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1944 
1959 



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[Document 16 — I960.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PARKS AND RECREATION 
DEPARTMENT 

FOB THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1959 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir: 

In accordance with section 15 of chapter 185, Acts of 
1875, the Parks and Recreation Commission herewith 
submits its annual report for the year 1959. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank R. Kelley, 

Chairman, Board of Parks 

and Recreation Commissioners. 



Harry J. Blake, 



Thomas J. Carty, 



Daniel G. O'Connor, 
O. Philip Snowden, 
Associate Commissioners. 






City Document No. 16. 



INTRODUCTION 



The Department of Parks and Recreation had its 
beginning with the appointment of the first Board of 
Park Commissioners on July 8, 1875, under the title 
"Park Department." The Board consisted of three 
members who served without compensation. As thus 
constituted, the department continued up to 1913, when 
by provision of Chapter 10, Ordinances of 1912, it was 
merged with the Public Grounds, Bath and Music 
Departments, under the name of Park and Recreation 
Department. The Commissioners were appointed by 
the Mayor for a term of three years, one term expiring 
each year. The Chairman was a paid city official, in 
charge of the operation of the department. The other 
two members served without compensation. 

In 1920 the Cemetery Department was merged with 
the Park and Recreation Department, and the title was 
changed to Park Department. On May 1, 1954, the 
department became the Parks and Recreation Depart- 
ment under the provisions of Chapter 2, Ordinances of 
1954. The Board of Parks and Recreation Commis- 
sioners was increased to five members. 

Under the latest ordinance, the Commissioner of 
Parks and Recreation becomes the active head of the 
department with power of authority far beyond that 
which existed when the Board consisted of three mem- 
bers (Sections 36-42, inclusive, Chapter 2, Ordinances 
of 1954). The Commissioners meet as required on call 
from the Chairman. 

The department is responsible for the maintenance 
and improvement of approximately 2,725 acres of parks 
and playgrounds. Included in this area are the following 
facilities: a general office building; 121 playgrounds 
and play areas, 47 of which have field houses; 20 parks, 
large and small; 2 service yards containing offices, 
mechanics' shops, storehouse and garage; a recreation 
office building; 13 indoor recreation centers; 10 public 
bath houses; 2 public golf courses (18 holes); 3 public 
bathing beaches with bathhouses in which are 2 so- 
laria; 4 swimming pools (2 indoor and 2 outdoor); 85 
public squares; 14 greenhouses; 19 cemeteries (3 active, 
16 inactive or historic); 108 miles of parkways, drive- 
ways, walks and paths; 131 acres of ponds and rivers; 
and the care and maintenance of all trees on city streets, 
parks, and playgrounds. 



Parks and Recreation Department .'$ 

The department organizes, promotes, and conducts a 
city-wide recreation program for all age groups with 
special emphasis on youth programs. 

This report summarizes briefly the efforts of the 
Parks and Recreation Commission and the staff of the 
department to maintain a high standard in essential 
services and bo expand the facilities of our park system 
to moot the needs of the department within our appro- 
priation allowances. 

In this report there is no particular attention given 
to the extensive maintenance responsibilities of the 
Parks and Recreation Department. Reference to the 
introductory section of this report, will indicate the large 
number of areas, buildings, etc., that require most, of 
the time of our staff. It, should be apparent that 
much of our appropriation is expended for the mainte- 
nance and improvement, of parks, gardens, park and 
recreation buildings, mechanics'' shops, golf courses, 
cemeteries, etc. Proper maintenance is the key bo 
efficient service. We are confining this report to major 
work accomplished in IO. r >S, all of which is substantially 
outside the area of general maintenance. 

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN L959 

Park and Playground Improvements 

Construction of Wed Street Plaza, Boston Common: 
Further construction work was continued on the 
beant, ideal, ion of LaFayette Mall, Boston Common, 
from the income of the George F. Parkman Trust 
Fund. The Laying of pipes for the drainage system 
and water supply connecting with the pool, which 
is the center of the new fountain, was completed. 
The light and dark pavement which is a feature of 

the new development was Completed. Seven steel 
flagpoles were; erected in place in tJie pool and inoini 

ment area. New seats and concrete benches were 
set in place, and much of the area Loamed and fertilized 
for a sum of $79,081.90. It is our hope to have thi 
area developed during the year of I960 with the, erection 
of figures for the three monuments and the completion 

of the center fountain. 

