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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

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&IVETif BY 






SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOSTON WATEE BOARD, 



FOR THE TEAR ENDING 



APRIL 30, 1882 







BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 

No. 39 ARCH STREET. 
1882. 



With Compliments Oj 

Boston Water Board. 



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3^9J Si'-' }, 



f LAJ -J 



[DocuMEi^T 124 — 1882.] 



CITY OF i^i BOSTON 




\ 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1882. 



Office of Boston Water Board, 

September 21, 1882. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston: — 

The Boston Water Board herewith respectfully submit 
their sixth annual report, together with reports from the City 
Engineer, Water Registrar, Clerk of the Board, the Clerk 
and Registrar of the Mystic works-, and the Superintendents 
of the several divisions. 

The various structures connected with the present works 
are in good condition. 

The Board are, however, unable to contemplate the capacity 
of the works with the same amount of satisfaction, and a large 
portion of their report will be given to requests for the en- 
largement of the high service and the further development of 
the Sudbury-river system. Even if the present enormous 
consumption of water is successfully checked by a meter sys- 
tem, it would still, in the opinion of the^Board, be the part of 
a wise foresight to begin the construction of the works. 

During the past year a number of the claims still remaining 
unsettled on the Sudbury works have been disposed of, and 
several alterations have been made in the water rates. An 
attempt has been made to treat the sewage of the Mystic 



2 City Document No. 124. 

sewer in accordance with the Act to abate a. nuisance in the 
lower Mystic pond ; and the construction of a new storage 
basin on the Sudbury river has been begun. 

An application made to the Legislature at its last session 
to secure the waters of the Shawshine river was unsuccessful. 
It is important that this matter should be urged at the next 
session of the General Court. 



Consumption of Water. 

The average daily consumption of water for the year 1881, 
including the Mystic works, was 38,214,900 gallons, an in- 
crease of 6.5 per cent, over the consumption for 1880. This 
amount is equivalent to an average daily consumpti(fn of 92 
gallons per hgad of population. 

This steady increase in the consumption of water presents 
one of the most serious problems which those in charge of 
the management of water works have to meet. Over and 
above the question of waste there are no data more certain, 
in view of the experience of the past, than those which point 
to the ever-increasino; extensions of existing works with the 
necessarily increasing number of takers and the constantly 
increasing uses which are found for the consumption of 
water. ♦■ 

Although the Board have often urged upon the City 
Council for a number of successive years the importance of 
extendino; the works in certain directions in time to meet the 
demands made upon them, it has been the practice in the 
past to provide the funds for increasing the capacity of the 
works only when the emergency was most strongly felt by 
the actual necessities and demands of the consumers. In the 
opinion of the Board this policy results in great wrong to 
the consumer. As a general riile the construction of im- 
portant additions to a water supply includes the loss of 
several working seasons. This is seldom taken into account, 
and, in consequence, if the works happen to be storage 
reservoirs, their water has to be hurried into the city, to pre- 
vent an actual scarcity of supply long before it is in a fit 
condition to be used. Then, again, the basins have to be 
drawn down to such an extent in the summer that a large 
part of the bottom is exposed, and the water in the lower 
portion is generally of an inferior quality to that nearer the 
surface. 

Two years ago the Board urged upon the City Council the 
importance of taking " immediate steps towards the construc- 
tion of an additional basin." It was not until August, 1881, 



Eeport of the Water Board. ' 3 

that the necessary authority was granted for the construc- 
tion of what is to be known as Basin No. 4, of the Sudbury 
system. Work was at once begun ; but, with every means 
taken to facilitate construction, it will be hardly possible 
to fill this new basin till 1884. It is now evident to the 
Board that work on another new basin should be begun 
at once, and they accordingly ask for authority to undertake 
the preliminary work of making the surveys and securing 
the land. 

The increase in consumption in the territory supplied by 
the Highland high-service works has been 2^ per cent, over 
the consumption of the preceding year ; but for the last few 
months it has been increasing at a much greater rate than 
this ; and the present indications are that, for the coming 
year, the increase will exceed 10 per cent. 

The enlargement of the present high-service system can- 
not be longer delayed with any degree of safety. 

To reduce the extravagant use o^ water to more reasonable 
limits has been the constant study of the Board. They have 
favored the more extended use of meters, and, during the past 
year, many new ones have been applied. There are, how- 
ever, difficulties in the way of an entire application of a 
meter system at once to a city like Boston. During the past 
year an investigation of this subject has been made by the 
Joint Standing Committee on Water, and from their report 
(City Doc. 78, 1882) it will be seen that, if the present con- 
sumption could be reduced to 60 gallons per head, the 
capacity of the works would be sufficient for many years. 

An experiment has been made in the Charlestown District 
with the Deacon meter, which has been so extensively used 
abroad. The Deacon meter is not a meter in the ordinary 
sense of the term. It is a large and expensive apparatus, 
which is applied directly to the main in the street, and serves 
for a whole district. Its nature is such that it acts rather 
as a waste-detector than as a meter. A full account of the 
experiment will be found in the City'Engineer's report. In 
general, the application of this system of detecting waste has 
been attended with gratifying success, and the Board favor 
its use in the city, in connection with house-to-house inspec- 
tion. 

Sudbury River. 

Sudbury river has supplied to the city 9,036,700,000 
gallons, equivalent to an average daily supply of over 24,- 
758,100 gallons. Almost all of this water was run directly 
to the city without passing through Lake Cochituate. The 



4 City Document No. 124. 

storage-basins were all full at the beginning of the year. 
Basin No. 1 has been used principally during the past 
drought in supplying the one and a half million gallons daily 
which the Board are required to pass into Sudbury river be- 
low their dams. Its water has not been of very good qual- 
ity, owing to the presence of algae. 

Basin No. 2, which was full on May 1, 1881, was emptied 
by the latter end of July ; but as this basin soon fills from 
rains, it has been drawn upon at different times during the 
entire year, and has formed the principal reliance of the 
city. A few improvements have been made around its 
margin. 

Basin 3 was used principally during August and Septem- 
ber to reinforce the supply. Algae made their appearance, as 
usual, in its waters early in the year, principally on the sur- 
face, but later they were more uniformly distributed through 
the water. While the basin was low a considerable amount 
of loam and stumps was |jemoved in the vicinity of the gate- 
house. 

The quality of the water in Sudbury river has been gener- 
ally good throughout the year. During the month of Oc- 
tober, however, a very disagreeable taste developed in the 
water of Farm pond, which, as the works are now arranged, 
forms a link in the Sudbury-river supply. As all the water 
from this source had to be passed through Farm pond, all 
the water became tainted. It had a fishy or cucumber 
taste, and awakened a wide-spread excitement in the city. 
Prof. Remsen, of Baltimore, was chosen by the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Water to make an investigation of the 
cause of the bad taste, which he ascribed (City Doc. 143, 
1881) to the 8pongilla fluviatilis, a fresh-water sponge, or 
low form of animal life. Whatever the cause, it became ap- 
parent that decided steps would have to be taken to correct 
the evil. Under the advice and direction of the City Engi- 
neer, Farm pond was lowered to grade 142.17, seven feet 
below high-water mar&, and a temporary ditch or canal, a 
mile in length, was built around the westerly margin, to con- 
vey the Sudbury water direct to the aqueduct. This work 
was done at considerable expense, but after its completion 
no further trouble was experienced in the city from the bad 
taste. 

It was part, of Mr. Jos. P. Davis' original scheme to con- 
nect the gate-houses at either end of Farm pond by means of 
a permanent aqueduct, and, in view of the shallow flowage of 
the pond and the liability to a recurrence of this trouble, it 
seems to the Board that it would be well to begin the con- 
struction of the work. They therefore recommend it to the 



Report of the Water Board. 5 

serious consideration of the City Council, and would urge an 
appropriation for the work. 

On August 21, 1881, an order of the City Council was 
approved appropriating three hundred and ninety-four thou- 
sand dollars for the construction of Basin No. 4. On Au- 
gust 26 the Engineer was directed to proceed at once with 
the construction, and on September 22 the work was begun. 
The plans and specifications had already been approved by 
the County Commissioners of Middlesex County, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Chapter 178, Laws of 1875. A 
large force is employed, and every means will be taken to 
forward the work. The site of the new basin is on Cold- 
stream brook, in Ashland. A dam is being built across the 
valley, which is about two thousand feet in width. This dam 
is to be of earth, with a centre wall of concrete carried down 
to .the bed rock. 

The basin formed by the dam will contain about 1,100,- 
000,000 gallons. The depth of the water will be 45 feet. 
The banks are quite precipitating. When completed, it is 
expected that this basin will add 5,000,000 of gallons daily 
to the supply. 

Lake Cochituate. 

On May 1, 1881, the lake was practically full. On June 
22 the flash-boards on the outlet dam were put on and waste 
stopped. Water was drawn from this source during the 
year, reaching a point only six feet above the bottom of the 
aqueduct on December 12. A slight cucumber taste was 
found in the lake water about the 1st of February, and for 
about two and one half months its waters were isolated from 
the supply. It is probable that the sponge is the cause of the 
cucumber taste in the lake, as its presence has been detected ; 
but, owing to the impracticability of emptying the lake suffi- 
ciently to expose any extended area of the bottom, it is 
difficult to determine to what extent it might be found. 

The structures are all in good order, with the exception of 
the outlet dam, which needs rebuilding. The attention of 
the Council is called to the importance of providing funds 
for this purpose. 



Aqueducts and Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct is in excellent condition. It 
has been in use during the entire year, with the exception of 
a few days when it was being cleaned. An average of about 



6 City Document No. 124. 

24,000,000 gallons daily has been sent through this struct- 
ure. The maximum amount run through in any one day 
was 86,600,000 gallons. 

The Cochituate aqueduct was not in use from May 1 to 
July 14, and from January 28 to April 29, on account of a 
bad taste in the lake water. Advantage was taken of these 
intervals to make some thorough repairs on certain weak 
portions of the work. These will be found fully referred to 
in the report of the Superintendent of the Western Division. 

The exterior structures on both lines of aqueducts are in 
good repair. 

The Chestnut Hill and Brookline reservoirs are in 
the same excellent condition as at the date of the last 
report. 

On November 27, 1880, the Beacon-Hill reservoir was 
seized by the Board of Aldermen, acting in their capacity as 
County Commissioners, for a site for a new Coui't-House. 
On March 7, 1881, the Water Board were requested to draw 
off the water and disconnect the pipes. This was done later 
in the year, and this reservoir has since passed out of the 
control of the Board. On November 21 a communication 
was sent to your honorable body, setting forth the facts, 
and asking for a proper compensation for the land and 
building. No action has been taken on this request. It is 
hoped that the City Council will take immediate steps to 
reimburse this department for the property so taken ; and 
the Board desire earnestly to call the attention of the City 
Council to the injustice of allowing this claim to remain 
longer unadjusted. 

The reservoir in South Boston is kept full for use only in 
case of accident to the supply mains. The East Boston 
reservoir is now used in connection with the high-service 
system. The Parker-Hill reservoir is in good repair ; some 
work in the way of grading and improving the grounds has 
been done. 

No new distributing mains of importance have been laid 
during the year. 

The connection of the 40-inch main on Brookline avenue 
with the 36-inch and 30-inch mains on Treraont street, by 
means of a 30-inch main through Francis street, was com- 
pleted in July. The whole quantity of new pipes laid, includ- 
ing pipes relaid and changed in size during the past year, is 
nearly eight miles in length. In the tables connected with 
the report of the Superintendent of the Eastern Division, the 
table showing the length of supply and distiibuting mains 
has been revised and presented in a new form. 



Report of the Water Board. 7 

It has been the custom heretofore to make no deduction 
for pipes relaid or abandoned, consequently the total lengths 
given have been in excess of the actual lengths. 



High-Service Works. 

The total quantity of water pumped during the year 1881 
at the Highland pumping-station was 878,447,000 gallons, 
against 856,840,000 gallons for the preceding year, an in- 
crease of about 2^ per cent. The cost per million gallons 
raised one foot was 9.1 cents. 

The Board have little to add to what has been already 
urged in previous reports in regard to the necessity of re- 
buildinsj the hio^h-service works. An Act of the Lesjislature 
has been procured, approved March 24, 1881, and nothing 
remains but the action of the City Council accepting the Act 
and appropriating the money. 

On September 30 the Board requested the City Engi- 
neer to report an approximate estimate of the expense of the 
scheme. On October 17 the report of the Engineer was 
received, and on November 7 following a communication 
was sent to the City Council (page 720, Proceedings for 
1881) setting forth the necessity for immediate action, and 
transmitting the report of the Engineer in full. As no action 
has yet been taken, the attention of the City Council is again 
asked to the consideration of the requests. In the opinion 
of the Board this work cannot longer be delayed with safety. 

At the high-service works at East Boston the average 
daily quantity pumped has been 388,300 gallons. At the 
Brighton pumping-station the amount pumped has varied 
from 50,000 to 200,000 gallons per day. 



The Mystic Department. 

The total amount of water pumped by the Mystic depart- 
ment during the year 1881 was 2,622,579,856 gallons, at a 
cost of 6.44 cents per million gallons raised one foot. 

The qualit}'^ of the water has been unusually good. The 
facts that algoe have not made their appearance in abundant 
quantities, and that the tannery pollution has been removed 
by means of the sewer, have conduced largely to this result. 

The total number of water-takers is 16,700, against 16,427 
for the preceding year. 



8 City Document No. 124. 

The attention of the City Council has been frequently 
called to the insufficiency of the Mj'^stic lake to meet the de- 
mand made upon it by the Mystic works. 

Two years ago, so low had the surface of the lake fallen, 
that a temporary set of pumps had to be erected to pump 
from the lower portion of the lake into the aqueduct. Every 
year, with its increasing consumption, places the Mystic in a 
worse condition. The only available source to supplement 
the Mystic, and ultimately to supplant it, is the Shawshine 
river. 

Every effort should be made to secure this source of sup- 
ply. A thorough examination has been made, in years past, 
into the quality of the water for a domestic supply, and it 
has been found in every way suitable. As already intimated 
in another portion of this report, renewed attempts will be 
made during the coming winter to secure a legislative Act for 
the taking of the Shawshine waters. 

An enlargement of the capacity of the pumping-engines 
at the Mystic works will also have to be made at no distant 
day. 

An important improvement has been made during the year 
which results in a solving in the method of delivering coal at 
the pumping-station. On September 29 a communication 
was sent to the City Council asking for authority to build a 
branch track from the Lowell Railroad to the works. On 
October 11 this authority was given to the Water Board, 
and the track has since been constructed. The land was 
secured by the city and the track was built by the Railroad 
Company. 

Much time has been devoted to the question of the treat- 
ment of the Mystic sewage. An attempt was made to 
secure a modification of the Mystic Sewer Nuisance Act, as it 
is called, approved May 13, 1881 ; but without success. To 
carry out the exact provisions of this Act was entirely im- 
practicable. After long delays an injunction was issued, on 
petition of the town of Medford, to prevent the further dis- 
charge of sewage into the Lower Mystic pond. Subse- 
quently an agreement was made with the town of Medford 
to erect the present filtration works on the line of the sewer. 

The works are located in the town of Winchester, upon a 
piece of land which was taken from the Boston & Lowell 
Railroad Company for the purpose. 

The sewage is lifted into a tank, and after being treated 
to what is known as the subsidence and downward filtration 
process, is discharged into the Lower Mystic pond. These 
works are expensive to maintain, but as the Act and decisions 
of the Court now remain there is no alternative. 



Report of the Water Board. 



Earnings or the Works. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water Works from all 
sources for the year ending April 30, 1882, are as follows, 
viz. : - — 

Stock on hand May 1, 1881 .... $95,763 86 
Income from sales of water .... 1,094,869 63 
Income from shutting off and letting on water 

and fees 2,658 25 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . . 21,133 65 

Profits in manufacturing hydrants, etc., 

etc., for the year ending March 15, 

1881 . . . ; . $10,752 66 
Less decrease in valuation of 

stock, March 15, 1881 . . 4,856 06 



5,896 60 



$1,220,321 99 



The total amount charged to Cochituate 
Water Works for the year ending April 30, 
1882, is as follows, viz. ; — 

Current expenses . . . $233,776 85 
Extension of works paid for out 

of income .... 93,540 80 
Interest on funded debt . . 598,97476 

$926,292 41 



Balance April 30, 1882 .... $294,029 58 



Stock on hand April 30, 1882, $100,189 22 
Paid to Cochituate Water Sink- 

ing-Fund, April 30, 1882 , . 193,840 36 . 

$294,029 58 



Amount required for Smking- 

Fund for 1881-2 . . . $195,308 00 

Excess of income over expendi- 
tures for 1881-82 . . . 193,840 36 



Excess of requirements over income . . $1,467 64 



10 



City Document No. 124. 



The outstanding Cochituate Water Loans at this date, 
exclusire of the Additional Supply, are as follows : — 



5 per cent. Sterling Loan 

(£399,500) . . . $1,947,273 98 
5 per cent. Loans . . 100,000 00 
5 per cent. Loan . . 1,000 00 



6 per cent. Loans 



4 per cent. Loan 



$100,000 
1,000 
f 300.000 
200,000 
450,000 
540,000 
250,000 
625,000 
688,000 
330.000 
413,000 
4,258,000 00 -{ 38,000 
161,000 
142,700 
6,000 
82,550 
8,750 
4,000 
8,000 
5,000 
1, 1,000 
280,000 00 280,000 



Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Dec. 
Due Dec. 
Due June 
Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due July 
Due Api'il 
Due April 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Jan. 
Due Api'il 
Due Oct. 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due July 
Due April 



1902 
1906 
1907 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1910 



$6,581,273 98 



The total receipts of the Mystic Water Works from all 
sources for the year ending April 30, 1882, are as follows, 
viz . : — 



Stock on hand May 1, 1881 . . 

Income from sales of water .... 

Income from shutting oif and letting on water, 
and fees ....... 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . 

Receipts by Mystic Water Registrar for service- 
pipes, etc. ....... 



The total amount charged to Mystic Water 
Works for the year ending April 30, 1882, is 
as follows, viz. : — 

Current expenses . . . $78,823 79 

Extension of works paid for out 

of income .... 4,116 04 



$16,657 44 
245,336 77 

889 00 
2,537 97 

5,595 09 

$271,016 27 



Amount carried forward, $82,939 83 $271,016 27 



Keport of the Water Board. 11 

Amounts brought forward, $82,939 83 $271,016 27 
Interest on funded debt . . 62,445 00 
Amount paid Chelsea, Somer- 
ville, and Everett, under con- 
tracts 31,106 23 

176,491 06 



Balance, April 30, 1882 .... $94,525 21 



Stock on hand, April 30, 1882 . $14,471 53 
Paid to Mystic Water Sinking- 

Fund, April 30, 1882 . . 80,053 Q^ 



$94,525 21 



Amount required for Sinking- 

Fund for year 1881-82 . . $90,367 00 

Excess of income over expendi- 
tures for year 1881-82 . . 80,053 68 



Excess of requirements over income . . $10,313 32 



Mystic Water Loans . $587,000 00 



1890 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1893 
1882 
1883 
1893 
189-t 
6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Sewer Loans . 130,000 00 130,000 Due April 1, 1886 

$1,127,000 00 



U02,000 Due April 



1885 
1886 
1886 
1887 



The outstanding Mystic Water loans at this date are as 
follows : — 

1,000 Due April 

35,000 Due April 

60,000 Due Oct. 

50,000 Due Oct. 

6 per cent, currency . mn'S S'^^ ^P"^ 

MvstiV. Watftr Lna.ns . <fi.'Sft7.nnn 00 *> -^rV'^'^^ -UUe July 

51,000 Due Jan. 

139,000 Due July 

67,000 Due Jan. 

42,000 Due July 

y 39,000 Due July 

r 100,000 Due Oct. 

5 per cent, currency J 202,000 Due Oct. 

Mystic Water Loans . 410,000 00 1 6,000 Due Oct 



Mystic Sewer. 

Balance of loan, April 30, 1881 . . . $16,882 73 
Payments during year 1881-82 . . . 5,743 89 



Balance unexpended April 30, 1882 . . $11,138 84 



12 



City Document No. 124. 



The following statement shows the appropriations by the 
City Council for an additional supply of water, with the 
loans issued to meet them, and the amount of expenditures 
to this date : — 

Additional Supply of Water. 



APPROPRIATIONS . 



Oct. 21, 1871. — Transfer from Reserved Fund 
Apr. 12, 1872. — Order for Treasurer to borrow 
Apr. 11, 1873.— 



Feb. 


26, 


1875.— 


July 


1, 


1876.— 


Apr. 


20, 


1878. — 


Apr. 


11. 


1879.— 



Total appropriations to April 30, 1882 . 

Oct. 1, 1875. — Premium on $1,000,000 bonds, under 

order of Feb. 26, 1875 . $83,700 00 
April 1, 1876. — Premium on $452,000 

bonds, under order of 

Feb. 26, 1875 . . 47,786 80 
Oct. 1, 1876. — Premium on $2,000,000 

bonds, under order of 

July 1, 1876 . . . 221,400 00 



$10,000 00 
100,000 00 
500,000 00 
1,500,000 00 
2,000,000 00 
600,000 00 
350,000 00 

$5,060,000 00 



352,886 80 
$5,412,886 80 



EXPENDED. 

1871-72 : • . 

1872-73 

1873-74 including $20,897.50 discount 
on bonds sold, January 

1874 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1881-82 



$2,302 81 
61,278 83 



114,102 77 

224,956 68 

783,613 49 

1,924,060 24 

1,257,715 26 

635,658 08 

213,350 97 

35,677 98 

97,406 78 



Balance of appropriations unexpended, April 30, 1882 



5,350,123 89 
$62,762 91 



Balance of loans, April 30, 1881 . . . $160,169 69 

Payment during year 1881-2 . . . 97,406 78 

Balance unexpended, April 30, 1882 . $62,762 91 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 



13 



The outstanding loans which were made on account of 
Additional Supply of Water are as follows : — 



4 per cent. Loans 


. $670,000 ] 


$82,000 
588,000 


Due July 1, 1908 
Due April 1, 1908 




( 


1,000,000 


Due Oct. 1, 1905 


6 per cent. Loans 


. 3,452,000 < 


452,000 


Due April 1, 1906 




( 


2,000,000 


Due Oct. 1, 1906 


5 per cent. Loan 


12,000 




Due April 1, 1908 




•■ 


100,000 


Due July 1, 1902 


6 per cent. Loans 


648,000 . 


492,000 
8,000 


Due April 1, 190;} 
Due Jan'y 1, 1904 






48,000 


Due July 1, 1905 


4a per cent. Loan 


. 268,000 




Due Oct. 1, 1908 




$5,050,000 





LEONARD R. CUTTER, Chairman, 
ALBERT STANWOOD, 
FRANCIS THOMPSON. 



EEPOET OF THE CLEEK. 



Office of the Boston Water Board, 

Boston, May 1, 1882. 

Leonard E. Cutter, Esq., 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board : — 

Sir, — The following is a statement of the receipts and 
expenditures of the Boston Water Board for the financial 
year ending April 30, 1882 : — 

Receipts. 

On account of Cochituate Water Works . $1,118,661 53 
" Mystic Water Works . . 254,358 83 



Balance of loans unexpended 

April 30, 1881, Additional 

Supply of Water . . $160,169 69 
Mystic Sewer . . . 16,882 73 

Balance Appropriation, New 

Main, Cochituate Water 

Works .... 12,221 20 
Appropriation, Chestnut-Hill 

Driveway, 1881-82 . . 5,800 00 

Stock purchased in previous 

years, Cochituate Water 

Works .... 101,660 46 
Mystic Water Works . . 16,657 44 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses, Cochituate 

Water Works . . . $233,776 85 
Current expenses, Mystic 

Water Works . . . 78,823 79 



$1,373,020 36 



313,391 52 
$1,686,411 88 



Amounts carried forward, $312,600 64 $1,686,411 88 



Eeport of the Water Board. 15 

Amounts brought forward, $312,600 64 11,686,411 88 
Extension of Cochituate Water 

Works .... 93,540 80 
Extension of Mystic Water 

Works .... 4,116 04 

Interest on Cochituate Water 

Loans .... 598,974 76 
Interest on Mystic Water 

Loans .... 62,445 00 
Chelsea, Somerville, and Ev^ 

erett contracts, account 

Mystic Water Works . 31,106 23 

Construction, New Main, Co- 
chituate Water Works . 2,398 24 
Construction, Additional'-Sup- 

ply of Water . . . 97,406 78 
Construction, Mystic Sewer . 5,743 89 

Surplus Income of Cochituate 

Water Works to Cochituate 

Water Sinking Fund. . 193,840 36 
Surplus Income of Mystic 

Water Works to Mystic 

Water Sinking Fund . 80,053 68 

Chestnut-Hill Driveway . 5,073 90 

Balance of Appropriation 

Chestnut-Hill Driveway 

carried into the Treasury, 

April 30, 1882 ... 726 10 



1,488,026 42 
$198,385 46 



April 30, 1882, Balance of 
loans unexpended. Addi- 
tional Supply of Water . $62,762 91 

Mystic Sewer . . . 11,138 84 

New Main, Cochituate Water 

Works .... 9,822 96 

Stock on hand April 30, 1882, 

Cochituate Water Works . 100,189 22 

Mystic Water Works . . 14,471 53 



$198,385 46 



16 City Document No. 124. 

Total Water Debt of the City of Boston. 

Cochituate, outstanding, 

April 30, 1882 . .$11,631,273 98 
Mystic, outstanding, April 

30, 1882 . . . 1,127,000 00 

$12,758,273 98 

Cochituate Water Debt. 

Outstanding, April 30, 

1881 .... $11,631,273 98 
Paid in 1881-82 . . 0,000,000 00 

$11,631,273 98 

Mystic Water Debt 

Outstanding, April 30, 

1881 .... $1,153,000 00 
Paid in 1881-82 . . 26,000 00 

$1,127,000 00 

Total Water Sinking-Funds, April 30, 1^82. 

Cochituate Water Sinking- 

Fund .... $2,282,299 86 

Mystic Water Sinking- 
Fund . . . . 468,263 51 

$2,750,563 37 

Trial Balance, Cochituate Water Worhs, April 30, 1882. 

Dr. Cr. 

Construction Account $16,943,863 87 

Cochituate Water Works . $16,943,863 87 

City Treasurer, Loan Ac- 
count .... 172,390 89 

Appropriation, Additional 

Supply of Water . . 62,762 91 

Appropriation, New Main, 

Cochituate Water Works 9,822 96 

Income of Cochituate Water 

Works. . . . 1,220,321 99 

Maintenance of Cochituate 

Waterworks . . 233,776 85 

Extension of Cochituate 

Water Works . ' . 93,540 80 



Amounts carried forward, $17,443,572 41 $18,236,771 73 



Eeport of the Water Board 


• 


17 


Amounts brought forward, $17,443,572 41 $18,236,771 


73 


Interest on Cochituate Water 






Loans .... 598,974 76 






Stock Account . . . 100,189 22 






City Treasurer, Revenue Ac- 






count .... 1,118,661 53 






Appropriation, Chestnut-Hill 






Driveway .... 


726 


10 


City Treasurer, Appropriation 


- 




Account . . . . 5,800 00 






pity Treasurer 


1,029,700 


09 


Funded Debt . . 11,631,273 98 


' 




Cochituate Water 6% Cur- 






rency Loan 


4,901,000 


00 


Cochituate Water 5% Cur- 






rency Loan ... 


13,000 


00 


Cochituate Water 5% Gold 






Loan .... 


3,552,000 


00 


Cochituate Water 5 <fo Sterling 






ling Loan 


1,947,273 


98 


Cochituate Water 4% Cur- • 






rency Loan 


588,000 


00 


Cochituate Water 4% Loan . 


362,000 


00 


Cochituate Water 41^% Loan. 


268,000 


00 


Commissioners ontheSinking- 






Funds .... 2,282,299 86 






Cochituate Water Sinking- 






Fund .... 


2,282,299 


86 


^ $33,180,771 76 $33,180,771 


76 



Trial Balance^ Mystic Water Worhs, April 30, 1882. 

Dr. Cr. 

Construction . . $1,634,108 82 

Mystic Water Works . . $1,634,108 82 

City Treasurer, Revenue Ac- 
count .... 254,358 83 

Licome of Mystic Water 

Works .... 271,016 27 

Maintenance of Mystic Water 

Works .... 78,823 79 

Extension of Mystic Water 

Works . '. . . 4,116 04 



Amounts carried forward, $1,971,407 48 $1,905,125 09 



18 



City Document No. 124. 



Amounts brought forward, $1,971,407 48 $1,905,125 09 

Interest on Mystic Water 

Loans .... 62,445 00 

Chelsea, Somerville, and Ever- 
ett contracts . . . 31,106 23 

Stock A'ccouut . . . 14,471 53 

City Treasurer, Loan Account, 16,882 73 

Appropriation, Mystic Sewer, 11,138 84 

City Treasurer . . . 180,049 04 

Funded Mystic Water Debt . 1,127,000 00 

Mystic Water 6^ Currency 



Loan 
Mystic Water 5% Currency 

Loan .... 

Mystic Sewer 6% Currency 

Loan .... 

Commissioners on the Sinking 

Funds .... 
Mystic Water Sinking Fund . 



468,263 51 



587,000 00 
410,000 00 
130,000 00 

468,263 51 



1,691,576 48 $3,691,576 48 



Cost of Construction of the Cochituate Water Works to 
May i, 1882. 

Cost of Water Works to January 1, 1850, 
as per final report of Water Commis- 
sioners $3,998,051 83 

Extension to East Boston .... 281,065 44 
Jamaica-pond aqueduct . . . . 13,237 50 
New dam at Lake Cochituate . . . 10,940 08 
Raising lake two feet, including damages . 28,002 18 
Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con- 
nections with lake . . . \ . 18,982 23 
New main from Brookline reservoir . . 304,991 83 
Land and water rights and land-damages 

since January 1, 1850 .... 49,486 17 

New pipe-yard and repair-shop . . . 25,666 51 

Upper yard, buildings, etc. . . . 9,165 63 

New water-pipes. East Boston . . . 20,999 43 

New main, East Boston . . . . 24,878 08 

Pamping-works at Lake Cochituate . . 23,577 69 
High-service, stand-pipe, engine-house and 

engines 103,829 53 



Amount carried forward, 



.,912,874 13 



Report of the Water Board. 



19 



Amount brought forivard. 
High-service, South Boston 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, including land 
Parker-Hill reservoir 
Charles-river siphon . 
Keeper's house, Parker Hill 
Temporary high-service, Brighton 
New stable at Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
Pegan dam, Natick . 
Willow dam, Natick . 
High-service, East Boston . 
New main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
Cost of laying main j)ipe for extension in 

Roxbury, Dorchester, Brighton, and West 

Roxbuiy Districts . . . . . 
Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of laying main pipe since January 1, 

1850 



^4,912,874 13 

27,860 29 

2,461,232 07 

228,246 17 

26,532 35 

2,764 90 

, 7,865 86 

8,103 55 

1,394 06 

1,567 29 

22,960 07 

270,177 04 



1,758,512 22 

5,350,123 89 

1,863,649 98 

$16,943,863 87 



Cost of Construction of the Mystic Water Works to May 

i, 1882. 



coal-shed, and chimney 



Salaries . 

Eno;ineering 

Land damages 

Reservoir . 

Dam 

Conduit . 

Engine-house, 

Engines . 

Grubbing pond . 

Iron pipes 

Iron pipes, trenching 

City distribution 

Hydrants .... 

Stopcocks .... 

Miscellaneous items . 

Roadway and bridge . 

Lowering Mystic river 

Inspections 

Service-pipes and meters . 

Amount carried forward, 



$17,644 61 

33,746 87 

91,855 38 

141,856 26 

17,167 26 

129,714 30 

36,112 99 

150,096 70 

9,393 26 

108,437 10 

61,029 

162,335 

19,976 

19,262 

14,012 51 

3,529 22 

3,012 06 

1,824 79 

133,858 70 

$1,154,865 56 



59 
23 
21 
52 



20 



CiTT Document No. 124. 



Amount brought forward , 
Hydrants for Somerville and Medford 
Somerville distribution 
Dwelling-house for engineer and fireman 

( pumpi ng-station ) 
Chelsea extension 
Medford extension 
Drinking fountains 
New line of supply main . 
Stable and pipe-yard 
Extension of engine-house and boiler 
New force main 

Mystic sewer .... 
New stable, engine-house . 
Additional force main 
Temporary pumping-works 
Cost of laying main pipe since 1873 



$1,154,865 56 


2,653 


08 


2,492 


10 


4,871 


.02 


37,347 


86 


3,997 


41 


1,415 


05 


203,050 


09 


8,964 


64 


33,727 


43 


9,875 


17 


118,861 


16 


1,767 


39 


24,882 


96 


6,905 


15 



18,432 75 

$1,634,108 82 



Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 
Clerk of the Boston Water Board. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, 

City Hall, Boston, July 1, 1882. 

L. R. Cutter, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — In accordance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance establishing the Boston Water Board, I respectfully 
submit the following report on the condition of the Water 
Works : — 

SUDBURY AND COCHITUATE WORKS. 

SUDBURY-RIVEE RESERVOIRS AND LaKE CoCHITUATE. 

The Sudbury-river reservoirs. Farm pond, and Lake Co- 
chituate, were all full, and water was being wasted at the out- 
let dams, on May 1, 1881. 

The variations of the water levels of these reservoirs are 
shown by the following table of heights of their surfaces 
above tide-marsh level on the first of each month during the 
year: — 



May, 18S1 . . 
June . . . . 
July . . , . 

August . . . 
September . 
October . . . 
November . . 
December . . 
January, 1882 
February . . 
March . . . . 
April . . . , 



Reservoir 
No.l. 
Top of 
flash- 
boards, 
159.29 


Reservoir 
No. 2. 
Top of 
flash- 
boards, 
167.12 


Reservoir 

No. 3. 

Crest of 

dam, 

175.24 


Farm 
Pond. 


