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W YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF 



DEPARTMENT BUREAUS 



FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 



1911 



Vol. 1 



FACTORY INSPECTION 

MERCANTILE INSPECTION 

MEDIATION AND ARBITRATION 



ALBANY 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

1913 



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V 



ALBANY 

J. B. LYON COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1913 



• " • • • ••- 
•• • • .•• 



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State of New York 

IN ASSBMBLY 

March 27, 1912 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OP THE 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 



STATE OF NEW YORK 

Department op Labor, 

Albany, March 27, 1912. 
To the Legislature: 

Pursuant to law, the annual reports of the Bureaus of Factory 
Inspection, Mercantile Inspection and Mediation and Arbitration for 
the year' ended September 30, 191 1, are herewith submitted. 

Respectfully, 

JOHN WILLIAMS, 

Commissioner. 



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CONTENTS. 



Pabt I. 
BUREAU OF FACTORY INSPECTION. 

PAGE. 

Report of the Factory Inspector 9 

Tabular summaries 9 

Work of the deputy inspectors 18 

Complaints 20 

Accidents 20 

Child labor ; 22 

Safety 23 

Ventilation 23 

Tenement manufactures 24 

Prosecutions 28 

Report of the Medical Inspector of Factories 30 

Ventilation 31 

Light 33 

Dust, fumes, gas, etc 36 

Women and children 37 

Industrial diseases 39 

Special investigations: 

Ventilation of a department store 44 

Cloak and suit industry in New York City 48 

Felt hat industry 67 

Results of air analyses 68 

Report of the Tunnel-Inspectors 94 

Report of tlie Mine Inspector v 100 

Statistical Tables (Prepared by Bureau of Labor Statistics) : 

I. Work of deputy factory inspectors 106 

II-IV. Orders and compliances 108 

V. Prosecutions 120 

VI. Complaints 138 

VII. Accidents in factories, etc.: number, age and sex of persons 

injured, by industries 141 

VIII. Accidents in factories, etc.: particulars of fatal accidents 151 

IX. Accidents in factories, etc.: part of person injured and nature 

of injury, by causes 184 

X. Accidents in factories, etc.: extent of injuries by causes 198 

XI. Accidents in factories, etc.: nature of known permanent inju- 
ries, by causes 204 

s^ [3] 

^ 1«AY 271913 2S7698 

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6^ 



4 Contents. 

Statistical Tables — Continued. page. 
XII. Children's employment certificates : by localities 224 

XIII. Statistics of factories inspected : by counties 236 

XIV. Statistics of factories inspected: by counties and localities.. . 240 
XV. Statistics of factories inspected in first and second-class cities, 

by industries: 

Albany 284 

Buffalo 288 

New York City 294 

Rochester 322 

Schenectady 328 

Syracuse 330 

Troy 336 

Utica 340 

Yonkers 344 

XVI. Statistics of factories inspected, by industries: 

Summary 348 

1. Stone, clay and glass products 350 

2. Metals, machines and conveyances 352 

3. Wood manufactures 360 

4. Leather and rubber goods 364 

6. Chemicals, oils, paints, etc 366 

6. Paper and pulp 368 

7. Printing and paper goods 370 

8. Textiles 370 

9. Clothing, millinery, laundry, etc 374 

10. Food, liquors and tobacco 376 

1 1. Water, light and power 380 

12. Building industry 380 

XVII. Statistics of mines and quarries inspected 382 

Industry classification 393 

Index of industries 407 

Part II. 
BUREAU OF MERCANTILE INSPECTION. 

Report of the Mercantile Inspector 419 

Tabular summaries 419 

Work of deputy inspectors 422 

Complaints 423 

Wash rooms and water-closets 424 

Seats for females 424 

Ventilation 426 

Child labor 426 

Hours of labor 427 

Prosecutions 429 

Fire prevention 431 

Detailed statement of prosecutions (prepared by Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics) 432 



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Contents. 5 
Pabt III. 

BUREAU OF MEDIATION AND ARBITRATION. page. 

Report of the Chief Mediator 453 

Statistics of Interventions: 

Summaries . . 460 

Detailed statement 462 

Special accounts of interventions: 

Boilermakers (New York Central Lines) 474 

Express drivers, New York City 485 

Building laborers, Syracuse 497 

Sheet metal workers, New York City 499 

Trackmen (Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad) 601 

Statistics of Strikes and Lockouts: 

Analysis 506 

Detailed tables: 

I. Detailed statement of disputes, by industries and localities. . . . 516 

II. Principal disputes 550 

III. Disputes, employees involved and time lost, by industries 562 

IV. Causes of disputes combined with results 554 

V. Results of disputes, by industries 560 

VI. Mode of settlement, by industries 564 

VII. Disputes, employees involved, time lost, causes and results, by 

localities 568 

VIII. Duration of disputes 576 

Conciliation and Arbitration Provisions in Joint Trade and Industrial 

Agreements (Arranged Alphabetically by Trades) 577 



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PART I. 



BUREAU OF FACTORY 
INSPECTION. 

[71 



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REPOET OF THE FACTORY INSPECTOR. 

Hon. John Williams, 

Commissioner of Labor, Albany, N. Y. 
Sib : The following brief statements cover the work performed 
by the Bureau of Factory Inspection during the year ended Sep- 
tember 30, 1911: 

1. WORK OP DEPUTY FACTORY INSPECTORS. 
SummartMed from Statittieal Table I, post. 
ReKular inapeotioiM: 1911. 

Factories in separate buildinc* 11 . 733 

Tenant factories 26.281 

Laundries 2, 483 

Bakeries 4,996 

Mine» and quarries 128 

Tunnel workings 74 

Tenant factory buiklings 141 

Tenement buUdings (licensed) 13,402 12,035 10.219 8.751 4,577 



1910. 


1909. 


1908. 


1907- 


12.178 


11,671 


11.854 


12,431 


26.847 


24,304 


23,480 


22,974 


2,820 


2.359 


1,945 


1,967 


4.156 


4.853 


4.101 


8.874 


84 


121 


118 


173 


46 


13 


22 




150 


277 


125 


820 



Total 59.238 56.816 53.717 60.396 46,816 

Special inspections 2,063 1.368 1,147 1.427 1,476 

Inrestigataons: 

AppUcations for Ucense 1,761 1,835 3,179 8,195 8.740 

Complaints 920 938 870 603 648 

Compliances t44,137 §35,460 130.640 ♦32.448 34.863 

On special orders 1,659 2,967 3,074 3,478 1.412 



Total 48.477 41.200 87,763 89.719 40.658 

Observations: 

Tenement buildings (unlicensed) 1 . 687 2. 125 2, 135 4, 736 5. 430 

Tunnel workings 118 75 200 186 

Tagging to stop woric: 

Goods in tenements (§ 100) 78 126 104 

Goods in tenant factories (§95) 357 469 399 

ArUcles in bakeries (§114) 61 191 59 

Unsafe machinery (§ 81) 8 

Scaffolding (§19) 8 1 



71 


251 


446 


356 


14 


26 


11 . 




3 


1 



Total 504 786 566 545 634 

Pioeecutions begun** 413 610 611 743 374 

* Includes 19.211 first and 13.237 subsequent visits, 
t Includes 28.045 first and 16.092 subsequent visits.' 

i Includes 19,775 first and 10,865 subsequent visits. 
Includes 21,929 first and 13.531 subsequent visits. 
' See detailed table of prosecutions below. 

[»] 



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10 



New York State Depabtment of Labor, 



2. orders and compliances. 

Summarized from Statistical Tables II, III and IV, post. 



CoifPLIANCSB 

Obobrb Ibbukd.* Rsportsd. 



Subject or Obdbrs. 

1. Administration (posting law, etc.) 

2. Sanitation and safety 

Lighting. 

VentiUUion and overerotoding 

Time aUewed for meals 

Cleanliness and sanitary conveniences 

Dangerous machinery 

Elevators and hoistways 

Protection from fire 

General safety 

3. Children 

4. Women and minora 

6. Laimdries (special) 

6. Bakeries and confectioneries (special) 

7. Mines, tunnels and quarries 

Total 

* Exclusive of orders suspended, rescinded, etc. 



Thereof in 




Thereof in 


New York 


] 


New York 


Total. 


City. 


Total. 


City. 


31,714 


26,151 


31,528 


26,063 


54,688 


37,711 


48,404 


33,677 


i,eu 


i,sei 


1,666 


1,303 


sie 


298 


161 


142 


11 


8 


10 


7 


B8,476 


£3,4J87 


t4,661 


20,076 


H,tOS 


6,804 


12,704 


6,620 


1.497 


739 


1,386 


706 


6,649 


4,683 


6,240 


4.409 


t,99S 


1,491 


2,676 


{:li^ 


1,600 


1,228 


1,660 


247 


101 


227 


94 


326 


286 


315 


283 


6,901 


6,025 


6,267 


6,533 


314 




253 




95,790 


71.502 


88,554 


66.860 



3. PROSECUTIONS (FACTORIES AND MINES). 
Summarised from Statistical Table V, post. 

RSSDIAB TO SlPTBlCBIR 30, 1911. 



OONTIOnD. 



Dis- 



OrriNfa. 



No. of 
oaseL 

(1) Proceedings Instituttd Before October 1. 1910. 



8ea. 
teaee 
Fend- orao- With- Bus- 
ing, quitted, drawn, pended. 



Fined. Finei. 



II. Saottation and Sawtt: 

Failure to provide li^ts in halls, S 81 

Failure to provide lights in water-oloeets. 

f 88 

Failure to voitilate factory; (86 

Failure to provide drssung rooms for 



females, 4 i 
Failure to clean and disinfect water-closets. 



.U 



Failure to repair wateiMtlosets, {88 

Failure to clean floors of woricrooms, { 84 . . 

Failure to guard shaftiog, (81 

Failure to ivovide exhaust system, $ 81 . . . 

in. CmLDRKf: 

Employing child under 14, S 70. 



Employing child under 16 without Board 
of Health certiacate. % 70. 



Employing child under 16 matt than 8 
hours a day, or before 8 a. m. w after 
5 p. m., i 77 

VIL Bakkrhs: 

Failure to plaster stone walls of bakeroom, 
1112 

X. MiSCELLANSOUS: 



Failure to pay wages weeklv, S 10. . 
Failure to pay wages in cash, fill. 

Total 



1 .. 












t25 


1 .. 

2 .. 






■"2 ; 


::::: . 




25 


6 .. 









3 




50 


1 .. 
1 .. 
1 .. 

1 .. 

2 .. 






••••• • 


..... 
2 . 




50 
25 
25 


15 .. 




1 


2 


4 




175 


45 


2 


4 . 




23 


16 


345 



84 



100 



1 

1 






37 





4 


5 


4 


34 1820 



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Repoet of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 11 



3. prosecutions (FACTORIES AND MIKES)— Continued. 
(B) Prpmdingt ImtUvUd im Cwrmd Tmr, 

RatuiAB TO SBPmiBn 80, 1011. 



OONTIOnv. 

Dii- SeD- 

miflsed teoM 

No. of Pend- orao- With- lus- 

Ormfn. oMea. ing. quitted, drawn, peoded. Fintd. fiam, 

(B) Prpmdinoi fuHtul$d in Currmt Yw, 

I. ADMnOBTftATION: 

Failure to report Modents, I 87 1 1 

Interfering with dqnit^ faetory inspeetm 
intheperformanoeoihiBdatMi, i 62... 1 1 

n. Sahitation and SAmr: 

Failure to provide lig^tB in halli or itaira, 

f81 3 8 

Fuhire to proride lighta m water-cloeeta. 

f88 3 J 1 

Failttre to provide 250 eu. ft of air space 

for each emplojree between 6 a. m. and 

6p.m.,|86. 2 1 1 $50 

Failure to provide proper and sufficient 

meansofventiUtion.|8« 3 2 1 

F^ahire to provide dressing nxuns fw 

femaleB.iS^ 28 3 1 22 2 40 

Falhire to provide additional or separate 

water-eloeetB, i 88 3 1 3 

Failure to dean water-doeeiB, f 88 8 4 1 3 

Failure to provide means for flushing 

watcTHsIoeeta, 1 88 1 1 

Faihire to repair waterHsloaets, 1 04 1 1 

Faihiretooleanfloorsofworkrooms,f 84.. 2 11 

Failure to limewash or paint walls or 

eeiUngs.f84 4 1 3 

Faihre to have boiler iiMpeoted. i 01 1 I 

Faihireto provide exhaust system, {81... 10 3 2 4 1 35 

Failure to countersink set screws, 181.... 2 1 1 

Faihire to guard saws, 1 81 4 1 3 70 



Failure to guard sewing machines, { 81*- • • 1 1 

Faihire to guard miscwlaneous maduncry, 

f81 2 2 

Failure to remove bars from doors or 

windows. 81 80, 83 4 1 3 

Faihire to unlock doors during woricing 

houis,|80 11 1 3 7 185 

Fulure to provide handrails on stidrways, 

f81 3 1 2 



1 1 



Failure to cease using unsafe scaffolding, 

Fisutm to provide access to fire-escape, 

f82 1 1 

Failure to provide doors to open outwardly, 

180 1 1 



in. OnLDBRf: 

Employing child under 14. 1 70 62 25 6 

Employing child under 16 without Board 

oTHealth certificate, i 70 112 40 16 

Employing child under 16 more than 8 

hoars a day, or before 8 a. m., or after 

5p.m.,|70 110 21 12 

Employiitt diild under 16 in bottling 

estab&^ent, 1 03 1 

IT. Womr and Mmoits: 

Empknring female under 21 before 6 a. m., 

or after p. m., 177 3 

Emi^oying female over 16 more than 10 

hours a dav, I 77 

Empbytng feniale more than 6 days a 

week.§77 8 1 

Employing female more than 60 hours a 

week,|77 2 

TL WouDUion of TairaiairrB: 

Permitting goods to be manufactured in 
onfieeued tenement houses, i 100 2 1 



18 


13 


200 


28 


28 


160 


47 


30 


625 


1 . 






2 


1 


35 


4 


5 


110 


1 


1 


50 


1 


1 


5a 



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12 



New York State Department of Labor. 



3. prosecutions (FACTORIES AND MINES)— ConcZuded. 
(B) Proemdingi IfutUut$d in Cwrrtnl Ytar—Condviid, 

Bmuvn TO SBPTBMBn 30, 1911. 



Omifsi. 
VII. Baobim: 

Failure to provide or repair floor, $ 113. . . 
Fkilure to provide pipe and hood over oven 

door or nre-pit, §112 

Failure to remove water-oloeet from 
bakery,|112 

X/ Mdcillakious: 

Failure to pay wages weddy, (11 



Total. . . , 
Grand Total. 



Die- Sea. 

misBed tenee 

No. of Pend- or ao- With sue- 

cases. ing. quitted, drawn, pended. f^ned. 



Fines. 



1 . 













1 


1 . 













3 


2 


1 .. 








3 . 


114 
118 


51 


2 
6 


161 

188 


3 *|1S0 


413 


96 12.280 


497 


139 13.060 



4. COMPLAINTS UNDER THE FACTORY LAW. 
Sumnuttwd from StaiitHcal TabU VI, po»t. 

CoMPLAIlfTS SpSCIALLT 

Intbstioatbd. 

SUBJBCT or COICPUONT. * ■■ 



Not 
Sua- aua- 
Factobikb. tained. tained. 

AdminietratioD (poeting law, etc.) 2 3 

Sanitation and safety 316 152 

LighHnQ £8 13 

VtntilaHon and overcrotodtng 14 14 

Tim aUowed for mfai$ 1 

CUanlintM and tanitatv eonvfnimess 14S 74 

Dongerout machvMry S6 tO 

ElnatoTt, hoi8itoai/$, tU 6 1 

Protection from firt 68 18 

Gvntral taftiy 16 11 

Children 64 122 

Women and minors 21 12 

Laimdries (special) 2 

Workahops in tenements 2 

General violation of the factory law (including com- 
plaints without particulars) 3 

Payment of wages 2 

Bakeribs and CoNTEcnoNUUSS (Special). 

Water-closets, drainage or pltimbing , 73 

Ventilation 6 

Sleeping in bakery 2 

Cleanliness 14 

Ceiling not 8 feet in height 7 

Walls or ceiling defective 117 

Flooring 24 

Other violations of bakeshop law 8 

Conditions Not Within Department's Jurisdic- 
tion 



Place 

not 

foiind. 



10 



36 
11 
2 
5 
3 
62 
9 
3 



13 



Total. 

5 

468 

41 

28 

1 

Ut 

66 

7 

86 

»7 

193 

33 

2 

12 

6 
5 

110 

16 

4 

19 

10 

187 
33 
11 

13 



Anony- 
mous 
com- 
plaints. I 



270 

$6 

B6 

I 

14£ 
16 
11 
38 
IM 
91 
28 
3 
54 

11 



13 



Total. 



662 



436 



29 tl.l27 J489 



* Three cases in which judgments for $50.00 each were secured under J12. 

t The number of separate communications was 831. Included therem were 194 which covered 
more than one subject (134 covered two. 43 covered three. 8 covered four, 1 covered five, 4 covered 
six. 2 covered seven, 1 covered eight and 1 covered ten subjects). 

X The number of separate communications 413. Included therein were 55 which covered more 
than one subject (44 covered two, 5 covered three. 3 covered four, 2 covered five and l.oovered six 
subjects). *»% 

I Investigated in course of regxilar inspections; no special reports made by inspectors. 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



13 



5. ACCIDENTS REPORTED IN FACTORIES, MINES, QUARRIES AND CONSTRUC- 
TION WORK IN YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30. 1911. 



See TablM VII to XI, post. 



ACCLDBNTS 

Bkpobx 
Oct. 1. 1910. 

Rbportkd 
Thurkaftbr. 



Accnwim Dusnco Ysam Emdbd 

Sbptsmbbb 30, 1911. Rbpoktbd 

Prior to Notbiibbr 1, 1911. 



Ikdvitrt. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
fatal. 



(a) Factoribs. 



I. 
II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 
XII. 
XIII. 



stone, clay and glaaa products. . 

Metals, maohineiy and convey- 
ances 

Wood manufactures 

Leather and rubber goods 

Chemicals, oils, paints, etc. . . . 

Paper and pulp 

Printing and paper goods 

Textiles 

Clothing, millinery, laundry, 
etc 

Food, liquors and tobacco 

Water, light and power 

Building industry (shops) 

Miscellaneoua* 



28 

387 
85 
17 
51 
87 
27 
40 

17 

54 

38 

2 

1 



Total. 



784 



29 



Total. 



786 

27,650 
2.393 
859 
2.403 
1,599 
1.412 
2.134 

746 

2,882 

1,660 

16 

12 

44,551 



I. Mmes. . . 
II. Quarries. 



(b) MiNBS AND QuABRIBS. 

85 1 453 

19 1 466 



Total. 



54 



919 



(c) BmLoiNQ AND Enginbbbinq. 



I. Excavating 

Tktrecf $hafl9 and tunnels 

II. Erecting and structural work. . 

III. Finishing and furnishing 

IV. Wrecking and moving 

V. Other or miscellaneous .^ 



59 
69 



Total. 



69 



6,884 
S,$89 
4.456 
1.565 
112 
2.318 

15.335 



Grand Total . 



897 



35 60,805 



THBRBOr 



Children 
under 
Women. 16. 

30 1 



Fatal 



15 



605 


61 


86 


22 


10 


23 


113 


20 


7 


96 


6 


25 


9 


2 


21 


298 


22 


6 


549 


22 


14 


374 


12 


153 


255 


5 


33 


1 


1 


20 





1 


2 


2.352 


153 


404 

17 
4 


^^-^== 


'=^ 


31 




4 


128 

4 




I 


86 
6 




I 


51 




9 


S42 


2.352 


162 


767 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



14 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



6. children found in factories.! 

Undsb 16 BUT NOT Undbb 14, 







EifPLor 


BD— 1 


Undbb 14 Ybabs. 
(lUegaUy 
















LbOALLT.* H iLLKQALLT.t 


employed.) 


Total 
children 
under 16. 


County. 


Boya. 


Girls. 


Boys. Girls. 


Boys. Girls, i 


Albany 


Ill 


162 


1 




274 


AUegany 


3 


3 






6 


Broome 


23 


86 


2 1 




61 


Cattaraugua 


30 


11 






41 


Cayuga 


63 


46 






109 


Chautauqua 


70 


60 






130 


Chemung , 


5 


6 


3 3 




17 


Chenango 


17 


11 


2 2 




32 


Clinton 


2 








2 


Columbia 


27 


30 
2 


1 




58 


Cortland 


1 


7 


Delaware 


1 


2 


Dutchess 


18 


63 






71 


Erie 


647 


634 


34 61 


6 


1,171 


FrankUn 


14 








16 


Fulton 


62 


44 

6 


1 1 


1 1 


97 


Geneaeo 


15 


25 


Greene 


3 


2 






7 


Herkimer 


21 


13 

7 








34 


Jefferson 


7 


15 


Kings** 


668 


1,461 


66 113 


11 13 


2.212 


Lewis 





6 




. . .^ 


5 


Livingston 


2 


10 







12 


Madison 


16 


10 


1 


...... 


27 


Monroe 


334 


468 
106 


12 22 




836 


Montgomery 


92 


198 


Nassau 


8 


9 


, , 





17 


New York** 


1,886 


8,032 
106 


143 174 
16 17 


23 68 
6 


4.816 


Niagara 


83 


226 


Oneida 


146 


284 


3 6 




438 


Onondaga 


137 


183 


1 2 


1 


324 


Ontario 


3 


16 
87 







21 


Orange 


61 


98 


Orleans 


12 


1 


1 2 




18 


Oswego 


47 


69 






111 


Otsego 


6 


3 


2 2 


1 


13 


Queens** 


146 


496 


11 2 


3 


667 


Rensselaer 


54 


67 






111 


Richmond**. 


27 


62 
24 


1 1 




81 


RockUnd 


37 


61 


St. Lawrence 


6 


3 
11 


1 




10 


Saratoga 


7 


18 


Schenectady 


33 


6 








38 


Schoharie 




1 
13 

3 
44 


...... ...... 





1 


Seneca 


11 


24 


Steuben , 


2 


6 


Suffolk 


48 


92 


Sullivan 




3 


Tioga , 


2 


7 

1 







9 


Tompkins 




1 


UUter 


91 


138 







229 



.1 



i. e. with emplojrment certificates. 
i. e. without emplojrment certificates. 
. This tabulation is made from slips turned in especially for the purpose by factory inspectors 
with each inspection report. For more detailed figures as to sex and ase of children employed, 
for cities and towns and also for industries, see Sutistical Tables XIII-XVI. post. The figures in 
the latter do not agree precisely with the figures here, since the child labor slips are tabulated for 
every inspection made, so that some children are duplicated in the count, while in Tables XIII-XVI 
only the latest inspection report is used. 

** New York City. r^ n,r^n]o 

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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 15 



6. children found in factories— ConcJtirf«d. 



COUNTT. 



Warren 

Waahinfton., 

Wayne 

Weetcbetter. 
Wyoming. . . . 
Yates 



Total: 1911. 
1910. 
1909. 
1908. 
1907. 



Under 1 


L6 BUT NOT UnDEB 

Emplotbd — 


14. 


fNDBRUYEABS.. 

(Illegally 
employed.) < 


Total 

irhildren 

under 

16. 

3 
26 


Legally.* 


iLLEQALLT.t 


Boya. 

2 

11 


Girls. 

1 
13 
11 
62 
11 

2 


Boys. 
8 


Girls. 
2 

4 


Boys. Girls. 


6 
50 





... 


17 
125 


6 
6 






17 
8 


4.465 
4.514 
4.182 
4,711 
5.999 


7.756 
6.947 
5.411 
5.434 
6.483 


330 
314 
323 
672 
1.212 


406 
445 
419 
656 
1,123 


51 
67 
44 
144 
108 


75 
53 
36 
161 
57 


13.083 
12.330 
10.415 
11.778 
14.982 



7. NUMBER OF CHILDREN'S EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES ISSUED BY BOARDS 

OF HEALTH IN FIRST AND SECOND CLASS CITIES. 
Set Staiistical Table XII, post. 

New York City:t 1911. 1910. 1909. 1908. 1907 

Bronx Borough 3.783 3.186 2,450 2.101 1,875 

Brooklyn Borough 13.648 11.214 8.910 5.354 1.078 

Manhattan Borough 19.860 18.261 14.036 12.772 12,266 

Queens Borough 2.719 2,262 1.596 607 669 

Richmond Borough 127 137 120 103 144 

Total 40,037 35,060 28.012 20.937 16.032 

Buffalo 1.203 1.403 1,123 832 1.250 

Rocheiit»r 1,685 1.378 1.066 556 965 

Syracuse 802 930 856 674 816 

Albany 169 258 174 110 231 

Troy 311 369 306 280 361 

Utica 479 601 406 288 440 

Yonkers 198 135 195 105 113 

Schenectady 331 312 204 134 280 



t Figures for New York City includ 
• ». e. with employmen t certificates. 
1 i. e. without employment certificates. 



"mercantile " as well as ** manufacturing " certificates 



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16 New Yoek State Department of Labor. 

8. tenement manufactures. 

STATBmNT or L1CBN8B8 FOR Enhbk Fbbiod ow Ambndbd Law (Oct. 1, 1904-Sbpt. 30. 1911)' 

New 

York Remainder 
City. of State. Total 

Total applications received 16, 651 586 17, 137 



Total applications granted 15,058 582 15, 640 

Total appUoationa refused (net)* 27 4 81 

Applications canceled 1 , 460 1 , 460 

Applications pending 6 6 



licenses canceled at request of licensee 1.772 131 1.008 

Licenses revoked for unlawful conditions 73 73 



Total number of licensed premises 13.213 451 13,664 

RbCORD or LiCBNSBS FOB 1911. 

New Re- 
York mainder Total, 

City, of State. Total. 1910. 

Applications pending Oct. 1 20 20 12 

Applications received during year 1,368 19 1,387 1.647 



Total 1,388 19 1,407 1,659 

On first investigation: 

Applications granted 1,199 19 1,218 1,462 

Applications refused 165 165 154 

Applications canceled 18 18 2S 

Applications pending Sept. 30, 1911 6 6 20 

On reinvestigation of applications previously refused: 

Applications granted 186 186 119 

Applications refused again 33 33 38 

Applications canceled 122 122 43 



Total 341 341 200 



Licenses canceled at request of licensee 971 119 1,090 277 

Licenses revoked for unlawful conditions 42 42 11 

Net increase or decrease in — 

Outstanding Ucenses +372 —100 +272 +1,293 

Refused applications — 143 — 143 — 8 

Canceled applications +140 +140 +66 



Outstanding licenses Sept. 30 13,213 451 13,664 13,392 

*A total of 4,768 applications (all but 27 in New York City), have been refused on first in 
vestigation; but all but 31 of these were afterward granted or canceled on reinvestigation. 



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Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 17 



8. TENEMENT MANUFACTURES — Concluded 
Rboistbrs or Outsidb Workers, 1911. 

Notifi- 
cations Registers 
Month. issued. filed. 

October, 1910 367 129 

November, 1910 , Ifil 83 

December, 1910 398 160 

January, 1911 84 87 

February, 1911 14 

March, 1911 189 75 

ApriU 1911 228 34 

May, 1911 112 83 

June, 1911 98 40 

July, 1911 20 11 

August, 1911 1 2 

September, 1911 

Total: 1911 1,658 718 

1910 2.924 1,999 

1909 2,947 2.292 

1908 2,743 2.101 

1907 5.740 1,832 



Not found 


Report 


or out of no outside 


business. 


hands. 


13 


ll 


8 


l3 


14 


9 


11 


17 




5 


6 


12 


4 


10 


14 


11 


3 


5 


1 




74 


03 


463 


262 


268 


342 


330 


432 


327 


676 



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18 Xew York State Department of Labor. 

Work of Deputy Factory Inspectors (Table 1). 

On the 28th day of March, 1911, 1 was honored by the Commis- 
sioner of Labor with appointment to the office of Firat Deputy 
Commissioner of Labor and Chief Factory Inspector. 

The work of the bureau of factory inspection was taken up at 
once and I proceeded to familiarize myself with the duties of the 
position to which I had been appointed. 

No radical change were made in the bureau owing to the fact 
that legislation on the Phillips bill was pending and this measure 
provided for the re-organization of the Department. When this 
re-organization takes place and is in working order, I believe it 
will result in giving to the State of New York a much improved 
system of factory inspection. 

Under the new law we now have a mechanical engineer who 
is devoting special attention to the matter of proper guards for 
machinery, prevention of accidents, etc. As the result of the work 
of this expert, we hope later on to have a uniform system of orders 
to guard machinery. 

Since my connection with this bureau a new mine inspector 
has been appointed and he has proved himself to be a very capable 
and earnest inspector. He is doing excellent work in the thorough 
inspection of the mines and quarries of the state. 

There has also been recently appointed an additional tunnel 
inspector who will be able to take up the wonderfully increased 
tunnel work now being carried on throughout the State of New 
York. 

Eight regular inspectors have been assigned to work under the 
immediate supervision of the superintendent of licenses. These 
inspectors will confine their efforts to the thorough inspection of 
tenements and places affected by the provisions of section one hun- 
dred of the Labor Law. 

While great credit is due our inspectors and our force generally, 
for the amount and character of the work accomplished during the 
year just closed, we hope, with our increased force and the con- 
templated re-arrangement of the work of the bureau, to perform 
better service and cover a greater amount of work during the 
coming year. It is the purpose to have more frequent inspections 

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Eeport of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 19 

made of the places most needing our watching and supervision. 
In many instances it has been clearly demonstrated to us that 
even with constant surveillance it is a difficult matter to have the 
standard maintained. 

During the year ended September 30, 1911, the force of in- 
spectors in this bureau made regular inspections throughout the 
state, including factories, laundries, mines, tunnels and tenement 
houses, to the number of 59,238. This number exceeds our figures 
for the year 1910 by 2,422. The total number of inspections made 
shows a steady increase each year. The number of places to be 
inspected is growing each year, and it is with pleasure we refer to 
the increased number of inspectors given to the Department to 
care for this steadily increasing business. 

The grovnng popularity of the modem loft building is clearly 
evidenced by the fact that in ITew York City alone the number of 
factories located in such buildings numbered 26,281 for the past 
year, while the number for the year 1910 was 25,847. 

A tenant-factory building, as was explained in our report for 
last year, is a building with at least two tenants, one of which is a 
factory. 

In addition to over 59,000 regular inspections, 48,477 visits 
wexe made on applications for licenses, in the investigation of com- 
plaints and compliances with orders. Of the visits on compliances, 
28,045 were first and 16,092 were second or subsequent visits. 

A decrease is noted from 126 tagging cases in tenements in 1910 
to 78 in the year 1911, while 112 fewer tenant factories were 
tagged in 1911 than in 1910. 

In bakeries the ovens and utensils were tagged in 61 cases. The 
total number of bakeries inspected in 1910 was 4,156 while during 
the past year 4,996 bakeshops were visited by our inspectors, this 
being an increase of 840 bakeries inspected, 

The total number of prosecutions instituted by officials of the 
factory inspection bureau was 413. 

Counsel, F. 5. Cunningham, and his assistant, Charles Whelan, 
deserve credit for the amount of work handled in the courts and 
the results obtained through legal actions instituted by them for 
violations of the law, as enforced by this bureau. 



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20 New York State Department of Labor. 

Complaints (Table 4). 

In the matter of complaints filed with this bureau it is found to 
be very unsatisfactory to handle those sent here anonymously, be- 
cause, in many instances, our investigations show that we have no 
jurisdiction in the premises and we are not able to convey informa- 
tion to those sending in the complaints. 

As soon as complaints are received they are accorded prompt 
and careful attention, whether or not they are signed. 

In no instance is the source of our information divulged. No 
action is taken against any manufacturer solely on the facts sub- 
mitted in the complaint. Our inspector makes investigation and 
if the conditions found by the ofiBcial warrant action by this bureau, 
such action is based on the report of our own representative. 

During the past year, as is usual, many complaints, signed and 
anonymous, have been received by the bureau, alleging the failure 
of incorporated concerns to pay employees weekly and in cash, as 
provided in the statute. 

When such complaints have been sustained by our inspectors' 
findings on investigation, legal notices have been issued requiring 
immediate compliance with the law. We have been generally suc- 
cessful in securing compliances with these special notices. 

4 

Accidbnts (Table 5). 

As will be noted by the summary of accidents, the law in regard 
to the prompt reporting thereof is being complied with very satis- 
factorily. 

However, to my mind, there is still room for improvement in 
this direction. A special effort will be made by the bureau during 
the coming year to secure even a greater observance of this require- 
ment of the law. 

The amendment to section 87 of the law, requiring that the per- 
son in charge of any factory shall keep a correct record of all 
deaths, accidents or injuries sustained by any person "therein or on 
the premises, in such form as may be required by the oommissioner 
of labor, the record to be open to our inspectors when they are on 
the premises, will prove of great assistance to the factory bureau 
in perfecting its work in the collection of information relating to 

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Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 21 

accidents and injuries in factories. A samiple showing the form 
in which this oflSce record of accidents is to be kept, is furnished 
in response to inquests and inquiries for information about this 
matter and ike same is set up in the following form : 

Pursuant to the provisions of the statute in effect October 1, 1910, the commis- 
sioner of labor will require that there be kept in the office of eaeh factory, a record 
which shall contain the information as set forth in the following sample form: 



Name of firm: 



List of Emplotebs Injured. Beginning October 1, 1910. 
Serial Name of Occupation at time Date of Date rep't'd 

No. employee. of accident. Home address, accident. to Albany. 

1 

2 

3 

Not only must the above record be kept in the factory, mine or quarry office, but 
aU accidents and injuries must be reported to the Factory Inspector, within 48 hours 
after their occurrence. Forms for this purpose are furnished by the Factory Ins|>eotor 
on request. 

Failure to keep the record and to report accidents is a misdemeanor. 

Many questions come to the bureau regarding the accidents that 
are to be reported. An effort is made by this oflBce and by our 
oflSoials in ;the field, to make it very clear to those affected by the 
statute, that reports are required covering only such accidents and 
injuria as happen in the factory or on the factory premises. 

A word of explanation is necessary with regard to the enormous 
increase in the number of accidents reported this year as compared 
with last. This increase in reported accidents throws absolutely 
no light upon the question of whether accidents in factories in this 
state are increasing in number or not. The increase is rather 
explained by changes in the method or completeness of reporting. 
Some of the increase is probably due to more nearly complete 
rei)orting of all cases, due to increased efforts by the bureau to 
insure reporting this year; but, most of the increase is due to a 
change made at the beginning of this year, in the specification of 
reportable accidents. 

Prior to this year employers were required to report only acci- 
dents causing " cessation from work for at least half a day (five 
hours or more)'' but on October first, 1910, this limit was abolished 
and thereafter all accidents were required to be reported which 
caused any interruption of work for the employee. The main 
reason for this change was the consideration that as an indicator of 



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22 New York State Department of Labor. 

danger a trivial accident may be quite as significant as a serious 
one. This change accounts for the fact that the increase in num- 
ber of accidents reported to nearly double the number last year, is 
almost entirely in the number of non-fatal accidents. 

Child Labor (Tables 6 and Y). 

To those interested in the work performed and the results 
accomplished by the factory inspection bureau, there is not a 
more interesting subject than that of child labor. Violation of 
the child labor provisions of the law has furnished a large number 
of cases for prosecution during the yean 

Coming- into the department with an especially keen interest in 
this particular phase of the work of the factory inspect! v,^ bureau, 
I was surprised to find that the child labor problem was so well 
in hand. The law requiring employment certificates for children 
between 14 and 16 years of age, can be considered as generally 
observed. 

There has, however, come to my special attention, a surprisingly 
large number of violations in the matter of employing children 
under 16 years of age in excess of eight hours per day and before 
eight o'clock in the morning and after five o'clock in the evening. 

Shortly after I assumed my duties as chief of the factory bureau, 
a vigorous crusade was started to wipe out as far as possible illegal 
practices in the hours permitted or required of children employed 
in factories. The inspectors, under my personal direction and in- 
struction, were sent out in squads in Greater ^NTew York, to clean 
up every case that could be found of violation of the law in this 
respect. In the case of one hundred and thirty-seven concerns 
we were able to establish violations as to illegal hours for children 
and the delinquents were taken into court. 

There will be no cessation of our efforts along this particular 
line. We will aim to bring about strict observance of the law regu- 
lating hours of labor of children employed in factories and no 
labor will be spared to impress upon the employers of children, the 
fact that they may expect no leniency when found violating the 
child labor provisions of the statute. The question of the hours 
permitted and required of children in factories is one of economic 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 23 

importance to the state and our energies will be concentrated on 
the wiping out of violations of this kind. 

For the year ended September 30, 1911, 13,083 children 
under the age of sixteen years were found employed in the factor- 
ies of this state, exceeding the number employed in 1910 by 753. 
Of the total number employed, 126 were under the age of fourteen 
years, and in every case where suflScient evidence of the age of the 
child could be obtained by the inspector, the employer was taken 
into court. 

A total of 12,957 children between the ages of fourteen and 
sixteen years was found employed, 736 of whom were illegally 
at work. 

The continued decrease in the number of children illegally 
employed, between 14 and 16 years of age, is shown in the 
following: 

1907 15.8 

1908 11.6 

1909 7.2 

1910 6.2 

1911 6.6 

Safety. 

From personal observation it is very clear to my mind that one 
of the most objectionable and serious obstacles to safe conditions 
in factories, is the wooden partition found entirely too frequently 
in the shops and factories where facilities for escape in case of fire 
are all but wholly inadequate. 

In many instances we have been fortunate in having these parti- 
tions removed or changed, merely as a result of earnest and urgent 
suggestion on our part. However, under the law we have no actual 
authority in a matter of the kind and in a number of cases we have 
been unable to get changes made which would materially improve 
conditions in the shops. These partitions not only obstruct but 
are a menace in case of fire. 

Ventilation. 

Since my connection with this bureau our field force has not 
been required to accord any special attention to the matter of 
ventilation in factories inasmuch as under the present law it is 



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24 New York State Department of Labor. 

almost impossible to secure satisfactory compliance with this 
provision of the statute. 

In some instances where atmospheric conditions were found to 
be particularly bad, improvement in the air conditions has been 
insisted upon. In every case where compliance with the law has 
been demanded, we have firmly refused to approve the apparatus 
installed, making it clear to those interested that the bureau 
insisted on proper air conditions and would approve and accept 
only such conditions as met the requirements of the law and the 
standard established by the department. 

It is to be hoped that very soon a legal standard will be estab- 
lished so that the bureau may be enabled to enforce provisions of 
the law calling for improved air conditions in unsanitary 
factories. 

Tenement Manufactures (Table 8). 

During the entire period in which the present tenement house 
law has been effective, 17,137 applications for licenses have been 
received, all but 586 of which were in Greater New YorL 
During the year 1911, 1,387 applications were made. Of these, 
33 stood refused at the close of the year, 140 were canceled and 6 
were pending on September 30, 1911. 

The tenement inspection work during the year was accorded 
particularly careful attention and the field force covered practi- 
cally all of the licensed tenements and rear shop buildings in 
Greater New York. 

At the time inspections were made by our officials, persons to 
the number of 19,628 were found working in 12,982 apartments. 
Of the persons employed, 4,146 were working in 1,472 separated 
shops in stores, wherein the license features of the tenement house 
kw do not apply. 

Persons to the number of 239 were illegally employed, while 
107 children of school age were working during the sessions of 
the public schools. Cases of disease reported in licensed houses 
numbered 64, but only 2 cases were found in apartments where 
work was being done. 

The sanitary condition of licensed tenements generally waj 
found to be very satisfactory. Orders were isaued against 310 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 25 

buildings, while in rear shop buildings, only 23 were found to 
require orders. 

In treating the subject of tenement work, the following from 
the report of the Superintendent of Licensee, Daniel O'Leary, 
concerning work in New York City, is respectfully submitted. 

The total of all licensed tenement houses in&pected numbers 12,632, and 
the number of licensed rear buildings, commonly designated " rear shops," is 
405, making a total of all licensed tenement buildings inspected during the 
year of 13,037. These figures exceed those of 1910 by 1,194 buildings. 

In the 12,632 licensed tenement houses 153,156 separate apartments were 
Borutinized besides cellars and basements and other parts of buildings not 
used in common and not used for living purposes. Licensed tenement houses 
to the number of 5,291 were found to contain no workers at the time of 
inspection. There were 1,472 store shops, or apartments that were found 
wholly devoted to work purposes and having no connection whatever with 
Uving rooms. In these store shops were found employed 4,146 persons in- 
cluding the proprietors of such shops. 

The whole number of persons found at work in tenement houses, including 
those employed in shops therein, is 19,628. The number of persons found 
actually at work in living rooms on articles coming under | 100 is shown to 
be 15^80. The total number of apartments found in use under the law in 
tenemeat houses, 12,982. This number includes 1,472 stores and other shops 
in tenement houses, and makes the number of living apartments or rooms 
which were found in actual use under § 100 to be 11,510, which number 
of Uving apartments or rooms contained 15,280 workers. 

Again this year a slight falling off is shown in the number of rear shops. 
In 1910, 431 recorded licensed rear shops were reported. This year we show 
only 405. I repeat my statement of last year, to wit, that this class of old- 
time and troublesome shop buildings is gradually disappearing. The chief 
cause is the construction of new and up-to-date shop buildings in which 
better accommodations are provided and which are vastly more satisfactory 
to both the employer and his employees. 

Of the 405 rear shops visited, 103 were found closed or devoted to other 
business. Only 23 orders were issued against the 302 shops found in use. 
This is very satisfactory as showing the sanitary conditions prevailing. In 
the 302 shops were found employed 5,438 persons. 

Only 910 of the 12,632 licensed tenement houses inspected received orders 
of any kind. In aU, 42 licenses were revoked for purely sanitary reasons. 
Cases of disease reported in licensed houses numbered 64, but in only two 
apartments was disease found where work was proceeding, and none was found 
in shops. 

There were 107 children of school age found at work in their homes during 
school hours, all of whom were promptly reported to the Associate City 
Superintendent of Schools for attention under the Compulsory Education 
Law. There is no provision of law placing this duty upon this Department, 
but I feel that the Department should have some record on the subject of 
the employment of children in the home, who are of school age, at least 
in so far as their employment may relate to work under $ 100. Consequently, 



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26 New Yoek State Department of Labor. 

I have instructed the inspectors to carefully watch for children employed 
in their homes during the sessions of the public schools, to closely question 
and report any so found and ascertain whether they attend school, cause of 
absence, etc., with results as above noted. 

There were 239 persons found illegally employed in living rooms, i. e., 
239 persons who were not living in the apartments in which they were found 
at work. All such violations were dealt with promptly, that is they were 
discharged by the tenant who hired them on the order of the inspector 
when found or if not, the work of such tenant was promptly stopped by 
the use of the tenement tag. 

There were 971 licenses canceled for reasons other than sanitary, and 42 
licenses were revoked for foul or unclean conditions found in the buildings 
for which they were issued; 1,404 new licenses were written; 1,368 new appli- 
cations were filed; 1,406 notices were sent out to owners of tenement houses 
under { 105; 1,698 inspections or reinspections of new applications were 
made. 

Of the applicatione for licenses 165 were refused on first inspection; 140 
were canceled. Cases of the application of the tenement tag numbered 78, in 
46 of which cases the goods so tagged were seized and removed from the 
place where found. I authorize the inspectors to use the tag freely to secure 
prompt compliance with orders, as I find from experience that such treat- 
ment is more effective in bringing about immediate results than if we re- 
sorted to the issuance of a warrant of arrest of the offender, in addition to 
a very large saving of time of the inspector who by this means is kept in the 
field instead of in court. 

There were 1,663 unrecorded tenement houses visited as being suspected 
of having persons employed in them of which only 204 were found to contain 
no workers. The total of all inspections of licensed houses, of houses for 
which new applications were filed, and houses suspected of violations of 
S 100 is shown to be 16,423. These figures show pretty clearly the constant 
activity of inspectors on this work. Complaints against this class of work 
have been few. This is especially true of those complaints having a valid 
basis under the law. 

I instructed the inspectors to carefully separate in their reports to me 
the ready made from the custom made clothing. This is, I believe, the first 
accurate information of this kind ever collected. I am much pleased with 
it. It is as complete and as accurate as is possible to obtain as the data 
were all collected from personal contact with and interrogation of the 
people found employed. In considering this feature, the terms " ready made " 
and "custom made" should be understood to apply entirely to clothing 
for adult or child, male and female. Custom work is composed of work 
from the hands of the journeyman tailor, which is made by hand for the 
individual customer from measure. The "ready made" is that work 
made up for the public trade, irrespective of the quality of the goodc or the 
class of the trade to be served. The number of home workers comprising 
both classes of workers run pretty evenly as to volume, 7,243 "custom" 
hands and 7,716 " ready made " hands being found. 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 27 

In location there is a great difference, as we find the custom workers scat- 
tered over every part of the city, while the ready made clothing workers 
are found in greatest volume in the sections wherein are located the shops 
of the ready made clothing manufacturers or of their contractors. Again, 
the majority of the custom workers are males, while those on ready made 
goods are females, and of course, there is a very large difference in the earn- 
ings of both classes as one class does only that part of the garment thai 
cannot be done in the shop and requires no particular skill, while the other 
class, the cUstom workers, must make and shape the garment after it is cut, 
which requires skill and knowledge on the part of the worker obtained only 
after long service as an apprentice, etc., at this trade. 

Of workers on articles other than clothing, there were 1,962 feather 
makers, 1,170 artificial flower workers, 1,537 engaged on various other articles 
specified in { 100. 

The nationality or race of the worker is another very interesting feature. 
The inspectors reported 22 different races employed in the home, but the 
great bulk of such workers was divided between the Italian and Jewish raoes^ 
the former having 10,081 while the latter had 6,668. The numbers reported 
for other nationalities or races were as follows: 



Natiooalitj or race. 

Italian 

Jewish 

German 

American 

Bohemian 

Greek 

Iridi 

Hungarian 

French 

Swediih 

Polirii 



Number Number 

of of 
workers. Nationality or race. workers. 

10.081 English 34 

6,668 Negro 88 

1,278 Finnish 17 

781 Russian 17 

174 Austrian 16 

©9 Scotch 14 

93 Chinese 8 

92 Slavonian 8 

88 Spanish 8 

80 Cuban t 

61 Armenian 1 



The number of recorded outstanding licenses on October 1, 1911, was 
13,213 against 12,841 for 1910. Comparison with other years will show that 
the percentage of home workers does not fluctuate very materially. My ex- 
perience teaches that necessity is the great impetus in this line or class of 
work. Few persons are met with among the home workers, who engage in 
such employment from purely sordid motives, or for the sake of earning 
mere pin money. The necessity for honest and decent self support, or to 
aid in the support of dependents, is, we find, the chief reason for the greatest 
amount of so-called home employment. I am satisfied also that this report, 
full and complete as it is, does not cover all persons who do work in their 
own homes, for I believe that there are many persons ift this city thus em- 
ployed who take great pains to hide that fact, not alone from the eyes 
of the law, but from the eyes of the whole world so far as possible. 

This work throws us into constant contact with that side of life where 
the struggle for existence is greatest, and misery and want and destitution 
cannot be hidden, and by those who strive to get a livelihood by honest 
efforts. Therefore, while the mandate of the law is harshness itself, we 



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28 New York State Department of Labor. 

try to temper it6 enforcement with as much consideration, patience and com- 
mon sense and a spirit of human sympathy as is possible to extend while 
performing our duty under the law. 

The general conditions met with show improvement, in that obedience with 
the requirements of the statute is more easily obtained than formerly, but we 
cannot check or stop the moving about of the people who are engaged in this 
line of work. The bulk of new applications is caused largely by removals of 
workers who perhaps seek a better paying location in which to prosecute 
their labor, or perhaps more often seeking cheaper rent. 

I am pleased with the new arrangement which gives to this division a 
permanent set of inspectors and shall strive with them to make the work 
for the present year more thorough and efficient if such is at all possiUe. 

Prosecutions (Table 3). 

To effectively enforce the provisions of the law applying to 
factories and to maintain a proper respect for those administering 
them, makes it necessary in many instances to have recourse to 
the courts. No year's work proves an exception to this rule, as 
the lesson sought to be impressed by resort to punitive action 
appears to be soon forgotten. This holds good especially in regard 
to the employment of children. In spite of all admonition and the 
publicity given to this subject, a comparison of the records for the 
past six years, in which period more drastic efforts were resorted 
to than at any other previous time in the history of the bureau, 
shows violations of this character continue to form the greater 
part of the causes for prosecution. 

The table setting forth a summary of prosecutions, and forming 
part of this report, is divided into two parts, the first giving cases 
pending on October first, 1910, and the other the cases instituted 
between that date and September 30, 1911. Out of 84 cases in 
the first group, 80 were disposed of, 2 are awaiting trial, and 
2 the magistrate's decision. These last two mentioned cases have 
been held in the balance since 1909. 

During the period covered by this report, 413 cases were insti- 
tuted, 285 for the illegal employment of children or nearly 70 per 
cent of all the cases brought. For failure to observe the laws of 
sanitation and safety 99 cases were instituted; there were 17 for 
employing minors and women under 21 illegal hours, 2 for permit- 
ting work in unlicensed tenements, 5 for failure to improve 
unsanitary bakeshop conditions, 3 for failure of corporations to 
pay their employees weekly, 1 for failure to report accidents and 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 20 

1 for interfering with the inspector while in the discharge of his 
duty. 

Of all those which came to trial there were 56 diMnissals or 
acquittals, 6 withdrawals and in 188 cases sentences were 
suspended. In 129 cases fines were imposed aggregating in 
amount the siun of $3,050. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my appreciation to you and 
the entire force of the bureau of factory inspection, my thanks 
and appreciation for their earnest co-operation and assistance in 
carrying out the laws of this Department 
Eespectf ully submitted, 

(Signed) John S. Whaxbw, 

Chief Factory Inspector, 



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30 Xew York State Department of Labor, 

11. 

EEPOKT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTOR 

Hon. John Williams, 

Commissioner of Labor, Albany, N. Y. 

Sir: I hereby submit my report as medical inspector of 
factories for the year ended September 30, 1911. 

During the year my activities have been confined principally 
to New York City, and were devoted to routine work in relation 
to ventilation, inquiries regarding sanitation, the possibility of 
poisoning or disease resulting from various processes of manu- 
facture, and special investigations. 

The special investigations completed were those relating to 
atmospheric conditions in the factories devoted to the manufacture 
of cloaks, suits and skirts in New York City, and the danger q{ 
mercury poisoning in the manufacture of felt hats. Reports of 
these are appended hereto. 

Through the courtesy of the Board of Directors of St. Barthol- 
omew's Clinic, the Department was continued in the privileges 
of the laboratory for intensive study and research work in con- 
nection with the various investigations undertaken. 

The Department was represented at the Conference on Indus- 
trial Diseases held at St. Louis December 29-30, 1910. 

That the activities of the Department relating to intensive work 
into atmospheric conditions of workrooms are now fully recog- 
nized, was evidenced through a request from the Commissioner of 
Health, and the Committee on Ventilation of the City of Chicago, 
for an investigation into, and a report upon, the practicability of 
ventilating basements and cellars of mercantile establishments and 
workrooms. A report of investigations made in response to this 
request is appended hereto. 

Factory inspection relates to inspections and investigations of 
conditions affecting the health, safety, and welfare of the workers, 
a large amount of this work being properly classified as industrial 
hygiene. Medical inspection, therefore, is intimately concerned 
with (1) obtaining of data regarding the sanitary conditions of 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 31 

factories or work rooms, (2) investigating and studying the 
various processes of manufacture with a view toward determining 
the presence of injurious or dangerous substances, especially, 
irritating or poisonous dust, fumes, gases or vapors, (3) conduct- 
ing physical examinations of the workers for the purpose of 
preventing the spread of infectious or contagious diseases, (4) the 
physical examination of minors and women to determine those 
physically unfit to continue work, and more especially the exami- 
nation of all workers engaged in industries known to be dangerous 
to health, for the purpose of preventing poisoning or disease, and 
(5) the recommending of such means or devices as may prevent 
injury, poisoning, or disease in the various industries. 

At present there is no legislative authority which permits the 
Department to carry on any investigations as to the actual physi- 
cal conditions of the workers, which is essential to the completion 
of an investigation of any industry. Investigations and inquiries 
have been limited therefore to intensive studies of the processes 
of manufacture, the conditions under which the workers are 
obliged to continue their labors, and the dangerous elements 
present to which the workers are exposed. 

Ventilation. 

Ventilation, i. e. factory or industrial ventilation may be 
divided into — 

General — as applied to all work rooms, irrespective of the 
nature of the work being carried on, and 

Special — as applied to the removal by mechanical means of 
dust, fumes, gases or vapors generated during the process of manu- 
facture, or resulting from the handling or storage of materials 
used in the industry. 

General ventilation may be secured either by natural or 
mechanical means, but just when the natural means cease to be 
proper and sufficient, and mechanical means become necessary can 
be determined only through comparisons with scientific standards 
which must be maintained. In the case of natural means, the 
standard must obviously be one of permissible amount of vitiation, 
determined preferably by a certain definite indicator, such as the 
amount of carbon dioxide present. 



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32 New York State Department of Labor. 

Special ventilation may be secured only through mechanical 
means, for it is self-evident that the removal of dust, fumes, gases 
or vapors, must be accomplished through pipes properly connected 
with blowers or exhaust fans of large capacity. Where it becomes 
necessary to dissipate heat or humidity, the air must be constantly 
and uniformly changed. 

Section 86 of the Labor Law relates to general ventilation, but 
there is an absence of specific standards as to purity or volume 
of the air required. Again, that portion of the section dealing 
with steam, gases, vapors, dust or other impurities generated in 
the course of the manufacturing processes carried on, relates to 
special ventilation, but fails to state specifically as to how the room 
shall be ventilated to render them as harmless as practicable. 

A portion of section 81 applies to special ventilation, in that 
it sp^ifically provides for proper hoods and pipes and that such 
pipes shall be connected to an exhaust fan of sufficient capacity 
and power to remove all matter thrown off from grinding, polish- 
ing, or buffing wheels, as well as dust and impurities from machin- 
ery creating the same. Were these specific requirements made 
applicable to that portion of section 86 relating to steam, gases, 
etc., it would, in my opinion, tend to solve one of the ventilating 
problems, as well as to render safe, many industries which are now 
a menace to the health of the workers, and in many of which 
women and children are employed. A large number of these 
industries are to be found in tenant factories and converted dwell- 
ings situated in congested districts. 

I have found that there is an inclination on the part of most 
factory proprietors to secure good atmospheric conditions in the 
work rooms, but as a rule they desire to be shown specifically 
what is required by the law in order to comply with its provisions. 
In the case of dust creating machinery this is easily accomplished, 
but, in many instances, large quantities of dust are present in the 
atmosphere not due to machinery, and it becomes difficult to secure 
proper compliance with the law; this is also true in regard to 
fumes, gases, vapors, excessive heat and humidity. 

The investigation undertaken in the cloak and suit industry 
is a definite illustration of the capabilities of natural and mechani- 
cal means for general ventilation in factories. 



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Report of BrREAu of Factoky Inspection, 1911. ^^ 

It must be conceded that, in large lofts with plentiful window 
area, and where the workers are spread out, good atmospheric con- 
ditions may be maintained through natural means, but this is true 
only in industries where no dust, fumes, gases or vapors are an ac- 
companiment of the work carried on. 

Some work was done for the bureau of mercantile inspection in 
relation to ventilation. The report of investigations into the ven- 
tilating conditions of a large mercantile establishment appended 
hereto shows what results may be accomplished by the installation 
of a proper system. 

Light. 

The proper lighting of factories is an important question, for 
it concerns not only the health of the workers, but also the preven- 
tion of accidents. 

Labor laws are intended to protect the health of the workers by 
requiring work rooms to be properly supplied with the natural 
conditions for labor, especially as to air and light. Notwith- 
standing this fact, there is a dearth of legislation relating to the 
subject of proper lighting and it has not received attention propor- 
tionate to its importance. 

In all factories visited I have found it the desire of the workers 
to get just as near the source of natural light as possible, with the 
result that in many industries there is a certain amount of crowd- 
ing about the windows, which increases as the window area becomes 
limited ; that this has a direct effect upon air vitiation is conclu- 
sively shown in the Departmental investigation of atmospheric 
conditions in various industries and more especially that of the 
garment workers. This spells the need of legislation requiring 
sufficient window area, both as to floor space, and to the number of 
workers. 

The use of certain kinds of window glass, and especially that of 
ribbed or prismatic glass, has the advantage over ordinary window 
panes in that the natural light is diffused over remote portions of 
the work room which would otherwise be dark, but it also has the 
disadvantage of causing a glaring and intolerable light to fall upon 
the workers' eyes on very sunny days. This I have found to be 
so from inquiries made of the workers in factories where such glass 



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34 New York State Department of Labor. 

is used, and have confirmed the truth of these statements from 
personal investigations as to the effects. 

Connecticut possesses a law which provides that colored and 
corrugated glass may be removed if injurious to the eyes of the 
workers. I would recommend that such authority be given to the 
Department. 

I would again refer to the question of the obstruction of natural 
lighting of work rooms through uncleanliness of window panes, 
arrangement of stock, partitions and machinery and recommend 
remedial legislation granting the Department authority to regulate 
such conditions. 

In my previous reports, the question of artificial lighting in its 
relation to air vitiation has been fully discussed. Its effects upon 
the eyes of the workers, if too dim, or too glaring, are to cause eye 
strain, nervous disorders, dimness of vision and the loss of eye- 
sight, which latter is the greatest calamity that can befall anyone. 
It has been impossible to undertake an intensive investigation into 
the subject, but as a result of general injuries among the workers, 
I find there are a number who suffer from the effects of faulty 
lighting. I have observed many workers employed with unshaded 
gas and electric light directly on a level with the eyes, and from 
my own experience with such means of lighting, I am fully con- 
vinced of the harmfulness of such illumination. 

When artificial illumination becomes necessary, there should 
be a fixed minimum standard of light to be maintained, as well as 
a proper means of protection from too brilliant illumination. 

In Holland the law requires a minimum intensity of ten bougie 
meters (one foot candle) to be maintained, and, in some special 
industries, such as sewing, knitting, embroidery, jewelry, engrav- 
ing, printing, etc., an intensity of fifteen bougie meters (one and 
one half foot candles) is required. 

In the opinion of expert®, this is a fairly scientific and practi- 
cable standard. I would recommend the adoption of such a stand- 
ard. In my opinion, the Department should also be given author- 
ity to require that workers l>e •proteete<l against excessive radiation 
from the illumination in use. 



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Repoet of Bueeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 35 

Dust, Fumes, Gases, Etc. 
The list of principal industrial poisons, as tabulated by a com- 
mittee of the International Association for Labor Legislation, con- 
tains thirty, and shows that the mode of entrance of such poisons 
into the body is as follows : 

In the form of duat 7 

In the iorm of a gaa 12 

In the form of a vapor H 

The industries wherein the workers are exposed to such poisons 
are numerous. 

As a rule, most dusts, gases, fumes and vapors are either so 
unpleasant or irritating in their effects that the necessity for their 
removal is quite evident. In many industries, however, gases and 
vapors of a character dangerous to the health of the worker are 
present and yet imperceptible to the ordinary senses. 

The question of dust in the industries has received such close 
attention during the past few years that its injurious effects have 
been fully demonstrated. The activities of the Department have 
been devx>ted to intensive work regarding this important subject 
and in the previous reports the question of dust has been discussed 
at length. 

Through Departmental investigation, it has been demonstrated 
that in certain industries not classified as dusty, the presence of 
dust in some quantities is one of the elements of danger. 

An analysis of sample of air secured in the shops where skirts 
are made showed as high as 70 grams of dust per million litres of 
air, this being as large a quantity as was found in some of the 
pearl button factories. The reason for its not being very apparent 
is due to the fact that it is mostly organic, consisting of fibres of 
cloth, emanations from the human body and, probably, particles of 
food. The tests for oxidizable organic matter showed over 2 grams 
per million litres. The danger from the presence of large amounts 
of organic dust is due, not only to the irritating properties of some 
of the cotton and wool fibres, but because it is fertile ground for 
the growth of disease germs. 

In some industries the danger is not alone from the irritating 
organic dust but from the addition to it of irritating inorganic 

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36 New York State Department of Labor. 

dust This is shown by the analysis of samples secured from the 
finishing room of a felt hat factory. In one gram (15 grains) of 
dust, there was found .01021 grams of silica, a fine sharp sub- 
stance which is the principal ingredient of glass. An analysis of 
a sample of dust secured in a room where paris green was boxed 
showed .303 grams per cubic meter, and further analysis showed 
that of this, .093 grams was arsenic. This dust is not only poison- 
ous, but very irritating, and, as a result of spending several days 
at the plant, the mucous membrane of my nose, as well as that of 
Inspector Vogt, was inflamed for some days after our visit 

Samples of air secured in a brass foundry were analyzed and 
showed 75.2 grams per million litres of air, and of this 55.4 
grams were silica, which undoubtedly came from the fine sand used 
for the flasks or moulds in which the metal is cast 

This is conclusive proof of the necessity for granting the De- 
partment authority to formulate regulations applicable to special 
dusty conditions in the industries. 

In order to satisfactorily safeguard the health of the workers 
and protect them effectively from dangers of gas, fumes and 
vapors, specific regulations applicable to the various industries 
wherein such fumes, gases or vapors are generated, are required. 
The question as to whether such conditions are the result of 
processes of manufacture or otherwise, and as to whether they 
may be dealt with effectively by appliances attached to machines, 
by general ventilation through the use of artificial means, by appli- 
ances to be worn by workers, or by a combination of these means, 
must also be given careful thought. 

There are many industries other than chemical works in which 
gases, fumes and vapors may be present, not however, due to pro- 
cesses of manufacture. These impurities may be in themselves 
harmless, but in combination with other gases or with dust they 
may become dangerous; they may be irritating in character, or 
under certain conditions of temperature and humidity they may 
lower the vitality, and predispose to disease; or they may be 
poisonous. 

As a result of the investigation in the cloak and suit industry, 
the presence of carbon monoxide was conclusively shown to be 
present in the air breathed by the pressers who used gas irons. 



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Ebpobt of Bubeau of Factoey Inspection, 1911. 37 

This is a most deadly gas and not perceptible to the senses, but 
under the present law we have no specific method of dealing with 
this dangerous element. 

Experience has demonstrated the need for well defined stand- 
ards embodied in the law, providing for the effective removal of 
impurities. 

Women and Childeen. 

The employment of women and children in the industries ii a 
question of industrial hygiene as well as of economics. It is an 
established fact that they are very susceptible to poisoning and 
disease, and upon the conservation of their health depends the 
health and usefulness of the future generation. It, therefore, 
becomes a matter for medical inspection. 

To pursue intensive investigations into the subject would re- 
quire time and a staff of specially trained investigators. As part 
of my activities some attention has been given to the conditions 
found in factories relating to the safety, health, and welfare of 
women and children. 

Section 88 of the law provides that " Where females are em- 
ployed, dressing or emergency rooms shall be provided for their 
use; each such room shall have at least one window opening to 
the outer air and shall be enclosed by means of solid partitions or 
walls." 

As a result of my visits I find that in the factories, and large 
tenant factories, this section of the law is generally complied witli. 
In many of the large factories a dressing room is rot only pro- 
vided, but a lunch room as well, and in many instances there is a 
small surgical room with a nurse in constant attendance; this is, 
of course, a branch of welfare work worthy of consideration. On 
the other hand, in many of the other smaller tenant factories 
visited, I find that, owing to the smallness of floor area, and lack 
of windows leading to outside air, it is almost an impossibility to 
secure proper compliance with the law requiring dressing rooms. 

Such rooms as are provided seem farcical, and are never used 
except for accumulating rubbish which aids in making the shop 
unsanitary. In my opinion, a remedy for this would be in requir- 
ing the owners of such tenant factories wherein it is impossible to 
provide suitalble emergency or dressing rooms in the individual 



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38 New York State Department of Labor. 

holdings, to set aside a portion of one floor for a common dressing 
or emergency room, provided with sanitary conveniences and 
lockers. 

Section 17 of the law provides that every person employing 
females in a factory shall provide and maintain suitable seats for 
the use of such female employees, and permit the use thereof by 
such employees to such an extent as may be reasonable for the 
preservation of their health. 

As a result of my observations it would seem that there is a wide 
difference of opinion as to what are suitable seats. In many 
industries the workers are seated during the entire period, using 
chairs, stools or benches. Many industries require constant stand- 
ing on the part of workers operating machinery, and rest is secured 
by using a small shelf attached to the machine. Very few of the 
seats that I have seen are in my opinion really suitable or restful ; 
there should be a standard, and I would respectfully recommend 
that a seat to be accepted as suitable should be such, that when the 
employee sits the soles and heels rest comfortably on the floor. 
Also, that such seats have a back set at an angle of not less than 
100 degrees. 

In many industries where women are employed near machinery, 
dangerous accidents have occurred through the long hair catching 
in gearing, pulleys, or about shafting. I would recommend that 
authority be given to the Department to require the proprietors to 
furnish caps or head coverings for females engaged at work near 
machinery. 

It must be conceded that a minimum age limit for working chil- 
dren is of great value, but the mere question of chronological age 
is no real determination of the child's physical fitness to engage in 
certain occupations, for I have found eighteen year old boys, who 
physically looked only fifteen, engaged at dusty occupations fit 
only for strong adults, and I have also seen children between four- 
teen and fifteen carrying heavy loads and engaged at work tending 
to decrease the vital resistance and make a poor physique, but 
under the law they were legally employed. 

In the majority of foreign countries, the child before beginning 
work must possess a certificate of physical fitness obtained only 
after a thorough medical examination, and, after having begun 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 39 

work, re-examination as to fitness to continue work may be required 
by the visiting inspector. In my opinion such authority should 
be granted to the Labor Department. 

A maximum standard of labor which may be performed by 
minors is essential for the encouragement of their proper physical 
growth. This question has been made the subject of legislation 
in France, and I quote some of the provisions relating thereto. 
Children under eighteen years of age are not allowed to operate 
foot-power machines, nor to turn horizontal wheels. No male 
employee under eighteen years of age or any female employee 
in an industrial establishment is permitted either inside or out- 
side of the work place to carry loads in excess of the following 
weights : 

Pounds. 

Boys under 14 yean of age 22.1 

6033 14 and 15 yean of age 33,1 

Boys 16 to 18 years of age 44.1 

Qirls under 14 years of age 11.0 

Girls 14 and 15 yea's of age 17.6 

Girls 16 and 17 years of age 22.0 

Girls 18 years of age and over 55.1 

In a large number of industries, considered dangerous because 
of the risk of poisoning, or because of the production of deleter- 
ious gases and dust, children under 18 and all females are pro- 
hibited from even entering the places in which the processes are 
carried on. 

In a large number of industries it is also prescribed that chil- 
dren under 18 years, minor girls, and women shall not be em- 
ployed in the workshops where dust is freely given off, where acids 
are used or their fumes are present, where the fumes of carbon 
dioxide or benzine are given off, and where poisonous materials 
are used. 

In my opinion, the Department should be granted authority to 
formulate prohibitive regulations along these lines. 

Industrial Diseases. 
Labor laws are intended for the protection of the health of all 
workers, and while there are many diseases traceable directly to 



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40 New York State Department of Labor. 

the occupations in which the workers may be engaged, the scope 
of medical inspection of factories is more to determine those 
pathological conditions due to the industries, meaning thereby, 
manufacturing processes or work in factories ; there remains then, 
a number of occupations within the provisions of the law, to which 
medical inspection might be extended. 

The study of the causes of diseases from which the workers 
suffer is one of the first principles of industrial hygiene, as well 
as one of the most intricate problems. The classification, or as 
we might term it, medical nomenclature of such diseases is no 
simple matter, owing to the fact that there are so many causes to 
be considered. 

In order to apply proper safeguards, statistical facts must be 
secured tending to prove that the industry is the dominant seti- 
ologieal factor in causing disease. A mere compilation based 
upon general reports, or conclusions drawn from the hasty observa- 
tions or casual inspections of the workers, is of little value. In 
order to secure data that may be of material assistance in formu- 
lating regulations, it becomes necessary to make an intensive study 
of the industry, the worker, and the housing conditions. 

In undertaking an intensive study of the industry for the 
purpose of defining its relation to disease, the Department has met 
with signal success. The result of the investigations already 
completed shows definitely just what dangers are present from 
processes of manufacture, materials used, or conditions under 
which the industry is carried on. 

The study of the workers presents a difficult problem, for it 
must comprise, not only a thorough physical examination of each 
one, but also a study of personal hygiene. To attribute to the 
industries various diseases, based upon superficial examinations 
of the workers, or upon mortality statistics is erroneous. For 
accurate data it becomes necessary to look to the foreign countries ; 
we are still lacking in those medical statistics which would go a 
great way toward demonstrating just where the fault lies. 

The hospital and dispensary records fail to show definitely the 
relation of the patient^s occupation to the disease, and though I 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 41 

was informed that there have been tabulations made relating to 
the illness of workers in certain industries, suoh statistics have 
been collected for personal use and were not available. 

The present mortality statistics are of small value, for there 
are many deaths due primarily to the occupations of the workers, 
but which have not been recorded as such. The following list 
furnished by Dr. Guilfoy, Registrar of the New York City Health 
Department, ^hows the number of deaths from occupational 
diseases reported in Greater New York during the year 1910: 

Lead poisoninK: storeotjrpere 1 

paintere 4 

Total 6 

Mercury poisoning, preaainaker, rubber goods 1 

Total deaths 6 



In proportion to the population, and the number of known 
dangerous industries, these statistics would indicate a very low 
mortality from occupational diseases or poisonings. 

From January to October, 1911, there were reported to the 
New York State Health Department : 

Deaths from chronic lead poisoning 16 

Deaths from other chronic occupational poisonings 10 

Of the many diseases attributed to the industries, tuberculosis 
(pulmonary) has received the most attention from statisticians. 
According to the authorities, the death rate from this disease is 
very high among workers in tobacco, textiles, cutlery and pearl 
buttons. 

The following table which I have compiled from reports of the 
State Health Department, January to October, 1911, shows the 
number of deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis which occurred in 
New York City, and a few cities and towns in other parts of the 
state. The places selected were those wherein one industry pre- 
dominated, and the factories had been visited by me. It is inter- 
esting to note that the industries tabulated are ones considered as 
ranking high in predisposing to pulmonary tuberculosis. 



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42 New York State Department of Labor. 

City or Town Industries 

New York City Miscellaneous 4.966,863 

Yonkers Textiles, felt baU 

Utica Textiles 

Amsterdam P(;arl buttons, textiles 

Kingston Cigars 

Oswego Textiles, matches 

Walden Cutlery 

FiShkiU Landing Textiles 

Fishkili Textiles 



»pulation 


Deaths 


4.966,863 


5,964 


84.361 


76 


77,088 


66 


33,116 


LO 


26,031 


42 


4.540 


6 


4.069 


2 


3,894 


6 


3.149 






The addition of section 58 to the law, which requires the 
reporting of certain industrial poisonings and diseases, will 
undoubtedly aid in determining more fully industries dangerous 
to the health of the workers. 

In my opinion, the Department should be given authority to 
rei|uire that all industrial j)oisonings be reported. During my 
visits to the factories, I have, in different industries, observed 
workers, who, in my opinion, were undoubtedly suffering from 
the effects of aniline, zinc, benzine, carbon monoxide, and altsohol, 
both amylic and methylic. Inquiries made of the workers seemed 
to confirm my belief. 

Accompanied by Inspector Vogt, some time was spent in a brass 
foundry for the purpose of securing samples of air during the 
|>eriods of casting the metal ; twenty-four hours later Mr. Vogt 
became quite ill, and exhibited all the symptoms of zinc poisoning, 
the illness lasting for several da}^. Analysis of the samples of air 
secured showed the presence of zinc and copper, which was 
definite proof of the danger from zinc poisoning, since the 
analyses were confirmed by the actual effects upon one exiposed to 
the air. Inquiries m-ade of the workmen in this and otiier brass 
foundries confirmed the fact, for all suffered from the symptoms 
known as brass founders' ague, which is zinc poisoning. 

Referring to my report for 1909, the dangerous nature of 
materials used in the manufacture of incandescent mantles was 
pointed out. In the report of the Chief Factory Inspector of 
Great Britain for tihe year 1910 appears the following report of 
Dr. CoUis, one of the medical inspectors : 

Manufacture of incandescent mantles. Four factories where incandescent 
mantles are manufactured have been vieited to ascertain whether under the 
present conditions of the work any injury is caused to the workers (1) by 
vapor arising from the baths in which the mantles are dipped; (2) excess 
of carbon dioxide generated in the process of seasoning or burning. The 



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BSFOBT OF BUSSAU OF FacTOBY INSPECTION, 1911. 43 

dipping bath contains a mixture of methylated ether (industrial epirit), 60 
per cent, and methylated •spirit, 30 per cent, in which is dissolved collodion 
and camphor. The vapor arising from this mixture if breathed to any ex- 
tent by the workers causes headache, sickness, anorexia, sleepiness, and 
lassitude, symptoms which are experienced to a greater extent on first com- 
mencing employment. At one factory where the workers had to enter the 
hot stoves, heated to about 115 degrees F. to carry in the mantles for drying, 
and to remove the dried mantles, all seven workers complained of some of 
the symptoms described. ♦ • • Suitable hoods and exhaust ducts, mini- 
mising the amount of vapor which escapes, can be fixed over the dipping 
hatha. 

This is confinnation of the dangerous nature of this industry, 
and in the places visited by me the employees were mostly minor 
females and children. 

In the manufacture of. felt hats, the principal danger has been 
considered to be from mercurial poisoning. As a result of the 
investigation undertaken by the Department into this industry, 
it has been found that there is also an added danger from carbon 
monoxide poisoning, and in the finishing process, the workers are 
liBihle to pulmonary diseases resulting from irritation of the 
mucous membranes through the inhalation of dust containing 
large quantities of silica. This dust is created in the pouncing 
and finishing of the hats with sand paper. From merely superfi- 
cial physical examinations of a number of workers in this indus- 
try, I found many of them suffering from bronchitis, although 
from general appearances they were of fine physique. M-any of 
them are reported as suffering from tuberculosis, but this I was 
unable to confirm. 

Dr. Waters of the New York City Health Department Tuber^ 
culosis Clinics reports that during 1910 the percentage of tubercu- 
losis in various occupations represented at the clinic was as fol- 
lows: laborers, 3.52; factory, 2.8&; operators, 5.47 ; pressors, 
2.5; cutters, 1.82; painters, 1.48; carpenters, 1.22; furriers, 1.22. 
All the garment workers grouped together furnish over thirteen 
per cent., and yet the trade has never been classified as dangerous. 

It is quite evident that the question of industrial diseases 
demands an intensive study, and I would respectfully recommend 
that authority be granted the Department to do so. 
Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) C. T. Graham Eogebs, 

Medical Inspector of Factories, 



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44 New York State Department of Labor. 

REPORTS OF SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS. 

I. VENTILATION OF A DEPARTMENT STORE. 

I would report that as per permission granted to comply with request of 
Hon. W. A. Evans, M. D., Ck)mmi88i0ner of Health, of Chicago, III., I visited 

the mercantile establishment of in New York City, on November 

10th, 11th and 12th, for the purpose of making determinations of temperature, 
humidity, carbon -dioxide and dust. Deputy Factory Inspector Vogt accom- 
panied me during the visit and aided in the laboratory determinations. In 
order to finish in time to comply with the Commissioner's request, it became 
necessary to do the laboratory work on the nights of the 10th and 11th. 

That portion of the basement devoted to merchandise is really a basement 
surrounded by a balcony, but there is a very large portion of it under this 
so-called balcony basement. From the basement there is an exit to the 
concourse of the McAdoo tunnels. The sub-basement is devoted to shipping 
and packing, and is divided by low partitions and racks; there are quite a 
number of young women employed here. 

There is a combination system of heating and ventilation of the plenum 
and exhaust type. There are nine intake fans, each being about seven feet 
in diameter, the air being taken dirctly from the sidewalk by means of three 
intakes. The air is washed, screened and then driven through the building. 
In the basement and basement balcony every other supporting column is an 
air supply, the source of supply being near the ceiling, while the exhausts 
are along the walls near the floor. In the water closets at the back of each 
hopper there is also an exhaust. A determination showed the temperature 
of the air being supplied to be 64 degrees F., humidity 60. Outdoor deter- 
minations showed temperature 45 degrees F., humidity 40. In the sub- 
basement, air supply is from ducts along the ceiling; and the exhausts are 
from gratings set in the floor and along the sides of the walls. There are 
ten fans for exhausting, which are about the same size as the supply fans. 

Determinations were made in basement balcony, basement and sub-base- 
ment for temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide. Samples of air were 
collected, and laboratory determinations m^de for anunonia, oxidizable or- 
ganic matter, and total solids (dust). Bacteriological determinations will 
also be made. The large amount of total solids found is probably due to 
(1) air intakes being at street level; (2) newness of wooden floors, not yet 
thoroughly oil soaked; (3) drying out of new plaster walls. 

Below are the results of our flndings. Temperature and humidity read- 
ings were taken at floor, breathing, and high levels, and are marked re- 
spectively a, b, c. The diagram following the table shows where tests 
were made by the letters A, B, C, etc. Determinations are per million litres 
of air. The carbon dioxide is recorded as parts in 10,000 volumes, 'ihe 
ammonia in every test was less than .5 part per million. In all cases, the 
air was carefully aspirated and measured; at no time were less than 500 
litres aspirated. 



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Repoet of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 45 



Location of tcet. 

Now. 10. 



BMement: 



Oxidii- 

able 
orgmnio 
Temperature. Humid- matter. Sotids. 

(F.) ity. (gnuns.) (gramt.) 

PaHly tUmdy. Temperature 66*. Humidity 67, 



a 71. 
b 60. 
c 73. 



73) 

73 

73] 



.46 



60.0 



CO,4n 

10.000 

volumes. 



a 60. 
b60. 
c 70. 



.52 



63.0 



[a 72. 

Baaement balcony: A \h 7] . 

Ic 74. 



.62 



50.4 



N<n) 11. Paraydoudy. Temperature 46\ Humidity 67. 
56l 



fa 67. 
]b67. 
[c 67. 



a 66. 
b 67. 
c 60. 



56 
56 

40 
40 
48 



.70 



.08 



80.3 



86.0 



a 68. 
b 68. 
c 60. 



.06 



80.0 



a 65. 
b65. 
c 65. 



.78 



01.0 



fa 60. 

Baaement balcony: B -jbdO. 

1 c 60. 



[a 60. 

bOO. 

lo 60. 



50 
46 
46 

46 J 



.86 



.76 



78.0 



82.0 



(a 60. 

b68. 
I c 68. 



.86 



20.0 



a 71. 
b70. 
c 71. 



1.12 



72.0 



fa 00. 
b60. 
60. 



.86 



78.03 



Sub-baaement: 



a 71. 
b73. 
73. 



.87 



27.0 



a 70. 
b73. 
c 73. 



.87 



50.0 



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46 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Location of test. 

Not. 12. 



Temperature. Humid- 

(F.) ity. 

Partly doudy. TempercUurt 4S*. 
a 70 62 



OxidU- 




able 




organic 


CO, in 


matter. Solids. 


10,000 


(grams.) (grams.) 


volumes. 


Humidity 6t. 





Sub-basemen t : 


C 


b 72 


52 




,c 72 


• 52 






a 70 


66 


Basement: 


G ^ 


b 70 


66 




,c 70 


56 






fa 72 


57 


Basement balcony: 


G 


b 72 


.... 67 




.0 73 


68 



.82 



.00 



.40 



21.0 



35.0 



63.0 



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Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 47 




W 



a 




P>H 



o 



t>0 
c 



4-3 

2 



o 

PQ 



m 



fe 



w 



o 



o 



Q 



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48 New York State Department of Labor. 

II. CLOAK AND SUIT INDUSTRY IN NEW YORK CITY. 

Technical Report. 

At the request of the Joint Board of Sanitary Control of the Cloak, Suit 
and Skirt Industry of New York City, an investigation into the atmospheric 
conditions of the factories devoted to this industry was undertaken. 

That the work might he facilitated, an assistant was provided by the Joint 
Board. In order to make the investigation an intensive one, I deemed it 
advisable to select certain types of buildings in which cloak and suit factories 
were to be found, and made a thorough study of each shop in the various 
types of buildings. Thus observations were made of the actual working con- 
ditions covering the entire day. The types of buildings selected were classi- 
fied as follows: 

Loft Buildings, Recent Type, This included the large fireproof loft build- 
ings of recent construction, containing all the up-to-date installations for 
lighting, heating and plumbing. 

Modem Loft Buildings, This included the loft buildings erected some 
years ago (ten to fifteen), and not possessing the most modern improvements. 

Old Type Loft Buildings, This included the old style loft factory building, 
as a rule not over six stories in height, containing no modern conveniences, 
and having two or more shops on each floor. 

Converted Tenements and Converted Dioellings. Those included buildings 
formerly used for family habitations, and were as a rule, situated in the 
congested districts. 

A number of buildings under each class were visited for comparison. 
Corner buildings as well as block buildings were included in each type. 

In order to properly consider the question of atmospheric conditions in 
the factories, it becomes necessary to know what is the ideal outdoor atmos- 
pheric condition, as well as the composition of the street air in New York 
City, so that proper comparisons may be made. 

Air is a mixture of gases. An analysis of air commonly accepted as normal 
is as followfii: 

Oxygen 21.04 

Nitrogen 78.06 

Argon 0.94 

Carbon dioxide 0.03 

Watery vapor variable. 

Ammonia trace. 

Organic matter variable. 

Helium, krypton, neon, xenon, hydrogen traces 

Micro-organisms 8 per litre of air 

This analysis is volumetric and represents parts per 100 volumes. 
Analyses made in St. Bartholomew's Laboratory of samples of New York 
City street air were as follows: 

Day clear and sunny, weather mild: 

Total solids (dust) 30.00 grams per million litres. 

Oxidisable organic matter 1 1 .00 grams per million litres 

Ammonia 1 part per million. 

Carbon dioxide 4 parts per 10,000 volumes. 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 49 

Day clear with strong wind blowing: 

Total solids 114 . 00 grams per million litres. 

Ozidisable organto matter 12 .00 grams per million litres. 

Ammonia 3 parts per million. 

Carbon dioxide. . , 4 parts per 10,000 volumes. 

Bacteria 12 per litre. 

Microscopic examination of the solid matter showed horse manure, quartz, 
sand and a dark substance probably asphalt or cinders. 

AnalyBis of a sample of air secured at Centreport, L. I., at an elevation of 
one hundred feet aboye sea leyel, at early morn, showed 2 bacteria and 8 
moulds per litre of air after four days* incubation at a temperature of 23 
degrees centigrade; also: 

Total solids (inorganic) 7 .00 grams per million li r. s. 

Oxidizable organic matter , 0.2 grams per million Utres. 

Carbon dioxide 3 + parts per 10,000 volumes. 

The foregoing observations of local outdoor atmosphere afford the means 
for comparison with the conditions found in the factories tabulated. 

An examination of the appended tables to these special reports shows 
some interesting data and does not support the usually accepted theory that 
a large loft with numerous windows means one that is well ventilated, or 
that old buildings in the congested district are unhealthful. 

In tabulating, especial care was taken that the records should be of the 
usual working conditions^ so that findings due to sudden changes resulting 
from the opening of a large number of windows at once, or suddenly start- 
ing up ventilating apparatus, and thereby causing sharp changes in the 
reading (usually low), were not recorded in the tables. In some instances, 
readings taken at noon, just after work was stopped, and a number of em- 
ployees had left the loft, are recorded for comparison. Several readings 
were taken in the morning usually beginning about 9 a. m. and again in 
the afternoon, from about 1:30 to 5 P. m., and the maximum a. m. and P. M. 
readings recorded in the table; the upper reading being a. m., the lower one 
p. H., except when otherwise noted. 

The samples for dust analyses were obtained by aspirating the air through 
special bottles containing sterile water and not confining the selection to 
any one portion of the room. In securing samples of air for determination 
of carbon monoxide, they were taken at the breathing level of the pressers. 

In determining the presence of micro-organisms, two methods were used, 
that of exiposing a gela.tine plate known as a Petri dish, and also aspirating 
a known quantity of air through sterile water, and then transferring a 
definite quantity to a culture media, according to a method for determining 
bacteria in water, recommended by the American Public Health Association. 

In the tables, the wet bulb thermometer readings have been recorded in- 
lAead of relative humidity readings being calculated. By so doing, the actual 
amount of aqueous vapor present is more definitely shown and clearer com- 
parisons may be made. 

No record is made in the tables as to the number of windows open, for 
in the majority of places visited, they were opened or closed at the con- 
venience of the workers, so that windows were open and closed intermittently 
during the securing of samples. This was also true of places where ventilat- 



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50 New York State Department of Labor. 

ing fans were installed, for the operations of these fans called forth loud 
protests from the workers near the windows used as intakes that they could 
not stand the draughts. Windows having ventilators were not exempt from 
being closed. 

In considering the carbon dioxide, temiperature and wet-bulbs, it will be 
noticed that they often vary in different parts of the room. This shows 
that there are not only numerous air currents and cross currents present, 
but certain areas in which the air is dead or stagnant. 

When there is a high velocity of the outer air, there is consequently an 
area of high pressure at the portion of the building exposed, and the read- 
ings will be lower than at the oppoedte or low pressure area of the building. 

The situation of the gas irons used by the pressers, also, has much to 
do with the readings. It is noticeable that in certain lofts where the irons 
are near the windows, the carbon dioxide readings are lower than in other 
parts of the room, which was caused by the changing of the air due to cur- 
rents created by the heat of the irons. In many instances, the temperature 
is high^ and carbon dioxide low. It will also be noticed that in some in- 
stances the carbon dioxide is higher where the irons are near the windows; 
this is probably due to this section being the low pressure airea and in the 
path of the escaping air currents. 

As a result of these tests, it is fully demonstrated that carbon dioxide is 
not an indicator for the amount of carbon monoxide present; for a glance 
at the tables shows that in many instances where the amount of carbon 
dioxide is low the amount of carbon monoxide is high. 

It is noticeable that the area of the loft, and also the situation of the 
irons, have a marked bearing upon the carbon monoxide findings. In the 
modern loft buildings with large floor area, there is less carbon monoxide 
where a great many irons are in use, than in the old type loft buildings with 
small floor area, and it is quite high in the converted tenement and dwell- 
ings where only one or two irons are in use. Again, it will be noted that 
the amount is less where the irons are near or at an open window. This 
proves the need of proper air dilution to minimize the danger from this 
gw. 

It will be noticed that irrespective of the type of the building or its 
situation, where a large number of workers are employed and natural means 
of ventilation are relied upon, the carbon dioxide findings are high. A 
reason for this lies in the fact that the workers are all situated in the por- 
tion of the shop near the windows, so that they may have good light to work 
by. The proper circulation of air through natural agencies is impeded, and 
rapidly vitiated by body emanations, and on days when there is a marked 
difference between outdoor and indoor temperature, conditions are made 
worse. Under conditions such as these, the actual amount of air space per 
person is unusually small, and there is a large dead area in the unoccupied 
portion of the loft. When artificial illumination becomes necessary, and gas 
is used, the conditions are rendered still worse, as the workers continue to 
labor in the same place. 

In the old loft buildings, and converted dwellings and tenements, where 
the shops are small, often several on a floor, and but a few workers in each, 
the carbon dioxide is rather high; this is due to the obstruction of natural 
air currents. The windows are usually in the front or rear of the build- 



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Ebport of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 51 

tag, and a partition separates the shops. In the cellar shops, even where 
the floor area i& large, and the workers are few, the carbon dioxide is high, 
due to inadequate means being present for facilitating air currents. 

Where artificial means for ventilation has been installed, it will be noticed 
that the carbon dioxide readings are low, and this despite the fact that the 
systems were only run intermittently. It is true that to work such systems 
continnally would compel the employees' to cease their labors, owing to 
draughts and low temperature. This is especially noticeable on very cold 
days. But it must be conceded that even the intermittent working of such 
systems are of benefit in maintaining proper atmospheric conditions. 

It has been proven that the amount of carbon dioxide increases the longer 
a room is occupied. The resultsi recorded show this to be true, for with 
the exception of those shops operating ventilating systems, the p. m. carbon 
dioxide readings are, as a rule, higher than the a. m. readings, and this is 
especially noticeable in the case of the older buildings. One of the probable 
eause^ for this condition is the sudden increase of energy on the part of the 
workers to finish the day's output. This muscular action increases the 
amount of impurities thrown oflf from the body, and that the presence of 
these impurities is indicated by the amount of carbon dioxide present cannot 
be doubted. It has been demonstrated by physiologists that, the greater 
the muscular activity, the greater the amount of carbon dioxide given off 
from the body. 

That the use of illuminating gas aids in increasing the amount of carbon 
dioxide as well as the temperature is clearly indicated. It will be noticed 
that where gas is used commercially for apparatus, or for illumination, the 
carbon dioxide readings are influenced; for in the modern large lofts, where 
a number of irons are in use, and the cubical contents of the room ample, 
the carbon dioxide readings are higher than in a small loft having few 
irons; this is due to the products of combustion, the irons consuming an 
amount of oxygen, and producing an amount of carbon dioxide equal to a 
great number of people. 

Where steam heating is used it will be seen that the temperature is higher 
than where coal stoves are in use and that the wet-bulb readings are also 
high. Where coal stoves are depended upon, it will be seen that the teni- 
perature is about 60 degrees F. and less, and that the wet-bulb readings are 
also low; with each higher reading there is a corresponding increase of the 
carbofn dioxide reading. 

A careful study of the wet-bulb readings shows that they are generally 
not high and that the means used for heating, use of gas, and crowding of 
employees also has a direct influence upon such readings. Where there are a 
large number working, steam heating and large quantities of illuminating 
gas used, the wet-bulb is high. In the small shops while the readings are 
not very high, in proportion to the number of workers present the readings 
should be lower. That the amount of carbon dioxide varies with the humidity 
is shown in the tables, for where the wet-bulb reading rises the amount of 
carbon dioxide also increases; and in the lofts, where ventilating fans are 
used and a low wet-bulb reading obtained, the carbon dioxide findings were 
low. 



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52 New York State Department of Labor. 

One of the causes of unsanitary shops is the presence of food. In many 
fthops the employees eat while at work, with the result that the food refuse 
becomes scattered about the floor and under the benches, there decaying and 
becoming fertile ground for bacterial growth, as well as vitiating the atmos- 
pHere. Such conditions are especially prevalent where the sale of food stuff 
is permitted in the factory, for, as a rule, the stalls and storage boxes used 
by the peddlers are not clean. 

To ascertain the presence of such impurities, analyses were made for the 
amount of total solids, and presence of organic matter. A study of the 
tables shows that wherever a food peddler was present, the shop was dirty 
and the amount of organic matter was high. It is also noticeable that the 
amount of carbon dioxide was high, demonstrating its value as an indicator 
where organic matter is present. It would naturally be expected that such 
conditions would only be found in the old types of buildings found in the 
congested districts, but it is clearly shown, that even in the highest class 
of shops, if food peddling is permitted it is difficult to secure proper clean- 
liness. 

In the old buildings in the congested district, an added danger ii^ the 
presence of bedding i<n the ^ihops. Here, there is not only fertile ground for 
bacterial growth, but also propagation of vermin, and in many instances the 
cause of disastrous flres. The tables show that where bedding was present 
organic matter was very high, and bacteria numerous. 

Analyses show that the amount of dust in the factories is rather high 
and yet the industry is not classed as a dusty one. That the duet is not 
readily perceptiUe is probably due to its being organic and light, and to its 
being generated in the course of cutting and sewing the goods. The ex- 
treme fineness, as well as the irritating properties of the cotton and wool 
fibres which compose the greater part of this dust, make it a source of 
danger to the workers* health. The large number of garment workers, who 
are treated for pulmonary diseases in the clinics and hospitals, fully estab- 
lishes this fact. 

The results' of the investigation clearly demonstrate that the atmospheric 
conditions found in the majority of the shops are not conducive to good 
health and should be remedied. That certain factors which cause unsanitary 
conditions in the shops can be eliminated, and that the air may be changed 
without discomfort to the workers has been established. 

To secure these results requires the oo-operation of enrploycr and emrployee 
a-s the present factory laws insure sanitary conditions in the shops, if properly 
complied with. 

In addition to these laws, I would suggest the formulation of regulations 
along the following lines: 

During the months of October and April a minimum temperature of 
61 degrees F. should be maintained in the factories. 

The amount of carbon dioxide present should not exceed 12 parts per 
10,000 volumes during the daytime, or 20 parts at night when gas or oil is 
used for illuminating purposes. 

Where a number of gas irons are in use, mechanical means should be in- 
stalled so that there may be a constant circulation of air maintained at the 
pressers' tables. 

The presence of bedding in the shops should be prohibited. 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 53 

The sale of food in shops, or eating at work tables during the hours of 
labor, should not be permitted. Where there is no lunch room, special tables 
should be provided at noon for the preparation of lunches, and all refuse 
should be removed immediately after finishing lunch. 

Smoking in the shops should be prohibited.' 

General Repoe?. 

In addition to the technical report covering the investigation of atmos- 
pheric conditions of the cloak, suit and skirt industry of New York City, 
the following general report is submitted. 

The industry is really a division of tailoring or garment working, and is 
carried on under practically the same conditions, many of the processes 
being identical. Many of the shops are situated in the lower portion of the 
city, and are found in all types of buildings devoted to commercial purposes. 
There has been a gradual removal of these shops from the converted dwell- 
ings and old type loft buildings to the more modern so-called fire-proof 
buildings. In many of the large establishments, all the processes are carried 
on in the same building, but in the small shops, which are found in the old 
buildings, certain portions of the work which have been contracted or sub- 
contracted for are carried on. 

In the process of nuinufacturing, the work is mostly machine work, the 
finishing and lining being done by hand. The various processes through 
which the cloth passes from bolt to the finished product is as follows: cut- 
ting, sewing and pressing. In many of the factr>ries tihe nmterial is merely 
cut, and is sent to contractors to be sewed, pressed and finished. The cutting 
consists in having a number of layers of cloth on top of which is placed the 
pattern, and the cutting of the goods is accomplished either by means of 
shears, a large knife, or the more modern method of a circular knife oper- 
ated by a small motor which the cutter guides by hand; this work is per- 
formed by those who are expert, the majority being males who command 
high wages. As the work is particular, good light, as well as large tabic 
space ifl necessary. The well lighted portions of the sliop are devoted to 
cutting. 

After the goods have been cut they are completed, either in the same 
shop, or they may be sent out to the contractors who keep small shops, or 
the work may be sent into the home. 

The next process, sewing, requires the goods to pass through a number 
of hands, for the industry is one in which the work is specialized, each 
worker being employed in basting, hand sewing, machine sewing or pressing 
just one special portion of the garment. The basting, which is a preparatory 
sewing of the goods together, and requires little skill, is performed mainly 
by the beginners, the majority of whom are male and female minors. The 
goods are finished by the nuachiine operatoT^s. In all the large shops and in 
the majority of the small ones, the machines are set on long tables which 
are situated in rows, the motdve power bei>ng usually supplied by means of 
an eleetric motor or gasoline engine. There are numerous sub-divisions of 
the sewing whereby the linings, as well as the goods, are assembled into 
the perfect garment. Duning the asaenvbling of the garment it is sent to 
the pressors. Here the work is done either with hand irons heated on coal 



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54 New Yoek State Department of Labor. 

furnaces or on small gas stoves, which is the method pursued in the very 
old loft buildings on the East Side, and the hand gaa iron or tailor's goose. 
There are many types of this iron, one which is equipped with the bunsen 
burner, the other, which in addition to the gas, is supplied with compressed 
air, so that the worker may regulate the flame. There is also a heavy gas 
iron which is operated both by hand and foot. 

The industry has never been considered either a dusty one or a dangerous 
one, and in none of the classifications by authorities, even of recent date, 
can it be found among the so-called " dusty trades," and yet, the results of 
the Department investigation into this industry shows the presence of dust 
in the air as high in amount as that found in some of the pearl button 
factories investigated. It is evident that among the conditions in this 
industry which are considered dangerous to the health of the workers, dust 
plays an important part. Through the analyses of the atmospheric condi- 
tions in those establishments where illuminating gas is used for heating 
the irons, it has been demonstrated that the pressers are exposed to the 
danger of the deadly gas, carbon monoxide. 

In considering the relation of the industry to the health of the workers, 
it may be well to start with the initial process, that is, the cutting of the 
goods. In this process, the dangers arise from the dust created in the 
cutting of the goods, and the operator, to follow the outline of the pattern 
accurately, must keep his face close to the work. It has been demonstrated 
that the inhalation of organic dust is a menace to health because of the 
irritating qualities of such dust, the cotton fibres being the most dangerous. 
This danger is minimized to a certain extent by the large amount of air 
space for each individual, not due to any thought on the part of the pro- 
prietors, but to the fact that it is necessary to have large table space to 
spread the goods on for examination and cutting. Notwithstanding this 
fact, a large number suffer from pulmonary tuberculosis, it being reported 
that 1.82 per cent of all the occupations treated at the New York City 
Health Department Clinic were cutters in the garment trade. The air 
analyses in cutting rooms show 16 to 18 parts cairbon dioxide per 10,000 
volumes, and 59 grams of total solids (dust) per million litres of air, prov- 
ing conclusively the presence of a predisposing cause for pulmonary affec- 
tions, and this condition was found in the most modern type of workroom. 

In the process of sewing there are two types of machines used by the 
operators. In the large shops power is used, whereas in many of the small 
places foot machines are used, so that to make an intensive study of this 
branch of the industry in its relation to the health of the employees careful 
consideration is required of a large number of conditions which have a 
bearing upon the health of the workers. The danger is not from the dust 
alone, but also from the effects of nerve strain or fatigue due to the opera- 
tion of the machines. This question has been studied rather carefully by 
Dr. Sydney I. Schwab of St. Louis, who has reported a large number of 
cases of neurasthenia among such workers. Another danger to which these 
operators are exposed is that of having to work with artificial illumination 
on a level with the eyes, especially that from incandescent electric bulbs. 
Reports show this has a deleterious effect, not only upon the eyes, but upon 
the general health. 



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Rbpobt of Buekau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 56 

Dr. Collis, one of the medical inspeetorB of the British Factory InBpection 
Service, reports as follows: 

The presence of nsrstagmio or oscillatory movements of the eyeball is well known to be caused 
among miners, but it is not recognised that mmilar though slighter movements of the eyeball 
occur when the vinon is directed laterally in other workers whose employment calls for continuous 
use of the eye. 

A case of pronounced nystagmus was brought to my attention, « * « « 

The inquiry was then pursued among the female workers employed at sewing machines; 516 
were examined, and it was found that 145, or 28 per cent, showed these movements; the condition 
was present among 29^ per cent of workers between 14 and 17 years of age, in 30 per cent of 
workers between 17 and 20 years of age, in 29.2 per cent of workers between 20 and 25 years of age, 
in 22.8 per cent of workers between 25 and 30 years of age, and in 23.4 per cent of workers aged 
30 and over, these figures point to the conditions being one of fatigue of the extra ocular muscles, 
a condition more Ukely to be found among young females than older women. 

Among the operators, the percentage of tuberculosis is rather high, it 
being reported as 6.47 per cent of all the occupations treated in the New York 
City Health Department Clinic 

Analyses of the atmospheric conditions in such parts of the shops where 
the operators work, show the carbon dioxide to be as high as 18 parts in 
the modern loft buildings, and 25 parts in the cellar shops. This was where 
natural means for ventilation were relied upon. A probable cause of the 
high percentage of carbon dioxide is due to the fact that the operators are 
crowded close to the windows for the purpose of securing as much natural 
light as possible. In those buildings where the window area is limited, as 
in the buildings situated in the centre of the block, it can be readily under- 
stood that with such crowding together the air in the immediate vicinity of 
such workers becomes vitiated through body emanations, causing that con- 
dition formerly termed ** crowd poison." 

The process of pressing is one which requires hard labor, and in the fac- 
tories is done by adult males. As the number of pressers are few in propor- 
tion to the other worKers, the process is carried on in the least desirable 
portions of the factory. Fortunately for the pressers, the irons are at times 
situated near a window, but the majority are in the centre or corners of the 
loft 

In pressing the goods a damp cloth is used, and as the operator must 
bend over his work, he receives the full effects of the vapors generated. 
The occupation of presser is, seemingly, the one most dangerous to the health 
of workeri^ engaged in the garment industry. In the shops where coal 
furnaces are used to heat the irons, the danger to the pressers from carbon 
monoxide poisoning is not so marked as where the gas irons are used. 
Where the irons are heated on a gas stove, the danger is increased, as the 
operators are constantly bending over the stoves to change the irons. Where 
gas irons are used, the danger is intensified, for in addition to the laborious 
work, there is the added danger from the fumes of the products of com- 
bustion, the carbon monoxide gas, the vapoi-s from the damp pressing cloth 
and the heat. 

It is well known that laborious work tires the muscles, that air vitiated 
from products of combustion produces drowsiness, that carbon monoxide 
destroys the red blood cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of oxygen in 
the body which means inhibition of the real stimulus for muscular and 



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56 New Yokk State Department of Laboe. 

mental aotivitieB, and that vapors and heat enervate ; what wonder, then, 
that with all these combined to afFect the worker, resort to stinMilantfl be- 
comes necessary. 

Prof. Glaisel has shown that constant working in close illuminating gas 
atmosphere causes a condition of lethargy leading to the use of alcoholic 
stimulants', and cites the tailoring industry as an example. From inquiries 
made among the workers, a large number admit that the use of stimulants 
is necessary. In many shops bottled beer is kept and sold to the workers, 
and many of the food peddlers carry as the most profitable part of their 
stock bottles of alcoholic stimulants, the best customers being the pressers. 

From personal observations and examinations, I am fully aware that 
many of the pressers suffer from pulmonary affections, and the cases of 
pulmonary tuberculosis reported from the New York City Health Depart- 
ment Clinic shows that of all occupations 2.5 per cent arc pressers. 

I feel assured that a large number of pressers suffer froin the effects of 
carbon monoxide poisoning; the majority are anspmic, and suffer from gastro- 
intestinal and pulmonary disorders, and, though no statistics are obtainable, 
many are treated in the dispensaries and privately for these conditions, 
which, in my opinion are caused by the effects of carbon monoxide inhala- 
tion, but which is not recognized as a cause. 

In a modern loft building where the pressers' table was situated at a 
window, gas irons in use, and natural means for ventilation relied upon, 
over 1 part carbon monoxide, and 17 parts carbon dioxide per 10,000 volumes 
were found at the breathing level of the pressers. In a similar loft where 
mechanical means for ventilation were in use, but a trace of carbon mon- 
oxide were found, and the carbon dioxide was only 7 parts. In converted 
dwellings, 1^ parts of carbon monoxide, and 18 parts- carbon dioxide were 
found at the pressers' tables, and in ce^llar shope over 2 parts carbon monoxide 
were found. From the high percentages of carbon monoxide and carbon 
dioxide found together at the pressers' tables, it is evident that the process 
of pressing with gas irons is dangerous to health, for it is known that 
when carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are combined, they seem to in- 
crease the toxicity of each other, and can do injury in proportions in whicb 
sinj^ly tliey would be less harmful. 

It has been my purpose if possible, to secure physical examinations of 
a number of the workers with a view toward determining the influence of 
illuminating gas upon their health, especially as to whether there was an 
anemia due to carbon monoxide, vitiated air, or general malnutrition. 
Visits were made to a number of associations to which the pressers be- 
longed, short talks were given regarding sanitation in the shops, and vol- 
unteers were asked for to submit not only to physical examinations, but to 
blood tests, for the purpose of demonstrating the effects of working in an 
atmosphere of illuminating gas vitiation. Unfortunately this phase of the 
investigation was not carried out. 

The fact must not be overlooked that general shop conditions have a bear- 
ing upon the health of the workers. The sanitary conditions of a shop 
reflect not only the character of the proprietor, but of the workers. In 
many shops toilets are filthy, floors dirty, and food refuse and cigarette 
butts are scattered upon work tables and under benches. In other shops, 
despite the efforts of the proprietor to keep his place sanitary, the toilets 



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Repoet of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. r»7 

are dirty and food refuse is scattered about. Such conditions can be pre- 
vented through the individual worker observing the simple rule of hygiene, 
personal cleanliness. 

One cause for unsanitary conditions arises from permitting the sale of 
food stuff and eating at the work tables during the working hours. In 
many factories gas or gasoline engines are installed for furnishing power; 
no mechanical means for ventilation are in use, and so fhe air becomes 
vitiated from the products of combustion and carbon monoxide. Tests made 
in a small shop situated near the river, and with splendid means for natural 
ventilation, showed 15 parts carbon dioxide and a trace of carbon monoxide 
when the gasoline motor was operated. 

In the small shops in the old loft buildings and converted dwellings, no 
dressing rooms* are provided owing to the lack of floor space. Such dressing 
rooms as are found cannot even be called closets. They are rarely used, 
and generally contain rubbish. 

In the majority of the factories devoted to the industry, washing facilities 
are a luxury, and but few have suitable wash rooms. 

In many of the modem shops, and in all of the shops situated in the 
older loft buildings and converted dwellings, beds and bedding were found 
which are used by the watchman, and, upon inquiry, it was found that the 
watchman works somewhere else during the day and uses the loft for his 
bed room at night. Examination of some of the bedding showed that it 
was not only unclean, but that in m-any cases vemiin were present. 

A great difficulty to be overcome lies in securing general ventilation, for, 
in the majority of cases, efforts to provide decent ventilation are rendered 
futile by the action of .those intended to be benefited. 

In the majority of the shops the males smoke and throw the butts of 
cigars and cigarettes about. There is- not only danger of fire from this 
habit, but danger from disseminating communicable pulmonary diseases 
through the medium of the saliva and sputum soaked ends which have been in 
the mouth, and are thrown on the floor there to dry up and fill the air 
with dust and germs. 

In the technical report submitted, and in my yearly report, remedial 
measures applicable to the industry have been recommended, but without 
the co-operation of the employer and employees they will be of small value 
in making the industry a healthful one. 

The majority of the workers are foreigners having but a small under- 
standing of English, so that a great part of the remedy must be supplied 
through a campaign of education beyond the domain of the Department. 

III. FELT HAT INDUSTRY. 

An investigation was undertaken for the purpose of determining the 
danger from mercury poisoning to workers in the felt hat industry. In 
order to understand more clearly the danger to which the workers are 
exposed it is probably advisable to briefly consider the toxicology of mercury. 

Metallic mercury is known chemically as hydrargyrum, hence its symbol 
Hg., meaning literally " water silver " signifying that mercury looks like 
silver and flows like 'water, a fact so well known that for ages it has been 
termed quicksilver. The metal is obtained from mercuric sulphide (cinna- 
bar), deposits of which are found in Spain, Austria, Russia, Italy, Mexico, 



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58 New York State Department of Labor. 

California and Texas; the production in the United States is about 1,900 
tons annually. 

According to authorities, the obtaining of mercury is one of the most re- 
pulsive and dangerous occupations. Dr. Theo. Sommerfeld of Germany, Sir 
Thos. Oliver, M.D., of Great Britain, and Dr. Putzeys of Belgium were ap- 
pointed by the International Association for Labor Legislation, a committee 
to prepare a list of industrial poisons. The subject of mercury is treated as 
follows:* 

Name of substance. Mercury, hydrargyrum. Hg. Silvery white, brilliant, not chancing in 
atmospheric air, evaporating at ordinary temperatures. 

Mercury alloys. Amalgams with gold, idlver, sine, tin, cadmium, lead, copper. 

Mercury compounds. Ck>rrosive sublimate, mercuric oxide, nitrate, sulphate, chloride, fulminate 
of meromy. 

Industry where prepared or tued. Mining attacks one to two per cent of the workers; smelting 
process 4 acks eight per cent of those engaged in it. It is used extensively in chemical factories, 
extraction of gold and silver, gilding, mlvering and bronxing processes, filling of barometers, ther- 
mometers, manometers, glow lamp industry, quicksilver air pumps, caps and explosives, silvering 
of mirrors, manufacture of felt hats, dyeing of hair, calico printing, photography, preserving of 
anatomical preparations and wood, etching on steel. [In this state I find that silver nitrate has 
replaced mercury in the silvering of mirrors.] 

Method of entrance into the body. As a vapor through the organs of req;>iration; through the 
digestive tract by soiled fingers. 

Symptoms 0/ poisoning. Inflammation of the gums and the mucous membranes of the mouth' 
ulcers in the throat and mouth, inflammation of the jaw bone, necrosis of the jaw bones, loss of 
the cflcium salts in bone thereby causing a deficiency in rigidity, derangement of the stomach 
and intestines, weakness, emaciation, and anaemia. Dermatitis, pustules on the skin, disturbed 
sensibilities, excitability, irritability, depression, hallucinations. The skin may be partly below 
normal sensitiveness (anaesthema), or partly supersensiitve (hyperaestheua), there is diffioidty 
of speech, exaltation of reflex action, palpitation, sexual function deranged in male and female: 
tremors of hands and groups of muscles. Mercury cachexia showing itself in anaemia, emacia- 
tion, atrophy of fat and muscles, relaxed sk'n. and want of appetite. 

Prerentive measures. Leading off of the vapors, proper ventilation of the workrooms, pr^ 
vention of the spilling of mercury, daily cleaning of workrooms, personal cleanliness of workmen. 
1 In case of poisoning. Hot baths and stimulants, good nutrition, arsenate or iodide of potasttum 
ntemally. 

Mercury begins to volatilize and give off vapor at 8.5** F. (1I5°C.), and 
this property increases with heat; so it can be seen that workers who are 
obliged to come into contact with mercury are ex'posed to danger of poison- 
ing. The danger from mercurialism is not confined to acute attacks. There 
may be nervous affections and paralysis resulting from chronic poisoning, 
and there may be an hereditary influence exerted. Dr. Kussmaul of Fiirth 
(in Untersuchungen Uber dem constitutionellen Mercurialismus) has given 
the matter grave thought and reports that children born of women suffering 
from mercurialism are feeble, rachitic and prone to tuberculosis. One case 
is reported by Beugrand of an infant with congenital mercurial tremor. It 
i^ reported that oliildren are healthy when bom of parents not working in 
occupations where mercury is used, whereas children born of the same 
parents after having been engaged in work where mercury was used are 
diseased. Lize has noted this heredity among the children of hatters 
(Lloyd). It is reported that women engaged at silvering mirrors with 
mercury frequently abort. 



♦ Cf Bulletin of U. S. Bureau of Labor. No 86. p. 164. 



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Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 59 

It is quite evident, then, that the danger from mercurialism is one of 
grave import, and is deserving of careful consideration. 

In the felt hat industry, the danger from mercurialism has been to those 
workers engaged in handling the body of the hat, or the material entering 
into its formation. The body is made of felted fur from coney, nutria, hare 
and rabbit. The felt hat industry in this state is not an extensive one, 
and really consists of associated industries, those of the hatters' fur makers, 
the body makers, and the finishers. 

Only one concern has a fur factory directly in connection with the felt 
hat making. During the past few years, it has gradually ceased operating 
this portion of the industry claiming that the stock can be imported much 
cheaper than they can make it. 

It is probably advisable to consider each industry separately, especially 
as the greater danger from mercurialism is in the manufacture of the fur. 

Hatters' Fur. 

In the nwwi-ufajcture of hatters' fur the initial processes are cutting and 
sorting. The dried skins are opened either by sharp hand knives, or circular 
knives driven by power. The workers are all males, usually Slavs, Poles, 
Italians and Greeks. The rooms devoted to this work are large and light, 
as considerable space is required to sort the skins; however, despite the 
large amount of cubic air space per person, the air is full of dust, consisting 
mostly of fine hairs which are thrown off by the constant handling of the 
dry pelts. 

The p«lt8 are cleaned and the strong coar:5e hairs removed so as to leave 
the fine fur. In handling expensive pelts such as coney and nutria, the hairs 
are plucked by hand, the operators using a blunt knife. At present it is 
not done in this state, though some years ago I recall having seen women 
engaged in the work. At present, the majority of the manufacturers shear 
the pelts by forcing the fur side against rapidly revolving blades of steel 
which remove the coarse hairs but leave the fine silky fur. ^fany factories 
employ women at the shearing machines. 

The next process is the carroting of the fur and it is with this process 
that the danger to the workers from mercurialism begins. 

Carroting is an artificial method of increasing the felting property of 
the fur by an operation which twists the fibres and raises the point of the 
scales which surround it. The process is accomplished either by hand or 
machine, and consists of thoroughly impregnating the fur with a solution 
of nitrate of mercury. In the hand method, the pelt is laid on a bench fur 
side up and scrubbed with a brush which has been dipped in the carroting 
mixture. The carroting machine consists of a rapidly revolving circular 
brush kept constantly wet by passing through a trough containing the car- 
roting mixture. The worker presses the fur side of the pelt against the 
revolving brush, and so impregnates the fur more evenly with the solution 
than in hand work. 

The impr^pQated pelts are then placed on trays and put into the carrot- 
ing ovens where they are exposed to a high temperature for a short period, 
after which they are taken out and removed to the drying rooms where they 



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60 New York State Department of Labor. 

are left for several days. They are then stored in bins, sometimes being 
slightly sprinkled by a dilute acid solution, and left until ready to be cut. 

After thorough drying the skins are again brushed to remove as much 
du€t, dirt or coarse hairs tilmt may not have been previously oHminated. 
The brushing is done by machinery, which in many plants is operated by 
young women, principally foreigners. 

The skins then pass to the cutting machines, which, through an ingenious 
arrangement of rapidly revolving knives, shred the skin and leave the fur 
coming from the machine intact; the fur is then examined, folded, placed 
in bags, and either shipped direct to the hat factories, or sent to machines 
for a more thorough cleansing and grading of the fur. 

This process is called blowing, and the machines are quite long, enclosed 
in glass or fine wire mesh ; the fur is placed in one en«l, and by means of a 
travelling apron carried along through a series of revolving pickers which 
tease the fur; a fan keeps blowing the teased fur about, and, through spe- 
cific gravity, the dirt is removed and the fur graded into various bins. In 
many of the hat factories, this process is carried on through a number of 
machines so that a very fine fur, almost down-like is obtained. 

This fur is then mixed with either raw stock or other stock both by hand, 
and machine, the various proportions lieing trade secrets. The process is 
an extremely dusty one, and none but males, usually foreigners, are engaged 
in the work. 

Fvur Hat Making. 

The first process in the making of a felt hat is forming. This is accom- 
plished by means of large machines driven by power; at one end of the 
machine is a hopper which automatically weighs out the amount of fur 
necessary for one hat, at the other end is a turntable upon which is 
placed a perforated copper cone about three feet high. The turntable and 
cone are enclosed by a cylindrical covering open at the top, and with side 
doors to remove the cone. By means of an exhaust fan, the fur is drawn 
through a series of pickers and sharp knives and deposited evenly upon the 
surface of the revolving cone. After the fur has all been deposited upon the 
cone, it is sprayed with hot water before removal, or after removal is dipped 
into a tub of hot water. The cone shaped fur body is then carefully re- 
moved from the copper cone, carefully examined, wrapped in a woolen cloth, 
and hand hardened by expressing as much moisture as possible. These 
bodies are then sent to the planking room for sizing and further hardening, 
which is really the process of felting the fur and shrinking the body. 

The term planking is dei"*ived from the fact that in the hand process a 
large tub of hot water is surrounded by planks upon which are placed 
burlap cloths. The plankers place the fur bodies upon the burlap and 
sprinkle them with hot water; the bodies are then folded within the burlap 
and gently rolled a few times, then opened and examined, this process being 
repeated a number of times until the body of the hat is strongly felted or 
hardened. This method is still in use, but the more modern sizing is ac- 
complished by passing the body through a sort of wringing machine equipped 



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Rbpobt of Bureau of Factory Tnsfeotion, 1911. 01 

with grooved spiral rollers which work over a trough of boiling water. The 
pressure is more even through such machines than in hand rolling. 

The hats are then shaved to remove such hairs as have not been gotten 
rid of in the planking process and is accomplished either by machines or 
by hand. After shaving, the body is passed through a series of processes 
whereby it is further reduced in size, stiffened, and blocked into shape. In 
all the processes the work is decidedly wet, as large quantities of hot and 
cold water are used, and the rooms filled with the vapor thus caused. All 
the workers are males. 

The bodies are now recognizable as hats, and are ready for dyeing and 
finishing. For the derbies, the bodies are treated to a further coating of 
shellac, which is forced into the hat under steam pressure, and the hat 
placed in an oven for drying. 

Felt Hat Finishing. 

In finishing, the processes are many and varied; to describe each process 
fully or technically would require many pages, especially as there is a dif- 
ference between soft hat and derby liat finishing. Considering the proc^^sses 
briefly, they all have to do with shaping the hat, smoothing the outside of 
the body, curling the brim, and finally trimming. 

The hat is first subjected to live steam, then placed in hydraulic machines 
which block the crown into the desired shape. A water stiffening is applied 
to the inside of the hat, it is dried, and then the hat is ironed to remove 
all wrinkles or uneven surfaces. 'Jhc ironing in most pla^ses is done by 
automatic gas iron machines. 

The brims are then pounced, that is rubbed smooth by a sand papering 
machine after which the hats are placed in a singeing oven to burn off 
such hairs and fibre as have not been removed by pouncing. The hat is 
then ready for the finisher. 

The hat finisher places the hat on a revolving block called a lathe, and 
with a piece of sand paper smooths off the whole hat. He then goes over 
the hat with a cloth which has been dipped in hot oil or grease, and so 
imparts a smooth fine finish to the body. 

The hat is then ready for brim curling. The brim is first cut or shaved 
to the desired width, the edges are tlien softened by a hot iron and curled 
over, both shaving and curling being accomplished either by hand or by 
machine. Ihe Imt is then placed on a hollow iron table heated by steam, 
and covered with hot sand bags; this process is called flanging, and prepares 
the brims for the final curl and pitch, this final process usually being ac- 
complished by hand upon a board shaped like a hat brim, and called a set 
board. 

The final stage through which the hat passes is trimming. This is done 
by females and consists of sewing on the binding, putting in the leather 
band, and in some cases a lining. The hat is then ready for the market. 

In the manufacture of soft hats, pouncing is a separate branch of the 
finishing, being done by men called pouncers. Here the hats are placed on 
a revolving lathe and subjected to sandpapering, the paper being held in 
the hand of the operator. 



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62 New York State Department of Labor. 

Dangers in the Pbocesb. 

In the manufacture of felt hat6 the principal danger has always been 
considered to arise from the use of mercury, and though many authorities 
have investigated the industry, analytical reports specific as to the actual 
processes wherein the danger is most prominent are very meagre. It is 
fully agreed upon that the danger from mercurialism begins with the pro- 
cess of carroting the fur. In considering the industry, my observations 
have not been confined to the question of mercurialism alone. 

Starting with the first process in the manufacture of hatters' fur, 
namely, opening and sorting the pelts, we find that organic dust, consisting 
chiefly of fine hairs, fills the atmosphere of the rooms where such work is 
carried on. In opening the pelts with a hand knife, the worker bending 
over the pelts is exposed to the full force of the dust and hairs, whereas 
th« operator at the machine knife is not exposed to quite so much dust. 
It is noticeable that good general ventilation by mechanical means does not 
remedy the condition, satisfactory results being obtained only where the 
dust is removed directly from the point of origin by means of an exhaust 
system. 

To demonstrate the fact that during the process the workers are exposed 
to the danger of inhaling the dust, a piece of gauze was placed over the 
nose and mouth, and, after standing alongside of a worker (both hand and 
machine) for about ten minutes, a small amount of felted fur was found on 
the gauze. Here was proof of the danger as well as proof of the unservice- 
ableness of using respirators in this sort of work, as the hair is partially 
felted by tlie breath, and would mat and clog up a respirator thereby making 
breathing diflScult. 

The reeults of analyses of samples of air secured in opening and sorting 
rooms showed as high as 1,700 particles of hair per litre of air, and the 
bacterial count showed as much as 28 colonies of bacteria per litre of air. 

In the shearing and brushing of the raw pelts the danger from dust is 
not so marked, as the knives and brushes are completely enclosed. The 
danger may, however, be entirely obviated by means of an exhaust system 
connected with the machines and this method is pursued in some factories. 
Many women are employed at this work. 

In the carroting process the workers are all males. Here the amount of 
dust in the air is slight, due to the process being a wet one, but nitric 
acid fumes are present, and, where the carroting ovens are in the same 
room, the high temperature and low humidity increase the danger from the 
irritating acid fumes, and from the mercury, which volatilizes at a low 
temperature; this is very noticeable as cold weather comes on. 

The remedy for this condition is good general ventilation; analyses show 
that in carroting rooms where mechanical means were used to remove 
fumes and change the air, no mercury was found in the atmosphere. The 
workers are foreigners and it was impossible to obtain any accurate infor- 
mation. It was admitted in some places that the workers had suffered 
from mercury poisoning in the form of the shakes, but the facts were not 
definite, and there was a reluctance on the part of the workers to submit 
to a physical examination. Where it was possible to examine the teeth 



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Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 63 

remilts were negative as the workers were ignorant of personal hygiene, and 
UMd tobacco, so that it was impossible to attribute the caries found specifi- 
cally to mercury or nitric acid. 

In many of the factories gloves are furnished the carroters, but they are 
not kept in repair, so that they are worthless as a protection. To prevent 
exposure of the workers to the fumes and heat of the ovens, one firm uses 
the following method. After carroting, the skins are placed on a traveling 
frame which passes through a long oven and delivers the dried skins at 
the other end. 

. After the skins have been carroted, the workers who handle them are 
exposed to the danger of organic dust plus mercurial ism. In the brushing 
of the fur the danger is eliminated by having an exhaust system connected 
to the brushing machines, and nearly every factory is so equipped, but in 
the case of the cutting machines there exists a difficult problem. These 
machines are completely enclosed, there being just a small opening for tlm 
pelt to enter and another for the fur to be delivered, and through the 
rapidity with which the circular knives move, the dust is throwji to ibe 
bottom by centrifugal force, and the fur is left intact. It is claimed that 
to use an exhaust system in connection with the machine would destroy the 
contour of the fur and lose considerable of the valuable product. It is re- 
ported that ifn Great Brit-ain an efficient and practii-al exhaust system has 
been connected to such machines. 

In the cutting rooms the danger from mercurialism is due to the amount 
of fur present in the air. The results of analyses show «that where the 
amount of dust (especially hairs) was small, merely a trace, or no mercury 
at all was found, but where the amount of dust was large, as high as 2.6 
milligrams of metallic mercury per cubic meter of air were found. 

Dr. Thorpe of the Britieh Governmental Laboratory reports finding 1.34 
per cent nitrate of mercury in a sample of fur taken from a cutting ma- 
chine. Inspector Vogt and myself secured a carroted skin weighing 65.243 
grams, and analysis showed .0543 grams of nitrate of mercury present or 
.0892 per cent. A complete fur cutting as it came from the machine was 
next secured and weighed 35.5 grams, analysis showed .0482 grams of nitrate 
of mercury' present, equal to about .0298 grams of metallic mercury. As 
Dr. Thorpe does not state the total amount of sample of fur used in the 
analysis, it is difficult to make proper comparisons especially as our findings 
are very much less than his. 

The operators of the cutting machines are females, and the examiners of 
the fur as it is delivered from the machines are both women and young 
girls, who are exposed to the very fine fluff which despite careful handling 
is liable to ariie. 

Inquiries made among these workers failed to elicit any information which 
might indicate that any suffered from mefcurialism, and as a rule they 
showed no external symptoms; the best proof is by means of a physical 
examination being made, but this was impossible. Many are foreigners, 
and though some appeared anaemic, it would be a difficult matter to declare 
the anaemia due to mercurialism. The teeth as a rule seemed well taken 



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04 New York State Department of Labor. 

care of> though some of the gold fillings appeared as if there was a slight 
amalgam present. 

In the blowing room the danger from the dust is in the mixing and feed- 
ing. The workers are all adults, few in number, and they do not remain 
constantly in the blower or picker rooms. The machines are all encased 
in wood or fine wire mesh, in order to prevent the loss of fur which is 
valuable material. Analyses made of samples of air taken from such 
rooms showed 21). 7 grtuns total solids in a million litres of air, of which 
5.20 grams were organic matter. In one cubic meter of air 29 long fur 
hairs and 170 small ones were found, while four milligrams of mercury 
were found per million cubic meters of air. 

In making the body of the hat there is an added danger from humidity, 
due to vapors created by the hot water used on the cone and in forming the 
hat. In this moist air the amount of dust is kept down, but in feeding 
the fur into the hopper, the operators are exposed to the fine fluff, and in 
many of the factories the hopper feeders are young women. While infor- 
mation could only be obtained through inquiries, it would seem that the 
effect of the work is deleterious to health. Analyses showed no mercury 
present in the air and the amount of dust was very slight. 

The operators at the cones are male adults and from general appearances 
arc of line physique, this being quite evident as they usually wear very 
little clothing owing to the character of the work and the high temperature 
and humidity. 

Afl reported by Jungtleish (Annales d^Hygiene, Dec, 1892), nearly .6 per 
cent of metallic mercury was found in a layer of felt* deposited upon a 
forming cone. This 9^ems ratlier high in comparison with our findings. 

All replies to inquiries as to mercury poisoning were in the negative. In the 
various processes through which the hody passes, such as planking, sizing, 
slaving, stiffening, dyeing, and blocking, the workers are strong adult males 
and are exposed to an atmosphere of high temperature, and vapors, due to the 
extensive use of hot and cold water; in fact the work is such that the ope- 
rators are at all times thoroughly wet. Analyses showed no mercury present 
in the air and water taken from the tubs showed but a minute trace. That 
very little nitrate of mercury is left in the body after passing through so 
much hot water, can be readily understood when we consider that the nitrate 
is about as soluble as ordinary table salt, and that the. metallic mercury is 
volatile at a low temperature. 

The majority of tlie workers are forei;:^ners and replies to inquiries as to 
mercurialism were in the negative, but it was admitted that they suffered 
from pulmonary affections and rheumatism. Some of the old operators said 
thai in the old days some of the men did have the shakes but not now. This 
may have been due to the fact that formerly metallic mercury was used and 
solutions improperly made; the mercury formed a very insoluble combina- 
tion with the keratin of the hair which was not removed in the processes 
subsequent to carroting. 

In the manufacture of stiff hats, such as derbies, the body Is shellaced. 
Here the danger arises from tlie liability to intoxication from the ethers 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 65 

and wood alcohol used, as well as danger from explosion of the highly in- 
flammable, materials. 

Jnftt how much danger the workers on the formed hat body are ezpoBed 
to may be seen from the following analysis made of a completed body ready 
for finishing. Weight of hat 65.3 grams^ amount of mercury present .0025 
gr<aims which is akno-st infinitesimal. Jungfleish reports having found .7 
per cent of mercury in a hat worn for some time. In my opinion there 
was either an error in calculation or a typographical error in his report. 

The workers engaged in the processes of finishing the hat are mostly 
males and in many cases boys. The dangers incidental to these processes 
arise from dust, temperature, humidity, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. 
Many of the processes are carried on in the same room so that all the 
workers are exposed to the same danger, irrespective of their particular 
work. The most dangerous portion of the finishing process is the pouncing 
and hand finishing. In this portion of the work a fine sandpaper is used 
and the dust created contains quantities of a fine sharp glassy substance 
known as silica. Many factories have exhaust systems attached to the 
pouncing machines which minimize the danger. In some factories young 
boys of poor physique operate the brim pouncing machines, unprotected by 
exhaust systems. Analyses of the air in the vicinity of such machines 
showed 80.2 grams per million litres of air. A further analysis of one 
gram of this dust showed .01021 grams of silica present, and in an analysis 
of some of the fioor sweepings a faint trace of mercury was found. 

In the hand finishing there is danger not only from this dust, but also 
from organic matter in the grease used, poisoning from carbon monoxide 
from illuminating gas - used, possibly also, from mercury for, in analyses 
of air taken at the breathing level of finishers in a few small shops, a trace 
of mercury was found. In none of the factories are exhaust systems con- 
nected with the finishers' tables. 

Inquiries made among the finishers* failed to reveal any cases of mercury 
poisoning, but a large number do suffer from pulmonary affections, and the 
secretary of one association reports a number of cases of pulmonary tuber- 
culosis. Mortality statistics show a large number of deaths among hat 
finishers from phthisis and tuberculosis. 

From a ouperficdfld examination of a numhefr of finishere, I found them of 
good physique, but many had slight bronchial affections. Among the hand 
finishers in the small shops in the large cities, I noticed a number were 
ansemic, but could obtain no history of illness or make a physical examination. 

In many of the factories boys and g^rls are employed in processes where 
Oluminating gas is used for the purpose of heating apparatus and machines. 
Analyses' of samples of air taken from such rooms showed as high as four 
parts of carbon monoxide per ten thousand volumes. Many[ of the workers 
complained of all the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, and Inspector 
Vogt and myself felt the depressing effect of the vitiated atmosphere after 
spending the day in such rooms. 

In the trinuning rooms the workers are females and apparently in good 
health. Analyses showed no mercury in the air, and a very small amount 
of dust and organic matter present. What is needed mostly in these rooms 
is' proper and sufficient ventilation. 

3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 Kew York State IDepaetment of lb abo^. 

Throughout the entire process of felt hat maldng from raw pelt to finished 
hat, meals are brought into the various workrooms and eaten there, and 
very little attention is given to personal cleanliness. 

Sumnnarizung: — in the industry there seeane to be a danger present which 
is not fully recognized, viz., that from dust and fumes. The danger from 
mercurialism is, in my opinion, limited to the carroting, and handling of 
the carroted product before forming the body of the hat; an intensive 
analysis of the industry seems to demonstrate this fact. 

Hitherto, it has been a disputed point as to which process of the industry 
is mostly to blame for mercurialism. Many authorities claim that it is in 
the carroting process, others in the finishing process, but the statistical 
facts in proof thereof are rather meagre, 'ihat the danger has been ma- 
terially decreased through the use of properly made nitrate of mercury is 
quite evident. Formerly each furrier made his own nitrate of mercury 
from pure metallic mercury and nitric acid, hence small globules of metallic 
mercury became lodged in the fur, and so became a danger to all workers. 
ThiB fact may account for the conditions reported by investigators of the 
finishing processes some years ago, and even at the present time. 

The investigation clearly proves that so far as the industry in this state 
is concerned the danger from mercurialism greatly decreases when the body 
of the hat leaves the forming machines, but that the danger from other 
conditions increases. It has been thoroughly demonstrated that certain in- 
fectious diseases are disseminated by means of hair, and that organic matter 
is the medium for bacterial growth, ^^'e have then, in the industry, the 
following dangers: 

(1) Organic dust, increasing the danger through being irritating, insoluble, 
poisonous, pathogenic. 

(2) Poisoning from carbon monoxide. 

<:{) Exposure to higli temperature, ^humidity and dampness. 
In view of the foregoing facts, I would respectfully recommend the formu- 
lation of regulations along the following lines. 

Rbquiations fob the Employes. 

There should be an attending physician at each factory. 

All employees should be examined physically every six months, and before 
returning to work after illness. 

All cases of illness should be seen by a physician and if the result, d\ 
rectly or indirectly of the industry, should be recorded in a book accessible 
to the Department. 

A sufficient supply of wash basins (one to every five workers) with hot 
and cold water, soap and hand brushes should be provided. 

Time should be allowed for washing up before meals and before leaving 
the factory. 

Overalls should be provided for males, and aprons and head coverings for 
females, the same to be discarded upon leaving the factory. Overalls, aprons 
and head coverings should be washed once a week. 

Rubber gloves and aprons should be provided for workers engaged in the 
carroting? process, tho sami* to he ke])t in «»ood rc*j>air. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 67 

No food Bbould be brougltt to, prepared or eeAen in, a room wliere any of 
the processes are carried on. A room for meals should be specially set 
apart for that purpose. 

No person under eighteen (18) years of age should be employed in any 
process or room where dust or fumes are freely given off, or where shellac 
varnish is made or applied. 

All work rooms should be ventilated by mechanical mean^ so that an 
abundant supply of fresh air may be maintained. 

Where dust is generated during the process of manufacture, an exlisust 
system should be provided, consisting of hoods and piping connected to an 
exhaust fan of sufficient power to remove all such dust at the point of origin 
and in a direction away from the worker, the system to be operated during 
the time work is carried on. 

In all carroting rooms, artificial means for ventilation should be provided 
and maintained to remove fumes from the ovens. 

All floors should be of such material as to be easily subjected to removal 
of dust by moist methods and should be cleansed daily. 

The mixing of the carroting solution should be done in a special room 
provided for the purpose, or after working hours. 

All rooms where wet processes are carried on should have an impervious 
floor and be properly drained. 

Workers exposed to mercurialism should be alternately shifted to other 
work bo as to lessen the danger. 

Where illuminating gas is used to heat tools, apparatus or stoves, all 
fumes, gases or vapors generated during the processes of manufacture where 
such tooU, apparatus or stoves are used, should be removed from the point 
of origin by means of properly installed exhaust systems. 

Notices regarding the danger of poisoning from materials used, the symp- 
toms, remedy and preventive measures should be posted in each work room 
and dressing room, and in several langauges. 

Regulations fob Employees. 

Extreme cleanliness should be observed. Care should be taken to wash up 
thoroughly before eating, and before leaving after finishing work. 

All workers when at work should wear an overall suit and head covering, 
which should not be worn outside the factory. 

No food or drink should be brought into any of the workrooms. Meals 
should be eaten only in the room provided for that purpose. 

Workers should make use of such safeguards as may be provided by the 
employer for the prevention of injuries or poisoning. 

No worker should in any way interfere with the means and appliances 
provided for ventilation or the removal of dust or fumes. 

None but male adults should do any cleaning of the floors. 

All workers should submit to a physical examination every few months, 
and, if iU, should report at once to the physician. 

Employees should become familiar with the symptoms of poisoning from 
the materials used, and the means for prevention, as well as the remedy to 
be applied. 

C. T. Gbahaic-Roqebs, 

Medical Inspector, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build- 
ing 

date. 



Floor. 



NuicBXB or 

ElfPLOTBKB. 



Male. 



Fe- 
nuUe. 



Means of ventilation. 



Meant of illumination and heat- 
ing, and number and location 
of presfling irons. 



Place 
of test 



1; 
Feb. 20 



2; 
Mar.22 
and 23 



S.- 
Feb. 27 



6th 


67 


0th 


46 


11th 


41 


8th 


67 


10th 


82 


Oth 


25 


5th 


30 


4th 


70 


6th 


25 

! 
1 



27 



10 



21 



Windows: 4 N., 2 E.. 15 S. 



Windows: 6 N.. 2 E.. 10 S.. 



Wmdows: 3 N., 2 E., 14 S., 3 
W. 3N.inL. 



Windows: 3 N.. 2 E., 14 S., 
W. 3N.inL. 



18 



00 



Wmdows: 3 N., 2 E., 14 S.. 3 
W. 3N.inL. 



Windows: 3 N., 2 E., 14 S., 3 
W. SN.inL. 



Windows: 3 N., 2 E.. 14 8. 
3W. 3N.inL. 



Windows: 3 N., 2 E., 14 S. 
3 W. 3 N. in L. 



Wmdows: 6 N., 2 E., 2 S.. 
14-inch exhaust fan with 
duct to center of loft. 



Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

15 gas irons in oenter of loft. 



Gas and dectrioity; 

steam heat; 

15 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and deetridty; 

steam heat; 

7 gas irons m center of loft. 



Gas and deetridty; 

steam heat; 

13 pa irons, north center 

wmdows. 
5 gas irons, front center. 



Gas and deetridty; 

steam heat; 

7 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and electricty; 

steam heat; 

4 gas irons, center of loft. 



Gas and deetridty; 

steam heat; 

7 gas irons at windows. 

Gas and deetridty; 

steam heat; 

14 gas irons at open windows. 



Gas and dectrioity; 

steam heat; 

6 gas irons at rear near windows. 



LOFT BUILDINGS, 
Center 



At irons 

Cutting dept. 



Canter... 
At irons., 
Side 



Cutting dept., 
front. 

Center 

Cutting dept.. 

Side 

At irons; front 

Center of L... 

Colter; front. 

Side 

At irons; center 

At irons; front 

Side 



Rear 

At irons. 



Rear... 
Center. 



Rear 

Center.., 
Center.. 
At irons.. 



Rear 

At irons. 
Center.. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 69 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, 1911. 



Time. 



Tkmpuutusb 
(Fahrinhbit). 



Out- ; In- 
doors, doors. 



Huiuditt. 



Out- 
doors. 



In- 
doora. 



Results or Am Analtso. 



Parts 
of CO-, 

in 
10.000 

vol- 



recent TYPE. 








(a.m 


2S 


70 


24 


58 


16 


1 p. M 


2i 


66 


1 26 


58 


14 


A.M 


21 


71 


1 24 


53 


15 


P. H 
A.M. 


2i 


60 


26 


47 


19 


22 


70 


24 


52 


16 


\ P-K 


1 28 


66 


26 


49 


1 '' 


(A.M 


1 25 


66 


24 


55 


16 


' P. M 


2i 


68 


26 


58 


1 18 


; A.M 


25 


1 65 


24 


57 


: 20 


1 p. n 


2i 


1 66 


26 


58 


i ^^ 


A.M 


25 


' 66 


24 


54 


i 16 


' P. M 


2J 


68 


' 26 


58 


18 


|A.M 


25 


65 


, 24 


52 


17 


28 


1 •^ 


1 26 


54 


17 


f A.M 


1 52 


1 62 


1 ^^ 


55 


10 


P. M 


1 65 


i «5 


' 63 


57 


17 


A.M 


52 


63 


46 


54 


10 


P. M 


65 


63 


63 


56 


12 


; A. M. 


52 


62 


46 


55 


12 


P.M. 

/a.m. 


65 


64 


63 


54 


14 


52 


64 


1 46 


55 


14 


P. M. 
/ A.M. 


65 


65 


63 


58 


18 


52 


66 


46 


58 


16 


P. M. 


66 


68 


63 


59 


17 


A. M. 


52 


66 


46 


58 


14 


P.M. 


65 


68 


63 


59 


15 


^ A.M. 


52 


66 


46 


56 


17 


P.M. 


65 


67 


63 


56 


17 


; A.M. 


52 


69 


46 


57 


10 


P.M. 


65 


69 


63 


58 


12 


A.M. 


52 


67 


46 


54 


7 


ip.M. 


65 


68 


63 


56 


9 


fA.M. 

Ip.M. 


52 


66 


46 


56 


9 


65 


1 66 


63 


56 


9 


/A.M. 


52 


1 63 


46 


50 


10 


P.M. 


65 


63 


63 


52 


14 


/a.m. 


52 


1 66 


46 


48 


12 


(p.m. 


65 


1 «5 


63 


48 


16 


/a.m. 


52 


66 


46 


52 


10 


p. M. 


65 


6S 


63 


53 1 


20 


A.M. 


52 


1 70 


46 


58 ' 


20 


P.M. 


65 


70 


63 


61 • 


23 


/ A. M. 


52 


1 ^ 


46 


50 J 


10 


P. M. 


65 


66 


63 


56 1 


12 


A.M. 


52 


' 67 


46 


50 


12 


P. M. 


65 


66 


63 


54 


15 


A.M. 


52 


65 


46 


52 


12 


P. M. 


65 


65 


6J 


52 


14 


A.M. 


52 


63 


.46 


55 


12 


P. M. 


65 


65 


63 


54 


13 


fA-M. 


49 


65 


43 


49 


14 


P.M. 


45 


67 


39 


50 


8 


A.M. 


49 


59 


43 


52 


8 


P.M. 


45 


60 


39 


51 


9 


A.M.' 


40 


62 


43 


50 


8 


P. M.! 


45 


62 


30 


51 


9 


tTrB<H 


>. 











Parts Parta of 
of (^0 ' ammonia 



10.(XK) 
vol- 



Grams j Nom- 

of oxidii- Grams bar of 

abio of solids ! colonies 

orRanic in i of 

,000.000 mattw in 1,000.000 bacteria 

vol- 1.000,000 liters of per 

umes. Uters of air. ' liter of 

air. air. 



Num- 
ber of 
moulds 

per 
liter of 



1} -> 



+1 



+ 1 



0.68 



0.65 



0.60 



59.0 



47.0 



40.0 




0.46 45.0 



I 0.60 I 58.0 



0.45 1 60.0 



0.50 



0.35 I 



48.0 



* 50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 



New York State Department of Labor. 



RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build. 



Floor. 


NuMBia or 

EllPLOTMS. 


Male. 


nutle. 



Means of ventilation. 



4; 
Mar. 1 



3d 



9th 



Feb. 16 I 



8th 



7th 



6th 



12th 



19 



44 



29 



27 



44 



10th 



9th I 23 



8th 19 



3d I 45 



Meant of illumination and beat- 
ing, and number and.IocatioD 
of preiung irona. 



Place 
of test. 



13 



10 



Windows: 6 N., 2 B., 2 8.... 



Wbdom: 4 N., 2 E.. 4 S.. 3 
W.; 4-inch euaust fan. 



Windows: 4 N., 2 E.. 4 a, 3 
W. 



Windows: 4 N.. 2 E.. 4 a 3 
W. 



Windows: 4 N.. 2 E., 4 S. 
W. 



Windows: 5 N.. 5 E.. 6 S., 3 

W.; 
doors: 1 S. 



Windows: 6 N., 5 E., 6 8., 3 

W.; 
doors: 1 S. 



Windows: 5 N., 5 E.. 6 S., 3 

W.: 
doors: 1 S. 



Windows: 5 N.. 5 E., 6 S., 3 

W.; 
doors: 1 S. 

Windows: 5 N.. 6 E.. 6 S., 8 

W.; 
doors: 1 8. 



Qas and deotricity; 
steam heat 



Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

3 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and deotricity; 

steam heat; 

8 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

5 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and dectricity; 

steam heat; 

6 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

10 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and deetricity; 

steam heat; 

9 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and deotricity; 

■team beat; 

7 gas irons at windows. 



Gas and dectricity; 

steam heat; 

4 gas irons at windows. 

Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

8 gas irons at windows. 



LOFT BUILDINGS, 
Center 



Rear.. 



Rear 

At irons 

Side 

Center 

Rear, center. 



Rear 

At irons 

Side, 1st test.. 
Side 



At irons, rear . 
At sewiers, rear 
Center 

At irons, rou*. . 
At sewers, side 

Center 

At irons 

Cutting depi.. 

At rear 

At gas irons. . . 



Center. . 

Rear 

At irons.. 



Center... 
At irons.. 
Center... 
At irons.. 



' Not reported. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



"Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 71 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, lO-ll— (Continued), 





Tkmpehaturi 


HuMXDnr. 


RssuLTB OP Am Analtbb. 




























Grama 




Num. 












Pvti 


Pwte 


Parte of 


of oxidii- 


Qramt 


berof 


Norn- 


time. 










of CO, 


of CO 


ammonia 


able 


ofiolids 


ookmiea 


bcrof 




Out- 


In- 


Out- 


In- 


in 


in 


in 


organic 


in 


of 


moalda 




doora. 


doors. 


doora. 


doora. 


10.000 


10,000 


1,000^ 


matter in 


1,000,000 


baotena 


per 












vol- 


vol- 


'«? 


litenof 


per 


Uterof 












xuam. 


nmm. 


umes. 


air. 


fiteTof 


air. 


















air. 




air. 




