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V 






/ 



82d Congress 2d Session 



Union Calendar No. 803 

House Report No. 2 516 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN 

ACTIVITIES 

FOR THE YEAR 1952 




DECEMBER 28, 1952 

(Original release date) 

JANUARY 3, 1953. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House 
on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed 



Prepared and released by the 
COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES, U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENT ATI 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman 

FRANCIS E. WALTER. Pennsylvania HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

CLYDE DOYLE, California DONALD L. JACKSON, California 

JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee CHARLES E. POTTER, 1 Michigan 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 
Louis J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
John W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 
Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 



1 Representative Charles E. Potter resigned from the House of Representatives and took 
office as a United States Senator on November 5, 1952. 

II 



CONTENTS 



Pag* 

Statement by John S. Wood, chairman of the Committee on Un-American 

Activities 1 

Foreword 3 

Investigations and hearings in industrial areas of the United States 7 

Detroit • 9 

Chicago , 27 

Philadelphia, Pa 34 

Communist infiltration of Hollywood motion-picture industry 40 

Communist activities among professional groups in the Los Angeles area 56 

Role of the Communist press in the Communist conspiracy 67 

Communist activities among youth groups 69 

Dr. Edward U. Condon 73 

Methods of Communist infiltration in the United States Government 74 

The Army Signal Corps Intelligence Agency 75 

Review of the Methodist Federation for Social Action 76 

Files and reference service 77 

Publications 79 

Recommendations SI 

in 



Union Calendar 803 

82d Congress ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES j Report 
2d Session j" ( No. 2516 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1952 



January 3, 1953.— Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State 
of the Union and ordered to be printed 



Mr. "Wood, of Georgia, from the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, submitted the following 

REPORT 

[Pursuant to H. Res. 7, 82d Cong.] 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1952 

Statement by John S. Wood, Chairman of the Committee on 

Un-American Activities 

Since this annual report to the Congress from the Committee on 
Un-American Activities is the final one to be submitted under my 
chairmanship. I wish to extend a personal message to the Congress 
and the American people. 

First. I would like to express my thanks to my colleagues on the 
committee for their excellent cooperation during my tenure as chair- 
man. I am especially proud that there has been no occasion where 
political considerations have been allowed to interfere with the prog- 
ress of the committee's work. Those of us who have devoted our 
lives to public representation recognize full well the necessity and 
benefit derived from our system of political parties. We must, how- 
ever, equally recognize the necessity of keeping political considera- 
tions from influencing such duties as are charged to the Committee 
on Un-American Activities. I can proudly state that the representa- 
tion on this committee has not been bipartisan, but rather nonpartisan. 
It has been Americanism against un- Americanism. The position of 
the members has not been to determine how to best serve a group or 
a party, but how best to serve the interests of our United States. 

During the relativelv short existence of this countrv as a free 
republic, a sizable portion of our heritage and our friends have laid 
their lives down to preserve the rights and free ich allow 

us to express in the Halls of Congress the views of the people we 
represent. Our young country has faced many formidable enemies 
in the past and has survived while older nations have perished. 
Today we face an avowed enemy whose potential danger is probably 
greater than any we have ever faced. 

From my experiences, however. I feel that we can face the future 
with optimism. In addition to an inherent love of freedom, the 
American people have become aware of the efforts to subvert these 
freedoms. I have been fortunate enough to observe that the American 
people, once apprised of the existence of subversive influences, not 
only reject them but strike out with resoluteness to destroy them. 

I am pleased to state that the committee has received complete 
cooperation from responsible individuals in all segments of American 
life. The realization has come that our Government, industry, labor, 
and organizations can continue to exist only if free of subversive 
elements. 

The attacks upon the committee are certainly no less vile nor vocif- 
erous, but the sources of these attacks are now much more readily 
discernible for what thev are. 



2 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 1 

I wish that upon my retirement I might be able to state that the 
duties of the Committee on Un-American Activities have been com- 
pleted. I regret, however, to state that this is far from the fact. 
While it is true that great strides have been made, the legislative 
mission of the Committee on Un-American Activities is far from com- 
pleted. The Congress must accept responsibility to act upon effective 
legislation to combat subversion. 

I leave the chairmanship of this committee with the confident belief 
that the Congress and the American people will continue to extend 
to the committee the full support and cooperation that it needs and 
deserves and has so faithfully received in the past. 

[s] John S. Wood. 



FOREWORD 

Pursuant to its duties to the House of Representatives, the Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities has prepared this report to reflect 
the results of hearings and investigations during the year 1952. The 
committee was made a standing committee of the House of Represent- 
atives by Public Law 601 (sec. 121, subsec. Q (2) ) , which was adopted 
August 2, 1946, in the Seventy-ninth Congress, and House Resolution 
No. 7 of the Eighty-second Congress. 

This report to the Congress serves as notice of the extent to which 
subversive activities and propaganda have been successful against 
our form of government. The committee realizes that this report 
embodying the results of the committee's investigations and hearings 
during the past year is of singular importance. The critical nature 
of the times makes it doubly important that the people and the Con- 
gress be fully aware of the danger from subversive elements. 

During the past year, the committee has had the benefit of informa- 
tion and testimony from several persons who at one time had been 
members of the Communist Party and who, having recognized that 
communism is unequivocally determined to overthrow our form of 
government, broke away from the conspiracy. It must be under- 
stood that these persons have not appeared before the committee for 
penitent confession, but rather to furnish valuable first-hand infor- 
mation concerning the Communist conspiracy. The committee realizes 
that it is not an easy thing for a person who has once been a part of 
such a debasing element as communism to recount his part in it. 
Fortunately, however, patriotism has outweighed pride in many of 
these witnesses, and they have chosen to assist the Government by 
furnishing it with all possible information in their possession regarding 
subversive activity. The testimony of other witnesses, while reluctant, 
was nevertheless helpful in adding to the sum of knowledge now pos- 
sessed by the committee and the American people. 

While the American people and their Government were fortunate to 
have this testimony, some of the witnesses themselves were not. In- 
stances have come to the committee's attention where several of these 
witnesses have been forced from gainful employment after testifying. 
Some have been released from the employment which they competently 
held for years prior to their testimony. This action on the part of 
present or prospective employers seems grossly unfair to the com- 
mittee. An examination of the testimony of a large group of these 
witnesses conclusively reveals that they did not join the Communist 
Party to participate in any action designed to overthrow the United 
States. They joined in some instances to defeat Hitler, or support 
labor, and it was only long after their association with the Communist 
Party that they learned the true intent and purpose of this organiza- 
tion. Every reasonable step should be taken to safeguard the eco- 
nomic future of individuals who have contributed to the knowledge 
now possessed by our Government concerning the efforts of organiza- 
tions and individuals presently working against the security of the 
United States. 

During the past year, the committee intensified its investigation of 
Communist efforts and successes in infiltrating vital defense areas. 
Through these investigations and hearings, it has become more ob- 

3 



4 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

vious than ever that communism had made dangerous inroads into 
several unions or union locals which are of strategic importance in 
our defense effort. For the most part, union members in the United 
States are completely loyal and patriotic. However, in numerous 
instances, the average union member has been unaware that, through 
his own apathy for union affairs, the union or local to which he 
belongs is under the domination of communism. 

The committee's investigations into communism in vital defense 
areas were centralized in the past year in the areas of Detroit, Mich., 
Chicago, 111., and Philadelphia, Pa. The committee was shocked to 
find domination of some unions and locals by the Communist con- 
spiracy. In almost every instance it has been found that the Com- 
munists have managed to seize control of these locals even though 
their numerical strength was in minute proportion to the total mem- 
bership in the unions. It has been found in some instances that 
practically the only Communists within a local were individuals 
holding official positions in that local. It is regrettable that in many 
instances the membership of the local was unaware that its leaders were 
Communists until they were identified in testimony before this com- 
mittee. The committee has been charged with attacks upon labor 
because of its exposure of communism in the areas mentioned above. 
However, the committee appreciates, as do all Americans, the ad- 
vances made by the labor movement in the United States and finds it 
unfortunate that there are instances in which Communists have utilized 
labor for their own nefarious ends. For this reason, the labor move- 
ment itself must exhibit constant and continuing vigilance and make 
every effort to remove from its ranks those elements which are domi- 
nated by communism and the agents of a foreign conspiracy against 
human freedom and free labor. 

One of the most important discoveries made by this committee grew 
out of testimony taken in Philadelphia concerning the institution 
and operation of a city- wide underground organization. This organi- 
zation existed in the third largest city of the United States and its 
membership was unknown even to the Communist Party functionaries 
who were responsible for all open party activity in this area. Each 
individual selected by the organizer was screened very closely in an 
effort to weed out those of whom there was attached the slightest 
doubt of party loyalty. After the selection of an individual, it was 
his duty to disassociate himself from all other known sections of the 
Communist Party, even if this action entailed the alienation of life- 
long friends who might inquire as to his new party work. During this 
period he was to devote himself to study and preparation for the task 
ahead. All personal contact with other individuals connected with the 
underground was made in public places, where it would be virtually 
impossible for investigators to obtain the gist or text of discussions. 
These discussions centered around the operating experiences of under- 
ground movements in other cities and countries, and their application 
to the Philadelphia area. Elaborate systems of communication be- 
tween these groups were devised; coded telephone calls in the dead 
of night were used to announce the time and place of the next meet- 
ing. Even certain repair shops were designated as message drops to 
announce important decisions affecting the operation of the under- 
ground movement to others, when other means of communication had 
failed. Articles containing instructive messages were to be left to be 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 5 

repaired and then picked up by other members. The cell or basic unit 
of this underground apparatus at no time contained more than three 
individuals and the structure of association pyramided so that an 
individual would know no more than three other members of the 
apparatus. The cell or basic group was autonomous in the respect 
that all membership dues, names, and so forth, remained the prop- 
erty of the basic group. So that quick and confidential dissemination 
of party information could be effected, mimeograph machines were 
obtained by the underground and cached with members of this organi- 
zation to insure that in event of complete destruction of all present- 
day means of printing and distribution of information, the party's 
work could go on. Further information relating to the aims and 
purposes of this section of the Communist Party is set forth under 
the subtitle "Communist Infiltration Into Basic Industries in the 
Philadelphia Area." 

We must, in these days of extensive defense production, obviate the 
possibility of any individual or group hampering vital production in 
order to advance the cause of our enemies. The committee recognizes 
that it has a serious obligation to intensify its investigations, not only 
in the areas which have already been mentioned but in other areas 
vital to our defenses and in which communism is exerting an influence. 

The committee ascertained during the past year that communism 
has developed cells within so-called professional groups in the United 
States. It has been found that within the city of Los Angeles and its 
suburbs important cells of the Communist Party have been formed 
and are active within the medical, legal, and journalistic profes- 
sions. The committee has had startling testimony to the effect that 
in some instances members of these professions could be utilized as 
espionage couriers. On this point, the committee heard testimony 
that instructions had been given to Communist Party officials in Los 
Angeles that, if it were necessary for the Communist Party to go 
underground, the offices of Communist physicians could be used as a 
clearing house for the exchange of information. A witness before 
the committee testified that, according to the plan, a Communist official 
would furnish instructions to a Communist physician, who in turn 
would pass along these instructions to Communist Party members 
who would visit the doctor under the guise of patients. 

The committee's investigation relating to communism in the profes- 
sional groups served to strengthen the committee's position that the 
National Lawyers' Guild is the "legal bulwark" of the Communist 
Party. The committee received testimony that those members of the 
Communist Party who were in the legal profession were required to 
be members of the National Lawyers' Guild also. 

During the course of the past year, the committee continued the 
investigation and hearings which first began in 1951 relating to the 
scope and success of Communist infiltration into the motion-picture 
industry. The committee still has a number of witnesses to be called 
in connection with the investigation of the motion-picture industry. 

The committee also feels that as a result of the hearings relating to 
the Communist infiltration of the motion-picture industry, that the 
extensive financial reservoir which had existed in Hollywood for 
Communist purposes has been greatly diminished. 

The committee has focused attention on the role that has been 
played by the Communist press in the Communist conspiracy. While 
it is true that the average American has never read, and probably 



6 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

knows little about, Communist publications in the United States, the 
committee would again like to point out that the Communist press 
plays a vital role in Communist operations not only within the United 
States but internationally as well. Through the utilization of official 
Communist Party organs such as the Daily Worker, the People's 
Daily World, and others, international communism is able to furnish 
Communist Party members within the United States the official policy 
or line that is to be followed. It has been disclosed through testimony 
that from time to time the Communist Party will set up apparently 
independent news services or news bureaus which serve as nothing 
less than pipelines for official Communist direction to Communist 
Party leaders in the United States. 

The Communist Party in the United States has for years directed 
all-out efforts to gain control of various youth movements within the 
United States. It realizes that in order to become more powerful it 
must make inroads among the youth of the United States. The com- 
mittee conducted several hearings which disclosed that, by and large, 
American youth has repulsed Communist efforts to recruit him. 

The committee also heard during the year testimony of Dr. Ed- 
ward U. Condon, former director of the National Bureau of Standards. 
As a result of this hearing, the committee is of the opinion that while 
it has no proof that Dr. Condon was ever a member of the Communist 
Party his persistent association with people who were either disloyal 
or of suspected loyalty, coupled with his public endorsement of some 
of these associates in the face of unshaken testimony to the contrary 
and his failure to make any inquiry to ascertain the true facts, as well 
and his obvious contempt for any form of security regulations dis- 
qualify him from holding any position in which he would have access 
to information of a confidential or secret nature. 

The committee also, upon the basis of a petition filed by several em- 
ployees of the Army Signal Corps Intelligence Agency, conducted 
an investigation into charges that there were subversive elements and 
security risks within that agency. As a result of the committee's 
investigation it was disclosed that for a period there was a noticeable 
security laxity in that agency which, on the strength of these em- 
ployees' complaints, were carefully examined by Army authorities. 
The committee is satisfied that, as a result of the complaints and the 
committee's investigation, a much stricter security enforcement has 
been effected in the Signal Corps Intelligence Agency. 

In order that the American public might fully realize that the 
Methodist Federation for Social Action is using the name of one of 
our largest and certainly most loyal religious bodies without authori- 
zation, the committee prepared and released a report which was a 
review of the Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

The committee would like to state that during this year there has 
been an unprecedented demand upon its file and record service and, 
more than ever before, by the executive branch of the Government. 
There has been a widespread demand upon the committee for its 
publications. We regret that in many instances publications are ex- 
hausted before they are secured by all those desiring them. Wherever 
possible, the committee has had additional prints made. 

In this annual report, the committee feels that the Congress and the 
American people will have a much clearer and fuller picture of the suc- 
cess and scope of communism in the United States by having set forth 
the names and, where possible, the positions occupied by individuals 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 7 

who have been identified as Communists, or former Communists, dur- 
ing the past year. In the matter of hearings relating to the motion- 
picture industry and professional groups, the committee is including 
those individuals who were named during 1951, inasmuch as these 
hearings have been of a continuing nature. 

As in the past, and in accordance with provisions of applicable law, 
the committee is recommending several legislative proposals. In 
order that the Congress may appreciate the value of the committee's 
records, there are being included all of the recommendations which 
have been made by this and preceding committees since the Seventy- 
sixth Congress. 

INVESTIGATIONS AND HEARINGS IN INDUSTRIAL 
AREAS OF THE UNITED STATES 

During the year, the committee has continued its investigation 
of Communist activity in industrial areas: Detroit, Chicago, Los 
Angeles, and Philadelphia. At the same time investigations have been 
continued or started in other localities. 

The committee considers investigations and hearings in the many 
industrial areas to be most important. The investigations to date 
have disclosed that in these areas Communist activities revolve around 
the members of the Communist Party who have infiltrated or are 
controlling the labor organizations. We have found leaders of the 
Communist Party on union payrolls in these areas; Communist leaders 
who, while posing as trade-unionists, are directing Communist activi- 
ties among youth, students, educators, professional and white-collar 
workers, and all other workers, organized and unorganized. We 
have found that these same unions are the major source of revenue for 
schools, newspapers, and periodicals operated and/or published by 
members of the Communist Party for the purpose of furthering the 
cause of communism. Of course, these vehicles of propaganda are 
never identified with the Communist Party but are fraudulently 
identified in some manner with labor. This has been done in order to 
brand attacks upon them as "antilabor," just as the exposure of indi- 
viduals in labor unions as Communists is branded as "antilabor." 
By identifying an organization or publication with labor, the Com- 
munist Party has found that it is able to sell the worker on enrolling 
or subscribing as a means of helping himself to become a better trade- 
unionist. The workers learn only too late that they have been in- 
doctrinated with communism, some to the extent of actually joining 
the Communist Party. These Communist trade-unionists are also 
the creators of organizations called by innocent names but which also 
have the purpose of furthering communism. 

The committee considers the failure of certain trade-unionists to rid 
themselves of Communists to be a national disgrace, directly affecting 
the security of the United States. This statement does not imply that 
the disgrace is the fault of the average worker, for he needs leadership 
and protection in this battle. This leadership and protection have 
been denied him in many instances by labor, management, and the 
Government itself. Examples of this have come to light during the 
committee's investigations. 

Take the case of workers employed by International Harvester in 
those plants where the Farm Equipment Council of the United Elec- 
trical, Radio, and Machine Workers— Independent, hereinafter re- 
ferred to as UE-FE, acts as bargaining agent. Hundreds of workers 



8 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

desiring to bring the membership under unions not dominated by Com- 
munists have devoted their nonworking hours to acting as voluntary 
organizers for non-Communist unions which they hope will supplant 
UE-FE as their bargaining agent. In the plants where the other 
unions have not defeated the UE-FE, these voluntary organizers have 
been expelled from the Communist-dominated UE-FE and thereby 
left without an agent to handle their demands or grievances. With- 
out this union representation, some management personnel has taken 
advantage of these workers with the result that the workers lose almost 
everything as a reward for their effort. Some have even lost their 
employment on the insistence of the Communist-dominated UE-FE. 
All of these voluntary organizers would lose their employment in the 
event of a closed-shop contract between International Harvester and 
UE-FE. 

This threat to the security of workers trying to clean Communists 
out of control of their union acts as a deterrent to other trade-unionists 
who would like to take an active part in the tight against communism. 
Organizers with families to support and financial obligations to ful- 
fill cannot sacrifice their future without assistance in the fight. 

In addition to the fact that the organizers receive no assistance in 
this fight, they also fail to receive the support of a majority of their 
fellow workers who are anti-Communists. According to the com- 
mittee's investigations, this latter category of workers fail to support 
organization efforts by a union such as the UAW because they distrust 
the UAW. This distrust results from the apparent failure of the 
UAW to drive out the Communists in positions of leadership in cer- 
tain of its own locals. 

Harvester workers in the Chicago area are well acquainted with the 
affairs of local 453, UAW, called the Little Kremlin, an amalgamated 
local in the vicinity of Cicero, 111. They recall that when local 453 
decided to comply with the non-Communist affidavit provision of the 
Taft-Hartley law the president and certain other officers resigned their 
position because they were Communists. However, the Harvester 
workers also know that this did not affect the leadership of local 453. 
They know that Hilliard Ellis and Sven Anderson had positions cre- 
ated for which no non-Communist affidavit would have to be filed, had 
themselves appointed to these positions, and, from these positions, con- 
tinue to control the affairs of local 453. As can be readily seen, this ac- 
tion circumvents the spirit of the law, and, as a matter of fact, this 
should have been investigated by the NLRB for a determination as to 
whether there existed a conspiracy to violate the non-Communist 
affidavit provisions of the Taft-Hartley law. Irrespective of whether 
there has been a violation of the law, the fact remains that no action 
has been taken in this situation by the UAW. This, on top of the un- 
healthy condition within local 600, UAW, Detroit, has lost for UAW 
much support. 

The Government can render valuable assistance to Harvester and 
all other workers represented by Communist-dominated unions and 
can assist UAW and other non-Communist internationals in cleaning 
out their locals which are heavily infiltrated or controlled by members 
of the Communist Party. The legislation which has been given much 
consideration by your committee will also force Communists out of 
positions of leadership in the union locals. 

It is the committee's recommendation that legislation be enacted 
which will empower an agency of the Government to make investiga- 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 9 

tions of labor organizations to determine whether any national, inter- 
national, local, or other organic labor organization is controlled, or 
dominated by, or has, as officers or leaders, members of the Communist 
Party or other totalitarian organizations. An affirmative finding 
should therewith deny to the labor organizations harboring such mem- 
bers all facilities of the NLRB. 

The committee hesitates to recommend that the NLRB be desig- 
nated as the investigative agency referred to above for reasons which 
seem to the committeeto be repeated failure on the part of the NLRB 
to investigate the activities of existing Communist-dominated unions, 
activities which apparently circumvent the intent of the Taft-Hartley 
Act and place non-Communist unions and industry to the dis- 
advantage of the Communist unions. 

It is further recommended that, with the enactment of this legisla- 
tion, the non-Communist affidavit now required be eliminated. This 
provision of law, after a start as intended by its authors, is now work- 
ing to the benefit of members of the Communist Party engaged in the 
field of labor. Scores of union officials who have filed non-Communist 
affidavits, and who have been witnesses before your committee and 
Federal grand juries, have refused, on the grounds of possible self- 
incrimination, to answer questions relative to their Communist affilia- 
tion. Evidence before the committee conclusively shows that certain 
of these union officials are still affiliated with the Communist Party, 
though they have non-Communist affidavits on file. Many workers 
cannot understand why these Communists have not been prosecuted 
for filing fraudulent affidavits, but this failure to prosecute is under- 
standable when we realize that an individual, in signing the non- 
Communist affidavit, swears only that he is not a member of the Com- 
munist Party on the day he affixes his signature. He can be, and in 
most cases is, a member of the Communist Party on the day before 
and the day after he signs the affidavit. In addition to enjoying the 
facilities of the NLRB, the Communist union leaders, as a result of 
their filing the non-Communist affidavit, have an argument to use 
against those who claim that they are Communists or that their unions 
are Communist-dominated. The Communist labor leader answers 
that he has signed a non-Communist affidavit and that certainly he 
would be prosecuted if he were a Communist. The average worker 
does not consider the above technicality, and the Communists win an 
argument and support. So that this support which the Communist 
receives may be understood, it must not be forgotten that he is ren- 
dering the services of a trade-unionist, which in most cases equal or 
excel the services rendered by non-Communist union officials. This 
excellent service rendered by the Communists can assist the Com- 
munist Party in gaining control. It is continued until the Com- 
munist Party has absolute control. 

Detroit 

The committee's hearings in Detroit, Mich., in February and March 
1952, climaxed a 7-month investigation in the State of Michigan. 
The hearings constituted only a partial revelation of the Communist 
activities uncovered during the investigation. The elements of in- 
filtration and control touched upon during the hearings were also 
only partial. 

This can be better understood by the fact that during the investi- 
gation the identity of over 600 individuals who were or are still 



10 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

members of the Communist Party was learned. Yet, during the hear- 
ings only about one-third of these were identified. Those identified 
during the investigation included students and former students at 
the major universities in Michigan. They included teachers through- 
out the State, professional workers, and others from almost every 
phase of life in Michigan. Also identified during the investigation 
were the Communist clubs operated in most areas of Michigan, as 
well as in industries in localities outside Detroit. Those individuals 
and clubs identified, but not the subject of the hearings held, have 
been under continuing investigation. However, the committee's 
limited investigative staff makes it impossible to proceed as rapidly 
as desired. 

During the hearings, the committee received detailed testimony 
from many individuals at one time active in the Communist Party 
of Michigan. Through these witnesses, we learned of the control ex- 
ercised by the Communist Party over the great auto industry's unions 
in the Detroit area. We also learned how the Communists control 
the activities of Communist-front organizations operated in the 
State of Michigan. These organizations, such as the Michigan chap- 
ters of the Civil Rights Congress, American Committee for Pro- 
tection of Foreign Born, Committee for Peace, Labor Committee for 
Peace, and the National Negro Labor Council, have played an im- 
portant role in fostering the policies of the Communist Party in the 
State of Michigan. 

Through the Civil Rights Congress, funds have been raised for the 
defense of Communists tried or being tried for violating the provisions 
of the Smith Act. Propaganda in support of Communists and advice 
on the procedures Communists should follow if arrested, on trial, or 
witnesses before congressional committees is given by the Civil Rights 
Congress. During your committee's hearing in Detroit, William L. 
Patterson, national executive secretary of the Civil Rights Congress 
and a leading Communist functionary, was in Detroit conferring with 
the Communists subpenaed and directing them in their conduct before 
the committee. 

