipidij a basin large enniinh to accommodate boats in passing and turn- 
lined bv the excavatioa of about 70,000 cubic yards of material, which 
cubic yanl would cost ?14,000. 
■'th lock and dam a similar baein can be obtained by the excavation 



ErPKimiX KK — HEi'OItT OF MA.IOR LIHU.OW. 2391 

mibit propntcd dam nsliinntol for is formed <i( twn ron-s of piles nnit 

■feant foitr (•.•••I a|iikrt, bi'tiri'eii which the eartli in oxcuvnterl anil thn 

n iritli (wnorete. Bfliiw th« coretwo rowsof pilCH are pl.ii-ml, nnu at tjio 

lownstiv.iiiislopeurthoDver (hll nail tlu-oChornt the lowor edga of the 

nreon the pilsa of this lower row aad a similar row nbuve the cora wall 1 

Ja driveu. Ji:stimat4H are mnde for gravt'l imd stotio liUiiig with a biuI>- 

1^ planking and rock filling below the apron. 

■ Eatinutied rout o/ daHi. • 


H 


UbII. 


pri«. 


QmnlHy. 


Com. 


Total. 

•'■■S:S 


r 




4. on 

i'.7a 

■.'(Ml 


w!«uo 

i;i13 

m 


"■!S:S 

:1,1m. to 
1. son! 00 

iffi:l!S 

1.9W.IKI 








ii iLM 






toMaiii..u -::;:. :.::::::/ ,.".10' *"!..i! 

below rtaai ..- .lu 


KM.M 






1 








i&t aimilar dam, bnt with only one irentral row of nilea nnd nhetit piling, 
t the concrete cort, will coet J15,aW. 

IKTIHATK yOR 8-FOOT CIIANKRL BY ORKIlOlKr,. 

B are made for an 8-foot channel by dredK'"K' From Orand Haven tn 
of Sand Creek (27.26 wilea) the slopo taken is .1100007 (0.H352 iuoliw ywr 
ve to Grandville (5.68 niileaj it is .000019 (1.203tM inches per mile), Ow 
BlattLebuseaDdsidealopesof 3 to 1 is the section Hasnmed for tbeabot-o 
From Grandville to Grand Kapidi the Btopo is .(NJOOaO \,\.UTa» inches per 
the «ectiun hsa n 90-foo( !>»«', with »id.> r,\t,\wf of 2 lo 1. Tlie snr- 



»i]d B:ipiil8 wonld 1) 
abic yards of utatrrial wuulil bi? rtijuireil, L'u.stin^;, ut tQ cuuta per j'ard, 
k winding basin at the upper end would coat #ti,000. 









Dining the inclination and the dimension of the section of a channel that 
,rce tho low-water flow of the river, the nsKiiiiiption of coiirHe is thnt the 
ttit; of wat«r discharges through that sei-tinii. A dredged cliaiinel of the 
ize selected would not be more than 130 to IGO leet wide at the surface, 
I width of the river varies from about 350 to about 600 feet at low water. 
berefore to coiitioe the dow to a snfflcieutty narrow channel and at the 
to prevent tba dredged material from finding its way back into it, wing 
aining dikes, or both, may be rciiiiired at various places to mainl-ain n 
reqnisile deptli. Such works woiilil eupccially be needed at crossings and 
ide and straight portions of river where shcmling occurs. In the whole 
he river there ure about twenty crossings. Tlie liiwer sevon of these, being 
' 2 to 3 feet of dredging will be reqnired to uiieu a 10-foot channel and iii 
ae river where there is little current even at High water, will probably re. 
irticnlar works, aa it will be less espeusive and more watisfactory to ro- 
ndjpng from time to time any ^•light sboaliiig that may occur at these 

I the upper 5 miles of river, where five crossiugsaccur and where the pro.ject 

1 10-foot clianiiel contemplates the lowering of the bed of the stream at 

from 1! to 4 feet, and where, t^io, the material to lie dredged is com- 

riyof clay, coarse gravel, cobble-stone, and liowldeis, it is tbongbt that a 

MMition of the dre^inss, supplemented by the eucouraeeroent of a willow 

fiowtli on the dred|ce damps and portions of the river lied which fur low 

b« ant of water, may secure a practically ]>ermunent channel without tho 

una or dikes. At and in the vicinity of the remaining eight cmssinga, 

tributed over a distance of about 1.8 miles of river and where the 

large fraction of this distance is largely sand, works more or less 



H 



>^E^'UIX K K KEi'OKT Ol' UAJOU J-IULOW. 



rf llip chuniiel wi'llh, nii<l (hat ennif gf them n re from 3 
W«e low wiitpr. anil liave .yoiiof; irilliiivs jjriin-in(; iiiion thciu. "liimgjv 
llll' a paminntMit obttuuel wbc^n iiuvu lumiFtLcUin lie uiafitUiillttil with biukII 



^wmol 



_^ n of toiinilinca talcen io 1884 previoiiH to ilrcil^'ii);. Hud acain in IS8E>, 
i Mfler dreiljipDK had been itone, indicntc that, cxcfcpt at croBfin^, the B11- 
he t-jcrKvuIed uhniinel ban uut 1>(^eD ^ea* 
mated (irstCDiitofiiujirove 
of the open chanDel, the 
i ooet of maintaining and operating it. make the open channel preferable 
more emtnouiical. There is also ttw loUowin^ cuDsiileration In favor of the 
ot channel: The lowering of the river bed 4,E feet at Granil Enpicts, an 
lonteni pi Ht««, would make a water power there which miKht be utiliited in in- 
healresd J lar;;e mannfaotuiiiij; iiitcresti of tbnt city. Takiii); tlie miuimiiiu 
' rluchiar;;^ of the river, viz, ISO uuUii^ feet ppr iteoond~61,153 poniidn prr 
a *-5 feet hoad, vre have » tlieoretirjvl hor-e power =?iJ^?5^-''^5O0.3, 
th an effieienry of W) pi>r t»ot. siveM 400.1! as the actnal hone power at- 

f 5 ponndH of coal to the horse powrr per hour, if thin power be ii>>n1 24 
>7 for three hundred and tpu iliiva in tlie v^iir, the iinantitf of coal tJi give 
power will be 7,440 tons, wurtli, at »2.2ft per ton, (16,740, yearly. If the 
jiied only 10 hDiirs a day for 310 days in the jeur, it will be eniiival^nt to 
of eoal, worth i&,S76 yearly. I''or a large part of the year the available 
nld be I'ODaidoTubly larger, bnt even this auiouiit, if capitalized at 5 per 
ldjii«tify theexpiui(liturenfr334,800. or $l3H,r>00for the open cbiinnel in 
Che coHt of a channel with look and dam. 

owing gentlemen aasiBtod in the Sel'I work : F.. C. Dunbar, asHtstant engi- 
jert L. Sackett, E. L. Allor, F. A. Sajjer, H, Baldwin; and H. B. Beeclier. 
roddard, aeei»tiiut engineer, and R. Stiurle aaniated in part of the ofllce 

y reepectfnlly, your obedient servant, 



Slatemeat of the jobbing biiiitteiii of Grnnii floprrfj/or 1891. 



1 


en-XwI. 


Amnunl of 


l.l=X*-. 


mrtrrbb.™ 1 4 


fa»,<H» 
15.), 11011 

sasiiiw 
anci.mo 


•3ZS,<HKI 

sod.oou 
27r..()uo 

\m.i>oa 
m.ow 

Wow 

350, «» 
BOO, 000 
-JB,000 

BO, OHO 
aw. 000 
iM.oon 

*J5,0UU 








pnidac. 7 


m 


^^r----"--;-;::;--- "■:;;■■;;::■ ! 




•""t ] 


ai 




23 








■23 








4.4IV!.n00 


"■•■-■" 




! 





API'tlNiiTX K K — KKfOlfT or MAJoli lAl-LOrt'. 2395 

vt o/ Iht mimii/tirturiiis ix'ln'ff'rn Oj'tiratid Kufitit* f'lr tS9t—ContUiW'i. 
C-tdtal 



not UiuiDcu 



iidftHlui 



xi.ooo 



hv l1<vP.S.Onini* Bnrran in IKKi. , 

uf'^i'liiiMi. Iral whivh arrln^Hl In Lheir i 



APPENDIX LL. 



rEBENT OF CERTAIN HIVEIJS AND HABBOBS IN EA8TEBN MICHI- 



T OF COLONEL 0. M. POf, fOBPS Of KyoHTEERS, OFFICES IN 
IGt:, FOR THE FISCAL FEAH KNOING JUNE SO, ISSt, WITH OTHSB 
7MENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 

IMPBOVllMEMTS. 



Uarjit Rirer, Micbiuiin. 
rating! and rare dT Si. MurynFalla 
anal. MioliiEan. 

*t.rk at i*t. Marys Falln Canal, 
licliinan. 

■ J.Bk- fb:uii.el, St. Miirvs River, 
IkhiKaii, 

bur nt Cheliuygiiu, Mii-liiKuii. 
linr at Thiiniler May. Micbigau. 
iltder Way River, Miibigan. 
'Iior ikt Au Hable, Michigan. 
iuaiT River, Mirltifcaii. 
-bunirrisfiicoatSaiidBeaeL, Luke 
[uiou, Mi.Lisan. 



11. Black BiTBT At Fort Horon, Hiohi- 

P">- 

12. Hunth of Blaok River, Michigmn. 

13. St. Clair Flatx Caoal. Michigan. 

14. Operaliiig and cure of St. Cliiir Flats 

Canal, Michigan. 
1.1. Clinton River, Michigan. 
16. liroMitc I'oiiite Chxnnel, Hichigau. 
IT. Koiige River, Michigan. 

18. llctniit River, MictiiKun. 

19. Removing Miinken vi-hhoU or craft ob- 

ntnicting or eDdaogering uaviga- 



Unitkd States Engineer Office, 

Betrint, Mich., July 16, 1893. 
[KBAL: I Iiave th(! honor to tiau«niit herewith the animal Ft5>»i-tfl 
ig to the works of river aud harbor improvetaents under my 
i, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 189li. 



Colonel. C'orpx of Engineers, 

BrtBrig. Gen., U. 8. A. 
: Geii. Thomas L. Casey, 

Chief of Engineers, U. 8. A. 




of 16 (kvx dqilhl 

and that tb« work oTfl 
EM ■Bdolaben, with tli* 

tznctioD «f a nflw 

I l^irtb of «00 

L « drpth i.f I'l fert OS 

p 18 Icet. Th« iiiiinl is d 

1 wf Ihi.* ciilargeanilll 

i tt irbk-h twc pace " 

««tf Ae ~ >< W Enpnt^T* for l**? 

mwlrf »i.JSMM Iwl twi-n iippn 

r aci «f Sepmalwr I'l. 

wli— wi. U<- Impi" 

rt( wis sad UVtr tur lUu mi 

K «« M(r fart *^the sAbk. to tie pniil for mt 

■ «Ma iwCag W»«<e by Uw;~ ai»d tbeaRiulryi^ 

Wnmiiutitiif; (lie iiBpTf^ 

I. IRrj. Tlif tftlai am" 

I, with luititoritiytoi 



WiKSS Fids Owal a^ tt* 

t a* Mi»v9^ via: TImT <«Av 



to iIm- hnppivi'inent r>r 
Oa JoHr 30; 1891, It* m 

I s«nwan<)inf the Bit<? of I 
tbr rXrat'^ktitDi of The loot Jtit^ 



SWUmX l«r% «a» ia eowl nxMlilMa 

bcva nu-hrd fcc4»« £t:kilr. exwpl a . . . 

and (be cvatrM-ti-rs «n« m^fml in rmnnng a ron^'lerable amom 
tif biv^e mnJ btvkro ^tunv b«4u'r cr^r; anil « nm^dera1>U' itiUOOoC*! 
Allium Vrt resuunnl iw he done Whiad Fort Rndy Pivr. A 

'nieoMiirAci<.>r$6ir ihema^Hin- of the ktek wnlls luitt a vonsiittrw^ 
purTiua of ibvir pU&t is ivatlinv^a? for us*^: had be^^un quairyio); fvj 
KtuDf ai K«liy IsLtud. Idke Erie, aad barking .■itunc at Drncimw 
I->Iuti<I. Micbi^jD: wvt* rev-eiving cenwm ami bad be^ou Uyiujr '"•! 
.;■;■ :i^ r'j' I-Kk itjuuilitlioti?, bat nu e^^timuti- bad jet bi-i-ii iiiatlcW 
pajnuriit irierefiir. 

Til*; fi>ll'i«-iiig oniract* weiv iu I'mx-f diiriiig tbe year, viz: 



H.D.ErtwmliiCo 

liriEhi-. |[ru4. iL Baogg " 



floifdJaiiiiarj-.l' 



Cl>-9f<l Ua;. ISaZ. 



APPENDIX L L — KEPOHt OF COLONEL POE. 239!) 

3 HADE DUBING THE PISOAL YBAK ENDING JUNE 30,1892. 

the Collins & Farwell contract but little was doDe. The con- 
ti)pi)ed the work nf excavation on July H, 1801, and made uu 
ilher to make g(«td with coniu'et« the excessive excavation, or 
te the filling behind Fort Brady, both of which were required 
rma of their contract. 

the contract of Hughe» BrotlieiH >!^ Bungs work on the ma- 
the lock wallB liae been pushed w itii vipur. They have a fine 
me at the camvl and at the Drumiuond Island (juarriei:). A 
ID of it is given in detail iti tlie apt>endcd report of AssiHtaut 

E. S. Wheeler. Although tbit inlbvmatiou ia not at hand for 
ration of a similar description of tlioir plant at the Kelly's 
larries, yet I know, from jMjrsoiial in8|)et;tioii, that it is qnite 
g with the rest of it. 

tlie decal year the follovriug quantities represent the work 

il Cable yirili, 

pit - .1, 1«I 

np well 2,fi03 

I - 5,7W 

inrbitionB of look walls . 7, 970 

<D liockiug anil rtiok &c(i of exrnvittiini '2ii 

if pnmii well • .- 361 

, - 8,478 

Bid 3,242 

Dfiolaid - - 7.305 

[jacking Stone laid th<> i-oiitractors furnished C,5!)i cubic yards 
■oveniinont fnniisUed 714 cubic yards, the latter being stone 
in the walls of the old State locks (of 18.~k>). 

id BtODi) in '■ tliu roUKli "— l*i«'*«. 

jd Julv. Anjciist, SBpteiLibut, iiml Ootuber, IWH J, 912 

-d April, May, and-lniie, 1882 3, OS* 

: reeeii'eil during liiti'al ycjii' ■1,945 

ere carried id tbirl>y-Beven (Mirgoee. 

gest stone contained 183 cubic feet, aud weighed about 14|^ 
'ter being cut its volume was 105,26 cubic feet and the weight 
;ed to about 8J tons. 

id Ktono " cut " — 

fiscal year pieces.. 2,414 

liiig c'liliicynrdH.. 3,220J 

iiOT^ea— all love been deiiverird ut the tuuiil, tlio weight licing about 

eivcd and used— B.irr«lB. 

id 2.159 

1 19,200 

U ' 21,S58 

ditional cement house was built. 

PBE8BNT CONDITION OF THE WORK. 

am. — The pmeess of "stock. lainiiiing" tlie day wall of the 
I was continued througliont the yc:ir witligntiit coittideiice in ita 
The operation is descnbe<l in detail in t)ie appended report 
.ant Eugiueer E. S. Wlieelet. Tlie party engaged upon tlii» 



■tf'etdam, excluUiii^, however, tbu»ite i>ccu|>i*^I^QKB 
1 it is nut intendpfl to dlKtiiib at pix-seut. 




IT gauge I'fJtdiugs above and belun' the l(H':ksw(»«eiMitiiraed 

', aD(l the iiDDnal meant! tor the caleiular year 1891 a'kid 

s for the varioas monthe in the dm-aX year have been 

1 added to the water-level tables apjieitded to mj annnal 

X). lu oi'dt<r that thent- pnbliRlied tnbleM may be kept ap 

s monthly and annual iricunn are submitted bereviG^ 





HssU>. 


1 L.k« 


^y;?'. 


H^ 




AtC 1 
MtltO 1 

Jta2.Tai! 

S8Z.eiT i 
HZ.E» 








1 




! 2||-™ 





















SK.ta 



Si.S»l M».lt 



SU.,*^n 


ft 


lwi*u 


llMW 


vru 












% 






































































I.7S 


M.S-i 




)8.7U 






21.01 




HLMH 


2-M 












11 




IT.KW 




2!» 



g9 showing the water-level curves for hikes Superior ami 
le former platted from observations taki-n above tlie locks at 
from January, 1889, to date, the latter from observations 
iand Bea<^h, Mich., during same time, are also submitted.* 
meous, — The series of chaiaeteristic iiliotographs of the work 
M has i>een kept up. The iiejrativcs become the property of 
Tuneiit and are preserved with the records, 
rk is under local charge of Assistant Kiigiiieer E. S. Wheeler, 
tided by Assistant Enjrineerw Joseph Hipley and J. L. Callard, 



t92 — -131 



"Sot priuUil. 



REPO OV THii CUIKf Of ESGINKEIU*, U. «. AKMT, 

part of the work does nothing «b<e, becaiiwe the dam U so vlftal 
other operations :liat it demands uiid tx'ceives nnreinlttiu)! atti 
About 8 cubic yards of clay flrwrttiiiincdinhithp dam each worbiq 
The dam is now as tiglit as it ever was, and the !e»ika^ through 
nipdiat«ly under it is reinaikably Bmall. 

i'umpinff plant. — The water xliich is now piimiHMl from thp l£ 
onmeB almost entirely through seants in the rork. and from that t 
jn the ojH'ratious connected with the constniction of the lo<i, 
pumping plant in iH>sition for the purpose of keeping tlu- Io<-k |il 
ha« not been required to operate one-fonrth of the liiiic during ili* 
year. It is not liable to get tiufc of order, and the s'l-Htest diui] 
be apprehended is from fire which might consume ihc bnilttingK i 
house all but thf x iiicli piston pump. For greater pn-cnution thi 
been placed in tlic immp well nf the new lock, at a distaiu-e froi 
buildings coiitaininj: tlir otlicr nnmns. 

There are four (.fim-Tit lionsir., ,..i., xfetlent condition, with ao 
ity for the storage of .s,L'UO biiriels oi cement at otie time. 

itaaonri/. — The first atone was laid in the lock September iL 
Tlie stonecutting for the first five courses is pnictionlly i-ompleteo^ 
the exeeption of the piers under the miter wall of the upper lock ; 
and the stone for the main miter wall. Work ou tlie»istbooa 
wcJI advanced. '' 

The great-er portion of the south face wall of the lock is boil 
courses high and the backing complete^] to correii^poml. In liktf 
uer the greater part of tiie opposite wall has been (-allied tbur ca 
high. Two courses in the bottom of -these walls are laid tbroa) 
nearly their whole length, but portions are notyetbackad. Tbeco 
are uniformly 2 feet high, except the lower course downstream 
the '■ drop " in tbe lock floor, wbich course is IJ feet thick. Parti 
the two lower courses of the upper guard gate miter wall have t 
laid. 

/'«»ij» well and jmmpiiiff pltiiit, — The concrete waits of the pre; 
well have been carried up to the level of the lock HiMir and the int 
thereto tmm the hwk chaiuber is completed. The preparation of 
plans for the punii>ing plant htm been intrusted to Mr. Julian Kenni 
of I'ittsburg, Pa., and he now lias them under consideration. 

Ijoek gatiis. — The designs for the lock gates are being prepared in: 
offi<«, alid are now well advanced. 

ISate anchorages. — The anchorages for the ten gates have been de 
ered at the canal. The anchor plates and the lower series of eye! 
ftu' the lower guard gates h.ive been set in phute. They arein keep 
with the massive character of the whole work. TheaiKrhorages Ua' 
total weight of about 27f> tons, costing, at the eontractpriees, ^;W,768 

Valves and vahc frames. — These are under ciuistruction in aceorda 
with a coutrac-t entered int*) March 10, is;i:i, with John P. McGuui 
Cleveland, Ohio. The contract provides tor 14 valves and 12 vi 
fninics, the estimated wei^rht of tlie wluile being nearly 136 tons, 
will cost, at the contract luice. ^iiiOjJSfi^.lli;, Hubie<:t to a stiglMi' rariat 
lioncvcr, in case any nioditicutiou.sareuiiulc duringthe processof ii 
uf'ac^tnrc. 

Valve and f/iitr eiiiiiiien. — The designs for these jire in course of pr 
I'iition in this ollici-, and the drawings arc well iidviuii-ed. 

Ih'cptiiiiKj thivunul prism. — In accordance with advcrliaetneut d: 
June 2, 1802, pmposals will be opened on July 2, ISI)2, fi)r deep*] 
the canal prism from a cross section ab()ut 27o Icct w est of the wea 




■REPOKT OF CULUNEL POE. 



euutfurdant, esdatiiny.liowovei-, tbeaitu uwmpittlby themor- 
I, whirh it is nut iutfiidcd to disturb at preauiit. 



' wvter gkoge readings above and b«lov the locks vere oontinaed 
Ute.yew, and the admial meaoB for the calendar year 1891 alid 
itUy meaBB fbr the Tarions moDtha in the fiscal year have been 
ed aid added to tiie water-level tables appended to my anniud 
!br 1890. In order.that these published tables may be kept np 
, the various monthly and animal menus are submitted bisrevith, 











Uontli. 


LakB 
Superior. 




HDTon. 




AM. 

601. m 

WI.3M 
ODl.SSH 

vui.aM 

Wl.lSS 

6oa.no 


JWt 

sga.ua 

SO. MB 


PHtt. 




























601. Ma 

<CIO.ZTT 

BOO. 439 
BOO. WO 


it a; 

fin.4TS 

SHI. 704 






=-~j^=; 





























Kivflr: 


tisp. 


^m 


is! 51S 


Fift. 

■i.xt 


2t.01 


lg.»W 


i.ett 


aiiio 
an.KO 


n'.m 
|H!oii:i 


ili 

2.» 



fings showing the water-level curves for lakes Superior iiml 
the former platted from observationK takcu above the locks at 
lal, from January, 1889, to date, the Itittor &om obaervatious 
A Sand Beach, Mich., during same time, are also submitted." 
ttlanetiun. — The series of cliuiafiteiistic phob»grapli;5 of the work 
Teas lias been kept ap. The negatives become tlie property of 
vernnient and are preserved witli tlie records, 
irork is under local charge of Assi.sf ant Engineer E. S. "Wheeler, 
ifl aided by Assistant Engineers Joseph If ijiley and J. L. Callard, 



BNe»ii— 



-161 



* Kot printeil. 



^^HHI^IHIIH 




1 ATPENDIX L L— REPOHT OF COLONEL FOB. 2403 


k Afpropriatianifor inproting St. ilaryt Eiver, ilichigo 




■h 


















i.TBO.tm 


«-*tei a^fmitr IS, 1891. 


iziaaiidaddnMof Ud.ler. 


1 
P 


i 


TotaL 


SeDuka. 


tiBM Inm Bridge u>d Uihiii. 
mStM Co., Clevuliod. Ohio. 
n^r ^™o/MXi.«ng Co., 

•oDB Bridge Co., CUicw, Dl- 

Bts Iron Co., Trenton. K, J. , , 


«,«. 


tao,«TT.M 




•A 


2t 
aft, 


at,i».M 
2a,a3a-TO 

=3,4-5.(H 


Infnnnol n lo signalure to 

lurormalaB tocciliflcafi not 
•Igned. 


•1 WbMl ind FoundTj' Co., 
!^ui£8I.LoDi>,U<) 

ss,.r°-' "" ■■■"■ 

took SBgbia Works, Df (roit. 
■dS.Poi».Detr^t.Mi(:b... 






25. 588. « 

a);fli4..«i 


81 


3i 


;8,aes.ji 




l«i 


31 


:«.345.71 


Infnrni»l.Bl-.ni™!in™tlon of 

ClBUKBlSgfelircllll'alluD. 



ITune and addraaa of liiddor. 


Strip and di». 

.fflr/„t 

n™ (pri™ 


D.-liver 
5.0IMI cubic 

,XSB. 


■„?.l^ii. 




(0.W 


»0.'47 






































M50 


M. t . ^ 







«/ Kd» for deUr:ering elayfor improving St. Margt Falh Canal, received and 
9» Kottmher SI, 1S9I, in accordance with adrertitemciil dattd October Si, 1S91. 




"'aw'**'*' '"''" '■ ~^ — ' 



1 If i-j, . '» ' '"nMni-.R'.: "■' 

■•«*wv-;,;y-v:-i;,;i:.:.''^'''*i..; 

•■■*wnv,(-j;;,;;y^.;;-j....:;;;;-- ;. 



E. 2405 -i 

a used coot inao Hill)' iloriog the !««, keeping the iMk pit diy at •]! * 

*- ~ *^~*~g uud to more thko one-funrtb its eapaoily. Three men have ^ 

-* — "- - a watch of eight honn pet dayf 486]^W)|tom of coal . £ 



HTiewB-showingthe progreaa of the workfaave been taken aach month 
IkiD progreM. Uodels of the lock of 1881 and the 800-foot lock an 
I for the Coluiubiaii Expovition. The wotxlwoTk of t h aa o mudeU is 




9 has remained without any leak of any mngnitnde during the entin 

'~B have bevn iicceHSsry eici'ept replacins two brokan waaheiB on tie 

""T the dnm was covered with bmBQ bo aa to hold the Biiow to a 

dnriug the winter, whiuh effertndly prevented Uie freextng of 

n the braah was removed in Ma; the olaj was found nnftoseu. 

STOCK BAMHISQ. 

k-nnininf; apparstuB has been Bomewbat improved and perfected alnoe 
~* « aoeompan.ving platra, Nos.l and2, ahow Itaaitianownsed. Plate 1 
otnaal work; the 3-1 neb pipe driven down to the bottom in thuclay 
.__ jon. In the figure it is represented fall of cylindrical molds of clay 
i it; the rammer la withdrawn; tbe workmen are upon the point of 
.ammerin the tube and forcing the cin; oat. 

rthoabeenmade tosbow th('fui-m thattLeclay ossumce after bcingdriven 
ttlomof (hepipc,ai]ii;eDupiirtof tlio dam, which bos ^E^«n Bturk ranmieil, 
. m examined. 
lapipeiBcompoaod of nevcral Hhort Hcrtion«, wbivh an conpled together in the 
^UMDUeiofpipecoiiplibi;; tbiapiiableB tbepipe toiraNliorti-ni'dorliugtbrnedao 
fdmorit th« fllay ut any tcqiiired di^ptb. Tlic tuanniT of making the ryiiniliTa uf 
'i»abown inakelc^b" A," Plate 2. An ordinaryuhovellias its blade cut ;iud rolled 
I a ring a little tc&stiian3 intbeit in iliamft^T and about 3 inches in length; Honu^of 
le shoveta are ahowu in tbe aketcli, Tbe workman pushes tbe abovcl into tiie 
xt'ued elay and fortes Ihu cyliudtr of rlay through the ring ; whvn the rvlindi'r is 
ntl foot long and lying on the up]ii-rpartnf the blade it is tuken olf ami plui-rit In 
iKvlbarrow and is then wheeled to tliu stock rammer and put in the tube by band, 
huwn in tbe aketrhea. 

be rammer is an iron rod 30 feet long and iihiiut-2l iurhrs in dinmeter ; almut 3 fr»( 
itbiweTeDd is enlarged to :2|iurheMiu lii]inieter,sulhatitwill worke^lyin tbe3- 

■ ]■^lv. 

■ ■■ weight whicb ptiaUeH tbe raniiner down is au onlinary pile-driver h.immer and 
. , - aliout 1,900 iMiunds; tbe derrick wbieli imiwid in an ardiiiiiry pile-driver. A 
-. j>i»-oinTau^ea at the top of thedeirick thut it is slipped under tW hum luer tiiid 

11 when it la up; this Much ia moved with liues fh)m the ground; a workiiiau 
■hf'e line-B in his hauda is atmwn in Platr 1. I'hc raiimier is uperatiil Ijy st<!:iiii; 
' I shown intbe Nmnll houae in Plate 1. Seven men are rc- 



1 lo work this nppnratna. 
. -yHtem which is being iisf.'i 
Tiipe ie lir«t pushed flown to the bottom of the dmu; about otie-third of il 



n nhich in being iw.'d thia yeur in aa follows: 



I claf in driven in tbe pipe; it ia then raised nbiiiii If) feet nnd iinntlier third 
I iu; It i^ again raised Id feet and the opemtiiui repented, making 1 yanl in 
ii>te. Tbe iipparatiis is tlicn moved forward ufeei and tlieoperiitinn repr'atcit. 

■oft KpntH am fimnil tn tbe einv iiitin-mpiiiatB bnlc!* are >oiije(ime'' ilrivi-u. 



L^ 



10 rammed during the i«ea^oti 

EXCAVATION. 



of eompletion of this coutract wa» extcnd'-d from .lime 1. IROO, to 
t 1, U91, and on account of lireak in euirerdam was aguin extended to 
MH, aad extended a third time to June 15, m)l. 



i 



•JKU; Ki:i-MKT OK THK CHI£K OF EyGiyZESS. r. i 

I... ...:: . ...i.,,l..t..,l tlio r.-.|,iir.,l .i..av..n..a. diiin ?Cr « ~r -I. 

I'lt. .Iuiii,iin;r j;r..iii„I. :„„1 the tjn i.^.k .„• y,,,^ Br^l'Tp.'^p " " '^ r- 

:r:,7;';:f r '''■""■■'• ""' •'"-'' '■•"•I'-t-t.-n. ^Js^e,/^ 

lull k «'Vr:iv:itioii Im-Ijiw j^ratli-. ' * *■-'■''■; 

l»iM k ••xiav.-itiiin mit^iilt' of .side ^Iujh^*. 

l.iiili r\.ivafi.iii alMiw jrrailr an.I within *id«' <Jop«« 

l.irili ••\i:iv:itioIi iMM^idf ot'sidr slo|w.e. 

>• t:i!, Mall irmovri! miTsiile of sli.i»' s:..j..-j. 

1" :!:•! rniiainiii;: litTwten certain rr.i-^s^eo^^.a* 

}'.:■.::,' I.;iik .if Foil IJraily Pitrr. ' " 

i i:::. h-f ,.<s:irv to romplete back of F.»ri Brudv Pi^r 

• P-i-.Tf was f*ubniitri.Ml. piviijir ail wrirc.*:: r.r.":"r,i -if--.^ - • -v* 

• • ...-:T ..f MK'tlloiis of d.iili;r wnrk. iU-i AliiO 1' "1 •> -i -l-'1j"» 
• —i «... . •...-.....•.. ..1..;... ..J — -^ -fc -»■• * «^.-d«. 




« ■: r\l!:i uiiioiiurM rlaiiiied. 






RA.VGR TAHGETS. Bl'OYS. ETC. 



t. 




I'M'ATION OF WRF.I.KS. 



r •! fi.it. sunk ar head of Litr\,} L.\k^ '--r^e. iLf Al 
:,•- Kl.its. and rbt- schiK.ner Ucl^xa. a: i»^i iioIe.i3 



7?.-. Kt OF C.VXAL. 



: :.'•, *hr i.v from th- M 



^ -1 :, '. '. t" •>". 



•» - ■ \ . \ " 1 



• 'V A " • A i . 

: * ■ ■ ! V:.' war. r :* i-jinH 
. ■ I " ■■ *'■ •::: :^^•:;J :L- :::il* 
- ^ :••• •■ i-::-^ .: !.;:«'.'• 
-' .. •i : "r *".' A'.'.i- "!':'.''°* ' 

. « ■ » : . • '^ t' ■! ■■•'•■' 



,519 



l-r 



-•r :".'iir art A^ 




op coLo.xEL Port. 2407 

I7 aach nnil nn nfii.rulml bjr 'l-liioli b; li inth rlniihlr ilrtun, donble-eylln- 

_j lluy Ml Kt ItMoot gan^i ami truirl nn f> in. h ritilb laid. on InttleB 

mlovd .nil. Icipntth. lir"! iirs ..1 n m .rirv 
irv "*(«« c/riyi Li, — l<Tirt.t. nil li nic! fl ir 1 ■" i 1 r iii 1< jdlngftOIlM ftua 
dw.u- ml iLmiiiigtl. in >ii lb ur^ 1 r sli |in i I 1 iK liiB look pit Two 
in< ui < icli • ikI <.l lb. »< rk ur )>r m1 1 ^ (btinitibl lud steam ■wiuj;- 
liniLiit Lu h d. tri'k in upi taU.1l b\ an >^i iiiib bj I'l niih danUe-dmm, 

huder Liil^rwuod tn^ne lliey are ailof t}ii sauii'Bi^puDdiiwke; boonu 
«Kt mui, 6H feet hi);u, two BfuF le^B, each 66 fe«t long, rapported by A 

feet lon^ 
lOWfT ^ rri-L' — rii<r ttr nnn l.ijv i-xiinbl.'d on tbe iiOTtb Stdfl of tha 
II it t' T r 1 H r 1 ' I - 1 ' -r 1 Piili hn n^T K-foOt DHt and 

I 1 1 1 r^ 1 » . > ) iul«. TlisM am 

u ! ^ -< ] liQ wide wall. A 

■nok IS placed at the nile of Gov. rumi nt backing atone (&oe atone taken 
«ld Btate lock) for Urn porpoee of loaiUng them on the can be ahlpinent 
bekpit. 

mAi^ plant — The rock-cnuibinK plant coneiBtu of two Gage rook-onuhen, 
■d a N0.4. They are operated by two liorltontal bollen and engine*. The 
aie on the north aide of the lock pit. 

ne.— The aautl acow U 100 faet long and 31 feet wide and la provided with 
■d poimi and a rotary engine. 

\ daiicK ia need for nnlowllDg the rand near the head of the weat incline. 
Sted by a amall rotary ensile. 

d MnM. — The tug Artkut, of the Hoilee line, ia chartered by the MBoon. 
■ployed in towing sand icow, pninping sand, towing icow laden with cnt 
m the ftone yarn to the place of nnlauing for Bhipment into the lock pit, 
r neccMary work. She also mukca n weekly trip to tiie Dminmond Island 
ury. Thne bcdwb ore osed in oarryiDg onl stone. 