157.74 


167.29 


175.47 


149.23 


159.53 


167.24 


175.50 


149.26 


159.46 


166.57 


175.44 


149.23 


159.02- 


159.86 


173.22 


149.18 


158.40 


158.96 


168.21 


149.06 


157.55 


160.80 


161.44 


149.25 


156.38 


162.78 


159.76 


149.20 


159.45 


167.24 


166.42 


142.14 


147.85 


167.43 


174.98 


146.10 


157.98 


166.05 


175.67 


146.05 


158.09 


16424 


173.52 


145.46 


157.84 


166.13 


175.45 


145.38 



Lake 
Cochituate. 
Top of 
flash- 
boards, 
134.36 



134.04 
134.20 
134.26 
133.51 
132.24 
131.: 5 
129.09 
127.44 
128.27 
129.49 
133.33 
133.29 



22 City Document No. 124. 

Eeservoir No. 1, as will be seen by an inspection of the fore- 
going table, has remained at or near the level of the crest of 
the dam during the greater portion of the year. It was emp- 
tied in December so that repairs could be made on the 48-inch 
pipe line connecting Eeservoir No. 2 with the gate-chamber at 
Dam 1. This line of pipe was found to be entirely discon- 
nected at a distance of albout 200 feet from Dam No. 2. Al- 
though laid with leaded joints and covered with several feet 
of earth the pipes at one point had risen vertically at least five 
feet, the bell of one pipe resting upon the top of the next 
pipe. The pipes were replaced in position and loaded with 
large stones. 

Owing to the large quantities of algse in the waters of this 
reservoir during the summerit was not used except to a slight 
extent for supplying the city until winter. 

A small amount was drawn from it into Farm pond on 
July 23, and from October 24 to 27 two million gallons daily 
were drawn from it into Farm pond. From December 5 until 
Jan. 5 it was drawn from for the supply of the city while 
the 48-inch pipe line was being repaired, and from February 
20 to May 1 all the water drawn from the Sudbury passed 
through it. 

Reservoir No. 2 has been used for supplying the city dur- 
ing a large portion of the year. Water was drawn directly 
from this reservoir from May 1 to July 23, at which latter 
date its surface reached the lowest point of the year, 157.91 
or 9.21 feet below the flash-boards ; its highest point during 
the year was 167.61 feet on June 11. From July 30 to 
October 18, from October 20 to October 27, from October 
31 to November 12, from January 5, 1882, to February 11, 
and from April 17 to 19, water for the city's supply was 
also drawn directly from this reservoir. A large quantity 
was drawn from this reservoir and passed through Reservoir 
No. 1 when the 48-inch main was out of use. 

Reservoir No. 3 was full May 1, 1881, and remained so 
until July 16, when it was drawn upon for the city's supply ; 
its surface fell from that time until October 23, at which 
date the reservoir was practically exhausted, the water 
standing at grade 159.35 or 15.89 feet below the crest of the 
dam. This reservoir furnished a portion of the supply until 
November 1, its surface rising gradually from October 24 
until January 2, 1882, when the crest of the dam was reached 
and water was wasted over it. It has been full and over- 
flowing since that time. The highest point reached during 
the year was 175.86, on January 28 ; the lowest was 159.23, 
on October 24. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 23 

Water was drawn directly from this reservoir for the 
city's supply from April 30 to May 15, from July 16 to 
October 18, from October 20 to October 27, from October 
31 to November 1, and from February 11 to February 20, 
1882. 

Farm pond was full May 1, 1881, and was kept so until 
November 15, when the lowering of its surface was com- 
menced so as to allow the construction of a temporary chan- 
nel on the westerly shore. It was kept as low as possible 
until the canal was completed, and was then allowed to rise to 
equalize the pressure on the banks of the canal. For this 
purpose the surface of the pond was kept at 146 from 
December 15 until April 15, when it was allowed to rise to 
high-water mark and flood the canal. The lowest point to 
which the pond was drawn was 142.12, which it reached 
December 2. 

Lake Cochituate, although kept a few inches below high- 
water mark, was practically full May 1, 1881, and water 
was being wasted at the outlet dam. This waste was con- 
tinued until June 22, when the stop-planks were put in 
position, and, with the exception of a few days in July, nd 
more water was allowed to run over the dam until February 
21, 1882. 

From February 21 until March 31 water was wasted at the 
outlet dam. 

The lake was not drawn upon for the city's supply until 
July 14, owing to the existence of the "cucumber taste ' 
in the water. From this time its surface gradually lowered 
until December 12, when it reached the lowest point of the 
year 127.03, or 7.33 feet below high water. 

Jan. 28, 1882, the use of the water from the lake was 
again discontinued, on account of the redevelopment of the 
"cucumber taste," and no more water was draAvn from this 
source until April 19. 

During the year the structures in connection with the 
Sudbury-river basins and Lake Cochituate have been kept in 
their usual good order. In Keservoirs 1 and 3 the shores 
have been improved in places by the removal of stumps and 
vegetable matter. This improvement is more noticeable in 
the portion of Reservoir No. 1, near Dam No. 3. The most 
extensive work of the year was the construction of the tem- 
porary channel in Farm pond. 

The channel, which was constructed in 14 days, is 4,750 
feet in length. For 3,740 feet it is a channel 5 feet deep, 
12 feet in width at the bottom, with side embankments of 
earth, 3 feet in width at the top, and side-slopes generally of 
4 to 1. 



24 City Document No. 3 24. 

For about 560 feet the channel is in mud, or partially so, 
along the north side of the Boston & Albany R.E.. embank- 
ment ; this portion is made partly of .sheet-piling, and is 
partly a flume, 9 feet wide, supported by transversal 
frames. 

Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in use during 
almost the entire year. While Farm pond was being emptied, 
and during the construction of the temporary channel around 
it, an opportunity was afforded for a thorough cleansing of 
the interior of this aqueduct from the pond to Charles river. 
The entire structure is in good condition, and has required no 
interior and but few exterior repairs; the latter being con- 
fined to repointing some of the gate-houses and culverts. 

The Cochituate aqueduct, which it was thought would not 
have to be used under the excessive strain of former years, 
owing to the completion of the Sudbury-river aqueduct, 
has again during the past year been run more than full. The 
bad water in Farm pond rendered it necessary to sup|)ly the 
city with all the Cochituate water that could be run through 
the aqueduct ; and, in the hitter part of October, and early 
part of November, a flow of 7 feet was maintained, Avhich was 
all the lake would afford. Repairs on this aqueduct were 
in progress at the time the necessity arose for using it to the 
full capacity of the lake supply; but they were not completed 
on the worst section of the line, at the Charles-river embank- 
ment. After the necessity for using the aqueduct ceased, 
thorough repairs were made upon this section, which was 
found to be in much worse condition than had been supposed. 

Almost all of the sections of this aqueduct which required 
extensive repairs have now been put in good condition, and 
the interior has been thoroughly cleansed by the removal of 
all deposits, in addition to the usual brushing, scraping, and 
flushing. For many years it has not been practicable to do 
this work in a thoiough manner, as the almost constant 
use of the aqueduct was a necessity. In future, with the 
two aqueducts in connection with the Chestnut-Hill and 
Brookline reservoirs, the thorough cleansing and repairing of 
these structures is practicable. 

The Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs are in excel- 
lent condition, and no work, except that required to keep the 
grounds and structures in their usual good order, has been 
done during the year. 

The Beacon-Hill reservoir is now being demolished, under 
the direction of the Joint Standing Committee on Public 



Report of the Water Board. 25 

Buildings. The inlet and outlet pipes were disconnected from 
the 30-inch main, in Hancock street, in October, 1881, and the 
reservoir ceased to form a portion of the water system. 

The East and South Boston reservoirs are in good condi- 
tion. The East Boston reservoir is kept in use in connection 
vp^ith the high-service works of this district ; but the South 
Boston reservoir is only kept full for use in case of accident 
to the supply mains of this section, and is not of much value 
as a portion of the water system. 

The Parker-Hill high-service reservoir has been made much 
more accessible by the extension of Parker-Hill avenue. 
This improvement rendered ne'cessary the regrading of the 
grounds, on the northerly side of the reservoir, to conform to 
the grade of the avenue extension. Screens have been placed 
in the outlet chamber and a new floor laid. The reservoir 
and its appurtenant grounds and structures are now in good 
order. 

Highland High-Service Works. 

The machinery and buildings at the Elmwood-street pump- 
ing-station are in their usual good condition. The Worth- 
ington engine has been used exclusively during the year. 

The total quantity of water pumped was 878,447,000 
gallons. 

Total coal consumed, 1,688, 800 lbs., of which 14.4 per cent, 
were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift, 113.25 feet. 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 520.4 gallons. 

Average daily quantity pumped, 2,407,500 gallons, an in- 
crease of 21- per cent, over that of 1880. 

Average duty, 49,107,800 ft.-lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal, 
without deduction for ashes and clinkers. The low duty is 
attributed to the poor quality of coal furnished. 

The table on page 45 shows the monthly quantities 
pumped, work done, etc. 

Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries . , . . 

Fuel 

Repairs .... 

Oil, waste, and packing 
Small supplies 

$9,067 57 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, $0,091. 
At the East Boston sttition the average daily quantity 
pumped has been 388,300 gallons. In order to give a better 



$3,836 38 


4,813 


90 


44 


46 


88 


76 


284 


07 



26 City Document No. 124. 

supply for the low-service of East Boston the high-service 
supply is pumped during the night, and the district supplied 
from the reservoir during the day. 

At the Brighton pumping-station the amount pumped has 
varied from 50,000 to 200,000 gallons per day. 

• Mystic Pumping-Station and Reservoir. 

The table on page 44 shows the work done by the engines 
at this station during each month. 

Engine No. 1 was in use 062 hours 30 minutes. 
<' 2 <' 1,338 " 15 " 

" 3 *' 7,332 " 40 " 

Total amount pumped, 2,622,579,856 gallons. 
Total amount of coal consumed, 6,454,200 lbs., of which 
8.Q per cent, were ashes and clinkers. 
Average lift, 150.64 feet. 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 407 gallons. 
Average duty of the three engines (no deductions), 51,- 
128,000 ft.-lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal. 



Cost or Pumping. 



Salaries 


$6,576 57 


Fuel .... 


17,000 36 


Eepairs 


1,203 26 


Oil, waste, and packing 


654 10 


Small supplies i 


25 29 



$25,459 58 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, $0.0644. 



MYSTIC WORKS. 
Mystic Lake. 

On May 1, 1881, the lake was full, and water was wasting 
at the outlet dam. Waste was continued, with few interrup- 
tions, until July 16. During August, September, October, 
and November, the lake surface gradually fell, and on Novem- 
ber 28 it was 4.4 feet below high-water mark. During 
December the lake was filling; on January 3, 1882, waste 
was commenced at the dam, and has been continued to the 
present time (May 1, 1882). 



Report of the Water Board. 27 

Mystic Valley Sewer. 

This sewer has been in constant operation since 1879. 

I mentioned in my last year's report to your Board that it 
had been found impracticable, if not impossible, to comply 
with the requirements of the Act (Chapter 303, May 13, 
1881) ordering the discontinuance of the sewer unless the 
sewage was so treated as to render it free from polluting 
substances. 

After a long delay, during which the constitutionality of 
the act was doubted by the city and affirmed by the courts, 
an injunction, on the petition of the town of Medford, was 
issued to prevent further discharge of sewage into the Lower 
Mystic pond. 

In this dilemma the city, reluctant to resort to a measure 
which would have endangered the purity of the Mystic 
supply, agreed with the town of Medford to erect the present 
works. 

Their purpose is to eliminate, partly by subsidence and 
partly by downward filtration through natural gravel-beds, 
the larger portion of the suspended impurities of the 
sewage. 

The works are located in the town of Winchester, near 
Bacon's crossing, upon a piece of land containing 5.5 acres, 
which was taken from the Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 

At that point the sewer is dammed, and its contents are 
lifted by a steam-pump into a large settling-tank, in which 
the slow velocity of the liquid favors the deposit of the heav- 
iest impurities, which are removed from time to time. 

The overflow from the tank is received into a ditch 1,250 
feet long, from which it enters again the sewer. During its 
passage through this long trench a portion of the partially 
purified sewage sinks into the gravelly soil in which the 
trench is dug. 

An additional amount of the suspended impurities is 
removed by means of brush dams placed at intervals across 
the trench. 

The cost of maintaining these works is large, and is, to a 
certain extent, an unreasonable one, as the same process could 
be carried on without pumping the sewage on land border- 
ing on the Lower Mystic pond. 

This change of location of the works, if permitted, would 
necessitate the building of an additional section of the sewer 
3,500 feet long and the taking of some additional land ; but, 
as the city has been unsuccessful in its efibrts to obtain an 
alteration of the legislation on this subject which would 
enable it to do the work in a more economical manner, it 
has now to continue it as at present. 



28 City Document No. 124. 



Distribution. 



The distributing mains of the Cochituate department have 
l^een extended about seven miles during the year. The 30- 
inch main in Francis street, connecting the 40-inch main in 
Brookhne avenue with the 30 and 36-inch mains in Tremont 
street, was completed in July. 

The total length of supply and distributing mains now 
•connected with the Cochituate works is 361.6 miles, with the 
Mystic works 117.7 miles, making a total of 479.3 miles for 
both works. 

Quality. 

As in former years the quality of the water from the Sud- 
bury and Cochituate works has been at times objectionable. 
Algse have been developed during the summer in large quan- 
tities in the waters of Reservoirs 1 and 3, and Farm pond, and 
to a lesser extent in Lake Cochituate. 

In Eeservoir 2 but few of these vegetable growths have 
been noticed. 

The fishy or cucumber taste to which the water supply has 
been subject in former years, and which has usually been lo- 
cated in Lake Cochituate, appeared the past year not only in 
the lake, but also in Farm pond. 

Fortunately this bad taste was not present in both sources 
at the same time. Prof. Ira Remsen, of Baltimore, was em- 
ployed to make an investigation, for the purpose of deter- 
mining, if possible, the cause for this obnoxious condition of 
the water in Farm pond. The result of his investigation, the 
details of which are given in his report to the Joint Special 
Committee on Water (City Doc. No. 143, 1881), was the trac- 
ing of the bad taste to the presence in the pond of quantities 
of the fresh-water sponge, Spongilla Lacusiius. The condi- 
tions which are favorable for the growth of this low order of 
animal life are not sufficiently well known to scientists to en- 
able them to suggest any precautions which can be taken to 
prevent its development. It is probable that it exists in 
portions of our water supply which have not been affected by 
the extremely objectionable taste which it at times produces. 

Specimens have been found in Reservoir 1, and a careful 
examination would, perhaps, show that it inhabits the other 
reservoirs. As there is no method of eradicating the sponge 
except by drawing off the water from the reservoir in which 
it appears, and then collecting and destroying it, the water 
supply must, until scientists know more of its habits, be sub- 
ject, periodically, to contamination from it. The condition of 
the supply, as regards quantity, will seldom permit the reser- 
voirs to be emptied, even if they contain bad water, and in the 



Report of the Water Board. 29 

case of Lake Cochituate it is impossible. The only remedy is 
the isolation, when practicable, of the reservoirs or portion of 
the supply which is contaminated, from the source from which 
the city is being supplied. 

The Mystic water has been unusually good the past year. 
The algoB, which have in former years rendered it at times 
objectionable, did not appear to any extent. The re- 
moval by the Mystic Valley Sewer of the sewage from the 
tanneries, which formerly polluted this source, has been the 
most important factor in the improvement of the quality of 
the water. 

SUDBURY-RlVER ReSERVOIR No. 4. 

In my annual report to your Board for 1880-1881, and in 
its appendix, are given the reasons for the selection of the 
site of Dam No. 4, and also a brief outline of the work to be 
done. The opinion is also expressed that the work should 
be commenced without delay. 

An order of the City Council, approved on Aug. 21, 1881, 
authorized the Water Board to construct this additional dam 
and storage-reservoir, at a cost not exceeding $394,000, and 
to build the portion extending from the underlying ledge to 
the surface of the ground by days' labor. 

The first preparations were immediately made, and the 
work begun on September 22. 

The plans and specifications for the construction of the 
dam were approved by County Commissioners of Middle- 
sex, on June 7, 1881, but were subsequently amended; the 
amendment being approved on April 8, 1882. 

The amount of woj'k to be performed to build and put in 
working order the dam and its reservoir is large, owing to 
the width of the valley of Cold Spring brook at the site 
selected, and to the depth to which the foundation must 
extend. 

In last year's report the opinion is expressed that three 
seasons would be required to bring the structure to comple- 
tion ; but the authorization of the City Council having been 
obtained so late in the summer of 1881, it is doubtful whether 
the work can be finished in time to fill the reservoir in the 
beginning of 1884. A large force is now at work, which will 
be increased as the season advances. 

The constant increase in the consumption of the Avater 
renders it so desirable to put the new reservoir in service as 
soon as possible that all means of shortening the time nec- 
essary for construction should be resorted to ; and in this con- 
nection it is important that the city should continue the 
work by days' labor after the foundations are completed. 



30 CiTT Document No. 124. 

This opinion is based especially on the fact that a large and 
costly plant is necessary to carry out the work ; that plant 
has been, or will be, procured by the city, and the continu- 
ance of its use would avoid the delays incident to the prep- 
aration of contracts and to the establishment by a contractor 
of a similar basis of operations. It must be said also that, 
in order to save time (in case the superstructure of the dam 
should be built by contract), work by days' labor and work 
by contract would have to proceed simultaneously, on the 
same limited ground, to the detriment of the quality of the 
work and to the rapidity of its execution. 

The valley of Cold Spring brook, at the site of the dam, 
is nearly 2,000 feet wide, and is underlaid by a bed of syenite, 
which the borings have shown to exist at a maximum depth of 
28 or 30 feet below the original surface, and on which it is 
intended to establish, for the whole width of the structure, 
the foundation of the centre-wall. This wall, varying in 
width from 8 feet to 2| feet, according to the pressure to 
which it is to be subjected, is to be made of concrete, covered 
on the up-stream side with a plastering of Portland cement 
mortar. 

Near the present location of the brook the foundation of 
the centre wall is widened to a size sufficient to support a 
gate-house containing the openings and gates necessary for 
the distribution of the water. The gate-house is to be con- 
nected with the exterior by two 48-inch iron pipes laid in 
masonry. 

The construction of the foundation of the centre wall and 
of the gate-house will consume much time, owing to the ex- 
tent and difficult nature of the excavation, the trenches re- 
quiring close sheeting and bracing, which must be shifted 
for the purpose of building the naasonry and refilling the 
trenches. 

The eaj-th embankment, which is to contain more than 
250,000 cubic yards of material, is to be 20 feet wide at 
top, with slopes of 1| to 1 on the up-stream side, and 2^ to 
1 on the lower side. 

The surplus water is to flow over a roll- way 30 feet wide 
placed on one of the side hills and built with numerous steps. 

The depth of the reservoir, when full, is to be 45 feet. 
The capacity is estimated at 1,100,000,000 gallons. 

The first work done consisted in clearing the grounds of 
loam, peat, and all perishable material on the location of the 
proposed embankment ; buildings were also erected for an 
office, stable, tool-house, etc., and a road-way, 2,()00 feet long, 
was built for connectinoj the working grrounds with the near- 
est highway m Ashland. 



Report or the Water Board. 31 

On the 1st of May, 1882, besides the preparatory work 
just mentioned, there had been removed 29,000 cubic yards 
of loam, peat, and other perishable materials; 1,400 cubic 
yards of trench excavation for the centre-wall ; 1,700 cubic 
3^ards of excavation for the roll-way. 

One pumping-engine and three derricks were at work, and 
water was supplied all over the ground by a special pump 
with its piping and tank. 

The endeavor will be made this season to build the centre- 
wall to the surface of the ground, and to complete the roll- 
way ; a portion of the embankment will also be constructed. 

In accordanee with the order of the City Council, loam 
will be removed from the basin, and it is expected that, by an 
arrano-ement between the Water Board and the Park Com- 
missioners, the loam thus removed will be carried to the city 
for the Back Bay park. 

Surveys have shown that a rail connection can be made be- 
tween the Hopkinton Branch Railroad and the basin, and it is 
hoped that agreements can be entered into with the various 
interested [larties so that a spur track will be found practi- 
cable and sufficiently economical to transfer the loam directly 
from the reservoir to the city by rail. 

Consumption. 

The average daily consumption during the year was as 
follows : — 

From Lake Cochituate and Sudbury river, 31,020,200 galls. 
" Mystic lake .... 7,194,700 *' 



Total .... 38,214,900 " 

an increase of 6.5 per cent, over the consumption of 1880. 

The daily average consumption per head of population 
was 95 gallons from the Sudbury and Cochituate works ; 81 
gallons from the Mystic works, and 92 gallons from the 
combined supplies. East Boston was supplied from the 
Mystic works from November 14 to December 14, and on 
several other occasions when the Cochituate supply mains 
have been shut off for repairs. 

The increase of consumption in the territory supplied by 
the Highland high-service works has been less than last year, 
being but 2^ per cent, over the consumption of 1880. This 
small percentage of increase is due to a much more limited 
use of hand-hose for lawn purposes during the summer, and 



32 City Document No. 124. 

to the fact that the weather during the winter was milder 
than usual. 

Although the low percentage of increase in the high- 
service territory for the three past years would seem to indi- 
cate that the works are of sufficient capacity to supply the 
demand for several years to come it should not be forgotten 
that the increase of consumption has been much larger in 
former years. No large addition to the area of the high- 
service territory has been made since the annexation of West 
Roxbury, in 1875, and the following figures will show the 
increase since that year : — 

Gallons daily Yearly percentage 

pumped. of increase. 

1876. 1,461,100 15. 

1877. 1,718,000 -17.5 

1878. 2,063,460 20.1 

1879. 2,248,840 9. 

1880. 2,341,093 4.1 

1881. 2,407,500 2.5 

Average yearly percentage of increase, 11.3. 

At the yearly average percentage of increase for the six 
last years the safe pumping capacity of the works will be 
exceeded before the new works can be completed. This 
average increase has been largely exceeded since January, 

1882. The increase during the present year has been as 
follows : — 

January, 10.5 per cent. February, 7. per cent. 

March, 15. " April, 15. " 

May, 21. " June, 27.8 " 

and the indications are that the increase for the ye(ir will 
equal, if not exceed, the figures of 1876-77 and 78. 

Waste. 

The wasteful and extravagant use of the water in most of 
the large cities of the United States is a subject upon which 
engineers and other officials having charge of water-works 
have written at great length in their annual reports. Various 
methods of preventing the evil have been proposed, and in 
many cities are in successful operation; but these methods, 
although applicable at a reasonable expense in a small com- 
munity, are either too expensive or too offensive to meet the 
approval of the water-takers and tax-payers of large cities. 
It is not my purpose, in calling attention to this subject, to 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 33 

dwell upon it at great length, as it has been carefully con- 
sidered in its bearings upon the water supply of this city in 
the report of the Joint Standing Committee on Water of 
the City Council (City Doc. 78, 1882), and I can add but 
little to the information contained in that report. 

The question of waste and its prevention is, however, more 
intimately connected with the question of quality than is gen- 
erally supposed, and that connection I desire to call attention 
to.. It may be assumed that however desirable it is to obtain 
the water supply for a growing community from some large 
river or lake, which shall, in the future, be able to furnish it 
in sufficient quantity, and of good quality, under all circum- 
stances, but especially that of a great increase of population, 
yet a community is rarely situated so that such a supply is 
obtainable ; even cities situated on the borders of many of 
the great lakes and rivers of this country, where the supply 
is inexhaustible, have the same problems to solve in regard 
to the impurities of their water supply that are present in 
cities which are not so eligibly situated as regards quantity. 
Any city, in a location -similar to our own, in reference to 
available sources of supply, must be largely dependent upon 
stored water, and upon the extent and character of the 
storage-reservoirs the quality of the supply will depend. 

If, as in the case of our city, the demands of the water-tak- 
ers are always in excess of the storage capacity of the works, 
the quality is always liable to be bad, as the reservoirs as 
soon as built, and before they have time to assume the charac- 
ter of natural ponds, must be drawn upon. With the works 
but just adequate to supply the consumption, no advantage 
can be taken of the better quality of water which one 
reservoir may contain ; good or bad, it must be sent to 
the city, for the consumers demand the quantity, and there 
is no other way to furnish it. That prevention of the exces- 
sive waste would, to a great extent, obviate this undesirable 
condition of the works, is manifest from the report (City Doc. 
78, 1882) to which I have before referred. If the consump- 
tion could be reduced to the limit therein mentioned (60 gal- 
lons per head), the capacity of the works would for many 
years be largely in excess of the consumption. That this 
waste can be prevented is shown not only by the figures 
given in the committee's report, but by the experiments made 
with the Deacon meter, in the Charlestown District, a sub- 
ject alluded to in my last year's report," but which I now 
desire to call your attention to. 

Soon after the arrival of the three meters, which I was 
authorized by your Board to purchase of the Waste Water 
Meter Company, of Liverpool, England, a general plan for 



34 City Document No. 124. 

their use in the Charlestown District was devised, an.d the 
operation of it was placed under the direct charge of Assistant 
Dexter Brackett of this department. 

Mr. Brackett's report of the results obtained, and the 
method of obtaining them, is both interesting and instructive. 
It gives in detail a description of the meter, its method of ap- 
plication and operation, tables of results, and diagrams illus- 
trating the records made by the meter, together with a plan 
of the metered districts. I shall therefore append it for your 
information. 

Although the results of the trial of the waste-water meter 
system in the Charlestown District have been so satisfactory 
as to warrant the recommendation that the system should be 
adopted for use in the City Proper and the other districts 
supplied from the Sudbury and Cochituate works, there are 
important considerations which lead me to modify the recom- 
mendation, to conform to the conditions existing in these 
districts. 

Nearly all of the stopcocks on the service-pipes are located 
in the street roadways, and are inaccessible except by the re- 
moval of a portion of the roadway to a depth of a foot or 
more from the surface. The cost of changing these stop- 
cocks from the roadways to the sidewalks would aggregate 
a large sum, as there are about 40,000 stopcocks which would 
have to be changed, at an estimated cost of eight dollars each. 
The saving which could be effected in the use of water in a 
series of years would render even this large expenditure an 
economical measure for the city, if there was no other meth- 
od by which a similar reduction in the amount used could be 
effected ; but, as I believe there is, I am not prepared to advise 
the changing of the stopcocks except in a gradual manner, 
as the income from the works may warrant. 

In addition to the cost, the time in which the change could 
be accomplished is also a matter of moment. Unless a large 
addition was at once made to the water debt, and the work 
prosecuted by a large force, several years would elapse be- 
fore the change could be effected, during which the con- 
sumption, unless checked by some means not requiring the 
alteration of the stopcocks, would rise to large proportions. 

The consumption has now reached an average of 95 gal- 
lons per head of population, and in years past has reached 
a still larger amount. If the rate of consumption should 
remain at this point even for two or three years, the expen- 
sive additional basin now being built will scarcely be com- 
pleted before another will have to be commenced. 

From a careful review, therefore, of all matters bearing 
upon this question of waste, I am of the opinion that the 



Report of the Water Board. 35 

adoption of the house to house inspection system, together 
with the use of Deacon meters, to ascertain the effect of the 
inspection in different sections, and to locate those which 
need it most, and also a more extensive application of the 
orduiary meters, are measures which would accomplish the 
desired object of preventing the enormous waste which now 
exists, and would reduce the consumption to reasonable 
limits. 

Condition of the Water Works. 

With few exceptions the structures, machinery, etc., con- 
nected with the works are in good condition for service. 

The Cochituate conduit, strengthened by the thorough re- 
pairs of many weak portions of it, is in better condition than 
for many past years. A new dam is needed at the outlet of 
Lake Cochituate, for reasons given in my report of 1880 ; 
otherwise no very expensive improvements are required on 
this section of the works. 

The Sudbury works, if the present waste of water is to be 
allowed to continue, will soon require the development, by 
the construction of reservoirs, of the entire capacity of the 
river as a source of supply. If the waste is to be stopped, 
the present reservoirs, and the one now under construction, 
are the only structures, with the exception of a conduit 
across Farm pond, to connect the two detached sections of 
the Sudbury-river conduit, that will be needed for many 
years. 

The Mystic works would not require for several years any 
large outlays if it was possible to preserve the lake and its 
tributaries from contamination by the sewage of the towns 
bordering upon them, and if the consumption cGuld be re- 
duced to a reasonable amount by preventing the present 
waste. 

At the present rate of consumption, .considering also the 
prospective increase of this rate, the future of the supply 
for the section dependent upon this source becomes a matter 
of much importance. This subject was referred to at some 
length in my report of last year, and I have seen no reason 
to change the views there expressed as to the advisability of 
procuring the right to take the Shawshine river as an addi- 
tion to the Mystic supply. 

The condition of the works of the Sudbury, and Cochituate, 
and Mystic systems, with regard to their capacity to furnish 
a sufficient quantity to supply the demands at present made 
upon them, is in the highest degree unsatisfactory. The 
works are entirely inadequate for such demands in a dry 



36 City Document No. 124. 

year, — a fact fully illustrated by the experience of 1880 and 
1881. The citizens escaped serious inconvenience from the 
short supply of those years, but it is by no means certain 
that they will be so fortunate in the future. 

There are several subjects in connection with the works 
which I have brought to the attention of your Board during 
the year, and to which I desire to allude briefly. The most 
important is the new high-service works, the construction of 
which has been recommended by your Board, and an appro- 
priation requested from the City Council. In view of the 
growing demands of the district, and the additions which 
should be made to its area, I do not believe that the pre- 
vention of waste would obviate the necessity which will 
arise for the new works before they can be completed. 

The necessity for some temporary or permanent increase 
of the capacity of the Sudbury supply beyond the provision 
which will be made by the construction of Reservoir No. 4 
is also a subject of great importance, unless your Board or 
the City Council should adopt some measures for the pre- 
vention of waste. 

The extension of the new 48-inch main from its present 
terminus, at the junction of Beacon street with Brookline 
and Brighton avenues, to the Common should not be post- 
poned for more than the present year, 

A new supply main for East Boston, or else the connection 
of the district with the Mystic works, must be decided upon 
if the loss of head is to be so serious as at present. 

A conduit across Farm pond, and the new dam at Lake 
Cochituate, I have before called attention to, and the im- 
portance of the subjects will warrant the careful considera- 
tion of your Board in forming an opinion as to their present 
necessity. 

In closing this report I would refer you to the tables ap- 
pended for detailed information and figures in regard to the 
rainfall, consumption of water, amount of water collected 
from the various water-sheds, and other valuable and inter- 
esting statistics. 

Respectfully submitted, ^ 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, 

Qity JEnginee7\ 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagram showing the rainfall and daily average consumption 
for each month. 



Yearly Averages shown thus 




TUHrhatyi^trinlir. 



Report of the Water Board. 



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Report or the Water Board. 



41 



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42 



CiTT Document No. 124. 



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rvoir. 
water 
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24.00. 


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Lake 

Cochitua 

High wa 

134.36. 


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ervo 
o. 1. 
i-boa 
9.29. 




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44 



City Document No. 124. 











o 


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c 


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> C 


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IB^oi JO -sqi 001 


~ 


2 


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oTo-r-TcOCOOOOOOr 

T-i-gioioii-oot-oi 


CD 


CO 




jad -sqi-'ij ni iJincE 


^ 




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0?<3?T-4IM(MCOc4'rHo" 


CO 


lO 






oo 


CO 


ro O It 


5 O ir 


3 rH CO C-1 CO 


CO 


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CI CO CO CI "■ 


5 Tj( CO O O 


■4 






"iaSl m WIT 9SB.19AV 


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padaind X^iiubu^ 




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CD 

CO 


COOOOlOJi-JOCOrH 
fficirHOil-H-^r^cOci 

cncj>T-H»-iciciTHOco 

C0CO-*-<*tJHtJ<-^-^JiC0 


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CO 


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1 




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coc?soicoc?jc:io6odo6 


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5j; 








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15 


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15 




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• 






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3 

1 


1 


1 


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c 
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1 
1 


a 
s 





Eeport of the Water Board. 



45 



'^ 






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as 


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3 ft- 




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antii 
rape 
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oal. 


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s 


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rH 




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to 




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tin 




































o 


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o 


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o 


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o 


o 


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o 


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, "-i. 


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to_ 


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to 


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to 


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t- 






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|Zi 


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o 


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6h 


a 


8 


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• 








o 


o 




• 


o 




■ft 

li 


CO 


• 




• 




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CO 






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C3 


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oo 


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(5 


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§ 


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l^ 










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M 


t-i 


^ 


^ 


"a 










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3 

1-5 


3 

1 


3 


1 




^ 
a 


01 

a 

3 
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tlO 

3 
< 


a 
s 

ft 


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"S 



46 City Document No. 124. 

Table showing the Rainfall on Sudhury-river Watershed, for the Year 1881. 



1881 




1 


1 




1^ 


<a 

a 

3 


3 


3 
3 


U 

1 
ft 

m 


1 

O 


1 
> 

1 


i 

B 

to 
v 

Q 


1 . . . . 














0.266 

0.004 
0.008 


0.016 
0.144 


1.152 


0.006 
0.005 
0.844 
0.042 


0.016 


0.326 


2 . . 










0.046 


0.085 










0.036 
0.564 
0.289 








4 . . 










1.36 
0.07 
0.046 


0.72 
0.036 


0.164 


5. . . . 

6. . . . 

1 


0.298 
0.634 










0.035 






0.446 
















0.378 








0.156 














0.124 
0.032 


0.204 










9 












0.032 






0.275 
0.016 




10 ... . 


2.618 


0.158 














2.342 

0.228 
0.056 
0.008- 






2.573 


0.446 




0.068 
0.384 
0.152 
0.042 






12 ... . 
13 


0.001 


1.522 


0.164 
0.688 




0.156 


0.522 


0.018 


0.004 


0.124 


0.020 






14 ... . 

15 ... 


0.195 








0.64 


0.24 




0.026 


0.001 


0.05 


0.71 






0.348 








17 














0.O04 




0.006 
0.243 






18 






0.004 






0.006 


0.018 
0.008 

0.124 






19 ... . 
20 


0.043 


0.70 










1.936 




1.176 


0.103 
0.018 


1.739 
0.048 
0.018 
0.016 


0.02 
0.054 


0.454 
0.268 












0.573 










22 . . . . 

