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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."




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[DocuMBi^T 62—1878.] 



/ 1 







BOSTON. 



^^^^4 SECOND ANNUAL EEPOET 
'/' 

OF THE 

BOSTON WATER BOARD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1878. 



OrFICE OF THE BoSTON WaTER BoAED, 

May 1, 1878. 
To the City Council of the City of Boston: — 

The Boston Water Board respectfully submit their second 
annual report, and transmit to the City Council reports 
from the City Engineer and the Water Registrar, as re- 
quired by the ordinance establishing the Board. They also 
present reports from the Clerk of the Board, from the Clerk 
and Registrar of the Mystic Department, from the Super- 
intendents of the Eastern and Western Divisions of the 
Cochituate, and the Superintendent of the Mystic Water 
Works. 

The greater part of the time of the Board during the 3'^ear 
has been taken up with the consideration and settlement of 
claims for property taken under the act authorizing the city 
to obtain an additional supply of pure water, and in carrying 
out the orders of the City Council for the construction of 
the works authorized by said act. 

The building of the Mystic- Valley Sewer, with the nego- 
tiations necessary to determine its line, and the settlement 
of damages, has also taken much time, and this, with the 
ordinary care of the Cochituate and Mystic Works, has left 
but small opportunity for the study and consideration of 
changes which, in theit first annual report, the Board ex- 
pressed an opinion were desirable and needful in the Water 



2 City Document No. 62. 

Department ; nevertheless, some progress has been made in 
this direction, and the work of reorganization is kept con- 
stantly in mind, and will gradually be accomplished. 

No changes have been made during the year in the prices 
and rents for the use of water. A good deal of information 
bearing upon the subject has been obtained, and how to 
equalize and modify the present regulations is the study of 
the Board. The matter is beset with difficulties which can- 
not easily be overcome ; but when the new works are com- 
plete and a full supply of water made unquestionable, an 
improved tariff of water-rates will at least be possible. 

The Board have not felt warranted in making a further re- 
duction in the price for water supplied by meter, until the 
effect of the reduced valuation of real estate, and the gen- 
eral depression in business, upon the income from the sales 
of water could be ascertained. 

CocHiTUATE Department. 

The general condition of this department continues to be 
satisfactory. The City Council is referred to accompanying 
reports for particular information in regard to it. 

Among the improvements which have been made during 
the 3^ear are, the purchase of a new pumping-engine of 
3,000,000 gallons per day capacity, for the Elmwood-street 
station ; the laying of a line of 3,514 feet of 48-inch cast-iron 
pipe around the Chestnut-Hill reservoir, between the ter- 
minal chamber of the Sudbury-river conduit and the 48-inch 
outlet pipe of said reservoir, in order to give a direct supply 
from Sudbury river to the city in case of need ; the erection 
of several miles of new fence around the grounds connected 
with the Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs, and the 
building of a very substantial wall along the whole front of 
South street, in the Brighton District, which has been wi- 
dened. A good deal of work has also been done in grading 
and improving the grounds, and planting ornamental trees 
on the city's land at Chestnut Hill. 

A contract for the new pumping-engine was made with 
H. E. Worthington & Co., of New York, immediately after 
the passage of the order authorizing its purchase. The 
opinion of the City Engineer had previously been given as 
to the kind of engine best suited to the work requu'ed to be 
done, and the highly satisfactory experience of the city in 
their former dealings with Messrs. Worthington & Co., and 
with the use of three of their engines at the pumping-station 
of the Mystic Water Works, left no question as to the 
proper action of the Board in carrying out the provisions of 



Keport of the Water Board. 3 

the order. Tlie engine, completed and in its place, was 
accepted and paid for March 11, 1878, and so far answers 
fully the expectations of the Engineer and the Board. 

The report of the City Engineer gives the condition ot 
Lake Cochituate, so far as the supply of water is concerned, 
the quantity of water turned into it from the Sudbury river, 

. and from Dug and Dudley ponds, and a full statement of 
the consumption of water during the year. It also 

/^hows the condition and use of the conduit, the average 
heights of water in the Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reser- 
voii's, and the uses of the other low-service reservoirs. The 
laying of water-pipes during the year, a description of the 
work made necessary by the rebuilding of Chelsea bridge, a 
statement of the work done on the water-plans in the En- 
gineer's office, the height of water in, and the use made of, 
the high-service reservoirs, the work done at the pumping- 
stations, with its cost, a description of the new pumping- 
engine, and needful information in regard to the rainfall and 
evaporation, can also be found in this rej)ort. 

The report of the Superintendent of the Western Division 
furnishes information in relation to the condition of Lake 
Cochituate and the Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs, 
and the gromids and property connected therewith; the 
pressure under which the conduit has been run, and its con- 
dition at .the time of the annual examination. May 8, 1877, 
and also the condition of the waste-weirs and culverts. 

From the report of the Superintendent of the Eastern 
Division it will be seen that he has laid during the year 
nearly 14 miles of cast-iron pipes, including 3,480 feet of 
48-inch laid by him for the new supply, or Sudbury-river 
Department, across Rosemary brook in Needham. The 
length and sizes are as follows : — 

6 feet of 60-inch, 7,200 feet of 48-inch, 
37 " " 36 *' 409 " " 20 " 

298 " " 16 <' 19,205 '* " 12 " 

14,105 " " 8 " 27,698 " " 6 " 
791 " " 4 " 

121 stopcocks and 100 hydrants have been put in. 

The total length of pipe laid from the commencement of 
the work to May 1, 1878, is 355 miles, 629 feet; total num- 
ber of stopcocks put in, 3,773; total number of' hydrants 
3,988 ; the number of service-pipes laid during the year is 
1,047, making a total to May 1, 1878, of 43,521. 

The Board can still report the general condition of the 
main pipes in the city as good ; and, with the exception of 
those referred "to in the last annual report as injuriously 



4 City Document No. 62. 

affected by dock mud, in which they are laid, no very mate- 
rial relaying of pipes will be necessary for some time to 
come. 

A contract for a supply of cast-iron pipes for the present 
year was made on the 12th of March, with the Warren 
Foundry and Machine Company, of Phillipsburg, N.J., at 
$26.47 per ton, delivered as usual. This is $3.53 per ton 
less than last year. 

The report of the Water Registrar shows the number of 
water-takers entered for the year 1878 to have been 49,970, 
— ^an increase over the previous year of 1,642. ^ 

The total amount of water-rates received for the year 
ending May 1, 1878, was $1,014,325.81. This includes 
$48,674.10 received from East Boston, and afterwards paid 
to the Mystic Department, the water having been supplied 
by the Mystic Water Works. 

The number of cases where water was turned off for non- 
payment of rates during the year ending January 1, 1878, 
was 1,849. Of this number 1,509 were turned on again, 
leaving 340 still remaining off. 

The number of meters now in use is 1,079. Of this 
number 684 are 5-8 inch ; 334, 1-iuch ; 43, 2-inch; 14, 3- 
inch ; and 4, 4-inch. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water Works, from 
all sources, for the year ending April 30, 1878, are as fol- 
lows, viz. ; — 

From sales of water 11,014,325 81 

From turning off and letting on water and 

fees 3,493 00 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . 66,837 24 

Instalment and interest on land bond . . 602 16 



$1,085,258 21 
The total amount charged to Cochituate 
Water Works, for the year ending April 30, 
1878, is as follows, viz. : — 

To current expenses . . $146,841 64 

To extension of works paid for 

out of income . . . 31,799 40 

Interest on fund- 
ed water debt . $620,575 50 

Interest on un- 
funded water 
debt . . 124,563 83 

Carried forioard, $745,139 33 $178,641 04 $1,085^258 21 



Report of the Water Board. 



Brought forward, $7^5, 139 33 $178,641 04 $1,085,258 21 

Premium on gold 
paid for inter- 
est . . . 6,345 61 

751,484 94 

Amount paid Mystic Water 
Works for water furnished 
East Boston ... 48,674 10 

Stock on hand not used . . 78,756 05 

$1,057,556 13 

Excess of income over expenditures . . $27,702 08 



5 per cent. Gold Loans 
5 per cent. Currency Loan . 



1,000 00 



The outstanding Cochituate Water loan at 
this date, exclusive of the additional supply- 
works, is as follows : — 

5 per cent. Sterling Loan (£399,500) $1,947,273 98 

494 000 00^^^^*'°°" 

434,UUU UU5 100,000 

1,000 

700,000 

50.000 

300,000 

200,000 

450,000 

540,000 

250,000 

625,000 

688,000 

330,000 

413,000 

38,000 

161,000 

142,700 

6,000 

82,550 

8,750 

4,000 

8,000 

5,000 

1,000 



6 per cent. Currency Loans 



5,003,000 00- 



Due Oct. 
Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Jan. 
Due July 
Due Dec. 
Due Dec. 
Due June 16 
Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due July 
Due April 
Due April 1 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due July 



1902 

1878 
190G 
1901 
1860 
1880 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1906 
190G 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 



$7,445,273 98 



Mystic Department. 

The Mystic Water Works are in good condition, and the 
lake during the year has furnished an abundant supply of 
very good water. When the Mystic Valley Sewer and other 
improvements, authorized by the City Council, are finished, 
no other considerable outlay is likely to be required, except 
for the renewal of distribution pipes, until it may be deemed 
expedient to construct an additional storage basin. 

The recommendation of the Board for the construction of 
a second line of force main-pipe from the pumping-station to 



6 City Document No. 62. 

the reservoir having been adopted by the Council, and 
authority given, by an order passed October 2, 1877, to proceed 
with the work, the City Engineer was requested to prepare 
the necessary plans, and a contract was made for the cast-iron 
pipes on the 12th of March, at $25.92 per ton. Preparations 
for laying the pipes are now being made, and the work will 
soon be completed. 

The right to lay these pipes in a direct line from the reser- 
voir to the pumping-station was obtained by the City of 
Charlestown at the time of the construction of the works ; 
but the Board have made arrangements, at smalL expense to 
the city, for laying out a street, 40 feet wide, — an improve- 
ment which has been referred to in former reports, and which 
can be carried out with advantage while the work on the new 
main is being done. 

The City Engineer's report shows the condition of the 
lake at various times during the year, the yield of the water- 
shed, with the quantity of rainfall ; the work done at the 
pumping-station, with the time each engine was run ; the 
quantity of coal used, of water pumped, and the cost of 
pumping ; the height of water in the reservoir, and the aggre- 
gate and average quantity of water consumed. 

The Superintendent's report shows what has been done 
during the year to keep up and improve the property of the 
city at the lake, the pumping-station, and the reservoir ; the 
additions, repairs, and condition of the supply-mains, the 
distribution and service pipes ; the quantity of coal consumed 
during the year, and on hand at this date. It also shows the 
total length of distribution-pipe laid from the commencement 
of the work to this date, as follows : — 

In Charlestown 29 miles, 276 feet; Chelsea 28 miles, 
1,489 feet; Somerville 44 miles, 2,323 feet; Everett 14 
miles, 1,852 feet; in all 116 miles, 944 feet. Connected 
with the Mystic Water Works at this date, there are 142 
miles, 487 feet of pipe, 1,046 gates, and 699 hydrants. 

With the exception of a few small lots, the coal used during 
the year was purchased by contract, at $5.49 per ton of 2,200 
lbs., delivered and weighed on the scales over the coal-shed 
at the pumping-station. 

The amount collected for water-rates during the year end- 
ing May 1, 1878, was $267,917.34, as shown by the report 
of the Eegistrar. The same report shows the number of 
water-takers, and the number of and kind of fixtures, build- 
ings, meters, etc. 

The total receipts of the Mystic Water Works, from all 
sources, for the year ending April 30, 1878, are as follows, 
viz. : — 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



From sales of water . . . 

From turning off and letting on water and fees 

Sundry receipts for extra work . 



In addition to the above amount there has 
been paid into the City Treasury the amount 
of cash on hand May 1, 1877 



$267,917 34 

815 75 

1,313 20 

$270,046 29 



1,256 69 
$271,302 98 



The maintenance account for the year is as follows : — 



Salaries, including one of the Board of Water 
Commissioners .... 

Clerk-hire ..... 

Inspectors ..... 

Printing, advertising, and stationery . 

Cochituate Water Department, for collections, 
etc., in East Boston ... 

Labor, off and on water in Charlestown 
Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett 

Rent of shop No. 8 Chelsea street 

Stable, Charlestown Department 

Taxes ...... 

Gas 

Meters and maintaining meters . 

Hydrants and maintaining hydrants 

Relaying main-pipe .... 

Extension and repairs main-pipe 

Extension and repairs service-pipe 

Engine-house, repairs, etc. 

Engine-house, stable department 

Lake ...... 

Reservoir ...... 

Roads and grounds .... 

Conduit ...... 

Contingencies , labor , tools , and 

material for repairs, $3,925 06 

Extra labor and material fur- 
nished for service-pipes, etc., 543 31 



Cr. By amount received for 
labor and material furnished 
for service-pipes, etc. 



4,468 37 



1,198 70 



^8,346 33 
1,371 67 

1,872 00 
918 07 

2,500 00 



50 
00 
32 



97 
36 
31 

85 



1,979 

550 

1,555 

43 

59 

2,006 

587 

5,537 

31,882 14 

4,281 36 

480 

470 
1,154 
1,677 
1,728 

478 



35 

03 

79 
98 
96 

83 



3,269 67 



Amount carried forward, 



$72,752 47 



8 City DocuiyiENT No. 62. 

Amount brought forward^ 

Pumping Service. 

Fuel $20,903 54 

Pay of engineers, firemen, and 



coal- wheelers 
Repairs, etc 
Oil 



6,849 60 
2,267 76 
966 42 



'2,752 47 



30,987 32 
$103,739 79 



The total amount of interest paid during the year was 

,875. 

The amount of Mystic Water Loans, outstanding at this 
date (April 30, 1878), is $1,228,000, as follows: — 



6 per cent, currency Mystic Water Loans $613,000 00 



5 per cent, currency Mystic Water Loans 410,000 00 { 



6 per cent, currency Mystic Sewer Loans 205,000 00 

$1,228,000 00 



$26,000 

1,000 

35,000 

60,000 

60,000 

3,000 

100,000 
51,000 

139,000 
67,000 
42,000 
39,000 

100,000 

202,000 
6,000 

102,000 

•205,000 



Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due July 
Due Jan. 
Due July 
Due Jan. 
Due July 
Due July 
Due Oct. 
Due Oct. 
Due Get. 
Due April 
Due April 



1, 1881 
1, 1885 
1, 1886 
1, 18S6 
1, 1887 
1, 1888 
1, 1890 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1892 
1, 1892 
1, 1893 
1, 1882 
1, 1883 
1, 1893 
1, 1894 
1, 1886 



Mystic-Water Sinking Fund. 



Amount in hands of Sinking 
Fund Commissioners, April 
30, 1878 



$175,831 79 



Mystic- Valley Sewer. 

The City Council having, on the 26th day of May, 1877, 
passed an order authorizing the Board to locate and con- 
struct this sewer, surveys and plans were made by the City 
Engineer, and the necessary descriptions and orders for 
taking lands and real estate were prepared and submitted to 
the Council by the Board, on the 26th of July, 1877. On 
the 30th of July, 1877, an order of the City Council was 



Eeport of the Water Board. 9 

approved by the Mayor, taking the lands so described, and 
needed for the construction of the sewer. On the 6th of 
August Mr. F. H. Tarbox was appointed by the Board 
Superintendent of the work, which was commenced on the 
20th of the same month, continued until December 1, 1877, 
and recommenced early in April of this year. A full 
description of the sewer and its location will be found in the 
report of the City Engineer, as well as a statement of the 
progress of the work, which, it is now expected, will be 
completed by the middle of August next. 

Before commencing the sewer the Board made an arrange- 
ment with the Boston & Lowell Railroad for the right to 
construct, and permanently maintain and keep in repair, so 
much of it in the towns of Medford, Winchester, and 
Woburn as lies within the location adjoining said railroad, 
and to use said location and the adjoining lands of said rail- 
road for this purpose. The price agreed upon for this right 
was large ($20,000), but it was the lowest that could be 
made, and a careful calculation had shown that, with any 
other line the diJSerence in construction, added to the es- 
timated land damages, would make the whole cost of the 
sewer, greater than it would be to follow out this plan ; in a 
word, the line was adopted because, on the whole, it was 
cheapest and best. 

In carrying out the work it has been necessary to alter the 
grade of one of the principal streets in Winchester, which 
change by the statute was to be made under the direction of 
the authorities of that town, who, we are happy to say, have 
shown a neighborly spirit, and have been reasonable in their 
requirements. 

The Board have made fair progress in the settlement of 
land and other damages, and have no doubt that all the par- 
ties who are expected to turn their drainage into the sewer 
will readily assent to reasonable and proper expenditures for 
this purpose. 

The sewer has been built by days' labor and by residents of 
the city, in conformity to an order of the City Council, passed 
July 10, 1877, authorizing and instructing the Board to have 
it done in this manner ; and, although it is probable that it 
will cost somewhat more than if it had been done by con- 
tract, it is only just to say, that the men employed have been 
better than the average of gangs hired by contractors, and, 
under the direction of the Superintendent, have worked fully 
as well as could have been expected. 

The materials used have all been purchased at very low 
prices. The construction account to this date is as fol= 
lows : — 



10 City Document No. 62. 



Amount expended to April 30, 1877 . 


$1,244 32 


(( " from " 


<« to May 1, 




1878, is as follows : — 






Superintendent 


$1,460 00 




Paymaster . . . , 


175 00 




Clerk and time-keeper 


480 00 




Materials, repairs, tools, etc. 


24,450 17 




Damages and right of way- 


21,460 00 




City Engineer's pay-rolls . 


2,248 25 




Pay of laborers 


27,007 69 




Laborers' railroad tickets . 


2,184 00 


$79,465 11 




1, 1878 . 


Total amount expended to May 


180,709 43 


SUDBURY-EIVER DEPARTMENT ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. 



The construction of the additional supply works has been 
successfully carried on during the year. The conduit from 
Farm pond is practically finished, and has already been used 
to convey water from Sudbury river to the Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir. Final estimates for work on this conduit have 
been made up for all the sections but No. 10 ; satisfactory 
settlements have been made with the contractors, and 
receipts in full given by them. But little remains to be done 
on Section 10, and but a small amount will be due on the 
contract for that section when it is fully completed. 

The gate-houses connected with the conduit, with the ex- 
ception of the terminal gate-house at Chestnut Hill, are all 
finished and mostly paid for. On the 21st of September last 
a plan for the terminal gate-house was adopted by the Board, 
and the City Architect is preparing the working drawings 
and specifications for the same. As soon as they are ready, 
the building will be put under contract. 

The conduit from Sudbury river to Farm pond, for the 
building of which a contract was made on June 12, 1877, 
will be finished without doubt by the first of September. 

The storage-basins in Framingham and Ashland it is ex- 
pected will be ready for use by the end of the present year. 

A statement of the contracts made during the year, and 
a table showing the progress of the whole work and its 
present condition, prepared by Mr. A. Fteley, Eesident En- 
gineer, will be found in the accompanying report of tho 
City Engineer, to which report the Council is referred for 
more particular information in regard to the new supply works. 

The following statement in addition to the taking of the 
water of Sudbury river will show what lands have been 
taken by the city under Chapter 177 of the Acts of the 
Legislature of 1872 : — > 



Eeport of the Water Board, 



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12 City Document No. 62. 

In their first animal report the Board referred to the 
awards of the commissioners appointed by the court to 
estimate the damages to mill-owners and others, occasioned 
by the taking of the waters of Sudbury river and its tribu- 
taries, and informed the Council that the awards not being 
satisfactory, they had, by advice of counsel, in each of the 
cases, asked for a jury trial as provided by the statutes. 
They can now report that four of the cases have been amica- 
bly settled, and there is good reason for doubt whether any of 
them will have to be passed upon by a jury. Previous to 
March 14, 1878, propositions for settlement had been made 
by the counsel of several of the claimants ; but they were not 
such as the Board felt warranted in accepting. 

On that date, the Saxonville Mills, to whom the largest 
amount of damage had been awarded, — $175,000, and inter- 
est from December, 1876, — by counsel, proposed to settle 
the claim in full for $131,250, and the taxable costs, which 
proposition was accepted by the Board, and on the 16th of 
March, the amount, $134,611.98, was paid by the City 
Treasurer. The other settlements have been : — 

The Belvidere Woollen Manufacturing Co., awarded 
$40,000; amount to be paid-, $31,150.22. 

Chas. P. Talbot et al., awarded $76,500; amount to be 
paid $59,224.81. 

Marshall P. Wilder e^ al., awarded ^16,500; amount to 
be paid, $12,986.38. 

The reduction from the awards was considerable, but not 
more than could justly be claimed by the city, after the cost 
of compensation for the loss of power which might be 
occasioned by the taking and diversion of the waters of the 
river from the several premises of the claimants, had been 
investigated. 

The settlements for land takep for the construction and 
maintenance of the conduit and storage-basins, and for dam- 
age occasioned thereby, have been mostly by agreement with 
the parties injured, without the intervention of referees or 
juries. But one case has been tried before a jur}^ and only 
two by commissioners appointed by the court. A few 
claims have been left to referees selected by the claimants 
and the Board, with an agreement that the decision should 
be final, neither party reserving the right of appeal. 

The amounts asked for by many of the claimants have 
been unreasonable and exorbitant, and have only been re- 
duced by hard work and the exercise of great patience. The 
Board have followed out the liberal policy with which they 
started, in every instance representing the city, as intending 



Report of the Water Board. 



13 



carefully to exercise the authority given them to interfere 
with private rights, and always fully and liberally to com- 
pensate the individual whose property had been taken for a 
public benefit. They have not been disposed to submit to 
imposition, or to award sums largely out of proportion to the 
injury done. 

. From the commencement of the surveys for the works, the 
ensfineers endeavored so to run the lines as to occasion the 
least possible disturbance or injury to estates, and especially 
with highly improved estates ; the owners in such cases were 
consulted and called upon to point out the least objectionable 
way to cross their lands. But few such claims re main un- 
settled ; the most important of which is that of H. H. Hun- 
newell, Esq., of Wellesley. Commissioners have been 
appointed by the court to assess the damages in this case, 
the Board having failed to come to an agreement with the 
claimant. 

The whole number of claims settled up to May 1, 1878, is 
148. The amount paid for land and water damages to the 
same date is $571,529.30. 

We present the following statement, showing the appropria- 
tions by the City Council for an additional supply of water, 
with the loans issued to meet thern^ and the amount of 
expenditures to this date. 



-Additional Supply of Water. 



APPROPRIATIONS . 

Oct. 21, 1871. — Transfer from. Reserved Fund 
Apr. 12, 1872. — Order for Treasurer to borrow 
Apr. 11, 1873. — 
Feb. 26, 1876. — 
July 1, 1876.— 
Apr. 20, 1878.— 



Total appropriations to April 30, 1878 

Oct. 1, 1875. —Premium on $1,000,000 bonds, under 
order of Feb. 26, 1876, $83,700 00 

April 1, 1876. —Premium on $452,000 bonds, 
under order of Feb. 26, 
1875 .... 47,786 80 

Oct. 1, 1876. — Premium on $2,000,000 
bonds, under order of 
July 1, 1876 , . . . 221,400 00 



$10,000 00 

100,000 00 

500,000 00 

1,500,000 00 

2,000,000 00 

600,000 00 

54,710,000 00 



Amount carried forward, 



352,886 80 
$5,062,886 80 



14 City Document No. 62. 

Amount brought forward, $5,062,886 80 

EXPENDED. 

1871-72 §2,302 81 ' • 

1872-73 61,278 83 

1873-74 including §20,897.50 dis- 
count on bonds sold 

January, 1874 . . 114,102 77 

1874-75 224,956 68 

1875-76 . . . . . 783,613 49 

1876-77 1,924,060 24 

1877-78 1,257,716 26 

4,368,030 08 



Balance of appropriations unexpended April 30, 1878, $694,856 72 

BONDS ISSUED. 

Aug. 15, 1872. — $100,000 at par, payable thirty years from July 1, 

1872, 6 per cent, currency. 

Jan. 31, 1874. — 8,000 at par, payable thirty years from January 

1, 1874, 6 per cent, currency. 
Aug. 18, 1873. — 5,000 at par, payable thirty years from April 1, 

1873, 6 per cent, currency. 

Jan. 27, 1874.— 287,000 at 95f, payable thirty years from April 1, 

1873, 6 per cent, currency. 
Jan. 31, 1874. — 200,000 at 95|, payable thirty years from April 1, 

1873, 6 per cent, currency. 
July 14, 1875. — 4,800 at par, payable thirty years from July 1, 

1875, 6 per cent, currency. 
Oct. 1, 1875.— 900,000 at 108^, payable thirty years from October 

1, 1875, 5 per cent. gold. 
Oct. 1, 1875. — 100,000 at 109, payable thirty years from October 

1, 1875, 5 per cent. gold. 
April 1, 1876.— 452,000 at IIOtV^t? payable thirty years from April 

1, 1876, 5 per cent. gold. 
Oct. 1, 1876. — 2,000,000 at IIItVtt* payable thirty years from Oct. 

1, 1876, 5 per cent. gold. 



t,100,000 



Appropriations to April 30, 1878 .... $4,710,000 00 

Loans issued ....... $4,100,000 

Transfer from Reserved Fund . . . 10,000 

4,110,000 00 



Loan not issued April 30, 1878 $600,0C0 00 

being order for loan dated April 20, 1878. 

The total amount of Cochituate Water Loans outstanding April 
30, 1878, including the above, and the amount shown on page 5, is 
$11,545,273.98. 

The total amount of the Cochituate Water Sinking Fund, April 30, 
1878, is $2,043,764.73. 

The new system of book-keeping, for which the Council, 
by request of the Board, authorized an expenditure (Feb. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 15 

11, 1878), will be started with the commencement of the 
present financial year ; and the Board feel confident that it 
will be a good step towards the accomplishment of what they 
represented in their first annual report as needful and im- 
portant in conducting the business of the department under 
their charge. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYEE, Ghairman, 
LEONAED E. CUTTEE, 
ALBEET STANWOOD. 



16 



City Document No. 62. 



EEPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Boston Water Board, 

Boston, May 1, 1878. 
Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board : — 

SiR^ — The following is a statement of the expenditures 
and receipts of the Cochituate Water Works, for the year 
commencing May 1, 1877, and ending April 30, 1878 : — 



Expenditures. 

Aqueduct repairs .... 
Blacksmith shop, stock and wages 
Eastern-avenue wharf (rent and salary of 

agent) 
Fountains 
High-service 
Inspectors 
Lake Cochituate 
Laying service-pipe 
Meters and maintaining meters 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Printing and stationery 
Proving yard 
Relaying main-pipe 
Repairing main-pipe . 

" service-pipe ► 

" hydrants 

" streets . 

*' hydrant and stopcock-boxes 
Reservoir, Beacon Hill . 

