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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

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CITY OF BOSTON". 

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City Document No. 57. 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOSTON WATER' 
BOARD FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1877. 

Office of the Boston Water Board, 

May 1, 1877. 
To the City Council of the City of Boston: — 

The Boston Water Board respectfully submit their first 
annual report, and at the same time transmit to the City 
Council reports from the City Engineer and the Water Regis- 
trar, as required by the ordinance establishing the Board. 
They also present reports from the Clerk of the Board, from 
the Clerk and Registrar of the Mystic Department, from the 
Superintendents of the Eastern and Western Divisions of the 
Cochituate, and from the Superintendent of the Mystic 
Water Works. 

The members of the Board were appointed by the Mayor 
on the 6th day of July, 1876, and confirmed by the City 
Council in season to enter upon their duties on the 25th ; but 
they postponed their organization to give the Cochituate 
Water Board an opportunity to hold another meeting, and 
finish up certain matters of interest and importance which 
they had under consideration. On the 31st of July the 
Board held its first meeting, and was organized by the 
choice of Timothy T. Sawyer as Chairman ; and official 
notice thereof, as required by the ordinance, was sent by 
him to the Cochituate and Mystic Water Boards, which 
Boards ceased to exist after having formally transferred to 
this Board the documents and property in their possession, 
and then under their care and custody. At the first meet- 
ing of the Board Mr. Walter E. Swan was elected clerk, 
and sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that 
office. 

The first business of the Board was to make a careful per- 
sonal examination of the property placed under their charge ; 



Cs 



2 City Document No. 57. 

and to this end, in company with the City Engineer and the 
Superintendents of Divisions, they made visits all along the 
line of the new Sudbury river, the Cochituate, and Mystic 
Water Works, and to all the reservoirs, pumping-statjons, 
shops, yards, and places connected with the water works of 
the city, and occupied and used in carrying on the business 
of the Water Department. The general condition of what 
they saw was such as seemed to warrant the decision of the 
Board to make only such changes as careful study and 
observation might prove to be necessary. 

The Board being authorized to establish and regulate the 
prices and rents for the use of water, deemed it proper at 
once to establish and continue the old rates, as very careful 
comparisons and calculations would be necessary in deter- 
mining on modifications and changes which at a later period 
they might be expected to make. 

Immediately after entering upon their duties, the Board 
were pressed with claims from persons whose lands and 
estates had been taken and disturbed by the construction of 
the Sudbury-river Works, and a great deal of time was 
taken up in examining the estates, hearing the parties, and 
estimating the amount of damages ; and but a month had 
elapsed after the organization, when the commissioners ap- 
pointed by the Superior Court to estimate the damage to 
mill-owners and others, occasioned by the taking by the City 
of Boston of the water of Sudbury river and its tributaries, 
commenced their investigations. The greater part of the 
time for more than two months was occupied by them in 
viewing the premises of the several claimants, hearing evi- 
dence and the arguments of counsel. The defence and care 
of all suits against the city, relating to the taking of the 
water of Sudbury river, had been entrusted by the Cochit- 
uate Water Board to Gen. B. F. Butler, assisted by Linus 
M. Child, Esq., as counsel for the city, and all the cases 
before these commissioners were under their management ; 
but the magnitude and importance of the cases were such as 
to especially interest the Board, and occupy the greater 
part of their thought and time. The petitions, testi- 
mony and arguments of counsel in these cases make a printed 
volume of nearly 1,200 pages. 

It will be seen, from what has been said, that in addition 
to the ordinary care and management of the Water Depart- 
ment, the Board entered upon their duties with a large 
amount of unusual and important work on their hands ; and 
that for a while, at least, watchful attention to this work, 
which had been laid out by others, would be all that 
they could reasonably expect to accomplish ; nevertheless, 



Report of the Water Board. 3 

they have not forgotten that a reorganization of the depart- 
ment, a modification of the water-rates, and an improved 
condition generally of things placed under their charge, will 
in a reasonable time be expected and required of them by the 
City Council. 

The Board have under their charge and direction the 
Cochituate, the Mystic, and the Sudbury-river Water 
Works, concerning each of which they present the fol- 
lowing : — 



Cochituate Department. 

The general condition of this department may be con- 
sidered as satisfactory. The lake, with the reinforcement 
from Sudbury river, has iurnished an ample supply of water, 
and is now full and overrunning. The dams have been 
closely looked after, and are in as good order now as they 
ever have been. The gate-houses and gates were never in 
better condition ; and all the property around the lake is in 
proper repair. The conduit has its defects, as is well known, 
but, with the aid of the new 40-inch pipe across Charles 
river, the successful laying of which was mentioned in the 
last report of the Cochituate Water Board, it is confidently 
expected will be equal to the demands upon it until the com- 
pletion of the new Sudbury-river conduit, now so near at 
hand. The reservoirs and the grounds connected with 
them are in good order, requiring no expensive alterations 
or repairs. The need of a renewal of some of the fences 
around the Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs, and the 
discovery of increased leakage in the old aqueduct in 
the bank around the Brookline reservoir, are referred to 
in the report of the Superintendent of the Western Division ; 
but arrangements have been made to remedy these defects. 

The exact use of Sudbury river during the past year, 
and the quantity of water diverted from it and turned 
into Lake Cochituate, the whole quantity of water used 
and wasted during the year, the daily average consumption, 
the height of the water in the lake at different dates, etc., 
will be seen by reference to the report of the City Engineer. 
The laying of new lines of pipei=>, and the putting down 
of new siphons, necessitated by the repairing of Dover-street 
bridge, with interesting information in regard to the con- 
dition of the pipes and siphons taken up, will also be found 
in that report ; and also the condition of the high-service 
reservoir and pumps, the cost of pumping, and a description 



4 City Document No. 57. 

of the Brighton Temporary High-Service Works, now fully 
completed . 

The Board deem it of much importance to call the atten- 
tion of the City Council to that part of the City Engineer's 
report which refers to the high service ; and especially to 
the high-service pumps, and the recommendation that a third 
engine of 3,000,000 gallons' capacity, and a new boiler, be 
purchased and erected at once. With the belief that the 
pumping-station at Roxbury will be abandoned within a few 
years for a new one at Chestnut Hill, the Board hesitated in 
their adoption of the recommendation of the Engineer for 
the purchase of a new engine, and were inclined to rest with 
an order for the proper repair of the defective valve-chests ; 
but, upon reflection, with the constantly increasing consump- 
tion of water, the liability to accident and its consequences, 
the fact that the new engine can be used to advantage even 
if the removal to Chestnut Hill should take place, — considera- 
tions given by the Engineer in support of his recommenda- 
tion, — they have come to the conclusion that he is right, and 
that the engine and boiler should be purchased and erected 
this season. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water Works, from 
all sources, for the year ending April 30, 1877, are as fol- 
lows, vrz. : — 

From sales of water, $1,029,109 39 

From turning off and on water, and fees, . 4,857 25 

Sundry receipts by Water Board, . . 62,206 69 

Instalment on bond for land sold, with in- 
terest, received by Collector and paid to 

Treasurer, 629 18 



$1,096,802 51 

The total amount charged to Water Works 
for the year ending April 30, 1877, is as fol- 
lows, viz. : — 

To current expenses, . . $209,902 30 
To interest and premium on 

water debt, . . . 747,624 77 

Amount paid Mystic Water 

Works for water furnished 

East Boston, . . . 66,934 60 

1,024,461 67 



Excess of income over expenditures, . . $72,340 84 



Report of the Water Board. 5 

The total amount charged to construction 

during the year ending April 30, 1877, is, $2,129,779 73 

From the report of the Superintendent of the Eastern 
Division, it will be seen that during the past year nearly 
twenty-three miles of pipe have been laid, the length and 
sizes of which were as follows : — 

120 feet of 48 inch, 1,027 feet of 16 inch, 
44,503 " 12 inch, '27,789 " 8 inch, 
42,322 " 6 inch, 1,608 " 4 inch, 

aiid 213 stopcocks have been put in during the same time. 

The total length of pipe laid from the commencement of 
the work to May 1, 1877, is 341 miles, 4,800 feet. The 
total number of stopcocks is 3,652, and the total number of 
hydrants 3,874. 

The number of service pipes laid during the year is 1,149, 
which makes a total to May 1, 1877, of 42,744. 

A detailed statement of all the work done is shown in the 
report of the Superintendent. 

The Board are happy to state that the general condition of 
the main pipes, at the present time, is very good. In a few 
localities where the pipes were originally laid in the dock 
mud, and the streets have been raised without changing 
them, they are unquestionably so much weakened that they 
should, from time to time, be taken out and their places 
supplied with new pipes properly laid. 

Under authority of an order passed by the City Council, 
February 16, 1877, contracts have been made for a supply 
of cast-iron pipes for the present year at remarkably low 
prices. Thirty dollars a ton for sizes from 10 to 12 inches 
diameter, and twenty-seven dollars per ton for 1,200 tons 
48-inch, 1| inch thick, to be laid around the Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir, and used in connecting the conduits directly with 
the mains leading to the city. These prices are the lowest 
ever paid by the city. 

The report of the Water Registrar will show that the 
number of water-takers entered for the year 1877 is 48,328, 
which is an increase over 1876 of 1,443. 

The total amount of water-rates received for the year 
ending May 1, 1877, was $1,029,109.39. This includes 
$66,934.60 received from East Boston and afterwards paid, 
to the Mystic Water Department, the water having been 
supplied by the Mystic Water Works. 

The total number of cases where the water was turned off 
for non-payment of rates during the year ending January 1, 



6 City Document No. 57. 

1877, was 1,604. Of this number 1,413 were turned on 
again, leaving 191 still remaining off. 

The total number of meters now in use is 1,082; 686 
f-inch, 333 1-inch, 46 2-inch, 13 3-inch, 4 4-inch. 

But few changes in the rules for water-takers have as yet 
been made, and the rates, as we have before stated, have 
been continued with but slight alterations. That some 
modification in the rules and rates are desirable seems 
evident enough, but to determine what it shall be will 
certainly require very careful investigation and study, and 
even then be very difficult. So much of the time of the 
Board has been taken up in the consideration of claims 
growing out of the taking of Sudbury river and the con- 
struction of the additional supply works, that it has been 
impossible for them as yet to take hold of this problem ; 
but it is fully remembered as a duty requiring their attention 
at the earliest possible moment. 

The petition of the Standard Sugar Refinery and others, 
for a reduction in the price of water furnished through meters 
to large manufacturers, which was referred to the Board, with 
a request that a reduction not exceeding one cent per one 
hundred gallons be made from and after April 1, 1877, was 
very carefully considered, with a view, if possible, to comply 
fully with the request. The Board had no doubt as to the 
soundi ess of the reasoning of the Committee on Water in 
their rt p >rt made to the City Council (City Document No, 99, 
1876) , and were fully of the opinion that the development of 
the industrial interests of Boston should in every proper way 
be encouraged. Nor had they any doubt that the supply of 
water would be sufficient to meet an increased demand ; but, 
from the best information which they could get in consulta- 
tion with the Water Registrar as to the probable income from 
all sources for the financial year, it seemed doubtful 
whether, with the depressed condition of business, the 
estimate made in his note to the Committee of Water, 
November 20, 1876, could be relied on, and they deemed it 
advisable, under the circumstances, to limit the reduction to 
one half cent per one hundred gallons, from and after the 
date named, April 1, 1877, hoping that the condition of 
thii'gj before the end of another year may be so improved 
as to warrant a further reduction, in unquestioned 
compliance with the statute under which the water-rate is 
established. 

Mystic Department. 
The Mystic Water Works are generally in good condition. 



Keport of the Water Board. 7 

The following improvements and repairs, suggested in the 
last report of the Mystic Water Board, have been made : — 

The new driveway on the west side of the hike has been 
finished. At the pumping-station the enlargement and 
repairs of the coal-shed have been completed ; a new stable 
has been built on the grounds ; an addition has been made to 
the dwelling-house ; needed outside repairs have been made 
on the engine-house, and the wood-work and roof painted; 
the wall and ceiling and the hard-wood finish inside have 
been painted and varnished ; the engines have also been 
painted and varnished ; the bridges at the lake and over the 
Mystic river, near the engine-house, have been repaired, and 
about 100 feet of sea-wall built and ballasted ou the shore of 
the river. Arrangements for protection of the buildings 
in case of fire have also been made, by the laying of a line 
of pipe with hydrants in it. The lot of land about the 
pumping-station, which was ploughed and laid down to 
grass, is looking well, and bids fair to produce a crop of 
some value the present season. The walks around the 
top of the embankment at the reservoir have been covered 
with concrete, the steps have been mostly renewed, and 
the gate-house repaired and painted outside. Particulars in 
relation to the improvements made will be found in the 
report of the Superintendent. In addition to these changes, 
the Mystic Water Board called attention specially to the 
need of a second line of force main pipe, and an enlarge- 
ment of the gate-house at the pipe-chamber on Mystic river. 
The remark in their report, that " with the large quantity of 
water now required to be pumped into the. reservoir, it 
does not seem to be well to rely upon a single line of 
force main pipe," has so much meaning in it, that this Board 
seem called upon to make a positive recommendation that 
a special appropriation for a new force main be made by 
the City Council this season. The estimated cost is $27,000. 
The enlargement of the gate-house is not a matter of so 
much consequence, but it would add much to the convenience 
of the work clone in it, and if a new one should be built it could 
be arranged so as to more effectually flush out the conduit. 

Tlr report of the Engineer gives the condition of the lake 
during the year, the yield of the* Mystic water-shed, the rain- 
fall on the water-shed, the work done by the engines at the 
pumping-station, the quantity of coal consumed, the time 
the engines were in use, and a comparison of their duty in 
1875 and 1876. In that report may also be found the cost 
of pumping, the largest and smallest quantity of water 
pumped in any one day during the year, and the condition 
of the engines at the present date. 



City Document No. 57. 



The average daily consumption in the year 1876 was 
8,825,808 gallons. The whole quantity drawn from the 
reservoir between May 1, 1876, and May 1, 1877, was 
3,201,036,135 gallons, or a daily average of 8,769,961 gal- 
lons, an increase of about 16^ per cent, over the year ending 
May 1, 1876. This includes the supply for East Boston, which 
has been taken wholly from the Mystic during this period. 

On the 12th of Sept., 1876, the Board made a contract 
for 3,000 tons Georges Creek Coal and Iron Company's Cum- 
berland Coal, at $5.94 per ton of 2,200 lbs., delivered and 
weighed at the coal-shed at the pumping-station. 

On the 10th of March a contract for cast-iron pipes was 
made with Messrs. R. D. Wood & Co., of Philadelphia, at 
$29.60 per ton of 2,240 lbs., delivered on the wharf at 
Charlestown. 

The additions, changes, and repairs of the supply mains, 
distribution and service pipes are shown in the report of the 
Superintendent, and also the total length of pipe laid iu 
Charlestown, Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett, from the 
commencement of the works to this date. 

The amount collected for water-rates during the year end- 
ing May 1, 1877, as shown by the report of the Registrar, 
Mr. Joseph H. Caldwell, was $289,819.11. The Registrar's 
report shows the number of water-takers, the number and 
kind of fixtures, buildings, meters, etc. 

The maintenance account for the year ending May 1, 1877, 
is as follows : — 



Mystic Water Department. 

Copy of the Maintenance Account, from April 30, 1876, to 
May 1, 1877. 

Salaries, including one of the Board of Wate 
Commissioners .... 

Clerk-hire ..... 

Inspectors ..... 

Printing, advertising, and stationery 
Rent of shop .... 

Stable, Charlestown District . 

Taxes . . 

Damage ..... 

Gas ...... 

Lake ...... 

Reservoir ..... 



Watei 


$8,142 39 




1,700 


00 




1,875 


00 




588 


85 




550 


00 




1,416 


25 




40 


47 




110 


00 




61 


91 




1,461 


49 




3,048 


11 



Amount carried forward . 



,994 47 



Keport.of the Water Board. 



Amount Drought forward . 

Eoads and grounds 

Conduit 

Stable, engine-house 

Engine-house, repairs, etc. . 

New stable, at engine-house . 

Coal shed, repairing roof, etc. 

Extension to dwelling-houses occupied by 
engineers .... 

Extension and repairs service pipes 
" " main pipes . 

Contingencies, labor, tools, and 
material for repairs, $4,783 87 

Extra labor and mate- 
rial furnished for 
service pipes, etc., 191 16 



Cr. By amount received for labor ' 
and material furnished for service 



:,975 03 



pipes, etc. 



Fuel . 
Oil . 
Eepairs, etc. 
Pay of engineers, 
coal-wheelers . 



1,542 40 



Pumping Service. 



firemen, 



.$22,721 16 
. 1,046 96 
. 1,344 22 
and 

. 6,823 00 



518,994 47 

1,831 43 

700 65 

373 60 

1,596 53 

1,767 39 

1,547 54 

1,045 23 

6,361 52 

18,571 53 



3,432 63 



31,935 34 



,157 86 



Bonds amounting to $90,000 have been paid during the 
year, which leaves the amount outstanding, including the 
sums borrowed for the construction of the Mystic-valley 
sewer, $1,228,000. 

The amount of the sinking fund, May 1, 1877, was $96,- 
701.18. The total amount of interest paid during the year 
was $66,290. 

Mystic-valley Sewer. 

A provision in the Act of the Legislature, authorizing the 
City of Boston to construct a sewer in the Mystic valley, 
which required the main sewer and all its branches to be 
kept on the easterly side of the ponds and streams which 
discharge into Mystic lake, which was found to be practically 
impossible, and a decision of the City Soliciter that this pro- 



10 City Document No. 57. 

vision must be strictly complied with, prevented the construc- 
tion of the sewer, or any part of it, during the last year. 
The Act was amended at the last session of the Legislature, 
and the troublesome provision stricken out ; and early in 
March the Board went over the line with the City Engineer, 
and gave directions for the completion of the plans, so that the 
work might be proceeded with at once. It was found, how- 
ever, that the order of the City Council, passed in 1876, 
followed the wording of the original act, and that further 
action by the Council would be requisite to give the Board 
authority to proceed with the work. They are now waiting 
for such authority. The line of the sewer has been deter- 
mined upon and the plans are ready. 

Quality of Water. 

The water from Cochituate lake during the past year has 
been of good quality, arid no complaints of it have been 
heard from any quarter. The unaccountable cucumber taste, 
which, for a while, shut out of use the Bradlee basin of Chest- 
nut-Hill reservoir, to which it was confined, as unaccountably 
disappeared; and since the gate was opened on the 1st of 
April, 1876, the basin has been in use, and the quality of the 
water unexceptionable. 

The mingling of the Sudbury-river water with that of 
Lake Cochituate has had no unfavorable effect on its quality, 
and there is every reason to believe that the quality of the 
Sudbury-river water, when the works are completed, will be 
entirely satisfactory. Weekly examinations of the quality 
of the water, as delivered in the city, have been made by 
Prof. Nichols, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and the results will be found tabulated on pages 14 and 15. 

The year has passed, too, with fewer complaints than ever 
before of the quality of the water of Mystic lake. Early in 
the month of August there were several complaints made to 
the Board, and at the same time their attention was called to 
an unusual condition of the water in Horn pond, from which 
Mystic lake is partly fed. A visit was made at once to 
that pond, and a state of things found anything but pleasing. 
A portion of the pond was covered with a thick, greenish 
scum, and it was plainly evident that some kind of decomposi- 
tion was going on in the water. Professor Wm. Ripley 
Nichols, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was 
at once employed to make such an examination as he should 
deem necessary to ascertain, if possible, the cause. The 
result of his investigation can be seen in the following com- 
munications from Professor Nichols and Dr. Wm. G. Farlow, 
Professor of Botany in Harvard University : — 



Report of the Water Board. 11 

To the Water Commissioners of the City of Boston : — 

Gentlemen, — On the 8th inst. I was requested by you to visit Horn 
pond, one of the ponds connecting with the Mystic-water supply, in 
order to investigate the present condition of the water. In accordance 
with your request I visited the locality on the following day, and made 
the entire circuit of the pond in a boat. 

I found the trouble to be due to the presence in the water of an 
enormous number of a microscopic organism, an alga belonging to 
Nostoc famih T , subsequently identified by Dr. Farlow as an Anabazna 
(perhaps gigantea) . 

The water over the whole surface of the pond, and to the depth of 
several inches, was filled with these minute bodies, which gave to it a 
greenish-yellow hue. The same vegetable matter in other stages of 
growth and decay had caused the accumulation of large masses of 
variously colored gelatinous matter, and where it was in a state of decay 
the odor was very disagreeable, reminding one of a pig-pen more than 
of anything else. 

Most ponds and reservoirs are liable in summer to be troubled by 
such growths, and it is probable that each year there has been more or 
less in Horn pond; but never, as far as I can learn, has the trouble been 
so great. The water supplies of other cities have, however, been 
affected in the same way, and in the report of the Water Board of New 
York for 1859, and in that of Albany for 1865, may be found a descrip- 
tion of a similar condition of things. 

Under the circumstances I did not judge that any chemical examination 
would be necessary, but in order to identify fully the vegetable growth, 
and especially in order to learn if there was anything in the condition 
and surroundings of the pond which might tend to cause or to aggravate 
the evil, I requested Dr. Farlow, Professor of Botany in Harvard 
University, to examine the pond, and to identify such vegetable species 
as might have a bearing on this subject. I visited the pond, in company 
with Dr. Farlow, on the 12th inst. At that time the condition of things 
was much improved, and the water was becoming clearer ; in Wedge 
pond, however, the water was rather worse than in Horn pond. Dr. 
Farlow's statement accompanies this report. 

The two practical questions which arise are, whether the matter is 
injurious to health, and whether anything can be done to prevent the 
reoccurrence of the trouble. I do not know of any direct evidence as 
to the wholesomeness or unwholesomeness of the water when in this 
condition. 

The vegetable matter is not generally considered injurious, but it 
gives to the water, especially when decaying, a disagreeable taste and 
odor, much of which can be removed by filtration ; most efficiently by 
means of filters of animal charcoal, which should be frequently cleansed. 

It would be, with our present knowledge, impossible in any way to 
prevent the growth of the plant in the pond ; but it is the opinion of Dr. 
Farlow that the abundance of the growth may be in a measure due to 
the presence in the upper part of the pond of large masses of another 
plant, a species of Plectonema. This plant may perhaps be described as 
resembling masses of tangled horse-hair as much as anything, except 
that when held up, so that the light slrines through, it is evidently bluish- 
green. This plant begins to grow on sticks and stalks of other plants 
under water, most commonly at a depth of not more than ten or fifteen 
feet, but subsequently rises in large masses to the surface, and furnishes 
a favorable starting point for the growth of the Anabcena. I do not 
know whether there is more this year than usual ; there is cei'tainly a 
large quantity of it. Whether it would be of any use to remove this 
now, it would be impossible to say, but it would be well another year, 
between the middle and last of June, to remove as much of it as 
practicable. 



12 City Document No. 57. 

I would further suggest the desirability of some sort of screen at the 
outlet of Horn pond, by which the masses of floating material might 
be arrested. The present year it would have been possible to remove 
at this point, and also along the shores of the pond, much of the decom- 
posing matter which, after a time, found its way to the lower pond. 

Yours respectfully, 

WM. RIPLEY NICHOLS. 
Mass. Institute of Technology, 
Boston, Aug. 16, 1876. 



To the Board of Water Commissio tiers of the City of Boston : — 

Gentlemen, — By request of Prof. W. R. Nichols I went with him to 
Horn pond, in the middle of the month of August, for the purpose of 
ascertaining if it were possible to account for the disagreeable odor 
exhaled by the water, owing to the presence of any vegetable substance 
visible to the naked eye or determinable by the microscope. We walked 
for some distance along the shore of the pond, and examined the water 
at both the upper and lower ends. I took away with me, for micro- 
scopical analysis, some bottles of the water, and others were sent me by 
Prof. Nichols. 

The odor seemed to be caused by the presence in the water of a large 
mass of a species of Anabcena in a state of decomposition. This was 
perceptible to the naked eye, floating in the water in a healthy con- 
dition in the form of minute glistening rods, and also collected on the 
surface, and often adhering to sticks, and jflants in gelatinous masses, at 
first of a bluish-green, and afterwards of a brown color, in which con- 
dition it was more or less decomposed, and emitted an odor which re- 
minded one of horse-clung. 

A microscopic examination showed a large number of filaments 
which could be recognized as belonging to a species of Anabcena, but, 
unfortunately, so far decayed as to render the determination of the 
species impossible. Although to be regretted in a scientific point of 
view that the specific name could not be determined, as far as all prac- 
tical bearings of the case are concerned it is of no consequence. The 
genus Anabcena belongs to the order Nostochinece, the order to which 
belong most of the plants which appear suddenly in fresh or salt water, 
often accompanied by a disagreeable odor. As an example, I may 
mention the plant Trichodesmium roseum, to which the Red Sea owes its 
color, which appears suddenly in immense masses and as suddenly dis- 
appears. 

To anticipate the appearance of the Anabcena,' and to prevent its 
growth, is at least, in the present state of knowledge, impossible. That 
is not, however, necessary in the present case, for so long as the Ana- 
bcena floats freely in the water it is not likely to prove offensive. 
When, however, it collects in masses on the surface, exposed to the heat 
of a midsummer's sun, it at once begins to decompose. This collecting 
on the surface is favored when the water of the pond is low enough to 
allow the weeds growing in it to reach the surface ; for the Anabcena 
collects readily on water weeds and sticks. There is furthermore in 
Horn pond an alga, which is very abundant, and which must have a 
great deal to do with hastening the decay of the Anabcena. About a 
year ago I received from a gentleman in Bethlehem, Pa., a curious 
alga, not only new to this country, but to the world, which I named after 
the discoverer, Plcctonema Wollci, and which I had intended to describe 
in a paper to be published in a few weeks. This plant, which I saw 
growing for the first time in Horn pond, forms long matted tufts of a 
spongy consistence, formed of an immense number of long, dark green 



Keport of the Water Board. 13 

threads closely interlaced. It is attached in the beginning to sticks 
and water plants, and groAvs in length until it reaches the siu-face of 
the water. Later in the season it breaks away from its attachment, 
floats round on or near the surface in patches of greater or less extent, 
and is finally washed ashore. I visited the pond on October 3d, and 
found that the large attached masses which Prof. Nichols and myself 
had observed in August at the upper end of the pond, had disappeared, 
and that large quantities had been washed up on the beach. 

The Plectonema Wollei, from its spongy nature and filamentous struc- 
ture, must absorb into its meshes and collect on its. surface quantities of 
the Anabcena, which, thus forcibly retained on the surface and exposed 
to the sun's rays, must soon decompose. 

It seems as though it might be desirable as a preventive measure to 
remove the Plectonema. It probably does not reach any perceptible 
size before the middle of June, and from that time until July would be 
the most favorable period for removing it. If the pond is kept com- 
paratively clear of the Plectonema one great source of danger from the 
Anabcena is avoided. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) W. G. FARLOW. 

Boston, October 5, 1876. 



The Plectonema which I have mentioned is known to persons living 
near the pond under the name of " eel grass." It is not, however, what 
is called by that name in other parts of the country, viz., Vallisneria 
spiralis, a flowering plant not in the least related to Plectonema. 



"While this state of things existed in Horn Pond, the 
Abajonna river, from which the Mystic lake is mainly sup- 
plied, was free from any such impurity, and the water was 
unusually clear and acceptable. On the 8th of August, when 
the Board made another visit to Horn pond, the appearance 
of the water had changed for the better very considerably, 
and the complaints of the water-takers were not long con- 
tinued. 



To the Water Commissioners of the City of Boston : — 

The following table contains the results of the partial chemical ex- 
aminations of Cochituate water made in the laboratory of the Institute 
of Technology during the year from July, 1876, to July, 1877. The 
water has been uniformly of good quality and generally very free from 
any matter in suspension. 

Yours respectfully, 

WM. RIPLEY NICHOLS. 



14 



City Document No. 57. 



Examination of Boston Water Supply. 
[Results expressed in Parts per 100,000. J 





TInfiltered 
Water. 


Filtered Water. 


Solid Residue. 


Date. 








o: 




H3 

p. 

CS 
o o 

'S3 

a s 
s- o 
C> 


CM 




c3 
O 

a 
a 
< 


.5 cj 

a -a 

P o 

sa 
<ia 
= < 


'a 

O 

a 
a 


s'S 

5 O 

isa 
■4 a 

5 «3 


o 

'3 
a 
ba 
o 

a 
>— i 


Is 
o 


1876. 
















July 7. . . . 


0.0037 


0.0173 


0.0053 


0.0157 


2.34 


1.52 


3.86 


" 14. . . . 


0.0040 


0.0171 


0.0040 


0.0163 


2.34 


1.90 


4.24 


" 21 ... . 


0.0040 


0.0171 


0.0040 


0.0163 


2.38 


1.7S 


4.16 


" 28 ... . 


0.0040 


0.0171 


0.0040 


0.0160 


2.42 


1.74 


4.16 


Aug. 4 . . . . 


0.0040 


0.0176 


0.0040 


0.0165 


2.16 


1.64 


3.80 


" 11 ... . 


0.0040 


0.0173 


0.0040 


0.0160 


2.50 


1.66 


4.16 


" 18. . . . 


0.0040 


0.0165 


0.0040 


0.0160 


1.94 


1.88 


3.82 


" 26 ... . 