23 ... . 


1.73 










0.006 




0.008 
0.012 


0.272 




0.210 
0.192 
0.004 
0.096 
0.264 
0.018 




0.514 








0.41 


25 




0.094 












0.05 






26 






0.032 




0.225 
0.026 
0.426 
0.162 
n nd.9. 


0.668 
























28 




1.245 






0.226 
0.113 
414 


0.168 


0.036 






0.80 








0.355 






1.374 


30. . . . 


0.039 












0.208 
1.394 


0.006 






1.027 




0.201 I . . . 


0.144 






















Total. 


5.558 


4.646 


5.73 


2.00 


3.511 5.395* 


2.35 


1.358 


2.617 


2.955 


4.091 


3.958 



Total for the year 



44.169 



Being an average of five gauges, located at Framingham Centre, Southboro', Marlboro', 
Westboro' and Hopkintou. 



Kepokt or THE Water Board. 



47 



Table showing the Rainfall at Lake Cochituate for the Tear 1881. 



1881 




g 

'a 


1 


1 


1^ 


(D 

a 
o 




3 

3 
< 


u 

"S, 


C 
o 
O 


3 
x> 

a 

o 


i 


1 . . . . 














0.34 








0.10 

0.11 
0.48 
0.06 


0.39 


2 . . . . 










0.04 


0.06 




0.15 


0.78 


0.87 




3 . . . . 






0.26 






4 . . . . 


0.27 
0.47 
0.05 




0.47 




0.45 


0.94 
0.09 
0.16 


0.34 




0.14 


5. . . . 
6 . . . . 




0.04 






7 . . . . 

8 . . . . 


0.20 


0.16 
0.14 
0.03 








0.21 


9 . . . . 
10 ... . 


2.43 


0.26 
1.35 












0.20 




11 ... . 


1.96 

0.24 
0.02 


0.36 
0.49 

0.48 




2.25 


0.34 












12. . . . 
13 ... . 




0.42 

0.25 


0.16 


0.51 
0.07 




14. . . . 
15 ... . 


0.17 




0.39 
0.56 
1.12 
0.04 
0.06 


0.20 
0.04 

0.09 
0.03 




0.05 
0.03 


64 


16 ... . 

17 ... . 




0.38 






18. . . . 
19 ... . 
20. . . . 
21 ... . 


0.03 
2.10 


0.65 
0.60 
0.02 


1.05 


0.05 


0.03 

0.21 
0.14 


0.39 
0.18 




0.17 


1.84 




22. . . . 

23. . . . 
24 ... . 


59 




0.48 


38 


25. . . . 

26. . . . 




0.10 




0.04 




0.34 


0.81 






0.09 






27 ... . 




05 








28. . . . 




1.07 




0.29 


0.16 

0.08 

0.28 


0.31 
0.18 
0.14 


0.16 










1.25 


29 ... . 










0.82 


30 ... . 
31. . . . 


0.04 




0.79 


0.21 






0.25 
1.33 




Total . 


5.56 


4.43 


4.79 


1 
1.71 j 3.18 


4.83 


2.78 


1.13 


2.13 


2.87 


3.85 


3.83 



Total for the year 41.09 



48 City Document No. 124. 

Tahle showing the Rainfall on Mystic Water-shed for the Tear 1881. 



1S81 


3 
1-S 


s 

u 


1 
1 


< 




•-5 


"3 

1-5 


3 
< 


1 


1 

O 


■ i 

1 


i 


1 . . . . 






0.115 
0.285 
0.29 
1.26 








0.23 
0.735 








0.02 
0.06 
0.22 
0.21 


0.305 


2 . . . . 








0.06 


0.09 






0.195 
0.40 




3 ... 








1.015 
0.195 




4 . . . - 










0.80 

0.315 

0.13 


0.10 




0.11 


6 . . . . 


0.285 
0.45 










6 . . . . 








0.445 














7 . . . . 










0.27 


0.01 






0.24 


8 ... 












0.125 

0.045 

0.25 

2.495 

0.02 


0.26 


0.02 


0.13 
0.16 




9 . . . . 


















10 ... . 


2.405 


0.105 








0.35 




0.01 






11 . . 


2.03 

0.63 

0.05 

0.195 

0.02 

0.03 












12 ... . 




1.19 


0.25 
0.42 








0.195 
0.14 


. . . 


0.465 


0.02 


13 ... . 










14 ... . 


0.155 






0.105 












15 ... . 


0.42 


0.47 

0.275 

0.485 

0.55 

0.235 

0.03 












0.435 


16 . 




0.32 
















17 ... . 








0.055 

0.07 

0.055 










18 ... . 










0.02 


0.045 




0.26 


0.53 




19 ... . 


0.04 


0,625 
0.135 
0.505 








20 . 


0.96 
0.02 












1.27 


0.046 


21 




0.175 
0.025 


0.06 
0.19 


0.185 








22 . . 


2.41 


0.055 










0.335 


23 . . 


0.01 






0.55 




0.43 


0.06 


24 . . 












0.02 


0.03 




25 . . 




0.09 












0.015 




0.25 


26 






0.06 




1.41 
0.345 


0.51 






0.72 


27 . . . 










0.055 
0.005 






0.045 


28 ... . 




0.645 








0.03 








0.675 


29 






0.055 
0.28 


0.045 
0.39 


0.30 
0.185 






0.045 


30 . . 


0.08 












0.325 
0.94 


0.03 




31 ... 




0.805 


0.075 




























Total. 


5.825 


3.625 


6.69 


1.54 


2.985 


6.835 


2.605 


0.665 


2.175 


2.155 


3.525 


3.285 



Total for the year 41.91 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges, located at Mystic Lake and Mystic Station. 



Report of the Wate'e, Board. 



49 



CO CO 05 CO 



CO tm c<i to 



- . _ _ O M to TiH 

Ol CO T-( to Tjl tH r-( 
CO CO CO CO 



>rt CO to ft 



00 0> CO CO 



tOC<J-<*'^000-rJ4t- 
-^TlH-^COcOCO'^CO 



rHUD«D(N eOOOCqoOtO'^ 



« rH i-( 



C^ CM IM (M O? C^ 



"^ 



CO CO lO W5 t- 

1-1 c^ »o a> '^ 



0> lO tJI oi 



C^ CO C^ (M 



T-i CO CO ira 



00 CO O CO 



i-M r-( O 



CO to CO iH 



lO CI CO 00 



O l>» Cq CT> to rH 
U3 1-1 O to O m 



COC^NClC^C^COCOC^CO(H(M 



to 1— I lO lO if5 CO 



o to O »o -^ 



c<i in to to 



CO CO CO cq c^ oo 



C^C^C^rHi-tiHiHrHi-t 



a»asTj<oooii«ir*o 

t-^0400tOlOt-00 



CO »>; to 00 Oi 00 

O to CO iO to o> 



tOF-(0<MOir3T*liO 
lOC^iHCOtOtOt-r-i 



CO CO CO lO 



toc^wioo^co^ 

lO-t^tOrHTjJt^r-JO 



^ O CO (M CO 05 iH 
CO C^ i-H lO to iO C^ 
lO -^ to »0 lO iO t^ 






o a 



"^ ^ ^ 



hJ S H 



9 £? 
5 Vn ^ <E 






50 



City Document No. 124. 



Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations on 
the Water Works. 









Temperature 


OP Air. 






Temperature 
OF Water. 




Myst 


ic Pumping- 
Station. 


Chestnut-HlU 
Reservoir. 


Parker-Hill 

Reservoir. 


B'kline 
Res'r. 


Mystic 
E. H. 


1881. 
























3 

Q 


1 


a 


a 
.1 




i 


S 

n 

a 


a 

a 
a 


i 


i 
1^ 


a 


January . . 


41 


-7.5 


21.2 


41 


-7 


19.6 


41 


-5 


19.4 


37.4 


36.7 


February . 


48 


-4.5 


25.1 


50 


-5 


25.5 


48 


-7 


24.1 


36.7 


34.3 


March . . . 


51.6 


24 


36.2 


50 


25 


35.9 


47 


23 


34.4 


37 


36.4 


April . . . 


77.6 


20 


43.7 


76 


20 


43.4 


76 


12 


4i.2 


62 


41.6 


May .... 


88 


32 


66.3 


89 


31 


67.9 


85 


31 


55.1 


66.8 


June .... 


83 


40.6 


61.3 


84 


38 


61.4 


81 


40 


59.6 


64.1 


July .... 


87.5 


52.5 


69.6 


89 


53 


69.9 


84 


51 


68 


70 


72.5 


August . . 


94.5 


63 


70.7 


93 


52 


70.8 


89 


61 


69.1 


71 


72 


September . 


95.5 


46 


67.1 


93 


45 


66.5 


93 


46 


66.2 


68.8 


69.1 


October . . 


86 


26 


58.6 


83 


24 


53.3 


84 


25 


63.3 


59.6 


68.6 


Noyember . 


68 


14 


41.9 


68 


13 


41.3 


64 


14 


40.7 


47.6 


47.6 


December . 


63 


12 


36.8 


62 


11 


36.2 


61 


8 


35.6 


39.4 


39.3 




The JbliityriiJ'rmfinij a ZUTrinxntStBost!^ 



APPENDIX. 



EEPORT ON DEACON-METER EXPERIMENTS. 



Boston, May 1, 1882. 

H. M. WiGHTMAN, Esq., City Engineer : — 

Dear Sir, — The following report upon the results of the ex- 
periments with the Deacon Waste Water Meters is respectfully 
submitted : — 

Before giving the results of the experiments a description of the 
meter itself, and of the method of applying this system of detect- 
ing waste, may not be out of place. 

The waste-water meter does not, like the ordinary water meter, 
record on a dial the number of gallons which have passed between 
any two observations, but it ]-ecords on a diagram the rate of flow 
at each and every instant. Being thus able to determine the rate 
of flow during the night when no water, or, at least, a very small 
quantity, is used for legitimate purposes, we can distinguish be- 
tween the water wasted and that used. 

The meter (Plate No. 1) consists of a hollow cone, having its 
small end upwards, and containing a composition disk of the same 
diameter as the small end of the cone. A vertical spindle, attached 
to the upper surface of this disk, is suspended b}'^ a fine German- 
silver wire, which passes, practically water-tight, through a small 
hole in the top of the chamber, over a pulley and supports a 
weight. 

This weight is so adjusted as to retain the disk at the top of the 
cone when the water is at rest. When any water is drawn through 
the meter the disk is pressed downward towards the bottom of the 
cone, its position depending upon the amount of water passing 
through the meter. By means of a pencil attached to the wire the 
motions of the digk are recorded on a drum, revolving by clock- 
work, once in twentj'-four hours. 

The meters, on their arrival from England, were tested in order 
to determine practically their accuracy and sensitiveness. They 
were found to be very sensitive and sufficiently accurate for the 
purposes for which the}^ were used. A flow of 100 gallons per hour 
could be recorded with accuracy, while the same meter would record 
a flow of 12,000 gallons per hour, or 288,000 gallons per day. 

The method of detecting, measuring, and preventing the waste 
has been as follows : Each meter was set in a box under the 
sidewalk and connected with the street main in such a manner 
that, b}' closing the valves on the street mains, all of the water 
used in a certain section was drawn through the meter, and the 
quantity and rate recorded. After a few diagrams had been taken, 



52 City Document No. 124. 

to show the ordluaiy rate of consumption, the inspection was com. 
menced. 

Every service-pipe is provided with a stopcock, which is 
accessible from the sidewalk by means of an iron wrench about 
seven feet in length. "When this wrench is applied to the stop- 
cock, the sound caused by the water passing through the service- 
pipe can be easil}' distinguished. When no noise is heard with 
the stopcock full}' open, it is partly closed, and the increased 
velocit}' always causes a distinct sound, although the quantity' of 
water passing the stopcock may be verj' small. The night-inspector 
began his work about midnight, and tested, by means of his 
shutting-off wrench, each service-pipe. If he discovered any flow 
through the service that stopcock was closed, and a note made of 
the time and the number of the house. He continued this oper- 
ation until about 4 A.M., when he retraced his steps and opened 
all of the stopcocks which he had found wasting. At the same 
time the waste-water meter was recording the consumption, and 
the diagrams indicated the amount of water wasted by each of the 
service-pipes closed, the time the inspector commenced and finished 
his work, and the time at which each stopcock was closed. 

The day-inspector received the night-inspector's report, visited 
the premises where waste had been noted, and ascertained the 
cause. Notices were then issued to the owners or occupants of 
the premises, and, in cases of waste from defective fixtures, the 
visits were continued until the repairs had been made. 

By this means the time of the day-inspector was occupied 
entirely in examining premises where there was known to be waste. 
This inspection was continued until the whole section supplied by 
the meter had been examined, after which the section was in- 
spected bystreets. This method of inspection consisted in closing 
the gate controlling the supply of an entire street and thus pro- 
ceeding through the section, gradually diminishing the territory 
supplied, until the entire section had been shut ofl". By this plan 
the amount wasting in any street could be determined by the 
record of the meter. 

If the waste in any street was found to be disproportionately 
large a night examination of that street was made, to determine 
whether the waste was on the premises of the water-takers or from 
the street main or services. To decide this fact ever^^ service 
pipe on the street was closed, and then the gate on the main pipe 
supplying the street. If, by the record of the meter, the closing 
of the main gate reduced the consumption, it was evident that the 
amount indicated was being wasted in the street. 

The whole district experimented upon was divided into twelve 
sections. The outline of these sections and the location of the 
meters are shown on the accompanying plan (Plate No. 2). 

Eleven of the sections were supplied by two of the meters with- 
out any change of location. This plan of supply necessitated the 
making of certain portions of some sections common to otliers. 
Thus, for example, Lexington street, with a-population of 470, was 
included in Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ; the east side of Monu- 
ment square. Monument court, Wallace court, and Winthrop street 




PLAN OF GHARLESTOWN 

SHONA/ 1 M G- 

WASTE WATtR METER SECTIONS. 
1881 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



53 



from Monument square to Adams street, in Sections 3, 4, and 5 ; 
Pearl street, from Medford to Bartlett, in Sections 7, 8, 9, 10, and 
11, etc. Section lA was first tested in connection with a portion 
of Section 1, but after the waste had been reduced, the two sec- 
tions were combined. The following table shows the number of 
families and other takers supplied in each section, and the popula- 
tion in each, based upon the average number of persons in each 
famil}", as given by the census reports. This method of obtaining 
the population, although not strictly accurate, is sufficiently so for 
the purpose of showing the results of these experiments. 



o 

3.2 


u O 

a o 

S2 

302 


o . 


•3 

!2i 


o 

as 

3CD 


•|o 


Population 
common to 
other Sec- 
tions. 


Number of 
Families to 
one Stop- 
cock. 


1 


307 


669 


• 14 


15 


2,810 




2.17 


I&IA 


406 


875 


19 


24 


3,675 


.... 


2.15 


2 


268 


517 


17 


8 


2,170 


470 


1.93 


3 


329 


481 


10 


11 


2,020 


470 


1.40 


4 


317 


448 


8 


6 


1,880 


630 


1.41 


5 


304 


426 


3 


9 


1,790 


684 


1.40 


6 


260 


446 


10 


3 


1,875 


470 


1.71 


7 


373 


606 


21 


20 


2,540 


424 


1.63 


8 


366 


570 


10 


9 


2,400 


.... 


1.56 


9 


394 


513 


8 


15 


2,150 


424 


1.30 


10 


322 


425 


3 


5 


1,790 


770 


1.32 


11 


432 


665 


7 


6 


2,800 


1,290 


1.54 


12 


303 


548 


6 


19 


2,300 




1.81 


Totals. . 


3,170 


5,180 


97 


122 


21,760 


.... 


1.63 



As the Charlestown District contained no sections devoted ex- 
clusively to business purposes, and as the manufacturing sections 
were generally metered, the sections were so selected as to ex- 
clude these portions of the district as far as possible, and also to 
combine in separate sections different classes of dwellings. 
Thus Sections 3, 4, 5, 9, and 10 embrace the wealthier class of 
popufation, while Sections 1, 2, 7, 8, and 12 are peopled almost 
entirely by mechanics and laborers. The stores included in the 
district are generall}^ small shops, for the sale of groceries, pro- 
visions, etc. 

Results. 

The first meter was set on May 4, 1881, the second on May 14, 
and the third on May 27. The work of inspection was commenced 
on May 10, and was continued until November 18. 



54 



City Document No. 124. 



On November 25 two of the meters were disconnected, the third 
remaining in service for the purpose of determining the quantity 
wasted to prevent the freezing of services. 

All of the sections were twice inspected, the inspections being 
made at intervals of about two montlis, as nearly as circumstances 
would allow, this being the time occupied by the force emploj'ed 
in completing an inspection of the whole district. 

After the second inspection was concluded a few readings of 
the meter were taken from each section to show the result of the 
two inspections, and some of the sections were inspected a third 
time. 

The force employed consisted of one day and two night inspec- 
tors. The day-inspector examined all of the premises reported as 
wasting water, reported the cause of the waste to the Water Regis- 
trar, and continued to visit the premises until the repairs were 
made ; he also had charge of the meters. The work of the night- 
inspectors has been previousl}' described. 

The results accomplished are shown by the following table : — 





3 
Ph 
O 

Ph 
•d . 

is 


It 
o S 
^ a a 


Gallons pkb head pbb day. 


Percentage of 


Numtier of 
Section. 


Before inspec- 
tion. 


After two orthree 
inspections. 


reduction. 




Total. 


Night 
rate per 
24 hrs. 


Total. 


Night 
rate per 
24 hrs. 


On 
Total. 


On 

Night- 
rate. 


1 


2,810 


9.2 


53.5 


39.1 


26.4 


10.6 


50.7 


72.9 


1 & lA 


3,675 


9.1 


52. 


39. 


34.1 


13.7 


34.4 


64.9 


2 


2,170 


8.1 


49.9 


33.1 


36.7 


13.2 


26.5 


60.1 


3 


2,030 


6.2 


71.8 


43.2 


45.1 


20.2 


37.2 


63.2 


4 


1,880 


.5.9 


68.4 


42.2 


47.8 


22.3 


30.1 


47.2 


5 


1,790 


5.9 


72.7 


53.3 


47.8 


17.8 


34.3 


66.6 


6 


1,875 


7.2 


60. 


44.6 


35.3 


15.1 


41.2 


66.1 


7 


2,540 


6.8 


55.2 


31.9 


39.6 


19.2 


28.3 


39.8 


8 


2,400 


6.6 


55. 


40.8 


37.9 


18.5 


31.1 


54.7 


9 


2,150 


5.5 


62.9 


40.1 


36.2 


13.7 


42.4 


65.8 


10 


1,790 


5.6 


52.3 


28.1 


46.1 


18.7 


11.9 


33.4 


11 


2,800 


6.5 


43.7 


17.6 


25.7 


9.5 


41.2 


45.7 


12 


2,300 


7.6 


80.4 


55.2 


31.2 


12.5 


61.2 


77.4 


Averages . . , 




6.86 


58.5 


37.5 


37.7 


16.8 


35.6 


57.9 



From the above table it appears that the average daily consump- 
tion of 21,760 persons was reduced from 58.5 to 37.7 gallons per 
head, a saving of 20.8 gallons, or 35.6 per cent, per day for each 
person supplied, while the rate during the night was reduced from 



Report of the Water Board. 



55 



37.5 to 15.8 gallons per head per da}-, — a saving of 58 per cent. 
The total saving on the entire district amounts to 450,000 gallons 
per 24 hours, which, at the price cliarged for metered water (2 
cents per 100 gallons), would represent a daily saving of $90.00, 
or $32,850 per year. 

The consumption of the district previous to the first inspection 
was somewhat smaller than the average of the whole Mystic 
system ; thus, the daily average constlmption of the whole system 
during the experiments was 78 gallons, while that of the district 
inspected was 58.5 gallons per head per day. Of the diflPerence, 
at least 10 gallons is used for manufacturing and trade purposes, 
public drinking-fountains, urinals, and street- watering ; this would 
show that the initial consumption in the inspected district was 
about 10 gallons per head per day less than that of the whole ter- 
ritory supplied. 

The results show that the wealthier class of the population are 
the largest consumers of water ; thus, at the close of the season the 
consumption of Sections 3, 4, 5, 9, and 10 was 44.6 gallons per 
head, while that of Sections 1, 2, 7, 8, and 12 was but 35.9 
gallons. 

This fact is corroborated by the following table, showing the 
results obtained in Glasgow, Scotland, where the system has been 
in use for about six years : — 



to 


S 
a 
a 
P, 

a 

3 
!25 


Class ot Property. 


G-ALLONS PEE Head per Day. 


o 
o 

A 
O 

CO 


At starting 
of meters. 


After first three 
inspections. 


e 

3 


Total. 


Night 

rate 

per 24 

hours. 


Total. 


Night 

rate 

per 24 

hours. 


79 
98 


2,971 
731 

1,562 


rO-ood tenement houses, $60 to $120] 
J rental, with a few inferior houses', 1 
1 $15 to $50 rental ; about fifty f 
I. shops, about $150 to $500 rental . J 

r High-class property, chiefly self-") 
contained houses, $400 to $1,500 

■; rental, with a few tenement } 
houses, $200 to $300 rental. No 


60.0 
146.4 

14.3 


42.5 
152.7 

7.4 


34.0 
60.0 

13.3 


16.4 
48.2 


42 


f Old property, chiefly low-class tene- "l 
ment-houses, about $10 to $40 

< rental, with a few better houses, y 
about $40 to $80 rental. A few 

t inferior shops, $30 to $110 rental, J 


4.8 



The conditions under which tins system of waste detection has 
been tried in Glasgow correspond more nearly with those existing 
in this city than do those of any other European cities where the 
system is in use. The supply furnished is constant and ample, 
and the proportion of water-fittings to the population is larger than 



56 



City Document No. 124. 



is common in most European cities. The following table shows 
the results obtained in Glasgow from an inspection, similar to the 
present one, upon a district containing over 80,000 people : — 





i 

1.1 


s ft 


m 

Is-s 

Coo 


Gallons pbb Head peb Dat. 


Number of 
District. 


At starting of 
meters. 


After first three 
inspections. 




Total. 


Night- 
rate per 
24 h'rs. 


Total. 


Night- 
rate per 
24 h'rs. 


I. 


9 


14,972 


25.8 


71.0 


54.0 


40.9 


21.1 


n. 


6 


10,002 


22.4 


79.0 


72.2 


50.4 


33.0 


III. 


3 


4,986 


35.4 


73.7 


62.4 


44.2 


21.7 


IV. 


6 


7,629 


30.6 


79.0 


57.0 


50.5 


24.8 


V. 


7 


9,815 


37.8 


55.1 


36.8 


37.7 


17.3 


VI. 


8 


12,614 


39.7 


37.2 


29.5 


27.1 


17.8 


VII. 


2 


4,132 


25.5 


45.5 


30.6 


41.9 


25.8 


vni. 


3 


6,306 


37.1 


44.9 


27.5 


33.6 


15.1 


IX. 


4 


7,821 


32.1 


44.9 


31.7 


30.8 


15.2 


X. 


2 


3,012 


34.6 


44.2 


33.4 


25.0 


12.8 


Totals and ) 
Averages \ 


50 


81,289 


30.6 


58.8 


45.2 


38.4 


21.0 



It is interesting to compare the above results with those obtained 
in Charlestown. Thus, the total daily consumption per head in 
Glasgow was reduced from 58.8 to 38.4 gallons, while in Charles- 
town the corresponding quantities are 68.5 and 37.7, the results in 
the two cities being almost identical. 

The night waste was larger there, but the amount of reduction 
corresponds very closel}^ in the two places. 

One very important difference in the methods of supply is shown 
by the number of persons per stopcock in the two cities. Glas- 
gow supplies 30.6 persons from each service, while we have but 
6.86. For this reason the work of our night-inspector is largely 
increased, but we are able to better localize the premises where 
waste exists. 

Plates 3, 4, and 5 contain diagrams showing the rates of con- 
sumption which prevailed in Sections 1, 5, and 12 both before and 
after the inspections. In Section 5 the consumption during the 
day hours was not greatly reduced, but in the night the saving was 
large. 

Sections 1 and 12 show a large reduction throughout the entire 
day, but the percentage of saving is invariably larger in the night 

Sources of Waste. 
The sources of waste may be divided into three classes : — 
1st. Defective services and fittings on the premises of the water- 
; takers. 



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Report of the "Water Board. 



57 



2d. Defective mains and services on the premises of the city. 
3d. Wilful waste. 

The following table enumerates the sources of waste which have 
been discovered by the inspections : — 









-S 






1 






», tJ) 


60 


















-2 


-2 a 


.H 




o 


O m 


o 




«l 


<d| 


13 




3 



w 3 


a. 
a 






11 






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II 






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li 


CO 


^"^ 


fi^ 





fi« 


fi^ 


a^ 


fif" 


^OQ 


^^ 


^'^ 





I&IA. 


423 


478 


5 


1 


4 


1 


1 


6 


17 


1 


12511 


2 


162 


208 


2 


1 


. . . 


21 




1 


51 


1 


4810 


3 


121 

5 
10 

8 

81 


14« 

173 

356 
32^ 

385 


2 
3 
1 

2 

62 


5 
6 
5 
21 
2 


2 








8 

51 
15 
131 

8 


2 


435 


4 






1 


37* 


5 








665 


6 


11 
2 








5810 


7 




1 


6 


713 


8 


302 
12 


361 

192 


11 
71 


1 

2 


4 






2 
3 


13 
9 




993 


9 


1 




633 


10 


9 
13 

263 


201 
121 
537 


1 
2 
132 


4 
1 

22 








1 
2 
2 


41 
3 
241 




392 


11 


2 






351 


12 






12015 












Totals . 


191" 


343M 


55= 


323 


151 


41 


2 


24 


1246 


4 


79477 



The small figures slio-w the number twice reported for the same defects. 



Defective Services and Fittings on the Premises of the 
Water-Takers . 

Of the fifty-five defective services on the premises of the takers 
but few were found wasting large quantities of water. When this 
source of waste is large within the buildings, it generally causes 
damage, and is, consequently, repaired ; occasionally, however, 
where services are carried through passage-waj^s and yards, or under 
buildings without cellars, defects of this class are the source of large 
waste, which is unseen, and, therefore, unknown. 

The largest leak discovered was one of this kind. A wrought- 
iron service-pipe supplying a stable was so destroyed by rust that 
it leaked throughout its entire length, wasting 24,000 gallons per 
day, for which the owner of the building should have paid a yearly 
tax of $1,752. The pipe was laid in a porous filling, through 
which the water soaked away unseen. The result of closing the 
stopcock on this service is shown by the diagram, Plate 6. 

Of the defective fittings, the water-closets are the greatest sources 
of waste. The aggregate waste of twelve of these closets, was over 



58 City Document No. 124. 

2,000 gallons per hour. Very few of them are supplied from tanks ; 
they are supplied directly from the street main, and operated by a 
handle and counter-weight or spring. 

The tanks and, consequent!}', the ball-cocks, in the district are few 
in number ; nevertheless thirty-two defective ones were discovered. 
Judging from this result, and from previous experience with this 
water fixture, there is no doubt but that, in many portions of our 
city where it is generall}' used, it is the source of an enormous 
waste. 

The defective faucets were generally repaired by repacking, al- 
though a few were found that were utterly worthless, and wasting 
large quantities of water. 

The defects in the fixtures were generally repaired upon the first 
notification, and, with six exceptions, all of the repairs have been 
made without the imposition of a fine. The cost to the water-tak- 
ers of all the repairs made is not accurately known, but without 
doubt has not exceeded $2,000. 



Defective Mains and Services on the Premises of the City. 

Twentj'-four services have been reported as wasting outside 
the premises of the water-takers. One of these (the most im- 
portant of all) was a tin-lined pipe, which had burst. 

About one-quarter of the whole number were small defects in 
the stopcocks at the curb. The amount wasted by all of the 
cases found was not more than 300 gallons per hour. 

The main pipes of a portion of this district are made of wrought- 
iron, coated inside and out with cement mortar. They were all 
originally of this type, but in the course of 15 years' use a large 
portion of them have proved defective, and have been replaced by 
cast-iron pipe. 

It was expected that many leaks would be found from the 
cement-coated pipes ; but these expectations have not been 
realized. 

In a few cases, after all of the services had been closed in a 
street, the closing of the main gate has shown a waste of from 
one to three hundi'ed gallons from the main, or from the services 
between the main and the sidewalks ; but no leaks have been dis- 
covered of sufficient magnitude to warrant the expense of uncover- 
ing a long line of main pipe. 



Wilful Waste. 

During the progress of the inspection 124 water-closets were 
found wasting water from being left running. These were all 
cases of deliberate waste, not cases of negligence ; for the water- 
closet fixtures are, with few exceptions, self-closing, and the waste 
could only be caused by the determined purpose of the occupants 
to allow the water to run. These closets were each wasting from 
2,400 to 7,200 gallons per 24 hours. This class of waste could 
only be reached by an appeal to the reason or the pockets of the 



00 
















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Eeport of the Water Board. 



59 



water-takers. The former plan was followed, and it is a fact 
worthy of mention that onh' five cases of the 124 were reported 
the second time, although the inspections were made at intervals of 
two months, and their occurrence was unknown to tlie water- 
takers. 

Another form of wilful waste is that caused by the universal hab- 
it of allowing the water to run continually during cold weather, for 
the purpose of preventing the freezing of service-pipes. 

For the purpose of determining the exact amount of this waste, 
one of the meters has been kept in service during the winter. 
Plates Nos. 7 and 8 and the following table show the amount of this 
waste in Section 1. 

Table showing the amount of cold weather waste in Section 1 : — 



POPTILATION OF SECTION 2,810. 



Before inspection, May, 1881 

After three inspections, December, 1881 

Dec. 29, 1881 

Jan. 4, 1882 

Jan. 22, 1882 

Jan. 23, 1882 

Jan. 24, 1882 

Jan. 25, 1882 



Gallons 


PEB 


Head 


PBB 


DAT 




Total. 


NiGHT-BATB 


63.5 




39.1 


26.4 




10.6 


27.6 




9.2 


61.5 




52.3 


35.8 




20.5 


58. 




61.5 


82. 




77.9 


About 100. 




88.9 



On the 25th the consumption during the day was more than 
could be registered by the meter, but the average for the day was 
not less than 100 gallons per head. 

From the above it appears that the daily waste in this section, on 
January 25, was about 70 gallons, and the night-rate nearly 80 gal- 
lons per head ; more than two-thirds of the whole consumption was 
wasted that the service-pipes might be kept from freezing. 

This section is one where this class of waste would naturally be 
large ; the houses are without furnace-heat, the plumbing so 
arranged that the pipes cannot be drained, and the tenants, know- 
ing that the water, if not wasted, will be cut off by the frost, nat- 
urally take the onlj^ method left them to retain their supply. 
This feature is graphicall}' illustrated on Plates 7 and 8. 

The lower diagram, on Plate 8, shows the average consumption in 
December, 1881, before the advent of cokl weather, and the upper dia- 
gram shows the effect of a sudden fall in the temperature during 
the afternoon of January 22. At noon the rate of consumption was 
the same on both dates, and there was but a small difference in the 
rates of consumption until 8 P.M. Between 8 and 10 P.M. the 
lower diagram shows a decrease of 1,000 gallons per hour, while 



60 City Document No. 124. 

the upper one shows an increase of 2,500 gallons, caused b^^ the 
opening of faucets b}' people before retiring. The December dia- 
gram shows an increase in the morning of 4,300 gallons, while that 
of January 23 is but 1,700, showing that the greater portion of the 
cold-weather waste occurs during the night. 

That the enormous increase shown by the above table is entirely 
due to this cause of waste, and not to increase in the waste from 
defective fixtures, is shown b^^ the two diagrams on Plate 7. On 
December 29 the weather was warm and the daily consumption was 
27.6 gallons per head, the night rate 9.2 gallons per head per day ; 
while on January 4, six days later, the advent of cold weather had 
increased the consumption in this section 34 gallons per head, or 
95,000 gallons per dsij. Between the same dates the consumption 
of the whole Mystic sj^stem increased from 68 to 109 gallons per 
head per day, a total daily increase of 3,363,000 gallons, or 60%. 

Cost of the Work. 

The saving of 450,000 gallons per day, which has resulted from 
the experiments, has been made at a cost of $2,834.33. Of this 
amount, the meters and setting of same cost $1,511.08, and the 
inspection $1,323.25. 

After the first three inspections the cost per section would be 
greatly reduced, as the inspections would be more infrequent, and 
the force employed could be concentrated where the waste was 
found to be greatest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Assistant Engineer. 



WATEE EEGISTEAE'S EEPOET. 



Office of the Water Eegistrae, 

Boston, May 3, 1882. 

L. R. Cutter, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The undersigned respectfully presents the follow- 
ing report, showing the receipts and expenditures of his de- 
partment during the year ending April 30, 1882 : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1882 is 53,655 ; being an increase of 401 over the previous 
year. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates is 928 ; of this number 784 have 
been turned on, leaving a balance of 144 still remaining off. 

The total revenue from the sale of water dur- 
ing the financial year of 1881-2 is . . $1,017,379 65 

Received from sale of water furnished 

during the previous year . . . 77,489 98 

Received for turning on water in cases where 
it had been turned off for non-payment of 
rates 1,222 00 

Received for summonses . . . . 1,436 25 



.,097,527 88 



The estimated amount of income from the sale 

■ of water for the year 1882-3 is . . $1,112,000 00 
Off and on water, and fees . . . . 4,000 00 



$1,116,000 00 



The expenditures of my department during the year 1881 
have been $27,080.07. 

The total number of meters now attached to the premises 
of water-takers is 1,673. 



62 



City Document No. 124. 



styles and Sizes of Meters. 





4-inch. 


S-inch. 


2-inch. 


l|-inch. 


1-inch. 


5 -inch. 


1-inch. 