RECEl 


rr TYPE — (Co 


ntlnu&t). 






, A.M. 
P.M. 


49 I 58 
45 : 61 


43 
39 


52 

50 


9 
9 


} 




0.30 


22.0 


1 




A.M. 


49 57 


43 


51 


9 














P.M. 


45 59 


39 


49 


8 














A.M. 


8« - 60 


31 


55 


9 














P.M. 


38 


67 


32 


52 


13 














A. M. 

I P.M. 


36 
38 


63 
67 


31 
32 


58 
56 


6 
9 


} t 




0.45 


50.0 


2 




A.M. 


36 


60 


31 


55 


7 














P.M. 


38 


66 


32 


52 


8 














A.M. 


36 


62 


31 


55 


7 














P.M. 


38 


65 


32 


57 


10 














A.M. 


36 


60 


31 


56 


••8 














\P. M. 


38 


60 


32 


55 


••7 














A. M. 


36 


65 


31 


58 


8 














P.M. 


38 


67 


32 


60 


6 














A. M. 
P.M. 


36 
38 


63 
66 


31 
32 


56 
57 


8 
8 


} t 




0.47 


49.0 


2 




A.M. 


36 


67 


31 


56 


15 














P. M. 


38 


• 


32 


* 


* 














A. M. 


36 


64 


31 


58 


10 












,P. M. 


• 38 


67 


32 


58 


^2| i 1 i 1 




A.M. 
P.M. 


36 
38 


68 
67 


31 
32 


55 
54 


9 !/ ' 


0.40 j 50.0 i 2 




A. M. 


36 


66 


31 


56 


14 


1 


P.M. 
A. M. 
P.M. 


38 


67 


32 


58 


^ 1 


' I 1 


36 


66 


31 


55 


9 , 1 




38 


67 


32 


56 


9 ' 

1 


1 ' i 


A. M. 


36 


67 


31 


59 


22 1 ' ' 


P.M. 


38 


68 


32 


58 


18 1 • 1 i 70 60.0 1 3 




A.M. 


36 


65 


31 


57 


■n +'; i 




P. M. 


38 68 


32 


54 




A.M. 
P. M. 


28 ' 66 
36 ; 68 


25 

32 


54 

56 


jj } 1 70 45 1 




A.M. 


28 69 


25 


53 


25 ; 


1 i 




P. M. 
A.M. 


36 1 60 


32 


57 


25. 






28 


68 


25 


54 


19 


1 






; P. M. 


36 1 69 


32 


56 


22 


1 






A. M. 
P.M. 


28 1 58 
36 62 


25 

32 


47 

50 


.?} t 


1 

1 0.48 


«.o 


1 




A.M. 


28 


60 


25 


47 


14 ; 










P.M. 


36 


61 


32 


5U 


15 










U.M. 


28 


60 


25 


50 


11 








JP.M. 


36 


66 


32 


5{J 


17 








A.M. 
P. M. 


28 
36 


60 
65 


25 
32 


52 
52 


11 } t 





0.50 


45 1 


A. M. 


28 


63 


25 


50 


15 ' 








I P.M. 


36 


67 


32 


50 


18 








A. M. 
P.M. 


28 
36 


66 
67 


26 
32 


52 
50 


10 \ 

14 ./ 




0.45 , 47.0 1 1 


A. M. 


28 


68 


25 


52 


12 




1 


P. M. 


36 68 


32 


50 


12 






A.M. 
P.M. 


28 
36 


71 

70 


25 
32 


57 
56 


23 \\ 

21 1 




56 54.0 1 


A. M. 


28 


71 


25 


55 


16 1 




1 ' 


I P.M. 


36 


71 


32 


56 


22 















'Noon. 



t Trace. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 Kew York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build. 

date. 



6; 
Feb. 25 



Floor. 



numbkr op 
Emplotsbs. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Means of veatUation. 



Means of illumination and heat- 
ing, and number and location 
of pressing irons. 



Place 
of test. 



7; 
Mar. 20 
and 21 



5th 


71 


10 


4th 


15 




nth 


33 


4 



Windows: 8 .. 9 E.. 12 S. 



Windows: 8 N., 9 E.. 12 S... 



Windows: 6 N., 5 S., 5 W. 



10th ' 19 



4 Wmdows: 6 N., 5 S., 5 W. . . 



8th 57 I 9 



Wmdows: 6 N.. 5S., 5 W. 



7th 



55 



10 i Windows: 6 N., 5 S.. 5 W. . . 

i 



6th 38 , 20 Windows; 6 N., 5 S., 5 W. 

! 1 I 



5th I 5 



4th ; 49 < 14 



Wmdows: 6 N., 5 S., 5 W. . 



Windows: 6 N., 5 S., 5 W.. 



LOFT BUILDINGS, 
(a) Qas and dectrioity; I Front 



steam heat: 

13 gas irons near windows. 



Gas and electricity; 
steam heat; 



Gss and deotricify; 

steam heat; 

6 gas irons near windows. 



Gas and electridty; 

steam heat; 

9 gaa irons near windows. 



(b) Gas and electricity: 

steam heat; 

10 gas irons near windows. 



Gas and electricity; 

Steam heat; 

9 gas irons near center. 



Gas and dectridty; 

steam heat; 

2 gas irons near windows. 



(e) Gas and dectricity; 

steam heat; 

12 gas irons near windows. 



At irons. . 
Center.. 
Center.. 
Rear 



I 



West end 

Center 

Center, west . . 
.\t irons 

North end... 

West end 

At irons 

North end 



Gas and dectricity; 

steam heat; i 

14 gas irons near windows. | At irons 



West end. 



North end . . . 

At irons 

West end... 



North end.. 

At irons 

West end... 



North end.... 

At irons 

West end 

North end.... 

Atm>ns 

West end 



(a) One large arc lamp and 2 gas jets burning. (6) 2 gas jets burning. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 73 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, IQ-ll — {Continued) , 



TBlCnBRATURB I 

(Fahrinhkit}. < 



HUSODITT. 



Rbsdltb or Air Analysis. 



Time. 



Out- Id- I Out- 
doors, doon. I doon. 



In- 
doots. 



Parts 
of CO, 

in 

10,000 

vol- 



Parts 
of CO 



10.000 
vol- 



PartBof 
-ammonia 

in 

1.000,000 

vol- 



Grams 
of oxidis- 

able 
organic 
matter in 
IjOOO.OOO 
liters of 

air. 



I Num- 

Grams berof , 

of solids colonies ber of 
in I of moulds 
1,000,000 1 bacteria 
liters of I per 
air. I liter of 
I air. i 



Num- 



per 
liter of 



RECENT TYPE — iContinuii). 



A.M. 

P.M. 

A. M. 
\ P. M. 
/A.M. 

P. M. 

/a.m. 

] P. M. 

j A. M, 
' P. M. 



A.M. 
\P. M. 
/A.M. 

iP. M. 
A.M. 
P. M. 
A.M. 
P. M. 



P. M. 
I A.M. 
I P. M. 
I A.M. 

i P. M. 

f A.M. 
. M. 
[ A.M. 

I P. M. 
I A. M. 

{ P. M. 

I A. M. 

. M. 

■ M. 
[ P. M. 

. M. 
[ P. M. 

/ A. M. 
) P.M. 

f A.M- 

IP. M. 

/A.M. 



I A.M. 

[ P. M. 

[ A. M. 

\ P. M. 
[ A.M. 

P. M. 
I A. M. 

tP.M. 



42 


60 


38 


47 


64 


42 


42 


66 


38 


47 


69 


42 


42 


61 


38 


47 


64 


42 


42 


62 


38 


47 


63 


42 


42 


60 


38 


47 


62 


42 


40 


62 


38 


52 


56 


45 


40 


60 


38 


52 


58 


45 


40 


60 


38 


52 


60 


45 


40 


59 


38 


52 


63 


45 


40 


63 


38 


62 


67 


45 


40 


61 


38 


52 


61 


45 


40 


63 


38 


52 


66 


45 


40 


63 


38 


52 


65 


45 


40 


67 


38 


52 


66 


45 


40 


62 


38 


52 


65 


45 


40 


63 


38 


52 


62 


45 


40 


61 


38 


52 


64 


45 


40 


64 


38 


52 


62 


45 


43 


66 


38 


47 


64 


39 


43 


67 


38 


47 


69 


39 


43 


64 


38 


47 


66 


39 


43 


61 


38 


47 


66 


39 


43 


• 


38 


47 


56 


39 


43 


63 


38 


47 


56 


39 


43 


66 


38 


47 


68 


39 


43 


68 


38 


47 


69 


39 


43 


64 


38 


47 


67 


39 



ie) 11 dectrie lamps and 5 gas jets burning. 



53 


14 


} 


t 




55 1 10 




52 1 








53 ; 12 








53 7 








52 ' 12 








50 > 6 








50 12 








50 ! 6 








51 12 








52 12 \ 
62 10 / 


t 






52 , 14 






50 


10 1 






48 


8 








51 


11 






50 


9 




1 


50 


14 




1 


50 


14 


} 


t 




51 


16 




62 


10 








5i 


13 






53 


14 






52 


14 








55 


12 


} 


t 




58 


20 




56 


10 








66 


12 








63 


12 








54 


16 








53 


" 1 
19 1 






58 


— 1 




64 


12 ' 


1 


57 


17 1 


! 


51 


11 


1 


53 


16 1 




64 
66 


20 1 
23 / 


1 

+•; 


63 


22 


1 1 


68 


24 




62 


9 


! i 


54 


15 

1 


, 1 


62 
60 


20 h 
20 / 


tl 1 


• 


• 






51 


9 






62 


8 




1 


52 


11 




1 


52 


14 1 






53 


16 








53 


14 


} 


t 




61 


14 




49 


11 








53 


17 








tsbi 


irning. 




•Not 


reported 



0.60 


61.0 i 


0.48 


39.0 


0.61 


42.0 


0.63 


40.0 


0.60 


42.0 


0.58 


50.0 


0.50 


51.0 


0.66 


47.0 



fTiace. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build. 

date. 



Floor. 



Mar. 14 



9; 
Mar. 14 



10; 
Mar. 16 



11; 
Mar. 9 
and 10 



NuMBBS or 
Emplotbbs. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. I 



Means of ventilation. 



Means of illumination and hoat- 
ing, and number and loeation 
of pressing irons. 



Place 
oftert. 











LOFT BUILDINGS. 


3rd 


13 


.... 


Window8:6N., 5 8., 5W... 


Oas and electricity; 

steam heat: 

4 gas irons near windows. 


North end.... 










At irons 












West end 


2nd 


45 


21 


Windows: 6N.. 5S.. 5W.. 


id) Gas and electricity 

steam heat; 

11 gas irons at windows. 


West end 










North end.... 












At irons 


8th 


14 


6 


Windows: 3 N.. 3 R.. 38.. 
1 W., skylights: 1. 


Gas and electricily; 

steam heat; 

4 gas irons near windows. 


Rear 

At irons 


7th 


20 


15 


Windows:3N.,3E..3S..lW. 


Qa^ and electricity; 

steam heat; 

6 gas irons ncur windows. 


Rear 

At irons 


6th 


10 


3 


Windows:8N..3E.,3S..lW. 


Gasandeleotrieity: 
steam heat; 
2 gas irons. 


Rear 

Center 


7th 


54 


26 


Window»:4N..3E,48.,lW. 


Gas and eleotruaty; 

steam heat; 

12 gas irons at windows. 


Rear 










Near irons — 


4th 


85 


13 


Windows: 4 N., 4 8., 1 W... 


Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

7 gas irons at windows. 


Rear 

At irons 


2nd 


15 


1 


Windows: 4 E.. 5 W 


Gas and electricity; 

steam heat; 

2 gas irons in center. 


Center 










Vton% 


3rd 


60 


27 


Windows: 5 B.. 5 W 


steamboat; 

11 gas iroM in center. 


Front 










At irons 


7th 


27 


3 


Windows: 4 N.. 4 E. 4 a, 
3W.;akyIigfats:3; 
exhaust fans: M4 in. N.. 
M4 in. S. 


Gas; 

steam heat; 

6 gas irons near windows. 


Front 

Rear, at irons. 
Rear 


6th 


19 


4 


Windows: 4 N..4 E.,4 S.. 8 W.; 
exhaust fans: 1-14 in. N.. 
1-14 in. a 


Gas; 

steam heat; 

3 gas irons at windows. 


At irons 

Front 


4th 


6 


6 


WindowB:4N..4E.*4S..8W.; 
exhaust fans: 1-14 in. N.. 
1-14 in. S. 


Gas; 

steam heat; 

2 gas irons at windows. 


Rear 

At irons 


3rd 


•9 


2 


Windows: 3 N.. 2 E., 3 3., 2 W. 


Gas; 

steam heat; 

2 gas irons at windows. 


Rear 

AtiraM 



id) 6 electric lamps and 5 gas jeta bummg. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Keport of Bureau of Factory Tnsfeotion, 1911. 



75 



SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, 1911— {Continued). 





TCMPCmATUEK 

(Fahrxnhkit). 


HUMIDITT. 


RB8T7LTB OP AlR ANALYSIS. 


















Grams i 


Num- 














Parts 


Pftrts 


Parts of 


ofoxidix- Grama 


ber of 


Num- 


Time. 










ofpOi 


of CO 


ammonia 


able 1 ofsoUds 


colonies 


ber of 




Oui. 


In- 


Out- 


IlH 


in 


in 


in 


^^^^anic 1. ^i?.^ 


of 


moulds 


1 doofs. 


doors. 


doon. 


doon. 


10,000 


10,000 


1.000.000 


matter in| 1.000.000 


bacteria 


..P*, 










vol- 


vol- 


vol- 


1.000.000, Utersof 


.P* , 


liter of 


i 








umes. 


umes. 


tunes. 


liters of ' air. 
air. 1 


Uterof 
air 


air. 


RBflBNT TYPE -(Co 


nHnued). 






/4.1I. 


43 


09 


38 


44 


20 


1 








P.M. 


47 


65 


39 


50 


22 


1 








A.M. 
P. M. 


g 


65 
65 


38 
39 


48 
50 


16 
16 


} t 


0.70 


59.0 


2 


1 


A. M. 


43 


66 


38 


48 


17 












P.M. 


47 


67 


39 


49 


18 












A.M. 
P. M. 


43 
47 


66 
68 


38 
39 


59 
57 


15 
13 


} +* 




0.69 


48.0 


2 


1 


A.M. 


43 


69 


38 


59 


17 














P. M. 


47 


68 


39 


56 


24 














A M. 


43 


04 


38 


69 


17 














P. M. 


47 


67 


39 


56 


21 














A.M. 
P. M. 


43 
46 


62 
66 


39 
40 


55 
66 


12 
14 


} t 




0.48 


50.0 




1 


A. M. 


43 


61 


89 


52 


13 














P. M. 


45 


62 


40 


54 


13 














. A. M. 
P.M. 


43 
46 


64 
67 


39 
40 


54 

53 


20 
20 


} 1 




0.65 


42.0 






A. M. 


43 


64 


39 


53 


18 














P. M. 


46 


66 


40 


56 


14 














A.M. 
P. M. 


43 
46 


61 
67 


39 
40 


54 

. 50 


14 
16 


} t 




0.69 


50.0 






A. M. 


43 


60 


39 


53 


14 














\P. M. 


46 


63 


40 


52 


16 








' 






/A.M. 
P. M. 


43 
46 


66 

66 


39 
40 


56 
59 


17 
19 


} "^"^ 




0.70 


48.0 






A. M. 


43 


67 


39 


56 


17 














P.M. 


46 


67 


40 


56 


17 














, A.M. 
P.M. 


43 
46 


68 
65 


89 
40 


65 
56 


10 
14 


} t 




0.68 


45.0 






A.M. 


43 


69 


39 


56 


12 














P. M. 


46 


68 


40 


56 


12 














A.M. 
P.M. 


22 
26 


66 

68 


10 
20 


52 
52 


17 
20 


} ~* 




0.78 


58.0 







A.M. 


22 


63 


19 


• 


12 














P. M. 


26 


65 


20 


• 


14 














A. M. 

P.M. 


22 
26 


70 
67 


19 
20 


53 
55 


17 
26 


1 1.5 




0.60 


50.0 






A.M. 


22 


69 


10 


52 


16 














P. M. 


25 


69 


20 


51 


10 














P. M. 


25 


64 


20 


59 


15 














A. M. 
P. M. 


40 
48 


66 

65 


34 
40 


56 
54 


10 
11 


} "^^ 


0.45 


57.0 






A.M. 


40 


64 


34 


54 


8 












P. M. 


48 


64 


40 


53 


10 












A. M. 


40 


65 


34 


56 


11 












P. M. 


48 


64 


40 


54 


10 














A. M. 
P. M. 


40 
48 


61 
63 


34 
40 


47 
49 


13 
16 


1 1 




0.50 


45.0 


1 




A. M. 


40 


02 


34 


47 


8 














P. M. 


48 


63 


40 


50 


10 














A.M. 
P. M. 


59 
48 


69 
60 


41 
42 


53 
63 


10 
10 


} t 




0.48 


45.0 







A.M. 


60 


67 


41 


52 







1 








P.M. 


48 


60 


42 


68 


10 




1 








A.M. 
P. M. 


60 
48 


60 
66 


41 
42 


56 
56 


7 
9 


} t 


0.50 


47.0 






A«M. 


69 


• 


41 


« 


9 




I 








P.M. 


48 


• 


42 


« 


9 




1 






•Not 


kreiwrtoi 


1 


t Trace. 



















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CXOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build- 



date. 



Floor. 



NuMBSR or 
EMPLonua. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Means of ventilation. 



Meam of illumiDation and heat- 
ing, and number and location 
of pressing irons. 



Place 
of test. 



LOFT BUILDINGS, 



12; 
Feb. 15 



13; 
Apr. 5 



14; 
Apr. 23 



Feb. 21 



2d I 14 I 



4th 16 : 



5th 




5th 


19 


5th 


7 

1 



4th 



60 



5th I 17 



5th 29 



16; 

Feb. 23 



6th 
6th 



3d 



27 



2 


Windows: 3 E. (louvre), 3 S., 

2W.; 
exhaust fans: 2-14 in. S. 


Gas; 

steam heat; 

2 gas irons at windows. 


R«r 

Center 

At irons 




Windows: 4 N.. 4 E., 4 S., 3 
W. 

Windows: 3 N.. 6 E., 3 S., 

1 W.; 
ventilators N. and E. 


Gas; 
steam heat 

Electricity: 
steam heat 


Center 

• 


5 


Front 

Rear 


5 


Windows: 3 N., 3 E. 


(«) Gas and electricity; 
steam heat 


Front 

Center 


2 


Windows: 3 N., I E., 6S. 


Gas and electricity; 
steam heat. 


Rear 

Center 


2 


• 


Gas and electricity; 
steam heat 


Rear 

Center 






LOFT BUILDINGS. 


13 


Wmdows: 7 N.. 15 W.. 7 on 
court. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

15 gas irons near windows. 


Center 

At irons 

North end... 
South end 


6 


Windows: 3 N., 6 on court. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

4 gas irons at windows. 


Center 

At irons. . . . . 


4 


Windows: 15W., 4N. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

5 gas irons at windows. 


Center 

At irons 

Rear 


3 


Windows: 6 on court. 


Gas; 

coal stove; 

2 gas irons at windows. 


Center 

\i irons 


3 


Windows: 7 N.. 15 W. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

4 gas irons at windows. 


At irons 

South end ... . 
Center 


4 


Windovi-s: 6 E., 7 W., 2 side. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

6 gas irons, side center. 


Center 

At irons 






(«) 2 gas stoves 1 


or heating irons 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 77 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, 1911— {Continued), 





Tbsipbrattjbk 
(Fahrinhkt). 


HuMionT. 


RisuLTs OP Air Analtsis. 




















Grams 




Num- 1 












Parts' 


Parts 


Parts of 


of oxidia- 


Grams 


ber of 1 Num- 


Time. 










ofCOs 


of CO 


ammonia 


able 


ofsoUds 


colonies | ber of 




Out- 


In- 


Out- 


In- 


in 


in 


in 


organic 


in 


of moulds 




doors. 


doors. 


doors. 


doors. 


10.000 


10.000 


1,000,000 
voi- 


matter in 


1,000.000 


bacteria per 












vo^ 


vol- 


1.000,000 


titers of 


per 1 titer of 












ttines. 


umes. 


umes. 


titers of 


air. 


titer of ! air. 


















air. 




air. 





RECENT TYPE -fCo» 


idud d). 












/ A. M. 59 
\p.M. 48 


60 
63 


41 
42 


63 
53 


10 } tj 0.60 


50.0 


2 


1 


fA.M. 69 


66 


41 


53 


8 ' 








P.M. 


48 


68 


42 


53 


9 1 ; 








A.M. 


59 


61 


41 


53 


10 ! 








P.M. 


48 


62 


42 


52 


10 i 1 








/A.M.! 59 
p. M.I 48 


62 

66 


41 

42 


64 
57 


1^} 1 »-^« 


45 


1 




/ A. M. 69 


62 


41 


54 


<2 1 ; 1 






p. M. 48 


66 


42 


57 


h| ' 1 




1 


/ A. M.| 24 

I p. M.I 27 


59 
61 


11 


52 
50 


10 
12 


} ' 1 0.61 


60 


1 

^! 


, A. M.I 24- 


59 


21 


52 


10 


1 






\ p. M.' 27 


61 


22 


50 


10 










A. M.' 24 
P.M. 27 


65 
66 


21 

22 


53 
55 


22 
24 


1 1.5 ' 0.65 


58.0 


* 




/a- M.I 24 


65 


21 


53 


23 i' 1 






\P.M.| 27 1 68 


22 


57 


27 1 ' 




1 


|A.M.t 47 1 65 
1 P. M. 57 ' 63 


46 
56 


54 
68 


ni} " «7o 


50.0 


2 ; 1 


A.M.J 47 65 


46 


54 


15 i 1 1 




i 


p. M. 57 63 


56 


59 


"i 1 






/a.m. 46 * 62 


41 


58 


1 1 t 
10 




1 


I P. M.I 50 60 


44 


54 


18 1 : 




j 


/ A. M.. 46 01 


41 


57 


14 1 1 ' 






\p. M.! 5) 68 


44 


54 


19' , , ; 






OLD TYPE. 












A. M. 23 

p. M. 26 


65 
67 


20 
31 


50 
62 


17 
16 


}+l 1 1 0.71 


48.0 


'1 


/A.M. 23 


63 


20 


61 


18 


1 




1 


p. M. 26 


65 


31 


61 


14 


1 1 




1 


. A.M. 23 


63 


20 


60 


16 


1 ' 




i 


P.M. 26 


63 


21 


48 


14 


1 




1 


A.M. 33 


63 


20 


49 


10 


' 




I 


P.M.1 26 


63 


21 


62 


13 






1 


A. M.I 23 
\ P. M.I 26 


63 
60 


30 
21 


52 
63 


18 
17 


}+l 0.90 


50.0 


3 j 


[A.M.' 23 


63 


20 


62 


18 


, 1 






\p. M.; 26 


04 


21 


60 


20 






, 


A.M.I 33 

P.M. 26 


04 
05 


20 
21 


64 

50 


12 
12 


} • "" 


48 


8 1 


A. M. 


23 


67 


30 


63 


15 






1 


P.M. 


26 


66 


31 


62 


19 


' 1 






A.M. 


23 


63 


30 


64 


12 






t 


P.M. 


26 


66 


21 


61 


14 










A.M. 
,P. M. 


23 
36 


60 
69 


20 
31 


63 
60 


16 
13 


}t ; 0.98 


51.0 


5 


2 


A.M. 


33 


07 


30 


63 


18 


' 1 








P.M. 


3d 


09 


31 


60 


17 


j 1 








A.M. 
P.M. 


33 
30 


03 
03 


30 
21 


49 
48 


16 
16 


}t 1 j 0.90 


50.0 


3 




A. M. 


33 


01 


30 


60 


12 


( 








P.M. 


26 


00 


31 


61 


11 










A. M. 


23 


02 


30 


60 


13 


! 






P.M. 


20 


00 


21 


61 


16 


1 








/A.M. 
P.M. 


20 
39 


00 

00 


33, 
34 


66 

69 


26 
20 


} ' 


3.15 


60 


15 


2 


A.M. 


30 


03 


33 


67 


30 












P.M. 


39 


05 


34 


W 


W 










I 





Nokm^wtwl f.TlraM 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build- 
ana 
date. 



Floor. 



NuMBu or 

ElfPLOTBaS. 



Male. 



¥^ 



Meana of ventilatioii. 



Means of illamination and heat- 
ing, and ttoniber and location 
of 



Place 
of teat 



17; 
Feb. 28 


«th 


19 


; 4 Windows: 4 N.. 4 S.. 4 W.... 

I 


LOFT BUILDINGS. 

Gas; Center 

coal stoves; 

4 gas irons near air shaft At irons 




5th 


11 


2 


Windows: 4 E.. 4 N., 5 8... 


Gaa; 

coal stoves; 

3 gas irons near air shaft 


Center 

At irons 




5th 


16 


1 

j 


Windows: 4 N., 4 S., 4 W. . . 


(e)Gas; 

coal stoves; 

4 gas irons near air shaft. 


Center 

At inns 

Center 




3d 


5 




Windows: 4 E 


(e)Gas; 
coal stoves; 
Igaairon. 


Center 








18; 
Mar. 28 


3d 
4th 

4th 
5th 
5th 
«th 


10 
8 

7 
11 

7 
10 


2 

2 
6 
3 

1 


Windows: 4 N.. 2 & on air 
shaft 

Windows: 4 E., 4 a. 2 on air 
shaft 

Windowa: 4 N.. 2 on air shaft 

Windows: 4 S.. 3 W.. 2 on air 

shaft 
Windows: 4 N.. 2 on air shaft 

Windows: 4 N, 3 E.. 2 W., 2 
onairahaft 


(/)Ga8; 

Gas; 

1 gaa iroo in rear, oomer. 

Gaa; 

2 gas irons in center. 
(«)Gas; 

2 gaa irons in center. 

Gas; 

2gas irons. 

Gas; 

2 gaa irons near ahaf t 


Cent* 

• 




Cent* 

• 




Center 

Center 

Center 

Center 


Apr. 22 


8th 
7th 


8 
5 


2 

1 


Windows: 2 W., 8 side 

Windows: 2 E.. 3 W.. 3 side.. 


Gas; 

coal stoves 
2 gai irons. 
Gas; 

coal stoves; 
1 gas iroo. 


Center 

Center 

Rear 




6th 





2 


Windows: 4 W.. 5 side 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2gas irons. 


Center 

Rear 


20; 
Feb. 14 


3d 


6 


3 


Wmdowa: 6 E., 2 W.. 1 side; 
all equii>ped with venti- 
lators. 


Gas; I 
coal stoves; 
2 gaa irons. 


Center 

• 




5th 


10 


3 


Windows: « E.. 6 W., 1 side; 
lators. 


Gaa; 1 
coal stoves; 
3 gaa irons. 


At irons 

Center 


21; 
Mar. 15 


4th 

1 


*i 


1 
2 Wiudowa: 2 N.. 5 E [ 

1 


Gas; , 
steam; ' 
2 gas irooa at windows. 

1 


Oenter 

Rear 


22; 
Mar. 16 


3d| 
1 


• 


• Windows: 4 N.. 6 E., IS...., Gas; 
steam; 
2 gas irons at windows. 


ade 

Atirooi 










(•) 


OaegasietlmniBf. (/)2gai 


ijetsbuninf. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 79 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, l^ll— (Continued). 



Time. ' 



TfiMPKBATUBK 

(Fahhknhbit). 


HUWDITT. 






Rbsui/ts 


or Air Amaltbxs. 




1 














Grams 


1 Num- 












Pfcrts 


Parts 


Parts of 


ofozkiia- 


Grams ! berof 


Num- 










of CO, 


of CO 


^mmnnui 


able 


of solids 1 ookMUfls 


ber of 


Out- 


Jn- 


Out- 


In- 


in 


in 


in 


organic 


in 1 of 


moulds 


1 doora. 


doon. 


doors. 


doors. 


10.000 


10.000 


LOOOiMO 


matter in 


1.000.000, bMteria 


per 










vol- 


vol- 


1.000.000 


Utersof per 


liter of 


, 








umes. 


umes. 


umes. 


Utersof 
air. 


air. Uterof 
1 air. 


air. 



OLD TYPE— (Con«iMMd). 



[ f- M.; 



; A. 1 
\ p. I 



f A.M. 
1 P. M. 
I A.M. 

] P. M. 

1 A.M. 
I P. M. 

[a.m. 

A.M. 
\ P. M, 
I A.M. 
iP.M. 
/ A.M. 
vP. M. 

(A.M. 
I P.M. 



\ P. M. 

/A.M. 
P. M. 
A.M. 
P. M. 

A.M. 

1 P. M. 
J A.M. 
IP. M. 

|A.M. 
1 P.M. 

J A.M. 
I P.M. 

|A.M 



34 


61 


27 


64 


24 


52 


27 


50 


24 


66 


27 


60 


24 


56 


27 


60 


24 


57 


27 


63 


24 


62 


27 


62 


24 


64 


27 


63 


24 


55 


27 


61 


40 


62 


38 


65 


40 


• 


38 


• 


40 


58 


38 


63 


40 


60 


38 


63 


40 


62 


38 


66 


40 


58 


38 


60 


40 


58 


38 


57 


40 


57 


38 


59 


43 


65 


42 


68 


43 


64 


42 


62 


43 


64 


42 


62 


43 


65 


42 


66 


43 


65 


42 


66 


20 


55 


31 


59 


29 


55 


31 


59 


29 


57 


31 


60 


29 


55 


31 


57 


44 


65 


61 


68 


44 


• 


51 


« 


44 


65 


51 


63 


44 


66 


51 


66 



46 
44 
46 
44 
53 
52 
51 
52 
48 
48 
50 
50 

59 
57 

53 
59 
53 
59 , 
57 ! 
57 I 
57 
57 I 

48 
50 
48 
50 
61 
50 
51 
52 



42 


52 


42 


54 


42 


* 


42 


« 


42 


55 


42 


57 


42 


56 


42 


57 



1.5 



+1 



}• 



}t 



0.99 


57.0 


096 


49.0 


0.99 


50.0 


1.00 


50.0 


2 05 


""1 



70 

1 40 
1.20 
0.85 
1 20 

0.89 

76 
0.80 



I f^M, 



59 



57.0 

60.0 
58.0 
61.0 
70.0 

52.0 I 

50 
50.0 I 



51.0 



5>J 



• Not reported. t Trace. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 ^New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 







NuuBKR or 

ElfPLOTSSB. 








Num- 
ber of 
bmld. 

iS5 

date. 


Floor 






Means of ventiUtion. 


Means of illumination and heat- 
ing, and number and location 








Place 
ofteet. 




Male. 


Ke- 
male. 




of presBUg irons. 










LOFT BUILDINGS. 


23; 
Apr. 10 


2nd 


8 
2 


10 
5 


Windows: 5 N.; 1 door 

Windows- 5 S 


Gas; 

4 gas irons at window. 

Gas; 

3 gas irons at windows. 


Genu* 

Center 










2nd 
2nd 
2nd 


7 
4 
5 


U 
8 
5 


Windows: 6 S 


(/)Gas: 

3 gas irons in center. 

Gas; 

1 gas iron in center. 
Gas; 

2 gas irons near windows. 


Center 




Windows: 2 E., 4 N.:l door.. 
Windows- 2 N 2 S 


Center 

Center 








24' 


2nd 


5 


12 


Windows* 4 N 4 S 


Gas; 

2 gas irons near windows. 


Center 


Apr. 11 








3rd 


4 


' 


Windows: 4 N.. 4 S 


Gas; 

steam; 
1 gas iron. 


Center 


25: 
Apr. n 


2nd 


5 


10 Windows: « N.. 2 E., 3 S.. 1 
door. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2 gas irons at windows. 


Center 


26: 
Apr. 12 


2od 


6 


10 


Windows: 6 N.. 4 S 


Gas; 

Qoal stoves; 

3 gas irons at windows. 


Center 


27: 
Mar. 3 


3rd 


19 


5 


Windows: 3 E.. 3 W 


(jF)Ga8: 

coalBtoves; 

6 gas irons near windows. 


Center 

At irons 




4th 


10 




Windows: 3 E.. 3 W 


CO Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2 gas irons near windows. 


Rear 

Front 


28: 
Mar. 3 


2nd 


25 


10 


Windows: 3 E. (louvre). 3 W. 


(w)Gas; 

5 gas irons at wmdowa. 


Center 

At ironn .... 




.«. 


» 


3 


Windows: 3 E.. 3 W 


WQas; 

1 gas iron at window. 


Front 

Center 


29; 
Feb. 10 


2nd 


21 


5 


Windows: 4 E., 4 W.; six 
equipped with ventilators. 


Gas and electricity: 

steam heat; 

4 gas irons near windows. 


Rear 

Center 




6tb 


• 


* 


Windows: 4 E.. 4 W.; six 
equipped with ventilators; 


Gas and eleetridty: 
steam heat. 


Rear 

Center 




4tb 


19 


5 


Windows: 4 E., 4 W.; six 


WGasandeloctricity: 

steamheat; 

4 gas irons near windows. 


Rear 

Center 




5tb 


10 


30 


Windows: 4 E.. 4 W.; six 
equipped with ventilators. 


Gas and electricity; 
steam heat. 


Rear 

Center 



ff) 3 rM iet* burnioE ^0^ ° cas jetf buroioK ^oa^i '^ teas i'*s and|oD« km oluster bumiof . 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 81 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, mi — {Continued) . 





TlMPXRATURK 


HuMiDin. 


Time. 


Oat- 1 In- 
doors, doors. 

I 


Out- 
doors. 


In- 
doors. 



Results op Aib Analysis. 



OLD TYPE— (C<m«nii«0. 



Parte 
of CO, 


Parts 
of CO 


1 Gnuns 
Parte of ;of oxidix- 
ammonia ' able 


1 Num- 
Grams ' ber of 
of solids colonies 


Num- 
ber of 


10.000 
vol- 
umes. 


m 
10.000 
vol- 
umes. 


in ' orgamc 

1,000,000 matter in 

vol- 1,000.000 

umes. liters of 


l.OOO.OOO'bac'terU 
liters of per 
air. ' liter of 


moulds 

per 
Uterof 

air. 






air. i 1 sir. 





p. 


M. 


A.U. 


P. 


M. 


A.H. 


P. 


M. 


A.M. 


P. 


M. 


A. 


M. 


P. 


"• 


A.M. 


P. 


M. 



[ A. IC.( 
I P- M.l 



A.M. 



P.M.I 
A.M.I 
P. M. 
A.M.> 

\P.M.1 
A. M.| 
P. M., 
A.II.I 
P.M.I 
A.M.' 
P. M.! 
A.M. 
P. M-i 
A.M. 

IP.-., 



45 I 
48 



45 
39 i 
45 
39 I 
45 ' 
39 I 

*5 
30 

45 ' 



62 



/ A.M. 


• 


58 


P. M.I • «1 


A.M. 


• 59 


P.M. 




59 


A.M. 




59 


r- M. 




58 


A. M, 




59 


P.M. 




59 


A. M. 




00 


P.M. 




59 


A.M. 




50 


r.M. 




60 


A.M. 




60 


P.M. 




62 


A.M. 




61 


I P.M. 




62 



39 



35 I 

39 I 
35 I 

on I 



36 
39 
35 



I 



56 I 
55 I 

57 ' 

57 I 

58 1 

67 
62 , 
53 ' 

1 
65 1 



49 I 
60 



50 ' 
60 



60 



55 



35 


53 


39 


54 


35 


• 


89 


• 1 


85 


59 , 


39 


60 1 


35 


54 


39 


58 ' 



54 ' 

56 



10 1\ . 

Slit 
'2l}t 



' t 



\l }+' 



}- 



0.70 
0. 9 

0.69 
0.66 
0.66 

0.69 

0.57 



0.64 



fA) 1 fss maot1# bumiog 



61 

60 

62 

52 

51 
' 48 
I '2 

63 

61 
' 52 

' 52 
I 55 

1 W 
55 

66 
(hh) 1 ffftf i«t huraioi. •Not rtpovtad. f Trset. 



0.65 



0.88 



0.97 



61.0 
65.0 

63.0 
61.0 

48 

62 
60.0 
00.0 

49 



0.61 I 46.1 



0.57 I 39 5 



3.00 ; 69 



0.86 45 



1.67 49 



50 



5:> 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82* Xew York State Depaktment of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 



Num- 
ber of 
build, 
ing 
and 



Floor. 



Number or 
Emflotbss. I 



I Fo- 
Male. , male . 



Means of ventilation. 



Means of illumination and heat^ 
ing, and number and location 
of preanng irons. 



Place 
of test. 



20: ' 6th 
Apr. 5 I 



31: , 3rd 

Mar.27| 



4th 



5th 



5 ' Windows; 3 N., 3 S., onel (i) Gas: 
skylight. coal stoves; 

I I 4 gas irons near windows. 



2 Windows: 3 N.. 2 S.; one 30j (;) Gas; 

inch exhaust fan in front 2 gas irons in center, 
window; ventilators in rear. 



LOFT BUILDINGS, 
Front ' 

Center 



Windows: 3 N.. 2 S.; one 30-, {k) Gas; 
inch exhaust fan in front/ 1 gas iron, 
window; ventilators in rear. 

Windows: 3 N., 2 S.; duct| (/) Gas; 
from exhaust fan to center 7 gas irons in center, 
of loft; ventilators: 2 front, i 
3 rear. 1 



Center. 
Rear.. 
Center. 
Rear... 
Center. 
Front. . 



LOFT BUILDINGS, CON 



32- 


3id 


6 1 


Windows: 3 N., 3 S 


(m) Gas and electricity; 
2 gas irons near windows. 


Center 


Apr. 7 








Front 




4th 


7 




Windows: 3S 


Gas; 

2 gas irons near windows. 


Center 






Front 




4th 


6 


4 


Wmdows: 3 N 


in) Gas; 

2 gas irons near windows. 


Center 






Rear 


33; 
Mar. 29 


4th 
5th 


7 
18 


2 
3 


Windows: 4 N.. 4 S.; small 

disc exhaust fan, front and 

rear windows. 
Windows: 4 N., 4 S.; small 

disc exhaust fan, front and 

rear windows. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

1 gas iron. 

Gas; 

coal stoves; 

3 gas irons near windows. 


Center 

Rear 

Front 




3rd 


13 


3 


Wmdows: 4 N., 4 S.; small 
disc exhaust fan, front and 
rear windows. 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2 gas irons. 


Center 

Front 




2nd 


8 j 1 


Windows: 3 N., 1 side 


(o) Gas; 
coal stoves; 
1 gas iron. 


Center 

Rear 


34; 
Mar. 29 


1st 


11 2 i Windows: 1 N., 3 E., 2 W., 
1 doors: 1 N. 

1 \ 


(p) Gas and electricity: 
2 gas irons near windows. 


Center 

Rear 














Center 



i) 13 gas jets burning. 



(j) S^gas jets burning. 



(k) 4 gas jets burning. (/) 3 gas jots burning, 

(p) 6 electric lamps and 2 gas jets burning. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



KePOKT of lU'KEAU OF FACTOltY INSPECTION, 1911. 83 

SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, IQll — {Continued) , 



HUUIDITT. 



ResTTLTB or AiB Analtbis. 



Time. 



Out. 
doocB. 



In- 
doors. 



Out- 
doors. 



A. M. 


47 


61 


P.M. 


67 


62 


A. M. 


47 


60 


1p. M. 


57 


63 


A. M. 


50 


50 


P. M . 


52 


58 


A. M. 


50 


58 


P.M. 


52 


61 


A.M. 


50 


60 


P. M. 


52 


60 


A.M. 


50 


59 


P.M. 


52 


60 


A.M. 


50 


60 


P. M- 


53 


61 


A. M. 


50 


50 


P. M. 


52 


61 



In- 
doors. 



OLD TYPE-(C<mrft«W). 



Parts 
of CO, 


Parts 
of CO 


in 
10,000 

TOl- 


in 
10,000 
vol- 


omes. 


umes. 



Parts of 


Grams 
of oxidii- 

able 
organic 
matter in 

£tenof 
air. 


Grams 
ofsotids 

air. 


Num. 
berof 
colonieB 

of 
bacteria 

per 

titer of 

air. 


Num. 
berof 


in 
1.000.000 

TOl- 

umes. 


mou]('s 

pv 
titer of 

air. 



56 


18 


52 


23 


54 


20 


54 


27 


52 


10 


40 


10 


51 





62 


10 


53 


9 


53 


fill 


53 


tio 


52 


11 


56 





56 


14 


54 


9 


55 


12 



} - 



1.02 



0.60 



0.48 



0.50 



67.0 


3 


45.0 


1 


53.0 


1 


50.0 


1 



VERTED TENEMENT HOUSES. 



/A.M. 
I P.M. 



[A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P. M. 


A.M. 


\p. M. 



A. M. 

I P.M. 
[ A.M. 
IP. M. 
[a. M. 
IP. M. 



53 


63 


46 


56 


66 


47 


53 


60 


46 


56 


63 


47 


53 


68 


46 


56 


60 


47 


68 


65 


46 


55 


68 


47 


53 


74 


46 


65 


73 


47 


53 


70 


46 


55 


74 


47 


42 


58 


39 


48 


60 


46 


42 


56 


39 


48 


60 


46 


42 


57 


39 


48 


59 


46 


42 


55 


39 


48 


57 


46 


42 


54 


39 


48 


56 


46 


42 


56 


39 


48 


56 


46 


42 


55 


39 


48 


58 


46 


43 


69 


39 


48 


60 


46 


42 


60 


39 


48 


59 


46 


43 


• 


39 


48 


69 


46 



19 !l 

20 I 
16 

fil8 I 
tl2 \ 

19 |/ 

17 1 

20 1/ 



1.5 , 



50 


18 1 


53 


823 , 


49 


tl2 


54 


20 


49 


14 


49 


fil5 


48 


m 


49 


16 


49 


12 


49 


!io 


47 


48 


12 


46 


25 


48 


fil5 


48 


18 


49 


19 


• 


m 


49 


23 



t i 



+1 



+1 



1.15 



0.98 
1.40 



1.95 



1.12 



1.40 I 



55.0 



50.0 



48.0 



60.0 



50.0 



49.0 



61.0 



(ri) 1 gas jet and 1 electric lamp bumins. 
t Tr«je. •Not reported, JA. M. 



(1)1 gas 

:p.m7 



5 i 3 

I 
jet and 1 gas duster buraia?. (o) 1 gas jet burning* 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



84 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES IN CLOAK AND 







NUMBBR OF 

Emplotbss. 








Num- 
ber of 
buUd- 

Z 

date. 














Floor 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Means of rentilation. 


Means of illumination and heat- 
ing, and number and location 
of pressing irons. 


Place 
of test. 








LOFT BUILDINGS. 


CONVERTED, 


35; 
Mar. 24 


4th 


30 


6 


Windowi: 3 E.. 3 W 


Gas; 

ooal stoves; 

6 gas irons near windows. 


Rear 

Center 




3rd 


2 


4 


Wmdoiw:3R,3W 


Gas; 

coal stores. 


Rear 

Center 




2nd 


3 


.... 


Wndows: 3 E., 3 W 


Gas; 

coal stoves. 


R-r 

Center 


86; 
Mar. 24 


5th 


21 


7 


Windowa: 3 E.. 5 W 


coal'stoves; 

1 gas iron near window. 


Ftont 

Center 


37- 


4th 


9 




Windows: 3 W 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2 gas irons near center. 




Apr. '7 




Center 

• 




3nl 


10 


3 


Windows; 3 E., 3 W 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2 gas irons near windows 


Center 

• 




4th 
5th 


5 
6 


1 
3 


Windows:3W 

Wmdows: 3 W 


Gas; 

coal stoves; 

2 gas irons near center. 

Gas; 

coal stoves; 

1 gas iron. 


Center 






Center 


38- 


3rd 


8 


2 


Windows: IN 


Gas; 

gas stoves; 

2 gas irons. 


Front 


AT>;.22 




Rear 










CELLAR 


39; 
Apr. 3 







2 


Windows: 3 S.; 4 transoms N. (g) Gas; 
to street , 2 gas irons at windows. 


Front 

Rear 


40; 
Apr. 3 


.... 


11 


2 


Windows: 2 S.. 2 vault Ughte, 
front. 


(r) Gas; 

gas stoves: 

2 gas irons at windows. 


Rear at irons.. 
Front 


41; 
Apr. 3 




14 





Windows: lN.:lYauItIifffat. 
front; 5 waU flues to roof.. 


WGas; 

2 gas tfons at window 


Rear at irons. 

Front at 
seweis 



(9) 6 gas jets burning, (r) 2 gas mantles and 1 cluster boming. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 85 
SUIT FACTORIES IN NEW YORK CITY, Idll — (Concluded) . 





TRUPiaATURB 

(Fahrinreit). 


HUMIDnT. 






Rksults or .\iB Analtsu. 


















Grains 




Num- 














Parts 


Parts 


Paitsof 


of oxidis- 


Grams 


ber of 


Num- 


'hme. 










of CO, 


of CO 


ammeaaiL 


able 


of solids 


colonies 


ber of 




Out- 


In- 


Out. 


In- 


in 


in 


in 


organic 


in 


of 


moulds 




doors. 


doon. 




doon. 


10,000 


10.000 


1,000000 


matter in 


1.000,000 


bacteria 


per 












yol- 


vol- 


voW 


1,000.000 


Uteisof 


P* - 


Uterof 












umes. 


umes. 


um«8. 


Iitenof 
air. 


air. 


Uterof 
air. 


air. 



TENEMENT HOUSES- 



[ A. 11.1 
I 9. U., 

A.M 

i r. u.\ 

A.M.! 

F. M.\ 
I A. M.l 
I >*• M. 

U.-.J 

A.M. 
P.M. 
A.M. 
P.M. 

A. M. 
P. 
▲.M. 
P. M. 

P.M.I 
A. M. 
P.M. 
A.M. 
P.M. 

f A.M. 
[P.M. 



/A.M. 

A.M. 

\f. M. 



66 

63 

66 

63 

68 

65 

63 I 

65 



71 
70 , 



65 I 
65 
63 ' 



(Conduded). 




24 


62 


18 


27 


50 


16 


24 


• 


28 


27 


• 


29 


24 


49 


9 


27 


• 50 


9 


24 


• 


9 


27 


• 


10 


24 


48 


10 


27 


47 


9 


24 


• 


10 


27 


• 


10 


24 


55 


18 


27 


57 


$19 


24 


54 


12 


27 


55 


15 


• 


61 


19 


47 


56 


fl9 
tl2 


• 


61 


47 


56 


20 


• 


60 


21 


47 


58 


20 


• 


57 


16 


47 


58 


16 


• 


58 


9 



47 



47 



40 



+1 



2.04 



60.0 




2.00 



1.28 
0.90 

0.99 



58.0 


3 


61.0 


4 


48.0 


3 


45.0 


3 


50.0 


2 


51.0 


3 



SHOPS. 



A. M. 

P. M. 
A. M. 
P. M. 

A.M. 
P. M. 
A.M. 
P. M. 

A.M. 
P. M. 
A.M. 
P.M. 



35 
41 
35 
41 

35 
41 
35 
41 

35 
41 

35 I 
41 



68 


36 


52 


16 


66 


35 


53 


••12 


68 


36 


53 


14 


65 


35 


53 


18 


65 


36 


50 


25 


66 


35 


51 


23 


63 


36 


51 


18 


65 


35 


61 


14 


63 


36 


51 


16 


62 


35 


53 


19 


60 


36 


51 


12 


60 


35 


53 


13 




0.98 



1.90 



1.45 



69.0 I 



50.0 



42.0 



(«} 1 gas jet burning. 



»Noou. 



• Not reported. 



J A.M. 



:p. M. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SC New York State Depautment of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES 



No. 






NuMBVt or 
I Emplotbes. 


1 


of 


Date and weather. 


Proceasat 
place of test 


1 




1 Number of windows.'doors and akylighti. 


plant. 












1 

i 


1 Male. 


Female. 












MANUFACrrURE OF 


J 


May 9; clear 


Cuttini? 

Carroting. 

Shearing. 

Blowing 


! 1 

1 2 


25 


! Windows: 3 E., 6 S.. 6 W 






do 




do 




do 


2 


May 19; clear 


Sorting 


1 

50 




Windows: 20 






Cutting 

Shearing 

Carroting. 


6 
40 
8 


15 


do 




do 




So :::::::::.::::::::;:::; 


3 


June 29; clear 


Cutting 

Blowing and 
brushing. 


11 

7 


22 
2 


Windows and skylights: 4 






Windows: 12 E., 14 W 






4 


June 29; okmdy 


Cutting........ 

Carroting 


7 
6 


7 


Windows: 10.... 

Windows: 19 


5 


June 21; dear 


Carroting 

Cutting 


10 
20 


""s* 


Windows: 4 






Windows: 13; skylights: 6 





June 29; dear 


Carroting 


10 




Windows: 25; skylights: 10 


7 


July 20; dear 


Carroting 

Pouncing 

Blowing 


3 
11 
5 




do 






Windows: 21 




Windows: 38 










MANUFACTURE 






Forming 

Thrfine 


42 

10 
41 




Windows: 31; skyBghta: 19 

Windows: 8 front 1 side 




Fmkhingdst).. 


Windows: 24 side, 19 on eourt 






Finishing (2d)... 
Finishing (3d)... 


60 
22 




Windows: 17 N., Isa.Srear 




Windows: 27 


8 


June 29; dear 


Sharing 

Piniahing 


6 
19 




Windows: 10; doors: 2 






do 


9 


July 6; dear 


Trimming 

Finishing 


* "m 


46 


Windows: 27 






do 


10 


April 28; dear 


Finiiihing 


24 




Windows: 18 front 40 side, 12 rear 


11 


Septl6;doudy 


Finishing 


12 




Windows: 5 side, 8 rear 


12 


Sept 16; dear 


Finishing 


10 


9 


Windows: 14 side, 2 rear 


13 


SadL 30! dnr ! 


Pinwh?ng, 


40 


30 


Windows: 21 front 42 side, 16 rear. . . . 


14 ' S«pt 30; dear 


Finf^hin|f 


16 


1 


Windows: 9 front, 6 rear 


15 ADril21:eleu- 


Finiflhinff , , > 


16 


1 

10 


Windows: 9 front, 17 side, 4 rear 


16 


Sept. 7; clear i 


K " 1 

Finishing 

Trimminir 


14 


6 


Windows: 4 front, 5 side, 3 rear 






Windows: 3 front 3 rear 


17 


Sept7;cloudy 

Sept 7; cloudy I 


1 

Finishing 

Trimming i 

Trimming 


12 
1 
3 1 


9 

7 


Windows: 2 front, 3 rear; skylights: 3.. 
Windows: 2 front 2 rear 


13 





• Not reported. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau of Factory Taspectiox, 1911. 87 
IN FELT HAT INDUSTRY. 





Means or— 


Kind of floors. 
Wood 


\f achines and appliances in use. 


inumlnation.! 


Heating. 


Ventilation. 




HATTERS' F 
Electricity... 


UR. 
Stwm 1 

« 

a 

m 
m 
m 

m 
m 

Steam 

m 

m 
m 

From ovens 
Steam 

a 

Steam 

" 


Natural 

m 




• 


a 


a 


4 machines. 


« 


• 


m 




• 


Patent electric fan in 

window. 
Natural 


M 




u 


M 




• 


Exhaust fan 

36 inch exhaust fan.. 

Exhaust system 

Exhaust system 

Natural 


■ 


6 machines. 


• 
i^M 


Cement 

Wood ' 






3 brushing machines, 2 blowing machines 


tltm 


Wood i 

Cement 

m 




JSleetridty... 


« 


Carroting machines. 


(}a8 


• m 




m 


M 


* 




m 


^ 






^ 


» 







m 


a 


Wood 

Wood 


10 machines. 


• 


• 


11 blowing machines, 2 devils. 


OF HATS. 
Gas 


Natural 


18 forming machines. 


m 




9 dyeing Uibe. 


• 


« 




30 gas' irons, 29 gas maohines, 14 


• 




30 inch exhaust fan . . 
Natural 

a 




steamers. 
31 gas irons. 3 steamers. 


m 




12 gas ironS; 11 steamers, 20 gas ma- 
chines, 3 sugers. 
1 machine. 


Electricity . . . 


. 




Exhaust fan 

Natural 


. 




m 


. 




* 


a 


10 gas irons, 2 singers. 


Gas 


^ 


„ 


1 2 machines using gM. 


n 


^ 


„ 


1 drying oven, 1 steamer, 6 lathes, 1 


« 


a 


Wood and cement. . 
Cement 


singer. 
5 steamers, 5 lathes, 5 gas irons, 1 rss 


Electricity. 





sin^. 
4 drying oveos, 7 bakers, 15 gas irons, 


Gas . . 


1 
Wood 


2 singers, 20 lathes. 
1 steamer, 8 gas irons, 1 singer. 


a 


1 
1 « 


12 gas stoves, 1 steamer. 


■ 


a 


^ 


6 gas irons, 1 steamv , 1 steam boiler. 


a 


m 


m 




^ 




1 

« 


1 steamer, 8 gas irons. 


a 


m 


1 steamer, 1 steam boiler, 2 steam bakers. 


• 


' « 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES 



No. of 
p!ant. 



Process at 
place of test 



j Cutting . . . 
I Carrotin? . 
I Shearing . . 
j Blowing. . . 



Sorting... 

Cutting. . 
Shearing. 



Carroting.. 



Cutting 

Blowing and 
brushing. 



Cutting. . . 
Carroting.. 

Canroiing.. 
Cutting. . . 



Carroting. 

Carroting. 
Pouncing.. 
Blowing . . . 



Forming 

Dyeing 

Finishing (Ist). 
Finishing (2nd). 
Finishing (3rd) . 



8 I Shaving... 
' Finishing , . 

9 I Trimming. 
j Finishing. . 

JO , Finishing. . 

1 1 Finishing . . 

12 , Finishing.. 
J3 I Finishing.. 



14 Finishing. . 
Finishing . . 
Finishing.. 
Trimming. 
Finishing.. 
Trimming. 
Trimming . 



TlHPBRATURX 

(Fahrenheit). 



HuMiDirr. 



RisTTLn or 



Out- 
doors. 



In- 
doors. 



Out- In- 

doors, doors. 



60 
60 
6} 
63 


67 
63 
65 
65 


GO 
60 
60 
50 


70 


70 


70 


70 
73 


72 
72 


70 
70 


73 


79 


70 


78 

78 


SO 
79 


54 
52 


70 
70 


70 
70 


55 
55 


70 
70 


79 
76 


53 
53 


78 


81 


54 


69 
69 
69 


72 
72 
80 


55 
55 
55 



Parts of 
CO, in 
10.000 

YOl- 



55 
55 



60 



I Grams I 

Parts of oxi- I ri««»- 

Parts of of am- disable ! JtSS?. 
organic I of ^W- 

"^>^ 1.000.000 

1,000,000 ^^*" o' 
litenof 
air. I 



CO in 
10.000 
▼ol- 1,000.000 

YOl- 



62 





65 
68 


10 
12 


66 
60 


6 

7 


69 




61 

78 
80 


12 



90 
91 

80 
80 
80 


10 

' "22 
23 
21 


40 
40 


12 
9 


50 


7 


50 


8 


75 


15 


80 


17 


81 


16 


35 


10 


80 


16 


50 





14 

I 

e I 

19 I 
18 
12 ' 



+4 

4 

+3 



t 
3 
2 
2 

3 
3 

+2 



air. 



65 


10 




1 


3.50 


67 








0.89 


60 


7 






4.10 


m 








6.10 


60 


9 




t 


2.81 t 



MANUFACTURE OF 

25.7« 
20. 0|^ 
46.5" 
47.0*^ 



24 00 

2 i 2.17 I 35.00 

1 3.00 I 39.10 

I 

1 I 1.72 31 00 



3.00 
3.20 I 



2.50 I 
0.96 I 

2.50 I 
4.50 I 



1.89 
5 12 , 
5.30 I 



28.30 
25.30 



29.40 
19.00 

32.00 
45.10 

30.00 

39 00 
50.03 
31.10 



manufacture 



9.32 

'5!56 
3.40 
4.12 

0.84 
2.10 

1.10 

1.40 

3.20 ' 

2.70 ' 

I 
1.70 I 

0.96 

2.30 
3.20 
4.31 j 
52 I 
1.07 I 
0.42 
0.50 ' 



29 40 

"42!86 
31.80 
72.00 

18.30 
20.10 

36.40 

30.25 

45.10 

40.10 

20.10 

21.30 

30.00 
44 00 
80.20 
31.00 
31.05 
20.00 
17 60 



t Trace. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory InspectioXj 1911. 89 
IN FELT HAT INDUSTRY— (CowHwued). 



Air Analtsis. 



Num. 






berof 


Num- 




eolonies 


ber of 


Number of 


of 


moulds 


particles of dust 


bacteria 


perKter 


per liter of air. 


per liter 


of air. 




of air. 







I Milli- 



of 
mercury 

in 

1.000.000 

liters 

of air. 



HATTERS* 
15 ' 

7 ' 
10 
12 ' 

28 ' 



20 I 



FUR. 
4 

1 
2 
2 



1,700 (mostly hair). 



900... 
1.605. 



2e0 (hairs). 

166 (hairs) 
1,500 



1.900.. 
1.850.. 



1.005 (141 haire) . 
174 



2.103. 



174... 

z,m' 



OF HATS. 
14 I 



34 
31 
17 



8 
7 

15 
6 

13 
8 
4 

5 

4 
15 
5 
6 

4 
5 



1.203 (mostly hair).. 
1.300 (mostly hair) . . 
2.307 



424 (96 hairs). 
824 (37 haire). 



1.204 (54 haire). 
1.001 



1.007 (mostly hair) 

936 (85 hairs) 

960 

30 



125 

aoo 

no (70 haire). 
51 (5 haire).. 



30 (10 haire). 
32 



Fumes or odore. 



Remarks. 



3.0 
4.0 



2.6 



Acid. 
Acid. 



Naphtha. 



Windows open. 
Windows open. 
Windows open. 
Windows open. 

Bales of skins opened and sorted; 

windows open. 
Windows open. 
Machines connected with exhaust 

system; windows open. 
Windows open. 
I I 

t , Wmdowa open. 

. . [ Brushing machines connected with 

, exhaust fan. 



2 6 



Acid. 



t 

t I Skins.. 



8.0 
3.1 

15 

16 
4.0 



.Acid. 



.\cid. 
Acid 



Windows partly open. 

Floora dirty; windows partly open. 
Floore dirty. 

Drying ovens hooded . 

Drying ovens hooded. 
No exhaust system. 
4 gas jets buraing. 



( Djc 

t I Gas and oil . 
t do . 

t I Gas 



Oil 

Oil 

Oil and wax 
Oil and wax . 

Oil 



Windows open. 

Machine connected with exhaust fa a 
Machines connected with exhaust fana 

Windows open; dry and dusty: 

strong south wind. 
Singeing machines hooded; windows 

open. 
Twenty windows open. 

Windows open: floor dirty. 

Windows open; steamcfs not hooded. 

Fifteen windows partly open; strong 
wind. 

Wmdows open; floore dirty. 

Windows open; floors dirty. 

Paraffin Windows open; water-closeta filthy; 

place dirty. 
Windows open: place dirty. 



Oil 
Oil 



Oil 



Windows and skylinhta open; walU 

dirty. 
Windows partly open; steamer not 

hooded. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES 



INo. 

of i Date and weather, 
plant. 



Procen at 
place of test 



NuMBKB or 
Employsbs. 



Male. Female. 



Number of windows, doois and skyfights. 



Sept. 

Sept 

Sept 
Sept 
Sept 



Sept. 
Sept 
Sept 

Sept 
Sept 
Sept 



11; cloudy 

12; cloudy 

14: cloudy.... 
15; cloudy.... 
16; rainy 

16; clear 

21; clear 

22; clear 

26; dear 

28; clear 

4 and 5; clear 



Finishing. 
Finwhing and 
trimnung. 

Finishing... 
Soft hat finishing 
Soft |iat trim- 
ming. 
Finishmg 

Finishing 

Curling and trim- 
ming. 

Curling 

Pressing 

Finishing.... 

Finishing .... 

finishing 

Trimming. . . 
Finishing .... 

Finishing.. . . 

Finishing.. . . 

Finishing (1) 

Finishing (2) 

Blowing 

Pouncing 



24 
23 


15 
15 


15 
14 
6 


"**i8 


6 


5 


10 


6 


3 





3 
2 
18 


15 


7 




3 


4 


4 
13 


13 


2 


3 





6 


44 




20 




4 
12 

1 


6 



MANUFACTURE OF 

Windows: front. 18 side 

Windows: 7 front 

Windows: 8 front 6 rear 

do 

Windows: 9 side. 8 front. 1 on shaft. . . 

Windows: 7 side. 4 front 

Windows: 4 front 3 rear; skylights: 3. . 

Windows: 3 front 3 rear 

Windows: 3 side 

do 

Windows: front, 16 rear, 1 side 

Windows: side. 2 rear 

Windows: 3 front, 10 side. 4 rear 

Windows: 1 front. 11 side 

Windows: 1 front 11 side; roof-seutUes:l 

Windows: 4 front, 4 rear 

Windows: 5 front. 14 side, 2 rear; sky- 
lights: 1. 
Windows: 9 E.. 9 S.; skylights: 4 

Windows: 4 N., 5 S., 11 W 

Windows: 2; doors: 1 

Windows: 7 N.. 4 E.. 6 S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 91 
IN FELT HAT INDUSTRY— (Concluded). 



T Umntn^tinn ■ I HcfttlllS. 



Ventilation. 



Kindof floon. 



HATS -(CondwM). 

CleotricHy... Steam Natural ] Wood. 



Om.. 
Gat.. 



1 14-inch diBO fan.... I 

Natural \ 

i 



. ' 30 inch exhaust fan. . ' 



48 inch exhaust fan . 



Maohinfli and applianoet m om. 



12 finWrfng potB, 1 iteanur. 



14 lathes, 1 steamer. 1 , 
5 gas itonen, 1 steamer. 



2 gas ovens, 6 lathes. 2 steam pots. 

1 steamer. 

1 gas maohin^ 2 baken. 



3bakers.S 
loTen. 
17 lathes. 3 



1 steamer, 1 baker, 8 gas irons, 1 singer. 

1 steamer, 3 l^pkers, 1 steam oven. 

2 steam tables. 8 gas irons. 

7 ^as irone rs, 1 steam boiler. 13 gas hand 

irons, 1 steamer, 1 singer, 1 baker. 
1 steam boiler, 3 gas irons, 1 steamer, 1 

baker. 
4 bakers, 1 rim curler. 6 gas iron% 1 

steamer. 1 rim pounoer. 
24 gas ironing maohines, 18 steam pv 
' sers. 8 nm pfesscrs. 
17 lathes, 28 steam pressen, 4 steam 

tables, 5 pouncing machines. 

4 poundng machines. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



92 New York State Department of Labor. 

RESULTS OF AIR ANALYSES 



No. of 
plant 



Prooenat 
place of test 



TniPKRATxmi 
(Fahbbnhkit). 



I 



HuioDXTr. 



Out- 
doors. 



In- 
doors. 



Out. 
doors. 



Finishing ! 

Finishing and 
trimming. 

Finishing 

Soft hat finishing 
Soft hat trimming 



Finishing. 
Finishing. 



Curling and 
trimming. 

Curling 

Pressing 

Fmishing 



Finishing., 
Finishing. 



Trimming 

Finishing 

Finishing 

Finishing 

Finishing (1) — 



Finishing (2).... 

Blowing 

Pouncing 



82 
83 
73 

n 

80 

78 

84 
80 
85 

78 

84 

74 
79 



84 I 
82 



In- 
doors. 



78 1 

87 1 
79 

79 I 

50 : 

72 I 

00 

90 I 
90 , 
90 ' 

50 I 

60 

i 
53 J 

53 I 

50 ' 

30 

40 

40 
43 , 
42 



RlBULTSOr 









GnuDi 






Parts 


ofoxi- 


Parti of 


Parts of 


of am- 


disable 


CO, in 


CO in 


monia 


organic 


10.000 


10.000 


m 


matter 


vol- 


vol- 


l.OOOXKX) 


in 


umes. 


umes. 


1.000.000 






umes. 


litenof 
air. 



Grams 
of solids 

in 

1.000000 

liters of 

air. 



MANUFACTURE OF 



83 
85 




75 
79 
60 


15 
16 
9 


68 


14 


74 


16 


70 


14 


85 
80 
85 


16 
19 
21 


80 


15 


60 


11 


70 


9 


72 


14 


55 


9 


40 


14 


70 


22 


75 
70 
69 


20 
9 
11 



-+1 

3 

2 
44 
+4 



1.80 
3.40 

2.30 
3.00 
0.96 

1.23 

1.96 

0.85 

1.65 
0.96 
3.40 

1.40 

0.72 

0.96 

1.82 

0.75 

1.85 

3.20 

4.40 
5.20 
5.50 



35.00 
42.00 

35.60 
32.10 
20.06 

24.80 

10.40 

24.80 

32.40 
20.00 
47.00 

41.30 

20.01 

24.50 

27.50 

18.40 

31.30 

55.00 

40.40 
29.70 
51.40 



•Not reported. •• Not determined. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Kepobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 93 
IN FELT HAT INDUSTRY— {Concluded), 



An Amaltsb. 



Num- 
b«of 
eoknues 

of 
btcteru 
per liter 
of air. 



Num- 
ber of 
moulds 
perfiter 
of air. 



Number of 
particles oi dust 
per litor of air. 



Milli- 
grams 
of 



J.OOOOOO 
liters 
of air. 



Fumes or odois. 



Remarks. 



EATS -(Cimdudtd). 



8 
17 




16 
16 
8 




5 




20 




8 
17 
5 




27 




9 




6 




17 




15 




6 





11 




14 




18 
16 
9 





40 

80 (50 hairs) 

256 (35 hairs) 

200 




•• 




IW) 




180 (14 hairs) 

50 




85 






1,100. 
760... 
120... 



540 

610 

114 

455 

1.100 (90 haira). 



800 

•(172 haira) 

1,400 (fine hairs).... 



Fuaffin 

Paraffin 

Paraffin 

Paraffin 

Oil and wax 

Oil and wax 

Oil and wax 

Oil and wax 

Oil and wax..., 
Pkraffin and oil. 
FttfaffinandoiL 



Windows open. 
Floor dirty. 

Windows open; singer hooded. 
Windows open. 
Windows open. 

Windows open; steam pots without 

hoods. 
Windows and skylights open; floors 

splintved. 
Windows open. 
Windows open. 
Windows opML 

Windows open: singers not hooded; 
3les hooded. 



steam tebles 
Windows open; 



not hooded. 



Windows open; steamer hooded: 
seventy thousand cubic feet o! 
air per hour entering windows. 

Windows open; gas irons not hooded; 
walls and floors dustv. 

Windows open; floors dirty. 

Windows open; baker not hooded. 

Windows partly open; st«amer not 
hooded; rim pouncer not hooded. 

Floor dirty; nm pressers not con- 
nected with exhaust system. 

Floors dirty. 

Floors dirty. 

Machines not connected with exhaust 
systein. 



t Trace. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



94 New Yo]?k State Department of Labor. 

III. 
KEPOKT OF THE TU:NNEL INSPECTOR. 
Hon. John Williams, 

Commissioner of Labor, Albany, N. Y. 

Sib: I hereby submit my annual report as tunnel inspector 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1911. 

Differing from previous years, the work was spread through the 
State, necessitating much traveling, and was much heavier than 
usual. In so far as was possible, a visit was made to each tunnel 
once in three months, but due to the large number of tunnels and 
their scattered location, all were not visited with this regularity. 
Fifty-nine tunnels were in the course of construction, together 
with five caisson contracts, having 184 pneumatic caissons. Two 
of the fifty-nine tunnels were operated in sections under pneu- 
matic pressure, but the pressure was very light, seldom reaching 
fifteen pounds to the square inch above normal, and yet, in spite 
of all medical examinations and precautions, two reported deaths, 
due directly to air pressure, were received from one of these 
tunnels. These were extraordinary cases, yet they show the 
danger of the work, at even so low a pressure. 

All of the pneumatic caisson work was divided between two 
contracting firms who make a specialty of this class of work. 
Realizing the dangers of the work, every perceivable precaution 
was taken, and very few accidents were reported from this class 
of work. 

Aside from the general inspection of locks, valves, etc., the main 
feature in this work is the hours of labor in air pressure. Work 
in caissons and work in tunnels in air pressure are two entirely 
different matters. In the former, due to the small air chamber, 
the fluctuations in pressure are great — quite frequently the pres- 
sure drops in a few seconds. This does not occur so rapidly in 
tunnels, for there the air chamber is much larger. In caissons, 
due to the small space and small air chamber, the temperature is 
frequently high and invariably much higher than in tunnels car- 
ried on under air pressure. For these reasons, mainly, the work in 
pneumatic caissons is carried on under shorter hours than set 
down by the State laws, which were framed with special regard to 
tunnel work under air pressure. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of JJuufiAti of Factoky Inspection, 1911. 95 

In the excavation of tunnels, three general methods were em- 
ployed, the top heading and bench method prevailing; several 
contractors holing through the entire tunnel with a top heading 
and excavating the bench afterwards. In one tunnel, the bottom 
drift and stoping method was employed. This last method re- 
sembles the manner of excavation used in the Alpine tunnels of 
Europe and caused considerable controversy among American 
engineers. These methods, of course, were the outcome of several 
reasons, mainly cost and the nature of the ground, but of the 
three methods, holing through the tunnel with a top heading and 
then taking out the bench, is, in my opinion, the safest for the 
workers. All other conditions being equal, loose rock falling in 
a small heading will actually not cause as much injury as falling 
through a larger distance and furthermore, can be more easily 
detected in a small top heading. So the final roof or the tunnel 
will be more solid and less liable to falling rock when the bench 
is taken out. Furthermore, after the top headings are holed 
through, excellent natural ventilation is obtained while the remain- 
ing excavation of the bench is carried on. 

The majority of the heavy tunnel work is along the route of the 
CatskiU Aqueduct for the. New York City water supply. The 
most interesting and heaviest piece of tunnel work is that section 
known as the Hudson River Syphon, the tunnel crossing under 
the Hudson River at Storm King mountain. 

This tunnel is carried on from the two deepest shafts in the 
State. These shafts are located on the east and west banks of 
the river at this point and are 1,140 feet deep. The rock in the 
tunnel and also in the shafts at this depth is of a peculiar char- 
acter. Although apparently solid and firm, it will, without notice, 
shoot out from the roof and sides of the tunnel with a popping 
noise like a gun shot, making a most dangerous place to work in. 
This has been overcome by putting in steel roof and sides with 
sheet steel lagging and carried as near to the heading as possible. 
This steel timbering, as it is called, will remain when the txmnel is 
being lined with concrete, differing from the wood timbering in 
that respect, and making work safer while the concreting is going 
on. At this depth several seams of water, under an enormous 
pressure, were encountered. Work in the headings had to be 
suspended because of this water on several occasions. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 New York State Department of Labor. 

A concrete bulkhead was built about 100 yards from the heading 
with an opening large enough to allow a muck car to pass through. 
A large iron door was fastened to the bulkhead with proper re- 
inforcing bracers, so that in the event of a serious inrush of 
water, the workers could find safety behind the bulkhead and only 
that part of the tunnel between the bulkhead and the heading 
rould be flooded. A special power plant had to be erected in 
i)rder to overcome these large seams of water. These seams were 
grouted by means of hydraulic pressure, averaging 750 pounds to 
the square inch. 

In accordance with your ruling at the beginning of this year, 
subway construction in New York City was regarded as tunnel 
construction and duly inspected. This class of work at present 
is quite large, employing on an average of 3,000 men, but will be 
very much larger during the coming year. Here, I find the 
greatest number of accidents occur from falling objects in general 
— tipping buckets, falling timbers, falling tools, etc. 

With a view to eliminating such accidents, as far as possible, 
I have ordered proper coverings and properly guarded work places, 
and orders along that general line, and in several cases, safety 
hooks where open hooks were in use. This latter is of paramount 
importance in subway work, and I would suggest an addition to 
our rules requiring that no open hooks shall be used with a bucket 
in hoisting, safety hooks only to be employed. This is also abso- 
lutely necessary in shaft sinking, and I have frequently seen open 
hooks in use in this kind of work. 

Sanitation, especially in subway work, is another factor. In 
my opinion, an article covering dry closets should also be added 
to our existing laws. 

During the past year, work was carried on from 35 shafts, 
where the signals for hoisting and lowering of cages differed with 
each contract. During the coming year, shaft work will be even 
more extensive and a uniform code of signals, in my opinion, is 
absolutely necessary. A committee appointed by the American 
Mining Congress at Denver, Col., in November, 1906, to frame 
uniform mining laws for the prevention of mine accidents, has a 
rule in their laws containing a uniform signal code. I would 
suggest the adoption of this code, permitting special signals in 
addition to those in the code to be used, providing they do not in- 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bueeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 97 

terfere with it in any way — to wit: One bell, hoist (when engine 
is at r^t) ; one bell, stop (when engine is in motion) ; two bells, 
lower; three bells, men on cage about to ascend or descend. 
. Ladder-ways in shafts are a subject which is not directly 
touched upon in our laws. In all our shafts we have ladder-ways 
after the cages are put in and the headings are turned, but while 
sinking the shaft, I doubt whether or not they can be ordered, and 
when the shaft is several hundred feet in depth (as all new shafts 
in New York City will be during the coming year) it is absolutely 
essential that laddei>ways be provided and a rule should be in- 
serted to this effect. According to a Legislative Act which went 
into effect October 1st, 1910, all accidents occurring on construc- 
tion or engineering work of any kind, should be reported to the 
Department, and a record of such accidents reported shall be kept 
by the employer in his office, in form prescribed by the Commis- 
sioner of Labor. 

I would suggest that an extra column be added to the sample 
heading furnished to employers, headed: "Cause of Accidents.'' 
When inspecting the book in an employer's office, if this column 
were added, it would aid considerably in making changes and 
giving orders, with the object in view of lessening accidents of a 
like nature. 

Due to the new accident law, the number of accidents is much 
greater than in any years past. Formerly, only those accidents 
which caused cessation of work for five hours or more, were 
reported, so this year, 3,289 accidents, of which 40 were fatal, 
were reported. In so far as was possible, all fatalities were inves- 
tigated immediately after receipt of such information. 

During the year 65 inspections and 119 observations were made. 
The number of men employed in this class of constniction work, 
by quarters, was as follows: First quarter, 8,931 ; second 'quarter, 
8,498'; third quarter, 8,425; fourth quarter, 8,fi20. 

It pleases me to state that most of the contractors were very 
willing to abide by all suggestions made, and to render whatever 
aid they could to assist me in my inspection. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Gustav Werxer, 

Tunnel Inspector. 
4 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



98 



New York State Department of Labor. 



STATISTICS OP TUNNELS INSPECJTED, 1911. 



LoCinON AMD KlMD 

or WoBX. 



Buffalo. 

Pipe line 

Water conduit 

Water intake 



Railnwd. 



Canaan. 



KingtUm. 
Sewer 

Lodbporl 
Water conduit 



New York City. 
Building foundations. . 

Building foundations. . 

Building foundations. . 

Buildmg foundations. . 
Building foundations. . 
Drain 



Gas main (Bronx and 
Queens) 



Railroad. 



Railroad (B'klyn Borough) . 
Railroad (B'klyn Borough) . 
Railroad (B'klyn Borough) . 
Railroad (B'klyn Borough). 



Shaft and station 

Shaft and statbn 

Niagara FaUt. 



Sewer. 



Sewer. 



RocKe^er. 



Sewer. 
Total. 



Yonkeri. 



Owner. 



Contractor or constructor. 



CMtyof Buffak). 
City of Buffalo. 
City of Buffalo. 



Boston and Albany 
R.R.CO 



City of New York... 

SUteofNewYork.. 

Emigrant Savings Bk. 

James Butler 

United Fire Co.'s.... 

Manhattan Trust Co. 

F. W. Woolworth.... 

Ollege of City of 

New York 



Astoria Light, Heat 
and Power (^o . . . . 

Hudson and Manhat- 
tan R. R. Co 

Cityof New York... 

Cityof Now York... 

Cityof New York... 

City of New York... 

Cityof New York... 
Cityof Nem York... 



City of Niagara Falls 
Cityof Niagara Falls 



City of Rochester.... 
Co. of Westchester.. 



Eastern Concrete Steel Co. . 

Buffalo Dredging Co 

Buffalo Dredging Co 



I. L. McCord. 



King, Rice & Ganey. 



Larkin & Sangster. , 



O'Rourke Engineering Con- 
tracting Co 

O'Hourke Engineering Con- 



0' 



ng Con- 



Tl ,.,.,u. 

Tin' i oundation Co 

ThoB. S. Crimmins Cont'g Co 



Jacobs & Da vies. 



Degnon Contracting Co 

Bradlcv Contracting Co 

E. E. Smith Contracting Co. . 

Smith, Scott & Co 

Tide Water Building Co. & T. 
B. Bryson 

Rapid Transit Subway CJon- 
struction Co 

Rapid Transit Subway Con- 
struction (^ 



Reed &. Coddington. 
R«ed & Coddington. 



Ripton & Murphy. 






NuiaiB ( 



r 

5z: 



WoBK Othbr tban Nbw York Citt Aqubduct. 



American Pipe and Construc- 
tion Co 



Orange County. 
N" y Windsor and Cornwall 

Oron^ & Duieheu CounHei. 
Cornwall and Storm King. . 

Putnam County. 

PhUlipstown 

'^uillipetown 



N«w York Citt AQuinuor. 

Mason k Hanger Co. 



Cityof New York... 
City of New York... 



City of New York. 
Cityof New York. 



T. A. Gillespie Co. 



B. Barker & J. G. Shaw. 
R. K. Everett 4 Co 



1 
a\ 

1 

•21 

•31 

•52 
•11 



208 



190 
200 . 



30 

88 



18 

IS 

60 
10 . 
60 

25 

450 

100 . 
976 
1,300 
293 

300 

60 . 

25 . 

40 
30 . 

75 



75 



4,500 



913! 

238 
238 



27 



• Caissons. 

t Average number where more than one return b the year was made. 

a Part of tunnel being driven under air pressure. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



99 



STATISTICS OP TUNNELS INSPECTED. 1911— (Concluded), 



L0C4TIOH AifD Kind 
or WoBX. 



OwiMT. 



Contraotor or eoMtnictor. 



r 



it 

r 



NuifBiE or— 



N»w York Cmr Aqusduct — (Condudtd), 



iCo.—iCcmdudti). 

PhiOiiatoini 

" iVallv 



Pubtamand Dutektu Coun- 

tie$. 

Fhillipttoim and Stonn 

King 



UUler Covniy. 

Marbfetown 

BCvbietown, New Palis.. . 

NewPfchi 

New Pahs 

New Palts, Gardenier 



WutduMkr CmaUi/. 

MtPlesnnt 

lit Pleaaant-Greenburg . . 
New Castlfr-Mt Pleasant. 

Yonkew 

Yonkew 

Yorictown 

Yorktown 

Yofkluwu 



Total.... 
QnadTotel. 



aty of New York... 
Ctt7ofNewYock... 



City of New York. 



City of New York... 
City of New York. . . 
City of New York... 
City of New York... 
City of New York. . . 



CttyofNewYork.. 
City of New York.. 
City of New York.. 
City of New York.. 
City of New York.. 
City of New York. . 
City of New York. . 
City of New York.. 



Hieka, Johiaon Co. . . . 
Clerefauid Tunnel Co. 



DraTO Contracting Co. 



H. 8. Eerbangh, Ine 

T. A. QillenMe Co 

Carpenter ft Bozley. ... 

James FiUdngton 

Degnon Contracting Co. , 



H. S. Kerbauiii, Ino 

Htteburgh Contracting Co. . 

Rinehart & Damis 

Dravo Contracting Co 

Geo. W. Jackaon. Ino 

Chaa. W. Blakedee A Sons. . 
Bradley Contracting Co. . . . . 
Qlyndon Contracting Co. . . . 



1 
3 
8 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 

35 

243 



145 
85 



88 



15 

575 

38 

30 

1.000 



103 
352 
156 
553 
30 
233 
111 



0.480 



30 
66 



S 
8 
7 
1 
8 
5 
6 
7 

82 

110 



t Average number where more than one return in the year was made. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



100 New York State Department of Labor. 

IV. 
EEPOET OF THE MINE INSPECTOR. 
Hon. John Williams: 

Commissioner of Labor, Albany, N. Y. 

Sir: I beg to report to you on the conditions in mines and 
quarries of the State and also in the factories where the products 
of these mines and quarries are treated. My term of office as 
mine inspector covers only that part of the present fiscal year from 
May 10 to October 1. 

During the year a total of 122 mines and quarries were in- 
spect^ed, 107 by myself and the remainder by my predecessor.* 
In addition, visits to ascertain whether orders had been complied 
with nimibered 38 for the year, all of which constituted a part of 
my work. 

The table given below shows the prevailing causes of accidents 
that it has been my duty to point out to operators and mine offi- 
cials on my visits of inspection. The largest number of orders 
issued to remedy certain defects does not prove that such defect, 
neglect, or practice is the greatest cause of accidents, but merely 
shows the number of operators that failed to comply with the 
mining law regarding that particular condition or practice. 

NxTMBBB or Orobbs 
Ibsubd bt — 



Present Former. 

SuBncr. inspector, inspeotor. Total. 

Payment of wages weekly to employees 18 18 

Payment of wages in cash 4 4 

Additional outlets to mine 3 3 6 

Explosives, storage 120 2 122 

Explosives, thawing outfits 40 40 

Designation of special blasters 10 10 

Metal temping rods 12 1 18 

Sjrstem of warning when blasting 2 2 

Improvement of traveling ways 4 4 

Inspection of steam boilers 85 85 

Keeping record of accidents 11 11 

Reporting aocidepts 10 10 

Sanitary closets 9 9 

Washrooms 15 15. 

Supply and receptacles for drinking water 11 11 

Ventilation 2 13 

Shaft timbering 1 1 

Headings 2 2 

Various dangerous practices 39 2 41 

t398 t9 407 

* In addition, 84 factories or mills in connection with mines and quarries were Inspeot^ds 
71 by myself. 

t In addition, 288 orders to guard machinenr in factories were issued. 
t. In addition, 3 orders to guard machinery in factories were issued. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repoet op Bueeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 101 

The greatest number of aoeidents were due to placing and 
allowing men to work in the mines and quarries in places where 
they were liable to receive injuries, without due care and proper 
supervision over them by foremen whose duty it should be to see 
that all places are fit for men to work in, just as it is their duty 
to see that so much tonnage is hoisted or manufactured. The 
employees also have contributed their share through n^ligence 
and disregard of orders of foremen and rules of mine and mining. 
Where the operators and foremen strictly enforce rules, accidents 
are rare. There is one great disadvantage for the operator in 
this state, compared with those of other states and European 
countries, namely, that the mining law of the state and the special 
rules prescribed by the Commissioner of Labor are binding only 
on the employer, while the employee breaks the same with im- 
punity. Dangerous practices will creep into mines, and the only 
remedy the operator has is to dismiss offending employees. These 
are a few of the offenses that, in my opinion, should be punishable 
by fines in preference to dismissal : 

1. Riding on loaded skip or on bail of skip. 

2. PoBsessing or usikig metal tamping bar. 

3. Thawing dynamite with other than proper thawing outfit. 

4. Leaving loaded or unexploded charges in holes without notifying foreman 
of incoming shift. 

5. Neglecting to examine ground for unexploded or partially exploded 
charges before drilling is resumed. 

6. Storing caps or exploders with dynamite or powder, 

7. Blasting when not specially designated as blaster, 

8. Signalling when not authorized, 

9. Crimping caps near explosives with teeth or with any tool other than 
proper crimper. 

10. Removing hand rails or guards from machinery or neglecting to replace 
after repairs. 



Eighteen corporations were ordered to pay wages of their em- 
ployees weekly. Four corporations were ordered to pay their 
employees in cash and without any store deductions. 

Two mines were ordered to provide more than one outlet, for 
safety as well as for better ventilation. On the whole, ventilation 
in all mines was good. 

Ample timber was supplied to all mines, but I found some 
underground foremen somewhat lax in their inspection of re- 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



102 New York State Depabtment of Labob. 

timbering after blasts and aba in inspecting the headings after 
the steam drillers and roofmen. They are inclined to forget that 
they are always responsible to see that the work is properly done. 

Owing to the fact that the state has no explosive law, I found 
explosives often stored in unsuitable buildings and locations — 
some close to dwellings, boiler houses and shaftheads. Much of 
this has already been remedied. Many have concrete buildings 
erected at safe distances from men and are comparatively safe 
even should the contents explode. Since previous inspection one 
magazine in Jefferson County was fired at with a rifle, and three 
bullets penetrated the outer door of ^/4-inch iron and half way 
through the 3-inch hard wood lining. 

There are a variety of crude and dangerous ways U5ed to thaw 
dynamite. Some use a coal or wood stoye. Some use live steam ; 
some use double vessels, and those in some cases put over a fire. 
There is some difiiculty in recommending the same system to 
large and to small users of dynamite. I consider the water heater 
system the safest means for thawing large quantities. 

A considerable number of small operators were negligent in 
having their boilers inspected and also in sending to the Depart- 
ment a copy of the inspection reports. Some, because their boilers 
were in bad condition, and they had no desire to make it knovm. 

Regarding blasting and blasters, I found much irregularity, 
especially among the smaller operators. Time was taken to ob- 
serve their methods of blasting and to correct some old blasters 
who still think that, having escaped with their lives for many 
years, it is safe to tamp charges of dynamite with a crowbar, iron 
bolt and hammer, or a steam pipe with wooden plug in the end 
of it and a few nails driven in that to keep it from wearing. It 
is hard to convince them, and, as pointed out to the employer, it 
is often best to appoint a blaster in place of such. It is almost 
impossible to change the habits of an old blaster. I believe every 
operator should post at his mine or quarry the names of the 
" specially designated blasters " in his employ, and that these 
persons be first approved of by the mine inspector as competent 
The publication and free circulation of handbooks of instructions 
relative to storage and handling of explosives and exploders and 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory InspeotioiTj 1911. 103 

blasting, will, I have no doubt, help to educate the men and pre- 
vent many accidents. 

Regarding the reporting of accidents, I found a great tendency 
among the amaller operators to report only serious accidents. 

Many operators of mines are improving their traveling ways 
to mines, particularly those with inclined shafts, by replacing 
ladders with stairs and handrails and, where practical, running 
the pathway through disused chambers. 

There are some dangerous conditions in mines arising from 
possibility of skips or cars running away on inclines and killing 
men employed on mine floor. These conditions are being rectified 
by automatic stop blocks and by advancing shafts below working 
floors, thereby forming a pocket for possible runaway skips. 

I found no boys under sixteen years of age working in mines. 

Considerable progress has been made in providing sanitary 
closets and washrooms for the men. Some operators are very 
doubtful whether washrooms would be appreciated. Why not 
educate the men? At the mine of the Hudson Iron Company, 
Fort Montgomery, the miners can be seen every evening rushing 
for the washroom. At this mine, lockers are provided for the 
men. The building is steam heated and equipped with sinks and 
hot and cold water. In an adjoining room is a shower bath. 

Machinery in factories in connection with mines and quarries 
was not well guarded, with tendency to put up frail guards and 
handrails, flimsy wooden brackets instead of firm iron bands or 
sut)stantial box covers for gears. 

I received every facility for inspecting all mines, quarries and 
factories from operators and their agents, and my recommenda- 
tions were generally complied with immediately. 
Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) William W. Jones, 

Mine Inspector. 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



V. 

STATISTICAL TABLES. 

Prepared bt the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

I. Work of deputy factory inspectors. 
II-IV. Orders and compliances. 
V. Prosecutions. 
VI. Complaints. 
VII. Accidents in factories, etc.: number, age and sex of persons injured, by 

industries. 
Vin. Accidents in factories, etc.: particulars of fatal accidents. 
IX. Accidents in factories, etc.: part of person injured and nature of injury, by 

causes. 
X. Accidents in factories, etc.: extent of injury, by causes. 
XT. Accidents in factories, etc.: nature of permanent injuries, by causes. 
XII. Children's employment certificates. 

XIII. Statistics of factories inspected: by counties. 

XIV. Statistics of factories inspected: by counties and localities. 

XV. Statistics of factories inspected in first and second-class cities: by industries. 
XVI. Statistics of factories inspected: by industries. 
XVII. Statistics of mines and quarries inspocted. 

[105] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



106 Xew York State Department of Labor. 

table l— monthly summary of work 



Items. 


Fiscal Year Octobbb 1. 


Oct, 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Regular inspections: 

Factonea in separate buildings 


890 

2.035 

101 

220 


721 

1,677 

71 

1,447 

5 

2 
31 


550 

2,446 

86 

1,575 

...... 

22 

1,887 


533 

2,184 
258 
137 

6 

1 
3,088 


333 


Tenant factories 


1,927 


Laundries 


112 


Bakeries 

Mines and quarries 


73 


Tunnel workings 


4 

5 
66 


4 


Tenant factory buildings 

Tenement buildings (licensed) 


3 
3,443 






Total.... 


3,321 


3,954 


6,577 


6.207 


5,895 






Special inspections (factories, laundries, bakeries). 


79 


115 


103 


490 


78 


Investigations: 

Applications for license 


104 

49 

3.363 

186 


165 

93 

2,889 

234 


140 

229 

2,143 

60 


118 

64 

4,119 

24 


166 


Complaints ... . 


42 


Compliances (number of establishments) 

On special orders ... . 


4.970 
24 






Total 


3,702 


3,381 


2,572 


4.325 


5,202 


Observations: 

Tenement buildings (unlicensed) 


59 
5 


55 
10 


115 
6 


187 
10 


268 


Tunnel 'workings 


12 






Total 


64 


65 


121 


197 


280 


Tagging to stop work: 

Goods in tenements (§ 100) 


12 
29 


15 
53 

5 


8 
26 

3 


1 
38 




Goods in tenant factories (§ 95) 


21 


Articles in bakeries (§1 14) 










Scaffolding (§ 19) 












Total 


41 


73 


37 


39 


21 






Prosecutions begim* 


62 


72 


40 


11 


7 







♦ See Table V. 



t Includes 21,929 first and 13,531 subsequent visits 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 107 



OF DEPUTY FACTORY INSPECTORS. 



1910. TO September 30. 1911. 






























Total, 
1910. 


















Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total 




800 


922 


1.314 


1,818 


1.101 


1,260 


1.491 


11.733 


12,178 


2.676 


3,084 


3.069 


2,820 


1.265 


1.188 


1,910 


26.281 


25,847 


259 


286 


333 


341 


184 


189 


263 


2.483 


2,320 


67 


152 


268 


299 


228 


280 


260 


4,996 


4,166 




15 


20 


37 


29 


18 


9 


128 


84 


6 


5 


3 


12 


1 


6 


11 


74 


46 


6 


35 


20 


12 


10 


6 


20 


141 


160 


4.099 


436 


214 


96 


33 


2 


7 


13,402 


12.036 


7.903 


4.935 


5,241 


5,435 


2,851 


2,948 


3.971 


59.238 


66,816 


131 


361 


265 


104 


105 


122 


120 


2.063 


1.368 


276 


238 


115 


146 


104 


60 


130 


1,761 


1.836 


59 


84 


85 


38 


92 


48 


37 


920 


938 


4.623 


3.737 


4.372 


3.321 


2.929 


3.888 


3,783 


t44,137 


t35,460 


61 


80 


186 


286 


189 


112 


217 


1.659 


2.967 


6,018 


4.139 


4.758 


3.791 


3.314 


4.108 


4.167 


48.477 


41.200 


309 


133 


136 


166 


47 


66 


146 


1.687 


2.125 


16 


9 


17 


4 


7 


11 


11 


118 


76 


325 


142 


163 


170 


64 


77 


157 


1.806 


2.200 


12 


13 




8 




6 


4 


78 


126 


33 


69 


15 


16 


26 




41 


357 


469 






16 


36 


10 






61 

8 


191 


45 


72 


31 


69 


36 


5 


46 


604 


786 


13 


37 


22 


19 


33 


43 


64 


413 


610 



t Includefl 28,046 first and 16.092 subsequent visits. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



108 New York State Department of Labob. 

TABLE n.— ORDERS ISSUED AFTER INSPECTION UNDER GENERAL 



Subject or Obdkbs. 
[With reference to section of Labor Law violated.] 



New York 
City. 



Re- 
mainder 
of the 
State. 



I. Admixtstration. 

Accidents, record of, to be kept (§87) 

Accidents to be reported (§ 87) 

Hours, schedule of, to be poeted (J 77) 

Law to be posted (J 68) 

Noonday meals, permit changing period of, to be obtained and posted (( 89) 
Register of children employed to be kept ($76) 



Total — Administration. 



Lightingff. 



II. Sanitation and Safett. 



Dressing rooms to be lighted (§88) 

Elevator shafts to be lighted (§ § 79, 94). . 
Halls and stairs to be lighted (S§ 81. 94). 

Washrooms to be lighted (J 88) 

Water closets to be lighted (5 J 88. 94).. . . 
Work rooms to be lighted (§81) 



Ventilation and overcrowding . 



Air space of 250 cubic feet for each employee between 6 a. m. and 6 

p. m. to be provided (§ 85) 

Veotilation, proper and sufficient means of. to be provided (§§ 86, 94). 



Time allowed for meals. 



Lunch at 6 p. m.. 20 minutes to be allowed for ($ 89) . 
Noonday meal. 60 minutes to be allowed for (§ 89) . . . 



332 

320 

7.067 

16,157 

2,036 

275 



26,187 



1.431 



857 



550 
24 



319 



30 
289 



24.824 



360 
3.986 

S,S90 



171 



Cleanliness and sanitary conveniences 

Air shafts, cellars and yards to be cleaned 

Dressing rooms 

Cleaning to be done and repairs to he made (§ 88) 

Dressing room to be separated from water closet (§ 88) 

Dressing room to be provided for females (§ 88) 

Lock to be provided for dressing room (§ 88) 

Screens and doors to be provided (§ 88) 

Signs to be provided on dressing rooms (§ 88) 

Storage in dressing rooms forbidden (§ 88) 

Ventilation to be provided (§ 88) , 

Halls and stairs , 

Cleaning to be done (5§ 6£, 94) 

Painting or whitewashing to be done (§§ OS, 94) 

Properly screen stairs (§§ 80, 94) 

Plumbing and drainage to be repaired (§5 62. 88. 94) 

Refuse to be removed (exclusive of workrooms) (§§ 62, 94) 

Washroom* (exclusive of foundries) 

Cleaning to be done (§ 88) 

Heat to be provided (§55) 

Painting to be done ( § 88) 

Repairs to be made (§ 88) 

Sink or water to be provided (§ 88) 

Washrooms to be provided (§ 88) 

Washrooms in foundries {dryroom to be provided) (§ 88) 

Water closetsj 

Additional water closets to he provided (§§ 88, 94) 

Approaches to be separate (§§ 88, 94) 

Cleaning to be done (§§ 88, 94) 

Door of women's toilet to be provided with lock (§§ 88, 94) 

Flushing, means of, to be provided (§§ 88, 94) 

Obscene writing to be removed from loalh (inclusive of hcdls) (§§ 88, 94) 

Painting or whitewashing to be done (§ j 88. 94) 

Partition to be extended at top and ventilation to open air to be pro- 
vided (ii88,94) 

♦ Exclusive of new notices to new owners. tl^iclusive of orders rescinded, held 
sponds to Table II of Report for 1910. t See Table III, po$t, ft See Table IV, 



47 

sss 

,026 

eee 

$64 
96 
17 
55 
54 
6 



t 

4S 

19 

7,547 

7/5 

999 

£,761 

SS 

Sl^ 

169 

489 

44 



in abeyance 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 109 
airrhoritt of factort, mine, tunnel and quarry laws.§ 



Obosbs.* 


CoBiPLiANCES Reported. 


Total 
State. 


Sus- 
pended, 
rescinded, 
etc.t 


Net 
total. 


Total 

final 

notices 

issued. 


Before 

final 
notice. 


After 

final 

notice. 


Total. 


Thereof 

in 

New York 

City. 


678 


13 


665 


34 


546 


24 


570 


285 


588 


13 


675 


26 


480 


20 


500 


275 


7,990 





7,990 




7,990 




7,990 


7.067 


19.849 




19.849 




19.849 




19.849 


16,157 


2.285 




2.285 




2,285 




2.283 


2.036 


372 


22 


350 


9 


328 


8 


336 


243 


31,762 


48 


31,714 


69 


31,476 


52 


31,528 


26.063 


1,724 


81 


1,643 


408 


1,207 


358 


1.565 


1.302 


50 


1 


49 


3 


44 


2 


46 




2 




2 




2 




2 




909 


24 


885 


196 


668 


174 


842 


797 


1 




1 




1 




1 




732 


52 


680 


203 


471 


179 


650 


486 


30 


4 


26 


6 


21 


3 


24 


19 


343 


27 


316 


18 


148 


13 


161 


142 


31 


2 


29 


1 


25 


1 


26 


25 


312 


25 


287 


17 


123 


12 


135 


117 


11 




11 


* * *. 


10 




10 


7 


8 




8 




7 




7 


5 


3 




3 




3 




3 


2 


30.151 


2,411 


27,740 


4,331 


20,479 


3,447 


23,926 


19.341 


380 


16 


364 


57 


291 


50 


341 


323 


4.967 


883 


4,084 


1,699 


2,289 


1,262 


3,551 


2,798 


6S 


1 


62 


6 


U 


6 


49 


40 


S 




S 


1 


2 


1 


3 


S 


4.9A6 


819 


S,4JS7 


1,611 


1,838 


1,100 


2,938 


2,287 


s 




$ 


« 


3 




3 




H7 


17 


230 


S9 


184 


36 


219 


166 


1 




1 




1 




1 




AS 


1 


47 


id 


34 


10 


44 


43 


see 


^ 


S21 


133 


183 


111 


294 


269 


1,089 


1,051 


202 


782 


185 


967 


910 


710 


16 


696 


97 


540 


00 


639 


697 


269 


IS 


256 


83 


163 


74 


237 


232 


110 


10 


100 


22 


70 


21 


91 


81 


30 


1 


29 


1 


26 


2 


28 


15 


67 




67 


3 


60 


3 


63 


54 


212 


16 


196 


24 


125 


11 


136 


42 


11 




11 




8 




8 


-* 


J 




I 




2 




1 




2 




2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


g 




s 




8 




8 




Q 


1 


s 




s 




3 




m 


16 


169 


23 


'l^ 


10 


'ii 


36 


63 


5 


48 


9 


6 


14 


8,903 


684 


8.219 


1,520 


6,469 


1,235 


7,704 


6.408 


1,014 


21S 


801 


284 


470 


179 


649 


472 


S22 


46 


277 


122 


151 


106 


257 


242 


SJS9 


1S9 


S,000 


187 


2,724 


166 


2,879 


2,532 


4S 


S 


42 


8 


33 


8 


41 


30 


S71 


9 


S62 


66 


293 


49 


342 


298 


187 


10 


177 


16 


156 


14 


170 


153 


699 


SI 


668 


121 


437 


111 


648 


444 


4S 


6 


40 


2S 


20 


18 


38 


37 


and those i 


Bsued in cae 


ics where th« 


3 establishm 


ent was bui 


■ned, closed 


or removed. 


SCorrc- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 New York State Department of Labor. 

Table II.— Orders lamed After Inapectfon Under Gene^l 



SUBJBCT OF ObDEKS. 

[With reference to section of Labor Law violated.] 



New York 
City. 



Re- 
mainder 
of the 
State. 



XL Sanitatiok and Safbtt — Continxud. 
Cleanliness and sanitary conveniences — Concluded. 
Water clooetA — Concluded. 

Provide access to water closet* (§§ 88, $4) 

Provide disinfectants (ii 88, 94) 

Repairs to be made Hi 88, 94) 

Remove drinking water from water closets (§( ^^. 94) 

Screen {%%88,94) 

Separation of water closets for seres to be made ((§ 88, 94) 
Siffne designating to be provided ( J5 88, 94) 



Storage in. forbidden (ii 88, 94) ■ 
Use of water closets to be permitted by unlocking door (J§ 88, 94) ■ 

Ventilation, means of, to be provided (§§ 88, 94) 

Work roomst 

Cleaning to be done (inclusive of waUt, ceiling, floors, doors and 

windows) (H dS. 84) 

Coal receptacles to be provided (J 84) 

Cuspidors to be provided (§ 84) 

Drinking water to be provuied ( § 88) 

Floors to be repaired or renexoed (J 84) 

Food products to be removed (§ 62) 

Heat to be provided (J 62) 

Living in, prohibited (J 62) 

Painting, papering or limewashing to be done (§ 84) 

Plumbing or sinks to be repaired, cleaned or provided (J§ 88, 94) 

Refuse, receptacle for, to be provided (5 84) 

Repairs or rearrangement of walls, ceiling, doors or windows to be 

made ^ 62. 84. 90) 

Water tank to be cleaned or covered (H 88, 94) 
Dangerous machineryft 



Belt shifter or loose pullej's to be provided (§81) 

Boilers to be inspected or repaired and report thereon to be submitted 

to Department of Labor ( J5 91 . 94) 

Exhaust fans to be provided, repaired, connected or cleaned (§ 81).. . 
Guards to be provided for danserous machinery 

Belting and pulleys by boxing or encasing (§ 81) 

Emery wheel H 81) 

Engine H 81) .' 

Extractor by providing cover (J 81) 

Gearing ii 81) 

Key of wheel (^ 81) 

Mangle (^ 81) 

Miscellaneous machinery {exclusive of elevator machinery) (5 81) . . 

Motor ii 81) 

Planer, shaper or jointer (J 81) 

Pulley or flywheel d 81) 

Rolls a 81) 

.Sato (i81) 

Set screws by countersinking (J 81) 

Shafting (^ 81) 

Sprocket and chain belt (5 81) 

Vat, water flume, etc. (^ 81) 

Guards, removal of. prohibited (J 81) 

Products of combustion, poisonous gases and dust to be removed 

(55 86. 94) 

Elevators and hoistwaj'sff 



Arrangements to be made so persons will not pass under (}5 79, 94) . 

Cleaning of shaft to be done (5 94) 

Clutch lock for hand cable to be provided or repaired (§5 79, 94). . . 

Doors to be provided (§§ 79, 94) 

Doors to be repaired (55 79. 94) 



Guard rail to be provided (55 79, 94) 

Hoistways, enclosure of shaft to be provided (55 79, 94). 



1,409 

6 

678 

1S9 

109 

14 

19 

S61 

11,760 

2,4S6 

67 

6,491 

166 

247 

6 

67 

5 

649 

641 

632 

4S7 

128 

6.104 



39 



421 

6,511 

706 

16 

73 

61 

1,184 

68 

2 

127 

76 

117 

604 

26 

676 

1,065 

690 

34 



73 



60 
759 



21 

35 

240 

204 



4 

4 

216 



116 

63 

1 

1 

6 

is 

2, €90 

239 

1 

1,662 

72 

87 

2 

6 

104 

125 

279 

IS 

92 

18 

8,342 



111 

841 

304 

7,013 

1,306 

19 

36 

76 

1,890 

86 

6 

238 

33 

129 

1,046 

17 

749 

1,029 

261 

90 

4 

37 



744 



7 
1 
16 
12 
70 
189 
14 



♦ Exclusive of new notices to new owners. 
post. ft See Table IV, pott. 



t Inclusive of orders rescinded, held in abeyance 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. Ill 

Anihorlly of Factory, Mine, Tunnel and Qoarry Laws — Continued. 



Obdbbs.* 








C0MPUANCE8 Reportbo 




Total 
State. 


Sus- 
pended, 
rosclnded, 
etc.f 


Net 
total. 


Total 

final 
notices 
issued. 


Before 

final 

notice. 


After 

final 

notice. 


Total. 


Thereof 

in 

New York 

City. 


11 




// 


1 


10 


t 


11 


7 


4 


i 

74 


3 
1,661 


262 


3 
1,239 


2l'4 


3 
U46S 




1,625 


iVoYb 


6 


1 


5 


2 


3 


1 


4 


4 
661 


7H 


99 


696 


261 


4S8 


218 


666 


192 


13 


179 


20 


155 


15 


170 


126 


110 


n 


99 


22 


77 


19 


96 


• 96 


15 


« 


13 


6 


8 


6 


13 


12 


24 


3 


21 


8 


15 


6 


' 21 


16 


400 


25 


375 


132 


237 


116 


353 


308 


14,450 


768 


13,682 


816 


10,410 


693. 


11.103 


8.777 


2,674 


160 


2,514 


81 


2,391 


68 


2,459 


2,244 


68 


8 


60 


3 


56 


3 


59 


68 


8,143 


327 


7,816 


72 


6,460 


56 


6,516 


4,060 


238 


22 


216 


46 


167 


37 


204 


141 


334 


23 


311 


U 


255 


40 


295 


216 


7 


1 


6 


1 


5 


1 


6 


4 
60 


63 


4 


59 


7 


47 


7 


64 


109 


3 


106 


6 


76 


4 


80 


4 
564 


774 


73 


701 


220 


465 


195 


660 


820 


70 


7o0 


176 


531 


139 


670 


449 


645 


41 


504 


U 


414 


20 


494 


482 


629 


34 


495 


115 


369 


103 


472 


394 


146 


2 


,o ^H 


22 


114 


20 


134 


122 


14,446 


599 


13.H47 


1,615 


11.043 


1.316 


12,359 


5,544 


150 


10 


140 


14 


100 


10 


110 


33 


841 


28 
184 


813 
541 


116 
165 


599 
375 


69 
96 


668 
471 




725 


24i 


12.524 


359 


12,165 


1,295 


9,800 


1,121 


10.927 


5.154 


2,010 


58 


l,9o2 


132 


1,618 


109 


1,727 


662 


34 


1 


S3 


3 


2S 


3 


31 


14 
67 


109 


4 


105 


17 


84 


H 


98 


136 


8 


128 


2Z 


90 


20 


119 


H 


3,074 


86 


2,088 


303 


2,4^1 


267 


2,688 


1,117 


144 


1 


143 


15 


121 


15 


136 


67 


8 




8 




8 




8 


2 


365 


lb 


356 


37 


266 


34 


310 


116 


108 


3 


105 


6 


97 


6 


103 


74 


246 


2 


244 


35 


189 


33 


222 


112 


1,650 


39 


1,611 


108 


1,328 


84 


1,41^ 


568 


43 


1 


42 


11 


30 


11 


41 


24 


1,424 


47 


1,377 


286 


i.ou 


196 


1,240 


623 


2,094 


43 


2,051 


206 


1,653 


183 


1,836 


1,009 


951 


52 


899 


168 


70S 


138 


841 


631 


124 


3 


121 


6 


107 


6 


113 


34 


4 


1 
4 


3 
106 


8 


ioo 


2 

7 


2 
107 




110 


68 


96 


14 


82 


17 


63 


13 


76 


48 


1.503 


46 


1.457 


158 


1,206 


141 


1.347 


697 


9 




9 




8 




8 


1 


6 




5 




5 




5 


4 


16 


i 

7 


15 
26 


9 


14 
14 


7 


14 
21 




33 


is 


106 


2 


103 


11 


86 


8 


94 


3l 


429 


14 


415 


47 


346 


38 


384 


22} 


218 


6 


213 


26 


178 


26 


204 



and those in cases where the establishment was burned, closed or removed. 



X See Table III . 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 I^Ew York State Departmext of Labor. 

Table 11. — Orders Issued After Inspection Under General 



Subject op Orders. 
[With reference to section of Labor Law violated.] 



New York 
City. 



Re- 
mainder 
of the 
8tote. 



II. Sanitation and Safety — Concluded. 
Elevators and hoiBtwaystt -Conciuiletl. 

Ledgcti to be Ruardfd (§§ 79. 94) 

Locks to be provided on door-^ < §§ 79, 04) 

Machiner>" to be guarde<l to insure safety of pa»«8enger» (J J 79, 94) 

Ma<-liinery to be repaired (§§ 79. 94) 

Repuip* to be niade (§§ 70. 94) 

Stretiu at top to be pn>vidcU (§§ 79. 94) 

Warninii apparatus for dosient U* be provided ^55 79. 94) 

WTiitewabhing or painting of abaft to be done (jj 79, 94) 

Protection fro .. firo 



Doors and windows 

fiarjt. grilling or in re mrsh to be rrmove'I (^ 8'^. 83. 94) 

Catcher on uindoua or Hnnf, cor J to he repl tctd (§§ S2, 94) 

Doors and uiudowA to he unlocked during working hours (§§ SO, 94) 

Outward opening of doors, provision Jor. to be rmde (§§ 8 J, 94) • • • • 
Fire escapes ! 

Access to fire-escapes to he provided by enlnrying doort or by other 
HiructurnI changes (§5 82. 94) 

Drop ladder to be proud* d r&J 8S. J) 

Fire-escape to he prondid [^\ S2. 04) 

Ladder ur tftairway to roof to b> procidcd (§5 82. 94) 

Passa •• to fire-escnpt'H to he cleared and obatr actions on fire-escapes 
to be removed iH Si. 94) 

Repairs to be marie {^^ 82. 94) 

Signs designaiiny, to be posted (5§ SS, 94) 



General safetytt- 



Building to be braced or new beams to be provided (§§ 00, 94) 

Rail to be provided to guard runwuy, pit, plutform opening, door, 

OU-. (5§ 79. 81) 

Roof to be repaired ( § 02) 

Stairrt. 



Handriil to he extended (§5 SO. 94) 

Handrail to 6« providtd ( 5§ S'\ 94) 

Handrail to he re,„iired (^^ SO. 94) . 

Repairs or reartangimint^ to be made {inclusive of halls) (§§ 80, 94) 

Stairs to be proridid (%% SO.82,94) 

Treads to be provided, repaired or replaced (§§ 80, 94) 



Total — Sanitation and Safety. 



III. Children. tt 

Children under 14 years of age to be discharged (J 70) 

Children under 16 years of ajte without certificati t<.» be discharged (§ 70) 
Children under 10 years of age not t^ be employed more than 8 hours per 

day. nor before 8 a. m. nor after 5 p. m. (§ 77) 

Children under 10 years of age not to be employed on dangerous machinery 



(5 93). 



Children under 16 year^ of age not to be employed in an establishment 
where malt or alcoholic liquors are manufactured, packed, wrapi>ed or 
bottled (§ 9M) 

Females under 10 years of age not to be employed whore continuous stand 
iim bt required (§ 03) 



Total — Children. 



IV. Women and MivoRs.tt 
Female minora under 21 yeans of age not to be employed after 9 p. m. nor 

before 6 a. m. (§ 77) 

Females 16 years of age and upward^ and males between 16 and 18 years 

of age to be employed irregularly in excess of 10 hours a day not more 

than 3 days a week (§ 78) 



120 

22 

4 

7 

20 

01 

8 

11 

5.080 



2,828 
1,020 
9 
655 
1.244 
2.252 

16S 
S 



1,750 

B87 

1.697 



1 

156 

45 

1,395 

13 
016 

29 

106 

6 

326 



40,122 



19 
252 



960 
23 



1,232 



355 
28 
17 



10 
1.038 



415 
117 

,t\ 

167 
623 

55 

102 

190 

48 

134 
93 
18 

1.555 



368 

10 

1,166 

46 

910 
11 
46 
14 

139 



17,326 



4 
140 



183 
33 



367 



17 



* Exclusive of new notices to new owners. f Inclusive of orders rescinded, held in abeyance 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspectioist, 1911. 113 

Aathorltj of Fmctorj, Mine, Tonnel and Quarry Lawa — Continved. 





Orders.* 








CoMPLiANCBS Reported 




Total 
State. 


Sui»- 

pended. 

rescinded, 

etc.t 


Net 
total. 


Total 

final 

notices 

issued. 


Before 

final 

notice. 


After 

final 

notice. 


Total. 


Thereof 

in 

New York 

City. 


475 
50 
21 
16 
27 
61 
27 
11 

8,118 


9 

1 
1 

2 

3 

1 

569 


466 
49 
20 
16 
25 
58 
26 
11 

6.549 


33 
3 

i 

1 

25 

2 

441 


389 
46 
19 
11 
24 
31 
24 
11 

4.892 


31 
2 

i 

1 

25 

2 

348 


420 
48 
19 
12 
25 
56 
26 
11 

6,240 


Ill 

21 

3 

5 

20 

56 

7 

11 

4,409 


3,243 
1,137 
IS 
682 
1.411 
2.875 

191 
105 
190 


423 

241 

39 

14S 
146 

12 
2 

36 
7 

81 

9 

165 


2,820 

896 

IS 

643 

1,268 

2,729 

179 

103 

166 

98 

1,803 

95 

296 

2.987 


290 
142 
1 
21 
126 
151 

17 
14 
28 
17 

61 

7 

414 


2.427 

735 

11 

690 

1,091 

2.465 

168 
76 

lis 

76 

1,689 
76 

277 

2,354 


226 
106 
1 
20 
100 
122 

14 
14 
14 
13 

66 
6 

7 

317 


2,653 

840 

12 

610 

1,191 

2.587 

172 
90 

127 
89 

1,744 
81 

284 

2,671 


2.309 

602 
1,066 
2,100 

139 
2 


106 

1,884 

96 

306 

3,152 


62 

1,631 

2 

274 

1.414 


3 

524 

64 

2,561 

69 

1,826 

40 

162 

20 

465 


15 

4 

146 

3 

101 

2 

6 

1 

33 


3 

509 

60 

2.415 

66 

1,724 

38 

146 

19 

432 


39 

16 

359 

2 
246 

8 
24 

2 
78 


3 

412 

41 

1.898 

60 

1,362 

29 

116 

13 

328 


25 

14 

278 

2 

194 

7 

19 

66 


3 

437 

55 

2,176 

62 

1,666 

36 

136 

13 

384 


1 

147 

39 

1,227 

10 

822 

26 

269 


57,448 


3.898 


53,550 


7.385 


41.339 


5.940 


47,279 


32.856 


23 
392 

1,143 

66 

1 
14 


37 


23 
392 

1,106 

66 

1 
14 


4 
2 


23 
392 

1,073 

47 

1 
11 


3 
2 


23 
392 

1,076 

47 

1 
13 


19 
252 

909 

21 

1 
6 


1,629 


37 


1,692 


6 


1.547 


6 


1.552 


1.208 


25 
11 


2 


23 
11 




23 
10 




23 
10 


8 
3 



And those in oases wher« sstftblishment was burned, closed or removed. ft See Table IV. poa 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114 I^Ew YoBK State DEPARTMEjsfr of Labor. 

TftUe n.— Orders lasaed After iBspeetfon Under General 



Subject of Orders. 
[With reference to section of Labor Law violated.] 



New York 
City. 



Re- 
mainder 
of the 
State. 



IV. WoM BN AND MiNOHfl ft — Concluded. 
Male minors under 18 years of age and females not to be employed more 

than 6 days in any one week (§78) 

Male minors imder 18 years of age and females not to be eihployed more 

than 60 hours in any one week (5 77) 

Male minora imder 18 years of age not to be employed between 12 o'clock 

midnight and 4 a. m. (§ 77) '. 

Male minora under 18 yeare of age and females not to be employed at 

polishing and buffing (§93) 

Seats to be provided for females (§17) 



Total — Women and Minors. 



V. Laundries (Special provisions of § 92). 

Floor to be cleaned (§92) 

Living in, prohibited (§92) 

Painting or whitewashing to be done (§ 92) 



Total — Laundries . 



VI. Bakeries and Confectioneries J (special law). 

Animals to be kept out of bake rooms (except cats) (§ 113) 

Ashes and rubbish to be removed from bakery (§ 113) 

Ceilings to be made 8 feet in height (§ 112) 

Cleanlme88 to be maintained (§113) 

Coal, receptacles for, to be pro\'ided (§113) 

Drip pana to be provided at ceiling or water pipes to be covered with asbes- 
tos (§ 113) 

Floor to be repaired, cleaned, scraped or oiled, or new floor to be provided 

,.(§112) 

Livmg in. forbidden (§113) , 

Painting or whitewashing to be done (§ 113) , 

Plumbing and drainage to be repaired (§ 113) , 

Roof to be repaired (.§113) 

Sink with running water to be provided (§ 112) , 

Sink to be repaired or cleaned (§113) 

Sleeping in. forbidden and beds to be removed (§113) 

Storage of food products in dry room to be provided (§113) 

Troughs, sheKHng and utensils to be cleaned (§ 113) 

Ventilation, provision for, to be made (§ 1 12) 

Ventilation, means of, to be repaired or extended (§ 112) 

Walls, ceilings, doore or partitions to be cleaned (§ 113) 

Walls, ceilings, doora or partitions to be plasterea. wainscoted or repaired 

„(§ 112) 

Water closet to be removed from bakery (§112) 

Yard or area to be cleaned (§113) 



Total — Bakeries and Confectioneries. 



VII. Mines, Tunnels and Quarries. 

Cease allowing men to ride on loaded skips (§ 123) 

Cease allowing men to ride up or down shaft with explosives (§ 123) 

Cease carrying dynamite and exploders in same skip (§ 125) 

Cease employing children under 16 years of age (§ 131) 

Cease overcrowding cage (§§ 120, 125) 

Designate experienced man to do blasting and handle explosives (§ 125). . 

Discharge brakeman under 21 years of age (§§ 120. 125) 

Examine holes to see that all charges have been exploded (§§ 120, 125) . . . 
Guard belts, pulleys, geara, set screws or other machinery (§§ 120, 125) . . 
Guard laddere. landings, platforms, shaft heads, sink holes, stairways or 

trestles (§§ 120, 125) 

Guard surface openings to shafts (§§ 120, 125) 

Have boilera inspected ( § 124) 

Keep record of accidents (§ 126) 

Limit stock of explosives to one day's supply and not to exceed 300 lbs. 

(§§ 120. 125) 

* Exclusive of new notices to new owners. t Inclusive of orders rescinded, held 

III, po9t. tt See Table IV. post. 



2 
25 

7 

11 
33 



90 



116 

65 

119 



300 



147 

77 

29 

462 

279 

124 

1,042 



2,110 

120 

2 

137 

194 

74 

38 

356 

353 

104 

37 

294 

88 



6,136 



30 
6 



6 

51 



117 



4 
17 
20 



10 

2 

9 

93 

30 



163 

1 

349 

35 

3 

25 

16 

9 

37 

12 

43 

2 

9 

61 
12 
23 



934 



2 

4 
5 
1 
4 
9 
1 
2 
17 

11 
5 



3 
I abeyance 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspectiox, 1911. 115 

Anthoritf of FactoiTt Mine, Tonnel and Quarrf Laws — Continaed. 



Orders.* 








Compliances Reported. • 


Total 
Stat«. 


Sus- 
pended, 
rescinded, 
etc.t 


Net 
total. 


Total 

final 

notices 

issued. 


Before 

final 

notice. 


After 

final 

notice. 


Total. 


Thereof 

in 

New York 

City. 


2 

55 

13 

17 
84 


1 

i 


2 
54 
13 

17 

83 


^ 


2 

61 
10 

15 

67 


6 


2 

51 

10 

15 
73 


2 

24 

4 

11 
30 


207 1 4 1 203 1 6 


178 


6 


184 


82 


120 

82 

139 


4 

2 
9 


116 

80 

130 


4 
11 
45 


112 
65 

84 


3 

11 
40 


116 

76 

124 


111 

67 

105 


341 


15 


326 


60 


261 


54 


315 


283 


157 

79 

38 

555 

309 

124 

1,205 
1 


4 

2 

23 

28 

27 

21 

75 

ios 

14 

ii 

9 
4 
9 
11 
59 
9 
2 

30 

17 

4 


153 

77 

15 

527 

282 

103 

1,130 

2.354 

141 

5 

151 

201 

79 

66 

357 

337 

97 

44 

315 
83 

88 


2 

14 
19 
50 

84 

169 

466 

36 

2 
51 
48 

9 
11 

4 
124 
26 

1 

108 
26 
15 


147 

72 

9 

486 

217 

33 

907 

'*'ii785 

97 

3 

105 

134 

72 

50 

340 

194 

70 

40 

188 
53 
67 


2 

1 
13 
26 

45 

122 

384 

25 

2 

29 

39 

2 

9 

3 

87 

26 

1 

64 
13 
10 


147 

74 

10 

499 

243 

78 

1,029 

""2;i69 

122 

5 

134 

173 

74 

59 

343 

281 

96 

41 

252 
66 
77 


137 

73 

6 

425 

223 

78 

897 


2,459 

155 

5 

162 

210 

83 

75 

368 

396 

106 

46 

345 
100 
92 


1,880 

100 

2 

113 

163 

70 

25 

334 

251 

94 

35 

219 
59 

57 


7,070 


464 


6.606 


1,265 


5.069 


903 


5,972 


5.241 


2 


i 

3 


2 
4 
5 

1 
4 
9 
1 
2 
16 

11 
5 

60 
4 

3 


1 

i 

i 



2 

1 

8 

1 


6 

1 

2 

16 

6 

3 

44 

2 

3 


1 

" i 

i 

1 

4 

1 


2 
4 
6 
1 
1 
7 
1 
2 
16 

7 

3 

48 

3 

3 




4 




5 




1 




4 




g 




1 




2 




17 




11 




5 




63 




4 




3 





and those issued in cases where the establishment was burned, closed or removed. 



X Sec Table 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 New York State Department of Labor. 

Table 11.— Ordera Umed After Inapectloii Under General 



Subject op Ordbbs. 
[With reference to section of Labor Law vioUted.] 



New York 
City. 



Re- 
mainder 
of the 
State. 



VII .MiXBs. TxjNNBLS AND QuABBiBS — Concluded. 

Miscellaneous orders relating to safety ( §§ 120. 125) 

Post signal code for hoisting (§> 120. 125) 

Post special rules (§} 120. 125) , 

Provide additional shaft (§ 121) 



15 



Provide bullet proof door on magazine (§ 125) 

Provide proper facilities for safely storing explosives (f 125) 

Provide proper facilities for safely thawing explosives (§ 125) 

Provide proper facilities for storing exploders apart from explosives (§ 125) 

Provide proper tools for tamping (§ 125) 

Provide proper place for preparing charges (§ 125) 

Provide proper system of warming when blasting (§ 125) 

Provide sufficient means of ventilation (| 122) 

Provide washroom with running water (fi 133) 

Provide ladderways with landings and manholes or repair sameCIf 120, 125) 

Provide or repair stairways or ladderwa>'8 (§5 120, 125) 

Properly light loading pomte (§ 127) 

Report accidents Vt 126) . 

Screen vent holes in magazine (} 125) 

Protect window in thawing shed (§ 125) 



5 

2 

53 

31 

37 

15 

3 

2 

1 

7 

6 

4 

1 

6 



Total — Mines. Tunnels and Quarries. 
Grand Total 



322 



74,097 



24,682 



* Exclusive of new notices to new owners. 



t Inclusive of orders rescinded, held in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 117 

Authority of Factory* Bflne, Tmuel aad Quarry Laws — Condnded. 



Obdbbb.* 


COMPLIAMCXS RkPOBTBD. 


Total 
State. 


Sus- 
pended, 
reflcinded. 
etc.t 


Net 
total. 


Total 

final 

notices 

issued. 


Before 

final 

notice. 


After 

final 

notice. 


Total. 


Thereof 

New^York 
City. 


15 


1 
2 

i 


14 

3 

2 

63 

31 

36 

15 

3 

2 

1 

7 

6 

4 

1 

5 

3 

1 


1 

i 

7 

8 
4 

1 

i 

3 

i 


13 

2 

1 
39 
22 
24 
13 
2 
1 

4 

2 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 


6 

6 
3 

1 

i 

i 

i 


13 














5 


2 

1 
44 
28 
27 
14 
2 
2 




2 




53 




31 




37 




15 




3 




2 




1 




7 


5 
2 

4 
1 
1 
3 

1 




6 




4 




1 




5 




3 




1 








322 


8 


314 


42 


226 
80.096 


27 


253 








98,779 


4,474 


94,305 


1,307 


6.987 


87.083 


65.733 



abeyance and those issued in oases where the establishment was burned, dosed or removed. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118- 



New York State Department of Labor. 



TABLE m.— ORDERS ISSUED AFTER INSPECTION UNDER SPECIAL AUTHORITY OF 
SECTIONS 95 AND 114 OF THE FACTORY LAW. 







Orders. 




Compliances. 


Subject of Obdebs. 


Total 
num- 
ber 
issued. J 


Sus- 
pended, 

re- 
scinded, 

etc. 5 


Net 
total. 


Before 
tagging. 


After 
tagging. 


Total. 


Tenant Factories (| 95). 
Water closets: 

Approaches to be separate 

Cleaning to be done 


3 

196 
5 
2 
6 

18 

366 
3 

1 

1 
170 


8 

2 

i 

1 

16 
7 


3 

188 
3 
2 
4 

17 

350 
3 

1 

1 

163 


1 

110 

1 

1 

9 

218 
3 

1 
91 


2 
78 
2 
1 
4 

8 

132 

1 
72 


3 

188 


Flushing, moans of, to be provided. 
Repairs to be made 


3 
2 


Screen 


4 


Ventilation, means of, to be pro- 
vided 


17 


Workrooms: 

Cleaning to be done (inclusive of 
walls, ceilings, floors, doors and 
windows) 


350 


Coal receptacles to be provided . . . 

Painting, papering or hme washing 

to be done 


3 
1 


Plumbing or sinks to be repaired, 
cleaned or provided 


1 


Refuse to be removed and re- 
ceptacles for, to be provided 


163 


Total 


770 


35 


735 


435 


300 


736 






Bakeries and Confectioneries 

(§ 114). 
Animals to be kept out of bake rooms 
(except cats) 


10 
*95 

1 

♦121 

1 
3 

18 

*70 
2 

6 

2 


1 
11 

12 

1 
9 


9 

84 

1 

109 

1 
3 

17 

61 
2 

6 

2 


6 
30 

52 

2 

9 
20 

5 


3 
54 

1 

67 

1 
1 

8 

41 
2 

1 

2 


9 


Ashes and rubbish to be removed from 
bakery 


84 


Drip pans to be provided at ceiling or 
water pipes to be covered with 
asbestos 


1 


Floor to be repaired, cleaned, scraped 

or oiled or new floor to be provided. . 

Living in bakery forbidden 


109 
1 


Plumbing and drainage to be repaired. . 

Sleeping in bakery forbidden and beds 

to be removed 


3 
17 


Troughs, shelving and utensils to be 
cleaned 


61 


Ventilation, provision for, to be made. . 

Walls, ceilings, doors or partitions to be 

cleaned 


2 
6 


Water closet to be removed from 
bakery 


2 






Total 


t329 


34 


295 


124 


171 


295 







♦ Includes one in Rochester. 

i Includes three in Rochester. 
In New York City except as noted. 
Inclusive of orders rescinded, held in abeyance and those issued in cases where the establish- 
ment was burned, closed or removed. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 119 
table ly.— orders issued on evtoence of employers' reports of 

ACCIDENTS. 









Orders. 




Compliances 
Reported. 


SuBJSCT OP Ordrrs. 

(With reference to section of Labor Law 
violated.) 


New 
York 
City. 


Re- 
mainder 

of 
State. 


Total 

in 
State. 


1 Sus- 
pended, 

re- 
scinded, 
ete.t 


Net 
total. 


Num- 
ber. 


There- 
of in 
New 
York 
City. 


II. Sanitation and Safety. 
Lighting: 

HaUB and ntAirs to be lighted (§§ 81. 
94) 


1 




1 




1 

1 


1 


1 






Dangemuq machinery . . 


76 


287 


1 363 1 7 


356 


345 


76 






Belt shifters or loose pulleys to be 
provided (> 81) 




1 

3 
93 

1 

4 
1 

13 
2 

67 

8 

6 

89 

32 


1 

3 
114 

1 

6 
1 

18 
3 

91 

9 
6 

no 

41 


1 
6 

i 

1 


1 

2 
109 

1 

6 

1 
18 

3 
90 

9 

6 

110 

40 


1 

1 
♦104 

1 

6 

1 
18 

2 
88 

8 

6 

109 

39 




Guards to be provided for: 

Belting and pulleys by boxing or 
encasing (J 81) 






0«%Aring (|fti),' , , , 


21 


21 


Mangle (§81) 




Miscellaneous machinery (ex- 
clusive of elevator machinery) 
(§81) 


2 


2 


Motor (§81) 




Planer, shaper or jointer (§ 81) . 
Rolls (§81)......... 


5 

1 

24 

1 

1 

21 

9 


6 

1 


Saws (§81) 


24 


(§81) 


1 


Shafting (§81) 


1 


Guards, removal of, prohibited (§ 81) 
Elevators and hoistwasrs 


21 
9 








Guard rail to be provided (S§ 79. 94) 
Ledges to be guarded (§§ 79. 94) . . . 
Machinery to be guarded to insure 

General safety 


3 

6 


11 
20 

1 

6 


14 
26 

1 

6 


1 


13 
26 

1 

6 


13 
25 

i 

5 


3 
6 










Rail to be provided to guard run- 
way, pit, platform, opening, door, 
etc: (§§ 79, 81) 




4 

1 
1 


4 

1 
1 




4 

1 
1 


4 

1 




Stairs: 

HandraU to be provided (§§ 80, 






Treads to be provided, repaired 
or rephiced (§§ 80, 94) 






Total — Sanitation and Safety. 


86 


325 


411 


8 


403 


390 


86 


III. Children. 
Children under 16 years of age not to be 
employed on dangerous machinery 


2 


6 


8 




8 


8 


2 






IV. Women and Minors. 

females not to be employed at polishing 

and buffing (§ 93) | 

Male minors under 18 years of age. and< 
female minors under 21 years of age' 
not to be permitted to clean machinery 
while in motion (§93) 


2 
10 


10 
22 


12 
32 




12 
32 


31 


2 
10 






Total — Women and Minors 


12 


32 


44 




44 


43 


12 


Grand Total 


100 


363 


463 


8 


455 1 


441 


100 







* Includes one after final notice. 

t Inclusive of orders rescinded, held in abeyance and those issued in cases where the establish- 
ment was burned, closed or removed. 



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3I3 







s 
^ 



" ri I 



H 1 §1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 



New York State Department of Laboil 



TABLE VI.— COMPLAINTS ALLEGING VIOLATION OF THE FACTORY LAW. AND. DISPOSI- 
TION OF THE SAME. 



Special Invebtioatioks. 



Si BJKiT OK Complaint. 

(With reference to article or section of Labor Law 
violated.) 



Sus- 
tained. 



Not 
sus- 
tained. 



Place 
com- 
plained 
of not 
found, 
closed, 
etc. 



Total. 



There- 
of in 
New 
York 
City. 



Anony- 
mous 
com- 

plainta. 
(6) 



I. Administration. 
Hours, schedule of, not posted (§ 77) . . , 
Law not powted (J (>H) 



Total . 



II. Sanitation and Safety. 
LiKhting: 

Halls, stain* or water closets not lighted (|§ 81 . 88. 94) 

Work rooihM not lighted (5 81) 

Ventilation and overcrowding: 
Air space of 250 cu. ft. fcr each employee between 6 

A. u. and p. m. not provided (§86) 

Ventilation, proper and sufficient means of, not pro- 
vided (5$ 80, 94) 

Time alloA'cd for meals: 

Noonday meal, 60 minutes not allowed (§ 89) 

Cleanliness and sanitary conveniences: 
Dressing rooms: 

Dressing room not provided for females (5 88) 

Screens and doors not provided (| 88) 

Halls and stairs: 

Unclean (§5 02, 94) 

Stairs not screened (§5 80, 94) 

Waih rooms not provided (exclusive of foundries) 

(§S88, 94) 

Washing facilities insufficient (§ 88) 

Wash and dry room in foundry not provided (§ 88) . 
Wat or closets: 

Not sufficient water closets (5 § 88, 94) 

Not sufficient venti'ation (§5 88, 94) 

Unclean water closets (§5 88, 94) 

Not sufficient water to Hush wattr closHs (§§88, 94) 

Water closet in need of repairs (J5 88, 94) 

Water closet not screened (§5 88. 94) 

Separate water closets for females not provided 
(5§88, 94) 

Water clotets lotked and use theieof not permitted 

(§§88.94) 

Workrooms: 

Unclean workrooms (§§ 62, 84) 

Painting or whitewashing necessary (§ 84) 

Unsafe floors (§§ 62, 84) 

Lack of heat in workrooms (§62) 

Employees sleeping in wor^crooms (§ 62) 



Running water not provided (H 88, 94) . 
Receptacle for refuse not proviied (§84) . 



Sanitary cuspidcra not provided (§ 84) . 
General sanitation 

5. Dangerous machinery: 

Exhaust tystem not provided or repaired (§ 81) . 

Boiler unsafe (§§ 91, 94) 

Machinery not guarded (§ 81) 

6. Elevatcrs, hoistways. etc.: 



Elnator entrance not guarded (§5 79, 94) 
Flpvator maehinery net ro ^a red (§§ 79, 94) 



Elevator doors to be repcire I (§§ 79, 94) 

Unsif? lobtway (§§ 79. 94).. . 
7. Protecti )n from fire: 

General or unspecified danger from fire (§§ 80. 

82.83,94) 26 3 29 

Doors and vindows: 

Window8barred(§§80. 83. 94)...... .... 1 1 2 

Doors locked during working hours (§§ 80, 94) 5 4 9 

Doors opening inward (§§ 80, 94) 6 6 12 

6 Investigated in the course oi regular inspection; no special reports made by inspectors. 



25 
3 



13 



31 
2 



13 



1 



3 t 



15 
2 
4. 



48 
3 
5 



31 
7 



18 

5 
1 . 

6| 
... I 

27 i 
3 

46 

9 
14 

4 

7 

2 

28 



31 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



139 



TiMe VI.— CooiflidBta Aflnbtf VMstioB oT the FMtorr Law, ud DiapMitloa oT the Sum — CmHtauMd. 



Subject or Complaint. 

(With reference to article or section of Labor Law 
violated.) 



Special Ikvkstioations. 



Sus- 
tained. 



Not 
sus- 
tained. 



Place 
com- 
plained 
of not 
found, 
dosed, 
etc. 



Total. 



There- 
of in 
New 
York 
City. 



Anony- 
mous 
com- 
plaints. 

(fc) 



II. Sanitation and Safety — Concluded. 
Protection from fire— Conc/wded, 
Fire escapes: 

Lack of fire escapes (Sfi 82, 83. 94) 

Obstructions to exits of fire escapee (Sfi 82. 83. 94) 
General safetv: 



Unsafe buildincs (|S 90. 94) . 
Leaking roof (fi 62. 94) 



General repairs 

Handrails not provided ({$ 80, 94) 

irnsafe scaffolcUng (fifi 18. 19) 

Failure to provide flooring m building in course of 

erection (H 19. 20) 

New treads to be put on stairs ({{ 80, 94) . 
Repair stairs (f S 80. 94) 



Total. 



III. Children. 

Employment of children under 14 (| 70) 

Employment of children under 16 without Board of Health 

certificate (5 70) 

Employment cf children imder 16 more than 8 hours a day, 

or before 8 a. u. or after 5 p. m. (J 77) 

Employment of children under 16 on dangerous machinery 



VioUtii 



ition of Child Labor Law, details not specified. , 
Total 



IV. Women and Minors. 
Employment of females more than 10 hours a day (I 77) . . 
Employment of females more than 6 days a week (I 77) . . 
Emi^jrment of females more than 60 hours a week {% 77).. 
Employment of male minors under IS between the hours 

of 12 p. M. and 4 A. M. (5 77) 

Employment of male minors under 18 and women at 

polisning and bufiing ({ 93) 

Seats for women not provided (§17) 



Total. 



V. Laundries. 
Occupants sleeping in laundry (| 92) . 
Repairs needed ($92) 



Total. 



VI. Workshops in Tenements. 
Mantifactiiring in unlicensed tenement houses (( 100) . 
Manufacturing under unsanitary conditions (f 100) . . . 



Total. 



VII. Bakeries and Conpectioneries. 

Roof in need of repairs (§ 112) 

Dog in bakeroom ($112) 

Ashes and refuse in bakeroom (f 112) 

Asbea and refuse in area of bakery (§112) 

Ceilings not 8 feet in height (| 112) 

Ceilings or walls in need of repairs (§112) 

Ceilings, walls, floors or utensils unclean ({ 112) 

Ceiling or waUs in need of painting or whitewashing (| 112) 

Floor m need of repairs, cleaning or oiling (1112) 

Lrving in bakery (| 113) 

Plumbing defective (fill) 

Sink with running water not provided ({ 113) 



21 
9 



316 



64 



21 



6 

1 

1 

7 

20 

75 

14 

24 

1 

23 

3 



152 



28 



122 



12 



10 



3 

7 

42 

7 
9 

*ii 

3 



23 

11 

2 
3 

1 

ii 

2 

1 
7 



468 



7 

133 

50 

2 
1 



193 



33 



12 



1 

6 

1 

1 

10 

29 

122 

21 

33 

1 

35 



377 



5 

94 
38 



138 



18 



11 



6 
1 
1 
7 

29 
122 

21 

33 
1 

35 
5 



6 Investigated in the course of regular inspection; no special reports made by inspectors. 



11 

4 



5 
270 



12 
47 
32 



91 



3 

1 
23 



28 



54 



54 



11 



Digitized J3y VjOOQIC 



140 



Nsw YoBK State Dbpabtmbkt ov Labob. 







Special ImrBsnoATioNs. 




SuBJSCT or Complaint. 

(With reference to article or section of T^bor Law 
violated.) 


Sus- 
tained. 


Not 
sus- 
tained. 


Place 
com- 
plained 
of not 
found, 
closed, 
etc. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
New 

City. 


Anony- 
mous 
com- 
plaints. 
ib) 


Sink or flushing in need of cleaning or repairing ({ 112) .. . 

fllMping iT> KfttrAry (f 119) 


7 
1 
2 
6 
8 
40 
12 


2 
2 
3 

11 
6 

19 
5 


..... 


9 
3 
6 
16 
15 
59 
17 


9 
3 
6 
13 
15 
60 
8 


1 
1 


Storage'of clothes inbakeroom ({ 112) 




Ventilation not provided (§ 111) 


6 


Walls or ceiling m need o^'plMtering (| 112) 




Water dooet connected directly witf bakerobm (| 113) .. . 


1 
2 






Total 


250 


131 


9 


390 


373 


28 






VIII. Wages. 
Non-payment of wages weekly (1 11) 


1 
1 


f 




3 
2 


.... 




Non-payment of wages in caw (| 10) 








Total 


2 


3 




5 










IX. MlBCBLLANSOUB. 

Conditions not within the provisions of the Factory Law. . 
General violation of the Factory Law (including com- 
plaints without particulars) 


3 


3 


13 


13 
6 


7 
5 


4 
11 






Total 


3 


3 


13 


19 


12 


15 






Grand Total 


662 


436 


29 


♦1127 


(934 


t488 







h Investigated in the course of regular inspection; no special reports made by inspectors. 

( The number of separate communications was 694. Included therein were 157 which covered more 
than one subject (108 covered two, 35 covered three,. 8 covered four, 2 covered six, 2 covered seven, 1 
covered eight and 1 covered ten subjects). 

t The number of separate communications was 413. Included therein were 55 which covered more 
than one subject (44 covered two, 5 covered three, 3 covered four. 2 covered five and 1 covered six subjects). 

* The number of separate oonununications was 831. Included therein were 104 which covered mora 
than one subject (134 covered two, 43 covered three, 8 covered four, 1 covered five, 4 covered six, 2 covered 
seven, 1 covered eight and 1 covered ten subjects). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt op Bukeau of Factoby Inspbotion, 1911. 141 

TABLE Vn.— NUMBBB. AGE AND 8BX OF PBBSONS BBPOBTED INJUBED IN FACTOBIBE* 
MINES, QUABBIES, AND BUILDING AND ENGINEEBING WOBK, BT INDUSTBIES. 

(Figure! in parentheses indicate fatal cases.) 



IlfDUSmT. 



Sex. 



Acddcnti 
before 
Oct. 1. 
1010. 



after 

NOT.I. 

1910. 



A<a or EiirLOTBM Inhtbbd in AccioBim OcroBn 1, 1910. 
TO Sirnnau 80, 1911. Rsposno Puor to NovufBU 
1. 1911. 



Under 
IttyxB. 



10-18 
yrs. 



ISm. 



Not 
stated. 



Total 



L Stomb, Ciat and Qulsb Products. 
1. Stone: 


M 

m 

r 


A. FA( 

2 

(1)8 


DTORIlffl 


6 


80 
72 

/ 


8 
18 


36 


b Cut atone 


98 




t 








Total 


M 


(1)10 




6 


102 

/ 


22 


129 




t 








2. Misedlaneoiis Mineral Products: 

a. AsbMtos. nanhite. etc 


M 

F 
M 

F 


1 

i 


/ 


8 
7 
8 


(1)110 
10 
19 
i 


2 


(1)130 




18 






32 






f 








Total 


M 


2 


/ 


11 
7 


a,m 


2 


(1)142 




$0 








3. Lime, Cement and PlsstsR 

^a! Asphalt 


M 

a 
« 
m 
m 

M 


2 
(1)2 




i 

8 


53 

(4)79 

(3)98 

(3)31 

5 

3 


.3 


56 


b Cffnent and lime. , . . r t 


(5)82 


e Plaster 


(8)108 


A RiftfH miH and mortar 


(3)81 


e Artifieial stcMM 




f. Pbster and oompo^tion casts and 
ornaments • . . . . r . r r 


1 


8 






Total 


M 


(8)7 




4 


(10)288 


(1)8 


(11)280 






4. Brick. Tile and Pottery: 

T^Boilding brick 

b. Tern cotta and fireclay produote 


M 

• 

/ 
M 

/ 


(2)6 

i 


i 


i 


1 

15 

/ 


7 

4 


(,,« 




2 


19 




/ 








Total 


M 


(2)7 


1 


1 


(3)W 


18 


(3)106 




f 








6. Qhss: 

a. Boiklins gisis 


M 

m 

F 
M 
/ 
M 


1 
2 




8 

8 

1 


9 
88 
» 

80 
5 
U 


4 


18 


b. Beveled glass and mirrors 


39 




f 


e. ftessed. btown and cut gbssware 




33 




4 
11 


d. Bottles and jan .... - 1 r 










ToUl 


M 


8 




8 

/ 


88 


4 


96 




e 








Total — Group I 


M 

f 


(«)29 


1 
1 


27 
8 


(14)678 

m 


■ (1)49 


(15) 755 












n. MnTAlS, MaCBDW AKD CONTITAKCW. 
» Ri1v«r oiwl nlated ware 


M 

/ 
M 

m 
m 


3 


: 


(1)11 
4 

i 


98 
5 

14 
3 
5 


5 


(1) 115 






b. OoWandsilwitfinmg 

d. GoU and siher watch-cases 

• Jflmlrv ffnU nMM. etfi .... 




14 





3 
ft 








Total 


M 
F 


8 


1 


(1)12 


130 
$ 


6 


(1)188 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



142 



New York State Depaetment or Labob. 



TfeMe YIT. — Nomber, Age and S«z «f PerMM Reported Injored !■ F^Mtortos, MIdm, Qurrles, an ' 
Building and EngUMorlng Work, by IndnotriM — Continaod. 

(Figures in parentheses indicate fatal oases.) 



Industbt. 



