(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

Accessions 



o\» 



Shelf ^a. 




EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOSTON WATER BOARD 



Xr 



FOR THE 






TEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1884. 




BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 

No. 39 ARCH STREET. 

1884. 




/ 



[DoouMEJ^T 123 — 1884.] 




CITY OF i^i^J BOSTON. 



EIGHTH ANNUAL EEPORT 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1884. 



Office of Boston Water Board, 

May 1, 1884. 
To the City Council of the City of Boston: — 

The Boston Water Board herewith respectfully submits its 
eighth annual report, together with the reports of the Engi- 
neer of the Board, the Water Registrars, Clerk of the Board, 
and the Superintendents of the several divisions. 

These various reports present a complete and detailed 
history of the business of the department during the year 
ending April 30, 1884, and the Board invites a careful 
perusal of their contents, in order that the members of the 
City Council may be fully informed of the progress and 
present condition of the work entrusted to its charge. 

The Board assumed its duties at the beo-inninof of the 
present financial year. It has made two elaborate reports 
to your honorable body, under date of September 6 and 
December 6, 1883, respectively, in which the policy of the 
Board, and what had been accomplished up to the respective 
dates, were fully laid before you. 

We do not deem it necessary to repeat at this time the 
facts and information contained in these reports ; but, as they 



2 City Document No. 123. 

present succinctly and clearly a large part of our labors for 
the year, we desire to recall them to your special attention, 
and to suggest that tliey be considered in connection with, 
and as a part of, the annual report. 

The Board has endeavored to accomplish during the year 
the following important results in connection with the ad- 
ministration of the afl'airs of the Water Department : — 

1. To establish a systematic and economic conduct of the 
public business. 

2. To adopt the best measures for the prevention of the 
enormous waste of water by consumers. 

3. To stop the pollution of our sources of supply, and to 
improve the quality of the water. 

The Peesent Condition of the Service. 

Every branch of the service in the Water Department has 
been carefully examined by the Board, and we believe that 
the various divisions are being managed economically and 
efficiently ; that no persons are employed whose services are 
not needed, and who are not rendering efficient service to 
the city, and that the whole business is being conducted 
upon business principles. 

Two new divisions have been organized during the year, 
viz. : The Meter Division, with Mr. Hiram Cutts, formerly 
Superintendent of the Mystic Department, as Superintendent, 
and the Inspection and Waste Division, with Mr. D. B. 
Cashman as Superintendent. 

The work accomplished by these new divisions has been 
of great importance and benefit to the City, and your par- 
ticular attention is invited to this work as set forth in the 
special reports of September 6 and December 6, 1883, and 
to the first annual reports of the Superintendents, herewith 
appended. 

We made an earnest request of the Water Committee, sev- 
seral months since, to examine our books, contracts, and 
general administration of afl'airs ; and, in conformity to this 
request, a sub-committee was appointed and the examination 
is being made. We presume a report will be rendered in 
due course of business. 

Prevention of Waste. 

The present Board, early in its organization, realized that 
the prevention of waste was one of the most important and 
difficult problems with which all large water-consuming com- 
munities are obliged to contend. It is practically conceded 



Eeport of the Water Boaed. 3 

by all experienced observers that at least 40 per cent, of the 
water supplied to large towns and cities is wilfully wasted. 
The great majority of people seem to be possessed of the 
idea that water is, or should be, supplied as free as air, and 
hence all idea of economy in connection with its use seems to 
be banished. 

Eestrictive measures have seldom been applied in our 
country ; and the natural result is, that everybody has become 
extravagant and wasteful. 

We stated, in our report of September last, that the enor- 
mous wastage constantly taking place had been brought to 
the attention of the City Council every year since 1852, but 
that practically nothing had been done to remedy it. The 
Joint Standing Committee on Water, in their report of April 
30, 1883, very strenuously urged that immediate measures 
should be taken to stop this waste and reduce our excessive 
consumption. We believed that the consumption should be 
reduced in Boston from 95 to at least 60 gallons ])er 
capita, and that if this could be done a very large amount 
of money would be saved to the tax-payers of the city. This 
was the opinion of the Joint Standing Committee on Water, 
of our predecessors in office, of the Engineer of the Board ; in 
fact of everybody who had given the matter close attention. 
We accordingly organized early in July, 1883, the Division 
of Inspection and Waste. The work accomplished by this 
division last year was of very great importance to the city ; 
indeed, without it we should have been compelled to cut off 
the supply, during a part of the severe drought of last year, 
from a considerable number of our citizens. The tabulated 
results of the labor of this division appear in our reports of 
September and December last, and in the appended report 
of Superintendent Cashman. This report is one of the most 
interesting and suggestive ever presented to the City Council 
upon the question of water waste. It confirms the cor- 
rectness of the judgment and policy of the Board, and shows 
conclusively that continuous systematic inspection is an essen- 
tial element in the prevention of the wanton waste now so 
prevalent in all large communities. Under this effective 
inspection the premises and fixtures of every water-tiiker in 
the city have been visited several times during the year, the 
leakages stopped, the defective pipes and apparatus repaired, 
and the people for the first time taught to respect and obey 
the city ordinances with reference to the prevention of waste. 
We earnestly recommend the report of Superintendent Cash- 
man, and the observations of the Engineer of the Board upon 
this subject, to the careful consideration of the City Council. 

During a part of the present year, since the date of Mr. 



4 City Document No. 123. 

Cashman's report, the Deacon system of waste detection has 
been in operation in conjunction with the house-to-house 
inspection, and up to the present writing, September 1, the 
results liave been very satisfactory. 

The following tables show the daily aggregate and per 
capita consumption in the Cochituate and Mystic Departments 
for the first eight months of 1884 in comparison with the 
corresponding months of 1883, this period being covered by 
the present system of inspection ; and also a statement of the 
average daily consumption for several months prior to the 
beginning of the work of inspection. 

SUDBUET AND CoCHITUATE WOEKS. 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April . . , 
May . . . , 
June . . 
July . . . , 
August . . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



1883. 


Daily Av- 
erage Con- 
sumption. 


Gallons 
per Head, 
per Day. 


32,151,100 


92.9 


34,662,300 


102.2 


32,656,300 


94.1 


30,827,000 


88.6 


28,738,000 


82.3 


33,178,400 


94.8 


30,992,600 


88.5 


34,149,300 


97.3 


31,691,600 


90.0 


31,563,800 


89.4 


31,138,700 


88.7 


32,352,300 


91.4 



1883. 



Daily Av- 
erage Con- 
sumption. 



34,715,500 
32,690,700 
34,110,700 
30,617,600 
32,169,500 
33,419,200 
36,774,000 
37,141,000 
33,645,600 
29,575,800 
28,839,300 
30,174,200 



Gallons 
per Head, 
per Day. 



97.8 
92.0 
95.8 
85.8 
89.8 
93.3 
102.4 
103.2 
93.2 
81.9 
79.6 
83.0 



1884. 



Daily Av- 
erage Con- 
sumption. 



32,162,300 
24,598,000 
23,711,900 
21,505,700 
23,708,500 
26,184,600 
25,409,000 
25,065,200 



Gallons 
per Head, 
per Day. 



88.4 
67.5 
65.0 
58.8 
64.6 
71.2 
68.9 
67.7 



Keport of the Water Board. 



Mystic Works. 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . 
August . 
September 
October 
November 
December 



1883. 



Daily Average 
Consumption. 



8,369,600 
7,714,650 
7,737,300 
6,171,150 
6,319,100 
6,912,550 
7,307,550 
7,261,500 
5,846,300 
5,497,250 
5,930,600 
6,771,500 



Gallons per 

Head, per 

Day. 



97.3 
89.6 
89.8 
71.5 
73.1 
80.0 
84.5 
83.9 
67.4 
63.4 
68.3 
77.9 



1884. 



Daily Average 
Consumption. 



8,019,100 
6,349,500 
6,337,100 
5,242,100 
5,800,000 
6,245,600 
6,312,300 
6,088,400 



Gallons per 

Head, per 

Day. 



92.2 
72.9 
72.7 
60.1 
66.4 
71.5 
72.1 
69.5 



These tables show the daily average consumption in the 
Cochituate supply from January 1, 1883, to September, 1883, 
to have been ..... 33,954,775 galls. 

And for the corresponding period of 
the present year, under the inspection sys- 
tem 25,293,150 " 



A net daily average' reduction of 
or about 26 per cent, saving. 

In the Mystic Department, for the same 
period in 1883, the average daily con- 
sumption was . . . 7,224,175 

And for the corresponding 
period in 1884 . . \ 6,299,262 



8,661,625 



A net daily average reduction of 13 per 
cent., or ..... . 



924,913 



Making a total average daily reduction, 9,586,538 " 

It is computed that the actual cost to the city for each 100 
gallons of water furnished is about I^^q cents, and upon 
this basis the reduction in consumption represents, in round 



6 City Document No. 123. 

numbers, the sum of $1,200 per day during the first eight 
months of 1884. Again, it will be observed that in the 
months of July and August, which may properly be cited at 
this writing, the Deacon system being in full operation, the 
consumption was reduced 34 and 36 gallons per head, each 
day, for those months respectively. 

It may be interesting to make a single comparison between 
the consumption of 1882 and 1883, when no special efibrts 
were in progress to economize the supply. 

The daily average consumption in the Cochituate supply 
from January 1, 1882, to September of the 
same year, was 32,116,288 galls. 

And for the corresponding period in 
1883, it was 33,920,422 



Making an increased daily average con- 
sumption of . . . . . . 1,804,134 

In the Mystic supply the daily average 
consumption for the year 1882 was . 6,574,400 

The daily average for the first eight 
months of 1883 [being the non-inspection 
period] was 7,224,175 

A net daily average increase of . . 649,775 

And the net daily average increase of 
1882 over 1881 was .... 330,300 

The daily average consumption in the 
Mystic for the first eight months of 1883 
[the non-inspection period] was . . 7,224,175 

And for the last four months after in- 
spection began ..... 6,011,412 

A daily average reduction of . . 1,212,763 

The average consumption per head per 
day for the year 1882 [discarding frac- 
tions] was ....... 89 

And for the non-inspection period of 
1883, eight months, from January to Sep- 
tember, it was ..... 921 

For the corresponding period of 1884, 69 

Showing a net average reduction of 20 gallons per head in 
1884 over 1882 and 23^ gallons over 1883. 

It is also a matter of note that the large decrease in con- 
sumption materially lessens the cost of pumping, the saving 
in coal at the Highland pumping-station alone being 35 per 
cent, for the first eight months of 1884 over the corresponding 
period of last year. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 7 

These figures and the results accomplished by the Inspec- 
tion and Waste Division demonstrate beyond question the 
wisdom, as well as the paramount necessity, for the adoption 
of measures to check permanently the prodigal waste which 
prevails. Unless some radical system be adopted, which 
will keep the consumption down to 60 gallons or less per 
capita, the tax-payers of Boston will be compelled, at a very 
early day, to expend several hundred thousand dollars in the 
erection of additional reservoirs, and several millions of 
dollars in obtaining a new source of supply. 

The city of Providence, with relatively the same industrial 
interests and class of people as our own community, keeps 
her consumption down to about 36 gallons per head per day. 
That of Boston for July, 1883, was 102 gallons per head 
each day, and in July of the present year, under the inspec- 
tion system, 69 gallons per head. It will be observed that, 
even with this great reduction of the present year, we are 
still using nearly 100 per cent, greater amount of waterier 
capita, than our more prudent neighbor. 

In Providence, however, it should be said that more than 
50 per cent, of her consumers are supplied by the meter or 
measurement system, while with us scarcely 10 per cent, are 
supplied by this method ; and that Providence is, perhaps, 
the only city in the United States which has undertaken to 
manage its water interests with the same reference to busi- 
ness principles that prevails among business men everywhere. 
We predict that all the large towns and cities will be com- 
pelled to follow her example in the near future. 

In connection with the house-to-house inspection system, 
and as a natural and necessary supplement thereto, the Board 
adopted the policy recommended in its December report (see 
page 50), and which was substantially as follows : — 

1st. To put recording meters on all manufactories, breweries, stores, 
business establishments, hotels, tenement-houses, and all other places 
where a large quantity of water is used, or where waste prevails. 

2d. To establish Deacon waste-detectors in the residential portions 
of the territory supplied with water, making specific districts, and doing 
the work in conjunction with the house-to-house inspection. 

3d. To begin the putting in of sidewalk stopcocks at once, adopting 
the Church stopcocks as the best complement to the Deacon, if the fur- 
ther trials continue to prove its excellence. 

Keference to the reports of Water Registrars Davis and 
Caldwell, and Superintendent Cutts, will show that recording 
meters have been applied in accordance with this original 
plan. The meters used have been largely those of the 
Tremont pattern, and have been furnished under the condi- 
tions of the bond of the company, as set forth upon page 28 



8 City Document No. 123. 

of the September report. They have been dehvered as fast 
as the city could use them, and have proven generally satis- 
factory, both with reference to workmanship and accuracy ; 
and we have no occasion to find fault with the manner in 
which the company has met all our requirements, and dis- 
charged its bonded obligations to the department. 

The Deacon system of waste-detectors is at this writing 
(September 1) fully applied to the Cochituate Department. 
It will be remembered that this system was thoroughly tested 
in the Mystic Department, in 1882, by Assistant Engineer Dex- 
ter Brackett, and was most heartily approved and recommended 
by Mr. Henry M. Wightmau, the Engineer of the Board, 
and Alderman Greenough, the chairman of the Water 
Committee, before the present Water Board was appointed. 
To these gentlemen, therefore, should be given in large 
part the credit of introducing this very efficient system 
into Boston, the first city in the United States to adopt 
it. We now have some 75 of the Deacon detectors in opera- 
tion, and the work being done by them is of a very satisfac- 
tory character. 

The Board was directed by the City Council, on the 19th 
of December, 1882, to make an examination of the merits of 
the Church stopcock. In accordance with this instruction 
a very elaborate and thorough series of tests were made last 
year, under the supervision of Assistant Engineer Dexter 
Brackett, and a full report of the same appeared in the report 
of December 6, 1883, page 40. Since that time Mr. Henry 
M. Wightman, Engineer of the Board, has made various ex- 
periments with this stopcock, and several important changes 
have been made in it as the result of his suggestions. The 
inventor, Chief Engineer B. S. Church, of the New York 
Aqueduct Commission, has also made a very valuable addi- 
tion to the instrument, by means of which the particular floor 
upon which the water may be leaking or running is indicated 
on the dial attached to the stopcock in the sidewalk. 

The Board has been conducting tests and experiments Avith 
this invention for more than 12 months, and is satisfied 
that it is altogether the best stopcock, for general pur- 
poses and waste-water detection combined, ever invented. 
No city or town having a water supply should be without a 
complete system of sidewalk stopcocks. Every service ap- 
plied in Boston for the past few years has been accompanied 
by such a stopcock. The failure of our water authorities to 
apply them originally was a grave mistake, and one which 
no other large community save New York has committed. 
The plan of the Board, following the recommendation of the 
Engineer, is to gradually apply these instruments until the 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 9 

city has its full complement. At this writing (September 1), 
the Church stopcock has been adopted by the Board, and 
5,000 of them have been ordered. It is not the intention of 
the Board to ask for additional appropriations to extend this 
system, but to endeavor thus to extend it from the annual 
appropriations. The necessity of the early application of 
sidewalk stopcocks was presented in our report of Do- 
ber (page 48), and has frequently been urged by Engineer 
Wightman. 

Bell Waterphone. 

We have also made extensive experiments with the Bell 
waterphone, which has been used very successfully in Cin- 
cinati and Philadelphia, and is about to be introduced in New 
York. Our experiments, however, were not successful, for 
the reason that, in the absence of sidewalk stopcocks, wires 
were used to connect the waterphone with the service-pipe, 
and the results were unsatisfactory. We contemplate giving 
this system another trial, at an early day, in the Mystic De- 
partment, where sidewalk stopcocks exist, and where the 
same conditions will obtain as in other cities in which it has 
met with success. 

In this connection it may be well for us to cite the expe- 
rience of other cities with reference to this waste problem, 
for the purpose of showing that other communities are 
engaged in the same work as ourselves, and are meeting 
with the same difficulties. 

Commissioner Campbell, of the New York Board of Public 
Works, in his report of 1879, says : — 

It is well known that great waste takes place in private dwellings 
from defective plumbing and neglect to close faucets at night. In the 
winter season water is often purposely lelt running at night to prevent 
freezing in the pipes. From observations made it was found that water 
was being wasted in several houses at the rate of from 10 to 60 gallons 
an hour, the average waste at 14 houses examined being at the rate of 
about 17 gallons per hour. A liberal and even abundant supply of 
water should be furnished by cities for domestic consumption, but 
waste from negligence and inferior and unprotected plumbing must be 
suppressed. The effect will be to improve the pressures, which have 
been deci'eased by the rapid extension of the water-mains to keep jjace 
with the growth of the city (N.Y.). If the same rate of average waste 
occurs thi'ough the city (N.Y.) the entire waste would exceed 
40,000,000 gallons per day ; there is every reason to believe the above 
a low estimate of the average waste of the city. 

His successor, Hon. Hubert O. Thompson, in his report 

of 1881, says : — 

The existence of inexcusable and wanton waste in private houses, 
amounting in the aggregate to enormous quantities, has been shown by 



10 City Document No. 123. 

the system of inspection recently established to observe the floAv of water 
from house-drains into sewers, during the hours from midnight to 6 
A.M. The result of 426 examinations was as follows : — 

311 houses, flow of water less than 1 gallon per minute. 
102 houses, flow of water 1 to 6 gallons per minute. 
11 houses, flow of water 6 to 15 gallons per minute. 
2 houses, flow of water 30 gallons per minute. 

I trust that further argument as to the necessity of stopping this waste 
is superfluous, and as to the means of accomplishing the object it is quite 
evident that it can only be done by an apparatus or instrument on service- 
pipes by which the flow of water into any building can be I'eadily ascer- 
tained at any time. 

Chief Engineer William Ludlow, of Philadelphia, in his 
report of 1884, says : — 

We pump say 65,000,000 gallons of water per day ; of this possibly 
not less than 35,000,000 gallons are absolutely wasted. In other words, 
more than one-half of all the water pumped into the mains and reservoirs 
sinks into the ground, or runs through the sewers into the rivers, with- 
out having served a single useful purpose. By water wasted I mean 
that which serves no useful purpose, does no good to any one, and in 
many cases exercises an influence prejudicial to health, and even to clean- 
liness. The leakages from defective services and leaking attachments 
amount to 5 per cent. ; the leakages from these and from horse-troughs 
amount to 37,000,000 gallons per day. An ordinary wash-basin running 
day and night will waste over 500,000 gallons a year. A hydrant 
allowed to run constantly wastes 1,500,000 gallons a year. In one 
block of buildings, in the vicinity of Third and Walnut streets, out of 
191 stopcocks 57, or 30 per cent, of the whole number, indicated that 
water was being wasted in the houses. I would not limit the free use 
of water, but facilitate and increase it. In order to enable everybody to 
have enough water this useless waste should be stopped. 

The European cities, in genei'al, are content with a daily supply which 
we ^hould consider aljsurdly inadequate, as Vienna and Berlin, with a 
daily allowance of 15 or 18 gallons, or St. Petersburg, with 22 gallons. 

In Pai'is, however, where, although the domestic use is limited, large 
amounts are used in keeping the streets clean, the daily consumption 
is about 42 gallons per capita. In the principal cities of Great Britain 
the supply averages from 35 to 40 gallons per head; and in London, 
which in its general features approaches perhaps more nearly than, 
any other to those of Philadelphia, the daily supply is about 31i British, 
or 37^ United States, gallons. It may therefore be safely assumed that 
40 gallons per day per head of population is ample for all purposes for 
which the water is legitimately used, this amount being divided nearly 
as follows : — 

Gallons. 

For domestic uses 20 

Manufacturing purposes ........ 15 

Sprinkling streets, etc 2 

Fountains ........... 2 

Fire purposes 1 

Total 40 

It follows that about 57 per cent, only of the consumption is used, 
and 43 per cent, is wasted. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 11 

In general, in all the American cities where the subject has been ex- 
amined, the estimates of waste are from 25 to 75 per cent, of the total 
supply. It may be assumed, then, with much confidence, that 40 gallons 
per day per head of population is an ample amount for all purjposes. 

The Bell waterphone is used in Philadelphia. 
The Cincinnati Water Committee, under date of April 4, 
1884, report as follows : — 

The Cincinnati Water Works have used the Bell Waterphone sys- 
tem for two years, with the following results : — 

Waterphone in use. 
1881. 1882. 1883. 

Millions gallons used . . . 8,397 7,126 7,028 

Gallons waterier capita . . 87 69 66 

Cost of fuel . . . . $75,527.63 $58,891.85 $54,671.75 

These results show a reduction in the quantity of water used during 
1883 of 1,369 millions of gallons as against the consumption in 1881, 
and a reduction in the cost of fuel of $20,855.88 in 1883, as against its 
cost in 1881 ; and these very satisfactory results without taking into any 
consideration the increase of the city's population or the increase of 
water system. The reduction in the quantity of water used, viz., 66 
gallons ^jer capita in 1883 as against 87 gallons per capita in 1881, is 
the most convincing proof of the valuable work resulting from the use 
of the waterphone system for the detection of wastes. In addition to 
the reduction in water and fuel the city of Cincinnati was unques- 
tionably saved from a water famine during the floods of 1883 and 1884 
by the use of the watei-phone ; for the large underground waste had 
been stopped, the consumers educated to a more careful use of water, 
and the supply so systematically controlled that, with some additional 
exei'tion, the consumption was maintained from the small storage 
in the reservoirs during the two weeks' cessation of pumping. 

Complaints. 

It is a matter of frequent complaint that the system of 
house-to-house inspection established by the Board is annoy- 
ing to water-takers, and that the frequent visitations of in- 
spectors to premises of water-takers is looked upon as a 
system of espionage liable to become very disagreeable and 
unpopular. 

There may perhaps be some measure of truth in these 
complaints, but there is no present remedy. There is but 
one other large city in the country so deficient in sidewalk 
stopcocks as Boston ; and until these are generally applied, 
and the recording-meter service largely extended, we must 
continue the house-to-house inspection system, or submit to 
the prodigal waste which has hitherto prevailed. There is no 
middle ground. People will not repair their defective fixtures, 
and will not stop wasting water, unless compelled to do so by 
official visitation, or by the adoption of a measurement system 
which will oblige them to pay for all the water used. The 
city must either be content to buy a new supply, and furnish 
water literally as free as air, or it must apply such restrictive 
measures as now prevail in Boston. 



12 City Document No. 123. 

Our inspection corps is composed of gentlemanly officials. 
Special instructions are given with reference to the courteous 
treatment of water-takers. Each officer is provided with a 
badge, which must always be worn in sight when on duty, 
and a commission which he must exhibit on demand. We 
have frequently had the whole corps of inspectors before 
the Board, specially to instruct them with reference to these 
matters. Whenever complaints are made in this direction 
the Board causes them to be thoroughly investigated, and 
prompt action is always taken. 

The Board has used every precaution, and adopted every 
possible measure, to insure courteous treatment to the water- 
takers and secure efficient results to the city. This system, 
vigorously followed up, will prevent a large part of the daily 
waste ; and no other method will accomplish it except the 
recording-meter or measurement system. When this is ap- 
plied, and people are required to pay for water as they do 
for gas, they will not waste it. The meter or measurement 
system could not be universally applied to Boston except at 
a very large expense, and even then it would require several 
years. 

Recognizing these difficulties the Board adopted the only 
feasible plan of reducing the consumption, that of an effi- 
cient house-to-house inspection ; and the results have jus- 
tified its action. 

The constant visitations of officials to the premises of water- 
takers may be annoying, but there is no other way to grapple 
successfully with the waste question in large communities 
except by applying a recording meter to every service in the 
city, or providing an unlimited supply ; and both remedies 
are at present impracticable. 

Prevention of Pollution and Improvement in the 
Quality of the Water. 

The water supplied during the past year has been of better 
qualit}^ than for several years previous, and is undoubtedly 
as pure as that furnished to any city in the United States at 
the present time. 

Advantage was taken of the severe drought of last season 
to cleanse, as far as possible, the sources of the Mystic supply, 
and to remove the loam or muck in the reservoirs of the 
Cochituate supply. 

The aqueducts were also cleansed twice during the year. 
This work was done under the immediate direction of Su- 
perintendents FitzGerald and Brown, and the general supervi- 
sion of Mr. Henry M. Wightman, the Engineer of the Board. 



Report of the Water Board. 13 

The work at Basin No. 2 was particularly well done : up- 
wards of 139,000 cubic yards of loam were removed, the 
capacity increased some 50,000,000 of gallons, and the reser- 
voir rendered one of the best in our system. 

We ask your attention to the reports of Messrs. FitzGer- 
ald and Wightman upon this matter, as evidencing some of 
the reasons why the quality of our supply is so much im- 
proved. 

The Board, in December last (see pages 16 and 54 of re- 
port of Dec. 6), asked for an appropriation of $14,000, "for 
the protection of the water interests of the city at Pegan 
Brook and elsewhere." The object of this appropriation was 
twofold, as explained to the Water Committee at the time ; 
in part to repair and extend, if required, the filtration works 
at Lake Cochituate, and in part to secure such legislation as 
would enable us to compel any persons or corporations emp- 
tying refuse or sewage into our water sources, to imme- 
diately cease such pollution. 

The members of the Board used every proper eifort in 
their power to secure such legislation as, in the judgment of 
the City Solicitor, would accomplish this object, and they 
were successful. 

We believe that Boston, under the law as amended by the 
Legislature of last winter, is now in condition to compel all 
persons draining house sewage, factory refuse, human excre- 
ment, or other contaminating substances, into our water 
sources, to find immediately other receptacles for such filth. 
An official notice (at this date, September 1) has been issued 
to all such violators to stop such pollution ; and prosecutions 
will be instituted against all persons or corporations failing 
to comply. We regard this as one of the most important 
legislative results secured for Boston in many years. The 
amount thus far expended in this interest is $3,775.92, which 
may be considered a small expenditure in view of the im- 
portant legislation secured. With the new reservoir Basin 
No. 4 completed ; with Basin No. 2 in first-class condition ; 
with the money in hand to cleanse Basin No. 3 as soon as 
the condition of the supply will permit ; with a law suffi- 
ciently broad to enable us to prevent the pollution of our 
sources, — there would seem to be no good reason why, in the 
near future, the people of our city may not experience the 
blessing of an assured supply of pure water. 

With reference to the sewage pollutions in the Mystic 
Department, and the general condition of afiiiirs in connec- 
tion with the care of the Mystic sewage, and of all matters 
relating thereto, we refer you to the able and exhaustive 
report of the engineer of the Board, herewith appended. 



14 City Document No. 123. 

At this writing (September 1) a large Farquhar-Oldham 
filter is being erected at the mystic pumping-station to prop- 
erly care for the sewage, as provided by the act of May 13, 
1881. 

Work upon the Reservoirs. 

The reservoirs are in a very satisfactory condition, and a 
reference to the accompanying reports of the Engineers and 
Superintendent FitzGerald will afford complete information, 
in detail, of what has been accomplished during the past 
year. The shallow flowage excavations in Basin 2 have 
been completed, and the work upon Basin 3, which was 
begun last fall, will be continued as soon as the condition of 
the supply will permit. 

The work upon the new reservoir at Ashland, Basin No. 
4, has been pushed forward this year with great energy. 
The new Superintendent, Mr. T. C. Davis, appointed in 
February last, has proved a most capable officer, managing 
the work most efficiently and economically. 

Early last year the Board concluded that a change was de- 
sirable in the superintendency of the work. 

We selected as the new Superintendent, Mr. W. F. 
Learned, who had been in the employ of the city for some 
eighteen years as Assistant Engineer, and who, during that 
time, had frequently been in charge of similar work. Mr. 
Learned is an honest man, and means, unquestionably, to be 
a faithful and painstaking public official ; but the work at 
Basin 4 seemed to be of greater magnitude than he could 
manage with business skill and economy. The present 
method of general supervision provided by the city ordi- 
nances is such that it is quite difficult for the Board to keep 
constantly advised of the mechanical details of construction 
work. 

Reference to the report of Engineer Wightman will afford 
full particulars regarding the progress and present condition 
of the work. The present appropriations will probably not 
be sufficient to complete the basin ; and should this prove to 
be the case it will be made a matter of special communication 
to the City Council. 

High-Service. 

We ask your attention to our recommendations of Sep- 
tember 6 (see report, page 16), and of December 6 (pages 
10 and 11), upon the question of the extension of the high- 
service. All that was then said we now repeat, and in 
addition refer you to the accompanying report of Engineer 
Wightman. This is one of the important questions of the 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 15 

early future, and in our judgment it should be considered 
and acted upon the present year. The policy of delay upon 
this matter is a wrong policy. 

Jamaica-Pond Aqueduct Corporation. 

We ask your reference to our December report (pages 
16, 17, 18) to this matter, renewing our recommendation that 
the proposition of the corporation be examined and consid- 
ered by the City Council. 

Finances. 

In making up the annual estimates of receipts and expenses 
our predecessors calculated upon a deficit of $70,914. The 
business of the year, however, not only met this estimated 
deficit, but yielded an excess of income over requirements 
of $14,777.39, which may be considered a very gratifying 
result. 

Eates. 

The Board has had in contemplation for several months 
a reorganization of the present system of assessing the water- 
rates. The several examinations made by the officials of the 
Inspection and Waste Division have developed the fact that 
the assessment, so far as related to fixtures, was based upon 
insufficient information, and that it would be materially ad- 
vantageous both to the city and the water-takers to rearrange, 
in whole or in part, the present system. This work will be 
done in the early autumn, and we confidently expect it will 
result in a more uniform and equable system. 

In conclusion, we may very properly and justly claim that 
the water-supply of Boston is in better condition than it has 
been for many years. 

The water for the past year has been as pure as that 
supplied to any city in the country ; and, with the improve- 
ments now in progress, we see no good reason why this 
standard of purity should not continue. It is true that the 
conditions of the weather have been unusually favorable, and 
much no doubt may justly be attributed to this fact ; but all 
that zealous watchfulness and efficient labor could do to 
secure and protect the purity of the water-supply has been 
done, and we believe if the policy already entered upon, of 
cleansing the reservoirs, stopping the pollutions and reducing 
the consumption, be vigorously pursued, that the city of 
Boston will not only have a pure and abundant present 
supply, but that the necessity of extending the reservoir 
system and securing new sources of supply may be postponed 
for many years, and the city thus be saved an expenditure ot 
several millions of dollars. 



16 



City Document No. 123. 



General Statistics. 



SUDBTJRT AND COCHITUATB "WOBKS. 



Daily average consumption in gallons 

Daily average consumption in gallons per inhabitant 
Dailj- average amount used through meters, gallons 

Percentage of total consumption metered 

Number of sei'vices 

Kumber of meters and motors 

Length of supply and distributing mains, in miles . 

Number of fire-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates 

Yearly revenue from metered water 

Percentage of total revenue from metered water . . 

Cost of works on May 1, 1883 and 1884 

Yearly expense of maintenance 

Mtstic Works. 

Daily average consumption in gallons 

Daily average consumption in gallons per inhabitant 
Daily average amount used through meters, gallons 

Percentage of total consumption metered 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 

Length of supply and distributing mains, in miles . 

Number of fire-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates 

Yearly revenue from metered water 

Percentage of total revenue from metered water . . 

Cost of works on May 1, 1883 and 1884 

Yearly expense of maintenance 



1882. 



1883. 



31,970,800 


32,836,900 


91 


91 


4,387,530 


5,085,600 


13.7 


15.5 


48,160 


49,290 


2,463 


2,919 


367.2 


378.0 


4,320 


4,446 


$1,127,982 32 


$1,167,704 17 


$319,785 42 


$371,074 61 


28.4 


31.8 


$17,184,751 14 


$17,775,955 68 


$249,064 71 


$300,851 34 


6,574,400 


7,093,500 


77.0 


82.5 


800,830 


933,150 


12.2 


13.1 


13,992 


14,453 


405 


501 


146.0 


147.2 


748 


770 


$245,981 85 


$259,791 28 


$58,459 80 


$68,116 91 


23.8 


26.2 


$1,641,762 22 


$1,648,452 35 


$84,483 87 


$116,572 94 



Eeport of the Water Board. 17 



Earnings of the Works. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water Works from all 
sources, for the year ending April 30, 1884, are as follows, 
viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $1,199,657 10 

Income from shutting oflf and letting on water, 

and fees 2,658 25 

Service-pipes, sale of old material, etc. . 14,058 79 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . 10,087 41 

Stock on hand May 1, 1883, $102,083 96 
Decrease in valuation of stock, 

March 15, 1883 . $9,550 82 
Less profits in manu- 

facturinghy drants , 

etc., etc., for the 

year ending March 

15, 1883 . . 6,346 50 



3,204 32 



98,879 64 
$1,325,341 19 



The total amount charged to Cochituate 
Water Works for the year ending April 30, 
1884, is as follows, viz. : — 

Current expenses . . . $300,851 34 

Extension of works paid for ' 

out of income . . . 96,389 69 

Interest on funded debt . . 639,213 41 



$1,036,454 44 



Balance, April 30, 1884 . $288,886 75 



Stock on hand, April 30, 1884, $79,628 36 
On hand to be paid to Cochitu- 
ate Water Sinking-Fund . 209,258 39 



$288,886 75 



Excess of income over expendi- 
tures for 1883-84 . . . $209,258 39 

Amount required for Sinking- 
Fund for 1883-84 . . . 194,481 00 



Excess of income over requirements . . $14,777 39 



18 



City Document No. 123. 



Loans at this date, 
exclusive of the Additional Supply, are as follows : — 



The outstanding Cochituate Water 



5 per cent. Sterling 


Loan 










(£399,500) 


. $1,947,273 98 




Due Oct. 


1, 


1902 


5 per cent. Loans. 


100,000 00 


$100,000 


Due April 


1 


1906 


6 per cent. Loan . 


