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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

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NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



TEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1885. 




BOSTON: 
ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 

No. 39 ARCH STREET. 
1885. 



\ \i Mr*J\ 










** C \J'- C ^'\\ /{'c '■[ \ 



[Document 118 — 1885.] 



CITY OF ^ms BOSTON. 




NINTH ANNUAL EEPORT 

OF THE 

BOSTON WATER BOARD, 

FOR THE TEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1885. 



Boston Water Board Office, 

May 1, 1885. 

The Boston Water Board herewith presents its ninth 
annual report, together with the reports of the Engineer of 
the Board, the Water Registrars, and tlie different Super- 
intendents. 

Condition of Reservoirs and Aqueducts. 

Special attention is directed to the reports of Engineer 
Jackson and Superintendent FitzGerald. They contain 
much valuable information with reference to the conditions 
of the storage-basins, the method of cleansing the same, and, 
generally, the work performed, during the past year, in 
order to insure a pure and abundant supply of water. 

The new basin at Ashland (No. 4) is fast approaching 
completion, and will be finished by November 1st. It will 
be in condition to be used next season, and will furnish an 
additional supply of about 5,000,000 gallons per day. Its 
storage capacity is about 1,100,000,000 gallons. The work 
will be completed within the appropriation made by the City 
Council, and the reservoir will be the largest and best in the 
water service. Total cost in round numbers, $800,000. 



City Document No. 118. 



Pollution of the Supply. 



Attention is also directed to that part of the report of 
Superintendent FitzGerald relating to the test case before 
the Supreme Judicial Court, with reference to the "Pollution 
of Boston's Water Supply." We regard this decision as one 
of the most inportant, not alone for the city, but for the 
whole State, that has been rendered in many years. It was 
generally regarded as a test case, and since the promulgation 
of the decision, we have notified all parties engaged in pol- 
luting the supply, that immediate steps must be taken to 
stop such pollution, or the city will be obliged to seek a 
remedy in the courts. The decision is being accepted by 
all parties in good faith, and the persons and corporations 
polluting our supply in Natick, Framingham, and elsewhere, 
have either ceased such pollution, or are making prepara- 
tions to cease the same at an early day. Under these circum- 
stances there is every reason to believe that the time is not 
far distant when the sources of our water supply will be 
practically free from the pollutions which have so long 
prevailed. 

The importance of the legislation which led up to the 
decision of the court, and the great benefits which must 
inevitably result to the citizens of Boston, and to all other 
communities in the State having a water supply, can hardly 
be overestimated. The struggle to reach it has been very 
protracted, and the efforts of the Board have been bitterly 
opposed by the various town authorities, corporations, and 
individuals who have been polluting our water supply. The 
final decision of the court, establishing the principle that 
polluters of water sources used as supplies for communities 
may be estopped from a continuance of such pollution, is of 
incalculable benefit, and may be justly considered as a great 
sanitary triumph. 

Peevention of Waste. 

This important subject is one to which the Board has 
given a great deal of attention. The Deacon waste detec- 
tion system, and the house to house inspection system, were 
organized in 1883 for the purpose of reducing the enormous 
consumption of water in our city, and the results justify, 
in our judgment, the expenditures made in this direction. 
The daily average consumption in 1883, in the Cochituate 
Department, was, in round numbers, 32,000,000 gallons, 
and the daily per capita consumption, 91 gallons. In 1885 
(the first six months), notwithstanding the increase of manu- 



Report oe the Water Board. 3 

factures and population, the daily average consumption had 
been reduced to 26,000,000 gallons, and the daily ^er capita 
consumption to 70 gallons. The reduction in the Mystic 
Department was not so large, in consequence of the defective 
system of pipes in Somerville and Chelsea. 

The accompanying report of Superintendent Cashman, 
of the Waste Division, indicates, in detail, the methods 
adopted to effect such results, and these show the effective- 
ness and benefits of the system. The examinations of the 
Inspection Corps are also calculated to materially add to the 
water revenue, for the reason that the rates are based in part 
upon the number and style of fixtures attached to the prem- 
ises, and these are inspected regularly by the officials. 
There is no other method of preventing the enormous 
waste which prevails, except by the universal adoption of a 
measurement system, and this is impossible, at present, in 
Boston. If the consumption cannot be kept substantially 
within its present limits, the necessity for obtaining new 
sources of supply will become imperative. This would 
necessarily involve an expenditure of several millions of 
dollars. The existing inspection and waste detection 
systems present the only practicable method of avoiding the 
large expense for a new supply ; and the Board is of the 
opinion that it should be continued until the people have 
become educated up to the standard of a more economic use 
of water. It may be said with some degree of force that the 
inspection system is somewhat expensive, but there is ab- 
solutely no other way to stop the enormous waste save by 
the universal use of meters ; and this, as we have already 
stated, is, at present, impracticable. 

The force is somewhat larger at present than it will need 
to be after the people have become thoroughly possessed 
with the idea that fixtures must be kept in repair, and wil- 
ful waste prevented. The Board has the reorganization and 
reduction of this force in contemplation, but does not deem 
it advisable to enter upon this until the early fall. 

In the report of the Water Board for 1882 it was stated 
that, " During the past year an investigation of this subject 
has been made by the Joint Standing Committee on Water, 
and from their report (City Document 78, 1882) it will be 
seen that, if the present consumption could be reduced to 
sixt}^ gallons per head, the capacity of the works would be 
sufficient for many years." The systems since established 
have accomplished two-thirds of this result, and it is hoped 
and believed that the per capita consumption may be re- 
duced to sixty gallons in the near future. 

We especially commend the tabulated statements of Super- 



City Document No. 118. 



intendent Cashman's report to the attention of your honor- 
able body. 

Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 





1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


188.5. 






Baa 


> a 
S a a 


l = P 

^ 1- t- 


> a 

«^a 




«g>a 


9 (u cs 

« t. M 
ftp. 


January . . 


32,151,100 


92.9 


34,715,500 


97.8 


32,162,300 


88.4 


26,711,900 


71.4 


February . . 


34,662,300 


102.2 


32,690,700 


92.0 


24,598,000 


67.5 


31,847,400 


84.9 


March . . . 


32,656,300 


94.1 


34,110,700 


95.8 


23,711,900 


65.0 


27,697,200 


73,7 


April .... 


30,827,000 


88.6 


30,617,600 


85.8 


21,505,700 


58.8 


22,720,450 


60.3 


May .... 


28,738,000 


82.3 


32,169,500 


89.8 


23,708,500 


64.6 


22,168,400 


58.6 


June .... 


33,178,400 


94.8 


33,419,200 


93.3 


26,184,600 


71.2 


27,214,800 


71.8 


July .... 


30,992,600 


88.5 


36,774,000 


102.4 


25,409,000 


68.9 




.... 


August . . . 


34,149,300 


97.3 


37,141,000 


103.2 


25,065,200 


67.7 






September . 


31,691,600 
31,563,800 
31,138,700 
32,352,300 


90.0 


33,645,600 
29,575,800 
28,839,300 


93.2 


26,389,500 
25,022,900 
22,954,200 
24,234,800 


71.1 






89.4 

88.7 


81.9 
79.6 


67.2 








61.5 








91.4 


30,174,200 


83.0 


64.9 















Mystic Works. 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



Daily Av- 
erage Con- 
sumption. 



8,369,600 
7,714,650 
7,737,300 
6,171,150 
6,319,100 
6,912,550 
7,307,650 
7,261,500 
5,846,300 
5,497,250 
5,930,600 
6,771,500 



Gallons 
per Head, 
per Day. 



71.5 
73.1 
80.0 
84.5 
83.9 
67.4 
63.4 
68.3 
77.9 



1884. 



Daily Av- 
erage Con- 
sumption. 



8,019,100 
6,349,500 
6,337,100 
5,242,100 
5,800,000 
6,245,600 
^,312,300 
6,088,400 
6,411,200 
5,834,200 
5,119,700 
6,330,800 



Gallons 
per Head, 
per Day. 



92.2 

72.9 
72.7 
60.1 
66.4 
71.5 
72.1 
69.5 
73.1 
66.4 
58.2 
71.9 



1885. 



Daily Av- 
erage Con- 
sumption. 



7,855,400 
10,019,500 
8,487,500 
6,042,600 
5,605,700 
6,594,200 



Gallons 
per Head, 
per Day. 



89.2 
113.6 
96.1 
68.3 
63.3 
74.4 



Eeport op the Water Board. 5 

Quality of the Water. 

The quality of the water during the past year has been 
excellent. Regular examinations and analysis have been 
made by Professor E. S. Wood, of Harvard University, and 
the results justify the conclusion that our city is receiving 
water of as good quality as any large community in the 
country. The Board has every reason to believe that the 
efforts which have been made for the past two years, and the 
work now in progress, will guarantee an abundant and pure 
supply of water for some years to come. 

Current Expenses. 

Gochituale Water- Woi^ks. 



Tear. 


Maintenance. 


Extension. 


Interest. 


1883-84 


$300,851 34 


$96,389 69 


$639,213 41 


1884 85 


336,578 36 


115,013 02 


668,658 07 



The increase in the cost of maintenance for the year end- 
ing April 30, 1885, was $35,727.02, and this was very largely 
caused by the transfer of the expenses of the inspection and 
waste Division, from a special appropriation, to the mainten- 
ance account, and in main-pipe repairing, and service-pipe 
relaying and repairing. These several amounts were as 
follows ; — 

Inspection and Waste Division . . . $25,019 82 
Main and Service Pipe . . . . 9,769 87 



$34,789 69 



The same reasons governed with reference to the increase 
in " Extension " and " Interest " accounts as in the previous 
year. It may properly be added in this connection that no 
extensions of main-pipes are authorized by the Board until 
6 per cent, income on the cost of the extension is guaranteed 
by the petitioners for a period of five years. 

Mystic Water-Works. 

Tear. Maintenance. Extension. Interest, 

1883-84 $116,572 94 $556 53 $538 60 

1884-85 128,126 40 446 03 489 60 

The increase in the cost of maintenance for the year ending 
April 30, 1885, over the preceding year was $11,553.46, 



6 City Document JSo. 118. 

and this was caused entirely by the additional cost for in- 
spection and waste, the repairs of pipes, and the work re- 
quired upon the Mystic sewer. 

Water-Rates. 

The estimate of the Water Registrar, Mr. W. F. Davis, 
for the year ending April 30, 1885, anticipated a deficit of 
about $80,000. The actual deficit, as ascertained after the 
year expired, was found to be $75,495.88. To provide, in 
part, for this deficit, and to relieve the overburdened manu- 
facturing industries from the onerous, and, in the judgment 
of the Board, inequitable water-taxes, it was decided to make 
such changes in the annual rates as would properly and 
equitably meet these exigencies. These changes were or- 
dered by the Board, but the vote was subsequently rescinded, 
in consequence of the action of your honorable body, and in 
deference to a very unusual exhibition of public clamor, 
but which the Board thought at the time was simply the 
natural complaints of the persons immediately affected by 
the increase of rates. We see no reason to change the views 
expressed in our communication to your honorable body 
under date of February 24, 1885. 

It is estimated that the surplus for the year ending April 
30, 1886, will amount to $121,745.50. We had hoped to be 
able to apply this surplus, in large part, to a reduction of the 
water-tax upon the manufacturing interests of the city ; but 
the opinion of the Corporation Counsel against the principle 
of discriminating rates, and the failure of the Legislature to 
authorize such discrimination, will prevent any present action 
in this direction. It should be stated that this large surplus is 
the result of the action of your honorable body in providing 
that the cost of the extension in main-pipes and appurtenances 
shall not be charged to the annual revenue hereafter. , 

There is no question but that a revision of the rates is 
demanded in the near future, and that when such revision 
is entered upon, it should be pursued wholly with regard to 
an equitable and just apportionment upon all water-takers, 
and with particular reference to a readjustment of present 
inequitable rates. 

High-Service. 

The appropriation for the extension of the high-service 
was passed December 24, 1884. The amount appropriated 
was $766,000, in accordance with the estimates of the 
Engineer of the Board. The latter was at once consulted, 
and, following his recommendations, the Board, early in 



Report of the Water Board. 7\ 

January, made contracts for the pipe required, and effected 
a saving, by reason of the speedy action of about $24,000. 
Subsequently contracts were made for the pumping-engines 
and machinery with the firm of R. Worthington, of the city 
of New York. 

Permission to exchange the engines at the Elmwood-street 
Station was obtained from the City Council under an order 
approved April 20th, and the exchange formed a part of the 
consideration in the Worthington contract. 

The land for the principal reservoir was purchased of Mr. 
George A. Wilson, on April 9th, for the sum of $91,934. 
The location of this new reservoir is upon Fisher Hill, 
Brookline, being the site originally selected by ex-City 
Engineers Joseph P. Davis and Henry M. Wightman, and 
approved by the acting engineer at the time of the purchase, 
Mr. Dexter Brackett. The price paid was five cents per 
foot beyond the estimates made by Mr. Wightman, but within 
the general estimate. The work of the high-service exten- 
sion will be pushed forward as vigorously as possible, and, 
it is expected, will be completed in about two years. 

Henry M. Wightman. 

Mr. Henry M. Wightman, the Engineer of the Board and 
General Superintendent of the Water-Works, died quite 
suddenly on the 3d of April. At the time of his death the 
Board was awaiting his report upon the location of reservoir 
sites for the high-service extension, and the best method of 
prosecuting the work. 

The Board regarded Mr. Wightman, both ofl5cially and 
personally, as a man of great executive force and ability ; 
of unquestioned integrity, and of almost invaluable service 
to the city. It will be difficult to replace him. The mem- 
bers of the Board, both individually and collectively, offer a 
tribute to his ability as an official and to his genial and 
generous qualities as a man. 

Meters. 

The report of Superintendent Cutts presents an exhibit 
of the present condition of the meter service. The purchase 
of new meters has been temporarily suspended, to enable 
the company to repair and return to the service a number of 
meters which had failed to come up to the requirements of 
the bond originally given by the company. It will be 
remembered that under the conditions of this bond the 
Tremont Company is required to guarantee each meter to do 
accurate duty for a period of twelve consecutive months. 



8 City Document No. 118. 

Whenever a meter has failed to reach this standard it has 
been removed at the expense of the Tremont Corapany, 
and either repaired or replaced by an accurate machine. 
The city is thus practically secured by a good and sufficient 
twelve-months' guarantee. 

The Eesults. 

In conclusion, we summarize the labors of the past two 
years with the statement that the Board has endeavored to 
secure — 

1st. An efficient and economic organization of the depart- 
ment, the business being conducted systematically and upon 
business principles. 

2d. The reservoirs and aqueducts have been thoroughly 
cleansed, shallow fiowage largely eliminated, with the ex- 
ception of Basin No. 3, which cannot be done until next year, 
and a genei-al system of watchfulness observed as to the re- 
moval of all impurities, and the causes thereof, from the dif- 
ferent sources of supply. 

3d. Leo-islation and decisions of the hio;hest law authori- 
ties have been obtained, of paramount importance to the 
water-takers of the city and elsewhere, and which place the 
power of protecting the purity of our water supplies securely 
in our hands. 

4th. The establishment of waste-prevention systems, 
under which the daily consumption has already been reduced 
6,000,000 gallons, and the^er capita consumption from 91 
to 70 gallons per day, with a possibility of better results 
later on. 

We present the above results and the accompanying reports 
as evidences of the faithfulness with which we have endeav- 
ored to discharge our duties. 



Report or the Water Board. 



General Statistics. 



4 

SUDBUBT AND COCHITUATE WOBKS. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


Daily average consumption in gallons 


31,970,800 


32,836,900 


25,090,500 


Daily average consumption in gallons per inhabi- 


91 

4,387,530 
13.7 


91 

6,085,600 


68 


Daily average amount used through meters, gal- 


6,171,120 


Percentage of total consumption metered . . . 


15.5 


20.6 


Number of services 


48,160 


49,290 


60,632 




2,463 

367.2 
4,320 


2,919 

378.0 
4,446 


4,666 


Length of supply and distributing mains, in 


388.5 


Number of flre-hydrants in use 


4,573 


Yearly revenue from water-rates 


$1,127,982 32 


$1,167,704 17 


$1,203,192 55 


Yearly revenue from metered water 


$319,785 42 


$371,074 61 


$378,484 75 


Percentage of total revenue from metered water, 


28.4 


31.8 


31.5 


Cost of works on May 1, 1883, 1884, and 1885 . . 


$17,184,751 14 


$17,775,955 68 


$18,173,644 45 




$249,064 71 


$300,851 34 


$336,578 36 


Mystic "Works. 








Daily average consumption in gallons 


6,574,400 


7,093,500 


6,209,700 


Daily average consumption in gallons per inhabi- 


77.0 
800,830 


82.5 
933,150 


71.0 


Daily average amount used through meters, gal- 


869,246 


Percentage of total consumption metered . . . 


12.2 


13.1 


14.0 




13,992 
405 

146.0 

748 


14,453 


14,939 




501 

147.2 
770 


571 


Length of supply and distributing mains, in 


1129.2 


Number of fire-hydrants in use 


794 




$245,981 85 


$259,791 28 


$262,243 50 


Yearly revenue from metered water 


$58,459 80 


$68,116 91 


$63,627 39 


Percentage of total revenue from metered water, 


23.8 


26.2 


24.3 


Cost of works on May 1, 1883, 1884, and 1885 . . 


$1,641,762 22 


$1,648,452 35 


$1,656,266 70 


Yearly expense of maintenance 


$84,483 87 


$116,572 94 


$128,126 40 



1 Reduction caused by correction of errors in previous reports. 



10 CiTT Document No. 118. 



Eaenings of the Works. 

The total receipts of the Cophituate Water- Works from all 
sources, for the year ending April 30, 1885, are as follows, 
viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $1,195,946 03 

Income from shutting off and letting on water, 

and fees 2,413 75 

Service-pipes, sale of old material, etc. . 17,613 94 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . 4,394 27 

Stock on hand May 1, 1884 . . . 79,628 36 

Increase in valuation of stock, 

March 15, 1884 . . $6,315 18 

Profits in manufacturing hy- 
drants, etc., etc., for the 
year endingMarch 15, 1884, 4,302 52 



10,617 70 
$1,310,614 05 



The total amount charged to Cochituate 
Water-Works for the year ending April 30, 
1885, is as follows, viz. : — 

Current expenses . . . $336,578 36 
Extension of works paid for 

out of income . . . 115,013 02 

Interest on funded debt. . 668,658 07 



1,120,249 45 



Balance, April 30, 1885 . $190,364 60 



Stock on hand, April 30, 1885, $70,235 48 
On hand to be paid to Cochitu- 
ate Water Sinking-Fund . 120,129 12 



$190,364 60 



Amount required for Sinking- 
Fund for 1884-85 . . $195,625 00 

Excess of income over expen- 
ditures for 1884-85 . . 120,129 12 



Excess of requirements over income . . $75,495 88 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



11 



The outstanding Cochituate Water Loans at this date, 
exclusive of the Additional Supply, are as follows : — 



5 per cent. Sterling 


Loan 








(£399,500) 


. $1,947,273 98 




Due Oct. 


1, 1902 


6 per cent. Loans . 


100,000 00 


$100,000 


Due April 


1, 1906 


5 per cent. Loan . 


1,000 00 


1,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1907 






f 500,000 


Due Dec. 


12, 1897 






450,000 


Due June 


16, 1898 






540,000 


Due Oct. 


3, 1898 






250,000 


Due April 


27, 1899 






625,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1901 






688,000 


Due April 


1, 1901 






330,000 


Due July 


1, 1901 






413,000 


Due April 


1, 1903 


6 per cent. Loans 


. 4,253,000 00^ 


38,000 
161,000 


Due April 
Due Jan. 


1, 1904 
1, 1905 






142,700 


Due April 


1, 1905 






6,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1905 






82,550 


Due Jan. 


1, 1906 






8,750 


Due April 


1, 1906 






4,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1906 






8,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1907 






5,000 


Due April 


1, 1907 






1,000 


Due July 


1, 1907 






C 280,000 


Due April 


1, 1910 


4 per cent. Loan 


743,200 00 


{ 120,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1913 






C 257,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1914 






( 50,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1915 


3i per cent. Loan 


50.000 00 


\ 36,200 


Due April 


1, 1915 


• 




(. 50,000 


Due April 


1, 1915 




$7,094,473 98 





The total receipts of the Mystic Water-Works, from all 
sources, for the year ending April 30, 1885, are as follows, 
viz. : — 



Stock on hand. May 1, 1884 . 

Income from sales of water . . . . 

Income from shutting off and letting on water, 
and fees ....... 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . 

Eeceipts by Mystic Water Eegistrar, for ser- 
vice-pipes, etc. . . . . . 



The total amount charged to Mystic Water- 
Works for the year ending April 30, 1885, is 
as follows, viz. : — 



$16,708 
267,670 

416 
2,330 



74 
59 

50 
42 



3,367 33 
$290,493 58 



Amount carried forward, 



$290,493 58 



12 



City Document No. 118. 

$128,126 40 



Amount brought forward, 

Current expenses 

Extension of works paid for out 

of income .... 446 03 

Interest on funded debt . . 48,960 00 

Amount paid Chelsea, Somer- 
ville, and Everett, under con- 
tracts 37,622 32 



Balance, April SO, 1885 .... 

Stock on hand, April 30, 1885 . $10,145 84 
On hand to be paid to Mystic 

Water Sinking-Fund . . 65,192 99 



Amount required for Sinking- 
. Fund for year 1884-85 . $66,568 00 
Excess of income over expendi- 
tures for year 1884-85 . . 65,192 99 



Excess of requirements over income 



$290,493 58 



215,154 75 
$75,338 83 



$75,338 83 



,375 01 



The outstanding^Mystic Water Loans at 'this date are as 
follows : — 



6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Water Loans 



5 per cent, currency 
Mystic Water Loans . 

6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Sewer Loans • 

4 per cent. Loan 





r $35,000 


Due April 


1, 


1886 




60,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 


1886 




50,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 


1887 




3,000 


Due April 


1, 


1888 




100,000 


Due July 




1890 


$586,000 00 'i 


51.000 


Due Jan. 




1891 




139,000 


Due July 


■•-) 


1891 




67,000 


Due Jan. 


Ij 


1892 




42,000 


Due July 


1, 


1892 




[ 89,000 


Due July 


*■» 


1893 


1 

108,000 00 ; 


6,000 


Due Oct. 




1893 


102,000 


Due April 


^t 


1894 


130,000 00 


• 130,000 


Due April 


^> 


1886 


15,000 00 


15,000 


Due Oct. 




1913 


$839,000 00 





The following statement shows the appropriations by the 
City Council for an additional supply of water, with the 
loans issued to meet them, and the amount of expenditures 
to this date : — 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



13 



Additional Supply of Water. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Oct. 21, 1871. — Transfer from Reserved Fund 

Apr. 12, 1872. — Order for Treasurer to borrow 

Apr. 11, 1873.— " 

Feb. 26, 1875.— " 

July 1, 1876.— " " 

Apr. 20, 1878.— " 

Apr. 11, 1879.— " " " 

Aug. 17, 1881.— " 

June 2, 1883.— " 

•Oct. 14, 1884.— " " 



Total appropriations to April 30, 1885 

Oct. 1, 1875. — Premium on $1,000,000 

order of Feb. 26, 1875 

April 1, 1876.— Premium on $452,000 

bonds, under order of 

Feb. 26, 1875 

Oct. 1, 1876. — Premium on $2,000,000 

bonds, under order of 

July 1, 1876 . 



EXPENDED. 

1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 including $20,897.50, discount 

on bonds sold, Januaiy 

1874 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1884-85 



$10,000 00 
100,000 00 
600,000 00 
1,500,000 00 
2,000,000 00 
600,000 00 
350,000 00 
324,000 00 
621,000 00 
150,000 00 

$6,155,000 00 



bonds, under 
, $83,700 00 



47,786 80 



221,400 00 



$2,302 81 
61,278 83 



114,102 77 

224,956 68 

783,613 49 

1,924,060 24 

1,257,715 26 

635,658 08 

213,350 97 

97,406 78 

85,677 98 

167,621 43 

423,625 79 

276,292 13 



852,886 80 
5,607,886 80 



6,217,663 24 



Balance of appropriations unexpended, April 30, 1885, $2 90,223 56 



Balauce of loans, April 3O5 1884, $389,515 69 
Loans issued in 1884-5 . . 27,000 00 



Payments during year 1884-5 



$416,515 69 
276,292 13 



Balance unexpended, April 30, 1885 . $140,223 56 



^ Not yet issued. 



14 



City Document No. 118. 



The outstanding loans which were made on account of 
Additional Supply of Water are as follows : — 



4 per cent. Loans 

6 per cent. Loans 
6 per cent. Loan 

6 per cent. Loans 

4^ per cent. Loan 



$1,576,000- 



( $324,000 

82,000 

688,000 

336,000 

209,000 

18,600 

16,000 

1,500 

C 1,000,000 

J,462,000< 452,000 

( 2,000,000 

12,000 

( 100,000 

RAA nnnJ 492,000 
644,000 <^ 8,000 

(^ 44,000 
268,000 



Due April 
Due July 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due Jan. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due April 
Due Oct. 
Due April 1 
Due Oct. 1 
Due April 1 
Due July 1 
Due April 1 
Due Jan, 1 
Due July 1 
Due Oct. 1 



1912 
1908 
1908 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1908 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1908 



$5,951,000 



WM. A. SIMMONS, Chairman. 
JOHN G. BLAKE, 
GEO. M. HOBBS. 



EEPOET OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Boston Wateh Board. 

Boston, May 1, 1885. 
Hon. Wm. A. Simmons, 

Chairman of the Boston Water Board : — 
Sir, — The following is a statement of the receipts and 
expenditures of the Boston Water Board for the financial 
year ending April 30, 1885 : — 

Eeceipts. 