»»ton*plaal. — BcHides the above enan(umt«d plant there is a large miBcella- 
uit, engine honsra. nhope, tool houses, JaplicatoB of variooa parte of ma- 
ttoraes, hamesees, dump carta, whcuIbnrrowH, tools, etc. 



. Hngbee Bros. &■ Bung» began grading and laying tracks, asBembling 
T, and other preliminary work on May 1, 1891, bitt the work of actaal 
Ijon was not began until June 24, when the Ernt batch of concrete wait laid. 
le. — The stone used for the concrete was the sandatone from the lock-pit 
in. An inapoctor was atntinncil at each cruBher tu see that good Btone was 
n leaving the cnisher the broken stone passed through a revolving screen 
ing and 3 feet in diameter, the openings in the screen being alToiit three- 
if an inch Bqnare,so that not the (fast alune,but a cunaidrrable portion of 
ler pieces of atone wdfb removed. The crushed stones were tooronghly 
vhen loaded into dimip carte to be taken to the mixing boards. 
an Pinnsund is used both fur the concrete iind for the layinc of the masont; ; 
iped Irom the bottom at a short distance from shore, and is a good quality 
avrm-grained, ooarae, sharp, and clean. 
ncrele for the fonndationa of the lock walla is laid to a line 3 feet ont from 

of the moxonry, to insure against crushing the edges. The average thick- 
be concrete for the foundatione of tbe luck walla is about 3 teet. The greater 
the concrete was laid in the following manner: Three mixing boxes for 
Dg were placed side by side on the completed concrete, their forwiird ends 
en with the front ed;.'e of the concrete. An urea about lo fe^'t long and the 
th of the foundation to bo laid was then prepared by having all loose and 
rat«d rock removed, the surface wsslieil with n streaiu of wuter irom a hose, 
ie wet a thin coating of mortar applied and rubbed in with a broom to in- 

ttUing of all cracks iu the rock and a good bond between the concrete and 

ncrete was of one part Milwaukee natural cement, one and one-half parts 
d four parts broken stone. A batch consisted of 6.25 cubii' fl'I^t of cement, 
ie feet of sand, and L'l cubic feet of broken stone. The sand was spread 
v«i the bottom of the mixing box and tbp cement ii|iread evenly on top of 

e«!meiit and sand were first thorougbl.v tiiixwd dry and then into a rather 
tar. The mortar was spread evenly over the bottom of tin- mixing box and 
■ apresd over it. The stoops and mortar were then mixed by fonr shovel- 

auttnif in and then casting nut a^'ain. When carefully done the two cast- 
vaoffloient to insnre a thorongh mixing, but this largely depended apon the 
t^ iboTelen. The concrete was then cast direct from the boards into place, 



pd.r.ru* ati.i running i 

- , i-is ■•f bjL-kiiiv' stDtur ' 

r..Vrl : It w;ii r..„ume.l Ma 

.twhi.:h lt.is:Ue.snn.th 



ir.t»l*.f«^jj:.-;;n.t«r'..r .-: 
i-i-mrnt i*f'- i ■;■: I'.ii.-rr •,'[ «■■;:■■ 
■lir h*oM I* lai'- z--nti,:'t v.th ;r 

7,:iff> I'lilii"" f ^r-i* b.i 

nii-'iiiiirtar ii*^d i« ut-nw part rtaturMl .:tiii.-:it ami on,. 
■■■latinn'iLiritlii'ucU kC^uiii'if iu^«><n> Ijyiim barkins^ln 
hiiiurrly g»ni:»d. an-l tlntf th» -H'lu- if iimperiy laid ju, ^ 
ilw Wintii i»l"»r'ft'l'> lill-il: tfiil-aket-iiSii <1uily n^.„rd 
i<)liinn>4>f liarkiii:; fntiiMieil !•;' tin- 1 iiiti-il srat«). 

V.'aimUii)! tn 'l>*^ :*}■(■. illi-iitit.n- |»iiyinrnt i*. to Ix iua>1e o 
iH.'iiiiiail bv tlic Htoii'- ill till? <-OTiii<lvtMl »aU, nn- m^-rl 
.W v.-liiiii» uf iMi'k'i'K l"''l '■'>» 'V^ iii"uth!y .-UTimtc- Ib fu 
. , '<,«it>iir,v t«iiiiiiiil In-Ill tlii«vi.liirapilp.ltn[ilif voliimes. 

» iMiiijt iloiin liy tliB I'lii tfd Sla 

iimf nrt'niiinirttl to riibr ont thi^fuiv>,j 

xni-r lilt- mortar lia-i linrdeneii tliejoiiiw sire tat 

• m..iMrt!il'orll!iiiil ceuu-iit uml out- part »r I 

.11.1 lliormiBlilv wimUwl. Tlip moriiir it mis 

tlki'i" ii.m iinri uialli'l «rr used in lilliiiR lli. 

" ■..,.! .H"li*li11u-1"'i"l. 



Thf poiiilinK ■' 




>I.ONKI, POE. ■ 2409 



„. -. - „.jitnTi»l ami dutMend rook 

<r wall und thu well cud of tbc Uwkjvlt. Tot*] 
t up tu Atte, :l,IBl enbiv yiu'c]». Tsli wotit U 

■0 7«irr!(.— Till- bai-'kiug slfint.' ia liroiigtit fi^om Diuiumoitdi JilMid. 
. A BMii^ts teiiseil Uip grouiid IVniu Mra. JuIiubuh uod developed tLa 

. JsloiuLtnl about midwiiy bi-lween the huil 

esloiiK for the old State lock aud tbi^ lock of 1H81. It hna* flMe?OOfeet 

Ifeet high, of which 1 foot is enrtli stt'ipping, 16 fovt is of mixed atoiie, 

ti' Htntta of which van be pserl, aoil 13 IV-Pt of good stone. 

s ie n cumiuwt, Ulniab gray, rryatiilliiii! liuietlone, having, k otWClioidAl 

)d noighs uUoat ITO poiindH |>«r cubif fi^t. 

g»«rTg. — FlnghM Bros. &, Ituuga huye built a good nubstaittiAl '{die dook 

IS and T5 feet wide in 14 feet of wat«T, and an apprnauli to the dook 100 

ad 30 iMt wide. 

_ _ .d enpne aa Utou oaed for unltMulitig atone at Oie lock. 

t nine derrirka for handling the atoue in the cinarry. These ue all oper- 



gls drum hone-power holats. 

^sek ia laid IVom the doi-k and extends the whole length of the iiaany, 
7 side tracks, crosaings, and switches. There are also all traoks 



tot disposing of ettrtk striiipings and rel'utie stone. Thare s 
Worm CM« of 10 tons capacity each and thirty damp oars. Fire barges 
a(« reqmred to transport the stonu from the (jaarrj' to the look. Thure 
built UTO boarding camiw, one hospital, one ice honae, and one black- 



ings, 210 vyebars, 40 eyobolts, 160 pins, 4 wtenchu, and 1 box of wuHhor 
it anchor castings for the 1[>wer giiaril giitrn. tusctbcr with the two eyo- 
wd to each, have been placed in punition in the luck wuUa. 

CUT STONK. 

e-cnttini: hnn all 1>e<>u done i>ii tile canal lands. Thestone used was trann- 
u KkIIv Island iti the Ton|);b, tho Ili-Ht cargo arriving in the HCho<inur tVed 
, July 17. 'ITio area oi-ciipicd by contractors for Htone yartl wns a strip of 
. 1,100 feet long and 150 fret wid.', I^iiig Just back of the Fori Brady I'ii-r. 
it used cWiaiKiM of twostUf-Ieg di-rricks of 15 tuns capacity ouch, oni- Mc- 
eliug crun*^, four stone jilnnurs, inanufuctnred by tlif Kiitbiud Iron WtirkN, 
t; a 100 H. P. untoiniitio cut-uti' engine, and iHiilrr fVir driving the nanii'. 
sg dLTrickn are plitcud at eacli end of the yard. IN I'l-rt from the Tncc of 
ud have lioums about 50 fi-et long. The booiiix <'an itiiike a <'uinplete rov- 
d are rained and lowered l>y steaiu. Tlire<>-IV>iirtlis ini-h wire liable, api'ing 
•winging gear are nsed on each. The truck lor the tnivcling rraiie is about 
n tbc face uf the pier and 1,1100 feot long. It runs bi-twncu the two atiff- 
iH. A 5-iiich rail unil IG-fout gunge lire uai'il. Th<- .McMyler crane oau 

feet per minute, although it« iisiinl B| d is almut 400 fi'i!t. Jts reach is 

n the center line of tr»i'>, iit which point it is ubi<- to raise 4 tons, which 
le weight of the ordinary head<'r or Hlietchcrin tlic rough. It issupposed 
to lift a loiul r>f 10 tons wlu-n sitniite<1 not more tiiiin :10 feet ttom th<- ecn- 
thc track. The machinery fi>r pIniiinK Htxne is situated in the center of 
The four phinc-rs are completed and two of thirui in ojieriition, but the 
>eltiug, lind minor fittings will not be cii.mpleted before .Fuly 7. At the 
le of fjrogreiw tin- entire pluut will be n-iidy fur (ipcriifiou by thut ibite. 
itruction of tbesi' miicbiiiea iswmiliir tn tbnt of im irun planer. Work on 
itiona was lH>giin April 1. The arst nincliiuciva^ 'oitiplcted Miiv 11. The 
le 6, and the third and fimrth .June *>. The yard is lighlcd by electricity, 
ng cnine and plriucrs being w»rkcd night and day. Tho cnpai'ity of tint 
a not lie delenuined at tliis diitc, as liicy are not yet fully e<|uipiiiil. All 
chinei? is suitably housed. 'ITic oltici-, jintfern room. Htureroom, uiid 
i shop ari* in one building, sitnaled m-ar the ccnier of fiie ynrd. 'I'hc eu- 
in yard has Ik-bu erected during tlie liscal year. 

tractors befjao cutting July 30 with a i'or.c of 2". ciiih-ri, and continued 
mberSO, witb the exception of a delny from the 'Jtli to 1:^1 h of September, 
t was practically aiupended for want of atone, one of tlie vewtols having 
■ed. The number of cutters em)iluyed <Iid not exi-ced 70 ut any time, the 
dag 47. The workof cnltiug was resumiid April 3 witli a force of 31 out- 



• •» 



» . f 






' ^-^'"I\t 



.!• 









-■ *■' .. 



»■ 



• •11 ft 






-'-».--. 



•-n. 



^ — 



•■ i. 






'*• I 



-^ ■ 'Jf; 



r^-r, 



. » i 




; N i; 






"^ ^"'^^•?i nv. 



iMs 



•I 

4 



I'm: 
■ ■ I 



; .,^-_. 



■Vpril.., 

'^lilV 

•'un,. ■■■-•---... 



'r,.f;,i_^ 



' ■ .■ \ ■ 



■ •. . • •■'-f»...T,, ^V *-Ni ••Ml,;, . 

* • •'.»•■ 

^ ■ ^ ■ „• • "»."»♦... ^ 



V* 



>> 



.V 



■ . *-• 



*V 



WDIX Lli — REPOItT OP COLONEL POE. 



root Inek. ftTna Kelly Umd , 

»t lock.ftum DrDTomonda Idud 

.vf te8l. Smopln tttkeil ttoai itugplleaf rclnnlini tloui 

old SUtclock _ 

\ from eiMTBtJon l<>r SOO-tMC Imk 

at imitate. M*rifl. OaUirla, iiUn>«ilatwlVnm AmhsnllnirB.. 
■t SMlt Ste. AIiirie,Oiit<uiB,> llaustone fraiti HaiDtniilBi 



from old Stute lock o„.. „„„,,.,„ .,,„ ,«., ..f,..^. .....^^...g , 

in foot. I!pJ<^c:Iiii!; thb the woigbt of the other Bamplm w 

da ptirculiio ftet. 

>f tie Potsdam Bandslonu from Wb pit were close Kroined and hnrd. 

t sent from the Wulurtown ArsL'iinl shown the «Iiililr of thi> I'ucp 

0-foot lock to rtslHt ooiupreiiisioii to lie us follows: 

ClUiMlB mmtglb. 






iiate etreogth 12,177 poiioda pei square inch. The compresaed snr- 
I with plaeeer of Paris. 

tiog for Ihu lirst five couraea of unaoory ie pnicticfillf completed 
of the piera and maiu miter wall. A few etono for llio piers have 
none for the main miter wall. Work od thi.< aiitb course ia well 



I 



Mamg of plmt. 


ClHt. 




•^SS-'S 






9.TZI.U 






J.311.S7 




















P P 


"■^-« 







J 



1 



-4lL' KLIN .K I iH' THE i lllEy r,y vs 



«"F\fTr •.- 



* • ji:«M.r lia^lMi'n r»ii-ivi»i| t'n.rii the • .•:.:: 



!•> -. 



I'Mltl.illlt 

N. it mat 



(ii'Vcrninrnt ot S.L'tHi li.iiii i<. " 

'I'lir tntlnwiiit: ili'iii ii|niii rriHi-nt t» >r> Iia< 1m-»i. ;.r^- 
Tin- ii*|iiiit «»i iuii <ii!iiii.rr's rniniiiitrtM' nf il.f' A!:.* r 
*ill :i •' riMtoiir •4\!^!tMn fi»r to-ts nl" «-«Milfiit " h/*. C!- 
h.»\i- lurii :iMi. to lult rj»ii t II and tin- r«sls in.Ml.- !:i . . i 
M'|».»ii III .l.iiiK.UN *». IVl, wlii. h was a)»)ini\ fii. 

mi-.f.i; n'..l> ;!i ai>:».ii .itr.*. .intl tn«-t hiuK- in h^,. 'm fi.j^,.' 
I»r «a^jjt .'. \n l!.!"* li'.r* • t;i»ii. ainl ronsidi-iah],? ,.xp,.i jj,,, 
siM»j«' ot llu hi^\ ». ni'i«««l lab«»iat«»i ii.^ of tIh" I'nititl.S 
i\w ;«n; ''I;: ,.1* ro'.v«T'.: %•••• .: Ii'.'iV scii-iiTilii ha-^is. 

I ho !t % lluuU a:ul .i't'i».nal>is a> aiii*Iit*d Iutc are di-sori 



- 1 1 <. , 

t.iTr 



" - « - 4 



- •• •"• " :«.*•••••• I: •- I'.VH^iM. ih.it -.»iiie iiujiortaiu-.- air :,li, . ;.. 

.. .^. 4; . •• ., •., ..., :.„.,:.s x-.r'.:;.I,' ..r ctitaiii. Variation!, in ^iiail. 
• •■ •> •^' . ^ .;'■• -:,•;■:•«:'.'.;. t.in diihivnr hraiuls mav !.,■ v 

%■ ' '•• •* '•. •■ I "^ . ■■.u«i viif \ i-isa. 

• . • •>: ■ ■i- ■•»-:•»>-'•-.*:>• ••'»T:rn.«l with Thi' liMl,t,-Nt r.-i 

w •:. :: IV :. c' 1.;:.. ir»oT. 






:."v >" y.: k n 



A:-T-:- 



; AI'PENDir L L KEPOKT OF fOLONEL POE. 



V hu« tiwn tfijicripiiwd iu ubtuiuing aievcs miltalile for u«i> in nifting 

^ FiTP wire rlolh »h-vb» wore llrst reisufved ninrlcuil Kos, 30.80. 50. 

n coimting, tlip uittilnn* ypi lim-ar iiith oiii'h wny were found li> lie 



AernM Arnu 



Me nieiihcE should bi; more venrly iiccuruUi to t.<i)uui wern luiknd for Iu ri 
t four niiuiberH. The maDiifacturHr mtid ni< curii)iluilit lioil nver Ih'c 
, but sent four Biu«e» of the aainn make nboHi- iiiti&boii uuuntod lu give 



.00 was a trifle better u to cunot, but the msBhcH appsiLred to be more ir- 
n thoM- of the iirst Nu. 100. 

ird lot received the last three wpra of » lUfToTMit style. It was explained 
lud been prociiicd of a "party in Now York who eluliued to have had the 
enpecially fur aui:h work." Table 3 given the reaultH for this lot. 



L. 






.ii-iiil .>t' I'l'iiij: .iili'-:-'. *■ "i> * ■ -' ■ ".■«■ .-ij 
,«. will.' ii« I'Hij;. V -■ -...r'-.-.'-i-^ i •:•.■■..:,-. 
tlKloxt'll 111 Iw I'f iT- x7- =-.-.-■: :-^.-..- :i-.ia ^-,.1 




8416 

s luliyriiitli iu in<lpt*« 

si»i of UuIbs in B»ev¥H that have . _ 

re itnd (li.-teruiicie (liu diiucnxioDs of the holes in bla own riOTe, 

I oniaioly know within a largo percentage the mz''^ of tha hi>let ift 

'Ihiir oxporimenten witli wbom lii" may wiah to fomiiwe.. 

m out of place, then, to endi^avor to fiirmalate trhitl ii dMlnblft in ft 

o inqnin hour it may best be obtained. It is thoiiirt<t Oua ths fiil- 

'-'ns (tefin» an ideal sieve: (1) holes of nnifortii "iae and abftpo 

IS of the holes rury snuKith, (S) space between holM of inoh ajje 

_jclfB will not easily rest thew. 

fc^.deriate from tho ideal and still bo a good one. A» r< ;;;icdaaDifi>rmltT, 
{bat the lHrgfvtholesdeti*rmiD(^thecbArnrt<iri<l' tilt ^II i >'. Forezunplel^ 
"balf its hoi™ O.Ol inch in size and the otli. i 1, i' ^ ■ siie, would, if 

lOnzh, separato the cameut exactly the b:iiii' ' if all Uie holM 

,02 toL-h ID itize, If evyo a very Binftll piT.-M ■ loles are lunt 

inal, it aeriooitly impairs tbe accuracy oL' ilr odnoing an ra- 

nt. On tbeiithoi band, bulea Hinaller tL:i:i I h< '<:.. i I . ive no greatei 
%D that, *• the sifting proceeds, they become spaoea bptweeu tha leal at 
^and H snoh do not ftijflll the third specification. Tbecefora, while 
■n not admissible, smaller boles may be allowed to the extent at, t»T, 10 - 
1 tbe ^ve still be gnud and aoonrate. ConoeminR the •eooodBpe«iflo»- 
■ of Uw baiea mnst be so smooth as not to allow ptuiiolea of cement to 
lliu elog the bole. The third reqniiement is for coavenienoe, bn( might 
id«ntl<m if the style of sieve were changad. 

I metal plate has been snggested as a saUstitnte for wire oloth, and is dia- 
rlally In Engineerini; News for September 26, 1891. An oUoction Is then 
langeinthe tbapeof tbehule. 1 do not see the validity ofthls objection. 
L qnart>, recommended by the Amarican Society of Civil Engineers' 
md which Is coming intonse for sand t«ats in this country, haflpiactloally 
nains, and it is not probable that the ihape of the gntins passlDg round 
De materially different &om those passing B(|nare holes. If it is argued 
onltl be difficulty in adjustiu;^ the size of opeuinm to correspond with the 
re holes in current nse, it may be reliirued that sieves now in use purport- 
Che same size of mesh differ so widely that they are hardly worth serious 
n inany changes which may sepm desirable. A punched metal plate could 
niade to falliTl the dist specitication almost perfectly, and would be ienn 
ary from use than a wire sieve, but the former might not so fully com|>ly 
and and third requirements. On the other band, a wire-cloth sieve reaif- 
witb tbe lost two, bat, as has been seen, Ih apt ti> lie wide of the mark 
I have been informed, however, by Edward Uarliy &. Sons, wire maiiu- 
dladelphia, that they are prepared to make "u cloth accurate in number 
the inch" at an advance in price of about 30 per cent over the ordinary 
believed that thoiio;h there are po*»ibilitie8 in the punched metal plate, 
I cloth should be adhered to if sufficient accuracy can lie obtained by its 

le question of sieves might be pot npon a better hanis if the following 

autnrers of wire cloth should be encouraged to make cloth which will 

krly OS may bo the foregoing specifications ; and 

rera should be urged to designate their sieves by the »i^e and ihape of Iht 

TIME OF SETTIXU. 

Witt's wires are need for this test, the apparatus being as slmpleas it can 
lie neat cemeot is gauged with the same percentage oT water for this test 
aking briquets. Care is taken that the water and coiuenC iind the ronnt 
) test is made ahall vary only slightly, if at all, from G5-' F. The effeot 
inges in temperature on the setting of cenieut is marked. 

lint aremade for determining the time of setting are Immersed, vhen 
t tendencies to expand. This test is of the liigbeat importance, as it is 
■otter to nsea cement that is souud, even if it is not very strong, than to 
Igh strength that will- ultimately " blow." Immersed in water of the 
nietatnre, a pat may not show signs of ansounduess until it has tieen 
Itane the cement for use. It is theretbre desirable that some method 
icb wia give eertain and qniok leanlts. 




■nuii.-ii 111 irid, m: 
■il -iiiiw*. I, litil, n 

L ujiTiamtTu. Ainiiln: 



t unnilNtra. Tlit- 1 






-KKrUKT IJF COLONEL I'OE. 2417 

Uie form rucDminc'ruliMl li;r Qencml Gilmiin-'K ['iiuimHt«e of the Amori- 
:;ivil lllnj^tneers, ninl now in general uaii in tbo Uuited Stales. Kifty- 
IiIk fiiaten n'ith au iron clump anil the other twu baivea ure completnly 
rtj are binjic molds with a faateniii^c at one enil. The Utter are nuator 
mil oi:<:npy less spaw on Ibe slab when in use, hui are iuoiq difflunll 
ia a matter uf somu moment when tiiukiD); n large number nf bi'ltjuuts. 

MOLDING. 

> the mold at a 
i small imr 
lud specifii 
lociety committee, whith is to nsi- tbf trowel for prmisiiiit the ni 

Ttro neat nntnral renient bri<|ii('ta were tniuK' ftum tbi' same mixing, 
ithod and the result* uf one hundred briijuots at seven days bIidw 
eniunt in the two 'raethodis. 

are covered with a damp elotbwben made and are iu general removeil 
Xatiiral brliinete m»y geiA^nlly be removed the sania day, but Blow 



ly-four hours aft«r molding. 



a before ni 



reof tbenmniiskept-uauoarly ut ruay l>e jil i^° tn 7(P P. Porttaia 
A'utvbman was employed all winter. Hniirlv r'>Hilin;;i of the tber- 
3orded during the night and a readijig i'i'<'i:i'<ii:il fur each aet.of 
iring the day. Four readinga adity wen- :iI~m uli'Ii- hI ihe tempera- 
air where somu special test bri que U are ''>.|i<i-vi[. 
1 witter i:-i-d in sn")ii"B ''''i''" '''■••• "II''' I', i-m i|j( in some Hpeoial 
in- .-|'ii. '- ■■-'■t--z . . -r.. -■! :r ■-■ ■ !'■■■'■■! ■ '.. u^o colder ma- 

'iii it was found 

the use of tlio !iuUuiii Tliivc nM;i ilisi-i>iuiiiuod. AU the boxes aro 



are broken on u RiehbS I.OOO-jiound machine. It has worked well, 
ion being that it requires consideralde xpace. .\ ]iair nf pulleys witii 
>o thrown in and out of gciir l)y the feet fiifiiitatcs working consider- 

briquets, having au average strength of 100 pniiiidH, c.in be broken 
tiont exceeding the rato of applying Htrain of . 100 pounds per minute. 
A are the RiehM style, fuTiiishnl with the niiichinc, and arc shown in 
iquets often break at the gripping pointt of the clipa. It is not known 
.t a clip break is due. It niiiy be, and probiilily it, duo to tbo briquet 

1 to compression at that point, bnt other theories are also advanced, 
re not usually accompanied by nn exhaustive series of tests, as this 
ult to make. With the hope of obtaining more trnthfnl resulta iu 
iet8 a pair of cvener clips, designed li.v Mr. S. Bent Kussell. of the St. 
''orks extension, were'purchaaed. These clips are showu iu Fig. 6, and 
n Engineer Sews for July 3, 18!tl. 

thought by some experimenters that the insertion of a vublwr strip 
hA briquet wonid be aitVisalile. Tliere is uo doubt that Ibis doea 
r» breaks, but the result* are lower tlian without tho nilibor. Two 
e l>©fin made to compare tho three styles of clip mentioned. (Csll- 
*ith rubber cushion a style l>y itself.) These will be reported 
e been rodurod. At pn^aent it is suttHient to say that tho rigid 

ihich the strain is applied is 400 pounils perininnte, an hnn previously 
. This rat^ is maintained constant l)y means of u pendulum, iu ac- 
wbirh the hand wheel is turned that moves the weight applying ihb 

% ^152 



;lip wit 
y Live I 



' 




fc-»^- 




!. BEPOET OP COLONEL POE. 2419 




- [lom PoiDl MX Pius, aboci 3 nulM *bim tbelock. 








:' nf thD eraiiH >r« <inartt. bnt tbej we not tkmrp. 




T iii.tv-i t lip Xo. 30 Move. \^lirD a iii«Mmn i* IdiikIt 




, -", Io'm pet teat'of tUc nuasim. 




1 otrnwiit weighi&e kboat 380 pounds im-I i* 
1 !,is HMDnt of uDd drv would wcigb about 




T, greatly Willi tbe moisture containod. Ar- 




,. ,4... .:. IraBOP thp presence of 1 perccnl of water in 
!'i [M-r ..cnt of sand by measure to obtain the same pet- 






It. WTmmi the sand is perfectly dry the proportiona »» 




i.li.>Qt cue to one by weight. 






-lilts for a different cement. >'<«. 12 and 13 show «%.- 


Point AD 


( Pins sand. No*. 14 to 18 


«vHier« 


a]t»of 

dstObe 


iml which I'oald be used tor pcantin^'. The tai 








:m' ia iDakiuE M^nrrete. Considerable of this sand is ex- 




1 it pawiirs No. 3J sieve (Table i), K to tO pei cent pasaes 




^ L^iMiM N... loa It is seen that the Tomlts afe abonl 20 








> (lean, but toe fine for general une. Sand A i» « very 




i.h'ii grains. It ia believed a nimilur «aiid waa asud fut 


• 


L> iu.'kof isai. 


1 




^^L 




^ 


U«tar. 






Xnntletlnustli. 






i7 




















































s^ 












^H| 




Kind. 




II 


^1 


Age. 


1 


t4 










II 


t 




1 


^ = 


=1- 


















•1 




^^^^^L 


1 






■Si 


1 




1 


l!l 




1 






I'S 


t; 




1 


1- 


£a 


^B 


» 






a 


£ 




s 


s 


■4 


L 


Fdlut sax 


Pebble. 


1 


\-i 


7 day. 


e.D 






nvt. 


Mmored. 


















...dit 






38 day a, ID 








.,,'.011 '.'.'".'. 










H'l!* lis 








::"dii;::" 




ji's 




«W.ci 


S.B 














Tdny*;: S 










'.'.'.:«»"'.'.'.: 


"."do::::. 


^ 




Mdiy«. 10 










...JB 


..-.do 


3 








3.0 


^^^^F* 


* 


..■..do 


—to 




11.* 


Td.j.: b 


U7.t 




^^^^■it 


s 


....do 


...-do...- 


a 


11.* 


iSiUyJ 10 


m* 








....do...- 










2.1 




s 


'sVnndard a»-JO 


s 




min*! T 


'm.2 





^^^^K a 


'» 






100 








^^^^B 




k"™.""' 








'"""l ' 






^^^^^ « 


M- 


— -do 


PSMlB-. 




10 8 


Bn,™ 1 s 


m.o 


fi 




H 


unKDlng. 


PusW... 


* 


lals 


""'"■ 1 ^ 




8,0 


HB^B . 


„ 


j> 


W-IW 


J 


17 5 


HUM S 


*78.a 


1 n 






PUMlb" 


a 


la!.! 


ffliu!-! 5 


133! 1 


t.i 




1 


FHutO-. 


2 


t».i 


II 1 


.■18S.0 


IT 








PuitO.. 


» 


«,, 


•— "i ' 


SM.1 


i.i 



KU[I|M>KC| 



fil!"nl'.ii 



■ iiii.y ■<r K'.viitx 



1>I.'UI. Wll.'l 
1»TK of ll:>< 

tllr Uuk "• 

f. ii-:W sill ' 

■..v.-ril-fai: 

If ih.'i.->; 

•■.iirelK-ik-., 



Al'l'KNDlX L L^REPURT ul' COLOXEL POE. 2421 

i~i'>|iicuc« til*-' lenults lire Hoiuewliiit frugjii(>nttiry. Duriu^ tiie whiter iiiore 
nilable, uDil sume of Uie mast iniportunt svuric is i1on« nt thHt time. Sei'iuB 
I ftWrt«il as foUowB : To shuw tbi> coiiiiiiinitive Htrens'li of about lilteeQ 
'Portland cemeut wheu mixed ni'iit aiu) wiili ont) nu<l tlirou pnrta of Band 
1. A similur Bcries for svveu binmU nf iLiittiial ittiiii-nt, agea bciliK sereli 
inr yonrB. Beversl weries from diliorrut liarri;l« of tlio siiniu brand f()r long 
; time tests, m>ut« to aid in the iiitwiiri'ti.lioii iif tLerenadnrHliort-tiinetPst" 
jue hmnds. Series to show the elieri cil'mill, rhe streiixtli of brine required 
it injury ftnta ftVat, uffcrl of Imatin;; nf uMti'rinls, nud tests to illuiitTate 
inia fffaich Lnve come up in tlie prai'tli iil ii.w Liiid t^stiDg of eements. SoRlo 
riqueta of n fi^w of tLc«e series have lui-n 1)n>Ueu, bat the results are not 
1 tlii'y wuulil noTV be incompti^te aud iiii^^bt bi^ misleading. 



irioti to tba rootiiw uiniui wnrk Ibu fnlliiwiLi;,' it;>tti^lat work has received iil- 

. letter books nsed daring tbo cons true tinn of the lockof 1881, most of which 
indexed, have been completed in thin ri*jieot, and these records are now iu 

r« for refi-reiico. 
report on clnims uf CoUidr & Fnrwell was siiliiDitt«d |o you under date of 
M^inber, 18!ll. A special report by Snbinsiiector L. li'leminj; on cost of work 
4, Hughes Brothers & Bangs for the Boaaoii of 1891, was submitted. This is 
<l as a part of the report of Clefk Ooniuton. 

itua npon " excnration " and "surveys" in this report have been prepared 
umt Engineer Joseph Biplsy. The items couceruing " lock" eon.ttruetion 
in prepared by Assistnnt Engineer J. L. Cnllard. The items "office work" 
»tT»ct«" hure been pn-puied by Clerk Richard Common, The item "cut 
aa l>eM<n prepurt'il by liirtprctur )■'. H. lEped. The item "cement" has bocn 

l)y Inspector I.. C. Siiliiii. iinil iUo iti'iii of "cost" of contractors' plant 

pwpured by Siibimpectot L. rb7i.inK. 

b;ive been eiiiplnv<-u upon Ibis nuik iliii'iiii; the year, AatiiBtant Enjiineers 
nd CuUard, Ck-rli Ccmimon, It14J>(-<<l■>r^ V. 11. Iteed, itohuert, Snbiii, Sheue- 
■joa, atui BirMn Reeil, llraiightsinau MuujruUdorf, Subiuspectors Fleming, 

Spenfer, P»rt«r, Pomeroy, St. John, Barnes, Reals, Fowls, and Johuson. 
•ty re«peet fully, your obedient siir\'aut, 






blipoht of colonel o, m. poe, corps of exginbeks. 

United States Enoikekr Ofeicb, 

Detroit, Mich., Jfovtmber 10, 18'.ll. 

I have tlie honor to submit the following report upon thevceciit 

(ie uf ehippiug in St, Marys River, Mii'liigan, caused by the 

» of tiie sti-amer Sman E. Pet-k in tlii> iiiifnnil chaiuiel about 5.10 

below the point known us "tlie Klliow " at the lower cn«l of the 

al channel dredged atiross Lnkp (Ji oifte Flats, abont '2\ inili'S 

t. Marys Falls Canal. The exiict loialion of the wreck is shown 

ttc«oiu])aiiyingLake Survey chart (Xo. 1) of river Ste. Marie. 

wciik-nt orourred about 1 :lll p. m. on Saturday, October 10, 1891, 

soil of a rolli»ion between the Sumtn E. Peck, bonnil down, laden 

Xain, and the sfbooner 0, IV, Atlamg, upward bound, Hyht. 

«une<l to fix the blame for the deplorable event, yet 

♦ ; if the tow of whieb the 0. W. Adams formed a 

»T(l instead of the winilward side of the chan- 

rt have happened. 

1? }es8 than 6 feet forward at the time, while 
Id eoiisec|ueuce of those conditions the iu- 



TENDIS L L — REPORT OP COLOXEL TOE. 2423 

ibe reeall vaa almost aniversal satisfaction npon the part 
^ted. 

B Lynch, snperintpndent of St, Marys Falls Canal, with 
BS, proceeded to the point of obstmction. Two bigs wer« 
nteb boats, and by visiting all waiting vessels obtained 
paeters thv time of their sirrival respectively, and an or- 
geioent was determin«l npou for the jtassage of bouts 
toecb as soon as the cbannel should beoonie available, 
wstfince above and below where the wreck was lying the 
jH) oacTow for vessels to safely patis ea<'h other, and it would . 
SiBry unwise to run the chance of another collision which 
liiyly undo all that had already been tloue. It was, tfaere- 
t advisable not to try to pass the vessels alternately up and 
lUtoiMi to arrange them in groups of ten in the order of 
1, aiid then jtass these giunps alternately — first one group 
i,titia next one down. This orracgemeut. having been made 
: of vessels were informed that a tug would notify them 
torn had come. The great majority of masters were an- 
ted with this arrangement, and ijnietly awaited their turn, 
time using Ilieir iiilliiciice to preserve order. There were 
lisuvodii.ii'I'- > ..I ;■:;■■.-. Mill] lln's<' iiiink- tlu^ question of the 
1 of iiidi-i .. <Uy niily. Ill iiue r;isf- ;i master 

vessel throiifiti belbre his torn, aud great <li:-i|iiiet arose 
B others, who felt tli;it if it was to be a scramble they must 
it to get an early passage. For a short time i^ seemed as 
■ontrbl would be lost and discipline destroyed. But when 
i known that the ofleuding vessel bad gained nothing, but 
dd at the canal until her turn came, in accordance with the 
arrival at the obstruction, all signs of dissatisfaction dis- 

)w and curved channel around the bow of the wreck and 
irrent made it aiU isable to use tugs in passing large boats, 
accidents should happen, and it was mainly due to this 
that none of any conseiinence occurred. The operation 
irily a slow one, and it was not uutil nuon of the Iflst that 
ting vessel bad passed, Mr. Lynch and his aasistauts re- 
il the UL'd. 