I 



I Sex. 



I 



Accidents 
before 
Oct 1, 
1910. 
reported 
after 
Nov. 1. 
1910. 



AoB or EMrLOTBm Ikjurbd nf AoaraNTB Octobbb 1, 1910. 
TO SvmuxR 30, 1911. Rbportbd Psioa to Novbhbbk 
1. 1911. 



Under 
16yTS. 



16-18 
yis. 



18yrs. 



Not 
stated. 



Total 



II. MiTALS, MaCHINSB AlfD CoKVBTANCBS 

-Continued. 

2. Ojpper, Lead, Zinc, Etc.: 

a. Smelting and reBning 


A. 
M 

m 

F 
M 

m 

F 
M 
F 

M 

F 


FACTOR 

(1)6 
2 

2 

5 

44 

t 

7 




IE8 — C 

3 

4 

1 


viUinued. 

i 

18 

ii 

'J 

81 
t6 

18 
It 


(2)163 
19 

117 

(1)48 
(1)348 
(2)935 

tee 

137 

tt 


7 

1 

23 


(2) 170 


b. Copper work 


W 1 /y 


c. BrasB, bronse and aluminum 
cMtingif 


161 




7 


d. Oas and electric fixtures 

where clsasi6ed . 


7 
18 

(1)87 

1 

15 


(1)67 
(1)380 


f . Sheet metal work . 


S9 

(3)1.057 


g. Metal goods not elsewhere 
clamifml 


19t 
171 




SS 








Total 


M 

F 


(1)66 


9 


148 
4t 


(6)1,762 

tto 


(1)108 


(7)2.027 


3. Iron and Steel Products: 

a. Orel crushing, etc 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

m 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 

M 

F 
M 

F 
•M' 

F 

IT 

F 


12 

"(2)45 

/ 

2 

(1)3 

/ 
8 

...... ^ 

....... 

■■]■ ■4 
......^ 

9 

. 4 
11 

19 

33 
-23" 

(3) ISl 


7 

4 

1 

2 

2 

3 
•2 

■■-■•••■, 


2 

32 
t 

' 25 

. 35 

; // 

7 

t 

13 

"'{"\7 

1 

* 16 

i 

! 15 

2 
27 

f5 

26 

• 74 

/ 
"26 

/ 


8 

(4)613 

/ 

(16)1,432 

7 

(2)559 

(1)877 

S6 

89 

e 

99 
t 
57 

(2)200 
S 
80 
5 

564 

(1) 157 
(1)963 

213 
21 
6M 

(7)1,325 

/ 

(3)1.012 

- t 




8 


b. Pigliron 


(1)13 


(5)628 


d. Briige and structural iron ...... 


/ 


43 

""(1)22 
16 


(16)1.507 

(3)606 
(1)935 


h. Cutlery . , 


21 

/ 
3 

1 


121 


i. To0l8 and dies i 

k. Firearms » 


9 

116 

5 

63 






f 


•m. Metal furniture . » 


13 


(2)230 




I 


n. Wire work not elsewhere classified 


3 


101 

s 


p. Car wheels and railway equip- 
ment 


22 

15 
24 

4 


601 


q. Architectural and ornamental 
iron work 


(1) 174 


r. Cooking and heating apparatus. 
8. Typewriting and registering 
machine , , 


(1)1.01« 
232 




t7 


t. Stationary engines, boilers, etc. . 
u. Machinery not elsewhere classi- 
fied... 


35 
• 56 


708 

(7)1.457 

f 


r,-<!^#£fTqt*-'- -" "• '• 


62 


(3)1.103 




a * 


Total 


25 


337 


(37)8.892 
8$ 


(2)852 


(39);9,606 




no 


4. Electrical Apparatus: 

a. Tele^ph, telephpne and fire 
autfm aDoaratus 


M 
F 
M 

F 






19 

4 

i 


508 

se 

8 
f 


5 

/ 


532 


b. Incaodesoeot lampt* . 


Bl 
8 






4 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 143 

T^le vn.— Numbed. Age and Sex of Pereons Reported Injured Iti Factories, Mines, Quarries, and 
Boilding and Engineering Work, by Industries — Continued. 

(Figures in pareDthesen indicate fatal cases.) 



Inovstrt. 



Sex. 



Accidents 
before 
Oct. 1, 
1910. 

reported 
after 

Nov. I, 
1910. 



AoE or EupiiOYm Injcebd in Acctdbvib Octobbs 1, 1910. 
TO Sbptbmbbk 30, 1911. RspoR-nED Prior to Novshbbr 
1. 1911. 



Under 
16yT8. 



1&18 
yrs. 



18yT8. 



Not 
stated. 



Totsl. 



II . MCTALB, MaCHINBS AND CONTITANCBS 

-Condudei, 

4. Electrical Apparatus— CondiMM. 

c Dynamos, motors and electrical 
supplies 


A. 

M 

F 


FACTOR 

26 

I 


[ES — Co 
4 


nUnyui. 

89 
19 


(3)2.233 
76 


1 


(3)2,358 
97 




Total 


M 

F 


26 
/ 


4 


108 
26 


(3)2,749 


37 


(3)2.898 




5. Vdiicks: 

a. Carriages, wagons and sleighs. . . 

b. BlacksmiUiing and wheelwright- 

iag 


M 

M 

F 
M 


7 

i 

(1)7 

i 

(1)1 

(1)56 


2 

i 


1 
1 

■ (1)34 
124 


(1)97 

4 

8 

(2)1.429 

/ 

79 

(3)2,5i6 

(21)5.662 


13 

4 


(1)111 
9 


c. Cyc& 







79 


(2)1,644 
/ 




e. Cars 




79 


f . Locomotives 


li 
116 


(4) 2 591 




(21)5 903 






Total 


M 

F 


(3)73 


3 


(1) 195 


(27)9.825 

1 


223 


(2S) 10 246 




/ 








A Boat and Shin Buildins 


M 


(1)9 


* 


(1)20 


(4) 574 


37 


(5) 635 








M 

F 


18 




(1)16 


(2)776 
g 


20 


(3)812 
2 










a. Professional and scientific instru- 
ments 


M 

F 

M 

F 

M 

F 
M 

F 

M 

F 


1 

3 

2 


1 

5 

! 


8 
5 

19 

/ 

4 

/ 

2 



33 

7 


67 

7 

226 

29 

112 

fj 
14 
37 

/ 


9 

7 


85 


b. Optical and photographic appa- 
ratus 


17 
256 




SI 


c. Lamps, reflectors, stereoptioons, 
etc 


5 



1 


l"i2 


d. Clocks and time recorders 

c. Scales, metcni. phonographs, etc 


li 

40 
/ 




22 




Total 


6 


! 


486 
43 


517 




% 



9. Sorting Old Metals 

Total— Oronji II 

III. Wood MANrrAcnHEfl. 
l.-Saw Mill Products t 



3. Planing Mill Products: 
a. House trim 



39 



M 

F 



h. Packing boxee, crates, etc . 
e. Cinar and fancy wood boxes 
ToUl 



(2) 38 



(41870 


r70) 25.223 


lO-i 


4S-y 


— -- — ~ 


'-^==~— ~ — — 


V' 


(4)6JJ- 


26 


(oV672 


H 


108 



(3iS07 Ofii 



6JJ-^ • -- iJiJ--^- 



/ , 
21 -f 



43 

6 r> 



■i\)71 



t6)7.tO 
/ 
VA 
I 
(1)21 




3. •Cooperage 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



144 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



Table VII.— Nnnber, Afe and Sex of Peraona Reported IiUored In Factories, 
Bnlldiiig and Engliieerlng Worii, by Induatriea — Contfaiaed. 

(FigUTM in parentheaea indicate fatal caoee.) 



Minea. Quarrtea, and 



Industbt. 



Sex. 



Accidents 

before 
Oct. 1, 

1910. 
reported 

after 
Nov. 1. 

1910. 



AoB or Emplotbu IwrRKO in Accidbntb Octobbe 1, 1910. 
TO Septbmbbr 30, 1911. Rbpobtbd Priob to Notbmbbr 
1, 1911. 



Ucder 
leyrs. 



16-18 
yra. 



18 yn. 

+ 



Not 
stated. 



Total. 



m. Wood Mikufactubbb— Conrfwferf. 
4. Wood. Tamed and Carved: 


A. 
M 


FACTOR] 

3 

2 


ES— Co 


3 

11 


(1)38 
128 




1 


c. Wooden toys and ooveltaeB 

e. Other articles and a|>pUanoes of 
wood 


1 
(1)26 


(1)42 
(1)166 






Total 


M 


6 




14 


(1) 167 


(1)27 


(2)208 






5. Furniture and Cabinet Work: 

b. Csskets 


M 

F 
M 
P 
M 
P 
M 
P 
M 


12 

/ 

4 

2 


1 


84 

2 

i 
21 
f 

1 

4 


(2)357 

(1)22 

(1)220 

10 

(1)49 


88 
1 
4 


(2)480 
(1)38 






e. Store, office and kitchen fixtures. 


4 


(1)246 


d. Mirror and picture frames 




11 




1 




3 


(1)66 






Total 


M 

F 


18 
1 


1 


62 

4 


(5)658 
6 


49 


(5)770 




It 


6. Pianos, Organs, Etc 


M 

P 


12 


(1)3 
. i 


12 

1 


(3)158 

1 


28 
1 


(4)301 




4 


7. Brooms, Cork, Etc.: 

a. PuId and fiber soods 


M 
F 
M 

P 
M 


i 


i 


i 

i 

1 


23 
5 
3 
1 

'I 

19 

(1)5 




23 






8 


b. Mats and woven goods 


1 
2 
2 


4 


0. Brooms 


6 


d. Articles of cork 


23 




4 


e. Pipes (smoking) 


1 


21 


f , Firnproofing himbw 


(1)6 








Total 


M 

P 


1 


1 


2 

1 


(1)72 
6 


6 


(1)81 




7 








Total — Group III 


M 

F 

M 

P 


(2)86 


(2)10 

1 


134 
6 


(19)1.980 
IS 


(2)186 


(23) 2,309 




i4 


IV. Lbathbb and Rubbbr Goods. 
1. Leather 




1 


3 

2 


(2)104 


3 


(2)111 




jl 










2. Furs and Fur Goods 


M 

F 


1 




6 
f 


41 
B 


1 


47 




5 


3. Leather and Canvas Goods: 


M 

P 
M 

P 

M 
P 
M 
P 
M 
P 


8 

1 
3 

i 


1 

i 

i 

6 

4 

i 




5 

t 

4 
31 
15 

i 


9 
5 

(1)15 

/ 

9 

(2)220 

tr 

8 

/ 

(1)6 
5 
2 
1 




10 


b. Saddlery and harness 


2 


7 

(1)18 




8 


f- Traveling begs and trunks 




14 


d. Boots and shoes 


9 
$ 

1 


(2)266 


e. Gk>ves and mittens 


48 

9 




/ 


f . Fsnev leather soods 




(1)6 






5 


g. Canvas and sporting goods 




3 




1 








Total 


M 
P 


12 

I 


10 

4 


36 
80 


'«^ 


12 
8 


(«« 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 146 



TftMe- VII. — Niimb«r» Age and Sex of Peraens Reported IiUored In Fftetorles, Mines* Qnarriee, and 
Bnlldliig end Badneering Werk, by Indostrles — Contlniied. 

(Figures in parentheses indicate fatal cases.) 



Industrt. 



Sex. 



AceidentB 1 

before 

Octl, 

1910, 
reported 

after 
Nov. 1, 

1910. 



Ao« OF EMFLOTBn Injubbd in Accidsntb Octobbb 1, 1910, 
TO Sbptbmbxr 30, 1911. Rbportido Prior to Novbmbbr 
1, 1911. 


Under 
IfiyiB. 


16-18 
yrs. 


18yra. 


Not 
stated. 


Total. 



IV. Lbjltbib aud Rubbbb Goods— ConcTd 
4. Robber and Gutta Pereha Goods 


A. 

M 

F 


FACTOR 

1 


lES— C« 

1 
i 


7 


99 
10 




107 






IS 








«. Artielfls of Pearl. Horn, Bone. Hair. Etc.: 
a. Pesrl buttons, handles, etc 


M 

F 

M 

F 
M 


2 


3 


1 
» 

5 

1 


24 
IS 

109 

11 

(1)12 


1 


26 
16 


b. Artides of horn. bone, tortoise 
shell, etc 


4 
$ 

1 


121 


c. Brashes ■ 


16 

(1)14 




Total 


M 
F 


2 


3 


7 
6 


(1) 145 


6 
t 


(1) m 

SI 




Totij — Group IV 


M 

F 

M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

F 


16 
/ 

1 

i2 

"(i)'i6 


16 

6 


58 
SI 


(7)657 
7» 


22 
8 


(7)752 




V. CHBMicue. Oils, Padhb. E>rc. 

1. Drugs and Chemioah: 

a. Proprietary medicines 


i 


6 
1 

17 

6 

(1)21 

4 


11 
6 

(2)983 

A 

(6)562 

IS 


3 


20 




e 


b. Sodas and other alkaUes 


(1)35 


(3)1.035 
9 


d. Other chemicak and drup 


28 


(7)611 
19 


Total 


M 

F 


(1)23 


i 


(1)44 
10 


(8)1.556 


(1)66 

1 


(10)1.666 




S4 


2. Paints. D^es and Colors: 

a. Pamt. varnish, etc 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

F 


4 

i 

i 


i 


3 

1 
2 

3 

e 


49 

(1)24 
1 

16 
IS 


8 


60 




5 


b. Pjr^i eoknv and inks 


2 


(1)28 




2 


c. Lead pencils and crayons 


1 
1 


20 
BO 


Total 


M 

F 


6 


i 


8 
7 


(1)89 

le 


11 

/ 


(1)108 




96 


3. Wood Alcohol and Essential Oib 


M 








(2)23 


(2) 


(4)23 


4. Animal Oil Products 


M 


4 




2 


(3)31 


(1)5 


(4)39 






5. Mineral OH Products 


M 

F 


10 




5 


(1)79 
6 


5 


(1)89 












6. Soap Perfumery and Cosmetics 


M 

F 


3 


1 


8 
6 


(4) 113 
6 


3 

1 


(4)126 
li 


b. Starch 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 


3 

"(1)1 


i 


2 

2 

4 

I 


47 

23 

(1)105 

S 

68 
10 

1 




49 


c. Ghw. mncilsffe. etc 




23 


diFaSiSB!?^. ..:::::::::: 


1 


(1)108 




5 


e. Matches and explosives . ... 




72 






18 


. f.CdluIoid and other plastics 




1 






Total 


M 

F 


(1)5 


i 


8 
1 


(1)244 
IS 


1 


(1)253 




16 








To^ — Group V 


M 
F 


(2)51 


1 

5 


(1)75 


(20)2.135 
61 


(4)92 


(25)2,303 




9S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



146 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table Vn.— Nnmber, Age and Sex of Peraona Reported Injured In Faeteriea, Mliiea, Qnarrlea, and 
BaOdlng and Engineering Work, by Indnatriea — Contfnned. 

(FigureA in parentheses indicate fatal oases.) 



Imdustkt. 



Sex. 



Aocidents 
bef(ve 
Oct. 1, 
1910. 

reported 
after 

Nov. 1, 
1910. 



AGS or EimoTSEs Injtkeo in AccrosinB Octobbr 1, 1910, 
TO Sbptexber 30, 1911. Rbpobtbd Priob ro Novucbbr 
1. 1911. 



Under 
leyrs. 



ie>18 
yrs. 



ISyrs. 



Not 
stated. 



Total. 



A. FACTORIES— Confuiaetf. 



VI. Papbb and Pulp. 
1. Pulp and Paper 

Vn. Pbhtiino and PAPxa Goods. 

1. Type and Printere' Materials 

2. Paper Goods: 

a. Paper boxes and tubes 

b. Paper bags and sacks 

c. Othor paper goods 

Total 

3. Printinff and Book Nfaking: 

a. Printing and publismng 

b. Bookbinding and blank-book 

milking 

c. Lithographing and engraving 

d. Games and novelties 

ToUl 

4. Wall Paper 

5. Photography 

Total — Group VII 

VIII. TxxmM. 

1. Silk and Silk Goods 

2. Wool Manufactures: 

a. Carpets and rugs 

b. Felt and felt goods 

p. Woolens and woretcdf. 

Total 

3. Cotton Goods. 

4. Hosiery and Knit Goods 



M 


(1)37 


2 


32 


(21)1.464 


68 


(21)1,566 


f 






1 


6 


/ 


8 


M 








1 




1 






M 


1 


4 


43 


142 


13 


202 


y 




4 


S6 


81 


17 


188 


M 


4 




2 


53 


1 


56 


y 


1 




6 


9 




14 


M 


3 




8 


04 


7 


79 


^ 




S 


li 


U 


2 


89 


M 


8 


4 


53 


259 


21 


337 


y 


1 


7 


6S 


Hi 


19 


m 


M 


11 


8 


68 


(2)408 


•(2)50 


(4)534 


y 


S 




// 


S8 


2 


61 


M 




1 


12 


56 


8 


77 


y 




S 


8 


22 


5 


88 


M 


5 


1 


17 


(1)105 


(1)7 


(2) 130 


■ y 






6 


12 


/ 


/8 


M 






I 





4 


14 


y 






i 






$ 








M 


16 


10 


98 


(3)578 


(3)69 


(6)755 


y 


S 


5 


M 


72 


8 


109 


M 


1 


1 


2 


7 


1 


21 


i ^ 






1 


1 




2 






M 


25 


15 


154 


(3)856 


(3)91 


r6) 1,116 


y 


4 


10 


79 


184 


27 


aoo 


M 


2 




12 


30 


10 


52 


y 




1 


12 


24 


7 


44 


M 


2 


1 


13 


(3) 138 


4 


(3)156 


y 




/ 


7 


67 


2 




M 


1 




1 


25 


I 


27 


y 









3 




3 


M 


2 


«> 


14 


(1)157 


4 


(1)177 


y 


1 


/ 


4 


35 


5 


• 4S 


M 


6 


3 


28 


(4)320 


9 


(4)360 


y 


/ 


t 


// 


105 


7 


126 


M 


5 


4 


26 


329 


9 


368 


y 


/ 




t4 


75 


S 


92 


M 


15 


4 


43 


(1)339 


17 


(1)403 


y 


1 


4 


27 


120 


9 


180 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repoet of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



147 



Tftble VIL— Nnmber, Afe and S«z of Parsons Reported liUnrad In Factories. 
Building and Engineering WotIe, by Indnstries ■ 

(Figures in parentheses indicate fatal cases.) 



Mines. Quarries, and 



Indubtrt. 



Sex. 



Aeoidoits 
before 
Oct.1, 
1910. 

reported 
after 

Nov. 1, 
1910. 



AoB or Emplotih Injurio m AoaDaim Octobsb 1, 1910. 
TO Sbptbicbkr 30, 1911. Rbportbd Puor to NovaiiBaR 
1,1911. 



Under 
WyiB. 



1&-18 
yiB. 



18 yn. 

+ 



Not 



Total. 



6. Oth« Textiles of Silk. Wool or Cotton: 

a- DynivK, finifihing, «>t4^ , 


A 

M 

F 
M 

P 

M 

F 


. FACTOI 

1 


IIES— C 
1 

1 
/ 


9 
8 

8 

3 
11 


115 

go 

10 
7 

13 

18 


8 


183 




88 




2 


12 




10 


e. Braids, embroideries and drees 
trimmings 





17 




8 


55 


Total 


M 
F 


1 


2 
i 


12 
17 


138 
4S 


10 
8 


182 




86 




M 

F 


11 


1 


17 
14 


(9)75 
87 


5 


WW 

61 








7. Oikloth, Window Shades, Ete 


M 

F 




1 


5 

6 


113 
8 


9 
1 


128 




16 


Total — Group VIII 


M 

F 


39 
5 


15 
8 


143 
101 


(14)1,344 
414 


69 
50 


(14)1,571 




668 


IX. CLorania, Milunbrt, Lauitort, 
Etc. 

1. Men's Garments and FunushingB: 
a. Tailoring 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

F 

M 


3 

6 

i 


2 

...... 


2 
6 
21 
16 

1 
/ 


52 

60 
2 

4 

1 


(2)8 

(1)10 
10 


(2)63 


br Shirts, coIIimt and OMfTf, , , 


86 
(\) 136 


c. Men's neckwew 


88 
3 






6 


d. Suspenders and other furnishing 
goods 




1 








Total 


M 

F 


8 

1 


3 

4 


24 


158 

88 


(3)18 
18 


(3)203 




188 


2. Women's Garments and PumishingB: 
a. DresB making 


M 
F 
M 

F 

M 
F 


(1)1 


i 

1 

2 


3 
i 

3 

6 
1 


(1)17 

ti 

6 

9 
1 
1 
2 
/ 


(19)* 20 

(187)* 188 

3 

8 


(20)40 


b. Women's white goods 


{187) 168 
12 


c. Infant's wear 


18 
8 


d. I^Kiies' neckwear, etc . 




1 


e. Concts, Karters. etc. . 




2 






/ 








Total 


M 

F 


(1)1 


1 
J 


6 

8 


(1)26 
32 


(19)23 
(li7) 140 


(20)55 




{li7) 183 


3t Mffl'fi Rats and rans 


M 

F 






5 

■ 8 


36 

4 


2 


43 




8 


4. Women's Headwear: 

a. Artificial rrathem and flownn 


M 

F 


i 




2 

1 
/ 


4 
3 
6 




6 


b Milfinerv 




4 






7 








Total 


M 

F 


1 




.3 

1 


7 

a 




10 






7 









'* Killed in Ascb Building fire. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



148 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table vn.— Nninber, A^e and Sex of Peraona Reported IiUivad In Faetorlea, Mlnea, Quarriea, and 
BoUdlng and Engineering Work, by Indnalrlea — Conttnoed. 

(Figures in parentheses indicate fatal cases.) 



Indistrt. 



Sex. 



Accidents 
before 
Oct.1, 
1010. 

reported 
after 

Nov. 1. 
1910. 



AoB or Emplotus Iiuubbo in Acodbntb Ogtobsb 1, 1010, 
TO SapmiBBa 30. 1011. RBPOinsD Puoa to NorxMBsa 
1. 1011. 



Under 
16 yn. 



16-18 
yrs. 



18vr«. 



Not 
stated. 



Total. 



IX. CiiOranfO. MnxmiBT. Laumdbt, 
Etc. — Condnded. 

6. Miscellaneous Needle Work: 

a. Curtains, embroideries, etc 

c. Umbrellas and parasols 

Total 

6. Laundering, Custom Dydng, Etc.: 

a. Laondries (non-Cbinese) 

b. Cleaning and dyeing 

Total 

7. Clip Sorting 

Total— Group IX 

X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco. 

1. Groceries: 

a. Flour and other cereal products. 

b. Sugar and molasses refining 

c. Fruits and vegetables canning 

and preserving 

d. Coflfee and spices roasting and 

grinding 

e. Groceries not ebewhere classified. 

Total 

2. Provisions 

3. Dairy Products 

4. Bakery Products, Confeetionenr. Etc.: 

a Macaroni and other food pastes. . 

b. Crackers and biscuits 

c. Bread and other bakery products 

d. Confectionery and ice cream — 

Total 



A. 

M 

F 
M 


FACTOR 


lES — C« 


nUnuad. 

1 

7 


6 

10 
2 


1 
/ 


8 
18 
2 






M 

F 






1 

7 


8 

to 


1 


10 
18 


M 
F 
M 

F 


1 
4 
1 




(1)2 
7 


(1)31 
18 
6 

1 


2 

S 

(1)3 


(2)» 
(1)« 

I 






M 

F 


2 

4 




(1)2 
7 


(1)37 
19 


(1)6 
6 


(8)44 
51 


M 

F 

M 

F 






i 


1 


1 


3 








(1)12 

s 


4 

7 


(1)41 
SO 


(2)272 
169 


(23)50 
(1S7) 160 


(26)367 
{1»7)S76 


M 

F 
M 

F 

M 

F 

M 

F 
M 

F 


I 

'ii)'\2 

4 


8 


2 

3 

4 

i 


(5)209 
5 

(2)517 
7 

(1) 112 
15 

2 

S 

(1)74 

1 


8 


(5)219 
5 


6 


(2)526 
7 


6 
f 


(1)122 
19 

2 


1 




5 


' 2 

1 




3 

1 


(1)78 
5 


M 

F 


a) 19 
s 


is 


10 
5 


(9)914 

rr 


28 

5 


(9)047 
55 


M 

F 


(1)5 




6 

1 


(3)280 
7 


22 


(3)808 
5 






M 

F 

M 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 


4 




5 


(2)103 

7 


9 

/ 


(2) 117 


2 

2 

"(1)3 

2 

/ 


i 

1 


1 

1 

29 

to 

(1)1 
/ 
7 
t 


7 


5 


13 


328 

(1)50 

50 
15 


4 


362 
99 


12 

/ 
10 


(2)63 
5 
67 

/a 


M 

F 


(1)9 

t 


I 


(1)38 
H 


(1)435 
68 


31 
5 


(2)505 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Kbpobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 149 

Table Vn.— Namber, Age and Sex of Peraons Reported Injured In Faetorlea, Mines* Qnarriea, and 
Bottding and Engineerliig Work, by Inda aUl ea — Contiaiied. 

(Figures in parentheses indicate fatal cases.) 



iNDuarar. 



Sex. 



Aondents 

before 
Oct. 1, 

1910, 
reported 

after 
Nov. 1. 

1910. 



Aai or EnTLoms Injurbd m Aocidbnib Octobbr 1, 1910. 
TO SapTiMBiR 30. 1911. RaposTBD Puoa to Novbicbbr 
1. 1911. 



Under 
l6yT8. 



16-18 
yre. 



18 yn. 

+ 



Not 
stated. 



Total. 



A. FACTORIES — ConcJtttW. 



X. Food. Liqvobs and Tob4Cco — 
Concluded. 

5. Beverages: 

a. Artjfioial ice 

b. Cider, xrape juice, etc 

c. Mineral and soda watn 

d. Malt 

e. Malt liquors 

f . Vinous and distilled liquors 

g. Miscellaneous bottling 

Total 

6. Tobacco Products: 

a. Tobacco and snuff 

b. Cigars 

c. Cigarettes 

Total 

Total — (}roupX 

XI. Water, Light and Powbr. 

1. Water 

2. Gas 

4. Electric Li^t and Power 

5. Steam Heat and Power 

6. Garbsge Disposal. Etc 

Total — Group XI 

XII. ButLDiNG Industry. 

1. Carpenters' Shops 

2. Paint Shops 

3. Plumbers' Shops 

Total — Group XII 

XIII. MlBCBLLANXOCS. 

1. Elevators in Tenant Factory Buildings 

2. Warehousing and Cold Storage 

Total — Group Xni 

Total — Factories 

1. Mines 

2. Quarries 

Total 



M 

P 
M 

u 


3 

1 
(1)1 

■"(1)6 




1 


i 

4 


38 
33 
44 


(1)4 
2 
14 


(1)42 
36 
63 

s 


13 

10 (10) 339 
1 2 

2 


(1)6 
(3)35 


(1)19 

(13)384 

3 


1 


3 


M 

F 


(2)11 


1 


16 (10)471 


(5)62 


(15)550 
5 






M 

F 
M 

F 


i 


i 


3I 




4 


2 

1 

1 
4i 


17 

/ 

(1)155 

63 


1 
1 


21 
S 

(I) 156 


1 


106 


M 

F 


2 


1 


6 
4i 


(1)173 
64 


1 
2 


(1) 181 
108 


M 

F 


(5)50 
4 


3 

S 


(1)81 
7/ 


(26)2,376 
173 


(5) 148 
9 


(32)2,608 
B66 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

M 

F 


"" i3 

(3)15 
"(1)8 


i 


2 

6 


13 

(4)738 

(13) 746 

(1)12 

45 


1 


14 
/ 


(i)20 


(5)760 
1 


42 

(1)2 

1 


(13) 704 

(2)14 

46 


(4)36 
S 


1 


8 


(18)1,668 

1 


(2)66 


(20)1,628 






M 


1 




-i I 


2 


6 
5 




2 


2 


4 


M 


1 




I 


10 


4 


15 


M 


1 


1 




(2)6 
2 


2 


(2)9 
2 






M 


1 


1 




(2)8 


2 


(2)11 


M 

F 


(29)764 

ts 


(2)120 
4M 


(7)1.624 
476 


(225)38.556 
1,690 


(43)1.653 

(127)248 


(277)41,953 
(187)t.SB6 



B. MINES AND QUARRIES. 



M 


(1)36 
(1)19 


i 


3 
2 


(17)405 1 
(3)417 


22 

(1)21 


(17)430 
(4)441 


M 


(2)55 


1 


5 


(20)822 


(1)43 


(21) 871 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



160 



New Yoek State Depaetment of Labob. 



Tftble vn.— Number, Age end Sex of Pereone Reported Injured in Fectorlee, Mlnee, Qnerrlea, end 
id Engineering Work, by Indnetries — Condnded. 

(Figures in parentheses indicate fatal cases.) 



Industry. 



Sex. 



AceidentB 

before 

Oct. 1. 

1910, 

reported 

after 

Nov. 1. 

1910. 



AoB or EifpLOTEKS Ikjitkxd m Acobsxts Octobkr 1, 1910. 
TO Skptbmbrr 30. 1911. Rbportsd Prior to Notrmbir 
1. 1911. 



Under 
Ifiyrs. 



16-18 
yra. 



18 yrs. 



Not 
sUted. 



Total. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING. 



I. EXCAVATINO. 



1. Open Excavations: 

a. Aqueducts. . 

b. Canals 

c. Foundations. 



1. Concrete. 

2. Piling. . . . 
d. Other 



ToUl... 

, Shafts and Tunnels: 

a. Aqueducts. . . 

b. Subways 

c. Other 



Total. 



3. Dredging 

Total— Group I 

II. Erectino and Structural Wor». 

1. Iron and Steel 

2. Masonry 

3. Concrete 

4. Wood A ■■.•.■•. 

5. Structural Work (Branch not Specified) 



ToUl— Group II. 



III. FiNisHiNa AND Furnishing. 
1. Roofint? (Except Sheet Metal) 



2. Sheet Metal Work 

3. Wood Finishing 

4. Glasing 

6. Tile Leyinj!, Mantel-setting, Etc. 

6. Painting and Decorating 

7. Plumbintt, Piping. Etc 

8. Electrical Wiring and Installation 

9. Installation of Machinery, Boilers. Ele- 

vators, Etc. 



Total— Group III. 



IV. Whrckino and Moving. . . 

V. Othxr or Miscbllanrous. 

1. Road Making and Paving 

2. Raiboad Construction 

3. Dock BuiWing 



a. Piers 

b. Dry docks. 



Total — Group V 

Total — BuiUing, Etc. 
Grand Total 



(3)59 

' ' " (1) 



(4)59 



(4)59 



(4)59 ' 



(35) 878 

U 

(35)903 



(1)1 



(30)734 

(23)1,082 

(3) 370 



13 

(5) 339 
(2)27 



(1)37 



(1)216 

(2)155 

(17)885 



(73)3.071 



(30)1.500 
(7)700 
(6)812 



(43)3.012 



(1)12 

(1)15 
(1)89 



(8)468 



(1)129 

(1) 139 

14 



(2)282 



(1)16 



(1)50 j (117)6.099 



83 



2 

(1)6 

8 



(1)26 



(17)808 

(22)1,070 

(9)1,153 

(9) 562 

(5)241 



(62)3.834 



(11)34 

(7)77 

(1)13 

15 

4 

(10)117 

(5) .^46 

(23) 562 

(6)188 



(63)1,356 



(6)100 



1 , (6)226 

(1)6 (35)1.692 
(1)5 (3)244 



(1)5 



1 



(2)12 



(10) 750 



(7)170 

(5)216 

(10)111 

43 

(2)49 



(24)589 



4 

(1)12 
(1)5 



(2)37 
(2)56 
(1)66 

12 



(7)194 



39 ' 
(3)206 I 



(44)2.162 



9 (4)121 (292)13,651 



(2) 130 
(2) 172 



(11)1.750 
(11)2,226 



(537)52,929 

1,590 

(537)54,519 



(5) 148 



(30)765 

(29)1.433 

(5)398 



(2) 227 

(3) 171 
(18)983 



(82)3,579 



(31)1.638 
(8)811 
(6)829 



(45)3,308 



(1)16 



(128)6,903 



(24)984 

(27)1,296 

(19) 1.278 

(9)608 

(7)294 



(86)4.460 



(11)38 

(8)94 

(2)19 

19 

4 

(12) 156 

(8)408 

(24)636 

(6)202 



(71)1,576 



(6) 112 



(1)15 (7)242 

(4)124 t (40)1.823 

9 (4)258 



4 43 

5 (4) 215 



(51)2,323 



(46)1,693 ' (342)15,374 



(60)3,389 

(167) iA8 

(217)3.a§7 



(640)58,198 
(lt7)gJS6^ 

(7»«a;55r 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection^ 1911. 151 

tablb vm.— particulars op fatal accidbnts. 



IXOrtTRT AND OCCUPATION. 




Partioulars. 



A. FACTORIES. 



I. Stcnb. Clay and Glass 
Pkoducts. 
1. Stone. 

b. Cut stone. 

♦Laborer 



2. MiM'ellaneou^) Mineral Products, 
a. Asbestos, graphite, etc. 

Forpmnn 



3. Lime. Cement and Plaster, 
a. Awhalt 
♦I 



Laborer . 



♦Laborer. 



Laborer. 



b. Cement and lime, 
laborer 



Machinist . 



MiUwright helper. 



Tunnelman . 



o. Plaster (wall and land). 
Charging mixer 

Deck hand 

MiUer 

d. Sifted sand and mortar. 
♦Laborer 



Brakeman . 



18 + 



55 



as 

40 



54 
35 



24 



35 



30 
40 



57 



M Raised one end of marble block which toppled 
over on him causing death. 



M Was tightening nut on clutch when briquetting 
machine was started catching his hand and 
throwing him over machine. Four ribs on 
left side wore broken and his head and palm 
of right hand were cut. Died two days after 
accident . 



M Taking care of asphalt melting tanks, he fell 
into tank half full of hot asphalt. Died 
from bums. 

M Standing on mixing floor looking up elevator 
shaft while elevator was stopped at floor 
above; signal wa« given ana elevator de- 
f<cended. striking man. pinning him between 
floor of mixing platform and elevator. Died 
from cut head and internal injuries. 

M Was feeding the coal crusher through a grating 
and used his foot to force coal through the 
grating. His foot caught in the rolls of the 
crusher causiDg injuries which necessitated 
the amputation of his leg above the knee. 
The man died the next day. 

M Found lying face down between crusher and 
loading track for crusher. He died shortly 
after beins found. Cause of death not known. 

M In order to move an overhead trolley along its 
track he fastened a rope to it. The other 
end of the rope he threw over a revolving 
line shaft where it caught. While trying to 
loosen the rope the man was caught, whirled 
around the shaft and thrown to the floor 
with great iorce. breaking his arm and 
crushing his cheat. He died the next day. 

M Injured man wa<) working on coal elevator 
over the coalpit. He lost his balance and 
fell to the bottom of the pit fracturing his 
skull. He died the next day. 

M Uncovered conveyor so that he could feed 
machine faster. He lost his balance and fell 
into conveyor where both legs were severed 
at the hips. Died seven hours later. 

M Man fell into the bin and was smothered to 

death by its contents. 
M Was caught by a loose line on a steam lighter, 

pulled ai^nst the " bit " and squeesed. 

causing internal injuries which resulted 

fatally. 
M The man was found dead, his neck, shoulder. 

and ankle being broken. Cause of accident 

is unknown. 



45 M 



33 I M 



♦ Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, 

t 18 + is used where there is evidence the dec* 

on the blank. 



In boat, was placing clam shell bucket unload- 
ing gravel from boat when bucket swung 
against him crushing him against bulkhead. 
Died from fractured wrist, collar bone, ribs 
and punctured lung. 

Man was standing on truss rod on the side of 
car. His foot slipped causing him to fall 
under the car; wheel ran over his head 
causing instant death. 

rted after November 1, 1910. 
was over 18 although the age was not stated 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



162 New York State Department of Labor. 

Table Vm.— Pwtlealan of Fatal Acddenta — Contiiiiwd. 



Industry and Occupation. 




Particulars. 



A. FACTORIES — Continued. 
I. Stons. Clat and Glaba 
Pboducts — C&nduded. 

3. Lime, Cement and Plaster — Con- 
dudwi. 
d. Sifted sand and mortar — 
Conduded, 
Engineer 55 M 



Laborer. 



4. Brick, Tile and Pottery, 
a. Building brick. 

Cart driver 

Laborer 

^Laborer 

Trucker 

* (Occupation not stated) 



II. Mbtals. MACHiNxa and 

CONYBTANCBS. 

1. Qold, ^ver and Precious Stones, 
a. Silver and plated ware. 

Pick up work 



2. Copper, Lead, Z*nc, Etc. 
a. Smelting and refining. 
Assistant electrician. 



*In electrolytic department 



Laborer. 



d. Gas and electric fixtures. 

(Occupation not stated).. . 



e. Bras« and bronxe ware, n. 
Lathe hand 



28 



27 

42 

18 + 

42 

18 + 



17 



20 



24 



22 



21 



42 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Supposed to have been caught by slack part 
of hip rubber boots on knuckle joint on shaft 
and whirled aroimd shaft. Died from 
fractured skiiU and legs. 

Instead of using the walk which led to an 
elevated lime crusher, the man walked up 
a plankf probably Lost his balance and 
struck his head aeainst a fly wheel causing 
instant death. 



Injured person was placing lumps of clay on 
top of nis cart. Somehow fell to the ground, 
breaking his back. Death resulted twenty- 
seven days later. 

A piece of clay fell from clay bank, struck man 
and broke his neck. 

Sprocket wheel on sand screen broke and a 
piece of easting fell and hit him on top of 
nead. Killed from compound depreoaed 
fracture of skull. 

Clay bank gave way crushing man against 
cart. He received internal injuries which 
caused death. 

Was helping employee falling a bank of clay 
and was standing on top of bank falling with 
the bank. Covered by clay and smothered. 



Was taking work from back of roll mill and 
reached over a pair of i^rs which caught 
his jumper and wound him around the jack 
shaft. He recdved some amall cuts and 
both legs were broken off above ankle. In- 
jured man died in hospital. 



Tried to fill a water rheostat with water be- 
fore the feeder switch had been thrown out. 
His hand came in contact with a iar at 
11,000 volts potential which killed him 
instantly. 

Was suffocated by breathing sulphuretted 
hydrogen evolved by apparatus of which 
he had charge. 

Fell into hole formed by coal dropping into 
chute, slipping down on coal, slightly frosen, 
which collapsed and covered the man, caus- 
ing death. 

Climbed up elevator cable and was unable to 
land from cable; had to slide down again 
and lost hold, falling to death. 



fell, striking head on hand 
floor. Died from cerebral 



Stumbled and 
roller and on 
hemorrhage. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18+ is used where there is evidence the deceasied was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report, of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 153 



TBUt Tin.— Partlealan of Fatal Acddenta — ContiMied. 



Indcbtbt and Occupation. 




Particulars. 



A. FACTO JOES— Continued. 



II. Mbtaub. Machinss and Con> 
VKY AH CKBr— Continued. 

2. Copper, Lead. Zinc, Etc. — ConcCd. 
I. Sheet metal work. 

Laborer 



Pr*^s hand. 



Truckman . 



Iron and Steel Products, 
b. Pig iron. 

Cast house heli)er. 



Fireman and brakeman. 



Laborer, 
house. 



helper in stock 



Laborer (riggers) . 



Loader. 



Rolling mills and steel worka 
Buggy man 



Carpenter. 



Engineer. 



Engineer. 



Helper. 



Helper 

Helper 

Helper in gas plant. 



Laborer, 
laborer. 



Laborer.. 
♦Laborer. 



34 



31 



18 + 



22 

18 + 



22 



45 



27 



25 



50 



60 



26 



30 

28 



30 



24 
50 



35 
32 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Getting coal from ooal bin on side of spur 
track, crossed track and was hit by last car 
of a string bumped by an engine at other 
end. Dragged between wheel and car 
frame and lolled. 

Operating power drawing press; easting 
around crank shaft broke and a piece falling 
hit man on head. Died on same day of 
injury. 

Pile of sheet steel fell on man, crushed head 
causing death. 



While drawing cinders with tonn. lost balance 
and fell into cinder pit. Scalded to death. 

Riding on front end of gondola car, fell off and 
run over. Leg cut off and cuts on back re- 
sulting fatally. 

Man was scooping ore into ore barrow and 
when ore started to sbde, was buried and 
suffocated. 

Man in rigging gang swinging cables on crane, 
was hit Dv boom suddenly falling which was 
suspended by own power about 8 feet above 
ground. Rupture of abdomen and bodily 
lacerations caused death. 

Blocking wheels of oars; in going between cars, 
just before coming together, caught between 
drawheads. Crushed abdomen caused death. 

Handle of buggy gave a quick turn, catching 
man in stomach, causing death. Was put- 
ting large ingot in furnace and didn't run 
bu^pi^ to furnace door straight. 

Repairing roof, slipped and fell to ground, 
causing fracture ot base of skull and dislo- 
cated hip resulting in death. 

Strap on connecting rod at crosi head broke, 
letting piston through and knocking out head 
of cylinder, which let steam into room, 
scalding the man to death. 

While cleaning out gutter of glass skylight on 
roof, stepped on we glass which didn t sus- 
tain him. Fall of about 15 feet resulted 
fatally. 

Tuyere blew out and flames set fire to clothing 
resulting in 2d-3d degree bums of entire 
body, causing death. 

Flames from blow hole burned body, causing 
death. 

Ash hoist counterweight hit him on head, 
fracturing skull. 

Overcome by gas in gas producer, fell over on 
torch and burned to death. 

Flames from cupola burned body, causing death. 

Wap loading ingots on canal bank on to wheel- 
barrow when he fell into canal and was 
drowned. 

While whitewashing was caught by revolving 
ithaft and killed instantly. 

Door fell off car 3triking chest. Died a week 
later of ruptured pancreas. 

♦ Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18+ is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



154 New York State Department of Labor. 

TiMe Vm.— Particalara of FMal Aeddeats ~ ContfaiMd. 



Industry and Occupation. 




Particulars. 



A. FACTORIES — Conhni»«d. 



1. Metals. Machines and Con- 
vey an CES — Continued . 

Iron and Steel Products — Cont'd 

c. Rilling mill and steel works 

— Conduded. 
Millwright helper 

Sailor 

Scrapman 

Stand pipe man 

*Welder 

(f)ccupatioD not stated) 

d. Bridge and stniotural iron 

I/aborer 



Machinist. 



Punch hand. 



Hardware, n. e. r 
♦Grinder 

Machinist 

. Metal furniture. 
Laborer 



Watchman . 



Architectural and 
mental iron work. 
Ironworker's helper . 



Cooking and 
paratus. 
Laborer 



heating ap- 



Machinery, n. e. c. 
Coremaker. elevator manu- 
factory 



Assistant foreman, elevator 
manufactory 



18 



53 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



27 M Rolling over core on bed. caught tip of finger. 
Death certificate: shock from crusliin? of 
finger due to falling iron. 

17 M In pouring metal in mould, metal broke out of 
mould and caught man. Died from bums. 

♦ Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18+ is used where there is e>'idence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Was on charging crane tightening nuts on 
mechanical brake and lost hi-, balance. 
Fall to groimd caused fracture at base of 
skull resulting m death, 
lane supporting •acafFold came imtied allowing 
scafTold to fall. Fracture of skull resulting 
fatally. 
Struck by coke larry Fractured ribs punc- 
tured lung$>. cauFiog death. 
39 M Struck by passing coal larry and killed. 
26 M Explosion of an oxygen generator killed m^n. 
42 M In reaching ore bin lever, caught in gearn. 
Arm. thigh and pelvis crushed, causing d^ath . 

08 M While spudding one of 4 girders standing side 
by side, when crane picked uo one of them, 
the other three tipped over and bo was caught 
under the one he wss working on. Cni!»hed 
chest caused instant death. 

18+ M In loosening hanger of shafting while same was 
in motion, he slipped and was picked up by 
shafting and whirled to death. 
In closing throttle of eight horse power engine 
driving punch at closing time, his overcoat 
was drawn into governor belt and was wound 
around small pulley attached to crank shaft. 
Arm amputated, nb broken, death resulted. 

Struck in back bv pieca of bursting em'^ry 

wheel and killed. 
Filing brsss. caUicht finwr on work; blood 

poisoning set in rejulting in death a*>t»i;t 

three weaki lat3r. 

Was holding carboy of vitriol on truck, mill d 
by fellow workman; «n crossing door thresh- 
old on stand, carboy tippc^l off ani bnkc. 
Vitriol burasJ ar.Tis and h^ad. Died latir 
from injury. 

Fire in building; bolv foun'l in b>iler Dom 
aoparently drowned. Not kn>wn just how 
life was lost. 



M Grinding piece of iron called a patch which 
caught between table of grinding machine 
and wheel, causing wheel to break. Flying 
piece struck him on head causing death. 

38 M Cleaning floor between milling machine and 
plsner. in stepping aside to allow fellow em- 
ployee to pass, he stepped between oasUng 
and head of planer. Left side crushed: 
died from shock and internal hemorrhage. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 155 

Tftble Vm.— PartknlwsofFMal AcddMrts — ContiM^. 



Industbt and Occupation. 



ScxJ 



Particulars. 



A. FACTORIES 

II. Metals. Machinks and Con- ; I 

VETANCE8 — Continued. 



3. Iron and Steel Productii — Cond'd. 
u. Machinery, n. e. c. — Cond'dA 
Foundry helper, elevator 
manufactory | 22 



- Contmiied, 



Molder. elevator manu-| 
factory ' 40 

Molder, elevator manu-' 
factory- 52 

laborer, foundry* and ma- 
chine shop I 4o 



Pipe cutter, auto-sprinkler I 
plant ' 45 



V. Castings. 

Furnace helper 55 



Iron chipper. 
Oiler 



Electrical Apparatus. 
Crane follower 



Laborer. 



Rigger. 



5. Vehicles 

a. Carriages, wagons and sleighs 



BlacKsmith . 



d. Motor vehicles. 
Helper 



Repairing automobiles. 



* Vulcanising tubes. 



54 

38 



31 



34 



18-1- 



18-f 
28 



22 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Riding on elevator when drum broke; elevator 
fell and man was crushed by falling counter- 
weight. 

Greasy clothing caught fire from match 
struck to light cigarette. Died from bums. 

Blowing up a plumber's fire pot with a com- 
pound foot pump, air pressure burst gas 
tank throwing gas mi clothes which ignited. 
Death hastened by bums. 

Gasoline burner used to heat vulcanizcr 
exploded. Man died from bums. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1. 1910. reported after November 1. 1910. 
1 18 4- is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



M 



In pouring metal in mould, mctnl broke out of 
mould and caught man. Died from bums. 

In pouring metrl in mould, metal broke out of 
mould and caught man. Died from bums. 

In pouring metal in mould, metal broke out of 
mould and caught man. Died from bum?. 

Covering plate for mould being hoisted on 
crane, when supporting filings lost hold, 
dropping plate on man. Died from crushes 
and internal injuries. 

Clothes being oily caught fire from paper used 
as torch. Ixjwer part of body burned, re- 
sulting in de.ith three days after. 

After securing crane to go to northwest doors 
of shop to pick up a ladle, while working 
along under crane, operator mn through 
switch causinic it to run off *'T" rail and fall 
to ground striking man. crushing him. caus- 
ing death. 

Cast iron columns turned over on him as he 
was pulling chain from under same. In- 
ternal injurie«i caused death. 

Was removing broken belt from pulley on idle 
shaft, clothinjr came in contact with end of 
active shaft just below idle shaft. Com- 
pound fracture of humems of left arm. Died 
four months later from blood poisoning. 



Riding on casting bring moved by crane from 
car to boring mill; when in transit hook 
suspended from two cables slipped from 
diaphragm, causing diaphragm to drop 
from horisontal to vertical; man riding on 
casting slipped between cable and diaphragm 
near hook Died from crushes and internal 
injuries. 

Crossing railroad track, was crushed between 
bumper post and end of box car being 
ccuDled at other end cf train. 

Stepping from crane truck on to girder, 
slipped and reached for a support, missed 
it and fell, leg fractured; death certificate: 

I)ulmonary embolism following fracture of 
egs. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



156 New Yoek State Department of Labor. 

Tdble Ym,— Pardcolara of FMal Acddeiits -. Contfmied. 



Ikdustbt and Occupation. 




Particulars. 



A. FkCTOniEQ — Continued. 



II. Metals, Machines and Con- 
VETAN CEB — Continued . 

5. Vehicles — Continued. 
e. Care. 

Hooker on 



f. Locomotivefl. 
Driller 



*In charge cf boiler testing 



Pipe helper 

Running wire straighten- 
ing machine 

Railway repair shops. 

Boilermaker's helper 

Boilermaker's helper.., 

Car inspector 

Car repairer 



Car repairer 

Carpenter's helper . . 

Engine wiper 

Fire cleaner 

General repair man . 
Helper (bridge shop) 

Laborer 



23 M On placing load of angles on trestle at punch 
No. 4. the trestle tilted allowing load to 
fall as far as slack on chains permitted, 
catching him between wall and IcmuI. Died 
from crushed skull. 

38 M While drilling hole in end of eccentric rod* 
when drill was nearly through, it caught 
on a burr and swung other end of red around 
which was not clamped to table of machine 
and hit man fracturing fifth rib caumng 
death. 

70 M Standing on ladder closing lever which was not 
finish^ and fastened. Pressing hard 
against no reeistanoe, he lost balance and 
fdl. Died from fracture of skull. 

17 M Caught on end of revolving shaft and thrown 
to floor from ladder. Arm amputated; legs 
fractured causing death. 

20 M Replacing belt on pulley in motion; caught 
by line shaft. Leg torn off; head crushed 
causing death. • 

32 M Holding on electric light leader, received shook 
and slid to ground from engine on which he 
was working. Killed by electricity. 

22 M Clothing came in ccMitact wiUi revolving shaft 
on pneumatic air motor. Neck broken, 
causing death. 

29 M Was coming out of inspector's shanty and 
evidently stepped in front of pusher engine 
backing up. Killed. 

54 M In stepping from derrick car to truck car, 
foot slipped and he fell 'between the two 
care striKing head and right side on arch 
iron of truck. Ribs broken and head 
lacerated, caiudng death a month later. 

Car repairer 39 M Repairing freijght car, jacked up on horsee, 

and while tightening body bolster, the two 
outside legs of a horse sank into ground 
pinning man under car. Skull fractured 
causing death. 
22 M While putting cans of bleach into car from 

Elatform, fell off platform and a can fell on 
im. Internal injuries resulted in death. 

18 M Working between care, when one car wa» 
suddenly bumped by another, causing man 
to be caught between care. Injuries re- 
sulted in death. 

M Shoveling ashes from ash pit, hit by engine 
moving from ash pit to coal chutes and run 
over. Decapitated and body crushed caue- 
, ing death. 

30 , M While cleaning fire, he was overcome by heat 
and died shortly afterwards- 

50 M Died from extreme heat. 

28 M Had placed time slip in electric switch box 
ancl while attempting to reach in and get it, 
allowed his hand to come in contact with 
switch. Killed by electricity. 

24 I M Engine moving back suddenly, caused by 
steam in cyundere. struck car of dirt on 
which was man. Cable of unloading plow 
tightened, caught man and threw him to 
ground killing him. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt of Bukeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 157 

TiOile Vm.— PartknlwsomitelAceideiits — GoBtiiiiMd. 



Indtjstbt and Occupation. 




Partieulara. 



A. FACTORIES— Conitnu^i. 



II. Mbtaub. MAcmNKa and Con- 
YETANCBfr— Concluded. 

6. Vehicles — Conduded. 

g. Railway repair diopa — Con- 
duded. 
Laborer in round hoiue. . 



Laborer 

Machine hand helper. 



'Machinist (night engine 
house) 

-Machinist's apprentice. . 

Machinist's helper 

Nut tapper 

Pumper 



Shop foreman (assistant). 
Turntable man 



6. Boat and Ship Building. 

Caii>enter'8 helper .... 

Helper 

Holder on 

*Mill man 

Stage builder 

Watchman 

7. Agricultural Implements. 

Elevator hand 

Laborer 

Trainman 

III. Wood Manufactubxs. 

1. Saw Mill Produotb. 

Laborer 



68 M Board caught saw throwing man against saw, 
causing amputation of legs and other outs 
resulting in death. . 

Overseer 48 M Standing behind edger, was hit by edging 

thrown back by saw. Intestines pierced 
causing death. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1, 1010, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



39 M Engine struck man, cutting off legs, causing 
death. 

44 M Man crawled under cars and was killed. 

38 M Taking timber off machine, when piece of 
scrap timber from outside of piece caught 
in some manner on top of saw and was 
thrown and hit man, breaking jaw which 
caused death. 

34 M Found in engine house with knee cap broken. 
Died three days later. 

21 M Hand came in contact with electric switch. 
Killed by electricity. 

37 M Caught between two en^nes while passing 
between. Body squeesed causing death. 

30 M While regulating oil feed on nut tapper, 
clothing caught on spindle, which drew nim 
into machine and caused death. 

65 M Tank on roof of pump house burst and weight 
of water caused roof to give way. Man 
was struck by debris; head and body cut 
and bruised and internal injuries caused 
death. 

34 M Lost balance and fell from roof of oar to con- 
crete floor. Skull fractured; died instantly. 

54 M After giving signals to back up, man ran 
between engine and car and was squeesed. 
Contusions of abdomen and internal injuries 
resulted in death. 

44 M Planks being swung over dide of boat by winch, 
slipped through sling and fell to dock, hitting 
man, fracturing skuU and legs causing death. 

17 M Fall from deck to tank top on steamer caused 
death. 
M Qas from forges in hold of ship sickened man, 
causing death. 

60 M On sawing machine, when material kicked back, 
hitting him on breast causing death. 
M While building stages, he was burned on neck 
by ashes from for^ emptied by iron workers 
upon him. Eiyapelas developed resulting 
in death about throe weeks later. 

20 M While watching on boat, it is presumed he fell 
overboard into dry dodc. Fractured skull 
caused death. 

17 M Head projecting out of elevator was crushed 
between car and floor beam causing death. 
M While ruling pig iron, pile fell on him causing 

26 M Fell from running board of switching en^pne. 
Run over; leg an^utated causing death. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



158 New York State Department of Labor. 

Tsbto Vm.— Particnlan of mtid Acddftirta — CoBtlnMd. 



Industry and Occupation. 




Particulars. 



A. VACTORIEB— Continued. 



III. Wood Manufactureb — 
Continued. 

1. Saw Mill "Productn— Concluded. 
Tail sawyer 



I 



33 I M 



Unloading logs I 38 



2. Planing Mill Products, 
a. House trim. 

Electrician 



♦Foreman. 



Helper 

♦Lathe machine runner. . 



Laborer, 
laborer. 



Sawyer. 
Sawyer . 



c. Cigar and fancy wood boxes, 
Sweeper 



4. Wood Turned and Carved. 

c. Wooden toys and novelties. 

Night watchman 

e. Other articles and appliances 
of wood. 
Laborer 



5. Furniture and Cabinet Work, 
a. Furniture and upholsterj'. 
Helper 



Teamster. 



b. Caskets. 

Lumber piler , 



c. Store, office and kitchen fix- 
tures. 
Laborer 



Sawyer. 



M 



* Accidents occurring before October 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence 
on the blank. 



Probably stumbled and fell against saw, cutting 

off leg causing death. 
While unloading loss from oar, one fell on him 

crushing him to aeath. 



Was winding tape on a 2,400 volt wire and 
neglected to pull the knife switch. Electro- 
cuted. 

Stumbled and threw out hand to save himself. 
Hand caught in gears of sanding machine 
and arm drawn in and badly mangled. Died 
of pneumonia five days later. 

While taking logs from steam tanks, he slipped 
and fell in. Scalded to death. 

Put lathe bolt on machine so it hit saw, being 
thrown back hitting man on left side. Died 
from chronic heart trouble, death being 
hastened by accident. 

Deceased was in sawdust tower starting saw- 
dust which had become blocked. Supposed 
to have fallen into chute and was suffocated. 

Was loading large doors on flat car when doors 
already stacked up on car toppled over on 
him. Killed. 

Working on rip saw from which wood flew, 
hitting man in abdomen, resulting in death. 

Sawing board, pushed hand ainunst saw, sever- 
ing thumb and finger. Died in hospital 
under ether. 

Looking down elevator shaft, head thrust in 
shaft was hit by desoending counterweight. 
Fractured skull resulted in death. 



Fire in building. Man was suffocated. 



Caught on revolving shaft going around with 
shaft striking head agtunst machine and floor. 
Fractured skull resulted in death. 



Cord fastened to overhead switch broke when 
man i)uUed it to turn switch; hand flew 
back into side gears of garnet machine. 
Thumb and finger lacerated, blood poisoning 
get in causing death about two weeks after. 

Died from cerebral hemorrhage. Man started 
to get on seat of wagon when he was 
heard to coll, whoa! He was found lying 
in rear of front wheel which was turned at 
right angles to wagon. Not known whether 
man fell or whether death was due to natural 
causes. 

While transferring lumber in car from Idln to 
yard, a board dropped off oar, hitting man. 
Fractured skull caused death. 



While going to take temperature in log tank. 

slipped and fell in taoik with water at 130 

to 140 degrees causihg death. 
Dropped board on saw; it flew back and hit 

him in diaphragm causing death. 

1. 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 

the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 



22 


M 


65 


M 


21 


M 


55 


M 


18 + 


M 


27 


M 


21 


M 


72 


M 


15 


M 


40 


M 


45 


M 


55 


M 


54 


M 


35 


M 


45 


M 


51 


M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 159 



Ttkbto Vm.— ParticnlanofFMal AeddMla — CMitiiiMd. 



I I 

Industbt and Occt'patiox, I Age.t ! Sex. 



Particulara 



A. FArrORIKS -Contuiued. 



III. Wood MANUFAcruaEs — i 
Concluded. 

6. Pianos. Organs, Etc. I 

Helper in plating dep't . . J 15 

27 



Machine hand. 



Watchman , 63 

Watchman 56 

7. Brooms, Cork, Etc. 

f . Fireproofing lumber. 

U^'e maker and engineeT. . { 37 

IV. LXATHEH AND RuBDBH GoODS. 



1. Leather. 
Foreman. 
Laborer. . 



Laborer. 



f. Fancy leather goods. 
Tanner 



5. Articles of Pearl. Horn, Bone, Etc. 
c. Brushes. 

Fireman and general helper 

V. Chemicals. Oils, Paints, Etc. 

1. Drugs and ChemicaU. 

b. Sodas and other alkalies 

Centrifugal operator's 
helper 



Machine helper. 
Pipe fitter 



d. Other chemicals and drugs. 
Carpenter and millwright . 



General utility man 

Laborer 

Lead burner 

Carpenter's helper. 



43 
46 



3. Leather and Canvas Goods. : 

b. Saddlery and harness. I 

^Occupation not stated) . . . i 62 



d. Boots and ahoes. 

Elevator runner I 20 



22 



48 



48 



23 

24 

18 + 

31 

28 
28 
28 

42 



M 



M 



Fooling, fell in vat of cyanide of potassium. 

Died in hospital. 
Part of plank caught in tooth of saw flying back 

hitting man in stomach. Contusions of 

abdomen resulting fatally. 
Fire in building: man burned to death. 
Fall down elevator shaft IdUed him. 



Shortly after starting engpUte, found dead, 
killed outright. 



Burned to death in fire following explosion. 
Building burned and he was caught and burned 
to death. 



Carrying box up stairs, box caught, causing 
man to lose bs lance. Fell backwards, frac- 
turing skull, causing death. 

Body caught between floor and elevator, caus- 
ing internal injuries resulting in death. 
Regular operator was instructing new man 
how to start motor. Deceased came up and 
placed hand on side of starting box; at same 
time starting lever was pushea ahead. Man 
was electrocuted. 

Stepped off elevator while in motion and was 
lulled. 



Ran nail in instep of foot. Died from lockjaw. 



Tried to move spra>r nozsle, while machine was 
running, with a piece of pipe. Pipe slipped, 
struck whirling basket, shoving end against 
injured man's stomach: two ribs broken and 
roleen ruptured. Died two days later. 

Fell about 8 feet off a scaffold, striking side 
against plug cock. Internal injuries caused 
death. 

Man standing on platform holding 110 volt 
16 candle power lamp, fell into pit. When 

Sicked up was dead. Cause uncertain, 
lay have been electrocuted. 

Repairing floor over large valve in dust col- 
lecting pipe from furnace gas system; over- 
come by gas from valve. Didn't regain 
consciousness. 

Received bums resulting fatally, in fire and 
explosion. 

While washing out mud in settiing tank was 
overcome with hydrogen sulphide gas. 

Overcome with hydrogen sulphide gas when 
going into settling tank to rescue felk>w work- 
man. 

Overcome with hydrogen sulphide gas when 
going into settling tank to rescue.fellow work- 



t 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not Htated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



160 New York State Department of Labob. 

T^a»le VIIL— Partic«kv8 of Fftlal Acddeata — Contiined. 



Industry and Occupation. 




Particulars. 



A. FACTORIES — ConHnu4d. 



V. Chbmicals. OiM, Paints, Etc.— 
Continued. 

1. Drugs and Chemicals — Concluded. 
d. Other chemicals and drugs — 
Concluded. 
Millwright 



^Running emery wheel . . . 
Shipping department man . 



2. Paints. Dyes and Colors. 

b. Dyes, colors and inks. 

Laborer 

3. Wood Alcohol and Essential Oils. 

Steam fitter, running the stills, 
acetone plant 

Steamfitter. acetone plant 

Steamfitter's helper, acetone 

plant 

Superintendent, acetone plant. . 

4. Animal Oil Products. 

Carpenter 

Cellar man 

Foreman 

Laborer 

5. Mineral Oil Products. 

Laborer 

6. Soap, Perfumery and Cosmetics. 

Dock laborer 

Foreman, alkali department 



Laborer, dye house 

Steamfitter 

7. Miscellaneous Chemical Products. 

d. Fertilisers. 

Trimmer 

e. Matches and explosives. 

♦Teamster 



VL Paper and Pulp. 



Acid maker . 



28 


M 


40 


M 


17 


M 


34 


M 


22 


M 




M 


26 


M 
M 


42 


M 

M 


40 


M 


35 


M 


39 


M 


26 


M 


40 


M 


37 


M 


27 


M 


27 


M 


64 


M 


19 


M 



H(M8tin|; fear of hand power crane broke as it 

was hfting wheel from its bearing. Man hit 

by falling wheel; right arm and part of chest 

torn from body, causing death. 
Man threw belt off from other machinery to get 

more speed; wheel broke, hitting man on 

chest. 
Found beside engine fly-wheel: sxipposed to 

have been hit by same. Died from injuria 

one-half hour later. 



Raised semi-automatic doors and looked down 
shaft to locate elevator; was struck by de- 
scending elevator and instantly killed. 



Died from bums received from fire followed by 
explosion. 

Received bums and broken arm in fire fol- 
lowed by explosion. 

Received bums in fire followed by explosion. 

Killed by explosion following fire. 

Started blower; was caught on shaft and killed 

Man backed into elevator hole with loaded 
truck, falling to cellar, causinf^ death. 

Clamp broke on door of rendering tank open- 
ing. Contents of tank esci^ng scalded 
man. caumng death. 

Died from bums received from falling into vat 
of hot I 



Fixing swing lupe in <^1 well, overcome with ga , 



Tried to jump off ascending elevator and was 
caught between elevator and ^te. Com- 
pound fracture of skull resulted in death. 

Lowering swinging suction into tank of alkali, 
luing a letter S hook. Hook cau^t him on 
back of neck, causing him to fall into alkali. 
Caustic lye bums resulted in death. 

Found lying on floor with conmound fracture 
of skull. Supposed to have fallen from lad- 
der used in inspecting tanks. Died without 



regaimng consciousness. 
Usedtc 



.._ torch while inside of tank oar. Gas ex- 
ploded. Bums caused death. 

On going to assistance of fellow laborer over- 
come by ammonia gases, he was asphyxiated. 

Riding on top of load drawn from yard to dock, 
fell off under wheel. Chest crushed, causing 
death. 



Acid tank fell through roof, spilling acid down 
through plant. To escape, man jumped from 

{)latform to floor. Inhaled fumes and dis- 
ooated hip. causing death. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1. 1910. reported after November 1. 1910. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt of BuKttAXT OF Faoto&y Inspbctios^, 1911. 161 



lUito VOL-- Ptttladan or FMal AecktoBto ~ OoBtiiiiied. 


IlTDUSXmT AND OCCUPATION. 


Ago.t 


Rm. 


Pftrtioulan. 



A. FACTORIES — ConHnu$d. 
VI. Pafxb axi> Pulp — CmUwiimcI. 



BandnwTtr. 



BaatormAn. 



Flrtnuui. 



Fourth hftnd. 



Foranum, lolphite miU (night) . 



Oiindarmmn. 



Labortr. 



Laborer., 



Laborer., 



Lay boy. 



Milhnii^t. 



OUer. 



Oiler. 



•Oiler and maohinist'e helper. 



Ttt^pmr man. 
Bepair man. 



Third hand. 



25 


M 


48 


M 


60 


M 


31 


M 


46 


M 


80 


M 


26 


M 


19 


M 


70 


M 


10 


M 


40 


M 


64 


M 


27 


M 


18 


M 


68 


M 


46 


M 


82 


M 


22 


M 


45 


M 



log on carriage. End of log farthest 

from oim waa on earxiage. other end on roll 
wasr. Moving carriage ahead to adjust log. 
end of log struck him, pressing down the feed 
lever, causing log to shoot ahead, throwing 
him over on sew frame. Log passed over 
him, breaking ribs and causing internal in- 
juries resulting in death. 

Belt woa slipping and man was putting on lag- 
ging to take up slack when his hand was 
caught, drawing ri|Eht arm between belt and 
shaft and tearing it off above elbow. Died 
from shock and loss of blood. 

In opening blow-off, probably opened it too 
quickly; the reaction causing blow-off {Upe to 
fly up and hit him on head, also scalding nim. 
Died from burns and blow on head. 

Attempting to stop reel, arm was caught and 
he was drawn between reels. Skull crushed 
and killed. 

While arranging to blow number three digester 
from bottom, the yoke on hand hole broke 
and the stock blew out on him. ElUed 
almost instantly. 

Struck by stick of wood from wood room above; 
finger broken. Death certificate: s^ti* 
cemia (injured in psper mill). 

Wheeling lime and refilling slackers; on going 
in with load he slipped under railing of plat- 
form and fell to floor. Fractured skull 
caused death. 

Took end of win in hand; climbed up on rail- 
ing surrounding q;>rocket wheel and took 
hold of chain. An explosion occurred throw- 
ing him to floor with wiro around him. 
Electrocuted. 

Hit by barrel of rubbish thrown out of door by 
fellow employee. Depressed fracturo of 
skull caused death. 

Passing paper between dryer felt and roll, left 
hand caught drawing man in between dryer 
felt, carrier roll and drver, killing him. 

Man caught by floor pulley on dner of paper 
making machine, wedging him between 
pulley and floor. Top of head torn off, head 
and trunk crushed, arm torn loose, resulting 
in death. 

Pipe filled with roan and plugged was being 
heated to bend, when it exploded. Died 
about two weeks after accident from burns. 

OiUnf box on shaft and his jacket was caught; 
whirled around sliaft. Ribs broken, lung 
punctmed and legs injured, causing death. 

While oiling machinery near shaft on first press 
drive on small paper machine, his clothing 
was caught in shaft. Head badly bruised 
and out caused death. 

Repairing grinder water wheel gear, when gear 
dropped on man. Died from crushed nbe, 
fractured breast bone and shock. 

Working on engine when side of hot water 
heater gave way. Died from burns. 

While repairing coal conveyer, fell from plank 
into pit. Autopsy showed fall due to hemor- 
rhage of lungs, resulting in death. 

Putting paper on reels, head caui^t between 
reels of paper machine. Broken neck 
caused death. 

Yardman 45 M Fell into mill pond and was drowned. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18+ is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 
6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



162 New Yobk Statb Depabtmbnt of Labob. 

Triito Hn.— PartlealwsorFftlal Aeeideiita — GoirtiiiMd. 



iKDUaTBT AMD OOCUTATXOir. 



Sex. 



PartiouUn. 



VI. Papbb and Pulp 
(Occupation not stated) . 

(Occupation not stated) . 



A. FACTORIES— ConiintMd. 
-Concluded. 



VII. Pbimteno AMD Papkb GooDt. 

3. Printins and Book Making, 
a. Pnntang and publishing. 
Ashman 



Elevator man. 
Plate man. . . . 
Pressman 



0. lithographing and engraving 
Laborer 



Stone gralner. . . . 

VIII. Tbxtilu. 

2. Wool Manufactures, 
a. Carpets and rugs. 
Box boy 



(Occupstion not stated) . 



Machinist. 



Woolens and worsteds. 
MiUwright 



4. Hosiery and Knit (Soods. 
Watchman 



6. Flax, Hemp and Jute Man\i- 
facture. 
Goal 



21 



60 



45 



64 



Coal passer. . 
Chiefenginee] 

Fireman 

Head mason. 
Iron worker. . 
Steam fitter. . 
Laborer 



M Probably struck by bolt joining together ends 
of revolvingbelt and protruding about one- 
half inch. Fractured skull resulted in death. 
24 M Stepping from tug to steamer, he fell into river 
and was drowned. 



18+ M Looked down elevator shaft; hit on head by 
descending elevator; head crushed between 
elevator and floor causing death, 

33 M Crushed by elevator, receiving injuries of leg, 
arm and grmn, resulting in deatii. 

60 M Thrust spUnter into thumb; died of blood 
poisoning about three weeks later. 

18+ M Caught arm between first impression cylinder 
and form ink roller; arm Dsdly lacerated; 
died one week later. 

M Elevator stopped between fioors to move box 
which threatened to catch on top of door 
opening. Man fell off devator. rolling 
between edge of elevator and fire door, 
dropping to oasement. Instantly killed. 
32 M Was affected with a hernia: ruptured it by lift- 
ing. Operated on and died. 



Cleaning drum carriage which was stopped; in 
some unknown wav head was caught 
between drum cylinder wad frame. Head 
crushed resulting in death. 

Found lying at bottom of elevator shaft with 
the elevator stopped at floor above. Died 
from injuries; hemorrhage of ivory of brain, 
fracture of bone of face, cut over eve. 

Dipping soap solution in a pail out from soap 
soluuon tank preparatory to washing shirt, 
he fell in tank. Died about two weeks later 
from bums. 

Reaching over shaft to nail stick on which to 
'tis his line for extending new shaft, coat was 
entangled; man was wound around shaft and 
instantly kUed. 

70 M Left leg caught between elevator and floor, was 
badly mangled causing death. 

Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man« 
Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man* 
Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man* 
Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man. 
Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man. 
Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man. 
Bottom head of boiler blew out and killed man. 
While working in yard, dropped dead from 

heat apoplexy. 
Opened guard gate to oil studs on which gears 
run. Oiling while machine was runnini;, 
he caught hand between intermediate and 
worker gears of breaker card. Fraotored 
and lacerated finger; died of lockjaw about 
three weeks later. 

1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Machine oiler. 



46 


M 


29 


M 


38 


M 


83 


M 


63 


M 


29 


M 


87 


M 


54 


M 


25 


M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of BuifcEAU OF Faotoey Inspection, 1911. 163 

Triito vm.— Ptttiadan of FMal Aeddeata — ContiaBcd. 



IxDunrnT AMD Occur AnoN. 



A«e.t 



Sex. 



PartiouUn. 



IX. CtxnmatQt Milumzbt, 
MIT, Era 



A. FACTORIES — Continued. 
Laun- 



Moi't GannenU and Furniiihingn. 
A. Tailoring. 

Driver 



Tailor 

b. Shirts, ooUan and ouif a. 
Laborer 



2. Women's GannenU and Fumiah- 
a. Dreei making. 



Shirt waist makers (146 in 
nomber— U9 males, 127 
females) 

0. Ijnindering. Custom Dyeing, Etc. 
a. Lanndries (non-Chinese) 
Bundle boy 



Helper — wash floor. 

b. Cleaning and dyeing. 
Cleaner 



X. Foon, LiQuoas and Tobacco. 

1. Groceries. 

a. Flour and other cereal prod- 
ucts. 

Fireman 

Laborer 

Laborer 



Oiler. 



Sweeper. 



, Sugar ^nd mnlnniMifi refining. 
Oiler 



^Bigger and engine driver. 



Truck driver . 



e. Fruit and vegetable canidng 

and preserving. 

Foreman 



e. Groceries, n. e. c. 

Carpenter, yeast plant. . 



2, Provisions. 

Electrician. 



18+ 


M 


18+ 


M 


46 


M 


28 


M 
M 




X 


16 


M 


37 


M 


18 + 


M 


30 
47 
21 


M 
M 
M 


20 


M 


19 


M 


50 


M 


35 


M 


42 


M 


33 


M 


37 


M 


37 


M 



In helping to lift case, feet slipped and he fell to 

basement. Died from internal injuries. 
Explosion of oil stove. Died from bums. 

While passing rods out of a door to man below, 
he fell 16 leet to ground and was instantly 
killed. 



Fell through elevator shaft and was killed. 
Was found under skylight, dead. 



lulled In factory fire in Asch Building In New 
York City. 

Jumping on elevator in motion^he was caught 
between elevator and door. Head and body 
crushed causing death. 

Soap boiled over covering man. Died of bums. 



Naphtha on hands caught fire; he jumped into 
vat of hot water to extinguish fire. Ditd of 
bums. 



Boiler tube blew out. Died of bums. 

Suffocated in bin of grain. 

While helping move empty ears, was caught 
between bumpers and oadly squeezed caus- 
ing death. 

Found lying on floor of engine-room basement 
with neck broken. Probably hit by piston 
rod of engine and instantly killed. 

Clothing caught on perpendicular shaft. 
Whirled around shaft and killed. 

While putting in cooler pipes, loose sleeve of 

jumper caught in chsln wheel of hopper; 

man was whirled to death before power 

could be turned off. 
Jumped from dock to coal boat; stmck side of 

boat; fell in and was drowned. 
Fell from truck and wheel ran over him; 

passing over stomach causing death. 



Clothes caught in revolving shaft. L«g. 
shoulder and skull factured resulting in 
death. 

Man climbed ladder from bin to floor, and 
while he had one leg over top of bin ready 
to get on floor, he ful backwards to bottom 
of bin. Broken spine caused death. 

Ladder slipped and man fell off onto a beef 
hook. Tnigh lacerated; blood poisoning set 
in resulUng in death. 
* Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1. 1910. 
1 18 + b used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
OB the blank. 
X Occupation taken from newspaper account. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



164 New York Statb Depabtmbnt of Labob. 

lUrfe Tm.— Pwtiailani of FMal Acddeata — ConUimed. 



INDU0TBT AND OCCUPATION. 




Sex. 



PartiouUn. 



A 

X. Food, Lxquobs and Tobacco — 
ConHnu4d. 

2. Proviaon*— Concluiad. 

Elerator runner 

Engineer 

Eni^neer 

3. Dairy Products. 

Stable man 

(Oooupation not stated) 



4. Bakery Product*, Confectionery, 
Etc. 

c. Bread and other bakery 

products. 
Baker 

♦Baker 

Helper 

6. Beverages. 

a. Artificial ice. 

Coal p a sse r 

0. Mineral and soda waters. 
Peddler 

d. Malt. 

Laborer 

e. Malt liquors. 

Bottling machine operator. 



FACTORIES — CcnUnu^d. 



Brewer. 



Brewery worker . 



Brewery worker. 



Brewery worker. 
Driver 



Driver. 



Engineer (night) . 





M 


68 . 


M 


40 


M 


40 
59 


M 
M 


38 


M 


33 


M 


17 


M 


18+ 


M 


35 


M 


18 + 


M 


30 


M 


32 


M 


18 + 


M 


46 


M 


46 


M 


60 


M 


33 


M 


31 


M 



Found dead in elevator shaft with fraotured 

skull and neck. Sent to repair cable. 
Coming down ladder, fell ana lacerated shin 

and lip. Blood poisoning set In causing 

death in about ten days. 
Man went into rendering tank sealed by 

government. Found some time later, 

drowned. 

Kicked by horse and killed. 

Unloading can of milk from sleich to platform, 
slipped from board and fell with can of milk 
on top of him. SkuU split open resulting 
in death. 



Cleaning dough mixer while in motion, hand 

was caught and he was pulled into machine. 

Killed. 
Boiler exploded in room nest to bakery. 

Scalded to death by steam. 
Explosion and fire in building. Man hit by 

falling timbers, causing internal injuriee 

and bums resulting in death. 



Cleaning out end of boiler feed pump, he was 
hit by plunger, fracturing skull which re* 
suited in death. 

tank of carbonated water. 

it in cellar causing explosion; hit 

. by fiying parts cauang death. 



Found dead in malthouse. 
unknown. 



Cause of death 



While adjusting top on beer bottUng fiUing 
Une heshp 



shpped wad fell about three feet. 
Internal injuries resulting fatally. 

Opened door on third fioor of storehouse, lost 
balance and fell about twenty feet breakinc 
neck which resulted fatally. 

Cleaning outside of machine, man took off 
cover and put hand on bucket conve^r 
while running. Hand was caught and wrist 
fractured. Man died from shook of injury. 

Coming up on elevator when foot was caught 
between fioor and elevator and crushed 
badly. Aii4>utated; gangrene set in caus- 
ing death. 

Walking in cellar when he tripped over line of 
hose, breaking leg. Died three days later. 

Loading wagon lifting a half barrel with fellow 
workman, latter let go and all the weight 
fell on one man. Complained of severe pain 
in stomach; was taken home and died. 

Man attempted to stop team by headstall; 
was thrown to curb by team. Fractured 
skull caused death. Man had been die- 
charged and took hold of team to prevent 
it being taken to bam. 

Opening blow off valve when the pipe stripped 
out of drum and the escaping steam scakied 
him to death. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1. 1910. reported after November 1. 1910. 
1 18 + u used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not staled 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt op Bxjbeatt of Faotoey Inspbction, 1911. 166 

Triito Vm.— PartkalvsorVktalAcddeiito — Cknitlned. 



iNSraTBT AND OcCtTPATION. 




PartioulMi. 



A. 

X. Food. Liquobs and Tobacco — 
Condudsd. 

5. BeveraM— C<m«IiMfad. 

e. MfJt Uquon—ConckuUd. 
In charge of fermenting 
room 

•Oiler 

Painter 

Fipe fitter 

Stableman 

Varnishing casks. . . . 

6, Tobacco Products. 

c. C^isarettes. 

Operator, tobacco cutting 
machine 



XI. WATBBt LXOBT AND POWKR. 

2. Gas. 

Carpeoter's hdper 

Gas maker 

Gas fitter 

Gas maker's helper 

Stationary engineer 

4. Electric Light and Power. 

Adi hftnoler 

Boiler cleaner and fireman. . . 

•Dynamo man 

•Electrician 

Fitter 



FACTOBIES — ConUntMd. 



Foreman, dynamo tender. 



31 


M 


18 + 


M 


35 


M 




M 


45 
18 + 


M 
M 


83 


M 




M 


50 
27 


M 
M 


20 


M 


69 


M 


23 


M 


eo 


M 


25 


M 


25 


M 


30 


M 


60 


M 



Cable of elevator broke while man was riding 
on elevator. One leg cut o£F. other partMlly 
severed; injuries caused death. 

Slipped and foU striking head on concrete floor. 
Died from fractured skull. 

Standing on pipe to i>aint cross bar, thread 
stripped from his weight caudng him to fall 
on flywheel, not in motion, fracturing rib 
and internal injunes. Died from pulmonary 
embolism. 

Fell off scaffolding. Left leg broken and 
internal injuries, resulting in death. 

Fell from ladoier. Skull fractured causin^eath. 

Varnishing inside of vats; complained of diasi- 
ness, went to bed and died shortly after. 



Putting belt on pulley of driving shaft, he 
caught hand in puUey, tearing arm off below 
elbow, tearing ear and cutting head. Died 
about two weeks later. 



Slipped off wooden horse. Internal injuries 
and shock. Died about a week later. 

Overcome by heat and died. 

In setting new meter opened gas cocks, forcing 
out quantity of condensation in pipe which 
saturated clothing. Liquid was imited by 
steppizig on match. Bums resulted in death. 

While shuting valves on connections to steel 
purifiers, explosion occurred bursting purifier 
and connections. Man was thrown into 
flames and burned to death. 

Fell off platform of gas holder to ground, ovw 
railing. Fractured skull caused death. 

Started electric locomotive, evidently turning 

controller wrong way; cars backed up instead 
• of goio^ forward, crushing body between 

locomotive and a^ chute. Killeo. 
Man fell to floor of boiler room while climbing 

down from manhole of boiler to scaffold. 

Broken neck caused death. 
Was sent to oil bearings on 125 volt, S-horse- 

power motor running window fan. Was 



picked up dead 40 feet away from fan. 

Working on column tightening up turn buckle; 
he fell off, causing death. 

Pumping drips; when going to empty drip- 
wagon, he found outlet cock frosen. WhOe 
thawing this out with red hot iron instead 
of through top inlet of tank, both ends of 
tank were blown out bv explosion. Ankle 
broken and leg severely burned, causing 
death about a week later. 

Taking off disconnection switch from a main 
bus of high tension machine, instead of 
hooked stidc provided, man used small piece 
of wood. Received severe shock reemting 
in death. 

• Accidents occurring before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



166 New Yoek State Dbpabtment op Labor. 

TiUe Vm.— Pftrtlcalws of FMal Acddento — OmtlinMd. 



INDXTBTBT AMD OCCUPATION. 



Sex. 



ParUouUra. 



A. FACTORnSS — ConeltuM. 



XI. Wat«b, Light and Pownr— 
ConckuUd, 

4. Electric Light and Power — Con' 
duded. 
^Helper 



Helpw — Bub-BtatioD . . . 
Operator — sub-etatioii . 

Operator — sub-station . 



Operator and wireman's hdpw. 
Pipe fitter 



Station operator. 

Station operator. 
Stoker operator. . 
Troubleman 



5. Steam Heat and Power. 

Fireman 

Laborer 

6. Garbage Disposal, Etc. 

♦Press tender 

XIII. MUCBLLANBOUS. 

1. Elevators in Tenant Factories. 
Elevator operator 

Engineer , 



19 

26 
52 

25 

44 
42 

27 

48 
24 
18 



21 


M 
M 


21 


M 


32 


M 


40 


M 



Evidenthr eUmbed step ladder and in some way 
came m contact with hi|^ voltage connec- 
tions and killed. 

Ascending ladder in switch room, took hold of 
wires 9 feet above floor. Died from bums. 

One leg on 83,000 vdt tension line blew out. 
Operator reaching up, took hold of fuse wire, 
while standing on floor instead of on insu- 
lated platform. Instantly killed. 

While inq;>eoting damaged potential tran»> 
former, man came into contact with 30,000 
volt bus. Electrocuted. 

Man painting wall was found on top of fram^ 
back of switchboard. Electrocuted. 

After making repairs to steam pipe, man turned 
on steam from valve located about 11 feet 
above floor. Pipe burst. Man found with 
head crushed and scalded to death. 

While working on dead bus, man came in con- 
tact with switch jaw 12 feet away carrying 
11,000 volts 25 cycle alternating current. 
Electrocuted. 

While synchronising rotary converter with 
other machines, he received fatal bums. 

Water tube of boiler burst. Man died from 
bums. 

Turned on current for purpose of replacing 
burned out street lamp. Retuming after 
work to transformer house, he apparently 
reached over insulation on plug switdies, 
receiving shock which caused death. 

Killed when boiler exploded. 

Fell down flight of stairs and was killed. 



Digester eiploded, man hit and killed by debris. 



Lost control of elevator and tried to Jump as 

car passed landins. Was caught between 

cage and floor and killed. 
While attaching new cable, elevator moved up 

and crushed him between top of elevator and 

roof • causing death. 



B. MINES AND QUARRIES. 



Mines. 
Driller and shooter, gypsum. 



Loading cars, gsrpsimi . 

Miner, gypsum 

Miner, gsrpsimi 

Miner, gypsum 



48 


M 


40 


M 


35 


M 


28 


M 


24 


M 



Was tamping hole and had charge in it and 
most of tamping when it exploded, severing 
leg and hand, driving hole in chest and caus- 
ing other injuries resulting fatally. 

Killed by a piece falling from roof of mine. 

Died from gas poisoning. 

Died from gas poisoning. 

After firing holes, inspected same and found 
roof wasbad and props blown out in blasting. 
While sounding roof or endeavoring to take 
down a loose piece, same fell, IdUing him 
instantly. 

* Accidents occurring before October 1. 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18 + ifl used where there is evidence tne deooased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Ebpoet of Bubeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 167 

TwUU Tm.~ Ptttleaktfs of Fatal Aeddeats^Contiined. 



Indubtbt A3a> OcovPATioir. 




Partieulara. 



B. MINES AND QVABBJES—Conduded. 
MzNBS — Ccndud^d. 



Drill helper, iron. 
Drill helper, iron. 



Laborer, iron . 



Laborer, iron 

Laborw. iron 

light hole man. iron . 



'.iron. 



Pit boss, iron 

^Trammer, iron. 



Trammer, iron. 

Trammer, iron. 
Trammer, iron. 



49 


M 


24 


M 


37 


M 


27 
31 
35 


M 
M 
M 


22 


M 


42 


M 


40 


M 


46 


M 


30 


M 


31 


M 



Section boes. salt 

QUAKKIBS. 

Blaster and foreman 
onubed stone 



of laborers. 



Laboror, limestone . 



Laborer, limestone . 



Mason's helper, limestone. 



^uarrsrman. Umestone . 



54 



18 + 



20 



44 



20 



32 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Machine ran into a missed hole, caunng ex- 
plodon. killinff man. 

Biding from surface into mine on skip oar when 
brakeman in power house lost control of car, 
which ran to bottom at unusual high rate of 
speed. As it struck, ball fell over on man, 
breaking neck, killing him. 

Biding on front of oar which jumped rail pin- 
nins man between car and track. Neck and 
leg broken and body bruises causing death. 

Killed by fall of oro from a pillar. 

Killed by fall of ore from a pillar. 

While taking portable forge to top of light hole 
of shaft house, car was pulled up i 
his head struck cross beam and 1 



of shaft house, car was pulled up so far that 
his head struck cross beam and leg ( 
between oar and shear wheel. Fractured 



; caught 



head and contused leg. resulting in death 
about two weeks after. 

Biding on bail of car, fell off in front of car sad 
run over. Fracture of spine, paralysis of 
lower limbs, cut scalp, causing death about 
six months later. 

Chunk falling from wall above fractured man's 
neck, arm and leg. causing death. 

Man went across place that had been shot out 
by blasting; passed under wires whose cover- 
ing had been torn off by blasting. Electro- 
cuted in handhng wire. 

Injured, slipped off pit car at top and fell into 
shaft. Hand, back and legs fractured, caus* 
ing death. 

Found at bottom of mine dead, with head, 
back, legs and arms fractured. 

Standing on pit car just before going down and 
fell off into shaft. Fractured skull caused 
death. 

Testing out three holes which miss fired. Two 
of the three holes suddenly exploded. Arm 
blown off, leg and head cut; death resulted 
about a month later. 



Placing sticks of dynamite into holea perpara- 
tory to blasting. While pushing stick of 
dynamite in hole it exploded, killing man. 

Feeding stone crusher, hat fell in elevator and 
was carried to storage bins. Man ran after 
hat, and in picking hat out of elevator, he 
was caught by buckets on elevator and 
pitched into stone chute. Neck was broken, 
causing death. 

Attempted to get on moving car; was caught 
between car and stone pier. Died from 
injuries. 

Cementinfc cracks in brickwork to boiler, near 
oirculating pipe, which parted where it 
screws into flange riveted to steam drumshell 
of boiler; was scalded to death by steam and 
hot water from break. 

In loading a hole before cap stick was placed, 
the chargo exploded. Died from compoimd 
fractures of legs, arm and ribs, lacerated hand 
and scalp wound. 



* Accidents occurring before October 1, 1010. reported after November 1, 1010. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



168 



New York State Department of Labor. 



TM» Vm.— PartfculanorFftlal Aeeideiita — ContbiMd. 



IkDUSTBT and OoCUTATIOlf. 




Sez. 



Partioolan. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING. 



I. EXCAVATXNG. 

1. Open EzcavatioDB. 
a. Aqueduoto. 

Brakeman 



Brakeman. 



Brakeman. 



Brakeman. 



Brakeman 

Concrete form laborer . 



DriU 



Engineer (hoisting) . 
Engineman 



Flagman. 
Laborer.. 



Laborer. 
Laborer. 



Laborer. 



Laborer., 
Laborer. , 



Laborer. 



Laborer. 



22 


M 


21 


M 


24 


M 


18 


M 


32 


M 


36 


M 


40 


M 


30 


M 


35 


M 


eo 


M 


18 


M 


32 


M 


35 


M 


37 


M 


22 


M 


23 


M 


29 


M 


45 


M 



Slipped from rear running board of looomotiTe 
and fell between traeks; engine passed over 
him cruahing knee, eeveriikg ear and i*fti!'^pg 
internal injuriee. Death resulted. 

Running over top of loaded oars moving out to 
dump; on coming to end of train he lost 
balance and fell off end of oar beneath 
wheels. Killed. 

Trying to stop runawav oar by placing block of 

' wood in front of it: fell under wheeb. Com- 
pound fracture of leg necessitating amputa- 
tion, caused death. 

Car jumped track and man was thrown off 
beneath wheels of following car. Contusions 
of body, ridit leg crushed necessitating am- 
putation. Man died three days later. 

Jumping from moving train to turn switch, man 
stumbled and fell between rails. Crushed 
between engine and ties causing death. 

Crossing creek In boat which q;>rung a leak and 
sank. Man was drowned while swimming 
out for boat after having reached shore with 
companions. 

Skip was being lowered into cut from crane. 
Man was crushed to death between skip 
and drill. 

Caught in belting of engine running stone 
crusher and was killed. 

Traveling crane toppled over, due either to 
Yielding track or overturning tendency of 
loaded Duoket with boom far out, or both. 
Man pinned beneath crane and received 
bxims from escaping steam, resulting in 
death about two weeks later. 

Believed to have shpped between second and 
third car of traixL Body dragged about 
1.000 feet. Head cut off and body mangled, 
causing death. 

Foreman was springing hole using about one- 
third of a stick of dynamite and an exploder. 
As charge was placed in hole, explosion oc- 
curred. Fractiu«d leg and skull caused 
death. 

Man was sent to powder house which blew up 
soon after. Man blown to pieces. 

Was working about steam shovel when side of 
excavation shd in. Leg was crushed and 
was amputated at hospitaL Man died from 
shock. 

Puncture wound of lung resulting from being 
struck in chest by dump car rebounding 
after load was dumped. Jammed between 
car and manhole of aqueduct and killed. 

Fell or jumped from dinkey and was run over. 



Worm shaft controlling boom of locomotive 
crane broke allowinfc boom to settle slowly 
to ground. Man hit and killed by falling 
boom. 

Man supplying steam shovel with coal was 
caught between shovel and bank when shovel 
revolved to unload. Body crushed resulting 
in death. 

Stone hurled from blast hit man on head. 
Fractured skull caused death. 

1 18+ is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Paotoby Inspection, l&ll. 16& 

Ttkbto Vm.— Particalars of Vktal Acddenta — CMittnaed. 



IkDVWTRY AMD OcCUPATIOlf. 



Sex. 



Partioulan. 



C. BUILDING AND ENQINEERINQ — dmtinwd. 
I. ExcATATiKG — CtmUnued. 



1. Open EzoavatioDfl — Continued. 
a. Aoueduots — Condudsd. 
Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer and hooker. . . 
Laborer 

Laborer. 

Laborer 



Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Pitman 

Signalman on cable way 



SUme maaon. 



b. Canals. 

Brakeman. 



Brakeman 

Carpenter's helper. . . 

Channeler fireman. . . 

Coal paaser on dredge 
Conveyor 

Cribman 

Deckhand 

Deckhand 



25 

24 
25 
30 

25 
.80 

67 
60 



28 
25 



46 



22 



10 



35 



80 



19 
17 



18 + 
18 

25 



M 



While stooping over concrete hoist to clean 
chute from mixer, hoist was started, crushing 
man to death between hoist and cross timbers 
of tower f rame.- 

Guy part of derrick fell and struck injured on 
head, fracturing skull causing death. 

Stone fell from dam above him, crushing skull, 
causing death. 

While getting out of way of scale box being 
hoisted, man was hit by box. Fracture of 
skull and hemorrhage of brain resulted in 
death. 

Bank of eut caved in pinning man against 
wheel of steam shoveL Crushed skull re- 
sulted in death. 

While loading skip with stone, in taking one off 
pile, another toppled over, striking leg. 
causing man to fadL Contusions and lacera- 
tions of leg. Man went insane and died in 
insane asijruim. 

Blown to pieces by explosion of thaw house for 
djrnamite. * ? ^ ^ « 

Hit by flying debris from exploaon of thaw 
house for dsmanute. SkuU and chest 
crushed, leg and arm broken resulting in 
death. 

While carrving chute, fell off false work to 
ground, fracturing skull causing death. 

Struck on head by rook falling from nde of out. 
Fracture of skull resulted m death. 

Bucket was descending on cable way to unload- 
ing platform when hoist line on cable way 
broke. Bucket falling hit platform and 
threw man, fracturing skull and legs, causing 
death. 

Electric light wire carrying 2,200 volts lowered 
to allow erection of a derrick. Man came 
in contact with wire and was electrocuted. 

Two cars jumped track. While train was 
backing to uncouple derailed cars, man 
stepped between derailed car and one on 
track and was caught as ends of cars came 
together. Rupture of Unes and intestines. 
• fracture of ribs and shock, caused death. 

Injured rode on flat car pushed by dinkey; 
was thrown from car, which was not coupled, 
under wheels of following car. Hand cut 
off and internal injuries resulted in death. 

Culvert form being lowered by derrick into pit. 
broke looee hitting man. Deoimntated and 
chest crushed causing death. 

Crossing canal in boat, fell overboard and was 
drowned. 

Fell off dredge and was drowned. 

Caught in pinion and gear driving screen on 
conveyor boat. Compound fracture of 
pelvis producing internal injuries which re- 
sulted fatally. 

Fell from cofferdam into river and drowned. 

Man fell overboard from scow being towed up 
river and was drowned. 

Caught by starboard friction arm of dredge 
while cleaning scraps of flag, etc.. off deck of 
dred^ near drums. Skull out and fractured 



1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



170 New Yobk State Department of Labor. 

Triile Vm.— PwtiailaniorFtBtal Aeddeata — OontliHied. 



Iin>U9TBT AND OCCUPATIOIT. 



Sex. 



Particulftn. 



C. BUILDING AND ENQINEERINQ ^ ConHnu^d. 
I. EzcAVATmo — Continued. 



1. Open Ezcavatioiifl — Continued. 
b. CtktiaiB— Concluded, 

Deck hand 



Dredge tooth recorder. . 
Foreman 



Handyman. 
Helper 



Laborer. 

Laborer. 
Laborer. 

Laborer. 

Laborer. 



Laborer 

Laborer (ceneral) . 

Laborer (general) . 



Laborer on steam drill. 
Mate of dredge 



Oiler, hydraulic dredge. 
Rigging foreman 



18+ 



46 


M 


45 


M 


18+ 


M 


29 


M 


30 


M 


25 
23 


M 
M 


35 


M 


18+ 


M 


30 


M 


27 


M 



20 

26 

26 
65 



Soowman. 



Watdunan 

(Occupation not stated). 

c. Foundations.'^ 

Quage tender/ foundations 
(caisson) 



Pipe fitter, (foundations) . 



Dock builder, pile driving. 



M 



24 



18+ 
60 



58 

18+ 

18+ 



M 



Caught by cable being wound on drum and 
was crushed to death between cable and 
drum. 

Removing piece of timber from derrick, fell 
into canal and was drowned. 

Man was on top of guy derrick mast changing 
guv connections; one guy was slacked and a 
fellow laborer slacked an adjacent guy; 
mast f eU to ground with man, kiUhig him. 

Connecting dinkcY and coal oar with draw bar, 
was caught and killed. 

Placed dynamite in hole, and while waiting 
for an exploder to be brought, a premature 
explosion lulled him. 

Bank caved in; leg and shoulder fractured and 
internal injuries causing death. 

Bank caved in causing death. 

Cable ti ^iiling oar on incline machine puUed 
loose; oar ran back into pit killing man. 

Stone fell from top of bank at lock; hitting 
man on back of head causing daath. 

While on loaded scow pushing it away from 
a li^t scow with pike pole, pde slipped caus- 
ing nim to fall overboard and to be drowned. 

While carrying water was struck by train and 
killed. 

While boarding moving train to go to dinner, 
he fell under wheels. Left leg severed caus- 
ing death five months later. 

Man stepped in front of train receiving plural 
injuries from which he died about 12 noun 
later. 

Guy of derrick broke causing derrick to fall 
striking man causing death. 

Sent to cut ice around coal scow. Dia* 
appeared. Body found by dragging river. 

Fell off dredge into river and drowned. 

Removing derrick and mast from canal bed; 
mast rested one end on rail along tow path; 
man ordered teamster to slack back to en- 
able readjustment of tackle; through mia- 
understanding drivtf let go line; mast started 
to slip off rail into canal; it stopped and man 
stepped between it and canal when it started 
suddenly carxying him into cuial. Ankle 
fractured and bruise about head resulting 
in death about three weeks later. 

Jumped off scow and while swimming to shore 
was drowned. Tried to dimb on scow again 
out was unable, so stilted for shore. 

Fell into canal and was drowned. 

Walking along construction track, was struck 
by train; head severed. 



Air lock being hoisted to position on caisson 
when chain oroke, dn^pmg lock into lot <m 
man, killing him. 

Employee of another contractor dropped bar 
on platform knocking of piece of wood which 
fell on man. Compound fracture of skull 
killed man. 

Killed by railroad train. Could not hear ap- 
proMhing train because of noise of trains 



1 18+ is used where there is evidenoe the deooased was over 18 althoush Ithe age was not state 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bttbeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 171 

Triito TOL— PartkalvsoTFiUal AeddeBta — Contfamed. 



iNsmmT A2n> Occupation. 



Sex. 



Pftrtioulars. 



C. BUILDING AND ENQINEERINQ — ConHnutd. 
I. ExcATATnra — ConHnu&d. 



I. Open EzoaTfttioDfl — Concluded. 
0. Foundations — Concluded. 
Hmndyman, pile driving.. 



Laborer, pile driving. 

d. Other. 

Blaster, sewer 



Drill nipper, sewer. . . . 
DriU runner, building. . 



Driver, building. 



Excavator, sewer. 
Fireman, sewer. . . 



Laborer, building. 
Laborer, building. 



Laborer (shovel), building. 

Laborer, flume 

Laborer, filling in gas tanks 
Laborer, sewer 



Laborer, sewer 

Laborer, sewer 

Laborer, sewet 

Laborer, water main. 



Laying tile, sewer 

(Occupation not stated), 
cistern 



2. Shafts and Txmnels. 
a. Aoueducts. 

Brakeman. . . 



35 


M 


33 


M 


42 


M 


44 


M 


38 


M 


41 


M 


64 


M 


24 


M 


40 


M 


63 


M 


64 


M 


32 


M 


30 


M 


67 


M 


40 
29 
60 

18 + 


M 
M 
M 
M 


21 


M 


18 


M 


26 


M 


28 


M 


44 


M 


26 


M 



Climbed up derrick to unhook so that hook 
could be placed into loop of cable to pull 
the pUe; mstead <A ridinc hook to ground, 
he let hook go and climbed down derrick 
frame which tipped over and fell crushing 
man to death. 

Swinging derrick around to unload bucket, 
link holding boom broke, boom falling and 
hitting man on head causing death. 

Supposed to have struck exploder with clean- 
mf spoon while extracting charge of dyna- 
mite which had missed fire. Premature ex- 
plosion killed man. 

Crossing railroad track, was struck by train. 
Oushed chest caused death. 

Drilling lifting hole between holes that had 
been fired. Rook being seamy, powder 
must have woriced out into seams. Explo- 
sion occurred; crushed side resulting in 
death. 

Wheel of truck collapsed overturning truck; 
man fell, fracturing skull and contusing lungs 
and back, which resulted in death. 

While diggmc in sewer, was suffocated when 
earth caved in. 

gh tension wire broken by blast. Live end 
Ml in trench; man picked it up and was 
electrocuted. 

Excavating under cottage for a cellar wall, was 
hit and killed by cottage, raised off founda- 
tion by windstorm ana dropped into cellar. 

Guy ropes of derrick broke, allowing derrick to 
fall. Mast broke in two, one of the pieces 
hitting man, fracturing skull, causing death. 

Bank caved in. Man died from fractured 
liver. 

Reaching for oar from boat, he became fright- 
ened and jumped in water. Drowned. 

Taking wood out of tank with grab hook, he 
fell in and was drowned. 

Tunneling under sidewalk to lay sewer pipe 
when roof ci tunnel caved in suffocating 



Trench caved in fracturing man's rib and neck. 
Fractured skull caused by falling of derrick. 
Killed by piece of frosen earth falling on him. 
Bank caved in on man causing injuries result- 
ing in death about two weelcs later. 
Bank caved in on man, suffocating him. 

Digging in oistem. was caught by cave in of 
walls and was killed. 



Riding between two concrete cars underneath 
arch forms: before car cleared, he raised head 
striking cross timbers of form carriage. 
Death resulted from fractured skull. 

*Brakeman 28 M Caught between ^uard and cage, while stepping 

off cage in motion. 

Car pusher 44 M Pushing car of muck on cage when signal to 

start was given too soon, causing car to tip 
over on man. Died from internal injuries 
and broken legs. 

Drill helper 26 M Hole being loaded exploded prematurely 

Man killed by compound fracture of skul^' 

* Accidents oceurripg before October 1. 1910, reported after November 1. 1910. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deoessed was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



172 New Yobk State Department of Labor. 

Table vm.— Partlciilan of FMal Aeddeate — Conttnaed. 



InDXTSTBT and OcCUPATIOlf. 




Partieulan. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — C<m<»nii«J. 
I. Excavating — Continued. 

, Shafts and Tunnels-— C<m<tntt«d. 
a. Aaueduots — Contintied. 

l>riller 40 M Fell into sump of shaft. Compound fracture 

of leg and jaw resulting in death a few dajrs 
later. 

Drill runner 26 M Piece of rook was loose but couldn't be pried; 

was drilled and drills were removed, when 
rock suddenly fell on man fractunng skull, 
causing death. 

Drill runner 32 M Trimming side of tunnel with wall drill when 

large slab of rock fell on him. Laceration of 
scalp producing cerebral hemorrhage and 
contusion of spinal cord in lumbal region 
caxised death. 

Drill runner 25 M f Vi^in^ unusual force in ramming explosive to 

load hole, he sot o£f cap causing explosion. 
Died from concussion and shock. 

Explosion of dynamite threw him on his engine 
causing fractured tkull and leg resulting in 
death. 

Prematuro explosion. Foot blown off causing 
death abuuL thr^ weeks later. 

Death resulted from being hit on head by 
small stone from side of tunnel. 

Engineer lost control of engine and car being 
lowered jumped track near bottom of in- 
cline. Man thrown out and killed. 

Jumped off car before reaching side wall form, 
axid trolley wire caught him under chin and 
arms. Killed by electricity. 

Removing muck when exploaon occurred. 
Death resulted from fractured skull. 

Removing muck when explosion occurred. 
Death resulted from laoeratioos of thigh, 
face and neck. 

Car of muck taken off elevator and dumped; 
on returning, car was pushed on wrong track 
and fell with man about eighty feet. Man 
died from fracture of base of dcull and ab- 
dominal contusions. 

Piece of rock fell from side of shaft, fracturing 
man's skull, causing death. 

Popping rock fell on man, fracturing skull 
cauang death. 

Killed by stone falling from side of shaft. 

Klled by stone falling from side of shaft. 

Died from caisson disease or the "bends." 

Walking alongade of tunnel, came in contact 
with electric wires and was electrocuted. 

Man coining on top of cage left gate open; 
after cage went to bottom, he walked into 
opening, fell down shaft, causing death. 

Rock dropping from above portal of tunnel 
caused death from depressed fracture 
of skuU. 

While dumping car, he was caught between 
bed of car and "A" frame, causing death 
from fractured skull. 

Leading mule with car when mule started to 
run; in attempting to stop mule, he was 
thrown and dragged. Sharp rock fractured 
skull and cut head and neck causing death. 

Nipper 37 M Drill steel caught in shaft timber pulhng him 

offcajce. Fell 250 feet. SkuU. arms, legs 
and ribs fractured causing death. 

*Fipe fitter 18+ M Fell on fly wheel in engine room of shaft. Died 

from compound fracture of leg and ribe and 
puncture of lung. 

* Accidents occurring bafora OJtabar 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910. 
1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Engine runner (hoijting) . 



Fireman 

Jap drill runner. 
Laborer 



Laborer. 



Laborer. 
Laborer. 



Laborer. 



*Miner 

Mining foreman . 

Foreman 

Mucker 

Mucker 

Mucker 

Mucker 



Mucker. 



Mule driver. 



Mule driver. 



40 


M 


26 


M 


32 


M 


25 


M 


30 


M 


27 


M 


45 


M 


21 


M 


32 


M 


28 


M 


24 


M 


27 


M 


26 


M 


30 


M 


28 
18 + 
24 
45 


M 
M 
M 
M 


32 


M 


21 


M 


35 


M 


18 


M 


37 


M 


18 + 


M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpoet of Bxtbeau of Faotoby Inspection, 1911. 178 

TtMm Vm.-- Partfcnlara of fWil Acddente ~ Continaed. 



InDXTSTBT and OcCUPATXOlf. 



Sex. 



PartloulAiB. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — ConHnued. 
L ExcAYATmo — ConHntied. 



StniiB and Tunnels — Continued. 
a. Aqueducts-— ConWiiiMi. 
Shalt superintendent. . . . 



Sgnal man for derrick. . . . 



Spader. 



Top man 

Top motorman. 
Water boy 



b. Subwasrs. 

Concrete laborer. 



Laborer., 
Laborer., 



Pipefitter's helper. 



ffignal mui. platform ex- 
tension 



Steel wori^er. 



Umberman's helper. 



Track man« platform ex- 
tension 

e. Other. 
Driller, 



Drill helper, sewer. . 
Mucker, sewer 



Drill runner, gas. 



Engineer (steam shovel), 
railroad 



Look tender (inside), water 
works 



48 



18 



25 



24 



27 

21 
42 

32 

35 

18 + 

40 

40 
30 

27 
33 

36 



24 



onihM 



t.l8+ is used where there ib evidence the 



M Ascending alone in cage, beoondng entangled 
in wire bell rope; body was thrown so that 
head was caught between case and shaft 
timbering. Death resulted from crushed 
skuU. 

M Man released hook while standing on edge of 
bucket. Gave signal to take up hook which 
engineer did. Man took hold of bail which 
fell toward him. Man fell backwards and 
bail fell across his abdomen causing death. 

M Holding lamp (with guard) at arms length to 
light fellow employee's work, when some 
soft concrete feu into lamp socket, causing 
short circuit, killing man. 

M Engineer raised cage without proper signal. 
Man's head "was crushed between cage and 
timbers causing death. 

M Failed to stop motor which broke through 
safety guards at top of shaft and went down 

shaft. Wi ping Tny.T> . 

M While sitting V fire he had a fit and fell into 
fire. Died about three weeks later from 
bums. 

M To dump oar of concrete, he jumped on lower 
bail of car and placed hands on upper and 
pulled. Concrete shifted, causing car to 
upset, pinning man beneath car, kiUing him. 

M Trimming sand in bin; was found deaof, evi- 
dently caught and smothered by sand. 

M Bucket attached to hoistinji fall on cable way 
was raised about eight feet when it fell on 
man, killing him. 

M While going down ladder beside shaft, he 
stopped and stepped on cross beam of shaft. 
Was hit by descending concrete shaft cage 
and killed. 

M Found dead between tracks. Evidently hit by 
train. 

M Working on top and lost balance, falling thirty 
feet to concrete floor. Died from compound 
fracture of skull, internal injuries and broken 
leg. 

M Struck by boom of derrick with bucket at- 
tached to it. Rupture of liver and internal 
injuries caused death. 

M Crossing track was struck by train and lulled. 

M Drilling heading, struck piece of djrnamite 
which exploded. Ribs broken, lung pene- 
trated, head and body cut resulting in death. 

M Stone fell from roof of tunnel fracturing skull, 
caumng death. 

M Stone fell from roof of tunnel, lacerating scalp, 
fracturing i^elvis and femur, rupturing 
femoral arteries, causing death. 

M Drilled into hole where dynamite hadn't been 
exploded. Died from depressed fracture of 
skuU. 

M Flying rock from blast came through roof of 
house, crushing man's skull. 

M While going from platform under lock to the 
ladder, fell into sump, striking his head and 
drowning, 
deceased was over 18 althou^ the age was not ftated 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174: New York State Department of Labor. 

Tfeble Vm.— PartieaUrs of Fatal Acddenta — Contlnaed. 



Industry and Occupation. 




Particulart. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — ContiniMd. 
I. ExCAVATiNQ — Concluded. 



2. Shafts and Tunnels — Concluded. 
0. Othei^-Conelttded. 



3. Dredging. 
Foreman. 



II. Ersctxno and Structural 
Work. 

1. Iron and Steel. 

Bridgeman, bridge 

Bridgeman, bridge 

Bridgeman, bridge 



Bridgeman, bridge. . . 
Bridgeman, building. 



Clearing up, bridge. 



Contractor, metal lathing. . . 
Foreman (ass't) gas holder. 



Helper, steel lock gates. 



Housesmith, building. 



60 



Housesmith, biiilding. 
Iron worker, building . 



Iron worker, building . 



Iron worker, building. 



Iron worker, building . 
Iron worker, building : 



Iron worker, bwlding . 



80 



18 + 
27 



22 

18 + 



38 



60 



60 



40 



18 + 
40 



32 



29 



27 
29 



38 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Hoist runner lost control of boom and it 
dropped, hitting man, causing him to fall to 
bottom of shaft. Scalp wounds caused death 
about a week later. 

Shear logs had been erected to raise raaehineiy. 
Topphng over, they hit man on head, break- 
ing artery, oaumng death. 



Throwing off tie and nail caught in glove pull- 
ing him off falsework. Died from fractured 
skull and bruises of body and face. 

Fell from scaffold and killed. 

Trestle of bridge washed out leaving track 
suspended from abutment to abutment. 
To remove this, man cut joint, all the wei^t 
being shifted to one rail which broke lettmg 
man fall. Fractured skull caused death. 

Fell about 40 feet from cross bar. Died from 
fractured skull. 

Beam being set in place when line parted, 
beam dropped and hit man working below. 
Died from fractured skull. 

Raising beam from ground to oar on bridge; 
beam caught on bent of old false work, tip- 

Sing it over; a beam fell crushing man to 
eath. 

Stepped on stay lath which gave way. Man 
fell, fracturing skull causing death. 

Stepped on end of plank which tilted with him 
causing him to fall about 40 feet to ground. 
Fractured skull caused death. 

Hit by falling wood filler block, used in adjust- 
ment of gates. Depression of skull caused 
death. 

Pushing columns around to dear guv when hm 
made a mis-step and fell. Died from frao 
tured skull. 

Mast on iron derrick dropped when chain broke 
ki Hip g man. 

Canying plank when it hit column, the foroe 
of whi<m knocked man off beam. Fall to 
^ 7" Tt chin and bruised body result- 

mu, lu death. 

Raising derrick and after landing It, was tak- 
ing lashings oPT foot block; rope puUed out 
causing fatal fall. 

Walking with plank on shoulder, lost footinc 
and fell 30 feet into cellar. Died from in- 
ternal injuries, broken ribs, abrasions and 
sprain of back. 

Fell while at work on elevator and killed. 

Timbers being hoisted; one fell, hitting man on 
head throwing him on floor acainst beam. 
Fracture of skuU and breast bone caused 
death. 

Sniib line broke letthag column slip causing 
hand derrick to swing around. In the ei- 
citement, man lost head and stepped off 

Elatform, fallinf^ to basement. Died from 
ead and body mjuries. 

1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased wac over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bubeau of Faotoby Inspbotion, 1911. 175 

TiOile VHL— PartfenlarsorF^tel Accldeate — GQBtiiUMd. 



Indostbt and Occupation. 




Partioulan. 



a BUILDING AND ENGINEEBING — ConUnued. 

II. Ekscting and Stbuctxtbal 
Work — ContiniMd. 



1. Iron and Steel— ^onetudcd. 
Iron worker, building 



Iron worker, building 

Iron worker (riveter) building. 



Iron worker, building. 
Iron worker, building. 



Laborer, building 

Unloading iron, bridge . 



2. Ml 
Btii 

Brioklayer 

Bricklayer 

Carpenter 

Hod carrier and watchman 

Hod earner 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Maible letter 

Maaon 



37 


M 


18 + 


M 


38 


M 


18 + 


M 


45 


M 


22 


M 


18 + 


M 


78 


M 


30 


M 


60 


M 


40 
42 


M 
M 


18+ 
31 


M 
M 


25 


M 


40 


M 


48 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


42 


M 


40 


M 



Standing on coping wall prying girder into 
poeition with pinch bar, bar shpped causing 
nim to loee balance and fall to yard. Frac- 
tured skull caused death. 

Taking down planking, stepped between two 
planks and feU. KUled. 

Supposed to have stepped from scaffold to 
lower flange of beam; m climbing, slipped and 
fell. Died from fractured arm and leg and 
body bruises. 

Slipped while walking on beam and fell. 

Putting tie rod in on the 10th floor, end of 
whi^ protruded into elevator shaft; reached 
into shaft to screw nut on end of rod; hod 
hoist descended catching head between shaft 
and car. Head crushed causing death. 

AiHMtrently was passing between bucket and 
aerrick and was hit by bucket. Died from 
fracture of skull. 

Girder was unloaded from cars on crib and was 
being jacked from crib to trucks, when a 
jack cantered over until the girder tightened 
up on crib catching man against car, killing 
him. 

Guy rope stake gave way letting gin pole fall, 

strikmg injured. Died four months later 

from scalp wound and bruise on shoulder. 
Fell while laying brick on roof. Died from 

fractured no and arm and internal injuries. 
Goins up ladder carrying clothes, lost footing 

and fell off striking on head. Killed. 
Fell down elevator shaft and killed 
Supposed to have fallen asleep on beam and to 

have fallen off. Killed. 
Scaffold broke and fell, killing man. 
Foot of derrick slipped on scaffold; man 

grabbed fallins derrick and was carried over 

with it. Died from broken neck. 
Moving plank was overbalanced by it, causing 

a faUL Died from fracture of legs and arm. 
Loading sand on barrow, was standing astride 

of barrow handle and when barrow tipped 

caused man to fall through floor opening. 

Died from broken neck. 
While dropping planking, man fell to bottom 

of uptake for boiler. Killed. 
Wheeling brick across runway, wheeled off 

and feu. Fractured skull caused death. 
Tripped on strip of wood holding scaffold to- 
gether and fell from scaffold to second story. 

^ed. 
Looking down shaft, was killed by descending 

elevator. 
Weights of elevator hit staging, causing man 

to fall off to bottom of shaft. Died from 

fractured skull. 
Loosening guard rope used to keep scaffold 

from swinging awav from wall whfle holding 



on to guard rail which slipped from socket. 
Man leaned toward wall tipping scaffold. 
Fell between wall and scaffold. Died from 



fractured skulL 



1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on Uie blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



176 New Yoek State Depaetmbnt of Laboe. 

TUile VHL— PartfcnlvsoffWil Acddanta^Cwtiimed. 



Induvtbt AiTD Occupation. 




PartieuUrt. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — Con«wtu«d. 



U. 



EUDCTINO AKD StBUCTVBAL 



2. MMonrsr — Cotichidad. 
Matoo 



Mason's laborer. 



Plaatarar. 



Scaffold builder. 
Stone outter.... 



Stone outter 

Stone outter. . . .« 

Stone tetter — foreman . 



Stone tetter. 
Stone tetter. 



Stone tetter. 
Stone tetter. 



8. Concrete. 
Can>enter. 



Carpenter. 
.Can>enter. 



M 


M 


28 


M 


21 


M 


54 


M 


18+ 


M 


47 


M 
M 
M 


43 


M 


40 


M 


28 
39 


M 

M 


55 


M 



Came into contact with live wire wliioli canted 
a faU. Died from burnt and fractured rib. 

At toaffold workert took out pin of outrLner 
to lower patent tcaffold, man jumpedon 
tcaffold: plank dropped with man. FaU 
cauted death. 

Emplosreet of another contractor took horte 
from under tcaffold, tubtUtutinc a Joitt 
without fattening it: tcaffold thifted throw- 
ing man off. Died from fracture of tkulL 

Killed by faUins off beam; tui>poted to have 
been blown off by wind. 

Carving stone whidi wat ditlocated by force 
of chitding and fell on tcaff olding tupport* 
in^ man : tcaffold fell with man causing death. 

Derrick fell, killing man. 

Stcme fell on man, breaking riba. Died. 

Apparently about to detMud ttairt when he 
Eeeitated, turned around and fell between 
beamt back of ttairt. Died of fractured 
tkuU. 

Fell from ttepladder. Died from fractured 
tkulL 

Using totting bar, pulling ttone out on bed, 
causing anchor to pull out which was holding 
stone in place; stone pushed man off scaffold^ 
following him down and crushing him to 
death. 

Fell through elevator opening and killed. 

Stooping over to lay cement, straightened up* 
coming in contact with stone on derrick. 
Lost balance and feU. KiUed. 

Stepped off second story floor into auditorium: 
struck on scaffold, rolling off to floor. Died 
from fractured c<^lar bone and ribs and in- 
ternal injuries about three wedcs later. 

Panel beinf hoisted was swung by wind, hitting 
2x4 against which was leaung ladder on 
irhich man was working; 2x4 broke ffm^rg 
fall of ladder with man. Killed. 

As man stepped from ladder, he stO(q;>ed to 
crawl under wire used as brace and guard. 
Striking against wire, he became over- 
balanced and fell to ground and was killed. 

Hod hoist started unexpectedly. Man lost 
balance and fell down shaft. Died from 
head bruises. 

Plank broke on which were men oanying mix- 
ing box for concrete. Man killed. 

Fresh reinforced concrete arches fell, killing 
man. 

Fresh reinforced concrete arches fell, killing 
man. 

Fresh reinforced concrete arches fell, killing 
man. 

Fresh reinforced concrete arches fell, killing 
man. 

Fell from roof. Died from fractured neck and 
limbs. 

Carrying timber along false work, fell, fracture 
ing skull, causing death. 

Was leveUng concrete in hoist bucket; gave 
signal to hoist before taking his body m>m 
between bucket and cross brace of hoist tower. 
Body crushed, ribs piercing heart. 

1 18+ is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
00 the blank. 



Carpenter's laborer. 



Foreman of laborers. 
Laborer 



Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer, concrete bridge. 
Laborer, concrete bridge . 



53 


M 


40 


M 


18 + 


M 


85 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 


18 + 


M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpoet of BrrBEAU of Factory Inspection, 1911. 177 

Table Yin. — Partfenlan of Fatal Acddenta — ConCinaed. 



iNDUWntT AND OoCUPATXOIf. 



Age.t 



Sex. 



Particiil&rs. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — Continued. 



U. 



"ExmcTOfQ AifD Stbuctubai* 
WoBX — Ccnduded, 



8. Concrete — Conduded. 
Laborer 



Laborer. 
Laborer. 

Laborer. 



Wheeling concrete. 



(Oeoupation not stated) . 
(Occupation not stated) . 



4. Wood. 

Carpenter. 
Carpenter. 



Carpenter . 
Carpenter. 
Carpenter. 



Carpenter's helper. 



Carpenter (assistant foreman). 

Carpenter (head) , 

Watchman , 



6. Structural Work (branch n. e. c.) 
Laborer 



Laborer. 



Night watchman . 
Night watchman. 



Night watchman ... 

(Occupation not stated) . 
(Occupation not stated) . 



in. FrsiBBma and Fttrkishinq. 

1. Roofing (except Sheet Metal). 
Carpenter 



19 
22 

18 + 



25 



40 
18 + 



46 
60 



53 
35 
47 



39 



60 


M 


49 


M 


69 


M 


56 


M 


23 


M 


35 

18 + 


M 

M 


61 


M 


50 


H 


18 + 


M 



30 



M 



M 



In cement house loading wheelbarrow with 
bags of cement, when pile tipped over, bury- 
ing and suffocating him. 

On wagon unloading lime when horses walked 
into canal. Man went with them and was 
drowned. 

As defective concrete wall was being taken 
down, it fell against two other walls knocking 
them over on man working behind them. 
Man killed. 

Scaffold was hanging on i indi round iron 
loop into rivet hole of beam when loop 
opened causing scaffold to fall. Died from 
injured spine. 

Wheeling concrete over span of iron work and 
concrete, when timbers supporting it broke. 
Man died from internal injuries. 

Struck on head by brick. Head cut resulting 
fatally. 

Killed by fall through opening in floor arch. 



Fall caused by hemorrhage of brain. Died. 
Supposed attack of dissiness caused fall from 

wmdow. Died from fractured skull and 

arms. 
Arm of scaffolding broke. Fall caused death. 
Jumped out of window, falling 35 feet. Killed. 
Overcome by heat, causing fall. Died from 

bruises, fractured ribs causing perforation 

of lungs and internal hemorrhages. 
While placing timber into position lor lowering, 

man fell from scaffold through opening. 

Died from fractured skull. 
While at work was struck by automobile and 

run over. Killed. 
Stand falling from scale box being hoisted, 

fractured man's skull causing death. 
Walking across beams, he felL Hip injured, 

causing death. 

While men were bracing up floor of building, 

man was hit by part which fell. Died from 

injuries. 
Riding load when branch of tree cau^t part of 

load, tipping it over on man. Died from 

dislocated neck. 
Suffocated by charcoal gas from stove. 
Body found on sidewalk in front of building. 

Alan died in hospital. 
Fell through hole. Died from broken hips, 

elbows and neck and scalp wounds. 
Fell off ladder, caused by loss of balance. Died 

from internal injuries. 
Fell from top of building, causing death. 



Fall from roof to ground. Died from dislocated 
shoulder and internal injuries. Supposed to 
have been stricken with heart f allium, causing 
falL 



1 18+ is used where there is eyide^oe the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
00 tb9 bUnk. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



178 New Yobk State Depabtmbnt of Labob. 

Table vm.— PwUcnlars of Fktal Aeddente — Conltomd. 



iNDnSTflT AND OCCUPATION. 



Sex. 



Fariioulan. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — C<m<miMd. 

III. Finishing and FuBNisHiNa — 
Conlinutd. 

1. Roofing (except Sheet Metal)- 
Coneluded. 
Contractor 



Roofer 

Roofer 

Roofer (canvas) . 



Roofer (slate) . 



Tile worker. 
Tile worker. 
Contractor. . 
Tile worker. 
Tile worker. 



2. Sheet Metal Working. 
Apprentice 



Helper 

Sheet iron worker. . . 
Sheet metal worker. 
Sheet metal worker. 



Tinsmith. 
Tinsmith. 
Helper 



33 

28 
29 
24 

62 



Wood Finishing. 
Carpenter, metal doors. 

Carpenter, metal doors. 



6. Painting and Decorating. 
Assistant engineer 



Grainer 

Painter 

Painter 

Painter 

Piunter (chimney) . 
Painter 



Painter 

Painter (bridge) . 



Painter. 



33 



22 
26 
33 
23 
39 


M 
M 
M 

M 
M 




M 


20 


M 


38 


M 


40 


M 


37 


M 


33 

86 
26 


M 

M 
M 


18 + 


M 


35 


M 



M 



18 + 


M 


52 


M 


27 


M 


24 


M 


18 + 


M 


20 


M 


40 


M 


39 


M 


58 


M 



Painting roof when foot slipped. Man fell, 
struck staging and from there to ground. 
Died from fractured skull and neck. 

Unrolling part of a roll of felt and walked back- 
ward off the roof. Killed. 

Flat tile fell off roof, hitting man on head, 
causing death. 

Supposed to have jumped from one roof to an- 
oUier. Slipped on edge and fell, causing 
death. 

Found dead at foot of ladder leading to scaf- 
fold. Supposed to have fractured skull in 
falL 

Roof fell in causing death. 

Roof fell in causing death. 

Roof fell in causing death. 

Roof fell in causing death. 

Roof fell in causing death. 

Painting leader, man fell from roof and was 

killfd. 
On structural iron work wiring up oomioe, 

slipped Hiid fell to ground, causing death. 
Putting corrugated iron enclosure on stairway, 

fell from scaffold and was killed. 
Caught foot in sill of window. Fell and was 

killed. 
Walking in gutter, tripped over coping and fell 

to ground. Killed. 
Roof f^ in causing death. 
Roof fell in causing death. 
Roof fell in causing death. 

Hanging metal elevator doors, foil down shaft 

s^idSlled. 
Stepped on brace of saw bench which gave way 

sjid threw him into elevator shaft, causing 

death. 

Painting railing near high tension section; cur- 
rent jumped from fuse to brush handle. 

Died from electnc bums and shock. 
Fell from scaffold while graining inside of 

windows and killed. 
Fell off roof. Died from fractured skull and 

internal injuries. 
Fell from ladder on which were two men. 

Man kiUed in faU. 
While t3ring rope to chimney to hold scaffold 

in phice, roof^fell with him, causing death. 
Rope broke and man fell from top of 60-foot 

smoke stack which he was painting. Killed. 
Man forgot to fasten second rope of scaffold to 
. chimney. When he got on from window the 

scaffold fell with him. Died of fractured 

skuU. 
While shifting scaffold he fell to street. Killed 

byfalL 
Needle beam supporting scaffold broke. Man 

fell with scaffold. Died from fractured 

skull and arm. 
Fell from scaffold. Died after two weeks from 

fractured ribs and collar bone. 

1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eeport of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 179 

Table Vni.— Pwdciilan of nual Aeddento— Contfnaed. 



Indubtbt AjrD Occupation. 




Partieulan. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — C<ml»ni««d. 



III. 



FmuBiNa AND Furnishing — 
CcniintMd, 



6. Pftintins and Deoor»ting — Cart' 

duded. 
Painter 

PiOnter 

7. Plumbing, Piping and Insulating. 

Helper (piping) 

Helper (pipe covering) 



Laborer (sewer connections) . . 
Plumber 

Plumber's helper 

Plumber's helper 

Plumber's helper 

Rivet heater 

8. Electric Wiring and Installation. 
Electrical foreman 

Electrician 

Electrician 

Electrician 

Electrician's apprentice 

Foreman. 

Laborer 

' Lineman 

Lineman 

Lineman 

Lineman 

laneman 

Lineman 

Lineman 

T' in4*m ftn 

Lineman 



1 18 + is used where there is evidence the 
oo the blank. 



30 
38 

30 

18 + 

18 + 
36 

18 

19 

17 
19 

35 

33 
35 
30 
18 

42 

32 

30 



18 + 


M 


35 


M 


41 


M 


26 
26 
38 


M 
M 
M 


35 


M 


23 


M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Pidnting on scaffold, came in contact 
electnc wires and lolled. 



with 



Painting skylii^ht on roof of pier when he fell 
through. Died from fractured wrist, head 
and fingers and internal injuries. 

Walking across 3i inch heating pipes and fell 

to floor. Died from compound fractures 

of arm and internal injuries. 
Stumbled while walking across top of boiler 

setting and struck head. Died from 

fractured skull. 
While repairing pipe, water main broke and 

carried bank down smothering man. 
Standing on ladder imscrewing pipe, which 

broke, causing fall. Died from fractured 

skulL 
Arranging plank to walk on, man fell down 

stairway shaft and was killed. 
Repairing sprinkler system, fell into sub-cistem 

and drowned. 
Fell throuffh opening in floor and killed. 
Discovered leak in tank of buckeye heater. 

Clothes became saturated with oil and 

ignited from torch in hand. Died from 

bums. 

In trying to make line dead he pulled wrong 
fuse plug. C]hit line with hand pliers and 
was lulled. 

On stepladder which was not placed securely 
and collapsed. Died from fractured skull. 

Collapse of scaffold. Died from crushed chest 
and fractured ribs. 

Cutting wire with wire cutters, was electro- 
cuted. 

Was working at cut off in dumbwaiter shaft 
when brick fell on him fracturing skuU caus- 
ing death. 

Clixnbing tree; limb broke allowin|E man to fall. 
Died from Colles fracture, bruises and con- 
tusions with acute endocarditis. 

Raising pole with gang of men; weight was 
borne by a few men who lost control; pole 
fell on man, breaking his neck. 

Supposed to have been on pole clearing trouble 
from wires which were near each other. 
Killed by electric shock. 

Man was on pole when pole broke falling on 
man. Died from fracture of skull and arm. 

Fellow workman received shock and man in 
rescuing him made a contact between live 
wire and steel work. Electrocuted. 

Lost balance while on pole and grabbed hold 
of a wire while holdini^ arc circuit. Killed. 

Received shock and was instantly killed. 

Received shock and was instantly killed. 

Shifting wires when he formed a short circuit 
which killed him. 

Placed one hand on secondary wire and other 
on grounded telephone messenger wire; 
died from electric bums on hands and shock. 

Changing bolts on double arm, came in con- 
tact with live wire and fell. Died from 
electric bums and shock and rupture of liver. 

deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



180 



New Yobk State Depabtmbnt of Labob. 



Table Tin.— PMlealan of Fktal Aeddmto — CMiltoMd. 



Industbt and Occupation. 




PariioulAn. 



a BUILDING AND ENGINEERINQ — ConimiMd. 

III. FXNISHINO AND FURNIBHINa — 

Canduded. 



8. Electric Wiring and Installation- 
Condud^d, 
Lineman 



Lineman. 



Lineman and wireman. 
Oiler 



Troubleman. 



Troubleman. 
Wireman.... 



9. Installation of Machinery, Boilers, 
Elevators, Etc. 
Elevator constructor, elevators 



Erector, elevators 

Machinist, engine repairs .... 
Laborer, installing machinery., 

Rigger, inwt.alling machinery. . . 
Helper, installing tanks 



IV. Wbbckxng and Moving. 



Carpenter. 



Carpenter. 



Laborer. 



Laborer. 



88 


M 


28 


M 


21 


M 


22 


M 


22 


M 


31 


M 


20 


M 


20 


M 


28 


M 


24 


M 


50 


M 


29 


M 


37 


M 


41 


M 


51 


M 


32 


M 


23 


M 


29 


M 



While on pole, leaned over and came into 
contact with high tension wire causing 
death. 

Had cut a 2,200 volt wire, twisting end around 
insulator. In reaching over Bne touched 
end of wire receiving a fatal electrical shock. 

Man touched live wire; received fatal electric 
bums and shock. 

Standing on cross arm pulling up dead wires, 
he came in contact with a live wire causing 
death. 

Repairing a steel wire supporting movable coil 
on street lighting tub, touched wire without 
gloves and fell on live wires. Burned to 
death bv electricity. 

Had climbed pole when climbers cut out 
causing loss of balance. Man grabbed hold 
of live wire with hand and leg, came in con- 
tact with another wire. Killed. 

Pole broke causing man to fall on stomach 
rupturing intestines causing death. 

Injured climbed pole to put linemen's protec- 
tors on temporary connections. Touched 
live wire and fell, not having on safety belt. 
Killed. 



WhUe working along side of shaft, empty hod 
hoist hit him on head knocking him down 
shaft causing death. 

Working on elevator in one shaft, when he was 
cauidit by weights of elevator in next shaft. 
Died a week later from internal injuries. 

After finishing repair job on steamer, he fell 
between boat and dock while coming aboard. 
Drowned. 

Passing between two coal cars, was caught 
between bumpers when third car was shifted 
to position near coal chute. Died from 
orusned hip and internal injuries. 

Hit on head and killed by timber knocked 
down shaft by employee of another con- 
tractor. 

Fitting up top curb angle using sledge to bring 
it into position. Fractured bolts holding 
beam supporting scaffold, causing it to fall. 
Died from fractured limbs and cut head. 



Moving house which slipped off blocking used 
for support, catching man between comer 
sill of house and piece of blocking. Died 
from broken neck and crushed shoulder. 

Sawing last tie timber when side of bam being 
torn down collapsed, carrying man with it. 
Died from internal injuries. 

Pulling down partition when man ran under 
falling partition; died from broken riba 
puncturing lungs or heart. 

Building was being moved; man was on top 
and fell off. Died from fracture of base of 
skuU. 

1 184- is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpoet of Bueeau of Faotoby Inspeotioit, 1911. 181 

Td>Ie ym.— Partlciilan of FatallAecideiils — Continued. 



InDUSTBT and OCCXTPAIION. 




Partloulara. 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — CorUinu^ 
Wbbcking and Movino — 
Coruiuded. 



TV, 



Wrecker. 



(Oocupaiion not stated) . 



40 


M 


45 


M 


30 


M 


60 


M 


50 


M 


27 


M 


26 


M 


25 


M 


18 + 


•M 


31 


M 


44 


M 


21 
47 
30 


M 
M 

M 


40 
27 


M 
M 
M 


32 
17 


M 
M 


25 
45 


M 
M 


18 


M 


40 


M 


19 


M 


80 


M 


18 + 


M 



While working on floor beams, header in front 
of chimney breast gave way, causing floor 
timbers to fall and carry men along. Died 
from fractured skuU. 

Man found on floor with fractured skull. Died 
two days later. 



V. OtHSB OB MiSCBLLANEOnS. 

1. Road Making and Paving. 
Drill runner 

Firanan , 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Loading holes for blasting. . . . , 
Night watchman 

2. Railroad Construction. 
Bridgeman, construction 

Bridgeman, construction 

Bridge carpenter, construction . 

Caroenter, construction 

Drill runner, grading, etc 

Foreman, grading, etc , 

Foreman, grading, etc 

Helper, electrical working, etc. . 

Laborer, construction 

Laborer, electrical woiking, etc 

Laborer, grading, etc 

Laborer, grading, etc , 

Laborer, grading, etc , 

Laborer, grading, etc , 

Laborer, grading, etc 

Laborer, grading, etc 

Laborer, grading, etc 

1 18+ is usad whare thare is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



^an contrary to orders used iron bar for tamp- 
ing causing hole being loaded to explode. 
KiUed. 

Coupling ears to traction enjcine; cars were 
not in straight line with engine and man was 
crushed between comer of car and corner of 
engine. Died from internal injuries. 

Carrying bag of cement to machine and 
dropped dead. 

While loading wagon, was struck by auto 
truck. Died from punctured lung. 

Flvin(( stone from blast went through shanty 
hittmg man. Died from bruised wrist and 
peritonitis caused from bruise on st<Hnach. 

Killed in en>losion of a charge being tamped 
with iron bar. 

While a barricade was being placed, it was hit 
b^ an automobile. One end of barricade 
hit man in side. Died in hospital. 

Placing steel girder, boom broke allowing 
girder to fall, causing man standing on false- 
work to fall to ground. Died from fractured 
skulL 

While excavating stone with stiff leg derrick, 
strap broke letting mast fall, striking him 
in stomach. Killed. 

Killed by train while crossing track. 

Killed by train. 

Hole being loaded exploded prematurely. 
Man died from general lacerations and 
contusions. 

Killed by train. 

Killed by railroad train. 

Man stepped between tracks to clear cars; 
hit bv shoe of motor; tripped up and hit by 
shoe beam on head. Killed. 

Struck by train and killed. 

Climbed pole coming into contact with con- 
ductor. Died from bums. 

Killed by train. 

Hit by stone from blast. Died from fractured 
ribs and jaw, and punctured liver. Man 
didn't heed warning of blast. 

Run over by train. Died from injury; one leg 
cut off and toes of other crushed. 

While on bridge was stmck b^ train. Died 
from crushed skull, broken hip and legs cut 
off. 

There was a foot of frost on top of bank; dirt 
undemeath gave way, killing man. 

While in pit excavating, the bank fell in suf- 
focating man. 

While excavating, frosen earth fell, killing 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



182 New Yobk State Department of Labob. 

Table ¥111.— Partfeolan of FrUU Aeddento — Contlnoed. 



Industrt and Occupation. 



Sex. 



PArtioulars. 



C. BUILDING AND ENQINBERINQ — CoiUiniMd. 

V. Other or Mibckllansous — 
Continued, 



2. Railroad Ck>n8tructioii — Concluded. 
Laborer, grading, etc 



Laborer, maintaining, eto. 

Laborer, maintaining, eto. 
Laborer, maintaining, eto. 



Laborer, maintaining, eto. 



Laborer, maintaining, eto 

Laborer, maintaining, eto 

Laborer, maintaining, eto 

Laborer, maintaining, eto 

Line foreman, electrical work- 
ing, etc 



Lineman's helper, 
working, eto 



electrical 



Lineman's helper. 



Lineman, electrical working. . . . 

Pipe fitter, electrical working, 

etc 



Section foreman, maintaining. 

etc 

Section foreman, maintaining. 

etc 



Section foreman, maintaining, 
etc 

Section laborer, maintaining, 
etc 

Section laborer, maintaining, 
etc 



Section laborer, maintaining, 
etc 



Timberman's helper, conatnio- 

tioD 

Trackman, maintaining, eto. . . . 

(Occupation not stated), main- 
tainmg, etc 



20 



30 



28 
22 



22 
40 



45 



27 



31 


M 


35 


M 


45 


M 


66 


M 


44 


M 


45 


M 


33 


M 



26 



35 
49 



18 + 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Man was working in pit around steam shoTcl 
digging a 60-foot sand bank. Earth slid 
from behind and suffocated him. 

Working near shoulder of roadbed, was killed 
by train. 

Distributing anglo bars, was killed by train. 

Leaning against wheel when switcher buckled 
into car causing man to fall under wheel. 
Killed. 

Crawled under train when it suddenly started, 
catching him under forward truck. Killed. 

Spiking ties, wa.'f hit bv engine and killed. 

Shoveling ballaat. was Killed by train. 

Grogging tracks, was killed by train. 

Walking on track, was killed by train. 

New pole had been set and wire transferred 
when foreman loosened ipiy on old pole 
which swuxig over coming mto contact with 
live wire. Current was transmitted through 
cross brace to guy wire held by man, causing 
death. 

New pole had been set up and wire transferred 
when foreman loosened guy on old pole 
which swung over coming into contact with 
live wire. Current was transmitted through 
cross brace to guy wire held by man, causing 
death. 

New pole had been set up and wire transferred 
when foreoutn loosened ^uy on old pole 
which swung over coming mto contact with 
live wire. Current was transmitted through 
cross brace to guy wire held by man, causing 
death. 

Fell from transmission pole and killed. 

Screwing in nortable light, stood with back 
against hydraulic tank which grounded him. 
lulled by electric shock. 

Supposed to have been killed by train. 

Slipped on ice while crossing track causing 
water on knee. Died later from heart 
trouble and blood poisoning; death hastened 
by injury. 

Struck by lightning and killed. 

Walking on track, was killed by train. 

Hit by engine; died from shoulder bruise, head 
cut and leg cut off. 

Ties falling from push car crushed toes. 
Reported '* killed ' on supplementary re- 
port. 

Killed by train while crossing track. 
While barring out stone near crane, column 
fell on man, causing death. 

Riding on flat car and started to set on blocks; 
car hit curve, man falling off backwards. 
Died from fracture of skull. 

1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not stated 
on the blank. 



M 



M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repoet of Bubeau of Faotoby Inspection, 1911. 183 

TiMe Vm.— PartkobmorFitel Acddeoti — Oondnded. 



Industbt and Occupation. 



Age.t 



Sex. 



Parttoulan. 



C. BUILDING AND ENQINEERINO— CanOudtd. 



OtHXB OB MlSCBLLANBOUS — 



3. Dqdc Building. 

shiniBttdry c 



M>chiniiit» Hry dooks. 



Sand hog, dry dooks. 
Sand hog, dry dooka. 

Sand hog, dry dooka . 



17 


M 


26 


M 


88 


M 


48 


M 



Coupling oars, gave signal to engineer to oome 
ahead and stepping between cars to plaoe draw 
bar, was caught. Died from lacerated and 
contused hips, ruptured bladder and other 
internal injuries. 

Engineer dropped bucket on him in caisson. 
I>ied from mjured hip and fracture of leg. 

Working on trestle when crane backed up. 
Steppmg aside to avoid crane, he fell off 
trestle. Died from fractured arm, lacerated 
hMd and injured back. 

Died from '* bends " which paralysed hips. 



1 18 + is used where there is evidence the deceased was over 18 although the age was not state ^ 
on the blank. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



184 New York State Depabtment of Laboe. 

TABLE n.— PABT OF PERSON INJURED 



Cause. 
[n. e. c.= not elsewhere clasnfied.] 



Mechanical Powbk. 
Transmission of power: - . i 

Motors (engines, dynamoe, fly wneeis. 
etc.) 

Air fans, steam pumps, etc 

Gearins 

Set screws 

Shafting 

Belts and Pulleys 

Conv^ring and hoisting machinery: 

Elevators and hoists • • • . 

Cranes (steam, electric, portable, etc.) . . . 

Hoisting and conveying i4)parat\is, n. e. c. 

Locomotive and trains 

Wood working machines: 
k Saws 

Planers and jointers 

Shapers 

Latnes 

Heading machines 

Other wood working machines 

Paper and printing machinery: 

Barkers ; : • • 

Calenders and other paper-making 
machines , •. . • 

PapexHmtting, stitching and staymg 
machines 

Printing presses 

Linotype machines 

Textile macninery: 

Picking machines 

Carding machines 

Spinning machines 

Looms • • , 

Formers, knitting machines and other 
textile machinery 

Sewing machines, etc 

Laundry machines 

Other textile machinery 

Leather working machinery 

Metal working machinery: 

Stamping machines 

Drilling and milling machines 

Screw machines 

Lathes 

Drop and other power hammers 

Shears 

Rollers 

Planers 

Power tools (chippers, etc.) 

Other 

Polishing machines: 

Contact with grindstones, emery wheels, 
etc ;• • ;• • 

Struck by fragments of polishing wheels. . 

Other : 

Machines used in bakeries, confectionery es- 
tablishments, etc 

Machines not elsewhere classified 

Total 

Heat an© Electricitt. 

Explosives (powder, dynamite, etc.) 

Explosion and ignition of gases, dust, etc. . . . 

Explosion of bouers, steam pipes, etc 

* As in last column of Table VII. 




Pakt of Person Injured (Num 



HEAD AND NECK. 


Trunk 

(ex- 
cept 

in- 
ternal 

in- 
juries). 


Arms 

or 
hands. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
eyes. 