The flower boxes along LaFayette Mail were planted 
with Evonymus shrubs, Japanese yews, and dwari 
yews at a cost of $8,624.50. An architect and sculptor's 



4 City Document No. 16. 

contract for the designing of the statuary fountain 
and surrounding area was awarded in the amount of 
$55,000, the work under this contract to be done in 1960. 

Construction of Playground at Veterans of Foreign 
Wars Parkway, Russett Road, Bruce and Weld Streets, 
West Roxbury: The construction work on this play- 
ground was continued from 1958 and completed in 
1959 with the furnishing and erecting of park benches, 
tables and bench units, chain link fence, play area 
equipment, asphalt surfacing, seeding and sodding 
of ball diamonds, and the planting of 55 trees for a 
sum of $47,027.20. 

Asphalt Surfacing and Play Area Construction at 
DeFilippo Playground, North End: This small area, 
containing slightly more than an acre of land, was 
reconditioned and redeveloped into a small children's 
play area. New playground equipment, reconditioning 
of the walks, placing of park benches, and enclosing 
the area with a chain link fence was completed at the 
cost of $11,490.75. 

Construction of Play Area at Sumner and Lamson 
Streets, East Boston: This particular area, containing 
half of an acre, has been under the control of the de- 
partment for approximately three and a half years, but 
we have never had a sufficient appropriation to properly 
develop the area. In 1959 we removed the brick struc- 
tures located on the premises. We proceeded to install 
new water drains, a drinking fountain, new seats and 
benches, and also play area equipment. The area was 
entirely enclosed with a chain link fence. This work 
was done at an expenditure of $39,772.36. 

Reconstruction of Play Area at Harrison Avenue, 
Boston: This small area containing approximately one 
tenth of an acre was developed in 1950 as a children's 
play area. During the ensuing ten years much use was 
made of the area, and in 1959 it was necessary to do 
considerable reconditioning work. New park seats were 
installed, the area was surfaced with a new special black 
top preparation, the fence and gate were painted, and 
other incidental repair work restoring the area in good 
condition was done at an expenditure of $4,178.90. 

Grading, Surfacing, and Improvements at Jefferson 
Playground, Roxbury: The redesigning and recondi- 
tioning of this playground started in 1958 and was 
completed in 1959 by seeding and sodding the ball dia- 



Parks and Recreation Department 5 

monds, erecting park benches, installing new playground 
equipment, planting eight maple trees, and surrounding 
the complete area with a chain link fence. This work 
was done at a cost of $14,195. 

Playground Improvements at McConnell Park, Dor- 
chester: This playground has been out of commission 
because of the construction of the Southeast Expressway. 
A considerable portion of the playground was taken by 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the construc- 
tion of the Expressway. Now that the Expressway is a 
reality, a start was made on the redesigning and recon- 
ditioning of the remaining part of the playground. In 
1959 the work consisted of fence repairs, grading, drains, 
a drinking fountain, grass sod, seeding, new walks and 
benches, baseball backstop, and the planting of 30 
Norway maples at a cost of $29,097.35. 

Repairs and Alterations to Steam Heating Boiler at L 
Street Bathhouse, South Boston: This work was com- 
pleted at a cost of $3,970.39. 

WALKS AND ROADWAYS 

Arnold Arboretum: For the first time in years a start 
was made on the asphalt surfacing of the roadways in 
the Arnold Arboretum. In 1959 work was completed in 
the amount of $11,830.50. 

Reconstruction of Service Roads at Franklin Park Serv- 
ice Yard, West Roxbury: The roads in and around the 
areas of our Franklin Park work shops were constructed 
after many years at a cost of $33,132.71. 

BUILDINGS, ETC. 

Paris Street Gymnasium, East Boston: A contract for 
roofing and metal work at this building was awarded, 
and the work completed in the amount of $15,723. 

Repairing and Painting Dome and Greenhouses at 
Franklin Park Yard: The greenhouses in Franklin 
Park, the center of our entire horticultural program, 
were repaired, painted, etc., at a cost of $13,880.78. 

TREES 

Approximately 1,300 trees, which included Norway 
maples, Schwedlari maples, Columnare maples, and 



6 City Document No. 16. 

European lindens, were planted on city streets and park- 
ways in the amount of $49,996. Several hundred trees 
located in all sections of the city were trimmed, had all 
deadwood removed, and were reshaped at a cost of 
$20,375. 