) of each vessel delayed was recorded, together with the 
me delayed, the registered tonnage, and value of each, 
time of delay was not as accurately determined as in the 
al records, because tiie time of amval of many of the ves- 
;he wreck was not noted until after they had been stopped 
as three days, and then it was obtaine(i from their masters 
ed npon their recollection. There were no large errors, how- 
le results are believed to be quite trustworthy. 
itJes have bei'U tabulated in a manner similar to those re- 
e interruption of navigation by the breaking of a lock valve 
le tiibles are long and are therefore not given in detail, but 
can be supplied if desired. The following is a summary of 
tion derived from them: 

ssets (IcliiVBil 275 

game J33,294.000 

827itnys 51i..urs .mil ll' iiiiiiutes. 

nnal report for ISOd I estimated the loss caused by the 
the lock valve at $."»(>.ll(»o. Tlie value of the delayed lieet 
iwas #10,489,000 and the total time lost by delayed vessels 



APPENIilX L L — EEPORT OF COLONEL POE. 2425 

B charged for the dredges anil tngs, iis stated above, include 
irate plant and all supplies therefor. 
>D to the sum of $6,453 there was un indirect cost to the 
E, due to the use of the United States tug Myra, but it is 
: uecessaiy to estimate it. 

1 asked why we dredged a channel lu-ound the wreck when 
-e been entirely removed in as short a time. The answer is 
gh. The laws of the United States require thirty days' no- 
my of their agents can proceed to remove a wreck. This 
rovisiou was quite sufficient to prevent any attempt in that 
id limit us to the only course left to our discretion, 
ranee compameB and others interested in the wieck wei-e 
■icted, however; yet it was five days after the collision be- 
reckiug outfit reached the ground, and it was not until nine 
ir fourteen days after the accident, that the wreck was swung 
B to partially clear tlie channel. In this position it remained 
ya longer, cansing more or less annoyance to passing vessels, 
on one occasion, for half a day completely blockading the 
nee to the channel. 

^at credit is due to vesselmen for the patience and for- 
isplayed during a ])eriod which must have severely tried , 
y three instances have come to my knowledge of violation 
jgement made for the orderly passage of the vessels, and of 
ras due to pure selfishness, one apjicars to have resulted 
inderstanding, and another from an attempt upon tite part 
to obey a telegraphic ordei' from the owner of tlie boat. In 
ie, the oQ'ending vessel, being upward bound, was stopped 
I and detained there thirty-six liours by the canal aathorl- 
er turn came exa*^:tly in accordance with the time when she 
e passed the obstrnction. In this case there was no miti- 
imstance. The seciond vessel would also have been stopped 
, but she had passed through before notice was received. The 
le third appeared detennined to disregard the arrangement 
jeen made to secure orderly passage, and paid no attention 
eler's directions, who tlieii called upon the vessel captains 
, and to the number of 25 they accompanied him on a tug to 
decisive interview with the offender. After this there ws^s 
.rouble. 

f this report ' ^^^^ occasion to agiiin invite attention to the 
vices ofMr. Martin Lynch, superintendent of St. Marys Falls 
passessesin a high degree the conlidence of the vesseluieu. 
dlivan, who so fieely gave his time and experience to the 
ith tireless energy pushed it ahyid when he might, without 
, have left it to his employes, I desire to exi)i-ess my thanks. 
■ Engineer E. S. Wheeler acted with his usual judgment 
ted the operations to my entire satisfaction. 
icism has been indulged in by persons who were tliemselves 
* some of the bad features of the matter. I can only think 
)ped by this course to divert attention from tlicir own de- 
art taken by the representatives of the Government I have 
adation, and, after tlie event, with all the light we now have, 
J to see where they could have done better, 
ind annoyance to sliippiiig interests were great, but the ac- 
"■"d at a point wl\fre no improvement has ever been made 
lent The de|ith of wat«r was amjilo and the width of 




^N&IX LL — REEOHT. OF COLONF.L POB. 

ORGANIZATION. 



fon reiuaiii» practically the naiue as last season, only a 
Kviiig been made among tlie lockmen. The regular 
ffl 8aperiDt«adeiit, 3 asmstaut superintendents, 1 clerh, 
b^cmen, 7 wat<;limeu, aud 27 lockmen, a. total of 45. A 
larty aveiagiiig 10 men, ilariug the working eeanon, lias 
A in inakiug cun-ent repaii's to buildings and piers and in 
ds. Tbe regular force is divided into three watthes of 8 
nd this arrangement has proved very satisl'actory, 

ACCIDENTS AND DELAYS. 

have lost their lives in the canal during the year: July 5, 
)y the name of Malcolm McDonald was found drowned in 
ive the locks. April 24, 1892, a sailor was drowned near 
le canal. April 30, a sailor was crashed against the pier 
er Pamidena and instantly killed. 

iter in the canal has caase<l au unusual amount of ground- 
ittbrme. On this account the lock has been delayed on 
' one-half a day per month during the season of navigation. 
Blbow WHS broken in the pipe connecting with the engine 
emptying valve, and in order to repair it it was necessary 
lock out; this was done and the pipe repaired, making a 
f twenty-five hours and thirty-six minutes. In addition 
!eii the usual number of small delays caused by obstme- 

the mitor sill, foal tow lines, jamming of boats in the lock, 
26th of May the 8. R. Kirby (bonnd down) iu passing out 

appeare<l to ground on the inner jilatform. When her 
! nearly tfopped her stem rose about 1'.! inches and then ' 
again, and she passed on without :iTiy lurther difficulty. 
its from the platform came np. A di^cr was immediately 

determine the cau.-ie. A piece of iiou 2 inches thick, 2^ 
1 14 inches wide was found cnibeilded in the i>latform «o 

was necessary to saw anumlier of the limbers before it 
ed out. This iron was evidently broken oti' the shoe of 
rhiri incident, though only causing a dchiy of one hour and 
lUtes, shows the impoitnnce- of the phittiinn. for without 
sill would undoubtedly have been cairied itway and the 

until a new sill could have been imt in. 

STACK OF WATRR. 

in the lock diuing the seiison h;is nvenint'd lower than ever 
I, On ac>"Tount of this lower .stiigt- it has been imjiossible 
sels to load tn their full cjipacity: titr this reason, light- 
ave been returned to this route, and the apparent falling 
^stered tonnage of boats using tlie ranal is probably due 

ber 16 and 17 there were unusual lln<-tnations, the water 
Iling3.65 feet in two hoars. 

jlevation of the surface of tlie wafer l»eio\v the lock for the 
.ril was 581.79 fei-t alx.ve laean tide at New York, which 
i lower than ever before during the season of navigation. 

MOVAUI.E DAM. 

Q has been tested m.nitlily and kept in perfect order. 
ewint«r qji the^ititli of JJeccinber. The wickets were 



r 



APPKNllIX LI, — KKl-OKT OF UOLONEL POE. 2429 

ESTIMATESJ. 

le project for operating and enre of the uaaal for the fiscal year 
og June 31), 1893, on ten plate 8 niaiutiiiiiing the present organiza- 
.parchasiiig the reqnisite supplies, moving any buildings belong- 
to thdicanal that may stand in the way of the work in progress iu 
lection with the construction of the proiK>sed new lock, possibly 
itractiug a new set of lower gates for the existing lock (of 1831), 
:lia^iig the timber necessary for repairing i^anal piers, abiding two 
ies to the present machine house, and ('nijilnying such labor as may 
(Mjuired in making current i-epairs and polit^ing the grounds. 
le estimated cost of the foregoing is as tbliuws: 

»f rBgnlor lock fbrtc $30,000 

a laSorparty 6,000 

nil pnrcUnsM - 5, 000 

JM uitd Hdilitiuiui to machine Iionte 10, 000 - 

er for repuiring canal pien, etc „.. 4,000 

tionat olectric-nglit plant - 4,000 

Total '. 59,000 

J (•Rtiuiate is Included for extraordinary repairs which may be ren- 
il necessary by accident. Such can not be foreseen, and, there- 

i;iu not be estimateil for, 

i-iuie of ii\)nry or damage to the canal beyond that dae to ordinary 
r mid tear, it must be promptly made good at whatever cost. 
tl expenses of operating and care are provided for by indefinite 
■ontiation, under section i of tlie river and harbor act approved 
' a, 1884. 

IcoqMinilitnn- to Jnue 30, I89I $316,015.34 

radiul ilarin;; Hseal ye.ir, exclusive of liabilitdst outstanding June 

rise - :... 57,870.99 

ToUl uzipeaiiitrire to June 30, 1892 373,886.33 

1. iliirys Falls Caual is in tbe cnllection ilistriot of Snperior, Mich, The neiirest 
I of rntry is MarciautCe. but Saiilt Ste. &Ittrie ia A sriliport. Two beacous Btaiid 
u the pien at the west^ru end of the oanal and Fort Brady is withiii half a 

Wint requited for fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1893 $59,000.00 

inee remHininc from allotments of preceding year, exclu- 

t» of oal«tan(lin(t-liiibilitiea $9, S)9. 01 

(tanding liabilitiea , 4,876.53 



<Uuent reqni red for fiscal yeur oiirtinR June 30, 1833 M, 317. 52 



Appropriation K for oparaliHg and cfire of SI. Manji Falh Canal, Michigan. 
leuded doriug tiacnl year ending .June 30 — 

W83 - $:n.2n7..i« 

1883 a-., .-.on. 70 

1884 31,212.93 

INS 27,242.45 

«««6 --- 25,100.95 

' 22,138.92 

29,898.72 

30,749.45 

34.323.85 



. 311,«!6.W. 




Fsrsrsarsgsas 



3regoing relates solely to tonnajie, ]f we eon.sider tbe value of 
»on's treigbt we find a very large inerease over any other. 
verage yearly increase in the value of the freight transported 
Si was about 15 per cent, but for the season of 1891 it was about 
?ent. The cause of this great increase in valuation is plainly 
the veiy large wheat c^rop. Since we are not likely to be iui- 
tly favored with another such crop, a decrease in valuation may 
>nably predicted for next year. 

he failure to maintain the record of annual increase in freight 
i is due, in a great degree^ to three causes other than the de- 
n iron-ore tonnage. 

Irst of these is the fact that the stage of water in the lakes, and 
lently the depth available at the canal, Was the low^est of which 
3 any record. In 1889 the average available depth was 15.14 

1890 it w as 15.06 feet, and in 1891 it was 14.42 feet. The aver- 

1891 was, therefore, 0.64 foot, or 7.6 inches lo\^er than in 1890, 
at a reasonable estimate of 20 tons to an inch of draft, corre- 
to an average of, say, 150 tons for each registered vessel; that 
e available depth of water in the canal during 1891 had been 
I that of 1890 (the next lowest recorded), the same 9,744 vessels 
arried 8,888,759 tons in 1891, would have carried 1,461,359 tons 
an they did, or an aggregate of 10,350,35.> tons, or, say, 10,000,000. 
no violent estimate, but is, I think, quite within the tmth. 
lext cause was the intentional delay of the vessel men in put- 
jir vessels in commission in the spring. This amounted to quite 
5k8 in the case of many of the. largest carriers. ^No attempt is 
I estimate the effect of the delay, but it must have been consid- 

hird cause was due to the sinking of the steamer Susan U. Peckj 

Elbow,'' in St. Marys Eiver, by which navigation was totally 

led from 1:10 p. m., October 11, to 3 p. m., October 15, a period 

Ive davs. Two hundred and seventv-five vessels were delaved 



( 



^APPSMDIX LL — REPORT OF COLONEL POE. 2433 

Falnatwn baitil on etliamU* a/ 1885, 

«53,118,*72.13 

69,090, 07L95 

78,031,757.78 

82,166.019.97 

83,732,537.15 

102,2U,[«8.70 

128,178,208.61 

O lo n&Tig&tioD during seaaon of 1890, 228 days; 1891, 225 dkfs. 



COMMERCIAL 



T«. 


ri«i»ly«ni. 


rncn.^.. 


DKtfflwe. 


im. 


Jew. 


A.««».. 


Per 


AmouiiL P" 




3:460.2.18 

u. let, MB 

log. Ml 


B:«it 

10;i(iT!<»3 

Z6.6»T 

2,717.0» 

•iFi 

(IS.WI 


1,018 
tool 

i.tm|b» 


31 

32 
31 








■d 


...nettiinB.. 


1 






m 






41S,M3 














IhHlirtnt) do.... 


■SiE 










as 


1 


















flwr, B. M.. 
...nolUiBS.. 








1.7« 












f^igl'' 




88,S37 


M 











r-TMMU 11,557 

r lockages S!G15 

ItaunaKe 9,828,871 

omsgB 10,107,603 

Hrs. Uin. 
) during ii 

hne occupied in making a 
b ■pent by veaoels in tlie lock . . 
tee ftpent by vemelB in pasRinf; lork . 



•akue . 
HMel... 



/■jHt laclodea all repaiia and improvomcntH made by the operntiug and 
' labor party, and purchases therefor. 
liclit «xc«eda that of any other fiscal year by 1,768,622 tons. The total 



"Uie preoedlug »_.._ 
rfnUTT \% more tliiin made iiii, a 
■ than ever before. 



\ 1893 has been ao 



OF mx ctOEF or ExcnrEEKs, r. s. is 

n^mc TSk>c«u ST. ihbts fau* cixit Dt1u!f» Ci 



?^ ^^■^" ** ■"*■ *!*'** AaOnw JarVmo. sod is similar 
"^^.T* y y *y *. **? •*•»»**• «*i«rt bM b««n to obWiii tlie 
■«VT •«*7«*" **?' ^''^ ■• » *■•«• »^» ""tire traffic lo si 
^^JJX* ►■^ *■ mmal and raported in proper forui u 




^^^^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^H 










^™l^BH!f4,L — REPORT OF COLONKL PO 

, icatOR a/ IS!)!. Coil of ran-ving frtlghl Iraniuorlrii Ihrnng 








Ilcmi. 


Unit- 


(JumHly. 


PllM 


AiMum. 




Natlnit 

Bunli 




J 

1.17 


*''S?'g!:iS 












«.5«l 
Z7.1BI 




Bmll™. 


NMtolH 


IW. 1«0. 110 




l^-r:!:::::- 


IM.SM.IKl 








■ndbnllJom 


''!^*™' 


li 'I^^ 




::::JI:::::::.: ^i;;^ 








B,Mn.i3».M 


1 1 '-"y " 


otal araoant of freigbt pnid, *9, 849,032. 81. divid^rt hj- tLn totjil mile lous, 
2,269, givBs the cost per mile ton na 1.35 milb. 

verage dJntniK'u froiglit wax rurrii-U woa :^.4 milpB, which was 33.3 iiiilca 
thnn ID 1890. 

tbe ctMt of loa>Uii<; anil on limiting. 

letons i.-m.\m.-m 



Mghl paid. . 

diBtance fteight wm carried 

ital nnnilier of refcinterpd craft nbich n«ed the <'i 



. *9, 819, (ia-2. 81 
..millB.. 1.35 

..milex.. 820.4 



,,.,, 


j».. 


iu.ai>t»i*.i 


Freieht 


Kiimber 


™..„... 




:=::=^ 


^Z 


«,12».52l 
J,3»«,SS7 


13,81T 


(at. STB. 100 














4Be,nM 


B,SM.«T8 


■■•'" 











Claim, 


So. 


tonDi>K<. 


«;. 


Nambcr 


TdiLlion. 




3. 


8|Z&5 


DBAI* 


12.373 


„, rf^ 






348, «» 








»l 


» 


2e.T« 


a«.»52 


I2,«7a 


!.m,MC 



Atmnari/. 

rmber of MgiRterort erafl! 

uiaagea by mirogfriterwl craft 

sight oarrietl l>y T«giiit«rod cr.iff Unw.. R, 8 

Eight carriod liy nnregistfirfl ornft ilii. .. 

xuH^TM^ern ouriM 

>fcraft (r^«t«r«d) S34, 



-u-. «. »- ■• <«. Inn* J 



• ^ "^i«-M < "■- -<*■-; ■*-. lio. 1 






ATPBSDIX I^L — REPORT OF COLOKEL POK. 



t »/ oamali anj olbrr icortu of i 
SL Matyi FatU Catui!, MUliigai 



rred on iicrounl of appropriatioii/or nperi 
ivigalioB, indefiaiU; applied to operaling 
for thejltQal yvar eaiiiiig Jhiu SO, 1S3^. 



Frvm I'll am porebunl. 



Morris Machine Wi 

WBlUm P. Mnr 



Fninialiltig ud drllVBiing at St. Marya 

F»ll» CmkI. Michigan- 

IM cudur [»BCB puatB. M 2(1 oeula 

103 piece* rDiuia Hbil« cuk Ilubet 8 

fMt loDE, ID inobea ill dloniotDr a' 

DDB^nd, utM.iGuwh. 

. FurniaLlDfl and dcllTertng ul St. Maryi 

Valla CoDil. UJchluAD— 

W,U<W iiblniiko. Bt W.6U per M 

lO.^wriet, S.UmBIdii tunliar, i<«biiu«i 
■t«k, I Inell liv II Imba by Ifl ffut, 

Bttii).7a_p«ti. 

1.UB feet, B. U.. |ilDelum>i« con 
atock. 2 bmha lir 11 inchi'sl 

■^ 1 13 (bet, a M.. t>in> Imolwr. onn 

■tovli, a iDdhHB hy 13 luchea by 18 

t.lIS?cul. B, M,.Bliie Inmtwr.cnnTn 
HbKk. 4inQh«LyliDflheflliylSfei 

BtClG.SOperM. 
Ta.2M fret, I(, M.. (fiiuife Onlt»r, li 

rocbes by I! Inibrs by IS fi#l. at 

• La.2BperM. 
260,376 feat, b. M.. aqtuw timber. 12 

Incbcs by 12 EncbM by 21 fbel aiid 



llleani fiwin Detroit. 
Ka^d& Uleh., ud 

«rric«a na dniI1» 



retim, being 310 



Jcbn Hickler & Son . . 
Frank M. DunUp 



aaaalatont aDpoilnleiideiila, at fl(Ki [h*i 

Irailoenian . 

1 gnflBHinaii 

4 torrmfln, att75 per mnuth 

3 watchmen, at'lM per miinlli.!..!! 

l««chinen,iit»IKp«rmuni)i 

3 lockmen. 2 raontbe uhI 28) da> a, nl «« 

3 beluueo, 3 montba and 21 days, at tUt 

SllookoieD, 30 montha and 23 daya, al 

10 lalnmn, S monlLa and Z!} days. M 
NS per munth. 

2 dlvera, lOJ daya. at 17.50 per day 

1 (cmbber, ia<UTii, nt (1.20 per dav 

- Tienler, 251 daya. at K.fiii per day .... 

oer. MiVdnrs. al«l perdiv 

chlnlai, 8A,diij-s, alKperday 

kitfhffii alnk nitb waale pipe Dud 

- Servliiea as drailaniBn, TrDm Aiicnat 1 to 
Angnat 31, IWl (both daya IncliislTei, 

3 aaslalant luparintnideiitA, at (lUO per 




Od. 1 i 



i Wwrr renl (Vnm Joij 1 1« Sf ptrmlwr 3 

I»lihi>lh iMtrt IncliuiTri, at to p. 

I Fruk M. DoaUp Scn-icm » dnftiiniui from Orlobrr 1 i 

S,« ' ri5 r^*, Oclsbcr. UHI. 



3 »>i.»nl < 


l*nn 


taioaU. at tl 


Mi-.'i 


















fin™™. ^ 








'"""' 


>Dd 27 d.r^ 


trsi 



APPKJtmX Lly— BKPOBT OF COLONEIi POB. ■ 



From vliDm pntchaaed. 
StendqittTlrr. ISX—Omfi. 

rq mill. OotobBT, mi 



PByndl^Korenber, I8»l. 



IB O.M. pM, CokinslCorl"' 
, EngiDun, »t< . 

la C. W. Fan-, proprlolor . . . 



rWrd quarfr, mat. 
PiV mill, BHcinlHT, 1BH. 



I lodknm. ktMn pcrmonlJi 

3 lockmnn, al |A0 iwrlDuutb ...--, --- 
31 Iwknt&D.Uii niDDllK aiul 2s Ihj-', ct ) 

B UboTpn, S uuoilia ml 3fi tUjii, al t 

1 ncmbber, 12| iny*. %l $i M p«T i»y . 

1 csrpoBler, !J il«y>. at 12,50 par da; . . 

4 ralfccn, JT) i]«;>,iil K^ per day . .. 

2 IMmii, ei days, at H per day 

1 UBiiBr,li duj-B.Bl *3 iwrday 

1 rtiTBr, OdaT*, al»T,M r*rdiiy — .. 
t uua anlbrwlta cod icht«Uiiii>, 

a una antlinirlta vi«] otovaj.al IS, 
pert™. 
■M lona bitnmln'mi coal (Uiulllmi), 

fl Mna oaDDd ooal (Wait Tlrsiuin) 

I aactloB IlIpl^ G bet S Inchei lone. 
iDilm In dtamaler, at bafl«r pUin 

OoeUnli, loW louu.S r«.t itfils, «■ 

4 l»t liigb, (•rt-in'^Ebullc'r inn. 
l.WM l^bMI pliper. plain, nuniled. al 

!S •beou paper, cttrlnn, at M par liii 

1 ftuperlslfloi^t. 

Iclerli. ...,., , 

1 Miffinaniaii -,,.- , 

4 faniusn, at trs iw mundl , 

1 iratditDnn ..._,..,.,,.., 

;i wiitchincn, »1 (Mpormonlb 

1 ■«al<'hiiion, BtttS pornHmlh 

alockmimls moDtbn and »(<!■)>>■' <l-^> 

aiTuukmim, M lounlha andaSl dai'>, at 

Ui permuntli. 
■ UbnrBn, e montba and Hi dayi. at HS 

laiTOr.i daj. al 17.60 p«r day 

] tetabVtr. H dan, at H. SU ]>cr day 

1 naruenter, 23^ lUya, U tl- ^' prr day . . . 

a ouukim, lit days, at fZ, 60 i>ei day 

1 tliiinT, aj<U«l. attaiKTilay 

1 maokliilat. [lAdayi. atfJ nenlay 

Itratn.lday. atlClp«(la.r 

UflrMi^ (nm Urtroll, Utvb., to Hanlt 
SU>. Harie, Ulrli., and rsluni, beUlt 
714 mllM, at » renta per milf. 

Rent of tfarea (3) IriepbmuB Tmai May 1 
toNoiRnberSo, tm (bulb days Lnrlii- 

Kent of ona nloras-'' room at Dotroll, 
Ulcb., rromllclijbct 1 to DwemlieT 31, 
18m (bulb dajH iuflTmivi-l, b*ing 3 



•uperlniiindonta, i4 tlOO pt 



giumnan 
KiuemnD 
glnemao 








. 








:- ;-::-::;■ 


ps 


P' 


m 









Ain'iiMjix LI, — Kiieuur uf lolokkl I'de. 



.ited ulaUntnt oj 



So-ot 




Artlolu. - 


AuMiml, 


1 ,, 

1 

lands 


Third njiarltr, MM— Cont'd. 


a lackmaa. 1 rauntb aud 23 daya. at WS 
per month. 

laerabliei. 5dm«, »t«.2i>p.*day 

1 blukfrnilb 1S| dsTS, at (fl per day 


42,50 
0.00 




asH taim»' work vllb BteoDi hMiiDiir, ;it 
ai70™nn«ib..iir. 

Sifboo'rt'work with .tcam-ponrar drill, 

aia6CBnI.pnhonr. 
ll^ boim' work nitb bolt onltor, at 35 

Ka'hS'uS^la^e'mirk, at 40 omW per 

1 ael'g'^ut allden for valro engluBi, cast. 

planed, and Itllod- 
50__^« paper, carbon, at *. par bnn- 

Rent at one storage nwni at Delmli, 
Mirh., from January 1 lo Xu-L-b 31. 
law (bolb day* iurlnsivel, beinR S 


288.00 




a.g; 

8.50 


The Richmond uid Bn.-kus 
UoiDiMoy, Liy Charli'i F. 

jiirrsi-itb 


2.110 


Fmrth qvarUr. MM. 
Pajmll.,Maroh, 1M2 

ray rolb. April, 1802 

Buard • Mc Work., by 
t lor, .Itpoly re. 




month. 


moo 






















a wati^hniBi.. 1 month tad 8 day), at WH 


..-. 




B31.S0 


n loPkmen, 20 moutlia and 21 day., at 415 


mncliialFit, Z3| ) daya, at fa per ib^ 






30IK00 






















* watchmen, 3 monthi. at •» tier iiiuntli. 
3 watdbmen, 1 month and 13 daya, at *13 

pernionlh, 
B lockraeo, 3 monlbs and 25} days, at m 

a l^men.Smontba and 25| days, Bt tSO 

21 lookmen,'20 months and 261 days, at 

11 Uboren., 3 monthi and IGJ day», atMS 

jSa-SSS,;!?;,.,:;:::. 

I.c™hbt^,^l2d-v», ,11 H^O |,..r day 

Witur rent fur Urst iiiiarli'r. IBOS, frooi 
Jannary 1, to March Bl, 1802 (both 


- siioo 

.142.50 

1M.1S 
07.50 

ii!jo 

3.» 



!■ JU'l'E.NL'IX L L — REPORT OK COLuSEL J'OE, "J-iW 

i - L, L 3. 

tmv DOCK AT ST. MAKY8 FALLS CANAL, MICHIQAN. 

{tositioii to locate a dry dock in imniediat« proximity to the 
Vtem is as objectionable as ever; bat if it sbould be decided 
tten the loeatioo heretofore referred to, at the eastern end of 
^Boaferrcd from the Port Brady militai? reservation to the 
rvation, is the least objectionable. 

'.construction of a pier in front of the Fort Brady reservation 
Wnnpleted, and a portion of this work would have to be re- 
us increasing by $20,000 the probable cost of a dry dock, and 
tte tbeiefor fluml.! ln' itic-nased affordiiigly. 
imstod) required for the constructjan of a dry dock at tba point 

•343,872 

t can be proQtably expended in fiscal year ending Jane 30, 1893. 150, 000 

shonld be added to the $C5,000 (more or leas) which it in 

d tiie State of Michigan holds in readiness to transfer to the 

ates for the purpose of constructing a dry dock at St. Marytt 

H. 

lot be improper to add that I am strongly ejipo-ted t6 the 

an of a dry dock to be operated in connection with the canal. 



tENT OP HAY LAKK CHANNEL, ST. MARYS EIVEE, MICHIGAN. 

improvements were commenced the channel through Hay 
restricted in depth at Sugar Island Bapids and at Middle 

At these two places a maximum draft of but 8 or 9 feet 
arried, if a very in-egular course was taken, and, i>ractieally. 
■awing more than fi feet of water would not attempt the 

In addition to the places above mentioned there were some 
Hay Lake reqniiiug removal to make the cbannc'l available 
( na\'igating St. Marys River. 

ginal estimates for this improvement were billed upon :i 
' a cLanuel .300 feet wide and 17 feet deep, leaving the present 

channel of St. Marys Eiver at Sugar Island liapids (about 
lelow the canal) through those into llixy Lake, and then hy 
ddle Neebish, rejoining the pi'^sent navigable channel at the 
gar Island, thus saving a distance of 11 miles and obtaining 
aich can be so marked by lights as to be navigable by night, 
n impracticable with the present channel, except by the use 
ghts. 

imated cost of this project was $2,127,292, The project was 
itly modified to increase the navigable depth to 20 feet, the 

cost being $2,659,115, subject to change, however, in case 
d difBculties are developed during the progress of the work. 
I June 30, 1890, $97i'>,000 had at various times been appro- 
r the work. The river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, 
ted an additional $400,000 for continuing the improvement, 
iroviaioii, "That such contracts as may be desirable may be 
ito by the Secretary of War for materials and labor for the 
' or any part of the same, to be paid for as appropriation^' 



APPENDIX L h — SEPOET OF COLONEL POE. 2445 

lOAVATION UyDER CONTKACTS STILL IH FOBL'E, 

le tiscal year excavation lias been tarried ou under six con- 
ed into February 6, 1891, Eacli of these (.-ontrBCts covers ^• 
ectiouu into which the work lias b#en divided, as shown on ' ^ 
^nded to this report, A depth of 20 feet was required ex- 
bed rock occurred, where a depth of Ul feet was nailed for 
A a 20-fout navigation might be established. At the doss 
yeai' the condition of work on the dift'erent sections was as 

ton. — The material to be removed consisted of about 190,000 
I of sand, gravel, bowlders, hardpan, and sandstone beil 
mown proiiortions, and a great deal of bhisting was neces- 
depthof2l feet is called for by the specifications; a rough 
2,040 feet in length, is required to be constructed on the 
if the channel between cross sections 286 and 490, and the 
ce for excavation is $1.20 per cubic yard, bank measure, 
etion of the dike being included without additional charge, 
actors began operations May 6, 1891, and, except for intcr- 
the winter, work on thia section has been in progress ever 
total to June 30, 1892, of the estimates for excavation ia 
i« yards, bank measure, of which 150,696 cubic yards have 
ited during the fiscal year. The dike constnn^tion required 
lontract has been entirely finished, and the total length of 
now 6,140 feet, 

wrftoH. — The mat<>rial to bo removed consisted of about 
ic yards of sand, gravel, bowlders, hardpan, and sandstone 
iiuknown proportions, and some blasting was necessary. On 
J depth of 21 feet is required ; elsewhere 20 feet, and the 
ice is 57 cents per cubic yard, bank measure. The con- 
!ssrs. Dunbar & Sullivan, began operations May 15, 1891, and, 
nten-uption by the winter, work on this section has been in 
er since. The total to June 30, 1892, of the ettimates for 
is 66,S7.> cubic yards, bank nieasui'e, of which 57,028 cubic 
been excavated during the Hwcal year. The actual amount 
8 really much greater than this, but owing to certain con- 
le specifications the additional amount can not yet be paid 

jtum. — The material to be removed consisted of about 
ibic yards of silt, sand, day, and gravel. The depth of 20 
red, and the contract price is 14| cents per cubic yard, bank 
rhe contractors, Messrs. Oarkin, Stickney& Craiu,beganop- 
iy 27, 1891, and, except for interruption by the winter, work 
ion has been in progress ever since. The total to June 30, 
estimates for excavation is 303,846 cubic yards, bank meas- 
ih 288,399 cubic yards have been excavated during the fiscal 

xtion. — ^The material to be removed consisted of aboat 
ic yards of sand, clay, gravel, and bowlders. The depth of 
squired, and the contract price ia 13 cents per cubic yard, 
ire. The contractors, Messrs. Carkin, Stickney & Cram, 
itions Julyl6, 1891, and, exceptforinteri'uption by the winter, 
s section has been in progress ever since. The total to June 
the estimates for excavation is 329,103 cubic yards, bank 

ion. — The material to be removed consisted of about 710,000 



'i 



'PBNDIS L L — REPORT OF COLONEL POE. 2447 

tg reports, and are so univuronlly admitted, tliat it is Dot 
leasary to repeat tbem. It ia an importaut part uf tlie ays- 
t improvement of the iiavigiitiou ol'tlie great lakes, and if it 
failable during the fiscal year just elosed, it would have 
!^ yesHels carrying 10,107,003 toua of freight and 25,697 pas- 

bste for the work ia $2,059,116, of which 11,675,000 has been 
jd, leaving $984,115 to be provided. To pay the vaiioua 
it 6inployi?fi and coutractorH, ¥500,0<H) will be required for the 
ending Jnne 30, 1894. This amount ahoald be appropriated, 
iroriso that any portion of it not required for Hay Lake 
>uld be expended elsewhere between lakes Snperior and 
places where excavation is needed to obtain the naTig;ibIe 
> feet. This entire amount can be expended to itdvantago 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1894. 

itura toJunoSO, 1891 $828,823.08 

ring fiaiTDl j-eur (eicliuive of ouUtnndlDK linbiljtiee) 380,983,01 

ii^etiditure to June 30, 1893 1,100,806.09 

Channel is ia the tollertinu tUHtrlct of Superior, Mich. The iieurcat 
r it Marqnotte, but Soiilt Sto. Miirio is a Babport. The neurMt light- 
Mmou on the pier at the wnst^uiu eu<l of St. Marye FaUs Cauul. 

Money utatement. 

bilance nneipended f8t9,6a'i.80 

', amount sKpeDiied dniiug fiscal year 284,370.24 

balance mieipencled 565,335,58 

ooUtandingliiibilitiaf. (84,820.07 

amnant covered by uni'omplPtud contracts 480,505.19 

365,325.56 

ropriatedby act approved August 6, 1892 115,000.00 

itimated) roqiiired fur completiun of existing project 869, 115.00 

it can be profitably cxi>etjdedinli8calyearen<IiugjL'ine30,1894 500,000.00 
in compliance with reiiiiirementA of aectiona 2 of river and 
Eto of 1866 and 1867, 



ionifoT improving Saji Lake Channel, Sault Sl«. Marie Ricrr, Michigan. 

82 $200,000 

125,000 

86 150,000 

«8 600.000 

), 1890 400,000 

1, sundry civil bill 300,000 

1,675,000 



APPENDIX L L REPORT OF COLONEL POl^ 



otitar end of the channel. 



Money statement. 



), baluice unexpended 18J82T.73 



ApfropriaUant for iapnvlng harbor at Cktboygcm, Vteh. 



,1871 110,000 

, 1872 15,000 

, 1873 15,000 

, 1874 15,000 

,1675 15,000 

14, 1876 10,000 

, 1878 8,000 1 

1,1879 3,000 I 



Jane H. 1880 $6,000 

MnrchS, 1881 6,000 

AuEUBt2, 1882 10,000 

July 5, 1884 ^000 

AngTiBt 5, 1886 15,000 

August 11, 1888 15,000 

Total 118,000 



- ■■ .« 



COMMEnriAI. STATISTICS. 

tf the harbor al Cheboggait, Mich., for lie leaton of 1891. 
m thflraport of Mr. Jno. W. LoackA, dopntj collMtor of Oiutonu-J 



Artlcln. 


books. 1 liuobi. 