On account of Cochituate Water-Works . $1,220,367 99 
" Mystic Water-Works . . 273,784 84 



Balance of loans unexpended 

April 30, 1884, Additional 

Supply of Water,$389,515 69 
Loans issued in 

1884-5 . . 27,000 00 

$416,515 69 

Mystic Sewer . $1,122 42 
From Transfer Fund 

under order of 

City Council, 

June 7, 1884 . 6,245 70 



$1,494,152 83 



7,368 12 



Balance appropriation, New 
Main, Cochituate Water- 
Works . . . . 8,297 72 

Appropriation, Chestnut-Hill 

Driveway, 1884-5 . . 3,000 00 

Appropriation Introduction of 
meters and Inspection, Co* 
chituate Water-Works . 279,831 86 



Amounts carried forward, P 15,013 39 $1,494,152 83 



16 City Document No. 118. 

Amounts brought forward, $715,013 89 $1,494,152 83 

Appropriation Introduction of 
meters and Inspection, Mys- 
tic Water- Works . . 11,541 27 

Appropriation High Service . 86,200 00 

Appropriation Extension of 

mains, etc. . . . 50,000 00 

Stock purchased in previous 
years, Cochituate Water- 
Works .... 90,246 06 

Mystic Water- Works . . 16,708 74 

Introduction of Meters and 
Inspection, Cochituate Wa- 
ter-Works . $5,177 50 

Purchased dm-ing 
year 1884-5, 
but not used . 7,835 95 



13,013 45 



$982,722 91 
$2,476,875 74 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses, Cochituate 

Water-Works . . . $336,578 36 

Current expenses, Mystic 

Water-Works . . . 128,126 40 

Extension of Cochituate Wa- 
ter-Works . . . 115,013 02 

Extension of Mystic Water- 
Works .... 446 03 

Interest on Cochituate Water 

Loans .... 668,658 07 

Interest on Mystic Water- 
Loans . . . . 48,960 00 

Chelsea, Somerville, and Ev- 
erett contracts, account 
Mystic Water-Works . 37,622 32 

Balance Appropriation New 
Main, Cochituate Water- 
Works, paid to Sinking- 
Fund Commissioners by 
order City Council, April 
28, 1885 .... 8,297 72 



Amounts carried forward, $1,343,701 92 $2,476,875 74 



Eeport of the Water Board. 17 



Amounts brought forward, $1,343,701 


92 


$2,476,875 74 


Construction, Additional Sup- 








ply of Water . 


276,292 


13 




Construction, Mystic Sewer . 


7,368 


12 




Introduction of Meters and In- 








spection, Cochituate Water- 








Works .... 


106,873 


92 




Introduction of Meters and 








Inspection, Mystic Water- 








W^orks .... 


6,044 


00 




High -service 


5,332 


72 




Extension of Mains, etc. 


1,050 


90 




Surplus Income of Cochituate 








Water- Works to be paid to 








Cochituate Water Sinking- 








Fund .... 


120,129 


12 




Surplus Income of Mystic 








Water-Works to be paid to 








Mystic Water Sinking-Fund 


65,192 


99 




Chestnut-Hill Driveway 


2,997 


48 




Balance of Appropriation 








Chestnut-Hill Driveway, 








carried into the Treasury, 








April 30, 1885 . 


2 


52 


$1,934,985 82 










$541,889 92 



April 30, 1885, Balance of 
loans unexpended. Addi- 
tional Supply of Water . $140,223 56 

Introduction of Meters and In- 
spection, Cochituate Water- 
Works .... 172,957 94 

Introduction of Meters and 
Inspection, Mystic Water- 
Works .... 5,497 27 

High-service . . . 80,867 28 

Extension of Mains, etc. . 48,949 10 

Stock on hand, April 30, 1885, 

Cochituate Water- Works . 70,235 48 

Mystic Water- Works . . 10,145 84 

Introduction of Meters and 
Inspection, Cochituate Wa- 
ter-Works . . . 13,013 45 



$541,889 92 



18 City Docuiment No. 118. 



Total Water Debt of the City of Boston. 

Cochituate, outstanding 

April 30, 1885 . . $13,045,473 98 
Mystic, outstanding, April 

30, 1885 . . . 839,000 00 

113,984,473 98 



Cochituate Water Debt. 

Outstanding April 30, 

1884 .... $12,882,273 98 
Issued in 1884-85 . . 163,200 00 

$13,045,473 98 



Mystic Water Debt. 

Outstanding April 30, 

1884 .... $840,000 00 
Puid in 1884-5 . . . 1,000 00 

$839,000 00 



Total Water Sinhing-Funds, April 30, 1885. 

Cochituate Water Sinking- 

Fund .... $3,106,323 82 
Mystic Water Sinking- 

Fund . . . . 444,453 69 

$3,550,777 51 



Trial Balance, Cochituate Water- Worhs, April 30, 1885. 

Dr. Cr. 

Construction Account . $18,173,644 45 

Cochituate Water-Works . $18,173,644 45 

City Treasurer, Loan Ac- 
count .... 835,667 77 

Appropriation, Additional 

Supply of Water . . 140,223 56 

Appropriation, High-ser- 
vice .... 80,867 28 



Amounts carried forward, %1^,0Q^,2>U 22 $18,394,735 29 



Repoet of the Water Board. 19 

Amounts brought forward, $19,009,312 22 $18,394,735 29 

Appropriation, Extension 

of Mains, etc. . . 48,949 10 

Appropriation , Introduc- 
tion of Meters and Inspec- 
tion .... 172,957 94 

Income of CochituateWater- 

Works . . •. • 1,310,614 05 

Maintenance of Cochituate 

Water-Works . . 336,578 36 

Extension of Cochituate 

Water-Works . . 115,013 02 

Interest on Cochituate Wa- 
ter Loans . . . 668,658 07 

Stock Account . . . 70,235 48 

Stock, Introduction of Me- 
ters and Inspection . 13,013 45 

City Treasurer, Revenue 

Account . . . 1,220,367 99 

Appropriation, Chestnut- 
Hill Driveway . . 2 52 

City Treasurer, Appropria- 
tion Account . . . 3,000 OU 

City Treasurer . . . 1,508,919 69 

Funded Debt . . . 13,045,473 98 

Cochituate Water 6% Cur- 
rency Loan . . . 4,897,000 00 

Cochituate Water 5 % Cur- 
rency Loan ... 13,000 00 

Cochituate Water 5 % Gold 

Loan . . . . 3,552,000 00 

Cochituate Water 5 % Ster- 
ling Loan ... 1,947,273 98 

Cochituate Water 4% Cur- 
rency Loan . . . 588,000 00 

Cochituate Water 4% Loan 1,730,200 00 

Cochituate Water 4|% Loan 268,000 00 

Cochituate Water 3 1-% Loan 50,000 00 

Commissioners on the Sink- 

ing-Funds . . . 3,106,323 82 

Cochituate Water Sinking- 

Fund .... 3,106,323 82 



$37,587,976 39 $37,587,976 39 



20 



City Document No. 118. 



Trial Balance^ Mystic Water- Worhs, April 30, 188b. 




Dr. 


Cr. 


Construction . . .1 


^, 656, 266 50 




Mystic Water-Works 




$1,656,266 50 


City Treasurer, Revenue 






Account 


273,784 84 




Income of Mystic Water 






Works .... 




290,493 58 


Maintenance of Mystic Wa- 






ter-Works 


128,126 40 




Extension of Mystic Water- 






Works . . . . 


446 03 




Interest on Mystic Water 






Loans .... 


48,960 00 




Chelsea, Somerville, and 






Everett contracts . 


37,622 32 




Stock Account . 


10,145 84 




Stock, Introduction of Me- 






ters and Inspection 


829 80 




City Treasurer, Loan Ac- 






count .... 


12,663 69 




Introduction of Meters, and 






Inspection 




5,497 27 


City Treasurer 




216,588 07 


Funded Mystic Water Debt . 


839,000 00 




Mystic Water 6% Currency 






Loan .... 




586,000 00 


Mystic Water 5% Currency 






Loan .... 




108,000 00 


Mystic Water 4% Loan 




15,000 00 


Mystic Sewer 6% Currency 






Loan .... 




130,000 00 


Commissioners on the Sinking- 






Funds .... 


444,453 69 




Mystic Water Sinking-Fund . 




444,453 69 


$3,452,299 11 


$3,452,299 11 



Cost of Construction of the Cochituate Water- Works to 

May 1, 1885. 
Cost of Water-Works to January 1, 1850, as 

per final report of Water Commissioners . $3,998,051 83 
Extension to East Boston . . . . 281,065 44 



Amount carried forward ^ 



t,279,117 27 



Report of the "Water Board. 



21 



Amount brought fonvard, 
Jamaica-pond aqueduct 
New dam at Lake Cochituate 
Raising lake two feet, including damages 
Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con 

nections with lake .... 
New main from Brookline reservoir . 
Land and water rights and land damages 

since January 1, 1850 . 
New pipe-yard and repair-shop . 
Upper yard, buildings, etc. 
New water-pipes. East Boston . 
New main, East Boston 
Pumping-works at Lake Cochituate 
High-service, stand-pipe, engine-house and 

engines 
High-service, South Boston 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
Parker-Hill reservoir 
Charles-river siphon . . . , 
Keeper's house, Parker Hill 
Temporary high-service, Brighton 
New stable at Chestnut-Hill reservoir . 
Pegan dam, Natick .... 
Willow dam, Natick .... 
Higli-service, East Boston . 
New main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
New high-service works 
Cost of laying main pipe for extension in 

Roxbury, Dorchester, Brighton, and West 

Roxbury Districts ..... 
Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of laying main pipe since January 1, 

1850 . . 

Extension of mains, etc. (from loans) 



including land 



$4,279,117 27 
13,237 50 
10,940 08 
28,002 18 

18,982 23 
304,991 83 

49,486 17 
25,666 51 
9,165 63 
20,999 43 
24,878 08 
23,577 69 

103,829 53 

27,860 29 

2,461,232 07 

228,246 17 

26,532 35 

2,764 90 

7,865 86 

8,103 

1,394 

1,567 

22,960 07 

341,702 28 

5,332 72 



55 
06 
29 



1,758,512 22 

6,217,663 24 

2,147,982 35 
1,050 90 

$18,173,644 45 



Cost of Construction of the Mystic Water- Works to May 

1, 1885. 

Salaries . $17,644 61 

Engineering . • . . . . . 33,746 87 

Land damages ...... 91,855 38 

Amount carried forward, $143,246 86 



22 



City Document No. 118. 



Amount brought forward, 
Reservoir . 
Dam 

Conduit . 

Engine-house, coal-shed, and chimney 
Engines . 
Grubbing pond . 
Iron pipes 

Iron pipes, trenching 
City distribution 
Hydrants . 
Stopcocks 

Miscellaneous items . 
Roadway and bridge . 
Lowering Mystic river 
Inspections 

Service-pipes and meters 
Hydrants for Somerville and Medford 
Somerville distribution 
Dwelling-house for engineer and fireman 

(pumping-station) . 
Chelsea extension 
Medford extension 
Drinking-fountains . 
New line of supply main 
Stable and pipe-yard 
Extension of engine-house and boiler 
New force main 
Mystic sewer . 
New stable, engine-house 
Additional force main 
Temporary pumping-works 
New work-shop 
Cost of laying main pipe since 1873 



$143,246 86 

141,856 26 

17,167 26 

129,714 30 

36,112 99 

150,096 70 

9,393 26 

108,437 10 

61,029 59 

162,335 23 

19,976 21 

19,262 52 

14,012 51 

3,529 22 

3,012 06 

1,824 79 

133,858 70 

2,653 08 

2,492 10 

4,871 02 
37,347 86 

3,997 41 

1,415 05 
203,050 09 

8,964 64 
33,727 43 

9,875 17 
. 136,245 70 

1,767 39 
24,882 96 

6,905 15 

3,000 00 
20,205 89 

$1,656,266 50 



Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 
Glei'k of the Boston Water Board. 



EEPOET OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



OrricE or City Engineer, 
City Hall, Boston, May 1, 1885. 

Hon. William A. Simmons, 

Chairman Boston Water Board : — 

Sir, — In accordance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance establishing the Boston Water Board, I respectfully 
transmit the following report on the condition of the Water- 
Works : — 



SUDBUEY RIVER. RESERVOIRS AND LAKE 
COCHITUATE. 

The supply from these reservoirs, both in quantity and 
quality, has been better during the last year than for a num- 
ber of previous years. During the greater portion of the year 
the storage reservoirs have been full ; and, with the exception 
of Reservoir No. 2, none of them have fallen more than 4.5 
feet below high-water mark. 

Reservoir JVb. 1. — This reservoir has been practically full 
during the entire year, the lowest point reached being 156.04, 
or 3.25 feet below the top of the flash-boards, on Jan. 6, 
1885. 

Water was wasted at Dam No. 1 for the greater portion of 
the time from May 1 until Sept. 2, when the water fell below 
the level of the flash-boards ; and, with the exception of the 
1^ million gallons per day which is always allowed to pass 
into the river, no water was wasted until Dec. 13, when the 
waste-gates were opened for a few days. 

On Dec. 22 the water reached the level of the crest of 
the dam, and has been wasting since that date. 

Besei'voir JVo. 2. — On May 1, 1884, water was wasting 
over the crest of the outlet dam, and the waste was con- 
tinued, except for a few days, until July 8. During the 
following month the reservoir was falling, and on Aug. 7 
the surface was 3.14 feet below the top of the flash-boards. 
A heavy rain on this date replenished the supply, and the 
reservoir filled nearly to high-water mark. 

The months of September and October were very dry, and 



24 City Document No. 118. 

the reservoir being drawn upon for the city's supply fell 
rapidly until Oct. 14, when it was practically empty. In 
the latter part of November the reservoir began to fill, 
and on Dec. 23 waste began over the stone crest of the dam. 
On April 25 flash-boards were placed on the dam, and since 
that time the reservoir has remained at ordinary high-water 
mark. 

Considerable work has been done in completing the work 
on shallow flowage, such as riprapping the shores, grading, 
loaraing, etc. 

Reservoir JVb. 3. — This reservoir was full and overflow- 
ing on May 1, 1884, and its surface remained near the level 
of the crest of the dam until September, when it began to 
fall ; and on Oct. 14 it was 174.44 above tide-marsh level. 

From Oct. 14 to 30 it was drawn upon for the supply of 
the city, and its surface fell about two feet. In November 
the reservoir was again drawn upon, and on Nov. 23 the 
water surface reached its lowest point for the year, 3.88 feet 
below the crest of the dam. On Dec. 19 the reservoir was 
again full, and waste was commenced over the dam. The 
reservoir is now full. 

Reservoir JVb. 4. — The quantity of gravel filled on to the 
dam during the past year was 119,300 cubic yards, and the 
quantity of concrete added to the core, or centre wall, was 
5,100 cubic yards, — thereby increasing the height of the 
dam twenty-five feet. 

The slope of the dam below the berme has been covered 
with riprap to the depth of eighteen inches, and about 7,000 
cubic yards of loam, for covering the outside slope and top 
of dam, have been deposited along the upper portion of the 
slope, ready for spreading. 

All the broken stone used in concrete and riprap has been 
crushed from stones collected in the basin ; the quantity 
aggregating 7,850 cubic yards. 

All the valves and iron-work required for the gate-chamber 
have been set, and now control the water flowing out of the 
basin. The valves were closed on the 4th day of February, 
1885, and water allowed to accumulate in the basin to the 
amount of 253,000,000 gallons, or to the depth of fifteen 
feet at the gate-house, — at which depth the water has been 
maintained to date. 

During the past year there have been removed from the 
basin 68,000 cubic yards of muck and soil, and two acres of 
shallow flowage have been formed. 

The old wooden bridge on the road at the extreme southerly 
end of the basin has been removed and a new bridge built 
with granite abutments and wing-walls. 



Report of the Water Board. 25 

The work remaining to complete the reservoir consists of 
about 20,000 cubic yards of material, to be placed in the 
embankment, 1,750 cubic yards of slope paving on the inner 
slope of the dam, soiling of embankment, superstructure of 
the gate-chamber, etc. This work will be completed during 
the present season. 

Farm Pond. — To accommodate the work of building the 
aqueduct across this pond the water-surface has been kept 
below its usual height for the greater portion of the year. 

It was kept nearly full until July 13, when it was lowered 
about 2.5 feet to 146.50, where it remained until December. 
It was then raised to 147., and kept at that height for four 
months, then lowered to 145, where it now remains. 

Lake Gochituate. — On May 1, 1884, the surface of the 
lake was 134.30 above tide marsh level. During June and 
July 320,000,000 gallons were run into the lake from the 
Sudbury river and the lake surface was kept near high water- 
mark until August. It then gradually fell until December 
6, when it stood at 129.90, or 4.46 feet below high water- 
mark. 

During December and January the lake was rising, and 
on Februar}?^ 6 waste was commenced. The surface is now 
at high-water mark. 

No water has been drawn from Dudley pond during the 
year. 

By the decision of the Supreme Judicial Court, rendered 
in February last, the authority of your Board to prevent the 
discharge of sewage into Lake Cochituate has been established, 
and the sources of pollution are now being removed from the 
brooks entering the lake. 

The temporary pumping machinery has not been required 
during the past year, and as the completion of Reservoir 
No. 4, during the present season, will probably render its 
use unnecessary for a number of years, I would advise its 
removal to a more secure situation. 

The diagram annexed to this report shows graphically the 
varying heights of the different reservoirs during the year, 
the rainfall on the Sudbury river, and the daily amounts 
drawn from the Sudbury-river reservoirs during the year. 

The following table shows the heights of water in the 
reservoirs and in Lake Cochituate on the first of each 
month : — 



26 



City Document No. 118. 



May 1, 188i 

June 1, " 

July 1, " 

Aug. t, " 

Sept. 1, " 

Oct. 1, " 

Nov. 1, " 

Dec. 1, " 
Jan. 1, 1885 

Feb. 1, " 

Mar. 1, " 

Apr. 1, " 
May 1, " 



Res. No. 1. 

Top of flash- 
boards, 
159.29. 



158.00 
157.88 
159.45 
159.30 
159.30 
158.97 
158.71 
157.67 
158.01 
157.73 
157.83 
158.15 
159.40 



Res. No. 2. 
Top of flash- 
boards, 
167.12. 



166.18 
166.09 
167.17 
164.80 
164.50 
155.64 
150.25 
152.95 
166.15 
165.95 
166.13 
166.34 
167.46 



Res. No. 3. 

Crest of 

Dam, 

175.24. 



175.58 
175.49 
175.40 
176.27 
175.14 
174.65 
172.35 
171.81 
175.56 
175.41 
175.07 
175.69 
175.50 



Farm Pond. 



149.27 
148.83 
149.22 
146.51 
146.50 
146.49 
146.54 
146.79 
146.83 
146.90 
146.97 
145.75 
145.04 



Lake Co- 
chituate 
Top of flash- 
boards, 
134.38. 



134.30 
134.28 
134.30 
133.86 
133.19 
131.85 
130.70 
130.08 
131.43 
132.74 
132.47 
132.62 
134.36 



Water has been drawn from the Sudbury-river reservoirs 
as follows : — 



May 1 to June 17, 
June 17 to June 25, 

June 25 to June 30, " 

June 30 to Oct. 14, '< 

Oct. 14 to Oct. 30, " 

Oct. 30 to Nov. 8, " 

Nov. 8 to Nov. 30, " 
Nov. 30 to Feb. 11,'85, " 

Feb. 11 to May 1, " 



from Reservoir No. 1. 
" " No. 2. 



Nos. 1 and 2. 
No. 2. 

Nos. 2 and 3. 
No. 2. 
Nos. 2 and 3. 
No. 2. 

No. 3. 



Farm-Pond Conduit, 

At the date of the last annual report Messrs. Parker & 
Sylvester were filling across the pond on the line of the con- 
duit. 

Their contract was completed on August 29, 59,010 cubic 
yards of material having been deposited at a cost of $27,- 
672.70. 

On August 4 proposals were received for the construction 
of the conduit, 3,760 feet in length, between the upper and 
lower gate-houses ; and on August 20 a contract was made 
for the work with G. M. Gushing, of J^ew York. 



Report of the Water Board. 27 

Work under this contract is now progressing, the trench 
has been excavated for a length of 1,200 feet, and 700 feet 
of the conduit completed. 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in constant use, with 
the exception of a few days in December, when it was being 
cleaned. 

During the summer, portions of the masonry of the Charles- 
river bridge were pointed in a thorough manner, at a cost of 
$584. 

The Cochituate aqueduct has been in constant use except 
from December 29 to January 4, when the water was drawn 
off for cleaning. 

From May 1 to June 10 the water in this aqueduct was 
kept six feet above the conduit invert ; it was then reduced 
to five feet, and maintained at that height throughout the 
year. 

The line of the Circuit Railroad, which is now being con- 
structed, crosses both aqueducts in Newton. At the crossing 
of the Sudbury aqueduct the arch has been strengthened by 
an additional ring of bricks, and the work of strengthening 
the Cochituate aqueduct will soon be done. The Chestnut 
Hill, Brookline, Parker Hill, and East Boston reservoirs have 
been in constant use, and are in good condition. At the 
Parker-Hill reservoir an iron fence has been erected on the 
coping surrounding the reservoir, at a cost of $2,094, and a 
stone and gravel walk constructed on the top of the reservoir 
bank at a cost of $1,064.25. 



Hian-SERViCE Works. 

The work done at the Highland station is shown in detail 
by the table on page 44. 

All of the water has been pumped by the Worthington 
engine. The total quantity of water pumped during the year 
was 884,988,000 gallons, — a decrease of 16.5 per cent, from 
the amount pumped in 1883. 

Total coal consumed, 1,551,900 lbs., of which 13.3 per 
cent, were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift, 108.49 feet. 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 570.3 gallons. • . 

Average daily quantity pumped, 2,418,000 gallons. 

Average duty (no deductions), 51,597,600 foot lbs., per 
100 lbs. of coal. 



28 City Document No. 118. 

Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries . . 

Fuel 

Repairs ..... 
Oil, waste, and packing . 
Sundry small supplies, gas, etc. 



^3,943 11 

3,784 00 

185 69 

243 96 

221 71 



$8,378 47 
Cost per million gallons, raised one foot high . $0,087 

The construction of new high-service works which has 
been constantly advocated for the past ten years was author- 
ized by a vote of the City Government, in December. 

On January 20 proposals were received for 2,920 tons of 
pipes, and special castings required for the force and supply 
mains, and on January 24 a contract was made with A. H. 
McNeal, of Burlington, N.J., for furnishing the same. 

The contract price is $26.45 per gross ton for the pipe, 
and $53.20 for the specials. 

During the month of January surveys and investigations 
were made with reference to determining the most advan- 
tageous site for a reservoir. 

At the East Boston station the daily average amount 
pumped has been 226,900 gallons, a decrease of 36% from 
the corresponding amount for the previous year. 

At the Brighton station the amount pumped has varied 
from 100,000 to 250,000 gallons per day. 

Mystic Lake. 

Mystic Lake was full and overflowing on May 1, 1884, 
and waste was continued until June 8. The lake remained 
full until September 1, after which date its surface fefl, and 
durins^ the month of November stood about 3.50 feet below 
high water. In December the lake filled, and on December 
23 waste began, and has been continued to the present time. 

Mystic-Valley Sewer. 

The treatment of the sewage from the tanneries in the 
Mystic Valley has been continued under the same system as 
for the two previous years. 

The Farquhar low-pressure filter has been placed in posi- 
tion, and trials have been made to determine the practicability 
of filtering the sewage ; but the experiments have not thus far 
been successful. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



29 



Experiments made during the past year show that the 
sludge removed from the settling-tanks has some value for 
manurial purposes. All of the land available has been 
graded, and the experiment will be continued during the 
present season. 

The quantity of sewage is constantly increasing, and, if the 
works are to be maintained at their present location, they 
should be placed upon a more permanent basis. The 
machinery and buildings are of a temporary character, and 
already in need of repairs. 

Authority for the removal of the works to the shore of the 
lower Mystic pond was asked by the Legislature^ but has 
not been granted. I would recommend that the subject be 
carefully considered, in order that some definite plan may 
be decided upon before the next session of the Legislature. 



Mystic Conduit and Eeservoirs. 



The conduit has been cleaned twice during the year, and 
is in good condition. The east basin of the reservoir was 
drawn off and cleaned in May, 1884, The stone- work was 
repointed, and the wrought-iron pipe leading to the west 
basin re-covered with cement. 



Mystic Pumping-Station. 

The work done at this station is shown by the table on 
page 43. 



Engine No. 1 was used 151 hours 30 min. 
" » 2 " " 1343 " 30 " 
« .< 3 .. << 7155 u 45 << 



pumping 25,005,600 gallons. 
" 258,542,200 <• 

'• 2,027,161,600 " 



Total amount pumped .... 2,310,709,400 " 
Total coal consumed .... 5,843,400 lbs. 

Of which 8.6% were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift 150.04 feet. 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 395.4 gallons. 

Average duty of engines (no deductions), 49,482,700 feet per 100 lbs. coal. 

Daily average amount pumped 6,313,400 gallons, a decrease of 7.4 per 
cent, from that of the previous year. 



Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries 

Fuel . 

Oil, waste, and packing 

Repairs . 

Small supplies 



$7,318 20 

13,957 07 

544 87 

1,299 52 

58 87 



$23,178 53 



30 City Document No. 118. 

Cost per million gallons lifted one foot high $0,067. 

The new boilers which were being erected at the date 
of the last report were completed and placed in service in 
June last. The boiler-room has been greatly improved by 
raising the ceiling so as to make the boilers and piping more 
accessible, and also to reduce the danger from fire. 

In order to determine the efficiency of the boilers a careful 
trial was made on February 9 and 10, with the following 
results. 

The test was conducted in the following manner : — 

On the morning of the 9th boilers Nos. 2 and 3 were 
supplying steam for engine No. 3, which was pumping the 
city's supply. At 10.18 A.M. the engine was stopped, the 
fires under the boilers drawn, and the ash-pits cleaned. At 
10.30 A.M. new fires were started under both boilers, the 
steam pressure at the time (as shoAvn by the gauges) being 
27 lbs. in boiler No. 2, and 29 lbs. in boiler No. 3. At 
10.50 A.M. the engine was started, and run continuously 
until 11,12 A.M. February 10, when it was stopped, the 
boiler-pressures at that time being the same as when the fires 
were lighted, viz., 27 and 29 lbs. 

All of the wood and coal used during the trial was carefully 
weighed on tested scales. The water fed to the boilers was 
carefully weighed, and also measured by a 2-inch Worthing- 
ton meter placed upon the boiler feed-pipe. Half-hourly 
observations were taken of the height of the water in boilers, 
steam pressure in boilers, temperatures of steam, feed-Avater 
and gases in flue. 