Through the American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, 
funds were raised to defend those Communists guilty of violating im- 
migration laws. It provides legal services to Communists who need 
them to defend themselves in proceedings instituted by the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service. While no instances of the Ameri- 
can Committee for Protection of Foreign Born defending non-Com- 
munists came to the attention of the committee, it was established in 
Detroit that this organization resorts to a form of blackmail against 
those fighting the Communists. It accomplishes this by circulating 
among the many foreign-born residing in Detroit circulars intimida- 
ting all who can give testimony against the Communist Party and its 
leaders. 

The Michigan Committee for Peace and the Labor Committee for 
Peace are other Communist fronts operating in Michigan. The inves- 
tigation and hearing established beyond doubt that they are dominated 
and led by members of the Communist Party. These groups are more 
vicious than all the others because they are playing on the nerves 
of mothers and fathers of American youth stationed in America's 
Armed Forces, especially those fighting in Korea. These organizations 
have only one role, irrespective of their claims — that of supporting 
the Korean policy of the Soviet Union, Red China, and Communist 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 11 

Korea. They have a direct connection with the Communists, as shown 
by the fact that, through these organizations, parents and relatives 
are receiving word from those Americans being held captive by the 
Communists. These organizations have drawn to them many honest 
Americans who are unable to see through their propaganda, blinded 
by the love they hold for one close to them lighting in Korea. Unless 
these organizations are completely exposed, they will continue to draw 
honest Americans into the web of communism. 

The National Negro Labor Council is a Communist-front organiza- 
tion, designed to infiltrate communism into Negro life. By accusing 
established labor organizations of overlooking the needs of the Ne- 
groes, it hopes to capture more Negroes for communism. It deals in 
propaganda and deceit to put across its line. One illustration of this 
can be seen from the following incident : 

William K. Hood telephoned the Ford Motor Co. and asked for an 
appointment to discuss labor problems affecting Negroes. He sought 
the appointment, as president of the National Negro Labor Council. 
He was advised that the Ford Motor Co. refused to discuss any prob- 
lems with the National Negro Labor Council. Hood then requested 
the appointment as recording secretary of local 600, UAW, which 
position he also held. After the interview, Hood, who was accom- 
panied by Coleman Young, claimed that the National Negro Labor 
Council had obtained certain benefits for the Negro worker. He ex- 
plained these benefits as being in the main an agreement to hire Ne- 
groes in the bomber plant which Ford was repairing. The Communist 
National Negro Labor Council claimed that never before had Negroes 
been hired in this building. This claim is false, as all Ford workers 
know, but, in making the claim in the Communist Worker, they knew 
that Negroes in other parts of the United States did not. The Com- 
munists have thereby used the story to convince unsuspecting Negroes 
that in the National Negro Labor Council they find their only friend. 

Local 600, UAW-CIO, is the largest labor local in the world. Its 
gigantic size resembles an international union. It has a treasury in 
excess of $300,000. Local 600 has always been the prime target of 
the Communist Party. While the actual number of Communist Party 
members is proportionately small, through their control of the left- 
wing element within the Ford empire they have always elected a large 
number of officers. In certain of the buildings, such as the foundry, 
the Communists have always controlled the labor organization. This 
control of units, such as the foundry, has given the Communists control 
or near control of local 600's executive council and, through the coun- 
cil, control of local 600. Most of local 600 ? s presidents have been non- 
Communist and some even anti-Communist, but, as our hearings point- 
ed out, the Communists are usually in control. Carl Stellato, president 
of local 600 at the time of the committee's hearings was in such a posi- 
tion. It has been reported that he is using the Communists to combat 
the attempt of the international president, Walter Reuther, to replace 
him as president. He, Stellato believes that he can control the mem- 
bers of the Communist Party. But the evidence shows the opposite to 
be the fact. Irrespective of his purpose, the committee's investiga- 
tion and hearings have established that he has surrounded himself with 
individuals who were or are members of the Communist Party, all of 
whom, regardless of their current membership status, are subservient 
to the Communist Party. His administrative assistant, Johnson, was 

H. Rept. 2510. 82-2 2 



12 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



at one time an officer of the foundry unit of the Communist Party. 
Many of the union's top advisers and union employees are also subser- 
vient to the Communist Party. Ways must be found to remove the 
Communists from their positions of control of this large local whose 
members play such an important role in America's defense. 

The hearings show that great strides have been made in removing 
them from the other auto locals. In congratulating the workers in 
these locals for ridding themselves of Communist leadership, the com- 
mittee wishes to point out that evidence uncovered during the investi- 
gation discloses that Communists formerly employed in white-collar 
positions are taking up trade work and, as unknowns in the com- 
munity, are obtaining employment in the auto industry. Some of 
these are already working within various locals. 

Testimony regarding various phases and aspects of Communist 
Party activities in the Detroit area which was given to the committee 
by Richard F. O'Hair, Walter Scott Dunn, Wayne Salisbury, Wil- 
liam A. Record, Berenice ("Toby") Baldwin, Casimir Rataj, Elesio 
"Lee" Romano, Shelton Tappes, Dave Averill, and Leon England was 
of great assistance. Those persons who are interested in keeping our 
labor unions and other groups free of the Communist ensnarement 
which these witnesses clearly exposed should find their testimony most 
enlightening. 

The following persons were identified as members of the Communist 
Party during the course of the Detroit hearings : 

Identified by 



Acciacca, Archie 
Ford Motor Car Co. 

Adamski, Stanley 

Member, United Auto Workers, CIO 
Adiken, G. 
Ahrens, (Jeorge 
Allan, Stephanie 
(Mrs. William Allan) 

Wife of Daily Worker correspondent 
Allan, William (Billy) 

Communist Party organizer, Daily 
Worker representative 



Allison, Helen 

(Mrs. Carl Winter). (See Helen Alli- 
son Winter.) 
Alston, Chris 
Officer, East Side Council, Communist 
Party; employee, Packard Motor 
Car Co. 
Anderson, Gus 

Painter 
Anderson, James 

Local 600, i nited Auto Workers, CIO 
Anderson, John 
Trade-unionist, Local 155, United 
Auto Workers, CIO 
Anderson, Thomas 

Educational director, Branch 1, Sec. 
5, Communist Party 
Asslin, Midge (Mildred). 

Communist Party functionary 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 13 



Bailey, Gay 
Baker, Foss 

Lansing, Mich. 
Baltic, Nick 

Transferred to Pittsburgh, Pa., 1945 
Banks, Rose 
Barclay, Sidney 
(Also known as Scotty) 

Employee, Hudson Motor Car Co. 
Barnes, Oscar 

Employee, Cadillac Motor Car Divi- 
sion of General Motors. 
Baron, Donnie 

United Auto Workers, CIO. 
Beiswenger, Ann 
(Mrs. Hugo Beiswenger) 

(Appeared Feb. 28, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 

Beiswenger, Hugo, Jr. 
7485 Parkland, Detroit 

(Appeared Feb. 26, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Beiswenger, Huso, Sr. 

Jackson, Mich. 
Berenson, Izzy 
(Isadore) 
Operator of newsstand, Detroit; 
Daily Worker agent. 
Bernstein, Joe 

Financial Secretary, District 7, Com- 
munist Party, Michigan. 
(Appeared Feb. 26, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Berry, Abner 

Editor of Daily Worker 
Bigford, Al 

Jackson, Mich. 
Bigford, Esther 
Jackson, Mich. 
Black, Mr. 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 
Blossom, Ray 

Blyth, Larry 

Marine City, Mich. 
Boatin. Ann Vartainian 
(Mrs. Paul Boatin) 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, CIO. 
Boatin, Paul 

(Appeared Mar. 11, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 

Bollin, Cliff 

Employee, Hudson Motor Car Co. 
Bollin, Shirley 
(Mrs. Cliff Bollin) 
Borad, Murray 
Bond, Jerry 
Boskey, Harry 

Employee, Dodge Division, Chrysler 
Corp. 



Identified by 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27. 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 19-")2. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



14 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Identified by 

Boyd, Gerald ( Jerry ) Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Officer, East Side Council, Communist Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Party; local 205, United Auto Bereuiece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Workers, CIO. 
Brandt, Joe Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Flint, Mich. Bereuiece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Moved to Cleveland, Ohio. 
Brantley, Imogene 

(See Imogene Brantley Le'Garde.) 
Braunlich, Art Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Out-State organizer, Communist 
Party. 
Bray, Mary Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Brinich, Dorothy Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Member 12th Street Club of Commu- 
nist Party. 
Brook, Van Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Member, Chrysler Club of Commu- 
nist Party. 
Brooks, Paul Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Officer, East Side Council, Communist Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Party. 
Brown, Robert (Bob) Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Employee, Packard Motor Car Co. 
Brown, Walter O. Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Pressed Steel Branch, Ford Motor Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Co. 
Burt, Herman Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Auto worker. 
Campbell, Miss Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Speaker at 1945 State convention of 
Communist Party. 
Campbell, Mr. Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Member, Ben Davis Club of the Com- 
munist Party. 
Chait, Max Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Former employee of Ford Motor Co. Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Chamblis, Hilliard Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

United Auto Workers, CIO, member. 
Chandler, William (Bill) Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

United Auto Workers, CIO, Local 
155, member. 
Cherveny, John Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Employee, American Metal Products 
(Appeared Feb. 26, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Christie, Walter Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

United Auto Workers, CIO, local 155, 
member. 
Cinzori, Mack Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Die maker, Ford Motor Co., United 
Auto Workers, CIO 
(Appeared Mar. 11, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Clark, Elizabeth Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Employee Frigid Food Corp. 
Clark, Terry Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Communist Party functionary. 
Cohen, Leonard Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Alleged to be reporter. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 15 



Cole, Adeline 

Young Communist League official. 
Cones. Leola J 

Jackson. Mich. 
Cones, Roy ' 

Jackson, Mich. 
Connors, William 
Cook, Elinor Lafferty 
(Now Mrs. Elinor Maki) 
Teacher ; Communist Party function- 
ary- 

(Appeared Feb. 27, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Cook, George 
Literature director, 14th District. 
Transferred to New York. 
Cook, Maurice 

(Former husband of Elinor Lafferty 

Cook) 
Officer Mid Town Club, Communist 
Party. 
Cook, Melva 

(Mrs. George Cook) 
Transferred to New York. 
Cooper, J. Will 
Coppock, Russell 

Flint, Mich. 
Cottrell, Leo 
Cummins, Bob (Robert) 

Former paint salesman, Montgomery 

Ward Co. 
(Appeared Feb. 28. 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Cunningham, Sis 
(Mrs. Gordon Friesen) 
(Mrs. Milton Freeman) 
Employee district office, Communist 
Party. 
Daley, Bill 

Jackson, Mich. 
Dalton, Clem 
Daniels, Nick 

Presently up for deportation. 
Daniels, Mrs. Nick. ( See Agnes Grigg. ) 
Davey, Fred 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Davis, Kurt 
Employee, Dodge Division, Chrysler 
Corp. 
Davis, Larry 

320 E. Milwaukee, Detroit, Mich. 
Davis, Mrs. Mary. (See Mary Page.) 
Davis, Nelson 
Employee, Ford Motor Co., vice presi- 
dent, local 600, United Auto Work- 
ers, CIO. 

(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 

Davis, Sally 
Employee, Dodge Division, Chrysler 
Corp. 



Identified ~by 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Fed. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Fed. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



1 Mr. Salisbury testified that It is his belief that Leola and Roy Cones had broken from 
the Communist Party. 



16 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Dearnley, Eric 

Former officer, Plymouth Local 51, 
United Auto Workers, CIO 
De Blois, Don 

Employee, Briggs Mfg. Oo. 
Delancey, Ann 

Formerly resided at Priscilla Home. 2 
Dennis, Tommy 

Ypsilanti, Mich. 
Dillard, Mr. 

Member, Midtown Club of the Com- 
munist Party. 
Dillard, Mrs. 
Member, Midtown Club of the Com- 
munist Party. 
Dolman, Leslie (Pvt.) 
Dombrowski, Ruth 
(Mrs. Tom Dombrowski.) 
Dombrowski, Tom. (Also known as 
Thomas X. Dombey.) 
Editor of Glos-Ludowy, Hamtramck. 
(Appeared Apr. 29, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Dorosh, Walter 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 

(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Drown, Vida (Nee, McDonnell). 

Jackson, Mich. 
Duncan, Johnny 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, CIO, 
Ford Motor Co. employee. 
Edwards, Byron 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, 
CIO, Ford Motor Co. employee. 
Edwards, Celia (Mrs. Byron Edwards.) 
Clerk in Local 600, United Auto 
Workers, CIO. 

(Appeared Mar. 11, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Endicott, Paul 
Employee, Dodge Division, Chrysler 
Corp. 
Fainaru, Harry 

Editor of Foreign Language news- 
paper. 
Falk, Sven 

Employee, Packard Motor Car Co. 
Ferris, Alice 

Operated Communist Book Store. 
Field, Fred 

Grand Rapids, Michigan. 
Fireman, Hy 

Auto worker. 
Fische, Fred 
Employee, Chevrolet Motors Div., 
General Motors Corp. 
Ford, James 

Communist Party functionary. 
Foreman, Carneller 

Officer, East Side Council, Commu- 
nist Party. 



Identified by 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury. Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



8 Records of the committee show correct Dame of place as Priscilla Inn, 2619 Cass Ave. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 17 



Forsythe, Emmett 

Editor, Michigan Worker. 
Franklin, Harold 
Employee, Ford Motor Co., foundry, 
River Rouse Plant ; United Auto 
Workers, CIO, vice pres. and re- 
cording secretary. 
(Appeared Apr. 29, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership. ) 
Franklin, Mrs. Harold 

(See Mary Mclntyre.) 
Frazier, Jim 

Charlotte, Mich. 
Freeman, Milton 

Formerly employed by Detroit Times. 
Furay, Mrs. Mort (Corinne Foray) 
Gale, Willie 
Gallo, John 
District' committeeman; employee, 
Ford Motor Co., Dearborn plant. 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Ganley, Ann (Mrs. Nat Ganley) 
Ganley, Nat 
Business agent, Local 155, United 
Auto Workers, CIO. 
Gannett, Betty 

Communist Party functionary. 
Garrett, Dewey 

Machine tool operator. 
Gates, Henderson 
Gebelle, Fred 

Employee, Plymouth Motor Corp. 
Gebert, Boleslaw 
Gladstone, Marvin 

Washtenaw County. 
Glassgold, Edna (Mrs. Harry Glass- 
gold) 
Former employee, Ford Motor Co. 
and former member, Theatre 
Guild, New York City. 
Glassgold, Harry 

Artist ; organizational section, branch 
1, section 5, Communist Party. 
Glenn, William 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership. ) 
Gonzales, Jesus (Jessie) 

New Haven, Mich. 
Goodman, Calvin 

18C64 Forrest Avenue, Detroit, Mich., 
Employee, Ford Motor Car Co. 
Goodman. Flo (Mrs. Calvin Goodman) 
Gordon, Hy 

Communist Party functionary. 
Gore, Jack 
Employee, Dodge Division, Chrysler 
Corp. ; former student at Ann 
Arbor. 
Gottlieb 

Member, Group 1, auto miscellaneous 
section of the Communist Party. 



Identified by 

Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Casimir Rataj, Mar. 10, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



18 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Green, Pressley 

Ford Motor Co. local 600, United 
Auto Workers, CIO. 
Greenberg, Ike 

Grigg, Agnes (Mrs. Nick Daniels) 
Grossman, Fay Gingold (Mrs. Saul 
Grossman) 
Secretary, district 7, Communist 
Party of Michigan. 
Grossman, Saul 

(Appeared Apr. 29, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Gustafson, John 

Employee, Plymouth Motor Corp. 
Haskell, Raphael (Ray) 

Former employee, Dial Machine Co. 

(Appeared Feb. 26, 1952 ; refused to 

affirm or deny Communist Party 

membership.) 

Haskell, Zina Brandi (Mrs. Ray 

Haskell) 
Hell, John 
Henley, Paul 

Steward, local 3, United Auto Work- 
ers, CIO, Dodge Division, Chrys- 
ler Corp. 
(Appeared Feb. 27, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Higdon, Hoke 

Muskegon, Mich. 
Hommer, Phil 

Local 205, United Auto Workers, 
CIO ; employee, Allen Industries Co. 
Hood, William R. 
At one time, recording secretary, local 
600, United Auto Workers, CIO; 
employee, Ford Motor Co. 
(Appeared Feb. 28, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Hrabar, Mike 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, CIO ; 
employee, Ford Motor Co. 
Hudson, Roy 

Communist Party functionary. 
Iglesias, Frank 

Member A. F. of L. Painters' Union. 
Ireland. Betty (Mrs. Max Ireland) 

Stenographer. 
Ireland, Max 
Employee, Cadillac Motor Car Divi- 
sion, General Motors Corp. 
Issacs, John 

Jackson, James (Dr. James E. Jackson) 
Communist Party functionary. 

Jacobowitz, Jake 

Auto worker. 
Jansen, Henry (also known as "Swede" 
Jansen ) 
Chairman, Timken Club of the Com- 
munist Party. 



Identified by 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 19 



Jelley, Tom 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. ; officer, 
United Auto Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared Mar. 11, 1952 ; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Johnson, Mrs. Hattie 
Johnson, Jean 
Jones, Dick 
Jones, Fred 
Jones, J. B. s 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, 
CIO. 
Jones, James 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, 
CIO. 
Jurist, Gus 
Juris, Mrs. Gus 
Kasper, Pete 
Local 600, United Auto Workers, 
CIO. 
Keller, James 

Believed to now reside in Chicago. 
Kelly, Ann 

Paid Communist Party functionary. 
Kelly, Laura 
Kennedy, Casper 

Flint, Mich. 
Kennedy, Royce 

Electrical appliances business. 
Kidwell, Omar 
Kitto, Russell 
Employee, Cadillac Motor Car Divi- 
sion, General Motors Corp. 
Kniep, Florence 

Traverse City, Mich. 
Kocel, Alice (Mrs. Ben Kocel) 
Kocel, Ben 

Newspaper, Glos Ludowy, Ham- 
tramck. 
Kowal, Pete 
Krawford, Leroy 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 

Kristalsky, George 

Hamtramck, Mich. 
Kudlik, Jeannie 
Lancey, Andy 
Lauderdale, Leonard 
Lawson, John 

Employee, tool and die unit, Dear- 
born plant, Ford Motor Co. 
Lee, Ginny 

Jackson, Mich. 
Lee, Katie 

Paid Communist Party functionary. 
Le Garde, Imogene Williams Brantley 

Local 205, United Auto Workers, CIO ; 
employee, Allen Industries Co. 
Lieberman, Robert 

Communist Party functionary. 
Lifsee, Bill 



Identified by 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb 25, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 



•Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27. 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wavne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Casimir Rataj, Mar. 10, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



* Dave Averill testified that it is his belief that J. B. Jones had broken with the Com- 
munist Party. 



20 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Lindouf, Charles 

Employee, Plymouth Motor Corp. 
Little, John 

Local 600, United Auto Workers, CIO. 
Llewelyn, Percy 

Vice president, Ford Local 600, United 
Auto Workers, CIO. 
Lock,- Edgar (Ed) 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. ; chairman, 
plastics unit, local 600, United 
Auto Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared Mar. 11, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Lymber, John 
Lynch, Katherine 

Former employee, Free Press. 

McAllister, Mr. 
McAllister, Verna 

Sent by the party to California 
McGee, Dewey 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 
McDonnell, Faye 
(Mrs. Floyd McDonnell) 

Jackson, Mich. 
McDonnell, Floyd 

Jackson, Mich. 
McGhee, Sam 

Resided on St. Antoine St., Detroit, 
Mich. 
Mcintosh. Matilda 
(Mrs. Ronald Mcintosh) 

Jackson, Mich. 
Mcintosh, Ronald 

Jackson, Mich. 
Mclntyre, Mary 
(Mrs. Harold Franklin) 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
McKie, William (Bill) 

Trustee, Ford local 600, United Auto 
Workers, CIO. 

McMahon, Richard 

Business Agent, Wayne Co., 
McPhaul, Arthur 

Employee, Ford Motor Co., officer In 
local 600, United Auto Workers, 
CIO. 
(Appeared Feb. 27, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership. ) 
Ma ben 

Barber. 
Maise, Felix 

Employee, Packard Motor Car Co. 
Maki, Elinor 

(Mrs. William). (See Elinor Laf- 
fery Cook.) 
Maniken,«Roy 

Employee. Hudson Motor Car Co. 
Maraniss, Elliot (Ace) 
Employee, Detroit Times. 

(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 



Identified by 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 

Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Casimir Rataj, Mar. 10, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 21 



Maraniss, Mary Morrison. (See Mary 

Morrison.) 
Mardiros, Ruben 

Employee, Ford Motor Co., local 600, 
UAW-CIO. 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Marksian, L. 
Martin, Frank 
Masee, Dr. J. 

Resided on Hastings St., Detroit, 
Mich. 
Mason, Hodges 

Employee, Bohn Aluminum and Brass 
Corp. 
Mates, Dave 

UE (local), understood to have been 
chairman of Indiana Communist 
Party. 
Mates, Lydia 

(Mrs. Dave Mates) 
Understood to have been cochair- 
raan of Indiana Communist 
Party. 
Maxwell, Matilda 

(Mrs. Jesse Parrish). 
Miller, Dave 

Employee, Cadillac Motor Car Divi- 
sion of General Motors Corp. 
(Appeared Feb. 26, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership.) 
Miller, Felix 

Mitchell, Mabel 
Mogill, Billie 

(Mrs. George Mogill.) 
Mogill, George 
Monicelovich, A. 
Moore, Dave 
Employee, Ford Motor Co. 

(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Morgan, Charles E. (Also known as 
••Peoples.") 
Employee, Ford Motor Co.; United 
Auto Workers, CIO, local 600. 
Morrison, Mary 

(Mrs. Eliot Maraniss.) 
Moskalik, Simon 
Employee, Pressed Steel branch, Ford 
Motor Co. 
Narancich, Roy 

Employee, Ford Motor Co., council 
member, local 600, United Auto 
Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Nerich 

Member, Heywood No. 2 Branch of 
the Communist Party. 
Newman, Willie 

Resided on E. Warren. 



Identified by 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



22 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Newsorne, George 

[Note: In the original release of this 
report an individual named Frank 
Novak was named as having, been 
identified by testimony of Wayne B. 
Salisbury. Mr. Novak has denied 
membership in the Communist Party, 
and in view of the vagueness of the 
testimony relating to him, his name 
is being deleted.] 

Nowak, John 

Member, local 155, UAW-CIO 

Nowak, Stanley 

Formerly State Senator, Hamtramck. 
(Appeared Mar. 10, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 

Orsage, Leo T. 
Ford Motor Co. 

Obriot, Tersil T. 

Member, Ford local 600, United Auto 
Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Page, Mary (now Mrs. Mary Davis) 
also known as Mary Reed Page ; 
Mary Reed; former wife of Fred 
Page) 
Secretary, Ford local 600, United 
Auto Workers, CIO. 
Palmer, Opal 

Stock clerk, local 600, UAW-CIO. 
Palmquist, Carl 

Educational director, Fourteenth 
Congressional Club of the Commu- 
nist Party. 
Palmquist, Helen 
(Mrs. Carl Palmquist) 
Palmquist, Jack (son of Carl Palm- 
quist) 
Former student, Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 
Parrish, Mrs. Jesse. (See Matilda Max- 
well. ) 
Parrish, Jesse 

Official, Midtown Club, Communist 
Party : resided E. Palmer St. 
Patrick, Marion Elder 

Officer, Fred Douglas Club, Commu- 
nist Party. 
Pearlstein, Mildred 

Communist Party functionary (party 
name: Mildred Pierce). 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny Communist Party 
membership. ) 
Perry, Louis 

Resided on Brush St. 
Piazza, Verne (La Verne) 

Dentist 
Pierce, Mildred. (See Mildred Perl- 
stein.) 
Pietrowski, Eddie 

Auto worker. 
Pietrowski, Sally 
(Mrs. Eddie Pietrowski) 



Identified by 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Casimir Rataj, Mar. 10, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury. Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 23 



Pitcher, Eva 

Saginaw, Mich. 
Ploetchl, Leo 

Jackson, Mich. 
Pollock. Mildred 

Formerly in local 155, United Auto 
Workers, CIO ; transferred out of 
Michigan. 
Poison, Bridget 

Head of Young Communist League 
office of Detroit. 
Poison, Ruth 

Employee. Bonn Aluminum and Brass 
Corp. : local 20S, United Auto Work- 
ers, CIO. 
Pompquist, Jack Jr. 