Trees were sprayed throughout the park system under 
contract in the amount of $11,000. This work was in 
addition to the work done by the Parks and Recreation 
staff. 

RECREATION 

Our recreation program and what this department 
accomplishes for all groups, from the youngest to the 
golden age, is well known in the community. Our pro- 
gram has been copied by many other cities in the United 
States. 

As in former years we have conducted our city-wide 
basketball, baseball, handball, and football programs 
in all sections of the city. Thousands of persons com- 
peted in all our events, which are set up in Junior, 
Junior Varsity, Varsity and Senior Varsity, and Senior 
Park leagues, in all these sports. It might be of interest 
to point out that in our Senior Park Football League, 
whose games are witnessed by hundreds of thousands, 
the final play-off game was held in the new Boston Col- 
lege Stadium. This privilege was granted to us through 
the courtesy of His Eminence Cardinal Richard J. 
Cushing and Boston College officials. 

During the summer season, for a nine-week period, 
we staffed 125 play areas and school yards with recrea- 
tion leadership, and the young men and women instruc- 
tors, most of whom were college graduates or upper 
classmen in college, directed a workshop covering sports, 
games, athletics, handcrafts, music, etc. Among the 
more popular attractions were the several soft ball 
leagues, which now include women as well as men. 

A special indoor recreation demonstration, which 
included girls from each of the 14 recreation centers 
throughout the city, was held at the Tobin Memorial 
Gymnasium, at which the May Queen was selected. 

In addition to the regular annual events like May 
Day, Halloween, and the Golden Age parties, the 
Recreation Division promoted weekly programs be- 
ginning with "Get Acquainted Week" and including 



Parks and Recreation Department 7 

"Be Kind to Animals Week," "Do It Yourself Week," 
"Be a Good Citizen Week," etc. 

Resodding and seeding of tees and fairways at the 
George Wright Golf Course, Hyde Park, was completed 
at a cost of $10,350. 

The beaches at the L Street Bathhouse were graded 
and sanded at a cost of $4,160.60. 

Arrangements were made to rope and floodlight 
special baseball and football games of the Park League 
senior teams. Because of insufficient funds we were 
only able to furnish this service to a limited number of 
areas. The roping work cost $4,970, and the furnishing 
of floodlight equipment $4,650, both under contract. 



CEMETERIES 

New areas for burials were developed in Mount Hope 
and Evergreen Cemeteries. This included the installa- 
tion of 872 new concrete liners. The work further 
included subsoiling and incidental work and was done 
under two contracts at a cost of $36 898.88. 

Expenditures for Maintenance, January 1 to December 31, 1959 

Parks, Gardens, Squares 



Albion and Village Streets 










$1,115 00 


Arnold Arboretum . 










1,906 28 


Back Bay District 










39,942 15 


Back Bay Yard 










34,383 16 


Barry Dump 










384 45 


Belmont Park . 










270 95 


Blackstone Square . 










5,414 45 


Boston Common, Bandstand 










4,357 69 


Boston Common, Convenience Stations 




14,966 47 


Boston Common, Deer Park Tool House 




555 36 


Boston Common, Frog Pond . 




5,046 29 


Boston Common, Grounds 




49,764 08 


Boston Common, Lafayette Mall . 




114 90 


Boston Common, Playland 




709 49 


Boylston Street Subway, Telephone Booth 




43 64 


Boynton Circle 




445 50 


Bradford and Wilkes Streets . 




483 77 


Brighton District 




29,677 28 


Cantillo Park 




213 00 


Castle Island 




5,064 70 


Central Square 




2,805 26 


Chandler Pond .... 




280 00 


Charlestown District 










24,366 35 



City Document No. 16. 



Christmas Festival . 

City Square .... 

Columbus Park .... 

Columbus Park Locker Building 

Columbus Park Stadium . 

Commonwealth Avenue . 

Commonwealth Avenue Underpass 

Concord Square 

Copley Square . 

Districts, General 

Dorchester Heights 

Dorchester Park 

East Boston District 

East Boston Parks and Squares 

East Boston Stadium 

Edward Everett Square 

Emerson Park . 