Worthmgt»n . . 


10 


15 
1 


63 


10 
1 


421 
8 


2 


866 
145 






15 
















60 












6 
1 




58 


























1 




















10 


16 


63 


11 


436 


2 


1,135 



There are fifty-three drinking-fountains established within 
the city limits. Those marked * are arranged for a contin- 
uous flow of water. The balance have automatic fixtures, 
operating the flow of water when required. 

City Proper. 

* Boston Common (6). 

North square. 

Washington street, opposite Blackstone square. 

Atlantic avenue, junction Commercial street. 

" " head of Row e's wharf. 

Atlantic Avenue, near N.Y. & N.E. R.R. freight-house. 
Haymarket square. 
Causewaj?^ street, at Boston and Lowell R.R. depot. 

" " junction Merrimac street. 

Charles street, opposite the Jail. 

'' " between Boylston and Beacon streets. 

'* " near Boylston street. 

Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Tremout street, near Clarendon street. 
Albany street, opposite water-works, pipe-yard. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the drawbridge. 

East Boston. 
Maverick square. 
Central square. 
Bennington street, junction Chelsea street. 

South Bcfston. 

Foundry street, opposite First street. 
Fourth street, near Foundry street. 
" " junction Emerson street. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 63 

Fourth street, corner of Q street. 
Telegraph Hill. 
Sixth street, near P street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 

Roxbury. 

Albany street, junction Dearborn street. 
Beacon street, junction Brookline avenue. 
*Eliot square. 

Eustis street, near Washington street. 
Heath street, near Tremont street. 
Pynchon street, near Roxbury street. 
Tremont street, junction Cabot street. 

West Roxbury. 

Centre street, junction Day and Perkins street. 

Centre and LaGrange streets, West Roxbury village. 

Morton street, junction South street. 

Roslindale, Taft's Hotel. 

Washington street, near Williams street. 

Dorchester. 

Commercial street, opposite Beach street. 
Nepojiset avenue, corner Walnut street. 
Upham's Corner. 
Glover's Corner. 
Grove Hall. 

Brighton. 

Barry's Corner. 

Market street. Cattle-fair Hotel. 

Union square. 

Western avenue, Charles-river Hotel. 

Washington street, Oak square. 

There are nineteen stand-pipes now located for street- 
sprinkling purposes, as follows : — 

Tremont street and Hammond park. 

Clay street, corner Tremont street. 

Eliot square. 

Brookline avenue, cdrner Longwood avenue. 

St. James street, corner Warren street. 

Blue Hill avenue, between Waverley and Clifford streets. 

Warren street, corner Gaston street. 



64 



City Document No. 124. 



Egleston square, corner Walnut avenue. 

Upham's Corner. 

Field's Corner. 

Dorchester avenue, near Savin Hill avenue. 

Dorchester avenue, at Old Boston line. 

Beach street, Harrison square. 

Union square, Brighton. 

Washington street, corner Winship street, Brighton. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, corner of South street. 

Dudley street, opposite Harvard avenue. 

Paris street, corner of Meridian street. 

Corner Munroe, Walnut avenue. 

Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam- 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1882, with the amount of water-rates 
received for 1881 : — 



33,720 Dwelling-houses (51,83^ 


: families) 


$486,665 96 


1,614 Model-houses (8,618 tenements) 


43,933 51 


21 Boarding-houses . . . 


1,159 00 


10 Lodging-houses 








298 00 


. 16 Hotels . 








840 42 


6,133 Stores and shops 








68,981 54 


473 Buildings 








20,271 58 


870 Offices . 








7,747 05 


49 Public halls . 








7^3 33 


5 Theatres 








144 17 


28 Private schools 








607 83 


24 Asylums 








1,454 00 


7 Hospitals 








305 00 


146 Churches 








2,350 50 


10 Market-houses 








721 00 


67 Greenhouses . 








1,617 24 


95 Cellars . 








607 00 


206 Restaurants . 








5,739 73 


955 Bars and saloons 








13,812 71 


12 Club-houses . 








300 41 


32 Photographers 








927 25 


2 Gymnasiums . 








33 50 


1 Laboratory 








50 00 


49 Packing-houses 








1,531 00 


1,985 Stables . 


, 






15,098 57 


38 Factories 






, t 


1,322 33 


7 Bleacheries . 






" 


178 75 



Amount carried forward. 



$677,421 38 



Report of the Water Board. 



65 



Amount brought forward^ 


$677,421 38 


150 Bakeries . . 


1,431 25 


5 Freight-houses 


120 50 


4 Gasometers . 


63 00 


4 Cemeteries .... 


84 25 


2 Bath-houses . • . 


50 00 


8 Armories .... 


151 00 


81 Laundries .... 


1,509 50 


22 Raih'oad stations . 


323 45 


2 Ice companies, washing ice 


21 00 


4 Ship-yards .... 


59 00 


1 Ship-yard and engine 


40 00 


3 Pumping-engines . . . 


30 00 


2 Dry-docks and engines . 


39 58 


181 Shops and engines . 


10,912 33 


24 Factories and engines 


1,397 73 


7 Printing and engines 


111 04 


38 Stationery engines ... 


2,814 90 


62 Discharging and pile-driving enginef 


3 721 00 


2,015 Hand-hose .... 


11,685 00 


12 Fountains .... 


155 00 


28 Tumbler-washers . 


420 00 


100 Beer water-pressures 


498 33 


12 Aquariums .... 


120 00 


12 Motors . . 


70 00 


Steam and tug boats 


9,645 08 


Jamaica-Pond Aqueduct Company 


1,263 78 


Street-sprinkling . 


1,936 01 


Building purposes . 


3,752 73 


Filling gasometers . 


652 04 


Metered water (9 months) 


200,526 83 


Miscellaneous 


137 25 


4 Police-stations 


102 75 


Steamer " Protector " 


100 00 


47 Fire-engines, hose, and hook and lad- 




der houses . . . . . 


970 00 


7 Chemical engine-houses . 


105 00 


4,025 Fire-hydrants . . . . 


80,500 00 


129 Reservoirs . . . . , 


2,580 00 


Steamer " W. M. Flanders " . 


170 00 


Repair-shop (B. F. D.) . 


35 00 


Public schools . . . . 


3,653 00 


Paving Department 


273 75 


Common Sewer Department . 


200 00 


Lamp Department . . . . 


42 25 


Amount carried forward^ 


$1,016,894 71 



66 



City Document No. 124. 



Amount brought forward. 

Committee on Common and Squares 

Committee on Bridges 

District Court-House 

Branch Libraries . 

Health Department 

Directors of Public Institutions 

Steamer " J. P. Bradlee " 

Steamer " Samuel Little " 

Total .... 



$1,016,894 


71 


s 385 


00 


82 


00 


49 


50 


129 


00 


1,565 


00 


187 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


. $1,019,592 


21 



The following table exhibits the yearly increase of water- 
takers since January 1, 1850 : — 

Takers. Increase. 

From January 1, 1850, to January 1, 1851, 13,463 





1851, 


a 


1852, 16,076 


2,613 




1852, 


i( 


1853, 16,862 


786 




1853, 


a 


1854, 18,110 


1,308 




1854, 


i i 


1855, 19,193 


1,023 




1855, 


a 


1856, 19,998 


805 




1856, 


a 


1857, 20,806 


808 




1857, 


a 


1858, 21,602 


796 




1858, 


(( 


1859, 22,414 


812 




1859, 


a 


1860, 23,271 


857 




1860, 


a 


1861, 24,316 


1,045 




1861, 


n ' 


1862, 25,486 


1,170 




1862, 


(( 


1863, 26,289 


803 




1863, 


(( 


1864, 26,851 


562 




1864, 


(( 


1865, 27,046 


195 




1865, 


(( 


1866, 27,489 


443 




1866, 


< ( 


1867, 27,754 


265 




1867, 


ti 


1868, 28,104 


350 




1868, 


ii 


1869, 29,738 


1,634 




1869, 


a 


. 1870, 31,500 


1,762 




1870, 


a 


1871, 36,132 


4,632 




1871, 


a 


1872, 38,716 


2,584 




1872, 


(( 


1873, 40,688 


1,972 




1873, 


(( 


1874, 42,345 


1,657 




1874, 


li 


1875, 44,676 


2,331 




1875, 


(( 


1876, 46,885 


2,209 




1876, 


(< 


1877, 48,328 


1,443 




1877, 


(; 


1878, 49,970 


1,642 




1878, 


(( 


1879, 51,523 


1,553 




1879, 


a 


1880, 52,268 


745 




1880, 


a 


1881, 53,254 


986 




1881, 


(( 


1882, 53,655 


401 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 



67 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
Octobe^r 25, 1848: — 

Keceived by Water Commissioners, as per 

Auditor's Eeport in 1848 
From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850 

1850, 

1851, 

1852, 

1853, 

1854, 

1855, 

1856, 

1857, 

1858, 

1859, 

1860, 

1861, 

1862, 

1863, 

1864, 

1865, 

1866, 

1867, 

1868, 

1869, 

1870, 

1871, 

1872, 

1873, 

1874, 

1875, 

1876, 

1877, 

1878, 

1879, 

1880, 

1881, 

1882, to May 1, 1882 



. 


$972 81 


1850 . 


71,657 79 


1851 . 


99,025 45 


1852 . 


161,052 85 


1853 . 


179,567 39 


1854 . 


196,352 32 


1855 . 


217,007 51 


1856 . 


266,302 77 


1857 . 


282,651 84 


1858 . 


289,328 83 


1859 . 


302,409 73 


1860 . 


314,808 97 


1861 . 


334,544 86 


1862 . 


365,323 96 


1863 . 


373,922 33 


1864 . 


394,506 25 


1865 . 


430,710 76 


1866 . 


450,341 48 


1867 . 


486,538 25 


1868 . 


522,130 93 


1869 . 


553,744 88 


1870 . 


597,328 55 


1871 . 


708,783 68 


1872 . 


774,445 70 


1873 . 


862,704 08 


1874 . 


917,415 92 


1875 . 


977,020 48 


1876 . 


1,005,120 94 


1877 . 


1,029,643 70 


1878 . 


1,015,562 89 


1879 . 


1,010,584 30 


1880 . 


1,025,803 14 


1881 . 


1,039,896 17 


1882 . 


1,087,528 49 


1882 . 


834,222 99 



68 



City Document No. 124. 



The following table exhibits the class of premises to which 
meters are attached, together with the amount of revenue re- 
ceived during the year : — • 



Revere House 

American House 

Parker House 

U.S. Hotel 

Tremont House 

Young's Hotel 

Adams House 

Hotel Berkeley 

Albion Building 

Hotel Pelham 

Hotel Boylston 

La Grange House. . . . 

St. Cloud 

Hotel Clarendon 

Seaver House 

Evans House 

Park-square Hotel . . . 

Hotel Kempton 

Hotel Hamilton 

Hotel Vendome 

Coolidge House ...... 

Hancock House 

Merrimac House . . . . 
Stanley House 



Class. 



Hotel 



Amounts car'dforw'd 14,909,824 $22,364 33 



Cubic Feet. 



786,799 

593,356 

1,517,931 

1,594,867 

1,673,080 

2,197,964 

1,229,930 

447,864 

161,883 

400,450 

515,451 

78,687 

220,324 

248,328 

55,247 

153,575 

37,364 

233,615 

215,993 

2,022,100 

388,764 

4,293 

44,472 

87,487 



fl,180 18 

890 01 

2,276 88 

2,392 29 

2,509 60 

3,296 93 

1,844 88 

671 78 

242 81 

600 65 

773 16 

118 02 

330 46 

372 47 

82 85 

230 35 

66 03 

350 41 

323 97 

3,033 14 

583 14 

6 42 

66 69 

131 21 



Eepoet of the Watee Board. 



69 



Class. 



Cubic Feet. 



Revenue. 



ATnounts hr't forw'd . 
International Hotel . . 

Hotel Alexander 

Hotel Brunswick .... 

Park's Hotel 

Derby House . . '. 

City Hotel 

Hotel Albemarle .... 

Asliland House 

Hotel Columbus 

Hotel Glover 

Merchants Hotel .... 

M. J. riatley 

New England House, 
Winthrop House .... 

Dooley's Hotel 

Falmouth House .... 

Job A. Turner 

Milliken House 

Sherman House 

Everett House 

Metropolitan House . . 
Commonwealth Hotel, 

St. James Hotel 

Massachusetts House, 

Bay State House 

Mariner's House 



Hotel 



Amounts car'dforw'd, 



1 1 



14,909,824 

323,591 

126,816 

1,173,546 

61,807 

71,697 

35,769 

140,864 

59,060 

.344,244 

85,981 

27,489 

22,168 

121,777 

58,962 

40,364 

106,842 

46,982 

72,668 

219,845 

64,223 

150,527 

491,346 

566,485 

24,617 

80,160 

32,715 



19,460,369 



522,364 33 

485 37 

190 20 

1,760 30 

92 70 

107 52 
63 64 

211 29 
88 67 ' 

616 35 

128 95 
41 21 
33 23 

182 65 
88 43 
60 53 

160 25 
70 46 

108 99 
329 76 

96 32 
225 78 
736 99 
849 70 

36 91 
120 23 

49 06 



$29,189 72 



70 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 


Class. 


4 

a 

op 


.2 


a 




a 

05 


4 


3 

o 


o 

« 

a 

M 


Cubic Feet. 


Revenue. 


Amounts Wtfor'wA . 


........ 


















19,460,369 


$29,189 72 


St. Leonard's Hotel. . 


Hotel .. 








1 






1 




18,990 


28 48 


Arlington House 




2 












2 




43,875 


65 79 


Robertson House 




2 












2 




93,466 


140 18 


Boston Hotel 




2 












2 




38,977 


58 45 


Creigliton House .... 




2 












3 


2 


779,155 


1,168 71 


Van Eensselaer 
















2 




73,026 


109 54 


Quincy House 




5 












6 




703,200 


1,054 78 


Marston House 




1 


•• 










1 




155,711 


233 55 


Crawford House 




i 












5 




618,263 


927 87 


Pavilion House 




•• 
















119,480 


179 20 


Norfolk House 




1 
















143,282 


214 90 


Hampton House 




















94,834 


142 23 


Hotel Agassiz . ■. ., 


















2 


290,079 


435 10 


Mason House 




1 


•• 














20,951 


31 41 


Albany House 




•• 
















75,343 


113 01 


Cattle-Fair Hotel 




















37,363 


56 02 


Phcenix House 




1 


•• 














34,187 


51 26 


Hotel Huntington 




















208,027 


312 03 


Hotel Cluny 


















3 


514,616 


771 90 


Ford's Hotel 




1 


•• 














46,099 


69 13 


John D. Miller 




2 












2 




20,229 


30 33 


Hotel BelleYue 




1 


2 










3 




239,016 


358 50 


New Marlboro' Hotel. 




3 


•• 










3 




99,107 


148 64 


Hotel Hoffman 




•■ 




2 








2 




316,332 


474 48 


Geo. W. Marks & Co. 




1 












1 




5,715 


8 66 


Hotel Bristol 






2 










2 


4 


468,517 


702 76 


Amounts car'dforw'd 





.. 


.. 




.. 


.. 




.. 


, , 


24,718,208 


$37,076 53 



Report of the Water Board. 



71 



Amounts br't forw^d 

Hotel Welden 

F. E. MaguUion 

F. F. Bibber 



Old Colony and New- 
port Kailroad Co. • . 



Boston and Albany 
Kailroad Co 



Boston and Maine 
Eailroad Co 



Boston and Lowell 
Eailroad Co 



FitchburgRailroadCo. 
Eastern Railroad Co. . 



New York and New 
England R.R. Co. . 

Boston and Provi- 
dence Railroad Co. 

Boston, Revere Beach, 
and Lynn R.R. Co. 

Boston, Winthrop and 
Pt. Shirley R.R. Co. 

Boston Gas Light Co. 

So. Boston Gas L't Co. 

E. Boston Gas L't Co. 

Roxbury Gas L't Co. . 

Dorchester GasL't Co. 

Jamaica Plain Gas 
Light Co 



Standard Sugar Re- 
finery 



G. A. Jasper & Co. . . 



Class. 



Hotel. 



Refinery 



Amounts car'd forw'd I . . • . 59,378,610 $89,066 61 



Cubic Feet. 



24,718,208 
64,202 
74,785 
26,614 

3,711,191 

6,204,662 

461,600 

824,884 
1,160,262 
1,295,359 

3,116,765 

2,637,374 

946,960 

32,963 

4,833,765 
152,882 
263,858 
356,295 
150,853 

12,212 

8,331,676 
11,350 



Revenue. 



$37,076 53 

81 28 

112 16 

39 91 

6,566 75 

9,306 73 

692 39 

1,237 32 
1,740 36 
1,943 02 

4,675 13 

3,956 03 

1,420 42 

49 43 
7,250 61 
229 31 
395 77 
534 41 
226 26 

18 30 

12,497 49 
17 01 



72 



City Document JSTo. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts br'tforw'd . 

Continental Sugar Re^ 
finery 



Bay State Sugar Ee- 
finery 



Oxnard Sugar Refin 
ery 



Boston Sugar Refinery 

Bay State Iron Co. . 

Norway Iron Works 

G. W. and F. Smith 
Iron Co 



Highland SpringBrew- 
ery 



Edward Habich 

J. W. Kenney 

Lang & King 

H. & J. PfaflF 

Standard Brewery . . . 

A. J. Houghton & Co., 
Hallock st 



A. J. Houghton & Co., 
Station st 



Boylston Brewery . . . 
Gottleib Burkhardt . . 

John Roessle 

Jones, Cook, & Co. • • 

Boston Beer Co 

Conrad Decker 

Suffolk Brewing Co. . 
J. K. Souther 



Amounts car'dforw'd 



Class. 



Brewery 



Cubic Feet. 



59,378,610 

3,353,660 

2,397,780 

312,720 
5,245,666 
4,528,385 
5,703,460 

150,869 

812,000 
401,289 
233,048 



817,430 
161,802 

14,433 

342,701 

589,081 

180,303 

988,100 

1,452,750 

1,150,346 

230,427 

1,100,430 

172,160 



89,717,450 



89,066 61 

5,030 48 

3,596 66 

469 06 

7,868 49 

6,792 57 

8,555 17 

226 29 

1,218 00 
601 91 
349 55 



1,226 13 
242 69 

21 64 

514 04 

883 62 

270 44 

1,482 13 

2,179 10 

1,725 49 

345 61 

1,650 63 

258 23 



t,574 54 



Report of the Water Board. 



73 



Name. 



Amounts ir't forw'd 
Spring 



Elmwoorl 
Brewery 



Vincent & Hathaway. 

Moses Fairbanks & 
Co 



Coburn, Lang, & Co. . 

Comstock, Gove, & 
Co 



Isaac Pratt, Jr 

Wesleyan Association 
Tremont Temple . . . • 
Houghton & Dutton . . 

P. McAleer 

Smith & Porter ...... 

F. A. Dewson 

Boston Journal 

Joseph Byers 



Class. 



Brewery 

Beer 

Factory . 



Building 



N.E. Mut. Life Ins. 
Co., 70 State st. ... 

N.E. Mut. Life Ins. 
Co., Milk St 



Horticultural Hall . . . 
Suffolk National B'k. 

Benjamin Leeds 

Blackstone Market . . 
John Kayner heirs . . . 

Hill & Towne 

Turn Hall 



Cubic Feet. 



89,717,450 

180,610 

108,395 

111,066 
8,025 

33,924 
150,332 

45,970 
346,870 
124,283 

32,455 

75,088 
158,089 
173,587 
104,761 

17,805 



Revenue. 



,574 54 

270 91 

162 58 

166 59 
12 03 

50 86 
225 48 

68 94 
520 29 
186 40 

48 66 
112 61 
237 12 
260 37 
157 13 

26 69 



L24,833 


187 24 


62,157 


93 21 


26,863 


40 28 


30,334 


45 48 


42,698 


64 03 


54,931 


82 39 


32,369 


48 54 


99,349 


149 01 



Amounts car'd forw'd I . . I . . I 91,862,244 $137,791 38 



74 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts br'tforw'd. . 
B. B. Appleton heirs. 

R. L. Merriam 

Peter B. Brigham est. 
Mrs. Ellen Brooks. . . 
Oriental Tea Company 

S. D. Hicks 

John Stetson 



MacuUar, Parker, & 
Co 



John F. Mills 

Albert Fellner 

J. I. Brown & Son. .. 

Hogg, Brown, & Tay- 
lor 



A. Wentworth, 71 
Sudbury st 



William Ropes estate, 

A. D. Puflfer 

L. Speidel & Co 

Grand Lodge of 
Masons 



Walter Frost est 

Henry C. Morse & Co. 

Mass. Int. of Tech- 
nology 



S. N. Brown, Jr., 147 
Tremont st 



A. H. Vinton. 
A. Stowell . . . 



Class. 



Building 



Amounts car'd forw'd I 94,257,027 $141,383 17 



Cubic Feet. 



91,862,244 
43,695 
27,638 
60,080 
30,490 
49,464 
364,616 
121,401 

63,990 

58,958 

175,474 

34,019 

379,312 



194,733 

40,292 
19,861 
61,806 



Revenue. 



$137,791 38 

65 52 

41 44 

90 10 

45 71 

74 18 

531 91 
182 08 

95 97 

88 42 

263 20 

51 01 

568 95 



27,476 


41 20 


353,470 


630 18 


81,924 


122 87 


89,975 


134 94 


47,473 


71 20 


57,631 


86 43 


21,005 


31 49 



292 08 

60 43 
29 78 
92 70 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 



75 



Amounts hrH forw'd • 
B. F. Bradbury . . . . 



Shepard, Norwell, & 
Co 



D. J. Hastings 



C. U. Cotting, 628 
Washington st. . . 



W. H. Mann 

Moulton & Bradley . . 

Jordan, Marsh, & Co., 
Washington street. 

Charles A. Millen . . . 

Stephen H. Bennett 
heirs 



W. H. Foster . . . 
Brown & Seavey 
Franklin Evans . 
J. Zane & Co 



Thayer, Dunham, & 
Ross 



Merchants' Exchange 

H. M. Burr & Co 

J. T. Brown & Co 

J. H. Pray & Son.... 

C. F. Hovey & Co. . . . 

Globe Publishing 
House 



Charles Rollins 

Adams Express Co. . . 
Brown & Putnam . . . . 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



Class. 



Building 



4 

1 

5 
2 
1 

5 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
2 1 

2 
1 
4 
4 

2 
1 
3 
1 



CuTjic Feet. 



94,257,027 
20,825 

53,432 
19,854 

46,757 



872,723 

353,566 
111,431 

124,425 
37,150 
16,816 
45,345 
43,890 

15,874 
792,501 
32,972 
34,443 
38,441 
214,746 

96,149 
100,201 

71,189 
141,658 



$141,883 17 
81 28 

80 13 

29 77 

70 12 



559 06 

580 38 
167 14 

186 62 
55 70 
25 20 
67 99 
65 82 

23 79 
1,188 73 
49 44 
51 64 
57 65 
322 10 

144 21 

150 29 
106 77 
212 46 



97,041,410 $145,559 36 



76 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Awounis hr'tforw'd'- 

W. Blenkinsop 

Boston Gas Light Co. 

John F. Wilson 

L. P. Ober 

E. H. Brainard 

T. H. Eussell 

M. L. Read 

J. Shedd 

D. Snow 

L. P. Bartlett 



Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association . . . 



A. A. Miner 

Henry F. Miller 

Art Building 

Equitable Life Ins. Co. 

Potter & Watson .... 

W. Warren 

John Simmons estate. 

Tremont National B'k 

M. Englehardt 

I. L. Pratt 

Stillman & NicoU 

R. H. White & Co. .. 

Young Men's Chris- 
tian Union 



Foster's Wharf Co. . 



Class. 



Building 



Cubic Feet. 



97,041,410 
41,110 
17,938 
40,864 
67,142 
64,439 
24,570 
62,020 
22,732 
49,900 
62,807 

20,187 

16,672 

75,307 

30,881 

176,863 

109,224 

8,845 

196,582 

151,308 

113,057 

9,164 

95,300 

336,203 

163,379 
115,036 



Revenue. 



$145,559 36 
61 65 
26 89 
61 28 
100 69 
96 64 
36 84 

93 01 
34 08 
74 84 

94 19 

30 26 

24 99 
112 94 

46 30 
263 03 
163 82 

13 26 
294 85 
226 94 
169 67 

13 74 
142 94 
504 36 

245 04 

172 54 



Amounts car'd forvi'd 



99,111,440 



$148,664 04 



Repokt of the Water Boaed. 



77 



Class. 



.g .s 



Cubic Feet. 



Revenue. 



Amounts br't forw'd . 
Deacon House 



Building 



Boston Herald Build 
ing 



Loring & Dexter, 
Trust 



Commonwealth Build- 
ing 



Mutual Life Ins. Co. 
ofN.Y 



F. Tudor 

E. Bangs 

Jacob Sleeper , 



Liversidge Industrial 
Inst'n 



U.S. & C. Express... 
U.S. Custom House.. 

H. P. Chandler 

Howes & Monks 

F. M. Johnson 

J. A. Laforme 



Robert Codman, 27 
Kilby st 



E. D. Goodrich, 7-13 
Exchange pi 



Robert Codman, 17-21 
Exchange pi 



E. D. Goodrich, 4 Ex- 
change pi 



W. A. Prescott 

Savings 



Five-Cent 
Bank . . 



Amounts car'd forw'd I . . . . I 100,745,667 



99,111,440 
32,642 

495,761 

73,290 

64,483 

177,620 

80,274 

5,055 

72,919 

3,279 
31,054 
66,898 
33,496 
45,367 
25,596 
87,261 

16,574 

71,322 

34,232 

35,880 
84,768 

97,456 



,664 04 
48 94 

743 62 

109 92 

96 71 

266 43 

120 40 

7 57 

109 36 

4 91 

46 56 

100 33 

50 23 
68 04 
38 38 

130 88 

23 35 
106 96 

51 33 

53 H-^ 
127 14 

146 17 



$151,115 09 



78 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts ir't forw^d • 

State of Massachusetts 

C. W. Freeland 

S. N. Brown & Son.. 

Mass.Ch.Mch.'sAss'n. 
Huntington ave. . . . 



Mason Building 
Leopold Morse . 
A. Wentworth . 



Keed's Block, 78-82 
Sudbury st 



Eirst National Bank 
Studio Building .... 
Boston Post Building 
Traveller Building. . . 

Union Building 

Wentworth Building. 

Rice Building 

Carter Building 

Edmands Building. . . 
Washington Building 

Niles Building 

Palmer's Building . 



J. Montgomery Sears, 

199 Washington st. Building 

J. Montgomery Searsj 

45 Arch st Building 



Clasi. 



Building 



Building 



Advertiser Building. 
Lawrence Building . 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



Cubic Feet. 



100,745,667 

39,381 

128,697 

60,026 

681,822 

38,200 

5,839 

19,709 

36,120 

68,089 
112,783 
169,952 

87,956 
258,331 

39,397 
178,645 

23,173 

58,026 
208,340 
139,679 

36,375 

126,534 

140,785 
130,364 
126,426 



Revenue. 



5151,115 09 

59 06 

193 04 

75 03 

1,022 78 

57 27 

8 75 

29 55 

54 18 
102 12 
169 16 
254 90 
131 92 
387 48 

69 07 
267 95 

34 73 

87 02 
312 50 
209 50 

64 54 

188 28 

211 17 
195 53 

189 61 



103,649,316 $165,470 18 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



79 



Name. 



Amounts br'tforw'd 

Codman Building . . ■ 

Marlboro' Building . 

Transcript Building . 

Merchants' Bank 
Building 



Paine Memorial Hall. 

Chauncy Hall School. 

Harv'd Medical School 

English High & Latin 
School 



Mass. General Hospi- 
tal 



Adams Nervine Hospi- 
tal 



New England Hospital 

Mass. Homoeopathic 
Hospital 



Mass. Eye & Ear In- 
firmary 



Notre Dame Academy. 

House of the Good 
Shepherd 



Church Home 

Industrial Home . . . 
Somerset Club . . . . 

Union Club 

Temple Club 

Central Club 

Boston Music Hall. 



Class. 



Amounts car'dforw'd 106,943,834 



Cubic Feet. 



103,649,316 
112,369 

57,680 
79,475 

82,962 

64,118 

9,054 

11,949 

732,244 

1,049,455 

159,571 
136,541 

91,549 

59,065 
14,001 

55,131 
168,455 

87,242 
111,715 
127,588 

26,969 
3,956 

53,439 



Revenue. 



S 155,470 18 

168 53 

86 52 

119 20 

124 43 
96 17 
13 56 
17 92 

1,098 35 

1,574 17 

239 34 
204 80 

137 31 

88 59 
20 99 

82 68 
252 65 
130 85 
167 55 
191 37 

40 42 
5 91 

80 14 



,411 63 



80 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Class. 



Cubic Feet. 



Revenue. 



Amounts hr't forw'd • 



N.E. Conservatory of 
Music 



Park Theatre 

State of Massachusetts 

The United States, i 



StateHo. 

Post \ 
Office J 



Howard Athenaeum . . 

Boston Theatre 

Globe Theatre 

Boylston Market .... 
Washington Market . . 

Suffolk Market 

Williams Market .... 

Medical College 

Boston College 

Mrs. C. C. Annable . . 

G. W. Palfrey 

Mrs. W. A. Colson.. 

F. J. Sargent 

L. A. Smith 

J. H. Grout 

George Odin heirs . . . 
Mrs. H. L. McClellan. 

Mrs. D. L. Morse 

Mrs. C. Cummings . . 
J. P. Robinson & Co. 
Ruel Philbrook 



Board'g. 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



106,943,834 

40,700 

60,849 

238,723 

141,330 

14,918 
69,382 
34,687 

124,631 
46,452 
45,871 
49,977 
48,773 
99,198 

212,931 
18,257 
36,372 
69,185 
23,359 
35,294 
22,830 
68,529 
38,190 
23,351 
98,849 
32,400 



),411 63 

61 03 

76 25 
358 07 

211 98 

22 36 
104 06 

62 08 
186 93 

69 66 
68 79 
74 96 
73 14 
148 78 
319 37 
27 37 
64 56 
88 76 
35 02 
52 93 

34 23 
87 78 
67 27 

35 00 
148 24 

48 58 



108,608,872 $162,908 76 



Report or the Water Board. 



81 



ZSTame. 



Amounts hrH forw'd 

J. A. Merrill 

Simon Oakes 

Mrs. N. F. Chapin. . . 
William Evans .... 

B. S. Evans 

E. Cutler 

Michael Doherty . . 
Job A. Turner .... 
James Chisholm . . . 

J. Collins 

Mrs. C. A. Moffitt.. 
Thomas Cantlon . . . 



Class. 



Lowell Five-Cent Sg,v- 
ings-Bank 



Board'g. 



Model 



N. Whiting . . , 
O. S. Sanders. 
H. H. Fay . . . . 
D. Goodnow • . 



David Wilcox & Co., 
8 Boylston square . . 

J. Morrill, Jr. & Co. 

Pearson Cordage Co. 

J. Morse 

L. Whittaker 

C. Wright & Co 

Howard Watch & 
Clock Co 



Roxbury Carpet Co. . . 



Factory. 



Cubic Feet. 



108,608,872 
79,815 
13,017 
14,907 
94,018 
45,193 
19,057 
67,204 
12,625 
18,523 
67,538 
289,217 
13,567 

175,118 

101,962 

79,422 

17,403 

54,920 

200,372 
11,799 

176,828 
28,669 
14,904 
89,904 

65,197 

374,675 



Revenue. 



,908 76 
119 72 
19 52 
22 34 
141 10 
67 79 
28 56 

100 79 
18 93 

, 27 77 

101 28 
433 82 

20 84 

262 66 
152 93 
119 11 

26 05 
82 36 

300 55 
17 68 

265 23 
35 48 
22 35 
59 84 

97 78 
561 99 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



110,679,726 |il66,014 64 



82 



City Document No. 124. 



Amounts hr't forw'd.. 

George C. Pearson . . 

Putnam Nail Co 

William Carleton .... 

Murphy, Leavens, & 
Co 



H. M. Richards 

Spriu'ger Bros 

J. H. Bailey & Co. . 

Peet Valve Co 

A. W.Bailey 

C. M. Clapp & Co. . , 
W. S. Pratt 



The Diamond Match 
Co 



Smith & Co 

Chickering & Sons. . . 

Potter & Wrightington 

Lockvrood Manf. Co. . 

N. E. Smelting Co. . . 

Mace & Keys 

Bagnall & Loud 

Boston Car Spring Co. 

A. Folsom & Sons . . . 

Dwinell, Hayward, & 
Co 



J. M. Cook estate 

Hallet & Davis Piano 
Co 



Amounts car'dforw^d 



Class. 



Factory. 



CulDic Feet. 



110,679,726 

26,522 

625,468 

283,723 

51,172 

174,426 

24,476 

18,419 

140,185 

27,624 

40,995 

146,750 

26,069 

42,825 

259,245 

173,088 

42,463 

1,457 

26,703 

55,465 

187,524 

62,850 

103,449 
229,323 

81,015 



Revenue. 



$166,014 64 
39 77 
938 18 
425 57 

76 74 

261 62 

36 70 

27 61 

210 19 

41 41 

61 48 

220 10 

39 09 
64 22 

388 85 

269 63 

63 66 

2 18 

40 04 
83 18 

281 27 
94 25 

155 16 
343 97 

121 50 



113,530,902l$170,291 01 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



83 



Name. 



Amounts br't forw^d 

S. D. & H. W. Smith, 
Montgomery st. . 

S. D. & H. W. Smith, 
Albany street. . .. 



Emerson Piano Co. . . 

William Underwood & 
Co 



G. D. Dowes & Co. . . 
J. D. Williams 



Newton, Morton, & 
Co 



Boston Belting Co. 

Eichardson, McKee, & 
Co 



Comrriercial Manf. Co. 

Conrad Zeigler 

C. H. Bacon 

Morton & Chesley • • . 

A. Zeigler 

Cummings & Carlisle. 