Employee, Chrysler Corp. 
Popescu 

National group, Communist Party. 
Potter, Tim. (See Timothy Shay.) 
Price, Frances 

Civil Rights Congress, Detroit. 
Purdy, Robert 

Auto worker, Dodge Division, Chrys- 
ler Corp. 
Raskin, Jack 

Civil Rights Congress, Detroit. 
Raymond, Phil 

Pingree St., Detroit, Mich. 
Redstone, Reva 

Office worker. 
Reed, Bob 

Circulation manager, Michigan Her- 
ald, Muskegon. 
Reed, Mary (also known as Mary Reed 

Page ; Mary Reed Page Davis ; former 

wife of Fred Page; now Mrs. Davis). 

(See Mary Page.) 
Revis, Otis 

Former employee, Briggs Mfg. Co. 
Rice, Pat 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. ; vice presi- 
dent, local 600, United Auto 
Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared Feb. 28, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Rhodes, Oscar 

Employee, Briggs Mfg. Co. 
Ripken, Hank 

Auto worker, Heywood Communist 
Party Club. 
Ripken, Katherine 
Riskin, Irving 

Business Agent, UOPWA, Detroit. 
Riskin, "Skippy" 
(Mrs. Irving Riskin) 
Rizzo, Sam 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 
Roach, Kenneth 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 
Robertson, Harold 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. 
Rodgers, William A. 

Resided on Brush St., Detroit, Mich. 



Identified bii 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



24 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Rogers, Carl 

Employee, Cadillac Motor Car Divi- 
sion of General Motors Corp. 
Ross, Norman 
Ross, Shirley 
Saari, John (Whitey) 

Employee, Ford Motor Co. ; local 600, 
United Auto Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Sampy, Mills 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Sanberg, Helen 
(Mrs. Jack Sanberg) 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Sanberg, Jack 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Sanders, Clarence 

Employee, Chrysler Corp. 
Sandretto, Aldo 
First Congressional Group, Commu- 
nist Party. 
Savola, Matt 

Member, Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers Union, Iron Wood, Mich. 
Schatz, Phil 
Communist Party functionary. 

Schkurman, Martha 
Officer, Fourteenth Congressional 
Club, Communist Party. 
Schleicher, Milton 

Michigan Herald. 
Schlicht, Joseph 

Concrete business. 
Sciverras, Louis 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Searles, Pfc. 
Shapiro 

Southfield Club, Communist Party. 
Shapiro, Esther 
(Mrs. Harold Shapiro) 
Shapiro, Harold 

Fur and Leather Workers. 
Shay, Timothy (Tim) (also known as 
Tim Potter) 
Formerly resided on Cass Ave., De- 
troit, Mich. 
Showerman, Glen 

Quiney Street, Detroit, Mich. 
Showerman, Sue 

Officer, auto group, Communist Party. 
Siegel, Esther 
Officer, Midtown Club, Communist 
Party ; resided on Elmhurst Street 
Silverberg, Dave 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Simmons, James M. 
Officer, local 600, UAW-CIO; em- 
ployee, Ford Motor Co. 
(Appeared Mar. 11, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Simmons, Steve 
Smith, Harold 
Fourteenth Congressional District, 
Communist Party. 



Identified by 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Richard F. OHair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Richard F. OHair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. OHair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 28, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. OHair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 



Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 25 



Smith. Hope (Mrs. Harold Smith) 

Fourteenth Congressional District, 
Communist Party. 
Sobczak, John 

Steward. Fred Douglas Club. 
Sorbonya, Julius (also spelled Sobonya) 

Auto miscellaneous group of Com- 
munist Party. 
Sorenson, Ernie 

Employee, Hudson Motor Car Co. 
Springer (husband of Barbara 
Springer) 

Formerly employed in post office, De- 
troit. 
Springer. Barbara 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Stepanchenko, Frank 

Local 600, UAW-CIO. 
Stern, Arthur (also known as Yeager) 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Stern. Barbara (Mrs. Arthur Stern) 

Midtown Club, Communist Party. 
Swetniek Nick 
Sykes, Frank 

Lower Eastside, Communist Party. 
Toohey, Pat 

Organizer, Communist Party, Detroit. 



Trees. Daniel 

Employee, furniture store. 
Turner, Carl 

Employee, Spring and Upset Unit, 
Ford Motor Co. ; officer, United 
Auto Workers, CIO. 
(Appeared March 11, 1952 ; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Turner. Edward (not identical with 
Edward N. Turner who appeared be- 
fore committee). 
Van Horn. Edith 
Employee, Dodge Division, Chrysler 
Corp. 
Vartainian. Bacrad 

Local 600, UAW, CIO ; employee, Ford 
Motor Co. 
Walker. Gurley (Mrs. James Walker) 
Local 205, United Auto Workers, CIO ; 
employee, Allen Industries, Inc. 
Walker, James 

Local 205, United Auto Workers, CIO; 
employee, Allen Industries, Inc. 
Walters, Charles 

Local 155, UAW, CIO 
Washington, Bob 

First Congressional District, Commu- 
nist Party. 
Watts. James 
Employee, Packard Motor Car Co. ; 
formerly at Flint. Mich. 
(Appeared March 11, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 



Identified by 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. J.".. 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 



26 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Webb, Ruth 

Midtowu Club, Communist Party. 
Weinstone 

Wellman, Peggy (Mrs. Saul Wellman) 
Wellman, Saul 

Employee, Briggs Mfg. Co. 
Wells, Harold 

Chrysler Club, Communist Party. 
Whipple, Ida (Mrs. Jess Whipple) 

Jackson, Mich. 
Whipple, Jess 

Jackson, Mich. 
White, Jack 

Oi'ganizer, Communist Party ; Em- 
ployee, Packard Motor Car Co., for- 
merly at Flint, Mich. 
Widmark, James 

Flint, Mich. 
Williams, Emma (Mrs. Fred Williams) 
Williams, Fred 
Employee, Bohn Aluminum and Brass 
Corp., member, local 208, UAW, 
CIO 

(Appeared February 27, 1952; re- 
fused to affirm or deny Com- 
munist Party membership.) 
Williamson, John 

National Committee, Communist Po- 
litical Association. 
Wilson, Barbara 

Member, Communist Political Asso- 
ciation. 
Wilson, Jack (alias for Fred Williams) . 
Wilson, Roy 4 

Employee, Department of Public Wel- 
fare, Detroit ; Young Communist 
League member. 
Winston, Henry 

Communist Party functionary, New 
York. 
Winter, Carl 

Official of District 7, Communist 
Party. 

Winter, Helen Allison (Mrs. Carl 
Winter) 

Official of District 7, Communist 
Party. 
Woodson, Mattie Lee 

Employee, District 7 office, Commu- 
nist Party, Detroit. 
Work, Merle 

Communist Party functionary 
Wright, Malcolm 

Auto Miscellaneous Group, Commu- 
nist Party 
Yanover, Jules 
Musician 

(Appeared Mar. 12, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 



Identified by 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Casimir Rataj, Mar. 10, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 



Shelton Tappes, Mar. 12, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romana, March. 11, 1952. 
Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 



Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Walter Scott Dunn, Feb. 26, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Richard F. O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 
Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 

Wayne B. Salisbury, Feb. 27, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 



Richard O'Hair, Feb. 25, 1952. 



4 Dave Averill testified that Roy Wilson, to his knowledge, had broken with the Com- 
munist Party. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 27 

Identified by 
Yanover, Ruth (Mrs. Jules Yanover) Richard F. CTHair, Feb. 25, 1952. 

Originally from Milwaukee, Wis. 
Yeager, Arthur. (See Arthur Stern.) 

Young. Coleman Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

National executive secretary. Na- 
tional Negro Labor Council 
(Appeared Feb. 28, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Young, Marion (Mrs. Coleman Young) Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 
Zahari, Daniel Dave Averill, Mar. 12, 1952. 

Employee, Pressed Steel Branch, 
Ford Motor Co. 
Zarichney. .lack Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Lansing, Mich. 
Zenchuck, Olga Bereniece Baldwin, Feb. 29, 1952. 

Packinghouse Local Elesio (Lee) Romano, Mar. 11, 1952. 

Chicago 

The hearings held in Chicago, 111., in September 1952 were only a 
partial exposure of evidence of Communist activities uncovered dur- 
ing the investigations. As a matter of fact, only the Communist activ- 
ities within local 347, United Packinghouse Workers of America 
(CIO), and certain locals of the United Electrical, Radio, and Ma- 
chine Workers of America (independent) were exposed. However, in 
the latter category only several of the top union officials were sub- 
penaed. While the committee considered the hearing only a partial 
exposure, it was given top priority for attack by the Communist Party. 

This attack by the Communist Party should be reviewed closely by 
the Congress for it came closer to mob violence and a forceful attack 
upon the legislative function of the Congress than any incident in its 
history. It started with several hundred Communists and their fol- 
lowers forming a picket line in front of the main entrance of the 
Federal Building, in which the hearings were held. These pickets, 
pursuant to a plan publicly announced by the Communist Party, 
carried signs designed to intimidate members of the committee and 
witnesses, and stormed the Federal Building itself. Brushing aside 
uniformed Federal Building guards, the group made its way to the 
second floor where the committee's hearings were in progress. De- 
manding admittance to a then already overcrowded courtroom, they 
pounded upon the doors, and threatened physical harm to the witness 
then testifying. Calling one witness a stool pigeon and shouting state- 
ments against the chairman and members of the committee, the demon- 
stration continued unhampered for over an hour. These pickets were 
led by Dick Criley, who has been identified as leader of the Com- 
munist Party's Youth Commission, and Sidney Ordower, a leader of 
the Progressive Party. 

The hearings forcefully disclosed how the affairs of local 347, 
UPWA, have been directed by leaders, who, one after another, are, 
or have been, members of the Communist Party. This Communist 
leadership, confined mainly to one packing-house local in the Chicago 
area, has never been disciplined by the international leadership, and, 
as a matter of fact, there are instances where the international, an 
affiliate of the CIO, has supported the Communists in control of 
local 347. 

H. Rept. 2516, 82-2 3 



28 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Local 347 has brought pressure upon the Department of State in an 
effort to force the Department to issue passports to Communists. 
This pressure has been in the form of paid advertisements and personal 
contacts with individuals occupying positions important enough to 
influence State Department decisions. One of the Communists who 
was denied a United States passport is a member of local 347. In 
order to proceed behind the iron curtain, this individual filed a fraud- 
ulent passport application. 

In subpenaing the leaders of the United Electrical, Radio, and 
Machine Workers of America in Chicago, the committee again came 
face to face with witnesses refusing to answer questions relating to 
their Communist affiliations, on the ground of possible self-incrimina- 
tion, while these same witnesses have on file non-Communist affidavits 
with the National Labor Relations Board. 

With respect to the International Harvester Council of the United 
Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America, we found local 
unions signing up their entire membership as subscribers to Communist 
publications, and paying the entire cost of the subscriptions from the 
local's treasury. Instances where the locals also paid the salaries of its 
members while they attended a Communist school were outlined before 
the committee. The investigation conclusively showed a working 
arrangement among all the Communist-dominated locals in the 
Chicago area to take care of members of the Communist Party. 

A Communist fired from one position is immediately hired by one 
of the Communist locals, or is placed on the international payroll, or 
else he obtains employment in a plant and is almost immediately 
elected to an important position. 

During the investigation, evidence was obtained of the existence 
on the campuses of the University of Chicago and Roosevelt College 
of Communist clubs among students, as well as faculty personnel. 
Evidence was also obtained with respect to the Communist club of 
the University of Chicago and its relationship to the Communist Party. 

Other evidence was uncovered during the investigation and wit- 
nesses were subpenaed. However, due to the lateness of the congres- 
sional year, the subpenas have been canceled and these matters will be 
the subject of our continuing investigation. In the meantime, all in- 
formation of Communist activities in the Chicago area, as well as in 
other industrial areas, should be brought to the committee's attention. 

The committee was assisted in the Chicago hearing through the 
testimony given by Irving Krane, Lee Lundgren, Roy Thompson, 
Alcide T. Kratz, John Edward Cooke, and Donald O. Spencer. 

The individuals identified during the hearings in Chicago, 111., as 
present or past members of the Communist Party in the Chicago area 
are listed below : 

Identified as Communist by — 

Alexander, Mrs. Annie Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Allen, Frank Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

International organizer, UE. Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Amato, Pat Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

President, UE local 1150. Irving Krane, Sept 2, 1952. 

Atkinson, Flo (Florence Atkinson 
Criley, Mrs. Richard Criley; see 
Florence Criley) 
Avery, James Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Official, local 347, UPWA. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 29 

Identified as Communist btj — 

Balsis, Joe Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Bartnick, Bruno (or Bartnik) John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Farm equipment worker, official, FEU 
local 108. 
Batterson, Warren Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Communist Party functionary, Iowa. 
Bentzenhoffer, Joe. (See Joseph Bezen- 

hoff er. ) 
Bernard, John T. Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Official, UE District 11. 

(Appeared before Committee Sept. 
3, 1952, refused to affirm or deny 
party membership.) 
Beverly, Leon R°y Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Official, local 347, UPWA. 

(Appeared Sept. 4-5, 1952, refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Bezenhoffer, Joseph (also known as Joe Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Marlovits) 

Official, local 347, UPWA. 
Bindman, Aaron Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Official, Longshoremen's Union. 
Birch, Jack Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Official. UE local 1119. - . --„.■ 

Brown. Edward (also known as Ed Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 19o2. 

Star) John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Secretary, Communist Party of Illi- 

Brown^Thomas, Jr. Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Member, UE. 
Burns, Milton L,ee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

International representative, UE. T „ „-_„ 

Carle, Tillie (Mrs. Frank Rogers) ^ Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Officer, Civil Rights Congress, Chi- 
cago 

Carter, Rachael -John Edward Cooke Sept 3 1952. 

Casaro, Mary Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Second vice president, local 107, FEU. in __ 

Childs, Morris Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Organizing director, Communist 

Party, Illinois. . . ., _ „ . „ . _ 1f ._ 

Clemmons Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Executive board, local 107, FEU. n _, . . .,„_„ 

Cole, Dorothy R °y Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Candidate for Congress, Ninth Con- 
gressional District, Illinois, Pro- 
gressive Party. 
Cornelius, Eugene R(, y Thompson, Sept. 4, 19o2. 

Chief steward. Cold Pork Division, 

local 347, UPWA. n 

Criley, Florence (Mrs. Richard Criley, Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

nee Flo Atkinson) Ir ving Krane, Sept. 2, 19o2. 

Official UE, local 1150. ,  1Q __ 

Criley. Richard Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Official, Communist Party, State of 

Illinois. _ „ 

Curry, Samuel Rov Thompson, Sept. 4, 19o2. 

Representative of UPWA. 

(Appeared Sept. 4, 1952, refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Cutno, James Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Chief steward. Hot Pork Division, lo- 
cal 347, UPWA. 



30 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Davenport, Sidney 

Inside guard, local 347, UPWA. 
Davis Pete 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Dawkins, James (Jim) 

Official, UE local 1150. 
Dennis, Joe 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Dunson, Perry 

Chief steward, Wool Division, local 
347, UPWA. 
Dutner, Fred 

Organizer, UE. 
Ellis, Hilliard 

Official, local 453, UAW, CIO. 
Engelstein, David 

Official, Communist Party, Illinois; 
instructor, Communist Party 
school. 
Erickson, Jean (nee Jean Horn) 
Feinglass, Abe 

Officer, Fur and Leather Workers 
Union. 
Fielde, Jerry (Gerald) 

Former secretary-treasurer, FE-UE. 
Fine, Fred 

Labor section, Communist Party, Il- 
linois. 
Fisher, Harold 
Freed, Harry 

Official, UE local 1119. 
Frisbie. Alvin 

Member, FEU local 108. 
Gardner, Bill 

Member, local 150, FE-CIO. 
Glicker, Lottie 

Member, UE. 
Gorgolinski, Ned 

Vice president, UE local 1150. 
Gray, Hazel 

Member, local 10S, FEU. 
Gray, John 

Instructor Communist Party school. 
Green, Gil 

Communist Party functionary. 



Identified as Communist by- 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 



Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 



Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 



Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 



Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 



Green, George 

Former vice president, local 347, 
UPWA. 
Gudinas, Julia 

Official, UE local 1150. 
Gustofson, Gus 

Official, local 150, FE. 
Hall, Catherine (Kate) (Mrs. John Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952 
Watkins) 

Employed district office, FE-CIO, 
Rock Island. 
Hall, Florence (Flo) 
Employee, Stewart-Warner ; official, 
Communist Party, Illinois. 
Hammersmark, Sam 
Operates Modern Bookstore, Chi- 
cago ; Communist Party function- 
ary. 
Handele, Arthur. ( See Arthur Hendle. ) 



Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 31 



Harris, Lem 

Instructor, Communist Party school. 
Hassen, Peter 

Member, Great Lakes Forge, local 
FEU. 
Hayes, Charley 

Believed an employee of the Wilson 
plant. 
Hendle, Arthur 
Herman, Irving 

Communist Party functionary. 
Hillyer. Dorothy 
Horn, Annette 

UPWA. 
Horn, Jean. (See Jean Erickson.) 
Howell, Willie 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Huff. Beatrice (Mrs. Pope Huff) 

Member, FEU, local 108. 
Huff, Pope 

Official, FEU, local 108. 
Johnson, Levi 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Jones, Hazel 

Member, local 150, FE-CIO. 
Karpa, Mike 

Official, UE, and member, UE local 
1119. 
Katzen, Leon 

Communist Party functionary and 
staff member, UE. 
Keller, Jim 

Communist Party organizer. 
Killinger, Charles 

Field representative, Farm Equip- 
ment Union. 
Koss, Anthony 

Financial secretary-treasurer, local 
1150. 
Kramer, Yield 
Krantzler, Melvin 

Official UE, district 11. 
Krantzler, Milt 
Kruse. Theo (female) 
Kushner, Sam 

Communist Party organizer, official, 
UE local 1119. 
LaMaux, Ina 

Official, UE. 
Lassiter, Charles 
Lawson, Charles 

Member, local 101, FEU. 
Leddel, Olaf 

Watchmaker. 
Levitova, Ruth 

Official. UE local 1150. 
Levine, Murray 

Employed, Birtman Electric. 
Levine. Sarah (Mrs. Murray Levine) 
Lewis, Mrs. Patricia 
Lightfoot, Claude 

Communist Party functionary. 
Lofgren, Raynal (Ray) 

Member UE. 
Lucas, Bernard 

Official, Longshoremen's Union. 



Identified as Communist by- 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 



Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 



Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 



Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 



John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 



32 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Identified as Communist by — 
Luke, Randolph Roy Thompson, Sept 4, 1952. 

Official, local 347, UPWA. 
McHale, Jerry Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Organizer, FE-CIO. 
Manning, George Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Executive Board, local 347, UPWA. 
March, Herbert (born Herbert Fink) Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Organizer, local 347, UPWA, Com- Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
munist Party functionary. 
(Appeared Sept. 5, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Marlovits, Joe. (See Joseph Bezenhof- 

fer.) 
Matusek, Anthony (Tony) John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Official, local 108, FEU. 
Meihs, Henry Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Field representative, UE local 1114. 
Milkovitch, John Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Employed East Moline branch, Inter- 
national Harvester. 
Moore, Fred John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Member, FEU local 108. 
Oakes, Grant Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Obitz, Jessie ( Mrs. ) Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Chief steward, Morris division, local 
347, UPWA. 
O'Rear, Les (not certain of spelling) Roy Thompson. Sept. 4, 1952. 

Staff member, national office UPWA. 
Parks, Sam Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Employed Wilson plant. 

(Appeared Sept. 4, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Patterson, William L. Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Communist Party functionary. John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Penkovosky, Mollie Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Counselor, Welfare Department, lo- 
cal 347. UPWA. 
Pentacost, Joseph John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Official, FEU local 108. 
Perez, Jesse Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Sergeant at arms, local 347, UPWA. 
Persley, Wilma (nee Wilma Horn) Abide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Peterson Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Emploved, Tractor Works, local 101, 
FEU. 
Poskonka, Joe Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Rhodes, Art Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Member, UE. 
Rogalski, Walter (Wallie) Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Vice president, UE, local 1150. Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Rogers, Mrs. Frank. ( See Tillie Carle. ) 
Rossi, Andrew Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Official, FEU. local 107. 
Schmies, John Alcide T. Kratz. Sept. 3, 1952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept 3, 1952. 
Schoenfeld, Edwin John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Educational director, FEU. 
Scott, Robert Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Member. UE local 1150. 
Sentner, William Lee Lundsren. Sept. 2. 1952. 

Communist Party functionary ; at one 
time with Chicago Star. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 33 



Shanta. Ceorge 

President, local 107, FEU. 
Sheehan, William J. 

International representative, UE. 
Smith, Adam 

Vice president, UE local 1119. 
Smith, Alice 

Official. UE District Council No. 11. 
Smith. Willie Mae 

Official. UE local 1150. 
Soso, Pasco 

Official, UE local 1114. 
Star, Ed (also known as Edward 

Brown). (Sec Edward Brown.) 
Starobin. Joseph 

Foreign editor — Daily Worker. 
Stempel, Walter 

Member, UE. 
Stern, Joe 
Stoecker, Clarence 

Financial secretary, local 10S, FEU. 
Talley, Luther 

Agent, Progressive Union Painters, 
Chicago. 

Former official, local 164, UAW, CIO. 
Teeple, Bay 

Secretary Communist Party, Quad 
City area, Iowa. 
Terry, Ben 

Sergeant at arms, local 347, UPWA. 
Thomas, Lane 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Tiegland, Donald 

Employed East Moline branch, Inter- 
national Harvester. 
Travis, Robert 
Tribbite, LeRoy 

Recording secretary, local 107, FEU. 
Turner, Leo 

Member, UPWA, formerly member 
UE. 
Van Norstrand, Joe 

Field representative Farm Equip- 
ment Union. 
Verri, Bettv (Mrs. Al Verri) 

Member, UE. 
Wagenknecht, Alfred 

Top official, Communist Party of 
Illinois. 
Washington, Symanthia, Mrs. 

Member, local 347, UPWA. 
Watkins, John 

District vice president, FE. 
Watkins, Mrs. John. (See Catherine 

Hall.) 
Weiss, Max 

Communist Party functionary. 
Wheelock, Rex 

Official, UE, Quad City district. 
White, Booker 

Official, FEU, local 108. 
Wilson, John 

Employed Red Jacket Pump Co., Dav- 
enport, Iowa. 



Identified as Communist by — 
Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1052. 

Lee Lundgren. Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Irving Krane, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 



Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, L952. 

Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2. 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 



Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 



Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 

Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Lee Lundgren, Sept. 2, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 
John Edward Cooke, Sept. 3, 1952. 
Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 



34 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Identified as Communist by —  
Wilson, Mabel (Mrs. John Wilson) Donald O. Spencer, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Secretary treasurer, Communist 
Party, Quad City area, Iowa. 
Wood, Thomas Roy Thompson, Sept. 4, 1952. 

Chief steward, local 347, UPWA. 
Zarniack, Grace Alcide T. Kratz, Sept. 3, 1952. 

Secretary, Roseland Branch, Com- 
munist Party. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Continuing the investigation of Communist infiltration into basic 
industries, the committee held hearings in another concentrated indus- 
trial section of the country, Philadelphia. Within this area are 
located many primary industries, RCA, Westinghouse, and GE, as 
well as many so-called secondary industries such as tool and die works 
which supply the tools and dies essential for the continuing defense 
of our country. 

During these hearings, the committee took testimony relating to the 
Communist control of Local 155, UE, which services approximately 30 
of the above-mentioned type shops. Mr. Thomas F. Delaney, in his 
testimony, revealed that, from the time he joined local 155 in 1941 
until he severed all connections with the Communist Party and local 
155 in May of this year, all major resolutions, elections, and disburse- 
ment of funds were engineered and sponsored by members of the Com- 
munist Party. Today, those who control the affairs of the union are 
Dave Davis, admitted member of the Communist Party, and Max 
Helfand, who refused to answer all questions relating to membership 
in the Communist Party, both of whom are currently employed as 
organizers for the local. Mr. Delaney testified that if he had not been 
a member of the Communist Party he would never have secured his 
position as organizer with the local, a position which he held from 
1942 through May 1952, nor would he have been elected as representa- 
tive of district 1, which includes eastern Pennsylvania, south New 
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and part of Virginia, on the national 
general executive board of UE, one of the unions belatedly expelled 
from the CIO for being Communist controlled and dominated. 