Fln- 



A. FAC 



240 


28 


6 


9 


62 


106 


83 


8 


4 


2 


13 


56 


679 


7 


1 


10 


72 


539 


50 


2 




1 


14 


22 


115 


18 


1 


6 


15 


25 


763 


94 


6 


31 


273 


250 


383 


60 




25 


26 


30 


516 


66 


1 


29 


51 


195 


987 


162 


7 


75 


116 


319 


289 


28 


1 


51 


35 


34 


1,156 


61 


14 


57 


135 


853 


397 


13 


10 


7 


53 


310 


84 


3 


2 


3 


8 


68 


40 


12 


3 


1 


8 


17 


8 
277 








2 
47 


6 


11 


6 


8 


205 


84 


13 


5 




7 


60 


313 


13 


1 


10 


96 


165 


677 
256 


6 
5 






43 
53 


520 


1 


3 


173 


12 
65 

Si 








5 

13 
18 
11 


6 






1 


38 






78 


2 


1 


1 


61 


108 


10 


3 


3 


34 


46 


48 
212 


3 

8 






8 
14 


34 


7 


1 


187 


67 
288 


2 
10 






20 
62 


30 


2 


2 


195 


150 
1.340 


2 
47 






21 
52 


183 


14 


3 


1,220 


1.104 


280 


235 


19 


205 


585 


98 


1( 


5 


2 


21 


62 


602 


166 


140 


7 


140 


276 


210 


7i\ 


52 


5 


20 


77 


233 


14 


4 


2 


21 


186 


107 

8 

215 


'I 

126 


4 

5 

85 


6 


16 


49 


2 


16 


60 


868 


x« 


73 


17 


127 


526 


650 


« 


5 


5 


125 


305 


090 


946 


919 


6 


8 


16 
163 


502 


247 


212 


8 


66 


122 


2 




1 


28 


85 


963 


110 


50 


20 


143 


629 


16,323 


2.852 


1.885 


434 


2,382 


9.084 


21 


8 




3 


4 


— J 


290 
154 


55 
36 


11 
11 


4 
11 


90 
11 


^1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt op Bubeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 185 
and natubb of in jubt, bt causes. 



BMB OF CaBBS). 



Natubb of Injdbt (Numbbb of Casbs). 



Lags 

or 
feet. 



In- 
ternal 

in- 
juries. 



Sev- 
eral 

parts 
or 

other. 



La- 
oera- 
tions. 













Suffo- 








Sprains 




cation, 


Bums. 


Cuts. 


Bruises. 


and 
dislo- 
cations. 


Frao- 
tures. 


effects 

of heat 

or gas. 

etc. 



Plural 

in- 
juries 

or 
other. 



TOBIES. 



18 


2 


16 


71 


5 


53 


41 


14 


17 




89 


8 




1 


25 


4 


25 


6 


1 


7 




15 


40 




11 


366 




185 


83 


2 


13 




80 


3 




8 


16 




14 


11 




2 




7 


11 




40 


28 


1 


12 


21 


7 


6 




40 


47 


1 


67 


209 


16 


162 


116 


51 


60 




149 


176 


2 


64 


92 


1 


32 


122 


21 


20 




95 


140 




35 


214 


3 


59 


134 


14 


24 




68 


240 


1 


74 


297 


10 


137 


288 


29 


57 




169 


75 


4 


62 


45 


1 


19 


91 


11 


26 




96 


19 


e 


25 


346 




607 


65 


3 


11 




124 


7 




7 


76 




248 


17 


5 


3 




48 


1 




1 


22 

8 

5 

84 


i 


49 
21 

1 
133 


4 

5 

2 

28 


1 






8 


2 






6 
















4 




7 




6 




25 


2 




3 


20 


2 


40 


6 


1 


4 




11 


14 




15 


113 


15 


50 


49 


13 


12 




61 


5 




3 


257 


1 


182 


84 


1 


4 




48 


18 




4 
1 

1 


115 

4 

33 
65 
42 
38 


4 

1 



1 


37 
2 

9 

9 

17 

25 


60 




6 




38 
2 


2 




i 

16 
27 








9 




2 


2 




7 


13 


1 

1 


2 


12 


7 


4 




8 


2 




1 


16 
29 
14 


2 

1 
7 


16 

152 

6 


5 

16 
11 








9 


2 




3 


il 

2! 


13 


2 




3 


14 







10 


125 


4 


58 


56 


5 


11 




29 


3 






47 
549 


1 


82 
492 


21 
132 


4 


1 
6 




8 


14 




4 


156 


33 


2 


21 


318 


8 


387 


87 


10 


12 




282 


3 






35 
144 


1 
32 


42 
262 


7 
35 


4 


3 
9 




10 


8 




5 


116 


22 




1 


60 


9 


42 


33 


8 


3 




55 


10 






66 
32 


i9 


118 
24 


26 
11 


2 


6 
4 




17 


20 




3 


15 


1 




1 


2 

38 

275 


2 

J6 


2 

55 

342 


1 
26 
117 








3 


11 


3 



2 
9 




89 


42 




12 


100 


14 




2 


317 


13 


158 


32 


3 


1 




26 


2 




12 


26 


18 


79 


15 


1 


3 




848 


11 


2 


5 


99 


2 


167 


28 


1 


6 




199 


3 




3 


41 


2 


35 


21 


1 


2 




20 


41 


3 


17 


299 


13 


397 


116 


12 


10 




116 


1,100 


25 


546 


5.123 


216 


4.994 


2,083 


242 


375 




3,290 


1 




2 


4 


7 


6 


2 




1 




2 







95 


4 


200 


68 


3 


1 




1 


13 


12 




81 


5 


111 


1 11 


5 




i 




21 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



190 New Yoek State Depabtment of Labob. 

Table IZ. — Pert ef Penes IiUored, aad 



Caubx. 
[n. e. 0.= not elsewhere clMufied.] 



Total 



Part or Person Iwjubbd (Nvk 



HSAD AND NBCK. 


Trunk 
(ex- 
cept 
in- 
ternal 

in- 
juries). 


Arms 

or 
hands. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
eyee. 



Fin- 
gen. 



B. MINES AND 



Fall of Fsrson — Concluded. 

Into shafts, hoistways or openings. 

From ^ders, joists, roofs, etc 

On stairs, steps, etc 

Into trenches, excavations, etc 

Falls by slipping, n. e, o 

Falls by tnpping, n. e. o 

Falls by slipping of tool 

Other or indefinite 

Total 

Wrxohts and Faixing Objxcts. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

Rock, earth, etc (quarries) 

Rock, earth, etc. (mines) 

Pile of material or part thereof 

Objects from trucks in transit 

Other or indefinite 

Falling tools or objects dropxHMi by other 

persons 

Fall or weight of objects being handled by 
injured person: 
Objects used in construction or repair by 

injured person 

Objects bemg moved or carried by hand. 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 

Other or indefinite 

All other or indefinite 

Total 

VlHICLXB AND AnHIALB. 

Boarding or alighting 

Coupling or unoouphng 

Unexpected starting or stopping 

Collisions or derailments 

Fall from wagons, cars, etc 

Struck by wagons, cars, etc 

Dump wagons, oars, etc 

Kick, push, bite, etc., of animals 

Other or indefinite 

Total 

Hand Tooub. 

Hammers, hatchets, etc 

Ejiives, saws, etc 

Bars and prying tools, etc 

Total 

MlBCXLLANSOnS. 

Striking against, or catching between edges. 

projecting parts, etc., n. e. c 

Cut on glass 

Stepping on nail, sliver, etc 

Flying objects not from machine, tool or ex* 

plosion 

Poisonous gases 

All other causes 

h^ Total 

Total — Mines and Quarries 

* As in last colunm of Table VII. 



10 
7 
2 
7 

19 
4 
3 

16 


1 
1 




2 
3 


1 




1 
2 
3 




1 
2 


1 


8 




1 
2 








4 




73 


8 


1 


16 


11 




29 
78 
19 
10 
22 

8 

19 
60 
83 
6 
11 


4 
6 


2 


2 
6 

1 


2 
7 
2 

4 
3 

1 
3 
11 


6 

14 

6 


2 

8 

4 




8 


1 


2 

1 


3 
8 

7 


2 

5 

1 




3 
1 


26 

62 

1 




1 


i 


a 








335 


32 


3 


16 


34 


121 


3 

8 
4 
6 
2 
28 
6 
4 
9 
















1 


1 
1 


a 


1 
1 














1 
1 
1 

1 






1 




2 


7 
2 


2 

1 






1 


6 








70 


6 




6 


6 


17 


70 

1 

26 


39 


30 




10 


13 
1 


9 


1 


1 


2 


9 


97 


48 


31 


1 


12 


28 


33 

1 
7 

7 
2 
11 


1 






14 

1 
1 

2 


16 
















6 


4 






1 






2 


2 








61 


7 


4 




20 


18 


871 


151 


67 


66 


114 


236 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt of Bubeau of Faotoby Inspection, 1911. 187 

Natf of lnJggy* by Cm t un a — CanflMwd. 



BKB or Cabbb). 



Natuu of Injubt (Numbbb or Gasbs). 



Lees 

or 

feet. 



In- 
ternal 

in- 
juries. 



Sev- 
eral 

parte 
or 

other. 



La- 
oera- 

tiODS. 



Bums. 



Cuts. 



Bruises. 



Sprains 
and 
dislo- 
cations. 



Frae- 
tures. 



Suffo- 
cation, 
effects 
of heat 
or gas, 
etc. 



Plural 

in- 
juries 

or 
other. 























119 




128 




533 


2 


1 


1 


1 




8 


53 


1 


42 
37 
52 

17 
107 


1 
4 

3 


383 
111 
544 

73 
360 


1 
2 
2 










32 


10 










5 


266 










10 


47 








2 
5 


3 


7 


2 


6 


2 




63 


72 




280 


4 


740 


5 


4 




1 


46 


177 


fi06 


1 


841 


25 


3,062 


98 


21 


4 


4 


54 


334 


139 


7 


108 


39 


1 


47 


136 


103 


72 




153 


118 


6 


80 


41 




34 


121 


118 


34 




98 


164 


2 


138 


53 


2 


43 


135 


97 


43 




162 


100 


1 


53 


21 


2 


19 


67 


41 


18 




62 


9 




27 


3 




2 


15 


5 


10 




24 


67 




55 


15 


1 


14 


58 


68 


26 




82 


209 


11 


53 


119 


7 


144 


174 


213 


73 




114 


252 


6 


29 


64 


2 


69 


99 


185 


29 




75 


23 


3 


17 


24 


4 


20 


39 


28 


10 




24 


46 




34 


23 


3 


41 


49 


41 


13 


2 


42 


4,117 


36 


594 


402 


22 


433 


892 


899 


328 


2 


836 


8 


1 


2 


3 




2 


4 


3 


2 




4 


212 


] 


40 


97 


4 


57 


192 


24 


28 


2 


61 


120 


]. 


6 


65 




31 


101 


10 


12 




30 


622 


4 


63 


347 


3 


278 


592 


17 


62 




207 


88 


' 


10 


90 


2 


71 


87 


3 


8 




37 


647 


8 


81 


623 


8 


397 


730 


97 


70 




161 


958 


22 


87 


878 


8 


628 


904 


269 


89 




218 


301 


8 


82 


371 


3 


201 


397 


70 


51 




112 


la 






8 
93 


2 


4 
30 


8 
79 


21 


3 
14 




5 


75 


4 


9 


40 


3.143 


51 


230 


2.575 


30 


1.699 


3.094 


514 


339 


2 


875 


422 


7 


56 


224 


4 


95 


360 


55 


57 




149 


202 


3 


14 


814 


23 


1.609 


596 


65 


44 




361 


30 


1 


11 


110 


2 


177 


108 


5 


14 




50 


160 


2 


14 


727 


11 


2,048 


216 


21 


13 




130 


15 




6 

1 


41 
25 




266 
609 


1 
17 


1 

1 






5 


673 


1 




22 


30 


is 

5 


10 
46 
63 


128 


16 


384 


65 


1 


4 


5i 

2 


1.014 
11 


77 


113 


7 


229 


80 


77 


10 


183 


1,286 


26 


165 


1.958 


59 


6,322 


1,083 


171 


86 


63 


1.766 


7,664 


146 


2.432 


10,307 


3,393 


12,641 


7,533 


1.885 


1.189 


111 


7,260 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



192 New Yoek State Depabtment of Labob. 

Tdile EL— Ftft or PecMB iQlved, ni4 



Causb. 
[n. e. 0.= not elsewhere claamfied.] 



Total 



Past or Psbbon Injitbbd (Num 



HIAD AND NSCK. 


Trunk 

(ex- 

oept 

in- 
ternal 

in- 
Juries). 


Arms 

or 
handii 


Total. 


There- 
of 
eye^ 







Fln- 
geii. 



MnCHAMICAI. POWSB. 

Transmission of power: 

Motors (engmes, flsrwheels, etc.) 

Air fans, steam pumps, etc 

Gearing 

Shafting 

Belts and pullesrs 

Convening and hoisting machinery: 

Elevators and hoists 

Breaking of apparatus 

Unexpected starting or stopping 

Struck by elevators 

Struck bv counterweight 

Caught between elevator and shaft, 

etc 

Other or indefinite 

Derricks, cranes, shovels, etc 

Breaking or slipping of apparatus. . . 

Swinging of load, bucket, etc 

Unexpected starting or stopping 

Loadmg or imloading 

Other or indefinite 

Conveying and hoisting apparatus, n. e. c. 
Locomotivee and cars 

Boarding or alighting 

Coupling or uncoupling 

Unexpected starting or stopping 

Collisions or derailments 

Struck by train 

Fell from train 

Other or indefinite 

Other machinery used in building, etc.: 

Crushers and mixers 

Drills, hammers, etc 

Saws 

Grindstones 

Pile drivers 

Other or indefinite 

Total 

Hbat Ain> Elbctbicitt. 
Exploeives: 

Powder and dynamite (except blasts) . . . . 
Blasts 

Delayed or premattire shots 

Tampin|( 

Drilling mto blasts (misfires) 

Other (including flying objects) 

Explosion and isnition of gases, dust, etc 

£s;>losion of bouers. steam pipes, etc 

Other injuries from steam and hot liquids 

Caustics dime) 

Explosion of molten metal 

Other accidents from molten metal 

Electricity 

Fire and heat, n. e. c 

Total 

* As in last column of Table VII. 









C.B 


OILDIN 


AND 


62 


6 


1 


1 


10 


20 


88 


14 


6 




6 


10 


43 

5 

13 








10 

1 
5 


28 






i 

1 




1 




8 


158 


40 


4 


8 


16 


12 


11 
87 












9 


2 


3 




1 


44 


19 


2 


8 


8 


1 


6 

24 
36 


2 

2 
8 






1 

8 

4 












2 


10 


881 


171 


5 


60 


98 


209 


156 


36 


1 


17 


15 


7 


303 


75 


2 


30 


32 


44 


37 


5 




2 


8 


11 


133 


15 


1 


5 


17 


57 


202 


40 


1 


6 


26 


90 


291 


74 




14 


48 


57 


500 


54 




38 


46 


56 


52 


4 




8 


5 


7 


6C 


1 




2 


4 


27 


20 

106 






1 
8 


8 
11 


1 


6 




3 


181 


24 




14 


15 


9 


42 


7 




4 


8 


3 


49 


12 




5 


6 


6 


61 


21 


1 


1 


10 


18 


187 


47 


18 


8 


8Q 


59 


16 
25 


1 
10 






8 
2 


12 


9 




11 


35 


11 


1 


2 


4 


6 


52 


9 


2 




3 


25 


2,307 


459 


47 


133 


294 


625 


19 


1 




1 


3 




135 


54 


9 


4 


12 




23 


5 


1 




2 




5 
37 


1 
17 


1 
4 








1 


2 




70 


31 


3 


3 


8 




89 


18 


2 




29 




11 


6 


3 




1 




142 


31 


10 


4 


50 




49 


22 


21 


1 


4 




2 
18 


1 
9 


1 
7 










3 




201 


25 


16 


1 


68 


17 


123 


25 


4 


2 


45 




789 


192 


73 


13 


215 


80 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



RepOBT OB' BUEEAU OF FaoTOBY INSPECTION, 1911. 198 



Itetara or biivy. br Cmmm — CoirtlMied. 



: or Casm). 



Natubb of Injury (Numbbb of Cases). 



or 
feet. 



In- 
ternal 

in- 
juries. 



Sev- 
eral 
parts 

or 
other. 



La- 
cera- 
tions. 













Suffo- 








Sprains 




cation. 


Bums. 


Cuts. 


Bruises. 


and 
dislo- 
cations. 


Frac- 
tures. 


effects 

of heat 

or gas. 

etc. 



Plural 

in- 
juries 

or 
other. 



BNGIN] 


SIKRTNC 


1. 


















11 
5 


2 


4 
3 
2 
2 
2 

44 


26 

16 

20 

1 

4 

32 


1 

2 


6 
6 
2 


9 
6 
11 
2 
4 

27 


i 

1 


4 




8 
10 


3 

1 


2 




7 
2 


1 






2 


2 
13 




3 


36 




13 


71 


1 


i 

i 

5 


10 

16 

9 

2 

4 

3 

118 






1 
1 
3 

2 

6 

77 


2 
8 
6 


1 






7 


7 

4 


6 
8 
1 

9 

9 

260 


i 


3 

4 
1 

4 

I 

62 




20 

23 

3 

6 

12 

210 


1& 

9 

176 


3 

8 

202 


i 

29 


33 
78 
12 
27 
26 
60 
149 


1 
2 

2 

i 

3 


47 
42 
4 
10 
16 
87 
154 


26 

70 
14 
47 
94 
68 
92 


1 





2 

1 


6 
37 

2 
14 
19 
41 
29 


30 
90 
6 
37 
39 
76 
181 


11 
9 
2 
3 
4 
6 

33 


23 

21 

3 

9 

6 

17 

36 




61 
76 
10 
23 
40 
81 
178 


24 


i 

1 

i 


9 

7 

7 

40 

66 

19 

7 


8 
22 

3 
17 
28 

6 

9 






9 
14 

8 
25 
66 
13 

7 


18 
3 

9 

2 
3 
3 


4 
2 
1 
8 
14 
8 
4 




18 
7 
8 
44 
73 
13 
13 


9 

8 




2 


37 

68 

6 

18 


i 


3 
9 
8 
12 


6 


i 


6 
6 


26 
46 
4 
9 
8 
16 


2 



..... 




16 
49 
10 
4 
6 
11 


4 
46 


2 
7 






13 


31 


9 




36 
2 

10 
7 

12 


2 






1 
11 
11 


i 


1 
2 
2 




9 
9 




3 
6 


49A 


12 


386 


616 


10 


262 

— ^ , — 


639 


82 


150 




649 


8 


i 


10 
60 


2 

29 


1 

2 


2 
20 


1 
14 


2 
2 






11 
66 


11 


10 


2 






16 
4 

16 
16 
36 

3 
28 

6 


6 
1 
7 
16 
2 
1 






1 




2 




14 

4 

11 

16 
3 










1 
10 

4 


i 


2 

66 

7 

142 

46 

1 

18 

132 

96 


8 

12 

2 


2 

11 

2 


2 

2 



1 
7 


2 


1 






25 












13 












4 

1 














4 


















7 
8 




83 
38 


3 


6 
2 


4 

1 


1 





3 
22 


63 
2 








76 


1 


263 


37 

! ! = 


610 


31 


22 


7 


10 


27 


146 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



194 New York State Department of Labor, 

TftUe DL— Part of Person InJwedU mi4 



Causb. 
[n. e. 0.= not elsewhete claaufied.] 



Total 
cases.* 



Part or Pbbson Injubvo (Nine 



HBAD AND NECK. 


Trunk 
(ex- 
cept 
in- 
ternal 

in- 
juries). 


Arms 

or 
hands. 


ToUl. 


There- 
of 
eyes. 



Fin- 



Fall of Pebaon. 
From ladders 


248 


23 


1 


C. Bl 
32 


JILDING AND 

35' , 


By breaking of ladder 


38 
74 

127 
9 

557 


1 
5 
17 


i 


5 

4 
22 

1 
73 


5 

14 
15 

1 
65 




By slipping or twisting of ladder 

By fall from ladder 


1 
2 


Other or indefinite 




From scaffoldA. ......... 


66 


4 


io 






By breaking of scaffold 


167 

67 
9 

61 
253 
152 
369 

45 
127 
349 
230 

33 
469 


15 

9 

1 

5 

36 

15 

't 

14 
43 
22 
5 
57 


4 

1 

i 

1 


27 

5 

2 

8 

31 

25 

52 

6 

21 

56 

27 

3 

61 


20 
11 


4 


By breaking of scaffold or supports 

By tilting of scaffold 




By slipping or twisting of loose boards. . . 
Other or indefinite 


2 
32 
17 
37 

4 
13 
83 
48 

8 
66 


1 
5 


Into shafts, hoistways or openings 


4 


From girders, joists,' roof, etc . .7. 


16 


On stairs, steps, etc 




Into trenches, excavations, etc 


1 


Falls by slipping, n. e. c 

Falls by tripping, n. e. c 

Falls by slipping of tool 


29 

17 
2 


Other or indefimte 


12 






Total 


2,579 


297 


8 


356 


376 


94 






Weiohtb and Falt.tng Objects. 
Falling objects not stopped: 

Rock, earth, etc. (open excavations) 

Rock, earth, etc. (tunnels) 


273 

361 

97 

70 

1,378 

516 

615 
1,018 

603 
47 
99 


47 

139 

9 

13 
699 

248 

81 
43 
26 
10 
14 


4 

is 

1 
3 


32 

19 

3 

4 

88 

31 

36 

48 
22 

1 
1 


24 

59 

11 

5 

166 

68 

63 

110 

77 

4 

11 


16 

41 


Pile of material or part thereof. 


25 


Objects from trucks in transit 


12 


Other or indefinite .* 


82 


Falling tools or objeoto dropped by other 
person * 


60 


Fall or weight of objects being handled by 
injured person: 
Objects used in construction or repair by 
injured person 


208 


Objects being moved or carried by hand. . 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 

Other or indefinite 


415 

242 

17 


All other or indefinite 


81 






Total 


6.077 


1.329 


24 


285 


588 


1,149 


Vehicles and ANiiiAiii. 
Boarding or alighting 


13 

5 

38 

46 

69 

224 

202 

71 

90 


1 






2 

3 

5 

7 

25 

3a 

6 
14 


1 


Coupling or uncoupling 




1 
1 
6 
5 
7 
9 
8 
5 


2 


Unexpected starting of stopping 


t 

11 
11 
25 
9 
13 




i 


8 


Collisions or derailments 


6 


Fall from wagons, cars, etc 


3 


Struck by wagons, cars, etc 


23 


Dump wagons, cars, etc 


70 


Kick, push, bitCt etc.. of animals 


4 


Other or indefimte 


27 






Total 


748 


75 


1 


42 


91 


144 






Hand Toolb. 
Hammers, hatchets, etc 


1,036 
130 
304 


386 

8 
78 


143 
3 
11 


17 
2 
7 


168 
37 

48 


288 


Knives, saws, etc 


66 


Bars and prying tools, etc. 


117 






Total 


1.470 


472 

, — 


157 


26 


243 


471 


. 


f a 





— ' ^- 



* As in Ijwt column of Table VII. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 195 

NatoM of lojwy, by Cmnam — ContfuMd. 



or Ca8C8). 



Legs 

or 
feet. 



In- 
ternal 

in- 
juries. 



.Sev- 
eral 
part3 

or 
other. 



Nattbb of Injury (Number or Casks). 



I 

I 
La- I 

cora- I Bums, 
tionb. 











Suffo- 






Sprain-i 




cation, 


Cuts. 


Bruises. 


and 
dislo- 
cations. 


Frac- 
tures. 


effects 

of heat 

or gas, 

etc. 



Plural 

in- 
june:i 

or 
other. 



ENGINEERING — Continued. 
















60 


6 


1 89 


22 


2 


7 


44 


38 


33 




102 


8 


1 


18 


6 






5 


6 


4 




17 


22 


1 


27 


7 


1 


2 


15 


11 


11 




27 


26 


4 


41 


9 


1 


5 


21 


2C 


17 




54 


4 


4 


3 
217 








3 
117 


1 
59 


1 
56 


i 


4 


122 


30 


2 


36 


256 


37 




64 


8 


1 


9 


37 


20 


17 




75 


21 


1 


20 


5 




5 


17 


4 


6 




30 


4 




2 
29 


1 
1 






1 
17 


4 

3 


1 
1 




2 


16 


1 


4 


34 


44 


3 


102 


15 




18 


45 


28 


31 




116 


36 


1 


54; 9 


1 


9 


23 


20 


18 




72 


60 


3 


155 


29 


1 


16 


76 


32 


52 




163 


20 


1 


8 


4 




4 


12 


11 


3 




11 


30 




48 


10 




7 


32 


14 


9 


2 


53 


119 


1 


18 


58 


3 


64 


78 


67 


18 




61 


98 


1 


17 


30 


3 


39 


49 


51 


17 




41 


13 




2 


8 




9 


4 


7 


1 




4 


118 


7 


148 


49 


2 


44 


116 


60 


32 


5 


161 


676 


24 


756 


249 


14 


235 


651 


359 


239 


7 


925 


107 


3 


44 


43 




29 


81 


17 


28 


3 


72 


64 




39 


89 




98 


66 


4 


26 


1 


77 


39 




10 


24 




7 


34 


7 


10 


1 


14 


30 




6 


20 




10 


20 


2 


4 




14 


217 


4 


122 


319 




242 


311 


10 


41 




455 


97 


1 


21 


107 




105 


122 


8 


13 




161 


201 


2 


24 


184 




106 


174 


38 


28 




85 


375 


9 


18 


364 




110 


345 


60 


32 




107 


220 


6 


10 


199 




62 


228 


31 


17 




66 


13 




2 


15 




7 


12 


1 


4 




8 


34 




8 


32 




9 


27 


3 


5 


1 


22 


1.397 


25 


304 


1.396 




785 


1,420 


181 


208 


6 


1,081 


r 




2 


2 




2 


4 


2 


1 




2 


2 






1 
10 




1 
4 


I 
11 


2 


2 
3 






17 


1 


4 




8 


21 




i 


9 




3 


13 


7 


4 


1 


9 


18 




15 


8 




5 


14 


2 


7 




23 


135 


1 


22 


50 




15 


88 


13 


13 




45 


46 


1 


21 


70 




23 


50 


7 


13 




39 


35 


1 


9 


7 




8 


27 


4 


3 




22 


23 




8 


26 




14 


18 


12 


5 




15 


3C4 


4 


88 


183 




75 


226 


49 


51 


1 


163 


180 




7 


264 




376 


173 


7 


24 




192 


16 




1 


22 




97 


5 




1 




5 


50 


2 


2 


91 


1 


92 


71 


9 


5 




35 


246 


2 


10 

. — . 


377 


1 


565 


249 


16 


30 




232 

■ ■ -11 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



196 New Yobk State Depabtmbnt of Labob. 

TMe EL— Fwt of PerMn Iqfvsd, aad 



Causv. 
(n. e. 0.= not e lo ew Ler e elMoifiecL] 



Total 
cases.* 



Past or Pumon Injubvo (Nim 



HBAD AND NBCS. 


Trunk 
(ex- 










cept 


Arms 




Ther^ 


in- 


or 


Total. 


of 


ternal 


hands. 




eyes. 


in- 
juries). 





Fin- 



C. BUILDINQ AND 



Striking against, or catching between edges, 
nroieetinff Darts. etCr. n. a. e, . ^ ...,.»,.». , 


003 

38 
837 

205 

15 

816 


103 
2 


8 


12 


417 
18 


870 


Cut on i^am 


M 










Flying objects not from machine, tool or ex- 


168 

1 

60 


131 


8 


13 





Pdisonoua gases 




AD other CaUa««- . ^ r r-, r - ■, ■, r-, r 


io 


U 


40 


82 






Total 


2.404 


834 


140 


20 


407 


446 






Total -~ Building, etc 


16.374 


3,158 


450 


884 


2. 304 


2.867 






GraT»d Total 


60.554 


11,125 


4,611 


3.065 


0.518 


20.108 







* As in last column of Table VII. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bubeau of Factoby Ikspbotion, 1911. 197 

fUtmrn ofl^Jory. by Cmmm — Goactadsd. 



BBB or Casm). 



Natubb of Injxtbt (Numbbr or Cabwb). 



Lett 
or 

feet. 



In- 

ternal 

in- 
juriee. 



Sev- 
eral 

parts 
or 

other. 



Lft- 
cer»- 
tione. 













Suffo- 








Spnune 




oatioii. 


Buma. 


Cute. 


Bruiees 


and 

dielo- 

catione. 


Frao- 
turee. 


effeote 

of heat 

orgae, 

etc. 



Plural 

in- 
Juriee 

or 
other. 



ENQINEEBINO — Conduded. 



85 

4 




6 


340 

5 

73 

22 


5 


486 

33 

406 

38 


78 


11 


3 




75 


837 






260 
14 


6 
2 






02 


11 




1 
14 
37 


1 


io 

5 


123 
5 


00 


6 


47 


2 


43 


42 


64 


14 


00 


1.036 


5 


58 


487 


7 


1.006 


304 


83 


18 


15 


304 


4.233 


73 


1.856 


3.344 


542 


2.050 


3.401 


777 


706 


56 


3.580 


12.114 


221 


4,383 


13.854 


3.965 


15.757 


11.186 


2.606 


1.053 


172 


11.001 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



198 



New York State Depabtmbnt op Labob. 



TABLE X.— EXTENT OF INJURIES* BY CAUSES. 

(The figures as to extent oi injuries in this and other tables are based on the first rm>orts of 
employers when extent of injury seemed to be clearly indicated thereby, or on supplementary 
reports called for by mail in sJl.doubtful cases.) 



Causs. 



Total 
cases. 


Non-Fatal Cabss. | 


Tern. 
ponxy 
mjunee. 


Per- 
manent 
injuries. 


Extent 

of 
injury 
uncer- 
tain. 



Fatal 
injuries.* 



A. FACTORIES. 
Mbchanical Power. 
Transmission of power: 

Motors (engmes. dynamos, flywheels, etc.) . . 

Air fans, steam pumps, etc 

Gearing 

Set screws 

Shafting 

Belts and pulleys 

Conveving and hoisting machinery: 

Elevators and hoists 

Cranes (steam, electric, i)ortable, etc.) 

Hoisting and conveying apparatus, n. e. o. . . 

Locomotives and trains 

Wood working machines: 

Saws 

Planers and jointers 

Shapers 

Lathes 

Heading machines 

Other wood working machines 

Paper and printing machinery: 

Barkers 

Calenders and other paper-making machines. 

Paper cutting, stitching and staying machines 

Pnnting presses 

Linotype machines 

Textile macninerv: 

Picking machines 

Carding machines 

Spinning machines 

Looms 

Formers, knitting machines and other textile 
machinery 

Sewing machines, etc 

Laundry machines 

Other textile machinery 

Leather working machinery 

Metal working machinery: 

Stamping machines 

Drilling and milling machines 

Screw machines 

Lathes 

Drop and other power hammers 

Shears 

Rollers 

Planers 

Power tools (chippers. etc.) 

Other 

Polishing machines: 

Contact with grindstones, emery wheels, etc. 

Struck by fragments of i)olishing wheels. . . . 

Other 

Mfci^hinoa usod in bakcries, confectionery estab- 
lishments, etc 122 

Machines not elsewhere classified 963 



Total. 



HsAT and Elbctbictty. 
Eq>losiTes» (powder, dsmamite. etc.) . 
Erosion and isnition of gases, dust, etc. 



Kiplosian of bmiers, steam pipes, etc. 
Other injuriea from steam and hot liquids. 



Esmlosion of molten metals 

Other aoddento from molten metals 

Vats, pans, etc. (containing hot liquids or caustics) 

* Figures in parsntheass are fatalities before October 1, 1910, 
and are not included in the other figures. 



240 
83 

679 
50 

115 

763 

383 
516 
987 
289 

1,156 

397 

84 

40 

8 

277 

84 
313 
577 
256 

12 

55 
91 
89 
103 

48 
212 

67 
288 
159 

1.340 

1.104 

98 

602 

210 

233 

107 

8 

215 

868 

550 
990 
502 



16.323 



21 
290 
154 
546 
417 
118 
560 

78 



199 
65 

485 
45 
87 

684 

311 
459 
862 
242 

871 

245 

68 

39 

7 

224 

62 
265 
465 
203 

11 

38 
70 
76 
95 

44 

204 

45 

251 

135 

888 , 
1.029 

94 
583 
191 
175 

95 

8 

208 

792 

505 
976 
466 



846 



13.801 



20 
269 
115 
516 
398 
107 
522 

61 



25 

12 

149 

4 

6 

24 

14 
30 
56 
16 

218 

127 

10 

1 



36 

15 
26 
85 
30 
1 

13 
13 

4 

1 

4 

5 

20 

16 

372 
50 
1 
11 
17 
50 
6 



6 
47 

27 

5 

20 

27 
87 



1,693 



13 
5 

40 
1 
9 

45 

42 
23 
61 
15 

58 
25 



1 
17 

7 
19 
27 
22 



4 
8 
7 
4 

3 
4 
7 
16 
8 

79 
24 
3 
8 
2 
8 



1 
27 

18 
8 
16 

6 

28 



731 



7 
15 
25 
18 

5 
34 

6 



au 



13 
10 

(1) 16 

(1) 4 
8 

(1) 16 

(2) 9 



2 
(2)1 



1 
(1) 2 



(10) 



(3) 8 
(2) 21 
3 
1 
5 
1 

(1) 7 



reportad after November 1, 1910, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepoet of Bukeau of Factoky Inspection, 1911. 199 



TftUe X— Extent of bUnries, by CaoMS — Contfnaed. 

(The figures as to extent of injuries in this and other tables are based on the first reports of 
employers when extent of injury seemed to be clearly indicated thereby, or on supplementary 
reports called for by mail in all doubtful cases.) 



Causb. 




Non-Fatal Casbs. 






Extent 


Tem- 


Per- 


of 


porsjry 


manent 


mjury 


injuries. 


mjunes. 


uncer- 
tain. 



Fatal 
injuries. *< 



A. FACTOBIEa — Concluded. 
Hbat akd ELBCTRicmr — Condtided. 

ElwJtridty 441 405 

Fire and heat not elsewhere classified 977 795 



Total. 



Fall of Pbrson 
Fall from ladder, scaffold, platform, etc. . . 
Fall from machinery, trucks, engines, etc. 

Fall caused by collapse of supirart 

Fall through opening in floor, etc 

Fall in hoistway. shaft, etc 

Fall on stairs, steps, etc 

Fall on level by slipping 

Fall on level by tripping 

Fall on level by slipping of tool 

Other or indefinite 



Total. 



WxioHTs AND Falling Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

Rock, earth, etc 

Pile of material or part thereof 

Objects from trucks in transit 

Other or indefinite 

Falling tools or objects dropped by other pnersons. 
Fall or weight of objects being handled by injured 
I>erson: 

Objects in course of numufacture or repair 
by injured person 

Objects being moved or carried by hand . 

Objects being loaded or unloaded on vehicles. 

Other or indefinite , 

All other or indefinite 



Total 

Vehicles and animals . 



MiSCBLLANSOUS. 

Hand tools (hammers, knives, wrenches, files, 
etc.) 



Toob in hands of fellow workmen 

Striking against or catching between edges, pro- 
jecting parts, etc., n. e. c 

Cut on glass 

Stepping on nail, sliver, etc 

Flying objects not from machines, tools or explo- 
sions 

Inhalation of poisonous gases 

All other causes 



Total 

Total — Factories . 



3.602 



550 
446 
535 
230 
59 
264 
844 
623 
149 
214 



3.814 



3,208 



507 
421 
501 
212 
48 
230 
800 
492 
145 
202 



3,558 



18 

465 

249 

1.506 

298 



2.086 

2.994 

1.205 

28 

279 



15 

426 

236 

1,435 

282 



2,002 

2.841 

1,127 

28 

252 



9.128 8,644 



23 



36 



9 
4 

21 

7 



46 
63 
28 



15 



193 



944 I 



885 



3,502 
466 

3.166 
314 
675 

1.612 

62 

701 



3,407 
443 

3,087 
299 
652 

1,565 

51 

649 



10.498 10.153 



44.309 I 40.249 



14 



53 
12 



21 
4 



24 

24 



138 



=1= 



18 
22 



150 



13 

28 

16 

6 

28 

34 

24 

1 

8 



181 



(1) 16 
tl69 



(7) 221 



(3) 14 
8 
2 

(1) 1 

(2) 5 
3 

2 

"(i)'4 



(7) 39 



1 
24 

8 
48 

8 



36 



(1) 2 
6 
1 
2 
1 



(1) 2 
89 (1) 1 

46 4 



12 



272 



(3) 19 



39 



186 



2.097 1.559 



(1) 6 



(1) 9 
9 



(1) 21 



(29) 404 



B. MINES AND QUARRIES. 
Mechanical Powbk. 
eion of power: 

Motors (engines, fly wheels, etc.) ' 

Air fans, steam pumps, etc -. i 

Gearing | 

Set screws 

Shafting. 

Belts and pulleys I 

* Figures in parentheses are fatalities before October 1. 1910. reported after November 1. 1910, 
and are not included in the other figures, f Asch building fire. 



3 


2 


1 




1 




1 




5 


3 


2 




1 


1 






1 


1 






2 


• 2 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



200 



New York State Depabtmekt ov Labob. 



Table X.~Ezt«Bt oTI^Jiiriai^ by Gmum — Contlaved. 

(The figures as to extent of injuries in this and other tables are based on the first reports of 
employers when extent of injury seemed to be dearly indicated thereby, or on stq>plementa^ 
reports called for by mail in all doubtful cases.) 



Caxtsb. 



Total 


NON 


-VATAL CaSM. I 


porary 
injuries. 


Per- 
manent 
injuries. 


Extent 

of 
injury 
uncer- 
tain. 



Fatal 
injuries.* 



B. MINES AND QUARRIES — Conitntied. 
MxcHANiOAL PowBB — Ccndudtd, 
ConT|nring and hoisting machinery: 

Elevators and hoirts 



Unexpected starting or ^^. 

Caught between elevator and 

Other or indefinite 

Derricks, cranes, shovels, etc 



t, etc. 



Breaking or slipping of apparatus. 
! load, bucket, etc. 



Swinging<tfl 

Unexpected starting or stopping . 

Loading or unloading 

Other or indefinite 

Conveying and hoisting apparatus, n. e. c. 
Locomotives and oars 



Boarding or •.li gtifin y 

Coupling or uncoupling 

Unexpected starting or stoi^ing . 

Collisions or derailments 

Struck by train 

Fall from train 

Other or indefinite 

Other machinery used in mining, etc.: 

Crushers and mixers' 

Drills, hammers, etc 

Saws 

Grindstones, etc 

Other or indefinite 



Total. 



Explosives: 
Blasts. 



Hkat Am) ELicnucrrr. 



Delayed or premature shots. 
Tampin|(. 



Drilling mto blasts ([misfires) . 
>ther (in " *" 



Other^Unoluding flying objects) . . , 
Explosion and ignition of gases, dust. etc. . 

Escplosion of bouers. steam pipes, etc 

Other injuries from steam and hot liquids. 

Explosions of molten metals 

Electricity 

Fire and heat, n. e. c 



Total. 



From ladders. 



Fall of PKBsoif. 



By slipping or twisting of ladder, 
'all from * * 



By fall from ladder 
Other or indefinite 
From scaffdds 



By slitting or tilting of loose boards . 

Other or indefinite 

Into shafts, hoistways or openings 

From (prders, joists, roofs, etc 

On stairs, steps, etc 

Into trenches, excavations, etc 

Falls by slipping, n. e. c 



23 



1 

1 

21 

19 



3 

4 
3 
5 
4 
30 
46 



6 
IS 
5 
5 
11 
1 
4 

8 
25 

1 
2 
2 



168 



42 



67 



20 



19 
15 



2 

4 
1 
4 
4 
25 
35 



5 
7 
5 
3 
9 
1 
4 

6 
21 



133 



22 



45 



17 



12 



10 



(1) 4 



2 



1 

'(i> 



(2) 5 



* Figures in parentheses are fatalities before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1. 1910* 
and are not included in the other figures. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Bepobt of Bubeau op Factory Inspection, 1911. 201 

Tkble X.— E»tert of ImSwii^B, by O— ■ — - Contfcwed. 

(The figures as to extent of injuiiee in this and other tablet are bated on the first reports of 
jBD^Osrers when eictent of injury seemed to be clearly indicated thereby, or on supplementary 
rep<nt<called for by mail in all doubtful oases.) 



Cauwi. 



Total 
cases. 


Non-Fatal Cabwb. 


Tem- 
porary 
injuries. 


Per- 
manent 
injuries. 


Extent 

of 
injury 
unoer- 
tafai. 



Fatal 
injuries.* 



B. MINES AND QUARRIES — ConduiM. 
Fall or Pumon — Concluded, 

Falls by tripping, n. e. c 4 

Falls 1^ slippinc of tool 3 

Other or indeWte 16 



Total. 



Waiosrs akd Faluno Objbcts. 
Falling objects not dropped: 



Rock, earth, etc. (quarries) . 
c. (n * 



Rock» earth, etc. (mines) 

Pile of material or part thereof 

Objects from trucks in transit 

Other or indefinite 

Falling tools or objects dropped by other ptersons. 
Fall or weight of objects bemg handled by injured 
persons: 

Objects used in construction or repair by in- 
jiued person. 

Objects being used or carried by hand 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 

Other or indefinite 

All other or indefinite 



Total. 



VamcuBS and Animals. 

Boarding or alighting ■ 

Coupling or uncoupling 

Unexj^eeted starting or stopping , 

Collisions or derailments 

Fall from wagons, cars, etc 

Struck by wagons, cars, etc 

iDump wagons, cars, etc 

Kick, pusE. bite. etc.. of animals 

Other or indefinite 

Total 



Hand Tools. 

Hammers, hatchets, etc 

Knives, saws, etc 

Bars and prying tools, etc 



Total. 



Misckllanbous. 
Striking against, or catching between edges, pro> 

jeeting parts, etc., n. e. c 

Cut on glass 

Steroing on nail, sliver, etc 

Fljrmg objects not from machines, tools or explo- 



Poisonous L 
All other causes. 



Total 

Total — Mines and Quarries. 



78 



78 
10 
10 



19 
50 



335 



70 



70 

1 

26 



97 



61 



871 



4 
8 
13 



61 



27 
67 
12 

8 
16 

7 



19 
44 

68 

5 

11 



284 



2 
7 
4 
5 
2 
24 
6 
4 
9 



63 



88 



30 

1 
5 

7 

"9 



52 



726 



12 



44 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING. 



MaCHANXCAL POWBR. 

n of power: 

Motors (en^nes, flywheeLs, etc.) . 
» Air fans, steam pimips, etc 

■ Gearing 
Shafting 

^ Belts and pulleys. 



52 
38 
43 
5 
13 

* Rgures in parentheses are fatalities before October 1, 1910, 
mnd are not included in the other figures. 



36 

30 

3 

7 



34 



80 



10 
2 
6 
2 
3 



(2) 21 



(1) 1 



reported after November 1, 1910* 

oogle 



uiyiiizeu uy ' 



202 



New Yoek State Depaktmbnt of Labob. 



Table X. — Eztenl of I^jiirtoa, bj Canaea — Continaed. 

(The figures as to extent of injuries in this and other tables are based on 'the first reportsTof 
employers when extent of injury seemed to be clearly indicated thereby, or^on supplementary 
reports called for by mail in all doubtful cases.) 



Causb. 



Total 
cases. 


Non-Fatal Cabss. | 


Tem- 
porary 
mjunes. 


Per- 
manent 
injuries. 


Extent 

of 
injury 
uncer- 
tain. 



Fatal 
injuries.'^ 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — ConHnued. 



Mechanical Powbb — Concluded. 
Conveying and hoisting machinery: 

Elevatora and hoists 


158 


90 


9 


47 


(1) 12 






Breakintr of annftmtiMi. , 


11 
37 
44 

6 

24 

36 

831 


5 
21 
24 

2 

12 

26 

689 


i 

1 

4 

3 
44 


6 

12 

16 

2 

6 

7 

167 




Unexpected starting or stopping 


3 

4 


Struck bv counterweisht 


2 


Caught between elevator and shaft, etc. 
Other or indefinite 


(1) 3 


Derricks, cranes, shovels, etc 


31 






Breaking or slipping of apparatus 

Swingjing of loaci, bucket, etc 


156 
303 
37 
133 
202 
291 
600 


88 
234 
18 
97 
162 
198 
345 


9 
8 
1 
12 
14 
21 
20 


41 
66 
17 
22 
32 
63 
87 


18 
6 


Unexpected starting or stopping 

T/Onding or unloading . . . . , 


1 
2 


Other or indefinite 


4 


Conveying and hoisting apparatus, n. e. c. . . 
Locomotives and cars 


9 

48 






Boardinir or aliffhtinff . ....... t - . - - r - - - 


62 
50 
20 
106 
181 
42 
49 

61 
187 
16 
25 
36 
52 


39 
36 
11 
74 
111 
33 
41 

46 
164 
8 
21 
26 
42 


4 
2 

1 
4 
8 

i 

10 
4 
3 

1 
1 
3 


7 
8 
7 
24 
32 
3 
6 

6 

29 

5 

3 

8 
7 


2 


Coupling or uncoupling. ..-,,.., ^ r t - - 


4 


Unexpected starting or stopping 

Collisions or derailments 


1 
4 


Struck by train 


30 


Fall from train 


6 


Other or indefinite 


1 


Other machinery used in building, etc.: 

Crushers and mixers. 




Drills, hftmmers, et^ ,..,,, 




Saws 




Grindstones 




Pile drivers 




Other or indefinite 








Total 


2,307 


1.633 


127 


444 


(2) 103 






Heat and ELBCTRicrrr. 
Explosives: 

Powder and dynamite (except blasts) 

Blasts 


19 
136 


12 

84 


2 

7 


1 
26 


4 
18 






Delaved or nremature shotiir . . - - t - t t - - 


23 

5 

37 

70 

89 

11 

142 

49 

2 

18 

201 

123 


12 

2 

24 

46 

77 

8 

115 

40 

2 

18 

138 

107 


1 

4 

2 

1 

2 

6 


4 

4 

18 

10 

3 

25 

9 

""26 
16 


6 


Tamping 


3 


Drilhng into blAstn (misfirea) 


5 


Other (including flying objects) 

Explosion and ignition of gases, dust, etc 

Explosion of boilers, steam pipes, etc 


4 
1 


Other injuries from steam and hot liquids 

Caustics (lime) 




Erolosion of molten metal 




Otner accidents from molten metal 




Electricity 


31 


Fire and heat, n. e. c 


1 


Total 


789 


601 


18 


116 


56 






Fall of Pbbaons. 
From ladders 


248 


186 


5 


51 


6 






By breaking of ladder 


38 
74 

127 
9 

557 


29 

60 

91 

6 

393 


1 
1 
3 

9 


8 

12 

28 

3 

132 






1 


By fall from ladder 


6 


Other or indefinite 




From scaffold 


23 






By breaking of scaffold , 


167 

67 

9 


117 

50 

7 


3 


40 

14 

1 


7 


By breaking of tackles or supports 


3 


By tilting d! scaffold .'.' 


1 



* Figures in parentheses are fatalities before October 1, 1910, reported after November 1, 1910, 
Doluded 



and are not induded in the other figures. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 203 

Table Z.— Eztoat of Jnimim, by Cmwm — Condmled. 

(The figures as to extent of injuries in this and other tables are basnd on the first reports of 
emgAoyen when extent of inJunr seemed to be dearly indicated thereby, or on supplementary 
reports called for by mail in all doubtful oases.) 



Causx. 



Total 
oases. 


Non-Fatal Casks. 1 


Tem- 
porwy 
injunes. 


Per- 
manent 
injuries. 


Extent 

of 
injury 
uncer- 
tain. 



Fatal 
injuries.* 



C. BUILDING AND ENGINEERING — Concluded. 



Fall of Person — Concluded. 
From scaffold — Conduded. 

By slipping or tilting of loose boards . 

Other or indefinite 

Into shafts, hoistwasrs or openings 

From girders, joists, roofs, etc 

On stairs, steps, etc 

Into benches, excavations, etc 

Falls by ^j;>ping, n. e. o 

Falls by tripping, n. e. c 

Falls by sUppinii of tool 

Other or indefimte 



Total. 



Wkights and Faluno Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

Rock, earth, etc. (open excavations) 

Rock, earth, etc. (tunnels) 

File of material or part thereof 

Objects from trucks in transit 

Other or indefinite 

Falling tools or objects dropped by other persons. 
Fall or weight of objects being handled by injured 
person: 

Objects used in construction or repair by in- 
jiu«d person 

Objects being moved or carried by hand . . . 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 

Other or indefinite 

All other or indefinite 



Total. 



VsmcLBS AND Animals. 

Boarding or alighting; 

Coupling or uncoupling 

Unexpected starting or stopping 

CoUisions or derailments 

Fall from wagons, cars, etc 

Struck by wagons, cars, etc 

Dump wagons, cars, etc 

Kick, push, bite, etc., of animals 

Other or indefinite 



Total. 



Hand Toou. 

Hammers, hatchets, etc 

Knives, saws, etc 

Bars and prying tools, etc 



Total. 



MiSCKLLANEOUS. 

Spiking against, or catching between edges, pro- 
jecting parts, etc., n. e. o 

Cut 



Fl^mg 

Poisonous gases 
All other 



Stepping on nail, sliver, etc 

Flying objects not from machine, tool or explosion 



Total 

Total — Building and Engineering . 
Gfand Total 



61 
253 
152 
360 

45 
127 
349 
230 

33 
469 



2,579 



273 

361 

97 

70 

1,378 

516 



615 

1.018 

603 

47 



5,077 



13 

5 

38 

46 

59 

224 

202 

71 

90 



52 
166 
107 
236 

36 

99 
305 
178 

23 
345 



1,907 



179 

278 

82 

54 

1,016 

402 



510 

832 

483 

31 

79 



3,946 



748 



1.036 
130 
304 



1,470 



993 
38 

837 

205 
15 

316 



2.404 



15,374 



60.554 



10 

3 

32 

37 

46 

158 

142 

58 



555 



874 
111 
255 



1.240 



872 
35 

586 

180 
13 

227 



1.913 



11,795 



52,770 



37 



15 

29 

17 

2 

7 



99 



19 



28 



4 I 



16 



344 



2,485 



6 
72 
29 
86 

9 
23 
42 
47 

6 
104 



530 



65 

12 

15 

329 

110 



157 

103 

14 

11 



974 



12 
38 



17 



(1) 105 



6 

11 I 

63 ; 

47 ! 

13 

15 



166 



146 
14 
42 



202 



117 I 
3 

251 ; 

22 ' 

1 
68 I 



462 



2.893 



4.532 



17 

(1) U 

2 

1 

22 
2 



(1) 58 



I 
12 



13 



(4) 342 



(35) 767 



* Fignras in parentheses are fatalities before October 1, 1910. reported after November 1, 1910, 
and are not included in the other figures. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 



New Yoek State Depabtment of Labob. 



TABLE XL— NATUBE OF KNOWN PEBMANENT 



' ■ 


FiNOBBS — IkCLUDINO 




L068 or-— 


Causb. 


Lew than 
ono-faalf.i 


One-halfor 
more.i 




Total 
oaoee. 


There- 
of 
••tipe." 


Total 
caeee. 


Thereof 


Amount 




More 
than 
one- 
one- 
half. 


On 

more 

than 

one 

finger. 


uncer- 
tain. 



Mbchanical Powbb. 
Tranamiasion of power: 
Motors, (engines, dynamos, flywheels, etc.) 


18 

5 

79 


6 

2 

33 

*"i 

2 

1 
5 
13 

49 

24 

3 

9 

9 

8 

38 

7 

1 

1 
2 
3 

1 
3 

■■••4 
4 

118 
15 

■■3 

2 

27 

1 
2 
8 

13 

""■5 

8 
25 


6 

4 

48 

2 

1 
8 

'*"6 

13 

1 

84 

40 

6 

11 

1 
6 
11 
7 

6 
6 
2 

""2 
5 
6 

74 
11 
1 
1 
7 
7 
3 
2 
13 

4 

'"5 

5 
19 


5 

2 

27 

""i 

3 

8 

1 

50 
22 

1 
7 

1 
5 
2 
6 

5 
3 

1 

..... 

2 
4 

36 

6 

..... 

4 

3 

..... 

4 

1 

' "3 

4 

11 


2 
"26 
..... 

■"3 
3 

45 
16 
4 
3 

1 
2 
6 
3 

3 
3 

1 

""2 

1 
3 

31 

1 

"3 

'""2 

1 
2 

2 

7 


A. FAC 






Oaring " 


2 


Set screws 




Shafting , ... 


2 

8 

3 
13 
27 

1 

104 

77 

4 

19 

11 
14 
67 
13 

1 

3 
4 
4 
3 

4 




Belts and pulleys 




Conveying and hoisting machinery: 

Elevatora and lifts 




Orftn«w. 




Hoisting and conveying apparatus, n. e. c 

Locomotives and trains 


1 


Wood working machinery: 

Saws 


4 


Planers and jointers 


3 


Shapers. .*. 


1 


Other wood working machines 




Paper and printing macEinery: 

Barkers, etc 




Calenders and othor paper making machines 

Paper cutting, stitching and staying machines. . . 
Printing pre<Wfl ... . ^ , . , 


2 


Linotype machines 




Textile machinery: 

Picking machines 




Carding machines 




Spinning niActhinftfl 




Looms 




Sewing machines, etc 




Laundry machines 




Other or indefinite 


10 

7 

271 
30 


1 


Leather working machinery. , 




Metal working machinery: 

Stamping machines. 


g 


Drilling and milling machines 




Screw machines 




Lathes 


7 
5 

42 
1 
3 

23 

19 
• j 

19 
51 




Drop hammers 


1 


Shears 




Rollers 




Power tools (chippers, etc.) 




Other or indefinite 


2 


Polishing machines: 

Contact with grindstones, emery wheels, etc 

Struck by fragment of polishing wheels 

Other 


1 


Machines used in bakeries, confectionery establish- 
ments, etc 




Machines, n. e. c 


5 


Total 


979 


456 


433 


234 


171 


31 






Heat and Electricity. 
Explosives (powder, dynamite, etc.) 




















Explosion and ignition of gases, dust, etc 

Explosion of boilers, steam pipes, etc 






Other injuries from steam and hot liquids 

Vats, pans, etc. (containing hot liquids or caustics) 

y . . . ^ 




' i 








Total 














1 1 









* See fourth column of Table X. 
> Equals first phalanx of thumb or two phalanges of a finger. 

* Equals loss at or above wrist but below elbow. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bukeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 206 
injuries.* by causes. 



TmmaBi.f 


Hands. 


Arms. 




Stif- 
fened 
orde- 
fonned. 


Total. 


LOMOF^-* 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 


Total. 


L088 OF — » 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 




TvteL 


One. 


Both. 


One. 


Both. 


Total. 



> Equals loss at or above elbow. 

t Injuries to two or more are olaasified according to most serious injury to any one. 



TORIES 
24 


i 

7 
1 

i 

i 

3 

16 
2 

3 

i 

2 

1 

i 

i 

3 

1 

2 

11 

6 

2 

3 

i 

4 

3 

i 

2 
3 


24 
10 
130 
3 
3 
17 

3 
20 
44 

2 

207 

122 

10 

33 

12 
21 
80 
23 
1 

9 
U 
6 

4 
4 
5 
17 
16 

364 

46 

1 

10 

16 

49 

6 

5 

42 

27 

""iz 

26 
78 


6 

i 

i 

i 

6 
2 

2 

1 
5 
4 

2 

2 

1 

2 

i 

2 






i 

1 

i 

1 

i 

1 

1 

i 

i 

'. '. '. .* '. ; 

i 

1 


i 

7 

i 

2 

i 

1 
1 

6 
3 

2 
2 
6 
6 

2 

2 

1 

2 

i 

i 

1 
2 


1 
2 

i 

2 

1 

i 

2 

1 
i 

i 

i 


i 


i 

i 

3 

i 

i 

1 
1 

i 

2 

i 

i 

i 



i 


1 


9 




1 


129 






2 

3 




2 


16 




6 


3 

19 




2 


41 






2 




8 


192 




2 


120 




1 


10 






30 




2 


12 






20 




2 


78 






22 






1 






9 




2 


10 




2 


6 






3 






4 






2 

16 






1 


13 






363 






41 






1 


1 






8 




1 


13 
49 






4 






5 






38 




2 


24 




i 


12 






24 






76 







1.448 


81 


1.624 


38 




11 


49 


14 


1 


16 


81 




2 

i 


2 

2 


1 




i 

1 


1 

1 

1 











i 

2 




... 


... 






1 


... 


* i 


2 


1 


8 


4 

= 


1 




2 


3 







3 


8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



206 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XI. — Nature of Known Pernaneat 



Caise. 



Fingers (Includinq 



r^ess than 
one-half.i 



Total 
cases. 



There- 
of 
*' tips." 



One-half or 
more.' 



Total 
cases. 



Thereof 



More 
than 
one- 
half. 



On 

more 

than 

one 

finger. 



Amount 
uncer- 
tain. 



Fall of Person. 
Fall from ladder, scaffold, platform, etc . . 
Fall from machinery, trucks, engines, etc. 

Fall caused by collapse of support 

Fall on level by slipping 

Fall on level by tripping 

Fall on level by slipping of tool 



Total. 



Wbiohts and Falling Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

Pile of Diiaterial or part thereof 

Objects from trucks in transit 

Other or indefinite 

Falling tools or objects dropped by other persons 

Fall or weight of objects b6ing handled by injured 
person: 
Objects in course of manufacture or repair by in 

jured person 

Objects being moved or carried by hand 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 

All other or indefinite 



Total 

Vehicles and animals . 



Miscellaneous. 

Hand toob 

Tools in hands of fellow workman 

Striking against, or catching between, edges, project- 
ing parts, etc., n. e. c 

Cut on glass 

Flying objects not from machines, tools or explosions, 
All other causes 



Total 

Total — Factories. 



3 I 



24 

27 

17 

6 



10 



35 



1.108 



Mbchanicaij Power. 
Transmission of power: 

Motors (engmes, flsrwheels, etc.) . . 

Air fans, steam pumps, etc 

Gearing 

Convey. ng and hoisting machinery: 

Derricks, cranes, abovels, etc 



Unexpected starting or stopping . . . 

Loading or unloading 

Conveying and hoisting apparatus, n. e. 
Locomotives and cars 



Coupling or uncoupling 

Other machinery used in mming, etc.: 

Drills, hammers, etc 

Pile drivers 



Total. 



22 



* See fourth column of Table X. 

1 Equals first phalanx of thumb or two phalanges of a finger. 

> Equals loss at or above wrwt but below elbow. 



A. FACTORIES 



23 



10 



472 



5 I 



10 I 



254 I 



37 



B. MINES AND 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Keport op Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 207 

InjBiiea,* by Canses — Continiied. 



Thumbs.) t 



Hands. 



Abus. 



Total. 



Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 



Total 



One. 



Both. 



Stif- 
fened 
or do- 
formed. 



Total. 



One. 



Both. 



Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 



Total. 



^Conduded. 
































1 










3 


1 
1 


1 
1 
3 








i 






i 


i 


i 


...... 


1 


















4 


2 


6 






2 


2 







1 


1 


2 
2 
10 

4 


2 
2 


4 
2 
12 

4 




:::::: 










'.'.'.'.'.'. 






31 
36 
10 
10 


2 

7 


33 
42 

19 
10 






i 


i 










113 


13 


126 






1 


I 










— 
8 


1 


9 








==^=^ 





1 




10 
6 


3 

1 


22 
6 










1 


I 
••• . . • • 


11 
12 


4 
2 

2 


15 
2 

1 
14 






3 

1 

i 


3 

1 

i 








•• 


48 


12 
112 


60 






6 


5 






1 


1 


1.617 


1.729 


39 


21 


60 


14 


1 


21 


36 


= 




1 








' 





CfUARRIES. 



12 



12 



» Bauals lose at or above elbow. ... 

t iSurioB to two or more are claasifie<l according to moet serious injury to any one. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



208 



New York State Dbpabtmbnt of Labor. 



Table XI. — Nature of Known Permanen 





FlNQBRS (InCLUDINO 




LOSS or — 


Gauss. 


Less than 
one-half.i 


One-half or 
more.i 




Total 


There- 
of 
"tips." 


Total 
cases. 


Thereof 


Amount 




More 
than 
one- 
half. 


On 
more 
than 
one 
finger. 


imoer- 
tain. 


Hbat and ELXCTBicrrr: 
Ezploeiyes: 
Blasts: 

Delayed or premature shots 










B. MINI 


as AND 


Tamning . 










1 




Total 


















' ' 


Fall of Pbrson. 
Fall by slipping, n. e. c 


1 













Falling objects not dropped: 

OojectB from truolcs in transit 


1 
1 

2 


1 

1 

1 


""i 


..... 






Otiber or indefinite 




Fall or weight of objects being handled by injured 
person: 
Objects being moved or carried by hand 




Total 


4 


3 


1 


1 










Vehiclbs and Animals. 
fltmok bv waeons. cars, etc 


1 


1 
















Hand Tools. 
Bars and Drvinic tools, etc 






1 


1 


1 










Total — Minej and Quarrries 


13 1 A 


7 


6 1 9 1 








. . ,_ ,. 


= 


' 


' ' ' 



C. BUILDING AND 



MSCKANICAL POWKB. 

Transmission of power: 

Motors (engmes, flywheels, etc.). . 

Gearing. . : 

Belto and Pulleys , 

Conveying and hoisUng machinery: 

Etovators and hoists , 



Caught between elevator and shaft, etc. 

Other or indefinite 

Derricks, cranes, shovels, etc 



Breaking or slipping of apparatus. . . . 

Swinging of load, bucket, etc 

Unexpected starting or stopping 

Loadmg or unloading 

Other or indefinite 

Convejring and hoisting apparatus, n. e. o. 
Locomotives and cars 



Boarding and alightmg 

Coupling or uncoupling 

Unexpected starting or stopping . 

Collisions or derailments 

Struck by train ; 

Other machinery used in building, etc.: 

Crushers and mixers 

Drills, hammers, etc 

Saws 



Total. 



19 



♦ See fourth column of Table X. 
1 Equals first phalanx of thumb or two phalan ges of a finger. 

* Equals loss at or above wrist but below elbow. 



27 



20 



12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bukeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 209 

faijvries,* hj Cmmcs — Contlnned. 



T«q^iB9).t 


Hands. 


Armb. 




Stif- 

feped 

orde- 

focowed. 


Totel. 


LOW or — * 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 


Total. 


Lessor — > 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 




Total.. 


One. 


Both. 


One. 


Both. 


Total- 



QUARRIES— Cc 

I 


^duded. 














1 


1 








1 

1 

I 

1 

1 


1 
1 




...... 1 ...... 


1 








2 






2 




1 
1 




I 




1 
















1 
2 




I 
2 










i 






i 


2 




3 



















5 




6 






' 1 1 






1 


1 




1 


















1 




1 



















20 




21 


2 





1 1 3 


2 







2 



ENQIN 


EERINO 














I 






2 




2 










1 






1 


5 




5 


1 






1 










1 




1 


















2 


1 


3 














1 


1 




1 


1 


















2 




2 















1 


1 


22 


2 


24 



















1 




1 


















2 




2 


















1 


1 



















8 1 


9 


















11 




11 


















17 


1 


18 


I 






1 










4 


1 


5 


1 






1 


2 






2 








1 






1 


2 






2 


2 




2 


















1 


i 


1 
1 


















1 




1 


















6 




6 


2 






2 


1 






1 


1 




1 


















2 


1 


3 














- 


62 


6 


68 


6 




5 


4! 1 


1 


5 



> Equals loss at or above elbow. 

t Injuries to two or more are classified according to moet serious injury to any one. 

uigitized by 



Google 



210 



New York State Depabtment of Labob. 



Table XI. — Nature of Known Pern 



Cause. 



FufOBBS (iNCLuniito 



L088 or — 



Leas than 
one-half.i 


One-half or 
more.* 




There- 
of 
" dps." 


Total 
cases. 


Thereof 


Total 
cases. 


More 
than 
one- 
half. 


On more 

than 

one 

finger. 



Amount 
unoer- 



Heat and Electricitt. 
Explosives: 

Powder and dynamite (except blasts) 

Blasts 






1 


C. BUILDIN 
1 1 


G AND 








Delayed or premature shots 






..... 


..... 


..... 




Electricity 












Total 






2 


2 


2 










Fall of Person. 
PFom scaffolds ^ 






1 




1 










By slipping or tilting of loose boards 

Other or indefinite 




1 
1 
1 


1 




1 





From girders* posts, roofs, etc 






Fall by slipping, n. e. c 

Fall by tripping, n. e. c 

Fall by slipping of tool 


1 
1 
2 




Other or indefinite 










Total 


4 


3 


1 




1 









Weiqhts and Falling Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

Rook, earth, etc. (open excavations) 


1 

1 


1 

"'2. 

7 
11 
3 
2 

1 


1 

1 
1 

■**'3 
2 

""2 


1 

1 

""3 
2 

"i 


....^ 




Rock,' earth, etc. {tunnels) '. 




Pile of material or part thereof 




Other or indefinite 






Falling tools or objects dropped by other persons 

Fall or weight of object being handled by injured person: 
Objects used in construction or repair by mjured 
person 


2 

8 
17 
7 
2 
2 




Objects being moved or carried by haiid 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 


1 


Other or indefinite 




All other or indefinite 








Total 


39 


27 


10 


8^ 


2 


1 






Vehiclxs and Animals. 
Boarding and alighting 




""2 


1 
..... 

1 
3 


1 
..... 

1 
1 


• ' • • • 




Unexpected starting or stopping 




1 


Fall l^om wagons, cars, etc ^ . . 4 . . . ^ 




Struck by wagons, cars, etc 






Dump wagons, cars, etc 




1 


Other or indefinite 








Total 


6 


2 


({ 


4 




2 






Hand Tools. 
Hammers, hatchets, etc 


4 
4 
5 


2 
4 
3 


3 


2 




1 


Knives, saws, etc 




Bars and DryinK tools 


1 






Total 


13 


9 


3 


2 




2 


Miscellaneous. 

Striking against, or catching between edges, projecting 

parts, etc., n. e. c 


4 
4 


? 


1 
1 

■••1 1 ::::: 






Au other cauiies 








Total 


8 

103 

l7224 


593 


1 

529 


..... 

3»> 

290 


17 
~~i88~ 




Total — Building and Engineering 


7 


Grand Total 


44 



♦ See fourth column of Table X. 

lEtiuals first phalanx of thumb or two phalanges of a finger. 

i Equals loss at or above wrist but below elbow. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eeport of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911, 211 

Injuries,* by Canaes — Continued. 



THTTlfDS).t 



Hands. 



Total. 



Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 



Total. 



One. 



Both. 



Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 



Total. 



One. 



Both. 



Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 



Total. 



ENGINl 

1 


BERING 


— Condm 
1 


ied. 


1 
1 






1 

1 










i 


i 


2 


1 






1 






i 


i 


2 


1 


3 


2 






2 






1 


1 


1 




1 














2 


% 








1 , 


1 

i 

1 
2 






i 




i 




1 
1 

2 


1 


1 

1 1 








1 
2 


1 ' ::.::. 






2 










1 


1 








6 


5 






1 


1 


1 




4 


s 








2 ^ 1 


3 
2 
1 

2 

8 

22 

11 

2 

5 






i 




I 






i 

1 




2 








1 1 






2 


i 

2 

i 






1 


8 






1 


21 








9 








2 










4 
















51 


R 


56 








1 


1 






2 


2 






* 




1 




1 
2 
1 
1 
8 
1 










I 










2 








1 








1 
8 
1 


1 















14 




14 




1 







1 










8 

4 


1 



4 

6 






::::: 












6 

















18 


1 


19 1 




1 










4 




4 

6 




















5 i 




















9 


1 


10 



























161 


14 


175 1 


8 




2 


K 




5 




8 


13 


1.798 


127 


1,925 ' 


49 




24 


7; 


21 


1 


29 


51 



* Equab loss at or above elbow. 

t Injuries to two or more are classified according to most serious injury to any one. 



Google 



212 



New York State Depabtment of Labor. 



Table XI. — Nature of Known PemuuM»t 



Cavsk. 



TOM.t 



LOM or — 



Oue- 
halfi 



less. 



More 

than 
one- 
halfi 



Amount 
uncer- 
tain. 



Total 



Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 



Total. 



A. FAC 



MECHA^aCAL POWKR. 

TransmisHion of power: 

Gearing 

Het BCfowa. ■■. 

Conveying and hoisting machinery: 

Elevators and lifta 



Hoisting and conveying apparatus, 
Looomoiiyea aad tiaiua 



Wood working machinery: 

Saws 

Planefs and jointers 

Lathes 

Other wood worlcing machines 

Piftper and printing machinery: 

Bar ers, etc 

Calenders and other p^;>er maJcing machines. . . 

Printing presses 

Textile machinery: 

Looms 

Metal working machinery: 

Htamninff n nrhirv^ 

Drilling and miUing machines 

Drop hammers 

Shears 

Power tools (chippera, etc.) 

Other or inde&nitc 

Polishing machines: 

Struck by fragments of polishing wheels 

Other 

Machines, n. e. c 



Total. 



Heat and Electbicitt. 

Ezp)oei<Mi and ignition of gases, dust, etc 

Elzplosion of boilers, steam pipes, etc 

Explosion ol molten ntetal 

Other accidents from molten metal 

Vats, pans, etc. (containing hot liquids or caustics) . 



Total. 



Fall or Person. 
Fall from ladder, scaffold, platform, etc. . . 
Fall from machinery, trucks, engines, etc. 

Fall caumd by collapse of support 

Fall on stairs, steps, etc 

Fall on level by slipping 

Fall on level by tripping 



Total. 



Weights and Falunq Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

PiJe of material or part thereof \ . . 

Objects from trucks in transit 

Other or indefinite 

Falling tools or objects dropped by other persons. . 

♦ S-ie fou th polumn of Table X. 

> Equals first phalanx of great toe or two phalanges of others. 

* Equals loss at or above ankle but below knee. 



5^ 
6 

4 



27 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 213 

UJwtea.* by Gmwm — ContlmMd. 



Fkkt. 






Legs. 






Etm. 




L088OF— * 


Stif- 
fened 
or de-. 
formed. 


Total. 


LOMOr — * 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 


Total. 


LOSS or — 


Im- 
pair- 
ment 

of 
sight. 




1 

One. 1 Both. 

1 


One. 


Both. 


One. 


Both. 


Total. 



TORIEf 

3 
3 

..... 
..... 


3. 


1 

1 
""2 


1 

4 

***'3 
3 

" "i 
"""i 


""3 







2 
■'"3 

..... 
"'"'i 


..... 

2 

'3 
3 

""'i 
..... 


..... 

2 

I 
1 

1 

4 

3 

'3 

3 
5 

1 




2 

i 

i 


i 

2 

1 
1 

1 

6 
3 

i 

3 

3 
6 

1 


9 




4 

..... 

1 


13 


3 




8 


u 


25 

3 

..... 

2 




4 


29 






1 




..... 


..... 




1 

1 


4 

1 
1 
2 






2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


o| 


2 


8 






1 


1 




1 

i 


1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 


1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 


1 










1 


1 


1 


u 


11 


j 






i 




""i 


""2 




1 

I 

i 

1 


1 

1 

2 


1 
1 
2 




i 







* Equals loes at or above knee. 

t Injuries to two or more are classiiied according to most serious injury to any one. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



218 



New York State Department of Labor. 

Table XI. — Nature of Known Permanent 



Cause. 



TOBS.t 



One- 
half i 



leas. 



More 
than 


Amount 


one- 
half.» 


uncer- 
tain. 



Stif- 
fened 

Total. I,^;^5, 



Total. 



*;Sce fourth column of Table X. 

^ Equals first phalanx of great toe or two phalanges of others. 

* Equals loss at or above ankle but below knee. 



Weights and Faluno Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

^^, Rock, earth, etc. (open excavations) 

' Rock, earth, etc. (tunnels) 

Other or indefinite 

Fall or weight of object being handled by injured 
person: 
Objects used in construction or repair by injured 
person 





1 
1 
2 

2 

1 
1 





C. B 

1 
1 
2 

2 

1 
1 


UILDIN 


G AND 

1 
1 
2 

2 


Objects being moved or carried by hand 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 


'.'.'.'.'. 


1 
1 










Total 




8 


' 8 


1 R 








° !.-/■■■ 1 


Vehicles axd Animals. 




1 
1 




j 

1 

1 




1 


Dump wagoH'' cars etc 




1 
















Total 




2 1 2 1 ; 2 






Hand Tools. 
Hammers, hatchets, etc 





::::: 




j 






Knives saws etc . 








1 


1 




1 








Total ^ 


1 ' i 1 


1 1 






Miscellaneous. 
Flyini? objects not from machine, tool or explosion . . . 
Ali^otber causes 




1 
:::::!:::::: 1::::: 


* 









Total 




. . . . 1 .... 








Total — Building and Engineering 


1 14 20 1 20 


Grand Total 


19 1 48 5 ' 72 1 6 7S 




1 ' i 1 1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Keport of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 219 

I^Jwtos,* bj Gmwm — Contiiiiied. 





Fbbt. 






LUQfl. 






Etes. 




LOSS or —^ 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 


TotaL 


L098 0F— * 


Stif- 
fened 
or de- 
formed. 


Total. 


LOSS OF — 


Im- 
pair- 
ment 

of 
sight. 




One. 


Both. 


One. 


Both. 


One. 


Both. 


Total. 



ENGI> 


^ERIN< 


3 — Con 


duded. 


















1 






1 






2 

1 


2 

1 










1 




2 


1 
2 






2 


2 






1 


1 


1 






1 










'.'.'.'.'. 








3 




2 


6 






5 


5 






1 


1 


. ! *. '. ! 














..... 


..... 







[ 








1 




1 


1 


1 


:.' 





















1 

6 


1 


7 


1 






1 











::::: :::::: 






1 






1 








6 1 1 1 


7 


















3 




— 


3 






1 


1 




1 


1 















1 


1 




1 


1 


3 1 




3 


13 1 1 1 


16 


30 


6| 1 24 


30 


15 1 1 


5 


21 


29 


1 


27 


57 


11 




58 


69 


93 


^ 


28 


120 



* Equals loss at or above knee. 

t Injuries to two or more are classified according to most serious injury to any one. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



220 K'ew Yoek State Depabtment of Labor. 

Table XL — Nature ef Known Permaneat 



Causk. 



Hbarino. 



LOSS or, IN — 



One 
ear. 



Both 
ears. 



Itt- 
pair- 
meat 
of — 



Total. 



MxcHANicAi. Power. 
Conveying and hoisUng machinery: 

Cranes 









A. FAC 


Locomotives and trains 






Struck by fragments of polishing wheels 

'Mfu»hinMi n p. r. 












Total 
















Heat and Elbctricitt. 
Fire and heat, n- e, c 
















Total 
















Fall or Person. 
Fall from ladder, scaffold, platform, etc 










Fall from machinery, truclcs. ensines. etc 






Fall caused by cc^lapee of support 






Fall in or throush omninc in" floor, etc 






Fall on level by slipping 






Fflill on level bv tnobinff 






Fall on level bv slioDina of tool 












Total ' 
















WsioHTS AND Falling Objects. 
Falling objects not dropped: 

Pile of material or part thereof 






1 


1 


Falling t/)ols or objects 'dropped by other persons 

Fall or weight of objects being handled by injured 

injured person , ■ t . , , 






Obiecto bemg moved or carried by hand 

Objects being loaded or unloaded 






All other or indefinite 












Total 






1 


1 








Vehicles and animals 




1 














Miscellaneous. 
Hand tools , 










Tools in hands of fellow workman 






Striking against, or catching between edges, projecting 

parts, etc., n. e. c 

All other causes . . 












Total 
















Total — Factories 






1 


1 




- 





Heat and ELEcrRi::rrr. 

Explosives: 
BlasU: 

Delayed or premature shots. . 



Miscellaneous. 



All other c 

Total — Mines and Quarries. 



B. MINES AND 



• See fourth column of Table X 

• •'. e. those involving two or more pasts specified in previous classifications. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Bbfobt of Bubkau op Factory Inspector, 1911. 

faUarlM.* b7 Gmwm — Coactaded. 



ImTBHN AL InJUBUU. 








Paraltsu. 




Other or 
indef. 
inite. 


TotaL 


L088 OP 
IIKMBBRS. 


Stiffen- 
formity. 


Total. 


In part. 


General. 


Hernia. 


One 

hand 

or arm 

and 

one foot. 

or leg. 


Other. 



223 



Injuries 
not 
else- 
where 
speci- 
fied. 



ENGINEI 


:ring. 




















1 


1 




1 


1 


2 






1 




1 


1 





1 

1 


1 


2 

1 






1 
1 











1 




1 






1 




1 


1 




2 


1 


3 






2 




1 


1 


















1 





1 














i 

1 




1 


1 








1 




2 


1 




1 








1 


1 




1 




1 










i 


1 


i 
















^ 




1 
















1 




i 










1 




1 






2 


i 




1 
















1 


2 


1 
2 














i 


3 1 2 


5 




1 




1 


1 


1 


5 




















1 




1 


1 










1 






1 




1 




2 




2 





I 




1 




1 










1 






5 




5 
















6 




5 
















1 




1 














1 


13 


1 


14 




2 




2 


2 


1 


2 


















i 


1 


1 




1 








! 1 




17 


5 

8 


22 




6 


1 


6 


3 


2 


12 


56 


64 


1 


9 


2 


12 


6 


3 


20 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2M Ksw Yosx Statb Depabtment of Labob. 

TABLE XIL— CHILDREN'S EMPLOYMENT CEBTDICATES ISSUED BY LOCAL 





Issued 
before 
Oct. 1. 
1910. 
but re- 
ported 
in 1911. 


iBBum 


LOCALITT. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 


Albany Countit. 
Albany city 


2 


19 

1 

1 

10 


11 


10 


Beme town, . 




CooyinaziB town 








Coho^fl city 


106 

A 

10 


12 


7 


Colonie town 


1 


Gfp^m Inland villaffft , , . . . 


2 

e 


3 

8 


3 


WfttervUet dty 


5 


Allboant COUICXT. 
Andovcr village 






Ont«rville town 




' 






Wellsville village 




1 

21 

1 
4 


1 
8 


1 


Bbooiub County. 
Binghamton city 




10 


Encucott village 






T'Witftnihirfl viiingo, .,,....,.,..,.,.,.,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,, 




1 




Li«le village 






Cattabavgvs County. 
Franklinville village 










Olean city ,,,,,..,,,-. 




6 


4 
2 

10 


4 


Portville town 






Cayuga County. 
Auburn city 




9 


f 


Chautauqua County. 
Carroll town 






Cherry Creek village 










Dunkirk city .... 7. 




4 


8 


Q 


Falconor village , 






Forc^ville village ^ . ^ . t ..... t .., r , - 










Hanover town 










Jamestown city 




13 


16 


9 


Portland town 






Sheridan town 










Cbkmung County. 
Big Flats |own 








1 


Elmira city ,.,.,..,.,,,,...,, ^ r - - t 




8 


1 


1 


Chknanoo County. 
New Berlin village * 






Oxford village 


11 


2 
2 

1 




fiherbiime vTllaffe ^ ^ . r r . r - . t ^ r r .. ^ . . 


2 


\ 


Clinton County. 
Aumble town 


3 


2 


EUenburgh town 








3 






Plattsburgh city 


2 






Rouses Point 








COLUMBLA COUNTT. 

Claveraek town 










Hudson city 


4 


4 
2 


6 


3 


G bent town 


1 


Livingston town ....••.•■••rt..TT.TTt---- - 






Philmont villaire ,,..,,--,,, 








I 


Stockport town 




7 

1 

3 
1 
2 




I 


Valatie village ,,,,.,.,, 


13 

4 




CoBTLAND County. 
Cortland city 








2 

1 
1 


1 






1 


MHTirawvillft village ^ .,.,,,,.,.,, . 




1 


Solon town 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factory Inspectob, 1911. 225 
boards of hbalth as rbpobtbd to the ihb»artmbnt of labor. 

BvrWBBK OCTOBEB 1, 1910, AKD SXPTSUBBB 30, 1911. 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


ApriL 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


8 


4 


7 


13 


8 


34 


18 


18 


22 


172 
1 


1 


















2 


10 


15 


20 


13 


14 


19 
6 
4 
5 


12 


2 


19 


153 
7 


2 
8 

2 


2 
7 

i' 

15 


6 
9 

1 


1 
6 


2 
6 


2 
3 


1 
2 

1 


1 
22 


29 
87 

4 






:::::::: :::::::: 




1 


1 


1 
15 


3 
12 


3 
15 


1 
23 






4 
32 


16 


6 


14 


21 


192 
1 


1 
2 


4 




2 


2 


6 


1 




1 


22 
2 








1 
4 


I 






1 
1 


2 

27 

1 

20 


5 


4 


12 


6 


3 

3 

24 

2 

1 
6 
3 
1 
1 
34 




74 
6 


10 


5 


6 


8 


4 


16 
2 


16 


134 
4 
















1 


9 
1 


3 
2 


3 


8 
2 


. 4 

4 


! 

1 


6 


23 


88 
13 








2 

















1 


i« 


7 




9 


9 


14 


19 


3 


84 

1 
1 


185 
1 


1 


3* 

1 
1 
3 


1 

2 
4 

1 

i' 

1 


1 


1 








5 


2 








5 


6 


5 


1 


i2' 

1 

2 
2 


7 


1 




1 
4 
2 


67 
5 




1 

1 


1 
2 






11 








16 








4 




1 
1 
1 














1 




2 

1 




1 








6 


1 


1 


2 


1 






2 


8 




i 2 

1 1 

1 ^ 






1 2 


















1 
1 


4 


3 


5 

1 


8 


6 


3 




4 


57 
4 






2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


2 

1 
3 










4 






4 

i' 

1 


1 2 
1 ^ 


2 

i' 

4 






12 




2 

1 

2 


1 
1 

7 


1 
3 

1 


19 


3 


12 


2 


2 


1 ^ 


28 
5 




1 


1 

1 


1 


2 






1 


11 




3 


1 

1 


8 










1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



234 New York State Department of Labor. 

Table XII.— ChUdren's^EmploTmeiit Certlfleatefl Israed bj Local 





Issued 
before 
Oct. 1. 
1910. 
but re- 
ported 
in 1911. 


laauED 


LOCAUTT. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


WK8TCHB8TKH COUNTT. 

Cortlandt town 


1 


3 




2 


Eastchester town *. 




Mount Vernon city. 




10 


10 


8 


North Tarrytown village • 






Port Chester village 




1 


] 


Rye village 




1 


Tuckahoe village 






1 


Yonkers city 





19 


16 


10 


Wtoming County. 
Arcade village 






Perry vfllage 








i 


Silver Bnrinir village. 










Yatbs Couktt. 
Penn Van village 






1 

1 










Total 


516 


4.21S 


3,575 


2.574 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspector, 1911. 235 

Boardi of Health as Reported to the Department of Labor ^ Condaded. 

Bbtwesn Octobeb 1, 1910, and SapmiBBR 30. 1911. 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


4 


2 


1 
1 
7 
1 
3 
1 

i2' 


7 
2 
6 

6 


■ 
8 


7 


2 


2 

• 1 

5 


4 

2i* 


42 

4 


8 


9 


10 

1 
8 


11 
1 
9 
1 
5 

27 


8 


118 
8 


2 


2 




3 


4 


37 
^2 




3 

7 


1 
11 


1 
11 


5 
30 


1 
19 


2 
30 

1 
2 


18 


6 


198 
1 






4 


2 

1 

1 


6 


9 


6 


i 




30 






1 






1 


7 


3 




2 


1 


15 








3.188 


4.188 


4.144 


3.442 


4,226 


8.213 


4.760 


2,052 


6.067 


60,655 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



236 



New Yoke State Depabtmxnt of Labos, 



TABLE Xm.— fiTATISTICB OF PACTORnS INBTBCTED IN 





Places iNSPsczsn. i 
c 


Nimdser 

►f estab- 
lish, 
menta 
with no 

em- 
ployees. 


Number 
of own- 
ers at 
work. 


Largest Numbbk of £m- 
PLOTEBS IN Year. 


COUNTT. 


Once. 


More 
than 
onoe. 


1 

J 

Total. 1 

1 


Offiee 


Shop 
force. 


Total. 


Albany 


755 

92 

223 

134 

210 

250 

174 

93 

71 

110 

67 

66 

259 

2.264 

49 

71 

254 

116 

59 

113 

198 

6.993 

59 

102 

114 

1.556 

127 

147 

22,639 

355 

472 

612 

168 

219 

66 

166 

84 

30 

767 

548 

232 

93 

172 

147 

242 

63 

25 

81 

183 

262 

38 

82 

185 

252 

144 

89 

124 

563 

72 

78 


4 

i 

1 

i 

i 

1 

is 

1 

i 

3 

3 

1 
203 

14 

i 

374 

1 
8 
2 

20 

2 

1 

3 

2 
2 



24 



} 


1 
759! 
92, 
223 
135' 
21ll 

^1 
?i! 

110 
68 
67. 
259 
2,279 
50 
71 
255 
119 
59i 
116 
199 
7.196, 
59' 
102 
114 
1,570 
127j 
148' 
23,0131 
356 
480 
614 
168l 
219| 
66' 
1661 
84 
30! 
787, 
550l. 
2331 
93. 
172 
150 
2441. 
65 . 
25L 
81,. 
183 . 
262 
38 . 
82'. 
186:. 
252' 
1441 
113, 
124'. 
5641 
73' 
781. 


18 

2 

5 

4 

3 

2 
2 

1 

i7 

1 
1 


349 
47 

212 
56 

112 

104 
63 
84 
12 
M 
77 
38 
86 

927 
15 
48 
12 


884 

73 

498 

238 

486 

824 

413 

95 

52 

111 

131 

18 

305 

3,213 

52 

32 

193 

108 

29I 

150 

1.832 

2 

72 

25 

3,354 

281 

263 

26,727 

980 

562 

2.030 

197 

347 

55 

233 

95 

2 

1.234 

765 

316 

137 

106 

150 

3.832 

10 

15 

158 

248 

183 

1 

42 

110 

105 

96 

144 

105 

1,028 

104 

31 


24.366 
1.411 

12.541 
5,984 
8.146 

16,428 
7,615 
2.483 
2.423 
5.150 
4,086 
1.241 
9.309 

88.499 
1.198 
1,681 
9,032 
4,469 
1.290 

10,419 
6.943 
152.720 
1.004 
2.841 
3.382 

59.231 

14,350 

1.803 

498.866 

17.262 

29.016 

31.767 
3.845 

12.220 

2.100 

9.692 

2.378 

267 

30.791 

27.873 
9.032 
5.246 
4.650 
6.763 

18,292 

719 

676 

2,541 

7,508 

4.164 

306 

1,419 

1,966 

8,174 

4,568 

4,832 

2.793 

27.556 

2,997 

892 


25,253 
1 484 


AUegany 


Broome * 


13.039 
6.222 
8,635 

17 252 


GsttaraugUB 


Cayuia 


Chautauqua 


Chemung . ^ ^ 


8,028 
2,578 
2,475 
5,261 
4 217 


Chenango 


Clinton 


Columbia 


Cortland 


Delaware 


1,259 


Dutcheas 


9.614 
91 712 


Erie 


Essex 


1 250 


Franklin 


1 713 


Fulton 


9.225 
4,577 
1 297 


GaneMe 


Oracne 


4 

i 

49 

4 

21 

3 

63 
2 
4 

19 

2 

1 
7 
3 

3 

6 

5 

1 

4 

7 

1 
6 

i 

3 


'37 
6 
66 
4.563 
23 
45 

968 

10 

89 

13,414 

97 

143 

758 

75 

96 

19 

182 

63 

4 

354 

291 

141 

34 

90 

50 

74 

19 

11 

42 

78 

116 

24 

40 

92 

132 

46 

42 

94 

45 

33 

33 


Herkimer 


10.718 

7,093 

154,552 

1,006 

2,913 

3,407 

62,585 

14.631 

2.066 

525,593 

18.242 

29.578 

33.797 

4.042 

12.567 


Jefferson 


Kin/s* 


Lewis 

Livin Bton 


Madison 


Monroe 


Montgomery 


Nassau 


New York* 


Niagara 


Oneida 




Ontario 


Oraniie 


Orleans 


2 155 


Oswego 


9,925 

2.473 

269 


Otseio 


Putnam 


Queens* 


32.025 

28.638 

9.348 


Rensselaer 


Richmond* 


Rockland 


5.383 
4.756 


St. Lawrence 


Saratoga 


6.913 
22,124 


Schenectady 


Schoharie 


729 


Schuyler 


691 


Seneca 


2,699 
7.756 


Steuben 


Suffolk 


4,347 
307 


Sullivan 


Tioia 


1 461 


Tompkins 


2,076 
8,279 
4,664 


Ulster 


Warren 


Washington 


4 976 


Wayne 


2.898 


Westchester 


28,584 
3.101 


Wyoming 


Yates 


923 






Grand Total 


43,979 


693 


44,672' 


275 


24,831 


54,159 


1,241,222 


1,295.381 


New York City* 


30.631 


598 


31,229, 


120 


18,472 


30.109 


691.409 


721,518 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepokt of Bureau of Factory Inspector, 1911. 237 



EACH COUNTY^ TBAB BIVDED aBPTBMBBR SO. 1911 



NuifBEB OP EmPLOTEES AT TlllE OP INSPECTION. 



Grand 
total. 



Office 
force. 



SHOP PORCE. 



COUNTT. 



Totid. 



Number in Shops Employing - 



; to 19. I 20 to 199. 



200+. 



24.525 
1.241 

12,351 
5.296 
8,459| 

14,1951 
7.219 
2.3181 
2.0731 
4,930! 
3.653 
1.2291 
9.338 

80.0331 
1.092 
1,6151 
8.617 
3.727 
1,287 

10,542 
6.377 
135,2871 
974 
2,400 
3.176 

58.421 

13,999 

,1.839 
447.184 

16.507 

28.1061 

28.448 
3,671 

11.5281 

1.789 

8,804! 

2,0841 

2391 

26,6351 

28,987) 
8,192 
6,0371 
3.989: 
6.26SI 

22,085' 

729 

548 

2,656, 

6,573' 

3.677 

282 

1.238 

2,029 

7,399 

3,667 

4,386^ 

2.0851 

27,1341 

2,741' 

751, 



1.139.661, 



883 

73 

492 

238 

486 

824 

413 

92 

52 

111 

131 

18 

305 

3,209 

52 

32 

192 

106 

7 

299 

150 

1.825 

2 

72 

25 

3,354 

281 

262 

25.635 

972 

551 

1,925 

197 

346 

55 

231 

95 

2l 

1,232 

758' 

311 

137 

106' 

149* 

3,832; 

10 

15' 

158 

248- 

181 

1 

42 

110 

105 

96 

142 

105 

1,028 

104 

31 



23,642 
1,1&H 

11.8.59> 
5,0.58t 
7.973 

13,371 
6,806 
2.226 
2,021 
4,819 
3,522 
1,211 
9.033 

76.824 
1,040 
1,583 
8,425 
3.621 
1,280 

10,243 
6,227 
133.462 
972: 
2.328! 
3.151 

65.067 

13,718 

1,577 

421.549 

15,535 

27.555 

26.523 
3.474 

11.182 

1J34 

8.573 

1,989 

237 

25,403 

26.229 
7,881 
4,900 
3,883 
6,119 

18.253 

719 

533 

2,498 

6,325 

3,496 

281 

1,196 

1,919 

7,294 

3,571 

4,244 

1,980 

26,106 

2,637 

72J 



52,896 1.086,765 



2,975l 
3511 

l,07l' 
424 
782: 
985 
650 
315 
255 
287 
268 
411 
87.S 

8,885 
198 
293 

1,163 
401 
163 
368 
608 
26, (M6 
266 
307 
393 

6,367 

396 

681 

105,489 

1.335 



703 
498 
609 
832 
201 
513 
384 
94 

2,685 

2,084 
669 
2691 
645i 
5821 

1.082 
2741 
831 
283 
639 
987 
170 
366 
750 
937 
519 
305 
382 

2.194 
258 
301 



9.231 

817 
3.865 
2,805 
1,471 
5,772 
2,478 
1,502 
1,381 
1.750 
1,62H 

80<J 

3.091 

27.929 

842 
1.290 
5,593 
1.993 

460 

3.096 

3,436 

W.397i 

706 

1,283 

1,959 

21,637 

2,799 

263 
229,200 
6,300 
8.785 
10.331 
1,825; 
4.3901 

8101 
3.3H3I 

659 

143 
8.693 
6.852 
2.4911 
3,0031 
l,4H8t 
2,362 
1.279! 

445 

450' 

982! 
2.467 
1.280l 

nil 

830! 

i.ioal 

3.910* 
1.776] 
2,789' 
1,598| 
4.420l 
981' 
419' 



11.4361. 



6,923 . 
1,829 . 
5,720 . 
6,6141. 
3,678 . 

409l. 

385|. 
2.782 . 
1,626 . 



Mhmay 

Allegany 

Broome 

.Cattacaasus 

Cayoga 

.ChautouqiM 
Chemung 



5,0&4 . 
40,010 . 



Clintoa 
.Ccdomkna 
. .Cortiaod 
. Deiowttre 
. .Dotefaen 
Bro 



•1- 



1,669 , 
1.227 . 
6571 . 
6.779:. 
2.1831. 
43,019 . 



738,. 

.7991. 

27,063i. 

10,523t. 

6331. 

86,8601. 

7.900'. 

17.067 . 

13,694;. 

1.040 . 

5.960!. 

7171. 

4.677 . 

9461. 



14.025;. 
17.2931. 

4,721 . 

1,628 . 

1.750.. 

3.175 . 
15.892,. 



1,233 . 
3,2191. 
1,229'. 



I 



2,4471. 
1,2761. 
1 , 150| . 



19,492 
1.398i 



Franklin 

Falt^jn 

Genesee 

Greene 

. . . .HerkuBBr 

JeCforson 

♦Kii^ 

Lewis 

. . . Liviiigslnn 

Maa»Mi 

Monroe 

.Montgomecy 

'.'.♦New York 

Ningnra 

Oneida 

Onoad ga 

Ontario 

Orange 

Oriesna 

Oswego 

Otsego 

Patoam 

♦Qoeewi 

. . . Rensselaer 
, . .* Richmond 

Roekland 

.St. Lawrence 

Saratoga 

. .Soh«ieotaay 

Sohofaarie 

Sdniyler 

Seneea 

Steuben 

Suffolk 

SoUiraa 

Tioga 

. . . . Tompkins 

Ulster 

Warren 

. .Washino^oii 

Wayne 

. . Westobesier 
.... Wyoming 
Yates 



186,3091 489.901 410,555' Grand Total 



017.298 

I 



2g,003 588,295 134,889 



304,7811 148,6251 •Now York City 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



238 New York State Department of Labor. 

Table XOL— StetiaClcs of FketoriM lupMled la Baeh 









NuiiBKR OP Emplotsbs ai 


Tniaop 


COUNTT. 


SHOP FOBC». 


Total 


Men 
(18 years 


Youths 
(16-18 
yrs). 


Bo3rs 

(14-16 

yrs). 


Women 
(16 years 


Girls 
(14-16 
yrs). 


Albany ................. 


23.642 
1.168 

11.859 
6.058 
7,073 

13,371 
6,806 
2,226 
2,021 
4,810 
3,622 
1.211 
0.033 

76.824 
1.040 
1.683 
8.425 
3.621 
1.280 

10.243 

6,227 

133.462 

072 

2.328 

3.151 

65,067 

13,718 

1,677 

421,640 

16.635 

27,665 

26,523 
3,474 

11,182 

1,734 

8,573 

1,080 

237 

25.403 

26,220 
7,881 
4.000 
3.883 
6.119 

18.253 

710 

533 

2.408 

6.325 

3.406 

281 

1.106 

1.010 

7,204 

3.571 

4.244 

1.080 

26,106 

2.637 

720 


14.863 
1.001 
7,421 
4.402 
6,633 

10.770 
4,011 
1,660 
1,830 
3.240 
2.762 
062 
6.408 

60.840 
040 
1.316 
6.593 
2.695 
1,080 
7.860 
6,430 

89.342 

886 

1,909 

2.674 

37,724 

7,516 

1,282 

261,485 

12.716 

17.352 

20.780 
2.694 
8,366 
1.066 
6.264 
1,680 
206 

20.263 

12,685 
6,933 
4,100 
3,247 
4,704 

16,283 

625 

476 

2,068 

6,052 

2,582 

266 

848 

1,569 

5.262 

2,019 

2,056 

1,404 

18.348 

1,680 

645 


93 

8 

236 

98 

193 

223 

69 

27 

8 

99 

14 

17 

85 

1,719 


131 

3 

27 

31 

43 

66 

6 

18 

2 

26 

5 

3 

20 

597 


8.392 
163 

4,136 
616 

2,167 

2,240 

1,821 
502 
172 

1,414 
739 
223 

2.467 

13,091 

91 

209 

2,650 
960 
181 

2,227 

773 

40,072 

81 

399 

646 

15,687 

5.775 

239 

152.638 

2.208 

9.464 

4.853 
717 

2.498 
622 

2,016 

363 

31 

4,196 

13.120 

791 

613 

693 

1,368 

1,930 

193 

57 

374 

1,202 

737 

9 

331 

331 

1,605 

1,524 

1,248 
447 

7,193 
901 
156 


163 


AUegany 


3 


Broome 


40 


Cattaraugus 


11 


O^vuffa r 


47 


ChautauQua 


63 


Chomung 


9 


Chenango 


10 


Clinton 




Columbia 


31 




2 


Delaware 


6 


Dutcheae 


63 


Erie 


668 


Eaeex 




Franklin . , r - , - , - . - . t . . 


43 

81 

43 

12 

119 

9 

1,977 


i6 
62 
16 

6 
22 

8 
676 




Fulton 


49 


Geneeee 


8 


Greene 


2 


Herkimer. 


16 


Jefferson 


7 


Kings* 


1,495 


LeX..:::; :.:.:. 


5 


I^ivingffton 


8 

15 
884 
228 

38 

3.293 

409 

286 

676 

44 
222 

30 
184 

24 


2 

10 

305 

91 

9 

1,231 

90 

157 

133 

4 

69 

13 

50 

9 


10 


Madison 


6 


Monroe 


467 


Monteomery 


108 


Nassau 


9 


New York* 


3,002 


Niagara 


112 


Oneida 


296 


Onondaga 


181 


OntarioT 


15 


Orange ^ , . , . , ^ , , , . 


37 


Orleans 


3 


Oswego 


69 


Otseco 


13 


Putnam 




Queens* 


463 

396 

90 

128 

31 

31 


i48 

59 

25 

36 

7 

6 

34 

1 


343 


Ilenseolaei' .,.,,.,,... ^ , . 


69 


Richmond*. 


42 


Rockland 


24 


St Lawrence 


6 


Saratoga 


10 


Schenectady 


6 


Schoharie 






Schuvler 






Seneca 


32 
66 
91 
3 
8 
17 

197 
25 
20 
27 

428 
29 
11 


a 

2 

41 

3 

2 


13 


Steuben 


3 


Suffolk 


45 


Sullivan 




Tioga 


7 


Tomnkins 


2 


Ulster 


92 
2 

7 
5 
48 
6 
6 


138 


Warren 


1 


Washington 


13 


Wayne 


7 


Westchester 


89 


Wyoming 


13 


Yates 


2 






Grand Total 


1.086.765 


730.027 


13,487 


4,374 


322.131 


7.746 


New York City* 


688.205 


378,023 


6.813 


1,980 


197,597 


4.88S 



t Inclusive of children discharged (or 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspector, 1911. 239 

Omnly, Year Ended September 80, 1911 — CeaclMded. 



iNSPXCnON. 


WEEKi.r HoxjES OF Labor. 


Children 
Under 




ALL CHILDREN 14 TO 
16 TEAB8 OLD.f 


NUMBER OP SHOP XIIPLOTEES 
WHO WORK — 


14 Years 
Found in — 


County. 


. Office, t 


Shop.t 


Total.t 


51 
hours 
or less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

03 
hours. 


Office. 


Shop. 




294 

6 

67 

42 

90 

129 

15 

28 

2 

57 

7 

9 

83 

1,165 


294 

6 

67 

42 

90 

131 

15 

28 

2 

57 

7 

9 

83 

1.165 


2.622 

16 

1.038 

157 

284 

645 

898 

110 

181 

193 

18 

36 

497 

5.788 

143 

25 

197 

471 

19 

42 

504 

17.966 

17 

24 

323 

4.325 

474 

554 

128,848 

979 

1,174 

1.852 

96 

1.723 

114 

229 

108 

10 

4,231 

2.592 

657 

98 

208 

1.498 

1.818 

20 

1 

51 

206 

286 

7 

56 

237 

478 

356 

780 

221 

2.719 

39 

17 


5,554 

161 

6.357 

694 

953 

5.585 

2.481 

683 

342 

751 

608 

114 

3,180 

24.638 

118 

81 

150 

192 

44 

509 

1.208 

73.282 

1 

250 

123 

40,913 

133 

616 

228,954 

4,751 

2.455 

9.516 

392 

3.962 

139 

713 

1,002 

89 

11.660 

11.637 

3.492 

2.724 

917 

1.388 

15.398 

84 

37 

567 

3,222 

1.446 

68 

2t2 

292 

990 

654 

917 

439 

17.389 

147 

38 


16,411 

985 
5,296 
3,998 
6.736 
7,126 
8,375 
1,280 
1,218 
3.773 
2.805 

801 

5,276 

38.275 

344 
1.28C 
8.060 
2,861 

791 

9,610 

3.167 

41 . 194 

426 

2,029 

2,037 

9,794 

13,111 

345 

61,609 

8,812 

23,076 

14,901 

2,936 

6,298 

1,472 

7.171 

448 
99 
8,127 
11,640 
3,691 
1,864 
1,940 
2,358 

969 

498 

340 
1,861 
2,878 
1,674 

101 

890 
1,345 
5,728 
2,337 
1,852 
1.292 
6,212 
2.367 

582 


66 

6 

168 

309 






Albany 








Allegany 






2 


Broome 




Cattaraugus 








Cayuga 


2 


15 

62 
163 
280 
102 

91 
260 

80 

8.123 

435 

197 

18 

97 
426 

82 

1,348 

1,020 

628 

25 
668 

35 






Chautauqua 








Chemung 








Chenango 








Clinton 








Columbia 








Cortland 








Delaware 








Dutchess 






4 


Erie 




Essex 




15 

101 

23 

7 

37 

15 

2.071 

5 

12 

16 

772 

199 

18 

4.233 

202 

453 

314 

19 

96 

16 

109 

22 


15 

101 

23 

7 

37 

15 

2.031 

5 

12 

16 

772 

199 

18 

4,345 

202 

453 

314 

19 

96 

16 

109 

22 






Franklin 








Fulton 






2 


Genesee 




Greene 








He? kimer 








Jefferson 


10 


1 


8 


*Kings 




Lewis 








Livingston 








MacUson 








Monroe 








Montgomery 




62 

2,138 

993 

850 

254 

50 

199 

9 

460 

431 

39 

1.385 

360 

41 
214 
818 
875 

68 
117 
155 

19 

19 

90 

105 

8 

45 

98 
224 
695 

28 
786 

84 

83 






Nacsau 


112 


2 

1 


30 

7 


*NewYork 

Niagara 




Oneida 








Onondaga 








Ontario 








Orang« 






2 

1 


Orleans 




Oswego 




Otsego 










2 


49i 
128 
67 
59 
12 
16 
40 
1 


493 
128 
67 
59 
12 
16 
40 
1 


1 


4 


*Queens 




Rensselaer 








*Richmond 









Rockland 








St. Lawrence 








Saratoga 








Schenectady 








Schoharie 








Schuyler 




24 
5 

86 
3 
9 
2 
230 
3 

20 

12 
137 

18 
8 


24 
5 

86 
3 
9 
2 
230 
3 

20 

12 
137 

18 
8 






Seneca 








Steuben 








Suffolk 








.Sullivan 








Tioga 








Tompkins 








Ulster 








Warren 








Washington 








Wayne 






2 


Westchester 

, Wyoming 








Yates 










128 


12.120 


12,246 


189,276 


194.342 


J76,772 


26.375 
4.584 


5 
4 


62 
^42 


Grand Total 


124 


6.862 


6.988 


151,702 


317,388 


114.621 


...•New York City 



jack of employment certificate. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



240 



Xew York State Depabtmejtt of Labob. 



TABLE XIV.— STATISTICS OF FACTORIB3 IlffSPBCTiBO IN BACH 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labgxst 

NuifBBil OF 
EUPLOYSBS 

iM Year. 






N^UlfBEB 


County and Citt ob Village. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFTXCE 
rOROB. 




(With industries having 200 or mere 
cmployoes specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
ahop. 


Total. 


of 
14-16 

age. 


Total. 


Albany County 


759 

530 

4 

8 

6 

121 

£0 

11 
6 
1 
1 

13 
2 

18 
/ 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
6 
4 

43 
4 
3 

92 


349 


25.253 


24.369 


24,525 


883 




23.642 




Albany (see Table XV) 


316 
3 

£ 





2 



i 

i 

2 

9 
47 


11,895 

11 

399 

5.9/ 

8,137 

3,176 

£,440 

789 

585 

£78 

1,741 

1,077 

1,453 

728 

£4£ 

31 

2 

2 

3 

100 

92 

239 

104 

1,044 

£78 

£37 

1.484 


11,315 

11 

399 

391 

8.020 

3,141 

£,423 

778 

575 

£60 

1,668 

1,054 

1,404 

696 

£39 

30 

2 

2 

3 

98 

89 

231 

102 

995 

£64 

£30 

1.411 


11.456 

10 

377 

369 

7.931 

£,970 

£,440 

789 

585 

£78 

1,741 

1,077 

1.453 

728 

If 

2 

2 

3 

85 

92 

239 

59 

1,044 

£78 

£37 

1,241 


580 




10.876 
10 


Altamont 


Co'^ymi^r"* .,..,-,-,- t - t 






377 


Building brick 






369 




"iii 

35 
17 
11 
10 
18 
73 
£3 
49 
S£ 
3 
1 




7.814 

£,935 

£,4£S 

778 


Hosiery and knit goods 




Shirts, collars and cuffs 


RoUing mills and steel works 


675 
£60 


Coionie 


1 668 




1,064 

1.404 

696 




Railway repair shops 


Laundries (non-Chinese) 


£S9 


Guilderland 


30 


Medusa » 


2 


Potters Hollow 






2 


Preston Hollow 






3 


Ravena 


1 
3 
8 
2 
49 
14 

73 




84 


Hlingerlands 


89 


Van Rensselaer Island 


231 


Voorheesville 


67 


Watervliet 


996 


Miscellaneous hardware 


£64 
£S0 


Shirts, collars and cuffs 


At-i-FQAVT County 


1.168 




Alfred 


5 
8 
6 

e 

6 

1 

7 
4 

15 
6 
8 

21 

223 


4 
3 
6 

4 
2 

6 

2 

7 

i 

9 
212 


39 
98 

101 
18 

265 

*I2 

7 

103 

43 

117 

674 

13.039 


38 

98 

99 

18 

239 

££5 

28 

7 

94 

43 

111 

636 

12,641 


13 

66 

98 

18 

192 

179 

26 

7 

93 

30 

114 

684 

12.361 


1 




12 


Andover 


66 


Angelica 


2 




96 


Belfast 


18 


Belmont '» 


16 

1 




176 


Miscellaneous tnachinerv 


164 
25 


Bolivar 


Canftfleragft . , , - r , r - 


7 


Cuba 


9 




84 


Fillmore 


30 


Friendship 

WellsviUe 

Brooue County 


6 
38 

492 




108 
646 

11.869 




Binirharaton 


172 

£4 

1 

1 

£ 

5 

3 

1 

2 

10 

12 

8 

1 

1 

1 

13 

/ 


175 

30 

6 

3 

8 
6 

ii 

9 
4 

9 


8,665 

£,340 

916 

725 

387 

379 

356 

£64 

£25 

£16 

£00 

92 

2,164 

1,779 

336 

23 

1.8.33 

1,S£3 


8.330 

£,327 

894 

704 

381 

346 

349 

£51 

£l£ 

£13 

174 

88 

2.067 

1,690 

319 

23 

1,784 

1,£93 


8.077 

i,£5£ 

916 

61 £ 

379 

£89 

340 

£13 

193 

£16 

£00 

91 

2.164 

1,779 

336 

23 

1.778 

1,S£3 


329 




7 748 




IS 


£,£S9 
894 
691 


Boots and shoes 


££ 
£1 

6 
S3 

7 
IS 
IS 

3 
96 

4 

107 

89 

17 




Furniture and upholstejy 


Brass, bronze and aluminum castings 

Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 

Tailoring 


S7S 
£66 
SSS 


House trim 


£00 


Miscellaneous hardware 


180 


Proprietary medicines 


£1S 


Printing and piUtltshing 


'U 


Depotitt 


Endicott 


2.067 
1 690 


Boots and shoes 


Clocks and time recorders 


319 


Harperaville 


23 


Leatershire 


49 
SO 




1,729 


Boots and shoes 


1 £9S 




tSeealso 


Deposit 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REroRT OF Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 241 



COUNTY AND TOWN* TBAR 



SO, 1911. 



OP EhKOTESS at TxMX op iNSPBCTlOir. 



Weekly Hours op Labor. 

















1 








1 


ChU- 

dron 

under 

14 








SHOP PORCZ. 






1 

\ 


NUMBER OP SHOP E&f- 
PLOTEES WHO WORK — | 


NTMBER IN 8HOP8 1 




SEX AND AGE. 


1 


51 

houra 
or 
leas. 


52-57 
houra. 


58-63 
houra. 


Over 

63 
houra. 


shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


1 

200 +.' 

t 


Men 

(18 
yre. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 
yre.). 


(14-16 
yre.). 


Worn. 1 Girh ! 
(16 1 (14-16 , 
yra. -|-).| yre.). 

1 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


2.975 


9,231 
4.005 


11,436' 


14.863 


OS 


131 
49 


8,392 

3.997 
4 


1 
I63I 


2.622 
2,189 


5,564 

3,665 

4 
5 


15,411 


55 




2,167 
10 


4,704 


6,657 

iS 

352 

3,958 

986 

1.305 

119 

575 

£60 

1,602 

1,0A7 

1,120 

696 

74 

29 

2 

2 

3 

84 

81 

231 

57 

679 

£46 

61 

1,001 


61 


6,011 

6 

372 

369 

7,291 

£.873 

£,401 

767 

675 


11 




8 


3e9 

$69 
2.679 

1,480 
541 
£07 


1,4^7 
l,8Sii 
557 
67 r> 
£60 
8(i4 
864 
935 
696 
£30 


25 

25 
1 
























434 
MS 


47 

14 

16 

1 


3,762 
1,906\ 
1,097 

6^\ 
1 


46 
Sit 

W 


162 

21 
11 


322 

18 

1 


39 











14 


























£60 
172 

"'7or. 

696 






33 


771 
190 
409 


.'/.'.... 


8 


58 


1 


40 
58 


1,442 

1,0J^7 
580 


5 




60 


?73' 


4 


















1 


£ 


168^ 


1 


■5 


£37 
30 






30 






2 






j ( 







2 

2 

3 

84 

2 






2 


















3 








1 1 










17 


67 
87 

206 
48 

690 

""ksb 

817 


"■*232 

£a£ 














2 










70 


8 






25 






122 109 






9 




1 '■'".. J 






57 

42(1 






173 


5 


2C 
19 


^ 


1 


8.') 
19 


490 







S£ 


£UV 42 
1 £04] 68 








169 

1^ 








351 


8 


3 


3 


16 


161 


986 


6 




12 






9 

43 

94 

16 

173 

m 

25 

7 

75 

29 

102 

42S 

7.421 






3 

19 

2 

3 






12 




• 


36 


30 
82 







1 


3 


4 


1 4 


::::::i::::;:: 


14 


1 2i 94 




18 












IS 
173 

"4 


::::::i::::::: 


12 


i64 
164 




: ' : ■ : ■ : 








1 3 

1 


1 












I 


25 










2 








7 


















84 











9 

1 

4 

110 

4,135 






17 


67 
30 

loe 

397 
5,296 




30 


















41 


67 
474 

3.866 


6.923 


2 

6 
236 


2 

27 






2 
133 

5.357 






72 
1,071 


40 


10 
1,^38 


6 
168 


1 


827 
90 


3.300 
960 


3.621 

1,937 

868 

£39 

373 

"m 

1,690 
319 

"ii293 
1,£93 


4,249 
643 
419 
643 
343 
£66 
60 
194 
17£ 
11£ 
164 
82 

1,680 

1,£I7 

316 

23 

1.306 
9£0 


123 
£ 

1 41 
£3 
1£ 


21 
3 
1 

'4 


3.319 

1.668 

4£9 

£6 

13 


3(> 
£3 

4 


710 

171 

5 


6,0241 1.966 

1 2.027^ 41 
1 863] 26 
1 £41 \ 350 
1 £5\ 343 
\ 175\ 81 
9(1 111 
1 51\ iA7 


48 


1 








$ 








1 


5 








£66 
318 
186 
180 

'""140 
41 






16 


i 
4 
7 


£ 

1 


271 


I 


1 
150 

31h 






16 












! IVJ 

1 20.', 

IS 








B 


111 

11 

5 

404 

400 
4 


/ 

i 

1 


; 






S4 


1 ' 


1 








4!6 





25 

1,710 
1,687 


44 






48 


70 
70 


2 
£ 














23 
38a 







23 




63 


36 

£0 


3 

1 


384 

Sou 


2 

2 


t 


1 25fc 
1 


1.468 
l.£90 







I 



UDder Delaware County. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



242 



New York State Depabtment of Labor. 



Tible XIV.— Stettedcs of Fketorlaa Lupeded la BMh 





Places 
in- 

WpWStr 

ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
woric. 


Larobst 

NUMBBR OP 

Employbbs 
inYbab. 


NUMBBB 


COUNTT AKD ClTT OB VZLLAOB. 


GRAND 

total. 


OPPICB 
POBCB. 




(With industries haying 200 or more 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 


Total. 


Brooms County — Condudtd, 

Sanitaria tina 


2 
6 
5 

4 

135 


8 

4 
3 

59 


13 

119 

81 

49 

6.222 


13 

118 

79 

49 

5,984 


13 
91 
69 
45 

5.296 






13 


Union . . 


1 

2 




90 


Whitney Point 


67 


Windsor 


45 


Cattabattocs County 


238 




6,058 






Allegany 


2 
5 
5 
1 
7 
2 
2 
8 
1 
1 

10 
1 
2 
1 
1 
6 
S 
3 

49 
g 
6 
g 
g 
2 
7 

20 
g 
2 

211 


5 

1 

6 

i 

2 
4 

3 

2 

18 

9 

i 

112 


79 

52 

48 

221 

118 

7 

5 

543 

300 

gg4 

443 

gll 

5 

5 

150 

241 

gis 

7 

2.772 

l,07g 

608 

SOO 

g77 

300 

217 

• 877 

Sgg 

132 

8,635 


75 

45 

48 

216 

115 

7 

5 

533 

g96 

gl9 

430 

g08 

5 

5 

148 

225 

goo 

7 
2,634 
l,0gg 
496 
g8g 
g67 
296 
213 
848 
916 
129 

8,149 


79 

47 

32 

221 

113 

4 

4 

279 

97 

gi4 

396 

gll 

5 

5 

67 

241 

gl9 

4 

2,489 

987 

947 

900 

g77 

174 

214 

856 

90g 

66 

8,459 


4 
7 




75 


Cattaraugus 


40 


Delavan 


32 


East Salamanca (rtultoay repair ahops) 
Ellicottville 


5 
3 




216 
110 


Elton 


4 


Farmersville ... 






4 


Frr nklinville 


10 
4 
6 

13 
9 




269 


Canning fruiU and vegetablei 

Cutlery 


55 

• gl9 


Gowanda* 


383 


Ijeather 


g08 


Great Vallev 


5 


Killbuck 






5 


Limestone 


19 


W'.'.V. 


65 


Little Vallev 


225 


Cutlery 


goo 


Machias 


4 


Olean 


138 

60 

Ig 

18 

10 

4 

4 

29 

7 

3 

486 




2.351 


RaUvoay repair Bhopt 


997 


Leather 


996 


Mineral oil producU 


gsg 


Bottlee and jan 


g67 


Pbrtville 


170 


Randolph 


210 


BftlAnK^nca ,,,, ---T 


827 


Leather 


t96 


South Dayton 


63 


Cayuga County 


7,973 






Auburn 


157 
4 
S 
g 
1 
S 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
3 
2 
12 
11 
4 
14 

250 


74 

i 

1 

i 

1 

1 

4 

2 

3 
1 
6 
8 
5 
9 

104 


8,323 

g,468 

1,454 

1,963 

347 

917 

g94 

g9l 

14 

3 

3 

13 

26 

39 

58 

35 

121 

17,252 


7,840 

g,g58 

1,408 

i,g66 

9g9 

910 

g88 

g89 

14 

3 

3 

13 

26 

38 

57 

35 

120 

16,428 


8,184 

g,454 

1,454 

1,969 

g66 

917 

g94 

g91 

11 

3 

3 

7 

15 

39 

48 

28 

121 

14,195 


483 

gso 

46 

98 

18 

7 

6 

g 




7.701 


Agricultural implementa 


g,gg4 
1,408 
l,g66 


Flax, hemp and jute manujacturet . . 
Boots and ehoet 


Miscdlaneoue brasi and bronse ware 
Carpets and rugs 


g98 
910 


Articles of hom, bone, etc 


gS8 


Woolens and worsteds 


g89 


Cato 


11 


Cavusa 






3 


Genoa 






3 


Meridian 






7 


Montezuma . . . 






51 


Moravia 


1 
1 




38 


Port Byron 


47 


Throopsville 


28 


Weedsport 


1 
824 




120 


Chautauqua County 


13.371 






Brocton 


6 
3 
2 

4 


2 
2 

2 


133 

9 

38 

108 


127 

9 

37 

105 


107 

5 

18 

101 


6 




101 


Cassadaga 


5 


Chautauqua 


i 

3 




17 


Cherry Creek 


98 



• See also ( 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 243 

Cewity aad Town, Year Ended SevCember M, 1911 — Coatiiiued. 



OF EmPLOTSBS at TlUB 


OP Inspbction. 








Weekly Houbs of Labob. 


Cha- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FORCS. 


KUMBBB OF SHOP EM- 
PLOTBBS WHO WOBK— 


NTTICBBS IN SHOPS 
■MPLOTTNO — 


SBX AND AOB. 


51 

hours 
or 
less. 


62-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 
hours. 


yMrs 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 
(18 

yw. +). 


Vths 
(16-18 

yw.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 

(le 

yT8.+). 


Girls 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


13 






12 
87 
58 
25 

4.402 


i 

5 
2 

98 


1 
31 










3 
44 

40 
40 

3.998 


10 
2 

27 
5 

3C9 




22 


68 
50 




2 
4 

17 

516 






44 




17 








45 


1 
11 








424 


2.805 


1.829 


157 


594 





4 


71 




42 

38 

31 

216 

83 

4 

4 

201 

is 

169 

338 

900 

5 

8 

65 

206 

18A 

4 

2.102 

987 

961 

£89 

199 

125 

177 

725 

996 

33 

5.533 


3 




30 
2 

1 








75 

35 

29 

216 

108 

4 

4 

260 

S3 

£18 

363 

£03 

5 

5 

65 

103 

101 

1 

1.473 

937 

£89 






40 





5 

1 








32 










2. 






2i6 










19 


9i 






27 






2 






4 














4 






















17 


33 


219 

' * ' "i'ib 

208 
M08 


5 




62 

8 

61 

37 


1 


1 


5 


3 






6 
3 
5 


5 

6 


1 



/ 
5 
6 


""is 






40 


135 












5 












5 










2 














65 
220 

too 


















5 


1 




18 
16 




3 


99 
99 

"469 


20 




4 








1 
127 


2 
282 




177 


988 

91 

SSo 

'$67 
170 
189 
782 
t96 
6] 

1.471 


1.186 
916 

"kw 

5.720 


63 


20 


157 


9 






1 




79 


/ 


1 


69 






19 


£89 






61 
4 

i9 


17 
1 
3 
2 






S7 
1 
3 

10 


230 








40 
30 
80 


i 


lAC) 






21 


4 20^ 






45 




817 

£95 

63 

6.736 












2 






30 
2.157 












782 


193 


43 


47 


284 


953 












607 


1,374 

2t4 


5.720 
£,000 

288 

B88 
M89 


5.344 

9,196 

768 

606 

916 

108 

90 

198 

11 

3 

3 

7 

15 
34 
43 
25 
48 

10.779 


191 
IS 
SI 

116 

i 

1 
s 


42 

1 

1 

57 

1 


2,077 

16 

618 

679 

18 

199 

196 

87 


47 

S6 

8 

1 
1 


264 

1 

1 
7£ 

1 
8 

1 
1 


875 

70 

""64 
987 

7 


6.562 
£,163 
1,407 
1,193 
£37 
£38 












s 






7 












9 


66 
















£88 
4 
3 
3 

7 






11 








3 




















3 






















7 






















15 


















15 






38 










4 
4 




9 
10 

1 


14 
16 
22 
19 


15 

21 

5 

101 






47 














6 


23 
74 

5.772 


6.614 


2 


1 






46 


72 
2.240 








985 


223 


66 


63 


645 


5.585i 7,126 


15 




16 


85 




84 

5 

14 

55 






17 








101 




~~' 


5 
















17 










3 
41 


i 


14 
2 


, ■ - . . 


3 




14 


84 






i 


2 


91 





under EIrie County. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



244 



Xew Yoek State Depabtment of Labob. 











Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


LARoaw 
Number op 
Employbbs 

IN Year. 


x™». 


County and City ob Village. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


Total. 


(With industriea having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


ToUl. 


There- 
of in 
ehop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
y^jrs 

age. 


Chautauqua County — Concluded. 
Dunkirk 


41 

/ 
/ 

14 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 

10 

3 

1 

1 

121 

35 
4 
5 
2 
4 
4 
5 
3 
5 

12 
3 
3 
1 
7 
/ 

174 


14 
2 

2 

i 

1 

i 

54 
7 

k 

1 
1 
2 
1 
6 

i 

1 



63 


4.972 

3,600 

385 

1,391 

436 

350 

225 

SIS 

98 

76 
23 

14 

9,166 

2,454 

2,SS3 

l,5St 

982 

Sol 

27 

36 

62 

82 

544 

402 

22 

51 

307 

250 

8,028 


4.774 

3,488 

308 

1.329 

42s 

330 

216 

198 

95 

12 

66 

71 

22 

14 

8,722J 

2.351 

S,174 

1,461 

946 

235 

26 

32 

59 

78 

600 

366 

20 

51 

279 

224 

7,615 


3.962 

2,742 

367 

1,153 

395 

184 

225 

SIS 

70 

12 

75 

69 

23 

14 

7,652 

2,096 

1,851 

1,243 

776 

246 

12 

36 

52 

80 

527 

398 

20 

51 

157 

100 

7,219 


198 

112 

17 

62 

10 

20 

9 

14 

3 


2 

2 


3,764 

2,630 

350 

1,091 

385- 

164 

216 

198 

67 

12 


Cooking and heating apparatus. . . . 

Falconer 

Woolens and worsteds 

Motor vehicles 


House trim 

Wooden toys and nottUies 

Forestville 

Forsyth 


Fredonia 

Frewsburg 


17 
4 

1 




58 
65 


Gerrv 

Hartfield 


22 

14 


Jamestown . .' 

Furniture and upholstery 


■••444':;:::: 
103\ 


7,208 
1 ,992 




49 

120 

36 

16 

1 

3 

3 

4 

44 

S7 

2 




1,802 


Metal furniture 


1,12s 


Sheet metal work 


739 


House trim 


229 


Kemjedv 


11 


Mh wille 


32 


Rinlev 


49 


hherman 


76 


Silver Creek . 


483 




965 


Sincloirville , 


18 


Stockton 


51 


Weotfield 


28 
26 

413 




129 


Cider, apple juice, grape juice, etc. . 
Chemunq County 


74 
e,806 






Big Flats 


6 

5 

134 

11 

% 

2 
3 
6 
2 
2 
4- 
2 
8 
1 
1 
14 
3 
3 
1 

93 


2 

1 

40 

2 

1 

1 

1 

6 

3 
2 

84 


117 
40 

5,794 
735 
637 
476 
401 
398 
376 
364 
299 
289 
245 

1.864 

779 

604 

187 

12 

9 

5 

2,578 


116 
40 
6,490 
717 
614 
AU 
396 
383 
368 
298 
297 
S76 
231 

i,76:i 

700 

600 

180 

12 

9 

5 

2.483 


39 

34 

5.352 

717 
464 
467 
373 
390 
276 
364 
299 
289 
246 
1.603 
697 
454 
171 
9 

4 

2.31S 


1 




38 


Breesport 


34 


Elmira 


304 
18 
23 
61 

5 
16 

8 
66 

2 
15 
14 
101 
79 

A 

7 




5.048 
699 


House trim . . 


Castings 


491 
406 
968 


Stationary engines, boilers, etc 

Silk and silk goods 


Railway repair shops 


976 




268 


Bookbinding and blank book making 
Hosiery and knit goods 


298 
297 


Motor Tehicles 


276 


Packing boxes, crates, etc 


291 


Elmira Heights 


1,502 


Bridges and structural iron 

Hosiery and knit goods 


618 
4S0 
164 


Horseheads 


Millport 


9 


Van Etten 






7 


Wellsburg 






4 


Chenango County 


92 




2 226 






Afton 


5 
9 

6 

9 


2 
7 

7 
6 

8 


28 
163 

93 
145 

29 

83 


28 
14b 

87 
139 

28 
82 


27 
163 

72 
100 
2B 
74 






27 


Bainbridge 


if 

5 

? 

1 




14« 


Earlville 


67 


Greene 

Mount Upton ... 


94 
28 


New Berhn 


73 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report oj Bueeau op Factory Inspection, 1911. 



245 



OMditir 


■Bd Town. Ymr 


BndodC 


leptaMiM 


irao, 19li — Contliiiied. 












w BiinoTEBS AT TxioB or iNSPECnOW. 


Weekly Hoctrs op Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OP SHOP EM- 
PLOYEES WHO WORK — 


NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPbOTIKO — 


SEX AND AOE. 


51 ' ' r\ 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yra. +). 


Y»th8 

(16-18 
yra.). 


Bojra 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yrs. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


hours 1 52-57 i 58-63 ! ^J|^ I cept 

or i hours.! hours, u^^ 1 as 

lees. 1 1 I *>°""-, not'd). 

, 1 1 1 
1 1 1 


231 


553 


2,980 

2,630 

350 

218 

£18 


3,388 

£,6£0 

350 

711 

83 

165 

£W 

ISO 

49 

9 

49 

42 

22 

13 

5.607 

U966 

690 

1,117 

687 

££1 

7 

31 

28 

63 

435 

556 

18 

40 

109 

68 

4.911 


15 
10 


3 


353 5 


197 


2.810 
2,630 


1 ; 

751| 6 














''sooC.'.'.'.'} '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


7 




866 
167 
164 
216 
198 
47 


40 
31 


8 
2 
1 


322 io 
265 6 


2i4 377 

S\ 577 

196^ '.'.'.'.'.'. 

9\ 

2' 

1 


501) 1 

1 1 




1GS\ ' 






20 


■■?? 


9 


6 

1 


50 
16 
3 
g 


4 

1 


189 

65, 

12' 


58 










. . 


4 - - 


641.. ... 


21 


44 

2 




4 


1 


,.."i " 


5 


""'22 


....""i:-:::l:::::': 


14 






1 
1,353 







14 

4.654 

1,931 

622 

1,013 




464 


3.328 

1,710 

100 

338 

MS 

£01 


3,416 
££6 

1,70£ 
776 
714 


155 

11 

65 

6 

60 

7 


5i 
// 

30 

k 

1 




i2 


1981 2.356 
i/' 50 
69\ 1-111 






67 


6i 








1,080 

1 


59 






10 




110 
737 










k 






£8 






u 


9P.fi 






11 


4 






3 8 
2 27 







10 


22 

34 

57 

459 

566 


ii:*/.:: 


1 
2 






3 






15 




i9 
13 
44 






45 

74 

469 

355 

16 

61 

12H 

74 

3,375 


4 




10 






2 

K 




24 


8 


1 




6 














18 










.. . ... 


2 






51 
120 

2,478 


3.678 






ii 

17 
5 

1,821 








9 


3 
5 

59 


6 






3 
















650 


9 


898 


2.481 


62 




13 


25 

20 

1,805 

£88 

77 

97 

77 
£37 

he 

£9 
534 


"2;7i6 

564 
599 
£71 
298 

'£95 
£88 
£90 
£0£ 
968 
618 
460 


16 

29 

3,708 

686 

499 

406 

78 
376 
118 
181 

43 
275 
116 
994 
618 

88 

144 

9 

7 

4 

1.660 






22 

5 

1,267 

4 

7 


8 


3 
5 

878 


19 

2 

1,619 

142 

84 

599 

""s'o 

'293 

"245 

"■"ssi 

518 


16 

27 

2.511 

116 

347^ 

362 
340 
£10 






14 








533 
58 


59 
9 
6 


6 


40j 




] 




7 











3 


£75 


5 


6 






i 


SI 






160 
107 


4 


68 
6 
6 


s 


10 
4 
1 

18 


k 




9 


£91 

31 

£27 

670 




go 






1 


96 
507 


1 
1 


4 

1 





















S6£ 

20 






450 

145 

2 




70 


94 








9 


6 

5 


io' 


9 






2j 


7 














2 




4 















4 
1.280 




815 


1.502 


400 


27 


18 


502 


10 


110 


683 


153 


27 






26 
144 
63 
02 
28 
35 


1 








1 


1 
81 

1 
39 


1 
35 
50 
15 


24| 


35 


111 
25 
76 
28 
44 






2 
4 




30, 


42 










lt>| 


18 


2 






40 












28| 


29 






38 




4 


3 


63 


3i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



246 



New Yokk State Depabtment of Labob. 







Table XIV.— StetisticB of Fketorlaa Inapectad la Btoeh 




Placet 
in- 

ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labgbst 
NuMBXB or 
Employbss 

IN YbAB. 


NUMBBB 


County and City ob Village. 


OBAND 
TOTAL. 


OFPICB 

roBcx. 




(With induBtries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
■hop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


Total. 


Cbbnakoo Couktt — Concluded. 

Norwich 


33 

1^ 

4 
2 

4 

72 


33 

i3 

3 

1 
4 

12 


1»542 

4ie 

100 

220 



68 

2,476 


1,487 

409 

105 

225 



57 

2.423 


1,440 

416 

148 

180 



68 

.2,073 


63 




1,306 


Railway repair ihope 


f22 


Oxford 


Sherburne 


186 


South New Berlin 





South Otselio 


62 




67 


Clinton 'Countt 


2,021 






Altona 


1 
8 
1 
5 
1 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
3 
41 
i 

4 

1 
1 
1 

110 


i 

i 

2 

8 

.'.'.'.v.. 

64 


15 
180 

60 
123 

17 
100 

47 

1 

110 

16 

37 

1.332 

530 

178 

28 

128 

6 

6,261 


15 
173 

67 
121 

17 
185 

47 

100 

15 

35 

1,306 

626 

174 

28 

126 

6 

6.150 


15 

148 

60 

123 

17 

100 

47 

1 

110 

4 

35 

1.048 

390 

108 

25 

128 

6 

4.030 






15 


Ausable Chasm* 


7 
2 
2 




141 


Cadyville 


67 


Charaplain 


121 


Chaiy 


17 


T^yon Mountain 


6 




186 


Nlooers 


47 


Mooers Forks 







1 


Morrisonville 


1 




100 


Perrys Mills 


4 


Peru 


2 

26 

6 

4 




33 


Plattsburgh 


1,022 


Motw vehicle$ 


385 


Rouses Point 


104 


Schuyler Falls 


26 


Standish 


3 





125 


West Chasy 


6 


Columbia County 


111 




4.810 






Boston Comers 


1 

15 
1 
1 
1 

55 
3 
B 
3 
2 
1 

10 
S 
1 
3 
2 
/ 
3 

U 
2 

68 


35 

2 

1 

7 

i 

2 

77 


3 

240 

108 

463 

301 

2.006 

976 

£30 

80 

41 

132 

706 

797 

32 

65 

660 

508 

164 

253 

it2 

4,217 


3 

242 

107 

460 

205 

1,031 

967 

230 

88 

30 

131 

780 

780 

32 

65 

667 

666 

153 

248 

217 

4,086 


3 
244 

108 

303 

301 

1.050 

976 

230 

80 

30 

01 

703 

784 

32 

65 

600 

608 

164 

240 

222 

3.663 






3 


Chatham 


7 
1 
3 
6 
75 
18 




237 


Columbiaviile 


107 


Empire {building brick) 


300 


Hudson 


205 
1,875 


Hoeiery and knil goode 


957 


Cement and lime 


M30 


Kinderhook 


1 
2 
1 
7 
7 




88 


Mellenville 


37 


Newton Hook 


00 


Philmont 


786 


Hoeiery and knit goode 


777 


Roflsman 


32 


Stockport Center 


65 


Stottville 


2 
2 

1 
6 
6 

131 




607 


Woolenr and woretede 




Stuyvesant Falls 




163 


ValaUe 


244 


Hoeiery and knit goode 


$17 




3.623 






Cincinnatus 


4 
43 

1 
1 
1 
1 
14 
4 
2 
3 


4 
43 

ie 

10 
7 
4 


21 
3.224 
1,261 
307 
263 
209 
330 
462 
368 
180 


21 
3.110 
1,248 
305 
250 
200 
320 
454 
362 
172 


17 

2.760 

1,238 

14 

199 

209 

288 

437 

368 

161 






17 


Cortland 


166 
13 
2 
3 

10 
8 
6 
8 




2.645 




1,225 


Catriageet wagone and eUigh^ 

Pianopt organe^ etc 


12 
106 


RoUing miUe and aUel wotke 

Homer 


2O0 
278 


McOraw 


420 


Coretie, gartered etc 


352 


Marathon 


153 



* See also Ausable Chasm 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 247 



Cmmtj aad Town, Tear Ended September 90, 1911 — CoBtfB«ed. 



OF ElfPLOTSBS AT TlMS 


or Inspsction. 










ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

shops 
ex- 
cept 
as 

not'd). 


SHOP FOBCB. 


NxnfBBs or shop bm- 

PLOTBBS WHO WOBK — 


KUlfBKR IN SHOPS 
KMPLOTING — 


BBX AKD AGB. 


61 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 
(18 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yrs.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yw. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 

yrs.). 


120 


867 


409 

m 


1.043 

409 

99 

100 

9 

30 

1.839 


16 


7 


821 


9 


63 


491 
409 

8 

7 

62 

342 


841 


1 


23 
3 


121 
182 


6 
2 


11 


29 
82 


i 


11 

1 


86 

184 

2 

3 

1.218 


391 

1 


9 


::::: 1 


9 


48 
1,381 


386 


1 
8 


2 


26 
172 






21 


256 





181 


280 


]5 






16 

117 

67 

121 

17 

186 

7 

1 

109 

4 

33 

924 

S86 

84 

26 

126 

6 

3.249 














16 
24 


) 


10 


131 
67 
118 








24 






107 


10| 


. 








67 


3 












121 
17 

186 

47 

1 

29 

4 

33 

667 

S85 

60 

26 


i 


17 














1 




186 

47 
















1 








40 












1 
















29 


80 












80 








4 














3 


30 

471 


"386 
S86 


















166 


2 




96 




27 


183 


145 




2 


102 

26 

126 


6 


2 


12 




2 


62 


























125 




5 










6 
193 








287 


1.750 


2.782 


99 


26 


1.414 


31 


761 


3.773 


102 




3 






3 

168 

36 

300 

296 

1,260 

S97 

»S0 

37 

33 

90 

343 

S34 

32 

46 

367 

see 

86 
164 
140 

2.762 














3 

175 

102 

300 

296 

1,133 

668 

230 

88 

Z2 






68 


179 
107 


'"366 

296 

1.032 

80t 

tso 

■■■"649 
649 

""506 
606 

1,626 


1 
9 




78 
68 


6 


7 
6 


6 


50 






























163 


680 
166 


41 
S6 


" 9 
7 


669 
611 


6 
6 


64 


688 
S89 


















13 


76 
31 
90 
128 
IMS 
32 
61 


1 




6C 
4 












6 








15 












90 
14 
14 






Q 


20 
90 


10 
10 


400 
409 


4 

4 




772 
763 
10 
63 
604 
603 
116 
200 
176 

2.805 














22 
10 




4 
1 


ie 

16 
5 
6 
6 

14 


i 

2 
t 
2 
2 
1 

6 


17 
121 
Itl 
54 
64 
62 

739 


1 
1 
1 
6 
8 
8 

2 


2 
3 
5 
8 
10 
9 

18 


""26 
32 
S2 

608 










3 
27 


160 
217 

Ml 7 

1.628 


3 
2 




268 


91 




17 






17 

2.304 

1,166 

It 

196 

too 

192 
163 














8 

2.166 

1,226 

12 

196 

200 

262 

228 

161 

151 


9 
73 




196 


1.024 


1,425 
l,Mt6 


11 


4 
5 


326 
66 




13 


403 




IM 
















196 


""kbb 

""261 
BOl 


1 
































40 
13 


238 
215 

161 
161 


3 


1 


81 
332 
286 


1 

1 
/ 


6 


4 

201 
201 


7 














2 






2 





under Essex county. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



248 



New YoitK State Depabt:mei7t of Labob, 



TaM« XIV. — 



•f Fwctti— lipaf led In E»A 



1 


Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labobst 
Number of ! 
Employbh i 

IN YSAB. 1 

1 


NUUBSB 


COUNTT AND ClTT OB VlIXAOI. 


QBAND 1 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FOBCB. 




(With industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


1 

There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


Total. 


DeLAW ABE COUNTT 


67 


38 


1.259 


1.241 


1.229 


18 




1,211 






Beerston 


2 

2 

1 
1 

13 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 
1 

16 

259 


2 

i3 

1 

3 



7 

i2 

89 


36 
21 
46 
10 
4 
73 

107 
14 
24 
23 
25 
21 
12 
22 
12 
10 
15 
11 
8 
10 

473 
12 

280 

9,614 


26 
21 
46 
10 
4 
70 

108 
14 
24 
23 
25 
21 
12 
21 
12 
10 
15 
11 
8 
10 

466 
12 

274 

9,309 


26 

21 
45 
10 
4 
73 
91 
14 
22 
23 
25 
21 
12 
72 
12 
10 
15 
11 
8 
10 

462 
12 

280 

9.388 






26 


Butternut Grore 






21 


Cadoaia 






45 


Centerville 






10 


Delancy 






4 


Delhi 


3 

1 




70 


Depomt* 


90 




14 


Elk Brook 






22 


Fiahs Eddy 






23 


HATnH<>n 






25 








21 


Harvard 






12 


Hobart 


1 




21 


Horton 


12 


Hort<;n Brook 






10 


Methol 






15 


Peakville 






11 


Rock Rift 






8 


Sbinhopple 

Sidney 

Trout Brook 







10 


7 




455 

12 


Walton 

DuTCBBsa County 


6 
306 







274 
9.033 






Arlington 

Amenia 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

30 
2 
6 
2 
4 

22 

! 

7 

\ 

4 

1 

141 

5 

1 12 
2 
6 
1 
4 
2 
6 
7 
7 
2 
3 
1 


1 

i 

5 

2 

3 

i 

61 

9 

1 

i 

a 
a 

a 


3 

2 


3 
2 


3 

40 

8 

2 

1.098 

4S7 

391 

54 

9 

1,980 

' 1,206 

280 

1 267 

46 

63 

41 

1 110 

1 2 

5,073 

976 

617 

1 466 

45i 

! 26S 

1 264 

\ 211 

121 
18 

1 11 
i li 






3 






2 


Camelot 


201 20 

40 40 

' 81 8 

2! 2 

1,193, 1.168 






20 


Ch*»lsoa 






40 


Clinton Comera 






8 


Fishkill 






2 


Fiahkill-on-Hudflon 


36 

7 
/ 
2 


•••'• 


1.063 


A/en's hat9 and capt 


632 

391 

64 

1 11 

, 1.96S 

1,2U 

280 

1 267 

1 46 

53 

41 

110 

1 2 

, 5,210 

979 

1 621 

1 469 

1 452 

328 

268 

217 

212 

121 

18 

4 

16 

18 


525 

390 

62 

11 

1,916 

1,2SS 

270 

241 

45 

52 

40 

108 

2 

5.022 

917 

605 

446 

448 

325 

251 

210 

206 

119 

17 

4 

U 

17 


4S0 


Btixldxrw brich 


5^0 


Hopewell Junction 


62 


\f adalin ... • 


9 


Matteawan 


62 

U 
10 
26 

1 
1 
1 
2 




1,878 


Men's haU and caps 

Rubber and gutta percha goods 

Cooking and healing apparatus 

MUlbrook 

Millerton 

New Hamburg 


1,196 

270 

241 

45 

62 

40 


Pine Plains 


108 


Pleasant Valley 


2 


Poughkeepsie.'. 

Agricultural implmmnts 

Tailoring 


188 

e» 

16 

es 

' 4 
s 
1 

7 
6 
2 

W 1 
;i 




4. 885 

914 
601 


Motor vehieUs 


448 


Cigars 


44S 


RoOing tnitls and steel teorks 

Women's white goods 


M60 


Pearl buttons, handles, etc 

Miscellaneous maehinery 


BIO 
MOt 


Red Hook 


119 


Rhinebeck 


17 


Salt Point 


3 


Staatsburg 


\^ 1 




14 


StanfordvUle 


17 



♦See also Deposit, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repoht of Bukeatj ov Factoby Inspectioit, 1911. 



249 



€matjinmATkmn,Ymm 


EmMi 


***«^ 


btM. 1911 — Coatiniied. 












OF Emwlotkeb at Time 


or iNSFECTIOlf. 








Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOPFORCB. • 


NUMBEB OP SHOP EM- 
PLOTEBS WHO WORK — 


KUMBSR IN SHOPS 

KimjarxHQ — 


SEX AND AOB. 


61 

hours 
or 
less. 


62-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


(in 
shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yiB. +). 


Y'tilB 

(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boys 
' (14-16 

1 ym.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yw. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


ex- 

as 
not'd). 


411 


800 




962 


17 


i 3 


223 


6 


36 


114 


801 


260 




2 


24 




26 
21 
44 
10 
4 
67 
68 
14 
22 
23 
25 
21 
12 
18 
12 
10 
15 
11 
8 
10 

306 
12 

203 

6.408 


i 








2 


9 

19 
10 


24 

12 
26 




21 


1 ■ ■ " ■ 










16 


29 




1 


1 












10 


! 












4 






1 










4 




70 






. . i . . . . 


3 
12 


3 


6 
S 


.3 


36 
87 
14 






90 




71 




14 






22 














221 


23 


' 










23 

" "io 


1 . . 


25 














8 


171 


21 






1 






2 


91 


12 












12| 




21 




1 


3 




3 


7 




11, 


12 


i 


12'!"' 


10 






1 












10 


15 






1 












151 


11 






1 












111 


8 


















8! . 