Total 




(jatntHleii. 


Ton«. ■ Quantilios. 


Tons, 


tous. 


ShiprnmU. 


115,971,«07 
1, 723, 000 

•■11 


173. Ml 
3,878 

7;SI0 

1.081 


3, 000, 000 


4.500 








e pie.-es. 


a,5«ii,oou 


015 


4,822 










ploe At,,., 


35.000.000 
1,500 


•■g 


7,023 










T,o6i 


















m.m 




18.175 


222. 2U 










11,™ 


nsi 
uo 

i.m 

M7 
































-"^ ,;.l;x 


''^ 








1,200 1 210 










"^ 11 
















































T.728 




15,8«0| 2a.58g 
















»■» 


■ •*- 






! 



APPEKDIX LI. — REPORT OF COLONEL POE. 2451 

(I)at tbe depth of IG feet that iias been obtained in the river 
idered available, the next appropriation should be expended 
Qg t\w. channel across the bar to the full depth of 16 feet for 

width. The river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, 
parute appropriations for the river aud the harbor, seemed to 

absolute division between the two, and this division was 
Bst of the lighthouse crib. It is evi<lent, however, that the 
lie law was to render the lO-foot depth required iu the river 

commerce, aud should no such distinction be made again 
le two prjrtions of the work, fature appropriations should be 
with this understanding. 

r and harbor act of September 19, ISDOj although separating 
iito two portions — permitted the gioiiping in one contract of 
■k of a siniiliir character situat<>d in the same region. A 
lid therefore be used on this work U> the best advantage by 

1 the baiboT during fair weather aud in the river during bad 
Sy being thus prevented from lying idle the cost of the work 
id nearly one-half. 

of the commercial importance of the city of Alpena, which is 
: the month of the river, the river and harbor are well worthy 
Litional appropriati^jn of $20,587.48, which, if made at one 
aot restricted as to the portion of the work on which it must 
ed, will probably suffice to make a continuous depth of 16 
1 entire amount can be profitably expended during the fiscal 
e June ao, 1894. 

lltore to Jnne 30, 1891 ©0,785.81 

tring fiscal year 3, 403. 69 

penditnie to Juno 30, 1892 24.189.50 

■iy River in in the cnlli^clion ili^tilct of Hiirmi, Mich. Tlio ueiircDt port 
ort Hiirini, and llin iii-rtii'sl lijrht-liiiiiso ii ut tliu work. 

Money stateiiieiit. 

balance unespen.lc.1 $6,372.50 

I, amount oi]>ende<l duriujc haeai .vpni' 1,548.87 

baluurc unexpcuded 823. 63 

Btiraated) required fur compbtioii of comliiiiorl piojmts foe 

■ Bay Kiver and liftrlxT 10,587.48 

at can be proG tabty expendod in lineal ytuv .-iidiuK.IuiiG 30, 1894 10, 587. 48 

in coDiplianco with reiiuiroment!* iil' soutiouH ii it rivur and 
«(B of 1866 aud 1867. 



I TliuiideiJIay, Mii-kigaii. 



practicable to obtain atatintics for the riileuchir year 1891, but they 
-n Bubstantlall; the siiDic as for rJio pTece<liiig year, when the com- 
''ioUnn, at the luontli of Thuudnr Bay River, -naa wtimated at 
Talne at over $5,000,000. 






PPEKDTX 1/ L REPORT OF COLONEL POE. 2453 

KiTer is in the collection district of Huroii; Mich. The nearest port 
Haxon, Mich., and the nearest light-house is at the raouth of the 

Money statement. 

ance unexpended $9, 608. SO 

noont expended during fiscal year '. 8, 328. 80 

anoe unexpended 1, 2T9. 70 

riatedby act approved July 13, 1892 10,000.00 

lefor fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 11,279.70 



oated) required for completion of existing project* 

an be profitably expended in ftncal year ending June 80, 1894* 
coihpliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
of 1866 and 1867. 



}propriation9 far improving Thunder Bay Biver, Michigan. 

890... $10^000 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS. 



ipracticable to obtain statistics for the calendar year 1891, bnt they 
oe substantially the same as for the preceding vear, when th^ com- 
k, Mich., at the mouth of the river, was estimated at 500,000 tons and 
r (6,000,000. A large portion of this commerce enters Thunder Bay 
impossible to determine its amount. 



L L 8. 
MOVEMENT OF HARBOR AT AU SABLE, MICHIGAN. 

beginning of improvements the mouth of Au Sable Eiver 
vide, with a depth of 5 feet over the bar. Above the mouth 
of a mile 7 to 10 feet of water was found, and above this 
or 6 feet. 

it project for the improvement of the harbor was adopted 
Qodified in 1879, the object being to obtain a channel of 
10 feet in depth for a width of 100 feet fi-om Lake Huron 
Road Bridge at Au Sable. 

' heretofore expended on this improvement has given tem- 

» only, and a permanent channel can not be secured except 

cost as to be disproi)ortiomite to the benefits to be ob- 

ents from this port are large and imi)ortant, but are prin- 

from private piers built into the lake entirely outside of 

Were there a fair prospect of seeming a permanent im- 

b a reasonable cost I would take pleasure in recommending 

opriations for this harbor, but can not clearly see my way 

ore to June 30, 1892 $114,786.12 

in the collection district of Hurou^ Mich. The nearest port of entry 
iikd the nearest light-house is at the work. 

* B«e Thunder Bay Harbor. 



APPESIIIX L I. — REPORT OF COLONKI, TOE. 



24r.,'i 



if Engineers let^ommtriided that » clianncl tiv mtiile 200 feat • 
a depth of 14 teet from Saginaw Bay t« Bay City imd with 

)f 12 feet thenre to the head of the river, ii t()tal distftnee of 

Qiles. 

Ds to ttiis |irqiP(-t have been made at various times. These 

Tor the repair, extension, aud rei'Oiistriietion of the revetioent, 
the Oarrolltou Chauuel. aud for the constniction of similar 

the head of Grow Island for the Improvement of Zilvaukee 

B 30, 1891, dredging was in progress on the bar at the month 
er and at Zilwaukee Bar, and repair work at GarrolltoQ re- 
,nd extension of wing dam. 

the fiscal year the following contracts were in force, all nndw 
priation of September 19, 1890: 



,tr«U«. 


Contract fuf— 


Eii(«radliitA. 


R««rk. 




predglnK aboTB Bay City . . , 


r«b.21,IB»l 


fk,-^ _^ 




ai^U)et.5,18Bl. 










Dredging W.tin™tlk 


Apr. g.lS«l 




' 



gresa made dnring the fiscal year was as followe: 

ted on the bar at the month, 75,982 cubic yards, bcoW meaenre, 

t the contract price of 34 cents per cubic yard, $25,8^,88. 

yet completed. 

ted at Zilwaukee Bar, 25,363 cubic yards, seow measure^ 
t the contract price of 36 cents per cubic yard, $9,132.48 and 
in a channel 200 feet wide and 12 feet deep for the whole ex- 
e bar. 

te<l at Bristol Street Bridge, in the eity of Saginaw, 13,019 
is, scow measure, costing, at the contract price of 36 cents 
yard, $4,686.84, resulting in a navigable channel 12 feet deep 
ige cuts wide nearly half a mile in lengtli. 
ted from the cliannel of Saginaw Ki\er below Melbourne, 
)ic yards, scow measorc, costing, at the contract price of 'M 
cubic yard, $8,504.28. 
■nt superstructure of the UaiTollton revetment was repaired, 

the wrecked portion of the lower end of tiie old wing dam at 
of Crow Island, and the latter waw extended downstream, 
ig upon the west sliore of the island. The original length of 
ilam was 900 feet. It is now 1,685 feet long, with a shore arm 
'g- 

sent condition of the improvement is as follows: 
at mouth of the rirer. — A channel 14 feet in depth and about 
ide has been made a.<;r08s the crest of the bar from deep water 
uth of the river to a i>oint on the light-lionse range — or axis of 
sed channel — 12,300 tieet from the front light, terminating in 13 
ter; tlicnce northward one dredge cut,14 feet deep and about 
le, nearly on range and east of axis, extends 3,800 feet farther 
foot curve in Sagin.aw Bay. 

b survey of the channel was made in January and l'\'bruary, 
ras then found that in order to complete the width of the i4-foot 
o the projected 200 feet, and extend it to the 14-foot curve, 
at a distance of 16,100 feet from the front light, it will be 
remove about 180,000 cubic yards of material, two-thirda 




U — KEPORT OP COLONEL POE. 



24r.7 



ft'etnlong the ttack fiillowed by tugs in 
ore nut coniicctMl. Thi> bottoin consists 
60 Ihr made to »t.*ciii't: u chaitiiel of tlie 
BUCcessfU. It is eMttuiiitud that a ulian- 

'■''•' will iiivolvci the excavatiou of about 
. Wht-tliei' sucli a channel would be pei- 

Jihool. — The improvement of this reach of 

Lii; ihii season of 1891, A survey made in 

!' . iiiimiel had uot deteriorated during the 

1 .1 iijjon the survey refened to, it is esti- 

,- I I'J loet deep and 200 feet wide will iu- 

IV tubic yards of sand. Whether it will be 

vorj- doubtful. 

ntliing has yet been done toward improving 

immediately above Mackinaw Street Bridge. In 

; ]'2 feet deop and 200 teet wide at this loc-ality 

■ i!' alxjut IWI.OOO cnbic yarfls of material, and 

made it will require fieqiient redredging to 

H'eat Bay City. — ^Thls is not a part of the origi- 
J!,000 has been expended in dredging it and 
•vey (iu January, 181H) it was found in much 
'" It can not be regarded as permanent, 

Ut of material yot to be removed to complete 

I at about 040,000 cubic yards, at an estimated 

t is perfectly well understood that considerable 

a never be considered as permanently completed, 

I dredging will always bo requir»«l after each 

' 'e cost of not less than $5,000 jier year, 

; by Assistant Engineer B. 11. Muehle, gives 

11 necessarily omitted from tliis. Particular 

D hta actiedule of dredging heret^ifore done, ami 

^Jquired to complete the original imije«;t; including 

Jmt Olianuel along West Bay City, and 81S,uOO for 

«ille Bar, neither of which weiv coniprisfKl in the origi- 

l will be observed that the total exceeds tlie balance 

^original estimates; but if the amounts already ex- 

t Giiannel along West Bay City, tlie amount 

r its further iuipro\ eruent, the auioiuit of the esti- 

rille Bar, the auiouiits of the annual expenditures 

■ to be made for redredging — referred to in 

B necessary, and estimated at $5,000 per year — and 

nded in keeping the sttveral revetments and wing 

1 the sum of the incidental oxpeiises pertaining to 

Igftted and the total deducted (as it should be done) 

^ required as shown by the schedule, the i-emainder will 

■witain the proportion of the origiriul estiniates yet re- 

f eredit. 

1- endint; Jiine ;H), 1SII3, the sum of *ir>0,(HH), in- 
ter West ChuiLiirl aloiit; West Bay City and ^lH/m 
IE, can be profitably expended upon the improvement. 

JonaSO, 1891 toO:J,331.78 

Ud jBftr(<)zcliiaiveofoiitHt;kU(Iliii: IhiljilLtLL'.-*) 32,320.00 

-MB to June 30, IBUS 555, «>7. 78 



;. lUti »»i* jump *•.•>■»». 



ct>imD.ai»i tb<f 



"lit* pMfWMil JW-bM cbMJMt. Bdnhvard t< 



O 



lPPENUIX L L — REPORT OF CoLO^^EL POE. 2459 

12,300 foot IroDi the frout range liKlit ; brought the nnfiniahed first, 
rd outs to the sniue toiiuiniiR, and iuiul« a complete second uid partial 
>r the range, -closing operations for the season of 1891 od November 
thority.of the Chief of tngineers — the contrtict having been extenfled 
iS'J — tbu coutrai'tora resnmed dredging on the 21st day of April, 1S92, 
t to tile i>nd of the flscal year; completing the third cut eaat of range 
irve, and exteudiug the fourth cat to a point 11,200 feet distant from 

light. AU eKCftvated matetial was dumped in Saeluaw Bay, about 
Clio outer end of the dredged channel . The Teeolt of the work of 

this contract may be aummarlEed as follows; 



J Jul* l-SsBt. 31. im I fl,SM 

. I Aqg. SB-Sept. M, law ' i,a« 



- Abe. n-sa. 18B1 .. 

. Sent.ae-NoT. 7, u 
.1 NoY.T-21, 18PI ... 
.1 Apr. 21-JiuiB 8, le 
. JoneS-tHi, laOS.... 




iFhlnk EMt, at tha oontnut prios of 31 rent* p«r iHUe yard, the ■um ot •2a.8aa.SB. 



aioi'f Hay Cii}/." — Under oonlraot witbTlioiimsM. Hubboll, dredging 
at the beginning of the Gscal year with <me dredge in tliu channel 
ankeo Bar at the bend of Crow Isloud. Tliis wort was completed 
a channel 300 feet wide and 12 feet deep having been madi< in aceord- 
pproved project, by excavating 25..%S cubic yards of sand, at a coat 
'he same droage waa then empuiyed in commeneinc the imprt^raiCient 
acTotu a shoal at the Bristol Street Bridge, in the city of Huginaw, for 
1 allotment was made Tcma the fippro]>ri:ifi"n for SsKinaw Hiver 

ty." Between September 17 iii"1 ".' i ■ i ". '■■"'I. l?:,f)10 cnbicyiiriLt 

tuavated »t an oipcuse of ii.H''-'. ' ' n-ivifriil-li: Hmtiin'l 

i two drfldRe-cntfl widp. and n. n l^iiclii. On tli,- 

. 1891, the same contractor tiinii^liril a ni'i:ii]li| dri'dge, as he was 
liy the terms of the specificatioim. This drcd;:*) was used in improv- 
of Kngiiiaw Kiver below Melbourne, and worked there continoouely 
r 27, 11^1, when the season's operations were teruiinated on account 
n of ice, and the contract was closed. On the 2d of November, 1891, 
joined the plant at Melbourne, and worked there to the end of the 
lerations at Melbourne resulted in mahiug u navigable cbunnel 12 
!t wide, and about 2,575 feet long across the cruet ot the shoal imme- 
he Melbourne lumber docks, thi» partially removing the most serious - 
lavigutioQ in this locality. The dr«Mli;i.-H excuvnteil ^,623 cubic yards, 
W4.2B. 

>imt of dredging done, iuid''r contract with Tliomas M. Hubl)eU dnr- 
■ar, was 62,010 cnbie yards, and its cost $22,323.1X1. 
on of the excavated material, principally clay, was put into dump 
ed a distance of about 14 miles to tbu dumping )>round in Saginaw 
lortion was transferred to the City Hall Dock and grounds, adjacent 
Street Bridge, in the city of Saginaw, and the b:ilanco dumped in 
1 with the aid of an elevator di'cdge, reilredged and used 
wharves, and swamp land. The fullowing scliedule shows 
.hns disposed of: 

Cubic yiirdi. 

umping ground 19.1M8 

, Saginaw 13, .k'M 

iTttU, at Crow Island 11,408 

9, dOl 

7,401 

It Carrollton 297 

ffiiOlO 

appropriate in this connection to ante tho fact that tlie selection of a - 
>f deposit for the excavated umt^^rinl is a dilHcuit pnililem to solve 
fbr improving Saginaw Itiver "above Bay City" are being mode. 



Blips, 

r docl 



kf-iPPEKDIX L L — KEPOHT OF COLONEL POE. 2461 

)t wai UBwl »lmo«t daily, transfiirriug niatiTiftlH and men engaged on the 
prorement. "dntinR eiftiuluatioiiH ami Burveys iDtideut thirelo, and on 
lection 1)J the ftSBistnnt engineer between (lie city of f>H(finiiw and the 
eriver. At the vloat> of the seuNoii of 18^1 tlielni)iir!i i. 

United 8tat«B property, placed in obnrpe of a watrliDi 
s Blightly dnmagpd by Uie i*e, ftnd fii"inoi]t pimiiiin- ■ ■! ,. ;.. ■ |. !:■ r 
at she was allowed tonettle to the Tivei bottom, iD sbnnl water. I'urtly 
uf thiailaniaifeand partly of berbaviu); been found iiumiitHhle and inade- 
e Mrrieu required. Offing to inaiifGeieucy of speed, it wa»d(Wmed ndvis- 
oae of her at tite opunioc of the Reason of It^, and Iter sale at public 

1 ordered by the Chief of GDgiueera, nndcr date.of June 6, 1892. June 28, 
at ■«•« Hold, accordingly, for the ium of K50, 

IB DiODtba of January and February, 1892, ice enrveys wore made in ae- 
itb yonr iostrnetiuiui dated January 11, 1803, at tbe following place* in 

it Bristol Street Bridge, in the city of Sftginaw. 

ront of Suginaw (east side) below the GoneNM arenna «id the Flint and 

ettc Railroad bridges. 

\Vnrk«. 

r, between the li);ht-hoaaea and the Tillage of 

heM Btirveys were made by me during the tloaing months of the fiaoal 
ler with cotnpntatioDH of qnantitiea of materials yet to be removed by 
^ order to complete (he prcHent approved project for improving S^Inaw 

tho latest eiamiuntionB of the diilVrent loealitiee, I have prepared a de- 
' the present condition and brief history of all the obatmctions to navi- 
laginaw River, for the uarpoae of showing how complicated, difficult, 
the river improvement hue been and will roatinue to be until such time 
B considered sat is factor ily ttnd tinally compbited. 

>Ted project conBi-tts in providing a dredgeil channel U feet deep and 200 
■omSagiuaw Bay to the PorlamoutU Bridge lit Sonth BayCi^, andthenoe 

2 feet deep and 200 feet wide to the bend of navigation, a oistsnoe of 25 

named reach of river has been entitled the ''General improvement" and 
above Bay City." This Hcparation in dno to the fact that the Saginaw 
throngh two Congressional districta, the Ri'presentatives of which have 
'erred a division of the appropriation for Sjiginaw River, ami hftVf^ tho 
rticiilarly specilied in every river ;ind 1iilv1")i' bill passed by Concii'sa; ho 
bongli there i« but "iin Hrni'ral project Jin- the improvement of the rii'or,, 
_. ^ — .._._... J > . ^1. . . ..... ■ .., — — 1 !■ _. ^g j^ij sepa- 



wmU. — This is nnqneationably the most important part of the improvo- 
.ding as it does forthe passage of all vessels navigating the S.igiuaw River 
rater bar to and t^om Saginaw Hay and I^ake tfnron. A channel of 14 
h and about 160 feet wide has thus far been made aeross the crest of the 
lep water at the month of the river, tn a point on the light-honse range, 
he proposed channel, 12,300 feet from the fmnt light, terminating in 13 
jr ; thence northward one dredge cnt it feet deep and about 22 feet wide, 
tnge and east of the axis, extendi !1,tj00 feet farther to the 14-foot curve 
IB in Saginaw Buy. 

inrvey of the channel nne made in January and February, 1891; it wae 
in order to complete the width of the 14-foot L-bainicl to the projected 200 
:tend it to the 14-foot cun-c~which is at a distance of 16,100 feet from 
(ht— it will be necessary to cxciiviito 180,000 eubio yards, two-thirds of 
iftTd clay, and one-half of this nitli only 1.5 feet depth of excavation 
he examination also doveloiKMl tile fact that the crest of the bar along 
de of the channel is slowly but constantly being raised by accnmu- 
lepoait of sand and even sewage brought ilown by the current, cniising 
nk of the dredged channel to cave in within a linear distance of about 
The dredging records show that the neeond, third, and fourth dredge cuts 
range line have been and tho lasl-uamed is uow being dredged to 14 feet 
ater for the third time. 

UU Bar. — This is a shoal, located between the village of Essexville and 
8 near the mouth of the river, and was not included in the original 
■within the loBt two years, during the pre 



OW water. The tint^ last, and only examination (since the lake survey 



■:'I.lr],nij»H'lwiui;C.7!»;i':;l..f y^:.:^'.' ;J.V,V. 
*i4i.M,.| H\.,nit Willow 1-1..:.^ nj. .::..]..t: . .:. 
''■ i" f«ras it Imt I'loi'itu"!. a;<!>-A:« - 

^ ■ !j-. If, ri, liar.— Wll ;;h . ..;>:.:..:j:.„ 

■ --'i^ r.i.ir.H.'.M'IsHw.- iii.|.|,.a::, ,;.:a-.. 
. .^!—,':.l ..., III,. l,.«pr.'»il 1.1 irii- V.jr. A: 



■■fl' 



X-PESDIX L L — ItEPOItr OF UoLOSEL POE. 

toad Bridge, ■wan made 
[lethero arognsll area* 1 .... 
are Ditnil in towing rafts, theae areaa are not coDiieeteir and do Dot 
nd convenient channel for loaded tcsbcIb, eithpT tlioHO iiasaiug dowu 
nbor anil other prod nets fWin the sawmillH further np atredmor sncli 
irinKing coal, linioatone, and bnildiiig nmtctiHla tn the wharrf a along 
of the city of ting^nan-. The river bottom nithin tbii reneh of tbe 
f fine sand and prevlona efTortn in dred)(ing a narrow channel for 
f were not attended with Hnfcetu), as tbe drt'dgn cute were soon tilled 
e action of passini; Hteambouts, front the sppitrently iite:fhanstibIo 
utterinl adjuoent tlivreto. It in eHtimated that a channfl 12 feet dee|i 
ie, can be made by eieavatiiig 86,000 cubic yards. Whether such a 
1 will be permanent is conBiilered very doubtful. 
tt Bridge Shoal.— This eitenda ftxjm a point 1,800 feet above to 1,000 
Briatol Street Bridge, which apans the river in the central part of the 
. The improvement of this reitch of the rivet vaa commenced dur- 
if 1881, aa hereinbefore deacribed. An ice enrvey was made in Jan- 
tbe mup of the KonndinKa ahows that thu dredged channel hail not 
ring tbe two niontlis inMrvenJDg. Tbe estimated quantity of mu- 
removed in order to make that channel the required width of aOO 
bicyanls. Ita permanency aftercompletion is also an open qiieotion. 
lau. — Ilnring tbe pieliiniiiary examination of the river, made in I1i<^ 
>Dg reach of river immediately above the Maokinaw Street Bridge at 
waa fonnd tn Imve leas than 12 feet depth of water, and the esti- 
of material to be excavated in order to make a channel 2IX) feet wide 
I, baaed cm that examiuation of 1881, wae 100,000 cubic yarda. A anb- 
latiou o/ the same loeality resulted ill au eatimatc of 70,000 eiibie 
laa been no attempt made to comnteuea the tmnrovcinettt of tbn river 
vicinity, becanao tbe biennial appropriations for the iwprovcmeut of 
have been too small to warrant an allutiuent for this porpiiae. In 
I later examination, I am inclined to retain the larger eatimitto, (. e., 



AIX)K(i V 



t CITV. 



Bents having been made from two appropriations for impioving 8ag- 
.j te,000 Angnat 5. 1886, and 915,000 Angnat II, 1888, these smonnta 
in accordance Atith a aupplementnry project for improvii " 

Saginaw River, dated April 11, 1887. An ici 
weat channel wbiih were dredged was made in 
aa fonnd Id good preservation. The sum of *10,000 haa been esti- 
aount required fur completing this special project. 
; schedule is a recapitulation of the estimated qnani 
4ed on the present condition of the channel o 
uiilB neceasary to complete tbe approved projec 



f the throe 



\n titles required to 





E..im«t«. 


Droaeed ilnoe. 


Katimatea June 30, 1802. 






^^■': y«d.. 


Cubie 
J-anU. 


PrioB. 


Amount. 


.,^,™... 


-: ":l! 


i 

JB91 1 56,52! 




30 


(52, 149 








i(wi ir.,410 




J 







.yCily: 

f^ 


iS! -fS '" =•■•» 


as I s 


II 


k worlM 




















'""1 " 


37, MO 
2I.TO2 
44,000 

1M,8M 




lEiCS 






T" "■■ ■ 




.im«l .long -Wat! j ! ' ' 1 



■'^ \ 



fciPPEKDlX L L T!ErORT OF COLONEL POE. 2465 

jiite of tLe pr((l)iilile cost of tbe improvement was $l,ii2,oOO. 

— 1,15.5,0(K) ha« been appropriated for the work und it was 
sapleted ill ISSo at a cost uf about $975,000, Few im- 
ive resnlted in greater hfiiiefit totlie lake oommm-ce, oe 
e infrwinency of disasters in the vicinity since it became 

lug Btatemeut sbows tbe various contracts in force daring 
r ending Jaue 30, 1^!)2, and the present condition of each: 



fellWMBT. CDntnMfOr- 


°T.i""i =">".. 




Juno !fl, IWO ri««l .Inne SO, IM3. 
m": -J:, iKK CI.wJ A|.r.3o', IBM'. 






|si,i|i*hi.iicn™7 



ontract with Channcey E. Mitchell, dated Jane 16, 1890, for 
)dge and outfit by tbe hoar, dredging was continued until 
t the season of 1801 luid resumed upon tbe opening of the 
[802. The work done consisted in removing shoals in and 
» harbor, tbe materiiil to be excavated being composed of 
iMvldeTS, and sandstone bed rock, very similar in character 
me. All the dredging contemplated lor the fiscal year was 
, except upon the shoal at tbe main entrance t^i the harbor, 
ditional dredge cuts were made across this fiom west to east. 
was 8topi>ed on June 30, 1802, because the limit of the con- 
reaebed on that day, and the dredge was then discharged. 
it of material removed during tbe fiscal yejir was 25,383 cubic 
rmeaftnre, in 1.338 hours, L'5 minutes, amounting to $10,f>73.49 
tj-act price of $7.90 per hour of work, or nearly 41.7 cents per 
:, scow measure, for the mati^'rial removed, Tlie total number 
vorked under the contract from its beginning was 1,8901; 
amount of material removed was ;Jl,ri47 cubic yards, scow 
tbe total amount earned by the dredge was ^15,004.07, and 
re cost for the use of the dredging pjaut was a little more 
enta per cnbic yard, scow measure. The apparent cost per 
I for tbe excavation wa.>* increased by the time spent during 
ear in removing the wre<-ked barge Col. Jirackett, for which 
d be no equivalent in cubic yards. 

by a diver were made to the main, west, and south piers 
i season of 1891, prior to Oitober 1. During the early part 
8)2, the diver made a thorough examination of tbe pier toun- 
id reported the result in detail. The damage done by the 
orms was much less tliau usual, doubtless due to the measures 
I; season and to tbe unusual immunity from severe storms 
I year. In tliis latter respect tbe winter was quite exceptional, 
s fact, more than to any other, may he attributed the piTsent 
ition of the structures and freedom from necessity for exten- 
iostly repairs. 

ingcrew was reorganized June 1, 1892, and from that time 
]oseof the fiscal year was employed in repairing the damaged 
lie foundation, using for this purjiosc bowlder stone purchased 
Krket for tbe low price ot^u per eonl. 

it pier now appears to be in a less satisfa<^'tory condition than 
, and extensive repairs must soon be made to the portion 
»r. The timbers are badly decayed, and tbe whole super- 
^02 165 




ArrEsDix LL — KKroRT or coLostL roE, 2467 

Moaeif /fttfl«iHent. « 

K>fcAlanc« niioxpeiu)i>d :.... |SI^673.S1 

it eipuniled during fUu*l yiiar U^ 611.88 

1.' iMLinec DuvKpcmlpil ,._ 44) 181. S3 

wtatBnding linliilirifs - 3,778,43 

jt1idneB*TMl»ble 40,388.21 

iCnpilated by Mt approved July 13, 18ilSC ISOtOOaoO 

allaUe A>r flaoal year ending Jane 30, 1893 100^383.21 

tet«anbapntGtabl;rezpeaded[uA8calTeucndinKJniie3l\18M 80^000.00 
lib^ Moiplinnce with nqairementsoi secUoEiatCllfV Iti. 
iwtotrf 1886 ud 1867. 



yraprialJvM for trnprming ftorhir o/ r^ge, Lalc» Bwnm, H IMf a*. 



March 3, 1881 

Augnat2,18S2 

Julys, lS8i 

Angnet 5. 1886 

Angust II, 1888 

September IS, 1890 . 



950,000 
76,000 
75,000' 
75,000 
70,000 



Total 1,150,000 



VwotuaxldnuufLlddu-. 


Omtmci for— 


Todd. 


A Co Suid Beach, illch 


C.«l 


■»*SS.«I 







■ BecuiDTQrudcil fgr accvplsnce. 



irind at tlmnnf 


IBBl. 


18M. 






JiJy. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Say. 


IVc. 


i«,. 


Apr. 

7 


lU,. 


Jdim 


Tutal. 




1 

A 


1 

1 


i 


cs 


, 






44 


4 
6 




















in 




h 






1 














"° 




ArPENDlX LL — REPORT OF COLOXKL TOi;. 24S9 



■dsrjair. 


Steuo. 


6*fl. 


t™. 


Total. 


TbUI 


A.m*) 




n.«sa 

IM.U29 

lu'.ta 

!Sli 

iliS 

271,817 

aH.ui7 


li 

U.MO 
ABM 
SITIS 

U.TU 

gffi 

BS.754 

|;| 


Km.. 

1.7: aw 

ll«,0»l 
133, 080 

iSiSS 

II 


Mi. 019 

3ta.iK« 
2Ts.tna 

ii 

S7D,W7 


m 

ili 

iIjm 


































































!l,Bza.iBlr 


SSa.IM 


j.oao.3»i> 


s.sie,!M 


n,«3 









iOVEMENT OP BLACK RIVEB AT POET HUKON, HICHICAN. 

iinproveineiits were (commenced the lower reath of Black River, 
iioutlt to the Grand Trnnk Kailroad Bridge, ii length of nearly 
varied in vidtli fr»nt 120 to 150 fL'«t, and had a navigable 
if fi-om 10 to 14 ftet in depth, except at a few points where it 
ructed by ahoals or bars having only 84 feet of water over 

er and harbor act of Angust 11, 1888, called for an examina- 
Black River at Port Huron, to deepen channel from month to 
■unk Railroad Bridge to depth of 18 feet." After aprelinii- 
filiation of the locality had bceu made I reported that the 
hin the limits indicated, while not worthy of iniprovcmeut to 
i depth as J8 i'eet, was worthy of improvement to a depth of 
nd a survey was consequently antliorized to obtain data on 
base a project for this latter depth. As a result of this survey 
ate of 955,110 was made on May 0, 1889, for improving the 
the river in question to a depth of 15 feet, 
er and harbor act of September 10, 1890, appropriated $25,000 
roving Black River at i'ort Huron, Mich., to deepen channel 
ith to Grand Trunk Ruilroad Bridge to depth of Iti feet," 1 
ter depth than that tbr which the estimate had been made. A 
Toject for the improvement of the river to the depth named in 
ipriation was therefore submitted in January, 1801, and was 
roved. It contemplates excavating a channel 16 feet deep 
month of the river to the Grand Trunk Railroad Bridge, and 
varying between 160 and 75 feet, according to locality. On 
if the greater depth the estimate for the work was increased 
0. 

beginning of the fiscal year a contract with Chauncey E. 
for dredging was in force, under a project for the expenditure 
appropriated for the work by the river and harbor act of 
JT 19, 1890. The work proposed to be accomplished was to 



OP THE CHIKP OF ElTOHrEEBS, V. 8. JOOSi. 

lol two dred^e-cats wide and 16 feet dMp ftotn 

Br upstream as for aa tbe funds aviiilablc wonld ii 

were more tlian eufficient to carry tin* two eats W 

„t „u ilroad Bridge, tLen to widen tlie lower reacli ut 

iTi»| udCL ^ii> fiiuds were ^ shaiist^d, all iu furtherance of thv j 

I'cct. TliiBContrai't bas been extended to December l,188i 

; haa been in progress throughont the fiscal >'ear und iia 

bed. It waa stopped for the season on Koveinbet liS, t 

resuiiitid April Ifi, 1S92. On June 30, 1892, a channel 16 itaU 

onded from the moutb of the river towards the Grand Tmnk 1 

il Bridge, tbe whole length being about 6,300 feet. Its width 

mouth of the river to Military Street Bridge, a distance of a 

feet, was 75 feet, and it ^ds 50 feet wide lor the further diil 

-bout 4,500 feet 



utt of nwU'Hul removed uaruii T. 

Totel amuunt of exoayation U *92 9 

tlof «sitmiiiatioii anil survey pi iriatiuD for iiaproveiueiit.. IT 

peu<litur«B to Juue 30, IHDI, iiiidi lion of September 19, 1890. 1,3 

pondi tu res and obligations duri , .- ending J imo 30, 1892 1^9 

Total cost to Jnne SO, 1883 »,< 



jnoiuit to credit of estimate SO;l 

Of the balance remaining to the lu^dit of the estimate tbeM 
$25,000 ciiii be advantageously expended during one fiscal year. 

Black River, at Port Huron, is in the coUei^tion district of Buran, Uicb. 
nearratport of entry is I'ort Huron, through Ihe midst of vrliii:1i the riTctniB 
the nojireat light-bouse is Fort Gratiot Light, distant about 2 miles. 

Afoncy statement. 



July 1, 1832, bnlanoB unexpended 

July 1, 1802, outflUmdiiiK liabililiea $2,309.88 . 

July 1, 1892, am on nt covered bj ancompleted uoiitracta lS,06t.62 

"■' 

AmoQiit appropriated by act approved July IS, 1892 1(1,1 

{Amount fpatimated) rei|aired for completion of ezistinK project i^l 
Aimiiuittliatran beprofltulilyespendPrl in BbcbI year endinR June 30, 18M Sv' 
Bubiiiittpd in I'omiiliance witti reiioireniBiits of Heetiona 2 of river nod 
hiirbor Ufls of laiU and 18li7. 



Jpproprialion for improving BJack Rhcr, Michigan, al Port Huron, tt*. 
September 19, 1890 | 



'APPENDIX 1,1. — REPORT OV COLONUL POE. 



24?! 



o„....««^ 




Tom. 