In connection with his stewardship as a Communist Party labor offi- 
cial, Mr. Delaney attended a secret party school in New York in 1946 
to which like labor leaders throughout the United States were invited 
to receive instruction in Communist Party doctrine. This school was 
attended by approximately 30 or 40 individuals. The degree of se- 
crecy maintained by the party concerning this school can best be illus- 
trated by the fact that Mr. Delaney was instructed to assume a ficti- 
tious name during his attendance and, under no circumstances, was he 
to communicate the purpose of his absence from Philadelphia or make 
known his whereabouts while attending this school. 

Mr. Delaney further testified that, prior to all meetings of this body 
which was the national governing body of UE, he would be contacted 
b} T known members of the Communist Party; i. e., Joe Kuzma, trade- 
union secretary of the eastern district of Pennsylvania, or Walter 
Berry, international representative of UE, and advised of the plans 
and proposals of the party which would be introduced and which he 
would support at the forthcoming board meeting. In his testimony, 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 35 

Mr. Delaney repeated again the often-heard method of control which 
a group of organized members of the Communist Party, numbering 
seldom more than 25 or 30, can exercise over a union of 3,000 or more 
members; how, prior to each scheduled union meeting, the Communist 
Party would hold a caucus of its members, also members of the union, 
and assign tasks to be performed by them in the open union meeting; 
tasks such as the selection of the individuals to introduce the resolu- 
tions, to second them, to speak for the passage of the proposals, and to 
denounce as red baiters and Fascists all those in opposition to these 
proposals. 

Mr. Delaney testified that it was one of the primary functions of all 
Communist Party members in influential positions in unions such 
as Local 155, UE, to be instrumental in securing places in light industry 
shops where an inexperienced Communist Party member, without 
prior industrial training, might obtain valuable experience without 
any questions asked as to his background or loyalty. This experience, 
in turn, could be used successfully by the Communist Party member 
when he or she made application for transfer to a heavy industry. 
Mr. Delaney testified that he was instrumental in securing such posi- 
tions for Lauren Taylor and Harold Allen in one of the shops serviced 
by local 155. Taylor and Allen later transferred to Baldwin Loco- 
motive and Bethlehem Steel, respectively. 

The committee has for many years conducted a continuing investi- 
gation into the so-called Communist underground in the United States, 
as a result of which much testimony has been taken, evaluated, and 
published for all to examine and form their own opinion as to the 
threat to our cherished liberty presented by this nefarious segment of 
the Communist Party. Adding to this knowledge of the underground 
section of the Communist Party, the committee took the testimony 
of Samuel J. DiMaria, who was one of the principal organizers 
of the underground section of the Communist Party in Philadelphia. 
Testifying as to the method used in educating and instructing mem- 
bers of this underground apparatus, Mr. DiMaria related that he was 
informed by Phil Bart in late 1947 to begin to outwardly sever all 
connections with the open Communist Party in Philadelphia and con- 
centrate all of his time and efforts upon the study of Marxist doctrine 
and the methods by which the underground apparatus had functioned 
successfully in Greece, France, and other countries. Sometime during 
the early part of 1948, he was again contacted by Phil Bart and told 
that his period of study was over and that he should next report to 
Abe Sokolov and Joe Kuzma for his future assignment in the under- 
ground apparatus in Philadelphia. Both Sokolov and Kuzma, long- 
time members of the Communist Party, were among the first to be 
selected by Phil Bart and Russ Nixon of the International UE staff to 
be the principal participants in the underground work. His primary 
function was that of liaison man between Sokolov and the other indi- 
viduals in the apparatus, Joe Kuzma, Jack Mondress, and Mike 
Fersick. 

While serving in this capacity, Mr. DiMaria was entrusted with 
various sums of money by Sokolov which was to be used in organizing 
work and for any other expenses incurred by the underground mem- 
bers. This money was kept in a safety deposit box secured for this 
purpose by him in his capacity as a union organizer and paid for by 



36 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Communist Party funds. Mr. DiMaria testified that it was the pur- 
pose of the underground section of the Communist Party in Philadel- 
phia to remain unknown and unidentified until such time as the Com- 
munist Party of the United States was declared illegal. If this hap- 
pened or does happen, the underground organization of the party is 
to assume leadership in organizing and solidifying Communist Party 
operations. 

For a better understanding of the true aims and purposes of the 
underground apparatus of the Communist Party in the United States 
today, we take the liberty of quoting directly from the testimony of 
Mr. DiMaria on this point : 

However, in the spring of 1951 * * * I was informed by Mr. Sokolov that 
there had been consideration of this group's activity in the event of hostilities 
between the United States and the Soviet Union. I was informed that in that 
event leaflets should be distributed advising the American people that such 
a war was opposed to the best national interests of the American people. 

I was informed, further, that the Communist Party believed that should such 
a war come to be — which I certainly hope does not and I believe that everybody 
in this room certainly hopes does not — the authorities would apprehend all known 
Communists ; and, therefore, those Communists who were not apprehended were 
to be organized in a group for the carrying out of such opposition to the general 
warfare. 

In addition, it was pointed out to me that this group might be called upon to 
hinder tbe war effort of the United States, especially in the trade-union move- 
ment, by slowdowns, strikes, or whatever may be. 

It should be pointed out that both Mr. Delaney and Mr. DiMaria 
have left the Communist Party and have severed all connection with it. 

The individuals identified as members of the Communist Party by 
Thomas F. Delaney and Samuel DiMaria in the Philadelphia hearings 

are as follows : 

Identified as Communist by — 

Abercauph, Jules Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Jeweler; on district committee, Com- 
munist Party of America. 
(Appeared Oct. 14, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Allen, Harold Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employee, Bethlehem Steel, Bethle- 
hem, Pa., member, UE local 155. 
Barry, Walter Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Former International Representative 
UE ; now works for March of Labor 
Magazine. 
Bart, Philip Abraham Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

District organizer Communist Party ; Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 
general manager and editor of 
Daily Worker, New York City. 
Cestare, Frank Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Antique dealer. Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Darcy, Sam Adams Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Furniture dealer, West Philadelphia : 
district organizer Communist Party, 
Philadelphia. 
Davis, Dave Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Organizer, 155, UE Local. Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

(Appeared Oct. 13, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 37 

Identified as Communist by — 
DeFazio. Tom Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employed National Metal-Edge Box 
Co.; member Local 155, UE. 
Delano, Dan Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

District committee, Communist Party 
of America ; member National Mar- 
itime Union ; now believed to reside 

in New York. ^ , _ . ._ „__ 

DeMarco, Helen Thomas Delaney, Oct. Id, 1952. 

Former secretary to David Davis. _ ,, . n ^ ._ .,.__ 

Devine, Jack Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Advertising business, Philadelphia. . 

Donchin, Sam (also known as Sam Thomas Delaney, Oct 13 19o2. 
Don) Samuel DiMaria, Oct. lo, 19o2. 

District committee, Communist Party 
of America ; trade-union committee, 
Communist Party of America; dis- 
trict organizer, Communist Party, 

Philadelphia area. _ ,, . ~ . -- ,r»Ko 

Dougher, Joe Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Instructor, Workers School, Philadel- 
phia, 1940. „_ ,__ 
Eddy. Red (J. G.) Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 19o2. 

District committee, Communist Party 
of America ; candidate for Con- 
gress, Tenth Congressional District, 
1940, Pennsylvania. 
Ellis, John Kelly (also known as John Thomas Delaney, Oct. Id, Uo2. 
Joseph Ellis) 
Carpenter. 

( Appeared Oct. 14, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Fast. Howard Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 19o2. 

Author and writer, New York City. 
Fersick, Mike Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Salesman, Ford Agency, Broad and Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15. 1952. 
Alleghany. 
(Appeared Oct. 16, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Frankfeld, Philip Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Organizer Communist Party, Phila- 
delphia and Baltimore. 
Gannett, Betty Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 19o2. 

National Committee, Communist 
Party. 
Gates, Mike Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15. 1952. 

Instructor, Workers School, Philadel- 
phia, 1940. 
Geiselman, Cea (Lucia) (sister of Paul ; Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 
Mrs. Joe Kres). 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Geiselman, Paul, Jr. Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

California. 
Glick, Ralph Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Instructor, Workers School, Phila- Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 
delphia ; Communist Party func- 
tionary. 
Goff, Irving Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Communist Party district representa- 
tive. New York. 
Green, Gilbert Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

High Communist Party functionary. 



38 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Identified as Communist by — 
Helf and, Max ( also known as Mac Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 
Harris) 
Organizer, Local 155, UE. 

(Appeared Oct. 13 and 14, 1952; 
refused to affirm or deny party 
membership. ) 

Heller, Otty Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Director, Workers School, Philadel- 
phia, 1940; now in California. 
Kaplan, Louis L. Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Organizer UE, Local 155. 
Kaplan, Samuel Meyer Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Teacher, Overbrook High School. 
Klonsky, Bob Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Paid functionary of Communist Party 
in eastern Pennsylvania district. 
Koczyalka, Louise (also known as Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 
Louise Koszalka) 
Employed at Eby Co. 
Kuzma, Joseph Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Paid functionary for Communist Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 
Party, eastern Pennsylvania dis- 
trict ; member Communist under- 
ground. 
Levy, Sid Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Member, Local 155, UE ; employed 
Wiedemann Machine Shop. 
Lowenfels, Walter Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Writer; editor Pennsylvania Daily 
Worker newspaper; district com- 
mitteeman, Communist Party. 
McCann, Joseph Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Organizer Local 155, UE. 
Mondress, Jack Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Laundry truck driver, active in Team- 
sters' Union. 
Morrell, Bob Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

District committee, Communist Party Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 
of America. 
Morrell, Mary Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

(Mrs. Robert Morrell) Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

District committee, Communist Party 
of America. 
Nabried, Tom Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

City committee of Communist Party, Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 
Philadelphia. 
Nixon, Russell Arthur Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

UE legislative director. 
Parris, Nina Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employee of the Hugh H. Eby Co. 
Price, Eleanor (also known as Eleanor Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 
Felsenstein) 
Employee of the Hugh H. Eby Co. 
Reams, Joseph Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Instructor at Communist Party na- 
tional training school, Camp Bea- 
con, N. Y. 
Rochester, Sterling Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Employee A. J. Workman & Co. ; Fur 
and Lpather Workers Union. 
(Appeared Oct. 16, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Saba, Philip Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Organizer Local 155, UE. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 39 

Identified as Communist by — 
Sehneiderinan, Jessie Samuel DiMaria. Oct. 15, 1952. 

District committee, Communist Party 
of America. 
Scott, Ernest Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employed at Eby Co. 
Sherrington, Wilford Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employed Eby Co. 
Siskin, George Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Instructor at Communist Party na- 
tional training school, Camp Bea- 
con, N. Y. 
Slinger, Dan Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Chairman, Wilmington, Del., branch 
of Communist Party in 1942. 
Smith, Norman Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Former member Local 107 UE-West- 
inghouse. 
Snyder, Matt Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Former member Local 107 UE-West- 
inghouse. 
Sokolov, Abe (also known as Solway, Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 
Abe) 
Owner Frankfort Quilt & Bedding Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Appeared Oct. 15, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Spencer, Charles Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Paid Communist Party functionary. 
Spiller, Ethel Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employed Local 155, UE. 
Stachel, Jack Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Instructor Communist Party national 
training school, Camp Beacon, N. Y. 
Storey, Arthur Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employee of the Hugh H. Eby Co. 
Strong, Ed Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

District Organizer, Communist Party. 
Taylor. Lauren Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Employee, Baldwin Locomotive. 
Thomas, Ben Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Member, Local 155, UE. 
Tisa, John 

Organizer, Distributive Processing 
and Office Workers of America. 
(Appeared Oct. 14, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Williamson, John Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

National trade-union secretary, Com- 
munist Party. 
Wood. Norris, Jr. Thomas Delaney, Oct. 13, 1952. 

Instructor, Workers School, Phila- 
delphia. 
Wood, Norris, Sr. Samuel DiMaria, Oct. 15, 1952. 

Instructor, Workers School, Phila- 
delphia, 1940. 
Zucker, Jack S. 

Executive secretary, Civil Rights 
Congress. 
' Appeared Oct. 14, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 



40 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

COMMUNIST INFILTRATION OF HOLLYWOOD MOTION- 
PICTURE INDUSTRY 

The committee originally instituted an investigation to ascertain 
the scope and success of Communist efforts to infiltrate the motion- 
picture industry in 1945. As the result of this early investigation, 
hearings were held in 1947, at which time the committee subpenaed 
10 persons associated with the industry who had been identified as 
members of the Communist Party. At that time these 10 persons 
refused to answer all questions concerning their Communist associa- 
tions, as a result of which they were cited for contempt of Congress, 
and all received and served jail sentences. 

From that time until 1951, the committee had carefully investigated 
all aspects of Communist efforts to infiltrate the motion-picture in- 
dustry, and in 1951 hearings were resumed. At that time, the com- 
mittee experienced much fuller cooperation and assistance from indi- 
viduals in and associated with the motion-picture industry. As a 
result, the committee ascertained that the Communist efforts to in- 
filtrate this industry had been a full-scale and carefully planned opera- 
tion and that the Communist Party had been successful in recruiting 
individuals in important and strategic positions in almost all phases 
of motion-picture production. Had these Communist efforts gone 
unexposed, it is almost inevitable that the content of motion pictures 
would have been influenced and slanted and become a medium for 
Communist propaganda. 

As a result of the many revelations from persons who had recognized 
the traitorous nature of the Communist Party, the committee de- 
veloped much more information concerning communism in the motion- 
picture industry which resulted in additional hearings during the 
past year. The committee wishes to urge that all fields of entertain- 
ment and culture maintain a steadfast vigilance in order to avoid the 
possibility of further Communist infiltration into them. 

There follows a listing of those individuals who, through the 
knowledge gained during their own past membership in the Com- 
munist Party, have been of invaluable assistance to the committee 
and the American people in supplying facts relating to Communist 
efforts and success in infiltrating the motion-picture industry. 

Date of appearance 

Bassman, George Jan. 28, 1952. 

Beck, George Sept. 25, 1951. 

Berkeley, Martin Sept. 19, 1951. 

Bridges, Lloyd Oct. 22, 1951. (Bridges furnished an 

executive sworn statement, testify- 
ing fully as to his former Communist 
Party membership. It has not been 
made public.) 

Collins, Richard Apr. 12, 1951. 

Dmytryk, Edward Apr. 25, 1951. 

Ettinger, Eve Sept. 10, 1951. 

Fleury, Bernyce Polifka (Mrs. Eugene Sept. 24, 1951. 
Fleury) 

Fleury, Eugene Sept. 10, 1951. 

Frank, Anne Ray (Mrs. Melvin Frank) Sept. 10, 1951. 

Hayden, Sterling (legal name: John Mar. 21, 1951. 
Hamilton) 

Huggins, Roy Sept. 29, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 41 



Date of appearance 

Jauney, Leon Feb. 13, 1952. (Janney appeared in 

executive session and testified fully 
as to his former membership in the 
Communist Party. It has not been 
made public.) 

Kazan, Elia Apr. 10. 1952. 

Keating, Fred July 19, 1951. (Keating appeared in 

executive session and testified fully 
as to his former membership in the 
Communist Party. It has not been 
made public.) 

Lawrence, Marc Apr. 24, 1951. 

Lennart, Isobel May 20, 1952. 

Levy, Melvin Jan. 28, 1952. 

Marion, Paul Oct. 2, 1952. 

Odets, Clifford May 19-20, 1952. 

Parks, Larry Mar. 21, 1951. 

Raksin, David Sept. 20, 1951. 

Roberts, Stanley May 20, 1952. 

Rosenberg, Meta Reis Apr. 13, 1951. 

Schoenfeld, Bernard C Aug. 19, 1952. 

Schulberg, Budd Wilson May 23. 1951. 

Townsend, Leo Sept. 18, 1951. 

Tuttle, Frank Wright May 24, 1951. 

Vinson, Owen Oct. 2, 1952. 

Wilson, Elizabeth (Mrs. Richard Wil- Sept. 21, 1951. 
son ; nee Anderson ) 

The following persons have been identified as present or past mem- 
bers of the Communist Party. Many of these persons having the 
opportunity that all persons named before the committee have ap- 
peared before the committee and have refused to affirm or deny the 
statements made concerning their membership in the Communist 
Party. "Where there is identifying information concerning the indi- 
viduals listed, it does not necessarily indicate the individual's present 
position or occupation but indicates the identification as made by the 
witness. 

There may occur instances in which individuals so identified have a 
name similar to persons innocent of any Communist connections. In 
such instances the committee will gladly correct any misunderstanding 
upon notification. 

Identified as Communist by — 
Albert, Sam Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Musician. 
Alexander, Harmon (Hy) Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Radio writer. Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny Commu- 
nist Party membership.) 
Altman, Mischa David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 

Musician. 
Ames, Robert Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Craft worker, movie industry. 
Amster, Lou Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Writer. Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 

Appelbaum, Max. (See Matt Pellman.) 
Appelman, Max. (See Matt Pellman.) 

Arden, Betty Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Babb, Sonora Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Writer. George Bassman, Jan. 28, 1952. 



42 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Backus, Georgia (Mrs. Hy Alexander) 
Actress. 

(Appeared Sept. 19, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny Commu- 
nist Party membership.) 
Barrie, Lee 

Singer. 
Barzman, Ben 
Writer. 



Barzman, Norma (Mrs. Ben Barzman) 

Bassman, Kay (formerly Mrs. George 

Bassman ) 
Becker, Leon 

Musician. 
Bein, Albert 

Writer. 
Bela, Nicholas 

Writer. 

Bengal, Ben 

Writer. 
Benson, Sidney (also known as Ted 
Wellman ) 
Communist Party functionary. 
Bercovici, Leonardo 
Writer. 

(Appeared May 16, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Berry, John (Jack) 
Director. 



Bessie, Alvah 
Writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 28, 1947, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Biberman, Edward 
Artist. 

Biberman, Mrs. Edward. 

(See Sonja Dahl.) 
Biberman, Gale. 

(See Gale Sondergaard.) 
Biberman, Herbert 
Director. 

(Appeared Oct. 29, 1947, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 



Blache, Herbert 

Actor. 
BlaeheVMrs. Herbert. 



Identified as Communist by- 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
George Bassman, Jan. 28, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1851. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Eve Ettinger, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets. May 19, 1952. 
Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Edward Dmytryk, April 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 



Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 



ANNUAL REPORT. COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 43 



Blankfort, Henry 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 18, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Blankfort, Lorry. 
Boretz, Allen 

Writer. 
Brand. Phoebe 
(Mrs. Morris Carnovsky) 

Actress. 

Bright, John 

Writer. 



Bright, Josephine (Mrs. John Bright). 
Bromberg, Goldie (Mrs. J. Edward 

Bromberg. ) 
Brown, F. 

Communist Party functionary. 
Buchman, Beatrice (Mrs. Sidney Buch- 

man.) 
Buchman, Harold 
Writer 

(Appeared Apr. 17, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Buchman, Sidney 
Writer, producer. 

(Appeared Sept. 25, 1951. He was 
later subpenaed to appear again 
before the committee on Jan. 25 
and 28, 1952, and in both in- 
stances failed to respond to the 
subpenas. As a result. Sidney 
Buchman is under indictment 
for contempt of Congress.) 
Burns, Jessie 
Studio reader 

Burrows, Abe 
Writer 

(Appeared Nov. 12, 1952 ; testimony 
was vague as to Communist 
Party membership and is still 
under investigation. ) 
Burton, Yal 
Butler, Hugo 
Writer. 



Butler, Jean (Mrs. Hugo Butler) 

Writer. 
Campbell, Mrs. Alan. (See Dorothy 

Parker. ) 
Carlisle, Harry 

Writer. 



Carnovsky, Morris 
Actor. 

(Appeared Apr. 24, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Carnovsky, Mrs. Morris. (See Phoebe 
Brand.) 

H. Rept. 2516, 82-2 i 



Identified as Communist by — 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Eliz Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets, May 19, 1952. 
Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle. May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
.Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Anne Ray Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley. Sept. 19. 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson. Sept. 21, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 



Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Marc Lawrence, Apr. 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 



44 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Chamberlin, Howland 
Actor. 

(Appeared Sept. 18, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Chapman, Tom 

Studio reader. 
Chodorov, Edward 

Producer. 
Chodorov, Jerome 

Writer. 
Clark, Maurice 



Cole, Lester 
Writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 30, 1947, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny Commu- 
nist Party membership.) 



Cole, Mrs. Lester 
Comingore, Dorothy 
Actress. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny Commu- 
nist Party membership.) 
Corey, George 

Writer. 

Corey, Jeff 

Actor. 

(Appeared Sept. 21, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny Commu- 
nist Party membership.) 
Crutcher, Norval 

Organizer, Technicians local, IATSE. 
Dahl, Sonja (Mrs. Edward Biberman). 



D'Ambarey, Bob 
D'Ambarey, Leona 
Studio secretary. 
Dana, Ambur. (See Mrs. Ambur Salt.) 
Dare, Danny 

Theatrical producer. 

(Appeared as witness on Sept. 27, 
1951, and denied he had ever 
been a member of Communist 
Party. This matter is still under 
investigation by the committee.) 
DaSilva, Howard 
Actor. 

(Appeared Mar. 21, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Dassin, Julius (Jules) 

Director. 
Davidson, Ellen 

Housewife ; ex-actress. 
Dimsdale, Howard 
Writer. 



Identified as Communist by — 
(Investigation identifying Mr. Cham- 
berlin as a member of the Communist 
Party has not been made public.) 

Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 195L 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Marc Lawrence, Apr. 24, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25. 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Melvin Levy, Jan. 28, 1952. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 23, 1952. 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 

Marc Lawrence, Apr. 24, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 45 



Donath, Hannah Schwartz 
(Mrs Ludwig Donath) 

(Appeared Sept. 12, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Dratler, Irving. (See Alvin Hammer.) 
Dreher, Carl 

Engineer ; technician. 
D'Usseau, Arnaud 

Writer. 
D'Usseau, Susan (Mrs. Arnaud D'Us- 
seau) 
Edgley, Leslie 

Edmond, Sue (See Sue Lawson.) 
Elisku, Edward 

Writer. 
Ellis, Dave 

Radio actor and writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952 and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Endfield, Cyril 

Writer ; director. 
Endore, Guy 

Writer. 
Faragoh, Elizabeth (Mrs. Francis 

Faragoh) 
Faragoh, Francis 
Writer. 

Farmer, Mary Virginia 
Actress. 

(Appeared Sept. 21, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in Communist Party.) 
Finn, Pauline Lauber (also known as 

Pauline Lauber) 
Fiske, Dick 

Movie studio. 
Folkoff, Isaac "Pop" 
Foreman, Carl 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 24, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny Commu- 
nist Party Membership.) 
Eraser, Bernice 
Fuller, Lester 

Writer. 
Geer, Will 
Actor. 

(Appeared Apr. 11, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in Communist Party.) 
Gilbert, Ed 

Set designer. 
Gleichman, Kelly 

Communist Party functionary. 
Glenn, Charles 

Writer, People's World. 



Glenn, Elizabeth Leech (Mrs. Charles 

Glenn.) (See Elizabeth Leech.) 
Goldberg, Alice. (See Mrs. Ian Hunter.) 



Identified as Communist by — 
(Investigation identifying Mrs. Donath 
as Communist Party has not been 
made public.) 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 1!>, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 

Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Edward Dniytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 

Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe. Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 

Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 

Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Melvin Levy, Jan. 28, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 



David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Eve Ettinger, Sept. 10, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen, Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



46 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Goldman, Harold 

Writer. 
Goldman, Kathleen (Mrs. Harold Gold- 
man) 
Gordon, Donald 

Assistant editor, studio story de- 
partment. 
(Appeared Sept. 24, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Gordon, Michael 
Director. 

(Appeared Sept. 17, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Gorney, Jay 
Song writer. 



Gorney. Sondra (Mrs. Jay Gorney) 

Gough, Lloyd 
Actor. 

(Appeared May 17, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Graff, Fred 
Actor. 

(Appeared April 13, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Grant, Elizabeth (Betty) 
Grant, Morton 
Writer. 