The height of the water in the boilers at the beginning of 
the trial was carefully noted, and the water left at the same 
elevation when the trial ended. 

The boilers are of the horizontal, return tubular type, with 
external furnaces. They are 78 inches in diameter, 17 feet 
in length, and each boiler contains 151 tubes of 3 inches 
outside diameter. The boiler shells are of ^^g-inch steel, 
tube sheets |-inch steel. 



Grate surface each 7 feet by 6 feet, for both 

boilers ..... 
Heating surface in both boilers 
Ratio of grate surface to heating surface 
Duration of trial .... 
Average steam pressure . 

" temperature of steam 
<< '♦ " gases in flue 

•« " '< feed water 

Total amount of wood used . 



84 sq. ft. 
4102.8 " 
1 to 48.8 ♦' 
24 hours 22 min. 
44 lbs. 
286.6° Fah. 
344.2° " 
115.6° " 
633 lbs. 



Report of the Water Board. 31 

Fuel equivalent at 40 % . . . . 253 lbs. 

Total goal used 19,235 

" fuel used ' 19,4.88 

*' ashes drawn from grates . . 1,463 

Unburnt coal in ashes .... 

Total combustible 18,025 

Total weioht of water fed to boilers . 190,986 

Water evaporated per lb. of coal at ob- 
served temperature and pressure . . 9.8 

Equivalent evaporation from and at 212°, 11,035 

Water evaporated per lb. of combustible 

at observed temperature and pressure . 10,596 

Equivalent evaporation from and at 212°, 11,931 

Fuel burnt per hour .... 800 

Fuel burnt per hour per sq. ft. of grate 

surface ...... 9.52 

Water evaporated per hour per sq. ft. of 

grate surface . . . . . 7,837 

Water evaporated per hour per sq. ft. of 

grate surface ..... 93.33 

Water evaporated per hour per sq. ft. of 

heating surface . . . . . 1.91 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption during the year was as fol- 
lows : — 

Gallons per Percentage of 
Gallons. head reduction from 

per day. year 1883. 

Sudbury and Cochituate 

supply . . . 25,090,500 68 
Mystic supply . . 6,209,700 71 



Total. . . . 31,300,200 68.6 21.6 

The daily average consumption from the combined works 
has been 8,630,200 gallons less than during the year 1883, 
and less than that of any year since 1877. 

The table on page 36, and the diagram facing page 36, 
show the daily average consumption for each month. 

Waste. 

The above figures show that the efforts which have been 
made to prevent the waste of water have been very success- 
ful. 



32 City Document No. 118. 

By request of your Board, Mr. Dexter Brackett has been 
especially detailed from this office to take charge of the 
Waste Detector Service, and I transmit herewith his report 
which gives more in detail the work accomplished : — 

"Boston, May 1, 1885. 
"William Jackson, Esq., City Engineer: — 

" Dear Sir, — The following report of the work done in 
the detection of waste is respectfully submitted : — 

"During the months of Ma^y and June, 1884, the Deacon 
meters, which had been received from England, were located 
throughout the city and were immediately placed in service 
to determine the amount of waste in the different sections. 
The localities found to be using large quantities of water were 
reported to Mr. D. B. Cashman, the superintendent of the 
Inspection and Waste Department, in order that a house to 
house inspection might be made by the inspectors under his 
charge. 

" After the house to house inspection had been made the 
sections were asjain tested, to determine the savins: effected 
by the inspection. 

" Nearly all of the residential portions of the city are now 
controlled by this system. 

" Sixty-nine meters are in use, supplying a population of 
about 360,000 people in 137 districts. 



Report of the Water Board. 



33 



"The saving which has been effected is shown by the fol- 
lowing table, which gives the daily average consumption per 
inhabitant during the past two years : — 





SUDBTJBT AND COCHITUATB. 


Mystic. 


Month. 


Consumption. 


Amount saved. 


Consumption. 


Amount saved. 
















Galls, per head 






Galls, per head 








per day. 


Galls, 
per head 
per day. 


Percent- 
age. 


per day. 


Galls, 
per head 
per day. 


Percent- 




1883 


1884 


1883 


1884 




January . . 


97.8 


88.4 


9.4 


9.6 


97.3 


92.2 


5.1 


5.2 


February . 


92.0 


67.5 


24.5 


26.6 


89.6 


73.0 


16.6 


18.5 


March . . . 


95.8 


65.0 


30.8 


32.1 


89.8 


72.8 


17.0 


18.9 


AprU . . . 


85.8 


58.8 


27.0 


31.5 


71.5 


60.1 


11.4 


15.9 


May .... 


89.8 


64.6 


25.2 


28.1 


73.1 


66.4 


6.7 


9.2 


June .... 


93.3 


71.2 


22.1 


23.7 


80.0 


71.5 


8.5 


10.6 


July .... 


102.4 


68.9 


33.5 


32.7 


84.5 


72.1 


12.4 


14.7 


August . . 


103.2 


67.7 


35.5 


34.4 


83.9 


69.5 


14.4 


17.2 


September . 


93.2 


71,1 


22.1 


23.7 


67.4 


73.1 


. . . 


(8.5 inc.) 


October . . 


81.9 


67.3 


14.6 


17.8 


63.4 


66.4 


. • . 


(4.7 inc.) 


November . 


79.6 


61.5 


18.1 


22.7 


68.3 


58.2 


10.1 


14.8 


December . 


83.0 


64.9 


18.1 


21.8 


77.9 


7] .9 


6.0 


7.7 


Averages . 


91.5 


68.0 


23.5 


25.6 


82.0 


71.0 


11.0 


13.4 





" It will be noticed that the saving effected on the Sudbury 
and Cochituate works has been greater than on the Mystic 
works. This I attribute to the fact that the distribution sys- 
tems of Somerville and Chelsea are in a yery poor condition, 
and that the Deacon system has not yet been extended to 
those cities. 

" There yet remains in some of the sections a considerable 
amount of waste, but whether this is taking place from the 
water-fixtures or from the street mains and services cannot 
be definitely ascertained until we have sidewalk stopcocks 
on the services. 

" The Board having adopted the Church stopcock to be 
placed on the services throughout the city, ordered 5,000 of 
them in September, 1884. 



34 City Document No. 118. 

"About 2,500 of these have been delivered and are now 
being tested for acceptance. Within a few weeks the work 
of setting them will be commenced, and it is intended to for- 
ward the work as rapidly as possible in order that they may 
be used to reduce the waste during the present season. 

"Further experiments have been made with the Bell Water- 
phone ; but I do not think it advisable to adopt it for perma- 
nent use. 

" Eespectfully submitted, 

"DEXTER BRACKETT, 

"Assistant JEngineer." 



Quality. 



The quality of the water from the different sources of 
supply has been generally good throughout the year. The 
cucumber taste has not been noticed. Algoe made their 
appearance in Farm Pond and Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 3 during 
the summer and fall ; but less trouble was experienced from 
their presence than in past years. Owing to the work 
going on at Farm Pond the water of that pond has not been 
very good during most of the year. 

The water of Lake Cochituate has been of good quality 
throughout the year. 

Disteibution. 

The distributing mains of the Sudbury and Cochituate 
works have been extended about eleven miles, and one mile of 
pipe relaid with pipe of larger diameter. The total length 
of supply and distributing mains now connected with the 
works is 388.5 miles. 

On the Mystic works the distributing mains have been 
extended 11,291 feet, and 5,232 feet of wrought-iron and 
cement pipe replaced by cast-iron pipes. The total length 
of supply and distribution mains connected with the Mystic 
system is 129.2 miles. This amount is less than that given 
in former reports, as a careful examination of reports and 
plans shows that many errors had crept into the figures, and 
the revised length is thought to be practically correct. 

The raising of the grade of Brookline avenue, between 
Beacon street and Burlington avenue, necessitated the rais- 
ing of about 1,200 feet of the 40-inch supply main. For a 



Report of the Water Board. 35 

length of 1,000 feet the pipe was raised and supported by 
a pile trestle. This trestle was also used by the railroad 
company in filling the street. The water passes over the 
bridge in two wrought-iron pipes 28 inches in diameter. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual statistical 
tables showing the rainfall, consumption of water, yield of 
the difi'ereut water-sheds, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM JACKSON, 

City- Engineer, and Engineer Boston Water Board. 



36 



City Document No. 118. 



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o 


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o 






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oo 


o 


G 




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CO 


C5 




t- 


oo 


00 






o 


& 


X 


00_ 


tq_ 


o 


CO 


IM 


t- 


c» 






■^ 


^ 


o 






























td 


H 


lo" 


t-^ 


CO 


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t- 


to 


00 


to 




o 


(N 


■M 


(M 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


<M 


<M 


IM 


<N 


IM 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


c: 


<N 


C0_ 








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°l 




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to^ 


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■^ 


to 


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o 


o 








o 


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o> 




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r^ 


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to 
































H 


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^ 


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c-f 




to 




00 


t- 


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Si 


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IM 


IM 


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CJ 




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Q 


o 


o 


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o 


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o 


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o 




o 


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o 


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o 


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o 


o 




o 




ac 




t-^ 




CO 




CD 


to 


CO 






to 


»r3 


t-^ 




o 


00 


oT 


CO 


co" 


cT 


o" 


oT 


oT 


o" 


o 


00 


in" 






-* 






(M 


CO 






CO 


o 


o 


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o 




X 


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CO 


CO 


o. 


co_ 


to 


CO 


^ 




IM 


IM 


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H 


^ 


CO 




o 


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CO 


lO 


Tf 


-* 


•* 


(M 


IM 


CO 






c^ 




C-l 


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IM 


<M 


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IM 


IM 


IM 


cq 


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m 


























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n 


















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IP 


IP 






>, 


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3 




5. 

< 


>> 


a 


3 


1 


1 

o 


s 

CI 

> 
o 

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i 

o 




3 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



37 












o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








3 "to 




c 


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o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


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o 


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o 










































C QJ 


s 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 


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o 


o' 








0-3^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 








&H§« 




o 


^ 


■o 




^ 










O) 


Oi 




K 


o 








c 






Ci 


aS 




T* 




to 


c: 




K 




:f 


g. 


o 




;i! 




CC 




(N 


to 






o 


^ 


CO 




CO 


a> 


ac 

H 


to 




« 


<>» 


<M 


3 


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Tjl 


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CO 


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tCJ 


o 

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o 








o 


o 


o 










o 


to 


s 


,, 5^ 






o 








o 


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s 




o 

o 








o 
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o 


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tc 








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tc 


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5 












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3 "as 




o 


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s 


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s 


to 




to 




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2 


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o 
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o 
o 


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c 


CO 












c< 


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o 
























o^S 




































Q 










c 
























^6 


^ 






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i 












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o 


o 


o 


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o 


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o 


o 


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c^ 




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o 


o 




"S^QD 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c: 


o 


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c 


o 




CO 


« 


































d <v 


8 


o 


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o 


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ac 

H 




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00 




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l^ 


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tc 


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^ 


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o 


a 


o 


05 






o 




t~ ty 


CO 


CO 


c< 






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o 




lO 


^ 


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to 


CO 




k£Z 


tc 


















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o 


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o 


c 


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o 








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o 


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o 


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a 0) 


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o 


o 


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o 


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o 








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o 


c 


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o 


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c 


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d: 


c 








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c 




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c 


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c 








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cc 




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oc 


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t- 


c 


to -^ to CT 






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c 


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c<- 


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o 






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II 
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tc 








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c 


c 


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c 


c 




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c 








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c 


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s 


c 


c 


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c 


c 


c 


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c 


c 


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c 


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g_ 


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c 


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c~ 


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c^ 


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c<- 


0- 


c- 


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s c 


cT 


o_ 


ac 






























cr 


_ § 


ei" 


















c 


c 


c 




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) c 


1 

co" 


s 


















c 


c 






o c: 






a 














c 
c 


c 


c 


: 


o c 
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_ c 


o 




^ 














c 


c 


c 




O sC 


3 C 






















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0" 




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j3 




































H o 
O 


8 














c 




a 




^ e- 


< ■- 








^ 














c 


•< 






CI 


5 






































3 . 


a . 
o 


































OD 


u , 


































a : 


> . 




W 






























o 

* • 


-Si. 




z 






























a • 


>>s 
































o . 


73 >a 




o 
































C3 




a 




i 
c 


- 

! i 


i1 


5 


li c 


r 1 




-. 5 


9 


1 a 

^ 1 


1 

X 
a 


1 i 

I i 

' 1 


1 "5 
1 c 




o 

1^ 








I ^ 


. 15 


3 < 


^ is 


J " 


2 C 


) 12 


; P 


5 


H 


<1 



38 



City Document No. 118. 



'i^ 



"i^ 



e cq 













^_ 




,_( 




^ 










to 


o 








'it 


CO 


0-. 






o 










to 








00 


CO 


o 


to 


to 


t. 


to 


to 


to 


in 


to 


to 


to 


to 


Mystic 
Reservol 
High wat 

147.00. 


00 


1-1 


Tjl 


TjH 


1-\ 


■* 


-# 


3 


^ 




1* 


3 


^ 


tjl 


w 

00 
00 


^ 


oo 




CO 


(M 


(M 


(M 


CO 


to 


^ 


1* 


eo 


to 


CO 


05 






to 




to 


to 


■* 


00 

to 


d 


d 


T-t 


■* 


•W 


TH 




■^ 


T»l 






r^ 








1 


00 
00 


^ 


^ 


(M 


CO 




in 


OO 


t- 


a> 


^ 


rH 


™ 


lO 


h 


lO 


(N 


a> 


>o 


















■ 


Mystic 

Lake. 

High wate 

7.00. 


eo 


to 


in 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


in 


•* 


CO 


m 




H 




























00 
00 
















00 




to 


o> 


CO 


s 


en 






to 


to 


to 


in 


CO 


<= 


d 


d 


° 


CO 






















1 


1 


1 






s 


CD 










CO 


o 


t- 


Ol 




CO 


OO 


s 






























Parker-Hll 

Reservoir 

Hlgh-wate 

219.00. 


00 

00 
H 


55 


CO 


S 




(M 


(M 


(N 


(M 


IM 


IM 


(M 


e3 


IM 


CO 
00 
00 


CO 


•* 










00 


•* 


IM 


in 


in 


00 


05 




OO 




t^ 


t^ 


CO 


■* 






CO 


t-^ 


00 


t-^ 




iH 


(N 


?q 


c^ 


M 


(M 


(N 


(N 


(M 


IM 


IM 


IN 


IM 


(M 




00 
00 






OJ 














IM 


in 


in 


^ 




Ol 




to 




>o 






'^ 








in 




rooklinc 
eservoir 
gh wate 
124.00. 










CO 




CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




















































































m 

00 
00 


o 


■2 


<N 


CO 


5 


5! 


to 


s 


O 


CO 


g 


00 


s; 


mp5g 






CO 












CO 


IM 


e-j 


IM 


CO 










































y-l 






r-\ 




"^ 


'"' 


""• 




00 
00 












on 






o> 




CO 


to 


S! 




^ 


CO 


CO 

CO 


o> 


CO 


CO 


OO 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo' 


CO 


gj 


























Chestnut 

Reserv 

High w 

124.00 


H 










tH 








rH 




■^ 


'"' 


'~' 


w 

00 
00 








eo 


CO 


i_i 






00 


00 


to 


^ 


00 




C3> 


CO 


to 

CO 


CO 


05 
CO 


CO 


CO 


<M 

CO 


!M 


CO 




K 


IH 




T-t 


c^ 


I-l 


(M 


0^ 


cq 


IM 


IM 








CO 




^ 




to 


eo 


o 


00 


eo 


•* 




to 


^ 


^ 


22 


o> 


lO 




o 


CO 




o 


to 


in 










Si 


















,_( 


o 


o 


r^ 


Lake 

Cochitua 

High wa 

134.36. 








CO 








eo 






", 




iH 








iM 










?-i 


tH 


'"' 






eo 

00 
00 
H 










^ 


^ 


^ 


00 


IM 


O 


to 


^ 


^ 


o 


CO 






o 


to 


Ol 


o 


Ui 




T~^ 












,_( 




CO 


y-^ 






to 


in 


^ 


00 




(N 


■M 


CO 


rH 


CO 


CO 


eo 










rH 




00 
00 


^ 




^ 


.n 


^ 


o> 


f_ 


o 


lO 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


Td 


'6 S 


^ 




t- 


>o 


t- 




(M 




in 








t~ 


00 


00 




2? 


2? 


2S 


^ 


■* 


^ 


to 


to 
-tj< 


to 


5 




'-' 






















'"' 


^ 


eo 

00 
00 




















ro 


to 


!2 


iS 


<M 


(N 


C^ 






IM 
















ga 
















00 








t.. 


CO 




^ 


■^ 




^ 


-* 


3 


•* 


T(i 


■^ 


■* 










'-' 


iH 




^ 










'-' 




''' 






00 

00 


ira 












^ 


1^ 


^ 




o 


00 


CO 


.fcj 


o 


o> 










e<< 


IN 


o> 










eservoir 
No. 3. 
one-cres 
175.24. 






lO 


lO 


in 


in 


in 


in 


-* 


CO 


f-( 


^ 


CO 


























iH 








rH 


^ 


^ 




'-' 


^ 


'-' 




r^ 




CO 
00 
00 


o 


<o 


UO 


S 


^ 


CO 


^ 


c<< 


o 


CO 


a> 


O 

O 


^ 


K & 














Tf 






rH 




































iH 


■-^ 


r-^ 


'-' 


'-' 


'-' 


rH 


I-l 








'"' 


r^ 






00 
00 


ro 


to 


^ 


o 


-* 


>n 


j_ 


in 


to 


to 


o 


CO 


"M 


.s -2 




CO 


^. 








to 


>* 


c5 


rH 


a> 










to 






to 


to 


to 


to 








































S o.a--o 






























CO 
00 
00 
H 


00 










to 




on 




IM 


CO 


00 


^ 




'^, 


(31 


o 
to 


iH 




00 

in 


to 


d 


00 


oi 


Cji 


d 


". 


fe 




to 




to 

1-1 


to 


to 




i~\ 










rH 




00 






J_^ 








^ 


CO 


IM 


o> 


00 


t- 


in 


.a "H 


CO 




■* 




a> 


rH 


eo 


CO 












vO 


t^ 






t— 










00 


t.. 


t.. 


00 






























33 o-^g 


iH 


rH 




rH 


'"' 


r^ 


'"' 


'"' 


■^ 




'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


^ 


CO 
00 

00 


--1 




^ 


(M 




j_ 






j_ 




to 


^ 


rH 




■^ 


M 


o; 


00 




CO 




00 


'~i 


tc> 


'°. 


^ 


d 


ta 




























iH 


>-* 






'-' 




IH 


'-' 


r^ 


'^ 


■"I 


rH 






u 

Eh 
O 




t>i 


>. 

^ 


• 






. 






B 




.o 




lU 




a 


3 


.a 


^ 










,o 


a 


s 


>-i 


S 






u 


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H 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagi'am showing the rainfall and dail^ average consumption 
for each month. 




Report of the Water Board. 



39 



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40 



City Document No. 118. 



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BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

J)iaf/a/n shoumg the Jiei^Jtis ofihe Sudbuiy JRiver Jfesejvoirs, Farm Tortd a/id ZaJke Coc/ti'tuate, t7te dady aj/wunt 
dj-awn fiv/rt tlte Sudbury Jfiver. and t7te JiainfalL on the SuMury Mver Jfatei- Shed ditriitj t/te jear 7SS-4: 




J(t/iiia>y 



Rlij'uarj/ 



Jiouemier 



Deceirtliei" 



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LAtrr cor.Hi 




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3 



I2C i-S 

II 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



41 







































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42 



City Document No. 118. 



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Eeport of the Water Board. 



43 









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44 



City Document No. 118. 






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1 



Report of the Water Board. 



45 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sudhury-River Water-shed, for 

the year 1884. 



18S4. 


1 


(A 

3 








a 

3 




..a 

3 ' 


02 


a 
O 

o 


1 


u 
a) 

a) 


1 . . . . 




0.065 






















2 . . . . 


1.405 




. . . 


. . . 




0.015 






. . . 




. . . 


3. . . . 




















0.08 






4 . . . . 








1.35 












0.43 


0.08 




5 . . . . 




0.60 


0.12 




0.015 
0.055 




0.735 
0.25 


0.425 
0.01 






6. . . . 


. . . 


0.035 


. . . 


1.74 


7. . . . 




0.16 












2.425 








. . . 


8 . . . . 


1.695 


0.175 


1.755 




0.54 
0.01 




0.08 
0.265 




0.03 


0.02 






9. . . . 




. . > 


10 








0.82 






. . . 


0.05 








. . . 


11 ... . 


0.03 




0.03 






0.355 


0.05 
0.39 


0.055 
0.015 


0.22 






0.06 


12 ... . 


0.135 






13 ... . 












0.125 


14. . . . 




0.90 


0.255 




0.52 












15 ... . 




0.77 


0.08 
0.02 




0.025 


0.18 








0.95 


16. . . . 




. 






17. . . . 










0.015 




0.01 


. . . 


. . . 






0.18 


18 ... . 








0.94 










0.145 


0.25 






19. . . . 










. . . 


0.575 


0.225 




0.52 


. . . 


20 ... . 


0.43 


1.44 


1.335 


0.095 


1.27 




. 


0.415 


0.09 








21 ... . 








22 ... , 
















0.35 


0.075 


0.425 


1.145 


1.636 


23. . . . 




1.065 






0.025 




0.105 




24. . . . 


1.145 


. . . 


0.215 




. . . 


. . . 




. . . 




. . . 




0.425 


25. . . . 




. . . 








. . . 


0.055 




0.095 


. . . 


0.015 


0.045 


26. . . . 






0.985 


0.43 


• • • 


2.515 


0.49 


0.265 






0.885 




27. . . . 




1.085 


. . . 


28. . . , 




1.055 






0.92 




. . . 




0.20 


0.045 


. . . 


0.01 


29. . . . 


0.01 


. . . 












0.375 


. . . 




. . . 


. . . 


30 ... . 


0.37 


• • • 


0.025 




. . . 


• • • 


0.66 
0.31 


0.065 
0.02 










31. . . . 




1.285 






Total . 


5.085 


6.545 


4.72 


4.405 


3.47 


3.445 


3.665 


4.65 


0.855 


2.48 


2.645 


5.17 



Total rainfall during year . .' 47.135 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges, located at Framingham and Westboro'. 



46 



City Document No. 118. 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on Lake Cochititaie Water-shed for the 

Year 1884. 



1884. 


a 

3 

a 


3 
.a 
fa 


1 

3 






a 

3 
1-5 


3 
1-5 


I 


a 

1 


1 

o 


a 

o 


1 

Q 




Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins, 


Ins. 


Ins.' 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


Ins. 


1 




0.12 






















2 , 


1.13 
























3. . . . 














. . . 


. . . 




0.03 






4. . . . 


. . . 


0.21 




1.05 


. . . 




. . . 


. . . 




0.38 


0.13 




5 . . . . 




0.39 




0.10 


0.06 




1.03 


0.14 










6. . . . 






0.12 








0.17 


0.43 




0.02 




1.85 


7. . . . 


. . . 


0.18 






0.05 




. . . 


2.20 








. . . 


8 . . . . 










0.48 




0.45 




0.06 


0.05 






9. . . . 


1.64 


• . . 




. . . 






0.29 










. . . 


10 






1.52 


0.82 
0.03 










0.23 








11 ... . 


0.04 










0.08 


0.10 






O.U 


12 ... . 




0.24 
0.55 


0.07 


0.02 




0.16 
0.20 


0.31 


0.11 




0.14 






13. . . . 


. . . 


0.09 


14. . . . 


0.02 








0.58 




. . . 


0.06 








. . . 


15 . 






0.25 


0.73 
0.14 
0.38 


0.07 
0.04 














0.93 


16 ... . 








0.10 












17 . . 








0.18 


18. . . . 




0.82 










0.04 




0.07 


0.16 






19 ... . 












0.40 


0.13 




0.09 




0.33 




20. . . . 


0.12 


0.68 


1.24 




0.73 


. . . 


21 
















0.10 








1.52 


22 ... . 
















0.52 


0.06 


0.39 


0.88 


0.10 


23. . . . 




1.20 






0.03 




0.07 


. . . 


24. . . . 


1.04 


. . . 


0.24 




. . . 




. . . 


. . . 










25. . . . 




. . . 










0.07 




0.11 




0.02 


0.29 


26 ... . 






1.06 


0.53 




3.12 


0.60 


0.22 


0.04 




0.02 


0.24 


27. . . . 


. . . 


0.70 


. . . 


28 ... . 


. . . 


0.95 






0.88 




. . . 




0.14 


0.03 


0.95 




29 . 














0.84 


0.63 










30 . 






















31. . . . 


0.40 












0.32 






1.39 






Total . 


4.39 


6.04 


4.50 


3.80 


2.92 


3.88 


4.42 


4.49 


0.90 


2.69 


2.33 


5.31 



Total rainfall during year 45.57 inchea. 



Report of the Water Board. 



47 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Mystic-Lahe Water-shed for the 

Year 1884. 



18S4. 




1 


i 


-A 




i 

3 


3 


I 

3 
< 


a 

ft 

m 


O 


S 


1 

a 

o 


1 




0.14 






















2 . . . . 


1.385 
























3. . . . 


0.06 




0.67 








. . . 




0.025 


, . . 




4. . . . 


. . . 


0.236 




0.38 






. . . 


. . . 




0.36 


0.26 


. . . 


5 ... 




0.20 
0.16 
0.08 


0.16 
■ ■ ■ 


0.07 


0.05 
0.065 


0.17 
0.095 


0.99 
0.226 


0.84 
2.29 










6 . • . . 




0.02 




1.435 


7. . . . 






8 . . . . 


1.71 


0.04 
0.06 


0.405 
0.66 
0.25 


0.03 
0.015 


0.09 

0.416 

0.24 




0.666 




0.01 


0,14 






9 . . . . 






10, . . . 














. . . 


11. . . . 


0.045 


0.19 




0.69 


. . . 








0.46 






0.16 


12 ... . 




0.09 
0.415 


0.05 






0.316 


0.06 
0.10 


0.136 
0.14 




0.16 






13 ... . 