Evergreen Cemetery 

Fens .... 

Fens, Rose Garden . 

Fens, Stadium . 

Franklin Park, Administration Buildings, Shops 

Yard, etc 

Franklin Park, Blacksmith Shop 

Franklin Park, Boat Locker and Boating Program 

Franklin Park, Carpenter Shop 

Franklin Park, Dump 

Franklin Park, Garage 

Franklin Park, Golf Course 

Franklin Park, Greenhouse 

Franklin Park, Grounds . 

Franklin Park, Harness Shop 

Franklin Park, Lawn Mower Shop 

Franklin Park, Paint Shop 

Franklin Park, Plumber Shop 

Franklin Park, Refectory Building 

Franklin Park, Repair Shops 

Franklin Park, Storehouse 

Franklin Square 

George Wright Golf Course 

Greenwood Square . 

Harrison Avenue Play Area 

Heath Street 

Highland Park . 

Horatio Harris Park 

Jamaica Pond . 

John Harvard Mall . 

Kenmore Square 

Lasalle Road 

Madison Park . 



93 
11 
71 
13 
07 
25 



$11,594 54 

508 01 

29,436 25 

3,099 01 

8,836 

17,743 

426 

144 

521 

81 

3,564 45 

12,052 30 

7,090 34 

1,428 00 

27,481 71 

34 31 

35 34 
39 15 

9,009 41 
22,115 92 
13,084 29 

80,506 89 

4,162 39 

9,198 16 

38,736 56 

618 96 

104,292 41 

35,752 29 

99,672 11 

19,980 47 

1,604 71 

36,335 09 

22,024 44 

13,986 18 

8,077 63 

43,545 98 

49,166 34 

3,825 45 

84,012 34 

124 96 

442 50 

30 80 

20 70 

854 32 

6,148 75 

30 80 

147 00 

495 00 

3,825 45 



Parks and Recreation Department 



9 



Mary P. C. Cummings Estate 

Mother's Rest . 

Mount Hope Cemetery . 

North End District . 

North End Prado 

North Square 

Oak Square, Brighton 

Orchard Park 

Parks and Squares, General 

Parks and Roadways 

Peabody Square 

Preble Street Traffic Circle 

Prescott Square 

Public Garden . 

Richard J. Doyle Square 

Roslindale Square 

Ross Estate 

Scarboro Pond . 

South Boston-Dorchester District 

Sumner and Lamson Streets 

Training Field, Charlestown 

Wachusett Street 

Walcott Square . 

Wallingford Square . 

Ward's Pond Area 

Washington Park 

Webster Square 

William Corbett Park 

Williams Farms 



$385 45 

81 32 

1,369 50 

2,920 55 

12,279 65 

69 40 

445 50 

122 50 

10,150 77 

4,313 31 

73 33 

579 66 

3,233 25 

48,666 91 

149 94 

4,403 50 

901 37 

492 38 

5,003 95 

4,495 50 

1,750 55 

192 22 

12 60 

90 00 

495 00 

1,127 95 

25 07 

1,371 11 

96 77 



Total . $1,163,554 14 



Playgrounds 

Almont Street Playground 
American Legion Playground . 
Arthur F. McLean Playground 
Billings Field Playground 
Brookside Avenue Playground 
Cassidy Playground . 
Ceylon Street Playground 
Christopher J. Gibson Playground 
Christopher J. Lee Playground 
DeFilippo Playground 
Fallon Field Playground . 
Francis Parkman Playground 
Franklin Field Playground 
George H. Walker Playground 
Glenwood Play Area 



$7,769 44 

4,535 19 

627 50 

13,065 45 

838 75 

12,458 40 

4,479 83 
12,598 09 
10,441 74 

1,415 25 
15,505 20 

3,407 42 
29,084 86 

9,390 77 
245 00 



10 



City Document No. 16. 



Green and Lamartine Playground 

James L. Cronin Playground . 

James F. Healy Playground . 

Jefferson Playground 

John J. Connolly Playground 

John A. Doherty Playground 

John J. Doherty, Jr. Playground 

John F. Holland Playground . 

John W. Murphy Playground 

John H. L. Noyes Playground 

John J. Ryan Playground 

John Winthrop Playground . 