HE 

t,to» 


lOT 




:::;::;;::::::::::;:::::::::;;;:;:::::::::::;;;:;::::::^;: 




as 




7,«» 






J,li5 


4k 








AM 




'. 



« made from the riT«T, 



iOTEHENT OF MOUTH OF BLACK BIVEK, HICHIQAK. 

er empties into St. Clair Eiver, at Port Huron, Mich. At 
:s moiitb, ext^iidiug boyoud tbe middle of St. Clair Biver, 
ar, or Middle Ui'ouud. Under former appropriations this 
d;;ed to a cleiir depth of 15 feet. The main channel of St. 
is ibiiitd between the Middle Ground and the Canadian 

iposit of material brought down by the current of Black 
epth on the bar had been reduced an average of about 6 
in conjunction with a low stage of water, became an im- 
navigation along the front of the city of Port Haron in 

mce with projects approved in 1889 and 1891 it was pro- 
arove the bar by makiug a series of dredge cute, of a uni- 
of 16 feet, along tbe dock front of Port Huron, from the 
e above to tbe same curve below the mouth of Black River, 
at a distance of about .50 foet from the wharves, and the 
titinue the work outward as far as the available funds would 

e project of 1889 (act of August 11, 1888) the bar was 
;he full depth of IC feet, for a width of 300 feet, the amount 
removetl being 40,230 cubic yai-ds, scow measurement. 
B project of 1891 {art of September 19, 1890) a contract 
1 11, 1890, with the Bay Oity Dredging Company, for dredg- 
foree at the beginning of the fiscal year, and work was 
itil Kovember 14, 1891, when it ceased on account of tbe 
of the appropriation. The amount of material removed 
iscal year was 40,011 cubic yards, scow measurement, and 
te under tfeis contract was 57,515 cubic yards. The result 
120 feet to the width of the improvement, thus making it 
e. 

I amount of material removed uoder the two projects was 
e yards, scon measure. The dredging should be continued 



^ ArrKNDlX L L — EKPOET OF COLONKr, POK. 2467 

Moiiep Mtiiteiitcnt. » 

IBSl. baUnoe iinnippudod ; *5J>,e7S.61 

, 18!K.>, aiuoiuit expended during flscsl futr l^Cll.SS 

aiMbnwaanpMdad..... «,l«l.e» 
osMudlBg fiaUlHlM 3,778.43 

UBS, iMbnoo'sTHlablA 40,383.31 

•pprapriatod bT Ht appnred July 13, 1892 I50,00a00 

»r*lUItIe for flio»l year ending J one 30, 1893 19(^383.21 

iitUi»tcanbeprofiUbljexpeiidediuaBcalTearoiidingJnn«S(^18M 8(^000.00 
tted i* oompliuice with nqaireiiieiita of Motion 1 8 dC rtra SiA 
MV Hti of IHtS and 18S7. 

A^HvprUttioM for imprwing harbor of r^Mije, latt Burnt, MUdfmn. 

,1871 flOOOOO MarohS.ieSl KC^OOO 

,1872 lliO om Ansait 2, 1882 75,000 

,1873 " rtX) July6,188* 75,000' 

,187* -itm Angasl5.1886 75,000 

,1875 UN JNIO Angost 11, 1888 70,000 

14,1876 im Bepteinber 19, 1890 30,000 

, IBM 1 X) <XX] 

,1879 7o 000 Total 1,150,000 

1880 75,000 



Mwe ud wUtcu or Udder. 


O.iitrael fur— 


Tatul. 




CM 


■Wis. DO 







aCwhidBt UiDcof 


1801. 


irm. 


Tutol. 


MUriog. 


ialS 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Not. 


I>oe. 


Ju. 


A,„. 


m,. 


I.,.. 




11 


IS 
3 

1 


I 


le 

13 

.3 


1 






1 


J) 


> 

4 
1 














9 

• 








I: 


5 




=^ 
















t^ 



» *-«-'»,„ 



"\r~ 



Ij ll Sf i 



S X » 



: =^ 


£ 


> 


r 

ft N 


* ^ 


S 


~ 


ITT n 


• •■ . . rs 


Vte Vr-*-- 


-'ry 


s:-'"' 


;*:- 


riT 




T^d. 




APPENDIX LL. — KEPORT OF COLONEL POK., 



MdarfBU. 


S(«D>. 


gaU. 


'"■ 


ToW. 


VHHll. 


S,L^ 




lis 

IT1.91T 

Sis 


li 

la 


oftiw 

]M>.OM 

IS:S 

iw.wrr 

is 

153.0117 
IwilM 

in. on 


II 

Jl§fl,7n;l 
323,428 

45§, lot 
MS.*** 

Si 


llM 
1.M3 

tS2 


S 




























































J,BM.I>» 


MB.1W 


a.oM.M» 


s,si8.aa 


IT.SM 









>SOT£H£NT OP BLACK EIVEB AT POET HUBOS, MICHICAN. 

e improvements were c-offlmenced the lower reach of Black River, 
□loath to tlie Gra-iid Trunk Kailxoad Bridge, a length of nearly 

8, varied in width Aom 120 to 150 feet, and had a navigable 
of fiom 10 to 14 feet in depth, except at a few points wliei-e it 

structed by shoals or bars having ODiy 8^ feet of water over 

iver and harbor act of Angast 11, 1888, called for an examina- 
"Black River at Port Hnron, to deepen channel from month to 
Fmnk Railroad Bridge to depth of 18 feet." Alter a prelinii- 
amination of the locality had been made I reported that tlie 
Ithin the limits indicated, while not worthy of improvement to 
t a depth as 18 feet, was worthy of improvement to a depth of 
and a survey was consequently authorized to obtain data aa. 

base a project for this latter depth. As a result of this survey 
mate of 965,110 was made on May 9, 1889, for improving the 
f the river in question to a depth of 15 feet. 

iver and harbor act of September 1!), 1890, appropriated t-5,000 
proving Black River at Port Huron, Mich., to deepen channel 
oath to Grand Trunk Railroad Bridge to depth of 10 feet," 1 
ater depth than that Ibr which the estimate had been made. A 
project for the improvement of the river to the depth named in 
ropriation was therefore submitted in January, 18i)l, and was 
iproved. It contempInt4.'s excavating a channel l(i feet deep 
e mouth of the river to the Gr.ind Trunk Railroad Bridge, and 
h varying between 160 and 75 feet, according to locality. On 
: of the greater depth the estimate for the work was increased 
WO. 
le beginning of the fiscal year a contract with Chauncey E. 

1 for dredging was in force, under a project for the expenditure 
100 appropriated for the work by the liver and harbor act of 
bar 19, 18B0. The work proposed to be accomplished was to 



ItfiJS 
Total- 



OP TITE CHIEF OT ElWlTWEKfiS, TT. J 
fur opriating ani cart ef SttiHl CUiir FlaU CaMal, lfuU( 
Dul year eudiug June 30 — 



Ilemtted italmtont of expenditure (nev 
and fiare of CHiiatt ana other worlu o, 
earc of SaUl Clair Fiatt Canal, Miehl 



on account of appropriation fin 
!|;a(tnii indejinife, applied to oft 
^orlke fiicat gear ending JhmM 



Fori Bf/trtt qvarter, It 

pBymll. July, IWI 

FayroD, AngTut.lSOl.. 



P»jro 


l,No 


ember 


», 


P«jm 


,D«. 


..ubcr. 


m 


■n 


>iiv 


nri.r. 


m. 


w.u 


Mult 


CUBlod 






M»<t 













iltHtllBfJuly, U 
l'ay"ll.J''"e,18»!-- 



iya.mtfa]wday.. 

lftboier,2edayi,at't$6perBnHiifa''! 



SeTT[c«»u raitodlao Mt St. Clslr FLiti 



Canal, VlirMp 



(bnLhdafalDcliuivB), 

Wdiim at St. Clair FUb 
Ban. ftom FeLmnry 1 (i 
1882 (boOi day ■ iocl niiiM, 

todhiD Ht St. CliJr FIsH 



, at dnya, M *M pa 




COLONEL rot . 2477 
LL 15. 

IHPROVEMENT OF CLINTON RIVER, MICHIGAN. 

) the channel over the barattlie entrance to tliia river afforded 
iof only 3jj feet, \Fhile the depth in the river for some distance 
s 10 feet. 

)Ct for dredging a chnnoel acrosB the bar waa approved and 
to effect in 1870. A project for the general improremeDt of 
^^er from its month to the city of Mount Clemens was Bnbmitted 
B80 and renewed and approved in 188!^ It contemplates a channel 
bS do^p "J^'' "*■ navigable width for tlie entire distnuce of a-hnnt M- 
« from the mouth of the river to Afonnt Clemenn. Involved in tUs 
ttie closing of a gap opposite Monnt Clemens and of Cstfleh [or 
id) Channel ; also closing the main channel at, and making a straight 
across, Shoemakers Bend, constrnctiDg a revetment on the north 
' of the month from the shore to the requisite, depth in Lake St. 
. ;iiid dredging wherever necessaT^to attain the desired depth, the 

I ted cost of the improvement being <t3a,926. 
I'ii to the beginning of the fiscal yflar the work at Shoemakerfl 
mi bad been eompletedj the gap opposite Mount Clemens had been 
jwxl, and some dredging had been done at the mouth of the river and 
.v;irion8 shoals between there and Mount Clemens. 
At the beginning of the flacal year the only contract in force was one 
Itli yii\ George Lockerbie, dated February 13, 1891, approved March 
■Wl, for diedging. Under this contract operations had been begun 
ly 1. 18m, and were continued untU October 4, 18'J1, when the funds 
ire t-xhaosted and the work ceased. 

rhe result was a channel 8 feet deep and 75 feet wide or more, from 
I month of the river to the bridge at Monnt Clemens. Although the 
Innel can not be considered permanent', yet no complaint of its 
[erioration Las reached this office up to the date of this re|)ort. 

iToliinio of raaturiul roinoved during the flscal year wnn 23,374 

J llic total voluiuo uuder this ooiilriict whs 38,401 

alMpenditiiresto.1iiDe30, IWHl WMOS.OB 

inideil dnriug fiscal year 6,000,64 

Total osp6ttditiir«a to JniiB 30, 1892 51, 411. GO 

Sight thoosand five hundred and sixty-four dollars and fourtei'n 
itB still remain to be appropriated to complete the improvement in 
iordance with the existing pniject, and in view of the relief already 
brded the river is worthy of the additional appropriation. This 
taunt can b« profitably expended during the fiscal yeai' ending June 
,1883. 

Bat the good effect of the dredging already done is liable to be de- 
«red by deposits of material brought down by annual trc-'shets in 
Bliver, for which reason the foregoing estimate can only be consid- 
|d as approximate for the fiscal yejvr, and is probably too low if the 
kk be deferred beyond that time. 

Ibe proposed navigable depth having been once obtaine<1, no charges 
i maintenance shonld be made against it. The balance named is 
iMded ot^ foe the construction of the revetment on the north side 
me met atlJie mont^ The good effect of the dredging already done 
Mte to lie fmjiaired by deposits of mateiial bi-ought down by annual 



freshets in the river, autl the cost of rpattiring tlio ilopdl di 
diargeable to future estimates wntl appropnatious Ctiftreunder. 



Money statement. 



n,^nl>Ie for Sscal year ending June 30, 1893. . 



Jp]n-t>prialion»/or improiing Clinlim SIrer, ifickigaK. 



AoBnirt30.1(«3 (5.000 1 Aiigiut 5. ISRfi.... 

Jo&XLlSTO B,000 AiiRiiBi II, 1(«S . 

Miiroh 3, 1871 1,500 Switi^mbw 10, 181)i 

Marrh3,1881 S.OOO 

Aaguata, 1882 6,000 1 Total 



COMMERCIAI. »■ 

AHleU* cnlercd nnd aUared iuring the u 



ArUolM 


nlBTC-l. 1 Amouat 


Tom. 


AMlclo rftBwa. I Aiowot': 




.,r«.t,li.M.,l T,aH),CK» 


14, am 

IB.UUD 
10, UM 


Ftaur ha ! 


.is 

.6,0M,IJM„ 




(Ht* bn«M.. 








IlBwlinp do... 






^^ 


.rBBl,RM.. K.I>OIi,Ul« 

■1"-... t.llWMKKl 

rto.... O.UOO.wn 

ounb.. 6,0U» 




1 




6!,aao 












Snmhtr of vesid 


e^earfli duriitj r^ teaim of 1S91. 















IMPKOVKMKNT OF GROSSE TOISTE CHANNEI,, MICHIOAU. 

Between tbe lower end of St. Clair Flats and tlie deep water 
troit Itiver, tlie only known obatiiiction to navigation is tht 
Klioal off Grouse Poiiite, known as Grosse Poiute Flats. At or 
stages of wat»r vessels drawing 16 feet can ctosb this obatructit 



a:^^^^ 




Ari-EXPIX L L ItEPOKT o/^COLOKEl. POt 2479' 



"II the wat*r is sis low as it liii^ liefu during the lust few years^ vos- 
[^ •Irnwiiig mure titan 16 feet can paaa ouly with grOat care and 
malty. 

The river anrt h:id>or act of Angnst 11, 1S86, appropriated 175,000 
? " imprfiviiiK St. C'lair Flats Smp Canal, • • • all or any por- 
iQ of wlii«:li luay.iu tlie dlHcretion of tbe engineer, be expended in 
^^ng GroKse Poiute Cbanuel," Five thousand dollftrs was eonae- 
nntly resej^ved from this appropriation for the removal of any small 
S well-defined obstruction that inight be fonnd at Gmsse Foiiite, 
well as for making such surveys as mightbeneceasary before making 
tefiiiito ftrojcct. A small shoal was removed in Jaly, 18S9, but no 
■re ^iii'li obstructions have since been found. 

\sf lh<- iiJt{)ioTement of other connecting channels of the Great Lalcea 
iriii-i ti> :if]iiioat'h tlie 20-foot depth, which it is recognized that they 
>iihl ultiiiiatc'ly have, the annoyance to shipping at Grosse Pointe 
us iiin^t irii'ii-;t>e, and the necessity for a channel at tbia point is 
j'lit. Tiic iJDinhcr of vessels annually crossing these flats is euor- 
ii~. -and to insure a thoroughly satisfactory result a channel 800 feet 
|i' :tud nearly 54 miles long should be dredged. The material to be 
nated consists of sand, gravel, and clay, and thtTapproximate esti- 
.u; of the cost of this work is as follows: 

bduinK 3,889,472 cnbio yards, at 30 cento «8ffl, 841. 60 

d 10 per cent for con tin gene lea 8S, !»4. 16 

Total 956,825.76 

iIq an estimate submitted Fobiuai-y 10, 1SS8, I iilareil theroxtof a 
itnuel 19) feet deep at $553,000, but remarked tliat to " g;un an ad- 
RJDual half ibot would materially increase the cost." That estimate 
B based upon a price of 20 cents per cubic ynnl for ili'cdging. For a 
■anel 20 feet indi^pth the length of the channel is inci-eased nearly 
fales, over which the work would be merely "scraping," and there- 
fe disproportionately costly. 

Bat tlip full depth of 20 feet should bo obtained at whntever cost, 
le comiiKicc wliich passes this [loiut already exceeds 20,)M)0,OiM) tons 
imally, and steps can not be taken too soon tor its accommodatiou. 
Ed accomplish valuable resultH a large appropriation will l>c required 
flnt, and unless this be granted the results will be uusiitisfactory, 
d the eventual cost will bo greatly increased. With ?.'JiHI,000 a^-ail- 
le^ a nan-ow channel of the proposed deptli can b<> o[icne(1, and will 
orA immediiito Ehongh insnflicient relief. ■ Its width can subsequently 
increased to such an extent as may be necessary. 
Fhis improvement is both necessary and urgent, aud wnll benefit 
krly the entire commerce of the lakes. 

k<MM Folnte Flats are iii the collet. tii>ii ilistrkt of Detroit, Micb. ^^'illd]ULll Point 
U'lKtaM anil range UglitB are in clouo vicinity. 

Monetj Mtatement. 

\fl, 1881, halnnce nneipendcd $3,WI. 05 

^ If 1893, balance unexpeudcd 3,JU4.ti5 



liMOimt (estimated) required for coiniiletioii ofcxiftiiiKproiMt iKW,8i'i.76 

■ ■ «bopr<iflta" ■ 

!om 



itth»tc»nbopr<ifltal.lyeipoud«iliiiIi3rul.vtiirciiaiiiaJiiiii-Hil,l«H SOU, 000. 00 

kiknUt«d in compliance vith ruiiiiireuitMita of suctiuus^j of livur aud 
^^^ ■ rf;8W(ui41867, 



b:- 



OF THE CSlEP bf EKGniTEEttS, T, 5. AUVT.^ 

LL17. I 

HOVKMENT OP ROHOE RITER, MICHTGAN. j 

impn einenta were li«gnn Boiigc River bad a chmuida 

■jvve tlie uitr at its month, and ftom 10 t« 17 i'eet tli«iK-«t^ 

e of tlin St. Louia aud Wal)»Hli Railrond, a distance of iiearlj^ W 

» In earlier days vesstils biid ascended it to Df>arl)orii, adistaal 

...ntnt IS tnileit. ] 

The ftppnived project for improvement coHteraplat«s drcJgingj 

iver to a depth of 10 fuet and width of 340 feet at the mouth, gn 

-lly narrowing to 100 fuet at a di^tanee of about 1,130 feet aboi-sJ 

•n continuing this width to the bridge of the St. Loiub aud WaH 

ilroiid, J 

tn .Tnne 30, 1891, the dro'if"' -i-Tinel waa Ifi feet deep, 2*) I 

> at the mouth, gnidual iug lo 100 fe«t at a distaiKi 

*'e8t above; thence to tUt t»n Central Kailroad bridgfl 

Dual distanie of about ] et, It averaged 70 feet in wB 

wider at tlifteurvea. T length of the dredged chai 

, -Jout 12,fi.'jy fL-et. J 

. xio fbnds were aviiilable duri y part i»f the fiscal year end 

June 30, 1892, for which reason rk waiD done, and some efaca 

baa taken place in jiortions of tt uiel already dredged; J 

To coniplct« the improvement . «v)rdance with the originalf 

mate will require the sum of * 0.39, that being (he ditl^ 

between the original estimates ; aggregate of the sums this 

appropriated. In view of the «iug number of DiannfactB 

establishments along its banks, .,,.^ us availability as a winter har 

fi)r veasels, the river ia well worthy of the additional apitruiirial 

necessary to complete the project for its impiuvement. The wi 

amount cjiu be profitably expended in one tisfal yeiir. 

Aimitnit of original oBtimatc $31,69 

Amount oxiieiiiled to June 30, 1832 $20, US 28 

LcBH cost of surveys and cxnuiiu.itious prior to mnkiiigtlio esti- 
mate GIG 45 

Amount actually expended npon improvement 19, S 

Balance to credit ofestlmiitfl 11,83 

BaloniM: on Land U 

Amount to bo appropriated 11,6* 

TliU work is in tlic collection district of Detroit, JEiili, Tho nearest lisht-b 
in (iriiaHV Island, aud tlie nearest fort is Fort Wayne, euub of wliicli is iu sight i 
tLe work. 

Money statement. 
Jnly I, 1831, bfilaiieo unexpended IS 

July 1 , I8.')2, balniiee niicxpendod li 

Aiiionnt appropriated liyaot approved Jidy 1.% 18n2 ILK 

AmouutnvailableforflscalycareQiIiiig Jnno30, 1893 J1,8S 

Apprnpriulioni for imprnving Eomjc Hirer, Michigan. 

Soptouiiier in, issio !*.!]!!!!!!!!!/.'..'. '.l."'.'..!l"I u 

Total 3 



Emer 



AITKXDIX L L REPORT OP COLONEL POE. 



COMStEECIAL STATISTIC 



_^jnercia] statistics have not bean obt-ainoil for tlie ctilendar year 1R91, but they 
•^ praetii.'-ally the Hama ae thone reported in tJie proireilinK Aiinnal Kejiort for 1890, 
tniii the; wen sUted in detail. The Ireight tonnage fur ItOO-nas 311,000 touB. 



j IMPEOVEMENT OF DETROIT RIVER, MICHIGAN. 

piriginally the djaniiel at Hmekiln Crossing, Detroit River, could 
i )X) depended niK>n for more than 13 feet of water, the ordinary 
:Bth being mnch affected by the direction of the wind. As originally 
yected in 1S74 the improvement at tliio point was to consist of a 
-yed cbsDTiel 300 feet wide, witli a uniform depth of 20 feet, ftod the 
^oal estimate was baefc upon thia project. 

xt 1883 it was wisely determined to so modify the project as to se- 
"c a straight channel, the least width of wtiich should be 300 feet, 
•li a somewhat greater width at each epd, utilizing the work already 
ae. 

'n 18SG this was ftirthcr modified to the end that the width of the 
MineJ shonld be increased to 100 feet by removing an additional 100 
!t from the western (American) side^ and in 1888 a further addi- 
>nal width of 40 feet on the western side was anthorized, as the low- 
k bid ander the final appropriation was so low that the money in 
lad would pay for the increased excavation. 

the estimated cost of a 400-foot channel was $1,374,500. The total 
bonnt: expended up to June 30, 1S91, was $701^,122.04, and the result 
<b been a channel 440 feet in width, thus accomplishing one-tenth 
Kne work than was estimated for at a cost of but little more than half • 
le estimate. Gratifying as this is, the benefit to commerce is far be- 
kid the amonnt of the original estimate, and since the excavation is 
Itrough rock the improvement will be permanent. 
The only work in progress during the fiscal year was the preparation 
tfk map of the water fiont of Detroit Kiver, from it head, at Windmill 
tint, to a point about 2 miles below the lliver Itouge, a total distance 
'about 13 miles. For this purpose the total sum expended to June 
y892, was $64.48. 

Water gauge observations were made during the months of May and 
uie, 1892, at the light-house depf)tj Detroit, and at Windmill Point 
glit-House. Their cost is included in the above statement of expend- 
ires. 

dft) expenditure to June SO, ISfll $702, 122. ftl 

[puia«l dnring fiscal year 64. 48 

Total expenditure to June 30, 1892 702,186.52 

The project for Limekiln Crossing having been completed, no further 

timate is submitted for work at tliat point. The extreme low water 

'■**"" last lew year.s, however, has caused vessels to strike on a num- 

. shoals in difierent parts of the river, whose existence had not 

ily beeii known^ ajid, in view of the magnitude of the commerce 

all such shoals should be removed &s soon as possible. As no 

Information on this subject is at hand, an accurate estimate of 

work can not be made, but $50,000 would probably suf- 



2482 REPORT OP THH CHIEF OF ENGLNEEH8, U. S. iKMT. 

flee for ttie removal of the more serious of the Bhoals betweeu the 
of Detroit aud Lake I'^iie, and au estimate of that amount is tLert 
snbmitted and Btron}.-ly reconitnended. 

Tbe work is in the colLi tinii district or Detroit, Mich. The npftrpst |iort aft 
is Detroit. Tha iiearnst l^uitml States ligbt-hoiiBux are Mammj Judy aod lh^r 
lighto at tbe head of Qrosee Iilc, about Ti in ilex [liat.ant. 

Money »taieii\ent. 

Jolyl, 1891, balance nneipi'iiileil Ml 

JuiieSO, 1892, amount ei]niiiic(i during fiscal jenr ,- I 

Jnly 1,1892, balance nneip.-iulcd t 

AnioHDt appropriated by :iit iipproved Jnly 13,1893 30^11 

Amoant available for fiKal ycarfodin); .lune3O,18i0 31^11 

(Amount (estimated) required Tor completion nf existliiK prt^ect m4 

AtnniuitthatcanbeproGtjilil.vDKpendeilinliHcal^earendinE.fuieSO. 1894 St^tf 

Submitted in compliaii-:t> nith requin^mcnta ot aectiuns 3 of Tivei and < 

harbor acU of 1866 and 1867. I 



Approjtriatu 



impToring Detroit Rin-r, ifUliisan. 



June 23, 1874 825,000 I July 5, L88* •» 

Jnnel8, 1878 100,000 Anguat fi, 18H6 >l 

March 3, 1879 50,000 Augast 11,1888 -. Ul 

JnneH,1880 50,0n0 | -^ 

March 3, 1881 50.000 Tata! HI 

Aagu8t2,ie82 60,000 ] n 



CotuniodiII<'s. 


A„.un„. 


Tou». 


c™. 


l-liliM.- 


A-muunls. 


T« 


anl 11 


•Allied 




«.l«S.O»J 

l,lM.in7 

WilKtl 
23»,21tt 











Iron 


SS3 

Lafli!..!'." 
.■<taiusln . 

i.-ciiimt . 

Telegr.-iiib 

Tola! 


hl.rt«-. 


e. em'. ■!!» 

IIMinSI 




IVheot b, 


?■■ 


73.(1011 




Corn M 






|H.I«..|>l»-«. 


.■■1.U8 




£;Jur!::-:::::£;:: 



















be iiiiirli icri'Lilcr. 
TufnJ number of ve. 



mat'e, 22.Ui0,000, t-xcliisivc of Tan, 
d Ibi> list (if uouimoditics made loin 
I u ciiatum-lioiiHe or not, the total i 



lefn and Inrningr '■liiirfil frini nil Ihr rnllrclion diatricti on Ike 




:^ *;f ,u-v • 



^ »' - 



/ 



APPENDIX Lli — ^REPORT OP COLONEL POE. 



2483 



^ - yumher of loaded cars that crossed Detroit liivcr during 1S91. 

filM>and ^ \ 199,173 

ill bound ...., • 120,956 

^ Total 320,129 

iniage at an average of 12 tons x>er car 3, 841, 548 

image at an average of 15 tons per car .4, 801, 985 

y 



LL ig. 



MOVINO SUNKEN VESSELS OR CRAFT OBSTRUCTING OR ENDANGER- 



Xj^- 



ING NAVIGATION. 



^reek 



^e 



ties 



iWhen 



of $cow Hannah Moore. — ^The unladen wooden scow Hannah 

became water-logged and sunk in St. Clair Eiver on July 3, 1891. 

lay off Port Huron^ Mich., in about 16 feet of water, nearly at right 

to the channel, on her beam ends, her two masts i)ointing up- 

She was about 450 feet from the Flint and Pere Marquette 

Dock, and 1,250 feet below Black Biver. Her dimensions 

approximately as follows: Gross tonnage, 74.23; length, 88 feet; 

~th 20 feet; depth, 6 feet 4 inches. She was built in 1868, at St. 

Mich., and hailed from Detroit, Mich. ^ 

it became apparent that the owner of the scow did not propose 
iove her, a project for her removal at an estimated cost of $1,000, 
ipanied by the necessary specifications, was submitted to the 
of Engineers. This project having been approved, the thirty 
notice required by law was published on August 22, 1891, and 
lifilcations were issued. 
Proposals for removing the wreck were opened on September 21, 
1, and on September 28, 1891, a contract was duly entered into with 
pie lowest bidder, Mr. Chauncey E. Mitchell, for the lump sum of $880. 
"^ The work of removal was begun October 15. The scow was broken 
Uto two pieces by dynamite, and on October 21 and 23 the two portions 
^ere raised and towed to a point near the shore, about 2 miles below 
llack River. On November 9 all the remaining portions of the wreck 
irere removed satisfactorily, and on November 16 the contract was 
losed. The total cost to the Government, including superintendence, 
tinting, advertising, etc., was $902.10. No articles of value were re- 
vered. 

pliia work was in the collection district of Hurou, Mich. The nearest port of 
' was Port Huron, and the nearest light-house was Fort Gratiot Light, at the 
of St. Clair River. 

^actof bids for the removal of the wreck of the scow Hannah Moore from the St. 

•tr River, opposite the Flint and Fere Marquette Railroad Dock^ Fort IliwoUf Mich,^ 
heeeired and opened on September SO, 1891, in accordance tcith advertisement dated 
\Amgu9t t2, 1891, 



^ 
t 



Name aod address of bidder. 



Cluunioey E. Mitchell, Detroit, Mich. * . 

Snocb Townaend, SomeTs Point, K. J . , 
BUah Dunbar, Detroit, Mioh :. . . 




Keniarks. 



Will iiBB dynamite. Dredge and lighters io be 

nsed when wreck will not float, aiter bLwt- 

ing.* 
Hotuove said vessel by dynamite, and pieces if 

necessary will lighter. 
Will use dynamite to break the ve^nel in pieces, 

and land' same on bank of river with tug. 



* KecomineTi4ed for acceptaiicQ. 



lit 



APPENDIX M M. 



TEMENT OF BIVERS AND HARBORS ON LAKE ERIE WEST OF 
• ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA. 



BT OF LIEUTENANT'COLONEL JARED A. 8MITW, CORPS OF ENGI- 
'K8, OFFICER IN CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 
^g, WITH OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS, 



IMPROVEMENTS. 



roe Harbor, Michigan. 

do Harbor, Ohio. 

, Clinton Harbor, Ohio. 

lusky City Harbor, Ohio. 

lasky River, Ohio. 

on Harbor, Ohio. 

aillion Harbor, Ohio. 



8. Black River Harbor. Ohio. 

9. Cleveland Harbor, Ohio. 

10. Fairport Harbor, Ohio. 

11. Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio. 

12. Removing sunken vessels or craft ob- 

structing or endangering naviga- 
tion. 



EXAMINATIONS AND SURVEYS. 

md River, Ohio, between Rich- I 14. Conncaut Harbor, Ohio, 
lond and the mouth. 



United States Engineer Office, 

Cleveland^ Ohio, July 9, 1892. 

7EB AL : I have the honor to transmit herewith, in duplicate, annual 
» for the year ending June 30, 1892, upon the improvement of 
and harbors in my charge. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Jared a. Smith. 
Lieutenant' Colonel J Corps of Engineers. 

y. Gen. Thomas L. Casey, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. S. A. 

2485 



2486 EEPOBT OP THE CHIKl^ OF ENGINEERS, U. S. AUMT. "^ 

MM I. 
IMPROVEMENT OF MONROE HARBOR, SUCHJGAIT. "l 

This improvement was c<>iiiiii<>ii(^ed in the yeiir I83u, at wbic&f 
the Raisin River was conHiden'd an impoi-taat stream, and Houmft 
a place of some prominence. Tlie plan of improvement consistei 
straightening the river and making direct connection with Lake 1 
hy a canal 4,000 feet long and lOU I'eet wide, thmtigh a sand peoiDS 

A description in detail of the earlier operations heretofore cairiec 
for the improvement of thin harbor will be foand in AnnQal Report 
]8S0 and 1381. 

Some minor repairs to the piers and revetment of canal were m 
in the fiscal year ending .Tune 30, 1891, but nothing has been done i 
ing the last fiscal year, aiut thi' j)ro,)ect for repairs remains untonci 

A project for a general ri'puir of the piers and revi-tmont of canal 
adopted in 188C, the cost at that time being estimated at 92u,WU. 
general repairs have been undertaken owing to lack of funds for b 
a purpose. Of course the condition of the superstructure of piers 
the canal revetment is constantly becoming worse. The amount < 
mat£d aa necessary for the general repairs in 1891 was $26,000. 
estimate appears to have been a general one only, as it is not e» 
determine in advance the exact extent to which the work mustbi 
newed. 

As the ofBcer in charge of the work has bad no opportunity to e 
a critical examination of the situation, the last estimate is ben 
peated. 

The annual report of last year gave the least depths of watei 
June, I89(), as 9 feet to lower docks and thence to upper docks a 
feet. No e;^aminatiou for channel depths has been made since the 
meiitinncd. 

The following is a stntomeiit of the amonut and date of all appro; 
tious tor this nii|)io\i.m(.nt 



telimirv -M 1S\ 


$■») 000 00 


Au!,ii8tl4 187b- 


jui\ J ijyo 


la 000 00 


luue 18 1878 


M-ircli t l«n 


■il\ (KK\ 00 


March i 1879 


JnlvT IHW 


1 . 000 00 


hiiie 14 1S80 


Jiiu. 11 mi 


20 000 00 


MnicL 3 1881 


AiigiiMt to 18.1-' 


u 000 on 


\iiHiist 2 1882 


J linn ^ 1KI>6 


11 OIj 27 


AiiKllst 5 I88C 


Jiilie 10 18,2 


10 000 00 


tufiiHt 11 1888 


Mnrcli 3 I8T3 


r. (KM) 00 


bepttinber 11 18 


JiiUB ^ 187+ 


10 000 00 




MurcU 3 1873 


10 000 00 


Total 



The comiiuTiiiil statistics are not sufficiently reliable to make 
iiite conipiirisoiis I'l-oni year to year. 

Apparently tlie tonnage for last fi.sral year was about 25 per 
less tlian in tlic year pri'vions. The principal imports were telep 
pules and h('ex|iortsa small aiiioniit ot'fisli and grapes. These fre 
arc not of a kind to promise a great increase in the future. 

Tliii li!irl.i.v .if Mi.iir.K! is in the eolltclion rlistriot of Detroit, Mifli. Tl 
a liiflit-lioiiHe on 1li<> outer viui ol' tlie west |>i<\r. 

No uew liue;4 ol' truiiHjiortiitioii liilve liei'ii estivblisheil in tliu last tiscal )-e&r. 

Money stiif erne lit. 
Anion lit appropriated by act apjiroveil July 13, 18!)2 JIO, 

{AmoiiDt {oatiniHt«(l) rof|iiiri'i! for compleliou of exist iug iiiojei'l 16, 
Amouiittbntcanbi<i>rolit:il>l,ve\pmi(li^(l in lisiiiIyeiireniliii^.Piine^O, 18H4 16, 
SiiliiiiittiMl In coinplinni^u uitli rijiiuironiuuta of suctioua 2oi livm ud 
harbor acta of 1866 and ItHJT. 



?■» 



' > • 



APPENDIX M M — ^REPORT bF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. "2487 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS. 



Ilowing statistics fov the year 1891, relative to the commerce of Monroe 
Michigan, were com|>iled from information furnished by the collector of 
and others^ 

telegraph poles tons.. 18,000 

fish ana grapes do... 22 

ntering 83 

eparting 84 

^e not known. 

inage for 1891 (estimated) 20,000 

given in last annual report 27, 000 

aft of the largest vessel using harbor is 12 feet. 

pth of water m the harbor prevents the largest vessels from loading to full 

r lines of transportation have been established during the year. 