E. W. Dailey 

Coburn, Lang, & Co. . 
J. W. Tufts 



Pickert, De Butts 
Co 



Avery Lactate Co. 
A. Ceppi & Co 



Walworth Manufact. 
Co 



R. Rhodes 



Amounts car'dforw'd 



Class. 



Factory 



Cubic Feet. 



113,530,902 

140,638 

126,634 
60,114 

94,584 
43,016 
21,162 

107,487 
2,217,710 

92,586 
369,860 

43,352 
223,202 
210,273 

15,736 

206,676 

9,387 

30,642 
216,529 

98,048 
16,845 
31,752 

49,247 
94,166 



Revenue. 



$170,291 01 

210 94 

189 93 
90 15 

141 86 

64 51 
81 73 

161 21 
3,326 54 

138 86 
554 77 

65 01 
334 78 
315 39 

23 59 

310 00 

14 07 

45 95 

324 78 

■ 147 06 
25 26 

47 62 

73 85 
141 23 



118,050,548 $177,070 10 



84 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts hrH forw'd 
A. J. Morse & Co. . 
Seth W. Fowie & Son 
O. H. Leach 



Dennison Manxifact. 
Co., 25 Vale st 



Chadwick Lead Works 
Henry Mayo & Co. 
B. F. Sturtevant . . 
Charles W. Spurr . . 
Hallett & Cumston. 

P. Lally 

S. G. Underhill.... 



Amer. Molded Collar 
Co 



Bardwell, Anderson, 
&Co 



ClaBB. 



Factory . 



N. E. "Water Meter 
Co 



Billings, Clapp, & Co. 

Lewis and Lane 

Samuel Williams . . . • 

F. G. Lamson 

John Broderick 

A. H. Miller 

D. Blyeven & Co 



Forbes Lithograph 
Manf. Co 



Lawrence Wilde & Co. 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



Cubic Feet. 



118,050,548 

60,338 

2,971 

40,262 

141,096 

193,727 

296,567 

77,795 

12,057 

113,648 

143,613 

56,626 

99,357 

74,415 

32,019 
42,478 
58,558 
48,831 
28,300 
19,620 
50,365 
13,530 

91,429 
93,089 



Revenue. 



S177. 



119,841,239 



070 10 

90 50 

4 44 

60 39 

211 62 
290 58 
444 83 
116 68 

18 08 
170 46 
215 40 

84 93 

149 01 

111 60 

48 02 
63 70 
87 82 
73 23 
42 45 
29 42 
75 53 
20 29 

187 12 
139 62 



$179,755 82 



Report of the Water Board. 



85 



Name. 



Amounts hr't forw'd 

Union Carpet Lining 
Co 

Walworth Manf. Co 
First St 

Codman & Shurtleff. 

Shreve, Crump, & Low 

Boston Cordage Co. . . 

Eice & Hutchings .... 

Eiedler, Moeldner, & 
Co., 

Woodbury & Pritchard 

National Sewing Ma- 
chine Co 

Glidden & Joy 

D. Shales & Co 

Christopher Blake . . . 
G. H. Dickerman . . . • 
E.. Estabrook & Son . . 
George Gill 

E. &E. King........ 

Downes & Adams 

Josiah B. Mayo 

E. P. Richard 

H. N. Glover 

A. K. Young 

Harrison Loring 

S. A. Woods & Co. . . 
George F. Blake 



Amounts car^d forw'd 



Class. 



Factory. 



Mach'ist 



Cubic Feet. 



119,841,239 

24,010 

15,818 

36,178 

33,663 

300,446 

135,291 

53,538 
85,020 

27,969 

2,871 

52,531 

87,285 

64,878 

42,166 

17,942 

73,360 

11,168 

1,034,896 

31,146 

42,089 

67,023 

49,517 

109,065 

125,640 



Revenue. 



$179,755 82 

36 00 

23 72 

54 26 

50 48 

450 65 

202 92 

80 29 
127 51 

41 93 

4 29 

78 78 

130 91 
97 31 
68 24 
26 89 

110 03 
16 75 
1,552 34 
46 70 
63 12 
85 52 
74 28 

163 58 

188 45 



122,354,749 $183,625 77 



86 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts hrH forw' d . . 
AshcroftManufact.Co, 

L. M. Ham 

Dennis Crowley 

L. A. Bigelow 

William Evans 

Smith & Lovett 



Am. Tool and Ma- 
chine Co 



J. Souther & Co. . . . 
Boston Machine Co. 
Hersey Brothers .... 



Hinckley Locomotive 
Works 



Atlantic Works, Chel- 
sea st 



Atlantic Works, Bor- 
der st 



Holmes & Blanchard. 
Charlestown st 



H. S. Eobinson 

Geo. T. McLaughlin . 

South Boston Iron Co. 

Holmes & Blanchard, 
Taylor st 



James Gurney & Co. . 

William Blake & Co. • 

Whiting Foundry Co. 

Tremont Foundry Co. 

Fulton Iron Foundry 
Co 



Class. 



Mach'ist 



Foundry 



Amounts car^dforw'd 125,618,061 



OubioFeet. 



^122,354,749 

88,972 

109,334 

26,870 

119,402 

146,424 

79,877 

129,540 
33,731 

235,178 
52,378 

925,920 

212,005 

236,390 

125,388 
53,466 
94,512 

313,678 

17,963 
34,082 
106,489 
92,947 
15,036 

13,730 



Revenue. 



33,526 77 
133 43 
163 98 
40 29 
179 08 
219 62 
119 80 

194 29 

,60 58 

352 75 

78 ,55 

1,388 86 

317 99 

354 58 

• 188 07 

80 20 

141 74 

470 50 

26 94 

51 11 

159 73 

139 41 

22 64 

20 68 



5,420 39 



Keport of the Water Board. 



87 



Kame. 



Amounts br'tforw'd. 



Charles Roberts . . . 
Highland Foundry Co. 
AUston Car Wheel Co. 
George Miles 



Downer Kerosene Oil 
Co 



S. Jenney & Co 

Maverick Oil Co 

Pierce & Canterbury. 
Beacon Oil Co 



Bowker, Torrey, & 
Co., Bowker st 



Bowker, Torrey, & 
Co., Foundry st. . . . 



Torreys & Co 

C. E. Hall & Co 

A. Wentworth & Co. . 
Richard Power & Son. 

Carew & Devine 

E. F. Meaney 

Folt & Sullivan 

Geo. F. Chapin & Co. 



Pike & Fabins . 



Horace H. Lewis 

"W. K. Lewis & Bros. 
M. M. Pigott & Son.. 



Amounts ca7-'dforw'd 



ClasE. 



Foundry 

a 
<( 

Boil'r'm. 
Oil W'ks 



Marble 
Works 



Stone Yd 



Vinegar 
Works 

Pickle 
Factory 



1 . 

2 . 



Cubic Feet. 



125,618,061 

131,833 
16,643 

58,279 
20,012 

1,312,075 

133,744 

322,815 

140,378 

35,440 

694,940 

456,183 
488,366 
264,046 
125,473 

86,622 
278,064 

47,484 

77,880 



Revenue. 



$188,420 39 

197 72 
24 94 
87 41 
30 00 

1,968 10 

200 60 

484 21 

210 56 

53 15 

1,042 40 

684 26 
732 54 
396 05 
188 19 
129 66 
417 08 
71 20 

116 80 



70,532 


105 79 


2,170 


3 25 


55,840 


83 74 


23,502 


35 23 



130,460,282 $196,683 27 



88 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts br'iforw'd.. 
E. T. Cowdrey & Co. 

Warner & Freeman.. 
Fobes, Hayward,&Co. 
Chase & Co 



A. F. Copeland, 4 Tre- 
mont row 



E. M. Messenger 

Mrs.G. F. Harrington, 
Marston & Cunio . . . . 

W. C. Cahoon 

Frost & Dearborn 

George Fera • 

D. T. Copeland 

F. E. Weber 

E. B. Brigham 

W. F. Bacon 

M. D. O'Keefe 

Campbell & Coverly . 

W. G. Foley 

Jones & Marshall. . . 

O. S. Edgerly 

C. H. Bailey 

Mary Smith 

Sheplie & Co 

Ci E. Bacon 

Thomas Walton .... 



Class. 



Pickle 
Factory 

SaltWks 

Confec'y 



Eesta'nt 



Amounta car'd forvi'd 



Cubic Feet. 



Revenue. 



130,460,282 

149,465 
25,786 
99,911 

253,448 

135,538 
18,354 
48,729 
70,912 
28,990 
72,036 
35,319 

108,228 
73,420 

202,979 
15,323 
18,088 
44,562 
33,740 
29,008 
6,682 
20,342 
18,393 
29,509 
8,192 
19,866 



fl95,683 27 

224 19 

38 65 
149 84 
380 16 

203 28 

27 51 

73 08 

106 36 

43 47 

108 04 

52 97 

162 31 

110 11 

304 45 

22 96 

27 12 

66 82 

50 60 

43 49 
10 02 
30 50 
27 58 

44 25 
12 28 
29 78 



132,027,097 $198,033 09 



Report of the Water Board. 



89 



Name. 



ClasB. 



Cubic Feet. 



Revenue. 



Amounts br'tforw^d. 

J. Gallagher 

A. H. Clark 

Charles Vossler . . . . 

J. Swallow 

L. E. Stearns 

S. A. Clough & Son. 
S. S. Rankin 



Resta'nt 



A. F. Copeland, 467 
Washington st. . • 



J. Backus . 
E, G. Park 



Brock & Coy, 243 
Atlantic ave 



Osborn & Dunn 



Sheppard & Cham- 
berlin 



Durgin, Park, & Co • . 

Edward Savoy 

T. H. Smith 

J. M. Learned. ...... 

C. F. Kendall 

Pearson &Macomber. 

J. H. Blodgett 

E. R. & J. S. Higgins. 
Atwood & Bacon . . . . 

Smith & Wright 

Elias Howe 

Felton & Son 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



Saloon 



Distill'y 



132,027,097 
49,352 
36,509 
65,604 

4,224 
19,360 

7,062 
41,701 

89,291 
66,318 
56,201 

58,172 
41,487 

42,834 
35,400 
41,319 
93,684 
62,596 
43,906 
56,281 
99,120 

129,248 
21,228 
70,642 
39,145 

297,151 



$198,033 09 

74 02 

54 75 

98 39 
6 33 

29 02 

10 58 

62 53 

133 92 

99 47 
84 29 

87 24 
62 21 

64 23 
53 08 
61 92 

140 54 
93 89 

65 86 
84 40 

148 66 
193 86 

31 82 
105 95 

58 69 
445 70 



133,594,932 



#200,384 43 



90 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amoimis hr't forw'd . . 

Jonas H. French 

German Am. Co 

C. H. Graves 

James Edmond & Co. 



A. Hale & Co. 



Joseph Byron, Jr. . . . 

James Gromley 

W. H. Swift & Co. . . . 

W. L. Bradley 

W. H. Bowker & Co. 
B. Randall 



Boston Dye Wood & 
Chemical Co 



W. H. Whitmore... 
Preston & Merrill . . 
Quirin & Nelson • . 
Mullen & Brown ... 
A. J. Foster & Co.. 

E. P. Richard 

Boston Forge Co. . • 



Boston Lead Man'fg 
Co 



A. N. Hardy 

Heliotype Printing Co, 

Suffolk Glass Co 

New England Pottery. 



Class. 



Distill'y 

Distiller 

Rectifier 

Fire 
Brick. 

Rubber 
Works. 

Currier. 



Fertiliz's 



Cheraic's 

Extracts 
Tannery 



Pho'pher 



Amounts car'dforw'd i 137,84:1,438 $206,753 86 



Cubic Feet. 



133,594,982 
70,863 
11,300 
68,259 

95,594 

92,182 
5,492 

13,555 
202,871 
589,199 

93,768 

29,856 

1,515,719 

71,762 

177,550 

81,823 

49,239 

9,607 

8,306 

667,520 

140,715 
14,194 
98,703 
85,543 
52,896 



Revenue. 



$200,384 43 

106 28 
16 96 

102 37 

143 38 

138 27 
8 22 

20 82 
304 39 

883 78 

140 64 

44 77 

2,273 65 

107 61 
266 31 
122 72 

73 83 

14 41 

12 46 

1,001 28 

211 06 

21 27 
148 04 
128 31 

79 32 



Report of the Water Board. 



91 



Amounts br'tforw'd. 



Simpson's Dry Dock 
Co 



Cunard Steamship Co. 



Union Freight Eail- 
way Co 



W. B. Gleason & Co. 
Hill & Wright 



Butchers' Slaughter- 
ing and Melting As- 
sociation 



A. J. Tower 



Metropolitan Eailroad 
Co 



So. Boston Railroad 
Co 



Highland Eailroad 
Co 



Union Eailroad Co., 
Oak square 



Union Eailroad Co., 
June. Wash. & 
Cambridge sts 



Draper & Hall 

V. E. Bridgham 

C. H. Foster 

A. J. Child 

J. C. Bean 

James W. Hale 

E. A. Batchelder 

Charles R. Smith . . . . 
J. Austin Rogers . • . • 



Class. 



Carying 
Coopers 



Skating 
Eink. 



Stables. 



Stable 



18 



Amounts car' d for w'd 142,863,046 $214,270 74 



OuIdIc Feet. 



137,841,438 

118,418 
626,270 

225,480 
37,696 
17,368 

622,043 

47,595 

1,592,080 

677,559 

294,338 

62,686 

11,883 
252,228 
98,668 
40,360 
45,693 
71,362 
24,893 
36,413 
35,736 
72,839 



Revenue. 



#206,753 86 

177 60 
939 39 

938 22 
56 52 
26 04 

933 04 

71 37 

2,388 07 

1,016 26 

441 44 

• 93 98 

17 82 

378 33 

147 99 

60 52 

68 52 

107 03 

37 32 

54 60 

63 58 

109 24 



92 



City Document No. 124. 



Uame. 


Class. 


a 


.3 


4 

.9 


.a 
a 


.9 

CO 


o 

.9 


"3 
o 
H 


1 


Cubic Feet. 


Kevenue. 


Amounts hr'tforw'd. . 










.. 










142,853,046 


$214,270 74 


Norfolk House Stable 


Stable . . 










■• 


•• 


1 




22,285 


33 41 


Charles Foster & Co. 














•• 


1 




37,518 


56 28 


Joseph Swallow 
















1 




30,693 


46 03 


Eobert H. Douglass . . 










•• 


•• 




1 




56,648 


84 94 


William K. Porter . . . 










•• 


•• 


•• 


1 




18,642 


27 94 


J. P. Barnard, 108 
























Chestnut street 


"•. 










•• 




1 




81,805 


122 69 


J. P. Barnard, cor. 
























Brimmer and Chest- 
























nut streets 




•• 


1 




•• 






1 




55,470 


83 19 


J. P. Barnard, Joy st. 




3 










•• 


3 




100,089 


160 12 


John A. Sawyer 




2 












2 




61,151 


91 71 


Clark & Brown, 4 




















62,957 


94 41 














, , 












Z. A. Eichardson .... 












.. 


.. 






28,303 


42 44 


J. E. Maynard 










•• 


•• 








72,536 


108 78 


A. Goss 




















150,853 
63,369 


226 26 


Adams Express Co. . . 










.. 


.. 


.. 






95 04 


John Eaton, Jr 










•• 


•• 


•• 






17,487 


26 21 






















19,768 
54,524 


29 63 


J. T. Manson 










.. 










81 77 


Warner & Tarbell . . . 














•• 






67,296 


100 93 


George M. King 










•• 




•• 






63,903 


95 85 


Milo Whitney 










•• 










28,294 


42 43 


Daniel Wood 










•• 




• • 






46,542 


69 80 


T, D. Sullivan 










•• 




• • 






29,483 


44 20 






9 












9 




30,176 
30,893 


45 24 


C. & E. Snow 




1 






•• 






1 




46 33 


Amounts car" A forw'd 




^ ^ 


^ ^ 


^ ^ 


^ , 


^ ^ 


^ ^ 


^ ^ 


^ ^ 


144,083,731 


$216,116 37 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



93 



Name. 



Amounts hr''tforw''d • 

Edgar Snow 

Herdic Phaeton Co. . 

James Jellison 

John Miller 

A. B. Winship 

Harwood & Hackett. 
H. C. Nims 



Boston Hotels Coach 
Co 



E. "W. Murray,Berke- 
ley street 



E. W. Murray, Stan- 
hope street 



H. C. Garner 

Geo. S. Johnson. . . . . 

Johnson Bros 

Ward & Hicks 

T. Thaxter & Co 

Miller & Eobinson . . . 

Jenness & Glover 

Hale & Mossey 

A. D. Pattee 

W. H. Emerson 

Moses Colman & Son. 

E. T. Walker 

J. H. Kichardson . . . . 
Riverside Club Stable. 



Amonnts car'dforw'd 



Class. 



Stable 



Cubic Feet. 



144,083,731 
3,967 
43,533 
37,800 
4,919 
38,841 
45,846 
91,348 

212,174 

17,773 

37,465 
92,004 

4,537 
16,678 
28,426 
40,444 
41,886 
58,413 
56,251 
23,530 
29,234 
11,402 
17,730 

6,252 
21,849 



Kevenue. 



$216,116 37 

5 94 
65 28 
56 68 

7 36 

58 24 

68 75 

137 01 

318 24 

26 64 

56 19 
137 99 

6 80 

25 01 

42 62 
60 65 
62 81 
87 61 
84 36 
35 28 

43 83 
17 09 

26 58 
9 36 

32 75 



145,066,033 f 217,589 44 



94 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts hr'tforw'd ■ 



Club Stable, Chardon 
street 



Beacon Club Stable . . 
J. H. Eichardson . . . . 

Henry Beckwith 

F. A. Phelps 

E. Hoisington & Co. . . 

Parker Bryant 

M. L. Ham 

F. S. Rice & Co 

M. & W. Ham 

J. H. Pote & Co 

J. B. Cassidy & Bro. . 

Peck & Hall 

W. H. Berry 

Ware & Bjissigny 

J. A. Riedel & Co 

J. C. Eichardson 

E. E. Webster 



Club Stable, 75 Chest- 
nut street 



C. S. Godfrey. 



Clark & Brown, 22 
Charles st 



Clark & Brown, 8 
Lime st 



A. H. Foss 

Tremont Stables . 



Class. 



Stable . 



Amounts car'dforw'd 146,160,638 $219,230 97 



CuTdIc Feet. 



145,066,033 

13,872 
17,607 
77,554 
30,157 
77,741 
34,318 
41,266 
27,422 
125,333 
45,647 
12,239 
27,554 
36,844 
37,238 
34,362 
38,241 
12,039 
21,043 

20,211 
32,733 

155,402 

19,111 

17,216 

139,455 



Revenue. 



$217,589 44 

20 79 
26 40 

116 31 
45 22 

116 59 
51 46 
61 88 
41 12 

188 00 
68 46 
18 34 
41 32 
55 24 
55 84 
51 63 
57 34 
18 04 
31 55 

30 29 
49 09 

233 09 

28 65 

25 81 

209 17 



Report of the Water Board. 



95 



Amounts hr'iforw'd . ■ 

C. F. Lord & Co 

Cilly & Stimson 

Club Stable, 44 Joy st. 

Asa Critchett 

A. S. Eaton 

L. A. No5'es 

Geo. D. Brown 

J. H. Hathorne 

H. D. Smith 

M. Munroe 



George W. Hollis 
(5mos.) 



Boston Driving Ass'n. 
National Tube Works. 
Globe Nail Works . . . 



Harrington & Hunne- 
well 



B. M. Cunningham .. 

L. Prang & Co 

J. H. Bufford & Co. . . 

E. G. Morse & Co. . . . 

Francis Brooks 

Walworth Manuf. Co. 

H. G. Denny 

Porter & Co 

C. U. Cotting 



Class. 



Stable . . 



Stocky'd 

Slaught- 
ering y'd 



Silver- 
smiths 

Laundry 

Chromos 

Lithog- 
raphers 

Engine 



Amounts car'dforw'd 148,174,583 |)2^,251 47 



Cubic Feet. 



146,160,638 
24,570 
34,318 
36,711 
26,017 
40,862 
18,361 
30,744 

150,799 
44,695 

370,955 

24,394 

89,770 

103,766 

96,719 

26,916 
150,131 
192,277 

91,151 
49,488 
40,337 
237,815 
53,527 
65,285 
14,337 



$219, 



,230 97 
36 83 
51 46 
55 04 

39 01 
61 28 
27 52 
46 10 

226 18 

67 02 

556 41 

36 57 
134 65 
155 64 
145 06 

40 36 
225 18 

288 40 

136 72 
74 22 
60 48 

356 71' 
80 28 
97 90 
21 48 



96 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts br'tfoo-w^d . 
Moses B. Wilde . . . . 



Brush Electric Light- 
ing Co 



John Foster 

J. S. Potter 

E. J. Brown 

John Briggs & Co. 

J. S. Potter 

S. B. Stebbins . . . 
L. W. Pickens . . . 
C. E. Folsom 



Boston City Flour 
Mills 



J. J. McNutt 

Glendon Co 

Manson Bros 

A. & J. McLaren & Co. 
W. L. Sturterant .... 
George McQuesten. . . 

J. F. Paul & Co 

Bugbee & Spooner. . . 

J. A. Eobertson 

Stetson, Moseley, & Co. 
Chauncy, Page, & Co. 

S. H. L.Pierce 

A. J. Stearns & Son. . 
Palmer, Parker, & Co. 



Amount?, car'd forw'd 



Class. 



Engine 



M 



Cubic Feet. 



148,174,583 
58,146 

80,250 
36,637 

10,942 
98,740 
105,357 
98,239 
92,747 
24,879 

137,395 
295,037 
125,806 
115,530 
130,179 
128,499 

56,113 
253,563 

58,677 
159,178 

50,709 

5,643 

112,260 

15,779 

79,883 



Revenue. 



#222,251 47 

87 20 

120 37 
54 94 

16 40 
148 08 
158 01 
147 34 
139 10 

37 31 

206 08 
442 54 
188 69 
173 30 
195 25 
192 73 
84 14 
380 32 

88 00 
238 75 

76 05 

8 46 

168 38 

23 65 
119 81 



150,504,771 #226,746 37 



Report of the Water Board. 



97 



Name. 



Amounts hr'tforw'd . . 

J. F. Keating 

Watson & Bisbee 

Laming & Drisko . . . . 

Creesy & Noyes . . . . . 

Smith & Jacobs 

B. D. Whitcomb 

S. Crosby & Son 

Nathaniel Cummings. 

Nelson Curtis 

Atlantic Dyewood Co. 

Standard Dyewood 
Mill 



Class. 



Engine 
Mill 



Caswell, Livermore. 

& Co : 



G. A. York & Co. 



Boston Water Meter 
Co., 29 Devonshire 
street 



Boston Water Meter 
Co., Foster's wharf 



G. D. Killura 

G. K. Withington&Co. 
J. H. Chadwick 



Horatio Harris . , 
Oakland Garden 
J. C. Nichols . . . . 



Warren & Co., Agts. . 



Fish 
Store 

Bacon 
Works 

Testing 
Meters 



Bakery 



House & 
Fountain 



Wharf 
purposes 

Steara'rs 



Cubic Feet. 



Amounts car'd forw'd 153,218,566 



150,504,771 

91,861 

54,703 

63,778 

188,180 

105,039 

160,520 

122,491 

11,313 

22,488 

1,123,503 

232,603 

55,130 

41,424 

1,119 

27,980 
13,532 

47,288 

13,370 
28,840 
23,207 

58,076 
227,350 



Revenue. 



.$225,746 37 

137 78 

82 04 

95 65 

282 24 

157 54 

240 76 

183 72 

16 95 

33 72 
1,685 24 

348 89 

82 68 

62 12 

1 68 

41 96 
20 28 
70 92 

20 04 
43 26 

34 79 

87 09 
341 01 

,816 73 



08 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Class. 



Amounts hrHforw^d . 



Hingham Steamboat 
Co 



Portland Steam Pack- 
et Co 



International Steam- 
boat Co 



J. Henry Sears & Co. . 

Steamer Empire State. 

South Shore Steam- 
ship Co 



House of Correction. 
Lunatic Hospital . • . 
City Hospital ....... 

Charity Building 

Temporary Home - . 

City Hall 

Wayfarers' Lodge . . 
Austin Farm ■ 



Steam'rs 



Suffolk County Court- 
House 



Suffolk County Jail. 



Directors of Public In- 
stitutions 



Marcella-st. Home. 

South Ferry 

North Ferry • 

Board of Health . . 



Police Station No. 1 
" " 2 



Public 
Urinals, 



Amounts car'dforw'd 163,840,854 



Cubic Feet. 



Revenue. 



153,218,566 

1,136,658 

333,220 

198,500 
200,300 
175,789 

94,170 

2,030,237 

614,900 

1,246,362 

48,177 

115,272 

196,891 

64,169 

262,064 

247,466 
213,911 

939,582 

496,437 

1,083,140 

757,370 

47,176 
36,477 
84,020 



.$229,816 73 

1,704 98 

499 82 

297 74 
300 44 
263 67 

141 25 

3,045 35 

922 33 

1,869 53 

72 25 

172 90 

295 33 

96 23 

393 08 ' 

371 18 
320 86 

1,409 35 

744,65 

1,624 71 

1,136 05 

70 75 

54 71 

126 02 



,749 91 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



99 



Name. 



Amounts Ir't foriv'd ■ ■ 
Police Station No. 3 
" 4 
" 5 
" 6 
" 7 
" 8 
" 9 
" 10 
" 12 
" 13 



City Prison 

L. W. Morrill & Co. . 

John C. Miller 

First Church 

King's Chapel 



Cathedral of the Holy 
Cross 



Washington Lodge 

St. Mary's Church. 

Tremont-st. M.E. 
Church 



South Cong'l Church. 

First Univ. Church . . 

Columhus-av. Univ. 
Church 



Shawmut Cong'l Soc'y 

Church of the Holy 
Redeemer 



Class. 



Rotary 
Fan 



Organ 



Cubic Feet. 



163,840,854 
16,103 
40,794 
24,118 
63,883 
18,665 
16,381 
14,128 
24,081 
13,272 
7,074 
227,510 

19,845 

9,000 
18,192 

29,000 

298 

62,846 

16,119 
11,066 
21,152 

24,925 
42,090 

21,400 



Revenue. 



t5,749 91 
24 14 
61 19 
36 19 
95 75 

28 00 
24 57 
21 19 

36 12 
19 90 
10 60 

341 25 

29 76 

13 50 

27 28 

43 50 

44 

94 35 

24 16 
16 60 

31 72 

37 38 
63 13 

32 10 



Amounts car'dforw'd 164,582,748 



$246,862 73 



100 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts br'tforw'd. 



Church of the Messiah 
St. Patrick's Church 
Baptist 



Euggles-st 
Church . 



St. Joseph's Church . 
Meth't Epis. Church. 
A. J. Knight 



Church of the Immac- 
ulate Conception . . 

Clarendon-st. Baptist 
Church 



Second Church Soc'y. 

St. James Church . . . 

First Baptist Church 
Society 



Boston Society New 
Jerusalem 



Second Hawes Unit. 
Society 



Old South Church 
Society 



Trinity Church Soc'y, 

German Catholic Ch, 

Church of the Good 
Shepherd 



Central Cong'l Soc'y. 

J. E. Pierce 

Bancroft & Dyer . . . . 
John L. Gardner . . . . 
Job F. Bailey 



Amounts car'dforw'd 



Claes. 



Organ 



Elevator 



Cubic Feet. 



164,582,748 

55,100 
45,400 

16,300 

32,100 

2,100 



55,893 

11,548 
13,665 
30,700 



14,830 

27,647 

23,019 

117,900 

33,500 

10,500 
17,000 
300 
94,779 
11,127 
102,070 



Revenue. 



5,862 73 

82 65 
68 10 

24 45 

48 15 

3 15 



83 84 

17 31 
20 49 
46 05 



22 24 

41 46 

34 53 

176 85 

50 25 

15 75 
26 60 

45 
142 16 

16 67 
153 09 



165,298,221 $247,936 87 



Report of the Water ^oard. 



101 



Name. 



Class. 



CulDic Feet. 



Revenue. 



Amounts hrHforw'd. . 

Henry S. Hovey 

E. Williams 

C. W. Guy & Bros. . . 

M. D. Spaulding 

William Claflin 

Mrs. H. D. Reed .... 
Joel Goldthwait & Co. 
Chickering & Sons . . . 
Odd Fellows Building 

Davis & Co 

A. J. Stearns 

James Tucker & Co. . 

Clark & Warren 

E. H. Sampson 



Elevator 



Stone, Bills, & Whit- 
ney 



J. C. Haynes 

Lewis, Brown, & Co. • 

Claflin & Thayer 

McConnell & Gardner 

W. E. Putnam & Co.. 

Henry Bond & Co., 
237 Congress st. . . . 



J. S. Stone 

Dennison Manuf g Co. 

A. Low Co 

Clement & Colburn . . 



165,298,221 

3,120 

11,200 

27,056 

17,147 

20,930 

3,328 

5,893 

292,840 

19,800 

59,397 

18,600 

215,700 

76,000 

81,300 

87,850 
66,903 
262,383 
173,030 
155,943 
112,700 

28,350 
144,300 
233,900 
212,800 

46,900 



$247,935 87 

4 67 

16 80 

40 57 

25 71 

31 39 

4 97 

8 83 

439 25 

29 70 

89 08 

27 90 

323 55 

114 00 

121 95 

131 77 
100 35 
393 57 
259 6<4 
233 91 
169 05 

42 52 
216 45 
350 85 
319 20 

70 35 



Amounts car' dforw'd 167,675,591 |251,601 80 



102 



City Document 'No. 124. 



Name. 



Cubic Feet. 



Amounts br'tforw'd . . 

Ehodes & Co 

Carey & Eulton 

Henry A. Gould 

Jolan Cummings & Co. 

Pope Manf g Co 

Mrs. H. W. Harris . . 

0. H. Underhill 

Hotel Westminster . . 

Hotel "Warwick 

Hotel Lyndeboro' 

Hotel Clifford 

Hotel Berwick 

Hotel Edinburgh .... 

Albert Thompson & 
Co 



Elevator 



J. Montgomery Sears, 
154 Tremont st. . 



Mrs. J. Longley. . . 

J. B. Kimball & Co. . . 

Notman & Campbell 

Mai'tin, Skinner, & 
]Fay 



Vinal, Pope, & Co. . . 

A. Storrs & Co 

Abram Erench & Co 

Talbot, Wilmarth, & 
Co 



Albert Metcalf 



167,675,591 

119,900 

878,500 

180,000 

126,800 

135,000 

43,900 

63,400 

61,400 

110,700 

220,620 

152,800 

383,674 

218,400 

47,510 

173,040 

4,564 

85,600 

49,800 

88,100 

94,200 

66,440 

130,810 

113,800 
21,000 



$251,501 80 

179 85 

567 76 

269 99 

190 20 

202 50 

65 85 

95 10 

92 10 

166 05 

330 92 

229 19 

575 50 

327 59 

71 26 

259 55 

6 84 

128 40 

74 70 

132 15 

141 30 

99 65 

196 21 

170 70 
•31 50 



Amounts car' d foi'w'd} 170,745,549 #266,106 66 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



103 



Name. 


Class. 


a 


4 

a 


a 

r-i 


4 

.3 


a 

CO 


^a 
^ 


o 


o 
a 

M 


Cubic Feet. 


Revenue. 


Amounts br'tforw'd. ■ 

Brown, Steese, & 
Clark 


Elevator 








•• 








1 

1 

2 
1 
6 

2 
1 
1 

1 

1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 

1 

2 

2 


170,745,549 

86,400 
41,100 
49,310 

164,350 
60,131 

140,330 
50,010 

461,873 

115,000 

105,990 
274,905 
134,700 
147,300 

81,810 
64,780 


$256,106 66 

129 60 
61 65 
73 95 

246 51 
90 18 

210 48 
75 00 

692 79 

170 Kn 


Withington &Hall... 

Brag, Conant, & Co.. 

Fairbanks & Brown. . 

W. E. Underwood. .. 

George D. Howe 

Converse & Stanwood 

John F. Mills estate . 

Daniels, Badger, & 
Co 


Wright, Worster, & 


158 98 
412 35 
202 05 
220 94 
122 71 
97 16 


Hotel La Fayette 

Hotel Baldwin 

Doll & Richards 

S. G. Allen 


Thomas Groom 

Enoch Page 

F. R. Sears 


7,300 

29,727 

72,240 

201,395 

216,000 

73,820 

38,280 


10 94 


S. D. Warren 

Howe Bros 


44 67 
108 35 


Dyer, Taylor, & Co.. 

Henry Bond, 249 
Purchase st 

Henry Bond, 87 High 
st 


302 06 
324 00 
109 98 


David Parker & Co., 
161 Summer st. ... 


57 41 


Amounts car'd forw'd 




















173,361,800 


$260,030 82 



104 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 


Class. g 




rg 
.9 


.a 
.9 

CO 


,3 


"3 
o 
Eh 


u 
o 

a 


Cubic Feet. 


Revenue. 










173,361,800 

61,175 
4,643 

138,800 
13,070 


$260,030 82 
91 75 


J. Mon1>gomery Sears, 
12 Arlington st. ... 

A. W. Stetson 

H. A. Turner & Co. . . 

E. M. Hodges 

J. H.Wright 

H. & J. Pfaff 

Hotel Comfort 

Duffy, Cashman, & 

Or, 














3 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
6 

1 

1 
2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


" 












6 96 


'< 












208 20 


" 












19 60 


u 














(( 


' 










469,642 
63,287 

57,000 
39,300 
478,989 
46,778 
77,820 
86,750 

44,300 
38,293 
13,250 

488,590 
10,750 
82,800 

222,190 
30,470 

144,850 

290,117 
11,444 


704 44 


(( 












94 92 


(( 












85 51 


Jones, Cook, & Co. . . 

Moses Willliams 

Andrew Wetherbee • . 