Joseph M. Byrne Playground 

Joseph E. Lee Playground 

Joseph A. McLaughlin Playground 

Lamson Street Playground 

L. Gertrude Howes Playground 

Leo F. McCarthy Playground 

Lester J. Rotch Playground . 

Little League Playgrounds 

London and Decatur Streets Playground 

Margaret and James Tobin Playground 

Mary Draper Playground 

Mary Hannon Playground 

Mary E. Hemenway Playground 

McConnell Park Playground . 

McKinney Playground 

Mission Hill Playground 

Murray Playground . 

Myrtle Street . 

Paris Street Playground 

Parker Hill Playground 

Pitts and Hale Street 

Playgrounds General. 

Portsmouth Street Playground 

Prince Street Playground 

Readville Playground 

Reddy Avenue Playground 

Richard Kiley Playground 

Rogers Park Playground . 

Ripley Playground . 

Ronan Park Playground . 

Smith's Pond Playground 

Stanley A. Ringer Playground 

Thomas J. Roberts Playground 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Playground 

Wesley G. Ross Playground . 

William J. Barry Playground . 

William E. Carter Playground 

William Eustis Playground 



31 
35 
09 
50 

18 
50 

85 
78 



$55 25 

6,172 22 

8,783 27 

9,585 48 

11,067 23 

4,065 40 

8,125 10 

4,378 14 

12,635 12 

10,199 46 

13,305 41 

1,691 06 

487 

840 
2,320 

142 
3,097 

376 
7,118 
2,084 
3,446 36 

491 39 
9,496 48 
3,130 26 
12,395 25 
3,181 98 
8,783 19 
9,444 00 
8,234 27 

103 14 
3,933 46 
4,240 48 

596 20 

35,493 37 

6,213 67 

1,138 

1,410 

2 

370 

14,318 09 

1,282 75 

9,236 

9,462 

6,883 

9,123 

5,480 

8,642 

12,821 29 

6,920 40 

16,912 08 



20 
17 

98 
71 



61 

74 
68 
86 
75 
86 



Parks and Recreation Department 11 

William E. Garvey Playground .... $34 91 

William F. Smith Playground .... 14,430 13 
William Gary Walsh Playground . . . . 9,113 75 



Total $469,163 05 

Recreation Division — Administration . . $446,834 86 



Baths, Beaches, Pools, Recreation Centers 

Brighton Bath $8,290 65 

Broadway Municipal Building, Bath, Center . 39,133 95 

Cabot Street, Bath, Pool, Center .... 60,514 29 

Charlestown Bath, Center 13,446 17 

Charlestown Pool (Outdoor) ...... 53,123 19 

Columbia Road, Bath, Center .... 15,090 00 

Curtis Hall, Bath, Pool, Center .... 30,075 25 

Dover Street, Bath House and Laundry . . 173,831 95 

Hyde Park, Bath, Center 15,640 30 

John J. Williams, Bath, Center .... 34,886 00 

L Street, Bath House and Beach .... 137,029 30 
Maurice J. Tobin Memorial Building, Bath, 

Center 26,822 29 

North Bennet Street, Bath, Center . . . 57,624 46 

North End Park Beach, Bath and Pool (Outdoor) 51,507 31 

Paris Street, Bath, Center 63,352 18 

Plympton Street Pool 183 75 

Repair Room, Sewing Room, and Stock Room . 40,308 34 

Roslindale, Bath, Center 11,611 00 

Tyler Street, Bath, Center 11,032 35 

Vine Street, Bath, Center 31,141 95 

Baths, General 36,419 06 

Total $911,063 74 

General Expenses 

Central Office — Administration .... $189,685 05 

Street Trees 153,226 52 

Automobiles, Tractors, Wagons, etc. . . . 146,916 74 



Total $489,828 31 



Recapitulation 

Parks, Gardens, Squares $1,163,554 14 

Playgrounds 469,163 05 

Baths, Beaches, Pools, Recreation Centers . . 911,063 74 



12 



City Document No. 16. 



Recreation Division — Administration 

General Expenses 

Franklin Park Improvements 
McConnell Park Playground, Dorchester 
Reconstruction and Repair of Parkways and 

Roadways 

Repairs to Buildings and Structures 

Park and Playground Improvements, Etc. 