* 



M M a. 

IMPROVEMENT OP TOLEDO HARBOR, OHIO. 

'ity and harbor of Toledo, Ohio, are near the mouth of the Mau- 

p^er. ^The harbor occupies Some distance on the river, and the 

part is about 5 miles from the mouth, where it empties into 

e Bay. From the mouth of the river to 17 feet depth of water 

ake is a little more than 7 miles. 

itory of the earlier operations carried on in past years for the 

3ment of this harbor will be found in the Annual Reports of 

>81, and 1883. 

)roject for the " old channel '^ has been amended from time to 

ice 1866. The latest plan provides for a channel 200 feet wide 

L)ottom and 16 feet deep through Maumee Bay to Lake Erie. 

isiderable part of the cost is due to the deposits of silt from the 

id the filling caused by seas in the bay. 

»ld channel is now about 100 feet wide on the bottom and 260 

the bends, with a least depth of 16.6 at the mean level of the lake. 

)eeu obtained by dredging in a long course of years, with a total 

iture to June 30, 1892, amounting? to $724,332.61. 

rt of the old channel is now included in the straight channel 

I Maumee Bay to deep water of Lake Erie. 

ict of July 5, 1884, appropriated $25,000 to commence the work 

ing a straight channel for the Maumee River from its mouth to 

rie, and the act of August 5, 1886, provided for continuing the 

ement " by a straight channel along such line as may be ap- 

by the Secretary of War." 

)ject for the work was approved by the Secretary of War April 

r. 

►rqject consisted in dredging a straight channel through Maumee 
fe.et wide at the bottom and 17 feet deep, referred to the mean 
the lake. The, line was so located as to utilize the old channel 
as possible. The estimated cost of the work was $1,875,000. 
aunt expended niion this project to June 30, 1891, was $286,470.55. 
q>ense to June 30, 1892, including liabilities, $471,707. 



intur any luitliw exiiciise iiix)ii tlie old cliaoueJ projet 

STEAIGHT CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT. 

Dredging was continued from Jnly 1, 1891, to Ji 
from Deccmbtir 1 to April 30, inclusive, when it was s 
winter. 

The amount dredged during the fiscal year is as fol 

Uniler contract with Jnmaa Hooney 

Uudcr coDtract with L. F. and J. A. Smith.' 

Total 

Amoant done by Jnmea liouiiey under bis contract is 

Amount dredged by L. P. and J. A. Smitli 

Total under the coutract with L. P. and J. A. SmitJl 

As a result of this dredging the channel is now op 
with a depth exceeding Ifi feet throughout, and a wid 
the botton, s:tve in one section of 2,400 feet in the I 
where it is but 175 feet wide, and 1,300 feet of Tun 
where the width is but 170 feet. 

It should be observed that the surface level of the h 
ble, and there seems to have been more than one plane 
iuga in different years have been referred. 

For further detjiils of work during the fiscal yea 
report of Lieut. William V. Judson, Corps of Bnginei 
peiided as part of this report. 

It will be noticed that the channet is not 17 feet i 
planned. This is primarily due to the fact that the 'd 
has been limited to a depth of 17 feet, and it is pract 
to obtain a perfectly uniform depth by dredging. As 
for IcBS depth, tiiere has been a constant deposition oi 
drodcfid flia.inip.l. 






APPENDIX M M — REPORT OP* LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2489 

lowinc the fill since dredging. Copies of these sections and 
nap of Manmee River and Bay are forwarded to accompany 
rt, and I invite attention to Lieut. Judson's discussion of the 

[ in the channel from sliding in of the banks of the cut seems 
ill, but it will be observed that the fill from all causes in two 
3 a little more than eight-tenths of a foot. * 
ident that the dredged channel through Maumee Bay can not 
adned by natural or ordinary conditions. 
}emative is then presented of permitting the channel to fill or 
ng considerable expense for its preservation. It is obvious 
method which offers most of certainty in maintaining the chan- 
dredgiug as necessities may require, and it is my opinion that 
^ing can be done most promptly when needed and most satis- 
and economically at all times with a dredge and scows owned 
nited States and operated by hired labor. I believe that one 
ige, with the necessary scows, would be capable of removing 
aterial which may be required for maintenance of the channel, 
services of a tug, which can probably be hired to best advan- 
t; may be needed. 

oject for this channel left the question of its protection and 
uce open for determination after observation and experience. 
e revetment to retain the sides of the cut, whether by a low 
L, by piling, or by other means, would be of little or no value, 
•uld neither prevent the sedimentary deposit nor the move- 
Qud and sand under the action of the seas, 
er any system of piers or dikes, submerged or otherwise, will 
ent tx) prevent the filling of the channel is doubtful, unless 
o constructed as^ to confine the river at its high stages sul- 
fco maintain a strong current entirely across Maumee Bay to 

system would be attended with many disadvantages in addi- 
le great cost. It would bring great inconvenience to many 
isels and boats of light draft which navigate the bay, and 

hich is now deposited over all of Maumee Bay would be de- 
ear the end of the dikes, and sooner or later make farther ex- 
ecessary. 

of the channel in the lake subdivision was cut through a sand 
:e the conditions would indicate the probability of a more 
than at other places under the action of the seas. It may be 
refore, to protect the channel over this bar by dikes, entirely 
id at first, as an experiment. The tops should be so arranged 
v^de against injury from ice. 
les should be placed at considerable distance from the dredged 

In determining that distance, the regime of the river should 
ered. In other words, the distance between the dikes should 
me as would be used if the river were to be conducted between 

^ as the dikes are to be used only to protect the channel from 
le to the action of the waves, probably the cheapest and best 
onstruction may be a compact dump of stone upon mattresses 
These would break up the seas which wash across the chan- 
wrould permit any material washed over them to settle on tlie 
fore the channel is reached. 

5 the deposit in the channel, there now remains to be dredged 
^f Turn-out Division on the south side of the light-house cribs 



2490 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ESGINEKKS, II. 8. ABXt. 

ill addition to amount required to complete the widtli at pUoe tl 
mentioned. 

No revision of fciiinOr estimate lias been mude. 

The estimate tbi- cutiipletion of project is ttic same as wae sol 
in last annual report. 

The following is a list of the appropriations made fortlie'jMi 
from 186C to pi-eseirt time: 



Jiine23,1866 r^.OOO.OO 

Miirch2, 1867 20,000,00 

April 10, 1869 20,700.00 

July 11, 1S70 50, 000. 00 

March 3, 1871 50.080.00 

June 10, 1872 , 15, 000. 00 

March 3, 1873 , 100,000.00 

Jnne23, 1874 75,000.00 

Morch8, 1875 TS; 000.00 

Angust 14, 1876 60.000.00 

June 18,1878 50.000.00 



Mnrcb3. 1879 M, 

JuuBl4, 1880 - 

March 3. 1881 

Aiigtifit 2, 1«83 , 

Jnlyo, 1B81 

Augusts, 1886 (»ee note .... 

AuyiiBt II, 1888 

SepUmber 19, 1890 

Total 

Appropriations hiivo been made for atrajglit channel as follbv 



AngnstS, 1886... 
August 11,1888.. 
September 19, 189 



s 



NOTR.— By aut of Aiignst 5, 1880, tU<- biiknec tltcii HViilInlilp of tlu> $39, 
priateil July 5, 1H84, for straight ohmiiid, v/om uiudo avuilftblu for ' 
I'hnnnel. 

Tohrdo JH in the coliortion ilistrict of Miami. Then in a ftxrd white light i 
fiHirlli orilcr on Turtle lalniiil, anG three. Hiitx of ijnigo lichts for parts of the fhi 

Til.' loiniiiKP "f Trvl.'do HhiUoi-, an fiirui.'=liMl fur Iblil, shows a coiisidcriiblf m 



Money statements. 



Jiily 1, 1801. balnrcc iinoxpfiiilpil 

Jll1ll^ :fO, 1892, amount expomletl during (jsi^al yci 



July 1, WJ-2, uiit«liiiiiih)g ILiibilili 



JiiIt 1, ]Mi>l. lijilaiic(> HTiP\ppmlo<l 

Jiiiif 30, 1H!I2, amount .■xptnilc.'d ilurinj,' listiil yciir 

Julv 1, 18H2, Imhniop i[ii.'xpc!i<Idl 

July 1, 1892, oHf!'laii<iiiii;li:il.ilitic-s 

July 1, 11*92, habiirp iivjiilMlilp 

AiiioHjit app™i>riate(l by a<-l fqipiovi'd .July l;(. 18!'^ ... 

AnioiiMt avaiUblc for tlHcal y<'ar cixliiig Jiiiin 30, 18»3 . . 



tcil) rp(|iiiro.l for pouii.lrlion of cxialirig pro.j.i-l l 200, 

1 Im pri>Iit;i))ty nxpi uili'd in Wtm-A yuar oiiilin); Jniitt 



Ftiibiiiifti'il in compliuuoi^ nitli ri' 
bnibnr acta of 1800 and 18IJ7. 



APPEKDIS H M — REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2491 

■■POIIT 0» USUTBN4NT W. V, JITDSON, conns OF ENOINKEKS. 

Toledo, Ohio, Jkik 30, iSSt. 
bare the honor to sabmlt the following report npon operations at this bar- 
ig tliefiical year eniliiiK Jnne 30, 1692: 

;e clearer what is to follow, I would first eiplaiu tliat the atraighl. channel 
Uaiuuee Baj diverges from tlie old channel at a point near the month of the 
River. From thia jioint to the 17-foot contour of Lake Erie it is 40,270 
le line of the channel. Between the river mouth sod the " Black Can " 
aner sectiun, 12,670 feet in len^h. Between the " Black Can " and a point 
. southwest of the main crib light lies the middle section, 10,600 feet in 
From the last-named point to a point 2,400 feet heyond {t. e., northeast of) 
crib li^ht lies the turn-oiil snhdivisioD, 3,400 fret in length. Beyond the 
subdivision, and extending 5,f)00 feet toward the lake, lies the crib siibdivi- 

from the outer end of the crib subdivision to the IT-foot contour of the lake 

the lake subdivision, 8,000 feet in length. 

ove-mentioned divisions of the straight channel are mentioned in reports 
Tacts for the paat three years. At the beginning iif the fiscal yeiir dredg- 
being done under two contract, one with Jiiniea Roouey, and one with L. 
I. Smith. 

eonlraet. — Two dredRefi worked steadily tipou this cotiTrant from July 1 
tobcr 9, 1891^ when Uie work of the contractor was coiiipleled. Dnring 
^ I65,l!i4 ouliie yards (scow nienitiirenient) were renioved fVoin the crib sub- 
completing the encavatinn witliin tin liinita to a least depth of 18.4 feet; 
tge depth being 16.9 ft«t. 
eonlraet. — Four dredges wockud eteadlly upon this cniihiict fVoin .Tnly 1 to 

IT 30, 1891, and these dredges rusumed opera tioiiH .M;ij 1, l«iJ, I worked 

QSly theresfler nntil the completion of the contract, June 7, 1892. 

angle between the old channel und the new, and at the inner end of the 
u situated a clay bank, which formerly deflected the water descending the 
River into the old channel. This clay bank conatitnted the river division, 
1 it was removed 111,967 cabic yards, whereby the approach to the straight 
has been widened, pn^tnoting ease of navigation, and tending to inLro- 
I river current into the straight channel for purposes of scour. The least 

this diviaion at completion of dredging was 16.2 feet, with an average 

16.8 feet. 

the turn-out subdivision there was removed 106,640 cuhic yards. About 
t of thin Hubdiviaion is parallel to a pite-prutectiou work that euibrnies tho 
I eaxt <-rib lights in Mautiiee Hay, and occupies n spiice 80 feet wide in the 
' the strnight channel. The north side of this pile work was cliosen for 
;. und at this locality the channel lias a width of 170 foet, measured from 
r.-ink. 

irn-ouf haa slanting approaches to the straight ehnnnel at either end each 
a feet long. The runinimter of tlie tnm-out subdivisictn is uni Ibrm in width 

n-st of the straight channel, and was excavated to aleastdepth of 16.4 feet; 
ige depth being about 16.8 ioet. 

he lake snlHlivisiou there was removed 282,327 cubic yards. This yieldeil a 
<th of about 16.4 feet with an average of 16.8 feet, but the full width of 200 
not obtained throughout; 2,400 linear feet of this subdivision is but 175 

.he old rhannet there was removed 20,3-'>6 cubic yards. Several slinnl spots 
pencd and the channel was made wider at the elbows. The result was a 
uf 15.6 feet minimum depth throughout, the width varying from 100 fuct in 
reaches to 260 feet at the turning points, 

■olrclioH tcork, — The main and east crib lights of the Iktaiinioe Bay rnnge are 
in Ihe axis of the channel. To prevent vessels from colliding with these, a 
e<:tion work was in progress at the beginning of the fiscal year. l{cpeat<'il 
]K of time were granted the contriictor, who was not prepared to prosecute 
: rapidly in the face of tho serioiiH dilticultiesth.itwerocouseqiient upon the 
location of the work. The work was tiuallysatiafactorily completed l>eccm- 
}1. The crib lights are about 1,080 feet apart. Two rows of piles, each 40 
1 the uxia of the channel and parallel tlieruto, incloso the interval between 
e lig'its, and prevent vessels t>oin getting between them. At either end the 
k is cxt«uded to an apex reaching 170 feet beyond the cribs. In bnlkheods, 
.treme apices stone and brnsb have been dcposiled to the water lino. About 
it of stone and brush have also been deposited abotit each crili to maintain 
lations. Large oak piles were used throughout. In the parallel rows these 
6 feet from center to eenter, hearing three heai-y waling pieces and bound 
«ch with iron tie-rods and wooden pieces supported upon intermedial to jiiles. 
ipices the piles ore but 3 feet from center to center, and on additional 



2492 REPoaT of the chief of engineers, u. a 



waling strip ia i 
together. 

An inspentoro 



CnwB pieces strongly bind tho convergingaiilvs of llia^ 
iployed upon tliia work by tbe United States w 



together. 

An inspentor employed _,.._. , - - - ^ ■ « 

MaitHal drrdged.—^o rock and no bowlder were enuouBtered. lu the nitt|| 



o.uU WM fuiind a Btiff clar. In the turn-out enbdiviaiun was found cUju.-.— 
The arib sub-divisioD yielded principally aand, lutdid also the Inke aubdivitiiSii 
the outereudoi' the luke subdivision tho Hand woe singularly hard and difflcnltHI 

TabJt ilioviing oreoi and qvanlitiet dredged, etc. 



dredgBd. 






L.P.& J,A.SmiUi 



"1 



Lttkorabdirigloii.. 






Tho mull 0/ !)■« dredging. — The straight ehannel bos now been ( 
the bike. In several plutes, as above mentioned, the channel has not lui luu oi 
nor does the t'ull depth of IT feet obtaiu throughout, lieoaoso IT fe^t was the n 
luum di>|ith to whit'h, according to thtir Hpi-i'llii^atmnB, contrsrtors hiivc bMi 

tiaual fill haa been going ou over the dredged portiona. At the present tiav 
cbanuel is practicable far vessels drawing 16.G feet with the water at the meui 
of 1S60-18T5. This is at least as good water as obtains in the oM channel. The L 
House Estsblishraent has not yet bnoyed the etraigbt chsiinet, but when thej 1 
and the proper .lights are established, the channel may be regularly opened to 
igation. 

Recent condition of channel. — During May and June, 1892, an examination has 
made to delvnuiue with ull possible accuracy the till that bus taken place lye 
dilferent parts of the channel bottom since the soundings were taken that it 
dintely followed the drcilgiug. Over the inner and miildlo sections this would 1 
tho fill for two years, and over the turn-out aubdi vision, crib subdivision, and 
Bubdivision the fill would bo shown for one year. About 10,000 aouuding« 
taken and plottttl ou five charts, each chart representing one of the above sm 
or Bulidiviaiona. The s:uiie charts show also the depths immediately after AirAi 
and tliiTi-fore contain the data for obtaining the lifl. An inspection of tlicst^ c! 

<1) Tho till is not far from nuiform over the whole length of the channt'l. 

(2) The bunks have held very well. Tho greater part of the fill is not from c.i 

(3) The fill is very soft and of a Bcdimontory character. A largo part of Ma< 
Bay is covered to a depth of a limt or more with this soft mud or slufb, whivh < 
lies the hard sanil or clav. and which appears to bare been brought by the .Ma 
RtviT. This sltish is ciiKily washed ubout, and the iill in tho channel'npi>raia 
principally dorived IVoui this source, and directly by deposit fVom the river nii 

(4) The fill over the whole channel avera^a a little over eiKbt-tcnths of a fc 
dei>tb. I transmit hi>rewith a traeing, which is intended to show the extent u 
fill null the ]>resp]it condition of the channel in clmrauteristie sections, Knch 
section drawn is tlie mean of from !> to \2 actual cross sections, 

Crosa aectiou A Is typical of the manner of fill and present condition of the 1 
net in the outer alopu of the liar, 

(JroHS section B is typical of the name lliroiigh the bar. 

CroMs sections C, D, and K, rupnwent the coml it ions respectively on the inner 
of the bur, in thomiddleaoctioii, and in the inner aoction near tho river mouth, 
middle and inner sections uro the only partH of the channel that have yet bct-r 
extensively by vessels. In cross sections D and E the path of vessels is "seen nc 
center. The fill is so soft that it ia readily pushed aside by tho screws of stiani 

Straight channel ivork (u the future, — From the amount of fill mentioned ab 
will he soi'ii that as at presPiit constituted llie straiitht channel can not luai 
itself. Eitbnr cstensive l)ank protection \ua»t bu built or dredging to the eit 
200,000 cubic yards or more must be done auuually. Considering the mogniti 



APPENBIX M M — BEPOBT OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 



2493 



»nd the continuing charges for rejHvirs and intereHt. it aeema probable that 
d by drerlgine wontcl bu motst ooonoiiiical {■• the United States. To aooom- 
aanaaldtedeiDgl^oulil recomineud tli.- iiiirchase of a plant bv the Go v- 
. The work cTeiuaDilB the continnoiueiaiiluyinent of one good dredge, the 
rmnniDg which wnnld be about 4>3O,OO0 p'i>t season. More would be*c- 
d thau coDtractnra would do for the saaic monej, and Ooverament work 
done more (-hi'.iiily nt neigliborinj; harhorB if the coutractors hereabouts, 
[ well together, sliould Koe that thi> (JiivpriiiiiBnt is not altogether depend- 

Bh«r. — A (Mtnsiderabia ahoal aziBta at present abont 1 mile below the 
loia Railroad Bridge, A preliminary examination of the river between the 
) and Uanmee Bay ahows that aboat 40,000 cnbio yards should b« removed 
a 17-foot channel thionxhont. The current prevents anv-rapid aocumula- 
t here, and thia dredging will probably mamtain the channel for several 

I. — For pnipoeea of inspection, snrvey, etc., the steamer Swantaa was em- 
the Government foi a period of 222 days during the fiscal year. The a 

^ .L.---. ■_..._ ^ ^ >--t «19. The crev 



expense of this si 



o the Qoyemtaent was about $ 



of 



le year, i _ __ „ _ __. 

n the river. An inspector was employed upon each dredge, whose duty it 
MtA and sapervise ite work. These inspectors received from $80 1« $100 
h, according to their efflciency and leuKth of service. Daring the past 
hile the extended esamuiation of the harbor has been In progresa, in addi- 
le above employes there has been a principal inspector on the work, at a 
(120 per month. 
7 leepeotinlly, yonr obedient aervaat, 

W. V, JCDBON, 

SeooiHf Lieut., Corp* of Engineer*. 



COHHEItOIAI. STATISTICS. 



ArticlM. 


Xont. 


.ArtlclM. 


To... 


lapiirU. 


W3 


Flonr« 


B^. 












































ai4.BS7 


1,111.617 


ahipptog. 


Ko. 


1....... 




2,180 

a.i8s 



















argest „ 

ith of water In the harbor prevents the largest vessels from loadmg to full 

limea of transportation )>ave been established during the ;ear. 



2494 BEPOBT Of THE CHlEt' OF ENGINEKfiS, V. 8. AEMT. 

M M3. 

IMPR0VEM1;NT of port CLINTON HAHIIOR. OHIO. 

Port Clinton, Oliio, is situate*! at tbe month of the Portage' River, J 
sti-euni which rises in tho iiorthweslera part of Ohio and emplJesiiti 
Lake Eriti. 

A history of the earlier oiiBrathms heretofore carried on for its i 
provement will be found in Annual fieports of 1880 ami J8S1, 

The present project, aduptwd in 1875, consists of a pile revetmwil « 
feet lone running from the north shore of Portage River op]io!ut«fl 
town ont into the lake, in a direction north 57 degrees ea«t, Thisren 
raent tlion inclines tow;ird the north aud extends 301 feet farther, rtl 
a pile dikeciimmences, which will be prolonged a total di»taiir«? of 1,31 
feet ont to a dejith of III feet at the ordinary level of the lake. 

Parallel to this and ^00 feet from it is an east pile pier, which will t* 
about 2,<iOU fuet long, iti:< inner end resting on tbe south shore of tU 
river. This east pier will be a simple pile stmctui-e of 2,150 feet: tte 
outer 150 feet will be a strong pile dike 12 feet wide. A channel 10 h* 
deep will be dredged between the piers. 

At the date of the last Annual Report, an agreement tad be«n ntnAt 
with Messrs. (Jarkin, Stickney & Uram, of East Saginaw, Micli., i» 
dredge through the bar and between the piers to obtain a chaiuid 
depth of 10 feet. 

"Work under tbe agri'cnieiit was commenced July 28 and com|itoM 
in AugiiHt. The amount of material diedged and removed from iW 
channel was 11,705 cubic yards, measured in scows. The price paid 
■was 25 cents per cubic; yard. 

The deepening of the channel causes no permanent improvenitut 
Nearly tbe same conditions return annuslly, and with the present ros- 
ditions nnonal expenditnie for dredging will be required if the channel 
is to be maintained. 

The proji'i't of ISTfi was cstinmted tocost $90,000. The snni of ISi.Wf 
has bi'i'u aiijivoiiriated and expended since the adoption of the projrct) 
bntai>ait lias Ih'imi fov repairs and for dredging, which did notsdvaiw 
tlie rriiisliiu'lioiis |>ro]">sed. 

Tlie arnimnt estimated in last Annual Report for completion of pnyert 
was !i;!7,OU0. 

As tlie ollicer now in charge of the work has had no opportunity 
a revision of the estimate, it is here repeated. 

Till' ibllowiii.:: is a statement of the amount and date of all appnipri*- 
tioris for tliis improvement: 

.liiiic iO, 1S7L' $S.00rt I Miircti 3, [R81 IM" 

Jiiiii) III, 1S7-' (:illi>eiii->iit) :.',<XX: AnKHatS, 1J<82 «,«" 

Jl:irrli:l. IMT.'i r>.niKI Aiif-ustS. ]«S6 tM" 

Aii^nsr. II. IWTii r,.iM>il ': AiiviiBl U, 1S88 S,W 

.liiiii! H, lK7a lii.iMKI I .sopMuiber 19, 1890 iW 

M:ir,Oi.t. I.-;?;) in.liKI 

Jiiuu II. IXSi) -.j«KI I Total «,«» 



Money statement. 

Jiilvl. 1801. LHlnncc luiexpemiert »S,ft».» 

Jiiur:)!), Wf>, riiiniiiiitexpeLnk'ilfliiringflaEalyenr 3,11».™ 

Aiuuunt ajiiirupriutfidby autappruvudJulf 13, 1893 lO.flW,* 



APPENDIX M M REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2405 

it (estimated) required for corujdetion of ext^tlu^ project . . . $27, 000. 00 

)ended in fiBci ' 
'equirements 



tthatcanbeprofitablv expended in fiBciil year ending J line 30, 1894 27, 000. 00 
tted iu compliance with requirements ot sections 2 of river and 



or acts of 1866 and 1867. 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS. 

lowing statistics for the year 1891, ^plative to the commerce of Port Clinton 
3bio, were compiled from Information furnished by the collector of customs 
rs: 



Shipping. No. Tounago. 




tering 34 (*) 

partiiig ^ 32 Do. 

lit , 1 13 

• Not known. 

Tons. 

—Fish and miscellaneous merchandise : 3, 753 

ta — Lumber, flour, and miscellaneous merchandise 4, 022 

gregat« tonnage of vessels given in last annual report was 5,149. 
rgest vessels entering the harbor draw from 9 to 12 feet. 



MM 4. 

BIPROVEMENT OF SANDUSKY CITY HARBOR, OHIO. 

usky Bay empties into Lake Erie about 40 miles from its western 
ty. It is a natural harbor, containing an area of about 22.J 

depth of from 8 to 12 feet, protected on the north and northwest 
le gales of the lake by a long narrow peninsula, and on the 
st by what is known as Cedar Point. 

)roject adopted in 1880 provides for a channel 200 feet wide and 
deep through the outer bar and in the bay, up to within 50 feet 
ine of docks, and then parallel to the docks, with a width of 100 
1 depth of 15 ifeet. 

evised project, adopted in 1888, proposes to improve the present 
1 by a straight channel cut from the north end of Cedar lN)int to 
; end of the existing channel in front of city. 
, history of this project for moking a straiglit channel and dc- 
stimate of cost, see Annual Reportof the Chief of Engineers for 
iges 2303 and 2304, and pages 2335 io 2341. 
1 description of the operations carried on in earlier years for the 
iment of this harbor will be found in Annual Reports of 1880 
L 

le close of the last fiscal year work was in progress under a con- 
ith Messrs. L. P. & J. A. Smith, of Cleveland, Ohio, for dredg- 

straight channel. Work under the contract wi^s completec] 
: 17, 1891, 



%.4:dS EEPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. AEHI. 

The amonnt of material removed after Jiiue 30 vraa 148,638 
yards, and tlie totiLlainonntTtuder tlie contract was 2I2,9l>2i-ubicn 
measured id scows. 

Other works of improvciiient in this harbor have hoen c 
simultaneoQSly with ^ti'tii;;ht Channel, having oQiuc and othe^cc 
gent expenses without a definite allotment or set of accoants fbt 
work, 80 that tl»e officer recently assigned to charge of the warkl 
it difficult to det<Tmin6 tlie exaet amount which should be cha 
cost of the Straight Chuunel alone. As nearly as can bi 
the amount expended on Straight Channel in last fiscal y«i 
$27,786.22; the amount reported as exploded on same to Jui 
1892, $41,199.07; total, $(>9,1S5.29. , 

The cost of Straight Channel originally estimated was for dreq 
628.000 cubic yards, scow measurement, at 14 cents per cubic d 
$87,920; contingent expense^, $8,7»2; total, $90,713, 1 

The prices by contract have been 17 and 23 cents per cubic yarf 
Btead of 14 cents, as estimated. ■ 

At the close oi last fiscal year, Messrs. Garkiu, Btickney & 0| 
of East Saginaw, Mich., were dredging in the old channel. Wotk^ 
this agreement was completed July 23. The a mount dredged iii| 
1891, was 5,872 rubiu yards, making a totiil i<\' '.>S>W} riiliic yards 41 
the agreement. Tlic i-ost was So cents per .uMr y.m]. 

The dredging was reported as giving :i iliaiiu.*! lii'j.th of ISJ 
throughout the dock channel and 15 teet in old channeL 

The bar outride of Cedar Point is the worst obstruction eDComit 
in entering the harbor. 

The water over the bar is only 12 to 14 feet deep and the chann 
Quite narrow, the least being but about 50 feet 

The follow 1 ^ 18 a tate t.i t of the amonnt and date of all appn^ 
t 01 a for this iro\e eut 

Mj IH 6 r WOO Jmiel8,18T8 t> 

J elllS4l 1,000 MarcL 3, 1879 

Aug ht JO I8j 1 ,000 Jnne 14,1880 1 

J uo J» lKb4 ( 11 t t) 10,000 March3,1881 1 

Jne'3l8b6 3H,.i80 Aiignst 2. 1882 I 

JIvlllSO 10.000 Julyu,l»<4 2 

J nel 18 '' H.000 AngnstO, 18»i 

MarpLJl«"l 25,000 Augnat 11, 1888 i 

JnneiS 1874 2., 000 Soptembec 19, 1890 4 

Mnnl 3 18 2 ,000 

Augu^tl4 18"e 2j,000 Total SG 

Toll 1 rape 1 t rwi to Tnno 30 18 1", *.^^K^ 391. 46. 

Snnluak (. tylUr>nr a u the illitclion (lietrict <if SaDttiieky, Ohio. Th«r 
1 >.b h iNo ii(.cl rlont wtl vrluliitelight of thelil'th ord«r,and threci 

liglitN williin Uiu li.'ky. I'urtWuyiK', Ill-low Detroit, ia thu uenrost workof def«n 



Amount aviiilablo for Jisoal year ending Jui 



f- . . . - ■ • ••. 



APBWtDa M H — SEPOBT OP LIEUT. COL. 8MITH. 2497 

COMMBRCIAL STATISTICS. 

bUowuAg statistios for the year 1891, relative to the commerce of the harbor 
iuflky (Sty. Ohio, were compiled firom information furnished by the collector 
WIS and otners. 

»— Tomi. 

mber 150,000 

► 120,300 

•oftol r. 270,300 

ntsycoal 164,780 



Ship^ng. 



BteriBK.. 



lul 



Ho. 



3,664 
8,6M 



Tomuige. 



756,601 
764, 8!» 



1,528,510 



igflresate tonnage given in last annual report was 1,051,108 ; increase, 472,402. 

i c? the largest vessel entering harbor, 15^ feet. 

h of -water pre¥ents largest vessels from loading to full depth. 

yw Uam of transportation have been established during the year. 



M M 5. 

mPROYEMENT OP SANDUSKY RIVER, OmO. 

Sandusky Biver rises in Richland County^ Ohio, and after a very 
botis course empties into Sandusky Bay about 14 J miles ftora Cedar 
where the bay empties into Lake Erie. 

oaont, the head of navigation, is 17 miles from the mouth of the 
It is a city of about 9,000 inhabitants, and the market place of 
e and productive surrounding country. 

history of the work curried on in earlier years for the improve- 
of this river wiU be found in annual report for 1881. 
present project, adopted in 1880, provides for dredging a channel 
Bt wide and 9 feet deep through the various bars between the city 
imont and the depth of 9 feet in Sandusky Bay. 
the beginning of the fiscal year a contract had been made with 
8. Garkin, Stickney & Cram, of East Saginaw, Mich., for dredging 
extent of available funds under the appropriation of September 
90. 

rk under the contract was commenced September 1 and completed 
mber 15, 1891, 

I amount of material dredged and removed was 6,808 cubic yards, 
ired in scows. Th(^ price paid was 25 cents per cubic yard. 
I channel was reported to be in fairly good condition, with a least 
of 7 feet in September, 1891. 

I estimated cost of the project for 9 feet depth was $44,000, but the 
ite was dimbtless intended to cover the first cost only of ohtain- 
ehannel if the work were done in one or two seasons. In a river 
lis there is a large amount of silt and other drift, which will till 
redged^ts linless the conditions of the channel be changed by 
Mstion imtka, 

BUG 82 ^157 



"* - 



2498 BKPOKT OF TttE CHIEF OF ENGfyEEBS, O. B. ABUT. 

Ill the tt-n yi'urrt since the coniTnenMiueut of work od the {ffojedjj 
11 IVrl dipll] till' drift has probably obhteratt'd nearly all tiedi ' ' 
wliii'li liMs l)i't.-ii (ioii«>, ;iiiil the espeuse woii](l thereture not bem 
silly rrilii.Tii I'V llie W(irk rtlrea^ly done. 

it i» the >>|iiaiiiuoltlie officer nuw in i-tiargeof thi>^ improTeoenlfl 
dredgiiiit will uftonl no really permanent improvement. ItwonldM^ 
that unless the commeree be such that the benefits of a deeps chn 
are nnfllcient to justify aconBtnut expense for dredging, orftvctfrf 
Hiderable outlay fi>r contraction works, the improvement of tiie lir 
will not pay as a bueiness propf)8itiou. 

The cHtiniate here unlimitted foranionnt re^inired to oomjilete^ 
prcKeiit project is nearly the original estimate reduced by a 
already appropriated, there being no present means of making I 
amount more definite, and no apparent necessity for so doing, ' 

The following is a statome"*^ "*" "■" amount and date of aU appK 
atioDN for this improvement. 

Maruha, 1867 -•- ? 

.Intie 10, IST2 

J.IUO 1*. IBtW 

MarDh8,188l 



Prumont, th« lii'ml of iiavtKnl>i>i i 

Tbu ueareat li^bt hiia»e is at C'edui '■!••. 

Fort Wayne, near Dptroft. Mioli., .^ Liu 

TSo definite statistics have been i 
aels for the river are included in 



Total 

^ 1 gollcL-tion ilixttict of SaiulMkTilll 
B ontranoo to iiuixlnFiky Bftf. 
aroBt iTork of dufense. 

eived /or Handasky Riret. 
istics for Sandusky Harbcw. - 



Moneif staiement. " 



ail approved July 13, 18!)*.' . 



iiitml) refiuireil fot completion of exint^ins project. . 



iB.!!J 



liarbur iicta of Itilitj uud 18GT. 



MM 6. I 

IMPROVEMENT OF HURON HARBOR, OHIO. 1 

The Hnron River rises irt the northern part of Ohio, aud afters' 
circiiit^nis course empties into Lake Erie about 10 miles east of 8 
dusky city. 

The project for the improvement of this harbor, adopted in H 
when the mmitli of the liver was cloned by a sand bar, and which p 
cct lias been iinieiidcd from time to time, as the demaiidt^ of thee 
iiicn-e called lor sin iiicro.i8od depth of channel, consists of pan 
liiers. 140 feet jipiirt, estendiug to the depth of 16 feet in the lake. 

I'lir a history of the ciirlicr operations Ciirried on in past ycare 
the improvement of this harbor, see Annual ReiM>rts of liiSO and 1 

Tlie project approved in 18!W consists in extending piers to the 
tour of 16 feet depth in the lake and dredging channel io same de 

This project was iu compliance with the reqiiirenieuts of the m 



'JT^' 






AFPEKDEL M M — ^REPORT OF VBUT. COL. SMITH. 2499 

>6r 19, 1890, appropriating $16,000 for ^< improving harbor at 
3hio ; oontinning improvement in amended project to give 16 feet 
; low water.'' 