10 
















10 
412 




ai 

12 


424 




4j 3 


139 


3 


7 


31 


5; 

12 


&4 
878 


190 
3.091 


5.064 


5t 

85J 20 


66 
2,457 


63 


15 
497 


63 
3.180 


171 
5,276 


25 
80 




3 






3 

2 

19 

40 

8 

2 

876 

£60 

386 

52 

9 

1.325 

801 

195 

£41 

44 

40 

40 

108 

2 

3.356 

911 

132 

44e 

89 

£50 

££ 

93 

£02 

85 

17 

3 

14 

17 












3 






2 














2 








20 

40 




1 











20 

40 

8 

2 

864 

4£6 

390 

20 

7 

1.806 

1,193 

£70 

£41 

17 

49 

4C 

108 
























8 
















2 






i 














98 


660 

1$3 

390 

52 


305 
305 


4 
I 


2 
2 


178 
175 


3 
3 


7 
6 


191 


1 






















32 




Q 












2 
43 




64 


193 
86 


- 1.621 

1,110 

£70 

£41 


17 
17 


T 
1 


522 

375 
75 


7 
1 


21 

2 


8 




























20 


25 






1 
12 






28 
3 






52 


. 












2 


38 
80 
















28 















. . . 




2 












2 

2.862 

877 

653 






509 


1.874 
37 

73 


2.602 
877 

679 
430 

see 

£60 


54 
3 

17 


11 


1.426 


38 


218 


1,768 

37 

22 

446 

366 

250 

6 

161 

4 

94 

11 

1 


37 




£t 


5 


426 


21 


26 






16 






$ 


9 


1 


329 


10 




20 


72 












s 


24* 
$10 
183 
109 






£25 
127 






242 
65 

198 

25 

6 








6 


2 


2 


4 






19 




■ 


10 


2 




32 










17 










3 
















2 




14 
















14 




171 












17 







under Broome County. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



250 



New Yokk State Depabtment of Labob. 











Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labobit 
Number op 
Employces 

inYbab. 


Numbbb 


County and Citt ob yiLZJk.GS. 


GRAND 

total. 


orriCB 

rOBCB. 




(With *ndu8trie8 having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
■hop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


Total 


DuTCHBSs CouNTT — Conclud«L 
Tivoli 


1 
8 
1 
1 
1 

2,279 


6 

i 

927 


6 
666 

250 
2 

91,712 


6 
648 
389 

88.499 


4 
666 

2 
80.033 






4 


Wappingers Falls 


18 

'1 




648 


J^yeino, finishing, etc 

ToilorinQ 


389 
217 


Washinirton Hollow 


2 


Ertb County .......••••>•.••••. 


3.209 




76.824 




^iCTon ..•.••«•••••••• 


16 
5 
5 
1 
5 
2 
1 
2.092 
3 
7 
1 
2 
3 

14 
2 
1 

18 
2 
3 
1 

1 
2 
5 
12 
5 
1 
6 
1 
1 

S' 

6 
2 
17 
30 
3 
1 
1 
6 

50 


12 
3 

i 

845 
2 

2 

14 

2 

i 

2 
4 



6 

2 
19 
10 

3 

15 


211 
124 
265 
210 
680 
460 
23 
73,561 

5 
865 
661 
216 

6 

3.164 

2,336 

618 

293 

206 

7 

7 

233 

17 

36 

260 

42 

181 

8,402 

8,060 

296 

690 

600 

44 

7 

230 

2,343 

832 

16 
1,250 


207 
124 
260 
205 
680 
460 
23 
70,612 

5 
865 
661 
216 

6 

3.164 

2,336 

618 

265 

167 

7 

7 

231 

17 

34 

260 

42 

181 

8,342 

8,000 

296 

690 

600 

44 

7 

230 

2,190 

808 

fA 

16 
1,198 


211 
104 
210 
155 
497 
460 
23 
67,292 

5 
806 
661 
216 

6 

2.048 

1,238 

618 

293 

206 

6 

5 

233 

17 

35 

227 

42 

181 

4,825 

4M3 

296 

561 

381 

44 

2 

230 

2,114 

672 

429 

*fl 

1,092 


4 




207 


Alden 


104 


Angola 


5 

6 




• 205 


Cycles 


150 


Blasdell 


497 


Rolling mills and sUsl works 

Brant 






460 






^ 


Buffalo (see Table XV) 


2.945 




64,347 
5 


Chaffee 


Cheektowaga 






806 


RailvHiv TSWiiT shovs. .•.....•...• 






651 


Pertilittrs 






916 


Colden 






6 


Depew 






2,048 


Car whs^ and railv>ay eguipmenl . 






1,238 


Railivau revair shovs 






618 


East Aurora 


' 38 
38 




255 


Printina and mMishino 


167 


Ebenezer 


6 


Eden Center 






5 


Farnham icanning fruits and vsgo- 
tables) 


2 




231 


Gardenville 


17 


Gowanda* 


2 




33 


Hamburg 


227 


Holland 






42 


Irving 






181 


LackAwanna 


60 
60 




4 765 


Rolling mills and steel works 

Railway revair shovs 


*'^ 


T^ancaster 






561 


Castings 






381 


North Collins 






44 


Sardinia 






2 


Sorinirville 






230 


Tonawanda ... r - - ^ - - - t r t ^ - - 


153 

24 

6 

13 




1 961 


Rolling mills and steel works 

Pianos, organs, etc 


211 


Paper miUs 


Williamsville 


16 


Essex County 


52 




1,040 






Ausable Forks 


5 
4 
2 
6 
6 
11 
15 
1 


2 
1 
2 
2 

4 

4 


218 

28 

5 

87 

203 

202 

394 

113 


207 

28 

5 

83 

189 

196 

382 

108 


218 

23 

3 

87 

153 

202 

293 

113 


11 


" ■ ■ ■ 



207 


Crown Point 


23 


■ Elizabethtown 






3 


Koeseville 


it 

6 

12 

5 




83 


Mineville 


139 


Port Henry 


196 


Ticonderoga 


281 


WUlsboro 


108 



* See also Qowanda. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 251 



CMUity And Town, Tear Ended September 30, 1911 — Coatlnaed. 



OF Bmflotbbs at Tiii« 


OF Inspi 


CTION. 








Wkbklt Houbs of Labor. 


ChU- 
drea 
under 

14 
years 

shops 
ex- 
cept 
as 

nofd). 


SHOP rOBOB. 


NUMBBR OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBB8 WHO WORK — 


KUMBBR IN SHOPS- 
EMPLOTWO— 


BBX AND AQB. 


61 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-67 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yw. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yra.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yw. +). 


Giris 

(14-16 

yrs.). 


4 






4 
340 
304 

'i 

60,849 














4 
395 
389 






12 




636 
389 


7 




286 

86 

$01 


15 




251 


2 
















7 




16 


$47 








2 






2 
38,275 






8,885 


27,929 


40,010 


1,719 


697 


13,091 


668 


6,788 


24,638 


8,123 


4 


79 


128 

95 

197 

150 

131 

100 

23 

25,137 


"356 
360 

'36",8i8 


150 
94 
204 
160 
497 
460 

49.428 

6 

806 

661 

$16 

6 

1,990 

1,BS6 

600 

165 

8t 

6 

4 

65 

16 

33 

139 

42 

80 

4,714 

4,386 

$96 

538 

550 

43 

2 

90 

1.713 

613 

319 

$10 

12 

949 


2 
3 
1 


4 


65 
3 






70 
66 


137 
34 
205 
160 
147 
100 






9 




4 






8 






















16 












360 

360 

21 

21,347 




























14 
12.351 


2 
654 


2 
6.566 






8.392 
5 


1,565 


659 


34.439 

6 

766 

661 

$16 

6 

128 

36 


2,985 


1 


11 


244 


55i 
661 










38 




2 


















616 










. 








6 


















45 


183 
36 


1,820 

1,B0B 

618 


18 

is 

11 

11 


7 

$ 


33 




10 
$ 


1.898 

1,$00 

618 

95 

91 


12 










. . 




49 


206 
163 




79 
76 





76 

76 


81 







4 






6 


6 
5 


. .. 




5 






1 

8 

1 













1 . . 






231 


6 


147 


6 


11 




220' 


17 






17 

7 

225 

42 
180 
162 

"146 

14 

/ 

44 

2 

180 

1.445 

396 

4$4 

1 

5 

344 


1 


9 


24 
188 

26 
181 

28 


'4;7i9 

4,4i3 

B96 
381 
381 










24 


'2! . "... 


39 




1 


87 







2i 3 


16 
















100 
6 


1 


i 
2 


"225 

37 
160 
477 
380 


1 


is 


44 
37 


2 


4,386, 

4.386 














^' 1 : 


21 


159 


14 

i 


6 

1 


3 




67 


31 


8 


36 








1 


2 












.1 . . . . 


42 
66 


188 
765 
143 


"i.iio 

606 
4£4 
211 


2 

55 

6 

9 

1 
3 


i2 

3 


i37 
176 

$7 
96 


1 
5 


i 

10 


12 

46 

3 


371 

460i 

g50\ 








1 












$10\ . ... 


16 






1 
91 







7 
118 


41 


198 


842 






143 


435! . . . 










6 


201 




207 

23 

3 

73 

139 

156 

240 

108 












2 
15 

5 

33 

1 

62 


10 
8 
1 
78 
92 
77 
78 


195| . 


23 














3 














2 


j 


16 


68 

99 

148 

218 

108 








10 




1 


40 










14' 


48 






40 
41 






II81 


63 








141 


1 










.... 


108 





under Cattaraugus County. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



253 



Xew Yoek State Depaktmidnt op Labor. 



Table ZI¥.- 



Qt iMCoriM iMpwrtiJ ia 1 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


1 

Num- 

1 berof 

1 owners 

at 

work. 


Larobst 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 


W-. < 


Cocirrr and Citt or Tillaob. 


ORAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 




(With induatrie* having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


Tbera- 

of 

14-16 

years 

of 

age. 


TotaL 


Franklin Countt 


71 


48 


1,713 


1,681 


1.615 


32 




1.583 




Bangor 


2 

I 

1 

7 
1 
3 
29 
1 
1 
1 
5 

2 
5 

e 

255 


1 
1 

a 

3 

i 

2» 

1 

2 

7 

1 
1 

12 


5 
15 
4 

10 

89 

12 

195 

693 

6 

10 

37 

264 

93 

12 

268 

260 

9.225 


5 

15 

4 

10 

88 

12 

194 

679 

5 

8 

37 

260 

• 88 

12 

2W 

256 

9.032 


5 
12 

4 
10 

72 

12 

195 

659 

6 

10 

23 

239 

93 

12 

263 

265 

8.617 






5 


Bminnrdimlje 






12 


Brush ton 






4 


Chasm Falls 






10 


Chatcaugay 


1 




71 


Duano. .. 


12 


Faust 


1 

14 

1 

2 




194 


Malpne 


645 


Moira 


5 


North Bangor 


8 


Owls Head 


23 


St. Regis Falls 


4 
5 




235 


Saranac Lake .'.... 


88 


Skerry 


12 


Tupper Lake 


4 

4 

192 




250 


Route trim 


261 


Fulton County 


8,425 






Broadalbin 


5 

148 

71 

IBS 

4 

88 

U 

16 

4 

8 

2 

119 


7 

5 

i 


190 

6. 811 

3.751 

1,085 

£86 

2.785 

2,719 

689 

221 

197 

21 

4.577 


189 

5.675 

3,680 

1,075 

276 

2,733 

1,691 

684 

218 

196 

21 

4,469 


183 

6.393 

S,S82 

1,036 

286 

2,643 

1,678 

641 

212 

165 

21 

3,727 


1 

135 

70 

10 

10 

52 

28 

6 

3 

1 




182 


Gloversville 


6,258 


Olovet end tnittcnt 


S,S1M 
1,026 


Leather 


Silk and silk goods 


276 


Johnstown 


2.501 


Traveling bagt and trunks 

Leather 


1,660 
636 


Mayfieid (gloves and mittens) 

North ville 


209 
164 


Vail Mills. 


21 


Genbsbs Countt 


106 




3,621 






Batavia . . 


63 
3 
S 

1 
8 
3 
31 
6 
S 
9 

5 

69 


37 


3.078 

1A78 

360 

201 

112 

3 

997 

409 

251 

365 

20S 

22 

1.297 


2.982 

1,436 

357 

200 

112 

3 

995 

407 

261 

355 

193 

22 

1.290 


2.496 

1,169 

967 

119 

96 

3 

765 

254 

179 

345 

203 

22 

1,287 


96 

1 




2,400 
1,116 


Agt icuUuial implements 


Houhe trim 


264 

118 

06 


Canning fruits and v^getabUs 

Bergen 


Corfu 






3 


Le Roy 






765 








264 
179 


Canning fruiL> and vegetables 






Oakficld 


10 
10 




335 


Plaster {wall and land) 


193 


Pavilion 


22 


Grep:ne County 


7 




1.280 






Alsen (cemtnt atid lime) 


1 
9 
2 
24 
/ 
2 
1 
9 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 


io 

1 
13 

4 

1 

2 

4 
2 


210 

165 

9 

435 

219 

235 

230 

187 

6 

31 

6 

7 

6 


210 

165 

9 

433 

217 
235 
230 
183 
6 
31 

7 
5' 


210 

163 

9 

429 

219 

235 

230 

187 

6 

31 

6 

5 

6 






210 


Athens 






168 


Cairo 






9 


Catskill 


2 
2 




427 


Hosit ry and knit goods 


217 


Cementon 


235 


Ctment and lime 






230 


Coxsackie 


4 




183 


East Durham 


6 


New Baltimore 






31 


Oak Hill 









Tannersville 








West Coxsuckie . 


1 




6 




ft 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



253 



Cmattr and TNftm^ Tesr ftidafl 



■n, 1911 — CoBttmied. 



OF Bmplotkbs 


iiTTiacE 


OF Inbpectxon. 








Weekly Hours of Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EM- 
FLOTEBe WHO WORK — 


NUMBER m 8HOP8 


SBX AND AOE. 


61 
hours 

or 
less. 


52-57 i 58-63 
hours. 1 hours. 

1 
1 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 
shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

ym. +). 


Y'ths 
a6-18 
yre.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

yra.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yra. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 

yra.). 


ex- 
cept 
as 
nofd). 


208 


1,290 




1,816 


43 


15 


209 




25 


81| 1,280 


197 





5 






5 
12 
3 

10 

70 

12 

173 

452 

5 

8 

23 

208 

71 

11 

253 

£46 

5,593 












, 


5I 


12 


















12 






4 






1 










1 






10 














... 1 


'■"io 

8 




81 


40 




1 










Q^M 




12 












U 
190 
475 

5 




1 


193 
610 




16 
2 


4 


1 
191 




4 
9 


" "21 






135 
5 


140 




8 


















8 






23 

233 

40 
















23 

204 

ax 




2 

48 


15 
2 


11 


1 

15 

1 




10 


53 


■"21 
2 




12 




2 


in 




8 


251 
£61 

5.593 


1.660 


6 
6 

81 






256 

£51 

8,060 


3 


. 
















1,163 


52 


2,650 


49 


197 


150 


18 




14 


168 

3,171 

1,683 

9S6 

969 

1,927 

l,tl6 

486 

194 

133 


"i;4i8 

1M8 

"'25i 

£61 


88 
3,493 

1,79£ 
1,026 

ie£ 

1,772 

1,008 

636 

131 

88 

21 

2.595 


8 
62 
66 


1 
31 

24 


83 
1.640 

1,414 


2 
32 

26 


3 

140 

52 


■ ■ ■ i48 
14s 


179 

4,955 

3,112 

1,026 

272 

2,536 

1,680 

636 

208 

161 

21 

2,861 






669 
SJl 




15 




90 






17 


2 
11 
3 


2 
19 
10 


106 
774 
'619 


2 
15 
10 


4 
53 
£0 


2 







413 






18S 
61 




■ 




15 




1 


77 
76 




1 









31 


3 




21 














401 


1,993 


1,227 


43 


15 


960 


8 


471 


192 


97 


2 


201 


972 
146 

""i'l8 
62 


1.227 
970 
£67 


1,912 

1.049 

£49 

48 

39 

1 

397 

131 

81 

234 

193 

12 

1.080 


40 

18 
15 


15 
£ 


427 

47 


6 


382 

£ 

£67 


155 

100 
2 


1.861 

1.014 

6 

118 

91 

3 

549 

61 

179 

335 

193 

22 

791 


2 




7 










70 

65 

2 

365 

123 

98 

101 









34 


2 










5 




3 










111 

16 


654 
£S8 
168 
305 
193 




1 




2 


80 
87 


37 

£1 


90 
80 




16 








30 















2 
















22 






10 
181 












163 


460 


657 


12 


5 


2 


19 


44 


426 









210 


210 

157 

6 

296 

103 

236 

230 

123 

6 

31 

6 

5 

5 














10 

157 

7 

390 

213 

15 

10 

167 


200 




19 


144 


6 
6 










6 
"'25 




9 


2 
8 
£ 


1 
120 
110 


2 

£ 


2 
9 

4 






83 


127 


217 
£17 
230 
£30 


3 




5 




220 

220 

3 




















20 


i63 






60 




2 
6 


11 




6 








5 


26 














3i 
6 
3 
5 







6 



















5 
















2 






6 






















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



254 



New York State Department of Labor. 











Plaees 
in- 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Laroest 
Number of 
Employebb 


NUIIBBB 


CouiiTT AND Cmr OB Village. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICB 
FOBCB. 




(With industries havinc 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total 


Thera- 

of 

14-16 

years 

of 

age. 


TotaL 




116 


6 


10.718 


10.419 


10.542 


299 




10.243 




Cold Brook 


6 
7 
5 
9 

21 
S 
1 

14 

1 
1 
£ 
45 
7 
1 
1 
3 
4 
2 
2 
3 

199 


i 

4 

i 

66 


39 
967 
7S£ 
446 

1,505 
908 
366 

3.642 

£,08£ 

1,047 

££3 

3,552 

£,£18 
SOI 
£09 
216 
151 

1 

94 
7,093 


39 
944 
716 
429 

1.471 
887 
S6£ 

3.620 

£,060 

990 

£08 

3,463 

£,194 

£97 

187 

210 

146 

96 


39 
943 
7S£ 
446 

1,487 
908 
S47 

3.642 

£,08£ 

1,047 

££S 

3.466 
£,18£ 
501 
£09 
213 
109 
98 






39 


Dolgeville 


23 
17 
17 
34 
£1 
3 
122 

3£ 

67 

16 

89 

£4 

4 

££ 

6 

5 

2 




920 


Felt and felt goods 


716 


Frankfort 


429 


Herkimer 


1.453 


Store, office and kitchen fixture* 

Hoaiery and knit goode 


887 

£,060 
990 


Ilion 


chinet 


Fireamu 


Store, office and kitchen fixturet 

Little j^alls 


£08 
3.377 


Hoaiery and knit goode 


£,168 


Leather 


£97 


Agricultural itnplementa 


187 


Middi^iue ^ :.:::.: 


207 


Mohawk ; . 


104 


Newport 


96 


Poland 


8 5 


5 


West Winfield 


93 
6,943 


94 
6,377 


1 
150 




98 


Jeffcrson County 


6.227 






Adams 


9 
11 
6 
7 
26 
5 
2 
8 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
6 
95 
£ 
6 
4 
£ 
£ 
8 

7.196 


1 
5 

1 
4 
14 

2 

i 

2 

2 

2 
31 

i 

£ 

i 

4.563 


171 

97 

168 

211 

554 

£6£ 

7 

44 

456 

351 

££6 

97 

238 

37 

40 

15 

88 

53 

4,116 

1,£86 

350 
154.652 


171 

94 

168 

209 

554 

£6£ 

7 

44 

456 

351 

££6 

97 

238 

37 

40 

15 

88 

53 

3,971 

1,£01 

m 

£06 
£09 
350 

152,720 


171 
97 
139 
211 
523 

'1 

35 

456 

351 

££6 

97 

238 

37 

40 

15 

36 

35 

3,540 

984 

£14 
111 
349 

136,287 






171 


Antwerp 


3 




94 


Black River 


139 


Brownville 


2 




209 


Carthage 


623 


Pulp and paper milla 






£47 


Chaumont 






7 


Clayton 






85 


Deieriet (pulp and paper milla) 






456 


Dexter 






351 


Pulp milla 






££6 


Felts Mills 






97 


Glen Park (pulp and paper milla).. . . 
Great Bend 






238 






87 


Herring 






40 


Natural Bridge 






15 


Philadelphia 






36 


Theresa 






36 


Watertown 


145 

% 




3.896 


Car wheela and railufay equipment. 
Miacellaneoua mcKhinery 


900 
439 


Motor vehiclea 


££ 


iSn 


Miacellaneoua braaa and bronze ware. 


9 




906 
111 


West Carthage 






349 


KiNOS County (New York City, Brook- 
lyn Borough. See Table XV) 


1.825 


10 


133.462 


Lewis CJounty 


59 


23 


1,006 


1,004 


974 


2 




972 






Beaver Falls 


4 
5 
6 
1 

1 
5 


5 

i 


109 


109 


109 
25 
32 
16 
16 

182 






109 


Castorland 


35' 35 
321 32 
16 16 
16 16 
182 182 






26 


Croghan 






32 


Glenfield 






16 


Gouldtown 






16 


Harrisville 






185 



* Includes one child under 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 255 

Comity and Town, Tear Ended September SO, 1911 — Contlnaed. 



OF EllPLOTEVS 


KtTaa 


OF Inspbctxon. 






Wbbklt Houbs of Labob. 


ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 


SHOP FOBCB. 


NT7MBBB OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBB8 WHO WOBK— 


NUMBEB IN SHOPS 
BMPIX>TINa— 


8BX AND AQB. 


51 
hours 

or 
less. 


62-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 




1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yrs. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yre. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


Over 1 ^^ 
63 *^P* 

^°""- no?d). 

1 


368 


3,096 


6.779 


7.860 


119 


22 


2,227 


15 


42 


509 


9.610 


82: 


39 






39 

700 

610 

405 

1.126 

866 

64 

3.042 

1,697 

939 

208 

2.182 

1,030 

297 

187 

196 

30 

42 

5 

93 

5,430 














39 
912 
708 
428 

1,419 
886 
338 

3.168 

1,714 


] 


29 


321 
14S 
413 
419 
S60 


570 
670 

'***98i 
697 

3,040 

2,060 
990 

■■2;i88 

1,891 
297 


3 
5 
2 
41 
19 
16 
39 

17 
18 


6 
6 

1 
4 
2 

5 

• 2 
3 


209 

196 

21 

276 


2 
2 

6 


8 
7 
1 
12 
2 
6 
8 

2 
3 


■"*i7 

*344 
834 


, 




1 


16 




53 


5 




268 
434 

334 
30 


6 




58 


A22 


1 




1 






987 

208 

3.236 

2,149 


1 




208 

1,039 

267 


150 


26 
19 


4 
5 


1.159 
1,100 


6 
6 


10 
9 


54 


77' 

1 




297 

187 

206 

10 

94 

5 

93 

3.167 









187 

203 

94 

96 


















4 


3 

4 
1 


1 

i 


7 
70 
51 




1 


"**94 






10 








..... 


2 






5 






4 


89 
3.436 


2.183 



















608 


9 


8 


773 


7 


504 


1,208 




1.348 





22 


149 
68 
119 
204 
440 
M47 




93 

82 

130 

193 

460 

223 

5 

27 

460 

333 

226 

94 

235 

37 

40 

15 

33 

20 

2,838 

900 

439 

201 

191 

21 

345 

89,342 






78 
12 
9 
16 
60 
22 




3 


87 

7 


81 
56 
64 

5 

320 

97 

5 
20 


1 


26 






****3ir.:::::; 


20 










75 


5 










77 
12 

2 

15 

456 

4 


1271 


83 




1 


2 
2 


8 
2 


1831 

148 


7 


1 


1 




35 






8 

6 

18 






::::::i::::::; 






456 
225 
226 

■'"238 












9 


117 










40 


3071 












22o\ 


12 


85 






3 
3 








3 


94 










235 


3 






7 


30 

40 






37 





















40 




15 
















151 


15 


2i 

23 

1,802 

'68 

196 
206 
111 
338 

64.397 


■i;264 
899 
S66 

43.019 




1 


2 

15 

541 






5 


3i 
35 
2,350 
90 






12 








327 




329 


8 


3 


5 


255 


463 




16 












400 


89 
200 
205 
110 
120 

41,194 




IB 






6 
12 
89 

2 

40,072 






1 
7 




2 










.1. ..:..: 




1 
1.495 


i 

3 
17.966 


■**"77 
73,282 




11 
26.046 


1,977 


2 

576 


i49 

1,020 ♦9 


266 


706 




886 






81 


5 


17 


1 


426 


528 






' ' 








37 


72 




109 
21 
32 
16 
16 

180 
















109 




25 






4 




2 




23 
32 
16 




32 














16 






















16 


















ie 

125 




5 


177 








2 








67 





years of age employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



256 



New York State Department of Labor. 



lUile XIVw— StelktiM •f FMtoiies bMPMted In EmIi 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


LABoarr 

NUMBEB OF 

EMPLoms 

IN YbaB. 


, KUMBKB 


County and Citt ob Village. 


OBAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FOBCE. 




(WHh industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


' There- 
Total. 1 of in 
1 shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


Total 


Lewis County — Concluded. 

Lowville 


31 
4 
5 

1 
6 

102 


11 

3 

3 

45 


221 210 

125 125 

154 154 

2, 2 

114' 114 

2,913i 2.841 


221 

103 

154 

2 

114 

2,400 


2 




219 


LyonfKi ale . . . 


103 


I^ynnn FaJIit 






154 


N(BW Bremen 






2 


Port Leyden 






114 


LiYtNoaroN County 


72 




2,328 










Avon 


17 

i 

10 
1 
23 
12 
2 
1 
1 
6 
4 

^1 

8 
2 

1 
1 

114 


8 
4 

io 

7 

5 

2 
6 

2 

1 

50 


325 
£06 
TSQ 
302 
578 
307 

119 

89 

23 

472 

383 

117 

88 

253 

94 

3,407 


318 
200 
133 
300 
546 
302 
260 

10 
115 

87 

23 
466 
380 
113 

87 
2.50 

91 

3.382 


300 
190 

89 
265 
384 
220 
182 
9 
119 

57 

15 
419 
3A8 
111 

65 
253 

94 

3,176 


7 
6 
3 
2 
32 
5 
4 




293 


Railway repair shops 


184 


Caledonia 


86 


Cuylerville (grooeries) 


263 


Dansville 


352 


Geneseo 


215 


Canning frwUa and vegeUMea 

LakeviUe... 


178 
9 


Leicester 


4 
2 





115 


T/ima . ^ 


55 


Livonia 


15 


Mount Morris . . 


6 
5 

t 

3 
3 

25 





413 


Nunda 


S4S 

107 


PiflFard 


64 


Retsof (salt) 


250 


York 


91 


Madison County 


3.151 






RniinlrviUft 


1 
25 
8 
7 
1 
3 
12 
1 
2 
5 
3 
45 
1 
J 
2 
7 
1 

1,670 


ii 

2 
4 

4 

2 

1 
26 

6 

908 


97 

505 

187 

72 

10 

13 

154 

157 

71 

17 

60 

2,060 

407 

400 

221 

220 

4 

62,585 


97 

601 

187 

72 

10 

13 

153 

157 

71 

17 

60 

2,040 

399 

400 

218 

220 

4 

59,231 


65 

450 

187 

72 

10 

13 

152 

157 

71 

17 

59 

1,919 

407 

400 

221 

218 

4 

58,421 






65 


Canastota 


4 





446 


Cazenovia 


187 


Chittenango 






72 


Clockviller 






10 


Eaton 






13 


Hamilton 


1 




151 


I^enox 


157 


Leonardsville 






71 


Morrisville 






17 


Munnsville 






59 


Oneida 


20 
8 




1,899 


Caskets 


399 




400 


Furniture and upholstery 


3 




218 


Cigars 


218 


South Bay 






4 


Monboe County 


3,354 




55.067 






Barnard 


1 
1 
1 
16 
1 
5 
1 
3 

J 

/ 
1 

^? 

1 


2 

i 

3 

2 

i 

12 


27 

40 

56 

665 

270 

194 

53 

30 

2,096 

1,020 

938 

80 

945 

645 

282 


27 

40 

55 

648 

260 

191 

53 

30 

2,945 

085 

929 

78 

914 

624 

278 


27 
40 
56 
591 
270 
194 
53 

2,096 

1.020 

938 

80 

870 

645 






27 


Bealsbuig 






40 


Brighton 


i 

17 

10 

3 




55 


Brockport 


574 


Boots and shoes 


200 


Charlotte 


101 


Chili 


53 


Churchville 






16 


East Rochester 


51 

55 

9 

2 

31 

Ml 

4 




2.045 

986 


Cars 


Pianos, oraans. etc 


929 


Egypt 


78 


Fairport 


830 


Sheet metal work 


'^ 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



257 



C^onty and Town, Year Ended Septomber M, 1911 — Condnaed. 



or Emplotkes 


AT Time 


OF Inspection. 








Weekly Houbs of Labob. 


ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 


8H0P FORCE. 


NUMBEB OF SHOP EM- 
PLOYEES WHO WORK — 


NTMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOTTNG- - 




SEX AND AGE. 




51 

hours 

or 

less. 


1 

52-57 ' 58-^3 
hours., hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 , 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yrs.). . 


Boys 

(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn, 

(16 

yrs. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

nofd). 


79 


140 

84 
150 





206 

101' 

154 

2, 

49, 

1.909 






13 
2 




9 


*''■' 


205 
2 


5 




19 






101| 

150, . 


4 






"■■*:' 


ii:::::: 


i 

R6 






"""; 






31 


83 
1.283 


738 






60 
399 


5 
10 


5 i 


22t 


307 


8 


2 


1 ' 

24 250! 2,029 


25 




5.3 


210 
44 


"'263 


238 

'?! 

260, 

281 

75, 

44 

9 

115 
51 
15 

290. 

gS6 

101 
61 

250 

2,674, 






^1::::::: 


3, 15 275 














18', 

m 

263 
154 






42 






14 






IS 








3 




"::::: 




' 




65 


287 
ITS 
17S 




7i 
126 

1X0 






184 
13 


..... i. ..... 


37 

9 


2 


• 1 


10 

10 


12 
IB 


184 6 

166 1 

9> i 




iis! 

40: 








.[ t 


115 
49 


1 


15 






41 


61..:::: 


1 


15 






15,::.:"' .:;;; 
394 3 


47 


141 

lis 

89 

58 


225 

■"256 
799 


3 

Si 




120 

ISO 

6 

3 






10 










34s . . . 1 . . 


IS 







4 


101, 2 


(> 









3 


or 1 






. . . 




250 1 




91 
1.959 








1 


91 
2.037 


1;:: 


393 


15 


10 


546 




6 


323, 123 


66s|....:.: 




65 
349 
155 

49 




65 

391 

145 

46 

10 

13 

82 

121 

44 

14 

59 

1,580 

308 

340, 

»J6 

186 

4 

37,724 










, 


65 ' 

4i7 4| 

68 100 

68' 4 

10 

11 2 


97 


1 




1 


54 
41 
24 






25 

10 


32 
23 


2 


9 


10 









* 


13 










: :::"" 




37 


114 
157 
67 








67 

36 

24 

3 


2 


* 


6 








!.../: 


157,::::::: 

i:::::: 


4 
17 


2 


i 





I 


1 66 

3 10 
2' r^7 


4 


55 

948 




■ ■■799 

S99 
400 






152 


12 

1 


8 


297 

88 

60 

4 

i4 





305 

90 


74 


1,168 

309 

GO 

211 

26 

4 


•■■352i::::::: 

1 


' 


s4o\ :. 




218 

m 


6 
6 


5 

s 





7 
192 




4 


::::::!::::::: 


6,367 


21.637 


27,063 


884 


305 


15,687 


467 


4.325 


40,913 


: 1 

9,794, 35| 




27 

40 

55 

264 


""260 
£60 


27 

40 

55 

• 406 

139 

187, 

52 

5 

2,009, 

985^ 

900\ 

28, 

492 

385 ^ 

66 






1 j 




27| ! 








.:..;:.i;:;;:;' 


■40 








1 ! 


55 

3^9 

2o.9 






50 


13 
12 


1 



153 

108 

4 


1 

1 


2 


183 
4 












16 


175 
53 


Ts7 






1 








53! 


' 


16 




8 

31 


3 


7 


4 5 ... J 


21 


110 


1,914 
986 
9t9 

""764 

1% 


6 




2,024 5 16' 








98o 

929 

50 


..; ::i::::: : 






4 




48 
322 
li8 
160 











78 
26 


2 
3 


6 


'*■■•>« 1 


49 


19 

11 

8 


3 

8 


5.59' 274'."!!; !;!!!!•'." 

62J,\ ! ; 

1 234^ i 






S 


6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



258 



New Yoek State Dbpabtment of Labob. 











Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


LABOB8T 

NuMBBB or 
Emplotsu 

IN YbAR. 


NUMBSB 




ORAKD 
TOTAL. 


omcB 

rORCK. 




(With industries having 200 or more 
emplosrees specified in each locality.) 


Total 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


TotaL 


MONROK CouNTT — Cotiduded, 
Qarbutt 


5 

4 
1 
2 
9 
2 
1 
3 
1,479 
2 
3 
6 
1 
3 

127 


2 

2 

6 

i 

872 
1 

1 
2 

10 


113 

290 

212 

25 

69 

424 

266 

12 

57,028 

15 

63 

325 

212 

. 35 

14,631 


112 

290 

212 

25 

69 

412 

260 

12 

53,798 

15 

62 

320 

210 

35 

14.350 


104 

290 

212 

23 

44 

414 

^2 

53,324 

12 

18 

127 

13,999 


1 




103 


Gates 


290 


Cooking and heating apparaUia .... 






212 


Hamlin , , ^ ^ . . 






23 


Honeoye Falls 






44 


IjFicnln Park , 


12 
6 




402 


Canning fruits and vegetables 

Pittsford 


240 
12 


Rochester (see Table XV) 


3.230 




50,094 


Scottsville 


12 


Spencerport 


1 
5 
2 




17 


Webster 


122 


Wheatland 


12 
30 


MONTOOUBRT CoUNTT 


281 




13,718 






Alfin 


1 

9 
6 
2 
1 

10 
1 
4 
3 

18 
2 
5 
2 
1 

14 
3 
2 
1 

148 


4 



3 

3 

89 


156 

11,488 

4,606 

4,188 

767 

733 

317 
118 
73 
696 
602 
199 
454 
7 
965 
684 

u^ 

2,066 


156 

11.280 

4,629 

4,161 

738 

724 

421 

419 

272 

116 

72 

693 

600 

195 

*1 

955 

677 

262 

3 

1.803 


156 

10.894 

4,606 

3,666 

767 

733 

373 

472 

317 

118 

73 

696 

602 

189 

454 

7 

937 

677 

-^ 

1.839 






156 


Amsterdam 


208 
77 
37 
19 
9 
13 
53 

1 

1 
3 
2 

4 




10.686 


Carpets and rugs 


4.629 


Hosiery and knit goods 


3,618 


Brooms 


738 


Silk and silk goods 


724 


Pearl butUms, handles, etc 

Oanajoharie 


3W 
419 


Canning Jruits and vegetables 

Fonda 


272 
116 


Fort Hunter 


72 


Fort Plain 


693 


Hosiery and knit goods 


600 


FultonviUe 


185 


Hagaman (hosiery and knit goods) . . . 


454 


Palatine Bridge, r '.. 






7 


St. JnhnRvillA 


10 
7 
2 




927 


Hosiery and knit goods 


670 


Pianos, organs, etc 


262 


So"th AmBt(?rdam 


3 


Nassau Countt 


262 




1,577 






Baldwin 


1 
4 
1 
2 
9 
1 

13 
4 
1 

16 
1 
2 
1 

16 

11 
3 
5 
5 
1 
1 
3 
4 

10 




i 

8 
9 

is 

2 

io 

9 

1 

1 

3 

i 

3 
2 
9 


6 

89 

3 

31 

130 

15 

83 

621 

693 

340 

269 

46 

7 

114 

198 

5 

25 

27 

16 

35 

18 

34 

27 


6 

87 

3 

30 

129 

14 

75 

411 

386 

317 

248 

45 

5 

112 

194 

5 

25 

27 

14 

35 

18 

24 

27 


3 

^1 

17 

86 

15 

83 

621 

693 

338 

269 

• 32 

7 

111 

123 

5 

25 

14 

11 

20 

18 

20 

23 






3 


Bethpage 


2 




72 


Cedarhurst 


8 


Central Park 


1 

1 

1 

8 

210 

208 

23 

21 

1 

2 

2 

3 




16 


F(irTiningd^l<^ ... 


85 


Floral Park 


14 


Freeport 


75 


Garden City 


411 


Printing and publishing 




Glen Cove 




315 


Belting, washere, etc 


248 


Glenwood 


31 


Great Neck 


5 


Hempstead 


109 


Hicksville ; 


120 


Inwood 


5 


Lawrence 






25 


Lynbrook .' 






14 


MftPhfWflflt 


1 




10 


Merrick 


20 


MineoU 






18 


New Hyde Park 






20 


Oyster Bay 






23 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



259 



CMUrty And T»WB. T«w 














OF Empxx>txx8 at Txmb 


OP l2«8PBGTION. 








Wbbklt Hottbs of Labob. 


Chil- 
dnm 1 
under 

A 

(inn 

shops ' 

ex- 1 


SHOP VOBCS. 


N171CBBB OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBBS WHO WOBB— 


VXTlfBBB IN SHOPS 
IMPLOTWO— 


SEX AND AOB. 


51 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yra. +). 


Y'thB 

(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boye 
(14-16 

y".). 


Worn. 
(16 

yre. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 
not'd). 


9 


94 
75 


* * ' '2i2 


103 

288 

210 

13 

35 

235 

73 

12 

33.610 

4 

13 

80 

1£ 

30 

7.516 












103 
3 






3 


2 
£ 








287 
£1£ 




!!!!!!! 














3 


20 




io 

9 

152 
16£ 






23 

23 

230 

£30 

12 

8,296 

4 

17 

84 

1£ 

30 

13,111 







44 






3 

3 


11 
10 
10 


10 
162 








162 


240 
$40 


5 
6 


7 
7 












12 








6,074 
12 


20,347 


23 ,'873 


" 838 


294 


14.898 

3 
42 


454 

1 


4.281 
8 


37,499 


io 




17 






1 








31 


91 








38 






1£ 














10 


20 
2,799 


10,523 

















396 


228 


91 


5.775 


108 


474 


133 













156 
1.300 


4*S$9 
3.97$ 

eos 

724 
S60 
272 
£79 

' " 446 

44e 


65 

5.871 

$,709 

1,676 

7M9 

ISO 

88 

235 

iig 

68 
401 
£38 

70 
193 
2 
505 
193 
£36 
3 

1.282 


4 

214 

167 

38 

10 

9 

9 


67 

6 

1 
1 
4 
4 
1 


86 
4.448 

i,eio 

1,967 


1 
86 
J£ 
43 


63 

13 

18 
274 

£7£ 

1 


*i24 
6 


155 






198 


10.406 

4A7e 

3,670 
73£ 
711 












""'^ 














681 
£64 
167 
108 

IIS 

116 

266 

5 

. 412 

373 

24 


ik 

17 
4 
£ 














28 


119 










5 

12 


111 

60 

174 

lU 

189 


3 


112 

72 

667 

449 
7 
916 
666 
£69 
3 

345 










73 


1 


10 
9 


11 
11 


'26 
£0 












40 








2 


3 


5 








7 






30 


545 

Mes 


*"*362 
56» 




7 

1 
3 


3 
3 


11' 






i 














3 






681 


263 


633 


38 


9 


239 


9 


554 


616 


62 




3 
27 

3 
16 
36 
14 






3 
72 

3 
16 
76 

6? 
271 

% 

5 
88 
56 

5 
25 
12 
10 
20 

6 
20 
21 






1 


3 










45 









1::;:::: 




72 












3 




















16 
35 






50 








9 

6 

6 

100 

100 

11 






50 

14 

45 

5 


















49 
26 


26 




****885 
S86 
248 
948 


1 

30 

30 

5 

4 


1 
7 
7 


3 

3 



14 

402 

386 

24 




16 






4 




67 




262 


16 


13 




4 
5 


27 
























5 

8 

4 




87 


22 

48 








2i 

^ 


6 


1 


19 
57 


46 

53 

5 

8 

9 




72 
5 
26 
14 
10 




1 














""iiVWWWWW, 

5i 














2 


WW v.. 














10 








20 








' 




20 








18 
20 
23 






11 


1 


14 


4 
20 
11 


























2 




' 3 


5 


4 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



260 



New York State Depabtment of Labor. 



Table XTT.— StetioiicB of PtoctMles Inspected in Each 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labosst ' 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Ykab. 


Number 


County and Citt ob Villaqe. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 




(With industrieB havinK 200 or more 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


iThere- 

To-- 'Ik 
of 
I age. 

1 


TotaL 


Nassau County —Conduced. 

Port Washington 


4 

11 

6 

4 
3 
3 

1 
3 

23,013 


2 
6 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

13,414 


21 


21 


35 

8 
10 
11 

1 
25 

447.184 


i 

! 


13 


Rockville Center 


88l 82 
41, 41 
8 8 
10 10 
12' 12 

1| 1 
26j 25 

525,693 498,866 


6! 


81 


Roelyn 


35 


Sea CliflF 




8 


Thomas ton 


1 


10 


Valley Stream 




11 


Weetbury 




1 


Woodmere 


• 1 

1 
25,635! 112 


24 


New Yokk County (New York City» 
Manhattan and Bronx Boroughs. 
See Table XV) 


421.540 






Niagara County 


356 


97 


1 
18,242 17,262 


16.507 


972 


15.535 






3 
3 
4 

\ 

118 

i 
J 

11 

7 
142 
£ 
7 
6 
3 
2 

4 

2 
1 
3 
3 

61 

/ 
3 
2 
11 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
2 
1 

480 


1 
5 

7 

3 

62 

o 


31 1 31 

68' 08 

128 123 

3 3 

241 24 

2.8171 2,686 

371 1 357 

322, 320 

305\ 297 

203^ 200 

353 343 

213| 203 

10,493, 9,848 

l,63l\ 1,609 

1,267 1.2A9 


29 
60 

24 

2,677 

364 

247 

305 

199 

284 

213 

9,498 

1,3.'^ 

1,082 

979 

876 

823 

772 

620 

601 
432 
308 
£63 
198 
3,461 

703 
468 
409 
372 
206 
£74 
£66 
188 
34 
24 
120 

28,106 


1 


29 


Barker 


! 


60 


Gaiport 

La Salle 


5! 


75 
3 


Lewisfon (town) 


1 


24 


Lock>>«)rt 


i3i 

14 

2\ 

51 

s 

10' 

10! 

640| 

£9, 

66\ 

fr' 


2,646 


Paper milh 

Rolling milis and Kteel iDorks 

Pulp and Jil>er goods 

Bottles and )ars 


350 
£46 
297 
196 


Middleport 


274 


Newlane 


203 


Niapura Falls 


8,858 


.Si7per and plated nnire 

Sntflting and rejining 


i,sts 

1,064 
909 


Sodas and other alkalies . . . 


1,021 
939 
864 
846 
627 

601 
432 
316 

272 

£J^ 

3,881 

703 

468 
440 
408 
381 
349 
298 
2J4 
85 


961 
883 
771 
829 
671 

621 
374 
261 
262 
2S9 
3,704 

666 
454 
433 
392 
376 
333 
288 
216 


Mii^t dlaneous chemicals and drugs, . 
1 hrasites 


820 
736 


Paper mills 

Flour and other cereal prmlurij^ 

Df/ymmos, motors mid elect nc^d smp- 
pUes 


765 


4 

1.3 

i 

3 
143 


66 

80 
68 
64 
10 





664 
6£1 


Bookhitidinfj imd hlafikiiook making. 

Electric lifjht and jwwrr 

AshestoH, f/raphite, <tc 


374 
£64 
£63 


Mi^cdhineoux machinery 

North Tonuwunda 


17I :::::: 


3,287 


Brass, brunse and aluminum cast- 
in4js 


S8 

16 

6 

16 




666 


Pianoi, oronn ^, etc 


454 


Cooktfta and hialiuy apjmratuti . . . . 
Hottte trim 


396 
S66 


Pig iron . 


201 


Silk and silk goods 


£58 


Packing boxeit, crates, etc 

Mitcellnneous machinery 

Ransonivjlln ■ , x , . , 


10 

5' 


£46 

180 

34 


Rftob^m 


20 25 


1 


2S 


Wilson 


120 
29,578 


119 
29,016 


1 . .. 119 


OirxxDA County 


551j 


27,555 






Boonrille 


17 

26 

2 

1 

1 


9 
6 






107 
380 
307 
217 
208 


107 
380 
303 
213 
207 


106 
366 
307 
217 
208 


1 


106 


Camden 




366 


Cappon 


4 

1:::::: 


303 


► Cotton goods 


£13 


Chadwicks (.silk and silk goods) 


207 



'*' Includes two children under 14 years of age. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report op Bubeau of Factoby Inspbctiow, 1911. 261 



GMBty and Town, Year Baded Bapfiabtr 30, »I1 — Contfaraed. 



or EMK.OTKE8 AT TiME OF InBPSCTION. 




1 
9} . 






12, 

3! 
5 . 


16 
2 




41 

il.. 


"% 









106,4^9 229,200 


86.860|281,48o 


3,293 


1.231! 152,538 


3,002 


12,S,H4S|22ii,!*v')4j61.609 


2,iad 


n2 


1.335 


6,300 


7,900 


12,716 


409 


90 


2,208 


112 


979 


4,731 


8,812 


99a 


8 


29 


46 

62 




23 

35 

63 

3 

23 

2,132 

S38 

245 

294 

180 

145 

105 

7,484 

915 

1,060 

909 

784 

684 

733 

343 

483 
180 
264 
253 
193 
2,643 

^f 

396 

335 

201 

50 

207 

177 

16 

22 

32 

17,352 





1 


5 
25 
21 




1 


& 


22 
00 
69 






14 






13 


1 








6 

3 

23 

412 






3 













24 

1.666 

349 

36 


""567 

"210 
297 

"5,q6q 

1,313 
494 
639 
741 
701 
401 
463 

480 
374 

"i;787 

666 
370 
293 

' ' ' "201 
258 




io 


i 
22 






1 
82 






473 


368 
12 


14 


1.561 
162 

24A 
14, 


4«t 
188 


4 


















I 

187 

67 

4 


s 

2 

J 

3 






3 

2 
57 

a 

784 
7 
4 


101 
111 
3,624 
1,306 
170 
639 


k'sti 






196 

229 

191 

2,676 


14 

114 

82 

1,105 

324 


9 

5 

53 

4 




45 
12 


ei 

84 
4,226 


55 




576 


2241 


tl 


19 


651 

262 

63 

34 

339 

98 

41 


890 
170 
820 
73S 







8 








WO 




16 


36 

12 
4 
9 

21 

20 




....... 










3 
10 


39 

18 

211 












16 
3 


i 

26 


671 

1 

3 
36 


11 

462 

477 
"I8& 


121 

71 

^1 


62\ 
SO 






S&8 

69 

263 

144 

2,669 

666 

396 
270 






7 


247 

24S 

128 

1,362 






10 
















66 


" " iss 

100 

24 


1 
22 

4 






1 
30 


49 
465 






138 


411 

80 
32 


26 


223 






84 
103 
360 


3 


7 


69 












6 


18 


3 






h 


SI 


22 
201 























192 


16 


""id 


....^ 1^ 




16 


230 

180 

25 


29 
3 


10 












lao 








9 




18 






34 
23 






23 


1 
12 

286 














1.703 


119 
8,785 


17,067 


11 
157 


59 
9,464 


5 
296 


16 
1,174 




2,455 


103 
23,076 


850 


3 


62 


64 

235 

90 


"*2i3 
213 
207 


82 
233 
146 
139 
100 






24 
129 
146 
68 
96 


3 

6 

7 


1 
7 
8 
3 
8 


16 
3 


89 






131 


3 

3 
3 


1 
2 
Z 

1 








7 2951 

1 210 

199 





















mployed in office. 



t Empioyed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



262 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



TftUe XIV.~ Stotfatff of ftictori— ffaifrf d to Bidi 





Places 

in- 
sp«5t- 

ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Larobst 
Number of 

ElIPLOTEES 

IN Ybab. 

1 




Numbbb 


COUNTT AND ClTT OB VILLAGE. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFnCB 
FORCE. 




(With induitries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


1 

There- 
of in 
shop. 


ToUl. 


There 

of 
14-16 
y«r. 

ane. 


TotaL 


Claries Mills (uphoUterv goodt) 

Clavville 


1 
3 
/ 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
6 
5 
2 
2 
5 
2 

77 
5 
4 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
4 
294 
5 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 

10 
2 
1 

614 




2 

i 

26 

9i 

4 

V.'.V.W 
5 

768 


609 
378 
55/ 

74 

37 
204 
262 
197 

53 

345 

278 

1,831 

283 

423 

407 

4.715 

1,462 

608 

413 

385 

367 

360 

72 

715 

221 

16.695 

300 

88 
14 
103 
902 
661 
145 

33.797 


604 
376 

'^ 

37 
200 
261 
197 

63 
834 
273 
1.812| 
280 
417 

'M 

'673 
407 
385 
367 
350 
70 
700 
221 
16.300 
300 

'il 

86 
14 
103 
894 
657 
134 

31.767 


509 

378 

361 

74 

37 

204 

262 

197 

63 

345 

278 

1.831 

254 

423 

4.^ 

1,429 

608 

413 

65 
367 
360 

72 
453 
221 
16.017 
300 
247 

10 

88 
6 

80 
902 
661 
145 

28.448 


6 
2 




604 
376 


Hotiery cmd knit goodt 


2\ 

6 


349 


Clinton 


69 


Deansboro 






37 


Hinckley {pulp milU) 


4 
1 




200 


Kenwood 


261 


Kirkland 


197 








53 


New Hartford 


11 
6 

19 
3 




334 


HoMty and knit goods 


273 


New York Mills {cotton good*) 

Oriskany 


1.813 
261 


Oriskany Falls 


gl 

0| 

681 

18 

35 


417 


Hotiery and knit good* 


401 


Rome 


4.190 


Copper tpork 


1,411 
673 


Motor vehieUs 


6 





*7. 


Hotiery and knit good* 






367 


Metal furniture 






360 


Sauquoit 


2 
15 




70 


Sherrill {mieeeUaneou* hardvpare) 

Stittville 


438 
221 


Utica (see Table XV) 


384 




15.633 


Vernon 


300 


Canning fruit* and vegetable* 








Walesviulf ."^^ . .^ 7^. . ! ! ! ! ! 






10 


Waterville 


2 




86 


Westdale 




6 


WAiptm<^rAWnd 






80 


Whitflsboro 


8 

A 

1.925 




894 


Hoeiery and knit good* 


667 


YorkviUe 


134 


On ONDAOA CJOUNTT 


26.623 






Baldwinsville 


12 

1 
4 
/ 
1 
1 
3 
/ 
3 
/ 
3 
1 
7 
1 
3 
5 
1 
1 
6 
2 
5 
2 
4 
2 
1 
8 


20 
3 
3 

i 

5 

3 
3 

3 

7 

4 

5 

4 

11 

4 

2 

1 
7 


379 

222 

380 

264 

25 

72 

^2 

326 

980 

720 

61 

35 

272 

753 

29 

16 

48 

122 

320 

293 

287 

60 

37 

3 

106 


354 

201 

373 

250 

25 

65 

316 

310 

962 

710 

60 

35 

265 

716 

28 

15 

45 

106 

313 

267 

290 

*n 

86 

3 

101 


374 
222 

350 

226 

21 

72 

247 

243 

952 

712 

31 

30 

248 

541 

15 

14 

40 

122 

273 

228 

279 

276 

54 

37 

1 

95 


25 
21 

7 
4 




349 


Stationary engine*, boiler*, etc 

Camillus 


! 201 

' 343 


Cutlery 


1 22M 


Cicero 




31 
65 


Dewitt 


7 
15 
15 
18 




East Sjrraouse 


233 


Silver and plated ware 


228 


Eastwood 


034 


Cooking and heating apparalu* 

Elbridge 


10\ 702 

1 30 


Fabius 


I.. .....' 30 


Fayetteville 


7i 1 241 


Oeddes (ro/hna miU* and tteel work*) . 


371 504 

Ij i 14 


Jordan 


1 


14 
' 37 


TAlrH^nd 


si:::::: 


Liverpool 


161 ! 106 


M^lnif 


6 
6 
3 
S 

1 
1 


......J 267 


Ca*ting* 


222 


MaroeUus 


276 


Woolen* and woreted* 


273 


Mu^lliii^ FalW 


53 


Mottville 


.... . 36 


^ina. . 




! 1 

91 




4 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



2&3 



CmhIj and Town. Tew Bwled September SO, 1911 ~ Contlniied. 



or Ekplotbm at Tnn 


OP iNSPBCnON. 








Wbbklt Hottrs op Labob. 


Chil- 
drea 
under 

14 
years 

.& 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 


SHOP rOBCB. 


KtTMBBB OP SHOP EM- 
PLOTBBS WHO WOBK— 


KUlfBKB IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINa — 


SBX AMD AGS. 


51 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrs +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yni.). 


Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yrs. +). 


Qiils 
(14-16 

yrs.). 






504 
349 
S49 

""266 

"iisii 

""226 

226 

2,850 

1,380 

603 

407 

' ' * "210 
360 

" "438 

"o.'sei 

247 

247 


383 
254 
228 

42 

26 
200 

74 
167 

53 
106 

69 

1.172 

207 

142 

131 

3,389 

1,336 

606 

237 

66 

36 
360 

25 
405 

93 

9,078 

256 

206 

10 

55 
6 

77 
447 
216 
124 

20,780 


2 
5 
6 
3 


2 
5 
6 


113 

107 

106 

24 

11 


4 
5 
6 


6 
10 
10 




498 

366 

339 

69 

37 

200 

82 






27 














32 


37 
29 






8 






























261 
197 
50 
320 
97S 






175 
30 


12 


137 


42 












197 




3 








53 

329 

269 

1.788 




14 


26 


2 

1 

10 


223 

200 

596 

42 

266 

263 

755 

70 

63 

170 


8 
3 

14 
2 
3 
3 

23 


5 

2 
5 

.46^ 


"iso 

""52 




















251 

175 

176 

1,149 

SI 

66 


119 
412 






16 


4 
3 
15 
6 
7 


2 

/ 
8 

J 








397 
3,960 






191 


32 




4 


;e 


7 








361 
360 








66 
167 























316 


16 


16 




















70 






45 

22 

124 

6,028 

44 

4^ 








70 








6 
""2i7 


5 

1 

107 


3 

203 


5 

4 

769 

4 


433 

30 

1,600 






11 


210 

5.119 

35 


187 

12,967 

49 






1,150 
18 


297 
247 

2A7 
10 












10 


















16 


70 




1 




30 








86 
6 

54 
805 
643 




6 














80 
219 


""657 
667 

13.694 


6 

i 

576 


3 
8 
6 

133 






3 
22 

1,852 


23 

"*i26 
9.516 






18 


426 
4.853 


8 
8 

181 


67 






134 
10.331 








2,498 


14,901 


254 




54 


94 


201 
201 
222 
222 

""228 
228 
702 
702 


339 

201 

226 

191 

12 

65 

176 

172 

904 

681 

29 

19 

218 

502 

14 

13 

37 

70 

237 

217 

184 

181 

49 

21 

1 

86 


1 




9 




1 


210 

201 

81 


119 


19 




10 


111 


7 
7 
2 


2 
2 


104 
22 

7 


4 


6 
2 


256 

220 

21 

224 
223 

932 
701 

30 

30 
223 
504 

11 
2 

37 














21 
65 


















4 


6 

6 

24 

20 


5 

6 
2 

1 


45 

4S 

4 




8 
6 
2 

1 
















232 












30 




1 
10 
19 








.... , 


30 
215 


""604 


1 
4 
2 














26 




4 




14 




14 












3 
1 






14 










1 




9 


2 






37 
106 
261 
»S$ 

273 

$75 
21 
28 












2 
2 


2 


24 

28 

6 

79 

79 

4 

14 


8 


10 


3 


96 
264 
222 

270 






6 


:::::: 














.... ^ 


9 
9 


2 


2 
2 


4 
4 


2 








269 
27 

7 






"■32 


26 




8 






1 


1 


28 

1 
2 




1 










18 


78 






, 


5 




13 


76 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



264 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Tsble nv.- 



of PMtoriM Itmpmoled In Kmth 



County and Citt ob Villxgs. 

(With industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 



Onondaoa Countt — Concluded, 

Skaneateles Falls 

Solvay 

Sodas and other alkalies , 

Dynamos, motors and eleetrioal 

supplier 

Syracuse (see Table XV) 

Warners 

West Phoenix 



Ontabio County. 



Canandaiffua 

Sheel mvtal work 

Clifton HprinfiH 

Flint 

Geneva 

Optual and photographic apparatus 
Cooking and heaiiJio apparatus 
Cannittg fruits and tegeiablca. . 

Gorbam 

Manchester 

Naples 

Phelps 

Ruflhvillo 

Shortsville 

Stanley 

Victor 



I 



Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 



Num- ' 

ber of '■ 
owners ! 
at I 
work. 



Largbst 
Number of 
Employbbb 

IN Year. 



There- 
Total, of in 
I shop. 



•I 



Oranqb County. 

Central Valley.. 
Cornwall. 



Cornwall Landing 

Comwall-on-Hudflon 

Firthcliff {carpets and rugs) 

Fort MoBtgomerj' 

Goshen 

Highland Falls 

Highland Mills 

Mochanicstown 

Middletown 

Railujay repair sliops 

Dairy products 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

New Windsor 

Newburgh .... * 

Tailoring 

Men's hats and caps 

Woolens and worsteAs 

Stationary engines, boilers, eie. 

Boat and ship building 

Dyeing, finishing, etc 

Agricultural implemaUs 

Port Jer\'i8 

Railway repair shops 

Silk and silk goods 

Roseton (building brick) 

Salisbury Mills 

Southfields 

Sparrowbush 

Walden 

CuUery 

Warwick 



525I 

il 

1681 



351 

1 . 

7' 

21. 
77' 

3 . 

3* . 

il. 

3i. 

5; 

S| 
131 

31. 

81 

li 

2191 



4 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
9 
51 
11 
V 
39 
1 
1 
5 
2 
10 
87 
5 
5 

li 

fl 

3\ 

20| 

i 

*i 

1 

i 

121 



s 

661 

1 
2 

76 



21 



24 



334; 329 
3,292! 2.829 
£,829i 2,390 



217 

25 » 763 

35 

62 

4.042 



Number 



OFFICE 
FORCE. 



GRAND 
TOTAL. 



Total 



There - 
' of 
I 14-16 
yenrH 
: of 



19: 

24,357 

34 

61 

3,845 



59S 
362 ■ 

Wi 

121 

2,309 

SS7, 

381 \ 

369\ 

14 
100 

20 
270 

90 

245. 

1 

297 



3241 5! 

2.9731 458, 

2,640 434' 

187^ 20. , 

21,258i 1.308 

35, 1|, 

62 1 i 

3,671 197 



54: 
312 

82 

12| 

2,293 

513 

357 

355 

14 

95 

20 

2651 

87 

238 

283. 



574. 
352 
86 
7', 
,185 
537 
38 U 
359 

5:. 
100 

15 . 
171 
61, 
171 

1 . 
295i 



106 . 



12,5671 12; 220 11.5281 



346 



18 



44 

19 

601 

5 

550 

3 

163 

12 

14 

10 

2,016 

646 

273' 

82 

79 

722 

4, 5071 

848 

6S3 

367 

$66\ 

S04\ 

25 4\ 

237\ 

1,412 

67 4\ 

223\ 

1,213' 

89' 

as, 
113' 

1 , 150| 
2161 





431 


44 




17i 


17 




601 


30 




A 


5 




537 


550 




3' 


3 




158, 


136 




12 


12 




14 


7' 




10' 


101 


1 


,963 


1,865 




632 


646 




266, 


273 




78, 


78 




79 


77 




711, 


641 


4 


,312l 


4,244 




797' 


817 




629 


497 




365 


S67\ 




333\ 


328^ 




301. 


303 




249\ 


254' 




222' 


153 


T 


,liHO 


1,289| 




669\ 


6221 




221] 


193\ 


1 


,208! 


9781 




87 


89 




851 


76 




112' 


31 


1 


,133! 


1.144 


/ 


,033 


1,047 




213 


202 



Total. 



319 
2.515 
2,206 

167 

19,950 

34 

61 

3,474 




11,182 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bujkeau op Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



265 



CotMly and Town, Year Ended Septooiber 30, 1911 — Continaed. 



OF Employbes 


AT TlMJB 


OF Inspection. 








Weekly Hours op Labor. 


ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 


SHOP FORCE. 


NinniBR OP SHOP EM- 
PLOYBBB WHO WORK — 


NUUBER IN 8HOP8 
XUPLOTINa 


SEX AND A<n. 


t 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 

(in 
shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yrs. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yrs.). 


Boya 
(14-16 

yre.). 


Worn. 

(16 
yrs. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 

yrs.). 


61 
hours 

or 
leas. 


52-57 
hours. 


ex- 
cept 

nofd). 


15 

4 


304 
305 


"2;266 

"o.'esi 



1.040 


213 
2.366 
2,166 

80 

14.911 

34 

54 

2.694 


14 
55 

40 

15 
446 


2 

1 


90 
91 


2 


2 

3 


'2;233 
2,206 


281 
279 


36 


::::::: 


2 [222 
2 


167 

8.007 

32 

26 

1,825 


""ii7 


71 
4,312 


/ 
164 


/ 


168 

11 . 107 

33 

7 

2.936 




. .1 


1.7881 6.052 
1 


103 





35 


1 
44 


4 


6 

717 








""^,::::::: 

60) 


•09 


15 


96 


392 


159 


50 


312 
312 


408 

*?S 

7 

1,612 

3S7 

353 

175 

5 

71 

14 

130 

33 

169 

1 

181 

8.366 


4 

i 




5 




38 


64 


419 

312 

65 

7 

1,757 

608 

357 

134 

68 

155 

1 
274 

5,298 


1 

1 


20 

7 


62 




...... 


6 


..'.'.'.'...'.....'. 


302 
16 


1.049 
124 
357 


72S 

373 

356 



25 

8 
4 
4 


4 
5 


""426 
113 


12 

2 


""32 
5 


"282 


8 








5 




1 


165 


lb 


11 






5 


90 

1 


2 




22 

1 

36 

23 

4 




40 




15 




6 


2 
82 




55 


111; 

40' 

1511 










18 

13 

1 


2 

1 














6 


2 


2 





9 


272 
4.390 




5.960 


6 
222 


59 


91 
2,498 


3 
37 


3 
1,723 


4 

3,962 









832 


199 




43 






34 
16 
30 

345 

3 

125 

8 

4 

10 

1.32S 

626 

ISO 

70 

46 

657 

2,625 

16B 

40^ 

234 

299 

288 

160 

138 

912 

600 

20 

952 

70 

63 

30 

946 

876 

188 






9 




3 


21 

10 

30 

4 

511 


19 
5 






15 














5 


30 


















3 





537 


14 


i7 


" " i52 


9 


""26 


i 






56 

12 

7 


76 


" 


3 




3 




12 
4 


23 
4 

7 


96 
4 






10 
136 




""778 



898 
632 
266 

"2,220 
64£ 
485 
300 
£55 
£89 
849 

""607 

607 

""760 

""938 
938 


30 

6' 




•"449 


5 


"163 


"24i 


'i;468 

632 

266 

64 

73 


""io 




21 

2 

24 

402 

k 


5^ 

75 

606 

1.427 

im 

65 

4S 


i 

6 
10 
86 

6 

7 
20 

6 
12 
15 


1 
5 
14 
2 



9 


136 

2 

23 

67 

1,321 

696 

84 

100 


i 

1 
3 

1 

2 


i 

2 

6 

1,448 

766 

488 

29 


7 

2 


""i2 




219 337 
1,5W 1,001 


68 
36 




6 

305 








5 


336 




















300 








....- 


138 
696 




74 




138 


249 






24 

7 


i 


317 


3 


83 


282 


892 

607 

80 








191 

214 
87 
73 
30 

172 
95 

174 





176 


3 


3 
I 


""lbs 

969 








17 


5 








14 
5 


3 
2 


'■"i: 


70 






3 




'.V.'.V. 71 




' ' ' ' IL 




30 
1.04. 






17 


26 

26 

2 


11 

1 


131 

107 

8 


io 

10 


24 


62 






••■•25 


24 1 1,009 

I 6. 189 


3 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



266 



"New Yoek State Depabtment of Labob. 







TM>le XIV.— 


StetlEtiefl of FMtoriM iBSpeetod In BMh 




Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 

at 
work. 


Largest 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 


Number 


CouNTT ANi City or Village. 


TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 




(With industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


Total. 




66 


19 


2.155 


2.100 


1.789 


55 




• 1.734 






Albion 


21 

5 

11 

34 

4 
1 
5 

166 


4 

4 

11 
1 

182 


631 

467 

139 

1,385 

219 
9,925 


622 

462 

136 

1,342 

213 
9.692 


555 
400 

1,151 
486 
126 
214 

8.804 


9 

6 

3 

43 

19 
2 
6 

231 




046 


HoUey 


896 
80 


Medina 


1,108 


Pumiturt and uphoUtery 

Canning fruita and veg^ablM 

CatHngn 


208 




8,573 




AUmar 


1 
4 
2 
43 
/ 
/ 

e 

3 
7 

1 
64 

1 
S 
1 

1 
£ 
1 

\ 

13 
14 
2 
2 

1 
1 

84 


2 
6 

1 
53 

I's 

5 

4 

73 

S 

2 

6 

1 

12 

15 

2 

2 

63 


35 

46 

76 

3.423 

1.46S 

664 

492 

i? 

290 
5,087 


35 

46 

74 

3.359 

1,449 

660 

477 

53 

86 

285 

4.930 


28 

43 

59 

3.130 

1,SU 

610 

il 

50 

231 

4,516 

666 

632 

663 

463 

482 

482 

189 

48 

30 

195 

247 

33 

19 

99 

37 

2.084 






28 


C1«^^^land 






43 




2 
64 

16 




57 


Fulton 


8.066 
1,SS0 


Woolent and toortteda 


Pulp ana paper miUa 


606 


T4M)ona X . 4 X 


Mexico 


1 

5 

146 

8 

19 

9 

6 

4 

1 




49 


Minetto (oil cloth, mndow thadea, etc.) 
Oswego 


226 

4,370 

626 

626 


Stationary enginea, boilera, etc 

Matehaa and exploaivea 


772\ 732 
686 . 678 


Hotiery and knit gooda 


686 

619 

486 

482 

229 

87 

30 

239 

267 

45 

20 

113 

37 

2.473 


677 

600 

476 

477 

226 

86 

30 

233 

254 

44 

20 

112 

36 

2.378 


186 


Raihoay repair ahopa 


Starch 


Cotton gooda 


Packing boxea, cratea, etc 


Parish 


47 


PennellviUe 


30 


Phoenix 


•6 
3 

1 


V.'.W. 


189 


PiilMlri 


244 


Richland 


32 


Sandy Creek 


19 


Vohiey 


1 
1 

95 





98 


Williamstown 


36 


Otsxoo County 


1,989 






Clinton Crossing 


1 
1 
5 
6 
3 
1 
3 

31 
/ 
4 
9 
2 
2 

12 
4 

30 


i 

6 
2 
1 
2 
5 
25 

3 

3 
2 

io 

3 
4 


4 

2 

191 

30 

18 

41 

32 

1.729 

1,28S 

20 

205 

3 

30 

141 

27 

269 


4 

2 

165 

30 

18 

40 

32 

1.679 

1,260 

20 

199 

3 

28 

131 

27 

267 


4 

2 

143 

16 

. 18 

26 

32 

1.425 

979 

20 

205 

3 

30 

133 

27 

239 






4 


Colliers 






2 


Cooperstown 


26 




117 


£dmeston 


16 


Hartwick 






18 


LeonardsviUe 


1 




25 


Milford 


32 


Oneonta 


50 
33 




1.375 


Raihoay repair ahopa 


OtMo 


Richfield Springs 


6 




199 


Schenevus 


3 


South Edmeston 


2 
10 




28 


Unadilia 


123 


Worcester 


27 


PiTTNAii County 


2 




237 






Baldwin Place 


1 
8 
5 
9 

1 


i 

2 

1 


2 
98 
18 
23 
30 


2 
96 
18 
23 
30 


2 
98 
18 
19 
30 






2 


Brewster 


2 




96 


Carmel 


18 


Cold Spring 






19 


Manitou 






30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 267 

OMOitjr aad T^iwb, Tmt Etoded fleffmber M, 1911 — CoBtiMed. 



OF Emtloybm at This 


OF iNSPBcnoir. 








Wbbxlt Houbb of IjABOB. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP rOBCB. 


NUMBKB OF SHOP MU- 
PLOTSB8 WHO WORK — 


NTTMBBB IN BHOP8 
■MFLOTDfO^ 


BBX AND AGE. 


61 

hours 

or 

lew. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 
shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yr8.+). 


Y*ihB 
(1^18 

yw.). 


Boyt 
(14-16 

yw.). 


Worn. 
(16 

y».+). 


Qirli 
(14-16 

yw.). 


cept 
as 

not'd). 


201 


816 


717 


1,066 


30 


13 


622 


3 


114 


139 


1.472 


9; 2 


96 


n 

68 

681 
1B3 
1M3 
M08 

3.383 


373 
373 

"**344 
344 

4.677 


126 
71 
46 

804 

997 
$8 

$07 

6,264 


2 


2 


414 

393 

33 

176 

49 

99 


2 

1 

1 


87 

i 

19 

8 


24 

6 

110 
9 


433 
391 
66 
974 
497 
193 
163 

7, in 


2 1 
1 


22 






2 


83 


28 

19 

8 

1 

184 


11 
8 


5! 1 












46 
713 






513 


SO 


2,016 


60 


229 


460 


1 




28 

22 

57 

1,112 


"*i;836 

1,330 

606 

"'■226 
2,615 
306 
6t6 
367 
444 
473 
400 






27 

28 

48 

2,179 

711 

399 

39 
181 
3.153 
616 
366 
113 

333 

160 

34 

23 

146 

209 

25 

9 

11 

1.580 


1 
3 

1 
38 












28 

38 

57 

2.558 

1,971 

606 

74 

38 

41 

224 

3.532 

660 

607 

699 






21 


1 

85 

S3 
1 


ii 

8 

784 

696 

109 

99 




1 


2 


2 




118 


30 
97 


74 
69 


21 


413 














477 
35 
31 








403 




4 








1 






18 






10 

40 

1,045 




8 






8 

131 

10 


1 

13 

1 

9 

4 


1 
28 


2 
137 

/ 
18 
19 


'"685 
66 

3 




191 


1,564 
3X0 


16 






901 
414 




16 
9 








178 


1 












6 

1 


3 


109 
116 






964 

473 

186 

43 

30 

161 

237 

32 

18 

98 

36 

448 








77 
186 

34 

30 
127 
185 

24 


1 


i 












13 




12 
7 

41 

31 
7 

10 


.[.'.,'., 


2 


2 




1 


62 

59 

8 


2 

4 






10 

1 


3 


18 
3 


!!.!.!.' 


19 








1 










98 
36 

659 




946 
















10 
363 












384 


24 


9 


13 


108 


1.002 


431 





4 


1 


4 

2 
91 
14 
18 
25 
28 
1.134 

'^ 

91 
1 
28 
97 
27 

206 










4 






1 


2 


1 












2 
14 
10 
11 
25 
22 
238 


4 
25 

2 


1 


22 


....'±::::: 


1 
1 




25 

1 






76 


271 


16 






6j 


18 










71:::: .. 




25 














1 


32 


8 

3 


1 
6 


3 
222 








io'::: ..: 


153 


276 


946 

, 946 


5 


70 


761 
649 


306 

997 

16 




20 














38 


....^'^i::::::: 


13 


2 


85 
2 


8 


10 
1 


164 




3 






3 


25* 

77, 

1 






28 
13 
18 

39 




46 
27 


1 




25 




23 


i 

89 


87 
8 

99 




94 


1 
143 






31 




10 












2 


1 


2 
72 
17 
19 
30 
















2 




25 


71, 

1 . . 






21 
1 






12 
5 

7 


84 
5 
10 




18 








6 
2 


2 




19 














30 












30 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



.M8 



Kew Yosk State Dep.uitment of Laboe. 







Table Xnr.— Stalkrties of Factories Inspeetod in EMh 


1 

1 


Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Larobst 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 


NtTMBER 


1 

COONTT AND ClTY OR VlULAQB. . 


1 

GRAND 
TOTAL. 

1 


OFFICE 1 
FORCE. ' 


Total. 


(With industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 

1 
1 


1 

Total. 

1 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


1 
There-' 

of 1 
14-16 1 
years 1 

of 
aj?c. j 


PtTTNAM CouNTT — Confludcd. 

PBttenon 


4 
2 


1 


67 


67 


41 
26,635 




1 

! 


41 
31 

25.403 


P Stonn King 


31; 31 
32.0B.-5 30.791 




' 


QtfBBNs CoDwrr (New York City. 
Que«Bs Borooi^. See Tabfc XV).. . 


1 
7Wl{ 354 


1.232 


2; 


RBNBflBIJknR COTJNTT 


550 

3 
7 

1 
7 
1 
I 
1 
1 

22 
/ 
/ 
/ 
5 
2 
2 
3 

2.5 
3 
t 
1 

453 
4 
9 

2 

4 

233 


291 


28.6381 27.873 


26.967 


7681 t 26,229 






AveriH Park 


1 
1 

2 

::::::: 

9 



2 

i4 



i 

255 

1 

i 

141 


2021 200 

250 249 

22 22 

485 474 

3£S\ 319 

16' 15 

21 2 

»2| 91 

2.050, 1.972 

1,335^ 1,267 

2o3\ 2A0 

Ml 1 250 

208 207 

20' 20 

491 47 

98> 98 

1 048| 1,004 

396 375 


1881 

16| 

485 

d23\ 

8 

2 

92 

l,475i 

8.i2 

2.',S 

204 

208 

11 

48 

95 

1,024 

396 

285 

200 

186 

22.561 

242 

230 

74 

81 

8,192 


2' 186 


Berlin 

Brainard 


1' 

1 


187 

16 

474 

819 

8 

2 

01 

1.367 


Castieton 

Piano; organs, etc 

Eagto Bridge 


"'*ii| 1 

1 


Eagle Mills 


Grafton 

Hoowck Falle 


1 

78. ' 


Agricuiiuml implemfuUs 

Ha»iery and knit gooth 


fl», 1 764 

S\ I 950 


Shirts, collar* and cujja 

Jobn»)nvillc 


i ' 90S 

11 207 


Nassau 




11 

46 

65 

660 

S7S 


North Hooeick 


^i:::::: 


Petersburg 


Rensselaer 

Raihaay rwpair ahops 


f,:v:.VA 


FeU and fdt goods 

Hosiery and knit ooods 


303 

200 

186 

23,514 

242 

230 

74 

81 

9.348 


293 

197 

178 

22,003 

240 

^8 

72 

79 

9,032 


9 976 

3 197 


Sch!«hticoke 

Troy (see Table XV) 


8' ' 178 

604i 21,060 


Valley Falls 


2; 240 


Cotton Qoods , 


2 998 


Walloomsac 


2I 72 


West Sand Lake 


2i i 79 


Richmond Cottnty (New Yosk C4ty. 
Richmond Borough. See Table XV) 


311 


7,881 


Rockland Cotjntt 


93 


34 


5.383 


5.246 


5,037 


137 


' 4,900 




1 '••'^^ 


Clarkstown. . . .' 


2 
3 

as 

9o 
9 
2 
1 
1 

23 
M 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 

i 'I 

1 1 
1 1 


2 

13 

6 

1 

8 

i 

9 

i 


145 

821 

102 

2.011 

1,659 

208 

375 

367 

12 


145 

806 

101 

2.003 

1,658 

204 

327 

310 

11 


120 
799 

96 

1.818 

1,467 

208 

316 

998 

12 
643 
966 
154 
407 
591 
192 
132 

35 

235 

2 

1 

75 






120 

783 

65 


Gamerville (dyeing cmd finishing) .... 
Grassy Point 


16 
1 
8 

/ 

4 

48 

47 





Ilaverstraw , 


1,810 


Ruildina brick 


; u^ee 

mA 


Siik and silk goods 


Hiabur.. 

Car wheels and railway equipment. . 
Mount Ivy 




26^ 

961 

12 


Nyack 

Dyeing, finishing, etc 


6661 646 

266\ 958 


20 
8 


1 


623 

958 


Orangeburg 

Pearl River. 


154 
407 
591 
192 
132 

35 

253 

2 

1 

75 


146 
384 
368 
186 
125 

35 

253 

2 

1 

76 


8l 

23| 

93\ 


146 
384 


Miscellaneous machinery , 


568 


Piermont 

Ramspo 

Rockland LaWc 


186 
125 
35 


Spring VaJlfly. . 




235 


Stonv Point 




2 


Suflem . 




1 


Tompkins Cove 




75 



* Includes one child under 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau of Factort Ihspection, 1911. 



26^ 



CmbU and T»wii, Yew Bnd«d fflftaiwhw M, 1911 — Contlniied. 



OF Emflotees at Ttmb 


OP Inhpectioit. 




, Weekly .Hours op Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 

(m 
shops 








SHOP VORCE. 




NUMBER OP shop BM- 

plotees who work — 


NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EUPLOTINO — 




SEX AND AGE. 




51 
boure 

Ices. 


1 ,- 

62-67 1 68-63 
houre.j houre. 

1 

1 


Over 

63 
houre. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yrs +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 
yre.). 


Boys 
(14-16 1 
yre.). 


Worn. 

(16 
yrs. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 
yre.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


21 


20 
22 

8,693 






14.02-) 


35 
31 

20,263 


, 


6 


2 


1 
1 
341 


6 




9 




31 
11,660 






2,685 


] 
453I 148 


4,196 


343' 4.231 


8.127 


1.385 


*5 


2,084* 


6.8.52 


17.293 


12.585 


390 


» 


13.120 


69' 2.592,11, 637!ll, 640 


360 




ll 


18.5 
159 


::::::: 


80 
80 

33I 

206 

I 

6 

991 

76A 

6', 

11 

70 

2 

46 

40 

632 

575 

ISS 

25 

130 

9,89S 

138 

1S6 

72 

49 

6,933 




2 


104 

100 

9 

105 

80 


i, 2I , 184 

1 46, 141 






28 






16 








16 
427 
SOS 

8 
2 






,, ' 


150 


319 

319 


20 
10 


■■' 4 
4 


* 11;. i7i 

io\ 14 


30 





8 




|1 








2 











. 












91 
111 


"i;2i7 

764 
260 
BOS 






8.5 

385 


"':;:;;! 


9i 

279 










60 


5 


3 


13|; 2L 


1,091 
764 


6 









/ 


184 

ISO 

129 

9 


}jl k 


9.JJi 






...... ....... 


id 12.... T. 

1; 2 2 


. . . 

191 

190 

11 

2 






27 

11 


180 


6 


2 


is 




2 


44 

9:) 
405 
121 


" " 630 
2H 
276 

"is '.667 

220 

220 

4.721 






:::::::l':::::: :::::: 


4* 






23 


1 
3 


54 
321 


12 




45 


\ ^2 


369 493 

24 2oA 


105 

97 






20 


3 


ISO 

172 

45 

11.6.5S 
S4 
84 


i\ I 

ii 5 


272 




1 




197 

156 

5.134 

68 

74 

2.491 




197 




22 


1 

32S 

9 


1 
36 

7 


A9. 140 




1,810 
20 


40i 2,456 10,863 8,553 

2i 181 222 

j8, 9 219 


8K, 


8 

4 


si 7 


1 

72, 


5 


4 

90 25 


26 
791 


www'x.'.w'.y.w... 


77 
3.691 


2 


669 


42 657 


3,492 


41 


269 


3,003 


1,628 


4.100 


12s 


35 


613 


. 


08 


2,724 


1,864 


1 2U| 




120 


■'■"783 

■* 

'*"25i 
251 


93 
603 

91 
1.52S 
US8!f 

64 
261 
244 

12 
431 
216 
146 
360 
36? 
185 
125 

3> 

146 

2 

1 

75 


2 
18 

4 
67 
62 


i2 


25 
142 








120 

703 




1 




8 


20 


95 






95 
1.746 

1.U8 
199 


::::::!::::::: 


64 
18 


is 

16 


i86 


11 


23 
16 


1.707 
1,4^1 


201 1 


6 
17 


2\ e 
61 1 


14-i 


'3 




7 

1 
1 


iin\ 

2.50 


1 

17( 




6 


1 


1 


2oQ 






12 




1 


12 
42S 




89 


308 
32 
133 


226 

226 

"'■36S 
368 


17 
6 




i72 

38 


3 


21 


VIA 






32. 226 





13 








133 

4 


13 


16 


6 

6 




12 




12 


30S 

36S 

2 









1 


185 
125 
35 
181 




1 






*"i23 

35 

146 


'■*i84::::::: 












1 




1 














54 


8 4 


75 


2 


21 


68 







2 




2 

1 

75 






1 




















76 




::::::: :::::::i::::::: 


1 











yean of age employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



270 



New Toek State Depabtment of Labob. 







TUUe XIV.— Statlstks of Factoriea Inapeeted la Each 




Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Larqust 
Number op 
euplotbbs 

IN Ybab. 


Numbbb 


CoxrsTY AND City ob Vxllaok. 


QRANO 
TOTAL. 


OITICB 
FORCE. 




(With indiwtriea having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


ToUl. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


Total. 


St, TfAWHRMCW COTIMTY, ...,,-,.,.,,. 


172 


90 


4.756 


4.650 


3.989 


106 




8.883 




Aldrich 


1 

3 

11 

2 

1 

1 
1 

18 
1 
2 
6 
9 
/ 
5 
1 
1 
3 
3 
/ 
6 

63 
/ 

17 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
3 

150 


1 
3 
9 
3 

6 

2 

3 
3 

i 

6 

34 

io 



6 

i 

4 
60 


41 

27 

55 

21 

51 

8 

4 

328 

29 

22 

63 

751 

716 

72 

81 

39 

191 

364 

SOS 

115 

1,352 

fel 

221 
138 

33 
3 

20 

5 

349 

174 

10 

28 

6,913 


41 

26 

65 

20 

60 

8 

4 

319 

29 

21 

61 

736 

700 

67 

80 

39 

189 

360 

SOO 

112 

1,307 

4to 

157 

220 

135 

33 

3 

20 

4 

346 

172 

10 

28 

6.763 


41 

27 

39 

6 

40 

8 

4 

285 

29 

21 

46 

622 

695 

65 

81 

39 

191 

291 

£76 

103 

1,014 

S48 

141 

221 

123 

5 

5 

339 

169 

10 

12 

6.268 






41 


Brfwh^r ''•ftll^ , , . 


1 




26 


Canton 


39 


Edwards 


1 
1 




4 


Emeryville 


39 


Fowler 


8 


Fullerville 






4 


Qouvemeur 


9 




276 


Haileeboro 


29 


Hammond 


1 
2 
16 
16 
5 
1 




20 


HewitviUe 


44 


MfMWAnA 


606 


Sm^inff and nfining 


680 


Morristown 


60 


Natural Pam 


80 


New Bridge 


39 


Newton Fall* 


* 2 

% 

3 

45 

6 

\ 

3 


...... 


189 


Norfolk 


287 


Paper miU$ 


£7S 


Norwood 


100 


Ogdensburg 


969 


Silk and ailk goodt 


w 


Potffdam 


Pyrites (mdp and paper mills) 

Raymonaviile 


220 
120 


Sissonville 


6 


South Edwards 






3 


Stellaville 






20 


Talcville 


1 
4 
2 




4 


Unionville (paper milU) 


336 


Wanakfflia , 


167 


Wecatchie 


10 


West Stockholm 






12 




149 




6,119 






Ballston Lake 


1 
22 

37 
49 


1 
10 

3 

is 

ii 

3 

2 

i 


2 
990 
S9g 
S68 

7 
114 

2 

5 

86 

2.061 

M71 

31 

219 

229 

658 

52 

1,263 

SOS 

$90 

125 

475 

S»6 

18 

164 


2 

974 

S90 

S61 

7 

114 

2 

6 

84 

2.013 

790 

S8$ 

£68 

30 

218 

225 

660 

61 

1,206 

SOO 

467 

S20 

18 

163 


sat 

348 

6 

71 

2 

5 

86 

1,978 

740 

SSI 

£68 

31 

219 

146 

661 

44 

1.020 

SOS 

160 

125 

431 

£89 






1 


Ballston Spa 


16 




868 


Jjeather 


SSO 


Paper bag$ and eaeke 


'% 


Conkfinville 


Corinth 






71 


Factory Village 






2 


Greenfield Center 






5 


Hadley 


1 
47 
£0 

i 

1 
1 
4 
8 
1 
57 
6 
6 




84 


\ffMihanicville. ...... ^ .......... t r . 


1.981 
7£0 


Pulp and paper miUs 


Buildinif brick ^ 

Hoeiery and knit goode 


S$7 
£66 


Milton 


30 


Moreau (town) {paper ndU) 

Nprthimiberland (toatt paper) 

Palmer {pulp and paper miUa) 

Rock Oitv Falls t - - 


218 

141 

643 

43 




968 


aUk and »ilk aoode 




SOO 

A49 


MitaihitiM/uM ifuxchifi^m ••••• 






Souw Olens Falls 


8 
6 




Puip and paper miUe 


1 ;^ 


Spier Falls 




i ^^ 

\ 163 


Stillwater 


i 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeatt of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 271 



Gowrt7 «»d Town, Yew Ended fleftenriber 99, 1911 — Contlnaed. 



OF ElCPLOTKSS AT TlHB 


or iNSPCcnox. 








Wbbxlt Hours of Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


aHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EM- 
PLOYEES WHO WORK — 


NUMBER IN SHOPS i 
KMPLOTINO — 


SEX AND AGE. 




51 

hours 
or 
lees. 


52-57 
hours. 


68^ ^^f 
*»o^- ho'Srs. 

1 


yws 
(in 

shops 
ex- 
cept 
as 

nofd). 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


1 

Men 1 

(18 1 

yrs. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boj-a 
(14-16 

yre.). 


Worn. 

(16 
yra. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 

yrs.). 


645 


1.488 


1,750 


3,247 


31 


7 


593 


5 


208 


917 


1,940 818j 




41 
24 




40 

i! 

3^ 

8 

4 

219 

29 

20 

20 

601 

680 

33 

80 

39 

183 

284 

270 

98 

*n 

97 
220 

] 

4,704 




1 










411 


2 










26| 
35, 


1 


39 






5 






4 




4 














41 




39 
















39; 

8, 1 


8 














4 


















4' "1:""" 


69 


207 
29 


....... 


5 




52 




79 


20 


149 


28...:.:: 

29i 


20 














26 
35 






14 


30 


''586 

68a 

* '273 
M7S 

""342 
""220 








24 
5 






2 
585 

580 
25 


7 




26 








2 


19 
















25 


25 

80 

39 

173 






17 






25 














80 


















39 
52 
273 
273 
100 
775 
336 
95 






16 


3 
3 
5 

1 
15 




3 








137 
14 




14 
























14 


86 
342 


6 

2 

1 


1 

446 

2fiO 

38 












285 


4 
4 
1 


45 
6 
2 


138 
"26 


11 




67 


70 


20 
220 






120 












120 






5 


1 










5 






3 














3 








20 
















20 




4 














4 

3 

167 

10 

12 

2.358 








335 


3 












332 




4 


163 














10 






2 












12 




















682 


2.362 


3.175 


31 


6 


1.368 


10 


1.498 


1.388 


876 




1 






1 

665 

306 

266 

6 

39 

2 

4 

84 

1.490 

686 

316 

100 

30 

218 

129 

643 

43 

615 

80 

'U 

369 

S83 

18 

44 














1 
363 
329 






78 


* ii9 


671 
SSO 
541 


3 
3 


1 
1 


199 
20 
86 




163 

1 

161 


327 

"isb 


15 












6 








6 
69 






39 




32 








32 




2 








2 






2 




5 








1 






1 
84 
23 




4 






84 
1,114 


' '720 
7M0 

""2i8 
* "643 










97 


16 


2 


419 
36 


4 


511 


674 
36 


723 
686 




16 


Sit 

$66 

30 


12 
2 








327 






2 


160 


2 


4 


262 








30 


, 












210 


8 
141 








141 


6 




6 














643 








43 














8 
546 

300 


35 
11 




257 


406 


300 
SOO 

""283 
98S 


4 




339 
216 


5 
6 


84 


322 






Hi 

138 








164 
""68 






6 






86 
54 




1 
284 

283 


124 
81 






2 




















18 












18 








lil 


'*"i85 




2 




i66 


i 


i 


i37 


is 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



272 



New York State Department of Labor. 



TWile Xnr.— Staiialies of Ftetories InapMrted im Each 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Larobst 
Number op 
Employees 

IN Yeab. 


NuiimHB 


COUKTY AKD CiTT OB ViLLAOB. 


QRAND 

total. 


office 

FORCE. 




(With industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 

of 
age. 


Total. 


Saratoqa Countt — Concluded. 

Victory Mills {cotton goods) 


1 
3 

1 
I 

244 




4 

74 


363 
11 
45 

4 

22.124 


350 

11 

44 

4 

18.292 


343 

6 

45 

4 

22.085 


3 




340 
6 


Waterford 


1 


West Milton 


1 




44 

4 


Willow Glen 


Schenectady Countt 




3 832 




18,253 




' 1 


Carmen 


2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
231 
6 

65 


.V.'.'... 



71 

3 

19 


9 
5 
37 
12 
11 
22.030 
20 

729 


9 
5 
36 
11 
10 
18,201 
20 

719 


I 

37 
12 
11 
21,991 
20 

729 




9 


Esperance* 





5 


M oba wk 


i:::::: 

1 


36 


NiakajTina 


11 

10 

18,162 

20 


Rotterdam 


Schenectady (see Table XV) 

Scotia 


SCHOHABIE CoUNTT 


,. 




719 






Central Bridge 


5 
30 

3 

3 
12 

2 
10 

25 


2 

7 

3 



11 


23 
366 
28 
188 
41 
39 
44 

691 


22 
359 

28 
187 

!l 

44 
676 


23 
366 
28 
188 
41 
39 
44 

548 


1 

7 




22 
359 


Coblcskill 


Esperance 


28 


Howes Cave 

Middleburgh 


1 





187 
41 


RichmondviUe 




1 




38 


Schoharie 




44 


Schuyler County. 


1. 






( '^WF 


Montour Falls 


7 

i 

16 

£ 

81 


3 

i 

7 
42 


355 

£06 

7 

329 

£SQ 

2,699 


348 

£00 

7 

321 

£So 

2.641 


269 

160 

7 

272 

199 

2.650 


7 
6 




262 

145 


Dj/namot, motors and electrical awp- 
pliet 


Odessa 


Watkins 


8 




264 




A'- 


196 


Seneca County 


168 




9 ^QA 




( "' ■"'"' 


Border City 


I 

37 

£ 

183 


1 
4 
4 

15 


18 

78 


117 

43 

14 

1,630 

992 

£00 

895 

S66 

7,756 


113 

42 

14 

1,496 

881 

J 93 

876 

S6£ 

7,508 


117 

43 

14 

1,630 

992 

£00 

8. .2 

366 

6,673 


4 
1 




113 


Interlaken 

Ovid 


42 
14 


Seneca Falls 


134 

/// 

7 

19 

A 

248 




1,496 
881 
193 
833 
S6£ 


Stationary enQtnes. boilers, etc 

Agricultural implements 

Waterloo 

Woolens and toorsteds 


Steuben County 


5.326 




Addison 

Atlanta 


8 

1 

6 

22 

if 

5 

1 

39 

8 

1 

3 

18 

32 

6 


6 

1 

8 

8 

3 



13 

1 

4 


140 

2 

171 

294 

4 

339 

120 

2 

2.852 

£,086 

202 

14 

195 

2.689 

l,£U 

786 
£S7 


139 

169 

276 

4 

324 

119 

2 

2.769 

£,OSS 

£00 

14 

184 

2,622 

1,£S0 

786 

£SS 


117 

2 

136 

275 

4 

311 

70 

2 

2,446 

1,8£ 

162 

10 

141 

2,168 

1M6 

668 

£36 


1 





116 
2 


Avoca 


2 




134 


Bath 

Campbell 


257 
4 


Canisteo 


15j 


TQA 


Cohocton 


1 !!!!.. i 60 


Coooers Plains. 


t i 2 




831 2 363 


Pressed, bloton and cut glassware. . 

Terra cotta and fire-clay products. . 

Greenwood 


^1;::::: 


1.774 

160 

10 


Hammondsport 


JJ!::;::: 

n 

18 

J^ 


130 


Homell 


2,101 


Silk and silk goods 


1,03$ 


Railway revair shovs 


660 


House trim 


MSI 




* See also Espersnoe, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeait of Factoky Inspection, 1911. 



273 



O0Wi^ Md Town. Yen Bsdad Septonber aOi» IMl — Contfnaed. 



or EafFLOTKES AT Tnu 


or iNSPEcnoN. 






Weekly Hours op Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP rOBCE. 


NUMBER OP SHOP EM- 
PLOYEES WHO WORK 


NT7MBBR IN SHOPS | 
BUPLOTmO — j 


SEX AND AGS. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


1 

58-63 0^'" 
^°""- hours. 


years 
shops 


1-19. 


1 
20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yra. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yre.). 


Boya 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 

ym. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

nofd). 






340 

1 


215 




^1 


123 




2 




33s. 
3i 

4, 






6 




6 

40 
4 

16,283 






3 








44::::::: 




...:... 4 






40 

4 . 


4 








1 


1,082 


1,279 


15.892 


1 

1 

1 


34 


1.930 


6 


1,818|15,398 


969 


68 




9 


i 


9 
5 
36 
11 
10 
16,192 
20 

525 












5 


4 

5 

36 






5 


1 



















36l 


::::::: 














ii 














10 

1,027 

20 

274 










7 






1,243 15.892 




34 


l,930l 6 


1.811 


115,385 

8 

! 84 


66| 

2 


445 




1 


i 

193| 


20 


49Sj 117 




221 


22 

226 

3 

187 

40 

15 

32 

476 









.... 1 .... 


22j 

28 
70 






119' 240, 






•'•iss!::::::: 


11 81 

. _ _ 1 






28 






25 









17 170' 


1 




.......... 


117 


41 1 







i 6l 3 


32 






3. 351 




1 


22| ll 371 

12 2 42 

67 ll 37i 340 






44 








83 


1 

45o! 


1 




1.*^ 






r 


.... 




7 


255] 

i4s\ 


262 

145 

20?'::::::: 

1S5\ 

2.068, 32 




::::::: 






1 SJ 257 

1 

1 145 

1 ' 1 7 

57; 11 32 76 

4o\ ' 40 

374, 13! 5l[ 567 1.861 


i 








7 






60 
283 


i95 

195 

982 1.233 


155 

155 

'^ 


26! 87l 


111 2 

25 

8 

1,330, 20 

see' a 

190 t 
594 10 
£S0 2 

5,0521 66 








• 

} 

2 


- ! ! 261 87 






42 
14 


1 


17 
6 


1 


1 3| 39 
1 12 






:::::::i 


'••••••;' 2 






114 


601 


881 
881 


142 1 9 1711 1,302 

45^ , 2 A7i/ 

1 I 7 1 '-'^'^ 


14 






19S 






87 


394 


352 
853 

3,219 


269! ia; 40 * 367 

iio, 3\ 5 34? 


1 421 


5| 

1 


639 


2,467 


1 ' 
l,202i 3, 206 3,222 


2,878 


19 




36 80 




12^ 

23^ 

4 

18^ 

2C 

1.99e 
IMt 

15C 
IC 

lOJ 
1,47^ 

m 

66C 

£»t 






2i 1 91 

. 1 .1.1 


25 






2 
24 


t 







2 
131 
233 






110 








9 
22 


' 


3 

' 19 






931 164 






1 


4 




4 
41 


' 


\ 




t 


1 


4 

147 

50 

2 

407 

83 






2fiA 




\ 




108 

«l 


10 139 
2 17 






6 63 


; 1 

5 








2 
138 

a 

lOQ 


1 






849 

1 S90 
1 150 



1.376 
1,376 


( 43 
) 


2 
£ 


322 

184 




31 


1,919 
I 1,680 
1 150 







) 










ioi I 


30 


■*i;479 

703 
650 
££6 


i 




22 
607 
558 


3 

s 


4 2C 
56 642 

3 4se 


106 


1 


112 


610 
S99 


[ 17 
) 11 
) 




1.396 
5/^3 
550 
£31 


7 






6 




1. e 












under Schoharie county. 





















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



274 



New Tobk State Depabtmeitt of Labor. 













Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


LABOBflT 

Number of 

Employees 

IN Year. 


NmiBEB 


County and Citt or Village. 


GRAKD 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 




(With industries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


TotaL 


Steuben Covjnr— Concluded. 

Painted Poet 


6 

1 
1 
4 

1 

1 

6 

11 

262 


1 

i 

3 

1 

2 

6 

116 


659 

10 

6 

64 

29 

276 

4.347 


518 

seA 

1 
10 

5 

50 

28 

272 

4.161 


531 

10 

3 

44 

29 

273 

3.677 


41 
86 




490 


Miaeellantcus machinery 


364 


Perkinsville 


I 


Prattsburgh 






10 


Pultney 






3 


Rheims 


4 




40 


Savona 


1 

4 

181 


28 


Wayland 


269 


Suffolk County 


3.496 










AmityviUe 


10 

13 

3 

17 

1 
3 
3 
5 
7 
2 
2 
1 
1 
5 
4 
18 

t 

1 

11 
5 

30 
2 
6 

32 
1 
1 

12 
2 

19 

12 
/ 
/ 
7 
2 

13 
3 
1 
7 

38 


5 

4 
1 
6 

i 

3 

4 
2 

1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 

8 

2 

19 

1 

2 

12 

6 

6 

4 

6 

2 
6 
3 

4 

24 


24 

63 

21 

88 

2 

118 

10 

12 

48 

26 

8 

1 

3 

33 

29 

395 

Bll 

7 

200 

93 


24 

63 

21 

87 

2 

118 

10 

12 

48 

25 

8 

1 

3 

33 

29 

394 

til 

7 

200 

86 


24 

58 

15 

82 

2 

91 

9 

9 

32 

16 

8 

1 

3 

33 

28 

248 

100 

7 

200 

68 

30 

86 

869 

ets 

137 

114 

227 

137 

758 

476 

199 

32 

4 

47 

4 

4 

16 

282 






24 


Babylon 






58 


Bayport 






15 


Bayshore 


1 




81 


Bellport 


2 


Bohemia 






91 


Bridgehampton 






9 


Center Moriches 






9 


East Hampton 






32 


East Nortnport 


1 




15 


East Patchogue 


8 








1 


Echo 






3 


Fair Ground 






33 


Oreen Lawn 






28 


Oreenport 


1 




247 


Bo€U and ship buildinff 


100 


Haleeite 






7 


Hicks Island {mineral oil products).. . 






200 


Huntington. .......... .T '. , 


6 




62 


uiip. .r. 


22 22 
403; 403 

5l| 61 
861 22 
970| 943 
62S e09 
Bit, too 
147 141 


90 


LiiuJenhurst 






305 


Mattituck 






30 


Northport 


64 
27 

\i 

5 

2 

4 

60 

66 

'\ 




22 


Patchogue 


842 


Upholstery goods 


609 


House trim 


lt6 


Port Jefferson 


109 


Riverhead 


281 
142 


279 
1.^ 


225 
133 


Sag Harbor 


945' 876 


689 


Gold and siher watdi cases 

Siher and plated ware 


58S 

tri 

34 

5 

52 

4 

4 

20 

307 


6SS 

t67 

33 

5 

52 

4 

4 

90 

806 


«2 


Sayville .". 


31 


Rmithtown Branch 


4 


Southampton 






47 


Southold 






4 


Stony Brook 






4 


Westhampton ..... x w . 






16 




1 




281 






Aoidalia 


1 

1 
1 
1 
3 
10 
6 
1 
7 
5 


1 

2 

3 

5 

4 
1 
6 
2 


11 
21 
21 
30 
21 
33 
35 
3 
67 
43 


11 
21 
21 
30 
21 
33 
35 
3 
66 
43 


11 
21 
21 
30 
21 
33 
35 
2 
55 
82 






11 


Fallsburg 






21 


Qrooville 






21 


Haael 






30 


Hurieyville 






21 


Liberty 






38 


Livingston Manor 






85 


Loch Sheldrake 






2 


Montioello 


1 




54 


Rotooe 


32 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bueeau of Factoby lNSPE:cTio:sr, l&ll. 



275 



CMiBty aad Town, Yaw BadMl S«ptember SO, 1911 — Contfaaed. 



OP ElfPZX>TXES AT Tim 


OP iNSPKCnOK. 










Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 

years 

shops 
ex- 
cept 
as 
nofd). 


SHOP PORCE. 


NUMBBB OP SHOP KM- 
PLOTKB8 WHO WORK — 


NUMBBR IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO— 


8BX AND AGS. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yre. +). 


Y'thB 

(16-18 
yra.). 


Boys 

(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 

(16 
yrs. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 

yrs.). 


10 


116 


364 
864 


487 

864 

1 

9 

3 

40 

28 

203 

2.582 






3 






391 
364 


99 




















1 












1 








10 










1 




3 


7 

3 

40 

26 

190 

1,674 






3 




















40 




















28 












2 






19 
987 


250 
1.280 


1.229 


5 
91 


41 


61 
737 


45 


10 
286 


67 
1.446 


2 
90 




24 






20 

41 

16 

66 

2 

23 

8 

8 

30 

14 

8 

1 

1 

83 

28 

245 

100 

7 

200 

45 

13 

167 

14 

21 

516 

810 

119 

96 

225 

98 

547 

8t4 

148 

22 

4 

45 

4 

4 

16 

266 


1 

1 


i 


3 
15 




3 
3 


8 
38 
14 
35 

2 
76 

""io 

10 


5 

17 

1 
18 


8 




58 








15 










81 






2 




13 




7 


21 




2 








2 


89 






3 


55 

1 
1 
2 


10 


13 

8 

1 

18 


2 

1 
6 
4 
5 
8 
1 






9 






9 










2 




32 












15 






1 








8 


















1 






















3 










2 






3 
6 






13 


20 












27 

28 
109 






28 
















56 


191 
90 








2 






132 
100 


6 




10 












7 












2 

200 

9 

3 

254 

14 

5 

31 


5 








200 
















62 




1 




16 

7 

183 

15 

1 

262 

848 





17 


31 

13 
122 

15 

4 

743 

688 

186 

73 


6 
4 




20 








157 


238 
29 




22 


^1 


12 

17 

17 


19 

1 

9 

56 

87 




1 






22 


4 
12 




108 


125 


609 
609 

""420 


37 

89 
6 


10 
10 






196 
47 

225 
65 

251 








62 




13 




15 


12 
225 

36 
597 
408 
179 

13 
2 

33 

2 


9 












68 


26 

17 
9 


2 
13 

7 
6 


37 

98 

% 


1 
5 


86 


11 






18 


)ll-" 


3 






186 


e 

8 


7 
2 
7 
2 

4 
7 

68 






31 


3 




4 












47 










2 




3 


4 




4 












4 




















16 














1 

7 


4 

101 


4 

105 




170 


111 




3 


3 


9 






11 






11 
20 
20 
30 
20 
29 
34 
2 
49 
31 
















11 
21 






21 
21 
30 






1 
1 
























21 














30 




21 






1 
4 








21 
19 
19 




83 












4 


4 


6 
16 




35 






1 






2 














2 
47 
15 




15 


39 




2 




3 
1 




3 


4 

16 






32 


1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



270 



Xew York State Depabtment of Labor. 



Table XIV.— 



of Fmct9tiem inspeeaed In Emeh 



County and Citt or Village. 

(With indufltrica havinK 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 



Ndhbbr 




Sullivan County — Concluded. 
Spring Brook 
Willowemoc 

Tioga County 

Berkshire 
Candor 
Loekwood 
Newark Valley 
Nichols 

OWCRO 

Richford 
Spencer, 
Wavcrly 

TOUPKlNa COUNTV 

Brockton 

Dryden 

Etna 

Forest Home 

Freeville 

Groton 

Hal.Hcyville 

Ithaca 

Jacksonville 

McLean 

Myers 

Newtield 

Slate rvi lie 

Taughannook Falls 

Trumansburg 

Ulstbr County 

Binnewatcr 
Brown Station 

Chichester 

Cliutoudale 

Eju<t Kingston (building brtck) 

Ellcnvi" 

(^utlery 
Flat bush {hnilditu] brick) 
(iht'^fo {building brick) 
HiKh Fiill' 
Highland 
Kerhonkson 
KinuHton 

CiiJ'irs 

Siiirts, collars and cuffs 

Bu'l'lintl hr>ck 

lioai and shipbuihiing 
Lackawack 

IJuyd 

Maiden. . . . 
Marlboro 
Milton... 
Napanoch 
New Paliz 
Phoenicia 
Port Ewan 
P.rK'rvill*', 
Rifton 



B 



72 

18 
113 

45 
3 

59 
138 

M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Btjeeatj of Factory Inspection, 1911. 277 

Qmmty nd Towb, Tmt bdml fl erX ibm SO, 1911 — Coiitina«d. 



or Bmplotxks at Timb or ImpKcmoN. 



SHOP rOBCB. 



NUllBEB tS BHOPS 
BItPLOTINa — 



1-19. : 20-199.1 200 +. 



•BX AND AOB. 



Men 

(18 
yra. +). 



Yths Boya 
(ie-18 (14-16 
yre.). yre.). 



Worn. 

(16 
yrs. +). 



12 , 
9 , 



366 



18 . 

6 

6'. 
35 
23 
123 
17|. 

18;. 

120 
750 



6 . 
25 . 

3 . 
18 . 

4'. 
13 

1 . 
615 

3 . 

4'. 



6 
11 

4 
37 

937 



830'. 



I 



12 . 

81. 

848 



331 



167, 



1551. 

24 . 

370 . 



114 
1.169 



298 



658 



66 
3.910 



115 



439 



295 
73 
34 



11'. 
88;. 
6 . 
188<. 
31 
293; 
17. 
91. 
205| 

1,569 



Giria 

(14-16 

yra.). 



2 
151 

1881 



Weekly Hours of Labor. 



NUMBER OK SHOP EM- 
PIX>rEE8 WHO WORK — 



51 



hours ! 52-57 I 58-63 I ^^f ' 



or I hours.) hours. I 
less. I , 



63 
hours. 



56| 242i 



8901 



4 . 
17 . 



25 . 



3311 



11 
237 



6 . 
23'. 

3,. 
18l. 

4 . 
2991 

1|. 
1,001 
3 . 

41. 
1341 
61. 
11,. 

4l. 
62! 



2,447! 5,262; 



1 
197 



2Wl 

£84, 



384 



21 

115' 

5, 

418! 16 

302, 9 

£^2 ^ 

277 15 

429 21 



45,' 



02 



4 
'2fi9 



16 



3 
232 



6o;. 

I.6O5I 



138i 



2 

478 



207 



2 
31, 



18 . 

171 . 

6 . 

190i. 

471 . 
235 

171. 

14' 
192;. 



292 1,345 



270 



990 



21 



6 . 

27, 
19.. 
3!. 

71. 



19 



4'. 
3081. 

1!. 

735i 

31. 

152L 

11'. 

101 1 . 

5,728t 



98 . 



llSt. 



4341. 
309 . 
£66.. 
292 . 
450,. 

14. 

60'. 



Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



12 . 

8 . 

8'. 



14 



31 



514 

le 



1,735 
06 

lis 

S4S 
B41 



1.639 

1,0S4 

606 



34 

*4i 

138 

61 



2,218 108 

276' 63 

ioe\ 4 

617 ^ 16 

m\ 6 



SI 

1 

10 

1 



1.28]| 
611, 
498 



127 j 374 i 860 



791 
44; 

15'. 
101 . 
451. 

3I. 
56 
130' 



106 

^1 



177' £94 
10 £26 

10 

1 



26!, 

lii: 



24 



3 . 



2.558 

60-) 

3SS\ 

6S3 

£40\ 

5 

28! 

83' 

67j 

18i 

80, 

42I 

3. 

591 

138 

63. 



6 




I 


1 


1 


j 


1. .;!.!! 


1 


1 




26 















; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



278 



New Yoek State Depahtment of Labob. 











Plaoea 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


LABOSflT 

NuMBBR or 

ElfPLOYBM 

m Ykar. 


NUICBBB 


County and Citt or Village. 


OBAND 
TOTAL. 


OPFICB 
FOBCB. 




(With industriea having 200 or more 
employees apedfied in each locality.) 


Total, 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

'T 

age. 


Total. 


Ulstsr CtouNTT — Concluded. 
Romndale 


1 
18 

e 

1 
1 

2 
2 
1 
3 
1 

144 


7 

2 

46 


34 

687 

SS3 

£07 

24 

84 

96 

60 

83 

2 

4.664 


34 

672 

3£6 

£00 

24 

84 

96 

60 

82 

2 

4,568 


84 

650 

333 

179 

24 

84 

84 

44 

65 

2 

3.667 






34 


Saugerties 


15 
8 
7 




635 


Paper miUt 

Bookbindtng and blankbook making 
Bhandaken 


3£S 

17 £ 

24 


South Rondout 






84 


Ulster Landing 






84 


Ulster Park . . '. 






44 


WallkiU 


1 




64 


Woodstock 


2 


Warbbn Countt. 


96 




3,571 






French Mountain 


I 

116 

8 

7 

1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
16 
B 
1 

113 


40 

/ 

6 

42 


18 
3,730 
1.799 

£66 
44 
41 
12 
42 
3 
66 
25 

690 

4,976 


18 
3.643 
1,773 

40 
11 
42 
3 
56 
25 
683 

^S 

4,832 


7 

2,980 

U4JB£ 

£79 

£68 

£10 

44 

36 

12 

37 

3 

66 

25 

464 

£60 

3 

4.386 






7 


Glens Falls 


87 

£6 

3 




2.893 


Shirte, eoUare and cuffe 


l,39e 


Dreeemakino >■ ^ •. ^ 


£76 


Pulp and Paper milla 


J:::::: 


£SO 


W(m paper 


194 


Graphite. T 






44 


Hague 


1 
1 




35 


I^lce George 


11 


Luseme. 


37 


North Creek 






3 


North River 






56 


Stony Creek 






25 


'Warrenrt>urg 


7 
4 




457 


Shirte, coHare and cuffe 


£46 


Weavertown 


3 




142 




4.244 






Battenville 


1 
10 

1 
1 
1 
2 

12 
/ 
1 

13 

18 
5 

20 
6 
1 
£ 
2 
4 
1 
6 
2 
3 

16 
1 

124 


4 

i 

i 

2 

7 

3 

i7 

i 

2 

4' 

04 


28 

313 

38 

12 

69 

18 

667 

607 

41 

208 

777 

£46 

1,549 

8£1 

£91 

£13 

22 

160 

41 

159 

50 

184 

660 

S46 

2.898 


28 

287 

38 

12 

57 

18 

658 

600 

40 

206 

753 

1.565 
814 
£70 
£06 

22 
147 

40 
157 

48 
175 
641 
330 

2.793 


28 

176 

30 

12 

59 

18 

614 

464 

41 

170 

729 

££8 

1.295 

791 

£11 

167 

22 

150 

33 

159 

50 

181 

619 

316 

2.085 






28 


Cambridge 


26 




150 


Center Falls 


30 


F.ftglAville 






12 


Easton 


2 




57 


Fort Ann 


IS 


Fort Edward 


9 
7 
1 
2 




' 605 


Pulp and paper miUe 


447 


Fort Miller 


40 


Granville 


168 


Greenwich 


23!:::::: 

4^:::::: 


706 


Hotiery and knit goode 


l,2S2 


Hudson Falls 


Paper bage and eacke 


•I 




784 


Wall paper 


190 


Miecellaneous machinery 


'^ 


Jamesvilie 


Middle Falls 


3 

1 
2 
2 
9 

19 
16 

105 




147 


Rexleigh 


32 


Salem 


157 


Shusheui 


48 


Thomson 


172 


Whitehall 


600 


Silk and eilk goode 


300 


Watnb Countt 


1.980 






Clyde 


17 

26 

4 

5 

e 


12 

16 
4 
6 


347 

498 

6 

249 

£36 


340 
486 
6 
249 
£36 


347 

491 

6 

23 

11 


7 
12 




340 


Lyons 


479 




6 


Marion '. 






23 


Canning fruite and vegetablee 






U 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bxibeau of Factory Iitspectiox, 1911. 



279 



Cooity and Tows. Ymt 














OF EllPLOTEKS AT TiMS 


OP Inbpbction. 








Wesxlt Hottbs or Labor. 


Chil- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP rORCB. 


NTJIIBBB OF SHOP Bli- 
PL0TBX8 WHO WORK — 


NUMBBB IN tHOPB 
BlfPLOTmO — 


8SX AND AGX. 


51 

houn 
or 
leas. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 

(in 

shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yw. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 
yra.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

yra.). 


Worn. 
(16 

yw. +). 


Girls 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


cept 

as 

nofd). 




34 

331 

86 

17$ 

24 

84 

84 

. 44 

48 


""240 
B40 


2 
434 

geo 
77 

24 

84 
80 
42 
61 
2 

2.019 






29 
195 
66 
94 


3 
1 


""32 


34 

7 








64 


4 


1 


530 

269 

171 

24 

84 

84 

44 

64 

2 

2,337 


, 66 
66 










1 


1 




































4 
2 
































16 




3 












2 
















519 


1,776 


1,276 


25 


2 


1,524 


1 


356 


654 


224 




7 






7 

1,564 

464 

SO 

B48 

161 

44 

35 

9 

2 

3 

56 

25 

271 

119 

3 

2,956 














7 

1,887 

1,S96 

264 






428 


1,189 
570 

est 


1,276 

i,oee 

£60 


25 
1 


2 


1,301 
9g9 

IS 


1 

1 


349 

1 


519 

'""it 
M 

194 


* i38 




14 















M48 








194 
44 
35 


MO 
















44 
35 
























11 






2 
35 






9 
37 


2 






37 














3 










3 

56 

25 

280 

246 








56 




















25 


















42 


416 








186 
1S4 




4 


89 


84 












3 








3 
780 








305 


2,789 


1.160 


20 


7 


1,248 


13 


917 


1.852 


606 






28 

132 

30 




28 
73 
30 
7 
57 
18 
503 

% 

67 
351 

6S 
995 
681 
186 

147 

28 

39 

24 

172 

367 

ie8 

1,494 
















28 




18 






77 






4 


146 














30 




12 






5 








12 






57 














57 
12 




18 















6 
32 




29 


129 


447 

U7 

"403 
40S 






101 


1 


462 
U7 


111 
















40 
140 
664 

Mie 

814 
381 
190 
149 


2 

1 
3 

e 
2 










2 
161 
471 
216 
383 

""l'9b 


38 

2 

196 




28 

42 

8 


5 

5 


110 
340 
161 
254 
iOS 
4 


7 

6 

1 


6 
13 

277 


""27 
432 




35 








76 






















'^ 






22 


















3 


144 
32 

142 
36 

170 

231 


"366 
SOO 
















147 








1 

1 


3 

116 

24 


i 


i 

5 


6 


31 
146 
48 




15 






12 






2 












172 
14 




69 


12 
ig 

27 


6 


218 

167 

447 


3 

S 

7 


8 
5 

221 


164 
439 


414 

297 

1,292 




382 


1.598 


28 




36 


304 
401 




266 

332 

4 

23 

11 


12 

1 
1 




63 
144 

1 


2 


124 

69 

1 


6 

13 

1 


210 

360 

4 

23 

11 






78 
6 


28 




23 










11 























Digitized by VjOOQIC 



280 



^Ew YoEK State Department of Labob. 



TAble XI¥.— StatfrtMofftetwIeslMpeelMliii 



County and City or Villaqk. 

(With industries having 200 or more 
emplc^ees specified in each locality.) 



Wayne County — Concluded. 

Newark , 

CanninQ fruU* and tegetablet. . . . 

Ontario 

Palmyra 

Ruhber and guUa percha goods . . . 

SoduB 

Williamson 

Wolcott 

WEarcHESTBK County 

Ajrdsley 

Briarciiflf Manor 

BronxvUle 

Buchanan (oil cloth, window thadet, 

etc.) 

Croton Falls ] 

Croton Lake 

Croton-on-Hudson 

Crugers . . . . 

Dobl)s Ferrj' ', 

Goldens Bridge ] ] 

Harrison 

fiastings-on-Hudson 

Dj/namos, viotors arid electrical 
supplies 

Miscellaneous brass and bronze 

ware 

Hawthorne 

Irvington 

Stationary engines, boilers, etc 

Katonah 

Kensico 

Kitchawan 

Larcbmont 

Lincolndale 

Mamaroncck 

Montrose 

Mt. Kisco ! 

Mt. Vernon 

Silver and plated ware 

Architectural iron work 

Nepera Park 

New Rochelle \ , , 

Printing and publishing 

Scales, meters, phonographs, etc. . . . 
North Pelham 

Lithographing and engraving 

North Tarry town 

Motor vehicles 

Ossining 

Peekskill '.'.'..'.'.'.','.'.'. 

Men's hats and caps 

Cooking and heating apparatus .... 

Miscellaneous groceries 

Women's white goods 

Pelham 

PleaaantviUe 

Port Chester 

Rolling miUs and steel wifrks 

Women's white goods 

Cooking and heating apparatus .... 
Rye 



Places 



spect- 
ed. 



31 

/ 

6 

16 

3 

8 
5 

7 

564 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



J • 

6'- 

I- 

W: 

16, 

4|. 

7, 

88l 

fl: 

41, 
4, 

I:- 

5,. 
5l| 

ii. 

h- 
h. 
3,. 
61. 
38 

ii. 

1\. 

2\. 



19 



Labobst 
Number op 

EMPLOYBOe 

IN Yeah. 



Total. 



1,060 

252 

21 

402 

277 

89 

98 

122 



There- 
of in 
shop. 



1,017 

850 

26 

363 

24^ 

89 

97 

120 



28,584 27,556 



4 
53 
113 

323 
43, 

275 

35 

46 

4 

17 

1,334 

752 

370 

2' 

4091 

300' 

18 

6 

2 

6 

7' 

115 

178 

41 

1.720 

285 

212 

17 

891 

337 

200 

332 

320 

1,949 

1,900 

364 

2,238 

Jt50 

44S 
413 

400 

18^ 

2, 551 I 

787, 

778 
729, 
41 



4 
53 
106 

312 

42 

9 

275 

35 

46 

4 

17 

1,311 

737 

362 

2 

365 

256 

18 

6 

2 

6 

7 

111 

178 

40 

1,676 

277 

210 

17 

842 

314 

179 

329 

317 

1,881 

1,835 

360 

2,192 

Ui 

439 

400 

395 

77 

18 

2,387 

697 

763 

678 

41 



NuifBBB 



QRAND 
TOTAL. 



703 
37 
11 

380 

277 

33 

12 

79 

27,134 



OFFICE 
FORCE. 



Total. 



There- 
of 

14-16 

years 

of 

age. 



__ 



1,028 



4 
49 
109 

323 

43 

9 

267 

35 

46 

4 

16 

1.284 

752 

370 

2 

409 

300 

18 

6 

2 

61 

7' 

951 

1631 

411 

1,4881 

16o\ 

2101 

17 

849! 

335 \ 

2001 

328 

316 

1,228 

1,179 

342J 

2,0551 

352\ 

448 

413 

321 

77 

18 

2.535> 

7*71 

7751 

7291 

411 



164 
90 
16 
61 



Total. 



660 
36 
10 
341 
t4M 
33 
11 
77 

26.106 



4 
49 
102 

312 

42 

9 

267 

35 

46 

4 

16 

1.261 

737 

369 
2 



M6e 

18 

6 

2 

6 

7 

91 

163 

40 

,444 

167 

208 

17 

800 

316 

179 

325 

SIS 

,160 

Jt4 



2.009 

S4S 

4S9 

400 

S16 

77 

18 

2.371 

697 

76S 

679 

41 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



281 



M, Itll ~ Continaed. 



OF Bl9U>TE>B AT TuiM 


OF iNSPBCnOX. 








Weekly Houbb of Labob. 


1 Chil- 
dren 
under 

^* 
years 

' (in 

1 shops 


SHOP FORCS. 


NX7MBBB OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBBS WHO WOKK — 


IfTTMBSR m SHOPS 
■MPLOTINO— 


SBX AND AQE. 


61 

hours 

or 

less. 


1 

1 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yrs. +). 


Y'ths 
(16-18 

yre.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

y«.). 


Worn. 

(16 

yre. +). 


Girls 

(14-16 

yre.). 


52-57 158-63 ^^f^' cept 
hours., hours. v.zr,^ \ as 
l^^^jnofd). 

! 1 


182 


528 
SS 




500 

20 

9 

286 

»H 

20 

7 

48 

18.348 


9 


3 


144 
16 
1 
55 
28 
13 
4 
22 

7.193 


4 


19 


; i 
1 1 

149; 492( , 


10 






;;;;;;; 


1 

4 


ii 8,::::::'::::::: 

262 75 


33 


308 

g4£ 














174 ^8 : 


33 












33 




11 















4 


7 




20 


57 
4.420 


1^.402 


4 

428 


2 

48 


1 

80 


3j 3j 7: 
2.719 17.389 5.212 




2,194 


786 2 


4 






4 
22 

77 

273 

40 

9 

265 

35 

46 

4 

16 

1.163 

641 

S62 

2 

344 

£66 

17 

1 

6 

88 

168 

40 

1,046 

130 

£04 

10 

597 

176 

167 

102 

100 

1.147 

1,114 

287 

1,493 

£69 

4SS 

400 

16 

77 

17 

1.516 

60S 

90 

^7 














4 




27 


22 

74 


312 








27 
19 

31 






46 


3 . . . 


28 


8 
2 


5 




11 8 


65 


23 
312 


G 




42 




42 
9 
14 




9 












19 


248 
35 
28 




2 








253 

35 

42 

4 

7 
43 










1 


i 


18 










I * 






4 












16 












:::::::i:::::: 




9'. . . 


22 


140 


1,099 
7S7 
S62 



4 




92 

92 




5 


i.iis 

757 
36Z 


10() 

1 






. 






' 


2 














2 
5 




9 


100 


256 
256 


4 

1 
1 

1 


1 


16 





81 


279 

266 


1 




1 


18 










3 


12 


3\ 


6 












6 






2 
















2 






6 














3 




3 






7 






1 
2 
4 








" ■ 7'....:.: 

41 


55 

4 


36 
159 

20 
870 

140 


""tbi 


i 


1 




io 

1 


27 

4 

28 

888 

91 
£04 


50 
158 

12 
181 


20 












370 


20 

6 
4 


4 


367 

22 


i7 375 

66 

1 






17 






,1 




4 








7 
170 
110 

12 
196 
193 

12 


1 17 

5 418 
4! SIB 







191 

B7 


321 


288 
£88 

'"*3i3 

SIS 

1,114 

1,114 

"i,zis 

S4S 
£69 
400 

sie 


24 

2B 


4 

4 


260 


121j 1 




9M 


7 


16 
313 
SIS 

31 


164 
10 


1 




12 


20 
£0 

1 




2 












15 


31 


1.114 

i,in 

239 
1.003 

343 
438 


is 












103 
181 


235 
510 


6 

22 

8 

6 


1 




44 

479 

76 


i2 


41 
95 


56 2 
908, 3 




/ 


179 





/ 
400 






::::::: :;;::::, ::;::::i:::::: 


1 






£ 




£90^ 


9\ 9 




S07 ! 


2 


75 




1 




75i 


18 


1 
58 

", 




1 




4 


7 


157 


76 


2.138 
697 
76S 
678 


'2 

i 


7791 

80 

662^ 


8 


805' 69 

«t 


1,459 38 

695 ' 






7' 763 












678 


13 


2» 




4' 







3 


32 


6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



282 



Xew Yoek State Depastment of Labor. 



Table XIV.— - Statlatlcs of PaetoriM Inspected In Eaeh 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Nimi- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labgbst 
Number op 
Employees 


NUMBBB 


County and City ob Village. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 




(With indtistries having 200 or more 
employees specified in each locality.) 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


Total. 


Wkbtchbster County — Concluded. 
Tanytown 


19 

13 

1 

2 

34 

129 

4 

73 


4 

10 

33 


139 
658 
479 

99 

320 

14.098 

32 

3,101 


139 
626 

% 

312 

13.579 

32 

2,997 


122 

620 
479 

99 

310 

14,040 

27 

2.741 






122 


Tuckfthoe 


32 

SI 




588 


Rubber and ffutta percha goods 


% 


White Plains 


8 
519 




302 


Yonkers (see table XV) 


13.521 


YorktowQ Height4 


27 


Wyoming County 


1Q4 




2,637 






Arcade 


9 
4 
5 

18 
S 
1 
2 
3 
3 
/ 

17 
3 

78 


3 
6 
2 

4 
8 



i 

8 

1 

33 


230 
136 

27 

27 

1.511 

IJOl 

SSO 

15 
202 
277 
£55 
606 

70 

923 


220 
123 

25 

25 

1,478 

1,077 

S24 

14 
198 
270 
B50 
574 

70 

892 


190 
128 

27 

21 

1.332 

960 

SIS 

14 
159 
275 
X66 
584 

11 

751 


10 

13 

2 

2 

33 

% 

1 
4 
7 
5 
32 


•••••• 


180 


Attica 


115 


Bliss 

Castile 


25 
19 


Perry 


1,299 


Hosiery and knit goods 


9Se 


Cudery 


SOT 


pike.T^..:.:::. :::::: ::;::::::: 


13 


Rock Glen 


155 


" Silver Springs 


268 


Miscellaneous groceries 


»60 


Warsaw 


552 


Wyoming 


11 


Yates County 


31 




720 






Benton Center 


2 
2 

'\ 

2 

1 

1 

62 

1 
3 

1 


2 

1 

6 

2 

1 
1 

20 

i 


5 

21 

18 

48 

6 

6 

2 

7 

758 

18 

31 

3 


6 

21 

18 

48 

6 

6 

2 

7 

727 

18 

31 

3 


5 

4 

18 

42 

6 

4 

2 

7 

645 

5 

10 

3 






5 


Branchport 






4 


Cascade Mills 






18 


Dundee 






42 


Ferguson Comers 






6 


Glenora 






4 


Jerusalem 






2 


Park Landing 






7 


Penn Yan. . " 


31 




614 


Potter 


6 


Rushville 






10 


Seneca Mills 






3 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Kepobt of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



283 



CMWtf and Town, Tew Ended Seftember SO, Itll — Gondiided. 



or Emplotbss at Tucb 


OP IlfSPBCTXOir. 








Wbbklt Hours or Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


BHOP rORCB. 


NUMBBR OP shop BIC- 
PLOYBBS WHO WORK— 


NXTMBBS IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYnVQ — 


8BX AND AOB. 


51 
hours 

or 
less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


(in 
shops 


1-19. 


20-199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yp8. +). 


Y'th« 
(16-18 
yr..). 


BOVB 

(14-16 
yiB.). 


Worn. 

(16 
yre. +). 


Qirls 
(14-16 

yre.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


67 
58 


55 

82 


'"*448 

'i2;662 


91 
373 

tes 

97 

261 

8,549 

26 

1.689 


5 
9 
7 
2 
4 
226 


1 


25 
203 

174 


3 


20 
28 


60 

534 

446 

99 

95 

11,351 

14 

147 


43 
26 


9 


1 










99 
151 
983 









isi 

536 
27 


is 


37 

4,693 
1 

901 


36 

12 


123 

311 

9 

39 


60 
1,357 

4 

2.367 


24 
502 


i 


258 


981 


1.398 


29 


6 


84 




21 159 




149 

112 

21 

19 

656 

5 
152 
235 


1 




30 
3 






48 
71 


60 
43 
22 
17 
1.253 
904 

260 

527 

9 

582 


72 
1 
3 




44 71 








25 
19 
56 




2 



















2 
21 

BO 




95 
95 


i.i48 
841 
S07 


2i 
U 
10 


6 

4 


607 

666 

S9 

8 

3 

33 

SO 

216 


9 
8 
1 


24 

ie\ 
s 


1 





:::;::i 






13 










155 


""250 
B60 
















18 
































51 
11 


501 


329 
11 

545 


5 




3 


15 


5 


6 
2 

83 




301 


419 




11 


6 


156 


2 


17 


38 




5 






5 

4 

18 

33 














5 
4 






4 






















18 


















18 
2 




42 











9 







16 


25 
6 
4 
2 
7 
511 
5 

10 
3 




6 






6 
4 
V 2 
3 
462 
5 
10 
3 













4 






















2 






















7 










4 
143 













195 
5 


419 




11 


6 


2 


17 


23 


63 




10 






















3 













































Digitized by VjOOQIC 



284 



!New York State Department of Labob. 



TABLE XV.— STATISTICS OF FAiCTOUES INSPfiCTED IN FIBST AND SECOND 





City- and Industry. 


Places 
Inspected. 




Labobsx 
Number of 
Employess 

IN Year. 








In- 


Onoe. 


More 
than 
once. 


Num- 
ber 

of 
owners 

at 
work. 


<3RAm> 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCB. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


1 

There- 
Total, of in 
shop. 

1 


Total 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


1-b 


ALBANY. 

I. Stone. Clav and Glass Products. 
Cut stono 


3 


4 


37 

71 

40 

9 


37 

71 

36 

9 


29 

71 

40 

9 






4-a 


Building brick 


2 
2 

1 









4-b 


Terra cotta and fire-clay products 

Building glass 





* 




5-a . . 









Total ' — Group I 


1 








Si 1 4 


157 


153 


149 


4 






II. Metals, Machines and Convey- 
ances. 
Jewelry' sold pons etc . . 




1-e 


1 

1 

1 


1 


5 


.«> 


5 

2 

15 

44 

15 

7 

4 

2 

3 

25 

45 

9 

82 

122 

716 

29 

129 

73 

10 

69 

12 

1,135 

276 






2-b 


Copper work 

Brass, bronze ami aluminum coatings .... 
Briusa and bronze ware not elsewhere 
c'las.sifted ... ... 





1 


2' 2 






2-c .... 


15 

44 

23 

7 

4 

2 

4 

3} 

45 

9 

82 

157 

716 

29 

129 

93 

14 

75 

12 

1,135 

276 


13 

42 

20 

7 

4 

2 

4 

32 

42 

9 

80 

146 

673 

28 

124 

90 

14 

71 

12 

1,107 

266 


2| 


2-c 


1 


2I 


2-f 


Sheet metal work 


1 


3 


t^- 


Metal gooda not elsewhere classified 

Rolling mills and stoel works 


i 











fl- 


Hardware not elsewhere classified 

Cutlery 


9 






2 ' 2 


' 




3-i 


Tools and dies 


i 

3 




3-ni 


Metal furniture 


1 
i 

3 
4 
2 
9 
2 
5 


1 




3-n 


Wire work not elsewhere classified 

Car wheels and railway equipment 

Architectural and ornamental iron work. . 
Cooking and heating apparatus 


1 2 




3-p.... 
3-q.... 
3-r. . 


2 

11 

43 

1 

5 

3 




..:...i' ■■ 2 




3-t 


Stationary engines, boilers, etc . . 







3-u . . . . 
3-v 


Machinery not elsewhere classified 

r!ftj*t.ings , 1 . , . ,,.,.. 


1 7 






4-c 


Dynamos, motors and electrical supplies. . 
Carriages, wagons and sleighs 


' 9 




5-a 


ii::::::i ii 


4 




5-d 


Xlotor vehicles 


1 

4 








I:?- 


Railway repair shops 






28 

10 




Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 


1 










Total — Group II 








M 


' 36 

1 


2,911 


2,793 


2,829 


118 






III. Wood MANUFACTURKa. 
Saw mill oroducts 




1 


3 
9 
2 
2 

1 
5 

7 


1 ' 


17 
134 
20 
23 
92 
16 
78 
3 
39 
62 
26 


17 
124 
20 
23 
82 
16 
76 
3 
34 
59 
24 


17 
119 
20 
23 
92 
16 
72 
3 
39 
62 
26 
14 






2-a . . 


House trim . 


10 




2-b 


PackiniE boxes crates etc 


::::::r- "2 




2-c . .. 








4-c 


Wooden toys and novelties 




10 




4-e 


Other articles and appliances of wood 

Furniture and upholstery 


:::::: 7 

2 




5-a 


2 




6-b ... 


Caskets 


1 
2 

i 

1 






5-c 


Store, office and kitchen fixtures 




5 
3 
2 




6-e 


Other cabinet work 


3 




6 


Pianos, organs, etc 




7-b 






24 24 






Total — Group III 












40 


1 16 


534' 502 


503 


32 






IV. Leather and Ritbber Goods. 




2 


4 

4 
4 

1 
3 


i 1 

1 2 

1 1 


21 21 

12' 12 

611 59 

5, 5 

11 11 

5! 4 


20 

11 

61 

3 

8 

4 






3-b 


Saddlerv and harness 






3-d.... 


Boots and shoes 


2 




f— 


Canvas and soortins ffoods 






.!.!..j 2 






5-c. . . . 


Brushes 


1 






Total — Group IV 








17 


6 


115! 112 


107 


3 























Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Btjbeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



285 



CLASS cmias, teak bndbd 



to, 1911^ BT INDUSTRIES. 



NniBKR or Emplotibs at TncB or IxsPBcnoic. 


Wkkklt Hours of Labob. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP rOBCB. 


NUMBER op shop BM- 
PLOTEKS WHO WORK — 




NT7MBER IN SHOPS 
BMPiOTINa — 


BBX AND AGE. 


51 I 
hours 52-57 | 58-63 
or 1 hours. I hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


yean 

(in 

shops 


Total 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yr8.+). 


Y'ths 

(16- 

18 

yrs.). 


Bo3r8 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yre.). 


cept 

as 

not'd) 


20 


4 

3 

9 


25 

71 
33 




29 

66 

36 

9 










1 
4 2". 






71 


6 










71 
33 


... . 1 


36 








3i 

1 9 


1 













i 1 


















145 


16 


129 




140 


5 








7 9, 129 1 












5 


5 

2 

13 

12 

7 
4 
2 






5 

2 

13 

42 

12 

7 

4 

2 

3 

24 

34 

9 

80 

111 

647 

28 

124 

70 

10 

65 

12 

1,107 

220 










n ; i 


2 














.: 2' 1.:::.:;.:: :: 


13 














3 10 




42 


42 














42I 




12 








j 1 4 


8 






7 














3! 4 

1 4 






4 














1 




2 












..*.'.*. J ' 


2 

2 

10 

42 




3 


3 

24 

9 












.:;:::i. ::.::: i 


■ 


34 




_ _ _ _ 








1 14 




42 


«i 


2 




6 


1 1 




9 


I;::.:..! 9 


i.:::::i.:.::: 


80 


ftOl 








1 .| 


80 




111 


21 90 








1 1 in 






673 


3i 270 

3 25 

84i 90 

70 


400 




1 


25 ' 4| 74 


595 






28 


1 1 3 


25 
30 
20 






124 






1 ' 94 






70 






1 1 50 






10 


10 
65 









.::::::i::;::: 


4! 6 
57 






65 










1 .... 


8 






12 


12 
31 










. .. 1 I 12 






1,107 


20 


1.066 
266 






t 1.066 


41 






266 


10 


36 


. . 1 ' 266 
















1 




2,711 


250 


729 


1.732 


2.631 


12 


1 


67' 14 1.792) 905 












17 


17 
64 
20 
23 

ie 

19 
3 
3 






17 
109 

18 
9 
64 
Ifi 
43 
3 
31 
59 
24 
14 




i 


17 
16 






109 


45 






, 1 ... 


29' 64 






20 


I i 


1 


1' 19 






23 






12l , 1 7 15 

14| 1 ll , 81 

v.l 2, 4 10 






82 


82 








16 








70 


«•' 


22 


I • 40 


30 
3 
3 

















34 


^^\ 


::::::!:::::: 




3 




! 31 


1 


m 


151 44, 

4 20l 




2i 57 
1 24 




24 









:; 1 

i4i::::::i:::.:: 


14 


14 


1 . . 






. 1 1 ■ 












471 


198 


273f 


407 


10 


2 


52 35t 228 208 













20 


20 
11 

8 
8 






13 
11 
32 

8 
2 






7 


1 ' ,H 


2 
9 

40 
3 
3 




11 














50 


48 






2 


23 *>! 4 f\ 


1 . 


a 


2 


i 


1 


8 












5 




3 






1 






.1 













' , 1 


104 


56 


48 




67 


• 1 


2 


32 1 9 ft 29 ()(> 

















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



286 



New Yoek State De:pabtment of Labob. 





'MMe. XV.- 






ClTT AND InDUBTRT. 


Placm 
Inspbctbd. 


Num- 
ber 

owners 

at 
work. 


Larobbt 
NuMBBB or 
Emplotbbb 

IN YbAR. 




In. 


Once. 


More 
than 
onoe. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


omcB 

rORCB. 


duttry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
rfu>p. 


Tdtal. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

"^ 
age. 


1-a ... 


ALBANY— Conttniwd. 

V. Chsmicaus. Onj», Faints, Etc. 
Proprietary medicinee 


1 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 






4 

278 
16 
12 
27 
4 
13 


4 

262 

16 

9 
22 

4 
11 


4 

278 

16 

12 

15 

4 
13 






1-b 


Sodas and other alkalies 






16 




3 


Wood alcohol and essential oils 








4 


Animal oil products 






3 
5 




6 


Mineral oil products 








6 


Soap, perfumery and cosmetics 








7-0 . .. 


Glue, mucilage, etc r , 






2 






Total — Group V 










9 






363 


327 


341 


26 






VII. PWNTINO AND PaPBB GoODS. 

Paper boxes and tubes 








2-a 


5 

1 
2 
34 
8 
8 
1 






267 

13 

293 

1.621 

134 


262 

12 

273 

1,337 

134 


260 
5 

293 
1,616 

134 

139 
3 


16 

1 

20 

184 




2-b 


Paper bags and sacks 








2-c 


Otiier paper goods 








3-a.... 
3-b.... 


Printing and publishing 

Bookbinding and blankbook making 




i7 
6 
6 

1 




3-c 


146 137 
3 3 


8 




6 


Photography 






Xotal — Group VII 








59 




29 


2,3761 2.148 


2.349 


228 






VIII. Tbxtilbs. 
Felt and felt goods 




' 




2-b.... 


1 
1 
1 
2 






17 

9 

26 

737 


17 

9 

22 

734 


17 

9 

26 

737 






2-0 


Woolens and worsteds 










3 


Cotton goods 






4 
3 




4 


Hosiery and knit goods 










Total — Group VIII 










6 






789 


782 


789 


7 






IX. Clothino. Mxluncbt. Laxtndrt, 

Etc. 

Tailoring 








1-a 


66 


2 


38 
1 

12 
6 


339 


329 


301 

1,276 

833 

1 

196 

288 

18 

16 

60 


10 

13 

9 




1-b 


Shirts, noUars and cuffs 


9^ 

32' 

3i 


1,280, 1,267 
889 880 




2-a 


Dif^^rnAking. ... . . 




3 


Men's hats and caps 


25 

3 

211 

320 

18 

16 

70 


1 

211 

313 

18 

13 

70 




4-a 


Artificial feathers and flowers 


1 
27 








4-b. . : . 


Millinery 




i3 

11 








6-a».... 


Laundries (non-Chinese) 


16 


7 




6-a*.... 


Chinese laundries 


10 
4 
3 






6-b.... 


^leaning and dyeing . , , 




2 


2 




7 


Clip sorting 






Total — Group IX 












161{ 2! 83 


3.170 


3.129 


3.014 


41 






X. Food. Liquors and Tobacco. 
Flour and other cereal products 




1-a 


2 

2 
3 

1 

3 

71 

21 

1 

4 

10 

1 

1 

34 






21 
17 


16 
16 


21 

16 
49 
2 
6 
19 
61 

283 

141 
13 
10 

368 
35 
42 

286 


5 
1 




1-0 


Fruit and vegetable canning and pre- 
serving , 




2 




1-d.... 


Coffee and spice roasting and grinding. . . 

Groceries not elsewhere classified 

Provisions ^ ^ . . ^ ... 


49 37 
2 2 
6 6 

19 18 


12 .. 


1-e 








2 




2 




3 


Dairy products 


1 


4-b 


Crackers and biscuits 


i 


3 
87 
17 


61 

246 

194 

16 

12 

381 

26 

42 

289 


51 

236 

190 

13 

12 

340 

19 

40 

284 


10 


4-c 

4-d.... 


Bread and other bakery products 

Confectionery and ice cream. 


'2i;::::: 


6-a 


Artificial ice." 


3^ 


6-c 






2 
2 




6-e 


Malt liquors 


41 


M 


Vinous and distilled liQUors 


6 


6-a.... 


Tohaooo and snuff. . . .' . ..... . 






2 


6-b.... 


Cigars ^ 


1 


27 


5 




Total — Group X 






167 


2 


142 


1,379 


1,279 


1.292 


100 - 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 287 

daas Cities, Year Ended SepCemlier SO, 1911: By Industriea — Continaed. 



Number of Emplotees 


AT Time of Inspbction. 






Weekly Hours or Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP rOBCE. 


NUMBER or shop EM- 
PLOTEES WHO WOBE — 




NUMBEB IN SHOPS 
EUPLOTING — 


8BX 


▲ND AOE. 




51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-67 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


•hops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 
(18 

yw. +). 


Y'thfl 
yrs.). 


?iT 

16 

yp8.). 


Worn. 


GiriB 
(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 
not'd). 


4 


4 

5 

15 

,S 

4 
11 






1 

222 
10 
9 
10 

4 
11 






3 
36 








4 

228 

14 

9 
10 

4 






262 


257 




4 


4 

1 




4 
1 


30 






15 






9 














10 






















4 






















11 
















11 




























315 


68 


257 




267 


4 


5 


39 




5 


41 


269 












245 


5 

4 

' "i67 

33 

67 

3 


240 




72 

1 

125 

964 

78 

100 

3 






169 

2 

135 

329 

55 

29 


4 


4 


5 


236 
4 

273 
7 

101 






4 


1 

13 

9 

1 


'"is 
i 






273 


37 
540 
101 

64 


236 
684 












1,331 


11 

i 


1.324 

33 

120 


ii 

3 






134 






131 






3 






























2.121 


219 


982 


920 


1,343 


24 


19 


719 


16 


1.481 


19 


621 












17 


17 
9 






9 

1 

19 

160 






8 

7 

3 

560 








17 

8 

22 

720 






9 










1 


1 








22 


22 
20 


""7i4 










734 






14 


14 


















782 


26 


42 


714 


189 






578 


15 


15 




767 
















291 


211 
20 

179 

25 

3 

165 

104 
18 
13 
15 


80 

452 

98 


* "79i 
547 


174 

100 

159 

21 


1 
2 


3 
5 

1 


113 
1.099 

654 
4 
3 

192 

195 


**'69 
8 


3 

64 

9 


66 

643 

382 

7 


222 

556 

433 

18 

3 

15 

207 

18 

10 

60 






1.263 






824 






25 






3 


















195 


30 
177 










3 

1 


10 
24 


170 
50 






281 




85 
18 
11 
25 










18 










13 










2 
35 






3 






60 


45 
































2.973 


753 


882 


1.338 


593 


3 


9 


2.297 


71 


110 


1,321 


1,542 












16 


16 

15 

37 

2 

6 

18 

13 

151 

74 

10 

10 

54 

19 

"'i29 






16 

10 

33 

2 

6 

18 

41 

154 














16 

15 

22 

2 

6 

18 

49 

219 

108 

10 

10 

2 

19 






15 










5 

4 












37 












15 








2 














6 






















18 






















51 


38 
72 
63 




...... 