Planting and Replacement of Trees 

Removal of Trees Afflicted with the Dutch Elm 

Disease 

LaFayette Mall, Boston Common 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway Playground 



Total 



$446,834 86 

489,828 31 

51,193 11 

17,345 10 

14,969 35 

6,850 35 

123,807 67 

35,026 65 

30,000 00 

110,998 56 

51,204 41 

3,921,839 30 



Expenditures of Revenue and Non=Revenue, Special Appropriation 
and Trust Funds, January 1, 1959, to December 31, 1959 

Mary P. C. Cummings, Trust Fund, income .... $6,868 03 

Randidge Trust Fund, income 1,568 20 

Department Equipment Loan, Revenue and Non-Revenue 3,861 20 

Total $12,297 43 



CASH RECEIPTS 
For Twelve Months Ending December 31, 1959 

Park Division 



Park 



and 



Franklin Park Golf Course 
George Wright Golf Course 
Permits for signs, openings, etc. 
Fees for services .... 
Commissions on public Telephones 

Department buildings 
Settlement of claims for damages 

Refunds 

Miscellaneous .... 
Towels, soap, in playground houses 

George Wright Golf Clubhouse 
Rentals from property and concessions 
Boston Common Tree Fund, income 
Randidge Trust Fund, income . 
Babcock Music Fund, income . 
Foss Flag Fund, income 
Foss 17th of June Fund, income 
Mary P. C. Cummings Trust Fund, income 



Bath Division 

Towels, soap, etc., in bathhouses 



$32,795 50 

44,061 50 

90 20 

535 00 

648 22 

1,291 56 

60 00 

124 43 

1,259 92 

9,669 50 

172 96 

1,817 09 

104 95 

85 00 

85 00 

6,241 92 



$27,288 44 



),042 75 



27,288 44 



$126,331 19 



Parks and Recreation Department 



13 



Above receipts were credited as follows: 

General Revenue $117,824 27 

Trust Funds, income 8,506 92 



331 19 



Franklin Park Golf Course 

1959 

Opening Date, April 1. Closing Date, December 20. 



Attendance, 53,000 
Annual Permits, 545 at 
Annual Permits, 2 at 
Daily Permits, 179 at $3 
Daily Permits, 4,607 at $2 
Daily Permits, 4,957 at $1.50 
Twilight Permits, 1,884 at $1 



Total 



$13,625 00 

100 00 

537 00 

9,214 00 

7,435 50 

1,884 00 



,795 50 



George Wright Golf Course 
1959 



Opening Date, April 1. 
Attendance, 46,913 
Annual Permits, 599 at $40 
Annual Permits, 26 at $70 
Daily Permits, 95 at $4 . 
Daily Permits, 3,415 at $2.50 
Daily Permits, 3,477 at $2 
Lockers, 482 at $5 . 



Closing Date, December 6. 



$23,960 00 
1,820 00 
380 00 
8,537 50 
6,954 00 
2,410 00 



Total $44,061 50 



Attendance Records — 1959 

Playgrounds, Shower Baths, Beaches and 
Swimming Pools, Gymnasia 

Playgrounds Summer Attendance .... 5,422 000 

Playgrounds, Winter Attendance (Skating) . 410,000 

Shower Baths 1,928,500 

Beaches and Swimming Pools .... 1,065,000 

Gymnasia Class and Individual Attendance . 149,000 



Total 



8,974,500 



14 



City Document No. 16. 



PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT — 
CEMETERY DIVISION 



The following annual report is presented for the 
Cemetery Division from January 1, 1959, to December 
31, 1959. 

Department Cemeteries 

The burying grounds, cemeteries, and tombs which 
are owned by and in charge of the City of Boston are as 
follows, with a total area of about 7,040,708 square feet: 

Square Estab- 
Feet lished 
1838 
1807 
1630 
1659 
1630 
1660 
1756 
1810 
1816 
1841 
1633 
1630 
1814 
1683 
1711 
1848 
1764 



Bennington Street, East Boston 

Bunker Hill, Charlestown 

Phipps Street, Charlestown . 

Copp's Hill, Hull street, City 

King's Chapel, Tremont street, City 

Granary, Tremont street, City 

Central, Common, City . 