Peter C. Brooks 

Continental Block . . . 
Gardiner, Murphy, & 

Cr, 


(I 












58 95 


u 












718 48 


(( 












70 16 














116 72 


ii 












130 11 


a 












66 45 


Mrs. T. B. Williams. 

E. E. Mudge 

Howard Natl Bank . . 

Sidney Bartlett 

Wendell, Fay, & Co. . 
Continental B. Build'g 

C. D. Swain & Co 

J. A. & W. Bird 

Eice, Kendall, & Co. . 
Mrs. D. B. Green . . . 


(( 












57 43 


(( 












19 87 


(( 












732 87 


<i 












16 12 


u 












124 20 


a 












333 28 














45 70 


(1 












217 26 


(1 












435 17 


,, 












17 15 
















Amounts car'd forw'a 


r .... 














176,276,108 


$264,402 12 



















Repoet of the Water Board. 



105 



Amounts br't forw'd . 

Geo. W. Chipman < 
Co 



Elevator 



D. W. King. 



Loring Paper & Twine 
Co 



Henry L. Daggett • . . 

A. Wentworth 

Atlantic Nat'l Bank. . 
R. E. Apthorp 



O. Ditson & Co., 453 
Washington st 



iSanfield, Forristall, & 
Co 



J. & J. Dobson 

Robbins & Kellogg . . . 

Houghton & Coolidge. 

Horswell, Kingsley, & 
French 



J. T. Bailey 

Z. A. Willard 

Minot, Hooper, & Co. 

J. P. Paine 

Miss C. D. Brewer. .. 

J. M. Beebe 

John Holman 

Paul & Co 



Oliver Ditson & Co., 
445 Washington st. 



W. H. Slocum 



Amounts car' d forw'd 180,349,886 $270,612 58 



Cubic Feet. 



176,276,108 

190,360 
4,311 

55,020 

31,362 

157,500 

196,351 

644,710 

946,580 

307,210 
117,050 
142,420 
153,089 

54,190 

6,051 

72,700 

260,460 

76,400 

3,444 

106,020 

31,700 

149,600 
367,250 



Reveuue. 



$264,402 12 

285 53 
6 45 

82 51 

47 03 

236 25 

294 52 

967 06 

. 1,419 86 

460 81 
175 67 
213 62 
229 62 

81 28 

9 06 

109 05 

390 68 

114 60 

5 15 
159 02 

47 53 

224 39 
550 87 



106 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 



Amounts hrH forw'd • ■ 
Charles H. Ward.... 

Doe & Hunnewell 

Henry Bond 

J. N. Denison 

Howe, Galloupe, & Co. 

E. Torrey 

S. E. Brackett 

Thomas Mack 

C. H. Denny 

George Lyon 

C. T. Hubbard 

Eisher & Fairbanks . • 

G. W. Harding 

E. D. Jordan 

E. B. Robbins 



Class. 



Elev or 



David Parker & Co. 
147 Summer st. . . • 



Henry Wood. 



Mass. Charitable Me 
chanics' Association 



A. Bushby 

Pratt, Warren, & Co 

Boston Cold Storage 
and Freezing Co. 



James L. Little. 
Levi Bolles. . . • 



S. N. Brown, Jr., 119 
Commonwealth ave. 



Amounts car'd forw'd '.. •• 181,517,339l$272,263 52 



Cubic Feet. 



180,349,886 

78,020 

172,150 

178,940 

4,608 

61,080 
2,920 

12,650 
5,058 
1,333 
1,210 
7,526 
3,397 
9,680 

11,788 
821 

160,625 
14,449 

41,579 
47,682 
40,350 

129,195 

16,540 

170,702 

5,150 



^270,512 58 
117 02 
258 22 
268 39 

6 90 
91 61 

4 87 
18 96 

7 58 
2 00 
1 81 

11 29 

5 09 
14 52 
17 68 

1 23 

225 92 
21 62 

62 35 
71 51 
60 52 

193 78 

24 80 

256 06 

7 72 



Report of the Water Board. 



107 



Name. 



Amounts br''t forw'd . • 

A. P. Morse 

Joseph Peabody 

G. D. Sargent 

F. 0. White 

E. N. Yerxa 

L. W. & H. F. Morse. 

Jacob Wirth 

Cobb Bros 

Atlantic Tea Co 

Bangs & Wells 

Naylor & Co.v. 

T. H. Foley 

J. W. Goodnow. . . . . . 



Telephone Despatch 
Co 



Hall & Eayrs 

Geo. S. Forbush 

Brokers' Board 

J. H. Pierce & Co 

E. F. Wilder 

London Tea Co 

William Tufts 

John Lyons 

James 0. Gray 

Stimson & Co 

Cobb, Bates, & Yerxa 
Cedar Grove Cemet'y 



Amounts car'd forw'd 



Class. 



Elevator 



Motor 



Ceraet'ry 



Cubic Feet. 



181,517,339 

112,927 

11,280 

6,493 

10,700 

20,600 

5,700 

56,700 

22,800 

101,500 

112,200 

17,200 

22,900 

43,950 

14,348 
7,800 
22,800 
35,500 
36,100 
7,700 
24,500 

180,500 
17,600 
16,000 
19,546 
12,000 

163,590 



182,619,273 



!72,263 52 

169 38 

16 92 

8 23 

16 05 

30 90 

8 55 

85 05 

34 20 

152 55 

168 30 

25 80 
34 35 
65 92 

21 51 

11 70 

34 20 

53 25 

54 15 
11 55 
36 75 

270 75 

26 40 
24 00 
29 32 
18 00 

122 68 



$273,793 98 



108 



City Document No. 124. 



Name. 


Class. 


o 

a 

00 


4 

a 


a 


-a 

.s 


.a 

CO 


.a 
a 


3 
o 


1 

'■5 

a 

M 


Cubic Feet. 


Revenue. 


Amounts br't forw'd . . 
Forest Hills Cemet'y. 
Paul Knowles and 


Cemet'ry 

Marine 
Water- 
men, as 
per con- 
tract.. . 








3 


1 




1 
3 




182,619,273 
324,310 

401,219 


$273,798 98 
243 22 




752 26 
91 98 








— 


















"Potal 


















183,344,802 


$274,881 44 

























Kepoet of the Water Board. 



109 



Statement showing the Number and Kind of Water Fixtures contained within 
the Premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston, January 1, 1882, as 
compared with previous years. 



1879. 


JS80. 


1881. 




8,900 


9,228 


9,674 


Tape. These have no connection with any drain or sewer. 


84,138 


84,498 


87,360 


Sinks. 


46,034 


46,116 


46,878 


"Wash -hand basins. 


15,751 


16,623 


17,113 


Bathing tubs. 


26,142 


27,535 


28,677 


Pan water-closets. 


726 


349 


330 


Hopper water-closets. 


22,856 


23,563 


24,443 


" " automatic. 


622 


583 


469 


" " waste. 


1,386 


1,069 


996 


Urinals. 


2,450 


2,972 


3,232 


" automatic. , 


18,406 


19,139 


19,710 


Wash-tubs . These are permanently attached to the building. 


690 


607 


556 


Shower-baths. 


211 


197 


172 


Private hydrants. 


1,004 


956 


1,008 


Slop-hoppers. 


138 


139 


147 


Foot-baths. 


229,353 


233,574 


240,765 





Kespectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



MYSTIC WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT, 

1881-2. 



Office of the Mystic Water Registrar, 

Boston, Charlestown District, May 1, 1882. 

Leonard E,. Cutter, Esq., 

CTiairman Boston Water Board : — 

Sir, — The Annual Report of the Mystic Water Registrar, 
for the year ending April 30, 1882, is herewith presented. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1882 is 16,700, distributed as follows : Charlestown District, 
6,208; Chelsea, 4,753; Somerville, 4,826; Everett, 913. 

The total amount of water-rates received from May 1, 
1881, to May 1, 1882, is as follows : — 

Charlestown District .... $109,677 65 

Somerville 70,006 84 

Chelsea 56,834 00 

Everett 8,818 28 



$245,336 77 



The amount paid the cities of 
Somerville, Chelsea, and town 
of Everett, as per contract, is . $31,106 23 

The amount received for water 

used in previous years is . 16,037 24 

The net receipts for water fur- 
nished during the year are . 198,193 30 



$245,336 77 



In addition to the above amount 
there has been received for 
labor and material furnished 
for work performed outside 
this department but connected 
with the Water Works, the 
sum of $4,905 55 



Amounts carried forward, $4,905 55 $245,336 77 



Report of the Water Board. 



Ill 



Amounts brought forward, $4,905 55 

Sale of old material . , . 689 54 

Fines, non-paymei)t . . • 362 00 

Off and on water for repairs . 272 00 

Fees, summons . . . 255 00 



Total amount received during the year 



$245,336 77 



6,484 09 
151,820 86 



The expenses of the office during the year ending April 
30, 1882, including all charges for collection in Chelsea, 
Somerville, and Everett, were $7,947.06. 

Table showing the Number of Places turned off for Non-'payment of Rates 
during the Year 1881, the Number turned on again, and the Number still 
remaining off. 



Charlestown District 

Chelsea 

Somerville '. . . . . 
Everett . . • . . . . 

Total 



Number turned 
off. 



11 

104 

65 

18 



Kumber turned 



Number remain- 
ing off. 



33 



Stand-pipes for Street- Watering. 

The whole number in use in this department is 35, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



Charlestoivn District. 

Cambridge street, near Stickney & Poor's factory. 
" " Eailroad. 

City stables. 

Allen street. 

Main street. 

Harvard School building. 

Laurel street. 



Rutherford avenue. 



South Eden street, 
Prescott " 

Monument square 



Chelsea. 

Cary square, corner Forsyth street. 
Broadway, near Stockton street. 
" " Cary avenue. 



112 City Document No. 124. 



SomerviUe. 

"Washington street, corner Boston street. 
" " Myrtle street, 

near Union square. 
Elm street. 
Laurel street. 
Poplar street. 
Cambridge line. 
Merriam street. 
Mossland street. 
Franklin street. 



Summer street, 
SomerviUe avenue, 



Broadway, 

" opposite Public park. 

SomerviUe avenue, " 439 SomerviUe avenue. 
Spring street, near " 

Beacon street, " Cooney street. 

Pinckney street, " Pearl street. 

Pearl street, " Cross street. 

Thurston street, " Broadway. 

Highland avenue, corner Medford street. 
Main street, junction Broadway. 

Everett. 

» 

Broadway, near Engine-house. 

" " Pleasant street. 

" " Chandler's. 

Main street, " Chelsea street. 
Chelsea " '* Winter street. 
Ferry " " Nichols street. 



Drinking-Fountains . 

The whole number in use in this department is 21, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



Gharlestown District. 

City square, corner Park street. 
Chelsea street, " Wapping street. 
Bunker Hill street, corner Tufts street. 
Canal street, " South Eden street. 

Main street, " Hancock square. 

' ' near Tufts wharf. 

Austin street, opposite Front street. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



113 



Chelsea. 

Broadway square. 

" near bridge. 
Winiiisimmet street, near Ferry. 
Pearl street, corner Marginal street. 
Eastern avenue, corner Crescent avenue. 



Somerville. 

Union square (2). 

Broadway, corner Walnut street. 

Highland avenue, corner Walnut street. 

Medford street, '* Central street. 

Davis square (2). 

Broadway, opposite Public park. 

Uverett. 
Main street, junction Broadway. , 

One of the fountains in Union square, one at the corner of 
Highland avenue and Walnut street, one at Davis square, 
Somerville, and one on Broadway, near the bridge, Chelsea, 
have automatic fixtures regulating the water supply. The 
others are so arranged that the water flows continuously. 

Table showing the Number and Size of Meters, also the Number of Motors in 
the Mystic Water Department. 





Size of Metbes. 




'I inch. 


I inch. 


1 inch. 


Ij inch. 


3 inch. 


3 inch. 


4 inch. 


Motors. 


Total. 


CharlestoTTii 
District . . 


69 


31 


48 


2 


25 


3 


6 


4 


188 


Chelsea . . 


20 


6 


11 


.... 


6 


1 


.... 


4 


47 


Somerville • 


10 


10 


18 


.... 


6 


1 


4 


2 


51 




1 


1 


3 


.... 


3 








8 












Total. . . 


100 


47 


80 


2 


40 


5 


10 


10 


294 



114 



City Document No. 124. 









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123 



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Report or the Watee Board. 



125 





















































































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City Document No. 124. 



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City Docuivient No. 124. 



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129 













































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City Document No. 124. 



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^ W 



^ ^ 



Eepoet or THE Water Boaed. 



131 



Statement showing the amount of water-rates received 
since the introduction of Mjstic-pond water, November 29, 
1864. Also the amount paid the several districts supplied 
under existina^ contracts : — 





II 
1^ 


|1h 


o 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 

to Mystic 

Water 

Works. 


CharleBtown, 1865 


$27,045 10 




$27,045 10 








" 1866 


47,247 16 




47,247 16 








1867 


60,188 83 




60,188 83 








" 1868 


68,815 32 




68,815 32 








" 1869 


74,369 81 




74,369 81 








<• 1870 


82,230 79 




82,230 79 








" 1871 


87,259 70 




87,259 70 








1872 


97,727 36 




97,727 36 








1873 


99,455 66 




99,455 66 








1874 


111,420 30 




111,420 30 








'< 1875 


118,568 00 




118,568 00 








" 1876 


116,271 17 




116,271 17 








1877 


109,963 25 




109,963 25 








1878 


104,174 76 




104,174 76 








" 1879 


98,313 88 




98,313 88 








, " 1880 


102,590 50 




102,590 50 








1881 


106,927 90 




106,927 90 


' 






" May 1,1882 


77,624 64 




77,624 64 
















$1,590,194 13 




$1,590,194 13 


East Boston, 1870 


$54,885 28 


$15,015 06 


$39,870 22 








1871 


63,371 71 


18,348 73 


45,022 98 








" 1872 


70,957 40 


21,383 02 


49,574 38 








" 1873 


77,480 79 


23,992 38 


53,488 41 








1874 


77,776 91 


24,122 83 


53,654 08 








" 1875 


70,256 26 


21,102 53 


49,153 73 








1876 


72,046 78 


21,818 74 


50,228 04 








1877 


66,637 43 


19,655 03 


46,982 40 








" 1878 


65,088 96 


16,535 63 


48,553 33 








" 1879 


56,165 94 


32,139 10 


24,026 84 








" 1880 


50,973 39 


10,889 36 


40,084 03 


725,640 85 


$225,002 41 


500,638 44 




forward 








Amounts carried 


$2,315,834 98 


$225,002 41 


$2,090,832 57 



132 



City Document No. 124. 



Amounts brought 

Chelsea, 1868 

(6 mo8.) 
" 1868-69 

" 1869-70 

" 1870-71 

" 1871-72 

" 1872-73 

" 1873-74 

<• 1874-75 

" 1875-76 

" 187Q-77 

« 1877-78 

" 1878-79 

" 1879-80 

<• 1880-81 

" May 1,1882 



Bomerville, 1869 

(6mos.) 

" 1870 

" 1871 

1872 

•' 1873 

« 1874 

" 1875 

" 1876 

" 1877 

" 1878 

" 1879 

" 1880 

•• 1881 

" May 1,1882 



forward 
$3,632 80 
19,548 14 
26,474 26 
31,161 56 
38,714 16 
42,239 50 
45,169 46 
60,644 51 
50,934 20 
49,893 35 
49,496 59 
50,368 45 
51,785 24 
54,990 65 
55,305 66 



2,932 

4,294 

5,290 

7,178 

8,171 

9,050 

10,757 

10,873 

10,468 

10,348 

10,647 

11,214 

12,496 

12,622 



$6,572 62 
13,189 89 
20,029 68 
25,275 13 
30,930 81 
37,325 96 
47,912 43 
49,743 55 
49,873 19 
53,581 31 
54,329 13 
56,988 65 
65,394 32 
55,641 90 



$3,087 88 
16,615 92 
22,179 41 
25,871 17 
31,535 62 
34,067 65 
36,118 61 
39,886 61 
40,060 54 
39,425 33 
39,147 60 
39,720 66 
40,571 15 
42,494 39 
42,683 40 



1,978 49 
3,005 94 
4,055 02 
5,232 70 
6,831 48 
9,873 73 
10,423 08 
10,461 97 
11,932 52 
12,231 65 
13,295 45 
16,657 73 
12,756 76 



Total 
amount 
received. 



$2,315,834 98 



Amounts carried forward $3,502,982 08 



$5,586 73 
11,211 40 
17,023 74 
21,220 11 
25,698 11 
30,494 48 
38,038 70 
39,320 47 
39,411 22 
41,648 79 
42,097 48 
43,693 20 
48,736 59 
42,885,14 



620,358 53 



Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 



Net amount 

to Mystic 

Water 

"Works. 



$225,002 41 



126,892 59 



566,788 57 



$2,090,832 57 



493,465 94 



119,722 41 



447,066 16 



71,617 41 $3,031,364 67 



Report of the Watee Board. 



133 





■6 

a t< 


Il 

^« 
"2 o 

Ph 


g 

CO ^ 

!2i 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 

to Mystic 

"Water 

Works. 


Amounts brought 
Everett, 1872-73 


forward 
$3,603 34 






$3,502,982 OS 


$471,617 41 


$3,031,364 67 


$540 51 


$3,062 83 






« 1873-74 


4,365 84 


654 88 


3,710 96 










1874-75 


4,677 58 


701 63 


3,975 95 










' 1875-76 


5,861 80 


879 28 


4,982 52 










1876-77 


6,548 38 


982 26 


5,566 12 










1877-78 


7,401 99 


1,110 29 


6,291 70 










1878-79 


7,429 06 


1,114 36 


6,314 70 










1879-80 


7,642 05 


1,146 33 


6,495 72 










' 1880-81 


8,329 87 


1,249 47 


7,080 40 










< May 1, 1882 


8,422 71 


1,263 42 


7,159 29 










1882 . . . 






64,282 62 


9,642 43 


54,640 19 


Total t.n Mb V 1 . 


$3,567,264 70 


$481,259 84 


$3,086,004 86 















Respectfully, 

JOSEPH H. CALDWELL, 

Mystic Water Registrar. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Chestnut-Hill Eeservoie, May 1, 1882. 

Leonard E. Cutter, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — In compliance with a rule of the Board, I submit 
herewith the annual report of the Western Division for the 
past official year : — 

SUDBURY-RIVER BaSINS. 

All of the basins at the present time are full, and water is 
wasting at the overfalls. 

The quality of the water is excellent ; but during the sum- 
mer of last year a great deal of trouble was experienced, 
both on account of the dryness of the season, the presence of 
algse in Basins 1 and 3, and the extremely bad cucumber 
taste, which developed in Farm pond late in the fall. As 
usual, the water in Basin 2 has proved the most trustworthy 
the year round . A large number of experiments and obsec- 
vations have been made to determine what change, if any, 
the water was undergoing in the basins ; but no satisfactory 
results have been arrived at, owing to the lack of appropria- 
tion for chemical analysis. In general, it may be remarked 
that the waters in the Sudbury supply experienced improve- 
ment in color during the first week in February, while the 
water in Lake Cochituate was slightly deteriorated at the 
same time. This was probably due to melted snow. Numer- 
ous specimens have been taken from 2 ft. below the 
surface, 2 ft. above the bottom, and midway, but very little 
difference has been detected by the eye or the taste. 

Basin 1. • 

On May 1 this basin was full, and water was running 
over the dam. On May 5 a double set of flash-boards were 
put on the overflow, and the water allowed to rise to grade 
159.29, which height was maintained until the latter part of 
July. Algse had made their appearance in this basin as early 
as May 7, and by the middle of the month had spread all 
through the water, in deep places as well as near the shore. 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 135 

On July 23 a small amount of water was drawn into 
Farm pond, but was shut off the next day, the effect on the 
water being very perceptible. From this date the surface 
fell gradually until Oct. 24 to grade 156.78. It remained 
at about this elevation until N6v. 21, when it began to rise, 
and on Nov, 29 was flowing over the flash-boards. On 
Oct. 24 two million gallons daily were drawn from this 
basin into Farm pond, owing to the condition of the water 
in Basin 3, but on the 27th the gates were shut. On Decem- 
ber 5 the supply for the city was taken from this basin, owing 
to an accident to the 48-inch main, which cut off for a short 
time the use of the other basins ; and on Dec. 20, the water 
being then at grade 154.86, in order to hasten the drawing 
down of the basin, the flood-gates were opened, and on the 
24th the water had receded to 148.33. On January 5 the re- 
pairs of the 48-inch main were completed. When the bottom 
of this basin was exposed, a considerable quantity of sponge 
\_Sjpongilla lacustiHs'] was found growing on the banks of 
Stony brook, just below the Salem-st. bridge. The growth 
was confined to about an acre in extent, and was all removed 
before the basin was filled. A careful examination all over 
the remainder of the bottom failed to disclose any more of the 
Spongilla. The waste-gates were closed on December 7, 
and the basin was filled rapidly to grade 157.92 by December 
14, when the flash-boards were removed and the water al- 
lowed to waste until April 17, when the flash-boards were re- 
placed. From February 20 to date, all the water drawn from 
the Sudbury source has been allowed to pass through this 
basin. During April the old Brown house, so called, for- 
merly used as an office by the works, was sold and removed, 
the cellar filled, and the grounds graded. During last sum- 
mer a great improvement was made in the upper portion of 
the basin, near Dam 3, by building low retaining- walls, ex- 
cavating: from in front of them where the flowas^e was shal- 
low, and grading up the shore. 

During the winter the 48-mch main, laid in the bottom of 
the basin, separated, owing to the imperfect way in which 
the joints had been made, and several lengths of pipe had to 
be relaid. 

Basin 2. 

On May 1, 1881, this basin was full, and water running 
over the flash-boards. Water has been drawn directly from 
this source for the supply of the city from May 1 to July 
23, from July 30 to Oct. 18, from Oct. 20 to Oct. 
27, from Oct. 31 to Nov. 12, from January 5, 1882, to 
Feb. 11, and from April 17 to April 19. In addition 



136 City Document No. 124. 

to these quantities, a large amount of water has been passed 
through Basin 1, when the 48-inch main was thrown out of 
use. The highest elevation of the surface during the 3^ear 
was on June 11, 167.61 ; and the lowest point reached was 
on July 23, 157.19. Both sets of stop-planks were put on 
the dam on April 6, and the basin at present date is full 
and running over. The quality of the water has been excel- 
lent during the year. On Sept. 12 a small quantity of 
algse was noticed in one portion of the basin where the circu- 
lation was not good, and by the last^of September traces of 
it were noticed around the gate-house ; but it at no time in- 
creased in sufficient quantities to affect the water delivered 
to the city. Samples of water taken at Woodville, above 
the basins, showed no traces of algse. 

A few improvements have been made on the borders of 
Basin 2 ; an old house, known as the La Motte house, has 
been sold and removed, and the grounds graded. A road has 
been built leading to the gate-house, and a combined horse 
and tool shed built near the dam. 



Basin 3. 

On May 1, 1881, the surface of the water in this basin was 
at grade, 175.47, and water was wasting over the crest of the 
overfall. On July 17 waste ceased, and the water fell 
gradually, as it was drawn on, to grade 159.35, on October 
23. From this date the basin began to fill, and on January 2, 
1882, began to run over. It has been full and water wasting to 
date. The highest point reached during the year was 175.86, 
on January 28, and the lowest 159.35, on October 24. Water 
was drawn directly from this source for the supply of the city 
from April 30 to May 15, from July 16 to July 23, from 
July 30 to October 14, from October 20 to October 27, 
from October 31 to November 1, from February 11 to Feb- 
ruary 20. Over 700,000,000 gallons were drawn from this 
basin during August and September. A considerable amount 
of loam was taken from the bottom while the water was low, 
and the stumps taken out ; other than this no improvements 
have been made. 

The gate-house and dam are in excellent condition. Algse 
were first noticed in the water, of this basin on May 7. The 
temperature of the water for the preceding week had been 
about 55*^. The weather following May 7 was very warm, 
the maximum temperature of the air averaging over 80*^, 
which increased the temperature of the water to 67°. On 
May 12 the algas had multiplied so rapidly as to appear 
in Farm pond. 



Repoet of the Water Bo^rd. 137 

The drawing of water from this source was accordingly 
stopped, to the manifest improvement of the water in Farm 
pond. The algge during the latter part of May appeared to 
be thicker at the surface than at any other part, gradually 
decreasing until at a depth of 12 ft. few specimens could be 
found. Later in the season it was more evenly distributed 
through the water. 

Farm Pond, 

On May 1, 1881, Farm pond was at elevation 149.23, and 
was kept about at this height until Nov. 15 when it was 
drawn down to allow the construction of a canal around the 
shore. Durinof the last of October a bad taste was noticed 
in the water of this pond , which grew considerably worse by 
the first week in November. The taste was a decidedly fishy 
cucumber taste, similar to that observed in previous years in 
the Cochituate water. Prof. Remsen, of Baltimore, was em- 
ployed to make an investigation into the cause of the taste. 
The changes in the works, which resulted from his report, 
were made under the direction of the City Engineer, and will 
be alluded to very briefly here. On November 28, the 
water in Farm pond was drawn off through the aqueduct 
to grade 142.17. On December 5, after the completion of 
the canal, and for the purpose of equalizing the pressure oa 
its banks, the surface was raised to 146.00, and w^as kept at 
about this height until April 15, when the filling of the pond 
to hiffh water was beofun and the canal flowed. The lowest 
point to which the pond was drawn was 142.12, on Decem- 
ber 2. The supply to the Boston & Albany Railroad was 
kept up during the lowering' of the pond by means of a 
special steam-pump. Water for the supply of the city was 
turned into the canal on December 5, and was run uninter- 
ruptedly until April 17. These changes have involved a 
great deal of labor around Farm pond. When the water 
was drawn oif the shallow bottom was found to be unusually 
clear and sandy, and almost free from mud. The growth 
of sponge was confined almost entirely to the stony points 
and islands. Its hold on the rocks was extremely feeble, 
and it would yield to the slightest touch or even a moder- 
ate wind. The bad taste in the water of Farm pond had 
entirely disappeared by the last of December. It may be 
mentioned here that in no portion of Farm pon(J was the 
sponge found growing where there was a muddy bottom, 
and it was found growing in the sand in only one spot, and 
that was in a little basin on the east side of the Old Colony 
Railroad. The only time when serious trouble from ice was 



138 City Document No. 124. 

experienced in the canal was during the cold weather of 
January 5, and then a dozen men kept the water free. 

Lake Cochituate. 

On May 1, 1881, the surface of the lake stood at elevation 
134.04 within a few inches of high water ; this height was 
maintained until the middle of July, from which time the 
surface fell steadily. Water was allowed to waste over the 
dam, at the outlet, in varying quantities from the first of 
May until the 2 2d of June, when the stop-planks were placed 
in position. With the exception of a few days in July no 
more water was wasted until February 21, 1882. The low- 
est point reached during the year was 127.03, on December 
12, six feet above the bottom of the aqueduct, nearly two 
feet higher than the lowest point reached during the pre- 
vious year. The lake is now as nearly full as is consistent 
with safety. A large amount of water was wasted during 
the month of March, for nearly two weeks the water averag- 
ing over a foot in depth over the crest of the dam. A slight 
taste developed in the water of the lake during the month of 
January, and it was deemed best to shut ofi' the supply from 
this source, which was done on Januar}'- 28. On this day 
the head-gates to the Cochituate aqueduct were closed, and 
were not opened again until the 17th of April. The water 
now in the lake is of good quality, clear in color, and free 
from bad taste. 

No new work of importance has been undertaken at the 
lake this year. Early in the summer of 1881, the water in 
the lower division of the lake was visibly affected with algse 
from the Hanchett meadow basin ; and, to stop any further 
deterioration, your Board determined, at my suggestion, to 
filter all the water from Pegan brook. A small house was 
erected over the sluice-way leading to the lake, and, by a 
simple arrangement, all the water was made to pass through 
a number of boxes of animal charcoal, of large superficial 
area. This contrivance effected the object for which it was 
designed, and prevented the free access of the algae into the 
lake. A marked difference was observed in the color of the 
waters on either side of the dam ; that on the Pegan brook 
side being of a decided muddy green color, filled with algse, 
while on the lake side the water was perfectly clear. 

The Sudbuey-river Aqueduct. 

This aqueduct is in as good condition as at the date of the 
last report. The enbankments have required considerable 



Eepoet of the "Water Board. 139 

work in the way of reloaming and sodding. In December 
the interior was cleaned from Farm pond to Charles river. 
During the summer and early autumn the work of pointing 
the culverts and other structures, which was begun the pre- 
vious years, was completed. The gate-houses at the Rosemary 
siphon were pointed in oil cement. The granite work at 
Clark's waste- weir, and at Culverts Nos. 38, Hurd's Bank, 
and 41, Ward wells, were pointed in Portland cement, and No. 
39 in American cement. No repairs have been made on the 
interior. An average of over 24,000,000 gallons daily have 
been sent through the Sudbury aqueduct, throughout the 
entire year, for the supply of the city. The maximum 
amount run through in any one day was 86,600,000 gallons, 
when the lowering of Farm poniwas under way. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct. 

No water was run in this aqueduct until July 14, owing 
to a taste in the lake. On this date the head gates were 
opened, and 4 feet of water was run until July 28. From 
July 28 to October 6 the flow was increased to 4^ feet. 
From October 6 to October 28 6 feet were run, and on 
October 28 the flow was raised to 7 feet, following the sur- 
face of the lake as it fell steadily to 5.9, or grade 126.90, on 
December 12. On January 28 the flow was shut off entirely, 
on account of a slight cucumber taste. On April 19 the flow 
of 6 feet was resumed to April 29, at which time the flow was 
reduced to 5^ feet. 

A great amount of work has been done on this structure 
during the year, principally on the interior. In October 
repairs were made on the two culverts in Newton, on the 
Collins place. It was found necessary to rebuild the brick 
work, and the 8-inch vertical walls were backed with rubble 
in cement 16 inches thick. Both structures were repaired in 
a complete and substantial manner. A thorough system of 
cleaning was carried on from February 3 to March 29. Dur- 
ing previous cleanings there has never been time to remove 
the accumulated dirt from the Newton tunnel. This was 
done by flushing out the lighter particles, and the heavier 
mud and sand were entirely removed by a gang of men with 
wheelbarrows. The sediment averaged about 6 inches deep 
the whole length of the tunnel. The sides and bottom were 
afterwards swept with brooms. The first mile of the aque- 
duct from the lake was found coated with a very heavy 
growth of spongilla lacustris. There was hardly a square 
foot of brick-work free from it. This portion was carefully 
cleaned, and subsequently the whole length of the aqueduct, 



140 City Document No. 1§4. 

with the exception of the portion from Grantville to Charles 
river, was cleaned, by going over the brick-work several 
times. The dirt was all taken out by means of wheelbarrows, 
and the quantity removed was very large. We have never 
had time before to remove the deposits in this way, but have 
had to rely on flushing. This year experience has proved to 
me that this method is inadequate to accomplish the result, 
and that to keep an aqueduct in a clean condition this work 
should be done once or twice every year. This, however, 
cannot be done when, as is generally the case, a city is 
depending on one aqueduct for its supply. When it is not 
done, the water will sometimes show the efi'ects of any 
change in the flow for several days, and even weeks, after 
the water is let on. 

On June 14, 1881, a gang of masons was set to work on the 
interior of the aqueduct, at the Newton Lower Falls embank- 
ment. Work was begun at Station 105 -|- 15, and was continued 
on the top arch and sides as far as Station 108 -f- 63, and on 
the invert as far as Station 108 -f- 09. The whole structure 
was found much shaken. When the plastering was removed 
cracks were found through both rings of the invert 2 inches 
wide. These had been covered with slate. A sufiicient 
number of holes were cut through the bottom to make sure 
that there were no cavities under the invert. From 105 -f- 15 . 6 
to 107 -f- 35 the cracks w^ere cut out and solidly filled and 
pointed. From Station 107 -j- 35 to 107 + 79 the upper ring 
of the invert, for eight courses in width, was taken up, the 
cracks in the lower ring repaired, and the upper relaid. 
From 107 -|- 79 to 108 + 09 both rings of the invert were 
relaid and plastered with Portland cement. Suspicion having 
been aroused that there were cavities in the earth-filling on 
the sides of the conduit, a hole was put through the side ; and 
at Station 107 -f- 93, on the northerly side, a cavity extending 
18 inches from the brick-work was found rising in a westerly 
and falling in an easterly direction. This was filled with 
concrete, and holes cut through the bottom in an easterly 
direction showed that the cavity extended under the bottom 
of the conduit from 2 to 5 feet in depth. As it was impera- 
tive to let the water on, a few piers were built at intervals 
under the bottom, and the flow resumed. 

In February, 1882, owing to the bad taste in the lake, the 
flow was again cut ofi" and an opportunity offered for con- 
tinuing this work. At this time the top and sides were 
repaired from Station 81 to Station 105 + 15.6; and the 
bottom, from Station 100 to 105 -|- 15.6, although much 
cracked, was not relaid, but was thoroughly pointed. From 
108 + 09 to 108 -f- 25 the cavity under the aqueduct already 



Eeport of the Water Board. 141 

referred to was only a few inches in depth, but at the latter 
point increased to 2 feet in depth, 1| feet in width at the top, 
decreasing to a point at the bottom. This cavity continued 
under the centre of the aqueduct to Station 109 + 30. The 
deepest portion was 4^ feet in depth at Station 108 + 50, 
and it was everywhere about the same width, viz., 18 inches. 
The embankment at this point is over 30 feet in height. 
The bottom was taken up in sections to 109 -|- 50, and for 
2 feet in width. After filling the cavity with concrete, the 
bottom was relaid. From 109 -|- 50 to 109 + 60 the upper 
ring only was removed, the bottom ring pointed, and the 
upper ring relaid with new work. The remainder of the 
bottom to the siphon chamber was pointed only. The upper 
arch and sides were overhauled in a thorough manner, and 
the interior plastered with Portland cement, as follows : The 
invert, from Station 108 + 09 to 111 + 13 ; from 108 + 09 
to 110 + 60 the north side was plastered ; from 110 + 60 to 
111 + 32 the north side received a wash of cement; the 
south side was washed with cement from 108 + 09 to 
108 + 32, and plastered from 108 + 32 to 111 + 32. On 
April 1 repairs were begun on a badly cracked portion of the 
aqueduct in Newton Highlands. The top and sides were 
repaired from Station 221 + 40 to 228 + 50, and the invert 
from 221 to 254 + 33. It was found necessary to cut out 
some of the brick-work in this portion. The cracks varied 
from Jg ^o ^ an inch in width. The following table gives 
the measurements of heights and widths after the work of 
repairs was completed on the Newton Lower Falls embank- 
ment : — 



Width. 