0.32 


0.08 


14 ... . 










15 ... . 






0.095 
0.025 




0.20 














0.925 


16 ... . 






0.91 
0.025 
0.13 


0.02 




0.025 


. 










17 ... . 
















18. . . . 


. . . 


0.625 


. . . 


0.01 




0.035 


. . . 








0.20 


19 ... . 


0.23 


0.11 
0.05 


1.62 


0.035 
0.01 


0.62 


0.46 


0.14 








0.265 




20. . . . 


. • . 


0.07 


• • « 




, . , 


21 ... . 


. . . 


0.57 


. . . 


0.035 














. . . 


1.20 


22 ... . 
















0.316 




0.485 


0.525 


0.10 


23. . . . 




1.16 






0.03 


. . . 


0.01 




24. . . . 


0.935 


. . . 


0.30 


. . . 


. . . 




0.01 






, . . 




0.345 


25 ... . 








0.035 

0.215 

0.03 






0.01 
0.335 


0.04 
0.226 










26 . . . . 




0.095 
0.63 


0.735 




3.605 








0.07 


27. . . . 


. . . 


0.05 


. , . 


0.055 




28. . . . 




1.175 






0.89 






. . . 


0.11 


0.04 


0.90 


0.045 


29 ... . 


0.025 






. . . 




. . . 


0.92 


0.87 


. . . 


0.15 






30. . . . 






0.065 




. . . 


. . . 


0.01 


. . . 


. . . 


1.01 




. . . 


31. . . . 


0.416 












0.185 






0.31 






Totals . 


4.746 


6.086 


4.255 


3.18 


2.96 


4.635 


3.72 


4.865 


0.70 


2.70 


2.006 


4.66 



Total rainfall during year 44,39 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges, located at Mystic Lake and Mystic Station, 



48 



City Document No. 118. 



1-1 <M (M 



05 CO eo 00 



C^ CO 00 Ol >0 (M 



CO (M I-H 



IN I-l IM (N 



^ 05 00 00 



CO -^ d -^ t^ 



i?^(MlMCOC^(N<NCqC^ 



cq CO CO CO 



00 CO <N CO 



<f< CO i-l 



■<* r-l 1-1 



CO CO »C CO CO CO 



Ti* Oi 00 CO 



CO CO CO •<1< 



CO 00 r-( 



O rH rl 



CO CO CO CO 



'is 



IM e^ CO <M 



00 O (N ■* 



rH to (N i-l 

lO CO lA tH 



»n CO *-* C<l 



lO CO (M O^ »^ 



cq CO 00 



eq CO I-l l- >0 rH 



05 CI 00 -^ O OS 
CO <M 00 00 O 00 



a .9 «^ 



I-! fe 



« S >> >> !>v 

^ o !$ S a 






— ■5 



iJ pq M M 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



49 



Tahle showing the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations on 
the Water - Works. 









Tbmperatube 


OP Air. 






Tbmperatube oi- 
Water. 


1SS4. 


Myst 


ic Pumping- 
Station. 


Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir. 


Parker-Hill 
Reservoir. 


Brookline 
Reser'r. 


Mystic 
Eng. 
Ho. 




S 

a 


1 

'3 


p 
a 


i 

a 


a 

'a 


a 


£ 

3 
1 

(S 


a 

3 

a 

'3 


a 


1 


1 


January . 


46.0 


—4. 


22.5 


47. 


—6. 


21.7 


48 


—3. 


23.1 


36. 


35.1 


Februaiy . 


57. 


2. 


30.9 


56. 


5. 


31.6 


56 


0. 


32.1 


36. 


35. 


March . . 


58. 


0. 


32. 


55. 


—2. 


32. 


57 


2. 


32.8 


87. 


35.6 


April . . . 


66.5 


25. 


41.8 


67. 


25. 


43. 


66 


24. 


41.6 


43.5 


41.8 


May . . . 


85. 


33.5 


53.7 


83. 


35. 


55.3 


84 


33. 


55, 


65.1 


56.7 


June . , . 


93. 


37. 


65.2 


92. 


37. 


66.9 


94 


34. 


66,6 


65.9 


66.8 


July . . . 


88. 


50. 


67.9 


90. 


51. 


69.2 


90 


51. 


68.7 


72.1 


72.3 


August . . 


90. 


46. 


68.3 


93. 


51. 


70.1 


88 


48. 


67.9 


72. 


71.8 


September 


91. 


37. 


64.2 


92. 


37. 


65.8 


90 


39. 


65.7 


69.7 


69.1 


October . 


82. 


27.5 


50.8 


80. 


28. 


51.8 


80 


28. 


52.4 


59. 


68.3 


November 


62.6 


19. 


38.2 


63. 


19. 


39.2 


66 


20. 


40. 


44. 


44.9 


December 


57.5 


—13. 


30.6 


59. 


-9. 


31.1 


68 


—10. 


31.4 


37.5 


37.5 



REPORT OF THE WATER REGISTRAR 



SUDBUET AND COCfllTUATE DEPAETMENT, 



Office of the Water Eegistrar, 

City Hall, Boston, May 1, 1885. 

Hon. Wm. A. Simmons, Chairman of the Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — In compliance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance, the Water Registrar herewith submits his annual re- 
port for the year ending April 30, 1885 : — 



The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
present year is 56,361, — being an increase of 2,193 over the 
previous year. 

The total revenue from the sale of water 
during the financial year 1884-5 is . . $1,089,124 23 

Revenue from the sale of water furnished 
in previous years ...... 106,821 80 







$1,195,946 03 


The total receipts from all other sources are as follows : — 


Revenue for off and on water for non-payment 


$1,016 00 


" " off and on water for repairs 


2,645 45 


n ii service-pipes and repairs 


3,017 24 


'* " elevator and motor pipes 




3,983 60 


*< " old material 




6,583 12 


*< *« merchandise 




993 53 


'* *' summonses 




• 1,397 75 


'* " fines and penalties 




290 00 


*' *' sundries .... 




101 00 




$20,027 69 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



51 



The estimated income from the sale of water 



during the year 1885-6 is . 
From all other sources . 



$1,256,871 00 
21,500 00 



,278,371 00 



The expenditures of my department for the 
year 1884 have been ..... 

The items of this expenditure are as follows : — 

Salaries 

Labor in service division 

Printing 

Travelling expenses 

Postage, etc. 



$39,307 27 

$24,473 34 

12,176 42 

1,658 21 

711 92 

287 38 

$39,307 27 



The total number of meters now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 4,439. 

Of this number 1,332 are |-inch in size 2,325 |-inch, 614 
1-inch, 84 2-inch, 24 3-inch, 14 4-inch, and 1 6-inch in size. 
There are also 235 elevators and 69 motors, with indicators 
attached to register the quantity of water consumed. 

There are 53 drinking-fountains established within the city 
limits. Those marked * are arranged for continuous flow of 
water. The balance have automatic fixtures, operating the 
flow of water when required. 



City Proper. 
* Boston Common (6). 
North square. 

Washington street, opposite Blackstone square. 
Atlantic avenue, junction Commercial street. 

" " head of Rowe's wharf. 

Atlantic avenue, near N.Y. & N.E. R.E. freight-house. 
Hay market square. 
Causeway street, at Boston and Lowell R.E. depot. 

" " junction Merrimac street. 

Charles street, opposite the Jail. 

" " near Boylston street. 

Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Albany street, opposite water- works, pipe-yard. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the drawbridge. 



52 City Document No. 118. 

East Boston. 

Maverick square. 

Central square. 

Bennington street, junction Chelsea street. 

South Boston. 

Foundry street, opposite First street. 
Fourth street, near Foundry street. 

*' '< junction Emerson street. 

'* " corner Q street. 
Telegraph Hill. 
Sixth street, near P street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 

Itoxhury. 

Albany street, junction Dearborn street. 
* Eliot square. 

Eustis street, near Washington street. 
Heath street, near Tremont street. 
Pynchon street, near Roxbury street. 
Tremont street, junction Cabot street. 
Blue Hill ave., opposite Oakland Garden. 

West Roxbury. 

Centre street, junction Day and Perkins streets. 

Centre and LaGrange streets. West Roxbury village. 

Morton street, junction South street. 

Roslindale, Taft's hotel. 

Washington street, near Williams street. 

Dorchester. 
Commercial street, opposite Beach street. 
Neponset avenue, cor. Walnut street. 
Upham's Corner. 
Glover's Corner. 
Grove Hall. 

Brighton. 

Barry's Corner. 

Market street. Cattle-fair Hotel. 

Union square. 

Western avenue, Charles-river Hotel. 

Washington street. Oak square. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



53 



There are 23 stand-pipes now located for street-sprinkling 
purposes, as follows : — 

Tremont street and Hammond park. 

Clay street, corner Tremont street. 

Eliot square. 

Brookline avenue, corner Longwood avenue. 

St. James street, corner Warren street. 

Blue Hill avenue, between Waverley and Clifibrd streets. 

Warren street, corner Gaston street. 

Egleston square, corner Walnut ave. 

Upham's Corner. 

Field's Corner. 

Dorchester avenue, near Savin Hill avenue. 

Dorchester avenue, at Old Boston line. 

Beach street, Harrison square. 

Union square, Brighton. 

Washington street, corner Winship street, Brighton. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, corner of South street. 

Dudley street, opposite Howard avenue. 

Paris street, corner of Meridian street. 

Corner Munroe, Walnut avenue. 

Near Francis, Tremont street. 

Centre street, Jamaica Plain. 

Emerson street. Junction Third street. 

Beacon street, corner Brookline avenue. 

Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam- 
engines, etc., in the city of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1885, with the amount of water-rates 
received for 1884 : — 



35,396 Dwelling-houses (54, 


299 families) 


. $520,076 23 


2,232 Model-houses (8,725 


tenements) 


52,499 19 


17 Boarding-houses 


• . • 


925 00 


5 Lodging-houses 


, 






114 00 


12 Hotels . 


^ 






464 17 


283 Buildings . 


, 






12,873 14 


5,740 Stores, shops, and offices 






55,554 61 


395 Shops and engines 








7,272 49 


148 Restaurants 








1,253 97 


1,065 Saloons and bars 








15,380 98 


6 Club-houses 








380 13 


112 Laundries 








2,156 00 


134 Bakeries . 








2,527 50 


Amount carried forward, 




$671,477 41 



54 



City Document No. 118. 



Amount brought forward , 


$671,477 41 


2 Markets . 


371 00 


33 Cellars 


195 00 


2,017 Stables 


14,681 60 


153 Churches ...... 


2,524 94 


72 Greenhouses 


1,038 25 


21 Photographers . . . . . 


513 17 


34 Public halls and theatres . . 


580 67 


29 Private schools . . . . . 


580 00 


27 Asylums and hospitals 


1,480 00 


5 Armories . . . . . 


107 00 


17 Bottling-houses . . . . 


317 50 


1 Laboratory . . . . . 


50 00 


28 Eailroad stations . . . . 


374 42 


8 Freight-houses . . . . . 


133 50 


1 Stationary engine . . . . 


116 00 


35 Pile-driving and discharging engines . 


426 00 


3 Pumping-engines . . . . 


45 00 


1 Dry-dock and engine 


12 00 


2 Ship-yards . 


60 00 


4 Boat-houses . . . . . 


43 33 


2 Ice Cos. (washing ice) 


25 00 


2,279 Hand-hose .... 


11,395 00 


11 Fountains .... 


186 25 


15 Tumbler-washers 


230 00 


4 Binderies ..... 


80 33 


59 Beer water-pressures 


295 00 


6 Aquariums .... 


50 00 


7 Motors 


35 00 


1 Library ..... 


17 50 


4 Smoke-houses .... 


95 00 


2 Lobster-boilers .... 


16 00 


Steam and tug boats . 


6,436 87 


Steamer " Flanders " 


170 00 


"Protector" 


150 00 


'' " Samuel Little " 


100 00 


" " J. P. Bradlee » 


200 00 


Engine, Hose, and Hook and Ladde 




Cos 


1,090 00 


Fire hydrants, 4,180 


83,600 00 


Reservoirs, 129 


2,580 00 


Fire Department, Repair-shop . 


35 00 


Lamp Department . 


20 00 


School Department . 


1,205 00 


Sewer Department . 


256 00 


Amount carried forward. 


$803,394 74 



Report of the Water Board. 



55 



'mount hr ought forward. 


1803,394 74 


Health Department . 


917 50 


Paving Department . 


99 75 


Police Department . . . . 


110 00 


Surveyor's Department 


12 50 


Committee on Common and Squares 


390 00 


Committee on Bridges 


80 00 


Committee on Public Buildings . 


136 00 


Committee on Armories 


35 00 


Board of Health 


792 25 


Directors of Public Institutions . 


201 00 


Public and Branch Libraries 


236 00 


City Hospital (shop and stable) 


25 00 


Quincy Market (public urinals anc 


[ 


closets) . . . . . 


67 50 


Building purposes 


3,890 48 


Street sprinkling . . . . 


1,287 22 


Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co. . 


1,344 00 


Filling Gas-holder 


75 00 


Meteied water (9 months) 


282,671 95 


Miscellaneous .... 


35 78 




11,095,801 67 



56 



City Document No. 118. 



The following table exhibits the classes of premises to 
which meters are attached, the amount of water consumed, 
and the revenue received for the years 1883 and 1884. 



Class op Pebmises. 



Hotels 

Apartment Hotels . . . . • < 

Business premises . 

Bteam Railroads 

Sugar Refineries - 

Factories and Machinists 

Iron Works and Foundries 

Mills and Engines 

Marble and Stone Works , 

Gas Companies , 

Breweries 

Oil Works , 

Chemical Works , 

Laundries 

Restaurants , 

Stables 

Theatres and Halls , 

Hospitals , 

Schools 

City, State, and Government Buildings , 

Steamers and Shipping 

Slevators and Motors 

Electric Light Companies 

Miscellaneous , 



Totals . 



18S3. 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



27,593,573 

6,567,065 

52,614,059 

26,489,786 

23,386,000 

19,760,772 

8,380,042 

7,900,982 

2,561,763 

8,328,522 

8,969,227 

1,844,000 

3,386,531 

318,667 

3,914,041 

9,820,665 

706,000 

2,065,928 

1,891,075 

10,401,903 

4,963,444 

13,859,038 



1,776,174 



247,499,257 



Revenue 
received. 



$41,390 36 

9,850 60 

78,921 08 

39,734 68 

35,079 00 

29,641 15 

12,570 06 

11,851 47 

3,842 64 

12,492 78 

13,453 84 

2,766 00 

6,079 80 

478 00 

5,871 06 

14,731 00 

1,059 00 

3,098 89 

2,836 61 

15,602 85 

7,565 44 

20,788 56 



2,370 34 



$371,075 21 



1884. 



Quantity 

used. 
Cubic feet. 



19,446,104 

17,058,166 

51,641,069 

26,592,829 

29,522,760 

22,087,052 

5,489,472 

4,562,819 

2,493,423 

7,252,200 

9,061,887 

1,532,898 

2,128,750 

424,000 

3,401,990 

9,767,765 

1,390,000 

1,643,000 

1,656,006 

8,001,702 

7,537,190 

13,929,396 

2,662,000 

3,068,187 



252,350,665 



Revenue 
received. 



$29,169 13 

25,587 20 

77,461 53 

39,889 22 

44,284 14 

33,130 51 

8,234 19 

6,844 19 

3,740 18 

10,878 30 

13,592 82 

2,299 47 

3,193 12 

636 00 

5,102 98 

14,651 61 

2,085 00 

2,464 50 

2,484 01 

12,002 55 

11,428 30 

20,894 08 

3,993 00 

4,438 77 



$378,484 75 



Eeport of the Water Board. 57 

The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848: — 

Eeceived by Water Commissioners, as per Auditor's report, 
in 1848 



. 


. , 


, , 


$972 81 


1849, 


to January '. 


1,1850 . 


71,657 79 


1850, 


a 


1851 . 


99,025 45 


1851, 


i i 


1852 . 


161,052 85 


1852, 


i( 


1853 . 


179,567 39 


1853, 


a 


1854 . 


196,352 32 


1854, 


a 


1855 . 


217,007 51 


1855, 


(< 


1856 . 


266,302 77 


1856, 


(( 


1857 . 


282,651 84 


1857, 


(( 


1858 . 


289,328 83 


1858, 


a 


1859 . 


302,409 73 


1859, 


a 


1860 . 


314,808 97 


1860, 


n 


1861 . 


334,544 86 


1861, 


a 


1862 . 


365,323 96 


1862, 


(( 


1863 . 


373,922 33 


1863, 


i i 


1864 . 


394,506 25 


1864, 


(( 


1865 . 


430,710 76 


1865, 


(( 


1866 . 


450,341 48 


1866, 


( ( 


1867 . 


486,538 25 


1867, 


it 


1868 . 


522,130 93 


1868, 


a 


1869 . 


553,744 88 


1869, 


(( 


1870 . 


597,328 55 


1870, 


( ( 


1871 . 


708,783 68 


1871, 


(( 


1872 . 


774,445 70 


1872, 


(( 


1873 . 


862,704 08 


1873, 


(( 


1874 . 


917,415 92 


1874, 


(C 


1875 . 


977,020 48 


1875, 


(( 


1876 . 


1,005,120 94 


1876, 


(( 


1877 . 


1,029,643 70 


1877, 


i( 


1878 . 


1,015,562 89 


1878, 


a 


1879 . 


1,010,584 30 


1879, 


li 


1880 . 


1,025,803 14 


1880, 


ii 


1881 . 


1,039,896 17 


1881, 


(( 


1882 . 


1,087,528 49 


1882, 


(( 


1883 . 


1,127,982 32 


1883, 


<( 


1884 . 


1,167,704 17 


1884, 


a 


1885 . 


1,203,192 55 


1885, 


to May 1 , 


1885 . 


870,967 96 



58 



City Document No. 118. 



The following table exhibits the 
takers since January 1, 1850 : — 



yearly increase of water- 













Takers. 


Increase. 


From 


January 1 


, 1850, to 


January 1 


, 1851, 


13,463 




(( 




1851, 


(( 


1852, 


16,076 


2,613 


(< 




1852, 


(( 


1853, 


16,862 


786 


(( 




1853, 


(( 


1854, 


18,110 


1,308 


(( 




1854, 


<( 


1855, 


19,193 


1,023 


(( 




1855, 


(C 


1856, 


19,998 


805 


(C 




1856, 


(( 


1857, 


20,806 


808 


(( 




1857, 


(( 


1858, 


21,602 


796 


It 




1858, 


(( 


1859, 


22,414 


812 


(( 




1859, 


(( 


1860 


23,271 


857 


(( 




1860, 


(( 


1861, 


24,316 


1,045 


(( 




1861, 


(( 


1862, 


25,486 


1,170 


<( 




1862, 


(( 


1863 


26,289 


803 


(< 




1863, 


(( 


1864 


26,851 


562 


(( 




1864, 


(( 


1865 


27,046 


195 


(C 




1865, 


(( 


1866 


27,489 


443 


(( 




1866, 


(( 


1867 


27,754 


265 


(( 




1867, 


(( 


1868 


28,104 


350 


(( 




1868, 


(( 


1869 


29,738 


1,634 


(( 




1869, 


(( 


1870 


, 31,500 


1,762 


(( 




1870, 


(( 


1871 


, 36,132 


4,632 


(( 




1871, 


(( 


1872 


, 38,716 


2,584 


a 




1872, 


(( 


1873 


, 40,688 


1,972 


i( 




1873, 


l( 


1874 


, 42,345 


1,657 


a 




1874, 


i( 


1875 


, 44,676 


2,331 


a 




1875, 


(( 


1876 


, 46,885 


2,209 


a 




1876, 


(( 


1877 


, 48,328 


1,443 


n 




1877, 


(( 


1878 


, 49,970 


1,642 


a 




1878, 


(( 


1879 


, 51,523 


1,553 


i( 




1879, 


(C 


1880 


, 52,268 


745 


i( 




1880, 


(( 


1881 


, 53,254 


986 


it 




1881, 


a 


1882 


, 53,655 


401 


(I 




1882, 


(( 


1883 


, 52,817 




(< 




1883, 


(( 


1884 


, 54,168 


1,351 


(( 




1884, 


(( 


1885 


, 56,361 


2,193 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



59 



The Service Department, under the direction of the Water 



Registrar, is in 



charge 



of Mr. C. F. Doherty, to whom all 



applications are made for service-pipes, shutting off and let- 
ting on water, repairs in service-pipes, and remedying stop- 
pages in the water supply. 

Mr. Doherty fully meets the requirements of the depart- 
ment and the demands of the public, and has therefore proved 
himself a capable and faithful officer. 

The total number of applications received during the year 
is as follows : — 



For service-pipes .... 


. 1,343 


" repairs on pipes . 


. 1,987 


' ' off and on water for repairs . 


. 3,679 


" " " " non-payment . 


. 1,248 


" turning on water for first time 


. 1,338 


' ' off and on for waste . 


193 



60 



City Document No. 118. 



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a. 



EEPORT OF THE VATEE EEGISTEAE OF 
THE MYSTIC DEPAETMENT. 



Office of the Mystic Water Registrar, City Hall Building, 
Chaelestown District, Boston, May 1, 1885. 

Hon. "Wm. a. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report of this department for the year 
ending April 30, 1885, is herewith submitted : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1885, is 18,269, distributed as follows: Charlestown Dis- 
trict, 6,302; Somerville, 5,624; Chelsea, 5,161; Everett, 
1,182. 

The total revenue received from all sources during the 
financial year of 1884-5 is $271,454.42, in detail as folows : — 



Charlestown District Water 

rates 
Somerville Water-rates 
Chelsea " 

Everett " 

Labor and material furnished 
for additional work on ser 
vice-pipes, etc. . 

Sale of old material 

Off and on water for repairs 

Fees, summons 

Fines, non-payment 

Maintaining meters 

Fines, wasting water 

Sale of potatoes . 



Total . 



. $114,792 80 




77,012 85 




64,652 ^^ 




11,212 06 






$267,670 59 


d 


$2,449 58 




467 16 




294 00 




208 50 




208 00 




106 59 




34 00 




16 00 






3,783 83 




• 


$271,454 42 



62 



City Document No. 118. 



There has been paid the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, and 
town of Everett, as per contract, $37,622.32, as follows : — 
Somerville .... $19,594 81 
Chelsea .... 16,327 92 

Everett .... 1,699 59 

$37,622 32 



The expenses of the office during the year ending April 
30, 1885, including all charges for collection in Chelsea, 
Somerville, and Everett, were $7,888.70. 



Tahle showing the Number of Places turned off for Non-payment of Rates 
during the Year 2884, the Number turned on again, and the Number still 
remaining off. 



Charlestown Diatrict 

Chelsea • 

Somerville 

Everett 

Totals 



Number 
turned off. 



Number 
turned on. 



146 



Number 
remaining off. 



Stand-pipes for Street-Watering. 

The whole number in use in this department is 36, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



Charlestown District. 

Cambridge street, near Stickney & Poor's factory. 

" " Kailroad. 

Rutherford avenue, " City stables. 

«< ♦' Allen street. 

South Eden street, <' Main street. 

Prescott, " Harvard school building. 

Monument square, " Laurel street. 



Chelsea. 

Cary square, corner Forsyth street. 
Broadway, near Stockton street. 
«* *' Cary avenue. 



Report of the Water Boabd. 



63 



Washington street 



Summer street, 
Somerville avenue 



Broadway, 



Somerville avenue 
Spring street, 
Beacon street, 
Pinckney street. 
Pearl street. 
Highland avenue, 
Main street, 
Medford street. 



Somerville. 

, corner Boston street. 
" Myrtle street, 
near Union square. 
" Elm street. 
" Laurel street. 
, " Poplar street. 

" Cambridge line. 
" Merriam street. 
" Mossland street. 
" Franklin street, 
opposite Public park. 

near Clarendon avenue. 
, " 439 Somerville avenue, 
near Somerville avenue, 
" Cooney street. 
" Pearl street. 
" Cross street, 
corner Medford street, 
junction Broadway. 

near Sycamore street. 



Everett. 

Broadway, near Engine-house. 

" " Pleasant street. 

♦* " Chandler's. 

Main street, " Chelsea street. 
Chelsea " " Winter street. 
Ferry " " Nichols street. 



Drinking-Fohntains . 

The whole number in use in this department is 19, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



Charlestown District. 

Bunker Hill street, corner Tufts street. 
Canal street, <' South Eden street. 

Main street, " Hancock square. 

" near Tufts wharf. 

Austin street, opposite Front street. 



Automatic. 



64 



City Document No. 118. 



Chelsea. 
Broadway square. 

" near bridge. 
Winnisimmet street, near Ferry. 
Pearl street, corner Marginal street. 
Eastern avenue, corner Crescent avenue. 



Automatic. 



8omerville. 
Union square. 

Broadway, corner Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, corner Walnut street. 
Medford street, " Central street. 
Davis square. 

Broadway, opposite public park. 

Somerville avenue, junction Washington street. 



Automatic. 



Automatic. 



Everett. 
Main street, junction Broadway. 



Automatic. 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



65 



The following Table exhibits the Classes of Premises to which Meters are 
applied, the amount of Water consumed, and the Revenue received for the 
Tear 1884. 



Class of Premises. 



Steam Kailroads • . . 

Horse Railroads 

Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co, 
City and government buildings . . . . 

Schools 

Stables 

Factories 

Chemical works , . 

Foundries 

Breweries 

Gas companies 

Oil-works 

Mills and engines 

Hotels 

Model houses 

McLean Insane Asylum 

Slaughter-houses 

Business purposes 

Wharves 

Laundries 

Elevators and motors 

Bakeries 

Restaurants 

Miscellaneous , 

Tanneries 

Total 



Quantity used. 
Cubic feet. 


Revenue 
received. 


15,704,172 


$23,556 19 


936,199 


1,404 29 


1,415,420 


2,123 13 


3,038,112 


4,557 OT 


860,528 


1,290 69 


1,928,298 


2,892 21 


4,749,162 


7,123 50 


774,160 


1,161 23 


815,244 


1,222 83 


869,004 


1,303 49 


161,769 


242 63 


337,148 


605 71 


870,305 


1,305 44 


465,994 


698 98 


714,007 


1,070 93 


1,628,621 


2,442 90 


1,367,951 


2,051 91 


567,174 


850 74 


778,669 


1,167 94 


484,169 


726 21 


236,930 


355 37 


275,080 


412 59 


232,506 


348 71 


2,134,192 


3,201 21 


1,074,366 


1,611 49 


42,419,180 


$63,627 39 



The quantity used through meters in the different districts 
was as follows : — 

Cubic feet. Revenue. 