South End South, Washington street, City 

Hawes, Emerson street, South Boston 

Union, East Fifth street, South Boston 

North, Uphams Corner, Dorchester 

Eliot, Eustis street, Roxbury 

South, Dorchester avenue, Dorchester 

Westerly, Centre street, West Roxbury 

Walter Street, West Roxbury 

Evergreen, Commonwealth avenue, Brighton 

Market Street, Brighton 

Mount Hope, Walk Hill street, 125 acres and 

14,330 square feet 

Fairview, Fairview avenue, Hyde Park, about 50 acres, 



157,500 
48,202 
76,740 
89,015 
19,344 
82,063 
60,693 
64,670 
11,232 
5,470 

142,587 
34,830 
95,462 
39,450 
35,100 

604,520 
18,072 



1851 
1892 



City Tombs 

Twenty-five in the South Ground; six in Phipps Street 
Ground, Charlestown; one tomb for infants in South Ground; 
one tomb for infants and one for adults in Copp's Hill Ground ; 
one for adults and one for infants in the Granary Ground; 
one for infants in King's Chapel Ground; one for infants in the 
Central Ground; two receiving tombs in East Boston; one 
receiving tomb in Dorchester North; one receiving tomb in 
Dorchester South; one receiving tomb in Evergreen Cemetery, 
Brighton; one receiving tomb in Mount Hope Cemetery; and 
one receiving tomb in Fairview Cemetery, Hyde Park. 



Parks and Recreation Department 15 

Cemetery Division Receipts, January 1 to December 31, 1959 



Cemeteries 


General 
Receipts 


Perpetual 

Care 
Receipts 


Interest on 

Perpetual 

Care 




$106,494 00 

33,247 50 

21,615 50 

145 00 

195 00 

72 00 


$20,980 00 
7,500 00 
13,825 00 


$22,812 16 




6,687 95 




8,652 17 




420 78 






137 87 






31 25 






191 45 








31 25 








8 44 


Bunker Hill 






1 35 








31 25 








31 25 










Totals 


$161,769 00 


$42,305 00 


$39,037 17 





Total, Book Value of General Fund, December 31, 1958. . $5,110,401 19 

Interest, General Fund, 1959 151,768 52 

Revenue (General Receipts), 1959 .... 161,889 00 

Appreciation on Investments 672 90 

$5,424,731 61 

Payments from Fund During 1959: 

Accrued Interest on Securities Purchased $970 61 

Refunds 2,135 00 

3,105 61 

Total, Book Value of General Fund, December 31, 1959. . $5,421,626 00 

Total, Perpetual Care Funds, December 31, 1959 1,290.845 56 

Total Cemetery Funds $6,712,471 56 

Samuel Parkman Tomb Fund (not included in above 

figures) $2,298 95 



16 



City Document No. 16. 



Summary Statement of Cemetery Activities, January 1 to Decem= 

ber 31, 1959 



Cemeteries 


a 

o_> 

a 

u 


2 
o 

02 
co 
O 


2 

"o 
CO 

CO 

o 


o 
. u 

So 

Ph-h 

to <u 
O " 


u <o 

g a 
O 


3 

a 
a 
< 
a * 

.- h 
co «« 


CB 

o 

.Sis 

to » 

> a 

03 << 
O 


c 

_o 

c3 -^> 

a 3 
3 pa 


a 

£ s 

S * 

cuPn 

Oh 


SO 


Mount Hope 


1,271 

498 

186 

2 

3 


153 
17 
34 


315 

251 

57 


8,852 
1,066 
1,113 

2 


2,101 
1,380 
2,762 






321 
63 
96 


13 


2 


1 








2 












































1 














1 
1 

1 












Bunker Hill 




























































Totals 


1,960 


204 


623 


11,036 


6,243 


1 




481 


15 


2 







Cemetery Division Expenditures for Maintenance, Year Ending 
December 31, 1959 

Office $11,828 64 

Mount Hope 213,036 35 

Fairview 64,899 45 

Evergreen 51,873 26 

Dorchester North 6,193 84 

Dorchester South 3,888 03 

Bennington Street 3,989 79 

Hawes and Emerson 60 00 

Westerly . 77 70 

Central 2,651 46 

Eliot 2,244 89 

South End South 2,051 32 

Copp's Hill 4,089 55 

Granary 3,832 00 

King's Chapel 2,698 52 

Bunker Hill 1,988 97 

Phipps Street 2,008 22 

Walter Street 27 10 

Market Street 107 43 



$377,546 52 



City op Boston 

Administrative Services Department 

Printing a^Hgte Section