...... 


2 
3 


8 
65 
57 


i 

7 


2 
4 
7 


22 






223 






137 


73 

18 

327 
19 
85 








10 










10 






















327 


273 













290 


35 






19 














40 


40 
152 






5 

1 






5 

176 


35 
99 






281 


2041 2 


74 




6 












1.192 


554 


638 




958' 2 
woo 


11 


213 


8 


499 


191 


502 

















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28S 



Xew York State Department of Labor. 



TiOile XV.-- Statlstica of FictoriM Inapected In First and Seeond 





■ 

CiTT AND InDUSTRT. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


LARaSST 

Number of 
Empix>tbes 
IN Year. 




In- 


t 

! 
1 

More 

Once, t than 

1 once. 

1 
i 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


orricE 

FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
■hop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


1 


ALBAliY — Concluded. 

XI. Water, Light and Power. 
Water 


1 
2' ! 


81 
13 
15 
2 


67 

11 

10 

2 


53 
13 
15 
2 


14 
2 




2 




2 ' 




4 


I'lectric liRht and power 


1 1 


5; 


5 




i; 1 









Total — Group XI 


1 








6l , .. 


111 


90 


83 


21 






Total — Albany 








526 4 


316 


11.895 


11.315 


11.45t» 


580 






BUFFALO. 

I Stone, Clay and Glass Productts. 
Cut stone 




1-b 


6 




442 
11 
4 
4 
59 
16 
46 

9 

224 

104 

359 

10 

324 

99 

4 


429 
11 
3 
2 
56 
15 
43 

9 

224 

101 

354 

10 

263 

99 

2 


173 
11 

4 

4 

42 

14 

26 

22! 

83 
345 

10 
312 

1 


11 




2-a 


Afibestos. graphite, etc 


2 

1 

1 

5 

1 

4 


1 
3 




2-b 


Abranives 


i 




3-b 




2' 


3-c 


Plaster (wall nnd land) 


3 


3-d 


Sifted sand and mortar 


1 


3-e 


Artiticinl stone, • 


3 


3-f 


Plaster and composition casts and orna- 
ments ... 


3' 

4 


3 


1.... 


4-a 


BuildiuK brick 

Terra cotta and fire-clay products 

Pottery products 

BuildinK plasa 

Beveled k'-i'-s and mirrors 




4-b 


5 




3 


4-e 


2 




6 


5-a 


1 






5-b 


5 

6 

1 


1 


61 


5-c 


Pressed, blown and cut glassware 

Bottles and jars 




5-d 


2 




Total — Group I 

II. Metam. Machines and Con- 
veyances. 
Silver and plated ware 












14 


1,715 


1.621 


1,360 


92 


1-a 


1 

2' 

't ' 


2 

9 


5 
515 
628 

9 

247 

44 

332 

1,950 

221 

952 

648 

829 

210 

4 

258 

3 

405 

287 

753 

104 

1,745 

31 

3,130 

3.375 

2,244 


6 
465 
625 

9 

232 

44 

322 
1,894 
205 
950 
646 
826 
200 

^1 

371 

270 

741 

100 

1,731 

31 

3,035 

3,157 

2,236 


5 
480 
495 

322 

1,504 

197 

952 

578 

810 

194 

4 

233 

1 

405 

247 

638 

70 

1.524 

31 

2.804 

3.079 

1,565 




1-e.... 
2-a 


Jewelry, gold pens, etc 

Smelting and refining 


50 

3 


2-b 


Copper work 

Bras8. bronze and aluminum castings 

Ghs and electric fixtures . . 


2 




1 


2-0 

2-d 


13 

5 

10 

48 

12i 1 
2 


5 
2 

2 

18 


15 


2-e 


Brass and bronze ware not elscwbere 
classifi*^ 


1 
10 


2-f 


Sheet metal work 


55 


U- 


Metal goods not elsewhere classified 


16 

2 


3-0 . . . 


Rolling mills and steel works 


Ill 

8 

14 

2 . .. 


I 
4 


2 


3-d.... 


Bridges and structural iron 


3, 


3-i 


H aroware not elsewhere class ficd 

Cutlery 

Tools and dies 


10 

1 


15 

1; 


3 


i" 


3-k 




! 


3-*n 


^letal furniture 


5 

11 

6 

li 


i 
2 


34' 


3-D ... . 
3-p.... 
3-q.... 
3-r.... 

3-e 

3-t 

3-u.... 
8-v.... 


Wire work not elsewhere classified 

Car wheels and railway equipment 

Architectural and ornamental iron work. . 


17 

12 

4 


9 




14 


Typewriting and reglHtering machines. . . . 

Stationary engines, boilers, etc 

Machinery not elsewhere classified 

Castings 


3 




1.... 


28: 

61; 

16; 


3 

9 
3 


95 

217 

8 


j 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt op Bubeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 289 

Omm OOtB, Yew Etaded September M, 1911: By Indutriee — Continiied. 



NuMBBB or Emplotbbs 


AT TxifB or iNSPBCnON. 








Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


■hop FORCa. 


NT7MBBB OF SHOP BUPLOTBBS 
WHO WOBK 




NUUBBB IN SHOPS 
BMPIX>TINa — 


SBX AND AQB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 
shops 


TotaL 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 


Y'ths 

(16- 

18 

yra.). 


16 

yra.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yw.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


39 


14 
11 

10 
2 


25 




39 
11 
10 
2 










14 


25 








11 












11 





10 
















10 






2 
















2 




























62 


37 


25 


1 «2 










14 


35 


2 


11 
















10.876 


2.167 


4.005 


4.704 


6,657 


61 


49 


3,997 


112 


2.189 


3.665 


5.011 


11 




162 


36 
11 
3 
2 
39 
13 
23 

9 

32 

4 

10 
4 

19 
2 


127 




111 
4 
3 

3I 

13 
23 

9 

215 

80 

153 

10 

249 

74 

1 


2 




48 

7 


1 


26 


135 
11 


1 




11 








3 
















3 

2 

39 

13 






2 






















39 























13 






















23 
















12 


11 
3 






9 














6 






224 


224 

48 


""336 


9 










1741 50 






80 








. . . 


111 60 






340 


33 


10 


132 


12 


22 


318 

10 

160 









10 




:::"::i:::::: 




251 


247 
80 




2 










91 






99 


10 




14 
1 


1 



1 
2 


59, 89 
1 






2 






















1,268 


206 


726 


336 


986 


56 


10 


202 


14 


63 


802i 313 

1 -■ 












5 


5 
96 
13 

9 
76 
19 

25 

260 

82 






5 
338 
490 

9 
177 
39 

254 

1,211 

124 

950 

671 

785 

152 

4 

214 

1 

313 

165 

617 

64 

1,477 

19 

2,682 

2.7«.8 

1,474 















6 

55 

492 

1 






430 


334 


"■479 


is 

2 


12 


62 




' 


13 


362 






492 






9 




...... 






8 






177 


101 
25 

287 

278 

99 


'***9ii 

""966 
287 
330 







2 
2 

2 

200 

9 


81, 94 

141 28 

49 261 






44 


2 3 

9I 1 











312 


48 
145 

48 






7 

1 






1,449 
181 


44 

7 


42 

1 


174 
67 


1.075 
105 
650 
552 
530 
97 
1 










950 


300 




570 


32 
16 
30 

4 
71 

1 
19 
59 

is 

31 
163 
227 

72 


267 
461 
154 


5 
15 
10 


::::::i::::::: 






24 

270 

80 




807 


7 

6 


:::.::: 




7 
7 
3 
7 






184 


15 


1 






4 






232 
1 


1 




5 


3 


10 




118 

1 

27 


104 


3 




371 


i5i 

171 

626 

66 

272 


201 
"i".225 


11 

14 

8 

1 

31 

1 

25 

67 

10 


1 
11 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
12 
4 


46 
39 


i 


10 

15 

63 

1 

2 

6 

1 

294 

6 


334 







230 


67 148 
1771 386 

1 65 

425 1,083 

i 25 

346 2.362 
669 1,909 
820 731 






626 






66 










1,610 










> 31 


10 








2,709 
2.862 
1.567 


831 

1,376 

359 


1.726 
1.259 
1,126 







14 
69 


1 












10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



290 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XY. — Statistics pf Factories Inspected in First and Second 



In- 
dustrj' 
num- 
ber. 



Places 
Inspcctbd. 



Cmr AND Industbt. 



Once. 



More 
than 
once. 



Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

worlc. 



Largest 
Number or 
Employees 

IN Year. 



Total. 



There- 
of in 
shop. 



grand 

TOTAL. 



omcB 

rORCB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 



BUFFALO— Continued. 

II. Metals. Machines and Con 
veyances — Concluded. 
Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm ap- 
paratus 

Dynamos, motors and electrical supplit 

Carriages, wagons and sleighs 

Blacksmithlng and wheelwrighting. . . . 

Cycles 

Motor vehicles 

Cars 



Railway repair ebons 

Boat and snip builaing 

Agricultural implements 

Professional and scientific instruments. 
Optical and photographic apparatus. . . 
Lamps, reflectors, stereopticons. etc. . . . 

Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 

Sorting old metals 



Total — Group II. 



III. Wood Manufactures. 

House trim 

Packing boxes, crates, etc 

Cigar and fancy wood boxes 

Cooperage 

Canes, umbrella sticks, etc 

Wooden toys and novelties 

Other articles and appliances of wood. 

Furniture and upholstery 

Caskets 

Store, office and kitchen fixtures 

Mirror and picture frames 

Other cabinet work 

Pianos, organs, etc 

Brooms 



Total — Group III. 



IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 

Leather 

Furs and fur goods 

Belting, washers, etc 

Saddlery and harness 

Traveling bags and trunks 

Boots and shoes 

Gloves and mittens 

Fancy leather goods 

Canvas and sporting goods 

Rubber and gutta percha goods 

Articles of horn. bone, tortoise shell, etc. 

Brushes 

Mattresses, muff beds, pillows, etc 



Totol — Group IV. 



V. CheuicalSj Oils, Paints, Etc. 

Proprietary medicines 

Sodas and other alkalies 

Other chemicals and drugs 

Paint, varnish, etc 

Dyes, colors and inks 



30, 

6 
56. 



6. 
10 

5 . 
10 . 

121. 



470, 



30 . 
11 . 

,; 

38!. 

2i. 
12i. 
10:. 

4 . 
71. 
51. 



167 . 




14 

41 
16 

6 
19 
10 

3 

7| 
16 

1 

3 
19 



126; 



172 

170 

365 

11 

74 

5.422 

2,3C8 

3.932, 

389' 

1.708 

601 

158| 

161 

175) 

158i 



170 

157 

348 

11 

71 

6.294 

2,264 

3,845 

384 

1,5391 

53 

1491 

161 

169' 

157| 



113 

137 

276 

11 

74 

6,120 

2,308 

3,8o7 

389 

1.408 

53 

158 

101 

175| 

100 



3. 
1281. 
44 . 

II: 

1691. 

7 . 



.1. 



129 34.182 33.131, 30.663' 1.049, 



40 



2,063 

103, 

199 

165 

3 

35 

414 

1,631 

39 

818 

46 

198 

438 

38 



6.190 



1 
14 



641 

144 

49 

465 

163 

667 

327 

66 

77 

620 

176 

60 

80 



53 3.204 



368 

1 6 
475 
300 

2 208 



1.953 

102 

197 

163 

3 

36. 

404 

1.5941 

37 

791 

45| 

194; 

424 

37 



1,828 

91 

168 

162 

3 

33| 

383 

1.679! 

391 

766 

43 

162 

425 

38 



110 . 

2 . 
21. 



6,9791 6,720 



608 

142 

49 

462 

160 

661 

318 

66 

70 

484 

168 

49 

79 



3,096 



317 
4 
472 
266 
202 



626 

77 

49 

426 

141 

662 

318 

66 

69, 

615 

lOO' 

601 

77, 



211 



2,946, 108 



475| 
290| 
192 



61 
2 
3 

45 
6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 291 

C1m8 Odes, Year Ended September 80, 1911: By Industries — Continued. 



Number of Employees at Time 


OF Inspection. 








Weekly Hours of Labor. 


ChU- 
• dren 
1 under 

1 14 
1 years 

ahops 


SHOP POBCB. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK 




NUMBEB m SHOPS 
EMPLOTINO — 


SEX AND AQB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


1 

i 


Total. 


\ 1-19. 

1 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yre. +). 


' Y'ths 

(16- 

18 

yra.). 


Boys 

(14- 
16 

yre.). 


Worn. 


GirlB 
(14- 
1 16 


58-63 
hours. 


i 0- ^, 


Ill 


8 

72 

182 

11 

9 

267 


103 
62 
87 




100 

115 

268 

11 

67 

4,810 

2,201 

3,746 

384 

1,189 

36 

139 

101 

165 

87 


8 
8 
1 


3 

1 




1 


2 
39 

2 
10 

1 
5 


109 




1 


124 






62* 23 




260 







59 208 

1 

39 31 

3.658 799 

234' 2,030 

1,738' 1.062 


! * * 


11 




1 




71 


62 
658 


■*4;i67 

2.264 

3,280 

233 

852 


3 
136 
36 
24 


1 
3 


1 




4.992 
2.264 


43 

27 




530 


3,770 


26 

13 

15 

1 37 

1 11 

1 41 


490 
125 
374 

31 
112 

90 
154 

68 






1 970 


384 




1 




384 
34 


...... .1 


1,239 


r'"4i 
3 
2 


2 
2 
2 


6 
5 
6 


1 






3 

I 

2 


1.202 


, 


46 
149 


35 8 
144j 3 
9! 90 
53 116 
20, 72 


1 


i ' 


101 






169 


' 












99 




12 




5 


2 










1 




29.614 


1 2.020 


8.305 


19,289 


28,322 


548 


124 


605 


15 


724 


10,347| 16.738| 1.805 




1.718 
90 


91 
13 
38 

«! 

33 

118 

120 

4 

13 

42 

10 

14 

37 


910 

77 
128 
99 


717 


::::::: 


1,608 

67 

40 

159 

3 

27 

320 

1,243 

36 

661 

37 

147 

393 

29 


100 

17 

3 




t 
4 
1 


^ 





4 

6 

10 

19 

3 

25 

13 

155 


289 1.425 

8 76 

661 90 

31 110 






166 


113 


6 







160 







3 










33 






5 

16 
161 


i 

2 
73 






::::::: s 

72 2S,S 

811 1,076 

4I 33 

66, 655 

11 18 

20' 136 

134 277 

27 1 






373 


'"■969 

33 

301 


255 
453 

••••425 


35 
60 

1 


' 






1,542 






37 









739 


55 
3 
9 
2 


23 
2 
2 

i 




is 

13 
2 






42 











158 


148 
397 


1 










411 


i6 

7 








37 




9 


















5,509 


597 


3.062 


1,850, 


4.770 


371 


121 


236 


" 


277 


1,039, 4.193 













493 
75 


32 
75 
27 
79 

5 
81 
95 

3 
31 
72 

14 

76 


171 


290; 


449 
32 
24 

340 
82 

299 

143 
20 
25 

454 

35 

23 

1 


3 

1 
14 

7 
20 
73 

9 

1 


10 

6 

5 

6 

45 

19 


31 
42 
2 
71 
27 
97 
132 
33 
27 

10 
57' 
25 

75; 


4 

3 

32 
6 
2 


10 

10 

23 

9 

9 

80 

37 

2 


36 332 
50 15 
3 23 
21, 893 
73 56 


115 




49 


22 

344 

133 

212 

214 

53 

21 

155 

93 

35 


■■■'-4 

252 






423 






138 






546 


237 229 






309 


272 
23 








56 


si 






52 


39, 13 

40. 438 






479 


14 

1 


i 


1 


1 







93 


1 


93 
13 






49 




1 
8 


35' 






76 


66 


2 




















2,838 


590 


1.453 


795! 


1,927 


143 


91 


629; 


48 


190 


895 


1.638 


115 


....... 


277 


53 
4 
37 
38 
29 


t 
224 


1 


80 

1 

462 

158 

142 






4 
42 


3 


83 


192 
4 

88 
137 

49 


2 






4 










472 


2i6 
207 
157 


225 


3 
2 


3 

2 


4 


7 

38 
4 


377 
70 
133 






245 






186 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



202 



New York State Department op Labob. 





Tfeble XV.- 


- Stadfltics of Ftetorles InapMted Id First and SmoimI 




Crrr akd Industbt. 


Placis 
Ikbpzctbd. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 

at 
work. 


Laromt 
NuuBSB or 
Emplotbw 

nr Ybab. 




In- 


Onoe. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


omcB 

rORCB. 


cl\ii«try 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


2-c 


buffalo— Conrtniiad. 

V. Chsmicalb. Oil«. Paintb. Etc. — 

Concluded. 

Lead penoUs and orayons 


1 

10 

8 

2 

10 

i 





1 

? 


4 
490 


4 
JUH 


2 

490 
163 
287 
1,691 
33 
186 






3 


Wood alcohol and easential oils 


47 
14 




4 


Animal oil products. 


163: I'iQ 




5. * 


Mineral oil products 


287 

1,699 

33 

309 


287 

1.696 

33 

286 




6 








4 


***** 


7-0. . . 


Cilue, mucilage, etc 


1 






7^ 


Fertiiisers . . 7. '. 


23 






Total — Group V 










78 


1 


7 


4.342 


4,147 


4.142 


195 






VI. Papkb and Pulf. 
Paper mills 




2-0. . . . 


2 






62 


60 


58 


2 






VII. Pbintino akd Papbb Goods. 
Type and printeni* materials 








1, 


1 
17 

7 
94 

9 
22 


2 


2 
2 
3 

43 
8 

16 


2 

2,442 

216 

2,457 

98 

1,193 

196 

8 


2 

2,390 

205 

2,164 

90 

1,104 

177 

7 


2,236 
206 

2,393 
88 

1,112 
196 

7 






2-ft 


Paper boxes and tubes 


52 

10 

293 

8 

89 

19 

1 




2-0 . 


Otfier paper goods 




3-a 


Printio/i and publishing r , . - 1 r - - 




3-b.... 
3-0 


Bookbinding and blankbook znaldng 

Lithographing and engraving 




4 


Wall paper 


1 
2 







6 


Photography 




2 






Total — GrouD VII 










163 


2\ 7fi 


6,611 


6,139 


6,238 


472 






VIII. TmxriMS. 
Silk and silk goods 








1 


4 
4 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 






910 
60 
30 

236 

102 

27 

8 

16 

247 
14 


907 
60 
30 

236 

98 

27 

8 

16 

247 
11 


876 
60 
22 

236 

78 

27 

8 

16 

247 
12 


3 




2-a 


CftrtM*trS and rxiirs ......t....i..iTtrrti-t 








2-b 


Felt and felt goods 










3 


Ootton soods • 










4 


Hosiery and knit goods 




2 


4 




5-a 


Oyping, finishing, etc , ,,,,t-r---T--Tr-- 




5-b 


Upholstery goocls 










5-0 .. 


Braids, embroideries and drees trimmings 

Flax, hemp and jute manufactures 

Oilcloth, window shades, etc 




1 
1 






6 






7 


3 






Total — Group VIII 










23 




4 


1,650 


1,640 


1.581 


10 






IX. ClOTHINO, MlLLlNKBT, LaXJNDBT, 

Etc. 

Tailoring . . . . , , . , r - - - - r t ^ - r r - t ^ - r 




1-a 


261 

7 

1 

136 

1 

1 

7 

7 

2 

89 

6 

1 

26 

18 

14 

14 


2 


175 


2,567 

312 

42 

2,146 

15 

10 

23 

119 

6 

769 

83 

1 

1,314 

19 

89 

411 


2.518 

300 

41 

2,117 

15 

10 

23 

118 

6 

758 

81 

1 

1,173 

19 

83 

398 


2,371 

259 

42 

2.051 

15 

1 

23 

103 

6 

721 

83 

1 

1.299 

19 

84 

336 


49 

12 

1 

29 




1-b 


Shirts (M>llarff and cufTs. ................ 




1-0 * * 


Men's neckwear 








2-a 


T^ffffBmaking 


1 


88 

1 




2-b 


Women's wfite goods 




2-d 


Women's neckwear, etc. ................ 






2-e 


Corsets, carters, etc 


i 


3 

7 

2 

62 






3 


TVl#»n*fl hiitii find CftPfl ... ■■••*■**•* ■ t .« t 


1 




4-a 


Artificial feathers and flowers, ,.,,,.,, ^ , 




4-b .. 


Millinery 


11 
2 




5-a 


Curtains* embroideries, etc 




5-0 


TTmhrellas and nara«ol« ,,,», ^ ,,,,,, ^ . 








6-a^ 


Laundries (non-Chinese) 




6 

14 

7 

3 


141 




6-a* 


Chinese laimdriM*- . , . . ^ , , ^ . - 1 r t 




6-b 


Cleaniiir and dyeing 


6 
13 




7 


Clin sortinff r ,. . 






Total — Group IX ...,,,, 






691 


4 


! 368 


7,926 


7,661 


7.414 


265 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 293 

CtoM Cities, Year Ended September SO, 1911: By Industriee — Continaed. 



NUMBBB OF ElfPLOTSSS 


AT TXMB OP iNSPBOnON. 






Wbbklt Hoitbs op Labob. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP rORCB. 


NUMBBB OP SHOP BaCPLOTBBS 
WHO WOBK— 




XrUMBBR IN SHOPS 
SMPLOTING — 


BBX AND AGB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


yeMB 

(in 

shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrB.+). 


Y^ths 
(16- 
18 

yw.). 


Boys 
(14- 
16 

yra.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 

not'd). 


2 


2 

33 
63 

6 
63 

5 






1 

433 

62 

287 

1.071 

29 

162 






1 

6 
64 


***'ii 


2 
28 
15 










443 
149 
287 


96 
162 


240 

'"'28i 
1.388 


3 

8 


2 

4 

1 


2 

12 

101 

1,433 


330 
107 
186 
245 

1 


83 
15 




1,687 


131 


1 ' 


479 

4 


3 


9 
4 






33 


28 
162 




162 


::::::i:::::: 




















3.947 


323 


1.490 


2.134 


2.888 


147 


14 


877 


21 


190 


2.018 


1.451 


288 




66 




66 




51 




5 








56 




















2 


2 
58 
19 

496 
59 

106 

6 






2 

251 

64 

1,710 

39 

712 

170 

4 


1 








2 
301 

59 
277 

25 
116 








2.183 
195 


911 
176 
995 
21 
707 
177 


1.214 
'*666 

iio 


83 
2 

60 
3 

52 
7 


12 

6 

74 

1 
21 


1.693 

123 

251 

37 

233 


194 

6 

6 


207 

45 

1,804 

55 

907 


1.660 
91 
19 


15 




2.100 






80 






1.023 








177 


177 






6 


1 


1 




1 


5 












*******i 




6.766 


746 


2.087 


2.033 


2.952 


157 


115 


2.338 


204 


3.019 


785 


1.947 


15 




872 
60 


is 

io 

22 
27 

8 
16 
10 

9 


170 
42 
22 

52 


702 
"**226 


44 

31 
12 
117 
29 
18 
4 
1 

1 


2 


3 


792 

29 

10 

116 

43 

7 

4 

15 

186 

3 


31 


34 


3i 


088 
29 
22 

232 

64 

19 

8 


150 




22 














236 


2 


1 
1 


3 

1 


4 
2 


8 

8 






74 






27 


1 


8 










...... 1 


16 














16 




247 




237 


4 


1 


7 

1 


8 
9 


239 


I 


9 


1 
















1,571 


120 


286 


1.165 


310 


8 


6 


1.204 


43 


57 


63 


1.301 


150 


2,322 
247 


873 
19 

""570 

15 

1 

S3 

29 

6 

363 

43 

1 

103 

10 

55 

94 


901 

228 

41 

1.452 


548 


1,116 

27 

5 


25 


25 


1,112 

215 

33 

1.737 

13 

1 

21 

47 

5 

647 

41 

1 

992 

5 

35 

156 


44 
5 
3 

59 


65 
10 

"*i96 


1.810 
67 
41 

1.458 
16 


447' 

170, 










41 










2.022 
15 


4 


4 


369 
i 










1 










2 

3 


1 
7 
4 






23 












16 

98 

5 

183 

44 


1 




102 


73 




49 

1 
39 
39 


2 


1 






e 


li 

433 

37 

1'. 

685 
17i 
40 

207 






710 


126 
38 


222 




2 

1 


22 


94 






81 






1 










1,158 


1,056 




163 
14 
42 

167 






3 


83 


390 

1 

32 

108 


i 


1 


10 








78 


23 
229 









1 


6 
8 




3^ 






1 










7,149 


2.214 


4.165 


770 


1.882 


31 


33 


5.061 


142 


473 


4,268 


2.407, 


< ' 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



294 



Xew York State Department of Labor. 



Table XV. — Statistics of Factories Inspected in First and Second 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber. 



1-a. 

1-0. 

1-d. 
1-e. 
2... 
3... 



ClTT AND InDDSTRT. 



Places 
Inspbctbd. 



Once. 



4-b. 
4-c. 
4-d. 
5-a. 
6-b. 
6-c. 
6-d. 
5-e. 
6-f.. 
6-b. 
6-0. 



BUFFALO— Concluded. 

X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco. 

Flour and other cereal products 

Fruit and vegetable canning and preserv- 
ing 

Coffee and spice roasting and grinding.. . 

iGroceries not elsewhere classified 

, Provisions 

, Dairy products 

, Macaroni and other food pastes | 

Crackers and biscuits i 

, Bread and other bakery products ; 

, j Confectionery and ice cream [ 

, Artiticial ice 

, Cider, apple juire, grape juice, vinegar, etc. 

, Mineral and soda waters I 

, Malt ! 

' Malt liquors 

I Vinous and distilled liquors 

Cigars 

.Cigarettes 



Total — Group X 

XI. Water, Light and Power. 



14 

4 

8 

7 

34 

4 

3 

5 

182 

31 

4 

1 

12 

13 

24 

9 

64 

2 



More 
than 
once. 



421 



Gas. 

Electric light and power. 

Total — Group XI . . 



I 



] XII. Building Industry. 
. Paint shops 



Total — Buffalo 2,077 



NEW YORK CITY. 



I 



1-a. 
1-b. 



1-0. 

2-a. 



2-b. 
3-a. 



3-c. 



3-d. 



I. Stonb, Clay and Glass Products. 

Crushed stone (BrookLn) 

Cut stone 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

kichmond 

Hones, slates, mosaics, etc 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 

Asbestos, graphite, etc 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn i 

Quiens i 

Abrasives (Brooklyn) 

Asphalt ' 

Manhattan and Bronx, .j 

Brooklyn ■ 

QuecnM I 

Plaster (wall and land) | 

Manhattan and Bronx. ., 

Brooklyn ] 

Que.cM j 

Richmond 

Sifted sand and mortar (Brookl^ny I 



1 
149 

69 
£3 
25 
S 
6 
51 
5 

121 
71 
6 



Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work, 



Largest 
nuuber of 
Employees 

IN Year. 





There- 


Total. 


of in 




shop. 


1.128 


1,121 


32 


30 


40 


40 


164 


136 


2.020 


1,831 



grand 

TOTAL. 



omcB 

FORCE. 



iThere- 
' of 

Total.! ^*-^^ 
i years 

of 

age. 



39 



73 
35 

364 
1,070 

722 
58 
11 
70 

263 

750 
38 

467 
18 



1621 7,329 



255 
51 



I 

J 

31 
345 
.014' 
701, 

39, 

64' 
257; 
611 

38' 
467, 

17 



1,103 

26 

36 

143 

1.891 

73 

35 

343| 

l.C5l! 

639 

58 
9 

66 
247 
722 

36 
444 

14 



6,816, 6,836 



248 
30 



300. 



278 



44, 



41 



151 845 73,5611 70,612 



12' 

4,8l4t 

l,714i 

1,094^ 

1,989 

17\ 

84' 

S7 

47. 

944' 

130 

797\ 

17\ 

1071 

254' 

100\ 

1S9, 

W 

7271 

99] 
660\ 

14 i 



12 

4,633 

1,628 

1,076 

1,912 

17 

83 

S6 

47 

903 

ItO 

766 

17 

105 

253 

99 

139 

15 

717 

S5 

5M 

95 

645 

14 



249 
51 



300 



34 



67,292 



4 

2,800 

1,056 

696 

1,035 

13 

69 

te 

47 
756 

lot 

637 
17 
107 
225 
100 
119 
6 
627 

te 

5» 

74 

476 

14 



28;. 

189 . 

8'. 

iS'; 

62 . 
21 . 
19 . 

I: 

61. 
139 . 



513, 



2li: 



28) 



2,945' 



181'. 

86 . 
18\. 

ll. 
1'. 

*4i ■ 

10\. 

I 

ioi! 

i\. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 295 

Claos CiCies, Year Ended September 30. 1911: By Industries — Continaed. 



Number or EifPLOYKE3 


AT TiMK 


OF iNSPdCTIO.V. 






Weekly Hours of Labor. 


Chil- 

dren 

under 

14 








SHOP 


PORCB 








NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOTKB5 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN 8HOP3 
KMPLOTING — 




SEX AND AGE. 




51 

houre 

or 

lees. 


52-67 
houre. 


5»-63 
houre. 


Over 
63 

houre. 


years 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


1 

' Men 
200 +. i (18 

,yr8. +). 

1 
1 


Y'ths 
(1^ 
18 


Boys 

(14- 

16 

yre.). 


Worn. 

(16 yre. 

+). 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


cept 

M 

nofd). 


1,096 


33 

24 
36 
30 

139 

8 

31 

20 

449 

1&4 

39 

7 

60 

104 
82 
36 

262 
13 


409 


1 

1 

1 

6M| 


948 

12 

14 

72 

1.560 

65 

31 

128 

719 

232 

39 

5 

44 

241 

5S2 

35 

302 

6 






139 

12 

20 

32 

108 


9 


10 


99 
17 


681 


30f 




24 






7 
4 

58 




36 


85 

306 
57 



304 
242 
354 

■ * ■ i37 
501 

" " i82 


■■i."267 

;;;;;;■ 

'"'298 

' 

1 

1 


1 





i 

11 




32 






115 


11 4; 






1,702 


34 






3«> 
4 


1 . 666 ",'".'. 
41 " on 




65 


..... 






31 










31 
314 
814 
407 

26 
7 

36 
124 
117 


1 




324 


8 

28 

3 


i 

17 

1 


i87 
223 
279 


i 




11 9 

6li 112 

7 95 






980 

518 
39 


' 2 
) 9 
1 13 




7 






2 

9 








60 


5 


2 


."..... 


41 26 






241 




99 
4.tR 


18 




683 




1 








30 




(36 


i 

77 
5 


■36 


4i 27 


..... 




444 


'1 


23 


391, 6; 47 

11 2 






13 







6.323 


1.537 


2.577 


2.209 


5.03.) 


93 


45 


1.094 


56 


530, 1.038 4.387 368 




242 


5 
30 




1 
237 


241 
30 


1 








i 


1 24. 

7 10 




30 








ii' 














• '"1 


272 


35 




237 


271 


1 








Ui 1 8 2531 










34 


4 


30 


! 


34 






1 
1 


321 2 


1 












2.995 




64.347 


8.392 


25.137 


30.818 


49.428 


1 . 55.5 559 


12,251 


554 


5.566, 21.347 ,34.439 


1 


4 


4 

779 

88 
IS 
45 
tl 
g4 
82 
62 
13 
17 
5 
36 

SO 

6 
22 

kk 


" ' i ! 508 

668 
402 
638 


1 

. 1 

'* 332i 

1 

3sk\ 
1 


4 

2.60a 

967 

677 

94-^ 

IS 

68 

£1 

47 

568 

66 

486 

16 

99 

224 

99 

119 

6 

579 

25 

62 

70 

432 

14 




.. . . 








4 








2.619 


16; 1 

2^ 1 


2| 


2,3i7 


233 


69 






970 


838\ 91 41 
636 39 3 
84l\ 92 25 






678 


1 
7 




1 






958 





2 

1 






IS 




2. 11 








68 


23 


1 


v.v.vx.v.w. 


1 


17| 27 
17\ A 


24 






ei 


1 


1 






47 


ks 

86 
40 
46 


1 

""547\ 
1 





:';""'i 




23 
126 
67 
69 


24 
5*4 

20 
647 

17 
105 

46 






715 


50 1 

/I 

49^ 1 


96 
25 
70 

1 




5 
6 






9B 






606 






17 











105 


ioo 

188 
99 
89 


..... 1 

i 


6 














224 




1 


39 


i39 

99 
40 






99 


' ... 


1 






119 




1 


39 


'40 
6 

617 
25 
62 
70 

470 
14 






6 


1 


1 






617 


125 

SO 
70 


470 
t 

470\ 

I 


18 


20 












£6 












6t 




..'.'/.','.. V.Va.V.V.V.K.V.V 







70 


' 


:::::::'::::::i:::::::i::::::: 






A70 


18 


20 




1 






u 


14 











....::.!. .::::: 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New Yokk State Depabtment of Labob. 



TM>le XV.--Statifltk8orFM<orlMlMpMted to FIrrt mud a» wd 





Cmr AND Industry. 


Placbs 
Inspbcted. 


Num- 
ber 

of 
owners 

at 
work. 


1 Labobst 
numbeb of 
Emplotbbs 

IN YbAB. 








In- 


Onoe. 


More 
than 
onoe. 


gkand 

TOTAL. 


OPFICB 

roscB. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


1 

Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14^16 

ace. 


3-e 


new YORK CITY— Continued. 

I. Stonb. Clat and Glass Pboducts — 

CondutUd. 
Artificial stone 


13 
3 

7 

1 
£ 

60 




1 


99 
46 

1 1^ 

706 

661 

46 

282 

1.196 

862 

889 

1 575 

882 

526 

1 147 

370 

9 

1.335 

698 

630 

7 

1.212 

997 

£06 

9 

2.168 

1,061 

849 

£68 

302 

143 

2S 

136 


203 
96 
45 
60 
18 

676 
638 

282 

1,137 
840 
886 
359 
868 
518 
140 
369 
9 

1.235 

606 

623 

7 

1.136 

981 

806 

9 

2.113 
998 
848 
£67 
291 
136 
80 
136 


187 

99 

39 

4S 

6 

524 

489 

36 

250 

1.093 
846 
847 
366 
8S6 
462 
106 
349 
7 
955 
639 
310 
6 

1.079 

884 

186 

9 

1.663 
899 
617 
147 
284 

83 

183 


5 
3 

1 
1 






Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklt/n 








1 






Queent 














3-f 


Plaster and oomposition casts and orna- 
ments 


1 


39 

31 

8 


30 
89 

1 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


60^ 1 
lOi 




4-a 


Building brick (Richmond) 


3 
28 
15 
12 
2 
1 
20 

e 






4.b.... 


Terra cotta and fire clay products 

Manhaitan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


:::::: 




4 
2 
8 


57 

18 

3 

14 

1 

7 
1 






Queena 






nichtnond . . 








4-c 


Pottery products 




3 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






13 

1 

48 

30 

17 

1 

47 

37 

9 

1 

78 

66 

18 

6 

12 

6 

6 

1 




3 






Richmond 




6-a. . 


RiiilHinf glftflf 




16 
9 

7 


"166 

93 

7 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Richmond . 




5-b. . 


Beveled glass and mirrors 




19 
17 
£ 


76 
76 






Brooklyn 






Richnwnd 






5-c.... 


Pressed, blown and cut glassware 

Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 


1 

i 


34 
80 
If 
8 
6 
3 
£ 


55 

63 

1 

1 
11 
7 
3 

1 






Quren* 




5Ki 


Bottles and jars 






Manhattan and Bionx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queena 






Total — Group I 










496 

£81 

166 

37 

13 


3 

1 
1 
1 


169 

116 

47 

3 

4 


14.891 
6,066 
4,720, 
2,948^ 
1,168 


14.311 
6,676 
4,(^68 
8,860 
1,133 


11.099 
4,806 
3,488 
1,811 
1,001 


678 

579 

68 

98 

33 


3 




Brooklyn 


3 




Queene 






Richmond 






II. Metai^. Machinbs and Convbt- 

ANCBS. 

Silver and plated ware 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




1-a.... 


119 

104 

16 

11 

8 

3 

18 

11 

7 

24 

£2 

2 

536 

602 

34 




103 

87 

16 

6 

6 


2,287 

1,681 

606\ 

88' 

76^1 

10\ 

265 

142, 

123 

3851 

213' 

1721 

7,293' 

6,827\ 

466\ 


2.191 

1,686 

606 

81 

71 

10 

246 

188 
350 
179 
171 
6,821 
6,361 
460 


1.849 

1,681 

388 

87 

78 

9 

241 

118 

Its 

356 
806 
160 
6,607 
6,814 
393 


96 
96 

1 
7 


1 

/ 


1-b 


Gold and silver refining 






Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 




1-c.... 


Gold, silver and aluminum leai 




9 

3 

6 

20 

80 


17 
16 
1 
35 
34 






Brooklyn 




1-d.... 


Gold and silver wstcb cases 




1 


Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 




1-e...-. 


Jewelry, gold pons, etc 


5 


4HA 






Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 


4i 466 
1\ 80 





*£mpk>yed 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report .OF Bureau op Factory Inspection, 1911. 297 

CkmB CUI68, Tew Ended September 80, 1911 : Bf Indiistriee — Contfaaed. 



NUMBKB 07 EmPLOTXXS AT TlMB 09 InBPECTION. 



Wbeklt Hoxjbs op Labor. 



ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 
I (in 
I shops 
I ex- 
j oept 

1 ** 

Inofd). 



SHOP rOBCB. 



NUMBEB OP SHOP BMPLOTBICS 
WHO WORK — 



NTTMBER IN SHOPS 
XMPIX>TIKa— 



1-19. 



20- 
199. 



200 +. 



Men 

(18 
yre. +). 



SEX AND AOB. 



Y'ths 

(16-. 

18 

yrs.). 



Boys 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



Worn. 

(16 yrs. 

+). 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 
hours 



52-57 
hours. 



58-63 
hours. 



Over 

63 
hours. 



I 



60 
16 
S8 



122 
80 



6 
324 

gso 

34 



4t 



170 
170 



109 

ei 

48 



250 
402 

17t 

196 

54 



525 



to 

66 

7 

249 

177 

«r 
6 

313 

g4S 

66 

9 

436 

S06 

110 

to 

62 
4t 
90 



371 
. 79 
B9t 



S18 
t07 



606 
369 
gS7 



690 
660 
ISO 



1,172 
640 
606 

ite 

211 
89 



lit 



182 

96 

S8 

4t 

6 

476 
446 
SS 
.250 
884 
118 
et8 
S36 
t06 
280 
76 

too 

6 
766 
607 
t66 

S 
955 
776 
171 

8 
1.344 
688 
64t 
114 
252 

lis 
to 

119 



1& 

8\ 



2961 
tOO^ 

6\ 



78 

153 

132^ 

21 \ 



91 . 

8J . 



141 

109 

16 

16 



141 

77' 

so\ 

S4\ 



150| IJ 
tt\ 

ite, 11 



76 
5/1.... 

4t\ 6 

3] 

28 1 

tl\ 1 

7\ 



119' 
SS\ 

84\ 
t . 
250 
189^ 

68\ 



83« 
166]. 
l6o\ 
318,. 

t07\. 

174| 
66\. 
108\ 



45 

38 

7 

250 



161 



66' 

63 
13\ 



193* 8 

140\ » 

S5\ 1 

18\ 6 

16 

16 



2.623 

1,636 

816 

131 

41 



6,024 

t,791 

t,061 

9St 

t60 



1.874 



647 
660 
677 



9.550 
3,994 
t,986 
1,661 



163 
37 
93 
10 

ts 



736 

577 

t97 

37 

t6 



174 

14 
68 
122 



122 



29 

8 

15 



3,559 

1,597 

893 

1,066 

4 



4551 
5/4' 
136 

6 . 
885 i 
718 
158 
9 . 
1,259 
6')5 
572 

32 
150 
131' . 

19, 



156 

5 

150 

50 . 
100 



52 . 

37 . 
15 . 



J75 . 

99 . 

30 . 

46 . 

1 



4.519 

2,439 

1,360 

484 

236 



2,443 
390 

1,161 . 
104 

7^8 . 



617 

6t7 

90 

eo 

61 

9 

100 

74 

te 

113 

lit 



2,740 

t,e4e 
94 



1,136 

899 

tS7 

2fi 

to 



124 

t8 

96 

209 

60 

149 

2.641 

t,348 

293 



756 
766, 



1.628 

l,S4t 

t86 

65 

66\ 

165 

7l\. 

307 . 

164] . 

143 . 
5.3261 
6,040^ 

t86 



11 
8 
S 



129 

110 

19 

4 

4 



157 

139 

18 



27 

26 

t 



614 I3I 

634\ lt\ 

80\ 1\ 



83| 
72\ 

lA 
30 
30\ 



7801 
694\ 



J', 2541 

IJU 

110 

74 

67 

71 

35 

20 

15 

142 

142 

'b\22A\ 
4,957] 

267\ 



I 

370 . 

172 . 
198 



^ 

1 ... . 




jg, 




106' 





/oi::;::: 




96\ 




1491 








1J^ 




133 

99 


*1 


34 


♦i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2^8 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XV. — SuUsties of Factories Inspected In First and Seeond 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber. 



City and Industry. 




OFFICE 
FORCE. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 



1-f.. 
2-a. 



2-b.. 



2-c... 



2-d. 
2-e. 



2-f.. 



2-g. 



3-b. 
3-c. 



3-d. 

3-g. 

3-h. 
3-i,. 



3-k... 



NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

II. Metals, Machine and Con- 
veyances — Continued. 

I Lapidary work 

I Manhattan and Bronx. . 

I Brooklyn 

ISmelting and refining 

j Manhattan and Bronx. . 
I Brooklyn 

(Mieens 

I Richmond 

Copper work 

I Manhattan and Bronx . . 

\ Brooklyn 

' Queens 

1 Richmond 

Brass and bronze cahtings 

! Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queena 

Gas and electric fixtures 

Manhattan and Bionx. . 

Brooklyn 

Brass and bronze ware not elsewhere 
classified ' 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

f^heet metal work 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Metal goods not elsewhere classified 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Pig iron (Brooklyn) 

Rolling mills and steel works 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Bridges and structural iron 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Hardware not elsewhere classified 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Cutler>' 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Tools and dies 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Fire arms (^Manhattan and Bronx) 



589 


15 




658 


16 




31 






1,465 


60 




317 


46 




30 






1,038 


7 




80 


7 




422 


15 




299 




116 


1 




6 






1 






899 


27 




668 


23 




£69 


3 




62 


1 




3.545 


192 




3,101 


188 




4U 


4 




5,954 


185 




2,888 


164 




2.809 


SO 




243 


1 




9.188 


364 




2,703 


144 




3,642 


80 




2,940 
3 


140 




4,264 


i38 





3,166 


116 




1,046 


22 




61 







3 


".y.',\.::.y. 


25 


1 


2,321 


113 


5 


707 


38 




1,601 


74 


i 


13 


1 




2,130 


220 




869 


86 




480 


6 





306 


34 





476 


94 




1,296 


64 




869 


69 




4i5 


3 




16 


2 




6 






589 


10 




476 


10 




114 






636 


14 




339 


8 




263 


6 




7 







27 




2 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau of Factoey Inspection, 1911. 



299 



Claas Cfdes, Tear Ended September SO, 1911: By Iiidastrie« — Continaed. 



NuuBER OF Employees at Time of Inspection. 








Weekly Hours of Tjaror. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK — 




1 NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYING — 




SEX AND AQE. 




51 

houra 

or 

less. 


62-67 
houre. 


68-^ 
hours. 


Over 

63 
houre. 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yre. +). 


Y'ths 
(16- 

18 

y«.). 


Boys 

(14- 

16 

yre.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yre.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


574 


174 

174 

■■"164 

74 

SO 



■ 'i43 

94 

42 

6 

1 

293 

It' 

162 

£1 

306 

£31 

76 

1,056 

816 

£11 

15 

1.385 

964 

393 

35 

3 

894 

710 

160 

31 

3 

2i2 

04 
136 

3^1 

£33 

93 

46 


400 
369 
31 
298 
197 






"iioos 


565 

537 

28 

1,385 

%i 

1,031 

73 

400 

282 

HI 

6 

1 

846 

520 

256 

61 

3.206 

2,805 

401 

4,953 
2,304 
2,100 

7,246 
2,291 
2,638 
£,314 

3,264 

£,400 
830 

% 

25 

2,109 

616 

1,482 

12 

1,891 

780 

468 

262 

381 

1,069 

674 

376 

13 

6 

392 

347 

45 

£7\ 

2i 




3 


6 





518 
487 
31 
68 
47 
11 


56 
66 






^ 


643 
31 








i 


3 








1 405 


i9!:::::: 

il\ 

*i 


97 
69 

£8 


1,250 

165 

19 

1,003 
73 
83 
£5 
68 






£71 






30 


^ 








1 031 


£8 

73 

264 

191 

73 


1,003 






73 






"::::'*i 








407 


3 
/ 
2 


2 

£ 


2 

£ 


...... 


145 

139 

6 


179 

1£1 

61 

6 

1 
618 
409 
169 

2,584 

^ £,387 

197 

3,192 

1,981 

1,182 

15 

4,395 

1,653 

2,834 

8 






£85 






115 






e 










1 























872 


26-4 

110 

114 

40 

1,813 

1,U8 

365 

2.526 

858 
1,668 


sis 

315 

■i,*234 
l,£34 

2,187 

1,060 

900 

£27 


u 


2 

1 
1 


ii 

11 


2 
2 


157 

116 

£0 

£1 

153 

137 

16 

455 

169 

69 

£27 


97 

£0 
77 






645 






£66 






61 










3,353 


' 70 

63 

7 

149 

84 

61 

4 


15 

11 
4 

24 
6 
18 




56 
S3 
23 

633 

555 

£95 

3 


6 

i 
6 

6 
6 


616 
S89 
££7 

2,118 

680 

1,638 







£,913 
440 

6,769 

£,734 

£,779 

£4£ 

14 

8,824 

£,669 

S,48£ 

£,800 

3 










4 

4 


1 
1 












2,670 

1,066 

1,4£9 

186 


4,769 

650 

1.640 

£,679 


207 
U 
60 

103 


48 

6 

14 

28 


i.292 

218 
737 
337 


31 

""is 

18 


1,621 
673 
350 
695 

a 

418 

293 

98 

£4 

3 


2,908 
£,197 




1 








/ 


4.126 

3,049 

1,0£S 

61 


1.830 

1,296 

614 

£0 


1,402 

1,04S 
359 


i27 

94 
22 


48 
19 

27 

2 


638 

495 

140 

3 


49 

41 

4 

4 


2,66i 

1,546 

449 

7 


1,367 

1,211 

126 

20 


350 




S60 




3 






25 


25 

1,032 

£96 

736 


"■964 
309 
666 














25 
755 

4£4 
331 






2,208 
669 


65 

27 
38 




13 
8 


21 
19 
2 




189 

84 

105 


1.264 

161 

1,091 

12 

1,624 

680 

474 

89 

381 

319 

£61 

48 

10 










1,6£7 








1£ 






1,910 


901 
660 
125 
£26 


637 

'256 

' ■ ' ■55/ 


i6 

10 



1 
/ 




2 




256 
73 


30 

SO 






783 






fri 


£ 










183 








381 














1 232 


249 
172 
67 

'i 

128 

84 

£09 
40 

2i 


983 
628 
365 


40 

£9 
10 

1 


2 

1 
1 


lib 

90 
£5 


6 
6 


272 

£06 

67 

4 

6 

34 

S4 


641 
S34 
S07 






800 






41£ 
14 



























679 


185 
116 
70 
366 
1££ 
£17 


266 
266 

..... 


2 

■■"if 

£ 

9, 


4 
£ 
2 
4 

^ 


179 

114 

65 

3 

i 


2 
£ 


463 

374 

89 

285 

£08 

46 

6 

£7 

2 


82 
67 
£6 

147 
6 

141 






466 

i!4 












190 

117 
71 
£ 






331 






£67 






7 






£7 


£7 

















2i 


1 



















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



300 



New York State Department of Labor. 





TeUe XT.- 






Cmr AND Industry. 


Places 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labobst 
NuMBEB or 

IN Year. 




In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


omcm 
roircE. 


durtry 
num- 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total 


There- 

of 
14-16 


S-m.... 


NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

II. METAL8. Machines and Con- 

VKTANCKS — Continued. 

MfttiJ furniture •.t.>r..t-T--- 


35 


1 


14 
7 
7 


844 

337 

472 

36 

2.155 

1,679 

607 

69 

281 

12 

269 

3,070 

1,891 

817 

368 

1,524 
1,076 

1,097 

1,944 

1,260 

696 

80 

8 

12.759 

6,234 

6,644 

820 

161 

8.407 

1,107 

2,096 

204 

3.572 

3,088 

869 

126 

435 

3.514 

M,964 

463 

87 

2.944 

1,324 

979 

664 

77 

60 

'i 

11 
9 
2 

7 


804 

314 

466 

36 

2.101 

1,627 

606 

68 

264 

12 

262 

2.963 

1,819 

816 

326 

1.896 

981 

416 

1.465 

1,027 

438 

1.816 

'•iU 

. 80 

8 

11.909 

6,638 

6,4B2 

796 

164 

3,257 

974 

2,086 

198 

2.367 

1,987 

819 

111 

426 

3.347 

2,799 

463 

86 

2.882 

1,310 

964 

681 

77 

49 

88 

6 

11 

9 

2 

7 


764 

296 

498 

90 

1.781 

1,282 

446 

69 

223 

./. 

2.411 

1,669 

609 

296 

1.319 
909 

1.395 
971 

,.«! 

1,169 

m 

6 
11.191 
6,660 
6,061 

3.197 

1,0M 

1,919 

191 

3.471 

9,064 

811 

106 

359 
3,067 
2,696 

818 

2.655 

1,162 

892 

689 

62 

60 

11 

2 
6 


40 
28 

17 






ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


i9\ : 

16\ 1 






Queens 


1 
125 
101 
21 







8-n 


Wire work not elsewhere classified 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


5 


77 

68 

7 

2 
1 


54 

62 
1 
1 

17 


::::;: 




Queent 


9 




8.P.... 


Car wheels and railway equipment 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


6 
/ 
6 










/ 

76 

69 

18 

9 

1 

9 

8 

I 

4 

4 


17 

107 

72 

2 

88 




8-q.... 


Architectural and ornamental iron work. . 
Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


163 

118\ 

4i':::::; 

92\ 

8i 






Queens . 










3-r 


Cooking and heating apparatus 


128 

04 

U 

70 

119 
9 


1 




Marih'attan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


t 


3-e.... 


Typewriting and rejristenng machines. . . . 
Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn . 


42 

86 

7 

44 







3-t 


Stationary engines, boilers, etc 




10 
9 
6 


4 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


23 

17 


4 






9 
1 








Richmond 





2 

196 

W 

69 

2 






3-u.... 


Machinery not elsewhere classified 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


428 1 

«74' 

191 1 
19 


846 
696 
122 

.3 

188 

11 

6 

1.205 

1,161 

40 

14 

9 
167 
166 


32 
SM 




Queens 








4 
46 
19 
24 






3-v.... 


Castings (iron foundr>' products) 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


...... 

1 


1 


10 
6 

4 

1 

7 
6 
2 


1 
I 




Queens 


9 

27 

21 

6 




4-»... 


Telegraph, telephone, fire alarm ap- 
paratus 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 


1 

5 

123 

100 

20 

9 
248 






4-b.... 


Incandescent lights (Manhattan and 
Bronx) .... ... 








4-0.... 


Dynamos, motors and electrical supplies. . 
Manhattan and Bronx . . 


1 


38 
82 

6 






Queens . 


62 
14 
16 
8S 




5-ft 


CarriageSi wagons and nlAighs 




i78 

92 

66 

8 

1 
1 






ManhaUan arid Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


128 

P4' 

12\ 

'kv.:v. 

6\ 

2\ 






Queens 










5-b.... 


Blacksmithing and wheelwrighting 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn .... 


1 
1 








/ 
3 









6-0.... 


Cycleo 




2 

/ 
1 








Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


il:::::: 













' Emplojred 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau op Factory Inspection, 1911. 



301 



CteM GItlea, Tear Boded SeyCeabar SD, 1911: B/ ladnatrles — Cratlnnei. 



NaMBIR or EWLOYBBJ 


AT Tnca or iNsrscnoir. 

8H0P FOBCl. 




Wbbk 

NUMBB 


LT H^UR) or LVBOB. 


ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
yettn 

(in 
•hope 
ex- 
cept 
aa 
not'd). 




NUM 




R or 8a3P BMPLOrBBa 
WHD WORK— 




BBS m a 

iPLomca 


H0P3 

200 +. 


aaX AND AOB. 


51 

hourd 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hoars. 


5S-63 
hours. 


Ow 

63 
hours. 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


Man 

(18 
yn!.+). 


Y'ths 

(16- 

18 

yrs.). 


Boys 

(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


QirU 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


724 

M79 


203 

146 

60 

*"*628 

693 

84 

19 

30 

4 

919 
70» 
186 
97 

161 

70 

193 

166 

97 

211 

118 

79 

'i 

2,133 

79 

9 

136 

106 

90 



157 

149 

16 

5 
549 

*n 

91 
1.127 

HI 

61 

69 

49 

99 

6 

11 

8 

B 

6 


618 
197 
931 
90 
1,099 
698 
961 




697 
961 
406 

30 

1.323 

889 

385 

69 
205 

2.292 

195 

1.140 

770 

970 

1,223 

868 

958 

1,576 

1,001 

495 

74 

6 

9.421 

4,616 

4,433 

335 

10', 

3,02i 

959 

1,835 

184 

1,768 

1,415 

969 

91 

131 

2,637 

9,9B3 

969 

40 

2.53S 

l,13g 

871 

6>4 

61 

49 

55 

.? 

8 
9 
6 




1 


26 

19 
14 




93 

94 

9 


233 

90 

160 

30 

1.123 

759 

SS7 

40 

5 


348 
89 

969 










4»1 
90 





1 










1,727 

l.MSO 

44S 

6t 


""36 


30 
17 
13 


331 

992 

99 


* 'io iR^ 


435 

981 

64 






8 
9 


97 

64 

19 

182 

4 

178 

265 

169 

98 

4 














205 






1 




19 






Ji 











176 
1,035 

%', 

175 


350 
950 






/ 




6 

1.936 

1,99) 

• 498 

193 


19 

63 
48 






2,301 


-ii 

9 

7 






1 


1*491 










607 










/ 


MOf 










4 








1 195 
999 






1 191 


450 
460 

"iiiis 

735 

S8i 

1,023 

64i 

% 

"3;453 

1,633 
1,3) J 

979 

95 

1,723 

937 
1.95^ 

185 

620 

179 

969 

99 

145 
1.778 

95 

1,051 

693 

493 

90 


610 
906 



332 

989 

"*4,'759 
1,751 
3,003 

"i,i85 

667 
618 

1,589 
1,689 

200 
663 
663 

""iih 

""415 


29 
93 
6 
11 
11 


2 

9 


26 

90 





261 

999 

95 

643 

445 

100 

63 

40 

18 

8 


.493 
461 

^99 
7(53 
455 
310 
' 979 
667 
400 

' % 

7,9n 

4,/i; 
3,3)S 

410 

lO'i. 
2,71t3 

98S 
1,6)9 

185 

2,119 

1,779 

955 

93 

69 

1.9 )i 

1,675 

946 

35 

1,633 

837 

793 

65 

33 

Ai 

99 

3 

11 

8 

9 

6 






*816 






976 






1.311 
901 


1 


73 
91 
69 


:::::: 












410 
1,619 








31 
31 


12 

19 


674 






^1^ 






77 
60 






....... 


. , 






74 




1 ' "] 








6 




. ,"\'----' - 








10,345 

4,854 


435 
30S 
196 


19 

9 


467 
96 

863 
88 


2' i.9S3 

1 4'n 

9\ 1,63) 

::::::! *'. 


419 
3£3 




♦1 


\\91& 


91 
9 






in 

3,017 




•i 


6 

1 
6 

47 
47 


4 


9 


104 


227 

9 

918 






960 




99 
7/: 






1,90£ 


5 

1 

18 

9 
16 


9 








185 


:;:;'i " 






2.2d6 


443 




82 
67 
16 


65 







1,903 


W 

41 






»7l 


1 . , , , 


9S 


1 
213 






359 









m 

695 

693 

61 

11 

232 

196 

71 

14 

Ml 

2 


1 


2.890 


'6S 


8 
6 
3 


273; 4 33) 

931 4 SSi 

36 1 6 


\ 


M,6S1 




313 




43 


6 
14 


t 




2,593 


7 

1 

6 



1 


4 
/ 
/ 
9 


6:li 




lft48 


// < iJifi 




877 




73 




606 






6$ 









49 








, 






89 






. ...j 


. ...\\ ... .' 






6 






t 


::::...i::::;j 


9 

1 






11 






;.;*;i . ! ! 


1 1 ...... . 


""". 




8 










1 ., 


1.:.... 




f 











'. 


. . .1 




6 










:::::::!::::;:.:::::: 


1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



302 



New I'^oRK State Department of Labor. 



Table XY. — Statistics of Factories Inspected in First and Second 





CiTT AND Industry. 


Pla 
Inspe 


CES 
CTED. 


Num- 
ber 

of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Largest 
Number op 

EMPrX>YEE8 

IN Year. 








In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


Thero- 

of 
14-16 
years 

of 
age. 


5-d... 


NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

II. Metals, Ma chinks and Con- 
veyances — Concluded. 
Motor vehicles 


244 


1 


62 

32 

14 

2 

4 


6,224 

6,010 

384 

802 

28 

6,588 

3,768 

1,243 

1,462 

125 

5,350 

957 

2,588 

300 

1,655 

27 

8 

19 

1,663 

644 

2S2 

90 

e47 

854 

787 

67 

2,474 

2,026 

40 

1,323 

40 

1,283 

2.133 

1,2(>S 

930 

34 


5.848 

4,691 

376 

763 

28 

6,427 

3,677 

1,213 

1,41B 

125 

6,226 

916 

2,499 

281 

1,630 

26 

8 

18 

1,623 

638 

275 

90 

620 

780 

720 

60 

2,350 

1,929 

39 

382 

1.306 

33 

1,273 

2,032 

1,110 

922 

33 


6,877 

4,800 

343 

716 

19 

6.117 

3,740 

1,118 

1,134 

125 

3,896 

640 

1,749 

261 

1,366 

23 

6 

18 

1,662 

617 

241 

67 

647 

789 

737 

62 

1,847 

1,400 

39 

1.292 

33 

1,269 

1,999 

1,093 

906 

32 


376 

318 

8 

49 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn ............. 


179 1 

6l\ 

8\ 

ffi 






Queens 






Richmond 





6-g.... 


Railway repair shops 


43 
23 

"s 

t 

60 




161 





ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






91 








30 




Queens 






40 




Richmond 






6 


Boat and ship building 




27 
9 
4 
3 

11 
2 
1 
1 

16 

11 
6 


124 

41 
39 
19 
25 

1 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


14 

2\ 

2\ 






Quctns 






Richmond 





7 


Agricultural implements 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






/ 




8-a.... 


Professional and scientific instruments . . . 
Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 


35 

22 
11 
1 
1 
64 
63 
11 




1401 

106 

7\ 




Queens 


1 




Riclt mond 






ifi ; 


8.b.... 


Optical and photographic apparatus 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




38 

35 

3 

10 

7 

3 


731 


8-0.... 


Lamps, reflectors, stereopticons, etc 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


49 

45 

3 


i2i':::::: 

97\ 




Queens 


1 
10 




26\ 


8-d.... 


Clocks and time recorders 




2 
2 


17' 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


7 

3 

39 

31 

8 




il\::v:.\ 


8-e 


Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 




9 

9 


101 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


93^ 

51 


9 


Sorting old metals {Manhattan and Bronx) 
Total — Group II 




2 


1 


:::::: 




3,813 

2,718 

928 

117 

60 


221 1.953 

14] 1,S13 

7\ RfiR 


113.587 

66,177 

33.967 

10,994 

3,459 


107,416 

60,231 

33,326 

10,560 

3,299 


99,527 

68,122 

29,463 

9,016 

2,936 


6,157 

4,936 

631 

433 

167 


44 




Manhattan atiA Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 


*f 




Queens . 


1 


24 
33 






Richmond 






III. Wood Manufacturbs. 
8aw mill product** 




1 


24 

10 

10 

2 

2 

193 

96 

68 

70 

61 

9 




10 

7 
3 


396 

180 

163 

47 

6 

6.378 

1,933 

3,006 

1,314 

126 

1,541 

1,020 

621 


376 

166 

160 

44 

6 

6,161 

1,829 

2,969 

1,249 

124 

1,485 

967 

618 


334 

149 

■& 

6.300 

1,686 

2,682 

923 

109 

1,462 

949 

613 


20 

14 

S 

S 






Brooklyn 






Queens 


...... 




Richmond 








2-a 


House trim 




62 
36 

20 
7 


217 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


46] 

66\ 




Queens 




Richmond 


2-b 


Packing boxes, crates, etc 




20 
19 

1 


5(> 




Manhattan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 


S3 '. '. '. '. ', \ 
S\ 



* Includes one child under 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau ob^ Factory Inspection, 1911. 303 

ClaM Cities, Year Ended September SO, 1911: Br Indnstriee — Continaedl. 



Number or Emplotees at Time of Inspectiox. 




5.0^ 


956 


1,68$ 


S84- 


9,696 


t85 


868 


84 


107 


s 


1,406 


290 


896 


£4B 


610 


67 



years of age employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



304 



New Yobk State Depabtment of Labor. 



Table XV.— Statisties of FMtorles InapMtod ia Flrat and SMMd 



In- 
dustry 
nam- 

ber. 



ClTT AND iNDUflTBT. 




omcB 

rOBCB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 

14-16 

years 
of 

age. 



2-c. 
3... 



4-c. 



5-a.. 

5-b.. 
5-c.. 
5-d.. 



7-a. 
7-b. 

7-c. 
7-d. 



NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

III. Wood MANUfxcTURBS — 

Continned. 

Cigar and fancy wood boxes 

ManhaUan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn 

Cooperage • • 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Canes, umbrella sticks, etc 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Richnwnd 

Wooden toys and novelties 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Richmond 

Other articles and appliances of wood .... 

ManhaUan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Furniture and upholstery 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Caskets • 

ManhaUan ar^d Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queena 

Store, office and kitchen fixtures 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queena 

Mirror and picture frames 

ManhaUan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn 

Other cabinet work 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Pianos, organs, etc 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Pulp and fiber goods 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Mate and woven goods 

ManhaUan and Bronx . , 

Brooklyn 

Queens | 

Brooms 

ManhaUan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn ' 

Articles of cork | 

ManhaUan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Richmond I 



51 
61 


1 
1 


5 

4 

1 








16 
16 








19 

18 

1 





6 

a 

£ 
56 
64 

e 


... 
, 

i 

1 






365 

su 

17 
4 
4 


I 
1 


6 
6 




1 
3 
/ 
« 
20 
16 
6 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt of Bubkau op Factoby Inspection, 1911, 



305 



CUm CMm, Tmt Bndad Se H s m fcer SO, 1911: B7 ladnstilOT ^ GontiuMd. 





AT Ttttt or Inspbctio 


N. 






Wkhklt Houbs of Labob. 


Chfl- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
oept 

as 
not'd). 


SHOP VOBCa. 


NUMBBB OF SHOP BMPLOTBBS 
WHO WOBX — 




mniBBB IN SHOPS 
BICPLOTINO — 


sax AND AGB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-67 
hours. 


5^-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


Total 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


aoo+. 


Men 

(18 

yra. +). 


Y'ths 
yrs.). 


16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Qiris 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


l.Qlfi 


380 
871 
9 
223 
143 
78 

8 

168 

147 

17 

29^ 

»»4 

70 

8 

580 

fii 

10 
1,596 

1,888 

878 

87 

9 

12 

4 

k 

795 
688 

' 463 

408 

61 

683 

668 

180 

6 

6 

410 

68 
8 

152 

117 
86 

68 

61 
17 
126 
45 
78 
3 


959 
851 
108 
213 


576 
676 

"■776 


1,181 

PP 

1,079 

143 

867 

49 

80 
892 
871 

17 

49^ 

935 

6,450 

4,858 

1,166 

85 

7 

288 

884 

66 


23 

80 

8 

125 


23 

88 

1 

2 


664 
i5 


24 
88 

1 


63 

61 

8 

31 
SO 


916 
891 

85 
271 

68 
160 

49 

""ios 

98 
7 


; 936 
846 

1 ^ 
904 

1 883 






1,798 






117 






1,206 






143 








99S 


14s 
49 
19 

239 

839 


770 


/«J 


/ 








49 










Ml 


""*i6 
10 


2 






1 
45 
46 


80 
257 

848 






407 


3 
3 








886 






17 


10 
! 80 

213 

163 
60 






4 





















558 


' 261 






2 


54 
5i 


3 
3 


86 
78 
IS 


430 
174 
856 






»e7 






$88 




j9 






S 






095 


4i5 

888 

87 




15 

/o 
5 


6 
5 
5 


38 

81 

16 

1 

681 

564 

115 


1 

i 

8 

f 


201 

178 

80 

9 

1.170 

1,026 

180 

17 

A 

80\ 


581 
444 
1S6 

2.339 

8,037 

896 

4 

8 

319 

865 

46 

8 

1.23«i 

608 

8SS 

305 

346 

317 

29 

74.5 

603 

848 






779 






Boe 






10 






6.167 


4.3ii 

8,887 
1,084 


260 
860 


*""2i 

8 


7 
5 


2.658 






4,829 






l.SOt 






87 






9 









ri 
f. 


2 






373 


361 

881 

80 




■'. 


3 
3 


34 






885 






80 


34 






8 


' 8 
37 

'1 






.■;."!!'!' 






2,257 


972 
868 
654 

60 
855 
880 

85 

1,299 

879 

480 


'* 490 
886 

'866 



2,207 

75f 
805 
751 

7J 

1,956 

1.410 

636 

6 

6 

9,010 

7,687 

870 

1,118 

63 

JO 

IS 

534 

i«5 

JW5 

5* 

189 

187 

68 

469 

55 

430 

3 


***i6 




2 


1 


5U 

403^ 

IIL 
1 


6J7 

84 

483 






1,186 






767 


10 


f 


/ 






806 






818 




17 

'i 

7 
8 
4 


* * 9 
9 

4 

4 


40 
88 
8 
15 
15 


i 

'. 






43' 
55 

io\ 

790, 

67 1\ 
109' 

i' 

523 

494 
IS 
16 

i 

i9 


429 

382 

s 

858 
189 






788 






86 






1,982 






1,488 






640 






6 















6 






















0.531 


4,801 

4.M90 

854 

160 

29 


4,317 
3,838 

""984 


117 

89 
11 
17 


215 
194 

5 
16 

2 


• 172 
170 


17 
17 


8,549 

7,827 

194 

1,188 

67 

38 

89 

392 

4S 

889 

68 

80 

33 

7 

608 

S\ 


459 






7,997 


87& 
179\ 

y\ 

18 

8 

247 

160 

97 






886 






'-'i^ 


8 

16 

i 

li 
97 


i 

2; 

8 










68 






81 


89 
506 

0j9 
866 

68 
126 

«/ 

6^ 


■"295 


i 

1 


8 
15 
/-♦ 

1 






658 






809 






891 






68 






194 


4 

4 


1 

i 




! 


32 
88 


82 
67 
16 






188 




1 






68 




1 






048 


12 


5 


457 
4^ 


5 


^'1 


29l' 

13 

881 












687 


896 


/« 


5 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



306 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Tabl e XV. — SUtfatfes of Factorie« Inspected in First and Second 





City and Indubtrt. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Largest 
Number or 
Employees 

IN Year. 




In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 

TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


7-e 


NEW YORK CITY—Coniinued. 

III. Wood Manufactures — 
Concluded. 


24 

BO 
3 

1 
6 
6 

I 




12 
// 

i 


1.802 
634 

4se 

6S2 
150 

lis 

32 


1,780 
627 
484 
675 
140 
110 
SO 


1,732 

664 
486 
682 
112 
80 
32 


16 

7 
2 
7 
6 




ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 










7-f 










ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Queens 






5 








2 






Total — GrouD III 


1,623 

1,172 

3S8 

49 
14 


21 
15 
6 


696 

509 

163 

19 

5 


42.8131 41.565J 37,953 

27,475\ 26,4251 24,655 

11,3241 11,239 9,924 

S,S2i' S,713\ S,S16 

190\ 188] 158 


1,235 

1,037 

86 

111 


3 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 


5 




Queens 








2 




IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 
Leather ■ • 






1 


33 

11 

852 

799 

52 

1 

18 

15 

2 

1 

91 

59 

27 

S 

3 

10.5 

95 

10 

166 

93 

73 

21 

16 

e 

289 

252 

34 

3 

74 

65 

'? 

107 

9t 
12 

42 
27 
5 
10 
44 
55 

ii 


8 

8 


12 

7 

5 

M9 

627 

22 


701 

299 

402 

12,004 

10,624 

1,430 

50 

321 

214 

102 

6 

690 

699 

81 

2 

8 

1,798 

1,722 

76 

9,155 

2, 052 

7,103 

2,291 

643 

1,648 

7,15.-, 

6.S52 

665 

148 

1,026 

736 

287 

3 

4.151 

2,084 

678 

1,389 

2.004 

1,159 

116 

729 

733 

484 

249 


671 

269 

402 

11,726 

10,253 

1,423 

50 

308 

202 

101 

6 

671 

682 

79 

2 

8 

1,769 

1,693 

76 

9,060 

1,993 

7,067 

2,279 

631 

1,648 

6,977 

6,184 

651 

142 

997 

708 

286 

3 

4,010 

1,981 

665 

1,364 

1.981 

1,148 

115 

718 

723 

474 

249 


584 

269 

316 

9,036 

7,788 

1,207 

41 

294 

196 

"i 

8 
1,626 
1,671 
66 
8.597 
1,964 
6,633 
2,2M 

608 
1,646 
6,480 
4,889 

629 
68 

877 

630 

3,815 

1,936 

653 

1,226 

1.564 

977 

103 

484 

509 

375 

134 


30 

SO 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 




2 


Kurs and fur soods 


278 

271 

7 




Manhattan arui Bronx. . 










3-a.... 


Reltinir w&shers etc 




10 
9 
1 


13 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 


'f!:::::: 








3-b.... 


fladdlerv and harness 


1 
/ 

i 

2 
k 





6 

f 


47 

24 

20 

2 

1 

60 

65 

5 

78 

63 

25 

12 

8 

4 

194 

169 

24 

1 

30 

'I 


i9 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


17 

2 














3-0.... 


Traveling bairn and tninkfj. . . , , , 


28 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Rrnnkhm 


...''I::-::: 


3-d.... 


"RnckiM WLTtA nhnAfl 


951 


ManhaUan and Bronx. . 


5P' 

S6, 


3-e.... 




121 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 


12 


3-f 




i78' 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklun 


168^ 

4\ 






6 
29 

28 




3-g.... 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 










4 


Tliihber and triitta nercha iroods 


:::::: 


51 

50 


141 


2 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 


103' $ 
13, 




QuecJis 


i 



/ 

...... 


1 
36 
25 

6 

5 
29 
20 

9 


26\ 


5-a.... 


Pearl buttons, hanales, etc 


23 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


11 

/ 






11 
10 
10 




5.b.... 


Articles of horn, bone, tortoise shell, etc . . 
Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 307 

Clam Cities, Year Ended September SO, 1911: By Industries — Conthraed. 



Number of Employees at Timb 


OF Inspbction. 








Wbbkly Hours of Labor. 


cha- 

dren 

under 

14 








SHOP rORCB 






• 




NUMBBR of shop BMPLOTBBS 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IX SHOPS 
EMPLOYING — 


SBX AND AOB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yra. +). 


Y'ths 

yra.). 


?ir 

16 
yra.). 


Worn, 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yra.). 


1,716 


130 

129 
1 


50S 

428 
80 


1.078 

""m 

675 


1.254 
483 
371 
400 
107 
77 
30 


. 

157 

2 

55 

100 


18 
1 
2 

16 


272 
69 
63 

150 


15 
2 
3 

10 


37 

I 

25 
52 
52 


1,644 

516 

478 

650 

40 

10 

30 


35 






657 


34 






484 


1 






676 






107 


37 

37 




70 


15 
15 






77 














30 
































36,718 

23,618 

9,839 


7,510 

6,837 

1,604 

142 

33 


20,566 

13,277 

6,017 

1,149 

123 


8.636 
4,404 
2,318 
1,914 


33.064 

21,350 

8,679 

2,882 

153 


631 
217 
289 
125 


341 

266 

40 

34 

1 


2,603 

1,635 

812 

154 

2 


79 
50 
19 
10 


5,592 

A,097 

1,106 

343 

46 


20,238 

13,961 

3,795 

2,476 

6 


10,820 

5,392 

4,938 

386 


68 
68 




3,206 






156 


m 












554 


115 

77 

38 

4.294 

4,138 

156 

si 

65 

11 

5 

366 

290 

66 

2 

8 

561 

629 

32 

733 

Ul 

292 

87 

58 

29 

1,678 

1,416 

143 

19 

336 

262 

71 

3 

478 

424 

63 

1 

210 

116 

i\ 

271 

186 

86 


439 
162 
277 
4.264 
3,379 
8U 

2^ 
118 


'"266 
'200 






496 
236 
260 
6,521 
5,619 
861 

270 
176 
90 
4 
538 
465 

'■ 

1,500 
1,466 

6,019 

1,546 

4,473 

740 

416 

324 

3,810 

3,441 

325 

U 

522 

fe] 

2,409 
1,246 
601 
662 
853 
690 
49 
214 
333 
222 
111 


5 

1 

4 

24 

24 


1 
/ 

9 

6 
3 


52 

1 

51 

2.194 

1,858 

336 




11 

11 


281 

84 

197 

6,583 

6,030 

612 

41 

270 

172 

93 

5 

390 

352 

34 


262 






239 


in 

1,075 
452 
623 






315 






8,758 


10 
10 


i.ioo 

1,035 
65 






7,517 






1,200 






41 








281 


3 
1 
2 


1 

i 


7 
6 




11 
11 








183 









93 









6 


1 
76 
73 

2 












632 

666 

66 


266 
266 




3 


""3 
3 




12 




135 

131 

4 


i65 

71 

793 

766 

27 

453 

334 

119 

3 

2 

2,469 

2,157 

262 

60 

51 

46 

5 


2 

2 




2 














8 










1 

86 

78 

8 

2,273 

333 

1,940 

1.373 

163 

1,210 

1.358 

1,175 

167 

16 

289 

215 

73 

1 

1,126 

623 

133 

i 

46 

194 

140 

132 

8 






738 
22 
7,628 
1,605 
6,123 
2,053 

616 
1,537 
2.519 
2,295 

224 

''"67i 

348 

220 

3 

2.377 

1,493 

334 

650 

497 

110 

15 

372 

226 

166 

60 






1,598 
1,643 
65 
8,502 
1,906 
6,697 
2,242 


1,037 

1,014 
23 

3,305 
810 

2,495 
187 
187 

**3,'234 

2,809 
382 

?^ 


"4;464 

664 

3,810 

1.968 

351 

1,617 

496 

496 


7 

6 

1 

131 

18 
113 

14 
8 
6 

53 

5 

""io 

'*'"68 

28 

4 

36 

25 

11 
5 


' 3 

1 
39 

; 

55 
3 

f 

52 
55 

i4 

5 
2 

2 

1 

34 

23 

""11 

14 

7 

9 

1 
8 


2 

i 

33 
112 

106 
35 
21 
14 

""22 

22 




44 

39 

6 

408 

63 
345 
186 

78 
108 
317 
266 

226 

208 
18 


1 

1 

13 

3 

10 


1 
/ 


696 






1,646 

5,308 

4,721 

526 






3 
3 




W...'. 


62 







848 






602 






'1 










3.674 


827 
702 
82 

1.331 

861 
61 

179 

49 


2.369 
707 
505 

1,157 


*"*37 

13 

2 

22 

102 

56 

2 

44 

% 

1 


""359 
297 
29 
33 
211 
98 
64 

il^ 

117 
9 


938 

43 

277 

618 

833 

768 

23 

62 

147 

82 

66 






1,833 






640 
1,201 











1,541 
966 


:::::: ' 


102 
473 
490 


i ' 


V...\'.\. '..... 


$65 




m 


1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



308 



New Yobk State Dei»abtment of Labob. 



Table XV.~ Statistics of FMtoriM I— petted ia Flrat aad flteoad 



In- 
doatry 
nam- 

ber. 



Crrr akd Industbt. 



Plaobs 
Inspbotbd. 



Onoe. 



More 
Uutt 
onoe. 



Num- 
ber 
of 

ownora 
at 

work. 



Labobst 
NcncBBB OF 

ElfPLOTBBS 
IN YbAB. 



Total. 



There- 
of in 
shop. 



ORAlfD 
TOTAL. 



omcB 

rOBCB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 

14-16 

years 
of 

age. 



5-0. 



5-d. 



NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

IV. Lbathbb and Rubbbb Qoods — 
Concluded. 

Brushes 

Manhattan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Mattresses, pillows, etc 

AfanhaUan and Bronx . . 
Brooklyn 



Total — Group IV 

Manhattan and Bronx . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 



1-a. . . 

1-b... 
1-d... 

2-a... 

2-b... 

2-0... 
3 



7-a. 



V. Chbmicals, Oils, Paints, ETa 
Proprietary medicines 

Manhattan and Bronx . , 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Sodi» and other alkalies 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Other chemicals and drugs 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Paint, varnish, etc 

Manhattan and Bronx. , 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Dyes, colors and inks 

Manhattan and Bronx . . 
J Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Lead pencils and crayons 

Manhattan and Bronx . . 

Brookltfn 

Wood alcohol and essential oils 

^^ Manhattan and Bronx. . 
^ Brooklyn 

Richmond 

Animal oil products 

.. Manhattan and Bronx. . 

.■:. Ifi Brooklyn 

it^Queens 

Richmond 

Mineral oil products 

Manhattan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Soap, perfumery and cosmetics 

Manhattan and Bronx . . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Wax figures, etc 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn. 



60 
S5 
13 

$ 
260 

38 



2,152 

1,813 

SIB 

H 

3 



84 
7M 
11 
1 
16 

e 

10 

105 

59\ 

38] 

8 



93 
S3 
48 
16, 

^\ 
70! 

39 

XT 

t 

£ 

4 

3 

1 

50 

37 

1$ 

1 

32 

17 

11 

3 

1 

10 

S 

6 

3 

103 

77 

»S 

g 

1 

15 

U 

1 



3 

1 

195 

lei 

33 



951 

568 
363 

3.863 

3.611 

35$ 



926 

634 

35$ 

40, 

3,742 

3,39e\ 

343\ 



832 

634 

$64 

34\ 

3,246 

$,9$4 

32$ 



25' 

B4 

117j 1 
lll\ 

S. 1 



1,3311 46,843 

1,1 63\ 30,937 

ie7\ 13,63$ 

10 $,368 

1 8 



45,840l 39,3711 

30,048[ $5,$33\ 

13,460] 1$,$67\ 

$,324\ 1,863 

8\ 8\ . 



2,709 

1,820 

4$7 

46$ 

271 

35 

$38 

3,153 

1,116 

t,ut 

618 

83 

2,601 

677 
1,186 

475 

363 
1,446 

661 

61$ 
70 

103 
2, 0131 
l,$07\ 

806\ 



328\ 

$os\ 

16$\ 
679 

180] 
$88] 
198] 

131 

1,715; 

^7 

956' 

2,4621 

1,333, 

396\ 

48] 
68$i 
1661 

nil 

661 



2,158; 

l,4ll\ 
414\ 
333\ 
265 
30 
$35 

2.9(9 
959 

1,418 

491 

81 

2,457 
61$ 

1,17S\ 
416, 
356i 

1,335 

67$\ 

607] 

6S\ 

93] 

2,010 

i*B04\ 

806\ 
630 

$e5\ 

$05\ 
160] 
633 
157] 
$7l\ 
19$\ 

13, 
1,6351 

14\ 

900] 

7$l\ 

2,265 

1,173 

393 

46 
660 
164 
109 

66 



2,60(1 

l,7$l\ 

4$v 

462 

250 

$2\ 

$28 

3.029, 

1,039\ 

1,397 

61$, 

8l\ 

2,517 

676] 

1,143^ 

466\ 

S44\ 

1,365 

640\ 

667\ 

65\ 

103] 

1,973 

1,167] 

803^ 

69^; 

316] 

180 

10$\ 

663! 

164 

$88\ 

198] 

13\ 

1,632 

/«! 

946\ 

674\ 

2,288 

1,173] 

385^ 

48 

68$ 

149 

94 

66\ 



993! 
884, 

72\ 
49. 



642 . 

400 . 

13 . 

1$9 . 

6 . 

?i: 

209 . 
167 . 

$3 . 

$7,. 

$ . 
144 . 
65 . 
13 . 
69 . 

nli: 

89 . 

^,- 
7,. 
10 . 
3 . 
3 . 



63 . 
V. 
$ . 

46 . 

$3 . 
17 . 



80 . 
3 . 

66 . 

$1 . 
197 . 
163 . 



$ , 

8$ . 

2 . 

f . 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau op Factory Inspection, 1911, 



309 



Omb CttiM, Tear EMed September M, 1911: By Indnstrlee ~ Centfaned. 



NUMBXB 


OF EllPLOTXKS 


AT TlMI 


OF iNSPXCnOM 


, 






WxKn.T HoTTBS OF Labob. 


Chil- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP rOBCB. 


KmBBB OF SHOP KBIPXX>TBK8 
WHO WOBK — 




KnMBEB m SHOPS 
EMPLOTINO — 




SBX 


AKD AOB. 




51 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-57 
hours. 


6&-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


yews 

(m 
shops 


TotiU. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrs. +). 


Y'thB 

(16- 
18 

yra.). 


16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


ex- 

oept 

as 

not'd). 


807 


264 

189 

1.849 

1,916 

ISS 


643 
398 
916 




692 
389 
183 
97 
1.048 
938 
110 


4 

*l 
9 

""si 

96 
6 


6 

1 

"'d 

17 

1 


206 

196 

78 

3 

1,986, 

1,799 

194 


" "46 


144 
63 
73 
18 
679 
696 
84 


272 

961 

91 

"2;8i6 

9,089 
991 


391 
906 
169 

16 
140 
199 

11 






610 






tes 






3.1^ 






1,780 

1,697 

183 








»,81S 
S16 
















88.878 

M4.S49 

19,196 

l,8tl 


10.723 

9,399 

1,198 

118 

8 


18,153 

19,749 

4,866 

646 


9,497 

9,908 
6,139 
1,167 


26.661 

17,099 

7,667 

996 

7 


389 

180 

167 

69 


196 

109 

71 

93 


11,713 

6,781 

4,946 

686 

1 


424 

194 

164 

66 


3.957 

3,009 

863 

109 


26.737 

16,149 

9,613 

971 

4 


7,660 
6,190 
1,718 


19 

8 

11 


2 
1 
1 


8 
























2,062 


376 
16 


828 

704 


847 
941 
973 
333 


944 

606 
166 
183 
149 
9 
140 

2.141 
606 

1,163 

438 

37 

1.974 
388 
878 
399 
316 

1,049 
483 

76 
822 

677 

J^ 

184 
177 
100 
409 
107 
130 
169 
13 

1.428 

6 

879 

613 

1.4% 
486 

"A 
11 

63 

S4 


7 
4 
3 


6 

6 


1,067 
680 
t41 
136 

92 
7 

86 
632 
367 
199 

37 

99 

361 

119 

919 

4 

19 
170 

87 

67 


48 
96 

9 
14 

1 

i 

26 
6 

i 

9 
1 


921 

813 

94 

7 

88 

885 

636 

397 

13 

10 

192 

46 

106 

1 

321 

969 

48 

8 

1 

13 

19 

1 

121 

117 

4 


1.132 

306 
319 
136 
10 
196 
636 
186 
936 

'^9 

1.299 

440 

663 

191 

106 

469 

911 

116 

40 

99 

1,957 

1,169 

806 

115 

106 

9 


9 






l,8il 
408 






9 


.... 


.... 


sSi 






244 


56 

17 

39 

464 

931 

186 

48 

396 

140 

19S 

67 

6 

261 

166 

78 

8 

8 

8 


188 


1 

1 

""ii 
4 
4 
6 
3 

24 
5 

90 


1 

i 

4 
1 
9 

i 

13 

""'lis 


13 






17 






tt7 


188 

1,750 

661 

893 

197 

79 

1,738 

130 

937 

339 

339 

1.003 

386 

*% 

93 


""606 

""'996 
310 

'240 
940 

*i;962 

1,166 

806 


IS 
945 

16 






2.820 
889 

1,374 

486 

79 


354 

90 

310 




2,873 

610 


882 







94 
697 
100 






1,130 
866 










337 


1 
22 
99 


1 

7 
6 

9 


931 

474 

71 

40S 






1 254 


'"",' 




661 






669 






ii 












16 

1.089 

669 

630 

67 

66 

9 


i 
6 
6 

1 








1,970 

1,164 

806^ 


46 
16 
30 

4 
4 


7 
7 




















632 


2ii 

170 
41 

2i3 

116 

66 

19 

IS 

17 

9 

6 

9 

491 

868 

193 


821 
83 
138 
100 
404 
96 
906 
173 


296 
SO 






963 






179 


166 
100 







100 










617 


4 


3 

9 


200 
39 

141 

97 


1 

i 


220 

38 
180 


113 
83 
17 

IS 

1.417 

'"766 

661 

499 

393 

89 

£4 

99 

44 
66 


276 
19 

74 
190 


8 
8 




199 


4 


1 






13 






1.562 
g 


266 


1,280 


6 


6 


113 
3 




93 

7 

84 

9 

507 

4«? 

44 

99 

6 

18 

19 


42 
£ 

40 











890 


194 
131 
950 

in 

40 


760 
690 
650 

'660 


6 


6 






663 
2,091 
ItOlO 


110 
628 
606 
63 
91 
48 
56 
36 
91 


" "2i 

2 






81 

/ 
17 


8 
5 


1,085 

181 

\ 969 

t 











S8S 






ef!, 






IS 

1 
1 


6 

1 
1 


SO 






147 


66 
66 


81 
96 
66 






99 






66 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



310 



Xew York State Depabtment of Labor. 



Table XV. — StatiaUcs of Factories Inspected in First and Second 





City and Industry. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Largest 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 






In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 

total. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There. 

of 
14-16 
years 

of 
age. 


7-b 


NEW YORK CITY— Continued, 

V. Chemicals. Ol^. Paints, Etc. — 

Concluded. 

Starch 


7 

4 

e 

1 

16 




1 

1 


59 

24 

25 

10 

499 

92 

407 

212 

367 

47 

6S 

257 

694 

494 

66 

34 


67 

22 

25 

10 

476 

69 

407 

207 

357 

47 

63 

257 

683 

488 

65 

SO 


68 

23 

25 

10 

250 

82 

168 

21 

239 

36 

63 

161 

408 

Sll 

63 

34 


2 






Afanhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 










7-c 


Glue, mucilage, etc 




3 
2 

1 


23 
23 






MankaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


1S\ 

5 




7-d 


Fertilisers {Queens) 


3 
6 

g 
1 
S 
17 
IS 
S 
1 




^ 




7-e 


Aiatches and explosives 




1 






Brooklyn 
















Kichtnond 










7-f 


Celluloid and other plastic ■* 




7 
6 

1 


11 
6 

1 
A 






AlanhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






Total — Group V 










627 

S78 

197 

40 

12 


2 i.'U 


19.637 
7,998 
7,164 
2,8^2 
1,663 


18.181 
6,985 
7,024 
2,562 
1.610 


18,044 
7,339 
6,707 
2,52i 
1,476 


l,447i 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


/ 


121 
S3 


1,004 
ISO 
260 






Queens 






Richmond. 


/ 




63\ 




VI. Paper and Pulp. 
Sorting waste paper 






1 


42 




28 
27 

I 


412 

370 

35 

7rZ 

1£1 

239 

53 

S3S 


404 

362 

55 

726 
116 
238 
60 
322 


406 
368 

33 

6 

699 

121 

219 

40 
319 


8 
8 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


'II:::::: 






Richmond 


/ 
13 

9 

2 
1 
1 








2-c 


Paper mills 




3 
3 


24 
6 

1 

i 

16 






Manliattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 










Richmond 











Total — Group VI 








55 

48 

4 
1 


31 

SO 

/ 


1,102 

'491 

274 

5i 

345 


1.130 

478 

273 

50 

329 


1,105 

489 

252 

40 

324 


32 
IS 

1 

2 

16 






Sfanhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






Richmond . 


2 


' 






VII. Printino and Paper Goods. 
Typo and printers* materials 




t 




1 


32 

25 

4 

3 

255 

205 

42 

7 

1 

7 

6 

1 

183 

163 

26 

4 

1 


1 16 

1 13 


364 

284 

2^ 

68 

9,260 

7,108 

1,791 

295 

• 66 

350 

'n 

6,442 

6,177 

1,103 

122 

40i 


334 

254 

22 

68 

9,052 

6,924 

1,771 

291 

66 

309 

S04 

6 

6,887 

4,eu 

1,086 
117 

40 


339 

284 

14 

41 

8.464 

6,601 

1,641 

266 

66 

315 

312 

3 

6,101 

4,961 

1,021 

119 

10 


30 


. _ . . 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


SO 




Richmond 


j 3 

3 107 


j 


2-a 


Paper boxes and tubes 


208 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


5 



85 
21 

1 


184\ 

20\ 




Queens . 


4 




Richmond 


2-b... 


Paper bags and sacks 




3 
2 

1 
89 
79 

9 


41 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


41 


2-0 


Other paper goods 


656 "is 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


6SS\ 16 
17\ 




Queens 


6 - - -- 




Richmond 




1 








Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Keport of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 311 

CUm Cities, Year Ended September 30, 1911: By Indastries — Continaed. 



NuuBER or Employees 


AT Time of Inspection. 






Weekly Hours of Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYING — 


SEX AND AGS. 


61 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-67 
hours. 


68-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrs. +). 


Y'ths 
(16- 
18 

yre.). 


Boys 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 
(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


66 


35 

21 

4 

10 

65 

69 

1 6 

I 16 

10 

10 

1 80 

66 
26 


21 




39 

7 
2£ 
10 

185 
39 

146 
16 

121 
15 
28 
81 

291 

251 
16 
24 






17 

14 

3 







24 
21 





32 






ii 










is 


21 













22 

10 
23 
23 






10 











221 


162 




5 

1 
4 




37 

19 
18 




7 

3 
4 


197 

33 

164 







69 






168 


162 








16 


16 

127 

9 

63 

66 






239 


229 

25 

63 

151 

317 

260 

37 

so 


V.'.V... 


10 
4 


4 
1 


9(5 
15 
25 
56 
84 
47 
34 
3 


5 


61 


hi 

26 






S6 


:::::; 




6S 








161 




6 

\ 


3 
12 
3 
6 
3 


6 

8 

2 

6 




61 

73 

66 

4 

3 


25 
207 
149 

68 






397 


117 

90 






S06 






6i 






SO 


27 












16,597 
6,336 
6,677 
S,t62 
1,4X3 


2,770 

1,800 

792 

\ 160 

18 


8.242 

2.89S 

3,630 

939 

765 


5,585 
1,637 
2,135 
1 . 163 
650 


11.522 
3,651 
4.800 
1,858 
1,207 


180 
69 
88 
10 
23 


71 

28 

29 

4 

10 


4,699 

2,5/f/) 

1,G£S 

363 

168 


125 
67 

26 
27 
15 


3,551 

2.388 

916 

169 

78 


8.317 
3,314 
3,328 
1,371 
304 


4,367 
606 

2,309 
412 

1,041 


362 

28 

24 

310 








398 


226 

213 

8 

6 

76 

76 




172 

147 
25 




324 

291 

28 

5 

530 
79 

156 
38 

258 






74 

69 

6 




5 


70 
70 


323 

290 
S3 






S60 










33 














6 








6 
46 

U 
2 









676 


296 
40 

218 
38 


303 

"so's 


1 

/ 


i 


138 

33 

60 




3 

1 
2 


52 

62 


577 
20 

216 
38 

SOS 






lie 






£18 






38 






SOS 






4S 






























1,073 


302 

289 

8 




468 

187 

243 

38 




303 

"so's 


854 
370 
183 
38 
263 


1 
I 


3 
3 


212 

102 
65 


3 

1 
2 


61 

U 
2 


122 
122 


900 






476 


SIO 






251 


249 

38 

303 







38 






308 






^^••••■• 


6 


















309 


148 

118 

14 

16 

1,180 

38 

ii 

8 

3 

905 

799 

79 

17 

10 


161 
136 




306 

261 
14 

2,760 

2,247 

421 

66 

16 

143 

142, 

1 

2,212, 

1,728 

447 

S7 


2 

2 




' 




112 

109 

3 


161 

109 

11 

41 

6,189 

6,219 

879 

91 

4 

1 

3 

3.668 

2,762 

800 

106 


36 
S6 






264 






14 
8,256 

e,si7 






26 
6.662 
4,969 
1,423 

%i 

263 
263 


""'4i4 
414 






::::::" ::::::i 








97 
62 

27 
2 
6 


63 

40 

'I 

1 


6,101 

3,806\ 

1.097 

166 

S2\ 

131 

129\ 

3.1611 

2,676\ 

6081 

68^ 

9\ 


245 

162 
69 
13 
11 


956 
706 
226 

\i 

7 
7 


1,111 
393 
617 
147 
64 
263 
263 




2 


1,621 






262 
66 




M 


274 






271 










3 










6,646 


2,622 

2,006 

619 

97 


2,019 

1,613 

406 


47 

S6 

7 

4 


37 

26 

6 

6 


89 
62 
S6 


1,705 

1,666 

139 


173 

100 

66 

8 






4,418 






1,004 










1 


10 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



312 



New Yobk State De:pabtment of Labor. 



Table XV.— StalMlcs ef Fbctorle* laapMled In Pint rad S»mmd 





CZTT AKD InDUSTRT. 


FULCEB 

Inbpbctsd. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labokst 
Number of 
emplotbe8 

IN Year. 








In. 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


OBAMD 
TOTAL. 


omcm 

rORCB. 


dufltry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


Then>- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

years 
of 


8-a.... 


NEW YORK CITY— ConHnued, 

VII. Printino and Paper Goods — 

CondtuUd. 

Printing and publishing 

Brooklyn 


1,410 

1,911 

164 

SI 

14 

262 

£ 

266 

£66 

10 

60 

63 

6 

1 
11 

7 

d 


7 
7 


802 

66£ 

116 

13 

1£ 

199 

189 

10 


41,337 

37,603 

3,484 

160 

90 

8,497 

6,490 

1,964 

63 

10.259 

9,160 

1,109 

2.784 

£,1£9 

663 

£ 

951 

449 

609 

712 


34.704 

31,090 

3,386 

140 

89 

8.327 

6,331 

1,948 

9.558 
8,468 
1,100 
2.672 
£,0£6 

eu 

911 
410 
601 
641 


37,592 

34,03M 

3,341 

149 

77 

7.629 

6,801 

1,780 

9.600 

8,690 

1,080 

2.554 

1,949 

610 

£ 

816 

3£6 

490 

675 

474 

£01 


5,737 

6,617 

99 

90 

1 

168 

167 

6 

6 

701 

699 

9 

112 

103 

9 


26 

MS 

t 




Ot4«e7M 






Richmond 




3-b.... 


Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


1 




Queens 




3-0 


T^tbographing and engraving. t 


1 

/ 


182 

180 

£ 

28 

£6 

1 

1 

1 

/ 


7 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


7 


3-d 


Gamed and noTeltiAB 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 




4 


Wftll pApf>r 


40 
39 
8 
71 
63 
18 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




5 


Photography 




22 
£1 

1 






Brooklyn 






Total — Group VII 






2,534 

£,200 

£80 

36 

19 


11 
11 


1.449 

1,£68 

160 

16 

16 


80.956 

69,££0 

10,860 

639 

£64 


72,395 

60,880 

10,664 

698 

£63 


74,085 

63,143 

10,181 

667 

194 


7.663 

7,449 

186 


49 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


^ 




Queens . 






Richmond 






VIII. TEXTiLsa. 
Silk and eilk gooda 




1 


73 
61 
1£ 

? 


1 
/ 


10 
6 
£ 

1 
1 
6 

i 

6 

i 

3 


5.181 
£,696 

eo£ 

1,906 

£16 
36 
103 
472 
£36 
£37 
206 

»1 

£7 

1,080 

8£1 

£49 

10 

5.745 

1,709 

3,467 

679 

3.191 

£,162 

479 

10£ 

468 


5,068 

£,646 

60S 

1,873 

161 
36 
10£ 
468 
£31 
£37 
202 

£6 

1,026 

767 

£49 

10 

5.648 

1,646 

3,434 

668 

2.990 

1,960 

478 

101 

461 


4.629 

£,371 

631 

1,680 

£7 

86 

454 

£19 

£36 

186 

46 

1£9 

1£ 

950 

780 

17£ 

7 

4.885 

1,461 

£,966 

2.792 
1,876 

446 
89 

389 


112 

79 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 


33 






Richmond . . 




2-a 


Carpets and rugs 


17| J 


55 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 




1 


1 
4 
4 




2-b.... 


Felt and felt goods 


6 

7 

5 

3 

1 

30 

£6 

4 

1 

172 

63 

99 

10 

90 

7£ 

1£ 

3 

3 








Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




2c 


Woolens and worsteds 


4 
3 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 








3 






Queens 


1 
54 
64 




3 


Cotton goods 


2 
/ 
1 


10 

8 
£ 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






4 


Hosiery and knit goods 


1 

/ 

2 

£ 


118 

50 

78 

6 

32 

£8 

£ 

1 

1 


97 

63 
£3 

11 
191 
189 

1 
1 
7 






^Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 




5-a 


Dyfiing, f niflhing, eto 






" Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






Richmond 





* Employed 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repoet of Bubbau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 313 

Om* OHM. Year &Hled Sfleiber M. 1911: Bf IndMlriM — Contlnaed. 



NuMBBB or Emplotbbs 


AT TttIB OF iKSPBCnON. 






Wbbklt Hours op Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP rORCK. 


NTTMBBR OP SHOP BMFLOTBaS 
WHO WORK — 




NUICBBR IH 8HOP8 
BICPLOTINO — 


BKX AKO AOB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


s 


TotoL 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yni. +). 


Y'ths 
(16- 
18 

yni.). 


16 
ynk). 


Worn. 


OirlB 

(14- 

16 

yre.). 


oept 

ss 
nofd). 


31.855 
$8,416 


7,043 

'•^ 

100 

76 

1,412 

'•'fs 

1 

1.318 
1,$74 

249 

$38 

9 

$ 

48 

266 
i5 


14.176 

13, $69 

894 

$$ 


10,637 
8,89$ 
1,745 


26.213 

$3,489 

$,641 

3.628 

$,91$ 

695 

$1 

6,710 

6,993 

717 

1,053 

8$7 

$$6 

1 

646 

$66 

380 

480 

361 

119 


432 

363 

76 

1 

3 

71 

88 

$9 

418 
$73 

'1 

6 

1 

■' '34 

7 

$7 

7 

7 


168 

'^ 

3 

fr 
at 

I 

i 

1 

i 

6 


4.955 
4,36$ 

697 

6 

1 

3.584 

$,617 

949 

18 

1.721 

1,618 

$03 
1.343 

971 

37$ 


87 

81 

6 

*"i29 
60 
69 

••"is 
11 

A 

30 


23.313 

$1,$76 

$6 
3,213 
$,809 

40S 

7,410 

6,361 

1,069 

144 

'^ 

$ 

8 

7 

/ 

226 

174 

6$ 


8.340 
8,948 
1,$86 

66 

61 
3,977 
$,669 
1,366 

4$ 
1.487 
1,476 

1$ 

1,954 

1,366 

699 


202 

19$ 

10 




1 


S,$4$ 






jS 




/ 


W 








7,461 


4.308 
3,810 

466 

4$ 

3,268 

3,091 

177 
1,243 
1,074 

169 


1.741 
1,$60 

3,463 
860 
950 
6$7 
4$3 


271 

$66 

6 






S,644 






i,m 






43 






8.899 
7,8$8 
1,071 


2 
$ 




*2 
*$ 


2.442 


344 






1,839 






601 






$ 








776 


403 
$61 
167 
338 
168 
170 


320 

"3$b 








96 
JP/ 
7>^ 
110 
46 
64 


i 

1 


47 
378 


721 
47^ 












48$ 






604 






4$1 








183 





















66,422 

66,701 

9,996 


12,580 

11, $84 

1,036 

168 

10$ 


33,448 

$9,017 

3,965 

376 

91 


20.394 

16,400 
4,994 


44.141 

38, $16 

6,660 

$39 

1$6 


1.114 

783 

311 

11 

9 


366 

«&« 

81 

13 

4 


20,202 

16,037 

3,866 

$67 
4$ 


699 

397 

177 

13 

1$ 


37,094 

33,133 

3,831 

83 

47 


26.205 

$0,7$7 

6,091 

$95 

9$ 


3.123 

1.841 

1,073 

165 

64 




5 
*$ 


633 
199 




8 








4,517 
$,$9$ 


364 

318 

31 

6 

**5i 

7i 

f? 

52 
$$ 

19 

11 
189 
1^1 

$1 

7 

994 

55/ 

^55 

30 
488 

J/ 
8 


1.998 

1,$80 

600 

171 

119 


2,165 
694 

1,471 


1,779 
797 
$08 

'g 

114 
61 
18 

101 

18$ 

55 

6 

U 

6 

433 

377 

64 

$ 

1,387 

440 

856 

91 

1,804 

1,$05 

$64 

87 

$48 


44 

19 
3 

19 
3 
1 

i 


55 

5f 

3 

$0 

3 

/ 
1 
1 
3 
$ 
1 


2.492 

1,366 

$97 

818 

1$ 

132 

90 

7 

36 

154 

104 

60 

126 

36 

85 

6 

1 

$,008 
309 
772 
475 
171 


147 
79 


273 

186 

17 

71 


3,538 

1,878 

330 

1,$83 

^l 

'A 

80 
302 
117 
186 
135 

""i$9 

6 
307 

$98 
9 

■'3,986 

l,$9i 

$,355 

333 

1.196 

888 

$$3 

77 

8 


706 
$$9 
184 
$93 










631 
















J 


50 


3 
5 






'^ 










aU 


166 
110 







f 

$ 

1 
1 


lit 

68 
60 
37 
5f 








30 
30 






$16 






$36 






182 


10 
iO 






4$ 
1$9 


















11 






**37 

14 

$$ 

1 

116 

/J 

39 

6$ 

9 

4 


6 
104 

50 

J5 

/ 

193 

6$ 

65 

66 

501 

403 

87 

11 








905 


494 
343 
161 


222 
$$$ 


6 
6 


7 

i 


494 
378 
110 
6 
614 

34 
611 

69 
904 
403 
134 






7$6 






17$ 






7 






4,788 
1,388 


2.133 

55* 

1.313 

1,019 

178 

77 

5P 


1.661 
$19 

1,161 
$91 
80J 
$70 
$0$ 

""S$8 


25 
5 

17 
6 

12 
6 
6 

1 


17 

/ 
4 
5 

i 


1 




$,93$ 
2,^\ 


t 








1.694 














376 


1$6 




367 







in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



314 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XV. — SUttstics of Factories Inspected In First and Second 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber. 



5-b. 



6-c... 



CiTT AND Industry. 



NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

VI 11. Tf.xtileb— Concluded. 
Upholstery goods 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Richmond 

Braids, embroiderios and dress trimmings 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Flax, bemp and jute manufactures 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Oilcloth, window shades, etc 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 

Brooklyn 

Richmond 



Total — Group VIII 

Manhattan and Bronx. 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 



1-a... 

1-b... 

1-c... 
1-d... 
2-a... 

2-b... 

2-c... 
2-d... 

2-e.,. 



IX. Clothinq, Mu.lisery, Laundry. 
Etc. 

Tailoring 

Manhattan and Bronx. 

Brooklyn 

I Queens 

[ Richmond , 

'Shirts, collars and cufFs 

■ Manhattan and Bronx. 
I Brooklyn 

Queen.'* 

Men's neckwear 

I ManhUtan and Bronx. 

Brooklyn. .^ 

Suspenders and other furnishing goods . . . 
I Manhattan and Bronx. . 

I Brooklyn 

I Dressmaking 

I Manhattan and Bronx. . 

I Brooklyn 

I Queens 

Richmond 

Women's white goods 

I Manhattan arid Bronx . . 

j Brooklyn 

I Ridtmond 

' Infants* wear 

I Manhattan and Bronx. . 

I Brooklyn 

Women's neckwear, etc 

I Manhattan and Bronx. . 

I Brooklyn 

( Queens 

Corsets, garters, etc 

; Manhattan and Bronx. . 
I Brooklyn 



Tlaces 
Inspected. 



Once. 



51 

45 

6 

I 

430 

SIO 

63 

6 

1 

40 

gs 

1£ 

2 

31 

25 
5 

1 



More 
than 
once. 



95."> 

700 

216 

32 

7 



4.201 37 

2,931. 26 

1,220\ 11 

11 

220 : i 

lo8' 

5.^1 1 

4' 

153( 2 

141, B 

if-::::; 
%::::■} 

4,117| 47 

5,49^1 4^ 

60'h 4 

io\ 

^1 

323 " 

271 

49 

3 

87 

76 

It 

113 

107 

6 

1 

147 

133\ 

14\ 



Num- 
ber 
of 
owners 
at 

work. 



Larqbst 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Yeah. 



I 



Total. 



10 

6 

4 

1 

203 

170 

30 

S 



409 

267 

128 

11 

3 



There- 
of in 
shop. 



I 



2.050 

l.So3\ 

180 

8\ 

11.440; 

9,066 

2,086' 

28;i, 

li 

6.27.'> 

1,096\ 

5,04V 

134\ 

l.US, 

28 r 

26\ 
811 \ 



1.970 

1,781 

187 

S\ 

11.1791 

8,8S0\ 

2,<m4 

273, 

12 

6,211 

1,051 

6,030 

130 

1.08H 

254 

26 

808 



OFFICB 
FORCE. 



GRAND 

total. 



Total 



37. 11 Hi 36.15."» 

20,099] 19,269 

12,540 12,477 

3,143 3,0S3 

1,336\ 1.3e6 



3.487 75 

2, 3221 56 
" 18 



1,12. 

36 

4 

107 

76 

28 

3 

5S 

63 

5 

15 

13 

2 

2.696 

2,176 

610 

8 

2 

201 



15 

175\ 12 
23 2 

1 
50 
45 

5 
60 
66 

3 

/I 
69 
64 

6 



,229 
,649 
,454 
21? 

9 
,793 
,875 
,781 
137 
,602 
,350 
2i2 
, 159 
,156 

3 
J86 
,782 
,871 
128 

5 
059 
403 
277 
319 
601 
,246 
3-,8 
,976 
,810 
158 

8 
,786 
,43'> 
35 1 



73,389 

54,741 

18,422 

217 

9 

8,597 

4.688 

3,772 

137 

3.483 

3,23S 

2W 

1.121 

1,118 

3 

117,215 

108,2^6 

8,817 

127 

6 

14.744 

12,168 

2,2i8 

318 

3.498 

3,140 

352 

4.800 

4 , 63 } 

157 

8 

3.664 

3,317 

347 



1.753, 
1.613\ 

132\ 

8 

9,333 

7.508< 

1,615 

198\ 

ir 

5,430! 

951. 
4,360^ 

119\ 
1,099 

269 
19 

811 



263 

233 

22 
8 



31.829 

17,280 

10,620 

2.669 

1,260 



947 

816 
63 
69 
10 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory I^^spection, 1911. 315 

Class Cides, Tear Ended September 30, 1911: By Indistrles — Cantlnaei. 



NlTMBEB OF EMPLOrBBS AT TlHB 


OP Inspection. 








Webklt Hours of Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP PORCB. 


NUMBER of shop EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO — 


BBX Ain> AOB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


shops 
ex- 
cept 
as 

not'd). 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 -f-. 


Men 

(18 

yrs. +). 


Y'ths 

yra.). 


Boys 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yra.). 


1,679 
1.6 At 


223 

176 

39 

8 

2,548 

2,213 

285 

38 

12 

189 

129 

40 

"176 

151 

19 


1,255 

1J64 

91 


201 

201 


400 

376 

21 

3 

2.936 

2,3S3 

511 

'% 

2.24S 

250 
1,919 

79 
910 
168 

13 
729 


3 

3 




13 

. 8 
5 


1,229 

1 , 12s 

98 

6 

5,711 

4.S4S 

1,02s 

130 

10 

2.780 

589 

2,156 

35 

137 

65 

6 

68 


34 

23 
6 


294 

269 

25 


1.374 

1.272 
102 


11 




3 

/ 


ISO 
8 


3 

8 

775 

356 

396 

23 




2 


9,070 


5.049 

3,946 

9.51 

152 


1,473 

1,116 

357 


117 

99 

16 

2 


49 

U 

6 


257 

231 

38 

18 


612 

498 

101 

13 


7.683 

6,421 

1,096 

154 

12 

3.279 

713 

2.512 

54 

230 

215 

15 






7,275 






1 ,593 







190 






IS 






5,367 


i,i82 

533 

634 

115 

91 

91 


4.016 

245 

3,771 

""ms 


€ 
162 

■■"is 

7 


55 
2 

62 
1 
3 
3 


120 
64 
66 

i 

/ 



251 

145 

108 

1 

20 

2? 

2 


1,834 

49 

1 , 725 

60 

810 







907 






4,345 






115 






1,069 






£4^ 







19 


2 
808 






808 




808 


11 























30.882 
16,485 
10,657 

B,eio 


5,309 

3,990 

1,189 

102 

28 


14.227 

9,508 

3,837 

746 

86 


11.346 

2.967 
6,481 
1,762 

1 , 136 


12.349 
6,153 
4,090 
1,0.92 
1,014 


396 
151 

204 
26 
13 


209 
103 

..." 


17.199 

9,648 

5,994 

1,336 

221 


729 
410 
187 
132 


2,463 

1.78'^ 

508 

172 


22.225 

13.1SS 

6.983 

1.987 

67 


6.191 
1.492 
3,065 
451 
1,183 


1 
1 


3 

/ 
2 


1,260 
















62.336 

46,840 

16,350 

139 


17.941 

13,045 

4,750 

139 

7 

1,063 

867 

196 

"'831 

744 

87 

191 

191 

3 

19,246 

16,679 

2,624 

39 

1,354 

1,157 

189 

8 

373 

320 

63 

475 

453 

16 

6 

664 

699 

66 


34.732 

25,323 

9,409 


9.663 
8,472 
1,191 


45.873 
35,3^3 
10,45s 

2.675 

1. 804 
859 
12 
8t5 
7,99 
46 
449 


247 

178 
69 


120 

83 
37 


15.911 

11,196 

4,666 

62 


182 

61 

130 

1 


9.991 

9,04s 

940 

3 


31.403 

24,42'i 
6.946 
28 
1 
4,787 
2,855 
1,932 

"i;9i6 

1,779 
131 
714 
714 


20.841 

13,269 

7,462 

104 

6 

2,35S 

1,0^9 

1.224 

95 

27 

21 

6 

41 

41 


101 

95 
2 
4 


4 
/ 
3 


7 












7.828 
^.505 
3,388 


4.7i8 

2,658 

1,923 

137 

2.0S6 

1,947 

130 

610 

640 


2,047 

778 
1,269 


25 

21 

4 

■■'i3 

12 
1 
4 
4 


35 

24 
8 
3 

10 
7 
3 
2 
2 


4,803 

2,373 

2,347 

83 

2,001 

1,84''> 

156 

36'? 

365 

3 

47.411 

42.960 

4,384 

65 

2 

10.949 

8.900 

1,843 

206 

2,267 

2,04s 

219 

3,031 

2,955 

70 

6 

2.475 

2,217 

258 


290 
81 

170 
39 

48 
28 
20 

11 
// 

"6i8 

62) 

97 

1 


683 

409 
232 

980 

891 

89 

79 

76 

3 

45,477 

43,542 

1,918 

17 




1 


137 






2.917 






9,691 






ti6 


, 




834 






831 






3 






89.671 

8B,»06 

7,270 

91 


60.513 

66,005 

4,4rj6 

62 


9.812 
9,622 

290 


41.422 

38,620 

2,777 

24 

1 

1,289 

1,110 

129 

50 

513 

493 

20 

559 

546 

13 


88 

79 

7 

1 

1 

24 

18 

6 

3 
3 


32 

27 
6 

""ii 

8 

1 

8 
4 

4 


4i.679 

37,468 

4,139 

68 

4 

10.281 

8.723 

1,553 


2.385 

l'.205 
6 


30 

22 

8 


;;;;;; 


4 






12.650 


8,979 
7,4S0 
1.526 

2i 
2.52S 
2.327 
199 
2.862 
2.791 

71 


2,3i7 

1,716 

347 

254 

"326 
33^ 
... 


371 

267 

89 

15 

114 

101 

13 

53 

49 

4 


2.160 

1,511 

364 

285 

951 

921 

23 

901 

90) 

4 


209 

69 
140 






10,303 






2,062 






285 






2.901 


1.915 
1,721 

334 
2,707 
2.613 
83 
6 
2.332 
2.131 

211 


5 
6 






2,649 






252 






3.663 


16 

16 


4 

4 


52 
62 






3,670 






87 






6 












3,205 


1.157 
918 
239 


1,3S4 

1,384 


666 

63 S 

33 


14 

14 


7 
6 

1 


43 

31 
12 


607 

568 

39 


266 

212 
64 






2,901 






304 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



316 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



Table XY.— Stetialica af Factoriea laaftUd Ib Pint aW Saeasd 





Crrr and Industbt. 


Placbs 
Inspsctbd. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labobst 
numbbb op 
Emplotbbs 

IN YbAB. 








In- 


Onoe. 


More 
than 
once. 


OBAND 
TOTAL. 


orrxcB 
roBca. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total 


There- 
of 
14-16 


8... 


NEW YORK CITY— Continued. 

IX. Clothino, MnXINEBT, Laukdbt. 

I>rc—ConchuUd. 

Men's hat4 and caps r . . . . , 


300 
B71 
B7 
f 
513 
469 

*i 

1 
685 
637 

tss 

259 

£14 

43 

e 

9 

8 

I 

56 

6M 

1.101 
84i 
B4M 

16 

1 

793 

414 

S08 

62 

19 
104 

60 

137 

109 
98 


5 

6 


235 

919 
16 


7,705 
6,696 
1.843 
336 
9,517 

17 

13,136 

11,867 

1.994 

45 

4,076 

3,443 

687 

46 

144 

^1 

1.249 

1,091 

168 

9.330 

6,605 

9,691 

998 

6 

1.454 

839 

499 

98 

39 

1.561 

899 

663 

109 

1.132 

989 

160 


7.588 
6,435 
1,897 
396 
9.342 
8,879 

*n 

17 

12.564 

11,391 

1,900 

3.951 

3,331 

675 

45 

142 

138 

1.195 
1,037 

168 
9,087 
6,334 
9,696 

991 

e 

1.454 

839 

499 

98 

39 

1.500 

660 
106 
1.090 
960 
140 


6.402 

4,397 
1,739 
973 
7.165 
6,798 

*n 

17 

9.421 

8,605 

898 

18 
3.226 
9,734 

133 

4 

1.101 

960 

8.836 
6,993 
9,380 

998 

6 

1.408 

810 

31 

1.351 

778 

i? 

1.041 
908 
133 


116 

90 

16 

10 

173 

170 

3 






Brooklyn 






Que€n9 




4-a 


Artificial feathers and lowers 


10 
9 

1 


242 

990 
91 

1 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queent 






Richmond 






4-b 


Millinery 


7 

6 

1 

4 

4 

i 

/ 

""u 

7 
6 

i 


336 

$49 

89 

6 

147 

HI 

96 

1 

8 

7 

/ 

33 

30 

3 

772 

601 

160 

10 

1 

722 

367 

990 

46 

19 

52 

'^ 

3 
86 
71 
16 


549 

694 

93 

9 

124 

/// 

19 

1 

2 

9 


2 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brookiyn 


g 




Qu««n9 




5-a 


Curtains, embroideriea, etc 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Quwn9 




5-b.... 


Quilts, comfortables, etc 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




5-0 


Umbrellas and parasols 


41 
4i 






Manhattan tmd Bronx. . 
Brooklun 




6-ai 


Laundries (non-Chinft«e) 


242 

171 

64 

7 


1 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


i 




Qiuon* 






nichmond 




6-a». . . . 


Chinese laundries 








Brooklyn 














Queons 








Richmond 






6-b.... 


CiAf^ififk* f^pd dyeinff ... . 


6i 
66 
3 
3 
42 
S9 
10 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 







Queena 




7 


Clip sorting < . . . . 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Total — Group IX ... 






13,362 

10,3eM 

$,861 

149 

SO 


139 
116 

M4 


9,376 

6,889 

9,346 

114 

97 


285.298 

940,996 

49,666 

1,360 

388 


278.424 

934,386 

49,316 

1,336 

387 


231.388 

193,766 

36,160 

1,139 

360 


6.745 

6,489 

938 

94 


9 




Brooklyn 


P 




Queona 






Richmond 






X. Food, Lxquobs and Tobacco. 
Flour and other cereal products 




1-a.... 


9 

6 

3 

1 

4 

5 

/ 

53 

36 

17 

68 

64 

IS 

1 




2 

i 
1 


295 

106 
66 

133 
3.350 
9,686 

664 
1.722 
1,418 

2.047 

1,638 

419 

90 


279 
99 
66 

3.189 
9,691 

698 
1.606 
1,306 

300 
1.759 
1,966 

419 
86 


282 

97 

69 

133 

8.193 

9,699 

1,968 

919 

1.885 

i,4S6 

38 1\ 

69\ 


16 
7 


1 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






QueenM 


9 
161 

116 
119 

285 
980 


i 


1-b.... 


Sugar and molasses re6nins. 










' BrooOyn . .. . 










Qtioena 








1-c 


Canning fruits and vegetables 




10 
6 

t 

6 
4 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




1-d.... 


Coffee and spioe roasting and grinding. . . . 
Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queena 


6 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpoet of BujuiAn of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



317 













NincBSB 


o» Emplotebs 


AT Time 


or Inspxction 


■ 








Chil- 








SHOP FOBCX. 










NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOTEBS 
3VHO WORK — 


under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 

QOt'd). 




NUMBKR IN SHOPS 
XMPIX>TINa — 




BEX 


AND AGS. 




51 

hours 

or 

leas. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


Totid. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yn. +). 


Y'tha 
(16- 
18 

yre.). 


16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 

(16 y«. 

+). 


Giris 

(14r- 

16 

yre.). 


6,286 
4,807 
1,716 


1.788 

1,687 

101 

8,787 

884 

8 

17 

2,811 

8,889 

466 

16 

1.553 

1,881 

"i 

37 
88 

242 

8,034 

8,840 

'% 

1,408 

810 

4^9 

98 

81 

4S1 

898 

174 

9 

613 

610 

108 


2,950 
8,416 

478 

68 

3,946 

8,771 

176 


1.648 

1,143 
801 


4,259 
8,078 

^■% 

979 

966 

83 


81 
18 
60 
18 
18 
18 


21 

11 

9 

1 

19 

17 

8 


1,896 

1,194 

608 

100 

5.645 

6,317 

306 

7 

16 

7,104 

6,334 

768 

18 

2,229 

1,984 

877 

88 

93 

93 


29 

11 

7 

11 

331 

861 

79 

1 

" i42 

119 

83 

""63 
3 


1,091 

668 

460 

73 

2,915 

8,786 

'"i 

17 

2.528 

8,316 

809 

3 

603 

647 

68 

A 

80 

1 

76 

76 


4,709 
3,313 
1,806 

190 
3.932 
3,714 

818 


486 
436 

60 














£6S 






6.992 
6,568 


145 

118 

87 




14 

14 






17 






1 

1.599 

1,601 

94 

4 

759 

683 

"A 

41 

38 

3 

358 

388 

36 

2.663 

8,085 

693 

i 

1,399 

808 

468 

98 

31 

683 

343 

319 

81 

550 

108 














8.872 

7,981 

875 


5.844 

5,436 

409 


217 
817 




20 
80 


7 
7 


6,048 

5,384 

651 

13 

2,383 

Ai 

592 

688 

4 

2.601 

1,847 

887 

17 


296 

881 

16 















16 










3.102 


1,212 
965 
818 

98 


337 

337 


29 
86 

1 
8 


22 

16 
7 

i 


116 

78 
U 






t,6g3 






. 484 






4£ 






135 
181 


2 
8 





1 
1 


1.060 


8 

6 

3 

46 

39 

7 


1 
1 
1 

" "42 

39 

3 




818 

686 

133 

4,794 

3,046 

1,676 

178 


""766 
766 




684 

688 

108 

5.798 

3,988 

1,697 

176 

3 

8 

7 

1 




9 
9 


392 

866 

137 

3,467 

8,408 
906 
164 
6 
958 
46S 

67 

7 

380 

164 

809 

7 

658 

688 

76 






919 






141 






8,694 
e,06t 
£,816 


45 

87 

16 

8 


2,423 

1,790 

683 

60 


13 
13 




281 






5 










1,408 






1 
1 






16 
16 


45 

43 

8 


889 

888 
46 
31 
84 




810 








469 








98 
















81 




















1,200 


609 
8£/i 
809 

76 
386 
866 

80 


200 
800 




1 


601 
376 
168 

63 
448 
434 

14 


5 

4 

1 


120 
61 
88 

87 
27 
37 


790 

843 
41 




788 






488 




/ 






84 






099 

876 


1 




20 

14 

6 


...... 


188 


1 














224.643 

187,874 

86,918 

1,108 

849 


67,164 
46,814 

7« 


138,872 

117,088 

81,869 

648 

83 


28,617 

83,988 

4,840 

801 

864 


107.581 

89,900 

17,161 

438 

98 


638 

478 

143 

16 

7 


345 

866 
78 

i 


113.725 

96,048 

17,864 

698 

887 


2,354 

1,606 

676 

68 

16 


71.662 

66,016 

6,108 

887 

308 


119,344 

100,170 

18,766 

408 

6 


33,084 

80,667 

11,976 

433 

18 


553 

43i 

6» 

36 
84 


20 

17 

3 


266 


35 
10 


231 
66 

31 
31 


"z,6di 

8,403 
698 

""266 
866 


259 

86 

68 

181 

2,903 

8,310 

Ui 

496 
86 
896 
68S 
884 
SS 




1 
1 


6 
9 




A 

4 


54 

8 
4B 


208 

76 

€ 

184 

2.448 

8,434 

u 

34S 
876 

161 
81 
6A 






90 







68 






8.032 






S 
114 
114 










14 
'""14 


1 
1 








58^ 




8,484 











5«S 








684 




1.361 


224 

89 


1,137 
996 

iU 

618 

318 

64 




767 
640 
187 
697 
66S 
114 
86 


12 

IC 

i 

2 
i 


483 
587 

9€ 
367 
301 

6( 


529 

48Jt 

'■ .t. 

711 
> 876 




1,148 











816 










1.600 


a 


s 



1 

1 




\ 




1,186 






861 






84 








Digitized by VjOOQIC 



318 



New York State Depabtment of Labor. 



Table XV. — SUttetlcs of Factorfes Inspected In Flrat and Second 





City and Industry. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owneri 
at 

work. 


Largest 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 








In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


i GRAND 
j TOTAL. 


opncB 

PORCB. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 

14-16 

years 
of 

age. 


1-e.... 


NEW YORK CITY — Continued. 

X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco — 
Continued. 

Groceries not elsewhere classified 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brookljfn 


48 

31 

17 

70 

68 

12 

17 

8 

7 

2 

38 

15 

22 

1 

45 

37 

8 

2,769 

1,675 

956 

188 

60 

660 




6 

1 
6 
13 

A 
6 

1 
1 


2.721 

1,892 

829 

3.625 

3,250 

375 

420 

269 

135 

26 

697 

312 

207 

178 

652 

463 

189 

16,673 

10,885 

3.895 

752 

14t 

9,363 

6,663 

2,725 

65 

10 

781 

391 

221 

166 

14 

49 

3 

46 

1.138 

850 

241 

29 

18 

226 

139 

79 

8 

5,032 

3,363 

1,296. 

228 

145 

707 

623 

70 

14 

141 

66 

Yi 

1.787; 

1,78a 
3, 
4 


2.443 

1,617 

826 

3,500 

3,125 

375 

365 

216 

126 

24 

670 

299 

203 

168 

625 

Ul 

16,186 

10,443 

3,870 

735 

138 

8,982 

6,219 

2,698 

67 

8 

763 

378 

217 

164 

a 

3 

1,075 

790 

240 

29 

16 

207 

120 

79 

8 

4,697 

3,06b 

1,270 

225 

136 

697 

616 

68 

54 

71 

1,769 

1,762 

3 

4 


1 

' 2,411 

1,638 

1 773 

3,369 

8,061 

308 

416 

256 

1 136 

26 

668 

811 

i t04 

163 

' 618 

. 4U 

' 174 

14,849 

10,291 

i 8,731 

701 

126 

8,341 

6,967 

2,312 

67 

6 

710 

366 

193 

144 
144 

49 
3 

1,0^ 

777 

213 

28 

12 

224 

139 

79 

6 

4.879 

8,261 

1,276 

210 

148 

682 

698 

70 

r 

1,740 

1,783 

3 

4 


278 
276 
8 
125 
126 




2 


Provisions 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brook lyn 




3 


Dairy products 


55 
4S 
10 

2 
27 
IS 

4 
10 
27 
22 

6 

482 

442 

20 

17 

8 

372 

886 

27 

8 

2 
18 
13 

4 

1 






Manhattan and Bronx. , 
Brooklyn 






Queens 








4-a 


Macaroni and other food pastes 





26 

8 

18 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 




4-b.... 


Crackers and biscuits .* 


i 

1 

■"34i 

170 

167 

14 

12 


28 

25 

3 

1,920 

970 

783 

126 

303 

135 

156 

11 

2 

4 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 




4-c 


Bread and other bakery products 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


4 
I 




Queens 






Richmond. ............ 




4-d.... 


Confectionery and ice cream 


3 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brook lyn 


310, 12 
230 


i 




Queens 


1 




Richmond 




6.a 


Artificial ice 


42 

16 

16 

10 

2 

6 

i 

6 

131 

74 

n 

i 

2 

3 

1 
87 

fo 

7 

11 

15' 
6, 
6, 
3 








Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 




2 






Richmond 




6-b 


Cider, grape juice, etc 




5 
2 
3 

68 
35 
25 

'3 








Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 












5-c 


Mineral and soda waters 


60 
67 

1 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






Richmond. 


k 
19 
19 




6-d.... 


Malt 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


















Richmond 










6-e 


Malt liquors 


1 

i 


3 

2 

1 


335 

297 

26 

8 

9 

110 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






Richmond 








6-f 


Vinous and distilled liquors 




4 

4 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 








Richmond 








6-g 


Miscellaneous bottling 




11 
6 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 


2 
2 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 






6-a 


Tobacco and snufT 


13 1 


28 
28 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 







Richmond 


1 


1 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



319 



Claes CiUes, Year Ended September 30. 1911: By Indastries — Contiiiaed. 



NuMBEB OF Employees at Time of Inbpection. 




1 


Weekly Houbs of Labor. 


Chil- 


SHOP FORCE, 


NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK— 


under 

14 
years 

i^ 
shops 

ex- 




NUUfiER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOTINQ — 


SmX AND AGE. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yr8.+). 


Y'ths 

(16^ 

18 

yni). 


'•I 

yn».). 


Worn. 
(16yr8. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


2.133 

1,363 


197 

166 

32 

846 

$70 

76 

83 

60 

30 

3 

60 

26 

36 

""iu 

120 

9,662 

6,863 

3,099 

687 

123 

1.257 

707 

A98 

*i 

336 

103 

133 

92 

8 

49 

3 

A6 

557 

S07 

$12 

$8 

10 

12 

6 

6 

245 

1$3 

91 

$6 

6 

327 

$96 

18 

1^ 

60 

n 

47 

*$ 

A 


1,397 
946 


539 

263 


1,040 

687 

A5d 

3,07C 

2,762 

SOS 

355 

206 

126 

24 

456 

214 

119 

les 

387 


59 
36 


6 

6 


1,019 

72S 
291 


10 
7 
3 
2 
2 


1 

219 1,512 
160 1,064 
69, A68 
270' 1.505 
270^ 1,606 


402 

149 
26S 




8 
8 


770 
8.244 
$,936 
308 
361 
$1$ 
1$6 

$A 

641 

$98 

£00 

IAS 

591 

A$$ 

169 

14.367 

9,8A9 

. 3,711 

68A 

123 

7,969 

6.63$ 

$,$86 

692 

36$ 

189 

IAS 

8 

49 

3 

7$0 

$1$ 

$8 

10 

205 

120 

79 

6 

4.544 


A62 xan 
1.2781 1.620 
1,046\ 1,620 

232. 

278, 

m\ 

96\ 

$l\ 

581 

273\ 


'i i 

^1 ' 


1,461 

1,161 

300 

175 

138 

16 

21 

455 

169 


8 




8 
3 




1 


" 1 




4| 179 




1 




74 
106 




1 




A 






1 









3 




31 1 
V 1 


162 

79 

71 

12 

183 

106 

78 

1,382 

1,328 

AS 

11 


19 
3 
9 
7 
14 
lA 

i 

1 


331 153 

ll\ 118 
14' S6 

8\ 

43 69 

57, 69 

6641 "4.086 

460] 3,670 
169\ A67 

31\ AS 

59e'"3;668 

325^ 2,011 

$6& 983 

2 14 








161 
136 







166 

IAS 

457 

302 

166 

1.822 

1,113 

612 

91 






■'2;88.3 
2,883 


1 
5 


2 

$ 

8 

6 
2 






489 

326 










an * 


163 






12,877 

3,664 
673 


99 
87 
12 


9.517 

6,766 

3,066 

689 

117 

4,299 

3,270 

996 

33 


ioe 
^5 
20 
21 
2 

66 
26 
AO 


1 

1 


123 
3,641 
2,667 
1,027 

692 
362 
189 








*3.*368 

$M$ 

966 


3.344 

$,613 

831 


59 

A7 
12 


28 
13 
16 


3,99i 

2,885 

1,101 

6 


250 

120 
130 


i 

i 










3 








""356 
61 

















57 

14 

16 
28 


67 
14 
14 
29 


620 

324 

102 

86 

8 














...... 








68 




14s 

8 

36 

3 

33 

958 

714 

206 

28 

10 

177 

120 

61 

6 





























3 




10 




18 6 


26 








1 ' 


3 

22 











3 
3 

3 


6 

3 
2 


id 

4 
3 

1 




18\ 6 

28 351 

21\ 316 

6 36 






••"268 
$08 


'■"206 
$06 


589 
382 
171 

27 
9 

46 


2 

2 










I 


















1 






193 

IPO 

73 








28 




50 33 


76 
70 








60 










28 




3S 


AS 















6 




2,917 
1,799 
808 
181 
1$9 
245 
196 
60 




3 
2 
1 


2 
1 


1 
1 




420 
A19 


3,330 

2.000 

1,121 

80 

120 

303 

289 


794 
636 
128 
126 
6 
116 
A8 










$,96A 

in 

A90 
68 

1^ 

60 
A$ 
lA 


360 


1,248 

206 

134 

488 

409 

68 

11 

106 

60 

A2 

lA 

439 

A3S 

2 

A 






1 






1 


















"" 83 
80 


1 

1 


163 
163 


















14\ 6A 










' ' 








'4 


















41 




















12\ 38 




















23 

6 

1,658 

1,665 

3 


19 
8 
























63 

63 


" 1.602 
1,602 


5 
6 


2 

• 


1,266 
1,266 

1 




54 

60 






1,712 








1,706 
3 
A 



















A 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



320 



New luitu. oTATE Depaetment of Labob. 





Table XV.- 






ClTY AND InDUSTRT. 


Places 
I oectbd. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Larobst 
Number of 
Emplotsxs 

IN Year. 




In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
on 


GRAND 

total. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


dustry 
numr 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


6-b 


NEW YORK CITY— Cmcluded. 

X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco — 

Concluded. 

Cigars 


680 
488 
168 


5 

6 




1 

16 

1 


17,948 

16,626 

889 

412 

22 

3,834 

2,493 

1,341 


17.664 

16,364 

874 

404 

22 

3,760 

2,434 

1,326 


15.704 

14.486 

824 

382 

12 

3.639 

2,404 

1,235 


284 

261 

16 

8 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 


18 

6 

49 

'5:::::: 






Richmond 




6-c 


Cigarettes 


74 
69 
16 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Total — Group X 






4.761 

2,866 

1,569 

254 

72 


360 

188 

158 

14 


2.864 

1,628 

1,128 

158 

60 


. ,208 

53,009 

16.077 

2,746 

376 


69.3141 66.274 


2,874 

IB.4'^8 

231 

129 

16 


8 




Sfanhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


50,4^ 

15,841 

2,617 

360 


48,595 

14,768 

2,581 

330 


5 
5 




Queens 


2 




Richmond 






XI. Water, Light and Power. 
Water 




1 


9 

2 

6 

1 

34 

16 

9 

7 

2 

99 

46 

33 

16 

d 

34 
14 






67 

37 

28 

2 

1.992 

1,160 

484 

S2i) 

28 

4,296 

2,4t5 

973 

790 

118 

234 

207 

27 


67 
37 

*l 

1,866 

1,137 

395 

306 

28 

4.102 

2.J98 

ui2 

<'4 

t>8 

234 

»J7 

27 


67 
37 

1,900 

1,088 

484 

900 

28 

4.108 

2,288 

917 

790 

113 

2U 

207 

27 








Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Queens 























Richmond 










2 


Gas 






i26 
23 
89 
14 






Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


















Queens 










Richmond 








4 


Electric I ight and power 




2 

2 


i94 
117 
31 
26 
20 






" Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 










Richmond 









5 


Steam heat and power 




2 

2 






ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 














Total — Group XI 








... . 




190 
98 
66 
29 
7 




4 

4 


6.589 
3,819 
1,484 
1,138 
148 


6,269! 6,309 
3,679^ 3,620 
1,364^ 1,428 
1,0981 1,118 
128 143 


320 

140 

120 

40 

20 






AfanhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Queens 










Richmond 










XII. Building Industry. 
Carpenters' shops 








1 


37 

25 

9 

3 

26 

18 

8 




19 

13 

4 

2 

17 

14 

3 


259 

198 

48 

13 

157 

120 

37 


255 188 

196\ 148 

48^ 28 

ir 12 








ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 






Richmond 






2 ... 


Paint shops 


154 

117 

37 


126 
99 
27 


' ' I 




Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


J 




Total — Group XII 

Manhattan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 








63 

43 

17 

3 




36 

27 
7 
t 


416 

S18 

85 

13 


409 

313 

86 

11 


314 

247 

65 

12 




1 

i 




Ricfimond 








Grand Total 






30.631 

22,639 

6,993 

767 

232 


698 

574 
203 


18.472 

13,414 
A.6fi3 


721,518 

626,693 

164,562 

32,026 

9,348 


691,409 

498,866 

152,720 

30,791 

9,032 


617,298 

U7,184 

136,287 

26,636 

8,192 


29.003 

U,635 

1,826 

1,232 

311 


124 




ManhaUan and Bronx. . 
Brooklyn 


lit 
lO 




Queens 


20 364 
1 til 


g 




Richmond 










— - 


== 



* Includes one child under 14 years of age employed in office. 



t Includes two children under 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau op Factory Inspection, 1911. 



3»1 



dmm attoo. Tew Ended September SO, 1911: B7 Indoslrlee — Continaed. 



NUMBBB 


OF £mpix>tki8 at TniB 


or Inspection. 








Weekly Hourc 


1 OP Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP rORCB. 


NUMBER OP shop EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
■MPLOTXNO — 




BEX 


A2n> AOE. 




51 

houra 

or 

less. 


62-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


(in 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 

3 


Men 

(18 


Y'ths 
(16- 
18 

yrs.). 


16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 
(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

dot'd). 


15.420 

i4,eS6 

809 


2,397 

1,785 

599 

60 

19 

214 

913 

1 


6,219 

6,009 
917 


6.804 
6,490 

'" 314 


7.507 

6,713 

G51 

134 

9 

1,124 

555 

965 


20 

18 

1 

1 


5 
5 


7,855 

7,460 
155 

2.359 

1,450 
909 


33 

99 

9 

9 

■ "52 

9 

SO 


5,734 

6,190 

566 

47 

11 

419 

555 

60 


7.625 

6,977 

999 

896 

"3445 
1,976 
1,169 


3.161 

9,198 

81 

1 

1 
1 




1 
1 


374 






It 






3.565 


460 
460 


2,891 
1,679 
1,919 


29 

93 

6 


1 






9,345 






j,ieo 


1 












63.400 

46,097 

14,537 

2,45i 

314 


16.641 

10,546 

6,051 

859 

185 


22.229 

17,099 

4.397 

681 

199 


24,530 

18,699 

6.089 

919 


42.531 

28,878 

11,212 

2,133 

308 


306 

994 
1 66 


63 

42 

90 

1 


20.103 

16,761 

3,043 

993 

6 


397 

199 

196 

9 


9.607 

8,143 

1,359 

89 

98 


28,515 

f«,55t 

6,056 

498 

199 


23.913 

14,687 

7,969 

1,171 

146 


1,365 

485 

170 

694 

16 


11 
10 

1 




\ 






67 


42 

19 

98 

9 

122 

i 

/ 

485 

958 

196 

88 

13 

153 

198 

97 


25 
96 




67 

57 

98 

i 

1.77a 

1.066 

396 

286 

9i 

3,91C 

2,161 

88(i 

76J, 

9t 

234 

20' 

9 










2 


33 
95 

8 


12 

19 


90 




57 












$8 












90 




e 














9 
4 




1,774 


989 

656 

359 

54 

97 

1,119 

555 

50 
81 
81 


663 
463 

""koo 

* 2;3i6 
1,545 

316 
450 


1 








25i 

908 

6 

10 


457 
9S9 

■ ■ ■ '994 

1 

1,368 

867 

536 

455 

10 

99 

81 

18 


1,062 

695 

386 

59 




1,065 










396 


1 








4 




i86 


, ' 










98 










97 
1 622 




3,914 


) 3 
5 
f . . . 


1 
1 






838 


86 
55 
U 
86 

1 
58 
54 

4 




£,171 






775| 987 

67\ £89 
51 §71 




88^ 








764 


, . 










93 


\ .. . . 










1 89 
A 




234 


I . 








72 




907 


r 








7«i : 




97 


r . 










' 






















5,989 


802 
A49 
196 
148 
16 


2,214 

1,030 
797 
980 
107 


2.973 

5,005 

315 

660 


5.98^ 
3,47i 
l,30i 
1.07 
19, 


i 4 
? 5 


1 
/ 






916* 1.911 


1.936 

699 

554 

676 

11 


1.226 

717 

lOfi 

1 




3,480 






851 

61 

t 


1,990 
993 
289 




1.308 








1,078 


r / 
J 











193 








2 109 
















184 


164 

196 

98 

IC 

12s 

r 96 

91 


20 

90 





18 

5. 

/ 

12 
5 
9 


1 3 
s 3 

8 








145 se 


r 






i^ 








5/ 

2x 


r 8C 

> t 
r t 
\ 5C 
^ 4-^ 
i i 







9€ 












tc 
















r ... 






12a 











1 

1 




) u 

' u 
\ 


I 




96 







b 




F . . . . 




91 




r 




7 ... 




























dffl 


287 

r 99i 

61 

) n 


r 2c 

J 


) 

) 


30 
23 

6 

1 


3 I 

8 t 
5 . . . 


\ 

i 


1 

J 


I 




20: 

4- 


i 8( 

7 7' 
9 ( 
7 i 


r u 
3 


J 




94i 


? 




5t 






K 


> . . . . 













J 




























588.29! 

49t.54i 

133,48i 

95,40i 

7.881 


U34.88( 
} 105,481 
i 96,041 
r 9,681 
661 


>304.7S1 
}999,90C 
? 64,39-^ 
^ 8,69t 
> 5,4/?j 

s 


1 )48,62^ 
) 86,86C 
f 43,01i 
r 14.09i 
4 79 


i 378.02 
^261,48 
? 89,34 
5 20,26 
f 5,53 


3 5.81J 
5 S,99i 
S 1,97' 
3 46. 
3 9' 
= === 


) 1,98( 
1 /,55J 

r 671 
J I4i 

1 9. 


) 197,59' 
f 169,53i 
3 40,07i 
? 4,19i 
5 79 
s ■ 


1 4.88 
? 3,00 
9 i.45 
? 5^ 


2 151.70 
8 /f5.5^ 
5 17,55 
5 4,23 

e 65 

= ■ ■ 1 


2 317.38J 
8 228,96 
8 73,28 
1 11,66 
7 3,49 

S -TT-— T" 


S 114.62 
( 61,60 
9 41,19 
8,19 
« 3,69 
=:'za:x=acz 


1 4.58 
9 9,13 
i 1,09 
7 1,88 

1 4 


4 Ufi 

8 ^82 

0\ *9 

'1 



years of age employed in office. 

11 



§ Inoludsa four children undsr 14 yeara of a?e employed in office. 



/Google 



322 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XV.— StattsUcs of Factories Inspected In First and Second 





Cmr AND Industrt. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labgbst 
Number of 
Emplotbes 

IN Year. 








In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFriCB 
FORCE. 


dufltr>' 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


of 
14-16 
years 

of 
age. 


1-b 


ROCHESTER. 

Cut stone 


3 

1 
2 
1 
3 
6 
1 






101 
8 

41 
125 
103 

43 
273 


99 
6 

41 
125 
101 

41 
270 


89 
8 

41 
30 

103 
43 

273 


2 
2 




2-a 


Asbestos, graphite, etc 




1 




3-a 


Asphalt 




4-a . .. 


BuUding brick 










4-b.... 
5-a 


Terra cotta and fire-clay products 

Building glass 




1 
2 


2 
2 
3 




6-d 


Bottles and Jars . . 






Total — Group I 










17 




4 


694 


683 


587 


11 






II. Metals. Machines and Con- 

VBTANCES. 

Silver and plated ware 




1-a . . 


1 
1 






113 

11 

41 

14 

6 

217 

9 

182 

1.195 

463 

57 

278 

9 

125 

33S 

32 

1.378 

17 

285 

79 

473 

2.618 

554 

747 


108 
11 
33 

'I 

210 
9 

178 

1.104 

431 

50 

264 

8 

120 

318 

31 

1.199 

17 

26S 

63 

455 

2.449 

536 

6S6 


113 

11 

41 

14 

6 

137 

9 

180 

1,135 

458 

57 

266 

9 

125 

313 

32 

1.347 

14 

285 

79 

467 

2.46S 

471 

747 

103 

451 

484 
43 

528 
4.076 

485 
47 
54 


5 




1-c. . . . 