5.09 
5.10 
5.05 
5.07 
5.06 
5.11 
5.12 
5.14 
5.22 
5.27 
5.39 
2.46 
5.49 
5.39 
5.36 
5.30 



station. 


Heighth. 


105 


6.30 


105 + 25 


6.18 


105 + 50 


6.22 


105 + 75 


6.25 


106 


6.22 


106 + 25 


6.22 


106 + 50 


6.17 


106 + 75 


6.18 


107 


6.13 


107 + 25 


6.11 


107 + 50 


6.00 


107 + 75 


5.99 


108 


6.03 


108 + 25 


6.05 


108 + 50 


6.07 


108 + 75 


6.16 



142 City Document No. 124, 



Station. 


Heighth. 


Width. 


109 


6.15 


5.28 


109 + 25 


6.18 


5.14 


109 + 50 


6.25 


5.12 


109 + 75 


6.28 


4.98 


110 


6.28 


4.98 


110 + 25 


• 6.30 


4.97 


110 + 50 


6.25 


, 4.97 


110 + 75 


6.23 


5.12 


111 


6.25 


5.02 


111 -f 25 


6.27 


5.02 


111 + 50 


6.31 


5.00 



Brookline Keservoir. 

This reservoir is in excellent condition, as are also tKe gate- 
houses and grounds. No new work has been done at this 
point during the year. 

Chestnut-Hill Eeservoir. 

At this point the grounds have been somewhat improved 
during the year. 

The various gate-houses and buildings are in good con- 
dition. The usual repairs have been made on the walks and 
drive-ways. 

About 40 tons of hay were made off the grounds. The 
usual list of tools and other property is annexed^ 

Very respectfully, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Sujperintendent. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



143 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir, for year eliding Dec, 18S1. 



1 




a 

,a 

a 

1— 1 


do o 


Duration. 


JaD. 4 


( .26 


Snow 


8.15 p.m. 
to 


" 5 


) 




3.30 a.m. 


" 6 


.54 


Mist 


3 to 11.15 a.m. 
11.15 a.m. to 8 p.m. 


" 9 


) 


Snow 


8.40 p.m. to 


" 10 


1 2.20 


Rain 


2 a.m. 

2 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


" 14 


.16 


" 


2.30 to 5.30 p.m. 


" 19 


.03 


Snow 


9.45 a.m. to 3 p.m. 


" 21 
" 22 


1 1.88 


Rain 
Snow 


1 to 11.30 p.m. 
11.30 p.m. to 
12.30 a.m. 
12.30 to 7 a.m. 


" 80 


.06 


" 


9 a.m. to 6.15 p.m. 


Total . 


513 







Feb. 10 


.11 


Rain 


5 to 9 p.m. 


" 12 


1.55 


" 


10.50 a.m to 9.30 p.m. 


" 16 


.39 


Snow 


5.45 to 11.30 a.m. 


" 18 
" 19 


: .83 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


10 p.m. 

to 
1.30 p.m. 


" 21 


.75 


Snow 


7.15 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


" 25 


.09 


" 


4.30 to 11.30 a.m. 


« 28 


.66 


Rain 


2 to 11.30 a.m. 


" 28 


.08 


" 


9.50 to 10.10 p.m. 


Total . 


4.46 







Mar. 2 


.21 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


8.10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 


" 3 

" 4 


1 .92 


Rain 


8 p.m. 

to 
8.30 p.m. 


" 9 


1-2.43 

J 




1p.m. 


" 10 


" 


to 


" 11 




3 a.m. 


" 13 


.25 


Snow 


2 to 11 a.m. 


" 14 


.02 


Snow 
flurr's 


During day. 


" 19 
" 20 


1 1.09 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


6 p.m. 

to 
4 p.m. 


" 30 
" 31 


1 .85 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


9.20 a.m. 

to 
10 a.m. 


Total . 


5.77 







Apr. 12 
" 13 
" 14 
" 15 
" 22 
" 29 



Total 



1.71 



Rain 
and 
Snow 

Rain 
and 

Snow 

Rain 



Duration. 



11 a.m. 

to 
9.30 p.m. 

10.30 p.m. 

to 
1.30 p.m. 

9.20 to 11.30 a.m. 

5.40 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. 



May 2 


.10 


Rain 


5 to 7 a.m. 


" 6 


.40 


" 


5.15 a.m. to 4 p.m. 


" 15 


.25 


" 


4.30 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


" 16 


1 




12.30 p.m. 


" 17 
" 18 


;-i.49 


" 


to 


'< 19 


J 




5.30 p.m. 


" 20 


.04 


" 


9.05 to 9.45 p.m. 


" 30 


.46 


" 


7.40 to 10.30 p.m. 


Total . 


2.74 







June 2 


.07 


Rain 


12.30 to 6 a.m. 


" 3 

" 4 


!■" 




8.30 p.m. 

to 
12 m. 


" 5 


.10 




7.40 to 11.50 p.m. 


" 7 
" 8 


1- 




6.15 p.m. 

to 
4.30 p.m. 


" 10 
" 11 


1 3.83 




1.15 a.m. 

to 
1 p.m. 


" 21 


.07 




3 to 5 a.m. 


" 26 


.08 




5 to 6 a.m. 


" 26 


.10 




1.30 to 5 p.m. 


" 27 
" 28 


!■« 




9.30 p.m. 

to 
5 a.m. 


" 28 


.18 




9.15 to 11.30 p.m. 


" 30 


.24 




5.30 to 6.15 p.m. 


Total . 


6.13 







144 



City Document No. 124. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 



,July 1 

" 1 

" 4 

" 8 

" 11 

" 18 

" 21 

" 21 

" 21 

" 26 

" 26 

" 31 



Total 



Aug. 7 

" 9 

" 18 

" 19 

" 21 



Total . 



Rain 



Show- 
ers 



Rain 



ShoW' 
ers 



Duration. 



2.45 to 5 a.m. 
3.15 to 5 p.m. 
3 to 5 p.m. 
6 to 8.40 a.m. 
1.30 to 4 p.m. 
3 to 5.30 p.m. 
6.30 to 9 a.m. 
1.40 to 2 p.m. 
6 to 6.30 p.m. 
3 to 6 a.m. 
9.15 to 10 a.m. 
12.30 to 4.15 p.m. 



7.45 a.m. to 11 p.m. 
10 to 11.30 p.m. 

5.15 to 5.30 p.m. 



Sept. 2 
" 3 


1.79 


Rain 


12.30 p.m. 

to 
9.15 a.m. 


" 11 
" 12 


1 .69 


" 


12.30 p.m. 

to 
11.45 a.m. 


" 13 


.10 


" 


6.20 to 8 p.m. 


" 24 


.57 


" 


7.50 to 11.45 p.m. 


" 27 


.20 


" 


10 to 10.40 p.m. 


Total . 


3.25 







Oct. 2 
" 3 


!•" 


Rain 


" 13 


.16 


" 



4.40 p.m. 

to 
10.30 a.m. 

9.30 to 10.30 p.m. 



Oct. 18 
" 24 
" 29 
" 30 
" 31 



Total 



Nov. 



ToUl 



Dec. 1 

" 3 

" 4 

" 7 

" 14 

" 15 

" 22 

" 23 

" 27 

" 28 

" 29 

" 30 



Total . 



1.78 



Rain 



Duration. 



4.20 to 7.30 p.m. 
1 to 10.30 p.m. 
12.30 p.m. 

to 
1.30 p.m. Nov. 1st. 



Rain 



Show- 
ers 

Rain 



Snow 



.08 



Rain 

Snow 
and 
Rain 

Rain 

Rain 
and 

Snow 

Rain 
and 
Snow 



Rain 



Stopped i-aining 1.30 
p.m. 

11 a.m 

to 
11.45 a.m. 

10.45 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

11.45 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 

1.15 p.m. 

to 
12.30 a.m. 

10.30 p.m. 

to 
9.45 p.m. 

5 p.m. 

to 
1.30 a.m. 



6.25 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. 

8 p.m. 

to 
6.15 p.m. 

6.15 a.m. to 7.10 p.m. 

5 p.m. 

to 
11.30 a.m. 



10.30 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 

12.15 a.m. 

to 
9.30 a.m. 

12.45 p.m. 

to 
6.30 a.m. 



Total for year 42.65 inches 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 145 

LIST OF CITY PROPERTY ON THE WESTERN 

DIVISION. 

1882. 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

Effluent Gate-House. 
1 hand-pump, 1 12-ft. ladder, 3 wrenches, 100 ft. of hose, 
120 ft. gas-pipes, 1 rattan-broom, 1 set evaporation apparatus, 
4 stop-plank hooks, 1 blow-off wrench, 2 gate wrenches, 32 ft. 
galv. chain, lock, etc., 1 fountain nozzle, 33 stop-planks, 1 
step-ladder, 5 pictures, 1 gauge, 1 thermometer, 1 broom, 2 
brushes and dust-pan, 2 lanterns, hydraulic apparatus, 1 
settee, 1 mat, 1 nozzle, 3 oil-cans and tunnel, 1 scrubbing- 
brush, 1 sponge, 1 window-brush, 2 wire scoops, 2 wrenches. 

Terminal Chamber. 

1 broom, 1 settee, 1 dust-pan and brush, 1 coal-box, 1 20- 
ft. ladder, 1 boat, 1 step-ladder, 2 lanterns, 1 duster, 3 oil- 
cans, 1 pair rubber boots, 1 iron rake, 1 mat, 2 stop-plank 
hooks, 25 stop-planks, 1 wire scoop. 

Intermediate Gate-House. 
18 stop-planks, 1 wrench. 

Influent Gate- House. 

26 long stop-planks for conduit, 14 stop-planks, 4 hooks, 
1 extra brass screw. 

Office. 

1 safe, 3 desks, 6 chairs, 3 stools, 5 pictures, 1 telegraph 
instrument, 2 sets scales, 1 stove, 2 reflecting lanterns, 8 
lanterns, 16 brooms, 1 hook-gauge, 2 inkstands, 2 thermome- 
ters, 2 copper pans, 9 tumblers, 1 kettle, 30 pairs rubber 
boots, 9 rubber coats, 8 gauging-floats, 1 drawing-table, 1 
sink, pump, wash-basin, and 6 towels, 1 automatic rain-gauge, 
l^book case, 1 barometer. 

' Tool-House. 

\ box glass, 1 copper elbow, 9 galls, lard oil and cans, 25 
galls, kerosene oil and cans, 12 bird-houses, 5 conduit re- 
flectors, 3 screen doors, 75 lbs. waste, 15 padlocks, 48 boxes 
candles, 6 bars soap, 2 gross matches, 22 paint-brushes, 1 
chimney-brush, 8 whitewash-brushes, 3 rolls wicking, 2 ice- 



146 City Document No. 124. 

chisels and hooks, 1 ice-saw, 2 glass-floats, 1 Johnson pump, 

12 wmdow-screens, 1 Avater-tank, 2 rain-guages, 2 horse-bon- 
nets, 2 shades, 5 draft-chains, 8 striking-hammers, 8 sledge- 
hammers, 2 paving-hammers, 4 small stone-hammers, 3 axes, 

4 screen-bars, 15 iron bars, 33 square shovels, 8 snow-shovels, 
54 round pointed shovels, 8 scufflers, 45 picks, 7 grub-axes, 31 
pick-handles, 3 sledge-handles, 23 trowels, 6 rifles, 1 lot of 
cord, 40 hoes, 3 1^-bu. baskets, 1 4-bu. basket, 1 pruning- 
saw and knife, 3 border-knives, 1 beadle, 7 paving-rammers, 
1 root-puller, 2 manure-forks, 1 limb-cutter, 1 gaff-hook, 1 
California pump-belt, 25 ft. wire fence, 2 pulleys, 12 drills, 
1 copper tamping-rod, 1 iron spoon, 1- box whetstones, | can 
palm-oil, 1 screen-brush, 2 bags grass-seed, 20 lbs. oakum, 

5 doz. hay-caps, 1 writing-desk, 1 cross-cut saw, 1 small tin 
dipper, 22 pails, 2 heavy buckets, 1 hay-knife, 12 sponges, 

1 grate, 1 keg powder, 150 feet fuse, 13 spades, 6 points, 

13 chisels, 6 grass-hooks, 1 watering-pot, 3 feed-baskets, 5 
rattan brooms, 7 snaths, 25 iron rakes, 31 wooden rakes, 15 
hay-forks, 2 hay-ropes, 1 oil cabinet, 30 lbs. axle grease, 4 
rubber blankets, 15 kegs nails, 6 plough-points, 1 cement- 
testing-machine, 100 feet of hose, 7 scrubbing-brushes, 9 
spading-forks, 2 coal shovels, 2 sets falls, 1 lot of rope, 2 
painters' jacks, 2 spare boxes for gates at Br. Kes., 800 lbs. 
lead, 1 wood-saw, 1 jack-screw, 1 box scythes, 1 lot of wedges 
and half rounds. 

Old Blacksmith's Shop. 

1 observatory and instruments, 2 pieces canvas, 1 pair oars, 

2 boats, 2,500 shingles, 1 flume, 1 post-spoon, 1 iron cover, 
9 bbls. Portland and 22 bbls. American cement, 5 galls, 
black oil, 1 lot crusher-plates, 1 large screen, 12 signs, 1 
iron bedstead, \ bbl. paint, 1 manhole grate, 5 galls, red 
paint, 1 house force-pump, 1 lot of chains, 3 stoves, 10 ft. of 
lead pipe, 5 galls ..Paraphine varnish, 2 galls, tar. 

Stable. 

8 horses, 3 pigs, 7 horse-blankets, 2 sets double harness, 
1 hay-rigging harness, 2 express harnesses, 2 driving har- 
nesses, 8 halters, 4 cart-harnesses, 1 harness pan, 6 galls, 
neat's-foot oil, sleigh-bells, 6 surcingles, 1 stove, 1 stable 
sponge, 6 curry-brushes and combs, 1 set lead chains, 1 hay- 
cutter, 30 bush, oats, 200 lbs. shorts, 10 tons hay, 2 brooms, 
1 open buggy, 1 covered buggy, Iwolf and lap robe, 1 duster, 
1 jack, 1 watering-pot, 1 Avhip, 2 forks, 24 stop-planks, 
7 ft. 6 in. long ; 80 stop-planks, 7 ft. long ; 4 bbls. spikes, 
7 and 10 inches long; and |-inch square; 1 14-ft. lever, 4 



Report of the Water Board. 147 

mortar and 19 brick hods, 1 truck, 1 wooden pump, 3 cans, 
300 bolts, assorted sizes; cast-iron pipe and 4 elbows, lot 
of old iron. 

Blacksmith's Shop. 

1 forge, 1 anvil, 1 set tools, 2 vises, 1 breast-drill, 3 stock- 
dies and taps, 1 ratchet and drill, 3 files, 75 lbs. iron, 200 
lbs. scrap-iron, 4 pairs pipe-tongs, 2 solid die-plates, 50 ft. 
steam-pipe, 2 cold-chisels, 2 monkey-wrenches, 1 soldering- 
iron. 

Carpenter's Shop. 

1 stove, 1 clock, 800 ft. clear white-pine, 100 ft. ash, 400 
spruce clapboards, 3 haiid-saws, 1 panel-saw, 1 bit stock 
and bits, 1 level, 8 planes, 8 augers, 1 pair dividers, 6 
chisels, 1 axe, 2 gauges, 17 fence-rails, 4X4, 1 water-tank, 
1 lot screws, 2 hammers, 1 compass-saw, 1 fence-wrench, 2 
ladles, 2 rubber belts, 2 jack-screws, 5 lbs. green paint, ^ 
gall, japan, ^ bbl. boiled linseed-oil, ^ bbl. raw linseed-oil, 
1 gall, black paint, 1 gall, varnish, 1 gall, spirits of turpen- 
tine, 3 cans paint-preserver, 30 lbs. yellow paint, 4 lbs. 
vermilion, 1 galv. chain and pulley, 1 belt-stretcher, 1 
rotary pump, 4 tons hard coal, 3 tons soft coal, 1 Blake 
pump, portable boiler, 1 feed-pump, 1 portable engine, 1 
glue-pot, 12 hand-screws, 400 ft. of oak. 

Yard. 

1 12-horse-power engine, 1 portable building and shed, 
1 crusher, 2 cans, 60 ft. 4-inch suction-pipe, 1 piece of lead 
suction-pipe (siphon), 30 ft. of 4-inch iron suction-pipe, 3 ft. 
30-inch drain-pipe, lot of land tile, 13 fire-buckets, 1 carry- 
all, 1 sleigh, 1 express wagon, 1 2-horse wagon, 4 carts, 2 
water-carts, 1 hay wagon, 1 pung, 2 2-horse sledges, 1 2- 
horse truck, 1 road-roller, 1 pair large wheels, 2 moving 
wheels, 4 roller wheels (1 horse-power), 2 hand-carts, 2 
hand-rollers, 2 sets lead bars, 1 fire-engine, 2 jacks, 2 con- 
duit forms, 1 step-ladder, 1 30-ft. ladder, 1 28-ft. ladder, 1 
20-ft. ladder, 2,000 bricks, 4 loads sand, 1 lot cast-iron 
grates, 1 lot of clay, 1 scraper, 2 snow-ploughs, 1 plough, 1 
harrow, 1 hay-tedder, 55 granite-bounds, 5 cedar-posts, 1 
rain-gauge, 6 gravel-screens, 10 wheelbarrows, 115 pickets, 2 
grindstones, 2 engines and pumps, 4 boilers, 1,200 ft. spruce 
boards, 200 ft. spruce plank, 2,200 ft. spruce fence-boards, 
1,500 ft. of spruce sheeting, assorted lot of old lumber, 1 
derrick and rigging (small). 



148 City Document No. 124. 



BrooMine Reservoir. 

1 writing-desk, 2 keys, 1 book, 1 inkstand, 1 pitcher, 1 
tumbler, 1 spittoon, 1 lantern, 1 stove and 32 ft. of pipe, 
2 elbows, 1 coal-hod, shovel and 2 pokers, 1 stove-brush, 2 
settees, 1 chair, 2 towels, 2 floor-mats, 1 pair rubber boots, 
1 scythe, 1 pick, 3 shovels, 2 rakes, 1 hoe, 1 sickle, 1 scuffler, 
1 spade, 2 pails, 1 rammer, 1 cold-chisel, 4 notices, 1 iron 
ladder, 1 ladder, 1 step-ladder, 1 bar, 3 thermometers, 5 
locks, 1 key, 1 sponge, 1 pair clipping-shears, 1 dust-pan 
and brush, 1 duster, 1 bushel basket, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 
broom, 1 dust-brush, 1 rattan broom, 1 border knife, 2 
scrubbing-brushes, 1 watering-pot, 1 axe, 1 gauge, 1 40-inch 
gate-key, 2 36-inch gate-keys, 1 30-inch gate-key, 2 wheels, 

1 wrench, 1 cover, 2 air-cock wrenches, 1 gate frame, 2 
chamber wheels, 1 crank, 89 stop-planks, 3 gas-fixtures, 6 
screens, 4 iron rods, 2 screen-doors, 6 window-screens, 4 
48-inch connection keys, 1 wrench, 1 iron cover, 1 wooden 
cover, 2 regulation notices, 1 wire scoop, 2 oil-cans. 

Lake Cochituate. 

1 oil-cloth carpet, 1 air-tight stove, 12 dining-chairs, 1 
extension table, 1 parlor table, 1 mirror, 1 horse, 1 express 
wagon and harness, 1 carryall and harness, 1 cart and harness, 

2 sets scales, 1 rain-gauge, 3 picks, 1 long-handle shovel, 1 
long-handle spade, 2 epades, 2 round-point shovels, 2 square- 
point shovels, 2 snow-shovels, 2 sickels, 4 hoes, 2 scythes, 
and snaths, 3 wrenches, 1 monkey-wrench, 1 saw, 1 hatchet, 
2 axes, 1 grub-axe, 1 sand-sieve, 2 gravel-screens, 2 white- 
wash-brushes, 40 stop-planks, 4 stop-plank hooks, 2 ladders, 
4 bits, 4 pails, 3 ox-chains, 3 iron rakes, 2 wooden rakes, 2 
hay-forks, 2 horse blankets, 1 pung, 1 telegraph instrument, 
1 map, 1 marble slab, 1 hogshead. 

Farm Pond Gate-House. 

1 stove, stove-pipe, shovel and hod, 1 dust-pan and brush, 
1 piece zinc, 1 bag waste, 1 broom, 1 hammer, 1 screw- 
driver, 2 screw-bars, 1 wrench, 2 gate-handles, 1 screen 
brush and rake, 2 pair rubber boots, 1 shovel, 1 step-ladder, 
1 chair, 1 11-ft. ladder, 1 22-ft. ladder, 1 table, 56 stop- 
planks, 1 wood-box, 1 coal-box, 1 closet^ 2 stop-plank 
hooks, 3 lanterns, box of rotten-stone, 1 tin pan, stove- 
blacking and brush, 1 oil-cup, 3 cans, 1 piece of rope, 1 ton 
of coal, 3 water-pails, 2 wrenches, 4 boxes candles, 1 boat 
and fixtures. 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 149 



Tool-House and Office, South Framingham. 

5 axes, 7 shovels, 2 beadles, 3 sledge-hammers, 3 picks, 
3 chisel-bars, 3 rattan brooms, 2 iron rakes, 2 snow-shovels, 

1 mortar-hod, 3 saws, 1 axe, 2 grub-axes, 1 bar, 8 pair rub- 
ber boots, 3 oil-cans, 1 spade, 1 manure-fork, 1 stone-ham- 
mer, 1 rammer, 1 wooden rake, 4 pails, 1 basket, 3 kegs 
nails, 1 tool-chest, 1 square, 1 plane, 1 level, 2 augers, 3 
bit-stocks, 1 bevel, 1 hammer, 1 screw-driver, 1 trowel, 1 
wrench, 2 lanterns. 

Course Brook Waste - Weir. 

1 pick, 1 grub-axe, 3 shovels, 1 iron rake, 1 spade, 1 
wheelbarrow, 1 pail, 1 ice-cutter, 1 oil-cup, 1 cement-box, 

2 boxes candles, 1 rattan broom, 26 stop-planks, 6 stop- 
plank hooks, 1 bag, 1 sickle. 

Bacori's Brooh Waste -Weir. 

1 oil-cup, 1 ice-cutter, 20 stop-planks, 4 stop-plank hooks, 
1 pail, 2 bags, 1 box candles, 1 piece of rope, 1 sickle, 1 
broom, 1 iron rake, 1 pick, 1 shovel, 1 spade, 2 wheelbar- 
rows, 1 grub-axe, 1 pair rubber boots. 

Rosemary Brook Blow- Off. 
1 gate-wrench, 1 ladder. 

Fuller'' s Brooh Waste - Weir. 

20 stop-planks, 4 stop-plank hooks, 1 ice-cutter, 1 wheel- 
barrow, 1 shovel, 1 grub-axe. 

Tool-Shed, near Fuller's Waste - Weir. 

6 wheelbarrows, 1,000 hard bricks, 2 portable sheds, lot 
of old lumber. 

West Siphon Chamber. 

54 stop-planks, 4 stop-plank hooks, 2 wooden horses, 1 
mat, 1 dust-pan, \ gallon paint, 3 paint-brushes, 1 water- 
pail, 1 bushel basket, 2 ladders, 8 boxes caudles, 1 scrub- 
bing-brush, 1 stool, 1 coal-hod, 4 hoes, 50 feet rope, 2 cans, 
1 tool-box, 6 bags, 1 cement-box, 1 bag grass-seed , 1 rub- 
ber coat and cap, 13 pairs rubber boots, 4 bush scythes, 2 
oil-cans, 2 quarts oil, 2 lanterns, 2 lantern globes, 2 sieves, 1 
ice-chisel, 3 rattan brooms, 1 mud-digger, 1 ice-saw, 2 iron 



150 CiTT Document No. 124. 

rakes, 1 roll sheet-lead, 1 manure-fork, 1 pick, 5 hand-ham- 
mers, 1 drill, 2 chisels, 13 points, 3 jointers, 5 tamping- 
irons, 1 tape, 5 signs, 1 auger, 4 shovels, 1 crack-tester, 1 
oil-cup, 25 cape-chisels, 1 lock, 25 lbs. nails, 8 brooms, 1 
hay-fork, 1 bar, 1 striking hammer, 1 hammer, 1 saw, 1 axe, 
1 grub-axe, 1 wheelbarrow. 

JEast Siphon Chamber. 

2 wheelbarrows, 1 iron rake, 2 spades, 2 pair rubber 
boots, 2 grub-axes, 1 pick, 4 shovels, 1 sickle, 1 square, 1 
boat, 2 ladders, 52 stop-planks, 2 stop-plank hooks, 1 
broom, 1 can varnish, 3 boxes candles, 1 dust-brush, 1 jug, 
5 hauks, 1 scrubbing-brush, 4 pails, 1 hand-hammer, 13 
points, 8 cape chisels, 1 cutting-out-chisel, 1 piece canvas. 

Clark's Waste - Weir. 

20 stop-planks, 2 stop-plank hooks, 2 shovels, 1 pail, 1 
pick, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 grub-axe, 1 iron rake. 

Basin 1. 

45 flush-boards, 110 stop-planks, 1 step-ladder, 1 stove, 

1 coal-hod, poker, and kettle, 1 floor-brush, 1 dust-brush, 1 
broom, 2 pails, 1 stove-brush, 1 tumbler, 1 dipper, 1 lan- 
tern, 2 oil-cans, 2 oilers, 1 feather duster, 2 wrenches, 1 
axe, 1 hammer, 2 snow-shovels, 2 ice-chisels, 2 branding- 
irons, 2 packages stove-blacking, 1 closet, 1 coal-bin, ^ ton 
coal, 1 bushel basket, 1 ratchet, 2 boat-hooks, 1 28-ft. lad- 
der, 1 12-ft. measuring-rod, 1 boat, 1 sponge, 1 ash-sifter. 

Basin 2. 

42 flush-boards, 94 stop-planks, 1 pair steps, 1 stove, 1 
coal-hod, poker, and kettle, 1 ash-sifter, 1 ratchet, 2 
wrenches, 1 12-ft. and 1 20-ft. measuring rod, 3 set stop- 
plank hooks, 2 small iron hooks, 2 snow-shovels, 2 ice- 
chisels, 1 boat, 1 sponge, 1 28-ft. ladder, 2 lanterns, 1 oiler, 

2 oil-cans, 1 hammer, 2 branding-irons, 1 axe, 1 floor-brush, 

1 feather-duster, 1 dust-brush, 1 stove-brush, 1 broom, 2 
pails, 1 closet, 1 shovel, 1 coal-bin, \ ton coal, 1 bushel 
basket, 2 snow-shovels, 1 pair steps, 1 2-ft. wooden scale. 

Basin 3. 

98 stop-planks, 1 step-ladder, 1 30-ft. ladder, 3 set stop- 
plank hooks, 1 pair small iron hooks, 2 ice-chisels, 1 ratchet, 

2 pike poles, 1 12-ft. measuring rod, 1 stove, poker, and 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 151 

hod, 1 ash-sifter, 1 kettle, 2 wrenches, 1 feather-duster, 1 
shovel, 1 axe, 2 pails, 3 oil-cans, 1 snow shovel, 1 broom, 1 
floor-brush, 1 hammer, 1 tumbler, 1 dipper, 3 oilers, 1 
scrubbing-brush, 1 lantern, 1 stove-brush, 1 package black- 
ing, 1 coal-bin, ^ ton coal, 1 closet, 1 2-bushel basket, 1 
2-ft. wooden scale, 1 thermometer, 1 boat, 2 branding-irons, 
1 sponge. 

Temporary Dam. 

40 flush-boards, 29 stop-planks, 1 bulk-head, 2 gates for 
measuring the flow, 4 stop-plank hooks, 3 barrels, 1 hammer, 
1 dipper, 1 tumbler, 1 measuring-rod, 1 coil coarse wire, 1 
ice-chisel, 1 axe, 1 grub, 1 step-ladder, 1 mattress, set of 
blocks and fall, 1 registering apparatus, 1 desk, 2 iron hand- 
hooks, 2 lamps. * 

Tool-House at Basin 3. 

2 horses, 1 open buggy, 1 express wagon, 1 hay wagon, 1 
cart, 1 set bob sleighs, 2 sets express harness, 1 cart harness, 

1 bufialo robe, 4 horse blankets, 2 halters, 2 surcingles, 2 
currycombs and brushes, 1 jack, 1 wrench, 2 ice-saws, 2 
cross-cut-saws, 2 hand-saws, 1 grindstone, 1 stump-puller, 
26 picks and handles, 18 old picks, 4 grub-axes, 5 bars, 4 
long bars, 2 striking-hammers, 2 stone-hammers, 2 bracing- 
hammers, 5 wooden mauls, 2 sets chains, 3 jack-screws, 2 
large chains, 4 axes, 2 striking-hammers, 1 box of drills and 
points, 1 Douglas hand-pump, 1 Edson hand-pump, 45 
round-pointed shovels, 3 long-handle round-pointed shovels, 
3 (long-handle square-pointed shovels, 12 square-pointed 
shovels, 8 hoes, 9 snaths, 4 bush-scythes, 4 iron rakes, 8 
wooden rakes, 3 spades, 3 forks, 10 hay-forks, 6 pails, 6 
brooms, 1 solder pot and furnace, 1 hammer, 1 level, 14 pairs 
rubber boots, 2 boat-hooks, 1 scow and oars, 100 lbs. sheet- 
lead, 50 lbs. dry red lead, 1 weir-gauge, 2 kegs nails, 1 
barrel, 2 kegs, 7 galls, red paint, 1 gall, linseed-oil, 1 small 
boat, 1 stove, 1 cylinder gauge plunger, 2 paving-hammers, 1 
oilstone, 10 locks, 50 ft. fuse, 3 sheets sandpaper, 1 dust- 
brush, 3 augers, 1 gas-stove, 2 doz. pick-handles, 1 set 
blocks and fall, 10 lbs. waste, 3 ladders, 60 ft. 2-inch drain- 
pipe, 4 wheelbarrows, 200 bricks, 2 48-inch pipes and 5 
sleeves, 2 cracked 48-inch pipe, 1 tool-box, 1 drag, 1 2-horse 
drag, 8 cords wood, lot of old lumber, 14 bound stones, 1 
sand-screen, 1 watering-pot, lot of old iron, lot of sand, 6 
tons hay, 1 rain-gauge, 2 paving rammers, 1 paint-pot and 

2 brushes, 1 branding-iron. 



152 City Document No. 124. 

Inlet Chamber, Farm Pond. 

26 stop-planks, 5 stop-planks, for siphon culvert under 
section A, 1 broom, 1 dust-brush, 1 pail, 1 boat-hook. 

Sluice in Farm Pond Dyke. 
8 stop-planks, 2 sets stop-plank hooks. 

Sluice from Farm Pond into Ditch. 
5 stop-planks, 1 set stop-plank hooks. 

New South Dam. 
4 stop-planks. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1882. 

Leonaed R. Cutter, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The report of the condition of the works under 
my charge, and amount of labor performed during the year 
ending with April 30, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

At the present date I consider the Avorks to be in excellent 
condition. The 48-inch main laid in 1880 has shown no 
signs of a leak and no repairs have been made on it of any 
description. 

The connection of the 40-inch main on Brookline avenue 
with the 36 and 30-inch mains onTremont street by a 30-inch 
main through Francis street, mentioned in myreport of 1881, 
was completed in July. 



Main Pipes. 

The whole number of feet of the various sizes laid during 

the year is . . . 37,543 
Relaid and changed in sizes 4,021 



Making 41,564, equal to 7||^-^ miles. 

The table showing the lengths of supply and distributing 
mains has been carefully revised, and is presented in a new 
form. 

In ygars past no deductions have been made for pipe which 
had been relaid or abandoned, and consequently the total 
lengths, as given in the reports, were larger than the actual 
quantities. 

Service-Pipes. 

Whole number put in . . . . . . 951 

Length in feet 24,588 

Total number to date . . . . . .47,266 



154 



City Document No. 124. 



Of the relaying of enlarged sizes, the following table shows 



the changes in sizes 



Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Size now. 


No. of feet. 


Size formerly. 


West Newton . . 

Tremont 

A 

Ellery 

Gold . 

India whaif . . . 


Columbus ave. and R.R. 
Camden and Lenox. 
Richards and First. 
Boston and Wadleigh court. 
C and D. 
Atlantic ave. and the water. 


12-in. 

12 " 

12 " 

6 " 

6 " 

6 " 


520 
36 
596 
640 
236 
662 


6-in. 
6 " 
6 " 
4 " 
4 " 
4 " 



Relaid. 

Northampton st., bet. Tremont st. and Shawmut ave 12-inch. 718 feet. 

Harrison ave. , bet. Curve st. and E.R. bridge 12-inch. 94 " 

Indiana st., bet. Harrison ave. and Washington st 12-inch. 42 " 

Ellery st., bet. Boston and Wadleigh court 6-inch. 150 " 

Francis st., bet. Tremont st. and Brookline ave 6-inch. 327 " 



Taken up and Abandoned. 

12- inch iron pipe » 312 feet 

8-inch iron pipe 90 

4-inch iron pipe 167 

2-inch lead pipe 80 

l^-inch iron pipe 541 

f -inch lead pipe 432 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



155 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1881. 