0.0037 


0.0173 


0.0037 


0.0160 


2.06 


1.72 


3.78 


Sept. 4 . . . . 


0.0040 


0.0168 


0.0040 


0.0160 


2.14 


2.10 


4.24 


" 23. . . . 


0.0040 


0.0168 


0.0040 


0.0136 


2.44 


1.76 


4.20 


" 30 ... . 


0.0040 


0.0163 


0.0040 


0.0163 


2.26 


1.76 


4.02 


Oct. 7 . . . . 


0.0040 


0.0160 


0.0040 


0.0157 


2.78 


1.46 


4.24 


" 14 ... . 


0.0040 


0.0152 


0.0040 


0.0149 




. . . 




" 23. . . . 


0.0037 


0.0160 


0.0037 


0.0155 


. . . 






Nov. 4 . . . . 


0.0037 


0.0136 


0.0037 


0.0136 


2.02 


1.94 


3.96 


" 11 ... . 


0.0032 


0.0125 


0.0032 


0.0125 


2.56 


1.40 


3.96 


" 17 ... . 


0.0029 


0.0141 


0.0029 


0.0141 








" 28 ... . 


0.0029 


0.0141 


0.0029 


0.0141 


1.92 


1.80 


3.72 


Dec. 5 . . . . 


0.0008 


0.0141 


0.0008 


0.0136 


2.24 


1.78 


4.02 


" 14. . . . 


0.0008 


0.0144 


0.0008 


0.0139 


2.12 


1.76 


3.83 


" 21 ... . 


0.0021 


0.0136 


0.0021 


0.0131 


2.10 


1.82 


3.92 


" 28. . . . 


0.0016 


0.0139 


0.0016 


0.0136 


2.22 


1.70 


3.92 


1877. 
















Jan. 4 . . . . 


0.0005 


0.0136 


0.0005 


0.0136 


2.22 


1.74 


3.96 


" 10 ... . 


0.0005 


0.0133 


0.0005 


0.0131 


2.34 


1.86 


4.20 


" 18 ... . 


0.0005 


0.0128 


0.0005 


0.0120 


2.62 


1.72 


4.31 


" 25 ... . 


0.0005 


0.0120 


0.0005 


0.0120 


2.74 


2.06 


4.80 


" 31 ... . 


0.0008 


0.0120 


0.0008 


0.0115 


2.38 


2.26 


4.64 


Feb. 15 ... . 


0.0011 


0.0112 


0.0011 


0.0107 


2.82 


2.30 


5.12 


" 22. . . . 


0.0019 


0.0109 


0.0019 


0.0101 


3.26 


2.32 


5.58 


" 28 ... . 


0.0021 


0.0115 


.0.0021 


0.0107 


3.20 


2.10 


5.30 



Report of the, Water Board. 15 

Examination of Boston Water Supply. — Continued. 





Unfiltered 
Water. 


Filtered Water. 


Solid Residue. 


Date. . 


03 

'8 

o 

a 
a 


2 

.3=8 

Sn 
P o 

sa 


5 
'3 
o 

a 
a 

<1 


'8; 

.a =8 
a - a 

P o 

sa 


'1 

u 
o 


a 

CS 

'S3 
cs a 


ft 
cq 

OS 

o 

EH 


Mar. 8 . . . . 


0.0019 


0.0128 


0.0019 


0.0125 


2.72 


2.28 


5.00 


" 14. . . . 


0.0016 


0.0120 


0.0016 


0.0115 


2.64 


2.34 


4.98 


" 28 ... . 


0.0019 


0.0117 


0.0019 


0.0112 


2.96 


1.98 


4.94 


April 5 . . . . 


0.0019 


0.0107 


0.0019 


0.0104 


2.32 


2.04 


4.36 


" 11 ... . 


0.0019 


0.0099 


0.0019 


0.0099 


2.68 


2.08 


4.76 


" 25 ... . 


0.0016 


0.0120 


0.0016 


0.0115 


2.68 


2.00 


4.68 


May 2 . . . . 


0.0029 


0.0115 


0.0029 


0.0109 


2.60 


2.04 


4.64 


" 10. . . . 


0.0024 


0.0120 


0.0024 


0.0115 


2.28 


2.04 


4.32 


" 15 ... . 


0.0024 


0.0120 


0.0024 


0.0117 


2.80 


1.68 


4.48 


" 23 ... . 


0.0027 


0.0123 


0.0027 ' 


0.0120 


2.48 


2.16 


4.64 


" 31. . . . 


0.0044 


0.0120 


0.0043 


0.0120 


2.44 


1.68 


4.12 


June 6 . . . . 


0.0040 


0.0147 


0.0040 


0.0141 


2.68 


1.64 


4.32 


" 13. . . . 


0.0056 


0.0152 


0.0056 


0.0149 


2.28 


1.88 


4.16 


" 20 ... . 


0.0048 


0.0165 


0.0048 


0.0157 


2.16 


1.72 


3.88 


" 27 ... . 


0.0053 


0.0136 


0.0053 


0.0131 


2.56 


1.64 


4.20 



SuDBTJRY-RlVER DEPARTMENT. ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. 

The several sums appropriated by the City Council for an 
additional supply of water, with the dates of each appro- 
priation, the whole (including the premium on bonds sold) 
amounting to $4,462,886.80, can be seen by reference to the 
accompanying report of the City Engineer, Mr. J. P. 
Davis ; where, also, particulars in regard to the expendi- 
tures, the total sum of which to' this date is $3,110,314.82, 
can be found. The progress and present condition of the 
works are also fully set forth in that report, to which the 
Council is referred for such information as they may need on 
the subject. 

The unquestioned value of the service of the Engineer, 
who, by the ordinance, is made the general superintendent of 
the water works, is too well known to require any remarks 
from this Board ; but they are glad of an opportunity to 
express their appreciation of his ability and judgment, and 
to acknowledge their obligation to him for his uniform 



16 City Document No. 57. 

courtesy, and valuable advice and assistance in the perform- 
ance of their duties. The good judgment of the Engineer 
has been in nothing more manifest than in the selection of 
his principal assistant, Mr. A. Fteley, the Resident Engineer ; 
and the Board feel that propriety and duty warrant and 
demand especial reference to his services. In almost daily 
contact with him, they cannot but be impressed with the 
. excellence of his spirit, the thoroughness of his knowledge, 
his incessant industry, and his active and devoted interest in 
the work under his charge. That the city has been uncom- 
monly fortunate in retaining his services is a fact that should 
be thoughtfully remembered by the City Council. 

It will be seen by the report of the Engineer that a large 
share of the work on the Sudbury-river conduit has been 
completed, and that final estimates on fourteen sections have 
been made up and paid. The contracts were made on a fall- 
ing market for materials and labor, and the city has without 
doubt derived its full share of benefit from this fact. For, 
with contentment on the part of the contractors under their 
obligations, it is but reasonable to suppose that the labors of 
the Engineers have been lightened, and their requirements 
as to the quality of the work more strictly complied with. 
The Board feel very confident that when they report a 
large share of the work done, they can add, with much cer- 
tainty, that it is well done. 

j The' following; statement in addition to the taking of the 
Twtiers of Sudbury river will show what lands have been 
taken up to April 26, 1877 : — 



Keport of the Water Board. 



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18 City Document No. 57. 

The settlement of claims growing out of these takings 
has occupied much the largest portion of the time of the 
Board, and will continue to do so for some time to come. 
Indeed, the difficulties attending these settlements can hardly 
be realized except by those who have had similar duties to 
perform. The Board understand fully, they think, the pro- 
visions in the Act authorizing the taking of lands, which 
makes the city liable to pay all damage that shall be sus- 
tained by any persons in their property by such taking ; and 
they have acted upon the ground that the city not only 
expected, but was desirous of making full compensation for 
the injury sustained by individuals in the construction of a 
necessary public work. 

They have met the claimants in this spirit, not to drive 
sharp bargains with them, but to form a fair judgment, after 
careful examination and consideration, of the actual damage 
done, and to make awards to cover it. It has been extremely 
difficult to estimate the damage done to some of the more 
valuable estates through which the conduit has been built, or 
from which land has been taken, and in some of these cases 
there is a wide difference between the amounts claimed and 
the offers of the Board. But this fact alone, with the experi- 
ence of the Board in the settlement of other cases, is not 
discouraging, and they are hopeful that litigation will be 
avoided with most of the claims. But few have as yet been 
entered in court, and commissioners have been appointed 
but for three. Seventy-eight claims have been settled, 
amounting in the aggregate to $270,520.10. 

The report of the commissioners appointed to estimate the 
damages to mill-owners and others, occasioned by the taking 
of the waters of Sudbury river and its tributaries, was made 
at the December session of the Superior Court. By advice 
of the counsel for the city, in each of the cases a jury has 
been asked for, as provided by the statutes, before whom the 
cases are to be tried, that being the only way by which the 
questions of law raised can be determined by the court. 

The Board has been considering a plan for the reorganiza- 
tion of the Water Department, that they hope after a while 
to be able to carry out, and which they believe will be an im- 
provement, at least so far as the division of labor is con- 
cerned, and the equalization of compensation for the services 
of employees. They desire also to make such a change in 
the manner of keeping accounts as will enable them at all 
times to know, by books kept at their office at City Hall, 
very nearly the condition of all work done or being done in 
any branch of the department. Under .the present system 
the accounts are kept in books at the various offices, but 



Report of the Water Board. 19 

they are not reported daily, and made a part of a system such 
as it seems to the Board is needful to keep them properly 
informed of the daily operations of the working force, and 
cost of the work it may be engaged upon. The distribution 
of materials, the labor expended upon any particular piece of 
work, the cost and disposal of tools, as well as the gross 
amount of expenditure, should, in the judgment of the 
Board, be shown in a set of regularly balanced books kept 
by an experienced accountant at their office. 

In suggesting such changes the Board have not forgotten 
that the present organization, and the system of doing the 
work, are the result of many years' experience, or that the 
department has been under the charge of intelligent and 
faithful men ; but the establishment of a paid "Water Board 
seems naturally to demand a closer and more direct oversight 
of the operations and business of the department than could 
have been expected under the former system. 

The orders adopted by the City Council establishing 
officers in the Water Department, and fixing their salaries, 
have interfered somewhat with the plans of the Board in rela- 
tion to reorganization, and put it out of their power to effect 
certain changes contemplated by them. They can now only 
mature these plans and present them at some future time 
for the consideration of the Council. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, Chairman. 
LEONARD R. CUTTER. 
ALBERT STANWOOD. 



20 



Citt Document No. 57. 



EEPOET OF THE CLEEK. 

Office of the Boston Water Board, 

Boston, May 1, 1877. 
Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board: — 
Sir, — The following is a statement of the expenditures 
and receipts of the Cochituate Water Works, for the year 
commencing May 1, 187G, and ending April 30, 1877 : — 



Expenditures. 






Advertising . . : . 


, , 


$56 00 


Damage ..... 


. . 


748 40 


Taxes ...... 


, , 


691 89 


Travelling expenses of Board 


. , 


173 05 


Printing and stationery 


. 


2,868 68 


Telegraph, repairing instruments and wires . 


154 95 


Fountains ..... 


. . 


2,875 78 


Eastern-avenue wharf (rent and salary oi 




agent) . . . 


. 


3,347 66 


Salaries ..... 


. . 


29,391 06 


Inspectors ..... 


. 


7,663 80 


Shutting off and letting on department 


. 


11,210 58 


Miscellaneous expenses . 


. 


1,701 96 


Aqueduct repairs .... 


. 


3,783 06 


Stable ...... 


. , 


4,027 22 


Tools 


. , 


2,150 48 


Upper yard ..... 


, 


3,915 09 


Meters and maintaining meters 


. 


5,086 83 


Lake Cochituate .... 


. 


2,687 68 


Service pipe .... 


. 


7,536 10 


Eelaying main pipe 


. 


19,201 91 


Blacksmith shop, stock and wages 


. 


3,348 77 


Proving yard " " 


. 


7,929 27 


High service " " . 


. 


11,302 66 


Laying service pipe " " 


. 


17,005 61 


Eepairiug service pipe . 


. 


9,741 86 


" main pipe 


. 


6,253 48 


" hydrants 


. 


11,443 48 


" stopcocks 


. 


2,298 67 


" streets .... 


. 


10,078 28 


" hydrant and stopcock boxes 


. 


2,222 71 


Parker-Hill reservoir . 


• 


4,055 99 



Amount carried forward 



$194,952 96 



Report of the Water Board. 



21 



Amount brought forward 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir . 
Beacon " " 
Brookline ' ' 

East Boston " 
South " " 

Temporary high service, Brighton 
Main pipe, construction 
Laying main pipe, construction 
Hydrants " 

Stopcocks " 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes, construction 
Keeper's house, Parker Hill, " 

Water Works, West Roxbury 

and Brighton Districts, " 

Additional supply, " 

Total .'■ $ 

And which is charged as follows : — 
To Water Works . . . $255,134 08 
" " " West Roxbury 

and Brighton Districts . 160,487 71 
" additional supply . .1,924,060 24 



$194,952 96 

9,749 67 

469 70 

2,591 77 

650 96 

337 11 

1,150 13 

13,875 06 

21,347 81 

3,199 45 

2,214 30 

1,830 26 

2,764 90 

160,487 71 
1,924,060 24 

2,339,682 03 



$2,339,682 03 



Receipts by Water Board. 



Fire Department, for use of 
hydrants .... 

Elevator pipes, stand pipes, ser- 
vice pipes, repairs, etc., etc. . 

Off and on water and fines 

Rent of house No. 7 Waverley 
place ..... 

Rent of part of Eastern-avenue 
wharf ..... 

Rent of estates in Framingham 
and Wellesley 

Rent of pastures and sale of 
wood at lake 

Rent of pasture and sale of hay 
at C. Hill Reservoir 

Sale of Rock inNeedhain, etc.- . 



Net amount charged to Water Works 



$44,484 00 


13,548 
2,456 


Cr2 
25 


679 


62 


300 


00 


225 


00 


235 


00 


153 
124 


40 
80 

6° °06 69 






r orks, 


$2,277,475 34 



22 City Document No. 57. 

Amount charged to Water Works, not includ- 
ing ?t Additional Supply," or " Water Works, 
West Roxbury and Brighton Districts" . $255,134 08 

The amount expended for construction on 
Water Works is as follows, viz. : — 
Main pipe 



Laying main pipe 

Hydrants 

Stopcocks 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes 

Keeper's house, Parker Hill 



$13,875 06 
21,347 81 
3,199 45 
2,214 30 
1,830 26 
2,764 90 



45,231 78 



Current expenses for the year ending 

April 30, 1877 . ... $209,902 30 

The total amount expended for construc- 
tion for the year ending April 30, 1877, is as 
follows, viz. : — 

Waterworks . . . . $45,231 78 
West Roxbury and Brighton 

Districts . . . . 160,487 71 
Additional supply . . .1,924,060 24 

$2,129,779 73 



The total amount expended for maintaining the 
Chestnut-Hill Driveway, in care of the 
Water Board, but not chargeable to the 
Water Works, for the year ending April 30, 
1877, is $3,629 57 



Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the . Water Works 

to May 1st, 1877. 
Amount drawn to May 1, 

1876 . . . ' . $14,996,020 93 
Amount drawn from May 

1,1876, to May 1,1877. 2,339,682 03 

$17,335,702 96 

Amount paid the City 

TreasurertoMayl,1876, $645,243 16 
Amount paid from May 1, 

1876, to May 1, 1877 . 62,206 69 



707,449 85 



Net amount drawn from 



Treasurer. . . $16,628,253 11 



Report or the Water Board. 23 

Gross payments (includ- 
ing interest, premiums, 
etc.), for account of 
"Water Works to May 1, 
1876 . . . ' . $26,831,504 48 

Gross payments from May 

1, 1876, to May 1, 1877 . 3,087,306 80 



Gross receipts to May 1, 

1876, . - . . . $13,359,978 65 
Grross receipts from May 

1, 1876, to May 1, 

1877 . $1,096,802 51 
Premium on 

bonds sold, 363,456 80 



,918,811 28 



.460,259 31 



Less amount 
paid Mys- 
tic Water 
works for 
water fur- 
nished E. 
Boston . 66,934 60 



1,393,324 71 
14,753,303 36 



Net cost to May 1, 1877 . . . $15,165,507 92 



Cost of construction of the Works to May 1st, 1877. 



Cost of Water Works to January 1, 1850 
as per final report of Water Commis 
sioners ...... 

Extension to East Boston . 

Jamaica-pond Aqueduct 

New dam at Lake Cochituate 

Raising lake two feet, including damages 

Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con 
nections with lake .... 

New main from Brookline reservoir . 

Land and water rights, since January 1 
1850 

Land damages since January 1, 1850 . 



1,998,051 83 

281,065 44 

45,237 50 

10,940 08 

28,002 18 

18,982 23 
304,991 83 

58,331 40 
15,511 62 



Amount carried forward . . . $4,761,114 11 



24 



City Document No. 57. 



Amount brought forward 
New pipe yard and repair shop 
Upper yard, buildings, etc., 
New water-pipes, East Boston 
New main, East Boston 
Water to Deer Island 
Pumping works at Lake Cochituate 
High service, stand-pipe, engine-house and 

engines ...... 

High service, South Boston 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, including land 
Parker-Hill reservoir, " " 

Charles-river siphon .... 

Keeper's house, Parker Hill 
Temporary high-service, Brighton 
Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of main pipe, since January 1, 1850 
" " laying main pipe since January 1 

1850 . 

Cost of hydrants, stopcocks and boxes, and 

setting same . 
Cost of main pipe for extension in Eoxbury, 

Dorchester, Brighton, and West Eoxbury 

Districts ...... 

Cost of laying main pipe for extension in 

Eoxbury, Dorchester, Brighton, and West 

Eoxbury Districts ..... 
Cost of hydrants, stopcocks and boxes, and 

setting same in above districts 



54,761,114 11 

25,666 51 

9,165 63 

20,999 43 

24,878 08 

75,000 00 

15,000 00 

83,829 53 

27,860 29 

2,449,982 07 

228,246 17 

26,532 35 

2,764 90 

7,865 86 

3,110,314 82 
844,186 02 

475,581 51 

258,620 64 



959,186 71 

416,986 76 
356,934 97 



Cr. By sale of Jamaica-pond 

Aqueduct .... $32,000 00 
By sale of land to May 1, 1877 24,356 85 



$14,180,716 36 



56,356 85 

$14,124,359 51 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 
Clerk of the Boston Water Board. 



Report of the Water Board. 25 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

Office of City Engineer, City Hall, 

Boston, May 5, 1877. 
Hon. T. T. Sawyer, 

Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance establishing the Boston Water Board, the following 
report is respectfully submitted : — 

COCHITUATE WORKS. 
Sudbury River and Lake Cochituate. 

Water from Sudbury river has been turned into the lake 
during 1876, from Jan. 12th to 18th, Jan. 21st to Feb. 19th, 
from March 27th to 30th, from May 4th to 10th, from July 
24th to Sept. 2d, from Sept. 9th to 16th, from Sept. 28th 
to Nov. 11th, Nov. 16th, and from Dec. 9th to 28th, or 161 
days in all. 

During the present year, till May 1st, it has been diverted 
from Jan. 3d to Feb. 6th, from Feb. 8th to 26th, and from 
March 7th to 11th. 

The total quantity diverted from the river in 1876 was 
2,528,300,000 gallons, equal to a daily supply of 6,907,900 
gallons for the whole year. The quantity diverted this year 
is 789,100,000 gallons. 

Water was wasted at the overflow of the lake from March 
25th to April 12th, from April 19th to 23d, from May 10th 
to 14th, in 1876. It has been wasted from March 21st to 
April 5th, from April 11th to 15th, and from April 20th to 
23d, of this year. 

The total waste in 1876 was 1,619,243,800 gallons, equal 
to a daily supply of 4,424,200 gallons for the whole year. 

In the latter part of 1875 the lake surface was slowly 
falling, and it continued to fall till Jan. 13th, when it 
reached a point 8 feet 9 inches above the bottom of the con- 
duit ; at this date it began to rise, and reached high-water 
mark March 26th. On March 21st a warm rain falling upon 
a considerable depth of snow produced a heavy freshet, which 
was further increased on the 25th by a snow-storm, which 



26 City Document No. 57. 

turned into rain. On the 27th Sudbury river had risen to 
an unprecedented height, and was flowing at the rate of over 
2,000,000,000 gallons in 24 hours ; the lake was also brought 
to a high point, and a heavy waste was occasioned at the 
dam, the depth of the overflow being 21 inches. 

From March 26th until the latter part of May the lake 
surface stood at or near high-water mark. It then began to 
fall, and on the 26th of July had fallen to 9 feet 4 inches 
above the conduit bottom. Water from the river was now 
turned into the lake at the rate of 20,000,000 gallons per 
day, and the surface rose until August 7th, when it stood at 
10 feet. It kept at this height for two weeks, and then 
began to fall, standing, Sept. 1st, 9 feet 7 inches ; Oct. 1st, 
8 feet 8 inches, and Oct. 21st, 8 feet 3 inches above the 
bottom of the conduit ; this last being the least height for the 
year. Nov. 1st it had risen to 8 feet 4| inches, Dec. 1st, 9 
feet 9| inches, and Jan. 1st, 1877, it stood at 9 feet. 

From that date the water rose until March 27th, when it 
reached high-water mark, and it has remained at or near that 
point to the present time, standing, May 1st, 13 feet above the 
bottom of the conduit. 

No water has been used from Dudley pond. As the town 
of Natick now controls Dug pond, no record of its waste 
into the lake is kept by the city. 

Conduit. 

The table on page 55 will show the depths of water that 
have been maintained at the head of the conduit during the 
year. The clear height of the conduit is 6 feet 4 inches. 

The usual yearly examination of the interior of the conduit 
has been made. It was found in about the same condition 
as at the time of the previous examination. 

Low-Service Keservoies. 

The tables on page 51 give the monthly and yearly aver- 
age heights above tide-marsh level of the water in the Chest- 
nut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs. 

The average height in Chestnut-Hill reservoir has been 
122.80 feet above tide-marsh level, or 0.57 foot higher than 
in 1875. 

The average level in the Brookline reservoir has been 
122.28 feet, or 0.56 foot higher than in 1875, and 0.52 foot 
lower than in the Chestnut-Hill reservoir. 

The other low-service reservoirs are used simply to store 



Report of the Water Board. 27 

water for use in an emergency, or during repairs to the main 
pipes. 

Pipes and Pipe Plans. 

The laying of pipes in Brighton and West Roxbury, which 
was commenced in 1875, has been continued during the past 
year. In all, about 15| miles of pipes have been hud, and 
155 hydrants have been set in those divisions of the city. 

In the older portions of the city, principally in Dorchester 
and the Highlands, about 6 miles of pipes have been laid 
and 82 hydrants set. 

Dover-street bridge, which has just been rebuilt, carried a 
20-inch low-service main and a 12-inch high-service main to 
South Boston. The rebuilding and widening of the bridge, 
and the change of position of the draw channel, necessitated 
the laying of new lines of pipes, and the putting down of 
new siphons. This work — which, as it had to be done at 
such times as the progress of rebuilding the bridge would 
permit, and as the flow of water through the pipes could be 
interrupted only for short intervals, was one of considerable 
intricacy — has been successfully accomplished. 

The siphon and the supports for the pipes were put down 
by Mr. George H. Cavanagh, contractor for rebuilding the 
bridge ; the pipe-laying was done under the direction of Mr. 
Jones of the Water Department. 

The siphon for the 20-inch main is 24 inches in diameter, 
and that for the 12-inch main is 16 inches in diameter. The 
siphon pipes are enclosed in strong wooden boxes, well bolted 
and strapped, and the spaces between the pipes and boxes 
are filled solid with cement concrete. 

The 20-inch pipes which were removed were laid in 1858, 
and were the first line of tar-coated pipes (by the Dr. Smith 
process) laid in this country. As they were taken up, their 
condition was observed. Their inner surfaces were not en- 
tirely free from tuberculation, but were very much more so 
than are the surfaces of uncoated pipes in this city after they 
have been laid but a few years. The tubercles were isolated, 
and were not in sufficient numbers or of sufficient size to 
very materially interfere with the capacity of flow of the 
pipes. They were very easily removed, — more easily than 
from uncoated pipes, — seeming to have very little hold upon 
the tar surface. 

Upon clearing off the surface under a tubercle one would 
•at first suppose there had been simply a deposit, — that no 
action had been had either upon the iron or upon the coating ; 
but a more careful examination would show that under the 
centre of the tubercle a portion of the iron, from the size of 



28 City Document No. 57. 

a pin-head to that of a small pea, had been transformed into 
a black substance that could be easily cut with a knife, and 
had the appearance of plumbago. 

The inference drawn from the general appearance of the 
pipes was, that they would have lasted for an indefinite 
period. Those that were not too much broken are reserved 
for further use.* 

After the new siphons were put down the old ones were 
taken up. The wooden box of the 20 -inch siphon was fas- 
tened with alternate copper and wrought-iron bolts. . The 
outside of the box to the mud line had been covered with 
sheet copper, to prevent worms from destroying the wood. 
All the wrought-iron bolts which passed through this sheet 
of copper were badly acted upon throughout their whole 
length (about 5 feet) , although they were protected by the 
wood through which they had been driven. Bolts 1^ inches 
in diameter were at points reduced to a mere thread ; and for 
their entire length looked as if they had been kept in strong 
acid to bring out their fibre. Where in contact with the 
copper they had entirely disappeared. 

The greater number of the iron bolts which were not in 
contact with the copper were also found to be in a bad state, 
but were still doing service. Some of them had not been 
much affected. The copper bolts were as perfect as the day 
they were made. The siphon was put down in 1849. 

The various plans of the pipe system belonging to the 
Water Board, to the Superintendent of the Eastern Division, 
and to this department, have been corrected as usual. 

Sectional plans of West Roxbury and East Boston, on a 
scale of 100 feet to an inch, are now being prepared for this 
office; and others, of East Boston and South Bostou, on a 
scale of 200 feet to an inch, are being made for the Superin- 
tendent of the Eastern Division. 

High-Service Reservoir and Pumps. 

Parker-Hill reservoir is in good condition. A neat, wooden 
cottage, designed by Mr. Clough, the City Architect, has 
been built for the keeper during the past season. The res- 
ervoir has been in constant service, and the water in it has 
been kept at an average height of 216.38 feet. 

The following table shows the work done by the pumps in 
1876, and the amount of coal consumed : — 

*For interesting information on the tuberculation of pipes, see Annual 
Report of Cochituate Water Board for 1852. 



Report or the Water Board. 



29 



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30 



City Document No. 57. 



Total quantity pumped 

" number of revolutions . 

" amount of coal used 

" " ashes and clinkers 

Average pressure on force main, lbs. 
" " supply " 



534,764,120 gallons. 
11,377,960 
1,478,446 lbs. 
223,811 " 



Pressure used in computing duty of engines . 



81.9 
35.1 

46.8 



Approximate duty per lb. of coal (no deduction for ashes 
or clinkers), 326,122 ft. lb. 



Cost of Pumping 



Salaries 
Fuel . 
Gas . 

Miscellaneous repairs 
Small supplies 



$4,030 14 

4,635 40 

- 297 81 

1,466 24 

162 73 

$10,592 32 



Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 18.3 cents. 

The average daily quantity pumped was 1,461,104 gal- 
lons, — an increase of 15.06 per cent, over the quantity 
pumped in 1875. 

In a special report upon the high-service system, made 
November, 1875, and reprinted in the last annual report, it 
was stated that the safe working capacity of each of the 
pumps was about 1,800,000 gallons per day. It was also 
stated, that if a second suction and a second delivery-main 
were laid, the works would be of a capacity of about 
2,750,000 gallons per day, — provided that no serious 
accident should happen to either engine. 

It is the intention to lay the second force-main this year, 
and I had hoped that, with this enlargement, the present 
works would supply the demand of the high-service territory 
until new works, designed upon a scale to meet the future 
wants, could be built. 

But it will be noticed that the average consumption has 
increased largely. The consumption in the cold months, when 
large quantities of water are wasted to prevent the service- 
pipes from freezing, is considerably above the average, and at 
such times it has required the full safe capacity of one pump 
to keep up the supply during the past winter. To main- 
tain a full supply during the coming winter, it is essential 



Report or the Water Board. 31 

that both machines should be in good working order, and 
safe from serious accidents. 

The valve-chests of the pumps have for some time been 
considered rather weak for the service required of them, 
and, recently, one has cracked, — not to an extent to throw it 
altogether out of use, but sufficiently to weaken it materially. 
The damage can be repaired at a moderate cost, by substitut- 
ing a new valve-chest for the broken one ; but the most com- 
plete, and by far the most satisfactory, remedy is to add a 
third engine of a capacity of about 3,000,000 gallons per 
day. 

The estimated cost of such an engine, with a new boiler 
and the alterations in the buildings that must be made to 
accommodate them, is $20,000. 

As was stated in the report to which reference has already 
been made, it is thought that the pumping-station at Rox- 
bury should be abandoned within a few years for a new one 
at Chestnut Hill ; and it may appear, at first sight, incon- 
sistent with this opinion to incur further expense for new 
machinery at the former, point. 

But, besides the fact that a new engine is needed there to 
insure that safety from an interruption to the supply of 
water which is demanded by a community without other 
source of supply than the public works, is the consideration 
that it can be made of good use at the new station to post- 
pone for a number of years the purchase of a second large 
engine. 