3 end of the last fiscal year work was in progress under a con- 

bh Mr. John Stang, of Lorain, Ohio, for extending west pier a 

of 120 feet This work was completed September 23, 1892. In 

to the constmction, minor repairs have been made to sajter- 

e of old piers. 

roject of 1890'is about one-half completed. The old piers are, 
, in a very bad condition from decay and ii\]ury by storms, and 
their sui>erstructure should be renewed. 
) end of June, 1891, the channel between piers was reported at 
ge depth exceeding 16 feet, but on the bar about 150 feet out- 
ends of piers the depth ranged from 14.5 to 15 feet, 
dlowing is a statemeot of the amount and date of all appro- * 
I for this improvement: 



June 28,1874 $1,500.00 

March 3, 1875 1,000.00 

June 18,1878 1,000.00 

June 14,1880 3,000.00 

March 3, 1881 3,000.00 

August 2, 1882 2,500.00 

July5,1884 7,500.00 

Augusts, 1886 3,000.00 

August 11, 1888 6,000.00 

September 19, 1880 16,000.00 

Total 139,273.71 



26 $6,000.00 

28 4,413.35 

1829 5,935.00 

830 1,880.36 

831 3,480.00 

E2 1,500.00 

»4 6,700.00 

S6 4,300.00 

837 2,565.00 

» 5,000.00 

Ui 5,000.00 

,1852 10,000.00 

m 39,000.00 

I amount expended upon Huron Harbor to June 30, 1891, was.. $128, 469. 43 

ires in last fiscal vear 10,804.28 

amount to complete project of 1890 13, 600. 00 

cost of repairing old piers 12, 000. 00 

uld be remarked that in harbors like this tlie woodwork of 
constantly decaying and receiving more or less injury from 
ises. 

iv at end of piers forms to a greater or less exti^nt during each 
tid spring, and as a result a part of each approi)riation is neces- 
pended lor maintenance of piers and channel and the remainder 
3 carrying out the project of improvement, 
nmber of vessels which entered and cleared during the last 
\ considerably less than in the pretteding year, but the aggre- 
Dage in freights was considerably more than the registered ton- 
jhe previous year. This indicates that a larger class of vessels 
used at this port. 

9arbor is in the collection district of Sandusky, Ohio. Fort Wayne, Mich., 
lUes distant, is the nearest work of defense. There is a fixed white light 
rth order oi^ the onter end of the west pier. 
lines of transportation have been establislied during the year. 

Money Htatement. 

)1, balance unexpended $10, 804. 28 

3^, amount expended during fiscal year 10, 804. 28 

ipropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 15, 000. 00 

that can be profitably expended in fiscal year end in^ J une 30, ISfVl 10, 600. 00 
ed in compliance with requirements oi sections 2 of river and 
r mU of 1866 and 1867. 



p s« 



2500 KliPOKT OF TUK tyUEf UF EHOINEERS, V. 8. ARMY, 



COMMKKOtAL BTA-nmCS. 



Total 

Tbe aggregate toonage of vessels n 



^ stated in last Asnual Beporl as T3,1U. 



i^ 



IMPRO\'EMRNT OF VERS ON HABBOE, OHIO. 



I ;hui'ii part, of Obu) and 
tward of Sandusky Citj", 
18 adopted in I83ti, when tht* 
)ver bar at entrance, and wlutk 
otimc a« the reqnireroetiteu' 
liatfi of panme) piers, 12o M 
iu the lake. 



The Vennillioii Kiver rises iu tbe i 
into Lake Erie iibuiit 20 miles to tl>' 

The project of iiiiproveiiient, wl 
was a depth of less thtin 2 tteet of .. . 
project hitK beeu amended from tiii' 
commerce demanded deejier water, i 
apart, running out to a dei>th of 12 

A history of the earlier operation_ ...rried on in the past years U 
the improvement of this harbor will be found in Annual BepoTt« of I** 
and 1881. 

The act of Hept^imber 19, 18!)0, appropriated $2,000 for prescrmttw 
of piers. The amonnt of re|)aira being small, the most ect'iiomii-al wi 
advautageoua method of doing the work was by hired labor. Otliu 
and more extensive works being in progress, it was not toiiveuieot te 
make the repairs in last fiscal year, as was contemplated. 

Tbe repair's will be completed as far as available tiiuds may iictviA 
during tbe season of 1892. 

The commerce of this harbor is not sufficiently exteusive or genwal 
at present to justify any large expenditure further than may be rtquiMJ 
for presei'vatiim of piers heretofore conHtnicted, save possibly a anwH 
amount of dredging to remove small obstructions. 

It is therefore proposi^d to apply such fands as may be appropti*'"! 
to the purpose indicated. 

Tbe following is a statement of the amount and date of all appr(i(<ri3 
tioiis for this impnivement: 



July 2, lS3e $10,000.00 I Jnne 18,1878 



MardiS. 1MS7.. 

Jiilj-7. IHIW 

Jline2K, INiU (ullotiii 

June lb! 1H7:; 

Warpli 3. IH7:i- 

Jiiiia'-*S,IX7.| 

Muri'li :t, lX7r. 



liifbluftlK'tirtbui'iluroul 
nearcHt work ordufcLae. 



20, (KM>. 
23, tiiMi. 57 
fi, 75M. FT? 



.. . W-OfW-n" 

2,m'<* • 

March 3, 1(«I llHHi*' 

Angnat 3, 18K2 S.0' " 

AuKuatB, 1886 $,»>"' 

S.my.m Aagaat ll, ISSS l.OHH."' 

ia,0OO,IH) aeutembel 19, 1890 a.W" 

3.W»0.n(l __, 

10,000.00 j Total !a6,70L»1 



I), Oil I 









APPENDIX M M — ^BEPOBT OP LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2501 

Money statement, 

f 1, 1801^ balance nnexpended $2,000.00 

r 1,1802, Imlance nnezpended 2,000.00 

gttnt appropriAted by act approved July 13, 1892 2,000.00 

oant available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1803 4, 000. 00 

aMmnt (estimated) Teqnired for completion of existing project 6, 000. 00 

jBOiintthat can be profitably expended in fiscal year endine June 30, 1894 • 6, 000. 00 
Oinnitted in compliance witli requirements of sections 2 of river and 
•liarbor aotsof 1866 and 1867. 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS. 

!lke following statistics for the year 1891, relative to the commerce of Vermillion 
>bor, Ohio, -were compiled from information furnished by the collector of customs 
dothers: 

MieU entering 84 

MhIb departing 83 

Tons. 

aedpts: Lumber, pound poles^ and fishing tackle 2,000 

hSpmenta: Timber, fish, and fishing tackle 1,000 

TIm draft of the largest vessel enterihg the harbor is 15^ feet, As the depth of 
•far in tke harbor is only 10 to 12 feet^ the largest vessels can not load to full depth, 
lbs chief indostry of the jKyr; is fishins . 
Ms tMOfd is kept of the amount brou^t in. 



Ba Ba 8* 
mPROVEMENT OF BLACK RIVER HARBOR, OHIO. 

Black Biver^ Ohio, is formed by two branches nearly equal in size, 
Udi, rising m Lorain Oounty, Ohio, and following northward, unite 
loat 8 miles from the town of Lorain, where the river ein])ties into 
ike Erie. 

A history of the operations carried on during the past years, whereby 
e depth at the entrance to this harbor has been increased from about 
[bet to at least 16 feet, will be found in Annual Eeports of 1880 and 
81. 

The project of improvement submitted in 1828, and amended from 

ne to time as. the demands of commerce called for an increased depth 

channel, provides for parallel piers 200 feet apart, running out from 

le ^ore on each side'of the mouth of the river to a depth of 16 feet 

the lake. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year work was in progress under a 
nitraet with Mr. John Stang, of Lorain, Ohio, for extending the east 
ier a distance of 102 feet. 

The date of expiration of the contract was originally August 1, 1891. 
h>ring to failure to receive materials for the construction, the con- 
tietor was granted an extension to August 30, and subsequently a 
Bemd, extending the time for completion of contract to September 30, 
nil. Work under the contract was conii)leted September 12, 1891. 
In addition to work of pier extension some minor repairs were made 
itifeB superstructure of old piers. The superstructure of old piers is 
I bad condition from decay and injuiy by storms and ice. 
In the last annual report the oflicer then in charge of the improve- 
lent recommended that provision be made for 17 feet depth of water 
tan estimated cost of 9^,000 in addition to tbe project previously 
dieted. The estimate is here repeated with the remark that the officer 
im in charge of the work has had no means of judging of the necea- 
if tox ibe work or fhe' accuracy of fhe estimate. 

• 




2502 REPOUT of THE cmiiP of enginkers, tr. s. Aioif. 

At the close of the last fiscal yeat' the t^haunel was reporUMl to be] 
fBot deep. Nn exammations uf tho cbaiinol have beeu made sinretk 
date. ! 

The following U a statcmeul of the amoiint and date of ^ apfl 
priatiouB for this iinpniveuieiit : I 



M»y33,1828 97,600.00 

April 23, 1830 6,659.77 

Mme1i2, 1831 9,a75.00 

JiiIy3,lSe 8,000,00 

Mwcha, 1833 2,100.00 

June 28, 1831 5,000.00 

MmcIi3,18S5 1,400.00 

July2,1838 6,660.00 

March 8, 1837 6.410.00 

July7,1838 5,000.00 

August 30, 1862 B, 000.00 

June 28, IBM (»1 lotment) . . - 20, OOO. "" 

Joiie23,186e 10,000.™ , 

June 10, 1S72 30,000.00 I Total 3S3,M 

Black River is in the oolleotioD district of Cuynliogn, Ohio, There is a flinlW 
light of the fotirtli order at the outer end of the we«t< pier. The nciarest nork d 
fense is Fort Wayne, Mich., 80 miles dista . 

Tne number of Teaoola reported as eo*-' ng and leaving the harhor in the; 
1891 is less than titutiittics for previous The later ligures were f^mi«ba 

the collector of custoiiiB and are prrsmui > be approxiniHtely currert. 

Od the other baud the tonnage in froi^ reported is greater than in tbe pn 
ingyear. 

Money statement 



March 3, 1873 &.«» 

Jitnel'3.1871 20^IM 

Miircb3,l876 laOX 

August II. IR76 6,M 

June 18. 1878 l,in 

June 11,1880 1,(01 

Miirdi 3.1881 7,M 

AnguBt 2, 1882 7.MI 

J(ay5,lftKl 10.001 

AngnstS, 1886 tQ,n 

AoguBt 11,1888 10, n 

September 19,1890 13,09 



Aniouut appropriated by a^^t approred July 13, 1892 26,(0 

I Auioiinttliatcftnbeprolital.].vexpendediufi9ralyearendinKJnne30, 18W 3S,00 
< Submitted in compliauce with requirements of euctious 2 of river and 
f harbor acts of 1866 and 18ti7. 

COMHKRCUL STATISTICS. 

The following statistics for the year 1891, relative t-o the commerce of BUek R 
Harbor, Ohio, were compiled from information furnished by the collector of eiul 
and utliera : 



Arti.1«. 


Ton., 


Artklea. 


u 


Ore '"""""- 


270.2*0 


c„^ ^'*"'- 


















T t>] 


















maoa 










SiiippiDg, 


No. 


t™. 




188 
30fi 



















Tho depth of w 

No new lines of tianaportation established. 




iF.ur, cot. SMiTBL 2503 

MMg. 
UtFfiOVEMBST OF CO-EVEt-AHD IlJJmOII, OHIO. 

SSerelaiid, Ohio, is sitaated at the mouth of tlie Cuyahoga Riveiv 
li^: river rises in tiie northern part of Ohio and after a voryciixuiitoun 
'"le empties into Lake Brie. 

■■original project of improremeut, adopted in 1825, when there was 
~"i of only 3 feet in the narrow and crooked eliaiiuel at the 
3, and which project has been amended &om time to time as the 
B Of conunerce called fbr an increased depth of water, provides 
-Jlel piers 200 feet apart, nmningont to a depth of 16 feet in the- 
. This project is completea. 
b 1876, in accordance with an act of Congress, a plan was submitted 
■iliaawrof reftageatthis place. 

e amended plan for this outer hivbor consists of two breakwaters. 
fi Bhtffe arm of the west breakwater starts from a point about 700 
itwflBti of the extremify of the old bed of the Cuyahoga Biver and 
Koatintothel^eiDa direction nearly due north a distance of 3,130 . 

lake anu, which is aboat parallel with the main shore, is 4,030 
long, and at a point 200 feet from its eastern extremity a spur 100 
long mns ont at right angles so as to break the force of the heavy 
ift rolling along the breakwater during westerly and northwesterly 
lies. j31 this portiou was completed in l>ecember, 1883. 
The proposed east breakwater, under the latest plan, begins at a 
^t on the prolongation of the lake arm of the west breakwater and 
10 feet from it, extends eastward on this line about 3,500 feet-, then iu- 
faies toward the shore, and extends 2,000 feet in a depth of 26 feet ot 
■ter, and having between its eastern end and the curve of 14 tVict 
—ith of water an entrance 2,300 feet wide. 

'or a history of this change in plan for harbor of refuge, see Annual 
Bports of 1884, 1885, 1880, and 1888. 

At the beginning of t)ie fiscal yeai' work was iu progress, extending 
le east breakwater, under a coutnutt with hlessrs. L, 1*. & J. A. Snnth, 
'Cleveland, Ohio. 

The contract was completed November 23, 1801. By this work the 
1st breakwater was extended eastward a distaiii'c of iif'2^ linear fi>et, 
taking the total length completed of breakwiitcr 0,308^ feet. The 
itonnt remaining to complete the breakwater, as ]ilanned, is 3,350 
near feet. 

Work under contract with Messrs. Garkin, Btiekney & Gram was 
Atinued from July 1 to July 15, when it van coni])leted to extent of 
ffulahle fiinds. 

The amount of material removeil in July wan 4,786 cubic yards, mak- 
hg a total under the contract of 18,286 cubic yards, measured in kcows. 
htlie spring of 1892, the breakwaters were found to be amsiderably 
^tlsred by ice and winter storms. 

Rq>airs, which could he undertaken, were neccsifurily limitetl by funds 
■nilahle for the purpose, which amounted to but $1,500. Tliese repairs 
hn commenced in June, hut were delayed owing to the diffunltyof 
pocnring certain pieces of oak lumber wliit'li were uceessary for the 
Rrposa 

The repairs will be completed early in July. 

In April, 1892, soundings wei'e taken to a-scertain the condition of 
ie channel from ibe railroad bridge to tlie opening in breakwater, 
be wnmdings show that the channel depths in the rlv^ 1i3.'v&>:)e«kU 



i; 



2504 REPORT OP THE cmV3? OV ES6INEER9, V. 9. i 

fully iiiiiiiitjiiiioil toapnint abmit 400 EeetiDxide theeitiliiof piofwb 
A Hliiiiiliti); is j)pn-«ivwl. From the end of tbe piers nulwardaduta 
of -UK) i'(.-oI t lie flmno«1 has aii average of iibuut 2 feet lesA depft d 
iu July. ISi»l, rrfer.i-ed to the mean lake level. 

The tictiiiil pi-eBunt depth is, Uiiwever, newly the same ss bst ^ 
SB tbe Miean »uifHce level of the lake in June, 1892, was 1.73fee(lu^ 
than 111 'liiiie, 1891. The least depth in the^Jiannet on the bu in i| 
1802, wiw> 15.2 fei't, i-eforred t« mean lake le\'el. 

At a iMiiut 5« feet below the bridge the ehannel is 16.> liw". widejl 
greatest depth oKeeeds 20 feet aud the avei-age ift aboat IH f<*l. 

The piers are not parallel, hut diverge so that they are 2j<t feeti| 

■ at the outer euds. The reanit of the divergence is plainly mUuvd i> 
Bhcialing of the river. 

It 16 apparent that uo very deep ehannel cjui be relied upon lifli 
a eunsiderahle aumial expenditure for dredging. 

The mud and drift brought dimu oy theriver during fiesliets i*' 
Ibnning a bar aei-oes the entrance to the anehorage basin behioi 
■west broukwftt*'!-. It is also reported that the anehorage basin ita 

fratUiatly Itecoming Glledfrom Various canses. such as sewerag«. iH 
uiiiping, diift, etc. flow far the statements are correct can onl 
determined by eareful eicamiuatioii, and itisthereforeprogMseiitDi 
BgoiMl hydttigrnphie survey of the harbor in the siimnier of ISfti. 
M«a of the outer harlmr, which wit^ planned as a harbor of r^fuf 
How mure than ample lor alt tlte pre.'^nt demands ujion it, and 1 
seems to t>e more need of gi'eat^r depth in tlte west basin tJian ( 
creasing the area for anchorage on the east side. 

All the business of the hitrbor is done in the river. About oM 

■ of the lake fi'out on the west side of the river is fiitly protected 
seas by the breakwaters, ajid harlwr lines were established some ; 
ago, but no })art of it has tJius far been nlilized for business purp 

The following is a nUitcinent of the amount and date of all a- 
priaticms for this improvement: 

Mowh 3, IRLTi (surveyt «S, 000. 00 

March2, IftiT '. 10.000.00 

MnrchS, 18W i;>. ITH.OO 

April 23, 1830 1.7H6.56 

Mnn'h2, 1831 H,B70.00 

.July 3. 1831' G. GOO. 00 

JuiioL-y, 1834 13,315.00 

July a, 183S l.->, 006.59 

Mar.>li3, 1837 lU.OOO.OO 

JnlyT, 1838 51,856.00 

Jmiell. 1844 1'5,000.00 

Augiwt 30, 1852 30.000.00 

MarcliS, 1853 U5.69 

Juue28, 1864 (allotment).... 20,000.00 

June23, 1866 59,806.00 

July 25, 1868 (allotment) 17, 000. 00 

April 10, 1869 (allotnieul) .... 13, 380. 00 

July 11, 1870 20, 000. 00 

Mitrrh 3, ISTl (allutiueiit " 

M!iTeh3,\ei3 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.','.'.'.'. 
Juu«2:l, 1874 



Total previous to adop- 
tion of prijjpct fur 
harbor of reiiifo .... 



March 8,1875 

AuftuBtH, 1876 

August 14, 1876 (repair of 

pier) 

June 18, 1878 

March 3, 1879 

June 14, 1880 

March S, 1881 

August 2, 1883 ..-. 

Julys, 1884 

AuguBt 5, 1886 

Augnatll, 188S 

Soptvmber 19, 1890 

Total .ippropriated 
siuceadojition of proa- 
ontprojeot \ 



346,881.61 

Amount rxiiendeil to June .10, 1892 .'. tl,18T. 

■ DliriTeuie betwpcn *1.000 Hud the amount whiob reverted to the Trrasni 
t Aljont tUI,l)O0 uf tbia auioniit tiaa been oiLpuudeU iu uiaiutenance of ths ol 



APPENDIX Ik M — IBlSPOKp OP LlEUT. COL. SMITH. 2505 

ralftnd harbor m in the colleotion district of ('Uyaho^a, Ohio. Thero Ir a fixed 
liffht of the third order on the shore and a bcaron on the outer end of each 
f mam beacon withflaah light and fog-whistle on the independent crib, just in- 
the eaat end of the lake arm of the breakwater. The nearest work of defense 
Wayne, Hich., 110 miles distant. 

Money statement 

1,1801, balanoe unexpended $56,350.15 

iWif 7902, amount expended during fiscal year 54,718.40 

1, 189S, balance unexpended 1,631.75 

Vim^mitstendingnabaitles 233.87 

1, 1892, bahttiee ayailable 1,307.88 

' appropriatedbyaotapproTed July 13, 1892 100,000.00 

It aTiilable lor fiscal year ending June 80, 1893 101,397.88 

... 344,250.00 
1894 344, 250. 00 
Ltted in eompliaaee with rJDqnirements of sections ^ of riyer and 
Mts of 1886 and 1887. 




COMHGBRGIAL STATISIICS. 



tta finnowing statistios finr the year 1891, relative to the commerce of Cleyeland 
"^^^ Ohio, wete compiled fhxm information fiirnished by the collector of costoms 



▲rttdM. 



JmiMrtf. 



grain 



Total 



del 



Tons. 



1,875,144 

1, 107, 038 

123,968 

118,701 

84,781 

40,331 

18,250 

8,506 

2,8U 

2,907 

9,770 



2,896,804 



Articles. 



Exports. 



Coal and coke 

Iron and Bteel 

Oil and groaso 

Stouo 

Lambor 

Flour and in-ain 

Brick 

Plaster, cement, and lime 
Miflcellaneoas 



Total 



Shipping. 



Tons. 



1. 398, 896 

99.428 

29,658 

18,731 

16,540 

2,763 

3,424 

954 

46,478 



1,616,871 



No. Tonnage. 




(•) 
12,792.06 



* Not known. 



Total tonnage lor 1881 (estimated), 5,000,000, varying little from amoant given in 
]aci annual report. 

The draft of the larsest vessel entering the harbor was 21 feet. 

The depth of water In the harbor prevents the largest vessels from loading to full 

Th€ IbOowing lines of transportation were established during the year: 

Liakanrood Transportation Company of Roekport^ Ohio. 

GlaBrelaiid and Lakeside Steam x^avigat ion Company of Cleveland. Ohio. 



4k AveKy ftansit Companv of Mantua, Ohio. 

I 



. . 1- 



*i50() REPOHt OV THfc OBtBP Ot" KHomftehSi TT. 6. ABltf. 



M M lo. 

IMPROVEMENT OF FAIKPORT HARBOK, OHIO. 

(iviiiiil Uivoi' rises in the iiortlicttsUTb partof Oliio, aod after* 
lirCiiiliiiiH i-oiirtte emptiea into Lake Erie at a point about miilvBrli 
t.wciii IIh- I'liwtern and we8t«ru extremities. 

A lull ili'siriptioii (li' tlie earlier operations cariied on for theimpf 
niuut iif tliia harbor during past years will befomid in Annua] B 
ol' lH80andl8Sl. 

The projiict of improvement adopted in 1825, when tht- month if ■ 
ri\'i^r wan V.loBfid by a sand bar so hard and dry in 6nuim<^ tbatt*^ 
iimld drive across, and whleh project has been amended iromtiBi 
timo mtn-i: tJiat date, as the demands of commerce called for an imm 
th-ptli in tlie rhunuel, provi<J<fs for parallel piers, aW feet apait,M 



)itk«^ 



int from nach side ( 



« to a depth of 16 feet ii 



tension of piers to depth d 
S feet depth in channeL 
outract was outstanding W 
)f Paines\"illc, Ohio, for d 
i bai' at its mouth, 
rac.t until July 30, vhea tl 
ict was annulled in a 

ily was 0,201 cubic yards. '. 
bwas 51,202 cubic yardSfU 
wned about 13,600 cubic y 



It^^vlB.•^^ pn.ject of 1890 pro' 
iVvt ill the lulie, and dredging; lu .- 

At the cl"se of the hist fiscal v, 
ihv. Amerii'nn Transixirtation 0< 
iii^ ill the channel of the river a 

Work was continued un< 
lime expired by limitation, n hi; 
with its terina. 

The amount dredged in th 
total umouut dredged unde: 
at the time of its aanulnienl hudra 
to complete it. 

Proposals for dredging were invited by circular letter, and tie , 
]»)siil« were oponcd September 5. The lowest bid was trom J. K. Irwii 
ul' I'liiiKiHville. ( Miiu. und a contract was entered iutit with hiiu, daM 
Sciitriiilii'i L'l, ISlll, Ul do the dredging at 17J cents per cubic yard. 

VViirk uniliT (lie contnict was commenced October 5 and completti 
Js'riM'iiihi'i Si. Ilii> (otal amount dredged under the contrai* b«ii| 

Tlir inisini I'm tlic large excess in amount done over that reqi 
tl) <'iitii|tli'ti' l!ii' liiiiiici' contract was that the forfeitures of amoouk _ 
miller t lir ili.si I'liiilnu'l increased the amount of available funds niaA 
vi.iiM lir .■\|iciiiii'il iiiidrr the second. 

{i\ niN.jjvii^in;: llii' cliaiiiiel was given a depth of 17 feet betrMi 
(lie (l(^l■^ ;iTiil (liniiii;li ilir hiirs in tlic lake neAr end of piers. - 

III till' -.in Ki" -.r iS'.n' ilic bars had again formo<l so that the 

di|ili I ■■ I ■ - 1 rii 14 feet. The necessity for immediate rcliefby 

. di'i < I ilii- bars was urgently represented, and the aiuoits^ 

oliii ' ',i.>irilbeingto<i small toattractauy competitioniiid<uii8 

llic ui.ik i.\ riiiiii.ict. an iiKri'cnicnt was made with the AnieriiSii i 
'l'ijiiiH|iiiM:iti(ni l.!iiiiip;in\, wliiib mviis the only dredging plant at Fail- I 
imrl iliirtnir, lo liiriij,-.!! ^m i.iiltil ol di'.'dgc, scowa, and tug, with their i 
niiHs, iiMii III (111 ilii' wiiik ;it (lie nitc ul' $75 per day. The commem'fr. 
meat of worli as well as its coniiiletion was greatly delaje«l by the 
windy weather which was phehomenally bad. Dredging was otHft- 
menccd April 21 and <«>n»pli'ted on the 4th of Jiuie, the uiunberof dftyi 
in which the dredge could work on tJie bar during that time being bnt 
ten and ah;ilf. 

The channel was oiicncd through the bar to a depth of 17 feet Mo 
examiuatiou haa been made between the piers to ftscertaiu the condt 




APPEDDDL if II — iSPOkt OP LtECT. COL. SUlTd. 



2507 



bf the cliaimel at dow of fiscal year, bat ao cotuplBtni bas been 

le work of pier extension was oontinaed from Jaly 1 to Augnst 31, 
i it was completed. The entire amount done nnder tlie contract 
istod in extending the east pier a distance of 120 feet and the west 
80 feet. General repairs were also made to old piers, 
le comiiieri'e of this harbor is rapidly increasing, and it is probable - 
adiliti')iiat facilities of increased depth in channel will be required 
le luar future. 

ppropiiations have been made for Grand River and Pairport Har- 
from 1825 to 1^0, inclnsive, aa follows: 

JnaelS, 1878 |5,OCiaO0 

JnoeM, 1880 3,000.00 

Hwrli 3. 1881 10,000.00 

AiiEiut^, ista io,ooaoo 

Julys. 1881 10,000.00 

AngnBtS, 188G 18,^0.00. 

Angnat 11, 1888 10,000.00 

SeptamlMr 19, 1890 30,000.00 



h$, 1«5 11,000.00 

MkUSe 5.620.00 

n tS28 9,136.11 

ft>LI830 5,563.18 

hi, 1831 5,680.00 

riMS 2,600.00 

I3B.18H 10.000.00 



I, 1090 ... ... 1U,UUU.UU 

»u. 18W :.. 10,000.00 

M30i,ies3 ao, 000.00 

IKISH U,K3.2i 

IBL1S86 24,072.00 

iiwei 60,000.00 

l»,1874 »,000.00 

4 8,1875 15,000.00 

MtU, 1876 5,000.00 



Total 320,873.63 

Amonat oxpendad to June 80, 

1891 299,169.83 

Anionnt ezpended in last Aa- 

caJjMT 20,033.26 



Total t« JuDe 30, IKfJ . 319. 508. 



int- ftTBilabI« for fiscal jear ending June 30, 1893 .46. 370. 45 

umnt (Mtiinat«d) re<taired fi: 



inffproj 



Wbor acts of 1866 and 1867. 



•5, ISSI, ill •coorAiMM inilA circufor Utter. dated Augstt Si, 1 







[lIetaiiioiiiitftTaild>le, (T.UO.] 








Nmm Mid addnM ot biddon. 


Price p«r 
luWc j-«rd. 


Totil. 




'■InMTiDe.Ohio.. 




Is' 

23 










■HM,' 















'Lovutbid received. 



tiflOS RK^1RT OF THE CBIKI' OF ESGIHEW 

IXll TtIK niil'AI. VRAH * 



(1) Cewtnct Willi J. Et. Irwin, of l^tnwvlllo, Ohio, di 
■ItiJaiaX 43,aat ralik ynrda. mora or Iohi, nf inatnrlal tWn 
bv; alM Onad Klnr, Oklo. 

lUla p«iil. 171 r«>U IM« mbde Tud, Mov uicaaiirvitiiutt 

„ .1 .t . '„ .-J=-w 10, U»l. 
dnod. 



CtlUMERClAL STATIBTT08. 

ne (iDllowIng alaUtUc* fur the yi»tr 1891, relalivo to 
IIu'Imt, OhiA. WMv ram^U«id from infonualioD fnniiahed 
»>il olhrn. 



fl.TOCi CuiDcleoi^... 



TDtel (OBMg* f«T 1891 <««rtlinat«d>. I,300,n 



Tbr lotlon-ini; linM uf tntispDrMlio 
Tbc liitotiell Slwuustup Campwij-. 



MPHOVEMENT OF ASHTABULA HARI 

Thrt original piiywt for the imprnvenieut of th- 
in 1^'M, nt whit-ii time tliere was » depth of o 
t)i? liiU'. Tlii» pi-ojiH-l hH» beeo modified from ti 
mwr the ileiiiand^ nf r^niiuen-e aud incroased di-; 
iiip the luko. As nt present being carried out, 
ninniiip: out into tho lako to 16 feet depth am 
thntiigii bar and K'twecn piers to secure 17 feet i 

The hist pmjwl, adopted iu July, 1890, provid 
piers to 22 teet natural <iept.h in lake and exeavati 
piers to 20 feet lit mean low water. 

Befoiv ni>eratioris were eommonced rocb was 
feet behiw wjit^r surfiice, extending across the cl 
wide reef, whi<'h refjuired blasting aud dredgi 
order to soeni-e the pr4^«ent depth of IG feet. 

At the i-ltwe of the last tscal year, a contiact 
Messrs. Oarlua, Stiokuey and Craju, of Ea&t Sagi 



!«!«-3¥r;^':-*r'' '^"^'- ■ ^^- 






joPEmyni u h^— sspoirr of zjeut. ool. smith. 



2509 



shale rock and loose material which form the bottom of the 
ud extend into the lake. 

aathority of the Ohief of Engineers, the contract was extended 
y 30 to August 30^ and subsequently to September 30, 1891. 
IS continued under the contract until Septmber ^^ when it 
pleted. 

lount'of rock and shale measured in scows and remoyed sub- 
bo June 30, was 22,271 cubic yards, and the total under the 
was 28,956 cubic yards. 

spring of 1892 it was ascertained that the channel through 
had Income filled. The necessity for dredging the channel 
bely was urgently reinresented. The amount required was too 
atteact any competition if advertised, and a dredge, scows^ and 

therefore hired by* the day to do the necessary work. The 
Ige available at the harbor was owned by the Pennsylvania 

Company. It was hired with the scows at $50 per day, in- 
erew, and the same parties furnished a tug at the rate of $30 

)ather was exceedingly bad for work upon the bar. Dredging 
menced April 7, and on the 6th of June it was suspended, 
hat time the dredge could work on the bar but 45f hour^ 
lonnt of material removed was 1,895 cubic yards. As a result 
1 about 100 feet wide was dredged to a depth of 18 feet through 

nual formation of a bar at the mouth of the river must be ex- 
t least until after the piers have been extended into deeper 
the lake. How far any such trouble may be experienced after 
one can be determined by experience only, but it is not prob- 
} the formation will be as rapid as before, oecause the action 
res on the bottom will be less, and the drift from the river will 
irger area of deep water into which it may fall. 
3ula is one of the largest shipping points for ore on Lake Erie, 
leeessity for deeper water in the channel is urgent. The Lake 
d the Pennsylvania Eailroad companies are expending large 
in improving their facilities for receiving and shii)ping iion 
the present channel is insufficient for the demands upon it. 

la Harbor is in the coUeotion district of Cuyahoga^ Ohio. There is a fixed 
t of the fifth order, varied by flashes, on the west pier, 
•ter, New York, is the nearest work of defense. 

priations for improving this harbor from 1826 to 1890 have 
le, as follews: 



26 $12,000.00 

» 2,403.50 

829 6,940.25 

831 7,015.00 

a 3,800.00 

833 3,400.00 

m 5,000.00 

335 7,591.00 

337 8,000.00 

8 8,000.00 

M4 5,000.1K) 

1852 10.0<K).(K) 

l$53 42.64 

im 24,708.82 

»7 54,000.00 

371 15,(HK).00 

W2^ 15,000.00 

373-««^******»* •••• 1^000.00 



June 23, 1874 $35,000.00 

March 3, 1875 25,000.00 

AugnstU, 1876 5,000.00 

June 18, 1878 12,000.00 

March 3, 1879 9,000.00 

June 14, 1880 20,000.00 

March 3, 1881 20,000.00 

August 2, 1882 20,000.00 

Julys, 1884 22,500.00 

Augusts, 1886 30,000.00 

AugU8t 11. 1888 25,000.00 

Septonihor 19, 181K) 40, 000. 00 



Total 467,401.21 

Total expended to June 
30, 1892, including lia- 
bilities 458,734.46 






KEPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENOINEBRB, O. 8. ABUT. ~ 

Money atntement. 

July 1, 189t, balance oaeipended $X,tt 

JuDeSO, 1892, ninount expended dnriiig fiscal year Sa,M 

July 1, 1892, bal&Que uueipended S,a 

Jnly 1, 1892, SutMtftiidiii,;linliiUties -. B 

July 1. 1892, bftlanco ftvailnble ?.» 

Amount upprupriftWd by nut approyed. July 13, 1862 TiXW 

Auionut STnilftble for ilBcal year eniluL(c Jniie 30, 1893 74* 

su.n 



r Amuunt (oatiiiiated) reqiiireil for cumpletloii of eiiBting project 344, XI 

Aiiiiiunt that oon be profitably expeuded in fiscal yeu citdiDg Jane 30, 



I Submitted iu oompiiance with lequiremenla of BOctions 2 of Ti 
L horboc acta of 1866 and 1807. 

COMltEKCIAL BTATienCS. 

The follotring BtatisticB for the year 1891, relative to the c 
HarboT, Ohio, were oompLled from LnfonoatioD famiahed by the colloct«i of cBil 
and others; 



UiBcetluni'uiu.- 

TotaJ.... 