Charlestown .... 28,345,934 $42,518 15 

Somerville . . . . 7,180,866 10,770 99 

Chelsea 5,962,421 8,943 33 

Everett 929,959 1,394 92 



Total 



42,419,180 $(^3,627 39 



66 



City Document No. 118. 









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67 



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68 



City Document No. 118, 






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Report of the Water Board. 



69 



Statement showing the amount of water-rates received 
since the introduction of Mystic-pond water, November 29, 
1865 ; also the amount paid by the several districts supplied 



under existing contracts : 





'6 

< 


a !. 
-o o 


a 
s 

O 


Total 

amount 

received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 

to Mystic 

Water 

Works. 


Charlestown, 1865 


$27,045 10 




$27,055 10 










' 1866 


47,247 16 




47,247 16 










' 1867 


60,188 83 




60,188 83 










• 1868 


68,815 32 




68,815 32 










' 1869 


74,369 81 




74,369 81 










• 1870 


82,230 79 




82,230 79 










1871 


87,259 70 




87,259 70 








♦, 


* 1872 


97,727 36 




97,727 38 








1873 


99,455 66 




99,455 66 










• 1874 


111,420 30 




111,420 30 






, 




' 1875 


118,568 00 




118,568 00 










' 1876 


116,271 17 




116,271 17 










' 1877 


109,963 25 




109,963 25 










' 1878 


104,174 76 




104,174 76 










1879 


98,313 88 




98,313 88 










' 1880 


102,590 50 




102,590 50 










' 1881 


106,927 90 




106,927 90 










• 1882 


109,921 18 




109,921 18 










1883 


115,462 25 




115,462 25 










' 1884 


115,781 43 




115,781 43 










'May 1,1885 


77,205 93 




77,205 93 


$1,930,940 28 




$1,930,940 28 


East Boston, 1870 


$54,885 28 


$15,015 06 


$39,870 22 




1871 


63,371 71 


18,348 73 


45,022 98 








" 1872 


70,957 40 


21,383 02 


49,574 38 








" 1873 


77,480 79 


23,992 38 


53,488 41 








1874 


77,776 91 


24,122 83 


53,854 08 








" 1875 


70,256 26 


21,102 53 


49,153 73 








" 1876 


72,046 78 


21,818 74 


50,228 04 








" 1877 


66,637 43 


19,655 03 


46,982 40 








" 1878 


65,088 96 


16,535 63 


48,553 33 








" 1879 


56,165 94 


32,139 10 


24,026 84 








" 1880 


50,973 39 


10,889 36 


40,084 03 


725,640 85 


225,002 41 


500,638 44 




forward 








Amounts carried 


$2,656,58113 


$225,002 41 


$2,431,578 72 



70 



City Document No. 118. 





■73 

< 


II 


a 
o 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 
to Mystic 
Water- 
Works. 


Amounts brought 


forward 
$3,632 80 
19,548 14 






$2,656,58113 


$225,002 41 


$2,431,578 72 


Chelsea, 1868 

(6 mos.) 
" 1868-69 


$544 92 
2,932 22 


$3,087 88 
16,615 92 


" 1869-70 


26,474 26 


4,294 85 


22,179 41 








1870-71 


31,161 56 


5,290 39 


25,871 17 








1871-72 


38,714 16 


7,178 54 


31,535 62 








" 1872-73 


42,239 60 


8,171 85 


34,067 65 








1873-74 


45,169 46 


9,050 85 


36,118 61 








'• 1874-75 


50,644 51 


10,757 90 


39,886 61 








" 1875-76 


50,934 20 


10,873 66 


40,060 54 








" 1876-77 


49,893 35 


10,468 02 


39,425 33 








1877-78 


49,496 59 


10,348 99 


39,147 60 






• 


1878-79 


50,368 45 


10,647 79 


39,720 66 








'" 1879-80 


51,735 24 


11,214 09 


40,571 15 








" 1880-81 


54,990 65 


12,496 26 


42,494 39 








1881-82 


57,535 56 


13,514 23 


44,021 33 








" 1882-83 


61,510 34 


15,104 14 


46,406 20 








" 1883-84 


63,263 53 


15,805 42 


47,458 11 








" May 1, 1885 


61,956 09 


15,282 44 


46,673 65 


809,318 39 


173,976 56 


635,341 83 


Some 


rville, 1869 

(6 mos.) 

' 1870 


$6,572 62 
13,189 89 


$985 89 
1,978 49 


$5,586 73 
11,211 40 




1871 


20,029 68 


3,005 94 


17,023 74 










1872 


25,275 13 


4,055 02 


21,220 11 










• 1873 


30,930 81 


5,232 70 


25,698 11 










• 1874 


37,325 96 


6,831 48 


30,494 48 










• 1875 


47,912 43 


9,873 73 


38,038 70 










• 1876 


49,743 55 


10,423 OS 


39,320 47 










• 1877 


49,873 19 


10,461 97 


39,411 22 










' 1878 


53,581 31 


11,932 52 


41,648 79 










• 1879 


54,329 13 


12,231 65 


42,097 48 










' 1880 


56,988 65 


13,295 45 


43,693 20 










' 1881 


65,394 32 


16,657 73 


48,736 59 










• 1882 


69,656 63 


18,362 65 


51,293 98 










' 1883 


73,872 23 


20,048 89 


53,823 34 










' 1884 


73,120 00 


19,748 00 


53,372 00 










' May 1, 1885 


64,411 00 


16,264 40 


48,146 60 
















792,206 53 
$4,258,10605 


181,389 59 


610,816 94 




forward 






Amounts carried 


$580,368 56 


$3,677,737 49 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



71 





S 
o u 


S3- 

•a o 
'3 


a 
o 

i 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 
to Mystic 
Water- 
Works. 


Amounts brougl t 
Everett, 1872-73 
" 1873-74 
" 1874-75 
" 1875-76 
*• 1876-77 
" 1877-78 

1878-79 
« 1879-80 

1880-81 
" 1881-82 
" 1882-83 
" 1883-84 
" May 1,1885 


forward 

$3,603 34 

4,365 84 

4,677 58 

5,861 80 

6,548 38 

7,401 99 

7,429 06 

7,642 05 

8,329 87 

8,868 48 

9,946 46 

10,078 54 

10,812 32 


$540 51 

654 88 

701 63 

879 28 

982 26 

1,110 29 

1,114 36 

1,146 33 

1,249 47 

1,330 29 

1,491 98 

1,511 79 

1,621 85 


$3,062 83 
3,710 96 
3,975 95 
4,982 52 
5,566 12 
6,291 70 
6,314 70 
6,495 72 
7,080 40 
7,538 19 
8,454 48 
8,566 75 
9,190 47 


$4,258,106 05 
95,565 71 


$580,368 56 
14,334 92 


$3,677,737 49 
81,230 79 


Total to May 1, '85 








$4,353,671 76 


$594,703 48 


$3,758,968 28 









Respectfully, 

JOSEPH H. CALDWELL, 

Mystic Wafer Registrar. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, May 1, 1885. 
Hon. W. A. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with a rule of the Board I submit 
herewith my annual report for the year May 1, 1884, to May 
1, 1885. 

SUDBURY-RIVER BaSINS. 

All of the basins at the present time are full, and water is 
wasting over the dams. The quality of the water has, as a 
rule, been better during the past year than usual. Although 
algm have appeared in Basin 3, less trouble has been experi- 
enced from their presence than ever before. Very little water 
has been drawn for the use of the city from Basin 1 . 

Until early in 1885 Basin 2 supplied the bulk of the water 
used from the Sudbury system. No algoe have appeared at 
this point. Considerable additional work in the way of rip- 
rapping around the margin of Basin 2 has been accom- 
plished. These are the principal facts in regard to the Sud- 
bury supply. A more detailed account will be found under 
each basin. 

Basin 1 . 

On May 1, 1884, water in this basin stood at elevation 
158.00 above tide marsh, with water wasting over the crest 
of the dam. On June 2, a double set of flash-boards was 
put on the overflow. On July 19, waste ceased, but on Au- 
gust 1 waste was resumed. 

With the exception of a few days, water was running over 
the flash-boards until September 2. On December 18, the 
flash-boards were removed, at which time the water stood at 
elevation 157.00. On December 22 water was wastino: over 
the stone crest, and so continued until April 25, 1885, when 
both sets of flash-boards were put on the dam, owing to the 
dryness of the season. 

The highest point reached by the water during the year 
was 159.60, on April 30. The lowest elevation was 156.04, 



Eeport of the Water Board. 73 

on June 6. Not less than 1,500,000 gallons daily have been 
allowed to pass into the river from this basin during the 
whole year, in accordance with the law. Algce were noticed 
from June 4, until December 27. 

The usual amount of care has been given to the mainten- 
ance of the works in connection with the dam. There is 
one point which will require considerable work at the earliest 
moment. The 48-in. main laid in the bottom of the basin 
has shown signs of leaking in many places. Once it has 
given away entirely, and it is probable that there are many 
bad joints, which will require re-leading when the water can 
be drawn otf without risk to the city's supply. 

Basin 2. 

On May 1, 1884, this basin stood at grade 166.18, and 
water was wasting over the dam. On June 4 a double set 
of stop-planks was put in place. On June 8 water was flow- 
ing over the stop-planks and continued to waste, wdth the 
exception of a few days, until July 8, when it ceased, and 
the surface gradually fell until October 14, at which time it 
was at elevation 150.90. Water was drawn from this source 
for the supply of the city from June 18 to June 24, from 
June 26 to February 11, 1885. On account of some work 
which was in progress in the bottom of Basin 2 the water 
was kept at about 149 until late in the autumn. During the 
greater part of this time the water was confined to the old 
channel of the river. During the early part of the winter, 
on "account of numerous rains, the surface rose rapidly, and 
water was wasting over the stone crest on December 23. 
This flow continued until April 25, when flash-boards were 
placed on the dam, and the surface of the basin carried up to 
ordinary high-water mark. The highest point reached dur- 
ing the year was 167.47, on April 30 ; the lowest, 148.75, on 
November 17. During the first part of May, 1884, the color 
of the water was very clear, the taste good, and very little 
matter in suspension. In October and November the water 
was not of so good a quality. It had more color and taste. 
Early in February, owing to the dark color, the supply was 
taken from other sources. No algm have appeared in Basin 
2 during the year. The road to the dam was gravelled, and 
the banks sodded last summer. During the winter a sub- 
stantial stone wall was built on the border of the city prop- 
erty on Union street. For three months a small force was 
employed completing odd jobs about the margin of the basin 
in connection with the work on shallow flowage ordered by 
the Board. The work consisted generally in trimming the 



74 City Document No. 118. 

borders of the original slopes, filling up considerable areas 
to high-water line, distributing loam, sowing grass-seed, etc. 
At one time 40 men, 9 double and 4 single teams, were 
employed on this work. All of the riprap left uncom- 
pleted between Fountain-street bridge and the wooden dam 
was completed to grade. Around Nevin's point, and facing 
Dam 2, where the basin is exposed to a long reach of wind 
and waves, about 2,200 square yards of riprap were placed. 
The gate-house, dam and other structures connected with 
this basin are in excellent order, and require no immediate 
repairs. 

Basin 3. 

On May 1, 1884, the water in this basin stood at grade 
175.58, and water was flowing over the crest of the dam. 
On July 16 waste ceased, and the basin was kept at about 
175.00 until September, when the surface gradually lowered 
to 174.44, on October 14. On this date a portion of the 
supply for the city was taken from this source, Basin 2 hav- 
ing been exhausted. By the last of October something like 
2 feet of water had been drawn oflf. On November 8 the 
gates were opened again for the supply of the city, and 
on November 29 the surface had fallen to 171.62. When 
the gates were shut the surface rose rapidly, and on Decem- 
ber 19 water commenced to flow over the dam and has con- 
tinued to do so ever since, with the exception of about a week's 
time. The highest point reached by the water was 175.89, on 
December 23, and the lowest, 171.36, on November 23. The 
quality of the water in Basin 3 has been somewhat better 
than usual. On June 4 algoe made their appearance and re- 
mained until the last of December. During the hottest 
weather, when the algce was thickest, the surface had a pecu- 
liar taste, and in its later stages, when the algcE had lost its 
green tint, and was almost white, they seemed to give the 
water a musty taste. Very little work has been done during 
the year on Basin 3. The gate-house and dam are in excel- 
lent order. 

Farm Pond. 

On account of the building of the Farm-pond aqueduct 
the surface of the water has been kept at a low level dur- 
ing a good part of the year. On May 1, the water was at 
elevation 149.27, but was soon lowered, and kept at about 
148.75 until June 27, when, in order to store some of the 
water wasting in the river, it was raised to high-water mark, 
and kept there until July 13. The pond was then lowered 



Eeport of the Water Board. 75 

to 146.50 until the middle of December. It was then raised 
a little and kept at about 147.00 until March 28, when it was 
gradually lowered to about 145.00 where it has been kept to 
date. The highest point reached during the year was 149.39, 
on July 5 ; the lowest, 144.98, on August 3. Algce appeared 
in the waters of Farm pond on June 3, but disappeared in a 
few days after the water from Basin 1 was shut off. 

On Aug. 8 algce reappeared, and remained until the last 
of November. 

The quality of water in Farm pond has not been very 
good during most of the year, owing to the construction of 
the embankment for the new aqueduct which has made the 
water somewhat roily. 

Lake Cochituate. 

The quality of the water in Lake Cochituate has been ex- 
cellent throughout the year. Persistent efforts have been 
maintained by your Board to abolish the evil from which the 
city has suffered for so many years, in the shape of sewage 
discharged into the brooks feeding the lake. At last these 
efforts have been crowned with success. In February a 
decision favorable to the city was rendered by the Supreme 
Judicial Court. 

My first report on the matter of sewage pollution, as affect- 
ing the waters of the lake, was made in 1879. Since that 
date several cases have been tried before different courts, 
but the city has always been beaten. We are now in a posi- 
tion to maintain the purity of Began and other brooks enter- 
ing the lake, and, under directions from your Board, I am at 
present engaged in the work of causing all the drainage, of 
whatever description, whether from water-closets or sinks, to 
be removed. Notices to polluters have also been served ou 
the Sudbury-river system. 

The following is the decision of the Supreme Court : — 



76 City Document No. 118. 

Decision or the Supreme Judicial Court in the Case 

or Augustus P. Martin, Mayor of Boston, 

vs. 

Luther Ellis Gleason. 



PRELIMINARY STATEMENT. 

(from CITT OF boston's BRIEF.) 

In 1846 the Legislature, by an act entitled "An act for 
supplying the City of Boston with pure water," authorized 
the City of Boston " to take, hold, and convey to, into and 
through said city the water of Long pond, so called ('now 
Lake Cochituate), in the towns of Natick, Wayland, and 
Framingham, and the waters which may flow into and from 
the same, and any other ponds and streams within the dis- 
tance of four miles from said Long pond, and any water- 
rights connected therewith." Acts of 1846, Ch. 167, § 1. 

Pursuant to this authority, and in part execution thereof, 
the city, in August, 1846, took certain water and water- 
rights, described as, " all the waters of Long pond, so called, 
and other brooks and streams, whether permanent or tempo- 
rary, entering into the same, and of all the bays, coves, and 
inlets thereof, and of the outlet of the same, and all the 
water-rights thereunto belonging, or in any wise apper- 
taining." 

August 19, 1846, the city filed in the office of the registry 
of deeds for the county of Middlesex, the foregoing descrip- 
tion of the taking, and a statement of the purpose for which 
taken, as required by said act of the Legislature (see copy, 
page 4 of the report) ; and, as soon as the necessary works 
could be constructed, proceeded actually to use, and has ever 
since used, said waters for the supply of its inhabitants. 
Pegan brook is, and has always been, one of the streams 
entering into Long pond. (Eeport, page 1.) 

The defendant is the proprietor of a hotel in Natick, and 
all the human excrement discharged from the water-closets, 
and all the sewage of his hotel are discharged directly into 
said brook in sufficient quantity to contaminate its waters. 
(Keport, page 1.) 

The City of Boston, by petition of its Mayor (St. 1884, 
c. 154), prays for an injunction to restrain the defendant 
from polluting this water-supply. 



Report of the Water Board. 77 

DECISION OF THE SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT. 

Martin vs. Gleason. 

C. Allen, J. Disregarding punctuation, as may prop- 
erly be done in construing a statute (Gushing vs. Worrick, 
9 Gray, 385), and looking at the purpose and contemplated 
scope of Stat. 1846, c. 167, the City of Boston was author- 
ized by Section 1 of that statute to take the water of Long 
pond, and the waters whicli may flow into and from the 
same, and any other ponds and streams within the distance 
of four miles from said Long pond, and any water-rights 
connected therewith, so far as may be necessary for the pres- 
ervation and purity of the same, for the purpose of furnish- 
ing a supply of pure water for the said City of Boston. This 
declared purpose relates back, and illustrates the extent of 
the authority conferred. Water-rights may be taken so far 
as ma}'^ be necessary for the preservation and purity of the 
water. The words "and any water-rights connected there- 
with " are not limited to the immediate antecedent, namely, 
the "other ponds and streams" there referred to, but they 
also include Long pond itself, and the waters which may 
flow into and from the same. It was designed to give a broad 
and comprehensive authority, for the purpose of furnishing a 
supply of pure water for the city, and to confer the power to 
take everything included within the meaning of the antece- 
dent words, so far as might be necessary for the preservation 
and purity of the water. Section 15, imposing a penalty for 
wantonly or maliciously diverting the water, or any part 
thereof, of any of the ponds, streams or water-sources which 
shall be taken by the city, or corrupting the same, or render- 
ing it impure, confirms this view. Under this authority, the 
city might lawfully take any water-rights connected with the 
waters flowing into Long pond, including the prescriptive 
rights which the plaintiff contends that he then had to dis- 
charge seAvage into Began brook. It appears that this brook 
is and always has been a feeder of Long pond; and that the 
whole of it is within four miles of the pond. A prescriptive 
right to foul the waters of a stream is included under the 
term "water-rights." This, indeed, is asserted by the de- 
fendant in his answer. It is a right in respect to the water 
of the stream ; and the statute conferred power to take all 
water-rights which might interfere with the purity of the 
waters taken. It is contended for the defendant that, if it 
was necessary to preserve the brook or the purit}^ of the 
water, power was granted to the city to take the land on each 



78 City Document No. 118. 

side of the brook, and thus cut off any use either of it or of 
its waters ; and, indeed, that the water-rights could not be 
taken separately from the h\nd. But it does not appear to 
us to be necessary, even if it was competent, for the city 
to take the land on the sides of tlie brook in order to ex- 
tinguish any prescriptive right to foul the water of it. 

Assuming that the defendant had such prescriptive right, 
it is further contended that the city did not take it; but that 
the taking of the waters of the brooks and streams entering 
into Long pond only appropriated the water as it flowed into 
the pond at the time of the taking, and subject to all legal 
burdens and uses then existing. This, however, is too nar- 
row a construction of the description of what was taken. 
The city, after reciting the whole of the first section of the 
statutes, took all the waters of Long pond, "and other 
brooks and streams, whether permanent or temporary, 
entering into the same," " and all the water-rights thereunto 
belonging or in any wise appertaining, for the sole use and 
benefit of said city." This language does not exactly follow 
the language of the statute ; but we cannot doubt that it 
is broad enough to include Pegan brook, and the taking of 
" all tlae water-rights thereunto belonging or in any wise 
appertaining," includes any right then existing to foul its 
waters. It is urged, by way of illustration, that, if a mill 
existed on the brook, the right to use the mill was not taken. 
But it is not necessary to consider that question here. It 
does not appear that there was any mill on the brook. If 
there was, the use of the water for turning its wheels might 
not foul the water, and might therefore be consistent with 
the purposes and rights of the city. But the right to use 
the brook as a discharge for sewage in large quantities, as 
practised by the defendant, is inconsistent with such pur- 
pose. If, therefore, the defendant had any such prescriptive 
right to foul the water of Pegan brook, as he claimed, such 
right was taken and extinguished by the act of the city 
under the Statute of 1846 ; and by Section 6 of that act 
the city was liable to pay all damages sustained thereby. 
The defendant, if he sustained damage, might have applied 
by petition for the assessment thereof at any time within 
three years from such taking. This remedy was the exclu- 
sive one. 

It was not seriously contended in the argument that the 
defendant has acquired a prescriptive right to foul the waters 
since the taking by the city in 1846. Such prescriptive 
right could not be acquired, because the fouling of the 
water, since the right to foul it ceased, would be a public 
nuisance. Morton vs. Moore, 15 Gray, 576. Brookline vs. 
Mackintosh, 133 Mass., 125, 226. 



Report of the Water Board. 79 

Finally, it was contended for the defendant that, by reason 
of constructions erected by the city at the mouth of the 
brook, since the taking in 1846, the waters of Pegan brook 
do not, in fact, contaminate the water of the pond ; and that, 
therefore, the city is not injured. It appears, however, as a 
fact, that the water of the brook is contaminated by the acts 
of the defendant. The city has a right to be protected 
against the necessity of maintaining works for the preserva- 
tion of the purity of the water from such a cause. If the 
acts of the defendant in fouling the stream have made it 
necessary for the city to resort to extraordinary means for 
preserving the purity of the water of the pond, he cannot 
justify the continuance of such illegal fouling by showing 
that the city has thus far been able, by the maintenance of 
special works, to prevent the natural result of his acts. 

The result is that the petition for an injunction is main- 
tained. 

Injunction to issue. 



On May 1, 1884, the surface of Lake Cochituate stood 
at elevation 134.30, and on the 16th at 134.36, exactly high- 
water mark. It was maintained at this height until May 29, 
when the surface began to fall. Between June 18 and July 1 
a flow" of 168,000,000 gallons was poured into the lake from 
Sudbury river, and at difierent times in July 152,000,000 
gallons more, which maintained the surface very nearly at 
high-water mark until quite late in the season. The lowest 
point reached during the year was 129.90, on December 6. 
On February 12, the water having risen as high as was 
considered safe, the stop-planks were taken out at the dam, 
and about 6 inches allowed to flow over the crest. This 
continued during the remainder of the month. On March 
22 the water was stopped and the lake was filled. The 
surface is now at high-water mark. 

The ice all disappeared from the lake on April 12. 

The engines, boilers, and pumps used last year, are still in 
position at the gate-house, but I should recommend their 
removal to a more secure situation. 

During the past year the old rotten stable, in connection 
with the keeper's house, has been pulled down, and a sub- 
stantial stable built in a better location. 

The attention of the Board is called to the importance of 
providing, at some convenient time, for the building of a new 
dam at the outlet of Lake Cochituate. A few years since, 
at the request of the City Engineer, I made a study of the 



80 City Document No. 118. 

present structures, their capacities under different circum- 
stances, and the portfolio of accompanying plans was filed 
with the City Engineer. 

During the past year, samples of the lake water have been 
analyzed every three months by Professor E. S. Wood. 

Dudley Pond. 

This pond is now full. No water was drawn from this 
source during the year. 

SUDBUKY-RIVER AqUEDUOT. 

This aqueduct has been in daily service during the entire 
year, with the exception of a few days when undergoing 
cleaning. It has brought to the city a total of over 
5,000,000,000 of gallons, or an average of 13,894,000 
o-allons daily. The greatest amount in any one day was 
31,900,000 gallons, on December 29, and the smallest 
7,100,000 gallons, on May 1, 1884. 

On December 15, 16, and 17, the whole of the interior was 
cleaned from Farm pond to Chestnut-Hill reservoir. The 
brick-work has never appeared so dirty before. Large 
quantities of black patches with thick muddy deposits were 
removed. Spots of spongiUa were found at occasional 
intervals. At station 124-]- 50, some bricks had started on 
the bottom from the pressure of a spring. The practice of 
applying loam to the embankment, in some places a foot in 
thickness, has been continued. Without this treatment it is 
impossible to maintain some of the embankments. All of 
the loam from the location of the new Circuit R.R. has been 
removed. The arch of the aqueduct has also been strength- 
ened at the crossing of the tracks by an additional ring of 
bricks. 

The waste-weir houses have been kept in good repair. 

Between July 11 and September 18 the following por- 
tions of the Charles-river bridge were pointed in a thorough 
manner. All of the brick-work, the two projecting belt 
courses, the joints under the belts, the ring of the large arch, 
the platforms, abutments and steps at each end of the bridge. 
The total cost of this work was $584. It was found that 
the cement-mortar was lacking in some of the joints from 
1 inch to 7 inches in depth. This admitted water to the 
interior and was damaging the masonry. As a general rule, 
oil cement, with l part fine sand, was liberally used in all, 
except vertical joints. The Waban arches need the same 
treatment, and will be taken in hand during the coming 
season . 



Eeport of the Water Board. 81 



The Cochituate Aqueduct. 

On May 1, 1884, a height of six feet of water was kept 
in this structure, and so maintained until June 10. On this 
day the head was reduced to 126.00 or five feet above the 
invert, which height was unchanged during the remainder 
of the year. Between December 29 and January 4 the 
water was drawn off for cleaning. For a distance of nearly 
a quarter of a mile or from Sta."l93 + 02 to Sta. 204 -|- 60 a 
considerable amount of offensive sewage weeps throuo^h the 
Brookline tunnel and of course finds its way immediately 
into the water. This sewage comes from the leaky cesspools 
of the residents in the vicinity and is a nuisance which should 
be remedied without delay. 

The upper six miles of the aqueduct were entirely cleared 
of spongilla on January 1 and 2, by a special gang of men 
after the regular cleaning had been accomplished. This sub- 
stance clings so closely to the brick-work that it is found 
more economical to remove it in this manner. 

Preparations for the crossing of the Circuit R.E. have been 
made, and work on the strengthening of the arch at this point 
will be begun in a few days. 

During the past year the town of Wellesley has put in a 
system of water- works, and their pipes have crossed the 
aqueduct in at least a dozen places. This has required the 
greatest watchfulness to see that no damage was done to the 
Boston works. The force main of their supply is located 
under the Newton Lower Falls arch, and is at a level with the 
bottom of the foundation of that structure. A break at this 
point might endanger the Cochituate aqueduct. 

The whole line has been kept clear of bushes by the usual 
annual mowing. 

No repairs of any importance have been made on the in- 
terior during the year. 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

This reservoir has been in constant use during the year. 
The water has been good in quality. Very little work has 
been done on the drive-ways on account of the crusher being 
in use at Basin 4. Considerable work will have to be done 
on these roads when the crusher can be spared for this pur- 
pose. 

The usual meteorological and other observations have been 
made. 

All of the gate-houses and other structures are in a state 
of good repair. 



82 



City Document No. 118. 



A table of rainfall, showing the time of beginning and 
ending of each storm is appended. 

Brookline Eeservoir. 

The grounds and structures connected with this reservoir 
are in good order. 

No new work has been done at this point during the year. 
Very respectfully, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

SwperintendeMt. 



Tahle of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir for year ending Dec. 31, 1884. 



1 


a 
t-i 


d 

OQ o 


Duration. 









Duration. 


Jan. 
« 


1 

2 


.13 

1.28 


Rain& 
Snow 


5.15 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
12.15 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


Feb. 12 

« 13 


1- 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


4.30 a.m. 

to 
4.15 p.m. 


« 


8 
9 


i 1,80 


« 


8.30 p.m. 

to 
8.40 a.m. 


" 17 
" 18 


!■" 


Rain 


2.45 p.m. 

to 
11.00 p.m. 


„ 


11 
12 


.03 

.02 


Rain 

Sqow 


1.10 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. 
1.10 p.m. to 10.15 p.m. 


" 19 

" 20 


i .62 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


9.30 p.m. 

to 
2.30 p.m. 


" 


13 
19 

20 


.03 

1 .28 


" 


7.45 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 

3,30 a.m, 

to 
7.30 p.m. 


" 23 
" 25 


1.37 


Snow 
and 
Raia 


6.00 a.m. 

to 
9.30 p.m. 

9.40 p.m. 


« 


24 


.84 


Rain 


9,30 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. 


" 26 


1 1.05 


Snow 


to 


« 


SO 
31 


!•« 


" 


7.45 p.m. 

to 
12.30 a.m. 


" 27 
" 28 


1.17 


" 


11.45 a.m. 

6.00 a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


Total . 


4.84 






Total . 


6.38 






F«b. 


1 

4 

5 


.07 
.19 

.34 


Rain 

Snow 

Snow 
and 
Rain 


3.30 a.m. to 8.00 a.m. 

4.00 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 

12.30 a.m. 

to 
3.30 p.m. 






March 5 
" 6 
« 7 


i- 


Snow 
Rain 


7.00 p.m. 

to 
6.30 a.m. 

11.00 a.m. 


c< 


6 

7 


!■" 


Rain 


7,15 p.m. 

to 
9,30 a.m. 


'♦ 8 
«' 9 


il.l7 

1 

J 


and 
Snow 


to 
5.30 a.m. 


" 


8 


.06 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


3.00 a.m. 

to 
9.30 p.m. 


" 9 

" 10 


i- 


Rain 

and 

Snow 


3.15 p.m. 

to 
8.15 a.m. 


" 


9 


.05 


Rain 


11.40 a.m. to 3.80 p.m. 


" 11 


.03 


Rain 


9.30 p.m. to 11.15 p.m. 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



83 



Table of Rainfall of Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 





S 


.5 






i 


a 




1 


0) 
M 


QQ O 


Duration. 


la 
P 


-1 
a 


O W 

m o 


Duration. 


Mar. 14 


j.24 


Rain 
acd 


7.15 p.m. 
to 


May 7 






4.40 p.m. 


'< 15 


) 


Snow 


1.30 p.m. 


8 


r •^'^ 


Rain 


to 


" 19 




Snow 


3.30 p.m. 


" 9 






2.00 a.m. 


" 20 


1.14 


and 
Rain 


to 
6.30 p.m. 


" 10 


.03 


Show- 
er 


11.50 a.m. to 12.10 p.m. 


" 23 


1 .22 


Rain 


7.30 p.m. 
to 


" 10 


.01 


" 


4.30 to 6.00 p.m. 


" 24 


) 




4.00 a.m. 


" 14 


.61 


Rain 


12.05 to 10.15 a.m. 


" 26 


{ .83 


Rain 


1.15 p.m. 
to 


•• 15 


.08 


" 


5.35 to 6.45 p.m. 


" 27 


) 




5.30 a.m. 


" 20 


.73 


" 


1.35 to 5.45 p.m. 


" 27 


.02 


Show, 
ers. 


1.15 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


" 24 


.02 


Show- 
er 


6.00 to 6.16 a.m. 


" 30 
'< 30 


.03 
.01 


Snow 


1.00 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 
5.45 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


" 28 


.83 


Rain 


7.40 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. 




Total . 


2.89 






Total . 


4.23 
























June 12 


j .31 


Show- 


12.15 p.m. 
to 










April 2 




Snow 


12.30 p.m. 


'« 13 


) 


ers 


2.30 a.m. 


" 3 


/■1.54 

J 


and 


to 
1.30 p.m. 


" 19 


1.66 


Rain 


2.05 to 6.05 p.m. 


" 4 


Rain 




«' 25 


) 




12.15 p.m. 












\ 2.76 


" 


to 


<< 9 


) 


Rain 


1.30 p.m. 


" 26 


) 




6.45 a.m. 


" 10 


.78 


and 
Snow 


to 










) 


7.15 p.m. 










" 15 


.86 


Rain 


1.45 p.m, 

to 
5.00 a.m. 


Total , 


4.73 






'< 16 


















July 4 


) 




9.10 p.m. 


" 16 


.06 


" 


6.05 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


" 5 


1 1.13 


Rain 


to 
7.40 a.m. 


.< 17 


.10 


Sho(v. 


7.20 p.m. 
to 


" 5 


) 




10.20 p.m. 


" 18 




ers. 


1.15 p.m. 


" 6 


1 .26 


'* 


to 
6.00 a.m. 


«• 18 


) 




9.00 p.m. 












.13 


<( 


to 


" 8 


.81 


" 


10.45 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 


" 19 


) 




7.15 a.m. 


9 


.03 


« 


5.40 p.m. to 6.05 p.m. 


" 20 


) 




2.00 p.m. 












( .13 


Rain 


to 


" 12 


) 


Show- 
ers' 




«« 21 


) 




7.00 a.m. 


" 13 


1 .24 


8.40 p.m. to 4.20 p.m. 


" 24 


.06 


<< 


4.30p.m. to 6.30 p.m. 






Show- 
ers 




" 25 


) 




1 p.m. 


" 14 


,02 


5.00 p.m. to 5.10 p.m. 




\ .80 


<< 


to 


" 16 


.05 


" 


6.25 p.m. to 7.10 p.m. 


" 26 


S 




10.45 a.m. 






Show- 
ers 

Show- 
er 












" 18 
" 19 
" 23 


1.27 
.02 
.02 


2.15 p.m. to 9.20 p.m. 


Total . 


4.46 






10.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. 






Show- 
ers 




7.35 p.m. to 9.15 p.m. 


May 5 


.04 


7.35 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


" 25 


.04 


Show- 


5.00 a.m. to 7.45 a.m. 


" 6 


.07 


Rain 


5.45 to 11 p.m. 






ers 





84 



City Document No. 118. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut' Hill Reservoir. — Concluded. 



1 




■g 

h- 1 


a s. 
02 o 


Duration. 


1 


o 

a 


te'S 
tfc o 


Duration. 


July 


27 
28 


.30 


Rain 


5.30 p.m. 

to 
2.30 a.m. 


Oct. 


8 
12 


.08 
.18 


Rain 


6.15 to 11.30 p.m. 
12.15 to 10.00 p.m. 


" 


29 
30 
31 


.95 
.33 


" 


6.10 a.m. 

to 
10. a.m. 

4.45 p.m. to 9.15 p.m. 




18 
22 
23 
28 


.15 

|.,e 

.07 


" 


4'.45 to 7.00 p.m. 

8.20 p.m. 

to 
5 a.m. 

9.30 a.m. to 4.15 p.m. 














** 


Total 




5.47 




; 


Nov. 


30 
31 
1 


1 

^1.71 

1 
J 


Rain 
and 

Snow 


5.00 a.m. 


Aug. 


5 
5 
6 


.08 
1 1.06 


Rain 


4.45 to 11.55 a.m. 

9.10 p.m. 

to 
2.00 a.m. 


to 
5.00 a.m. 


'■ 


Tota 


. 


3.41 






,1 


6 

7 
8 


.10 
1 2.14 


" 


2.40 to 3.20 p.m. 

11.15 a.m. 

to 
12.10 a.m. 












ij 


Nov. 


5 
19 


.30 
.49 


Rain 
Snow 


12.05 to 1.30 a.m. 
4.40 to 11.50 p.m. 


„ 


12 
13 


1 

■ .24 

.30 
.23 


„ 


11.30 p.m. 
to 




23 

24 


1 .99 


Rain 


12.20 p.m. 

to 
5.00 a.m. 




14 
22 
26 


" 


3.00 a.m. 

7.15 to 9.15 p.m. 

4.40 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 




28 
29 


1 1.24 


" 


1.30 p.m. 

to 
9.45 a.m. 


" 












■' 


29 
30 
31 


1 .63 

.06 


" 


9.10 a.m. 

to 
5.40 a.m. 

2.00 to 2.20 p.m. 


Total 




3.02 






" 


Dec. 


6 

7 

11 


[ 1.45 
.16 


Rain 

Snow 


3.45 p.m. 

to 
3.30 p.m. 


Tota 




4.78 






5.00 a.m. to 11.45 p.m. 














12 
13 


.05 
.09 


« 


8.00 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 


Sept. 


11 


.12 


Rain 


5.00 to 7.15 p.m. 


6.45 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


" 


20 


.06 


" 


3.30 to 4.45 p.m. 




15 


.85 


Rain 


2.00 to 9.40 a.m. 


" 


25 


.10 


Show- 
ere. 


2.45 to 4.30 p.m. 




17 


.22 


Snow 


6.00 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


" 


28 


.14 


Rain 


1.00 to 3.30 a.m. 




21 


\ 1.42 


Snow 
and 
Rain 

Show- 
ers 

Snow 


5.30 a.m. 

to 
3.00 a.m. 

2.45 to 11.50 p.m. 


Total . 


.42 








22 
22 
24 


.14 
.54 


Oct. 


3 
4 


.02 
.34 


Rain 


8.00 to 8.30 p.m. 
7.00 to 11.50 p.m. 


6.10 a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
















" 


6 


.11 


" 


10.00 to 11.00 a.m. 


Tota 




4.92 







Total for year 49.55. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1885. 
Wm. a. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — I herewith present my report for the year ending 
with April 30. The works under my charge are, in my 
judgment, in good condition. In the large sizes of main- 
pipes only one break has occurred. On the 4th of October 
last one of the 48-inch pipes on Beacon street, beyond 
Brookline avenue, was broken by the falling of a large stone 
during the construction of one of the abutment-walls of the 
new bridge over the Boston and Albany railroad. The 
damage was soon repaired. Last season the 40-inch main on 
Brookline avenue was raised to conform to the new grade ; 
two wrought-iron pipes were laid on the new bridge, and 
connections with the opening of the 40-inch line were made 
this spring, and water let on. Up to now the evidences are 
the whole line is in a good condition. 

Beyond the laying of new mains, introduction of service- 
pipes, and the general maintenance of the works, nothing of 
note, except the above-mentioned items, has occurred. 

Main-Pipe. 

The whole length of main-pipe of the different sizes laid 
since the commencement of the works to the present time is 
437^ miles. The whole length of pipe laid during last year 
is 61,849 feet, or about 12 miles. 

Whole length now in service, 388.52 miles. 

Service-Pipes. 

Whole number put in last season .... 1,342 

Length in feet 35,475 

Total number to date 50,632 

Hydrants and Stopcocks. 
118 hydrants and 173 stopcocks established during the 
year. 



86 



City Document No. 118. 



Relaying of Enlarged Sizes. 



Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Size now. 


No. of Feet. 


Size 
formerly. 


Tremont 

Boylston 

Eliot 

"W. Dedham . . . 
Crawford .... 


Holiis and Boylston 

Across Tremont 

Pleasant and Tremont .... 
Shawmut ave. and Tremont . 
Humboldt ave. and Tower . . 


S 
12 
8 
8 
12 


789 
30 
744 
686 
92 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



Taken up and Abandoned 



40-inch 
12-incli 
8-incli 
6-inch 
4-inch 
li-inch 



112 feet 


808 " 


145 " 


3,564 "• 


932 " 


820 " 



Changed. 

One |-inch out, one 2-inch put in. 
One |-inch out, one l^-inch put in. 
One |-inch out, one l^-inch put in. 
Eight |-inch out, eight 1-inch put in. 
Seven |-ineh out, seven |-inch put in. 
Three ^^-inch out, three |-inch put in. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



87 



Statement of Liocation, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1884. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; S.B. South Boston; E.B. East Boston; B.H. Boston High- 
lands; D.Dorchester; W.R. West Roxbury; Bri. Brighton. 



In -what. Street. 



Brookline ave. 



Huntington ave. 
Chestnut Hill ave. 



West Chester park 
Westland ave. . . 
West Newton . . 

J?oylston 

Tremont 

Gloucester .... 
Boylston .... 

Prescott 

Crawford .... 

Amory 

Holborn 

Lawrence ave. . . 
Blue Hill ave. . . 

Nelson 

Prospect 

Forest Hill ave. . 

Erie ave 

Pond 

Canterbury . . . 

Florence 

Clarence 

South 

Everett 

Roxbury ave. , . 



Between what Streets. 



Over B. and A. R.R. 



Total 28-inch 



Tremont and Wigglesworth 
South and Englewood ave. . 



Total 16-inch 



Westland aye. and Boylston . . 
Parker and West Chester park . 
Washington and Shawmut ave. . 

Across Tremont 

Boylston and Head place .... 

Boylston and Newbury 

Fairfield and Q-loucester .... 

Bremen and New 

Elm Hill ave. and Tower .... 

School and Centre 

Blue Hill ave. and Warren . . . 
Blue Hill ave. and Cedar . . . . 

Columbia and Elmo . 

Norfolk and Evans 

Milton ave. and Norfolk . . . . 
Norfolk and N.T. and N.E. R.R. 
Washington and Merrill . . , . 

May and Brookline line 

Walk Hill and Ashland ..... 

Hancock and Brown ave 

Spring and Prospect 

From Walk Hill 

Pearl and Vernon 

Englewood ave. and Beacon . . . 



Carried forward , 



B.H. 
Bri. 



B. 



E.B. 
B.H. 



D. 



W.R. 



Bri. 



244 



259 
1,403 

1,662 

135 

973 

297 

30 

67 

57 

552 

1,731 

1,33T 

1,071 

333 

293 

14 

262 

260 

175 

40 

2,021 

3,662 

146 

24 

142 

185 

291 

14,098 



88 City Document No. 118. 

Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Nonantum 

"Warren 

Lake 

West Dedham 

Eliot 

Tremont 

"West Chester park . . . 

Moore 

Curtis 

Atwood ave 

Gilbert 

Milbourne 

Back 

Qulncy 

Bowdoin ave 

Torrey 

South 

Eittredge 

St. John 

Centre 

Brown ave 

Bourne 

Ashland ..... . . . 

Fairview 

Albano 

Allandale 

Braintree 

Bennett 

"West Chester park . . . 
St. Botolph ....... 

Eastern ave 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

"Washington and Newton line . . 
Cambridge and Massachusetts ave. 
Washington and South 



Total 12-inch 



Shawmut ave. and Tremont 

Tremont and Pleasant 

Hollis and Boylston 

Huntington ave. and B. & P. R.R. bridge 

Saratoga and Milton 

Chelsea and Bremen 

From Day 

"Wyman and Hoffman 

"Welles ave. and Centre 

Austin and Madison 

Magnolia and Ceylon 

Eldon and Washington 

"Withington and "Washington 

From "Washington 

Albano and Washington 

Centre and Rockvlew 

Louder lane and "Walter 

Gardner and Florence 

Canterbury and "Walk Hill 

Brown ave. and B. & P. R.R. bridge . . 

South and Proctor 

Washington and Salem 

From Centre 

"Wilton and Everett 

From Parson 



Total 8-inch 



Columbus ave. and B. & P. R.R. 
Cumberland and Durham . . . . 
Atlantic ave. and the Ferry . . . 



Carried forward 



Bri. 



E.B. 



B.H. 



Dor. 



W.R 



Bri. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 
Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



89 



In what Street. 



Boylston 

Waterford 

La Grange 

Falmouth 

Commonwealth ave. 
Cumberland . . • . 

Parker 

Marlborough . . . . 

Claremont 

Carlton 

Mayo 

Baxter 

Boston place . . . . 

C 

Bowen 

East Fifth 

New 

Moore 

Kickerson's wharf . 

Putnam 

Bennington . . . . 
Maverick wharf . . 
Kensington . . . . 

Tower 

Waumbeck . . . . 

"Wyman 

Bromley 

Winthrop . . . . . 

Bavin 

Winthrop 

Townsend 

Simmons 

Pierpont 

Sunderland . . . , 
Wise 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Fairfield and Hereford 

Shawmut ave. and Washington • . . 

Tremont and Farnsworth 

West Chester Park and Camden . . 
West Chester Park and Beacon . . . 
Huntington ave. and St. Botolpli . . 
Westland ave. and Boylston .... 
West Chester Park and Hereford . , 

Columbus ave. and Carlton 

Claremont and Greenwich park . . . 

From Castle 

CandD 

Dorchester ave. and Old Colony R.R. 

Seventh and Baxter 

C and D 

GandH 

From Prescott 

Saratoga and Pope 

From New 

Condor and Falcon 

Moore and Wordsworth 

From North Ferry , . 

Bainbridge and Elmore 

Crawford and Oriole 

Warren and Wabon 

Gilbert and Danforth 

New and Old Heath 

Blue Hill ave. and Dennis 

Warren and Tupelo 

From Dennis ._ 

Walnut ave. and Warren 

Vernon and Clay 

Station and Prentiss 

Blue Hill ave. and Warren 

Centre and Roys 



Carried forward 



S.B. 



E.B. 



139 

372 

51 
590 

58 
302 
110 

58 

85 
115 

60 
231 
222 

14 
399 
142 
172 
515 
184 
214 
769 
240 
259 

12 
153 

81 
376 

24 
227 
157 
771 
368 
196 
152 
111 

1,310 



90 City Document No. 118. 

Statement of L/Ocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Goldsmith . . . 
Fenwick . . . . 
Oregon . . . . 
Phillips . . . . 
Shirley . . . . 
Irving ave. . . . 

Clapp 

Carruth . . . . 

Folsom . . . . 

Liongmeadow . 
New ...... 

Maxwell . . . . 

Selden 

Holbrook ave. . 
Newhall . , . . 
Crescent ave. . 
Milton ave. . . 
Baker court . . 
Pierce ave. . . . 

Plain 

Swan court . . 

Fuller 

New 

Tremlett. . . . 
Chickatawbut . 
Bodwell park . 
Spring Garden , 

Wales 

Leeds 

Humphrey sq. , 

New 

Grampian Way 
Harbor View 
Clifton .... 
Elmo .... 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . . 

From Ruggles 

Circuit and Hulbert 

Smith and Conant 

Longwood ave. and Conant . . 

Dudley and George 

From Blue Hill ave 

East Chester park and Boston 

Fairfax and Codman 

Dudley and Harlow 

Clifton and Batchelder . . . < 

From Boston 

Milton ave. and Capen . . . . 



From Neponset ave 

Pierce ave. and Ashmont . . . 
Newport and O.C. & N.R.R. . 
Norfolk and Lauriat ave. . . . 

From Washington 

Plain and Newhall 

Pierce ave. and Chickatawbut . 

From Olney 

Milton ave. and Washington . 

From Magnolia 

Washington and Hooper . . . 
Plain and Minot .... ... 

Columbia and Bird 

Crescent ave. and Harbor View 
Harvard and Blue Hill ave. . . 
Savin Hill ave. and Bay .... 

From Dudley 

From Savin Hill ave 

Savin Hill and Savin Hill ave. . 
Dorchester ave. and Newport . 

Hudson and Shirley 

Erie and Blue Hill ave 



Carried forward 15,933 



B.H. 



Dor. 



Report of the Water Board. 



91 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Fairfax .... 
Whitfield . . . 

Elmo 

Rockwell . . . 
Sigourney . . . 

Allen 

C 

Pratt ave. . . . 
Woodman . . . 
Ballard .... 

School 

Bismarck . , . 
Spring Vale . . 
Corinth .... 
Hancock .... 

Maple 

Sharon .... 
Hancock .... 

Pine 

Hawthorne . . 
Atherton ave. . 

Baker 

Meehan .... 

Keyes 

Rockview . . . 

Hazel 

Sheldon .... 

Salem 

Farrington ave. 
Danforth .... 
John A. Andrew 
Union ave. . , . 

Hobart 

Wilton 

Pratt 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 

From Carruth 

Wheatland ave. and park . . 

Erie and Erie ave 

Milton ave. and Washington 
Glenroad and Walnut . . . 
Brown ave. and Rowe . . . 
Spring Park and Boylston . . 

From Centre 

Centre and Jamaica 

Centre and Custer 

Amory and Coplej' 

Boylston and Germania . . . 
Spring and Marshall . . . , 
Washington and Birch . . , 
Prospect ave. and Ashland . 

Centre and Weld 

Brown ave. and Rowe . . . . 
Prospect ave. and Pine . . . 
Brown ave. and Hancock . . 
Florence and Sycamore . . . 
Washington and Albano . , 

Spring and Garden 

Williams and Keyes . . . , 
Washington and Meehan . . 

Green and Hazel , 

Rockview and Enfield . . , 
Ashland and Prospect ave. . 
Albano and Corinth .... 
Oak and B. & P. R.R. . . 
Wyman and Boylston . . . . 
Sedgwick and Newburne . 
Green and Washington . . 

From Brooks 

Cambridge and Braintree . 
From Linden 



Carried forward , 



Dor. 



W.R, 



Brl. 



15,933 
151 
258 
485 
821 
168 
175 
217 
142 

81 
213 
263 
392 
207 
356 
356 
237 
469 
335 
123 

60 
164 
452 
107 
252 
314 

88 
120 
348 
301 
274 

78 
153 
329 
117 
188 

24,675 



92 City Document No. 118. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc, — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Peaceable . . 
Englewood ave, 
Foster .... 
Surrey .... 
Appian Way . 
Hichborn . . 
Sinclair court 
Oakland . . . 
Gardner . . . 
La Rose place 
Linden .... 

Lindall ave. . 
Fenton court . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Winship and Rockland 

Chestnut Hill and Roxbury aves. 
Washington and Surrey . . . . 

Parsons and Foster 

Franklin and Vernon 

From North Beacon 



Washington and Faneuil 
Chester and Malvern . . 

From Union 

Garden and Brighton ave. 



Total 6-inch , 



Lindall park and Vernon . . . 
Greenwich pi. and Greenwich 

Total 4.inch 



Bri. 



B.H. 
Dor. 



24,675 
213 
67 T 
116 
458 
122 
713 
240 
158 
200 
185 
176 

27,933 
54 
100 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



93 



Statement of Liocation, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Relaid and Abandoned in 1884. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


5 




Length. 


as 


Brookline ave 


Under Boston and Albany R.R. . . 
Total 40 inch 


B. 


40 . 
12 


112 






112 

297 




"West Newton 


Sbawmut ave. and Washington . . 


B. 


12 


Brookline ave 


Burlington and Boston and Albany 
RR 


B H. 


12 
• 8 


511 






Harrison ave. and Washington . . 


B. 






808 




Central place 


17 




Montana 


From Georgia 

Atlantic ave. and the Water .... 


B.H. 
B. 


6 


128 






145 




T. Wharf 


615 




Tremont 


Hollis and Boylston 


« 




789 


S 


Boylston 

Eliot 




,, 




30 


12 


Tremont and Pleasant 

Shawmut ave. and Tremont . . . 


" 




744 
686 


8 


West Dedham 


8 


Crawford 


Humboldt ave. and Tower .... 


B.H. 




92 


12 




East Chester park and Boston . . . 
Atlantic ave. and the Water . . . 


D. 
B. 


4 


608 


6 








3,564 




T wharf 


134 




Waterford 


Shawmut ave. and Washington . . 


" 


" 


372 


6 


Parker 


Boston and Albany R.R. and West- 


" 


" 


415 
11 






Atlantic ave. and the Ferry .... 


6 








932 




Brookline ave 


Raised. 
Burlington ave. and Beacon .... 


B.H. 


40 


1,161 




Beacon 


Brookline and Commonwealth ave. 


B. 


" 


100 




Brookline ave 


Burlington ave. and Boston and 
Albany R.R 


B.H. 


12 


250 




Clapp 


East Chester park and Boston . . . 


Dor. 


6 


304 






Lowered. 










D 


_ Eight and Ninth 

D and E 


S.B. 


12 


100 




Ninth 


B.H. 


6 


175 
550 




Sheridan ave 


Chestnut and Terrace 






From D 


S.B. 


4 


50 













94 



CiTT Document No. 118. 



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Eeport of the Water Board. 



95 



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96 City Document No. 118. 

Repairs of Pipes during the Year 18S4. 



Whbkb. 


Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 




48 


40 


36 

1 

1 


30 
3 

1 
4 


20 

13 

5 
12 

30 


16 

2 

2 


12 

14 
5 
2 
8 
5 
3 

37 


10 
1 

1 


8 

1 

1 

2 

. 

4 


6 

46 
14 

1 

10 
1 

1 

73 


4 

61 

7 
1 
1 
3 

1 

74 


3 

7 

1 

4 
1 

13 


2 

9 
2 

1 
12 


47 
47 


5 
5 


1 

14 
3 

3 

20 


S 

12 

1 

1 
14 


i- 


h. 

6 
13 
14 

1 

1 
35 


Total. 




401 
116 
109 
209 
76 
56 
39 


642 


South Boston 

East Boston 

Boston Highlands .... 

Dorchester 

West Roxhury 

Brighton 


1 

1 


1 
1 


169 
139 
240 
86 
64 
40 


Totals 


1,006 


1,380 



Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards : joints, 146 ; settling of earth, 18 ; 
defective packing, 2 6 ; defective stopcock, 17 ; de- 
fective pipe, 17 ; broken by B. & A. E.R. bridge- 



struck by 



12 ; settling 
settlin": of 



builders, 1 ; by wharf-builders 
pick, 3 ; by frost, 2. Total 

Stoppages by frost 

Of 3-inch and on service-pipes : joints 

of earth, 159 ; settling of wall, 3 . ^ 

drain, 2 ; defective pipe, 265 ; defective faucet, 
23 ; defective packing, 13 ; defective coupling, 
13 ; struck by pick, 34 ; by frost, 3 ; stiff con- 
nections, 45 ; by sewer diggers, 15 ; faucet 
pulled out, 3 ; gnawed by rats, 9. Total . 

Stoppages by fish, 33 ; rust, 306; dirt, 8; solder 
1 ; paper, 1 ; gasket, 2 ; frost outside, 99 ; frost 
inside, 71. Total 



231 
22 



606 



521 



Total 



1,380 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



97 



statement of Leaks and Stoppages 1850-1884. 





DiAMBTER OF. 




Yeab. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Totals. 


1850 


82 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 

109 

213 

211 

135 

145 

170 

171 

263 


72 
173 
241 

260 

280 

219 

232 

278 

324 

449 

458 

399 

373 

397 

594 

498 

636 

487 

449 

407 

767 

1,380 

1,459 

1,076 

2,120 

725 

734 

801 

1,024 

995 

929 

833 

1,248 

782 

1,127 


104 


1851 


237 


1852 .' 


823 


1853 


345 


1854 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


S63 


1858 


401 


1859 


631 


I860 


592 




508 


1862 


490 




494 


1864 


489 




607 


1866 


•676 




609 


1868 


631 




439 


1870 


926 




1,565 


1872 


1,647 
1,229 




1874 


2,554 
929 




1876 


948 




910 


1878 


1,237 




1,206 


1880 

1881 


1,064 

1,028 

1,248 

953 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1,380 





98 



City Document JSFo. 118. 



Hydrants. 

During the year 171 hydrants have been established, and 
53 abandoned. 



Boston 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester . . . 
West Roxbury . 
Brighton . . . . 





Established. 




Abandoned. 


















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3 


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6 








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2 


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11 


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10 


10 


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28 


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6 


4 


12 


16 


31 

9 


7 
8 


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3 


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3 


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23 








1 
2 


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2 


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21 










66 


54 


23 


28 


171 


6 


2 


11 


34 


53 


118 



Total Number up to May 1, 1885. 



Boston 

South Boston . . . 
East Boston . . . 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester . . . . 
"West Roxbury . . 

Brighton 

Deer Island . . , 
Brookline . . . . 
Chelsea 



o 9 



pq 



234 



100 
33 
33 
43 
98 
208 
153 
16 



143 
112 
650 
560 
94 
62 



2,112 



753 

327 

171 

125 

86 

56 

S9 



1,567 



1,386 
S21 
324 
844 
801 
419 
272 
16 



4,598 



104 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 164 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual atten- 
tion paid them. 



Report or the Water Board. 99 

Stopcocks. 

173 new stopcocks have been established this year. 117 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. The 
stopcocks have had the proper attention paid them. 

Respectfully, 

E. R. JONES, 

Superintendent Eastern Division, 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DEPAETMENT. 



Mystic Depaetment Boston Water- Works, 

CHARLESTOWisr DISTRICT, May 1, 1885. 

Hon. William A. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The annual report of this department for the year 
ending April 30 is herewith submitted : — 

Mystic Lake. 

During the past year the water has been abundant and 
unusually good. 

The cleaning mentioned in my last report was continued 
the past season on Wedge pond and that part of the Aba- 
jonah river between the tracks of the Boston & Lowell R..R. 
The depth of water was a hindrance, and on that account we 
were unable to do all that was intended. Considerable work 
was done on that part of the lake above the old canal, and on 
the land owned by Mr. Bacon, in blowing out the old stumps 
that were left when the works were built. If the state of the 
water will permit we shall continue the work of cleaning this 
season. 

Mystic-valley Sewer. 

The sewer is in good condition, but is now taxed to its 
capacity, and, if the tanneries continue to increase their 
business, will have to be enlarged. 

The engine and pump are badly worn, and will need ex- 
tensive repairs this summer. The boiler has been repaired 
twice the past year, and is liable to give out at any time. 

When the works were built the plant was sufficiently large 
to take care of the sewage ; but, as there is six times the 
amount running now, the plant should be increased in pro- 
portion. 

The land at the sewer-pump has been graded, using the 
sewage refuse as a fertilizer. We raised a good crop of 
Hungarian grass and yellow corn the last year, and, as the 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 101 

land was clear gravel, it showed conclusively that the refuse 
taken out by our settling-tanks is of value as a fertilizer. 

Conduit. 

The conduit is in good condition. It has been cleaned 
twice the past year, and thoroughly inspected each time. 
At the fall cleaning some small patches of sponge were found, 
which were scraped off and thoroughly scoured. This spring 
there were no traces of vegetable growth discovered. 

Reservoir. 

The east basin was drawn off and cleaned last spring ; the 
brick lining to the slope, with the exception of a small piece,, 
was found in good condition. The necessary repairs were- 
made to that portion, and the stone-work pointed. We 
found the covering to the cement-pipe, leading to the west 
basin, in bad condition. The old covering was cleaned off,, 
the iron thoroughly scraped, and newly covered with cement 
well worked on. 

The banks were thoroughly top-dressed last fall, and now 
show the benefit of the work done. The concrete walk 
around the reservoir will have to be resurfaced this season, 
and it will be economy to concrete the gutters around the 
first slope. 

This work can be done after the west basin has been 
cleaned and pointed. The gate-house has been painted 
inside, and a new set of screens for the outlet pipes have 
been made and put in. 

I again call the attention of the Board to the great need of 
a telephone at this gate-house, and recommend tha-t it be put 
in immediately. 

Roads and Grounds. 

This part of the works has received the usual attention. 
The grass shows the effect of top-dressing. 

The roads around the works are in poor condition, having 
been made with clay and loose gravel. In wet weather they 
are mud ; in dry, dust, I would recommend that a stone- 
crusher be purchased for this department, and the roads be re- 
built. The railroad track has been straightened, and the wail 
built on the east side. A foundation has been built for a new 
shed for the storage of carts and tools which should be built 
this season. 

I would also recommend that the house at the lake be 
clapboarded this season. 



102 City Document No. 118. 



Pumping Service. 

This department is in good condition, though, like all 
works of the kind, it needs constant care and repairs to keep 
it in working order. 

No. 3 pump will have to be thoroughly overhauled this 
season. Since my last report the new boilers have been 
finished, and are now in use, showing a saving in fuel over 
the old ones. The partial repairs on the engine-house, men- 
tioned in my last report, have been done, and the work should 
be continued this year. 

I would recommend the purchase of a gas-machine to light 
the engine-house. At present it is poorly lighted, and hardly 
safe. 



DiSTEIBUTION-PlPES . 

These pipes have been extended by the addition of 211 feet 
6-inch and 90 feet 4-inch pipe. There have been 5,455 feet 
of cement pipe replaced with cast-iron. There have been 78 
leaks the past year. The annexed tables show the amount 
of work performed in this branch. 



Hydeants and Gates. 

3 new Lowry hydrants have been placed by this depart- 
ment the past year. 

12 old Lowry and 1 post have been taken out and replaced 
with new. 

17 rotten hydrant-boxes have been replaced. 

There have been added 9 new gates, 7 4-inch and 2 6-inch, 
the past year. 

49 rotten gate-boxes have been renewed. 



Service-Pipes and Boxes. 

54 new services have been laid in this district the past 
year. There has been repaired and relaid 197, in which 
there was used 1,561 feet of lead pipe. 

61 were alterations of tin-lined ; 35 leaks ; 38 stoppages by 
eels ; 6 by rust, and 57 frozen. 

525 wooden service-boxes were replaced by iron, and 2 
fire-pipes were put in. 



Report or the Water Board. 



103 



New Services. 



Size. 


I of an inch. 


% of an inch. 


2.inch. 


Total number. 


Total feet. 


Number 


50 


2 


2 


54 


1,317 



Summary of Services connected with the WorTcs, May 1, 1885. 





Charlestown. 


Somerville. 


Chelsea. 


Everett. 


Totals. 


Services 

Feet 


5,595 ' 
149,908 


4,046 
132,788 


4,456 
120,600 


842 
18,978 


14,939 
422,274 



422,274 feet, or 79 mile, 5,154 feet. 
Breaks and Leaks on Distribution-Pipe. 



Size of Pipe. 


16 


12 


10 


8 


6 


4 


3 


2 


Total. 




1 


1 




3 
3 
4 


27 

29 

15 

3 


14 
83 
20 
4 






46 








65 








8 

1 


4 




51 








8 














Totals 


1 


1 


9 


10 


74 


71 


4 




170 



Extension of Distribution- Pipe, 



Location. 



Ham's Court .... 
Frothingham avenue 
Cordis-et. avenue . . 
Waterman's wharf . 

Somerville 

Chelsea 

Everett 



Totals 



SiZK OF PiPB. 



4-inch. 



24 



175 

12 

1,913 

857 
455 

3,436 



35 
3,703 
2,837 
1,225 

7,855 



Total feet. 



24 

48 

181 

48 

5,616 

3,694 

1,680 

11,291 



104 



City Document No. 118. 



Distribution-Pipe Relaid. 



Location. 


Original 
Size. 


4-inch. 


e-inch. 


S-lnch. 
Feet. 


16-inch. 




Inches. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Total ft. 




16 
4 
. 6 
4 
8 
4 


24 

84 
108 


24 
564 

60 
192 
806 


6 


1,752 


1,800 

570 






60 








192 


Bunker Hill street • . 

Fitchburg railroad 


2,112 




2,602 
108 










Totals 




216 


1,146 


2,118 


1,752 


5,232 







Eeport of the Water Board. 



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City Document No. 118. 








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Report of the Water Board. 107 

Connected with the works are the necessary tools, horses, 
and wagons to do the work, all of which are in good 
condition. 

Yours, respectfully, 

J. HENEY BROWN, 

Superintendent. 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
METER DIVISION. 



Meter Division, 221 Federal st., 

Boston, May 15, 1885. 

Hon. W. a. Simmons, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report of Superintendent of Meter 
Division for tlie year ending April 30, 1885, is herewith 
submitted. 

The total number of meters in the Cochituate Department, 
doing duty at the commencement of the year, was 2,653. 

There have since been applied 1,841, and in the same time 
102 have been discontinued, making a total in this branch, at 
the present time, of 4,302. 

In the Mystic Department the year commenced with 496 
meters doing duty. There have since been applied 114, and 
during the same time 44 have been discontinued, making 
the total number in this branch 567, and the total number in 
the whole works 4,959. 

Accompanying this report is furnished, in tabular form, the 
different sizes and styles of all the meters in use at date : — 



Summary of Meters connected with the Works April 30, 18S5. 



Sttlb. 


6-incli. 


4-inch. 


3-inoh. 


2-inch. 


It inch. 


l-inch. 


J-inch. 


1-inch. 


. f Worthington . . 


.... 


6 


10 


67 


16 


409 




445 


1 Crown 


1 


5 


16 


20 


25 


110 


48 


851 
















89 
3 

74 


2,248 
57 
















13 




Worthington . . 




7 


2 


40 


5 


93 


6 


Crown 


2 


6 


2 


8 


2 


13 


48 


65 


^1 


Tremont .... 












13 


119 










3 


5 






2 


1 


















8 


24 


83 


140 


48 


721 


2,522 


1,468 



Report of the Water Board. 10 9* 

During the year 41 meters have been condemned as use- 
less (worn out in service). 

These were of the Worthington pattern, and were of the 
older numbers in use in the works, having done a duty of 
200,000 cubic feet and upwards. 

In the wear of these I have especially noticed that those 
from the northern sections of the city are much more scarred, 
and show a destroying substance to contend with that is not 
apparent in those removed from other localities. 

This destroying agency is manifest in the scouring process 
to which they give evidence of having been subjected, 
proving, in many cases, to have been very destructive. 

Owing to the continued extreme cold of the past winter 
77 meters were frozen, fully 33 per cent, of which were 
located in street-boxes placed 4^ to 5 feet below the surface, 
while the balance were located in the most available places 
in buildings, — generally the cellars, — carefully packed 
with hay for protection from frost. 

In all cases where these were frozen some portion of the 
service-pipe was exposed ; this exposed part was first af- 
fected ; the ice, once formed in the pipes, naturally and 
quickly extends along the services, and soon comes in con- 
tact with the meter. 

The effect is to disable if not entirely destroy it. In my 
opinion the packing of meters for protection, where any 
portion of the service-pipes are exposed to frost, is of little 
or no account, and until consumers are made to realize the 
necessity of properly protecting their fixtures from frost the 
city will suffer. 

It has been the custom to let the water run to waste in 
extreme cold weather, thereby keeping a circulation to pre- 
vent freezing. 

The application of meters somewhat interferes with this 
arrangement, at first causing a vigorous and determined op- 
position, manifested very impressively to the employes of 
the department while performing their legitimate duties, 
more especially in localities where a lesser degree of intel- 
ligence may be looked for. 

Seventy-five decayed street-boxes have been replaced with 
new ones, and 27 have been repaired. 

For the safety of the community these require constant 
and careful attention. 

There are also in connection with the works, and under 
the supervision of this department, 234 elevators, having 
supply-pipes varying from 2 to 6 inches in diameter. 

Six of these have meters attached ; 228 are operated with 
cord and pulley, or ratchet, according to style, and are sup- 



110 City Document No. 118. 

plied with one to four indicators each. These attachments 
are adjusted by actual measurement, and record the con- 
sumption comparatively correct, and might be considered 
reliable, provided they were not so liable to disarrangement, 
either by carelessness or accident ; this cord is easily dis- 
placed or broken, and I am of the opinion that the city is 
not properly protected by such arrangements, and I most 
respectfully recommend to the consideration of the Board the 
application of meters, at the expense of applicants, to all 
elevator-pipes hereafter granted. 

In addition to the above, there are in the Cochituate works 
40 motors with indicators attached, and in the Mystic De- 
partment 4, making 44 in the whole works. These motors 
are generally of one style, viz., Boston Motor Company's 
make, and are owned privately by the parties using them, 
they having been proved and accepted by the department. 

Alterations made last season in the |-inch Tremont meter 
proved, after trial, unsatisfactory, and they are at the present 
time being removed. 

The trouble being in the mechanical construction, this has 
caused delay in the work of the departmen, and annoyance 
to the consumers who were unfortunately brought in contact 
with them. 

Beside the substituting of these rejected ones with perfect 
machines, the contracting parties assume the expense of re- 
locating all such, thus relieving the city of all extra outlay 
occasioned thereby. 

There have been purchased during the year 2,818 |-inch, 
and 281 1-inch Tremont meters, and, adding 882 previously 
purchased, makes the total 3,981, distributed as follows : — 

Placed in service. ...... 2,479 

On hand in stock ....... 345 

Obsolete 87 

At factory for alterations ..... 1,070 

43 Crown meters have been purchased, viz. : 3 6-inch, 4 
4-inch, 2 3-inch, 13 2-inch, 9 l|-inch, 6 1-inch, and 6 |- 
inch. 

The 6 l^-inch were disposed of to consumers for private 
use, they reimbursing the city for the same, and becoming 
owners thereof. The others have been placed in service, with 
the exception of 1 4-inch, 2 2-inch, and 1 1-inch, which are 
still retained in stock. 

98 Crowns, of different sizes, have been repaired, at an 
outlay of $643.72. 



Eepoet of the Watee Board. Ill 

Eepairs of this style of meter incur the extra expense of 
transportation to and from New York. 

53 Worthingtons have been purchased, viz. : 2 4-inch, 15 
2-inch, 17 1^-inch, 18 1-inch, and 1 |-inch, and they have 
all been put in service excepting 2 2-inch, which still remain 
in stock. 

The repairs of this class are almost entirely done in the 
department, and charged to maintenance. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

HIRAM CUTTS, 
iSuperintendent Meter Dept. 




EEPOET or THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
INSPECTION AND WASTE DIVISION. 



Division of Inspection and Waste, 

City Hall, Boston, May 1, 1885. 

"William A. Simmons, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — In compliance with the order of the Board I here- 
with respectfully submit the report of the work of this 
division for the year from May 1, 1884, to May 1, 1885. 

At the date of my last annual report (May 1, 1884) 
nearly half of the general house-to-house inspection in the 
Cochituate Department, for assessing the revenue of the 
present year, had been done. The entire inspection, with the 
exception of premises classed as "buildings" and "model 
houses," on which special examinations were to be made later 
in the year, was completed early in June, when the inspectors 
were sent to their various districts to check waste, and see 
that the hose regulations of the Board were enforced. 
Three of the divisions, viz., 1, 3, and 4, were subsequently 
specially detailed for hose and waste service, their working 
hours being changed to from 1 o'clock P.M. to 8 o'clock 
P.M. ; the evening being the principal time at which viola- 
tions of hose regulations occur. The result of this arrange- 
ment was that a large number of persons were found illegally 
using hose, not having paid for the privilege, while others 
were violating the regulations in using it during prohibited 
hours ; fines were inflicted on some, others being compelled 
to take out the necessary license from the water-registrars. 

In the beginning of June, some additional inspectors having 
been appointed, a division was formed called " The Deacon 
Division," to check the waste indicated by the Deacon meters. 
This division attended exclusively to this service until the end 
of December, when the meters were removed on account of 
the freezing of the ground. 

On July 28 all of the inspectors were placed on Deacon 
waste service until the end of the second week of August, 
when Division 1 was sent to the Mystic Department to make 
the inspection for revenue (January bills) in Charlestown 



Keport of the Water Board. 113 

and Somerville. Division 3 was then detailed to inspect 
special business buildings, which, on account of the frequent 
changes in occupancy, water-fixtures, etc., it is not deemed 
advisable to take earlier in the year. Division 4 was at the 
same time placed inspecting model houses for which special 
rates are charged. 

As we proceed with our examinations of the water-fixtures 
in dwelling-houses, I find that a great many of the sources of 
waste in past years are gradually ceasing to exist ; for ex- 
ample, persons who habitually left open the valves of 
water-closets to flush out the soil-pipes have generally ceased 
doing so, as an inspector is liable at any time to call and find 
the water wasting, in which case the premises are fined $2 
for each ofl'ence. Again, where old, leaky fixtures existed for 
years, new ones have been put in, or proper repairs made ; 
the inspection visits to examine the fixtures being anticipated, 
the plumber is frequently sent for before such occurs. 

A large percentage of the waste that in former years raised 
the consumption to over 100 gallons per head of the popula- 
tion, I consider, from the results of the past two years, must 
have occurred from bursts in street-mains and service-pipes 
before reaching their source of supply. During the year 
covered by this report I have notified the service division of 
the Cochituate Department of over 200 bursts in street mains 
and pipes ; also, of a large number of public fountains and 
hydrants found wasting water; the necessary repairs were 
made in each case. 

The work of this division in checking waste and cutting 
down the supply will be readily seen by the following table, 
which gives, by way of comparison, the consumption for 
each month for a year before the house-to-house inspection 
began, with the corresponding figures for each month since 
that time. The increase in the consumption for the first 
three months of the present year is accounted for by the 
fact that it was an exceptionally cold season, in consequence 
of which faucets in nearly all parts of the city were left open 
to prevent freezing : — 



114 



City Document No. 118. 



CocHiTUATE Department. 



Consumption in Q-allons. 



The year before Inspection. 



J anuary . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October. . 
November 
December 



31,691,600 
31,563,800 
31,318,700 
32,352,800 



1$8». 



34,715,500 
32,690,700 
34,110,700 
30,617,600 
32,169,500 
33,419,200 
36,774,000 
37,141,000 



Since Inspection began. 



1SS3. 1S84. 1S85 



33,645,600 
29,575,800 
28,839,300 
30,174,200 



32,162,300 
24,598,000 
21,862,600 
21,460,700 
23,708,500 
26,184,600 
25,409,000 
25,065,200 
26,389,500 
25,022,850 
22,954,250 
24,234,800 



26,711,900 
31,847,400 
27,697,200 
22,720,450 



The saving for the entire year, 1884, as compared with 
the consumption of the year before inspection, averaged per 
day 8,292,742 gallons in the Cochituate Department. The 
daily average consumption the year before inspection was 
33,213,758, while for 1884 it was but 24,921,016. 

In the Mystic Division a considerable saving in the con- 
sumption was effected during the year through checking 
waste ; but, owing to the imperfect condition of the street 
mains in Somerville and Chelsea, it bears no comparison to 
that effected in the Cochituate Division. 

After the Deacon service was discontinued for the year, in 
conformity with the order of the Board, the Inspectors were, 
each in turn, beginning January 1, suspended, with loss of 
pay, for twenty days ; these suspensions ended April 24, when 
all the inspectors were again at work. 

The work of the present year was opened with the service 
of, the January bills for the Water-Kegistrars. In the Co- 
chituate Department, 37,557 bills, and in the Mystic Depart- 
ment for Somerville and Charlestown, 9,281 bills, were 
delivered ; this work was completed in eleven days. 

The house-to-house inspection, at present.in progress for the 
revenue of next year, was begun January 12 ; it is, at the 



Eeport of the Water Board. 115 

time of writing (May 22) , more than half done. The entire 
of the inspection-books for South Boston have been passed 
to Water-Registrar Davis, and a large part of the result of 
the inspection throughout the city is ready for delivery to 
him. The inspection for Registrar Caldwell, of Chelsea, 
Everett, and Revere — for his July bills — will, I expect, be 
ready in a few days. 

A large number of inaccuracies existed in the returns of rate- 
able fixtures sent to the Water-Registrars in the last inspec- 
tion ; this resulted from not having in my possession accu- 
rate returns of previous inspections, and consequently being 
unable to compare the returns, as they came in, with those of 
former inspections. To obviate this, and give to Registrar 
Davis this year, a perfect account of all taxable water-fixtures in 
the Cochituate Department, I, with the consent of the Board, 
detailed two inspectors to compare the present with last year's 
return ; where discrepancies were found, I placed four of the 
most reliable inspectors on the vyork of verification, their 
duty being to visit the premises, examine the fixtures, and 
bring in correct reports of what they found. Some thousands 
of errors were discovered and corrected, the result of this 
will be that the inspection on which the Division is at present 
engaged, will be the only thoroughly accurate and reliable 
one ever made. I expect to complete the inspection of the 
Cochituate Department early in July. 

On February 17 I received a communication from the 
Water Board stating that " the Board of Health desire to be 
informed of the number of privy-vaults and wells, whether 
used or not, within the city," and instructing me to obtain 
the information, and transmit the same to the Board of 
Health. I was further instructed by the Water Board to call 
on the members of the Board of Health, and ascertain if they 
needed any additional information that this division could fur- 
nish, I did so with the result that immediately afterwards I 
had printed in schedule form a return to be filled up by each 
inspector, giving the following information of all privy-vaults 
and wells within the limits of the City of Boston, viz. : — 
Of vaults — the " street and number; if in use, condition, 
whether broken, if full, etc. ; and of wells — their number, 
if in use, etc." I have thus far transmitted to the Board of 
Health returns of 3,533 vaults, and of 200 wells, with their 
condition as stated above. In addition to the foregoing, I 
was requested by the Board of Health to give them an ap- 
proximation, from any source which I then had in hand, of 
the number of privy-vaults within the city limits ; the fol- 
lowing copy of a letter which I wrote them explains my 
action in reference : — 



116 



City Document No. 118. 



"Inspection and Waste Division. 

Water Department, March 7, 1885. 

Samuel H. Durgin, Esq.,M.D., 

Chairman, Board of Health: — 

Dear Sir, — In conformity with instructions received from 
the Water Board, February 17, I herewith send you re- 
turns of vaults and wells taken by the inspectors of this 
division since that date, and which I shall continue to furnish 
you with during the progress of the present inspection. 
Below you will find an approximation of the number of 
privy-vaults in the various districts within the limits of the 
City of Boston, asked for by your Board in our recent inter- 
view. 

Eespectfully yours, 

D. B. CASHMAN, 

Superintendent. 



South Boston . 


. 2,082 


City Proper 


. 2,874 


Boston Highlands 


. 1,314 


Dorchester District . 


. 1,114 


Brighton District 


880 


East Boston 


. 1,682 


Charlestown District 


. 1,545 



11,491" 



I consider that there is a marked improvement in the dis- 
cipline and efficiency of the Division. Only a few trivial 
reports were received from citizens during the past year of 
any impropriety on the part of inspectors, and on investiga- 
tion they proved groundless ; no serious complaint has been 
made against any of the men. 

Refusals to admit the Inspectors into dwelling-houses for 
purposes of inspection are now very rare, although they 
were quite frequent in the earlier days of house-to-house 
inspection. 

Metered premises are examined for waste the same as 
those not metered. In cases where waste is found to exist, 
the persons interested are orally notified ; no notice to repair 
is served. By this course we frequently save such persons 
considerable expense, as otherwise they would have to pay 
for the water received through the meter, whether used or 
wasted. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 117 



Schedules of the Work Performed by each Inspector. 

In the following schedules the work performed by each 
Inspector for the year will be found. It is but just, however, 
to remark, that, in some cases where the figures do not seem 
to give large results, the work done was of an intricate and 
important kind, that required time and care, hence, the 
figures do not in all cases give the value of the work done. 



INSPECTION OF 1884, 



CocHiTUATE Department. 

The following tables give the work of each Inspector from 
May 1, 1884, to the end of the house-to-house inspection 
then in progress (June 6, 1844) : — 

Division 1, — James H. McGuire, Chief Inspector. 



Inspkctoks. 



Bacharach, Solomon , 

Dunn, Jno. J 

Finnegan,D. A. . . . 

Furlong, L. P 

HasBett, J. B 

McAuliffe, J. J. . , . 

Quigley, J. L 

Boss, George F. . . . 
Toland, Jos. H. . . . 



Total , 



1884. 
May 19. 

1884 
Jan. 14. 



1883. 
July 16. 



1884. 

Jan. 1. 

1883. 

July 16. 



a 5 



Eft 



251 
494 
721 
418 
478 
272 
404 
723 
266 

4,027 



Defective Fixtures. 






•43 S 
O P< 

« ■ 



5 5 






Wilful 
Waste 
Reports. 



Hose 
Reports. 



-*. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



119 



Division 2. — John B. Maguire, Chief Inspector, 





a 


c . 
M a> 
K 3 


Defective Fixtures. 


Wilful 
Waste 
Reports. 


Hose 
Reports. 




1 


00 S 

11 






























Inspectors, 


a 
t 
< 


S 

o . 


^1 

CO M 

1-3 
o ft 


6 

1! 

:£.2 


= "21^ 






^ . 
r' ^ 


13 
0) 

o 

ft 

s 

M 

a 




fi 


!? 


^ 


« 


tL, 


rt 


fe 


M 


f=^ 




1884. 














Connolly Jno. A. . . . 


Jan. 1. 

1883. 


582 


8 


11 


4 

















Corbett, Jno. J 


July 16. 


105 


5 


5 


6 

















Daly, Jas. F 


Aug. 18. 


511 


1 


1 














20 


10 


Desmond, Jno. F. . . . 


July 16. 


517 


























Haley, Jno. A 


" 


395 


13 


13 


7 

















McNamara, Jno. . . . 


1884. 


591 


























McCarthy, T., Jr. . . . 


Jan. 14. 


596 


4 


4 


5 

















Rosnosky, Raphael . . 


May 19. 
1883. 


180 


6 


6 


4 

















Sweeney, C. F 


July 16. 


539 


1 


1 




















Total 




4,016 


38 


41 


26 











20 


10 









120 



City Document No. 118. 



Division 3. — William P. Caeroll, Chief Inspector. 



Inspectors. 



Butler, Wm. F. . 
Corbett, Jno. J. . 
Cassidy, M. F. J. 
Leahan, Jno. W. 
Maguire, R. E. . 
McKetina, B. F. . 
Quigley, J. J. . . 
Ready, Edward . 
Smith, P. J. . . . 



Total 



1883. 
July 16. 



1884. 
May 19. 

1883. 
July 16. 

1884. 
Jan. 14. 

1883. 
July 16. 



1884. 
Jan. 1. 



= 03 



385 
248 
486 
401 
494 
613 
565 
81 
635 

3,708 



Defective Fixtures. 



a) 0) 



72 



«S 



74 



123 



3 3 a 



Wilful 
Waste 
Reports. 



Hose 

Reports 









Eepoet of the Watee Board. 



121 



Division 4. — James J. Strange, Chief Inspector. 





1 

a 


£ > 


Defective 


Fixtures. 


Wilful 
M'aste 
Reports. 


Hose 
Reports. 




i(S 


m 




n 












Inspectors. 


O 

< 
O 


3 


(D O 

r 




.2 

1| 

■.a a 




1" 






o 

Cm 




1883. 




















Cullen, Jno. F 


July 16. 


268 


3 


3 


6 

















Edmonds, Michael . . 


IC 


159 


1 


1 


6 


3 














Kilduff, William , . . 


" 


592 


6 


6 


10 

















Murray, Thomas F. • . 


<l 


585 


5 


5 


14 

















Murray, Richard J. . . 


1884. 


579 


























Marphy, Jno. J 


Jan. 14. 


488 


11 


14 


22 


4 














Neagle, Joseph B. . . . 


" 


220 


1 


1 


6 

















Wood, Walter B. . . . 


" 


519 


17 


17 


18 

















Total 




3,410 


44 


47 


82 


7 





















Summary of the Part of the Insjpection of 1884 comprised 
in the foregoing Schedules : — 







Defective Fixtures, 


Wilful 
Waste 
Reports. 


Hose 
Reports. 




a| 




















9t^ 


IE 




Ol 












Division. 






<Ot3 

oS 

^^ 

o a 


1 

ca 

:Sa 


a; ,o *S 


0) 

5?o 


1 

^§ 
Qm 


Pi . 

II 


ll 




^ 


fe 


« 


E 


rt 


f=( 


rt 


fe 


One 


4,027 


4 


5 


7 

















Two 


4,016 
3,708 
3,410 


38 

72 
44 


41 
74 
47 


26 

123 

82 
















20 



20 


10 


Three 














Total 


15,161 


158 


167 


238 


7 








10 







122 



City Document No. 118. 



Deacon Service. 

The following tables give the work of each Inspector, in 
checking waste, from the time of districting the men, Jane 7, 
1884, to the end of the year : — 

Division 2. — James H. McGuire, Chief Inspector. 









• 










Wilful 








, 




Defective Fixtures. 


Waste 


Hose 
Reports. 








a 










Rep 


orts. 
'6 










-r) 




V, 


INSPBCTOBS. 


a 
'o 


11 




« 
2 




3 

o 


m'3 


1 


3 


-a 
> 


3 
1 




ft 

< 




o 


o 




■s. 


v3 a 


^ 


O 


P5 


J 




O 


^ 


^1 


63 -o 


Ji 


Et3 


^^ 


u 


^ 


h 


O 






n 


i&- 


P 


« a 
■■fr 


So 
.9'S 


P^ 


a 


a 


(U 




Q 


"A 


"A 


!z; 


« 


fe 


M 


fe 


« 


lit; 




1884. 






















Dunn, John J. . . . 


Jan. 14. 


. , 


3,237 


370 


370 


332 


4 


1 


1 


11 


8 




1883. 
























Desmond, John F. . 


July 16. 
1884. 






2,940 


245 


244 


320 


10 


1 


1 


1 





Finnegan, Daniel A. 


Jan. 14. 

1883. 






3,609 


394 


390 


468 


12 








3 





Furlong, L. P. . . . 


July 16. 






288 


20 


20 


30 

















Murray, T. F. ... 


1884. 






614 


83 


83 


32 


11 


1 


1 


2 


2 


MoKenna, B. F. . . 


Jan. 14. 






231 


45 


45 


43 


3 














MoCormack, D. . . . 


July 9. 
1883. 






2,888 


152 


152 


227 





1 


1 


1 





Ross, George F. . . 


July 16. 

1884. 






3,848 


256 


254 


255 


4 


12 


12 


10 


6 


Eosnosky, Raphael . 


May 19. 
1883. 






3,810 


479 


481 


448 


7 


4 


4 


1 





Toland, Jos. H. . . . 


July 16. 






2,950 


69 


68 


48 

















Total 








24,415 


2,113 


2,107 


2,203 


51 


20 


20 


29 


16 













Report of the Water Board. 



123 



Division 3. — James J. Strange, Chief Inspector. 











Defective Fixtures. 


Wilful 
Waste 


Hose 






a 


a 








Reports. 


Reports. 




ct 


g 3 






































13 




•B 


Inspbctobs. 

* 


a 

a 
'o 

fu 

< ■ 






1 


U 


a 
.2 
« 
a 

a 6 

«T3 


is 

M * 
^ ft 

S 2 
•la 


•i 

> 

"a 
1 

t4 


I 

M 

O 
1 


> 

1 


i 

M 
O 
1 




1 


r^ 


as. 

p So 


1"- 


O.rt 


=$ a 


So 


o 




o 


p 




« 


"A 


% 


15 


P5 


fa 


« 


^ 


tf 


s 




1884. 
















Bacharach, Solomon . 


May 19. 

1884. 


49 


1,946 


384 


382 


358 


6 


8 


8 


18 


5 


Berran, Joseph . , . 


July 9. 
1883. 


110 


1,754 


411 


401 


481 


13 


6 


6 








Edmonds, Michael . 


July 16. 


82 


1,419 


203 


201 


208 


9 








23 


IS 


Kilduff, William . . 


1884. 


30 


2,277 


231 


228 


243 


2 








5 


2 


McKenna, B. F. . . 


Jan. 14. 
1883. 





1,781 


188 


187 


160 


5 








6 


2 


Maguire, R. E. . . . 


July 16. 

1884. 


24 


1,569 


160 


160 


167 


2 














Smith, P.J 


Jan. 1. 


26 


2,383 


852 


852 


879 


40 


10 
24 


7 
21 



52 





Total 




321 


13,129 


2,429 


2,411 


2,496 


77 


21 









Division 4. — William P. Carroll, Chief Inspector. 





4A 

a 

a 
1 

a, 
< 

1 


a 

m p 

aS 

o > 

11 

!2; 


£^ 

u 

<tH O 

o « 

-a 

ai 


Defective Fixtures. 


Wilful 

Waste 

Reports. 


Hose 
Reports 


Inspbctobs. 


i, 

t. 
o 

ft 

(S-d 


•s 

ft 
« 
P3 

2 . 

•11 


a 
o 

•J3 
P 

Si 
SI 


g " 

•2 a 
^^ 
fa 


-d 
-> 
'S 

1 

o 

ft 

P3 


13 

p 

M 
01 

p 

fa 


■6 

> 
'S 
o 

& 

u 
o 

ft 

12 
3 
9 
13 
11 
13 

61 


V 

t— 1 

o 

•1 
o 

s 

fa 


Corbett, John J. . . 
Foye, John E. . . . 
Leahan, John W. . 
Murphy, John J. . . 
Quigley, John J. . . 
Woods, Walter B. . 


1883. , 
July 16. 

1884. 
July 7. 

May 19. 

Jan. 14. 

1883. 
July 16. 

1884. 
Jan. 14. 


10 


26 


12 

24 


2,777 

2,474 
2,729 
2,594 
2,572 


312 

302 
400 
120 
362 


312 

301 
398 
120 
361 


353 

323 
441 
87 
396 


3 


5 
5 

6 


2 


4 
5 
1 


2 


4 
5 
1 


5 
2 
S 
10 
4 
5 


Total 




72 


13,146 


1,496 


1,492 


1,600 


19 


12 


12 


?<^ 









124 



City Docuihent No. 118. 



Deacon Division, 5. — Edward Keady, Chief Inspector. 

The following table gives the work of the Deacon Division, 
(No. 5) , from its inception, May 13, 1884, to the end of year. 





I 
g 
o 
p- 
p< 

o 

<s 


.s 

.2 a 
Is 
^^ 

«t-i .o 
Ti 

II 


.9 

m 
a -2 


Defective Repairs. 


Wilful 

Waste 

Reports. 


Hose 
Reports. 


Inspectoes. 


o 

PS-d 


P< 
a 

o 

.2 i 

O M 


a 
•g3 


T3 


i 

> 

'a 

s 

P3 

u 
o 
P< 


73 

§ 

1 

O 

i 

a 

4 

3 


3 

7 
5 
3 

2 
1 





'6 

a 

.5 

a 
(§ 
S 

u 
o 
0. 

« 

2 

2 
7 

2 
1 




2 






'6 

1 
M 

s 

•J 

i 


Butler, WilUam F. . 
CuUen, John F. . . . 
Cassidy, M. F. J. . . 
Daly, James F. . . . 
Edmonds, Michael . 
Foye, John E. . . . 
Furlong.Lawrence P. 
McAuliffe, John J. . 
McNamara, John . . 
Murray, T.F. . . , 
Maguire, H. G. . . . 
Neagle, Joseph B. . 
Quigley, J. L. ... 
Ready, Edward . . 
Sweeney, C. F. . . . 
Toland, Joseph H, . 


1883. 
July 16 

ii 

Aug. 18. 

July 16. 

1884. 
July 9. 

1883. 
July 16. 

1884. 
Sept. 20. 

Jan. 14. 

Jan. 1. 

1883. 

July 16. 




612 

676 

2,455 

256 

128 

1,568 

2,141 

2,286 

2,203 

1,878 

1,042 

2,019 

1,780 

80 

224 

248 


167 

118 

483 

34 

. 11 

155 

286 

375 

178 

248 

167 

297 

292 

18 

28 

27 


167 

118 

483 

34 

11 

155 

287 

375 

178 

248 

167 

297 

291 

18 

28 

27 


131 

83 

690 

49 

4 

132 

197 

338 

245 

271 

133 

243 

194 

5 

4 

14 


1 
8 
7 
3 

2 

6 

5 

6 
7 





4 

3 


3 

7 
5 
3 

2 
1 





1 



1 

7 

2 
1 




2 






Total 






19,596 


2,884 


2,884 


3,480 


45 


28 


28 


16 


14 



Report of the Water Board. 



125 



Mystic Department. 

The following table shows the work of each Inspector, 
checking waste in the Mystic Division from the time of dis- 
tricting the men (June 7, 1884), to the end of the year, and 
also includes the house-to-house inspection in the Mystic 
Department. 

Division 1. — John B. Maguire, Chief Inspector. 









■« 


Defective Fixtures. 


Wilful 
Waste 


Hose 




- 


a 


o 










Reports, 






a 


.9 
























13 


■d 




"O 




Inspectob. 


p 

'3 
p. 
< 




a) 

Is 

SI 

° u 


5 

u 
o . 

0) 0) 
00 O 


P< 
-S-e 


_o 

"S 

a 
a c 

X a 


•la 


> 
o 


M 
O . 

15 -a 


1 
o 


H 
o 




C3 


n^ 


nH 




OM 


■■%B 


a=S 


Ph 


»'i 


Pi 


ss 




ft 


fe 


^ 


^ 


« 


fe ■ 


« 


^ 


« 


1=( 




1884. 






















Connolly, John A. • . 


Jan. 1. 
1883. 


2,376 


694 


158 


158 


148 


4 








37 


4 


Daly, James F. . . . 


Aug. lb. 





71 


22 


22 


18 

















Haley, John A. . . . 


July 16. 





439 


48 


48 


48 











19 


11 


Hassett, John B. . . 


" 


1,429 


1,933 


265 


261 


265 





1 


1 








Murray, R. J 


1884. 


1,509 


1,353 


195 


195 


223 


14 








15 


4 


McCarthy, T., Jr. . . 


Jan. 14. 


2,515 


750 


276 


276 


245 


4 








38 


5 


McDavltt, D. B. . . . 


July 9. 
1883. 


1,664 


895 


130 


130 


134 


12 








1 


1 


McAullffe, John J. . 


July 16. 
1884. 


15 


52 


16 


16 




















Quigley, J. L 


Jan. 1. 

1883. 
July 16. 


858 


216 


. 263 


259 


270 


11 


3 


3 








Sweeney, 0. F. ... 


1,405 
11,771 


1,096 


128 


129 


110 





1 


1 


20 


7 


Total 


7,499 


1,501 


1,494 


1,461 


45 


5 


6 


130 


32 



126 



City Document No. 118. 



Summary of the foregoing Tables of Deacon worh , 









ts 










Wilful 










i 




Defective Fixtui 


es. 


Waste 
Reports. 


Hose 
Reports. 




s 

a 


03 

.9 


.9 




















"a 


-d 






i 




a 
















3 


-a 


3 




0) 




















INSFBCT0K8. 


o 
ft 

Cm 
O 

Q 


.S a 
IS 

!2i 


1^ 




II 

1^ 


o 

£3 
So 


ll 
1^ 


o 

0) 

o 
ft 


M 

o 

a 


u 
o 


o 


Division 1 . . . . • . 




11,771 


7,499 


1,501 


1,494 


1,461 


45 


5 


5 


130 


32 


" 2 






321 

72 




24,415 
13,129 
13,146 
19,596 


2,113 
2,429 
1,496 
2,884 


2,107 
2.411 
1,492 

2,884 


2,203 
2,496 
1,600 
3,480 


51 

77 
19 
45 


20 
24 
12 

28 


20 
21 
12 

28 


29 
52 
61 
16 


16 


<« 3 




21 


«' 4 , 




?9 


" Deacon (5) . 




14 


Total 




12,164 


77,785 


10,423 


10,388 


11,240 


237 


89 


86 


288 


112 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 



127 



t-i i-( e^ M 





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rt 












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^ 


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-uo^ joj pans 


































-sj S8pi}0^ ani^ 
































3 








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MmodoofififiHP^Sii(WMi-i 



128 



City Document No. 118. 



•paioads 
-ni 8119 JA. JO 'OR 



Wirti tJi to t» 



•popads 
-ni siintJA JO -ojsi; 



3 rH *0 in CO CO CO 



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CCOOCCCOGOCOCZ300CCCOOOOOC30GOCOOOOCGOCOCOCOQOCCGO 

COCDCOO'^TJ1CO'<#05 c» oT^OO ^CD co"orc0 Co'cxT 1-Tcd'-^ i-T 
1-1 iH 1-1 (M r-( 1-1 1-1 T-1 cq r-i CN i-( i-l ^ rH (M i-l iH (M 

i-s * OQi-3 i-t) f^ "^ 15 ^ t-s a »^ f^ " S P=H f^ S I-: »? '-3 <! 















is § aT « 

'5 ° .- j; £ " ^^ 1- 5 "" s^ 7^ L' 1* " 






Repoet or THE Water Board. 



129 



Other work done by the Division, and not included in the 
foreo-oino- schedules, is as follows : — 



From what Source received. 



Engineer's Department 
Police " 

Health " 

Service Division . . . 



Defective Fix- 
ture reports 
received. 



Wilful waste 
reports re- 
ceived. 



Violation of 

Hose reports 

received. 



During the year 614 tines have been inflicted for non-re- 
pairs of water-fixtures, wilful waste of water, and violations 
of hose regulations. 

Of these 176 were collected, and 438 abated for various 
causes. 

During the same period the water has been cut off for non- 
repairs from 96 premises and let on again to 95. 

The amount of cash received for fines and turned over to 
the Water-Registrars is as follows : — 



To Registrar of Cochituate Dep't. 
Mystic Dep't. 



Amount refunded 



Total 



$296 00 
36 00 

332 00 
32 00 

$364 00 



The $32 collected in fines, and afterward refunded to the 
parties, was done by order of the Water Board. 

Very respectfully, 

D. B. CASHMAN, 

Superintendent. 



130 City Document No. 118. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER-WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO MAY 1, 1885. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From May 

4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having Charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1860, to October 
1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works, from May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to April 
3, 1885. 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

After Jan-uary 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J.. Avery Richards, were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 81, 1849, which was limited to keep in force 
one year; and in J 851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

CocHiTUATE Water Board. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 

7, 1856J ' • Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned June 
5, 1860$ Four years. 



Report of the Water Board. 



131 



Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 1865t Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

16, 1867t One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868t One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April, 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17. 

1874J One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned May 

31, 1875 ■ • Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876 One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55f .. . Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59$ . Eight years. 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 . . . Five years. 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56 . . . Four years. 

James W. Seaver, 1851$ One year. 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851$. 

John T. Heard, 1851$ ........ One year. 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 55$ . . Four years. 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853$ Two years. 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852$ One year. 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55$ ... . Three years. 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 . . . Six years. 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57$ . . . Four years. 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 . . . . . Two years. 

TiSDALE Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ .... Four years. 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ .... Three years. 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59$ Two years. 

Joseph Smith, 1856$ Two months, 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64.$ Eight years. 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61$ . . . . Five years. 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$. . . Five years. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ . . . ■ . . . One year. 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 . . . Six years. 

Clement Willis, 1860 One year. 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ One year. 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ ... . Three years. 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 . . . . . Two years. 

John F. Pray, 1862 One year. 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 One year. 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ Three years. 

Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66$ ..... Two years. 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67$ . . . Four years. 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . . . . Three years. 

William S. Hills, 1867 One year. 

Charles R. Train, 1868$ . . . . . . One year. 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868, and 69$ .... Two years. 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68, and 69 .... Three years. 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 One year. 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ - . •' , • • • One year. 

John O. Poor, 1870 . .... . . . One year. 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 One year. 



132 



City Document No, 118. 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69 
and 71 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71 

Sidney Squires, 187 If . 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 

Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 
72 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74f 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 aixl 74 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74$ 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* . 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 . 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75J 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 . 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74 
and 76t 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876t 

Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t. 

Nahum M. Morrison, 18761 . 

Augustus Parker, 1876f 



70, 



, 69, and 



75, 



Nine years. 
Pour years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Four years. 

Seven years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
Five years. 
Six years. 

Ten years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



*Mi-. John H. Wilkins resic^necl ISTov. 15, 1855, and Chai'les Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Hemy B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. "Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer .Johnson was elected President ; and 
Julv 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill 
the vacency occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

J Deceased. 



Kepoet or THE Water Board. 138 



Boston Water Board, Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to present time. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to present time. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to present time. 



Organization of the Board for Year 1884-85. 

Chairman. 
William A. Simmons. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Board. 
Henry M. Wightman. 

Water-Registrar of the Cochituate Department. 
William F. Davis. 

Water-Registrar of the Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 
Ezekiel R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division of Cochituate Department. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic Department. 
J. Henry Brown. 

Superintendent of Meter Division. 
Hiram Cutts. 

Superintendent of Inspection and Waste Division. 

D. B. C ASHMAN. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Report of the Water Board ........ 1-14 

Condition of reservoirs and aqueducts ...... 1 

Pollution of the supply ......... 2 

Prevention of waste ......... 2-4 

Daily and per capita consumption, 1882-1885 .... 4 

Quality of the water ......... 5 

Current expenses ........... 5 

Water-rates ........... 6 

High service ........... 6 

Henrj' M. Wightman 7 

Meters .....' . 7 

Results . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 

General statistics, 1882-84 9 

Earnings and expenditures, loans, etc. ....".. 10-14 

Report of the Clerk . . . . 15-22 

Receipts and expenditures .' . . . . . . . 15-20 

Cost of works 20-22 

Report of the City Engineer . . ... . . . . 23-49 

Sudbury-river reservoirs, and Lake Cochituate .... 23-26 

Farm-pond conduit . . . . . . . . . 2& 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs . . . ... . 27 

High-service works . . . . • . . . . 27 

Mystic lake , . 28 

Mystic-valley sewer . . . . . • . . . . 28 

Mystic Qonduit and reservoirs ....... 29 

Mystic pumping-station ......... 29 

Test of boilers at Mystic station ....... 30 

Consumption ........... 31 

Waste prevention .......... 31 

Table showing saving effected ...... 33 

Quality of water .......... 34 

Distribution system ......... 34 

Tables and diagrams : — 

Daily average consumption, 1878-84 ..... 36 

Diagram showing daily average consumption, 1875-85 . . 36 
Diversion of Sudbury river water, 1879-84 .^ . . .37 

Average monthly and yearly heights of reservoirs, 1883-84 . 38 

Diagram showing heights of reservoirs, rainfall, etc. . . 38 



Contents. 135 

PAGE 

Yield of Sudbury river water-shed, rainfall, etc., 1875-84 . 39 

" " Lake Cochituate " " " " 1852-84 . 40 

" " Mystic lake " " " " 1876-84 . 42 
Monthly amounts pumped, coal used, etc., at Mystic station, 

1884 43 

Monthly amounts pumped, coal used, etc., at Highland station, 

1884 ■ .... 44 

Daily rainfall on Sudbury-river water-shed, 1884 . . * . 45 

" " " Lake Cochituate " " " . . . 46 

" " " Mystic lake """... 47 

Monthly rainfall at various places, 1884 ..... 48 

" temperature of air and water, -1884 .... 49 

Kepoet of "Watbb-Rbgistkar of the Subbuet and Cochituate 

Depaetmbnt .......... 50-60 

Number of water-takers ......... 50 

Revenue for the year 1884-85 50 

Number and size of meters in use ....... 51 

Location of public drinking fountains ...... 51 

" " stand-pipes for street sprinkling . . . . .53 

Classes of takers supplied and revenue received from each . . 53 
Quantity used and revenue received from different classes of 

metered takers, 1883-84 ■ '. 56 

Yearly revenue from water rates, 1849-85 ..... 57 

Number of water takers, 1850-84 . . . . . . ' . 58 

Number and kind of water fixtures in use ..... 60 

Eepoet of the Watee-Rbgisteak of the Mystic Depaetment . 61-71 

Number of water-takers 61 

Revenue received, 1884-85 ........ 61 

Location of stand-pipes for street sprinkling ..... 62 

" " public drinking fountains ...... 63 

Quantity used and revenue received from different classes of 

metered takers, 1884 65 

Classes of takers supplied and revenue received from each . . 66 

Number and kind of water fixtures in use . . . . .68 

Yearly revenue from water rates, 1865-1885 ..... 69 

Repoet of the Supeeintendent of the Westeen Division . . 72-83 

Sudbury-river basins . . . 72 

Basin 1 . . . 72 

Basin 2 .73 

Basin 3 74 

Farm pond . . . . . . . . . ... 74 

Lake Cochituate .......... 75 

Decision of the Supreme Judicial Court in regard to the pollution 

of Pegan brook . . . . . . . . . . 76 

Sudbury-river aqueduct ......... 80 

Cochituate aqueduct ......... 81 

Cliestnut-Hill reservoir . . . . . . . . . 81 

Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill reservoir .82 



136 City Document No. 118. 

PAGE 

Eeport of Superintendent of Eastern Division .... 85-99 

Main pipe and services laid and relaid ...... 85 

Table of location, size and length of pipe mains laid in 1884 . . 87 
Table of location, size and length of pipe mains relaid and aban- 
doned in 1884 93 

Table showing length of mains laid during 1884 and length in use 

May 1, 1885 94 

Table showing number and length of service-pipes laid in 1884 

and total number May, 1885 95 

Leaks repaired, 1884 96 

Table showing number of leaks and stoppages, 1850-1884 . . 97 

Number of hydrants established in 1884 and total in use . . 98 

Report of Superintendent of the Mystic Department. . 100-107 

Mystic lake 100 

Mystic-valley sewer . . . . . . . . . 100 

Conduit . . ' . .101 

Reservoir . . . . . . • . • • • 101 

Roads and grounds ......*.. 101 

Pumping service 102 

Distribution-pipes . . . . . . . . . . 102 

Tables showing mains and services laid in 1884 .... 103 

Table showing sizes and lengths of mains connected with the 

works . . . • • • • • • • • • 10"'^ 

Table showing number of gates connected with the works . . 106 

Table showing number of hydrants connected with the works . 106 

Report op the Superintendent op the Meter Division . . 108 
Number of meters in use . . . . . . . .108 

" " " purchased during year 110 

Report of the Superintendent of the Inspection and Waste 

Department .......... 112 

Work accomplished ......... 112 

Number of vaults in the city ........ 116 

Schedules of work done by different divisions .... 118 

Inspection for revenue, 1885 . . . . . . ' . . 127 

Civil Organization of the Water-Works 130