Greenherg, Alex 
Grennard, Elliott 
Gruen, Margaret (Peggy) 

Writer. 
Hallgren, George 

Hallgren. Nora (Mrs. George Hall- 
gren) 
Communist Party functionary. 
Hammer, Alvin (real name; Irving 
Dratler) 
Actor. 

(Appeared May 16, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Hammett, Dashiell 

Writer. 
Harper, Annette 
Actress. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Harris, Lou 
Publicity man. 



Harris. Vera (Mrs. Lou Harris) 



Identified as Communist by — 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Leo Townsend. Sept. 18, 1951. 
Charles Daggett. Jan. 21, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 



( Investigation identifying Mr. Graff as 
a member of the Communist Party 
has not benii made public.) 



Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Richard Collins, April 12, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2. 1952. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17. 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 



ANNUAL REPORT. COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 47 



Hellinan, Lilliau 
Playwright. 

(Appeared May 21, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 

Hentschel, Irving Paul 
Crafts worker ; member IATSE. 

Hilberman, David 
Motion picture lay-out artist. 

Hilberman, Lib (Mrs. David Hilber- 
man) 

Hopkins, Pauline 
Radio writer. 

Huebseh, Edward 
Writer. 



Hunter, Ian MeLellan 

Writer. 
Hunter, Mrs. Ian (Alice Goldberg) 
Ivens, Joris 

Documentary films. 
Jacobson, Eli 

Party functionary. 
James, Daniel Lewis 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 19, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
James, Lilith (Mrs. Dan James) 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 19, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Jarrico, Paul 
Writer. 

(Appeared Apr. 13, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 



Jarrico, Sylvia 



Jeffries, Jan 

(Pen name for Henry Blankfort; see 
Henry Blankfort.) 
Jerome, V. J. 

Tarty functionary. 

(Appeared Mar. 8, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 



Identified as Communist bit — 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Bernyce Fleury, Sept. 24, 1951. 
Eugene Fleury, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Eugene Fleury, Sept. 10, 1951. 

Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Lee Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Melvin Levy, Jan. 28, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard S'-hoenfeld. Aug. 19, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

George Bassman, Jan. 28, 1952. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg. Apr. 13, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, Mav 23, 1951. 
Lee Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
IsoBel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Anne Ray Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 

(Elizabeth Wilson identified Paul 

Jarrico as a member of the Young 

Communist League.) 
Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 

(Elizabeth Wilson identified Sylvia 

Jarrico as a member of the Young 

Communist League.) 



Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 
Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, Mav 23. 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets, May 19. 1952. 



48 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Kahn, Gordon 
Writer. 



Kibbee, Roland 

Writer. 
Killian, Michael 
Killian, Victor 
Actor. 

(Appeared Apr. 13, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Klowden, Nina (also known as Anna) 

Radio actress. 
Koenig, Lester 

Associate producer 

(Appeared Sept. 24, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Kraber, Tony 

Actor. 
Kraft, Hyman Solomon (Hy) 
Writer. 

(Appeared Mar. 20, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Lardner, Ring, Jr. 
Writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 30, 1947, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 



Lauber, Pauline. 

(See Pauline Lauber Finn.) 
Lawson, John Howard 
Writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 27, 1947, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 



Lawson, Sue (Mrs. John Howard Law- 
son) 



Identified as Communist by — 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Marc Lawrence, Apr. 24, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Anne Ray Frank. Sept. 10, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets, May 19, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 

Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 

Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 

George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Anne Ray Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 

Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 

(Elizabeth Wilson identified Ring 
Lardner, Jr., as a member of the 
Young Communist League. ) 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Anne Ray Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
David Raksin, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 49 



Leech, Elizabeth (Mrs. Charles Glenn) 
Communist Party functionary. 



Lees, Robert 
Writer 

(Appeared Apr. 11, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party. ) 



Leonard, Charles 

Writer. 
Lerner, Tillie 

Writer. 
Leverett, Lewis 

Actor. 
Levitt, Alfred 

Studio reader, writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 18, 1951 ; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Levitt, Helen Slote. (See Helen Slote.) 
Lieberman, Irwin 

Writer. 
Lindeman, Mitchell 

Director. 
Lord, Sarajo 

Director, Hollywood Arts, Sciences, 
and Professions Council. 
(Appeared Oct. 7, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Losey, Joseph 

Director. 
Losey, Louise 
(Mrs. Joseph Losey) 
MacGregor, Marjorie. 
{See Marjorie Manoff.) 
Maltz, Albert 
Writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 28, 1947; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 



Manoff, Arnold 
Writer. 



Manoff, Marjorie 

(Mrs. Arnold Manoff; also known as 
Marjorie Potts and Marjorie Mac- 
Gregor.) 

Marrow, Sylvia. 

(See Mrs. Abraham Polonsky.) 

Matthews, Allen 
Actor. 

Max, Edwin Miller 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952: refused to 
affirm or deny party membership.) 



Identified as Communist by — 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson. Sept. 21, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Rov Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 

Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets, May 19, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Melvin Levy, Jan. 28, 1952. 



Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 

Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
(Investigation identifying Miss Lord 

as a member of the Communist Party 

has not been made public.) 



Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Anne Rav Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Leo Townsond. Sept. 18, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson. Oct. 2, 1952. 



50 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



McElroy, Walter 

Writer. 
McGrew, John 

Cartoon animator. 
Meyers, Henry 

Writer. 



Miller, John (also known as Skins 
Miller) 
Actor. 
Miller, Patricia 
(Mrs. John Miller) 
Miller, Paula 
(Mrs. Lee Strasberg) 
Actress. 

(Mr. Kazan testified that it was 
his belief that Paula Miller had 
broken from the Communist 
Party.) 
Mischel, Josef 
TV story writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 24, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Moore, Sam 
Writer. 

(Appeared Apr. 17, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Morgan, Ann Roth. 
(See Ann Roth Morgan Richards.) 
Morley, Karen 
Actress. 

(Appeared Nov. 13, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 



Identified as Communist by — 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Eugene Fleury, Sept. 10, 1951. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 
1 '.ernard Schoenf eld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Paid Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 
Marc Lawrence, Apr. 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Moss, Carleton 

Writer. 
Murphy, Maurice 

Actor. 

North, Joseph 

Writer. 
Offner, Mortimer 

TV work ; ex-screen writer. 



O'Neal, Catherine 
(Mrs. Bob Roberts) 
Ornitz, Sadie 
(Mrs. Sam Ornitz) 
Ornitz. Samuel 

Writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 29, 1947; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Overgaard, Andrew 

Trade-unionist. 
Page, Charles 

Writer. 
Parker, Dorothy 
(Mrs. Alan Campbell) 

Writer. 



Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 

Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Melvin Levy, Jan. 28, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 

Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets, May 19, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19. 1951. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 51 



Pellman, Matt (also known as Mike 
Pell, Max Appleinan or Appelbaum) 
Communist Party functionary. 
Pepper, George 

Employee, Communist front organi- 
zations. 
Pepper, Joy 
Perlin, Paul 
Studio worker. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Pettus, Ken 

Radio writer. 
Polifka, Bernyce. (See Bernyce Po- 

lifka Fleury.) 
Polin, Ben 

Photographer. 
Polonsky, Abraham Lincoln 
Director-writer. 

(Appeared Apr. 25, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 

Polonsky. Sylvia Marrow 
(Mrs. Abraham Polonsky) 
Pomerance, Mortimer William 

Screen Writers' Guild, former execu- 
tive secretary. 
(Appeared Feb. 5, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Potts, Marjorie. (See Marjorie Mac- 

Gregor Manoff.) 
Purcell, Gertrude 
Rapf, Maurice 
Writer. 

Revere, Ann 
Actress. 

(Appeared Apr. 17, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Reynolds. Bella Lewitzky 
Dancer. 

(Appeared Sept. 12, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Richards, Ann Roth Morgan 
Housewife. 

(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Richards, Robert L. 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Rinaldo, Fred 
Writer. 



Rinaldo, Marie 
River, W. L. 

Writer. 



Identified as Communist by — 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 



Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, Mav 20, 1952. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Bernyce Fleury, Sept. 24, 1951. 
Eugene Fleury, Sept. 10, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
(Investigation identifying Miss Revere 

as a member of the Communist Party 

has not been made public.) 



(Investigation identifying Mrs. Reyn- 
olds as a member of the Communist 
Party has not been made public.) 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend. Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept 19, 1951. 



52 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Roberts, Bob 

Producer. 
Roberts, Mrs. Bob. (See Catberine 

O'Neal.) 
Roberts, Marguerite (professional 
name for Mrs. Jobn Sanford, nee 
Smith.) 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Robeson, Naomi. 
Robinson, Jack 
Radio writer. 
Robinson, Mary 
Radio writer. 
Romain, Jerome Isaac. (See V. J. Je- 
rome. ) 
Ronka, Wayne 

Musician. 
Rossen, Robert 
Producer. 

(Appeared June 25, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Roth, Ann. {See Ann Roth Morgan 

Richards. ) 
Rousseau. Louise 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 21, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Ruthven, Madelaine 

Communist Party functionary ; ex- 
writer. 



Sabinson, Lee 

Broadway producer. 
Sage, Frances 

Actress. 
Salt, Ambur 
(Ambur Dana) 

Secretary. 
Salt, Waldo 
Writer. 

(Appeared Apr. 13, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 



Sanford, Marguerite. (See Marguerite 

Roberts.) 
Schneider, Isadore 

New Masses editor. 
Schneiderman, William 

Communist Party functionary. 
Schulberg, Virginia (now Mrs. Peter 

Viertel.) 
Scofield, Janette (Mrs. Louis Scofield.) 



Identified as Communist by- 
Martin Berkeley, Sept 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept 19, 1951. 



Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Anne Ray Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 



(Investigation identifying Miss Rous- 
seau as a member of the Communist 
Party has not been made public.) 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizaltetb Wilson. Sept. 21, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Eve Ettinger, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Frank W. Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 53 



Seofield, Louis 
Actor, writer. 

( Mr. Vinson testified that it was 
his belief that Mr. Seofield had 
broken from the Communist 
Party.) 
Scott, Adrian 
Producer. 

(Appeared Oct. 29, 1947; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Seidel, Louise 
Shafran, Eva 
Communist Party functionary. 

Shapiro, Art 

Radio writer or publicist. 
Shapiro, Victor 

Publicist. 
Ship, Reuben 

Radio and screen writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 24, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Shore, Viola Brothers 

Writer. 
Shore, Wilma (Mrs. Lou Solomon) 

Writer. 
Sillen, Samuel 

Writer. 
Silverblatt, Howard. (See Howard Da- 

Silva.) 
Sklar, George 

Writer. 

Slote, Helen (Mrs. Al Levitt) 
Secretary. 

i Appeared Sept. 18, 1951 ; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Smith, Art 

Actor. 
Smith, Ralph 

Set designer. 
Solomon, Mrs. Lou. 
Sondergaard, Gale 
ergaard ; Mrs. 
A. tress 

(Appeared Mar. 21, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Sparks, Nemmy (Ned) 
Communist Party functionary. 

Stander, Alice (nee Alice Twitchell). 
Stander, Lionel 
Actor. 



Stander, Lucy (Mrs. Lionel Stander), 



Identified as Communist by — 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



(See Wilma Shore.) 
(Edith Holm Sond- 
Herbert Biberman) 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 



Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
George Bassman, Jan. 28, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
( )wen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29. 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19. 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Elia Kazan, Apr. 10, 1952. 
Clifford Odets, May 19, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Marc Lawrence, Apr. 24, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 



54 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Stapp, John 
Communist Party functionary. 



Stephenson, Janet. (-See also Janet 

Stevenson.) 
Stevenson, Janet (Mrs. Philip Steven- 
son). (See also Janet Stephenson.) 
Stevenson, Philip Edward 
Writer 

(Appeared Sept. 19, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Stewart, Donald Ogden 

Writer. 
Stone, Eugene R. 
Radio writer 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Strack, Celeste 

Communist Party functionary. 
Strasberg, Mrs. Lee. (See Paula 

Miller. ) 
Strawn, Arthur 
Writer 

(Appeared May 10, 1951 ; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Sullivan, Elliott (also known as Ely 
Sullivan ) 
Actor. 
Taffel, Bess 
Writer 

(Appeared Sept. 18, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Terkel, Ida (Mrs. Louis Terkel). 
Terkel, Louis 

Actor. 
Thompson, Jim. 

Tompkins, Capt. Ward Miller (War- 
wick) 

Ship captain. 
Town send, Mrs. Lee 

(Mr. Townsend testified that Mrs. 
Townsend had broken from the 
Communist Party.) 
Tranbe, Shepard 

Theater director and producer 

(Appeared Mar. 6, 1952; refused to 

affirm or deny party membership. 

His testimony has not been made 

public. ) 

Tree, Dorothy. (See Dorothy Tree 

Uris.) 
Trivers. Jane (Mrs. Paul Trivers). 



Identified as Communist by — 

Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
William Blowitz, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Rov Hnggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 



Leo Townsend, Jan. 18, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 55 



Trivers, Paul 
Writer. 



Trumbo, Dalton 
Writer 

(Appeared Oct. 28, 1947; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 

Tuttle, Tania (Mrs. Frank Tuttle). 



Twitchell, Alice. (See Alice Stander.) 
Uerkvitz, Herta 

Studio research department 

(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Uris, Dorothy Tree (Mrs. Michael Uris) 
Actress. 



Uris, Michael 
Writer. 



Viertel, Mrs. Peter. (See Virginia 

Schulberg. ) 
Vorhaus, Bernard 

Director. 



Vorhaus, Hetty 

Waldman, Herman (aka David Wolf) 
Radio actor. 

( Appeared Oct. *>, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Waxman, Stanley 
Radio actor. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Weber, John 

Agent. 
Weil, Richard 

Writer. 
Wellman, Ted. (See Sid Benson.) 
Wells, Miss Susan (Mrs. Arnaud D'Us- 
seau) 
Head of Communist book-shop. 
Wexley, John 
Writer. 

White, Irving J. 



Identified as Communist by — 

Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Anne Ray Frank, Sept. 10, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Budd Schulberg, May 23, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 



Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 



Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Stanley Roberts, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Edward Dmytryk, May 25, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. IS, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 



56 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Whitney, Lynn 
Actress. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Willner, George 
Writers' agent. 

(Appeared Apr. 24, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Willner, Tiba (Mrs. George Willner) 

Wilson, Michael 
Writer. 

(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship.) 
Winter, Carl 

Communist Party functionary. 



Winters, Bea (Bernadette) 
Secretary. 

(Appeared May 16, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 
Wolf, David. (See Herman Waldman.) 
Wolff, William 
Radio writer. 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny party member- 
ship. ) 



Identified as Communist bij- 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Melvin Levy. Jan. 28, 1952. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 

Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Isobel Lennart, May 20, 1952. 
Bernard Schoenfeld, Aug. 19, 1952. 



Richard Collins, Apr. 12, 1951. 
Meta Reis Rosenberg, Apr. 13, 1951. 
Frank Tuttle, May 24, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Sterling Hayden, Apr. 10, 1951. 



Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Owen Vinson, Oct. 2, 1952. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES AMONG PROFESSIONAL 
GROUPS IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA 

The committee lias long recognized the fact that the Communist 
Party has directed its recruiting activities toward every form of 
American life. In order to gain any semblance of strength the Com- 
munists must have not only a foothold among laboring people but 
among professional groups as well. The results of the extent and suc- 
cess of Communist efforts in the professional field as typified in the 
Los Angeles area were amazing. While the committee is aware that 
these hearings only exposed Communist success in a specific area, there 
is every reason to believe that the Communists have had some success 
in other areas. 

The hearings in Los Angeles revealed that the Communist Party 
had built a formidable cell among lawyers in the Los Angeles area. 
There was this Communist success notwithstanding the fact that 
there is probably no other field in which the members are so 
thoroughly schooled in the rights and privileges afforded by our Con- 
stitution. Yet these lawyers would overthrow the very Constitution 
under which they took shelter when called upon to affirm or deny 
whether they were members of a group which seeks to overthrow this 
Government by force and violence, if necessary. 

It was not surprising that practically all of the lawyers identified 
as Communists were members of the National Lawyers' Guild. This 
merely confirmed further the committee's findings that the National 
Lawyers' Guild is the legal bulwark of the Communist Party. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 57 

The hearings in Los Angeles further disclosed that the Communist 
Party had developed appreciable strength in the recruitment of mem- 
bers in the medical profession. These doctors, who upon their oath 
dedicate themselves to the care and preservation of human life, had 
become members of an organization in which human life is held in- 
significant and nonessential to the furtherance of their plans for 
world conquest. 

Testimony in the Los xVngeles hearings also disclosed that during 
a period the Communist Party had developed a cell in the newspaper 
profession in Los Angeles. Testimony revealed that although the 
Communist Party cell in the Newspaper Guild had constituted only a 
small percentage of the total membership it was sufficiently well 
organized to gain positions of importance for its members. 

The committee wishes to point out that the overwhelming numbers 
of the legal, medical, and writing professions in the Los Angeles area 
are completely loyal Americans and share in the shock experienced by 
the committee upon learning of this almost unbelievable Communist 
infiltration in the professional fields mentioned. 

The committee wishes to express its appreciation to the following 
listed individuals without whose testimony as to their knowledge and 
experience of Communist efforts to infiltrate professional groups in 
the Los Angeles area, the committee's efforts could not have been 
successful : 

Date of appearance 

Aaron, David Jan. 23, 1952. 

Ashe, Harold J Sept. 17, 1951. 

Ashe. Mrs. Harold (Mildred Ashe) Sept. 17, 1951. 

Bennett, Alice K May 22. 1952. 

Blowitz, William Sept. 20, 1951. 

Daggett, Charles Jan. 21, 1952. 

Daniel, Urcel July 8, 1952. 

Glass, George Jan. 21, 1952. 

Herzig, Albert Jan. 23, 1952. 

Israel, William G Jan. 25, 1U52. 

Judson, Charles W Jan. 26. 1952. 

Krieger, Dr. Mendell M Sept. 11, 1951. 

Light. Louise. (See Louise Light 

Silver.) 

Reznick, Dr. Sam Sept. 11, 1951 (Dr. Reznick appeared in 

executive session, testified fully as 
to his former membership in the Com- 
munist Party. Portions of his testi- 
mony have been made public). 

Silver, Louise Light Jan. 21 and 22. 1952. 

Silver, Max Jan. 21, 1952. 

Yerkes, Marburg Jan. 25, 1952. 

The following individuals, who have been identified as members of 
the Communist Party, are being listed as having been associated with 
the various professional groups in the Los Angeles area. It is recog- 
nized that in many instances the identifying information does not 
classify the individual as being engaged in a profession but since the 
testimony was received from individuals whose principal information 
deals with professional groups they are being included herein. It 
should also be noted that with these identifications it does not neces- 
sarily indicate the present position or occupation of the individuals 
but indicates the identification furnished by the witness. 



58 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Abowitz, Ellenore (Mrs. Murray Abo- 
witz; nee Ellenore Bogigian) 
(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Abowitz, Dr. Murray 
Physician. 

(Appeared Sept. 21, 1951, refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Adam, Mrs. Loretta 

Communist Party functionary. 
Aidlin, Joseph 

Attorney. 
Aidlin, Mrs. Joseph (Mary Raden) 
Office secretary, Communist Party, 
Los Angeles County. 
Allen, Jimmy 

Communist Party functionary. 
Allen, Sam Houston 
Attorney. 

(Appeared, Oct. 1, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Altman, George 
Attorney. 

(Appeared, Oct. 1, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Austrian, Spencer 
Attorney. 

(Appeared, Oct. 1, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party. ) 
Bachelis, Selma 
Attorney. 



Barker, Dr. Oner B., Jr. 
Physician. 

(Appeared, Oct. 6, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Barrigan, Andy 

Communist Party newspaper unit. 
Beeman, Ruth (Mrs. Morton Beeman) 

Bigelman, Dr. Leo 
Physician. 

(Appeared Sept. 18, 1951, refused 
to affirm or deny membership 
in the Communist Party.) 

Bogner, Max 

Social worker. 
Bogner, Marta (Mrs. Max Bogner) 
Bonner, Miriam 

Codirector Los Angeles Workers' 
School. 
Bridges, Harry 

ILWU president. 
Broman, Jack (see Jack Wilson) 
Bryan, Al 

Communist Party functionary. 



Identified as Communist by — 
Dr. Mendell M. Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Dr. Mendell M. Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
( Jharles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 



Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1952. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 
Leo Townsend, Sept. 18, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
David Raksin, Sept. 20, 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 



Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 59 



Burke, Sidney (Berkowitz) 
Newspaperman. 



Bush, Rose 

Communist Party underground work- 
er. 
Callahan, Pat 
Callahan, Mrs. Pat 
Cefkin, Leo 

Student. 
Champion, Clyde 

Communist Party functionary. 
Cline, Paul 

Communist Party functionary. 



Cohee, Alice (Mrs. John Cohee) 



Cohee, John 

Newspaperman, Communist Party 
newspaper unit. 
Cohn, Bob (also known as Bob Cole) 

Social worker. 
Connelly, Dorothy. (See Dorothy 

Healy.) 
Connelly, Philip 

Communist Party functionary. 

Cope, E. O. 
Corey, Mrs. George 

Advertising executive. 
Covey, Florence 

Social worker. 
Cullen, Tom 

Newspaperman. 
Darcy, Sam 

Communist Party functionary. 
Davis, Dr. Edwin Howard 

Optometrist. 

(Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Davis, Mrs. Edwin Howard. 

Decker, Dr. I. S. 
Dobbs, Ben 

Communist Party functionary. 
Druckman, Dr. Jacob S. 
Psychiatrist. 

(Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Druckman, Dr. Sidney 
Physician. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Eddy, Jonathan 

Newspaper Guild organizer. 



Identified as Communist by- 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Dr. Mendell M. Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, Mav 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 



Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Dr. Mendell Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29. 1952. 



Dr. Mendell Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 
Roy Huggins, Sept. 29, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 

Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 



(Investigation identifying Dr. Druck- 
man as member of the Communist 
Party has not been made public.) 



Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 



H. Rept. 2516, 82-2- 



60 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Elfman, Rose 
Elkins, Dr. Oscar 
Board of Health. 

(Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Epstein, Pauline 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Sept. 30. 1952, refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Esterman, William 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Feder, Dr. Morris 
Physician. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Finn, Aubrey 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Foreman, Katherine 

Social worker. 
Foster, Dorothy 

Communist Party functionary 
Franchi, Davida (Mrs. Fred Franchi) 

School teacher 
Franchi, Fred 

Frankel, J. Allen 
Attorney 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Freed, Emil 

Communist Party functionary 
Freeman, M. E. 
Gallagher, Leo 

Attorney. 
Gannett, Betty Bennett, 

Communist Party functionary. 
Gardner, Helen 

Communist Party functionary. 
Garrigues, C. H. 

Newspaperman. 
Goodlaw, Dr. Edward Isiah 
Optometrist. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Gordon, Emily 

(Mrs. Julian Gordon) 
Louise Light Silver testified that 
she believed Emily Gordon had 
broken with the party. 
Grodzins, Jane 
• Attorney. 



Hanoff, Elmer ("Pop") 

Communist Party organizer. 



Identified as Communist by — 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21 and 22, 1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1951. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 

Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21 and 22, 

1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 

Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21. 1952. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
David Aaron, Jan 23, 1952. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
(Investigation identifying Dr. Goodlaw 

as member of the Communist Party 

has not been made public.) 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 61 



Hathaway, Clarence 

Communist Party functionary. 
Healy, Don R. 

Painters union. 
Healy, Dorothy (also known as Dorothy 
Ray) 

Communist Party functionary. 



Hickox, Dr. Albert 

Dentist. 
Hittleman, Dr. Joseph 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party). 
Holther, William Benjamin (also 

known as Wilben Holther). 
Hull, Charlotte (Mrs. Morgan Hull) 

Ingham, William 

Communist Party functionary. 
Jeffrey, J. E. 

Social worker. 
Johnson, Grover 
Attorney 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Jones, Lillian 

Codirector, Los Angeles Workers' 
School. 
Kaplan, Victor 
Attorney 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 

Kashner, Milt 

Social worker. 
Katz, Mrs. 
Katz, Charles 
Attorney 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 

Katz. Robert D. 
Attorney. 

(Appeared as witness Oct. 1, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in the Communist 
Party.) 
Kempler, Dr. Walter 
Physician. 

( Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny Communist 
Party membership.) 
Kibre, Jeff (also known as Barry 
Wood.) 

Communist Party functionary. 
Kibre, Virginia (Mrs. Jeff Kibre) 

Killoran, Pat 

Newspaperwoman. 



Identified as Communist by — 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 



Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Max Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Dr. Mendell M. Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 



( Investigation identifying Dr. Kempler 
as member of the Communist Party 
has not been made public.) 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 



62 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Klein, Herbert 
Newspaperman ; teacher 

(Appeared as witness Sept. 18, 
1951, and refused to affirm or 
deny membership in the Commu- 
nist Party.) 

Klein, Minna (Mrs. Herbert Klein) 



Knappen, Gail (Gale) 

Communist Party newspaper unit. 
Konigsburg, Raphael 

Social worker. 
Koppelman, Dr. Harold 
Physician. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Lambert, Rude 

Communist Party functionary. 
Lechrome, Cliff 
Leech, John 

Communist Party functionary. 
Lester, Dr. Milton 
Psychiatrist. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Letzman, Melvyn 

Communist Party functionary. 
Lieberman, Dr. Benjamin 
Physician. 

( Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Liefchild, Gerald 

Hospital technician. 
Liefchild, Gladys (Mrs. Gerald Lief- 
child) 
Hospital employee. 
Light, Noum 

Communist Party functionary. 
Lishner, Arthur 
Pharmacist. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party. ) 
Mandell, Seymour 
Attorney. 

(Appeared as witness on Oct. 1, 
1952, and refused to affirm or 
deny membership in the Commu- 
nist Party.) 
Marcus, Freda 

Social worker. 
Marcus, Dr. Simson 
Physician. 

(Appeared as witness Oct. 3, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
Communist Party membership.) 



Identified as Communist by — 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

(Investigation identifying Dr. Koppel- 
man as member of the Communist 
Party has not been made public.) 



Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
(Investigation identifying Dr. Lester as 

member of the Communist Party has 

not been made public.) 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

(Investigation identifying Dr. Lieber- 
man as member of the Communist 
Party has not been made public.) 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 

(Investigation identifying Mr. Lishner 
as member of the Communist Party 
has not been made public. ) 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21 and 22, 
1952; Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 






ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 63 



Margolis, Ben 
Attorney. 

(Appeared as witness Sept. 30, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
Communist Party membership.) 



McClaughlan, Charles 

Communist Party functionary. 
McTernan, John 

Attorney. 



Miller, Ida (Mrs. Jay Miller) 

Cloakmakers union. 
Miller, Tom 

Communist Party functionary. 
Moore, Jack 

Communist Party functionary. 
Moore, Mrs. Jack 

Communist Party functionary. 
Most, Rose 

Social worker. 
Nedelman, Dr. Jack 
Physician. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
O'Connor, Oleta (Oleta O'Connor 
Yates) 
Communist Party functionary. 
O'Connor, Tom 
Newspaperman. 

(Appeared as witness May 22, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
Communist Party membership.) 
Oliver, Bill 

Newspaperman ; drama critic. 
Pally, Henrietta 
Social worker. 
Patterson, Tom 
Newspaperman ; 
functionary. 
Pennes, Dr. Alexander 
Physician ; radiologist. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Perry, Pettis 

Communist Party functionary. 



Identified as Communist by — 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
George Glass, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Paul Marion, Oct. 2, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Edward Dmytryk, Apr. 25, 1951. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

(Investigation identifying Dr. Nedelman 
as member of the Communist Party 
has not been made public.) 

Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July S, 1952. 



Communist Party 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 



Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Perry, Dr. Thomas L. Louise Light Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 

Physician ; pediatrician. 

(Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Pestana, Frank David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 

Attorney. Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, and refused William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
to affirm or deny membership in Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
the Communist Party.) 



64 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Pestana, Jean (Mrs. Frank Pestana) 

Attorney. 
Pezinan, Dorothy 
Social worker. 
Porter, John 
Attorney 

(Appeared Sept. 30, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Praeger, Nat 

Communist Party functionary. 
Prokop, Prokop Jack 

Dry cleaning establishment 

(Appeared Sept. 12, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Raden, Mary. (See Mrs. Joe Aidlin.) 
Ray, Dorothy. (See Dorothy Healy.) 
Reese, Mercier 

Social worker. 
Reeves, Nancy 

Attorney. 
Reynolds, Dr. Frederick G. 
Ophthalmologist 

(Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Reznick, Sarah (Mrs. Sam Reznick) 

Social worker. 
Richman, Matt 
Attorney 

(Appeared Sept. 30, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party.) 
Riskin, Dr. Alexander 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital, New 
York City. 
Robbins, Ed 
Newspaperman. 



Roberts, Dr. Bertram L. 
Optometrist 

(Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Rosenberg, Rose 
Attorney 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Rosenblum, Dr. Gordon 
Physician ; surgeon 

( Appeared Oct. 2, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Rosenwein. Samuel 

Attorney. 
Ross, Lawrence 

Communist Party functionary. 

Ryan. Allen Lane 

Communist Party functionary. 
Ryan, Maureen 

Social worker. 



Identified as Communist by — 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1952. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
(Investigation identifying Mr. Prokop 

as a Communist Party member has 

not been made public.) 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 

Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 



Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 



Dr. Mendell M. Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 



Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 65 



Rykoff, Richard L. 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Samuels, William M. 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Sanford, John 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Sept. 20, 1951, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny member- 
ship in the Communist Party. ) 
Schoen, Dr. Max 
Physician. 

(Appeared Sept. 21, 1951; refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Schonfield, Dr. Louis 
Dentist. 

(Appeared Oct. 3, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Segure, Rose 

Social worker. 
Selden, Betty 
Social worker. 

(Appeared Oct. 7, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Seller, Richard 

Newspaperman. 
Shandler, Esther 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Sept. 30, 1952; refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Shapiro, Julian (Jack). (See John 

Sanford.) 
Silberstein, Robert J. 
Attorney. 

( Appeared Apr. 9, 1952 ; refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Simon, Leo 
Newspaperman. 

Smith, Darr 
Newspaperman. 



Snider, Fred M. 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Oct. 1, 1952; refused to 
affirm or deny membership in the 
Communist Party.) 
Solomon, Miriam 
Social Worker 
Solotoy, Percy 
Attorney 

(Appeared as witness Sept. 17, 1951, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in Communist 
Party.) 



Identified as Communist by — 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Martin Berkeley, Sept. 19. 1951. 
Elizabeth Wilson, Sept. 21, 1951. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
William G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 
Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 



66 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Solotoy, Mrs. Percy (also known as 
Sonya Solotoy) 
Attorney 
Sosin, Dr. Max 
Dentist 

(Appeared as witness Oct. 3, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in the Communist 
Party.) 
Specter, Frank 

Communist Party functionary 
Sperber, Lawrence 
Attorney 

(Appeared as witness Oct. 1, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in the Communist 
Party.) 
Sperling, Dr. Sam 
Psychiatrist 

(Appeared as witness Oct. 3, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in the Communist 
Party.) 
Steinberg, Max 

Communist Party functionary 
Steinmetz, Fred 
Attorney 

(Appeared as witness Sept. 30, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in the Communist 
Party.) 
Sulton, J. 

Communist Party functionary 
Tenner, Jack 
Attorney 

(Appeared as witness Oct. 1, 1952, 
and refused to affirm or deny 
membership in the Communist 
Party.) 
Todd, Louise 

Communist Party functionary 
Tourney, Jim 

Communist Party 
Tracy, James 

Railroad organizer 
Turrett, Leon 
Attorney 

(Appeared Oct. 6, 1952, and refused 
to affirm or deny membership in 
the Communist Party.) 
Tyre, Milton S. 
Attorney. 

(Appeared Jan. 25, 1952, and re- 
fused to affirm or deny his mem- 
bership in the Communist Party 
under oath.) 
Wallace, Jane. (See Jane Wilson.) 
Walsh, Julia 

International Labor Defense Secre- 
tary. 
Ward, Bill 

Policeman, Los Angeles. 
Ward, Clara 

Communist Party functionary. 
Weiner, William 

Communist Party functionary. 



Identified as Communist by- 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Alice Bennett. May 22, 1952. 
Louise Light Silver, Jan. 22, 1952. 



Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



Louise Light Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 
Dr. Sam Reznick, Sept. 11, 1951. 



Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 
Wm. G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 

Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Milton S. Tyre, Dec. 14, 1951. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 



David Aaron, Jan. 23, 1952. 
Albert Herzig, Jan. 23. 1952. 
Marburg Yerkes, Jan. 24, 1952. 
Wm. G. Israel, Jan. 25, 1952. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 



Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 
Max Silver, Jan. 21, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 67 

Identified as Communist by — 
Wilson, Jane Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Communist Party functionary. 
Wilson, John (Jack) Harold Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Newspaperman. Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17. 1951. 

Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Winebrenner, Dolph Charles Daggett, Jan. 21, 1952. 

Newspaperman. Charles Judson, Jan. 26, 1952. 

Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 
Urcel Daniel, July 8, 1952. 
Witczak, Sam Dr. Mendell M. Krieger, Sept. 11, 1951. 

Communist Party functionary. 
Wood, Barry, (See Jeff Kibre.) 
Yates, Oleta O'Connor. (See Oleta 

O'Connor.) 
Young, Charles Mildred Ashe, Sept. 17, 1951. 

Needle trade worker. 
Zukas, Branislaus Alice Bennett, May 22, 1952. 

Social Worker, ex-union organizer. 

ROLE OF THE COMMUNIST PRESS IN THE COMMUNIST 

CONSPIRACY 

The committee, during the course of its investigations, particularly 
those relating to the Sorge spy case, recognized that the Communist 
press had an essential role in the Communist espionage operations. 

The investigation disclosed that in 1936, Max and Grace Granich 
were sent to Shanghai, China, by the Communist Party of the United 
States to organize, edit, and publish a Communist propaganda organ 
which could be circulated throughout the entire East. In furtherance 
of instructions of their Communist superiors, Max and Grace Granich 
published in Shanghai, from March 1936 until November 1937, the 
Voice of China, which spread Communist propaganda throughout 
the Far East. 

Because of this obvious Communist propaganda, the Granichs 
encountered frequent difficulty with the Chinese and French au- 
thorities. As a result, the Granichs were recalled to the United States 
by the Communist Party. Efforts of the Communist Party to replace 
the Granichs in China were thwarted by the outbreak of war there 
in 1937. This, however, was not the end of the Granichs' usefulness 
to the Communist conspiracy. 

During the period following the return of the Granichs to the 
United States, the Communist Party in the United States found itself 
confronted with the problem of avoiding the requirements of the 
Foreign Agents' Registration Act. This was during the period when 
the Daily Worker, official organ of the Communist Party, was en- 
deavoring to conceal its relationship with the Communist Party and 
the Communist Party here was itself trying to conceal its true rela- 
tionship with the Communist International in Moscow. For this 
reason, Grace Granich, upon the direction of the Communist Party, 
in March 1941, established the Intercontinent News Service in New 
York City. 

Under the operation of Grace Granich, Intercontinent News Service 
was a device used by the Communist Party and the Daily Worker 
to obtain party information and official directives from the Communist 
International in Moscow. 



68 ANNUAL REPOKT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



Identified as Commum 


st by — 


Morris L. Appehnan, Jan. 


10, 1952 


Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 


1952. 


Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 


1952. 


Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 


1952. 


Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 


1952. 



In line with Communist Party instructions, Grace Granich reg- 
istered her news service as an agent of the Kussian Government, thus 
hoping to divert public attention from the connection between the 
Daily Worker and Moscow. 

The committee's investigation disclosed that the Intercontinent News 
Service was an effective pipeline through which the Daily Worker and 
the Communist Party received the official party line to be followed 
from Moscow. 

Max and Grace Granich were subpenaed and appeared before the 
committee. However, they refused to answer any questions concern- 
ing the Communist connections of the Voice of China, Intercontinent 
News Service, as well as the accusations of their own Communist 
Party connections. 

Through the testimony furnished the committee by Mr. Louis L. 
Appelman, Miss Elizabeth T. Bentley, and Mr. Louis F. Budenz, re- 
lating to the role of the Communist press in the Communist con- 
spiracy, the following individuals were identified as members of the 
Communist Party : 



Allen, James S. 
Benjamin, Herbert 
Benjamin, Mrs. Herbert 
Bittelman, Alexander 
Blankfort, Michael 

Writer. 

(Appeared before committee Jan. 
28, 1952, and denied Communist 
Party membership; still under 
investigation.) 
Boldt, Howard 
Bransten, Louise 

(now Louise Berman) 
Bridges, Harry 
Browder, William 
Childs, Morris 
Davis, Benjamin J. 

Daily Worker. 
Gebert, Boleslaw 

Espionage agent. 
Gold, Mike 
Golos, Jacob 
Gromov, Anatole 
Granich, Grace Maul 
Granich, Mas 
Halperin, Maurice 

Formerly head of Research and Anal- 
ysis Division, Office of Strategic 
Services, Latin American branch. 
Harris, Lemuel Upham 

Controller, Dailv Worker funds. 
Jaffe, Philip 
Jerome, V. J. 
Kuntz, Edward 

Attorney for Daily Worker. 
Lawson, John Howard 
Martell, 

Teacher at party school. 
Page, Charles 
Page, Polly 
(Mrs. Charles Page) 






Louis 
Louis 

Louis 
Louis 
Louis 
Louis 



F. 
F. 

F. 
F. 
F. 
F. 



Budenz, 
Budenz, 

Budenz, 
Budenz, 
Budenz, 
Budenz, 



Jan. 
Jan. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



15, 
15, 

15, 
15, 
15, 
15, 



1952. 
1952. 

1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 



Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 



F. 
F. 



Budenz, Jan. 15, 
Budenz, Jan. 15, 
Elizabeth Bentley, Jan. 15, 
Elizabeth Bentley, Jan. 15, 



Louis 
Louis 



1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 



Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 
Elizabeth Bentley, Jan. 15, 1952. 



Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 

Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 
Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 
Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 

Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 
Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 



Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 
Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 



10, 1952. 
10, 1952. 



ANNUAL REPORT. COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 69 



Peters, J. 

(also known as Alexander Stevens) 
Communist Party functionary under- 
ground. 
Pressman, Lee 
Scherer, Marcel 

UE. 
Stachel, Jack 

Underground Communist Party 
agent. 
Tenney, Helen 

Soviet agent in the Office of Strategic 
Services. 
Trachtenberg, Alexander 
Weiner, Robert William 

Communist Party and Daily Worker 
functionary. 

Buchmah, Alice 
(J lass, Frank 



Identified as Communist by — 
Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 



Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 
Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 

Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 



Elizabeth Bentley, Jan. 15, 1952. 



Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 
Louis F. Budenz, Jan. 15, 1952. 



Identified as Trotzkyite by — 
Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 
Morris L. Appelman, Jan. 10, 1952. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES AMONG YOUTH GROUPS 

In February, the committee took testimony from Harvey M. Matu- 
sow relative to Communist activities among youth. Matusow joined 
the Communist Party through the organization, American Youth for 
Democracy, this latter organization being the successor to the Young 
Communist League. In justice to this witness, it is only fair at this 
point to set forth that, while he joined the Communist Party of his 
own volition, in October 1947, he started in 1950 to furnish the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation with information on the activities of the 
Communist Party and continued to do so until he was expelled in 
January 1951. Incidentally, one of the charges filed against him by 
the Communist Party was that he was acting as an agent for the 
Government. 

Valuable knowledge was gained from the witness on the operation of 
a summer camp in up-State New York, known as Camp Unity. This 
camp, which is patronized in the main by teen-age boys and girls, is 
operated by the Communist Party even though this fact is kept from 
the general public. Testifying with respect to the camp, Matusow 
related that the camp personnel was entirely composed of members of 
the Communist Party and that he was selected by the Communist Party 
to manage the distribution of Communist literature which he sold to 
the campers. He stated further that he was instructed by the Com- 
munist Party as to the type of literature to project, depending on the 
political affiliations of campers or guest speakers. 

All campers at Camp Unity are not members of the Communist 
Party, but nearly all have been determined as favorable to the Com- 
munist Part} 7 , so that a concentration upon these non-Communists 
by Communist personnel during a stay usually brings their submis- 
sion to Communist Party membership and discipline. In testifying 
on the morals of the youth in the Communist movement, Matusow 
told of parties where moral standards were completely ignored. He 
also told of the use of narcotics by some members of the Communist 
Party, but he possessed no knowledge as to whether this use was en- 
couraged by the Communist Party. 



70 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Matusow testified with respect to the Communist control exercised 
by the Communist Party over the Young Progressives of America 
and the Labor Youth League, which organization succeeded the 
American Youth for Democracy. 

The witness was well equipped to also testify with respect to Com- 
munist activities among the entertainment profession, especially those 
in the folk-song field. Many of these belong to the Communist-con- 
trolled "People's Songs," which recently changed its name to "People's 
Artists." 

Associated with the witness as members of the Communist Party 
were Joy Silver and Paul Robeson, Jr., who were the leaders of the 
American youth in attendance at the Berlin Youth Festival in 1951. 
While Robeson, Jr., was denied a passport, all those who did attend 
obtained their passports by fraudulent means in that they failed to 
list their true destination or purpose of their travel. The witness 
testified regarding an instance of travel by a Puerto Rican Communist 
to Europe. Matusow carried to him instructions from the Communist 
Party directing him not to list his true destination or purpose of 
travel. 

Following this testimony, the chairman, upon direction of the com- 
mittee, introduced legislation intended to tighten up our passport 
laws and thereby eliminate fraudulent travel by Communists. This 
legislation should be enacted early in the coming Congress. 

In the course of his testimony in Washington, D. C, dealing with 
Communist efforts to control youth groups, Harvey M. Matusow 
identified the following individuals as members of the Communist 
Party : 

Aaronson, Norma, president, local 16, UOPWA 

Abrams, Carl, radio script writer 

Aptheker, Herbert, teacher, Jefferson School 

Ballinger, Sidney, manager, Jefferson School Book Shop 

Baron, Rose, manager, Workers' Book Shop, Communist Party functionary 

Bassett, Ted, party organizer 

Beach, Ethel (Sandy), placement bureau, UOPWA, New York City 

Bernardi, Betty (Mrs. Hesh Bernardi) , employed at Camp Unity 

Bernardi, Hesh, employed at Camp Unity 

Bernstein, Pearl, employed at Camp Unity 

Bernstein, Elmer, employed at Camp Unity ; presently doing musical scores for 

pictures in Hollywood 
Bernz, Harold, Jefferson School Bookshop 
Berry, Abner, editor, on Daily Worker 

Berry, Rosalie (Mrs. Abner Berry), registrar of the Jefferson School 
Black. Henry, librarian at Jefferson School 
Bonofsky, Philip, writer 

Bordofsky, Ben, director, Wholesale Book Corp. 
Bradford, William ( Bill ) , Jefferson School Bookshop 
Brown, Mel, employee, Jefferson School Bookshop 

Bucholt, Joe, Communist Party functionary ; organizer, Labor Youth League 
Buckingham, Sue 

Callen, Diez, student, Columbia University 
Callen, Monnie (Mrs. Diez Callen) 
Casatta, Mario (Boots), former editor of Peoples' Songs Bulletin and organizer 

of Peoples' Songs of Los Angeles 
Claiborne, Adrian (Mrs. Robert Claiborne), People's Songs and Farmer's Union 
Claiborne, Robert (Bob) 
Coleman, James, editor, New Foundations 

Collins, Charles, officer, Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union, New York 
Colon, Jesus, IWO, Puerto Rican 
Daniels, Roger 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 71 

Darr, John W., Jr. (Rev.) 

Davis, Ben, Jr., convicted Communist leader 

DeCormier, Betty, employed at Camp Unity. Former wife of Robert DeCormier 

DeCormier, Robert, employed at Camp Unity 

DeLarco. Fran, member of People's Songs 

Diskin, Bernice (wife of Lou Diskin) 

Diskin, Lou. Communist Party functionary; former head of New York state 

Labor Youth League 
Dorfman, Carl, assistant to William Z. Foster 
Drucker, Louis, employee of Wholesale Book Corp. 
Duncan, Laura, employed at Camp Unity 
Durkin, James, president, UOPWU 

Engler, Sam, State educational director of Labor Youth League 
Finkel, Seymour 

Finkelstein, Sidney, instructor at the Jefferson School, author 
Fogel, Enid (Mrs. Robert. Fogel) 
Fogel, Robert, Communist Party organizer 
Foner, Jack, employee of the furrier workers' union 

Fox, Jean (Mrs. Kenneth Fox), corresponding secretary for People's Songs 
Fox, Kenneth, People's Songs 
Foy, Hope, formerly with "the Weavers" 
Frankfeld, Phil, head of Communist Party in Baltimore 
Freeman, Mort, employee, Camp Unity 
Gates, Lillian (Mrs. John Gates) 

Gay, Harry, West Side regional organizer of the Labor Youth League 
Gibson, Jackie, full-time employee of Communist Party 
Gilbert, Ronnie (woman) , member of People's Songs and "the Weavers" 
Gold, Ben, president, furrier workers union 
Goldway, Dave, director, Jefferson School 
Goldway, Tillie (Mrs. Dave Goldway), teacher 
Goodelman, Aaron J., teacher, Jefferson School 
Gordon, Hallie Wood, member, People's Songs 
Gottlieb, Vicki, employee, Camp Unity 
Green, Adolph, member of People's Songs 
Greenspan, Mrs. Jack 

Greenspan, Jack, organizer, United Office and Professional Workers Union 
Grennel, Horace, faculty, Jefferson School 
Guthrie, Woodie, member, People's Songs 
Halpern, Liz 

Hammett, Dashiell, author 

Hardy, Edward, Communist Party organizer, State of Texas 
Haufricht, Betty (Mrs. Herbert), organizer, Communist Party 
Haufricht, Herbert, member of People's Artists 
Hays, Lee, member, "the Weavers" 
Hellerman, Freddie, member of People's Songs 
Hillie, Wally, official of People's Songs 

Hunton, W. A. (Alpheus), director or vice chairman of Council on African Affairs 
Huston, Cisco, recording artist for Young People's Records 
Hutchinson, James, teacher-conductor ; instructor, Jefferson School 
Ireland, Richard 
Irwin, Silber, executive director of People's Songs, music section organizer for 

the Communist Party 
Jacobson, Leonard, official of People's Songs 
Jaffe, Joe, employee, Camp Unity 
James, Oscar, worked full time at Workers Book Shop in New York. Communist 

Party organizer. 
Jaroslow, Jerry, employee, Camp Unity 

Jenks, Clint, regional organizer for the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers Union 
Kelber, Harry, employed, Trade Union Service 
Kewskin, Herb 
Kewskin, Yale 

Klein, Harry, member of People's Songs 
Kogel, Lenny, employed at'Camp Unity 
Kramer, Aaron, poet, employee UOPWA 
Kramer, Terry, employee, People's Songs, Inc. 
Kruckman, Herbert, art teacher, Jefferson School 



72 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Krushenick, Johnny (also known as Johnny Rush), editorial group, People's 
Songs 

Landauer, Sam, American Newspaper Guild, Local 3, New York City 

Lawrence, Vicki 

Lawson, Elizabeth, teacher, Jefferson School 

Lee, York ( may be Lee York ) 

Lefkowitz, Irving (Lefty) 

Lefkowitz, Laura (Mrs. Irving) 

Lieberman, Ernie, member of People's Artists 

Leibowitz, Bob, student, City College, New York City 

Lippman, Bernie 

Litch, Benna 

Lowenfield, Walter, editor, Philadelphia edition of Daily Worker 

McGhee, Browning, member People's Songs, Inc. 

Mclntyre, Harry 

McRay, Otis, Communist Party organizer 

McRay, Phillis, employed at Camp Unity 
(Mrs. Otis McRay) 

Maggusu, Toni, one-time director of People's Artists 

Miirtel, Harry, teacher at Jefferson School. 

Mason, Dolly, office employee at Jefferson School 

Max, Allen, teacher, Jefferson School, former city editor of Daily Worker 

Monas, Ray, employed at Camp Unity 
Mooney, Helen (sister of Irwin Silber) 

Morford, Rev. Richard 

Nadler, Al, member of People's Songs 

Nadler, Shirley (also known as Lydia Edwards), member of People's Songs 

Nesi, James, teacher, Jefferson School 

Nesi, Ruth (Mrs. James) , employed, Wholesale Book Corp. and Jefferson School 

Nessolroth, Raoul, full-time employee of Communist Party 

Nessolroth, Vicky (Mrs. Raoul) 

Newirth, Bob, University of Chicago 

Norman, Winifred, officer, Local 1G, UOPWA 

Ostrowsky, Clara, assistant librarian at Jefferson School 

Paley, Tom, American Folksay Group, People's Songs 

Parent, Ernie, Communist Party organizer 

Pascoff, Ben, teacher, Jefferson School 

Patterson. William L., national executive secretary of the Civil Rights Congress 

Peladori, Janice (Mrs. Neal Peladori) 

Peladori, Neal, official of People's Songs 

Perry, Carrie, full-time employee of the New York County Communist Party 

Phiffer, Carol 

Phillips, Furman 

Plever, Gerb 

Rheinfeld. Irene (Mrs. Milton Rheinfeld) 

Rheinf eld, Milton (Meshie) 

Rivington. Ann, worked on Harlem edition of Sunday Worker 

Robeson, Marilyn (Mrs. Paul, Jr.), employed at Camp Unity 

Robeson, Paul, Jr. 

Robinson. Earl, composer 

Rodriguez, Helen 

Rubenstein, Nettie, principal, Robert Louis Stevenson School, New York City 

Sacco, Joe, employed, Grey Advertising Agency in 1949 

Sacco, Nola (Mrs. Joe Sacco) 

Saha, Art, East Side organizer, LYL. 

Sanders, Betty, official of People's Songs 

Sax, Milton 

Schappes, Morris 

Schappes, Sonia (Mrs. Morris U. Schappes), Manager, Book Fair 

Schlanger, Bob 

Schwendinger, Hy, editorial board, People's Songs, Inc. 

Seeger, Pete, official, People's Songs, Inc. 

Selsam, Howard, director, Jefferson School — teacher 

Selterman, Joe 

Sharf, Lee 

Sheik, Jules 

Siegel, Gloria 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 73 

Silber, Irvin, executive director of People's Songs, Inc., also known as People's 
Artists 

Sillen, Samuel, writer for International Publishers 

Smith, Ferdinand C, officer of National Maritime Union 

Smith. Jessica, writer 

Speed, Mrs. (mother of Jane Speed), ran Communist Bookshop in Birmingham 

Speed, Jane (Mrs. Caesar Andrean Ingleas), Communist Party organizer 

Stpiier, Ceorge, labor specialist, Jefferson School 

Steck, Robert (Bob), in charge of hiring of personnel at Camp Unity 

Steck. Jo (Mrs. Robert Steck), employed at Camp Unity 

Steinberg, Sam 

Sufferin, Herb, employed at Camp Unity 

Talkington, Lester, president, Local 21, ULPA 

Tarrentola, Joe, Communist Party organizer 

Tarrentola, Selma (Mrs. Joe Tarrentola) 

Thomas, Everett (Teak) 

Torg, Artie 

Turetsky, Murray 

Turetsky, Tzvia (Mrs. Murray) 

Vila. William, member, Labor Youth League 

Vincent, Craig 

Vincent, Jennie Wells (former wife of Harry Wells, now wife of Craig Vincent) 

Walkeustein, Jack 

Ward, Roosevelt, Jr., Communist Party organizer 

Weinstock, John, employed at Camp Unity 

Weinstock. Johnnie, member, Labor Youth League 

Wells. Dr. Harry (also known as Dan Wells), teacher of philosophy at Jefferson 
School 

Wells, Harry K. (alias Dan Wells), teacher at Jefferson School 

Wheeler, Irene 

Wilkerson, Doxey 

Williamson. Mel, organizational secretary, Labor Youth League 

Winston, Leon, teacher 

Wofsy, Leon, national director of LYL 

Wolfe, Bob, song writer 

Wolff, Milton, representative CRC 

Wood. Inez (Mrs. Randy Wood), full-time employee of district 65, Distribu- 
tive Workers Union 

Wood, Randy, active in People's Artists 

Yellen. Dave, now serving time in New York State penal institution 

York, Lee. {See Lee, York.) 

DR. EDWARD U. CONDON 

Dr. Edward U. Condon was appointed director of the National 
Bureau of Standards in November 1945. This appointment was made 
even though it was known at that time by the executive branch of 
Government that Dr. Condon had not been permitted to visit Soviet 
Russia and that a passport issued by the State Department had been 
revoked upon the request of intelligence authorities. 

Dr. Condon had, early in the development of nuclear fission, been 
offered a position on the atomic bomb project at Los Alamos, N. Mex. 
After a short while, Dr. Condon rejected that appointment voicing his 
distain for the security regulations which were necessary at Los 
Alamos. 

During the course of its investigations to ascertain the extent and 
success of Soviet espionage activities relating to the atom bomb, the 
committee w T as amazed at the numerous instances in which it was dis- 
closed that Dr. Condon was acquainted with known and suspected 
espionage agents. The committee did not, nor does it now, possess 
information that Dr. Condon was a Communist or committed any 



74 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

act of espionage. However, because of his associates and disdain 
for security regulations the committee recognized his vulnerability in 
any post of security. For this reason the committee issued a report 
in 1948 setting forth the information it possessed concerning Dr. 
Condon's associations. It was hoped that Dr. Condon would volun- 
tarily resign but if he did not it should serve as a warning to Dr. 
Condon as well as security officers that his associations disqualified 
him from access to classified material. 

Dr. Condon did not resign but rather attempted to justify his as- 
sociations and not only claimed his lack of knowledge of any espionage 
activities on the part of these people, but in some instances went so 
far as to voice confidence in their complete honesty, notwithstanding 
unshaken testimony of others, even though he made no inquiry as to 
the veracity of these charges. 

Dr. Condon adopted the attitude that because he had not appeared 
before the committee he had been maligned when the report was 
issued, although he did not deny his association with these known 
and suspected Soviet espionage agents, but claimed that his associa- 
tions with them were perfectly normal and that he had not engaged in 
espionage with them. 

In 1952, a Member of Congress, in prefacing a statement on the 
floor of Congress, charged the committee with failure to hear Dr. 
Condon. As a result the committee voted to invite Dr. Condon to 
appear before it. Dr. Condon declined the invitation and the com- 
mittee voted to subpena him. 

Dr. Condon was heard on September 5, 1952, at which time he 
reiterated his lack of knowledge of the espionage activities of the 
persons the committee had named as having associated with him, and 
denied having ever been a Communist. 

Dr. Condon's appearance, however, served to confirm the com- 
mittee's belief that because of his propensity for associating with 
persons disloyal or of questionable loyalty and his contempt for 
necessary security regulations, that he is not qualified for acceptability 
to any security position. 

METHODS OF COMMUNIST INFILTRATION IN THE 
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

The committee has long been puzzled at the relative ease with which 
individuals who have been identified as members of the Communist 
Party have gained employment in the United States Government. 

Through the records of hearings before the committee in the past, 
there has been exposure of Communist Party cells and persons en- 
gaged in Soviet espionage within various agencies of the executive 
branch of the Government. With this in mind, the committee has 
commenced an investigation to ascertain the methods which were 
used in securing employment for these Communists and to determine 
how it was possible for these Communists to move from one agency 
to another with apparent ease. 

The committee definitely believes that there is a pattern being fol- 
lowed through which these persons secured employment and transfers 
and it is intensifying its efforts to ascertain the key that will explain 
this Communist operation. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 75 

THE ARMY SIGNAL CORPS INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 

The Army Signal Corps Intelligence Agency is one of the most 
"sensitive" groups in the field of intelligence activities in Washington. 
Composed of approximately 90 civilian employees and 21 military 
personnel, it is the receiving center for intelligence reports from 
world-wide sources, chiefly concerning telecommunications infor- 
mation needed by American intelligence agencies. Its files contain 
such information, stored in chronological fashion, and are used as 
the basis of reports. It also collects reports on radar stations, tele- 
phonic and telegraphic communications vital to the national defense. 
The attention of the committee was called to alleged subversive 
conditions in this top-secret Agency through a remarkable "petition 
to Congress" signed by 10 Agency employees. The petition was 
signed by the following : 

Lt. Col. Ollie J. Allen, executive officer 

Capt. Robert M. Herron, Chief of Contacts Branch 

Lt. Harry Donohue, Chief, Strategic Branch 

Edwin Y. Webb, Jr. 

Robert L. Stilmar, Chief, Scientific Branch 

Kurt G. Happe, Chief, Area II 

Stephen J. Roberts, Chief, Area IV 

Mrs. Doris C. Swain, secretary 

William H. Thompson 

Lionel Hirschhorn 
The petition contained a long recitation of incidents involving 
other Agency employees which indicated, in the opinion of the signers, 
the presence of security risks in the Agency. 

We the undersigned — 

the petition stated — 

respectfully petition the Congress of the United States to investigate conditions 
of 2 years' duration in and surrounding the Signal Corps Intelligence Agency, 
and execute the necessary corrective measures to remove all subversive elements 
and security risks therefrom, thereby improving the security of the United 
States. 

Inquiry developed that the charges preferred by the 10 petitioners 
had been under investigation by military intelligence for more than 
a year before they were submitted to Congress. Seven civilian em- 
ployees of the Agency had been accused. The complete files on these 
cases were made available through the cooperation of Maj. Gen. A. R. 
Boiling, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2. These files indicated that 
little tangible evidence, indicative of espionage or subversive activi- 
ties, had been developed by the military investigation. The inves- 
tigation did disclose an unrest, lack of morale, and bickering between 
factions unseemly in an intelligence group of this importance. 

The very fact that ten employees, three of them in officers' uni- 
forms, saw fit to demand a congressional investigation of conditions in 
their agency indicated a state of affairs inimical to security. 

Coupled with this unsatisfactory state of affairs was the apparent 
disappearance of a number of secret documents. An official inven- 
tory by a security officer of the agency revealed "no record" for some 
57 reports bearing the "top secret" label. 

Subsequent checking resulted in another security officer report that 
"certificates of destruction" or the documents themselves had been lo- 

H. Kept. 2516, 82-2 6 



76 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

cated by a more thorough search. Pentagon officials contended that 
the first inventory had been "inadequate." 

In view of regulations which insist that the custodianship of all 
top-secret reports shall be recorded at all times, the committee cannot 
minimize the seriousness of a condition which permitted the where- 
abouts of even a single such document to be unrecorded at any time. 
The inescapable conclusion is that lax security prevailed in the 
Agency. 

An intensive investigation by the committee staff added no sub- 
stantial evidence to that gathered by Army investigators concerning 
the accused employees. Several of those accused were also given full 
held investigations by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and no de- 
rogatory information, except for the charges of their fellow em- 
ployees, was uncovered. 

Admission of Communist sympathies was made by one employee 
who left the Agency. No corroborating evidence was obtained con- 
cerning numerous allegations by the complaining employees concern- 
ing conversations in which certain employees talked in a vein indi- 
cating procommunism in the opinion of the complainants. 

The committee is assured that tight security precautions have been 
established in the Agency which has been entirely reorganized as a 
result of the military and congressional investigation. 

The incident emphasizes the value of a standing congressional com- 
mittee to which Government employees may appeal when they feel, 
for one reason or another, that conditions exist which need correc- 
tion. The unusual petition to Congress undoubtedly alerted the mil- 
itary to strengthen security in the agency and to remedy conditions 
which were not in the best interests of the national defense. 

The committee has nothing but the highest praise for the 10 em- 
ployees, 3 of them, in uniform, who sought the aid of Congress. All 
are responsible citizens who became alarmed by conditions which 
they regarded as a menace to national security. All have splendid mil- 
itary and Government records which they knew they might be im- 
periling by airing charges which could not please those in high au- 
thority. All were motivated by an intense patriotism worthy of emu- 
lation by all in Government employ. 

REVIEW OF THE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR 

SOCIAL ACTION 

The committee, during the past, has received requests from Members 
of Congress concerning the Methodist Federation for Social Action 
and its predecessor, the Methodist Federation for Social Service, in 
such volume that it became necessary to publish a careful review of 
available information dealing w r ith these organizations. 

The committee recognizes that these organizations do not represent 
the Methodist Church or its members and in fact these organizations 
have been repudiated by outstanding clergymen and laymen of the 
Methodist Church. The committee is also aware that during the last 
convention of the Methodist Church, further and more substantial 
steps were taken to disavow any official connections with the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 77 

FILES AND KEFEREXCE SERVICE 

The Hies of the committee should not be thought of as files in the 
ordinary sense which can be closed out and stored or destroyed peri- 
odic-ally and forgotten but rather as a constantly growing, live col- 
lect ion'of specialized material — a collection of books and pamphlets, 
periodicals and leaflets, letterheads, handbills, and other documents 
issued by or descriptive of subversive organizations and activities or 
serving as contributory, background material to the subject. The 
collection, the care and handling of that collection, and the various 
types of reference service furnished might better be described as those 
of a special library. 

Due both to the type of work of this committee and to the nature 
of the subject matter with which it is concerned, very old documents 
and pamphlets and books must be handled constantly and kept as 
readily accessible as the newer material which is constantly being 
added. Books and pamphlets must be cataloged, periodical and cir- 
culation records kept, and reference service furnished as in any 
library. In addition, our own hearings and reports must be indexed 
and a large volume of documents and clippings must be processed 
properly and incorporated into the collection. This calls for careful 
examination of each piece of material, correct classification of it to 
place it with other information on the same subject, cross-referencing 
to show additional subjects covered, and, in most cases, indexing to 
even the smallest details which may later provide the necessary and 
immediate answers to questions which arise. Even the proper hous- 
ing of such a collection presents problems caused both by its inherent 
nature and volume and by serious limitations of space and the suit- 
able type of equipment. 

However, in 1952, there have been incorporated into an already 
voluminous collection 2,827 pages of printed hearings and reports of 
this committee, about 200 books and pamphlets, 936 issues of news- 
papers and magazines, and 600 to 700 documents of other kinds. The 
number of clippings cannot even be estimated. 

The reference service furnished during the vear has shown a steadv 
increase, reflecting a greater growth in the amount of information 
requested and furnished than in the actual number of separate requests 
made. Records show that well over 3,600 inquiries involving about 
9.500 individuals and approximately 2,000 organizations were an- 
swered in 1952, an increase of about 300 in number of requests, 1,800 
in number of individual names involved, with the number of organiza- 
tions concerned remaining the same. The figures cannot show, how- 
ever, that answers in most instances were naturally longer because 
more information had been accumulated and made available for use 
during the year, nor can numbers reveal the type and quality of the 
reference service. 

Since the files of the committee are not open for personal consulta- 
tion by anyone other than the committee's own employees and the 
designated representatives of the executive branch of the Government, 
a very specialized reference service is furnished the Members of Con- 
gress. Written requests are preferred in the interest of accuracy, 
but telephone inquiries from Members' offices are also accepted daily. 
These inquiries are handled by trained staff members who consult all 



78 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

indexes and files for all available information on the subject or sub- 
jects under consideration. They then review, compile, and report the 
pertinent information as it appears in the committee's own public 
hearings and reports and public documents contained in the commit- 
tee's files. A total of 1,440 written reports were sent to Members of 
Congress in 1952, and a conservative estimate of the number of pages 
of such written memoranda would run over 10,000. This does not 
include written replies in cases where no information was found on 
the subject of the request. 

Answers are also made by telephone in reply to verbal inquiries, 
from Members of Congress, where there is no information on the sub- 
ject to report, where only a brief answer or small amount of informa- 
tion is needed, or in some few cases where extreme urgency demands it, 
usually followed by a written report. Brevity of answer, however, 
does not mean that less research work or knowledge of our subject 
matter is required than in the written reply. About 1,000 inquiries 
from Members of Congress were answered verbally in 1952. 

As the number and range of the committee's investigations and hear- 
ings increased during the year, so has the demand for information 
from the committee's own staff members increased. The variety of 
information and the type of answers needed by them may be guessed 
from the description of the hearings and investigations described in 
other sections of this report. Inquiries from staff members were 
answered in varying manners, extending from the verification of a 
single point or the loan of a single document to the writing of a 
lengthy report or the loan of hundreds of documents for consultation 
in connection with investigations or use as exhibits in hearings before 
the committee. 

A certain amount of reference service has also been furnished this 
year in answering some requests made by private individuals who 
showed a sincere and genuine need for information of the type which 
is available here. Answers to such inquiries were necessarily greatly 
restricted both as to number and as to length of answer because our 
staff is not large enough to supply any considerable service of this kind. 

Still another service has been furnished by the files section to the 
executive branch of the Government whose agents must make a check 
of the committee's files under provisions of the President's Executive 
Order No. 9835 pertaining to the loyalty of Government employees. 
Accordingly, arrangements have been made to give the designated 
representatives of the various agencies access to all the information 
in our files. While these men have made their own checks and have 
compiled whatever information they found, it has still been necessary 
for the staff of this section to answer innumerable questions as to our 
records and to withdraw from files a great amount of documentary 
material for their examination. 

In 1952, these agents made 6,260 visits to the committee's files section, 
about the same as last year, but recorded that they had checked the 
names of almost 840,000 individuals through our records. This repre- 
sents an increase of over 80,000 in names checked and probably indi- 
cates longer visits on the part of persons not already assigned by their 
agencies to full-time checking of our records. It has placed an addi- 
tional burden upon our records, our working space and staff, but shows 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 79 

an additional interest in, and use of, the information assembled here. 
In conclusion, it is gratifying to report at the end of the year 1952 
that the valuable and, in some instances, irreplacable collection of 
material in the committee's files has not only been preserved and 
augmented but has been used as a source of vital information to a 
greater extent than in any previous year. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The work that has been done in the past by the committee in the 
dissemination of literature exposing the workings of the Communist 
Party is reflected in the increase of requests for committee publica- 
tions during the year 1952. One after another, a series of events have 
occurred on both national and international scenes which could very 
easily have been anticipated years ago by a study of the pattern of 
Communist tactics which have been revealed by hearings and reports 
of the committee at least since 1938. 

From the coup d'etat in Prague to the crossing of the thirty-eighth 
parallel in Korea, with the prolonged fighting that has ensued in that 
area, many things have happened to demonstrate the self-avowed 
plans for world conquest by the Soviet Union. That these things 
have intensified the desire of thousands of individuals to know more 
about this Communist conspiracy in order to combat it in this country 
is evident from the letters received by the committee asking for all 
available information on the subject. 

One of the principal functions of the publications section of the 
committee staff is supplying material requested by congressional offices 
and governmental agencies. These requests in 1952 have exceeded 
those for any other year and have been for information or publica- 
tions dealing with Communist infiltration into every field which has 
been exposed by the committee. These include the Hollywood motion- 
picture industry, professional groups, labor unions, farming, the press, 
youth groups, and our own Government. 

Students and faculty members of schools and colleges have sought 
information for use in classes which are being conducted on the Com- 
munist menace, and, according to their letters, a great deal of com- 
mittee material is used for reference purposes in these studies. We 
have endeavored to supply these publications in as many cases as 
possible, even though our supply is very limited. 

It is gratifying to see the concerted effort on the part of the major 
labor organizations in preventing Communists who have been highly 
trained in methods of infiltrating them and gaining control from 
accomplishing their purposes. Printed copies of the many hearings 
which the committee has conducted in this field have been in great 
demand by numerous trade-unionists and union offices. 

It has been possible for the committee staff to fill requests for almost 
a half-million of these publications during the year 1952. 1 

Many letters requesting this material indicate that the publications, 
when received, would be circulated among a number of persons, thus 
increasing the individual value of each one. 



1 In addition to these, the committee has also distributed thousands of copies of publica- 
tions printed in previous years, as well as documents released by other congressional 
committees and Government agencies. 



80 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

Types of the many thousands of letters received weekly by the com- 
mittee may be seen in the following : 

Parks Air Force Base, Calif., November 7, 1952. 
Dear Sirs : I am presently in the process of preparing a course of instruction 
in security for air police students and would appreciate any literature of an 
unclassified nature that you might have in this category. 

******* 

San Jose, Calif., October 2k, 1952. 

Gentlemen : Thank you so much for sending us the copies of 100 Things You 
Should Know About Communism. We have had many calls for the book and 
know that it will help many of our people to realize the hold communism can get. 
******* 

Jersey City, N. J., November 2%, 1952. 
Gentlemen : May we have 400 copies of 100 Things You Should Know About 
Communism for use in this school? 

******* 

University of , November 25, 1952. 

Gentlemen : We should very much appreciate having for this library a copy 
of the Guide to Subversive Organizations and Publications (and appendix) re- 
vised May 14, 1951. 



Dr. 



Gloucester, Mass., November 24, 1952. 

Dear Sirs : Please send me any available pamphlets that you have on com- 
munism. 

* * * * * * * 

Chicago, III., November 25, 1952. 
Dear Sirs : In the interest of the Railroad Retirement Board and its staff, the 
library is writing to request a copy of your publications, Communist Activities 
Among Professional Groups in Los Angeles Area, Part 1 ; Communism in Detroit 
Area, Part 1 ; Communist Infiltration of Hollywood Motion Picture Industry, 
Parts 6-8. 

Committee Publications for the Second Session of the Eighty-second 

Congress, 1952 

Review of the Methodist Federation for Social Action 

Role of the Communist Press in the Communist Conspiracy 

Communist Infiltration of Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry — Part 7 

Communist Activities Among Professional Groups in Los Angeles Area — Part 1 

Communism in the Detroit Area — Part 1 

Communism in the Detroit Area — Part 2 

Communist Activities Among Youth Groups 

Methods of Communist Infiltration in the United States Government 

Communist Infiltration of the Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry — Part 8 

Communist Activities Among Professional Groups in the Los Angeles Area — 

Part 2 
Testimony of Lynne L. Prout 
Communist Activities in Chicago — Part 1 
Communist Activities in Chicago — Part 2 
Testimony of Dr. Edward U. Condon 
Communist Activities Among Professional Groups in the Los Angeles Area — 

Part 3 
Communist Activities Among Professional Groups in the Los Angeles Area — 

Part 4 
Communist Infiltration of Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry — Part 9 
Testimony of General Walter Bedell Smith 
Communism in the Philadelphia Area 

Communist Infiltration of the Hollywood Motion-Picture Industry — Part 10 
Annual Report of the Committee on Un-American Activities for 1952 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 81 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The committee, on the basis of investigations and hearings, has from 
time to time made certain recommendations to the Congress for the 
enactment of legislation which it feels is necessary to combat sub- 
version. 

The Internal Security Act of 1950 resulted directly from hearings 
conducted before this committee and many of the recommendations 
dealing with security against subversive aliens have been incorporated 
in the McCarran- Walter immigration bill. Certain other of the rec- 
ommendations have been enacted by resolutions of various Members 
of Congress and other recommendations have been acted upon by the 
executive branch of the Government. It is regrettable, however, that 
in numerous instances recommendations that the committee has made 
which would serve as a security safeguard against subversive activities 
in the United States have not yet been enacted into law. 

In order that the Congress and the American people might have an 
understanding of the recommendations that have been made by the 
committee in the past, there is being included a complete list of those 
that have been made by the committee since the first session of the 
Seventy-sixth Congress. 

Recommendations contained in House Report No. 2, Seventy-sixth 
Congress, first session, dated January 3, 1939 : 

Although this committee has worked continuously since the adjournment of 
Congress and has done everything within its power to get as many facts as 
possible to the people, we have only skimmed the surface. We were able only 
to hold brief hearings in New York and Detroit. We were urged to conduct hear- 
ings in many other cities, such as Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Minneap- 
olis, Milwaukee, Birmingham, Atlanta, New Orleans, San Antonio, Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland, but due to limited time and funds we were 
unable to comply with these requests. We had hoped and planned to conduct 
extensive hearings on the west coast because the evidence before the committee 
indicates that this area ranks first in the extent of un-American activities and 
propaganda. We received numerous letters from citizens and public officials in 
the west-coast area urging us to hold hearings there. We have approximately 
150 witnesses on the west coast that should have been heard. However, due 
to a lack of funds, we were unable to devote any extensive consideration to 
west-coast activities of Communist, Nazi, and Fascist groups. The situation is 
so serious on the west coast that it would require G months of preparatory in- 
vestigation before a committee would be ready to conduct hearings, and it is 
probable that hearings would last 3 or 4 months. 

Not only were we unable to investigate un-American activities and propaganda 
in many important sections of the country ; but, as a matter of fact, we found it 
impossible to investigate many of the important phases of un-American activi- 
ties. Even as to those that we did investigate, we only scratched the surface. 

In view of the foregoing, we do not think that the investigation has proceeded 
far enough to justify us in recommending legislation to Congress. We need and 
can secure much more information not only from sections of the country that 
we have investigated but also from the larger areas that we have not even 
touched before recommending legislation to Congress. Even after we are sup- 
plied with full and complete information and facts, several months of considera- 
tion must be devoted to the question of legislation. This will require expert 
assistance and thorough research. 

Legislative recommendations contained in Report No. 1, Seventy- 
seventh Congress, first session, dated January 3, 1941 : 

The committee realizes the difficulty of reaching and curbing certain phases 
of un-American and subversive propaganda and activities through legislative 
action. In view of our findings and the origin of these activities, we submit the 
following recommendations as a partial legislative program : 

The enactment of legislation to bring about the immediate mandatory deporta- 
tion of alien spies and saboteurs. 



82 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

The mandatory deportation of aliens who advocate any basic change in the 
form of our Government. 

The enactment of legislation requiring that all employees and officials of our 
Federal Government be American citizens. 

Withhold all Federal financial support from any educational institution which 
permits members of its faculty to advocate communism, fascism, or nazism as 
a substitute for our form of Government to the student body of these educa- 
tional institutions. (This particular recommendation is not concurred in by Mr. 
Voorhis, not because of disagreement with the principle involved but on the ground 
that the administration of such an act is impossible without risking grave in- 
justice being done to people seeking merely to explain the principles involved 
in totalitarian philosophy.) 

The enactment of legislation to outlaw every political organization which is 
shown to be under the control of a foreign government. As long as these organi- 
zations have a legal status in the United States, it will be difficult for any agency 
of the Government to deal with them. We now know that they furnish the legal 
apparatus for the operations of saboteurs, and the window dressing for espionage. 
The committee believes that legislation can be worked out to outlaw such organi- 
zations, and that this will in no sense constitute a violation of the Bill of Rights, 
since such legislation would only affect organizations controlled or directed by 
foreign countries. 

The enactment of legislation to stop all immigration from foreign countries 
that refuse to accept the return of their nationals found under American law 
to be deportable from this country. This legislation is made necessary by the 
fact that some foreign governments have refused to accept their own citizens 
who have been deported by the United States Government. 

As previously stated in the body of the report, the committee recommends 
the passage of added legislation to place restrictions on the distribution of totali- 
tarian propaganda, when that distribution involves any cost to the American tax- 
payers, and when such propaganda emanates and is shipped from foreign 
sources. 

We recommend that the statutory period during which citizenship papers can 
be revoked under existing law be extended to at least 10 years. 

Due to the fact that the committee has discovered that many members of 
foreign-controlled organizations have traveled on American passports which 
have been fraudulently obtained, the committee feels that the statute of limita- 
tions should be extended from 3 to 7 years. This is made necessary because of 
the unusual difficulty in apprehending those who resort to the use of fraudulent 
passports within the period of 3 years. 

Recommendations contained in House Report No. 1, Seventy- 
seventh Congress, first session, dated January 3, 1941 : 

The committee recommends as a policy that employment in national-defense 
industries or the Government service be denied to any person who has been and 
is now active in any political organization which is found to be under the control 
and guidance of a foreign government. 

Recommendations contained in House Report No. 2742, Seventy- 
ninth Congress, second session, dated January 2, 1947 : 

That the Congress create an independent commission with authority to investi- 
gate and to order the discharge of any employee or official of the Federal 
Government whose loyalty to the United States is found to be in doubt. 

That the Department of State and the Department of Justice be required by 
law to publicize every 6 months the names and identity of all agents of any 
foreign governments who are in the United States for either diplomatic, com- 
mercial, or other purposes. 

That the Department of Justice be required by law to establish within the 
Department a special division devoted to the prosecution of subversive elements 
now operating in the United States. 

That the Attorney General be instructed by a proper resolution of the House 
to report to the House the number of prosecutions instituted under the Voorhis 
Act and the McCormack Alien Registration Act, and to advise the Congress if 
new legislation is necessary to insure the security of this country. 

That legislation should be enacted that would restrict Federal employment 
to citizens of the United States and that only citizens be permitted to hold 
office in any labor union subject to Federal laws. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 83 

That legislation be enacted requiring that all alien Communists and other 
subversive aliens be promptly deported and that the Immigration Service main- 
tain a stringent screening process to restrain the present influx of aliens into 
the United States and to determine whether their political background is inimi- 
cal to the best interests of the United States Government. 

Legislation should be enacted to restrict the benefits of certain tax-exemption 
privileges now extended to a number of Communist fronts posing as educational, 
charitable, and relief organizations. 

The following is a quotation from committee Report No. 1996, Union Calendar 
No. 588, Seventv-ninth Congress, second session, submitted by Chairman John S. 
Wood, May 10, 1946 : 

"The investigative staff of your committee has conducted an extensive investi- 
gation into the various sources of financial aid to organizations engaged in the 
dissemination of propaganda in the United States. The heart of propaganda 
activities is, by necessity, sustained with money. Reasonable regulation of 
tax exemptions and proper enforcement of such regulations would immediately 
restrain to a large extent the vicious attacks now being made upon our constitu- 
tional form of government." 

That the House request, by proper resolution, a report from the Postmaster 
General of the United States, setting forth the number of Embassies or foreign 
agencies now enjoying second-class mailing privileges and also specifically iden- 
tifying such agencies where the respective foreign governments do not accord 
to our Embassies, Ministers, and other United States officials equal mailing 
privileges in those countries, and that proper legislation be enacted by Congress 
limiting the use of second-class mailing privileges to such Embassies and agencies 
of those foreign governments which extend reciprocal privileges to officials of 
the United States Government. 

That legislation be enacted forbidding the use of the United States mails 
under second-class mailing privileges to any and all newspapers and periodicals 
printed in any language other than English, which do not carry a full English 
translation, in parallel columns next to the foreign-language context. 

That legislation be enacted denying the use of second-class mailing privileges 
to any groups of persons or organizations engaged in the publication, distribution, 
or promotion of subversive or un-American propaganda. 

For many years, various organizations in the United States have permitted 
membership under an alias or an assumed name, and have even gone so far as 
to permit concealed or secret membership. It is recommended that the Congress 
enact legislation designed to prohibit membership in any organization using 
the United States mails or subject to Federal laws, by persons using an alias 
or assumed name. Such legislation should also include a provision which would 
clearly ban concealed or secret memberships in any such organizations as de- 
scribed above. An exemption should be made for properly authorized law- 
enforcement officers in the conduct of their investigations. 

Recommendations contained in the annual report of the committee 
to the House of Representatives, Eightieth Congress, second session, 
dated December 31, 1948 : 

In its annual report of January 3, 1940, the Special Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities characterized the Communist Party of the United States not as a 
true political party but as a conspiracy in behalf of the Soviet Union. Our in- 
vestigations and hearings during the past 2 years have borne out this conclusion 
in the most startling fashion. The evidence now before us establishes beyond a 
doubt that espionage and treasonable activity against these United States is, 
in fact, the primary purpose of the organization. We are convinced that all other 
outward activity and propaganda of the Communist Party, its front organiza- 
tions, and controlled unions, serve merely to — 

Enlist new recruits for the primary underground espionage apparatus. 

Lend an idealistic camouflage to this sinister conspiratorial apparatus. 

Act as its protective defense mechanism. 

Provide it with funds and other resources. 

The enacting of legislation to cope with this problem is a task confronting the 
incoming Congress. 

We recommend the early passage of legislation modeled substantially after 
the so-called Mundt-Nixon bill, which passed the House last year by a roll-call 
vote of 319 to 56. 



84 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

In addition, we recommend that the espionage laws of the United States be 
substantially strengthened by early laws of the new Congress, with special 
attention to means for returning aliens to other countries upon conviction for 
crimes against the United States. We also recommend that the penalties for 
those properly cited for contempt of Congress be increased to a minimum of 5 
years in prison and a $5,000 fine. 

We further suggest that our immigration laws and passport-visa regulations 
be carefully studied to determine what changes are necessary to prevent disloyal 
elements from entering this country and remaining here. 

Recommendations contained in the annual report of the committee 
to the House of Representatives, Eighty-first Congress, first session, 
for the year 1949, dated March 15, 1950 : 

Looking back upon 4 years' experience as a standing committee of the House 
of Representatives and almost 7 years as a special committee, we feel more 
than ever impressed with the insidiousness and vastness of the ramifications 
of the Communist movement and the urgent necessity for unflagging efforts 
to expose and curb its machinations. To further the effectiveness of these 
investigations and to curb the subversive activities of the Communist Party, 
United States of America, its agents and its dupes, the committee recommends 
the following action by the incoming House of Representatives : 

The statute of limitations in espionage cases must be amended. Under our 
present laws we have found that a long list of Communist operatives who have 
committed acts of espionage and treachery in the interest of a foreign power 
have remained immune to punishment due to the present form of the statute of 
limitations. 

The nature of modern war — the fact that nations find themselves confronted 
nowadays with undeclared but actual warfare — makes it necessary that the 
legal definition of treason and the penalties attached thereto be broadened to 
cover a period like the present cold war. 

Experience during the past 5 years has demonstrated that the embassies of 
Communist-dominated countries constitute a focal point of Communist es- 
pionage and propaganda. Such activity should be limited by proper safeguards 
sternly enforced. 

H. R. 3903, providing safeguards against the employment of subversive indi- 
viduals in defense plants, should be adopted. 

H. R. 10, providing for the supervision and detention of undeportable aliens, 
should be enacted into law in order to deal with thousands of alien Communists 
refused acceptance by the country of their birth. 

It would be advantageous to enact legislation creating a presumption of law 
that a committee quorum, once established, continues to exist. 

Effective action against the well-coordinated, interlocking Communist net- 
work requires the utmost teamwork among branches of the Government. Petty 
rivalry or separatism can only work to the advantage of the Communists. A 
small bit of information in the hands of one agency may well be the missing link 
of an entire chain of evidence in the hands of another agency. Hence, the com- 
mittee recommends the fullest cooperation between legislative and executive 
arms of the Government in the matter of dealing with subversive activities. 
Modification of the Executive order in loyalty and investigative cases is recom- 
mended for consideration. 

In a number of cases we have found that subversive elements will submit in- 
formation to one arm of the Government when it suits their purpose and will 
withhold it from another. Communist trade-unionists will deny their affiliations 
before the National Labor Relations Board and refuse to affirm or deny them be- 
fore a congressional committee. They will deny them in filling out form 57 in 
applying for Federal employment and refuse to affirm or deny such affiliations 
before this committee. It is highly necessary that the Department of Justice 
take effective action against those who would make a tragic joke of law enforce- 
ment. Here, again, there is room for maximum cooperation between the legisla- 
tive and executive arms of Government. 

In connection with national-defense contracts involving secret and classified 
work for the Atomic Energy Commission, the Army, Navy, and Air Force legis- 
lation should be enacted which subjects officers of national labor unions having 
bargaining contracts to the same security standards as members who have access 
to secret or classified material. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 85 

Recommendations contained in the 1950 annual report of the com- 
mittee to the House of Representatives, dated January 2, 1951 : 

The year 1950 has marked a new stage in the struggle against communism in 
the United States. The attack upon Korea makes it plain beyond all doubt that 
communism has passed beyond the use of subversion to conquer the independent 
nations and will now use armed invasion and war. With the Armed Forces of the 
United States actually pitted in conflict against the legions of international com- 
munism, the Communist Party of the United States can no longer be viewed pas- 
sively as a group of mere political and ideological dissidents, but must be looked 
upon with all seriousness as a military fifth column actively aiding our enemies. 

Yet, today we find many of these potential fifth columnists employed in our 
leading defense plants, making weapons to be used against the Communist 
armies which they are pledged to support. To remove these persons from posi- 
tions where they could sabotage our defense production, there was included in 
the Wood-McCarran Communist-control bill a section which prohibits employ- 
ment of Communist Party members in defense plants designated as such by the 
Secretary of Defense. The committee recommends that the Congress adopt a 
resolution calling upon the Secretary of Defense to immediately place in effect 
the provisions of section 5 of Public Law 831, Eighty-first Congress. 

The operations of the Smith Act and the Subversive Activities Control Act 
of 1950, and the various Communist cases before the courts should be made 
the subject of continuing study during the coming year, with a view to deter- 
mine their effectiveness and the adoption of constantly improved methods of 
restricting the operations of the Communist fifth column. We cannot afford 
to allow ourselves to become hopelessly enmeshed in outworn legal technicalities 
which oftentimes serve to give protection and encouragement to a most insidious 
internal foe. We must streamline our legal machinery to meet the present 
emergency, which poses legal problems never envisaged by our Founding Fathers. 

Loopholes in the present laws and in procedure before congressional com- 
mittees, which Communist lawyers are quick to exploit, should be plugged up. 
The committee recommends that the Congress seriously consider authorizing 
the use of technical evidence secured during the course of investigations in- 
volving espionage, treason, or other crimes involving the security of the United 
States, to intercept and use as evidence in any criminal proceeding information 
obtained as the result of a technical surveillance. 

Both in the courts and in hearings before our committee, the informative 
value of testimony by those who have actually been inside the Communist move- 
ment, either as undercover agents or as former party members, has been in- 
creasingly demonstrated. In the light of the present world situation and the 
possible aggravation of the Communist problem, it can be expected that legal 
prosecutions will increase, making the services of qualified witnesses more and 
more indispensable in building up evidence. Thought should be given to ways 
and means of stimulating defections from the Communist movement and of 
encouraging qualified informants. 

In connection with hearings dealing with local 74 of the AFL Laborers' 
Union, it was brought out that those operating under the discipline and direc- 
tion of the Communist Party went through the process of formally resigning 
from the party and then signing the non-Communist affidavit, in order to comply 
with the provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act. A number of cases of this kind 
have been brought to the attention of the committee. The incoming Congress 
should study the advisability of amending the act in order to make such evasion 
illegal and impossible. 

Recommendations contained in the 1951 annual report of the com- 
mittee to the House of Representatives, dated February 17, 1952 : 

The committee feels that, in line with the findings on Soviet espionage in the 
United States as reflected in the committee report, The Shameful Years, it is 
necessary that positive steps be taken to stem Soviet espionage. It is felt that 
Congress must take the initial steps to ascertain what legislation is necessary 
to afford adequate protection against espionage. In the course of such congres- 
sional study, it would be necessary to ascertain whether the existing laws relat- 
ing to espionage have been properly enforced ; and, if not, proper responsibility 
should be affixed. 

The committee suggests that among the phases Congress should consider in 
strengthening espionage legislation are : 



86 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

A single comprehensive espionage statute applicable to both peacetime and 
wartime. — This should incorporate the present provisions of wartime espionage 
statutes, carrying a capital-punishment sentence. The statute of limitations 
would not then apply in espionage any more than it applies to other crimes 
carrying a capital punishment. The provisions of legislation dealing with the 
unauthorized taking of classified Government papers and documents should be 
broadened to include the transportation of such papers and documents in inter- 
state or foreign commerce. 

The broadening of the rules of admissibility of evidence. — The committee is 
also aware that the executive branch of the Government is seriously being 
hampered in the prosecution of persons engaged in espionage because of the 
present limitations on evidence that may be presented in the courts. The com- 
mittee realizes that the restrictions against the admissibility of evidence secured 
from wire tapping has been imposed to protect the rights of the individual. The 
committee, while desiring to maintain all of the rights of the individual, feels 
that the rights of the individual can be preserved only if the national security 
remains. It is the committee's opinion that, if Soviet espionage continues un- 
checked, the rights of American citizens are being placed in graver danger than 
would be the case with legalized wire tapping. The committee suggests, there- 
fore, that Congress consider legislation to permit as evidence the results of wire 
tapping in matters affecting the national security as well as in such crimes as 
kidnaping and extortion. In order that a proper control might be exercised, it 
is felt that, as in the matter of arrests, searches, and seizures, the judicial branch 
of the Government should be empowered to authorize the use of such techniques. 

Immunity for witnesses appearing before congressional, executive, or judicial 
hearings. — The committee also feels that, since it is essential to any investiga- 
tion, whether it be congressional, executive, or judicial, to have the testimony 
of competent and informed witnesses, legislation should be enacted to effect a 
greater latitude in granting immunity from prosecution to these witnesses. 

The committee has frequently experienced instances where witnesses while 
having information of undoubted value to the work of the committee, have 
refused to answer questions on the basis that to do so might tend to incriminate 
them. If such legislation as suggested by the committee were enacted, it would, 
while maintaining the rights of the individual, permit the proper investigative 
bodies to gather a true and comprehensive picture of the information they seek. 

Reciprocal restrictions on travel by Soviet and satellite diplomats. — The com- 
mittee's investigations have also disclosed that Soviet espionage has been assisted 
by the fact that Soviet nationals have been given unlimited freedom to travel 
throughout the United States and to and from Canada and Mexico. The com- 
mittee's reports dealing with Soviet espionage show that Soviet officials have 
abused this freedom to actively engage in espionage operations. This situation 
exists even though United States diplomats in Russia and her satellites are 
virtually under house arrest and under constant surveillance by the Russian 
secret police. There have been instances in which United States officials have 
been prohibited from contact with American nationals who were being held by 
authorities in Soviet countries. 

Tor these reasons, the committee feels that there should be reciprocal restric- 
tions enforced by this country with the Soviet and satellite countries. 

The committee also feels that, in order to afford a greater national security, 
foreign nationals entering the United States should be required to surrender 
their passports and/or visas at the point of entry and that these papers should 
not be returned until the departure of the individual from the United States. 

Issuance of passports. — The committee recommends that all persons securing 
passports must, at the time the passport application is executed, state under 
oath whether they will or will not visit any of the presently so-called ironTCurtain 
countries. 

The committee also recommends that if, in the course of travel abroad, any 
person holding a passport finds it necessary to visit an iron-curtain country, 
and did not indicate that he intended to visit an iron-curtain country on his 
original application, he must obtain authority to make such a visit from either 
a consular officer of the United States, the proper Ambassador, or a specified 
member of the consular or ambassadorial staffs. 

A similar provision, such as that set forth in paragraph 2 of this section, 
should also be made applicable to all persons holding passports who desire to 
visit any other country exclusive of iron-curtain countries and who have not 
indicated their intention to visit these other countries on the original passport 
application. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 87 

It is hoped that these provisions will prevent American Communists from 
receiving instructions from abroad. It is a well-known fact that American 
Communists often travel abroad for the purpose of receiving instructions from 
Communist functionaries, not only in the iron-curtain countries but in other 
European countries as well. 

Cancellation of passports. — The committee in the past has experienced several 
instances in which persons for whom subpenas have been issued are found to 
be outside the United States and the subpenas cannot be served upon them. 
The committee recognizes the fact that a person might endeavor to use a pro- 
longed absence from the country as a means to evade appearance before this, 
as well as other congressional committees. 

It is believed that in order to cope with such situations legislation should be 
enacted to provide for the cancellation of the passports in the possession of 
any United States citizen in a foreign country for whom a subpena is out- 
standing within 6 months of the date upon which he receives personal notifica- 
tion that such subpena is outstanding. Notice would be made by an accredited 
oflicial designated by the United States Department of State. 

Revocations of commissions in the armed services. — The committee, during its 
hearings, has had the unfortunate experience of having had before it witnesses 
who, while holding commissions in the armed services of the United States, 
have refused to affirm or deny allegations of membership in the Communist Party 
or Communist-front organizations. The committee is aware that a commission 
in the armed services of the United States is a privilege accorded to citizens 
of the United States of unquestioned loyalty and not an inherent right provided 
for in the Constitution. This being the case, the committee recommends that 
in any instance where a person holding a commission in the armed services 
chooses to refuse to answer questions concerning his present or past membership 
in the Communist Party, such commission shall be immediately revoked. 

It will be recognized that many of these recommendations have 
been enacted into law. Among those which have not been enacted 
are some that should be given early attention by Congress so that our 
country might have the legal channels necessary for our own protec- 
tion in these critical times. Legislation must be enacted that will 
cover the present serious situation in which, through our representa- 
tion in the United Nations, our Armed Forces are combating an enemy, 
although technically we are not in a state of war. 

Since our espionage and internal-security legislation is now gaged 
upon times of war and peace, these distinctions should be removed 
in order that war measures may be enforced during this and similar 
critical times. 

In matters dealing with internal security, it is believed necessary 
that emergency powers of the executive branch of the Government be 
placed on a wartime basis in periods such as now exist. 

As a result of the committee's findings regarding the extent of Com- 
munist infiltration into vital defense areas, the committee is of the 
opinion that it must again, and more forcibly, recommend, as it did 
on January 2, 1951, that the Congress adopt a resolution calling upon 
the Secretary of Defense to immediately place into effect the provi- 
sions of section 5 of Public Law 831 of the Eighty-first Congress, 
which states in part : 

Sec. 5. (a) When a Communist organization, as defined in paragraph (5) of 
section 3 of this title, is registered or there is in effect a final order of the Board 
requiring such organization to register, it shall be unlawful — 

(1) For any member of such organization, with knowledge or notice that 
such organization is so registered or that such order has become final : 

(A) In seeking, accepting, or holding any nonelective office or employment 
under the United States, to conceal or fail to disclose the fact that he is a 
member of such organization ; or 

(B) To hold any nonelective office or employment under the United 
States ; or 



88 ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

(C) In seeking, accepting, or holding employment in any defense facility, 
to conceal or fail to disclose the fact that he is a member of such organ- 
ization ; or 

(D) If such organization is a Communist-action organizaiton, to engage 
in any employment in any defense facility. 

(2) For any officer or employee of the United States or of any defense 
facility, with knowledge or notice that such organization is so registered or 
that such order has become final : 

(A) To contribute funds or services to such organization; or 

(B) To advise, counsel, or urge any person, with knowledge or notice that 
such person is a member of such organization to perform, or to omit to 
perform, any act if such act or ommission would constitute a violation of 
any provision of subparagraph (1) of this subsection. 

(b) The Secretary of Defense is authorized and directed to designate and 
proclaim, and from time to time revise, a list of facilities, as defined in paragraph 
(7) of section 3 of this title, with respect to the operation of which he finds and 
determines that the security of the United States requires the application of the 
provisions of subsection (a) of this section. The Secretary shall cause such list 
as designated and proclaimed, or any revision thereof, to be promptly published 
in the Federal Register, and shall promptly notify the management of any 
facility so listed ; whereupon such management shall immediately post con- 
spicuously, and thereafter while so listed keep posted, notice of such designation 
in such form and in such place or places as to give reasonable notice thereof to 
all employees of, and to all applicants for employment in, such facility. 

Paragraph 5 of section 3, referred to above, reads as follows : 

(5) The term "Communist organization" means a Communist-action organ- 
ization or a Communist-front organization. 

Paragraph 7 of section 3 referred to above reads as follows : 

(7) The term "facility" means any plant, factory, or other manufacturii g pi • 
ducing or service establishment, airport, airport facility, vessel, pier, wate T *i ~m\ 
facility, mine, railroad, public utility, laboratory, station, or other establis: 
or facility, or any part, division, or department of any of the foregoing. 'J 
term "defense facility" means any facility designated and proclaimed by 
Secretary of Defense pursuant to section 5 (b) of this title and included o;i tin 
list published and currently in effect under such subsection, and which is in f«oi 
pliance with the provisions of such subsection respecting the posting of notion 
such designation. 

The committee finds it again necessary to recommend legislation 
which would broaden the rules of admissibility of evidence. The 
security agencies are being seriously hampered in successful prosecu- 
tion of violations of our espionage and internal-security statutes by 
their inability to place into testimony evidence that has been secured 
through use of wire tapping and similar investigative techniques. 

One of the most important recommendations, in a matter which 
has been sadly lacking in the past few years, was made by the com- 
mittee on March 15, 1950, calling for the fullest cooperation between 
the legislative and executive arms of the Government in the matter 
of dealing with subversive activities. It is a tragedy that during the 
past few years this cooperation has been for the most part one-sided 
in that it was only congressional committees which were furnishing 
information to agencies of the executive branch. Tl 
demonstration of the benefits of such cooperation is 
William Walter Remington in which, through the sole 
efforts of this committee, sufficient information was secur 
the executive branch to obtain an indictment against Rem 

The committee further recommends that it be made a ci 
person or persons to unauthorizedly transport in intersta 
any Government document falling within a secret, coni 
stricted, or top-secret classification. 



ANNUAL REPORT, COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 89 

It is also recommended that the Civil Service Act be amended to 
provide that Government employees under the Civil Service Act who 
are employed in the United States or Territories must be citizens of 
the United States or owe allegiance to the United States. 



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