" Brookline 
^ '♦ East Boston 

" South Boston 
Chestnut Hill 

'* Parker Hill . 
Pumping works at Lake Cochituate 
Salaries 
Stable . 
Service-pipe 

Shutting-off and letting-on department 
Tools 

Amount carried foioai^d, 



$2,285 85 
1,004 41 

3,117 76 
1,110 72 
10,799 49 
7,116 43 
2,392 95 
9,181 31 

1.431 85 
1,234 46 
1,775 44 
6,312 34 

980 64 

692 84 

10,380 96 

800 20 

6,980 69 

189 2Q 

617 68 

2,986 58 

549 85 

387 58 

16,918 55 

1,243 03 

1,001 47 

28,842 99 

4,427 56 

6,107 80 

9.432 16 
1,720 00 

$142,022 35 



Report of the Water Board. 17 

Amount brought forward, $142,022 35 

Temporary high-service, Brighton . . . 2,096 03 

Upper yard . . . . . . 2,723 26 

Additional pumpiug-engine, construction . 20,000 00 

Main-pipe, construction, .... 5,425 99 

Laying main-pipe, construction . . . 5,087 19 

Hydrants, construction . . . . . 963 11 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes, construction . 323 11 

$178,641 04 
Water Works, WestRoxbury and 

Brighton Districts . . $25,403 78 

Additional snpply of water .1,256,013 56 

1,281,417 34 



Total expenditures, $1,460,058 38 

Stock on hand April 30, 1878, 
Cochituate Water 

Works . . $78,756 05 
Additional supply, 1,701 70 

80,457 75 



Total payments, $1,540,516 13 

Receipts by Water Board. 



Fire Department, for use of 








hydrants .... 


$46,212 00 




Elevator pipes, stand-pipes, ser- 








vice-pipes, repairs, etc., etc. 


7,304 


95 




Off and on water and fines 


1,882 


50 




Rent of house No, 7 Waverly 








place ..... 


784 


54 




Rent of part of Eastern-avenue 








wharf ..... 


300 


00 




Sale of old material . 


3,000 


00 




Mystic Water Works, collecting 








East Boston rates . 


2,500 


00 




Rent of pastures, sale of hay, 








etc. ...... 


510 


64 




Extra charge to petitioners for 








main- pipe .... 


- 2,845 


47 




Rents, sale of cement, etc., on 








account of additional supply . 


1,497 


14 


66,837 24 




kVorks, 




Net amount charged to Water "^ 


$1,473,678 89 



18 City Document No. 62. 

Amount expended on Water Works, not in- 
cluding " Additional Supply " or " Water 
Works, West Roxbury and Brighton Dis- 



tricts" 

The amount expended for construction 

Water Works is as follows, viz. : — 
Main-pipe .... $5,425 
Laying main-pipe . . . 5,087 
Hydrants .... 963 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes . 323 
Additional pumping-engine . 20,000 


on 

99 
19 
11 
11 
00 


$178,641 
"31,799 


04 
40 










Current expenses for year ending 
April 30, 1878 . 


$146,841 


64 



The total amount expended for construction for 
the year ending April 30, 1878, is as follows, 
viz. ; — 

Waterworks . . . $31,799 40 

West Roxbury and Brighton 

Districts . . . . 25,403 78 

Additional supply of water . 1,256,013 56 

$1,313,216 74 

The total amount expended for maintaining 
the Chestnut-Hill Driveway, in care of the 
Water Board, but not chargeable to the 
Water Works, for the year ending April 30, 
1878, is $3,494 04 

Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water Works to 
May i, 1878. 

Amount drawn to May 1, 

1877 .... $17,335,702 96 

Amount drawn from Mayl, 

1877, to May 1, 1878 . 1,540,516 13 

$18,876,219 09 

Amount paid City Treas- 
urer to May 1, 1877 . $707,449 85 

Amount paid from May 1, 

1877, to May 1, 1878 . 66,837 24 

774,287 09 



Net amount drawn from Treasurer . $18,101,932 00 



Report of the Water Board. 



19 



Gross payments (including 

interest, premiums, stock, 

etc. ) for account of 

Water Works to May 1, 

1877 .... $29,918,811 28 
Gross payments from May 

1, 1877, to May 1, 1878, 2,292,001 07 



Gross receipts to May 1, 

1877 . . . . 
Gross receipts from May 

1, 1877, to May 1, 

1878 . $1,085,258 21 
Less amount 

paid Mys- 
tic Water 
Works for 
water fur- 
nished East 
Boston . 48,674 10 



Net cost to May 1, 1878 . 



,210,812 35 



$14,753,303 36 



1,036,584 11 



15,789,887 47 
$16,420,924 88 



Cost of Construction of the Worhs to May i, 1878. 



Cost of Water Works to January 1, 1850, 
as per final report of Water Commis- 
sioners ...... 

Extension to East Boston . 

Jamaica-pond aqueduct 

New dam at Lake Cochituate 

Raising lake two feet, including damages 

Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con 
nections with lake .... 

New main from Brookline reservoir . 

Land and water rights, since January 
1850 . . . . . 

Land damages since January 1, 1850 . 

New pipe-yard and repair-shop . 

Upper yard, buildings, etc. 

New water-pipes, East Boston . 

New main. East Boston 

Amount carried forward^ 



1,998,051 83 

281,065 44 

45,237 50 

10,940 08 

28,002 18 

18,982 23 
304,991 83 

58,331 40 

15,511 62 

25,666 51 

9,165 63 

20,999 43 

24,878 08 

i,841,823 76 



20 



City Document No. 62. 



Amount hr ought forward, 
Warer to Deer Island . . . 

Piimping-works at Lake Cochituate . 
High-service, stand-pipe, engine-house and 

engines ...... 

High-service, South Boston 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, including land 
Parker-Hill reservoir 
Charles-river siphon .... 

Keeper's house, Parker Hill 

Temporary high-service, Brighton 

Additional pumping-engine 

Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of main-pipe, since January 1, 1850 
Cost of laying main-pipe since January 1 

1850 - 

Cost of hydrants, stopcocks, and boxes, and 

setting same ..... 
Cost of main-pipe for extension in Eoxbury, 

Dorchester, Brighton, and West Roxbury 

Districts ...... 

Cost of laying main-pipe for extension in 

Eoxbury, Dorchester, Brighton, and West 

Roxbury Districts ..... 
Cost of hydrants, stopcocks, and boxes, and 

setting same in above districts 



$4,841,823 76 
75,000 00 
15,000 00 

83,829 53 

27,860 29 

2,449,982 07 

228,246 17 

26,532 35 

2,764 90 

7,865 86 

20,000 00 

4,366,328 38 
849,612 01 

480,668 70 

259,906 86 



972,347 71 

428,608 38 

357,556 13 

$15,493,933 10 

56,356 85 

$15,437,576 25 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 
Qltvlc of the Boston Water Board. 



Cr. By sale of Jamaica-pond 

aqueduct . . . .$32,000 00 
By sale of land to May 1, 1878, 24,356 85 



Report of the Water Board. 



21 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

Office of the City Engineer, 

City Hall, Boston, May 1, 1878. 

Hon. T. T. Sawyer, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance establishing the Boston Water Board, the following 
report is respectfully submitted : — 

COCHITUATE WORKS. 



Sudbury River and Lake Cochituate. 

Water from the Sudbury river has been turned into the 
lake during 1877 as follows : — 



January 3 to 31 

February 1 to 6, and 8 to 26 

March 7 to 11 

May 17 to 31 

June 1 to 30 . 

July 1 to 6, and 10 to 31 

August 1 to 18, and 27 to 31 

September 10 to 22 

October 5 to 27 

Total, 191 days . 



427,200,000 gallons. 

353,700,000 " 

8,200,000 '* 

6,400,000 ♦« 

87,500,000 '* 

2,660,000 ** 

47,990,000 " 

78,400,000 *' 

882,300,000 '' 



1,894,350,000 



equal to a daily supply of 5,190,000 gallons. Water was 
wasted at the overflow of the lake from March 21 to April 
5, from April 11 to 15, and from April 20 to 23, from May 
2 to 5, and from June 12 to 16, the total waste being 
1,484,978,600 gallons. 

On the first of January, 1877, the surface of the water in 
the lake was 9 feet, 3 inches above the bottom of the conduit. 
During the months of January, February, and March the 
lake surface was rising, and on the 27th of March reached 
high- water mark. 

It remained at or near that point until the middle of June, 
when it began to fall, and continued to lower until the 4th 



22 City Document No. 62. 

of October, when it was 6 feet, 7^ inches above the conduit 
bottom. 

In consequence of copious rains during the months of 
October and November, and the amount received from the 
SuJbury river, the hike surface had risen, on November 1, 
to 9 feet 10 inches, and on December 1 to 10 feet, 11|^ 
inches. 

January 1, 1878, it stood at 11 feet, February 1, 11 feet, 
7^ inches, March 1,12 feet 6| inches, April 1, 12 feet, and 
at this date, May 1, it stands at 13 feet, 1 inch above the 
conduit bottom. 

Dug and Dudley Ponds. 

Very little water was received from Dug pond during 
1877, —about 16,500,000 gallons. 

Dudley pond was drawn upon from September 25 to Octo- 
ber 9, the water falling during that time from 141.80 feet to 
140.46 feet. 

The amount delivered to the lake during this time was 
about 280,000,000 gallons. 

Conduit. 

The table on page 46 will show the depths of water that 
have been maintained at the head of the conduit during the 
year. The clear height of the conduit is 6 feet 4 inches. 

An examination of the conduit was made on May 8, 1877. 
It was found in about its usual condition. 

Low-Service Reservoirs. 

The tables on page 39 give the monthly and yeai'ly aver- 
age heights above tide-marsh level of the water in the 
Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs. 

The average height in Chestnut-Hill reservoir has been 
121.52 feet, or 1.28 feet lower than in 1876. 

The average level in the Brookline reservoir has been 
120.80 feet, or 1.48 feet lower than in 1876, and 0.72 of a 
foot lower than the Chestnut-Hill reservoir. 

The other low-service reservoirs are used simply to store 
water for use in an emergency, or during repairs to the main 
pipes. 

Pipes and Pipe Plans. 

The laying of pipes during the past year has been con- 
fined mainly to short lines laid in compliance to petitions. 



Report of the Water Board. 23 

About 12 miles in all have been laid and 101 hydrants 
set. 

Chelsea bridge, which has been rebuilt during the past 
season, carried a 20-inch Cochituate water pipe to East Bos- 
ton, and a 16-inch Mystic water-pipe to Chelsea. The 
rebuilding and widening of the bridge, and the change 
of position of the draw channel, necessitated the laying of 
new lines of pipes and the putting down of new siphons ; 
these were successfully laid in a trench dredged for the 
purpose. 

It was also necessary to move the pipes from their former 
positions for the whole length of the filled portion of the 
bridge ; this was done without stopping the supply of water, 
as either pipe was, fortunately, large enough, with the assist- 
ance of the East Boston reservoir, to do duty for both for 
short periods. 

The siphons and supports for the pipes were put down by 
Messrs. Boynton Bros., the contractors for rebuilding the 
bridge ; the pipe-laying was done under the direction of Mr. 
Jones, of the Cochituate Department, and Mr. Bigelow of 
the Mystic Department. 

The siphon for the 20-inch main (Cochituate) is 24 inches 
in diameter, and for the 16-inch main (Mystic) is 20 inches 
in diameter. The siphon pipes are enclosed in strong 
wooden boxes, well bolted and strapped, and the spaces 
between the pipes and boxes are filled with cement concrete. 

The plans, showing water-pipes, gates, and hydrants, have 
been corrected, as usual. Sectional plans of West Roxbury 
and East Boston, mentioned in the last annual report as in 
preparation, have been completed, and plans of Charlestown, 
on a scale of 100 feet to an inch, are now being made for 
this office. A large plan, on a scale of 500 feet to an inch, 
is being prepared, showing the entire high-service system of 
distribution. 

High-Service Reservoir and Pumps. 

Parker-Hill reservoir has been in constant service during 
the year, and the water in it has been kept at an average 
height of 216.24 feet above tide-marsh level. 

The table on page 40 gives the average monthly heights 
for the year. 

The following table shows the work done by the pumps 
during the past year, the running time of each engine, the 
amount of coal used, and the average monthly and yearly 
duty : — 



24 



CiTr Document No. 62. 



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■drand no 



(MCiMNi— tHMN 



00 00 



CO o> o> <o 



00 00 00 00 00 00 



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jad padrand 



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i-H O) rH 



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•paning 

-nOO IBOQ JO 







irt 


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o 


<o 




































































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ir^ t^ f-H 



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00 00 to 1X5 ID t- 



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HunoniB iB^oj, 



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iTd O U? O 



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jaqnina ib;ox 



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Eepoet of the Water Board. 



25 



Total quantity pumped . . . 627,068,830 gallons. 
«' " coal used . . . 1,817,215 lbs. 
'< " ashes and clinkers . 254,820 " 

Average duty in foot lbs., per 100 
lbs. of coal consumed, no deduc- 
tion being made for clinkers .... 31,843,600 

Average number of gallons pumped 

per lb. of coal . ... . . . . 345.1 

The average daily quantity pumped was 1,717,997 gallons, 

an increase of 17. G per cent, over the quantity pumped in 

1876. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Salaries . 

Repairs . 

Fuel 

Small supplies 

Gas 

Total 



$3,883 53 

664 13 

4,532 48 

115 96 

275 49 

$9,471 59 



The following shows the comparative cost of pumping for 
each year since the works have been in operation : — 

37 per million gallons raised one foot high. 



1871 . 


$0.37 p 


1872 . 


0.34 


1873 . 


0.283 


1874 . 


0.244 


1875 . 


0.22 


1876 . 


0.18 


1877 . 


0.137 



New Engine, etc. 

In the last annual report it was recommended that a third 
engine, of a capacity of 3,000,000 gallons, and a new boiler 
be purchased and erected during the season. 

In the fall, in accordance with a request of the Water 
Board, an order was passed by the City Council, approved 
Oct. 4, 1877, authorizing the Water Board to purchase a 
pumping-engine, etc., at an expense not exceeding $20,000. 
A contract was made with Mr. Henry R. Worthington, of New 
York, for a compound duplex pumping-engine, and a boiler, 
— the engine to have a pumping capacity of 3,000,000 gal- 
lons per day. The work under this contract was completed, 
and the engine, etc., accepted and paid for March 11, 1878. 

In connection with the new engine important changes 



26 City Document No. 62. 

have been made in the suction and force mains of the pumps. 
The suction mains of the present pumps have been so con- 
nected as to enable both pumps to be used together, and 
a new 20-inch force-main has been laid from the engine- 
house, through Ehnwood and Roxbury streets, to the junction 
of Pynchon street, there connecting with the main to Parker- 
Hill reservoir. 

Brighton High-Service. 

The pumps have worked satisfactorily. 

The pumping time has ranged between 1 hour and 18^ 
hours, and the consumption from 12,000 to 13i,000 gallons 
per 24 hours. The consumption is largest during the sum- 
mer months, when water is used for watering streets. 



Consumption of Water. 

The table on page 42 gives the average daily consump- 
tion of water from the Cochituate works for each month. 

The average daily consumption in 1877 has been 20,673,- 
500 gallons, — an increase of about 2 per cent, over the 
consumption of 1876. 

No water has been supplied to East Boston from the Co- 
chituate Works during the past year. 

EVAPOKATION. 

The experiments on evaporation were contiuu&d through 
the summer months, both at Beacon-Hill and Chestnut-Hill 
reservoirs. 

The following tables give the results of the experiments, 
also the temperature of the air at Parker-Hill and Chestimt- 
Hill reservoirs, and of the water at Brookline reservoir and 
the Mystic Engine-house. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



27 



Table showing the Amounts of Evaporation at Beacon-Hill and Chestnut-Hill Reser- 
voirs, and the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations on the Water 
Works. 





Evaporation in Inches. 


T^MPERATUKE OP AlR. 


Temp. 
OF "Water. 


1877. 


Beacon-Hill Reser- 
voir. 


Chestnut- 
Hill 
Reservoir. 


Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir. 


Parker-Hill 
Reservoir. 


B'line 
Res. 


Myst. 
E.-H. 




1 


O ea 


a 


a 


a 
a 

03 


i 
a 

'S 


a 

c3 
<U 

1^ 

56 
68 
72 
72 
64 
51 
44 
35 


a 

a 
'>< 

80 
86 
85 
86 
82 
76 
64 
56 


a 
1 

.5 

32.5 

48 

56 

55 

43 

31 

22 

13 




d 


i 
1 


May . . 
June • . 
July . . 
August . 
Sept. . . 
Oct. , . . 
Nov. . . 
Dec. . . 


3.36 
5.41 
5.39 
5.03 
4.73 


3.66 
5.53 
5.35 

4.60 
4.29 


4.03 
6.05 
6.98 
5.33 
5.57 


4.52 
6.34 
6.13 
5.55 
5.87 
3.59 


87 
92 
90 
90 
85 
79 
66 
58 


33 
48 
53 
55 
40 
31 
25 
15 


55 
67 
71 
71 
64 
51 
42 
34 


55 
67 
73 
75 
69 
57 
47 
35 


57 
69 
73 
75 
69 
57 
46 
39 



To eliminate a disturbing element, periods of a few days 
during which the evaporation Avas not affected by rainfall 
have been selected for comparison. The evaporation at those 
times was as follows : — 





o 


Beacon-Hill Reservoir. 


Ches'nut-Hill 
Reservoir. 


187'?'. 


Reservoir 


Wooden 
Tank. 


Tin Tank. 


Tin Tank. 


May 26th to June 5th 

June 9th to June 2l8t 

July 30th to August 8th 

August 20th to August 25th . . . 
September 3d to September 19th . 
September 24th to October 3d . . 


10 

12 

9 

5 

16 

9 


1.28 
1.94 
1.63 
0.70 
3.03 
1.05 


1.86 
2.27 
1..58 
0.84 
2.49 
1.09 


2.02 
2.58 
1.83 
1.00 
3.18 
1.47 


2.16 
2.47 
2.07 
0.94 
2.80 
1.26 



Eainfall. 

Tables giving the rainfall for the year 1877, at various 
points in New England, and tables showing the quantity of 
rain which fell at Cochituate and Mystic lakes, each day of 
the year, will be found appended. 



28 City Document No. 62. 



Additional Supply. 

By an order of the City Council approved April 20, 1878, 
the City Treasurer was authorized to borrow, under the 
direction of the Committee on Finance, the sum of six hun- 
dred thousand dollars, to meet the additional appropriations 
for " Additional Water Supply." This sum has not been 
negotiated at this date, Ma}^ 1. This, added to the suras be- 
fore appropriated for preliminary investigations (Oct. 20, 

1871, $10,000), for connecting Sudbury river with Lake 
Cochituate as a means of temporary supply (April 12, 

1872, $100,000), and for building the Sudbury-river works 
(April 11, 1873, $500,000; Feb. 26, 1875, $1,500,000), 
makes the total amount appropriated $4,710,000. The 
premium on the sale of bonds ($352,886.80) stands to the 
credit of this appropriation ; therefore the total sum which 
the Water Board are authorized to expend for this work is 
$5,062,886.80. 

The amount expended to May 1, 1878, is, $4,368,030 08 

To which add for percentage retained 
from contractors for the faithful comple- 
tion of the various contracts . . 17,126 OQ 



Total ' $4,385,156 14 

Of which sum $3,376,182.65 have been expended for work 
done by days' labor or under contract, and for material 
furnished. 

The balance has been spent for the construction and 
maintenance of the temporary connections with Lake Cochit- 
uate, for the preliminary investigations for a source of supply, 
for engineering and superintendence of construction, for land 
and water damages, etc. 

The following extracts from the report of Mr. A. Fteley," 
Resident Engineer in charge, will show the progress made in 
the construction of the works : — 

The work of construction of the "Additional Supply" has been 
prosecuted without interruption, and, owing to the mildness of the 
weather, was continued later than usual in 1877. For the same reason 
it has been resumed early this season. 

The work authorized to be done by day labor (order of the City 
Council, approved Oct. 30, 1875), including the foundations of the dams, 
and Section No. 1, has been completed during the year. Some excava- 
tion has been made in Reservoir No. 1, and contracts have been entered 
into for building the superstructures of Dams 2 and 3. Dam No. 1, 
with its sluice-gates and iron-work complete, has already been finished 
with the exception of the house which is to be erected over the gate- 



Report of the Water Board. 29 

chamber. The various dams have also been connected by 48-inch cast- 
iron pipes, which have been laid by contract. 

That portion of the area of Basin No. 3 which was covered with 
wood and brush has been cleared, and the Boston, Clinton, Fitchburg 
and New Bedford Railroad, under an agreement with the Boston Water 
Board, has built a new bridge, and is strengthening its embankments in 
view of the coming flowage. 

Section A of the conduit, which connects dam No. 1 with Farm 
pond, has been put under contract, and at the present rate of progress 
will be finished within two months. Although, owing to unavoidable 
delays, considerable work remains to be done in and about the reservoir 
basins, it is expected that they will be in condition to be filled by the 
end of the present year. On the line of the conduit all the sections 
already under contract have been completed, with the exception of 
Section 10, where only a little work remains to be done. Additional 
brick arching has been laid in Rockland-street and Beacon-street tun- 
nels (Sections 6 and 20). Siphon pipes have been laid in Section 13, and 
the connection of the Sudbury-river aqueduct with the Lawrence basin 
of Chestnut-Hill reservoir has been commenced and completed. 

A line of 48-inch cast-iron pipe has also been laid around Chestnut- 
Hill reservoir between the terminal chamber of the Sudbury-river con- 
duit and the 48-inch outlet pipe of Chestnut-Hill reservoir, in oi-der to 
render the city supply independent from tjae latter. The paved slopes 
of Section 1 remain to be completed. A contract has been entered into 
to connect the terminal chamber of the Sudbury-river conduit with the 
Bradlee basin and with the Cochituate conduit. 

The superstructure of the terminal chamber is also to be built, and 
a small amount of work is being done on the line of the conduit to 
maintain and seed the embankments, to erect fences, etc. With the ex- 
ceptions above mentioned the work on the conduit is practically finished. 
The water has already flowed directly from Sudbury river to Chestnut- 
Hill reservoir, and the communication between these places is now per- 
manently established. 

The average rainfall on the Sudbury-river water-shed for 
the year ending April 30, 1878, as deduced from the gauges 
kept in Framiugham, Southboro', Marlboro', Westboro', and 
Hopkinton, is 50.36 inches, of which 53.26 per cent, 
reached the river. The flow as gauged at the temporary 
dam has been, for the whole year, 35,580,000,000 gallons, 
equivalent to an average daily flow of 97,480,000 gallons. 

The following table shows the progress of the work to 
date : — 



30 



City DocuiMent No. 62. 



•« { 



Section and Descrip- 
tion of work. 



Gate Chamber at- 
Sect. 1 



6, Brick arching 
7 



9. 

10. 
11 . 
12. 
13. 
U. 
15, 
16 , 
17. 

18, 

19. 
20 



Name of Contractor. 



Cape Ann Granite Co. 

John F. Ward .... 

John F. Ward .... 

John F. Ward .... 

James McDonald . . . 

Wm. L. and Bruce 
Hoblitzell 



Beckwith and Quack- 
enbush 

Beckwith and Quack- 
enbush 



Wm. L. and Bruce 
Hoblitzell 



" 20, Brick arching 

" 21 

Connection with Brad- 
lee basin 



Gate-houses for Siphon 
Chamber 



Gate-houses for Waste 
Weirs and for Farm 
Pond 



Sluice-gates and iron 
floors 



48-inch pipe for connec- 
tions with Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir . . . . 



Chas. Linehan . . 

Boynton Bros 

John F. Ward .... 

John F. Ward .... 

C. McClallan and Son . 

Chas. Linehan .... 

Geo. W. Phelps . . . 

Chas. Linehan .... 

Frye, Kittredge and 
Page 



Date of final 
estimate. 



June 6, 1877. 

Jan. 27, 1877. 

Jan. 18, 1877. 
March 19, 1877. 

June 14, 1877. 

Jan. 18, 1877. 

Dec. 24, 1877. 

Dec. 21, 1876. 

Jan. 18, 1877. 

Oct. 23, 1877. 



Frye, Kittredge and 
Page 



Chas. Linehan . . . . 

Lobdell & Phelps , . . 

Dennis Collins . . . . 

J. H. Freeman & Co. . 



Clinton Beckwith 



Benj. F. Dewing 8c Co. 



D. N. Jacobs and E. F. 
Meany, assignee . . . 



James S. Newell 



Jesse W. Starr & Son . 



Aug. 14,1877. 

Nov. 21,1876. 

Jan. 15, 1877. 

April 22,1878. 

Sept. 20,1877. 

April 22,1878. 

Dec. 23, 1876. 

Sept. 21, 1876. 

Nov. 1, 1877. 

Dec. 6, 1875. 
March 7, 1878, 

Dec. 4, 1877. 



Remarks. 



JTearly finished. 



Oct. 12, 1877. 



* Begun this season. 

* Finished. 



* Finished, save 
some little brick- 
work. 

*90 per cent, com- 
pleted. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



31 






Section and descrip- 
tion of work. 



48-inch pipe for Sect. 13 

Hoisting apparatus for 
screens at Farm Pond 

Flagging for gate-houses 

Stone for intersection 
chamher at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir .... 

Bricks for arching Sect. 
6 

Hauling pipes to Chest- 
nut-Eill Reservoir . . 

Hauling pipes to Sect. 
13 

Fences in Needham . . 

Section A 

Road in Framingham . 

Superstructure of Dam 
No. 1 

Dam No. 3 

Dam No. 2 

Excavation in Basin 
No. 1 

48-inch pipes for Res- 
ervoirs 

Laying the same . . . 

Clearing Basin No. 3 . 



Name of contractor. 



Jesse W. Starr & Son . 

Boston Machine Co. . 
Cape Ann Granite Co. 

Cape Ann Granite Co. 

Natt. & W. F. Head . 

G. S. & W. F. Howe . 

F. Jones & T. Harris . 

Theo. Bemis 

Allen & Chase . . . . 
John Brown 



Beckwith and Quack- 
enbush 



Fuller & Nash .... 
Trull, Wood & Murray 



Beckwith and Quack- 
enbush 



Jesse W. Starr & Son 
J. J. Newman & Co. . 
Harrison Fames . . . 



Date of final 
estimate. 



Dec. 8, 1876. 

April 21,1878. 
March 21, 1878. 



Dec. 8,1877. 

Jan. 12, 1878. 

March 2,1877. 
Jan. 1, 1878. 



Sept. 8, 1876. 
Jan. 28, 1878. 



Dec. 21, 1877. 
Nov. 15, 1877. 



Dec. 4, 1877. 



Remarks. 



* Let March 12, 1878. 



* To be finished 
within two mos. 



*In course of con- 
struction. 

* In course of con- 
struction. 



* Finished. 



*The items of work marked with an asterisk have been contracted for within the past 
year. Their aggregate amount is $333,149.65. 



32 City Docuiment No. 62. 

MYSTIC WOUKS. 
Mystic Lake. 