1,000 00 


1,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 


1907 






' 500,000 


Due Dec. 


12, 


1897 






450,000 


Due June 


16 


1898 






540,000 


Due Oct. 


3 


1898 






250,000 


Due April 


27 


1899 






625,000 


Due Jan. 




1901 






688,000 


Due April 




1901 






330,000 


Due July 




1901 






413,000 


Due April 




1903 


6 per cent. Loans 


. 4,253,000 00 ■ 


38,000 
161,000 


Due Ajjril 
Due Jan. 




1904 
1905 






142,700 


Due April 




1905 






6,000 


Due Oct. 




1905 






82,550 


Due Jan. 




1906 






8,750 


Due April 




19U6 






4,000 


Due Oct. 




1906 






8,000 


Due Jan. 




1907 






5,000 


Due April 




1907 






1,000 


Due July- 




1907 






("280,000 


Due April 




1910 


4 per cent. Loan 


657,000 00 


\ 120.000 


Due July 




1913 






(257,000 


Due Jan. 




1914 




$6,958,273 98 





The total receipts of the Mystic Water Works, from all 
sources, for the year ending April 30, 1884, are as follows, 
viz. : — 



Stock on hand, May 1, 1883 . 

Income from sales of water .... 

Income from shutting off and letting on water, 
and fees ....... 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . 

Receipts by Mystic Water Registrar, for service- 
pipes, etc. ...... 



The total amount charged to Mystic Water 
Works for the year ending April 30, 1884, is 
as follows, viz. : — 

Current expenses . . . $116,572 94 

Extension of works paid for out 

of income .... 556 53 



$24,622 62 

266,401 20 

272 00 

2,332 42 

2,580 98 

$296,209 22 



Amounts carried forward, $117,129 47 $296,209 22 



Eeport of the Water Board. 19 

Amounts hrougJitforiuard, $117,129 47 $296,209 22 
Interest on funded deSt . . 53,860 00 
Amount paid Chelsea, Somer- 
ville, and Everett, under con- 
tracts 37,508 51 



208,497 98 



Balance, April 30, 1884 .... $87,711 24 



Stock on hand, April 30, 1884 . $16,708 74 
On hand to be paid to Mystic 

Water Sinking-Fund . . 71,002 50 



$87,711 24 



Amount required for Sinking- 
Fund for year 1883-84 ^ . $71,032 00 

Excess of income over expendi- 
tures for year 1883-84 . . 71,002 50 



Excess of requirements over income . . $29 50 

The outstanding Mystic Water loans at this date are as 
follows : — 



6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Water Loans . 



5 per cent, currency 
Mystic Water Loans . 

6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Sewer Loans . 

4 per cent. Loan 



Mystic Sewer. 

Balance of loan, April 30, 1883 . . . $7,256 02 
Payments during year 1883-84 . . . 6,133 60 



- 


f $1,000 


Due April 




1885 




35,000 


Due April 




1886 




60,000 


Due Oct. 




1886 




50,000 


Due Oct. 




1887 




3,000 


Due April 




18.^8 


$587,000 00^ 


100,000 


Due July 




1890 




51,000 


Due Jan. 




1891 




139,000 


Due July 




1891 




67,000 


Due Jan. 




1892 




42,000 


Due July 




1892 




[ 39,000 


Due July 




1893 


108,000 00 ! 


6,000 
102,000 


Due Oct. 
Due April 




1893 
1894 


130,000 00 


130 000 


Due April 




1886 


15,000 00 


15,000 00 


Due Oct. 




1913 


$840,000 00 





Balance unexpended April 30, 1884 . $1,122 42 



20 



City Document No. 123. 



The following statement shows the appropriations by the 
City Council for an additional supply of water, with the 
loans issued to meet them, and the amount of expenditures 
to this date : — 



Additional Supply of Water. 



APPROPRIATIONS . 

Oct. 21, 1871. — Transfer from Reserved Fund 

Apr. 12, 1872. — Order for Treasurer to borrow 

Apr. 11, 1873.— 

Feb. 26, 1875.— 

July 1, 1876.— 

Apr. 20, 1878,— 

Apr. 11, 1879.— 

Aug. 17, 1881.— 

' June 2, 1883. — 

Total appropriations to April 30, 1884 



$10,000 00 
100,000 00 
500,000 00 
1,500,000 00 
2,000,000 00 
600,000 00 
350,000 00 
324,000 00 
621,000 00 

$6,005,000 00 



Oct. 1, 1875. — Premium on $1,000,000 bonds, under 

order of Feb. 26, 1875 . $83,700 00 
April 1, 1876. — Premium on $452,000 

bonds, under order of 

Feb. 26, 1875 . . 47,786 80 

Oct. 1, 1876. — Premium on $2,000,000 

bonds, under order of 

July 1, 1876 . . . 221,400 00 



352,886 80 
3,357,886 80 



1871-72 
1872-73 

1873-74 including $20 
on bonds 



1874-75 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1883-84 



1874 



EXPENDED. 



,897.50, discount 
sold, Januaiy, 



$2,302 81 
61,278 83 



114,102 77 

224,956 68 

783,613 49 

1,924,060 24 

1,257,715 26 

635,658 08 

213,350 97 

97,406 78 

35,677 98 

167,621 43 

423,625 79 



5,941,371 11 



Balance of appropriations unexpended, April 30, 1884 $416,515 69 



^ Loans for $27,000 of this appropriation not yet issued. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



21 



Balance of loans, April 30, 1883, $219,141 48 
Loans issued in 1883-84 . . 594,000 00 



Payments during year 1883-84 

Balance unexpended, April 30, 1884 



1,141 48 
. 423,625 79 



,515 69 



The outstanding loans which were made on account of 
Additional Supply of Water are as follows : — 



4 per cent. Loans 

5 per cent. Loans 

6 per cent. Loan 

6 per cent. Loans 
4^ per cent. Loan 





^ $324,000 


Due April 1 , 


1912 




82,000 


Due July 1, 


1908 


. $1,548,000 < 


. 588,000 . 
336,000 


Due April 1, 
Due Oct. 1, 


1908 
1913 




209,000 


Due Jan. 1, 


1914 




9,000 


Due April 1, 


1914 




( 1,000,000 


Due Oct. 1, 


1905 


. 3,452,000- 


} 452,000 


Due April 1, 


1906 




( 2,000,000 


Due Oct. 1, 


1906 


12,000 




Due April 1, 


1908 




f 100,000 


Due July 1, 


1902 


644,000 < 


492,000 


Due April 1, 


1903 


8,000 


Due Jan'y 1, 


1904 




44,000 


Due July 1, 


1905 


268,000 




Due Oct. 1, 


1908 


$5,924,000 





WM. A. SIMMONS, Chairman. 
GEO. M. HOBBS, 
JOHN G. BLAKE. 



EEPOET OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Boston Watee Board, 

Boston, May 1, 1884. 
Hon. Wm. A. Simmons, 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The following is a statement of the receipts and 
expenditures of the Boston Water Board for the financial 
year ending April 30, 1884 : — 

Receipts. 

On account of Cochituate Water Works . $1,226,461 55 
" Mystic Water Works . . 271,586 60 



Balance of loans unexpended 

April 30, 1883, Additional 

SupplyofWater,$219,141 48 
Loans issued in 

1883-4 . . 594,000 00 

$813,141 48 

Mystic Sewer. . . . 7,256 02 
Balance Appropriation, New 

Main, Cochituate Water 

Works . . $9,486 78 
Loan issued in 

1883-84 . . 70,000 00 

79,486 78 



$1,498,048 15 



Appropriation, Chestnut-Hill 

Driveway, 1883-84 . . 3,000 00 

Appropriation Litroduction of 
meters and Inspection, Co- 
chituate Water Works . 330,000 00 

Appropriation Introduction of 
meters and Inspection, Mys- 
tic Water Works . . 15,000 00 



Amounts carried forward, $1,247,884 28 $1,498,048 15 



Repoet of the Water Board. 23 

Amounts brougJit forward, $1,247,884 28 $1,498,048 15 
Stock purchased in previous 

years, Cochituate Water 

Works . . . . 98,879 64 
Mystic Water Works . . 24,622 62 

1,371,386 54 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses, Cochituate 

Waterworks . . . $300,851 34 

Current expenses, Mystic 

Waterworks . . . 116,572 94 

Extension of Cochituate Water 

Works .... 96,389 69 

Extension of Mystic Water 

Works .... 556 53 

Interest on Cochituate Water 

Loans .... 639,213 41 

Interest on Mystic Water 

Loans .... 53,860 00 

Chelsea, Somerville, and Ev- 
erett contracts, account 
Mystic Water Works . 37,508 51 

Construction New Main, Co- 
chituate Water Works 71,189 06 

Construction, Additional Sup- 
ply of water . . . 423,625 79 

Construction, Mystic Sewer . 6,133 60 

Introduction of Meters and In- 
spection, Cochituate Water 
Works . . . . 50,168 14 

Introduction of Meters and 
Inspection, Mystic Water 
Works .... 3,458 73 

Surplus Income of Cochituate 
Water Works to be paid to 
Cochituate Water Sinking- 

• Fund .... 209,258 39 

Surplus Income of Mystic 
Water Works to be paid to 
Mystic Water Sinking-Fund 71,002 50 

Chestnut-Hill Driveway . 2,998 26 



$2,869,434 69 



Amounts carried forward, $2,082,786 89 $2,869,4.34 69 



24 City Document No. 123. 

Amounts brought forioard, $2,082,786 89 $2,869,434 69 
Balance of Appropriation 
Chestnut-Hill Driveway, 
carried into the Treasury, 
April 30, 1884 ... 1 74 









fl)^,\lOZ/, 1 (JU Uli 




$786,646 06 


April 30, 1884, Balance of 








loans unexpended, Addi- 








tional Supply of Water 


$389,515 


69 




Mystic Sewer 


1,122 


42 




New Main, Cochituate Water 








Works .... 


8,297 


72 




Introduction of Meters and In- 








spection, Cochituate Water 








Works . 


274,654 


36 




Introduction of Meters and 








Inspection, Mystic Water 








Works .... 


11,541 


27 




Stock on hand, April 30, 1884, 








Cochituate Water Works . 


79,628 


36 




Mystic Water Works 


16,708 


74 




Introduction of Meters and 








Inspection, Cochituate Wa- 








ter Works 


5,177 


50 


$786,646 06 









Total Water DeM of the City of Boston. 
Cochituate, outstanding- 
April 30, 1884 . . $12,882,273 98 
Mystic, outstanding, April 

30, 1884 . . . 840,000 00 

$13,722,273 98 



Cochituate Water Debt. 
Outstanding, April 30, 

1883 .... 111,955,273 98 
Issued in 1883-84 . . 994,000 00 



$12,949,273 98 
Paid in 1883-84 . . 67,000 00 

$12,882,273 98 



Report of the Water Board. 25 

Mystic Water Debt. 

Outstanding, April 30, 

18«3 .... $1,027,000 00 
Issued in 1883-84 . . 15,000 00 



$1,042,000 00 
Paid in 1883-84 . . . 202,000 00 



$840,000 00 



Total Water Sinking-Funds, April 30, 1884. 

Cochituate Water Sinking- 
Fund .... $2,746,505 58 

Mystic Water Sinking- 
Fund .... 330,540 15 

$3,077,045 73 



Ti'ial Balance, Cochituate Water Works, April 30, 1884. 

Dr. Or. 

Construction Account . $17,775,955 68 

Cochituate WaterWorks . $17,775,955 68 

City Treasurer, Loan Ac- 
count . ... . 1,222,628 26 

Appropriation, Additional 

Supply of Water . . 389,515 69 

Appropriation, New Main, 

Cochituate Water Works . 8,297 72 

Appropriation, Introduction 

of Meters and Inspection . 279,831 86 

Income of Cochituate Water 

Works .... 1,325,341 19 

Maintenance of Cochituate 

Water Works . . . 300,851 34 

Extension of Cochituate Wa- 
ter Works . . . 96,389 69 

Interest on Cochituate Water 

Loans .... 639,213 41 

Stock Account . . . 79,628 36 

Stock, Introduction of Meters - 

and Inspection . . . 5,177 50 

City Treasurer, Revenue Ac- 
count .... 1,226,461 55 



Amounts carried forward, %2l,?)4.Q,d>Qb 79 $19,778,942 14 



26 City Document No. 123. 

Amounts brought foriuard, $21,34:^,^05 79 $19,778,942 14 

Appropriation, Chestnut-Hill 

Driveway .... 1 74 

City Treasurer, Appropriation 

Account .... 3,000 00 

City Treasurer . . . 1,570,361 91 

Funded Debt . . 12,882,273 98 

Cochituate Water 6<^ Cur- 
rency Loan . . . 4,897,000 00 

Cochituate Water 5% Cur- 
rency Loan . . . 13,000 00 

Cochituate Water 5^ Gold 

Loan .... 3,552,000 00 

Cochituate Water 5 % Sterling 

Loan .... 1,947,273 98 

Cochituate Water 4% Cur- 
rency Loan . . . 588,000 00 

Cochituate Water 4% Loan . 1,617,000 00 

Cochituate Water 4^% Loan . 268,000 00 

Commissioners on the Sinking- 

Funds .... 2,746,505 58 

Cochituate Water Sinking- 

Fund .... 2,746,505 58 



$36,978,085 35 $36,978,085 35 



Trial Balance, Mystic Water Works, April 30, 1884. 

Gr. Dr. 

Construction . . $1,648,452 35 

Mystic Water Works . . $1,648,452 35 

City Treasurer, Revenue Ac- 
count .... 271,586 60 

Income of Mystic Water 

Works .... 296,209 22 

Maintenance of Mystic Water 

Works .... 116,572 94 

Extension of Mystic Water 

Works . . . . 556 53 

Interest on Mystic Water 

Loans .... 53,860 00 

Chelsea, Somerville, and Ev- 
erett contracts . . . 37,508 51 

Stock Account . . . 16,708 74 

City Treasurer, Loan Account, 22,256 02 



Amounts carried forward, $2,167,501 69 $1,944,661 57 



EePOET or THE 


Water Board 


27 


Amounts brought forward, $2,167,501 


69 $1,944,661 57 


Introduction of Meters, and 








Inspection 






11,541 27 


Appropriation, Mystic Sewer, 






1,122 42 


City Treasurer 






210,176 43 


Funded Mystic Water Debt . 


840,000 


00 




Mystic Water 6% Currency 








Loan .... 






587,000 00 


Mystic Water 5% Currency 








Loan .... 






108,000 00 


Mystic Water 4% Loan 






15,000 00 


Mystic Sewer 6% Currency 








Loan .... 






130,000 00 


Commissioners on the Sinking- 








Funds .... 


330,540 


15 




Mystic Water Sinking-Fund . 






330 540 15 


13,338,041 


84 


$3,338,041 84 



Cost of Construction of the Gochituate Water Works to 
May 1, 1884. 

Cost of Water Works to January 1, 1850, as 
per final report of Water Commissioners 

Extension to East Boston . 

Jamaica-pond aqueduct 

New dam at Lake Cochituate 

Eaising lake two feet, including damages 

Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con- 
nections with lake . 

New main from Brookline reservoir 

Land and water rights and land damages 
since January 1, 1850 

New pipe-yard and repair-shop 

Upper yard, buildings, etc. 

New water-pipes, East Boston 

New main. East Boston 

Pumping-works at Lake Cochituate 

High-service, stand-pipe, engine-house and 
engines ...... 

High-service, South Boston 

Chestnut-Hill reservoir, including land 

Parker-Hill reservoir 

Charles-river siphon .... 

Keeper's house, Parker Hill 

Amount carried forward, 



. $3,998,051 


83 


281,065 


44 


13,237 


50 


10,940 


08 


28,002 


18 


18,982 


23 


304,991 


83 


49,486 


17 


25,666 


51 


9,165 


63 


20,999 


43 


24,878 


08 


23,577 


69 


103,829 


53 


27,860 


29 


. 2,461,232 


07 


228,246 


17 


26,532 


35 


2,764 


90 


$7,659,509 


91 



28 



CiTT Document No. 123. 



Amount brought forward 
Temporary high-service, Brighton 
New stable at Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
Pegan dam, Natick . 
Willow dam, Natick . . . 
High-service, East Boston . 
New main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
Cost of laying main pipe for extension in 

Roxbury, Dorchester, Brighton, and West 

Roxbury Districts ..... 
Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of laying main pipe since January 1, 

1850 



$7,659,509 91 

7,865 86 

8,103 55 

1,394 06 

1,567 29 

22,960 07 

341,702 28 



1,758,512 22 

5,941,371 11 

2,032,969 33 

$17,775,955 68 



coal-shed, and chimney 



Cost of Construction of the Mystic Water 

1, 1884. 

Salaries 

Engineering 

Land damages 

Reservoir . 

Dam 

Conduit . 

Engine-house, 

Engines 

Grubbing pond 

Iron pipes 

Iron pipes, trenching 

City distribution 

Hydrants . 

Stopcocks 

Miscellaneous items . 

Roadway and bridge . 

Lowering Mystic river 

Inspections 

Service-pipes and meters 

Hydrants for Somerville and Medford 

Somerville distribution 

Dwelling-house for engineer and jfireman 

(pumping-station) . 
Chelsea extension 
Medford extension 

Amount carried forward 



Works to M 


'ay 


$17,644 


61 


33,746 


87 


91,855 


38 


141,856 


26 


17,167 


26 


129,714 


30 


36,112 


99 


150,096 


70- 


9,393 


26 


108,437 


10 


61,029 


59 


162,335 


23 


19,976 


21 


19,262 


52 


14,012 


51 


3,529 


22 


3,012 


06 


1,824 


79 


133,858 


70 


2,653 


08 


2,492 


10 


4,871 


02 


37,347 


^Q 


3,997 


41 


$1,206,227 


03 



Report of the Water Board. 



29 



Amount hrought forward 
Drinking-fountains 
NeAV line of supply main . 
Stable and pipe-yard . 
Extension of engine-house and boiler 
New force main 
Mystic sewer . . . 
New stable, engine-house 
Additional force main 
Temporary pumping-works 
New work-shop 
Cost of laying main pipe since 1873 





$1,206,227 03 




1,415 05 




203,050 09 




8,964 64 




33,727 43 




9,875 17 




128,877 58 




1,767 39 




24,882 96 




6,905 15 




3,000 00 




19,759 86 




$1,648,452 35 



Kespectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 
Clerh of the Bodon Water Board. 



EEPOET OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, City Hall, 

Boston, June 20, 1884. 

Hon. Wm. A. Summons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 
Sir, — In accordance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance establishing the Boston Water Board, I respectfully 
submit the following report on the condition of the Water- 
Works : — 

SUDBURY RIVER RESERVOIRS AND LAKE 
COCHITUATE. 

On May 1, 1883, the reservoirs on the Sudbury river were 
full and overflowing. 

Water was wasted at Dam No. 1 until June 25, from 
which date until January 30, 1884, no water was allowed to 
flow into the river, except the 1,500,000 gallons per day' 
required by law. 

Reservoir JSTo. 1. — The water in Reservoir No. 1 re- 
mained near the crest of the dam until August 1. It then 
began to fall slowly, and January 2, 1884, it was 4.89 feet 
below the crest. January 30 it had risen above the crest, 
and waste was commenced. 

Reservoir JSTo. 2. — In consequence of the draft for the 
city's supply, Reservoir No. 2 began to fall about the middle 
of June, and on August 1 the reservoir was empty. It 
remained so until January 9, 1884, when it commenced to 
fill, and on January 26 the water reached the crest of the 
dam. 

All of the shallow flowage areas of the reservoir have been 
deepened by the excavation and removal of the loam, muck, 
and other materials above a plane of about 8 feet below the 
crest of the dam. In addition to this work 35,330 cubic 
yards of loam and muck have been removed from other por- 
tions of the reservoir below this plane. The reservoir has, 
in fact, been practically cleared of loam and muck in all 
shallow places, and the bottom and side slopes are as clean 
as a judicious expenditure of the amount appropriated for the 
purpose would warrant. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 31 

Reservoir JVb. 3. — This reservoir was full on May 1, 
and remained so until July 19, when it was drawn upon for 
the supply of the city. 

From the latter date the surface gradually fell until the 
last of November, when the reservoir was practically empty, 
and it remained so until January 9, 1884. On February 8 
the reservoir had again tilled, and water was running over 
the outlet dam. 

At this reservoir only a commencement of the work of 
deepening the shallow flowage was made, as the operations 
were not begun until October, and were stopped by the 
extreme cold weather in December. It is doubtful if the 
work can be completed before another season, as it would 
not be advisable nor safe to empty the reservoir for this 
purpose, and it will be late in the season before the city's 
consumption will exhaust it in the ordinary manner of using 
the supply. The extraordinary dry season of the past year 
furnished an opportunity for prosecuting the work of deep- 
ening the shallow flowage of the reservoirs, which is not likely 
to again occur ; and it is probable that the work at Reservoir 
No. o cannot be completed until Reservoir No. 4 is finished 
and filled. With the reduction in the consumption etfected 
by the stoppage of waste, and with Reservoir No. 4 full of 
water, it would be safe to empty Reservoir No. 3 ; otherwise 
the work could only be prosecuted when the legitimate de- 
mands of the consumption had emptied it. 

Reservoir No. 4. — The work at this reservoir was very 
much delayed by the cold and wet weather of the spring. 

It had been hoped that by commencing the work early in 
the season the dam might be completed during the present 
season ; it now seems unlikely that this can be accomplished. 
A large force was employed as soon as the weather would 
permit, and the stripping of the basin of loam and muck has 
been so actively prosecuted that only a small amount of work 
of this character remains to be done. The railroad plant is 
removing either to the waste dump or to the Back-Bay park 
the loam and muck as fast as it is piled up by the stripping 
gangs, and there is no doubt of the complete clearing of this 
basin of these materials by fall. 

On the dam the work is now so arranged that nearly all of 
the gravel and other material used in its construction are 
transported by the railroad plant. 

Excellent progress is now being made ; but the embank- 
ment is wide, and there is for the present no difficulty in 
properly compacting all the material the contractor can bring. 
The embankment narrows quite rapidly as it increases in 
height, and it Avill soon be impracticable to take care of the 



32 CiTT Document No. 123. 

amount now delivered dail^^ by the contractor, — some 1,200 
cubic yards, — and beside the various operations in connection 
with the concrete centre wall, the slope paving, etc., will 
seriously interfere with the rapid prosecution of the work. 
It is not probable that the dam will be completed this season, 
although it may be so far completed that the reservoir can be 
partially filled next spring. 

The work has been managed in an economical and efficient 
manner by the nevv superintendent, Mr. Thomas C. Davis, and 
a large saving in the cost of the various items of construction 
has been effected. In some cases there has been a 50 per 
cent, reduction from the cost of work done last season, and it 
seems probable that the lower scale of cost can be maintained 
under the present management. 

Ou May I, 1884, 113,000 cubic yards of material had been 
placed in the embankment, and the quantity required to com- 
plete the dam was 135,000 cubic yards ; 14,470 cubic yards of 
concrete had been placed in the centre wall, and 6,390 cubic 
yards remain unfinished. 

The unexpended balance of the appropriation of $650,000 
for this basin amounted on May 1 to $193,922.74. 

Lake Cochituate. — The surface of the lake remained near 
high-water mark during the month of May, 1883, and water 
was wasted at the outlet dam from May 24 to 28. From 
June 1 to January 1, 1884, there was an almost constant 
fall in the lake surface, and on January 7 the water was 
10.29 feet below high-water mark, or but 3.04 feet above the 
conduit invert. During the months of January and February 
the lake surface was rising. On February 29 the lake was 
so near high-water mark that waste was commenced at the 
outlet dam, and, with the exception of the periods from March 
2 to 6 and April 4 to 6, it has been continued to the present 
time. During the month of November temporary pumping 
machinery was erected at the lake, and from November 26 
to January 14 water was pumped from the lake into the con- 
duit. 

The diagram annexed to this report shows graphically the 
varying heights of the different reservoirs throughout the 
year, the rainfall on the Sudbury river, and the daily amounts 
drawn from the Sudbury river reservoirs during the year. 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 



33 



The following table shows the heights of water in the res- 
ervoirs and in Lake Cochituate on the first of each month : — 



May 1, 1883 

June 1, " 

July 1, " 

Aug. 1, " 

Sept. 1, " 

Oct. 1, " 

Nov. 1, " 

Dec. 1, " 
Jan. 1, 1884 

Feb. 1, " 

Mar. 1, " 

Apr. 1, " 

May 1, " 



Res. No. 1. 

Top of flash- 
boards, 
159.29. 



157.68 
159.47 
159.35 
158.96 
157.78 
156.63 
156.18 
155.29 
154.43 
157.91 
158.23 
158.26 
158.00 



Res. No. 2. 
Top of flash- 
boards, 
167.12. 



166.04 
166.85 
163.06 
r 151.30 
149.08 
148.55 
150.65 
149.60 
150.05 
166.21 
166.22 
166.40 
166.18 



Res. No. 3. 

Crest of 

Dam, 

175.24. 



175.43 
175.44 
175.30 
173.15 
167.52 
163.50 
161.24 
b ( 157.26 



^H (156.41 
171.41 
175.47 
175.71 
175.58 



Farm Pond. 



149.23 
149.12 
149.34 
148.80 
148.11 
147.45 
147.80 
147.90 
146.05 
149.09 
149.05 
148.38 
149.27 



Lake Co- 
chituate, 
Top of flash- 
boards, 
134.36. 



133.71 
134.28 
132.84 
131.07 
128.85 
127.11 
125.70 
124.73 
124.24 
125.85 
133.78 
133.28 
134.31 



"Water has been drawn from the Sudbuiy-river reservoirs 
as follows : — 



May 1 to May 10, 


from 


Reservoir 


No. 


1. 


May 10 to July 19, 






No. 


2. 


July 19 to Oct. 27, 






Nos. 


2 and 3. 


Oct. 27 to Nov. 3, 






No. 


2. 


Nov. 3 to Jan. 9, 


'84, - 




Nos. 


2 and 3. 


Jan. 9 to Feb. 1, 






No. 


2. 


Feb. 1 to May 1, 






No. 


1. 



Farm-Pond Conduit. 

Mr. George H. Cavanagh, the contractor for the pile and 
timber work forming the foundations for the masonry conduit 
across the pond, completed his work April 24, 1884, at a 
cost of $26,054.35. 

Messrs. Parker & Sylvester, the contractors for the filling, 
are progressing rapidly with this work ; but it is still uncer- 
tain when they will complete it, although it is probable that 
by the 1st of July the largest portion, if not the whole, of it 
will be done; 



34 City Document No. 123. 



It was anticipated that the dumping of this gravel, and the 
consequent sudden displacement of the mud when suflSciently 
loaded, would cause movements of the pile-work which might 
injure or destroy portions of it ; but, although several exten- 
sive settlements of this kind have occurred, no injury to the 
pile-work, except of a trifling nature, has resulted. 

The question of the advisability of commencing the con- 
struction of the masonry conduit during the present season 
cannot be definitely determined until the filling contract is 
completed. All of the plans are drawn, and the work could 
be put under contract in a short time, but could not be 
finished the present year. There are other circumstances 
connected with this work which might render its postpone- 
ment to another season advisable; but as I intend to submit 
to the Board a full statement of matters connected with this 
subject as soon as the filUng contract is completed, or nearly 
so, I will not refer to them in this report. 

Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in constant use, with 
the exception of eight days, when the water was drawn ofl" for 
the purpose of cleaning. 

The Cochituate aqueduct has been thoroughly cleaned 
twice during the year, and, in addition to the ordinary re- 
pairs, the concrete coverings of the Charles-river and Waban 
bridges have been resurfaced, at an expense of $1,350. 

From May 1 to August 17, 1883, the water in the aque- 
duct at Lake Cochituate was maintained at a depth of 5^ 
feet; August 17 to September 11, 7 feet; from August 17 to 
November 27, when pumping was begun, the depths varied 
with the height of the lake surface from 7 feet to 3.7 feet. 
From November 27 to January 14, while the pumps were 
in operation, the height oscillated between 4 feet and 6 feet ; 
January 14 to March 5 the level of the water in the aqueduct 
followed the rising surface of the lake, and on the latter date 
reached the depth of 6 feet, at which point it has since been 
maintained. 

The Chestnut Hill, Brookline, Parker Hill, and East Boston 
reservoirs have been in constant use, and are in good con- 
dition. 

Highland High-Service Works. 

The table on page 51 exhibits in detail the work performed 
by these works during the year 1883. As usual the greater 



Eeport of the Watee Boaed. 35 

portion of the work has been performed by the Worthington 
engine, on account of its economy. 

During the month of April, 1883, this engme was thorough- 
ly overhauled and repaired, after having been in constant u.^e 
for five years. The total quantity of water pumped during 
the year was 1,060,321,495 gallons, of which amount the 
Worthington engine pumped 959,667,000 gallons. 

Total coal consumed 2,108,800 lbs. of which 12.4 percent, 
were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift, 113.92 feet. 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 502.8 gallons. 

Average daily quantity pumped, 2,904,990 gallons. 

Reference to the table on page 51 shows that the quantity 
pumped per lb. of coal increased during the latter portion of 
the year; this was due to the improved working of the 
engine, caused by the repairs made, and to increased pres- 
sure in the supply main, caused by the reduction in the con- 
sumption, and the laying of the 48-inch and 24-inch mains. 



Cost of Pumping. 
Salaries ..... 
Fuel 

Repairs ..... 
Oil, waste, and packing 
Sundry small supplies, gas, etc. 



^3,861 88 

6,383 75 

1,150 74 

217 46 

25 7 47 



Total $11,871 30 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, $0,098. 

The necessity for new high-service works has been so often 
alluded to and advocated in my former reports to the Board 
that it seems almost unnecessary for me to again bring the 
subject to your attention ; but the constant pressure from the 
inhabitants of the districts inadequately supplied from the 
low-service, for an extension of the high-service to these 
sections, compels me to make a brief allusion to the present 
condition of the works. 

Although a large reduction has been made in the consump- 
tion from these works, hy the suppression of a considerable 
proportion of the waste, the growth of the districts supplied 
by them is so rapid that I have not considered it advisable to 
imperil their efficiency in localities which can be supplied in 
no other way by extending the service to districts which can 
obtain a tolerably good supply from the low service. There 
are several districts, embracing a population of two or three 



36 City Document No. 123. 

thousand people, that are insufficiently supplied from the low- 
service ; but the effect of annexing them to the present high- 
service works would be to at once reach the safe limit of 
their capacity during the cold weather of the winter season. 
It will take from two to three years to build new high-service 
works ; and, until 'favorable action is taken by the city govern- 
ment in relation to their construction, I cannot recommend 
any material addition to the area supplied by the present 
ones. 

Mystic Lake. 

Mystic lake was full on May 1, 1883, and remained near 
high-water mark until June 4, when the waste was stopped 
at the outlet dam. There was a constant fall of the lake 
surface during the months of June, July, August, and Sep- 
tember, and on October 23 it was but 3.28 feet above the 
conduit invert, or 7.89 feet below high water. This was the 
lowest point reached, although it remained at about the same 
level until January 9, 1884. On January 26, the lake having 
again filled, waste was commenced at the outlet dam, and has 
been continued to the present time. 

In October the temporary pumping machinery was placed 
in position preparatory to raising the water into the conduit 
when a sufficient supply could not be obtained by gravita- 
tion ; but, although the lake surface remained for a month 
within a few inches of the point when pumping would have 
been necessary, the pumps were not used. 

Advantao;e was taken of the low level of the lake to clean 
the bed and shape the banks of the Abajonna river from the 
lake to Whitney's dam. Considerable work was also done in 
cleaning the shores of the lake. 

Mystic-Yalley Sewer. 

The extension of the works for the removal of the im- 
purities of the sewage has been completed. Two new and 
improved settling-tanks have been constructed, and a new 
ditch, about 1,400 feet in length, excavated between the tanks 
and discharge outlet. 

As much of the surplus land as it was practicable to utilize 
has been graded, and experiments are in progress to ascertain 
practically the value of the sewage for manurial or agricul- 
tural purposes. Judging from the experience at Pullman, 
III., — the only place 1 ain aware of in this country where the 
utilization of sewage for agricultural purposes has been at- 
tempted upon anything more than an experimental scale, — it 
would require probably 200 or 300 acres of land to take care 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 37 

of the sewage from the Mystic-valley sewer. At the lowest 
price the city has had to pay for land in the immediate 
vicinity of its present station, even if a sufficient amount 
could be obtained, the cost of this item alone would reach 
from $100,000 to $150,000. 

It is evident, therefore, that at the present location of the 
works, comprising an area of only 5 acres, nothing but ex- 
periments to ascertain the feasibility of utilizing this sewage 
can be accomplished. If these experiments should be suc- 
cessful it is not probable that a sufficient area of land, even 
at the price named, could be obtained in the vicinity. 

The Farquhar low-pressure filter, contracted for by your 
Board, will determine the practicability of the filtration of 
the sewage by this kind of machinery. If this pattern of 
filter will not operate successfully upon the sewage there, it 
is extremely doubtful if any form of machine filter would 
have any value for the purpose. If it should operate suc- 
cessfully, and the experiments already made would indicate 
that it will, the cost of an outfit comprising filters and appur- 
tenant machinery for the treatment of the entire amount of 
the sewage would be quite large, and the expense of attend- 
ance and maintenance an onerous one. 

The question of the feasibility of chemical treatment has 
already been considered, and the results of the investigations 
of Prof. Wm. Ripley Nichols and Dr. E. S. Wood are either 
embodied in former reports, or are now upon the records of 
your Board. Any chemical processes known to these emi- 
nent authorities are exceedingly expensive in operation, and 
give only partial promise of successful practical results. 

I have briefly reviewed the present condition of the Mystic- 
valley sewer problem, for the purpose of calling the attention 
of the Board to two important matters, which I referred to in 
my annual report to the City Council. 

Mystic Conduit and Eeservoirs. 

The conduit has been in constant service with the exception 
of one day. 