Gold, silver and aluminum leaf 




1 
2 




1-e 


Jewelry, gold pens, etc 


8 


8 
2 




2-a 


Smelting and refining 


1 
1 
3 

1 

6 






2-b 


Copper work 








2-c 


Brass, bronse and aluminum castings .... 
Gas and electric fixtures 






7 




2-d 








2-e 


Brass and bronse ware not elsowhere 
classified 




1 
5 
6 


4 

91 
32 

7 
14 

1 

5 
20 

1 
179 




2-f 


Sheet metal work 


31 




t'--: 


Metal goods not elsewhere classified 

Rolling mills and steel works 


12 
2 

12 
2 






u- 


Hardware not elsewhere classified 

Cutlery 




2 
2 
3 




3-i 


Tools and dies 


4 




3-TO . 


Metal furniture 


2 
5 
3 
3 
3 
4 
9 

1? 






S-n.... 

f-P ••• 
S-q.... 

S-r 


Wire work not elsewhere classified 

Car wheels and railway equipment 

Architectural and ornamental iron work. . 
Cnokinir nnd h<*Atinflr AonnrAtu^ - - 




5 















17 
19 
18 
169 
18 
61 
27 
17 




3-§ 

3-t. . . . 
3-u.... 
3-v.... 
4-a 


Typewriting and registering machines .... 

Stationary engines, boilers, etc 

Machinery not elsewhere classified 

Castings 

Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm apparatus 
Dynamos, motors and electrical supplies. . 
f^ftrriage^, wngon^i and Hl<^ighn. 




1 

1 

31 

7 




4-c 

5-a 


1 


2 
9 
2 
3 


118 91 
629 612 
2l 2 
458j 416 
531 I 516 
47 43 




5-0 


Cycles 

Motor vehicles 

Railway repair shops 


1 : : ; : 




^-d.... 

^.... 


u 

5 

1 




42 

15 
4 

45 
321 

12 
8 
2 










8-a. . . . 
8-b..,. 
8-0 


Professional and scientific instruments . . . 

Optical and photographic apparatus 

Lamps, reflectors, stereopticjns, etc 

Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 

Sorting old metals 


i 


1 


528 
4.076 

536 
67 
54 


483 
3,755 

524 
59 
52 




8-«.... 
9 




1 
1 






Total — Group II 








2551 2| 86 


16,237| 15,116 


15.631 


1,171 






III. Wood Mandkactures. 
Saw mill products 




1 


32 i 


1 
8 


7 

1,412 

345 

6 

106 

19 

231 

1.441 


7 

1.352 

326 

6 

105 

19 

226 

1.409 


7 

1.253; 

345 

6 

96 

18 

205. 

1.401 






2-a 


House trim 


60 
19 




2-b 


Packing boxes, crates, etc 


4! 
2 
2 
5 






2-0 




5 




3 


Cooperage 


1 




4-0 


1 


6 
14 
12 




4-e 

5-a.... 


Other articles and appliances of wood 

Furniture and upholstery 


16 

23' 


5 
32 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 323 

CiMS cities. Year Ended September SO, 1911: By Indaetrles — Continaed. 



Number or Employees 


AT Time of Inspection. 






Weekly Hours of Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP FOBCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK — 




NXTMBBB IN SHOPS 
EMPLOTINQ — 




SE^ 


AJ^D A.OB. 


51 

hours 

or 
lew. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
houra. 


shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yiB. +). 


Y'ths 
(16- 
18 

ym.). 


Boys 
(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 
(16 yrs. 

+). 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


87 


17 

6 

18 

i 

21 


70 




87 
1 

41 

30 
101 

40 
250 




j 

t 




87 


1 






6 






' 






6 






41 


23 
30 
100 
20 


■ 270 








18 


23 
30 

51 
41 






30 














101 




i 




50 






41 


1 
18 


! !: 








270 


2 




270 























576 


63 


243 


270 


550 


19 


2 


5 

1 


375 


145! 56 












108 


a 

33 

12 

6 

4 

9 

6 
183 
66 
15 
43 
8 
16 
16 
31 

i4 

3 

11 

32 

240 

30 

14 

58 

131 

2 

53 

7 

4 

19 

8 

29 

14 

4 


108 




101 

7 

32 

12 

6 

130 

8 

122 
977 
252 

50 

239 

8 

120 

275 

21 
1.164 

14 
268 

60 

449 

2.298 

450 

571 

73 

602 

2 

408 

469 

39 

310 

2.681 

439 

39 

52 






7 

* 








108 






11 










11 
22 
12 






33 






1 






8 


3 






12 






1 . . 






6 








' 




6 
130 








130 


126 






............. ...... 










9 





1 




9 








176 


170 
289 

35 

209 


""672 
360 




54 
53 




176 

484 








1.044 


11 
12 


3 

10 




160 
19 


400 






426 


147 5 


393 14 






50 


50 
60 








252 


7 


3 


3 


31 


161 






8 






21 6 
62 58 







120 


104 


■"278 




"";■ 1 ::::;■ : 










293 


10 


8 








8 


285 
24 








31 


10 




2 


k 






1.168 


104 


1.064 


12 


2 




2 


1,002 104 




' 


14 




14 
188 

60 

449 

2.286 

452 

686 

37 

592 

2 

378 








268 


265 

49 

215 

771 
423 

20 

54 


""262 
1,288 

""672 

'426 










80 






60 














449 
















2,299 


""I 

1 


i 

1 


... .j ... . 


5 

1 


8 






453 


2| 






686 


106 
1 
2 










78 




41 








606 


i3 






2 










409 


358 
462 
35 
24 
673 
144 
25 
48 




440 

3,074 

300 


1 








.^1 






469 








269 206 






39 


■ 








39 
461 








483 


15 

257 

34 


9 
41 


136, 13 
764' 12 


22 
53 
19 








3.755 


3.702 
45 








473 


409 






39 






39 








52 










25 


27 


















14,510 


1,131 


4.709 


8.670 


12.738 


374 


79 


1,289' 30 


380 


12.503 


1,627 










7 


7 

127 

6 

6 

is 

69 
69 






3 

1,187 

291 

2 

95 

18 

199 

1.326 


2 

"11 
2 


2 
1 
4 




2 

465 

4 


""692 

131 

6 

30 

6 

180 

101 


5 
36 
191 






1.193 


1.066 
320 




5' 

20! 






326 






6 


2 








95 


95 


'/.'.'.'.'.'. 




65 

12 








18 


""" :::::: 










200 


131 
705 


"595 


1 

23 






20 






1.369 


4 


ie 





5 


1.260 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



324 



New York State Department of Labor. 





Table XV.- 






Cmr AND Induotry. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 

of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labobst 
Nttmber of 
Emplotsbs 

IN Year. 




In- 


Onoc. 


More 
than 
once. 


grand 

TOTAL. 


OPPICB 
FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


6-b.... 


ROCHESTER— Cwtltntied. 

III. Wood Manufacturbs — Concluded. 
Cmk^iM 


2 

7 
7 
5 
2 

1 






109 

1.219 

214 

141 

34 

52 


157 

1,083 

209 

139 

34 

50 


160 
1,199 
159 
136 
34 
28 


12 

136 

5 

2 




f-o . . . 


Store, office and kitchen fixtures 




.... ^ 

2 
2 




6-d.... 


Mirror and picture frames 




6 


Pinnna. nraraLnfi. «tC, 




7-0. . , , 


Brooms - . . 




7-d.... 


Articles of cork 






2 






Total — QrouD III 










109i 2 

1 


52 


5.396| 5.122 


5.066 


274 






IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 




1.... 


3 
10 
3 
5 
3 
50 






55 
151 
32 
39 


52 
143 
22 


55 

143 

32 

3"> 

173 

7,068 

46 

42 

35 

84 

964 

31 


3 
8 
10 
2 
15 

253 
2 
1 
1 
2 

120 




2 


Piirn and fiir gofidii 







7 




»-• ... 


Belting washers, etc 




3-b 


Saddlery and harness 





5 




^•0 


TntvAlinir bam and trunkn, . . . , 


173 158 
7,459 7 206 




3-d 


Boots and shoes 


1 


"'i5 
5 




3-f 


Fancy leather goods 




55 
42 
42 
84 
1.427 
33 


53 
41 
41 
82 
1,307 
33 




3^.... 


Canv'as and soortinir sooda 


3 

8 
1 
3 
8 






Rubber and gutta percha goods 





6 




5-a. . 


Pearl buttons, han<)les, ptc 




6-b 


Articles of horn, bone, tortoise shell, etc. . 
Mattresses. oiUows. etc 








5-d.. 




6 






Total — Group IV 


1 








104 j ij 44 


9,592 


9,175 


8,708 


417 






V. Chemicaui., Oils, Paints, Etc, 
Proprietary medicines 




!-•. . . . 


1 
12 






6 

3,1&4 

185 

39 

29 

291 

94 

4 

19 

66 

7 


4 

2,737 

145 

38 

26 

263 

86 

2 

19 

65 

7 


5 

3,184 

182 

39 

29 

291 

80 

4 

19 

15 

7 


1 
447 

40 
1 
3 

28 
8 
2 




1-d 


Other chemicals and drugs 




1 
2 

1 




2-b 


Dsres, oolors and inks 


10 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 






3. 


Wood alnohol and essential oils 




4 


Animal oil products 




6 


Mineral oil products 








6 


Soap, perfumery and cnsmAtion. . . , 








7-c 


OliiA mucilasre. etc - 








7-d 


Fertilisers 








7-« 


Matches and exi>lo^ivm 





1 
1 


1 




7-f . . . 


Celluloid and oth'^i* plasticM 






Tr»#jd — rSrniin V 






36 




« 


3,923 


3.392 


3,855 


531' 




VI. Paper and Pulp. 

$L>rft.inff wastO DMV^r. , . , 




1 


1 
2 




1 


4 
35 


4 
34 


4 
35 






2-c 


Paper mills . . 1 1 


i 






TntAl — GroMo VI 










3 




1 


39 


38 


39 


ll 




VII. Pbintinq and Paper Goods. 
Paoer boxes aiul tubes 




2-a 


19 
2 
5 

58 
7 
9 





5 


864 
38 

87 

1,512 

326 

69S 

11 


845 

21 

78 

1,326 

294 

655 

5 


844 

38 

85 

1.462 

326 

698 

11 


19 . 


2-b 


Paper bags and SAokM 


17, 


2-c 


Otner oaoer icoods 




i 

36 

1 
4 


9 


3-a 


Printing nnd publishing 


186 


3-b.... 
3-0 


Bookbinding and blanlcbook making 

LiUiographing and engraving 


32 

43 


5 


Photography 


6 




Total — Group VII 








101 


1 47 


3,536 


3,224 


3.461 


312' 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eeport of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 325 

CfaMi Cities, Ymt EndMl September SO, 1911 : Bf ladafltriea — Continiied. 



Number of Employees 


AT Time op Inspection. 






Weekly Hours op Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP rORCB. 


NUMBER of shop EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYING — 




SEX 


AND AOE. 




51 

houra 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yrs. +). 


Y'tha 

(16- 

18 

yrs.). 


16 
yre.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 

not'd). 


157 


7 
24 
40 
54 

4 


150 
278 
114 
80 
30 
26 


""76i 


147 
888 
150 
134 
34 
U 






10 

151 
3 






1 
1.042 
10 
94 
30 
26 


156 
20 

144 

40 

4 






1,063 


23 

1 


1 




1 






154 






134 










34 
















26 






15 


























4.782 


431 


2,995 


1.356 


4.485 


63 


12 


222 




554 


2.352 


1.876 












52 


10 
72 
22 
13 
18 
131 
44 
41 
34 

3i 


42 
63 




52 

57 

20 

31 

140 

3.712 

26 

31 

26 

35 

398 

6 














52 

55 
19 
25 
17 
1.654 

8 
24 

4 






135 






77 
2 
2 

11 
2.689 

17 

10 
7 

41 
409 

23 


1 


1 


79 

3 

8 

140 

4.897 

35 

17 

29 

78 

825 

10 






22 










33 


20 

140 

1,905 


'4.779 














158 


6 
198 

1 


1 
101 


'"ii5 


i 

264 
1 






6,815 






44 






41 











34 







2 

15 


1 
1 
1 


3 

21 
2 


i 

4 
19 
3 






82 


82 
112 


■ 732 






844 








31 


18 




















8.291 


416 


2.364 


5,511 


4,534 


222 


105 


3.288 


142 


294 


6.121 


1.876 












4 


4 

66 

43 

6 

3 






2 

1,820 

106 

32 

26 

259 

16 

2 

19 

14 

1 






2 

871 

34 

6 






4 

2.658 

73 

6 








2,737 


254 
99 
32 
23 


2.417 
263 


31 




14 
2 


65 
2 


14 
67 
32 
26 






142 






38 










26 














263 


4 










263 

72 

2 






72 


29 
2 

19 
14 

7 


43 




56 










2 
















19 
















i9 
14 






14 






















7 










6 






7 


























3.324 


193 


451 


2,680 


2,297 


35 




975 


16 


07 


3.085 


172 













4 


4 
7 






2 
26 






2 

8 






£ 
15 


2 






34 


27 












19 
















38 


11 


27 




28 






10 






17 


2 


19 
















825 


88 
21 
30 
258 
20 
42 
5 


736 




235 

10 

43 

995 

198 

542 

2 


6 


2 


537 
11 
29 

230 

80 

86 

3 


45 


157 


668 

12 

74 

37 

118 

447 








21 


9 






76 


46 

1.018 

274 

219 


' '394 


2 
30 
10 
20 


6 
6 


1 
2 

2 


2 

1,239 

176 

208 






1.276 








294 








655 









5 




























3.152 


465 


2.293 


394 


2.025 


68 


33 


976 


50 


1,782 


1.361 


9 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



326 



Xew York Statk Department of Labor. 



Table XV.— Statistks of Factories Inaperted la FInt aad Seeoiid 





Cmr AND Industrt. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Larobst 
Number or 

ElCPLOTEBS 

IN Year. 




.^ 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAl,. 


omcB 

rORCB. 


dustry 
Hum- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


Tliare- 

of 
14-16 
years 

of 
ace. 


2-a. . . . 


ROCHESTER— Concluded. 

VIII. Textiles. 

Carpets and rugs 

Woolens and worsteds 


2 
2 

1 

3 
2 





1 


U 
94 

306 
3 

362 
13 


11 
93 

300 
3 

355 
13 


11 
94 

306 

3 

347 

13 






2-c 


1 
6 




4 


Hosiery and knit goods 








6-a.... 


Dyeing, finishing, etc 

Upholstery goods 




1 




5-b.... 


7 




7 


Oilcloth, window shades, etc 

Total — Group VIII 




1 












11 




3 


789 


775 


774 


14 






IX. Clothino, Milli.very, Laundrt, 
Etc. 

Tailoring. 

Shirts, collars and cuffs. . .... 




1-a 

1-b.... 


305 
5 
5 

146 
1 
6 
6 
2 
80 
6 
1 
16 
3 
6 
7 


4 

i 


268 

I 

128 


8.829 

434 

255 

848 

7 

11 

38 

18 

579 

47 

3 

746 

4 

53 

105 


8,638 

430 

242 

846 

5 

11 

38 

17 

579 

47 

3 

711 

4 

49 

100 


8,723 

431 

192 

805 

7 

11 

38 

18 

487 

45 

3 

731 

4 

53 

105 


191 

4 

'I 

2 




1-0 

2-a .... 
2-b.... 


Men's neckwear 

Dressmaking. 

Women's white goods 




2-e 


Corsets, garters, etc 

Men's hats and caps 

Artificial feathers and flowers 




6 

8 
2 

80 
2 
1 

11 
3 
5 
4 




3 






4-a 


1 




4-b.... 


Millinery 

Curtains, embroideries, etc 

Umbrellas and parasols 




5-a 






5-e 






6-a».... 


Laundries (non-Chinese) 


35 




6-a«. . . . 


Chinese laundries 




6-b.... 


Cleaning and dyeing 


4 
5 




7 


Clip sorting 






Total — Group IX 






604 


5 


624 


11,977 


11,720 


11,653 


257 






X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco. 
Flour and other cereal products 




1-a 


8 
6 
4 

8 

3 

1 

3 

1 

103 

17 

3 

1 

7 

2 

1 

44 




1 
1 


123 
1,845 

150 

496 

58 

32 

30 

3 

349 

61 > 
18 
31 

472 
82 
30 

201 


115 
1,804 

142 

427 

57 

26 

27 

3 

340 

626 
17 
30 

418 
67 
29 

198 


113 

843 

150 

263 

58 

32 

30 

3 

348 

608 

14 

31 

471 

82 

30 

201 


8 
41 

8 
60 

1 
6 
3 




1-c 

1-d.... 


Fruit and vegetable canning and preserving 
Coffee and spice roasting and grinding . . . 

Groceries not elsewhere classified 

Provisions ... 




1-c . . . 








2 








3 


Dairy products 


1 
2 


3 

1 
60 

3 




4-a 


Macaroni and other food pastes 




4-b . 


Crackers and biscuits 

Bread and other bakery products 

Confectionery and ice cream 




4-c.... 
4-d.... 




10 

1 

1 

54 

15 

1 

3 




6-c 


Mineral and soda waters 

Malt 

Malt liquors. . 

Vinous and distilled liauors 




5-d 








5-e.... 
5-f. 


1 






6-a 


Tobacco and snuff 








6-b 


Cigars 




35 






Total — Group X 






212 


4 


104 


4.565 


4.326 


3,277 


239 






XI. Water. Lioht and Power. 
Gas 




2 


1 
8 






97 

109 

6 

15 


95 

109 

6 

14 


97 

109 

6 

15 


2 




4.. . 


Electric li|^t and power 








5 


Steam heat and power . 


2 

1 










6 


Garbage diqxMnT etc 






1 






Total — Group XI 










12 






227 


224 


227 


3 






XII. BuiLDXNG Industry. 
Paint shops 








2 


J 


1 


3 


3 


3 








Total — Rochester 








1,465 14 


872 


57.028 


53,798 


53.334 


3.230 








— . 1 




1 _ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 327 

CbMf CHiM. Year Ended September SO. 1911: By Industries — Continned. 



NUMBEH 


or Emplotbss 


kT TncB 


OF iNSPBCnON. 








Weekly Houbs of Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FOBCB. 


NUMBER OF SHOP BMPLOTEB8 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO— 


SEX AND AGE. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


5&-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


jreATS 
shops 


TotaL 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yra. +). 


Y'ths 

(16- 

18 

yre.). 


16 

yw.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 

nofd). 


11 


11 

3 






9 
59 
19 

3 
96 

8 






2 

34 

274 








11 






93 


90 


"**366 










93 
293 






300 






7 


7 








3 


3 
5 
13 








3 






340 


126 


210 


2 


1 


239 
5 


2 


3 


337 
13 






13 




























760 


35 


215 


510 


194 


2 


1 


564 


9 


10 


736 


14| 












8,632 


1.348 

18 

43 

618 

5 
11 
14 
17 
295 
22 

3 
83 

4 
29 
43 


4,006 

■"' i36 
185 


3,178 
409 


4,191 

69 

31 

133 

1 


46 


44 


4.090 

368 

136 

667 

4 

11 

13 

17 

462 

16 

3 


161 


204 


8.041 

427 

160 

629 

5 

11 

11 

3 

266 

18 


287 






427 






179 




1 


11 
13 


19 
10 








808 


164 






5 










11 




















38 


24 




25 










27 

14 

215 

21 

3 

1 

4 

31 

61 






17 














487 


192 
23 




26 
27 






9 


6 
6 






45 




2 






3 


i 






606 


613 




101 

3 

30 

55 




1 


691 

1 
18 


3 


74 


621 






4 






49 


20 

57 






i 




1 
10 


17 
29 






100 


46i 




















11,396 


2.553 


5,256 


3.587 


4.692 


46 


49 


6.412 


197 


330 


10,238 


828 












105 


50 
11 
20 
42 

7 
26 
27 

3 

275 

61 

13 

ii 

6 

'"m 


55 
96 
122 
152 
50 


"695 


105 

288 

76 

67 

57 

26 

14 

2 

317 

198 

13 

30 

417 

55 

8 

167 














105 

798 

141 

10 

67 

26 

17 

2 

328 

233 

8 






802 






512 
66 
124 


2 


3 


1 

1 

182 






142 










194 


1 


1 


1 


2 






57 






26 
















27 










13 






10 

9 

345 
5 
30 
146 
61 
29 
13 




3 






5 


1 
2 




1 
2 
11 


. .1 


339 


64 
528 




20 
379 


7 






589 






13 






30 


30 
406 
61 
29 
37 


















417 










271 








67 






12 
21 
20 




6 






29 














198 


3 


8 




182 


3 













3.038 


713 


1.630 


. 695 


1.840 


9 


12 


1.167 


10 


472 


832 


1 1.734 


1 








95 


40 

6 
14 


95 
60 




95 

109 

6 

14 














95 


1 




100 












109 








6 












6 






14 














14 




























224 


60 


164 




224 






1 


14 


109 


101 












1 






3 


3 






3 










3 






























50.094 


6.074 


20.347 


23,673 


33.610 


838 


294 


14.898 454 


4,281 


37.499 


1 8.295 


19 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



328 



Xew Yobk State Depabtjient o* Labob. 





Table XV.- 


-StelisUca of Factories iBspeetod in First aad SecMkd 




ClTY AND iNDCflTRY. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Largbst 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 




In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 

total. 


office 
force. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total- 


There- 
of 

14-16 

years 
of 

age. 


1-a 


SCHENECTADY. 
Crushed stone 


4 
5 

1 
2 

1 






61 
63 
127 
33 
8 


60 
50 
120 
31 

7 


61 
63 
127 
33 

8 


1 




1-b . . . . 


Cut stone . 






4 


2-a 


Asbestos, graphite, etc 






7i 


3-a. . . 


Asphalt 






2 


3-c 


Plaster (wall and land) 






11.. 




Total — Group I 






*J 




13 






292 


277 


292 


15! 




II. Metals. Machines and Con- 
veyances. 
Sheet metal work 








2-f 


6 
1 

1 
2 
7 
10 
1 
3 
1 






54 

11 

5 

106 

10.280 

31 

46 

3.217 

109 

87 


60 

10 

5 

100 

12.915 

31 

43 

2.901 

108 

80 


54 

106 
16.252 
31 
46 
3.217 
109 
87 


4 . . . 


3-t. . 


>^t-atinnary engines, boilers, etr 






1 


3-u 


Machinery not elsewhere classified 

Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm apparatus 
Djoiamos, motors and electrical supplies. . 
Carriages, wagons and sleighs 








4-a. . . . 






6 ] 


4-c 






3,365 .. 


5-a 





1 




5-d.... 


Motor vehicles 


3 .. 


5.f 


Locomotives 






316 


5-g 


Railway repair shops 






1 . . 


7 


Agricultural implements 






7 




Total — Group II 










33 




1 


19.946 


16.243 


19.918 


3.703' 




III. Wood Manufactures. 
House trim 


2-a 


5 
4 
1 






128 
30 
27 


119 
30 
26 


128 
30 
27 


J 


5-a 


Furniture and upholstery 








7-c 


Brooms 






1 




Total — Group III 










10 






185 


175 


185 


10' 




IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 
Saddlery and harness 








3-b . . . . 


2 

1 
1 
1 




2 


7 
7 
5 
3 


7 
7 
5 
3 


7 
7 
6 
3 






S-f 


Fancy leather goods 






3-g 


Canvas and qx>rting goods 




1 
1 






4. . 


Rubber and gutta percha goods 








Total — Group IV 








6 




4 


22| 22 


22 


......I 




V. Chemicals. Oim, Paints, Etc. 
Proprietary medicines 




1-a. . . . 


1 
1 






20 10 
9' 8 


20 
9 


.0'. .. 


2-a 


Paint, varnish, etc. 






1 




Total — Group V 










2 






29 18 


29 


11 




VII. Printing and Paper Goods. 
PaTM»r boxes and tubes 








2-a 


2 

17 

1 






43 42 

408 342 

3 3 


43 

408 

3 


,• 


3-a . . . 


Printing and publishing 




5 


06 . 


3-b.... 


Bookbinding and blankoook malcing 

Total — Group VII 














20 




5 


454 


387 


454 


67 






VIIL Textiles. 
Woolens and worsteds 




2-c 


1 






22 


20 


22 


2 






IX. Clothing, Millwery, Laundry, 

Etc. 

Tailoring 










1-a 


32 

1' 


16 

1 


243 

7 

9 
71 


238 

7 

8 
71 


243 

7 

9 
71 


5 




1-b 


Shirts, collars and cuffs 




l-d... 


Suspenders and other furnishing goods for 
men 


4 




1 





2.a.... 


Dressmaking 




i 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



329 



CiMa CitlMi, Ymt BbiImI SayCember St, 1911: Bf IndvsCriM — Contfamed. 



Number 


or Emplotbm at Tons 


OP Inspection 








Webklt Hours op Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FORCB. 


NT7MBBR OP SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYING 


BEX AlfD AGE. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


(in 
shops 


TotaL 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 


Y'tha 

(16- 

18 

yrs.). 


16 

yra.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 

not'd). 


60 


60 
21 

3i 

7 






60 












i 

■i 
1 


60 






59 


38 
120 












59 










120 


■■.::: : ; r.^! 






55 




120 

1 


: 1 




31 


i 


311 

7 








31 
7 






7 














I 












I " ' 








1 






277 


119 


158' j 222, 


j 


55 




59 


120, 98 














50 


.V) 






50 


1 








50 








loj ic 






100 

11.625 

31 










1 


10 
5 






5! 5 






















100 


166 
99 


12^788 












ioo 

12.098 
23 






12,887 


si 
43 




31 


1.231 




789 








31 


8 






43 






43 

2.901 

108 











4 
422 


32 7 






2,901 




2.901 











2.462t 


17 




108 


9 


99 












108 




80 


80 












80 


. 






! 


. 














16.215 


148 


378 


15,689 


14.953 




31 


1.231 




1.265 


14.795] 138 


17 




119 


12 
3n 


107 





119 
18 
26 












1 
78, 41 

26) 5 






30 






12 










S, :: 


26 














26 


1 








1 


















175 


42 


133 


I 163 






12 






1C3, 72 






















7I 7 






7 
6 
3 
3 












1 
4; 3 
1 6 






7| 7 








1 






1 


1 




5 5 






2 






« 


1 




3| 3 














3 


1 




<»l « 














' ■ 




22I 22 






19 




1 


2 




1 


7 


14 


1 














10 


10 
8 






2 

8 


1 
1 


8 




10 




1 




8 












8 


1 

























18 


18 


1 


10 






8 




10 




8 


1 












1 




42 


13 

51 

3 


1 

29 

88 203 


10 

272 

2 






32 

68 

1 






42 


1 




342 




1 


1 


135 
3 


207 


1 , 


3 






: . .. 














1 


387 


67 


117 


203 


284 




1 


101 


1 


138 


249 


. . .i 






20 





20 





11 






9 








1 1 
20' 1 














238 


9€ 
7 

8 
11 


142 


1 

1 infl 






130 

fi 

4 
64 





142 


7 

8 


9« 


(1 


7 




1 1 

4 

7 






... 


8 
















1 


71 




6C 
















9» 


1 32 


}• 


1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



330 



New Yobk State Defastment of Lasob. 





TaOile XV.- 






Cmr AND Industby. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labgbst 
Number of 
Employees 

IN Year. 




In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


grand 
total. 


omcE 

fOBCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. . 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

T 


2-b.... 


SCHENECTADY— ConcZwded. 

IX. Clothing, Millinsrv, Laundbt, 

Women's white goods 


1 
12 

1 
7 
18 







152 
85 
25 

102 
46 


147 
85 
24 
99 
46 


152 
85 
25 

102 
46 


5 




4-b.... 


Millinery 







3 




5-a 


Curtains, embroideries, etc 


1 
3 




6-«».... 


T/ftundrim (non-Chinese) 




1 
12 




C-a«.... 


Chinese laundries 






Total — Group IX 








77 




34 


740 


725 


740 


15 






X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco. 
Flour and oUier cereal products 




1-a 


2 
2 

1 
1 

33 
9 
6 

12 




1 


10 

20 

3 

3 

123 

50 

56 

54 


10 

20 

3 

3 

123 

50 

51 

54 


10 

10 

3 

3 

122 

50 

56 

54 






2 








4-ft 


Macaroni and other food pastes 


2 


1 

1 
18 






4-b.... 


Crackers and biscuits 






4-c 


Bread and other bakery products 

Conf ftfttionery and ice cream 






4-d.... 






6-e 


Malt liquors' 






5 




(«).... 


C>eftni . , , . 




6 






Total — Group X 








66 


2 


27 


319 


314 


308 


5 






XI. Watbr, Light and Power. 
Gas 




2 


1 
I 






12 
9 


11 
9 


12 
9 


1 




4 


ElectHo light and power 










Total — Group XI 












2 






21 


20 


21 


1 
















220 


2 


71 


22,030 


18,201 


21,991 


3,829 






SYRACUSE. 

I. Stone, Clat and Gi.am Products. 
Cut stone 


... 


1-b.... 


1 
1 
1 
5 

3 
2 
1 




1 
2 


7 
27 
20 
117 

73 

. 551 

4 


7 
23 
20 
111 

66 

542 

2 


7 
14 
18 
94 

71 
501 

4 






2-b.... 


Abrasives 


4 




a-ft 


Aaphfjf 




3-c 


Plaster (wall and land) 




5 

3 
3 

1 


6 

7 
9 
2 




8-f 


Plaster and composition oasts and orna- 
ments 




4-c 


Pottery products 




6-b.... 








Total — Group I 






U 




15 


799 


771 


709 


28 






II. Metals, Machines and Convey- 
ances. 
Silver and plated ware 




1-a 


1 
2 
8 

1 
7 
5 
3 
3 
6 
6 
1 
1 
2 
3 


i 


2 
2 
10 

2 
9 
5 
5 
3 
8 
7 
3 
2 
3 
6 


28 
236 
195 

210 

438 

45 

933 

136 

495 

98 

68 

24 

47 

167 


27 
230 
191 

190 

418 

44 

900 

128 

475 

93 

55 

23 

46 

150 


26 
52 
142 

170 

300 

35 

881 

126 

464 

82 

58 

21 

47 

118 


1 
6 

4 

20 

20 
1 

33 
8 

20 
5 
3 
1 
1 
8 




2-» 


Smelting and refining 




2-c.... 
2-e.... 


Brass, l>ronse and aluminum castings 

Brass and bronae ware not elsewhere classi- 
fied 




2-f 


Sheet metal work 




2-g.... 
3-c. . . . 


Metal goods not elsewhere classified 

R<^ling mills and steel works 




S..:: 


Bridges and structural iron 




tf- 


Hardware not elsewhere classified 

Tools and dies 




a-k 


Fire arms 




3-m.... 


Metal furniture 




3-n. ... 
3-r. . . . 


Wire work not elsewhere classified 

Cooking and heating apparatus 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report op Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. SSI 

GteM CiliM» Yew Ettded S«»tomber ao, 1911: Br Indutrtes — GontiBiied. 



Number oi" Emplotbbs at Tim 


or Inspection. 




Wbbklt Houbb OP Labor. 


ChU- 


SHOP TOBCE. 


WHO WORK— 


area 

under 

14 




NUUBEB IN SHOPS 
EMPLOTING 


SEX AND AGE. 


51 
hours 

or 
less. 


52-57 
hours. 


6&-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 

(in 
shops 


Total 


1-19. 


20- 

199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 
yr8.+). 


Vths 
yi».). 


16 

yiB.). 


Worn. 


Girls 
(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


ex- 
cept 
as 
not'd). 


147 


86 

68 

46 


147 




12 






130 

86 

2 

74 


6 


136 


6 


12 
79 
24 

87 
8 






85 










24 


24 
41 




22 
25 
46 














99 










12 






46 










38 
























725 


311 


414 




225 






496 


5 


277 


72 338 


38 














10 


10 

10 

3 

3 

122 

50 

28 

64 






10 

10 

3 

3 

114 

43 

60 

62 














10 
10 
3 






10 






















3 






















3 


















3 

121 

60 

11 

4 






122 










8 
7 




1 








50 














51 


23 






1 




1 
50 


39 






54 


2 






















303 


280 


23 




285 




1 


17 




62 


39 


212 












11 


11 
9 






11 
9 
















11 




9 














9 






























20 


20 






20 










9 






11 
























18,162 


1,027 


1.243 


16,892 


16.192 




34 


1.930 


6 


1.811 


15.385 


900 


66 




7 


7 
10 
18 
25 

14 
18 
2 






7 

8 

18 

88 

44 

291 

2 










7 

1 










10 






1 


1 








9 
18 

88 

60 






18 














88 


63 
50 


**"474 


















64 






20 
151 






14 

476 

2 






492 


34 


13 


3 


ie 






2 


















■ 












681 


94 


113 


474 


458 


35 


14 


171 


3 


24 


492 


165 












25 


5 

14 

60 

34 

12 

25 
16 


25 
41 
124 

150 


■ 220 


19 
43 
128 

137 

260 

34 

840 

118 

363 

75 

53 

20 

26 

109 


1 

2 

8 
8 


i 


5 
2 
8 

6 
22 








25 

5 

62 

150 
263 

34 
360 

80 
400 

68 






46 




2 
1 


39 
76 






138 






150 






280 




16 


2 






34 






848 


105 
106 
64 
61 

fLR 


743 
"355 


6 


2 






2 


496 

9 
65 






118 










444 


12 
2 
2 




69 










77 










55 















20 


20 

14 32 
13 97 










20 
31 
97 






46 


2 


1 
1 


16 


1 


2 
13 


13 






110 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



332 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Tkble XV.— StmiMks of FaetoriM lupMCed ia First aad SecMid 





City and Indubtrt. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labobst 
Number or 
Employees 

IN Year. 








In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


grand 

TOTAL. 


orricE 
force. 


durtry 
num- 
ber. 


ToUl. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 

of 
age. 


3-fl.... 
3-t 


SYR.XCU -iE— Continued. 

11. Metals. Machines and Con- 
veyances — Concluded. 

Typewriting and resistering machines 

Stationary enitines. boilers, etc 


6 
12 


...... 


7 
19 
31 
13 


2.571 
485 

2.772 

970 

22 


2.481 
467 

2.669 

955 

21 


2.399 

438 

1,484 

716 

22 

298 

209 

1.422 

177 

859 

6 

265 

16 

61 


90 
16 




3-u. . . . 
3-v 


Machinery not elsewhere classified 

^R»»tings 


18 

71 - - - 


102 

lOi 


4-a 


Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm apparatus 
Djnamos. motors and electrical supplies. . 
Carriages, wagons and sleighs 


1 
4 
4 




i!:::::: 


4-c 

5-a 




7 
4 

8 


300 251 

219| 212 

2,158l 1.799 

1811 171 

925 836 

8 6 

355 349 

41 40 

64| 58 


491 

7 . .. . 


5-d. .. 


Motor vehicles 


6: 


266 


5-g 


Railway repair shops 


2 
4 

1 
1 
1 
1 




10 


7 


Agricultural implements 





5 


1::;::: 

6 


8-b.... 
8-c 


Optical and photographic apparatus 

I^impe. reflectors, stereopticons. etc 

Clocks and time recorders 


8-d.... 





1 


1 


8-e 


Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 


6 




Total — Group II 







1 




116 


1 


162 


14.181| 13,294 


10.897 


791 






III. Wood MANurAcrtmEs. 
House trim 




2-a 


17 

1 

i.:;:;: 

41 

91 

li 

21 

2 


27 
2 

1 
3 
7 
8 
4 
1 
1 
2 
2 


1 

3171 304 
30j 29 
24; 24 
51 40 
53l 52 

4371 426 
60i 55 
15 14 

• 8 8 
30 28 

244 237 
141 14 
45, 44 


273 
30 
21 
41 
33 

412 

?? 

5 

30 

244 

10 

45 


13 

1 




2-b 


Packing boxes, crates, etc 




2-c 


Cigar and fancy wood boxes 




3 


Cooperage 


11 
1 

11 
5 




4-e 

5-a 


Other articles and appliances of wood 

Furniture and upholsterj', . 




5-b. 


Caskets 




5-c 

5-d . 


Store, oflBce and kitchen fixtures 

Mirror and picture frames 


1 


5^ 


CHher cabinet work 


2 


6 


Pianos, organs, etc 


7 




7-b 


Mats and woven goods 


1 
1 






7-c 


Brooms 




3 


1 






Total — Group III 


1 






45 


61 


1,328! 1,275 


1.211 


53 






IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 
Leather 




1 


1 
1 







4 

10 
15 
7 
1.016 
36 
13 
4 
4 


4 

10 
15 
7 
976 
35 
12 
4 
4 


3 
6 
13 

1 

981 

36 

13 

2 

4 






2. 


Furs and fur goods 





1 
2 
2 
5 

4 
2 
2 

1 






3-a. . . 


Belting, washers, etc 


2 






3-b 


Saddlery and harness 






3-d... 


Boots and shoes 


39 

1 
1 




3-e 


Gloves and mittens 




^- 


Canvas and sporting goods 




Brushes 




6-d. . 


Mattresses, pillows, etc 








Total — Group IV 








'*! 


19 


1.109 


1,067 


1.059 


41 






V. Chemicals. Oils, Paints, Etc. 
Proprietary medicines 




1-a 


1 
11 ... 


2 


25 

239 

84 

10 

6 

4 

283 

120 


16 

232 

77 

8 

5 

4 

275 

72 


21 

239 

77 

10 

5 

3 

276 

105 


9 
7 
7 
2 
1 




1-b 


Sodas and other alkalies 


1 

4 

1 
1 






1-d 


Other chemicals and drugs . . 









2-a. . . 


Paint, varnish, etc 


.... 






2-b 


Dyes, colors and inks ... 


. 


1 

1 
7 
3 




3 


Wood alcohol and essential oils 


•i:;;;;; 




4 


Animal oil products 


8 
48 




6 


Soap, perfumery and cosmetics 






Total — Group V 






181 


14 


771 


639 


1 735 


82 










1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repokt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 333 

Oms CitlMi, Yew Ended SepteaAer M, 1911: Bf ladwilriee — Continaed. 



NlTMBSB or EmPLOT£K8 AT TzilB 


OF iNSPBCnON. 








Wbbklt Houbb or Labob. 


Chil- 

/Iron 


SHOP rOBCB. 


KUMBBB or SHOP BMPLOTBBS 
WHO WOBK — 


under 
14 




XrUMBBB IN 8HOP8 
KMPLOTINQ — 


8BX AND AOB. 


51 

hours 

or 

leas. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200.+. 


Men 

(18 

yrB.+). 


Y'tha 

yiB.). 


16 


Worn. 


Oirlfl 

(14- 
16 

yni.). 


oept 

as 

not'd). 


2.aoe 


10 

58 

39 

is 

8 
14 

4 


"134 

546 

491 

21 

" 'i94 
220 
167 
155 


3.299 
240 
797 
210 

■ 23i 

922 

'ois 


2.002 

422 

1,351 

665 

17 

221 

196 

1,144 

167 

749 

4 

208 

15 

58 


59 


1 


247 




1 


1,205 

36 

259 

117 

21 

4 

202 


1.103 
386 

1,131 
570 






423 






1,382 


29 

20 

4 

5 


2 
5 






2 
5 






701 


11 








21 






249 




23 
6 






245 






202 










1,156 


12 




■ 




1.156 
167 
155 






167 
















770 


18 


3 






3 


612 

4 

250 






4 










250 




259 


8 




43 












15 


15 








15 
58 






58 


58 






























' 








10,106 


359 


2,856 


6.891 


9.434 


198 


16 


457 


1 


46 


3.490 


6.570 












260 


111 

30 

33 
58 

io 

5 

7 

4 

10 


149 
29 
21 




260 
24 
11 
29 
31 

381 

48 

10 

5 

27 

194 

6 

23 










15 
3 


22 


233 

36 

31 

9 

4 

395 

50 

10 






29 


2 


3 










21 


10 








30 


1 

1 
3 
2 






21 


28 

3 






32 
















401 


343 
61 




3 
1 


14 




3 

1 







51 






10 










5 














5 








28 


21 


233 






i 

42 






38 

191 

9 

37 






237 


1 
3 
2 


i 

5 






46 






10 






1 

7 







44 


44 






12' 2 














1.158 


267 


658 


233 


1.049 


15 


13 


79i 2 66 


99 


1.003 













3 


3 
6 
13 

1 

36 

12 
2 
4 






3 
2 
13 

1 

517 

13 

6 












3 
6 
2 








6 










4 












13 














11 

1 

933 

35 

13 






1 




















042 


245 


697 


71 
2 


12 


335 

20 

6 


7 


19 








35 






12 
















2 






1 


1 




2 








4 






1 


3 




4 


















1 








1,018 


76 


345 


697 


556 


74 


13 


368 


7 


21 


15 


963 












12 


12 






4 

89 

62 

8 

4 

1 

135 

32 






8 






8 

232 

27 


4 






232 




232 


9 

1 




134' 
7 










70 
8 


14 
8 
4 
3 
33 
15 


56 






43 

8 














4 










....... ......| 


4 








3 










2 
91 




3 

6 








267 
57 


234 
43 




g 


^9 


on\ 


32 
9 


235 
42 






i "1 


25. ...T.I 














«53 


89 


333 


232 


335 


19 


12 


267' 5?nl 


45| 


376 


332 








i 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



334 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



TftUe XV.— Stodsticfl of VuetadeB fni»ftrtnd in First and SMoad 





Cnr AND Industry. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 

of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Number or 

Employees 

IN Year. 








In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICB 
FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


TotaL 


There- 
of 
14-16 

ace. 


2-a. 


SYRACUSE— C<mdud«d. 

VII. PRINTINQ AND PaPER GoODS. 

Paper boxes and tubes 


5 

2 

44 

4 
. 6 


...... 


6 
3 

54 
9 

12 


211 
31 

883 
93 

105 


209 
27 

819 
92 
93 


200 
29 

821 
90 
102 


2 

4 
64 

1 
12 




2-c 


Otfier paper gooda 




3-a 


Printing and publishing 




3-b.... 
3-c 


Bookbinding and blank book making 

Lithographing and engi^aving 






Total — Group VII 






61 




84 


1,323 


1,240 


1.242 


83 






VIII. Textiles. 
Carpets and rugs 




2-a. 


2 
2 




3 

1 


63 
284 


61 
278 


60 
274 


2 
6 




4 


Hosiery and knit goods 






Total — GrouD VIII 






4 




4 


347 


339 


334 


7 






IX. Clothing, Millinery, Laundry, 

Etc, 

Tailoring. 




1-a 


48 
3 
1 

1 

11 

1 

15 
7 
1 
2 


i 


65 
2 
2 

2 
31 

2 
11 

1 

20 

7 


1,841 

60 

6 

11 
619 
207 
299 

35 
334 


1.765 

i 

11 

610 
205 
299 
36 
323 


1,686 

36 

6 

9 
499 
167 
256 

9 
326 


86 
5 




1-b 


Shirta, collars and cuflFs 




1-c 


Men's necKwear 




1-d.... 


Suspenders and other furnishing goods for 
men 






2-a 




9 
2 




2-b' 


Women's white goods 




4-b 


Millinery 




5-b 


Quilts, comfortables, etc 






5-ai 


Lauodries (non-Chinese) 


11 




5.a« 


Chinese laundries 




6-b 


Cleaning and dyeing 


27 
12 


26 
10 


27 
9 


1 
2 




7 


Clip sorting 




2 






Total — Group IX ... 






113 


1 


145 


3,441 


3,326 


3,028 


116 






X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco. 
Plour and other cereal products . . ... 




1-a 

1-c. . . . 


3 

3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

77 
9 
1 
1 

10 
1 

22 




2 
5 


44 

498 

6 

98 

16 

42 

6 

372 

319 
20 
36 

282 
11 

507 


37 

464 

6 

98 

15 

39 

5 

369 

309 
19 
36 

258 
11 

602 


24 

366 

3 

33 

9 

42 

3 

333 

266 

15 

32 

265 

11 

469 


7 
34 




Fruit aod vegetable canning and preserv- 
ing 




1-d 


Coffee and spice roasting and grinding 

Groceries not elsewhere classified 

Provisions 




1-e 




2 
1 
1 
2 
73 
21 
3 






2 






4-a 


Macaroni and other food pastes 


3 




4-b 


Crackers and biscuits 




4-c 

4-d 


Bread and other bakery products 

Confectiooery and ice cream 


13 
10 

1 

1 

24 




5-c 


Mineral and ' oda waters 




5-d 


Malt 




5-e 


Malt liauors 




i7 

2 
28 




6-a 


Tobacco and snuff. . . .' 




6-b 


Cigars 


5 






Total — Group X 






133 




157 


2,256 


2,157 


1,840 


98 






XI. Water, Light and Power. 
Gas 




2 


1 
2 
1 

4 






lOo' 92 


100 
81 
22 


S 




4 


Electric light and power 






82 
27 


82 
26 




6 


Garbage disposal, etc 






1 






Total — Group XI 














209 


200 


203 


1 « 






Total -— SjTacuse 










523 


2 


661 


25,763' 24 .T<i7 


21.268 


1.308 


\ 








I 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



336 



Omb CitiM, Ymt Elided September M, 1911: By Imtaeaies — ConCioiied. 



NUMBKB 


OF Emplotkkb at Time 


OP iNSPBCnON. 








Wbbkly HoUBfl 


OF Labob. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


8HOP FOBCB. 


KUMBBB or SHOP BMPLOTSSS 
WHO WORK — 




KUUBKR IN SHOPS 
KMPLOTXKO — 


SBX AND AGK. 


51 

houiB 
or 
lees. 


52-57 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. J 


yesrs 

(in 
shops 


TotaL 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 

3 


Men 
(18 


Y'ths 

(1ft- 

18 

yrs.). 


16 

yw.). 


Worn. 


GirU 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

lofd). 


198 


12 
25 
186 
14 
36 


186 




38 

9 

581 

62 

70 


6 

3 

25 

4 
13 


6 

1 

15 

4 
4 


112 
12 

135 

19 

. 2 


37 

i 

i 


48 
16 
731 
16 
20 


6 

21 

73 
70 


144 

9 
6 






25 






757 


571 
75 
54 








89 






90 
















1,150 


273; 886 




760 


51 


29 


280 


39 


831 


170 


158 












58 




58 
209 




44 
46 






14 
204 








58 
253 






209 


3 


1 


15 


16 














327 




327 




90 


3 


1 


218 


15 


16 




311 












i.eoo 


296 
31 


616 


788 


671 
6 


25 


11 


837 

26 

6 

i 7 
444 
145 
241 
7 
251 


56 


78 


1,359 
31 


163 






31 








6 


: 

133 










4 

4 
1 


6 

9 

5 

4 

21 








9 






1 
38 
14 
13 

2 


1 
3 
2 


i 










490 


357 




333 
161 
203 
9 
189 


i52 






185 


59 

9 
108 


165 
196 






255 


31 






9 










314 


206 




61 






2 


30 


95 



















26 


7 


26 




14 

4 






i2 
3 








26 
3 






7 










4 


























2,912 


658 


1.466 


788 


824 


.^l 


11 


J 1,978 


67 


163 


2,289 


470 














17 


17 

3 



) g 
\ 






16 

162 
1 


3 




li 






6 


12 

321 

1 






321 


321 




1 1,56 










2 


1 ^ 






2 
33 






32 


33 




4 

9 














( 












9 

35 

2 

267 

234 

14 

31 

> 73 

IC 

IC 






3C 




39 





2C 

2 

26C 

127 

14 

31 

241 

J 32] 


. . . . 
1 
1 
4 
2 


:::::i ..'' 


4 


4 

1 
14 


Xi 






5 






32( 


) 16€ 





....... 


' 56 

1| 112 


4 






24< 


\ 36! 2T(i 


6> 1 






1^ 


[ 14 

I 












3] 




.'11 


\ '.'.'.'.'.'.' 

















24 


I ' 33I 208 








132 

1 

2 43( 


\ 3£ 



\ 






1 


L 11 
1 111 






8 


i! i 

) 4 lU 


J S 




> 




45^ 


21 


' 3ie 


\ 












1,74. 


2 40( 


J 1.02( 


) 311 


} 1.21] 


L 2( 


) 7'| m 


[ 1( 


) m 


) 12 


I 1,021 


) 








9 


2 .... 

1 

1 


91 
8 
2 


2 

I 

I 


0: 
8 
2 


2 ... 












9 


2 


8 


I 










7( 


) 111...... 


2 


I 










2 


I 
















19 


4 


19- 


4 


19^ 


1 


. . 1 . . 








9 


I 103 






1 










19.96 


2.22: 

3 ■ " ■ '— 


2| 8.09' 


7 9,63 


1 14.91 


1 44 


5 11 


l\^L!L 


2 16 


4 1.78 

= 


8 6.95 


2 11,10 


7 10 


3' 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



336 



New York State Department of Labor. 





TaUe XV.- 


-SteOi 




b4 la FInt and SeeMid 




City and Indubtby. 


Places 
Inspbctsd. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 

work. 


Labobvt 
Number of 
Emplotbeo 

IN Ybab. 




In- 


Onoe. 


More 
than 
onoe. 


grand 
total. 


OPFICE 

force. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Totel. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 


l-b... 


TROY. 

I. Stone, Clay and Glaba Pboducts. 
Cut Intone 


4 
1 
3 
3 




4 


20 

10 

105 

123 


20 

10 
103 
114 


16 

10 

105 

123 






3-a.... 


^Vijphalt 






4-a 


BuUding brick 






2 
9 




4-b,... 


Terra cotta and fire-clay products 

Total — Group I 


















11 




4 


258 


247 


254 


11 






II. Metals, Machtnrs and Con- 
veyances. 
Brass, bronse and aluminum castings .... 
Sheet metal work. . . 




2-c 

2-f 


2 
9 
2 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
6 
2 
12 
6 
3 
9 
1 
1 
3 
3 
4 
2 




2 

4 
4 


19 

53 

12 

1,226 

63 

8 

15 

3 

74 

332 

459 

19 

098 

44 

67 

2 

2 

20 

73 

245 

12 


17 
51 

11 

1.215 

60 

8 

15 

3 

72 

325 

442 

18 

186 

677 

42 

62 

2 

2 

19 

68 

228 

12 


19 

51 

12 

1,212 

53 

8 

12 

3 

65 

324 

434 

19 

108 

678 

44 

67 

1 

2 

17 

73 

245 

12 


2 
2 

1 
11 
3 




n ■ 


Metal goods not elsewhere classified 

Rolling mills and steel works 




3-d . . 


Bridges and structural iron 








3-g. ... 


Hardware not elsewhere cla&<ified 

TooIq and dies 








3-f..... 










3-m 


Metal furniture 










3-n . . . . 
3-p .... 


Wire work not cli^ewhere classified 

Car wheels and railway equipment 

Cooking and heating apparatus 




2 


2 

7 

17 

1 

22 

21 

2 

5 




3-f . . . . 








3-t 


Stationary engines, boilers, etc 




2 

10 

1 




3-u . . . . 
3-v 


Machinery not ebewhere classified 

Castings 




4-c 


Dynamos, motors and electrical supplies . . 
Carriages, wagon** and sleighs 




5-a 




7 

1 
1 
2 




5-b.... 


Blacksmithing and wheel wrighting 

Cycles 




5-c .. . . 






5-d 


Xlotor vehicles 


1 
5 
17 




5-g 


Railway repair shops 




8-S.... 
8-e 


Professiona) and scientific instruments 

Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 




? 






Total — Group II 










78 


1 39 


3,654 


3.535 


3.549 


119 






III. Wood MANurAcruREs. 
Saw mill products 




1 


1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
11 
2 






5 
32 
29 

3 
43 
52 
11 


4 
30 
29 

3 
42 
52 
11 


5 
81 
29 

3 
43 
51 
10 


1 
2 




2-a 


House trim 




3 
2 

1 
2 
7 

1 




3 


Coopflfftge 




4-c 


Wooden toys and novelties 






4-e 

5-a 


Other articles and appliances of wood 

Furniture and upholstery 


1 




5-e 


Other cabinet work 








Total — Group III 








24 




16 


175 


171 


172 


4 






IV. Leather and Leather Goods. 
Furs and fur goods 




2 


3 
2 
3 

1 
3 
10 




2 


8 
9 
27 
•5 
3 
466 


8 
7 
24 
5 
3 
461 


8 
9 
27 
3 
3 
460 






3-a. ... 


Belting, washers, etc 


2 
3 




3-b .... 


Saddlery and harness 


...'.' 


2 

1 
5 
9 




3-g.... 


Canvas and sporting goodn 




4 


Rubber and gutta percha goods ... . 






5-c 


Brushes 


5 






Total — Group IV 






22 




19 


518 


508 


516 

56 
14 
16 


10 






V. Chemicals. Oils, Paints, Etc. 
Paint, varnish, etc 


1 




2-a 


2 
1 
2 






56 
14 
16 


48 
12 
16 

76 


8 
2 




4 


Animal oil products. 


1 




7-c 


Glue, mucilage, etc 


. . 1.... . 






Totf\l — Group V 


1 


10 






5 




86 


86 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 387 

GteM CMm. T«w Ended fiteyte i bw m, 1911: Bf Udnslrlea — GontiBiMd. 



Number of Emplotbbs at Timb or iNSPBcnoN. 


Weekly Hoxtbs op Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FOBCB. 


KTTIIBBB or SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK- 




NX7MBEB IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO — 


8BX AND AGB. 


SI 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


yews 

(in 

shops 


ToUl. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrs. +). 


Y'thsl Boys 

(16- 1 (14- 

18 ; 16 

yr».). j yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


ex- 
eept 

as 
not'd). 


16 


16 
10 
16 






• 

16 

10 

102 

114 


i 
1 

1 






16 
10 

1 










10 






















103 


87 
114 







i 






40 


102 
74 






114 










243 


42 


201 




242 




1 






27 


40 


176 














17 


17 
22 
11 

8 

8 

12 

3 

20 

42 

18 

4^ 

9 

18 

62 

1 

2 

16 

12 

23 

12 






17 

49 

11 

1.201 

50 

6 

12 

3 

62 

317 

417 

18 


1 








7 
2 
11 

50 


10 
29 






49 


^ 












18 






11 












1,201 


50 


1.193 










5 


1.196 






50 














8 


...'.'.[ 


2 






2 


6 

12 

3 

53 

317 
23 
18 

165 
26 
42 
62 






12 












3 




















63 


43 
42 

75 


■ "275 
300 





i 






1 


9 




317 








417 










75 


319 




18 












176 


i34 
169 
24 


479 


176 

657 
42 


• 










21 

591 






657 











40 




42 


1 








62 


62 
1 
2 

16 
68 
















1 
















.... 




2 
















2 

16 

■■'228 
228 


7 




16 




















68 


56 


"265 












6i 




228 


228 
12 














12 














3 






3,430 


358 


620 


2.452! 3.427! 


3 






141 1 1.075; 2.207 


7 








1 








4 


4 

29 

2 

3 

5 

51 

10 






2I 

29 














4 






29 










1 .. . 





20 
27 




29 


27 












9 






3 


3 
42 
47 
10 










3 


i. . . 




42 


37 














42 

A9 






51 






4 




3 
2 


6 






10 










1 '8 






168 


104 


64 




164 






4 




17 


53] 98 






8 


8 
7 

24 
3 
3 

37 






•3 






5 







8 








7 






1 

411 











'"7 

24 






24 


. 


















3 










1 









3 

3 

388 






3 






















461 


424 




17 


1 


31 


1 


2 


71 






506 


82 


424 


1 45l| 17 


1 


36 


1 


2 


79| 425| 




48 


1 
3 45 




48 
12 
16 












I 
3 45 






12 


12 
16 
















12 
16 






16 


■;;;;;; 






















76 


31 1 45 


76l 










3' 73 





















■ ■ - 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



338 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



TiOile XV.— Statfsdes of FftctorlM IiMpeclod in Ffrat and SeeMid 





Cmr AND Industry. 


Places 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Largest 
Number op 
Employees 

IN Year. 








In- 




grand 
total. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


dustry 
num- 
ber. 


Once. 


More 
than 
once. 


TotaL 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


There- 
of 

Total. 1^J« 
******* years 

of 

age. 


2-c 


TROY— Concluded. 

VI. Paper and Pulp. 
Piiper milh 


5 






156 

300 
480 

18 


151 


156 


5 






VII. Printinq and Papkr Goodsi. 
Paper boxes and tubes 








2-a . . . 


5 

24 

2 






300 

417 

16 


280 

461 

17 




63 

2 




a-a 


Pnnting a^d publi"^hing , , 




16 




3-c 


Lithographing and engraving 






Total — Group VII 










31 




16 


807 


733 


767 


74 






VIII. Textiles. 
Cotton goods 




3 


2 
3 

1 
2 

1 






07 

014 

12 

48 
22 


80 
003 
12 
46 
21 


07 

876 



46 

20 


8 
11 




4 


Hosiery and knit goods 








5-a 


Dyeing, finishing, etc 








6 


Flax, hemp and jute manufactures 

Oilcloth, window shades, etc 






2 

1 




7 










Total — Group VIII 

















1.003 


1.071 


1.048 


22 






IX. Clothing, Millinery. Lavndry, 

Etc. 

Tailoring 







1-a. . . . 


46 
33 

1 
23 

10 
1 
1 
16 
11 
4 
3 


...... 


48 
1 


108 

14.600 

25 

207 

2 

146 

540 
18 
14 


108 

14.308 

25 

206 

2 

146 

12 

4 

533 

18 

14 


170 

13.063 

25 

288 

1 

142 



1 

524 

18 

14 

28 






1-b ... 


-Shirts, collars and cuflfs 


294 




1-0 


Men's neckwear 




2-a 


Dressmaking 




16 

1 
13 


1 




3 


Men's hats and caps 




4-b 


Millinery 






5-a 


Curtains, embroideries, etc 






5-b .. . 


Quilts, comfortables, etc 

Laundries (non-Chinese) 


!!".'..' 


1 

12 



4 
1 






6-a».... 


7 




6-a» 


Chinese laundries 




6-b 


Cleaning and dyeing 






7. . . 


Clip sorting 


33 31 


2 






Total — Group IX 






150 


1 


106 


15.808 15.587 


15,102 


304 






X. Food, Lic<uor9 and Tobacco. 
Flour and other cereal products 




1-a ... . 


2 

3 
1 
40 
11 
4 
14 
20 






21 
3 


17 
2 


2) 

3 

12 

2 

149 

37 

17 

271 

241 


4 

1 

1 ' 




1-c 


Fruit and vegetable canning and preserv- 
ing 








2 


Provisions 


i 


4 
1 

22 
3 
1 
1 

17 


12 12 
6 6 

150 150 
42 42 
21 20 

277 244 




3 


Oairy products 






4-0 


Bread and other bakery products 

Confectionery and ice cream 






4-d . 






5-c. . . . 


Mineral and soda waters 


1 
32 

1 




5-e 


Malt liquors 




6-b 


Cigars 


264 


262 


. 




Total — Group X 







oe 


1 


40 


70€ 


75C 


763 


4C 






XI. Water, Light and Power. 
Gas 







2 


1 

2 
2 






Ifi 
li 

2 




J It 


] 
i : 
\ 


I 


4 


Electric light and power 






I 


5 


Steam heat and power 










Total — Group XI 




) : 






£ 






4C 


) 3- 


r 4< 


1 .... 




XII. BuiLDiNQ Industry. 
Carpenters' shops 









1 


C 


\ 


t 


) 3: 


J 3 

i 22. oa 


I 3 


1 : 


2 




Total — Troy 


1 




451 


s 


I 251 


) 23.51^ 


3 22. 56^ 

s 


1 6041 








1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau op Eaot6ry Inspection, 1911. 339 

Ctam OliM, Yew Ended SepteaAer SO. 1911 :^ Br Industriee -^ Condnned. 



NuMBca 


OF Emplotkbs at TniB of IxspscnoN. 






Wbbklt Hours of Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP FORcne. 


NUMBER OF SHOP BMPLOYBBS 
WHO WORK— 




NUUBBB IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO 


sex AND AQB. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hours. 


68-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 

(in 
shops 


Total. 


1-10. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrs. +). 


Y'ths 

yw.). 


IT 

16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Giris 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


ex- 
cept 
ss 
not*d). 


151 


17 


134 




145 






6 






26 


46 


79 
















280 


24 

109 
15 


256 
289 




129 

358 

15 


39 
28 


8 
2 


101 
10 


3 


11 

395 

8 


59 
2 
7 


210 

1 






398 






16 


























003 


148 


546 




502 67l 


10 


111 


3 


414 


68 


211 
















80 


6 

13 
10 


89 
114 


*""76i 


32 

229 

7 

21 

19 






57 

609 

2 

18 








89 

862 

9 

31 

19 






865 


24 




3 


3 








9 






44 


31 




5 








13 






19 
































1.02fl 


41 


234 


751 


308 


29 




686 


3 


3 


13 


1.010 












179 


144 
10 

■''i23 

1 

122 



1 

47 

18 

14 

26 


35 

1,855 

25 

164 


iiisoi 


140 

3.480 

8 

61 






39 

9,944 

17 

226 

1 

140 

3 






38 


141 






13.600 


200 


16 


29 


1.563 


8.6061 3.495 






25 


25 
122 


.......1 






287 










Ift.")! 






1 








1 








142 


20 




2 
6 
1 
89 
18 
14 
16 






i3S 4 






9 










9 








1 
















1 

120 

18 

14 

26 






517 


470 




5 




419 


4 


10 


387 






18 






14 






















26 










10 
































14.888 


515 


2.569 


11,804 


3,835 


205 


16 


10,799 


33 


1,579 


9.325 


3.984 












17 


17 

2 
12 

2 
149 
37 
16 
88 
92 






17 

2 

12 

2 

144 

37 

16 

238 

214 














17 

2 
12 

2 

lAz 

34 

16 

77 






2 






















12 






















2 























149 






2 


1 


2 




1 

1 


6 
2 






37 










16 


















238 


150 

148 

! 












2 
240 


169 






240 


8 


4 


14 


















713 


415 


298i 


682 


10 


5 


16 




244 


167 


302 












18 


18 

16 

3 






18 
16 
3 














18 
3 






16 
















14 


2 




3 


1 






































37 


37 






37 












14 


21 


2 






















26 


29 






29 










29 
































21.96C 


1.819 


5.134 

1 


15.007 


9.898 

■ ■ ' 


328 


36 


11,658 


' 40 


2.456 


10.863 


8.563 


88 


•^- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



340 



Xew York State Detaktment of Laboe. 



Tabto XV.— Stalistks of nMtories lupMted In First and SecMd 



City and Industry. 



Places 
Inbpbctxd. 



Once. 



More 
than 
oooe. 



Num- 
ber 
of 
owners 
at 

woric. 



Laxobst 
NuiCBXB or 
Emplotsbs 

IN YkAR. 



Total 



There- 
of in 
shop. 



ORA2n> 
TOTAL. 



omcB 

FORCE. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 



UTICA. 

I. Stone. Clay and Glass Products. 

Cut stone 

Asphalt 

Plaster (wall and land) 

Buildmg brick 

Building glass 

Pressed, blown and cut glassware 



Total — Group I. 



II. Metals, Machines and Convey- 
ances. 

Jewelry, gold pens, etc 

Brass. Dronxe and aluminum castings 

Gas and electric fixtures 

Brass and bronse ware not dsewhere classi- 
fied 

Sheet metal work 

Metal goods not elsewhere classified 

Haitlware not elsewhere classified 

Cutlery 

Fire arms 

Metal furniture 

Car wheels and railway equipment . . . 

Architectural and ornamental iron work. . 

Cooking and heating apparatus 

Stationary engines, bouers, etc . . . . .' 

Machinery not elsewhere classified 

Castings 

Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm apparatus 

Dynamos, motors and electrical supplies. . 

Carriages, wagons and sleighs 

Cycles 

Motor vehicles 

Railway repair shops 

Agricultural implements 

Scales, meters, phonographs, etc 



Total — Group II . 



III. Wood Manufactures. 

House trim 

Cigar and fancy wood boxes 

Wooden toys and novelties 

Other articles and appliances of wood. 

Furniture and uphofsterj' 

Other cabinet work 

Pianos, organs, etc 

Brooms 



Total — Group III. 



IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 

Furs and fur goods 

Belting, washers, etc 

Saddlery and harness 

Traveling bags and trunks 

Fancy leather goods 

Canvas and sporting goods 

Pearl buttons, handles, etc 



Total — Group IV. 



11 



15 



135 



131 



131 



1 

4 

112 

43 

15 

42 

16 

67 

341 

334 

3 

16 

580 

93 

318 

667 

30 

153 

379 

4 

12 

174 

50 

4 



1 

4 

111 

41 

15 

42 

15 

57 

318 

315 

3 

11 

546 

93 

315 

565 

80 

142 

375 

4 

12 

169 

50 

4 



1 

4 

112 

43 

15 

42 

16 

57 

341 

334 

3 

15 

580 

93 

314 

530 

30 

101 

269 

4 

12 

174 

25 

4 



111 3.347 



3,238 



3.119 



290 
11 
70 

3 
42 

6 
17 

3 



280 
11 
70 

3 
40 

6 
17 

3 



290 
11 
60 

3 
42 

6 
17 

3 



442 



430 



432 



3 
8 
16 
35 
14 
14 
125 



3 
8 
16 
35 
14 
14 
124 



215 



214 



177 



19 



109 



10 



12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bueeau of Faotoey Inspection, 1911. 341 

ClaM CttiM. Yev Ewled September U, 1911: By Indnslrles — Conthraed. 



NUMBBB 


OF Employees at Tno 


OF Inspection. 




Wbeklt Hours of T/aror. 


ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 




SHOI 


FORCE. 




NUMBER OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
BMFLOTINa — 


SEX AND AOE. 


61 

hours 

or 

less. 


62-67 
hours. 


68-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men y;^^ 

(18 ({J- 

y^«-+>- yi). 

1 


Boys 

(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 

(16 yrs. 

+). 


Girls 

(14- 
16 

yiB.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


31 


31 
10 
6 
16 
6 
4 


1 


31 
101 












19 


12 
10 
29 
47 






10 


















29 


23 


















47 


31 




















6 












6 






4 

















4 




























127 


73 


54 





.271 












25 


102 






















1 


1 

4 

20 

11 

16 

2 

15 






1 

1! 

151 

63i 

310 

297 

3 

9| 














1 






4 
















4 

1 






111 


91 
30 




6 


2 


5 

1 






2 


m 

40 

16 

38 

16 

55 

318 

314 

3 






41 






15 














42 


40 






2 






2 


2 






15 










57 


57 


■■■'sis 

282 




2 


2 
8 
9 




2 









318 






315 


7 
3 
11 

8 

60 


26 


8 


1 




1 









3 






11 








2 
1 






5 


6 






516 


259 

85 

251 


287 
■ 628 


543 2 






645 






93 


93 

242 

528 

30 

90 

266 








93 








311 


1 




60 


8 


8 


127 


176 

528 
30 
H8 






528 






30 


2 

32 

4 

12 

23 

4 


30 

88 

233 



















90 












2 






265 












92 1731 






4 














4 
12 
71 
25 

4 






12 






12 

1G9 

25 

4 


















169 


146 
26 
















98 




25 
















4 






































3.010 


234 


1.361 


1.115 


2.891 


16 


10 


85 


8 


21 


327 


£.561 


98 




280 


29 
11 

3 

19 

6 
17 

3 


251 




2S0 

2 
31 

3 
32 

6 
16 

3 










31 
2 
2 


163 



27 

3 


96 






11 




2 


7 
27 


2 






60 




60 




31 






3 










40 


21 








8 






40 






6 












6 

17 

3 






17 






1 
















3 











































420 


88 


332 





373 


1 


2 


42 


2 


35 


192 


193 












3 


3 
8 
8 

i4 

12 






1 
8 






2 








3 






8 
















8 

8 

36 






8 






6 
35 
10 

5 
20 






2 












35 


35 



















14 







4 

7 

70 








14 

6 

90 






12 















7 






96 


06 




_ 


2 


4 


6 








1 






176 


45 


131 




86! 


2 


86 


4 


6 


7 


163 



















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



342 



New Yobk State Depabtment of Labor. 





Ttb^ XV.- 






ClTT AND InDVSTRT. 


Places 
Inbprcted. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Largest 
Number of 

ElCPLOTBES 

IN Year. 




J"^ 


Once. 


More 
once. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


office 
force. 


dusiry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


1-b.... 


VTICA— Continued. 

V. Chbiiicalb. Oim, Paints, Etc. 
Sodas and other alkalies 


1 

1 
1 

1 






2 
3 

4 
9 


2 
3 

4 
9 


2 
3 

4 
9 






6 


Soap, perfumery and cosmetics 




1 






7-c 


Glue, mucilage.' etc 






7-d.... 


Fertilisers 












Total — Group V 












4 




1 


18 


18 


18 








VI. Paper and Pulp. 
Paper mills 






2-c 


2 






70 


70 


70 








VII. Printing and Paprr Goods. 
Paper boxes and tubes 










2-ft 


2 

19 

1 
2 






102 

397 

22 

8 


102 

342 

22 

8 


102 

396 

22 

8 






3-a 


Prmting and publishing 




8 


55 




3-b.... 


BpokbindinjK and blankbook making 




3-0 




1 








Total — Group VII 








24 




9 


529 


474 


528 


55 






VIII. Trxtilbs. 
Woolens and worsteds 




2-« 


1 
4 
25 
3 
1 






951 

2.403 

5,927 

91 

2 


940 
2.382 
5.833 

88 
2 


803 

2.403 

5,748 

83 

2 


11 

21 

94 

3 




3 


Cotton goods 








4 


Hosiery and knit goods 


2 






5-a. . . . 


r^eing, finishing, etc 




6 


Ffaz. £iemp andlute manufactures 

Total — Group VIII 




















34 


2 




9.374 


9.245 


9.129 


129 






IX. Clothinq, Millinrrt. Laundry, 

Etc. 

TaUoring 




1-a 


33 

1 

1 

4 
2 
1 
1 
12 
2 
4 


1 


18 


1,564 
3 

9 
46 
13 
10 
15 
194 

6 
44 


1.510 
3 

9 
46 
13 
10 
15 
194 
6 
44 


1,479 
3 

9 
27 
12 

5 

15 

194 

6 
42 


54 




1-b.... 


Shirts, <»llarB and cuiffs 

Suspenders and other furnishing goods for 
men 




1-d.... 










2-a. . .. 


f^rwMminking 


i 


3 
6 






3 


Men's hats and cum 






4-b.... 


Millinery 






5-a 


Chirtains. embroideries, etc . . 










6-a». . . . 


Laundries (non-Chinese) 




7 






6-a«. . . . 


Chinese laundries ' 






7 


Clip oortiug 












Total — Group IX 












61 


2 


34 


1,904 


1.850 


1.792 


54 






X. Food. Liquors and Toracco. 

Flour and other cereal products 

Coffee and spice roasting and grinding . . . 




1-a 


3 

1 
2 
3 
1 

31 
7 
2 
4 
2 

15 






19 

2 

27 

10 

68 

88 

56 

6 

154 

54 

64 


18 

2 

26 

10 

67 

87 

54 

6 

129 

54 

64 


19 

2 

27 

10 

68 

88 

53 

5 

118 

54 

64 


1 




1-d.... 








2 






1 




3 


Dairy products 




1 




4-a 


Macaroni and other food pastes . . 


1 
1 
2 




4-c 

4-d.... 


Bread and other bakery products 

Confectionery and ice cream 




16 

4 





6-c 


Mineral and soda waters 




B-c.. .. 


Malt liquors 






14 




5-a 


Tobacco and snuff. . , 








B-b 


Cigars . . 




11 








Total — Group X 








71 




32 


548 


517 


508 


20 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of Bukbau op Factoby Inspection, 1911. 343 

Ckm QOea, Tev Ended Septomber SO, 1911 : By Industrlee ~ Contiiiaed. 





AT Tna OF Inspkction. 






Wbbkly Hottbs of Labob. 


ChiU 

dren 

under 

14 


BBOP FOBCC 


NTTMBBB OF SHOP KMPLOTKB8 
WHO WOBK— 




NTTMBKH IN SHOPS 
■MPLOYING 


BMX. AND AOB. 


61 

houiB 

or 

less. 


6^-57 
hours. 


68-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yr8.+). 


Y'ths 

(16- 

18 

yrs.). 


Bosrs 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 
nofd). 


2 


2 
3 

4 
9 






1 
1 
4 
9 






1 

2 






2 
3 








8 




















4 














4 
9 






9 












































18 


18 






16 






3 






5 


13 
























70 




70 




70 
















70 






















102 


60 

8 


102 

291 

22 




48 

289 

12 

7 


1 
11 
2 


1 


61 
29 

7 

1 




2 

207 

22 


""i34 


100 






341 






22 








8 


8 





























473 


58 


415 




36fl 


14 


16 


88 




231 


142 


100 












882 






882 
2.274 
4,032 


430 

1.273 

1.974 

63 

2 


5 
5S 
68 


7 

2 

48 


420 

1.044 

3,400 

17 


20 

5 

155 


27 

7 

203 


"653 


866 

2,375 

4,798 

SO 

2 






2,382 


20 

19 
2 


ios 

1,693 
61 






6,654 






80 






2 







































9,000 


60 


1,762 


7,188 


3,742 


131 


57 


4.890 


180 


237 


653 


8.110 












1,425 


140 
3 

9 
27 
12 

6 
16 
74 

6 
42 


524 


761 


813 


52 


14 


542 
3 

6 

25 

1 

6 

14 

125 


4 


30 


86 
3 


1.309 






3 






9 






3 
2 
10 








9 








27 










26 
1 
5 

15 


1 
10 






12 








1 




1 






5 










16 






1 
65 

6 
14 
















1(M 


120 







1 


3 


33 


161 
6 
6 






6 






42 










28 




36 






















1,738 


333 


644 


761 


914 


62 


16 


749 


7 


100 


136 


1.493 


, 










18 


18 

2 

26 

10 

87 

22 
6 

4 

4 

64 






18 

2 

26 

10 

16 

86 

27 

5 

104 

40 

60 














18 






2 
















2 






26 
















10 
1 
67 
85 
39 
5 


16 




10 


67 















9 




67 






52 










87 




2 

1 




2 
3 


9 






61 


29 




21 


2 






5 






104 


100 
60 












80 


24 
50 
19 




64 


2 

1 


2 


12 
1 




4 






64 




45 


















488 


242 


246 




392 


3 


5 


86 


2 


130 


113 


229 


16 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



344 



New Yobk State Department of Labob. 





Table XV.- 






Cmr AND Industry. 


Placbb 


Num- 
ber 
of 

owners 
at 

work. 


Labobbt 
Number op 
Emplotbes 

IN Year. 




In- 


Once. 


More 
than 
onoe. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFPXCB 
rORCB. 


dtwtry 
num- 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


2 


VTIC A— Concluded. 

XI. Watbb, Lioht and Power. 
Gaa 


I 


i 

! 


50 


50 
63 


60 
63 






4 


Elcrtric light and power 




63 








Total — Group XI 










3 


1 


113 


113 


113 








Total — Vtica 










289 


5j 91 


16,695 


16.300 


16.017 


384 






YONKERS. 

I. Stonb, Clay and Glass Products. 
Pressed, blown and cut glassware 

II. Metals. MACHmES and Con- 
veyances. 

Metal goods not elsewhere classified 

Hardware not elsewhere classified 

Architectural Knd omamenUl iron work. . 

Machinery not elsewhere classified 

Castings 




5-c 


1 


1 
1 




3 


3 


3 














2-g.... 


1 

6 

1 
2 
3 

1 






7 

6 

29 


7 

5 

29 

871 

18 

3 

755 

17 

40 


7 

6 

29 

1.134 

18 

3 

772 

18 

40 


1 


3-i.... 






1 




4.... 









3-u.... 
3-v.... 




2 


1.135 

18 

3 

772 

18 

.40 


264 




4-a 


Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm apparatus 
CK^namos. motors and electrical supplies. . 
Motor vehicles 


■ 








4-c 






17 

1 




5-d.... 








5-g.... 


Railway repair shops 










Total — GrouD II 












21 


2] 2.028 


1.745 


2,027 


283 






III. Wood MANurAcrcRES. 
House trim 




-a . . . . 


9 

1 
2 

1 






67 

126 

14 

3 


67 

125 

14 

3 


64 

126 

14 

3 






3 


Cooperage 






1 




5-a.... 


Furniture and upholstery* 








7-c 


Brooms 












Total — Group III 












13 






210 


209 


207 


1 






IV. Leather and Rubber Goods. 
Fancy leather goods 








-f 


1 
2 






60 
72 


59 
69 


31 
72 


1 
3 




4 


Rubber and gutta percha goods 










Total — Group IV 










3 






132 


128 


103 


4 






V. Chemicals. Oils. Paints, Etc. 
ProprieUry medicines 


. 






1-a.... 


1 
2 






6 
91 


6 

85 


6 
91 






l-d... 


Other chemicals and drugs 






6 






Total — Group V 










3 






97 


91 


97 


6 






VII. Printing and Paper Goods. 
Printing and publishing 








3-a 


6 






96 
2 


92 
2 


96 
2 


4 




3-c 


Lithographing and engraving 











Total — Group VII 












7 






98 


94 


98 


4 






VIII. Textiles. 
Silk and silk goods 








1 


1 






66 
7,310 


66 
7,197 


66 
7,310 






2-a 


Carpets and rugs 


3 






113 






Total — Group VIII 










4 






7.376 


7.263 


7.376 


113 
















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



345 



Oam CitlM. Ymt Ended September M, 1911: By ladastries — Contiiiaed. 



NUMBBB 


OF Emplotess 


AT Time 


OF Inspection. 






Weekly Houbs of Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP FOBCK. 


NUMBBB OF SHOP EMPLOYEES 
WHO WOBK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYING 


SEX AND AGE. 


51 

hours 

or 

loss. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
houis. 


Aops 


ToUl. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


aoo+. 


Men 

(18 
yre. +). 


Y'ths 
yra.). 


16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


oept 

as 

not'd). 


50 


9 


60 
54 




60 
63 
















50 
63 




63 




































113 


9 


104 




113 
















113 






















15,633 


1.150 


5,119 


9.364 


9.078 


217 


107 


6.028 


203 


769 


1,600 


12,967 


297 




3 


3 






3 










3 

































7 


7 
5 
29 
15 
18 
3 






6 

5 

28 

817 

18 

3 

661 

17 

40 


1 








7 










5 




















20 






1 
45 








is 

870 
18 








870 


86 


769 


1 


7 










18 












3 















3 








756 




755 


8 




86 





765 
10 








17 


17 






7 








40 


40 












40 

























1.744 


94 


126 


1.524 


1.505 


65 


1 


93 




33 


1.671 


40 












64 


64 

i4 

3 






64 

120 

9 

3 










64 










125 


125 




5 










125 
6 






14 




5 






8 
3 






3 








































206 


81 


125 




196 


6 




6 




64 


11 


131 












30 


i7 


30 
52 




19 
29 






11 
38 






19 
68 


11 






60 


1 


1 




1 














99 


17 


82 




48 


1 


1 


49 




1 


87 


11 












6 


6 






4 

30 






2 

52 


i 


6 
16 










85 


85 






2 


69 
















91 


6 


85 




34 




2 


54 


1 


22 


69 
















92 


37 
2 


55 




77 
2 


8 




7 




92 
2 










2 






I ■ " 
























94 


39 


55 




79 


8 




7 




94 




















66 




66 


■'7;i97 


2 
3.478 


1 
98 


3 


51 
3.621 


9 


12 


54 
7,197 








7,197 
























7.263 




66 


7.197 


3.480 


99 


3 


3.672 


9 


12 


7,251 

















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



346 



Xew Yohk State Depart-mext of Labob. 





Table XV.- 






Cmr AND Industry. 


Placbs 
Inspected. 


Num- 
ber 
of 

at 
work. 


Largest 
Number of 

ElfPLOTEES 

IN Yeab. 




In- 


Onoe. 


More 
than 
once. 


grand 

TOTAL. 


omcB 

FORCE. 


dustry 
num- , 
ber. 


Total. 


There- 
of in 
shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

age. 


1-a. . . . 


YONKERS— Conc/wded. 

IX. Clothing. Milunkbt. Laundry. 
Etc. 

Tt^ilnring 


1 
1 
1 
- 4 
3 
5 
12 
1 






6 

24 

46 

2.293 

67 

no 

36 
4 


6 
21 
46 
2,238 
57 
107 
36 
4 


3 
24 
46 
2,272 
56 
110 
36 
4 






l-c 


Men's neckwear 






1 


2-a 


Dressmaking 






1 


3. .. . 


Men's hats and caps 






55 


5-a 








1 


6-a>... 


Tift^ndrins (v>or*-Ohinpiff>) 






3 


6-a». . . . 


Chinese htundries 








6-b 


Cleaning and dyeing 










Total — Group IX 










28 






2,576 


2.518 


2,551 


58 




X. Food, Liquors and Tobacco. 
Siigar and molaMHW refining.-. 








1-b 


2 

1 
29 
3 
2 
5 
2 
3 






1,355 
4 
97 
10 
24 
19 
15 
14 


1,305 
4 
97 
10 
24 
19 
15 
14 


1,355 
4 
97 
10 
24 
19 
15 
14 


60 


2 


Proviwons. 








4-c 


Bread and other bakery products 

Confectionery and ice cream 


1 


6 






4-d.... 






5-a 


Artificial ice 










5-c 


Mineral and soda waters 




i 






5-e 


Malt liquors 






6-b. .. 


Cigars 

Total — Group X 




1 












47 


1 


8 


1.538 


1,488 


1,538 


50 




XI. Watbb, Light and Power. 
Gas 

Total — Yonkers 




2 


1 






40 


40 


40 
















128 


1 


10 


14.098 


13,679 


14,040 


619 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



347 



CiMS Cities, Tear Ended September SO, 1911: By Indaatries —Concluded. 



NOMBBB 


or Emplotbcs 


AT TiMB OP InSPBCTION. 






Wbbkly Hours of Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EICPLOTBBS 
WHO WORK — 




NUMBKB IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYINQ— 


SBX AND AOB. 


61 

hours 

or 

leas. 


52-57 
hours. 


58-63 
hours. 


Over 

63 
hours. 


years 

(in 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 +. 


Men 

(18 

yrs. +). 


Y'tha 

(16- 

18 

yrs.). 


?iT 

16 

yrs.). 


Worn. 


Oirls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


cept 

as 

not'd). 


3 


A 






3 
3 

30 
1,503 

7 
19 
36 

4 














3 






2A 


24 
46 
222 
36 
76 


'i;976 






19 
16 
640 
47 
87 


2 


24 








46 






46 

2,058 

54 

85 








2,217 19 


45 


7 


1 


29 
2 
14 


iso 






66 20 






1 


107 31 


1 




8 
36 






36 36 






4 4 
















4 




























2,493, 113 


404 


1,976 


1.605 


46 


7 


809 


26 


69 


2.247 


177 




1 


1,305 

4 






1,305 


1,297 
4 
95 
7 
24 
15 
14 
13 


7 


1 










827 

4 

97 

6 


478 




4 















97 


97 
10 
24 
19 
16 
14 






2 
















10 








3 




5 








24 










24 




19 






1 
1 


3 










19 
6 




15 












9 
6 






14 








i 




8 






















1.488 


183 




1,305 


1.469 


11 


4 


4 




13 


15 


958 


602 




40 




40 


40 














40 

























13,521 


536 


9a3 


12,002 


8.549 


225 


18 


4.693 


36 


311 


11,351 


1,357 


502 


1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



348 



New York State Department of Labor. 



TABLE XVI.— statistics OP FACTORIES INSPBCTBD IN 

RecapitaUtion by Industry 



Qroupb or Indubtrues. 



• 






Num- 




ber of 


P1ac«s 


estab- 


in- 


lish- 


Bpecl- 


mentB 


^. 


with 




no em- 




ployees., 



Num- 
berof 
owners 

at 
work. 



I. Stone, clay and glsss products 

II. Metals, machines and conveyances . 

III. ^ood manufactures 

IV. Leather and rubber goods 

V. Chemicals, oils, paints, etc 

VI. Paper and pulp 

VII. Printing and paper goods 

VIII. TextUes 

IX. Clothing, millinery, laundry, etc 

X. Food, liquors and tobacco 

XI. Water, light and power 

XII. Building industry 

Total 

I. Stone, clay and glass products 

II. Metab, machinery and conveyances 

III. Wood manufactures 

IV. Leather and rubber goods 

V. Chemicals, oils, paints, etc 

VI. Paper and pulp 

Vn. Printing and paper goods 

Vin. Textiles 

IX. Clothing, miU'mery, laundry, etc ... . 

X. Food, liquors and tobacco 

XI. Water, light and power 

XII. Building industry 

Total 



490 
3,835 
1,644 
2,178 

629 

55 

2,545 

969 
13,501 
5,121 

190 



31.229 



Labout 
NuuBaa or 
EMPLoraia 

m Ykab. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



Grand 
Total. 



omci 
roROi. 



Total. 



Thereof 
14^16 
years 

mage. 



951 


1 


275 


37.733 


36.641 


31.249 


TOTAL NEW 
1,086| 3 


6,109 




2,866 


318.738 


300.842 


280,608 


17,775 


46 


2,958 


6 


1,234 


86,332 


83,598 


77,608 


2,720 


3 


2,808 




1,541 


83.437 


81.218 


73,203 


2,212 


3 


913 




216 


33.7*4 


35.614 


36.372 


3.103 




230 




65 


14.681 


14.402 


14.013 


279 




3.709 


1 


2.075 


109,527 


98.539 


101.158 


10.038 


49 


1.405 




495 


115.743 


113.594 


107.278 


2,130 


4 


16.258 


31 


11.195 


•355.936 


347.583 


297.238 


8.216 


9 


8,746 


236 


4.805 


124.143 


119.299 


111,098 


4.803 


8 


499 




13 


9.721 


9,247 


9,317 


473 




86 




61 


656 


645 


519 


11 


1 


44.672 


275 


24,831 


1.295.381 


1,241.222 


1.139.661 


52.896 


126 



8 
105 



120 



169 
1,953 

696 
1,331 

154 
31 
1,449 
■ 409 
9.376 
2.864 
4 

36 



18,472 



14,891 
113.587 
42,813 
46.843 
19.637 

1.162 
80.956 
37,118 
235,298 
72,208 

6,589 
416 



721,518 



14.311 

107.416 

41,565 

45,840 

18,181 

1.130 

72.395 

36,155 

278,424 

69.314 

6,269 

409 



691.409 



11,099 

99,527 

37.953 

39,371 

18,044 

1,105 

74.085 

31.] 

231,388 

66,274 

6.309 

314 



617.298 



NEW 

578 

6,157 
1.235 

998 

1.447 

32 

7,663 

947 
6.745 
2.874 

320 
7 



29.003 



YORK 
3 



44 
3 
3 



49 

4 
9 
8 



1 
124 



* Includes four children under fourteen years of age employed in office. t Includes two children under fourteen yrars 

under fourteen years of age employed in office. SS Included in figures for total New York State. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



349 



BACH INDUSTRY, YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER M. 1911. 
Groops or daases. 



NVMBKR or EUPLOTXBS AT TllIB Or IlfSPBCnOM. 



Wkbklt Hours or Labob. 



Chil- 
dren 

under 
14 

yeus 
(in- 

shope 
ex- 
cept 
as 

noted). 



SHOP rOBCK. 



NUMBU or SHOP BMPMTBM 
WHO WORK — 



Total. 



NUMBBB IN SHOPS 
BMPLOmfG — 



1-1». 



20-199. 



200 +. 



BBX ANB AOB. 



Men 


Youths 


Boys 


Worn. 


(18 


(16-18 


(14-16 


(16yT8. 


y».+). 


yw.). 


y».). 


+). 



Girb 
(14-16 
y».). 



51 






houn 


62-57 


58-63 


or 


hours. 


houn. 


len. 







Over 

63 

hours. 



YORK STATE. 



30,163 


4.181 


18,542 


7.440 


27.791 


678 


169 


1.485 


60 


4.829 


12.686 


11,967 


781 




262.833 


27,129 


88.042 


147.662 


244.302 


4.133 


803 


13.346 


260 


16.830 


135.116 


102,064 


8.824 


t6 


74.888 


13,081 


44.286 


17.621 


67.820 


1,617 


647 


4.685 


119 


8.663 


28.091 


37,696 


436 


3 


70,991 


13.306 


31.608 


25.987 


46.016 


1.242 


627 


22.426 


750 


4.782 


36,747 


29,328 


134 


2 


33.299 


4.206 


13.075 


15.989 


24.661 


522 


116 


7,763 


207 


4.067 


17.370 


10,485 


1,367 




13.734 


90S 


7.163 


5.663 


13.081 


19 


4 


621 


9 


3.253 


1.032 


3,341 


6.108 




91,070 


17.617 


47.11? 


26.341 


59.558 


1,795 


673 


28.066 


988 


48.966 


32.762 


8.998 


354 


t6 


106,148 


6.130 


33.218 


66,800 


45.705 


1.592 


647 


55,636 


1,560 


3.949 


37,658 


63.340 


201 


4 


289,022 


68,188 


163.672 


57.182 


128,193 


1,149 


513 


156,098 


3,069 


77,904 


154,692 


55,823 


603 


24 


106,296 


23.931 


39.584 


37,780 


72.528 


732 


234 


32.016 


735 


14,665 


36.545 


51,076 


5.009 


t22 


8,844 


2.240 


3,394 


3.210 


8.838 


5 


1 






1.016 


2,643 


2,687 


2.56S 




508 


393 


115 




504 


3 




1 




332 


111 


66 












1.086,766 


186.309 


489,901 


410.555 


739.027 


13.487 


4.374 


322.131 


7.746 


189.276 


494,342 


376,772 


26,375 


§67 



CITY.H 
10.621 

93.370 

36.718 

38.373 

16.697 

1.073 

66,422 

30.882 

224.643 

63.400 

5.989 
307 



588.296 



2.623 


6.024 


1.874 


18.182 


40,318 


34.870 


7.516 


20,566 


8.636 


10.723 


18,163 


9.497 


2.770 


8.242 


5.586 


302 


46S 


303 


12.580 


33.448 


20.394 


5.309 


14.227 


11.346 


67.154 


138.872 


28,617 


16.641 


22,229 


24,530 


802 


2.214 


2,973 


287 


20 




134.889 


304.781 


148.625 



9.550 


163 


43 


736 


29 


3,659 


4.619 


84,493 


1,988 


342 


6.404 


143 


13,045 


59,169 


33,064 


631 


341 


2,603 


79 


6.592 


20.238 


25.651 


389 


196 


11,713 


424 


3.957 


26,737 


11.522 


180 


71 


4,699 


125 


3.561 


8.317 


854 


1 


3 


212 


3 


51 


122 


44,141 


1,114 


366 


20,202 


599 


37.094 


26.206 


12,349 


396 


209 


17.199 


729 


2.465 


22.225 


107,531 


638 


345 


113,725 


2.354 


71.662 


119,344 


42,531 


306 


63 


20,103 


397 


9.607 


28,515 


5.984 


4 


1 






916 


1,911 


303 


3 





1 


. 


203 


86 


378,023 


6,813 


1,980 


197,697 


4.8S2 


161.702 


317,388 



2,443 






20,166 


990 


t5 


10,820 


68 




7,660 


19 


2 


4,367 


362 




900 






3,123 




t6 


6,191 


1 


3 


33,084 


563 


20 


23,913 


1,365 


11 


1.936 


1.226 




18 








. 




114,621 


4,531 


•46 



of Age employed in office. t Includes one child under fourteen yean of age employed in office. 



S Includes five children 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



350 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XVI.— Stetisdes of Factories Inspected In Each 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labgbst 
nuubbr of 

EuPLOrBBS 
IN YraR. 




Industbt akd Localitt. 


OHAND 
TOTAL. 


omcB 

FORCE. 


[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified*.] 


Total. 


Thereof 
in shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
a«e. 



1. Stonb 

a. Crushed stone . 



b. Cut stone 

Buffalo 

New York City. 



c. Hones, slates, mosaics, etc 

2. MlBCELLANSOUS MlXERAL PRODUCTS. 



a. Asbestos, graphite, etc . 

New York City 

Niagara Falls. 



b. Abrasives 

Niagara Falls. 



3. Lime, Cement and Plaster . 



a. Asphalt 

New York City. 

b. Cement and lime. , 

AUen 

Cementon 

Greenpori 

Hudson 



c. Plaster (wall and land) . 

New York City 

Oakfield 



d. Sifted sand and mortar . 



Artificial stone . . . . 
New York CUy. 



f. Piaster and composition casts and 

ornaments 

New York City 



4. Brick. Tile and PorrERY. 



a. Building brick . . . 
East Kingston. 

Haverstraw 

Kingston 

Roseton 



b. Terra cotta and fire-clay products 

Coming 

New York City 



c. Pottery products . 

Buffalo 

New York CUy. 
Syracuse 



275', 



28;. 

2371. 

6\. 
IW . 

10 

45 



35 

IS 

S 

10 
179 



17 

7 

22 

l\. 

l\. 
^1 

35! . 



61 
212 



134 

6 

26 

6 

4 

51 

1 
£8 

27 

£0] 



87 6,698 



395 

6,171 

44£ 
4,814 

132 

2.791 



. I. 

6.470 



1,702 
944 
£72 



864 
4.928 



28 



14 



660 

£64 

1,588 
210 
£30 
301 
£30 

1,460 

727 
£03 

46 

354 

£08 



820 
706 

13,977 



10,379 

667 

1,669 

666 

1,£13 

1,942 

202 
1,196 

1.656 
359 
626 
651 



393 

5,947 

429 
4,633 

130 

2,616 



1.637 

903 
262 

979 
771 

4,784 



621 
263 

1,571 

210 
230 
295 
230 

1,422 
717 
193 

45 

342 
203 



783 
676 



13,829 



STONE, 
4,271 



381 

3,776 

173 

2,800 

114 

2.539 



1,499 
766 
263 

1,040 
828 



10.348 
667 

1,668 
666 

1,208 

1,861 

200 

1,137 

1,620 

354 
618 
642 



560 
226 

1,530 
210 
230 
301 
230 

1,305 
627 
203 

43 

292 
187 



632 
624 

12.181 



CLAY AND 
226| 



8,941 
4S9 

1,467 
643 
978 

1,7321 

1621 

1,093\ 

1.508i 
345 \ 
462^ 
60l\ 



222] 

11 
181 

2 

175 



65 
41 
10 

110 
93 

144 



144 



29 



* Including all localities represented in the industry at any time during the year by 1.003 employees or by 
employees being omitted. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Burkau of Factory I^spkction, 1911. 



351 



ladnatrj. Tear Ended Sepiember SO, 1911 — Conllnaed. 



Number of Emplotsbs at Time of Inspection. 


Weekly Hours of Labor. 


ChU- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EM- 
PLOYEES WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOTINO 


SEX AND AQE. 


61 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-57 
hrs. 


6»-63 
hrs. 


Over 
63 
hrs. 


(in 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 

+. 


Men 

(18 
yrs. 
+). 


Youths 
(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 
(14- 
16 

yrs.). 


cept 

act 

not'd). 


GLASS 
4.045 


PRODUCTS. 

1,403: 2,3101 332! 3.974 


16 


3 


51j 1 2,738f 5331 774 






















379 


164| 215 

1,150| 2,072 

36\ 1£7 
779\ 1,608 

89 23 

223 893 




332 
"SS£ 

1,248 


376 

3.488 

111 
£,606 

110 

2.059 


2 

13 

£ 
10 

1 

72 


1 

2 

/ 

4 


1 


17 
2.704 


13 

455 
136 


349 
395 






3,554 


50 1 






16£ 


48 1\ £6 






£,619 


2 

1 
11 


£,317 
17 
22 


£33' 69 






112 


65 
342 


30 
1.971 






2,364 


229 




29 




1.434 
716 


181 1 706 

8£^ 86 


547 
647 

701 
701 

1,435 


1,188 
668 
£63 

871 

684 

4.142 


53 

SO 


3 


190 
96 




21 
6 


342 
1£6 


1.042 

929 
736 

2,567 


29 




£63 


10 
42 

894 


£43 

187 
34 

1.889 






930 


19 

;* 

21 


1 


39 
39 

64 




1 








736 






4,218 


1 


395 


504 


752 




521 


123 398 
36 188 

75 473 


965 
£10 
£30 
£96 
£30 

470 
470 


521 

££4 

1.513 

£10 
£30 
£96 
£30 

1.229 
670 
193 

42 

280 
182 

557 

476 

11,008 










67 
39 


162 
139 

34 


192 

827 

10 

10 

£96 

230 

1.248 
617 
193 

42 


100 




££4 
1,613 






















652 

£00 




£10 
















£30 



















££0\ 


£96 
















1 


£30 










1 






1 


1,267 


146 


A*;! 


18 
18 




20 






19 




617 


"1 ','A 


£0 








193 










42 


42 


















280 


168 
60 

350 
3£4 

456 


122 
1££ 

246 
170 

8,802 


2,779 










32 
13 

296 


116 


1.^2 






18£ 










78\ 91 

1 
1731 126 






595 


339 


78 


34 

14 

580 


1 
1 

32 






494 
12,037 


£96 16A> A£ 






547 


5.682I 5,808 










8,912 
439 

1*466 
643 
974 

1 053 


166 

18 

174 

"' 109 

117 

si 

18 


7,303 

439 

1,448 

643 

£14 

954 


1,444 
"760 


8.608 
418 

1,389 
617 
96£ 

1.500 
160 
884 

900 
163 
£80 
gfii 


253 
16 
6£ 

i? 

6 


51 

6 

16 

10 

5 

1 






244 

6 

16 

10 

6 

144 


3,671 5,097 

jiBA 






■ 












1,461 

"969 

1,116 
160 
836 












633 














141 


5 


393 






160 


160\ 

40£ 6 £6 

5451 810 

336 

371 

171 








1 036 


s 

80 
33 
11 
34 
engaged 


1 

26 

10 

£ 

13 

in that 


141 

439 
13£ 
160 
161 


oi 141 

27' 159 

1£, £2 

11 119 

5' 16 


69 






1.472 
340 
464 
492 

five per 


995 318 






318 
174 
176 








161 











cent or more of the employees 


ndustry in the state, all place. 


9 report 


ing un<j 


Ier200 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



352 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Table XYI.— SCatisCies ef Fkctories InapecCed la Badi 





Places 
in- 


Num- 
ber of 
estab- 

lish- 
ments 

with 
no em- 
ployees. 


Nunf- 
berof 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labqbst 
Number of 

ElfPLOTEES 
Df YbAB. 




Industbt and Locality. 


OBAND 
TOTAL. 


omcE 

FOBCB. 


industry are specified.] 


Total. 


Thereof 
in shop. 


Total. 


Theie- 

of 
14-16 

age. 



6. Glass. 



Building glass 

New York City. 



b. Beveled glass and mirrors . 

Buffalo 

New York City 



Pressed, blown and cut glassware. 

Coming 

New YorkCUy 



d. Bottles and jars. . . 

Lockport 

New York CUy. 

Olean 

Rocketer 



Total — Group I . 



2401. 



50 . 

55' 

6 

47 

104 

8 
79 

22 

/ 
12 
2 

1 



951 



go 



9.330 



1.422 
1,335 

1.616 

StA 

l,2lt 



43 4.766 

/ 9,086 

34 t,168 



1.535 

tos 

302 

m 

973 



275 37.733 36,641 



I. STONE. CLAY AND 
8.042 7.806 307 



1,320 
l,t35 

1,473 

263 

1,136 

4.653 
9,033 
t,ll3 

1,496 
200 
291 
267 
270 



1.040 
966 

1.456 

312 

1,079 

3.039 
1,827 
1,663 

1.461 
199 

284 
277 
273 



31.240 



102 
100 

143 

61 
76 

113 
63 
65 

30 

3 

11 

10 

3 



1.086 



1. Gold. Silver and Precious Stones. . 



Silver and plated ware . 

East Syracuse 

Mount Vernon 

New York City 

Niaifara Falls 

Sag Harbor 



b. Gold and silver refining (New 
York CUy) 



c. Gold, silver and aluminum leaf . 
New York City 



d. Gold and silver watch cases. 

New York CUy 

Sag Harbor 



Jewelry, gold pens, etc . 

Buffalo 

New York City 



f . Lapidary work ( A>tr York City) . 
Copper. Lead. Zinc. Etc 



Smelting and refining . 

Buffalo 

Massena 

New York City 

Niagara Falls 

Syracuse 



b. Copper work 

New York CUy. 
Rome 



805 



135 

/ 
3 
119 
2 
1 



24 

18 

25 

24 

1 

573 

20\. 
6411 

371, 
I.247I 



461. 

5'. 



670 15.1101 



111 
3 



400 

9 

486 

28 

529 



17 



II. METALS. MACHINES 
14.272 13.1821 830 1 



6.184 
326 

285 
2,287 
1,631 

271 



88 

330 
266 

073 
385 
688 

7.860 

616 

7,293 

675 

45.842 



l\ 




29\ 


8 


7! 


6 


2 


2 


43 


14 


35 


13 


4 





4.666 

628 

716 

1,704 

1,267 

236 

1,093 

468 
608 



5.008 

310 

277 

2,191 

1,699 

267 



81 

310 

246 

883 
350 
633 

7.330 

466 

6,821 



44.221 



4.180 

243 

166 

1,849 

1,342 

199 



87 



241 

831 
366 
476 

7.130 

480 

6,607 



30.081 



172 
16 
8 
96 
29 
14 



18 

17 

00 
35 
66 

528 

60^ 

470\ 

15 

1,616 



4.554 


3.700 


625 


496 


700 


696 


1,644 


1.465 


1,249 


1,082 


230 


62 


1.043 


1.047 


463 


422 


673 


608 



112 

3 

16 

60 

18 

6 



60 

16 

36 

♦ Employed 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bueeatt op Factory Inspection, 1911. 



353 



', Yev Efeided September M, 1911 • Contfaned. 



NuifBBB OF EmPLOTBBS 


AT Time of Inspection. 






Weekly Hours op Labor. 


CWl- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
nofd). 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBER OF SHOP EM- 
PliOTBBS WHO WORK — 




NUMBER IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINQ — 


sex and aqb. 


51 

hours 

or 

less. 


52-57 
hrs. 


58-63 
hrs. 


Over 

63 

•hrs. 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 


Men 
(18 


Youtha 
(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boys 

(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.) 



GLASS 

7,499 


PRODUCTS — 

1 205 4 fUAl 


Concluded. 
1 646 R n08 


230 


74 


671 


16 


1.127 5.R2.'i 


847 








-, , 
















938 


312 

249 

319 

4 
313 

510 


626' 
606 

994 

247\ 
690^^ 

1 040 


1,376 


846 
766 

1,263 

249 
966 

.^.244 


9 

7 

14 

12 

106 
43 
39 

101 

f 

61 
18 


4 
4 

7 


76 
76 

28 


3 
3 

1 


266 
260 

66 


522 
466 

1.047 
160 


150 
160 

200 
91 
62 

496 

83 

176 

1 






866 






1,313 






261 






1,003 


7 

■ 32 

2 

24 

31 

2 

3 

17 

2 


28 
432 

85 

Ye 


12 
8 


66 


Jift& 






3,826 


237 3-093 






1.774 
1,608 


8 390\ 
436 1,1721 

64 1 nft8 


/ , 376 1 ^^f* 


2 

174 

658 
2 

122 
37 


1,689 
1,269 

863 
194 
160 
230 






270 

"Wo 


1,3U 

1,266 
180 
262 
199 
260 






1 422 






196 


« 


196 
211 
267 






273 


1 






267 






270 






270 
































30.163 


4,181 18.542 


7,440 


27,791 


678 


159 


1.485 


60 

II ■ 


4.829.12,586 


11,967 


78li 

= = 1-^ 



in office. 



AND O 

12,302 


onveyances 

4.037 5.548 


2.717|10,452 


326 


78 


1.420 


26 


1.667 


8.621 


2.014 




*i 


4,008 
228 


647j 1,820 


1,5411 3,303 
228\ 172 

130 

1,628 

1,313\ 916 

1 '^ 


128 

6 

5 

34 

67 

9 


25 

6 

11 

3 

6 


648 

46 
22 
80 
324 
22 

14 

96 
63 

79 
12 
67 

677 

62 

614 

« 
3.822 


4 



.WW. 

4 

1 

5 

5 

16 

3 

13 

126 


2L3 

6 

66 

129 

7 

6 

4 

84 
83 

42 
SO 
12 

806 

13 
780 

518 

3.583 


2,652 

""91 
1,254 
1,306 

74 

84 
35 

142 

142 

5,613 

362 
6,224 

56 

17,645 


1.143 
223 










167 


/7| 140 
617 \ 1.1.^ 






1,76S 


370 






1,313 










186 


60 
164 


186 
20 

124 


179 

2 

120 

106 

557 
149 
408 

192 

66 

133 






80 






288 


420 


185 
165 

631 
nor 


6 
6 

17 

17 

175 

16 

167 

816 


1 

9 

2 
7 

40 
. 12 

27 

3 
225 






224 
741 


100. 124 

112 209 
112 209 










321 






4iO 

6.611 

430 

6,137 

674 


M] S2A 







2,880 2.976 

96 334 

2,740 2,641 

174 400 

5.788 13.645 


...'^ 


5.703 




*i 


766\ 6,SM 

[ 565 

18,932133,376 




*i 


38.365 




16.783 


354 


2 


3 678 


187 ft.'l.T 


2,556! A.M8 


7 
2 


2 


21 




65 


898 


2.715 

492 






492 

680 


13 




479 

680 

1,003 

494 

503 
""6Q3 


490 

680 

1,385 

1,060 

43 

923 
400 
606 















680 
97 

170 
39 

195 

179 






1,406 

1.0S4 

46" 

997 

407^ 
573 


104 

19 

5 

161 

143 
4 


298 

661 

41 

330 

264 

66 


1 
4 

10 
3 

7 





19 




58 
4 
2 

152 

14S 

7 


1,250 

690 

5 

650 

83 

666 








1 

7 
2 
6 


2 

56 

2 

6S 


2 
£ 




I 


1 


: 1....:: 



12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



354 



Xew Yoek State Depaktment of Labor. 



Table XVL— Stattotlca of F^actoriea laspectod In Each 





Places 

in- 
spwt- 

ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Largest 

NUMBBR OP 

Emplotcbs 
IN Ykar. 




Indubtrt and LocALmr. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


OFFICE 
FORCE. 


(Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 


Total. 


Thereof 
in shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
ace. 



2. 


Coffer, Lead. Zinc, Etc. — Conehidtd. 
c. Brass, bronse and aluminum caat- 
insB 


89 

1 

19 

49 

9 

95 

84 

258 

219 

9 

465 




48 


I 

2.526 
987 

1,263 
217 

3,954 

9,781 

10,423 
6,964 
1,462 

17,031 

1,960 

982 

10,477 
1,196 

6.149 

4,869 

463 

129.450 


I. META 

2.453 
981 
292 

1,226 
210 

8.761 
9,689 

10,137 
6,768 
l,4U 

16.330 

10,119 
1,104 

5.943 

4,718 
431 

123.581 


LS. MACHINES 

1.972 73 
979 6 
192 16 
899 27 
197 7 

3.717 193 
9,646 192 

9,247 285 

6,964 186 
1,429 18 

14,753 700 

1,604 66 

776 96 

9,188 964 

1,196 91 

5.455 203 

4,964 198 

468 99 

111.457 5,856 


3 AND 




Binffhatnton 






Buffalo 




6 

24 






New York City 






Rochester 






d. Gas and electric«fizturea 




27 
99 

117 

110 






New York City 






e. Brass and bronae ware not else- 
where classified 






New York City 






Rome 






f. Sheet metal work 




160 
18 






Buffalo 


48"'" 






Jatneetomi 


2 

907 

94 

251 
196 








New York City 




"i 

136 

109 

6 

955 












g. Metal goods not elsewhere classified 
New YorkCUy 






Rochester 


12 




3. 


Ibom and Steel Pboductb 


2,227 




43 




a. Ore crushing, etc ^ 






9 

7 
2 

1 

98 

1 
48 

78 
8 
1 

60 

136 
66 
12 

1 
6 
4 

61 
/ 

/ 
1 
9 
91 
1 
3 

127 
16 
66 






391 

1.776 
962 
981 

19.424 
8,060 

2,767 
1,226 

4,798 
829 
779 

2,709 

4,831 
716 

^t 

3,649 
264 
288 
224 
213 
603 
330 

1.047 

2,743 
268 
761 


372 

1.757 
960 
976 

18.939 

8,000 
2,6U 
1,216 

4,472 
826 
700 

2,489 

4,634 

700 
476 
264 

3.580 
260 
284 
219 
200 
699 
924 

1,033 

2.673 
267 
747 


341 

1,601 
969 
906 

14,750 

l^f 

1,919 

3,891 
810 
697 

9,190 

4,184 
1,996 
966 
463 
464 
978 

3,548 
926 
288 
224 
213 
689 
919 

1,047 

2,456 
299 
696 


19 
19 

J 

60 

119 

11 

326 

9 

79 

990 

197 






b. Pi« iron 










Buffalo 
















c. RoUmg mills and steel works 

Lackatoanna 




31 


6 




New York City 




16 


.6 




Troy 






d. Bridges and structural iron 

Buffalo 




16 
6 






Elmira Heights 






New York City 




7 

44 

• 21 

2 






g. Hardware not elsewhere classified. 
New York City 






Rodteeter 






Sherrill 


16 




Syracuse 




8 


90 . . 




Watervliet 


/-f . . . ! ! : 

69 




h. Cutlery 




35 




Camillus 


4 
4 






EUenville 










FranklintiUe 






6 
19 
10 

6 
14 

68 
i 






lAtOe Valley 










New York CUy 




16 






Perry 






Walden 




2 

81 






i. Tools and dies 






Buffalo 


9 

49 






New York CUy 


14'.'/.'.'.: 



t Includes one child under 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspectio::^, 1911. 



355 



Indofltry. Yew Ended September SO, 1911 — ContiiiBed. 



NUMBEB or EmPLOTBSS at TncX of iNtPSCTZON. 




ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
yeara 

(iB I 
shops 

ez 
oeptl 

as I 
nol'd). 



SHOP FOBCB. 



NUMBBR OF SHOP BU- 
PLOYBBS WHO WOBK — 



Total. 



NUMBBB IN SHOPS 
BUPLOriNO — 




8BX AND AGS. 




61 
hours 

or 
less. 


62-57 
hrs. 


58-63 
hrs. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 

+. 


Men 
(18 


Youths 
(16-18 

yrs.). 


Boys 
(14-16 

>T8.). 


Won). 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



Over 
63 
bra. 



CONVi 

1.899 
373 


:yance 

476 


8 — Coi 

736 


rUinwd, 

688 
373 

'316 

1,234 
1,234 

4,167 
2,187 
1,380 

8,022 
Oil 

4,760 
672 

1,762 

1,402 
360 

56, 136 


1.832 
343 
177 
846 
ISO 

3,369 
3,206 

7,809 
4,063 
1,336 

11.810 
1,211 

687 
7,246 

077 

3.996 

3,264 

262 

100,492 


26 
12 


7 
4 


82 
13 


3 


169 
6 
2 

167 


960 
«J 
5/ 

130 

2,698 

3,966 


770 






177 


76 

293 

4 

361 
306 

1.146 
1,066 

2,272 

260 

"iVskh 

183 
1,183 

9,662 


101 
264 
126 

1.929 
1,813 

3,649 

2,626 

31 

3,769 

278 

26 

2,670 
280 

2,307 
1,830 

39,903 






872 


11 


2 


11 


2 






130 






3.524 
3,363 

8.962 
6,760 
1,411 

14.063 

1,440 

739 


77 
70 

192 

149 
6 

344 

.1 

207 
11 

161 

127 

12 

1,603 


21 
16 

29 

24 

96 

63 
48 
10 

307 


61 
66 

919 

633 

70 

1,766 
146 


6 
6 

13 

10 


171 
163 

467 
466 


766 

616 

4.626 
f./i5 

6.517 
1,076 










4 

4 


1 
/ 


38 

7 


2,090 

200 

2 

1,621 
160 

469 

418 

19 

6,708 


6.446 
174 
737 

4,306 
484 

2,682 

2,001 

393 

46,666 




1 






8,824 

uou 

5,252 

4,126 

426 

106.601 


1,292 
63 

969 
638 
147 

3.148 


31 
64 

61 


2,908 
400 

1.861 

1,367 

14 

48.947 




/ 


360 
360 




6.391 


t2 


322 


18 


304 
431 


1,161 
060 
201 

11,666 
4,423 

1,486 
330 
618 
637 

1.026 

366 
232 

2.236 
222 

284 
210 

"266 
307 
038 


322 

1,682 
060 
201 

13,793 
4,386 
2,100 
1,201 

3.522 
786 
618 

1,801 

3.661 

1,060 

230 

863 
246 

2,847 
191 

If. 

184 
302 
266 
876 

2,266 
214 
601 












26 


276 

860 
660 


20 

732 
300 
201 

4.636 
4.55tf 




1 682 














'960 
201 

14,266 

2,208 
1,201 

3,666 
807 
618 

1,910 

8.987 

1,232 

262 

438 

Ui 

3.479 
222 


































308 


2,391 


234 
37 
66 


20 


218 




198 


2,362 

37 

1,264 

2,600 

618 
1,624 

1.789 

213 
679 

822 
118 
286 


7.069 
'"755 

802 
630 




212 
8 

403 
16 


1,032 

1,677 
461 


13 


21 




189 
6 

263 
7 








33 
16 


8 

7 


2 




















372 
620 


001 

2,442 
083 
200 


16 
99 

6 
12 

68 
7 
4 
6 


1 

66 

2 
3 
6 

19 

44 
2 

14 


2 

266 

116 

3 

22 

69 


7 
6 




266 

386 

272 

31 

6 


30 

1.812 
54i 
7W 






















Si 

209 


"64 
1,034 


400 
42 

2.706 

218 

101 

82 

304 

1,009 

1.350 
104 
147 








19 

94 
2 

19 

1 






601 
22 
21 

.61 
16 

179 
29 

107 

69 

10 

3 


19 

6 

1 










284 
219 














200 

679 

307 

1,033 

2,388 
232 
622 


""i'28 


200 
186 






2 

10 
26 

46 

6 

14 


4 

2 

U 

8 
3 
4 


f 

10 


24 

213 

7 
190 










481 

71 

266 


06 

1,907 
161 
366 






3 
5 





jrears of age employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



356 



New Yobk State Depaetment of Labob. 



TUrfe ZVL— Stettotics of Aictorles Ingpactod In 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
eeub- 

Uah- 
ments 

with 
no em- 
ployees. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labobst 
NuMBSB or 

EMPIX)TKn8 

m Ybab. 




Indubtbt AMD LocAurr. 


OBAMD 

TOTAl^ 


omcB 

rOBCB. 


[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.) 


Total. 


Thereof 
in shop. 


1 "^ 

Total 1*-^® 
^°*~- years 

of 

ace. 



8. IbOK AVD StEBL PBODUCTS^COfltfllMieci 

k. Fire arms 

Ili4m 

UHea 

m. Metal furniture 

Buffalo 

Jam^tioum 

Nfw York City 

Roche^or 

Rome 

Utica 

n. Wirework not dsewhere classified 

Buffalo 

Cortland 

New York City 

p. Car wheels and railway equipment 

Buffalo 

Depew 

Rocheeter 

Watertovm 

q. Architectural and ornamental iron 

work 

Mount Vernon 

New York City 

r. Cooking and heating apparatus 

Albanu 

Buffalo 

Eaetwood 

New York City 

Port Chester 

Utiea 

s. Typewriting and registering ma- 
chines 

Ilion 

New York City 

Syracuee 

t. Stationary engines, boilers, etc. . 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Oewego 

Seneca FaUe 

u. Machinery not elsewhere classified. 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Rocheeter 

Syracuee 

Yonkere 

V. Castings (iron foimdiy products) 

Buffalo 

CiAonie 

New York City 

Syracuee 

Troy 



II. METALS. MACHINES AND 



9 




7 


t 






1 






63 




19 


3 




/ 


fi 






56 




14 


f, 






1 






5 






166 




97 


11 




e 


t 






Its 




77 


33 




1 


e 






f 






s 






s 






184 




831 


f 






163 




7J| 


95 




14 


4 






9 






t 






40 




9 


ft 






4 






60 




12! 


t 






4£ 




4 


6 




7 


167 




61 


t8 




S 


U 




10 


4 




9 


f 






791 




386 


61 




5' 


4£9 




196 


61 




31 


18 




31 


'6 




' 


153 




68 


16 




3 


ff 






47 




10 


7 




13 


6 




1 



1.910 

1.047 

341 

4,250 
405 

1,681 
844 
338 
350 
334 

4.118 

B87 

1,261 

M,155 

7,497 
763 
t,336 
1,378 
1,986 



BIB 
3,070 

9,473 

716 
1,746 

7t0 
1*6B4 

799 

580 



6.636 
$,08B 
1,649 
t,671^ 

11.210 
3,130 
1,944' 

rrt 

992 



3,375 
12,769 
2,618 
2,772 
1,136, 

13.591 

2,2U 

1,077 

3.407, 

970 



1.804 
990 
318 

3.991 

371 
1,401 
804 
318 
350 
315 

4.020 

270 

1,248 

2,101 

7.088 
741 
2,336 
1,199 
1,201 



3.610, 

210\ 
2,963 

9.031 
673 

1,731 
710 

1,396 
678 
546 



6.394 
2,060 
1,466 
9,481 

10.544 

3,036 

1,816 

732\ 

88 1\ 

27.4771 
3,167 

11,909 

9.449 

2,669 

871. 

I3.I95I 

2,2S6\ 

1,054] 

3,267\ 

966\ 

677\ 



1.838 


106 




1,047 


57 




941 


93 


3,795 


259,' 


lH^ 


34\ 

190 


764 


40 




313 


90 




350 




334 


19 


3.648 


98 


947 


17 




1,938 


IS 




1,781 


C4 




5.806 


¥r7 




638 


19 




1,938 






1,347 


179 




984 


84 




3,030 


166 


910 


9 




9,411 


107 




8.863 


442 


1 


716 


4S 




1,594 


14 


719 


10 


1,319 


198 1 


799 


61 


680 


84 


6.241 


1 
2421 


9,089 


S9\ 


1,395 
9,599 


f^ 




10.354 


604 


4 


9,804 


96 




1,747 


198 


4 


666 


40 




999 


HI 




25,360 


1.905 


32 


5,079 


917 




11,191 


846 


99 


9,438 


169 




1,484 


109\ 


1,154 


•64 




11,751 


395 


1 


1,666 


8 




1,077 


93 




5,197 


160 1 


716 


16 


678 


91 





^Employed 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bubbau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



357 



ladmlrj. Taw Boded Sef«Miiber SO, 1911 — CMClaiMd. 



NUMBBB OF EmPLOTBBS AT TiMB OF iNaPBGTXON. 



Wbbklt Houbs of Labob. 



Chil- 
dren 
under, 

14 
years 

(in 
■hope 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



■hop fobcb. 



NUMBBB OF SHOP BU- 
PLOrkBS WHO WOBK — 



NUUBBB IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO — 



1-19. 



20- 

199. 



200 



■BX AND AOB. 



Men 
(18 



Youths 
(10-18 
yra.). 



Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 



Worn. 

(16 yrs. 

+). 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 




I 


hours 


62-67 


5S-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 







Over 
63 
hrs. 



CONVEYANCES — CotUinuei. 



i 4 
) 


420 


f 




I 291 
19 
10 

Boe 

16 
) 


1.369 

161 
SS8 
618 


7 

) 827 
} 69 
> 


Be 

1.498 
171 


; z 

r 

? 

r 

> 1 

1.007 

4 

919 

366 

S 

IS 


1,099 

1.656 

696 

36 

104 

1,814 
i[d3'6 

2,608 

970 
979 


tsi 


460 


260 


969 
1.300 


- 193 
10 

706 
16S 

ill 


i.iis 



4.137 

831 
1,096 

390 


3.664 
£,1S0 

16 

406 

It 

"'"196 
9 


9.832 

1,376 

9,466 

771 

646 

86 

6.503 
369 
190 

1,796 
491 
169 



1,308 1,( 
990 939 
318 310 



1.886 
901 
776 



978 
350 
989 

1.226 



1,996 



3.691 



1,909 

1,064 

899 



564 

904 
360 

6,467 
400 

1,995 
708 
610 
678 
987 



4.349 
9,060 

9,999 

4.847 

1,796 

389 

306 

831 

9,969 
1,969 
4,769 
1,988 
797 
769 

6.387 

1,196 

864 

1,185 

910 

479 



3.886 
313 

1,117 
617 
975 
350 
997 

2.910 

165 

1,166 

1,396 

5.366 

617 

1.936 

1,164 

900 



2.863 

904 

9,999 

8.240 
647 

1,477 
681 

1,140 
645 
643 



6,237 

1,697 
1,893 
9,009 

9.633 

9,688 

1,676 

615 

896 

22,215 
9,768 
9,491 
9,998 
1,351 
817 

11,163 

1,474 

1,047 

3,088 

635 

657 



10 



19 



19 

4 

19 

128 



31 
90 
99 
33 
9 



90 
17 
11 
69 

94 
95 
St 
10 
8 

600 

67 

4S5 



6 
90 



47 

11 

3 

30 

6 
1 
9 
9 



6 
9 

1 
1 

18 

9 
19 

1 

9 

44 
19 
90 

1 

9 

^1 
27| 

iK 

4\ 

6\ 



100 

4e 
1 

96 



525 

39 

66 

331 



90 



687 

334 

73 

947 

45 



45 

665 

14 
487 



117 

69 



117 
10 



189 
16 



10 166 



340 

63 

9 

9 



272 



966 

350 
4 
9 
1 

964 



552 
9 

643 
1 

125 
/ 

66 
1 
9 



11 2,357 

l\ 994 
9, 1,980 

..' 6 

..I 9 



2i9 

6 



58 



705 
97 
110 
980 
985 



1.286 

67 



1,196 

2.694 

177 

1,900 

1,089 



2.421 

904 

1,986 

2,371 

74 
495 



490 



2. 382 
394 
768 

1,903 

3.852 

343 

979 

65 



15.262 

659 

7,943 

9,883 

859 

870 



6.347 
880 

7\ I 

104] 8,713\ 

5\ 117\ 

40{ 69t\ 



1.671 






987 






318 






2,714 






334 






1,013 






348 












350 






314 






2,076 






148 






1,985 






436 






2.365 






386 

36 

104 

900 



















182 
4 




1 


63 

6.700 
695 

1,083 
701 
447 
678 




/ 






















6A5 






3.065 






1,714 













1,103 






5,713 






9,388 
674 










630 






879 






5,838 
1,909 


...... 


♦1 


*'$ 




♦/ 


1 191 














4,760 






731 






1,047 






997 






579 






98 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



358 



New York State Department of Labob. 



Table XYI.— Statlalles of FactorlM Inspected in Bach 





Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Labobst 
Number or 

EMPLOrEBS 

IN Ybab. 




Industbt and Locality. 


GRAND 
TOTAL. 


omcB 

POBCB. 


Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 


Total. 


Thereof 
in shop. 


Total. 


There- 
of 
14-16 

a«e. 



. Elbctbical Apparatus 

a. Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm 

apparatus 

New York City 

RocheHer 

b. Incandescent lamps {Nmo York 

cm 

0. Dynamos, motors, electrical sup- 
plies 

New York City 

Schenectady 

5. Vbhiclbs 

a. Carriages, wagons and sleighs. 

New York CUy 

Rochester 

Utica 

b. Blaoksmithing and wheelwrighting 

0. Cycles 

Angola 

d. Motor vehicles 

Buffalo 

New York City 

North Tarry town 

Syracuee 

e. Cars 

Buffalo 

Eaet Rochester 

f. Locomotives 

Dunkirk 

Schenectady 

g. Railway repair shops 

AUbany 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Clean 

Oneonta 

6. Boat and Shipbuildino 

Buffalo 

Kingston 

New York City 

7. Aobicultural Implements 

Auburn 

Batavia 

Buffalo 

Hoosick Falls 

Poughkeepsie 

Syracuse 



230 




64 


I 
20.010 


I. METALS. MACHIN:g 
23,024| 28,064 5.095 


AND 


40 

27 

3 

5 

185 

124 

2 

1.096 




8 
7 


4.002 

3,572 

747 

435 

23.682 

3,514 

16,280 

62,367 


3.604 

2,367 

686 

426 

10.894 

3,347 

12,915 

60,050 


4,736 

3,471 

747 

350 

22,069 

3,057 
16,252 

55,881 


1.29S 

1,205 

61 



3,783 

167 

3,365 












56 
38 






446 


2,323| 


447 

248 

17 

6 

18 

20 

/ 

453 

57 

6 

6 
3 

1 

3 

/ 
/ 

140 

4 

10 

/ 
03 




236 

178 

9 

2 



10 


7,232 

"i 

208 

447 

210 

10.016 

5,42S 
6,22^ 
1,900 
2,158 

3.567 

2,303 
1,020 

7.001 
3,600 
3,217 

23.096 
1,135 
3,932 
6,688 
1,072 
1,283 

7,140 


7.062 

2,882 

612 

375 

205 

435 
205 

18.812 

5,294 
6,843 
1,835 
1,799 

3.470 

2,264 

985 

6.569 
3,488 
2,901 

23.388 

1,107 
3,845 
6,427 
1,022 
1,250 

7,032 


6.203 

2,655 

622 

269 

207 

355 
155 

16.803 
6,120 
6,877 
1,179 
1,422 

3.567 

2,308 
1,020 

6.123 

2,742 
3,217 

22.618 

1,135 

3,857 

6,117 

987 

979 

5.274 


1701 

62^ 

'J!:::::: 

'1 

12 

6 




141 

16 
62 


1,010 

128^ 

375 

65\. . 




8 


88' 






^1 






35 

432 

112 
316 

60S 
28 
87 

161 
60 
33 

133 








2 






B 














































38 




5 
07 






389 

373 

5,350 

12.233 


384 

371 

6,226 

11.340 


389 
3,896 
10.622 


6 
2 

889 












27 
30 




4 
3 
11 
1 
3 
4 


i 


M,468 
1,478 
1,708 
1,335 
979 
925 


2,238 
1,435 
1,639 
1,267 
917 
836 


2,4H 

1,169 

1.408 

832 

976 

859 


230 
4S 

169 
68 
6» 
89 












4 












6 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



859 



laOuMtrj, Ymt Ended Septamber SO, 1911 ^Contiiraed. 



Number op Employees at Time op Inspection. 



Weekly Hours op Labor. 



Chi 

dr6n 

under 

14 
yean 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

a" 
not'd) • 



shop porcb. 



NUMBER OP SHOP EM- 
PLOYEES WHO WORK 



Total. 



NUMBER IN SHOPS 
EMPLOYING 



1-19. 



20- 
199. 



200 



SEX AND AGE. 



Men 
(18 
yti. 

+). 



Youths 


Boys 


(16-18 


(14-16 


yrs.). 


yrs.)- 



Worn. 

(16yre. 

+). 



Girls 

I (14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 




1 


loure 


52-67 


53-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 




1 
1 



Over 
63 
hrs. 



CONVE 
22.969 


YANCE 
1,011 


9 — Cot 
3.943 


Uinued. 
18,015,19,982 


221 


70 


2,681 


15 


1.403 


19.424 


2.142 






3.438 


187 

167 

14 

5 

819 
649 

4.695 


990 
620 

145 

2.808 

1,778 
99 

14,644 


2.261 2.747 

1,689 1,768 

672 671 

200 131 


84 


22 

18 


585 
443 
106 

213 

1,883 

273 

1,231 

253 




93 
82 


3.035 


310 






2,266 


2,1 19\ 65 






686 


688 








350 


6 

9 
4 


86 

1.224 
339 
789 

3,279 


69 

16.320 

1,956 

12,098 

26.830 


195 

1.637 
695 






19.181 


15,554 

66S 

12,788 

34,219 


17,104 
2,637 
11,625 

52.912 


137 
68 

375 


48 

8 

31 

18 






2,890 






12,887 






53.558 


20.372 


3.077 


1 


6.038 


2,201 

1,127 

131 

32 

77 

39 

2,021 

267 

1,166 


3,002 

1,051 

S4 

233 

127 

304 
150 

5.041 

658 

2,853 


835 
416 
420 



8,731 
4,167 
1,483 
I4II4 


5.932 

2,668 

602 

265 

204 

337 

160 

15,452 
4.810 
6,374 
1,114 
IJU 

3,416 

2,201 
985 

5,681 
2,620 
2,901 

21.840 

1,107 

3,746 

6,848 

937 

943 

5.103 


14 

7 

/ 




36 
14 
2 




670 
665 


2,976 


2.392 






2,693 


1,696\ 232 

692\ 13 
92 173 

44 146 

1 
49 1 292 






605 






266 










204 










14 
2 






343 


4 


2 











160 








150 

4.226 

799 
403 






15.793 
4,992 
6,602 
1,114 


245 

136 

87 


5 


86 
43 
36 




2,171 

6 

2,108 


8.836 
3,658 
2,974 
1,114 


560 

630 

17 


1 


1,166 


14 


220 


922 


12 

36 
36 










1,158 
2.260 






3.479 


230 


3,249 

2,264 
985 

5 531 





27 

27 






1,219 






2,264 






23 4\ 2.030 






986 










985 

5,092 
2,630 
2,462 








5,691 




160 




10 
10 








422 




160 


17 




2,630 




2,630 
2,901 

15.873 










2,901 












422 




17 
2.500 




22.010 


357 
21 

99 


5.780 


66 




104 




8,614 10.896 
l,066i 41 
1,738 1.062 




1,107 


«0, 1,066 

490\ 3,280 

1,763^ 4,094 

2l\ 916 








3,770 













970 
619 




6,966 




100 






2,029 


3,308 
937 

419 




937 








946 




946 
.^044 


3 
30 










649 
4.449 


297 




5.136 


433 


1.659 


1 


2 




268 












384 

241 

3,772 


26 

""k'lk 

228 


126\ 233 

24r - 


384 

234 

3,768 

9,535 












384 








6 
12 

97 


1 
9 






/ 
266 

25 


240 








1,038 
3,427 


2,622 
6.078 


2 
91 


1 


3,606 
2.357 


2 

7.351 






9.733 












2,224 


13 


224 
146 
374 


2,000 
970 
862 


2,195 

1,049 

1,189 

764 

911 

749 


13 
18 
41 


/ 
2 
2 


16 

47 

6 


1 


/ 
2 

3 


70 


2.163 






1,116 


ioo\ 1,014 

34\ 1.202 






1,239 






764 
9U 




764 
R77 




764 

S7 








37 


3 
18 










877 






770 


166\ 616 


3 






3 


6121 166 




•••••• 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



860 



'N'EW York State Department of Labor. 



Tabto XVL— StelistfM of FMtorles iMpertai ia Eftcii 



IXDUBTBY AMD LOCAUTT. 

[Osly the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 



Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



Labobst 
Number or 
Emplotbbs 

m YvAR. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



ORAKD 
TOTAL. 



OFFICB 

roacB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 



8. Inbtbxtmbnts and Appuancbs , 

a. Professional and scientific iastru 

ments 

New York CUy 

RodiCMter 

Troy 

b. Optical and photographic appa- 

ratus 

Geneva 

New York CUy 

Rochester 

0. Lamps, reflectors, sterecqptioons.eto. 

New York CUy 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

d. Clocks and time recorders 

EndicoU 

New York CUy , 

e. Scales, meters, phonographs, etc. 

Albany 

Binghamton 

New Rochelle 

New York CUy 

9. SoRTiKG Old Mbtala 

Total — Group II 

1. Saw Mill Products 

New York CUy 

2. Planinq Mill PRODucrra 

a. House trim 

Buffalo 

New York CUy 

Rochester 

b. Packinjs boxes, crates, etc 

Elmira 

New York CUy 

North Tonawanda 

Oswego 

Rochester 

c. Cigar and fancy wood boxes . . . 

New York CUy 

3. Coopbraqb 

New York CUy 

4. Wood. Turnkd and Carved 

a. Canes, umbrella sticks, etc 

New York CUy 



281 



93 
3 

64 
12 

61 

49 

6 

1 

15 

1 

10 

61 
/ 

39\. 
33 . 



6.109 . 



II. METALS, MACHINES AND 
100! 17.1801 16.157 15.865 1.022 



24| 2.6291 

16 1,663, 

/. 628] 

«' H5 



43 



38 



2,420 

1,62^ 

4S3 

228 



5,771 5,338 5.704 

637 613 637 

854' 783 789 

4,076i 3,755\ 4,076 



2.517 

1,668 

523 

245 



19 



2.866 



3.631 8.483 

2,474\ 2,350 

638] 524 

355^ 349 



1.815 

33e\ 

1,323^ 

3. 3311 

276 

379 

230 

2,133 

392 



318,738 



1.770 

319 

1,303 

3.149 

233] 

343\ 
1791 

2,032\ 

386 



203 . 

140 . 
45 . 
17 . 



2.803 

1,8^7 
4S5 
235 

1,753 
3S3 

1,233 
I 

3.0S2 
273 
289 
233 

1,999 

I 

332 



432 

*4 . 
73 . 
321 

151 

124 

12 

6 

45 
17 
17 

185 

10 

33 

21 
101 



6 



300.8421 280.603 17.775 



46 



86 




28 


1.100 


1.078 


969 


III. 
22 


WOOD 


f4 
949 




10 
876 


396 
25,564 


376 334 
24.653 22.518 


20 
910 


I 


705 
30 

193 
S3 

158 
2 

70 
4 

1 
4 

86 
63 

118 




268 

7 

62 

8 

56 


18.716 
2,063 
6,378 
1.41B 

4.872 

245 
1,541 
298 
229 
345 

2.476 
2,058 

2.551 


17.979 
1,953 
6,161 
1,362 

4.252 
231 

1,485 
288 
225 
326 

2.422 

2,007 

2.524 


16.198 
1,828 
6,300 
1,253 

3.976 
245 

1,482 
266 
189 
345 

2.344 

1,966 

2.370 


736 

no 

217 
60 

120 
14 
66 
10 
4 
19 

54 
61 

27 






20 
















•••••• 


52 

36 

44 


1 
1 


863 


4 


21 
229 


1,272 
6.352 


l,2e7\ 1,211 
5.180 4.765 


6 
172 




'^ 


3 
3 


26 
26 


478 
474 


462 

458 


427 
423 


16 
16 





t Includes two children under 1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



361 



inAurtn 
















NuMBSR or Emplotbu at Timb or Inbfbction. 


Wbbklt Hours or Labor. 


ChU- 


8HOP rORCB. 


NtTMBBR OP SHOP BM- 
PLOYBBS WHO WORK — 


dren 

under 

14 




inTMBBB IN SHOPS 
EMPLOTINO — 


BBX AND AOB. 


51 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-57 
hrs. 


5S-63 
hn. 


Over 
63 
hrs. 


years 

(in 
shops 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 

199. 


200 


Men 

(18 

?5: 


Youthi 
(1&-18 
yrs.). 


Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


ex- 
cept 
as 
nofd). 



OONVE 
14.843 


YANCES — ConciMderf. 

1,185 5-1371 8 fJ21ll2 17QI 


669 


95 


1.879 


31 


892 10 lii.^ 


3.798 


















— , — 






2.308 


264 

190 

19 

23 

433 

16 

"% 

246 

200 

29 


779 
612 

1.142 

124 
120 
673 

1,260 
936 


1.265 
620 
440 
206 

3 697 


1,822 
i,tt4 

310 
228 

^ Q9A 


56 


27 

13 

9 


386 
160 
136 


17 

/ 
13 


132 

101 

22 


1.804 

1,908 

461 


372 

13 














228 

533 

608 




6.272 

613 


276 
8 
3 

267 

105 

63 

34 

8 

169 


48 
3 

2 
41 

6 
6 


998 

lis 

96 
764 

137 

84 


14 
2 


222 

6 

162 

63 

127 

106 
19 


4,517 

""664 
3,702 

1,634 

1,321 

46 

259 

113 






'37S\ ^'S87 
260 6ifi 






716 






3,766 

2.652 
/ 7t3 


S,074 

1.146 
687 
300 
269 

1.397 

319 

1,078 

1.016 
266 


2,681 

2,404 

1,670 
439 
208 

1,260 
316 
824 

2.767 
220 
266 
167 

1,830 

271 








8»1 

296 
409 










473 






260 


6 


4S 

290 

4 

286 

68 
36 








1,714 
319 


41 


276 




337 

319 
16 

74 


1.261 










1,276 


26 
201 


171 
1,680 


164 

63 
10 


/ 
9 


81 

2.08) 
266 
175 
164 

1,385 

81 


1,179 
738 






2.897 
266 











266 


32 

108 

190 


266 






1 *' 






179 


147^ 






"" 12 
20 

49 




16 
69 

5 






1,898 


1,040 
136 


760 


39 
6 


9 


1 454 
1 238 




326 


2 




262.833 


27.129 

! 


88.042 147. 662 '244. 302 


4.133 


803 


13.3451 260 


16.830 


135.115' 102,0«4J 8.824 


to 



MANUI 
947 


^ACTUR 
460 


Ea 

487 




929 


7 


4 


7 




19 


95 


828 


5 




SI4 
21,608 


87 
4,462 


227 

13.943 


3,203 


312 
19,666 


2 

480 








7 
4.328 


79 
5.364 


11.789 


5 
127 




118 


1.320 


34 


3 


15,462 

1,718 


3,263 

91 

966 

127 

731 

""'29'9 
16 

6 

468 
380 

566 


9,774 
910 

3,277 
1,066 

2.923 
29 

1,107 
230 
186 
320 

1.246 
969 

1.007 


2,425|l5,143 
717 1,608 
860] 6,026 

1 1J17 


276 
100 
49 

176 
18 
33 
29 
36 
11 

29 
23 

162 


27 

e 

8 
1 

61 

/ 

9 

10 


17 
4 
1 
6 

399 
96 

1 


4 
1 


4.168 

1,893 
466 

84 
10 


3.647 

289 

1,041 

692 

640 

""446 


7,540 

l,A2o 

2,086 

36 

3,112 

227 
938 
230 
185 
191 

1.137 
936 

1.722 


107 


1 


6,083 
1,193 


5J 




3,866 
231 


202 
202 

:::::: 

676 
676 

770 


3.216 
116 

1,363 
207 
160 
291 

1,297 
1,181 

2.162 


20 


2 


■« 








• ; ; ; ; 













326 

2,290 
1,916 

2.343 


4 
19 


20 

904 
664 


30 


4 

76 
63 

167 


131 

1.077 
916 

464 


;;;;■; 











1 206 


223 
1.606 


213 
2,643 


770 
266 


1,079 
4,088 


126 
92 


2 
33 






31 


«7/ 901 






4.693 


370 


10 


1 ""'1 "' 
4251 1,615 2.553 










411 


172 

168 


239 

239 


1 


395 

392 


11 

10 


2 

£ 


3 

3 




48* 106 257 
46\ 105. 257 






407 







years of ace employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



362 



New Yobk State Department of Labor. 

IWrie XVL— Statistics of Factories laspectMl In Each 



Indubtrt and Locautt. 

[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 



Places 

in- 
spect- 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



4. Wood Tubnkd and Carved— ConcJ'd. 

c. Wocden toys and novelties. 

Falconer 

New York City 

e. Other articles and appliances of 

wood.... 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Rochester 

6. FniKiTTmB and Cabinxt Work. .'. . 

a. Furniture and upholstery 

Buffalo 

JameUown 

New York City 

Rocheeter 

b. Caskets 

New York City 

Oneida 

Store, office and kitchen fixtures . 

Buffalo 

Herkimer 

New York City 

Rochester 

d. Mirror and picture frames 

New York City 

Rocheeter 

e. Other cabinet work 

New York City 

6. Pianos, Organs, Etc 

Eaet Rochester 

New York City 

7. Brooms, Cork, Etc 

a. Pulp and fibre goods 

Lockport 

b. Mats and woven goods 

New YorkCUy 

c. Brooms 

Amsterdam 

New York City 

d. Articles of cork 

New York City 

e. Pipes (smoking) 

New York City 

f. Fireproofing lumber 

Total — Group III 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



Larobst 
Number or 
Emplotces 

IN Yb\h. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



GRAND 

total. 



omcE 

FORCE. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 



III. WOOD MANUFAC 



97 

1 

60 

231 

17 

130 

16 

1.109 




65 


1 1 
1.7621 1,6901 1.618 
212 198, 212 


72 
14 
19 

84 

10 

90 

6 

997 




1 
J 

2 


55 

148 

f 
9t 
14 

449 


702 

3.112 
414 

1,161 
231 

30,428 


683 

3,028 

404 

1,141 

226 
29,425 


677 

2,720 
383 

1,016 
206 

27,103 


1 


642 

38 

36 

396 

es 

20 

7 

1 

179 

/« 

3 

:4s 

111 
ftp 

7 

167 
131 

183 


2 

k 


261 

• IS 

7 

169 

12 

7 

1 


18.660 
1,631 
M,464 
7,316 
1,W 

1,237 

403 
407 

6,985 

818 

908 

2.647 

1,219 

1,272 
963 
214 

3,274 
2,669 

16,194 


18.078! 16,688 
1,694, 1,679 
2.361 2,095 
7,04S\ 6,4S3 
1,409] 1,401 

1.198 1,198 

396 S80 
399 407 

6,710 6,569 

791 766 

887 908 

2,688 2,316 

1.083 1,199 

1,241 1,100 
929 842 
fOP 169 

3,198' 2,648 
2,613 2,038 

14,7461 14.167 


676 

37 

103 

266 

32 

39 

7 
8 

276 

27 

21 

69 

136 

31 

24 

6 

76 
66 

447 






97 
5 






91 

B 

42 
33 

S 

42 

97 

63 


1 
i 

I 


1 
W 

160 






938 
10,814 

6,143 


929\ 938 


9 
366 

146 







42 
65 


10,447 
6,993 


9,896 
6,716 


i 


17 

/ 

31 

'^ 

40 
5 




3 


772 
306 

876 
793 

1,305 
767 
211 

1.127 
1,076 

1,878 
1,802 

185 


704 

297 

869 
787 

1,278 
738 
208 

1.105 
1,066 

1.862 
1,786 

175 


760 
306 

718 
664 

1,287 
767 
197 

996 
968 

1,808 
1,732 

147 


68 
8 

7 

' 6 

27 

19 

3 

22 
20 

16 
16 

6 




....... 


15 
13 

15 








10 

7 

7 

16 

12 




2,968' 6; 1,234 


86,332 


83,698 


77,608 


2.720 


3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eeport of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



363 



lBdiwtr7» Tl«^ Ended September SO, 1911 — Contiiraed. 



NuMBBR or Emplotxbs at Ttme or Inspbction. 



Wbbklt Hours or Labor. 



Chil- 
dren ' 
under 

yeara 
(In 1 
■hops 
ex- 
cept 
as 
not'd). 



shop rORCB. 



NUMBBB OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBB8 WHO WORK 



Total. 



NUMBER IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINO — 



1-19. 



20- 

199. 



200 



SBX AND AGE. 



Men 

(18 
yra. 

+). 



Youths 
(16-18 
yra.). 



Boys 
(14-16 
yra). 



Worn. r«^_ 

(16vrs.| ^It- 

+^- lyra.). 



51 

hours 

or 

less. 



52-57 
hrs. 



58-63 
hrs. 



Over 
63 
hrs. 



TUREl 
1.54( 


B — Cofw 

\ 432 

f 

f t97 

\ 1,091 

r 118 

680 

) 69 

4,653 


hidmi. 