The water in the lake, Jan. 1, 1877, was 6.13 feet above 
tide-marsh level, or 0.77 of a foot below high-water mark. 
From this date until July, 1877, it remained at or near this 
point, water being allowed to waste over the dam from Jan. 
8 to June 17. 

On July 1 the lake surface had fallen to 5 56 feet above 
tide-marsh level; Aug. 1, 4.18 feet; Sept. 1, 3.69 feet; 
Oct. 1, 1.22 feet; and on Oct. 4, 0.97 of a foot. This was 
the lowest point reached during the year, the lake surface 
having risen, Nov. 1, to 4.55 feet; Dec. 1, to 6.18 feet; 
and on Jan. 1, 1878, to 5.88 feet above tide-marsh level. 
It has remained at or near high-water mark since that date, 
and water has been constantly wasted over the dam from 
Nov. 8, 1877, to the present time. May 1, 1878. 

During the year new arrangements have been made for 
measuring the amount of water wasted over the outlet dam, 
and also at the conduit waste-weir. A float-gauge has been 
placed in the gate-house to indicate the height of water in 
the lake. 

Hiffh-water mark is 11.17 feet above bottom of conduit. 

The total yield of the Mystic water-shed for the year 1877 
is shown by the following figures : — 

Gallons. 

Quantity drawn from the lake for use, 3,069,554,800 

of water at the dam, 6,796,792,600 

" " " " conduit waste-weir, 303,430,900 

" '' fish-way, 150,000,000 



10,319,778,300 
Less quantity due to difference of levels of 

lake at first and last of year, 16,291,400 

Total yield of water-shed, 10,303,486,900 

Equal to a daily yield of 28,228,700 

The amount of the rainfall on the water-shed (exclusive 
of water surfaces) was 20,127,679,800 gallons, of which 51.2 
per cent, passed through the lake. 

Pumping-Station and Force Main. 

The table on page 34 shows the work done by the Mystic 
engines during the year, the number of days that each engine 



Report of the Water Board. 33 

ran, the coal used, and the average monthly and yearly 
duty : — 

Engine No. 1 was in use 82 days, 12 hours, 50 minutes. 

it n 2 " " 36 " 7 " 20 " 

" " 3 " " 321 " 17 " 55 '« 

Total coal consumed, 7,640,600 lbs., of which 7.9 per cent. 

was ashes and clinkers. 

Total quantity of water pumped, 3,061,128,725 gallons. 
Average lift or head pumping against, 151.83 feet. 



34 



City Document No. 62. 



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Eeport of the Water Board. 35 

Cost of Pumping. 



Salaries 

Fuel . 

Repairs . 

Oil waste, and packing 

Small supplies 



$6,944 60 

19,931 22 

2,094 37 

951 07 

101 20 



Total $30,022 46 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, $0,065. 

The largest quantity pumped in any one day was 13,180,- 
407 gallons (Jan. 27, 1877). 

The smallest quantity pumped was 5,858,009 (April 26). 

The average duty of the three engines for the year was 
50,731,500 foot-lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal consumed, without 
deduction for ashes or clinkers, and the average number of 
gallons pumped per lb. .of coal was 400.6. 

The duty given above is somewhat less than that given for 
1876, although the number of gallons pumped per lb. of coal 
is larger. This is accounted for by the fact that during 
1876 no record was kept of the height of the water in the 
pump-well, and the lift of the pumps was estimated larger 
than it should have been. 

In October, 1877, an order was passed by the City Council 
authorizing the construction of a new force main from the 
Mystic Engine-house to the reservoir. Plans for the work 
have since been made, and the pipe contracted for ; some of 
it is already delivered, and the work of laying will soon be 
commenced. 

In connection with this work a new street, 40 feet in 
width, has been laid out over the line of the force mains, 
giving a direct route from the engine-house to the reservoir. 



Eeservoir and Consumption. 

The reservoir and grounds are in good condition. The 
tables of average monthly heights is appended, and shows 
also the average daily amount drawn from the reservoir for 
each month. The average for the year was 8,386,257 gal- 
lons, or 439,551 gallons, about 5 per cent, less than for 1876. 

The largest consumption for one day was on January 4th, 
when it reached 13,857,469 gallons. 

The least consumption was on April 29, when it fell to 
6,015,825 gallons. 



36 City Docu3ient No. 62. 



Mystic- Valley Sewer. 



It was stated in the last annual report that, owing to 
certain restrictions of the act passed by the Legislature of 
1875, this sewer could be built only along an unnecessarily 
circuitous route, and that further operations on the work had 
therefore been suspended until an amendment to this act 
could be obtained. 

An amendment, removing the objectionable restrictions, 
was passed by the Legislature of 1877, and on the 16th of 
May an order of the City Council was approved, authorizing 
the Boston Water Board to locate and construct the sewer in 
conformity with the provisions of the Acts of 1875, as 
amended by Chapter 11 of the Acts of 1877. 

In June work upon the surveys and plans of the line was 
recommenced, and in the latter part of July it was so far 
completed that a plan of the lands required, with descriptions 
of the same, was submitted to the City Council. An order, 
approved July 30, was passed, taking the lands required. 

August 6 Mr. F. H. Tarbox, of this city, was appointed 
by the Water Board Superintendent of Construction ; and 
August 20 work upon the sewer was commenced, and was 
continued until the 1st of December. 



Location of the Sewer. 

The sewer is located in the towns of Medford, Winches- 
ter, and Woburu. Commencing at the outlet in lower 
Mystic Lake, it extends in a northerly direction through the 
bed of the old Middlesex Canal for about 3,000 feet; thence 
leaving the canal and crossing under the tracks of the Bos- 
ton, Lowell & Nashua Bailroad, it continues generally 
within the railroad location until it reaches Main street, 
Winchester ; crossing again under the railroad tracks at this 
point, and extending through Main street to a point 
nearly opposite Lake street, it then turns towards the 
north-east, and crosses private lands and under the tracks 
of the Woburn branch of the Boston, Lowell & Nashua 
Railroad. From this point to Prospect street, in Woburn, it 
is within the location of the Woburn Branch Eailroad. 
Crossing Prospect street and extending for a short distance 
through private lands, it then turns and runs in a northerly 
direction through other private lands as far as Railroad 
street. From the point where it turns after leaving Pros- 
pect street, a branch line 785 feet in length is to be extended 
in an easterly direction to Pollard's tannery. 



Report or the Water Board. 37 

From the line in Main street branches are to be laid to the 
houses draining directly into Wedge pond, and from the 
line within the Woburn Branch Railroad location branches 
are to be laid to catch-basins at each tannery. 

Main Sewer. 

The main sewer is built of brick, and is 28 inches high by 
26 inches wide. It is 11,857 feet in length, and extends 
from the outlet to a point within the Woburn Branch Rail- 
road location nearly opposite Moseley's tannery. 11,228 
lineal feet of the sewer is " single-course work ; " under the 
railroad crossings and at Waldmyer's tannery at Winches- 
ter, where it runs parallel with and 12 feet from the tan-pits, 
it is "double-course work." At the outlet and along the 
railroad embankment near Moseley's tannery cast-iron pipes, 
24 inches in diameter, are used. 

The sewer crosses the Al)bajona river by means of two 
wrought-iron pipes, of different diameters, one built inside the 
other, thus forming an air-space to prevent freezing. One 
end of the pipe is fixed and the other end is movable, being 
provided with an expansion joint at its connection with the 
masonry. The crossing of the stone culvert at the Wedge- 
pond outlet in Main street is effected by means of wrought- 
iron pipes of the same construction. This culvert has been 
enlarged by building two new water-ways, to compensate for 
the area in the old culvert occupied by the wrought-iron 
pipe. 

The grade of Main street, in Winchester, has been raised 
so as to make the depth of filling over the sewer 4 feet. An 
agreement was made, Nov. 26, with the Selectmen of Win- 
chester, for raising the grade of this street, and doing all 
the other necessary filling, at the rate of 40 cents per cubic 
3^ard, bank measurement. The work of filling was com- 
menced Nov. 28, and is now finished. 

The gravel filling on other parts of the main line was 
mostly furnished by the Boston, Lowell & Nashua Railroad 
C(jrporation, at the rate of $2 per car-load ; 889 car-loads 
have been used. 38 manholes and 10 flushing-tanks have 
been built on the main sewer line ; the manholes aie located 
about 250 feet apart, and the flushing-tanks about 1,000 feet 
apart. 

Pipe Sewer, or Russell-brook Line. 

The pipe sewer extends from the terminus of the main 
line to Railroad street in Woburn. Its total length, includ- 



38 City Document No. 62. 

ing all of its branch lines, is 11,644 feet. For 6,150 feet of 
this length, Akron sewer pipe, 15 inches in diameter, and 
for about 2,000 feet the same kind of pipe, 10 inches in diam- 
eter, will be used. All the -branch lines will be 6 inches in 
diameter. 

There will be about 35 manholes and 10 flushing-tanks 
built on the Russell-brook line, located the same distance 
apart as on the main line. 

Progress of the Work. 

The main line is completed with the exception of the iron- 
pipe outlet into the Lower Mystic Lake. 

On the pipe line 5,356 feet of 15-inch pipe have been laid ; 
also 16 manholes and 5 flushing-tanks have been built. 

Work upon the sewer was resumed April 8, 1878, and it 
is expected that the entire line will be completed by the 1st 
of July. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOS. P. DAVIS, 

Gity Engineer. 



Eeport of the Water Board, 



39 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, in feet and decimals, of the Reservoirs 
above ^'■tide-marsh level," 1866-77. 

BROOKLINE. 

Maximum high-water line, 124.60. 



Month. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.^ 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January . . 


122.28 


122.00 


123.29 


122.58 


122.83 


121.89 


118.64 


120.46 


121.06 


121.41 


122.09 


118.16 


February . 


122.47 


123.12 


122.79 


122.64 


122.80 


122.54 


120.48 


119.86 


119.52 


120.17 


121.86 


118.16 


March . . , 


123.19 


123.05 


122.33 


122.48 


122.77 


122.08 


122.04 


119.71 


119.27 


118.95 


122.24 


121.12 


April . . . 


123.45 


123.00 


123.04 


122.60 


122.56 


122.00 


122.10 


121.36 


119.69 121.45 


123.48 


122.97 


May .... 


123.04 


123.07 


123.04 


122.77 


122.75 


121.79 


122.29 


121.84 


121.70 122.84 


123.08 


122.72 


June .... 


123.29 


122.34 


122.77 


121.85 


122.64 


121.98 


122.25 


120.90 


121.83 


122.82 


122.24 


121.43 


July . . . . 


122.97 


1122.98 


122.77 


122.10 


122.50 


122.19 


121.25 


118.79 


121.08 


121.64 


121.88 


120.68 


August . . 


122.80 


122.23 


122.75 


122.19 


122.23 


122.06 


122.14 


118.48 


120.50 


121.69 


122.22 


120.49 


September . 


122.81 


122.52 


122.12 


122.50 


122.35 


121.50 


123.44 


119.04 


118.65 


122.45 


122.05 


119.80 


October . . 


123.03 


122.65 


122.31 


122.58 


122.64 


119.54 


122.96 


119.00 


117.60 


122.81 


122.41 


119.78 


November . 


122.75 


122.89 


122.55' 122.46 


122.60 


116.94 


120.98 


119.69 


118.43 


123.03 


122.70 


121.78 


December . 


122.64 


122.37 


122.00 


122.92 


122.50 


117.71 


121.06 


119.71 


120.17 


121.38 


121.09 


122.48 


Yearly j 
average ( 


122.89 


122.69 


122.65 


122.48 


122.58 


121.02 


121.63 


119.91 


119.98 


121.72 


122.28 


120.80 



1 New gauge put in, with a zero point .08 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



CHESTNUT HILL. 
Maximum high-water line, 125.00. 



Month. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.1 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 






102.00 
102.81 
105.19 
110.48 
116 21 
121.46 
122.40 
122.02 
121.44 
119.67 
117.08 
115.35 


116.90 
120.46 
122.29 
122.52 
122.54 
122.35 
121.77 
122.15 
122.77 
122.08 
122.42 
121.40 


120.76 
120 26 
120.11 
121.55 
122.03 
121.24 
119.65 
119..32 
119.74 
119.70 
120.21 
120.21 


121.32 
120.19 
119.95 
120.16 
121.93 
122.11 
121.50 
12100 
119.75 
119.15 
119.32 
120.61 


121.79 
120.86 
119.90 
121.80 
123.11 
123.19 
122.13 
122.03 
122.70 
123.09 
123.24 
122.95 


122.86 
122.97 
123.14 
123.73 
123.42 
122.70 
122.26 
122.5 S 
122.41 
122.72 
123.07 
121.78 

122.80 


119.99 






119.79 






121.61 






123.26 






123.05 






122.04 






121.19 






121.05 






120.55 






120.82 


November 

December 


100.80 
101.29 


122.11 

122.78 


Yearly average 


101.04 


114.67 


121.64 


120.40 


120.58 


122.23 


121.52 



iNew gauge put in, with a zero point .18 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



40 



City Document No. 62. 



Parker- Hill Reservoir. 
Maximum High-water Line, 219.00, 



Month. 



January 

February . . . . . 
March ....... 

April 

May 

June 

July ....... 

August 

September . . . , 

October 

November . . . . . 
December 

Yearly average 



18T5. 



21T.81 
216.00 
218.00 
217.96 
21T,96 
214.67 
214.71 
216.25 
216.19 
216.29 
216.29 
215.79 



216.50 



1876. 



215.29 
215.96 
216.69 
216.42 
216.58 
216.75 
217.02 
216.58 
216.62 
215.69 
216.12 
215.83 



216.38 



1877. 

216.49 
215.15 

215.76 
216.34 
216.11 
216.77 
216.81 
215.53 
215.61 
216.62 
216.46 
217.20 

216.24 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



41 



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42 



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44 



City Document No. 62. 






■§ = t^ 



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CD i-< f-H 



J= S 



TlH^ C^ G^^ CO CO 

co" o" -^ utT oT 

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Eeport of the Water Board. 



45 



CO CO to O CQ "^ 



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43 '-li-l i-4r-l 



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46 



City Document No. 62. 



Table showing the Depths of Water in the Conduit at Gate-house, Lake 
Cochituate, the Number of Days it was runnijig at those depths, and the 
average Depth for each Month. 



18T7. 


a 

>-> 




i 




1 


i 

3 

2 

2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

17 
5 


"3 

18 

1 

12 


3 
< 

31 


0. 

(U 
SQ 

3 

1 
3 
2 
21 


O 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
2 

20 


> 

30 


o 

Q 

31 


Total Days. 


I'-ll" 


1 


3'-6" 










2 


4'-0" 












2 


4-7" 














5'-l" 












^ 


5'-4" 














5'-9" 














6'-5" 

6'-6" 










6 

22 

1 
1 


25 


6-7" 

6'-8" 

6-9" 

6-10" 

6'-ll" 

7'-0" 

7'-l" 

7'-2" 

7'_3" 








10 


1 
3 
2 
3 
3 

71 
2 
2 

32 


7'-4" 








2 


7'-5" 








2 
13 

1 

1 
3 


8 


7'-6" 








106 


7'-7" 








1 


7-11" 

8-0" 

S'-l" 

8'-2" 


1 

29 
1 


9 
1 




1 

38 

1 
1 


8-4" 




1 


8-5" 






3 

27 

1 


3 


8-6" 




18 


48 


8'-7" 




1 








365 



Average Monthly Depths. 



187T. 





8'-4" 


1 


Pi 

<1 




3 
•-3 


3 
"-5 


3 


■ft 

o 


o 


> 

o 

7'-6" 


o 



S'-O" 


8'-6" 


7'.6r' 


6'.10i" 


a'-ir' 


V.2\- 


7'-0" 


e'-iiv' 


7'-3" 


7.-6" 



7'-^' 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



47 



Observations at Mystic Lake and Reservoir. 



January . . 
February • . 
March . . . 
.April . . . 
May . . . • 
June .... 
July .... 
August . . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 
December . 

Averages 



Height of Water 

in Lake above 

tide-marsh level. 

Feet. 



1876. 



6.71 
6.60 
6.56 
6.00 
6.51 
5.8T 
S.71 
4.57 
2.54 
1.45 
3.69 
6.22 



5.04 



1877. 



6.40 
6..'i4 
6.35 
6.24 
6.29 
6.09 
5.03 
3.64 
2.48 
3.01 
6.02 
6.26 



Height of Water 

in Reservoir above 

tide-mansh level. 

Feet. 



1876. 



146.35 
146.11 
146.33 
146.22 
146.38 
146.17 
146.51 
146.30 
146.43 
146.50 
146.41 
145.97 



1877. 



146.34 
146.38 
146.41 
146.30 
146.32 
146.05 
146.33 
146.52 
146.20 
146.58 
146.56 
146.64 



Average Daily 

Consumption. 

Gallons. 



1876. 



9,896,737 
10,601,013 
9,396,910 
7,568,052 
7,610,317 
8,560,937 
9,152,492 
8,600,788 
8,619,557 
8,081,052 
7,153,629 
10,673,036 



8,825,808 



1877. 



11,859,854 
9,982,621 
8,578,935 
7,200,533 
7,250,492 
8,190,530 
8,371,295 
8,121,402 
8,242,180 
8,780,799 
7,396,879 
7,732,921 



8,386,257 



High water in the Lake is 7.00 feet above tide-marsh level. 

" " Reservoir is 147.00 feet above tide-marsh level. 

Bottom of Conduit at Lake is 4.17 feet below tide-marsh level. 



48 



City Document No. 62. 



as 


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Kepoet of the Water Board. 



49 



Table showing Rainfall at Lake Cochituate for the year 1877. 



Totals . 3.19 0.53 7.79 3 



81 



24 3.73 2.^ 2 



54 



,04 



77 3.35 



.07 



44 



46 8.14 6.94 1.02 



97 



Total for the year . . 



, 43.80 



50 



City Document No. 62. 



Table showing Rainfall at Mystic Lake for the year 1877. 





C 

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0.81 




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0.38 








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0.52 


0,48 




0.81 


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10 . . . . 








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11 










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0.71 
0.02 




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0.545 


















14 




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15 . . 






0.54 








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0.77 










16 ... . 


0.80 








0.06 






0.08 


0.03 




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0.145 






18 ... . 






0.485 








1.78 


0.11 


0.45 
0.51 
0.53 
0.20 


0.06 




19 . . 












0.05 
0.10 




20 ... . 


0.05 






1.53 














21 








0.14 










22 . '. . . 






0.82 
0.865 


0.04 


0.27 












23 


















24 








0.80 
0.27 
0,07 
















25 . 




0.68 










1.20 
0.11 
0.95 

0.06 




0.10 






26 ... . 










2.43 
1.72 




27 ... 






1.97 
0.13 














28 












0.26 


0.04 






29 ... . 


















30 . 








0.55 




0.03 


0.14 






0.76 




31 ... . 












0.48 




























Totals . 


3.065 


0.765 


6.72 


3.445 


3.17 


1.69 


2.30 


6.94 


0.39 


7.61 


7.11 


0.89 



Total for the year 43.095 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



51- 



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52 City Document No. 62. 



EEPOET SUPERINTENDENT WESTERN DIVISION. 

Office of Western Division Boston Water 
Works, Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

May 1, 1878. 

Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, Chairman Boston Wafer Board: 

Sir, — I submit herewith the usual annual report of the 
Western Division for the past year : — 

Lake Cochituate. 

On the 1st of May, 1877, the water in the lake stood at 
elevation 134.07, 13 ft. 1 in. above the bottom of the aque- 
duct and very near high-water mark. It was kept at about 
this point, without material waste over the dam, until the 
middle of June, when the surface lowered steadily and uni- 
formly until Oct. 4, at which date it stood at 127.66, 6 ft. 
8 in. above ithe invert of the aqueduct. From this time until 
Jan. 16, 1878, the surface was rising, reaching 132.95 at 
that date. 

The lake was kept at about this height until the last of 
April, when it was alloAved to fill nearly to high-watermark. 
It will be seen from the foregoing that we have had a full 
lake for a large part of the year, but accompanied by the 
usual lowering of the surface during the hot summer months. 
As we require about 8 ft. of water to meet the consumption 
of the city, it was feared, as the water began to fall below 
this point, that pumping would again have to be resorted to 
to maintain the supply, Sudbury river at that time not being 
available. By order of the Board all the necessary machinery 
was put in complete order. On Sept. 26 the engines and 
pumps were put in position ; but, owing to a fortunate and 
heavy rain, they were not called into use. During October a 
large amount of water was received from Sudbury river, 
averaging from twenty to thirty million gallons per day, and 
giving us all the water we needed. Waste Avas begun at 
the outlet on January 15, beginning with 4 inches, which 
was increased to a foot on Feb. 25. On March 28 the 
gates were shut and waste ceased. 

No changes have been made of any importance in the 
structures or grounds at the lake during the past year. 



Report of the Water Board. 53 

The usual repairs have been made, and everything neces- 
sary to keep the works up to the customary standard has been 
done. 

A large amount of water has been received from Dug 
pond. A full table of heights of the water flowing over the 
river bjetween this pond and the lake has been sent to the 
City Engineer. 

Arrangements are now pending between the Board and the 
Selectmen of Natick in regard to the building of the Pond- 
street culvert, made necessary by the widening of the street. 
The prison authorities at Framingham are constructing a 
temporary filter to filter their sewerage, but it is hoped that 
a more permanent and better system will be adopted as soon 
as they can secure the means to alleviate the nuisance caused 
by the discharge of such a large amount of sewerage into 
Course brook. 

Dudley Pond 

Was called upon to reinforce the lake between Sept. 25, 
when the stop planks were taken out, and Oct. 9, when 
they were replaced, the water falling during that time from 
141.80 to 140.46. 

The Aqueduct. 

On May 1, 1877, we were running the aqueduct un- 
der a head of one foot, which was continued until May 
26, when it was increased to 1.25 ft. This height was 
maintained until June 26, when 6 inches more were 
added. On July 15 the head was reduced to 8 inches, 
owing to the scarcity of water, but, on October 12, 6 inches 
more were added, which was increased to 1 ft. 8 in. on Jan. 
16, and to 2 ft. 2 in. on Jan. 29. On Feb. 13 the head was 
reduced to 20 inches, at which height the water now stands 
over the top of the arch. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that the aqueduct has 
been run under a head throughout the entire year, and even 
this forcing process has proved insufficient, the reservoirs 
losing steadily meanwhile. 

But one examination of the conduit has been made. On 
May 8, 1877, the water was shut ofi" for twenty-four hours 
and parties sent through. A certain amount of cleaning and 
brushing was done. No breaks of any importance were dis- 
covered. The badly cracked portions seemed to have stood 
remarkably well, considering the strain put upon them. 

The usual patrolling has been kept up, but can now be 
discontinued, as we have the new aqueduct to fall back upon. 



54 City Document No. 62. 

The waste-weirs, culverts, etc., are in the usual condition. 

There are a number of trespassers on the land of the city 
along the line of the aqueduct. A list has been made out, 
and the parties notified. I think it would be a good plan 
to oblige those having buildings OAcr their boundaries to 
lease the city's land at a reasonable sum per year, and thus 
prevent the acquisition of rights, and avoid unnecessary hard- 
ships by requiring the buildings to be moved. 

Chestnut-Hill Eeservoie. 

The grounds and driveways around this reservoir have 
been much disturbed during the past year by the laying of 
the 48-inch pipe around the reservoir, and the construction 
of other works connected with the "Additional Supply." A 
large portion of this work is now completed, and we have 
beeti enabled to put everything in thorough order with the 
exception of a certain portion near the terminal chamber, 
now building. In rebuilding the fences we have made them 
of a more permanent character. Some three miles of new 
fencing have been erected. A large amount of grading and 
finishing of gutters, grounds, and walks has been accom- 
plished, and a number of trees planted from our own nursery. 
The labor connected with the digging and back filling for the 
48-in. main and the inverted siphons under the Cochituate 
conduit was done under my superintendence, and I have also 
designed and partially erected a system of self-recording 
gauges for the new gate-houses. During the past winter a 
new and substantial wall was built along our whole front on 
South street, and a new avenue connecting the Lawrence 
driveway with that street constructed. 

The stones were taken from the adjoining fields, which 
have thus been turned into grass land. 

The gate-houses are all in the best order. Some minor 
repairs are now in progress. 

Experiments have been kept up during the summer on the 
evaporation from our water surfaces, and the results, with 
records of temperature, heights, etc., transmitted to the 
City Engineer. 

On Feb. 13, the water being at a low point, the reser- 
voirs were filled from the new aqueduct. About 150,000,000 
gallons were run in in four days. 

Brookline Eeservoie 

Is in good order. There are from 10 to 16 inches of mud 
on the bottom of this reservoir, but there is no practical and 



Report or the Water Board. 55 

safe way to clean it out until a new main is laid. A substan- 
tial fence has been erected on two sides of the grounds. 
The gate-houses will require a thorough overhauling when 
the basin is emptied. No further difficulty has been ex- 
perienced from the old conduit around the basin. 
The usual table of tools, etc., is added. 
Very respectfully yours, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

8u:pt. West. Div. B. W. W. 



LIST OF CITY PROPERTY ON THE WESTERN 
DIVISION. 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

JEffluent Gate-house. 

1 hand-pump, 1 12-ft. ladder, 1 10-ft. ladder, 1 box 
whitewash putty, 1 wrench, 100 ft. of hose, 25 ft. lead pipe, 

2 tons coal, 2 shovels, 1 rattan broom, 1 set evaporation 
apparatus, 4 stop-plank hooks, 1 blow-off wrench, 1 gate 
wrench, 32 ft. galv. chain, lock, etc., 1 fountain nozzle, 
13 stop-planks, 1 step-ladder, 5 pictures, 1 gauge, 1 ther- 
mometer, 1 broom, 2 brushes and dust-pan, 2 lanterns, 
hydraulic apparatus, 1 stove, stove-pipe, pokers, and hod. 

Office. 

1 safe, 3 desks, 6 chairs, 3 stools, 5 pictures, 1 telegraph 
instrument, 1 set scales, 2 stoves, 3 reflecting lanterns, 3 
lanterns, 4 brooms, 3 ice-chisels and hooks, 1 ice-saw, 1 
glass float, 1 hook-gauge, 3 inkstands, 3 thermometers, 1 
copper pan, 10 tumblers, 2 kettles, stove blacking, 11 pairs 
rubber boots, 7 pairs rubber coats and caps, 8 gauging floats, 
1 drawing table, 1 sink, pump, wash-basin, and 6 towels. 

Tool-House. 

1 box oil-cups, I box 9X12 glass, 1 copper elbow, | bbl. 
lard oil and cans, f bbl. kerosene oil and cans, 1 can sperm 
oil, 2 cans glycerine, 12 bird-houses, 3 conduit reflectors, 

3 screen-doors, 40 lbs. waste, 11 padlocks, 5 boxes candles, 

4 bars, soap, 1 gross matches, 10 paint-brushes, 1 chimney 
brush, 2 whitewash brushes, 1 i-peck measure, 2 bunches 
tacks, 2 slates, 4 rolls wicking, 4 sheets rubber gaskets, 1 



56 City Document No. 62. 

Johnson pump, 12 window-screens, 1 water-tank, 2 rain- 
gauges, 6 horse-bonnets, 4 back-straps, 1 hand-hammer, 6 
striking-hammers, 8 sledge-hammers, 1 paving-hammer, 3 
axes, 4 screen-bars, 17 iron bars, 14 square shovels, 10 snow- 
shovels, 57 round-pointed shovels, 7 scufflers, 37 picks, 2 
grub-axes, 8 pick-handles, 3 bars solder, 20 lbs. block-tin, 12 
sledge-handles, 3 trowels, 4 rifles, 1 lot of cord, 5 cape- 
chisels, 4 hoes, 3 one-bushel baskets, 4 border-knives, 

2 beadles, 1 paving-rammer, 1 root-puller, 7 manure- 
forks, 1 limb-cutter, 1 gaff-hook, 1 California pump-belt, 
25 ft. wire fence, 2 pulleys, 3 mowing-machines, 22 drills, 
1 copper tamping-rod, 2 iron spoons, ^ box whetstones, 1 
wooden pulley, 1 can palm-oil, 1 screen-brush, 1 bucket 
grass-seed, 1 bag grass-seed, 15 lbs. marlin, 5 lbs. oakum, 

3 dozen hay-caps, 1 rubber tank-hose, 1 box candlesticks, 
1 writing-desk, 1 cross-cut saw, 8 small tin dippers, 9 pails, 
9 heavy buckets, 1 tin boiler, 1 hay-knife, 100 ft. fuse, 
1 can sulphur, 2 large sponges, 1 quart horse-medicine, 1 
box horse-j^owders, 2 grates, 1 step-ladder, 75 lbs. lead, 13 
rattan brooms, 11 snaths, 8 scythes, 20 iron rakes, 24 
wooden rakes, 9 hay-forks, 5 hay-ropes. 

Old Blacksmith's Shop. 

1 observatory and instruments, 2 pieces canvas, 1 pair 
oars, 2 boats, 1,000 shingles, 1 flume, 1 post-spoon, 4 root- 
pullers, 1 iron cover, 17 bbls. Portland cement, 10 bbls. 
American cement, 1^ bbls. black oil, 1 keg powder, 1 lot 
crusher-plates, 4 screens, 1 large screen, 12 signs, 1 iron 
bedstead, 1 bbl. paint, 3 plough-points, 1 man-hole grate, 

1 cask red paint, 1 house force-pump. 

Stable. 

7 horses, 10 horse-blankets, 1 rubber horse-cover, 2 sets 
double harness, 1 hay-rigging harness, 1 express harness, 

2 driving harnesses, 9 haltersy 4 cart harnesses, 1 harness- 
pan, 1 gallon neatsfoot oil, 1 Johnson pump, sleigh-bells, 
8 surcingles, 1 stove, 3 stable-sponges, 2 bars soap, 4 curry- 
brushes and combs. 1 set lead chains, 1 hay-cutter, 1 knee- 
pad, 50 bushels oats, 8 bushels cracked-corn, 14 barrels 
carrots, 1 lot chains. 

Carpenter'' s Shop. 

1 stove, 1 clock, 200 ft. clear white pine, 100 ft. ash, 
560 spruce clapboards, 3 hand-saws, 1 panel-saw, 1 bitt- 
stock and bitts, 1 level, 8 planes, 4 augurs, 1 pair dividers, 



Eepokt of the Water Board. 57 

13 chisels, 2 axes, 2 gauges, 28 fence-rails, 4X4 ; 1 wood- 
saw, 1 water-tank, 1,100 lbs. nails, 1 lot screws, 1 hammer, 
1 hatchet, 1 compass-saw, 12 eye-bolts, 1 fence wrench, 2 
ladles, 3 rubber belts, 2 jack-screws, 4 cans green paint, 
1 can Japan, 1 can spirits turpentine, 1 can boiled linseed 
oil, yV ^^1- ^^^ linseed oil, ^ bbl. asphaltum varnish, 6 paint- 
brushes, 1 can shellac, 1 can lard oil, 25 cans paint, 1 can 
coach varnish, 1 grindstone, 1 galv. chain and pulley, 
1 roll tarred paper, 1 belt-stretcher, 1 rotary-pump, 23 stop- 
planks, 1 ton coal, 1 Blake pump, 1 portable boiler, 1 feed- 
pump, 1 portable engine, 1 roll brown paper. 

Blacksmith'' s Shop. 

1 forge, 1 anvil, 1 set tools, 1 vice, 1 breast-drill, 3 stock- 
dies and taps, 1 ratchet and drill, 3 files, 50 lbs. iron, 500 
lbs. s'crap-iron, 4 pairs pipe-tongs, 1 solid die-plate, 200 feet 
steam-pipe, 3 cold-chisels, 3 monkey-wrenches. 

Yard. 

1 derrick and rigging, 1 Blake stone-crusher, 1 12-H. P. 
engine, 1 tank, 4 cans, 1 portable building and shed, 60 ft. 
4-in. suction-pipe, 1 piece of lead suction-pipe (syphon), 1 
piece of copper suction-pipe, 18 in. ; 16 ft. 4 in. iron suc- 
tion-pipe, 12 ft. 4 in. iron suction-pipe, 3 clay-knives, 18 fire- 
buckets, 1 carryall, 1 sleigh, 1 open buggy, 1 covered buggy, 
1 express waggon, 1 2-horse wagon, 4 carts, 2 water-carts, 

1 hay-wagon, 3 2-horse drags, 1 pung, 2 2-horse sleds, 1 
2-horse truck, 2 road-rollers, 1 pair large wheels, 2 moving 
wheels, 1 horse-power, 2 hand-carts, 1 spare pole, 2 hand- 
rollers, 1 fire-engine, 1 whip, 1 bufialo robe, 1 watering-pot, 

2 jacks, 2 conduit forms, 1 step-ladder, 1 30-ft. ladder, 1 
28 ft. ladder, 2 small ladders, 1 20-H. P. engine, 2 bundles 
straw, 2,000 bricks, 2 loads sand, 1 lot cast-iron grates, 1 
lot clay, 1 scraper, 2 snow-ploughs, 1 plough, 1 harrow, 35 
granite bounds, 13 cedar posts, 1 rain-gauge, 6 ft. Scotch 
drain-pipe, 1 hay-stack, 42 ft. of 15-in. drain-pipe, 9 ft. 30 
in. drain pipe. 

JBrookline Reservoir. 

1 writing-desk, record-book, ink-rack, etc., 1 gauge, 1 
stove, stove-pipe 32 ft., hod and pokers, 1 pitcher, 1 
tumbler, 1 spittoon, 1 lantern, 1 stove-brush, 2 settees, 4 
stop-plank hooks, 2 towels, 2 mats, 1 pair rubber boots, 1 
scythe, 3 shovels, 1 pick, 1 dust-brush, 2 rakes, 1 hoe, 1 
sickle, 1 scuifler, 2 water-pails, 1 13-ft. ladder, 1 step- 



58 City Document No. 62. 

ladder, 1 sponge, 1 pair hedge-shears, 1 dust-pan, 1 feather 
duster, 1 bushel basket, 1 border knife, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 
spade, 1 broom, a screen-brush, 1 rattan broom, 2 scrubbing 
brushes, 1 watering-pot, 1 axe, 1 chair, 1 wrench, 1 40-in. 
gate-key, 9 ft., 2 36-in. gate-keys, 4 ft., 1 40-in. gate-key, 
6 ft., 2 air-cock wrenches, 2 gate-wheels, 1 gate-cover, 1 
gate-crank, 2 gate-chamber wheels, 3 'stop-planks, 3 ft. 
3^X8 in., 18 stop-plank, 4 ft. 5 in.X8 in., 33 stop-planks, 
5 ft. 6 in.X8 in., 3 gas-fixtures, 1 frame for gates, 1 rammer, 
4 keys for 48 in. connection, 1 wrench, iron cover and 
wooden cover for 48 in. connection, 1 crowbar,- 3 ther- 
mometers, 5 padlocks, 2 screen-doors, 6 window-screens, 4 
screens, 5^X5 ft., 1 iron ladder, 7^ ft., 4 signs, 1 hammer, 
1 cold-chisel. 

Lake Cochituate. 

1 dining-room table, 18 dining-room chairs, 1 small table, 
1 mirror, 1 air-tight stove, 1 oilcloth carpet, 2 spittoons, 2 
record-books, 1 old range, 1 bowl and slab, 1 steelyards, 1 
horse, 1 wagon, 1 light wagon, 1 cart, 1 pung, 3 harnesses, 
1 bufiklo robe, 3 25-horse-power engines, 3 18-in. pumps, 3 
12-in. pumps, shafting, pipe and tools, 4 stop-plank hooks, 
2-in. hooks, 1 box bolts and pieces steam-pipe, 2 pieces 
boiler plate, 1 map, 1 rain-gauge, 2 light stands, 1 old boat 
(flat bottom), 1 old boat (metal), 1 telegraph instrument, 7 
wheelbarrows, 1 lot offence posts, 6 wooden rolls, 38 stop- 
planks, 1 screen for gate-house, 4 hoes, 1 scythe, 2 pieces 
rubber hose, 1 rope, 2 gravel-screens, 1 drain-mould, 1 lot 
of corrugated iron, 4 rattan brooms, 6 candlesticks, 2 grind- 
stones, 1 grappling-iron, 1 boat-hook, 1 raft, 2 square- 
pointed shovels, 2 snow-shovels, 2 round-pointed shovels, 
10 picks, 2 grub-hoes, 2 stone hand-trucks, 4 ox- chains, 1 
short chain, 2 hay-rakes, 2 whitewash brushes, 1 saw, 1 
hammer, 1 roll telegraph wire, 1 sledge, 1 striking-hammer, 

1 road-roller, 5 bbls. cement, 1 pair hedge-shears, 2 sickles, 

2 hay -forks, 1 manure-fork, 50 stone bounds, 6 pails, 1 pair 
oars, 2 sand-sieves, 6 hand-drills, 2 hand drill-hammers, 6 
steel-points, 3 axes, 1 hatchet, 2 jointers, 1 pointing-trowel, 
4 bars, 1 pinch-bar, lot of scrap-iron, copper, and lead, 
lot of lamps, chimneys, etc., 3 pairs rubber boots. 

Siphon Chambers. 

2 gauges, set of stop-planks, and differential blocks. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 59 



WATEE REGISTRAR'S REPORT, 1877-78. 

Office of the Water Registrar, City Hall, 

Boston, May 6, 1878. 

T. T. Sawyer, Esq., 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the ordinance, the 
Water Registrar herewith presents the following Report : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1878 is 49,970, being an increase since January 1, 1877, of 
1,642. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates during the year ending January 
1, 1878, is 1,849. . 

Of this number 1,509 have been turned on, leaving a 
balance of 340 still remaining off. 

The total amount of water-rates 

received from April 30, 

1877, to May 1, 1878, is . . . $1,014,325 81 
Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used during 

the previous year the sum of $57,512 88 
Leaving the receipts for water 

furnished during the financial 

year ..... $956,«12 93 
Amount paid Mystic Water 

Department during the year 

ending April 30, 1878, as 

per contract . . . $48,674 10 
In addition to the above there 

has been received for turning 

on water, in cases where it 

had been turned off for non- 
payment of rates, the sum of . . . $1,722 00 
Received for summons . . . . 1,771 00 



Total, $1,017,818 81 



60 



City Document No. 62. 



The total amount of assessments now made 

for the year 1878 is .... $858,76676 

The estimated amount of income from the 

sales of water during the year ending with 

April 30, 1879, is . . . . . $1,015,000 00 
The expenditures of my office during the year 

1877 have been $23,648 54 

The total number of meters now applied to premises of 
water-takers is 1,079. Of this number 684 are |-inch, 334 
1-inch, 43 2-inch, 14 3-inch, 4 4-inch, sizes. In addition to 
these there are 131 elevators, and 19 organ motors, with 
indicators attached to determine the quanity of water con- 
sumed. 

Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam- 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1878, with the amount of water-rates 
received for 1877 : — 



31,296 Dwelling-houses 
37 Boarding-houses 
1,391 Model-houses 
12 Lodging-houses 
16 Hotels 
5,918 Stores and shops 
479 Buildings . 
790 Offices 
41 Halls 

2 Museums .• 
37 Private schools 
21 Asylums . 

4 Hospitals . 
59 Greenhouses 

128 Churches . 
8 Markets . 
97 Cellars 
823 Restaurants and saloons 
11 Club-Houses 
30 Photographers 
32 Packing-houses 
1,818 Stables 
44 Factories . 

5 Bleacheries 

Amount carried forward, 



$487,313 88 

1,870 92 

34,568 12 

447 00 

1,044 25 

64,137 23 

21,435 76 

7,009 85 

710 00 

70 50 

709 92 

. 1,360 00 

144 00 

1,472 09 

2,026 98 

1,224 12 

651 17 

18,194 40 

237 00 

957 39 

1,300 00 

13,026 26 

1,723 29 

117 50 



$661,751 63 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



61 



Amount brought forward^ 
6 Beer-factories 
116 Bakeries . 
1 Boat-house 
10 Freight-houses 
4 Gasometers 

1 Cemetery . 

2 Bath-houses 
6 Ship-yards 

3 Dry docks and engines 
123 Shops and engines 

20 Factories and engines 
2 Foundries and engines 

13 Printing and engines . 
2 Bakeries and engines . 
2 Ship-yards and engines 
8 Buildings and engines 

21 Stationery engines 
77 Discharging and pile-driving engines 
10 Armories . 

1,224 Hand-hose 
12 Fountains . 
40 Tumbler-washers 
70 Beer water-pressures 
27 Laundries . 

1 Commercial College 

2 Gymnasiums 
Custom House . 

8 Aquariums 
Ice Company (washing ice) 

8 Railroad stations 
74 Steamboats 

1 Round house 

1 Mill . 

9 Motors 
Office (City Scales) 
Office (City Surveyor) 
District Court Houses 

2 Police Stations . 
1 Lock-up . 

Probate Building 
House of Reception . 
46 Fire-engines, hose, and hook and lad 
der houses 
6 Chemical Engines 

Amount carried forward. 



$661,751 


63 


328 


50 


1,204 


82 


49 


00 


252 


00 


60 


00 


10 


00 


50 


00 


82 


25 


115 


00 


7,884 


87 


1,086 


QQ 


118 


50 


933 


42 


58 


00 


75 


00 


741 


50 


1,517 


43 


870 


00 


158 


50 


7,975 


00 


160 


00 


600 


00 


347 


50 


670 


42 


61 


50 


65 


00 


85 


00 


50 


00 


30 


00 


176 


03 


11,170 


32 


50 


00 


50 


00 


46 


67 


11 


00 


, 16 


00 


103 


50 


71 


50 


6 


00 


75 


00 


10 


00 


950 


00 


90 


00 


$700,217 52 



62 



CiTT Document No. 62. 



Amount brought forward, 
3,722 Fire hydrants . 
129 Reservoirs 
Repair shop 
Committee on Bathing 
Public Urinals . 
Common Sewer Department 
Steamer " J. P. Bradlee " 
Steamer " Wm. M. Flander 
Steamer " Samuel Little " 
Police Steamer, " Protector 
Public Schools . 
Drinking Fountains 
Public Garden . 
Deer Park 

Boston Truants' Home 
Public Library . 
Branch Libraries 
Faneuil Hall 
City Stables 
Washing-Carts . 
Offal Station . . 
Sprinkling streets 
Street watering . 
Lamp Department 
Paving Department 
Building purposes 
Filling gasometer 
Filling cistern . 
Metered water (9 months) 
Maintaining meters 



$700,217 


52 


66,996 


00 


2,322 


00 


38 


50 


82 


00 


225 


00 


275 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


- 100 


00 


3,904 


00 


300 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


50 


00 


104 


50 


68 


00 


40 


00 


226 


25 


150 


00 


225 


00 


500 


00 


302 


76 


42 


25 


442 


75 


2,050 


18 


131 


28 


2 


00 


170,521 


37 


97 


00 


$949,938 36 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



63 



Statement showing the Number and Kind of Water Fixtures contained within 
the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston to January 1, 1878, as 
compared with previous years. 



1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Remarks. 


7,271 


8,269 


8,386 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 

sewer. 


72,897 


77,111 


80,340 


Sinks. 


37,611 


39,764 


41,859 


Wash-hand basins. 


12,725 


13,690 


14,300 


Bathing-tubs. 


20,575 


22,703 


22,704 


Pan water-closets. 


2,584 


1,875 


1,038 


Hopper water-closets. 


17,569 


19,912 


2t),680 


" " automatic. 


564 


557 


539 


" " waste. 


1,636 


1,545 


1,438 


Urinals. 


1,693 


2,043 


2,307 


" automatic. 


15,055 


15,990 


16,608 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


633 


629 


598 


Shower-baths. 


330 


286 


263 


Private hydrants. 


805 


830 


850 


Slop-hoppers. 


113 


110 


106 


Foot-baths. 


192,061 


205,314 


211,516 





The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochitnate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848 : — 



Received by Water Commissioners, as per 
Auditor's Report in 1848 .... 
From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850 



1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 



1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 



$972 81 

71,657 79 

99,025 45 

161,052 85 

179,567 39 

196,352 32 

217,007 51 

266,302 77 

282,651 84 

289,328 83 



Amount carried forward, 



$1,763,919 56 



64 City Document No. 62. 



ghtforwi 


ird. 




$1,763,919 56 


1858, to 


January 1, 


, 1859 


. 302,409 73 


1859, 




1860 


. 314,808 97 


1860, 




1861 


. 334,544 86 


1861, 




1862 


. 365,323 96 


1862, 




1863 


. 373,922 33 


1863, 




1864 


. 394,506 25 


1864, 




1865 


. 430,710 76 


1865, 




1866 


. 450,341 48 


1866, 




1867 


. 486,538 25 


1867, 




1868 


. 522,130 93 


1868, 




1869 


. 553,744 m 


1869, 




1870 


. 597,328 55 


1870, 




1871 


. 708,783 68 


1871, 




1872 


. 774,445 70 


1872, 




1873 


. 806,102 51 


1873, 




1874 


. 859,436 55 


1874, 




1875 


. 914,748 73 


1875, 




1876 


. 944,680 94 


1876, 




1877 


. 962,332 80 


1877, 




1878 


. 949,938 36 


1878, to 


May 1, 


1878 


. 782,876 94 




$14,593,576 72 



The following table exhibits the yearly increase of water- 
takers since January 1, 1850 : — 









Takers. 


Increase. 


1850, to 


January 1 


,1851, 


13,463 




1851, 




1852, 


16,076 


2,613 


1852, 




1853, 


16,862 


786 


1853, 




1854, 


18,170 


1,308 


1854, 




1855, 


19,193 


1,023 


1855, 




1856, 


19,998 


805 


1856, 




1857, 


20,806 


808 


1857, 




1858, 


21,602 


796 


1858, 




1859, 


22,414 


812 


1859, 




1860, 


23,271 


857 


1860, 




1861, 


24,316 


1,045 


1861, 




1862, 


24,456 


1,170 


1862, 




1863, 


26,289 


803 


1863, 




1864, 


26,851 


562 


1864, 




1865, 


27,046 


195 


1865, 




1866, 


27,489 


443 


1866, 




1867, 


27,754 


265 



Report of the Water Board. 



65 













Takers. 


Increase. 


om January 1 , 


1867, to 


January 1 


, 1868, 


28,104 


350 




1868, 






1869, 


29,738 


1,634 




1869, 






1870, 


31,500 


1,762 




1870, 






1871, 


36,132 


4,632 




1871, 






1872, 


38,716 


2,584 




1872, 






1873, 


40,688 


1,972 




1873, 






1874, 


42,345 


1,657 




1874, 






1875, 


44,676 


2,331 




1875, 






1876, 


46,885 


2,209 




1876, 






1877, 


48,328 


1,443 




1877, 






1878, 


49,970 


1,642 




Drinking-Fountains . 






There are 52 


drinking 


-fountains 


now establislied 


within 


3 city limits : - 


— 













* Common (6). 

Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Washington street, near Blackstone square. 
Charles street, near Boylston street. 

" " between Boylston and Beacon streets. 

" " opposite jail. 

Commercial street, junction Atlantic avenue. 
Albany street, opposite City Hospital. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the bridge. 
Foundry street, near First street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 
Telegraph hill, South Boston. 
Fourth street, near Foundry street. 
Fourth street, junction of Emerson street. 
Eustis street, corner of Washington street. 

* Eliot square, opposite Norfolk House. 
Pynchon street, opposite Roxbury street. 
Tremont street, junction of Cabot street. 
Beacon street, junction Brookline avenue. 
Commercial street, opposite Beach street, Dorchester. " 
Upham's Corner, Dorchester. 

Glover's Corner, " 

Grove Hall, " 

Maverick square, East Boston. 
Central square, " 



Those marked * are arranged for a continuous flow of water- 
automatic fixtures, operating the flow of water when required. 



The balance have 



6Q City Document No. 62. 

Bennington street, junction Chelsea street, East Boston. 

Albany street, junction of Dearborn street. 

Washington street, near Elm street. 

Neponset avenue, corner Walnut street. 

Morton street, junction South street. 

Roslindale, Taft's Hotel. 

Union square, Brighton. • 

Western avenue, Charles-river Hotel. 

Market street, Cattle Fair Hotel, Brighton. 

Barry's Corner, Brighton. 

Causeway street, opposite Lowell R.R. depot. 

" " junction Merrimac street. 

Fourth street, corner of Q street. 
North square, junction of Merrimac street. 
Hay market square. 
Atlantic avenue, near N.Y. & N.E.R.R. freight-house. 

" " head of Foster's wharf. 

Centre and La Grange streets. West Roxbury. 
Washington and Williams streets, West Roxbury. 
Corner Tremont and Heath streets. 
Centre street, junction Day and Perkins streets. 

There are six stand-pipes now located for street-sprinkling, 

as follows : — 

DOECHESTER DISTRICT. 

Corner Stoughtou and Boston streets. 
Dudley street, opposite Harvard avenue. 

Roxbury District. 

Clay street, near Tremont street. 

Brookline avenue, corner of Longwood avenue. 

Brighton District. 

North Beacon, near Union square. 

Washington street, earner Chestnut Hill avenue. 



Eeport of the "Water Board. 



67 



The following table exhibits the class of premises to which 
meters are attached, together with the amount of revenue 
received during the year 1877 : — 



I^ame. 



Revere House . . 
American House 
Parker House . . , 
U. S. Hotel ... 
Tremont House . 
Toung's Hotel . . , 
Adams House . , 
Hotel Berkeley . 
Marlboro' House . 
Albion Building . 
Central House . , , 
Hotel Pelham • . , 
Hotel Boylston . , 
La Grange House 

St. Cloud 

Hotel Clarendon . , 
Seaver House . . , 
Evans House . . . 
Park.square Hotel . 
Hotel Kempton . , 
Hotel Hamilton . , 
Hotel Vendome . , 
Coolidge House . . 
Hancock House . . 
Merrimac House . 
Stanley House . • . 
International Hotel 
Hotel Alexander . 
Hotel Brunswick . 
Park's Hotel . . . 
Derby House . . . 



Class. 



Hotel 



Amount carried fonoard . 



Gallons. 



9,623,930 
7,852,717 
10,633,680 
4,331,991 
7,815,460 
9,784,709 
4,106,886 
3,053,429 
Vacant 
1,145,272 

156,059 
1,677,231 
1,321,572 

349,057 

655,071 
1,496,344 

255,816 
1,325,834 

197,804 
1,771,341 
2,314,746 
3,756,426 

991,191 
82,927 

355,447 

620,8'04 
2,057,616 
1,050,111 
5,700,457 

484,145 

542,714 



Revenue. 



$2,532 17 
2,050 55 
2,783 58 
1,128 12 
2,047 30 
2,542 10 
1,037 79 
820 51 

295 13 

41 95 
437 33 
351 95 

91 99 
172 46 
404 33 

66 83 
349 80 

51 16 

467 58 

611 82 

985 25 

259 69 

21 83 

93 23 

166 46 

514 40 

276 23 

1,497 89 

128 84 

142 35 



85,510,2871 $22,370 62 



68 



City Document No. 62. 



Amount brought forward 
City Hotel . . . 
Hotel Albermarle (3 mos.) 
Ashland House . . 
Hotel Columbus . . 
Hotel Glover . . . 
Merchants' Hotel . 
M. J. Flatley . . . 
New England House 
"Winthrop House . 
Dooley's Hotel . . 
Commercial House 
Joh A. Turner . . 
Milliken House . , 
Sherman House . • 
Everett House . . . 
Metropolitan House 
Commonwealth Hotel 
St. James Hotel . 
Massachusetts House 
Bay State House . 
Mariner's House . 
Robertson House . 
Boston Hotel . . . 
Creighton House . 
Van Renssalear . . 
Quincy House . . . 
Marston House . . 
Stumcke & Goodwin 
Pavilion House . . 
Norfolk House . . 
National House . . 
Hotel Agassiz . . . 
Phillips House . . 
Albany House (9 mos.) 
Cattle Fair Hotel (3 mos.) 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Hotel 



Gallons. 



85,510,287 
188,819 
884,161 
444,269 

2,692,266 
300,858 
101,677 
164,706 
655,060 
504,509 
58,537 
435,276 
587,700 
533,181 

1,340,709 
141,471 

1,234,702 

1,627,335 

2,684,527 
113,737 
601,266 
78,989« 
270,576 
515,714 
767,917 
446,407 

2,141,129 
763,747 

3,471,013 
370,041 
965,002 
646,709 

2,053,364 

67,485 

138,458 

38,970 



Revenue. 



$22,370 62 

49 05 

235 60 

116 59 

697 95 

79 54 

26 92 

43 06 

170 16 

131 66 

14 88 

116 22 

154 11 

141 25 

359 45 

36 66 

325 36 

433 14 

710 28 

29 90 

156 30 

20 15 

70 81 

135 95 

200 41 

116 82 

558 17 

199 44 

913 62 

98 56 

254 54 

167 53 

548 84 

17 28 

34 61 

9 74 



113,540,574 $29,745 17 



Keport of the Water Board. 



69 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Hotel Cluney 

Stinson House 

John D. Miller • . . . . 
Moody Merrill 



Old Colony and Kewport 
Railroad Co 



Boston and Albany Rail- 
road Co 



Boston and Maine Railroad 
Co 



Boston and Lowell Rail- 
road Co 



Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Eastern Railroad Co. . 



New York and New Eng- 
land Railroad Co 



Boston and 
Railroad Co. 



Providence 



Boston, Revere Beach, and 
Lynn Railroad Co. . . . 



Boston Gas Light Co. . . . 
South Boston Gas Light Co. 
Bast Boston Gas Light Co. 
Roxbury Gas Light Co. . . 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. . 
Standard Sugar Refinery . 
Jasper Sugar Refinery . . 
Continental Sugar Refinery 
Bay State Sugar Refinery . 
Oxnard Sugar Refinery . . 
Boston Sugar Refinery . . 
Bay State Rolling Mill . . . 
Norway Iron Works . . . 
Highland Spring Brewery . 

Edward Hahich 

J. W. Kenney (5 mos. ) . . 
Frey &King (3mos.) . . . 
H. &J. Pfa£f 



Class. 



Hotel . 



Brewery 



Amount carried forward 397,023,266 $103,824 00 



Gallons. 



Revenue. 



113,540,574 

242,168 

153,060 

257,864 

1,559,152 

22,952,030 

33,799,730 

5,391,569 

9,963,706 
3,457,836 
8,211,975 

11,294,541 

11,270,143 

3,378,975 

34,395,211 

965,991 

1,050,921 

1,001,331 

514,783 

46,478,797 

9,260,557 

20,346,375 

7,890,750 

2,204.661 

685,267 

11,890,094 

25,035,543 

6,397,092 

2,694,671 

745,799 

I0r,055 

3,885,045 



$29,745 17 

60 54 

40 38 

67 17 

408 50 

6,003 19 

8,891 47 

1,402 69 

1,549 91 

898 49 

2,190 93 

2,974 04 

2,949 60 

882 49 

9,116 48 

262 54 

275 99 

265 45 

138 82 

12,089 91 

2,380 82 

5,218 56 

1,972 67 

555 75 

204 14 

3,167 50 

6,487 02 

1,663 06 

708 24 

186 44 

26 78 

1,039 26 



70 



City Document No. 62. 



. Name. 


Class. 


S3 
If 

00 .£ 


.a .G ^ 
a c c 

(M CO, -^ 


o 


Q-allons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forwm 
A. J. Houghton & Co., 


'•d . 






397,023,266 

419,171 

811,236 

1,138,552 

1,790,099 

6,974,942 

4,664,242 

6,063,524 

834,419 

6,389,625 

1,223,625 

80,565 

575,999 

691,296 

396,686 

261,831 

813,689 

414,081 

1,697,513 

618,696 

479,619 

734,564 

1,048,176 

1,430,924 

668,490 

111,645 

984,382 
213,412 
223,748 
340,664 
181,813 
435,839 
210,216 
399,787 


$103,824 00 
111 13 


Hal- 




2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


I . . . 

I , . . 

1 . . . 
1 . . 
1 . 

2 . , 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 

2 

2 
. . 1 
. . 3 
. . 2 
. . 2 
. . 2 
. . 2 
. . 1 


A. J. Houghton & Co., 


Sta- 


Bee 


r Factory . 


210 76 






301 44 


Gottlieb Burkhardt . . 




469 31 
1,562 15 






1,218 53 






1,571 42 






221 06 


Suffolk Brewing Co. . 




1,648 60 
320 48 


Elm-wood Spring Brewery . 
Vincent & Hathaway . . . 
Moses Fau-bahks & Co. . . 


20 14 
147 31 
175 83 
101 56 


Comstock, Q-ove & Co. 




Bull dins' . . . 


66 93 
213 50 


Wesleyan Association 








110 25 
423 23 


S. S. Houghton & Co. 




162 46 
124 09 


Smith & Porter . . . 




192 31 


T. H. Carter .... 




272 90 
375 66 






176 10 


N. B. Mut. Life Ins. 
70 State st 


Co., 


29 89 


N. E. Mut. Life Ins. 
Milk St 


Co., 


259 61 


Horticultural Hall . 
Suffolk National Bank 




55 24 
58 82 
91 68 


Blackstone Market . 
John Rayner, heirs . 
Otis T. Buggies . . . 




47 88 
117 61 
55 94 


Turn Hall 




106 37 








Amount carried fonca 


rd . 










439,246,136 


$114,832 08 



Report of the Water Board. 



71 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
B. B. Appleton, heirs . . 

J. W. Merriam 

Peter B. Brigham .... 
Mrs. Ellen Brooks .... 

Orieatal Tea Co 

8. D. Hicks 

John Stetson 

Macullar, Williams & Parker 
John P. Mills 



Lilly, Toung, Pratt 85 Brack- 
ett 



J. I. Brown & Son . . . 
Hogg, Brown & Taylor . 

A. Wentworth 

William Ropes, estate . . 

A. D. Puffer 

Eastern Express Co. . . 
Grand Lodge of Masons . 
James W. Rollins .... 



Haley, Morse & Co., 61 
Washington street . . . 

Mass. Inst, of Technology 

8. N. Brown, Jr 

A. H. Vinton 

A. Stowell 

B. F. Bradbury 

Shepard, Norwell & Co. . 
D. J. Hastings 

C. U. Cotting, 628 Wash, st, 
C. U. Cotting, 7 Court sq, 

W. H. Mann 

Smith & Watson .... 

Jonas Fitch 

H. C. Stephens 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Building 



Gallons. 



439,246,136 
653,774 
269,069 
627,704 
117,721 
207,396 
1,309,400 
1,503,021 
571,169 
447,264 

1,155,747 
271,581 

3,118,507 
440,070 

2,557,073 
332,241 
799,454 
360,652 
466,590 

183,420 
1,092,862 
344,812 
360,832 
302,278 
187,109 
549,950 
180,149 
574,057 
658,207 
473,992 
409,101 
100,514 
369,187 



Revenue. 



$114,832 08 
168 28 

71 92 
163 20 

31 17 

54 34 

341 98 

402 92 

150 55 

91 48 

298 88 

72 02 
816 36 
113 43 
672 67 

87 51 
213 18 

96 00 
120 59 

47 32 

290 14 

. 88 91 

95 17 

78 22 

50 20 

143 81 

46 63 

150 02 

172 45 

115 07 

109 32 

26 14 

93 22 



460,241,039 $120,305 16 



72 



City Docujient No. 62. 



Name. 


5-8 inch. 

1 incb. 

2 inch. 


4 inch. 
Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount broiight foru 
Jordan, Marsh & Co. 








460,241,039 

477,058 
494,334 


$120,305 16 
125 33 


Wash- 


Building . 


, . 4 , . 

. . 1 . . 
. . 2 . . 
. . 1 . . 
. . 1 . . 
. . 1 . . 
. . 2 . . 
. . 1 . . 
. . 1 . . 
..11. 
. . 2 . . 
. . 1 . . 
..31. 
..31. 
. . 1 . . 
. . 1 . . 
.'. 1 . . 
..21. 

. . 2 . . 
. . 2 . . 


. . . 4 
. . . 1 
. . . 1 
. . . 2 
. . . 1 
. . . 1 
. . . 1 
. . . 2 
. . . 1 
. . . 1 
, . . 2 
, . . 2 
. . . 1 
. . . 4 
. . . 4 
. . . 1 
. . . 1 
. . . 1 
. . . 3 
... 1 
... 2 
... 2 
... 1 
... 1 

... 1 
... 1 
... 1 
... 1 
... 2 
... 1 
... 1 
... 2 
... 1 


G. T. Burnham & Co. . . . 


140 57 


Stephen H. Bennett, heirs . 


659,279 
201,351 
351,089 
388,791 
341,106 

1,807,724 
263,249 

2,968,933 
170,385 
256,851 

1,034,999 
758,826 
705,613 
44,871 
933,952 
537,899 

1,124,564 
266,894 
115,754 
262,680 
359,938 

285,565 

237,277 

229,746 

137,617 

1,213,381 

1,460,275 

171,216 

2,165,256 

515,503 


172 86 
54 65 






99 81 






101 11 


J. Zane & Co. . . . 




89 43 






475 22 


Allen & Woodworth . . . 
Merchants' Exchange . . . 


69 40 
776 93 
44 31 


J T. Brown & Co 


66 84 


J C Gray 


270 71 


C. F. Hovey & Co 

Globe Publishing House . . 
J. M. Smith & Co 


198 71 

183 64 

8 17 




240 52 


Adams Express Co 

A. J. Wright 


143 99 

297 32 




69 19 


Boston Gas Light Co. . . . 
John F. Wilson ...,., 


30 47 
69 03 


L. P. Ober 

Toung Men's Christian As- 


94 40 
73 24 




63 27 


Henry F. Miller ...... 


59 71 


Art Building 


35 81 


Equitable Life Ins. Co. . . 
R H White & Co 


318 96 

380 74 


H. S. Lawrence 

Toung Men's Christ'n Union 
W. R Clark 


45 13 
564 63 
135 16 








Amount carried for 


ward 




481,183,015 


$125,804 42 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



73 



Name. 


Class. 




J3 
o 

a 


i 

a 


u 

a 

CO 




s 

o 

a 
i-i 


"a 
o 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought fonoard . 






481,183,015 


$125,804 42 


Loring & Dexter, Trust. . . 


Building . . . 


2 












2 


339,734 


88 98 


Commonwealth Building . 


" ... 


. 


1 










1 


601,176 


156 95 


Mutual Life Ins. Co. of N.T. 


... 






1 








1 


617,025 


158 80 


F. Tudor 


„ 


R 












3 


481,942 
762,106 
717,861 


126 83 








1 










1 


197 95 








1 










1 


188 54 


Traveller Building .... 




9 


1 










3 


697,949 


183 11 






t) 












5 


425,324 
335,743 
615,142 
112,905 


111 02 






1 












1 


86 79 


Rice Building 






1 










1 

2 


159 51 


Carter Building 




2 


29 99 


Edmands Building .... 




1 












1 


249,508 


65 80 


"Washington Building . . . 




3 


• 










3 


773,069 


201 45 


Mies Building 






2 










2 


985,582 


256 37 


Palmer's Building 




1 










. 


1 


265,589 


70 86 


Joy's Building 




3 


. 










3 


293,512 


76 07 


Joshua M. Sears, 199 Wash- 




? 


1 










3 


1,279,491 

779,946 


332 48 


Advertiser Building .... 






1 




■ 






1 


206 13 


Charity Building 




2 










, 


2 


139,949 


37 91 


















7 


904,408 
610 109 


234 18 


Transcript Building .... 






1 










2 


159 83 


Merchants' Bank Building . 






1 










'>. 


1,401,600 


373 97 


Paine Memorial Hall . . . 






1 










1 


100,102 


25 99 


















1 


97,056 


25 33 








i\ 


t 








7 


4,978,159 

9,938,182 

3,387,612 

679,087 


1,302 69 

2,592 22 

886 95 


City Hospital 






7 










8 


Lunatic Hospital 






s 










4 


New England Hospital . . 
















1 


180 23 


Mass. HomoBopathic Hospi- 
















1 


302,299 
381,135 
353,024 


78 08 


Notre Dame Academy . . 
















1 


100 06 


House of theAngel Guardian 
















1 


93 45 


House of the Good Shepherd 
















1 


143,804 


36 93 


Home for Catholic Children 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1,097,122 


286 48 


Amount carried forward . 






516,030,267 


$134,916 35 



74 



City Document No. 62. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Church Home . . 
Sailors' Home . • 
Temporary Home 
Somerset Club . 
Union Club ... 
Temple Club . . 
Central Club . . 
Boston Music Hall 
Beethoven Hall . 
City Hall .... 
State of Massachusetts 
United States of America 
Howard Athenaeum 
Boston Theatre . . 
Globe Theatre . . 
Boylston Market . 
Washington Market 
Suffolk Market . . 
Franklin Market . 
"Williams Market . 
Tremont Market . 
Medical College . . 
Boston College . . 
Mrs. C. C. Annable 
Mrs. R. W. Prescott (6mo8 
Mrs. W. A. Colson 
Mrs. M. P. Ruggles 

A. Carr 

J. H. Grout .... 
George Odin, heirs 
James F. Goodwin 
M. E. Knowlton . . 
Mrs. C. Farley . . 
Mrs. C. Cummings . 
James Knowlton . 



Class. 



State House 
Post Oflce 



Amount carried forward . 



Boarding 



Gallons. 



Revenue. 



516,030,267 
503,904 
495,657 
443,729 
1,596,651 
603,490 
215,144 
168,442 
913,694 
98,876 
1,696,717 
1,095,434 
921,000 
71,429 
311,317 
222,562 
555,314 
400,581 
534,800 
216,307 
176,129 
133,094 
115,762 
322,229 
620,249 
143,722 
241,027 
258,719 
229,956 
89,452 
226,215 
407,534 
Vacant 
100,716 
242,429 
954,988 



$134,916 35 
130 93 
129 64 
115 68 
420 25 
158 15 

56 59 
43 78 

240 74 
24 67 

439 87 
293 20 

241 42 
19 46 
82 87 
58 83 

143 98 

102 32 

147 66 

60 03 

47 36 

33 27 

31 80 

85 68 

165 20 

39 56 

64 08 

68 30 

57 81 
22 36 
62 57 

107 00 



26 27 

63 57 

249 88 



631,355,536 $138,951 13 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



75 



Amount hrought forward 

Ruel Philbrook . . 

F. G. Shaw (3 mos.) 

Mrs. Gr. A. "Winn . 

Mrs. N. F. Chapin 

William Evans . . 

E. Cutler, 147 Kneeland st 

E. Cutler, 146 Kneeland st 

Michael Doherty 

Job A. Turner 

James Chisholm 

J. Collins . . . 

D. L. Webster 

Thomas Cantlon 

W. B. Mendum 



Lowell Five-Cent 
Bank 



Co., 8 



David Wilcox & 
Boylston scxuare 

J. Morrill, Jr., & Co. . . 

Pearson Bros & Co. . . . 

J. Morse 

L. Whittaker 

C. Wright & Co 

Howard Watch & Clock Co 

Haley, Morse & Co. . . . 

Rosbury Carpet Co. . . 

George C. Pearson . . . 

Putnam Nail Co 

William Carleton .... 

Murphy, Leavens & Co. . 

H. M. Richards ..... 

Charles E. Kershaw . . . 

E. Strain St Co 

G-. G. Morris (3 mos.) . . 

James Standish ..... 

A. W. Bailey 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Boarding 



Model 



Factory 



Gallons. 



531,355,586 
295,694 

23,167 
301,146 
136,462 
330,749 
180,164 
223,851 
498,697 

78,674 
215,407 
194,842 
988,56' 
111,779 

91,169 

772,327 

1,100,700 
128,054 

1,592,902 

154,641 

84,052 

433,702 

1,171,499 
486,704 

3,177,487 
385,424 

2,847,044 
308,616 
368,609 
493,971 
815,728 
130,027 
5,700 
Vacant. 
283,282 



Revenue. 



B,951 13 

78 23 
5 79 

79 91 
35 88 
85 99 
48 13 
60 29 

131 80 

20 74 
56 11 
51 12 

260 67 
29 05 
23 95 

200 35 

285 85 
33 74 

416,41. 
40 14 

21 22 
115 22 
315 51 
126 80 
840 92 

97 87 
751 10 

79 96 

96 55 
137 27 
213 95 

35 41 
1 71 



75 70 



549,766,373 $143,804 47 



76 



City Document No. 62, 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
C. M. Clapp & Co. . . . 

Pratt Bros 

Byam, Carlton & Co. . 

Vose St Sons 

Stephen Smith & Co. . 
Chickering & Sons . . . 

Mace & Keyes 

Bagnall & Loud .... 
Boston Car Spring Co. . 
A. Folsom & Sons . . . 
Dwinell, Hayward & Co. 
J. M. Cook, estate . . 
HalletSc Davis . . , 



8. D. & H. "W. Smith, Mont 
gomery st 



S. D. & H. W. Smith, AL 
bany st 



Harrison, Beard & Co. 
William Underwood & Co 
G. D. Dowes & Co. . . 
D. "Wilcox & Co., Avery 
C. P. George & Co. . . 
Boston Belting Co. . . 



Richardson, McKee & Co 
(3 mos.) 



H. Barker (8 mos.) . . 
K. Zeigler (6 mos.) . . 

C. H. Bacon 

Morton & Chesley . . . 

A.. Zeigler 

Ciunminga & Carlisle . 
Walworth Manufact. Co 
Newton, Morton Ss Co. 
A. J. Morse & Co. . . . 
Seth W. Fowle & Son . 
H. B. Arnold & Co. . . 



Class. 



Factory 



Amount carried foi~war A 



Gallons. 



Revenue. 



649,766,373 
45,614 
265,957 
92,010 
1527002 
325,304 
1,407,862 
224,287 
251,009 
946,386 
538,769 
476,130 
960,113 
369,966 

765,396 

666,052 
1,007,939 
687,613 
571,537 
134,662 
483,374 
130,971 

169,096 

125,670 

206,512 

1,223,826 

1,103,032 

56,781 

1,313, 

425,993 

255,951 

463,124 

40,941 

566,294 



$143,804 47 
11 72 
69 77 
23 75 
38 36 
85 58 
372 55 
60 38 
65 76 

250 99 
145 89 
125 19 

251 59 
99 87 



566,219,555 $148,124 01 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



77 



Kame. 



Amount brought fo'iioard 
Charles Woodbury . . . 
W. P. Emerson Piano Co. 
Hallett & Cumston . , 

P. Lally 

S. G-. Underbill .... 
Amer. Molded Collar Co 

Kittredge & Co 

D. Shales & Co 

Christopher Blake . . 
Or. H. Dickerman . . . 

J. L. Ross 

R. Estabrook & Son . . 

George Gill 

F. King & Co 



Grover & Baker Sewing 
Machine Co., Wash, st 



Peet Valve Co 

G. F. Waldron .... 

A. K. Young 

Harrison Loring . , . 
8. A. Woods & Co. . . 
George F. Blake . . . 
E, H. Ashcroft .... 

L. M. Ham 

Eyelet Tool Co 

L. A. Bigelow 

William Evans .... 
Smith & Lovett .... 
Am. Tool and Machine 
J. Souther & Co. ... 
Boston Machine Co. . . 
Hersey Brothers .... 
Hinckley Locomotive Works 
Atlantic Works, Chelsea st, 
Atlantic Works, Border st, 



Co 



Class. 



Factory 



Machinist 



Amount carried forward 



Gallons. 



566,219,555 
275,999 
703,552 
148,694 
228,343 
600,002 
374,740 
54,382 
332,617 
342,847 
274,808 
283,922 
122,451 
139,199 
499,507 

567,104 

615,052 

115,230 

563,324 

216,388 

570,441 

1,172,182 

487,544 

365,803 

38,504 

476,445 

792,509 

187,094 

847,416 

246,516 

1,204,057 

264,960 

1,286,481 

1,015,356 

1,284,750 



Revenue. 



1,124 01 

71 77 
184 78 

39 11 
59 39 

130 50 
96 34 
14 08 
87 05 
90 02 

72 45 
74 99 
31 84 
36 71 

131 68 

157 04 
163 28 

30 43 
147 21 

59 63 
150 16 
307 11 
127 53 

94 50 

10 12 
124 64 
207 57 

48 91 
224 45 

66 38 
318 05 

69 37 
342 07 
264 29 
333 34 



582,817,774 $152,490 SO 



78 



City Docibient No. 62. 



Name. 



Amount brought fot'ward 

H. S. Robinson 

Geo. T. McLaughlin . . 

South Boston Iron Co. . 

Holmes &Blanchard, Taylor 
street 



James Gurney & Co. 
William Blake & Co. 
Whiting Foundry Co. 
Tremont Foundry Co. 
Fulton Iron Foundry Co, 



Chelmsford Iron Foundry 
Co 



Highland Foundry Co. . 

George Miles 

Downer Kerosene Oil Co. 

S.Jenney&Co 

Maverick Oil Co 

Pierce & Canterbury . . . 

Kidder, Vaughan & Co. . 

Bowker, Torrey & Co. 
Bowker street 



Bowker, Torrey & Co. 
Foundry street (3 mos.) 



Torreys & Co 

C. E. Hall & Co. . . . 

A. Wentworth St Co. 
Richard Power & Son 
Jeremiah Carew (6 mos.) 
E. F. Meaney . . 
Geo. F. Chapin & Co 
C. D. Brooks . . 
Horace H. Lewis 
W. K. Lewis & Bros 

B. M. Clark .... 
E. T. Cowdrey & Co 
Warner Ss Freeman 
Fobes, Hayward & Co 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Machinist 



Foundry . 



Boiler Maker 
Oil Works . 



Marble Works 



Stone Yard . . 

Vinegar Works 
Pickle Fact'y . 



Salt Works . . 
Confectionery 



Gallons. 



582,817,774 

197,129 

672,389 

2,648,719 

137,459 

98,235 

1,127,813 

400,244 

68,819 

216,824 

910,199 
342,328 
270,164 

7,291,634 
676,889 
426,989 

1,065,074 
115,049 

3,083,909 

262,230 

2,958,456 

2,334,674 

2,467,033 

745,717 

281,444 

1,078,244 

108,614 

328,581 

143,819 

180,902 

177,478 

400,402 

617,339 

525,667 



615,178,240 



Revenue. 



52,490 80 

51 15 

175 17 

689 46 

36 38 
26 49 
296 98 
105 55 
18 05 
58 49 

238 39 

86 73 

70 79 

1,933 73 

190 63 

114 11 

280 47 

31 67 

804 80 

78 66 

772 60 

609 71 

633 70 

195 93 

70 35 

275 92 

28 42 

85 87 

38 10 

48 06 

46 43 

104 60 

163 05 

138 58 



1,989 82 



Report of the Watee Board. 



. 79 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Chase & Co 

Charles Cop eland .... 

E. M. Messenger .... 
Mrs. Gr. F. Harrington . . 
Marston & Cunio .... 

W. L. Egerton 

Frost & Dearborn .... 
George Pera 

D. T. Copeland 

F. B. Weber 

R. B. Brigham 

E. Lar chard d'Henn . . , 

"W. P. Bacon 

A. W. Fisher 

Frank B, Ingalls .... 
Campbell & Coverly ... 

Severance & Co 

O. A. Jones 

O. S. Edgerly 

C. H. Bailey 

E. E. Tucker ...... 

R. M. Waitt 

C. E. Bacon 

J. C. Murphy 

J. Gallagher 

V. Stahl (3 mos.) .... 

A. E. Stahl & Co 

Dearborn & Ingalls . . . 

A. R. Wier 

Mrs. A. Cook 

"Walter Grieve 

A. F. Copeland 

J. Backus 

W. S. Matthews 

Brock & Coy ...... 



Class. 



Confectionery 



Restaurant 



Amount carried forward 629,180,069 $164,66134 



Gallons. 



615,178,240 
956,227 

1,513,839 
245,991 
226,641 
362,767 
436,394 
552,997 
574,432 

1,255,162 
311,594 

1,251,644 
83,369 
139,319 
284,804 
200,774 
402,854 
393,141 
281,503 
110,729 
131,293 
260,497 
171,457 
241,941 
145,544 
208,266 
28,270 
142,612 
493,064 
333,209 
439,627 
153,891 
472,056 
545,377 
260,973 
389,571 



Revenue, 



0,989 82 
249 52 
399 12 

64 30 
61 46 
95 25 

114 08 

144 94 

150 94 

328 56 

81 16 

327 31 

21 49 

38 01 

74 36 

52 44 

105 79 

105 26 

73 77 

29 10 

34 30 

65 11 
45 06 

63 43 
37 41 

64 4S 
8 48 

37 03 
128 88 

87 45 
114 78 

40 16 
125 75 
142 69 

67 88 
101 77 



80 



City Document No. 62. 



Name. 



Amou7it brought forward 
W. C. Cahoon & Son 
Durgin, Park & Co. 
Brock & Coy . . . 
Smith & Underwood 
J. M. Learned . . . 
Charles Vossler . . 
Tibhets & Russell . 
J. H. Blodgett . , . 
E. R. & J. S. Higgins 
Atwood & Bacon 
Smith & Wright . 
Palais Royal . . 
Felton & Son . . 
Jonas H. French 
C. H. Graves . . . 
James Edmond & Co 
E. L. Perkins . . . 

A. Hale & Co. . . . 

I. Byron 

W. H. Swift & Co. 
W. L. Bradley . . 

B. Randall .... 
J. L. Blodgett . . . 



Boston Dye Wood & 
ical Co 

W. H. Whitmore . 

M. Crocker & Co 

G. W. & F. Appleton 

Preston & Merrill . 

Quiriii & Edwards 

F. 8. Merritt . . . 

R. W. Ames & Son 

James A. Frampton 

Boston Forge Co. . 

Boston Lead Co. . 



Chem 



Class. 



Restaurant 



Saloon 



Distillery 



Rectifier 
Fire Brick 
Card Factory 
Rubber Works 
Currier . . 
Fertilizers 



Baths 



Chemicals 



Extracts 
Tannery 



Amoxmt carried foncard 661,103,812 $173,054 27 



Gallons. 



629,180,069 

332,414 

324,704 

431,601 

776,377 

502,057 

649,380 

497,362 

647,106 

1,025,107 

143,954 

459,187 

114,261 

1,152,292 

2,115,172 

248,002 

241,968 

99,846 

429,472 

22,995 

1,114,814 

3,905,633 

538,350 

531,321 

11,167,001 

1,059,306 

Closed. 

24,864 

491,400 

525,262 

180,306 

129,074 

138,614 

1,091,286 

813,255 



Revenue. 



$164,661 34 
86 72 
85 32 

113 16 
204 51 
131 95 
170 99 
129 79 
166 93 
271 81 

38 94 
120 81 

30 30 
300 88 
572 23 
.. 64 74 

63 29 

26 70 

114 24 

5 75 
289 76 

1,028 89 
138 62 
138 15 

2,920 20 
280 11 

6 55 
129 33 
140 71 

49 13 

34 27 

36 54 

288 97 

212 74 



Report of the Water Board. 



81 



Name, 


Class. 


J5 


J3 -f 


,a 


c 
^ 1 


-i 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 






QO 


a .£ 


.= 


c t: 


o 










o 


r-l ff^ 


CO 




B 






Amount brought forward . 


, , 














661,103,812 


$173,064 27 


Compressed Shafting' Co. . 
Suffoli Glass Co 










1 












. . 






1 










354,582 


98 77 


Washington Pipe Works . 










1 . 








656,489 


175 67 


East Boston Pottery .... 


. . 








1 








446,534 


115 60 


Simpson's Dry Dock Co. . 










1 . 








691,666 


154 25 


Cunard Steamship Co. . . 












1 






3,065,775 


814 90 


Portland Steam Packing Co. 












1 






1,570,905 


415 13 


Union Freight Railway Co. 












1 






§26,550 


244 95 


W. E. Gleason & Co. ... 


Carving . 




1 










159,081 


42 69 


Butchers' Slaughtering and 




















Melting Association . . . 









1 








3,930,322 


1,034 42 


Metropolitan Railroad Co. . 


Stabies . . 




14 


5 






19 


7,404,734 


1,944 24 


So. Boston Railroad Co. . . 


• • 




1 


3 








5,117,151 


1,341 14 


Highland Railroad Co. . . 


" . . 




4 










1,763,830 


482 79 


Draper & Hall . 




.... 


Stable . . 




3 










832,267 


214 40 


Israel Tibbetts 








" , . 




2 










300,768 


80 64 


P. E. Murray . 








" 














275,339 


71 64 


A. J. Child . . 








" 














536,122 


137 76 


E. A. iSToyea . 








" 






1 








444,753 


116 31 


James W. Hale 








" 














230,804 


59 71 


A. H. Foster . 








" 














290,114 


75 88 


John Tonry . . 








" . . 














572,122 


152 70 


W. L. Wellington 






" 














81,884 


21 42 


Charles R. Smith 






" 














208,716 


53 83 


J. Austin Rogers 






" 














615,160 


135 66 


Norfolk House Stable . . , 


" 














Vacant. 


...... 


Charles Foster & Co. . . . 


" . . 














314,196 


81 90 


Parmenter Si Sumner , . . 


" 














206,736 


54 56 


Robert H. Douglass .... 


" . . 














223,237 


57 67 


T. H. Seavey 


" 














86,016 


22 07 


J. P. Barnard, 108 Chestnut 




















street 


« 














650,077 


170 76 


J. P. Barnard, cor. Brimmer 




















and Chestnut streets . . . 


" . . 






1 








557,324 


146 71 


J. P. Barnard, Joy street . 


" 




3 








3 


772,507 


199 49 


A. Garcelon ........ 


" . . 




2 




-- 


-- 


2 


266,248 


69 64 


Amount carried 


A 


n 


vard . 


.. 


.... 


.. 






'~ 


1 894,455,821 


$181,830 77 



82 



City Document No. 62. 



Name. 



Amount hrongTit forward 
C. S. Godfrey . . . 
G. W. Sherburne . 
J. E. Maynard . . 

A. Goes 

Adams Express Co. 

J. B. Gott 

F. S. Merritt (6 mos. 

L. W. Porter & Co! 

Warner & Richardson 

George M. King 

Milo Whitney . 

Daniel Wood . 

T. D. Sullivan . 

Ham & Co. . . 

r. E. Russeli . 

Edgar Snow , 

John Feeney . 

James Jellison 

John Miller . . 

Shorey & Co. . 

Harwood & Hackett 

H. C. Nims .... 

J. A. Riedell & Co. 

E. W. Murray, Berkeley st 

E. W. Murray, Stanhope st, 

A. B. Atherton & Co. 

Geo. S. Johnson & Co 

Johnson Bros 

T. Thaxter . 

C. A. Upham & Co 

Miller & Robinson 

L. L. Rowland . 

P. E. Murray . . 

J. E. Maynard . 

John Rice .... 



Amount carried forward 



ClaisB. 



Stable 



Gallons. ReTenue, 



694,455,821 
S46,S34 
131,272 
526,484 
230,040 
336,231 
98,976 
9,187 
280,596 
577.9Z7 
431,850 
128,249 
326,079 
185,249 
362,201 
168,217 
126,390 
213,022 
267,779 
85,192 
329,144 
219,344 
497,811 
439,312 
389,392 
328,109 
400,282 
205,154 
248,572 
172,108 
176,122 
306,936 
107,488 
275,339 
526,484 
582,277 



$181,830 7T 

82 54 

34 32 

135 12 

61 36 

86 70 

26 7S 

2 4S 

72 11 

150 09 

114 2T 

33 68 

84 99 
48 52 
92 42 
43 53 
32 71 
54 79 
69 08 
21 29 

85 68 

66 61 
128 89 
113 62 

98 11 

84 77 

107 76 

54 63 

67 84 
43 69 
45 9S 
78 64 
27 71 
71 64 

135 12 
149 09 



704,490,970 $184,427 15 



Report of the Water Board. 



83 



Name. 


Class. 


1 5-8 inch. 
1 1 inch. 
1 2 inch. 


1 4 inch. 
1 Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue, 


Amount brought forward . 


.... 






704,490,970 


$184,427 15 


Geo. S. Fogg & Co 


Stable 




2 . . 


. . 2 


453,285 


117 78 


A. D. Pattee 


(( 








322,199 


89 94 


K. A. Batchelder 


« 




• 1 ., 




62,076 


17 32 


Moses Coleman & Son . . . 


" 








117,734 


30 56 


Boston Hotels Coach Co. . 


" 








1,305,711 


338 28 


Geo. E. Rogers & Co. . . . 


" 








247,844 


63 60 


Eastern Express Co. . . . 


" 




. 1 . 




214,072 


54 24 


Riverside Club Stable . . . 


" 








153,674 


42 27 


Club Stable, Chardon st. . . 


" 








193,814 


53 18 


Beacon Club Stable .... 


" 








173,578 


47 16 


D. G. Leavitt (7 mas.) . . . 


" 








437,265 


109 31 


Henry Beckwith (6 mos.) . . 


" 








82,902 


20 72 


F. A. Phelps 


" 








.405,769 


106 93 


A. P. Marion 


" 








187,926 


48 70 


W. C. Burgess 


" 








177,917 


47 22 


Parker Bryant 


" 








271,319 


70 63 


C. E. Paige 


" 








242,174 


62 10 


F. S. Rice & Co 


" 








330,524 


83 80 


M. & W. Ham 


" 








260,602 


68 42 


F. B. Shipman (3 mos.) . . 


" 








19,860 


4 93 


J. H. Pote & Co 


'< 








168,344 


43 99 


J. B. Cassidy & Bro. . . . 


" 








177,989 


46 28 


Peck & Hall 


" . 








127,770 


32 69 


J.Hale 


" . 








289,822 


74 27 


J. M. Smith 


" 








, 120,083 


30 94 


E. R. "Webster 


" . 








220,694 


57 89 


Club Stable, 75 Chestnut st. 


" . 








129,486 


33 94 


B. T. "Wrightington .... 


" . 








100,724 


26 03 


Clark &Bro-wn 


" . 








510,750 


135 58 


WilUamPike 


" . 








128,474 


33 27 


A. H. Foss . . 


" 








163,161 


41 67 


Cilley & Stimson 


i< 








279,277 


73 48 


Club Stable, 44 Joy st. . . . 


'< 








274,882 


70 95 


AsaCritchett 


" 








124,634 


33 14 


A. S. Eaton 


" 




. 1 . . 




176,166 


45 37 


Amount carried forward . 









713,143,471 


$186,683 76 



84 



City Document No. 62. 



Name. 



Amount brought foncard 
Geo. D. Brown 
J. H. Hathorne 
H. D. Smith . . 
M. Munroe . . 
Beacon Park , 
National Tube "Works 
Globe Nail Works . 
Farrington & Hunnewell 
B. M. Cunningham 
Harwood & Quincy 
Manley Howe . . . 
L.. Prang & Co. . . 



L. Prang & Co., 1482 Tr 
mont Bt. (3 mos.) . 



Morse Ss Jordan .... 

E. Brooks 

"Walworth Manuf. Co. . 

H. G. Denny 

Porter & Co 

C. U. Cotting 

Moses B. "Wilde .... 

John Foster 

Boston & Albany R. R. Co 
J. M. Sears, 45 Arch st, 
Briggs & Robinson . , 
J. S. Potter . . . 
S. B. Stebbins . . 
L. "W. Pickens . 
C. E. Folsom . . 
Boston City Flour 
J. J. MoNutt . . 
Glendon Co. . . 
Manson Peterson 
S. G. Bennett . . 
Cross & Gilman . 



Mills 



Class. 



Stable 



Stock yd. 



Silversmiths 
Laundry 



Chemist 
Chromos 



Engine 



Amount carried forward | 736,395,5451 $192,770 86 



Gallons. 



713,143,471 
180,457 
649,807 
257,707 
958,270 
403,425 
396,225 
1,372,851 
93,945 
528,458 
249,306 
615,007 
373,687 

178,486 
186,509 
324,270 
1,088,040 
206,744 
432,749 
431,129 
358,904 
458,414 
389,200 
685,844 
640,034 
565,035 
760,161 
698,842 
129,239 
4,518,839 
1,634,002 
1,772,001 
635,887 
656,263 
422,339 



Revenue, 



$186,683 76 

46 14 
170 04 

66 70 
239 57 
100 85 
102 94 
364 66 

24 66 
138 86 

64 33 
159 90 
100 35 

44 62 

49 09 

86 74 
289 33 

54 97 
113 67 
113 11 

94 43 
121 68 

97 30 
181 20 
166 32 
155 17 
198 16 
183 86 

34 01 
1,185 50 
426 38 
460 93 
168 09 
171 78 
111 76 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



85 



N"ame. 



Amount brought forward 
McQuesten & Fogg 
J. F. Paul & Co. . 
Bugbee & Spooner 
J. A. Robertson . . 
Stetson & Pope . . 
Chauncj', Page & Co. 
S. H. L. Pierce . . 

A. J. Stearns & Son 
Palmer, Parker & Co. 
J. P. Keating . . . 
Watson & Bisbee . 
Laming & Drisko . 
Cressey and Noyea 
Smith & Jacobs . . 

B. D. Whitcomb . 

S. Crosby & Son . . 

Nathaniel Cummings 

R. 8. Gihnore . . 

G-lover & Jones . 

Slade Dye Wood Mill . . 

Knowles, Freeman St Co. 

G-. B. Spaulding & Co. . . 

Bond, Blanchard, Worthen 
85 Co 



Gt. K. Witfaington & Co. (3 
months) 



J. H. Chadwick .... 

Horatio Harris (6 mos.) 

W. V. Hutehinga . . , 

J. C. Nichols 

Thayer & Llncoia (3 mos.) 

House of Correction ... 

Suflfolk County Court House 

Suffolk County Jail , . 

Directors of Public Institu 
tions 



Amount carried forward . 



Class. 



Mill 



Fish Store 
Bacon Works 

Bakery . . . 

House ScFount'n 

Fountain . . . 
Wharf purposes 



Gallons 



736,395,545 
294,157 

1,245,779 
448,859 
585,230 
Not using. 
470,504 
945,112 
26,609 
744,128 
466,575 
648,129 
426,052 

1,213,169 
801,426 

1,166.039 
675,547 
227,549 
110,122 
404,279 

2,588,361 
704,128 
163,912 

441,944 

48,645 

135,539 

40,299 

36,112 

38,625 

51,607 

12,015,375 

660,148 

1,569,036 

5,383,018 



Revenue. 



92,770 86 

76 63 

325 00 

117 77 

154 84 



124 97 

248 5fi 

7 41 

196 33 

122 96 

140 68 

112 59 

316 71 

210 71 

807 83 

176 48 

62 01 

28 62 

107 37 

678 76 

192 30 

42 74 

116 29 

12 16 

35 22 

10 07 

9 03 

9 65 

12 90 

3,169 93 

173 25 

413 12 

1,424 86 



771,071,559 $201,908 63 



86 



City Document No. 62. 



Name. 



Amouni brought forward 

South Ferry 

North Ferry ....... 

Board of Health 

Police Station No. 1 . . . 

'• " 2. . . 

" " 3 . . . 

" " 4. . . 

" " 5 . . . 



City Prison 

Cedar Grove Cemetery • . 

L. W. Morrill & Co 

First Church 

King's Chapel 

Cathedral of the Holy Croas 

Trustees Maflonic Building 

St. Mary's Church 

Tremont-st. M. E. Church . 

South Cong'l Church . . . 

First Universalist Church . 

Columhus-av. Univ. Church 

Bhawmut Cong'l Society . . 

Church of the HolyRedeemer 

Church of the Immaculate 
Conception 



Clarendon-st.Baptist Church 
Second Church Society . . 

St. James Church 

Brattle-st. Church 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Public Urinals 



Rotary Fan . . 
Organ . . . . 



Gallons. 



771,071,559 

7,113,750 

9,172,125 

1,022,910 

194,861 

374,152 

235,582 

603,971 

383,864 

475,261 

340,005 

152,573 

201,141 

147,412 

74,873 

74,152 
499,575 
1,684,675 
158,2&7 
100,233 
112,332 
231,270 

20,000 
361,259 

78,701 

94,665 
200,071 

44,452 
114,750 

96,509 

346,795 

55,848 

50,541 

216,828 

Vacant. 



Revenue. 



$201,908 62 

1,872 89 

2,405 14 

255 72 

51 63 
97 71 
62 61 

132 22 
100 83 
125 08 
90 75 
40 41 

52 66 
39 19 
19 78 
19 99 

129 74 
168 45 
39 57 
27 27 
SO 02 
60 99 
5 00 
95 70 
18 54 
25 60 
52 78 
11 83 
SO 56 
25 IT 

89 45 
14 82 
13 28 
57 30 



796,^04,988 §208,171 35 



Keport of the Water Board. 



87 



Name. 


Class. 


4 




4 4 

a a 


s 

4 s 

a '■3 


1 
o 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 






- 




IM CO 


•* M 


H 






Amount brought forward . 




. . 


796,004,988 


$208,171 35 


Boston Soc'ylirew Jerusatem 


Organ . . . . 








. 1 




56,997 


14 93 


Second Hawes Unit. Soc'y . 


" . . . . 


1 










86,714 


23 06 


Old South Church Society . 


.... 








. 1 




349,875 


90 2S 


Trinity Chui'ch Society (11 


Grain Elevator 




1 




. 2 




429,356 

157,720 
622,172 


117 08 


German CathoSie Church (6 


39 43 


Boston & Albany R.R. Co. 


138 46 


Shawmut Elevator Co. . . . 


" 




1 








467,197 


116 79 


Bancroft & Boyden .... 


Elevator 






1 








643,301 


165 36 


John L. G-ardner 


" 








1 . 






68,550 


18 46 


Job F. Bailey 


" 






1 








607,581 


157 85 


Crsorge O. Hovey 


" . 








1 . 






47,025 


12 14 


E.Williams . . 


" 














115,500 


30 33 


Sidney Squires 


" 






1 




_ 




210,089 


54 57 


Henry G-. Denny 


" 














19,694 


5 38 


William Claflln (6 mos.) . . 


" 








1 . 






36,000 


10 26 


Mrs. B. S. Dunn 


" 






1 








14,467 


4 10 


Joel Goldth wait & Co. . . . 


" 




1 










53,804 


U 21 




" 














1,863,750 


474 41 


Odd Fellows' Building . . , 


" 














131,250 


35 32 


Davis & Co. . . 


u 














585,750 


152 20 




'• 














1,265,250 


333 78 


A. W. Clapp 


" 














1,137,000 


299 28 


Eufus Gibbs & Co. .... 


" 














192,000 


49 98 


James Tucker & Co. ... 


" 














866,250 


225 89 


Pomeroy, Dol€ & Co. . . . 


'• 














404,250 


105 63 


Lamkin & Foster ..... 


" 














951,000 


246 63 


E. H. Sampson ...... 


" 














666.750 


175 87 


Davis, Whiteomb & Co. . . 


" 














477,750 


124 1« 


J. 0. Haynes 


" 














501,750 


130 84 


Lewis, Brown & Co. . . , . 


" 














1,276,500 


330 22 


Field, Thayer & Co 


" 














1,857,750 


482 09 


McConnell St Gardner . . . 


" 














582,000 


151 15 


W. E. Putnam & Co. ... 


" 




- 


- 










780,750 


203 50 


Amount carried forward . 




.. 


.. 


813,370,780 


$212,704 99 



City Document No. 62. 



Name. 



Amovnt broucjM foncard . 
Henry Bond & Co. . . . . 

J. S. Stone 

Dennison & Co 

W. H. Mawliinney & Co. . 
Clement & Colburn . . . . 
Jordan, Jewett & Co. . . . 
Smith, Riciavason & Bates 
Henry A. Gould 



John Crzmmings & Co. (S 
mo&.) 



Mitchell, Green & Stevens , 

R. W. Kendall ...... 

Mrs. Harris . 

Josiah Cummings , . . . 

Hotel Westminster .... 

Hotel Warwick ...... 

Hotel Lyndeboro' 

Hotel Clifford 

Hotel Berwick (5 mos.> . . 

Hotel Edinburgh (2 mos.) . 

H. & D. W. Watrous . . . 

J. Montgomery Seairs (& 
mos.) 



Class. 



Elevator 



Mrs. J. Lon^ey (7 mos.) . 

J. B. Kimball (7 mos.) . . 

First National Bank (7 mos.) 

Notman & Campbell (6 mos.) 

Martin, Skinner & Fay (T 
mos.) '. . 



A. A. Pope 8s Co. . . . 

A. Storrs & Co 

Abram French & Co. . 
Talbot, Wilmarth & Co. 
Albert Metcalf .... 
Edward Spauldiug . . 
F. Upton & Co. ... . 



Amount carried forward 



= c 



Gallons. 



Eevenne. 



813,370,7 
831,000 
893,250 

1,405,250 
713,^50 
877,500 
476,250 

1,125,750 
928,950 

27,000 
Vacant 

250,500 

Vacant 

76,275 

622,500 

668,324 

1,231,500 

632,025 

338,325 

219,750 

145,125 

593,458 
15,592 

252,750 

2,112,075 

51,750 

546,750 
668,625 
197,425 
564,375 
306,000 
76,500 
199,500 
315,000 



$212,704 99 
218 77 
231 33 
368 96 
185 96 
223 49> 
121 76 
293 44- 
244 70 

6 75 



19 36 

151 IT 
165 96 
307 ST 
158 01 

84 58; 
54 94 
37 73 

152 97 
3 90 

83 18 
528 02 

12 93 

136 68; 
175 42 

49 35 
147 80 

79 50 
20 25 

50 7T 

84 54 



830,737,114 §211,159 81 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



89 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . 
Perry, Wendall, Fay & Co. 
Continental Bank Building 

C. D. Swain & Co 

J. A. & W. Bird 

A. Wentworth 

Atlantic National Bank . . 
R. E. Apthorp 



Churchill, Gilchrist, Smith 
& Co 



Banfleld, Porristall & Co. . 

J. & J. Dobson 

Robhins & Kellogg .... 
Fogg, Houghton & Coolidge 
Horswell, Kinsley & French 

J. T. Bailey 

Z. A. Willard 

F. M. Johngon 

Minot, Hooper & Co. . . . 

J. P. Paine 

Miss C. T>. Brewer 

J. M. Beebe 

John Holman (6 mos.) . . 
Paul & Co. (5 mos.) .... 
Oliver Ditson & Co. (4 mos.) 
"W. H. Slocum (4 mos.) . . 
Charles H. Ward (5 mos.) 
Doe & Hunnewell (5 mos.) 

J. Cottle (1 mo.) 

A. A. Lawrence (3 mos.) 
David Parker & Co. (2 mos.) 
Joseph Peabody (1 mo.) 

8. N. Brown, Jr 

Paul Knowles and others . 



Class. 



Elevator 



Marine Water- 
men, as per 
contract . . 



Totals 



M ^ 



Gallons. 



830,737,114 
540,750 

1,627,575 
173,037 

1,014,675 
162,000 
861,547 

3,099,450 

7,808,669 

922,350 

430,275 

525,150 

922,575 

96,975 

62,422 

337,139 

1,541,250 

1,581,375 

621,750 

24,292 

38,377 

157,500 

130,125 

318,075 

238,575 

95,700 

352,050 

26,250 

1,248,375 

203,925 

14,925 

23,093 

1,839,829 



857,777,169 



Revenue. 



$217,159 31 
141 00 
424 21 

44 77 
264 69 

42 00 
226 73 
812 31 

2,048 20 

234 78 

109 24 

133 15 

240 08 

26 10 

16 43 

88 80 

404 96 

408 98 

163 71 

6 27 

10 69 

39 37 

32 53 

79 52 

59 64 

23 92 

88 01 

6 56 

312 09 

50 98 

3 73 

5 77 

1,471 79 



$225,180 32 



Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar, 



90 Cirr Document No. 62. 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 

Boston, May 1, 1878. 
Hon. T. T. Sawyek, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — My report for the year ending with April 30, I 
here respectfully submit. 

Beyoucl the usual labors in extensions and maintenance of 
the work during the past year, there has been laid at Rose- 
mary Brook, in Needham, two lines of 48-inch mains, 
measuring 3,480 feet, connecting the chambers of the aque- 
duct on each side of the valley, and one line of the same 
size connecting with the 48-inch main from the Bradley 
basin of the Chestnut-Hill reservoir, and ending near the 
terminal chamber of the new aqueduct, — 3,514 feet in 
length; 1,920 feet of 20-inch pipe relaid on the new part 
of Chelsea bridge, 430 feet of 20-inch, and 138 feet of 12- 
inch on Columbus-avenue bridge. 

The new Worthington pumping-engine has been set up, 
and the old boilers thoroughly repaired. 

> ' Main Pipes. 

The whole number of feet of main pipe, of all sizes, laid 

during the year is . . 69,749 feet. 
Relaid .... 3,343 " 



73,092, equal to 13|^|f miles. 

Service-Pipes. 

Whole number put in ...... 1,047 

Length in feet 28,217 

Drinking Fountains. 

Established during the year (with troughs) . . 4 

Total number now established . . . . 52 

Posts for Watering-Carts. 

Established during the year ..... 2 

Total number now established .... 6 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



91 



Of the relaying of enlarged sizes, the following table 
shows the changes in sizes : — 



Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Size now. 


No. of 
feet. 


Size 
formerly. 




BOSTON. 


6 in. 
6 «' 
6 '< 
6 " 


65- 
140 
162 
310 




Meander 


Maiden and Dedham 


4 " 
4 " 


Myrtle Street .... 


Grove and Revere 


4 " 



Maik Pipe Belaid. 

Chelsea bridge, Medford st. and Chelsea line 20-inch. 1,920 feet. 

Columbus ave., between Clarendon and Berkeley 20 " 430 

" " " " " " 12 " 138 

North Market St., Commercial st. and Merchants' Row. . . 6 " 550 

Meander, Maiden, and Dedham 4 " 24 

Savin Hill ave., Sagamore and Dorchester ave 6 " 281 



Lowered. 

Downer st., from Tremont 6-inch. 30 feet. 

Sargent st., between Howard ave. and Hartford st 6 " 793 " 

Warren sq., from Green st 6 " 125 " 



Taken Up. 

16-inch iron pipe 60 feet. 

6 " " 25 

li " " 1,573 

2 " lead pipe 14 

1 " " 151 

5 " " 104 

I " " 118 

i << <t a 



Extended | pipes . 



69 



92 



City Document No. 62. 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 

laid in 1877. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 






Gloucester • . . 

Cplumhus ave 

Clarendon and Chandler. 
Boylston 



Boston Common 

St. Jamea ave 

Boylston, Wash'n and Essex 



Mason 

St. James ave 

Newhury 

Commonwealth ave. (N. side) 
" " (S. side) 

Pinckney 

Hereford 

Tremont 

"Wellington 

Fairfield 

Chelsea Bridge 



BOSTON. 

Marlboro' and Newbury 

Chester park and Northampton. 
Columbus ave. and Berkeley . . . 
Dartmouth and Fairfield 



Total 12.inch . 



Common and Mason 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

Head place and Globe Theatre 



Total 8-inch. 



Tremont and Boston Theatre . 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

Clarendon and Dartmouth. . . , 



0pp. Louisburg square 

Marlboro' and Newbury , 

Bromfield and School 

Columbus ave. and B. and P. R. R., 
Commonwealth ave. and Newbury . 
Medford and Chelsea line 



Total 6-inch. 



Mason Mason and Boston Theatre. 



Fruit-st. court. 
Carroll place . 



From Fruit . 
From Salem. 



12 



Total 4.inch . 



344 

24 

958 

1,022 



2,343 

219 
81 



384 
435 

70 
2,330 
2,330 

68 
485 
410 

36 
180 
132 



190 



Eeport of the Water Board. 93 

statement of Location, Size, etc. — Co7itinued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



PS 



Thomas. 



Kemp. 
A 

Sixth . 



Silver 



Bremen . 



Condor. 



Roxbury . 
Elmwood . 



Elmwood . 
Terrace..., 



Creighton 

Brookline ave. 



Weston . 



SOUTH BOSTON. 
Pacific and Atlantic 



Total 12.inch . 



Dorchester ave. and Rogers 

North of Richards 

PandQ 



Total 6-inch. 

A and B 

Total 4.inch . 



EAST BOSTON. 

Marion and Porter 

Putnam and Brooks , 



Total 6-inch. 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 

Pynchon and Elmwood 

Roxbury and Elmwood court 



Total 20-inch. 



Roxbury and Elmwood court. 
Heath and Parker place 



Total 16-inch. 



Centre and Day 

Burlington and R.R. Crossing. 



Total 12-inch.. 

Cabot and Tremont. 

Total 8-inch. . . 



263 

181 

75 



519 

45 



45 



781 
921 
223 



1,925 



257 
142 



29 
249 



278 

89 
219 

308 

439 

439 



94 



City Document No. 62. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Bavin 

Tupelo 

Kearsarge ave. . 

Dorr 

Langdon 

Creighton , 

May wood 

Brookline ave. .. 
Bicknell place... 
Bartlett court . . . 
Kand square . . . . 
Cedar square.... 
Lawrence Estate 

Riverside 

Downer 

Summit 

Terrace 

Weston . . » 

Hulbert 

Ray 

Fellows court . . . 

River 

Adam 

Bellevue 

Granite ave 

Milton 

Dorchester ave.. 

Bailey 

Quincy 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS.— Cowiireweti. 

Tupelo and Blue Hill ave 

Quincy and Savin .• 

Warren and Winthrop 

Highland and Lambert ave 

Dudley and George 

Centre and Day ." . . . 

Warren and Blue Hill ave 

Burlington and R.R. Crossing 

From Roxhury 

From Norfolk ave 

From Rand 

Cedar and Cedar 

From Brighton ave 

Tremont and Gary 

From Tremont 

Regent and Circuit 

Heath and Parker place 

Cabot and Tremont 

Washington and Ray 

Hulbert and Regent 

Total 6-inch 



From Fellows . . . 
Total 4-inch. 



DORCHESTER. 
Temple and Mr. Conness' house . 

Gibson and Neponset ave 

Total 12-inch 



Bowdoin and Mt. Everett 

Adam and Milton 

Adam and Granite ave 

Ashmont and Bailey 

Washington and Dorchester ave. 

Ceylon and Howard 

Total S-inch 






210 

41 
269 
289 

52 
175 
486 

12 
242 
118 
126 
383 
141 

S3 
500 

57 

8 

9 

144 

110 

3,455 

231 
231 

2,884 
. 10 
2,894 

1,229 

1,031 
190 
295 

1,637 
532 

4,914 



Report of the Water Boaed. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



95 



In what Street. 



Bellevue 

Street 

Greenwich .... 

River 

G-ranlte ave 

Sprhig Garden 
Savin Hill ave. 
Grampian Way 

Leonard 

Bailey 

Taylor 

Linden 

Quincy 

Myrtle 

Harlow 

Baker ave 

Olney 

Glendale 

Merrill 

Dix 

Everton 

High 

Walk Hill 

Walk Hill 

Day 

Canterbury . . . . 

Spring 

Beech 



Between what Streets. 



DORCHESTER. — Continued. 

Clark and Quincy 

From Tileston place 

From Dorchester ave 

Cedar and Mr. Conness' house 

Adams and Milton 

Harbor View and Crescent ave. 

Grampian Way and Grampian Way . . 

Savin Hill ave. and Savin Hill ave 

Clayton and Duncan 

Washington and Dorchester ave 

Dudley and Taylor ave 

Adams and Dorchester ave 

Myrtle and Ceylon 

Quincy and Myrtle place 

Woodward and Howard ave 

From Washington 

Bowdoin and Everton 

Hancock and Columbia 

New Seaver and Erie ave 

Adams and Dorchester ave 

Olney and Geneva 

Commercial and Highland 



Total 6-)nch . 



WEST ROXBURT. 
Canterbury and Sargent 



Total 20-inch 



Washington and Back ... 

Centre and Perkins 

Walk Hill and Morton . . . 
Walnut and Webster ave. 
Centre and Anawan .-. . . . 



S ft 



12 



Total 12 inch 



184 

43 

24 

18 

448 

48 

521 

228 

16 

156 

289 

9 

104 

22 

306 

266 

427 

402 

420 

452 

77 

4,468 

15 
10 

8,016 

158 

1,855 

6 

1,090 

11,125 



96 City Document No. 62. 

statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Chestnut . . . 

Perkins 

Anawan ave. 



Bourne 

Walk Hill 

Forest Hill Cemetery 

Bishop 

Perkins 

Greenwood ave 

Monument 

Canterbury 

Buchanan ct 

Carolina ave 

Lee , . 

Chapel 

Germania 

Walnut 

Warren square 

Brown place 

Seaverns ave 

Beech 

Anawan ave 

Farrington ave 

Oak ave ,. . 

Taft place 

Brookside ave , 



Court 

Small-Pox Hospital 



Between what Streets. 






WEST ROXBURY. — Continued. 

Cedar ave. and Grove 

Day and Prince 

Irving and Railroad Crossing 



Total 8-inch. 



Walk Hill and Canterhury 

Hyde Park ave. and Back 

Morton and entrance to cemetery. 

Starr and John A. Andrew 

Day and Pond ave 

From Washington 

Eliot and Centre 

Walk Hill and Morton 

From South 

Starr and Lee 

Keyes and Childs 

From Boylston 

Baker and Brookside ave 

From Spring 

From Green 

From Seaverns ave 

Starr and Starr lane 

Centre and Anawan ave 

Irving and R. R. Crossing 

From Anawan ave 

Beech and Farrington ave 

From South 

Germania and Chemical ave 



Total 6-inch. 



From Lamartine . 
From Canterbury 

Total 4-inch. 



112 
3,171 
1,476 

4,759 

1,242 

60 

1,196 

68 

23 

825 

343 

38 

186 

445 

304 

364 

359 

212 

197 

196 

460 

25 

18 

131 

348 

270 

71 

7,381 

34 
291 



Report of the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



97 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 






.2 P< 



Western ave. 
Cambridge . . 

Everett 

Parsons 



Bennett 

Parsons 

Harvard ave. 

Arlington 

Chester 



"Western ave. . . , 

Pearl , 

Sparhawk 

Baldwin place.., 

Rockland 

AUston Heights . 

Court 

Essex 

Bennett 

Pleasant 



BRIGHTON. 

North Harvard and Everett 

North Harvard and Cambridge line 

Pleasant and Pearl 

Faneuil and North Beacon 



Total 12-inch 

Market and Parsons 

Bennett and Faneuil 

Cambridge and R. R. Crossing 

From Parsons 

Gardner and Ashford 



Total 8-inch 

North Harvard and Everett 

Auburn and Everett 

Market and Murdock 

From Washington 

From Chestnut-Hill ave 

From Cambridge 

From Chestnut Hill ave 

Brighton ave. and Cambridge line 

Market and Parsons 

Franklin and Everett 



Everett I Pleasant and Pearl . 



Parsons .... 
School ..... 
Allen place 
Court , 



Cheetnut Hill Reservoir . . . 



Arlington and Faneuil 

From Market 

From Washington . . . . 
From North Beacon . . 



Total 6-inch 

CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 
Outlet of Chamber 



Total 60-inch. 



675 
912 
326 
139 

1,952 

746 

1,679 

159 

206 

205 

2,995 

9 
483 
389 
226 
14S 

48 

811 

168 

T 

15 
8 

16 
355 
355 • 
552 

3,090 

6 
6 



98 City Document No. 62. 

statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 






Chestnut Hill Reservoir , 



Chestnut Hill Reservoir . 



Chestnut Hill Reservoir 



Section 13. 



CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. - Cow. 

Gate House and New Chamber. 

Lawrence Basin and New Chamber 

Outlets of Chamber 



Total 48-inch 

Gate House and Beacon street. 
Total 36-lnch 



Beacon and the Brook 

Lawrence Basin and New Chamber 



Total 12.inch. 



NEEDHAM. 
Between the Chambers 



Total 48-inch 

Between the Chambers. 
Total 16-inch 



36 



12 



48 



16 



3,514 
180 
26 

3,720 

37 

37 

451 
103 



3,480 

3,480 

20 

20 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



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102 



City Document No. 62. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1877- 

















Diameter o: 


Pipes 


n Inches. 














48 


36 


30 


20 


16 
2 

2 


12 

8 
1 
1 
2 

12 


10 

1 
* 

1 


8 

1 

1 


6 
24 

1 

25 


4 

41 
14 

1 
56 


3 

2 
2 
1 

5 


2 

10 
9 
1 
1 

21 


1^ 
105 

105 


1 

1 


1 

18 
2 

1 
21 


I 

3 
1 

1 
5 


1 

367 
87 
97 
56 
14 
6 
3 

630 


5 

5 
5 
2 

1 

13 


"3 
o 


Boston 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester .... 
West Roxbury . . 
Brighton ..... 
Brookline .... 


1 

1 


2 
2 


1 

1 

2 


2 

1 
4 

7 


592 

121 

107 

61 

17 
6 

6 

1 

910 



Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 4-inch 
and upwards : joints, 41 ; settling of earth, 12 i 
defective pipe, 13 ; defective gate, 3 ; cap blown 
off, 1 ; struck by pick, 1 ; blasting, 1. Total . 

Stoppage by fish, 36 ; by frost, 1 . . . 

Of 3-inch and on service-pipes : joints, 15 ; settling 
of earth, 145 ; settling of boxing, 1 ; defective 
pipe, 51 ; defective faucet, 2 ; defective coup- 
ling, 23 ; faucet loose at main, 2 ; coupling loose 
at main, 1 ; gnawed by rats, 4 ; 
29 ; pipes not in use, 7 ; by 
falling upon it, 1 . Total . 

Stoppage by fish, 245 ; rust, 257 ; 
2 ; gasket, 2 ; frost, 4 

Total .... 



struck by pick, 
frost, 3 ; cover 

dirt, 7 ; solder, 



72 
37 



284 
517 
910 



Report of the Water Board. 



103 



statement of Number of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1877. 





Diameter of. 




Year. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Totals. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

184 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

167 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 

109 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
• 278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
873 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
769 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725 
734 
801 


104 


1851 


237 


1852 


323 


1853 


345 


1854 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


363 


1858 


401 


1859 


531 


I860 


592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 




494 


1864 


489 




607 


1866 


675 




609 


1868 


531 




489 


1870 


926 




1,565 
1,647 


1872 




1,229 
2,554 


1874 




928 


1876 • 


943 




910 







104 



City Document No. 62. 



Hydrants. 

During the year 100 hydrants have been established, and 
13 abandoned, as follows : — 







Established. 






Abandoned. 






Lowry. 


Boston. 


Boston Y 


. Post. 




Lo^vry. Boston. 


Dif. 


Boston, 


6 






2 


8 


3 


5 


South Boston, 




3 






3 


1 


2 


East Boston, 


1 


4 




2 


7 


-1 


6 


Boston Highlands 


> 


5 


1 


2 


8 




8 


Dorchester, 


2 


11 




12 


25 


3 


22 


West Roxbury, 


3 


7 




24 


34 


2 


32 


Brighton, 


2 


8 




5 


15 


1 1 


13 


Brookline, 












1 


1 



14 38 



1 47 — 100 1 12 = 13 87 



Total amount up to May 1, 1878 



Boston . 
South Boston 
East Boston . 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester 
West Eoxbury 
Brighton 
Deer Island . 
Brookline 
Charlestowu . 
Chelsea 



1,313 

476 

292 

769 

630 

278 

187 

16 

8 

11 

8 

3,988 



37 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 103 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 



Stopcocks. 

121 new stopcocks have been established this year. 80 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. All 
the stopcocks have had the attention of former years paid 
them. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



105 



statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusi've of Tools, May 1, 1878. 

















Diameter in Inches 














48 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


10 


9 


8 


6 


4 


3 


2 

17 
3 


H 




8 

1 

7 
3 

1 


2 


32 

2 

2 
7 
1 
6 

2 

1 

1 
1 
4 

3 

4 

1 


34 
3 

1 
2 
1 
11 
2 
2 
3 

3 

2 

2 

5 

1 
2 


57 
3 
1 
2 
6 

11 
7 
4 
2 

22 
10 

2 
2 
6 

1 

4 
18 
2 
2 


32 
1 
1 
9 
9 
1 

29 

3 

7 

18 
4 

9 
6 

3 
1 


53 

1 
6 
2 

6 

3 
10 

11 
3 

3 

4 

2 


4 
1 
1 

20 
19 

2 
7 

4 
2 

15 

8 

26 
6 

1 

7 


766 
3 

60 
32 

3 
35 

5 
21 
41 

10 
62 

27 
13 

31 
12 

31 
3 

11 


46 

5 
12 

2 

6 

1 

* 
• 


4 
37 

4 
1 


1,148 
18 

41 
36 

7 

12 

20 

26 
9G 

50 
13 

59 
18 

12 

5 

35 


287 

8 
27 

36 
23 
36 
48 
6 
9 

44 
13 
20 
24 

33 
23 

16 
31 

51 


580 

21 

1 

41 

8 

36 

15 

3 

22 

16 

44 
2 

21 
13 

17 
37 

38 


191 

1 

13 

7 

7 
8 

4 
9 

■ * 
18 




Blow-off Branches . . 

T Branches 

4-Way Branches . . . 
3-Way Branches . . . 

Flange Pipe 

Sleeves 

Clamp Sleeves 


2 


Reducers 

Bevel Hubs . _ 

Curve Pipe 

Quarter Turns .... 

Double Hubs 

Offset Pipes 

Yoke Pipes 

Manhole Pipes .... 
One-eighth Turns . . . 

Pieces of Pipe 

Blow-offand Manholes . 

Plugs 

Thawing Clamps . . . 

Straps 

Branch Openings . . . 

Stopcocks 

Manhole Branches . . . 



Lowry Hydrants. — 54 Lowry hydrants, 23 barrels 8 
frames and covers, 18 round covers, 10 square covers, 13 
bottom extensions, 7 top extensions, 23 wastes, 18 screws, 4 
rings, 35 rubber valves, 32 rubber rings, 10 iron valves, 12 
screws, 10 chucks, 9 caps, 2 sidewalk frames and covers, 
198 bolts, 471 nuts. 

Post Hydrants. — 10 Post hydrants, 18 barrels, 22 frames 
and covers, 3 valve pots, 6 pots unfinished, 36 pieces for 



106 City Document No. 62. 

pots unfinished, 4 extensions, 17 screws, 20 nipples for 
caps, 6 nuts and screws, 6 valve-seats, 14 stuffing-boxes, 19 
wastes, 16 wastes unfinished, 12 2i-inch nipples, 34 washer- 
rings, 3 rubber valves, 20 rubber rings, 29 valve-seats for 
valve pots, 18 iron spindles with gear, 21 iron spindles. 

Boston Hydrants. — 70 Boston hydrants, 19 frames and 
covers, 88 covers, 2 heavy frames and covers, 1 heavy frame, 
184 straps, 137 wastes, 24 bends, 49 extensions, 51 frames, 
12 nipples, 17 nuts, 10 valve seats, 96 screws, 5 nuts, 8 
guides, 13 three-sided caps, 12 valves, 30 boxes for side of 
rod, 70 lbs. chain, 256 iron nuts. 

Boston Y Hydrants. — 2 Y hydrants, 7 unfinished, 13 
pots, 28 stuffing-boxes, 30 screws and nuts, 28 nipples, 30 
washer rings, 32 valve-seats, 35 rubber valves, 30 nipples 
unfinished, 2 frames and covers, 3 barrels, 1 top. 

For Stopcocks. — 1 4-inch screw for waste weir, 1 do. for 
Brookline reservoir, 2 16-inch check valves, 1 16-inch ring, 
1 12-inch valve, 7 12-inch rings, 8 12-inch rings unfinished, 
18 8-inch valves, 18 8-inch screws, 130 8-inch rings, 18 
8-inch stuffing-boxes, 5 6-inch rings, 7 3-inch screws, 3 
3-inch valves, 10 2^ X 2-inch valves, 7 2|-inch screws for 
goosenecks, 2 bose nozzles, 1 3-inch iron globe valve, 41 
frames, 52 covers, 9 heavy frames and covers, 31 reservoir 
covers, 21 fire-pipe covers, 8 elevator covers, 22 blow-off 
covers, 6 flanges for 6-inch gates, 2 do. 4-inch gates, 1 do. 
for 2-inch gates, 529 bolts, 208 malleable nuts, 550 |-inch 
nuts, 128 lbs. |-inch washers, 145 lbs. lead washers, 14,408 
lbs. iron castings for 12, 8, 4, and 3-inch gates. 

Meters in Shop. — 2 3-inch, 8 2-inch, 7 1-inch 55 |-inch. 

Stock for Meters. — 3 2-inch nipples, 10 1-inch, 6 |-inch,. 
26 1-inch cocks and pipe for connections, 30 |-inch do., 1 
4-inch clock, 3 3-inch do., 10 1-inch, 45 |-inch do., 40 spin- 
dles, 60 rubber nipples, 16 glasses, 16 sheets strawboard, 4 
2-inch connection pieces, 3 1-inch do., 6 |-inch do., 4 fish- 
boxes, 3 strainers. 

For Service Pipe. — 24 2-inch nipples, 32 2-inch nuts, 32 
2-inch tubes, 3 1^-inch union cocks, 2 l|-inch nuts and 
tubes, 1 l|-inch union cocks, 79 l|^-inch tubes, 46 l|-inch 
nuts, 9 1^-inch male couplings, 47 1-inch union cocks, 37 
1-inch crooked cocks, 11 1-inch crooked air-cocks, 56 1-inch 
T cocks, 31 1-inch tubes, 13 1-inch nuts, 116 1-inch male 
couplings, 18 1-inch do. unfinished, Q>di 1-inch nipples unfin- 
ished, 32 |-inch union cocks, 42 |-inch T cocks, 135 |-inch 
tubes, 60 |-iuch nuts, 97 |-inch male couplings, 114 |-inch 
union cocks, 5 |-inch crooked cocks, 27 |-inch thawing 
cocks, 42 |-inch T cocks, 24 |-inch Y cocks, 78 l-inch 
solder cocks, 35 |-inch right-angle cocks, 46 |-inch thawing 



Report of the Water Board. . 107 

couplings, €2 |-inch male couplings, 212 |-inch tubes, 303 
|-inch uuts, 40 | X ^-inch tubes, 400 |-iuch washers, 107 
1-iuch do., 138 1 and |-inch nuts, 669 lbs. unfinished cast- 
ings for |-inch cocks, 52 1-inch plugs, 24 f-inch do., 22 
|-inch do., 34 ^-inch do., 190 |-inch do. unfinished, 22 
^-inch union cocks, 22 |^-iuch crooked cocks, 39 i-inch male 
couplings, 21 |-inch nuts, 30 ^-inch tubes, 13 2-inch double- 
headers, 106 l|-inch do., 49 flange pipe for 1-iuch cocks, 20 
flanges, 30 caps, 594 tubes, 57 extension tubes, 692 caps, 
104 boxes, 21 old boxes, 132 T boxes (new), 30 T boxes, 
23 Y boxes, 109 square boxes. 

Lead Pipe. — 255 lbs. 3-inch lead pipe, 1,805 lbs. 2-inch 
lead pipe, 751 lbs. 1^-inch lead pipe, 119 lbs. 1^-inch lead 
pipe, 1,627 lbs. 1-inch lead pipe, 990 lbs. |-inch lead pipe, 
20,106 lbs. |-inch lead pipe, 1,71.6 lbs. ^-inch lead pipe, 380 
lbs, 1-inch tin-lined pipe, 923 lbs. |-inch lead pipe, 80 lbs. 
|-inch block-tin pipe, 21 lbs. 1-inch waste pipe, 25 lbs. banca 
tin, 76 lbs. solder. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 1,205 lbs. round iron, 1,775 lbs. flat 
iron, 781 lbs. cast steel, 50 lbs. spring steel, 418 lbs. shoes, 
33 pick blanks, 1| tons Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter'' s 8hop. — 51 Lowry hydrant boxes, 43 Post 
hydrant do., 14 Boston do., 63 Lowry do. unfinished, 7 Post 
do. unfinished, 16 Boston do. unfinished, 45 stopcock boxes, 
30 do. unfinished, 1 meter box, 800 lbs. spikes and nails, 
18,500 feet 2-inch plank, 5,325 feet 1^-inch spruce batting, 
30 feet maple, 652 paving blocks, 300 feet spruce joist. 

Tools. — 1 steam-engine, 1 large hoisting-crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 8 hand-geared do., 8 sets shears and rigging for 
same, 8 tool-houses, 4 tool-boxes, 7 nozzles, 2 platform 
scales, 1 portable blacksmith shop, 1 portable cover for 
Brewer fountain, 1 hand roller, 2 horse do., tools for laying 
main and service pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot do., 1 
hand do., 1 Pratt and Whitney do., 1 planer, 1 boring mill, 

1 chain hoisting-gear, 1 upright drilling-machine, 4 grind- 
stones, 1 trip-hammer, the necessary tools for carrying on 
the machine, blacksmith, carpenter, and plumbing shops, 1 
circular saw, 1 fan-blower, 1 40-iuch proving press, 1 36- 
inch do., 1 small do., 9 wheelbarrows, 3 handbarrows, also 
a lot of patterns at foundry where we obtain castings. 

Stable. — 13 horses, 13 wagons, 2 buggies, 6 pudgs, 1 sled, 

2 sets runners, 2 carts, 17 sets harness, 20 blankets, 3 buf- 
falo-robes, 2 sleighs, 2\ tons hay, 80 bushels grain, 1 jigger, 
4 lap-robes, 1 set wagon wheels, 2 hay-cutters. 

Beacon-Hill Reservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder, 1 
16-inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition plates, 
9 cast-iron plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe 



108 City Document No. 62. 

patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets for 
small fountains. 

Miscellaneous. — 31,317 lbs. pig lead, 1,637 lbs. gasket, 
1 fountain basin, 1 stone trough for drinking fountain, 116 
cords wood, 1 thawing boiler, 1 hose carriage, 3 iron lamp- 
posts, 1 garden pump, 68 3-in. earthen pipe, 1 12-inch earthen 
\ turn, 2 6-inch ^ do., 293 lbs. sal soda, 140 lbs. new rope, 
1 side sole leather, 2 sacks salt, 500 paving brick, 46 face 
brick, 3 tons sand, 60 tons gravel, 11 gallons neats-foot oil, 
42 gallons spindle oil,' 16 gallons kerosene oil, 3 gallons lin- 
seed oil, 5 gallons spirits turpentine, 35 gallons black varnish, 
56 tons furnace coal, 3 tons egg coal, 80 lbs. waste, lot of 
old iron, 1 bbl. cement, 242 set-screws, lot of old bolts. 

E. R. JONES, 

Buperintendent Eastern Division. 



Report of the Water Board. 



109 



EEPORT OF THE MYSTIC WATER REGISTRAR 

FOR 1877-78. 



Office of the Mystic Water Registrar, 
CiTT Hall Building, Boston, 

Charlestown District, May 1, 1878. 

Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer, 

Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith the Annual 
Report of the Mystic Water Registrar, for the year ending 
April 30, 1878. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
year 1878 is 18,730, distributed as follows : Charlestown 
District, 5,952 ; East Boston, 4,427 ; Chelsea', 4,082 ; Som- 
erville, 3,702; Everett, 567. 

The total amount of water-rates received from April 30, 
1877, to May 1, 1878, is as follows : — 



Charlestown District 
East Boston " net " 
Chelsea 
Somerville 
Everett . 



$109,029 63 

48,674 10 

51,104 69 

51,890 63 

7,218 29 



,917 34 



There has been paid the cities 
of Chelsea, Somerville, and 
town of Everett, as per con- 
tract, the sum of 

There has been received for 
water used in previous years 
the sum of . 

Leaving the net receipts for 
water furnished during the 
financial year 



,674 92 



15,038 54 



230.203 88 



$267,917 34 



Amount carried forward, 



$267,917 34 



110 



City Document No. 62. 



Amount brought forward. 
In addition to the above 
amount, there has been re- 
ceived for extra work on 
service-pipes, including ma- 



$267,917 34 



terial furnished, the sum of . $1,198 70 
Fines, non-payment . . 422 00 
Fees for summons . . . 287 75 
Off and on water . . . 106 00 
Maintaining meters . . 114 50 


2,128 


95 






Total amount received during the year 

in addition to the above amount there has 
been paid into the City Treasury the 
amount of cash on hand, May 1, 1877 . 


$270,046 
1,256 


29 
69 




$271,302 


98 



The expenses of the office during the year 1877, including 
all charges for collections on Chelsea, Somerville, and Ever- 
ett, and exclusive of $2,500 per annum allowed the City of 
Boston for collections, etc., in East Boston, was $6,577.55. 



Table showing the number of places turned off for non- 
payment of rates during the year, the number turned on 
and the number still remainino^ off. 



again, 



CharleBtown District 

Chelsea 

Somerville 

Everett 

Total 



Number turned 



148 

369 

126 

15 



648 



Number turned 
on. 



164 
60 
3 



Number remain- 
ing off. 



82 

196 

66 

12 



356 



The places cut off for non-payment of rates in East Boston 
are included in the report of the Water Registrar of the 
Cochituate Water Department. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



Ill 



Table Showing the Number of Dwelling- Houses, Families, Stores, etc., Sup- 
plied with Mystic-pond Water. 





60 


.S 


mm 


1 . 

il 

a-2 


o § 


o 


1 

m 


.So 
Phdq 


1 


6 

1 

11 


Charlestown 
District . . . 

East Boston . . 

Chelsea .... 

SomerviUe . . 

Everett .... 


4,676 
3,508 
3,552 
3,423 
510 


8,105 
5,898 
4,780 
4,564 
597 


463 
256 
231 
132 
9 


66 
32 
35 
20 
5 


67 
13 
65 
13 
4 


11 

10 
9 

10 

1 


382 
171 

304 

552 
96 


124 

76 
57 

78 
8 


190 
285 
136 
263 
69 


63 
16 
42 
40 
14 


Total .... 


15,669 


23,939 


1,091 


168 


162 


41 


1,505 


843 


943 


175 



112 



City Document No. 62. 






-^ 



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1,268 

1,291 

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9,535 
7,859 
5,656 
5,289 


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545 
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Report of the Water Board. 



113 



Tahle Showing the Number and Size of Meters in the Mystic Water 
DepartTnent. 











Size of 


Meters 










1 inch. 


% inch. 


1 inch. 


1| inch. 


2 inch. 


3 inch. 


4 inch. 


Total. 


Charlestown District 


32 


.... 


21 


1 


15 


3 


4 


76 


East Boston .... 


22 




22 




5 


3 




52 


Chelsea 


15 


1 


7 


1 


4 


1 


.... 


29 


Somerville 


8 




8 


2 


2 


.... 


1 


21 


Everett 




1 


3 


1 


2 






7 












Total 


77 


2 


61 


5 


23 


7 


5 


185 



Drinking-Fountain s . 

The whole number in use in this department is 22, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



Charlestown District. — City square, corner Park street ; 
Chelsesi street, corner Wapping street ; Bunker Hill street, 
corner Tufts street ; Canal street, corner South Eden street ; 
Main street, corner Hancock square ; Main street, near Tufts 
wharf; Austin street, opposite Front street. 

Chelsea. — Broadway square ; Broadway, near bridge ; 
Winuisimmett street, near the Ferry ; Pearl street, corner 
Marginal street ; Bellingham square. 

East Boston. — Maverick square; Central square; Ben- 
nington street, junction Chelsea street. 

Somerville. — Union square (2) ; Broadway, corner "Wal- 
nut street ; Highland avenue, corner Walnut street ; Medford 
street, corner Central street ; Davis square. 

Everett. — Main street, junction Broadway. 

One of the fountains in Union square, and the one at the 
corner of Highland avenue and Walnut street, Somerville, 
have automatic fixtures, regulating the water supply. The 
others are so arranged that the water flows continuously. 

The following table exhibits the class of premises to which 
meters are attached, together with the amount of revenue 
received during the year 1877 : — 



114 



City Document No. 62. 



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Eeport or THE Watee Board. 



115 



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116 



City Document No. 62. 



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Report of the Water Board. 



117 













































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118 



City Document No. 62. 







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Eeport of the Water Board. 



119 



















5 

eo" 








CO 

CO 




199 04 
1,262 97 
35 94 
22 76 
73 65 
26 04 

122 76 
33 17 
14 63 


914 77 
149 54 
12 54 
62 84 






13,567,845 
4,415,094 


CO 

1 

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760,C00 

4,743,000 

137,017 

88,350 
280,866 
104,175 
491,061 
132,675 

58,500 


3,543,651 

592,857 

50,176 

228,911 






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120 



City Document No. 62. 



Statement showing the amount of water-rates received 
since the introduction of Mystic-pond water, November 29, 
1864: — 



Charles 


town 


District, 




1865 




. $27,079 10 














1866 




. 47,323 16 














1867 




. 60,188 83 














1868 




. 68,815 32 














1869 




. 74,369 81 














1870 




. 82,230 79 














1871 




. 84,318 71 














1872 




. 98,445 91 














1873 




. 99,470 66 














1874 




. 111,420 30 














1875 




. 118,568 00 












May 1 


1876 

1877 
1878 




. 116,271 17 
. 109,963 25 
. 75,258 47 
















$1,173,723 48 






East Boston, 


net 




1870 




. 39,870 22 








it 




1871 




. 45,022 98 








<< 




1872 




. 49,574 38 








(( 




1873 




. 53,488 41 








<< 




1874 




. 53,654 08 












1875, 
1876 
1877 


10 n 


los. 49,153 73 
. 50,228 04 
. 46,982 40 








t( 


May 1 


, 1878 




. 38,972 55 
















426,946 79 






Chelsea 


net 




1868, 
1868- 
1869- 


6 m 

69 
70 


OS. 3,087 88 
. 16,615 92 
. 22,179 41' 






<( 




1870-71 


. 25,871 17 






(C 




1871- 


72 


. 31,535 62 






It 




1872- 


73 


. 34,067 65 






tt 




1873- 


74 


. . 36,118 61 






It 




1874-75 


. 39,886 61 






tt 




1875- 


76 


. 40,060 54 






It 




1876- 


77 


. 39,425 33 






tt 


May 1 


, 1878 




. 38,142 42 


326,991 16 


Somerville 


net 




1869 




. . 5,586 73 


(( 








1870 




. . 11,211 40 




" 








1871 




. ; 17,023 74 




<<. 








1872 




. . 21,220 11 




(.<. 








1873 




. . . 25,698 11 




(.i- 








1874 




. . 30,494 48 




t.<. 








1875 
1876 




. . 38,038 70 
. . 39,320 47 




cc 








1877 




. . 39,411 22 




(.C. 






May 1 


, 1878 




. . 35,999 50 
















264,004 46 


Everett 


net 




1872- 


-73 


. . 3,062 83 


(( 


ti 




187.3- 


-74 


. . 3,710 96 




(i 


carried J 


brward. 


1874-75 


. . 3,975 95 










Amount 


$2,191,665 89 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 121 

Amount brought forward, $2,191,665 89 

Everett net 1875-76 . . 4,982 52 

1876-77 . . 5,566 12 
May 1, 1878 . . . 5,914 27 

27,212 65 



The aggregate amount to May 1, 1878 .... $2,218,878 54 
Respectfully, 

JOSEPH H. CALDWELL, 

Mystic Water Registrar. 



122 City Document No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC WATER WORKS. 

Charlestown District, Boston, May, 1878. 
Hon. T. T. Sawyer, Ghairman Boston Water Works: — 

Sir, — My report for the year ending April 30, 1878, is 
herewith respectfully submitted. 

The works are in very good condition throughout. At 
the lake the shores and riprap have been carefully looked 
after and kept in good repair. The area near Mystic station 
in Winchester, on the easterly side of the Lowell Railroad, 
adjoining Bacon street, which is usually covered by water, 
was entirely bare during the low level of the lake in Septem- 
ber, and the opportunity thus offered to clear up the bottom 
was improved ; about an acre of muck, etc., to the depth of 
about 18 inches, was wheeled out and banked along the shore, 
which made an improvement that should be continued when- 
ever the level of the water will permit. The filling in on 
the westerly side of the dam, which has been going on more 
or less for two years, has been continued as occasion would 
allow. 

The lawn on the easterly side, in front of the gate-house, 
has been ploughed up, and a border of sods placed around 
the outside, the centre being sown with grass-seed. The 
gate-house has been painted and sanded outside, and the 
plank covering to the bridge over the dam has been re- 
newed. The building used last season as an office during 
the construction of the Mystic sewer, which has been located 
near the "waste-weir" to the conduit, will furnish needed 
and additional accommodations at the lake. On Mystic 
street, on the line of the lot belonging to the works, a 
substantial stone wall has been built, about 125 feet in 
length, with materials already on hand. The level of the 
water in the lake has varied during the year from extreme 
high-water level, to a point 6 feet below, at which point it 
stood on October 4. 

Conduit. 

The conduit has not been drawn off during the past year, 
and no examination has been made of the inside ; but as there 



Eeport of the Water Board. 123 

are no indications of any change apparent I have no doubt 
it is in good order. An additional " manhole " was made 
into it at Jerome street, on the request of and at the expense 
of the town of Medford, for additional facilities for fire pur- 
poses. 

Pibiping-Station. 

At the pumping-station everything is comparatively in 
good condition. The work on Engine No. 2 (new pistons, 
etc.), which was in progress as mentioned in the last annual 
report, was completed in June, and the working of the en- 
gine, which showed improvement at once, steadily improved 
as it was run during the year ; the engine is now in excellent 
working order. Engine No. 1 is in good condition and has 
required but ordinary repairs ; Engine No. 3, which had been 
run almost constantly day and night, was stopped March 8 
for general repairs. The "foot valve" on the suction-pipe 
of this engine has been out of order for some time, but owing 
to the trouble of pumping out the wells, repairs on it have 
been delayed, with the idea that some permanent arrange- 
ment might be adopted to make the wells independent of 
one another, and a direct acting steam-pump put in, to pump 
out either, at any time when desirable. During the repairs 
one of the "low-pressure" pistons was found so badly 
cracked as to be unfit for further use. It had evidently been 
so some time, being held in place by the " follower." A new 
one has been ordered from Mr. Worthington. With these 
exceptions the engine is in good condition. 

In the bailer-room one of the old set of boilers has been 
thoroughly repaired ; it required a new bottom sheet directly 
over the furnace. The room has been renovated by whiten- 
ing and painting. 

The coal record for the year is as follows : — 

Amount on hand January 1, 1877 . . ^SOj^Vo tons. 
Received from S . Knights (balance of contract) 1 ^4^y^q% ' ' 

'♦ " " " (special orders) 417^4_y^ " 
" Wellington & Co. (contract) 2,6S0j%% " 

" " S. Knights (special order) . '^^j%%\ " 

Total .... 4,026 iVoV " 
Amount used from May 1, 1877, to May 1, 

1878 3,414^-4-fo '« ^ 

On hand May 1, 1878. . . . 612^2_3^2_.. 



124 City Document No. Q2. 

The dwelling-houses have been thoroughly repaired and 
painted outside. The land on the easterly side has been 
wholly sown with grass-seed, and the area in front of the 
new stable has been brought to the proper grade, and the 
entire grounds about the engine-house are in good condition. 

t 

Force Main. 

There was one joint-leak on this main repaired during the 
year. 

Reservoir. 

The reservoir and grounds have been carefully looked 
, after, and are, as a whole, in good order. I would respect- 
fully recommend replacing the old wooden steps at the main 
entrance from the college grounds with granite steps. 

Supply Mains. 

There were 3 joint-leaks repaired on the 24-inch iron main 
during the year, and they are now in good order apparently 
throughout. In Somerville the Water Board have, in relay- 
ing and enlarging a part of their main pipes, made connec- 
tions with each of the supply mains, — one with the 24-iuch, 
at the corner of Broadway and Temple street, and one with 
the 30-inch main, at the corner of Pearl and Cross streets. 
These connections are made with branches that were located 
when the supply mains were originally laid. 

Distributing Mains. 

The distributing mains have been extended 820 feet, with 
498 feet of cast-iron, and 322 feet of wrought-iron and cement 
pipe. There have been 6,550 feet of wrought-iron and cement 
pipe replaced with cast-iron pipes ; 4,520 feet of which was 
with pipe of a larger size. There were 36 '* breaks " on the 
wrought-iron and cement pipe, viz. : one on 2-inch pipe ; 16 
on 4-inch ; 12 on 6-inch and 4 on 8-inch pipe. The number 
of " breaks " is considerably less for the past year than for 
the previous three or four years ; probably from the fact 
that some of the most defective pipe has been replaced, and 
also that the hydrants are used with more care now by the 
different departments, since they have become familiar with 
the circumstances, than was the case directly after annex- 
ation ; but there is still considerable pipe in the city that is 
more or less defective, and liable to give out at any time, 



Eeport of the Water Board. 125 

and especially when the hydrants are opened suddenly for 
fire purposes. The supply main (16-mch) to Chelsea was 
taken up and relaid from Scott's court to the farther side of 
the Mystic Improvement Co.'s Wharf, inchiding a new 20- 
inch syphon, on account of the rebuilding of Chelsea bridge. 
The whole distance relaid was about 2,000 feet. 



Service-Pipe. 

There have been 59 new service-pipes entered the past 
year. Ten old " tin-lined " pipes have been replaced with 
lead-pipe. Six pipes have been lowered on account of frost, 
10 do. enlarged, 11 do. changed from double to single 
supplies. 

Seven services have been stopped by frost, 12 by rust, 10 
by fish or other causes ; 452 rotten or defective boxes have 
been replaced. 

In Chelsea the main pipes have been extended 1,150 feet, 
making the total length 149,329 feet. 73 new service-pipes 
have been entered the past year. 

In Somerville the main pipes have been extended 2,931 
feet, making the total length 234,643 feet; 158 new service- 
pipes have been entered the past year. 

In Everett the main pipes have been extended 1,613 feet, 
making the total length 75,772 feet; 39 new service-pipes 
have been entered the past year. 

The following tables give the amount of pipe laid and re- 
laid, the number of gates and hydrants, and the items of 
stock on hand May 1, 1878. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. BIGELOW, 

Superintendent. 



126 



City Document No. 62. 



Extension of Distribution Pipes in Charlesiown in 1877-78. 



Streets. 


Size of Pipes. 


Kind of 
Pipe. 


Total feet. 




3 inch. 


4 inch. 


6 inch. 




Holdeu row • 

Fred 


24 

102 

28 
294 


324 
24 


24 


Iron. 

Cement. 
* <• 


324 

48 


Lexington court 

Harvard Hill 

Hull's place 

Fred 


102 
24 
28 

294 






Totals 


448 


348 


24 


.... 


820 



Service-Pipe Laid in Charlestown in 1877-78. 



Size. 


1 inch. 


f inch. 


- 
1 inch. 


2 inch. 


Total No. 


Total feet. 


Number 


29 


28 


1 


1 


59 


1,358 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



127 



Distrilution Pipes Relaid in Gharlestown in 1877-78. 





6 

M 

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a 
'So 

•c 

O 


Size of Pipe. 


6 
ft 


Streets. 


20 in. 


16 in. 


12 in. 


Sin. 


6 In. 


4 in. 


Ell 
o 




Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 






2inc 
3 • 

3 ' 

4 ' 
4 ' 
4 ' 
4 ' 
6 < 
4 ' 
4 ' 
4 • 
4 ' 
2 ' 
2 ' 
6 • 
4 ' 
4 ' 

12 ' 
4 ' 
4 ' 
4 < 
4 ' 
4 ' 
4 ' 
4 ' 
16 ' 
20 ■ 


h. . . 










372 

648 

336 
396 

24 
12 
24 




Frothingham ave 






















528 
660 










































Allen 










300 
996 
36 
384 
328 




Phipps and Lawrence .... 


















900 














Princeton 






. . . 






Eden 








48 




Williams 










36 
36 

48 
36 




Winchester 














Walker 










36 




Sullivan 
































62 








Miller t . . . . 










24 
36 

36 
48 
60 




























36 
36 
16 




























Tufts 


























Chelsea Bridge J 

Incudlng Siphon I 


120 


1,960 






48 






















Totals 




. . 120 


1,960 


62 


948 


3,368 


2,172 













128 



City Document No. 62. 



Charlestown. 



fRelaid 8,558 feet. 

Relaid and enlarged . . . 6,742 " 

Extension 820 feet. 

Laid previous 152,576 " 

Aggregate 153,396 " or 29 miles, 276 feet. 



Chelsea. 



'Extension 1,150 feet. 

Laid previous 148,179 " 



Aggregate 149,329 " or 28 miles, 1,489 feet. 



SOMERVItiLE. 



["Extension 2,931 feet. 

Laid previous 231,712 " 



, 234,643 ♦' or 44 miles, 2,323 feet. 



EVEKETT. 



Engine House 
Grounds, Somer- \ Laid previous . 

VILLE. 



(Extension 1,613 feet. 
Laid previous 74,159 " 



e 75,772 " or 14 miles, 1,852 feet. 



} Laic 



287 feet. 



Total amount of distribution pipe May 1, 1878, 116 miles, 947 feet. 



Report of the .Water Board. 



129 



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130 City Document No. 62. 



STOCK ON HAND. 

Iron Pipe. — 3 lengths, 36-inch; 7 lengths, 30-inch ; 2 
lengths, 30-inch, with flange ; 19 lengths, 24-inch ; 5 lengths, 
20-inch; 586 lengths, 12-inch ; 167 lengths, 10-iuch ; 332 
lengths, 8-inch; 394 lengths, 6-inch; 500 lengths, 4-inch; 
J|*lengths, 3-inch. 

\4Ji'on Branches. — 2 16 X 16-inch ; 1 16 X 12-injch ; 2 do., 
It X 8-inch; 2 do., 16 X 6-inch; 1 do., 16 X 4-iuch; 

3 do., 12 X 8-inch.; 3 do., 12 X 6-inch; 3 do., 12 X 4- 
inch ; 1 do., 10 X 8-inch ; 3 do., 10 X 4-inch ; 3 do., 8 X 8- 
inch ; 5 do., 8 X 6-inch; 1 do., 8 X 4-inch; 6'do., 6X5- 
inch ; 1 do., 6 X 4-inch ; 3 do., 4 X 4-inch ; 1 do., 4 X 3- 
inch. 

Iro7i Sleeves. — 2 36-inch sleeves ; 11 30-inch do. ; 7 24- 
inch do. ; 5 20-inch do. ; 18 16-inch do. ; 4 12-inch do. ; 9 
10-inch do. ; 9 8-inch do. ; 6 6-inch do. ; 1 4-inch do. ; 63 
3-inch do. > - ■ 

Iron Bends. — 5 16-inch bends ; 3 12-inch do. ; 5 10-inch 
do. ; 6 8-inch do. ; 12 6-inch do. ; 13 4-inch do. 

Iron Reducers. — 2 24 X 16-inch; 2 20 X 16-inch; 1 16 
X 12-inch ; 1 6 X 4-iuch. 

Gates and Frames. — 1 20-inch gate ; 1 16-inch do ; 1 10- 
incli do., 1 6-inch do.; 5 frames ; 20 covers; 22 2-inch 
covers ; 15 2-inch frames. 

Hydrants and Frames. — 1 16-inch 3-way Low. hyd. pat. 

I do., 12 X 6-inch; 1 do., 8 X 8-inch; 2 do., 8 X 6-inch 

4 do., 6 X 6-inch; 2 do., 6 X 4-inch; 9 Low. hyd. barrels 

II iron valves; 8 blanks; 7 frames; .13 tops; 14 covers 
46 lbs. rubber gaskets ; 8 rub. valves ; 2 garden hydrants 
1 6-inch post do. ; 80 lbs. valve plate. 

Gement Pipe. — 2 lesngths, 30-inch; 4 do., 20-inch; 3 
do., 16-inch; 31 do., 8-inch; 61 do., 6-inch; 18 do., 4- 
iuch; 11 do., 3-inch; 20 do., 2-inch. 



Service Depaetment. 

3,183 lbs. lead pipe, ^Jnch ; 1,908 lbs. do., |-inch ; 933 
lbs. do., |-inch ; 289 lbs. cjo., Ij-inch ; 275 lbs. do., 2-inch ; 
1,904 lbs. do., 2d hand, ^-inch; 339 lbs. do., 2d hand 11- 
inch; 125 lbs. pig tin; 161 lbs. solder; 60 common service- 
covers; 41 do., heavy; 30 wood service-boxes; 12 patent 
do. ; 24 |-inch service-stops; 39 |-inch do. ; 14 |-inch do. ; 
7 1-inch do, ; 14 ^-inch corp. stops; 18 |-inch do.; 17 |- 



Keport of the Water Board. 131 

inch do. ; 19 1-inch do. ; 16 |-inch 3 way do. ; 12 |-inch hy- 
drant stops; 10 |-inch hose bibbs; 3 lengths wrought 
cement pipe, 2-inch; 8 lengths do., 1-inch; 13 lengths do., 
|-inch; 3 lengths gal. iron pipe, 2-inch.' 

Fittings. — 108 T's, assorted sizes ; 27 couplings do. ; 53 
elbows do. ; 38 reducers do. ; 17 plugs do. ; 4 bushings do. ; 
5 1^-inch unions; 31 brass sal. nipples, assorted, sizes ; 16 
brass nipples for iron pipe, assorted ; 2 gross iron screws. 

I Meters. 

1 4-inch Worthington meter; 1 2-inch do. ; 1 |^-inch do. ; 
2 1-inch do. ; 2 |-inch do. ; 3 |-inch do. ; 6 1-inch counters 
for Worthington meters ; 6 2-inch do. ; 6 4-inch do. ; 2 
papers brass screws ; 2 meter frames and covers ; 20 lbs. 
leather board ; 3 lbs. brass wire ; 900 lbs. composition. 

* Sundries. 

9 casks cement ; 1 cask Portland do. ; 30 lbs. common 
sheet-iron; 8 lbs. rivets; 4,940 feet pine plank; 14 bags 
salt; 30 yards cotton cloth; 12 yards enamelled do.; 2 
bales jute packing; 4 bales M. rope; 10 tons sand; 191 
lbs. lead; 3,747 lbs. scrap-iron, ^ box 14 X 20 tin plate ; 7 
pkgs. emery cloth; 4 lbs; copper rivets; 1|^ bbl. rosin; 2 
tons store coal ; 2 kegs 50d. nails ; 50 kegs 40d. ; 2 kegs 
30d. do. ; 3 kegs 20d. do. ; 4 kegs lOd. do. ; 1 keg 8d. do. 

Paints and Oils. 

100 lbs. white lead ; 30 lbs. putty ; 18 lbs. dry Brandon ; 
20 lbs. Eng. red ; 12 lbs. red lead ; 4 galls, raw oil ; 25 do. 
boiled do. ; 1^ do. neatsfoot do. ; \ do. Shellac; 8 do. black 
oil; 12 do. best black varnish; 1 bbl. do., 2d quality; 1^ 
boxes 8 X 10 window glass. 

Fixtures. 

2 150 gall, tanks ; 2 spring water-gauges ; 1 mercury do. ; 
200 feet lead pipe ; 1 platform scale ; 2 work-benches ; 2 
iron sinks ; 2 stoves ; 2 office desks ; 3 office chairs ; 1 do., 
stool ; gas fixtures. 

Tools, etc. 

3 Low. hyd. chucks ; 150 feet 2^-inches canvas hose ; 150 
feet rub. do.; 12 street-lanterns; 12 hand do.; 16 French 
pumps ; 10 street-horses ; 2 bench vices ; 1 pipe do. ; 1 
bench shears ; 2 hand do. ; 1 ratchet drill ; 2 braces and 



132 CiTT Document No. 62. 

drills ; 1 set taps and drills for iron pipe ; 1 machine for 
tapping iron pipe ; 1 set drills for cement pipe ; 5 sledges ; 
(3 ladles ; 8 monkey wrenches ; 1 hatchet ; 2 axes ; 8 planes ; 
12 hand hammers ; 7 cutting chisels ; 8 trowels ; 6 hand- 
saws ; 1 compass do,; 2 augurs; 8 jam irons; 37 sets; 4 
paving hammers ; 1 square ; 3 plumber's furnaces ; 6 plumb- 
ers' force pumps ; 6 plumber's irons ; 5 sol. coppers ; 5 sol. 
pots; 8 cold chisels; 6 carpenters' do.; 1 rivet set; 1 
spirit level ; 1 oil stone ; 1 emery wheel ; 1 grindstone ; 1 
copper pump ; 1 iron force do. ; H diamond points ; 2 divid- 
ers ; 50 feet |-inch tin tube ; 7 assorted bits ; 1 belt punch ; 
3 screw-drivers ; 1 chain tongs ; 7 frost wedges ; 3 cutting 
knives ; 6 pairs rubber mitts ; 2 palette knives ; 3 pipe cut- 
ters ; 12 j)ipe-tongs ; 1 die and plates for iron pipe ; 20 work- 
ing-wrenches ; 11 service do. ; 9 gate do. ; 2 valve do. ; 3 
hydrant do. ; 50 feet Manilla rope ; 5 lead pots ; 4 drilling 
crabs; 2 chain slings; 1 Low. hyd, do.; 16 L.H. R.P. 
shovels ; 4 S.H. do. ; 4 square do. ; 30 picks ; 9 rammers ; 
6 brass ; 1 tool-chest ; 3 cement boxes ; 3 lead furnaces ; 1 
wood saw ; 1 lining machine for cement, 7-inch pipe ; 4 
derricks ; 5 blocks and falls ; 2 iron grappers ; 2 long tongs ; 

1 copper hose pipe ; 1 copper 3-way hose connections ; 2 
bench screws ; 2 hoes ; 26 flat 14-inch files ; 23 do. 12-inch 
do. ; 3 round 10-inch do. ; 29 assorted saw files ; 1 tar ket- 
tle ; 1 hand-cart ; 1 wheelbarrow ; 1 windlass derrick. 

Stable Department. 

800 lbs. hay, 300 lbs. salt do., 4 horses, 4 harnesses, 6 
blankets, 3 bufialo robes, 2 oiled covers, 1 sleigh, 2 pungs, 

2 buggies, 2 wagons, 1 stable fork, 1 hay do., 3 currycombs, 

3 brushes, 1 wheel-jack, 2 pails, 1 axe, 1 lantern, 1 stove 
and copper kettle. 

Engine-house Department. 

Tools and I^ixiures at Gate-house. — 3 picks, 5 shovels, 2 
bars, 3 log hooks, 2 ladders, 1 thermometer, 1 wood-saw, 1 
scales, 2 chains, 2 ice chisels, 5 lanterns, 2 grubs, 2 nets, 2 
boat-hooks, 1 brat, 2 oil-cans, 1 hammer, 3 stoves, 2 hand- 
lamps, 5 wheelbarrows, 1 pipe-tongs, 2 rain-gauges, 1 shears, 
3 pails, 1 axe, 2 iron rakes, 4 hay do., 4 hoes, 2 wrenches, 
2 sets block and falls, 3 spades, 1 pump, 1 sledge, 1 hammer 
(stone), 1 spirit level, 3 derricks, 1 brace and bitts. 

Stable. — 2 horses, 2 carts, 2 cart harnesses, 2 plough do., 
1 plough, 1 pung, ] harrow, 4 bushels oats, 1 ton hay, 2 tons 
salt do., 4 blankets, 1 axe, 1 hammer, 1 saw, 2 rakes, 2 
scythes, 3 hay-forks, 1 lawn-mower, 50 feet rubber hose. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 133 



Pumping-Service . 

Stock on Hand. — 130 lbs. mop waste, 550 lbs. cotton do., 
23 lbs. hemp packing, 3| lbs. asbestos do., 11 lbs. Martin's 
do., 16 galls, soft soap, 12 galls, kerosene oil, 42 galls, cylin- 
der do., 40 galls, petroleum do., 6 galls, neatsfoot do., 1 
gall, sperm do., 3 galls, boiled do., 35 lbs. red lead, 23 bars 
hard soap, 30 lbs. |-inch brass pipe, 29| lbs. brass fittings, 
6 1 lbs. Babbitt, 2 spare water-valve seats No. 3, 2 do. rub- 
ber do., 8 feet 6-inch copper pipe, 11 assorted iron elbows, 
3 do. unions, 4 2-inch nipples, 14 assorted plugs, 2 2-inch 
T's, 4 assorted reducers, 16 feet i-inch pipe, 17 do. | do., 
32 feet 1-inch do., 6 feet 2-inch do., 19 feet 2|-inch do., 2 
air-pump rubber valves, 100 feet |-inch round iron, 30 feet 
l|-inch do., 1 bbl. kaoline, 2 6-inch globe valves, 1 6-inch 
T do., 730 fire-brick, 67 lbs. old brass, 5,765 lbs. old scrap 
iron, 455 tons Cumberland coal. 

Tools, Fixtures, etc. — 1 platform scales, 1 24-inch stand- 
ard gauge, 2 ladders, 2 desks, 4 chairs, 2 clocks, 1 table, 
3 12-iuch flat files, 3 12-inch \ round do., 24 lamp chimneys, 
8 lamp burners, 1 brass lantern, 16 kerosene oil lamps, 4 
pails, 2 1-gall. cans, 1 pole and. duster, 2 wheelbarrows, 1 
steam kettle, 1 brace and bitts, 2 sledges, 6 screw-drivers, 
8 wrenches, 27 socket do., 8 box do., 9 service do., 3 screw 
do., 2 Stillson do., 1 anvil, 1 forge and bellows, 2 vises, 3 
bars, 10 cold chisels, 2 sets fire-irons, 2 shovels, 2 coal cars, 
2 jack-screws, 2 ratchets, 2 sets taps and dies, 1 set pipe 
tongs, 2 pipe-cutters, 2 blocks and falls, 1 valve-seat reamer, 
25 draw-bolts, 10 eye-bolts, 100 feet 2^-inch hose, 100 feet 
|-inch do., 4 oil cans, 1 waste do., 1 tallow press. 



134 City Document No. 62. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1878. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge op the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From November 25, 1872, to 
present time. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works, from May 10, 1873, to present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whit- 
well, and J. Avery Richards, were elected a Water Board, subject 
to the direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by 
an ordinance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in 
force one year ; and in 185 1 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

Cochituate Water Board. 
Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned 

April 7, 1856J Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned 

June 5, 1860$ Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired 

April 3, 1865 Five years. 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



135 



Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned Jan- 
uary 15, 1867 One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired 
Api'il 6, 1868 . ... . One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and 
resigned January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 
4, 1873 Two years and four months. 

John A.« Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874J . . . ■ . . . One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned 
May 31, 1875 '. .Six months. ■ 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 

31, 1876 One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55t . 
John H. Wilklns, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 
Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 
Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56 . 
James W. Seaver, 1851 J .... 
Samuel A. Eliot, 1851J .... 
John T. Heard, 1851 .... 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, 55% 
Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853 . 
Ezra Lincoln, 1852^ • . . • . 
Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55^ . 
Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 
Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57:]: 
William Washburn, 1854 and 55 
TiSDALE Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ 
Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ .. 
John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59 . 
Joseph Smith, 1856 .... 
Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 69, 60, 61, 62, 63 

64 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61$ 

George P. Erench, 1859, 60,' 61, 62, and 63 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ . 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 

Clement Willis, 1860 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ .... 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ . 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 . 

John F. Pray, 1862 .... 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 .... 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66 . 

Otis Norckoss, *1865 and 66 . 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 

William S. Hills, 1867 

Charles R. Train, 1868 . . 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69 . 

Benjamin James, *1858, 68, and 69 . 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 . 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ . 

John O. Poor, 1870 .... 

HoLLis R. Gray, 1870 



59$ . 



65 



and 



Five years. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Four years. 
One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Six yeai's. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Two months. 

Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 
One year. 
Six years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Two 3'ears. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



136 



City Document No. 62. 



67, 68, 69, 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 

70, and 71 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71 . 

Sidney Squires, 1871 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 . 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 

Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 

and 72 

Chakles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74t 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

Leonard R. Cutter. 1871, 72, 73/»74, 75, and 76t . 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 

75, and 76t 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 76t . 
Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t 
Nahum M. Morrison, 1876t 
Augustus Parker, 1876t . 



Nine years. 
Four years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Four yeai's. 

Seven years. 
Three'years. 
Two years. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
Five years. 
Six years. 

Ten years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



* Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President; and 
July 2, Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the city. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. 'Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15 to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

f Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

i Deceased. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 137 



Boston Water Board, Organized July 31, 187G. 



Timothy T. Sawyer, Chairman, from July 81, 1876. 
Leonard R. Cuttek, from July 31, 1876. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876. 



Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Coehitxmte Departniejit. 
EzKKiEL R. Jones. 

Supei'intendent of the Western Division of CochituaU: Department. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic DexKirtment. 
Charles H. Bigelow. 

Water Registrar of the Gochittmte Department. 
William F. Davis. 

Water Registrar of the Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

City Engineer. 
Joseph P. Davis. 

Resident Engineer on Additional Supx)ly. 
A. Fteley. 



^ 



B.P.L..Bindei7 

MARIS im 



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[Jan., 1880, 10,000] 

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