The portion of the conduit which was stated in the last 
annual report to be in an unsafe condition has been replaced 
by a new and stronger structure. 

As the supply to the city could not be interrupted except 
for a few hours, a temporary channel, consisting of a 30-inch 
iron pipe, about 250 feet in length, was laid around the site 
of the section to be rebuiltj and connected with the conduit 
at either end. The section removed was found to be in a 
very bad condition, and its failure was entirely due to the 



38 City Document No. 123. 

poor design of the pile foundation. Additional piles were 
driven and capped crosswise of the trench with 10-in. X 10- 
in. spruce caps. 4 feet apart on centres. The spaces be- 
tween the caps were then carefully filled with coarse gravel, 
and the capping covered with a flooring of 2-in. spruce plank 
10 feet in width. The conduit was rebuilt as nearly as pos- 
sible on the original line and of the same interior dimensions ; 
but the concrete side-walls were made much heavier. Ad- 
vantag-e was taken of the time when the conduit was emptied 
to make the final connection with this work, to clean the inte- 
rior for the entire length. 

Mystic Pdmping-Station. 

The table on page 52 shows the work done by the engines 
at this station. 

Engine No. 1 was in use 578 hours 30 minutes. 

" 2 " " 1,865 " 30 
" " 3 " " 6,902 " 15 " 

Total amount pumped, 2,488,469,070 gallons. 

Total amount coal consumed, 6,173,100 lbs., of which 8.4 
per cent, were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift, 150.5 feet. 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 403 gallons. 

Average duty of three engines (no deductions), 50,596,400 
foot-lbs. per 100 lbs. coal. 

Daily average amount pumped, 6.817,723 gallons, — an 
mcrease of 3.7 per cent, over that of the year 1883. 

Oost of Pumping. 

Salaries $6,816 80 

Fuel 14,650 85 

Oil, waste, and packing . . . . 718 77 

Eepairs 339 12 

Small supplies ...... 149 95 

$22,675 49 
Cost per million gallons lifted one foot high, $0.0605. 

On August 15 a contract was made with Kendall & Rob- 
erts, of Caml)ridge, Mass., for furnishing and setting three 
new steel boilers, to replace four boilers which had been in 
use since the works were built, in 1865. 

The new boilers are now being set, and the contract will 
soon be completed. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



39 



The boilers are of the horizontal tubular type, 78 inches in 
diameter, 17 feet long, and each contains 151 3-inch tubes. 
The shells are composed of j7_-inch thick, steel plates. 
Samples of all plates used in the boilers were tested on the 
testing machine at the U.S. Arsenal, Watertown, Mass., 
and either fulfilled the requirements of the specifications 
or the plates from which they were taken were rejected. 



Consumption. 

The average daily consumption during the year was as 
follows : — 



Gallons. 



Gallons per 
head, 



Sudbury and Cochituate 

supply. . . . 32,836,900 91 
Mystic supply . . . 6,819,200 79.3 



Total 



39,656,100 88-7 



Increase over 
year 1882. 



2.7 
3.7 



Waste. 

Although the consumption for the whole year shows an in- 
crease over that of 1882, yet an examination of the following 
table, which gives the monthly average of 1883 and of the 
first four months of the present year, shows that since active 
measures have been taken to prevent waste there has been 
a very large reduction in the amomit of water used in the 
city. 









Daily average 


Gallons per head, 


consumption. 


per day. 


January, 1883 . . . 34,715,000 


97.8 


February ' ' 






32,690,700 


92.0 


March " 






34,110,700 


95.8 


April " 






30,617,600 


85.8 


May " 






32,169,500 


89.8- 


June " 






33,419,200 


93.3 


July " 






36,774,000 


102.4 


August ' « 






37,141,000 


*103.2 


September ' ' 






33,645,600 


93.2 


October " 






29,575,800 


81.9 


November " 






28,839,300 


79.6 


December " 






30,174,200 


83. 


January, 1884 






32,162,300 


88.4 


February ' ' 






24,598,000 


67.5 


March " 






23,711,900 


65. 


April " 






21,505,700 


58.8 



' Inspection commenced. 



40 CiTr Document No. 123. 

This saving has been effected by the system of honse-to- 
honse inspection, aided in some portions of the city by the 
use of Deacon waste-water-meters. The operation of the 
Deacon meters, and the results which have been accomplished 
by their use, have been given in detail in previous reports. 
(City Docs. Nos. 122 and 173, 1883.) 

In all cases they have been found of great value in the 
economical suppression of waste, and, as a result of the trials 
made, the system has been adopted for permanent use. 

Sixty-three meters have been ordered, and are now being 
received and placed in position. These, with the 12 pre- 
viously purchased, will supply the means of placing nearly, 
if not quite all, of the residential portion of the city under the 
control of the system. 

Experiments have also been made with the Church waste- 
detector and with the Bell waterphone. 

The details of the experiments Avith the Church detector, 
or stopcock, are given in detail in City Doc. No. 173. 

The waterphone has been and is used in other large cities 
of the country with good results, in the reduction of the con- 
sumption ; in fact, this result can be accomplished by the use 
of most of the so-called waste-detectors, by water-meters, and 
by house-to-house inspection. , 

Any of these methods will, if faithfully carried out, accom- 
plish a large saving in the consumption ; but what is desired 
is the best means of accomplishing the saving, taking into 
account facility of introduction and operation, convenience 
to the public, and economy both of introduction and main- 
tenance. 

All the experiments which have been made in this city 
have indicated that the Deacon system is the one which will 
best fulfil the above conditions. 

In order that the Deacon system may be worked to the 
best advantage it is necessary to have shut-off cocks in the 
sidewalks, for the purpose of testing the house services. 

As the greater portion of our services are not yet provided 
with these shut-offs the system cannot be used to the best 
advantage ; but there is no question but the consumption can 
be easily reduced to 60 gallons per head, — a saving of 33 per 
cent, on the consumption of the past few years. 

Quality. 

The quality of the water from all of the sources of supply 
has been better than for a few years past. 

The " cucumber taste " has not been complained of, although 
at times a slight trace of it was perceptible in water drawn 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 41 

from the pipes in the city proper. The algse have not been so 
numerous in any of the sources of supply as to cause any 
appreciable deterioration of the water. 

The sewage contamination of the feeders of Lake Cochitu- 
ate still continues, notwithstanding the efforts made by the 
Board to stop it. On the Sudbury this contamination, 
although comparatively trivial in extent at present, is a 
growing evil, and measures should be taken to remove the 
causes and prevent future extensions of the systems now in 
operation in several of the towns located upon the water-shed. 
On the Mystic, situated as it is, in a thickly populated valley, 
the elimination of sewage from the feeders of the lake is 
practically impossible ; and, although much has been and may 
yet be done to preserve the purity of the supply, it is evi- 
dent that it must, before many years, be abandoned. 

The law in relation to the contamination of water-supplies, 
enacted by the Legislature during its last session, gives the 
necessary authority to prevent, to a large extent, the pollution 
by sewage, now so common on all of our sources of supply. 



DiSTRIBUTIOlSr. 

The distributing mains of the Sudbury and Cochituate 
works have been extended 50,260 feet during the year, and 
those of the Mystic works 6,723 feet. 

In addition to the above the 48-inch main from Chestnut 
Hill reservoir has been extended from the junction of Bea- 
con street and Commonwealth avenue through Common- 
wealth avenue to West Chester park, a distance of 2,183 
feet, and connected with the 40-inch main in Beacon street 
by a 30-inch pipe 609 feet in length, and with the 36-inch 
and 30-inch mains in Tremont street by a 24-inch main 
4,429 feet in length. 

The laying of these mains, and the reduction in the con- 
sumption, have increased the pressure, so that the head through- 
out the city is at present from 6 to 10 feet greater than it 
was a year ago. 

The rebuilding of Warren bridge necessitated the reloca- 
tion of the 20-inch East Boston supply main, and the con- 
struction of a new siphon. The main has been relaid for a 
length of 1,400 feet with new pipes, and enclosed in a 
substantial box under the northerly sidewalk of the bridge. 
The cost of this work was about $15,200. 

On the Cochituate works about two miles of pipes have 
been relaid. With the exception of Warren bridge, and one 
or two streets where the pipes were in poor condition, this 



42 City Document No. 123. 

relaying has been done with larger pipes, for the better fire 
protection of certain districts of the city. 

On the Mystic works 5,627 feet of the wrought-iron and 
cement pipes have been replaced with coated cast-iron pipes. 
The total length of supply and distributing mains connected 
with the Cochituate works is 378 miles, and with the Mystic 
works 147.2 miles. 

General Condition and Kequirements of the Works. 

The year 1883 was remarkable for the smallness of the 
rainfall, and of the quantity of water which was collected 
from the drainage areas of the several sources of supply. 
The records show that the rainfall was the least since 1846, 
and that the amount of water collected was smaller than any 
year since sufficient data have been obtained to determine it. 

On the Sudbury-river water-shed 11.02 inches were col- 
lected, on the Lake Cochituate water-shed 10.11 inches, and 
on the Mystic water-shed 9.34 inches. The average quanti- 
ties collected on the different sources, since the records have 
been kept, are as follows : Sudbury-river average for 9 
years, 20.8 inches ; Lake Cochituate, average for 30 years, 
21.18 inches ; Mystic lake, average for 8 years, 18.81 inches. 
These figures show that during the year 1883 the amount of 
water collected was only about 50 per cent, of the average 
quantity. 

As a result of this small rainfall, and a large consumption 
during the summer months, our supply during the latter por- 
tion of the year was at a very low stage. The storage reser- 
voirs on the Sudbury were drawn down rapidly during the 
summer, and Lake Cochituate was also drawn down so low 
as to leave but a comparatively small quantity of available 
water. 

If the summer draft had been continued during the fall, as 
it would undoubtedly have been if no measures had been taken 
to prevent waste, all the Sudbury-river reservoirs would have 
been empty on December 1, and the available supply from 
the Sudbury and Cochituate works during the month of 
December would have been about 7,000,000 gallons per day 
less than the actual quantity used during the month. Another 
season as dry as the last is extremely unlikely to occur the 
present year ; but if it should, with the reduction in the con- 
sumption efl^'ected by the means adopted for waste prevention, 
the supply would be ample to meet all requirements. The 
completion and filling of .Basin 4 will make the works of 
ample capacity to supply the city for a number of years if 
the reduction of consumption already effected can be main- 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 43 

tained, and the fear of a short supply of water which the citi- 
zens were subjected to during the winter of 1883-84 will not 
occur again if measures are taken to provide additional 
storage capacity on the Sudbury as soon as the growth of the 
city foreshadows the necessity for it. 

With the completion of Basin 4 and the Farm-Pond con- 
duit, and the deepening of the shallow flowage of Basin 3, 
the necessity for large expenditures upon this division of the 
works should cease for many years. 

Lake Cochituate needs a new outlet dam ; but its construc- 
tion is not an absolute necessity unless the present ones should 
show more signs of weakness than they do now. In case of 
a freshet when the lake was at high-water mark the means 
of discharging the surplus water over or through the present 
dams is entirely inadequate ; but with careful attention this 
difficulty need not be a source of danger. 

The increase in head in East Boston, due to the reduction 
in the consumption by the prevention of waste, has rendered 
it unnecessary to consider at present the question of a new 
and more direct main to connect this section with the pipe 
system of the city proper. 

The Sudbury, Cochituate, and Mj^stic aqueducts are in 
excellent condition, the two latter much better than they 
have been in for years. 

With this report will be found the usual statistical tables 
in regard to the rainfall, consumption of water, yield of the 
different water-sheds, etc., and a diagram, already alluded to, 
presenting a synopsis of the fluctuations of the Sudbury-river 
reservoirs and Lake Cochituate. 

HENEY M. WIGHTMAN, 

City Engineer, and Engineer Boston Water Board. 



44 



City Document No. 123. 



•n 



"t^ 







o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


Q 


Q 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 




« 


CD 




CO 








to 




CO 








IN_ 
































<x> 


oT 


■^ 






c:5 


IN 








t- 


o 




oT 




o 




CO 


t- 






o 


to 


•* 


o> 


CO 








OD 


CO 










OS 


CO 


IN 




■^ 






00 
































H 


00 


"^ 


*" 


to 


to 


■ to" 


** 


"^ 


lO 


t« 


in 


to 


to 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






CN 


CO 








■^ 


Ttl 


1N_ 




CO 


-<# 


to 


•* 


































cd" 




CO 


to 




3 




in" 


tH 


r-H* 




t-^ 


"** 






n 


b- 


^ 


en 


















« 


CO 


Ol 








to 


00 


°5> 


"i. 


<D 


"i 




>o 
































H 


t^ 


■^ 


to 


iO 


o 


to 


to 


to 


o" 


to 


icT 


to 


to 




o 


o 


o 


~~(^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~~o~~ 


O 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








H 








t-^ 






-^ 






^ 




°i 


































OC 


CO 




IM 


o 


IN 


to 


to 






lO 


o 


to 


■* 




o 


(M 




(N 


o 




o 




00 


en 




o 


OB 


00 


« 




-^ 


O 


^_ 


s_ 




°l 


o 




r^ 




c= 






























O 


H 


CO 


oT 


'^ 


to 


to 


to 


to 


t-^ 


to 


to 


"^ 


*" 


'■" 




Oi 


OD 


CO 


,—1 


CO 


t^ 


^ 


o 


f-A 


oo 


T-H 


to 


OS 






■^ 


CI 


CO 




VO 


•* 




00 




-* 




^ 


e 


c^ 


S__ 


co_ 


o>_ 


OT^ 


o^ 


lO 










o 


00 




























1-1 


to 


-d^ 


o 












■^ 




CO 


t- 








<N 


o 




Ol 






en 


CO 


-* 






o 


« 




5 


CO_ 


-* 


ffl 


00_ 


£3 








!N 
































H 


o 




O 


d> 


oT 


o* 


o 


OS 


en 






to 


OS 






^ 


'"' 


'^ 






'"' 


'^ 
















CA 


o 


Oi 


^ 


1 


t^ 


lO 


in 


,—1 


00 


IN 


OS 


o 


H 
S 










IN 








LO 






CT 


t- 


«5 






IN 


to_ 




^. 


o 


CO 


°l. 






t- 


■* 






























CO 






CO 


^" 


o* 




■*■ 




<N 


>o 


CO 




r- 1 






T-t 








IN 




t' 










oe 




c^ 


CO 


CO 


o 


CD 


r-^^ 


o_ 


to 


l^ 


CO^ 


>o 


^ 




H 


r-l 


c-f 


a> 


00 


otT 


1^ 


oT 


OtT 


b^ 


"^ 


"^ 


oo" 


oo" 




lO 


o 


lO 


rH 


to 


t- 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


J^ 


tH 


00 






o 


-* 


C<) 


lO 




to 




CO 




o 


lO 








oc 






00_ 


°i. 


^ 


to 




o 


Tf^ 


o 


"i. 


CO 


































!» 




1 


c^" 


»o" 


t-^ 


CO 








o 






lO 




(M 


o> 


to 






00 




to 


o 


IN 


IN 


T-H 




« 


CO^ 






CO 


t-^ 


CO 


o 










IN 


o 
































H 


o 


Ci 


00 


t-T 


t-^ 


00* 


oT 


00 


oo 


'~ 


"^ 


00 


» 




-^ 


I— ( 


ira 


CO 


OJ 


o 


K5 


IN 


o 


OS 


OS 


^ 


t^ 








(M 


CO 




Oi 


CO 


03 


O 


00 


OS 




<N 


lO 




li 


CO 


CD 


°l 


»o 


^. 




<N 


-* 






"i. 


OS_ 


IN 




oT 


(N 


oT 


o 


o 


o 


f-4* 


r-7 


cs* 


o 


to 


in" 


to* 






CO 




o 








IN 


■* 




OS 


CO 


CO 




cc 


CO 


*^ 


lO 


(N 


IN_ 


I— ■ 


CO 




<N_ 


t- 


CO 


t^ 


CO 




H 


T-l 


oT 


00 


'^' 


t-T 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


00 


"^ 


t-^ 


00 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








u^ 






to 


lO 




o 


o 


to 




CO 


M 


































irT 


c> 


o 


t-^ 


oT 


o> 


T}!* 




>n 


iO 






to 






OS 




i-H 


to 






rtl 


'd" 




CO 




£2 




cc 




CD 








5 






to 


lO 






GO 
































H 


'^ 


cT 


^ 


o 


IN 


CO 


to 




CO 


oT 




o 


IN 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IN 


c^ 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


(3 


t^ 


o 


^ 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 






o 




O 






o 


o 


S 






r-< 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


■* 


to 




to 


00^ 




co^ 


00 




th" 


c-f 


CD* 


t^ 


00* 


00* 


ci" 


oT 


J^ 


CO 


00* 


c^ 


o" 










IN 


CO 




Ol 


-* 


OS 


to 


IH 


■o 


t- 




« 






(N 








OS 




to 


ira 


CO 




OS 
































H 


C-^ 


^ 


oT 


o 




CO 


o* 


-* 


1-H* 




iH 


in 


rH 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(3, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




o 


Q 


S 




H 


oi 


05^ 








<N^ 




IN_^ 


>o_ 


IN^ 


co^ 


^ 


CN 




« 




IT-T 








c^ 




IN 






OS 


o* 


CO* 




c-i 


o 


CO 


■* 


o 


■o 


00 




o 












CC 












o_ 




■* 








00 


o 




H 






























(N 


I-H 






o 


o* 




■* 


-* 


o^ 




tSS 




QQ 




CO 


CO 


IM 


IN 


IN 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


IN 


IN 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(^ 


o 


OS 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


M 


© 

an 






t-^ 






^ 




r-^ 


^ 


OS_ 


^ 


"^ 


CO 


1 1^ 








cT 








•a 


i 


t-^ 




o 


o" 






a» 


t- 


CO 


o> 






CO 


>o 




o 


O 


at) 


co_ 


«3_ 


o 


to 


IN 




OS_ 


iH 




-^ 


■* 


o_ 


"^ 


s^ 


H 










uf 




to* 


OC 






to" 


00* 






<M 


(M 


(M 


C<1 


!N 


<N 


(N 


IN 


IN 


(N 


(N 


IN 


IN 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 




o 


i ^ 




c^ 










IN 


OS 


r-^ 




to^ 


IN 


"i. 


°i. 


<1 


o" 


co" 




T-T 


CO 




to 


\a 




IN 


oT 






o 


Tt^ 


eo 


IN 




o 


>o 






o 


Ol 


CO 


■5 


t= 


QC 




'^ 




Td 


°i. 






<= 


o 




IN 


"^ 


to 




H 






■^ 


o 


IN 


-* 


to 










s 






c^ 


(M 


(M 


IN 


(N 


IN 


IN 


(N 


IN 


(N 


IN 


(N 


IN 




o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 
a 




o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


§, 


O 


o 










CO 


00_ 


to 


o 








in 


t^ 


o 


oo" 


OS 


oo" 


CO 


o* 


o* 


oT 


en* 


o 


o* 


00* 


lO* 




•^ 








to 


IN 




to 


o 


o 


°i 


o 




K> 


H. 




o_ 


to__ 


o 


CO 


to 


to__ 


•^ 


i-H 


IN 


(N 


c^ 




H 


-* 


co' 




cT 


?f 


CO 




■^ 


•^ 


-f 


ei* 


(N* 


CO 






(M 


<M 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


^ 


O 


o 


O 


O 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




5__ 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 








00^ 


to 


oo 


CO 


■-* 


•^ 


« 


1-^ 


^ 


°i. 


lo 




Oi 


rH 


to* 


ocT 


o" 


(N* 


a> 


00 


Os" 


CO 


tJ" 


u^ 


CO 




<N 




^ 




(M 


OS 


OS 




=2 


OS 




CO 






% 




O 


•^ 


OJ 








t-^ 


•* 


»o^ 


it^ 


•^ 


to 




H 


ts 


cT 


t^ 


00* 


cT 


o* 


o 


o 


T-T 


oT 


oT 


o" 


s 






Q^ 


(M 




iH 




IN 


IN 


IN 


(N 




'"' 


!N 


















• 










o* 




in 
















\ 










« 




H 


















ki 




i^ 


j_, 


1 




% 


>i 


b 














a 

i 
fit 


J 


,o 


ID 




o 


1 

a 

cS 
<-> 




s 


a 
p. 


^ 

s 






3 

<1 


XI 

o 

o 


i 

o 

12; 


i 





BOSTOK WATEJR WORKS. 

tire daiJ^ amowtt^ df-a/in ii^ojtt^ t/te- Sud/fur^ Riven caid tJce :ffai7ifMl dm-i/t^ tJt^ i/ear' 7SSJ. 


1 


Jimuart/ 


Feifuan^ 


JGzrcTc 


^4/3r-il 


Maif 


June 


JU^if 


^i^ustr 


S^^entA^r 


Oc^oe/'' 


Joi'efftder IMce/reOeA 


in mtltion. 
gallons. 


II 


■lll'l 1 


\" \ 


11 1 ■' 


'M* 


■ 1 r 


"'■ "' f 


iri - 1 


1 * 




0.^ 


\ 




m»i 


— ' 1 




— 1 — ' 


L 


1 


1 

BAINrALL 


IN INCHES. 






u 
















i.s- 


1 










_Li 




— 






/tES. ^fS. 
1. ^. 


/f£S. 
3. 


a 








»-s- 












S-f 






3Z^ 
ZZ3 


47f- 
•«/ 
3S3 

30S 

270 
23< 
Zo/ 

no 
mi 


1053 

ass- 
SSI 
Soo 

71i 

eso 
SSI 
s/e 

4S* 

39e 

3*o 
its 

238 
191 

1*7 
107 

7Z 
*l 

IS 

€ 

^' 
<: ^ 

li 

ss 
s» 

7S 
7(7 

es 

ss 

so 
JIS 
40 
3S 
30 
ZS 

Za 
IS 
lO 

* 


ns 





c>^ 


^'''"•^^^'^''^ 


— ---1 : - 


r?r<ir;?i^n/p 


NO. 3. 


X 




























X 










7^ 














-V- 








no 


^^ 
















'es. or-^ Da 


«.^. - . 






/es 


5=: 


^ 


- - - - 


^ 


Sff^P^^tS. 


/Vft~\2. 




y~- 


^ 








/60 


^ 


srJ 








^F^rkvaif? 


NO, /. 


^ 


Ii-ASIJ_Bo<t 




-^ 


— 1 
— 1 
















\ 






"*"•-*- — _- 




53 
3S 


ee 
Z8 

■J 

zees- 

l6tO 

/*so 

/Z30 

/OiO 

SIS 

Sir 
-no 

270 

107 














— V— 








— 


-^-. W 


/so 




— ~^..-— 4 ' 










=i 




F^^ 


V\rUr 




/45 
f40 
/3S 
I30 
125- 










FAI^M POU 







<vIT 


r_^^ V 




' 


'V 
































































































































:to 










— .CsrsjL 


o/- Dam.- 














--^ 


"LAKe catk 


ruAT^' - - - 


~^-. . 


















V-- 










-, 














,-- 


■ 




— 1 A 








^~. 












----''' 














*"*■-•.. 










.— 
























" '-f\' 










(1 
















. r\l^ 




, 




\^ r 






■" 1 


"^\ 






.., y' 


A- f\z 














-^ 


\r- 


\ JV. 




'~\y y\.. y^ i 


















\ r— 














































__ _ 














1 



>JingCo 2il TremantSt I 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagram showing the rainfall and daily average consumption 
for each month. 



Yectrb/ Averages shoiv?t tftus 




iiyCa SI/ TnmmtSt Botien 



Report of the Water Board. 



45 





■ C 




o o 
o o 


o o o 
o o o 


§ g 


§ 


g 


o 
o 


g 


o 

o 


S 1 










o o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


CO 


o_ 


<o_ 


CO 


o 1 












































e 


o o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o" 


cT 


cT 


cT 


o 








o o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






^ 


"^ 00_ 




1 <» 


to CO 








ao 




°'- o 






8 


CO t-^ 


r1^ O CO 


rH -^ 


o" 






o' 


to" 


a> o 






rG "tS 


cs 


CO Ol 


CO CO rH 


CO »o 


Tjl 


to 






CO 


o o 




« 


oa 


i>: >o 


to lO to 


(D t- 


to 


^ 


■^ 


in 


in 


r- 


•*, 


at) 
































^^ o 


tH 










c 


o o 
















<= 'S' 


tS 












o o 
















o m 




^ 


ffl 3 


CO 

a 




• 


o o_ o 
o o" o" 
















o in 
o ^- 


CO 
(N 




■2 






c 


o o 
















O CO 












(>o 


05 O 


























































B 






t- 1- o 






















<ij 




• 




to to 
















.^„ 






o 






































~s 


o 


~o 




o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(= 


o 


o 




-ti ^ 




o 


o 






o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 




3 "tc 




o 


o 






o 




o 


o^ 




o_ 


o 


o 


c 


o 


co^ 


t* 


































-=3 


s 




o 




c 


o 


o 


o 


o" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o" 


(n" 


t> 


o 




o 




c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O I 




o 


05 




c 






(N 


00 




CJ 




°i 


CO 




c^ 


Q 


c^_ 




H 


































Q 


iC 












to 






cT 


<N 




XT 


in^ 




Ci 








oc 


o 


c- 


^ 




o 


t- 






cr 


CO 


IN 




Ok 


in 


Ol 


o 




-* 


to 


to 


CO 


in 


in 


to 
















1-H 




















t- 


t- 










^ 


o~ 


c 


o o 


~~o o 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


3 












o 


c 


o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 1 






3 "oa 






o_ 


<3 


o o 


c 


o_ 


o_ 


o^ 


o^ 


o 


o_ 


o 1 








































^1? 






o" 


c 


o o 


<= 


o~ 


o" 


o 


o" 




o 


<= 1 






•2 




o 




o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 1 








c^ 


CO 


cc 






■-i* 








i^ 






(^ 






B 


^ 


o 


c^ 


o" o 






o" 




oT 




IN 


t— o 


o 






^ 




00 


iT 


i-( to 


■* i-H 


CO 


CO 


CI 






lO o 


o 


„ 


OS 


«: 


CO 


ce 


00 m 


05 Oi 






■* 


CO 


5i 


s- 




H 






























on o 




a) ^ 


























o 


o 1^. 
o ^ 


CO 




c3 3 


s 


























o 


<N 




1-1.^ 


•2 




















" 




g 


O CO 






o-o 




































o 


























t- 






^1 


Ci! 
























1-4 


s 






o 






























1 










~~c 


o 


~c 


c 


o 


~~c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 
















c 




o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










p'oll 




<= 


o 


c 


c 


Ss 


c 


o_ 


o_ 


<3 


o 


o^ 


o^ 










s 




































c 


o" 


c 




o 






cT 






o 


s 


c 








5 




o 


c 




o 






o 


o 




o 


o 


c 










'^ 




^ 


c 


o 


to 


•* 


o^ 




to 


IN 


I-H 


ir 


o 






e 


c^ 


■* 












in" 


in 






c^ 


O" 


o 


o 




^ 


t- 


o 


tc 


T 




o- 


t- 


Oi 


:l 


CO 




o 


c 


o 


o 


e 


Ohq 


ffi 


«3 


(M 


c^ 


•* 




CO 


115 


^ 


CO 


•* 


-^ 


o" 


^ 


ao 

H 






























ir 


o 


c-T 






~c 


o 


~C 


c 


o 


""c 














c 


— '-'1 


§ 








o 






o 


















CO* 


2 tS 




c 


o 




c 


o_ 


c 














c 








ca 3 


g 






(^ 




o" 
















c 


OI_ 


rH 




^ 










o 
















c 


to* 






e 


oc 


. ■^ 


OC 


c^ 


cT 


t- 














CC 








^5 


^ 


§ 


^ 






CO 

IN 


cr 














oc 












~c 


o~ 


~c 


c 


o 


~~a 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~o 


^ 














o 


c: 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










3 "in 




c 


o 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o^ 


o_ 


to 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 










e 










































c 


o" 


c 


o" 


<3 


o" 


cT 




o 


c 


















o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 
















t- 


"i 








to 




CO 


■N 


a 










































e 


■^ 


c^' 


»r 


t' 




c 


(M 


(N 




-* 


Oi 




tr- 


o 


o 




^ 


c 








-* 




(N 




s 


CO 


CO 


o 


ee 


o 


o 


o 


^M 


(M 


c5 


(M 


r 


(M 


■- 


CO 


CO 


(N 


CO 




cr 


o 


o 


at) 

H 
































o 


of 


















(^ 


o 


~s~ 




o 


o 


c 


(N^ 


IN 


^2 


















o 


o 




o 


o 


c 


cjT 
















o_ 


o 


o 




o 


o_ 


c 


•^ 


!0 




s 
















o^ 


o 




o 


o 


c 








o 














o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


c 


CO 
























CO 




•* 


o 


c^ 








o-S 


« 














CO 


o 


oT 






of 










H o 
O 


Qj 














g 


•* 






IN 




5 














o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


_ 














o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










3'iE 






o 










o 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o. 










S 






































o 










cT 




o 




o 


o 


c 








■S 




o 










o 




o 






o 


c 












Tl<_ 










IN 


"^ 


c» 


^ 


^ 


o 


oc 


o 






B 




OO 














^ 




(3i 




0" 








Qj 




-^ 












Oi 


CO 


to 


o 


t- 


iT 


o 


g 


ae 


Or 




'"' 










>-< 






T-l 






J> 


o" 


o 
o 


i« 
































o 


to 


at) 

H 








o 


C 




o 


o 


o 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o 




c 


•"i^ 


















o 


o 




o 


o 






(M 


CO 


f^ 










o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






IN 






s 




























•* 


o 




a 3 




o 


C 




!3 




<^ 


o' 


o 




cT 




c 






o 




o 


c 




o 




o 


o 


o 




o 




c 


cf 












o 




o_ 




CO 


<N__ 


















o-g 
^5 










' 


























B 




•* 


c< 






■<t 








r-t 


to 












;b 










Ol 


c 




^ 






t— 




(IC 


















IT 


'"' 


"^ 


(N 


to 


■^ 




cc 






































no • 
3 . 


C3 . 

o 


































m 


u 


































a ; 


> . 




W 






























o 


'"^u 




o 






























•is 






a 




















L< 




h 


^ 


cc 




-§« 








> 

3 

l-J 


2 


1 


^ 
T 
s 


. 1 


4] 


3 
IT) 


3 

i-s 


+3 

p 


1 


o 


1 

o 




1 




o 








fR 


s 


< 


;^ 


<i 


02 


o 


12; 


ft 




H 


<1 



46 



City Document No. 123. 



^ 



^ 





• 






to 












to 










u^ 


eo 

CO 




o; 


to 








to 




^ 




to 


to 






CD 
H 

00 
00 


•* 


r-l 


^ 








-* 




-* 


-* 






















T-H 






"^ 




^ 


r-l 


CO 


o> 


CM 


CO 


in 


j_ 


CO 


^ 


•* 


<-> 


IM 


o> 




en 










00 




00 




o 




f^K 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 




to 


to 


to 


to 






























I-l 






T-H 




■"* 


iH 




r~( 






I-H 




rH 




TO 
00 
00 


to 


,^ 


rr, 


ro 




CO 


m 


ir\ 


CO 


'O 




00 


in 






I-H 
























Mystic 

Lake. 

igh wate 

7.00. 


o 


to 


lO 


to 


to 


to 


UZ 


CO 


o 


q 






m 


H 




























00 


n> 


1^ 


CO 


Ttl 


^ 


o 






^ 


to 




oo 


CO 






^ 












o 


t-; 




■^ 


in 


K 


00 




" 












^ 




^ 


" 


in 


o 




n 


-r, 


tX 


■o 


CJ 


o 


^ 


00 


•* 


IM 


lO 


in 


00 
































ier-Hll 
servoir 
h wate 
19.00. 


00 




J^ 




J^ 








J:; 


^ 






« 


t^ 


H 


(N 




IN 










IM 


IM 


IN 


IM 


IM 


IM 


00 


n= 


.m 


^ 


CO 


^ 


■* 


£» 


^ 




in 






00 




t-^ 










00 


00 


00 


I-H 


IM 






l- 






























H 


eq 


















IM 


IN 


IN 


IN 




00 
00 
H 


'^ 


Ol 


^ 


o 


^ 


-* 


to 


00 


^ 


CO 


CO 






■- o cio 




CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


■^ 


^ 


q 




q 


00 




IM 




I-l 




rH 


1-1 






IM 


rH 


IM 


rH 


IN 

rH 






























££^2 


00 
00 






ira 




CO 


o 




t- 


O 




O 




CO 


^ 


Cl 


CO 


■* 








^ 




CO 




to 


•^ 


Krtffi 














CO 


























<M 


IM 






















■^ 


rH 




T-H 












'"' 




eo 

00 
00 


tr, 










^ 












^ 




W " ■s . 

^ g >o 


!-*■ 


°! 






°2 

CO 


03 

CO 




CO 


IM 

CO 


(33 

im' 




q 


in 








(N 


IM 


IM 








IN 


IN 












I-l 




















■^ 


00 
00 


a. 




to 


in 


^ 


^ 


o> 




^ 


to 


IN 


to 


IN 






CO 


to 


in 


00 


t— 


Ol 




■* 




O 


o> 


CO 


<>> 

t-H 


CO 
r-l 


CO 
IM 


IM 


CO 


S 


CO 


rH 


CO 


IM 


CO 


CO 




n 

00 
00 


c» 




IN 


CO 


^ 


rH 


t- 


oo 


IM 


o 


to 


^ 


^ 


m '-' 


o 


CO 


00 


o> 


O 






o 


a 


CO 


rH 


Tjl 


ao 






















to 








S P ?^ 








CO 




CO 


CO 




IN 


IN 


o\ 




IM 




























































oo 

00 

I-l 


to 


^ 


o 


lO 


O 


IM 


,^ 


J^ 


O 


rH 


j_ 


IM 


Oi 


ii3 


»o 








ca 




Oi 






rH 


•* 




OO 


^ 




CO 




CO 


IM 






od 


^ 


to 




(M 


CO 




CO 
I-H 


CO 


CO 
7-i 


CO 




rH 


IN 

rH 


IN 


IM 


rH 




n 










^ 


•* 












in 


O 


"^ J3 










IM 




















s 






























^P 


-* 


-* 


IH 




I-H 


s 


'^ 


r-\ 


rH 


rH 


rH 


^ 


00 

00 


^ 


o 


OJ 




IM 


^ 


I-H 


o 


CO 


<M 




C2 




S: t/j'-i 


1-^ 






Oi 
















rH 




Sffl 




lO 






a 














O 


00 














^ 




^ 


^ 


^ 




^ 








I-H 




rH 


^ 


•^ 


"^ 




r-t 




'"' 


'"' 






eo 

00 . 
00 


•a 




to 


CO 




US 


•* 


o 


O 


00 


Ol 


O 


^ 


+3 


^a 


Ci 




lO 


^ 


CO 




IM 


^ 






O 


rX 


.S g 








»o 










W3 


rH 




to 
































r" . V c^ 






r-l 


I-l 


I-l 


rH 


'-' 


'"' 


'"' 


T-l 












00 
00 


ro 




m 


IM 


^ 


to 


IM 


00 


to 


m 


00 


CO 


^ 






<N 


't 


la 


CO 


q 


\a 


^• 








CO 
































rH 


^ 


"-I 


IH 


'-' 


rH 


rH 


'"' 




^ 


■^ 


"^ 






CO 
00 
00 


00 






CO 


to 


to 


IM 


00 


O) 


IN 


to 


oo 


^ 


t. -a 


(M 








in 


00 




IM 


Ol 




CO 








^ 






to 




to 




oo 


Oi 




Ol 


t- 


gc^gS 






























IH 




rH 


I-l 




rH 


rH 


I-H 


I-H 




rH 




rH 


3 6-?i- 


























































rf 


00 
00 












to 

IM 






CO 












O 




o 


CO 


02 


U3 


1~\ 


1(1 


rH 




to 


to 




to 


1^ 










^_i 


t_ 




=3 


P=H 




to 








to 




















r-t 








T~i 




'-' 


■^ 


"^ 


■^ 


■^ 




eo 

00 
00 
















tX 


^ 


IM 


to 


^ 


^ 


t^ "O 


^ 


CO 


05 




•a 


CO 


r^ 


00 


■^ 


to 


in 


"? 


to 


§-•§§1 






























1-1 


I-i 




rH 










rH 




































































g^-ss 


(M 

00 
H 




























liti 






Cl 


•* 












^ 




t— 


M .3 


lO 


00 


00 








00 


ira 


tjf 


-* 


-rX 


•<* 


to 


P!^ 


o 


■o 


o 


rH 




rH 


O 






rH 




^ 




K 










. 




. 




• 


U 


. 






lu" 


H 




>1 


>i 




' 




■ 






.a 


^ 


^ 


0) 


>> 


iz; 




C3 


a 
P 


;3 


^ 








P 


^ 


s 

> 


b 


s 


a 




a 


1^ 


a 


ft 


> 


c 
p 
1^ 




P 


p< 




s 


H 






1-5 


;? 


<i 


a 


<5 


02 


o 


Iz; 


p 





Eeport of the Water Board. 



47 



8 



> 



CO 



^ • i 

!!^ "^ - 

§ -2 § 

tq ^ ^ 

I CO S 

TS ""^ PI 

1 '?" J 

1^ ^ 

•"S ^ " 

-< ^ '^- 

-^ « s 

^ ^ ■.-: 

§ 5 a 

|| i 

^ 1^ H 

T^ CS| -S 



^ 00 



't^ 



SQ 



1 = ^" 
ts o o > 



° u P . 

5 CO 



E:§00 



00 (N 05 O 



CQ r-1 i-H C^ r-l j-H 



CO -H CQ t— 



CD Oi t- 



t- 00 Oi rH CO 



(N CN CO 05 CO C^ 



OS^ C^ CO^ 00_ 

iM oT cT co" -*■ 



i-l CD CO 



C^ "<* rH 



CO CO CO (N 



I:- -il CO Ol i-t CS t— 1-- 



(N C^ CO CO (M r-4 



(M C^ CO C^ 



to fN Oi tM 



CO CO CO 00 



00 00 00 00 



48 



City Document No. 123. 



o 


« 


g 


t^ 


T] 


t^ 




C) 






<U 


(M 


rie 


M 




11 


s 


■» 


■«!- 


ri; 


-^ 


IS 




H 


<u 


"♦^ 



g '^ 



rt 


CO 


V~, 




« 






•i<» 




1 


'fe" 




TO 


to 


o 


CO 


s 


M 


'^ 


o 


••^ 


oq 


'W 


-o 




00 


to 


■~i 


« 




s 








R 




» 


n 


o 


"w 






S 


T? 


^ 


<u 





f 


u 




C) 


fti 


5S 


"^ 


H 


!5l 


g 


^ 


O 


s 


"^ 


« 


ff 




S 


w^ 


« 





1^ 



ft^ 









«/? 






g 


g 






s 


%> 


•^ 


r^ 


S 


c 


c 


H 


rs: 





6a 



HBjaiBa JO 



K o 



r^ 


a 






hr 










S5 




o 


o 


_2 








o 


^ 


>,u 


u 




























p 


c 


Vi 





rt c3 o rS 



' a S g 






CQ 



o ■'• a 
c ii a 

^ « 2 



CO O CO lO 



I-H C^ (M (N i-l 



CO CO ^^ ^ 



C-l '* C^ CO 



(M C^ CO CO 



tH iH CO r-l 



OJ O u^ (N 
oi o <?^ u:5 

CO CO CD O 



CD (N CO CO 



I^ CO 



t^ a 
















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o ^ « 




























<i 






o 




to 


o 


o 












o-S^ 














o 








































a I-' 


e 


o 




(>i 


CO 




°i. 


S" 




<^ 


d> 






ti 




























m 


CO 


CO 




■* 


'^ 


TjT 


CO 


«o 


to 


o 



to t- 00 



2 3 



COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOQO 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



49 





































rH 














W5 


<^ 




OJ 


O 


CO 






C3> 


o 


t^ 


(M 




CO 




M 






M 


, ^ 


lO 


CO 










<N 


■* 


CO 


CO 


"* 










00 


«5 


to 


<-:. 


■* 


O 


IH 


lO 


to 


O 


tt 


m 




00 


1? 






o 


ai 


OT 


(M 






■* 


c; 






CO 


CO 


o 




i-H 










•^ 


to 


t- 








CO 


to 




o 


to 


o 




f-i 


IM 


cq 


(N 












r-i 










*~* 














^ 




a 




CO 


cr 


a> 


o: 


o 


X 




M 






o 


CO 












^ 




a- 


-1 






xa 


o 




o 


o 


IN 


o 










L^ 


00 


o 


ir 


»o 


00 


CO 


c^ 




lO 


JH 






00 


u: 


■* 


to 


ii: 


^ 


•^ 


"* 


" 


^ 


T* 


■* 




CO 


CO 


-* 




CO 


ttl 
























^ 


o 


o 


^ 




o 








































<E 


IM 


K 










o 


as 


en 




t- 






■^ 


















to 










^ 


CO 


CO 


to 


m 


l^ 




co" 










































OC 


'd 




Tj 




\r 




ic 


0< 


t: 


c 


IN 


t: 




c 












































































Ol 


IN 


CJ 




f-i 


(M 


r^ 


r^ 




IM 


IM 






rH 


1-1 




tH 








^ 




^ 




o 


r- 


c 


o 


o 


^ 


c 






































o c 


<= 




c 




Oi 








QC 








tc 


u- 


o> 






p- 




t^ 




















CT 




^ 
















^ 




















tH u- 










to 


































Tit 


■N 




^ 




b- 1— 






CO* 




































































































<o oc 


t~ X 


■* 


IC 






\r 








CO 




•* c<- 










































































































































































































































































































































o 


CO 












CO e<- 












'"' 






tH 








'"' 














c 


c 






c 






<z 


t= 


C 


C 






1- 


















































c 




^ 












<= 


c 


c 






•^ 
























































































c^ 


a 






a 








^ 


b- 


t- 






C 
























































































V 








*r 












Cn 






^ 




















^ 








c 


^ 


c 


<= 






























































■fl 








c 


O 


o 




o 


c 




o 
















ec 






c 


c 


C 


!= 


o 


o 






c 






















































tc 








c^ 


cr 


0- 


c^ 




tc 
































































































tc 














■<t 


CO 






















" 






<M 


IM 


i- 


IM 

















o 


o 


o 


o 














































































o 










o 








t- 


oo 






^ 


o 


,-H 






]f^ 


y^ 




co' 


otT 


iS 


^ 


I-, 




CO* 


J^ 




















































































o 


^ 


































































ki 






'A 


























CO 


en 




to 


^ 


CO 






eq 


CO 


tH 


(N 


M 


« 


tH 


•* 






cq 


^~* 




T-l 


*"* 


C3 


*"* 




(M 


'"' 




<N 


o 


^ 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 












































































































































































































































































































































a 






^ 






>o 


to 




OI 






o 






Oi 




(>» 


■<* 


>o 


i« 


o 


■o 


■o 


to 


to 


^ 


"^ 


"^ 


■^ 


to 


Tf 


oq 


CO 


tp 


o 



OOOsOi-f<MCO-^tO 



00 0> O T-( 



CO 00 00 00 CO CO 



5TS 



50 



City Document No. 123. 



t^ 















•^ 



t^ 



a> 


. 1 






















II 


to -- -H 1 


•^ 




















Percenta 
of 
Rainfal 
collecte 


s 


«o 


(N 


t^ 


a> 


1-; 


oo 


■^ 


rH 


(35 


o 




r-( 


t-^ 


OS 


lO 


CO 


00 


o> 


CO 


;. 


■* 


5 


^ 


■* 


CO 


■<ll 


CO 


<N 


"* 


1^ 








































--■d 






















"3 3 




o> 


CO 


o> 


T-* 


00 






"* 


(N 




< 


^. 


o 




CO 


<M_ 


M 


O 


CO 


CO 


.2 J 




o 


oi 


lii 


t-^ 


C^ 


CO 


O 


O) 


t~^ 




J 


(M 


cq 


(M 






T-l 


IH 






«1 


N 




















'U 




o 




«5 


o 


^. 


i-H 


W 


<M 




"is 




o 


o 


O 


CO 


o: 




cs 




3 


■§ 




CO 


Tl! 




^ 




C» 


^ 


o 


c« 


.8 


Tj( 


■* 


us 


M 


CO 


5 


CO 


CO 


•^ 


Ph 


>^ 




















o , 6 






















^tt^r:M 






















« o § =a 

a; -*j ^ M 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


S 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


s 


o 


I— 






o 




CO 




CO 




=3 3^.S 


o 






















o 




cd' 


oc 




c< 




d 




1 


"^ 


c^ 


(X) 








CO 


c^ 


CJ 




CO 


IN 


OT 


IN 
(N 


CO_ 


CO 


CO 


o> 




,5 Ph " 
iJ 




<N 


(N 


c: 


(M 


1-^ 


<M 


IH 


" 


c^ 


imonnt 
iufall 
ted in 
ke. 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


g 


O 
CO 
03 


cd 


o> 


Tt 


cd 


o 
c 


CO 


o 


03 

"^ 1 


^ 


& 


■^ 


I- 


oc 


-* 


c 




cc 




ra c; o ta 






oi 


o 






c< 


o 






Total 

ofR 

coUe 

L 


e 


to 


o 


^ 


(M 


CO 


a 


CO 






05 


di 


CO 

c 


o 


T- 

00 


lO 


00 


o 




(N 

00 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 










■ s 


o 


"* 




05 


o 






o 










^ 


cf. 




e- 


-^ 


o 














o 

1^ 






o 


b- 




o 














1 




C£ 


CO 
00 


o 


« 






tr 










CO 




(M 




rH 






•<* 






^ 












6 


T-l 






c^ 






a 


























< 


















































o 


























&- 
















c 


c 








02 




s 












c 


c 
c 










d 




































c 


c 
























c 












"e 












c- 


^ c 


, 








Q) 












t- 


























c 










-« 




c 






c 


C 


c 


> c 


> c 


o 


o|i 




c 






c 


C 




5 C 


> c 


> o 


6D 


t- 




cc 




C^ 


c 


>_ c 




^ 


1^5 


g 


H 


e^ 


o 


^ 




c 






lo^ 


5 


t- 


c^ 


t- 


o 


5 


G 








t- 


c- 


•5j 


1 «: 


t' 


:. '^ 


L '' 


L '^ 


5^ '"1 


o J- d 


"5 


o 


c 


Tj 




r a 




f "^ 


l" 'd 


* •* 








c- 


"" 




^ -^ 








c^ 


t- 


- C£ 






5. ^ 


^ c 






t£ 


r t- 


r a 


r -"i 


F c^ 


u 


r 'i 


f (> 


f lO 


^ =< . 




c 


5 C 


3 C 


3 C 


> c 


) c 


3 C 




3 O 


°|5 




c 


3 <Z 


> C 




> c 


> c 


3 c: 




3 O 






3_ a 


i c 


L " 


3 t- 


^ c 


ft t- 


c 


3 (N 






















"S Jh Ce 


s 








^ t- 




r c 






f ^f 


S-oj 


o 


c 






c 


3 a 




c 












3 a 
















e 


c 


>" c 






r o 


r u 


^ c 


3" g 


f r^ 


<2> 




3 Ci 




1 c 


3 a 




H t- 




3 •* 





q c 


i " 


3 t 


» c: 




u 




3 rH 




" 


r o 


3 C 


3 P 


r c< 


3 C 


-f e 


* c 


f CO 


a 












; 


• 








■< 






















H 






















h 










• 




• 




, 


0) 








7 b 




C 


» c 


3 r 


■H C 














- t 








o t 


c 


> > 








° 


H r 


O 
H r 


5 o 

-4 r 


c 
H r 


° r 


° r 


-1 r 




d 1 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



51 















(^ 






































•[■BOO 




■a 


0" 




CO 


a. 




" 


•^ 






■^ 




. -* 


►^ 
^ 














C: 


t^ oi ai \ ri 1 


IBiO^ JO -sqt oot 
aad •sq[ -y m ijnd 


t-^ CD_ o to 




CO 


O tH lO to — o 1 t- 1 
t— CO^ t-^ 1-i^ Ol^ w t-^ 




Til ^ 


Ttl CO 


•^ 






lO Tl 














^ 


o 


^ 




Tt 


u- 




to 


t- 1 <M 1 




•» 






t- 


I— 1 




00 






c^ 








o>. 


•;a8j ni ijn 9SB.13AY 


^ 




«: 


5^ 


^ 


cq 


■* 


tc 


;£ 


■^ 




a 


o 1 " 1 






*" 


■" 


I-H 


^ 




■" 


■" 










1 - 1 


•jBoo ;o -qx .isd 


. 








J^ 
















1 


























padcand XjtinBn^ 


^ 


-^ 




CO 


s 


s 


•^ 

u- 


ir 


OJ 


IT 


ra 1- 1 o 1 


■9.I3I[U![0 




I- i~ 0- 


C-l 


CO 


1-H 


Tj 


c 




t- T)1 ■* 1 •* 1 






































"^ 


"^ 






















^ 


.n 


^ 














lO 


•SJ35[nip 


-o 


t- 


o 




to 


^ 


csi 










tc 


X 




pnB saqsB ^anotuy 


s 


(> 


?j 


a- 


(N 


(M 


<M 
(M 


CO 




T- 




o- 


^ 


to 


■painnsuoo 








J^ 




>o 


^ 


■M C 


) to ^ O O 1 00 1 
























eStjjaAB jCiibq 


S 




- ^ 


t-T 00 


o 
to 


to" 


o a:_^ CO o 0)_ cN 1 t- 

tcT ^o" "^ -^ Co' -^ lO^ 






o o o o 


o 


o 


o o o o o o o 














•psmnsuoo \-eoo 




rM rH lO^ CO^ 


■t. 






JO innooiB ib;ox 


s 


o ti. C^ -* 

Cq rH (M (M 


00 




oo a 

iH r- 


^ (N i-( C< 
< rH rw rH r- 


o 






























C<l 






O rH O t- 


lO 


CO 


O O O O t- c 




































•psdcand innoinB 






CO 00 OS 


^ 


00 


rH 00 00 C^ 


" oo" OC 




sSBjaAB i^ireQ 


1 


r-l O IM Oi 


o 


oJ 


c^ i-t irs CO CO cv 


o 




CO CO CO CM 


CO 


CO 


CO CO IN « IM Cs 


(M 






o c 


^ 


o 


.o 


o 


c 
































«5 






»^ 










o c 




^ 


•psdnitid 


S 


s § 


o- 


oo 


s 




rH CO t- IM CO C 


rH 


}nnotuB iBjox 


8 


t-T tc 


c 


CO 


lO 






00 to" o 


o" -a 


", 




03 


CT 


"^ 


c 




o> 


a> 


^ 


05 t- t- t- t- 


to 

O 






























■- 














o 


,n 
















U5 


a 


o cu a 


•2 






























0; 








00 


a 
















o 


o 


a^ 






























^ 






























































H 

K 


3 2 M 


a 




























0! 


^.gg 


























































M 




1 








r~i 


t- 
















-* 
w 




































a 




<- 




c 




o 


o 


r 














































K 


o-d 


es 














o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


a> 


IS, 
































































a 


« 


c^ 




CO 












Tl 






































8 






c 




CO 








tc 


(> 


c 


Tj 






<i 


























































o 




H 




























































K 




a 






























W) 










CO 
















CO 


































B 




'^ 




























PS 

o 
































. 


T* 


m 


o 




m 


tn 






to 


<n 






^ 


t^ 












































to 


o 




to 


CO 


to" 


« 






























« 






























W) 






























H 






> 














<u 




s 










> 


OS 












^ 




^ 


-c 


rC 


f2 








5 
1 


1 


P. 
<1 


^ 
a 


P 



•-3 


1-3 


> HI 

p 

<1 


fcl 

1 


1 
O 






o 



52 



City Document No. 123. 



•IBOoiEjoijo-sqTOOI 



i-H CO »0 r- 



t* to (M 



lO lO O O 



•;j HI ?ji[ eSBjaAy 









IM CO Ol (N 



-tjl CO -^ -^ 



O I-H CO Q 



•s.ta5[ni[o 



00 OO 00 00 



•paransnoo |bo3 



CO CO CO to en >o 



00 Oi im lO 



CO 

00 
S 

s 

^5 



^ 











CO 




CO 


^ 


^ 


05 


o 


<M 


^ 


to 




■padrand lunotnB 


a 






O) 






f:: 


IM 


CO 


00 


S 


JS^ 


(N 


(N 


aSBISAB £\K<J 








^ 




oT 


in 


^ 


CO* 


oo" 


1^ 


IM 






e 


























































<ij 






























CO" 


■^ 


"■^ 










*" 






uj 







•padcnnd 
:junoniB ib;ox 






S.S 



CO CO 00 CO 



O rH T-H 00 



■^ i-H rl 



t- I- O t- 



C^tD00dOlr-l<Di-1 



CO 00 o> 



00 CO Ol 



00 OO i-H 



CD lO '^ r-l 
M d t— t- 



r-( 1-1 C^ <M C^ T-t 



O t-H T-H 






(N OJ 03 to 
C^ (M OV <M 



<§ 



t?. 



S.S 



CO CO 00 00 



tQ 



la 



CO CO 00 o 



00 CO OS 



a a 



^ a ^ a 



^ ^ 



o Iz; ft 



Eepoet of the Water Board.' 



53 



Rainfall on Lake Cochituate Water- shed for the Tear 1883. 











% 










C 




u 


u 


18S3. 


C 
1-5 


03 




i 




a 

3 
1-5 


t-5 


-g 

3 
60 

3 


m 


u 
o 

o 

o 


s 

4) 

> 

o 


a 

s 
« 

p 




Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


1. . , , 


























2 . 














0.30 






1.14 


0.09 


0.14 


3 




1.10 


















4 












0.03 


0.22 
0.07 












5. . . . 










0.10 




0.03 








6. . . . 


0.17 




0.41 






0.17 


. . . 


. . . 






. . . 


. . . 


7. . . . 




0.85 








0.48 










. . . 




8. . . . 








0.25 






0.50 










0.06 


9 . 






















0.21 




10. . . . 


0.68 




0.70 
















0.07 




11. . . . 




0.67 




0.14 


0.30 


0.10 






. . . 




0.04 


. . . 


12 ... . 




















0.20 






13. . . . 
U. . . . 


0.37 






1.12 




0.11 


0.07 


0.10 
. . . 


0.03 


0.08 
0.68 








. . . 


15. . . . 




0.33 






0.68 




0.04 






0.12 




. . . 


16 ... . 
















0.12 










17. . . . 


0.34 






« . 


. . . 


0.08 


0.46 




0.17 






0.50 


18. . . . 




0.08 




. . . 








0.11 


. . . 




. . . 


0.08 


19 


15 






















0.40 


20 ... . 




0.15 


0.51 


0.48 


0.02 


0.03 
0.05 








0.32 






21. . . . 


0.69 


0.38 


22 










2 15 
















23. . . . 










0.56 






0.06 






0.09 


. . . 


24 ... . 








24 










0.89 


1.40 


0.10 


0.40 


25 ... . 




0.34 














0.38 


26 ... . 




















0.10 






27. . . . 






0.06 




0.14 












1.46 


0.80 


28 ... . 


0.28 


0.07 




0.04 




0.40 
0.32 
(1.04 


0.82 
0.33 












29 ... . 




0.19 


1.12 






30. . . . 






0.08 






. . . 


31. . . . 


0.20 












0.07 












Total . 


2.88 


3.59 


1.76 


2.27 


3.95 


1.81 


2.88 


0.3 9 


1.31 


5.16 


2.06 


3.14 



Total rainfall during year . 31.20 inches. 



54 



City Document No. 123. 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sudhury-River Water-shed, for 

the Year 1883. 



1S83. 



10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26, 
27. 
28, 
29, 
30, 
31, 



0.005 
0.025 



Total . 2.81 3.865 1.78 1 



475 



055 
. 



845 4.185 2.40 2 



68 0.735 1 



52 5.60 1.81 3.55 



735 

10 

535 



425 
295 



Total rainfall during year 32.78 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges, located at Framingham and Southboro'. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



55 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Mystic-Lake Water-shed for the 

Year 1883. 



1883. 


IS 


a 


.a 


ft 


^ 
^ 


ID 

a 

1-3 


1-3 


3 


u 

o 

a 


i 
1 

O 


1 

> 


1^ 

o 
■a 

V 


1 . . . . 












05 














2. . . . 

3. . . . 




l.lu 










0.20 




0.01 


1.295 




0.23 


4 . . . . 












0.02 
0.23 


0.215 
0.02 
0.01 












6 . . . . 








0.055 


0.055 
03 










025 


6. • . . 


0.28 


0.715 


0.67 


0.025 


7 . . . 












8. . . . 
9 . • . . 






0.21 




0.37 


0.385 




0.055 




0.21 


0.085 


10. . . . 

11. . . . 
12 ... . 


0.27 


0.675 


0.77 


0.085 


0.02 
0.155 


0.23 
0.085 


0.02 
0.055 
0.12 








0.035 
0.035 


0.005 


13 ... . 


0.25 






1.45 


0.185 


0.03 


0.135 
0,795 
0.265 

0.17 






14 ... . 






15 . , . . 


0.015 

0.28 

0.115 


0.195 

0.03 
0.02 






0.715 
0.05 

0.025 












16. . . . 

17. . . . 

18. . . . 

19 ... . 

20 ... . 


0.62 


0.40 


0.05 
0.02 
0.07 

0.025 


0.46 


0.18 

0.43 
0.015 
0.03 


0.225 


0.01 
0.08 

0.08 


0.68 
0.485 


21 ... . 


0.78 


0.275 


22 ... . 










0.145 


23. . , . 

24. . . . 








0.175 
0.04 


1.875 
0.405 




0.135 


0.03 


0.865 


1.05 
0.33 


0.23 
0.095 


25 ... . 




0.285 










0.25 


26 ... . 


















0.225 


1.525 


0.085 


27. . . . 

28. . . . 


0.30 


0.045 


0.115 


0.055 


0.17 

0.045 

0.04 


0.475 
0.01 


0.25 
0.835 






0.205 
0.175 


29 ... . 




0.135 
0.175 


1.165 
0.02 






30. . . . 






0.045 








0.005 




31. . . . 


0.38 










0.08 






Totals . 


2.67 


3.065 


2.22 


2.47 


3.585 


1.635 


2.785 


0.87 


1.495 


5.45 


1.98 


2.996 



Total rainfall during year 31.22 inches. 



Being an average of two gauges, located at Mystic Lake and Mystic Station. 



56 



City Document Ko. 123. 



"s 



s 







o 


in 


^_^ 


Oi 


lA 


o> 


rH 


lO 


IN 


00 


T* 


CO 


00 


o 


t. 


o> 


11 


* 


V 


(N 


05 


CO 




°°. 


ira 






CO 


•* 


CO 


in 


"*. 


^ 


r~i 


in 


■2 


rfa 


T— 1 


^ 


CO 


^ 


d 


^ 


d 


i>i 


d 


d 


in 


in 


d 


to 


IN 


o 


*M 


« 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IN 


03 


IN 


?3 


CO 


CO 


03 


03 


^ 


03 


&H 








































■>* 


la 


lO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


-* 


00 


O 


CO 


o 


CO 


^ 


-* 


s 


t- 


O 


S 




■* 


CO 






05 




in 


CO 


CO 


OCJ 


t^ 


t-; 


03 


CO 


T-\ 






« 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IN 


03 


IN 


CO 


IN 


IN 


03 


CO 


03 


c4 


^ 


03 ■ 






CO 


o 


(>» 


^ 


OO 


00 


Ol 


U3 


00 


CO 


o 


^ 


OO 


03 


CO 


t_ 


> 


i 


o 






o 


c> 


a> 


OJ 


°i 


y-\ 




o 


o 


O 


C> 


U5 


at 


o 


« 


2sJ 


^ 


rA 


cq 


1-^ 


f-4 


r4 


iH 


<N 


rA 


IN 


IN 


cq' 


tH 


t-I 


1-1 


!z; 


1 






























IM 


























IN 


















to 


1-1 


OS 


CO 


oo 


IN 






Td 


O) 




^ 


o 




(N 


in 


_^ 


u 




oo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


>o 


03 


in 


o 


IN 


oo 


CO 


-* 


IN 


t-^ 


in 


o 


o 


^ 


kA 


- ^ 


to 


id 


in 


in 


in 


in 


in 


in 


d 


d 


in 


t~- 


in 


O 


^ 






























■" 


























^^ 






















CO 


iH 


IN 


t- 


-* 






00 


CO 




o 


IN 


o 




+3 


u 


CO 


o 




CO 




-* 


^ 


o> 


o 


-* 


00 


03 


in 


CO 


t-; 


■* 


Ol 


■s 


1—1 


f-H 


r-^ 


f^ 


I-H 


r4 


i-H 


d 


rH 


rH 


T— I 


rA 


rH 


rA 


d 


rH 


M 


^ 






































05 


-^ 


CO 


00 


CO 


00 


1-1 


CO 


O 


o> 

O 


IN 


Tf 


OJ 


^ 


Ol 


■5 


ti 


s 


CO 




Oi 


IN 


00 




in 


"^ 


o 


°J 


in 


CO 


03 


CO 


IN 


in 


3 


« 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


PH 


d 


d 


d 


00 


d 


<1 


1 






































CO 


CO 


o 


^ 


CO 


Tf 


CO 


03 


•* 


So 


^ 


^ 


CO 


CD 


•* 


CD 


>. 


s 






CO 


"*. 




00 




CO 




in 


in 


in 




03 


o 


CO 


3 


« 

s 


cq 


ci 


c4 


IN 


<N 


IN 


c4 


IN 


c4 


03 


'^ 


IN 


IN 


IN 


d 


IN 


•-5 


»^ 






































































, 






(M 


00 


CD 


CO 


^ 




CO 


•* 


CO 




«:- 








OO 


V 


« 


oo 


O 




ya 


s 


in 


«-; 




CO 


en 




O 


^ 


in 


r-^ 


d 

3 


o 


r-; 


e4 


(M* 


ci 


rH 


rA 


rH 


IN 


rH 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


IN 


d 

CO 


IN 


i-s 


^ 






































to 


CO 


•^ 


■o 


IN 


O 


00 


CO 


O 


^ 


r-i 


:S 


^ 


ta 


S 


-* 


>> 


s 


CJ> 


CO 


lO 


IN 








CD 


IN 


CD 


IN 


Oi 


r^ 


0C3 


03 


1-; 


C3 


"o 


CO 


CO 


T|i 


•«* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


rfi 


•* 


in 


CO 


in 


03 


I— 


^ 


:^ 


^ 






































^ 


00 


^ 


CO 


<N 


(N 


•* 


o 


00 


■n 

05 


00 


in 


03 


IN 


in 


00 


;i3 


« 


!S 


o> 


t-; 


IN 


US 


1* 


Ol 


"* 


■^ 


00 


CO 


Ol 


cc 


t— 


CO 


CO 


ft ! 




c4 


tH 


'-' 


■N 


<N 


ei 


IN 


IN 


IN 


rH 


IN 


ci 


e^ 


IN 


i 


c<i 


<1 


































rg 




CD 


a 


^ 


O 


ira 


OS 


CD 


«3 


00 


S 


00 


^ 


CO 


CO 


IN 


05 


S 




CO 


OO 










C 


^ 


oc 


r- 




cc 




O 


OS 


C3 


*? 


r- 


-^ 


1-5 


r^ 


c4 


oi 


r- 


IN 


rA 


'-' 


IN 


c; 


IN 


'-' 


IN 


rH 


S 






































Oi 




<M 


IN 


00 


in 


l- 


^ 


O 


c 


CO 


in 


-* 


00 


^ 


,_ 


;^ 


i 


•r. 


s 




K 


o 


CO 


OJ 




o 


•<d 


00 


ir: 


t- 


c 


C^ 


CO 


rfS 


n 


CO 


•* 


CO 


oo 


CO 


IN 


CO 


03 


03 


CO 


03 


IN 


03 


t- 


03 


fe 


1 






























■<* 








CO 


o 


^ 


IN 


«o 


Oi 


^ 


CO 


00 


o: 


o 


■>* 


at 


CO 


o 


G 


i 


i 


x 


a 


t— 


1- 


CC 


CO 


5 




lO 


o 


-d 


o 


in 


I- 


■^ 


o 


•g 


ci 


(M 


c4 


CO 


IN 


<N 


eq 


IN 


CN 


<> 


n 


t 


CO 


co 


IN 


CO 


1-3 


^ 






























-* 






























































C 




c 




































> 


C 
b 


. 1 
































c 




_c 


S 
































T 




«^ 


a 












o 




















c* 


^ 
^ 




a 










PLI 




c 
c 




t 

: c 


■ e 


J 


c 

1 a 


( 

5 
ti 
a 
c 
'S 
c 


B 
< 

c 


c 
c 

> 1 


^ 1 
1- 


! \ 


1 

) a 

I 2 


> a 
or 

c 
5 

„ a 


2 a 




< 


) 







.i 


d ] 
1 l 
3 fi 


^ 1 
? i 


i 1 




*1 t 




i ^ 
5 ^ 


3 „ 

1- 


3 1 

3 F 


i 1 

3 p 


\ 1 

> c 
3 p: 


3 C 

; C 

C 

3 PC 


^ 





Report of the Water Board. 



57 



Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations on 
the Water Works. 







Tbmpebatube of 


AlB. 








Temperature of 
Water. 


1SS3. 


Mystic Pumping- 
Station. 


Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Parker-Hill 
Reservoir. 


Brookline 
Reser'r. 


Mystic 
Eng. 
Ho. 




a 

3 

a 


a 

a 

'a 


i 
1 


a 

3 

a 

M 


a 

3 

a 

i 


a 

es 


i 

3 

a 
1 


a 

3 

a 


a 


a 

1^ 


a 


January . 


46. 


—1.5 


22.2 


44. 


—5. 


21.7 


44. 


0. 


21. 


37.8 


37.8 


February . 


52. 


1. 


25.9 


50. 


2. 


25.8 


49. 


7. 


26.6 


37.6 


36.8 


March . . 


65. 




28.6 


55. 


—2. 


28.2 


58. 


4. 


29.2 


37.7 


36.6 


April . . 


68. 


21. 


43.5 


67. 


21. 


43.6 


65. 


20. 


43. 


45.2 


42.7 


May . . . 


83.5 


28.5 


55. 


85. 


29. 


56.7 


80. 


34. 


55.6 


56.7 


56. 


June . . . 


86.5 


41. 


68.7 


91. 


43. 


69.8 


85. 


49. 


68.5 


70. 


71.5 


July . . . 


96. 


51. 


71.7 


94. 


51. 


72. 


91. 


45. 


71. 


75. 


75.4 


August . . 
September 


91. 


41.5 


68.3 


92. 


41. 






42. 




72. 


72.6 


83. 


37. 


60.3 


79. 


37. 




80. 


40. 


61.5 


65.6 


65.1 


October . 


79. 


24. 


48.3 


78. 


24. 


47.7 


77. 


29. 


48.4 


54.6 


54.5 


November 


66. 


15. 


41.3 


67. 


16. 


41.2 


65. 


12. 


42.9 


44.6 


44.9 


December 


55. 


—13. 


27.4 


55. 


—11. 


27.1 


53. 


—14. 


28.1 


36.9 


37.2 



REPORT OF THE WATER REGISTRAR 

OF THE 

SUDBURY AND COCHITUATE DEPAETMENT. 



Office of the Water Registrar, City Hall, 

Boston, May 1, 1884. 
Hon. Wm. A. Simmons, Chairman of the Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — In compliance with section thirteen of the ordi- 
nance regulating this department the Water Registrar here- 
with submits his annual report for the year ending April 
30, 1884. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
year 1884 is 54,168, — being an increase of 1,351 over the 
previous year. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
oif for non-payment of rates is 592 ; of this number 499 
have been turned on, leaving a balance of 93 remaining off. 
The total revenue from the sale of water during 

the financial year of 1883-84 is . . ^ $1,092,290 84 

Received from the sale of water furnished in 

previous years ..... 107,366 26 

Received for turning on water in cases where it 

had been turned off for non-payment of rates, 956 00 

Received for summonses . . . 1,702 25 

Received from all other sources, including 

elevator, motor, and fire pipes . . 14,058 79 

$1,216,374 14 



The estimated income from the sale of water 

during the year 1884-85 is . . . $1,260,000 00 

Off and on water for non-payment, and fees, 2,800 00 

Off and on for repairs .... 2,50000 

Sundry receipts from service, fire, and elevator 

pipes 13,500 00 

$1,278,800 00 



Eeport of the Water Board. 59 

The expenditures of my department during 
the year 1883 (including service-pipe branch 
since July 1) have been .... $33,723 43 

The total number ot meters now applied to the premises of 
water-takers is 2,298. 

Of this number 1,431 are |-inch, 198 |-inch, 521 1-inch, 
31 1^-inch, 78 2-inch, 19 3-inch, and 14 4-inch, size. There 
are also 217 elevators and 50 motors, with indicators attached 
to register the quantity of water consumed. 

There are 53 drinking-fountains established within the city 
limits. Those marked * are arranged for continuous flow of 
water. The balance have automatic fixtures, operating the 
flow of water wlien required. 

City Proper. 
* Boston Common (6). 
North square. 

Washington street, opposite Blackstone square. 
Atlantic avenue, junction Commercial street. 

" " head of Howe's wharf. 

Atlantic avenue, near*N.Y. & N.E. R.R. freight-house. 
Hay market square. 
Causeway street, at Boston and Lowejl R.R. depot. 

" " junction Merrimac street. 

Charles street, opposite the Jail. 

" " between Boy Iston and Beacon streets. 

" " near Boylston street. 

Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Albany street, opposite water-works, pipe-yard. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the drawbridge. 

East Boston. 
Maverick square. 
Central square. 
Bennington street, junction Chelsea street. 

South Boston. 

Foundry street, opposite First street. 

Fourth street, near Foundry street. 
" " junction Emerson street. 

" " corner of Q street. ■^ 

Telegraph Hill. 

Sixth street, near P street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 



60 City Document No. 123. 

Roxbwy. 

Albany street, junction Dearborn street.. 
Beacon street, junction Brookline avenue. 
* Eliot square. 

Eustis street, near Washington street. 
Heath street, near Tremont street. 
Pynchon street, near Eoxbury street. 
Tremont street, junction Cabot street. 

West Roxhury. 

Centre street, junction Day and Perkins streets. 

Centre and LaGrange streets. West Roxbury village. 

Morton street, junction South street. 

Roslindale, Taft's Hotel. 

Washington street, near Williams street. 

Dorchester. 

Commercial street, opposite Beach street. 
Neponset avenue, corner Walnut street. 
Upham's Corner. 
Glover's Corner. 
Grove Hall. 

Brighton. 
Barry's Corner. 

Market street, Cattle-fair Hotel. 
Union square. 

Western avenue, Charles-river Hotel. 
Washington street. Oak square. 

There are 20 stand-pipes now located for street-sprinkling 
purposes, as follows : — 

Tremont street and Hammond park. 

Clay street, corner Tremont street. 

Eliot square. 

Brookline avenue, corner Longwood avenue. 

St. James street, corner Warren street. 

Blue Hill avenue, between Waverley and Clifford streets. 

Warren street, corner Gaston street. 

Egleston square, corner Walnut avenue. 

Upham's Corner. 

Field's Corner. 

Dorchester avenue, near Savin Hill avenue. 

Dorchester avenue, at Old Boston line. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



61 



Beach street, Harrison square. 

Union square, Brighton. 

Washington street, corner Winship street, Brighton. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, corner of South street. 

Dudle}'' street, opposite Howard avenue. 

Paris street, corner of Meridian street. 

Corner Munroe, Wahiut avenue. 

Near Francis, Tremont street. 

Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam- 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1884, with the amount of water-rates 
received for 1883 : — 



35,228 Dwelling-houses (54,082 families) 


$510,809 61 


1,786 Model-houses (8,361 tenements) 


44,557 30 


13 Boarding-houses 


741 00 


11 Lodging-houses 








272 00 


8 Hotels 








405 00 


5,101 Stores and shops 








50,069 37 


259 Buildings . 








11,699 50 


662 Offices . 








5,710 30 


2Q Public halls 








312 50 


1 Theatre . 








32 50 


28 Private schools . 








579 25 


30 Asylums . 








1,924 58 


5 Hospitals . 








275 00 


155 Churches . 








2,308 70 


3 Market-houses . 








527 00 


75 Greenhouses 








1,041 00 


56 Cellars . 








340 08 


132 Restaurants 








2,835 90 


997 Bars and saloons 








12,892 41 


10 Club-houses 








350 46 


20 Photographers . 








518 33 


1 Gymnasium 








37 50 


2 Laboratories 








112 56 


49 Packing-houses 








1,481 50 


2,028 Stables . 








13,825 28 


24 Factories . 








564 75 


2 Bleacheries 








32 50 


140 Bakeries . 








1,658 94 


10 Freight-houses . 








145 00 


3 Gasometers 








47 00 


1 Cemetery . 








60 50 


Amount carried forward 


$666,167 32 



62 



City Document No. 123. 



Amount brought fonoard 


$666,167 32 


6 


Armories ...... 


113 13 


119 


Laundries .... 


2,066 25 


23 


Railroad-stations . . . . 


344 30 


1 


Ice Co. (washing ice) 


15 00 


5 


Ship-yards . . . . . 


70 00 


1 


Ship-yard and engine 


40 00 


2 


Dry-docks and engine 


50 00 


111 


Shops and engines 


4,659 85 


13 


Factories and engines 


617 05 


8 


Printing and engines . . . . 


361 00 


17 


Stationary engines . . . . 


719 25 


54 Discharging and pile-driving engines 


640 00 


9 


Pumping-engines . . 


90 00 


2,068 


Hand-hose . . . . . 


10,350 00 


10 


Fountains .... 


155 00 


19 


T umbl er- washers 


285 00 


70 


Beer-water pressures 


347 50 


7 


Aquariums .... 


50 00 


9 


Motors ..... 


45 00 




Steam and tug-boats . 


6,680 45 




Street sprinkling . . . . 


1,963 34 




Building purposes . . . 


3,921 00 




Filling gasometers 


284 00 




Fire Department 


87,055 00 




Street Department 


6,492 60 




Health Department . 


1,790 75 




School Department . 


1,130 00 




Directors of Public Institutions . 


401 00 




Committee on Common and Squares 


385 00 




Paving Department . 


268 50 




Police Department 


260 00 




Common Sewer Department 


2bQ 00 




Public and Branch Libraries 


236 00 




Committee on Public Buildings . 


136 00 




Committee on Bridges 


80 00 




City Hospital (shop, stable, hose) 


75 00 




Quincy Market (public urinals anc 






closets) ..... 


67 50 




Committee on Armories 


35 00 




Lamp Department 


20 00 




Office (City Surveyor) 


12 50 




Metered Water (9 months) 


276,928 63 




Miscellaneous .... 


42 00 




$1,075,705 92 



Eepoet of the Watee Board. 63 

The following table exhibits the yearly increase of water- 
takers since January 1, 1850 : — 

Takers. Increase. 

From January 1, 1850, to January 1, 1851, 13,463 

1852, 16,076 2,613 

1853, 16,862 786 

1854, 18,110 1,308 

1855, 19,193 1,023 

1856, 19,998 805 

1857, 20,806 808 

1858, 21,602 796 

1859, 22,414 812 

1860, 23,271 857 

1861, 24,316 1,045 

1862, 25,486 1,170 

1863, 26,289 803 

1864, 26,851 562 

1865, 27,046 195 

1866, 27,489 443 

1867, 27,754 265 

1868, 28,104 350 

1869, 29,738 1,634 

1870, 31,500 1,762 

1871, 36,132 4,632 

1872, 38,716 2,584 

1873, 40,688 1,972 

1874, 42,345 1,657 

1875, 44,676 2,331 

1876, 46,885 2,209 

1877, 48,328 1,443 

1878, 49,970 1,642 

1879, 51,523 1,553 

1880, 52,268 745 

1881, 53,254 986 

1882, 53,655 401 

1883, 52,817 

1884, 54,168 1,351 



a a 


1851, 


li it 


1852, 


a a 


1853, 


it a 


1854, 


a ii 


1855, 


li a 


1856, 


li (( 


1857, 


11 <i 


1858, 


(( i( 


1859, 


(( (( 


1860, 


(( (( 


1861, 


(( (( 


1862, 


a li 


1863, 


(( <c 


1864, 


(C (( 


1865, 


( C ( ( 


1866, 


(( (< 


1867, 


(C (( 


1868, 


<( (C 


1869, 


li (< 


1870, 


(( (( 


1871, 


(( (( 


1872, 


I. ll 


1873, 


ii cc 


1874, 


( ( ( ( 


1875, 


( ( C ( 


1876, 


(( (( 


1877, 


(< ii 


1878, 


ii ii 


1879, 


(< (( 


1880, 


<( (C 


1881, 


11 cc 


1882, 


(< (( 


1883, 



64 



City Document No. 123. 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848; — 



Ee 


ceived 


by Water Commissioners, as per 


Auditor's report 


in 1848 


. 


$972 81 


From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850 . 


71,657 79 






1850, 


1851 . 


99,025 45 






1851, 


1852 . 


161,052 85 






1852, 


1853 . 


179,567 39 






1853, 


1854 . 


196,352 32 






1854, 


1855 . 


217,007 51 






1855, 


1856 . 


266,302 77 






1856, 


1857 . 


282,651 84 






1857, 


1858 . 


289,328 83 






1858, 


1859 . 


302,409 73 






1859, 


1860 . 


314,808 97 






1860, 


1861 . 


334,544 86 






1861, 


1862 . 


365,323 96 






1862, 


1863 . 


373,922 33 






1863, 


' • 1864 . 


394,506 25 






1864, 


1865 . 


430,710 76 






1865, 


1866 . 


450,341 48 






1866, 


1867 . 


486,538 25 






1867, 


1868 . 


522,130 93 






1868, 


1869 . 


553,744 88 






1869, 


1870 . 


597,328 55 






1870, 


1871 . 


708,783 68 






1871, 


1872 . 


774,445 70 






1872, 


1873 . 


862,704 08 






1873, 


1874 . 


917,415 92 






1874, 


1875 . 


977,020 48 






1875, 


1876 . 


1,005,120 94 






1876, 


1877 . 


1,029,643 70 






1877, 


1878 . 


1,015,562 89 






1878, 


1879 . 


1,010,584 30 






1879, 


1880 . 


1,025,803 14 






1880, 


1881 . 


1,039,896 17 






1881, 


1882 . 


1,087,528 49 






1882, 


1883 . 


1,127,982 32 






1883, 


1884 . 


1,167,704 17 






1884, to Ma 


y 1, 1884 . 


878,214 48 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



65 



The following table exhibits the classes of premises to 
which meters are attached, the amount of water consumed, 
and the revenue received for the years 1882 and 1883. 



Class of Premises. 



Hotels 

Boarding and Model Houses 

Business purposes 

Steam Railroads 

Sugar Refineries 

Factories and Machinists 

Iron Works and Foundries 

Mills and Engines 

Marble and Stone Works 

Gas Companies 

Breweries 

Oil Works , . . • . . 

Chemical Works 

Laundries 

Restaurants 

Stables 

Theatres and Halls 

Hospitals 

Schools 

City, State, and Government Buildings . 

Steamers and Shipping 

Elevators and Motors 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



24,485,301 

2,021,091 

31,686,454 

22,862,737 

23,740,678 

18,333,023 

12,792,679 

6,209,426 

2,756,264 

7,100,885 

9,999,689 

1,828,034 

2,997,126 

280,691 

2,308,938 

9,118,710 

222,015 

1,960,844 

1,276,994 

9,341,694 

2,981,399 

16,671,397 

2,550,244 



213,526,313 



Revenue 
received. 



$36,726 76 

3,031 20 

47,524 10 

34,293 79 

35,610 91 

27,497 27 

19,188 83 

9,-313 47 

4,134 24 

10,651 21 

14,999 16 

2,741 97 

4,495 54 

421 01 

3,462 75 

13,676 12 

332 95 

2,941 16 

1,915 18 

14,012 31 

4,596 10 

25,005 59 

3,213 80 



$319,785 42 



1883. 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



27,593,573 

6,567,065 

52,614,059 

26,489,786 

28,386,000 

19,760,772 

8,380,042 

7,900,982 

2,561,763 

8,328,522 

8,969,227 

1,844,000 

3,386,531 

318,667 

3,914,041 

9,820,665 

706,000 

2,065,928 

1,891,075 

10,401,903 

4,963,444 

13,859,038 

1,776,174 



247,499,257 



Revenue 
received. 



$41,390 36 

9,850 60 

78,921 08 

39,734 68 

35,079 00 

29,641 15 

12,570 06 

11,851 47 

3,842 64 

12,492 78 

13,453 84 

2,766 00 

5,079 80 

478 00 

5,871 06 

14,731 00 

1,059 00 

3,098 89 

2,836 61 

15,602 85 

7,565 44 

20,788 56 

2,370 34 



$371,075 21 



Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



KEPOET OF THE WATER REGISTEAE OF THE 
MYSTIC DEPAETMENT. 



Office of the Mystic Water Eegistrar, City Hall Building, 
Charlestown District, Boston, May 1, 1884. 

Hox. Wm. a. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — I herewith submit tlie annual report of this de- 
partment for the year ending April 30, 1884 ; — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1884 is 17,579, distributed as follows: Charlestown Dis- 
trict, 6,258 ; Somerville, 5,321; Chelsea, 4,929; Everett, 
1,071. 

The total amount of water-rates received during the finan- 
cial year of 1883-84 is as follows : — 

Charlestown District $116,99692 

Somerville 76,614 40 

Chelsea 62,635 35 

Everett . 10,154 53 



$266,401 20 



Paid the cities of Somerville, 
Chelsea, and town of Ever- 
ett, as per contract . $37,508 51 

Received for water used in 

previous years . . . 16,490 45 

Received for water used dur- 
ing the year . . . 212,402 24 



Received for labor and ma- 
terial furnished for work 
performed outside this de- 
partment, but connected , 
with the Water Works . $1,454 49 
Sale of old material . . 375 44 

Oflf and on water for repairs . 272 00 



,401 20 



Amounts carried forward, $2,101 93 $266,401 20 



Kepoet 


or 


THE W 


ATER JbOARD. 


67 


Amounts brought forward, 


$2,101 93 


1266,401 20 


Fines, waste 


. 


. 


254 00 




Fines, non-payment 


. 


. 


222 00 




Fees, summons 


, 


, 


212 00 




Maintaining meters 


• 


• 


63 05 


9 «f^9 Q« 



Total amount received during year, 



$269,254 18 



The expenses of the office during the year ending April 
30, 1884, including all charges for collection in Chelsea, 
Somerville, and Everett, were $8,185.29. . ' 

Table shoiving the Number, of Places turned off for Non-jpayiinent of Rates 
during the Year 1883, the Number turned on again, and the Number still 
remaining off. 





Number 
turned off. 


Number 
turned on. 


Number 
remaining off. 




47 
90 
51 
10 


46 

77 

49 

7 


1 




13 


Somerville 

Everett 


2 
3 


Totals 


198 


179 


19 







Stand-pipes for Street- Watering. 

The whole number in use in this department is 35, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



Oharlestown District. 

Cambridge street, near Stickney & Poor's factory. 
Railroad. 
City stables. 
Allen street. 
Main street. 



Rutherford avenue, 



South Eden street, 
Prescott 
Monument square. 



Harvard School buildino^. 
Laurel street. 



Ohelsea. 

Cary square, corner Forsyth street. 
Broadway, near Stockton street. 
" " Cary avenue. 



68 



City Document No. 123, 



Somerville. 

"Washington street, corner Boston street. 
" " " Myrtle street, 

near Union square. 
" Elm street. 
" Laurel street. 
" Poplar street. 



Summer street, 

ti a 

Somerville avenue. 



Broadway, 

Somerville avenue 
Spring street, 
Beacon street, 
Pinckney street. 
Pearl street, 
Highland avenue 
Main street, 
Med ford street. 



Cambridge line. 
Merriam street. 
Mossland street. 
Franklin street, 
opposite public park. 

" 439 Somerville avenue, 
near " " 

" Cooney street. 
" Pearl street. 
" Cross street, 
corner Medford street, 
junction Broadway. 

near Sycamore street. 

Everett. 



Broadway, near Engine-house. 

" " Pleasant street. 

" " Chandler's. 

Main street, " Chelsea street. 
Chelsea " *' Winter street. 
Ferry " " Nichols street. 

Deinking-Fountaixs . 
The whole number in use in this department is 20, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 

Charlestown District. 

City Square, corner Park street. Automatic. 

Bunker Hill street, corner Tufts street. 
Canal street, " South Eden street. 

Main street, " Hancock square. 

" near Tufts wharf. 

Austin street, opposite Front street. 

Chelsea. 
Broadway square. 

" near brido;e. Automatic. 

Winnisimmet street, near Ferry. 
Pearl street, corner Marginal street. 
Eastern avenue, corner Crescent avenue. 



Eepoet or THE Water Board. 

Somerville. 

Union square. 

Broadway, corner Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, corner Walnut street. 
Medford street, " Central street. 

Davis square. 

Broadway, opposite public park. 

Somerville avenue, junction Washington street. 

Everett. 
Main street, junction Broadway. 



69 



Automatic. 



Automatic. 



Automatic. 



70 



City Document No. 123. 



t^. 








1 


O) 






CO 


o 


!l 


•sinBjpi^H ^i\£L 


IM 


M 


<N 


CO 




•s^nBjpyCH ajBAUj 


- 


■* 


Ol 




o 

(M 




j^ 


CO 


-* 


^ 


s 


•sqnx-qsB_Ai 


-* 


Ol 


o 


00 




•si^npxi 


-# 


■* 




■* 


CD 




^ 








O 


•sq}'Ba aajioqg 




rH 


■* 




Ol 




•s.iaddojj dojg 


1-1 


o> 


§ 




m 

tH 




•ajse^ 


CO 


-* 


to 

CO 


c^ 


o 
o 


H 














pa 




























o 














a 














O 
1 


•s-iaddoH 




to 


!0 




CO 


P5 














N 
H 


























< 














^ 






o 


05 


CO 


CO 


•S^l50^^Jl^g 


O 




to 




o 




















CO 


rH 


'"' 




CD 




.o 


to 


Ol 


CO 


CO 




•ncj 


o 


<M 


•* 


■^ 


O 




















tH 


'"' 


'"' 




>«r 




CO 


IM 


■n 


c- 


to 


•sqnxq^Bg 


cn 


Ol 


K 


■- 


CO 






CO 


Ol 




^ 


■sinsBa pn^q-qsK^ 


a 


§ 


O 

o 


" 


^ 






'-' 


(M 




«o" 




^ 


Q 


Ol 


p 


5 CO 




cc 


-d 






o 


•sqmg 




to 

CD 


d 


a 


cq 




cc 


in 


iO 


a. 


3 -* 


•sdBX 


-; 








J Ol 








rH 




CO 
































;- 










































P 












j 


c 








IS 


, 


1 




_a 




"3 
















_c 


c 




H 


o 












^ 






"a 


£ 


\ 


3 




X 


X 


c 


t- 








C 


C 


a. 


f- 


; 





Repoet of the Water Board. 



71 



The following Table exMhits the Classes of Premises to which 3Ieters are 
applied, the Amount of Water consumed, and the Revenue received for the 
Year JSS3 : — 



Class or Premises. 



Steam Railroads 

Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co, 
City and government buildings .... 

Schools 

Stables . . . . , 

Factories 

Chemical works 

Foundries 

Breweries 

Gas companies 

Oil works 

Mills and engines 

Hotels 

Model houses 

McLean Insane Asylum 

Slaughter-houses 

Business purposes 

Wharves 

Laundries . 

Elevators and motors 

Bakeries 

Kestaurants 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



Quantity used. 
Cubic feet. 


Revenue 
received. 


14,480,546 


$21,720 00 


1,217,720 


1,826 38 


3,273,696 


4,910 54 


1,652,654 


2,478 78 


3,094,032 


4,640 85 


6,446,120 


9,668 68 


2,232,001 


3,348 00 


838,951 


1,258 00 


745,423 


1,118 00 


239,725 


359 89 


336,156 


504 23 


1,537,001 


2,305 50 


394,659 


591 99 


715,754 


1,073 63 


1,524,170 


2,286 25 


3,153,507 


4,730 00 


1,203,651 


1,805 40 


771,071 


1,157 60 


462,048 


693 07 


145,854 


218 78 


276,987 


415 48 


243,107 


364 66 


428,299 


642 44 


45,413,132 


$68,116 91 



The quantity used through meters in the different districts 
was as follows : — 



Charlestown 
Soraerville 
Chelsea . 
Everett . 

Total 



Cubic Feet. 

28,736,661 

10,020,303 

5,389,919 

1,266,249 

45,413,132 



Revenue. 

143,102 93 

15,030 31 

8,084 33 

1,899 34 



,116 91 



72 



City Document No. 123. 






t:^ 



!;:5 



«« 



O O CO * o o o 



So, 



O O CO (N "^ OS 

O lO '^i* r-t CO O 

CD CI in t- OS iM 
(M lO ^ CO OJ »0 



«« 



I— ( CO T-ICOii^'Min)OOOOOOOOOC>OOiOOi--iCOO 



00 CO CO C^ Oi Oi ' 



JOOOOOO'OiOOO'^DOOSC 



O T*<i— '(MfMCDt-'MCDb-O^iCiOCO'MOint—r-Ht— -tFcO 



«« 






t- CS COWOOOOOOOfM 
O '^ IMCOiOiOOl-OOOCO 

<N I- CO to iH 



Sft 



OJ I- CO O M CO I-l 

00 CO C<» I-l lO 

03 O 



o o > 



. to I 



CO ■* CO 

b-ooO'-'Oi-^oeoco 

rH I-l 1-1 lO _ _ 

rl iH CO t^O^i-1 

i-TirT 



> ^ c<< 



K« 



S ft 



CD t— oo-^t-i— lOt-t-^cOOOOOOOO 
CX> C-liOiOCOCDiOCOOCDiOOvOCZSOOO 

incOC^COrHt-cDOlOJC^'Mlr-CDOiOCO 

-rh CD lO 00 (N iH rH i-l I 



O r-" 

i-T 00 <Mi-l 



)i— t-iOOCOOlt-'-'iO'MT-lrHr 



OOcOC^cDOCOiOt-C^OlCOiOi-HCOiH-^-^i-lr-tCO 
OOOl— CDI:-t-00(Mi-( i-(rHrH «3 






t— O lO CO lO 
r- O '^ Oi Cq 

c: O OO 'M CD 
CD i-H ^ O I-H 
<N r-HM •— Cq 



^ 



I rt 



a 

a Oi 






- 5 « 
o i>c . - 

* S !3 " « O. C S » fc, 

0.a= « o = S 5 o^ 



d " 3 a 
■. ?5 „, ^ y 



bt >, 



cz2 02a2OS3c 



^ fl bf)-- •= =: .S ;^ » o " 

Sc<!5«Oc3rt-S^c3i-~S-^3q 



Eepoet or THE Water Board. 



73 



o o o 
lO o oo 



.000000000000 



. 1-H C^ r-1 CD 10 



( O 03 00 1-1 r-( 



sr 
.2 a3 



■3 



2 



o a 

£■0 ?i 



.0 



o 2 

- a; +j t^ 
> sog OS 



vh "'o -tJ C r^ 












s at3 

O Ob* 



o >, 






74 



City Document No. 123. 



Statement showing the amount of water-rates received 
since the introduction of Mystic-pond water, November 29, 
1865 ; also the amount paid by the several districts supplied 
under existinsf contracts ; — 





13 
O g 


-o o 
'a " 


d 

o 

■g fl 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Ket amount 

to Mystic 

Water 

Works. 


Charlestown, 
« 

« 


1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 


$27,045 10 
47,247 16 
60,188 83 
68,815 32 
74,369 81 
82,230 79 
87,259 70 
97,727 36 
99,455 66 




$27,045 10 
47,247 16 
60,188 83 
68,815 32 
74,869 81 
82,230 79 
87,259 70 
97,727 36 
99,455 66 








« 


1874 


111,420 30 




111,420 30 








« 


1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 


118,568 00 
116,271 17 
109,963 25 
104,174 76 
98,313 88 
102,590 50 
106,927 90 
109,921 18 




118,568 00 
116,271 17 
109,963 25 
104,174 76 
98,313 88 
102,590 50 
106,927 90 
109,921 18 








<i 


1883 


115,462 25 




115,462 25 








"May 


1,1884 
1870 


78,194 56 




78,194 56 


$1,816,14748 




$1,816,147 48 


East Boston 


$54,885 28 


$15,015 06 


$39,870 22 




" 


1871 


63,371 71 


18,348 73 


45,022 98 








« 


1872 


70,957 40 


21,383 02 


49,574 38 








•' 


1873 


77,480 79 


23,992 38 


53,488 41 








(( 


1874 


77,776 91 


24,122 83 


53,654 08 








« 


1875 


70,256 26 


21,102 53 


49,153 73 








" 


1876 


72,046 78 


21,818 74 


50,228 04 








" 


1877 


66,637 43 


19,655 03 


46,982 40 








" 


1878 


65,088 96 


16,535 63 


48,553 33 








" 


1879 


56,165 94 


32,139 10 


24,026 84 








" 


1880 


50,973 39 


10,889 36 


40,084 03 


725,640 85 


$225,002 41 


500,638 44 




arried 


forward 








Amounts c 


$2,541,78833 


$225,002 41 


$2,316,785 92 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 



75 





3 '53 

o o 


1^ 


+3 

o 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 

to Mystic 

Water 

WorJiS. 


Amounts brought 

Chelsea, 186S 

(6mos.) 
" lb68-69 


forward 
$3,632 80 
19,548 14 






$2,541,78833 


$225,002 41 


$2,316,785 92 


$544 92 
2,932 22 


$3,087 88 
16,615 92 


" 1869-70 


26,474 26 


4,294 85 


22,179 41 








'< 1870-71 


31,161 56 


5,290 39 


25,871 17 








" 1871-72 


38,714 16 


7,178 54 


31,535 62 








" 1872-73 


42,239 50 


8,171 85 


34,067 65 








" 1873-74 


45,169 46 


9,050 85 


36,118 61 








" 1874-75 


50,644 51 


10,757 90 


39,886 61 








" 1875-76 


50,934 20 


10,873 66 


40,060 54 








« 1876-77 


49,893 35 


10,468 02 


39,425 33 








«' 1877-78 


39,496 59 


10,348 99 


39,147 60 








" 1878-79 


50,368 45 


10,947 79 


39,720 66 








1879-80 


51,785 24 


11,214 09 


•40,571 15 








" 1880-81 


54,990 65 


12,496 26 


42,494 39 








" 1881-82 


57,535 56 


13,514 23 


44,021 33 








" 1882-83 


61,510 34 


15,104 14 


46,406 20 








" May 1,1884 


60,566 74 


14,726 70 


45,840 04 


744,665 51 


157,615 40 


587,050 11 


Somerville, 1869 

(6 mos.) 

" 1870 


$6,572 62 
13,189 89 


$985 89 
1,978 49 


$5,586 73 
11,211 40 


" 1871 


20,029 68 


3,005 94 


17,023 74 








'< 1872 


25,275 13 


4,055 02 


21,220 11 








" 1873 


30,930 81 


5,232 70 


27.698 11 








«• 1874 


37,325 96 


6,831 48 


30,494 48 








" 1875 


47,912 43 


9,873 73 


38,038 70 








1876 


49,793 55 


10,423 08 


39,320 47 








'< 1877 


49,873 19 


10,461 97 


39,411 22 








" 1878 


53,581 31 


11,932 52 


41,648 79 








" 1879 


54,329 13 


22,231 65 


42,097 48 








" 1880 


56,988 65 


13,295 45 


43,693 20 








" 1881 


65,394 32 


16,657 73 


48,736 59 








" 1882 


69,656 63 


18,362 65 


51,293 98 








" 1883 


72,872 23 


20,048 89 


53,823 34 








" May 1, 1884 


60,518 15 


14,707 26 


45,810 89 


715,193 68 


160,084 45 


555,109 23 




forward 






Amounts carried 


$4,001,647 52 


$542,702 26 


$3,458,945 26 



76 



City Document No. 123. 





< 


■ eg 

r§ 



o 

l2i 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 

to Mystic 

Water 

Worka. 


Amounts brought 
Everett, 1872-73 


forward 
$3,603 34 






$4,001,647 52 


$542,702 26 


$3,458,945 26 


$540 51 


$3,062 83 




1873-74 


4,365 84 


654 88 


3,710 96 










1874-75 


4,677 58 


701 63 


3,975 95 










1875-76 


5,861 80 


879 28 


4,982 52 










1876-77 


6,548 38 


982 26 


5,566 12 










' 1877-78 


7,401 99 


1,110 29 


6,291 70 










' 1878-79 


7,429 06 


1,114 36 


6,314 70 










1879-80 


7,642 05 


1,146 33 


6,495 72 










' 1880-81 


8,329 87 


1,249 47 


7,080 40 










< 1881-82 


8,868 48 


1,330 29 


7,538 19 










1882-83 


9,946 46 


1,491 98 


8,454 48 










' May 1, 1884 


9,678 80 


1,451 83 


8,226 97 
















84,353 65 


12,653 09 


71,700 54 










Tota 


1 to May 1,1884 


$4,086,00117 


$555,355 35 


$3,530,645 80 



Eespectfully, 

JOSEPH H. CALDWELL, 

Mystic Water Registrar. 



ANNUAL EEPOET SUPERINTENDENT 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, May 1, 1884. 

Hon. William A. Siivlmons, Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — In compliance with a rule of the Board I submit 
herewith the annual report of the Western Division for the 
past official year, May 1, 1883, to May 1, 1884. 

SuDBURY-ElVER BaSINS. 

The water has been of the usual quality in these basins. 
On May 10 algm appeared in Basin 3, and in a few days 
spread entirely through the water. 

The year was begun with a very severe drought, which did 
not lessen as the season advanced, rendering the use of 
nearly all the water in store necessary before January 1, 
1884. Basin 2 was first drawn from ; and when it was emptied 
extensive work for the improvement of the borders was 
prosecuted. A certain amount of work was also undertaken 
at Basin 3 after it had been emptied. 

The rainfall from May 1 to December 1 was one foot in 
depth less than the average for 32 years. 

Something over a billion of gallons of the spring surplus 
from the Sudbury river was run into Lake Cochituate. 

These are the principal facts in regard to the Sudbury 
supply. A more detailed account will be found under each 
basin. 

Basin 1. 

On May 1, 1883, the surface of the water stood at eleva- 
tion 157.48 above tide marsh, and water was running to 
waste. May 12 two sets of stop -planks were placed on the 
overflow, and on the 19th the water had reached high-water 
mark. On June 25 waste was stopped, and the water re- 
ceded gradually until January 2, 1884, when it stood at 
grade 154.40, — the lowest point reached during the year. 
On January 30 the surface had risen to the top of the 
overflow, and waste began, which has continued to date. 



78 City Document No. 123. 

The highest level durhig the year was 159.68., on May 23, 
1883. Water was drawn from this basin for the use of the 
city from May 1 to May 10, and from February 1, 1884, to 
date. The one and one-half million gallons per day which 
is required by law to be run into the stream has been wasted 
at the dam during the whole year. 

Basin 2. 

On May 1 this basin stood at elevation 106.04, and water 
was wasting over the dam. On May 7 the flash-boards 
were placed in position. On May 23 high- water mark was 
reached, and waste began, which continued until May 31, 
when the basin was drawn from for the use of the city. On 
July 28 the surface had fallen to 151.00, and it became 
evident that the work of filling up and excavating the shallow 
flowage might be proceeded with. The water was accord- 
ingly drawn down still further, to a height varying from grade 
149.00 to 150.00, and thus confined to the bed of the original 
stream, leaving the whole bottom bare. 

The following report, which was submitted to the City 
Engineer on the completion of the work, will give an idea of 
the number of cubic yards of material moved, and its dis- 
tribution : — 

" Western Division Boston Water Works, March, 1884. 

Heney M. Wightman, Esq., Engineer Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — Herewith you will please find my report on the 
'Shallow flowage of Basin 2.' 

During the early part of the summer of 1883 the water in 
Basin 2, of the Sudbury-river system, was used for the sup- 
ply of the city, and by the middle of July the surf ice had 
been drawn down below the old meadows bordering the orig- 
inal stream. 

The season being extremely dry, the only w^ater left was 
a small thread confined to the bed of the old Sudbury-river 
channel, and yielding on some days only 3,000,000 or 
4,000,000 of gallons. 

After the water in the basin had receded, the sides drained 
rapidly, and were soon in a favorable condition to treat for 
shallow flowage. Stated briefly, this treatment, as recom- 
mended by the ' Commissioners on Investigation of Water- 
Supply,' was to fill up all the shallow places around the mar- 
gin and excavate others, so as to leave nowhere less than 
8 feet of water in the basin when full. 

During the latter part of July, an accurate survey was 



Report of the Water Board. 79 

made of the work to be undertaken. Mr. E. C. Appleton, 
C.E., was appointed Assistant Engineer, with your con- 
currence, and remained until its completion. Mr. W. W. 
Castle was appointed general foreman, in charge of laborers 
and teams. On the 27th of July a small working force was 
organized, and set to work in advance of the engineering plans, 
in a place where it was obvious that the work could be done 
to advantage. On August 6 I was enabled to make a re- 
port, showing sections of the valley at the upper end of the 
basin, with the position of the loam and gravel to be moved, 
and its distribution. 

The work at this time by day's labor was confined to that 
portion of the basin marked 'B' on the accompanying plan, 
and embraced both sides of the basin lying between the 
B. & A. R.R. on the north, and the highway between Ashland 
and Framingham on the south. 

On August 13 the Boston Water Board employed 
Messrs. Munson & Co. to excavate 30,000 cubic yards of 
loam and gravel, in the section marked ' C,' at the cost of 
28 cts. per cubic yard. On Sept. 17, this amount having 
been moved in a satisftictory manner, Munson & Co. were 
further employed by the Water Board to excavate 25,000 
cubic yards additional, at the same price and under the same 
conditions. This work was prosecuted during the remainder 
of the season. 

As the autumn ushered in a period of great drought, and 
the soil in every part of the basin was in a more favorable 
condition for working than could have been anticipated, the 
work on shallow liowage was laid out on a moi'e comprehen- 
sive scale, embracing every portion of the basin. When the 
engineer corps were not occupied in the duties of estimating 
and laying out work they were directed to push on the cross- 
sectioning in the lower portions of the basin. 

The excavations in Section ' B ' proved to be more diffi- 
cult than in any other portion. On the north bank of the 
main stream the deposits were almost wholly loam, which 
was very easily removed. On the southerly portion, how- 
ever, and at the same level, was found cemented gravel with 
considerable rock. As this material lay above the shallow 
flowage line it had to be removed as well as the loam. The 
gravel was used for the facing, or water side of the embank- 
ments, and the loam was placed in the rear, as the accompa- 
nying representative sections will show, that portion shaded 
red in the drawing being the gravel dike. The red lines 
show the new grades formed by the process of excavating 
and filling, and the black line shows the old surface of the 
gravel. Near the site of the old mill, in the vicinity of the 



80 City Document No. 123. 

Ashland road, was found a mass of solid rock, stumps, 
gravel, and loam, mixed in most curious confusion. The 
total number of cubic yards of excavation in Section ' B ' 
was 17,584, of which 9,754 were loam, 4,200 cemented 
gravel, 2,010 loose rock, and 1,620 solid rock. In addition 
to this labor the wings of the stone arches under the rail- 
way had to be protected by heavy paving, and the embank- 
ment by riprap, placed by hand. The slopes adjoining the 
highway bridge were also paved for a distance of 100 feet 
from the bridge. There were laid 2,070 square yards of rip- 
rap, and 741 square yards of heavy stone paving, not less 
than 2 feet in thickness. South of the highway (section 
marked 'A' on plan) 200 cubic yards of sand, gravel, and 
boulders were excavated, and 237 square yards of riprap 
placed. When Section 'B' was completed, the force, con- 
sisting of about 100 men and 15 double teams, were moved 
down the valley to section ' D,' below the small dam. 

The force employed by Munson & Co. in Section 'C 
averaged 5 foremen, 71 men, and 15 double teams, for 75 
days. Their work was faithfully executed, and the margin 
of profit must have been very small. 

Adjoining the railway the bottom was taken out to grade 
157.00, and near the small dam to 155.00; a uniform de- 
scending grade connected the two points. The average grade 
of the new bottom in this section being 156.00, and tlie water 
line of the overflow of the main dam 165.87, leaves, for the 
future, about 10 feet depth of water at this point. 

The embankments were carried to grade 170.00. The 
annexed plan shows an average section. The total excava- 
tion was 53,867 cubic yards, composed of 33,085 cubic yards 
of loam, 10,000 cubic yards of sand and gravel, and 10,000 
cubic yards of cemented gravel. In addition to these quan- 
tities there were moved 760 cubic yards of loose rock and 
22 cubic yards of solid rock ; and 1,195 square yards of rip- 
rap, 17 square yards of paving, and 111 cubic yards of box 
culvert masonry, were laid. The last three items were exe- 
cuted by the city. 

In this portion of the basin there was an ample supply of 
excellent gravel, and the sfrades were so arrang^ed as to include 
just enough of this material to form protecting dikes, with 
slopes of 3 horizontal to 1 vertical on the water front. 

The section below the small dam, marked 'D' on plan, 
embraces that portion of the basin between the small dam and 
the old highway which crosses the valley in the neighborhood 
of Cutler's mill. This section was almost entirely devoid of 
gravel, necessitating the liberal use of paving and riprap to 
protect the sandy slopes. 



Kepoet of the Water Boaed. 81 

The former muddy bottom was just below the limit fixed 
on for shallow flowage ; but as the material was of an objection- 
able nature, audit could be used to good advantage in filling a 
large shallow area near the railroad, it was decided to remove 
a certain portion, amounting to 13,066 cubic yards. In 
addition to this work the following amounts were excavated 
within the limits of shallow flowage, — 6,408 cubic yards of 
loam, 1,765 cubic yards of sand and gravel, 2,168 cubic yards 
of loose rock, and 505 cubic yards of solid rock. The total 
excavation in this section amounted to 23,912 cubic yards. 

There were laid at this point 8,868 square yards of riprap 
and 248 cubic yards of culvert masonry. No other work than 
that by day's labor was done in this section, the uncertain 
nature of the material and the quantities rendering it more 
advantageous for the city to do the work. The force con- 
sisted of about 150 men and 20 double teams. It may be of 
interest to state here that the steep banks of the valley were 
sometimes found to be covered with several feet of loam, in 
places extending to the depth of 5 or 6 feet, notwith- 
standing the gravelly appearance on the surface caused by 
wave action. This loam was either removed to the gravel, or 
covered with better material and riprapped. 

The old highway at Cutler's mill was removed to the 
shallow flowage line. It is marked on plan '^ Old Eoad.' 
From this road 1,620 cubic yards of sand and gravel, and 810 
cubic yards of loose rock, were removed. Total excavation, 
2,430 cubic yards. 

The next section, marked 'E' on plan, extends from the 
old highway to the new road crossing the basin with an iron 
bridge. From the meadows on this section 15,965 cubic 
yards of muck and loam were excavated below the limits of 
shallow flowage ; of this 10,856 cubic yards were removed, at 
a cost of 35 cents per cubic yard, by Munson & Co., under 
an agreement with the Boston Water Board, dated Oct. 3. 
The force employed averaged 16 men and 12 double teams 
for 36 days. 

The larger portion of this material was placed around the 
shallow margins of the small, isolated basin lyiug between 
the highway and the railroad at Park's corner. The average 
haul was 1,500 feet. 

The quantities removed from Section " E ' within the limits 
of shallow flowage were 2,505 cubic yards of loam, 2,825 
cubic yards of sand and gravel, and 420 cubic yards of loose 
rock. Total excavation, 21,715 cubic yards. In addition to 
these amounts 1,011 square yards of riprap were placed by 
hand. 

As there was very little shallow flowage in this section the 



82 City Document No. 123. 

work at this point consisted principally of trimming off the 
loamy slopes and removing stamps. 

There remains below Section ' E ' the large basin extend- 
ing from the highway to the main dam. In this section, 
marked 'F' on plan, the bulk of shallow flowage was con- 
fined to the Nevins place, on the easterly side, and an ex- 
tended area on the westerly shore, adjoining the dam. The 
latter portion was improved by Munson & Co., under an 
agreement with the Boston Water Board, dated Nov. 3, 
at a cost of 30 cents per cubic yard. The average force 
employed by Munson & Co. at this point was 28 men and 
10 double teams for 25 days. The material removed con- 
sisted of 2,622 cubic yards of loam, 5,844 cubic yards of 
sand and gravel, making a total of 8,466 cubic yards. Besides 
this amount there were excavated in shallow flowage 4,355 
cubic yards of loam, 9,226 cubic yards of sand and gravel, 
and 74 cubic yards of loose rock. Below shallow flowage 
grade 6,300 cubic yards of muck were removed. There is 
still left a limited amount of work to be done in this section, 
and it is believed that enough remains of the appropriation 
to complete it. With this exception the whole basin has 
been treated for shallow flowage. 

The total quantity of material excavated in all the various 
sections amounts to 148,129 cubic yards of loam and gravel, 
and there have been laid 13,381 square yards of riprap, 758 
cubic yards of stone paving, and 359 cubic yards of culvert 
masonry. 

The whole cost of this work has been $71,472.18, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



139,640 cubic yards loam and gravel exc. 



® 333V0C. 



13,381 square yards riprap, (a) $1.00 . 

6,342 cu. yds. loose rock, (d) $1.00 . 

2,147 " " solid " (0) $2.00 . 

758 sq. yds. heavy paving, (a) $1.50 . 



$46,318 18 

13,381 00 

6,342 00 

4,294 00 

1,137 00 



Total $71,472 18 

The appropriation by the City Council was $80,000, leav- 
ing a balance of $8,527.82 remaining, to be expended on 
Section 'F.' 

It may be stated that the work already accomplished will 
give much more than the 8 feet of water originally contem- 
plated in the scheme for removing the shallow flowage. 
The slopes, as a general rule, have been made of coarse gravel, 
with inclinations of 3 horizontal to 1 vertical. Points 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



83 



especially exposed to wash have either been paved or rip- 
rapped. Where stone excavation adjoined the new dikes 
the slopes were made of a steeper inclination, and pro- 
tected with the stone. 

Accompanying the report you will find a contour map of 
the valley, and sheets embracing sections, showing the former 
and present surfaces. 

Very respectfully yours, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 
Resident Engineer and Superintendent." 



Work done on Shallow Flow age Basin No. II. between August 1 and 
December 3i, 1883. 





Shallow Flowage. 


at 
fa 

MPs 


=4 
> 

a 

M 

H CO 

SS 
H 




si) 
a 




Subdivi^oii. 


Loam. 


Sand 

and 

Gravel. 


Cement- 
ed 
Gravel. 


Loose 
Rock. 


Solid 
Rock. 


l§ 
O 




Cu. 
yds. 


Cu. 

yds. 


Cu. 

yds. 


Cu. 
yds. 


Cu. 

yds. 


Cu. 

yds. 


Cu. 
yds. 


8q. 
yds. 


Sq. 

yds. 


Cu. 
yds. 


"A" "A" . 


9,754 

33,085 

6,408 

2,505 
6,977 


100 

10,000 
1,765 
1,620 
2,825 

15,070 


4,200 
10,000 


100 
2,010 

760 
2,168 

810 

420 
74 






200 
17,584 
53,867 
23,912 
2,430 
21,715 
28,421 


237 
2,070 
1,195 
8,868 






"B" . . . 
"0" . . . 
"D" . . . 

" Old road " 


1,620 

22 
505 


13,066 


741 
17 


Ill 

248 


"E" . . . 




15,965 
6,300 


1,011 






"F" ... 
















58,729 


31,380 


14,200 


6,342 


2,147 


35,331 


148,129 


13,381 


758 


359 



On January 2, 1884, the basin began to rise rapidly, 
and before the end of the month water was wasting over the 
dam. The highest point reached during the year was 167.45, 
on May 24; and the lowest, 148.55, on October 2. 
Water has been drawn for the use of the city from this basin, 
from May 10, 1883, to February 1, 1884, without inter- 
ruption. 

The iron bridge on Fountain street has been thoroughly 
scraped and painted during the year. 

A new road has been built, leading from the main highway 
to Dam 2, and during the period of low water the gates in 
the gate-house were painted. 



84 City Document No. 123. 



Basin 3. 



On May 1, 1883, Basin 3 stood at elevation 175.43, and 
water was running over the dam. On July 13 waste was 
stopped, and the surface was maintained at the level of the 
overflow until July 19, when water was drawn for the use 
of the city. The surface then fell gradually until December 
24, at which time it stood at 154.00, — the lowest point 
reached during the year. On January 9 no more water 
was drawn, and the surface then rose gradually until Feb- 
ruary 8, when water began to waste over the dam, which 
has continued to date in varying quantities. The highest 
point reached during the year was 175.98, on February 14. 
Water was used from this source for the supply of the city 
from July 19 to October 27, 1883, and from November 3 
to January 9, 1884. 

On May 10 algoe made their appearance, and spread 
rapidly. As a general rule the taste of the water was better 
at a distance of 5 or 6 feet from the surface than elsewhere. 
No complaint was heard from the use of this water iii the 
city ; in fact, it is probable that a large part of the algae 
had been dissipated before reaching the city mains. 

During the autumn a considerable amount of the upper 
portion of this basin was treated for " shallow flowage." The 
whole of one meadow was excavated, and embankments 
formed over the shallow portions, transforming what was 
rather a disagreeable marsh into a small basin, with nowhere 
less than 8 feet of water, and with gravelly sides and 
bottom. Owing to the impracticability of securing boarding- 
houses for the men sent to work at this point, a series of 
shanties were erected, with a common dining-room and 
kitchen in the centre, thus accommodating about 100 men. 

The gates in the gate-house were overhauled and painted 
during the period of low water, and the stop-planks at all the 
basins have been rejointed and painted. 

Farm Pond. 

The water in this pond has varied in quality according to 
the source from which the city was drawing. On July 12, 
some spongilla lacustris appeared on the screens, and more 
or less of this growth was found fastened to the fascines that 
were used to protect the water side of the embankment of 
the canal. On May 1 the pond stood at elevation 149.23, 
and was kept at this point until July 29, when it was 
lowered 2 feet to allow for the retaining of any surplus 
water from the basins in case of a heavy rain, and to avoid 



Eeport of the Water Board. 85 

interfering with work on Basin 2. Early in January the sur- 
face was allowed to rise again, since which time the pond 
has been kept practically full. 

Aqueduct from Dam 1. 

During the drought this aqueduct was cleaned for the first 
time since its construction. Its situation below the level of 
Farm pond renders it difficult of access. The brick-work 
was found covered with sponge. 

Lake Cochituate. 

On May 1, 1883, the surface of the lake stood at ele- 
vation 133.71, — about 8 inches below high-water mark. 
The w^ater having risen to 134.36, on the 24th, the stop- 
planks were removed from the dam, and the water was wasted 
until the 28th. The surface of the lake fell steadily during 
the summer, and by the middle of September it had reached 
the top of the aqueduct. On the 27th the pumps and boilers 
were removed from Chestnut-Hill reservoir, and taken to the 
lake, in anticipation of their use should the water recede 
much lower. In October, the drought still continuing, it 
became evident that pumping \xould have to be resorted to 
for filling the aqueduct ; and, under the advice and direction 
of the City Engineer, the machinery was located on the 
platforms near the gate-house. Temporary houses were 
built over the pumps, engines, and boilers. On November 
26 the machinery was started, and continued to supply the 
city until January 14, when the pumps were stopped. 

The lowest point reached b}' the lake during the year was 
grade 124.07, on January 8, 1884, — 3 feet above the invert, 
or nearly 2 feet lower than the lowest point reached the pre- 
ceding year. 

Early in February, there being a large surplus of water 
flowing in the Sudbury river, it was decided by the City 
Engineer to fill the lake from the river, and the Sudbury was 
accordingly turned into Course brook to the extent of over 
1,000,000,000 gallons. On March 7 the stop-planks were 
taken out of the dam, and waste was begun, which has 
continued in varying quantities to the present date, and 
has amounted to more than the whole amount turned in 
from the river. 

The quality of the lake water has been excellent through- 
out the year. Analyses have been made from different points 
on the works, including the Sudbury and Cochituate water- 
sheds, the aqueducts, reservoirs, and service-pipes. Samples 



86 City Document No. 123. 

have been collected, and sent to Prof. E. S. Wood, of Har- 
vard Medical College, who has made the analyses. 

Dudley Pond. 

This pond, which stood 4 feet 11 inches below high- water 
mark, was turned into the lake on September 8. On No- 
vember 5 flow from this source was stopped, the water 
then being 11 feet below high-water mark. 

SUDBURY-RIVER AqUEDUOT. 

This aqueduct has been in use throughout the entire year, 
except when shut off for cleaning. The amount of water run 
through has varied from 4,000,000 to 40,000,000 gallons 
daily. Total for the year, 7,566,300,000 gallons. During 
the last week in May, 1883, this structure was cleaned its 
entire length, and again in February, 1884. A year is too 
long a time to allow to elapse between cleanings. Owing to 
the low stage of water last year the water for cleaning could 
not be spared. 

In May a small amount of rock was removed from the 
Badger-Hill tunnel, and small patches of sponge were noticed 
at different points along the line. In the cleaning of Febru- 
ary more sponge was found, and the brick-work was very 
dirty. From Rosemary brook easterly the brick-work is 
always cleaner than in a westerly direction. A fibrous 
growth, with mud, is found in patches between Farm pond 
and Rosemary brook, principally on embankments, where it 
clings to the sides with the greatest tenacity. 

Some 15 tip-cart loads of stone were removed from the 
Beacon-street tunnel, and it is evident that a portion of the 
tunnel between Stations 801 and 803 will have to be arched. 

An attempt has been made to systematize the work of 
cleaning, and some progress in this direction has been 
made during the year. It is found that an average day's 
work is 850 lineal feet of conduit, or 8,350 square feet of 
brick surface, swept three times per man. This estimate 
is formed on the present flow- line of water in the aqueduct. 
When the consumption increases materially, the lineal feet, 
but not the square feet, will decrease. It is found necessary 
to sweep only about a foot above the water-line. This esti- 
mate does not include the expelling of the dirt after it has 
been dislodged. Usually reliance has been made upon 
flushing to accomplish this end ; but it is impossible to do 
this part of the work thoroughly in this manner. The 
following method has been found effective, but one require- 



Eeport of the Water Board. 87 

ins: considerable time. The work of cleanino- is carried on 
up stream. A greater head of water is then let on, amount- 
ing to 6,000,000 gallons per day, or about a foot in depth. 
The men then work down with the current, stirring up the 
deposits, and sweeping the invert clean. Experiments are 
now in progress for doing this portion of the work by a 
machine. 

The modus operandi of cleaning is as follows : the water 
having been drained out during the night, the men enter in 
gangs of 7 the next morning, each man armed with a 
corn broom, rubber boots, and a tin reflector, holding two 
candles strapped to the thigh. Three men work on each 
side of the aqueduct. The seventh man works on the bot- 
tom, with a rattan broom. This triple sweeping leaves the 
brick-work of the sides clean, and the dirt dislodged from the 
bottom, at a cost of $400. 

During the season the concrete covering of the Waban 
and Charles-river bridges were coated with a one-half inch 
layer, to fill the cracks and make a new surface, at a total 
cost of $1,350. 

The grade of Leach's lane was raised during the year, 
occasioned by the laying of a water-pipe by the town of 
Natick. 

Permanent iron ladders, of a special design, were provided 
for 5 of the manholes most frequently used. They do not 
interfere with the flow of the water. They were inserted at 
the following points : Leach's lane, Waban bridge, Welles- 
ley town-farm, Charles-river bridge, and westerly end of 
Beacon-street tunnel. 

A large amount of loam has been applied to the embank- 
ments during the past year. Trees have been set out on 
each side of the Waban embankment. The Conant farm 
shed has been removed to the westerly siphon chamber, 
where it is used for the storage of lumber and tools. About 
a mile of new fencinsT has been built. 



CocHiTUATE Aqueduct. 

Five and one-half feet of water were run in this structure 
from May 1 to August 17, when the head was raised to 7 
feet, or 8 inches over the top of the arch. This height was 
maintained until September 12, when the lake began to re- 
cede below this elevation, and, in consequence, the water in 
the aqueduct followed the level outside the gate-house. On 
November 26 about 4 feet of water were maintained by 
pumping, and on February 5, when the flow through the 
head gates had been resumed, and the lake had risen to a 



88 City Document No. 123. 

sufficient height, 6 feet of water were run. This height has 
been maintained steadily until the present date. 

Water has been shut off twice, during the year, for the pur- 
pose of cleaning. On May 31 and June 1 the whole 
length of the aqueduct was swept from the lake to Brook- 
line reservoir. Considerable sponge was found growing in 
the upper portion, but it had attained a length of but one- 
half inch. The brick-work was quite dirty. The second 
cleaning occurred January 21, 22, and 23, 1884. There 
was about the same amount of dirt and sponge as was 
found in May. In the Brookline tunnel sewage was found 
leaking through the seams in the ledge, and it undoubtedly 
comes from adjoining estates. It is to be hoped that some 
action will be taken by the Board to stop this evil. The 
cleanings referred to were thoroughly done, but should be 
prosecuted once in 6 months to keep the brick-work clean. 

The same methods of cleaning have been pursued as al- 
ready described under the head of the Sudbury-river aque- 
duct. The average work of sweeping, per man per day, has 
been found to be 10,600 square feet of brick-work swept 
three times, or 600 lineal feet of conduit. The cost is about 
$350. 

Very little work has been done in the way of repairs 
during the year. On the exterior some of the manholes near 
the lake have been partially rebuilt, and protected against 
the action of frost. The whole line has been cleaned of 
bushes by mowing. 

Chestnut-Hill Eeservoie. 

This reservoir has been in constant use throughout the 
year. The water has been quite evenly good. The usual 
meteorological and other observations have been made, and 
considerable work in the way of permanent improvement of 
the grounds has been accomplished. Some of the loam from 
Basin 4 has been used for the grading of a lawn near the 
stone stable. All the gate-houses, etc., are in excellent 
condition. A table of rainfall, showing the time of the 
beginning and ending of each rain or snow, is appended. 

Brookline Eeservoir. 
The grounds and structures connected with this reservoir 
are in good order. JSTo new work has been done at this 
point during the year. 

Very respectfully, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD. 

Superintendent. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



89 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, for Tear ending Dec. 31, 1883.* 









a 








d 






1 






o 
a 


O t, 

c o 
m 


Duration. 




a> 
d 

M 


° u 


Duration. 




Jan. 


2 
5 


.03 


Snow 


during night. 
10.30 p.m. 


April 5 

« 7 


.02 
) 


Shosv- 
ers 

Rain 


7.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 
5.15 a.m. 




" 


6 


■ .47 


" 


to 


" 8 


|.3, 


and 

Snow 


to 
10.30 a.m. 




" 


7 


J 




5.00 a. m 


" 11 


.10 


Show- 


6.30 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 




" 


10 


.27 


" 


3 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


" 12 


) 




7.45 p.m. 




<i 


13 


) 




7.30 p.m. 




1.11 


Rain 


to 








J .32 


Rain 


to 


" 13 






5.00 a.m. 




" 


14 


) 




8 a.m. 


" 20 


.38 


« 


9.15 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. 




(I 


17 


.38 


Rain& 
Snow 


3.00 to 10.00 p.m. 




















" 23 


) 


Rain 


9.15 a.m. 




" 


19 


.12 


Snow 


1.30 to 8.30 p.m. 


" 24 


|.. 


and 
Snow 


to 
7.00 a.m. 




" 


20 


i .80 


Rain 


7.15 p.m. 
to 
























** 


21 


) 




3.45 a.m. 


Total . 


2.26 








" 


28 


1 .26 




5.30 a.m. 

to 
4 a.m. 












" 


29 




May 5 


.10 


Rain 


10.30 to 11.00 p.m. 




CI 


R1 


.47 


<i 


12.05 to 4.00 p.m. 




















" 11 
" 14 


.16 




1.00 to 5.15 p.m. 
9.00 p.m. 
















Total . 


3.12 








\ .80 


<< 


to 














" 15 
" 22 


) 




8.00 a.m. 
6.30 a.m. 




Feb. 


?. 




Snow 


5.25 a.m. 








[ 1.00 


and 


to 




[ 2.28 


" 


to 




" 


4 


} 


Rain 


4.00 a.m. 


" 23 


) 




1.30 a.m. 




" 


6 


).,, 


Snow 
and 


10.30 p.m. 
to 


'< 23 


.06 


" 


12.05 to 1.30 p.m. 




*' 


7 


) 


Rain 


1.15 p.m. 


" 23 


!... 


« 


7.00 p.m. 
to 




" 


11 


.57 


Snow 


12.15 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


" 24 


) 




5.00 a.m. 




" 


15 


.20 


" 


1.40 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


" 27 


.14 


" 


1.30 to 5.30 a.m. 




" 


18 
20 


.11 
.05 


" 


6.20 to 9.30 a.m. 
7.15 to 10..30 p.m. 


" 31 


.47 


" 


4.15 to 4.55 p.m. 




" 












" 


25 


.54 


Rain 


6.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


Total . 


4.25 








j^ 


28 


.06 


Snow 


12.30 to 6.00 a.m. 














Jime 6 
" 6 
" 7 


.47 
,10 
.21 


Rain 


12.55 to 2.00 p.m. 
6.00 to 11.55 p.m. 
7.00 to 11.55 p.m. 




Total . 


3.32 




















March 6 


.18 


Snow 


11.45 a.m to 10.00 p.m. 






















" 11 


.04 


" 


6.00 to 7.00 a.m. 




" 


10 


.75 


Rain 


12.30 to 9.30 p.m. 


" 11 


.25 


<< 


5.00 to 5.35 p.m. 




" 


20 


.65 


" 


3.50 to 7 a.m. 


" 13 


.16 


« 


3.05 to 8.30 p.m. 




" 


27 


.06 


Snow 


7.45 to 11.45 p.m. 


" 17 


.08 


<< 


7.30 to 9.45 a.m. 




" 


30 


.06 


" 


during night. 


« 19 
" 21 


.12 
.05 


** 


5.15 to 9.45 a.m. 
2.45 to 3.15 p.m. 




Total . 


1.70 









* Gauge 14.85 inches in diameter 2| ft. above ground. 



90 



City Document No. 123. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Concluded. 



6 


11 


a 

B ° 
m 


June 27 


\ .49 


,, 


" 28 


) 




" 29 


.59 


" 


Total . 


2.56 




July 2 


.29 


Rain 


.. 4 


.08 


" 


" 5 


.02 


Show- 
ers 


" 8 


.51 


Rain 


" 13 


.25 


" 


" 15 


.03 


Show- 
ers 


" 18 


.28 


Rain 


" 28 


.20 


" 


" 28 


1.75 


,, 


" 29 


) 




Total . 


2.41 




Aug. 13 


.07 


Rain 


" 16 


.17 


" 


" 23 


.04 


" 


Total . 


.28 




Sept. 5 


.03 


Rain 


" 9 


.04 


" 


" 13 


.05 


Show- 
ers 


" 17 


.08 


Rain 


" 24 


1.77 


i< 


" 25 


] 




" 29 


.03 


" 


" 30 


.31 


" 


Total . 


1.31 




Oct. 2 


1.24 


Rain 


" 12 


.10 


" 



Duration. 



3.00 p.m. 

to 
8.45 a.m. 

4.30 to 5.05 p.m. 



6.00 to 8.30 p.m. 
8.00 to 11.10 p.m. 

11.30 a.m. to 11.45p.m. 

3.30 to 4.30 a.m. 

8.45 to 10 p.m. 

3.30 to 5.00 a.m. 

3.30 to 6.15 a.m. 

10.30 a.m. 

to 
3.30 a.m. 



7.00 to 8.10 p.m. 
12.30 to 7.00 p.m. 
8.30 to 9.15 p.m. 



7.15 to 7.30 a.m. 

8.00 to 9.15 a.m. 

during day. 

6.45 to 9.50 p.m. 

4.00 p.m. 

to 
12.45 a.m. 

8.45 to 9.30 p.m. 

9.45 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 



9.45 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 
6.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 






1 


d 

a o 

03 


Oct. 13 
" 14 


1 .89 


" 


" 20 


.19 


" 


" 23 
" 24 


1 1.65 


" 


" 26 


.15 


" 


" 29 
" 30 


1- 


" 


Total . 


5.33 




Nov. 9 


.21 


Rain 


" 10 


.03 


" 


" 11 


.04 


" 


" 16 


.02 


Snow 


" 23 


.10 


Rain 


" 24 


.10 


" 


" 26 
" 27 


1 1.51 


c< 


Total . 


2.01 




Dec. 2 


.01 


Snow 


" 2 


.17 


Rain 


" 5 


.02 


" 


8 


.05 


" 


" 16 
" 17 


1 .85 


Snow 


" 18 


.05 


" 


" 19 


.43 


" 


" 21 
" 24 
" 25 


.55 
.44 
.33 


Snow 
and 
Rain 

Snow 


" 27 
" 28 


i .34 


Rain 


Total . 


3.24 





Duration. 



7.30 p.m. 

to 
4.15 p.m. 

6.30 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 

9.30 p.m. 

to 
11.15 p.m. 

12.45 to 4.50 p.m. 

3.30 a.m. 

to 
5.80 a.m. 



1.50 to 4.10 p.m. 

4.50 to 8.00 p.m. 

6.30 to 9.30 p.m. 

8.15 to 9.50 a.m. 

5.00 to 7.30 a.m. 

3.00 to 5.00 p.m. 

5.30 p.m. 

to 
2.45 a.m. 



In morning. 

9.15 a.m. to 2.15 p.m. 

6..30 to 8.30 a.m. 

8.30 to 9.30 p.m. 

6.45 p.m. 

to 
4.45 p.m. 

8.00 to 11.30 a.m. 

8.00 a.m. to 9.15 p.m. 

4.45 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. 

1.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 

6.00 to 11.15 p.m. 

10.30 a.m. 

to 
3.00 a.m. 



Total for year 31.79 inches. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE EASTEEN DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1884. 
W. A. Simmons, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — My report for the year ending with April 30th, I 
herewith respectfully submit. Beyond the usual work of 
laying main-pipes by petitions, introducing new service- 
pipes by application, and the general maintenance of the 
whole during the season, there have been laid 2,183 feet of 
48-inch main from the four corners on Beacon street through 
new Commonwealth avenue to West Chester park (its 
terminus for the present) ; 609 feet of 30-inch in West 
Chester park, connecting this main with the 40-inch on 
Beacon street ; 4,429 feet of 24-inch through said park, con- 
necting the 48-inch with the 36 and 30-inch on Tremont 
street. 

Since these connections were made the pressure throughout 
the city has been greater than at any time since the intro- 
duction of the water. Also laid a new 20-inch main the 
entire length (1,398 feet) of the new Warren bridge. This 
is a great improvement. The old pipes, by being imperfect 
in their construction, made the maintenance very troublesome 
and expensive. 

Main-Pipe. 

The whole length of main-pipe of the difterent sizes laid 
and relaid from the commencement of the works to the 
present time is 4251- miles. The whole number of feet laid 
and relaid during last year is 67,056 feet, or about 13 miles. 

The whole leng-th now in service is 377.86 miles. 



Service-Pipes. 

Whole number put in past season . . . . 1,130 

Length in feet 30,284 

Total number to date 49,290 



92 



City Document No. 123. 



Of the relaying of enlarged sizes the following table 
shows the chansre in sizes : — 



street. 



Between what Streets. 



Tremont .... 


Dover and Dwlght 


Pirst 


M and P 


P 


First and Sixth 


Dorchester ave. . 


Second and Foundry 


Condor 


Brooks and Glen don 


Glendon .... 


Condor and Eagle 


Eagle 


Chelsea and Princeton .... 


Chelsea 


Saratoga and Curtis 


state 


Commercial and Atlantic ave. . 


East 


South and Tufts 


South 


East and Summer 


Avon 


Chauncy and Washington . • . 


Cove Place . . . 


Cove and Furnace 


Bennington . . . 


R.R. Crossing and Swift . . . 


La Grange . . . 


Washington and Tremont . . . 



Size now. 


No. of Feet. 


Size formerly. 


12-in. 


227 


6 


" 


1,592 


6 


" 


1,838 


6 


" 


372 


6 


" 


687 


6 


" 


325 


6 


" 


261 


6 


" 


1,247 


6 


8-in. 


720 


6 


" 


18 


6 


" 


586 


6 


6-in. 


451 


4 


" 


85 


4 


" 


85 


4 


" 


492 


4 



Taken up and Abandoned. 

24-ineh iron pipe 135 feet. 

20-inch " 1,420 " 

6-inch " 7,873 " 

4-inch " 1,113 " 

li-inch " 326 " 

Changed. 

One 1-inch taken out, and one 2-inch put in. 
One 1-inch taken out, and one Ij-inch put in. 
Two 1-inch taken out, and two 1^-inch put in. 
One |-inch taken out, and one 1-inch put in. 
One |-inch taken out, and one li-inch put in. 
Fifteen |-inch taken out, and fifteen 1-inch put in. 
Six |-inch taken out, and six |-inch put in. 
Eleven ^-inch taken out, and 11 |-inch put in. 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



93 



Statement of IJocation, Size, and ^Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1883. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; S.B. South Boston; E.B. East Boston; B.H. Boston High- 
lands; D. Dorchester; W.R. West Roxbury; Bri. Brighton. 



In what Street. 



Beacon 

Commonwealth ave. 

West Chester park 

West Chester park 
Warren Bridge . . 

Warren Bridge . . 

Huntington ave. , • 

Gloucester .... 
West Chester park 

Tremont 

Westland 

East Newton . . . 
B. ....... . 

First 

P 

H 

Swett 

Dorchester ave. . . 

Condor 

Glendon 

Eagle .... ... 

Swift 

Chelsea 

Blue Hill ave. . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Commonwealth ave. and Brookline 
Beacon and West Chester park . . 



Total 48-inch 

Beacon and Commonwealth ave. 



Total 30-inch 

Tremont and Commonwealth ave. 
Under the draw 



Total 24.inch .... 
Causeway and Fitchburg R.R. 



Total 20-inch 

Parker and West Chester park 



Total 16-inch 



Newbury and Boylston . . . . 
Westland and Boylston . . . . 

Dover and D wight 

Parker and West Chester park 
Washington and Harrison ave. . 

First and Congress 

MandP 

First and Sixth 

Emerson and Broadway . . . . 

Ellery and Boston 

Second and Foundry 

Brooks and Q-lendon 

Condor and Eagle 

Glendon and Chelsea 

Saratoga and Bennington . . . 
Saratoga and Curtis . . • . . . 
Hay ward and Devon 



Carried forward , 



B. & 
B.H. 



B.H. 



16 



2,183 



4,429 
135 

4,564 
1,398 

1,398 
1,942 



1,942 

230 
262 
261 
116 
631 
501 

1,606 

1,838 

10 

131 

456 

1,5T5 
450 

1,297 
49 

1,247 
548 

11,208 



94 City Document No. 123. 

Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Elm Hill ave. 
Crawford . • 
Norfolk . . . 
Robinson . . 
Boston . . . 
Milton ave. . 
Erie ave. . . 
Centre . . . 
Washington . 
Commercial . 
La Grange . 
Park .... 
Dudley ave. . 
Washington . 
Brown ave. . 
Cambridge . 
Nonantum . 
Everett . . . 
AUston . . . 

State .... 
Garrison . . 
Camden . . . 
East .... 
South .... 
AUston . . . 
Mellville ave. 
Hartford . . 
Rosseter . . 
Eldon .... 
Stanwood ave. 
Templeton . 
Park .... 
Alban .... 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Crawford and ISTorthrup 

Elm Hill ave. and Nasby 

Nelson and Walk Hill 

Adam and Draper 

Dorset and Washburn 

Prospect and Armadine 

Merritt and New Beaver • 

Washington and AUston 

Wells ave and Roslin 

Preston and the Bridge 

Dent and Newton line 

Rutledge and Anawam ave. .... 

From Washington 

Albano and Dudley ave 

Poplar and Ashland 

North Harvard and Cambridge line 

Washington and Newton 

North Beacon and B. & A. R. R. . . 
Washington and Warren 



Total 12 inch . 



Commercial and Atlantic ave 

Huntington ave. and Providence R.R. 



South and Tufts 

East and Summer 

Mellville ave. and Centre . . 
AUston and O. C. & N. R. R. 
Howard ave. and Sargent . . 
Union ave. and Eldon . . . , 
Rosseter and Bowdoin ave. . 

From Columbia 

" Adam 

Standish ave. and Cemetery . 
Ashmont and Welles ave. . . 



Carried forward 



B.H. 



Dor. 



Bri. 



Dor. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 95 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Torrey 

Glen Road .... 

Brown ave 

Albano 

Kittredge 

St. John 

Sedgwick 

Cottage ave 

Union 

Summit ave. . . . 
Bennett 

Tremont 

Parker 

Avon . . • . . . . 
Claremont park . . 
East Concord . . . 

Otis place 

Ivanhoe 

Fabin 

Baldwin 

Commonwealth ave. 
Oxford terrace , . 

Lagrange 

Montgomery . . . 

Eemp 

Granite 

A court 

Pickering court . . 
Vale ....... 

Princeton 

Bennington .... 

Orleans 

Putnam 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward .... 
Washington and "Withington . 
Sigourney and Walnut .... 
Ashland and Gardner . . . •,. 
Washington and Kittridge • . 
Alhano and Clarendon .... 

From Centre 

Elm and South 

From Centre 

Washington and Nantasket ave. 

Allston and Mass. ave 

From Parson 



Total 8 inch 



Mason and Boylston 

Boylston and Westland 

Chauncy and Washington 

Columbus ave. and Providence R.R. 

Albany and Harrison ave 

Brimmer and Mt. Vernon 

Fabin and West Canton 

From Ivanhoe 

Camden and Northampton .... 
West Chester Park and Beacon . . 

From Huntington ave 

Washington and Tremont 

Clarendon and Tremont 

From Dorchester ave 

Richards and Sugar Refinery . . . 
From H street 

" Fifth 

" Lowland 

Eagle and Prescott 

Swift and R.R. Crossing 

Maverick and Decatur 

Chelsea and Bennington 



Carried forward 



Dor. 
W.R. 



S.B 



E.B 



4,879 
39 
155 

1,172 
118 
208 
396 
63 
679 
196 
373 
175 



150 
428 
451 

86 
198 

70 
144 

26 
393 
202 
339 
492 
308 

25 
164 
191 
129 
503 

18 
596 
168 
242 

5,273 



96 



City Document No. 123. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. 



Continued. 



In what Street. 



Ray 

Georgia 

Gilbert 

Blue Hill ave. . . 

Binney 

Peabody . . . . 

Sterling 

Minden . . . . . 

Regent 

Blue Hill ave. . . 

Randlett 

Langdon . . . . 

George 

"Waumbeck . , . 
Winthrop . . . . 
Mulvey ave. . . . 
Norfolk . . . . . 
Rockwell . . . • 
Nixon ave. . . . 

Clifton 

Evaus 

Corbett 

Nelson 

Houghton court . 
Ashland . . . . 
Sayward . . . 
Maxwell . . . . 

A court 

Fremont place . 
River View . . . 
Hopkin place . . 
Greenwich place 
Glendale . . . . 
Carruth ... 
Fairfax .... 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Hurlbert and Regent 

Hartwell and Montana 

Centre and Hoflfman 

Woodbine and Southwood . . . 

Peabody and Smyrna 

Binney and Brookline ave . . . . 
Shawmut ave. and Westminster . 

Ulmer and Walden 

Dale and Hurlbert 

Alaska and West Cottage . . . . 

From Rand sq 

George and Dudley 

Langdon and Shirley 

Warren and Wabeno 

Blue Hill ave. and Dennis . . . . 

From Heath 

Nelson and Madison 

Milton ave. and Washington . . . 

Centre and Mather 

Cottage and Taylor 

Thetford ave. and Nelson . . . . 

From Nelson 

From Norfolk 

From Houghton 

Mill and Harrison ave 

Bird and Columbia 

Milton ave. and Capen 

Park and Clarence pi 

Fremont and Hopkin pi 

From Adam , 

From Fremont pi 

Dorchester ave. and Commercial , 

Glen and Payson 

Beaumont and Van Winkle . . , 
From Carruth 



Carried forward 



B.H. 



Dor. 



Report of the Water Board. 



97 



Statement of Liocation, Size, eita. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Bellevue . . . 
Cemetery . . . 
Shamrock . . . 
Holmes place . 
Prederika . . . 
New Minot . . 
Jackson place . 

Fuller 

Milton ave. . . 
A new street . 
Harrison ave. . 
Harrison . . . 
Bodwell park . 

Fuller 

Selden .... 

Elmo 

Harbor View . 
Skinner . . . . 
Story place . . 
Ashland . . . . 
Alden place . . 
Prospect ave. . 
Hancock ... 
Sheldon .... 

Keyes 

Newberne • . 
Chapin ave. . . 
Woodside ave. 

A 

Jamaica place . 

Child 

Harvard place . 
Farrington ave. 
Parson . . . . 
Nantasket ave. 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Trull and Quincy 

From Norfolk 

Dorchester ave. and Commercial . 

From Mill st 

Adam and New Minot 

Frederika and Adam 

From School 

Milton ave. and Capen 

Norfolk and Prospect ave 

Clifton and Shirley 

Ashland and Green Hill 

Harrison ave. and Green Hill . . . 

Columbia and Bird 

Dorchester ave. and Washington . 

Milton ave. and Capen 

Erie ave. and N. Y. & N. E. R.R. . 
Dorchester ave. and Newport . . . 

From Sou*h 

From Greenough 

Albion and Sheldon 

From Green 

Brown ave. and Sheldon 

Gardner and Ashland 

Ashland and Prospect ave 

Washington and Meehan 

John A. Andrew and Carolina ave. 

From La Grange 

Washington and Forest Hill . . . . 

Boylston and Spring Park 

From Jamaica 

Call and Lee 

From Washington 

Lincoln and Harvard 

Washington and Bennett 

From Union • . 



Carried forward 23,967 



15,418 
135 

32 
689 
108 
308 
274 
352 
124 

11 
758 
187 
190 
393 

73 
lOO 

28 
184 
551 
214 
200 

50 
609 
492 
203 

55 

24 
235 
181 
143 
101 
153 
.311 
250 
640 
191 



98 City Document No. 123. 

Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Aehford . . . . 
Waverley . . . 
Mansfield . . . 
Holbroot place 
Saunders . . . 
Church . . . . 
A new street . 
Hill ave. . . . 
Madison ave. . 
Adam 

Pelhain court . 
Wendell . . . 

Lark 

Texas Court . . 
Court 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward, 

Chester and Mr. Spaulding's house 

From Western ave . 

Cambridge and Hill ave 

From North Beacon 

From Cambridge 

Washington and Mt. Vernon . . . 

From Western ave 

Franklin and Mansfield 

From Washington 

From Everett 



Total 6 inch 



From Pelham . . 
Preble and Hyde 
Eighth and Ninth 
From Texas ave. 
From River . . . 



Total 4 inch 



B. 

8.B. 



B.H. 

Dor. 



23,967 
435 
95 
425 
156 
187 
552 
354 
370 
205 
366 

27,112 

24 
42 
86 
156 

248 



Eepoet or THE Water Board. 



99 



Statement of Location, Size, and Numtoer of Feet of Pipe 
Kelaid and Abandoned in 1883. 



In what Street. 



Warren bridge . . 
Warren Isridge . 

Tremont 

East Newton . . . 

Oak 

State .... 
West Chester Park 

East 

South 

First 

P 

Dorchester ave. . . 

Condor 

Glendon 

Eagle 

Chelsea 

Avon 

Cove place . . . . 

Lagrange 

Bennington . . . . 

Albany 

Way 

Marlborough . . . 

Wyoming 

Jerome 



Between what Streets. 



Under the Draw 



Causeway and Fitchburg R.R. 
crossing 



Dover and Dwight 

Washington and Harrison ave. . 



Albany and Albany R.R 

Commercial st. and, Atlantic ave. . 

Columbus ave. and Providence 
R.R. bridge 



South and Tufts . . . 
East and Summer . . 

M and P 

First and Sixth .... 
Second and Foundry . 
Brooks and Glendon . 
Condor and Eagle . . 
Chelsea and Princeton 
Saratoga and Curtis . 



Chauncey and Washington . . 

Cove and Furnace 

Washington and Tremont . . 
R.R. Crossing and Swift . . . 

Raised. 
Broadway and Lehigh .... 
Albany and Harrison ave. . . 
Hereford and W. Chester park 

Lowered. 

Warren and Wabon 

Cushing ave. and Everett ave. 



E.B. 



B.H, 
Dor. 





Length. 


s 




24 
20 
12 


135 


1,420 


34 


12 
6 


631 


665 


100 


" 


720 


" 


89 


<• 


18 


" 


686 


" 


1,592 


" 


1,838 


" 


372 


" 


687 


" 


325 


" 


L-61 


4 


1,247 


7,835 


451 


" 


85 


" 


492 




85 


1,113 


12 


200 


" 


200 


6 


50 


6 


250 


8 


288 



24 

20 

12 
12 



100 



City Document No. 123. 



s 



CO 



h: 'ii 



s 


^ 


'^ 


,o 






•^ 








c 








« 


5s 






^ 


a 


^^ 




s 


"B 


•p- 


S 


s 


« 






20 









Ol 


^1 


CD CD O CO O C^ 


















lO CD O OO I- r^ Tf CO 






4Jo| 








rH l- O^r-I >n_ tO_a 


























lo co't-T cT r-^o: 






Si a 


oi 






T-H CD T-( 1^ 

C5^ C5 




cq 


I 












CT. c?oo 
^ CO 








(N-t<coco<rOr-<icca 















ro 00 lO rH ri « Ql 










^ 




O ^-i lO i-l >o o 






CO 






(Nt^r^Tcoccoi-^in 




(M 


IH 








CO <M — — t- r-. C-l (N 










» 




co cq i-o 




CO 


«_ 






^ O CO 00 • • CO oc 


















C-l c- 








c5 




OD 




(rq 00 




o" 














O CO • • 




O CO 

















o 




o 












e 




(N_^ • . 




c^_ 








n 




H 




CO . . 




CD 








CO 


m 






^ • • 




*"* 














.-^ CD cn m-^- 
^ CO CO ?J CO 


CO 1C5 


CO-^ 


o> . 


« 




CP^l' CN^ 




CO 




H 


H 




rt co" 


.M 




c^ 


■ci^^ 


1 

1— ( 






CO (M 


s 






?J "' 






t-cocq ^ • 


0-. t- 


Cs 


as 






1:- 00 •* 




o» 


CO 




H 




t- 03 










^ 




t-^ i-T 


oT 






(sT 


)--( 






^ 


^ 






"# 


H 






























tj 






00 O 00 • o 


CDC 








CO 




© 




CD Kl ro (M 


Tp C^ 








-* 


Ph 




00 CO • Tl< 


OO 












« 




■* T-* .A 


■*" 








■^ 


fR 






^ 


■* 








^ 


O 






















t- lo ^ in in 


CO <= 








CD 


(^ 

w 






^ (M CO CO 


t-CC 












■* »ra i-i 
CD -* 


CB_ 











• H 








CO 








CO 


H 
a 




















00-* CR 1-1 • 


t- ir 







^ 


M 


© 
« 








.- 




^ 






CO 




CO 




(n" 


CO 






lO Oi -CO 




~io05 




CD a- 


^ 




















(M 




© 




IM 






C-) 






■^ 




« 




s" 








(M 




•"^ 


IM 






CO t^ 






CD I- 




lO 






© 

























CO 








^ 




i-T 


TjT 








(M 








e5 






IM 






00 .- c-- 








~^ 




rHiT 


<M 




« 




fo 5 






^ 







f^ 




^ 






















CO (M 










CO 










(M 






(N 






^ 
















CO 


CO 




© 






















CD 


CD 
IM 




© 






















































■^ ■ 












c- 

> 




i 













ft 








"A 






5 








i 






,g 








I 






bx) 















'^ 










CO 




bB 


^ 


M 


-+ 








P 


00 


3 


_g 


00 


> 


00 


13 











- 


T3 


3 


'~l 


ft 


*"* 


*2 








12; 

K 

i 


'"'orrto'do^i-tii 


;5 

P3 
H 
H 


^ c 


<u 








lScS— ci»aic:r 


c« r 


n 
a 



5« 








H 


5 'Le ^s S.a = 




3 ?. 

.S c 


■&i5° 








SCO MO u,o b^C 

go2 go2 gaj ga 




34 








H 




H 














t- 




H 


1 



• Oi CO ?0 
) -:^ CD 1- 
1 (M (X3 t-H 






S 






i-T-l-dioo 

■* I- CO 1~ 

CD CD O 



CO 'P biii-T 

CO 3.2 >i 

si; oj S 

i^ f" o S 
S 5'=-' 

r- r- ,- '^ 

c a a -f-: 
a- q; :y O 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



101 



►J 

< 

O 




M 

i-l 


s 


ta 


c: 


H 


to 


00 

o 

00 


d 


o 

4 




















•SCllJ JO 


CO rH t- 


to 


s 


"* 
IM 


CO 


o 

CO 






O 

H 

in 
o 

S 








rH 


§ : 


CO 






•adij JO 
.laquinj^ 






rH 


rH 


-Tf 






q;Sua'X 










^ 


^ 


ir 




•adij JO 

aaqiunjj 










(M 


^ 


r^ 






•laaj up 
q;Sudi 










-* 


g 


r- 
00 






a 

o 

a 
o 
ft 
























•adij JO 
joquin^ 










'"' 


c^ 


3 

CO 






^ 1 

i 1 

o = 








V 


o- 


rH 


^ 


Tl 

Til 






•adi.j JO 

•loquinjij 






'~ 




< t- 


e^ 


a 






f5 
O 
H 

O 
P 
H 






cq 


■^ 


■* 


-a 


^ 






•8dlJ JO 

jflqtunjvj 




'"' 




rH 


'" 


to 




r-^ 


o 

o 
W 








CO 




3 s 

c 

CO 




o 

p. 

3 

a 

3 

a 
"a 


a 
o 

02 


•adij JO 
.laqiun^ 






■^ 


CO 


'"' J^ 




O 

H 


■133 j[ ni 
qiSuo^; 




^ 


(> 


I- 


> -* 

1 cc 


CO yr 
o- 


i 

t 
t 
< 


J) 3 
' 1^ 


O 
W 


•3di<3 JO 
.igqiunjvj 


eo 


■^ 


1 T 


II CO 


s 1 








? 




















f 


a? m 
5 
























cr 


J c^ 


J r- 


N HI 

■1 I- 


■i r- 


Wl 


^ lOlC 


» 







102 



City Document No. 123. 

Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1883. 



Whbbb. 


Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 




48 


40 
2 

2 


36 
1 

1 


30 

2 

2 


24 
4 

4 


20 
]5 

5 

1 

21 


16 
1 

1 


12 

15 
5 

5 
1 
2 
1 

29 


8 
2 

2 

4 


6 

25 
5 
14 

7 
5 

56 


4 

38 

7 
2 

2 

1 

50 


3 
4 

2 

6 


2 

5 

1 

4 
10 


H 

29 
1 

30 


U 
5 

5 


1 
9 

1 

1 

11 


3 

5 
1 

' 
6 


1 


8 

10 
7 
2 

27 


Total. 




281 
84 
107 
131 
41 
29 
14 


451 


South Boston 

East Boston 

Boston Highlands .... 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 


1 
1 


113 

137 

153 

62 

31 

16 


Totals 


687 


953 



Of the leaks that have occuiTed on pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards : joints, 9(5 ; settling of earth, 23 ; 
defective pipe, 22 ; defective packing, 16 ; de- 
fective stopcock, 8 ; struck by pick, 1 ; by blast- 
ing, 1 ; by frost, 3. Total .... 

Stoppages by frost . . . . . . 

Of 3-inch and on service-pipes : joints, 19 ; settling 
of earth, 173; settling at boxing, 1; settling of 
wall, 2 ; defective pipe, 104 ; defective packing, 
19 ; defective coupling, 15 ; defective faucet, 11 ; 
stiff connections, 29 ; pulled out by parties un- 
known, 1 ; by sewer diggers, 6 ; faucet loose at 
main, 1 ; gnawed by rats, 13 ; struck by pick 
46 ; by nail, 1 ; by blasting, 4 ; burnt oif at wall 
1. Total 

Stoppages by fish, Q2 ; rust, 221 ; dirt, 18 ; solder 
2 ; gasket, 7 ; frost outside, 21 ; frost inside, 5 
Total 



170 
1 



446 



336 



Total 



953 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



103 



statement of Leaks and Stoppages 1850-1883. 





Diameter of. 


Yeab. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 

109 

213 

211 

135 

145 

170 

171 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
899 
373 
397 
594 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
767 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725 
734 
8Q1 
1,024 
995 
929 
833 
1,248 
782 


1851 


1852 


1853 


1854 


1855 


1856 


1857 


1858 


1859 


I860 ; . . . . 


1861 


1862 . • . ,. 

1863 


1864 


1865 


1866 


1867 


1868 


1869 


1870 


1871 


1872 . ; 


1873 


1874 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 





Totals. 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
401 
531 
592 
508 
490 
494 
489 
607 
675 
609 
531 



1,565 

1,647 

1,229 

2,554 

92S 

948 

910 

1,237 

1,206 

1,064 

1,028 

1,248 

953 



104 



City Document No. 123. 



Hydrants. 

Durins: the year 205 hydrants have been established, and 
69 abandoned. 





Established. 


Abandoned. 


« 




>> 


1 


>> 

o 

1-1 


O 

o 
M 


3 

o 


(A 

li 


o 


o 


o 
o 


"3 
o 
H 

28 

13 

13 

6 

7 
1 
1 


3?s 


Bostop 


11 
4 
2 
6 
19 
10 
6 


26 
8 

16 
6 

13 
3 
4 

76 


18 

10 

5 

2 

1 

1 


2 

1 

3 
14 
6 

8 


57 
23 
23 
17 
47 
19 
19 


2 




1 


25 
13 
12 
3 
5 

1 


29 
10 




1 

1 


1 
1 


2 
1 


10 


Boston Highlands 


11 

40 


West Roxhury 


18 
18 














58 


37 


34 


205 


4 


2 


4 


59 


69 


136 



Total number up to May 1, 1884. 





Ol_l 


S. . 


1 


o 

1-1 


a 
o 

o 

M 


i 

o 
Eh 




45 
14 

5 
18 
53 
30 

9 


1 


77 
33 
31 
40 
89 
201 
145 
16 


475 
143 
112 
651 
564 
91 
59 


772 

327 

170 

125 

79 

51 

38 


1,369 
518 




Bast Boston ............. 


313 




834 




785 


West Roxbury ..i. ....... 


373 




251 


Deer Island 


16 








5 


3 

7 


8 










7 


























4,479 




.... 











92 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 263 boxes have been taken out and re- 
j)laced by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual atten- 
tion paid them. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 105 



Stopcocks. 

186 new stopcocks have been established this year. 146 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. The 
stopcocks have had the proper attention paid them. 

E. E. JONES, 

Superintendent £Jastern Division. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DEPAETMENT. 



Mystic Department, 

Chaelestown District, May 1, 1884. 

Hon. William A. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 
Sir, — The annual report of the Mystic Department for 
the year ending April 30 is herewith submitted : — 

Mystic Lake. 

The water the past year has been good, and there has been 
no complaint. During the fall and winter the lake was 
very low, and arrangements were made to start the temporary 
pumps ; but the early snow and rain filled the lake, so that 
after getting the pumps ready we had no occasion to use 
them. Among the improvements at the lake are new build- 
ings, taking the place of the temporary structures formerly 
used to store the pumps and engines, and a coal-shed. The 
borders of the lake were thoroughly cleansed last season, and 
the river from the lake to Whitney's dam was also cleaned. 
I propose to clean above Whitney's this year. 

Mystic-valley Sewer. 

The works connected with the sewer, and the sewer itself 
are in good condition ; but the increase of business done by 
tanneries makes double the work that was contemplated when 
the sewer was built. If the sewer works are to be con- 
tinued I would recommend that a right of way from the 
works to the lake (through the old canal), and thence to the 
road, be obtained either by purchase or rental. 

Conduit. 

The repairs upon the conduit have been completed, and it 
is now in as good condition as when built. It has been 
cleaned twice the past year, and the improvement is so great 
that I sha?l in future clean it fall and spring. I would rec- 
ommend that more manholes be built, so that access may 
be made easier. 



Report or the Water Board. 107 



Reservoir. 

The basins are now being drawn off for the purpose of 
cleaning the reservoir. On examination I find that some 
pointing to the mason-work will be necessary. The concrete 
walks, banks, and grounds are in a fair condition ; the grass 
has been allowed to run out, and it will require considerable 
work and manure to put them in the shape they should be. 
I expect to have money enough this year to thoroughly top- 
dress all the land connected with the reservoir, and with a 
little re-sodding I think will bring it out all right. 

Pumping Service. 

This department is in good condition. August 28, 1883, the 
engineer reported that the low-pressure cylinder to No. 3 
pump had given out. On examination there was found a 
crack in the rim. Another cylinder was ordered of Messrs. 
Worthington, and they were instructed to repair the old, 
which they did, so that it has run since that time. The new 
cylinder is now at the engine-house, for use when needed. 
The contract for new boilers having been given to Messrs. 
Kendall & Roberts they are now engaged in setting the 
same. Considerable work will have to be done in the fire- 
room, and a new tin roof is needed. This work is all under 
way. 

Roads and Grounds. 

This part of the works has received considerable attention 
the past year. The road from the engine-house to the 
reservoir has been graded. The stone- wall mentioned in the 
last report has been built ; also a wall on one side of the rail- 
road track. I find the same trouble with the grass-land here 
that I did with the reservoir grounds. It has been allowed 
to run out for want of care and manure. We do not raise 
h&y enough to keep our horses, when we should, and have some 
to sell. It will be my endeavor to bring the land up to proper 
shape, so that in the future we shall not buy hay. 

Distribution-Pipes. 

These pipes have been extended by the addition of 264 feet 
6-in. pipe. There have been 5,672 feet of cement pipe re- 
placed with cast-iron. There was one break on the force 
main, caused by settling of the earth under the pipe, and 52 
breaks and leaks in the others. The followinsf tables show 
the number, and also the extension and relaying : — 



108 



City Document No. 123. 



Breaks and LeaTcs. 





Size of Pipe. 


30 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 


12in. 


Sin. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


Sin. 


2 in. 


Total. 


Number 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 


6 


26 


1 


8 


52 









Extension of Distribution-Pipes. 





Size of Pipe. 




Location. 


6 inch. 


4 inch. 


All sizes. 


Total feet. 




228 ft. 
36 






228 








36 




48 


6,411 


48 






6,411 










Totals 








6,723 











Distribution-Pipes relaid 18S3-S4. 



Location. 



Eden street .... 
Concord avenue . 
Fitchburg Railroad 
Main street .... 
"Wall street .... 
Cordis street . . . 
Forbush court . . 
Middlesex street . 
Mystic place . . . 
Lawrence street . 
Austin street . . . 
Decatur court . . 
Bunker Hill street 



Original 

Size. 


4 inch. 


6 inch. 


8 inch. 


16 inch. 




Inches. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Total ft. 


6 
4 
6 
16 
6 
6 
4 
6 
4 
6 
6 
4 
8 


6 
156 

19 

120 


160 






166 






156 


48 

8 

492 

504 






48 


34 


1,680 


1,722 
492 






504 






19 


288 






288 






120 


264 






264 


972 




972 


144 




144 


156 


576 


.... 


732 



Making- a total of 5,627 feet relaid. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



109 



^ 


to xa iH 




















(N 








^ 


c. 


t' 


(35 
























M 


c^ 










b- 


S 


-^ 
















(C- 


















CM 


CO 


,= 


-f ir 


(31 




































(N 




or 


^ 


O 


o 


CO ^ 




















CO 


I-H CC 


^■^ 


,a 


CO c/- 


to 












(M -^ 






^ 


C 


(»" 


















,c 






CO 
















































^ 




OO 










CD OC 
























(M 










,d 


§ 5 


o 






















-* 










IM 








■fl 


,, 














a 




































,a 


-* ir 


C3> 




CO IT 
























(^^ 


« 








,a 














a 




(3> 


• FH 
















M 








<D 










!i. 


































a 








^ 




-i^ 












e£ 


C 


V, 












c 


F 












H 


C 


) b 





s 

o 
in 


c 




a 


fe 




(» 
o 


4 

a 


CO 


.9 


i-H 


4 

a 
o 


rtl 


-a 
a 
(i^ 


CO 


■S 


(M 


a 
o 

(M 


^ 


,a 
a 


- 


.a 
o 

o 

CO 


s 


(1) 

o 







"3 
o 


r- r-i 




a 

o 




•o >o 


o 

r-( 




iH 


C<D 


§ 


3 




CO 


s 


g 

o 


« S 1 


(^^ 


a' 
o 

CD 


-H rH -^ 
CO CO O 


(3> 


a 

a 

V 


> 

1-^ 


^ f: 
S 


C 

(1. 




C 





no 



City Document No. 123. 



Service-Pipes and Boxes. 
81 new Services have been laid the past year. 



Size. 


1 inch. 


1 inch. 


3 inch. 


1 inch. 


Ij inch. 


2 inch. 


Total 

No. 


Total 
Feet. 


Number 


3 


65 


3 


7 


2 


1 


81 


1,989 





There have been repaired and relaid 114 service-pipes in 
which there were used 1,370 feet lead pipe; 46 alterations 
were made, 2 were frozen, 25 tin-lined relaid with lead, 24 
were stoppages by eels, 14 were stoppages by rust, 3 were 
stoppages by moss. 287 service-boxes have been replaced 
by 154 iron and 133 wood ; 4 fire-pipes have been placed in 
private buildings. 

Hydrants and Gates. 

2 additional liydrants have been placed by this department, 
1 post on Main street, 1 Boston Lowry on Wall street, 3 post- 
hydrants have been changed for Boston Lowry's, and 1 old 
post at engine-house grounds for I taken from this district. 

12 rotten hydrant-boxes have been replaced. In Somer- 
vilie, there have been placed 4 post-hydrants. 

There have been added 2 new gates in this department and 
14 in Somerville ; there have been 2 16-inch gates replaced by 
new ones ; 32 gate-boxes have been replaced. 



Summary of Services connected with the Worlcs, May 1, 1884. • 





Charlestown. 


Somerville. 


Chelsea. 


Everett. 


Total. 


Services 

Feet 


5,541 
148,591 


3,838 
125,206 


4,312 
116,399 


762 
17,295 


14,453 
407,491 



Aggregate 407,491 feet, or 77 mUea 931 feet. 

Yours most respectfully, 

J. HENRY BROWN, Superintendent. 



EEPORT OF SUPEEINTENDENT OF METER 
DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1884. 
Hon. Wm. A. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sm, — The annual report of the Superintendent of Meter 
Division for the year ending April 30, 1884, is herewith sub- 
mitted ; — 

This department was organized and began operations 
July 1, 1883. 

At that time there was applied to the Cochituate works 
2,245 meters, 228 elevators, and 38 motors with indicators 
attached. 

Of these meters 1,555 were | in., 45 | in., 525 1 in., 15 
l\ in., 72 2 in., 21 3 in., and 12 4 in. 

In the Mystic Department, which includes Charlestown 
District, the cities of Chelsea and Somerville, and town of 
Everett, there were applied 405 meters and 4 motors ; of 
these 246 were in the Charlestown District, viz., 90 | in., 
56 I in., 56 1 in., 2 1^ in., 33 2 in,, 6 4 in., and 2 motors. 

In Chelsea, 79, of which 26 were | in., 
6 2 in., 1 3 in., 1 4 in., and 2 motors. 

In Somerville, 73, of which 22 were | in. 
11 2 in., 1 3 in., and 1 4 in. 

Everett, 5, viz., 1 | in., 1 | in., 1 1 
making a total of 2,916 in the whole works, 
year 41 have been discontinued in the Cochituate Depart- 
ment and 31 in the Mystic. In the same time there have 
been applied to Cochituate works, by especial order, 133 ; 
and by general orders, applying meters to tenement houses, 
etc., there have been 316 ; making the total distribution of 
this branch to date 2,653 meters. 

In the Mystic works 123 have been added ; making the 
total in this department to date, 497, and of the whole works 
3,150. 

406 exchanges have been made for diflferent causes. Dur- 
ing the cold weather of the past winter, notwithstanding pre- 
cautionary measures were taken to prevent, 39 meters were 
frozen and burst. Many tenements where meters are, and 



24 1 


in.. 


19 1 


in., 


,10 


f in.; 


,25 1 


in., 


in., 
)rks. 


and 
Di 


1 4 
Liring 


in. ; 
the 



112 City Document No. 123. 

are now being applied, are constructed with little regard to 
protecting their water-fixtures from frost. 

The occupants generally are negligent, and needlessly ex- 
pose them ; for these reasons a large number of this class 
have to be metered from the street, considerably increasing 
the expense both in time and material. 

39 meters were damaged by hot water, having been lo- 
cated near hot-water or steam boilers without check-valves 
to prevent the back pressure. Only meters constructed with 
vulcanized rubber piston are affected in this w^ay. 

53 decayed street boxes have been replaced with new 
ones, and 25 have been repaired. 

Of the different devices applied to elevators for registra- 
tion 55 are ratchets, and are reliable and satisfactory; 165 
operate with cord and pulley. This arrangement I am not 
favorably impressed with, and consider the city is not prop- 
erly protected in the use of them. 169 have 1 index each, 
54 have 2, and 5 have 6. These complications have a ten- 
dency to confuse and render the inspection a delicate duty. 

From July to October but little activity was manifest in 
the department, occasioned by delay in procuring the nec- 
essary machinery to manufacture the meters to be delivered 
as per contract. 

During this delay some 250 meters of the smaller sizes 
were removed, having done a long term of service ; of this 
number 140 proved, on test, to be unreliable. Appended to 
this report is a list in tabular form giving the result of those 
tests. 

December 15 the Tremont Meter Co. had so far perfected 
facilities to manufacture as to enable the delivery of 87 |-inch 
on that date. 

The quantities furnished since that time have steadily in- 
creased, and at the present time they are furnishing about 300 
per month. They propose to still add machinery sufficient to 
enable them to manufacture and deliver 800 to 1,000 per 
month, provided such quantities should be required. 

In order to dispose of the increasing numbers as fast as re- 
ceived, and perform the duties of maintenance, the working 
force is being gradually increased, and at the present time it 
consists of 1 assistant superintendent, 3 inspectors, 2 Avriters, 
6 plumbers and helpers, 2 machinists, 1 tester, 2 carpenters, 
4 teamsters, and 12 laborers with 4 single-horse teams. This 
force will, of a necessity, have to be immediately increased. 

The meters are now being delivered 100 at a time ; they are 
received by their designated numbers, each being subjected 
to a proper test, as near as possible to the condition in which 
it may be placed. These tests are for accuracy, etc., etc. 



Report of the Water Board. 113 

Having passed successfully the test they are sealed, and a 
record is made of the same. Should any one fail in the test it 
is immediately returned to the factory "rejected." There are 
but very few, however, returned on this account ; the regis- 
tration is generally very correct. 

At the present time there are being 12 to 20 new meters 
applied daily, and it is anticipated before July next we shall 
increase to 25 or 30 per day, and by early fall have added 
3,000 to the distribution. 

This increase will require a corresponding increase in the 
inspection force, the duties of which are to record monthly 
the statement of each meter, and report the condition of any 
found needing repairs. These duties require especial qualifi- 
cations to insure successful inspectors. 

The records of all meters placed ; locality ; size and 
style of each ; repairs or alterations done ; change of reg- 
ister ; record of duty performed, together with the monthly 
statement of each, are recorded at this ofiice, — and a daily 
report of all made to the Water Registrar. This detail must 
be carefully attended to. 

Those furnished are generally doing good service ; the 
exceptions are cases incidental to the circumstances, viz., 
a new concern adapting itself to a new business. 

In conducting some experiments certain alterations have 
been suggested, and when accomplished as contemplated it is 
believed will prove a decided benefit. 

The cost of placing is materially increased above the 
estimates, occasioned by the absence of any shut-off in a large 
proportion of the localities, obliging the department to dig 
up the street stop. In many instances we are not very 
successful in our search for them. These vexatious delays, 
together with cost of inserting a shut-off on such premises, 
occasions a considerable extra expense. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HIRAM CUTTS, 
Superintendent. 



EEPOET OF SUPERINTENDENT OE INSPEC- 
TION AND WASTE DEPARTMENT. 



Division of Inspection and Waste, 

City Hall, Boston, May 1, 1884. 

William A. Simmons, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sm, — The following report of the progress made by this 
division, with the results attained, since its formation in July, 
1883, is respectfully submitted. 

The house-to-house inspection begun July 16, was fin- 
ished the 19th of last February, and the general inspection 
at present in progress was commenced February 20. Up 
to the date of this report about half the Cochituate division 
has been inspected, and the results for assessing next year's 
water-rates passed to Registrar Davis. 

As the first inspection was principally to check waste, it 
may be apropos, notwithstanding that some of the informa- 
tion can be found tabulated in the report of the Engineer of 
the Board, — but in diflerent form, — to give here figures that 
will show the saving of w^ater eflfected by the work of the 
division. 

In the Cochituate Department the daily average consump- 
tion, owing to unchecked waste, reckless use of water, and 
increase of population, had for years been steadily increasing. 
In 1876 the average daily consumption was 20,237,700; in 
August of last year it had reached the maximum of 37,141,000 
gallons. In that month, the inspection being vigorously 
pushed, repairs of defective fixtures began to be made, 
illegal use of hand-hose, and waste by other methods, was 
stopped, so that as the inspection progressed, and the law 
was enforced, the consumption sensibly decreased. 

From January to September, 1883, the daily consumption 
in the Cochituate Department, as compared with that of 1882 
and previous years, considerably increased; but, when the 
waste began to be checked, it fell from 37,141,000 gallons in 
August to 33,645,000, in September ; 29,575,800, in October, 
and 28,839,300, in November. The greatest reduction oc- 
curred in February, March, and April of the present year ; it 



Report of the Water Board. 



115 



being for February, 24,598,000, March, 21,862,600, and 
April, 21,460,700 gallons. 

The following daily average consumption in the Cochituate 
division, from January, 1883, to April, 1884, inclusive, before 
and after the house-to-house inspection began, will show the 
rate of increase up to August, with the remarkable decrease 
from that date. It will be observed from the figures that 
after the first month's inspection, and the notices issued by 
the Board, the steady reduction continued, except during 
January and February, when faucets are generally kept open 
to prevent freezing : — 



Before inspection, 



Dii 



ing progress of inspection, 







Consumption. 
Gallons. 


1883 


, January, 


34,715,500 




February, 


32,690,700 




March, 


34,110,700 




April, 


30,617,600 




May, 


32,169,500 




June, 


33,419,200 




July, 


36,774,000 




August, 


37,141,000 



After close of first inspection. 



" September, 33,645,000 

" October, 29,575,800 

<' November, 28,839,300 

" December, 30,174,200 

1884, January, 32,162,300 

" February, 24,598,000 

" March, 21,862,600 

" April, 21,460,700 



116 



City Document No. 123. 



The following table gives the average daily saving effected 
in the Cochituate Department during the progress of the in- 
spection, from September, 1883, to May 1, 1884, as com- 
pared with the consumption of the same months of the pre- 
vious year : — 



Bbfokb Inspection. 


After Inspection. 


Average 
Daily 

Saving. 


Per 

cent. 
Saved. 


Consump- 
tion per 
Head of 
Population. 


Average Daily Consumption. 


Average Daily Con- 
sumption. 


Aug., 1882 


Gallons. 




Gallons. 


Gallons. 




103 2 


Sept., " 

Oct. " 

Nov., " 

Dec, " 

Jan., 1883 

Feb., " 

Mar., " 

Apr., " ■ 


31,691,600 
31,563,800 
31,318,700 
32,352,800 
34,715,500 
32,690,700 
34,110,700 
30,617,600 


1883 
1884 


33,645,000 
29,575,800 
28,839,300 
30,174,200 
32,162,300 
24,598,000 
21,862,600 
21,460,700 






93.2 


1,988,000 
2,479,400 
2,178,600 
2,553,200 
■8,092,700 
12,248,100 
9,156,900 


6.3 
7.92 
6.73 
7.35 
24.78 
35.9 
29.9 


81.9 
79.6 
83.0 
88.4 
67.5 
65.0 
58.8 


Averages .... 


32,481,400 


.... 


26,953,271 


5,528,128 


16.98 


74.8 



The effectiveness of the division in checking waste is 
amply proved by the above figures, which give the consump- 
tion per head of the population last August as 103.2 gallons, 
showing a gradual decrease for the 8 months until last 
month (^April), when it was reduced to 58.8 gallons. 

If this reduction can be accomplished without the aid of 
the Deacon meters and Church stopcocks great results may 
reasonably be anticipated when those appliances are in effec- 
tive service. 



Eepoet of the Watee Boaed. 



117 



The folio wins; table gives the average daily consumption 
in the Mystic division for the eight months after the inspec- 
tion began, with the saving effected, as compared with the 
figures for the same months for the previous year : — 



Befoee Inspection. 


Aftbb Inspection. 


Average 
Dally 
Saving. 


Per 

cent. 
Saved. 


Increased 
Consump- 
tion. 


Average Daily Consumption. 


Average Daily Con- 
sumption. 


Sept., 1882 

Oct., " 


Gallons. 
5,964,100 
6,011,300 
5,557,400 
6,877,600 
8,369,600 
7,714,650 
7,737,300 
6,171,150 


1883 
1884 


Gallons. 
5,846,300 
5,497,250 
5,930,600 
6,771,500 
8,019,100 
6,341,500 
6,337,200 
5,242,100 


Gallons. 
117,800 
514,050 


1.97 
8.55 


853,200 


Dec, " 

Jan., 1883 

Feb., " 

Mar., " 

Apr., " 


106,100 

350,500 

1,373,150 

1,400,100 

829,050 


1.54 
4.3 
17.8 
18.1 
15.1 




Averages .... 


6,802,887 




6,248,187 


670,107 


9.62 





The smallness of the saving in the Mystic, as compared 
with the Cochituate division, is accounted for by the fact that 
nearly the entire of the former was inspected after the middle 
of last January; the Charlestown District and Chelsea being 
the last places visited ; so that while the Cochituate Division 
has in the returns the benefit of an entire inspection, and 
about half of the one now in progress, the Mystic division 
is credited with but one inspection. 

In the followino- schedules the work of the first and second 
inspections is given separately, in order that the results of 
the first or complete inspection, and the progress made in the 
second, may be more clearly defined and understood. 



FiEST Inspection. 

The following tables give the work of each Inspector for 
the period during the first house-to-house inspection, viz., 
from July 16, 1883, to February 19, 1884, inclusive. 



118 



City Document No. 123. 



Division 1. — E. A. Nichols, Chief Inspector, from July 
16 to September 13, 1883. 

George E. Raymore, from September 13 to Dec. 15, 1883. 

J. H. McGuire, from December 15, 1883, to the end of 
inspection. 









Defective 






Wilful 


^ 






13 
a) 


Fixtures. 


1 

3 


•a 


Waste. 


5 


Inspectob. 


Date of 


o 

CD 
& 

c 








h-l 




. 






Appointment. 


hH 


i^ 


O 3 


a 
1 

'a 


o 


Oh 










1 


It 




a 


II 




■a o 






r^ 


« 


^ 


P3 


!=^ 


tf 


fa 


fa 




1883. 


















J, B. Hassett 


July 16. 


2,354 


578 


575 


532 


6 


1 


1 




R. E. Maguire 


" 


2,336 


476 


475 


517 


35 


2 


2 


1 


R. J. Murray 


" 


2,428 


391 


390 


387 


27 


4 


4 


1 


C. F. Sweeny 


" 


2,292 


664 


666 


670 


41 


4 


4 


3 


J. J. Strange, \ 
made Chief, Jan. 5, '84. ( ' 


" 


1,853 


415 


414 


526 


40 


1 


1 




J. F. Daly, transferred to j 
Div. 2, Jan. 1, 1884. \ 


Aug. 18. 


1,382 


185 


183 


181 


8 








Geo. B. Raymore, ) 
made Chief, Aug. 18, '83. j 


July 16. 
1884. 


362 


82 


82 


80 


• 








J. L. Quigley 


Jan. 1. 


554 


105 


105 


88 












Jan. 14. 


475 
399 


85 
96 


84 
94 


70 
60 


1 


4 
1 


4 
1 




J. B. Neagle 




Total 




14,435 


3,077 


3,068 


3,111 


158 


17 


17 


5 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



119 



Division 2. — P. D. Dwyer, Chief Inspector, from July 
16, 1883, to January 1, 1884. 

J. B. Maguire, from January 1, 1884, to end of inspec- 
tion. 



J. B. Maguire ] 

madeChief Jan. 1,1884. j 

George F. Ross 

John McNamara 

J. A. Haley 

J. J. Corbett 

J. F. Daly, ) 

from Jan. 1, 1884 ( • • • • 

Chas. McCarron, and sub- ) 
Btitute, to Jan. 1, 1884. ) 

J. A. Connolly 

T. McCarthy, Jr 

W. B. Wood 

Total 



Date of 
Appointment. 



1883. 
July 16, 



Aug. 18 



July 16. 

1884. 
Jan. 1. 

Jan. 14. 





Defective 






Wilful 


Ti 


Fixtures. 


"A 


TJ 


Waste. 








a 


a 




o 






QQ 


^ 






ft 






a 


>-< 










S.V-. 


o 


m 






M 


0) 


^% 


■s 




0) 


0)- 




& . 




a 




— ' . 


•- . 


<a 






a 




cc-O 


=''S 


.2 




a .^ 


'A 




^i< 


a 

2 






•A 
•.<a 


a 




Cm 


pL. 


A 


^ 


« 


1^ 


r^ 


r=H 


1,6:7 


301 


301 


278 


10 








2,640 


408 


405 


3S3 


16 


3 


3 


2,224 


260 


251 


238 


2 


3 


3 


2,502 


638 


634 


689 


9 








2,573 


433 


426 


422 


5 








598 


113 


115 


129 


5 


1 


1 


1,045 


172 


172 


169 


4 








579 


102 


102 


88 


3 








457 


92 


92 


69 











450 


72 


70 


83 











14,685 


2,591 


2,568 


2,548 


54 


7 


7 






120 



City Document No. 123. 



Division 3. — W. P. Carroll, Chief Inspector, from July 
16, 1883, to end of inspection. 



Inspectok. 



L. P. Furlong , 
E. Ready . . 
J. H. Toland 
J. J. McAuliffe 
J. !F. Desmond . 
M. Edmonds . 
J. J. Murphy 
B. F. McKenna 

Total . 



Date of 
Appointment. 



1883. 
July 16. 



1884. 
Jan. 14. 



2,435 
2,247 
2,442 
2,597 
2,371 
2,589 
465 
531 



15,677 



Defective 
Fixtures. 



442 
467 
304 
466 
278 
356 
76 
58 



Ǥ 



o A 



430 
463 
301 
465 
269 
353 
70 
57 



2,447 2,408 



423 
569 
242 
416 
232 
335 
46 
46 



2,309 



Wilful 

Waste. 






Division 4. — D. A. McCarty, Chief Inspector, from July 
16 to January 5, 1884. 

J. J. Strange, from January 5, 1884, to end of inspection. 



Inspector. 



J. F. Cullen . 
M. F. Cassidy 
Wm. Kilduff . 
J. J. Quigley . 
W. F. Butler . 
T. F. Murray 
P. J. Smith . . 
D. A. Finnigan 

Total . . 



Date of 
Appointment. 



1883. 
July 16. 



1884. 
Jan. 1. 



Jan. 14. 



2,246 
2,432 
2,335 
1,741 
1,878 
2,010 
547 
550 



13,739 



Defective 
Fixtures. 






539 
575 
433 

331 
280 
341 
1.36 
82 



2,717 



534 
566 
430 
327 
275 
344 
131 
79 



586 
521 
359 
536 
231 
335 
55 
40 



Wilful 
Waste. 



^3 



s 






Eepoet of the Water Board. 121 

Business done on reports received from other Departments. 









Defective 







Wilful 


%H 






■d 


Fixtures. 


TS 


■a 


Waste. 






• 






^ 


3 




tD 




« 





















ft 




'?_: 


n 


1— 1 






^^; 










(2 ITS 










(U 


Depabtment. 


o 


A 


<A 


5S 


a 







<o 






(§'S 


tu 


-So 


CQ M 


S 


^ 






=2o 




■3 '53 
« 


a 



^1 

0) " 


0. 




0) 


'^o 


Cm 


^2, 




H ■ 


Ph 


<A 


"A 


« 


s 


« 


P^ 


N 


Engineer's Dept 


1,080 


622 


427 


434 


446 


19 


30 


30 


1 


Mystic Registrar's Office, Charlestown . 


31 





33 


37 


45 


4 


1 


1 





" Off and On " Dept 


158 


, 


121 


121 


261 


10 





15 


37 




137 





84 











6 





47 






Total 


1,406 


622 


665 


592 


752 


33 


37 


46 


85 







Summary of the First Inspection. 





0) 

a 
S 


Defective 
Fixtures. 


1 

3 


a 
1 

M 


1— I 


a 


Wilful 
Waste. 




<u 

1^ 


Division. 




niT3 


|2i 


1^ . 


Cm 


•3 

6^ 


One 


14,435 
14,685 
15,677 
13,739 


3,077 
2,591 

2,447 
2,717 


3,068 
2,568 
2,408 
2,686 


3,111 

2,548 
2,309 
2,663 


158 
54 
61 

169 


17 

7 

6 

21 


17 
7 
6 

21 


5 


Two 





Three 







7 






Total 


58,536 
622 


10,832 
665 


10,730 
592 


10,631 

752 


442 
33 


51 
37 


51 
46 


12 


Other Departments 


85 


Total 


59,158 


11,497 


11,322 


11,383 


475 


88 


97 


9T 







The above summary gives for each of 188 working days 
covered by the foregoing report the following averages : — 

Number of premises inspected each day, 31 1|-. 

Number of premises having defective fixtures reported 
each day, 571-. 

Number of notices to repair issued each day, 57. 



122 City Document No. 123. 

The above comprise only the business done through the 
regular inspectors. 

During this inspection the water was cut off from 70 
premises, and let on again to 69. 

There have been 117 fines collected for non-repairs of 
fixtures, 40 for Avilful waste, and 37 for illegal use of hand- 
hose. 

There were also 77 fines abated for non-repairs of fixtures, 
22 for wilful waste, and 22 for illegal use of hand-hose. 

The amount of cash collected for fines, and turned over to 
the Mystic and Cochituate Water Kegistrars respectively, 



is : 



Mystic $67 00 

Cochituate 490 00 



Total $557 00 

The total of 59,158 " premises inspected " does not mean 
the total number of water-takers in the Cochituate and 
Mystic divisions, for the reason that, owing to the lateness of 
the season when the inspection began, large numbers of citi- 
zens were at the beaches and travelling, and their houses, 
being locked up, could not be reached before the second 
general inspection was commenced. 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 



123 



Second Inspection. 

The following tables give the work of each division from 
the commencement of the second inspection, February 20, 
to May 1, 1884: — 

Division 1. — J. H. McGuire, Chief Inspector. 



* Inspectors marked thus * transferred to the divisions indicated, from other divisions, March 



21. 



21. 



t Inspectors marked thus \ transferred from the division indicated, to other divisions, March 



Inspector. 



J. B. Hassett . 
J. L. Quigley . 
J. J. Dunn . . 
fC. F. Sweeney 
tJ. F. Cullen . 
fJ. B. Neagle . 
fR. J. Murray 
tR. B. Maguire 
*Geo. F. Ross . 
*L. P. FurloBg 
*D. A. Finnigan 
*J. H. Toland , 
*J. J. McAuliffe 

Total. , 



Defective 
Fixtures, 



Ph 



1,073 
1,129 
1,193 
301 
380 
320 
283 
303 
918 
737 
675 
701 
776 



8,789 



ft ^ 



«^ 



o Pj 



31 


19 


49 


25 


31 


12 


10 


2 


29 


134 


5 


12 


4 


1 


3 


10 


2 


4 








232 


300 



Wilful 
Waste. 



OT3 






a 6 



h. 



124 City Document No. 123. 

Division 2. — J. B. Maguire, Chief Inspector. 



Inspector. 



John McNamara 
J. F. Daly . . . 
J. A. Connolly . 
T. McCarthy, Jr. 
J. A. Haley . . . 
fW. B. Wood . 
fj. J. Corhett . 
tGeo. F. Eoss . 
*C. F. Sweeny . 
*J. F. Desmond 

Total . 



1,064 

1,228 

1 049 

3,175 

],3S8 

387 

390 

395 

816 

693 



8,584 



Defective 
Fixtures. 



358 






354 



Wilful 
Waste. 



o '^ 






Eepoet of the Water Board. 125 

Division 3. — W. P. Carroll, Chief Inspector. 



Inspector. 



Edw. Ready . . 
B. F. McKenna . 
tJ. J. Murphy . 
fL. P. Furlong . 
jM. Edmonds . . 
fj. F. Desmond 
tJ. H. Toland . 
tJ. J. McAuliffe 
*R. E. Maguire . 
*"W. F. Butler . 
*M:. F. Cassidy . 
*P. J. Smith . . 
*J. J. Quigley . 
*J. J. Corbett . . 



Total 8,645 



950 
1,152 
395 
352 
38T 
334 
387 
342 
830 
767 
468 
778 
743 
760 



Defective 

Fixtures. 



as 



127 
56 



37 
29 
57 
133 
17 
39 



«^ 



O ft 



127 
57 
45 
21 
21 
27 
35 
8 
39 
26 
57 

135 
17 
41 



127 
93 
32 
19 

15 

74 



31 
24 

77 
122 
22 



Wilful 
Waste. 



.2 m 






126 City Document No. 123. 

Division 4. — J. J. Strange, Chief Inspector. 



Inspectob. 



T. T. Murray . 
Wm. Kilduff . 
*M. Edmonds 
fW. F. Butler . 
f D. A. Finnigan 
fM. F. Cassidy 
t J. J. Quigley . 
fP. J. Smith . 
*J. F. CuUen . 
*R. J. Murray 
*J. J. Murphy 
*W. B. "Wood 
*J. B. Keagle . 

Total 





Defective 


o 




Wilful 




Fixtures. 


a 


•d 


Waste. 


01 




S 


3 










ft 






§ 


A 




0)13 




(^ . 


O CO 


a 


_o 


& . 




s 


m-^ 


m>-^ 


S 


•^ 


m^ 


"gd "^ 


a 

41 


11 


.S-3 

r 


M 


4) 

a 


ft'S 


o '^ 


Ph 


w 


« 


f^ 


K 


^ 


1,080 


53 


54 


42 











1,184 


56 


59 


37 


3 








614 


6 


6 


8 











407 


30 


32 


7 





3 


3 


405 


36 


38 


72 


3 


1 


1 


295 


39 


42 


153 


3 


1 


1 


362 


26 


28 


21 











399 


72 


75 


49 


2 


4 


4 


782 


5 


5 


8 











792 


2 


2 


18 











763 


31 


31 


18 


1 








535 


9 


9 


10 


1 








646 


12 


12 


32 











8,264 


377 


393 


475 


13 


9 


9 



Report or the Watee Board. 

Total Worli done hy each Inspector. 



127 



Inspector. 



C.F. Sweeny . . 
J. F. Cullen . . . 
J. B. Neagle . . 
E.. J. Murray . . 
R. E. Maguire . 
W. B. Wood . . 
J. J. Corbett . . 
Geo. F. Ross . . 
J. J. Murphy . . 
L. P. Furlong . . 
M. Edmonds . . 
J. F. Desmond . 
J. H. Toland . . 
J. J. McAuliffe . 
W. F. Butler . . 
D. A. Finnlgan . 
M. F. Cassidy . . 
J. J. Qulgley . . 
P. J. Smith . . . 
J. B. Hassett . . 
J. L. Quigley . . 
J. J. Dunn . . . 
Edw. Ready . . . 
B. F. McKenna . 
John MeNamara 
J. F. Daly . . . 
J. A. Connolly . 
T. McCarthy, Jr. 
J. A. Haley . . . 
T. F. Murray . . 
"Wm. Kjlduff . . 





Defective Fix- 
tures. 






Wilful 
Waste. 


§* 

a 

M 

i 






a 
o 

a 

a 

03 


a 

1 
o 

iz; 




6 


a 1 

IS 

o ft 




o 
o . 


1,117 


59 


60 


55 


2 








1,162 


53 


54 


33 











966 


41 


43 


44 











1,075 


12 


12 


20 











1,133 


67 


68 


165 


2 








922 


40 


42 


39 


1 








1,150 


60 


61 


78 











1,313 


50 


51 


66 











1,158 


70 


76 


50 


2 








1,089 


25 


25 


20 





2 


2 


1,001 


27 


27 


23 











1,027 


42 


44 


89 











1,088 


37 


37 


31 











1,118 


8 


8 


49 


2 








1,174 


59 


58 


31 





3 


3 


1,080 


38 


41 


82 


3 


1 


1 


763 


96 


99 


230 


3 


1 


1 


1,105 


43 


45 


43 











1,177 


205 


210 


171 


2 


9 


9 


1,073 


17 


18 


20 











1,129 


32 


32 


32 











1,193 


17 


18 


29 





6 


6 


950 


127 


127 


127 


5 








1,152 


56 


57 


93 


4 


1 


1 


1,064 


21 


21 


47 











1,228 


29 


29 


39 











1,049 


28 


25 


52 





1 


1 


1,174 


62 


62 


86 











1,388 


70 


72 


79 


1 


1 


1 


1,080 


53 


54 


42 











1,184 


56 


59 


37 


3 









128 



City Document No. 123. 

Summary of Secoiid Inspection to 3fay 1, 1884. 







Defective Fix- 


• 




Wilful 


« 






tures. 


-§ 


■B 


Waste. 


t3 




a 






a 


3 


















Q^ 




i-d 


a 
o 


1— ( 






to 


Division. 


i-i 

(a 


mis 


^ 3 

o g 


Is 

1 
a 


o 






•^1 




1 
Pi 




•J3 cj 
o a 




a 


P5 






One 


8,789 
8,584 
8,645 


222 
358 
643 


232 
354 
656 


300 
477 
750 


4 

1 

12 


6 
2 

8 


6 
2 
8 





Two 





Three 







8,264 


377 


393 


475 


13 


9 


9 









Total 


34,282 


1,600 


1,635 


2,002 


30 


25 


25 





Engineer's Department . . . 





48 


50 


55 





4 


4 





Police Department 





18 











2 








Total 


34,282 


1,666 


1,685 


2,057 


30 


31 


29 






The above summary gives for each of the 61 working- 
days, covered by the second inspection, the following 
averages : — 

Number of premises inspected each day . . .562 

Number of premises having defective fixtures reported 

each day ........ 26 

Number of notices issued to repair . . . .26 

The above comprise only the business done through the 
regular inspectors. 

During this inspection the water was cut off from 43 prem- 
ises, and let on again to 43. 

There have been 40 fines for non-repairs of fixtures col- 
lected, 39 for wilful waste, and 2 for illegal use of hand- 
hose. 

There were also 54 fines for non-repairs of fixtures abated, 
26 for wilful waste, and 2 for illegal use of hand-hose. 

The amount of cash collected for fines, and turned over to 
the Mystic and Cochituate Water Registrars respectively, 
is : — 



Mystic 
Cochituate . 



$44 00 
82 00 



Total 



1126 00 



Repoet of the Water Board. 129 

It will be observed from the returns that the average daily 
number of premises inspected during the time of the tirst in- 
spection was 311^, Avhile the number credited to the second 
inspection is 562 j)er day. This large increase of work is 
owing to the a})pointment of seven additional inspectors, 
January 14, 1884 ; and to the fact that, as the men became 
familiar with their duties, they performed more work, and, I 
may add, of a better quality. 

Of the general house-to-house inspection, at present in 
progress, about half the districts comprising the Cochituate 
division is done. This section includes South Boston, and the 
greater portion of the city proper, with parts of Koxbury, 
West Koxbury, and Dorchester. The entire of the inspec- 
tion I expect will be finished by the end of August. 

During the progress of both inspections many citizens, 
especially in the Back Bay District, refused admission to the 
inspectors ; but on receiving a circular letter from the office, 
explaining the law in reference to, and the necessity for the 
inspection, they readily consented to have their premises 
examined. 

That the revenue from the water-rates will be materially 
increased by means of the inspections I have no doubt. 
Water Registrars Wm. F. Davis and Jos. H. Caldwell have 
so expressed themselves to me, their opinions being based 
on the returns of extra fixtures, model houses, etc., charge- 
able with water-rates received from this division. The fact 
that Registrar Davis, in his report to the Water Board up to 
January 1, 1883, returns 1,772, as the number of model 
houses in his district, and that up to date, on the second in- 
spection, I have furnished him with returns of 2,640 of that 
class of buildings, amply proves that the income from that 
source alone will be considerably increased. 

Very respectfully, 

D, B. CASHMAN, 

Superintendent. 



130 City Document No. 123. 



CIYIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO MAY 1, 1884. 

Water Commissioners. j 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From May 
4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Westei'n Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whit well, Cliief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

CiTT Engineers having Charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. Fi-om October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N . Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25. 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works, from May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to pres- 
ent time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J. Avery Richards, were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force 
one year; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

CocHiTUATE Water Board. 
Presidents of the Board. 
Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 

7, 18o6t Five years. 

John H.- Wii.kins, elected in 1856. and resigned June 

6, 1860$ Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 1865$ Five years. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



131 



Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867t ...... One j^ear and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868t ...... One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April, 6, 1868. and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 ....... Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dee. 17. 

1874 J . .* One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned May 

31, 1875 ......... Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876 One year. 



63, and 64$ 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55^ 
John H. Wilkins, 1S51, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59t 
Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 
Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56 
James W. Seaver, 1851J 
Samuel A. Eliot, 1851J. 
John T. Heard, 1851^ .... 
Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 63, 54, and 55$ 
Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853$ 
Ezra Lincoln, 1852$ .... 
Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55$ 
Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 
Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57$ 
William Washburn, 1854 and 55 . 
TiSDALE Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ . 
Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ 
John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59$ 
Joseph Smith, 1856$ .... 
Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 
Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61$ . 
George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$ 
Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ . . . ' 
George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 
Clement Willis, 1860 .... 
G. E. Pierce, 1860$ . . . ' . 
Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ 
George Hinman, 1862 and 63 
John F. Pray, 1862 .... 
J. C. Jj Brown, 1862 .... 
Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ 
Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66$ 
John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, m, and 67$ 
Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . 
William S. Hills, 1867 .... 
Charles R. Train, 1868 . . . 
Joseph M. Wightman, 1868, and 69 
Benjamin James, *1858, 68, and 69 
Francis A. Osborn, 1869 
Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ 
John O. Poor, 1870 .... 
Hollis R. Gray, 1870 .... 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67. 68, 69, 
and 71 



0, 



Five years. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Four yeai's. 
One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Six years. 
Four 3^ears. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Two months. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 
One year. 
Six years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Two years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 

Nme years. 



132 



City Document No. 123. 



George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71 . . . . Four years. 

SiDNKY Squires, 187 If One year. 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 One year. 

Charles H. ALLENf, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 . . . Four years. 
Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, and 

72 Seven years. 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74| . . . Three years. 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 .... Two years. 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74:j: . , . Five vears. 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* . . . . '. Three years. 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 Three years. 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75^... Three years. 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 One year. 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t . . Five years. 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t . Six years. 
L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, Q6, 67, 74, 75, 

and 76f . Ten years. 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876t .... Two years. 

Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t One year. 

JSTahum M. Morrison, 1876f One year. 

Augustus Parker, 1876t One year. 



*Mi\ John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, .June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President ; and 
July 2 Mr. L. MUes Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was i-eelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fiU 
the vacency occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Sei'ved until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

J Deceased. 



Report of the Water Board. 133 



Boston Water Board, Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 188-2, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutti-.r, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to present time. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to present time. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to present time. 



Organization of the Board for Year 1883-84. 

Chairman. 
William A. Simmons. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Efigineer and Engineer of the Board. 
Henry M. Wightman. 

Water Registrar of the Cochituate Department. 
William F. Davis. 

Water Registrar of the Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 
EzEKiEL R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division of Cochituate Department. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic Department. 
3. Henry Brown. 

Superintendent of Meter Divisio7i. 
Hiram Cutts. 

Superintendent of Inspection and Waste Division. 
D. B. C ashman. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Eeport of the Water Board 1-21 

Present condition of the service ....... 2 

Prevention of vs^aste . . . . . . . . . 2-11 

Daily and per capita consumption, 1882-84 . . . . . 4-5 

Complaints ........... 11 

Prevention of pollution ........ 12-14 

Work upon the reservoirs . . . . . . . .14 

High-service .......... 14 

Jamaica Pond aqueduct ......... 15 

Water-rates ............ 15 

General statistics .......... 16 

Earnings and expenditures, loans, etc . 17-21 

Report of the Clerk ......... 22-29 

Receipts and expenditures, etc. ....... 22-27 

Cost of works 27-29 

Report of the Engineer ......... 30-57 

Sudbury-river reservoirs, and Lake Cochituate .... 30-33 

Farm Pond conduit ......... 33 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs ...... 34 

Highland high-service works . . . . . . . . 34 

Cost of pumping ......... 35 

Necessity for new works . . . . . . . . "BS 

Mystic lake 36 

Mystic-valley sewer ......... 36 

Mystic conduit and reservoirs ....... 37 

Mystic pumping works . . ....... 38 

Cost of pumping . . 38 

New boilers 38 

Consumption 39 

Waste 39 

Quality of water .......... 40 

Distribution ........... 41 

General condition and requirements of works .... 42 

Tables : — 

Daily average consumption of Cochituate and Mj'stic works, 

1877-83 44 

Diversion of Sudbury River water, 1878-88, .... 45 

Average monthly and yearly heights of Reservoirs, 1882-83 . 46 



Contents. 135 

PAGE 

Yield of Sudbury-river water shed, rainfall, etc., 1875-83 . 47 

" " Lake Cochituate " " " " 1852-83 . 48 

" " Mystic Lake " " " " 1876-83 . 50 
Monthly amounts pumped, coal used, etc., at Highland station, 

1883 51 

Monthly amounts pumped, coal used, etc., at Mystic station, 

1883 52 

Daily rainfall at Lake Cochituate, 1883 ..... 53 

" ," on Sudbury Elver water shed, 1883 ... 54 

" " " Mystic Lake u «t ... 55 

Monthly rainfall at various places, 1883 ..... 56 

" temperatures of air and water, 1883 .... 57 

Eepokt of Water Registrar of the Sudbury and Cochituate 

Department .......... 58-65 

Number of water-takers . 58 

Revenue for year 1883-84 58 

Number and size of meters in use ....... 59 

Location of public drinking-fountains ...... 59, 60 

Classes of takers supplied, and revenue received from each . . 61, 62 

Number of water-takers, 1850-83 -63 

Yearly revenue from water rates, 1849-84 64 

Quantity used, and revenue received from different classes of 

metered takers, 1882-83 65 

Report of the Water Registrar of the Mystic Department . 66-76 

Number of water-takers ........ 66 

Revenue received during 1883-84 . . . . . . , 66 

Location of stand-pipes and drinking-fountains .... 67-69 

Number and kind of water-fixtures in use 70 

Quantity used, and revenue received from different classes of 

metered takers ......... 71 

Classes of takers supplied, and revenue received from each . . 72, 73 

Yearly revenue from water-rates, 1865-84 . . ' . . . 74-76 

Report of Superintendent of Western Division . . . 77-90 

Sudbury-river basins ......... 77-84 

Report on shallow flowage of basin 2 ..... . 78-83 

Farm Pond 84 

Lake Cochituate 85 

Dudley Pond 86 

Sudbury-river aqueduct 86 

Cochituate aqueduct 87 

Chestnut Hill and Brookline reservoir . ..... 88 

Table of rainfall at Chestnut Hill reservoir 89, 90 

Report of Superintendent of Eastern Division . . . 91-105 

Main pipe and services laid and relaid during year . . . 91,92 

Table of location, size, and length of pipe mains laid during 1883 . 92-98 
Table of location, size, and length of pipe mains relaid and 

abandoned during 1883 99 

Table showing length of mains laid during 1883, and total 

length in use, May, 1884 100 



136 City Document No. 123. 

PAGE 

Table showing number, and length of service-pipes laid in 1883, 

and total number May, 1884 101 

Eepairs of pipes .......... 102 

Table showing number of leaks and stoppages, 1850-83 . . 103 

Number of hydrants established in 1883, and total in use . . 104 

" " stopcocks <' u ;i (. jQg 

Report of Superintendent of Mystic Department . . 106-110 

Mystic Lake 106 

Mystic-valley sewer ......... 106 

Conduit 106 

Reservoir . . . . . . . ... . . 107 

Pumping-service .......... 107 

Roads and grounds ......... 107 

Distribution-pipes .......... 107 

Nu ber of breaks and leaks ........ 108 

Tables showing length of pipes laid and relaid .... 108 

Summary of pipes, gates, and hydrants connected with: works . 109 
" " " services connected with works ..... 110 

Report of Superintendent of Meter Department . . 111-113 
Number of meters in use, etc. . . . . . . .111 

Report of Superintendent of Inspection and Waste Depart- 
ment . • . . . . . . . . . 114-129 

Results accomplished by inspection ..... 114-117 

Eirst inspection .......... 117 

Tables showing work done by each inspector . . . 118-120 

Summary of the first inspection ...... 121, 122 

Second inspectiou .......... 123 

Tables showing work done by each inspector . . . 123-127 

Summary of second inspection to May 1, 1884 .... 128 

Civil Organization of the Water Works 1846-84 . . 130-133 



[Oct., 1884, 20,000] ' ' 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



One volume allowed at a time, and obtained only by card; 
to be kept 14 days (or seven days in the case of fiction and 
juvenile books published within one year,) without fine; not 
to be renewed; to be reclaimed by messenger after 21 days, 
who will collect 20 cents besides fine of 2 cents a day, includ- 
ing Sundays and holidays ; not to be lent out of the borrower's 
household, and not to be transferred; to be returned at this Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
defaced, are expected to report it; and also any undue delay 
in the delivery of books. 

*.**No claim can be established because of the failure of any 
notice, to or from the Library, through the mail. 



The record telow must not be made or altered ly borrower.