Note. — B indicates Boston; S.B., South Boston; E.B., East Boston; B.H., Boston 
Highlands; D., Dorchester; W.R., West Roxhury; Bri., Brighton. 



In what Street. 



Commonwealth ave 

Francis 

Huntington ave 

Albany 

West Chester Park. 

Newbury 

Swett 

Crawford 

Beacon 

Parker Hill ave 

Tremont 

Blue Hill ave 

Park 

Mill 

Warner ave 

Erie " 

Warner " 

Back 

Boston 

Poplar 

Walkhill 

Western ave 

Eastern R.R 



Between what Streets. 



Beacon and W. Chester Park 



Total 48-inch 

Tremont and Brookline ave. 



Total 30-inch . 

Exeter and Camden . 

Total 16.inch . 



Northampton and E. Chester Park 

Huntington ave. and B. & A. R.R 

Hereford and W. Chester Park 

Ellery and R.R. Bridge 

Warren and Tower 

Brighton ave. and B. & A. R.R 

Parker and the Reservoir 

Benton & Hammond 

Columbia and Elmo 

Dorchester ave. and Washington 

Neponset ave. and Preston 

Harvard and Coolidge ave 

Elmo and Warren ave 

Erie ave. and Blue Hill ave 

Walkhill and Austin 

Dorset and Vernon 

MetropoUtan ave. and Dale 

Sargent and Back 

Market and Harvard 



Total 12-inch 
From Marginal . . . . 
Total 10-inch 



S.B. 
B.H. 



W.R. 



Bri. 



E.B. 



116 

632 



2,933 



2,933 

24 
584 
289 
165 
319 
323 
882 
185 

69 
1,221 
356 
282 
310 
386 
710 
408 
574 

52 
2,112 

9,251 

466 

466 



156 



City Document No. 124. 



Statement of liocation. Size, etc. — Continued. 



In -5vliat Street. 



Huntington ave. . . . 
Pemberton square. 

Congress 

Montana 

Union a\% 

Bowdoin ave 

Allston 

Hartford 

Sanford 

Boylston 

Arlington 

Harwich 

Court square 

Lenox 

Purbam 

West Chester Park 
Cazenove place. . . . 

Broadway 

St. Botolph 

Boston Wharf . . . . 

Congress 

Richards 

Fifth 

New 

M 

Sumner 

Prescott 

Meridian 

Gurney 

Gaston 

Savin 

Geneva ave 



Between what Streets. 



Exeter and Dartmouth 

Near Tremont 

A and N.Y. & N.E. R.R. . . . 
Mt. Seaver ave. and Georgia . 
Bowdoin and Bowdoin ave. . 
Union ave. and Washington . 

Centre and Mather 

Sargent and Howard ave. . . . 

Cedar and Temple 

Centre and Chestnut ave. . . . 
Market and Parsons 



Total 8-uich 



Yarmouth and Dartmouth 

Cornhill court and Court 

Harrison ave. and Fellows , 

St. Botolph and Providence R.R. 
Columbus ave. and R.R. bridge 
Columbus ave. and Chandler ... 
Washington and Harrison ave. . 

Durham and W. Newton 

N.Y. & N.E. R.R 

N.Y. & N.E. R.R. and A 

Granite and A 

Handl 

From First 

Second and Third 

Jeffries and the water 

Saratoga and Lexington 

Marion and Eagle 

Tremont and Parker 

Warren and B. H. ave 



From Blue Hill ave. 



Amount carried forward 



S.B. 

B.H. 

D. 



W.R. 
Bri. 



S.B. 



E.B. 



B.H. 



18 
292 
1,245 
412 
404 
507 

86 
232 
154 

3,943 

429 
182 
116 
276 
166 
110 
133 
244 
164 

24 
257 
172 
153 
153 
145 
547 
191 
243 

82 
176 
469 

4,431 



Eeport or THE "Water Board. 



157 



Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In -what Street. 



Wabon 

Begent 

Sunderland 

Hampshire 

Highland Park ave 

Highland Park et 

Minden 

"Wayne 

Elmore 

Regent square 

Maywood 

Geneva ave 

Elmwood 

Everett 

Ehn 

Columbia 

Millet 

Dorset 

Clayton 

Bellevue 

Holmes place 

Baker court 

Tileston place 

Sagamore 

Belfort 

"Willard court 

Miller 

Erie ave 

Centre 

Mt. Vernon st. extension, 

McClellan ave 

Orchard 

Centre 



Between what Streets. 



Amount brought forward 

From Warren 

Circuit and Hurlburt 

Warren and Blue Hill ave 

Vernon and Culvert ^ . 

Fort ave. and Highland Park st 

Highland Park ave. and Cedar 

Heath place and Bickford 

Blue Hill ave. and Maple 

Wilmont and Walnut ave 

From Begent 

Warren and Blue Hill ave 

From Blue Hill ave 

King and Clay 

Park and Elm 

Everett and Elm 

Blue Hill avo. and Michigan ave 

Park and Wheatland ave 

Dorchester ave. and Boston 

Granger and Greenwich 

Trull and Columbia 

From Mill 

" Willow court 

'" Neponset ave 

Belfort and Elton 

Sagamore and Auckland 

From Union ave 

Washington and Merrill 

Warner and McClellan ave 

Allstonand O. C. & N. R.R 

From Carleton 

Erie and Blue Hill ave 

From Boston 

Adams and Dorchester ave 



Amount carried forward. 



B.H. 



Dor 



4,431 

403 

268 

159 

283 

22 

94 

62 

319 

69 

142 

135 

31 

20 

389 

31 

14 

331 

341 

250 

310 

398 

29 

153 

264 

232 

106 

406 

288 

30 

276 

236 



10,819 



158 



City Document No. 124. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Alexander ave. . . 

Cook 

Cedar 

South 

Rill 

Ware 

Taylor ave 

Dale 

Green 

Alden place 

Terrace ave. . . . 

Custer 

Hawthorne 

John A. Andrew 

Newherne 

Bishop 

Alfred 

Seavern ave 

"WaiTen square. . 

New 

Ashford 

•Webster ave 

Nevens place 

HoUis place 

Sparhawk ave... 
Wicklow 

Hartford 

Carleton 

Congress 



Between what Streets. 



Amount brought forward . 
From Mather 

" Dudley 

" Washington 

" River 

Pleasant and Neponset ave. 

Ware and Hancock 

Trull and Rill 

From Dudley 

Poplar and Providence Railroad. 

Washington and Forest Hill 

From Green 

■" Sheridan ave 

" South 

Florence and Sycamore 

Newherne and Walker 

Bishop and John A. Andrew. . . . 

Newberne and Call 

Green and Seavern ave 

Elm and Star lane 

From Green 

" Centre 

Chester and Malvern 

From Cambridge 

" Washington 

" Allston 

Sparhawk and Cambridge 

Market and N. Beacon st 



Total 6-inch. 



Pearl place and High 

West Newton and Berwick park. 
A and N.Y. & N.E. R.R 

Amoxint carried foncard. . 



W.R. 



Bri. 



B. 



S.B. 



10,819 
172 

97 
116 
994 
125 
229 

41 

32 
746 
312 
238 
109 
680 
■263 

41 
210 

70 
179 

93 
171 
233 
623 
324 
511 
221 
302 
939 

18,890 

112 

134 

15 



Eepokt of the Water Board. 



159 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 




m 


i 










261 






E.B. 

B.H. 

D. 


4 


225 


Elbow 




106 






101 






228 


Tileston School-yard . . . 


From Norfolk 


296 




95 




Total 4-inch 






1,312 













160 



City Docu]ment No. 124. 



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Report of the Watee Board. 



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162 



City Document No. 87. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1881. 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


WHEEE. , 


48 
1 

1 


40 
1 

1 


36 
1 

1 

2 


30 
2 

2 


24 

1 
3 

4 


20 

4 
1 
9 
1 

15 


16 

2 

1 
3 


12 
19 

6 
2 
1 

28 


10 

• 


8 

2 
2 

1 
5 


6 

31 
4 
6 

6 

1 

48 


4 

22 
3 
6 
1 

3 
35 


3 

3 
3 

6 


2 

1 

3 
4 


4 

72 
1 

73 


1 
1 


1 

11 

1 

1 

13 


1 
13 
1 

14 


« 

414 

124 

93 

117 

748 


h 

7 

12 

3 

2 

24 


Total. 




607 


South Boston 

East Boston 

Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 

"West Roxhury 

Brighton 


150 

120 

137 

9 

4 

1 


Totals 


1,028 



Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards ; joints, 90 ; settling x)f earth, 13 ; 
defective pipe, 10 ; defective stopcocks, 21 ; 
defective packing, 4 ; struck by pick, 1 ; sewer 
caving in, 4. Total ..... 143 

Stoppages by fish, 1 ; by frost, 1 . . . . 2 

Of 3 -inch and on service-pipes : joints, 22 ; settling 
of earth, 146 ; settling of boxing, 1 ; settling of " 
sewer, 12; settling of wall, 1; defective pipe, 
47 ; defective stopcock, 1 ; defective coupling, 3 ; 
defective faucet, 3 ; defective packing, 10 ; eaten 
by soil, 1 ; stiiff connections, 72 ; coupling loose 
at main, 6 ; struck by pick, 24 ; struck by bar, 2 ; 
frost, 4 ; blasting, 36 ; gnawed by rats, 5 ; stone 
falling on pipe, 1. Total . . . . 397 

Stoppages by fish, 197; rust, 263; dirt, 16; gas- 
ket, 2 ; frost, 5 ; solder, 2 ; grass, 1 . . 486 



Total 



1,028 



Report of the Water Board. 



163 



Statement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1881. 



Year. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
186T 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 



Diameter or. 



Four inches and 
upwards. 



82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

ni 

139 
122 
82 
82 
157 
185 
188 
153 
434 
203 
214 
109 
213 
211 
135 
145 



Less than four 
inches. 



72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
594 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
769' 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725 
734 
801 
1,024 
995 
929 
883 



Totals. 



104 

237 

323 

345 

354 

294 

307 

363 

401 

531 

592 

' 508 

490 

494 

489 

607 

675 

609 

531 

489 

926 

1,565 

1,647 

1,229 

2,554 

928 

948 

910, 

1,237 

1,206 

1,064 

1,028 



164 



City Document No. 124. 



Hydrants. 
During the year 122 hydrants have been established, and 
54 abandoned. 





Established. 


Abandoked. 


o 
q 




13 >> 

o o 


o 
Ph 


^ 

^ 
3 


O 

o 


s 

o 
Eh - 


a >> 

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h5 


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o 




16 


21 
5 
4 
6 

11 

6 


6 


1 


44 
6 
7 

20 

26 
9 

11 


1 


1 


11 


21 
3 
1 

4 
5 

1 


33 
4 
1 
9 
6 
1 


11 




1 






2 
2 

1 


1 

8 
6 
4 
4 


6 


Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 

West Roxhury 


4 
9 
4 
1 




1 


4 
1 


11 
20 

g 








11 








34 


53 


11 


24 


122 


1 


2 


16 


35 


54 


68 



Total number up to May 1, 1882. 





C3 >» 

o o 

pai-j 


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1^ 


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Ph 


% 
o 


i 



P5 


Total. 




33 
9 
2 
8 
26 
17 
2 


1 


41 
16 
14 
34 
72 
197 
135 
16 


443 
130 
101 
647 
559 
90 
58 


820 
345 
190 
123 
63 
40 
28 


1,337 
601 






307 




812 




720 




344 




223 




16 








5, 


3 

7 


8 










7 


























4,275 

















41 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 309 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 

Stopcocks. 

98 new stopcocks have been established this year. 94 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. All 
the stopcocks have had the proper attention paid them. 



Report of the Water Board. 



165 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, May 1, 1882. 















DiAMETEB 


IN Inches. 












60 


48 


40 


36 


30 

1 


24 

i 


20 


16 


12 


10 


9 


8 


• 6 


4 


3 


Pipes 


2 

1 

1 

1 


26 
2 

1 

7 
3 
2 

1 

16 
6 


36 

2 
6 

1 
10 

2 
5 

2 
1 
3 
3 


31 
2 

1 
3 

6 
2 
2 
3 

3 
1 
4 
2 

2 

2 

1 
1 


30 
2 
1 
2 
6 

11 

7 
2 
2 

2 

5 

2 

15 

10 

18 
1 
1 


30 
1 
1 

8 
5 

28 

2 
3 

9 

2 
18 

4 

3 

1 


48 

1 
5 
1 

11 

3 

7 

10 
4 
12 
11 
3 

1 

1 


206 

4 

1 

10 

33 

10 
1 
10 

1 

15 
2 
6 
9 
6 

2 


1,168 
10 

47 
16 

3 
26 

3 
30 
43 

18 
14 

54 

2 

25 

49 

23 
18 


123 
3 

10 

25 

3 
4 

3 

3 
3 


5 

27 

51 


690 
16 

49 
44 

35 
13 
11 
14 

27 
13 

46 

2 

16 

37 

7 
21 


1,412 


54 


127 


Y Branches . . . 

4-Way Branches . 

3-Way 

Flange Pipe . . . 

Sleeves 

Clamp Sleeves . . 

Caps 

Reducers .... 
Bevel Hubs . . . 
Offset Pipes . . . 
Yoke " ... 
Manhole " ... 
One-eighth Turns 
Pieces of Pipes . 
Curve Pipe . . . 
Quarter Turns . . 
Double Hubs . . 
Blow-off and Man- 


8 
154 

56 
29 
12 
42 
3 
80 
23 

29 
6 
39 
31 
12 

10 
12 

8 


24 

23 
7 
9 
9 
2 

29 
9 

17 

3 

11 

4 

20 
12 

17 


35 
9 

7 
2 
6 
18 


Plugs 

Thawing Clamps . 






3 

4 

1 




Branch Openings 








Manhole Branches 









Lowry Hydrants. — 23 Lowry hydrants, 32 barrels, 32 
pots, 24 gaskets, 10 chucks, 24 wastes, 3 covers, 420 
bolts. 

Post Hydrants. — 11 barrels, 9 pots, 18 valve pots, 19 
frames and covers, 30 gaskets, 93 bolts. 

Boston Hydrants. — 48 Boston hydrants, 16 wastes, 47 
straps, 19 heavy frames and covers, 29 frames, 48 covers. 



166 City Document No. 124. 

Boston Loivrys. — 20 barrels, 34 pots, 30 frames and 
covers, 58 gaskets, 85 bolts. 

For Stopcocks. — 1 4-inch screw for waste-weir, 120 lbs. 
washers, 520 bolts, 19,412 lbs. iron castings, 490 lbs. compo- 
sition, 70 lbs. brass, 322 mailable nuts. 

Meters in Shop. — 11 3-inch, 22 2-inch, 3 1^-inch, 18 1- 
inch, 27 |-inch. 

Stock fdr Meters. — 6 1-inch clocks, 20 |-inch do.', 20 1- 
inch cocks, 35 |-inch do., 69 nipples, 12 fish-boxes. 

For Service-Pipe. — 46 2-inch nipples, 3 nuts, 10 solder 
nipples, 9 screw nipples, 36 male couplings, 77 tubes, 4 
offsets, 10 valves, 8 |-inch nuts, 28 tubes, 13 cocks, 2 male 
couplings, 20 plugs, 24 1^-inch male couplings, 53 nuts, 42 
cocks, 49 T cocks, 5 male couplings, 51 1-inch cocks, 15 T 
cocks, 5 air-plugs, 33 sidewalk cocks, 17 crooked cocks, 21 
straight cocks, 31 male couplings, 25 female couplings, 24 
plugs, 52 |-inch cocks, 35 T cocks, 108 sidewalk cocks, 64 
nuts, 65 male couplings, 75 tubes, 9 plugs, 171 |-cocks, 43 
crooked cocks, 59 right angle cocks, 24 T cocks, 11 thawing 
cocks, 18 Y cocks, 175 sidewalk cocks, 25 thawing couplings, 
63 |-tubes, 27 male couplings, 40 female couplings, 25 plugs, 
46 ^-inch cocks, 51 crooked cocks, 97 nuts, 60 tubes, 18 side- 
walk tubes, 44,761 lbs. iron castings. 

Lead Pipe. — 446 lbs. 3-inch lead pipe, 2,182 2-inch, 1,274 
lbs. l|-inch, 3,234 l|-inch, 1,062 1-inch, 208 lbs. f-inch, 2,441 
|-inch, 91 |-inch, 185 lbs. 1-inch, tin-lined, 141 lbs. |-inch, 
1,979 lbs.|-inch, 36 lbs. |-inch block tin-pipe, 391 lbs. solder. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 556 lbs. refined iron, 415 lbs. Norway 
iron, 133 lbs. band iron, 1,655 lbs. round refined iron, 421 
lbs. cast steel, 19 lbs. machine steel. 

Carpenter's Shop,. — 20 Lowry hydrant boxes, 18 Y boxes, 
28 post boxes, 17 Boston hydrant boxes, 24 stopcock boxes, 
6 meter boxes, 20 casks nails, 66,000 ft. spruce plank, 39,000 
ft. batting boards. 

Tools. — Steam-engine, 1 large hoisting-crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 8 hand-geared do., 8 sets of shears and rigging for 
same, 8 tool-houses, 4 tool-boxes, 7 nozzles, 2 platform 
scales, 1 portable blacksmith shop, 1 hand-roller, 2 horse do., 
tools for laying main and service-pipe, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot 
do., 1 hand do., 1 Pratt & Whitney do., 1 planer, 1 boring 
mill, 2 chain hoisting gears, 1 upright drilling machine, 4 
grindstones, 1 trip-hammer, the necessary tools for carrying 
on the machine, blacksmith, carpenter, and plumbing shops, 
1 circular saw, 1 fan-blower, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 small 
do. 

Stable. — 13 horses, 13 wagons, 2 buggies, 6 pungs, 1 
sled, 2 set runners, 2 carts, 17 sets harness, 30 blankets, 
1 ton hay, 40 bush, grain, 1 jigger, 2 hay-cutters. 



Eepoet or THE Water Board. 167 

Fountain Jets. — 1 large composition cylinder, 1 16-inch 
jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition jets, 9 cast-iron 
plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe-patterns, I 
2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets for small 
fountains. 

Miscellaneous. — 4,420 lbs. pig-lead, 400 lbs. gasket, 1 
fountain basin, 125 cords wood, 1 thawing-boiler, 1 hose- 
carriag'e, 2 garden-pumps, 44 3-inch earthen pipe, 2,000 
paving-brick, 45 galls, kerosene oil, 20 galls, linseed oil, 10 
bbls. cement. 

E. E. JONES. 

Sup't Eastern Division. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC WATEE WOEKS. 



Chaelestown District, Boston, May 1, 1882. 

Leonard E. Cutter, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The annual report of this department, for the year 
ending April 30th, is herewith submitted : — 

Mystic Lake. 

Beyond the general maintenance of the lake, and its sur- 
roundings, no expenditure has been made during the past 
year. The good effects of the work accomplished during the 
summer and fall of 1880, in removing large quantities of 
muck and vegetable matter, have since been apparent in the 
improved condition of the water, which has been remarkably 
good, and especially free from disagreeable flavor, so often 
complained of in previous years. I recommend that this 
work be continued from time to time, as the low level of the 
water and other circumstances may admit. 

Mystic Sewer. 

Constant attention to this branch of the works has kept 
the sewer in good working order throughout, and it remains 
in good condition at present date. 

Conduit. 

The conduit was not drawn off during the past year ; con- 
sequently no examination has been made inside. The last 
examination was made two years ago, and the general appear- 
ance at that time, compared with the previous years, gave no 
indications of a change. I am of the opinion that it is in good 
condition at the present time. I shall, however, make a care- 
ful inspection of this branch of the works at an early day. 

Pumping-Station . 

Engines Nos. 1,2, and 3, have all been thoroughly over- 
hauled and put in good substantial repair. The water cylin- 



Eeport of the Water Board. 169 

ders, and pipes connecting with the other iron-work, are at 
the present time being painted, and when finished I shall 
consider them in perfect order. In the boiler-room the 
boilers have received some repairs during the year ; the walls 
and ceiling of the room have been whitened, the wood-work 
repainted, and a general renovation taken place. 

Reservoir. 

The reservoir has had careful attention during the year. 
The gate-house has been finished inside, the top being 
sheathed and painted, the walls whitened, and new covering 
boards, with other minor improvements, supplied. 

Supply Mains. 

The bridge over the Boston & Maine and the Eastern 
Eailroads, on Main street, at the Neck, supporting the 24- 
inch iron supply main, has been entirely rebuilt with hard- 
pine timber, 8 X 14 inches, making a substantial and lasting 
structure. 

Forge-Mains. 

The force-mains are apparently in good order. No leaks 
have occurred on either during the year, and no expenditure 
has been made aside from the clearing away of snow and ice 
that accumulated in and about the culverts duringf the winter 
season. 

Distribution-Pipes . 

The distribution-pipes have been extended 912 feet, of 
which 876 feet were of 6-inch and 36 feet of 4-inch pipe. 600 
feet included were for Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co. , 
on private account. There were also 100 feet of 4-inch ex- 
tended at the Engine-house grounds in Somerville ; making 
a total extension of 1,012 feet for this department. There 
have been 672 feet of cement pipe replaced by cast-iron ; of 
this 324 feet were enlarged. Accompanying this report are 
tables showing the localities and changes made. 

There have been 25 breal?:s and 24 leaks in this district 
on the distribution-pipes. Of the breaks, 1 was on 16-inch 
pipe, 1 on 8-in., 11 on 6-in., 3 on 4-in., 3 on 3-in., 6 on 2- 
in. pipe. 

In Everett 9 breaks and leaks have been repaired. 

In Somerville the extension has been 2,977 ft. ; in Chelsea, 
520 feet ; in Everett, 300 feet. 



170 City Document No. 124. 

In this district S additional post hydrants have been located 
on Hittenger's Avharf, for Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator 
Co., on private account. 

In Somerville, 6 additional post hydrants. 

In Chelsea, 1 discontinued. 

Service-Pipes. 

There have been 6Q new service-pipes entered in this dis- 
trict. 83 service-pipes repaired or altered ; of these, 23 were 
leaks, 9 enlarged, 13 altered, 7 tin-lined renewed, 3 frozen 
and burst, 4 changed from " Y" branch, 24 stoppages, 20 by 
fish and 4 by rust. 593 decayed service-boxes have been re- 
placed by 454 iron and 139 wood. 

In Somerville 139 new services have been entered ; in 
Chelsea, 55 ; in Everett, 24. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

HIRAM CUTTS, 

Superintendent. 



Eepoet of the Watee Boaed. 171 

Uxtension of Distribution- Pipe in Chao'lestown in 1881-82. 



Streets. 


Size of Pipe. 


Total Feet. 




4 nch. 


6 inch. 








156 

120 

36 

564 


156 






120 






36 




36 
100 


600 


Engine-house grounds, Somei-ville .... 


100 


Totals 


136 


876 


1,012 







Service-Pipes laid in Gharlestown in 1881-82. 



Size. 


\ inch. 


finch. 


3 inch. 


linch. 


1| inch. 


2 inch. 


Total 
No. 


Total 
EFeet. 


Number 


3 


45 


11 


1 


3 


3 


66 


1,690 



Chaklestown. 



Chelsea. 



SOMERVILLE. 



fRelaid 348 feet. 

Relaid and enlarged . . 324 " 

Extension 912 feet. 

Laid previous 154,894 " 



Engine-house ! t -j 

Grounds. Somer- [ ^^^^ previous 

YILLE . 



e 155,806 " or 29 miles, 2,686 feet. 

(Extension 520 " 

Laid previous . 149,463 " 

L Aggregate 149,983 " or 28 miles, 2,143 feet. 

fRelaid 2,649 feet. 

Extension 2,977 " 

Laid previous 236,808 " 

i. Aggregate 239,785 " or 45 miles, 2,185 feet. 

("Extension 300 " 

J Laid previous 76,024 " 

I 

1. Aggregate 76,324 " or 14 miles, 2,404 feet. 

fExtension 100 " 

287 " 



Aggregate 387 " 

Total amount of distribution-pipe, 117 miles, 4,525 feet. 



172 



City Document No. 124. 



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Eeport of the Water Board. 



173 



Distribution- Pipes Relaid in CJiarlestown in 1881-82. 





6 

fl 
.'§> 
O 


Size oe Pipe. 




Streets. 


4 inch. 


6 inch. 


12 Inch. 


Total. 




Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 




Charles-river avenue . . . 
Waterman's Mills 


6 inch. 
4 inch. 
6 inch. 
2 inch. 


12 

300 


60 

24 

252 


24 


60 

38 

276 

300 


Walker avenue 










Totals 




312 


336 


24 


672 







Statement of Pipes, Specials and other Stock on Hand. 















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4 


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Pipes 


3 


19 
6 
1 


14 

2 


2 


1 

21 


188 

40 

4 

11 

12 

9 

8 

22 

16 

10 


88 

40 
3 

18 

11 

5 

4 

3 

26 

14 


160 

27 

8 

14 

8 

8 

11 

15 

23 

32 


101 

32 
12 
24 
14 
8 
5 
1 
1 
34 


129 

18 
1 
10 
19 
15 
6 


16 


















2 




















11 
11 
12 




Eighth Turns 
























Offsets 


















2 
6 


1 

8 


3 

2 






2 


7 


10 
11 


40 


Plugs 



















Gates. — 1 20-inch, 1 10-inch, 2 8-inch, 1 3-inch, 25 
frames and covers. 

Hydrants. — 30 Lowry hydrant barrels, 30 pots, 18 frames, 
12 covers, 12 gaskets, 12 wastes, 25 round covers. 

Miscellaneous. — 880 lbs. pig lead, 4 casks nails, \ bale 
jute, 1 M. feet spruce plank. 



174 City Document No. 124. 

For Meters. — 1 3-inch, 2 2-inch, 7 1-inch, 1 f-inch, 1 
|-inch meters, 4 frames and 8 covers, 12 2-inch, and 11 1-inch 
meter connections. 

Sioch for Services. — 5,513 lbs. |-inch lead pipe, 400 lbs. 
f-inch do., 398 lbs. 1-inch do., 641 lbs. l|-mch do., 816 lbs. 
2-inch do., 55 iron boxes, 36 covers, 4 |-inch service-stops, 
14 1-inch do., 17 |-inch corp. stops, 5 |-inch do., 6 1-inch 
do., 11 |-inch sol-nipples, 12 |-inch do., 2 1-inch do., 10 lbs. 
solder, 10 lbs. block tin. 

Paints, Oils, etc. — 25 galls, linseed-oil, 1 gall, sperm-oil, 
75 lbs. red lead, 1 gall, turpentine, 1 gall, alcohol, 1 gall, 
shellac, 32 lights glass, ^ bbl. black varnish, 10 galls, black- 
oil, 10 galls, kerosene-oil. 

Tools, etc. — 1 tool-house, 2 tool-chests, 4 derricks, 1 
Fairbanks scales, 1 tapping-machine, 1 drilling-machine, 1 
30-ft. and 2 15-ft. ladders, 4 wheelbarrows, 1 grindstone. 
All the necessary tools for laying and repairing main and 
service-pipes ; for carpenter's work, etc. ; patterns for small 
castings. 

Stable. — 3 horses, 2 wagons, 2 buggies, 2 pungs, 1 sleigh, 

1 tip-cart, 3 sets harness, 3 blankets, and the necessary stable 
tools. 

At the Engine-house. — 2 jack-screws, 32 socket wrenches, 
10 boxes do., 18 straight do., 18 S do., 1 set pipe taps and 
dies, 12 pipe-tongs, 2 pipe-cutters, 2 die-stocks, 2 ratchets, 

2 braces, 3 twist-drills, 19 taps, 25 cold-chisels, 45 draw- 
bolts, 10 eye-bolts, 4 scaling-hammers, 2 augers, 2 saws, 1 
hatchet, 2 bitt stocks and bitts, 4 reamers, 1 square, 1 spirit- 
level, 1 24-inch standard gauge, 1 pair bellows, 27 steel 
drills, 6 iron clamps, 2 lead-ladles, 3 crowbars, 6 pinch-bars, 
4 oil-tanks, 1 waste-tank, 3 derricks, 2 blocks and falls, 3 
ladders, 1 forge, 1 anvil, 1 pair scales, 17 kerosene lamps, 
150 feet 2^-inch hose, 1 copper hose-pipe, 1 pair rubber boots, 
79 Argand chimneys, 160 common chimneys. 

At Lake. — 'i 20-hor8e-power engines, 2 rotary pumps, 
50 feet 18-inch copper pipe, 2 quarter-turns copper, 2 do. 
iron, 2 boats, 1 15-foot ladder, 1 set hooks and chains, 1 set 
blocks and falls, 1 axe, 2 saws, 1 brass water-gauge, 4 nets, 
1 pair scales, 1 rain-gauge, 2 lanterns, 1 measuring-rod, 6 
iron rakes, 1 grass-hook, 4 hay-rakes, 2 forks, 2 hoes, 3 
crowbars, 1 wheelbarrow, 4 picks, 1 spirit-level, 1 iron 
square, 1 pipe-tongs, 1 hammer, 1 portable pump, 5 pails, 
1 stove, 1 clock, 1 table, 3 chairs. 

Stable at Engine-house. — 2 horses, 2 casks, 1 hay wag- 
on, 1 express do., 1 pung, 1 plough, 1 harrow, 1 scraper, 3 
harnesses, 1 plough do., 1 robe, 3 blankets, 4 tons hay, 1 do. 
salt hay, 3 hay-forks, 2 manure do., 3 rakes, 3 scythes, 1 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 175 

lawn mower, 1 grass-hook, 1 hedge shears, 22 shovels, 5 
spades, 4 picks, 2 rakes, 1 25-ft. ladder, 1 gate-wrench, 1 
axe, 1 saw, 1 screw-driver, 1 iron vise, 1 stone-hammer, 

2 spirit-levels, 4 gravel hoes, 7 bog hoes, 1 brace and bits, 

3 pails, 7 wheelbarrows, 1 sand-screen, 1 gravel do., 2 lan- 
terns, 1 tool-chest, 4 nets, 1 set drills, 1 trowel. 

At Reservoir. — 1 stove, 2 chairs, 2 lamps, 2 lanterns, 1 
settee, 4 oil-cans, 1 coal-hod, pail and pitcher, 1 broom, 1 
table, 1 net, 1 rake, 1 clock, 5 wrenches, 2 sets blocks and 
falls, 1 chain falls, 1 saw, 1 axe, 3 hoes, 1 pick, 1 hay-fork, 
^ bbl. kerosene oil, 1 stoue-hammer, 1 brass water-gauge. 

Mystic Valley Sewer. — 6 dip-nets, 62 brass-mounted 
sewer-poles, 12 iron-mounted do., 1 pick, 1 shovel, 6 long- 
handled nets, 1 iron frame, 5 feet 16-inch clay pipe, 4 6-inch 
quarter turns, 6 8-inch do., 1 wagon, 1 sleigh. 



176 City Document No. 124. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO MAY 1, 1882, 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From May 
4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbkough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having Charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 1865. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From Api-il 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works, from May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to pres- 
ent time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Cpiesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J. Avery Richards, were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1849, Avhich was limited to keep in force 
one year; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

Cochituate Water Board. 

• Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and i-esigned April 
7, 1856t Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1866, and resigned June 
5, 1860$ . . . Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 1865t Five years. 



Report of the Water Board. 



177 



Otis Nokcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

16, 1867 One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 
6, 1868$ One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April, 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874J ...... One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned May 
31, 1875 Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 
1876 One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55$ 
John H. Wilkins, 1^51, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59$ 
Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 
Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 66 
James W. Seaver, 1851f 
Samuel A. Eliot, 1851$. 
John T. Heard, 1851$ .... 
Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 64, and 65$ 
Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1863 
Ezra Lincoln, 1862$ .... 
Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 65$ 
Samuel Hatch, 1864, 55, bQ, bl, 58, and 61 
Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 67$ 
William Washburn, 1854 and 55 . 
Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 68, and 59$ . 
Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ 
John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59$ . 
Joseph Smith, 1866$ .... 
Ebenezer Johnson, 1867, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64$ 
Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 69, 60, and 61$ . 
George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63 
Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ 
George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 66 
Clement Willis, 1860 .... 
G. E. Pierce, 1860$ .... 
Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ 
George Hinman, 1862 and 68 
John F. Pray, 1862 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 .... 
Jonas Fitch, 1864, 66, and 66$ 
Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66 
John H. Thorndike, 1864, 66, 66, and 67$ 
Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . 
William S. Hills, 1867 .... 
Charles R. Train, 1868 
Joseph M. Wightman, 1868, and 69 
Benjamin James, *1858, 68, and 69 
Francis A. Osborn, 1869 
Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ 
John O. Poor, 1870 .... 
HoLLis R. Gray, 1870 .... 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 66, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 
and 71 



Five years. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Four years. 
One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Six years. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Two months. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 
One year. 
Six years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years 
One year. 
One year. 
Two years 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 

Nine years. 



178 



City Document No. 124. 



George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71 . . . . Four years. 

SiDNKY Squires, 187 IJ . . . . . . . One year. 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 One year. 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 . . . Four years. 
Alexander Wads worth, * 1864, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, and 

72 Seven years. 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74 . . . . Three years. 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 .... Two years. 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74$ . . . Five years. 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* Three years. 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 76 Three years. 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75 . . . Three years. 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 One year. 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t • . Five years. 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t . Six years. 
L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 75, 

and 76t Ten years. 

Charles E. Powers, * 1875 and 1876f .... Two years. 

Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t One year. 

Nahum M. Morrison, 1876t One year. 

Augustus Parker, 1876f One year. 



*Mr. John H. Wilkins resijrned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President ; and 
July 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fiU the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867. having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 16, to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

X Deceased. » 



Report of the Water Board. 179 



Boston Water Board, Organized July SI, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5. 1879. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to present time. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to present time. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. 



Organization of the Board foe Year 1881-82. 

Chairman. 
Leonard R. Cutter. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of C&phituate Department. 
Ezekiel R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division of Cochituate Department. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendenl of Mystic Department. 
Hiram Cutts. 

Water Registrar of the Cochituate Department. 
William F. Davis. 

Water Registrar of the Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

City Engineer. 
Henry M. Wightman. 



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