Exporta: Coftl 



Shippldg. 


N«. 


TIM 


,. 


1 ■ 1 




I.OM 




v,.«- 


I" jl^l'iirK-'t 




Da. 











Total tonnage for 1891 (««tiniate()), 3,600,000, vaiTing Httle (rota amoant gJTi 

last nniiiial re|Mirt. 

No now linea of tranHportation have been eetabliBhed during tBe year. 

Tho draft of the largest vessel euteriuf; the harbor is 21 feet. 

ThP dupth of water in the harbor preient« the largBst TBBaela &om loading « 
depth. 



In tlie spring of 18fl2 inforraiitiou was received that two small wh 
which had been nbaiidoned in the harbor of Port Clinton, Ohio, ' 
obstructions to navigation at that place. One of the wrecks w« 
hull of the sailboat Rescue and the other of the steam tug WUcoi- 

An examination of the situation was made by Ijieut. Judson, 
from his report the ofticer iu cliar^ of the improvement of that h( 
considered that the obstructions were such as are covered by s© 
i of the river and harbor net of June H, 18S0. An estimate of (IW 
submitted for removal of tlie wiecks. This was approved and the : 
ment inside by tlie Secretary of War May 17, 18i>2. 

Although the ob8tru('tii)n8 are small it was not couveQieut to u 
take their removal previous to .lune 30. The work wUJ be done s 
first convenient opportunity in the summer of 1892. 



-*■ •■/. ■ •. * 



APPENDIX M M— REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2511 



M M Z3. 

(Pxiiited in Hoone Ex. Doc. Xo. 81, FiftyneiH)iid Congresfi, first Mssioii.] 
UMINARY EXAMINATION OF GRAND RIVER, OHIO, BETWEEN RICH- 

mond and the mouth. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Clevelandj OhiOj November 20^ 1690. 

BNEBAL: In compliance with circular letter from the office of the 
Bf df Engineers, U. S. Army, dated September 20, 1890, 1 liave the 
or to submit the followiiig rex>ort of " preliminary examination" for 
rey of ^^ Grand Bivei^, Ohio, between Kichmond and the mouth," aa 
rided for in section 17 of the river and liarbor act approved Septem- 
19, 1890. 

i is assumed that the object of the survey or examination required is 
li view to deepening the existing channel of the river so that large- 
id vessels can get to Richmond docks to discharge their cargo. 
Irand Biver rises in the northeastern part of the State of Ohio, and 
ring first north, then west, and then noilh, after a very circuitous 
ise empties into Lake Erie at a point about midway between its east- 
and western extremities. Faii-port Harbor is at the mouth of Grand 
'er. Richmond is located on the west bank of the stream about 1^ 
es from the present mouth of the river, and before the improvement 
Pairjmrt Harbor was the port of entry for the neighboring country. 
it Richmoud, and from thence dowii to the piers, the river is about 320 
; wide and of varying depth. An irreguhir channel, of least width 
00 feet and least depth of D feet, averaging about 12 feet, now ex- 
, but with.comparatively small amount of dredging can be made 160 
; wide and 18 feet deep. 

he docks of the railroad company and ore storage companies extend 
the right bank of the river from iM)int opposite Richmond to United 
tes piers at Fairi>ort, about 1 mile in length. 

.t Richmond there has been built a dock 1,000 feet long, on which 
re is being erected a grain elevator capable of storing 1,000,000 bush- 
also two immense storage waia?houses for storing general merclian- 

'airport Harbor is now the third harbor on the list of Lake Erie luir- 
8 iu order of amount of ore received and coal shipped. During 
season of navigation now drjiwingto a close (1890), Fairport Harbor 
have received over 1,000,000 tons of ore as against 829,000 tons in 
I, and against only 112,000 tons in 1885, and the amount of this 
imerce bids fair to increase still more as other railroad companies 
preparing to build to said harbor. With present dock facilities 
00 tons of ore can be handled daily, and there is storage capacity 
1^000,000. The use Of steam shovels for loading fiom dock to cars 
IB good despatch to t^e ore. 
eir improvements m the way of new docks and new hoisting ma- 



.-. j» 



1 . -..J 

2512 REPORT OP THK PHIEP OF BNaiNERIW, V. fl. Aft 




chinery, ftiid other general improvcmeiits, are 
season. 

FairiKtrt Harbor, therefore, »iuply rejiays tor all inoneyB eipKii 
lor its improvement, and deeerves liberal appropriatious for ite spwdf 
iiuprovement. 

Owing to the increased size of vessels now in nse on the lakwil 
transporting ore and coal, and on account of the verj- large iiicrfi«i 
in recent years, in the commerce seeking Fairport Harbor, ObJo,il'B 
necessary and ]>roper that all projects for the improvementrif thecha 
nel should contemplate not less than 1$ feet from lake to imier enii 
railroad docks on Grand River. 

On the above basis the following rough estimate of cost to impw 
Grand Biver, Ohio, from Kichmood to the mouth, to give diuatejl 
feet deep, is submitted : 



•"'"vated to 18 feet depth — aTfr- 
Lace meoearc, or, suj, US,0(XI 
bic ;ud, ia H 



is worthy of improvonent,! 
t and prospective, ^1 ft 
ity mentioned, 
fict of Cuyahoga, Ohio. ' 
. on the shore aud a beoc 

■iug the eleven months e 
imports, consisting of in 
,000; aud the exports, 



Channel 150 f^t wide, 7,000 leet ^^ 

age uut of 3 feet — gives I16,5( 

onbic ynrdB, bcow nipasare, at 
Contingcul; eipeiiBes, 8»y 

Total 

I am of the opiaiou that G 
that the demands of commt 
improvement of the channel hi 

Fairport Ilsirbor is in the coll. 
is a fixed white light of the tli n— 
the ca:«t pier. 

There were no revenue collectit 
May 31. 1890. During same perio^ 
and lumber, amounted in value to $4,»chj 
of coal, amounted in value to tl92,000. 

Five hundred and seventy-two. vessels entered (aggregate toniuf 
not stilted), and iliu vessels cleared, whose aggregate tonnage wastl^M 
tons. 

The largest cargo of vessels entering or clearing was 2,476 tooB^tf 
the deejtent draft was 16^ feet. 

The above statistics, obtained from the deputy collector at Fairp*! 
Harbor, were all that could be obtained, the collector of cnstonw "* 
Cleveland being unable to famish items and figures desired. 

In further compliance with terms of circular letter from the offlofl 
the Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, dated Septeral>er 29, 1888, 1 hi 
to respectfully submit estimate of cost of survey, as follows: 

EIKLD WORK. 

Services of an aBsiatant engineer, eaj ti 
SL>rviceB of leadsman and rodm.in, say t' 
KtTviriiB of two laliorers, as axmeii and boatmen, sav twcnty-tive day«, a. 

»2iier day eai-h lOO.J 

Hire of two boats, say twooty days, iit W per day each W.* 



■ -X^- 



APPENDIX M M — REPOBT OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2513 

I soryey should be made as soon as possible if it is to be made 

inter. 

Very^respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. CooPEB Overman, 

Major of Engineers. 
g. Gen. Thoicas L. Gasey, 

Chief of UngineerSj U. 8. A. 

toagh Gol. Henry L. Abbot, Gorps of Engineers, Division Engi- 
EfiH^east Division.) 

[Tint indonement.] 

Northeast Division, Enoineer Office, 

Kew YorJcy November 22^ 1890. 

pectfiiUy forwarded to the Ghief of Engineers, IT. S. Army. 
»ncur with M%jor Overman's opinion that, for the reason stated, 
id Biver, between Bichmond and the mouth,'' is worthy of im- 
nent. 

Henrt L. Abbot, 
Colonel of Sngineersj Bvt Brig. Oen.. U. 8. A.^ 

Engineer ITortheast Divteum. 



:t of grand mvER, omo, between Richmond and the mouth. 

TJnitbd Stated Engineer Office, 

Cleveland^ Ohioy November 10^ 1891. 

rERAL: In compliance with letter from the office of the Oliief of 
eers, 17. S. Army, dated November 25, 1890, 1 have the honor to 
t the following report of a survey of " Grand Ei ver, Ohio, between 
lond and the mouth," as provided for in section 17 of the river and 
p act approved September 19, 1890. 

ras assumed that the object of the survey or examination required 
ith view to deei)ening the existing channel of the river so that 
sized vessels can get to Bichmond docks to discharge their cargo. 
nd River rises in the northeastern part of the State of Ohio, and, 
g flrst north, then west, and then north, after a very circuitous 
) empties into Lake Erie at a point about midway between its 
n and western extremities. Fairport Harbor is at tlie mouth of 
I Rive'r. Richmond is located on the west bank of the stream. 
If miles from the present mouth of the river, and, before the im- 
ment of Fairport Harbor, was the port of entry for the neighboring 

ry. 

Richmond and from thence down to the piers the river is about 

et wide and of varying depth. An irregular channel, of least 

of 90 feet and least depth of 9 feet, averaging about 14 feet, now 

, but with comparatively small amount of dredging can be made 

et wide and 18 feet deep. 

t docks of the railroad company and ore-storage companies extend 

) right bank of the river from point opposite Richmond to United 

\ piers at Fairport, about 1 mile in length. 

Richmond there has been built a dock 1,035 feet long, on which 

has been erected a grain elevator capable of storing 1,000,000 

Is, also two immense storage warehouses for storing general mer- 

JKe. 

mort Harbor is VLoy( the third harbor on the list of Lake Erie hoic^ 



Fairi)ort Harbor, whicli includes Grand River aa fai 
therefore amply repays for all moneys expended for il 
and deaervea liberal apjiropriatioua for its speedy impn 

Owing to tlie invreased size of vessels now in nse 
trangpurting ore and coal, ajul on uccount of tbu very 1 
recent years in tlie conmierce seeking Fairpoi-t Ilarbor 
essary and proi)er that all projects for tbe improveineu 
for liarbors and riveru shoidd cont«ntp1ate not less tl 
lake to inner end of railroad docks on Grand River. 

On tlie above basis the following a>pproxiiuate estima 
prove " Grand River, Ohio, from Kiehmond t« the mom 
to give chaunel 18 feet deep is Bnbmitted: 
Cbaanel 160 feet wide, 7,3in I'eot lunK, aud excavated to IB fei-t d 

age uut of 4.016 feot, g\v<-» 160,000 onbiu yards, plane nieuu 

IWjOOO oubic yards, acowiimasure, dredging itllSueutspcrcubit 
ContniBent expenaes, say 

Total 

I am of the opinion that Grand River, from Richnioi 
is worthy of iutprovenient, and that tbe demands of «>i 
and prospective, call fur tho improvemetLtof the (dianm 
mentioned. A chart (tracing) of locality is triinsinitl 
separate package.* 

Fali'port Uarbor is in the collection district of C 
There is a fixed white liglit of the Ihiid order on the sb< 
on the east pier. 

During the eleven niontlis ending May 31, 1891, the 
enue collected was $1.50. 

The imports, consisting: of iron ore and lumber, s 
amounted iu value to ^4,512,49iJ, and the esporttt, con 
amounted in value to jl^fliSSO. 

T?ivi> liiin/froil anil iiinof.f.tl.rw. vuBGala pviiroil witl 



APPEKDIX M M — REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2515 

[Fint indortemeni.] 

Northeast Division, Engineer Office, 

Nett Yarky November 14 j 1891. 

Bespectftilly forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army. 
liere ean be no donbt that Grand Biver beh)w Richmond is worthy 
m^rovement. Whether this shall be done by the United States or 
ihe local interests is a matter for Congress to determine. 

• Henry L. Abbot^ 
OoUmel of BngineerSf BvU Brig. Gen., U. S. A., 

Engineer UTortheast Div^ision. 



MM 14. 

PPidiitdlaHwa fa. Poo. Ho. 4^ JUIy-«6ooiid Oongreit, fliwt ■enkm.j 
FRETiTlfTNARY EXAMINATION OF CONNEAUT HARBOR, OHIO. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Cleveland^ OhiOj November 3y 1890. 

imwRAij: In compliance with circular letter from the office of the 
hf of Engineers, dated September 20, 1890, 1 have the honor to sab- 
i fhe following report of ^^preliminary examination" for survey of 
Bneaat Harbor, OMo, as provided in section 17 of the river and har- 
r act approved September 19, 1890. 

/onneaat Harbor, Ohio, is situated at the mouth of Conneaut Creek, 
nt 30 miles west of Erie, Pa^ and 13 miles east of Ashtabula, Ohio* 
The cree^ empties into Lake Erie near the boundary line between the 
tea of PennBylvania and Ohio, and although a narrow stream pre- 
ts a depth of 15 feet after passing inside the piers. The attention of 
General Government was first called to this locality for a harbor in 
B, when there was a depth of only 2 feet at the entrance to the har- 
. Since that date the appropriations have amounted to $112,629.39, 
last appropriation being that of June 14, 1880, for $6,000. The work 
the improvement of this harbor has been continued during fifty -one 
m, witii many interruptions and susxKMisions for want of funds. 
3ie best channel depth ever obtained at the entrance was only 11 
)j the more usual depth being from 8 to 9 feet. The project for 
movement was designed to give a depth of 12 feet, but the plan waA 
BT carried to completion for want of suflacieut appropriations. The 
ffopriatton of 1880 of $6,000 was expended in making the most press- 
repairs, and it was estimated by the then engineer in charge that at 
St. $35,000 should be expended in renewals and repairs, and an 
ma] expenditure of $1,000 to maintain piers. Ifo appropriation has 
m made since 1880, and no work done since 1881. 
le commerce of the i>ort has always been very small. We may 
cefbre conclude that the hopes entertained for this harbor when its 
irovement was undertaken have never been realized. 
teports that surveys were being made for extending a line of railroad 
"^onneaut Harbor for a lake ter minus have been circulated a number 
ttmes* but nothing definite has yet been done. 
Lt present the harbor is virtually destroyed; the piers are nearly 
ttroye^l, breaches having been made bi both, so that the stream now 
is an outlet througli the east pier, causing a bar, dry at low water, 
IT ttie entrance at end of piers. Very extensive repairs and renewals 
uecessarjr, to|^tii6ir with a large expenditure for diedglng. 

fcii ■'-* It - " -':■ '.-.*' 



•1 



2516 REPORT OF THE CHIKP OF ENGINEERS, U. S. iEMT. 

A TOngh estimate aa ta what the proposed improvement wodJ 

would be as follows: I 

For a obsnuel entrnnrc IGO feet nide, 18 fuet deep: .| 

Dredging from l» feet ilefith in l&ke to inejile, sa; 150,000 cnliie jaiiM rf : 

m&Mria], at iibiiut 18 cents i>or cubiBfUiiil 

B«pnira nnd reuenalH of piera and revetment, estimated in 1S90 d 

|SG,0OO, wliirh now woold cost not lege thun '.< 

Additional reooiTuU, repn^iis, und enlBrgenient of hnrboT neotMitalaC 

by prpHont (iemamis of lake commerce, Bay J 

Contingent expeuaea on nboie estimate, soy 15 per cent .,i 

ToUl .J 

With a line of railroad flx>m the coal regious of Pennsylvam^ 
neant Harbor the coniineree would doubtless increase rapidly l| 
harbor be frequented by vessels of the larger class now navigd 
Iftkes, and render the reconBtmction of the harbor necessary, 
line of railroad constructed, I am of the opinion that the deej 
provement to restore the harbor and to deepen and widen cdBb 
same is a worthy one, but without such a road built or assni 
outlay for the improvement of the harbor is injudicious. 

Xktnneaat is in the collection district of Cuyahoga, Ohio. Tb 
fixed white lifjltt of the sixth order npon the ban£ of lake neai 
of creek, the light beacon having been removed from end of pia 
count of the dilaitidnted condition of the piers. Fort Porter, N 
miles distant, is the nearest work of defense. 

The amoiuit of revenue collected during the eleven months 
Hay 31, ISS.'i, was $lii.95. During the same period the valu 
imports was iSO, and of the export* 4125. 

Ten vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 360 tons, enter 
twelve vessels, with an aggregiite tonnage of 395 t«ns, cleared. 

The above is the latest report received. The office of deputy c 
for the port was abolished in 18S3. 

In fhrther compliance with termsof circular letter from the < 
the Chief of Engineers, U. B. Army, dat«d September 29, 1S88 
to respectfully submit estimate of cost of survey, as follows : 



Services of an asBistant engineer, say 25 days, at $160 per moutb 

Services of leadsman find rodman, say 25 days, at>90permontji 

Services of two laborers, as boatmen and axmen, sayJA days, at $2 per da; 

Hire of two boats, at $1 each per day, say 20 days 

OPPICB WORE. 

Serrlces of assistant engineer, 30 days, making estimates, profiles, mapi 
plotting, etc., at $160 per moutb 

Total 

This survey should be made as soon as possible if it is to be m 
winter. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. Cooper Overmai 
Major of Engi 
Brig. Gen. Thomas L. Oasbt, 

Chief of Engineers, U. 8. A. 
(Through Col. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers, Divif 
gineer, Northeast Division.) 






. APPENDIX M M — ^REPORT OF UEUT. COL. SMITH. 2517 

[Fourth indorsement.] 

U. S. Engineer Opfiob, 
Olevelandj Ohio, November 24, 1890. 

mectftilly returned to the Ghief of Engineers, IT. S. Army, through 
9. L. Abbot, Division Engineer* 

tiliin the past few days I have received a commnnication from Mr. 
Dicky inresident of the Pittsburgh, Butler and Shenango Baikoad 
lony^ fltflding that the company wmch he represents expects to ex- 
its imes to Oonneant Harbor, Ol^io, for a lake terminus ; that they 
yine track at the rate of a mile per day; that they expect to make 
nection witii the ^^ Nickel Plate Bailroad,'' at a point 10 miles 
Oonneant Harbor, by January 1, 1891; that they exjpect to com- 
to Conneaut Harbor not later than June 1, 1891; and intend work- 
i their terminal at Oonneant Harbor this winter, 
new of the above I am of the opinion that Oonneant Harbor, Ohio, 
rthy of further improvement, as the prospective demands of com- 
) justify such expenditure. 

L. OooPBR Overman, 

Mt^or of Engineer 9. 

(Ilftli IndorMDiflBi.] 

Northeast Division, Engineer Office, 

ITew TorJcy November 26, 1890. 

tpectfnlly returned to the Ohief of Engineers. The facts stated in 
urth indorsement show that <^ the construction of a railroad to corn- 
sate with the ircm and coal regions '' may now be expected at an 
day, and I accordJJigly concur with M%jor Overman in thinking 
this harbor is ^^ worthy of improvement." 

Henrt L. Abbot, 
Colond nf Ungineersj Bvt Brig. Qen., U. 8. A, 

Engineer Northeast DivuAon. 



SURVEY OP CONNEAUT HARBOR, OHIO. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Cleveland, Ohio, November 10, 1891. 

neral: I have the honor to transmit herewith, in separate pack- 
a chart* (tracing) of Oonneant Harbor, Ohio, and to submit the 
ring report of a survey of said harbor in accordance with letter 
. office of the Ohief of Engineers, U. S. Army, Ifovember 29, 

meant Harbor, Ohio, is situated at the mouth of a creek of the 
name, about 30 miles west of Erie, Pa., and 13 miles east of Ash- 
a^ Ohio, near the boundary line between the States of Pennsylvania 
)nio. 

meant Greek, although a narrow stream, drains a large watershed 
nresents a depth of 15 feet and over after coming inside the shore 
Oonsiderable current is usuaUy found and the volume of dis- 
^ is equal or greater than that of most streams of similar width 
iepth. The banks are firm and the valley near the harbor would 

1 e^ccellent room for docks for storage of ore and coal. 

e attention of the General Government was first called to this 
ty for construction of a harbor in 1829, when there was a depth of 

2 iGaet across the bar at mouth of the stream. Since that date ap- 

* Not printed. 



i .'. 



iJf»18 RKPORT OF THB CHIEF OF KNGISEERS, tl. 8. ABM*. 

i)ropri»tion8 amotmtiut; to a, total of $112,62!).3y have been eip(«l 
tlie harbor, a lATge part bpinp lor reimirs to niaiiitaui the sttl 
during fifty years. 

Tbc last approiniatibu wna that proviiied by the act of Jimei 
and was 80,0(K) " for ri^pairs." The appropriations were irrepi 
tntennitteut, witli many Buspeudous, so tbat the plans for theil 
toent of the hai'bftr, as prmected, were nevei- caiTied to completidi 
bfist chauiiel depth ever obtained was 11 feet itt entrance, & 
dc^th being 8 teet. 

The commerce seeking the harbor has always been email, aodi 
to coudude that the hopes entertained for tliis harbor when its ii 
meiit was undertaken were never realized, mainly for waot of : 
ooiumiiiiicatiou direct from the harbor to the coal regions a 
fBTiiiues south of the harbor. 

The ftulure to attract an adeciuate commerce to the harbor 1 
grese to omit from the regular appropriation bills during the 
years any allotment lor Connoaut Harbor, Ohio, and since 1S81 
has been done towards keeping the harbor in repair. It is now i 
destroyed, and the chaimel entrance closed by a sand bar. 1 
have rotted down and been dejstroyed by the storms so as to b 
cally useless. The stream, following its natural bent, has brok< 
sage thi-ougb the east pier, flowing to the eastward, instead of 
northwai'd through channel provided by the piers. A large d 
Band, ete., from the lake storms has choked the channel beti 
piers. 

At present there is neither town nor harbor, nor any oomme 
some small fishing vessels which frequent the old harbor to d 
small quantities of fish for local consumption. Veiy exteiisivt 
and I'cuewals, together with a large expenditure for dredging, i 
necessary to restore the harbor as it was and give the 12-foot 
depth heretofore sought. 

From a consideration of the data obtained it is considered thi 
be as ewnomical to ignore the old piers and build new, as to rei 
old piers on old lines; such a change would also enable as to m 
and better location of the piers, and this is very necessary if C 
Harbor is to be improved to accommodate the class of vessels wl 
are employed in the commerce of the lakes. 

The additional or extra dredging rendered necessary by reloi 
the piers would not be much, m the widening and deepeniU; 
present channel would necessitate the removal of at least one 
tirely, and consideiable of the structure of the other pier, to st 
the channel ; and the portion of the pier which is left would re 
be strengthened and sustained by piling to prevent underminii 
depth of channel is dredged to 18 feet, as the piers were fou 
only 12 feet channel depth. 

BOHEME A {SEE THACINO), 

To widen and deepen the existing old channel at Conneanl 
to secure 17 feet depth and ICO feet width between piers, extend 
17 feet natural depth in lake to inside the shore end of the old 
at present located, would incur the following expenditure, appro 
estimated : 



iujC weet pier, s^ 1,200 liueu feet, at $70peiiiBearfoot.. 



A^&Kl>IX M It — ^REPOBt OF LIEUT. COL. SMITH. 2519 

WMDStTUct the additional length of piers to 17 fi^t natural depth in lake, 

San extension of 800 feet for each pier, or for both 1,600 linear feet, at 
per linear foot... -^ $120,000 

Spiers to be 200 feet apart, with full channel width of 160 feet, and 
|brt ehaimel depth. Dreading recinired for IBO feet width from 17 feet 
im] depth in lake to in8i£, say 2,100 feet, will require the remoyal of— 

lOOj^OOCTcahio yards of soft material, at 18 cents 18,000 

.|B^€00 inibio yards of stones and gravel, at 30 cents 10, 500 

SO^OOO eubio yards of bowlders, etc.^ at 50 cents 10,000 

ratanent inside of shore line for 500 linear feet on the west skle and 700 
bettiiMtoiktheeastaidey a total of 1,200 linear feet, at$10per foot 12,000 

290,500 
ittifsint expenses, at least 15 per eent 43,575 

Tbtal 334,075 

SCHEME B (SEE TBAOINa). 

3o relocate the channol and constmct new piers will incur the fol- 
dbig expenditure, approximately estimated : 

MnMrtmot two new piers of the same length as the old piers, say 1,200 feet 

i^ or 2,400 linear feet of piers, at $75 per linear foot $180, 000 

Boostract the additional length of piers to 17 feet natural depth in lake, 

Kan extension of 800 feet for each pier, or for both 1,600 linear feet, at 
per linear foot 120,000 

llMging new channel firom 17 feet natnral depth in lake to inside, for 
tonraepth of 100 feet, length say of 2,100 feet, will require the removal of— 

laOjXm cubic yards of soft material, at 18 cents 21, 600 

50,000 cubic yards of stones and gravel, at 30 cents 15,000 

90,000 cabio yards of bowlders, etc., at 50 cents 15,000 

wrtMBit inside of shore line, 500 linear feet on the west aide and 700 

Imt feet on the east side, a total of 1,200 linear feet, at $10 per foot 12, 000 

363,600 
stingent expenses, at least 15 per cent 54,540 

Total 418,140 

It will be seen firom the above that the difference in cost^ per the ap- 

oximate estimates, between the two plans for improvement is small 

ten compared with the total cost of either plan, and too small not to 

ike it advisable to adopt the plan which provides for the relocation 

the chimnel and construction of two new piers throughout. 

A line of railroad to Conneaut Harbor for a lake terminus is being 

DStmcted, and the grading, it is reported, willbe finished by the end 

this year to within 2 miles of the harbor. 

Witii a line .of railroad from the coal regions of Pennsylvania to Con- 

iat Harbor, the commerce of this harbor will rapidly increase and 

abor be frequented by vessels of the larger class by which lake com- 

BTce is now transported. This will render the reconstruction of this 

iAor necessary, and on plan in accordance with present requirements. 

With a line of railroad assured, I am of the opinion that the reloca- 

mof the harbor and the widening and deepening of the channel is a 

Mthy improvement, and the prospective demands of commerce call 

r the improvement. 

Conneaut is in the collection district of Cuyahoga, Ohio. There is a 

8d white light of the sixth order upon the bank of lake near mouth 

ereeky the light-beacon having been removed from end of pier on ac- 

ant of the dilapidated condition of the piers. 

P(Mrt Portly ^ew York; 100 miles distant, is the nearest work of de- 



2520 EEPOKT OF TUE CHIEF OF KNOlliEF.RS, V. 3. ARMY. 






Tlie amount of revenue colliusted diiriug tbe eleven mantlis eni 
May 31, 1885, was $15.95. Dining tlic name peiitKl the \-alne of the 
ports was J80 ami the exiMrts H'iH. 

Tcu vefiselB, witli an aggregate toiinage of 3G0 tons, entered; t 
twelve vessels, witli an aggregate tonnage of 395 tons, cleared. 

The above is the I»t4!8t report received. The office of deputy oolleota 
for tiiejport was abolished in 18S5. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant^ 

L. COOFEB OVEBHAN, 

Major of Ertginem. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas I-. Casey, 

Chief of Engineers, U. 8. A. 
(Through (j|ol. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers, Division Esgincel 
l^ortheast Division.) ^ 

(Unit IndonanMiit.] 

Northeast Ditision EsaiNEER Office, 

Neu: York, November U, 189i. 

Respectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, U. 8, Army. 

Ill view of the favorable location of Conneaut Harbor for the ironu 

coal trade, and of the construction of a railroad, now well advanced,! 

develop itti natural advantages, I consider the harbor to be worl^i 

improvement. 

Henry L. Abbot, 
Colonel of Engineers, Bvt. Brig. Qcn., U. 8. A., 

EngMeer Nortkcwt Divitio*. 



APPENDIX N N. 



ITEIISMT OF EBIE BXABOB, PENNSTLYAinA, AND OF DUNKIRK, 
BUFFALO, WILSON, OLCOTT, AND OAK ORCHA^ HARBORS, AND OF 
^X>HAWANDA HARBOR AND NIAGARA RIVER, NEW YORK. 



MKFOMT OF MAJOR E. H. BUFFNElR, CORPS OF ENGINEERS, OFFICER 
jar CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE SO, 189g, WITH 
OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 



f^- !• Erie Harbor, Pennsylyania. 

f - . 8. PreBorvation and TO^tection of Presqne 

Isle PeninsTila, £rie Harbor, Penn- 

sylyania. 
P 8w Dnnlurk Harbor, New York. 
' 4k Buffalo Harbor, New York. 



IMPROYEMENTS. 



5. Tonawanda Harbor and Niagara River, 

New York. 
8, Wilson Harbor, New Yurk. 

7. Olcott Harbor, New York. 

8. Oak Orchard Harbor, New York. 






BXAJfflNATION AND SURVEY. 
, •• Fori Day, above Niagara Falli^ New York. 



k 



United States Engineer Office, 

Buffalo^ y. r., July 7, 189J2. 

Gbnebal: -There are forwarded herewith the annual reports for the 
year ending June 30, 1892, for the harbors of Erie, Pa.; Dunkirk, Buf- 
tBAOy Wilson, Olcott, and Oak Orchard, N. Y.; and for Tonawanda 
Harbor and Niagara Biver, Kew York. 

• •' • • • • • 

Very respectflilly, your obedient servant, 

E. H. Rupfner, 
Major of Engineers. 

Brig. QeiL Thomas L. Gaset, 

Okitf of JBnffineers^ U. S. Army. 

2521 






aim oiiiy D K'lT III ui-iHii), jiroviacd lor ciosuig an oi ru 
tlie liarbxr by ineiiiis of a b if ak water, in which should 
iiig 200 feet wide, and for extciidiiig to deep water 
parallel piers, one on eiwsh side of the opeuing. Tbi 
Btantiully in for«'e at the present time, excepting that t 
feet apart. 

Preaent irmkit. — The present works ootiBist of (1) a b 
north and wiiitb from tlm main shore to the Hoath side 
to the harbor; (2) a pier on the soiitJi side of iHie- e 
nearly ciist and west in {>i>sitiou; {3) 'a pier on then 
channel paritllcl with and 35U feet di^tiiiit from the p 
tiooed, and (4) a vat<;b-»bLnd jetty, biiilt in 1883, about 
of the north pier, for the pmiwse of arresting the mo 
into tlie channel. The construction of this .jetly i» s 
not serve the purpose for which it wsis built, and it 
repairs since its construition. These works arc known 
breakwater, (2) the south pier, (3) the north pior, and (■! 
jetty. 

The piers and breakwater consist of timber crib-w 
stone and covered with pine-plunk deck. 

The cat(!h-satid jetty consists of a siugle row of pi 
together and bound together with oak waliugs. 

OPEEATIONH UTrniNG TBM FISCAL YEA: 

Repairs topierg and brcnkirater, — Between stftti^nB 1 
north pier sis courses of superstnictiire on chiui&el fi 
removed and new deck Imilt; 00 decayed deck plajil 
new; 000 linear teet of waling repaired and oak teadc 
150 feet of the pier toprovide a landing for harbor tugs 
pier minor repairs were made to the deck, and to th( 
at the junction with the south breakwater. Repairs 
July 13 and completed on August 10, 1891. 

Dredging in channels. — No dredging was done iu th( 



I 
AJP^KNDtX K K — ^RfiPCRt OP MAJOR ttUFFNER. 2523 

laoiiels were mad^ monthly aud the water gauge tested fre<iueut]y 
riAmaiiitainedjTi good order. 

Bseiensian 6/ the fiarth pieri—TYi^ exteuHioii of this pier eastward into 
tte Erie 450 feet, more or less, Under contract of J; B. Donnelly^ 
KiwegOy K. Ys, was begtin in June, 1891; The contractor cartied on 
Is work energeticldly tod completed his contract on October 2, 1891. 
!9ie total length of the extension was 453.15 feet. Tlie ex)st of the 
Stension was $32,025i77, or 970.83 per lineal foot of completed pier. 

SwrteiUanee of tne peninsuUu — ^The watchman was on duty during the 
iUHze year. He enforced the rules in regard to the building of iires and 
Mttiiig of trees or any growth on the peninsula, so far as {lossible over so 
IK6 an area (about 4 square miles). No depredation was committed. 

Kfbb occurred on the peninsula a« follows : Two small fires on the 
igr ahore on August 30, 1891, extinguished before any damage was 
oner a fire in marsh grass on the bay shore of the ^^ neck," on October 
% 1881, burned oyer 20 acre« of marsh, but was extinguished before 
ny dunage was done to large growth; a fire in large hemlock (m the 
igr ibore at ^^ Big Bend," on April 24. 1892, burned trees over an area 
F 100 feet square, before the fire could, be extinguished. In additi(m to 
ii dntieBon the peninsula, the watchman maintained a carefiil watch 
vcr the pubUc proi>erty stored in the boathouse and warehouse, and 
Bted aa engineer of the steam launch. 

OOMDITION OF THB WORKS. 

AmiA hredkteater. — This structure is old and much decayed. Its 
iCal length is 2,024 feet; height above mean lake level, 1^ feet; width, 
•to 12 feet. 'So repairs were made during the year. At the close of 
le year the structure was intact and no repairs urgently needed. 

BmUhpier. — ^Length of this pier is 1,220 feet. The pier is in fair con- 
ttion, but the timbers of the superstructure are becoming soft and 
liow decay. At the junction of the pier and south breakwater some 
f the stone filling has been washed out and should be replaced. To 
this will cost about $50. 

North pier, — This pier is 2,437 feet long, having been extended 452 
Bet during the year. The westerly 993 feet of the pier is old, but with 
^airs to the deck, costing about $250, it can be put in fail* condition. 
Se remainder of the pier, 1,444 feet long, is in good condition, requir- 
ig only minor repairs, which will cost about $200. 

Oakik-sand jetty. — ^Aoout 450 feet of the je^y remain intact but it is 
Ml considered worth repairing. 

The ohannel. — ^The total length of the channel, from the 18-foot con- 
tour at low water in the lake to the same contour in the harbor, about 
UOO feet, is made up as follows : 

■ Feet. 

nom IS-foot contour at low water in the lake to the east or outer end of tlio 

lorth pier, outer channel 1,250 

bhreen piers 2,450 

hnn west or inner end of piers to 18-foot contour at low water in harbor^ 

inner ehannel 3,400 

The width of the channel when complc^tcly clear is 300 feet. A length 
f channel of 2,000 feet, lying between the piers, is kept thoroughly 
Doored out by the strong ciurents which run in and out and thus 
laintain the good condition at all times. The outer and inner chan- 
bh require repeated dredging in order to maintain them at the required 
BpCh. TSo dredging was done in the inner channel throughout the 
At the dose of the year it was in good condition, the depth of 



2524 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGIN