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Full text of "Annual Report January 1st, 1902"

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Doylcstown, Pa. 




GEO. W. KNADLER, Mgr. and Treas. 






CLEANEST BAKERY IN AMERICA 



1113, 1115, 1117, 1119 Spring Garden Street 



Quality — Best 
Q uantity — Q reatest 
Price — Lowest 
Bakery — Cleanest 



nCeiSTERtO PATENT OFFICE 



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WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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A Piano is usually bought on faith. 
You can't take it apart, so you examine 
the case critically, ask if the keys are 
real ivor}?', play it and take the sales- 
man's word for it. He may not know- 
more about it than you do. It's 
~^^^ / different here. 

^VtlOv A Jury of Tone Experts 

examine and test each piano in our 
arerooms and tell you just what it is, on a'certiiicate sealed 
to its back. This with our lo-year guarantee and our strict 
one-price system has given a degree of safety to piano buying 
not enjoyed elsewhere. 



C.J.HEPPE&SONC 



Three 
Stores 



) 1 115= II 17 Chestnut 
^ 6th and Thompson 



PIANOS AND EVERYTHING MUSICAL. 



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Main Building. 



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AT WORK IN THE FIELD. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportjanu1902doyl 



The National Farm School 

Doylestown, Pa. 

ANNUAL REPORT 

January ist, 1902. 



Board of Directors* 



President, RABBI JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. I). 

122 West Manheiin Street, Germantown, Pa. 

Vice-President, HERMAN JONAS. 

Treasurer, FRANK H. BACHMAN, 119-123 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia. 

Secretary, Geo. W. Lehman, 931 Chestnut Street, Room 309, Philadelphia. 



Sidney Aloe, 
Frank H. Bachmak, 
Jamejs L. Branson, 
Adolph Eichholz, 
Adolph Grant, 



DIRECTORS. 

Herman Jonas, 
Morris A. Kaufmann, 
Joseph Krauskopf, 
M. H. Lichten, 
Samuel D. Lit, 



Howard A. Loeb, 
H. M. Nathanson, 
Isaac H. Silverman, 
Benj. F. Teller. 



AUXILIARY 

CALIFORNIA. 
Sacramento — H. Weinstock. 

COLORADA. 
Denver — Solomon Holzman. 

C0NNE(;TICUT. 

JS'ew Haven — Jacob Newman. 

GEORGIA. 

Atlanta — S. Landauer. 

ILLINOIS. 

Chicago — Leon Mandel. 

INDIANA. 

IiidianapoUs — Abe Weiler. 

IOWA. 

Davenport — David Rothschild. 

KANSAS. 
Leavenworth — Bernard Flesher. 

KENTUCKY. 

Louisville — Bernard Bernlieim. 

LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans — Isidor Hernsheim 

MARYLAND. 

Baltimore — Dr. S. L. Frank. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Boston — Godfrey Morse, Esq. 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City — Sol. Block. 



NATIONAL BOARD, 

MISSISSIPPI. 
NutcJtez — Henry Frank. 

NEW MEXICO. 
Santa Fe — B. Seligman. 

NEW YORK. 

New York — Nathan Straus. 

OHIO. 
Cincinnati — Benj. Pritz. 

OREGON. 
Portland — Benj. Selling. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Pittsburgh — A. Leo Weil, Ei^q 

TENNESSEE. 

Nasliville — Josef Koorts. 

TEXAS. 
Dallas — Philip Sanger. 

UTAH. 

Salt Lake City — Simon Bamberger. 

VIRGINIA. 
Richmond— Sol. Binswanger. 

WISCONSIN. 
Milwaukee — L. L. Tabor. 

CANADA. 
Montreal.— B. A. Boas, Esq. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Adolph Eichholz, Cliairman, 

Mohris Kaufmann, I. H. Silverman, Sidney Aloe, James L. Branson. 

Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, (Ex-Officio.) 



Faculty of I90L 



ERNEST E. FAVILLE, M. S. A., Dean, 

Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture. 

EOGER MARR ROBERTS, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Agriculture, Superintendent of Farm. 

MYRON 0. TRIPP, B. Sc, A. B., 

Professor of History and Mathematics, 

WILLIS T. POPE, B. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Superintendent of the Grounds. 

CLARANCE J. BROWN, 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

W. G. BENNER, V. S., 

Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene. 

FRANK SCHWARTZLANDER, Jr., M. D., 
Professor of Physiology. 



PHYSICIANS. 



De. SAMUEL J. GITTELSON, 

Dr. SCHWARTZLANDER, 

Dr. M. GREENBAUM. 



STUDENTTS. 



Name. 



SENIORS. 

BuRD, Louis 

GOI,DMAN, J 

Heller, Chas. . . . 

MiTZMAN, M 

Newman, A 

Berlin, Wm. j. . . . 

JUNIORS. 

BoROViK, Geo. S. . . 
HiRSCHowaTz, Louis . 

SOPHOMORES 

Goldman, M. , 
Lee, Elmore . 
Levy, M. ... 
moxblatt, a. . 
Sadler, Harry 
Zalinger, Bernie 

FRESHMEN. 

FiNKLE, Samuel - . 

Freides, a 

HiRSCH, Harry . . 
Kysela, Rudolph . 
Klein, Julian M. . 
Malish, Max . . . 
Newstadt, S. ... 
Ratner, Jacob . . 
Rosenblatt, S. . . 
Shaw, Geo. A. . . 



Residence. 



Ocxupation at Time of Admission 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chicago, 111. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Chicago, 111. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alliance, N. J. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Chicago, 111. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chicago, 111. 

New York, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chicago, 111. 
New York, N. Y, 
Schuyler, Neb. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Woodbine, N. J. 
Eliot, Me. 



Employed in Cloak Factory. 

Cigar Making. 

Employed in Stationery Store» 

Stock Boy. 

Attending School. 

Attending School. 

Clerk in Mercantile Agency, 
Employed in Cloak House. 

Tailoring. 
Attending School. 
Attending School. 
Attending School. 
Attending School. 
Stock Boy. 

Attending School. 
Attending School. 
Clerk in Clothing House. 
Attending School. 
Attending School. 
Operatorin Men's Shirt Factory 
Employed in Millinery Store. 
Clerk in Cigar Store. 
Electrician. 
Attending: School. 



'// 



Course of Study and Program — 1902, 



WINTER TERM, 1902— TWELVE WEEKS. 

Thursday, January Qtli. — Winter Term begins. 

Friday, February I4tli. — Mid Term Examinations. 

Thursday and Friday, March 20th and 21st. — Examinations at close 
of Winter Term. 



SPRING TERM, 1902— ELEVEN WEEKS. 

Friday, April 25th. — Mid Term Examinations. 

Thursday and Friday, June 5th and 6th. — Examination at close of 
Spring Term. 

June 7th to September 12th. — Industrial Period. 



FALL TERM. J902. 

Wednesday, September loth.— Examinations for Admission. 

Tuesday, Septepiber i6th. — School Year begins. 

Friday, October 24th. ^Mid Term Examinations. 

Thursday and Friday, December 20th and 21st. — Examinations at 
close of Winter Term. 

Friday, January 9th, 1903. — Winter Term begins. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



The course of study covers a period of four years 
thorough training in practical and scientific agriculture, 
jects as they occur in the respective years. 

First Year. 



FALL TERM. 

Algebra, 5* 

English, 5 

Farm Practice, ... 3 
Practical Agriculture 2 
Freehand Dravying, . 2^ 
Military Drill, . . . 4t 
Industrial, . . . . . 5 



FALL TERM. 

Geometry, 5 

Physics, 5 

Soils and Soil Manage- 
ment, 5 

Botany, 3 

Theme Writing, ... 2 

Elocution, 1 

Military Drill, .... 4 
Industrial, 5 



FALL TERM, 

Farm Drainage, ... 3 

Road Making 2 

Analytical Chemistry, 5 
Hoticulture, 5 

a) Vegetable Garden- 

ing. 

b) Small Fruit Culture 

Rhetoric, 5 

Elocution, 1 

Industrial, 5 



WINTER TERM. 

Algebra, 5 

English, 5 

Agriculture, . . . 
Bookkeeping, , . 
Freehand Drawing 
Military Drill, . . 



Industrial, 5 

Second Year. 

WINTER TERM. 

Hygiene of Farm 

Animals, 3 

General History, . . 5 
Greenhouse Manage- 
ment, 3 

Dairying, 3 

Laboratory, .... 2 
Chemistry, 

a) Class Work, . . 5 

b) Laboratory, , . 2h 
Military Drill, ... 4" 
Industrial, 5 

Third Year. 

WINTER TERM. 

Stock Feeding, ... 5 
Agricultural Chemis- 
try, 5 

19th Century History 5 

Botany, 3 

Dairying, 2 

Industrial, 5 



FALL TERM. 

Agricultural Bacteri- 
ology, .5 

ComparativeAnatomy 5 

Horticulture, .... 5 
a) Floriculture. 
6) Landscape Gar- 
dening. 

Literature, 5 

Industrial, 5 

* The figures denote the number of hours per week, 
t Omitted during summer months. 



Fourth Year. 

WINTER TERM. 

Veterinary Science, . 5 
Horticulture, .... 3 
Agricultural Physics, 2 

Agriculture, 5 

Dairying, 3 

Industrial, 5 



and is designed to give a 
Following are the sub- 



SPRING TERM. 

Geometry, 5 

English, 5 

Live Stock, ..... 3 

Botany, 2 

Military Drill, .... 4 
Industrial, 5 



SPRING TERM. 

Agriculture, .... 5 
Breeds and Breeding 5 
Physiology, .... 3 
Chemistry, 

a) Class, 5 

b) Laboratory, . . 2J 
Military Drill, ... 4 
Industrial, 5 



SPRING TERM. 

Geology, 5 

Botany, 2 

Laboratory, 1 

Economic Entomolo- 
gy, 5 

Zoology, 3 

Industrial, 5 



SPRING TERM. 

Agricultural Econom- 
ics, 2 

Horticulture, .... 3 
Field Crops and Farm 
Management, ... 3 

Botany, 3 

Agriculture, 5 

Thesis, 5 

Industrial, 5 



The course of instnictioii is so arranged as to permit a student to give special 
attention to lines to which lie seems best fitted. The course is designed to teach 
the sciences that underlie practical agriculture, together with sutiicient English, 
mathematics, literature and such other supplementary studies as will sustain both 
scientific antl practical agriculture, thereby raising the agricultural student to the 
intellectual level of the educated. The agricultural instruction is given by means 
of lectures, text books, and practical work in the fields, barns and dairy. Starting 
with the first year student who has had liltle if any agricultural training, the 
course is so constructed as to build up a systematic agricultural education so that, 
the graduate will have passed through all of the phases of farm work, from the 
fundamental principles to the most advanced. The instruction in class-room, 
supplemented by field work, takes up the improved methods used in the various 
operations of farming, such as the use of farm machinery, treatment of soils, value- 
of fertilizers, management of crops, feeding and caring for stock, dairy operations 
(including butter and cheese making), poultry keeping, study of breeds and 
breeding,' diseases of plants and animals, the study of chemistry in its apphcatiou 
to agriculture, insects in their relation to farm crops, gardens and fruit trees, green- 
house and nursery work, vegetable and truck gardening, small fruits and land- 
scape gardening. Special attention is given to industrial work. Five hours per 
day during the school period are devoted to industrials in carrying on field opera- 
tions and laboratory work in gi'eenhouses, dairy and chemistry. 

During the summer months the entire period is devoted to industrial work. 



GENERAL EQUIPMENT. 

The farm consists of 122 acres of exceedingly fertile land, all of which is till- 
able, making it possible to carry on diversified farming, so essential to the instruc- 
tion given in the various subjects considered. The farm also contains several 
acres of timber land affording three fine groves. The farm is well stocked with 
thoroughbred and grade stock. The buildings for grain, stock and machinery 
are ample. Improved tools and implements are in general use. The dairy build- 
ing is thoroughly equipped with modern machinery for carrying on dairy opera- 
tions. A model horse and dairy barn has been added during the past year. On 
the ground may be found vegetable and truck gardens, orchards and nursery 
grounds, these together with the greenhouses make practical industrial work in 
horticulture possible throughout the entire year. 

The main building is fitted up with dormitory rooms, class rooms, library, 
reception rooms, dining rooms and offices, and is lighted by gas and heated by 
steam. The buildings are supplied with spring water. The library contains 
several hundred volumes and a reading file of the leading daily papers and agri- 
cultural journals. Illustrative material for class room and field work is being 
constantly added. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The maintenance of good behavior and order in the dormitories and about 
the buildings is strictly adhered to. Detail and industrial work must be 
thoroughly and carefully done. Students failing to conform to the rules and 
regulations of the institution will be immediately dismissed. 



DAILY PROGRAM. 

The following is the program for each day except Saturday, Sunday and 
Monday during the school period: 

5.30 A. M., Rising Bell. 12.15 P. M., Dinner. 

5.45 A. M., Details. 1.00 to 5.00 P. M., Industrials. 

6.30 A. M., Inspection of Rooms. 5.00 P. M., Details. 

7.15 A. M., Drill. 6.00 P. M., Supper. 

8.00 A. M., Chapel. 7 00 to 9.00 P. M., Study Period. 

8.15 A. M. to 12 M., Class Exercises. 9.45 P. M., Retiring. 

Meeting of Farm School Literary Society takes place every Saturday at 7.30 
P. M. Monday is devoted entirely to industrial work. 

For further information address the Dean of the National Farm School, 
Doylestown, Pa. • 



Regulations Governing the Admission of Students. 

1. An applicant for admission must be between 15 and 21 years of age. 
(His mental and physical development must be such as ensure liis being able to 
pursue the advanced studies and to perform the industrial work.) 

2. He must pass a thorough entrance examination completing the common 
branches equivalent to the entrance examination into the High School. 

3. An applicant must be in good health. A physician's certificate, accord- 
ing to the form prescribed by the Directors, must accompany the application. 
Where practicable, a physician will be designated near the residence of the appli- 
cant, from whom such certificate must be obtained. 

4. An applicant must be of good moral character and able and willing to 
perform hard out-door work. Satisfactory references must accompany the appli- 
cation, and wherever practicable, the recommendations must be submitted by the 
applicant to be endorsed by the member of the Auxiliary Board representing the 
State in which such applicant resides. 

5. Preference will be given to the applications of graduates of Orphan 
Asylums, or other like charitable institutions. The number of admissions will be 
dependent upon the annual income of the School. Applications will be considered 
in the order in which they are received. 

6. A limited number of pay students will be accepted at a charge of |;200 per 
annum, payable semi-annually in advance. In lieu of this fee, the Directors will 
accept the written pledge of a sufficient number of reliable persons agreeing to 
contribute annually, for four years, membership dues to the amount of |;20c. (The 
dues are as follows: — Friends, 125.00 per annum; Patrons, $10.00 per annum; 
Members, fc.oo per annum.) 

It is estimated that the charge of $200 per annum will merely cover the ex- 
penses of the student's maintenance. 

7. When an applicant shall have been notified that his application has been 
favorably acted upon, he must come to Doylestown, Pennsylvania, at his own ex- 
pense, and must come provided with seasonable clothing for one year. 

The outfit must consist of one heavy overcoat, one suit for Sabbath wear, one 
school suit, two pairs of working shoes, one pair gum boots, one pair of slippers, 
three suits of heavy underwear, three suits of light underwear, one dozen pairs of 
socks (J^ dozen light, ^ dozen heavy), one half dozen collars, two pairs cuffs, two 
bosom shirts, six working shirts (two winter, four summer), three night shirts, one 
dozen handkerchiefs, two pairs of overalls, two blouses, one hair brush and comib, 
one tooth brush, one umbrella, three neckties, one hat for Sabbath wear and one 
■working hat. The articles of clothing will be marked by the institution. 

8. The receptacle for a student's personal effects must not exceed in size, 
that of an ordinary steamer trunk. 

9. Before any student shall be admitted, his parents or guardian must release 
all control over him from the time of his entrance until his completion of the four 
years' course, or until such prior time as he may, in the discretion of the Board, be 
discharged therefrom. Such parents or guardian must also waive all claim for 
compensation for services which he may render in or about the school or the farm 
thereunto belonging. 

This Regulation is made in order to enable the Board to encourage the 
student in the pursuit of his studies and to protect him against any possible ill- 
advised interference of relatives. 

io. Applications should be made at least two months before September ist, 
the opening of the school year. Such applications should be sent to the Dean of 
the institution, Doylestown, Pa., who will furnish list of examination questions. 



Annual Meeting. 



Grounds of the National Farm School, 
DoYivESTOWN, Pa., Sunday, October 6, 1901. 

The Fifth Annual Meeting and Pilgrimage of the National 
Parm Sciiool was participated in by about one hundred members 
:aiid friends. 

The meeting was called to order at 10.45 ^- ^^- ^Y ^^^^ Presi- 
-dent, Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., in the Ida M. Block Memorial 
Chapel. Prayer was offered by Rev. Henry M. Fisher, of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

On motion of Mr, Eichholz, the minutes of the last annual 
meeting having been published, were ordered approved without 
Teading. 

President, Rev. Dr. Krauskopf presented his annual report, 
<:op\- of which is herewith appended, Report of Dean Faville was 
received, showing the year's work in the field and class room. 
Ordered to be filed and published. Chairman Eichholz, of the 
Executive Committee, reviewed in his report the management of the 
Institution for the fiscal year, showing the total receipts to have been 
-$16,353.64; disbursements, $16,021.59, showing a balance of 
$332.05, in bank, against which there stood an indebtedness of 
.something over $2,500 00. 

The meeting was addressed by Mr. Horace J. Smith, Rev. S. 
M. Fleischman and Dr. Henry Leffman. 

The Committee on nominations, consisting of Mess, Simon L. 
Block, Ralph Blum and Sidney Aloe reported the following names 
for election to the Board of Directors to serve for three years: — 
Mess. Ely K. Selig, Harry M. Nathanson, Morris A, Kaufmannj 
Benjamin F, Teller, 1 H. Silverman, all of whom were unanimously 
elected, in addition to the following officers to serve for the ensuing 
year, President, Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, Vice-President, Herman 
Jonas. 



Report of the President. 



This is the fourth time that I have the honor of presenting to you are- 
annual report of the National Farm School on our yearly Succoth Pilgrim- 
age. 

At preceding Annual Meetings we have had records of new buildings-^ 
added and accounts of extensive improvements made. This year we have 
no new buildings to dedicate, no corner-stone to lay, no ground to break, 
no improvements to speak of, excepting the sinking of a new well and the- 
repairing of the roof and painting of the main building. 

Nor can we report additions to our Sinking Fund by bequests or en- 
dowments. Our financial struggle has been and is as hard as ever. Mr. 
Joseph Hagedorn's generous and enthusiastic action at our last Annual' 
Meeting alone saved us from placing a mortgage on our property. Yet. 
the fund raised at that time by means of his noble appeal covered less than. 
one-half of the debt floating over our head. The remainder has continued^ 
to this day, and has even increased, in spite of the most economical man- 
agement on the part of the Board. 

The noble effort made by Mr. Ralph Blum to secure financial aid for 
our institution from the State has resulted in an appropriation having been^ 
made to the amount of twenty-five hundred dollars annually for two years, but 
of that sum only a small portion has as yet been received. Hence our 
struggle must probably continue for some time, unless the public will gen- 
erously come to our aid. Even with the aid of twenty-five hundred dollars a 
year from the State, our annual income is unequal to our annual needs. 

On the other side, however, while there have been no material additions- 
to our school, while the financial struggle has been as great as ever, there has- 
been one achievement attained that gives promise of proving the long-awaited j 
favorable turning point in the history of our institution. 

Our first graduation took place on June 26th, in the presence of a large - 
and representative concourse of people. Eight young men were graduated,. 
having successfully completed their four years' course of study, and each.' 
of them to-day is following the profession taught him at our school in. 
different States of our country. The reports that have reached us of them are- 
not only creditable to th'^ young men, but also assuring to us that the work of 
our school is ably performed, and its purpose conscientiously and nobly- 
carried out. 

The Secretary of Agriculture, the Hon. James Wilson, was the guest 
of honor and the baccalaureate orator at the first graduation exercises of our 
school. He delivered an oration on that occasion that has been regarded- 
by the press throughout the land not only as a valuable state document, but 
also as a very important contribution to the science of agriculture. Excerpts- 
from that oration were published in the leading papers 01 the land, were- 
commented upon editorially, and the object of our school and the urgent 
necessity for it were spoken of in most commendatory terms. 

This first graduation of our school ought to usher in a new era in the- 
history of our institution. Up to that event there were reasonable doubts 
and fears as to whether or not the institution would be able to realize its 
hope. . There was an uncertainty, firstly, as to whether we would command 
sufficient faith in the people to furnish the means necessary to start the enter- 



prise; secondly, as to whether we would get Jewish boys to leave the crowded 
city for the purpose of taking up their abode and calling in isolated country 
districts; thirdly, even if we would succeed in keeping them there for a while, 
as to whether we would be able to keep them long enough to graduate 
them; and finally, as to whether they would enter and continue to follow 
their profession after their graduation. 

The enterprise being new, the Jew having been forced by persecutions 
to abstain from his original pursuit of agriculture for eighteen hundred years 
and more, there was good reason for entertaining such fears, and it required 
no small amount of faith to proceed in the face of all the ominous prophecies 
of failures that were very frequently and very liberally made. 

We secured money for starting; we have built up this goodly plant; we 
have secured enough of Jewisli boys for four graded classes, kept and taught 
the first class for four years at this institution, graduated them, sent them 
out into the world, Avhere they are this day following their profession suc- 
cessfully and enthusiastically. 

Ail ominous predictions having thus far proven false, all fears having 
been allayed, the need for such institutions as ours having been recognized, 
there is no longer a just reason why that larger support that we have all 
along needed, and that we have all along endeavored to deserve, should 
not now come to us. If it be now denied us, we must account for it only 
on the ground that the Jewish people do not favor agricultural pursuits, and 
therefore do not care to contribute towards the maintenance of an institu- 
tion for the practical and scientific teaching of agriculture. But we cannot 
believe this to be the truth. If ever there was a time when the mind of the 
Jew should be directed towards agricultural pursuits, it is the present. Dis- 
content among the laboring people is rampant, and here and there breaks out 
in anarchy. That some of our people are tinged with that disease we know 
only to our sorrow. Much of it is due to the miserable lives tliese people 
are compelled to eke out in th filthy sweatshops and in the overcrowded 
tenement, districts. Physical weakness among overcrowded laboring people 
breeds mental feebleness and physical ill health, and physical filth breeds moral 
disease. Double rations of toil and misery and want, with scarce half a ration 
of healthy food and air, make men malcontents first, pessimists next, and 
finally anarchists, if they do not cut them ofif before by means of consump- 
tion. 

A cure to be effective must be radical. A lessening of the congestion in 
the labor markets will assure better wages for those who remain, and greater 
physical and moral health to those who depart. Such a lessening of the 
congestion can be made possible only by scattering some of the surplus 
laboring people as agriculturists over our country, where there is work and 
labor and health and contentment for all of them. 

The government of the United States had a very clear conception of 
this difficulty, and is now more than ever looking towards a radical cure of 
existing evils. Its Agricultural Department having taken a special interest 
in our school, has, both by official speech and official report, expressed its 
approval of the work done by us, and has now in its employ one* of the 
graduates of our school, with whose efforts it is more than pleased. 



*NoTE— Since the presentation of this report, the Agricultural Department of the United 
States Goverument has sent for another graduate of the National Farm School to conduct 
Tobacco Experimentations in the State of Ccnnecticut. 



Mr. Robert Watchhorn, of the Immigration Bureau, the gentleman who 
■some few years ago was sent to Roumania by our government for the purpose 
of studying the cause of the immigration of the Roumanian Jews to our 
country, wrote us: 

"It is a well-worn truism that millions of hands want acres, and mil- 
lions of acres want hands. He who can satisfy both of these wants will go far 
towards appeasing unnecessary but none the less painful hunger, leading to the 
amelioration of those sad conditions which are as blight and mildew in the 
verj- centres of our highest order of civilization." 

This is one of the aims of the National Farm School. It is our special 
purpose to educate leaders of agricultural colonies, heads of farm settlements, 
who shall be of that very people, share their fairh, speak their tongue, under- 
stand their nature and disposition, and therefore have the best possible chance 
to deal with them successfully. There have been failures in the past, but these 
failures have been due to causes which such a school as ours can best ob- 
viate. Colonies of Jewish people who have been removed from agricultural 
pursuits, and from hard outdoor labor for centuries, to be successful must 
have thoroughly trained Jewish agriculturists as heads, who, properly under- 
standing limitations, can shape conditions to circumstances. For such lead- 
erships our graduates are now fitting themselves. All of them are at the 
present time employed on farms or in dairies, as managers or assistant man- 
agers. While their present positions will prove to them excellent perfecting 
schools, they must by no means be regarded as having attained the end sought 
at this school. The object of this school is not merely to provide a certain 
number of boys with an agricultural trade, and to be done with them when 
positions have been found for them. It is after their graduation that our 
higher interest in students of this school must really begin. The training of 
these boys is but a means towards a certain de'finite end — that end being the 
physical and moral redemption of many of our people, now utterly demoral- 
ized in the modern sweatshop and ghetto. By colonization or other, methods 
that shall restore them to the soil their physical and moral health will likewise 
be restored. | While we may be proud of the fact that we train boys suf- 
ficiently able to be employed by our government in its Agricultural Depart- 
ment, it would be a cause of yet greater pride to see our graduates at the 
head of Jewish agricultural settlements, realizing the main purpose for which 
this school was founded. It is for this reason that I should like to see more 
and more of our graduates take positions wherever possible with Jewish 
land-owners near cities of large Jewish settlements — a fact that is recognized 
and heartily recommended by Mr. I. W. Bernheim, of Louisville, Ky., who has 
in his employ one* of our graduates, with whose progress he expresses his 
fullest satisfaction, and whom, before very long, he will probably make the 
head of a little Jewish agricultural settlement in the vicinity of Louisville. 
Likewise, another Jewish agricultural settlement is to be started within the 
very near future under the leadership of one of our graduates, at Paducah, Ky. 
There is one fact in this connection that has forced itself upon my atten- 
t'ion which I am in duty bound to bring to your notice. To be enabled to 
graduate our students at an age old enough to possess necessary physical 
and intellectual capacity, we are obliged to defer the admission of boys to 



*NOTE— Since presentation of this report, Mr. I. W. Bernheim, being pleased with the 
graduate of u'lr Kami School, has advanced him to the position of Manager of his estate and has 
given the uosition of .Assistant Manager to another of our graduates 



13 

our school till Ihcy are about sixteen years of age, and till they are ready for 
a high school examination, so that when we graduate them, four years later, 
they may be capable of filling positions of some responsibility. By far the 
largest number of applications for admission to our school, however, come 
froln boys who arc about thirteen years of age, who have not yet completed 
their grammar school training, and who, owing to their youth, are physically 
too weak to do much of the necessary hard outdoor work, not having been 
trained to it, like the ordinary farmer's boy, from earliest childhood. Denied 
admission at thirteen, deferred till they are sixteen, for the most part obliged 
by poverty to do som.ething for their livelihood, they drift into the sweatshop 
or into trading and become lost to agriculture. 

Ought not provision be made for such boys as these? Ought we not to 
have a three years' preparatory course in light practical agriculture for boys 
of thirteen and upward, as well as a practical and scientific course of training 
for boys of sixteen? Would not such a division of courses afford an oppor- 
tunity to boys who intellectually are not highly endowed to lit themselves 
for successful farm hands, while giving the more highly endowed a chance 
to become farm heads? Inasmuch as both are needed, trained farm hands 
as well as trained farm heads, provision ought to be made for both at our 
school, and the necessity of turning away dozens of young lads .who apply to 
us for admission ought to be obviated. But here enters our great besetting 
trouble. To make such a course possible would require larger dormitory ac- 
commodations, a larger household, larger expenditures, when at the present 
time we have not enough means for one course, with even a limited number of 
pupils. We have the will to provide this greatly needed course. We have 
the pupils. But we lack the means, the means which the people possess, but 
which we do not know how to secure. Would that some kindly disposed 
friend might tell us to-day how to obtain them! 

- But to return to the subject from which we have somewhat digressed. 
There is yet another reason why we believe that we ought now to receive 
larger financial support than hitherto. The fact that, besides allaying, by 
reason of the agricultural positions now creditably tilled by our graduates, 
the fears hitherto entertained as to whether or not they would follow agri- 
culture, besides the strong governmental recognition our school has merited 
by reason of its efficiency, we have at last secured the official endorsement 
of our work by the Central Conference of American Rabbis, representing, 
more than one hundred and fifty Rabbis from all parts of our country, who, 
upon the grounds of the National Farm School, on July 4t"n, amid enthusias- 
tic speeches concerning the noble purpose of our school and its magnificent 
work done, unanimously passed resolutions endorsing the "wise purpose and 
far-reaching philanthropic scope of this undertaking," and resolving to in- 
terest their respective congregations, in their annual Succoth sermons, in the 
national character of this institution, and to plead for the more generous co- 
operation and larger support so richly deserved from every Jewish community 
in the land. 

Besides these endorsements, there have been quite a number of individual 
expressions of the highest commendation by heads of charitable institutions, 
professors of agriculture, students of political and social science, and editors, 
there being but one unanimous sentiment among them all, that the school is one 
of the noblest philanthropies of the age, that it fills a most urgent need, that it 
is a solution of one of the most vexing of social problems, that it is one 



14 

of the regenerators of society, and a deadly foe to the sweatshop and to the 
disease- and vice- and crime-breeding tenement districts of our larger cities. 

These letters, interesting reading though they would make, I have not 
the time to-day to read to you, but they are filed among the archives of -our 
institution and easily accessible, if any of you care to peruse them. 

Our membership has grown from the number of 858 last year to the num- 
ber of 891 at the present time. Our income since our last Annual Meeting till 
October ist, 1901, from dues, donations, life memberships, donation from 
Hebrew Charity Ball, and an instalment of $625 from the State appropriation, 
amounts to $11,736.03, against $13,253,33 the preceding year, showing a falling 
off in annual income of $1,518.30 compared with the preceding year, in reality 
even more, considering that we have hitherto shown an annual increase. This 
falling off in income of $1,518.30 is attributable to our recently organized 
Federation of Charities, very many people being under the impression that the 
National Farm School is included in the distribution of its funds, and that by 
contributing in bulk to the Federation they at the same time contribute a 
share toward the support of the National Farm School. It is evident that either 
the Federation of Charities must include us in its distributions or the public 
must be properly and speedily informed that we are excluded. 

There have been a number of donations of implements, stock, fertilizer, 
wearing apparel, household goods and other things that have been very help- 
ful to our institution. To the private thanks that have already been sent to the 
kind donors I desire to add here our public thanks. 

One loss the National Farm School has sustained that has been unfor- 
utnate, and which, we trust, may serve as a timely lesson to some of its 
friends who intend to remember it in their last wills. Mr. Simon Rice, of 
Scranton, Pa., a warm friend of the institution, remembered the school in his 
last testament to the amount of some fifteen thousand dollars, which action, 
however, is nullified by the fact that Mr. Rice's death occurred a few days 
after the drawing up of the will, the laws of the State requiring the lapse of at 
least a month between the making of the will and the death of its maker. This 
miscarriage of Mr. Rice's good intentions is especially unfortunate at this 
present crisis in the history of our institution, inasmuch as such a sum would 
have put the institution fairly on its feet and enabled it to make some of those 
necessary improvements that have long been urgent, such as the enlargement 
of the dormitory, the building of a modest little manual training shop, for the 
training of the students in the handling of elementary mechanical tools for 
farm carpentering, harness mending, wagon repairing and the like, also for the 
increase of the library of our institution. 

This matter of the library ought to receive your most serious considera- 
tion. The boys of the school are entirely dependent upon it for their intellec- 
tual food. They are many miles from the city and far removed from public 
libraries. The limited number of books provided a few years ago by the con- 
tribution of the "Sadie Bash Memorial Alcove" has served its purpose and has 
served it well. There is, however, a need of more books, and of a larger va- 
riety of them, more especially of such as deal with the science and practice 
of agriculture and other kindred sciences, which are as necessary for these 
boys' minds as implements are for their hands, and ought therefore to receive 
the same attention. 

Here is an opportunity for some one to prove himself a real benefactor 
of our institution and to connect his or her name with a department that 



15 

shall not only redound to their lasting credit, but shall also prove of material 
lielp to our pupils. 

The revenue from our farm continues to be limited. To a large extent we 
raise the products consumed in our Farm School household, which last year 
-amounted in value to about $1,200. In addition to this, the sale of products 
■during the past year has amounted to $1,027.50. 

Of course, our farm revenues could be considerably increased if our plant 
were larger. It is to be remembered that all the work is done by the boys, 
one-half of whose time is spent in the school-room. At first very little profit- 
able field work can be had from boys, owing to their inexperience and lack 
of strength. Then, again, the limited acreage of land under cultivation, the 
small herd of cattle available for dairy purposes, and our insufficient green- 
house capacity, allow but a very limited supply to be marketed. We could 
■easily find a market for a dozen times as much butter and vegetables and 
flowers, if we had but the accommodations and means for raising and pro- 
•ducing them. 

Our two greenhouses last year, besides serving the boys as a school of 
instruction, which requires the raising of many a plant for which there is no 
market value, brought last year $247.44, which is $147.44 in excess of the cost 
•of coal for running the furnaces. 

The faculty of the school, under the direction of our efficient dean, has 
undergone some changes during the past year. 

Messrs. Eckles and Jackson resigned their respective positions for the 
purpose of entering upon larger fields of work, our school being unable to pay 
the salaries their capacities merited. But T am very glad to be able to report 
to 3'ou that their positions are filled by very able instructors, one by Professor 
Roger M. Roberts, of Cornell University, a son of Dean Isaac P. Roberts, 
■of Cornell University, who ranks as one of the leading authorities on agricul- 
tural subjects in this country. The other professor, Myron O. Tripp, professor 
of English and mathematics, is a graduate of the Indiana University, and has 
taken a post graduate course in the Michigan State Agricultural College. 

By the aid of the personal expense of a friend of the mstitution, and at 
"the solicitation of the Hon. James Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture, Professor 
Brown, of the Ames (Iowa) Agricultural College, came to our school last 
^spring to give a three months' special course of instruction to the graduating 
■class in agricultural chemistry. 

The moral and religious welfare of the students has been conscientiously 
looked after. Chapel exercises are held every morning, and a religious service 
is held, during the regular school sessions, on Saturday afternoons, at which 
^ sermon is preached or an address on some moral subject delivered by some 
Tninister or educator or representative man. - 

The discipline of the boys during the past year has, in the main, been very 
satisfactory, although the Board was obliged to suspend two of its boys and to 
■expel a third, owing to repeated misdemeanors and disobedience. One of the 
ioys resigned. 

Friends of the institution have been very kind to the boys during the 
past year as during previous years, having entertained them in various homes 
during the Holy Days and during their vacation. A number of young people 
from Philadelphia entertained them at the school on Purim, and an outing of 
several days was afforded the boys at Sea Girt, during the summer, through 
the kindness of Mr. J. Banford Samuels. 



i6 

Our special thanks are due to Dr. Samuel J. Gittelson, Dr. Schwartzlander 
and Dr. Grecnbaum for professional services rendered to our pupils, and also 
to Mr. S. Lubin for contributions of eye-glasses prescribed for our boys. 

The Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Annex Farms of the National Farm 
School, for which Mr. Max Schoenfeld, of Rorschach, Switzerland, donated 
^10,000 a year ago, have not yet been purchased, the Board having deemed it 
advisable to have the first graduates acquire a little larger experience in their 
present positions, under their present employers, before entrusting to them 
the entire management of model farms with the hope of making a success 
of them. It is to be hoped, however, that within a year from now these farms 
shall have been purchased, some of our graduates located upon them, and one 
of our future annual Succoth Pilgrimages made to them, there to inspect with-, 
our own eyes the independent results of the training of this school. 

For the first time in the history of our institution, it is my painful duty 
to record the loss, by death, of one of the founders of this institution, its- 
first treasurer and for a number of years one of its most active Bo3rd mem- 
bers, Mr. Morris M. Newman, whose ashes have been deposited within their 
last resting-place this very morning. In Mr. Newman we have lost a valuable 
friend, one who was ever ready with his counsel, time and means, whenever 
this young and struggling institution had need of them, and which at one time 
was quite frequent. Our Board honored itself as much as it honored the mem- 
ory of its former co-laborer when it ordered, at a special meeting, that a. 
Page of Sorrow be consecrated to his memory on the records of our institu- 
tion, and that a tree be planted to his lasting memory on Arbor Day next 
spring, on these grounds, which were so dear to his heart. 

Members and friends of the National Farm School, I shall not prolongf.- 
this report. I have probably taken already more of your time than I should. 
and yet have not said all I might. It is a serious work we are doing here, a. 
grander, a nobler, a more historic work than many of us realize as yet. This- 
institution is but in its infancy. When these little memorial trees around us, 
that are annually planted on these grounds on Arbor Day by friends of the 
National Farm School, or in memory of friends of the school, shall stand 
in the pride and glory of their vigor, and shall spread their shade and dispense 
their invigorating fragrance far and wide, an appreciative posterity will speak 
of us as benefactors, as men and women who builded wiser than even they 
themselves knew, whose labor deserved to be remembered, and v/hose mem- 
ory deserves to be blessed. 

JOSEPH KRA.USKOPF. 




Ida M. block Mha\orial Chapel. 




Zadok M. Eisner Chemical Lahowaiory. 



17 

Report of the Executive Committee. 



PhiIvADEI/Phia, October 6th, 1901. 

To the Members of the National Farm School: 

The Executive Couiinittee of the Board of Directors submits the 
following report of the operations of the school frpm the closing of the books on 
October ist, 1900, until the closing of the books on October ist, 1901. 

RECEIPTS. 

r^ues, I5.319 50 

General Donations of Cash, 4,680 53 

Special Donation from Phila. Hebrew Charity Ball Assoc'n, 500 oo 

Tuitions 484 50 

Scholarships, including Income from Lewisohu Scholarship 

Trust, 1,000 00 

Interest on Schoenfeld Trust Fund, 300 10 

Life Memberships, 600 00 

Farm Products, 6c;5 71 

Greenhouse and Garden Produce, 275 29 

Board, 3 '5 44 

Interest on Deposits, 17 57 ;. 

From the State of Pennsylvania, 625 00 

Loan, 800 CO 

Special Guaranty of Mr. Jos. Hagedorn, 800 00 



$16,323 64 



SAMUEL LEWISOHN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP. 



$5000 Philadelphia & Reading General 4% Bonds @ 95)^ 14,775 co 

I year's Interest paid to General Fund, 200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries— Faculty $4,477 86 

Secretary and Clerical Services, 664 00 

Wages, Household Help, Farm Foreman and 

Extra Help, 1,355 ^3 

Meats and Groceries, 1,872 84 

Light, Power and Heat, including Greenhouses,- 873 82 

Students' Wearing Apparel, 796 90 

Fertilizers, etc., 549 43 

School Supplies, 195 59 

Library, , 72 70 

Feed and Farm Expense, 838 49 

Printing, Postage and Stationery 352 09 

Printing Annual Catalog and Postage, 261 25 

Interest on Special Loan, 8 00 

Insurance 15 years), 184 60 

Express, Freight, Transportation, Telephone and Telegrams, 

and Sundry Expense, ■ . . . . 1,175 4^ 

Improvements to Buildings, 242 58 

Repairs " '' 782 70 

Digging Well and Repairing Pump, 2ro 40 

Household Goods and Furnishings, 268 83 

Repairs to Machinery and Implements, . 160 05 

Repayment to Jos. Hagedorn on Account of Special Guaranty 420 00 

Deficit last year, 178 10 

$'5 991 59 

Balance in Bank, 332 05 

$1^323 64 



iS 

LIVE STOCK ON FARM AT PRESENT. 

Milch Cows, 13 Chickens 250 

Bulls, 2 Ducks, 9 

Calves, 5 Pigeons, 100 

Hogs and Pigs, 15 Sheep, 21 

Horses, 6 ' 

All stock are of good strains and well bred. 

The following is the data regarding students during the past year between 
October ist, 1900, and October ist, 1901: 
8 Graduates. 
6 Seniors. 
2 Juniors. 

6 Sophomores. 

7 Freshmen are now in attendance. 11 are eligible to admission and will 
arrive at tlie institution within 10 days. Other applicants are taking the entrance 
examination and the new class will contain probably 15 to 20 new members. Two 
students have been dismissed. 

Since the last annual meeting Mr. Max Schoenfeld signed the deed of trust 
relating to The Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farms and paid over the sum of 
]f[0,ooo therein mentioned. The carrying into effect of the terms of the trust has 
given us very serious concern, but we have not yet been able to make the invest- 
ment contemplated by Mr. Schoenfeld. The intention of the donor as expressed 
in the terms of the trust is that the money shall be invested in two farms in the 
vicinity of the City of Philadelphia, so as to enable the tenants to readily take 
their products to the market. These farms were to be leased successively to 
graduates of our institution at low rentals, so as to permit these graduates to take 
what might be called a practical postgraduate course under the supervision of our 
instructors. It would have been impossible to place any of our graduates upon 
such farms immediately after the commencement. Summer is harvesting time 
and not the time for a new tenant to move upon a farm. Other practical difficul- 
ties presented themselves, and it was deemed wise to have all of our graduates 
obtain employment at wages. Mr. Branson has given much time and labor in the 
investigation of properties that have been offered for sale. While favorable consi- 
deration has been given to a number of pieces of land that may be regarded as 
desirable farming property, yet the locations were such that their being purchased 
for this trust would not have carried out the intention of Mr. Schoenfeld. We 
hope after we shall have succeeded in securing the farms in the proper locality, 
to place two of our graduates thereon. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph EiCHHOtz, Chairman, 

I. H. Silverman, 

Sidney Aloe, ( Executive 

Morris Kaufman, ( Counnittee. 

Jas. L. Branson, 

Joseph Krauskopf. 



19 



Report of the Dean. 



The annual report differs this year from previous reports, inasmuch as 
the institution has but recently graduated its first class of eight in number, 
who are now engaged in their chosen profession, and who are holding what, 
for young men, are good positions. While some are engaged in more or 
less of actual manual labor, we should recognize this with favor rather than 
disfavor, because the ability of the employee to prove to the employer that 
he is competent to do the manual labor as well as the mental work required 
in agriculture, places the young man on the proper road to advancement. 
Four years of work for a bright young fellow at the National Farm School 
is none too long a time to prepare h-im for his life work. Coming as he dees 
from urban pursuits, he must necessarily acquire the first principles of agri- 
culture and apply them in the field. Mere book farming has always proven a 
failure and always will. The United States Department of Agriculture has 
been quick to recognize the importance of a thorough grounding in manual 
work and starts her student aids in the field, advancing them as they prove 
themselves capable. It is not for the training of mere farm hands that the 
curriculum of the National Farm School is intended, but it does plan to 
teach the students how best to perform manual labor in order that they may 
understand actual farm work, so that when they become managers of one 
or more branches of fa.rm work they will be the better able to direct intel- 
ligently the smallest detail, and for such men as these, need I tell you, there 
is always a growing demand. 

Graduates of agricultural schools who have been taught not only to 
think but to do are in constant demand. 

In reviewing the work done in the various departments during the past 
3'ear we are pleased to note progress. In the Farm department the followmg 
is he acreage of the various crops grown: 

Corn, 21 acres; wheat, 20 acres; oats, 6 acres; rye, i acre; potatoes, 7 
acres; sorghum, 5 acres; hay (timothy meadow), 6 acres; beets, i acre; rape, 
l^ acres; pasture, 10 acres; clover, 3 acres; soiling crops, 5 acres; turnips, 
% acre. 

The bulk of these crops has been or will be consumed by the institution. 
Mixed farming is practiced not only for the benefit of instruction, but such a 
system is the one suited to general agricultural conditions in the United 
States. A number of plots of field crops, such as soy beans, cow peas, 
alfalfa, etc., were planted during the past year to acquaint students with the 
growth of crops raised in abundance elsewhere in this country. 

The live stock branch of our work has been augmented by the addition 
of a herd of sheep. Our dairy still continues to turn out products of high 
grade, and in this connection it might be well to note the national recognition 
we have received by the American Guernsey Breeders' Association of the 
United States to conduct the advanced Herd Registry Test for the eastern 
section of the State of Pennsylvania, such work usually being done by the 
State Experimental Stations. Thus far such tests have been made by ad- 
vanced students under the direction of the department. 

Our work along horticultural lines has shown an increase in instruction 
in botany, floriculture and vegetable gardening over previous years. The 
operations in the Theresa Loeb Memorial Rose house have not only brought 



u fund of information to the student, but a revenue to the department from 
tht sale of cut flowers. The vegetable garden has supplied the tables of the 
School with all vegetables used. The nursery, small fruit and orchard plots 
have furnished interesting material for class and field study. The following 
comprises the acreage devoted to horticultural field work: 

Orchards, 4 acres; truck garden, 3V2 acres; small fruit, 11/2 acres; peach 
orchard, i acre. 

Our instruction in chemistry is divided into two divisions: 

First. — Pure Chemistry, conducted by our resident instructor. 
Second.— Agricultural Chemistry, or the chemistry of soils, plants, dairy 
products, feeds, etc. During the past year the work was conducted by the 
assistant chemist of the Iowa State College. 

In the general department sufticient mathematics, English, literature and 
such supplementary studies are taken as are deemd sufficient to sustain both 
scientific and practical agriculture. 

The instruction given in class-rocm work takes up the study of those 
sciences which are applied to agriculture, improved methods used in opera- 
tions of farming, uses of farm machiner}^ management ol crops, care of 
cattle, etc., all instruction being paralleled, wherever possible, with actual 
farm work. 

The practical work being done by the School is emphasized by the fol- 
lowing extract taken from the address of Prof. Charles T. Harrison, of the 
Bureau of Road Inquiry of the Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C, before the National Good Roads Convention recently held in Chicago. 
Pie said: 

'■Coincident with this work was that done at the National Farm School, at Doyles- 
tov/n, Pa., started by my father and jQnished by me, where the students actually worked 
on the sample road as part of their instruction. During the summer, to test their pro- 
ficiency in road construction, a road was projected running through a stretch of woodland 
and across a meadow; much of the preliminary and all of the other work was done by the 
students, who were changed about on the work at the pleasure of the expert in charge. 

"As a result of the practical teaching at this school several of the young men proved 
themselves capable of acting as foremen of any part of the work, and with but little 
practice could take their place as superintendents of construction. It is this practical 
work that counts. 

"Months of study, reading reports of work done by others, or watching methods of 
construction will not give the result that a shorter time spent in actual work will." 

It is gratifying to have such reports come to us from those high in 
authority. And while good work is being done at our School, there is still 
room for development along all lines. 

The needs of the various departments are many. As the institution in- 
creases in attendance the plant requires corresponding enlargement.. 

In order to teach agriculture in its many phases, much illustrative ma- 
terial is required; this would be greatly helped by the enlargement of our 
dairy, the addition of a manual training department, where the use of the 
several tools could be taught and the general development of the grounds. 

Let us hope that our wishes for a healthy growth may be realized. 

E. E. FAVILLE, Dean, 



Address by Professor Henry Leffman, 

Delivered at the Annual Meeting:, 

Some words of explanation may be due to many of those present who 
wonder why I am asked to speak at a farm meeting. I fear it is generally 
supposed that, being a confirmed city man, I have no more knowledge of 
agriculture than to think that turnips grow in trees and that the horseradish 
is^some kind of farm animal. As a matter of fact, I have long been inter- 
iested in the scientific phases of agriculture and have been one of the 
honorary members of the Pennsylvania State Board of Agriculture almost 
since its organization, oyer twenty-five years ago. In the earlier days of this 
membership I was an active participant, attending Farmers' Institutes in 
various parts of this State. Of late years the State Board has become less 
active, owing to the overshadowing influence of the Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

Agriculture is the foundation of civilization. Mankind cannot progress 
from the savage state until a fixed abode is adopted; a nomadic tribe will 
always be in a low developmental stage. Land is the only source of true 
wealth, as it is the only natural monopoly. The planting and rearing of crops 
involves skill and discipline, as well as labor, and brings about an observance 
of the relations of seasons. The seed-time and harvests are important periods, 
and hence, as your religious teachers will tell you, some of the most important 
church feasts are agricultural in origin. It is not uninteresting to note that 
although the work of this and other agricultural educational institutions is 
carried on almost exclusively by and for men, yet there is good reason to 
believe that to woman belongs much of the credit of the most ancient pro- 
gress in this direction. In the more savage state of man the males were busy 
with the chase for food or in war for the defence of the family, and the do- 
mestic duties devolved on the weaker sex. It was woman's feeble attempts 
to cultivate the soil and raise grain that led to a change from a wandering 
to a stationary life; the sowed seed must be watched until it is harvested. 
It was woman's efforts to weave and spin that led to a substitution of cloth 
for skins as garments, and it is probable that the first rude pottery, the be- 
ginning of decorative art, was shaped by her hands. 

Man}' persons are inclined to look with doubt upon the value of the work 
of such institutions as this, thinking that agriculture, being merely a rude art, 
dependent on natural conditions, may be carried ovit with success without 
the aid of books or professors. The truth is that the highest success in the 
growing of crops or the rearing of animals is attained only by the most care- 
ful study, and it would take hours to recount the practical advantages that 
have already resulted from the scientific studies of the last fifty years. The 
inquiries have been pursued with great zeal in the United States, which, in 
addition to its Central Bureau of Agriculture, has public and private experi- 
mental farms dotted over its wide area. It was said many years ago by an 
Englishman that it was a commendable act if any one made two blades of 
grass grow where but one grew before, but scientific agriculture has not 
done this; it -has done more, it has made the one blade of grass grow larger 
and better and produce a larger yield. 

A very important field of inquiry has been the study of the disease of 
plants and animals. Vast sums of money have been lost and much suffering 
caused, as well as danger to human beings by some of these diseases, and 



beneficent results have followed from the scientific inquiries of recent years. 
A further important phase is the determination of the adaptability of various 
parts of the country to the cultivation of new plants. Among the works in 
this line are the proposed cultivation of the tea-plant in the South, the suc- 
cessful introduction of fig culture in California and date culture in the South- 
west. To those who are most susceptible to the materialistic argument, it will 
be simply necessary to point out the great pecuniary value of these enter- 
prises. The questions of irrigation and forestry are also of great moment. 
There are many millions of acres of land in this country on which no ma- 
terial amount of rain ever falls, and the study of the methods of bringing this 
into cultivation is of the greatest practical moment. 



CENTRAL CONFERENCE OF AMERICAN RABBIS, 

Resolutions unanimously passed at the Seventeenth Annual 
Session of the Central Conference of iVmerican Rabbis at The 
National Farm School, Doylestown, near Philadelphia, on July 4th, 
1901, introduced by Rabbi Joseph Stoltz, D. D., of Chicago, 111. 

Whereas, we, members of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, have 
this day enjoyed the hearty and generous hospitality of the Directors of the 
National Farm School; and 

Whereas, it has been our privilege and rare pleasure to inspect, at close 
range, the beautiful farm and its splendid equipment, and to see for ourselves how 
thoroughly the scientific course of study is carried out both theoretically and 
practically; therefore be it 

Resolved, that we extend to the Directors of the School our thanks for the 
hospitable receptiou granted us, and our congratulations upon the remarkable 
results achieved in so short a time, and further be it 

Resolved, that we extend our congratulations to the Founder of the School, 
our colleague, the Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, for the practical success which has 
attended his self-sacrificing labors, his untiring, zeal and unflagging enthusiasm; 
and, while we endorse the wise purpose and far reaching philanthropic scope of 
this undertaking, be it further 

Resolved, that in our annual Succoth Sermons we endeavor to interest 
our respective congregations in the national character of this institution, and 
plead for the more generous cooperation and larger support it so richly deservea 
from every Jewish community in the land. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY. 



June 26th, 1901. 

Wednesday was the day of days at the National Farm School.. 
The day was clear, and over 600 friends of the institution came out 
to participate in the graduating- exercises of the first class to finish 
its course at the school. The feature that added the largest degree 
of interest to the proceedings was the fact that the baccalaureate 
address was to be delivered by a member of President McKinley's 
Cabinet, Secretary of Agriculture James Wilson. 

The Secretary was escorted by a committee of about fifty well- 
known Philadelphia citizens, to the Reading Depot, where they 
boarded a special train, arriving at the Farm School at 2 o'clock^ 
Here they were met by a reception committee, which included the 
Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, James L. Branson, W. Atlee Burpee 
and Professor E. E. Faville. The students of the school, lined up 
on either side of the road leading from the station to the gaily 
decorated stand in the grove, where the exercises were held, stood 
at salute while the guests and escort passed to the stand. 

The exercises were opened with prayer by the Rev. Joseph 
McElrey, of Trainer. After an introductory address by the 
President, Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, Hon. James Wilson, Sec- 
retary of Agriculture of the United States was introduced and 
delivered the Baccalaureate Oration. 

ORATION BY HON. JAMES WILSON, 

Secretary of Agriculture, U. S. A. 

There is peculiar interest to all lovers of industrial education in the efforts 
being made at Doylestown to prepare young men of Jewish blood for farm 
management. The wisdom of it requires no argument; it is as appropriate that 
those who produce from the soil should learn about the soil and its relation to 
the plant, and the relations of the plant to the animal, as it is necessary to train 
the professional for his specialty. We have reached the time in cropping and 
animal husbandry when it is generally recognized that the best results are had 
by those who have observed most and inquired farthest. You have begun in 
the right way, at the right end. You are teaching young men concerning the 
soil while they handle it and experiment with it; concerning the plant by study- 
ing it in the field and forest, conservatory and lawn, under tlie microscope as 
well as with the naked eye, what the world has learned of it and something 
new that you have found out; and you find the studying as edifying and en- 
grossing, as broadening and developing, as dead languages or living lan- 
guages; that the study of the plant is quite as instructive as the history of the 



king, and far more useful; that the future farmer is far more interested in 
knowing something of grasses than a great deal about the Roman empire; that 
Lawcs and Gilbert have done more for him than any Greek author; that Hell- 
riegal's works with legumes are worth infinitely more to him than anything 
beside done by any European; that the student of plant life only knows that re- 
search into it in our day has done more for the comfort of mankind than all that 
was known previous to its drawing. He has some conception of the influence 
of its study upon our export of $610,851,940 worth of vegetable matter during 
the last fiscal year — the surplus from our fields; and he, only, can intelligently 
apprehend the effect upon economic production in the future of the present 
scientific inquiry along these lines. 

You are teaching animal husbandry with animals as object lessons. You 
study the development of the several kinds of domestic animals as far as 
history tells it; the influence of food, climate and habit upon them; the breed- 
ing, rearing and uses; and how to feed them economically for growth, work 
or product. Our people just now complain of the high prices of meats, a class 
of foods more freely used by Americans than by any other nation. The dealer 
is blamed, but the student of plants and animals learns that the wild grasses 
west of the Missouri are being destroyed to such an extent by injudicious 
grazing that some states produce less than half of the meats they did ten 
years ago; that this process is continuous, and that the meats of the people 
must come more and more, in the future, from the humid sections of 
our country, through more scientific animal husbandry. 

I am delighted to find the children of Israel doing this work in the sensible 
and thorough manner in which they do everything they undertake, and with- 
out help from federal or state sources. It will have a reflex influence on 
federal and state institutions that are in some instances doing just as little 
along these lines as they can do, without losing their federal and state bene- 
factions. You educate along these lines because it brings your people back 
to contact with the soil, the plant and the animal; to contact with Nature- and 
the God of Nature — relations so intimate and so prominent in the history of 
your race. 

The Patriarchs were great flockmasters; their history should be studied 
carefully by the student of animal husbandry. Moses, the lawgiver, kept the 
flocks of Jethro, his father-in-law, in the Avilderness while he was being pre- 
pared for his life work. David, the sweet singer of Israel, was a shepherd 
when he was sent with loaves and cheeses to his brothers in Saul's army. 
Joseph understood irrigation and the effect of moisture on growing crops; 
Daniel knew the value of the legume in his food ration, and conducted the 
first feeding experiment of which we have any record. There is no book in 
print, of which I have any knowledge, that gives so many hints to the farmer 
about his business as the Bible. Every student of agriculture should be entire- 
ly familiar with it; its intensive and forcible styles are quite as desirable as 
any he is likely to acquire elsewhere. 

This beneficence is one of the very few in our land, or in any land, where 
philanthropists give money to educate the young farmer. Wealthy men are 
giving for education in all other imaginable lines, for which we must not 
withhold our admiration. The Republic will not live if we do not educate. 
The difference between an educated and an ignorant citizenship is becoming 
more apparent every year as our country moves to the front in all her under- 
takings at home and abroad. The necessity for education in the field of pro- 
duction has not been impressed upon those who give toward the elevation of 



25 

the masses, although manufactures and commerce both depend upon agri- 
•culture. The educated men of our country do not comprehend the value of 
scientific knowledge to the farmer, and with few exceptions are hostile or entire- 
ly indifferent regarding its acquirement. 

The Jew is a thoroughbred, with a history running back to the time when 
Abraham dwelt in Ur of the Chaldees, and has a pedigree compared with 
which modern family trees are bramble bushes. He can look back over the 
■centuries and note the effect of occupation on his race. Other races concede 
his mental acuteness to determine what is good for his people. He has been 
denied the privilege of owning the soil by many shortsighted governments, 
but "his love of the soil is deathless," to use the expression of one of the 
founders of this institution. He desires to restore the physical vigor of the 
.race where it requires it, by returning to the early vocation of its founders. 
It is wisely resolved that young men be educated in the sciences and arts 
relating to agriculture, and money is contributed for that purpose by far- 
seeing and goodhearted men and women. No investment ever made by a 
people will pay like this one, and that is a venturesome saying in this presence. 
If there is to be a movement of your people toward the soil, then it will be 
well to study the soil. I can not get a soil physicist by advertising for him, 
because our systems of education do not teach concerning soils. I can not 
get a plant pathologist by advertising, for our systems of education do not 
teach along these lines. I can not get a physiological chemist for plants by 
advertising, because none are educated in the great institutions to which peo- 
ple leave their benefactions. These are illustrations of the neglect of the 
education of the producers — one-half of our people! If you resolve to educate 
along these lines, you will do it thorough]}', as your people do everything they 
set about. 

At no time in the world's history have the plant and the animal had as 
much attention as they are now getting in our country. All the states and 
territories are doing something toward a better knowledge of these two great 
factors in civilization. There is some duplication of work, but each College 
-and Experiment Station is working along independent lines with a view to 
solving problems affecting the people of its locality. The people of the several 
states and territories are becoming more interested in the work of research 
being conducted in their interest. The Department of Agriculture is co-operat- 
ing with most of them in the specialties in which they are severally interested, 
.and aims to do work that is beyond the reach of the individual institution, or 
help where assistance is most needed in local undertakings. The local col- 
leges and stations are gradually securing a better class of teachers and ex- 
perimenters, with more complete facilities and staff's to teach and conduct in- 
quiry. Better salaries are being paid as the institutions compete for the best 
-equipped scientists. The universities and colleges of our land and of other 
'lands have not been educating with regard to soils, plants arid animals, and 
some of the universities receiving federal monies for this education have 
partially failed to devote the means so provided to teaching the sciences re- 
lating to production. The people are anxious to have the young farmer ed- 
ucated toward his life work, the legislatures are liberal, in many cases, in 
-giving money; but some boards of control and old-fashioned faculties are not 
enthusiastic in this work. The American people, realizing agriculture as the 
so jrce of national growth, earnestly desire the education of the producers, 
and the wonder groAvs, why institutions, designed to do this work, have turned 
i;h;ir energies in other directions, and either fail entirely to provide for this 



26 

work or conduct it in such a manner that it is not attractive to those who 
desire it. On the other hand, many colleges are vigorously meeting all 
reasonable requirements along educational lines, have well rounded faculties, 
and are graduating classes well prepared to continue study and to attack the 
problems that so vitally interest producers. 

The struggles going on between the farmers of many of our states and 
the boards of control are quite earnest, resulting generally in the farmers- 
having their work done either in separate colleges or through more generous 
divisions of university funds. The education of the farmer is made the excuse 
for getting many appropriations that are promptly diverted to the education 
of more lawyers, doctors, dentists and the like. This practice is conducted- 
with as straight faces and as much conscience as men assume when they 
smuggle goods into our country from foreign lands. But progress is being; 
made. The farmers of the country are getting publications of original re- 
search that interest and instruct them, from quite a number of well conducted- 
experiment stations, and many agricultural colleges are giving the country- 
well equipped graduates. 

Why should young farmers be educated in the sciences and practices re- 
lating to their life work? Is agriculture of suf^cient importance to justify- 
the institution of schools and colleges to prepare those who live by it to 
conduct its operations with the highest intelligence, or, is it enough to have 
a farmer taught the everyday methods by which soils are handled, crops are- 
cultivated, hai-\-ested and stored, and animals are bred and fed? 

Our agricultural exports for the fiscal year of 1900 were $844,616,530, which- 
is 61.62 per cent, of the whole. Half of the people of the country are directly 
engaged in producing the articles exported. Of the other exports the forests- 
furnished 3.81 per cent., the mines 2.76 per cent., the fisheries .46 per cent., 
miscellaneous .34 per cent., and domestic manufactures 31.01 per cent. Our~ 
oil exports are included in manufactures, amounting to $68,247,588. This- 
briefly shows the position agriculture occupies in our foreign commerce. IIl 
has supplied the home demand, and maintains its place as our leading export- 
Consider the grand productions of these two sources of national wealth, the- 
plant and the animal and the money they bring to the United States after 
supplying home necessities. They carry abundance to the individual homes- 
of our producers, and fill the national treasury to overflowing. They give- 
plenty of cheap food to cur people, enabling our manufacturers to make- 
goods cheaply for home consumption and some to send abroad. 

Animal husbandry is neglected at many of our agricultural colleges. The 
monies intended by Congress to be used in giving instruction in the sciences- 
relating to animals and plants are diverted to other uses. Instruction can 
not be given about animals without animals as object lessons. The student 
can not be taught the difference between a road horse and a draught horse, 
a fine wooled sheep and a mutton sheep, a dairy cow and a beef cow, a lard 
hog and a bacon hog, unless the animals are present where the instruction is 
given, and can be brought into the class room to illustrate subjects under dis- 
cussion; nor can the pasture be studied without the pasture, nor cultivation 
ond its effects without the crop and the cultivation; nor the curing of forage 
crops without the crops, nor harvesting without the harvester, nor feeding 
i/'ithout the feeding of the animal, nor the change that takes place in the 
manure heap without experimentation with manures. The sciences that re- 
late to each of these farm operations are not mastered without actual contact: 
with them, and years in college are required to become master of them. 



27 

Three articles make up the bulk of our agricultural exports. Animal mat- 
ter amounts to $2.33,764.590; breadstuffs to $262,744,078, and cotton to $242,- 
988,978, a total of $739,497,646. The total export of vegetable matter is $610,- 
851,940. So you see the large sums we get from foreign countries originate 
with the plant and the animal. 

We buy from foreign countries about half as much agricultural produce 
as we sell — $420,139,288 worth during 1900, the products of plants and animals, 
all of which can now be produced under our flag and most of it within the 
United States. The education of the young farmer in soil, plant and animal 
directions will contribute promptly to this end. Sugar is the heaviest im- 
port. We will, within a few years, produce all the sugar we use within the 
United States, or, when our farmers realize that the by-product of the beet 
sugar mill is as valuable to the dairy cow as the entire beet. The young farm- 
er needs lessons in nutrition to understand this. Sugar is not necessary to 
the dairy cow in this connection, she gets all the carbonaceous matter she 
requires in her other fodders. She needs what is left after the sugar is ex- 
tracted. Sugar and butter come from the atmosphere, and they are the 
things to sell without exhausting the farm. Over forty factories will be mak- 
ing sugar from beets in the United States this fall; and others will be built 
in many states. No other crop is so profitable. We shall not grow cofifee in 
the United States, but we will teach the brown men of our island possessions 
how to grow it more successfully than it is now being done anywhere. The 
graduates of agricultural colleges like this will find employment in this work. 
We shall grow our tea within the United States within a few years. Ex- 
periments being conducted at Pinehurst (Summerville) South Carolina, give 
assurances of it. The two tons made last year satisfied capitalists so fully 
that tea-growing is being undertaken as a commercial enterprise. Our rubber, 
spices, etc., will be grown in the tropics. We will teach the people of the 
island groups lately acquired to grow what we can not raise within the 
United States. There will always be a large sum sent there for what we can 
not produce here. This will enable them to buy from us what they can not 
grow in the islands, but for intelligent production in those islands, we 
must send educators to them, so that they may be lifted above the competition 
of other islanders. Sumatra has been growing a superior tobacco wrapper for 
many years. Last year the Department of Agriculture sent to the Paris Ex- 
position American-grown Sumatra leaf that took the gold medal over that 
grown in Sumatra. Cubans came to Florida to grow tobaccos there after 
the manner of growing them in Cuba. Within two years the Americans took 
premiums over them. 

We sold over twenty-nine million dollars' worth of tobacco in 1900, but 
we bought over thirteen million dollars' worth. We bought high-priced 
tobacco, stich as is not grown in our country, in amounts sufficient to meet 
home demands. Efforts are being made to understand the underlying prin- 
ciples that control the growing and curing of these high-priced tobaccos, and 
to learn what influences operate to produce them. Once we understand these 
principles, we shall buy no more from abroad, but rather increase our sales. 
Scientists of complex education are required to carry on these investigations; 
they should be plant physiologists with chemical training. Our work in 
Florida and Connecticut will result in producing wrapper tobacco at home, 
while experiments are now being carried on in your state and others with 
a view to the production of a superior filler that will take the place of much 
of the imports from Cuba. This work is being done by our Soils Division, 



28 

where men are educated for the work who have graduated at tlie agricultural 
colleges. The Department of Agriculture calls for such graduates from all 
the states where education is given along agricultural, scientific lines, and 
gives them special instruction preparatory to helping the producers in the 
fields. We have what there is of the Washington University you read about 
in the newspapers, and it is growing very rapidly. Classes in soils, plant 
industry, forestry, etc., are organized regularly, while other scientific divisions 
have their students at work. We are helping the man who works in the field 
and farm- laboratory with his coat off. 

The new education for the farmer teaches observation and trains towards 
experimentation. It is as comprehensive as the universe; it inquires into 
ever J' created thing; it lays all science under tribute; it is interested in every 
fact of history, whether it be the pedigree of a royal family or the crop re- 
port of an Oxford bailiff in the fourteenth century; it takes note of the 
discoveries of the pathologist who finds new remedies for the ills of man- 
kind, that it may minister to the animal; it studies the rains that go up by the 
hills and go down by the valleys; it heralds the movements of the cyclones 
and makes plain the life-history of the microbe. It comprehends the mold in 
the cellar and the breeding of the war-horse; it concerns itself with decom- 
position in the manure heap and confiagation in the forest; it experiments 
with vegetable growth possible in Alaska with its long winter and in Florida 
wuth its perpetual summer; it suits plants to the sand dunes and alkali plains, 
and cross-breeds grains for the corn and grass latitudes; it watches the descent 
of free nitrogen from the atmosphere to the soil through the legume and its 
bacteriological copartner, and then into plant food through nitrification; it 
makes plain the laws of sanitation and is wrestling with the laws of nutrition. 

The student of these sciences will not be as strong in literary directions 
as students of literary institutions, but he will be better equipped than those 
who make no special studies of anything. Agricultural libraries are becom- 
ing quite extensive and contain much that is entertaining as well as instructive. 
The duty incumbent upon each state that gets an endowment from the federal 
government is to provide education for the young farmer along the lines of 
his life work, who would not attend a literary -college, and to make that edu- 
cation so attractive that young farmers will go after it. 

By careful systematic breeding the Department is striving to increase the 
production of crops, secure better varieties and varieties adapted to certain 
soils. The economic results of plant improvement are already enormous in 
the aggregate. In ten years the Minnesota Experiment Station produced by 
carerul breeding a wheat which yielded five bushels per acre more than the 
best variety generally grown in that State. Five bushels per acre increase 
would add to the world's supply of wheat 625,000,000 bushels annuallj-. Even 
one bushel per acre increase would still give 125,000,000 bushels increase in the 
world's crop. The possibilities of increasing the yield five bushels per acre 
are certainly within reach, judging from the results already obtained. It is 
the aim of the Department to emphasize work of this nature until this ideal 
figure is reached and our average production approaches more nearly that 
of England which is now estimated at thirty bushels per acre, while in the 
United States the average production is below fifteen bushels per acre. The 
same is true of our corn production. In Texas the average yield is said to be 
only eight bushels per acre, and this by a few years of careful selection could 
doubtless be doubled. In oranges w^e are working to produce more hardy 
sorts and encouraging results have already been obtained. In pineapples we 



29 

have produced several sorts of high quahty which are being propagated for 
distribution. In all agricultural and horticultural crops results of the greatest 
importance await the attention of the careful breeder, and we intend to push 
this work as rapidly as possible. 

The great problem before the American cotton grower is not to extend 
the acreage but to decrease the cost of production and improve the grade of 
the product. In order to aid the grower in this direction the Department 
has experiments under way with a view to producing select strains of the 
standard sorts which will be more productive. There is a demand for a cotton 
of intermediate grade between the ordinary Sea Island and Upland now grown 
in this country and the Department is attempting to produce varieties of 
this grade by hybridizing these two sorts. Many very promising hybrids have 
been produced which art now being tested. There is a lack of cotton of this 
grade and any improvement in this direction will be of great value to the 
southern farmers. 

'"Cotton wilt," which the Department has found to be a fungous disease of 
the roots, is becoming widespread and threatens to destroy the cotton in- 
dustry. We have found that certain plants resist the disease, and by select- 
ing seed from such plants we have produced a strain which holds up well in 
badly infected fields, resisting the disease to a wonderful extent. The value 
of this discovery can hardly be overestimated, as it places within reach of the 
planter the means of securing at slight expense strains which will resist the 
disease. We have also found that certain varieties now but little grown are 
almost entirelj'- immune to the disease. 

Coupled with the breeding and improvement of our crops as they are 
now grown, the Department has been actively engaged in improving our in- 
dustries by importing the best sort grown in foreign countries. We are im- 
porting wheat, cotton, corn, apples, peaches, vegetables, nuts, grasses legumes, 
in fact, everything w-hich our trained agricultural explorers consider to be 
promising for growth in the United States or anj' other tropical possessions. 
This line of \vork has furnished many striking successes in the short time it 
has been under way. 

The importation and establishment of the fig insect is an accomplished 
fact. The introduction of this insect renders the cultivation of the Smyrna 
fig possible in this country. Our annual imports of Smyrna figs are worth, 
at the ports of entry, about one million dollars and it is hoped that this 
amount can be added to the annual income of the producers of this country. 

Last year the United States imported from Egypt about $6,500,000 worth 
of Egyptian cotton, exporting of our own cottons about 9,000,000 bales. The 
Egyptian cotton fills a special market with which none of our cottons now- 
grown compete. With our great extent of territory we should be able to 
grow this cotton on our own plantations. The Department has made a 
special featvtre of securing and testing the best known Egyptian varieties and 
the results obtained indicate that we will be able to produce an Egyptian 
cotton as good, or better, than the imported article, which commands a price 
from three to eight cents per pound higher than our ordinary Upland sorts. 
One manufacturer has made a test of the American grown Egyptian cotton 
and pronounces it better than the imported product. It remains now to find 
by experiment, where it can be grown most successfully. 

Among the importations of great interest to the eastern United States 
including the wheat regions of Pennsylvania, are certain of the best varieties 
of Hungarian wheats which produce a flour superior to that of our own wheats 



30 

in this section, the flour selling commonly for a dollar more, per barrel, in the 
Liverpool markets. From preliminary tests it would seem that we may be able 
to successfully grow these Hungarian wheats here. We should aim to pro- 
duce the very best of every product. 

Fifteen million pounds of macaroni are annually imported into this coun- 
try, which sells at a much higher price per pound than domestic made maca- 
roni. The reason is that the best macaroni is made from durum or true 
macaroni wheats, while our own macaroni has been made from ordinary 
bread wheats. Investigations made by the Department show that macaroni 
wheats can be very successfully grown in this country. Our factories are now 
being interested in the matter and are already demanding the wheat. Practically 
all that can be raised this year is now contracted for and there is a good mar- 
ket for several million bushels, if raised next year. The foreign demand is 
great but is now principally supplied from Russia. Yet the small amount 
raised here is admitted to be as good as the Russian. We will raise from 
75,000 to 100,000 bushels this harvest, but there is a market now for fifty times 
that quantity. These wheats flourish in the driest portions of the Great Plains 
and are especially fine when grown in North and South Dakota. Three mill- 
ion bushels or more of Goose wheat, a macaroni variety, were shipped from 
Canada last year, and yet the Canadian product is known by examination to be 
inferior to wheat of this kind grown in our Great Plains region. These wheats 
are not only extremely resistant to drouth but must be grown in arid regions 
to produce the best results. 

It is impossible to obtain known varieties of bread wheat that will resist 
rust. But the Department is now crossing certain good bread wheats with 
varieties of other groups and thereby producing new varieties that will resist 
rust and at the same time be excellent kinds in other regards. In the same 
way non-shattering varieties are being made for the Palouse region, earlier 
varieties for the middle Great Plains, and varieties that are more productive, 
etc. All these qualities are even now being brought out in the work thus far 
done. There are striking instances in which the remarkable earliness of 
Japanese sorts is preserved and yet their tendency to smut is overcome by 
crossing with Turkestan varieties. 

A very important work in our plant introduction is the establishment 
of hardier winter wheats from Russia. Varieties from east and south Russia 
already tried in northern Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa have in many cases 
survived the winter when other varieties failed. By further work of this 
kind it is expected to extend the winter wheat area much farther northward 
and thus increase the yield 3 to 5 bushels per acre, and escape various diseases. 
The gain obtained in this way already, by the use of Russian varieties, is very 
great. They are not only hardier in winter but also resist drouth to a great 
degree. Moreover, they produce flour of the very best grades. Last year 
the flour from these wheats (including the so-called Turkey of Kansas) was 
absolutely the best in the United States, and the yield of the wheat was re- 
markable. It bids fair now to be the saine this year. These Russian wheats 
have practically effected a revolution in wheat growing in the Great Plains. 

A marked improvement in the rice industry has been made by the intro- 
duction of Japanese rice into Louisiana and Texas. The Honduras rice, 
previously grown deteriorated quickly in quality and broke badly in milling. 
The new Japanese rice has a shorter harder grain and does not break, and has 
thus increased the demand for rice so much that it has been impossible to 
supply all orders for it. At the same time the yield per acre averages twenty- 
five per cent, higher than formerly. 



31 

The Department is conducting experiments on various forage crops 
-■wliicli are of great importance to the entire country. Attempts have been 
made in certain portions of Europe to prevent the importation of American 
red clover seed on the ground that the crop is inferior to that produced from 
European seed. The Department has been making experiments to test the 
validity of the claim, and these show that in the great clover area of the north- 
eastern United States a decidedly larger crop is produced from American 
grown than from European grown seed, and that for American clover grow- 
ers American grown seed is superior. We are importing Alexandrian clover, 
Turkestan alfalfa, smooth brome grass, etc., and striving in every way to 
improve the forage crops of the country. The smooth brome grass imported 
from Russia by the Department, owing to its remarkable drouth-resistant 
qualities has proved to be a most valuable grass for dry regions where other 
grasses could hardly exist. In the arid west and southwest it is proving a 
god-send. 

One of the most difficult problems before the American farmer is the 
successful marketing of his -products. The Department is making efforts to 
bring the grower and manufacturer in closer touch. Cases have been re- 
ported to the Department where certain crops of wheat and cotton have been 

.almost wasted because no market could be found for them. This has been 
the case to some extent with American grown Egyptian cottons and macaroni 
wheats. It is our desire to show that good products of this sort can be 

.grown ana Lo induce the manufacturer to recognize this and purchase the 
American grown product. In the case of our fruits, the export trade of both 
the fresh and preserved product is increasing, now amounting to from $9,000,- 
000 to $12,000,000 annually. The greatest obstacle to the increase of our ex- 
ports of fruits is the uncertainty as to the condition of the fruit when it reaches 
foreign markets. An extensive investigation is about to be made by the De- 
partment of the whole question of frtiit harvesting and marketing, including 
the application of refrigeration to fruit storage both in the warehouse and 
while in transit, and it is hoped that much light will be shed on the causes 
that operate to the injury of the fruit iii transit, from the orchard to the 
consumer, and the best means of counteracting such injury. Such investiga- 
tion cannot fail to be of great value to the extensive fruit industries of this 
country. Wheat and corn frequently deteriorate in export shipments and 
special investigations of the causes of such deterioration has been especially 
authorized by Congress. ■ 

The American will cut a wide swath in the world's affairs in coming 
years, along all lines of human effort, intellectual and material, at home and 

.abroad. The best blood of all lands is in combination here to furnish him 
forth. His composition is superior, every way, to any unit in the man. The 
sons of Jacolj, a unique factor, give us an object lesson in commercial 

.acuteness and financial enterprise. I welcome them to the field where the 
trees wave, the grasses grow, the birds sing, and the flowers bloom ,1 invite 
them from the distiaicting haunts of man in the city to the pasture where the 
thoroughbred colt| courses about its dam, where improved cattle ruminate 
in the shade, and the mothers of the fleece rear the emblems of innocence in 
peace and safety, by the green pastures and the still waters. He will impress 

;himself there as he has in all other avenues of effort. This promising beginning 

.at Doylestown is like the "handful of corn in the earth upon the top of the 
mountains, the fruit thereof shall shake like Lebanon." 



32 

Fruits of the First Graduating Class. 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS OF TWO OF THE RECENT GRADUATES 



Louisville, Ky., November tglh, 1901. 
Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, 

3ly Dear Doctor: 

Yo'ir Farm School boys are doing very well indeed. 

Morris Lebowitz, who commenced work on the ist of November, is as good and 
desirable a young man as Sam Kolinsky; both of them are filling their places very 
satisfactorily, and because of their peculiar adaptability, their sobriety and con- 
scientious attention to their duties, have relieved me of a great deal of anxiety and 
have made my farming experience far more satisfactory and pleasant than it has 
ever been before. It is rather a source of regret that a greater number of our co- 
religionists have as yet not acquired that love of nature which induces so many of 
our gentile friends to find in spring and summer pleasure and recreation on the 
farm and in the country rather than on the front porches of fashionable resorts 
where many of them are but tolerated. These changes will come gradually to our 
people and then you will find enthusiastic supporters where now you receive but 
fainthearted encouragement. You work in the right direction, but the task of the 
pioneer is always a hard one, 



I. W. BERNHEIM. 



Philadelphia, December 5th, 1901. 
Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, 

Dear Sir: 

Your favor of the 4th inst. is received, acknowledging receipt of 
the small subscription that I made to the National Farm School. This subscrip- 
tion was made in the full belief that the National Farm School is a valuable ad- 
junct to our industrial aifairs, and that the work being done there was of a satis- 
factory and commendable character. This I learned from the Secretary of 
Agriculture when he was in Philadelphia a few days ago. Naturally our conversa- 
tion turned towards the country, and finally centred in Bucks County, which is 
my native place, and from there drifted to the locality of Doylestown, where your 
school is located. From the Secretary I learned that you Vv^sre doing a most 
valuable work, and one which could not help being effective on agricultural lines, 
training a large number of young men to the love of farming, and rescuing them 
from the channels of want and misery. 

My contribution was made with a full appreciation of all that your work 
implied, and I trust that the good that I feel that is being accomplished there is- 
being daily realized by all who are su closely connected with it. 

Yours Truly, 

T. C. SEARCH. 



SuFFiELD, COXN., January 2d, 1902. 
Rabbi Jos. Krauskopf, D. D., 
Esteemed Sir : 
" Enclosed you will find a letter addressed to me from the Chief of the Bureau 

of Soils, of the Agricultural Department, Washington I know 

that the sentence ' It affords me pleasure to enclose you a promotion as a recogni- 
tion of the very efficient service which you have rendered us in the past,' will 
please you as much as it pleases me. 

The promation is from I4S0 to I840 per annum, beginning from February rst, 
1902. I believe this generous promotion is to a great extent due to the interest the 
Hon. James Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture, takes in the National Farm School. 
Greater responsibility is accompanied with a higher salary. I will continue to 
discharge my duties faithfully, for the sake of the National Farm School as well 
as my own. 

Harry Weinberg has hardly been long enough in the service to be advanced. 
He has been here but two months, but his promotion is sure to come within a 

short time, for he is making a very good impression." 

Respectfully Yours, 

Harry Rich. 



The above is certainly a very satisfactory record for a young man not 20 years 

old and but six months in the field. Harry Rich came to us at the starting of the 

School, four and a half years ago, from the Jewish Orphan Asylum of New 

Orleans. The other graduates are doing comparatively as well, and we certainly 

have everv reason to look forward to bright futures for such of our pupils who 

have the capacit)^ and the will to succeed. 

Joseph Krauskopf. 




A Class Room in the Main building. 




IN THE Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Chemical Laboratory. 



Welsbach Kn Lamps 



(16 Different Styles.) 




MAKES ITS OWN GAS ^s^ssra 



W'ELSBACH COMPANY 



GLOUCESTER, N. J. 






m 



ORIENTAL RUOS 



» 



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* 



IviRS, Dietz &l Magee, 

Carpet and Rug Manufacturers, 

lUPORTERS AMD l^llTAILERS, 
1220 and 1222 Market sr., Philadelphia. 







^IC^g^RD (lOCMA^, 



jaddlepy 



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236 Soutl^ 2tst St. 

Ptjiladelptjia, 



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U. S. Department of 

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3(> 

Names of Deceased for whom Memorial Trees were planted^ 
April 1898 and 1899. 



Michael Bash. 

Sadie Bash. 

Isaac Bedichimer, 

Bernard Berman. 

Edgar Bernstein. 

Ida M. Block. 

Mrs. James I,. Branson. 

vS. K. Davidson. 

Rebecca De Costa. 

A. M. Feldman. 

Simon Fleisher. 

Lena Frohsin. 

Marietta Grant. 

Ethel Greenbaum. 

Estelle Fleisher Hagedorn. 

Sidney A. Heller. 

Margaret A. Kaufman. 



Linda Springer Langfeld. 
Mrs. Isaac Lesem. 
Samuel N. Levy. 
Philip Lewin. 
Aaron Lichten. 
Emanuel Levy, 
Theresa Loeb. 
Mrs. M. Marquis. 
Meyer Meyers. 
Simon Nathan. 
Mrs. A. L. Raff. 
William S. Rayner. 
Samson Simon. 
William Singerly. 
Joseph J. Snellenburg. 
Francis S. Teller. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Tuch. 



Rosa Bamberger. 
Isaac R. Behal. 
Joseph Berkowitz. 
Lazarus Bernheimer. 
Mrs. Louis Blumenthal 
Fannie Blumenthal. 
Isaac Cohen. 
Miriam Cortissoz. 
Emil Friedman. 
Adam Gimbel. 
Fridolin Gimbel. 
Selemen Gimbel. 
Lillie Glaser. 
Samuel Hexter. 
Benno H. Heyman. 
Lehman Hoffman, 
Mrs. B. Hope. 
Lewis Hutzler. 
Isaac S. Isaacs. 
Matilda Kaufman. 
Fanny Kind. 
Henry Kohn. 
Mrs. Henry Kohn, 
Jacob Lehbach. 
Isaac Lesem. 
Emanuel Lieberman, 
Mrs. Fannie Loeb. 
Leonard Loeb. 
Moses Loeb. 
Lottie Schvparz Loeb. 
Arthur B. Leopold. 



Friday, April 27th, J 900. 

Marks Leopold. 



Emma Trainer Mac El'Rey, 

Jean A. Marks. 

Joseph Marschuetz. 

A. E. Massman. 

Henrietta Massman. 

S. E. Massman. 

Sophia Meyer. 

Caroline P. Nirdlinger. 

Miriam Noar. 

Mina Oppenheimer. 

Cassie Theobald Pfaelzer. 

Bella Oppenheimer Rosenberg, 

Albert Schwarz. 

Nannie Schwarz. 

Barbara Silverman. 

Isaac Snellenburg. 

Mrs. Jacob Stern. 

Leon Stern. 

Lena Sternberger. 

Bertha Techner. 

Heyman Techner. 

Rachel Traugott. 

Mrs. Carrie Weil. 

Samuel Weil. 

Herman Wieder. 

Rev. Dr. Isaac M. Wise. 

Carrie Wolf 

Flora E. Wolf. 

William P. Wolf. 



Mannes M, Asch. 
Hannah Asch. 
Clara Binswanger. 
Solomon Binswanger. 
Samuel I. Bernheimer. 
Joseph Bonnheim. 
Horace C. Disston. 
Benj. Einstein. 
Evelina Einstein. 
Mrs. Ropa Fulda. 
Samuel Fulda. 
Ferdinand Greenburg. 
Emily Herrmann. 



April J 901. 
Clara F. Hinlein. 
Benj. Kahn. 
Henrietta S. Kahn. 
Simon Kohn. 
Samuel Lehman. 
Mrs. Leonard Lewisohn. 
Samuel Lewisohn. 
Isaac Lyon. 
Joseph Marks. 
Theresa Marks. 
Milton Mayers. 
Simon S. Myers. 
Mrs. Julia Miller. 



Simon Netter. 
Alex. Reinstine. 
Elsie Reinstine. 
Emma H. Rosenthal, 
Aaron Schloss. 
Mary Simpson. 
Henry Simpson. 
Caroline .Smith. 
Carrie Smith. 
Isaac Smith. 
Joseph R. Teller. 
Solomon Thalheimer, 
Rosa K. Weiler, 



37 



Endowment Fund* 

Max Schoenfeld, Rohrscbacb, Switzerland. Fuud to establish The Flora 

Schoenfeld Memorial Farm, v |io,ooo.oo 

Income to September 1901 300.10 

Leonard Lewisobn, Kew York, 5,000.00 

(Income to be applied to an annual Samuel Lewisohn Scholarship.) 

Income July ist, 1900, 100.00 

" Januarj' ist, 1901, 100.00 

" July ist, 1901 100.00 



Memorial Buildings, 



I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House, in memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, 
Pa., by her family. 
II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, in memory of Ida M. Block, Kansas City, 
Mo., by her husband and family. 

III. Zadok Eisner Memerial Laboratory, in memory of Zadok Eisner, Philadel- 

phia, Pa., by his wife. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, in memory of Rose Krauskopf, 

Philadelphia, Pa., by her children. 
V. Dairy, | , j^^. ^^^ j^j^.^^ -^^^^^ j_ Aaron, Pittsburg, Pa. 

VI. Dairy Stable, > 



Scholarships, 

Joseph Bonnheim Memorial Fund, Sacramento, Cal., $200.00 

James L. Branson, Langhorne, Pa., 200.00 

Bertha Rayner Frank, Baltimore, Md., 200.00 

(In memory of her father, Wm. S. Rayner.) 



Special Friends, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

A friend, I500.00 

Krauskopf, Rev. Dr. Joseph, annual donation of marriage, funeral and 

lecture fees (for Chemistry Professorship) •,.... 225.00 

New York City. 

Schiflf, Jacob H. , |ioo per annum. 

Louisville, Kentucky. 

Bernheim, B., 15° per annum. 

Bernheim, J. W., $50 per annum. 



3« 



Subscriptions from IVIay ist, 1900, to date. 



ALABAMA. 

Birmingham . 

*?iinii"r1i"'" T^"'Tl' ^'^" i*^- 

I-r O. D. D: Is-oo 

Demopolis. 

"'"ll i T iiii ii ^ ^i'i T n il jjj f I ' jn T^2i • • 10.00 
Mobile. 

Beth Zar Lodge No. 84 . . . 5.00 

*Eichold, Emanuel 5.00 

Montgomery . 

'•i Kalil, Muu t guiiitiy - 10.00 

B. B 5.00 

Kmamipl T^nrl^p TsTn— uay^^-Q. 

B. B 5.00 

* Locb, Jac q aoo 3.00 

Uniontown. 

rnnrnrrlij T nrlrr^f^" T^'' 1 

0. B. B 2.50 

ARKANSAS. 

Little Rock. 
* BuQi loracl (rrjugieg ation . . io.oq 
I/ iUlL Ru r L Tj- i rlgr N n. 158, 

1. O. B. B 10.00 

Pine Bluff. 

*Bloom, Mrs. Hannah .... 5.00 

Dg cifus, Isaac - 10.00 

*W eil, M ax 5.00 

*KULh, LUuib .■ . 5.00 

CALIFORNIA. 

Sacramento. 
Joseph Bonheim Memorial 

Fund (annual scholarship) |200.oo 

iJjuiihLim, tTT^. . 10.00 

*Q ohon, Ic a dor 5.00 

EthamLodgeNo. 37, 1.O.B.B. 5.00 

*Skeels, Wm 5.00 

*WGinotoolf,- Ilarric- 25.00 

Sa7i Francisco. 

Anspacher, A 5.00 

^I lah«r ^ - r 9. ^. ' I. 5.00 

-^Hirschteidyr, Di. J. II. . . . 5.00 

*Lt'irmua, Mil.. 0. DT .... 5.00 

*Rosenbaum, Mrs. Chas. , . . 5.00 

*Schwabacher, Abe 5.00 

*Schwabacher, Louis .... 5.00 

*Schwabacher, Mina A. . . . 5.00 

COLORADO. 

Denver. 
*Holzman, S. L 5.00 

CONNECTICUT. 

Bridgeport. 

Abraham Lodge No. 89, I. O. 

B. B 5.00 

New Haven. 

*AaiLi, M.i.1. 5.00 

-Ml. iiiJlli Lud»Tc No. .nn) 

I. O. R. B 5-00 

*New Haven Lodge No. 2:, 

O. B. A. . ... 3.C0 
*^l iiMii, JULulii 5 00 



DELAWARE. 

Seaford. 

*Van Leer, $5.00 

Wilmington. 

*Lieberman, N 10.00 

*Snellenburg, David 5.00 

Wilmington Lodge No. 470, 

I. O. B. B 2.50 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Washington. 
Grace Aguilar Lodge No. 117, 
I. O. B. B. . . . 



Elijah Lodge No. 50, 1.O.B 
*Saks, Isidore . . . 
*Tobrinor, Leon . . 
"IVnlf, Hnrii Sim^n 

Watchhorn, Hon. Robt 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 



GEORGIA. 

Albany. 

^^aiMr""i J ^^^ 5-00 

Atlanta. 

* Hobfow BenevoleaL Congrc " 

,- j^tiaf r 20.00 

Savannah. 

J^^^pV, T prIorg-Mn nf^^ T O Pi'P- 2.00 

M"^r Brn'i 2.0a 

IDAHO. 

Boise City. 

Boise City Lodge No. 481, 

I. O. B. B , . 7-50 

Ladies' Judith Montifiore 

Society 5-00 



Bloomington. 



ILLINOIS. 



i^s L 0- P- g^ • 
Chicago. 

^'jiiiii mj'i' I , ' V . ._ 

'^Dr"pri I n iiillll'l' T 
*Eckstein, Louis . 
*Eisendrath, Isidore 



Eisenstadt Bros, (tuition do- 
nation), . . 

*Eppstein, Max ....... 

^ F o rgnnii, Oaooir , 

*Eranh| Hrnryf?. 



*& ata| JohH - 

* Cntr i ort i | Auguotr 

Germania Lodge No. 58, F. 
S. of I 

Goldman, Albert ...... 

*Goldman, Eugene . . . . , 

^Grrrnrhnnmi Flinr^ . . . , 
* /> r eGnobnnm Snrw .... 

"Hirsch, Mr. and Mrs. S. . 
-x^laaiab- ^ubbani JlI i iiuI '7 . . 

_J_j.i ill j^ ililiiilli Qui 1^ . 

' ''■^uhii. Icuuiiw ' 

*Kohii, Louis H 



5.GO' 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 

100.00 

5-00 
5-00 
5.00 
5-00 
5.00 

5.00 
5.0a 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5-00 



• indicates Annual Subscriber. 




Seeds 

THAT ARE SURE TO GROWl Bjj 



Everything for the Garden, i 

Lawn-mowers, tools, fertilizers, bulbs, plants, incubators, poultry supplies, etc. mfi 

Micheirss^HotiselOlSphSph^l 

Catalogue free on application. All the reliable novelties in seeds and plants. 




D. M. Osborne & Co. '^:L?or.J\r' 



FACTORY, AUBURN, N. Y. 

MANUFACTURERS 



Binders, Moivers, Rea.pers, Com Harvesters, Tedders, Rakes, 
Spring and Peg Tooth Harrovjs, Disc Harrows, Cultiva- 
tors, Binder Tivine, Fodder, Yarn, 'Tfppe, OiL 

Institutions ) o^^„„^^ / "They Succeed 

Implements [ Because | ^j^^^e Others Fail." 



State and National 
use Osborne Farm 



CATALOG FREE ON APPLICATION. 



DELIC10U5! 



REFRESHING 




At all 

Soda 

Fountains 



5c 



Jpirfth and Jpesteif g©. 

i^eifs and ffinisheifs 

]|>hiladelphia. 




NEW YORK OFFICE, '»— 
SILK EXCHANGE BUILDING, 
Broadway and Broome St. 



WAMPOLK'S 

ANTISEPTIC SOLUTION 




USEIS: 

A Gargle for Purifying and Sweetening the Breath, 

Throat Troubles, '^ Mouth Wash, 

Cuts, '^ Bruises and Wounds. 

A GENERAL HEALING ANTISEPTIC. 

T)ruggists sell it everywhere in full pint bottles at 50 cents. 



Qi 



raoe ce i rean) ko 




MAKERS OF 





e L^ream 

Fine Cakes and Pastry. 

Our Fruit GbRcS ^^^'^ ^ national reputation, 
— = same being shipped to many- 

States. Call and sample same, 45 cents a pound, j* ^ ^ 

Eighteenth and Filbert Streets, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



41 



M-sh kIlI, Le on I50.CO 

•^'Mnnrlrl, Sitiinn 5.00 

Newburgh, Mrs. Albert . . . 5.00 

*Nusbauni, Aaron E 500 

*Ramaii-4,etiTr^ No. 33, I.O.BrB. 10.00 

*Reese, Ben 5.00 

*Rosenwald, M. S 5-00 

•■■Roth, Mrs. J __ ^ . 5.00 

*ScliaJifa*teeT-, Rev. Dr. lb"5Tas 5.00 

*Schlesinger, L 10.00 

Schlesinger, L 10.00 

^Solomon, Mrs. H. G 5-00 

Sovereigutv Lodge No. 148, 

I. O. B. B 10 00 

*^Steele, H. B 5 00 

^ iStola^ Rli. Pi. Joj.. 5.00 

*Strouss, Emil W 5.00 

, Lin CO hi. 
^Liberty Lodge No. 294, I. O. 

B. B. . . : 3.00 

^Peoria. 

*6siepnhnt, J B 25.00 

•■Levir^^^^-Xlias- 5-00 

INDIANA. 

.Angola. 

»ct-^;f^i^^ Mri ^ P 3-00 

Evansville. 

Thisbe Lodge No. 24, I.O.B.B. 5.00 
.Fort Wayne. 

Cohn, Rev. Fred 2.00 

I. (X-B_JEL. 10.00 

*Frirdbnrf;rr Trgpnld .... 10.00 

'Goshen. 

•^S^linff'^^i NPit^^n 5-oo 

Hartford City. 

*Wales, Miss 'Amy 5.00 

Indianapolis. 

*Efromsoii & Wolf ..... 5.00 

"Kahn, Mrs. G 5.00 

*Rauh, Sam E 25.00 

'*Weiler, Mr. and Mrs. Abe . . 25.00 

Weiler, Abe (memorial tree) 100.00 

■^Weiler, Abe (memorial tree) 10.00 

■^Wineman, Jos 5.00 

La Fayette. 

Barzillai Lodge No. iii, I. O. 

B. B 5 00 

JPeru. 

*Levi, William 3.00 

J^etersburg. 

Fortland. 

Terra Haute. 

Gan Bdon LodgQ N a. iiO) i I. 

O. B. B 10.00 

^IIciA, A . 5.00 

Vincennes. 

Gimbel, Mrs. Mary ..... 20.00 

IOWA. 

Davenport. 

^Rotticliild, D 5- 00 



Des Moines. 

^J^f^.-Mninon-fend^e NO. '33, 

T O B B I5.00 

Oskaloosa. 

"Pflldnnf. S^'^"'^'' 10.00 

KANSAS. 

Leavenzvorth . 

•■^^les lier, E. - . 10.00 

^^ft,o,-,K^q^ S- fS ^hlnss, . . . 10.00 
St. Mary's. 

*Urbansky, A 5.00 

Topeka. 
Chevra Kadisho Bechor Cho- 

lim, 10.00 

Washington. 

*Oberndorfer, Adolph .... 3.00 

KENTUCKY. 

Henderson. 

*B-^ldinf, Mnrris. 10.00 

Lexington. 

'■^■ixiiugtea — Ivodge — No. a 89 , 

Louisville. 

^ ^ c iiultLim, B. "' 5.00 

^ BorDhoim, L Wi »- ...... 5x0 

*Moses, Rev. A 5.00 

Maysville. 

-=tMe*»-*f!TTard 5.00 

Paducah. 

> ^Imuiuu> ' LuQjj,b No. i4» _J. 

1^ 0. B. B. — 5-00 

Shelbyville. 

^Jewish Literary Society . . . 5.00 

LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans. 

Bnai Israel Lodge No. 188, 

I. O. B. B 5-00 

*Gutman, Eugene H 5.00 

Jewish Orphan Home (tuition 

donation) 200.00 

"Ko hn, - J enr . . 5-00 

^Newi Ban, Is idore-, 10.00 

Rayville. 

5^itehe^Giras . 5-00 

MAINE. 

Lewision. 

Pride of Maine Lodge No. 202, 

O. B. A 5-00 

MARYLAND. 

Baltimore. 

^Benedict, Benj 5-oo 

*Cahn, Bernard ....... 5.00 

*Dillenburg, Noah 5.00 

" Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Frank) Eortha RQ3mor ( a n - 

nual memorial scholarship) 200.00 

• indicates Annual Subscriber. 



42 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



^rnn1-, Dr, S,.^ ^lo.oo 

*Frank, Rosenberg & Co. , , 5.00 

••'Goldenbur^, Mrs. M 5.00 

"'^"'•'•Trbal^^', ]riK 10.00 

*Gottschalk, Mrs. Rosa . . . 25.00 

^f^nttmacher. Rev. A. . . . . 5.00 

?^Himbnrgpr RroB 10.00 

*Hamburger, Henry 5.00 

*Holztnan, M 5.00 

Hornthal, Mrs. J. P 1.00 

*Hutzler Bro,s 10 00 

jrqnfmqnn T.nnig I.OO 

*Kohn, Louis B 5.00 

*Levy, Julius 10.00 

*Lovy, Wm. 10.00 

v:-T,^v."o^ H J ....... 5.00 

■^L/Oucbbeini, Mrs. A 5.C0 

^Lowenstein, Mrs. David . . 5.00 

*Mandelbaum. Seymour . . . 5.00 

*Marquis, M. (memorial tree) 5 00 

^Rjyiioi ' , Albert W 5.00 

*Raynor, Isidore 5 00 

Raynor, Wm. S. (deceased, 

life member) , 100.00 

*Rosenau, Rev. Wm 5.00 

Scbloss, Master Chas. (me- 
morial tree) 5.00 

*Schloss, Natban 5.00 

*Ciuohcimc ? ', L. 5.00 

*S &-uncborn, Ilcuvy .... 5.00 

P i nnnrhnrn ^^ '^" 1 TT^n*";' . . 25.00 

aQr^nt^oKr^rn Qinr T^ ^.QO 

*Straus, Jos. L 5.00 

*Strauss, H F 5.00 

*Sjxiitt&erMis. Henrietta . . , 5.00 

*Strouse, Leopold 5-00 

^ Wlmani A i J. 5.00 

^tJlman, N<itlr!in 5-00 

Cumberland. 
Ber Chajim Lodge No. 177, 

L O. B. B 5.00 

Frostburg. 

* \ttin o laiirl, Mir-s . 10.00 

^ginplcinri T\/rar^ 25.00 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Boston. 

Bradley, Cbas. 2 Books. 

Fleiscber, Rev.Cbas. (collected) 3.00 

*Hecht, Jacob .' 25.00 

*KaflFenburgh, J 5.00 

*Meyer, Adolpb 5.00 

*Stu*ffl«TT7"SaTrra«l- 5.00 

Steinert, Wm 10.00 

William Russell Lodge No. 

22-^, O. B. A 3.00 

*Wolff, Wm 10.00 

21 icgcl, I 7 . 5.00 

Pittsfield. 

Adullam Lodge No. 326, I. O. 

B. B 3.'-o 



MICHIGAN. 

Alpena. 

Alpena Lodge No. 473, I. O. 

B. B Iio.oo 

Detroit. 

Pesagb Lodge, I. O. B. B. . . 10.00 

Grand Rapids. 
Julius Houseman Lodge No. 

238, I. O. B. B lo.oo- 

Jackson. 

Jack.son City Lodge No. 256, 

L O. B. B 5.00 

MINNESOTA. 

St. Paul. 

Minnesota Lodge No. 157, 

I. O. B. B 5.00 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Greenville. 
*Jewisb Women's League . . 5.oO' 
Simmons, Misses Rubie and 

Pearl, 5.00 

Jackson, 
"Manassah Lodge No. 202, I. 

O. B. B 3.00 

Myles. 

*Tausig, Joseph 3.oo- 

Tausig, Joseph 5.00 

Natchez. 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City. 

»Rpnj^piin,^A44Vp7l' 5.0O 

*Benjamin, D 5.00 

*Berkowitz, Mannee 5.00 

*Berkowitz, W. J 5.00 

Berkowitz, Mrs. Wm. J. . . 5.00 

■B,e.rnbpimpr, G — 5.00 

Binswanger, Mrs. E 5.00 

*Bloch, Sol 25.00 

■'■"Feineman, B. A 5.00 

Feineman, Mrs. B. A. ... 5.00 

*^Siifir-5VJ(V 5.00 

*Harzfeld, S 5.00 

Hyman. A 5.00 

King David Lodge No. 86, 

O. B. A 5.00 

*Mayer, Rev. H 5.00 

*Meyer, L S-oo 

Shane, M 5.00- 

St. Joseph. 
*St. Joseph Lodge No. 73, 1. O. 

B. B 10.00 

^'Newburger, B 5.00 

Schloss, Moses A r.oo 

*St. Joseph City Lodge No. 197, 

O. B. A 5.00 

*Westheimer, Ferdinand . . 25.0a 

* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



If you appreciate 



the advantages of having 
lots of water and want a 

safe, simple, dnrable, economical and reliable apparatus to supply it, 

you will buy a 



RIDER or ERICSSON 
HOT=AIR PUMPING ENGINE. 



Awarded a GOLD MEDAL at the Pan= 
American Exposition, Buffalo, 190L 




Catalogue " C 3 " on 

application 

to nearest ofi&ce. 




Rider. 



Kricsson. 



Rider-Ericsson Engine Company, 



22 Cortlandt St., New York. 
239 Franklin St., Boston. 
22A Pitt St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
Teniente-Rey, 71 Havana. 



40 Dearborn St., Chicago. 
40 North 7th St , Philadelphia. 
692 Craig St., Montreal, P. O. 
Merchant and Alakea Sts. , Honolulu. 



Wm. Newell & Bro. 

PLOMBll, GAS FITTING, 

' Drainage and Ventilation, 
1713 SANSOM STREET, 



PHILADEL-PHIA. 



Telephone. 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 
WORK AND MATERIAL GUARANTEED. 



Among many important contracts already 
completed by this firm are tlie 

Princeton Casino; Princeton Infirmary; 
Real Estate Trust Building, Broad and 
Chestnut Sts.; Horticultural Hall, Broad 
Street, below Locust; Mercantile Club, 
Broad Street, above Master; Bryn Mawf 
College; Albermarle Apartment House, 
Thirteenth and Walnut Sts.; Normandie 
Apartment House, 36th and Chestnut Sts ; 
Covington Apartment House, Thirty- 
seventh and Chestnut Sts ; new Tracy 
Apartment House, Thirtv-sixth St., above 
Chestnut; Hotel Chamberlin, Old Point 
Comfort, Va. 




Must soon claim attention. Send for onr Garden and 

Farm Manual for 190a. You will lind it iuterest- 

ng and instructive reading for these long wintereveu- 

ings. It is profusely illustrated and contains every thing 

that is new in Vegetable and Flower seeds. Sent FREE on request. 

'^inUilCny 9 CTnifeC 217-219 IWarStet street. 




ONE 

OF 

OUR 

Specialties 



A wheelbarrow made of all steel, 
light and durable. 



rOUNDRY 



SUPPLIES AND 

EQUIPMENT 



Manufacturers. 



J. W. PAX50N CO. 

Philadelphia, Penna. 



Conl^Iing-Aiiiii^tr'ong 

TERRA (OTTA (0. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Architectural Terra Cotta, 



WORKS 
Philadelphia. 

Telephone 9005. 



OFFICES 
Builders Exchange, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



HARRISON C. REA. 



WM. W. REA'S SON, 

Contractor, 
Builder # Carpenter 

Office, 1 815 Francis St. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



George W, Gormley, 

Manure, Street Dirt 

AND 

BAR SAND, 

Nos. 1063-65 N. Delaware Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA. 
Phone 328 7. 



Cbe Sanitary 
Product Co. 

Cand title Building, 
^ Broad and Chestnut $t$. 
Pbiladelpbia. 



CLARENCE B. KUGLER, President 
W. W. INGRAM, Secy 4. Treas. 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



45 



SL Loin's. 

Ebn Ezra Lodge No. 47, I. O. 

B. B. . . . Iio.oo 

Progress Lodge No. 53, F. S. L 5.00 

*Sale, Rev. Sam'l 5.00 

*Stix, Win 10.00 

Louisiana. 
*Micbael Bros 3.00 



NEBRASKA. 

Omaha. 

Nebraska State Lodge No. 

144, O. B. A 5.00 

NEW JERSEY. 

Allan fie Citv. 

*McClellan', A. C 5.00 

Haddenjield 

^Meyers, Daniel 5.00 

^Hudson Lodge No. 295, I. O. 

B. B 5.00 

Jersey Cily. 
*Hudsun Lodge No. ags.I.O.B.B. 5.00 

Newa7-k. 

Bamberger & Co., L 10.00 

*FiscLi, Jos 5.00 

*Frehbch, Sam 5.00 

*Fu]d, Felix ... .... 5.00 

*Glueck, Dr. B 5.00 

*Goetz, Jos 5.00 

*Heyman, S 5.00 

*Krug, Nathaniel 5.00 

*Lehman, L 5.00 

*Loeb, Frieda 5.00 

*Lowy, Philip 5.00 

^Michael, Chas.- 5.00 

Michael, Chas 5.00 

*Michael, Oscar ....... 5.00 

*Plaut, Mrs. L. S 5.00 

*Plaut, Mrs. Moses 5.C0 

*Scheuer, Selig 5.00 

*Scheuer, Simon 5.00 

*Strauss, B 5.00 

Strauss, B 5-0O 

*Strauss, Moses . , 5.00 

*Trier, Reuben 5.00 

*Walter, S. R 5.00 

*Wolff, D 5.00 

Paler son. 

*Fleisher, Nathan 5.00 

Sonierville. 

*Mack, Lewis C 5.00 

Trenlon. 
*Trenton Lodge No. 319, I. O. 

B. B. • 5.00 

NEW MEXICO. 

Las Vegas. 

*Bonnheim, Rev. B. A. ... 5.00 
Sanla Fe. 

*Seligman, B. ....... . 5.00 



NEW YORK. 

•Albany. 

Beth FCmeth Albany. Congre- 
gation 

Gideon Lodge No. 140, I. O. 

B. B 

*Waldman, Louis I 

Brooklyn. 

Abraham, A. (life member) . 

*Blum, Edw. C 

*May, Moses 

*Rothschild, S. I 

Buffalo. 

*Fleishman, Simon 

Geiershofer, I 

*Montifiore Lodge No. 70, I. 

O. B. B 

Pinchas Lodge No. 79, O.B.A. 

*Wile, Herman . 

Elinira. 

^Friendly, H ' . . . 

Ml. Vernon. 

*Samuels, Julius 

*Samuels, Moritz 

New York. 
*Adelsoti & Bro., Ph., . . . . 

*Bach, Joseph 

*Bendix, Herman 

^Benjamin, M. W 

*Benj Harrison Lodge No. 9, 

O. B. A 

Beran, Theo 

*Bijur, Nathan 

yBlock & Bro., S. E 

^Bloomingdale, Jos 

"■Boehm, Alex , . 

^Bowsky, Louis 

^Bruecks, Mr 

Budge, Henry (life member) 

*Cohen, Isaac 

*Cohn, A 

*Estricher, Henry 

Frank, Elias 

*Friedman, Sol. & Co 

*Fuld, Ludwig 

Funk & Wagnalls Co. ... 
Goldman, Marcus & Bertha . 

*Goodhart, P 

*Grossman, Rev. Dr. Rudolph 
Guggenheim, Wm. (life 
member) 



*Har]em LodeeNo. 84, O 
*Harris, Dr. Maurice H. 
*Heine, Arnold B. . . 

Henrv Jones Lodge No 

I 6. B. B 

^Herman, Mrs. Esther 

Herman, Mrs. Esther 
*Herrman, Nathan . 
*Herrman, L^riah . . 
*Herzig, L 

Hochstadter, A. F. . 



79 



$25.00 

5.00 
10.00 

100.00 

TO 00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 
25.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

3.00 

5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

3.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

100.00 

5.00 
25.00 

5.00 

5. CO 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 

100.00 
10.00 

5.00 

100.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

2.00 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5-00 
5.00 



* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



46 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



*Kahn, Louis I5.00 

*Kleinert, I. B lo.oo 

*Kohn, Eniil W 5.00 

*Krauskopf, Mrs. Henrietta . 5.00 

*Krauskopf, Nathan 5.00 

*Ladenburger, Theodore . . . 10.00 

Ladenburger, Mrs. Theo. . . 33.00 

*Laird, James 5-oo 

*Lauterbach, Edw 25.00 

*Levy, Louis 5.00 

*Levy, Morris 5.00 

Lewisohn, Leonard (memorial 

trees) 100.00 

^Loeb, Emil 5.00 

*Loeb, Ferd 5.00 

*Loeb, Henry 5.00 

*Loeb, Miss H. K 5.C0 

*Loeb, Louis 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Louis 160.00 

*Louis, Mrs. Minnie D. . . . 5.00 

*Lubin, David 10.00 

*Mack, Fred. A 10.00 

*Mayer, Otto L , 10.00 

*Meyer, Arthur 5.00 

Meyer, Wm. (life member) . 100.00 

Minzesheimer, David M. . . 50.00 

*Mode3% I 3.00 

*Moses, Rev. Isaac 5.00 

Mt. Sinai Lodge No. 270, I. 

O. B. B 10.00 

*011esheimer, Henry .... 5.00 

*Pulaski, M. H 5.00 

*Reichman, Wm 3.00 

*Rice, S. M 25.00 

*Root, Chas. J 5. CO 

*Rothschild, Jacob 5.00 

*Sadler, A. N. . . 5.00 

*Schoenfeld, Mrs. David . . . 5.00 

*Scholle, Melville J 5.00 

*Schonfeld, Mrs. David . . . 5.00 

Sidenberg, G. (life member) 100.00 

*Sidenberg, Henry 5.00 

"^Silverman, Rev. Jos 5.00 

*Singer, Dr. Isidor .... 5.00 

*Sondheim. Max 5.0c 

*Sparger, Rev. S 5 00 

*Spe3^er, James 10.00 

Sternberg. Sgd 3-00 

*Sutphin, D. D 5.00 

*Sutro, Lionel 5.00 

*Sutro, Richard 5.00 

*Waterbury, John 1 25.00 

Weinberg Bros. ...... 5.00 

*Wolf, Mrs. L 5.00 

*Zeckendorf, Louis 5.00 

*Zion Lodge No. 2, I. O. B. B. 10.00 
Niagara Falls. 

*Silberberg, Moses L 5.00 

Silberberg Bros 5.00 

Rochester. 

*Wile, Julius M . 10.00 

Zerubbahel Lodge No. 53, 

L O. B. R 5.00 

Rondout. 

Harris, Jacob 1.0(3 



^Lebanon Lodge No. 55, I. O. 

F. S. of I 

Syracuse. 

Eisner, Henry 

Guttman, Dr. Adolph . . . . 

Jacobson, Dr. N 

*Marshill, Benj 

*rhalheimer, G 

TotlenviLle . 

*Levinson, Henry 

Yonkers. 
Youkers City Lodge No. 451, 
I. O. B. B 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Tarboro. 
Zanvah Lodge No. 255, I. O. 
B. B 



OHIO. 

Canton. 

-Abt, Wm 

Hirshheimer, Louis . . . 

*^Loewenstine, S 

*Salsburg, M 

*Simon, S . . 

*Stern & Mann 

■^^ Wolff, Ludwig 

Cincinnati. 

*Block, Abe 

*Block, Leon 

^Fletcher, "Victor 

"Freiberg, Jos 

*Freiberg, Julius 

"Freiberg, J. W 

*Freiberg, Maurice J. . . . 

*Goodheart, Wm 

*Grossman, Rev. Dr. L. . . 

^Harris, Geo. W. . . . . . 

*Levy, Harry M 

Levy, Harry M 

*Lowenstine, L. H. . . . . 

*Mack, M. C 

*Mack, M. W 

^Magnus, Jos. A 

*Mayer, Mrs. L 

*Mihalovitch, B 

'^Moyse, Julius 

*OfFner, Alex 

*Philipson, Rev. Dr. David 

'"Pritz, Benj 

^Pritz, Sidney E 

*Pritz, Sol. W 

■^Scheuer, Jacob 

*Shohl, Chas 

*Weiskopf, D. K 

Weiskopf. D. K 

*Westheinier, Morris . . . 

^- Weiler, Isaac 



fS-oo 

5.00 
300 
5-00 
5-00 
5.00 

3.00 



5. CO 



2 50 



5.00 
5-00 
500 
500 
5.00 
500 
5.C0 



Cleveland. 
*Baron De Hirch Lodge No. 

454, L O B. B 

*Black, Morris A 



5-00 
5-00 
5-00 
5.00 
25.00 
5-00 
5-co 
5-00 
5-00 
5.00 
5.00 

5-00 
10.00 
5.00 
5-00 
5.00 
5. CO 
5 00 
500 
5CO 
5.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5. CO 

5.00 



5.00 
10.00 



indicates Annual Subscriber. 



DOYLESTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 

CAPITAL. $105,000 SURPLUS, $1 10,000 

CONDUCTS GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS. 
ALLOWS INTEREST ON TIME DEPOSITS. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 



JiENRY LEAR, 

PRESIDENT. 



GEO. P. BROCK, 

CASHIER. 



S'AMES BARRETZ 

General Hardivare 

TfEALER, 

cMain and cAshland Streets ^ 

Doylesto^wtif Pa, 



Martin Hulshizer 




i[u§§ist, 



IS 



Cor. JViain and State Sts. 



DOYLESTOW^N, PA. 



HENRY S. BEIDLER 

(Successor to Swartley Bros. M. & T. Co.) 

MERCHANT MILLER, 
and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

COAL, FLOUR, 

Grain, Feed, Timothy and Clover 
Seed, Lime, Fertilizers, &c. 



South Main St., opposite the Gas Works 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



E. H. BUCKMAN. 



General Partner, 
F. J. GERUTZKI. 



E. H. BUCKMAN & CO. 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL, 

Brackets, Mouldings. Doors, Window 

Sash, Blinds, Shutters, Window 

Frames, Etc. 

The best Fertilizers always on hand. 
All kinds Factory Work done to order. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Vienna Bakery. 

I have just completed and refurnished 
my Bakery with the latest improved 

VIENNA STEA^ OVENS, 

and am now prepared to furnish my 
customers and the public in general 

with 

BREAD, ROLLS, BUNS, CAKES 
A. M. KELLER, 

Successor to L. Weinrebe, 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



ROBERT M.YARDLEY, President. 
WARNER WORSTALL, Secretary, 

HENRY O. HARRIS, TREASURER. 

JOHN S. WORSTALL, Superintendent 

THE WORSTALL & CARL 
SPOKE & WHEEL COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

"Wheels and Wheel Stocky Shafts, 
Poles, Reaches, Etc. 

WEST STATE STREET, 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Bucks County Trust Company, 

DOYLESTOVV^N, RA. 
Insures Titles. J- Pays Interest on Deposits. J. Executes Trusts.. 

HUGH B. EASTBURN, President and Trust Officer. 

JOHN S. WII^UAMS, Vice President. T. O. ATKINSOX, Trea.surer. 

GEORGE WATSON, Assistant Trust Officer. 



SAMUEI^ STECKEL, 
PHILIP H. FRETZ, 
ROBT. M. YARDLEY, 
GEORGE WATSON, 
J. FERDINAND LONG, 



Directors. 

JACOB HAGERTY, 
THOS. O. ATKINSON, 
HUGH B. EASTBURN, 
JOHN S. WILLIAMS, 
JOSEPH THOMAS, 



SAMUEL J. GARNER, 
HENRY W. WATSON, 
B. F. SHEARER, 
T. HOWARD ATKINSON. 



MILTON REED, 

DEALER IN 

I^iamonds, VV)o.tebes, Glocl^s 

® Jewelry ® 

Gut Glass and SiluerKuare. 



CASH 

PAID FOR OLD GOLD AND SILVER. 

Hart Building, DOYLESTOWN, PA, 



R. L. Clymer, 



DEALER IN 



Dry Goods, Groceries,. 
Notions, 

and General Merchandise. 



P. .Tr.'d7pot. Doylestown, Pa. 



WYNNE JAMES 

ATXOR^TEY Arc X^ATW 

Room D, Hart Building- 

doxlestown, 3?a. 

all kinds 

real estate for sale 

fire instjrance 

>rOTARY PTTBLIC 



Lumber 

Mill Work and Coal. 

Old Lehigh Coal a Specialty. 



West State Street 
Near Clinton, 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



John Donnelly^ 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Steam, Hot Water and 
Hot cMir Heating. J- ^ 
Roofing and Spouting. 

^UnQhin^ ^°^^^' 'Ranges,. ^ 
KjUllCillULC, Furnaces, Heaters. 

VOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Bicycles and Sewing Machines 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Wm. P. Ely, 

DEALER IN 

Ready=iVlade Clothing 

For Men, Boys and Children, 

Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, 

Furnishing Goods.. 

Corner Ashland and Clinton Streets, 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 




AT WORK IN THE THERESA LOEB MEA\0RIAL GREENHOUSE. 




Grafting in the krauskopf Memorial Greenhouse. 



Subscriptions from May ist, i900> to date. 



49 



Eiseman, Cbas. fo-oo 

*Feiss, Julius 5.00 

*Feiss, Paul 5.00 

*Gries, Rev. M. J 10.00 

*Hexter, Sol. M 5.00 

*Josepb, Isaac 10.00 

^Joseph, Sig 5.00 

*Marks, M. A 5.00 

*Mayer, Adolpli 10.00 

*0.scar Wiener Lodge No. no, 

0. B. A 500 

*Sclivvab, Mrs. M. B 5.00 

*Schlesiuger & Co., Sig. . . . 5.C0 

*Lazarus, F. & R 5.00 

*IIuhn, E 5. CO 

Colninbns. 

Zion Lodge No. 62, L O. B. B. 5.00 
Dayton. 

Daneman, Jacob i.oo 

Greenstone, Isaac r.oo 

Piqiia. 

*Ansbi Emetb Congregation . 5.00 
Steubenville. 

*Sulzbacber, Isidor 5.00 

Toledo. 
*Epbraim Lodge No. 183, I.O. 

B. B 5.00 

Yomigstoivn. 

*Grossnian, Dr. J. B 5.00 

Tbeobald. Mrs. C. (life 

member) 100.00 

OREGON. 

Portland. 
*Portland Lodge No. 416, I. O. 

B. B lo.co 

*Wise, Rev. Stephen .... 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Alleniown. 

■''^Feldman, Mrs. Anna M. . . 5.00 
Blooinsburg. 

^Alexander Bros. & Co. . . . 5.00 
Bradford. 

Don Ab^banel Lodge No. 85, 

1. O. S. B 3.00 

*Greenwald, David C 5.00 

*Greenwald, J. C 10.00 

Carlisle. 

^Livingstone, Jacob ..... 5.00 
Danville. 

Mayer, Rev. A 2 r.oo 

*Scarlet, James ....... 10.00 

Scarlet, James lo.co 

Doylestoivn. 

*Sboemak.er, Harry J., E?q. . 5.00 
£ as ton. 

*Ladies' Hebrew Ben. Society, 5.00 

*Springer, E 5.00 

Harrisburg. 

Friedman, S i.oo 

*Kuhn, Sam'l and Sol. . . . 5.C0 

*Marks, Herman . ... 5.00 

Honesdale. 

*Weisp, W 5.00 



Jenkintown. 

*Silberman & Sou, l\l 

Kiitanyiing. 

*Einsteiii, Jacob 

Lati carter. 

*Cobeu, F. M 

*Gansman, A 

Lancaster Lodge No. 228, I. 
O. B. B 

*Levy, Morris 

*Moss, S. R 

*Roseusteir, A 

Lavghorne. 

*Bransou, Jas. L. (tuition and 

scholarship I 

Branson, Ja.-. L 

McKeesporl. 

*Bachniaii. Ma,\ 

*Corn. S. B 

*Sunstein, I 

Overbrook. 

*Louchheini, Walter 

Philadelphia. 

* Abbott, Geo 

*Abeles, Simon 

*Abrahani.-i, Sam'l 

*Acker, Finlev 

*Allman, H D 

*Allrnau, Jusiiu 

*Aloe, Sidney A 

*Alumni of Kcnesetli Israel, . 

American Road Machine Co. 
One Drag Scraper. 

*Anspach, Moses 

*Appel, Alex. M 

Apt, Morris ...:.... 

*Armhold, Wui 

^Arnold, Arthur S 

*Arnold, Mrs. Cbiience 

Arnold, Lizclie and Julia 

(memorial tree) .... 

*Arnold, Mrs. Lottie A. . . 

*Arnold, Philip . ... 

A?^ch, Mrs. Rachel (memorial 

tree) 

*Asher, Sol 

*Bacharach, Augustus . . 
*Bacharach, Gustav . . . 
*Bacharach, Simon . . 
*Bachman, F. H. . 
*Bachman, Mrs. F. H. . . 
*Bambeiger, Albert J. . . 
*Bamberger, Mrs. F 

Bamberger, H. (memoiial tree 
*Bamberger, Hanv . . . 
^Bamberger, Leonard J. . 
^Bamberger, Ttlax .... 

^Bamberger, Wni 

*Bamberger, Mrs. Wm. 
*Bash, Mrs. Plenrietta . . 

Ba.sh, ]Mr.<5. Henrietta (memo- 
rial tree) 



5-00 

5-00 
5.00 

3.00 
5.C0 
5.00 
5-00 



200.00 
192.57 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5-00 



5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
5-co 
5-00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



5-00 
5-o» 
5.00 
3-co 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

15.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5CO 
5.00 
5,00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10. OO' 

5.00 

5-00 
5 CO 
5.0a 
5:00 

5. CO 

10.00 



* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



50 



Subspriptfons from May ist, 1900, to date. 



Bash, Mrs. Henrietta ... $20.00 

*Bash, Julius 5.00 

*Bauer, Behj 5.00 

*Baum, Sam'l 5.00 

*Baxter, J. & Iv 5.00 

*Bayersdorfer, Sydney .... 5.00 
*Bedicheimer, Mrs. I. (memo- 
rial tree) 5.00 

*Bedicheimer, Mrs. Louis . . 5.00 

*Behal, Joseph 5.00 

*Behal, Mrs. Sol 5.00 

*Berg, Max 5.00 

*Berkowitz, Albert 5.00 

"Berkowitz, Henry 5.00 

*Berkowitz, Paul 5.00 

*Bernheimer, Chas. S 3.00 

*Bernheimer, Morris .... 5.00 

*Bernheimer, Murray S. . . . 5.00 

*Berostein, Henry 500 

Bernstein, Mrs. Theresa . . . 3.00 

Betz&Son, J. F. (life member) 100.00 

*Biernbaum, Max 5.00 

*Birge, Isidore 5-oo 

Binswanger, B. (memorial tree) 10.00 

*Blaylock and Blynn .... 5.00 

*Block, Arthur 5.00 

*Block, Bernard 5.00 

*Block, Simon L 10.00 

Block, Simon L 25.00 

^Bloomberg, Samuel . . 5.00 

Bloomingdale, Mrs. Bell S. . 5.00 

*Blum, Gabriel 10.00 

*Blum, Mrs. Gabriel . . . . 10.00 

Blum, Mrs. Gabriel 45.00 

*Blum, Isaac 5.00 

*Blum, J. Iv 5.00 

*Blum, Mrs. Ralph 25.00 

Blum, Ralph (memorial tree) 100.00 

Blum, Ralph, i Calf. 
I Pony Phaeton. 
3 Military Manuals and Charts. 

Blum, Ralph (special fund) . 250.00 

*Blumenthal, Harold ... 5.00 

■*Blumenthal, Hart 5.00 

Blumenthal, Sol. (lifememb.) 100.00 

*Blumenthal, Mrs. Sol. . . . 5.00 

Bostwick, G. A 5.00 

Bougher, J. K 5.00 

•^Bowers, A. J. S 5.00 

Bowers, W. H 5.00 

*Brandes, Moses , 5.00 

*Brown, Emil 5.00 

*Brunhild, L, 5.00 

Brunswick, Emil 5.00 

*Buckey, E. L 5.00 

*Buck, Daniel H 5.00 

*Butler, Benj. F 5.00 

Byers, Jos. J. (life member) . 100.00 

*Cartun, J 5.00 

Casper, Mrs. H. (memorial 

tree) 10.00 

^Casseres, Ida 5.00 

CaufFman, Emil 25.00 

*Clay, Henry . . . . 5.00 

Class & Nachod Brewing Co. 5.00 



*Cohen, Joseph $5.00 

*Cohen, M. K 5.00 

*Cohn, Alex. B 5.00 

*Cohn, 1 5.00 

*Cohn, Leo L 3.00 

Confirmation Class Keneseth 

Israel 1901 75-00 

Co^ns, Mrs. G. (memorial tree) 15.00 

*Cope, Walter 5.00 

Corbin, P. & F. 55 Gross Screws. 
*DeCosta, H. R. (memorial tree) 5.00 
Dairymen's Supply Co. 
I Feeder and Weaner. 

*Dannenbaum, H. M 5.00 

*Daniel, Gustav 5.00 

*Dannenbaum, Mrs. L. . . . 5.00 
*Dannenbaum, Morris .■ . . . 5.00 
*Davidson, Mrs. Amelia (me- 
morial tree) 5.00 

^Davidson, D. K 5.00 

Davidson, D. K 2.00 

Diligent Sewing Circle. 
16 Night Shirts. 

*Dodge, Jos. M 25.00 

Dreer, H. A. 200 Bulbs. 

*Eicholz, Adolph 10.00 

*Einstein, Meyer 5.00 

*Eisner, Mrs. S lo.oo 

^Einsheimer, Henry . . . . 5.00 
Ettinger, Mrs. S. (memorial 

tree) 5.00 

*Faggen, Nathan 5.00 

*Fels, Samuel S 25.00 

*Feustman, Maurice M. . . ■ . 5.00 

*Fernberger, Harry 5.00 

*Field, John 5.00 

^Finberg, B 5.00 

Fineman, A. Book. 

*Fleisher, B. W 10.00 

*Fleisher, B. W., Jr 25.00 

^Fleisher, Louis 5.00 

*Fleisher, Mrs. Martha . . . 5.00 
Fleisher, Mrs. Martha. Books. 
Fleisher, Mrs. Martha (me- 
morial tree^ 10.00 

*Fleisher, Penrose 10.00 

■^Fleisher, Samuel 10.00 

Fleisher, S. B 10.00 

*Fleisher, Mrs. S. S 5.00 

*Frank, Jacob S 5.00 

*Frank, ^leyer 5.00 

*Frank, Mrs. R 10.00 

*Franklin, Dr. M 10.00 

*Freidenberg, Mone S. ... 5-00 

*Freidenberger, S. L 5.00 

*Friedman, Chas 5.00 

*Friedman, H. S 500 

Friend, per Dr. Jos. Krauskopf 5.00 

^Frohsin, Sam'l 5.00 

Fuhrman, Abe 5.00 

Fulda, Isidor (memorial tree) 10.00 

*Furstenburg. David 10.00 

*Gans, Mrs. Jeannette .... 3.00 



* indicates Annual Subscriber. 




1108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

UEADINQ HOUSE FOR 

CouuEae, SCHOOL, and Weddinq Invitations 
Dance Programs, Menus 

FINE ENGRAVING Ofi 
ALL. KINDS 



before ordering elsewhere 

Compare Samples 

AND Prices 



WM. R. CHAPMAN 
& SONS, 



8 



ricklg^ers 
(lilders 



1215 South Broad Street, 
PHILADELPHIA. 



THE GREATER NEW YORK 

rietallic Bed Co. 

B. LEVIN &, CO., PROPS. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Iron & Brass Bed Steads 

and Manufacturers of Fine 

Mattresses, Springfs & Steel Slats, 

No. 251 South Second Street, 
Phii.adei,phia, Pa. 



raiRtiiLL cofli CO. 

!Bezl' liebigh ©oal, 

"Kindling "(Hood. 

Office and Yard : 

Ninth St. and Qlenwood Ave. 
PHILADELPHIA. 

H. M. DAY, Jr., Proprietor; 

Residence, 3134 Park Avenue. 



T. W. SPARKS, 

No. 121 Walnut Street. 



e:d\a/ard r e: I d^ 
Mbolesale fflorist, 

No. 1S26 Ranstead Street. 



® ^R. E. W. W." * * * 



E. H. FRETZ. D. G. FRETZ. 

N. FRETZ'S SONS, 

Successors to E. W. Kirk. 

FouotMD House Livery 

Sale and Exchange Stables. 

TTpvT) QT:^Q for sale OR EXCHANGE 
-tiWiVOXVO AT ALL TIMES. 

AN UP-TO-DATE LIVERY THROUGHOUT. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Telephone No. 31. Hack meets all Trains. 



SEWING MACHINES. 




A. S. HELLYER'S SONS, Merchants, 



Ladies' and Children's Wear, 

Dry Goods and Groceries, 

Notions, Shoes, Etc. 



Doylestown, 
Pa. 



ACKERS 

Highest Award Bon Bons. 

"How did you ever come to sell 
these 80c Bon Bons for 39c?" 

This question is frequently asked. 

Perhaps it was a blunder — but as you're 11 
the gainer by it, and we're not complain- H 
ing, perhaps the "blunder" isn't serious. R 


Try . — . 

forrest Lj^uijdry 

For CLEAN LINEN 

and the WOOLEN BLANKET, 

and RUG CLEANING 

cannot be excelled. 

C. J. MILLER, 

1223 & 1225 Columbia Ave. 


Eighth St. above Arch and « 

Market St. below Twelfth. H 

Philadelphia and Atlantic City. ■ 


F. Brecht's Sons, 

Cigap Bo5^ 
IVIanufaGtat^et^s, 

109 and III 
North Orrianna Street, 


For Your Wines and Liquors 

GO TO 

wn. RunnEL, jr. 

Wholesale Liquor Dealer, 

1516 Columbia Ave., Philad'a. 


Between Third and Fourth, 
Race aud Cherry Sts. 

Telephone Connection. 


10 yrs. old Rye a Specialty, 
$1.25 per qiiart. 


Sale and Exchange Stables. 

BOSHER BROS. 

Horses, Wagons, 

Express and Light Carriages 

TO HIRE. 

620 to 626 Christian Street, 
Telephone 41-61 X. Philadelphia, Pa. 

FOUR AND SIX HORSE COACHES 
for Picnics, Parties, Etc. 


Philadelpliia. Atlantic City. New York. 

Have you tried a Pound of 

G. E. BROWINBACK'S 

FAMOUS 

Golden Butter, 

FARMERS' MARKET, 
Eighteenth Street and Ridge Avenue, 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Telephone 

Connections. A. H. FRY, Manager.. 




We have just issued our new 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE of 

Bridal Bibles 



Address 

OSCAR KLONOWER, 
1435 Euclid Avenue, Philadelphia^ 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



53 



Gardiner, J |5.oo 

*Galtuian, M 5 oo 

*Gelb, W. B 5.00 

*Geiiiniie, W 5.00 

*Ger£tle, Mrs. Julius 5.00 

*Gerstley, Louis 25,00 

*Geratley, Wni 10.00 

Gerslle}', Wni 25.00 

*Gitiibel, Benj 5.00 

*Ginibel, Clias. L lo.bo 

*Ginibel, Mrs. Ellis . . . . 10.00 

*Ginibe], Isaac 5.00 

*Giiiibe], Jacob 5.00 

*Ginsberg, Isaac 5.00 

*Giiibberg, J 5.00 

*Gleason, Kdw. P 5.00 

Goldsmith, Mrs. H 2.00 

*Goldsniitli, Milton 5.00 

*Goldstein, S 5.00 

*Goodinan Bros 5x0 

^Goodman, I. H 5,00 

*Goodman, Leon 5.00 

Goodman, Mrs. M. (deceased) 5.00 

*Goodman, S. W 5.00 

*Goodman, Mrs. S. W. ... 5.00 

*Goodstein, Isaiah 3 co 

Grant, Adolph (life member) 100.00 

*Graves, N. Z 5.00 

Green baum. Dr. and Mrs. Max 

(memorial tree) 5.00 

*Greenbauni, Dr. Max .... 5.00 

*Greenburg, Sol 10.00 

Greenburg, D. (memorial tree) 5.00 

*Greenhaum, Milton J. . . . 5.C0 

*Greenb£Utn, Simon 5^0 

*Greenewaid, David 5^00 

Green felder, Mrs. Jos. . . . I'oo 

Greenfield, M i ro 

*Greenspan, A. . . , c qo 

^Greenwald, A. E. : . .'.'.'. 500 

*Greenwald, B. F 5^00 

Greenwald, B. F io!oo 

Greenewald, Mrs. B. F. . . . io!oo 

Greenwald, Mrs. Jos. H. . . 2500 

*Guckenheimer, Jos 5.00 

*Haac, Felix (memoriai tree) 500 

*Hackenberg, Mrs. W. B. . . 5 00 

-^Hagedorn, J. J lo.oo 

Hagedorn.J.J. (Special Fund) loo.oa 

*Hagedorn, Jos. H. . . . . . 5 co 

Hagedorn, Jos. H 250.00 

*Hagedorn, Mrs. Jos. H. . . . 5.00 

*Hahn, Henry . 5 00 

*Hanau, Herman io!oo 

*Hansfen, Jno. E 5^00 

Har Nevoli Lodge No. 12, 

I- O. B. B 5.C0 

Harrison, Chas.C.(lifememb.) 100.00 

Hebrew Charily Ball Assoc'u 500 00 

*Hecht, Israel 5.C0 

*Hecht, Mrs. Samuel .... 5.00 

*Heebner, Philip A 5.00 

*Heebner, Samuel 5.00 

*Heilbron, Henry H 5.00 

"*Henly, Jacob 5.00 



Herman, The Misses (memo- 
rial tree) fc.oo 

*Hertz, E. J 5.C0 

*Herzberg, G 5 00 

*Herzberg, Isaac 5.00 

Hexter, Mrs. Esther .... 3.00 

*Heynian, David 5,00 

*Heynian, Henry 25. co 

*Heyman, Mrs. H 5.00 

Heyman, Mrs. H. (memorial 

tree) 10.00 

*Hi'l, Robt. C 5.00 

*Hinlein, J. H 5.00 

Hinlein, J. H. (memorial tree) lo.oo 

*Hirschberg & Bro., J 5.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. David 5.00 

Hirsh, Henry 10.00 

*Hirsh, Mrs. Leopold .... 10.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. Mina (memorial 

tree) 25.00 

Hirsh, Walter A 5 00 

*Hirsh, Wm. Mason 5.00 

*Hirsh, Mrs. Wm 5.C0 

Hirsh, Mrs. Wm 10.00 

Hoffman, Geo. P\ (memorial 

tree) ico.co 

*Hoffman, Julius 5.00 

Hope, Jacob 5.00 

*Hovey, F. S 5.00 

Hyman Lodge No. 75, 1.O.B.B. 10.00 

*Isaacs, Mannie 5 co 

Isman, Felix (memorial tree) 100.00 

*Jacobs, J 5.00 

Jewish Publication Society. 3 Books. 

*Jonas, Henry 5.C0 

Jonas, Herman (life member) 100.00 

Jonas, Herman 100.00 

*Jonas, Leo 5.00 

*[oshua Lodge No. 23, I.O.B.B. 10.00 

*Katz, Arnold 5.00 

*Katz, Marcus 5.00 

*Katzenberg, I lo.co 

*Kaufman, A 5.C0 

*Kaufman, Isador 5.00 

*Kaufman, Mrs. Jos 5.00 

Kaufman, Jos 25.00 

*Kaufman, Mrs. J 5.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. Max . . . 15.00 

*Kaufman, Wm 5.00 

*Kaufmann, Ernest 3.00 

Kaufmann, Morris (life 

member) 100 co 

*Kaufmann, Morris A 10 00 

*Kaufmann, Mrs. Morris . . . 5.CO 

Kayser, Samuel (life member) 100.00 

*Kayser, Samuel 5.00 

Kayser, Samuel . ... 5.00 

*Keystone Hotel Supply Co. . 5.00 

*Kind, Samuel ........ 5.00 

Kind, Samuel (memorial tree) 50.00 

King, Wm 25.00 

*Kirschhaum, Mrs. Ab. . . . 10.00 

*Kirschbaum, Bernie .... 25.00 



* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



54 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



*Kirshbaum, Simon l5-00 

*Klein, Alfred M 5.00 

*Klein, Mrs. Henry ..... 5.00 

*Klein, Leon G 5.00 

Kline, Moses •. . 3.00 

*Klonower, Herman 3.00 

Klonower, Mrs. O. and Mrs. 

Bertha K. Wolf (mem. tree) 5.00 

*Klopfer, S. C 5.00 

^Knoblauch, G. A 5.00 

*Kohn, Abe 5.00 

*Kohn, Arnold 5.00 

Kohn, Mrs. Caroline (memo- 
rial tree) 10.00 

*Kohn, David 3.00 

Kohn, Harry B 20.00 

*Kohn, Samuel 5.00 

*Kohn, Simon 1 5.00 

*Koons, Samuel W 5.00 

*Koplin, L. W 5.00 

*Kraus, S. C 5.00 

*Krauskopf, Eleanore .... 5.00 

*Krauskopf, Harold 5.00 

Krauskopf, Harold (life 

member) 100.00 

Krauskopf, Rev. Dr. Joseph 

(Special Fund) 125.00 

2 Gas Radiators, i Book. 

*Krau^kopf, Rev. Dr. Jos. . . 25.00 

*Krauskopf, Mrs. Jos 5.00 

*Krauskopf, Madeline .... 5.00 

*Krauskopf, Manfred .... 5.00 

Kuhn, Mrs. Benj 5.00 

*Labe, Benj 10.00 

*Landauer, W. B 5.00 

Landis. Miss K. R 5.00 

*Lang, Morris 5.C0 

*Langfeld, A. M 10.00 

Langfeld, A. M 100.00 

*Langfeld, Morris F 5.00 

*Langstadter, I. B 5.00 

*Leberman, Adolph ..... 5.00 

*Iveberman, Jos. W 5.00 

Leffman, Dr. Henry .... 10.00 

*Lehman, Henry 5.00 

*Ivevi, Mrs. Caroline (memo- 
rial tree) 50.00 

Levi, Edgar A. (memorial tree) 5.00 

*Levi, Gerson 5.00 

Levi, Morton K. (memorial 

tree) 5.00 

*Levy, Jos. H 5.00 

Levy, Sol. (life member) . . 100.00 

*Lewin, Mrs. Philip 5.00 

Lewin, Mrs. Ph 5.00 

Liberty Lodge No. 4S, I. O. 

F. S 5.00 

Liberty Lodge No. i5, O. B. A. 5.00 

*Lichten, M. H 25.00 

■*Lichten, Wm 5.00 

*Lieberman, A 10.00 

*Lipper, Arthur 5.00 

*Lipper, M. W 10.00 

*Lisberger, L 5.C0 

*Lit. David J 5.00 



*Lit, Jacob $25. oo 

*Lit, Mrs. J. D 5.00 

Lit, Sam D. (Special Fund) . 250.00- 

*Lit, Sam D 25.00 

*Liveright, Max 5.00 

*Liveright, Morris 5.00 

*Loeb, A. B 10.00 

Loeb, Arthur, Jr 5.00 

*Loeb, Mrs. Herman .... 5.0a 

*Loeb, Horace 5.00 

*Loeb, Howard A 10.00 

*Loeb, Mrs. Howard A. . . . lo.oa 

*Loeb, Jos 5. CO 

*Loeb, Leo 5.00 

*Loeb, Leopold lo.oo- 

*Loeb, Dr. Ludwig 5.00 

*Loeb, Marx B 5.00 

*Loeb, Maurice 5.00 

*Loeb, Michael 5.00- 

*Loeb, O.scar D 5.00- 

*Loeb, Sol lo.oo- 

*Loucheim, Jerome H. ... 5.00 

*Louchheim, Jos. A 10.00 

*Louchheim, Samuel .... 3.00 

*Lowengrund, Isaac 5.0a 

*Lowenstein, Benj 5-oo- 

*Lowenstein, Mrs. H. & Esther 5.00 

*Lyon, Benj 5.00 

*Lyon, Miss Mabel .... 5.00 

Lyon, Mrs. Rosa (memorial 

tree) 5.00 

*McDonnell, Chas 5 00 

*Maccaulay, Jos 5.00 

*Mahn, Godfrey S 5.00 

*Margolin, A. J 5.00 

Marks, Al. S. (memorial tree) 10.00 

*Marks Bros 10.00 

*Marks, Mrs. E 5.00 

*Marks, I. L 5.00 

Marks, I. L. and wife (me- 
morial tree) 100.00 

Marschuetz, Mrs. A. (memo- 
rial tree) 5 00 

*Massman, Em 5.00 

*Mastbaum, Levi 5.00 

*May, Fred. L 5.00 

*May, Jacob 5.00 

*May, Morris , . . 10.00 

*May, Simon 5.00 

*Mayer, Isaac 5.00 

Mayer, Levi 25.00 

Mayers, Jennie (memorial tree) i.oo 
*McCreary, George W. . . . 5.00 

*Mendel, Mrs.' S. L. . . - . . 5.00 

Menke, Jno. B 5.00 

^Mendelsohn, Mrs. Jeanette . 5.00 

Merz, Dan'] (life member) . 100.00 

*Merz, Dan'l 5.00 

Mitchell, Henry 5.00 

Miller, Jacob lo.oo- 

*Miller, Sol. 5-00 

Moore & White . ... 5.0a 

Morris, Wni lo.oo- 

* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



A. B. BARBER & SON, 
Painters and Decorators 

S. W. Cor. Ilth and Spring Garden Sts. 
At Barber's Retail Paint Department 

There is always on hand a full line of 

WHITE LEADS AND LINSEED OIL. al<=o 
Varnishes, Glass, Putty, Brushes of all 
kinds. Oil and Water Siains Dry Colors, 
Artists' Materials, Whilinp, Ghie. Plaster 
Paris. Water Color Tints. SHELLAC AND 
TURPENTINE, BENZINES, Gasoline and 
Sundry Oils. Bath Enamels for inside of 
bath tubs, and Ready Mixed Paints and 
Enamels, all shades. Bronzes and Gold Leaf 
Sponofes and Chamois Skins. All are invited 
to call and examine our goods. 



THEO. LECNHARDT 
& SON, 



Commercial-^ 
Lithographers 



J23& 125 South Fifth St, 
PHILADELPHIA. 



THOMAS A. LYNCH 

Carpenter, 
Builder and Contractor, 

SHOP, 
1618 NORTH CAR]_IS]_E ST. 

Residence, 1619 North Fifteenth St. 

Established iSfc6. PHILADELPHIA. 



Jobbing promptly attended to. 



Brighton Mills 

SAMUEL WHITE, 

Front St. and Cohuiibia Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Phone 5-29-86 Y. 

John Mavvson 
Hair Cloth Co. 

INCORPORATED. 

N. E. CORNER 

Coral and Dauphin Streets 

PHILi^DELPHR, PA. 



WITHOUT A PEER 

Barnes & Erb Co^ 

f Prices 
Everything Popular <^ Service 

[ Quality of Work 

PHONE OR SEND POSTAL 



Christian Pfafft 

WHOLESALE 

Wine and Liquor 

DEALER, I 

A'^, E Corner 

Passyunk Atjc. and Catharine St, 

PHILATiELPHIA. 



Jerome H. Sheip. Asa W. Vandegrift. 

Local and Long Distance Telephone. 

Sheip & Vandegrift 



MANUFAC^^URERS CF 



LOCK-CORNER BOXES 

Nos. 818-826 Lawrence St. 
PHILADELPHIA. 



RUBBER BOOTS 



BEST QUALITY 
LIGHTNESS and 
DURABILITY 




WATER-PROOF FOOTWEAR 

FOR 

...SPORTSMEN... 



Manufactured in Philadelphia by 

Geo* Watkinson & Co* 

GRAVES FERRY 



Sportsmen can buy direct 
from the factory 



Single Pairs made to Measure 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



57 



*Moss, Dr. W IS-oo 

Muhr, Jacob (life member) . loo.oo 

Muller, Chas. P 5.00 

*Myers, D., Jr 10.00 

*Myers, Heury 10.00 

*Myers, Jos 5.00 

*Myers, S. H 5.C0 

*Myers, vS. S 5.C0 

Myers, Mrs. Yetta (memorial 

tree) 5 00 

•*Nadel, Mrs. J 5.00 

"^Nachod, J 5.00 

*Nathanson, Mrs. H. M. . . . 5.00 

*NeUer, David 5.00 

*Netter, Joseph 5.00 

Netter, Joseph (memorial tree) 10.00 

*Newburger, Mrs. Morris . . 5.C0 

*Newburger, Sam. M 5.C0 

*Newmau, Adolph ..... 5.00 

*Newman, M. M 25.00 

*Nixoii, Wm. H 10.00 

*Nixon, Sam. M 25.00 

*Oppeuheimer, Mrs. C. ... 5.00 

*Oppenheimer, Oscar .... 5.00 

*03theimer, Mrs. J 5.00 

*Paulus & Co., Jos. C 5.00 

Pepper, Dr. Wm. (deceased, 

life member) 100.00 

Pfaelzer, Simon (life memb.) 100.00 

*Pfaelzer, Smiou 5.00 

*Pfifferling, E 5.00 

Philadelpbia Lodge No. i, 

I. O. B. B 5.00 

*Plonsby. H 5.00 

*Pollitz, Miss Lydia 5.00 

Pollilz, Kd 25.00 

*Poth & Sons, F, A 10.00 

*Potter, Jos 5.00 

Powdermaker, Mrs. M. . . . 10.00 

*Pulaski, Helen ....... 5 00 

*Ralph, W. T 5.00 

*Raphael, Rudolph 10.00 

Rappaport Lodge No. 35, I. 

O. F. S. of 1 10.00 

Reform Congregation Kene- 

seth Israel (life member) . 100.00 

*Reinhard, Moses 5.00 

Reinsline, Jos. (memorial tree) 10.00 

*Rice, T. J 5.00 

*Rice, W. H 5.00 

Ridgeway, Jacob 10.00 

*Roedelhein], S 5.00 

*Rosenau, Chas 5.00 

"*Rosenau, Mrs. N 5.00 

"*Rosenau, Philip 5.00 

*Rosenau, Simon 5.00 

*Rosenbaum, Heinrich . . . 5.00 

*Rosenbaum, Henry M. . . . 5.00 

Rosenbaum, Leon 15 00 

*Rosenbautn, M 5 00 

*Rosenberg, Abram 5.00 

*Rosenberg, Arthur ... . 5.00 

Rosenberg, Arthur (Special 

Fundi 150.00 

^Rosenberg, C. C 5.00 



Rosenberg, Grace (life 

member) $100.00 

*Rosenberg, Louis lo.co 

*Rosenberg, Morris 5.00 

Rosenberg, Morris. Tobacco Stems. 

Rosenberg, Walter J. (life 

member) 100.00 

*Rosenblatt, H. M. ..... 5.00 

*Rosenblatt, A 5.00 

Rosenblatt, Mr. and Mrs, S. . lo.oo 

^Rosenthal, Dr. Kdwin . . . 5.00 

♦Rosenthal, H 5.00 

Rosskam, Isaac 5.00 

*Rothchild, Ed. L 5.00 

*Rothchild, Henry 5.00 

*Rothchild, M 5.00 

Rothschild, Emil (for self and 

friends) II. 00 

*Rothschild, Sol 5.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Clara K. (me- 
morial tree) 20.00 

*Rubin, Joseph H 5-00 

*Rust, C. G 5-00 

*Sabin, Fred'k 5.00 

*Saller, Isaac 5-Oo 

Sailer, Isaac 25.00 

Sailer, Mrs. Isaac 10.00 

Samuel, J. Batiford 10.00 

*Samuel, Banford 10.00 

^Samuel, Miss Eleanor . . . 10.00 

*Schamberg, Henry 5.00 

*Schoeneman, Jos 5 00 

*Schoenfeld, Max 5.00 

Schloss, Caroline E. (memo- 
rial tree) 5-Oo 

Schloss, Mrs. Herman (life 

member) 100.00 

Schloss & Roedelheim . . . 25.00 

*Schoettle, W. C 500 

Schwacke, Jos. H 5.00 

*Schweriner, Theo 5.00 

*Schwoerer, Conrad 5.00 

Search, Thos 25.00 

*Seidenbach, Henry 5.00 

*Seidenbach, J. M 25.00 

*Seidenbach, Louis 5.00 

*Selig, Bernhard 500 

Selig, Bernhard 25.00 

*Selig, Sol 5-00 

*Selig, Eli K 25. co 

Selig, Emil 5-oo 

Sempliner, David 5.00 

*Shamberg, Lewis M 3.00 

*Sharp, S. S lo.co 

*Showell, E. B 5-oo 

*Sichel, Julius 5.00 

Silberman, Mrs. Ida .... 25.00 

*Silberstein, Mrs. Louisa . . 5.00 

Si'verman, I. H. (life memb.) 100.00 

Silverman, I. H. (Sp. Fund) 100.00 

*Simon, David E 5 00 

*Simon, Mrs Fannie .... 5.00 

Simon, Mrs. Fannie (memorial 

tree) . 5-00 

* iudicates Annual Subscriber. 



-58 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



*Simon, Mrs. S $5.00 

*Sinzheimer, Alex. ..... 5.00 

*Skidelsky, S. S 5.00 

*Smith & Co., E. B 5.00 

*Smith, Caroline 5.00 

*Smythe. E. E 5.00 

*Snellenburg, Miss Claudia . 5.00 

Snellenbuxg, Miss Hortense 

(Scholarship Donation) . . 500,00 

*Snellenburg, J. N 5.00 

Snellenburg, Nathan (life 

member) 100.00 

^Snellenburg, Samuel .... 25.00 

*Solomon, A. A 5.00 

*Solomon, Mrs. A. A 5.00 

*Sommers, L. J 5.00 

Sostman, Julius 5.00 

*Soulas, Chas. . .• 10.00 

*Sou]as, G. A 5.00 

*Spiesberger, Jacob 5.00 

*Springer, Em 5.C0 

*Stecher, L 5.00 

*Steinbach, L. W 5.00 

*Steinhart, Miss Francis . . . 3.00 

*Steppacher, Walter M. . . . 5.00 

*Stern, Mrs. C. K 5.00 

*vStern, Edw. 5.00. 

*Stern, Israel 5.00 

*Stern, Morris 5.00 

*Stern, Moses H . 10.00 

Stern, Mrs. Moses H. . . 10.00 

Sternberger, Samuel (life 

member) 100.00 

*Sternfeld, H 5.00 

*Stewardson, Thomas .... 25.00 

*Straus, Karl 10.00 

Strauss, S 5.00 

*Strouse, A 5.00 

Strouse, H. L 5.00 

*Strouse, Nathan 10.00 

*Sundheim, Jonas 5.00 

*Sundheim, Julius 5.00 

Sundheim, Mrs. Julius . . . 10.00 

Teller, Benj. F. (life member) 100.00 

Teller, Mrs. Benj. F. (life 

member) 100.00 

Teller, Joseph R. (deceased, 

life member) . 100.00 

Teller, Mrs. Jos. (deceased, 

life member) 100.00 

*Teller, Louis A 5.00 

^Teller, Oscar 5.00 

*Teller, Raphael ...... 5.00 

Temple Sewing Circle. 3 dozen 
Napkins. 

*Thalheimer, Bernard .... 5.00 

Thalheimer. Miss Estelle 

(memorial tree) . . 5.00 

Thalheimer, Mrs. L. S. (me- 
morial tree) 10.00 

*Tickner, H. J 5.00 

*Trauerman, S. B 5.00 

*Trenner, Simon 5.00 

Troutman, Dr. B. (lifememb.) 100.00 

Troutman, Dr. B. . . . . . 16.66 



*Trymby, E. D , $5.00- 

*Tuch, Benj 5.00 

*Tutelman, Nathan 10.00 

*Uffenheimer, Ad 5.00 

*Ulman, Miss Hennie .... 5.00 

*Vendig, Chas 5.00 

Walter, Henry J 5.00 

Wanamaker, John (life 

member) 100.00 

*Wasserman, Benj. F 5 00 

Wasserman, Mrs. I. (memorial 

tree) 5.00 

*Warburton, Barclay H. . . . 5.00 

Weil, Jacob 15.82 

*Weil, Sam'l 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. S. (memorial tree) 5.00 

*Weil, Mrs. Theo 5.00 

Weiler, Herman (life memb.) 100.00 

*Weiler, Herman 10.00 

*Weinman, Mrs. Chas. . . . 20.00 

*Weinman, E 5-Oo 

*Weinman, Mrs. Fanny . . . 5.00 

Weinman, Mrs. Fanny . . . 5.00 

*Weinman, Harry 5.00 

Weinman, Mrs. Jacob .... 5.00 

*Weinman, J 5.00- 

*Weinman, Jos 5 oo- 

*Weinman, Miss L 5.00 

Weinman, Leo. L S.co- 

*Weinman, Leo. J 5.00 

*Weinman, Max 5.00 

*Weinman, Miss Rita .... 5.00 

*Weinrich, H 5.00 

Weintraub, Wm 5.00 

*Wertheimer, Jos 5.00 

*Wertheimer, Samuel . . . 5.00 

*Wertheimer, Simon .... 5.00 

*West, Wm 5.00 

*Weyl, Maurice N 5.00 

*Wi€ner, Jacob ... ... 5 00 

Wiener Sons, Jacob. 2 Lots Dishes. 

*Wilson, Thos 5.00 

*Wilson & Richards 5.00 

*Wineland, Elias S-oo 

*Wi£e, Chas 5.00- 

*Wolf, Albert 5.00- 

*Wolf, D 5.00 

nVolf. Ed 5.00- 

*Wolf, Frank 5.00 

*Wolf, Gus. 5.00 

Wolf, I., Jr. (life member) . 100.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Martin L. (memo- 
rial tree) 20.00 

Wolf, Mrs. M. L 5.00 

*Wolf, Mrs. Solomon .... 5.00 

Zimmerman, Dr. M. L. . . . 3.00- 

*Zurn, O. F 5.00. 

Pittsburg. 

*Aaron, Chas. 1 5.0O' 

*Aaron, Louis 1 5.00^ 

Aaron, Louis 1 25.00 

*Aaron, Marcus 5.ot> 

Aaron, Marcus (life member) 100.00 

* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900 to date. 



59 



*Aaron, Mrs. Mina l5-oo 

*Adler, E. B , . 5.00 

*Adler, Henry 5.00 

*Adler, Julius 5.00 

*Adler, Louis J 5.00 

Browarsky, Max (life memb.) 100.00 
Cohen, Aaron (life member) . 100.00 
Cohen, Josiah (life member) 100.00 

*Cohen, Mrs. Josiah 5.00 

*DeRoy, Jos 5.00 

*Dreifus, C 5-00 

Dreifus, C. (life member) . . 100.00 
*Feuchtwanger, Marcus . . . 5.C0 
*Floersbeim, Berthold .... 5.00 

*Frank, Isaac W 5.00 

^Friedman, J. M 5.00 

*Gallinger, Mrs. N 5.00 

Goldman, Mrs, Rachel . . , 10.00 

*Gross, Isaac 5.00 

*Guckenheimer, Mrs. A. , . . 10.00 
Hamburger, Philip (life 

member) 100.00 

Hanauer, A. M. (life member) 100.00 

*Hanauer, Mrs. H 5 00 

Iron City Lodge No. 324, I. 

O. B. B 5-00 

*Kann, W. L 5-oo 

Kaufman Bros, (life member) 100.00 

*Lazarus, David N 5.00 

*Lippman, A 10.00 

*Rauh, A. L 5-0o 

*Rauh, Marcus 5.00 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie (life 

member) 100.00 

Rodef Sholem Congregation 50.00 

Rothschild, M. N 5.00 

*Sidenberg, Hugo 25.00 

Solomon & Ruben (life 

member) 100.00 

*Stadfeld, Jos 5-00 

*Sunstein, A. J 5.00 

*Sunstein, C 5-oo 

United Hebrew Relief Asso'n 200.00 

*Weil, Leo A 25.00 

Weil, Leo A. (life member) . 100.00 
Weil, J. (life member) . . . 100.00 

*Wertheimer, Em 10.00 

*Wertheimer, Isaac 10.00 

*Wertheimer, Samuel .... 10.00 

*Wolf, Fritz 5.00 

*Zugsmith, Chas 5.00 

Pottsville. 

*Greenwald, Gab. 5.00 

*Union Lodge No. 124, I.O.B.B. 5.00 
Scranton. 

*Ackerman, J. 5.00 

*Amos Lodge No. 136, I.O.B.B. 5.00 
*Anspacher, Rev. A. S. ... 5.00 

*Breschel, Adolph , 10.00 

^Goldsmith, Aaron 5.00 

*Goldsmith, Morris 5.00 

^Goldsmith, Sol 5.00 

*Haept, Dr. Henry 5.00 

Harris, Mrs. Rosalie .... 2.00 
*Krotosky, Isidore ..... 5.00 



*Levy, Jos IS-oo 

*Levv, N. B 5-00 

*Oettinger, Louis 5.00 

*Rice, Max 50° 

*Rice, Simon ^.00 

*Roos, Dr. Elias G 5-00 

*Scranton City Lodge No. 47, 

0. B. A 5-00 

Selin's Grove. 

*Weis, S 5-00 

Shamokiii. 

*Rothchild, H 5-00 

Sunbury. 

*Mitchell, L 5-oo 

Uniontown. 
Uniontown Lodge No. 471, 

1. O. B. B 3-oc) 

Wilkesbarre. 

*Levy, Leon 5-oo 

Levy, Leon .• • • 5-0O 

Rodef Sholem Lodge No. 139, 

I. O. B. B 5-00 

*Salzman, Rev. M 5-oo 

*Stern, Harry F 500 

*Strauss, S. J 5-00 

York. 
*Lehmayer, N 5-00 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Westerly. 
*Frankenstein, Ignatz .... 5.00 

Providence. 

Haggai Lodge No. 132, I. O. 

B. B 5-00 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Florence. 

Sulzbacher & Sons 5-00 

TENNESSEE. 

Memphis. 

*Harpman, Sol 5-0° 

Harpman, Sol 5-00 

Katzenburger, Wm. .... 25.00 

Lehman, Felix 2.00 

*Memphis Lodge No. 35, I. O. 

B. B = . . 10.00 

*Morris, H 10.00 

Nashville. 
*Kulmbach, Jacob 5.00 

TEXAS. 

Beawrnont. 
Jubilee Lodge No. 435, I. O. 

B. B. .......... 2.50 

Dallas. 

*Dreyfus, Gerard 5-00 

*Friend, Alex S-OO 

■'Friend, Mrs. Alex 5.00 



* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



6o 



Subscriptions from May ist, 1900, to date. 



Friend, Mrs. A. M. (memorial 

tree) $5.00 

Jacob Fries Lodge No, loi, 

O. B. A 5.00 

*Kahn, E. M 5.00 

*Lieberman, Rudolph .... 5.00 

*Linz & Bro., J 5.00 

*Rheinhart, Sidney > . , . . 5 00 

*Sanger Bros 5.00 

*Titche, Ed 5.00 

El Paso. 

Aronsteiu, S i.oo 

Solomon, Mr. & Mrs. Adolph 3.00 
Ft. Worth. 

^Davidson, Sam 5.00 

*Levy, Samuel 5.00 

■Galvestoii. 
*Zacharias Frankel Lodge No. 

242, I. O. B. B 5.00 

Houston. 

*Levy, Ben 5.00 

Mexia. 

*Nussbaum, Jos 5.00 

San Antonio. 

*Edar Lodge No. 211, I.O.B.B. 5.00 

*HalflF, M 25.00 

*Halff, S 10.00 

Victoria. 
Levi & Co., A |io.oo 

UTAH. 

^alt Lake City. 

■^Bamberger, Simon 10.00 

*Meyer, Mrs. Rosa 15.00 

VIRGINIA. 

J^orfolk. 

*Crockin, H 5.00 

*Friedlander, Chas 5.00 

*IIecht, Jacob 5.00 

*IIirschler, E 5.00 

*Lowenburg, D 5.00 

*Seldner, A. B 5.00 

Jiichniond. 

*Binswanger, Helen ...;.. 5.00 

*Hutzler, Henry S. .... 5.00 

Kaufman, 1 5.00 



Millheiser, Gust, (lifememb.) 100.00 
*Millheiser, Mrs. Clarence . . 5.00 

Millheiser, Mrs. Rosalie . . 25.00 
*Raab, E. . 5.00 

Staunton. 
*Loeb, Julius 5.00 

WASHINGTON. 

Seattle. 

Seattle Lodge No. 342, I.O.B.B. 10.00 

Spokane. 
^Abraham Geiger Lodge No. 

423, r. O. B. B 5.00 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Wheeling;. 
*Levi, Rev. Harry 5.00 



WISCONSIN. 

Appleton. 

Loeb, F 

Eau Claire. 

Chippena Valley Lodge 

La Crosse. 

Hirschheimer, A. . . . 
*Strouse, B. C 



Milwaukee. 
*Cohen, Mrs. Gertrude 
*Cohen, Jonas 



Cream City Lodge No 
L O. F. S. of L . 
*Greenwald, J. Oscar 
^Hamburger, Nathan 

Isaac Lodge No. 87, I. 
*L^ndauer, Max . . 
*Miller, Morris . . 
*Michelbacher, A. J 
*Shuster, Chas. . . 
*Tabor, L. L. . . . 
*Wiscousin Lodge No. 



63- 



O. B 



5.00 

5.00 

50.00 
5.00 

5.00 
5.00 



B. 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
80, O.B.A. 5.00 



CANADA. 

Montreal. 
*Victoria Lodge No. 92, I.O.B.B. 5.03 

* indicates Annual Subscriber. 



The Present CsnGration 

of HOUSEWIVES will no 
doubt remember this picture 
on the wrappers around ^ 

Dobbins' Electric Soap 




THE SOAP their mothers and grandmothers used to 
always praise so highly, and which they thought was 
the cheapest and best soap made even when they paid 
lo cents a bar for it. 



The same soap is now sold 
by all first-class grocers at 



Cents 
a Bar 



Size of bar and quality is exactly as it used to be. 
A box of DOBBINS' ELECTRIC should be in every 
house, as it improves with age. 

Dobbins Soap Mfg. 

(Sole Proprietors) 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



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THIRTY-SIX YEARS, U a c^uoAO^ida^ tkoX kt cUz^ 
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1744 

\^liaiin/niyM(ri 



The: William H. Moon Co. 

N{irser2n)en and landscape mtists, 

GLENWOOD NURSERIES, 702 Stephen Girard Building, 

Morris ville, 21 South J 2th Street, 

Bucks Co., Pa. Philadelphia, Pa. 

SHADE TREES, EVERGREENS, FLOWERING SHRUBS, HERBACEOUS 
PLANTS, VINES, ROSES, 

Carefully grown in large assortment. 

PLANT FOR A PERMANENCY. PLANT THE BEST. 

EUGENK K. NICE, 

272 and 274 South Second St., Philadelphia. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

/arnishes, Japans, Paints, Pure 
Colors, Brushes, Glass. 

FACTORY, BROAD AND BIGLER STS. 

THOS. ECCLES, 

Shop: 520 Cypress 5t. Ccll^pCntCP ^^ 

(Below Spruce Street.) C^ ~ 

Buildet^ 



(Below Spruce Street.) 

Residence: 733 S. 15th St. 



JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



LIGHT. 5IQNS. POWERJi 

Illuminate Your Windows \ ^ 

and Stores with i 

I 

£leetrie (igfit. 

There is no artificial illuminant comparable with electricity for 
this purpose. Customers should be made comfortable; salespeople 
should be provided with a healthful workroom. Electric light is 
the only illuminant which does not vitiate the atmosphere. 
Progressive Merchants realize the tremendous force exerted by a 
brilliantly and handsomely lit window and store. It is a paying 

ADVERTISEMENT. 

Electric Light is 

. ^ ..^..^ 

HEALTHFUL! ^ 
BRILLIANT! 

DECORATIVE! 

CONVENIENT! 

ECONOMICAL! 

Do not allow the adjoining Store to get ahead of you. It is better '; 
and easier to keep trade than to get it after it is once lost, ^ 



Electric Signs are readable day and night. 
Electric flotOrS are clean, efficient and economical. 

CONSULT US NOW. 

The Edison Electric Liglit Co. 

OF PHILADELPHIA, 

N. E. Cor. 10th and Sansom Streets, Phone. 



/ 



^