1.114 
198 
£61 

1,290 

' ■ '416 
131 

16.625 


255 

£66 

4.828 


1.238 
130 
499 

2.455 
S£0 
936 
199 

23,974 


82 

49 
16 
16 

1 

493 


15 
6 
£ 

16 
£ 
6 


252 
60 
64 

115 
36 
38 


9 
4 
3 

1 

i 


149 

9 

86 

228 

13 

£01 


515 
"430 

994 

7£ 
681 
180 

7,485 


882 

189 

49 

1,414 

£88 

£13 

£0 

15,712 






19i 






661 






2.63C 






S7t 






996 






eoc 






26,10€ 


178 


1.443 


18 


2.959 












16,012 


2,426 
1»0 

67 
1,696 

69 

45 
IM 


11,470 

969 

1,710 

4.311 

706 

715 
361 


2,116 
463 
££6 
£60 
696 

399 

""39'9 

2,313 

6.592 


14,565 
l.£4S 
1,966 
6,160 
1,3£6 

952 
£88 
308 

4.965 
661 
866 

£,£07 
888 

984 
761 
160 

2,508 
1,966 

12,664 


310 

161 

11 

£1 

£3 

5 

1 
1 

136 

66 
19 
37 
£S 

21 

17 

1 

21 

7 

185 


118 

73 

11 

7 

4 

6 

3 

36 

£3 

£ 

10 

1 

11 
9 

7 

4 

230 


1.005 

60 

6 

681 

16 

194 
79 
88 

156 


14 

6 

k 

2 

£ 

1 


1,417 

166 

11 

1,170 

6 

116 
£0 
90 

556 

18 

£ 

614 

1 

61 
48 


3.408 

311 

60 

£,339 
104 

886 

319 

2,388 

"l',£3is 
1,04£ 

417 

/O 

886 
746 

10,138 


11,187 
1,076 
1,931 






Jt64i 






l,99i 






6,167 


£,668 






1,369 


1,£60 

707 

64 

309 

2,350 

886 

607 

£0 

591 
lU 

877 
-W7 

3,024 






1.159 






373 






399 






5,294 


858 
13 

""796 
»4 

550 

463 

40 

774 
683 

552 


2.123 
301 
£60 
97£ 
£78 

519 
366 
114 

1,798 
1,£99 

6,576 






739 






887 










t,t67 


£ 

161 

52 

40 

3 

36 
16 

611 


i 

1 
1 






1,063 






1.060 






818 






164 
2,572 






30 


809 

790 

558 






1,98M 






13,720 










9M9 






9£9 
4.S17 

1,873 


POO 
P.OIO 

4,347 


4 
117 

198 


'£16 
65 


£6 
17 £ 

934 






2.980 








9,631 


410 
603 


4.804 
3.005 


17 
27 


6£3 
217 


2.070 






5.571 


304 





602 

M97 


61 


334 


297 
£97 

203 
£03 

295 
£96 

1,078 
1,078 


657 
^94 

570 

1,196 
7££ 
189 

480 

1.302 
1,964 

142 


2 

5 

1 

16 

10 

4 

12 

1£ 

163 
167 


9 
3 

17 
16 

15 
6 

1 

5 
6 

19 
18 


22 


2 


5 

21 

19 

59 

42 
49 

38 
57 

52 


70 

392 
39£ 

154 

""80 
638 

1,686 

40 


313 
14 

298 

1,047 

73£ 

89 

294 

68 
36 

50 


304 

980 




711 


185 
169 

154 

68 

126 

ite 

180 

130 

37 


526 
606 

903 
636 
1£6 

553 

6£7 

584 

608 

105 


119 

108 

28 


5 




668 






1.260 






738 






194 
974 










472 
467 

293 

£7£ 


16 






948 

1,792 

1,716 














142 




















74.888 


18.061 


44.286 


17.521 




67.820 


1.617 


647 


4.685 


1191 


8.663 

— = • 


28,091 


37.698 


436 


3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



864 



New Yobk Statb Department of Labob. 



Tabto XVL— Stadrtto of ft w to ri — Injected in BMh 



Ikdustbt and Locautt. 

[Onlj the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 



Places 



spect- 
ed. 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



LABOBflT 

NUM-ER OF 

Emplotsbs 

IN YbaB. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



GRAND 
TOTAL. 



OFFICB 
FORCB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
ace. 



1. L&ATBKR 

BaUtton Spa 

Buffalo 

OUnertviUe 

Johntiovm 

LUiU Fails 

New York City 

Olean 

Salamanca 

2. FuB8 AND Fur Ooods 

New York City 

8. LSATRXR AND CaNVAS GoODS 

a. Belting, washen, etc 

Olen Cove 

New York City 

b. Saddlertr and hameas 

Buffalo 

New York City 

o. Travelling bags and trunks 

Johnetovm 

New York City 

.d. Boots and shoes 

A vhum 

Endicott 

Leeterehire 

New York City 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

e. Gloves and mittens 

OloversviUe 

New York City 

f. Fancy leather goods 

New York City 

g. Canvas and sporting goods. . . . . . 

New York City 

4. RUBBBR AND GUTTA PbRCHA GoODS. . . 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Tuckakoe 

5. Articlbs of Pbarl. Horn, Bone. 

Hair, Etc 

a. Pearl buttons, handles, etc 

Amsterdam 

New York City 

Pougkkeepsie 













IV. LEATHER AND 


108 




18 


6.763 


6.639 


4.986 


124 


/ 

9 

£3 

16 

1 

33 

6 

g 

896 






392 
641 
1,086 
689 
301 
701 
608 
322 

12,420 


390 
608 
1,076 
684 
297 
671 
496 
316 

12,180 


332 
626 
1,036 
641 
301 
684 

9.872 


2' 




f 


83\ 

10 




f 


i 

12 
7 

290 






19 












670 




860 




649 


12,004 


11,726 


9,086 


£78 




1.179 




663 


47,497 


46.314 


43,542 


1.180 




32 

/ 

18 




14 


719 

269 
321 


672 
248 
308 


600 
269 
894 


47 

21 . . 




10 


IS 


167 
17 
92 




82 

7 

47 


1,621 


1,677 

462 
671 


1.484 


44 

8\ 

'^ 


161 

U 

106 




63 


8,960 
1,719 
1,798 


8,883 
1,691 
1,769 


3,727 
1,678 
1,626 


76' 

28 .. 




60 


^'l 


268 
t 

1 

1 

168 

61 

4 




112 

/ 


24,694 
1,363 
1,779 
1,323 
9,166 
7,469 
1,016 


23,928 
1,266 
1,690 
1,293 
9,060 
7,206 
976 


23,681 
1,863 
1,779 
1,823 
8,697 
7,068 
981 


J 

98 

89 - 






90 

96 

268 

89 




'...,... 


78 

16 

6 




130 
71 
$1 




28 


7,368 

3,761 
2,291 


7,267 
3,680 
2,279 


6,816 
3,382 
2,264 


100 
70 
12 






It 




319 

t96 




204 
194 


7,860 
7,166 


7,669 
6,977 


6,118 
6,486 


201 

178 




112 

74 




60 
SO 


1,876 
1,026 


1,828 
997 


1.181 
877 


47 
£9 




163 




72 


6,061 


5,799 


6.706 


262 


2 


16 

107 

1 




6 
61 


620 

4,161 

479 

11,696 


484 

4,010 

448 

11.836 


616 

3,816 

479 

9.666 


8e 


i 


472 




828 


856 


1 


48 

43 
s 




36 


2,864 
434 

2,004 
217 


2.818 
421 

1,981 
210 


2.835 
878 

1,684 
217 


46 
18 
£8 

7 






86 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bukeaxj of Factory Inspectioi^, 1911. 



365 



tod— Cif , T— r 



8«p(MBber SO, ttll — Cratliiaed. 



NUMBWI OP EmPU>TBB8 AT TlM* OT InBPBCTION. 


WsKKLT Hotnis OF Labor. 


Chil- 
dren 
under 
14 


SHOP PORCK. 


NUMBBR OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBES WHO WORK — 




MUMBU IK 8BOPS 1 
UIFLOT»Q— 1 


SBX AND AQB. 




51 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-57 
hrs. 


58-63 
hrs. 


Over 
63 
hrs. 


(in 

shopB 

ex> 

cept 

BS 

nofd). 


Total 


1-19. 


20- 

109. 


. Men 

200 1 (18 


1 Youtha Boys 
(16-18 (14-16 
yw.). yra.). 


Worn. 


GirlB 

(14- 

16 

yra.). 


RUBBE 
4,861 


R GOO 

322 


DS. 
3,414 


1.125 


4.539 


18| 18 


285 


1 


29 


411 


4.306 


116 




SSO 






330 
996 

"997 
200 


306 

636 

997 

^t 

996 
6.680 


5I i 
5, 20 


90 
31 




1 
20 


'"'36 


399 
339 
1,096 
636 
997 
969 
989 
995 

1.227 






1,096 


3t 

90 

61 

....... 


171 
936 
486 


226 




636 

















B97 
664 


1 














4.512 


996 
4.370 


6\ / 

2\ 

• • 1 • 


69 
72 


/ 


li 

1 


98'i 
69 






$36 






996 


1 




0.082 


i 
25| 9 


2.357 


11 


1.111 


6.744 








• 1 • 






8,768 


4,994^ A. 961 


900 
19,943 


8,692 
26.656 


94 9 

970 895 

1 


9,294 
13,855 


10 
486 


2,100 
2.013 


6,683 
21.431 


1,075 
18.899 






42.362 


5.525 


16,894 


19 


1 


643 


173 


222 


248 
948 


596 

970 

1.215 
340 
638 

2.786 
2,003 
2,600 

14.111 

606 
l,917\ 

990 
6,019\ 
3,719, 

617 

3.061 

1,799: 

740 

4,203 

3,810 

634 
699 

3.76S 


21 6 


16 


4 


34 


526 
948 

970 

491 
91 

390 

933 


83 






M48 


4 
3 








981 


81 

638 

79 
366 

777 
283 
661 

1,013 
7 


900 

802 
344 





7 

189 
71 

76^ 

794 

619\ 

83 

7,522 

67i^ 
400\ 

3-rh 

9,973^ 

9,63 J 

335' 

3,377! 
1.414 
1.373 

i 
1.54 >i 
1,3}^' 

4li 
l,5JSl 


14 

""{9 

15 

'S 

2\V 

.57 
/ 
? 

4i 

US, 

7 

145' 
2i 
1131 

1 

3', 

11 

2i 

40; 




21 

156 

91 
235' 

74' 
90 > 








1,440 

639\ 

3.651 
2,660^ 


14i 8 
7 6 
3 3 

S6 20 
5, 20 

'\ ' 

. 742 247 

215 37 

70 9 

90 / 


791 
393 


2 






2.623; 251 
2,916^ 961 


105 

2,593 

1.68) 


1 


1 


l,698i 

22,866 
1,966\ 
1,690^ 


2,037 
6.291 

i 




15.562 
l,9o8 
2,690 
2,993 
4.464 
4,779 
697 


4^ 7*1) 793 

870 13,6(31 8.316 
74 i,i'.n 

3 1 ,6^7 


13 


/ 


1,993\ 





S l,2:n ' 


8,609, 

6,816 

949 


""733 
231 

650 

311 

87 

1,715 
/.J75 

559 
336 

638 

7^ 
47« 


5,5051 
1,905^ 

945\ 


131 

193 

71 

82 
66 
24 

65 
63 

10! 


39 
202 

29 

48 

94 

3 

6) 

o2 

6 


40i 7,^3^ 4i3 
2r, 4,3'^r' i,6j'f 

19 ■ 92S 

333 2.483 3,930 

52 143 3,112 

181 2,053 3 

337' 2,615 2,957 
5/71 2,619\ 9,469 

I 1 
233 672; 223 
92>3, 671 \ 61 

393) 3,246* l,829j 


..." 




6.7161 
S,319\ 
9,949] 


2,680. 3,386 

1,683\ 1,418 

187\ 2,968 

3.7011 496 
5,^5-;, 496 

575 

619^ 

1.467 3,333 














5.912! 
6,308 

1,134! 


3 

5 

1 




848 


/(? 5 
92 38 


1 


1 
5,444| 


1 




479\ 


i55; £:£\ 4H\ 

897^ 9.3fi.T 9.A09\ 


/^l 

63\ 34 

7| 

1 
1371 63 


2,123' 
17 4\ 

4,42ll 


212 


359 9,377^ 938 




0.242 




• 1 


AAS\ «/??! 


9 4^ 

1 

1,263 4,915 






2,309 


1 
5,553 


1 .-isn 


4,403 


3.087 


! 






1 


1 
i 


2.289,' 
360 . 


210 


1.719j 


363 
36J 


1,063 

83 

85S 

93 


33 

n 


■ 20 

/ 

24 

9 


l,033j 
951, 
547 
197 


103^ 

9[ 


243i 633 
18\ 

91 1\ 497 
4^ 65 


1.416 1 

3i2[ 1 


910\. 


910 


i,5J/! 
910, 


833 \ 
151 \ 


::::::l 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



366 



New Yoek State Department of Labor. 



Tabto XYI.— StaCislicfl of FaetorlM In^Mtod In Bach 



Industry and Locality. 

nly the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 





Num- 




ber of 


Places 


estab- 


in- 


liah- 


spect- 


ments 


^. 


with 




no em- 




ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



Labqbst 
Ndmbbb of 
Employsbs 

IN Ybar. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



GRAND 
TOTAL. 



OFFICE 
FORCS. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
a«e. 



IV. LEATHER AND 



5. Articlss of Pearl, Horn, Bonb, 
Hair, Etc. — Concluded. 
b. Articles of horn, bone, tortoise 

shell, etc 

Auburn 

New York City 

RocheeUr 



c. Brushes 

New York City. 
Troy 



Mattresses, pillows and other 

articles of hair, feathers, etc. . 

New York City 



Total — Group IV. 



1 Drugs and Chemicals. 



a. Proprietary medicines. , 

Buffalo 

New York City 



b. Sodas and other alkalies. 

Albany 

New York City 

Niagara Falls 

Solvay 

Syracuse 



Other chemicals and drugs. 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Niagara Falls 

Rochester 



2. Paints, Dyes and Colors. 



a. Paint, varnish, etc. 

Buffalo 

New York City. . 



b. Dyes, colors and inks. 

Buffalo 

New York City 



0. Lead pencils and crayons. 
New York City 



3. Wood Alcohol and Essential Oils. . 



" ] Buffalo 

New York City.. 

4. Animal Oil Products. 



Hicks Island. ... 
New York City. 
Promised Land, . 
Syracuse 



304 



114 
16 
84 

31 

S 
16 

6 

1 
1 

169 

10 

107 

3 

IS 

212|. 



90\. 
94l. 



67 , 



^1- 

e\. 



66 
/ 

I'o 

10 

298 

B67 




33 

/ 
$9 


3.148 
994 
739 

1,497 

1.672 
951 
466 

4,012 
9,869 


2.993 

988 

799 

1,907 

I.635I 
996 
461 

3.890 
9,749, 


2.349 
994 
609 
964 

1,646 

839 
466 

3.368 

9,946 


1 
165 .. 




6 


io\.: 

190^.. 






42 

28 
9 

217 

196 


.... 


6\\: 
1 

118i 
117 


1 
/ 


2.808 




1.641 


83.437 


81.218 

J 1 : =1 = 


73.203 


2.212! 


3 



74 16.828 



11 



3.467 

968 

9,709 

4.665 

978 

971 

1,091 

9,829 

939 

8.696 
475 

9,168 
939 

9,184, 



V. 
14,8181 



CHEMICALS. OILS , 
16,210 1,996 ! 



2,7881 

5171 

9,168\ 

4.124* 
969 
966 \ 
96 1\ 

9,990^ 
9991 

7,906' 

' 479\ 

9,949^ 

88S\ 

9,737\ 



3.315 

998 

9,604 

4.406 
978 
960 
979 

9,640 
999 

8.489 
476 

9,099 
876 

9,184 



7,0631 6.686' 6.816 



3.067 

300 
9,601 

1,979 

908 

1,446 

2,017 
9,013 



25| 1,692 



17 



490 
696 

1,804 



900 
679 
281 
983 



2.858, 

956^ 

9,4671 

I.8I4I 

90 B, 

1,335 

2.014' 
9,010\ 



2,963 

990 
9,617 

1,878 

199 

1,966 

1,976 
1,973 



1,666| 1.686 



443 
630 

1.702 



490 
698 



1.721 



900 
633' 

979\ 

9761 



900 
669 
997 
976 



670 

61 

649 

636 

16 

6 

70 

434 

7 

790 

3 

909 

66 

447 

377 



209 

45 

144 

166 

6 
111 

3 

9 

126 



47 
66 

99 



46 
9 
8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factoey Inspection, 1911. 367 

bdmbr. Taw Bwled Septonib«r SO, 1911 ~ Coatfamed. 



NUUBBB or EmPLOTBBS at TiMB op iNSPBCnON. 



Wbbklt Houbs or La.bob. 



ChU- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



SHOP rOBCB. 



NUMBBR OF SHOP BM- 
PLOYBE8 WHO WORK — • 



Total. 



NUUBBB IN SHOPS 
BM PLOTINO — 



1-19. 



20- 

199. 



200 



BEX AND AOB. 



Men 

(18 



Youths 


Boys 


Worn. 


(ie-18 


(14-16 


(16 yrs. 


yre.). 


yrs.). 


+). 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.)'. 



51 






lOurs 


52-57 


58-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


lees. 







Over 
63 
hrs. 



RUBBER GOODS — Concluded. 



2,194 


281 


893 


1,020 
£88 

"Ysk 


1,098 

90 

SSS 

898 

1.174 

69£ 
411 

1.062 
U048 


44 

/ 
11 
16 

29 

,i 

31 
SI 


20 

b 

1 

11 
6 
1 

18 

18 


999 

196 

'^0 

293 

£06 
SI 

2,090 
1,986 


33 
1 
6 

£1 

2 

i 

49 
46 


160 

1 

1£6 

19 

164 

693 

679 


l,4a3 
£87 
££6 
8£5 

412 

£72 

71 

2.390 
£,S10 


551 






£88 






499 
8U 

1.509 


B71 

348 

£64 
37 

1.470 
U949 


££8 
11£ 

1,161 
64S 

4£4 

1.780 
1,780 


W 










933 

59/ 
338 

167 






807 







461 
3.250 











5,1 £9 


140 












70.991 


18.306 


31.698 


25.987 46.046 


1.242 


527 


22,426 


750 


4,782 


36,747 


29.328 


134 


2 



PAINTJ 
14.214 


3. ETC. 
1,335 


4,762 


8,117 


10,428 


152 


24 


3,517 


93 


2,211 


8,495 


2,999 


509 




2.645 

£77 


546 

53 

39B 

86 
6 


1,252 847 

£24 

823 847 

707 3,077 
267\ 


1,152 

80 

944 

3.540 
222 
149 
909 

£,166 
89 

5,736 

4e£ 
£,141 

784 
1,820 

4,487 


7 


6 


1,429 

194 

1,057 

274 
36 
9£ 


51 
3 

48 

1 
1 


1.113 

83 

9£1 

99 

4 

95 


1.354 

192 

1,132 

3.259 

30 

136 

639 

2,206 
233 

3.882 

88 

636 


178 

2 
9 

412 

228 

13 

170 










£,06£ 


7 
50 

i 


6 

6 

4 

1 






3,870 
26£ 


100 




£U 
909 


66 188 1 






8 


£6£ /7.9.9I 


/06 . . 


£,£06 
£3£ 




2,206 


40 

9 

95 
3 
17 
36 
31 

97 










....^1;::::: 






£32 

4.193 

2£5 

606 

741 

2,417 

2,202 


13 
4 


134 

1,814 

7 

632 










7.699 
47£ 

£,8£0 
8SO 


703 
37 

464 
16 
66 

886 


2,803 
£10 

1,760 

63 

£64 

3.351 


41 
'""26 


999 

7 
886 


2,409 

377 

945 

820 

14 

1.798 


409 




354 




£,737 
6.439 


1 
32 


871 
1,804 


14 
19 


66 
576 


2,658 
4,065 














2.754 

£45 

£,373 

1,713 


524 

38 

396 

352 

£9 

£51 

10 


1,990 

£07 

1,738 

1,361 

157 


240 

'"24b 


2,26S 

168 

1,974 

1.396 

142 

1,049 

823 
8£2 

1.348 


26 
£ 

24 

25 

££ 

46 
46 

11 


16 

5 

IS 

9 

? 

7 
7 

4 


439 

78 

361 

275 

.^ 

1,090 
1,089 

97 


5 

4 

1 

• 8 

6 

6 


230 
38 
192 

331 

15 

13 

152 


1,459 

137 

1,299 

649 

49 

459 

1,957 
1,967 

151 


1,065 

70 

882 

733 
133 
474 



















186 






U»64 
1,972 


1,003 









1,962 
1.962 

240 






1 970 


V 

507 713 








1,460 


833 


324 




44S 
5S£ 


33 
£11 

334 


170 

1 321 


£40 


433 
461 

1,157 


3 
4 

23 


£ 
21 


5 
67 

381 


40 


28 
121 

277 


2 
116 

128 


550 
296 

1,194 


83 




1,622 


l.OS^, 200 


23 




£00 
617 
££6 




£00 
\ 

1 


£00 
409 
££6 
136 














200 
276 
226 
235 






£13 40^ 
££6 


4 


3 


£00 


/ 


220 


113 


8 




£67 


33 £34\ 


9 


1£ 


91 


£0 


32 




\'.V.V.\ 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



368 



New York State Department of Labor. 



Tribto ZVI.— StolladM of n^torlM 



Iia>U8TBT AND LOCALITY. 

[Only the more important oentera of each 
industry are specified.] 



Places 

in- 
q>ect- 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
mento 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



LABaSST 

Number of 
EiiPiiOTBas 

IN YSAR. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



ORAND 
TOTAL 



OFFICB 
PORCB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 



5. MiNEBAL Oil Products. 



Buffalo 

New York City. 

Olean 

Rochester , 



6. Soap, Perfumery and Cosmetics . 



Buffalo 

New York City. 



7. MiSCBLLANEOUS ChBMICAL PRODUCTS. 

a. Wax figures, etc 



b. Starch . . . 
Osweffo. 



c. Glue, mucilage, etc . 
New York City... 



d. Fertilisers 

Buffalo 

Cheektoxoaga . . . , 
New York City. 



Matches and explosives . 

New York City 

Oswego 



f. Celluloid and other plastics. 
New York City 



Total — Group V. 



1. Sorting Waste Paper . 

New York City . . 

2. Paper and Pulp 



Pulp mills 

Dexter . . , 

Hinckley 

Pulp and paper mills. 

Deferiet 

Fort Edward 

Fulton 

GUns FaUa 

MecJianiceille 

Palmer Falls 

Soulk GUhs Fallt . . . 



c. Paper mills 

Lockport 

New York City. 
Niagara Falls, . 
UnionviUe 



241 



g . 
1331. 



10 

tos 



15 

10 

1 

25 

lol. 

i: 

.?: 

/ . 

18. 
i7. 



913>. 



43 



4g 
187 



32 

/ 
1 

41 

1 
I 
6 
I 
1 
1 
1 

114 

4 
13 

7\ 

1\ 



Total — Group VI. 



2301. 



1 2,802 



»87 

1,716 

300 

991 

4.495 



1,099 
4,050 



166 
559 

718 
A99 

842 
S09 
215 
BIB 

1,164 

367 
685 

601 
594 



216 38,734 



2,664 



287 

1,635 

282 

263 

4.231 



1,695 
2,266 



3.947 



164 

545 

476 

687 
476 

807 
286 
215 
207 

1,154 
357 
678 

590 
583 



35,614 



CHEMICALS. OILS. 
2,707| 1381 



287\ 

1,632 

300 

291 

4.279 



1,691 
2,288 



3.053 



149 

566 
482 

469 
260 

527 

186 

216 

21 

938 
239 
632 

415 
408 



36.372 



80\ 
18,. 



261 



4: 
197 \ 



103 



141. 

9\, 



aij. 

23K 



351. 
23 . 



11 . 

11\. 



3.103 



29 



416 



408' 



VI. PAPER 

410 8 



28 41^\ 

361 14.265i 



404 
13,994 



4O6 
13.603 



17| 



13 



1.609 

226^ 
204, 

5,849 
466\ 
607\ 
492i 
3081 



1.590 

226^ 
200 

,7631 
466^ 
600\ 

4771 
300\ 



18 



740 


720 


658 


650 


326 


320 


6.807 


6.641 


371 


357 


760 


726 


846 


829\ 


349 


34o\ 



1.483 
225 
204 

5.589 
456 
454 
492 
258 
740 
651 
289 

6,531 
364 

699 
772 
339 



65 14,6S1 14.402| 14,013 



8 
271 



7 
16 

8 
MO 

8 

6 

166 
14 
94 
17 
4 



279 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



369 



IndH^T. Taw Ended J 



•M, UU^CesCUHMd. 



NUMBBB OF EmPLOYBBS AT TlMB OW IlfSPBCnON. 



Wkbklt Homts or Labob. 



Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shope 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



8BOP rOBCB. 



KITMBBB OP SHOP EM- 
PLOTBB8 WHO WOBK — 



TotaL 



NUMBBB IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTINa — 



1-19. 



20- 
199. 



200 



BBX AND AOB. 



Men 

(16 
yrs. 

+). 



Youths 
(16-18 
ym.). 



Boys 
(14-16 
yni.). 



Worn. 
(16 yrs. 

+). 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 






hours 


52-67 


58-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 







Over 
63 
hrs. 



PAINTS, 
2,569| 


ETC.- 
99 


"Cond 
•376 


uded. 
2,094 


2.489 


12 


51 


113 





93 


1,781 


3841 


811 




£87 


6 
17 
1£ 


"£56 


£8l\ £87 
1,£80\ 1.128 




1 1 ' - 

: 1 


101 
1,417 


■i 






1,66£ 


h 


6 


113 


...... 


^ 






£8£ 


£70 
£63 

2.038 


£8£ 
£69 

2.690 


£8£ 




£63 . 




4 


....... ...... ......J...... 


£63 
2.028 






4,015 


660 


1,327 


n| 


1,218 


. 


539 


1.448 . 






1 


• 1 1 






1,6871 
£,09l\ 


63 
491 

394 


£36^ 1,388\ 1,071 
960\ 650 1,403 

1.458i 1.098 2.203 


181 
31 

64 


s! 

8\ 

1 

19, 


479 

628 

633 


3 
21 

31 


9 

607 

209 


1,433 

499 

722 


£46 . 

1,085\. 

I.S29I 










2,950i 


190 




1471 


66 
47 


81 

21' 473 


87 

410 
369 

372 

186 

492 

16£ 

£16 

16 


1 

5 

6 

5 

6 


1; 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1. 


56 

126 

109 

61 
37 





18 


99 

109 
109 

210 

197 


30|. 

4041. 

364\. 

189 

£3 . 

3301 
1 






1 
5411 






47S\. 




473 






438 
££7 


103 
66 

50 

'""ih 

41 
10 


335 

16£ 




11 

7 


28 




492 


442 ...... 

16£^ 

2161 


162 
16£ 




16£ . 














£16,. 




1 


. 




£16\. 

7691. 
1£7\. 
607 . 

1171. 
117\ 




161 







' 








928. 


262! 625 


560 


51 
JO 
40 

2 


r 

6' 

4 

2 

12 
12 


300 

96 

£01 

90 
84 


21 

6 
16 

8 
8 


79 
61 
18 

73 
73 


90 
61 

214 

207 






£39^ 


££9' ' 1£A 






6£6\. 





6£6\ 366 
202 






404' 


87 
80 


317 






S97' 


317^ [ £91 












33.269, 


4.205 


13.075|15.989 


24.661 


522 


116' 


7.763 


207 


4.057 


17.370 


10,4851 


1,357 


...... 



AND P 

402 


►ULP. 

230| 172 


1 326 




! 76 





5 


72 


3251 1 












398 


££6\ 17£ 
678] 6.991 


5.663 


324 
12,755 




74 


« 


6 
3,248 


70 
969 


323 

3.016 

511 


1 


13.332 


19 


41 545 


6.108; 


1,4M 


2081 831 


425 

££5 
£00 

3,019 
466 
447 

'"£60 
7£0 


1,464 
££5 
£00 

5,364 

460 

% 

£48 
esR 









70 




833 


££6 








£25 




£00 


......1 













£00 
326 




5,503 
466 


1 

15' 2.469 
1 


6 


1 

1 131 

1 6 


2 


2,004 


610 
458 


1 
2.5631 


JU7 








1 




447 








477 


;; 


477 




£9 






74 


403 




£60 




2 


;;;;;; 


243 


« 




7£0 








35 


35 


685 




643 






'^ If, 

2,219. 5,927 

' 33S 

303' 630 
401 , 733 

555| 332 






643 
283 

1,174 

46 
671 






^ 





















6,365 
360 


455 


3.691 

XA9 


13 


41 414 
12 


7 

'3 




350 

"hh 

11 


2.179' 2.662 
162' 188 




676 
766 
336 


76 £96 

161 339 

, .. .1 


1 


3 138 

' 18 


677\ 1 

121 62 

S 332\ 






.... ^ 







T032 




13.734 


908 

■ — • 


7.163 


5.663 

===== 


13,031 


19 


41 621 


9 


3.253 


3.341I 6,108 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



370 



New York State Department of Labor. 



TftUe XVL— StatiattcsorF)MtoriMliiipeel»dUiBMh 



Industbt and Localitt. 

Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 



Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



Larobst 

Nu&CBBB OP 

Emplotsbs 

IN Yb.\H. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



QRAND 
TOTAL. 



omoa 
roRcs. 



Total. 



There- 
of 

years 
of 



. Ttps and Prxntkrs' Materials. 

New York City 

2. Papbr Goods 



Paper boxes and tubes. 

Buffalo 

N9XD York City 

RoehuUr 



b. Paper bags and sacks . 

BalUton Spa 

Hudson FalU 

New York City 



0. Other paper goods. 
New York CUy. . 



3. Printino and Book Making. 

a. Printing and publishing . . 

• Albany 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Rochester 



Bookbinding and blank book mak- 
ing 

New York CUy 



Lithographing and engraving. . 

Buffalo 

New York City 

RocheetMT 



d. Games and novelties. 
New York City 



4. Wall Papbr. 



Glena PaUa 

HudeonFaUe.... 
New York City.. 
Northumberland . 



5. Photoorapht 

New York City 

Total — Group VII. 



3£ 
600 



366 

17 

»58 

19 

25 

/ 



209!. 
18S,. 



3.001 



2.3131 

96\. 
1,417] 
68\. 



306 . 

321'. 
M 

t67 
9 



18 



48 



3,709 



19 



435 



16 
241 



135 



107 
5 



100 
89 

1,787 



864 
24,640 



15.149 

9,B60 
884 

2,033 
358 
821 
350 

7.458 
6,44M 

81,474 



405 



334 
23,570 



14.788 

B,390 

9,05B 

845 

1,947 
351 
814 

309 

6.835 
6,887 

71,777 



1,306, 55,487 
17\ l,6gl 

43 e.4^7\ 

-" At. 337] 



802, 
36 



231 

199 



41,337] 
1,61 Si 



10.252' 
8,4^ 



222 12.947 



16 

18B 

4 

28 

B8 



25 



•I 



BB 



1! 2,075 



1,193 
10,859 



2.788 
t,784 

2,193 



47,118 
1,337 
B,164 

34,704 
1,3M6 



9.906 
8,327 

12,077 

1,104 

9,558 

655 

2,676 
B,67B 

2.084 



B65 
B91 
951 
BB9 

785 



B49 
B70 
911 

BB5i 

7031 



VIL PRINTINO 
408 30 



339 
22,967 



30 



14,024 

B,B35 

8,464 

8U\ 

l,877i 
348 
79 1\ 

5i5| 

7,066, 
6,10l\ 



360 

5B 

BOS 

19 



7 

7 

41 

623 
655 



75,217: 8,798 



51,148 
1,515 
B,393 

S7,69B 
1,48B 



7.472 
184 
B93 

5,737 
186 



9,336 
7,6B9\ 



344 
168 



12,175 870 

lillBl 89 

9,600 701 

698 43 



2,558 
B,654 



1,819 



112 
IIB 



109 



BIO 16 

Bll Bl 

816\ 40 

U5 4 



747 



82 



71B\ 



641 



109.5271 98.539 



675 



71 



101,158 10.088 



15 



15 
15 



34 



26 
BS 



49 



1. Silk and Silk Goods. 



Amsterdam 

Buffalo 

Hornell 

New York City. 



141 



21 



10 



13,568' 



733 

9W\ 
1,B44. 
5,18l\ 



ru 



13.3281 


12.306 


237 .. 




724 
907 


733 

875 
1,049 
4,6B9 


9 ... 
3 ... 


... 


l,i3). 
5,033] 


14 ... 
llBi... 


... 



♦ Employed in office. 



t Includes two children 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



371 



ladwtiy. Yew Ended Sepienbw SO. 1911 — ContiaMd. 



Number of Emplotebs at Tims of Inspkctiok. 



Wbsklt Houbs of Labor. 



Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
yean 

(in 
ahopi 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



SHOP FORCB. 



NXTMBBB OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBBS WHO WOBK — 



I NUMBER IN SHOPS 
I EMPLOTINQ — 



Total. 



1-19. 



20- 
199. 



200 

+. 



BBX AND AOB. 



Men 
(18 



Youths 
(16-18 
yrs.). 



Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 



Worn. 
(16yre. 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 






hours 


52-67 


58-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 







Over 
63 
hrs. 



AND PAPER GOODS. 

378 lajLi *>.*>A\ 1 Aia a\ i »<2l I i^^l 17AI .<m 






























309 


148 
2.701 


161 
14,570 


4,627 


505 2 

8,061' 280 


166 


/ 
12,734 


657 


112 
3,656 


161 36 
12,200 6,760 






21.898 


282 


2 


13.664 

2,183 

8,266 

826 


1.646 
68 

1,180 
89 

54 


10,390 

911 

6,662 

736 

993 


1,628 

1,914 

414 

744 
341 
403 

2.255 
2,019 

21,394 


4,186 212 
£61\ 33 

2,760, 97 
286 


118 

12 

63 

2 


8,585 

1,693 

6,101 

637 

693 

86 

203 

131 

3,556 
3,161 

15,014 


563 

194 

246 

46 

2 

92 
89 

330 


1.436 
207 
966 
167 

447 
161 

277 
7 

1,773 
1,706 

44.885 


7,661 
301 

6,189 
668 

645 

180 
432 


4,537 
1,660 
1,111 


30 
16 


2 


1,791 
341 
784 


1.195 
266 
681 


1 


542 


167 




....... 

1,001 
906 

14,400 


55/ 
263 

3,187 
2,622 

30.625 








76 




m 

6,443 
6,646 

66.419 


143 

2,680 
2,212 

49,145 






4 

3.894 
3,668 

19,483 


263 

681 
173 

2.049 




67 

47 

1,431 


48 
37 

499 


95 




2 




43,676 


10.949 
107 

7,043 
268 

1,585 
1,412 

1,613 

106 

1,318 

42 

253 

249 

65 


19,92l!l2.806 
5An\ ttfti 


35,259 

964 

1,710 

26,213 
995 

4.491 
3,628 

8,335 
712 

6,710 
642 

1,067 
1,063 

1.491 


777 
9 

60 
432 

30 

123 

71 

625 

62 

418 
20 

6 

6 

73 


354 

18 

74 

168 

19 

71 

49 

67 

21 

36 

6 

7 
7 

1 


7.170 
329 
261 

4,966 
230 

4,147 
3,684 

2.364 

233 

1,721 

86 

1,343 
1,343 

145 


116 

// 

6 

87 

2 

157 
129 

24 
6 

16 
2 

33 
33 


32,032 
1.324 
1,804 

23,313 
1,239 

3,571 
3,213 

9,138 
907 

7,410 
208 

144 

lU 

8 


10.827 

"277 

8,340 

37 

4,536 
3,977 

2,162 
116 

1,487 
447 

1,958 

1,964 

502 


816 

7 

19 

202 


2 


2 


2,100 

31,866 

1 ,276 


995 

14,176 

1,018 

4.999 
4,308 

4,462 
707 

3,268 
219 

1,243 

i,94S 

1,325 


609 
10,637 

2.408 
1,741 

6,230 

210 

4,313 

394 

950 
960 

320 








/ 


8,992 

7,461 

11.305 
1 ,023 


885 
»71 

5 












*2 


8,899 
666 


2 




*2 


2,446 
9,442 

1,710 


344 
SU 

1.130 











70 




194 
190 


'4S 

297 


194 




161 
186 

519 


20 




13 
4 

96 
6 

131 






194 








190\\V.V.\ 
408\ 320 
141 

368 






l'9b 
721 






776 
W 

665 


34 
6 

7 


/ 
7 




8 


1% 

391 










1 


274 
















604 


266 


^^\ 


480\ 7 


6 


110 


/ 


226 


575 














91,070 


17,617 


47,112126,341 


69.558 1.795 


673 


28.056 


988 


48,966 32.752 


8.998 


354 


t6 



TEXTILES. 
12.009 



403 


5,694 


5.972 


3.778 






724 

702 

703 

2,166 


130 
1,779 


""364 


/70 

5«P 

/.P55 



120 



84 



7,794| 293 



564 5,090; 6,275 



150 



724 

872 
1,032 
4,617 

under 14 years of age employed in office. 



2 

ir. 

441 



66 



681\ 

792\ 

558^ 

2,492\ 



12 

31 

3 

147 



13 

34 

3 

273 



711 

, ' 688 

486\ 643 

3,538^ 706 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



372 



New Yoek State Department of Labob. 



Tibto XVL— S«ii«Mics«rnMlMl6« 





Plaoea 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees 

1 


Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 


Number of 




iNDtmTXT AND LOOAUTT. 

[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 


Emplotku 
IN Year. 


orand 

TOTAL. 


OFnca 

FORCE. 


Total. 


Thereof 
in shop. 


There- 
of 

Total ^*-^® 

of 
age. 


2. Wool MANnrAcruRcs 


114 




36 


24.108 


23.661 


vin 

23,269 


. textiles 

4471 , 
















a. Carpets and nic(s 


41 
3 
3 

27 
3 

14 




17 


13.454 

4,eoe 

7,310 

2.420 
738 

478 
308 

8,231 

436 

1.463 

8,883 

568 

951 

10,324 


13.184 

4,589 
7,197 

2.367 

715 
468 
893 

8,110 
486 

kin 

566 

940 

10.155 


13.401 

4,606 
7,310 

2.334 
738 
454 
885 

7.534 

895 

1,3U 

1,851 

608 
893 

10.111 


270i ..... . 


Am^erdam 


77;-...,, 


Yonkers 






It3\....\\ 


b. Felt and felt goods. 




6 


53!...... 


DolffeniU " . 


^^':::::: 


New York City 




6 




1 
3\ 




p....... 


c. Woolens and worsteds 




13 


1 

124(...... 


Falconer 


iO ..... . 


Fulton 


1 

4 

1 
1 

85 






/4|...... 


Jameatoxon 






49\.....\ 


StoOviUM 






*...... 


Utica 






/ii.....: 


3. Cotton Goooa 




16 


169!...... 


Cohoet 


38 

J 

330 






8,440 
1,080 
1,831 
8,403 

36,465 


8,483 
1,086 
1,818 
8,388 

36,98S 


8,440 

969 

1,831 

8,403 

34.203 


/7i...... 


New York City 




10 



64 •.'.., 


New York Milla 


19\ .. 


Utica 






«i i ..... . 


4. Hosiery and Knit Goods 




124 


474' 










Amsterdam 


9 






4,188 
3,176 
8,818 
5,745 
1,101 
6,987 

20.805 


4,151 
3,141 
8,194 
5,648 
1,077 
5,833 

20.181 


3,655 
8,970 
8,188 
4,885 
960 
6,748 

17,897 


37\ 


Cohoes 


87 
635 






35 ...... 


JAtUe Falls 






84] 


New York City 




113 


97\ 


Perry 


84 


Utica 






94i 


6. Other Textiles of Silk, Wool or 
Cotton 




269 


1 
6I0' 










ar Dyeing, finishing, etc 


1091 


36 


5.176 4,925 
881 805 

3,191 8,990 
868 868 


4,744 

799 

8,798 

886 

404 

8.596 

609 

1,763 

683 

347 

9.657 
9,398 

7.644 


241 


GurnerviUe. . 


1\ 

1 




16, 


New York City 




32 


19l\ 


Nyack 


8\ 


Wappingers Falls 






404 

3.945 

509 

8,050 


389 

3,839 
604 

1,976 
609 
355 

11,417 
11,179 

8,305 


16 


b. Upholstery goods 





10 


1061 


Clark Mills 


6 


New York City 




10 


74 


Patchogue 





623 
368 

11,684 
11. U6 


14 


Rodiester 






7 


c. Braids, embroideries and dress 

trimmings 

New York City 




223 
80S 


263| 4 
863. 4 


6. Flax, Hemp and Jute Manufactures 


59! 


18^ 8,426 


J 


Auburn 

New York City 


»l 

*i\ 

4l| 


1\ 1,454 
71 6,876 
1 
11> 2,049 


1.976 


1.943 


46 

63 


7. Oilcloth, Window Shades, Etc 


73 


IiuchaH<Ui . . . 


J| 






888 

890 

1,118 


318 

885 

1,088 


883 

831 

1,099\ 


11 


Minetto 


. 


::::::: 


6 


New YorkCity 




9 


^ 


Total — Group Vni 


1,405; 1 495 


115,743 


113,594 


107.278 


2,130| 4 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



373 



S«pieiDbw 9% 1911 — CMrtlMed. 



NiniBBB OP EuFuoramB at Txica or Inspbctxom. 






Wbbklt Houbs of Labob. 


Chil- 


SHOP FORCB. 


NUMBBR OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTBB8 WHO "WORK — 


dren 

under 

14 




inTMBBB IN SHOPS 
BIIPLOTWO — 


■BX AirO AOB. 


51 

hours 
or 
less. 


52-^7 
hrs. 


58-68 
hrs. 


Ove^ 
63 
hrs. 


years 


ToUl. 


1-19. 


20- 
199. 


200 


Man 

(18 
yrs. 
+). 


Youths 
(16-18 
yrs.). 


Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 


Worn. 


Oiris 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 


ex- 
cept 

as 
nofd). 



22,922 


279 


3.613 


18,930 


12,273 


527 


169 


9,704 


149 


548 


11,002 


11.272 




1 


18,131 


98 


533 


12.505 
4,699 
7,197 

846 
670 

"'976 

5,579 

918 

1,880 

1,709 

606 

889 

7,589 


6,981 
9,709 
8,478 

1.567 
610 
988 
139 

8.735 
88 
711 
690 
866 
480 

5,635 


278 

167 

98 

43 
8 

7 
90 

206 
81 
84 
63 
16 
6 

132 


62 

41 

11 
6 
3 
3 

96 

80 
9 

7 

58 


5,777 
1,610 
8,691 

662 

196 

3.266 
963 
696 

1,080 
191 
490 

4.038 


33 

19 


145 
63 


8.166 

'7,197 

746 

809 

979 

2.090 
877 

"l\'l'l'l 
331 


4,820 
4,476 






4,699 






7,197 











2.281 
716 


88 

71 


1.347 
146 
879 


8 
9 

3 

1 

108 

6 

97 

89 

1 

90 

79 


131 

7 

118 

4 

272 

8 

69 

69 

8 

97 

192 


1,404 
708 




1 


460 


80 






We 






7,410 


98 


1,733 
167 


5,048 






S86 






1,S90 


1,971 
699 
603 
866 

9,369 






1,809 




100 






606 






889 










9.942 


579 


2,074 


50 




'•fig 


""'189 


641 
494 


1,889 
999 

1,819 
9,974 

20.861 


1.306 

488 

1,179 

1,973 

11,580 




6 

90 
68 

366 


16 
7 

10 
9 

168 


1,097 
493 
696 

1,0U 

21.060 


6 
87 
14 

6 

561 


91 

104 

94 

7 

772 


1 
807 

6,056 


9,401 

494 

1,788 

9,375 

26,905 











1,819 






9,589 


1.156 


108 
11,717 






88,734 


1 




8,618 


98 

""m 

99 

3,566 


946 

^•^ 

9,188 

96 

1,698 

8,277 


8,879 
1,417 
1,891 
1,661 
841 
4,089 

5.444 


1,676 
986 

1,030 

1,887 
348 

1,974 

7.626 


88 

'lb 

96 
11 
68 

219 


6 

17 

4 

48 

103 


1,957 
1,906 
1,100 
8,943 
665 
3,409 

8.985 


43 

30 

6 

116 

8 

166 

354 


48 

44 

9 

193 
19 

903 

1.574 


""l8 

'is',98d 

90 
658 

11.557 


3,670 
9,873 
9,149 
614 
904 
4,798 

4.156 






9,986 






9,168 






4,788 
986 


/ 




6,664 






17.287 




3 


4.508 


568 


1,498 


2.447 

788 
800 
996 
889 

1,624 
604 
901 
609 
910 

1,473 
1,47S 

5.658 


8.278 
603 

1,804 
916 
804 

1,830 
888 

96 

3,018 
9,986 

3,272 


52 

18 

19 

6 


16 

19 

4 


1,140 

149 

779 

38 

85 

2.002 

lis 

1,999 

5.843 
6,711 

3,764 


17 
8 
9 


521 

90 

601 


1,283 

"1,196 
89 


2,699 
763 
904 






783 






9,601 


488 


1,818 
89 






968 


tm 






889 






889 

517 

498 

11 






3.490 
604 


286 


1,730 


48 
9 

8 

99 
9 

119 

117 

207 


36 

9 
13 
10 

1 

51 
49 

61 


74 

s\ 

17 

9 

263 
967 

130 


436 
6 

994 

87 

8 

617 
619 

260 


2.537 

"l',S74 
689 
837 

7.737 
7,688 

3.348 




3 


J, 679 
609 


198 


1,966 




3 


840 


6 

2,772 
9,648 

236 


196 

5,049 
6,049 

1,530 








9.294 


940 
775 

3.807 






9,070 






7,42A 












1,408 


8 

169 

211 


'l','l'89 
313 


1,406 
4,016 

1.346 


768 
8,948 

1.541 


81 
164 

31 


66 
4 


618 
9,780 

291 


''l'9b 
3 


8S4 
40 


3,979 
274 


1,407 
1,834 

1.556 






6,867 






1,870 








1 


819 






819 
996 
808 


978 
181 
910 


8 

3 

18 


/ 

3 


31 









819 
9£4 
810 







996 






/ 


9 

99 


-ibb 







1,069 


170 


91 













105.148 


6,130 


33.218 


65,800 


46,706 


1.692 


647 


55.635 


1.569 


3.949 


37,668 


63.340i 20l' 4 



uigitized by 



Google 



374 



Xew York State Depabtment of Laboe. 



Taa>l6 XVI.~ Stalifltkfl of Factories bupected lo Emeh 



INDU8TKT AND LOCALITY. 

[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 





Num- 




ber of 


Places 


estab- 


in- 


lish- 


spect- 


ments 


ed. 


with 




no em- 




ployees. 



Num- , 

berof 

owners 

at 
work. 



Largest 
Number or 
Emplotbes 

IN Year. 



Total. ! 



Thereof 
in shop. 



I 



GRAND 
TOTAL. 



OFFICE 
FORCE. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
year* 
of 



1. Men's Garments and Furnishings. .1 5,8341 



a. Tailoring 

Buffalo 

New York City. 

RodiMter 

Symcuae , 

Itiea 



b. Shirts, collars and cuffs. 

Albany 

Glena Falls 

New York City 

Troy 



c. Men's neckwear. . 
New York City. 
Rochester 



d. Suspenders and other furnishing 

goods for men 

New York CUy 



2. Women's Garments and FuRNUHnros 



a. Dressmaking 

• Buffalo 

New York City. 



b. Women's white goods . 
New York CUy 



c. Infants' wear .... 
New York City. 



d. Women's neckwear, etc . 
New York City 



e. Corsets, garters, etc. 

McGraw 

New York City.... 



3. Men's Hats and Caps. 



MatteaxDan 

New York City. 
Yonkers , 



4. Women's Headwear. 



a. Artificial feathers and flowers. 
New York City 



b. Millinery 

Buffalo 

New York City. 



6. Miscellaneous Needle Work. 

a. Curtains, embroideries, etc. . 
New York City 



6,265' 

Besl 

4,238^ 

S09\ 

48 

S4 

356 

9 

8 

Mtl 

S4 

166 

166 

6 



47 
U 

5.322 



4,602 
1S7 

4.m 

852>. 
S3M 

90 . 
89 . 

163 . 

i47 

341 



5 

S06 
4 

1.571 



530 
6»S 

1,041 

90 
69t 

359 



b. Quilts, comfortables, etc. 



»63 
11 



IX. CLOTHING, MIIXI 
4,480 132,492 129,376! 117,086 3,055 



4.265 

175 

3,487 

968 

66 

18 

132 
/ 



107 
1 

66 

68 
6 



3.404 



3.003 

88 

9,696 

206 
901 



94,527 
9,667 

76,999 
8,899 
1,841 
U564 

32,808 
1,980 
1,799 
8,793 

14,609 

3,969 

3,609 
966, 



92,199 
9,618 

73,389 
8,638 
1,766 
1,610 

32.193 
1,967 
1,773 
8,697 

14,308 

3,835 

3,483 

949 



1,188 
1,169 



156,804 



126,755 

9,146 

119,786 

17,249 
16,069 



50j 3.629 

60^ 3.604 

60l 4,986 

60\ 4,976 



85 
7\ 



4,185 

368 

3,786 



266 13,121 



936 



801 



246 

949 

555 

62 
336 

194 



150 
147 

10 



1,9U 
7,705 
9,293 

25,377 



1,149 
1,191 

153,382 



124.104 

9,117 
117,915 

16.888 
14,7U 

3,523 

3,498 

4,810 
4,800 

4.057 

359 

3,664 

12,914 



82.584 
9,371 

64,196 
8,793 
1,686 
1,479 

30.265 
1,976 
1,499 
8,099 

13,963 

3.338 

3,036 

199 



899 
879 



123.999 



98.428 

9,061 

92,194 

14,987 
12,968 

3,027 
3,004 

3.833 
3,839 

3,724 

368 

3,397 

11.426 



2,277 

49 

1,789 

191 

86 

64 

605 

13 

96 

194 

994 

134 

119 

13 



38 
3.387 



9.584 
9,617 

15,793 

769 

13,136 

6.973 



4,637 

4,076 

183 



1,2S3\ 
7,688 
9,238\ 



1,906 
6,402 
2.972 



24,618{ 18,953 



9,408 
9,342 

15,210 

768 

19,664 

6,785 



4.406 
3.961 

181 



7.225 
7,166 

11.728 

791 

9,491 

4.923 



3.671 
3,996 



147 



2.633 

99 

9,663 

354 

308 

103 

103 

169 
169 

128 

6 

199 

206 



// 

116 

66 

734 



174 
173 

660 

11 

S49 

174 



131 

194 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bueeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



375 



Im^mUj, Tew EmAtd September SO, 1911 — Centlraed. 



NUMBBI 


OF EllPLOTSB* AT TllIB OF InSPBCTION. 




Webklt Hours of Labor. 


cha- 

dren 

under 

14 


SHOP FORCE. 


NUMBBB OF SHOP Ell- 
PLOTBBB WHO WORK — 




NUMBBB IN 8HOP8 
■M PLOYING — 


8BX AND AOB. 


51 

hours 

or 

lees. 


52-67 
hrs. 


58-63 
hrs. 


Over 
63 
hrs. 


(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

not'd). 


Total. 


1-19. 


20- 

199. 


200 


¥,? 1 Youtha 


Boys 
(14-16 

yw.). 


Worn. 1 G»J^ 
+^- jyrs.). 



NERY, 

114,031 


LAUNI 
L 24,202 


>RY. i 

I56.08C 


rrc. 

33,748 


63.157 


687 


29fi 


48.885 


1,003 


15.295 


62, 357 1 36, 278 


101 


8 


80.30? 


' 21,762 

r 87i 

f 17,941 

r 1,84£ 

> 296 

14C 

1.328 

20 

"1,068 
10 

892 

881 

48 

220 

194 

24.116 


42.138 

f 901 

84.78i 

4,006 

616 

624 

10,990 

462 

870 

4.718 

1,866 

2.312 

2,086 

186 

640 
640 

80.830 


16.406 

64£ 

9,665 

8,178 

788 

761 

17,342 

791 

1,026 

2,047 

11,804 

15,666 


54.152 

1,116 

46,878 

4,191 

671 

813 

7,656 

100 

2,676 
8,480 

893 

846 

81 

Abl 
449 

45,606 


431 

26 

247 

62 

238 

/ 

26 
200 

13 

IS 

5 

4 

161 


225 


25,004 
1 lis 


495 

161 

66 

4 

433 
69 

1 
\ 290 
1 29 

64 

f: 

11 
// 

1.339 


11.735 

66 

9,991 

204 

78 

80 

2.422 

64 

1 

683 

1,668 

1.041 

980 
19 

97 

79 

51.309 


43.832124.630 
1,810\ 447 

31,408 20,841 

8,041 287 

1,869 163 

86 1,309 

15.667 11,571 
64S\ 666 


101 


6 


8,6Si 


/«), 16,914 
U\ 4.090 

II 837 
14 642 

61 21.273 

6 1,099 

1 929 

86 4,803 

16 9,944 

III 2.223 

10\ 2.001 


101 


A 


t.eoc 






1,4B6 






29.660 

i,e65 


1 


2 


1,896 


i!7«7 
8,606 

2,136 

1,910 
160 

722 
714 

63,655 


1,896 
2,868 
3,496 






7,8tS 

is,ees 




1 


3.204 


27 

27 






2,917 






176 


1 

2 
2 

72 


186 

385 
868 

73.434 






860 


41 

41 

5.618 






8S4 






120,612 


80 





96.795 

t,ott 


21,124 

670 
19,246 

1.440 
1,864 

'373 
878 

476 
476 

703 

664 

1.900 


64.312 

1,462 
60,613 

9,797 
8,979 

2.661 
2,^28 

2,862 
2,862 

1.308 

161 

1,167 

3.553 


10.369 

'9,812 

3.396 
2,817 

326 
826 

1.585 

201 

1,884 

5.767 


42.30ll 97 

218 4 
41.422 88 

1,501 31 
1,289 24 

613 3 
613 8 

\ 
559 16 
669 16 

732 14 


39 

4 

82 

18 
17 

4 

4 

4 
4 

7 


52.630 

1,737 

47,411 

12,685 
10,940 

2.290 
2,267 

3.032 
8,081 

2.797 

285 

2,476 

3.353 


728 

69 

618 

398 
871 

114 
114 

53 
55 

46 

/ 
48 

58 


45.761 

iP5 

46,477 

3,073 
2,160 

951 

906 
«?4 

619 

"607 

1.621 


45.602 

1,468 

41,679 

10.818 
10,281 

1.968 
1,^46 

2.707 
2,707 

2.660 

201 

2,882 

7.234 


4,402 

369 

2,886 

742 

6 
. 6 

52 

417 
161 
266 

2.365 


30 




89,671 
14,633 


SO 




19,660 






2,924 






2,901 






3,664 






8,668 






3.696 






862 


66 
666 








8,206 


1A 


7 
34 






11,220 


7,615' 160 












1,196 


"i',788 
19 

7.374 


86 

2,960 

222 

10.406 


1,110 fifil^ If 


/ 

21 

7 

28 


876 

1,896 

640 

14.963 


22 

617 


l,09l\"4,709 
29^ 2,068 

6,67711,262 


i./P5 
486 
130 

1.380 






6,286 


1.648 
1,976 

439 


4,269\ 81 
1,608 48 

2,672 39 






2,217 






18.219 


...... 

14 


7,051 
6,992 

11,168 


3,082 
8,046 

4.292 

868 

2,811 

1,980 


3.969 
8,946 

6.437 

126 

6,844 

2.432 


439 
222 

217 

337 


983 
979 

1.689 

89 

1,699 

1.363 


18; 

18 
21 

'20 

37 


19 
19 

9 
2 
7 

28 


6.693 
6,646 

9.270 

7,104 

3.242 


338 

55i 

179 
22 

142 

79 


2,916) 3.973 
f.W5| 5.iWif 

2.6621 7.289 

94\ 188 

2,628\ 6,048 

710j 3.258 


163 
/^ 

1,217 
781 




14 
lA 


710 






8,872 
4.749 








1 


8,640 
3,102 

145 


1,687 
1,668 

47 


1.616 
1,212 

98 


337 
887 


961 
769 

44 


29 

29 


26 

22 

1 


2.464 

2,229 

100 


70 
05 


613. 2.545 
608^ 2,888 

21' 121 


382 
3 












1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



376 



New Yobk State Depabtment of Labob. 



Tdbto XVL— StalMiM«rnMlMl6«lM»«el6dlB EmA 



Indubtbt and LocAurr. 

[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are qpeoified.] 



Places 

in- 
spect- 
ed. 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



hjLRQwn 
NnicBSH OP 
Emplotbbs 

IN YSAR. 



Total 



Thereof 
m shop. 



OBAND 
TOTAJU 



omcB 

FOHCa. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
years 
of 
age. 



6. Misc ELLANaova Nbbdlb Wobk — 
CondtuUd. 

0. Umbrellas and parasols 

New York C%ty 



6. Lavmdkbzno, Custom Drsma, Etc. . . 



a>. Laundries (non-Chinese). 

Buffalo 

New York City 



a*. Chinese laundries. 
New York City.. 



b. Cleaning and dyeing. 
rYorkCity 



New 
7. Clip Sohtinq 



Buffalo 

New York City. 



Total — Group IX . 



501. 

67\. 



2.652 



1,628 

26 

1,119 

975 
794 

149 
104\- 

179'. 



14. 
137 . 



16.258 



IX. CLOTHING. MILLINERY. 



27 



31 



34 
99 

1.961 



1.062 

6 

772 

812 
722 

TJ 
62 

99 



11.195 



1.263 

1,249 

20,264 



16.618 
1,914 
9,990 

1.807 
1,464 

1.829 
1,661 

1.915 



411 
1,192 



365.936 



1.190 
1,196 

19.650 



16,102 
1,179 
9,087 

1.807 
1,464 

1,750 
1,600 

1.849 



1,090 



347.683 



1.106 
1,101 

19,126 



16,761 
1,299 
8,896 

1,760 
1,408 

1.614 
1,961 

1.726 



996 
1,041 



297.238 



604 



616 

242\ 



66 



19 
4^ 



8.216 



. Gbgceries 


821 1 326 


33,786 


32,186 


X. FOO 

28,066 


D. UC 
1.688 


iUORS 
1 












Buffalo 


400 

'i 

4 

7 
4 
2 

199 

SS 

6 

90 
68 

125 

6 
48 

1 
8 

141 




247 


4.015 

1,128 

296 

627 

4,717 
9,960 
1,966 

16,487 
1,722 
1,846 

2.336 
2,047 

7,231 
409 

2,721 
419 
496 

6.809 


3,797 

1,121 

279 

671 

4.604 
9,189 
1,906 

16,132 
1,606 
1,804 

2,015 
1,769 

6,738 
6.572 


3,789 

1,109 

282 

620 

4.660 
9,199 
1,966 

11,715 

2.167 
1,886 

6,834 
6.492 


218 

7 

16 

66 

213 

161 

60 

364 

lie 

41 

818 
986 

486 


1 


New York City 




2 


/ 


Niagara FoUk 




b- Kiigfir And tnoIftflRefl refining, . t . , . 








New York City 








Yonkera 








c. Fruit and vegetable canning and 
preserving 




46 

10 

1 

12 
9 

21 




New York City 




Rocheeter 




d. Coffee and spice roasting and 
gripding ,.,,,.,., 




New York City 




e. Groceries not elsewhere classified. 
Lt Ray 




New York City 


....... 


6 


278 
19 
69 

337 




Peekekill 




Rochetter 








. Pbovisions 




38 








Buffalo 


34 
70 

277 




6 
19 

30 


2,020 
9,626 

3,659 


1,891 
9,600 

3,476 


1,891 
9.969 

8.603 


18» 
126 

1S3 




New York City 




3. Daibt Pbopucts. 








Midcttetown 


17 






279 
4£0 


266 
966 


273 
416 


7 
66 




New York City 




/ 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Repobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 



377 



ladoHry. Yew Ended September 9^ 1911 — OoBtlned. 



NUMBBB OP EmPLOTBM AT TlMB OP IlfBPBOnON. 



WSBKLT HOUBS OP LaBOB. 



Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
yean 

(in 



SHOP POBCB. 



NXnCBBB OP SHOP KM- 
PLOTBBS WHO WOBK — 



ToUl. 



NUMBBB IN SHOPS 
KIIPLOTINO — 



1-19. 



20- 
199. 



200 



8BX AND AOB. 



Men 

(18 
yrs. 



Yonths 
(16-18 
yra.). 



Bogrs 

(14-16 
yrs.). 



Worn. 

(16 yrs, 

+). 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 






hours 


52-67 


58-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 







Over 
68 
hrs. 



ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



LAUNDRY. ETC.— Ooncfuilea. 



1.064 


246 

M4» 

7.712 


818 
818 

9.614 


1,235 


858 
S68 

6,938 


8 
8 

61 


1 
/ 

49 


683 
684 

11.437 


9 
9 

73 


76 
76 

3.292 


592 

699 

6.488 


396 
S99 

8.299 






1,060 






18.631 


452 


1 


15,236 
1,168 


5.295 

103 

3,034 

1.760 
1*408 

657 
481 

933 


8.936 
1,055 
4,794 


1,035 

"766 


4,825 

163 
9,663 

1.740 
1,399 

843 

683 

872 


63 


47 


10.731 
999 

6,798 

19 
8 

6St 
601 

784 


67 

3 

46 





6 
6 


3.143 

83 

9,493 

16 
16 

183 

190 

100 


6.575 

390 

9,691 

65 
46 

853 
790 

438 


6.505 

685 

3,467 

1,250 
968 

544 

380 

1,102 


13 

""is 

439 
S89 


1 
1 


8,694 
1,760 


48 

1 

1 

1 


49 

2 

1 

3 




1,408 








1.535 


678 
609 

757 


300 
900 




1,M90 






1.660 


20 




SMS 


94 
613 


S29 
388 




167 
650 






166 

4^ 




8 
37 


108 
934 


907 
658 






999 


1 





90 




289.022 


68.138 


li\,^72 


57.162 


12), m 


1.H9 


513 


158.038 


3,069 


77.934 


15^6»2 


55.823 


603 


24 



AND 1 
26.477 

8.571 
1,098 


roBACx:;o. 

3.033|11,814 

l^sjIioSQ 

551 A09 


11.575 

T.TlT 
654 

' "433 

4.338 

3,001 
1,305 

4.191 


17,525 

~3,7l9 
949 
959 
343 

4,210 
9,905 
1,907 

5,761 

5sa 


217 


61 
1 


8,523 

431 

13? 

6 

911 

lU 


151 

10 
9 

/ 


1.712 
22 

'I 


4.474 

633 
90 
54 

439 


17,213 
2,582 

est 

903 
71 

3,235 

9,4^3 
827 

8,153 

549 
755 

431 

953 

2.732 

iO 

3.320 



1,338 
1,431 

2.041 


3,078 

313 
303 


1 : 


968 


35 
3 

10 


931 
98 

81 
31 


b 

21 
116 


/ 

2 

/ 

i 

53 




664 
4,817 


so 

1,062 

634 
478 

1.423 




3,039 










1,305 










11.361 
1.361 


675 

994 
11 

430 
SSS 

553 

16 

197 


6.495 

1,137 
93 

1.110 
983 

3,039 

9S3 

1,397 


5,323 

787 
519 

831 

697 

1,845 

19S 

1,019 


105 


833 
4SJ 

371 
357 

433 

«i5 


933 

630 

1 

l.OU 

1,831 

91 

1,619 


7 


809 


695 '983 

1 

! 
259, 1.039 
959^ 803 

1,732 3.338 

1 131 

639\ 1,040 
4O0\ j^oo 











1.849 




4 
3 

67 


1 
1 







1,600 






5.819 
964 

9,133 
400 


210 
85 


10 


69 


5 


' 5 


194 
5.165 


49 
636 


1,632 

303 
1,976 

1.815 


2,877 


67 
4,819 


1 
85 

54 

1 

3 


1 

i 

3 


194 

278 

103 
170 

402 


1 

2 


9 
271 


1,550 

33 
1,605 

3i2 




24' 


1,709 


139 
346 

1,239 


1,957\ 1,530 
1,690\ 3,070 

266| 2,912 




8,9U 
3,820 


f 


52 


8 

8.sl 


966 






938\ ISO 
1 355 






i55 








«5? 
i75 


( 


861 


83 


978 








-^ 


179 


3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



378 



Xew York State Department of Labor. 



table XVL~Stati8tfc8«rFMCoriMlMpectedloBMh 



Industry and Localitt. 

[Only the more important centers of each 
industry are specified.] 



Places 



spect- 
ed. 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
no em- 
ployees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



Larqbst 
Ndmbsb op 
Emplotebs 

IN YbAR. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



GRAND 
TOTAL. 



onrcB 

rORCB. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
yeaiB 
of 



Bakbrt Products, Conpbotionbrt, 
Etc 

a. Macaroni and other food pastes. . 

New York City 

b. Crackers and biscuits 

Buffalo 

Nmjo York City 

0. Bread and other bakery products. 

Buffalo 

Nmo York City 

d. Confectionery and ice cream 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Rocheeter 

Bbybbaqes 

a. Artificial ice 

New York City 

b. Cider, grape juice, etc 

Westfieli 

c. Mineral and soda waters 

New York City 

d. Malt 

Buffalo 

New York City 

e. Malt liquors 

Buffalo 

New York City 

Rochester 

f. Vinous and distilled liquors 

New York City 

g. Miscellaneous bottling 

Tobacco Products 

a. Tobacco and snuff 

Elmira 

New York City 

b. Gi^rs 

Binghamton 

Kingston 

New York City 

0. Cigarette 

New York City 

Total — Group X 











X. FOOD. LIQUORS AND 


5,491 


234 


3,384 


35,007 


33,840 


32,382 


1,153 




56 
38 


2 


36 


928 
697 


888 
670 


895 
668 


40 




61 

S 

46 


1 

i 


38 

t 
$8 


1,159 
364 
652 


1.093 
345 
6S6 


1,102 


66 
19 
27 




4,591 

183 

3.110 


197 

8 

68 


2,901 

95 

l,9g0 


20,559 

1,076 

16,673 


19.967 

1^014 

16,186 


19,585 

1,061 

14.849 


687 

62 

482 


4 

i 


783 
5/ 

57£ 
17 


34 

S3 


409 
5 

303 
3 


12,361 

7»B 

9,363 

645 


11.892 

701 

8,982 

696 


10,800 

639 

8,341 

608 


460 
21 

S72 
19 


8 

S 


728 




191 


13,966 


12.847 


12.828 


1,104 




81 
4£ 




9 
4 


1.110 
781 


1,050 
763 


1.032 
710 


60 
18 




31 

1 





10 


856 
»50 


811 

S24 


445 

100 


44 

26 




221 

131 




96 
68 


1,631 
1,138 


1.536 

1,076 


1,482 
1,030 


92 

60 




24 

13 

6 

256 

88 
8 




1 


624 
£63 
BBS 

8.359 

750 

6,03t 

47B 

1.190 
707 


596 

B57 
t07 

7,632 
611 

4,697 
418 

1.029 
697 


679 

247 
224 

8,070 
722 

4.879 
471 

1,063 
682 


28 

6 

19 

716 

1S9 

SSS 

64 

161 
110 












52 
6 
3 




85 

61 




8 
4 




30 




15 


196 


193 


157 


3 




1.288 


2 


827 


31,826 


31.378 


28,828 


448 




32 

6 
13 




9 


2,472 

376 

1,787 


2,431 

368 

1,759 


2.244 

276 

1.740 


41 
8 

28 






3 




1.205 

9 
685 


2 
k 


802 

SO 

9 

43g 


25,502 
17,948 


25,170 
g,3B7 
1,076 

17,664 


22,931 
2,252 
1,081 

16,704 


333 

IS 

5 

984 




51 
49 




16 
16 


3.852 
3,834 


3,777 
3,760 


3.653 
S,6S9 


75 

74 




8,746 


236 


4,805 


124,143 


119.299 


111.098 


4.803 


8 


—^-rr=s 




-^ ' 


=T — r— a 


—i—t—iza^ 


i. J— »-3 




■ ■ m 



t Includes one child undsr 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of Bureau of Factoby Inspection, 1911. 



379 



IiidiMti7» Tear Ended September SO, 1911 — Contfaiaed. 



Number of Emplotbbs at Timb of iNSPBcnoN. 



Weekly Hours of Labor. 



Clul- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not'd). 



SHOP force. 



NUMBER OF SHOP BM- 
PLOTSB8 WHO WORK — 



Total 



NUMBER IN SHOPS 
BMPLOTING — 



SEX AND AGE. 



1-19. 



20- 
199. 



200 



Men 

(18 



Youths 
(16-18 
yrs.). 



Boys 
(14-16 
yre.). 



Worn. 

(16yr8. 

+). 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yra.). 



51 






lOurs 


52-57 


58-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 







Over 
63 
hrs. 



TOBAC 
31,229 


CO — Ci 
15,764 


meludec 
8.940 


I. 
6.52522,901 


251 


85 


7,673 


319 


1,642 


8.166 


21,319 


202 


t4 


855 


168 
60 

180 

90 

134 

13,360 

449 

9,669 

2,056 

164 

1,957 

61 

3.503 


687 
681 

856 
304 
457 

2.457 

949 
1,899 

4.940 
364 

3,368 
698 

6.634 


RSU 


4 
3 

14 
8 
6 

157 

98 
99 

76 
3 

69 
6 

31 


1 
1 

6 

i 

43 

17 

8 

35 

/ 
98 

18 


243 
169 

408 
187 
183 

1.850 

993 

1,389 

6.172 

979 

3,991 

379 

185 


23 
19 

14 

'""14 

t 

1 

278 
3 

960 
7 

4 


39 
33 

48 

/ 

43 

808 

6t 

664 

647 

7 

696 

11 

1.698 


168 
163 

101 

9 

69 

4.350 

119 

4,080 

3,647 

96 

3,008 

3A6 


648 
466 

887 
314 
489 

13.725 

814 

9,617 

6,059 

9AM 






641 






3.181 

998 
9,883 

3,344 

3,344 

1,687 


456 

694 
198 
387 

16,944 

719 

19,877 

4,779 
939 

3,641 
198 

11,486 






1,036 






394 






691 






18,998 

989 

14,367 

10,340 

618 

7,969 

689 


115 

9 

106 

87 

9 

66 


t2 

1 

2 

i 


11,724 


5,694| 3.672 


860 




972 


56S 
336 

164 

936 

667 

160 

104 

19 

1.025 
89 

'f, 

506 
397 

164 

4.731 


404 

366 

247 

74 

249 
908 

391 
137 
193 

4.947 
601 

9,917 
406 

396 
946 


205 
905 

1,382 
i',389 


972 
699 

359 

68 

1,343 
968 

523 

941 
177 

7.338 

589 

4,538 

417 

797 
438 

154 

12,865 








. 58 
68 

22 


73 
67 

18 


143 
67 

361 

74 

924 
689 

228 

194 

46 

1.459 
117 
794 


698 
690 




699 










401 


6 
3 

14 
5 


1 

13 
5 


32 
5 

20 
4 

28 


3 




74 






1.390 
970 

551 


:::::: 


49 

98 

50 


411 
351 

179 
99 
33 

4,676 
436 

3,330 
146 

391 
303 

46 

15,279 


6 
9 

94 

18 
76 

67 




941 








906 






98 
1 





60 

1.262 

30 

490 

971 

157 
163 




7,364 
683 


11 

3 


4 
/ 
9 




4,644 


I 









417 






902 






104 
83 


1 

1 


354 
116 

103 

3,611 






679 










154 






6 




28.380 


8.699 


14,950 


195 


113 


14.958 


259 


9,490 


1 


2,203 


118 

31 
47 

4,386 
99 
16 

9,397 

227 

m 


483 

937 

63 

7,756 
903 

6,919 


1,602 

i',6b'9 

10.457 
1,937 
1,034 
6,804 

2.891 
9,891 


708 
118 
439 

11,017 

643 

975 

7,507 

1.130 

1,194 


7 


8 


1,480 

160 
1,966 

11,114 

1,668 

611 

7,866 

2,364 
9,369 


207 
93 

106 
33 

52 

69 


126 

68 
64 

8,934 
171 
177 

6,734 

430 

419 


1,787 

1,658 

10.347 

9,097 

994 

7,695 

3.145 
3,145 


290 
910 






968 







1,719 


6 

157 

9 
63 
90 

31 
99 


9 

104 

3 

31 

6 

1 






22,599 
9,939 


3,318 

4t 

606 

9,161 

3 

/ 




1 


1,076 






16,490 
3,678 




/ 


3,665 












106.295 


28.931 


39.584 


37,780 


72,528 


732 


284 


32.016 

= 1 ! 


735 


14.665 


35.545 


51,076 


5,009 


t22 



years of age employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



380 



New Yoek State Department of Labob. 



TUUe Xyi.~Steti«tics af FkctoriM Imported lo 



IirDUOTST AND LOCAUTT. 

[Only the more important centers of eaoh 
industry are q;>eoified.] 



Places 



q>ect- 



Num- 
ber of 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 
with 
noem- 
plo3^ees. 



Num- 
ber of 
owners 

at 
work. 



Labobst 
numbbr of 
Emplotbbs 

IN YbaR. 



Total. 



Thereof 
in shop. 



oband 

TOTAL. 



omcB 
fobcb. 



Total. 



There- 
of 
14-16 
yean 
of 



1. Watbb 

2. Gab 

Buffalo 

Nno York City 

4. Elbotbxo Liobt A2n> Powbb. . . 

New York City 

Niagatra PaUt 

5. Stbam Hbat and Powbb 

Now York City 

6. Qabbaob Dxspobai., Etc 

Total — Group XI. 



39 



94 



f 

305 



58 



48 



499 



11 



13 



274 



2.915 



MS5 

1,99$ 



6.125 



4,M9e 
S2d 

305 



B94 
102 



9,721 



258 



2.765 



»4S 
1,866 

5,819 



4J0$ 
Ml 

305 



BS4 
100 



9.247 



XL WATER. LIGHT 
245 16 



2.811 



849 
1,900 

6.919 



4»108 
908 

303 



884 



9.317 



150 



7 
196 



305 



194 
64 



478 



1 T Cabpbntbra* Shops 


47 




btP 


28 S91 


816 


XIL BUILDING 
239f 61 


















Ntw York City 


97 
31 




• 19 
21 


869 

206 


866 
203 


188 
165 


4 
8 




2. Paint Shops 




1 








3. Pluiibbrs' Shops 


8 




2 


129 


127 


115 


2 










Total — Group XIL 


86 
44.672 




51 


656 


645 


519 


11 


1 










GrandTotal — New York State 


276 


24.831.1,295,381 


1.241,222 


1,189,661 


58.896 


126 



t laclades five ehildren under 14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BePOBT of BtIBEATT of FaOTOBY iNSPECTIOlSr, 1911. 



381 



In&aatTf, Tear Ended SevCember SO, 1911 — Coadaded. 



NUMBXB OF EmPLOTBSB AT TlMS OF InSPSCTION. 



WXKKLT HOTTBS OF LaBOX. 



Chil- 
dren 
under 

14 
years 

(in 
shops 

ex- 
cept 

as 
not*d). 



SHOP FOBCX. 



• NUMBBR OF SHOP Blf- 
PLOTBB8 WHO WORK — 



Total. 



NX71CBBB IN SHOPS 
BM PLOTXNQ 



1-19. 



20- 

199. 



200 



SBX AND AQX. 



¥,? Youths 
ii? (16-18 



Boys 
(14-16 
yrs.). 



Worn. 
(16yrB. 



Girls 

(14- 

16 

yrs.). 



51 






lOurs 


52-57 


58-63 


or 


hrs. 


hrs. 


less. 







Over 
63 
hrs. 



AND P 
229 


OWER. 
158 


71 




229 










29 


101 


40| 69 
















2,661 


426 


1,385 


900 


2,650 


2 








8 


271 


6671 1.716 














' 




M4M 


S 
Hi 

1.440 


""oish 

1,864 


£37 
66S 

2.310 


1,773 
5.610 


1 
3 












457 
1,745 


£41 
1,06» 

734 




1»774 
5,614 








4 
923 


»61 
2,212 




1 











1 








S,91A 


486 
7 

200 


UU9 
H7 

. 108 


g,S10^ S.910 


3 


1 






838 


185 
60 


1,368 
69 

114 


86 




m 




303 








308 










72 


58 
















87 


16S 
16 


82 
21 




m 

37 










72 
14 


6 


99 
21 


68 
2 


























8,844 


2,240 


3,894 


3,210 


8.838 


5 

■''-!■ 


1 






1,046 


2.643 


2,687 


2.668 










- 


=^ 






INDUSTRY. 
233 213 



20 



230 



180 



60 



184 
162 



164 
132 



£0 



181 
161 



146 
93 



113 



48 



65 



113 



59 



46 



508 



1,086,765 



186,309 



115 

489,901 



410,555 



504 
9, 0*27 



332 



111 



66 



13,487 



4,374 



322,131! 7,746 



189,276 



494,342 



376,772126.375 



t67 



*< ears of a<e employed in office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



382 



New Yoek State IDepaetment of Laboe. 



TABLE ICVIL— STATISTICS OF MINES AND QUARRIES 



Industkt and 

LOCAUTT. 



Firm name. 



I 



I Num- 

Material mined or ber of 

quarried. iinspeo- 



Nam» 
ber of 
ahafto 

<Nr 
open- 
ings 
in op- 
era- 
tion. 



1. Stoks Quabries. 

•any County. I 

South Bethlehem Callanan Road Imp. Co. 



Albany County. 
- ■ -etJhl« 

Cayuoa County. { 
Auburn City of Auburn 

- W. 8. Beardsley 

" 'Braver Bros 

" C. E. Goodrich 

Sennett Gilbert B. Lewis 

Chautauqua County. 
Jamestown ! Jamestown Shale Paving Brick Co. 

Chenango County. j 
Norwich |Clark, Conroy A Co 



Clinton County. ' 

Ausable Forks Sherrill Hardware Co 

Chasy The Chaxy Marble Lime Co . 

Plattoburg Peter Lasotte 

OUver Gebo 

Columbia County. 
Hudson 



Knickerbocker Port Cement Co. . 
N. Y. & N. £. Lime A Cement Co. 



DelaxjDare County. \ 

East Branch iChaa. Baxter. . . . 

W. B. Snyder. . . 
Wilson & Irwin. 
Apley &, Irwin. . 



Fish Eddy 

Dutchess County. 

Dover Plains Dutchess County Lime Co. 

Stoneco Clinton Point Stone Co 



Erie County. 
Akron 



Buffalo . 



General Crushed Stone Co 

Kelly Island Lime A TranqK>rta- 

tion Co 

J. L. Apperheimer 

Barber Asphalt Paving Co 

[Buffalo Cement Co 

" Buffalo Crushed Stone Co 

" lAnna Geheres Quarries 

Mat T. Wind 

Clarence Carroll Bros 

Williamsville Carroll Bros 



Essex Counhf. | 

Ausable Forks Charles Clement 

Port Henry Northern Iron Ore Co. 



Limestone. 



Limestone. 



Blueetone . 



Bluestone . 



Granite. . . 
Limestone. 



Limestone. 



Bluestone . 



Mari>le.... 
Limestone. 



Limestone. 



Granite. . . 
Limestone. 
I j 

Genesee County. ' 

LeRoy General Crushed Stone Co 'Limestone . 

" Heimlick Kiln A Stone Quarries. " 

Greene County. 

Alsen 

Cementon 



Herkimer County. 

Little Falls Kalian Bros. 

" 'Syenite Trap Rock Co. 



Alsen Portland Cement Co Limestone. 

CatakiU Portland Cement Co . . 



Traprock. 



ll 

ii 

ll 
1 
ll 
1, 



*Not inspected 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpobt of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 383 



INSPBGTEDIIN THE TEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER SO, 1911. 







NUMBKB OP EmPLOTBBS. 






Boys 
under 
16 years 
(illegally 

em- 
ployed). 




l^AMOWn NtJMBn 
XM TBAR. 


AT mfB OF XNSPBCnON — 


Weekly 
hours of 
labor in 




Thereof 
office 
foroe. 


Total. 


Office 
etc. 


IN MINE OR QUABRT. 


mine or 
quarry. 


Total 


Total. 


Males 
18 years 
or over. 


Boys 
16-18 
years. 




111 


1 
1 


HI 

29 

8 

26 

16 

8 


1 
1 


110 

28 

8 

25 

15 

8 


110 

28 

8 

26 

16 

8 






60 


61 






48 


14 






69 


40 










69 


16 


i 


1 






64 


16 






69 
































18 


i 


18 

66 

6 

13 

20 
69 


1 


18 

64 

6 

13 

20 

66 


18 

64 

6 

13 

20 
66 






64 


66 






60 


6 






64 


13 










64 


20 










60 


79 


4 


4 






60 


















































































180 

76 

173 

5 




iso 

66 

173 

6 

203 

66 

64 

10 

1 

261 

41 

6 
11 

64 

16 

100 
30 

9 
107 




180 
65 


180 

65 

170 

4 

200 

66 

63 

10 

1 

260 

40 

6 
11 

63 
16 

100 
30 

9 
105 






60 


1 

3 
1 
3 


1 






60 


3| 170 
li 4 
3 200 






60 






60 


203 

66 

70 

26 

1 






60 




66 
63 
10 

1 
9fln 






60 


1 


1 






60 






60 










60 


261 

76 

5 


1 
1 


1 






60 


ll 40 






60 




6 
11 

63 

15 






64 


11 

100 
30 

100 
30 

9 
107 










60 


1 


1 






60 






60 






100 
30 

9 
105 




1 . . . . 


60 






1 


60 






! 


64 


2 


2 


1 


60 



duriocsrear. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



384 



New Yobk State Department of Labob. 



TiUe XYIL— Staltallea ef Min m and QurriM bwpected 



Industbt and 

LOCALITT. 


Firm name. 


Material mined or 
quarried. 


Num- 
ber of 
[inspec- 
tions. 


Num- 
ber of 
shafts 

or 
open- 

in op- 
era- 
tion. 


1. Stonb Quarribb— 
Continue. 

Jefferson County. 

Chaumont 


Adams A Duford Co 


Limestone 


1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

* 


1 


Natural Bridge 


New York Lime Co 


Magnesia limestone. 
BedGranite 

Limestone 


1 


PictoD LslaDcl 


Picton Island Red Granite Co.. . . 
New York Lime Co 


1 


Letvis County. 

Natural Bridge 


1 


Montgomery County. 

Canaioharie . 


Empire Equipment Co 


Lim<wrtone 


1 


South Amsterdam 


Valley Stone Co 


M 


1 


Monroe County. 

Bocheeter 


Whitmore. Bauber & Vioinus 

Foery & Kastner 


Sandstone 






m 


* 


M 


T. C. Lauer & Son 


« 


•i 


Oneida County. 

Blakesley 

Hisginville 

J acKflonbers 


F. E. Conley Stone Co 


Limestone 


* 


F. E. Conley Stone Co 


m 


», 


F. E. Conley Stone Co 


m 


* 
* 

• 

1 

1 

* 

: 

* 




Idunnsville 


F. E. Conley Stone Co 


a 




Oriakany Falls 

Onondaga County. 

Snlit Rock 


F. E. Conley Stone Co 


m 




Solvay Process Co 


Limestone 


1 


Syracuse 


Rock Cut Stone Co 




1 


Orleana County. 
Albion 


H. P. Burghard & Co 


Sandstone 




M 


Pat Cleary 






a 


Orleans County Quarries Co 

Reed. Allen A Beed 


m 




« 


M 




M 


M. A. Byan 


« 




« 


Martin Scanlon 


a 




Holley 


Orleans County Quarries Co 

M. A. Ryan 


M 


4> 


Hulberton 


m 


♦ I . 




A. R. Squires 


« 


♦ 


« 


Vincent Stones A Co 


• 


♦ 

1 
1 
1 

* 

1 

1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 

1 

* 




Rockland County. 

Ilaverstraw 


Haverstraw Stone Co 


Tri^) rock 


1 


\f ount Iw 


Belmont & Gumee 




1 


Rockland Lake 


Rockland Lake Trap Book Co 

Ramapo Trap Rock Co 


m 


1 


Suflfem 


a 




Tompkins Cove 

St. Lawrence County. 
Gouvemeur 


Tompkins Cove Stone Co 

Callahan A Son Mining Co 

Geneeee Furnace Co 


Limestone 


1 


Marble 


1 






1 


M 


Gouvemeur Marble Co 


M 


1 


« 


Northern New York Co 


« 


1 


« 


St. Lawrence Marble Co 

Potsdam Red Sandstone Co 

Saratoga Trap Bock Co 


« 


1 


Potsdam 


Sandstone 


1 


Saratoga County. 

Greenfield 


Trap rook 


I 


Schenectady County. 

Pattersonville 


Flint Hill Quarries 


Limestone 








« 


Not inspected 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Kbport of Bureau of Factory Ikspbction, 1911. 385 



in the Tc«r EMe4 SeytonbOT SO. tMI — < 


ymtkmml. 










Number or Emplotsbb. 


Boys 

under 

IMjemn 

(iUsBaUy 

em- 
ployed). 




LABOMT NUMBER 
nVTBAS. 


AT ItMB OF XNSPBCnON — 


Weekly 
hovrs of 
labor in 




Thereof 
office 
force. 


Total. 


Office 
force, 
etc. 


IN MINE OB QUAitBY. 


mine or 
quarry. 


TotaL 


Total. 


Males 
18 years 
or over. 


Boys 
16-18 
years. 




80 




5 




5 

It 

100 

6 

10 
28 


5 
19 

100 

6 

SO 
28 






64 


20 




13 
100 

6 








60 


100 










54 


8 










60 


10 




10 
28 








60 


40 










60 








































































1 


































































285 


3 


2R.'i 


3 


282 


282 






60 


111 


1| MH 


1 100 

i 
1 


10» 






60 










::::';::::::::i::::::::: 


1 


' 










! 





















1 ; 


_ 








:::::::;.' i 


1 










[ 


1 








1 


:::::::::':::::::::, ::::.:;::i. ...:.;.. 












::: ^ i 


























85 






85 

28 

236 




86 

27 
235 


as5 






60 


28 


1 
1 


1 

1 







60 


236 






60 










127 


2 


127 

6 
16 
19 
14 
IS 
«0 

30 


2 


125 

6 

la 

19 
14 
16 
60 

30 


125 

6 
1« 
19 
14 
1ft 
60 

30 






60 


6 






60 


25 










60 


23 











60 


14 










60 


16 










60 


60 










60 


30 










60 












_ ^ , 



during 3rear. 



13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



386 



New Yobk State Department of Labok. 



Table XVIL— StaUstics of Mines and Qaarrles In^»ected 



Indubtbt and 

LOCAUTT. 


Firm nanoe. 


Material mined or 
quarried. 


Num- 
ber of 
inspec- 
tions. 


Num- 
ber of 
shafts 

or 
open- 
ings 
m op- 
era- 
tion. 


1. Stone Quarriks — 

Sehofutrie County. 
CobleakiU 


A. L. Morton 


Limestone 


1 
1 
1 

♦ 
* 

* 
* 
m 

m 

1 
1 
1 

* 

1 

1 

4i 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 


1 


Howes Cave 


Helderberg Portland Cement Co. . 
Mix Stone Co 




1 


Schoharie 


M 


1 


SuUivan County. 
Livin^ton Manor 


The Basoomb 


Bluestone 




Dutcher ft McGrath 






H 1 


W. Hurch. Jr 


M 




u m 


Jas. licme. ............. x .... ^ . 


a 




a m 


Victor Wicks 


M 




M w 


Wood Bros 


« 




TompkiM County. 
Portland Point 


Cayuga Portland Cement Co 

Cons. Rosendale Cement Co 

Jacobus, Granweller ft Co 

City of Kingston 


Limestone. 




Vi4fter County. 
Binnewater 


Limestone 


1 


Cementon 




1 


Kingston 


M 


1 




Hudson River Blue Stone Co 

Upper Hudson Stone Co 

North River Stone Co 


Bluestone. . 




Marlboro 


Limestone 


1 


Rondout 




1 


Saugerties 


Jas. Moxwesson 


Bluestone 




Warren County. 
Glena Falls 


Jointa Lime Co 


Limestone . . 


1 




Glens Falls Portland Cement Co.. 
Finch, Pruyn ft Co 




1 


M M 


M 


1 


M U 


Sherman Lime Co 


N 


1 


M M 


F. W. Waite Lime Co 


« 


1 


Waahington County. 
Granville 


Hayes ft Roberts Red fflate Co . . . 

Griffiths. Roberts ft Jones 

Mathews Slate Ca (National).. . . 
Chan. L Baker 


Red slate 


1 


M 




1 


Hatch Hill 


« 


I 


M M 


M 


1 


Hebron 


Guthrie Bros 


a 


1 




Nelson ft Guthrie 


m 


1 


•« 


Kehoe. Jones ft Evans 

Mathews Slate Co. (New Eagle) . . 
Mathews Slate Co. (Empire) 


M 


1 


M 


M 


1 


Jamesville 


§Sra.1S*r-. :::::: 


I 


Middle Granville 


1 




Grace WIBmmm ft Son (Old Eagle). 
Prairie SUte Co 


M 


1 


M M 


Variegated slate 

Red slate. . . 


1 


North Granville 


E. J. Johnson 


1 


Smith Basin 




Limestone 


1 


WeHckeater County. 
Elmsfoid 


Pittsburg Construction Co 

South Dover Marble Co 


Limestone 


1 


South Dover 


Marble. . 




« M 


Dover White Marble Co 

Jas. Duell 






Tarr3rtown 






YonkeiB 


F. Haokett 


Granite 






Louis Petro 


M 




WyomingCounty. 


Am. Bluestone Co 


Bluestone 




m m 


Warsaw Bluestone CJo 






PortaceriUe 


Portageville Bluestone Co 


M 










Total — Stone 


78 


78 











* Not inspected 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 387 



|B tlM Yew Ended September SO, 1911 — Continned. 



. 




Number of Emplotbbs. 






Boys 

under 

16 years 

(iUegally 

em- 
ployed). 




LAROKST NUMBER 
IN YEAR. 


AT TIME OF INSPECTION — 


Weekly 
hours of 
labor in 




Thereof 
oflBce 
force. 


Total 


Office 

force, 

etc. 


IN MINE OR QUARRT. 


mine or 
quarry. 


Total. 


Total. 


Males 
18 years 
or over. 


Boys 
16-18 
years. 




37 


1 


37 
58 
35 


1 


36 
58 
35 


36 
58 
35 






60 


58 






60 


40 










60 





















































































































• 






62 


2 


44 
16 
6 


2 


42 

16 

6 


42 

16 

6 






60 


16 






60 


6 








48 














145 


1 

1 


145 
71 


i 

1 


144 
70 


144 
70 






60 


71 






60 










35 




30 
60 
30 
60 

75 

4 




30 
50 
30 
60 
75 

4 
3 
8 

10 
5 

16 
2 

17 
7 

12 
4 
5 

13 

40 

44 


30 
60 
30 
50 
75 

4 
3 
8 

10 
5 

16 
2 

17 
7 

12 
4 
5 

13 

40 

44 






59 


70 










59 


40 










56 


50 










59 


76 








59 


4 










60 


3 




3 
8 
10 









50 


8 











56 


10 










56 


5 




5 
16 

2 
17 

7 
12 

4 

5 
13 









60 


16 










50 


2 










60 


17 










56 


7 










56 


12 










60 


4 










50 


5 










60 


13 












55 


50 




40 








60 


44 




44 








48 






























































































































































4.124 


35' 3.700! Xfi 


3,755 


3.755 

















= 


- 


■J 



during year. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



388 



Xew York State Dbpabtmbnt of Labor. 



Table XTIL— SHrtislics of MIm» i 



IlfDnSVBT AJf D 
LOGAUTT. 



firm name. 



Material mined or 
quarried. 



Num- 
ber of 

tioos. 



Num- 
ber of 
shafts 



2. IbON» PTBITEa AJfD ZiNC 

Mikes. 

Clinton County. 
Lyon Mountain 



Dutcheat County. 
Amenia 



The Chateaugay Ore ft Iron Co.. 
Mine 



Magnetite. 
Limonite . . 



E$$ex County. 
Mineville. . . 



Inc., 



Port Henry. 



Port Henry Iron Ore Co. . . , 
Witheii»ee, Sherman dc Co. 

Bonanaa 

Witberbee, Sherman ft Co., Inc. 

Joker 

Witharbee. Sherman ft Co.. Inc 

Harmony A 

Witherbee. Sherman ft Co., Inc., 

Harmony B 

Witherbee, Sherman ft Co., Inc. 

Barton Hill 

Witherbee, Sherman ft Co., Inc., 

Smith Mine 

Cheever Iron Ore Co 



Magnetite. 



Eerkimtr County. 
Salisbury Centre . 

neida County. 
Clinton 



Salisbmy Steel ft Iron Co. 
Clinton Hematite Co 



Orange County. 
Fort Montgomery. 
Sterlington 



Hudaim Iron Co. 
Sterling Iron Co. 



Magnetite. 
Hematite. . 
Magnetite. 



St. Lawrenet County. 
DeKatb Junction. . 

Edwards 

Gouvemour 



Wayne County. 
Ontario Centre. 



St. Lawrence ^rrites Co. 

Northern Ore Uo 

Hinckley Fibre Co 



Pyrites. 
Zmc ... 
Pyrites. 



Fruitland. 



FumaoeviUe Iron Co. 
Ontario Iron Ore Co. . 
Wayne Iron Ore Co. . 



Red Hematite. 



Total — Iron, Pyrites 
and Zino 



3. Qtpsux. 



JSrie County. 
Akron .... 



Akron. Qjrpsimi Co. 



Genesee County. 

Akron 

Oakfield 



American Gypsum Co 

Niagara Gypsum Co 

United States Gypsum Co. 



Monroe County, 
Garbutt , 



Wheatland. 



Empire G>npsum Co 

Lycoming Calcining Co 

Consolidated Wheatland Plaster 

Co 

Empire Gypsum Co 

Monarch Plaster Co 



Gypsum. 
Gypsum. 

m 

Gypsum. 



Onondaga County. 
FayetteviUe . . . 



C. L. Miller Co. 



Gsrpsom. 



Total — Gypsum. 



15 



10 



* Not inspected 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpoet of Bureau of Factoey Ixspection, 1911. SSS 



sa,.lfU — CMitln 







Number of Emplotess. 






Boys 

under 

16 years 

CiflegaHy 

em- 
ployed). 




ULHOBST NUMBBR 
INTBAB. 


AT TIMH OF INBPBCnON — 


Weekly 
hours of 
Idborin 
mine or 
quarry. 




Thereof 
office 
force. 


Total. 


Office 

force, 

etc. 


IN MINB OB QUABBT. 


Total. 


Total. 


Males 
18 years 
or over. 


Boys 
16-18 
years. 


434 


4 


343 
26 

153 

159 

158 

140 

69 

56 

U 
131 


4 


339 

26 

150 

156 

155 

138 

69 

56 

14 
125 


338 
26 

150 

166 

155 

188 

69 

56 

14 

125 


1 




64 


26 




54 


153 


3 
3 
3 
2 


3 
3 
3 
2 






54 


208 






54 


208 






54 


173 






54 


88 






54 


61 










54 


60 










54 


166 


6 


6 






60 










60 




U 
119 




U 

118 


11 

118 






60 


lid 


1 


1 






60 










182 


2 


182 
11 
10 


2 


180 
11 
10 


180 
11 
10 






59 


11 






59 


10 










60 




































































1,059 


24 


1.582 


24 


1,558 


1,557 


1 










* * 


43 




43 

67 
112 
117 

28 
28 

20 

6 

17 

25 




43 

67 
112 
117 

28 
27 

20 

6 

17 

25 


43 

67 
112 
117 

28 
27 

20 

6 

17 

25 






60 


67 










54 


112 










60 


117 










60 


28 










60 


28 


1 


1 






60 


20 






60 


6 











60 


17 










60 


25 










60 














463 


1 


463 

===== 


1 


462 


462 










= = 


1 — 





daring year. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



390 New York State Departmext of Labor. 

Table XVIL— SUOaOee of MIbm and Qoarrles bwpectod 



Industrt and 

LoCALITr. 


Firm name. 


Material mined or 
quarried. 


Num- 
ber of 
in«H>ec- 
tions. 


Num- 
ber of 
shafts 

or 
open- 
ings 
inop- 
cra- 
tior. 


4. MlSCELLAXEOUS. 

BBsex Couniif. 
Crown Point 


Crown Point Spar Co 


Feldspar 

reioapar 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 

« 

1 

1 
1 
1 


1 


Ticonderoga 


Barrett Manufacturing Co 

American Glue Co 




1 


North River 


Garnet 


1 


LivingtUm County. 

Caledonia 


Caledonia Maii Co 


Lime 


1 


CuylerviUe 


Sterling Salt Co 


Salt 


1 


Retsof 


Retaof Mining Co 


a 


1 


St. Lawrence County. 

Fowler 


Union Talc Co 


Talc 


1 


FullerviUe 


Ontario Talc Co 




1 


. Talcville 


International Pulp Co., Mine 2J. . 
International Pulp Co.. Mine 3. . . 
Uniform Fibrous Talc Co 

The Sagandaga Graphite Co 

Empire Graphite Co 


« 


1 


M 


a 


1 


m 


« 


I 


Saratoga County. 

Conklinville 


Graphite 


1 


Kings 






Warren County. 
North River 


North River Garnet Co 


Garnet 


1 


Sodom 


Gore Mountain Garnet Co 

Warren County Garnet Mill Co. . 
American Graphite Co 


a 


1 


Wevertown 


M 


1 


Graphite 


Graphite 


1 










Total — Miscellaneous 


18 


16 










Grand Total 


121 


128 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Rbpoet of Bureau of Faotoey Inspection, 1911. 391 



IbUmYmu 












Number of Emplotbbs. 


Boys 

under 

16 years 

(UlegaUy 

em- 
ployed). 




LABOS8T NUMBER 
IN TEAR. 


AT TIME OF INSPECTION 


Weekly 
hours of 
labor in 




Thereof 
office 
force. 


Total. 


Office 
force, 
etc. 


IN MXNE OR QUARRT. 


mine or 
quarry. 


Total. 


Total 


Males 
18 yean 
or over. 


BOVB 

16-18 
years. 




18 




18 

11 

9 

12 
90 
135 

6 
6 




18 
11 

9 

12 
90 
135 

6 
6 
12 
20 
5 

10 


18 
11 
9 

12 
90 
135 

6 

6 

12 

20 

5 

10 






55 


12 










54 


9 










60 


12 










60 


90 








^ 


60 


140 











60 


6 










60 


6 










54 


14 




12 

20 

5 








59 


22 










59 


5 










59 


12 




10 









60 














61 


1 


53 

35 

3 

51 


1 


52 

35 

3 

50 


52 

35 

3 

50 






60 


35 






66 


3 










48 


51 


1 


1 






60 






* 




496 


2 


476 


2 


1!1 


474 




! 








7,042 


62 


6.311 


62 


6,249 


6.248 


1 


1 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INDUSTRY CLASSmCATIOir. 
October i, 1910 — September 30, 1911. 



GROUPS. 

I. STONE. CLAY AND GLASS PRODUCTS. 
II. METALS, MACHINES AND CONVEYANCES. 

III. WOOD MANUFACTURES. 

IV. LEATHER AND RUBBER GOODS. 
V. CHEMICALS, OILS. PAINTS, ETC. 

VI. PAPER AND PULP. 
VII. PRINTING AND PAPER GOODS. 
VIII. TEXTILES. 
IX. CLOTHING, MILLINERY, LAUNDRY, ETC. 
X. FOOD, LIQUORS AND TOBACCO. 
XI. WATER, UGHT AND POWER. 
Xn. BUILDING INDUSTRY. 

GROUP I. 

STONE, CLAY AND GLASS PRODUCTS. 

1. Stonb. 

(a) Crushed stone. 

(Includes trap rook.) 

(b) Cut stone. 

(For buildings, monuments, soda fountains, tombstones, etc.) 

(c) Hones, slates, mosaics, etc. 

Blackboards of slate. Pumice stone. 

Fcimdry facings (soapstone). Soapstone. 

2. MnCSLLANSOUS MiNBRAL PrODUCTB. 

(a) Asbestos, graphite, etc. 

Carbons. Gaa nantls*. 

Feldspar. Mica. 

Foundry facings (graphite). Talc. 

(b) Abrasives. 

Emery, carborundum, sand paper, etc. 

3. LniB. Cbmbnt and Plaster. 

(a) Asphalt. 

(b) Cement and lime. 

(c) Plaster (wall and land). 

Gyjmam. 
Plaster board. 

<d) Sifted sand and mortar. 
<e) Artificial stone. 

Cement block, etc. 

<f) Plaster and composition casts and ornaments. 

CHay models. a]*ter blocks. 

Hectographs, Stucco. 

[393] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



394 



New Yoek State Depabtment of Labor. 



4. Buck, Tile and Pottcbt. 

(a) Building brick. 

(b) T«rra ootta and fire-clay produtrts. 

AlUcnnm. 
Chimney topa. 
Crucibles. 
Enameled brick. 
Fire brick. 

Fireproofing material, not elsewhere 
classified. 

(c) Pottery products 

China ware. 

Crockery. 

Dolls (china or porcelain). 

Earthen ware. 



Fhie, fumaoe and stove linings. 

Gas retorts. 

Mosaioi (ceramic). 

Paving brick. 

Sewer pipe. 

TUe. 



Porcelain. 
Stone ware. 
Yellow ware. 



5. Glass. 

(a) Building glass. 

Cathedral, decorated, obscured, opalescent, plate, stained, window and wire 
glass signs; vault lights; wind shields. 



(b) Beveled glass and mirrors. 

(c) Pressed, blown and cut glassware. 

Art glass. 

Bulbs. 

Chimneys. 

Globes. 

Lamps. 

(d) Bottles and jars. 

Carboys 
Demijohns. 
Druggists' glassware. 



Opal ware. 
Shades. 

Stoppered work. 
Tableware. 
Tubes. 



Flasks. 

Insulators of glas*. 
Prescription ware. 



GROUP II. 
METALS, MACHINES AND CONVEYANCES. 
1. Gold, Silvbr and Pbscious Stones. 

(a) Silver and plated ware. 

Gold and silver plating. 

(b) Gold and silver refining. 

Assaying. 
Smelting. 

(e) Gold, silver and aluminum leaf 

(d) Gold and silver watch cases. 

(e) Jewelry, gold pens, etc. 

Enameled work on jewelry. 
Engraving and chasing (gold or silver). 



Mountings. 

Watches, making and repairing 



(0 Lapidary work. 

Diamond cutting, mounting, polishing, setting. 
Precious stones. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 395 



2. CoppBB, Lead, Zinc, Etc. 
(a) Smelting and refining. 

Analyses and experiments with metals. 
Babbitt metal. 



Solder. 
Spelter. 



(b) Copper work. 

Sheet copper. 
Wire (copper). 

(c) Brass, bronxe and aluminum castings. 

Bells. 
Foundry work. 

<d) Gas and electric fixtures. 

(e) Brass and bronse ware, not elsewhere classified. 

Brass or bronse spinning or raising. Tubing (brass). 

Furniture (brass). Wire (brass). 

Locks (brass). 



(0 Sheet metal work. 

Bath cabinets (metal). 
Ck>mices. 
Enameled ware. 
Galvanised iron. 
Granite ware. 
Japanned ware. 

(g) Metal goods, not elsewhere classified. 

Aluminum goods (except castings). 

Buttons (metal). 

Glove fasteners. 

Hooka and eyes. 

Lead (sheets, shot, pipe, etc.). 

Metal spinning (not elsewhere classified). 

Ibon and Stbkl Products. 

(a) Ore crushing, etc. 

(b) Pig iron. 

Blast furnaces. 



Metal stamping. 
Sheet iron work. 
Stencils. 
Tin cans. 
Tinsmithing. 
Tinware. 



Nickel plating. 

Plumbers' supplies (except brass, cc^per 

or iron). 
Soda water apparatus. 
Tinfoil. 
Toys (metal). 
Zinc statuary, etc. 



(e) Rolling mills and steel works. 




BIcomeries. 


Nails. 


Boiler tubes. 


Pipe (wrought iron). 


BolU and nuU. 


PUtes. 


Cables (wire). 


Rails. 


Chains. 


Rods. 


Forgings. 


Skelp. 


Horse shoes. 


Springs (steel, except car). 


Iron or steel wire. 


Wire rods. 


(d) Bridges and structural iron. 




Safes and vaults. 




(g) Hardware, not elsewhere classified. 




(Brass hardware— II-2-e.) 


Needles. 


Ball bearings. 


Pipe cutting. 


Gaskets. 


Screws. 


Locks. 


Traps. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



99$ 



New York Statb Dkpabtmbnt of Iabos. 



3. Ibon and Stbel Products — Concluded. 
(h) Cutlery. 
G) Tools and dies. 

Ice tools. 

Levels (other than surveyors). 

Polishing and buffing wheels (steel). 



(k) Firei 

(m) Metal furniture. 

(Brass furniture — II-2-c.) 

Wire mattresses. 

Steel office fixtures. 



(n) Wire work, not elsewhere classified. 

Bird cages. 
Fences. 
Hat frames. 



Netting. 
Wire doth, etc. 



(p) Car wheels and railway equipment. 
Air brakes. 
Axles. 
Couplers. 
Springs (car). 

(q) Ardiitectural and ornamental iron work. 
Cast iron columns, lintels, etc. 
Doors. 
Fire escapes. 
Gates and grilles 

(r) Cooking and heating spipratus. 
Car heatsm. 
Exhaust systems. 
Furnaces. 
Ovens. 
Radiators (except automobile). 

(s) Typewriting and registering machines. 
Adding and computing machines. 
Car registers. 
Cash registers. 
Check protectors. 

(t) Stationary engines, boilers, etc 
Fire engines. 
Gas engines. 
Ice machines. 



Switches. 
Trucks (car). 
Vault lighu (ut>n). 



Iron railings. 
Pipe bending. 
Stairs (iron). 



Ranges. 
Stovos. 

Stofe nastinit. 
Tanks. 
Ventilators. 



Copjdng machines. 
Numbering machines. 
Telegraph typewriters. 



Marine engines. 
Steam engines. 
Steam pumps. 



(u) Machinery, not elsewhere classified. 

Includes ad dr s us ing mnohines, air compressors, buffing wheels (not s tos u keig classified), 
gas machines, gears, etc. 

(v) Castings. 

Includes piano plates, valves (iron) and other iron foundry products. 

4. EuecnucAL Appabatub. 

(a) Telegraph, telephone, fire-alarm apparatus. 
Annunciators. 
Arc lamps. 
Bells (electric). 
Patrol alarms. 



Switchboards (telephone). 

Tickers. 

Transmitters. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Ebpokt of Bukea-u of Eactomt Inbebctiom;, 1911. 31)7 

4. ExACTRiCAL Apparatus — Conduded. 

(b) Incandescent lamps. 

(c) Dynamos, motors and iiisiitiiiiii] supplies. 

Includes cables miA -win insulated), signs (electric), spark ^kmm* pniehes, switch- 
boards (except telephone), etc. 

6. Vbbicles. 

(a) Carriaoes, ivagoBB sad sIsiglB. 

Indudes wire carrisse w!he«ls, etc.; excludes children's carts nd imvxns — III-4-<}. 

(b) Blacksmithing and wheelrighting. 

Horseshoeing. 
Weldins. 

(o) Cycles. 

Also parts, including bicycle wheels. 

(d) Motor vehicles. 

Aeroplanes. Motor trucks. 

Automobiles. Also parts, including bodies and wheels, 

Motor cycles. Tadiators, steering wheels, etc.* 

(e) Cars. 

Except ndlway sh(q;>s. 

(f) Locomotives. 

Except railway shops. 

(g) Railway repair shops. 

The building and repairing of cars and locomotives by railway companies. 

6. Boat ANn Ship Buildinq. 

7. AGBicx7i;ruRAL Implbmbntb. 

Artesian well boring tools. Hoes. 

Cane mills. Inmft at tw s. 

Canning machinery. Lawn mowers. 

Cider mills. Lime spread«n; 

Coffee (plantation) machinery. Milkteskns. 

Cotton choppers, gins, presses. Oil well mrohineitr. 

sweeps. Plows. 

Dairy apparatus. Pumps ^mnd, bofse). 

DtteyngiiMidiiiMB. Rice machinMBr. 

Ensilage cutters, «le^wtois. Road graders and cssaapen. 

Evaporators. RoUen. 

Extractive industry i— riwasry. Scoops. 

Fence machines. Scythes. 

Gardening i mptomwJU . Shovds vmA mpttAm, 

Grinding mills. Sickles. 

Grubbing machines. Wind mills. 

8. Inrbumbivts Ain> Appbixnobb. 

(a) Professional and scientific instruments. 

Barometers. Nautical instruments. 

Dental appliansss. Surgical instruments. 

Engineers' and jmrvsyoM' instruments. Thermometers. 



♦ Transferred from II-6-a. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



398 



New York State Department of Labor. 



8. Instbumbnts Ain> Appliances — Condudtd. 
(b) Optical and photographic apparatus. 
Cameras. 
Eye I 



Microscopes. 



(c) Lamps, reflectors, stereoptiooos, etc. 

(Excludes gas lamps — I-5-c. and incandescent lamps — ^II-4-b.) 
Calcium lights. Locomotive headlights. 

Lamp burners. Motion picture machines. 

I^antems. Railway signal lamps. 



(d) Clocks and time recorders. 

(e) Scales, meters, phonographs, etc. 

Automatic machines (except elec- 
trical). 
Automatic q;>rinklers. 
Balances. 



Gas and water meters. 
Slot machines. 
Speedometers. 
Steam gauges. 



SoBTXNo Old Mbtals. 
Junk shops. 



GROUP III. 



WOOD MANUFACrrUBES. 

1. Saw Mill Products. 

Includes excebdor, kindling wood, etc. 

2. Pianino Mill Products. 

(a) House trim. 

Sash, doors, blinds, moldings, etc. 

(b) Packing boxes, crates, etc. 

Includes cheese boxes, fruit baskets and boxes, etc. 

(c) Cigar and fancy wood boxes. 

Indtides jewelry cases (wood). 

3. COOPBBAOB. 

Barrels, hogsheads, kegs, pails, tube, etc., also heads and staTes. 

4. Wood, Turnbd and Carved. 

(a) Canes, umbrella sticks, etc. 
(Umbrellas— IX-6-C.) 



(c) Wooden tos^s and novelties. 
Advertising signs. 
Baby carriages. 
Bicycle specialties (wood). 
Blackboards (wood). 
Blocks (children's). 
Checkers and chessmen. 
Dominoes. 



Express wagons (children's). 

Fishing rods. 

Games. 

Rulers. 

Sleds. 

Tennis racquets. 

Yardsticks. 



(e) Other articles and appliances of wood. 

Agricultural woodwork (drill heads, Carwoodwoik. 

plow handles, tongues, trees. Carriage woodwork. 

etc.). Chair stock. 

Artificial limbs. Clothes pins. 

Barrel covers. Curtain poles. 

Blocks (wall paper printing). Duster handles. 

Blocks (pulley and tackle). Flag poles. 

Buttons (wood). Hames. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 399 



4. Wood, Turned and Carved — CondueUd, 

(e) Other articles and i^>pUancee of wood — Conduded, 



Hamper bottoms. 
Hat blocks. 
Heels (wood). 
Hub blocks (wheel). 
Ladders. 
Lasts. 

Loom parts, and repairs (battens, bob- 
bins, frames, beddles. reels, shuttles). 
MaUeU. 
Map roUs. 
Patterns. 

Pipe (water pump, etc.). 
Plane handles. 



nates (wood). 
PuUejfs. 

Push carts (wood). 
Saw handles. 
Scroll sawing. 
Spokes. 
Veneer goods. 
Wagon woodwork. 
Wheelbarrows (wood). 
Wood carving. 
Wood turning. 
Woodenware. 



FuRNiTURR Ain> Cabinbt Work. 

(a) Furniture and upholstery. 

Includes bamboo furniture and mattresses other than hair and wire; excludes metal 
furniture. 



(b) Caskets. 

Includes undertakers* supplies of wood. 

(c) Store, office and kitchen fixtures. 

Bank fixtures. 

fBarbers' chairs. 

Billiard and pool balls and tables. 

Bowling alle}rs and si4>plies. 

Butchers' fixtures. 

Churob and hall seatings. 

fDentists* chairs. 

Druggists' fixtures. 

Draughting furniture. 

(d) Mirror and picture frames. 

(e) Other cabinet work. 

Fretwork (wood). 
Grilles (wood). 
Marquetry. 



Office furniture. 
Refrigerators. 
Revolving doors. 
Saloon fixtures. 
Show oases (wood). 
Stage settings. 
Telephone booths. 
Washing machines. 



Telephone backs. 
Water-closet seats and 
Wood mantles. 



6. Pianos, Oroans, Etc. 

Includes banjos, mandolins, guitars, etc. and p«rts (wood) ; excludes brass instruments 
— U-2-e. 

7. Brooms, Cork, Etc. 

(a) Pulp and fiber goods. 

Includes artificial plants, beaver board, indurated fiber pails, etc. 

(b) Mats and woven goods. 

Splint baskets. 

Straw goods; excludes hats. 

Willow and reed baskets. 

(c) Brooms. 

(d) Articles of cork. 

(e) Pipes (smoking). 

(f) Fireproofing lumber. 



t Transferred from III-5-a. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



400 Njlw Yoek Statb Dspabtmbnt of Labok. 

GROUP IV. 
LEATHER AND ItUBBBR GOODS. 

1. LSAIHEB. 

Includes curing of hicks md manufacttire of leather. 

2. FuBA AND Fur Gooda. 

3. Lbatheb AifD Canvas Goods. 

(a) Belting, washers, etc. 

Leather #ood8 for xuiBuiaataBrers' use. 



(b) Saddlery and 1 

Automobile tops. Horse faiaakets. 

Dashboards. Whips. 

Fenders. 

(o) Traveling bags and trunks. 

Inflludss madirinft oassa. musical instrument nssns, stc. 

(d) Boots and shoes. 

(e) Gloves and mittens. 

(f) Fancy leather goods. 

Includes chamois underwear, drum heads, hand bags, hat bands, purses, rasor strops^ 
trusses (except rubber), etc. 

(g) Canvas and sportive osoda. 

Includes awnags, silsd eMking, tents, ssii% etou 

4. Rubber and Gutta PmcBa Goons. 

Atomizers. MadantodKS. 

Combe (rubber). Penholders (nilAier). 

Dental rubber. Stamps (mbber). 

Dress shields (rubber). Stopples (n^yber). 

Druggists' goods (rubber). Trusses (rubber). 

Gas tubing. Tubing (nAiber). 

5. Articles of Pearl, Soxn, Bokb, Hair, Etc. 

(a) Pevi buMoiia, tusadftsa, «te. 

(b) Articles of horn, ^eae, tortoise shell, etc. 

Combs. Sponges. 

Composition buttons. Vegetable ivorir. 



Music strings (gut). 

(c) Brushes. 

Includes platers' brushes and buffs (hair). 

(d) Mattresses, muff beds, pillows, taxidermy and other articles of hair, feathers, etc. 

GROUP V. 

CHEMICALS, OILS, PAINTS, ETC. 
1. Drugs and Chemicals. 

(a) Proprietary medicines. 

(b) Sodas and other alkalies. 

Alimi. Borax. 

Ammonia. Chloride of lisae. 

Baking powder. Pearl ash. 
Bleaching powder. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of Bubeau of Factokw Inspection, 1911. 401 



1. Dbuos and Cbsmicals — Conclud«d. 

(d) Other chemicals and drugs. 

Acids, not elsewhere classified. 

Boiler compound. 
X Calcium carbide. 

Cream of tartar. 

Digestive ferments. 

Oxygen. 

Pharmaceutical products. 

Photographic paper. 

2. Paints, Dtes and Colors. 

(a) Paint, varnish, etc. 

Acetanelid. 
Colors in oil. 
Dryers. 

Furniture polish. 
Japans. 
Kabomino. 

(b) Dyes, colons and inks. 

Blacking. 
Bluing. 
Carbon paper. 
Dairy colors. 

(o) Lead pencils and crayons. 

3. Wood Alcohol aitd Ewkntial Oilsl 

Acetic add. 
Acetone. 
Charcoal. 
Distilling wood. 
Flavoring extracts. 

4. Animal Oil Pboducts. 

Beeswax candles. 

Fish oiL 

Grease, tallow, etc. 



Plasters, medicated. 
Saltpetre. 
Sugar of lead. 
Sulphv. 

Tanning extracta. 
Tin crystals. 
Welding compound. 



Lacquers. 
Oxides of lead. 
Putty. 
Shellac. 
White lead. 
Whiting. 



Dyewood. 

Inked ribbons (for typewriters, etc.). 

Lampblack. 



Foundry fadngs (oharoosj). 
Glycerine. 
Linseed ml. 
Olive oiL 



Lard oil. 

Leather and shoe 
Stearin. 



5. MiNBRAL Oil PRODX7CTS. 

Axle gveaae. 
Coal tar. 
Coke. 
Gasoline. 

6. Soap, Pxbfumert and Cosusnca. 

Toilet powder. 

7. MncsLLANsoua Cbbmiqal Pboducts. 

(a) Wax figures, etc. 
Sealing wax. 



^liVhiha. 
PsTaffirae 

Petroleum refining. 
Wax (parafllne.). 



(b) Starch. 

Com starch. 

(c) Glue, mucilage, etc. 

• Gum, paste, sixings. 

(d) Fertilisers. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



402 



Xew York State Department of Labor. 



7. Miscellaneous Chemical Phodccts — Concluded. 

(e) Matches and explosives. 

Fireworks. 
Guni>owder. 

(0 Celluloid and other plastics. 
Also oreosoted paper. 

group VI. 
paper and pulp. 



1. SoRTiNa Waste Papeb. 

Includes paper stock. 

2. Pulp and Paper. 

(a) Pulp mills. 

(b) Pulp and paper mills. 

(c) Paper mills. 

Includes the manufacture, but not the re-wcrking of cardboard, pasteboard, straw- 
board, etc.; also glased paper, surface coated paper, waxed paper. 



GROUP VII. 
PRINTING AND PAPER GOODS. 

1. Ttpb and Printers' Materials. 

Printers' rollers, steel and copper plates, and boxwood for engraving, etc. 

2. Paper Goods. 

(a) Paper boxes and tubes. 

Includes butter dishes, letter files, paper pails, ribbon blocks. 



(b) Paper bags and sacks. 

(c) Other paper goods. 

Binders' board. 

Blue print paper. 

Cards (cutting, etc.). 

Cigarette tubes. 

Cutting labels. 

Deckling and pebbling paper. 

Embossed paper and cards. 

Envelopes. 

3. Printing and Book Making. 

(a) Printing and publishing. 

Addressing and mailing. 

Calendars. 

Composition (linotype) and tjrpesetting. 

(b) Bookbinding and blankbook making. 

Binding cloth samples. 

Numbering, perforating and ruling paper. 

Photograph albums. 

(o) Lithographing and engraving. 

Designing post cards. 
Music engraving. 



Lace or shelf paper. 
Papier mache novelties. 
Patterns. 
Perforated music. 
Perforated paper. 
Photo mounts (cards). 
Stationery. 



Stereotyping and electrotsrping. 
Tip printing. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Eepobt of Bubeau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 40 J] 

3. pRurriNo and Book Maxxno — ConclutUd. 

(d) Games and novelUea. 
Plasring cards. 
Sample cards and toys. 
School globes. 

4. Wall Papbb. 

6. Photoobapht. 

Includes motion picture films. 

GROUP VIII. 

TEXTILES. 

1. Bilk and Silk Goods. 

Includes ohi£Fon, gloves, laoe. ribbons, thread, veils, etc.; excludes knit underwear 
(silk). 

2. Wool Manufactures. 

(a) Carpets and rugs. 

(b) Felt and felt goods. 

Includes felt shoes and paper makers' felt. 

(c) Woolens and worsteds. 

Including mixed and union goods, shoddy, wool extract, wool waste. 

3. Cotton Goods. 

Including cotton batting, netting, tape, thread, twine, yarn, waste, etc. 



4. Hosiery and Knit Goods. 

Gloves (knit, except silk). 
Sweaters. 

5. Otbbr Textiles of Silk. Wool or Cotton. 

(a) Dyeing, finishing, etc. 
Bleaching. 
Mercerising. 
Printing. 



Underwear (knit). 
Wristers, etc. 



Refinishing. 
Sponging. 
Water proofing. 



(b) Upholstery goods. 

Upholstery bindings, braids, fringes, galloons, gimpa, gorings, webbing, lace curtains, 
etc. 



(c) Braids, embroideries and dress trimmings. 
Bias bindings. 
Bindings (dress). 
Chenille trimmings. 

6. Flax, Hemp and Jute Manufactures. 

Bagging. 

Burlaps. 

Carpets and rugs Gute). 

Cordage. 

Hammocks. 

7. Oilcloth, Window Shades, Etc. 

Buckram. 
Crinoline. 
Hair cloth. 



Cords (dress). 
Machine embroideries. 
Passementerie. 



Linen fabrics (woven or knitted) . 

Linen thread. 

Rope (jute, manilla, sisal). 

Twine. 

Yam (flax, hemp, jute). 



Imitation leather. 
Linoleum. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



404 New York State Depaktmbnt of Labor, 

GROUP DL 

clothing, millinery, laundry, etc. 

1. Mkn'b Garments and Fubnishinos. 

(a) Tailonng. 

Men's and boys' outer garments — ^blouses, coats, jackets, overalls, overcoats, suits, 
trousers, vests, etc. 

(b) Shirts, collars and cuffs. 

Includes boys' waists, butchers* coats and aprons, pajamas, etc. 

(c) Men's neckwear. 

(d) Suspenders and other furnishing goods for men. ■ 

2. Woioin'b Gabments and Furnishings. 

(a) Dressmaking. 

Women's and girls' outer garments — cloaks, dresses, jackets, kimonos, shirt waisis; 
ulk petticoats, skirts, suits, waists, wrappers; also cordinc mui. vhutim . 

(b) Women's white goods. 

Aprons (women's), handkerchiefs, lingerie, napkins, pillow oases and flhams, and sheets, 
also hemstitching and tucking. 

(c) Infants' wear. 

Dolls' wear. 

(d) Women's neckwear, etc. 

Rufflings, niching, silk belts, etc. 

(e) Corsets, garters, etc. 

Cloth covered buttons, cloth straps, fans, leggings. 

3. Men's Hats and Caps. 

Straw hats. 

4. Women's Hsadwear. 

(a) Artificial feathers and flowers. 

Dyeing and curling feathers. 

(b) Millinery. 

5. Miscellaneous Needle Work. 

(a) Curtains, embroklferies, etc. 

Flags, regalia, stamped linens, stuff ed^toys; also carpet sewing by department storss. 

(b) Quilts, comfortables, etc. 

(c) Umbrellas and parasols. 

(Umbrella sticks— in-4-a.) 

6. LAUNDBRnra, Custom Dteino, Etc. 

(aO Laundexies (non-Chinese), 
(a*) Chinese laundries, 
(b) Cleaning and dyeing. 

Carpet and rug oleaaadBg. 

7. Cup Sobtinq. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubbau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 405 

GROUP X. 

FOOD. LIQUOR8 AND TOBACCO. 

1. Gbocbrxss. 

(a) Flour and other oereal products. 

Brewers* grains, stock foods. 

(b) Sugar and molasses refining. 

(c) Fruit and vegetable canning and preserving. 

Crushed and dried fruits, pickles, presenres, sauces, sympa, ete. 

(d) Coffee and spice roasting and grinding. 

Mustard, peanut roasting. 

(e) Groceries not elsewhere classified. 

Chocolate and cocoa. Salt. 

Gelatine. Sifting seed. 

Miscellaneous grocery packing. Sorting beans. 

Nut meats. Yeast. 

2. Provisions. 

Slaughter house and meat paeking products, tnduding fi^, osrsters, etc.; also wool 
pulling. 

3. Daibt Pboducts. 

Butter, cheese, condensed milk, sugar of milk, etc. 

4. Baxbrt Products, Confbctionbrt, Etc. 

(a) Macaroni and other food pastes. 

(b) Crackers and biscuits. 

Includes ice cream cones and matsoths. 

(c) Bread and other bakery products. 

(d) Confectionery and ice cream. 

Includes cough drops, chewing gum, licorice, pop com, salted peanuts. 

5. Bbvbragbs. 

(a) Artificial ice. 

Includes refrigerating and warehousing. 

(b) Cider, apple juice, grape juice, vinegar, etc. 

(c) Mineral and soda waters. 

Includes bottling same. 

(d) Malt. 

(e) Malt liquors. 

Includes bottling same. 

(f) Vinous and distilled liquors. 

Includes bottling same. 

(g) Miscellaneous bottling. 

(Including bottle cleaning and sorting.) 

6. Tobacco Products. 

(a) Tobacco and snuff. 

(b) Cigars. 

(c) Cigarettes. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



406 New York State Department of Labor. 

GROUP XI. 
WATER, LIGHT AND POWER. 



1. Water. 

2. Gas. 

4. Electric Light a2«d Power. 

5. Steam Heat and Power. 

Includes compressed air. 

G. Garbage Disposal, Etc. 



GROUP XII. 

BUILDING INDUSTRY. 

1. Carpenters' Shops. 

Includes stair building. 

2. Paint Shops. 

Decorating, glaxing, paper hanging; painting scenery 

3. Plumbers' Shops. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bureau of Factory Inspection, 1911. 407 



INDEX OF INDUSTRIES. 



product. 



Abrasives 

Aoetanelid 

Acetic ftcid 

Acetone 

Acids 

Adding machines 

Addressing 

Addressing machines. ...... 

Aeroplanes 

Agricultural implements .... 

A|[ricultural woodwork 

Air brakes 

Air compressers 

Air, compressed 

Alcohol, wood 

Aligntim 

Alkalies 

Alimi 

Aluminum castings 

Aluminum goods 

Aluminum leaf 

Ammonia 

Animal oil products 

Annunciators 

Apple juice 

Aprons, butchers' 

Aprons, women's 

Arc lamps 

Architectiu-al iron work 

Art glass 

Artesian well boring tools . . . 

Artificial feathers 

Artificial flowers 

Artificial ice 

Artificial limbs, wood 

Artificial plants 

Artificial stone 

Asbestos products 

Asphalt 

Assaying, gold and silver. . . . 

Atomisers 

Automatic machines, except 

electric 

Automatic sprinklers 

Automobiles 

Automobile bodies 

Automobile parts 

Automobile radiators 

Automobile tope 

Automobile wheels 

Awnings 

Axle grease 

Axles, iron 

Babbitt metal 

Baby carriages 

Bagging, biu-lap 

Bags, jute 

Bags, traveling 

Bags, paper 

Bluing powder 

Bakery products 

Balances 

Ball bearings 

Banjos 

Bank fixtures, wood 

Barbers' chairs 

Barometers 

Barrel covers 

Barrel heads 

Barrel staves 

Barrels, wood 

Baskets, reed and willow 

Baskets, fruit 



Industry 
group. 



I-2-b 
V-2-a 
V-3 
V-3 
V-l-d 
TT ? ,, 
VII-3-;i 
H-.Vu 

n-7 

ni-4-e 
I1-3-P 

n-3-u 

XI-.5 

I-4-b 
V-l-b 
V-l-b 
1I-2-C 
I1-2-K 
II-l-c 
V-l-b 

II-4-a 
X-.5-b 
IX-l-b 

lX~2-h 

II-3-q 

I-5-C 

II-7 

IX-4-a 

IX-4-a 

X-6-a 

III-4-e 

III-7-a 

I-3-e 

1-2-a 

I-3-a 

Il-l-b 

IV-4 

II-8-e 
II-8-e 
II-5-d 
II-5-d 
II-5-d 
II-5-d 
IV^b 
II-5-d 
IV-3-g 
V-5 
II-3-P 
II-2-a 
III-4-C 
VIII-6 
VIII-6 
IV-3-C 
VII-2-b 
V-l-b 
X-4-C 
II-8-e 
II-3-g 
III-6 
III-5-C 
III-5-C 
II-»-a 
III-4-e 
III-3 
HI-3 
III-3 
III-7-b 
III-2-b 



Page. 



PRODUCT. 



350 

366 

366 

366 

366 

354 

370 

356 

358 

358 

362 

356 

356 

380 

366 

360 

366 

366 

354 

354 

352 

366 

366 

358 

378 

374 

374 

358 

356 

352 

358 

374 

374 

378 

362 

362 

350 I 

360 

350 

352 

364 

360 
360 
358 
358 
358 
358 
361 
358 
364 
368 
356 
352 
362 
372 
372 
364 
370 
366 
378 
360 
354 
362 
362 
362 
360 
362 
360 
360 
360 
362 
360 



Baskets, splint. . . , 

Bath cabinets, metal 

Bean sorting 

Beaver board 

Bells, electric 

Bells, brass 

Belting, leather 

Belts, silk 

Beverages 

Bias bindinipB 

Bicycle specialties, wood. . . 

Billiard balls. 

Bill'ard cues 

Billiard tables. 

Binders board 

Binding cloth samples 

Bindings, dress 

Bindings, upholstery 

Bird cages, wire 

Biscuits 

Bf.w,v».^..irr!^ r-UAn 

Black l)oard3, wood 

Blacking 

Blacksmithing 

Bhinkbook making 

Bleuthing powder 

Blcufhing, textiles 

Bl hIh, wood 

Bi k,M, children's wood. . . . 

B! I;s, pulley and tackle.. . 

B]tK ks, wallpaper printing.. 

BliMiineries. 

Bhmses 

Blue print paper 

Blucstone quarries 

Billing 

Boat building 

Boiler compound 

Boikr tubes 

Boilers 

Bolts and nuts 

Bone, articles of 

Bookbinding 

Bookmaking 

Boots, leather 

Borax 

Bottle cleaning and sorting. 

Bottles, glass. 

Bottling malt liquors 

Bottling mineral and soda 
waters 

Bottling, miscellaneous . . ^ 

Bottling vinous and dis- 
tilled liquors 

Bowling alleys and supplies. 

Boxes, cheese 

Boxes, cigar 

Boxes, fancy wood 

Boxes, fruit 

Boxes, packing 

Boxes, paper 

Boxwood for engravers .... 

Braids, dress 

Braids, upholstery 

Brass castings 

Brass spinning or raising. . . 

Brassware 

Bread 

Brewers' f(rains 

Brick, building 

Brick, enameled 

Brick, fire 

Brick, paving 



Industry 
group. 



III-7-b 
II-2-f 
X-l-e 

III-7-a 
lI-4-a 
II-2-c 

IV-3-a 

IX-2-d 
X-5 
VIH-5-C 

III-4-C 

JTT --r^ 

1I1-5-C 

III-5-C 

VII-2-C 

Vir-3-b 

VIII-5-C 

VIII-5-b 

II-3-n 

X-4-b 

M-c 

ni-4-<j 

V-2-b 

Il-^b 

VII-3-b 

V-l-b 

VlII-5-a 

ni-2-a 

1II-4-C 

II-3-C 
IX-l-a 
V1I-2-C 



V-2-b 

II-6 

V-l-d 

II-3-C 

II-3-t 

II-3-C 

IV-5-b 

VII-3-b 

VII-3-a 

IV-3-d 

V-l-b 

X-5-g 

I-5-d 

X-5-e 

X-5-C 
X-5-g 

X-5-f 

I1I-5-C 

III-2-b 

III-2-C 

III-2-C 

III-2-b 

III-2-b 

VII-2-a 

VIM 

VIII-5-C 

VIII-5-b 

II-2-C 

II-2-e 

II-2-e 

X-4-C 

X-l-a 

I-4-a 

I-4-b 

I-4-b 

I-4-b 



Page. 



362 
354 
376 
362 
358 
354 
364 
374 
378 
372 
362 
362 
362 
362 
370 
370 
372 
372 
356 
378 
350 
362 
366 
358 
370 
366 
372 
360 
362 
362 
362 
354 
374 
370 
382 
366 
358 
366 
354 
356 
354 
366 
370 
370 
364 
366 
378 
352 
378 

378 
378 

378 
362 
360 
360 
360 
360 
360 
370 
370 
372 
372 
354 
354 
354 
378 
37S 
3.50 
350 
3.^0 
350 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



408 New York State Depaktment of Labor. 

Index of Industries — Continued. 



product. 



group. 


Page. 


n-3-d 


3M 


II-2-C 


351 


n-3-e 


354 


II-2-« 


S54 


III-T-c 


362 


IV-5-C 


336 


IV-5-C 


366 


vin-7 


372 


• II^»H1 


356 


I-l-b 


350 


I-6-C 


362 


vnr-6 


3r2 


IX-l-h 


37« 


III-6-C 


382 


X-9 


378 


IV-«-b 


368 


ix-a< 


374 


IV-5-b 


366 


II-2-ff 


36i 


rv-5-« 


364 


IV-4 


364 


in-i-e 


362 


ni-6-e 


362 


n-4Hj 


36S 


n-3-c 


354 


V-l-d 


366 


n-8-c 


360 


VII-3-a 


370 


n^8-b 


360 


V-4 


366 


n-7 


358 


III-4-fli 


360 


X-lHJ 


376 


n-7 


35S 1 


IV-3-« 


364 


IX-3 


374 


II-3-r 


356 


II-»^I 


356 


II-3-P 


356 


n-3-p 


356 


n-3-p 


356 


III-4-e 


362 


V-5S-b 


366 


1-2^ 


350 


I-2-b 


350 


r-5-d 


352 


VI-S^o 


36 •» 


VII-2-C 


370 


vir-s-d 


370 


VII-3-d 


370 


XIM 


3S0 


rx-6-b 


376 


viri-2-» 


372 


vin-« 


372 


IX-5-a 


374 


III-4-e 


362 


n-5-8 


35S 


II-5-« 


35S 


II-3-» 


356 


ni-5.b 


362 


n-3-q 


356 


n-2-c 


364 


n-2-c 


364 


II-2-C 


354 


II-3-T 


356 


II-3-r 


356 


I-3-b 


350 



PRODUCT. 



group. 



Page. 



Bridges, iron and steel 

BroDse castings 

Bronse spinning or raising. . 

Bronse ware 

Brooms 

Brushes 

Brushes and buffs* platers' 
(hair) 

Buckram 

Buffing wiieela. 

Buildinir stooe 

Bulbs, glass 

Burlaps 

Butchers* coats and aprons. 

Butchers' fixtures 

Butter 

Buttons, bone 

Buttons, cloth covered 

Buttons, campasition 

Buttons, metal 

Buttons, pead 

Buttons, rubber. 

Buttons, wood. 

Cabinet work 

Cables (electric) insulated, 
lead-covered, etc 

Cables, wire 

Calcium carbide 

Calcium lights 

Calendars 

Cameras 

Candles, beeswax 

Cane mills 

Canes, wood 

Canning, fruit and vege- 
table 

Canning machinery 

Canvas goods 

Caps, men's and boys' 

Car heaters 

Car registers 

Car springs 

Car trucks 

Car wheels 

Car woodwork 

Carbon paper 

Carbons 

Carborundum 

Carboys 

Cardboard, manufacture of. 

Cards, cutting 

Cards, playing 

Cards, sample 

Carpenters shops 

Carpet cleaning 

Carpets 

Carpets, hemp and jute. . . . 

Carpets, sewing (depart- 
ment stores) 

Carriage woodwork, ex- 
cept assembling 

Carriages 

Cars, railway, except rail- 
way shops 

Cash registers 

Caskets, wood 

Castyipon columns 

Castings, aluminum 

Castings, brass 

Castings, bronse 

Castings, iron 

Castings, stove 

Cement 



Cement blocks 

Celluloid 

Cereal products 

Chains, iron 

Chair stock 

Chamois undarwear 

QKircoal 

ChLising. gold or silver. . 

Clieckera. wood 

Check protectors 

Cheese 

Chemicals 

Qictiille trimmings 

Qiovving gum 

anfFon 

Chimney tops, clay 

Oilninevs. vdam 

Onll, ^.,;r: 

Chocolate 

Church and hall seatmgs 

Cider 

Cider miUs 

Cigarette tubes 

Cigarettes 

Cigars 

Cleaning, custom, and dyaing 
Clip sorting. . . . 

Cloaks 

CJlocks 

Clothespins. . . . 

Coal tar 

Coats. butcfaeEs' 
Coats, men's. . . 

Cocoa 

Coffee, idantation. nmofain- 

ery 

Coffee roasting and grinding. 

Coke 

CoUara. men's 



Colors, excepting in oil. . . 

Colors in oil 

Combs, except rubber and 
metal 

Combs, rubber 

Comfortables 

Composition casts 

Composition, hand and lino- 

_type. 

Composition omaraentB. . . . 

Compressed air. 

Computing machines , 

Condensed milk 

Confectionery 

Cooking apparatus 

Coopenage 

Copper 

Copper sheets 

Copper wire 

Copper woric , 

Copying machines 

Cordage, flax, hemp or jute 

Cording , 

dkirda. dress 

Cork, articles of 

Com starch 

Cornices, metal , 

Corsets , 

Cosmetics , 

Cotton choppers, gins, pres- 
ses, sweeps 

Cotton goods 

Cotton Batting 

Cough drops 



r-3-e 
V-7-f 
X-l-tt 
II.3-C 
IU-4-e 
IV-»-f 
V-3 

n-i-e 

UI-4-C 
II-3-e 
X-3 
V-l-d 

vni-5^ 

X-4-d 

vin-i 

I-4-b 

I-5-C 

I-t-c 

X-l-e 

IU-5-0 

X-6-b 

II-T 

VII-2-C 

X-6-C 

X-6-b 

IX-6-b 

IX-7 

IX.2-a 

II-8-d 

III-4-e 

IX-l-b 

IX-l-« 

X-l-e 

II-7 
X-l-d 
V-6 
IX-l-b 
V-2-b 
V-2-a 

IV-6-b 
IV-4 
IX-54> 
I-3-f 

Vn-3-a 
I-3-f 

XI-5 
n-3-s 
X-8 
X-4-d 
Il-a-r 

III-3 
II-2 
11-2^ 
n-2-b 
II-2-b 
n-3-s 
VIII-6 

IX-a-a 

III-7-d 
V-7-b 
n-2-f 

IX-2-e 
V-6 

II-7 
VIII-3 
VIII-3 

X-4-d 



850 



378 
354 



354 
906 



356 
378 
986 
»72 
378 
370 
350 
362 
360 
878 
362 
878 
368 
370 
878 
378 
378 
370 
374 
380 



374 
374 
370 

368 
378 
388 
374 
388 
368 

308 
364 
374 
350 

370 
350 
3^ 
358 
370 
378 
368 
360 
352 
352 
362 
352 
368 
372 
374 

3sn 

383 
388 
364 

374 



372 
872 
378 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Report of Bubeau of FAcrroBY Inspection, 1911. 
Index of Industries — Continued. 



409 



product. 



InduAtxy 
group. 


Page. 


n-3p 


856 


878 


Ill 2-b 


aeo 


V-2-C 


800 


V-l-d 


860 


VII 1-7 


872 


I-4-C 


8 


I-l-b 


3oO 


IX-l-b 


374 


IIM-e 


862 


IX-&-a 


874 


VIII-5-b 


372 


I-l-b 


360 


ir-:i-h 


354 


H-.Vo 


858 


H-7 


358 


V-it-b 


366 


X-3 


376 


IV-3-b 


364 


XU-2 


360 


1-5^ 


352 


Il-fr* 


360 


IV-4 


364 


III-&« 


362 


n-i-f 


862 


II-3-i 


354 


V-l-d 


866 


X-5-f 


378 


V-3 


366 


II-7 


358 


1-4^ 


350 


IX-a-c 


374 


III-l-o 


362 


11-^ 


356 


m-2-» 


860 


III-6-C 


362 


IX-iJ^ 


374 


IV-4 


364 


VIII-S-c 


372 


IX-a-a 


374 


IX-2-a 


374 


III-6HJ 


362 


IV-4 


364 


V-1 


366 


IV-3-f 


364 


V-2-a 


366 


ni-4-e 


362 


IX-6-b 


376 


IX-4-a 


374 


Vni-6-a 


372 


v-a-b 


366 


V-2-b 


366 


II-4-C 


358 


XI-4 


8.0 


II-4-C 


358 


VII-2-C 


370 


VII-2-C 


370 


VIII-o-c 


372 


IX-5-a 


374 


I-2-b 


360 


I-4-b 


3.0 


II-2-f 


354 


IM-e 


352 


Il-S-a 


3(i0 


II-3-t 


356 


Il-3-t 


356 


II-3-t 


:-r.6 


II-3-t 


356 


II-3-t 


356 


VII-3-C 


370 I 



PRODUCT. 



Lkhutry 
group. 



Page. 



Gouplera, car 

Cxackers 

Oratea, wood 

Ccayons 

Cream of taztar 

Crinoline 

Crockery 

Crucibles, day 

Cuffs, men's 

Curtain poles, wood 

Curtains, lace, hand work.. . 

Curtains, lace, textile 

Cut stone 

Cutlery 

Cycles and parts 

D^iry apparatus 

Dairy colora 

Diairy produots 

Dsshbooids. leather 

Decorating 

Demijohns, glass 

Dental appliances 

Dental rubber 

Dentists' g^xtb 

Diamond cutting, mounting, 

polishing axxi setting 

Dies 

Digestive ferments 

Distilled Uquors 

Distilling wood 

Ditching machines 

Dolls, china or porcelain 

Dolls' wear 

Dominoes 

Doors, iron 

Doors, wood 

Draui^tiB|[ furniture 

Dress cordmc 

Drees shields, rubber 

Dress trimmings 

Dresses 

Dressmaking 

DruggistB' fixtures, wood . . . 

Druggists' goods, rubber 

Drugs 

Drum heads .... 

Dryers 

Duster handles. . 
Dyeing, euatocn . 
I^ing. feathers 
I^eing, of silk, cotton or 

wool tectike 

Dyes 

I^ewood 

^mamoa , 

Etoctric light and power 

£3ectrical supplies 

Embossed cuds 

Embossed paper 

l^broidenes. dress, 

band 

Embroidexias, hand 

Emery 

fhiameled fariek 

Enameled ware 

Enameling on jewelry. . . 
Engineers instruments. . 

Engines, fire 

Engines, gas 

Engines, marine 

Engines, stationary 

Engines, steam 

Engraving, copper, steel 

wood 



€au:ept 



, <mr<ing fipnA dyeing. 

, artides of 

, artificial 



Etisilafic cutters 

Ensihi^e rlevators 

Envelopes 

EX'ajKiratots 

Bhccfl.sior 

Eacbau^4t ir^yttkSBDB 

Exploaivc-H 

EkpresH %v£i^ons, children's. 
Extractive mdustiy marhiu- 

ery 

Ex+T-nf**;^ flavoring, 

Fi 

¥y 
Fi 

Fcldst^ar <piarTies 

F\ li 

FU. i,„Js 

Felt, paper makers' . . . 

Felt shoes 

Fence manhines 

Fences, wire 

Fenders, leather 

Fertilisers 

Fiber goods 

Fifans, motion pictures 

Finishing, of silk, cotton or 
wool taztites