I would therefore recommend that a third engine, of a 
capacity of 3,000,000 gallons, and a new boiler, be purchased 
and erected this season. 

Brighton Temporary High-Service Works. 

In a report made in 1875 it was recommended that, for 
the purpose of supplying the high lands of Brighton, a small 
system of works should be built, consisting of a reservoir on 
Academy Hill, and steam pumps of small capacity located 
at some convenient point. 

An appropriation of $10,000 was^made by the City Coun- 
cil for this purpose, and the works have been built during 
the past season and have been in operation since August 10th. 

The reservoir, which is situated in the school-house yard 
on Academy Hill, is 30 feet square at the top, 9 feet 8 inches 
deep, and, when filled to a depth of 8 feet, holds 47,000 
gallons. It is located upon a ledge ; the foundation is a 
layer of concrete, 9 to 18 inches thick; the side-walls, built 
of Roxbury pudding-stone, are 10 feet high, 5 feet thick at 



32 City Document No. 57. 

the base and 2 feet at the top. The sides and bottom are 
lined with a 4-inch course of brick, pargetted with a thin 
coat of Portland cement, and the whole is covered with a 
timber roof. 

The engine-house, designed by the City Architect, is sit- 
uated on the city ledge lot on Cambridge street, about one 
mile from the reservoir. It is a neat, wooden building, 20 
feet by 35 feet 8 inches. 

The pumps and boilers were furnished by Mr. H. R. 
Worthington, of New York. 

The pumps, of which there are two, are of the duplex, 
high-pressure type, having 12-inch steam cylinders, 7-inch 
water cylinders, and 10-inch stroke. 

The boilers are upright tubular, 42 inches in diameter. 

The height of the water in the reservoir is at all times 
shown on a dial in the engine-house by an electric indicator, 
the invention of Mr. Thomas Hall, of this city, by whom it 
w r as furnished. It is a very simple and ingenious apparatus, 
and has proved very reliable. 

High-water mark is at grade 174.10 above tide-marsh 
level. 

Consumption of Water. 

The table on page 53 gives the average daily consump- 
tion of water from the Cochituate works for each month. 

The average daily consumption in 1876 has been 20,237,- 
700 gallons, — an increase of 5 per cent, above that of 1875. 

No water has been supplied to East Boston from the 
Cochituate works during the past year. 



Experiments on Evaporation from Water Surfaces. 

In 1875 *a series of experiments was begun at Beacon Hill 
reservoir to determine the amount of evaporation from water 
surfaces. The main object aimed at was to ascertain what 
relation the evaporation from a large body of water, having 
a depth of several feet, bore to that from tanks and pans, 
such as are usually used for experiments upon this subject. 

Beacon-Hill reservoir is a stone structure, supported, at a 
considerable height above the street surface, on arches, and 
so arranged that any leakage can easily be detected. As it 
is shut off from the street service, the water in it being held 
simply as a reserve in case of accident or other emergency, 
and as it is nearly square in plan, and has practically vertical 
sides, it forms a very good vessel for such experiments. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 33 

During the experiments the surface of the water was kept 
about 4 feet below the top of the coping. 

Last year a series of experiments upon evaporation from 
tanks was commenced at Chestnut-Hill reservoir for compar- 
ison with those at Beacon Hill. 

The evaporation at Beacon Hill has been measured in 
three different ways : — 

1st. The amount from the surface of the reservoir. 

2d. The amount from a wooden tank. 

3d. The amount from a tin vessel. 

The tank and vessel are attached to a raft floating on the 
reservoir surface, and are submerged to very nearly their 
full depth. 

The reservoir has a surface of 28,000 square feet, and has 
had about 12 feet depth of water during the experiments. 
The wooden tank is 3 feet wide, 4 feet long, and 3 feet deep, 
and is covered on the outside with zinc. The tin vessel is 
about 15 inches in diameter, and 18 inches deep. 

The observations were taken daily by means of a hook 
gauge. 

The rainfall was measured in two gauges ; one, 2 inches 
in diameter, the other, 14.85 inches in diameter. 

The tanks at Chestnut-Hill reservoir are similar to the 
above, and are attached to a raft floating in the centre of a 
basin of water of about 87 acres area and 20 feet deep, 
where they are fully exposed to the sun and winds. 

The following table gives the results of the experi- 
ments : — 



34 



City Document IS t o. 57. 



Table showing Results of Experiments on Evaporation from Water Surfaces. 
BEACON-HILL RESERVOIR. 



1875. 


I . 

O CO 

PI 

a 


a 

o 

J a" 

*3 3 

a °° 

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a 


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a 
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May . . 
June • . 
July . . 
August . 
Sept. . . 
October . 
Nov. . . 


56.2 
65.7 
71.7 
70.3 
59.7 
49.9 
34.2 


68.4 
77.6 
83.4 
81.2 
72.7 
60.9 
44.7 


81.5 

92.5 

91. 

86. 

88. 

74.5 

59. 


36. 
46. 
54. 
53. 
35. 
29. 
1.5 


60.1 
66.8 
65.4 
74.2 
72.4 
76.6 
79.4 


3.40 
7.43 
3.95 
3.46 
3.43 
5.29 
5.37 


58. 

69.5 

76. 

75.9 

67.3 

53.7 

38. 


3.72 
4.05 
6.46 
4.56 
5.30 
2.72 
2.29 


58.4 

69.4 

75. 

74.5 

64.8 

51.8 

37. 


4.72 
5.23 
6.54 
5.00 
4.94 
2.55 
1.47 


58.7 
70.1 
76.4 
76.5 
67.6 
54.1 
38.0 


4.63 
5.51 
7.15 
5.72 
5.82 
2.93 
1.72 


Totals . 


58.2 


69.8 






70.7 


32.33 

4.62 


62.6 


29.10 


61.6 


30.45 


63.1 


33.48 












1876. 


























Jan. . . 
Feb. . . 
March. . 
April . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . 
August . 
Sept. . . 
Oct. . . 
Nov. . . 
Dec. . . 


30.5 
27.5 
32.9 
43.2 
53.9 
67.6 
73.1 
69.5 
58.9 
48.0 
40.8 
22.3 


39.6 
37.2 
43.4 
55.3 
64.1 
82.4 
86.4 

71. 
62.2 


66.5 

57. 

66.5 

73.5 

86. 

90. 

96.5 

94. 

90.5 

69. 

74. 

48. 


7 

—4 

6 

25 

33 

43 

53 

51 

44 

27 

14 

—4 




1.83 
4.31 
6.63 
3.10 
3.33 
2.05 
6.77 
1.50 
3.30 
1.97 
8.51 
3.29 




0.47 
0.73 
2.13 
2.25 
3.37 
3.78 

8.42 

Res. 
emp'y 

5.66 
4.34 




4.79 
5.15 
7.75 

3.56 
2.83 




4.48 
5.29 
8.18 

4.80 
3.75 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 

CHESTNUT-HILL RESERVOIR. 



35 





Temperatures. 


Evaporation. 


1876. 


Water in 
reservoir. 


Water in 
wooden 
tank. 


Water in 
tin tank. 


Wooden 

tank. 
Inches. 


Tin tank. 
Inches. 


Rainfall. 
Inches. 


August . . . 
September . . 
October . . . 
November . . 


66.5 
78.0 
74.S 
64.9 
49.2 
43.8 


64.5 
74.4 
70.4 
60.2 
43.5 
41.0 


66.7 
78.0 
74.6 
64.5 
48.9 
43.4 


5.44 
7.50 
6.21 
3.48 
3.12 
0.66 


5.71 
8.82 
7.94 
5.23 
4.57 
0.95 


1.70 
6.59 
1.84 
3.67 
1.65 
7.42 


Totals .... 
Means .... 


62.9 


59.0 


62.7 


26.41 


33.22 


22.87 



The figures in the column of mean temperature for 1876 
are from the. observations of the U. S. Signal Service. 

At Beacon Hill the observations were taken at 2 P. M. 
each clay; those at Chestnut Hill at 8.45 A. M. 

On two occasions hourly observations were made at Chest- 
nut Hill clay and night to ascertain what variations took 
place in the surface temperatures of the water in the tanks 
and reservoir. The following tables give the observed tem- 
peratures : — 



36 



City Document No. 57. 



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City Document No. 57. 






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Report of the Water Board. 



39 











94.7 
89.6 
94.7 
89.6 
94.7 
89.8 




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3.33 


17 


2.15 2.94 


3.04 


14 


1.37 1.73 


1.90 


8 


0.74 0.63 


0.78 


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0.94 0.64 


0.88 


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Kainfall. 







40 City Document No. 57. 

To eliminate a disturbing element, periods of a few days, 
during which no rain fell, have been selected for compar- 
ison. The evaporations at those times were as follows : — 

1875. 



May 22d to June 7th, 
June 19th to July 3d, 
July 7th to July 15th, 
Oct. 17th to Oct. 26th, 
Oct. 31st to Nov. 9th, 



Tables giving the rainfall for the year 1876 at various 
points in New England, and one showing the quantity of rain 
which fell in Boston each day of the year will be found 
appended. 

Additional Supply. 

By an order of the City Council approved July 18, 1876, 
the City Treasurer was authorized " to borrow the sum of 
two million dollars, to be added to the appropriations here- 
tofore made for an 'Additional Supply of Water.'" This, 
added to the sums before appropriated, for preliminary 
investigations (Oct. 20, 1871, $10,000.00) for connecting 
Sudbury river with Lake Cochituate as a means of tempo- 
rary supply (April 12, 1872, $100,000.00), and for building 
the Sudbury-river Works (April 11, 1873, $500,000.00, 
Feb. 26, 1875, $1,500,000.00), makes the total amount 
appropriated $4,110,000.00. The premium on the sale of 
bonds ($352,886.80) stands to the credit of this appropria- 
tion ; therefore the total sum with which the additional sup- 
ply is credited is $4,462,886.80. 

The amount expended to May 1, 1877, is $3,110,314.82, 
of which sum $2,595,694.55 is chargeable to labor and 
materials used in the construction of the permanent works, 
that is, has been paid on account of contracts, for work done 
by day labor and for materials. The balance, $514,620.27, 
is the sum expended for the temporary connection of the 
river with Lake Cochituate, for preliminary investigations, 
for engineering and superintendence of construction, for 
land and water damages, etc. The retained percentage to 
secure the faithful completion of the various contracts is 
$104,286.01. 

The following extracts from the report of Mr. A. Fteley, 



Report of the Water Board. 41 

Resident Engineer in charge, will show the progress made in 
the construction of the works : — 

" The work for the construction of the ' Additional Sup- 
ply' has been actively prosecuted during the year 1876, and 
has been resumed as early in 1877 as the weather would per- 
mit. Work has been continued (and on some sections 
terminated) under the various contracts executed in 1875 
(see City Doc. No. 80, 1876, pages 40, 41, 42), as is shown 
in the accompanying table." 



42 



City Document No. 57. 



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Keport of the Water Board. 43 

" New contracts were made during the year as follows : — 

Feb. 25, 1876.— With Jesse W. Starr and Son, 
for furnishing 48-inch cast- 
iron pipes for Section 13 
(siphon across Rosemary 
Brook Valley) . Amount 
of contract, " $42,752 00 

Aug. 29, 1876.— With Cape Ann Granite Co., 
for the construction of a 
. gate-chamber in Farm 
pond. Amount of con- 
tract, 15,957 95 

Oct. 31, 1876. —With F. Jones and A. Harris, 
for hauling pipes to Sec- 
tion 13. Amount of con- 
tract, 856 95 

Dec. 1876. — With Theo. Bemis, to build 
fences in Needham, at lie. 
per foot. Amount not 
fixed; about 1,000 00 

Mar. 8, 1877. —With H. Eames & Son, for 
clearing Basin No. 3. 
Amount of contract, 2,000 00 

Mar. 31, 1877. — With Jesse W. Starr & Son 
for furnishing 48-inch pipes 
for the connection with 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, 
and for the connection of 
the various reservoirs on 
Sudbury river. Amount 
of contract, 115,200 00 

Apr. 21, 1877. — With Beck with & Quacken- 
bush, for building super- 
structure of Dam 1. 
Amount of contract, 48,485 00 

Apr. 28, 1877. —With G. S. & W. F. Howe, 
for hauling 48-inch pipes 
from, the city wharf to 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, at 
$3 per pipe, and 75c. per 
ton of special castings. 
Amount of contract, 1,200 00 



Total, $227,451 90 



44 City Document No. 57. 

M Several other contracts were entered into for furnishing 
materials (bricks, stones, timber, etc.), steam-engines, der- 
ricks and horses for the work done by the city by day's 
labor, and their amounts are included in the cost of work 
shown in the preceding table. 

" The work to be done by the city by day labor (order of 
the City Council approved Oct, 30, 1875), has been con- 
tinued. Section 1 of the Sudbury-river conduit has been 
completed with the exception of the finishing of the embank- 
ments, and of the removal. of the coffer dam ; and work has 
been commenced for the foundation of the three dams on 
Sudbury river. 

"The foundation of Dam 1 was completed Jan. 1, 1877. 
Some difficulty was experienced in building it, owing to the 
porous nature of the river-bed, which was excavated to a 
depth, at places, of nearly twenty feet, and to the fact that it 
was often found necessary to raise the water in the river in 
order to supply the city. 

" The foundation of Dam No. 2 is about one-half done. The 
foundation of Dam No. 3 is nearly completed across the val- 
ley of Stony brook. 

" In each case the foundation is formed of a substantial wall 
of rubble masonry, built mostly on rock for Dam No. 2, 
and on gravel and sand protected by sheet piling for 
Dams Nos. 1 and 3. 

" The cost of the work done by day labor is shown in the 
preceding table. 

" Work has just been commenced by day labor at Section 
13, for laying two lines of cast-iron siphon pipes, 48-inch 
diameter, across the valley of Rosemary brook. 

" A small amount of work is also being done along the line 
of the conduit in the same manner, for trimming the banks 
of the conduit, erecting fences and seeding. Over ninety 
per cent, of the work on the conduit sections is finished. 

"Section A, connecting Dam No. 1 with the Sudbury con- 
duit, and Section 21, connecting the conduit with Chestnut- 
Hill reservoir, will probably be put under contract before 
the end of this month. 

" The work remaining to be done outside of what is men- 
tioned above, to complete the Sudbury-river works, is as 
follows : — 

" Improvement of Course brook (the channel between the 
Sudbury-river conduit and Lake Cochituate). 

"Superstructure of Dam No. 2. 
" " " 3. 

"Clearing 1 of Basins Nos. 1 and 2, and excavation in the 



same. 



" Dyke at head of Farm pond. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 45 

"Building of a road between Framingham and Ashland, 
above the proposed water surface in Basin No. 2. 

" Protection of railroad banks in Basins 2 and 3. 

"Connection of the Sudbury-river conduit with the Cochit- 
uate aqueduct, Bradlee basin, and the outlet pipes of Chest- 
nut-Hill reservoir. 

" Sluice-gates and iron floors for the various gate-houses of 
the conduit and dams. 

" Superstructures of gate-houses for conduit and clams." 

During September, October, and November, hearings in 
the matter of the taking by the city of Boston of the waters 
of the Sudbury river and its tributaries were held before a 
Board of Commissioners, consisting of William G. Rus- 
sell, Esq., of Boston, James B. Francis, Esq., of Lowell, 
and Charles A. Stevens, Esq., of Ware. 

The closing argument was made Nov. 4th, and the award 
of the commissioners was made public early in January of 
this year. 

By advice of the counsel of the city all the cases have 
been appealed. 

In connection with these cases it was found advisable to 
have accurate gaugings made of the flow of the Concord 
river at Lowell, where most of the mills claiming damages 
are situated ; accordingly three assistants were employed for 
this purpose, under the direction of Mr. Clemens Herschel. 

The gaugings were taken night and day for some three 
months, and were used with similar gaugings of the Sudbury 
river, to determine the ratio of the quantity of water to be 
diverted by the city, to the whole flow of the Concord. 

The temporary structures erected in 1872 for the supply 
of Lake Cochituate are in a satisfactory condition ; but their 
temporary nature makes it desirable to use shortly the per- 
manent works now building ; the bracing of the ditch has 
been renewed to a large extent, and additional protection 
against freshets has been provided in the wooden flume under 
the embankment of the Boston & Albany Railroad, at the 
south end of Farm pond. 

The average rainfall on the Sudbury river water-shed for 
the year ending April 30, 1877, as deduced from the gauges 
kept in Framingham, Southboro', Marlboro', Westboro', and 
Hopkinton, is 46.82 inches. 

The total flow of the river for the year has been 30,145,- 
600,000 gallons, equal to an average daily flow of 82,000,- 
000 gallons, and 48^- per cent, of the rainfall. 

The least flow was in September, 1876, when about 6,000,- 
000 gallons in 24 hours were passing, and the greatest flow 
(1,109,800,000 in 24 hours) in March 28, 1877. 



46 City Document No. 57. 

In January, 1875, the level of Lake Cochituate was reduced 
to the lowest point it has ever reached. The lake in great 
part was refilled from Sudbury river, and the measurements 
of the water diverted for this purpose have furnished the 
data for estimating approximately the capacity for storage of 
the gravel-beds which form the Cochituate valley. This ca- 
pacity, it will be noticed, is just about one-half of the available 
capacity of the lake itself, and increases largely the supply 
to be derived from this source in a season of drought. 

Assuming that the supply to the lake from its own water- 
shed was in the same ratio as that to Sudbury river from its 
water-shed (this last was carefully measured) , it has been 
found that 1,020,700,000 gallons more than the apparent 
capacity of the lake were required to refill it, and must have 
been absorbed by the gravel-beds. 

MYSTIC WORKS. 
Mystic Lake. 

In the table on page 58 may be found the average monthly 
heights at which the water has stood in Mystic lake during 
1876. 

The long-continued drought of the summer and fall 
months, when the smaller streams of Eastern Massachusetts 
practically ceased to flow, reduced the water level of the 
lake to the lowest point it has ever reached since the con- 
struction of the works, with the single exception of that to 
which it fell in 1875, viz. : 2 feet 11^ inches above the 
bottom of the conduit. The lowest point of last year was 
5 feet 10 inches above. 

The following are the heights at which it stood at various 
dates during 1876 : — 

1st, 10.85 feet above bottom of conduit. 



January 


1st, 


10.85 


January 


4th, 


11.00 


February 


1st, 


11.10 


March 


1st, 


10.55 


March 


8th, 


11.00 


April 


12th, 


9.30 


May 


1st, 


10.40 


May 


7th, 


10.30 


May 


11th, 


11.15 


July 


30th, 


7.00 


August 


5th, 


9.45 


October 


1st, 


6.15 


November 


1st, 


5.20 



Keport of the Water Board. 47 

November 6th, 5.10 feet above bottom of conduit. 
November 22d, 11.20 " " «« " " 

December 1st, 10.35 " " " " " 

Jau'y 1st, 1877, 10.30 " 

High-water mark is 11.20 feet above bottom of conduit. 

Since January 1st, to date, the level has varied from 9.75 
to 11.20 feet above. 

The total yield of the Mystic water-shed for the year 
1876 is shown by the following figures : — 

Gallons. 

Quantity drawn from the lake for use, 3,230,101,300 

" of water at the dam, 5,913,700,200 

" " " " conduit waste-weir, 306,074,500 

" " fish-way, 150,000,000 



9,599,876,000 



Less quantity due to difference of levels of 

lake at first and last of year, 32,583,000 



Total yield of water-shed, 9,567,293,000 

Equal to a daily yield of 26,140,145 

The amount of the rainfall on the water-shed (exclusive of 
water surfaces) was 21,951,525,000 gallons, of which 43.6 
per cent, passed through the lake. 



Pumping-Station and Eeservoir. 

The table on page 48 shows the work done by the Mystic 
engines during the year, the number of days that each 
engine ran, the coal used, and the average monthly and yearly 
duty. 

Engine No. 1 was in use 109 days, 23 hours. 

" " 2 " " 30 " 20 " 45 minutes. 
" " 3 " " 325 " 11 " 45 minutes. 

Total coal consumed, 8,103,280 lbs., of which 7.73 per 
cent, was ashes and clinkers. 

Total quantity of water pumped, 3,230,101.297 gallons. 
Average lift or head pumped against 154.25 feet. 



48 



City Document No. 57. 



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Eepoet of the Water Board. 49 

The average duty of the three engines for the year was 
51,281,200 ft. lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal consumed, no deduc- 
tion being made for clinkers or ashes, and the average num- 
ber of gallons pumped per lb. of coal was 398.6, or 11.7 
gallons (3 per cent.) more than in the previous year. 

The duty reported for 1875 is somewhat greater than that 
given above, but it will be noticed that the quantity of water 
raised per lb. of coal is 3 per cent, greater in 1876 than in 
1875, showing that in reality the engines have worked more 
economically during the past year than during the previous 
one. 

This apparent discrepancy is due to the fact that a mercury 
gauge has lately been attached to the force main to measure 
the lift, which varies from 3 to 3^ lbs. from the old gauge 
in its readings, thus reducing the lift credited to the engine 
about 6 1 feet. 

The cost of pumping has been as follows : — 

Salaries $6,858 00 

Fuel 23,181 24 

Eepairs . . . ... . . 806 64 

Oil, waste and packing . . . . 1,312 88 

Miscellaneous small supplies . . . . 133 61 



Total, $32,292 37 

Making the cost per million of gallons raised one foot 
high, 6 1 cents, — a very favorable result. 

The largest quantity pumped in any one day was 15,475,- 
239 gallons (Feb. 26, 1876). 

The smallest quantity pumped was 6,040,736 gallons 
(Nov. 7th). 

Besides the mercury gauge already mentioned, a float 
gauge, to indicate the height of the w r ater in the pump-well, 
and a metre to measure the water fed to the boilers, have 
been set. 

New steam pistons are being placed in engine No. 2. 
When this work is finished the engines and buildings will be 
in good condition, and will probably require but little expen- 
diture for repairs for some time to come. 

The reservoirs and grounds are in very good order. The 
water has been kept at an average height of 146.31 feet 
above tide-marsh level, or at almost exactly the same height 
as in 1875. The average monthly heights will be found 
recorded in the table on page 58. 



50 Citt Document No. 57. 



Consumption and Quality of Water. 

The average daily consumption of water from the Mystic 
works for each month can be found in the table on page 58. 

The average for the year was 8,825,808 gallons, or 
1,292,778 (171 per cent.) more than for 1875. 

East Boston was supplied from the Mystic works only five 
months of the latter year, while it has been supplied from 
those works the whole of last year, which fact, in part, 
accounts for the notable increase of consumption. The 
largest consumption for one clay was Feb. 24th, when it 
reached 15,169,895 gallons. The least consumption for one 
day was Nov. 19th, when it fell to 6,553,945 gallons. 

Early in August the consumers of Mystic water began 
complaining of a bad taste and smell in the supply. A visit 
to the works on August 8th revealed the fact that Horn 
pond, from which Mystic lake is largely fed, was covered 
with a minute vegetable growth, some of it still green, but 
much of it in a state of decomposition, and producing a very 
disagreeable appearance and odor. 

Nothing could be done to remedy the evil, but Professor 
Nichols, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was 
requested to examine the pond, to ascertain the cause and 
suggest a method of preventing a return of the trouble, if 
possible. His report, together with that of Dr. Farlow, 
Professor of Botany, Harvard University, has been handed 
you. 

JOS. P. DAVIS, 

City Engineer. 



Report of the Water Board. 



51 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, in feet and decimals, of the Reservoirs 

above " tide-marsh level," 1866-1876. 

BKOOKLINE. 

Maximum high-water line, 124.60. 



Month. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.* 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


January . . . 


122,28 


122.00 


123.29 


122.58 


122.83 


121.89 


118.64 


120.46 


121.06 


121.41 


122.09 


February . . . 


122.47 


123.12 


122.79 


122.64 


122.60 


122.54 120.48 


119.86 


119.52 


120.17 


121.86 


March .... 


123.19 


123.05 


122.33 


122.48 


122.77 


122.08 


122.04 


119.71 


119.27 


118.95 


122.24 




123.45 


123.00 


123.04 


122.60 


122.56 


122.00 


122.10 


121.36 


119.59 


121.45 


123.48 




123.04 


123.07 


123.04 


122.77 


122.75 


121.79 


122.29 


121.84 


121.70 


122.84 


123.08 




123.29 


122.34 


122.77 


121.85 


122.64 


121.98 


122.25 


120.90 


121.83 


122.82 


122.24 


July 


122.97 


122.98 


122.77 


122.10 


122.50 


122.19 


121.25 


118.79 


121.08 


121.64 


121.88 


August .... 


122.80 


122.23 


122.75 


122.19 


122.23 


122.06 


122.14 


118.48 


120.50 


121.69 


122.22 


September . . 


122.81 


122.52 


122.12 


122.50 


122.35 


121.50 


123.44 


119.04 


118.65 


122.45 


122.05 


October .... 


123.03 


122.65 


122.31 


122.58 


122.64 


119.54 


122.96 


119.09 


117.60 


122.81 


122.41 


November . . 


122.75 


122.89 


122.56 


122.46 


122.60 


116.94 


120.98 


119.69 


118.43 


123.03 


122.70 


December . . . 


122.64 


122.37 


122.00 


122.92 


122.50 


117.71 


121.06 


119.71 


120.17 


121.38 


121.09 


Yearly Average 


122.S9 


122.69 


122.65 


122.48 


122.58 


121.02 


121.63 


119.91 


119.96 


121.72 


122.28 



* New gauge put in, with a zero point .08 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



CHESTNUT HILL. 
Maximum high-water line, 125.00. 



Month. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.* 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


January 












102.00 


116.90 


120.76 


121.32 


121.79 


122.86 


February . 












102.81 


120.46 


120.26 


120.19 


120.86 


122.97 


March . . 












105.19 


122.29 


120.11 


119.95 


119.90 


123.14 


April . . . 












110.48 


122.52 


121.55 


120.16 


121.80 


123.73 


May . . . 












116.21 


122.54 


122.03 


121.93 


123.11 


123.42 


June . . . 












121.46 


122.35 


121.24 


122.11 


123.19 


122.70 


July . . . 












122.40 


121.77 


119.65 


121.50 


122.13 


122.26 


August . . 












122.02 


122.15 


119.32 


121.00 


122.03 


122.58 


September 












121.44 


122.77 


119.74 


119.75 


122.70 


122.41 


October . . 












119.67 


122.08 


119.70 


119.15 


123.09 


122.72 


November 




100.S0 


117.08 


122.42 


120.21 


119.32 


123.24 


123.07 


December . 




101.29 


115.35 


121.40 


120.21 


120.61 


122.95 


121.78 


Yearly Average 


101.04 


114.67 


121.64 


120.40 


120.58 


122.23 


122.80 



* New gauge put in, with a zero point .18 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



52 



City Document No. 57. 



Parker-Hill Reservoir. 
Maximum High-water Line, 219.00. 



Month. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Yearly average 



IS 76. 



217.81 
216.00 
218.00 
217.96 
217.96 
214.67 
214.71 
216.25 
216.19 
216.29 
216.29 
215.79 



216.50 



216.29 
215.96 
216.69 
2'16.42 
216.58 
216.75 
217.02 
216.58 
216.62 
215.69 
216.12 
215.83 

216.38 



Report of the Water Board. 



53 






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54 



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o 


o 




CM 


CM 
















i-H 




rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


r ~ l 


rt 


rt 






rH 


I 


rt 




CD 






cl 






^ 


OS 


CM 




o 


^ 


■* 




o 




OS 


o 




CO 










OS 




CO 




t- 


CO 


o 


CI 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


r-\ 


































m 


^ 








H 




CM 


00 


OS 


s 




1-1 




CO 


lO 


CO 






o 




•* 








o 


O 


o 






O 


OS 


OS 


fc- 




CO 


tr- 


OS 


r-H 


rH 


* H 


1-1 




r " 1 


1-1 
















T}< 






ro 


CO 


r_ 


CO 


o 


^ 


tX 


o 


o 


00 


o 




CS 


CO 




OO 


CO 


o 






CO 








CO 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


OS 


CO 


CO 


IO 


to 


CO 


OS 


r-H 




























a 

H 
O 


& 


3 


-a 




• 




. 


+3 

s 

to 

p 

<1 


U 

r0> 

s 


u 


rO 

a 

as 
t- 
o 

rH 


B 


a! 

r> 
0! 


a 


13 

p 
1-5 


rQ 

as 

Ph 


3 


ft 

-1 


CS 


p 

■2 
rB 


h5 


*-> 

ft 


o 
o 

o 


p 


01 



Keport or the Water Board. 



55 



Table showing the Depths of Water in the Conduit at the Gate-house, Lake 
Cochituate, the Number of Days it was running at those Depths, and the 
Average Depth for each Month. 



1876. 


1-D 


ft 




ft 
•< 




t-3 


>> 

"3 


<1 


ft 

DQ 


O 


> 
o 


c5 

ft 


Total Days. 


O'-O" 










i 

9 
1 

19 
1 


30 


11 
1 

8 
1 

9 
1 


7 

1 

8 
1 

14 


29 

1 


2 
29 


18 

1 

2 
9 


10 
1 

1 

9 

1 

2 

7 


1 


6'-3" 








1 

4 


28 
1 
1 


6' i" 








14 


6' 5" 








1 


7' 0" 








7 
1 
1 

12 
1 

1 
2 


1 

2 

2 

150 


7' 1" 








3 










1 










1 
1 

20 


7 '-8" 








2 
1 


7' 11" 








17 
2 
3 


8' 4" 


7 
1 


1 


2 
1 

1 
27 


82 
2 
1 


8' 5" 




1 




23 


28 


78 
366 



Average Monthly Depths. 



1876. 


A 


rO 


rt 


ft 


(A 


0) 

B 


£ 


60 


ft 


j 


> 
o 


c 




l"B 


1=1 


a 


«1 


a 


h> 


1-5 


«1 


0Q 


o 


% 


fl 




8 '-4 J" 


8'-6" 


8'-5J" 


7'-2i" 


6 '-6 \" 


7'-0" 


7'-4J- 


7'-8$" 


7'-0" 


7'-0" 


a'4l" 


6'-llJ" 



> ^ 



7'-4i 



56 



City Document No. 57. 



^ * 



s> o 



to 




cy 


s 


G 




s 


s 


■>• 


B 


^ 


•^ 


^J 






| 








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I 



k e g 



V 



«, 



fi 


-Si 


^ 




s~ 


K 




1 


m 


is 




^ 




^ 


1 





§ 8 



S «T 

© e 
^ © 

'§1 



M "a 

C^3 






o<~- 



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2 ? a 

73 'S a 



M cj 

C3 f3 



a** 



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11° 



n - 


o 




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o 


































o 


CO 


00 




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o 




CO 


in 


o 




































co 














cN 


cq 


w 


CO 


































^5 
































r-c 


<M 


^ 


I-H 


CO 




CI 


cq 


cq 


H 






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5 


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O 




















































CO 










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o 


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o 


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CM 


















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CO 


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CO 


o 


O 









(M 




§ 










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CO 


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I— 


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:> *n 












































o 






































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CI 




OS 




































CM 


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cc 


CO 


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m to in to 



cS cq co © 



co in oo oo 

CO © © CO 

i-i CO © 



fc * s - 



o 1 « 

3 '-iJ 




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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 






















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o 




o 






o 


























o 






o 


© 


o 




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o 


a 




£ 


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CO 




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icT 




-1" 


































O 


o> 
















o 


o 












asg 






































































<s 
















© 




CO 


ifO 


CI 






CO 


o 


OS 














DO 








^^ 














































C) 




CO 


co 


** 


•* 




<a 


© 


© 


CO 


lO 


CD 


■* 


•* 


^f 


si m 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






© 














© 


of Ra 

Watt 

f Lak 

tuate. 






o 




o 
























o 






o 




o 


o 






















© 












































CB 


C-l 


N 








CO 








ro 




m 
















CO 








































CO 


CO 






Ol 








































mounl 

ill on 

shed o 

Ooch 










-f 


















CO 






•* 






to 


















CO 












<£ 








-f 






OS 




CI 


CI 


CO 


1- 


o 


O) 








co 






CO 


o 


in 


to 


CO 




CO 




-+ 


CD 


o 


CO 


<$<H 
















































































































to 


CO 


to 


CO 


o 


© 




01 


-* 




o> 


o 


o 


CO 


01 








© 


t- 




© 








© 




-* 


CO 


CO 


CO 






IN 


P3 








CO 






CO 


















c-> 


CO 


^ 




o 


*JI 


CO 


-* 


CO 


"•# 


T* 


u0 


■^ 


-f 


CO 


■« 


>* 


CD 


■o 


K 




N 




-H 


in 






00 








<N 
















m 






























CO 














00 


CO 




CO 




CO 




CO 




CO 


CO 




h 





































Keport of the Water Board. 



57 



t- CO »o 













n 





O 


O 












to 






















































CO 


































T* 














































cm 


01 


CM 



















O 


O 


O 







O 









O 










O 









O 








CD 


























CO 












O 

























CI 


CO 










O 












































CO 


t- 


















O 






























CO 


t— 


00 






CO 


CO 




CO 








O 






































O 

















ro 


CO 
CO 




CO 


O 

































































t- 


CM 







M 










r-l 








IH 














O 



















O 




























o 









lO 








00 




<M 






Ci 




























CO 


CO 












0-1 


£? 










-K 






CM 




















co 


-# 












+ - f 




o 





O 


O 







O 


O 





o 





O 


O 







O 







00 o 
000 

flOO_ 

cooo" 

CO O o 
CO^CO^cO^ 

fr- "0 CM 

CD "0 tri 

i-Toi cm- 



cm Cl to o 



CO CO ITS CT> 



]^J 3 



,22 a 

.£ . CD !-. 



o o oS 

•j3 o m w 

g CO '3 rt 

t* C3 ;-< H 

^ del 5 



C3 



fc fc 5 



fc s" 



r; CB rH 



." iO uO uO 






















>» 

































































** 
















rH 


































































bo 

c3 



















































-* 




CO 






CO 







o> 




























CO 






T* 








X* 












01 
















** 









-f 










CO 


o> 








CO 


CO 


T* 




CJ 






















00 


T* 


cv 


ua 


>* 


rtl 


■^1 


CO 






on 












«# 




CD 




















CO 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 




00 







58 



City Document No. 57. 



Observations at Mystic Lake and Reservoir. 



Rainfall 
at 'Lake. 



Height of 
Water in Lake 
above bottom 

of conduit. 



Height of Water 
in Reservoir 
above tide- 
marsh level. 



Average 

Daily 

Consumption. 



1876. 



Inches. 



Feet. 



Feet. 



Gallons. 



January 
February ■ 
March . . 
April . • . 
May . . , 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . , 
November 
December , 



1.625 

3.67 

8.72 

4.37 

2.83 

1.09 

8.675 

0.865 

4.49 

1.905 



10.88 

10.77 

10.73 

10.17 

10.68 

10.04 

7.88 

8.74 

6.71 

5.62 

7.86 

10.39 



9.21 



146.35 
146.11 
146.33 
146.22 
146.38 
146.17 
146.51 
146.30 
146.43 
146.50 
146.41 
145.97 



146.31 



9,896,737 
10,601,013 
9,396,910 
7,568,052 
7,610,317 
8,560,'937 
9,152,492 
8,600,788 
8,619,557 
8,081,052 
7,153,629 
10,673,036 



8,825,808 



High-water mark of Lake is 11.17 ft. above bottom of conduit. 
" " Reservoir is 146 ft. above tide-marsh level. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



59 



Table slioiving the Rainfall at Lake Cochituate for the year 1876. 





n 
3 
CI 
C3 
*3 


>> 

u 
ci 

CD 




< 




P 
3 
►a 




3 
60 
3 
«1 


CD 

a 

0) 

Ph 
CD 
CO 


CD 
O 

O 

.54 


■a 

a 

CD 
1> 
O 


a 






















.10 
















































.06 


.03 








































































































8. . . . 


.28 


. . . 




.05 


.23 






































.05 


.36 


10 . . . 


.37 


.34 






.62 


.07 


.46 
























.80 


.06 
























.72 


.07 




















































15 ... . 


.04 


1.67 












.12 


.04 


.42 


.04 


















17 ... . 






.60 










1.52 


2.40 






















































1.16 
















.09 


.25 










21 ... . 






2.27 


.06 


.12 










.06 


2.76 




22. . . . 


.28 


.43 


.04 


23 ... . 








.08 


.60 




2.50 






.70 




.32 












25 ... . 












.36 










• 


































































.08 


.03 


29 ... . 


.29 


.35 


1.04 
.04 






.04 


.03 










30 ... . 


.29 












1.06 


















































Totals . 


1.83 


4.21 


7.43 


3.24 


2.80 


1.60 


9.49 


2.19 


3.98 


2.00 


6.59 


3.13 



Total for the year 



60 



City Document No. 57. 



Table showing the Rainfall at Mystic Lake for the year 1876. 



Day. 


3 


03 


u 
a 
a 
u 

o 




'u 

ft 
< 




a 




cm 
P 
«1 


a 


t4 

O 

6 


a 

o 

o 


o 

a 

o 
o 
o 

A 






















.45 


.06 




2 














.31 






































































































































1.96 


• ■ . 






















































17 ... . 






.25 


.28 


.815 






.545 










18 ... . 


























































1.17 


21 ... . 






3.63 


.08 


























23. . . . 


.25 








1.24 




3.12 








.10 






























26 ... . 






3.22 












































29 ... . 






1.39 


















.175 


30 ... . 






.32 


.125 














.775 
















































Totals . 


1.625 


3.67 


8.72 


4.37 


2.83 


1.09 


8.675 


0.865 


4.49 


1.905 


6.64 


2.12 



Total for the year 47.00 



Keport of the Water Board. 



61 



*» 





"3 


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on 

i a 

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° 


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73 


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62 



City Document No. 57. 



Annual Amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at Lake Cochituate, Boston and 
'vicinity, 1849 to 1876, inclusive. 





Places and Observations. 




a ,3 


O >, 


2 **> 




a 


In 


C3 


Tear. 


02.2 

Is d 


"3 g 

Wpq 
^> . 


<V > 
6(5 


s>l 

11- 
2 R ? 


H 

a 

o 


1-3 

O e3 

^ ft 

a 


< 

O 








Sh o 
| o 


„-3 




i! 




1-1 


w 


O 


Hi 


(-1 


Ph 






40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


41.91 


. . 


34.69 






53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


51.09 




51.49 






44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


45.68 


• . 


43.38 




*47.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 




38.58 




*55.73 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 


• • 


53.27 




43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 


. • 


46.25 


1855 


34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 


1856 


40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 




63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.75 




48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 




49.02 


56.70 


. . 


'48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.16 




55.44 


51.46 


46.95 


45.97 


46.91 


46.67 


38.44 




45.44 


50.07 


50.14 


36.51 


43.32 


42.95 


44.25 




49.69 


' 61.06 


57.21 


46.42 


44.26 . 


44.61 


50.14 




69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


55.17 




42.60 


49.30 


39.46 


36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.83 




49.46 


47.83 


43.59 


35.84 


37.38 


38 82 


44.69 


1866 


62.32 


50.70 




43.46 


38.18 


41.36 


46.02 




56.25 


55.6* 


41.71 


41.40 


45.54 


45.87 


47.04 


1868 


49.71 


64.11 


39.89 


44.65 


47.96 


49.58 


53.52 




64.34 


66.28 


47.98 


47.30 


47.30 


48.96 


47.70 




55.89 


59.73 


41.53 


39.40 


46.30 


48.71 


49.02 




45.39 


48.33 


40.56 


36.82 


44.45 


44.17 


47.91 




48.47 


58.04 


52.73 


45.80 


44.32 


48.67 


48.71 




45.43 


54.94 


46.81 


42.58 


39.86 


45.05 


52.56 


1874 


35.93 


41.09 


38.73 


32.32 


35.68 


41.75 


43.39 




45.49 


51.01 


51.00 


40.30 


40.29 


43.63 


52.22 




48.49 


55.19 


47.65 


47.34 


45.43 


47.46 


50.36 



* By J. Vannevar. 



Keport of the Water Board. 63 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 

Western Division Boston Water Works, 

May 1st, 1877. 

Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, Chairman Boston Water Board : — 
Sir, — In compliance with the rules of the Board, I sub- 
mit herewith the Annual Report of this Division for the past 
official year. 

Lake Cochituate. 

On May 1st, 1876, the water in the lake stood at 12 feet 
11 inches above the bottom of the aqueduct, or 5 inches 
below high-water mark. During the summer, notwithstand- 
ing large quantities of water drawn from Sudbury river, the 
surface of the lake was gradually drawn down to 8 feet 3 
inches, or 5 feet 1 inch below high water, on Oct. 23d, which 
was the lowest point reached during the year. 

We have now a full lake, and since the spring freshets 
have been obliged to waste largely at the outlet dam. 

No repairs of any importance have been made during the 
year beyond those incident to the maintenance of the 
structures. 

Dudley Pond 

was called upon in the autumn to reinforce the supply. The 
stop-planks were taken out September 13th, at which time 
the water was 4 feet below high-water mark. On October 
10th the water was drawn down to the bottom of the outlet 
pipe, and was allowed to run until October 28th, when the 
stop-planks were put in. 

Dug Pond, 

now under the control of the town of Natick, has only fur- 
nished us with a small amount of water when the pond was 
running over. Arrangements have been made with the 
Natick Board to determine the quantity supplied in the 
future. 



64 City Document No. 57. 



The Aqueduct 

has been run under a head, as in the p:ist few years. The 
usual care has been taken to guard against accidents, by 
patrolling, etc. The water has been drawn off but once 
during the year, for purposes of examination, viz. : on May 
30th, 1876. All the cracks on the Newton Lower Falls em- 
bankment were repaired between stations 107 -f- 60 and 
109 + 40. 

While some portions of the conduit show motion, the gen- 
eral condition, compared with former examinations, was found 
to be good. Some obstructions were removed from the 
siphon-pipes, all four of which were examined. There are 
still some fifty bricks in the south 36-inch pipe, which will be 
removed whenever time can be afforded for more complete 
repairs. As soon as the new conduit is in running order, I 
would recommend a thorough pointing of all the cracks in 
the old aqueduct by which the dangerous points can be 
accurately noted. This can be done in a few clays. A table 
has been prepared of a few portions which will need special 
repairs. 

The Waste-Weirs 

and culverts are all in good order. Webber's waste-weir 
was partially rebuilt during the summer. The stone-work 
of the culvert had moved from 2 inches to 5 inches. The 
repairs were thoroughly made, the ashlar stones being dow- 
elled to the foundation on the lower side, and the courses 
clamped and dowelled together, and the wings backed with 
rubble. 

Chestnut-Hill Eeservoie. 

The bad taste of last year has made no reappearance. 
The structures and grounds connected with this reservoir are 
all in good order. The revolving screens at the effluent gate- 
house were injured during the winter by anchor ice, and in 
February were repaired by pumping out the chamber and 
renewing the wire. 

The lower box, which was made movable to take up the 
slack of the wire, was fixed in position, and, as most of the 
trouble with these screens has come from the fact of the 
lower rolls getting moved out of place, it is hoped that no 
farther difficulty will arise. The materials required to build 
a mile of the fence around the driveway were secured during 
the winter, and the fence is nearly erected. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 65 

A large amount of rich loam was secured early in the 
season and is being applied to the improvement of the 
grounds. 

Brookline Eeservoir. 

A new fence around a large portion of this reservoir has 
been begun. Last full , leaks from the old three-feet aqueduct 
laid in the bank around this reservoir, increased in amount, 
and it was decided to plug up the ends, which was done. 
Three manholes were built up at the following points, to give 
access to this structure. The first is in the walk 100 feet 
west of the effluent gate-house ; the second, 31| feet east of 
Ihe end of the iron fence; the third, 91^ feet east of the 
outside wall of the influent gate-house. The leaks, which are 
nearly stopped, will be gauged from time to time, but when 
the reservoir is low there is no danger to be apprehended 
from this source. 

The usual list of property is appended. • 
Respectfully yours, 

DESMOND FLTZGEEALD, 
Supt. West. Div. B. W. \V. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPEETY AT CHESTNUT-HILL 
EESEEVOIE. 

1 two-horse express wagon, 1 single ditto, 1 horse water- 
cart, 2 two-horse water-carts, 2 iron road-rollers, 1 single 
horse pung, 2 sleighs, 1 two-horse truck, 1 horse-power, 3 
horse-carts, 1 hay-wagon, 2 hand-carts, 1 pair large wheels, 
1 two-horse sled, 1 two-horse plow, 1 harrow, 1 drag, 1 
Concord wagon, 1 carryall, 1 top-buggy, 11 sets harnesses, 
9 blankets, 1 rubber horse-covering, 7 horses, 1 tank, 7 gravel 
screens, 10 ox-tie chains, 1 house force-pump, 1 raking-pump, 
1 feed-pump, 1 force-pump, 1 garden-engine, 2 Johnson 
pumps, 1 stone-crushing machine and castings, 1 blacksmith's 
forge and tools, 1 man-head, 2 grub-axes, 27 picks, 28 
shovels, 5 spades, 5 hoes, 22 iron bars, 10 iron-rakes, 9 
stone-hammers, 25 wooden rakes, 4 border-knives, 1 root- 
puller, 7 snaiths, 4 scythes, 3 scythe-stones and rifles, 7 hay- 
forks, 5 lanterns, 6 oil-cans, 3 reflectors, 8 peat-knives, 6 tin 
dippers, 25 drills, 14 tin candlesticks, 18 fire-buckets, 20 
pails, 10 rattan-brooms, 5 wooden rammers, 8 wheelbarrows, 
6 ladders, 1 grindstone, 2 jack-screws, 1 window-brush, 6 
paint-brushes, 1 telegraph battery, 7 rubber coats and caps, 



66 City Document No. 57. 

11 pairs rubber boots, 3 rain-gauges, 1 set scales, 1 safe, 1 
clock, 4 bushel baskets, 1 4-bushel basket, 2 hay-ropes, 1 
large canvas, 6 ft. 18 in. Scotch pipe, 42 ft. 15 in. ditto, 9 
ft. 30 in. cement pipe, 15 gall, of raw linseed oil, 150 lbs. 
green paint, 1 sand-pump, 30 lbs. candles, 15 padlocks, 2 
boats, 9 ice-hooks, 3 ice-chisels, 2 brooms, 1 ice-saw, 15 
gall, asphaltum, 1 chain fall, 1 rope fall, \\ bbls. paint, 2 bbls. 
cement, 1 wood saw, 3 chopping axes, 2 M. brick, 8 tons of 
hay, 100 bushels oats, 20 bushels meal. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AT BROOKLINE 
RESERVOIR. 

1 writing-desk, 1 book, 1 pen-stand, 1 ink-bottle, 1 pitcher 
and glass, 1 spittoon, 1 lantern, 1 stove, 1 coal-hod, 1 fire- 
shovel, 1 poker, 1 stone brush, 2 settees, 4 iron rods, 2 
towels, 2 floor-mats, 1 pair rubbers, 1 scythe, 2 shovels, 1 
pick, 1 brush, 1 oil-can, 1 iron rake, 1 wooden rake, 1 hoe, 
1 sickle, 1 scuffler, 1 water-pail, 2 ladders, 1 sponge, 1 pair 
clipping-shears, 1 dust-pan and brush, 1 bushel baskets 1 bor- 
der-knife, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 duster, 1 spade, 1 corn-broom, 1 
coarse broom, 2 scrubbing-brushes, 1 sprinkler, 1 axe, 1 chair. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AT LAKE 
COCHITUATE. 

1 parlor table, 1 looking-glass, 1 stove, 1 extension table, 
18 chairs, '1 map, 1 oil-cloth carpet, 1 marble-slab and wash- 
bowl, 1 horse, 1 buffalo robe, 1 carryall, 1 express wagon, 1 
pung, 1 express-harness, 1 light harness 1 tip-cart harness, 1 
rain-gauge, 1 set scales, 3 lanterns, 5 pairs rubber boots, 2 
iron bars, 5 hand-drills, 6 steel points, 2 sledge-hammers, 7 
picks, 2 grub-hoes, 2 iron rakes, 6 hoes, 1 coal-shovel, 2 
spades, 2 square pointed shovels, 2 long-handle shovels, 4 
stop-plank hooks, 2 ice-hooks, 6 buckets, 5 brooms, 6 wheel- 
barrows, 2 gravel screens, 2 sieves, 2 boats, 1 pump-frame, 
1 double pulley, 3 ox-chains, 1 telegraph battery, 1 hand- 
saw, 1 manure-fork, 2 hay-forks, 1 stone-roller, 1 grind- 
stone, 1 scythe, 1 brush, 1 spirit-level, 2 axes, 1 drain- 
mould, 2 engines, 3 18-in. pumps, 3 12-in. pumps, 1 pair 
hedge-shears, 2 ice-chisels, 9 lamps, 14 chimneys, 4 lamp- 
tops, 11 reflectors, 4 carriage lamps, 14 glass oil-cups, 1 pair 
lamp-shears, 1 bitt-punch, 4 doz. wicks, 2 steam-gauges, 8 
lamp-brackets, 2 horse-carts, 3 pieces 18-in. copper pipe. 



Report of the Water Board. 67 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT, 1876-77. 

Office of the Water Registrar, City Hall, 

Boston, May 1, 1877. 
Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board : — 

Sir, — The undersigned, in compliance with the require- 
ments of the ordinance providing for the care and manage- 
ment of the Boston Water Works, respectfully reports : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
year 1877 is 48,328, being an increase since January 1, 
1876, of 1,443. 

The total number of cases where the water has been 
turned off for non-payment of rates during the year ending 
January 1, 1877, is 1,604. 

Of this number 1,413 have been turned on, leaving a 
balance of 191 still remaining off. 

The total, amount of water-rates 

received from April 30, 

1876, to May 1, 1877, is . $1,029,109 39 

Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used during 

the previous year the sum of $65,986 03 
Leaving the receipts for water 

furnished during the financial 

year 963,123 36 

Amount paid Mystic Water 

Department during the year 

ending April 30, 1877, as 

per contract . . . 66,934 60 
In addition to the above there 

has been received for turn- 
ing on water in cases where 

it had been turned off for 

non-payment of rates, the 

sum of 2,762 00 

Received for summons .... 2,095 25 



Total $1,033,966 64 



68 



City Document No. 57. 



The decreased amount of income for the finan- 
cial year, as compared with the previous 
year, is . 

The decrease in revenue is chargeable to 
various causes, but principally to the large 
number of vacant premises. 

The total amount of assessments now made 
for the year 1877 is .... 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water during the year ending with 
April 30, 1878, based upon the assessed 
valuation of dwelling-houses and reduction 
in meter-rates, May 1, 1877 

The expenditures of my office during the year 
1876 have been ..... 



7,314 59 



865,128 25 

1,000,000 00 
25,568 68 



The total number of meters now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 1,082. Of this number 686 are |-inch, 
333 1-inch, 46 2-inch, 13 3-inch, 4 4-inch. 

Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam- 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1877, with the amount of water-rates 
received for 1876 : — 



30,791 Dwelling-houses 


. 






$487,589 24 


43 Boarding-houses 






2,082 33 


1,060 Model-houses . 






32,559 17 


16 Lodging-houses. 


. , 






529 00 


16 Hotels 


• < 






1,050 58 


5,853 Stores and shopg 


. 






62,915 28 


453 Buildings . 


. 






20,723 81 


757 Offices 


. 






6,201 82 


56 Printing-offices 


. 






1,395 00 


31 Banks 


. 






518 50 


39 Halls 


. 




' 


673 83 


1 Museum . 


. 






45 50 


36 Private schools 


. 






736 50 


21 Asylums . 


- 






1,290 00 


4 Hospitals . 


. 






249 50 


55 Greenhouses 


. 






1,221 33 


114 Churches . 


. 






1,753 92 


7 Markets . 


. 






1,174 50 


86 Cellars 


, . 






563 25 


836 Eestaurants and saloons 






18,258 29 


12 Club-houses 






263 00 


Amount carried forward . ... 


. $641,794 35 



Report or the Water Board. 



69 



Amount brought forward 
35 Photographers 
31 Packing-houses 
1,649 Stables . 
50 Factories . 
5 Bleacheries 

1 Brewery . 
5 Beer-factories 

105 Bakeries . 

2 Boat-houses 
10 Freight-houses 

4 Gasometers 

2 Ship-yards 
1 Cemetery . 
1 Bath-house 

3 Dry docks and engines 
61 Shops and engines 
47 Stores and engines 

14 Factories and engines 

1 Foundry and engine 
7 Printing; and engines 
3 Bakeries and engines 

2 Ship-yards and engines 

7 Buildings and engines 
1 Caterer and engine 

23 Stationery engines 

63 Discharging and pile-driving engines 

15 Armories . 
949 Hand-hose 

14 Fountains . 
50 Tumbler-washers 
58 "Water-pressures 
21 Laundries . 

3 Commercial colleges 
1 Laboratory 

1 Milk Company . 

2 Caterers . 
1 Gymnasium 

Custom House . 
Branch post-offices 
13 Aquariums 
1 Ice company (washing ice) 

4 Depots 

8 Railroad stations 
71 Steamboats 



,794 35 

1,057 89 

l',248 67 

12,585 08 

1,56.0 71 

117 50 

30 00 

297 50 

1,268 00 

55 00 

246 00 

60 00 

36 00 

10 00 

25 00 

100 00 

2,982 56 

4,454 00 

838 33 

92 50 

776 50 

124 00 
75 00 

701 50 

52 50 

1,548 93 

756 00 

250 00 

6,285 00 

225 00 

750 00 

295 00 

574 17 

129 00 

50 00 

55 00 

88 50 

50 00 

85 00 

62 00 

190 00 

30 00 

65 00 

125 50 
10,931 46 



Amount carried forward 



$693,134 15 



70 



City Document No. 57. 



Amount or ought forward 
Fillino- cisterns . 



1 College 


. 


1 Mill .... 


. 


3 Moters 


. 


Office (City Scales) . 


. 


District Court-Houses 


, 


2 Police stations . 


. 


1 Lock-up . 


. 


Probate Building 


. 


House of Reception . 


. 


41 Fire-engines, hose, and hook and 


houses . . 


. 


5 Chemical engines 


. 


3,578 Fire-hydrants . 


. 


129 Reservoirs 


. 



ladder 



Insurance Brigade 

Boston Protective department 

Fire-boat " Wm. M. Flanders" 

Repair shop and engiue 

Public schools . 

City stables 

Washing-carts . 

Offal station 

Faneuil Hall 

Public Library . 

Branch Libraries 

Paving Department . 

Common Sewer Department 

Lamp Department 

Public Garden . 

Deer Park 

Branch Surveyor's office 

Small-pox Hospital 

Public urinals 

Drinking fountains 

Street sprinkling 

Street watering . 

Committee on Bathing 

Steamer " Samuel Little " 

Dredging- machines 

Contract pipe 

Washing coal . 

Filling gasometers 

Building purposes 

Metered water (9 months) 



$693,134 15 
27 00 


40 


00 


50 


00 


15 


00 


11 


00 


103 


50 


71 


50 


6 


00 


75 


00 


10 


00 


910 


00 


70 


00 


64,404 

2,322 

31 


00 
00 
00 


28 


50 


200 


00 


38 


50 


3,358 

226 


00 
25 


150 


00 


225 


00 


40 


00 


104 


50 


58 


00 


377 


75 


250 


00 


22 


25 


25 


00 


10 


00 


16 


00 


25 


00 


197 


50 


790 


00 


500 


00 


51 


65 


15 


00 


100 


00 


561 


36 


261 


29 


10 


20 


945 


93 


2,297 
190,167 


39 

58 


$962,332 


80 



Report of the Water Board. 



71 



Statement showing the Number and Kind of Water Fixtures contained within 
the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston to January 1, 1877, as 
compared with previous years. 



1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


Remarks. 


7,266 


7,271 


8,269 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


72,310 


72,897 


77,111 


Sinks. 


36,141 


37,611 


39,764 


Wash-hand hasins. 


12,040 


12,725 


13,690 


Bathing-tubs. 


18,877 


20,575 


22,703 


Pan -water-closets. 


18,765 


2,584 


1,875 


Hopper water-closets. 


201 


17,569 


19,912 


" " automatic. 


291 






•' " pull. 

" " self-acting. 

" " waste. 


188 






606 


664 


557 


2,851 


1,636 


1,545 


Urinals. 


459 


1,693 


2,043 


" automatic. 


14,300 


15,055 


15,990 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


680 


633 


629 


Shower-baths. 


363 


330 


286 


Private hydrants. 


754 


805 


830 


Slop-hoppers. 


134 


113 


110 


Foot-baths. 


186,226 


192,061 


205,314 





The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25th, 1848: — 

Received by Water Commissioners, as per 

Auditor's Report in 1848 . 
From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850 



1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 



1851. 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 



51 
71,657 79 
99,025 45 
161,052 85 
179,567 39 
196,352 32 
217,007 51 
266,302 77 



Amount carried forward, 



,191,938 89 



72 City Document No. 57. 



Amount brought forward, 




$1,191,938 89 


From January 1. 


, 1856, 


to 


January 1, 


, 1857 


. 282,651 84 


(< 


c< 


18*57, 




cc 


1858 


. 289,328 83 


< c 


t ( 


1858, 




cc 


1859 


. 302,409 73 


cc 


(( 


1859, 




cc 


1860 


. 314,808 97 


cc 


(( 


1860, 




c c 


1861 


. 334,544 86 


cc 


c c 


1861, 




c c 


1862 


. 365,323 96 


cc 


CC 


1862, 




cc 


1863 


. 373,922 33 


CC 


cc 


1863, 




c c 


1864 


. 394,506 25 


cc 


«< 


1864, 




cc 


1865 


. 430,710 76 


cc 


cc 


1865, 




cc 


1866 


. 450,341 48 


(< 


(< 


1866, 




cc 


1867 


. 486,538 25 


cc 


c c 


1867, 




cc 


1868 


. 522,130 93 


CC 


cc 


1868, 




cc 


1869 


. 553,744 88 


CC 


cc 


1869, 




c c 


1870 


. 597,328 55 


(( 


(< 


1870, 




I c 


1871 


. 708,783 68 


cc 


CC 


1871, 




cc 


1872 


. 774,445 70 


(< 


cc 


1872, 




cc 


1873 


. 806,102 51 


(< 


cc 


1873, 




cc 


1874 


. 859,436 55 


<< 


cc 


1874, 




cc 


1875 


. 914,748 73 


CC 


cc 


1875, 




cc 


1876 


. 944,680 94 


cc 


cc 


1876, 




cc 


1877 


. 962,332 80 


cc 


cc 


1877, 


to 


May 1, 


1877 


. 784,114 02 




$13,644,875 44 



Drinking-Fountains . 

There are 48 drinking-fountains now established within 
the city limits : — 

*Common (6). 

Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Washington street, near Blackstone square. 
Charles street, near Boylston street. 

" " between Boylston and Beacon streets. 

" " opposite jail. 

Commercial street, junction Atlantic avenue. 
Albany street, opposite City Hospital. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the bridge. 
Foundry street, near First street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue, and Dor- 
chester street. 
Telegraph hill, South Boston. 
Eustis street, corner Washington street. 
*Eliot square, opposite Norfolk House. 



Report of the Water Board. 73 

Pynchon street, opposite Roxbury street. 

Tremont street, junction of Cabot street. 

Beacon street, junction Brookline avenue. 

Commercial street, opposite Beach street, Dorchester. 

Upham's Corner, Dorchester. 

Glover's Corner, " 

Grove Hall, " 

Maverick square, East Boston. 

Central square, " 

Bennington street, junction Chelsea street, East Boston. 

Albany street, junction of Dearborn street. 

Washington street, near Elm street. 

Neponset avenue, corner Walnut street. 

Morton street, junction South street. 

Roslindale, Taft's hotel. 

Union square, Brighton. 

Western avenue, Charles-river hotel. 

Market street, Cattle Fair hotel, Brighton. 

Barry's corner, Brighton. 

Fourth street, corner of Q street. 

Fourth street, junction of Emerson street. 

Causeway street, opposite Lowell R. R. depot. 

Causeway street, junction of Merrimac street. 

North square, junction of North street. 

Haymarket. square. 

Atlantic avenue, near N. Y. & N. E. R. R. freight house. 

Atlantic avenue, head of Foster's wharf. 

Those marked thus * are arranged for a continuous flow of water. The 
balance have automatic fixtures, operating the flow of water when required. 



74 



City Document No. 57, 



The following table exhibits the class of premises to 
•which meters are attached, together with the amount of 
revenue received during the year 1876 : — 



Name. 



Revere House . . . 
American House . 
Parker House . . , 
H. S. Hotel . . . . 
Tremont House . . 
Young's Hotel . . . 
Adams House . . , 
Hotel Berkeley . , 
Marlboro' House 
Albion Building . , 
Central House . . , 
Hotel Pelham . . , 
Hotel Boylston . , 
La Grange House , 
St. Cloud .'..., 
Hotel Clarendon 
Beaver House . . , 
Evans House . . 
Park square Hotel 
Hotel Kempton . 
Hotel Hamilton . , 
Hotel Vendome . 
Coolidge House . . 
Hancock House . , 
Merrimac House 
Temple House . 
Hotel Belmont . 
Hotel Alexander 
Hotel Brunswick 
Park's Hotel . . 
Derby House . . 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Hotel 



Gallons. 



11,596,995 

6,407,712 

10,267,551 

4,623,667 

9,124,121 

5,494,761 

3,125,234 

2,942,992 

Vacant. 

1,303,881 

189,284 

1,586,414 

1,583,669 

358,207 

346,050 

2,302,987 

279,666 

1,201,200 

220,057 

1,374,809 

1,854,591 

1,961,624 

817,746 

107,592 

311,510 

787,087 

2,057,399 

892,851 

3,833,354 

495,096 

579,989 



Revenue. 



£3,479 07 
1,922 29 
3,080 24 
1,387 09 
2,737 21 
1,648 41 
937 56 
882 88 



391 14 

56 77 

475 91 

475 08 

107 44 

103 80 

690 88 

83 89 

360 34 

66 00 

412 42 

556 35 

588 47 

245 30 

32 26 

93 43 

236 10 

617 21 

267 84 

1,149 98 

148 51 

' 173 97 



78,028,096 $23,407 84 



Eepoet of the Watee Board. 



75 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

City Hotel 

Hotel Albermarle (3 nios 
Ashland House . . . 
Hotel Colunibus . . . 
Hotel Franklin (6 mos. 
Hotel Harrison (6 mos 
Hotel Glover (9 mos.) 
Merchants' Hotel . 
M. J. Elatley . . . 
New England House 
Winthrop House . 
Dooley's Hotel . . 
Commercial House 
Job A. Turner . . 
Milliken House . . 
Sherman House . . 
Everett House . . . 
Metropolitan House 
Commonwealth Hotel 
St. James Hotel . . 
Massachusetts House 
Bay State House . 
Mariner's House . 
Robertson House . 
Boston Hotel . . . 
Creighton House . 
Van Rensselaer . . 
Quincy House . . . 
Marston House . . 
Stumcke & Goodwin 
Pavilion House . . 
Norfolk House . . 
National House . . 
Hotel Agassiz . . . 
Phillips House . . 



Amount carried forward . . 



Class. 



Gallons. 



78,028,096 
174,074 
178,830 
427,439 

1,684,986 
176,257 
276,472 
422,182 
171,359 
174,765 
634,738 
262,304 
39,276 
352,437 
368,077 
538,394 

1,717,776 
252,726 

1,141,326 

1,792,387 

3,661,631 
74,166 
652,611 
138,418 
191,512 
545,812 
693,376 
389,174 

2,456,946 
784,694 

3,391,236 
394,994 
781,799 
514,641 

1,986,194 
134,872 



Revenue. 



$23,407 84 
52 20 
63 64 
128 21 
505 47 
52 86 
82 93 
126 64 

51 30 

52 41 
190 40 

78 68 

11 77 
105 72 
110 41 
161 50 
515 31 

75 80 

342 38 

537 70 

1,098 47 

22 24 
195 76 

41 51 

57 43 
163 73 
177 98 
116 73 
737 07 
235 38 
1,017 35 
118 48 
234 52 
154 37 
595 84 

40 45 



105,505,977 $31,650 48 



76 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Stinson House 

Franklin Park House . . 

John D. Miller 

Hotel Marion 

Moody Merrill 



Old Colony and Newport 
Railroad Co 



Boston and Albany Rail 
road Co 



Boston and Maine Railroad 
Co 



Boston and Lowell Rail 
road Co 



Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Eastern Railroad Co. . 



New York and New Eng 
land Railroad Co. . . . 



Boston and Providence 
Railroad Co 



Boston, Revere Beach and 
Lynn Railroad Co. . 



Boston Gas Light Co. . . 
South Boston Gas Light Co 
East Boston Gas Light Co 
Roxbury Gas Light Co. . 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. 
Standard Sugar Refinery 
Jasper Sugar Refinery . . 
Continental Sugar Refinery 
Bay State Sugar Refinery 
Oxnard Sugar Refinery . 
Boston Sugar Refinery . 



Commonwealth Sugar Re. 
finery 



Bay State Rolling Mill . . 
Norway Iron Works . . 
Highland Spring Brewery 
Edward Habich 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Brewery 



Gallons. 



105,505,977 

189,705 

51,652 

431,871 

143,658 

1,611,516 

22,122,991 

36,168,393 

5,139,142 

5,396,924 
3,299,114 
8,468,097 

9,927,754 

14,145,545 

4,081,747 
34,186,006 

2,519,887 
925,209 

1,180,865 

430,221 

31,731,202 

9,199,747 
25,838,504 

8,038,290 

3,994,424 
15,624,975 

1,213,725 

10,714,259 

22,659,289 

7,191,471 

3,060,382 



Revenue. 



$31,650 48 
56 89 
15 48 

129 54 
43 08 

483 44 

6,636 89 

10,850 36 

1,541 73 

1,619 06 

989 72 

2,540 38 

2,978 31 

4,243 62 

1,224 50 

10,255 78 

755 95 

277 55 

354 22 

129 05 

9,519 35 

2,759 91 

7,751 64 

2,411 46 

1,198 31 

4,687 48 

364 11 
3,214 25 
6,797 76 
2,157 42 

918 10 



395,192,542 $118,555 72 



Eepoet of the Watee Boabd. 



77 



Name. 


Class. 


a 

CO 




d si si 
o • o o 

a i c a 


u 

M H 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 






N 05 f 




Amount brought forward . 






395,192,542 


$118,555 72 


H. & J. Pfaff 


Brewery . . . 






1 . . 


1 


3,450,750 


1,035 21 


A. J. Houghton & Co., Hal- 
leck st 


" 




1 




1 


914,504 


274 33 


A. J. Houghton & Co., Sta- 
tion st 


« ... 


1 






1 


678,089 


203 41 


Boylston Brewery 


" 




1 




1 


930,059 


279 00 


Gottlieb Burkhardt .... 


... 




1 




1 


854,654 


256 38 


John Boessle 


" 






1 . . 


1 


4,503,724 


1,351 09 


Jones, Johnson & Co. . . . 


... 


1 


1 




2 


4,491,937 


1,347 56 


Boston Beer Co 


... 




2 




2 


4,152,406 


1,245 70 


Conrad Decker , 


... 


1 






1 


709,297 


212 77 


Suffolk Brewing Co. ... 


« 








1 


3,508,350 


1,052 49 


Burton Brewery 


... 




1 




1 


965,160 


289 53 


Standard Brewery .... 


... 




1 




1 


1,720,381 


516 10 


Vincent & Hathaway . . . 


Beer Factory . 




1 




1 


650,316 


195 08 


Moses Fairbanks & Co. . . 


" 




1 




1 


1,138,537 


341 54 


Coburn, Lang & Co 


" 


1 






1 


429,292 


128 77 


Comstock, Gove & Co. . . . 


" 


1 






1 


253,942 


76 17 


Isaac Pratt, Jr 


Building . . . 


1 


1 




2 


963,269 


288 97 


Wesleyan Association . . . 


" 


3 






3 


584,737 


175 40 


Tremont Temple 


" 


1 


1 




2 


1,525,709 


457 70 


S. S. Houghton & Co. . . . 


" 


1 






1 


577,596 


173 25 


P. McAleer 


" 


2 






2 


349,784 


104 91 


Smith & Porter 


... 


2 


. 




2 


1,004,691 


301 39 


T. H. Carter 


» ... 


2 






2 


838,971 


. 251 67 


Boston Journal 


" 




1 




1 


1,420,919 


426 26 


Joseph Byers 


« 


2 






2 


782,032 


234 60 


IS. E. Mut. Life Ins. Co., 
70 State st 


" 


2 






2 


122,212 


36 64 


N. E. Mut. Life Ins. Co., 
Milkst 


" 


1 


1 




2 


1,126,049 


337 79 


Horticultural Hall 


" 




1 




1 


237,749 


71 30 


Suffolk National Bank . . . 


" 


2 


1 




3 


469,476 


140 83 


Benjamin Leeds 


» 


2 






2 


471,352 


141 38 


Stone, Bier & Weiss .... 


" 


2 






2 


174,829 


52 43 


John Rayner, heirs .... 


" 


2 






2 


513,164 


153 94 


Otis T. Ruggles 


" ... 


2 






2 


256,649 


76 98 


Amount carried forward . 






435,903,128 


$130,786 29 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
B. B. Appleton, heirs . . 

J. W. Merriam 

Peter B. Brigham .... 
Mrs. Ellen Brooks .... 

Oriental Tea Co 

S. D. Hacks 

John Stetson 

Macullar, "Williams & Parker 

John F. Mills 

Joshua M. Sears . . . 



Lilly. Young, Pratt & Brack 
ett 



J. I. Brown & Son .... 
Hogg, Brown & Taylor . 

A. Wentworth 

William Ropes, estate . . 

A. D. Puffer 

Eastern Express Co. . . . 
Grand Lodge of Masons . 
James "W. Rollins .... 



Haley, Morse & Co., 615 
"Washington street . . 

Mass. Inst, of Technology 

S. N. Brown, jr 

A. H. Vinton 

J. W. Pierce 

B. F. Bradbury 

Shepard, Norwell 85 Co. . 
D. J. Hastings 

C. U. Cotting, 628 Wash, st, 
C. U. Cotting, 7 Court sq 

W. H. Mann , 

Hallett & Davis 

Duffy, Cashman & Co. . , 
Jonas Fitch 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Building 



435,963,128 
564,486 
398,594 
376,320 
107,744 
266,226 
1,055,985 
1,251,412 
560,031 
401,894 
603,501 

823,761 
296,016 

2,831,205 
299,728 

2,358,869 
354,373 
552,163 
454,799 
445,206 

226,236 
907,326 
410,661 
310,304 
242,002 
166,964 
925,416 
170,647 
583,057 
418,994 
363,967 
438,359 
479,497 
68,077 



Revenue. 



$130,786 29 
169 32 

119 56 
112 87 

32 30 

79 84 

316 78 

375 41 

167 99 

120 55 
181 03 

247 10 

88 78 
849 29 

89 91 
707 64 
106 29 
165 64 
136 42 
133 55 

67 86 

272 18 

123 18 

93 07 

72 58 

50 C6 

277 61 

61 18 

174 89 

125 68 

109 17 

131 48 

143 83 

20 40 



455,676,948 $136,699 73 



Report of the Water Board. 



79 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
H. C. Stephens 



Jordan, Marsh & Co., Wash 
ington street 



G. T. Burnham & Co 

G. D. Dowes & Co., vacant 

Stephen H. Bennett, heirs 

R.F.Yeaton 

J. T. Moriarty . . . 
Franklin Evans . . . 

J. Zane & Co 

Metropolitan R. R. Co 

Art Garden 

Allen & "Woodworth . 
Merchants' Exchange 
J. J. Stevens .... 
J. T. Brown & Co. . 

J.C.Gray 

C. E. Hovey & Co. . . 
Adams, Taylor & Co. 
Globe Publishing House 
J. M. Smith & Co. . , 
Charles Rollins . . , 
Adams Express Co. , 
A. J. Wright ... 
"VV. Blenkinsop . . 
Boston Gas Light Co 
John F. Wilson . . 
L. P. Ober .... 



Young Men's Christian 
sociation .... 



As 



A. A. Miner .... 

Henry F. Miller . . 

Art Building . . . 

Equitable Life Ins. Co., . 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., King- 
ston street .... 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Building 



Gallons. 



455,676,948 
341,122 

850,624 
415,564 
Vacant. 
850,349 
323,324 
162,164 
441,201 
442,559 
21,750 

2,283,786 
183,929 

3,094,664 
198,817 
377,624 
799,927 
730,769 
89,339 
437,917 
32,340 
847,214 
784,132 

1,268,991 
240,463 
134,654 
248,106 
427,334 

210,179 

196,312 

203,736 

80,489 

1,230,719 



Revenue. 



$136,699 73 
102 32 

255 18 
124 65 



48 64 

132 24 

132 76 

6 51 

685 12 

55 16 
928 38 

59 63 
113 26 
239 96 
219 21 

26 78 
131 36 
9 68 
254 16 
235 23 
380 67 

72 12 

40 37 

74 41 
128 18 

63 04 
58 87 
61 10 
24 12 
369 20 

57 73 



473,819,555 $142,141 82 



80 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 


Ciass. 


o 

n 




V 


4 


■-- 


o 


►3 
<< 

Eh 
5 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 






o 




<N 


CO 


■* 


►^ 


H 






Amount brought forward. . 






473,819,555 


$142,141 82 




Building . . . 


1 












1 


206,676 


61 99 




« 




1 










1 


40,777 


12 21 


Young Men's Christ'n Union 


ii 




1 










1 


1,178,355 


353 47 




" ... 


1 












1 


387,282 


116 18 


Loring & Dexter, Trust. . . 


" 


2 












2 


151,305 


45 39 


Commonwealth Building . 


" 




1 










1 


474,501 


142 32 


N. Y. Mutual Life Ins. Co. . 


" 






1 








1 


61,800 


18 54 


F. Tudor 


" 


3 

1 


2 










3 
3 


366,764 
634.551 


110 01 




190 34 








1 










1 


586,199 


175 94 






9, 


1 










R 


570,029 


170 99 


















5 


788,901 


236 65 






1 












1 


222,884 


66 85 


















1 


504,081 


151 21 






2 












2 


176,159 


52 83 






1 












1 


237,111 


71 12 


















3 


605,458 


181 62 








9, 










2 


865,012 


259 48 






1 












1 


459,375 


137 79 






3 












3 


578,827 


173 62 






?, 


1 










3 


1,025,091 


307 51 








1 










1 


799,499 


239 84 


















2 


168,494 


50 52 


















7 


498,358 


149 49 






1 


1 










?, 


573,329 


171 98 






1 


1 










B 


1,363,799 


409 12 


















1 


63,606 


19 06 






1 












1 


133,348 


40 00 






? 


4 


1 








7 


4,275,981 


1,282 78 






3 


4 










7 


7,576,102 


2,272 81 






1 


T 










4 


2,569,686 


770 89 






1 












1 


607,739 


182 30 


Mass. Homoeopathic Hospi- 
















1 


154,920 


46 46 








602,725,554 


$150,813 13 



Report of the Water Board. 



ei 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . 
Notre Dame Academy . . . 
House of the Angel Guardian 
House of the G-ood Shepherd 
Home for Catholic Children 
Church Home . . 
Sailors' Home . . 
Temporary Home 
Somerset Club . 
Union Club . . . 
Temple Club . . 
Central Club . . 
Boston Music Hall 
Beethoven Hall . 
City Hall .... 
State of Massachusetts 
United States of America 
Howard Athenaeum 
Boston Theatre . 
Globe Theatre . 
Boylston Museum 
Boylston Market 
Washington Market 
Suffolk Market . 
Franklin Market 
Williams Market 
Tremont Market 
Medical College . 
Boston College . 
Mrs. C. C. Annable 
Mrs. R. W. Prescott 
Mrs. M. E. Sawyer 
Mrs. W. A. Colson 
F. E. Ruggles . . . 
A. Carr 



Amount carried forward ■ 



Class. 



State House 
Post Office 



Boarding 



Gallons. 



502,725,554 
504,674 
336,006 
143,422 

1,073,692 
461,399 
503,166 
425,189 

1,321,994 

663,082 

430,372 

87,869 

633,113 

53,323 

1,753,482 
767,819 

1,684,142 
100,439 
370',769 
298,050 
270,006 
326,527 
429,501 
663,907 
548,857 
411,944 
101,235 
146,976 
316,026 
466,824 
212,961 
130,233 
248,397 
182,796 
182,001 



Revenue. 



$150,813 13 
151 39 
100 78 

43 00 
322 10 
138 40 
150 93 

127 63 
396 68 

198 90 
129 09 

26 36 

159 92 

15 98 

526 02 

230 32 

505 24 

30 12 

111 21 

89 41 

80 97 

97 93 

128 83 

199 16 
164 64 
123 67 

30 36 

44 07 
94 79 

137 03 

63 87 
39 06 
74 50 

64 81 
54 58 



518,865,747 $165,654 55 



82 



City Document No. 57. 



Amount brought forward 
George Odin, heirs 
James F. Goodwin 
Mrs. A. P. Cleverly 
M. E. Knowlton . . 
Mrs. C. Farley . . 
Mrs. C. Cummings 
James Knowlton . 
Ruel Philbrook . . 
Isabel Sargent . . . 
Moore and Sargent 
Mrs. G. A. Winn . 
Mrs. N. F. Chapin . 
William Evans . . 
E. Cutler, 147 Kneeland st 
E. Cutler, 146 Kneeland st 
Michael Doherty 
Job A. Turner . 
James Chisholm . 
J. Collins .... 
D. L. Webster . 
Thomas Cantlon . 
W. B. Mendum . 
Henry B. Williams 
David Wilcox & Co 
Jacob J. Storer. Vacant 
Joseph Ni.ckerson & Co. . 
J. Morrill, Jr., & Co. . . 
Pearson Bros. & Co. . . . 

J. Morse 

L. Whittaker 

C. Wright & Co 

Howard Watch & Clock Co 
Haley, Morse & Co. . . . 
Roxbury Carpet Co. . . . 



Amoxint carried forward , 



Class. 



Boarding 



Factory 



Gallons. 



518,865,747 
260,991 
361,679 
67,934 
138,247 
212,396 
324,351 
793,132 
346,649 
6,270 
213,053 
264,456 
169,124 
708,021 
180,831 
315,569 
705,171 
140,197 
329,144 
186,547 
826,491 
175,335 
106,318 
520,207 
756,847 

478,229 

234,636 
1,727,212 

106,777 
75,4S6 

471,218 
1,264,394 

454,904 
3,678,494 



Revenue. 



$155,654 55 

78 £7 
108 48 

20 36 

41 45 
63 71 

97 28 
287 91 
103 97 

1 88 
63 90 

79 33 
50 72 

212 38 

54 23 
94 66 

211 53 

42 05 

98 72 

55 94 
247 93 

52 58 

31 88 
156 04 
227 03 

143 46 

70 38 

518 15 

32 02 
22 62 

141 35 

379 31 

136 46 

1,103 53 



535,466,057 $160,634 05 



Report of the Water Board. 



83 



Name. 


Class. 


00 


I 1 inch. 
| 2 inch. 
| 3 inch. 


| 4 inch. 
| Indicator. 

j Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 











535,466,057 


$160,634 05 


George C. Pearson . . . . 


Factory . . 


. 1 




. . 1 


372,538 


111 74 


S. B. Putnam ....... 


" 


. 1 


1 . . 


. . 2 


2,157,112 


647 11 


Union Elastic Goods Co. . 


" 


. 2 




. . 2 


8,722 


2 61 


William Carleton, 


" 


. 3 




. . 3 


322,469 


96 72 


Murphy, Leavens & Co. . . 


«' 


. 1 




. . - 1 


' 319,176 


95 74 


H. M. Richards 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


572,834 


171 83 


Charles E. Kershaw . . . . 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


700,611 


210 17 


E. Strain & Co 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


81,367 


24 39 


G. G-. Morris 


" 


. 1 




. • 1 


36,885 


11 05 


James Standish 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


400,000 


120 00 


A. W. Bailey 


" 


. 2 




. . 2 


319,149 


95 74 


C. M. Clapp & Co 


'i 




1 . . 


. . 1 


45,697 


13 68 


Hasse & Pratt 


(i 


. 1 




. . 1 


277,004 


83 10 


Byam, Carlton & Co. . . . 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


76,305 


22 88 


H.F.Miller 


" 


. 1 




. • 1 


Vacant. 




Stephen Smith & Co. . . . 


" 


. 1 




. • 1 


427,996 


128 39 


Chickering & Sons 


<< 




3 . . 


. . 3 


1,470,606 


441 17 


Mace & Keyes 


" 


. 1 




. • 1 


268,171 


77 43 


Bagnall & Loud 


•' 


. 1 




. • 1 


222,679 


66 78 


Boston Car Spring Co. . . . 


« 




1 . . 


. • 1 


969,892 


' 290 95 


A. Folsom & Sons 


" 




1 . . 


. • 1 


559,378 


167 80 


Dwinell & Co 


» 


. 1 




. • 1 


494,384 


148 30 


Standard Vinegar "Works . 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


4,972 


1 49 


J. M. Cook, estate 


" 




1 . . 


. • 1 


891,547 


267 44 


Hallett & Davis 


" 




1 . . 


. • 1 


409,244 


122 75 


W. Wolff & Co 


" 


. 1 




. • 1 


82,494 


24 74 


S. D. & H. W. Smith, Mont- 
gomery st 


« 




1 . . 


. . 1 


814,094 


244 20 


S. D. & H. W. Smith, Al- 
bany st 


« 




1 . . 


. . 1 


803,098 


240 91 


Harrison, Beard & Co . . . 


" 


. 1 




. . 1 


1,465,777 


439 71 


William Underwood & Co. 


« 


. 2 




. . 2 


563,173 


168 94 


G-. D. Dowes & Co 


"V . . 




1 . . 


. . 1 


555,216 


166 55 


D.Wilcox &Co 


'• 




1 . . 


. . 1 


463,634 


139 07 


George & Proctor .'.... 


■i 


. 1 




. . 1 


697,326 


209 18 


Boston Belting Co 


" . . 




1 . . 


. . 1 


128,917 


38 66 


Amount carried forward . 










552,438,524 


$165,725 27 



84 



Citt Document No. 57. 



Name. 


Class.. 


| 5-8 inch. 

1 inch. 
| 2 inch. 
1 3 inch. 


4 inch. 

Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 








552,438,524 
1,179,240 
1,002,321 


$165,725 27 
353 75 




Factory . . . 


2 . . . 


2 




. 1 . . 


. . 1 


300 68 




ii 


1 . . . 


. . 1 


29,527 
1,356,382 


8 85 


Cummings 8s Carlisle . . . 


" ... 


. 1 . . 


. . 1 


406 91 


Leigh Manufacturing Co. . 


... 


. 1 . . 


. . 1 


421,380 


126 41 


"Walworth Manufact. Co. . 


... 


1 . . . 


. . 1 


426,526 


127 94 


Newton, Morton & Co. . . 


... 


1 . . . 


. . 1 


282,944 


84 86 




" 






507,276 


152 17 


SethW. Fowle & Son . . . 


... 


1 . . . 


. . 1 


44,721 


13 39 




" 






728,374 


218 50 




... 






157,342 


47 19 


"W. P. Emerson Piano Co. . 


" 






518,055 


155 40 


Hallett & Cumston .... 


K 






213,218 


63 94 


P. Lally 


,1 


. 1 . . 


. . 1 


683,837 
247,252 


175 13 


S. G. Underhill 


" 






74 16 


Amer. Molded Collar Co. . 


... 


1 . . 


. . 1 


. 297,643 


89 27 


Kittredge & Co 


,1 


1 . 


. . 1 


206 399 


61 90 




<( 


1 . 


. . 1 








(1 


1 . . 


. . 1 


451,474 


135 43 




... 






261,486 


78 43 




" 






288,959 
154,844 


86 67 


R. Estabrook & Bon .... 


46 44 




li 


1 . . 


. . 1 


130 611 


39 16 






1 . . 


. . 1 


561,022 
144,779 


168 28 


Grover & Baker Sewing 
Machine Co., Albany st. . 


ii 


. 1 . 


. . 1 


43 42 


Grover & Baker Sewing 
Machine Co., "Wash. st. . 


" 


. 3 . 


. . 3 


1,890,036 


566 99 




Machinist . . 






668,519 


200 53 








« 


1 . . 


. . 1 


142,297 


42 68 








a 


2 


. . 2 


502,619 
230,047 
683,016 
1,138,731 
498,186 


150 76 


Harrison Loring 
S. A. Woods & Co 






<( 


2 1 . 


. . 3 


68 99 






„ 


1 . . 


. . 1 


204 87 


George F. Blake 






t( 


. 1 . 


. . 1 


341 60 






« 


. 1 . 


. . 1 


149 44 








u 




2 


512,961 


153 88 






Amount carried fo 


;■< 








568,900,548 


$170,663 29 



Report of the Water Board. 



85 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Eyelet Tool Co 

L. A- Bigelo-w 

William Evans 

Smith & Lovett 

Am. Tool and Machine Co 

J. Souther & Co 

Boston Machine Co. . . . 
Hersey Brothers .... 
Hinckley Locomotive Works 
Atlantic Works, Chelsea st 
Atlantic Works, Border st. 

H. 8. Robinson 

Geo. T. McLaughlin . . . 
South Boston Iron Co. . . 
Holmes & Blanchard . . 

Dyer & G-urney 

William Blake & Co. . . 
Whiting Foundry Co. . . 
Tremont Foundry Co. . . 
Fulton Iron Foundry Co. 
Chelmsford Iron Foundry 



Highland Foundry Co. , 

George Miles , 

Downer Kerosene Oil Co 

F. H. Jenney 

Carter, Winsor & Co. . , 

Farrar, Pierce & Canterbury 

Kidder, Vaughan & Co. . 

Bowker, Torrey & Co 
Bowker street 



Bowker, Torrey & Co. 
Foundry street .... 



Torrey s & Co 

C. E.Hall & Co. . . 
A. Wentworth & Co. 



Class. 



Machinist 



Foundry 



Boiler Maker 
Oil Works 



Marble Works. 



Amount carried forward 604,413,168 $181,316 50 



Gallons. 



568,900,548 
81,568 
488,977 
809,362 
183,982 
794,729 
283,207 

1,108,109 
222,471 

1,339,801 
808,462 

1,606,335 
127,349 
636,779 

1,436,107 
245,248 
151,642 

1,170,877 
407,826 
73,687 
73,230 

687,225 
104,639 
188,226 

6,536,062 
983,729 
612,456 

1,169,824 
125,692 

3,380,406 

1,790,609 
3,361,242 
2,447,167 
2,175,585 



Revenue. 



$170,663 29 
24 45 
146 68 
242 78 

55 17 
238 40 

84 95 
332 41 

66 72 
371 93 
242 52 
481 89 

38 19 
191 02 
430 81 

73 55 

45 47 
351 25 
122 33 

22 09 

21 95 

206 15 
31 39 

56 45 

1,960 80 
295 10 
183 71 
350 94 
37 69 

1,014 10 

637 17 

1,008 35 

734 14 

652 66 



86 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Richard Power & Son 
Jeremiah Carew 

B. F. Meaney . 
Geo. F. Chapin & Co 

C. D. Brooks . 
Horace H. Lewis 
W. K. Lewis & Bros 
B. M. Clark .... 
B. T. Cowdrey & Co 
Warner & Freeman 
Fohes, Hayward & Co 

Chase & Co 

Charles Copeland . 
Messenger Brothers 
Mrs. G . F. Harrington 
Marston & Cunio 
W. L. Bdgerton . 
Frost & Dearborn 
George Fera . . 

D. T. Copeland 
F. E. Weber . 
R. B. Brigham 
A. W. Chase . 
John Kleasa . . 
J. L. Reichardt 
W. F. Bacon . 
A. W. Fisher . 
Frank B. Ingalls 
Campbell & Coverly 
Severance & Co 
O. A. Jones . . 
O. S. Edgerly . 
Drew & Co. . . 
C. H. Bailey . 

Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Marble Works 
Stone Yard . . 

u 

Vinegar Works 
Pickle Fact'y 



Salt Works . . 
Confectionery 



Restaurant 



Gallons. 



604,413,158 

601,814 

206,369 

1,371,913 

131,939 

462,659 

168,494 

194,835 

238,506 

477,712 

538,681 

590,174 

1,004,601 

2,229,464 

348,831 

350,186 

367,476 

457,987 

569,272 

401,811 

1,145,458 

.357,831 

1,674,411 

48,412 

36,052 

129,283 

168,126 

283,139 

199,709 

4S9.568 

374,047 

278,406 

131,849 

80,167 

133,837 



Revenue. 



$181,316 50 

180 53 

61 90 

411 55 

39 57 

138 78 

50 53 

58 44 

71 53 

143 29 

161 59 

177 04 

301 37 

, 668 81 

104 64 

105 04 
110 22 
137 38 
170 77 
120 53 
343 62 
107 33 
502 31 

14 51 
10 81 

38 77 
50 41 
84 92 
59 90 

146 86 
112 19 
83 50 

39 54 
24 03 

40 14 



620,656,177 $186,188 85 



Keport of the Water Board. 



87 



Name. 


a 

> 

5-8 inch. 

1 inch. 

2 inch. 


4 inch. 
Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward. . 






620,656,177 


$186,188 85 


R. M. Waitt 


Restaurant . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


171,816 


51 52 


C. E. Bacon 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


326,488 


97 92 


W. W. Alley 


" . . 1 . . 


. . • 1 


27,217 


8 15 


J. C. Murphy 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


105,029 


31 49 


J. G-allagher 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


160,416 


48 11 


V. Stahl 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


138,254 


41 46 


A. 8. Onthank 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


527,129 


158 12 


Dearborn & Ingalls .... 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


468,021 


140 38 


L. E. Stearns 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


295,920 


88 76 


Mrs. A. Cook 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


466,048 


139 79 


Walter Grieve 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


136,619 


40 96 


B. S. Wright (3 mos.) . . . 


. . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


8,055 


2 41 


A. F. Copeland 


" . . 1 . . 


. . . 1 


524,339 


157 30 


J. Backus 


" . . 1 . . 


... 1 


458,654 


137 58 


W. 8. Mathews 


« ' . . 1 . . 


... 1 


309,217 


92 75 


Brock & Coy 


. . 1 . . 


... 1 


426,479 


127 92 


W. C. Cahoon & Son . . . 


. . 1 . . 


... 1 


335,016 


100 48 


Durgin, Park & Co 


. . 1 . . 


... 1 


367,814 


110 32 


James Brown & Co 


. . 1 . . 


... 1 


543,959 


163 18 


Smith & Underwood . . . . 


" . . 1 . . 


... 1 


999,059 


299 69 


J. M. Learned 


" . . 1 . . 


... 1 


596,139 


178 83 


Wm. Englehardt 


" . . 1 . . 


... 1 


359,607 


107 86 


Tibbetts & Russell 


. . 2 . . 


... 2 


468,276 


140 47 


J. D. G-ilman 


" . . 1 . . 


... 1 


496,214 


148 86 


R. R. & J. 8. Higgins . . . 


Saloon .... 2 . . 


... 2 


957,089 


287 10 


Atwood & Bacon 


" . . . . 1 . . 


... 1 


186,644 


55 97 


Smith & Wright ...... 


. . . . 1 . . 


... 1 


454,274 


136 26 


Palais Royal 


" . . . . 1 . . 


... 1 


346,603 


103 96 


Felton & Son 


Distillery ... . 2 . 


... 2 


3,489,141 


1,046 73 


Jonas H. French 


" .... 1 . 


... 1 


1,714,034 


514 18 


C. H. Graves 


Rectifier ... 1 . . 


... 1 


216,329 


64 87 


James Edmond & Co. . . . 


Fire Brick . . 1 . . 


... 1 


190,911 


57 26 


E. L. Perkins 


Card Factory . . 1 . 


... 1 


128,136 


38 42 


A. Hale & Co 


Rubber Works 1 . . 


... 1 


353,002 


105 88 


Amount carried forward 






637,408,125 


$191,213 79 



88 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Class. 













^ 


















,0 










CO 


hi 




fl 


-a 


A 


r=3 


sx 

o 


^ 




C 


a 


T) 










C 
H 


.0 


H 


CN 


M 


Tt< 


H 



Gallons. 



Revenue. 



Amount brought forward 
W. H. Swift & Co. . 
W.L.Bradley .... 

B.Randall 

Committee on Bathing 
J. L. Blodgett .... 



Boston Dye Wood & Chem 
ical Co 



W. H. Whitmore . . 
M. Crocker & Co. . . 
G. W. & F. Appleton 
Preston & Merrill . . 
Quirin & Edwards . . 
F. S. Merritt .... 
R. W. Ames & Son . 
James Frampton . . 
Boston Forge Co. . . 
Boston Lead Co. . . 
National Bridge Co. . 
American Steam Safe Co 
Suffolk Glass Co. . . . 
Washington Pipe Works 
East Boston Pottery . . 
Simpson's Dry Dock Co 
Cunard Steamship Co. . 
Hingham Steamboat Co. . 
Portland Steam Packet Co 
Union Freight Railway Co 
W. B. Gleason & Co. . . 



Butchers' Slaughtering & 
Melting Association . 



Metropolitan Railroad Co, 
So. Boston Railroad Co. . 
Highland Railroad Co. . . 

Draper & Hall 

V. R. Bridgham 



Fertilizers 



Baths 



Chemicals 



Extracts 
Tannery 



Carving 



Stables 



Stable 



Amount carried forward . I 692,678,575 $207,794 31 



637,408,125 
500,302 

2,555,431 
420,337 

1,177,875 
630,337 

9,513,697 

1,311,292 

Vacant. 

7,125 

524,100 

923,069 

148,470 

246,449 

99,269 

1,719,787 

1,052,841 

83,782 

Vacant. 

703,177 

1,122,087 

334,041 

581,368 

3,309,150 

4,768,200 

1,717,425 

929,025 

260,729 

4,433,144 
8,671,541 
4,567,093 
1,687,092 
827,518 
444,697 



$191,213 79 
150 07 
766 60 
126 09 
353 36 
189 09 

2,854 09 
393 37 



2 13 

167 22 

276 90 

44 51 

73 92 

29 76 

515 92 

315 84 

25 13 



210 93 
336 60 
100 20 
174 39 
992 73 
1,430 45 
515 22 
278 69 
78 19 

1,329 93 

2,601 42 

1,370 08 

506 07 

248 23 

133 39 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



89 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

P. B. Murray 

A. J. Child 

E. A. Noyes 

James W. Hale (3 mos.) . 

S.A. Tuttle 

John Tonry . . ■ 

W. L. Wellington .... 
Charles R. Smith .... 
J. Austin Rogers .... 
Norfolk House Stahle . . 
Northend & Foster . . . 
Parmenter & Sumner . . 
Robert H. Douglass . . . 
T. H. Seavey . . 
C. & J. F. Baker . 
W. P. Pierce . . 
L. E. Hartshorne 



J. P. Barnard. 108 Chestnut 
street .... 



J. P. Barnard, cor. Brimmer 
and Chestnut street . . 

J. P. Barnard, Joy street 

A. Grarcelon 

C. S. Godfrey 

G. W. Sherburne .... 

J. E. Maynard 

A. Goss 

Adams Express Co. . . . 

John Eaton, jr 

F. S. Merritt 

L. W. Porter & Co. . . . 

Warner & Richardson . . 

Geo. M. King 

Milo Whitney 

Daniel Wood 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Stable 



Gallons. 



692,678,575 

64,851 

463,372 

635,447 

62,820 

358,350 

324,951 

75,853 

342,315 

601,447 

Vacant. 

468,066 

206,571 

187,994 

108,224 

115,755 

69,382 

43,357 

469,447 

614,871 
808,537 
264,411 
365,547 
138,681 
113,249 
223,147 
336,823 
174,989 
45,307 
331,444 
641,384 
433,034 
114,344 
332,144 



$207,794 31 

19 45 

139 00 

190 62 

18 84 

107 49 

97 47 

22 73 

102 68 

180 42 



140 3& 
61 96 
56 39 

32 45 
34 70 
20 80 

12 99 

140 81 

184 45 
242 55 

79 31 
109 65 

41 58 

33 96 
66 92 

101 02 
52 48 

13 56 
99 41 

192 39 
129 90 

34 29 
99 63 



702,214,689 $210,654 60 



90 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

T. D. Sullivan . 

Ham & Co. . . 

F. E. Russell . 

Edgar Snow . . 

John Feency . 

James Jellison 

John Miller . . 

Shorey & Co. . 

Harwood & Haekett 

H. C. Nuns . . . 

J. A. Riedell & Co 

E. W. Murray, Berkeley st 

E. W. Murray, Stanhope st 

A. B. Atherton & Co. 

Geo. S. Johnson & Co 

Jordan, Marsh & Co. 

T. Thaxter . , . 

James Monroe . . 

Miller & Robinson 

L. L. Howland . 

P. E. Murray . . 

J. E. Maynard . . 

John Rice .... 

G-eo. S. Fogg & Co 

A. D. Pettee . . 

E. A. Batchelder 

Moses Coleman & Son 

Boston Hotels Coach Co 

W. Hutchings .... 

Eastern Express Co. . 

Charles Barnard . . 

Riverside Club Stable 

Club Stable, Chardon st 

Beacon Club Stable . . 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Stable 



Gallons. 



702,214,689 
139,994 
210,561 
242,924 

84,201 
181,201 
293,452 
185,474 
453,967 
266,204 
522,395 
• 494,400 
314,040 
316,574 
477,187 
220,275 
234,802 
101,991 
137,234 
347,046 
137,955 
226,509 
517,529 
199,891 
574,551 
322,642 
131,167 
130,116 
1,649,736 
168,259 
166,761 

69,246 
181,709 
147,044 
154,836 



$210,654 60 
41 98 
63 15 
72 86 
25 23 

54 33 
88 02 

55 64 
136 17 

79 85 
156 70 
148 30 

94 20 

/ 94 95 

143 14 

66 06 
70 41 
30 58 
41 16 

104 09 
41 37 

67 63 
155 24 

59 95 
172 34 
96 78 
39 34 
39 02 
494 90 
50 49 
50 01 
20 76 
54 49 
44 10 
46 42 



712,215,562 $213,654 26 



Report of the Water Board. 



91 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

F. A. Phelps . 

A. P. Marion . 

W. C. Burgess 

Parker Bryant 

G-. H. Hayden . 

A. Burton . . . 

A. Burton, 125 Emerson 

C. E. Paige .... 

J. Rice 

M. & W. Ham . . . 

John Quinn .... 

J. H. Pote & Co. . 

Sumner & Dickinson 

J. B. Cassidy & Bro. 

L. C. Chase . 

Peck & Hall . 

T. H. Ayres 

J.Hale . . . 

J. M. Smith . 

E. R. Webster 

Club Stable, 75 Chestnut 

B. T. Wrightington . 
Clark & Brown . . . 

D. T. Robinson . . . 
Alden & Dean . . . 
Cilley & Stimson . . 
Club Stable, 44 Joy st 
Asa Critchett- . 
L. A. Noyes . 
A. S. Eaton . . 
Geo. D. Brown 
J. H. Hathorne 
H. D. Smith . . 
D. W. Beckler, Trotting P' 
National Tube Works 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Stable 



Gallons. 



712,215,562 

173,572 

114 

231,299 

271,731 

89,49 

46,728 

83,258 

267,731 

716,856 

228,164 

846,177 

200,159 

276,264 

183,044 

30,854 

139,169 

Vacant. 

329,488 

122,848 

241,679 

137,655 

132,337 

324,276 

119,196 

154,754 

238,454 

212,871 

188,129 

129,420 

134,062 

142,319 

777,553 

192.112 

56,227 

369,809 



Revenue. 



$213,654 26 
52 05 
34 43 
69 38 

81 50 
26 83 
14 00 
24 96 
80 31 

215 03 
68 43 

103 83 
60 03 

82 86 
54 90 

9 24 
41 74 



98 84 
36 84 
72 49 

41 28 

39 69 
97 27 
35 74 
46 40 
71 51 
63 84 

56 42 
38 81 

40 26 

42 69 
233 25 

57 61 
16 86 

110 92 



719,618,063 $215,874 50 



92 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Globe Nail Works . . . 
Farrington & Hunnewell 

B. M. Cunningham 
Manley Howe . 
L. Prang & Co. 
Morse & Jordan 
E. Brooks . . . 
Walworth Manuf. Co 
H. G. Denny . 
Porter & Co. . 

C. U. Cotting . 

Moses B. Wilde 

John Foster . . 

Briggs & Robinson 

Carpenter, Woodward 
Morton . . 

8. B. Stebbins 

L. W. Pickens 

C E. Folsom 

Boston City Flour Mills 

J. J. McNutt .... 

Glendon Co 

Manson Peterson . . 

W. W. Bennett . . . 

Cross & Gilman . . . 

McQuesten & Fogg . 

J. F. Paul & Co. . . . 

Bugbee & Spooner . 

J. A. Robertson . . , 

Stetson & Pope . . , 

Chauncy, Page 8s Co. 

S. H. L. Pierce . . . 

A. J. Stearns & Son , 

Palmer, Parker & Co 

J. F. Keating . . . , 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Silversmiths 
Laundry 
Chemist 
Chromos 



Mill 



Gallons. 



719,618,063 
1,020,050 
120,554 
582,292 
544,117 
439,551 
382,837 
367,514 
938,609 
177,201 
392,219 
443,564 
408,404 
423,194 
550,633 

809,422 

741,216 

700,041 

200,601 

3,112,911 

1,468,363 

1,536,344 

631,102 

593,601 

531,606 

301,214 

2,188,476 

551,728 

645,169 

168,465 

836,512 

1,077,321 

72,119 

483,614 

370,621 



Revenue. 



$215,874 50 
306 00 

36 15 
174 67 
163 22 
131 84 
114 83- 
110 24 
281 56 

53 14 
117 64 
133 04 
122 51 
126 93 
165 17 

242 80 
222 34 
210 00 

60 17 
933 84 
440 49 
460 88 
189 31 
178 05 
159 46 

90 35 
656 51 
165 50 
193 53 

50 53 
250 94 
323 17 

21 60 
145 07 
112 17 



743,429,248 $223,018 15 



Report of the Water Board. 



93 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Watson & Bisbee , 
Laming & Drisko . 
Cressey and Noyes 
Smith & Jacobs . , 
B. D. Wbitconib 
8. Crosby & Son 
Nathaniel Cummings 
A. C. Hopkins . . 
R. S. Gilmore • . 
G-lover & Jones . 
Slade Dye "Wood Mill . 
Knowles, Freeman & Co 
G. B. Spaulding & Co. . 



Bond, Blanchard, Worthen 
8c Co 



G. H. "Withington 
J. H. Chad-wick . 
Horatio Harris . 
W. V. Hutchings 
J. C. Nichols . . 
House of Correction 
Suffolk County Court House 
Suffolk County Jail 



Directors of Public Institu 
tions 



South Ferry 

North Ferry 

Board of Health . . . 
Police Station No. 1 . 

" "2. 

" "3. 

" "4 

" "5 



Class. 



Mill 



Fish Store 
Bacon Works 

Bakery . . . 

House &Fount'n 

Fountain 
Wharfpurposes 



Public Urinals 



Amount carried forward ' 796,180,083 $238,841 97 



Gaulons. 



Revenue. 



743,429,248 

£56,237 

357,869 

1*411,461 

738,217 

1,347,779 

503,399 

86,437 

33,186 

206,323 

591,831 

2,206,041 

444,178 

431,207 

486,793 

227,024 

391,207 

87,705 

201,705 

39,525 

13,171,200 

2,815,309 

1,559,736 

5,092,762 

7,444,125 

8,397,225 

688,536 

299,524 

" 580,715 

628,102 

291,149 

567,607 

479,393 

387,328 



$223,018 15 
165 86 
107 35 
423 42 
221 45 
404 31 
151 00 

25 91 
9 94 

61 87 
177 53 
661 79 
133 24 
129 34 

146 02 
68 09 
117 34 

26 29 
60 50 
11 85 

3,951 35 
844 59 
467 90 

1,527 81 

2,233 22 

2,519 17 

206 55 

89 85 

174 21 

188 43 

87 36 

170 27 

143 81 

116 20 



94 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 


Class. 


| 5-8 inch. 
| 1 inch. 
| 2 inch. 


| 3 inch. 
4 inch. 
| Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 






796,180,083 


$238,841 97 


Police Station No. « . . . . 






1 . . 


... 1 


148,201 


44 46 


" 9 . . 








1 . . 


... 1 


169,934 


50 98 


" 10 . . 








1 . . 


... 1 


521,308 


156 38 


" 12 . . 








1 . . 


... 1 


84,397 


25 33 


" " 13 . . 








1 . . 


... 1 


62,407 


18 72 


City Prison 








. . 1 


... 1 


390,585 


117 15 


Cedar Grove Cemetery 










1 . . 1 


1,341,750 


211 43 


First Church 




Organ .... 




. . 1 1 


198,187 


59 44 


King's Chapel 




.... 




. . 1 1 


126,753 


37 99 


Cathedral of the Holy Cross 


.... 




. . 2 2 


363,477 


109 02 


Trustees Masonic Building . 


.... 




. . 1 1 


16,666 


5 00 


St. Mary's Church 


.... 


. 1 . 


. . . 1 


297,397 


89 20 


Tremont-st. M. E. Church . 


« .... 


. 1 . 


. . . 1 


97,154 


29 13 


South Cong'l Church .... 


" .... 




. . 2 2 


96,646 


28 98 


First Universalist Church . 


.... 




. . 1 1 


153,670 


46 09 


Columhus-av. Univ. Church 


" .... 


. 1 . 


. . . 1 


60,044 


18 00 


Shawmut Cong'l Society . . 


.... 


. . 1 


. . . 1 


201,750 


60 52 


Church of the HolyRedeemer 


.... 


. 1 . 


. . . 1 


99,217 


29 75 


Church of the Immaculate 






. . 1 1 


446,598 


133 95 


Clarendon-st.Baptist Church 


« 




. . 1 1 


83,330 


24 98 


Second Church Society . . 


.... 




. . 1 1 


86,459 


25 91 




" 




. . 1 1 


136,482 


40 93 




" .... 




. . 1 1 


Vacant. 




Boston Soc'y New Jerusalem 


» .... 




. . 1 1 


62,208 


18 64 


Second HawesUnit. Soc'y . 


it 


1 . . 


. . . 1 


51,727 


15 49 


Old South Church Society . 


.... 




. . 1 1 


543,780 


163 11 


Bancroft & Boy den .... 


Elevator . . . 


. 1 . 


. . . 1 


511,581 


153 45 




" ... 


. . 1 

. 1 . 


. . . 1 
. . . 1 


74,400 

579,809 


22 30 




173 93 




(1 




. . . 1 


26,175 


7 84 




« ... 


. 1 . 


. . 1 1 

. . . 1 


123,000 
182,713 


36 89 




54 80 




«' ... 




. . 1 1 


45,562 


13 64 


"William Claflin (3 mos.) . . 


" ... 


. . 1 


. . . 1 


25,725 


7 71 


Amount carried forward 








803,589,175 


$240,873 11 



Keport or the Water Board. 



95 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . 

Mrs. S. S.Dunn 

Joel Goldthwait & Co. . . 

Chickering & Sons 

Odd Fellows' Building . . 

Davis & Co 

J. C. Tucker & Co 

A. W. Clapp 

Rufus Gibbs & Co 

James Tucker & Co. . . . 
Boston Rubber Shoe Co. . 
Pomeroy, Dole & Co. . . . 
Lamkin & Pester 

E. H. Sampson 

Davis, Whitcomb & Co. . . 

J. C. Haynea 

Lewis, Brown & Co 

Field, Thayer & Co 

McConnell & Gardner . . . 

F. Shaw & Bro 

W. B. Putnam & Co. . . . 

Henry Bond & Co 

J. S. Stone 

Dennison & Co 

W. H. Mawhinney & Co. . 

R. H. White & Co 

Clement & Colburn . . . . 

Jewett&Bush 

Smith, Richardson & Bates 

Henry A. Gould 

F. H. Dodge 



Mitchell, Green & Stevens 
(6mos.) 



R. W. Kendall . . . 
Mrs. Harris (6 mos.) 
S. C. Bixby & Co. . . 



Class. 



Elevator 



Amount enrried forward I . . I . . . 823,829,377 $246,944 81 



Gallons. 



803,5S9,175 
39,997 
71,661 

1,651,500 
133,500 
691,500 
772,500 
961,500 
133,500 
977,250 
78,750 
306,000 
600,750 
585,000 
341,625 
753,000 
880,500 

1,092,750 

' 230,025 
514,500 
548,250 
843,750 
614,250 

1,739,776 
544,875 

1,675,500 
613,150 
447,000 
990,168 

1,055,625 
Vacant. 

168,750 
100,500 
29,250 
53,550 



Revenue. 



,873 11 
11 99 
21 4S 
495 44 
40 04 
207 43 
231 74 
288 44 
40 03 
293 17 
23 61 
91 80 
180 21 
175 49 
102 47 
225 91 
264 13 
327 81 
69 00 
154 34 
164 47 
253 12 
184 27 
521 92 
163 44 
502 64 
183 92 
134 08 
297 04 
316 68 



50 62 
30 14 

8 77 
16 06 



96 



City Document No. 57. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . 

A. A. Pope & Co 

Dale Bros. & Co 

At>ram French & Co. . . . 

Talbot, Wilmarth & Co. . . 

John Shepard (3 mos.) . . 

Edward Spaulding . . . . 

P. Upton & Co 

Perry, Wendall, Pay & Co. 

Continental Bank Building 

C. T>. Swain & Co 

J. A. &W. Bird 

A. "Wentworth (3 mos.) . . 

Atlantic National Bank . . 

E. E. Apthorp (3 mos.) . . 

Churchill, G-ilchrist, Smith 
& Co. (2 mos.) 



Banfleld, Forristall & Co. 
(2 mos ) 



George Croome & Co. (2 
mos.) 



Bobbins & Kellogg (1 mo.) . 

Pogg, Houghton & Coolidge 
(lmo.) 



Horswell, Kinsley & French 
J. T. Bailey (9 mos.) . . . 
Z. A. Willard (9 mos.) . . 

F. M. Johnson 

Minot, Hooper & Co. . . . 

J. P. Paine 

Miss C. D. Brewer .... 
J. M. Beebe 



Barker Bros. & Gardner, 
vacant 



Paul Knowles and others 



Total 



Class. 



Elevator 



Factory . . . 

Marine Water- 
men, as per 
contract . . 



Gallons. 



823,829,377 
451,500 
149,261 

1,273,215 
290,250 

. 15,750 
91,500 
384,750 
448,500 

1,404,075 
187,800 

1,034,925 

94,500 

343,185 

291,150 

867,817 

261,464 

47,400 
30,900 

45,900 

140,475 

73,649 

340,327 

2,034,000 

1,747,350 

570,000 

33,810 

55,311 



1,918,763 



838,456,904 



Revenue. 



.,944 81 

135 44 

44 76 

381 94 

87 07 

4 72 

27 45 
115 41 
134 53 
421 20 

56 33 
310 46 

28 34 
102 94 

87 34 

260 34 



14 22 
9 27 

13 77 
42 13 
22 07 
102 08 
610 19 
524 19 
170 99 
10 13 
16 58 



1,534 93 



$252,292 06 



Kespectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



Report of the Water Board. 



97 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



OF THE 



May 1st, 1877. 
Hon. T. T.. Sawyer, 

Chairman Boston Water Board : — 

Sir, — I" hereby respectfully submit my report for the 
year ending with April 30th. 

Main Pipe. 

The whole number of feet of main pipe, of the various 
sizes, laid and relaid, is 120,248 feet 22^ miles. The 
lengths, sizes, and in what streets, may be found in the 
tables below. 



Service Pipes. 



Whole number put in 
Length in feet 



1,149 

30,888 



Of the relaying of enlarged sizes, the following table 
shows the changes in sizes : — 



' Street. 

i 


Between what Streets. 


Size now. 


No. of 
feet. 


Size 
formerly. 


Cornhill court .... 


BOSTON. 

BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 
Commonw'th ave. and B. & A. R.R. 


12 in. 

£ " 

6 " 
6 " 
6 " 

6 " 


515 j 

24 
3 

108 
3S4 

450 . 


6 in. 
4 '< 
4 " 
4 " 
f 4 " 

4 " 



Main Pipe Relaid. 

Boston st., between Dorchester ave. and Mt. Vernon st. 
Dover st. bridge, between Albany st. and O. C. R. R • • 



.20 inch. 
24 " 
20 " 
16 " 
12 " 



1,950 feet. 

85 " 

635 " 

85 " 
640 " 



98 City Document No. 57. 

Eaised. 

Boston st., between Boston line and Mt. Vernon st 20 inch. 600 feet. 

Loweked. 

Boston st., between Dorchester ave. and Ellery 6 inch. 224 feet. 

St. James ave., between Clarendon st. and Huntington 

ave 6 " 200 " 

Terrace st., between Heath and Parker 6 " 125 " 

Taken up. 

6-inch iron pipe 746 feet. 

4 « << " 418 

2 " " " 39 

l£ « " « 1,230 

1 " lead" 187 

| n a <« 24 

| a n " 84 

Extended, | pipes 79 



Report of the Water Board. 



99 



Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1876. 



In what Street. 



Atlantic ave 

'* " 
Hancock 

Richmond 

Atlantic ave 

Huntington ave. .. 

St. James ave 

Commerce 

Atlantic ave 

Fruit - 

Cortes , 

Isabella , 

James , 

Fairfield 

Commonwealth ave 

Newbury 

Newton 

Tremont 

Emerson , 

"Woodward 

Sixth 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON. 
Commercial Wharf and South Market 

Long Wharf and Broad 

Myrtle and Mount Vernon 



Total 12-inch . 



Mercantile and Atlantic ave 

Commercial "Wharf and South Market 
Boylston and Dartmouth 



Total 8-inch. 



Clarendon and Huntington ave 

Commercial and Atlantic ave 

Commercial "Wharf and South Market 

North Grove and Charles 

Berkeley and Ferdinand 

Columbus ave. and Ferdinand 

Newton and Concord 

Marlboro' and Commonwealth ave 

Fairfield and Exeter 

Clarendon and Exeter 

Columbus ave. and Carlton 

Park and Bromfield 

School and Court 



Total 6-inch. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Dorchester and H 

Glover and Dorchester ave 

GandH 



Total 6-inch. 



.2 & 



624 
1,155 

20 



1,799 

72 

8 

625 

705 

322 
383 

16 
226 

29 
200 
376 
324 

50 
278 

26 
300 
288 



2,818 

468 
108 
360 



100 City Document No. 57. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Seaver . . 
Saratoga 

M 

Moore . . 
Havre.... 



London . 



Terrace. 



Creighton . 
Amory . . . 



Cobden 

Bumstead lane 

Terrace 

Smith ] 

Langdon 

Tupelo 

Maple 

Walkullah 

West Walnut park 

Heath place 

Rockland 

Creighton 

Rockland aye 

Summit 

West Cottage 

Hollis place 

Wayne 



Between what Streets. 



EAST BOSTON. 

Sumner and Webster 

Moore and Byron 

Moore and Swift 

Saratoga and Bennington 

Porter and Marion 

Decatur and Maverick 

Decatur and Maverick 



Total 6-inch. 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 
Tremont and New Heath , 



Total 16-inch. 



Centre and Day 

Centre and Codman ave. 



Total 12-inch 



Washington and Walnut ave 

Smith and Conant 

Tremont and New Heath 

Phillips and Bumstead lane 

Dudley and G-eorge 

Quincy and Savin 

From Schuyler 

Dale and Rockland 

Prom Walnut park 

Heath and Walden 

Dale and Walnut ave 

Centre and Day 

Dale and Rockland 

Regent and Circuit 

Woodville square and Brook ave. 

Washington and Vernon 

Maple and Blue Hill ave 



o fl 
el 

a p, 

PS 



308 



Total 6-inch. 



6 
353 

1,027 
1,027 

439 

814 

1,253 

150 

133 

62 

371 

143 

124 

292 

456 

571 

1,575 

993 

8 

380 

187 

402 

72 

190 

6,109 



Eeport of the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



101 



In what Street. 



Fellows court . . . 

Court , . . . . 

Einwood sq 

Heath ave 

Orange court . . . 
Palmer place . . . 
Washington .... 

Harvard 

Columbia 

Pond 

Centre 

Mt. Bowdoin ave 
Wheatland ave. . 

Back 

Park 

Welles ave 

Mt. Bowdoin ave 
Davenport ave. . 

Stanton ave 

Kilton 

Standish ave. 

Wales 

Harvard 

Abbott 

Back .' 

Sheridan 



Between what Streets. 



From Fellows 

From Heath place 

Linwood and Centre 

From Heath place 

From Fellows 

From Palmer 

Cobden and Westminster. 
Marcella and Valentine. . . 



Total 4-inch. 



DORCHESTER. 

School and Blue Hill ave 

Bird and Hamilton ave 

Pleasant and Dorchester ave 

Allston and Centre ave 



Total 12-inch. 



Bowdoin and N". T. and N. E. R. R. 

Millet and Kilton 

Austin and Blue Hill ave 

Kilton and Standish 

Harley and Ocean 



Total 8-inch. 



Bowdoin and N". T. and N". E. R. R. 

From Columbia , 

Norfolk and Evan , 

Park and Wheatland ave 

Park and Harvard , 

Harvard and Blue-Hill avenne , 

Wales and Warner ave 

Harvard and Blue-Hill avenue 

Austin and Blue-Hill avenue 

From Minot 



a a, 



Amount carried forward 



27 
107 

45 

194 

211 

126 

9 

20 



2,523 

1,491 

238 

150 



4,402 

1,157 
227 
899 
190 
309 



2,782 



6 


18 


" 


20 


" 


717 


" 


829 


'« 


857 


" 


1,088 


" 


5 


" 


793 


» 


12 


" 


198 



4,537 



102 City Document No. 57. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Sumner 

Clayton 

Granger 

Columbia , 

Pond 

Locust 

Clarence place 

Mather 

Luetner place. 

Waterlow 

Centre 

Sargent 



Davenport ave. 



Washington 



South . . 
Centre , 



Ashland 

Spring 

Florence 

Walkhill 

Scarborough. 

Keyes 

Morton 

Canterbury . . 
LaGrange 



Between what Streets. 



DORCHESTER. — Continued. 

Amount brought forward 

Cottage and Sumner place 

Leonard and Granger 

Clayton and Duncan 

Bird and Quincy 

Pleasant and Dorchester ave 

From Dorchester ave 

From "Washington 

Allston and Dorchester ave 

From Dorchester ave 

From Harvard . . .'. 

Allston and Dorchester ave 

Hartford and Howard ave 



Total 6-inch. 



From Columbia . . 
Total 4-inch. 



WEST ROXBURY. 

Walkhill and Poplar 

School and Boylston 

Green and Morton 

Washington and Centre 

South and Spring 

South and May 

Washington and Florence 

Centre and Clarence 

Ashland and Albion 

Morton and Washington 

Morton and Walnut 

Washington and Starr 

Scarborough and Canterbury 

Morton and Austin 

Centre and R. R. Crossing 



.2 p< 
PS 



Total 12-inch. 



4,537 

917 

35 

179 

28 

9 

415 

440 

1,566 

294 

78 

942 

36 

9,476 

225 

225 

2,410 

494 

3,484 

4,908 

6,416 

2,000 

724 

3,344 

502 

231 

1,122 

649 

1,587 

1,151 

583 

29,605 



Keport of the "Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



103 



Ik what Street. 



"Washington. . 
Forest Hill... 
Glen Road... 

Poplar 

Prince 

Centre 

Morton 

Boylston 

Mt. Vernon . . 

Washington. . 
Chauncey 
Oak place.... 

Baker 

South 

Maple 

Revere 

Walnut place 
Forest Hill .. 

E 

Bellevue 
Centre 

Spring 

Mt. Vernon . . 
Sheridan ave 
Ashland 
Glen Road . . 

Florence 

Poplar 

Prince 

Monument . . 



Between what Streets. 



WEST ROXBURY.- 
Boylston and Forest Hill . . . 
Washington and Williams . . 
Forest Hill and Walnut ave. 
Washington and Augustus . 

Pond and Perkins 

May and Lowder lane 

South and Scarborough .... 

Chestnut and D 

Centre and Lagrange 



Continued. 



Total 8-inch. 



Walk-Hill and South , 

From Washington 

Lamartine and Green 

From Boylston 

Maple and Centre 

Centre and Weld . . . ; 

Starr and Elm 

From Green 

Washington and Williams., 

From Spring Park 

Centre and Linnel , 

Anawan ave. and Spring 
Monument and Louder lane , 

Centre and Clarence 

Centre and La Grange , 

Curtis and Roxbury line 

Florence and Albion , 

From Forest Hill 

Poplar and Ashland , 

Florence and Albion 

Pond and Perkins , 

Centre and Elliot 



PFM 



Amount carried forward , 



536 
3,196 

453 
1,228 
2,006 
1,123 
4,608 

211 
1,531 

14,892 

54 

482 

1,157 

417 

52 

1,139 

211 

474 

36 

461 

1,430 

88 

55 

27 

21 

613 

383 

8 

750 

4 

20 

387 

8,269 



104 City Document No. 57. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In -what Street. 



Porter 

Orchard 

Roanoke ave. . . . 

Court 

Myrtle 

Morton 

Scarborough 
Lamartine place. 

Keyes 

"Washington 

Austin 

Terrace ave 

Greenwood ave.. 

Union ave 

Byron court 

Austin Farm. . . . 

Monument 

Seaverns ave. . . . 

Austin 

Jess 

Canterbury 

LaGrange 



Maple place 

Green Vale terrace. 
Austin Farm 



Oak square . 
Washington 



Between what Streets. 



WEST ROXBURY. — Continued. 

Amount brought forward 

Boylston ave. and Bismark 

Centre and Pond 

Revere and Alveston 

From Chestnut 

Centre and Pond 

Washington ^,nd Scarborough 

Morton and Walnut 

From Lamartine 

Washington and Starr 

Green and Morton 

Canterbury and Back 

From Sheridan ave 

From Washington 

Green and Washington 

From School 

From Austin 

Elliot and Centre 

Starr and Starr lane 

Canterbury and Back 

From Porter 

Morton and Austin 

Centre and R. R. Crossing 



Total 6-inch. 



From Seaverns ave. 
From Lamartine . . . 
From Austin 



Total 4-inch. 



BRIGHTON. 

Washington and Faneuil 

Lake and Tremont 



°-9 

£ - 

AS 



Amount carried forward 



8,269 
277 

41 

618 

395 

1,142 

36 

5 

331 

21 

60 
555 
637 

50 
780 
410 
670 
419 
271 
555 
227 
7 

10 

15,786 

185 
152 
152 



205 
2,129 

2,334 



Report of the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



105 



In what Street. 



Bigelow 

Faneuil ....... 

Washington . 

Brooks , 

Union , 

Western ave. . 
Market 

Cambridge. . . 
Washington . 
Rockland .... 
Reservoir lot. 

Union 

Newton 

Murdock 

Mechanic .... 

Auburn 

Sparhawk . . . 
Washington . 

Bigelow 

Faneuil 

Oakland place 
Cambridge . . . 
Washington . 
Webster ave. 
Western ave. . 
Rockland 

Court 

Wilton 



Between what Streets. 



BRIGHTON. — . Continued. 

Amount brought forward, 

Faneuil and Newton 

Oak sq. and Oakland 

Union and Brookline line 

Faneuil and Newton 

Washington and Howard place 

Market and Everett 

Waverly and Western ave 



Total 12-inch. 



Sparhawk and Gordon 

Tremont and Newton line 

Chestnut-Hill ave. and High-School place. 

From Rockland 

Howard place and Shepard 

Brooks and Bigelow 

Cambridge and Whitney 



Total 8-inch. 



Brighton ave. and Allston 

Pleasant and "Vernon 

Market and Murdock 

Lake and Newton line 

Faneuil and Newton 

Bigelow and Oakland 

From Oakland 

Sparhawk and Gordon 

Union and Allston 

Brighton ave. and Brown court. 

Market and Everett 

From High School place 

From Cambridge 

From Cambridge 



Amount carried forward 



3 a 

PS 





2,334 


12 


721 


" 


1,663 


" 


2,408 


" 


1,450 


" 


629 


" 


1,219 


" 


20 



10,444 

130 

1,720 

538 

140 



4,410 

318 
720 
818 

71 
9 

16 
201 
130 

27 
459 

18 
220 
251 
253 



3,511 



106 City Document No. 57. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In -what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



A'fc 



Otis 

Norton 

Gardner 

Linden 

High-School place 

Fratt 

Ashford 

Brooks 

Union 

Newton 

Murdock 

Brown court 

Brooks 

Section 13 



BRIGHTON.— Continued. 

Amount brought forward 

From Cambridge 

Harvard and Brighton ave 

Chester and Malvern 

Gardner and Cambridge 

Rockland and Mt. Vernon 

From Linden 

Linden and Chester 

Bigelow and Newton 

"Washington and Howard place 

Brooks and Bigelow 

Sparhawk and "Whitney 



Total 6-inch . . 



From Webster ave.. . . 
Faneuil and Bigelow . 



Total 4-inch. 



NEEDHAM. 
Gate Chambers on ends of Aqueduct. 

Total 48-inch 



48 



3,511 
76 
560 
627 
977 
313 
289 
442 



24 

7 

6,844 

130 
25 

155 



Report of the Water Board. 



107 



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108 



City Document No. 57. 






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City Document No. 57. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1876. 

















Diameter of Pipe 


s in 


Inches. 














WHERE. 








































m 




40 
1 


36 


30 
2 


24 


20 
4 


16 
4 


12 

15 


9 


8 
2 


6 

46 


4 
56 


3 


2 

7 


1| 

75 


11 
11 


1 

21 


1 
5 


1 

317 


i 

2 

13 


a 
o 




5S6 


South Boston • . 










3 




7 






8 


6 




5 




1 


2 




63 


5 


100 


East Boston . . . 








1 


5 




2 






6 


2 










1 


1 


90 


6 


114 


Boston Highlands 




1 




2 


2 


5 


5 






8 


3 




2 






2 


3 


61 


9 


103 
















2 


1 




6 


2 




1 










18 


3 


33 


West Roxbury . 


















1 


5 
















4 




11 








































1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


14 


9 


32 


1 


3 


79 


69 


7 


15 


75 


12 


26 


9 


553 


37 


948 



Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 4 inch 
and upwards : Joints, 124 ; settling of earth, 
17; defective pipe, 14; defective packing, 20; 
defective gate, 10 ; cap blown off, 7 ; struck by- 
pick, 2; burst by frost, 1. Total . 

Stoppages by fish, 14 ; by frost, 5 

Of 3-inch and on service-pipes : Joints, 15 ; settling 
of earth, 161 ; settling of wall, 1 ; settling of 



boxing, 
ing, 23 
cet, 7 ; 



1 ; defective pipe, 65 ; defective pack- 
; defective coupling, 12 ; defective fau- 
stiff connections, 75 ; faucet pulled 
out, 5 ; faucet broken off, 1 ; faucet loose at 
main, 7 ; faucet punched out, 2 ; gnawed by 
rats, 4; struck by pick, 27; burst by frost, 7; 
pipes not in use, 15; blasting, 2; nail-hole, 2; 

twisted off, 1. Total 

Stoppages by fish, 167; rust, 74; dirt, 12; gas- 
ket, 4; stone, 1 ; solder chips, 1 ; thawing pipe, 
•1 ; frost from inside of house, 20 ; from outside, 
21. Total 



195 
19 



433 



301 



Total 



9^8 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



Ill 



Statement of Number of Leaks, 1850-1876. 





Diameter of. 




Yeah. 


Four Inches and 
upwards. 


Less than Four 
Inches. 


TOTA1S. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

• 82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
636 
487 
449 
407 
769 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725. 
734i 


104 




237 




323 




345 


1854 


354 




294 




307 


1857 


363 


1858 . 


401 


1859 


531 


I860 


592 


1861 


508 




490 


1863 


494 


1864 


489 




607 


1866 


675 


1867 


609 




531 


1869 


489 


1870 


926 


1871 


1,565 
1,647 


1872 


1873 


1229' 


1874 


2,554 
928 


1875 


1876 


948 . 







112 



City Document No. 57. 



Hydrants. 

During the year 252 hydrants have been established, and 
15 abandoned, as follows : — 





Established. 




Abandoned. 






Lowry. 


Boston. 


Post. 




jowry. 


Boston. 


Dif. 


Boston 


16 


5 


8 


29 




6 


23 


South Boston 


1 


6 




7 






7 


East Boston 




1 


5 


6 




1 


5 


Boston Highlands 


5 


9 


8 


22 


2 


4 


16 


Dorchester 


5 


7 


20 


32 




1 


31 


West Koxbury 


27 


12 


74 


113 




1 


11.2 


Brighton 


9 


6 


28 


43 






43 




63 


46 


143 = 


=252 


2 


13=15 


237 



Total amount up to May 1, 1877. 



Boston 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester . 
West Roxbury 
Brighton 
Deer Island 
Brookline . 
Charlestown 
•Chelsea 



1,282 
474 
285 
761 
608 
246 
174 

16 
9 

11 



3,874 



52 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new 
or repaired ones, and 65 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 



Stopcocks. 

213 new stopcocks have been established this year. 113 
l)oxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. All 
the stopcocks have had the attention of former years paid 
them. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



113 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, May 1st, 1877. 





Diameter in Inches. 




48 

30 
2 


40 


36 1 30 


24 


20 


18 


16 


12 


10 


9 


8 


6 


4 
99 

1 

29 

16 
5 
34 
10 
30 
22 

10 
6 

8 
11 

16 

9 

12 


3 

67 

12 
8 

8 
10 

5 

17 


2 




33 

3 

7 
1 
6 

2 

1 
1 

2 

3 

4 
1 


33 63 


44 
1 
1 
9 
8 
1 

30 
1 
2 

18 
4 

9 
1 

2 
3 
1 


91 
2 

5 
4 

9 

4 

6 
12 
3 

. 4 
1 

1 


3 


39 
8 

20 

19 

3 

2 
11 

17 

16 

15 
6 

3 


889 
4 
1 

58 
45 

15 

15 

45 
18 

57 

27 
16 

51 
10 

29 
2 
6 


.46 

4 

12 

2 
6 


4 
50 

49 
1 


2,137 

43 
71 

14 

27 
19 
36 
52 

45 
14 

64 
13 

17 

57 


399 

10 
23 

26 
19 
33 
28 
22 
35 

31 

20 

38 
29 

2 
14 

11 


1 


Blow-off Branches .... 
Y Branches 


1 

3 
1 
11 
4 
3 

9 

2 

2 
2 
2 

1 

2 
3 
1 


3 
1 
2 
6 
1 

11 

11 

4 

1 
10 

5 

23 
1 

1 

4 
11 
2 


















7 






• 


Quarter Turns 

Double Hubs 




• 














Blow-offs and Manhole . . 
Manhole Branches .... 

























Lowry Hydrants. — 54 Lowry hydrants, 19 pots, 12 iron 
extensions, 8 screw extensions, 10 chucks, 11 caps, 10 
frames and covers, 3 frames, 8 round covers, 1 sidewalk 
cover, 31 screws, 3 valve-seats, 17 rubber valves, 33 small 
do., 25 lbs. composition castings, 18 wastes. 

Post Hydrants. — 12 Post hydrants, 4 barrels, 7 pots with 
valves connected, 7 common pots, 2 frames and covers, 61 
Post hydrant castings, 75 screws and nuts, 28 wrought- iron 
rods, 1 large nipple, 48 2|-inch nipples, 6Q stuffing-boxes, 
27 valve seats, 46 rubber valves, 120 bottom rubber rings, 



114 City Document No. 57. 

546 lbs. composition castings, 32 iron tops, 147 6|X { bolts, 
14 pots with valve unfinished, 50 wastes. 

Boston Hydrants. — 31 Boston hydrants, 40 extensions, 
25 bends, 44 frames, 131 covers, 11 heavy frames, 3 covers, 
41 wastes, 89 straps, 100 screws, 20 nuts, 7 valve-seats, 40 
nipples, 12 caps. 

For Stopcocks. — 1 4-inch screw for waste weir, 1 do. for 
Brookline reservoir, 2 16-inch check valves, 1 12-inch valve, 
18 8-inch do., 2 3 inch do., 2 2-inch do., 130 8-inch rings, 
64 6-inch do., 4 4-inch do., 19,590 lbs. iron castings for 16- 
inch, 12-inch and 8-inch stopcocks, 25 12-inch unfinished, 
160 lbs. lead washers, 140 lbs. malleable nuts, 1,025 lbs. 
composition castings for 12-inch gates, 8 heavy frames and 
covers, 11 frames, 31 covers, 11 blow-off covers, 6 elevator 
covers, 8 fire-pipe covers, lot of old bolts. 

Meters in Shop. — 4 3-inch, 6 2-inch, 4 1-inch, 56 f-inch. 

Stock for Meters. — 12 2-inch nipples, 21 1-inch do., 2 
2-inch connection pieces, 4 1-inch do., 8 f-inch do., 5 1-inch 
cocks, 17 f-inch do., 1 4-inch clock, 2 3-inch do., 3 2-inch do., 
40 f-inch do., 50 brass spindles, 25 rubber nipples, 6 fish 
boxes, 23 covers, 20 glasses for clocks. 

For Service Pipe. — 20 11-inch union cocks, 40 1-inch do. , 
46|-inchdo., 16|-inchdo., 98 i-inchdo.,3 21-inch air cocks, 
18 1-inch do., 48 l\ X |T cocks, 14 1-inch X f do., 41 § x f 
do., 46 | do., 15 f-inch right angle cocks, 3 f-inch Y cocks, 
36 f-inch thawing cocks, 35 1-inch crooked cocks, 28 f-inch 
do., 27 | -inch do., 10 2-inch couplings, 57 2-inch nuts, 131 
1-inch mate couplings, 21 J-inch do., 59 1-inch tubes and 
nuts, 86 f-inch do., 60f-inch do., 20 |-inch do., 42 f-inch 
thawing couplings, 1,080 boxes, 50 square do., 58 T do., 21 
Y do., 127 extension tubes, 570 tubes, 1,120 caps, 25, 4 X 3 
flanges, 21 1-inch tubes, 20 caps, 9 flanges for 1-inch service 
pipes, 20 3 X 2 reducers, 20 composition hose reducers, 10 
4x2 composition reducers, 24 2 X 1 do., 20 2 X f do., 
35 lbs. composition for f-inch cocks. 

Lead Pipe. — 1,082 lbs. 2-inch lead pipe, 1,354 lbs. 11- 
inch do., 1,170 lbs. 1-inch do., 1,700 lbs. f-inch do., 14,127 
lbs. f-inch do., 1,765 lbs. 1-inch do., 388 lbs. 1-inch tin- 
lined do., 181 lbs. f-inch do., 540 lbs. f-inch do., 58 lbs. 
11- inch waste pipe, 70 lbs. 1-inch do., 345 lbs. block-tin 
thawing pipe, 70 lbs. solder, 1 pig tin. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 2,060 lbs. round iron, 620 lbs. flat 
do., 600 lbs. square do., 1,500 lbs. cast steel, 100 lbs. spring 
steel, 50 lbs. calking steel, 150 lbs. working-pieces, 200 lbs. 
shoe shapes, 50 lbs. horse nails, 150 lbs. shoes, 33 pick 
blanks, 4 tons Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter Shop). — 98 Lowry hydrant boxes, 43 Post do., 



Report of the Water Board. 115 

45 Boston do. 92 Lowry do., unfinished, 24 Post do. un- 
finished, 95 stopcock boxes, 26 do. unfinished, 2 meter 
boxes, 600 lbs. spikes and nails, 75,600 feet 2-inch plank, 
2,500 feet ll-inch spruce batting, 34 feet oak, 1,000 paving- 
blocks, 240 feet spruce joist, 1,800 feet blocking. 

Tools. — 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 8 hand-geared do., 8 sets shears and rigging for 
same, 8 tool-houses, 4 tool-boxes, 7 nozzles. 2 platform 
scales, 1 portable blacksmith shop, 1 portable cover for 
Brewer fountain, 1 hand roller, 2 horse do., tools for laying 
main and Service pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot do., 1 hand 
do., 1 Pratt & Whitney do.. 1 planer, 1 boring mill, 1 chain 
hoisting gear, 1 upright drilling machine, 4 grindstones, 1 
trip-hammer, the necessary tools for carrying on the machine, 
blacksmith, carpenter, and plumbing shops, 1 circular saw, 1 
fan-blower, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 36-inch do., 1 small 
do., 9 wheel-barrows, 3 hand-barrows, 1.600 feet hose, also 
a lot of patterns at foundry where we obtain castings. 

Stable. — 15 horses, 12 wagons, 2 buggies, 6 pungs, 1 
sled, 2 sets runners, 2 carts, 2L sets harness, 25 blankets, 
3 buffalo robes, 2 sleighs, 8 tons hay, 48 bushels grain, 2 
bales straw, 1 jigger, 4 lap ropes, 1 set wagon wheels, 2 
hay-cutters. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder, 
1 16-inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition 
plates, 9 cast-iron plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swiv- 
el-pipe patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composi- 
tion jets for small fountains. 

Miscellaneous. — 279 pigs lead, 10 gallons linseed oil, 5 
gallons asphaltum, 40 tons furnace coal, 39 bags salt, 
1 thawing boiler, 25 gallons spindle-oil, lot gravel, 100 
brick, 50 cords wood, 1 iron fountain-basin, 4 stone 
troughs for drinking-fountains, 1 hose carriage, 26 bales 
gasket, 5 iron lamp-posts, 1 fountain bottom, 2 lawn-cutters, 
1 garden-pump, 6 manhole covers, 2 barrels cement, lot old 
iron. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. R. JONES, 
Superintendent Eastern Division B. W. W. 



116 



CiTr Document No. 57. 



EEPORT OF THE MYSTIC WATER REGISTRAR. 

Office of the Mystic Water Department, 
Boston, Charlestown District, May 1, 1877. 

Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, 

Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with the requirements of section 
thirteenth of the Water Ordinance, I herewith submit the 
Annual Report of the Mystic Water Registrar, for the year 
ending April 30, 1877. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1877 is 17,890 ; distributed as follows : — 

Charlestown District, 5,568. East Boston, 4,419. Chel- 
sea, 3,967. Somerville, 3,420. Everett, 516. 

The total amount of water-rates received from April 30, 
1376, to May 1, 1877, is as follows : — 



Charlestown District 
East Boston (" net ") 
Somerville . 
tChelsea 
Everett 



There has been paid the cities of 

Chelsea, Somerville and town 

of Everett, as per contract, 

the sum of . 
There has been received for 

water used in previous years, 

the sum of . 
Leaving the net receipts for 

water furnished during the 

year, the sum of . 



,360 52 



1,595 64 



265,862 95 



In addition to the above there 






has been received for extra 






work on service-pipes, includ- 






ing materials furnished, the 






sum of .... 


1,434 


40 


Off and on water 


108 


00 


Non-payment fines . 


440 


00 


.Delinquent notice fees 


240 


25 



$115,372 75 

66,934 60 

51,402 48 

49,532 87 

6,576 41 

$289,819 11 



$289,819 11 



2,222 65 



$292,041 76 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



117 



The total amount paid into the 

City Treasury from April 30, 

1876, to May 1, 1877, is . $290,785 07 
The amount of cash on hand, 

collected for extra work on 

service-pipes, including mate- 
rials furnished, and off and on 

water, from August 1, 1876, 

to May 1, 1877, is . . 1,256 69 



,041 76 



The total amount of revenue received for water used 
through meters, from April 30, 1876, to May 1, 1877, is as 
follows : — 



Charlestown District 
East Boston . 
Chelsea 
Somerville . 
Everett 



$41,610 11 

16,433 21 

. 5,660 86 

4,442 46 

876 69 

$69,023 33 



The number of places where the water has been cut off 
for non-payment of rates during the year is 394; of which 



164 have again been let on. 



The expense of the office, including all charges for collec- 
tions in Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett, and exclusive of 
$2,500 per annum allowed the City of Boston for collec- 
tions, etc., in East Boston, was $2,288.85 ; viz. : clerk-hire, 
$1,700; printing, advertising, and stationery, $588.85. 



Statement showing the Number of Dwelling-Houses, Families, Stores, etc., 
supplied with Mystic-pond Water. 





do 

1'S 

p o 

OH 


1 1 

C3 
ft 


-a 

c . 

e8 m 
m a 

<D O ' 

s-< o 

mm 


- - 
S3 


a 
OHO 


0) 

o 

3 
o 


0> 

1 

m 


.So 

Ph02 


c 


III 

1.1 
III 


Charlestown 
District . . . 

East Boston . . 

Chelsea .... 

Somerville . . . 

Everett .... 


4,653 
3,497 
3,366 
3,091 

461 


7,844 
5,800 
4,623 
4,274 
552 


417 
292 
232 
114 

7 


75 
43 
53 
22 
5 


61 
23 
42 
27 
3 


10 
10 

8 
10 

1 


317 
172 
277 
486 
97 


113 

50 

67 

79 

8 


190 
283 
136 
246 
67 


20 
16 
11 
14 
3 


Total .... 


15,068 


23,093 


1,062 


198 


156 


39 


1,349 


317 


922 


64 



118 



City Document No. 57. 






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Report or the Water Board. 



119 



Statement showing the Number and Size of Meters. 











3ize or 


Meters. 








Where Applied. 




















| inch. 


| inch. 


linch. 


l^inch. 


2 inch. 


3 inch. 


4 inch. 


Total. 


Charlestown District 


2S 


. . . 


20 


3 


15 


1 


4 


71 


East Boston .... 


23 




23 




4 


2 


. . . 


52 




14 


1 


10 


1 


4 


1 


. . . 


31 




8 




7 


2 


3 




1 


21 






1 


1 


1 


2 






5 










73 


2 


61 


7 


28 


4 


5 


180 



Drinking Fountains. 

The whole number in use in this department is 21, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 

Charlestown District. — City square, corner Park street ; 
Chelsea street, corner Wapping street ; Bunker Hill street, 
corner Tufts street ; Canal street, corner South Eden street ; 
Main street, corner Hancock square ; Main street, near Tufts 
wharf; Austin street, opposite Front street. 

Chelsea. — Broadway square; Broadway, near bridge; 
Winnisimmett street, near the ferry ; Pearl street, corner 
Marginal street ; Bellingham square. 

East Boston. — Maverick square ; Central square ; Ben- 
nington street, junction Chelsea street. 

Somerville. — Union square (2) ; Broadway, corner Wal- 
nut street ; Highland avenue, corner Walnut street ; Medford 
street, corner Central street. 

Everett. — Main street, near Broadway. 

One of the fountains in Union square, and the one at the 
corner of Highland avenue and Walnut street, Somerville, 
have automatic fixtures, regulating the water supply. The 
others are so arranged that the water flows continuously. 



Statement showing the amount of water-rates received 
since the introduction of Mystic-pond water, November 29, 

1864: — 



120 



City Document No. 57. 



Cbarlestown District, 



East Boston, net 



Chelsea, net 



Sonierville, net 



Everett 



net 



, 1865 


. $27,079 


10 




1866 


47,323 


16 




1867 


60,188 


83 




1868 


68,815 


32 




1869 


74,369 


81 




1870 


82,230 


79 




1871 


. . . 84,318 


71 




1872 


98,445 


91 




1873 


99,470 


66 




1874 


. 111,420 30 




1875 


. 118,568 


00 




1876 


• . . 116,261 


86 




May 1, 1877 


76,201 


40 


$1,064,693 85 








1870 


39,870 22 




1871 


45,022 


98 




1872 


49,574 


38 




1873 


53,488 


41 




1874 


53,654 


08 




1875, 10 i 


aios. . 49,153 


73 




1876 


50,228 


04 




May 1, 1877 


37,280 


85 


378,272 69 








1868, 6 m 


os. . . 3,087 


88 




1868-69 


16,615 


92 




1869-70 


22,179 


41 




1870-71 


25,871 


17 




1871-72 


31,535 


62 




1872-73 


34,067 


65 




1873-74 


. 36,118 


61 




1874-75 


39,886 


61 




1875-76 


40,060 


54 




May 1, 1877 


37,294 47 









— 


286,717 88 


1869 


5,586 


73 




1870 


11,511 


40 




1871 


17,023 74 




1872 


21,220 


11 




1873 


25,698 


11 




1874 


30,494 


48 




1875 


38,038 


70 




1876 


39,320 


47 




May 1, 1877 


34,587 


29 


223,181 03 








1872-73 


3,062 


83 




1873-74 


. ' 3,710 


96 




1874-75 


3,975 


95 




1875-76 


4,982 52 




May 1, 1877 


5,344 


84 


21,077 10 




I, . . . . 




amount to May 


$1,973,942 55 



Respectfully, 

JOSEPH H. CALDWELL, 

Mystic Water Registrar. 



Repoet of the Water Boaed. 121 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC WATER WORKS. 

Chaelestown District, Boston, May, 1877. 
Hon. T. T. Sawyee, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sie, — My report for the year ending May 1st, 1877, as 
Superintendent of the Mystic Water Works, is respectfully 
submitted. 

The works as a whole are in very good condition. The 
supply of water has been ample, but the consumption has 
largely exceeded that of any previous year. The consump- 
tion of water during the cold weather has largely increased 
since the winter of 1874-5, when so much trouble was ex- 
perienced with frozen pipes, and indicates that the practice 
of runuing water in cold weather, to prevent the service- 
pipes from freezing up, has become very general. 

Lake. 

The lake" and its borders have been carefully looked after 
and protected during the year. About 275 feet of rip-rap 
has been laid on the westerly side. 

The old driveway from Mystic street to the dam has been 
discontinued, and a new one laid out, of aii easier grade, the 
entrance being some 300 feet northerly from the old one. A 
footpath has, however, been retained on the line of the old 
driveway. 

The fence on the line of Mr. Huffmaster's land has been 
completed. The railing to the bridge across the over-fall to 
the dam has been repainted, and a new flooring is now being 
laid. The outside wood-work and roofing of the gate-house 
will need repainting the present season. The larger part of the 
temporary pump erected during the winter of 1875 has been 
removed from the lake to the shore, and I should recommend 
that the iron-work be sold for what it will bring, as it will 
not probably be of any further use to the department. 

Conduit. 

The conduit has not been drawn off the past year for 
examination ; but, from the fact that no perceptible change 
has taken place in it for a number of years, and the very 



122 City Document No. 57. 

good condition it was in when last examined (in 1875), I 
have no doubt that it is in good order now. An entire new 
set of screens has been put in the pipe-chamber the past 
year. The bridge across Mystic river directly over the 36- 
inch iron mains has been very thoroughly repaired, and will 
no doubt last for a number of years. The wall on the 
southerly side of the bridge has been entirely rebuilt and 
extended, to correspond with that on the other side, rebuilt 
last year. It has been well backed with stone ballast, and 
the whole makes a permanent and durable piece of work. 



Pumping-Station. 

The engine-house has been thoroughly renovated and re- 
paired during the year. All the outside wood-work and the 
roofing have been repainted, and the granite steps in front 
of the large doors have been entirely reset, on a new founda- 
tion. Inside, the walls and ceiling of the engine-room have 
been repainted, and the hard-wood finish refilled and var- 
nished. The boiler-room and cellar have also been renovated, 
and two new basement windows put in, in the rear of En- 
gines No. 1 and 2. The whole expense of these repairs was 
$756.70. 

The repairs on the coal-shed, which were in progress at 
the time of making the last 'annual report, have been com- 
pleted, at an expense of $1,574.54. The alterations have 
made a great improvement, in an enlarged capacity and a 
more convenient way of receiving the coal. 

The dwelling-houses were repaired inside in September, 
being painted, papered and whitened, at an expense of 
$100.16. 

They were further improved and altered in January, by 
the addition of an ell to the rear of each house, in each of 
which is a kitchen, bath-room, store-closet and water-closet, 
which adds much to the convenience and comfort of the 
houses. The whole expense was $1,048.78. The main part 
of the houses needs thorough repairs outside at" once. 

The new stable, which was contracted for in October, was 
completed and occupied about the last of January. It is 
conveniently situated above the dwelling-houses, on the 
south-easterly side of the grounds, near the driveway to the 
reservoir. It is 32 by 36 feet outside, two stories in height, 
and has ample carriage-room, with stalls for five horses on 
the first floor. The second story will be used entirely for a 
hay- loft. The whole cost of the building was $1,766.92. 



Keport of the Water Board. 123 

The grounds, which were ploughed up last fall, are being 
gradually brought into shape. The land on the westerly 
side of the engine-house has been sown with grass-seed, and 
a part of that on the easterly side. The whole will be com- 
pleted in a short time, and it will greatly improve the 
appearance of the whole place, besides ensuring a good crop 
of hay. The land directly around the new stable is being 
gradually graded with ashes and other material, and, when 
completed, will be in keeping with the rest of the grounds. 
A line of 6-inch cement pipe, 287 feet in length, has been 
recently laid and connected with the " force main," on which 
are located three Post hydrants, one near the engine-house 
and two directly in front and between the new stable and 
dwelling-houses. These will ensure a good supply of water 
in case of fire in either building. To make the arrangement 
complete, there should be 300 to 500 feet of hose supplied, 
with suitable equipments, so as to be easily available in an 
emergency, as our buildings are located a considerable dis- 
tance from any fire-apparatus. The new concrete sidewalks 
around the engine-house, laid in November last, made a very 
desirable and durable improvement, and I would recommend 
that the sidewalk from the engine-house to the dwelling- 
houses, and also the new stable, be covered with the same 
material, as the walks are used very much in passing to and 
fro ; and, as it is now, it requires constant repairs, and is 
liable to be washed out more or less every heavy rain, 
especially in the spring of the year. 

The pumps are in good order, with the exception of No. 2, 
which is now dismantled to receive the new steam pistons 
ordered by the Board in April last, which are being made 
by the builder of the engine, Mr. Worthington, to replace 
the " Wheelock pistons and packing," which were put in in 
1874, and which, for an engine of this kind, have proved a 
failure. These repairs will be completed the last of May, 
or early in June. The water-cylinders to all the pumps, 
and all the connections that required it, were repainted and 
varnished, at an expense of $207.50. With these exceptions 
the pumps have required only ordinary repairs. 

A new line of brass " feed-pipe " to the boilers has been 
substituted for the old iron pipe, which had becomje badly 
corroded and filled up. The boilers are in good order, and 
have received careful attention during the year. 

The coal account for the year is as follows : — 



124 City Document No. 57. 

Amount on hand May 1, 1876 . '. 190,454 tons. 

Received on special orders to Sept. 26 . 1,319,063 " 

Received by contract to May 1, 1877 . 2,872,812 " 



Total . . . . . 4,382,329 " 

Consumed from May 1, 1876, to May 1, 

1877 3,631,498 " 



On hand May 1, 1877 .... 750,831 " 

Force Main. 

The leak on the branch running from Engine No. 1, which 
broke out in October, was caused, no doubt, by the gradual 
settling of the "check-valve" located just above, which 
cracked the pipe close to the flange-joint. The pipe was 
prompt^ and thoroughly repaired, and caused no delay in 
pumping. With this exception, there was no work required 
on this main, and it is no doubt in good order. 



Reservoir. . 

The reservoir and the grounds connected with it have 
received the* usual care and attention, and are in good order. 
The concrete covering to the walk around the top of the 
embankment, which was laid in November, is the right thing 
in the right place, and has made a most decided improve- 
ment. It not only protects the top of the embankment, 
especially in winter, but makes the whole place look neat, 
clean, and attractive. 

I would respectfully suggest to the Board that the gate- 
house at the reservoir be finished inside. It was well 
enough at first, when the whole place was fenced in and no 
one allowed there, but it is not in keeping with its surround- 
ings, now that the place has been so much improved outside, 
and made attractive as a place of resort. The bank steps 
have all been renewed except the large flight at the front 
entrance, which have been repaired so as to answer for 
another year, when it may be well to substitute granite for 
wood. • 

Supply Mains. 

The supply mains are in good order. Two joint leaks 
have been repaired on the 30-inch, and one on the 24-inch 
main. 

That part of the bridge over the Boston & Maine and 



Report of the Water Board. 125 

Eastern "Railroads which supports the 24-inch main will need 
thorough repairs the present season. 

Distributing Mains. 

There have been laid in this district the past year 306 feet 
of cast-iron pipe, which was in extension. There have been 
12,254 feet of the original wrought-iron and cement pipe 
taken up and replaced with cast-iron pipe, only about 500 
feet of which was fit for further use. Of the amount that 
was taken out, 8,259 feet was replaced with pipe of a larger 
size, and the balance with pipe of the same size. 

There have been 64 " breaks " on the wrought-iron and 
cement pipes during the year. 

Service-Pipes. 

Sixty-six new service-pipes have been entered during the 
year. Twenty-six old tin-lined pipes, and one rubber pipe 
have been replaced with lead pipe. 

Twelve service-pipes were frozen up in the streets during 
the cold weather. 

In Chelsea the main pipes have been extended 504 feet, 
making the total length 148,179 feet. 104 new service-pipes 
have been entered during the year. 

In Somerville the main pipes have been extended 6,794 
feet, making the total length 231,697 feet. 137 new service- 
pipes have been entered during the year. 

In Everett the main pipes have been extended 1,700 feet, 
making the total length 73,949 feet. 29 new service-pipes 
have been entered during the year. 

There have been 9 new gates set, making the whole num- 
ber May 1, 1877, 1,007. 

Four additional Lowry hydrants have been located, and 
one Post hydrant discontinued, making the whole number of 
hydrants in this district May 1, 1877, 189. 

The following tables give the amount of pipe laid, the 
number of gates and hydrants, and the amount of stock on 
hand May 1, 1877. , 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

' CHARLES H. BIGELOW, 

Superintendent. 



126 



City Document No. 57. 



Service-Pipe Laid in Charlestown in 1876-7. 



Size. 


5 inch. 


| inch. 


% inch. 


1 inch. 


Total No. 


Total feet. 


Iron — Cement Lined . . 


23 
23 


35 
35 


r 

3 
4 


1 
1 


66 
61 
5 


2,023 

1,487 

536 



Extension of Distribution Pipe in Charlestown in 1876-7. 





Sizes or Pipes. 


Kind of 
Pipe. 


Total feet. 




6 inch. 


4 inch. 


3 inch. 


Winchester "1 
"Williams J 

Linwood Place 




54 feet. 

48 " 
48 " 
48 " 


108 feet. 


Iron. 


162 

48 

48 
48 




287 feet. 


198 feet. 


108 feet. 


Cement. 


306 


Engine House Grounds in 'j 


287 




287 feet. 


198 feet. 


108 feet. 




593 



Report of the Water Board. 



127 



Distribution Pipes Eelaid in Charlcstown in 1876-7. 



Streets. 



Chapman 

Cambridge . . . . 

Front 

"Water 

Tremont 

Wapping 

Corey 

Common . . . . . 

Joiner 

Adams 

Green 

Warren 

Brighton 

Sullivan 

Monument Avenue 

Cottage 

Cedar , 

Hancock .... 

Hudson 

Hittenger's Wharf 
Harvard Square . 
Avon Place . . . 
Quincy 

Totals . . . 



8 inch. 



Size or Pipe Laid. 



Feet. 



Feet. 



852 
1,512 

1,056 
1,367 



Feet. 



12 
60 
18 
481 
744 
516 
207 
48 
916 
240 
600 



4 in. 



6 
210 



54 
192 



210 
636 



2,403 



3 in. 



Iron. 



Cement. 



Iron. 
Cement. 



128 



City Document No. 57. 



Charlestown. 



Chelsea. 



fRelaid 3,996 feet, 

Relaid and enlarged . . . 8,259 " 

Extension 306 feet. 

Laid previous 152,270 " 



Aggregate 152,576 " or 28 miles 4,736 feet 

fRelaid- 134 feet. 

Extension ' . . . 504 feet. 

■{ Laid previous 147,675 " 

\ 



Aggregate 148,179 " or 28 miles 339 feet. 



SOMERVILLE. 



Extension 6,794 feet. 

Laid previous 224,903 " 



I 



Aggregate 231,697 " or 43 miles 4,657 feet. 



Everett. 



f Extension . 1,710 feet. 

Laid previous 72,449 " 

Aggregate 74,159 " or 14 miles 239 feet. 



Engine House 
Grounds, Medford. 



287 feet. 



Total amount of distribution pipe May 1st, 1877, 114 miles 4,978 feet. 



Eepoet or the Water Board. 



129 



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130 City Document No. 57. 



STOCK ON HAND, MAY 1, 1877. 

Iron Pipe. — 36 feet, 3 lengths, 20-inch; 191 feet, 16 
lengths, 16-inch; 210 feet, 171 lengths, 12-inch; 1,020 feet, 
85 lengths, 10-inch; 552 feet, 45 lengths, 8-inch; 180 feet, 
15 lengths, 6-inch; 492 feet, 41 lengths, 4-inch; 120 feet, 
10 lengths, 3-inch. Quarter bends — 1 16-inch, 3 12-inch, 
3 10-inch, 2 6-inch, 3 5-inch. Reducers — 4 8x2 inch, 4 
6X4 inch. Crosses — 28x4 inch, 14X3 inch. 

Iron Brandies. —2 T's, 16X16 inch; 1 do., 16X8 
inch; 2 do., 16x6 inch; 3 do., 12X8 inch; 4 do., 
12X6 inch; 3 do., 12X4 inch; 1 do., 10x8 inch; 
2 do., 10X6 inch; 3 do., 10x4 inch ; . 3 do., 8x8 
inch ; 4 do., 8X4 inch ; 2 do., 6 X Q inch ; 6 do., 6X4 
inch ; 3 spicket, 6 X Q inch ; 4 do., 4X4 inch ; 4 do., 4X3 
inch. 

Iron Sleeves. — 1 whole sleeve, 30-inch; 5 clamp do., 30- 
inch; 5 whole do., 24-inch; 2 whole do., 20-inch; 6 clamp 
do., 20-inch; 5 clamp do., 16-inch; 9 whole do., 16-inch; 
7 whole do., 12-inch; 2 whole do., 10-inch; 7 whole do., 
8-inch; 14 whole heavy do., 6-inch; 6 whole light do., 6- 
inch; 10 whole light do., 4-inch; 11 whole heavy do., 4- 
inch ; 65 whole light do., 3-inch. 

Cement Pipe. — 18 feet, 2 lengths, 30-inch; 36 feet, 4 
lengths, 20-inch; 27 feet, 3 lengths, 16-inch; 175 feet, 25 
lengths, 8-inch ; 630 feet, 90 lengths, 6-inch ; 518 feet, 74 
lengths, 4-inch; 119 feet, 17 lengths, 3-inch ; L 40 feet, 20 
lengths, 2-inch. Reducers — 3 8 to 6-inch, 2 8 to 4-inch, 2 
6 to 4 inch, 1 6 to 3 inch, 1 6 to 2-inch. Branches — 1 
G X Q inches, 13X3 inches. 26 feet wrought-iron, cement- 
lined, 1-inch ; 224 do., do., -|-inch. 

Gates and Frames and Hydrants and Frames. — 1 gate, 
20-inch; 1 do., 16-inch; 1 do., 10-inch; 1 do., 8-inch; 5 
do., 4-inch; 3 special frames and covers, 570 lbs. ; 10 com- 
mon do., 1,760 lbs.; 4 common covers, 304 lbs. ; 20 2- 
inch frames and covers, 1,120 lbs. ; 3 2-inch do., 72 lbs. ; 
2 gate-boxes; 2 Post hydrants, 4-inch; 1 do., 6-inch; 1 
do., 3-inch; 6 rubber washers; 12 rubber valves; 6 top- 
nuts ; 5 large nozzle-caps ; 16 iron valve-plates ; 7 Lowry 
hydrant barrels with valves; 5 do., less valves; 1 Lowry 
hydrant pot, 4-way, 8-inch; 1 do., 3-way, 8-inch; 1 do., 
2-way, 8-inch ; 1 do., 3-way, 8X6 inch ; 3 Lowry hydrant 
pots, 4-way, 6-inch; 1 LoWry hydrant pot, 3-way, 6-inch; 
1 do., 2-way, 6-inch; 4 Lowry hydrant pots, 3-way, 6X4 



Keport of the Water Board. 131 

inch ; 1 Lowry hydrant pot, 3-way, 4-inch ; 13 round covers, 
1,250 lbs. ; 9 frames, 900 lbs. ; 9 tops,!, 170 lbs. ; 10 waste- 
cocks ; 15 rubber washers ; 5 rubber valves ; 42 bolts and 
nuts ; 2 flush hydrants. 

Service Department. 

240 lbs. lead pipe, 2i-inch ; 360 lbs. do., 2-inch ; 258 lbs. 
do., 1 1-inch ; 1,497 lbs. do., 1-inch; 1,057 lbs. do., f-inch ; 
333 lbs. do., |-inch ; 1,464 lbs. do., 1-inch; 200 lbs. do., 
second-hand; 64 corporations, 1-iuch ; 80 do., |-inch ; 8 
do., 2-way, |-inch ; 6 do., f-inch ; 26 do., 1-inch; 20 stops, 
|-inch; 22 do., -jj-inch ; 27 do., f-inch ; 12 do., 1-inch ; 5 
compression stops, |-inch ; 55 lbs. pig tin ; 34 lbs. plumber's 
solder; 80 lbs. strap solder ; 100 service covers, 450 lbs. ; 
4 4-feet service boxes ; 6 patent do. ; 8 2 -inch soldering 
nipples ; 4 1^-inch do. ; 3 1^-inch do. ; 10 1-inch do. ; 24 f- 
inch do. ; 14 |-inch do. 

Fittings. — 25 2-inch iron tees ; 6 ll-inch do. ; 50 1-inch 
do. ; 31 f-inch do. ; 6 2-inch iron couplings ; 88 1^-inch 
do. ; 25 1-inch do. ; 46 1-inch iron elbows ; 10 2-inch do. ; 
9 2-inch iron unions; 20 1| to f-inch iron reducers ; 6 2- 
inch iron plugs ; 6 1^-inch do. ; 6 1-inch do. ; 6 f-inch do. ; 
6 l-inch do. ; 6 2-inch iron bushings; 6 l^-inch do. ; 6 1- 
inch do. ; 6 f-inch do. ; 6 1-inch do. ; 4 2-inch composition 
valves ; 6 f-inch composition caps ; 6 Jj-inch do. 

Meters. 

6 2-inch Worthington meters ; 1 1-inch do. ; 2 |-inch do. ; 
1 11-inch Worcester meter ; 1 f-inch do. ; 1 |-inch do. ; 9 
meter frames and covers, 828 lbs. ; 6 meter covers, 252 lbs. ; 
40 lbs. bolts and nuts ; 1 meter-box ; 300 lbs. old composi- 
tion ; 25 baskets charcoal. 



Sundries. 

800 feet 2-inch pine plank ; 100 feet 1-inch pine boards ; 
150 feet |-inch pine boards, planed; 4 casks cement; 2 
casks Portland cement ; 80 tons gravel ; 3 tons sand ; 100 
brick ; 12 feet wood ; 1 barrel rosin ; 30 yards cotton cloth ; 
20 yards enamelled cloth; 1\ coils jute packing; 1 coil 3- 
strand rope ; \ coil 2-strand rope ; 3 bushels salt ; | box 
14 X 20 tin plate ; 5 lbs. No. 8 iron wire ; 43 lbs. nuts and 
washers; 70 lbs. galvanized sheet iron; 12 lbs. sheet 
zinc ; 4 iron rivets ; 2 lbs. emery ; 2 kegs lOd. nails ; 1 keg 



132 City Document No. 57. 

30d. do. ; 1J kegs 40d. do. ; 1 keg 50d. do. ; 6 lbs. finish- 
ing do. 

Paints and Oils. 

30 gall, coal tar; 30 gall, naphtha; 15 gall, black 
oil; 36 gall, boiled oil; 1 gall, raw do.; 25 lbs. English 
red; 15 lbs. Brandon red; 50 lbs. white lead; 75 lbs. red 
lead; 40 lbs. mixed paint; | gall, shellac. 



Fixtures. 

2 150-gallon tanks; 2 spring water-gauges; 1 mercury- 
water-gauge ; 200 feet lead pipe ; 2 working-benches ; 2 iron 
sinks ; 2 shop stoves ; 2 desks ; 3 office chairs ; 1 office 
stool ; gas fixtures ; 1 platform scales ; 1 30-foot ladder ; 1 
14-foot ladder. 

Tools, etc. 

125 feet l-inch rubber hose ; 50 feet 1-inch do. ; 150 feet 
2-inch canvas hose ; 3 hydrant chucks ; 1 1 street lanterns ; 
3 hand do. ; 13 working-pumps ; 10 street horses ; 4 car- 
penters' do. ; 2 vises ; 1 pipe vise ; 1 bench shears ; 1 
ratchet drill ; 5 sledges ; 6 ladles ; 8 monkey wrenches ; 1 
hatchet ; 2 carpenters' planes ; 5 hand hammers ; 5 cutting 
chisels ; 4 trowels ; 5 hand-saws ; 2 augers ; 10 yarn-irons ; 
23 sets ; 5 paving hammers ; 1 square ; 3 axes ; 3 plumbers' 
furnaces ; 6 plumbers' force-pumps ; 6 plumbers' irons ; 5 
soldering irons ; 5 soldering pots ; 6 cold chisels ; 2 wood 
do.; 4 carpenters' do.; 1 rivet set; 1 spirit level ;,1 oil- 
stone ; 1 emery wheel ; 1 set common drills ; 2 drill-stocks ; 
1 copper pump ; 1 iron force-pump ; 7 diamond points ; 2 
dividers ; 50 feet |-inch tin tube ; 7 bits, assorted sizes ; 1 
belt punch ; 1 2 water-pails ; 1 set taps and drills for iron 
pipe ; 1 machine drill ; 1 set drills for cement pipe ; 3 screw- 
drivers ; 1 chain-tongs; 7 frost wedges; 3 cutting knives ; 
8 pairs rubber mitts; 2 palette knives ; 3 pipe cutters ; 12 
pipe-tongs ; 1 dig and plates ; 2 hand-shears ; 20 working 
wrenches, assorted; 50 feet 3-inch Manilla rope; 11 service 
wrenches ; 9 gate do. ; 2 valve do. ; 3 hydrant do. ; 3 lead 
pots ; 4 drilling crabs and chains; 2 chain 'slings ; 1 Lowry 
hydrant sling ; 1 grindstone ; 5 R. P. S. H. shovels ; 34 R, 
P. L. H. do ; 5 square do. ; 25 picks ; 14 rammers ; 4 coal- 
scoops ; 1 tool-chest ; 3 cement boxes ; 2 lead furnaces ; 3 
heavy hammers ; 1 wood saw ; 1 lining machine and bench ; 
1 lining machine for cement pipe ; 3 derricks ; 3 sets blocks 
and falls ; 2 iron grapples. 



Keport of the Water Board. 133 



Stable Department. 

3 horses ; 2 wagons ; 2 pimgs ; 1 sleigh ; 1 light wagon ; 
1 buggy : 2 light harnesses ; 3 working do. ; 1 wagon cover ; 
3 blankets ; 1 hay cutter; 1 feed. trough ; 2 pails ; 1 hoe ; 2 
forks ; 9 cwt. hay ; 1 bushel cracked corn ; 2 bushels oats. 



Engine-house Department. 

Stock on Hand at Yard. — 36 feet iron pipe, 36-inch; 
108 feet do., 30-inch; 248 feet do., 24-inch; 75 feet steam 
pipe; 2 iron sleeves, 36-inch; 3 do., 30-inch; 1 do., 24- 
inch; 3 iron clamps, 30-inch; 2 do., 24-inch; 1 cement 
pipe, 30-inch; 1 flange-pipe head, 30-inch. 

Tools and Fixtures at Gate-house. — 3 sets blocks and 
falls ; 2 pumps ; 2 pairs screen-hooks ; 2 wrenches ; 2 hoes ; 
2 iron rakes ; 2 ice-chisels ; 3 lanterns ; 1 boat ; 2 boat- 
hooks ; 3 wheelbarrows ; 5 ladders ; 2 chain and hooks ; 3 
nets ; 3 stoves ; 1 large gear-wheel, pinion and shaft ; 1 lot 
round iron ; 1 lot bolts ; \ barrel neat's foot oil. 

Stable. — 2 horses ; 2 carts ; 2 cart harnesses ; 3 blankets ; 
1 scythe ; 1 hammer ; 1 saw ; 1 sledge ; 1 lantern ; 1 wrench ; 
1 pung ; 2 shovels ; 5 picks ; 2 spades ; 4 bog- hooks ; 2 
iron bars; 12 feet iron pipe; 1 pail; 1 plough; 1 harrow; 
4 plough chains ; 2 plough whiffle-trees ; 50 feet rubber hose ; 
1 barrel cement ; 500 lbs. hay; 6 bushels oats; 1 platform 
scales. 

Pumping Service. 

Stock on Hand. — 22 5-inch rubber air-pump valves ; 11 
air-pump springs ; 6 9-inch water-pump valves ; 3 10-inch 
do.; 2 spare valve-seats, Engine No, 3; 2 6-inch globe 
valves ; 2 T valves ; 1 6-inch expansion joint ; 600 fire- 
brick ; 4 Worthington grate bars ; 3 boiler tubes ; 1 6-inch 
copper pipe, 8 feet long; 106 lbs. broken valve springs ; 54 
lbs. pieces brass pipe; 173 lbs. springs; 78 lbs. iron pipe 
fittings ; 30 lbs. old cups and cocks ; 22 feet 2|-inch iron 
pipe ; 2 oil-cups \ 64 cast-iron valve covers ; 3 steam-pipe 
flanges ; 11 lbs. Babbitt's metal ; 230 lbs. window weights ; 
24 lbs. rubber cloth, \\ 11 lbs. do., ^ ; 33 lbs. hemp 
packing; 87 lbs. f-inch bolts; 10 pipe-plugs, from \ to 2 
inches ; 136 feet |-inch round iron ; 35 feet l|-inch do. ; 20 
bars soap ; \ barrel soft soap ; 3 galls, asphaltum paint ; 45 
lbs. red lead; 7 lbs. white do. ; 18 galls, kerosene oil; 15 
galls, sperm do. ; 13 galls, petroleum do. ; 13 neat's foot 



134 City Document No. 57. 

do. ; 1 gall, cylinder do. ; 2 barrels kaolin ; 140 lbs. mop 
waste ; ^ bale cotton do. 

Tools, Fixtures, etc. — 1 table ; 2 clocks ; 2 desks ; 4 
chairs ; 1 brace-drill ; 3 lengths 21-inch hose ; 100 feet f- 
do. ; 5 screw-drivers ; 2 ladders ; 1 standard 24-inch gauge ; 

2 water-coolers ; 8 wrenches ; 27 socket do. ; 8 box do. ; 9 
S do. ; 3 screw do. ; 1 anvil ; 1 forge ; 2 bellows ; 2 vises ; 

3 iron bars ; 1 brass lantern ; 1 brass tray and fillers ; 12 
cold chisels ; 2 sets fire-irons ; 3 shovels ; 2 coal cars ; 4 oil 
and 1 waste cans ; 2 jack-screws ; 2 platform scales ; 2 sets 
taps and dies ; 2 sets pipe-tongs ; 2 pipe-cutters ; 2 ratchets ; 
2 brace and drills ; 1 set stencils ; 2 blocks and falls ; 13 
kerosine lamps ; 1 tallow press ; 1 steam-kettle ; 2 wheel- 
barrows ; 3 derricks ; 2 valve-reamers ; 25 draw-bolts ; 10 
eye-bolts. 



Beport of the Water Board. 135 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1877. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. , 

N. Hknky Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. 
From February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From November 25, 1872, to 
present time. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
conduit, from May 10, 1873, to present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whit- 
well, and J. Avery Richards, were elected a Water Board, subject 
to the direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by 
an ordinance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in 
force one year ; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

Cochituate Water Board. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned 

April 7, 1856J Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned 

June 5, 1860^ . • Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired 
April 3, 1865 Five years. 



136 



City Document No. 57. 



Otis ISTorcross, elected in 1865, and resigned Jan- 
nary 15, 1867 One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired 

April 6, 1868 One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and 
resigned January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected from January 4, 1871, 

to May 4, 1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874$ One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned 
May 31, 1875 ■ . . ■ . . Six months. 

L, Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 
31, 1876 One year. 



62, 63 and 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 55$ 

John H. Welkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 and 59$ 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 

James W. Seaver, 1851J . 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851$ 

John T. Heard, 1851 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, 55$ 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853 . 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852 J .... 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55$ . 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56 and 57$ 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59f 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58$ . 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59 . 

Joseph Smith, 1856 .... 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 

64 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61$ 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ . 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 

Clement Willis, 1860 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ . 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63$ 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 

John F. Pray, 1862 . 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 . 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66 

Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66 and 67 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68 

William S. Hills, 1867 

Charles R. Train, 1868 

Joseph M. Wigutman, 1868 and 69 

Benjamin James, *1858, 68 and 69 

Francis A. Osuorn, 1869 . 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ . 

John O. Poor, 1870 . 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 



Five years. 
Eight yeai'S. 
Five years. 
Four years. 
One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Six years. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Two months. 

Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 
One year. 
Six years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three yeai'S. 
One year. 
One year. 
Two years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



137 



67, 68, 69 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 

70 and 71 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70 and 71 . 
Sidney Squires, 1871 .... 
Charles H. Heesey, 1872 . 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71 and 72 
Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 

and 72 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73 and 74 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73 and 74$ 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74 and 75* 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871. 72 and 75 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74 and 75 

Chaules J. Prkscott, 1875 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75 and 76f 

Leonakd R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75 and 76f 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 

and 76f 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 76f 
Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876-f- 
Nahum M. Morrison, l876f 
Augustus Parker, 1876f . 



75 



Nine years. 
Four years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Four years. 

Seven years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
Five years. 
Six years. 

Ten years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



*Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President; and 
July 2, Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the city. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15 to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

■f Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

^ Deceased. 



138 City Document No. 57. 



Boston Water Board, Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, Chairman until the first Monday of May, 1879. 
Leonard R. Cutter, until the first Monday of May, i878. 
Albert Stan wood, until the first Monday of May, 1877. 



Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 
Ezekiel B. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division of Cochituate Department. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic Department. 
Charles H. Bigelow. 

Water Registrar of the Cochituate Department. 
William F. Davis. 

Water Registrar and Clerk of the Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 



Engineer. 
Joseph P. Davis. 



Resident Engineer on Additional Supply. 
A. Fteley. 



SHELF N< 


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